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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley197677leba 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

bulletin 



.ebanon Valley College 
bulletin is published five 
imes a year in the Spring, 
iummer, Fall and twice 
n Winter by Lebanon 
/alley College, Laughlin 
lall, Annville, Pennsyl- 
ania 17003 



Volume IX, Number 5 
Winter 1975 



The college reserves the 
right to change any pro- 
visions or requirements 
at any time within the 
student's term of res- 
idence. 



Second class postage 
paid at Annville, Penn- 
sylvania 17003 



CALENDAR 1976 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 




MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 5 6 7 




12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 


28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 


JUNE 




JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


12 3 4 5 




1 2 3 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 29 30 


25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 30 31 


30 31 










SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 




NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


1 2 




12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 29 30 


26 27 28 29 30 31 



CALENDAR 1977 



JANUARY 
S M T W T F S 
1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 



FEBRUARY 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 



MARCH 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 



20 21 22 23 24 25 26 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 



27 28 



27 28 29 30 31 



APRIL 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



MAY 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 



JULY 
S M T W T F S 
1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 



OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 
1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 



NOVEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 1976/1977 

1970 First Semester 

Aug. 28 Saturday, 5:45 p.m Faculty-Administration reception and 

dinner 

29 Sunday, 2:00 p.m Residence halls open for new students 

30-31 Monday, Tuesday Orientation for new students 

31 Tuesday, 8:30 a.m Registration by new students 

31 Tuesday, 1:00 p.m Registration by upperclassmen 

Sept. 1 Wednesday, 10:00 a.m. . . .Opening College Convocation 

1 Wednesday, 1:00 p.m Classes begin 

1 1 Saturday Board of Trustees Retreat 

21 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Religion and Life — Balmer Showers Lec- 

ture 
Oct. 2 Saturday Homecoming Day 

19 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Balmer Showers Lecture 

20 Wednesday Mid-Semester grades due 

Nov. 10-17 Wednesday through 

Wednesday Pre-Registration for second semester 

13 Saturday Board of Trustees meeting 

24 Wednesday, 1:00 p.m Thanksgiving vacation begins 

29 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

Dec. 9 Thursday, 5:00 p.m First semester classes end 

10-12 Friday through Sunday .. Reading period 
13-18 Monday through 

Saturday First semester examinations 

18 Saturday, 5:00 p.m First semester ends 

]q«7 Second Semester 

Jan. 16 Sunday, 2:00 p.m Residence halls open 

17 Monday, 8:00 a.m Registration 

18 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

Feb. 8 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Religion and Life— Balmer Showers Lec- 

ture 

22 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Founders' Day 

25 Friday, 5:00 p.m Spring vacation begins 

Mar. 2-11 Wednesday through 

Friday Concert Choir tour 

7 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

15 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Religious Emphasis Day 

27 Sunday, 3:00 p.m Spring Music Festival, Wind Ensemble 

29 Tuesday Phi Alpha Epsilon Day 

30-Apr. 6 Wednesday through 

Wednesday Pre-registration by current students for 

first semester, 1977-1978, and 1977 sum- 
mer session 

3 Sunday, 3:00 p.m Spring Music Festival, College Chorus and 

Symphony Orchestra 

7 Thursday, 5:00 p.m Easter vacation begins 

12 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

17 Sunday, 3:00 p.m Spring Music Festival, Symphonic Band 

29-May 1 Friday through Sunday . . . Seventh Annual Spring Arts Festival 

3 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Awards and Recognition Convocation 

5 Thursday, 5:00 p.m Second semester classes end 

6-8 Friday through Sunday . . Reading period 

7 Saturday Alumni Day 

9-14 Monday through 

Saturday Second semester examinations 

14 Saturday, 5:00 p.m Second semester ends 

20 Friday Board of Trustees meeting 

21 Saturday Orientation for incoming students 

22 Sunday, 9:00 a.m Baccalaureate service 

22 Sunday, 11:00 a.m 108th Annual Commencement 

1977 summer session: June 13-August 5 



Contents 



College Profile 5 

College History 5 

Accreditation 7 

Statement of Purpose 8 

Support and Control 9 

Enrollment Statistics 13 

Information For Prospective Students 14 

Admission 14 

Student Finances 17 

Financial Aid 20 

Academic Programs and Procedures 22 

Requirements For Degrees 22 

General and Distribution Requirements 26 

The College Honors Program 27 

Auxiliary Schools 28 

Germantown Metropolitan Semester 29 

Marine Biology Program 29 

Junior Year Abroad 29 

Merrill-Palmer Institute Semester 30 

Washington Semester Program 30 

Academic Procedures 30 

Administrative Regulations 33 

Student Activities 37 

The Religious Life 37 

Campus Organizations 39 

Cultural Opportunities 41 

Student Government 41 

Athletics and Recreation 42 

Courses of Study By Departments 43 

Special Plans of Study 95 

Directories 104 

Faculty and Administrative Staff 104 

Board of Trustees 116 

General Alumni Organization 120 

Degrees Conferred 122 

Student Awards 126 

Correspondence Directory 131 

Index 132 

4 



COLLEGE PROFILE 



COLLEGE HISTORY 

Officials of the East Pennsylvania Conference of the Church of the 
United Brethren in Christ were acutely embarrassed in the spring of 1866. 
Five public-spirited citizens of the town of Annville had come to Con- 
ference on February 22 and offered as a gift the Annville Academy build- 
ing on Main Street, which they had bought for $4,500, providing that the 
Conference would establish and maintain there forever an institution of 
learning of high grade. The gift was accepted. The name Lebanon Valley 
College was chosen. It was decided to lease the property to someone 
qualified to operate a school. The opening date was set — May 7. Planning 
then came to a stop, for they could find no one to take the lease. 

That was the situation seven weeks before the opening date, accord- 
ing to George Washington Miles Rigor, whose short account is the earliest 
extant history of Lebanon Valley College. There was no college graduate 
in the whole Conference, and a poll of Otterbein College graduates failed 
to turn up a prospect. Rigor, a United Brethren minister who had at- 
tended college for only three years, stepped into the breach. He enlisted 
the cooperation of a neighbor, Thomas R. Vickroy, a Methodist minister 
and graduate of Dickinson College. They took over the lease as partners 
for the next five years, Vickroy to run the school and Rigor to act as agent. 
The building was readied and Lebanon Valley College opened on May 
7, as scheduled, with 49 students enrolled. From its first day it was co- 
educational. 

President Vickroy's term was marked by action. Eleven acres were 
added to the "lot and a half of ground" conveyed by the original deed. 
A spacious four-story building was erected. A charter was granted by the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. A faculty was hired. A complete college 
curriculum, based on the classics but including music and art, was es- 
tablished, and two classes were graduated before Vickroy gave up his 
lease in 1871. The college was not leased again but continued operations 
through a Board of Trustees. 

The five presidents during the next 25 years had great difficulty in 
keeping the college financially afloat, due to lack of support ranging from 
apathy to open opposition. There was some progress. A library was es- 
tablished in 1874, and a college newspaper appeared in 1888. However, 
in the fall of 1896, the school was debt-ridden, living from hand to mouth, 
with an enrollment of only 80. 

The administration of President Hervin U. Roop, starting in 1897, 
marked the first real period of expansion. Under his leadership, five new 
buildings were erected, including a library donated by Andrew Carnegie, 
and the Administration Building was re-built after a disastrous fire on 
Christmas Eve, 1904. By 1905, enrollment had soared to 470, with a 
faculty of 23. 



Loss of public confidence and financial support prompted Roop's 
resignation in 1905, and the college faced its darkest days. Bankruptcy 
was averted by the keen business sense and personal generosity of Presi- 
dent Lawrence Keister, who served from 1907 to 1912. 

President George D. Gossard finally gave the college stability when 
he achieved for it accreditation and a million-dollar endowment fund, the 
income from which was to form the financial cushion dreamed of by all 
the presidents before him. By the end of his 20-year term in 1932, there 
were 653 students and 32 faculty members. Most important, the Con- 
servatory of Music was accredited by the Commonwealth for its program 
in public school music, marking the start of an outstanding academic de- 
partment. 

Following Dr. Gossard's death in 1932, Dr. Clyde A. Lynch faced 
a series of external crises which lasted throughout his 18 years as presi- 
dent. The stock market crash shrank the handsome endowment raised by 
his predecessor. The depression of the 1930's reduced the enrollment, and 
World War II lowered it still further; the post-war influx of veterans then 
stretched it to more than capacity. In spite of these trials, Dr. Lynch's 
administration began buying property adjacent to the campus to allow 
for further expansion. It also raised over a half-million dollars, part of 
which was to be used for a new physical education building. This build- 
ing, still unfinished at the time of Lynch's death in 1950, was named in his 
honor upon completion. 

The twelfth president of the college, Frederic K. Miller, served for 
almost 17 years. During his term, inflation caused mushrooming costs, but 
the so-called "tidal wave of students" made possible selective admissions. 
The greatest physical expansion in the history of the college occurred, 
with seven new buildings erected and several renovated. Two major fund- 
raising drives were concluded successfully. Enrollment increased 60%, 
with a corresponding increase in faculty and administrative staff. The 
centennial of the founding of the college was observed by a year-long 
series of events. 

On April 1, 1967, Dr. Miller retired, and Allan W. Mund, president of 
the Board of Trustees, became acting president. It was not until February 
3, 1968, that Frederick P. Sample was elected by the board to become 
thirteenth president of Lebanon Valley College. When Dr. Sample as- 
sumed office on September 1, 1968, Lebanon Valley College faced its sec- 
ond century as a fully-accredited, church-related, coeducational college 
of the liberal arts, occupying a 35-acre campus of 26 buildings, and sup- 
porting an enrollment of 900 and a full-time faculty of 58. In the years 
since then, the college has continued to grow in acres and buildings, in 
students and faculty. This growth is reaching its culmination in the 1970's 
with the multi-million dollar ambitions of the Fund for Fulfillment. 

Just as the college has changed through the years, so has the Church 
of the United Brethren in Christ which gave it birth and offered its sup- 
port. Organized in 1800 as the first Christian church indigenous to the 
United States, the denomination merged with the Evangelical Church to 
become the Evangelical United Brethren Church in 1946. In April, 1968, 



this body joined with the Methodist Church to form the United Meth- 
odist Church. 

In looking to its second century, Lebanon Valley College is con- 
scious of the dream of its forefathers that it be "an institution of learning 
of high grade." It aims to be essentially what it is now, a relatively small 
college of the liberal arts and sciences that takes its Christian origins 
seriously. 

Presidents of 

Lebanon Valley College 



Rev. Thomas Rees Vickroy, Ph.D. 

1866-1871 
Lucian H. Hammond, A.M. 

1871-1876 
Rev. D. D. DeLong, A.M. 

1876-1887 
Rev. E. S. Lorenz, A.M., B.D. 

1887-1889 
Rev. Cyrus J. Kephart, A.M. 

1889-1890 
E. Benjamin Bierman, A.M., Ph.D. 

1890-1897 
Rev. Hervin U. Roop, A.M., Ph.D., 
LL.D. 

1897-1906 

Rev. Abram Paul Funkhouser, B.S. 
1906-1907 



Rev. Lawrence Keister, S.T.B. 
1907-1912 



D.D. 



B.D. 



Rev. George Daniel Gossard, 
D.D., LL.D. 
1912-1932 
Rev. Clyde Alvin Lynch, A.M., B.D., 
D.D., Ph.D., LL.D. 
1932-1950 
Frederic K. Miller, M.A., Ph.D., Litt.D., 
D.H.L., D.Pd., LL.D. 

Acting President 1950-1951 
President 1951-1967 
Allan W. Mund, LL.D. 

Acting President 1967-1968 
Frederick P. Sample, B.A., M.Ed., D.Ed., 
Pd.D. 
1968- 



ACCREDITATION 

Lebanon Valley College is on the approved lists of the Regents of the 
State University of New York and the American Association of Univer- 
sity Women. 



Lebanon Valley College is accredited 
by the following bodies: 

Middle States Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools 

Department of Education of Pennsyl- 
vania 

National Association of Schools of 
Music 

American Chemical Society 



Lebanon Valley College is a member of 

the following bodies: 

American Council on Education 
Association of American Colleges 
College Entrance Examination Board 
College Scholarship Service 
Eastern College Athletic Conference 
Pennsylvania Association of Colleges 

and Universities 
Pennsylvania Foundation for Inde- 
pendent Colleges 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Annville, Pennsylvania 

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 

Lebanon Valley College affirms its Christian origins by maintaining 
affiliation with the United Methodist Church and by recognizing the 
Christian faith as the perspective for its policies. Both the Christian 
spirit, which encourages the unhampered search for truth, and the aca- 
demic program, which gives form to the search for truth, combine to 
generate free and responsible inquiry by students and faculty. 

In accordance with the purposes of its founders, Lebanon Valley 
College seeks to provide an atmosphere in which the student can respond 
creatively to the contemporary world. Each person is encouraged (1) to 
develop a genuine concern for cooperative living and community ser- 
vice; (2) to attain a heightened sense of moral and spiritual values 
through a deepened awareness of how people have thought of themselves 
in relation to nature, to society, and to God; (3) to appreciate the close 
and unmistakable relationship among rational thought, creative imagina- 
tion, and moral commitment; and (4) to deal candidly and intelligently 
with the past, the present, and the future and their interrelationship. 

The programs of the College are designed to provide a demanding 
as well as a rewarding encounter with the means necessary to achieve 
the discovery of self and society: consideration of humanity's most sig- 
nificant ideas and accomplishments; development of logical thought and 
clear communication; practice in precise analysis and effective per- 
formance. The academic, social, religious, and aesthetic experiences 
blend to create the atmosphere of the College in a way that fosters en- 
livened curiosity, discipline of self, and excitement about ideas that are 
the hallmark of the educated individual. 

Lebanon Valley College, with approximately one thousand students 
and a low-student-faculty ratio, in giving life to the concept of liberal 
arts as expressed in the preceding paragraphs has chosen to maintain 
an educational institution which is academically strong, guided by the 
Christian faith, and small enough to give personal attention to all stu- 
dents. 

Adopted February 1, 1975 
Lebanon Valley College Board of Trustees 



SUPPORT AND CONTROL 

Lebanon Valley College receives support authorized by the General 
Conference of the United Methodist Church, individual congregations of 
the denomination in the Eastern Pennsylvania Conference and the Cen- 
tral Pennsylvania Conference, endowments, and the Pennsylvania Foun- 
dation for Independent Colleges. Also, since at Lebanon Valley College 
as at most other institutions of higher learning the tuition and other an- 
nual charges paid by the student do not cover the total cost of his educa- 
tion, additional income is derived through the Lebanon Valley College 
Fund. The Fund is supported by industry, alumni, the Board of Trustees, 
parents of students, and other friends of the college. 

Total assets of Lebanon Valley College are approximately $19,600,000, 
including endowment funds of about $3,200,000. Aside from general en- 
dowment income available for unrestricted purposes, there are a number 
of special funds designated for specific uses such as professorships, schol- 
arships, and the library. 

Control of the college is vested in a Board of Trustees composed of 
49 elected members, 24 of whom represent church conferences; 5 of whom 
represent the alumni of the institution; 5 of whom represent the faculty; 
and 15 of whom, including 3 students, are elected at large. 



NEW FACILITIES 
Blair Music Center 

— 600 seat music hall 

— 5 classrooms 

— 15 teaching studios 

— rehearsal hall 

— organ choral room 

— 2-manual, 26 rank, tracker organ 

— 50 individual practice rooms 

— 4 organ practice rooms 



— instrument storage room 

— music storage library 

— electronic piano laboratory 

— learning resource center 

— recording studio 

— recording control center 



Computer Facilities 

PDP 11/40 Computer built by the 
Digital Equipment Corporation 
of Maynard, Massachusetts. 

On-line, time-sharing system 

28K core memory system 



two removable discs capable of 
handling 1.2 million words a- 
piece 

six consoles 

systems library available 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS (June 30, 1975) 

UNRESTRICTED 

For General Purposes 



Publicity Funds 

Harnish-Houser Publicity Fund 



RESTRICTED 

Professorship Funds 

The Butterwick Chair of Philosophy 

Chair of English Bible and Greek 
Testament 

Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professor- 
ship of Latin Language and 
Literature 

John Evans Lehman Chair of 
Mathematics 

The Rev. J. B. Weidler Endowment 
Fund 

The Ford Foundation 

Restricted Other 

Bishop J. Balmer Showers Lectureship 

Fund 
Karl Milton Karnegie Fund 
LTnger Academic Assistance Fund 

Special Fund— Faculty Salaries 

The Batdorf Fund 
E. N. Funkhouser Fund 
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Horn Fund 
Mary I. Shumberger Memorial Fund 
Woodrow W. Waltermyer Professor- 
ship Fund 

Library Funds 

Library Fund of Class of 1916 
Class of 1956 Library Endowment Fund 
Dr. Lewis J. and Leah Miller Leiby 
Library Fund 

Maintenance Funds 

C. B. Montgomery Memorial Room 

Fund 
Hiram E. Steinmetz Memorial Room 

Fund 

Equipment Funds 

Dr. Warren H. Fake and Mabel A. 

Fake Science Memorial Fund 
Williams Foundation Endowment Fund 

10 



Scholarship Funds 

Ministerial Trust # 1 
Ministerial Trust #2 
Ministerial Trust #3 
Ministerial Trust #4 
Ministerial Trust #5 
Alumni Scholarship Fund 
Dorothy Jean Bachman Scholarship 

Fund 
Lillian Merle Bachman Scholarship 

Fund 

E. M. Baum Scholarship Fund 
Andrew and Ruth Bender Scholarship 

Fund 
Cloyd and Mary Bender Scholarship 

Fund 
Biological Scholarship Fund 
Eliza Bittinger Scholarship Fund 
Mary A. Bixler Scholarship Fund 
I. T. Buffington Scholarship Fund 
Alice Evers Burtner Memorial Award 

Fund 
Oliver P. Butterwick Scholarship Fund 
Mr. and Mrs. D. Clark Carmean 

Scholarship Fund 

Isaiah H. Daugherty and Benjamin P. 
Rabb Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Senator James J. Davis Scholarship 
Fund 

William E. Duff Scholarship Fund 

Derickson Scholarship Fund 

Samuel F. and Agnes F. Engle Scholar- 
ship Fund 

M. C. Favinger and Wife Scholarship 
Fund 

Fred E. Foos Scholarship Fund 

C. C. Gingrich Scholarship Fund 

Gossard-Plitt-Monteith Memorial Schol- 
arship Fund 

Margaret Verda Graybill Memorial 
Scholarship Fund 



Peter Graybill Scholarship Fund 
Jacob F. Greasley Scholarship Fund 
Hilda Hafer Scholarship Fund 
Alice M. Heagy Scholarship Fund 
J. M. Heagy and Wife Scholarship 

Fund 
Bertha Foos Heinz Scholarship Fund 
Harvey E. Herr Memorial Scholarship 

Fund 
Edwin M. Hershey Scholarship Fund 
Merle M. Hoover Scholarship Fund 
Judge S. C. Huber Scholarship Fund 
Cora Appleton Huber Scholarship 

Fund 
H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund 
Henry G. and Anna S. Kauffman and 

Family Scholarship Fund 
John A. H. Keith Fund 
Barbara June Kettering Scholarship 

Fund 
Rev. and Mrs. J. E. and Rev. A. H. 

Kleffman Scholarship Fund 
Dorothea Killinger Scholarship Fund 
A. S. Kreider Ministerial Scholarship 

Fund 
D. Albert and Anna Forney Kreider 

Scholarship Fund 
W. E. Kreider Scholarship Fund 
Maud P. Laughlin Scholarship Fund 
Lebanon Steel Foundry Foundation 

Scholarship Fund 
The Lorenz Benevolent Fund 
Mrs. Edwin M. Loux Scholarship Fund 
The F. C. McKay Fund 
Medical Scholarship Fund 
Elizabeth Meyer Endowment Fund 
Elizabeth May Meyer Musical 

Scholarship Fund 
Mrs. Elizabeth H. Millard Memorial 

Scholarship Fund 
Harry E. Miller Scholarship Fund 
Bishop J. S. Mills Scholarship Fund 
Germaine B. Monteux Memorial 

Scholarship Fund 
Germaine B. Monteux Music Award 



Elizabeth A. Mower Beneficiary Fund 
Gene Bowman Neidig Memorial 

Scholarship Fund 
Philadelphia Lebanon Valley College 

Alumni Scholarship Fund 
Rev. H. C. Phillips Scholarship Fund 
Pickwell Memorial Music Award 
Quincy Evangelical United Brethren 

Orphanage and Home Scholarship 

Fund 
Ezra G. Ranck and Wife Scholarship 

Fund 
Levi S. Reist Scholarship Fund 
G. A. Richie Scholarship Fund 
Emmett C. Roop Scholarship Fund 
Reynaldo Rovers Memorial Scholarship 

Fund 
Harvey L. Seltzer Scholarship Fund 
Special Fund 
Mary Ann Ocker Spital Scholarship 

Fund 
Rev. and Mrs. Cawley H. Stine 

Scholarship Fund 
Dr. Alfred D. Strickler and Louise 

Kreider Strickler Pre-Medical 

Scholarship Fund 
Robert L. Unger Scholarship Fund 
Henry L. Wilder Scholarship Fund 
Jacob C. Winter Memorial Scholarship 

Student Loan Funds 

Mary A. Dodge Loan Fund 
Daniel Eberly Scholarship Fund 
Glant-Gibson-Glunt Educational Loan 

Fund 
Esther and Frank Ligan Fund 

Prize Funds 

Bradford C. Alban Memorial Award 

Fund 
The L. G. Bailey Award 
Henry H. Baish Memorial Fund 
Andrew Bender Memorial Chemistry 

Fund 
The Class of 1964 Quittapahilla Award 

Fund 



11 



Governor James H. Duff Award 
Florence Wolf Knauss Memorial 

Award in Music 
La Vie Collegienne Award Fund 
Max F. Lehman Fund 
The David E. Long Memorial Fund 
People's National Bank of Lebanon 

Achievement Award in Economics 

The Rosenberry Award 

Wallace-Light-Wingate Award 

The Salome Wingate Sanders Award in 

Music Education 
Francis H. Wilson Biology Award 



Annuity Funds 

Ruth E. Bender 

Paul F. Fulk and Margaret M. Fulk 

Rev. A. H. Kleffman and Erma L. 

Kleffman 
E. Roy Line Annuity 
Mary Lutz Mairs 
Esta Wareheim 
Ruth Detwiler Rettew Annuity Fund 

Life Income Agreements 

Lutz Memorial Trust 

Unitrust Agreement 

Richard L. and Ruth W. Davis Fund 



12 



ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 

SUMMARY OF COLLEGE YEAR, 1974-1975-CUMULATIVE 



DAY-TIME FULL-TIME 

Men Women Total Men 

Degree Students 

Seniors 112 108 220 7 

Juniors 118 131 249 1 

Sophomores ... 132 119 251 2 

Freshmen 193 161 354 1 

Non-degree 3 3 6 22 



Day-Time Total 558 522 
Evening-Campus 

Classes 

University Center 

at Harrisburg . . 



Grand Total 
Names 
repeated . . 

Net Total . . 

* Music Specials . 
1975 Summer 
Session 



558 



1080 



558 522 1080 



PART-TIME 

Women Total 

8 15 

9 10 
1 3 
1 2 

17 39 



33 

39 

89 

161 

-12 



36 

61 

108 

205 

—11 



69 

100 

197 

366 

-23 



TOTAL 

Men Women Total 



119 
119 
134 
194 
25 



116 
140 
120 
162 



591 
39 
89 

719 
-12 



522 1080 



149 

2 

67 



343 

18 

122 



707 
2 

67 



716 
16 

55 



235 
259 
254 
356 



20 45 

558 1149 

61 100 

108 197 

727 1446 

-11 —23 



.423 
18 

122 



Not included in totals 



SUMMARY OF FIRST SEMESTER 1975-1976 

DAY-TIME FULL-TIME PART-TIME TOTAL 

Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total 

Degree Students 

Seniors 119 127 246 8 9 17 127 136 263 

Juniors 99 92 191 5 4 9 104 96 200 

Sophomores ... 104 114 218 4 2 6 108 116 224 

Freshmen 203 146 349 1 1 2 204 147 351 

Non-degree 3 8 11 9 16 25 12 24 36 

Day-Time Total 528 487 1015 27 32 59 555 519 1074 

Evening-Campus . 33 38 71 33 38 71 
University Center 

at Harrisburg . 126 136 262 126 136 262 

Grand Total . 528 487 1015 186 206 392 714 693 1407 
Names 

repeated .. —9—4—13 —9—4—13 

Net Total ... 528 487 1015 177 202 579 705 689 1394 

* Music Specials . . 1 10 11 1 10 11 

* Not included in totals 

13 



INFORMATION FOR 
PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 



ADMISSION 

Students are admitted to Lebanon Valley College on the basis of 
scholarly achievement, intellectual capacity, character, personality, and 
ability to profit by college experience. 

General Information 

1. All communications concerning admission should be addressed to the 
Director of Admissions, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, Pennsyl- 
vania 17003. 

2. Applications should be submitted as early as possible in the latter part 
of the junior or the beginning of the senior year of high school or 
preparatory school. 

3. Applications must be filed on forms provided by the office of admis- 
sions. 

4. Each application must be accompanied by an application fee of 
$15.00. This fee is not refundable. 

5. A transcript of the secondary school record, on a form provided by 
the college for that purpose, must be sent by the principal to the 
director of admissions. May 1 is the deadline for receiving applica- 
tions. 

6. A student transferring from another collegiate institution must pre- 
sent an official transcript of his scholastic record and evidence of 
honorable dismissal. 

7. All new students are required to present on or before August 15 the 
official health record showing a physician's report of medical exam- 
ination, and previous immunization records. 

8. All applicants shall be considered for admission without regard to 
their race, religion, creed, or country of national origin. 

Admission is based on total information submitted by the applicant 
or in his behalf. Final decision, therefore, cannot be reached until all 
information has been supplied by the applicant. 

Factors Determining Admission 

Each candidate for admission will be considered individually and 
the decision with respect to admission will be based on the following 
factors: 

1. The transcript of the applicant's secondary school record. 
14 



2. Recommendation by the principal, teachers, and other responsible 
persons as to the applicant's special abilities, integrity, sense of re- 
sponsibility, seriousness of purpose, initiative, self-reliance, and con- 
cern for others. 

3. A personal interview, whenever possible, with the director of admis- 
sions or his designate. 

4. College Entrance Examination Board test results: (a) Scholastic Ap- 
titude Tests, (b) Three Achievement Tests — English Composition, 
Foreign language, and one optional test. All candidates for admission 
are required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test and three Achieve- 
ment Tests — English Composition, Foreign language, and one option- 
al test. Those seeking entrance in September are advised to take these 
tests no later than in the preceding December and/or January. In ex- 
ceptional cases the requirement of the CEEB Tests may be waived at 
the discretion of the Director of Admissions. Full information con- 
cerning dates and locations of these test administrations may be ob- 
tained by writing to: College Entrance Examination Board, P.O. Box 
592, Princeton, N.J. 08540. 

5. Applicants for admission may submit the results of the American Col- 
lege Testing Program in lieu of the Scholastic Aptitude Test. 

6. Additional test results may be required in special cases. 

Admission to the Department of Music 

An applicant to the music or music education curriculums is ex- 
pected to satisfy the general requirements for admission. In addition, the 
candidate must appear for an audition before members of the music 
faculty and show evidence of: 

1. An acceptable singing voice and a fairly quick sense of tone and 
rhythm; 

2. Ability to sing at sight hymn and folk tunes with a fair degree of ac- 
curacy and facility; 

3. Ability to sing or to play the piano, organ, or some orchestral instru- 
ment at a level representing three years of study. 

Recommended Units for Admission 

It is recommended that all candidates offer 16 units of entrance 
credit and graduation from an accredited secondary school or submit an 
equivalency certificate acquired through examination. 

Ten of the 16 units offered for admission must be from the following 
subjects: English, foreign language, mathematics, science, and social 
studies. 

An applicant for admission whose preparatory courses do not coin- 
cide with the distribution of subject units (see below) may be considered 
if his academic record is of high quality and if he appears to be qualified 
to do college work satisfactorily. All entrance deficiencies must be re- 
moved before sophomore academic status will be granted. 

15 



DISTRIBUTION OF SUBJECT UNITS 

English 4 units 

Foreign Language (in one language)* 2 

Mathematics 2 

Science (laboratory) 1 

Social Studies 1 

Electives 6 

Total required 16 

Transfer Credit 

A student applying for advanced standing at Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege after having attended another accredited institution of higher educa- 
tion shall submit an official transcript of his record and evidence of good 
standing to the director of admissions. If requested, he must provide 
copies of the appropriate catalogs for the years of attendance at the other 
institution or institutions. 

Credits are accepted for transfer provided that the grades received 
are C- (1.7) or better and the work is equivalent or similar to work offered 
at Lebanon Valley College. Grades thus transferred count for hours only, 
not for quality points. 

Students, with the exception of those in the medical technology and 
nursing programs, who transfer from two-year institutions are required 
to earn at least 60 hours of credit from a four-year institution for grad- 
uation. A minimum of 30 hours must be taken at Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege by all students to meet the residence requirement. 

Transfer students may be required to take placement examinations 
to demonstrate adequate preparation for advanced courses at Lebanon 
Valley College. 

Subject to the conditions listed in the second paragraph, Lebanon 
Valley College will recognize for transfer credit a maximum of 15 hours 
of USAFI course work provided such credit is recommended by the 
American Council on Education's publication, A Guide to the Evaluation 
of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services. 

Credit will not be granted for correspondence courses. 

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) 

Credit is granted for acceptable achievement on such Subject Exami- 
nations of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) as are ap- 
proved by the appropriate College department and the Curriculum 
Committee. Students shall have achieved a scaled score of 50 or better on 
the objective section and shall have earned a grade of C or better, as de- 
termined by the appropriate department, on the essay section of the 
examination. 

Examinations may be taken prior to admission or after a student has 



* If an applicant cannot present the two units of foreign language, he will be re- 
quired to take a minimum of two years of one language in college. His credits for this 
work will be counted toward graduation requirements. 

16 



matriculated at the College. Credit is given only to students who have 
matriculated at the College. Applicants for admission interested in re- 
ceiving credit should consult with the Office of Admissions; current stu- 
dents should consult with the Vice President and Dean of the College. 
Applicants interested in the CLEP Program should write to the Program 
Director, College Level Examination Program, P.O. Box 1821, Princeton, 
NJ 08540, for a CLEP Bulletin of Information for Candidates, which 
provides information on examinations and the dates and locations of test 
administrations. 

Advanced Placement 

Advanced placement and/or credit in certain areas may be granted 
to entering students who make scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the College Board 
Advanced Placement examination. 

Advanced placement without credit may be granted on the basis of 
the Achievement Tests of the College Board Examinations or such other 
proficiency tests as may be determined by the assistant dean of the col- 
lege and by the chairman of the department in which advanced placement 
is sought. 

STUDENT FINANCES 

Lebanon Valley College is a private, non-profit institution. It derives 
its financial support from endowment and gifts from the United Method- 
ist Church, alumni, industry, friends, and from the tuition, fees, and 
other charges paid by the students. The cost to the student is maintained 
at a level consistent with adequate facilities and high quality instruction. 

Fees and Deposits 

An application fee of SI 5.00 which is not refundable is charged each 
applicant against the cost of processing his application for admission. 
An admission deposit of $100.00, payable within ten days of notification 
of acceptance, is required of all new (including transfer) students. Until 
this deposit is paid the student is not guaranteed a place in the entering 
class. The admission deposit is not refundable; it will be applied to the 
student's account upon registration. 



17 



1976-1977 Fee Structure for Full-time Degree Candidates 

Per Semester Per Year 

Comprehensive Fee $1,401.50 $2,803.00 

Fee includes the following per semester: 

Tuition $1,367.50 

Fees 34.00 
Student Insurance $ 30.00 $ 30.00 

Total Charges for Commuting Student .... $1,431.50 $2,833.00 

Room 280.00 560.00 

Dining Hall 420.00 840.00 



#* 



Total Charges for Resident Student $2,131.50** $4,233.00 

Private Music Instruction (i/ 2 hour per week) 

* Beyond the First Half Hour $82.00 per semester 

Transcript in Excess of One $2.00 

A required insurance fee is collected in the first semester of the stu- 
dent's enrollment and a pro-rata charge applies to the student who first 
enrolls in the second semester. 

The contingency deposit in the amount of $25.00 must be made be- 
fore registration and is required of all full-time students and will be re- 
funded upon graduation or withdrawal from college provided no damage 
has been caused by the student. All student breakage that occurs in col- 
lege-operated facilities will be charged against this deposit and the amount 
must be repaid to the college within 30 days of notice to the student. 

A fee of $10.00 is charged each student who does not register for 
classes during any prescribed pre-registration or registration period. A 
fee of $5.00 is charged for every change of course made at the student's 
request after registration. 

The fee for part-time students (less than 12 credit hours per semes- 
ter) is $82.00 per semester credit hour plus a $3.00 registration fee. 

Auxiliary School Fee Structure ( Evening and Summer ) 

Tuition, $65.00 per semester credit hour 
Registration fee, $3.00 

Late preregistration or registration fee, $5.00 
Change of registration fee, $5.00 

Payment of Fees and Deposits 

Semester charges are due and payable in full on August 10 (first 
semester) and January 2 (second semester) as a condition for registration. 
Those preferring to pay semester charges in monthly installments are 



* The first half hour of private music instruction is included in the basic tuition 
charge of all full-time music students. 

**The fee structure (student charges) as published in this catalog are subject to 
change or revision at the discretion of the college. 

18 



invited to consult with the office of the controller regarding deferred pay- 
ment plans offered by various financial institutions. Arrangements for 
deferred payment plans shall be completed early enough to assure pay- 
ment of bills no later than the date that semester charges are due and 
payable (August 10 and January 2). 

A satisfactory settlement of all college accounts is required before 
grades are released, transcripts are sent, honorable dismissal granted, or 
degree conferred. 

Refund Policy 

Refunds, as indicated below, are allowed only to students who offi- 
cially withdraw from the college by completing the clearance procedure: 

Period since beginning of % of tuition 

classes in the semester refunded 

Less than three weeks 75% 

Over three weeks 0% 

The above refund schedule also applies to part-time students, and 

to full-time students who withdraw from a course or courses so as to 

reduce the remaining course load to less than 12 semester credit hours. 
A refund on board charge is allowed for the period beginning after 

honorable official withdrawal. No refund is allowed on room charges. 

No refund is allowed on student charges when a student retains his 

class standing during his absence from college because of illness or for 

any other reason. 

Residence Halls 

Residence hall rooms are reserved only for those returning students 
who make an advance room reservation deposit of $50.00. (Receipt must 
be presented at the time of room sign-up which occurs during April.) 

Occupants must pay for any breakage or loss of furniture, or any 
other damage for which they are responsible. Damage not assignable to 
an individual occupant may be prorated to accounts of occupants within 
the responsible area (wing, hall, floor, dorm, etc.). 

Each room in the men's residence halls is furnished with chests of 
drawers, book case, beds, mattresses, chairs, and study tables. Drapes are 
provided in Funkhouser, Hammond, and Keister Halls. Students must 
provide bedding, rugs, lamps, and all other furnishings. 

Each room in the women's residence halls is furnished with beds, 
mattresses, chairs, dressers, book case, and study tables. Drapes are pro- 
vided in Mary Green and Vickroy Halls. Other desired furnishings must 
be supplied by the student. 

Students rooming in residence halls may not sublet their rooms to 
commuting students or to others. 

Since Lebanon Valley College is primarily a boarding institution, all 
students are required to live in college-owned or controlled residence 
halls. Exceptions to the above are: married students, students living with 
immediate relatives, or those living in their own homes who commute 
daily to the campus. 

19 



Should vacancies occur in any of the residence halls, the college re- 
serves the right to require students rooming in the community to move 
into a residence hall. 

The college reserves the right to close all residence halls during vaca- 
tions and between semesters. 

The college reserves the right to inspect any student's room at any 
time. Periodic inspection of residence halls will be made by members of 
the administration. 

The college is not responsible for loss of personal possessions by the 
students. It is recommended that each student consider the need to pro- 
vide private insurance coverage. 

Meals 

All resident students are required to take their meals in the college 
dining rooms. Commuting students may arrange for meals Monday 
through Friday, on a semester basis, if space is available. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Lebanon Valley College offers financial aid to deserving students who 
have been accepted for admission insofar as its aid funds permit. Students 
apply for financial aid by submitting the Parents' Confidential Statement 
(PCS) directly to the College Scholarship Service, Box 176, Princeton, 
New Jersey 08540. Applications for financial aid (PCS) are available to 
high school seniors in the guidance counselor's office and to college upper- 
classmen in the financial aid office. It is not necessary to await notification 
of acceptance to Lebanon Valley College before applying for financial 
aid; in fact, application for financial aid should be made as early as 
possible and no later than February 1. 

All financial aid is awarded for one year on the basis of financial 
need (except Presidential Scholarships). The PCS form assists the finan- 
cial aid officer in determining the applicant's need for financial aid. Partic- 
ipants in CSS subscribe to the principle that the amount of financial 
aid granted a student should be based upon financial need. Students re- 
ceiving aid from sources outside the college are required to report the 
amount and source of financial aid to the financial aid office. The college 
reserves the right to review and to adjust the financial aid offering and 
award accordingly. 

The college may require that a notarized or certified copy of the 
parents' most recent income tax return (Form 1040) be sent directly to 
the Financial Aid Office, Lebanon Valley College. If a notarized copy is 
unavailable a "Request for Copy of Tax Return" Form 4506 should be 
secured from the nearest office of the Internal Revenue Service. 

All financial aid is reviewed annually. Eligibility for renewal of 
financial aid is based upon need as established on the renewal PCS, satis- 
factory conduct, and maintenance of the required scholastic average. 

Presidential Scholarships 

Presidential Scholarships are awarded to entering students by the 

20 



president of Lebanon Valley College in recognition of superior attain- 
ment in high school study. A 2.5 cumulative grade-point average each 
semester is required for automatic reinstatement of these awards. 

Grants-in-Aid 

Grants-in-aid are available to entering freshmen and upperclassmen 
who have filed a Parent's Confidential Statement Form (PCS) and who 
have demonstrated capability either in high school or in college work. A 
2.0 cumulative grade-point average each semester is required for auto- 
matic continuation of these grants. Annual renewal of the PCS is re- 
quired for upperclassmen. 

Basic Educational Opportunity Grants 

Basic Educational Opportunity Grants are available to students who 
qualify under Federal Criteria. Application Forms may be secured from 
High School Guidance Counsellors as well as College Financial Aid Of- 
fices. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants 

Educational grants range from $200 to $1,000 per academic year and 
are based upon genuine need as stipulated by the federal government 
and supported by the Parents' Confidential Statement. 

Student Loans 

National Direct Student Loans are available under the Higher Ed- 
ucation Act of 1965 as amended. Qualifying students may borrow up to 
$1,000 per year. A Parents' Confidential Statement must be submitted. 

Student Employment Programs 

A student in need of financial assistance may be assigned a campus 
employment position. The College Work Study Program is underwritten 
by the federal government to the extent of 80 percent of the earnings. 

In addition, the college operates its own student employment pro- 
gram affording opportunities for students to work in a variety of positions 
as their schedules permit. 

For further information, write to the Financial Aid Officer, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pennsylvania 17003. 



21 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 
& PROCEDURES 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

Lebanon Valley College confers five bachelor degrees. They are: 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, 
Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology, and Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon students who com- 
plete the requirements for graduation in the following areas, and who 
are recommended by the faculty and approved by the Board of Trustees: 
English, foreign languages, French, German, history, mathematics, music, 
philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, religion, social science, 
sociology, and Spanish. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon students who 
complete the requirements in the following areas, and who are recom- 
mended by the faculty and approved by the Board of Trustees: actuarial 
science, biology, chemistry, cooperative engineering, cooperative forestry, 
economics and business administration, elementary education, mathe- 
matics, music education, and physics. 

The professional degrees of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, Bache- 
lor of Science in Medical Technology and Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
are conferred upon students who complete the requirements in the re- 
spective professional areas and who are recommended by the faculty and 
approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Semester Hours 

The requirements for degrees are stated in "semester hours of credit" 
which are based upon the satisfactory completion of courses of instruc- 
tion. Generally, one semester hour of credit is given for each class hour a 
week throughout the semester. In courses requiring laboratory work, 
not less than two hours of laboratory work a week throughout a semester 
are required for a semester hour of credit. A semester is a term of ap- 
proximately 15 weeks. 

Candidates for degrees must obtain a minimum of 120 semester hours 
credit in academic work in addition to the required courses in freshman 
and sophomore physical education. However, a student who has a physical 
disability may be excused (on recommendation from the college physician) 
from the requirement in physical education. 

Major 

As a part of the total requirement of 120 hours, every candidate for 
a degree must present at least 24 semester hours of course work in one 

22 



department (this is his major). The initial selection of a major may be 
indicated or recorded any time before the end of the student's sophomore 
year. Such a choice of department or curriculum in which he will pur- 
sue work of special concentration must be made by the time of registra- 
tion for the junior year. 

A student shall be accepted as a major in a department so long as 
he has not demonstrated (by achieving less than the minimum grade- 
point average in the desired major) that he is incapable of doing satis- 
factory work in the department. A student accepted as a major has the 
right to remain in that department, except by special action of the dean 
of the college, as long as he is in college. 

Substitution or waiving of specific courses required for the major 
may be approved by the departmental chairmen or advisers in a special 
curriculum upon student request. 

A student desiring to major in two subject areas should consult his 
current adviser and the chairman of the department of his proposed sec- 
ond major concerning requirements and procedure. 

Examinations 

Candidates for degrees are required to take end of course examina- 
tions if scheduled. 

Residence Requirement 

Degrees will be conferred only upon those candidates earning in 
residence a minimum of 30 semester hours out of the last 36 taken before 
the date of the conferring of the degree, or before the transfer to a co- 
operating program. Residence credit is given for course work completed 
in regular day classes and in evening and summer session courses taken 
on campus. 

Grade-Point Averages 

Candidates for degrees must also obtain a cumulative grade-point 
average of 1.75, computed in accordance with the grading system indi- 
cated below. 

In addition, candidates must earn a grade-point average of 2.0 in 
the major field of study. 

Only grades received in courses taken on campus or in courses staffed 
by Lebanon Valley College at the University Center at Harrisburg are 
used to determine grade-point averages. 

System of Grading and Quality Points 

The work of a student in each subject is graded A, B, C, D, or F, 
with the plus and minus available to faculty members who wish to use 
them. These grades have the following meanings: 

23 



A — distinguished performance 
B — superior work 

C — general satisfactory achievement 

D — course requirements and standards satisfied at a minimum level 
F — course requirements and standards not satisfied at a minimum 
level 

A student may not take any course which has as a prerequisite a 
course that he has failed. If a student fails in a course twice, he may not 
take it a third time. 

In addition to the above grades the symbols "I," "W," "WP," and 
"WF" are used on grade reports and in college records. "I" indicates 
that the work is incomplete (that the student has postponed with the 
prior consent of the instructor and for substantial reason, certain re- 
quired work), but otherwise satisfactory. This work must be completed 
within the first six weeks of the beginning of the semester following, or 
the "I" will be converted to an F. Appeals for extension of time beyond 
six weeks must be presented in writing to the assistant dean of the col- 
lege not later than one week after the beginning of the next semester. 

W indicates withdrawal from a course through the eighth week of 
classes in the semester. In case of a withdrawal from a course thereafter 
through the last day of classes in the semester, the symbol "WP" will be 
entered if the student's work is satisfactory, and "WF" if the work is un- 
satisfactory. The grade of "WF" is counted as an F in calculating 
grade-point averages. 

For courses in which no academic credit is involved, student work is 
evaluated as either S (Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). 

For each semester hour credit in a course in which a student is graded 
A, he receives 4 quality points; A- 3.7; B+, 3.3; B, 3; B- 2.7; etc. F carries 
no credit and no quality points. 

Pass/Fail Grading 

After attaining sophomore standing (28 semester hours credit), a stu- 
dent may elect to take up to two courses per semester and one one- 
semester course per summer session on a P/F basis, but only six of these 
courses can be counted toward graduation requirements. 

Any courses not being counted toward the fulfillment of the general 
requirements or the major requirements may be optional on a pass/ 
fail basis. Any prerequisite course taken on a P/F basis and successfully 
completed will satisfy the prerequisite. 

Each department may, with the approval of the dean of the college, 
designate certain courses, including those required for the major, in 
which the grading will be P/F for all students enrolled. Such courses 
may not be taken for regular grading even if a student desires it. Any 
course so designated shall not count toward the total number of courses 
available P/F to the student. 

24 



Any course taken on a P/F basis will be graded P/H (pass with dis- 
tinction), P (pass), or F (fail). P/H is denned as B+ and up, P is denned 
as D- through B; and F is below D-. 

Any course completed on a P/F basis shall be counted toward gradu- 
ation requirements, but only an F grade shall be included in computing 
the grade-point average. All passing grades shall be treated on the record 
as is transfer credit. 

The student will indicate at registration or through the eighth 
week of classes in the semester the courses that he has elected to take on 
a P/F basis. He may, with the approval of his adviser, change his option 
for P/F grading to the regular grading basis or from regular grading to 
P/F grading during the same period. 

Instructors may be informed of the grading option selected by the 
student only after semester grades in the course have been recorded. In- 
structors will submit for each student an A through F grade which will be 
converted to P/H, P, or F for students selecting this grading system. 

Transfer Students 

Students transferring from two-year institutions (except those in the 
medical technology and nursing programs) are required to have at least 
60 hours of work at a four-year institution for graduation. All students 
must take a minimum of 30 hours at Lebanon Valley College to meet 
the residence requirement. (See page 23.) 

Students transferring from other institutions must secure a grade- 
point average of 1.75 or better in work taken at Lebanon Valley College, 
and must meet the 2.0 grade-point average in their major field. 

Attendance at May Baccalaureate and Commencement Programs 

All seniors are required to attend the May baccalaureate and com- 
mencement programs at which their degrees are to be conferred. 

Degrees will be conferred in absentia only for the most compelling 
reasons and only upon a written request approved by the assistant dean of 
the college. Such requests must be submitted at least two weeks prior to 
the date of commencement. 

Faculty approval is required for the conferring of the degree and the 
issuance of the diploma in any case of willful failure to comply with these 
regulations. 



25 



GENERAL AND DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS 
REQUIREMENT AND AREA REQUIRED OR 

Semester ELIGIBLE COURSES 

I. General Requirements: Hours 

English Composition* 6 En 111/112 

Foreign Language* 6 Fr 111, 112; Ger 111, 112, 113, 114; 

Intermediate Level of any Ian- GK 211, 212; La 111, 112; Ru 111, 

guage 112; Sp 111, 112 

Religion 6 Re 111, 112, OR 

Physical Education Re 111 or 112, and Re 120 or 140 

(4 semesters) 

II. Distribution Requirements: 

Humanities: Three one-semester Ar 110, 201/202; En 221/222, 225/226, 

courses (not more than two 227/228, 229, 321/322, 338; 

from one field) to be chosen FL 315H/316H; Fr or Ger or Sp 115, 

from among art or music 116,215,221/222,331/332,441/442; 

treated as one field; interdis- Gk321, 322, 431, 432; IC 130; MS 

ciplinary courses; literature 290; Mu 100 or 341/342; all philos- 

as offered by the Depart- ophy courses except Ph 120, 365 and 

ment of English; literature 500; Re 211, 222; and Re 120, 140 if 

as offered by the Depart- not used to meet religion general re- 

ment of Foreign Languages; quirement. 

philosophy; religion 9 

Social Sciences: Three or four EcllO, 120; all history courses except 

one-semester courses (from Hi 412 and 500; MS 260; all political 

at least two fields) to be science courses except PS 217, 412, 

chosen from among econom- 500; all sociology courses except So 

ics, history, political science, 311, 342, 410, 422, 432, 500. 

sociology 9-10 

Natural Sciences: Three one-se- Bi 101/102, 111/112; Ch 111, 112; 

mester courses (not more Ma 100, 102, 111, 112, 161, 162, 170; 

than two from one field) Phy 100, 110, 103, 104, 111, 112; Psy 

to be chosen from among 110,235,236,444. 
biology, chemistry, math- 
ematics, physics, psychology. 
At least one course must be 

a laboratory science 9-12 

* Requirement can be met by proficiency examinations selected by the chairman of 
the department involved in consultation with the assistant dean of the college, or 
through the Advanced Placement Program. The foreign language requirement may also 
be met by the Foreign Language Achievement Test in some instances. 

No course in major fields shall be used to meet general or distribution requirements, 
except that a Social Science major may use nine (9) hours of the Major Requirement 
to meet Social Science Distribution Requirements. 

No course taken as a general requirement may count toward a major. 

Credit may be given for an elementary language if the student had two (2) or more 
years of the same language in secondary school and the Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages recommends that credit be given by reason of inadequate background of the 
student to take the intermediate level. No credit is given for an elementary language 
course if credit for the same elementary language course was given on transfer from 
another institution. 

26 



THE COLLEGE HONORS PROGRAM 

The Honors Program provides an opportunity for superior students 
to develop and to challenge their intellectual abilities, to challenge their 
originality and intellectual curiosity, and to nurture academic excellence 
both in students and faculty. 

The Program has two phases: lower division Freshman-Sophomore 
Honors; upper division Honor Studies and Departmental Honors. 

Prospective freshmen are selected, after interviews with members of 
the Honors Subcommittee of the Academic Life Committee and Honors 
instructors, on the basis of class rank, CEEB scores, Presidential Scholar- 
ship Examinations, and other useful information. Others may be chosen 
by a similar procedure by the Honors Subcommittee toward the end of 
the first semester, on the basis of recommendations invited from all in- 
structors. 

To graduate with college honors, a student must earn twelve semes- 
ter hours in lower division honors and nine semester hours in upper 
division honors. In upper division work, three semester hours must be 
gained in Honors Studies and three in Independent Study. A student's 
grade-point average must be 3.0 overall and in Honors work. 

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE HONORS 

Freshman-Sophomore Honors may be conducted in either lecture or 
seminar format; all students are expected to contribute to seminar dis- 
cussion. Participation in Freshman-Sophomore Honors is restricted to 
Honor students; exceptions are made only with consent of the instructor 
and the Honors Subcommittee of the Academic Life Committee. Enroll- 
ment in Freshman-Sophomore Honors sections should be limited to 15. 

Freshman-Sophomore Honors sections are offered in the following 
courses which meet the appropriate general and distribution require- 
ments: English 111/112, English 227/228, Religion 111/112, Economics 
110/120, Foreign Language 315H/316H, History 125/126, and Psychol- 
ogy 110. 

HONORS STUDIES 

Honors Study is a team effort in independent work with the guid- 
ance of one or more instructors. Honors Study generally deals with an 
interdepartmental subject, is restricted to Honors Students at the junior- 
senior level, and consists of a team of no more than seven students. An 
Honors student may participate in an Honors Study after completing 
nine hours in Freshman-Sophomore honors. In appropriate instances, 
the Curriculum Committee will be petitioned to approve courses to 
meet the distribution requirements. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Departmental Honors is taken in the major field in junior and senior 
years. The program consists of a reading and/or research program pro- 
ducing a thesis or an essay. The latter is done on a problem or subject 

27 



of the student's own choosing under the supervision of a faculty adviser, j 
Opportunity also exists to do creative work. A maximum of nine hours 
credit may be earned in departmental honors. 

AUXILIARY SCHOOLS 

Summer, Evening, Extension 

Summer sessions, evening classes on campus, and extension classes in 
the University Center at Harrisburg have enabled teachers, state em- 
ployees, and others in active employment to attend college courses and 
secure academic degrees. By a careful selection of courses, made in consul- 
tation with the appropriate adviser, students can meet many of the re- 
quirements for a baccalaureate degree. Some courses may be taken for 
provisional and permanent teaching certification; others may be taken 
with the aim of transferring credit to another institution. Many courses 
lead to professional advancement or are of direct benefit to persons in 
business or industry, while others assist in broadening the student's voca- 
tional, social, and cultural background. 

Separate brochures are published for the summer session and the eve- 
ning classes. For copies or for other information pertaining to the summer 
session or evening classes write to the Assistant Dean of the College, 
Lebanon Valley College, Annville, Pennsylvania 17003. 

Summer Session 

Regular enrolled students may, by taking summer session courses, 
meet the requirements for the bachelor's degree in three years. 

Campus Evening Classes 

Evening classes are offered on the campus, Monday through Thurs- 
day, and carry residence credit. 

The evening school includes an ENRICH Program in Business Ad- 
ministration. The student receives a certificate of achievement upon 
successful completion of the 60 semester-hour program. 

University Center at Harrisburg 

Extension classes are offered in the William Penn High School, Third 
and Division Streets, and at the Center's campus, 2991 North Front Street, 
Harrisburg, 17110, on Monday through Thursday evenings and on Satur- 
day mornings during the regular academic semesters. Classes meet during 
the summer sessions on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday evenings. Leba- 
non Valley College's extension program in Harrisburg is carried on in 
conjunction with Elizabethtown College, Temple University, The Penn- 
sylvania State University, and the University of Pennsylvania. 

All students admitted and enrolled for a degree at the college are re- 
quired to secure the permission of their advisers and the assistant dean of 
the college prior to enrolling for any courses at the University Center at 
Harrisburg. 

For details pertaining to the University Center at Harrisburg write 

28 



or call the director at 2991 North Front Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
17110, at 238-9694 during the day or 238-9696 during the evening. 

GERMANTOWN METROPOLITAN SEMESTER 

Lebanon Valley College sponsors an urban semester program 
through the Metropolitan Collegiate Center of Germantown, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. This is a one-semester program of a pre-professional 
internship and academic seminars relating to the city. The program is 
designed especially for students who are interested in cities and the op- 
portunity of living and working in a pluralistic urban world; or who 
want the practical and personal advantages of a concrete work ex- 
perience especially for purposes of vocational and educational decisions. 

Internship placements are available in a diverse range of social 
service, mental health, law enforcement, medical research, and health- 
care-delivery agencies. 15 academic credits are offered in the program. 
Metropolitan Semester students live in housing approved by the Center 
staff. Total costs are comparable to those of a semester on campus. 

JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD 

A Lebanon Valley student may spend his junior year abroad in study 
under a program administered by an accredited American college or uni- 
versity, or in a program approved by Lebanon Valley College. Such a 
student must have maintained a B average at Lebanon Valley College, 
must be proficient in the language spoken in the country in which he will 
study, and must be a person who in the judgment of the assistant dean of 
the college and the faculty will be a worthy representative of his own 
country. His proposed course of study must be approved by the chairman 
of his department and the assistant dean of the college. 

MARINE BIOLOGY PROGRAM 

Lebanon Valley College offers a limited program in marine biology in 
cooperation with the University of Delaware College of Marine Studies 
and the University of Georgia Marine Institute. 

Under this program the student takes the necessary fundamental sci- 
ence courses on campus and spends six to ten weeks in the summer be- 
tween his junior and senior years at the University of Delaware College of 
Marine Studies, Lewes, Delaware. Nine credits of marine science work 
can thus be earned for transfer to Lebanon Valley College. 

In addition, short field trips are made to Lewes as part of the ecol- 
ogy course (Biology 403). An extended field trip is made in the senior 
year to Sapelo Island, site of the University of Georgia Marine Institute. 
Opportunities are given here for study of various aspects of the ecology 
of an undisturbed marsh ecosystem and of basic oceanographic research 
methodology. 

The college believes that the best preparation for a career in marine 
biology is a thorough grounding in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathe- 
matics. With the addition of the specific work in ecology and marine 

29 



science, on campus and at the cooperating institutions, a student is well 
prepared both for an immediate career as well as for graduate work in 
the field. 

MERRILL-PALMER INSTITUTE SEMESTER 

Usually during their junior year, selected students may spend a 
semester in Detroit, Michigan, at the renowned Merrill-Palmer Institute, 
enrolled for courses and involved in a practicum experience, either work- 
ing with children or with community organization. The theme of the 
study program is "Children and Families in Urban Communities." In 
the student residences small groups from many different colleges and 
universities and from all sections of the United States participate co- 
operatively in the management and social affairs of their houses, with 
12-18 persons in each residence. 

WASHINGTON SEMESTER PROGRAM 

Students at Lebanon Valley College are eligible to participate in the 
Washington Semester Program which is offered in cooperation with Amer- 
ican University in Washington, D.C. This includes the study of the 
American governmental and political system as a whole (the Washington 
Semester), the urban polity and intergovernmental decision-making in 
urban affairs (the Washington Urban Semester), American foreign policy 
formulation and implementation (the Foreign Policy Semester), and inter- 
national development (the International Development Semester). Stu- 
dents in the first two programs take a seminar, which includes meetings 
with public officials, political figures, private interest group representa- 
tives, and other knowledgeable persons; an individual research project 
determined in consultation with instructors at Lebanon Valley and Amer- 
ican University; and either an elective course at the university or an 
internship program arranged with a political or administrative office in 
Washington. The Foreign Policy Semester and the International Develop- 
ment semester are modules, expected to occupy the student's full academic 
time. 

The program is open to juniors and seniors in any major field who 
have at least a 2.5 average, have had the basic courses in American na- 
tional government, and are recommended by the chairman of the depart- 
ment of history and political science. Two students from the college will 
be selected each November by American University to participate in the 
following spring semester. Students in the program have the same status 
as full-time undergraduates at American University and will receive full 
credit for one semester's work toward their degree at Lebanon Valley 
College. 

ACADEMIC PROCEDURES 

Registration and Pre-Registration 

Students are required to register for classes on official registration 
days and on designated pre-registration days of each semester. Informa- 

30 



tion concerning the dates for official registration and pre-registration is 
listed in the college calendar, page 3. 

Late Registration and Pre-Registration 

Students registering later than the days and hours specified will be 
charged a late registration fee of ten dollars. Students desiring to register 
later than one week after the opening of the semester will be admitted 
only by special permission of the assistant dean of the college. Students 
who do not pre-register during the designated time will be charged a late 
pre-registration fee of ten dollars. 

Change of Registration 

Change of registration, including pass /fail elections, when necessary, 
must be made over the signature of the adviser. In most instances regis- 
tration for a course will not be permitted after the course has been in 
session for one full week. With the permission of his adviser, a student 
may withdraw from a course at any time through the last day of classes of 
the semester. (See page 23 for grading policy.) A fee of $5.00 is charged 
for every change of course made at the student's request after registra- 
tion. 

Orientation for New Students 

A spring orientation day is held annually for incoming students. At 
this time the activities include a general orientation to the college, coun- 
seling with academic advisers, and pre-registration for courses. Special 
sessions for parents are a vital part of the program. 

An orientation period of several days at the beginning of the college 
year is provided to help new students, both freshmen and transfers, to 
become familiar with their academic surroundings. This time is devoted 
to lectures, social activities, and informal meetings with upperclassmen 
and members of the faculty. 

During the first semester all freshmen and transfer students are re- 
quired to participate in an orientation course which includes a series of 
lectures and discussions on college procedures, campus activities, and 
methods of study. 

Discontinuance of Course 

The college reserves the right to withdraw or discontinue any course 
for which an insufficient number of students have registered. 

Repetition of Courses 

No student shall be permitted to repeat for credit, grade, or quality 
points a course for which he has already received a passing grade. 

If a course on campus or staffed by Lebanon Valley College at the 
University Center at Harrisburg is failed but is later repeated and passed 
at either location, the failure is ignored in calculation of cumulative 
grade-point averages in the semester in which the course is passed or 
thereafter. The grade of F remains on the permanent record card, with 
an asterisk used to indicate that the course was repeated and passed. 

31 



Concurrent Courses 

A student enrolled for a degree at Lebanon Valley College may not 
carry courses concurrently at any other institution without the prior con- 
sent of his adviser and the assistant dean of the college. Neither may a 
regular student carry work concurrently in evening or extension courses 
without the prior permission of his adviser and the assistant dean of the 
college. 

A student registered at Lebanon Valley College may not obtain credit 
for courses taken in other colleges, including the University Center at 
Harrisburg, during the summer unless such courses have prior approval 
of his adviser and the assistant dean of the college. 

Auditing Courses 

Students are permitted to register to audit courses with the consent 
of the instructor and the academic adviser. Audited courses are counted 
in considering the course load relative to limit of hours (overload). The 
regular tuition fee is charged to part-time students. Neither grade nor 
credit is given either at the time the course is audited or thereafter. A 
change of registration from credit to audit or or from audit to credit 
must be accomplished by the end of the fifth week of classes of the semes- 
ter. 

Faculty Advisers 

Each student is assigned a faculty adviser who serves in the capacity of 
friendly counselor. 

The initial selection of a major may be indicated or recorded any 
time before the end of the student's sophomore year. Such a choice of de- 
partment or curriculum in which to pursue work of special concentration 
must be made by the time of registration for the junior year. This depart- 
ment or curriculum shall be known as his major. A student shall be ac- 
cepted as a major in a department so long as he has not demonstrated (by 
achieving less than the minimum grade-point average in the desired ma- 
jor) that he is incapable of doing satisfactory work in the department. 
The chairman or another member of the department or the adviser of the 
curriculum in which the student has elected to major becomes the adviser 
for that student. The adviser's approval is necessary before a student may 
register for or withdraw from any course, select or change his pass/fail 
elections, or change registration from credit to audit or from audit to 
credit. 

Arrangement of Schedules 

Each student arranges his course of study and his class schedule in 
consultation with, and by approval of, his faculty adviser. Students already 
in attendance do this during pre-registration periods. New students ac- 
complish this on the spring orientation day. 

Limit of Hours 

To be classified as full-time, a student must take at least twelve se- 

32 



mester hours of work. Sixteen semester hours of work is the maximum 
permitted without approval of the adviser and special permission of the 
assistant dean of the college; physical education carries no credit. Audit- 
ed courses are counted in determining the course load. 

The privilege of carrying extra hours will be granted only for com- 
pelling reasons and only when a satisfactory grade level has been main- 
tained for the previous semester. 

Academic Classification 

Students are classified academically at the beginning of each year. 
Membership in the sophomore, junior, or senior classes is granted to those 
students who have earned a minimum of 28, 56, or 84 semester hours 
credit respectively. 

All entrance deficiencies must be removed before the academic status 
of sophomore is granted. 

Counseling and Placement 

Lebanon Valley College recognizes as part of its responsibility to its 
students the need for providing sound educational, vocational, and per- 
sonal counseling. Measures of interest, ability, aptitude, and personality, 
in addition to other counseling techniques, are utilized in an effort to 
help each student come to a fuller realization of his capabilities and per- 
sonality. An important part of the counseling program consists of a series 
of lectures and discussions conducted as a non-credit orientation course 
for new students. 

Placement services are provided by the college for aiding students in 
procuring part-time employment while in college and in obtaining posi- 
tions upon graduation. A current file is maintained which contains in- 
formation about positions in various companies and institutions, civil 
service opportunities and examinations, entrance to professional schools, 
assistantships, and fellowships. Representatives of business, industry, and 
educational institutions visit the campus annually to interview seniors for 
prospective employment. A file of credentials and activities of those stu- 
dents availing themselves of the services is available to prospective em- 
ployers. Graduates may keep their individual files active by reporting 
additional information to the director of industrial placement. 

A Teacher Placement Bureau which assists students in finding posi- 
tions is maintained. 

Records of students' credentials in all areas of student activities are 
on file. 

ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS 

The rules of the college are designed to provide for proper regulation 
of the academic community. The rules and regulations as stated in this 
bulletin are announcements and in no way serve as a contract between 
the student and the college. Attendance at the college is a privilege and 
not a right. The student by his act of registration concedes to the college 
the right to require his withdrawal any time deemed necessary to safe- 

33 



guard the ideals of scholarship and character, and to secure compliance 
with regulations. It is expected that the conduct of all campus citizens 
will conform to accepted standards. All students are required to respond 
to communications sent by any duly constituted authority of the college. 

Class Attendance 

Each student is held responsible for knowing and meeting all require- 
ments for each course, including regular class attendance. Because of 
differences in various disciplines, specific regulations governing class at- 
tendance are set by each department, approved by the dean of the col- 
lege, and administered by the instructor. At the opening of each course 
the instructor will clearly inform the students of the regulations on class 
attendance. Violations of class attendance regulations will make the stu- 
dent liable to being dropped from the course with a failing grade, upon 
the recommendation of the instructor and with the approval of the assis- 
tant dean of the college. 

In case of absence from class because of illness and for most other 
reasons, the student speaks directly with the instructor concerning the 
absence, whether anticipated or not, even if an examination has been 
scheduled. The student informs the assistant dean of the college only if 
the absence could not be anticipated and the period of absence will be a 
week or more. The assistant dean of the college informs faculty members 
of students who will be absent from classes because of participation in 
official functions of the college. Students on academic probation are per- 
mitted only excused absences. 

Excused absences do not absolve the student from the necessity of ful- 
filling all course requirements. 

Academic Dishonesty 

Instances of open and conclusive academic dishonesty are dealt with 
in accordance with the following regulations: 

For the first offense the faculty member shall have the authority to 
fail the student in the course. 

For the second offense the student shall be failed in the course and 
additional action taken, up to and including expulsion from college, if 
deemed warranted by the dean of the college. 

For the third offense, if the second act of dishonesty did not warrant 
expulsion in the opinion of the dean of the college, the student shall be 
punished by failure in the course and expulsion from the college. 

Chapel-Convocation Program 

A chapel-convocation program is held regularly each week. The 
weekly programs are augmented by additional events at other times dur- 
ing the semester. From the total of twenty-four programs each full-time 
student will select not less than twelve to fulfill his attendance require- 
ment for the semester. For each unexcused absence, resulting in less than 
twelve attendances, one hour will be added to the hours required for 
graduation. 

34 



Hazing 

Hazing is strictly prohibited. Any infringement by members of other 
classes upon the personal rights of freshmen as individuals is interpreted 
as hazing. 

Cars and Student Parking 

All cars owned or operated by Lebanon Valley College students must 
be registered with the office of the dean of students. Violations of estab- 
lished parking regulations will result in fines and may result in suspen- 
sion or revocation of parking privileges. 

Transcripts 

Each student, former student, or graduate is entitled to one transcript 
of his college record without charge. For each copy after the first, a fee of 
two dollars is charged. 

Regulations Regarding Academic Probation, 
Suspension, Dismissal, Withdrawal 

A. Probation 

A student can be placed on academic probation by the dean of the 
college or suspended or dismissed if his academic standing fails to come 
up to the grade-point average shown in the following table: 

Suspension or 
Probation dismissal 

1st semester 1.25 

2nd semester 1.50 1.25 cumulative 

3rd semester 1.65 

4th semester 1.75 1.50 cumulative 

5th semester 1 .75 

6th semester 1.75 1.65 cumulative 

7th & 8th semesters 1.75 in all courses 

A student placed on academic probation is notified of such status by 
the dean of the college and informed of the college regulations governing- 
probationers. Students on probation are required to regulate their work 
and their times so as to make a most determined effort to bring their work 
up to the required standard. 

When a student is placed on academic probation, faculty and par- 
ents are notified by the dean of the college. The dean of the college may 
terminate the period of probation of any student. Usually this occurs at 
the end of a semester or summer session. 

Infraction of the following regulations governing probationers ren- 
der a student liable to dismissal: 

1. No unexcused class absences will be permitted. 

2. Any office or activity in any college organization that involves 
such expenditure of time as to jeopardize the successful pursuit 
of academic work must be relinquished. 

35 



B. Suspension 

1. A student who obviously fails to achieve at a level commensurate 
with his measured ability may be suspended for at least one semester. 

2. A student suspended for academic reasons is not eligible for re- 
instatement for at least one semester, preferably two. 

3. A student seeking reinstatement to Lebanon Valley College must 
apply in writing to the dean of the college. 

4. Students suspended for academic reasons are not permitted to reg- 
ister for work in the auxiliary schools except for the most compelling 
reasons and then only with the approval of the assistant dean of the 
college. 

5. A student may be suspended without a prior period on probation. 

C. Dismissal 

A student dismissed for academic reasons is not eligible for readmis- 
sion. 

D. Withdrawal from College and Readmission 

Official withdrawal from the college is accomplished only by the com- 
pletion of withdrawal forms obtained in the office of the assistant dean of 
the college and registrar. This is the sole responsibility of the student. 

Application for readmission will be considered only if the formal 
withdrawal procedure has been followed at the time of withdrawal. 



36 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



THE RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Lebanon Valley College was founded as a Christian college and con- 
tinues to be dedicated to its faith. All students are invited and urged to 
participate in some phase of religious activity. 

The Chapel-Convocation Program 

A series of twenty-four programs is held each semester from which 
each student selects a minimum of twelve to fulfill attendance require- 
ments. These programs include chapel services and convocation programs 
that are held on Tuesday mornings, as well as cultural events selected 
by the Chapel-Convocation Committee. This committee, with equal rep- 
resentation from administration, faculty, and students, will announce the 
total chapel-convocation program at the beginning of each semester. 

Rationale of Chapel-Convocation Policy 

The aims and objectives of Lebanon Valley College as they relate to 
the chapel-convocation policy and program have been duly published and 
constantly remind us that this institution was chartered to promote the 
highest human possibilities. The goals of our chapel-convocation policy 
and program derive from (1) our conception of the distinctive nature of 
the liberal arts and (2) the character of the academic community we 
would consciously shape. 

Every aspect of educational activity reflects qualitative concerns or a 
scale of values. The liberal arts inevitably raise fundamental questions 
which require honest regard for ultimate values and personal commit- 
ments. To insure responsible learning and human concern it is necessary 
to recognize the value-laden nature of all knowledge. Indeed, the liberal 
arts are not so much courses of study as they are human attributes or per- 
sonal qualities which enhance the possibility for rational discrimination, 
uncoerced decision, and responsible commitment. Chapel services and 
convocation programs are considered therefore not only an opportunity to 
focus honest criticism upon our qualitative concerns and scale of values, 
but they are offered as an integrating experience for the development of 
the whole person. Thus, we believe an authentic liberal arts experience 
will engender a sense of mystery, reverence, adoration, and celebration of 
the Highest. Such an experience can be most profitably exercised and crea- 
tively structured in communal worship and convocation programs. 

Second, we believe a liberal arts college is a community of learning 
responsibly committed to humanistic values. But human values are not 
meaningfully experienced in abstraction or in isolation. Man is truly hu- 
man only in community and therefore man can be correctly understood 
only when seen in relation to God and fellow man. As an institution we 
consciously attempt to shape this community with reference to the values 

37 



of Jesus Christ which we confess to be our highest norm of truth and 
goodness; in Him we see authentic humanity as God's intention for all 
men. This orientation is not in any way an exclusion or bemeaning of 
non-Christians; rather, such a confession positively requires a good will 
and sincere openness to all persons. When a college seeks community at 
its highest and deepest levels through corporate learning and worship it 
does so for the same reason it provides a library, gymnasium, theatre, or 
laboratory, namely, opportunity for the highest human development. Of 
course it is fatuous to assume that every opportunity offered in college 
will prove to be an occasion for an enriching experience for every stu- 
dent; but that fact does not excuse the college from the obligation of pro- 
viding opportunities for experiences considered most essential to the 
realization of man's highest potential. 

In summary, a liberal arts institution may engage in a sort of quasi- 
education and will fail to serve the whole person if it defaults in its con- 
frontation with qualitative concerns, deflects from commitment to en- 
nobling values, or denies the need for corporate celebration of life's high- 
est good. Granted our conception of the nature of the liberal arts and the 
particular kind of community we seek to be, provision for corporate 
worship and convocation programs is integral to our total reason for being 
a liberal arts community committed to a definite value-orientation, i.e. 
Christian. 

Sunday Services 

The United Methodist Church and the other churches of the com- 
munity extend a warm welcome to all college students who wish to attend 
Sunday worship. 

There are seven churches of different denominations in Annville it- 
self. Other parishes of major religious groups not found in Annville are 
located within a five-mile radius of the college. 

PROJECT 

PROJECT is the all-campus organization which coordinates the ac- 
tivities of the various denominational religious groups on campus. It also 
provides programs and activities to fulfill the spiritual needs of the stu- 
dents and promotes the spirit of brotherhood in the college community. 
Throughout the year the organization sponsors a Big Sister-Little Sister, 
Big Brother-Little Brother program, and all-campus retreats for fun, 
fellowship, and relaxation. PROJECT also provides special seasonal ser- 
vices, opportunities for weekend work camps, presentations by guest 
speakers, films, dramas, and other types of programs. All students are 
welcome to assist in the planning and to participate in these activities. 

Denominational Organizations 

It is possible for the different denominations and faiths to organize 
their students into clubs or other type organizations. Each of these groups 
in turn elects one of its members to the Executive Board of PROJECT. 

38 



Religious Emphasis Day 

This is one of the oustanding religious events of the school year. 
Notable speakers are invited to share their experiences with the student 
body through the chapel-convocation programs and personal interviews. 
Other features usually included in the activities of the day are a music 
program by a student group, and a movie or drama. 

The Balmer Showers Lectureship 

This annual lectureship was established and endowed by the late 
Bishop Emeritus J. Balmer Showers, '07, of the Evangelical United Breth- 
ren Church. Under the stipulations of the endowment, the lectures are 
delivered by distinguished scholars of recognized leadership in the areas 
of Christian faith and theology, biblical archaeology and interpretation, 
and Christian ethics of the Christian ministry. 

Religion and Life Lectures 

The purpose of the Religion and Life Lectures is to deepen the stu- 
dent's understanding of some of the problems of life and the religious re- 
sources that are available to meet such problems. Currently, the Religion 
and Life Lectures and the Balmer Showers Lectures are coordinated into 
a series of three offerings at various times during the year. 

Delta Tau Chi 

Delta Tau Chi is an organization composed primarily of students 
who have decided to devote full-time service to church vocations. Mem- 
bership is open, however, to all students who wish to participate in its 
activities and subscribe to its purpose. The group holds regularly sched- 
uled meetings and daily meditations, sends deputations to churches, con- 
ducts programs at various hospitals and homes, and enters into other com- 
munity projects. 

CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 

Social Organizations 

Five organizations endeavor to enrich the social program of the col- 
lege by sponsoring social activities on the campus and in the community, 
and by broadening the experience of its members through group action. 

Delta Lambda Sigma 

Kappa Lambda Nu Knights of the Valley 

Kappa Lambda Sigma Phi Lambda Sigma 

Recognition Groups 

Students who have achieved scholastic distinction in their academic 
work or in certain areas are eligible for membership in honorary scho- 
lastic societies. 

Phi Alpha Epsilon Pi Gamma Mu 

Beta Beta Beta Psi Chi 

39 



Honorary and Service Organizations 

Six organizations exist to bring recognition to deserving music stu- 
dents and participants in dramatic activities or to function as service or- 
ganizations on the campus. 

Alpha Phi Omega Phi Mu Alpha 

Alpha Psi Omega Sigma Alpha Iota 

Gamma Sigma Sigma White Hats 

Publications 

Practical experience in management, writing, and editorial work is 
available to students through membership on the staff of the college 
yearbook. 
The Quittapahilla 

Departmental Clubs 

Many departmental clubs provide opportunities for students to par- 
ticipate in supplemental department activities. At regular meetings re- 
ports on appropriate topics are presented and discussed. Other activities 
sponsored by the departmental clubs include lectures by specialists in the 
club's particular field of interest, educational films, and field trips. 

Chemistry: American Chemical Modern Languages: French Club, 

Society Affiliate German Club, Spanish Club, 

Economics: Investment Club, International Club 

Business and Economics Club Physics: Physics Club, Student 
Education: Childhood Education Section of the American Institute 

Club, Student P.S.E.A. o£ Physics 

English: Green Blotter Club 

Mathematics: Industrial Psychology: Psi Chi 

Mathematics Society Affiliate Sociology: Sociology Club 

Special Interest Groups 

Art Club Photography Club 

Bridge Club Ski Club 

Chess Club Jazz Band 

Dramatics and Music 

An opportunity to develop dramatic and musical talents under qual- 
ified leadership is offered to the students of Lebanon Valley College by 
the following organizations. 

Chapel Choir Symphonic Band 

College Chorus Symphony Orchestra 

Concert Choir Wig and Buckle Club 

Guild Student Group Wind Ensemble 
(American Guild of Organists) 

40 



CULTURAL OPPORTUNITIES 

Lebanon Valley College offers cultural programs in the form of the 
Great Artists Series, concerts by students, faculty members, and musical 
organizations in the department of music, and lectures sponsored by the 
various departments of the college. In addition, the neighboring commu- 
nities of Harrisburg, Hershey, and Lebanon offer concerts, lectures, and 
other cultural activities throughout the year. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Ultimate responsibility for activities on the college campus rests with 
the faculty and the administration. However, the faculty and the admin- 
istration have delegated powers and responsibilities to the student govern- 
ing bodies so that, to a large extent, students govern themselves. The col- 
lege encourages initiative and self-government as a part of the democratic 
training offered. 

The representative organizations described below were established to 
function in areas of student government. They are privileged to conduct 
the affairs of the student body of Lebanon Valley College under their sep- 
arate responsibilities so as to guide and promote the affairs of the stu- 
dents in accordance with local, state, and federal laws and general institu- 
tional rules. 

Student Council 

The Student Council seeks to foster understanding and cooperation 
among the students, faculty and administration of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege. It is the elected group that acts as the central clearing house for all 
recommendations and grievances, outside the area of responsibility of the 
Student Senate, which emanate from the student body. The Student Coun- 
cil also coordinates student activities and provides for the financing of 
those activities. It is composed of eighteen members. 

Student Senate 

The Student Senate, composed of twelve elected members, is the stu- 
dent disciplinary body. In addition to rendering decisions concerning stu- 
dent justice and assigning punishments for rule violations, it has the re- 
sponsibility of establishing social rules and regulations in accordance 
with the general rules of the college. One of the key concepts that under- 
lies student government is that all students are encouraged to assume re- 
sponsibility for the enforcement of all rules that are under the jurisdic- 
tion of the Student Senate. These rules and other information about stu- 
dent government are found in the L Book which is distributed to all 
students at the start of the school year. 

Student Government Executive Committee 

The highest authority in matters of student government at Lebanon 
Valley College is the Executive Committee. This group, composed of 
four students, two administrators, two faculty members, and the presi- 
dent of the college, who serves as chairman, has authority to make major 

41 



policy changes upon recommendation by the Student Senate or Student 
Council. It acts on matters or appeals referred to it by students, faculty 
members, administrators, the Student Senate, or the Student Council. 

Institutional Rules 

1. There shall be no dichotomy between rules for men and rules for 
women and there shall be equality in all aspects except security mea- 
sures for women to be determined by the women. 

2. Senior students and students twenty-one years of age and older are 
given preference in applying for permission to live off campus in the 
event the college is unable to furnish housing, provided preference is 
also given to students with such qualifications of age and class stand- 
ing who are not on academic or social probation. 

3. The possession and/or consumption of alcoholic beverages by any 
one on any property owned by Lebanon Valley College is prohibited. 

4. Any interference with the educational or administrative processes of 
the institution is forbidden. 

5. Persons of the opposite sex may visit in an individual's dormitory 
room only within the limitations as stated in the L Book. 

6. Gambling is forbidden on the campus. 

7. Smoking is prohibited in all college buildings except in residents' 
rooms and where receptacles are provided by the college. 

8. Pets shall not be kept in the dormitories unless they are approved 
by the office of the dean of students. 

9. All firearms are prohibited on campus. 

10. Pledging and initiation into any organization may not include any 
physical abuse. 

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION 

Lebanon Valley College maintains a full program of intramural and 
intercollegiate athletic activities. Intramural leagues and tournaments are 
conducted in the various sports for men and women. 

The college participates in nine intercollegiate sports for men (base- 
ball, basketball, cross-country, football, golf, lacrosse, soccer, track, wres- 
tling) and three for women (basketball, hockey and lacrosse). Tennis is 
offered for men and women. 

Lebanon Valley College is a member of the following national and 
regional athletic associations: National Collegiate Athletic Association, 
Middle Atlantic States Collegiate Athletic Conference, Eastern College 
Athletic Conference, the Central Pennsylvania Field Hockey Association, 
and the Penn-Mar Conference for women. 

Aims and Objectives of Intercollegiate Athletics 

Lebanon Valley College supports its intercollegiate athletics program 
because it offers its students an opportunity to participate in activities 
that afford an outlet for competitive spirit and vitality, while further pro- 
viding each student with an opportunity to develop, understand and ap- 
preciate the values of teamwork, pride, morale, dedication, physical fit- 
ness and school spirit. 

42 



COURSES OF STUDY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Course Numbering System 

The first digit of the three-digit course number indicates the aca- 
demic year in which the course is normally taken. Thus, a course is nor- 
mally taken in the senior year if the first digit is 4, in the junior year if it 
is 3, in the sophomore year if it is 2, and in the freshman year if it is 1. 
(A first digit of 1 may also indicate that the course may be taken by fresh- 
men even though it is usually taken by sophomores, juniors or seniors.) 
A first digit of 5 is employed for courses in private music instruction 
and independent study courses. Course numbers for music organizations 
have 6 as a first digit. The same number is used each time a student en- 
rolls in a course whose first digit is 5 or 6. 

A course is offered in the first semester if the third digit is an odd 
number, in the second semester if the third digit is an even number. A 
course with as a third digit is a one-semester course offered in both 
semesters. 

A comma separating the numbers of two courses with a common 
title indicates that the first course (offered in the first semester) is a pre- 
requisite to the second course (offered in the second semester). A slash 
(/) separating the numbers of two courses with a common title indicates 
that the first course is not a prerequisite for the second course. 

A course is offered every year if an academic year is not indicated. 

Course Credit 

Semester hours of credit, class hours per week, and laboratory hours 
per week are indicated by three numbers at the end of the line containing 
the course number and title. For example, "4:3:4" for Biology 201 means 
four semester hours of credit, three classroom hours per week, and four 
laboratory hours per week. 



ART 

Assistant Professor Iskowitz; Adjunct Professor Wise 

110. Introduction to Art. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

Students are introduced to various visual forms which arc analyzed in an attempt 
to understand the nature of art through structure, the characteristics of media, and con- 
tent. The importance of shaping individual perception is stressed in order to show how 
the observer plays an active role in his appreciation of a work of art. In the lectures, 
problems using old and new techniques are explained as well as the various media of the 
visual arts. 

43 



140. Studio Drawing and Painting. 3:4:0. Either semester. 

Problems are offered which provide maximum opportunity for the development 
of the creative capacity of the individual. An exploration of the inherent qualities 
of various media, techniques, and tools is undertaken through active involvement in 
studio. Introduction to printmaking, especially etching and woodcutting, is offered. The 
staff reserves the right to select one example of each student's work for its permanent 
collection. 

Prerequisite: Art 110. 

201. Art History I, Pre-history through the Middle Ages. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Representative examples in painting, sculpture, and architecture of the major 
cultures of successive historic periods are considered. Stress is given to the interaction 
of factors influencing the various forms of visual expressions. Lectures, discussions, 
and visual aids are employed to encourage individual research in the area of develop- 
ing interest. 

Prerequisite: Art 110. 

202. Art History II, Renaissance to Twentieth Century. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Study of the major forms of the visual arts representative of the Renaissance and 
succeeding centuries as expressed both by the individual and major schools. These 
viewed in terms of degree of reflection of the social, ideological, and economic foci 
of the period. Lecture, discussion, visual aids, supplementary assignments. 

Prerequisite: Art 110. 

401. Art in the Elementary School. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Survey of theories of art education and of programs of creative process activities 
adaptive to the various levels of maturation at the elementary level. Studio experience 
employing a variety of media and techniques is offered to give experience and under- 
standing to the problems involved. Practical knowledge of process, sources of supply, 
approaches to display, and trends in evaluation of process are presented through lec- 
ture, discussion, demonstration, visual aids, supplementary reading. 



BIOLOGY 

Associate Professor Wolf, Chairman; Assistant Professors Argot, Gring, 
Henninger, Verhoek, Williams, and Wolfe 

The work outlined in the following courses in biology is intended 
to develop an appreciation of man's relation to his universe, to acquaint 
students with those fundamental concepts necessary for the proper inter- 
pretation of the phenomena manifested by the living things with which 
they are surrounded, and to lay a foundation for specialization in profes- 
sional courses in biology. 

The courses are designed to prepare students for the work in pro- 
fessional schools, schools for medical technologists, hospital schools for 
training of nurses, for graduate work in colleges and universities, for 
teaching the biological sciences in high schools, and for assistantships in 
university and experiment station laboratories in the departments of 
agriculture and other government agencies. 

Major: Biology 111, 112, 201, 302 or 307, 411 or 412; one course each 
in the general areas of physiology, cellular and subcellular biology, and 
morphology; and four additional hours in biology; two years of chem- 
istry; Physics 103, 104 or 111, 112; and Math 161. 

44 



DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

The departmental honors program in biology is open to students of 
junior and senior status who have demonstrated superior scholastic ability 
in formal courses as well as the potential to complete successfully an 
original independent research project. A candidate for departmental 
honors will be assigned to a faculty member who will direct his research 
problem. Two weeks prior to the close of the second semester of his 
senior year, the candidate will submit a thesis based on his laboratory 
investigations and defend it before an examining committee chosen by 
the research sponsor. Following successful completion of the defense, the 
candidate's record will be reviewed by the examining committee, where- 
upon a decision will be made concerning a recommendation to the dean 
of the college that the candidate graduate with departmental honors. 

101/102. Introduction to Biology I, II. 3:2:2 per semester. 

These courses, designed for the non-science major, place emphasis on the mastery 
of certain biological principles which are inherent in living material. These principles 
are then applied to specific organisms with special stress placed on the study of human 
biology. 

The laboratory includes exercises in anatomy, physiology, embryology, genetics, 
and ecology. 

111/112. General Biology I, II.* 4:3:4 per semester. 

An attempt is made to familiarize the student with some of the basic concepts of 
the physical sciences necessary for the understanding of modern biology. Basic biological 
principles are stressed as related to the major subdivisions of the biological sciences. 

201. Genetics. 4:3:4. First semester. 

The central theme of this course is the mastery of the universal properties of the 
mechanism of heredity. The laboratory stresses the demonstration of the key concepts 
of heredity utilizing both a classical and a molecular approach. 

Prerequisites: Biology 111 and one year of chemistry. 

202. Animal Physiology. 4:3:4. Second semester. 

A study of the principles of vertebrate body function. Emphasis is placed upon 
the mechanisms by which cells and organs perform their functions and the interaction 
of the various organs in maintaining total body function. 

Prerequisites: Biology 101/102 or 111/112. 

302. Survey of the Plant Kingdom. 4:2:4. Second semester. 

The diversity and differentiation of plants and the relationships between them 
will be stressed. Field and laboratory work will familiarize the student with the 
morphology of lower plants and with the identification and ecology of gymnosperms 
and angiosperms on campus and in the local flora. 

Prerequisites: Biology 111/112 or permission of the instructor. 

304. Developmental Biology. *2:4. Second semester. 

The study of basic descriptive phenomena in the development of typical inver- 
tebrate and vertebrate embryos will be extended into consideration of modern em- 
bryological problems. 

* Unless otherwise noted, Biology 111/112 are prerequisites for all biology courses 
beyond 112. 

45 



305. Vertebrate Histology and Microtechnique. 4:2:4. First semester. 

Microscopic anatomy of vertebrate tissues illustrating basic tissue similarities and 
specialization in relation to function. The laboratory work includes the preparation of 
slides utilizing routine histological and histochemical techniques. 

306. Microbiology. 4:2:4. Second semester. 

A basic study of the morphology, physiology, and biochemistry of representative 
microorganisms. 

307. Plant Physiology. 4:2:4. First semester. 

The functioning of plants and plant systems with emphasis on vascular plants. 
Processes will be studied at the biophysical, biochemical, cellular and organismal 
levels. Structural background at all levels will be included. 

Prerequisite: One semester of organic chemistry or permission of the instructor. 

308. Comparative Chordate Anatomy. 4:2:4. Second semester. 

The anatomy of the chordatcs is studied from a comparative viewpoint with par- 
ticular attention given to the correlation of structure to living conditions. Laboratory 
work involves dissection and demonstration of representative chordates. 

401. Cell Physiology. 4:2:4. First semester. 

A molecular approach to the study of the organization and function of the cell. 
For senior or junior majors who have completed at least two years of chemistry, 
or by permission of the instructor. 

402. Invertebrate Zoology. 4:2:4. Second semester. 

Through the use of a systemic approach, the morphology and physiology of repre- 
sentatives of most of the invertebrate phyla are studied. This approach centers around 
the following areas: movement, metabolism, information and control, reproduction, and 
association between animals. 

403. Ecology. 4:2:4. First semester. 

The fundamental concepts of ecology are examined with emphasis placed on the 
interaction between organisms and their biological and physical environment in selected 
ecosystems — freshwater, marine, and terrestrial. Field trips will be taken to selected 
areas. Laboratory work will be conducted on problems associated with various types 
of ecosystems. 

Prerequisites: Biology 112 or permission of the instructor. 

411/412. Biology Seminar I, II. 1:1:0 per semester. 

Reading, discussions, and reports on special topics in biology. 

451/452. Special Problems I, II. 1:0:3 — 3:0:9 per semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 

Designed for those students who have had most of the courses required for their 

major but who may have a special need for experience in fields not listed in the 

course offerings of the department. Students interested in a course in marine biology 

should elect Biology 451/452 in their senior year. 

Prerequisite: Permission of staff. 

500. Independent Study. 1:0:3 — 3:0;9 per semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
Limited to students majoring in biology who have had ample courses in the 
department and whose records indicate that they can be encouraged to take part 
in research or can work independently on research problems in which they have 
a special interest. Biology 500 may lead to Departmental Honors for qualified students. 
See page 45 for information on the Departmental Honors Program. 
Prerequisite: Permission of staff. 

46 



CHEMISTRY 

Professor Neidig, Chairman; Professor Lockwood; Associate Professor 
Spencer; Assistant Professors Bailey, Bell, and Moe 

The aims of the department are: (1) to provide students majoring in 
chemistry rigorous training in the principles and applications of modern 
chemistry; (2) to provide students interested in the teaching profession an 
opportunity to become acquainted with the teaching of science; and (3) to 
offer students interested in advanced study or in industrial employment 
professional training in chemistry. 

Major: Chemistry 111, 112, 213, 214, 216, 311, 312, 314, 315, 
316, 319, 320 and 4 hours of 500; Math 161, 162. 

B.S. in Chemistry (certified by the American Chemical Society): 
Chemistry 111, 112, 213, 214, 216, 311, 312, 314, 315, 316, 319, 320, 
411,412, 413, 414 and 4 hours of 500; Math 161, 162. 

For outline of program leading to the degree of B.S. in Chemistry, 
see pages 95-96. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Juniors and seniors may participate in the departmental honors pro- 
gram if they have demonstrated a high scholastic ability and proficiency 
in both experimental and theoretical chemistry. To be recommended for 
departmental honors, a student is required: (1) to submit a thesis based 
on extensive laboratory investigation of an original problem; and (2) to 
defend the thesis before an appropriate examining committee. 

111,112. Principles of Chemistry I, II. 4:3:3 per semester. 

A systematic study of the fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry. 

213. Introductory Organic Chemistry. 4:3:4. First semester. 

An introduction to the structure, nomenclature, and properties of the major 
classes of organic compounds. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 112. 

214. Organic Chemistry. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A study of the preparation, properties, and uses of the aliphatic and aromatic 
compounds with emphasis on the principles and reaction mechanisms describing their 
behavior. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 213. 

Corequisite: Chemistry 216. 

216. Laboratory Investigations III. 1:0:4 or 2:0:8. Second semester. 

Investigations of methods of synthesis and analysis of organic compounds includ- 
ing some physical-organic studies. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 213. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 214. 

311,312. Physical Chemistry I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A course in the physical theories of matter and their applications to systems of 
variable composition. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 214 and Mathematics 162. 

47 



314. Instrumental Analysis. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A consideration of the use of instrumental analytical methods including spectro- 
photometric, electroanalytical, coulometry, and polarography. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 311 and 319. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 312. 

315,316. Laboratory Investigations I, II. 1:0:4 per semester. 

Use of instrumental techniques for investigating chemical systems. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 214. 
Corequisites: Chemistry 311, 312. 

319. Chemical Equilibria. 4:3:4. First semester. 

An investigation of chemical systems involving a study of reaction kinetics and 
equilibria, emphasizing the reaction of ionic substances and using modern analytical 
methods. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 214. 

320. Laboratory Investigations IV. 1:0:4. Either semester. 

Physical-chemical investigations of chemical systems. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 311 or 312. 

411,412. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

An advanced course applying theoretical principles to the understanding of the 
descriptive chemistry of the elements. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 312. 

413. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of advanced topics in analytical chemistry. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 312 and Chemistry 314. 

414. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A consideration of the structure of organic compounds and the mechanisms of 
homogeneous organic reactions. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 214, Chemistry 216, and Chemistry 312. 

421,422. Biochemistry I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A course in the physical and organic aspects of living systems. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 214, and Chemistry 216. 

425. Qualitative Organic Analysis. 2:0:8. First semester. 

Presentation of the principles and methods of organic analysis. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 214, and Chemistry 216. 

426. Advanced Physical Chemistry. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A presentation of advanced topics in chemistry from such areas as quantum 
mechanics, thermodynamics, and kinetics. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 312. 

427. Clinical Chemistry. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of the chemical properties, pathological significance, and experimental 
determinations of clinically important metabolities. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 213, 214, 216, 312, 314, and 316. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 421. 

430. Laboratory Investigations V. 1:0:4. Either semester. 

Investigations of the properties of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 214, and Chemistry 216. 

43 1 , 432. Clinical Chemistry Seminar I, II. 1:1:0 per semester. 

A discussion of topics relevant to the applications of chemistry in a clinical 

laboratory. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Chemistry 427. 

48 



440. Laboratory Investigations VI. 4:0:ia Either semes ter. 

Investigations of clinical chemical procedures, methodology, and instrumentation. 

Work to be carried out in a hospital laboratory. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Chemistry 427 and approval of the departmental 

chairman. 

500. Independent Study. 2:0:8 or 3:0:12 per semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit, for students enrolled 

in the departmental honors program.) 

Intensive library and laboratory study of special interest to advanced students 

in the major areas of chemistry. For students preparing for secondary school teaching, 

the emphasis is placed on methods of teaching chemistry. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 311, 312, and the consent of the chairman of the de- 
partment. 

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 

Professor Mayer 

110. BASIC Computer Language. 0:1:0. Either semester. 

Introduction to the BASIC Language. 



ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

Assistant Professor Buffenmycr, Chairman; Professor Tom; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Knight and Warner; Instructor O'Neill 

The aim of Lebanon Valley College is to give its students the oppor- 
tunity to procure a liberal education of the highest quality. Thus within 
this general objective of the college, the program of study in economics 
and business administration at Lebanon Valley College is designed to 
provide for its own major: 

1. A broad and liberal education so that graduates of this department 
will play a more active role in our changing world of ideas and ac- 
tions; and 

2. A sound and integrated knowledge of the essential principles and 
problems of business administration, accounting, and economics. 

Major: Accounting 151; Business Administration 100, 180; Econom- 
ics 110, 120, 201, 221; BA 490 or EC 490; and 6 additional hours of de- 
partmental courses; Math 170. 

For an outline of the suggested program in economics and business 
administration, see pages 96-97. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

The purpose of the departmental honors program is to provide op- 
portunity for capable students to undertake advanced academic work in- 
dependently under the supervision of one or more members of the de- 
partment. 

49 



In order to participate in the departmental honors program, the ap- 
plicant is required to: 

1. demonstrate in his academic work the caliber of scholarship required 
to undertake extensive research projects, 

2. apply for and receive permission for such participation from the de- 
partmental chairman and from the dean of the college no later than 
the end of the first semester of the junior year, 

3. obtain departmental approval of a research project, 

4. prepare a paper on the research project under the guidance of one or 
more staff members of the department, 

5. submit the paper in March of the senior year, and 

6. present and defend the paper before a faculty committee selected by 
the departmental chairman and the dean of the college. 

On the basis of the student's performance in this program, the de- 
partmental chairman and the dean of the college will determine whether 
or not the student will be graduated with departmental honors. 

ACCOUNTING 

151. Principles of Financial Accounting. 4:3:2. First semester. 

A beginning course in accounting. Common business transactions are recorded in 
various journals and summarized in general and subsidiary ledgers. The effects of 
these transactions are reported in classified financial statements. 

152. Principles of Managerial Accounting. 4:3:2. Second semester. 

Emphasis is placed on the accumulation and analysis of financial data for man- 
agement purposes. 

Prerequisite: Accounting 151. 

251. Intermediate Accounting I. 3:3:0. First semester. 

An advanced course in accounting principles stressing statement presentation 
and valuation problems in presenting assets, liabilities, and stockholder's equity on 
the statements. 

Prerequisite: Accounting 152. 

252. Intermediate Accounting II. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Emphasis is placed on the analysis of financial statements, effects of error on 
statements, preparation of funds flow statements, and price level adjustments. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 251. 

351. Advanced Accounting. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

Includes a study of partnerships, installment sales, consignment sales, home 
branch office relationships, business combinations, special problems of consolidations, 
foreign subsidiaries and branches, and fiduciary accounting. 

Prerequisite: Accounting 252. 

451. Advanced Cost and Managerial Accounting. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Emphasis is placed on costing for planning and control, including cost-volume- 
profit analysis, budgeting, capital budgeting, inventory control, standard costing, and 
the concept of relevant costs. 

Prerequisites: Accounting 152 and Economics 201. 

452. Income Tax Accounting. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Analysis of the federal income tax law and its applications to individuals, partner- 
ships, fiduciaries, corporations; case problems, preparation of returns. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 152, or consent of instructor. 

50 



455. Auditing. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

Involves a study of professional ethics and legal responsibilities of public accoun- 
tants, generally accepted accounting principles, and auditing procedures. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 252. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

100. Introduction to Business. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

An orientation to the nature and environment of business, its structure, organ- 
ization, functions and opportunities. Provides an integrated framework for further 
study in accounting, finance, marketing, and management. 

180. Principles of Management. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

A study of the process of utilizing and coordinating all available resources in or- 
der to achieve the objeciives of a business, governmental, educational, social, or re- 
ligious organization. Includes discussions and cases on decision-making, planning, or- 
ganizing, staffing, motivation, leadership, control, and communication. 

3G1. Corporation Finance. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of financial management covering analysis of asset, liability and capital 
relationships and operations; management of current assets, working capital, cash, liquid 
assets, receivables, inventory; capital planning and budgeting; capital structure and 
dividend policy; short and intermediate term financing; long term financing, external 
and internal; mergers and acquisitions; multinational operations; and corporate failures 
and liquidation. 

Prerequisite: Accounting 152. 

362. Investments. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Development and role of investment and its relation to other economic, legal, 
and social institutions. Includes discussion on investment principles, machinery, policy, 
and management; types of investment; and the development of portfolios for indi- 
viduals and institutions. 

Prerequisite: Business Administration 361. 

371/372. Business Law I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

Elementary principles of law as they relate to the field of business. Contracts, 
agency, employment, commercial paper, personal property, sales, security devices, in- 
surance, partnerships., corporation, real estate, estates, bankruptcy, and government 
regulations are discussed. 
382. Marketing. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A study of the marketing system within an economy in terms of an efficient use 
of resources and the distribution from producers to consumers according to the ob- 
jectives of the society; performance of business activities to direct the flow of goods and 
services to satisfy customer needs. Includes market research, product development, pack- 
aging, distribution, promotional activities, sales management, and price policy. To 
bridge the gap between the understanding and the application of marketing principles, 
students are required to prepare and discuss a number of cases pertaining to some 
specific areas of marketing. 

Prerequisites: Economics 201 and Business Administration 180. 

390. Internship. 3 " 9 hours credit. Either semester. 

Field experience in a business, government or other organization in some area of 
economics, business administration, or accounting. Ordinarily, a few juniors will be 
chosen for the available internships by the department faculty in open competition. 

490. Seminar and Special Problems. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
Reading, discussion, and research in business administration or accounting under 
the direction and supervision of the departmental stall. 

Prerequisite: Business Administration 180, 361 or Accounting 351. 

51 



500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
A course designed for students in the departmental honors program and other 
qualified students who wish to undertake independent study in a specific area of 
business administration or accounting. 

ECONOMICS 

Economics 110 and 120 are prerequisites for all courses of a higher number in 
this section. 

110. Principles of Economics I. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

An introductory study in economic principles and the American economy with 
emphasis on the elementary concepts of national income, price level, business fluctua- 
tions, banking activities, money supply, and economic growth. 

120. Principles of Economics II. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

An introductory study in economic principles and the American economy with 
emphasis on the elementary concepts of consumption function, production function, 
product pricing, factor pricing, resource allocation, labor economics, public finance, and 
international economics. 

130. Economics of Public Issues. 3:3:0. Either semester. (Not offered 1976-1977) 

A survey and economic analysis of public issues. 

201. Microeconomic Analysis. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Economic decision-making of firms and resource allocation of an economy. A core 
course studying tools of analysis for students in economics, business, accounting, and re- 
lated areas or disciplines. 

202. Macroeconomic Analysis. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Theoretical and empirical study of national income and business cycles. 

221. Quantitative Methods. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Development and application of mathematical concepts and statistical methods 
to the analysis of theory, and the resolution of problems, in economics and business 
administration. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 170. 

301. Labor Economics and Industrial Relations. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

Theoretical analysis of labor market functioning, including impact of unionism, 
government policy, demographic trends, etc.; human capital theory; measurement of 
the labor force and data sources; history of the American labor movement; U.S. legis- 
lation affecting industrial relations; collective bargaining process and the system of 
industrial jurisprudence. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201 or permission of the instructor. 

311. Money and Banking. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

Nature and functions of money and credit. Development and role of commercial 
banking and central banking. Structure and functions of the Federal Reserve System. 
Monetary and banking theory, policy, and practice. Influence on prices, level of income 
and employment, and economic stability and progress. 

322. Public Finance. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

Revenues and expenditures and economic functioning of the federal, state, and 
local governments; principles of taxation — shifting, incidence, and burden; influence on 
incentives, income distribution, and resource allocation; economic and social aspects of 
public spending; budgetary control and debt management; fiscal policy and economic 
stability. 

332. International Economics. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A study of theories and empirical analysis of international trade; capital move- 
ment; mechanism for attaining equilibrium; economic policies such as tariff, quota, 

52 



monetary standards and exchange rate, state trading, cartel, and other international 
economic agreements. 

401. History of Economic Thought. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

The evolution of economic thought through the principal schools from mercan- 
tilism to the present. Attention will be given to the analysis of the various theories of 
value, wages, interest, rent, profit, price level, business cycles, and employment, and to 
the influences of earlier economic ideas upon current thinking and policy-making. 

411. Economic Growth and Development. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

Analysis of classical and modern theories and models of economic growth; study 
of theory and implications of alternative development policies. 
Prerequisite: Economics 221. 

490. Seminar and Special Problems. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
Reading, discussion, and research in economics under the direction and super- 
vision of the departmental staff. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201 or 202. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
A course designed for students in the departmental honors program and other 
qualified students who wish to undertake independent study in a specific area of 
economics. 

EDUCATION 

Professor Ebersole, Chairman; Associate Professor Herr; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Albrecht, Jacques, and Petrofes; Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Knight; Instructor Rogers 

The aim of the department of education is to acquaint students with 
the art of teaching and to develop in each prospective teacher a full reali- 
zation of his responsibilities in this profession. 

For a statement of requirements for those planning to enter the 
teaching profession, see pages 97 and 101-103. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Major: Elementary Education 220, 270, 332, 341, 344, 361/362, 440, 
444; Art 401; Education 342; Geography 111; Psychology 321. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

The departmental honors program in elementary education permits 
the capable student to increase the depth of his understanding in an area 
of special interest and the general scope of his knowledge of elementary 
education. It is planned as an integral part of the student's major program 
rather than work superimposed upon it. 

A student majoring in elementary education may participate in the 
departmental honors program when he completes the freshman-sopho- 
more college honors program or when he demonstrates in his academic 
work the caliber of scholarship required to undertake an extensive re- 
search project. He must also have achieved a 3.3 grade-point average 
in departmental courses and a 3.0 grade-point average in all college 
courses. Application is made in writing to the chairman of the depart- 

53 



ment not later than the end of the first semester of the junior year. Ap- 
proval of the application must be given by the dean of the college upon 
recommendation by the department staff. 

A maximum of nine credit hours may be earned in this program. 
These hours will be distributed over the junior and senior years with a 
minimum of one and a maximum of three hours to be taken in one semes- 
ter. This must include participation in the Senior Seminar, Elementary 
Education 444, which is required of all students majoring in elementary 
education. The student will investigate an area of special interest begin- 
ning with the study of the literature and culminating in the design and 
execution of an approved experimental or theoretical research project. 
He will submit to the departmental chairman periodic progress reports 
and any other indication of performance that may be required by the 
department. The project should be completed by March of the senior 
year, at which time the student will report and defend the findings of the 
project in a manner to be determined by the departmental staff. 

Graduation with departmental honors in elementary education will 
depend on the quality of performance in the research project, the main- 
tenance of the grade-point averages required for admission to the pro- 
gram, success in the comprehensive student-teaching program, and the 
final approval of the departmental staff and the dean of the college. 

EDUCATION COURSES 

for both Elementary and Secondary Education 

110. Social Foundations of Education. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

A study is made of the social, historical and philosophical foundations of educa- 
tion correlated with a survey of the principles and theories of noted educational lead- 
ers. Emphasis is placed on the influence of these leaders and their followers have had 
on school and society. 

331. Educational Measurements. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of the principles of validity and reliability, appraisal and construction of 
test items and consideration of the uses of test results. 

Recommended elective in elementary and secondarv fields. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 

342. Reading Improvement. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

An advanced course in reading giving special attention to diagnosis, readiness, 
correction, and remediation in reading. Attention will be focused on current research 
findings. Instruments and guidelines for effective diagostic teaching will be examined 
and evaluated. 

Open only to junior or senior students enrolled in the elementary and secondary 
programs. 

346. Educational Technology and Instructional Media. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

The course examines some of the psychological bases of technological teaching 
devices and media, and includes the study and appraisal of various kinds of media and 
equipment. Applications and uses are explored. Instruction and experience in the 
planning and production of media as well as practice in the setting up and operation 
of certain pieces of technological teaching equipment are also offered. 

Field trips are taken to functioning public school instructional materials centers 
and some discission is devoted to how to establish and operate an instructional media 
center. 

54 



423. An Introduction to Guidance. 3:3:(K First seme ster. 

An overview of guidance in the public schools including the history, philosophy, 
and development of programs. Procedures and instruments to be employed by the class- 
room teacher; creation of conditions for mental health; relation of guidance to othei 
phases of instruction. 

Prerequisite: Education 110. 

442. The Education of the Exceptional Child. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A general view of the practices and programs for the education of exceptional 
children and youth. The study includes children with physical, mental, and emotional 
handicaps, and gifted children. Field work in special classes, child study, and the 
survey of curricular materials used in their education are part of the requirements. 

Prerequisites: Education 110; Psychology 110. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

220. Music in the Elementary School. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

Fundamentals of music, varied approaches for developing conceptual learning, 
movement, playing classroom instruments, introduction to Orff and Kodaly techniques, 
creative applications, guided listening, the child voice, materials for use in elementary 
schools, interest centers. 

250. Mathematics for the Elementary Grades. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of mathematics and a survey of the 
new and old in mathematical disciplines as applied in the elementary school. 

270. Children's Literature. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

A study of the literature of childhood, including authors and illustrators. Atten- 
tion is given to children's reading interests, criteria and aids in selecting materials, a 
brief survey of the development of children's literature, and the art of storytelling and 
its place in the curriculum. 

332. The Physical Sciences in the Elementary School. 3:2:2. Second semester. 

Recent developments in arithmetic and science and their applications in the class- 
room; curriculum planning; modern teaching methods; instructional materials; demon- 
strations and experiments adapted to the elementary classroom. 

Prerequisites: Elementary Education 250 and one year of a laboratory science. 

341. Teaching of Reading. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of the problems and procedures of instruction in the development of 
basic reading skills. Effective reading programs, courses of study, teaching and learning 
materials, and research studies in this field are investigated and evaluated. 

Prerequisite. Elementary Education 270. 

344. Health and Safety Education. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

The course includes a study of basic health and safety practices and procedures as 
applied to the elementary school, a program of physical education for elementary school 
children, an American Red Cross-approved program of first aid, and an evaluation of 
sources and use of materials. 

Prerequisites: Education 110; Psychology 220. 

361/362. Communications and Group Processes in the Elementary School, I, II. 

3:2:2 per semester. 

A course dealing with fundamentals for language growth in the areas of oral and 
written expression, correct usage, spelling, and handwriting. The development of basic 
concepts related to effective citizenship in a democracy. A variety of learning experi- 
ences and materials will be used and evaluated; especially, students will have experience 
in preparing an individual resource unit. 

55 



440. Student Teaching. Twelve semester hours credit. First semester. 

Each student spends an entire semester in a classroom of an area public school 
under the supervision of a carefully selected cooperating teacher. Open to seniors only. 
A cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 during the first six semesters in college is re- 
quired. 

Student teaching begins with the opening of the public schools. College residence 
halls and dining hall are available to the student teachers. 

Prerequisites: Education 110; Psychology 220; Elementary Education 270, 332, 341, 
and 361/362. 

444. Senior Seminar. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

The semester gives immediate help with pertinent problems in student teaching. 
Topics related to over-all success in teaching will be thoroughly dealt with: professional 
ethics, classroom management, home and school relationships, community responsibili- 
ties, professional standards, and other related areas. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
A course designed for the student who desires to engage in independent study 
whether enrolled in the departmental honors program or not. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

420. Human Growth and Development. 3:7Vi:0. Either semester. 

This course deals with the practical application of principles of psychology and 
human learning to secondary school teaching. Such topics as classroom management, 
inter-personal relations in the school setting, and the psychology of teaching are dis- 
cussed and studied. 

Required of all seniors in secondary education. 

Prerequisite: Education 110. 

430. Practicum and Methods. 3:7Vi:0. Either semester. 

This course is designed to acquaint the students with some basic behaviors in the 
classroom that will help the prospective teacher in any subject area. A text serves as a 
source of information about "methods of teaching" and planning. Students work inde- 
pendently on the problems related to their major areas and teaching reading in their 
particular fields. Visits to the area schools, class presentations by teachers from these 
schools, and the students' vidio-taped presentations for their own analysis all help to 
prepare them for the student teaching experience. 

This course is required of all seniors in secondary education, except English 
majors who will take English 431. 

Prerequisite: Education 110. 

440. Student Teaching. Nine semester hours credit. Either semester. 

Each student spends one semester in a classroom at an area school under the 
supervision of a carefully selected cooperating teacher. Open to seniors only. Re- 
quirements are: (1) a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 during the first six semes- 
ters in college, (2) the written recommendation of the major adviser, (3) the ap- 
proval of the director of secondary student teaching, and (4) the approval of the dean 
of the college. 

Prerequisites: Education 110, 420; Education 430 or English 431. 



ENGLISH 

Professor Ford, Chairman; Professor Faber; Professor Emeritus Struble; 
Associate Professors O'Donnell, Kearney, and Woods; Assistant Profes- 
sors Billings, Kir by, and Markoivicz 

Major: In addition to the required courses in English Composition 
56 



(English 111/112), English majors will take English 221/222 225/226 
227/228, 321/322, 331, 332, and 444. Prospective secondary school teachers 
will take English 218 and 334; others will take six hours of electives. 
English 431 replaces Education 430 as a requirement for secondary 
teachers. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Students who are majoring in English may become candidates for de- 
partmental honors if they have a grade-point average of 3.0 in courses in 
English, and if they receive permission from the chairman of the depart- 
ment and the dean of the college, ordinarily no later than the end of the 
first semester of their junior year. 

The specific program for each student accepted for the departmental 
honors program will be worked out by that student in consultation with 
the chairman of the department. 

INTERN PROGRAM 

A senior who has been accepted for departmental honors and who 
looks forward to a career in college teaching may, upon recommendation 
of the chairman of the department and appointment by the dean of the 
college, become an intern in English, to render such assistance in the 
duties of the department of English as will in some measure help to pre- 
pare him for a professional career in this field. Ordinarily only one intern 
will be appointed in any one academic year. 

111/112. English Composition I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

The first semester examines the principle of composition; supplemented by stu- 
dent papers. The second semester examines the various genres of literature. 

211/212. Word Study I, II. 1:1:0 per semester. 

This course has a twofold purpose: (1) to give the student some insight into lin- 
guistic processes, particularly as they pertain to the growth of the English vocabulary; 
and (2) to increase the range of the student's vocabulary, in order that he may have 
greater mastery over his native tongue. Problems of pronunciation and spelling go 
hand in hand with vocabulary building. 

218. Oral Communication. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

This course is designed to establish basic concepts, understandings, and attitudes 
concerning the nature and importance of oral communication and to provide experi- 
ence in speaking and in competent criticism of these activities. 

221/222. American Literature I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

First semester: a survey of American literature from the beginnings to the Civil War. 
Second semester: a survey of American literature from the Civil War to the pres- 
ent day. 

223. Creative Writing. 3:3:0. First semester. 

The writing of poetry and the writing of fiction in alternate years. 

225/226. Survey of English Literature I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A study of English literature from the beginnings to our own time, viewed in per- 
spective against the background of English life and thought. 
Prerequisites: English 111/112. 

57 



227/228. World Literature I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

This course has four principal aims: (1) to familiarize students with some of those 
masterpieces of Western world literature which are a part of the common heritage of 
every cultivated mind; (2) to acquaint students with the conventions, techniques, and 
presuppositions of various types of literature, so that they may be able to deal intelli- 
gently with these types when they meet them elsewhere; (3) to provide students with 
genuinely aesthetic experiences, in the hope that reading and the appreciation of liter- 
ature will continue to enrich their spirits throughout their lives; and (4) to pass on to 
them some sense of the underlying values of our cultural system. 

229. Contemporary Literature. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of selected prose and poetry produced in America and England since 
World War I. 

321/322. Shakespeare I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A survey of English drama from its beginnings to and including Shakespeare: (a) 
a study of Shakespeare's history plays and their place in the Elizabethan world, and an 
analysis of early Shakespearean comedy; (b) a study of Shakespeare's major tragedies, 
the problem comedies, and the late romantic comedies. 

Prerequisites: English 225/226 or 227/228 or consent of the instructor. 

331. History of the English Language. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Historical study of English sounds, grammatical forms, and vocabulary; introduc- 
tion to structural linguistics; standards of correctness and current usage. 
Prerequisites: English 225/226 or 227/228 or consent of the instructor. 

332. Chaucer. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Intended to give the student a reasonable familiarity with Chaucer; to provide a 
detailed picture of medieval life, culture, and thought; and to develop skill in the read- 
ing of Middle English. 

Prerequisite: English 331. 

334. Modern Grammars. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A review of traditional grammar and an introduction to recent concepts in gram- 
mar resulting from developments in structural linguistics. 
Prerequisite: English 331. 

335. Seventeenth Century Literature. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1975-1976. 

A study of seventeenth century prose and poetry within the context of seventeenth 
century thought. Authors from the late Elizabethans up to and including Milton are 
studied. 

336. Poetry of the Romantic Movement. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A study of the principal poets of the early nineteenth century: Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

Prerequisites: English 225/226 or 227/228 or consent of the instructor. 

337. The Novel. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1975-1976. 

A study of the development of the novel in England from Richardson to Joyce. 

338. Contemporary Drama. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A survey-workshop of Continental, British, and American drama from Ibsen to the 
present. 

Prerequisites: English 111/112. 

339. History of the Theater. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A selection of Western and some Oriental dramas from Aeschylus to Ibsen pre- 
sented historically, with attention to theater modes and techniques. 
Prerequisites: English 111/112 or consent of the instructor. 

341. Eighteenth Century Literature. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A survey of the principal English authors from Dryden to Blake. 

58 



343. Literature of the Victorian Period. 3:3:(X Rrst semester 

Survey of the nineteenth century as seen through the literature and other arts pro- 
duced from 1830 to 1915. r 
Prerequisites: English 225/226 or 227/228 or consent of the instructor. 

344. Theater Workshop. 3:3:0 SecQnd semester 
The elements of theater art oriented toward stage presentation, with classroom 

practice in production of scenes and whole plays. 

Prerequisite: English 339 or consent of the instructor. 

431. The Teaching of English in Secondary Schools. 3:3: 0. First semester. 

Concerned primarily with the role of the English teacher in the secondary schools! 
Attention may be given to the teaching of composition, mechanics, speech, and literary 
forms. Sessions on recent research in the field of English, resource materials, mass 
media, and teaching techniques will be included. 

440. Special Problems. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

Offered according to interest of students and staff. This course will rotate among 
faculty members, the content of the course to be determined by the instructor with the 
advice of the department and consent of the chairman and the dean of the college. 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

444. Seminar in English. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

This capstone course for English majors varies in content depending on the in- 
terests of the instructor. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
For the student who desires to engage in a project of independent work whether 
enrolled in the departmental honors program or not. 
Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Associate Professor Cooper, Acting Chairman; Professor Piel; Professor 
Damus; Assistant Professor Cantrell, Albrecht, Markowicz, Martin, 
McNerney, and Nowicki; Adjunct Instructors Garman and Say lor 

The study of modern foreign languages has a two-fold aim. The first 
is to develop fluency in the skills — speaking, oral comprehension, reading 
and writing — which will enable the student to communicate effectively. 
The second is to provide a knowledge and appreciation of the literature, 
civilization and cultural heritage of the people whose language is studied. 

Recognizing the importance of foreign language study to internation- 
al understanding and world peace and the value of language literacy 
within the framework of liberal education, the department prepares the 
language major for a career in many crucial and challenging fields: 
teaching, diplomatic and government service, foreign trade, business and 
industry. 

Since knowledge of a foreign language alone is often insufficient for 
many of these careers, the language major should, where appropriate, 
combine knowledge of foreign languages with work in other disciplines in 
the Humanities and Social Sciences. 

59 



Major: A student may elect either a major in one language or a de- 
partmental major, which requires two languages. The major in one lan- 
guage requires 24 hours above the elementary level in that language; the 
departmental major requires the same plus at least 12 hours above the 
elementary level in another language. A major in one language with cer- 
tification to teach requires 2 additional hours. In all cases the general col- 
lege requirement of completing a foreign language at the intermediate 
level must be fulfilled in still another language. 

In French, German, and Spanish, at least one advanced course is of- 
fered each semester. It is hoped to increase the number and variety of the 
advanced courses offered. All courses are taught in the language studied 
(audio-lingual method) with the exception of Greek, Latin, and Scien- 
tific German. 

The department strongly recommends that all language majors study 
abroad in the junior year in the country of their major language. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Students who are majoring in foreign languages may become can- 
didates for departmental honors if they have a grade-point average of 3.0 
in departmental courses, and if they receive permission from the depart- 
mental staff and the dean of the college, ordinarily no later than the end 
of the first semester of their junior year. 

Honors work will involve the selection of a topic for investigation 
under the guidance of the department adviser, independent reading and 
study, frequent conferences with the adviser, preparation of a paper to be 
submitted by March 15 of the senior year, satisfactory defense of the paper 
before a committee composed of the departmental staff, the dean of the 
college, and any other faculty members who may be invited to participate, 
and, finally, an oral examination in the language of major concentration. 
If these requirements are satisfied, the student will be graduated with 
honors in his major language. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

315H/316H. Contemporary European Literature I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

Reading, in translation, of selected works by Hesse, Sartre, Camus, Brecht, Kazan- 
tzakis, Solzhenitsyn, and others. Designed to familiarize students with important authors 
and trends in contemporary European literature. 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. 

French 

101, 102. Elementary French I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A beginning course in French; audio-active technique. 

111,112. Intermediate French I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A continuation of French 102 with further practice in conversation, dictation, and 
in reading and writing. Attention is given to the cultural and historical background of 
the literature that is read. 

Prerequisite: French 102 or two years of secondary school French. 

60 



115, 116. Introduction to French Literature I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A general language review with intensive practice in the four basic language skills 
through a study of selected literary works in their cultural and historic contexts. 

Prerequisite: four years of secondary school language or three years for specially 
qualified students; or French 112. 

215. French Culture. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of modern France with special attention to those qualities and char- 
acteristics which are uniquely French. Intended both to provide a useful background 
for the study of French literature and to prepare students to spend the junior year 
in France. Taught entirely in French. 

Prerequisite: four years of secondary school language or three years for specially 
qualified students or French 112. 

221. French Literature of the Middle Ages. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1978-1979. 

A study of the masterpieces of the Medieval French Literature in the context of 
the social and intellectual climate in which they were produced. 
Prerequisite: French 116 or equivalent. 

222. French Literature of the Renaissance. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1978-1979. 

A study of the major works of the French Renaissance as a literary reflection of 
the tremendous vitality and progress achieved in all sectors of society. 
Prerequisite: French 116 or equivalent. 

331. French Literature of the Age of Louis XIV. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A study of the major authors of this apogee of French civilization, and how the 
particular social structure and institutions of the time influenced these authors. 
Prerequisite: French 116 or equivalent. 

332. French Literature of the Enlightenment. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A study of the main literary and philosophical currents, with particular attention 
to their influence ov> the French and American Revolutions. 
Prerequisite: French 116 or equivalent. 

441. The Modern Novel in France. 3:3:0. First Semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A study of the ?:odern French novel. 
Prerequisite: Frew;'" 116 or equivalent. 

442. Modern Drama and Poetry of France 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A study of modern drama and poetry of France. 
Prerequisite: French 116 or equivalent. 

445/446. Seminar I, II. 1-3 hours credit per semester. 

This seminar is designed to supplement and integrate the student's knowledge, to 
stimulate individual study and research, and to prepare him for future work in his 
field. The course content varies according to the needs of the group involved. For those 
students who are planning to teach, the seminar will provide instruction in teaching 
methods. 

Prerequisite: French 116 or equivalent. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
This course is designed for the student who wishes to engage in independent study 
whether enrolled in the departmental honors program or not. 
Prerequisite: French 116 or equivalent. 

German 

101, 102. Elementary German I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A beginning course in German; audio-active technique. 

61 



111,112. Intermediate German I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A continuation of German 102 Avith practice in conversation, dictation, reading 
and writing. Emphasis is given to the cultural and historical background of the litera- 
ture that is read. 

Prerequisite: German 102 or two years of secondary school German. 

113,114. Scientific German I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

Practice in reading scientific and technical German with emphasis on vocabulary 
and the special difficulties inherent in this type of writing. General readings followed 
by readings in the student's major field. 

115, 116. Introduction to German Literature I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A general language review with intensive practice in the four basic language skills 
through a study of selected literary works in their cultural and historic contexts. 

Prerequisite: four years of secondary school language or three years for specially 
qualified students; or German 112. 

215. German Culture. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of modern Germany with special attention to those qualities, character- 
istics and traditions which are uniquely German. Intended to provide a useful back- 
ground for the study of German literature and as a preparation for the junior year 
abroad. Taught entirely in German. 

Prerequisite: Four years of secondary school language or three years for specially 
qualified students; or German 112. 

221. German Literature from the Beginnings to 1750 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1978-1979. 

Survey of German literature of the Medieval, Renaissance, Reformation and 
Baroque periods. 

Prerequisite: German 116 or equivalent. 

222. The Classical Period. 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1978-1979. 

Background of the Classical Period; detailed study of the period; readings from 
the works of Lessing, Goethe and Schiller. 

Prerequisite: German 116 or equivalent. 

331/332. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century I, II. 

3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

Romanticism; Realism. 

Prerequisite: German 116 or equivalent. 

441/442. German Literature of the Twentieth Century I, II. 

3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A study of contemporary German literature with extensive reading of the works of 
the outstanding authors. 

Prerequisite: German 116 or equivalent. 

445/446. Seminar I, II. 1-3 credit hours per semester. 

This seminar is designed to supplement and integrate the student's knowledge, to 
stimulate individual study and research, and to prepare him for future work in his 
field. The course content varies according to the needs of the group involved. For those 
students who are planning to teach, the seminar will provide instruction in teaching 
methods. 

Prerequisite: German 116 or equivalent. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
This course is designed for the student who wishes to engage in independent 
study whether enrolled in the departmental honors program or not. 
Prerequisite: German 116 or equivalent. 

62 



Greek 

101, 102. Elementary Greek I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

An intensive course in the basic elements of ancient Greek. A study of forms and 
syntax, with easy prose composition. 

211, 212. Intermediate Greek I, II 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

First semester: readings from the New Testament Gospels. 

Second semester: readings from Xenophon's Anabasis. A review of grammar 
throughout the year. 

Prerequisite: Greek 102. 

321. Readings from the Book of Acts. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 
Prerequisite: Greek 212. 

322. Readings in Hellenistic Greek. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

Selections from the Septuagint, the Greek church fathers. 
Prerequisite: Greek 212. 

431. Readings from the Epistles of Paul. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

Prerequisite: Greek 212. 

432. Readings from the Greek Philosophers. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

Prerequisite: Greek 212. 

Latin 

101. Elementary Latin I. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A beginning course covering the basic grammar and syntax, with some reading 
of ancient writers. 

102. Elementary Latin II. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A review of Latin grammar and syntax via translation of English to Latin; and, 
reading of Latin prose selections including Cicero. 
Prerequisite: Latin 101 or equivalent. 

Ill, 112. Intermediate Latin. 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

Review of forms and syntax and readings of selections from prose works such as 
Cicero's Essays. 

Prerequisite: Latin 102, or two years of secondary school Latin. 

Russian 

101,102. Elementary Russian I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

Offered only in Auxiliary Schools 
An elementary course. 

111,112. Intermediate Russian I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

Offered only in Auxiliary Schools 
An intermediate course in Russian with continued reading and translation, and 
conversation. 

Prerequisite: Russian 102 or two years of secondary school Russian. 

Spanish 

101, 102. Elementary Spanish I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A beginning course in Spanish; audio-active technique. 

111,112. Intermediate Spanish I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A continuation of Spanish 102 with further practice in conversation, dictation, 
and in reading and writing. Attention is given to Spanish literature in its cultural and 
historical context. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or two years of secondary school Spanish. 

63 



115, 116. Introduction to Spanish Literature I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A general language review with intensive practice in the four basic language skills 
through a study of selected literary works in their cultural and historic contexts. 

Prerequisite: four years of secondary school language or three years for specially 
qualified students; or Spanish 112. 

215. Hispanic Culture. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of Hispanic culture as found in modern Spain and its reflection in 
American countries and in the Spanish language. Intended both as a useful back- 
ground for the study of literature and as a preparation for the junior year abroad. 
Taught entirely in Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Four years of secondary school language or three years for specially 
qualified students; or Spanish 112. 

221. Spanish literature of the Middle Ages and Early Renaissance 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

Reading of the outstanding works of the period with emphasis on the beginnings 
of the Renaissance in Spain. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 116 or equivalent. 

222. Spanish Literature of the Golden Age. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 
A study of the major works of the Renaissance period in Spain. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 116 or equivalent. 

331. Spanish Literature of the 18th and 19th Centuries. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1978-1979. 

Readings from the Enlightenment in Spain and a study of the major works of 
Romanticism and Realism. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 116 or equivalent. 

332. Spanish Literature of the 20th Century. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1978-1979. 

Starting with the Generation '98 and Modernism, a study of all the movements 
and some of the outstanding works of this century. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 116 or equivalent. 

441. Spanish American Literature to the 20th Century. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

Readings of the representative authors from the Colonial and Independence 
periods of Spanish American literature. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 116 or equivalent. 

442. Spanish American Literature of the 20th Century. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A study of important writers of the early part of the century, with emphasis on 
recent developments in the literature of Spanish America. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 116 or equivalent. 

445/446. Seminar I, II. 1-3 hours credit per semester. 

This seminar is designed to supplement and integrate the student's knowledge, to 
stimulate individual study and research, and to prepare him for future work in his 
field. The course content varies according to the needs of the group involved. For those 
students who are planning to teach, the seminar will provide instruction in teaching 
methods. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 116 or equivalent. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
This course is designed for the student who wishes to engage in independent 
study whether enrolled in the departmental honors program or not. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 116 or equivalent. 

64 



GEOGRAPHY 

Professor Ebersole; Adjunct Assistant Professor Knight 

1 1 1. World Geography I (Physical Geography). 3:3:0. First semester. 

The first course of a two-course sequence required of elementary education majors 
and those who wish to be certified to teach comprehensive social studies in secondary 
school. The course explores the physical aspects of the earth, its place in the solar 
system, earth movements, time, seasons, use of globes and maps, earth's waters, land 
forms, climate, soil types, weather phenomena, and processes which form and change 
the earth's surface. 

112. World Geography II (Regional Cultural Geography). 3:3:0. Second semester. 

This course is recommended for elementary education majors and is required for 
those wishing to be certified in comprehensive social studies. The course examines vari- 
ous countries and regions of the world, relating the geographic features of each to the 
life and culture of the people. Natural resources and economy of each region arc 
studied as well as such facts as states and capitals, population density, food supply, and 
ecological factors. 

GEOLOGY 

221/222. Structural and Historical Geology I, II. 

2:2:0 per semester. (Not offered 1976-1977.) 

The first semester, structural geology, acquaints the student with the forces and 
dynamic agencies by which the earth has been formed and has evolved into its present 
condition. 

The second semester, historical geology, deals with the probable location of land 
and sea areas of each of the various geologic periods, and the development of the 
plants and animals which lived during periods identified by their fossil remains. 

German 

See Foreign Languages, page 61. 

Greek 

See Foreign Languages, page 63. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Gefjen, Chainnan; Professor Fehr; Assistant Professors Joyce 
and Norton 

The aim in the teaching of history is to acquaint the student with 
human behavior in the dimension of past time, in the belief that by thus 
extending the range of his knowledge he may also enlarge the scope of his 
sympathies and become more richly human. 

The aim in the teaching of political science is to acquaint the student 
with the many-sided aspects of government, in the belief that by thus 
enlarging the extent of his knowledge he may expand the scope of his 
understanding and adopt a critical and objective attitude toward the 
problems of modern society. 

The department also prepares students for graduate and law schools 
and for careers in teaching, government, and business. 

65 



HISTORY 

Major: Four one-semester courses in European history as approved 
by the adviser; History 125 and 235/236 or History 126 and 225/226 or 
History 225/226 and 235/236 in American history; one course from among 
History 343, 344, 345, 346; and History 213 and 412. Substitutions may 
be approved by the chairman upon request. 



DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Students majoring in history may participate in the departmental 
honors program when they fulfill the following requirements: (1) dem- 
onstrate in their academic work the caliber of scholarship required to 
undertake an extensive research project; (2) achieve a 3.0 grade-point 
average in departmental courses and a 2.5 grade-point average in all col- 
lege courses; and (3) apply for and receive permission for such participa- 
tion from the departmental chairman and the dean of the college no later 
than the end of the first semester of the junior year. 

The student may work for from one to three semester hours credit 
per semester for a maximum of nine semester hours in the departmental 
honors program. A member of the departmental staff will serve as his 
honors adviser. 

During his participation in the program, the student must (1) sub- 
mit to his honors adviser periodic progress reports; (2) show progress at a 
rate and level indicating that he will complete the program on time and 
at the desired level of achievement; and (3) maintain a 3.0 grade-point 
average in departmental courses and a 2.5 grade-point average in all 
college courses. 

The participant must (1) obtain departmental approval of a research 
topic; (2) prepare an essay on the subject selected for research under the 
guidance of his honors adviser; (3) complete the writing of the essay by 
March 1 of the senior year; and (4) defend the essay in a manner to be 
determined by the departmental staff and the dean of the college. Upon 
fulfilling these requirements, the student will be recommended by the 
departmental chairman to the dean of the college for graduation with 
departmental honors. 

111/112. History of Western Civilization I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

The first semester covers the development of Western European culture in all its 
aspects from its Near Eastern origins to about 1715. The second semester covers its 
evolution during the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. 

125/126. Survey of United States History I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

The first semester covers the development of the United States to 1865, the second 
semester from 1865 to the present. Special emphasis throughout the course is placed 
upon historiographical philosophy and method. 

211. Greek and Roman History. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

An examination of the origins, structure, and values of Greek and Roman societies 
from about 1200 B.C. to about 500 A.D. The Mediterranean nature of these cultures 
and the historians' treatment of them are emphasized. 

66 



212. The Middle Ages. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A study of the emergence of a European society from 500 to 1300. Emphasis is on 
the social and intellectual aspects of medieval life, and the historiographical record is 
analyzed. 

213. Introduction to Historiography. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 19771978 

Theory and practice in the writing of history. The work of selected historians is 
studied and each student conducts and reports upon his own research. Training is 
given in research methods and in the preparation of research reports. 

221. The Renaissance and Reformation: 1300 to 1600. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A study of the beginnings of the modern era, paying particular attention to the 
inter-relationships between its political, social, economic, and intellectual aspects. 

222. The Old Regime: 17th and 18th Centuries. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

An investigation of the impact of modern science and thought upon the devel- 
opment of Western European culture. Particular attention is paid to the nature of 
European society before the era of revolutions. 

224. British History from the Tudors to Victoria. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A survey focused on the British Isles from 1485 to 1837. The cultural evolution of 
the English people is studied with emphasis upon the interplay of political, social, and 
intellectual forces. It is strongly recommended that students take History 111 to estab- 
lish the setting. 

225. American History to 1800. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

An examination is made of all aspects of the development of the United States 
from its European origins to 1800. Historiographical issues, methods, and problems are 
stressed. 

226. American History from 1800 to 1865. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

The developments of nineteenth century American history to the end of the Civil 
War are studied, with special attention to historiographical concerns. 

235. The United States: 1865 to 1900. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

The post-Civil War developments of American history during the nineteenth cen- 
tury are analyzed and interpreted, with emphasis upon historiography. 

236. The United States: 1900 to the Present. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

The twentieth century history of the United States is studied in all its aspects. 
Historiographical interpretation is stressed. 

331. The Era of Revolutions: 1789 to 1870. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A study of the political and economic changes in Europe from 1789 to 1870 and 
the total cultural impact of these changes. 

332. Contemporary Europe: 1870 to the Present. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 
An analysis of the nineteenth century state system, its economic and social bases, 

its ideology, and its evolution through world wars and technological revolutions. 

343. History of Russia. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A survey of Russian history from ancient times to the present, with special atten- 
tion to developments since the seventeenth century. 

344. History of the Far East. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A survey of the development of the cultural institutions of the Far East, with 
emphasis upon the trends since 1500. 

345. History of Latin America. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A survey of the Latin American republics from their colonial beginnings to the 
present time. 

67 



346. Introduction to the History of African Culture. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A survey of African culture from the tenth-century Sudanic origins to the present 
day. Emphasis is on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

349. Select Problems in History. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A course to provide the student with an opportunity to explore in depth a topic of 
special interest. 

Open to junior and senior history majors and to other students by permission of 
the instructor. 

412. Senior Seminar in History. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A review of the student's college program in history, with reading, discussion, and 
writing to serve the following purposes: (1) synthesis of previous course work in his- 
tory; (2) relation of the academic discipline of history to other fields of knowledge; and 
(3) formulation and expression of a personal philosophy of history by each student. 

Open only to senior departmental majors. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 3 semesters.) 
A course designed for students who wish to undertake an independent study 
project in history. Open to all students, subject to the following qualifications: 

Those who do not desire departmental honors are admitted by permission of the 
instructor who agrees to accept supervision of the student's work. 
Students desiring departmental honors must meet the conditions set forth above 
under "Departmental Honors." 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Major: Political Science 111/112, 211, 212, 217, 311, 312, 411, 412, 

413. Substitutions may be approved by the chairman upon request. 
Majors are also required to take History 125 and 235/236 or History 
126 and 225/226. History 225/226 and 235/236 may be taken in place 
of the combination of either with History 125/126. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Students majoring in political science may participate in the depart- 
mental honors program when they fulfill the following requirements: (1) 
demonstrate in their academic work the caliber of scholarship required to 
undertake an extensive research project; (2) achieve a 3.0 grade-point 
average in departmental courses and a 2.5 grade-point average in all col- 
lege courses; and (3) apply for and receive permission for such participa- 
tion from the departmental chairman and the dean of the college no 
later than the end of the first semester of the junior year. 

The student may work for from one to three semester hours credit 
per semester for a maximum of nine semester hours in the departmental 
honors program. A member of the departmental staff will serve as his 
honors adviser. 

During his participation in the program, the student must (1) submit 
to his honors adviser periodic progress reports; (2) show progress at a 
rate and level indicating that he will complete the program on time and 
at the desired level of achievement; and (3) maintain a 3.0 grade-point 
average in departmental courses and a 2.5 grade-point average in all col- 
lege courses. 

68 



The participant must (1) obtain departmental approval of a research 
topic; (2) prepare an essay on the subject selected for research under the 
guidance of his honors adviser; (3) complete the writing of the essay by 
March 1 of the senior year; and (4) defend the essay in a manner to be 
determined by the departmental staff and the dean of the college. Upon 
fulfilling these requirements, the student will be recommended by the 
departmental chairman to the dean of the college for graduation with 
departmental honors. 

111/112. American National Government I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

The first semester concentrates on backgrounds, theories, principles, processes, and 
practices of American national government. Subject areas include: the nature of democ- 
racy, constitutional backgrounds, federalism and its problems, civil rights, public opin- 
ion formation, voting behavior, political parties, campaigns and elections. Special atten- 
tion is given to contemporary racial and student unrest in the United States. 

The second semester stresses institutional surveys and the actual work of govern- 
ment. The structure, functions, and processes of the main organs of national govern- 
ment—the Presidency, the Congress, the judiciary, and the bureaucracy— are examined. 
Subject areas covered include: the role of government as regulator, promoter, and man- 
ager; national defense; foreign policies; and internal development. 

211. Comparative Government. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A comparative study of important political systems of the world, including an 
introduction to the basic methodologies. The course examines both totalitarian and 
representative forms of government. It is strongly recommended that Political Science 
111/112 be taken previously or concurrently. 

212. Foreign Relations. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A survey of the external relations of American government, with emphasis on 
twentieth century developments. Subject areas include diplomacy, military affairs, geo- 
graphic and regional problems, trade and aid, technology and underdevelopment, 
alliances, nuclear problems, and opposing ideologies. Consideration is given to recruit- 
ment, training, and problems of the United States foreign service and to the multiple 
influences shaping American foreign policies. It is strongly recommended that Political 
Science 111/112 be taken previously or concurrently. 

217. Research Methods in Political Science. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A course in the conduct and interpretation of research in political science. Topics 
covered include: formulation of a research problem, research design, techniques of 
scaling and measurement, data collection and analysis, and writing the research report. 

Prerequisites: a major in Political Science and sophomore standing, or permission 
of the instructor. Mathematics 170, Elementary Statistics, is strongly recommended. 

219. State and Local Government. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

This course deals with governmental institutions and political characteristics of 
state and local political systems. It will treat major urban problems in the context of 
the legal dependency of cities on state governments and constitutions. It will also 
examine the major intergovernmental problems in state and local relationships with 
the national government. It is strongly recommended that Political Science 111/112 be 
taken previously or concurrently. 

311. Political Parties in the United States. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A study of the origins and history of American political parties, their develop- 
ment, organization, leaders, conventions, platforms, and campaigns. Emphasis is given 
to recent changes in American political patterns. It is strongly recommended that 
Political Science 111/112 be taken previously or concurrently. 

69 



312. American Constitutional Law. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A study of the growth and development of the Constitution through the medium 
of judicial construction. Recent decisions illustrating its application to new conditions 
of the present age, and proposals for court modification are given particular attention. 
It is strongly recommended that Political Science 111/112 be taken previously or 
concurrently. 

313. Foundations of American Law. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

This course provides an historical survey of the Western legal tradition from 
classical times through eighteenth century conceptions of the English common law as 
an introduction to the study of the evolution of American law. It supplements the 
study of American Constitutional law but does not duplicate the content of Political 
Science 312. It is strongly recommended for pre-law students. 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

314. Public Opinion. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

An analysis of the nature and sources of contemporary public opinion, with spe- 
cial attention to methods of determining public opinion. 

350. Select Problems in Political Science. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A course to provide the student with an opportunity to explore in depth a topic 
of special interest. It is strongly recommended that Political Science 111/112 be taken 
previously or concurrently. 

411. Political Theory. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A survey of the different philosophies and theories of government, ancient and 
modern, with special reference to political philosophy since the sixteenth century. It is 
strongly recommended that Political Science 111/112 be taken previously or con- 
currently. 

412. Senior Seminar in Political Science. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Reading, discussion, and written assignments to accomplish the following pur- 
poses: (1) relation of the discipline to other fields of knowledge and (2) development 
and expression of an individual political philosophy by the student. 

Prerequisites: a major in political science and senior standing; or permission of 
the instructor. 

413. International Politics. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A course in the origin, forms, dynamics, and prospects of the international political 
pattern, with emphasis on current developments and changing concepts in world 
politics. It is strongly recommended that Political Science 111/112 be taken previously 
or concurrently. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 3 semesters.) 

A course designed for students who wish to undertake an independent study 

project in political science. Open to all students, subject to the following qualifications: 

Those who do not desire departmental honors are admitted by permission of the 
instructor who agrees to accept supervision of the student's work. 
Students desiring departmental honors must meet the conditions set forth above 
under "Departmental Honors." 



INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES 

130. Philosophy in Literature. 3 hours credit. Either semester upon demand. 

A detailed critical examination of various literary works having philosophical con- 
tent. Exact topics and works to be considered will vary from year to year. 
Prerequisite: Philosophy 110 or consent of the instructors. 



70 



332. Seminar in Psychology and Literature. 3 hours credit. Second semester. 

A consideration of major psychological theories for use in literary interpretation. 
Prerequisite: a major in psychology or English, junior or senior standing and/or 
permission of the staff. 

334. Seminar in Philosophy and Psychology. 3 hours credit. Second semester. 

Offered 1977-1978. 

A detailed consideration of matters of common interest to philosophy and psy- 
chology, taught by members of both departments. Topics will vary from year to year. 
Prerequisite: consent of the instructors. 

LANGUAGES 

See Foreign Languages, page 59. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Mayer, Chairman; Associate Professor Fleischman; Assistant 
Professors Burr as and Hearsey 

The department of mathematics has several objectives. The mathe- 
matics program prepares the student for a career in the applied sciences 
or in industry, or for continued study in a graduate program. In coopera- 
tion with the department of education, it offers a sound preparation for 
secondary school teaching. Together with the department of economics 
and business administration it offers a strong program in actuarial science. 
Last but not least, it also gives the mathematics courses needed by stu- 
dents majoring in other fields. 

REQUIREMENTS 

B.A. or B.S. with a major in Mathematics. All mathematics majors 
must take the following basic courses: Mathematics 111, 112, 201, 211, 
264, 266, and 321. In addition the student must take at least 12 semester 
hours of mathematics courses numbered 300 or higher (with no more than 
three hours in seminar). This choice must have the approval of the de- 
partment of mathematics. 

B.S. with a major in Actuarial Science. All students in this program 
must take the following courses: Mathematics 111, 112, 201, 211, 264, 266, 
321, 383, 471, 472, 481, and 482; Economics 110 and 120; and Busi- 
ness Administration 151 and 152. In addition, Examination 1 of the So- 
ciety of Actuaries must be passed by the fall of the senior year. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

Secondary school teaching. A future teacher of mathematics should 
take Mathematics 111, 112, 201, 211, 264, 266, 321, 322, 331 and 452, plus 
at least three additional hours of courses numbered 300 or higher. 

Students preparing for graduate school. A student planning to attend 
graduate school in mathematics should take, in addition to the basic 
courses, the following: Mathematics 322, 363, 364, 400 and 412. 

Applied mathematics. A student planning to work as a mathemati- 

71 



cian in industry should take, in addition to the basic courses, the follow- 
ing: Mathematics 361, 362, 363, 364, 471, and 472, as well as suitably 
chosen courses in the physical and/or social sciences. 

Physical science. A major in a physical science should choose from 
Mathematics 161, 162, 261, 264, 266, 321, 322, 361, and 362. 

Behavioral and social science. A major in these fields is advised to 
choose from Mathematics 161, 162, 170, 264, and perhaps 261. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Students may participate in the departmental honors program if they 
have demonstrated high scholastic ability and have received permission for 
such participation from the departmental chairman and the dean of the 
college no later than the end of the first semester of the junior year. 

A student may receive upon graduation, departmental honors if he 
has maintained a 3.0 grade-point average in mathematics and has satis- 
factorily completed the departmental honors program. 

100. Basic Concepts of Mathematics. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Outlines of some basic mathematical concepts. 

102. Algebra and Trigonometry. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

College algebra and trigonometry. 

111,112. Analysis I, II. 5:5:0 per semester. 

A rigorous introduction to continuity, derivative, integral, and series, for mathe- 
matics and actuarial science majors. 

161, 162. Calculus I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

Introduction to derivative, integral, series, and partial derivative with emphasis 
on applications. 

170. Elementary Statistics. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

Descriptive and inferential statistics. An introductory course requiring no calculus. 

201. Foundation of Mathematics. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Introduction to logic, set theory, real numbers. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 112.* 

211. Analysis III. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A continuation of Analysis I, II. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 112.* 

261. Calculus in. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Vector calculus, differential equations and applications. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 162.* 

264. Introduction to Computer Science. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Computer logic and languages, algorithmic procedures, computer design, appli- 
cations. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 112.* 

266. Differential Equations. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

First and second order linear differential equations, power series solutions, special 
functions. Introduction to partial differential equations. Special topics. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 211 or 261. 



* Prerequisites may be waived by the department. 

72 



321. linear Algebra. 3:3:0 First semes ter. 

Vector spaces, transformations, matrices, systems of equations. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 112.* 

322. Abstract Algebra. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Fundamentals of groups, rings, and fields. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 321.* 

331. Geometry. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Introduction to the axioms of geometries; Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 112.* 

361, 362. Methods of Applied Mathematics I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

Linear vector spaces, matrices, determinants, integral equations, partial differential 
equations, integral formulas. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 266.* 

363, 364. Classical and Numerical Analysis. 3:3:0 per semester. 

Taylor's theorem, Newton's method, numerical integration, power series, per- 
turbation series, asymptotic series, Fourier series, Runge-Kutta method, finite differ- 
ences, interpolation. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 266. 

383. Seminar in Actuarial Science. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Compound interest, annuities and other material for actuarial science majors. 

400. Seminar. 1:1:0. Either semester. 

A seminar devoted to problem solving techniques. 

412. Functions of a Complex Variable. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Analytic functions, contour integration, Cauchy theorem, residue theory, con- 
formal mapping. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211.* 

450. Special Topics. 3:3:0 each semester. 

A junior/senior course whose contents are chosen according to student interest. 
Examples are Topology, Graph Theory, Advanced Topics, and Computer Science. 

452. Seminar for Teachers. 1 : 1 :0. Second semester. 

A senior seminar for prospective mathematics teachers. This seminar is required 
of those students who wish to become certified to teach mathematics. 

466. Topics in Operations Research. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

Linear programming, transportation and assignment problems, basic game theory, 
introduction to other topics. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 211 or 261, and 264. 

471. Mathematical Probability. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Sample space, random variables, probability laws and distributions, limit theorems. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 211.* 

472. Mathematical Statistics. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Generating functions, frequency distributions, decision theory, tests of hypotheses. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 471.* 

481, 482. Life Contingencies I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

Single life functions, life insurance, life annuities, multiple life functions, com- 
pound contingent functions, reversionary annuities. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
Independent work for majors enrolled in the departmental honors program and 
others. 



* Prerequisites may be waived by the department. 

73 



METROPOLITAN SEMESTER COURSES 

250. Work Internship. 6 hours credit Either semester. 

Internships in service, technical and business agencies and institutions of choice 
of students are supervised by staff members of the Metropolitan Semester. Three-and- 
one-half or four days per week. 

260. Metropolitan Seminar. 3 hours credit. Either semester. 

The seminar surveys the major issues in urban America, using Philadelphia as 
the point of reference. 

280. Social Sciences Research Seminar. 3 hours credit. Either semester. 

The seminar surveys the nature of social research with special emphasis on 
methods of collecting valid data. Students design and complete a small research study 
on a relevant urban problem. 

290. Values Seminar. 3 hours credit. Either semester. 

Students examine ethical issues and moral dilemmas which arise from personal 
life, work in large organizations, and the conduct of public policy. 



MUSIC 

Associate Professor Smith, Chairman; Professor Emeritus Bender; Profes- 
sors Curfman and Getz; Associate Professors Fairlamb, Lanese, Stachow, 
and Thurmond; Assistant Professors Burrichter, Englebright, Lau, 
Morgan, Ogg, and Sweigart; Instructors Sanford and Wat kins; Adjunct 
Assistant Professors Knisley and Toroni; Adjunct Instructors Aulenbach, 
Bilger, Binkley, Campbell, Checket, Dunn, Fine, Gifford, Goebel, Grove, 
Reed and Stambach. 

The aims of the department of music are to prepare performers and 
teachers, to teach music historically and aesthetically as an element of 
liberal culture, and to offer courses that give a thorough and practical 
understanding of theoretical subjects. 

Attendance at all faculty recitals and a portion of student recitals is 
compulsory. 

All majors in music or music education are required to take private 
instruction on the campus if the department offers instruction in the indi- 
vidual's principal performance medium. 

Participation in music organizations may be required of all majors. 

One-half hour of private instruction is included in the basic tuition. 
For additional music fees see page 18. 

MUSIC 

(B.A. with a major in Music) 

This program is designed for those students desiring a liberal arts 
context in their preparation for a career in applied music. 

Special Requirements 

All majors are required to take an hour lesson per week in their 
major performance area and are expected to perform a half recital in the 
junior year and a full recital in the senior year. 

All majors outside of the keyboard area are required to study piano 

74 



(private or class) until the minimum requirements have been met. 

For the recommended plan of study in this program see page 99. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

(B.S. with a major in Music Education) 

This program has been approved by the Pennsylvania Department 
of Education and the National Association of Schools of Music for the 
preparation of teachers of public school music. 

A "track system" permits the student to select an area of concentra- 
tion: (1) general, (2) instrumental, (3) keyboard/vocal. 

The music education curriculum requires voice instruction (class or 
private) for a minimum of one year and piano instruction (class or pri- 
vate) for a minimum of two years. A competency jury must be passed 
successfully in each area. 

For the recommended plan of study in this program see page 100. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

1. A candidate must have achieved a minimum grade-point average of 
3.00 at the end of the sophomore year, and must maintain this min- 
imum to remain eligible for honors status. 

2. The private instructor in the candidate's major performance area 
must recommend the student for full recital privileges during the 
senior year, and will serve as adviser to the individual's departmental 
honors program. 

3. The candidate through reading and research will produce a thesis or 
an essay, based on a problem or subject of his own choosing under 
the direct supervision of his faculty adviser. Creative work will be 
encouraged with reference to, or emphasis upon, his principal per- 
formance medium. 

4. Honors recognition shall be dependent upon the quality of the pre- 
pared thesis or essay and the level of the candidate's recital per- 
formance, botli to be reviewed by a committee of three, including the 
private instructor (adviser), the chairman of the department, and a 
third music faculty member to be designated by the chairman with 
the approval of the adviser. 

5. In addition to any established pattern of announcing honors candi- 
dates and recipients, the printed recital program shall also indicate "in 
partial fulfillment of requirements for Honors in Music." 

6. A maximum of 9 hours credit can be earned in departmental honors. 

7. Upon the completion of the above requirements at a satisfactory level, 
the student will be recommended by the reviewing committee to the 
dean of the college for graduation with departmental honors. 

I: THEORY OF MUSIC 

Sight Singing 

111. Sight Singing I. 1:2:0. First semester. 

A beginning course in music reading with the use of syllables, incorporating the 
elements of melody and rhythm within the beat and its division. The following are 

75 



studied: basic beat patterns, simple and compound time, diatonic intervals, implied har- 
monic structure within the melodic line, the C clefs, modulations. Phrasing and the 
application of dynamics are stressed. 

112. Sight Singing II. 1:2:0. Second semester. 

A continuation of music reading, using more difficult melodies and rhythms, the 
beat and its subdivision, and additional interval problems. Exercises in four clefs, em- 
ploying modal melodies, remote modulation, superimposed background and meter, 
changing and less common time signatures. 

Ear Training 

113. Ear Training I. 1:2:0. First semester. 

The study of the basics of music notation essential for the writing of melodic and 
rhythmic dictation. Emphasis is placed upon aural recognition of intervals, scales, 
triads and their inversions, and simple harmonic progressions and cadences. Harmonic 
dictation is begun in the latter half of the course. Correlated with Sight Singing. 

114. Ear Training II. 1:2:0. Second semester. 

A study of more difficult tonal problems including seventh and ninth chords, 
chromaticism, modulation, and modality. Emphasis is placed upon harmonic and cor- 
rective dictation. Correlated with Sight Singing. 

Harmony 

115. Harmony I. 2:3:0. First semester. 

A study of the rudiments of music including notation, scales, intervals, and triads; 
the connection of triads by harmonizing melodies and basses with fundamental triads; 
playing of simple cadences at the piano; analysis of phrases and periods. 

116. Harmony II. 2:3:0. Second semester. 

A study of inversions of triads, seventh and ninth chords, harmonizations of mel- 
odies and figured basses; analysis and composition of the smaller forms; modulation. 

215. Harmony HI. 2:2:0. First semester. 

The use of dominant and diminished sevenths as embellishments of and substitutes 
for diatonic harmony; harmonization of melodies and figured basses; analysis of two and 
three-part song forms; composition in two-part song form. Playing of more advanced 
cadences and modulations at the piano. 

315. Elementary Composition* on special announcement. 2:2:0. First semester. 

Melody analysis and writing; four-part choral writing; continuation of two and 
three-part song-form analysis and composition. Composition in theme and variations, 
fantasia, rondo, and dance forms. Study of contemporary harmonic ideas. 

316. Keyboard Harmony. 2:2:0. Second semester. 

Work at the piano includes the harmonization of melodies both with four-part 
harmony and with various accompaniment forms; also transposition, improvisation, 
modulation, reading from figured bass. (Students are placed in elementary, intermediate, 
or advanced sections on the basis of keyboard ability.) The successful completion of a 
piano jury is required for admission to the course. 

Additional Theory Courses 

217. Basic Concepts of Structure and Style. 2:2:0. First semester. 

A course designed to develop the student's knowledge of specific musical styles 
resulting from the synthesis of musics constituent and expressive elements. The study 
is approached through listening to, discussing, and analyzing compositions representing 
a variety of styles and media. Other course objectives include: acquaintance with lit- 
erature, comprehensive application of the basics of music theory, and development of 
musicianship. 

* B.A. program in music. 

76 



224. Counterpoint. 2:2:0. Second semester. 

Introductory work in strict counterpoint through three and four-part work in all 
the species. 

226. Form and Analysis I. 2:2:0. Second semester. 

A study of the structure of music including hymns, folk songs, two, three and five- 
part song forms, variations, contrapuntal forms, rondo, and sonata forms. Compositions 
in these forms are studied primarily for their structural content. Course includes ex- 
tensive listening. 

329. Form and Analysis II* on special announcement. 2:2:0. First semester. 

A study through analysis and listening of fugal forms, suite, overture, complete 
sonata forms (evolution of the symphony), string quartet, the tone poem. Analysis of 
classical and contemporary works in these forms. 

400. Arranging and Scoring for the Stage Band. 2:2:0. Either semester. 

Study of modern harmony, modulation, style analysis, special instrumental effects 
as applied to modern arranging. Laboratory analysis and demonstration of sectional 
and ensemble voicings. 

410. Composition, Schillinger System. Private teaching. 

A scientific system of music composition created by the late Joseph Schillinger, 
teacher of such accomplished professionals as George Gershwin and Ted Royal Dewar. 

The major aims of the system are to: (1) generalize underlying principles regard- 
ing the behavior of tonal phenomena; (2) classify all the available resources of our 
tonal system; (3) teach a comprehensive application of scientific method to all compo- 
nents of the tonal art, to problems of melody, rhythm, harmony, counterpoint, orches- 
tration, and to composition itself. 

The system is best studied in the light of a traditional background and admission 
to course or private instruction is by special permission only. 

416. Orchestration. 2:2:0. Second semester. 

Study of instrumentation, devices, techniques, and mechanics of scoring transcrip- 
tions, arrangements and solos for orchestra and concert band; special work in scoring 
for mixed ensembles as they occur in public schools. Laboratory analysis and demon- 
stration of various instrumental colors and combinations. Emphasis is placed on creative 
scoring. 

II. METHODS AND MATERIALS 

333. Methods and Materials, General Music: Elementary. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A comprehensive study of general music teaching at the elementary level, includ- 
ing the rationale for building a music education currriculum, current emphases in 
music education, varied approaches for developing conceptual learning, movement, 
playing classroom instruments, introduction to Orff and Kodaly techniques, creative 
applications, guided listening, the child voice, materials, and interest centers for open 
classrooms. 

334. Methods and Materials, General Music: Junior High School. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Materials and approaches for junior high school general music, attention to the 
organization and presentation of a varied program, and recent trends in teaching. 
Adolescent voices, creative applications, improvisation, guided listening, interest cen- 
ters, units of study, and characteristics of youth. 

335. Methods and Materials, Instrumental: Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grades. 

2:2:0. First semester. 

A study of methods and materials used in teaching band and orchestral instru- 
ments to children in these grades, with emphasis on a sound rhythmic approach. Both 
individual and class techniques are studied. Musical rudiments as applied to instru- 
mental teaching are reviewed. 



* B.A. program in music. 

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336. Methods and Materials, Instrumental: junior and Senior High School. 

2:2:0. Second semester. 

A study of intermediate and advanced instrumental teaching techniques; methods 
of organizing and directing school orchestras and bands; fundamentals of musicianship. 

402. Seminar in Advanced Instrumental Problems. 2:2:0. Second semester. 

A study of the general and specific problems which confront the director of school 
orchestras, bands, and instrumental classes. Problems of general interest include: organi- 
zation and management, stimulating and maintaining interest; selecting beginners; 
scheduling rehearsals and class lessons; financing and purchasing instruments, uniforms, 
and other equipment; marching band formations and drills; evaluating music materials; 
organizing festivals, contests, and public performances. 

404. Music Education Seminar: Secondary Level. 2:2:0. Second semester. 

A study of aspects of secondary school vocal music curriculum and related course 
offerings. Topics with which a high school choral teacher or director of music will need 
to be knowledgeable are investigated with particular attention given to those problems 
relating to the responsibilities of the vocal music teacher. Philosophy of music educa- 
tion, musical theater, tests and measurements, elective courses, planning inservice 
events, and choral materials. 

405. Methods in Piano Pedagogy. 2:2:0. First semester. 

A study of methods of teaching piano to children and adults. The course includes 
the song approach method, presentation of the fundamental principles of rhythm, 
sight leading, tone quality, form, technique, pedaling, transposition, and the harmoni- 
zation of simple melodies. Materials are examined and discussed. 

412. Electronic Music. 1:1:1. Second semester. 

An introduction to the use and function of synthesizers and their application to 
the electronic music field, with special attention to the education area, live perfor- 
mance, and integration with studio equipment. 

III. STUDENT TEACHING 

441. Student Teaching. 12 semester hours credit. First semester. 

Each student spends a semester in the music department of an area public 
school under the supervision of cooperating teachers. Experiences are provided ac- 
cording to the individual student's selection of a track program, with emphasis on 
general, instrumental, or keyboard-vocal areas. Requirements are: (1) a cumulative 
grade-point average of 2.0 during the first six semesters in college, (2) ability to 
demonstrate proficiency in the competencies for music teachers as set forth by the Penn- 
sylvania Department of Education, (3) approval by the music facility. 

IV. INSTRUMENTAL COURSES 

Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments. 

Practical courses in which students, in addition to being taught the fundamental 
principles underlying the playing of all band and orchestral instruments, learn to play 
on instruments of each group, viz., string, woodwind, brass, and percussion. Problems 
of class procedure in public schools are discussed; transposition of all instruments is 
taught. Ensemble playing is an integral part of these courses. 

Brass Instruments (Trumpet [Cornet], Horn, Trombone, Baritone, Tuba) 

123. Brass I. 1:2:0. First semester. 

A study of two of the above instruments. 

124. Brass II. 1:2:0. Second semester. 

A study of the remainder of the above instruments. 

Percussion Instruments (Snare Drum, Timpani, Bass Drum, etc.) 

227. Percussion I. V£:1:0. First semester. 

A study of snare drum only. 

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328. Percussion II. 1/2: 1:0. Second semester. 

A study of the remainder of the above instruments. 

Woodwind Instruments (Clarinet, Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, Saxophone, Bassoon) 

231. Woodwind I. 1:2:0. First semester. 

A study of the clarinet. 

232. Woodwind II. 1:2:0. Second semester. 

A study of the remainder of the above instruments. 

String Instruments (Violin, Viola, Cello, String Bass) 

337. String I. 1:2:0. First semester. 

A study of all of the above instruments. 

338. String II. 1:2:0. Second semester. 
A continuation of the study of all of the above instruments. 

Instrumental Seminar. 1/2: 1:0 or 1:2:0. First or second semester. 

Application of specific techniques to problems of class instruction. 

420. Brass Prerequisite: Music 124. 

430. Percussion Prerequisite: Music 327. 

440. String Prerequisite: Music 338. 

450. Woodwind Prerequisite: Music 232. 

V. MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS 

Opportunities for individual performance in a group experience are provided by 
music organizations. Membership in the organizations is open on an audition basis to 
all students of the college. 

601. Symphonic Band. 0:3:0 per semester. 

The Blue and White Marching Band of L.V.C. is noted for its half-time per- 
formances during the football season. The Symphonic Band of ninety pieces plays sev- 
eral concerts during the year, both on and off campus. The finest original music for 
band is performed, as well as arrangements of the standard repertoire. Membership in 
the band is dependent upon the ability of the applicant and the instrumentation of 
the band. Students from all departments of the college are invited to audition. 

602. All-Girl Band. 0:1:0 per semester. 
L.V.C. is unique in having one of the few all-girl bands in the nation. All girls in 

the college with ability as instrumentalists are welcome to audition. Membership de- 
pends upon proficiency and the needs of the band regarding instrumentation. 

603. Symphony Orchestra. 0:3:0 per semester. 

The Symphony Orchestra is an organization of symphonic proportions maintain- 
ing a high standard of performance. A professional interpretation of a wide range of 
standard orchestral literature is insisted upon. 

604. Concert Choir. 0:3:0 per semester. 

The Concert Choir is composed of approximately fifty voices, selected by audition. 
All phases of choral literature are studied intensively. In addition to on-campus pro- 
grams and appearances on radio and television, the Concert Choir makes an annual 
tour. 

605. College Chorus. 0:1:0 per semester. 

The College Chorus provides an opportunity to study and participate in the pres- 
entation of choral literature of major composers from all periods of music history. It is 
open to all students who are interested in this type of musical performance and who 
have had some experience in singing. 

606. Chapel Choir. 0:1:0 per semester. 
The Chapel Choir is composed of approximately forty voices, selected by audi- 
tion. The main function of this choir is to provide musical leadership in the college's 
chapel services. In addition, seasonal services of choral music are prepared. 

79 



607. Beginning Ensemble. 0:1:0 per semester. 

A training band and orchestra in which students play secondary instruments and 
become acquainted with elementary band and orchestral literature. Opportunity is given 
for advanced conducting students to gain experience in conducting. 

608. Wind Ensemble. 0:1:0 per semester. 

The Wind Ensemble provides an opportunity for advanced players of wind and 
percussion instruments to play the growing repertoire of music being written for this 
medium. In addition, standard classical works for wind and/or percussion instruments 
are played. The members of this organization are chosen by audition. 

Instrumental Small Ensembles. 0: 1 :0 per semester. 

Open to the advanced player on an audition basis. 

611. String Quartet. 

612. String Trio. 

613. Clarinet Choir. 

614. Woodwind Quintet. 

615. Brass Ensemble. 

616. Percussion Ensemble. 

617. Saxophone Quintet. 

618. Saxophone Ensemble. 

VI. THE HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF MUSIC 

100. History and Appreciation of Music. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

A course for the non-music major designed to increase the individual's musical 
perceptiveness. Through selective, intensive listening, the student develops concepts of 
musical materials and techniques. The vocabulary thus gained is utilized in a survey of 
Western music beginning with the 20th century and progressing backwards to the 
Middle Ages. This course is designed primarily for the student with no previous 
musical background. 

341/342. History and Literature of Music I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A survey course of the history of Western music. Emphasis is placed on the vari- 
ous stylistic developments which have occurred from one era to another, on the com- 
posers who have been responsible for these developments, and the music written dur- 
ing these various eras illustrating these stylistic trends. For this purpose, extensive use 
of recordings is made a part of the course. The first semester includes the development 
of music up to the Baroque era, the second semester from the Baroque to the present. 

351/352/353/354. Organ Seminar I, II, III, IV. 2:2:0 per semester. 

A four-semester sequence based upon the investigation and study of the following: 

351: Organ Design and Registration. 

352: Organ History and Literature. 

(Early times through the mid-Baroque with emphasis upon French and 
German music.) 

353: Organ History and Literature. 

(An investigation of the organ literature of J. S. Bach and his contem- 
poraries; organ literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.) 

354: Church Service Playing. 

Required for organ students in the B.A. program in music; open to other students 
with the approval of the instructor. 

406. Piano Seminar. 2:2:0. Second semester, on demand. 

A survey of the history of the piano including a brief review of its predecessors; a 
study of the literature for the instrument, with special emphasis on that available to 
the average student; a study of the problems encountered in the preparation of piano 
material, its presentation in recital, and related pedagogical problems. 

Required for all piano students in the B.A. program in music; open to other stu- 
dents with the approval of the instructor. 

80 



462. Music Literature Seminar. 3 :3:0 . Second semester. 

A study of music literature to extend the scope of students' familiarity with 
major instrumental works and to promote further investigation. Designed especially 
for the B.A. Student in music with application of accumulated knowledge in theory, 
music history, and musical form. The course includes examination of various theories 
of aesthetics as they apply to music, a survey of orchestral literature, study of twen- 
tieth-century compositions, and student pursuit of a project of each individual's own 
interest. 

VII. CONDUCTING 

246. Principles of Conducting. 2:2:0. Second semester. 

Principles of conducting and the technique of the baton are presented. Each 
student conducts vocal and instrumental ensembles made up of the class personnel. 

345. Instrumental Conducting. 2:2:0. First semester. 

Emphasis on practical work with instrumental groups. Rehearsal techniques are 
applied through individual experience. 

347. Choral Conducting. 2:2:0. First semester. 

Further refinement of the conductor's basic technique applied to the choral idiom. 
Laboratory situations will provide for training in areas of rehearsal procedures, mate- 
rials, and special problems of choral conducting: diction, tonal development and style. 

VIII. APPLIED MUSIC INSTRUCTION 

132. Diction for Singers. 1:2:0. Second semester. 

An introduction to the pronunciation of singer's English, German, French, Italian, 
and Latin, utilizing the International Phonetic Alphabet. Required for all voice stu- 
dents in the B.A. program in music and for all keyboard-vocal track students in the 
B.S. program in music education; open to other students with the approval of the in- 
structor. 

520. Class Instruction (Voice and Piano). 1:1:0 per semester. 

530. Individual Instruction. 1:V£:0 per semester. 

(Voice, Piano, Organ, Orchestral and Band Instruments.) 

Piano study (private or class) is required for a minimum of two years. 

540. Individual Instruction. 2:1:0 per semester. 

(Voice, Piano, Organ, Orchestral and Band Instruments.) 
A charge is made for the second half-hour of instruction. 

IX. DEPARTMENTAL HONORS AND 
INDEPENDENT STUDY 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
A course designed for the student who desires to engage in independent study, 
either with or without departmental honors. (See information on page 75 for De- 
partmental Honors.) 

THE STUDENT RECITALS 

The student recitals are of inestimable value to all students in ac- 
quainting them with a wide range of the best musical literature, in devel- 
oping musical taste and discrimination, in affording experience in appear- 
ing before an audience, and in gaining self-reliance as well as nerve con- 
trol and stage demeanor. 

Students at all levels of performance appear in these student recitals. 

81 



PHILOSOPHY 

Assistant Professor Thompson, Chairman; Adjunct Professor Ehrhart; 
Instructor Heffner 

The department of philosophy serves a major purpose in the cur- 
riculum by attempting to make the student aware of the need for a crit- 
ical evaluation and analysis of the ideas, beliefs, and faiths — scientific and 
humanistic — within the Western intellectual tradition. 

Part of the rationale for the study of philosophy at the college is 
found in the value of its attempt to examine the history of ideas as it 
comes to us from the ancient Greeks. But more than this, philosophy seeks 
to interpret and analyze these ideas as they relate to the student's own exis- 
tence and that of mankind as a whole. The study of philosophy at Leba- 
non Valley College takes both inspiration and justification from the 
maxim of Socrates that "the unexamined life is not worth living." 

Major: A total of twenty-four hours, including Philosophy 120, is re- 
quired of the philosophy major. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY AND DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Students who wish to do independent work in philosophy beyond 
the scope of courses listed in the college catalog may elect, with depart- 
mental approval, to take Independent Study, Philosophy 500, which is 
conducted in a tutorial fashion. 

A junior or senior student may, with departmental permission, un- 
dertake to do individual study for honors by enrollment in Philosophy 
500, Independent Study. This involves the writing and oral defense of 
a detailed research project or critical study on an approved topic. This 
program is open ordinarily only to departmental majors who have done 
well in their course work and are aiming at advanced work in philos- 
ophy; it is not, however, limited to such students. The student who suc- 
cessfully meets the requirements of the program shall be recommended to 
the dean of the college for graduation with departmental honors. 

110. Problems of Philosophy. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

An introduction to some of the main problems of philosophy and to the ways in 
which leading philosophers have dealt with them. As part of this course, students learn 
the critical analysis of ideas. 

120. General Logic. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

An introduction to the rules of clear and effective thinking. Attention is given to 
the logic of meaning, the logic of valid inference, and the logic of factual inquiry. 
Main emphasis is laid upon deductive logic, and students are introduced to the ele- 
ments of symbolic logic as well as to traditional modes of analysis. 

228. Ethics. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

An inquiry into the central problems of ethics, with an examination of the 
responses of major ethical theories to those problems. 

231. Philosophy of Religion. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of the issues raised for philosophy by contemporary religious and theo- 
logical thought. A critical examination of such problems as faith and reason; the mean- 
ing of revelation, symbolism, and language; the arguments for the existence of God; 
faith and history; religion and culture. 

82 



323. Greek Philosophy. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A study of the evolution of philosophy from its origin in the speculations of the 
pre-Socratic nature philosophers to the work of Hellenistic philosophers of the fourth 
century, with emphasis on the thought of Plato and Aristotle. 
Prerequisite: Philosophy 110 or consent of the instructor. 

326. Medieval Philosophy. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

The history of philosophy is traced from the decline of the Hellenistic Age to the 
Renaissance, with emphasis on the development and subsequent criticism of the system- 
atic elaborations of the schoolmen of the late Middle Ages. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 110 or consent of the instructor. 

333. Modern Philosophy. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

This course follows the development of philosophic thought in the writings of 
the principal thinkers from the Renaissance to the beginning of the nineteenth century, 
with emphasis on the work of Hume and Kant. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 110 or consent of the instructor. 

336. Twentieth Century Philosophy. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

An examination of the foremost American, British, and Continental philosophers 
from 1900 to the present. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 110 or consent of the instructor. 

340. Aesthetics. 3:3:0. Offered either semester on sufficient demand only. 

A study of the nature and basis of criticism of works of art. 
Prerequisite: Philosophy 110 or consent of the instructor. 

341. Metaphysics. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A detailed consideration of the theory of reality, as interpreted by representative 
philosophers from the pre-Socratics to the British and American linguistic analysts, in- 
cluding the twentieth-century phenomenologists. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 110 or consent of the instructor. 

346. Epistemology. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A critical and analytical study of the chief questions involved in "knowing," as 
formulated by representative thinkers from the time of Plato to the present. 
Prerequisite: Philosophy 110 or consent of the instructor. 

365. Philosophy of Science. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

An examination of the philosophical foundations of the physical sciences. Topics 
include: experimental method, structure and confirmation of theories, inductive logic, 
causality, philosophy of space and time. One of these topics is selected for special em- 
phasis. Students are strongly urged to have taken a course in physics or chemistry. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 110 or consent of the instructor. 

442. Seminar. 3 hours credit. Second semester. 

Discussion of selected problems of philosophy. 

Open to upperclassmen only, with consent of the instructor. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

See information on page 82. (Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Assistant Professor Petrojes, Chairman; Assistant Professors Reed and 
Yuhas; Instructors Correll, and Satalin. 

The aims of this department are (1) to encourage attitudes and habits 
of good total health; (2) to develop the student's physical capacities; (3) 
to provide activities which will enrich leisure throughout one's life. 

Four (4) semesters of physical education are required. 

83 



In addition to the family physician's report, it is strongly recom- 
mended that all entering students also undergo a thorough visual ex- 
amination. 

Students are required to wear the regulation gymnasium outfit, 
which may be purchased at the college store. 

110. Physical Education (Men) (Women) 0:2:0 per semester. 

(Men) The physical education activities include: physical fitness and conditioning, 
touch football, basketball, softball, volleyball, bandminton, golf, handball, squash, 
wrestling, tennis, swimming, soccer, lacrosse, paddleball, gymnastics and weight train- 
ing. 

(Women) The physical education activities include: soccer, softball, swimming, 
golf, archery, volleyball, badminton, tennis, gymnastics, field hockey, squash, basketball, 
and paddleball. 



PHYSICS 

Professor Rhodes, Chairman; Professor Emeritus Grimm; Associate Pro- 
fessor O'Donnell; Assistant Professor Thompson 

The department of physics attempts to develop in the student an in- 
creased understanding of the basic laws of nature as they relate to our 
physical environment, and to indicate the possible extent, as well as the 
limitations, of our knowledge of the physical world. 

The course Physics 100 is designed especially for the non-science 
major who may wish only a one-semester introduction to the role of 
physics and its impact on society. The introductory course Physics 103, 
104 is intended for students who desire a one-year survey course in physics 
without the calculus prerequisite. The sequence of courses 111, 112 and 
211, 212 provides suitable training for students who anticipate additional 
work in the physical sciences, whether it be in physics, chemistry, engineer- 
ing, applied mathematics, or some other area for which a strong back- 
ground in physics is essential. Laboratory work is an an integral part of 
all the physics courses at the freshman and sophomore level; laboratory 
work at the junior and senior levels is provided in Physics 327/328 and 
Physics 500. These are courses designed to acquaint the student with the 
experimental techniques and the measuring instruments appropriate to 
the various areas of investigation, and to give experience in the interpre- 
tation and communication of experimental results. Laboratory facilities 
include a neutron howitzer, beta and gamma detection equipment with 
a multi-channel pulse height analyzer, lasers, a 50 kV X-ray diffractom- 
eter, and a harmonic wave anlyzer. 

The department prepares students for graduate study, for research 
and development work in governmental and industrial laboratories, and 
for teaching physics in the secondary schools. It also provides background 
courses in physics appropriate for work in various basic and applied areas 
of the physical sciences, such as astrophysics, biophysics, space science, and 
computer technology. 

Major: Math 161, 162, 261, 266, or 111, 112, 211, 266; Physics 

84 



Ill, 112, 211, 311, 312, 321, 322, and six additional semester hours, of 
which at least two shall be in experimental physics. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY AND DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Independent Study, Physics 500, is available to all physics majors 
with the approval of the departmental chairman. Experimental facilities 
are available in the department for independent investigations in X-ray 
diffraction, neutron reactions, radioactivity, Mossbauer effect, gamma 
ray spectroscopy, and wave analysis. Theoretical problems may be chosen 
from classical physics, statistical mechanics, or quantum mechanics. 

Physics majors who have demonstrated high academic ability may, 
with the permission of the departmental chairman and the dean of the 
college, participate in the departmental honors program in physics. Ap- 
plication for admission to this program should be made before the end 
of the junior year. A student admitted to the program enrolls in Physics 
500 and works on an experimental or theoretical research project, nor- 
mally for a period of a year, with departmental supervision. Upon the 
satisfactory completion of an approved project and the formal presenta- 
tion of a research paper before an examining committee, the student will 
be recommended to the dean of the college for graduation with depart- 
mental honors. 

100. Physics and Its Impact. 4:3:2. Either semester. 

A course designed to acquaint the student, especially the non-science major, with 
some of the important concepts of physics, both classical and modern, and with the 
scientific method, its nature and its limitations. The role of physics in the history of 
thought and its relationships to other disciplines and to society and government are 
considered. The weekly two-hour laboratory period provides experience in the acquisi- 
tion, representation, and analysis of experimental data, and demonstration of the physi- 
cal phenomena with which the course deals. No mathematics or science prerequisite. 

103, 104. General College Physics I, II. 4:3:3 per semester. 

An introduction to the fundamental concepts and laws of the various branches of 
physics, including mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and atomic 
and nuclear structure, with laboratory work in each area. 

110. The Physics of Music. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

This course, for students with an interest in music, comprises a study of wave 
motion, the analysis and synthesis of waves, resonance, physical characteristics of music 
sounds, musical instruments, the reproduction and amplification of sound, and the 
acoustical properties of rooms. Whenever feasible, laboratory exercises and physical 
demonstrations will supplement or replace classroom instruction. A working knowledge 
of algebra and trigonometry is required. 

111,112. Principles of Physics I, II. 4:3:3 per semester. 

An introductory course in classical physics, designed for students who desire a 
more rigorous mathematical approach to college physics than is given in Physics 103, 

104. Calculus is used throughout. The first semester is devoted to mechanics and heat, 
and the second semester to electricity, magnetism, and optics, with laboratory work in 
each area. This course should be followed by Physics 211. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 111 or 161. 

211. Atomic and Nuclear Physics. 4:3:3. First semester. 

An introduction to modern physics, including the foundation of atomic physics, 

85 



the quantum theory of radiation, the atomic nucleus, radioactivity, and nuclear reac- 
tions, with laboratory work in each area. 
Prerequisite: Physics 104 or 112. 

212. Introduction to Electronics. 4:3:3. Second semester. 

The physics of electrons and electronic devices, including vacuum tubes, diodes, 
transistors, power supplies, amplifiers, oscillators, switching circuits, and servomechan- 
isms, with laboratory work in each area. 

Prerequisite: Physics 104 or 112. 

311,312. Analytical Mechanics I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A rigorous study of classical mechanics, including the motion of a single particle, 
the motion of a system of particles, and the motion of a rigid body. Damped and 
forced harmonic motion, the central force problem, the Euler description of rigid 
body motion, and the Lagrange generalization of Newtonian mechanics are among the 
topics treated. 

Prerequisites: Physics 111 and Mathematics 266. 

321, 322. Electricity and Magnetism I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A rigorous study of the basic phenomena of electromagnetism, together with the 
application of fundamental principles to the solving of problems. The electric and 
magnetic properties of matter, direct current circuits, alternating current circuits, the 
Maxwell field equations, and the propagation of electromagnetic waves are among the 
topics treated. 

Prerequisites: Physics 112 and Mathematics 266. 

327/328. Experimental Physics I, II. 1 :0:3 per semester. 

Experimental work selected from the areas of mechanics, A.C. and D.C. electrical 
measurements, optics, atomic physics, or nuclear physics, with emphasis on experimental 
design, measuring techniques, and analysis of data. 

Prerequisite: Physics 211. 

421, 422. Modern Physics I, II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A rigorous study of selected topics in modern physics, utilizing the methods of 
quantum mechanics. The Schrodinger equation is solved for such systems as potential 
barriers, potential wells, the linear oscillator, the rigid rotator, and the hydrogen atom. 
Perturbation techniques and the operator formalism of quantum mechanics are intro- 
duced where appropriate. 

Prerequisites: Physics 211 and Mathematics 266. 

430. The Teaching of Physics in Secondary Schools. 1:1:0. Either semester. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with some of the special methods, 
programs, and problems in the teaching of physics in secondary schools. 
Required for secondary certification in physics. 

480. Special Topics in Physics. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A seminar in one or more of the following areas of physics is offered each semes- 
ter, and is open, with the approval of the instructor, to juniors and seniors from any 
department. 

(a) Thermodynamics. A study of the laws of thermodynamics from which the 
following topics are developed: thermodynamic variables, equations of state, phase 
transitions, specific heats, entropy, and low temperature phenomena. 

(b) Statistical Mechanics. Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac 
statistics are derived and used to discuss specific heats, paramagnetism, the properties 
of molecules, photons, and electrons, and fluctuations. 

(c) Wave Theory. A study of the theory of waves as it applies to electrodynamics, 
optics, and acoustics. The topics covered include propagation of wave motion, wave 
guides, diffraction and interference phenomena, and polarization. 

(d) Nuclear Physics. The topics covered include properties of nuclei, nuclear 
86 



force, nuclear models, properties of alpha, beta, and gamma decay, fission, and fusion, 
(e) Solid State Physics. The topics covered include the properties of crystals, 
electronic states in solids, semiconductors, and the electric and magnetic properties of 
solids. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
An experimental or theoretical investigation in a selected area of physics under 
the supervision of a physics staff member. Open to all physics majors with the permis- 
sion of the departmental chairman. 
See information on page 85. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Davidun, Chairman] Professor Love; Associate Professor Lasky; 
Assistant Professor Carlson; Adjunct Assistant Professor Peters 

The program presents psychology from its scientific and professional 
perspectives, and provides a means for students' psycho-social develop- 
ment through increased knowledge. As a behavioral science., the program 
is designed to contribute to students' general education, to provide a 
background for many human service occupations, and to prepare some for 
later graduate work. There is a complete program for those preparing for 
graduate school studies in either experimental or clinical psychology. 

Many who major in psychology upon graduation are employed in 
agencies, hospitals, and industry. Furthermore, many of the courses pro- 
vide an important background for those preparing for careers in other 
fields such as medicine, business and teaching. 

There is a program for majors who wish to qualify for teaching 
psychology in high school, with Pennsylvania Teaching Certification in 
Social Studies upon graduation. A double major in psychology and 
elementary education provides not only certification to teach in elemen- 
tary school, but also preparation for graduate programs in counseling 
and school psychology. 

Major: Psychology 110, 215, 236, 343 and 443; either 235 or 444, or 
both; either 332 or 336, and at least two of the following: 321, 346, 431. 
Certain substitutions may be approved by the Department. Students 
preparing for graduate school are advised to include Psychology 237 or 
238. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY AND DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

For the capable student who wishes to take part in selecting and 
planning his own investigation within particular areas of psychology, a 
program of independent study and research for credit may replace 
courses. The student is assisted by a member of the faculty with whom 
he has individual conferences. The student's investigation is designated 
as Independent Study (Psychology 500), whether or not he is a candidate 
for departmental honors. 

In order to begin a program of individual study for departmental 
honors, a psychology major 'is required to: (1) have an over-all grade- 

87 



point average of 2.5; (2) have an average of 3.0 in psychology courses; (3) 
show consistently high interest and initiative; and (4) obtain the ap- 
proval of the departmental staff and the dean of the college. 

Graduation with honors in psychology will depend on the quality 
of independent study, the written and oral reports, and the maintenance 
of the grade-point averages specified for admission to the study program. 

110. General Psychology. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior and human experience, with 
emphasis on biological and environmental influences upon learning, perception, motiva- 
tion, and cognitive functions. Studies of the person, of development and personality, 
and of interpersonal relationships are reviewed. 

215. Experimental Methods in Behavioral Science. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A course to acquaint students with the method, design, analysis and interpretation 
of data in the behavioral sciences. The course will provide the student with the appre- 
ciation of the experimental study of behavior as well as correlational methods and case 
study methods. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 taken previously or concurrently. 

220. Educational Psychology. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

An application of psychological principles to problems and issues encountered in 

formal education. Required for state certification in elementary and music education. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 

235. Experimental Psychology I: Sensory and Perceptual Processes. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Review of major areas of investigation of visual, auditory and other sensory 
systems. Psychophysical methods, and principles of sensory differentiation and field 
organization are included. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 

236. Experimental Psychology II: Learning and Motivation. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Instrumental and classical conditioning techniques are compared and related to 
theories of human and animal learning and motivation. Basic methods in the investiga- 
tion of verbal learning are also considered. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 

237. Laboratory Investigations I: Sensory and Perceptual Processes. 

1:0:3. First semester. 

Experiments with human subjects, coordinated with topics in Psychology 226. 
Students select sensory/perceptual problems for investigation, have a part in the de- 
sign of experiments, conduct trials, do statistical computation, and interpret the results. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 

Corequisite: Psychology 226. 

238. Laboratory Investigations II: Learning. 1:0:3. Second semester. 

Animal learning experiments coordinated with topics in Psychology 225. Simple 
learning situations are demonstrated. Students conduct investigations, analyze data, 
and write reports. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 

Corequisite: Psychology 225. 

300. Cinematic Conceptions of Man. 3 hours credit. 

Viewing films as literary works, an examination of the thematic, stylistic, and 
structural statements and assertions concerning man's actions and psychology that are 
made by auteurs, and involved in film genres and historical periods. Specific topics (e.g., 
Fellini, Antonioni, the Western, and Neo-Realism) to be selected each term, and dis- 
cussions will be based upon films in a film series illustrating the topic, a series held in 
conjunction with the course. May be taken twice for credit. 

321. Childhood and Development. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of human growth and development with particular emphasis upon the 

88 



psychological development of the child. Theories of development and appropriate re- 
search studies are included. Opportunities will be made available for field experience 
with children. Required for state certification in elementary education. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 

332. Psychological Testing and Assessment. 3: 3:0 . Second semester. 

An introduction to basic psychometric theory, and an overview of selected per- 
sonality, ability and attitude measures. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 

336. Research Design and Statistics. 3 hours credit. Second semester. 

Principles of research design and inferential statistical analysis planning and ex- 
ecution of studies. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 110, 235, 236. 

337. Organizational Psychology. 3 :3:0 . First semester. 

The application of basic psychological principles and findings to problems of orga- 
nizational behavior and psychology in industry. Topics to include: ecological psychol- 
ogy— man/environment relations, systems design and analysis, human factors engineer- 
ing, and the evaluation of the impact of the organization on the individual. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 

343. Personality. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A sudy of major concepts and theories concerning human personality and of the 
empirical bases for these. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 110: junior or senior standing, or permission of the 
instructor. 

346. Social Psychology. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Studies of the person's social responses and attributes, of group structures and rela- 
tions, of cultural norms, and of social influences on behavior. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 110; junior or senior standing, or permission of the 
instructor. 

431. Abnormal Behavior and Experience. 3 hours credit. First semester. 

An introduction to the major syndromes of abnormal behavior and their dynamics, 
and to the psychological, sociocultural and biological conditions associated with their 
development. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 110 and 343, or permission of the instructor. 

432. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. 3 hours credit. Second semester. 

Consideration of diagnostic procedures, dynamics, etiology, and treatment of be- 
havior disorders. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 110, 431; senior standing or permission of the instructor. 

443. History and Theory. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Philosophical issues, areas and trends of investigation, and '•schools of psychology" 
prior to 1940. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 110, 235 and 236; junior or senior standing, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

444. Physiological Psychology. 3:2:2. Second semester. 

A comparative study of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology with emphasis on 
the human nervous system. Functional and anatomical relationships arc related to 
problems in sensation, perception, learning, and motivation. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 110; Biology 101/102 or permission of the instructor. 

445/446. Research Seminar I, II. 1-3 hours credit per semester. 

Each semester areas of investigation or problems will be selected for individual or 
group study, and students conduct reviews of the relevant literature, regularly discuss 
studies and theoretical issues at seminar meetings, and prepare research papers. 

Prerequisites: Two semesters of psychology beyond Psychology 110. and permission 
of the instructor. 

<X9 



500. Independent Study. 3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
Individual investigation of a selected topic in psychology, involving either an ex- 
periment, a project in the community, or a systematic program of reading, each under 
the supervision of a member of the department. This includes conferences with the 
instructor. See information on pages 87-88. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 110, two additional psychology courses, and permission 
of the department. 

RELIGION 

Professor Wethington, Chairman; Professor Troutman; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Byrne and Cantrell; Adjunct Associate Professor Bemesderfer 

The aim of this department is to provide opportunity for the aca- 
demic study of the meaning of man's religious experience. 

Toward this end, the department offers courses which introduce the 
student to the various historical and contemporary expressions of the 
Christian heritage as well as courses which acquaint him with the diverse 
religious traditions of mankind. 

As pre-professional preparation, courses are provided for those who 
are looking toward graduate studies in the humanities, social sciences, 
world cultures, the Christian ministry, world missions, and other church 
vocations, as well as the academic teaching of religion. 

Major: A total of twenty-four semester hours is required, including 
Religion 404. A total of six hours of New Testament (Greek 211) or 
Hellenistic Greek (Greek 321, 322) as well as Philosophy of Religion 
(Philosophy 231) may be counted toward a religion major. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Students wishing to participate in the departmental honors pro- 
gram in the department may do so by fulfilling the following require- 
ments: (1) achieve high academic standing in departmental courses; (2) 
submit a paper in connection with a course beyond the first year courses; 
(3) apply and receive approval for participation in departmental honors 
from the departmental chairman and the dean of the college by the end 
of the first semester of the junior year; (4) prepare an essay of 10,000 
words or more under the direction of a member of the department to be 
submitted by March 15 of the senior year; (5) defend the essay before a 
faculty committee selected by the department chairman and the dean of 
the college. 

On the basis of his performance in the essay and the oral examina- 
tion, the departmental chairman and the dean of the college will de- 
termine whether or not the candidate is to receive departmental honors. 

111. Introduction to Biblical Thought. 3:3:0. First semester. 

An examination of some of the basic themes of Biblical religion in relation to 
their historical context and their contemporary implications. 

112. Introduction to the Christian Faith. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A systematic inquiry into the areas of religious languages, religious knowledge, 
and the doctrines of God, man, Christ, and the Church. 

90 



120. Religion in America. 3 . 3:(X Either semeste r. 

A study of contemporary Judaism, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism in the 
United States, including a brief historical background of each. Some attention is given 
to the various religious sects and cults. 

No prerequisite. 

130. American Folk Religion. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A study of both of the folk traditions of selected American denominations and 
sects, and of the theological implications of "secular" folklore. Emphasis will be placed 
on field-work as well as on analysis. 

Prerequisite: Religion 120 or permission of instructor. 

140. World Religions. 3 :3:0 . Either semester. 

An examination of the rise and development of religion along with a study of 
the ideas, and cultic and ethical practices of the great world faiths. Special attention 
given to Asian religions. 

No prerequisite. 

202. The Prophets. S:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1978-1979. 

A study of the lives and writings of the Old Testament prophets, and an analysis 
of their contributions to Hebrew-Christian religious thought. 
Prerequisite: Religion 111. 

206. Near East Archaeology and the Bible. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

An examination of archaeology in biblical lands, its methods, objectives, and con- 
tributions to the areas of history, culture, and religion. 

Prerequisite: Religion 111 or permission of instructor. 

211. Life and Teachings of Jesus. 3:3:0. First semester. 

An intensive study of the life and message of Jesus as set forth in the Gospels. 
Prerequisite: Religion 111. 

212. Life and Epistle of Paul. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

A study of the life, writings, and theological thought of Paul and their relation- 
ship to the practices, problems, and beliefs of the early church. 
Prerequisite: Religion 112. 

222. Christian Ethics. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A systematic analysis of the implications of the Christian faith both for personal 
moral decision, and for social policy in such areas as government and political life, 
work and the economic order. Strongly recommended for all pre-theological students. 

Prerequisite: Religion 111 or 112. 

331. Christian Tradition and Reform. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of the major and continuing strains in the history of Christianity and 
the principal reform movements. Strongly recommended for all pre-theological students. 
No prerequisite. 

332. Theological Issues in Contemporary Secular Authors. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Offered 1976-1977. 

Identification, analysis, and interpretation of issues of special theological import 
raised by thinkers representing "non-theological" disciplines. 
Prerequisite: Religion 112, or consent of instructor. 

340. Introduction to Christian Nurture. 3:3:0. (Not offered 1976-1977.) 

An investigation of some of the principles and problems of religious education as 
they are related to higher education, the public school, the (lunch school, and the 
home. 

Prerequisite: Religion 111 or 112. 

403. Seminar in Classical Christian Thinkers. 

3:3:0. First semester. (Not offered 1976-1977.) 

An intensive study of the thought of such classical religious thinkers as Augustine, 
Aquinas, Luther, and others. 

91 



Required of majors and strongly recommended for all pre-theological students; 
others by permission of the chairman of the department. 

404. Seminar in Contemporary Religious Problems. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of selected problems arising from recent theological efforts. Research 
methodology is stressed. 

Required of majors and strongly recommended for all pre-theological students; 
others by permission of the chairman of the department. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 
For departmental honors see information on page 90. 

RUSSIAN 

See Foreign Languages, page 63. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

General Adviser: Professor Geffen. Upon choice of an area of concentra- 
tion the student is given an adviser in that discipline. 

The social sciences examine the structure of society and the be- 
havior of human beings in group relationships within that structure. 
This interdisciplinary program provides an opportunity for the student 
to explore the basic concepts of a broad spectrum of social science dis- 
ciplines — economics, history, political science, and sociology — and then 
to do more concentrated work in his choice of one of these subject areas. 

All courses are taught by the respective departments and share the 
objectives of those departments. These objectives and specific course 
content are described in the respective departmental sections in this 
catalog. 

The general purpose of the program is to develop the student's un- 
derstanding of the nature of the social processes in which he is involved 
as a human being and the structure within which he lives as a member 
of society, in order that he may function more effectively. 

The program also offers basic preparation for graduate, theological, 
and law schools, and for careers in business, government, social work, 
and teaching. 

Basic Requirements: Economics 110/120, History 125/126, Political 
Science 111/112, Sociology 110 and any other Sociology course. 

Concentration Requirements (One of the following): 

Economics: Economics 490 and any other three courses in Eco- 
nomics. 

History: History 213, 412, and any other two courses in History. 

Political Science: Political Science 217, 412, and any other two 
courses in Political Science. 

Sociology: Sociology 311, 422, and any other two courses in So- 
ciology. 

92 



SOCIOLOGY 

Associate Professor Berson, Chairman; Assistant Professor Welch 

The Department of Sociology assists students in developing their un- 
derstanding of the general character of human relationships and of the 
specific nature and processes of group life. In addition to helping pre- 
pare students for further study in graduate schools of sociology and so- 
cial work, the department also provides pre-professional training for stu- 
dents who plan to pursue vocations in social, religious, and community 



service. 

Major: Sociology 110, 311, 422, and 432, plus 15 additional hours in 
the department. Psychology 346 may be counted toward the 27 hours 
required for a major. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

The departmental honors program is an encouragement to superior 
students to undertake a concentrated program of directed study. The stu- 
dent must apply for and receive admission to the program by the con- 
clusion of the first semester of his/her junior year. Admission to the 
program will be granted by the department chairperson and the dean of 
the college. The student must meet the following requirements: (1) 
complete 15 hours of sociology prior to admission into the program; 
(2) maintain a 3.2 grade-point average in sociology and a 3.0 grade- 
point average overall; (3) complete a major research or study program; 
(4) present and defend the results of his/her work before a faculty com- 
mittee and interested departmental majors; and (5) receive final ap- 
proval of departmental honors from the chairperson of the department 
and the dean of the college. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 110 is a prerequisite to all other courses in the department ex- 
cept Sociology 121. 

1 10. Introduction to Sociology. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

A systematic study of the major concepts, methods, and areas of sociology focusing 
on the nature of society, the behavior of social groups, and the impact of society on 
individuals. 

121. Introduction to Anthropology. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A general survey of the uses and methods of anthropology, focusing on the inter- 
action of physical and cultural factors in the development of man and his behavior. 

132. Minority Groups. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

An analysis of relations within and between racial and other ethnic groups. Con- 
sideration is given to unique historical contexts, basic social processes, and emergent 
contemporary developments. 

142. Criminology. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

An investigation of the social phenomenon of crime, including consideration of 
the nature, causes, and responses to behavior which is defined as criminal or deviant. 

93 



211. Urbanology. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

An inquiry into the nature and degree of urbanization in the United States and 
the world, and of the impact of urban life on contemporary society. 

221. Population. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

A consideration of both the quantitative and qualitative aspects of population 
growth in the United States and the world, with special emphasis on current trends 
and future projections. 

232. Family Sociology. 2:4:0. First seven weeks. Second semester. 

An intensive study of the family as a social institution which varies from one 
social-historical context to another. 

242. Marriage Making. 2:4:0. Second seven weeks. Second semester. 

A look at the marriage pattern, from initial dating to final dissolution, which 
most Lebanon Valley students can expect to encounter. 

311. Research Methods. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1977-1978. 

Students conduct a group project utilizing scientific principles to develop a re- 
search design, to collect and analyze data and to interpret and communicate findings. 

Prerequisite: Sociology major, junior or senior status, or permission of department 
chairperson. 

321. Sociology of Religion. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1976-1977. 

An investigation of the structure and functions of religious organizations and 
phenomena, with particular emphasis on the varieties of religious expression in Amer- 
ican society. 

331. Social Welfare. 3:3:0. First semester. 

An introduction to the nature and function of social welfare in contemporary so- 
ciety, stressing its history, its problems, and its prospects. 

342. Social Work Methods. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

An examination of the knowledge and skills required for professional social work, 
emphasizing the methods of social casework, social group work, community organiza- 
tion and social action. 

Prerequisite Sociology 331. 

352. Social Problems. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

An in-depth investigation of selected problems of contemporary life as seen 
through different analytical perspectives. 

410. Field Experience in Social Welfare. 3-4 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 8 hours credit) 

An extension and application of knowledge through a supervised field placement 
experience in a public or private social service agency or program. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 342. 

422. Social Theory. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

An intensive exploration of the major sociological theorists and movements. 
Prerequisite: 12 hours in the department. 

432. Senior Seminar. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A critical analysis of selected themes and issues in contemporary sociology. 
Prerequisite: Sociology major, senior status, or permission of department chair- 
person. 

500. Independent Study. 1-3 hours credit. Either semester. 

(Maximum of 9 hours credit.) 

Directed work in areas approved by the instructor. 

Prerequisite: 18 hours in sociology, a cumulative 2.5 average, and a contract with 
the instructor prior to registration for the course. 

94 



SPANISH 

See Foreign Languages, page 63. 

SPECIAL PLANS OF STUDY 

The adviser to each of these programs should be consulted for the details 
of the program's requirements and recommendations. 

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE 

Adviser: Dr. Hearsey 

The actuarial science program (see page 71 for requirements) is designed 
to prepare students for the first four of the ten examinations required by the So- 
ciety of Actuaries for admission as a Fellow. The college is a testing center for 
the Society of Actuaries, and each of the four examinations may be taken on 
campus. In addition, the choice of courses available to the actuarial science major 
is broad enough to qualify him as a major in mathematics. 

BIOLOGY (Professional Biology, Marine Biology, Pre-Medicine, Pre- 

Dentistry, Pre-Veterinary Curricula) 

Advisers: Dr. Wolf, Dr. Gring, Dr. Henninger, Dr. Verhoek, Dr. Williams, Dr. 
Wolfe 

First Year Third Year 

Bi 111/112, General Biology I, II Bi elective (4 hrs. each sem.) 

Ch 111. 112, Principles of Chem. I, II Phy 103, 104 or 111, 112, Gen. Coll. 

En 111/112, English Composition, I, II Physics I. II or Prin. of Physics I, II 

Ma 161, 162, Calculus I, II* Soc. Sci. or Hum., dist. req. (3 hrs. 1st 

PE 110/110, Physical Education sem., 6 hrs. 2nd sem.) 

Electives (3-6 hrs. 1st sem.) 
Second Year 

Bi electives (4 hrs. each sem.) 

Ch 213, Introductory Organic Chem. Fourth Year 

Ch 214, Organic Chemistry Bi elective (4 hrs. each sem.) 

Ch 216, Lab. Investigations III Bi 411 or 412, Biology Seminar (1 hr. 

For. Lang. Ill, 112, Interm. Fr, Ger, either sem.) 

Ru, or Sp 1,11 Electives (6-7 hrs. 1st sem., 9-10 hrs. 

Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 2nd sem.) 

Soc. Sci. or Hum., dist. req. (3 hrs. Soc. Sci. or Hum., dist. req. (3 hrs. 1st 

each sem.) sem.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 



* Ma 161 required; Ma 162 and 170 recommended. 

CHEMISTRY 

Advisers: Dr. Neidig, Dr. Lockwood, Dr. Spencer 

Students entering with advanced placement in chemistry are asked to consult 
the advisers. 

Curriculum leading to the degree of of the requirements for American 
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry (part Chemical Society certified degree). 

95 



First Year 

Ch 111, 112, Principles of Chem. I, II 
En 111/112, English Composition I, II 
For. Lang. Ill, 112, Interm. Fr, Ger, 

Ru, or Sp I, II* 
Ma 161, 162, Calculus I, II 
Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 

Second Year 

Ch213, Introductory Organic Chem. 

Ch214, Org. Chem. 

Ch 216, Lab. Investigations III 

Ma 261, Calculus III** 

Phy 111, 112, Prin. of Physics I, II 

Soc. Sci. or Hum. dist. req. (3 hrs. 1st 

sem., 6 hrs. 2nd sem.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 



Third Year 

Ch 311, 312, Physical Chemistry I, 
Ch 314, Instrumental Analysis 
Ch 315, 316, Lab. Investigations I, 
Ch 319, Chemical Equilibria 
Ch 320, Lab. Investigations IV 
Elective (3 hrs. 2nd sem.) 
Soc. Sci. or Hum., dist. req. (6 
1st sem., 3 hrs. 2nd sem.) 



II 



II 



hrs. 



Fourth Year 

Ch 411, 412, Adv. Inorganic Chem. I, 

II 
Ch 413, Adv. Analytical Chemistry 
Ch 414, Adv. Organic Chemistry 
Ch 500, Independent Study (both sem.) 
Electives (9 hrs. 1st sem. and 2nd sem.) 



* Ger 113, 114 recommended 
■* Ma 262 recommended 



ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Advisers: Dr. Buffenmyer, Mr. Knight, Mr. O'Neill, Dr. Tom, Dr. Warner 



First Year 

Ac 151, Principles of Financial 

Accounting 
Ac 152, Principles of Managerial 

Accounting 
CP 110, BASIC Computer Language 
BA 100 Introduction to Business 
Ec 110/120, Principles of Economics I, 

II 
En 111/112, English Composition I, II 
For. Lang 111, 112, Interm. Fr, Ger, 

Ru, or Sp I, II 
Ma 170, Elementary Statistics 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 

Second Year 

Distribution req. (3-4 hrs. 1st sem., 6-7 

hrs. 2nd sem.) 
Ec 201, Microeconomic Analysis 
BA 180, Principles of Management 
Ec 221, Quantitative Methods 
Ec or BA electives (6 hrs. 2nd sem.)* 
Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 

Third Year 

Distribution req. (6-7 hrs. each sem.) 
Ec or BA electives (6 hrs. each sem.)* 
Electives (3 hrs. each sem.) 



Fourth Year 

Ec 490 or BA 490, Sem. & Special Prob. 
Distribution req. 3-4 hrs. each semester 
Ec or BA electives (6-9 hrs. each sem.)* 
Electives (3-6 hrs. each sem.) 



* Students concentrating in areas desig- 
nated should schedule courses as indicated: 



Economics: 

Ec 301, Labor Economics and 

Industrial Relations 
Ec 311, Money & Banking 
Ec 322, Public Finance 
Ec 332, International Economics 
Ec 401, History of Economic 

Thought 
Ec 411, Economic Growth and 

Development 

Business Administration: 

BA 361, Corporation Finance 
BA 362, Investments 
BA 371, Business Law I 
BA 372, Business Law II 
BA 382, Marketing 



96 



Accounting: 

Ac 251/252, Intermediate Accounting 
I, II 

Ac 351, Advanced Accounting 

Ac 451, Advanced Cost and Mana- 
gerial Accounting 

Ac 452, Income Tax Accounting 

Ac 455, Auditing 

For students who are interested in 
receiving Pennsylvania Teaching Certi- 
fication in Social Studies with a major 
in economics and business administra- 
tion, the following courses are required: 

Ec 110/120, Prin. of Economics I, II 
Ec 201, Microeconomic Analysis 
Ec 221, Quantitative Methods 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Advisers: Dr. Ebersole, Mrs. Herr 

Suggested program for majors in ele 
First Year 

Ed 110, Social Foundations of Educa- 
tion (2nd sem.) 
En 1 11/112, English Composition I, II 
For. Lang. Ill, 112, Interm. Fr, Ger, 

Ru, or Sp I, II 
Geo 111, World Geography I 
Nat. Sci., dist. req. (3-4 hrs. each sem.) 
Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 

Second Year 

Electives (3-6 hrs. 1st sem., 6-9 hrs. 

2nd sem.) 
EE 220, Music in El. Sch. (either sem.) 
EE 250, Math, for El. Gr. (either sem.) 
EE 270, Children's Lit. (either sem.) 
Hi 125 or 126, Surv. U.S. Hist. I or II 
Hum., dist. req. (3 hrs. either sem.) 
Psy 110, General Psychology (1st sem.) 
Psy 220, Educational Psych. (2nd sem.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 



Ec 490, Seminar & Special Problems 
Ac 151, Principles of Financial 

Accounting 
BA 180, Prin. of Management 
Ma 170, Elementary Statistics 

With electives chosen from among: 
Ec 202, Macroeconomic Analysis 
Ec 301, Labor Economics and 

Industrial Relations 
Ec311, Money & Banking 
Ec 322, Public Finance 
Ec 332, International Economics 
Ec 401, Hist, of Economic Thought 
Ec 411, Economic Growth and 

Development 
BA 371, Business Law I 
BA 372, Business Law II 



mentary education. 
Third Year 

Elective (3 hrs. either sem.) 

EE 332, Physical Sci. in Elem. Sch. 

EE 341, Teaching of Reading 

EE 344, Health & Safety Education 

EE 361/362, Communications & Group 

Processes I, II 
Ma 100, Basic Concepts of Math, or 
one of the following: 102, 111, 112, 
161, or 162, as background indicates. 
Psy 321, Childhood & Development 
Soc. Sci., dist. req. (3 hrs. each sem.)* 

Fourth Year 

Ar 401, Art in the Elementary School 

Electives (6-9 hrs. 2nd sem.) 

EE 440, Student Teaching (1st sem.) 

EE 444, Senior Seminar 

Hum., dist. req. (3-6 hrs. 2nd sem.)* 



* Education 342 is also required and may 
be taken the second semester of either the 
third or fourth year. 



COOPERATIVE ENGINEERING PROGRAM 

Adviser: Dr. Rhodes 

Lebanon Valley College offers a cooperative program in engineering whereby 
a student may earn a Bachelor of Science degree from Lebanon Valley College 
and a Bachelor of Science degree in one of the fields of engineering from the 
University of Pennsylvania or other cooperating institution. 

97 



Students who pursue this cooperative engineering program take three years 
of work at Lebanon Valley College in the liberal arts and also in the mathemat- 
ics and physics courses prerequisite for engineering. Then, if recommended by 
Lebanon Valley College, they may attend the University of Pennsylvania or other 
cooperating institution for two additional years of work in engineering. After 
the satisfactory completion of this five-year program the student is granted the 
Bachelor of Science degree by Lebanon Valley College while the University 
grants the appropriate engineering degree. At the University of Pennsylvania the 
student may select from among eight different curricula — bioengineering, chem- 
ical engineering, civil and urban engineering, computer science and engineering, 
electrical engineering and science, mechanical engineering and applied mechan- 
ics, or metallurgy and materials science, and systems science and engineering. A 
typical curriculum for the first three years of the cooperative engineering pro- 
gram is given below, but each student's curriculum is planned to meet his par- 
ticular needs. 



First Year 

En 111/112, English Composition I, II 
For. Lang., gen, req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 
Ma 161, 162, Calculus I, II 
Phy 111/112, Principles of Physics I, II 
Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 
PE 110/ 110, Physical Education 

Second Year 

Electives (3 hrs. each sem.) 
Humanities, dist. req. ( 3 hrs. each sem.) 
Ma. 261, Calculus III 
Ma. 266, Differential Equations 
Phy 211, Atomic & Nuclear Physics 
Phv 212, Introduction to Electronics 



Social Sciences, dist. req. 

(3 hrs. each, sem.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 

Third Year 

Ch 111, 112, Principles of Chem. I, II 
Humanities, dist. req. (3 hrs. 1st sem.) 
Ma 361, 362, Methods of Applied Math. 

I, II 
Phy 3 1 1 , 3 1 2, Analytical Mechanics I, II 
Phy 321, 322, Electricity and Magne- 
tism I, II 
Social Sciences, dist. req. (3 hrs. 2nd 
sem.) 



COOPERATIVE FORESTRY 
PROGRAM 

Please consult Dr. Williams 

Students completing three years at 
Lebanon Valley College studying the 
liberal arts and sciences basic to forest- 
ry may apply for admission to the co- 
operative forestry program with Duke 
University. Qualified students, admit- 
ted by Duke University will receive the 
professional degree of Master of For- 
estry from Duke University and the 
Bachelor of Science degree from Leb- 
anon Valley College after successful 
completion of a two-year (plus one 
summer) program at Duke. This pro- 
gram enables students to obtain a B.S. 
degree and a Master of Forestry degree 
in five years and one summer. 



First Year 

Bi 111/112, General Biology I, II 

Ch 111, 112, Principles of Chem. I, II 

En 111/112, English Composition I, II 

Ma 161, Calculus I 

Ma 170, Ele. Statistics* 

CP 110, Basic Computer Language* 

PE 110/1 10, Physical Education 

Second Year 

Bi 403, Ecology 

Bi 302, Survey of the Plant Kingdom 

Ch 213, Introducing Organic Chem. 

Ch 214, Organic Chemistry 

Ch 216, Lab. Investigations III 

For. Lang. Ill, 112, Interm. Fr, Ger, 

Ru, or Sp I, II 
Hum., dist. req. (3 hrs. 1st sem.) 
Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs. 2nd sem.) 
Soc. Sci. dist. req. (3 hrs. each sem.)** 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 



98 



Third Year 

Bi 307, Plant Physiology 

Bi 201, Genetics 

Bi 306, Microbiology 

Phy 103, 104, Gen. College Physics, I, II 

Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs. 1st sem.) 



Soc. Sci., dist. req. ( 3 hrs. 2nd sem.) 
Hum., dist. req. (3 hrs. each semester) 



* Recommended 
** Ec 110 recommended. One other course 
in economics may be helpful. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Adviser: Dr. Argot 

The medical technology student 
takes three years of courses at Lebanon 
Valley College in order to fulfill the 
requirements of the college and of the 
Board of Schools of the American So- 
ciety of Clinical Pathologists. Preceding 
or during the third year of the pro- 
gram it is the student's responsibility to 
gain admission to a hospital with an 
American Medical Association-approved 
school of medical technology, where he 
spends the fourth year in training. 
Lebanon Valley College is affiliated 
with the following hospitals: Abington, 
Allentown Sacred Heart, Harrisburg, 
Harrisburg Polyclinic, Lancaster Gen- 
eral and Reading. This curriculum 
leads to the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Medical Technology from Leb- 
anon Valley. 

First Year 

Bi 111/112, General Biology I, II 
Ch 111, 112, Principles of Chem. I, II 
En 111/112, English Composition I, II 



Ma 102 or 161, Algebra & Trig, or Cal- 
culus I. 
Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 

Second Year 

Bi 201, Genetics 

Bi 202, Animal Physiology 

Ch 213, Introductory Organic Chem. 

Ch 214, Organic Chemistry 

Ch 216, Lab. Investigations, III 

For. Lang. Ill, 112, Interm. Fr, Ger, 

Ru, or Sp I, II 
Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs.) 
Soc. Sci. or Hum., dist. req. (3 or 6 hrs. 

1st sem., 3 or 6 hrs. 2nd sem.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 

Third Year 

Bi elective (4 hrs. 1st sem.)* 
Bi 306, Microbiology 
Elective (3 hrs. either sem.)** 
Phy 103, 104, Gen. Coll. Physics I, II 
Soc. Sci. or Hum., dist. req. (9 hrs. 
either sem.) 



Bi 304 or 305 recommended. 
Ma 170 recommended. 



MUSIC 

Adviser: Mr. Fairlamb 

First Year 

En 111/112, English Composition I, II 
For. Lang. Ill, 112, Interm. Fr, Ger, 

Ru, or Sp I, II 
Mu 1 1 1, 1 12, Sight Singing I, II 
Mu 113, 114, Ear Training I, II 
Mu 115, 116, Harmony I, II 
Mu, applied music (2 hrs. each sem.)* 
Nat. Sci., dist. req. (3-4 hrs. each sem.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 



Second Year 

Electives (3 hrs. 1st sem., 1 hr. 2nd 

sem.) 
Mu 215, Harmony III 
Mu 217, Basic Concepts Structure & 

Style 
Mu 224, Counterpoint 
Mu 226, Form & Analysis I 
Mu 246, Prin. of Conducting 
Mu, applied music (2 hrs. each sem.)* 
Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 
Soc. Sci., dist. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 

99 



Third Year 

Electives (5 hrs. 2nd sem.) 

Hum., dist. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 

Mu 315, Elementary Composition 

Mu 316, Keyboard Harmony 

Mu 329, Form Sc Analysis II 

Mu 341/342, History and Lit. of Music 

I, II 
Mu, applied music (2 hrs. each sem.)* 
Soc. Sci., dist. req. (3 hrs. 1st sem.) 



Fourth Year 

Electives (7 hrs. 1st sem., 11 hrs. 2nd 

sem.) 
Art 110, Intro, jo Art (hum. dist. req.) 
Mu 462, Music Lit. Seminar 
Mu, applied music (2 hrs. each sem.)* 
Nat. Sci., dist. req. (3 hrs. 1st sem.) 



* Study of voice, organ, piano, and band 
and orchestral instruments. 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

Adviser: Mr. Smith 

Variances by track systems are identi- 
fied as: 

(a) General track 

(b) Instrumental track 

(c) Keyboard- Vocal track 

First Year 

Bi 101/102, Intro, to Biology I, II 

En 111/112, English Composition I, II 

For. Lang. Ill, 112, Interm. Fr, Ger, 

Ru, or Sp 
Mu 111, 112, Sight Singing I, II 
Mu 113, 114, Ear Training, I, II 
Mu 115, 116, Harmony I, II 
Mu 123, Brass I 

Mu, applied music (2 hrs. each sem.)* 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 
(a-b) Mu 124, Brass II 
(c) Mu 132, Diction for Singers 

Second Year 

Ed 110, Social Foundations of Educa- 
tion (2nd sem.) 
Mu 215, Harmony III 
Mu 217, Basic Concepts of Structure & 

Style 
Mu 226, Form & Analysis I 
Mu 227, Percussion I 
Mu 231, 232, Woodwind I, II 
Mu 246, Principles of Conducting 
Mu, applied music (2 hrs. each sem.)* 
Psy 110, General Psychology (1st sem.) 
Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 
Soc. Sci., dist. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 
PE 110/110, Physical Education 

Third Year 

Hum., dist. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 
Mu 316, Keyboard Harmony 

100 



Mu 334, Meth. & Mat. Gen. Music: 

Junior High School 
Mu 335, Meth. & Mat. Instrumental: 

Gr. 4-6 
Mu 337, String I 
Mu 341/342, History and Lit. of Music 

I, II 
Mu, applied music (2 hrs. each sem.)* 
(a-b) Mu 327, Percussion II 

Mu336, Meth. & Mat. Instru- 
mental: Jr.-Sr. High 
Mu 338, String II 
(a-c) Mu 333, Meth. & Mat. Gen. Mu- 
sic: Elementary 

(b) Elective (3 hrs. 1st sem.) 

Mu 345, Instrumental Conduct- 
ing 

(c) Elective (3 hrs. 2nd sem.) 
Mu 347, Choral Conducting 

(a) Mu 345 or Mu 347 

Fourth Year 

Elective (3-6 hrs. 2nd sem.) 

Hum., dist. req. (3 hrs. 2nd sem.) 

Mu 441, Student Teaching 

Mu, applied music (1 or 2 hrs. each 

sem.)*f 
Psy 220, Educational Psych. (1st sem.) 
Soc. Sci., dist. req. (3 hrs. 2nd sem.) 
(a-b) Mu 416, Orchestration 

(b) Mu 402, Sem. in Adv. Instrmntl. 
Prob. 

(c) Mu404, Mu. Ed. Sem.: Secondary 
Level 

(a) Mu 402 or Mu 404 



* Study of voice, organ, piano, and band 
and orchestra instruments. 
f Private study during the student teach- 
ing semester is at the discretion of the 
student. 



NURSING 

Adviser: Dr. Wolf 

The nursing program consists of the two- or three-year program of an ac- 
credited hospital school of nursing and a two-year program in liberal arts at 
Lebanon Valley College. The two phases of the course may be taken in either 
order. Completion of the program and receipt of the R.N. (registered nursing) 
certificate will result in the awarding of the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing by Lebanon Valley College. One plan of study is outlined below. 

First Year Second Year 

Natural Science requirement-Select Electives (9-1 1 hrs. each sem ) 

£"w%W i < Sfi , S. J S. Ma,70, E1 e m . st a ti s £i cs (r eco mm e„ d e d ) 

Ru, or Sp I, II 
Religion, gen. req. (3 hrs. each sem.) 
Soc. Sci. or Hum., dist. req. (3 hrs. 



nrilSnL • it^ . * Not re q uire d if student has the R.N. 

PE 110/110, Physical Education* certificate. 

TEACHING 

Advisers: Dr. Ebersole, Dr. Albrecht, Mrs. Herr, Dr. Jacques, Mrs. 
Rogers, Dr. Knight 

The requirements listed below are applicable to students desiring 
to be certified to teach in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 



BASIC REGULATIONS-PENNSYLVANIA 
INSTRUCTIONAL I CERTIFICATE 

A. General Education 

Certificates are based on the completion of a minimum of sixty (60) 
semester hours of acceptable courses in general education with not less 
than twelve (12) semester hours in the humanities and not less than 
nine (9) semester hours in each of the following areas: the social sci- 
ences and natural sciences. 

These requirements apply to both elementary and secondary fields. 

B. Elementary Education— Subject Matter Requirements 

The Pennsylvania Instructional I certificate may be issued to those 
who have completed the approved program. 

The prospective elementary education teacher is also required to 
have an academic major or an area of concentration of at least 18 to 24 
semester hours. 

The area of concentration may be defined as follows: 

Study in a single subject such as history; study in a broad field such as 

101 



sociology, psychology, and anthropology elected from social science; study 
in an interdisciplinary field such as courses elected from the humanities, 
social science, or the natural sciences. 

C. Professional Education for Secondary Teacher Certification 

Pennsylvania Instructional I certificates are based on the completion 
of the approved program in the subject field to be taught in the secondary 
school and a minimum of eighteen (18) semester hours of professional 
education distributed in the following areas: social foundations of ed- 
ucation, human growth and development, materials and methods of in- 
struction and curriculum, and nine (9) semester hours in actual prac- 
ticum and student teaching experience under approved supervision and 
appropriate seminars including necessary observation, participation and 
conferences on teaching problems. The areas of methods and materials 
of instruction and curriculum, and student teaching shall relate to the 
subject matter specialization field or fields. 

D. Secondary Student Teaching Program 

A student concentrating in a major area of interest may, upon the 
direction of his adviser and approval of the dean of the college, enroll in 
one of two student teaching programs. 

1. Semester of Professional Training 

A student desiring to receive, upon graduation, the Pennsylvania In- 
structional I certificate devotes a semester of the senior year to pro- 
fessional preparation. The sixteen weeks are organized as follows: 
Ed. 420. Human Growth and Development. 3:7]/ 2 :0. See page 56 for 
course description. 

Ed. 430. Practicum and Methods. 3:71/4:0. See page 56 for course 
description. 

Some time is devoted to the presentation of data on basic reading 
instruction to fulfill certification requirements for the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania. 

Ed. 440. Student Teaching. 

Nine semester hours credit. 

The student enters on a full-time student teaching experience of 
one semester. He is under the direction of a trained teacher in an 
accredited high school and is counseled and directed by the college 
director of secondary student teaching. The student teacher also is 
observed by his major adviser. 

Prerequisites for Student Teaching: A student must have: 

a. Maintained a 2.0 grade-point average in his major field, 

b. Completed the basic courses of Education 110, 420, and 430, and 

c. Secured written approval of his major adviser, the director of sec- 

102 



ondary student teaching, and the dean of the college in order to be 
accepted for student teaching in the professional semester of his senior 
year. 

Post-Graduate Student Teaching 

The post-graduate student teaching program is under the direc- 
tion of Lebanon Valley College or, by arrangement, may be pursued 
with any other accredited institution which has provision for super- 
vising student teaching in the public schools. 

Because of the necessity of meeting Pennsylvania state certifica- 
tion requirements of proper supervision, only a limited number of 
students are accepted in the in-service student teaching program. 
Likewise, assignments are made only to those schools within the range 
of the institution responsible for supervising the enrollee. 



103 



DIRECTORIES 



FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, 1975-1976 



Faculty: 

FREDERICK P. SAMPLE, 1968—; 
President. 

CARL Y. EHRHART, 1947—; 
Dean of the College. 

WILLIAM H. FAIRLAMB, 1947— 
Secretary of the Faculty. 



Emeriti: 

RUTH ENGLE BENDER, 1918-1922, 
1924-1970; 

Professor Emeritus of Music Educa- 
tion. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1915; 
Oberlin Conservatory; graduate New 
England Conservatory. 

O. PASS BOLLINGER, 1950-1973; 
Associate Professor Emeritus of 
Biology. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1928; 
M.S., The Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1937. 

D. CLARK CARMEAN, 1933-1972; 
Director Emeritus of Admissions. 
A.B., OhioWesleyan University, 1926; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1932. 

GLADYS M. FENCIL, 1921-1927; 1929- 
1957; 

Registrar Emeritus. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1921. 

DONALD E. FIELDS, 1928-1930; 
1947-1970; 
Librarian Emeritus. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1924 
M.A., Princeton University, 1928 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1935 
A.B. in Library Science, University 
of Michigan, 1947. 

104 



SAMUEL O. GRIMM, 1912-1970; 
Professor Emeritus of Physics. 
B.Pd., State Normal School, Millers- 
ville, 1910; A.B., Lebanon Valley 
College, 1912; A.M., 1918; Sc.D., 
1942. 

ALVIN H. M. STONECIPHER, 

1932-1958; 

Professor Emeritus of Latin Lan- 
guage and Literature; Dean Emer- 
itus. 

A.B., Vanderbilt University, 1913; 
A.M., 1914; Ph.D., 1917; Litt.D., 
Lebanon Valley College, 1962. 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE, 1931-1970; 

Professor Emeritus of English. 
B.S. in Ed., University of Kansas, 
1922; M.S. in Ed., 1925; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1931. 



Professors: 

GEORGE D. CURFMAN, 1961—; 
Professor of Music Education. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1953; 
M.M., University of Michigan, 1957; 
D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1971. 

HILDA M. DAMUS, 1963—; 
Professor of German. 
M.A., University of Berlin and Jena, 
1932; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 
1945. 

ROBERT S. DAVIDON, 1970—; 

Professor of Psychology; Chairman 
of the Department of Psychology. 
A.B., University of Illinois, 1940; 
M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1946; Ph.D., 1951. 



CLOYD H. EBERSOLE, 1953—; 
Professor of Education; Chairman of 
the Department of Education. 
A.B., Juniata College, 1933; M.Ed., 
The Pennsylvania State University, 
1941; D.Ed., 1954. 

ANNA DUNKLE FABER, 1954—; 
Professor of English. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1948; 
M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1950; 
Ph.D., 1954. 

ALEX J. FEHR, 1951—; 
Professor of Political Science. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1950; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1957; 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1968. 

ARTHUR L. FORD, 1965—; 

Professor of English; Chairman of 
the Department of English. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1959; 
M.A., Bowling Green State Univer- 
sity, 1960; Ph.D., 1964. 

ELIZABETH M. GEFFEN, 1958—; 
Professor of History; Chairman of 
the Department of History and Po- 
litical Science. 

B.S. in Ed., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1934; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., 1958. 

PIERCE A. GETZ, 1959—; 
Professor of Organ. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1951; 
M.S.M., Union Theological Sem- 
inary School of Sacred Music, 1953; 
A.M.D., Eastman School of Music, 
1967. 

KARL L. LOCKWOOD, 1959—; 
Professor of Chemistry. 
B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1951; 
Ph.D., Cornell University, 1955. 

JEAN O. LOVE, 1954—; 
Professor of Psychology. 
A.B., Erskine College, 1941; M.A., 
Winthrop College, 1949; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1953. 



JOERG W. P. MAYER, 1970—; 
Professor of Mathematics; Chairman 
of the Department of Mathematics. 
Dipl. Math., University of Giessen, 
1953; Ph.D., 1954. 

HOWARD A. NEIDIG, 1948—; 
Professor of Chemistry; Chairman of 
the Department of Chemistry. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1943; 
M.S., University of Delaware, 1946; 
Ph.D., 1948. 

SARA ELIZABETH PIEL, Jan., 
I960—; 

Professor of Languages. 
A.B., Chatham College, 1928; M.A., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1929; Ph.D., 
1938. 

JACOB L. RHODES, 1957—; 

Professor of Physics; Chairman of 

the Department of Physics. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1943; 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 

1958. 

C. F. JOSEPH TOM, 1954—; 

Professor of Economics and Business 

Administration. 

B.A., Hastings College, 1944; M.A., 

University of Chicago, 1947; Ph.D., 

1963. 

*PERRY J. TROUTMAN, I960—: 
Professor of Religion. 
B.A., Houghton College, 1949; 
M.Div., United Theological Sem- 
inary, 1952; Ph.D., Boston Univer- 
sity, 1964. 

L. ELBERT WETHINGTON, 

1963—; 

Professor of Religion; Chairman of 
the Department of Religion. 
B.A., Wake Forest University, 1944; 
B.D., Divinity School of Duke Uni- 
versity, 1947; Ph.D., Duke Univer- 
sity, 1949. 

R. GORDON WISE, 1973—; 
Adjunct Professor of Art. 
B.S., University of Missouri, 1960; 
M.A., Roosevelt University, 1964; 
Ed.D., University of Missouri, 1970. 

105 



Associate Professors: 

JAMES O. BEMESDERFER, 1959—; 
Adjunct Associate Professor of Re- 
ligion. 

ELAINE S. BERSON, 1970—; 

Associate Professor of Sociology; 

Chairman of the Department of 

Sociology. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1950; 

M.S.W., University of Oklahoma, 

1953; Ph.D., Duke University, 1958. 

CHARLES T. COOPER, 1965—; 
Associate Professor of Spanish; Act- 
ing Chairman of the Department of 
Foreign Languages. 
B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, 1942; 
M.A., Middlebury College, 1965. 

WILLIAM H. FAIRLAMB, 1947—; 
Associate Professor of Piano and 
Music History. 

Mus.B., cum laude, Philadelphia 
Conservatory, 1949. 

WILLIAM M. FLEISCHMAN,1973— ; 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
B.A., Lehigh University, 1959; M.S., 
1964; Ph.D., 1967. 

JUNE EBY HERR, 1959—; 

Associate Professor of Elementary 
Education. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1943; 
M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

JOHN P. KEARNEY, 1971—; 
Associate Professor of English. 
B.A., St. Benedict's College, 1962; 
M.A., University of Michigan, 1963; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1968. 

THOMAS A. LANESE, 1954—; 
Associate Professor of Strings, Con- 
ducting, and Theory. 
B.Mus., Baldwin-Wallace College, 
1938; fellowship, Juilliard Graduate 
School; M.Mus., Manhattan School 
of Music, 1952. 



DAVID I. LASKY, 1974—; 

Associate Professor of Psychology. 
A.B., Temple University, 1956; M.A., 
1958; Ph.D., 1961. 

AGNES B. O'DONNELL, 1961—; 
Associate Professor of English. 
A.B., Immaculata College, 1948; 
M.Ed., Temple University, 1953; 
M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1968. 

J. ROBERT O'DONNELL, 1959—; 
Associate Professor of Physics. 
B.S., The Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1950; M.S., University of Del- 
aware, 1953. 

ROBERT W. SMITH, 1951—; 
Associate Professor of Music Educa- 
tion; Chairman of the Department 
of Music. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1939; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1950. 

JAMES N. SPENCER, 1967—; 
Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
B.S., Marshall University, 1963; Ph.D., 
Iowa State University, 1967. 

FRANK E. STACHOW, 1946—; 
Associate Professor of Theory and 
Woodwinds. 

Diploma, clarinet, Juilliard School 
of Music; B.S., Columbia University, 
1943; M.A., 1946. 

JAMES M. THURMOND, 1954—; 
Associate Professor of Music Educa- 
tion and Brass. 
Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music, 



1931 
1951 
1952 



A.B., American University, 

M.A., Catholic University, 

Mus.D., Washington College 



of Music, 1944. 

PAUL L. WOLF, 1966—; 
Associate Professor of Biology; Chair- 
man of the Department of Biology. 
B.S., Elizabethtown College, i~960; 
M.S. University of Delaware, 1963; 
Ph.D., 1968. 



106 



GLENN H. WOODS, 1965—; 
Associate Professor of English. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1951; 
M.Ed., Temple University, 1962. 

Assistant Professors: 

MADELYN J. ALBRECHT, 1973—; 
Assistant Professor of Education. 
B.A., Northern Baptist College, 1952; 
M.A., Michigan State University, 
1958; Ph.D., 1972. 

JEANNE E. ARGOT, 1969—; 

Assistant Professor of Biology. 
B.S., Moravian College, 1965? M.S., 
Lehigh University, 1967; Ph.D., 1969. 

DAVID N. BAILEY, 1971—; 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
B.S., Juniata College, 1963; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy, 1968. 

RICHARD C. BELL, 1966—; 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1941; 
M.Ed., Temple University, 1955. 

PHILIP A. BILLINGS, 1970—; 

Assistant Professor of English. 
B.A., Heidelberg College, 1965; 
M.A., Michigan State University, 
1967; Ph.D., 1970. 

JAY R. BUFFENMYER, 1974—; 
Assistant Professor of Economics and 
Business Administration; Chairman 
of the Department of Economics and 
Business Administration. 
B.S., Elizabethtown College, 1961; 
M.P.I.A. University of Pittsburgh, 
1967; Ph.D., 1970. 

FAY B. BURRAS, 1964—; 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1960; 
M.A., Smith College. 1961. 

RONALD G. BURRICHTER, 

1968-1971; 1973—; 
Assistant Professor of Music. 
B.M.E., Wartburg College, 1964; 
M.M., Peabody Conservatory of Mu- 
sic, 1968. 



DONALD E. BYRNE, JR.,. 1971— ; 

Assistant Professor of Religion. 
B.A., St. Paul Seminary, 1963; M.A., 
Marquette University, 1966; Ph.D., 
Duke University, 1972. 

VOORHIS C. CANTRELL, 1968—; 
Assistant Professor of Religion and 
Greek. 

B.A., Oklahoma City University, 
1952; B.D., Southern Methodist Uni- 
versity, 1956; Ph.D., Boston Univer- 
sity, 1967. 

ROGER D. CARLSON, 1972—; 
Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
A.B., Sacramento State College, 1968; 
M.A., 1969; Ph.D., University of 
Oregon, 1972. 

VIRGINIA E. ENGLEBRIGHT, 

1971—; 

Assistant Professor of Voice. 
B.M.E., Florida State University. 
1969; M.M., 1970. 

DAVID M. GRING, 1971—; 
Assistant Professor of Biology. 
B.A., Franklin and Marshall College, 
1967; M.A., Indiana University, 
1970; Ph.D., 1971. 

BRYAN V. HE ARSE Y, 1971—; 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
B.A., Western Washington State Col- 
lege, 1964; M.A., Washington State 
University, 1966; Ph.D., 1968. 

JOHN H. HEFNER, 1972—; 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1968; 
A.M., Boston University. 1971: Ph.D., 
1976. 

RICHARD A. ISKOWITZ, 1969—; 
Assistant Professor of Art. 
B.F.A., Kent State University, 1965; 
M.F.A., 1967. 

L. EUGENE JACQUES, 1975—; 
Assistant Professor of Education. 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh. 1937; 
M.Ed., 1941; D.Ed., 1952. 



107 



RICHARD A. JOYCE, 1966—; 
Assistant Professor of History. 
A.B., Yale University, 1952; M.A., 
San Francisco State College, 1963. 

RICHARD N. W. KIRBY, 1971-1972; 
1974—; 

Assistant Professor of English. 
B.A. University of Leicester, 1966; 
M.A., 1967; Ph.D., University of Sus- 
sex, 1972. 

EVA GOFF KNIGHT, 1975—; 
Adjunct Assistant Professor of 
Education. 

B.A., Goucher College, 1955; M.A., 
Columbia University, 1963; C.A.S.E., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1964; 
Ed.D., Columbia University, 1968. 

ROYAL E. KNIGHT, 1975—; 

Assistant Professor of Economics and 
Business Administration. 
B.S., Eastern Illinois University, 1955; 
M.S., 1970. 

NEVELYN J. KNISLEY, 1954-1958; 
1963; 1970—; 

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Piano. 
Mus.B., Oberlin Conservatory of 
Music, 1951; M.F.A., Ohio Univer- 
sity, 1953. 

ROBERT C. LAU, 1968—; 

Assistant Prof essor of Musical Theory. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1965; 
M.A., Eastman School of Music, 
1970. 

LEON E. MARKOWICZ, 1971—; 
Assistant Professor of English. 
A.B., Duquesne University, 1964; 
M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1968; Ph.D., 1972. 

JOHN W. MARTIN, 1971—; 

Assistant Professor of French. 
B.A., Yale University, 1958; M.A., 
San Diego State College, 1967; Ph.D., 
University of Rochester, 1972. 

KATHLEEN E. McNERNEY, 1974—; 
Assistant Professor of Spanish. 
B.A., University of New Mexico, 
1967; M.A., 1969. 

108 



OWEN A. MOE, JR., 1973—; 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
B.A., St. Olaf's College, 1966; Ph.D. 
Purdue University, 1971. 



PHILIP G. MORGAN, 1969— 
Assistant Professor of Voice. 
B.M.E., Kansas State College, 
M.S., 1965. 



1962; 



JOHN D. NORTON, 1971—; 
Assistant Professor of Political Science. 
B.A., University of Illinois, 1965; 
M.A., Florida State University, 1967; 
Ph.D., American University, 1973. 

ROBERT L. NOWICKI, JR., 1975—; 
Assistant Professor of German. 
A.B., Fordham University, 1966; 
M. Phil., Yale University, 1970. 

JANETTE E. OGG, 1975—; 
Assistant Professor of Voice. 
A.B., Asbury College, 1958; M.A., 
University of North Carolina, 1969; 
D.M., Florida State University, 1975. 

JOSEPH E. PETERS, 1974—; 
Adjunct Assistant Professor of 
Psychology. 

B.S., Juniata College, 1968; M.S., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1970; 
Ph.D., 1973. 

GERALD J. PETROFES, 1963—; 
Assistant Professor of Physical Ed- 
ucation; Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Physical Education. 
B.S., Kent State University, 1958; 
M.Ed., 1962. 

O. KENT REED, 1971—; 

Assistant Professor of Physical Ed- 
ucation. 

B.S. in Ed., Otterbein College, 1956; 
M.A. in Ed., Eastern Kentucky Uni- 
versity, 1970. 

DENNIS W. SWEIGART, 1972—; 
Assistant Professor of Piano. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1963; 
M.M., University of Michigan, 1965. 



PHILLIP E. THOMPSON, 1974—; 
Assistant Professor of Physics. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1968; 
Ph.D., University of Delaware, 1975. 

WARREN K. A. THOMPSON, 

1967—; 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy; 

Chairman of the Department of 

Philosophy. 

A.B., Trinity University, 1957; M.A., 

University of Texas, 1963. 

WALLACE J. TORONI, 1975—; 
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Strings. 
Graduate, New School of Music, 
1959. 

ANN L. HENNINGER TRAX, 
1973—; 

Assistant Professor of Biology. 
B.A., Wilson College, 1968; Ph.D., 
University of Michigan, 1973. 

WILLIAM H. G. WARNER, 1972—; 
Assistant Professor of Economics 
and Business Administration. 
B.A., Haverford College, 1939; J.D.. 
University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 

EDWIN H. WELCH, 1975—; 
Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
A.B., Western Maryland College, 
1965; S.T.B., Boston University 
School of Theology, 1968; Ph.D., 
1971. 

STEPHEN E. WILLIAMS, 1973;— 
Assistant Professor of Biology. 
B.A., Central College, 1964; M.S., 
University of Tennessee, 1966; Ph.D., 
Washington University, 1971. 

SUSAN E. VERHOEK WILLIAMS, 

1974—; 

Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 

1964; M.A., Indiana University, 1966; 

Ph.D., Cornell University, 1975. 

ALLAN F. WOLFE, 1968—; 
Assistant Professor of Biology. 
B.A., Gettysburg College, 1963; M.A., 
Drake University, 1965; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Vermont, 1968. 



ROSEMARY YUHAS, 1973—; 
Assistant Professor of Physical 
Education. 

B.S., Lock Haven State College, 1966; 
M.Ed., West Chester State College, 
1970. 



Instructors: 

ROBERT A. AULENBACH, 1968—; 
Adjunct Instructor in Woodwinds. 
B.M., Boston Conservatory of Music, 
1949. 

DAVID V. BILGER, 1974—; 

Adjunct Instructor in Woodwinds. 
B.M., Ithaca College, 1967. 

ROBERT B. CAMPBELL, 1968—; 

Adjunct histructor in Woodwinds. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1954; 
M.M., University of Michigan, 1960. 

JAMES W. CHECKET, 1973—; 
Adjunct Instructor in Brass. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1959. 

BRUCE S. CORRELL, 1972—; 
Instructor in Physical Education. 
B.S., Bowling Green State Univer- 
sity, 1971; M.Ed., 1972. 

JAMES L. DUNN, 1972—; 

Adjunct Instructor in Woodwinds. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1964; 
M.M., University of Michigan, 1968. 

KENNETH FINE, 1975—; 
Adjunct Instructor of Music. 

RICHARD D. FINK, 1973—; 
Adjunct Instructor in Actuarial 
Science. 
B.S., Ursinus College, 1948. 

NADIA K. GARMAN, 1975—; 
Adjunct Instructor in Russian. 
B.S., Millersville State College, 1968. 

GUY A. GIFFORD, 1974—; 
Adjunct Instructor in Flute. 
B. of M., Catholic University, 1970 

109 



JOSEPH A. GOEBEL, JR., 1972—; 
Adjunct Instructor in Percussion. 
B.S. in Ed., Millersville State Col- 
lege, 1961. 

WILLIAM A. GROVE, 1971—; 
Adjunct Instructor in Brass. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1965; 
M.M., Temple University, 1974. 

JAMES P. O'NEILL, 1974—; 
Instructor in Economics and Business 
Administration. 

B.S., Fordham University, 1965; M.A., 
University of New Mexico, 1974. 

H. DONALD REED, 1975—; 
Adjunct Instructor in Brass. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1964; 
M.Ed., West Chester State College, 
1973. 

SARAH F. ROGERS, 1975—; 

Instructor in Elementary Education. 
A.B., University of South Carolina, 
1943; M.A., Columbia University, 
1944; M.A. in Special Ed., American 
University, 1972. 



DEBORAH E. SANFORD, 1975—; 
Instructor in Piano. 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1971; M.M., Temple University, 1975. 

FRANCIS P. SATALIN, JR., 1975—; 
Instructor in Physical Education. 
B.A., St. Bonaventure University, 
1967; M.S. in Counseling, Syracuse 
University, 1971; M.S., in Physical 
Education, 1974. 

MALIN Ph. SAYLOR, 1961—; 

Adjunct Instructor in French. 

Fil. Kand., Universities of Upsala 

and Stockholm, 1938. 

GLORIA E. STAMBACH, 1970-1973; 
1975—; 

Adjunct Instructor in Piano. 
Diploma, Juilliard School of Music, 
1952; Post Graduate Diploma, 1956. 

VIRGINIA T. WATKINS, 1972—; 
Instructor in Piano. 
B.M., Muskingum College, 1970; 
M.M., Manhattan School of Music, 
1972. 



110 



OFFICES OF ADMINISTRATION 



Office of the President: 

FREDERICK P. SAMPLE, 1968—; 
President. 

B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1952; 
M.Ed., Western Maryland College, 
1956; D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University, 1968; Pd.D., Albright 
College, 1968. 

DOROTHY M. SPOHN, Secretary. 

LILLIAN M. SUMMER, Secretary. 

Academic: 

Office of the Dean of the College 

CARL Y. EHRHART, 1947—; 
Dean of the College, I960—; 
Vice President, 1967 — . 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1940; 
M.Div., United Theological Sem- 
inary, 1943; Ph.D., Yale University, 
1954. 

RALPH S. SHAY, 1948-1951; Feb. 
1953—; 

Assistant Dean of the College, 1967—. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1942; 
A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 
1947; Ph.D., 1962. 

MARIAN C. ROGERS, Secretary. 



GLORIA I. FERNSLER, Secretary. 
MARION G. LOY, .Secretary. 

Library 

WILLIAM E. HOUGH, III, 1970—; 
Head Librarian; Associate Professor. 
A.B., The King's College, 1955; 
Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary, 
1959; M.S.L.S., Columbia University, 
1965. 

ELOISE P. BROWN, 1961—; 

Reference Librarian. 

B.S.L.S., Simmons College, 1946. 

ALICE S. DIEHL, 1966—; 
Cataloging Librarian. 
A.B., Smith College, 1956; B.S., Car- 
negie Institute of Technology, 1957; 
M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh, 
1966. 

MYUNG JA KANG, 1970—; 
Assistant Cataloging Librarian. 
B.A., Sook Myung Women's Univer- 
sity, 1962; M.S.L.S., Villanova Uni- 
versity, 1969. 

CHRISTINE M. HOPPLE, Secretary. 
GERALDINE E. LENTZ, Secretary. 



Office of Admissions 

GREGORY G. STANSON, 1966—; 
Director of Admissions, 1972 — . 
B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1963; 
M.Ed., University of Toledo, 1966. 

JOSEPH L. ROESER, 1975—; 

Counselor in Admissions. 

B.S., Elizabethtown College, 1961. 
SYLVIA H. SNYDER, Secretary. 
LORETTA A. WATSON, Secretary. 

Office of the Registrar 

RALPH S. SHAY, 1948-1951; Feb. 
1953—; 

Assistant Dean of the College and 
Registrar, 1967—. 



Departmental Secretaries 

KATHY M. CHECKET, Blair Music 
Center. 

CAROL L. KREISER, Miller Chapel. 

ELIZABETH C. MICHIELSEN, 112 

College Avenue. 

EVELYN D. NAGLE, Administration 
Building. 

MARILYN F. PARKER, Lynch Me- 
morial Building. 

CHARLOTTE J. RITTLE, Science 
Hall. 

BERNICE K. TEAHL, Science Hall. 

MAE B. WALLACE, Teacher Place- 
ment. 

Ill 



Student Affairs: 

Student Personnel Office 
GEORGE R. MARQUETTE, 1952—; 

Dean of Students, 1972 — . 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1948; 

M.A., Columbia University, 1951; 

Ed.D., Temple University, 1967. 

FRANCES C. NORTHRUP, 1974—; 
Assistant Dean of Students. 
R.N., Fairview Park Hospital, 1967; 
B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 
1972; M.Ed., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1974. 

LOUIS A. SORRENTINO, 1971—; 
Assistant Dean of Students, 191 % — . 
B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1954; 
M.A., Bucknell University, 1961. 

MARCIA J. GEHRIS, 1972—; 
Assistant to the Dean of Students. 
B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1969. 

ESTHER A. KLINE, Secretary. 

JUNE S. ZEITERS, Secretary. 

MARY P. KELSEY, Head Resident, 
Mabel I. Silver Hall. 

MARY M. COX, Head Resident, Vick- 
roy Hall. 

KATHRYN E. ROHLAND, Head Res- 
ident, Mary Capp Green Hall. 



College Center 

WALTER L. SMITH, JR., 1961-1969; 
1971—; 

College Center Directory Coordina- 
tor of Conferences. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1961; 
M.S. in Ed., Temple University, 1967. 

ROBERT E. HARNISH, 1967—; 

Manager of the College Store; 
Business Manager of the Concert 
Choir and Chamber Orchestra. 
B.A., Randolph Macon College, 1966. 

DORIS C. FAKE, Secretary, College 
Store. 



Health Services 

ROBERT F. EARLY, 1971—; 

College Physician. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1949; 

M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 

1952. 

RUSSELL L. GINGRICH, 1971—; 
College Physician. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1947; 
M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 
1951. 

ROBERT M. KLINE, 1970—; 
College Physician. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1950; 
M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 
1955; B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 
1971. 

JULIANA Z. WOLFE, 1975—; 
Head Nurse. 

R.N., St. Joseph's Hospital, Carbon- 
dale, 1963. 



CAROL FOUST, 

Nurse. 

SYBIL HADDON, 

Nurse. 



R.N., Resident 



R.N., Resident 



Office of the Chaplain 

JAMES O. BEMESDERFER, 1959—; 
College Chaplain. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1936; 
M.Div., United Theological Sem- 
inary, 1939; S.T.M., Lutheran Theo- 
logical Seminary, Phila., 1945; S.T.D., 
Temple University, 1951. 

CAROL L. KREISER, Secretary. 

Office of Athletics 

GERALD J. PETROFES, 1963—; 
Director of Athletics. 

MARILYN F. PARKER, Secretary. 



Coaching Staff 

JEFFREY L. BENSING, 1973—; 
Soccer Coach. 

B.S., Elizabeth town College, 1964; 
Ph.D., Brown University, 1971. 



112 



BRUCE S. CORRELL, 1972—; 
Lacrosse Coach; Assistant Basketball 
Coach. 

JAMES F. DAVIS, 1972—; 
Cross Country Coach. 
B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1969. 

CHARLES E. EYLER, 1971—; 
Assistant Football Coach. 
B.S. in Ed., West Chester State Col- 
lege, 1953; M.S. in Ed., Temple Uni- 
versity, 1963; M.S., University of 
New Hampshire, 1968. 

FRANK GRABUSKY, 1975—; 
Assistant Football Coach. 
B.S., Millersville State College, 1969. 

TERRY L. KLINE, 1974—; 
Athletic Trainer. 

B.S. in Ed., Millersville State Col- 
lege, 1969. 

JOHN T. LOFTUS, 1975—; 
Assistant Basketball Coach. 
B.S., King's College, 1969. 

KENNETH D. MILLER, 1974—; 
Equipment Manager. 

GERALD J. PETROFES, 1963—; 
Wrestling Coach; Golf Coach. 

O. KENT REED, 1971—; 

Assistant Football Coach; Track 
Coach; Director of Intramurals for 
Men. 

FRANCIS P. SATALIN, JR., 1975—; 
Basketball Coach; Baseball Coach. 

LOUIS A. SORRENTINO, 1971—; 
Football Coach. 

JACQUELINE S. WALTERS, 1965—; 
Women's Hockey Coach. 

ROSEMARY YUHAS, 1973—; 

Women's Basketball Coach, Women's 
Lacrosse Coach, Director of Intra- 
murals for Women. 



College Relations Area 
Development Office 



ROBERT 

1967—; 



M. WONDERLING, 



Director of Development. 

B.S., Clarion State College, 1953; 

M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1958. 

JAMES F. DAVIS, 1972—; 

Assistant Director of Development, 

1974—. 

B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1969. 

MARILYN E. BOESHORE, Secretary. 

DORIS J. MAY, Secretary. 

Public Relations Office 

ANN K. MONTEITH, 1966—; 
Director of Public Relations. 
A.B., Bucknell University, 1965. 

LOTTIE M. BROWN, 1974—; 

Associate in Public Relations, 1975 — ; 
B.A., University of Arkansas, 1949. 

HAROLD D. ULMER, 1973—; 
Associate in Public Relations. 
B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1973. 

Alumni Office 

DAVID M. LONG, 1966—; 

Director of Alumni Relations and 

Industrial Placement. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1959; 

M.Ed., Temple University, 1961. 

HELEN L. MILLER, Secretary. 



Rusiness Management: 

Office of the Controller 
ROBERT C. RILEY, 1951—; 

Controller, 1962 — ; Vice President, 
1967—. 

B.S. in Ed., Shippensburg State Col- 
lege, 1941; M.S., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1947; Ph.D., New York Univer- 
sity, 1962. 

IRWIN R. SCHAAK, 1957—; 
Assistant Controller, 1964 — ; Finan- 
cial Aid Officer, 1967—. 

ROBERT C. HARTMAN, 1969—; 
Accountant. 
B.S., Elizabethtown College, 1962. 

113 



RONALD G. EVANS, Administrative 
Services. 

SANDRA K. KELLIHER, Switchboard 
Operator. 

MARY R. MILLS, Administrative Ser- 
vices. 

CHERYL L. NEWMASTER, Secre- 
tary, Assistant Controller. 

THOMAS A. PEIFFER, Administra- 
tive Services. 

JOANNE J. STRAWDERMAN, Sec- 
retary, Vice President and Controller. 

ERMA R. STONE, Secretary Business 
Office. 

LILLIAN G. STRANGE, Secretary, 
Vice President and Controller. 



Buildings and Grounds 

SAMUEL J. ZEARFOSS, 1952—; 
Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds, 1969—. 

WILLIE E. CARLISLE, 1974—; 
Director of Maintenance, 1975 — . 

HERMAN W. HEISEY, 1975—; 
Chief of Security 

DELLA M. NEIDIG, 1962—; 

Director of Housekeeping, 1972 — ; 

MARY E. RHINE, Secretary, Build- 
ings and Grounds. 

Food Service 

GEORGE F. LANDIS, JR., 1966—; 
Manager of Food Service, 1970 — . 



FLORENCE B. WILLIAMS, Secretary, 
Business Office. 



MILDRED J. REESE, 1969—; 

Manager of the Snack Shop, 1973 — . 



114 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY- 1975-1976 



Mr. Cooper 

Mr. Joyce, Chairman 



Central Committee 

Dr. Lockwood 
Dr. Rhodes 



Dr. Wolfe, Secretary 



Curriculum Committee 



Dean Ehrhart, Chairman 

Dr. Berson 

Dr. Buffenmyer 

Mr. Cooper 

Dr. Davidon 

Dr. Ebersole 

Dr. Ford 

Dr. Geffen 

Mr. Hough 



Mr. Iskowitz 
Dr. Mayer 
Dr. Neidig 
Mr. Petrofes 
Dr. Rhodes 
Mr. Smith 
Mr. Thompson 
Dr. Wethington 
Dr. Wolf 



Dr. Shay, advisory member 
Joy J. Hoffman, student 
Curtis G. Kemmerer, student 
Keith J. Kominiak, student 
Jeffrey A. Loser, student 
Kenneth O. Mosteller, 

student 
William L. Routson, 

student 



Academic Life Committee 

Dr. Berson Dr. Carlson Mr. Lanese 

Dr. Buffenmyer, Secretary Dr. Henninger, Chairman Mr. O'Donnell 
Dr. Byrne Dr. Jacques Dr. Wolf 



Dr. Ebersole 
Dr. Getz 
Dr. Gring 
Dr. Hearsey 
Mr. Joyce 



Continuing Committee on Liberal Education 

Dr. Kearney Dr. Spencer 

Dr. Kirby Mr. Thompson, 

Mr. Lau Vice Chairman 

Dr. Markowicz Dr. Tom 

Dr. Martin Dean Ehrhart, Ex officio 

Dr. Neidig, Chairman 



Dr. Bailey, Secretary 
Dr. Davidon 
Mr. Heffner 
Dr. Lasky 



Faculty Life Committee 



Dr. Norton, Chairman 
Mr. Nowicki 
Mr. O'Neill 



Mr. Petrofes 
Mr. Stachow 
Dr. Verhoek 



Dr. Albrecht 
Dr. Argot 
Dr. Faber 
Dr. Fehr 



General Campus Life Committee 

Dr. Fleischman, Chairman Dr. Thompson 
Dr. Ford, Secretary Dr. Thurmond 

Mrs. O'Donnell Mr. Woods 



Mr. Bell 

Dr. Billings, Chairman 

Mr. Burrichter 

Mr. Correll 



Student Life Committee 



Mrs. Englebright 

Mrs. Herr 

Dr. Mayer 

Mr. Reed, Secretary 



Dr. Warner 
Dr. Welch 
Miss Yuhas 



115 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 1975-1976 

OFFICERS: 

President Lawton W. Shroyer 

First Vice President F. Allen Rutherford, Jr. 

Second Vice President Elizabeth K. Weisburger 

Secretary E. D. Williams, Jr. 

Treasurer E. Peter Strickler 

Assistant Treasurer Gerald D. Kauffman 

President Emeritus E. N. Funkhouser 

President Emeritus Allan W. Mund 



MEMBERS: 

**Edward H. Arnold (1978) 
B.A. 
President, New Penn Motor Express, 

Inc. 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

** James M. Ault (1977) 
A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D., LL.D. 
Resident Bishop of the Philadelphia 

Area 
Eastern Pennsylvania Conference 
United Methodist Church 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

**Jefferson C. Barnhart (1977) 
A.B., LL.B. 
Attorney — McNees, Wallace and 

Nurick 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

* George W. Bashore (1976) 
A.B., M.Div. 
Superintendent, Lebanon-Reading 

District 
Eastern Pennsylvania Conference 
United Methodist Church 
Reading, Pennsylvania 

tAlfred L. Blessing (1978) 
A.B. 

District Manager, McGraw-Hill Inc. 
New York City, New York 

*William D. Boswell (1977) 
Ph.B., LL.B. 

Attorney — Berman and Boswell 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



* Elected by Church Conference 
** Trustee-at-Large 
f Alumni Trustee-at-Large 

116 



tNicholas Bova, Jr. (1978) 
B.S. 
Vice President, International 

Division of Avon Products Inc. 
New York City, New York 

*W. Edgar Cathers, Jr. (1977) 
B.A., B.D. 
Administrator 
Simpson House 

The United Methodist Church 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

*Ruth Sheaffer Daugherty (1977) 
B.A. 

Homemaker 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

**Curvin N. Dellinger (1976) 
B.S. 

President, J. C. Hauer's Sons Inc. 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

*Woodrow S. Dellinger (1978) 
B.S., M.D. 

General Practitioner 
Red Lion, Pennsylvania 

**DeWittM. Essick (1977) 
Assistant General Manager, 

Personnel Relations, Armstrong 

Cork Company 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

**Neil E. Fasnacht (1976) 

Student, Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

*Eugene C. Fish (1975) 
B.S., J.D. 

President, Peerless Industries, Inc. 
Boyertown, Pennsylvania 



Chairman of the Board — Eastern 
Foundry Co., Boyertown, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Attorney — Romeika, Fish and 
Scheckter 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Sr. Partner, Tax Associates 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

**Pierce A. Getz (1978) 
B.S., M.S.M., A.M.D. 
Professor of Organ 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

*Kathryn Mowrey Grove (1977) 
A.B. 

Homemaker 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

* Thomas W. Guinivan (1976) 
A.B., B.D., D.D. 
Superintendent, York District 
Central Pennsylvania Conference 
United Methodist Church 
York, Pennsylvania 

**John Richards Harper (1978) 
Vice President, Pardee Company 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

*Philip C. Herr, II (1976) 
A.B., LL.B. 

Attorney — Herr, Potts and Herr 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

*Paul E. Horn (1976) 
A.B., B.D., D.D. 
Pastor, Stevens Memorial 

United Methodist Church 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

*Mark J. Hostetter (1976) 
A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. 
Pastor, Morrisville United Methodist 
Church, Morrisville, Pennsylvania 

*Gerald D. Kauffman (1976) 
A.B., B.D., D.D. 
Pastor, Grace United Methodist 

Church 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania 



* Elected by Church Conference 
** Trustee-at-Large 
f Alumni Trustee-at-Large 
$ Faculty Trustee-at-Large 



** James H. Leathern (1977) 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Sc.D. 
Professor of Zoology & Director of 

the Bureau of Biological Research 
Rutgers, The State University 
New Brunswick, New Jersey 

tWalter Levinsky (1977) 
Free-lance Musician, Composer, and 

Conductor 
New York City, New York 

+Karl L. Lockwood (1977) 
B.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

*Thomas S. May (1978) 
B.S., B.D., D.D. 
Pastor, St. Paul's United Methodist 

Church 
Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 

**Allan W. Mund (1978) 
L.L.D., D.B.A. 
Retired Chairman, Board of 

Directors 
Ellicott Machine Corporation, 
Baltimore, Maryland 

^Howard A. Neidig (1976) 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Chairman, Department of Chemistry, 

Professor of Chemistry 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

* Henry H. Nichols (1978) 
B.S., B.A., B.D., S.T.B., D.D., LL.D. 
Pastor, Janes Memorial United 

Methodist Church 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

+Agnes B. O'Donnell (1977) 
A.B., M.Ed., M.A. 
Associate Professor of English 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

♦Harold S. Peiffer (1977) 
A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. 
Superintendent, Northeast District 
Eastern Pennsylvania Conference 
United Methodist Church 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

117 



*Kenneth Plummer (1978) 
Vice President, E. D. Plummer Sons, 

Inc. 
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 

**Lawrence E. Priester (1976) 
Student, Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

*Ezra H. Rank (1976) 
A.B., B.D., D.D. 
Pastor, Milton Grove and St. Mark's 

United Methodist Church 
Mt. Joy, Pennsylvania 

**Daniel S. Reifsnyder (1976) 
Student, Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

* Mildred M. Reigh (1978) 
B.A., M.Ed., M.S. 
Professor of Mathematics 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
Indiana, Pennsylvania 

JJacob L. Rhodes (1976) 
B.S., Ph.D. 
Chairman, Department of Physics, 

Professor of Phvsics 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

**Herbert C. Richman, Jr. (1978) 
B.S. 

Executive Vice-President, 
Marts and Lundy, Inc. 
New York City, New York 

*Melvin S. Rife (1977) 
Treasurer, Schmidt and Ault Paper 

Co., Div. St. Regis Paper Company 
York, Pennsylvania 

*Ralph M. Ritter (1976) 
President, Ritter Brothers, Inc. 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

tF. Allen Rutherford, Jr. (1978) 
B.S., C.P.A. 
Principal, Arthur Young and 

Company 
Richmond, Virginia 



* Elected by Church Conference 
** Trustee-at-Large 
f Alumni Trustee-at-Large 
J Faculty Trustee-at-Large 



Frederick P. Sample 
B.A., M.Ed., D.Ed., Pd.D. 
President of the College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

*Daniel L. Shearer (1977) 
A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. 
Director — Program Council 
Central Pennsylvania Conference 
United Methodist Church 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

*Lawton W. Shroyer (1975) 
President, Shamokin Dress Company 

and Shroyer's, Inc. 
Shamokin, Pennsylvania 

** Horace E.Smith (1977) 
A.B., LL.B. 

Attorney — Smith and McCleary 
York, Pennsylvania 

*Paul E. Stambach (1977) 
A.B., B.D., S.T.M., Ph.D. 
Pastor, Otterbein United Methodist 

Church 
Mount Wolf, Pennsylvania 

**Sara K. Stauffer (1978) 
B.S. 

Treasurer 
Leola Supply Co. of Leola and 

Maryland 
Leola, Pennsylvania 

fE. Peter Strickler (1977) 
B.S. 
President, Strickler Insurance 

Agency, Inc. 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

**Woodrow W. Waltemyer (1978) 
Business Executive 
St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands 

**JohnB. Warman (1977) 
A.B., B.D., Ed.M., D.D. 
Bishop, Harrisburg Area 
Central Pennsylvania Conference 
United Methodist Church 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

fElizabeth K. Weisburger (1976) 
B.S., Ph.D. 

Scientist Director, Biology Branch 
National Cancer Institute 
Bethesda, Maryland 



118 



* Harlan R. Wengert (1978) 
B.S., M.B.A. 

President, Wengert's Dairy, Inc. 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

*E. D. Williams, Jr. (1978) 
Secretary, Lebanon Valley College 

Board of Trustees 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

* Ralph C. Woolley (1977) 
B.M. 

Assistant Professor of Music 
York College of Pennsylvania 
Director of Music, Asbury United 

Methodist Church 
York, Pennsylvania 

*Richard A. Zimmerman (1978) 
B.A. 

President and Chief Operating Offi- 
cer, Hershey Foods Corp. 
Hershey, Penna. 17033 



HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Bertha Brossman Blair 

LL.D. 

President %c Chairman of the Board 

Denver and Ephrata Telephone Co. 

Ephrata, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Albert Watson 
Homemaker 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania 



TRUSTEES EMERITUS 

Dr. William D. Bryson 

LL.D. 

Retired Executive, Walter W. Moyer 

Company 
Ephrata, Pennsylvania 

Paul C. Ehrhart 

A.B., M.A. 

Retired Teacher and Guidance 

Counselor 
Millersville, Pennsylvania 



* Elected by Church Conference 
** Trustee-at-Large 



E. N. Funkhouser 

A.B., LL.D. 

Retired President, Funkhouser Corp. 

Hagerstown, Maryland 

Hermann W. Kaebnick 

A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D., L.H.D. 

Retired Bishop, Central Pennsylvania 

Conference 
United Methodist Church 
Hershey, Pennsylvania 

Robert Lutz 

A.B. 

Retired Executive, 

Blumenthal-Kahn Electric Company 

Owings Mills, Maryland 

Robert H. Reese 

Retired President 

H. B. Reese Candy Company, Inc. 

Hershey, Pennsylvania 

Samuel K. Wengert 
B.S., LL.D. 

Chairman of the Board, 
Wengert's Dairy Inc. 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



COMMITTEES 
OF THE BOARD 

Executive Committee: 

Frederick P. Sample, Chairman; Ruth 
S. Daugherty; Paul E. Horn; Mark J. 
Hostetter; Thomas S. May; Allan W. 
Mund; Henry H. Nichols; Jacob L. 
Rhodes; Lawton W. Shroyer; Paul E. 
Stambach; E. Peter Strickler; Richard 
A. Zimmerman. 

Finance Committee: 

F. Allen Rutherford, Jr., Chairman 
(1977); Eugene C. Fish, Vice Chairman 
(1976); E. D. Williams, Jr., Secretary 
(1977); E. Peter Strickler, Treasurer; 
Gerald D. Kauffman, Assistant Treasur- 
er (1978); Jefferson C. Barnhart (1978); 
Curvin N. Dellinger (1977); Woodrow 
S. Dellinger (1976); Allan W. Mund 
(1977); Howard A. Neidig (1978); Her- 



119 



bert C. Richman (1976); Ralph M. 
Ritter (1976); Frederick P. Sample; 
Lawton W. Shroyer; Harlan R. Wen- 
gert(1978). 

Faculty Administrative Committee: 

W. Edgar Cathers, Chairman; William 

D. Boswell; DeWitt M. Essick; Pierce 
A. Getz; Kathryn M. Grove; Ezra H. 
Ranck; Frederick P. Sample; Daniel L. 
Shearer; Elizabeth K. Weisburger 

Auditing Committee: 

Melvin S. Rife, Chairman; Alfred L. 
Blessing; Thomas W. Guinivan. 

Buildings and Grounds Committee: 

E. D. Williams, Jr., Chairman; Philip 
C. Herr, II; James H. Leathern; Agnes 
O'Donnell; Kenneth Plummer; Fred- 
erick P. Sample; E. Peter Strickler 

Nominating Committee: 

Lawton W. Shroyer, Chairman; Ruth 
S. Daugherty; Thomas W. Guinivan; 
Curvin N. Dellinger; Karl L. Lock- 
wood; F. Allen Rutherford, Jr. 



GENERAL ALUMNI 
ORGANIZATION 

Board of Governors of the Lebanon 
Valley College Alumni Association — 
1976-1977 

OFFICERS 

President 

Martin L. Gluntz, '53 
1 14 Sand Rd., Glen Acres 
Hershey, PA 17033 

Vice President 
Merle L. Wise, '53 
R.D. 8, Meadow Crest 
Frederick, MD 21701 

Executive Secretary 
David M. Long, '59 
Box 97, Mt. Gretna, PA 17064 



ELECTED MEMBERS TO THE 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Melvin E. Hostetter, '53 

42 Center Dr., Camp Hill, PA 17011 

John W. Metka, '60 
868 Beechwood Rd. 
Havertown, PA 19083 

Frank A. Ritrievi, '54 
29 Tulip Rd. 
Levittown, PA 19056 

Evelyn Toser, '52 

2402 Rudy Rd., Harrisburg, PA 17104 

ALUMNI TRUSTEES 

Alfred L. Blessing, '45 
155 Maple St. 
Haworth, NJ 07641 

Nicholas Bova, Jr., '52 
16 Townsend Road 
Newark, DE 19711 

Walter Levinsky, '51 

379 Bogert Rd., River Edge, NJ 07661 

E. Peter Strickler, '47 
201 Hathaway Pk., Lebanon, PA 
17042 

Dr. Elizabeth K. Weisburger, '44 
5309 McKinley St., Bethesda, MD 
20014 

PAST PRESIDENT 

Thomas C. Reinhart, '58 

41 E. Court Boulevard 

West Lawn, Reading, PA 19609 

REGIONAL ALUMNI AREAS 

ANTHRACITE AREA 

Key Alumnus 

Dale C. Schimpf, '69 
606 Center St., Ashland, PA 
17921 

BALTIMORE AREA 

Key Alumni 

John & Sandra Jones '72/72 
26 Mission Wood Way 
Reistertown, MD 21136 



120 



BERKS COUNTY 

President 

Robert A. Kaufmann, '68 
2913 Octagon Ave. 
Sinking Spring, PA 19608 



NATIONAL CAPITAL AREA 

President 

Edith Kreiser Probus, '46 
1901 Bargo Court 
McLean, VA 22101 



BUXMONT AREA 

Key Alumnus 

Stephen H. Roberts, '65 
2020 Parkview Dr. 
Lansdale, PA 19446 

DERRY AREA 

Key Alumni 

George & Carol Hollich, '65/'66 
212 West Orchard Dr. 
Palmyra, PA 17078 

HARRISBURG AREA 

Key Alumnus 

Melvin E. Hostetter, '53 
42 Center Dr. 
Camp Hill, PA 17011 

LANCASTER COUNTY 

President 

Lois E. Quickel, '67 
128 Atkins Ave. 
Lancaster, PA 17603 



Key Alumnus 

Robert F. Doster, '58 
6029 Amherst Ave. 
Springfield, VA 22150 

NORTH JERSEY AREA 

Key Alumnus 

Taki Bobotas, '70 
1 Linmar Ave. 
Newton, NJ 07860 

PHILADELPHIA & WESTERN 

Key Alumnus 

Martin J. Grochowski, '56 
1251 MarlynRd. 
Philadelphia, PA 19151 

READING AREA 

President 

Robert A. Kaufmann, '68 
2913 Octagon Ave. 
Sinking Spring, PA 19608 



LEBANON AREA 

Key Alumnus 

William E. Checket, '65 
156 W. Chestnut St. 
Jonestown, PA 17038 



SOUTH JERSEY AREA 

Key Alumnus 

David D. Neiswender, '53 
3 Colonial Lane 
Cherry Hill, NJ 08034 



LEHIGH VALLEY AREA 

Key Alumnus 

Dean A. Flinchbaugh, '62 
1885 Abington Rd. 
Bethlehem, PA 18018 



YANKEE CLUB 

President 

Richard W. Moller, '49 
19 Kimball Ave., Wenham, MA 
01984 



MASON/DIXON CLUB 

Key Alumni 

William & Alice Kelly '54/'54 
231 Ramsey Ave. 
Chambersburg, PA 17201 



YORK COUNTY 

President 

Kenneth R. Orwig, '59 
185 Scott Rd. 
York, PA 17403 



121 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



DEGREES CONFERRED JANUARY 5, 1975 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Martha Rebecca Bushong, English Penny Hope Pratt Huber, Psychology 

Dianne Gaynell Hepford Dilger, Quintin Allan Lerch, Music 

Psychology Maureen Elizabeth Lewis, Psychology 

Mark Webster Fuhrer, English Carol Ann Miller Mathias, Sociology 

Deborah Ann Gernerd, Mathematics James Gary McDivitt, Mathematics 
Rex Patrick Hildebrand, Psychology 



BACHELOR 

Janet Susan Bashore, Elementary Education 
Louise Mary Gelsinger, Elementary 

Education 
Lois Jean Goodman, Elementary Education 
William Scott Hazel, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Francis Thomas Lichtner, Jr., Biology 
Robert Bruce McNeill, Elementary 

Education 



OF SCIENCE 

Richard Joseph Newmaster, Jr., Economics 

and Business Administration 
Peggy Ann Olver, Music Education 
Thomas Jeffrey Schwalm, Elementary 

Education 
Daryl Allan Shaffer, Biology 
Ronald Laurence Swaim, Biology 
Judith Heyser Taylor, Music Education 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Patricia Ann Pheasant 

DEGREES CONFERRED MAY 18, 1975 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Stephanie Lynn Bates, Music 

David Michael Bennethum, History 

Leslie Anne Berger, English 

Robert Alan Boyer, Sociology 

Marlene Joyce Camillo, Psychology 

Anthony John Cek, Psychology 

Lisa Virginia Chmura, English 

Jeffrey Charles Compton, Political Science 

Edward Robert Donnelly, German 

Dixie Lee Drybread, Political Science 

Robert Nelson Eckler, English 

Roberta Louise Eppley, History 

Kim Edward Feinauer, Philosophy 

John Guilio Fenimore, English 

Lynn Ellen Ferriola, Mathematics 

Stephen Michael Fitzgerald, History 

Sheryl Denise Forte, Psychology 

Nancy Elaine Fritz, Psychology 

David Alfred Gross, Music 

Barbara Gail Hammond, Psychology 

Kevin James Hartnett, Psychology 

Jayne Devine Holsinger, Psychology 

William Ross Ingraham, Religion 

Janet Marilyn Katz, Psychology 

Christine Louise Kielb, Psychology 

Janet Marie Kitzmiller, English 

Deborah Lee Kost, French 

Francis Walter Kushler, Jr., Psychology 

Linda Maxine Long, Mathematics 

Heidrun Hergard Mayer, Sociology 

122 



Jeffrey Oliver McGary, English 
Barbara Anne McNamara, Psychology 
Janice Carol Miles, English 
Stephen John Miller, Mathematics 
Chester Quintin Mosteller, Mathematics 
Nancy Elisabeth Murphy, English 
Nancy Anne Nelson, English 
Sharon Lynn O'Neal, Sociology 
Michelle Elaine Painchaud, Psychology 
Anastasia Diomone Pappas, English 
Michael Dustin Rhoads, Social Science 
David Frank Rice, Political Science 
Patricia June Evans Sanford, Music 
Christie Diana Savage, Psychology 
Janet Eileen Scattergood, Mathematics 
Barbara Gail Schroeder, Music 
Eugenie Margaret Scott, English 
Howard Purvis Scott, Music 
Kenneth Andrew 7 Seyfert, German 
Holly Celia Shirk, English 
Elizabeth Langan Shivell, History 
Irwin Henry Siegel, English 
Lonna Marie Snavely, English 
Gregory Allen Souders, Foreign Languages 
Donald Malcolm Teed, Sociology 
Laura Evelyn Tilipko, Political Science 
Robert Jacobs Wilt, Jr., Religion 
William Henry Worrilow, III, English 
Charles Lester Zoll, III, Religion 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Kathleen Jane Abbey, Elementary 

Education 
John Miller Albert, Elementary Education 
Cynthia Lee Albright, Biology 
Steven Jamieson Aleshire, Economics and 

Business Administration 
David Cedric Amsden, Music Education 
Bonnie Lee Bashore, Elementary Education 
Marilyn Adele Bauer, Chemistry 
Donna Lynne Beltz, Elementary Education 
Nancy Ruth Bonnet, Music Education 
Sue Ella Boohar, Elementary Education 
Elizabeth Ann Boyd, Elementary Education 
Eileen Ruth Briggs, Music Education 
Edward Robert Burkhart, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Tomilyn Fay Campbell, Elementary 

Education 
Donald Leonard Charlton, Jr., Economics 

and Business Administration 
Ronald George Chronister, Biology 
Paula Ann Clarke, Music Education 
Scott Alan Copenhaver, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Kim Douglas Dahms, Biology 
Wesley Thomas Dellinger, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Joseph Francis Deroba, Biology 
Thomas Clifford Dilworth, Mathematics, 

Economics and Business Administration 
Susan Kay Dunnick, Elementary Education 
Robert Michael Edris, Economics and 

Business A dministration 
David Charles Egner, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Matthew John Eisenhauer, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Charlotte Wistar Evans, Elementary 

Education 
James Frederic Feeman, Jr., Economics and 

Business Administration 
Gloria Isabella Fernsler, Music Education 
Terry Lynn Fick, Music Education 
Christopher William Fisher, Economics 

and Business Administration 
Harold Clair Fortna, Physics 
Douglas Kendall Franz, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Sandra Kay Frieswyk, Music Education 
Jane Haverstick Fuhrman, Biology 
John Howard Gable, III, Mathematics 
John Charles Gamaldi, III, Biology 
Randall Stephen Georgic, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Richard Carl Gromis, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Susan Mary Grundy, Elementary Education 



John Francis Halbleib, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Susan Victoria Hancock, Music Education 
Michael Anthony Hardisky, Biology 
Joy Eubanks Hartmann, Elementary 

Education 
Donald Curtis Heck, Music Education 
James Irvin Heindel, Biology 
Nancy Ellen Heston, Music Education 
Alfred John Hockley, III, Biology 
Jean Mary Holbrook, Elementary 

Education 
Daniel Thomas Hoover, Music Education 
Frank Clair Hummert, Jr., Elementary 

Education 
Gary Evan Hunter, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Robert Edward Johns, Jr., Economics and 

Business Administration 
LuAnn Matylewicz Kaszuba, Elementary 

Education 
Deborah Joan Kava, Elementary Education 
Jeffrey Stuart Kern, Music Education 
Lorraine Elsie Killheffer, Music Education 
Robert William Knapp, Chemistry 
Katherine Elizabeth Kocher, Music 

Education 
Cynthia May Leeper, Elementary Education 
Carol Louise Lentz, Elementary Education 
Derek Lieber, Physics 
John Russell Longacres, Jr., Mathematics 

Economics and Business Administration 
George Alvin Lyons, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Brenda Carol McClelland, Biology 
Raymond Hummer Mitchell, Economics 

and Business Administration 
Anita Madge Morbach, Elementary 

Education 
Michael Warren Mover, Chemistry 
Dale Eugene Oehler, Economics and 

Business Administration 
Cheryl Ann Otto, Music Education 
Cynthia Louise Pike, Music Education 
Carol Christine Potter, Music Education 
David Michael Poust, Biology 
Cathy Sue Rex, Music Education 
Allen Ziegler Roth, Music Education 
Robin Edwin Rowand, Music Education 
Laura Sarah Sandleman, Music Education 
Stephan Ray Sanko, Biology 
George Christopher Sariotis, Economics 

and Business Administration 
Ruth Sharon Schantz, Elementary 

Education 
Nancy Lee Schreiber, Biology 
Jean Louise Schultz, Elementary Education 



123 



Thomas Harold Sheaffer, Economics and Thomas Michael Strohman, Music 

Business Administration Education 

Jeffry Dean Shearer, Biology Larry Lee Sweigart, Music Education 

William Daniel Shumway, Mathematics Susan Ashley Thomas, Elementary 
Charles Barton Shupp, Economics and Education 

Business Administration Paul Eugene Visneski, Biology 

Susan Edna Siegel, Elementary Education Joan Lynette Walker, Biology 

Marcia Sue Smith, Elementary Education Patricia Ann Walsh, Music Education 

Martha Mary Smith, Biology Thomas Richard Ward, Economics and 
Richard David Smith, Music Education Business Administration 

Deborah Dean Speir, Elementary Education Nancy Lee Winter, Music Education 

James Richard Sprecher, Economics and Phillip Lee Wise, Chemistry 

Business Administration Wendie Virginia Wood, Biology 

Michael David Steltz, Biology Laura Lee Wysolovski, Music Education 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

Randy Alan Bull Cynthia Diane Penturelli 

Linda Irene Freed Joel Howard Persing 

Richard Scott Harner Donald Leroy Reigle 

Charles Robert Knipe, Jr. Penelope Ann Siler 

Marie Elizabeth Miller Sally Ann Wiest 

Walter William Wolf 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Nancy Jean Moore Joanne Elizabeth Sweigart 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Kathleen Louise Baum Jeanne Kathleen Hockenberry 

Joan Irene Gelsinger Fessler Kathleen Ann Lines Rudisill 

Roberta Lee Sheriff 

DEGREES CONFERRED AUGUST 10, 1975 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Joseph Pease, Psychology 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

William Ellis Bangs, Biology Charles Cecil Kindt, Elementary Education 

John Stephen Fechtsin, Economics and Timothy Allen Knaub, Music Education 

Business Administration James Lee Martin, Economics and 
Diane Louise Frick, Elementary Education Business Administration 

Kenneth Richard Hoover, Elementary Richard Cole Rollinson, Biology 

Education 

Richard Scudder Schneider, Music Education 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 
Faye Marlene Lehman 

GRADUATION HONORS 

SUMMA CUM LAUDE 

Cynthia Lee Albright John Russell Longacre, Jr. 

Kim Edward Feinauer Sharon Lynn O'Neal 

Stephen Michael Fitzgerald Michelle Elaine Painchaud 

Nancy Elaine Fritz Cynthia Diane Penturelli 

Linda Maxine Long Michael Dustin Rhoads 

Roberta Lee Sheriff 

124 



MAGNA CUM LAUDE 



Janet Susan Bashore 
David Michael Bennethum 
Eileen Ruth Briggs 
Marlene Joyce Camillo 
Anthony John Cek 
Jeffrey Charles Compton 
Charlotte Wistar Evans 
Lois Jean Goodman 
John Francis Halbleib 
Frank Clair Hummert, Jr. 
Janet Marilyn Katz 
Christine Louise Kielb 
Deborah Lee Kost 
Derek Lieber 
Janice Carol Miles 
Nancy Jean Moore 



Philli 



Chester Quintin Mosteller 
Nancy Anne Nelson 
Carol Christine Potter 
David Frank Rice 
Patricia June Evans Sanford 
Stephan Ray Sanko 
Barbara Gail Schroeder 
Jean Louise Schultz 
Howard Purvis Scott 
Kenneth Andrew Seyfert 
Holly Celia Shirk 
Irwin Henry Siegel 
Penelope Ann Siler 
Gregory Allen Souders 
Joan Lynette Walker 
Sally Ann Wiest 
Lee Wise 



CUM LAUDE 



Marilyn Adele Bauer 
Elizabeth Ann Boyd 
Edward Robert Donnelly 
Sheryl Denise Forte 
Linda Irene Freed 
Jane Haverstick Fuhrman 
Deborah Ann Gernerd 
Jeanne Kathleen Hockenberry 
Alfred John Hockley, III 
George Alvin Lyons 



James Lee Martin 
Peggy Ann Olver 
Eugenie Margaret Scott 
Susan Edna Siegel 
Marcia Sue Smith 
Richard David Smith 
Deborah Jean Speir 
Michael David Steltz 
Susan Ashley Thomas 



PHI ALPHA EPSILON 



Cynthia Lee Albright 
Janet Susan Bashore 
David Michael Bennethum 
Elizabeth Ann Boyd 
Eileen Ruth Briggs 
Marlene Joyce Camillo 
Anthony John Cek 
Jeffrey Charles Compton 
Edward Robert Donnelly 
Charlotte Wistar Evans 
Kim Edward Feinauer 
Stephen Michael Fitzgerald 
Sheryl Denise Forte 
Linda Irene Freed 
Nancy Elaine Fritz 
Jane Haverstick Fuhrman 
Deborah Ann Gernerd 
Lois Jean Goodman 
John Francis Halbleib 
Jeanne Kathleen Hockenberry 
Alfred John Hockley, III 
Frank Clair Hummert, Jr. 
Janet Marilyn Katz 
Christine Louise Kielb 



Deborah Lee Kost 
Derek Lieber 
Linda Maxine Long 
John Russell Longacre, Jr. 
George Alvin Lyons 
James Lee Martin 
Janice Carol Miles 
Nancy Jean Moore 
Chester Quintin Mosteller 
Nancy Anne Nelson 
Peggy Ann Olver 
Sharon Lynn O'Neal 
Michelle Elaine Painchaud 
Cynthia Diane Pentruelli 
Carol Christine Potter 
Michael Dustin Rhoads 
David Frank Rice 
Patricia June Evans Sanford 
Stephan Ray Sanko 
Barbara Gail Schroeder 
Jean Louise Schultz 
Eugenie Margaret Scott 
Howard Purvis Scott 
Kenneth Andrew Seyfert 



125 



Roberta Lee Sheriff Gregory Allen Souders 

Holly Celia Shirk Deborah Jean Speir 

Irwin Henry Siegel Susan Ashley Thomas 

Susan Edna Siegel Joan Lynette Walker 

Penelope Ann Siler Sally Ann Wiest 

Marcia Sue Smith Phillip Lee Wise 
Richard David Smith 



COLLEGE HONORS 

Frank Claire Hummert, Jr. Holly Celia Shirk 

Linda Maxine Long Joan Lynette Walker 

Jean Louise Schultz Sally Ann Wiest 



DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

In Biology Cynthia Lee Albright 

In Biology Stephan Ray Sanko 

In Biology Joan Lynette Walker 

In Chemistry Richard Scott Harner 

In Chemistry Cynthia Diane Penturelli 

In Chemistry Penelope Ann Siler 

In Chemistry Sally Ann Wiest 

In Economics & Business Administration John RussellLongacre, Jr. 

In Elementary Education Frank Clair Hummert, Jr. 

In Elementary Education Jeanne Louise Schultz 

In English Holly Celia Shirk 

In History David Michael Bennethum 

In Mathematics Linda Maxine Long 

In Mathematics John Russell Longacre, Jr. 

In Physics Derek Lieber 



HONORARY DEGREES 

Conferred May 18, 1975 

Pauline Frederick Robbins Doctor of Humane Letters 

Warren M. Robbins Doctor of Laws 

Laverne E. Rohrbaugh Doctor of Divinity 



STUDENT AWARDS, 1975 

Senior Awards 

BAISH MEMORIAL HISTORY AWARD 

Stephen Michael Fitzgerald, Eagleville, Pa. 

ANDREW BENDER MEMORIAL CHEMISTRY AWARD 

Cynthia Diane Penturelli, Laureldale, Pa. 

THE SALOME WINGATE SANDERS AWARD IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

Carol Christine Potter, Pennsauken, N.J. 

PI GAMMA MU SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 

Michael Dustin Rhoads, Harrisburg, Pa. 

126 



THE SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA SECTION, 
AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY AWARD 

Cynthia Diane Penturelli, Laureldale, Pa. 

THE M. CLAUDE ROSENBERRY MEMORIAL AWARD 

Susan Victoria Hancock, Hightstown, N.J. 

B'NAI B'RITH AMERICANISM AWARD 

Chester Qiiintin Mosteller, Spring City, Pa. 

THE GOVERNOR JAMES H. DUFF AWARD 

Robert Alan Boyer, Sunbury, Pa. 

THE CHUCK MASTON MEMORIAL AWARD 

Chester Quintin Mosteller, Spring City, Pa. 

THE JOHN F. ZOLA ATHLETIC AWARD 

Thomas Harold Sheaffer, Harrisburg, Pa. 

THE SIGMA ALPHA IOTA HONOR CERTIFICATE AW T ARD 

Carol Christine Potter, Pennsauken, N.J. 

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION CLUB AWARD 

Cynthia May Leeper, Miami, Fla. 
Marcia Sue Smith, Millersville, Pa. 

OUTSTANDING SENIOR OF DELTA ALPHA CHAPTER, SAI 

Carol Christine Potter, Pennsauken, N.J. 

THE PENNSYLVANIA INSTITUTE OF CERTIFIED 
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AWARD 

John Francis Halbleib, Harrisburg, Pa. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE AWARD 

Elizabeth Langan Shivell, Camp Hill, Pa. 

WALL STREET JOURNAL AWARD 

George Alvin Lyons, Wila, Pa. 

PHI BETA KAPPA PRIZE 

Kim Edward Feinauer, Reading, Pa. 
Michael Dustin Rhoads, Harrisburg, Pa. 

SENIOR PRIZE IN ENGLISH 

Holly Celia Shirk, Milroy, Pa. 

THE FRANCIS H. WILSON MEMORIAL BIOLOGY AWARD 

Joan Lynette Walker, Newport, Pa. 

127 



WALLACE-LIGHT-WINGATE AWARD IN LIBERAL ARTS 

Sally Ann Wiest, Harrisburg, Pa. 

ACHIEVEMENT SCHOLARSHIP AWARD IN 
ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas Clifford Dilworth, Greencastle, Pa. 
John Francis Halbleib, Harrisburg, Pa. 
John Russell Longacre, Jr., Broomall, Pa. 
George Alvin Lyons, Wila, Pa. 
Richard Joseph Newmaster, Jr., Lebanon, Pa. 
Dennis James Weidman, Ephrata, Pa. 

HARRISBURG CHAPTER OF 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ACCOUNTANTS AWARDS 

Richard Joseph Newmaster, Jr., Lebanon, Pa. 

THE DAVID E. LONG MEMORIAL MINISTERIAL AWARD 

David Michael Bennethum, Reading, Pa. 
William Ross Ingraham, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

THE MARTHA C. FAUST MEMORIAL AWARD 

Joan Lynette Walker, Newport, Pa. 

RHO ETA CAST OF ALPHA PSI OMEGA AWARD 

Richard Scudder Schneider, Trenton, N.J. 

WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 
Cynthia Lee Albright, York, Pa. 
Robert Alan Boyer, Sunbury, Pa. 
Kim Douglas Dahms, Temple, Pa. 
Dale Herring Everhart, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Nancy Elaine Fritz, Stilwater, Pa. 
John Francis Halbleib, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Susan Victoria Hancock, Hightstown, N.J. 
Richard Scott Harner, Annville, Pa. 
Cynthia May Leeper, Miami, Fla. 
Linda Maxine Long, Robesonia, Pa. 
John Russell Longacre, Jr., Broomall, Pa. 
Chester Quintin Mosteller, Spring City, Pa. 
Nancy Anne Nelson, Stanhope, N.J. 
Cynthia Diane Penturelli, Laureldale, Pa. 
Joel Howard Persing, Brogue, Pa. 
Carol Christine Potter, Pennsauken, N.J. 
Michael Dustin Rhoads, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Allen Ziegler Roth, Carlisle, Pa. 
Stephan Ray Sanko, Manheim, Pa. 
Holly Celia Shirk, Milroy, Pa. 
Elizabeth Langan Shivell, Camp Hill, Pa. 
Marcia Sue Smith, Millersville, Pa. 
Thomas Michael Strohman, Lebanon, Pa. 
Paul Eugene Visneski, Tunkhannock, Pa. 

128 



Joan Lynette Walker, Newport, Pa. 
Sally Ann Wiest, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Walter William Wolf, Ephrata, Pa. 

Recognition in Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges is 
awarded annually on the basis of grades, personal character, and campus leadership. 
Final selection is made by the publishers. 

GENERAL AWARDS 

ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS 

John Milton Creeger, Smithsburg, Md. 
Marian Jean Melenchick, Pottsville, Pa. 
Ronald Oscar Schlee, Johnstown, Pa. 

MAUD P. LAUGHLIN SOCIAL SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 

Patricia Joanne Boyle, Littleton, Colo. 
Laurel Sue Schwarz, South Plainfield, N.J. 

JOHN F. ZOLA MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 

Gregory Allen Hilt, Wrightsville, Pa. 

THE BIOLOGICAL SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 

Theresa Veronica Brown, Harrisburg, Pa. 
James Burgess Cooper, Warminster, Pa. 

MEDICAL SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 

Mary Susan Adler, Collegeville, Pa. 

THE WOMAN'S CLUB OF LEBANON SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 

Susan Jean Hollowell, Lebanon, Pa. 

ALICE EVERS BURTNER MEMORIAL AWARD 

Joy Janelle Hoffman, Windber, Pa. 

DELTA ALPHA CHAPTER OF SIGMA ALPHA IOTA AWARD 

Cathy Ellen Freundel, Catonsville, Md. 

SOPHOMORE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD IN CHEMISTRY 

Rick Charles Mellinger, Red Lion, Pa. 

PHYSICS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 

Dale Allen Miller, Annville, Pa. 

THE MAX F. LEHMAN MEMORIAL MATHEMATICS PRIZE 

Dale Allen Miller, Annville, Pa. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE AWARD 

Glenn Alan Zearfoss, Annville, Pa. 

129 



FLORENCE WOLF KNAUSS MEMORIAL AWARD IN MUSIC 

Sharon Ann Hatfield, Pottstown, Pa. 

MATHEMATICS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 

Ronald Oscar Schlee, Johnstown, Pa. 

PICKWELL MEMORIAL MUSIC AWARD 

Stephen Warren Sachs, Chambersburg, Pa. 

FRESHMAN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD IN CHEMISTRY 

Walter Kobasa, Jr., Lansdale, Pa. 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 

Jill Ellen Samples, Nottingham, Pa. 

ACHIEVEMENT SCHOLARSHIP AWARD IN ECONOMICS 
AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Neil Edward Fasnacht, Hershey, Pa. 
Gary Lee Kipp, Lancaster, Pa. 
Lynn Louise Wenger, Quarryville, Pa. 
Glenn Alan Zearfoss, Annville, Pa. 

GERMAINE BENEDICTUS MONTEUX MUSIC AWARD 

Carolyn Robertson Reed, Fallston, Md. 

BETA BETA BETA FRESHMAN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD IN BIOLOGY 

Carole Jean Menges, Soudersburg, Pa. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS 

French: Marty Harry Slabley, Red Lion, Pa. 
Catherine Irene Kaylor, Annville, Pa. 
Deborah Lee Kost, Camp Springs, Md. 

German: Russell Paul Labe, Jr., Reading, Pa. 
Anne Auerbach, Essex Fells, N.J. 
Brian Wayne Moody, Lebanon, Pa. 
William Henderson Kelly, Jr., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Russian: Christina Maria Negrete, Oberlin, Pa. 
Gregory Allen Souders, Winchester, Va. 

Spanish: Nancy Gay McCoy, Camp Hill, Pa. 

THE EDWIN B. GARRIGUES FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP 

Stephen Warren Sachs, Chambersburg, Pa. 

THE PRESSER FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP 

Joyce Louise Houser, Lampeter, Pa. 
Kenneth Oscar Hiding, Jersey Shore, Pa. 



130 



CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

To Facilitate Prompt Attention, Inquiries 
Should be Addressed as Indicated Below: 

Matters of General College Interest President 

Academic Program Vice President and Dean of the College 

Admissions Director of Admissions 

Alumni Interests Director of Alumni Relations 

Business Matters, Expenses Vice President and Controller 

Campus Conferences Coordinator of Conferences 

Development and Bequests Director of Development 

Evening School and Summer Session Assistant Dean of the College 

Financial Aid to Students Financial Aid Officer 

Placement: 

Teacher Placement Director of Teacher Placement 

Business and Industrial Director of Industrial Placement 

Publication and Publicity Director of Public Relations 

Religious Activities Chaplain 

Student Interests Dean of Students 

Teacher Certification Assistant Dean of the College 

Transcripts, Academic Reports 

Assistant Dean of the College and Registrar 

Address all mail to: 

Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 

Direct all telephone calls to: 

Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

Area Code 7 1 7 Local Number 867-441 1 

Regular office hours for transacting business: 

College office hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1:00 p.m. 
to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Members of the staff are available 
for interviews at other times if appointments are made in advance. 



131 



INDEX 



Absences 34 

Academic Classification 33 

Academic Dishonesty 34 

Academic Offices Ill 

Academic Probation 35 

Academic Programs and Procedures . . 22 

Academic Procedures 30 

Academic Program 22 

Academic Requirements 22 

Accounting, Courses in 50 

Accreditation 7 

Activities, Student 37 

Actuarial Science, Outline of Program 95 

Actuarial Science, Plan of Study in . . 71 

Administrative Staff Ill 

Administrative Regulations 33 

Admissions Deposit 17 

Admissions, Requirements and 

Information 14 

Advanced Placement 17 

Advisers, Faculty 32 

Aid, Student 20 

Alpha Phi Omega 40 

Alpha Psi Omega 40 

Alumni Office 113 

Alumni Organization 120 

Anthropology, Course in 93 

Application Fee 17 

Application for Admission 14 

Art, Courses in 43 

Athletics 42 

Athletics, Aims and Objectives 42 

Attendance, Chapel-Convocation .... 34 

Attendance, Class 34 

Auditing Courses 32 

Auditions, Department of Music .... 15 

Auxiliary Schools 28 

Auxiliary School Fees 18 

Awards Conferred, 1975 126 

Baccalaureate, Attendance at 25 

Balmer Showers Lectureship 39 

Band, All-Girl 79 

Band, Symphonic 40, 79 

Basic Educational Opportunity Grants 21 

Baseball 42 

Basketball 42 

Biology, Courses in 45 

Biology, Outline of Program 95 

Biology, Marine 29 

Board Fees 18 

Board of Trustees 116 

Board of Trustees, Committees 119 

132 



Board of Trustees, Officers 116 

Business Administration, Courses in .. 51 
Business Administration, Outline of 

Program 96 

Business Management 113 

Campus Employment 21 

Campus Map 1 36 

Campus Organizations 39 

Cars, Student Rules Concerning 35 

Certification, Requirements for 

Teachers 101-103 

Change of Registration 31 

Chapel Choir 40, 79 

Chapel-Convocation Program 34, 37 

Chemistry, Courses in 47 

Chemistry, Outline of Program 95 

Class Attendance 34 

Clubs, Departmental 40 

College Calendar, 1976-1977 3 

College Center 112 

College Chorus 40, 79 

College Entrance Examination Board 

Tests 15 

College History 5 

College Honors, 1975 126 

College Honors Program 27 

College Level Examination Program 

(CLEP) 16 

College Profile 5 

College Relations Area 113 

Commencement, Attendance at 25 

Committees, Board of Trustees 119 

Committees, Faculty 115 

Computer Facilities 9 

Computer Programming 49 

Concert Choir 40, 75 

Concurrent Courses 32 

Contingency Deposit 18 

Cooperative Programs 97 

Correspondence Directory 131 

Counseling and Placement 33 

Course Credit 43 

Course Numbering System 43 

Courses of Study by Departments .... 43 
Credits Earned at Another Institution 16 

Cross Country 42 

Cultural Opportunities 41 

Cum Laude Graduates, 1975 125 

Degrees Conferred, 1975 122 

Degrees, Requirements for 22 

Delta Tau Chi 39 



Denominational Organizations 38 

Departmental Clubs 40 

Departmental Honors 27 

Departmental Honors, Biology 45 

Departmental Honors, Chemistry .... 47 

Departmental Honors, Economics ... 49 
Departmental Honors, Elementary 

Education 53 

Departmental Honors, English 57 

Departmental Honors, Foreign 

Languages 60 

Departmental Honors, History 66 

Departmental Honors, Mathematics . . 72 

Departmental Honors, Music 75, 81 

Departmental Honors, Philosophy . . 82 

Departmental Honors, Physics 85 

Departmental Honors, Political 

Science 68 

Departmental Honors, Psychology . . 87 

Departmental Honors, Religion .... 90 

Departmental Hcaors, Sociology .... 93 

Departmental Honors, 1975 126 

Departments, Courses of Study by . . . 43 

Development Office 113 

Directories 104 

Discontinuance of Courses 31 

Dismissal 36 

Distribution Requirements 26 

Double Major 23 

Dramatic Organizations 40 

Economics and Business Adminis- 
tration, Courses in 50 

Economics and Business Administra- 
tion, Outline of Program 96 

Economics, Courses in 52 

Education, Courses in 54 

Elementary Education, Courses in ... 55 
Elementary Education, Outline of 

Program 97 

Elementary Education — 

Subject Matter Requirements 101 

Emeritus Professors 104 

Employment 21 

Endowment Funds 10 

Engineering, Cooperative Program, 

Outline of Program 97 

English, Courses in 57 

Enrollment Statistics 13 

Entrance Requirements 14 

Evening Classes 28 

Examinations 23 

Examination, College Entrance Board 15 

Expenses 18 

Extension Courses 28 

Extra-Curricular Activities 37 

Faculty 104 



Faculty Advisers 32 

Faculty Committees 115 

Fees and Deposits 17 

Financial Aid 20 

Football 42 

Foreign Languages, Courses in 60 

Foreign Language Requirement 26 

Forestry, Cooperative Program, 

Outline of Program 98 

French Club 40 

French, Courses in 60 

Freshman Orientation 31 

Furnishings, Residence Halls 19 

General Alumni Organization 120 

General Requirements 26 

German town Metropolitan Semester . . 29 

Geography, Courses in 65 

Geology, Courses in 65 

German, Courses in 61 

Golf 42 

Governing Bodies 41 

Grade-Point Average 23 

Grading and Quality Points, System of 23-24 

Grading, Pass-Fail 24 

Grants-in-Aid 21 

Green Blotter Club 40 

Greek, Courses in 63 

Guild Student Group 40 

Hazing 35 

Health Reports 14 

Health Services 112 

History and Political Science, 

Courses in 66 

History, College 5 

History, Courses in 66 

Honorary Degrees, 1975 126 

Honorary Organizations 40 

Honors Program 27 

Honors Studies 27 

Hours, Limit of Credit 32 

Independent Study, Biology ......... 46 

Independent Study, Chemistry 49 

Independent Study, Business 

Administration 52 

Independent Study, Economics 53 

Independent Study, Elementary 

Education 56 

Independent Study, English 59 

Independent Study, French 61 

Independent Study, German 62 

Independent Study, History 68 

Independent Study, Mathematics .... 73 

Independent Study, Music 81 

Independent Study, Philosophy ... 82, 83 
Independent Study, Physics 85, 87 

133 



Independent Study, Political Science 70 
Independent Study, Psychology .... 87,90 

Independent Study, Religion 92 

Independent Study, Sociology 94 

Independent Study, Spanish 64 

Information for Prospective Students 14 

Institutional Rules 42 

Instructors 109 

Insurance Plan and Fee 18 

Intercollegiate Athletic Programs .... 42 

Interdisciplinary Courses 70 

Investment Club 40 

Junior Year Abroad 29 

Lacrosse 42 

Late Registration 31 

Limit of Hours 32 

Loans 21 

Major Requirements 22 

Marine Biology Program 29 

Map, Campus 136 

Mathematics, Courses in 71 

Meals 20 

Medical Examinations 14 

Medical Technology, Cooperative 

Program, Outline of Program .... 99 

Merrill-Palmer Institute Semester .... 30 

Metropolitan Semester 29 

Music, Conducting 81 

Music, Courses in 75 

Music Education, Outline of Program 100 

Music Fees 18 

Music Instruction, Applied 81 

Music Instruction, Individual 81 

Music, Instrumental Courses 78 

Music, History and Appreciation of . . 80 

Music, Methods and Materials 77 

Music Organizations 40, 79 

Music, Outline of Program 99 

Music, Special Requirements 74 

Music, Student Teaching 78 

Music, Theory of 75 

National Direct Student Loans 21 

New Facilities 9 

New Student Orientation 31 

Night Classes 28 

Nursing, Cooperative Program, 

Outline of Program 101 

Office of President Ill 

Officers, Board of Trustees 116 

Orientation 31 

Parking, Student Rules on 35 

134 



Part-Time Student Fees 18 

Pass/Fail Grading 24 

Payment of Fees and Deposits 18 

Philosophy, Courses in 82 

Physical Education, Courses in 84 

Physical Education Requirement ... 26 

Physical Examinations 14 

Physics, Courses in 85 

Placement 33 

Political Science, Courses in 69 

Pre-Dental Curriculum 95 

Pre-Medical Curriculum 95 

Presidents of the College 7 

Presidential Scholarships 20 

Pre-Veterinary Curriculum 95 

Private Music Instruction 81 

Prizes Awarded, 1975 126 

Probation, Academic 35 

Procedures, Academic 30 

PROJECT 38 

Professional Curricula, Special Plans 

for 95 

Professors 104 

Professors, Assistant 107 

Professors, Associate 106 

Professors, Emeritus 104 

Psychology, Courses in 88 

Public Relations Office 113 

Publications, Student 40 

Quality Points, System of 23 

Quittapahilla, The 40 

Readmission 36 

Recitals, Student 81 

Recognition Groups 39 

Recreation 42 

Refund Policy 19 

Registration 30 

Regulations, Administrative 33 

Religion and Life Lectureships 39 

Religion, Courses in 90 

Religious Emphasis Day 39 

Religious Life 37 

Repetition of Courses 31 

Requirements, Admission 14 

Requirements, Degrees 22 

Requirements, Distribution and 

General 26 

Residence Halls, Regulations 19 

Residence Requirement 23 

Rules, Institutional 42 

Russian, Courses in 63 

Schedules, Arrangements of 32 

Scholarships 21 

Scholarship Funds 10 



Secondary Education, Courses in ... . 56 
Secondary Education — Subject Matter 

Requirements 101 , 103 

Semester Hours 22 

Semester Hour Limitations 32 

Service Organizations 40 

Soccer 41 

Social Organizations 39 

Social Sciences, Major 92 

Sociology, Courses in 93 

Spanish, Courses in 63 

Special Plans of Study 95 

Student Activities 37 

Student Affairs Offices 112 

Student Awards, 1975 126 

Student Employment 21 

Student Finances 17 

Student Government 41 

Student Loans 21 

Student Personnel Offices 112 

Student Publications 40 

Student Recitals 81 

Student Teaching 56, 78, 101, 102 

Summer Session 28 

Sunday Church Services 38 



Statement of Purpose 8 

Supplemental Educational 

Opportunity Grants 21 

Support and Control 9 

Suspension 35 

Symphonic Band 40, 79 

Symphony Orchestra 40, 79 

Teacher Placement Bureau 33 

Teaching, Certification 

Requirements 97, 101-103 

Track 42 

Transcripts 35 

Transfer Credit 16 

Transfer Students 25 

Trustees, Board of 116 

Two Majors 23 

University Center at Harrisburg .... 28 
Urban Semester 29 

Washington Semester Program 30 

Withdrawal 35 

Withdrawal from Courses 24 

Withdrawal Refunds 19 

Wrestling 42 



135 




CAMPUS ENTRANCE I 



1 


Administrative Building 


11 


Faculty Offices, 


22 


Maintenance Building 


2 


Allan W. Mund 




130 College Ave. 


23 


Mary Capp Green Hall 




College Center 


12 


Funkhouser Hall 


24 


Miller Chapel 


3 
4 
5 


Arnold Field 

Art Studio 

Blair Music Center 


13 
14 


Gladys M. Fencil 
Building (Registrar) 

Gossard Memorial 
Library 


25 
26 

27 


North College 
Saylor Hall 
Science Annex 


6 


Carnegie Building 


15 


Hammond Hall 


28 


Science Hall 




(Admissions Office) 


16 


Heating Plant 


29 


Sheridan Hall 


7 


Centre Hall 


17 


Infirmary 


30 


Silver Hall 


8 


East College 


18 


Keister Hall 


31 


United Methodist Church 


9 


Faculty Offices, 


19 


Kreider Hall 


32 


Vickroy Hall 




104 College Ave. 


20 


Laughlin Hall 


33 


Wagner House 





Faculty Offices, 


21 


Lynch Memorial 


34 


West Hall 




1 12 College Ave. 




Building (Gym) 


35 


West Annex 



FIRST CLASS 

PERMIT No. 8 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

17003 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

No Postage Stamp Necessary if Mailed in the United States 



Postage Will Be Paid By. 
Office of Admissions 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 



FIRST CLASS 

PERMIT No. 8 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

17003 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

No Postage Stamp Necessary if Mailed in the United States 



Postage Will Be Paid By. 
Office of Admissions 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 



FIRST CLASS 

PERMIT No. 8 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

17003 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

No Postage Stamp Necessary if Mailed in the United States 



Postage Will Be Paid By. 
Office of Admissions 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 




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I am interested in learning more about the 
educational opportunities at Lebanon Valley College. 



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educational opportunities at Lebanon Valley College. 




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