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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog: Summer School Bulletin"

Hetmnon "Uallep 
College 

BULLETIN 



Vol. 9 (newser.es) FEBRUARY, 1922 No. 11 



Reautiful 



"I 




MOONLIGHT ON THE LAKE: 

Mt,Gretna,Pa. 

^ _. 



SUMMER SCHOOL NUMBER 

1922 



PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Entered as second-class matter at Annville, Pa., under the Act nf August 24, 1912 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalleycol19229leba 



letanon 9a(ltj> College 

MT. GRETNA 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

1922 




HALL OF PHILOSOPHY 



BULLETIN 

Published by 

Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pa. 



CALENDAR 



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Summer School Calendar 



June 23, 24 and 26 — Registration of Students 
June 26 — Summer Term Begins 
August 4 — Summer Term Ends 



ADDRESS ALL SUMMER SCHOOL CORRESPONDENCE TO 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar 

MOUNT GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 

ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



THE FACULTY 



GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D., D.D. 

President 

SAMUEL HOFFMAN DERICKSON, M.S. 

Biological Sciences 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, B.Pd., A.M. 

Education and Mathematics 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, A.B., LL.B. 

Social Sciences 

*T. BAYARD BEATTY, A.M. 

English 

R. R. BUTTERWICK, A.M., D.D. 

Bible and Philosophy 

MARY C. GREEN 

French 

WALTER E. SEVERANCE, A.M. 

Latin and Education 

ANDREW BENDER, Ph.D. 

Chemistry 

RUTH ELIZABETH ENGLE, A.B. 
Music 

W. ALBERT BRUNNER, A.M. 

History 

E. E. STAUFFER, A.M. 

English 



Committee in Charge of Summer Session 

R. R. BUTTERWICK, Director 

C. R. GINGRICH, Secretary 

S. O. GRIMM, Registrar and Treasurer 

S. H. DERICKSON 



K On leave of absence abroad summer of 1922. 



General Information 



THE Mount Gretna Summer School is an extension of 
the work of Lebanon Valley College, authorized and 
approved by the trustees of the college and directed 
by the faculty. The sessions are held at Mount Gretna, 
Pennsylvania, in the buildings of the Pennsylvania Chau- 
tauqua Association. The environment, the social life of the 
resort, the opportunities for healthful recreation, as well as for 
quiet and effective study make this an ideal location for the 
Summer School. The courses are planned primarily for the 
following groups of men and women: 

I. Those who wish to complete their college entrance re- 
quirements. 

II. Those who desire to shorten the period of college resi- 
dence or to make up deficiences. 

III. Teachers of Elementary schools, high schools, and 
normal schools who seek advanced instruction with or with- 
out the idea of acquiring a degree. 

IV. Other persons who desire collegiate instruction or 
courses for general culture. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission to the sum- 
mer school. Students, both men and women, will be admitted 
to such courses as the respective instructors find them qualified 
to pursue with advantage. 

In order that the work may proceed with dispatch upon the 
opening of the term, it is urged that arrangements for registra- 
tion be made by mail. Applications for admission and regis- 
tration will be received by the Registrar up to and including 
Friday, June 23; address, Annville, Pa. 

On Saturday, June 24, Monday, June 26 and Tuesday, 
June 27, registration will be continued in the C. L. S. C. Build- 
ing, Chautauqua Grounds, Mount Gretna. The registration 
hours will be from 1 P. M. to 4. P. M. Classes will be open to 



6 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

all on June 26 and 27, but after June 27 they will be restricted 
to duly registered students. 

Regular exercises will begin promptly on June 26. Notice of 
any proposed addition or cancellation of courses must be re- 
ported at once in person at the Office of the Registrar. Stu- 
dents will be allowed, after securing the consent of the Direc- 
tor, to make changes in their courses up to and including 
Tuesday, June 27, but after June 27 they will be permitted 
to make no changes whatever. Full credit will be given only 
for those courses for which students have registered and paid 
not later than June 27. Students registering June 28 to July 
5th, inclusive, may receive half credit for the work done in 
any course; but students entering after July 5th will receive 
no academic credit. A student attending any course is re- 
quired to do the full work assigned to the class; auditors are 
not admitted. Absence from class exercises may be excused 
only in case of illness. 

PROGRAM 

Exercises will be held every day in every subject, but no 
stated exercises will be held on Saturdays. Each course will 
consist of thirty lectures or other exercises, or their equiva- 
lent in laboratory or field work. 

Students are allowed to take one or more courses as they 
desire, although they are advised not to exceed six credits. 
All courses are assigned a certain number of tuition points 
and most courses have a credit value. A point is the credit 
gained for a duly matriculated student upon the completion 
of an hour weekly for one academic half year, or the equiva- 
lent thereof, unless otherwise specified, and is designated a 
semester hour credit. One hour of lecture or recitation, or 
two hours of laboratory or field work daily during the summer 
session will cover the requirements for two semester hours 
towards the bachelor's degree. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The sessions are held at Mount Gretna, Pennsylvania, in 
the buildings of the Pennsylvania Chautauqua Association, 
situated on the grounds of the Association. These buildings, 
especially designed for educational work, contain commo- 
dious and well equipped class rooms and are located in the 



MT. GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 7 

heart of the resort. Adjoining the grounds of the Pennsylvania 
Chautauqua Association are grounds of the Campmeeting 
Association of the United Brethren in Christ. This resort of 
nearly five hundred cottages, scattered among the trees and 
shrubbery, accommodates a summer population of several 
thousand people. To the west of the grounds of the Chau- 
tauqua Association is the beautiful Lake Conewago which 
offers splendid facilities for bathing and boating. This lake 
is fed by pure mountain streams flowing from innumerable 




CAMPUS VIEW 



springs of the finest water to be found. The grounds also ad- 
join those of the military reservation of the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania, where encampments, attended by thousands 
of soldiers are held annually. 

Mount Gretna is situated on the Lebanon Branch of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad, eleven miles from Conewago where it 
forms a junction with the main line. At Lebanon this railroad 
joins the Philadelphia and Reading, so that Mount Gretna is 
within commuting distance of Lebanon, Lancaster and Harris- 
burg. It is, moreover, easily accessible from these points by 
automobile, being located midway between the Lincoln High- 
way and the William Penn Highway. 

Mount Gretna is a paradise for the Naturalist or Biologist. 
The opportunities for study of inland forms of life are un- 
limited. An abundant variety of plant and animal associa- 



8 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

tions and varied ecological conditions are accessible. The 
topography consists of mountains with a wide range of forest 
trees and shrubs, deep ravines, with cold mountain streams, 
carrying the pure spring water through densely vegetated 
swamps out into richly cultivated meadowlands. Old fields, 
once under cultivation and now reserved for military purposes, 
supply unusual types of uncultivated forms of life. The lake 
and ponds are rich in aquatic forms, some of which are very 
rare. The flora is rich in fungae, mosses, ferns and flowering 
plants. Over thirty species of ferns are found in the vicinity. 
Over one hundred species of flowering plants have been iden- 
tified by classes in a single day's tramp. An herbarium of 
several hundred species may be collected in a season. 

Birds and insects are abundant both in species and numbers 
and in the summer season offer excellent opportunities for 
the study of breeding habits and life histories. 

All necessary equipment from the biological laboratories of 
the college will be transferred to a laboratory which has been 
provided in the Hall of Philosophy at Mount Gretna. 

ENTERTAINMENTS AND LECTURES 

During the Summer Term a number of entertainments will 
be offered by the students of the school. Weekly lectures 
will be given to the entire student body by different mem- 
bers of the faculty. 

THE BIBLE CONFERENCE 

During the closing week of the Summer School the United 
Brethren Bible Conference, directed by many of the most 
noted Bible teachers of the day will be in session on the grounds 
of the Campmeeting Association, to continue for a period of 
ten days. 

THE FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 

Although announcement of the Summer Session preceded 
the opening of the school by only several weeks, the attend- 
ance exceeded expectations and emphasized the need of the 
work offered. The session was not only successful from the 
standpoint of the number of students but from the character 
of the students, their loyalty and cooperation, and the ex- 
cellent quality of the work accomplished. The school is 
particularly indebted to the Pennsylvania Chautauqua As- 



MT. GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 9 

sociation through whose earnest and devoted cooperation its 
work was made possible. The complete educational equip- 
ment of the Association is generously placed at the disposal 
of the school. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Numerous demands from public school teachers striving to 
meet the higher educational standards required of them by 
recent legislation, and the appeal from the State Department 
of Public Instruction for the school to shape its curriculum 
to meet these requirements, have resulted in the organization 
of a separate department of the school which, following 
directly these suggestions, will be devoted entirely to the in- 
terests of teachers. 

ENROLLMENT 

Enrollments for the Summer Session of 1922 indicate a 
large increase in the number of students over the Session of 
1921. Accommodations will be arranged by the school for those 
who request that this be done and register at a date early 
enough to make this possible. 

A number of desirable rooms have been offered for students 
by the cottagers. Since the student body must be limited in 
accordance with accommodations and educational facilities, it 
will be to the advantage of the student to register as soon as 
possible in order to be assured of enrollment at the opening 
of the school. 

RECREATION 

The private beach of the Pennsylvania Chautauqua Asso- 
ciation adjoins the grounds of the Summer School and is 
open to the students. This is an ideal resort for bathing, 
boating and canoeing and is visited each afternoon by a con- 
siderable portion of the student body. The refined nature of 
the amusements of the resort commend them to the student 
seeking healthful recreation after the strain of a hard day's 
study. A summer camp for men and boys, under the super- 
vision of the school, enables the student to enjoy the outing 
of a mountain camp while engaging in the regular work of the 
school. Tents will be provided by the school for those who 
apply within a reasonable time before the opening date. 




*a?Arf M% 



LOrtli 



■■- 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

FEES 

A matriculation fee of five dollars ($5.00) will be charged 
each student upon registration. 

Tuition will be charged at the rate of six dollars ($6.00) per 
semester hour credit. For courses in which no college credit is 
allowed tuition will be charged at the same rate ; that is, for a 
course offered one hour per day the tuition for the course will 
be twelve dollars ($12.00). Rates for special courses will be 
supplied upon application. 

Checks should be drawn for the exact amount of the bill 
and made payable to the order of the REGISTRAR, — 
MOUNT GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL. 

ROOM AND BOARD 

While a large number of rooms are available in private 
cottages, Mount Gretna is well supplied with Hotels and Inns 
at which both rooms and board may be had at reasonable 
rates. The Summer School is glad to recommend the follow- 
ing: 

Hotel Conewago, Chautauqua Inn, Kauffman House, and 
Gretna Hall. 




HOTEL CONEWAGO 



MT. GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 13 



Department of Education 



s-12 — History of Education — One hour per day. This course is an 
analysis of the history of education from the days of primitive man to the 
present day, with special emphasis upon the work of Rousseau, Pestalozzi, 
Herbart and Froebel, as the forerunners of modern educational theories 
and practices. Two semester hours credit. 

s-22 — Class Room Organization and Administration — One hour 
per day. Various phases of the work of the teacher in charge of a class of 
pupils are considered. Emphasis is placed upon the problems of prepara- 
tion, control of pupils' environment, methods of testing pupils' achieve- 
ment and recording results. Two semester hours credit. 

s-32 — Principles of Secondary Education — One hour per day. This 
course begins with an intensive study of the history of public education 
in the United States to determine the institutional origin of the American 
High School. The subsequent work will concern itself with the educational 
principles that energize our present Secondary School work. Two semester 
hours credit. 

s-62 — High School Administration — One hour per day. This course 
is intended for High School principals of limited experience who want to 
study and discuss their problems. Teachers who are desirous of fitting 
themselves to become principals will be admitted. Two semester hours 
credit. 

s-72 — Child Psychology — One hour per day. A course on the nature 
and development of intellect and character during childhood and adoles- 
cence. Two semester hours credit. 

s-82 — Educational Psychology — One hour per day. This course 
makes a direct and scientific application of psychological theory to the 
educational problems of the day, including social and vocational aspects 
of education. Two semester hours credit. 

s-92 — Introduction to Teaching — One hour per day. A study of the 
principles underlying the process of learning, together with methods of 
directing and assisting others in the learning process. This course is de- 
signed to assist teachers who are beginning the work of elementary in- 
struction and who have not had the advantage of scientific training. 
The approved methods, of general application in this field, will be studied 
and discussed. High School graduates who are beginning the work of 
teaching and teachers who feel the need of methods in their grade work 
will find this course adapted to their needs. Two semester hours credit, 

s-102 — Physiology and School Hygiene — One hour per day. This 
course offers a general survey of the principles of sanitary science and dis- 
ease prevention, the spread and control of infectious diseases, problems 



. 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

of rural hygiene, personal hygiene and the social and economic aspects of 
health problems. The work of the State and Local Boards of Health will 
be studied. Two semester hours credit. 



s-112 — Methods of Teaching Biology in the Secondary Schools — 

One hour per day. This course includes lectures dealing with the problems 
of High School Biology and Zoology courses, course content, types of 
courses and methods of collecting and preserving materials for class work 
and demonstrations. Field work. Two semester hours credit. 

s-122 — Lessons in Problems of Democracy — One hour per day. 
This course consists of an analysis of the various economic, political and 
social problems incident to the democratic form of government. It is the 
aim of the course to assist the teacher, as a leader in the social life of the 
community, to render a greater public service. The course begins with a 
study of the foundations of government after which much time is given 
to readings and discussions. Two semester hours credit. 

s-132 — Methods of Teaching English — One hour per day. This 
course consists of lectures and discussions in the interpretation and pre- 
sentation of literature. The subject of technique in the study of litera- 
ture and the direction of library and general reading will receive special 
consideration. Teachers in the grammar grades and High School will find 
this course of particular value. Two semester hours credit. 

s-142 — Methods of Teaching History — One hour per day. In the 
first part of the course the principles underlying the study of History and 
Civics will be discussed; the place of History in the field of civic education; 
the use of illustrative materials in ''making the past real" and generally 
approved methods of presentation of the subject will receive due consider- 
ation. The teacher's experience will be drawn upon extensively and the 
subject of measurements in the teaching of History will be emphasized. 
Semester hours credit. 

s-152 — Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary 
Schools — One hour per day. This course presents the best modern prac- 
tice in the teaching of Algebra and Geometry. It includes a discussion of 
the present problems relating to the position of Algebra and Geometry in 
the curriculum, the general organization of the subject matter and the 
sequence of topics. The work of the National Committee on Mathemati- 
cal Requirements in the reorganization of mathematical instruction will 
be included. Semester hours credit. 

s-162 — The Teaching of the Physical Sciences in the Secondary 
Schools — One hour daily. The object of t, t course is to develop the pos- 
sibilities of the teacher for helping the pupil to discover for himself the sim- 
ple laws and related facts of the physical world by using the ordinary ex- 
periences and phenomena of every day life. Two semester hours credit. 

s-172 — Educational Sociology — One hour per day. See page 19. 



MT. GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 15 

BIOLOGY 

Professor Dericksox 

s-6 — Nature Study— One hour per day. Two classes may be conducted 
in nature study, one for boys and girls from the public schools and another" 
for adults. The aim of the course will be to familiarize the student with the 
forms of life with which they are surrounded and to acquaint them with 
their habits and associations. Assistance will be rendered those who de- 
sire to pursue special studies in any particular group of plants or animals. 
No college credit. 

s-81 — Bird Study — One hour per day. About seventy species of birds- 
may be studied in the immediate vicinity of Mount Gretna. The class will 
spend an hour or more each morning in the identification of species both 
by appearance and by note. Special work in the study of feeding and nest- 
ing habits and distribution will be outlined for those desiring the same. 
Prepared skins will be at hand to assist in the closer study of the different 
species. A pair of opera or field glasses will be found very serviceable in 
the course. A limited number may be rented for the season from the 
laboratory. One semester hour credit. 

s-92 — Botany — One hour per day. This course will consist largely of 
field work supplemented by laboratory work. Structure of the plants and 
their relation to their environment will be studied and the plants identified 
with the aid of a key. Teachers of Botany will have an opportunity of 
becoming familiar with the summer flora and of collecting and preserving 
much valuable material for use in their classes. A copy of Gray's Manual, 
Seventh Edition, will be needed for this course. Those desiring to prepare 
an herbarium should provide themselves with plant presses and driers. 
Herbarium materials, note books, museum bottles and reagents for fixing 
and preserving materials for sectioning, dissection or demonstration can be 
purchased at the laboratory at cost. Two semester hours credit. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Bender 

s-92 — Household Chemistry — One hour daily. A study of foods,, 
baking, water, beverages, fermentation, disinfectants and common medi- 
cinals and principles that demand attention from the modern intelligent 
home maker. Two semester hours credit. 

s-52 — Organic Chemistry— Two hours daily. A double course. The 
student's inability to do laboratory work will be in part compensated for 
by a carefully graded series of lecture demonstrations covering the entire 
field of organic chemistry. Sen'^s of questions will be distributed for out- 
side study and charts and representative specimens will be freely 
used. An elementar _,e in general chemistry is a prerequisite for the 
course. Four se. .^cer hours credit. 

s- 162— The Teaching of the Physical Sciences in the Secondary 
Schools— See page 14. 



16 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ECONOMICS 

Professor Gingrich 

s-12 — Economic Theory — One hour per day. A course in Economic 
theory covering the work of one semester. Two semester hours credit. 
Offered in alternate years beginning in 1921. 

s-22 — Economic Problems — One hour per day. A study of practical 
economic problems continuing the work of Economics s-12, which is a 
prerequisite. Offered in alternate years beginning in 1922. Two semester 
hours credit. 

s-52 — Practical Banking — One hour per day. The course covers a 
short study of the various types of banking institutions, the forms in com- 
mon use in banking practice and a careful analysis of the Uniform Negoti- 
able Instruments Law. One year of Economics is a prerequisite. Two 
semester hours credit. 

EDUCATION 

Professors Grimm and Severance 
See courses listed under Department of Education. 

ENGLISH 

Professor Stauffer 

s-13 — Dramatic Interpretation — -One hour per day. This is a course 

in the vocal interpretation of several of Shakespeare's plays; the study of 

the one act play and the presentation of a public program of modern one 

act plays or a modern drama. One semester hour credit. (Not offered 1922). 

s-15 — Modern Drama — One hour per day. This is a course stressing 
the theories of play-construction and dramatic criticism. The types of 
dramatic literature, the aims, the technique, the problems, as represented 
by Ibsen, Hauptman, Maeterlinck, Hervieu, Rostand, DAnnunzio, Tche- 
khov, Phillips, Pinero, Galsworthy, Shaw, Synge and Yeates, will be 
studied. (Not offered 1922). 

s-26-a — History of English Literature — One hour per day. This 
course covers the development of English Literature from the Anglo Saxon 
Period to the Restoration. This course is intended for those who have had 
the general survey afforded by the High School and the Normal School. 
Lectures, assigned readings and discussions. Two semester hours credit. 

s-26-b — History of English Literature — One hour per day. This 
course covers the period of English Literature from the Restoration to 
the present. This course is intended for those who have had the general 
survey afforded by the High School and the Normal School. Lectures, 
assigned readings and discussions. Two semester hours credit. 

s-52-a — American Literature — One hour per day. This is a course in 
the history of American Literature with special emphasis on Emerson, 
Hawthorne and Whitman. Lectures, discussions and assigned readings. 
Two semester hours credit. 



MT. GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 17 

s-62 — Shakespeare — One hour per day. This is a course in the life 
and art of Shakespeare. Lectures, discussions and required reading. Two 
semester hours credit. 

s-132 — Methods of Teaching English — See page 14. 

FRENCH 

Professor Green 

s-a — Children's Course in Conversational French — One hour per 
day. The aim of this course is to enable children to understand to some 
extent the language when spoken, to form simple sentences, to memorize 
nursery rhymes and to play French games. No college credit. 

s-12-a — First Year French — One hour per day. This course includes 
a drill in French pronunciation and grammar with exercises in dictation 
and composition. Text: Thieme and Efhnger's French Grammar. Course 
offered in 1921. Two semester hours credit. 

s-12-b — First Year French — One hour per day. A continuation of 
French s-12-a and the reading of the following: La Belle France and La 
Poudre aux yeux. Course offered in 1922. Two semester hours credit. 

s-22-a — Second Year French — One hour per day. Advanced Compo- 
sition, dictation and the reading and interpretation of the following 
classics: Madame Therese and Lectures Historiques. Course offered in 
1921. Two semester hours credit. 

s-22-b — Second Year French — One hour per day. Continuation of 
French s-22-a and the reading of the following classics: Standard French 
Authors and La Mare au (liable. Course offered in 1922. Two semester 
hours credit. 

HISTORY 

Professor Brunner 

s-42 — A Survey of American History to 1789 — One hour per day. 
This course offers a survey of the European background of American 
History and the establishment in America of European Institutions, with 
special emphasis upon the English settlements. Lectures, discussions and 
readings. Schuyler and Fox's Syllabus of American History will be 
used. Two semester hours credit. 

s-52 — Modern European Problems — One hour per day. This course 
is planned to show the relation of the United States to European problems. 
The chief topics discussed are the Congress of Vienna, the reshaping of 
the map of Europe, the Industrial Revolution, the growth of Italian and 
German unity, the rise of Russia, the late war, and current and inter- 
national problems resulting therefrom. Lectures, readings, reports and 
discussions. Two semester hours credit. 

s-62 — Methods of Teaching History in the Secondary Schools — 

See page 14. 



18 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

LATIN 

Professor Severance 

s-12 — -Cicero — One hour per day. The "De Senectute" will be read 
with thorough drill in syntax. Two semester hours credit. 

s-22 — Virgil — One hour per day. Selections from the works not usually 
read in secondary schools, chiefly from the last six books of the Aeneid. 
Two semester hours credit. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Grimm 

s-1 — Elementary and Intermediate Algebra — One hour per day. 
The course is arranged to meet college entrance requirements. No college 
credit. 

s-22 — Plane Trigonometry — One hour per day. This course covers 
trigonometric functions as ratios. Proofs of the principal formulae and 
transformation of trigonometric expressions by means of these formulae. 
Solution of trigonometric equations, theory and use of logarithms and the 
solution of right and oblique triangles. Two semester hours credit. 

s-32 — Methods of Teaching Mathematics — See page 14. 

MUSIC 

Professor Engle 

s-1 — History and Appreciation of Music — One hour per day. This 
course is intended to give a survey of the History and Aesthetics of Music, 
the History of the Art of Music as an element of liberal culture, the pur- 
pose being to furnish the basis for an intelligent appreciation of musical 
composition from the standpoint of the listener. This course is illustrated 
with music. No previous knowledge of music is essential for admission to 
the class. 

s-2 — Piano Technique and Interpretation — One hour per day. A 
course for teachers and advanced students of the piano. Instruction in 
class, where each student will have the opportunity of performing the 
technical work and repertoire compositions assigned. Limited class; 
hours to be arranged with the instructor. 

s-3 — Chorus — This course is intended for all who are interested in 
choral music. Rehearsals will be held daily. At the close of the Summer 
School a public program will be rendered by the class. In addition to the 
public program the chorus will assist in the Sunday services of the Chau- 
tauqua Association. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Butter wick 

s-22 — Introduction to Philosophy — One hour per day. A study of 
representative philosophical writings. Two semester hours credit. 



AIT. GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 19 

s-52 — Ethics — One hour per day. This course will be primarily con- 
structive and critical, and historical only in so far as its constructive 
purpose demands. Two semester hours credit. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Gingrich 

s-12 — American Government and Politics — One hour per day. A 
course designed to give the student a working knowledge of the funda- 
mental laws of Federal and State Government. The course is devoted 
largely to the study of leading cases. Two semester hours credit. 

s-122 — Lessons in Problems of Democracy — See page 14. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Gingrich 
s-172 — Educational Sociology — One hour per day. The course is 
intended to give the student an understanding of the various theories of 
society together with the place of Sociology in the general field of learn- 
ing. Modern social problems are considered at length. The course is 
designed as far as practical, to emphasize the subject matter of especial 
interest to teachers. Two semester hours credit.