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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

Office of Communications, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, PA 17003-0501 
Send change of address to Office of Admissions, Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville. PA 17003-0501 
January 1987 



(jxlegE 

Annville, Pennsylvania 17003-0501 



Catalog 
1987 









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IV 




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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Academic Calendar 

1986-1987 4 

1987-1988 5 

1988-1989 6 

Introduction 7 

Statement of Purpose 8 

Accreditation 9 

Affiliation and Governance 9 

Admissions 9 

Continuing Education 10 

Student Finances 12 

Student Services 13 

Academic Regulations and Procedures 14 

Academic Programs 27 

Course Descriptions 33 

Directories 

Board of Trustees 108 

Administration 112 

Faculty 117 



Academic Calendar 1986- 1987 



FIRST SEMESTER 



AUGUST 


30 


Saturday, 12:00 noon 


Residence halls open for new students 




31 


Sunday, 1 2:00 noon 


Residence halls open 


SEPTEMBER 


1 


Monday, 8:30 a.m. 


Registration 




1 


Monday, 5:00 p.m. 


Classes begin 




2 


Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. 


Day classes begin 


OCTOBER 


27 


Monday, 5:00 p.m. 


Change of registration deadline 


NOVEMBER 


24-28 


Monday- Friday 


Week of Thanksgiving vacation 


DECEMBER 


1 


Monday, 8:00 a.m. 


Classes resume 




12 


Friday, 5:00 p.m. 


Classes end 




15-19 


Monday -Friday 


Final exams 


SECOND SEMESTER 






JANUARY 


11 


Sunday, 12:00 noon 


Residence halls open 




12 


Monday, 9:00 a.m. 


Registration 




13 


Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. 


Classes begin 


MARCH 


2-6 


Monday -Friday 


Week of spring vacation 




9 


Monday, 8:00 a.m. 


Classes resume 


APRIL 


15 


Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. 


Easter vacation begins 




21 


Tuesday, 8:00 p.m. 


Day classes resume 


MAY 


1 


Friday, 5:00 p.m. 


Classes end 




4-8 


Monday -Friday 


Final exams 




10 


Sunday, 9:00 a.m. 


Baccalaureate 






11:00 a.m. 


Commencement 

Mini-Term 


MAY 


11 


Monday 


Begins 




22 


Friday 


Ends 


SUMMER SCHEDULE 


:i987 




Mini Term 


May 11-22 




Summer Session 1 )une8-IulylO 




Summer Session 11 )uly 13- August 14 




Evening Session I May 27 -July 9 




Evening Session 1! luly 13-August 25 




Weekend College May 16-August 22, alternating weekends 



Academic Calendar 1987-88 



FIRST SEMESTER 






AUGUST 


29-30 


Saturday/Sunday 


New student orientation 




30 


Sunday 


Residence halls open 




31 


Monday, 8:00 a.m. 


Registration 






5:00 p.m. 


Classes begin 


OCTOBER 


19 


Monday, 4:30 p.m. 


Mid-semester grades due 




26 


Monday, 4:30 p.m. 


Change of registration deadline 


NOVEMBER 


iSiiff' Tuesday -Thursday 


Registration for second semester 


if-'iJl^O 


Friday, 5:00 p.m. 


Thanksgiving vacation 




30 


Monday, 8:00 p.m. 


Classes resume 


DECEMBER 


11 


Friday, 5:00 p.m. 


Classes end 




12-13 


Saturday -Sunday 


Reading period 




14-l<i^ 


Monday- Saturday 


Final examinations 




^ 68tuj4a^t^:00 p.m. 


Semester ends 




/f/k^c4// 




SECOND SEMESTER 






JANUARY 


11 


Monday, 12:00 noon 


Residence halls open 




12 


Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 


Registration 




13 


Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. 


Classes begin 


FEBRUARY 


26 


Friday, 5:00 p.m. 


Spring vacation 


MARCH 


7 


Monday, 8:00 a.m. 


Classes resume 




30 


Thursday, 5:00 p.m. 


Easter vacation 


APRIL 


4 


Monday, 5:00 p.m. 


Classes resume 




5-12 


Tuesday -Tuesday 


Fall registration 




28 


Thursday, 5:00 p.m. 


Classes end 




29-1 


Friday-Sunday 


Reading period 


MAY 


2-t; 


Monday -Saturday 


Final examinations 




8 


Sunday, 9:00 a.m. 


Baccalaureate Service 




8 


Sunday, 1 1 :00 
a.m.l 19th Annual 
Commencement 





Academic Calendar 1988-89 



FIRST SEMESTER 



AUGUST 



OCTOBER 
NOVEMBER 

DECEMBER 



27 
28 
29 
29 
30 

24 

21-25 
28 

9 
12-16 



Saturday, 12:00 noon 
Sunday, 12:00 noon 
Monday, 8:30 a.m. 
Monday, 5:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. 

Monday, 5:00 p.m. 

Monday -Friday 
Monday, 8:00 a.m. 

Friday, 5:00 p.m. 
Monday -Friday 



Residence halls open for new students 

Residence halls open 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Day classes begin 

Change of registration deadline 

Week, of Thanksgiving vacation 
Classes resume 

Classes end 
Final exams 



SECOND SEMESTER 



lANUARY 



15 
16 
17 



FEB. 27-MAR. 3 

MARCH 6 

22 
28 

MAY 5 

8-12 

14 



MAY 



Sunday, 12:00 noon 
Monday, 9:00 a.m. 
Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. 

Monday -Friday 

Monday, 8:00 a.m. 
Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m. 

Friday, 5:00 p.m. 
Monday -Friday 
Sunday, 9:00 a.m. 
1 1:00 a.m. 



15 Monday 
26 Friday 



Residence halls open 
Registration 
Classes begin 

Week of spring vacation 

Classes resume 
Easter vacation begins 
Day classes resume 

Classes end 
Final exams 
Baccalaureate Service 
Commencement 

Mini-Term 
Begins 
Ends 



To Our Students 

Lebanon Valley College offers you a broad-based education that assures 
the flexibility and sensitivity required for a meaningful life and successful 
leadership in the Twenty-first Century. 

Through its focus on the concept of leadership and through its ennphasis on 
theory and practice in all its programs, LVC will provide you with the under- 
standing and the experiences necessary both to appreciate the qualities of 
good leadership in a democratic society within a complex world and to 
prepare you to take your place as a professional and community leader. 

Welcome to Lebanon Valley College. 



STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 



Lebanon Valley College affirms its Christian origins by maintaining affiliation 
with the United Methodist Church and by recognizing the Christian faith as 
the perspective for its policies. Both the Christian spirit, which encourages 
the unhampered search for truth, and the academic program, which gives 
form to the search for truth, combine to generate free and responsible 
inquiry by students and faculty. 

in accordance with the purposes of its founders, Lebanon Valley College 
seeks to provide an atmosphere in which the student can respond creatively 
to the contemporary world. Each person is encouraged (1) to develop a 
genuine concern for cooperative living and community service; (2) to attain a 
heightened sense of moral and spiritual values through a deepened aware- 
ness of how people have thought of themselves in relation to nature, to 
society, and to God; (3) to appreciate the close and unmistakable relationship 
among rational thought, creative imagination, and moral commitment; and 
(4) to deal candidly and intelligently with the past, the present, and the 
future and their interrelationship. 

The programs of the College are designed to provide a demanding as well as 
a rewarding encounter with the means necessary to achieve the discovery of 
self and society; consideration of humanity's most significant ideas and 
accomplishments; development of logical thought and clear communication; 
and practice in precise analysis and effective performance. The academic, 
social, religious, and aesthetic experiences blend to create the atmosphere 
of the College in a way that fosters enlivened curiosity, discipline of self, and 
excitement about ideas that are the hallmark of the educated individual. 

Lebanon Valley College, with approximately one thousand students and a 
low student-faculty ratio, in giving life to the concept of liberal arts as 
expressed in the preceding paragraphs has chosen to maintain an educa- 
tional institution which is academically strong, guided by the Christian faith, 
and small enough to give personal attention to all students. 

Adopted February 1, 1975 

Lebanon Valley College Board of Trustees 



Accreditation 

Lebanon Valley College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Educa- 
tion of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. 

Lebanon Valley College is also accredited by the Pennsylvania Department 
of Education, the National Association of Schools of Music and the American 
Chemical Society. 

Lebanon Valley College is on the approved list of the Regents of the State 
University of New York and of the American Association of University Women. 

Lebanon Valley College is a member of the following: National Association 
of Independent Colleges and Universities; Pennsylvania Foundation for 
Independent Colleges; College Entrance Examination Board; College Schol- 
arship Service; National Collegiate Athletic Association; Middle Atlantic 
States Collegiate Athletic Conference; Penn-Mar Athletic Conference; Central 
Pennsylvania Field Hockey Association; Eastern College Athletic Conference. 



Affiliation and Governance 

Lebanon Valley College is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. 
Control of the College is vested in a Board of Trustees composed of 49 
elected members; of the 56 members, 24 represent church conferences, 5 
represent the alumni, 5 represent the faculty, and 22 (including 3 students) 
are elected at large. 



Admissions 

High School Preparation 

All admission candidates should have completed 16 credit units and gradu- 
ated from an accredited secondary school, or present an equivalency certifi- 
cate (G.E.D.). Of the 16 units, 4 should be in English, 2 in foreign language, 2 
in mathematics, 1 in science and 1 in social studies. 

Application Procedure 

A candidate for admission to Lebanon Valley College must submit a com- 
pleted application form with the required application fee. Scholastic Aptitude 



or American College Test results and an official transcript of high school 
grades. Students planning to transfer to Lebanon Valley must submit official 
transcripts of completed college or university work. Lebanon Valley College 
does not require the College Board Achievement Tests. However, Achieve- 
ment Tests in foreign language are recommended for students seeking 
advanced placement. 

All candidates are required to visit campus for a personal interview. Appli- 
cants for admission into music, sacred music or music education programs 
are required to audition on campus; audition applications are available from 
the Admissions Office. 

Early Decision Admissions Policy 

An Early Decision applicant will be expected to complete an application 
stating his/her intention to seek consideration as an Early Decision candi- 
date. The application must be accompanied by the required non-refundable 
application fee no later than November 15. An Early Decision applicant will 
be notified of the admissions committee decision by December 1. A student 
accepted as an Early Decision candidate must confirm his/her acceptance by 
submitting a non-refundable deposit no later than January 1. An applicant 
not accepted under the Early Decision program will be considered for 
admission under the regular admission program. 

For further information contact: ^ 

Admissions Office 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville. PA 17003-0501 
(717)867-6180 



Continuing Education 

Weekend College, Evening School, Summer Sessions, Special Programs, 
Mini Terms and Extension classes in the University Center at Harrisburg en- 
able teachers, state employees, and others in active employment to take 
college courses and earn academic degrees. By careful selection of courses 
made in consultation with appropriate advisors, students can meet many of 
the requirements for a baccalaureate degree. 
Catalogs are published for Continuing Education and for Summer Sessions. 

10 



For information write to the Dean of Continuing Education, Lebanon Valley 
College, Annville, Pennsylvania 17003. 

Weekend College and Evening School 

Baccalaureate degree programs are offered in accounting, administration for 
health care professionals, health care professionals, "administration for 
military personnel, computer information systems, English general studies, 
management, psychology, sociology and social service. Certificate programs, 
each consisting of 30 credit hours, are offered in accounting, banking, 
business computing, human resources, management, marketing, public 
relations and supervisory management. Weekend College classes meet on 
Friday nights or Saturdays in both the academic semesters and the summer. 
Evening School classes meet one night per week, Monday through Thursday, 
each week during the academic semesters and twice weekly during the two 
summer sessions. All classes carry residence credit. 

Summer Session 

Students enrolled full time, by taking summer session courses, may meet the 
requirements for the bachelor's degree in three years. 

University Center at Harrisburg 

Extension classes are offered at the Center's campus, 2986 North Second 
Street, Harrisburg, 17110, on Monday through Thursday evenings during the 
regular academic semesters. Classes meet during the summer sessions on 
various evenings. Lebanon Valley College's extension program in Harrisburg 
is carried on in conjunction with Elizabethtown College, Temple University, 
The Pennsylvania State University and The University of Pennsylvania 
between Elizabethtown College, and Temple University. Undergraduate 
courses offered at the University Center carry residence credit at Lebanon 
Valley College. 

All students admitted and enrolled for a degree at the College are required 
to secure the permission of their advisors and the Registrar prior to enrolling 
for any course at the University Center at Harrisburg. 

For details pertaining to the University Center at Harrisburg write to the 
Director at 2986 North Second Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17110, or 
call 717-238-9694 during the day or 717-238-9696 during the evening. 



11 



student Finances 

Payment for tuition, room, board, and other charges is due by a published 
deadline prior to the beginning of each semester. Students failing to meet 
this deadline will be required to make special arrangements with the Business 
Office before their course registrations will be processed. Questions about 
student finances should be addressed to the Business Office. 

Refund Policy 

Students withdrawing from a course, or the school, will receive a refund 
prorated according to the following schedule. 

Time Period Refund 

During the first week of classes 100% 

During the second week of classes 80% 

During the third week of classes 50% 

After the third week of classes 0% 

Summer School 

During the first week of classes 1 00% 

During the second week of classes 50% 

After the second week of classes 0% 

Students with questions about financial aid should contact the Financial Aid 
Office, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, Pennsylvania, or call (7 1 7) 867-6207. 

Deferred Payment 

Lebanon Valley College offers a deferred payment plan for those families 
who, after exploring other options, are unable to meet the College's prepay- 
ment requirements. Two agents have been appointed to process deferred 
payment applications for Lebanon Valley College: 

Academic Management Services Knight Insurance Agency, Inc. 

Pawtucket, Rhode Island 02861 Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Phone: 1-800-556-6684 Phone: 1-800-225-6783 

The College has no financial interest in either of these plans and offers them 
as a convenience to students and parents. Students who are receiving 
monthly Social Security or Veteran's Education Benefits may defer that 
amount covered by these benefits. 

12 



student Services 

The College provides a variety of services to students including: academic, 
financial, career, religious and personal counseling; health care; and athletic, 
recreational and extra-curricular activities. Further information about student 
services may be obtained from the Office of the Vice President for Student 
Affairs. 



13 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND 
PROCEDURES 



The rules of the College are designed to provide for proper regulation of the 
academic community. The rules and regulations as stated in this bulletin are 
announcements and in no way serve as a contract between the student and 
the College. Attendance at the College is a privilege and not a right. The 
student by his act of registration concedes to the College the right to require 
his withdrawal any time deemed necessary to safeguard the ideals of schol- 
arship and character, and to secure compliance with regulations. It is ex- 
pected that the conduct of all campus citizens will conform to accepted 
standards. All students are required to respond to communications sent by 
any duly constituted authority of the College. 

Degrees 

Baccalaureate Degrees 

Lebanon Valley College confers seven baccalaureate degrees. Candidates for 
graduation must be recommended by the faculty and approved by the Board 
of Trustees. 

The Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon students who have completed the 
requirements in the following major programs: English, foreign language, 
French, general studies, German, history, music, philosophy, political science, 
psychology, religion, sociology, Spanish and certain individualized majors. 

The Bachelor of Science is conferred upon students who have completed the 
requirements in the following major programs: accounting, actuarial science, 
administration for health care professionals, administration for military 
personnel, biochemistry, biology, chemistry, computer information systems, 
computer science, cooperative engineering, cooperative forestry, economics, 
elementary education, general studies, international business, management, 
mathematics, music education, physics, psychobiology, social service and 
certain individualized majors. 

The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, the Bachelor of Science in Medical 
Technology, the Bachelor of Music, the Bachelor of Music in Sacred Music, 
and the Bachelor of Music in Sound Recording Technology are conferred 
upon students who have completed the requirements for the appropriate 
major programs. 



Associate Degrees 

The College confers three associate degrees. Candidates for graduation must 
be recommended by the faculty and approved by the Board of Trustees. 

The Associate of Arts and the Associate of Science degrees are conferred 
upon students who have completed the requirements in the general studies 
program. 

The Associate of Applied Science degree is conferred upon students who 
have completed the requirements in the food service, hotel and travel 
administration majors. 

Privacy of Student Records 

In accordance with the Family Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 the College 
releases no student education records without written consent and request 
of the student, or as prescribed by law. 

A student has the right to inspect his or her educational records maintained 
by the College. It is the student's responsibility to contact the appropriate 
office of the College to make the necessary arrangements. 

The College makes public such directory information as name, address, 
telephone, date of birth, major field of study, degrees and awards received, 
previous schools attended, participation in activities, and athletic information. 

Credit Hours 

A credit hour is the unit used to measure academic progress. Each course 
has a credit designation approximately equal to the number of hours to be 
spent in class each week. A course requiring three hours of class attendance 
each week will carry three credit hours. Credit for laboratories is generally 
awarded at one-half the regular rate. 



Graduation Requirements 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree must obtain 1 22 credit hours. Credit 
hours are accumulated in three separate categories: general education 
requirements, major requirements, and electives. 

Candidates for an associate degree must accumulate at least 60 credit hours, 
including the coursework appropriate to their major program. Fifteen of the 
last eighteen credit hours toward the degree must be in residence. 



15 



The general education program is that part of the curriculum that is shared 
by all students in all majors. The nine areas of required courses reflect 
45-49 credit hours. 

The major programs each require at least 24 credit hours of coursework. 

Electives are those courses selected by the student that reflect neither major 
nor general education requirements. 

Candidates for degrees must also take in residence 30 credit hours of the 36 
taken immediately prior to graduation. Coursework taken in all of the 
College's programs, plus those at University Center at Harrisburg, qualify as 
work done in residence. 

Advising Program 

Each student has a faculty advisor whose role is to counsel about registration 
procedures, course selections, academic requirements, and regulations. The 
student is required to obtain the advisor's counsel and approval before 
registration, withdrawal, election of pass/fail option, and/or change in 
credit/audit status. 

Academic Procedures 

Arrangement of Schedules 

Each student arranges a semester program of courses in consultation with, 
and by approval of, his faculty advisor. Students already in attendance do 
this during registration periods. New students accomplish this on orientation 
days. 

Limit of Hours 

To be classified as full time, a student must take at least twelve credit hours 
of work in a semester. Seventeen credit hours of academic work is the 
maximum permitted without approval of the student's advisor and permis- 
sion of the Registrar. Audited courses are counted in determining the course 
load, but physical education, music organizations are not. To be permitted 
to take more than 17 credits the student should have a cumulative grade 
point average of 3.0 or higher, or be enrolled in the Honors Program, or be a 
senior. Students will pay the prevailing tuition rate for each credit hour 
beyond 17 (not counting physical education and music organizations). 

Class Standing 

Students are classified academically at the beginning of each year. Member- 
ship in the sophomore, junior or senior classes is granted to students who 
have earned a minimum of 28, 56, or 84 credit hours respectively. 

16 



Transfer Credit 

A student applying for advanced standing after having attended another 
accredited institution shall send an official transcript to the Dean of Admis- 
sions. If requested, the student must provide copies of the appropriate 
catalogs for the years of attendance at the other institution or institutions. 

Credits are accepted for transfer provided the grades are C— (1 .7) or better 
and the work is equivalent or similar to work offered at Lebanon Valley 
College. Grades thus transferred count for credit hours only, not for quality 
points. 

A candidate for admission holding an associate degree from a regionally 
accredited college can be admitted with full acceptance of coursework at 
the previously attended institution. Coursework in the major field, however, 
for which the applicant has received a D will not be counted toward fulfilling 
the major requirement. 

Because Lebanon Valley College is a liberal arts institution, consideration of 
full acceptance of the associate degree will be granted with the understand- 
ing that the candidate has followed a basic course of study compatible with 
the curriculum and academic programs of the College and has been enrolled 
in a transfer program. 

In most instances the applicant may be expected to complete the baccalau- 
reate degree within two years. However, when the requirements of a particu- 
lar major field or the nature of the previous study demand additional work 
beyond two years, the applicant will normally be notified at the time of 
admission. 

Discontinuance of Courses 

The College reserves the right to withdraw or discontinue any course. 

Registration and Preregistration 

Students are required to register for courses on designated days of each 
semester; these dates are listed in the official college calendar. Students who 
register later than the designated times will be charged a fee. Students 
desiring to register later than one week after the opening of the semester 
will be admitted only by special permission of the Registrar. 

Change of Registration 

Change of registration, including pass/fail elections, changes of course hours 
credit, changes from credit to audit and vice versa, must be approved by 
signature of the advisor. In most instances registration for a course will not 
be permitted after the course has been in session for one full week. With the 
permission of the advisor, a student may withdraw from a course at any time 



17 



through the last day of semester classes (see grading policy). A fee is 
charged for every change of course made at the student's request after 
registration. 

Auditing Courses 

Students may register to audit courses with approval of the academic 
advisor. Audited courses are counted in considering the course load relative 
to limit of hours (overload). The regular tuition fee is charged to part-time 
students. Neither grade nor credit is given either at the time the course is 
audited or thereafter. A grade of AU (audit) will not be entered on the 
student's permanent record card if the student seldom attended classes. A 
change of registration from credit to audit or from audit to credit must be 
accomplished by the end of the eighth week of semester classes. 

Pass/Fail 

After attaining sophomore standing (28 credit hours) a student may elect to 
take up to two courses per semester and one per summer session on a 
pass/fail basis; however, only six such courses can be counted toward grad- 
uation requirements. No courses taken pass/fail may be used to meet either 
general education, major course area requirements, or pre- or co-requisites 
for classes. A student may select or cancel a pass/fail registration any time 
during the first eight weeks of a semester. 

Repetition of Courses 

A student may repeat as often as desired, for a higher grade, a previously 
taken course, subject to the following provisions: the course must have been 
taken in all registrations on campus and/or in courses staffed by the College 
at the University Center at Harrisburg. Semester hours credit are given only 
once. The grade received each time taken is computed in the semester 
grade point average. The higher or highest grade is used to compute the 
cumulative grade point average. Each semeste; grade report will show hours 
credit each time passed, but the total hours toward degree will be equal only 
to the semester hours credit for the course. For a course previously passed 
P/F, the grade received in the subsequent registration for regular grade is 
the "higher grade." Each grade received remains on the permanent record 
card and a notation is made thereon that the course has been repeated. 

Concurrent Courses 

A student enrolled for a degree at Lebanon Valley College may not carry 
courses concurrently at any other institution or in Weekend College or the 
University Center at Harrisburg without prior consent of his advisor and the 
Registrar. 

A student registered at Lebanon Valley College may not obtain credit for 



courses taken during the summer in another college, including the University 
Center at Harrisburg, unless such courses have prior approval of his advisor 
and the Registrar. 

Attendance Policy 

Each student is responsible for knowing and meeting all requirements for 
each course, including regular class attendance. At the opening of each 
course the instructor shall clearly inform the students of class attendance 
regulations. Violations of those regulations will make the student liable to 
being dropped from the course. Upon the recommendation of the instructor 
and the approval of the Registrar a grade of W will be assigned during the 
first eight weeks of the semester, and an F will be assigned after that date. 

In case of short absences from class the student shall speak directly with the 
instructor. The student shall inform the Registrar only if the absence could 
not be anticipated and extends for more than a week. The Registrar informs 
the faculty of students who will be absent due to an official function of the 
College. 

Excused absences do not absolve students from the necessity of fulfilling all 
course requirements. 

Credit by Examination and Life Experience 

Lebanon Valley College recognizes the ability of superior students to master 
specific areas of study on their own initiative and provides programs to allow 
these students the opportunity to gain credit. Any regularly matriculated 
student, in an approved degree program, may earn a maximum of 30 credits 
toward a bachelor's degree or a maximum of 1 5 credits toward an asso- 
ciate's degree through non-traditional means (experiential credit, advanced 
placement, CLEP, challenge examinations). 

Academic Policy on Challenge Exams 

Only the courses formally listed in the College curriculum may be challenged 
for credit. Full-time students should request challenge examinations through 
their academic advisors. Part-time students and those students enrolled 
through the continuing education program should make application for chal- 
lenge exams through the Continuing Education Office. All requests must be 
approved by the Registrar and the chairperson of the department in which 
the course is listed. 

Challenge exams are considered to be comprehensive examinations in the 
subject area and are graded Pass/Fail. The grading criteria for passing a 
challenge exam will be determined by each department. A ""pass" indicates 



19 



that the credit is to be awarded. A failing grade on a challenge exam will not 
be recorded on the permanent record. The exact nature of the examination 
will be determined by the faculty member and chairperson of the depart- 
ment involved and may include any means of evaluation normally employed 
by the department. There is a fee for each challenge examination. This fee is 
for preparation and grading of the examination and is charged without 
regard to the test results. 

Challenge exams may not be taken by students who have received any 
grade in a course equivalent to or more advanced than the courses for which 
the student is requesting credit by examination. Challenge exams may not 
be used for the purpose of acquiring credit for a course previously failed. 
Practicums, internships, seminars, research courses, independent study, and 
courses with required laboratory components are not subject to credit by 
examination. 



Advanced Placement 

Advanced Placement with credit in appropriate courses will be granted to 
entering students who make scores of 4 or 5 on College Board Advanced 
Placement examinations. For scores of 3, final determination is made by the 
appropriate department. 

Advanced Placement without credit may be granted on the basis of the 
Achievement Tests of the College Board examinations or such other profi- 
ciency tests as may be determined by the Registrar and by the chairman of 
the department. 



CLEP (College Level Examination Program) 

Credit will be granted to those students who score well on CLEP examina- 
tions that are approved by the College. To receive credit, a student must 
score above the 50th percentile on the objective section and above a C, as 
determined by the appropriate academic department, on the essay section. 

A maximum of 6 credits will be awarded for each examination; of these 
credits, only 3 may be applied to the general education requirements, in the 
appropriate area. Credit is only granted to students who have matriculated 
at Lebanon Valley College. Requests for CLEP credit must be approved by 
the Registrar before the student has completed 30 credits in residence. 

20 



Credit for Life Experience 

Lebanon Valley College provides for the awarding of undergraduate aca- 
demic credit for knowledge acquired through non-academic experience in 
areas where the College offers instruction. The experience should bear a 
direct relation to the material taught in a course in the College curriculum 
and should extend over a sufficient period to provide substantive knowledge 
in the relevant area. Regularly matriculated students who, in approved 
degree programs, believe they qualify for such credit may petition the appro- 
priate department through their academic advisors. Students enrolled 
through the continuing education program must petition through the Con- 
tinuing Education Office. This petition must (1) detail the experience in 
question, (2) provide appropriate supporting evidence, (3) note the equiva- 
lent College course by department and number, and (4) state the number of 
credit hours sought. The appropriate department will consult with the 
academic advisor or the Continuing Education Office to determine the best 
means (interview, examination, portfolio, etc.) for evaluating the experience. 

Approval of experiential credit for full-time students must be made in writing 
over the signatures of the academic advisor, the appropriate department 
chairperson, and the Dean of the Faculty. Approval of experiential credit for 
students enrolled through the continuing education program must be made 
in writing over the signatures of the Dean of Continuing Education, the 
appropriate department chairperson, and the Dean of the Faculty. The credit 
will be recorded upon completion of the most recent semester in which the 
student was enrolled for credit courses taken in residence. / 

Experiential credit cannot exceed six credit hours in one academic year and 
cannot exceed a maximum of twelve credit hours in the degree program. A 
maximum of 30 credit hours toward a Bachelor's degree or a maximum of 1 5 
credit hours toward an Associate's degree may be earned through non-tradi- 
tional means (challenge exams, CLEP, advanced placement, experiential 
credit). Grades will not be assigned to experiential credit. 

Grading Systems and Grade Point Averages 

Student work is graded A (distinguished performance), B (superior work), C 
(satisfactory achievement), D (requirements and standards met at a minimum 
level), F (course requirements not met). For each credit hour in a course in 
which a student is graded A, he receives 4.0 quality points; A—, 3.7; B+, 3.3; 
B, 3.0; B— , 2.7; and so on. F carries no credit or quality points, but grades of 
F are used in calculating the grade point averages. The cumulative grade 



21 



point average is calculated by dividing the quality points by the credit hours 
completed. 

Candidates for a degree must obtain a cumulative grade point average of 
1 .75, and a major grade point average of 2.0. Only grades in courses taken at 
Lebanon Valley College, at the University Center in Harrisburg, or through 
the Germantown Metropolitan Semester and the LVC-Washington Semester 
programs are used to determine grade point averages. 

A student may not take a course that has a prerequisite course he has failed. 

In addition to the above grades the symbols 1, W, WP, and WF are used. I 
indicates that the work is incomplete (certain required work postponed by 
the student for substantial reason with the prior consent of the instructor), 
but otherwise satisfactory. This work must be completed within the first 
eight weeks of the next semester, or the I will be changed to an F. Appeals 
for an extension of time must be presented to the Registrar by the first week 
of the next semester. W indicates withdrawal from a course through the 
eighth week of semester classes, in case of withdrawal from a course thereaf- 
ter through the last day of semester classes, the symbol WP is used if the 
work has been satisfactory, and WF if unsatisfactory. The grade of WF is 
calculated as an F in the grade point averages. For physical education a grade 
of either S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory) is recorded. 

Once a grade has been recorded it may not be changed without the approval 
of the instructor and the Registrar. Students who feel the grade may be 
inaccurate should contact the instructor at once, but in no case later than 
the end of the semester following the course in question. 

Academic and Graduation Honors 

The Dean's List 

Students achieving a 3.40 grade point average while carrying at least 12 
credit hours will be named to the Dean's List at the end of each semester. 

Graduation Honors 

After completing a minimum of 60 credit hours of in-residence work a 
student may qualify for graduation honors. The honors to be conferred are 
Summa Cum Laude for grade point averages of 3.75-4.0, Magna Cum Laude 
for grade point averages of 3.60-3.74, and Cum Laude for grade point 
averages of 3.40-3.59. 

Phi Alpha Epsilon 

Students graduating with grade point averages of 3.50 are eligible for 
induction into Phi Alpha Epsilon. 

22 



Academic Dishonesty 

Instances of open and conclusive academic dishonesty are dealt with in 
accordance with the following regulations: for the first offense the faculty 
member shall have the authority to fail the student in the course; for the 
second offense the student shall be failed in the course and additional 
action taken, up to and including expulsion from college, if deemed war- 
ranted by the Dean of the Faculty; for the third offense, if the second act of 
dishonesty did not warrant expulsion in the opinion of the Dean of the 
Faculty, the student shall be failed in the course and expelled from the College. 

Probation 

A student can be placed on academic probation, suspended or dismissed if 
his academic standing fails to come up to the grade point average shown in 
the following table: 







Suspension or 




Probation 


Dismissal 


1st semester 


1.25 




2nd semester 


1.50 


1.25 cumulative 


3rd semester 


1.65 




4th semester 


1.75 


1.50 cumulative 


5th semester 


1.75 




6th semester 


1.75 


1.65 cumulative 


7th semester 


1.75 


in all courses 


8th semester 


1.75 





A student placed on academic probation is notified of such status by the 
Dean of the Faculty and informed of the College regulations governing 
probationers. Students on probation are expected to regulate their work and 
their time in a most determined effort to bring their performances up to the 
required standard. 

A student on probation who desires to begin a new activity or continue in 
an activity already begun, shall submit an appeal to the Vice President for 
Student Affairs. After consultation with the student's major advisor and 
parents, the Vice President for Student Affairs will render a binding decision. 

Suspension 

A student who obviously fails to achieve at a level commensurate with his 
measured ability may be suspended for at least one semester. This suspen- 



23 



sion may occur without any prior probationary period. A student suspended 
for academic reasons is not eligible for reinstatement for one semester. 

A student seeking reinstatement to Lebanon Valley College must apply in 
writing to the Dean of the Faculty. 

A student twice suspended for academic reasons shall be considered for 
readmission, upon application, only if the following conditions are fulfilled: 
(a) firm evidence of renewed interest and motivation; (b) completion of a 
significant amount of appropriate academic work at an accredited institution 
subsequent to his second suspension; (c) recommendation of the appropri- 
ate academic department for readmission on a probationary status. The 
student must achieve at a level that assures successful completion of this 
program or be subject to dismissal. 

Dismissal 

A student dismissed for academic reasons is not eligible for readmission. 

Withdrawal from College and Readmission 

Official withdrawal from the College is accomplished only by the completion 
of withdrawal forms obtained from the Registrar. This is the sole responsibil- 
ity of the student. Application for readmission should be in writing and sent 
to the Dean of the Faculty. 

Transcripts 

Each student, former student, or graduate is entitled to one transcript of his 
college record without charge. For each subsequent copy requested, a fee is 
charged. 



Veterans' Services 

Veterans who are eligible to receive educational benefits must report their 
enrollment to the Registrar after they register for each semester or summer 
session. The Registrar will then submit certification to the Veterans Adminis- 
tration. 

Veterans who are attending Lebanon Valley College for the first time must 
complete the appropriate forms in the Registrar's Office before certification 
will be sent to the Veterans Administration. 

24 



Veterans with questions about the College or their status with the College 
should contact the Registrar. 



Serviceman's Opportunity Colleges 

Lebanon Valley College has been designated as an institutional member of 
Serviceman's Opportunity Colleges (SOC), a group of over 400 colleges 
providing postsecondary education to members throughout the world. As an 
SOC member, Lebanon Valley College recognizes the unique nature of the 
military lifestyle and has committed itself to easing the transfer of relevant 
course credits, providing flexible residency requirements, and crediting 
learning from appropriate military training and experiences. 



Teacher Certification for Non-Matriculated 
Students 

Lebanon Valley College offers teacher certification to a variety of special 
students. Students with degrees from other colleges, or teachers seeking 
certification in other fields, or Lebanon Valley College alumni seeking 
certification for the first time may receive certification. All students must 
present official transcripts of college work, or their previous teacher certifica- 
tion to the Office of the Registrar. The Education Department, the Registrar 
and the appropriate academic department will evaluate the record and 
recommend the appropriate course of action. A fee will be charged for this 
service. 



Off-Campus Programs 

The College offers several off-campus experiences for which students may 
register and receive credit. 

Germantown Metropolitan Semester 

This is a one-semester program of a pre-professional internship and academic 
seminars relating to the city. The program is sponsored through the Metro- 
politan Collegiate Center of Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



25 



Internships are available in a diverse range of social service, mental health, 
law, research and other agencies. Information is available from the Depart- 
ment of Sociology. 

Study Abroad 

Students have opportunity for study abroad through the College's member- 
ship in the International Student Exchange Program, which consists of a 
network of more than 1 50 colleges and universities in 24 countries. Details 
are available from the Dean of the Faculty. The College also assists students 
in locating and gaining admission to other foreign study programs; however, 
participation in programs other than the International Student Exchange 
Program may affect the level of financial aid provided. In all cases, the 
proposed course of study must be approved by the appropriate department 
chairman and the Registrar. 

Washington Semester Program 

luniors and seniors in any major field who have at least a 2.5 grade point 
average, and have had basic courses in American national government and 
are properly recommended are eligible to participate in this program. We 
offer this program in cooperation with The American University in Washing- 
ton, D.C. Information is available from the chairman of the Department of 
History and Political Science. 



26 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



General Education Program and Requirements 

Through the General Education Program the College most directly expresses 
its commitment to the ideal of liberal education which underlies its state- 
ment of purpose. The Program consists of three elements: The General 
Education core, Leadership Studies, and a distribution requirement. The 
program's chief goals are to provide the essential foundation for the growth 
of knowledge and for making the connections between experience and 
learning. All degree students must complete the program outlined below. 

General Education Core 

The College requires that all students successfully complete the following 
interdisciplinary courses. 

GE 1 20 The Western Experience: Our Cultural Heritage. A study of how 
life in the late Twentieth Century has been influenced by historical develop- 
ments in Europe and America, including the growth of science, the rise of 
national states, social classes and values, and changing views of the world. 3 
credits. 

GE 140. Human Culture and Behavior. Culture as a context of human 
behavior. The nature and definition of culture. The biological and social 
sources of culture. Culture, language, personality. The impact of culture on 
social life and on the individual; examples from Western and non-Western 
sources. 3 credits. 

GE 160. The Aesthetic Experience. The artist's achievement. Interrela- 
tionships among the arts. The creative process. Questions of form versus 
content. Art as the product of a specific socio-historical context. 3 credits. 

Leadership 

In keeping with its commitment to fostering an understanding and fostering 
the development of leadership the College requires all students to complete 
successfully a course in this area. 

Area 1. Leadership Studies. 3 credit hours. To introduce all students to 
theories of leadership and to analyze practical applications of those theories. 
LC 1 00 or LC 111 (for Leadership Award students and other students are 



27 



approved by the Director of Leadership Programs) or HC 202 (for Leadership 
Award students who are also Honors Program students). 

General Education Distribution 

By requiring students to study a variety of academic areas the distribution 
requirement encourages each student to acquire an understading of the 
broad spectrum of ideas and patterns of thinking that constitute the liberal 
arts. No course taken pass/fail or required for the first major may be used to 
meet the distribution requirement. Mathematics and computer science 
majors are exempt from the requirements of Area 3. 

Area 2. Communications. 6 credit hours. To develop effective speaking 
and writing skills. Two sequential courses in English composition. EN 111, 
112; or HC 201. 

Area 3. Mathematics and Computers. 3-6 credit hours. To understand 
mathematics as a way of thinking and as a tool for problem solving. One 
integrated mathematics/computer course (MA 100) or one mathematics 
course and one computer course. Eligible courses are CS 147 or 170 plus 
one from MA 111, 150, 160, 161, 170. MA 100 fulfills entire requirement. 

Area 4. Foreign Language. 6 credit hours. To gain perspective on the role 
of language in human affairs. Two sequential courses in a foreign language 
(or exemption by examination). All foreign language courses numbered 101, 
102, 201, 202 are eligible. 

Area 5. Historical and Cultural Contexts. 6 credit hours. To establish 
and explore the nature of human society. One history course (GE 120), and 
one general course in culture (GE 140). GE 120 and GE 140; or HC 202. 

Area 6. Science and Technology. To discover scientific principles and 
discuss related moral and ethical questions. Two laboratory courses in 
biology, chemistry, physics or psychology (the two courses need not be in 
the same science). Eligible courses are Bl 101, 102, 111, 1 1 2, CH 1 00, 111, 
112, 113, 114, PHY 100. 103, 104, 111, 112, or PSY 120. 

Area 7. Aesthetic Experience. 6 credit hours. To learn to appreciate 
works of art and gain insight into creative process. One interdisciplinary 
course (GE 160) and one course in art, music or literature. Eligible courses 
are AR 110, 201, 203, EN 200, 227, 228, FR311, 312, GER311, 312, MU 100, 
341, 342, SP 311, 312; or HC 204. 

Area 8. Values, Persons and World Views. 6 credit hours. To explore the 
relationship between world views and value systems. Two courses in religion 

28 



or philosophy (the two courses need not be in the same discipline). PH 110. 
220, 230, 240, RE 1 10, 1 1 1, 1 12, 120, 140, 222; or HC 203. 

Area 9. Physical Activity. 2 credit hours. To develop an interest in 
physical activity as a part of total fitness. Two courses in physical activity as 
a part of total fitness. Two courses in physical education involving condi- 
tioning or life-long sports. Any physical education course is eligible. 

Leadership Studies Program 

Leadership Studies are a vital component of the education of every Lebanon 
Valley student. In addition to the stress on leadership in various disciplinary 
courses, an interdisciplinary course involving the study of leadership 
theories and processes (LC 100, LC 1 1 1, or HC 202) is required as part of the 
General Education program for all students. Beyond these basics, Lebanon 
Valley offers two advanced programs in Leadership Studies. 

The Leadership Studies Program for Presidential Leadership Award Recipi- 
ents is designed to provide a thorough grounding in the fundamentals of 
leadership, in both theory and application. This program consists of a 
four-course sequence spread over the four years of undergraduate study. 

A voluntary program in Leadership Studies is available to all students in the 
College who wish to continue their study of leadership, both to broaden 
their understanding of leadership theories and processes and to increase 
their self-awareness in their roles as leaders and followers. 

The Leadership Studies Program seeks to achieve the following outcomes for 
all participating students: 

1 . An understanding of the most significant theories and models of 
leadership. 

2. Knowledge of how people in diverse social and cultural contests have 
assumed leadership roles and performed as leaders. 

3. A critical awareness of how ethics and values help determine whether 
responsible leadership or mere manipulation (the irresponsible use of power 
and authority) will occur. 

4. Increased self-awareness and understanding of how a person's 
behavior affects relationships with others in leader/follower situations. 

5. Awareness and appreciation of the responsibilities and difficulties 
inherent in leadership. 

6. Enhanced potential to assume a role as leader or responsible follower 
within a group, organization or community. 



29 



Leadership Studies Program for Presidential Leadership 
Award Recipients 

LC 1 1 1 or HC 202; RE 222 (Christian Ethics) or PH 220 (Ethics); LC 350 and 
LC 400. 

Leadership Studies Voluntary Program 

LC 100 or 1 1 1 or HC 202; one course in communications: EN 210 or 218; 
one course in organizational leadership: MG 330 or PSY 337 or SO 340; LC 
330, 350 and 400. 

Leadership Studies Courses 

100/1 1 1. Theories and Applications of Leadership Processes. Theories 
and concepts of leadership, power and authority. Analysis of their practical 
applications. Specific areas to be covered include group dynamics, commu- 
nication skills, conflict resolution, motivation, decision making, and values 
clarification and ethics. 3 credits. 

330. Ethical Issues and Values in Leadersip. A critical examination of 
the ethical and valuational questions which reside at the core of both 
leadership and leadership theories. Prerequisite: LC 100 or 1 1 1. 3 credits. 

350. Advanced Leadership Studies Models and theories of leadership as 
exemplified in selected case studies. Analysis of leadership in other cultures 
and assessment of the student's own leadership style are also included. 
Prerequisite: LC 100 or 111. 3 credits. 

400. Leadership Internship. Prerequisite: LC 100 or 111. 3-15 credits. 



Honors Program 

The honors program is designed for superior students who are keenly 
motivated to expand their intellectual horizons, develop their originality and 
curiosity, and challenge their intellectual abilities. 

The program seeks to sharpen critical and analytical thinking, develop verbal 
and writtten expression, encourage intellectual independence, and foster 
sensitive and informed investigation of human values. 

To achieve these goals, the program offers a demanding, stimulating and 
integrated alternative to the general requirements of the College. 

30 



Entering students and first semester freshmen are selected on the basis of 
interviews and scholastic records. 

Requirements: Students graduate with college honors after they have 
completed the honors program with a 3.0 grade point average or better 
overall and in the honors courses. 

Honors Courses 

201. Honors Communication. Writing and speaking clear, grammatical and 
articulate English. Listening and reading well. Searching information sources 
and applying those sources ethically. Analyzing and drawing conclusions. 3 
credits. 

202. The Individual and Society. An investigation into the structures of 
society, their origins, and their impact upon human values. Emphasis on the 
interaction of the individual and the socio-cultural environment. Evaluation 
of the approaches of the various social sciences. 6 credits. 

203. Human Existence and Transcendence. A close examination of 
questions and issues pertaining to human existence and the ways in which 
mankind has attempted, religiously and philosophically, to rise above the 
conditions of human existence. This course seeks to describe and examine 
the commonalities and differences between religion and philosophy as each 
discipline addresses itself to existence and transcendence. 6 credits. 

204. Human Creativity. A study of the major forms of literature, music, 
and plastic art, designed to acquaint students with functions, values, and 
aesthetic and cultural contexts of art, as well as to enhance their responses 
to art works. 6 credits. 

Honors Seminars 

The honors seminars are intensive studies of topics offered for junior and 
senior honors students. The honors students choose the topics for the 
seminars, help select the instructors and assist in the design of the seminars 
with the instructors. Each participant. Each participant in the honors pro- 
gram shall complete two honors seminars. 

Honors Independent Study 

An independent study project, the capstone of the honors program, provides 
the opportunity to carry out an extensive academic study of the student's 
own design. The project, overseen by a faculty member, must be approved 



by the honors director. When acceptable to an academic department, such 
independent study may serve as the basis for departmental honors. Upon 
completion, the project will be presented publicly. 3 credits. 

Graduation Requirements 

In addition to the honors program and major requirements, honors students 
take: two (2) one-semester courses in science; two (2) sequential courses in a 
foreign language or exemption by examination; a one-semester integrated 
course in mathematics and computer science (MA 100) and two (2) courses in 
physical education. 

Departmental Honors 

All major programs provide the opportunity for departmental honors work 
during the junior and senior years. For specific information, interested 
students should contact the appropriate department chairman. Generally, 
departmental honors consists of a reading and/or research project producing 
a thesis or essay. This project is undertaken on a subject of the student's 
own choosing under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Opportunity also 
exists to do creative work. A maximum of 9 hours credit may be earned in 
departmental honors. 



32 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Art 

The Art Department, through course work and the minor program, provides 
an opportunity for creative expression and a richer understanding of accom- 
plishments in the visual arts. 

Minor: AR 110, 140, 201, 203, (15 credits) 

Courses in Art 

110. Introduction to Art. An exploration of meaning in the visual arts. The 
subject is approached through discussions of perception, the aesthetic 
experience, and form/content analyses of painting, sculpture, and architec- 
ture. 3 credits. 

140. Drawing, Painting and Printmaking. An introduction to the mate- 
rials and processes of drawing, painting, and printmaking. Spatial perception, 
composition, light and dark as well as color relationships are major areas of 
study. 3 credits. 

191-198. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

201. Art History 1. Prehistoric through Medieval Art. A stylistic survey 
from paleolithic through medieval art, including a focus on the artist's role 
within society. 3 credits. 

203. Art History 11. Renaissance to Twentieth Century. A survey of 
individual masters and their major schools, the course covers the period 
from the close of the medieval era to the modern day and includes stylistic 
analyses and historical contexts for the painting, sculpture, and architecture 
of each period. 3 credits. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

39 1 - 398. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

401. Art in the Elementary School. Introduction to creative art activity for 
children in elementary school. Topics covered include philosophical con- 
cepts, curriculum, evaluation and studio activity involving a variety of art 
media, techniques, and processes. 3 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 ^6 credits. 



33 



Biochemistry 

The major in biochemistry is an interdisciplinary program that provides an 
opportunity for interested students to engage in a comprehensive study of 
the chemical basis of biological processes. It is designed to prepare students 
for advanced study in medical, dental, and other professional schools, for 
graduate programs in a variety of subjects including biochemistry, clinical 
chemistry, pharmacology, molecular biology, genetics, microbiology, and 
physiology, and for research positions in industrial, academic, and govern- 
ment laboratories. 

DEGREE: B.S. degree with a major in biochemistry. 

MAJOR: Bl 111 , 11 2, 20 1 , 202 and/or 307, 306, 40 1 (24 hours); BCH 421, 
422, 430, 480 (9 hours); CH 111, 112, 113, I 14, 213, 214, 215, 216, 31 I, 312, 
319, 323, (29 or 30 hours); MA 161, 162 (6 hours); PHY 103/104 or 111/112 
(8 hours). 

Courses in Biochemistry 

421, 422. Biochemistry I, II. A course in the physical and organic aspects 
of living systems. Prerequisites: CH 214, 216, and 3 1 2 or approval of the 
departmental chairman. 3 credits per semester. 

430. Biochemistry Laboratory. Investigations of the properties of pro- 
teins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. Prerequisites: CH 214, 216. 1 
credit. 

491 -498. Special Topics. I -6 credits 

499. Biochemistry Seminar. Readings, discussions, and reports on special 
topics in biochemistry. 1 credit. 

500. Independent Study. Prerequisites or corequisites: CH 311, 312, and 
permission. 2-3 credits per semester (maximum of 9). 



Biology 

The aims of the program for biology majors are: (I) to provide a thorough 
understanding of the principles of biology and background in disciplines 
basic to biology; (2) to develop skills in the application of the scientific 
method and in the retrieval and communication of technical information; 
and (3) to train students for employment at the baccalaureate level and to 

34 



provide preparation for tinose interested in graduate, professional and 
medical programs. 

DEGREE: B.S. degree with a major in biology. 

MAJOR: Bl 1 00, 11 1 , 1 1 2, 20 1 , 302 or 307, 499; one course each in the 
general areas of physiology, cellular and subcellular biology, and morphol- 
ogy; and 4 additional hours of biology for a minimum of 34 hours. Also 
required are two years of chemistry; PHY 103, 104 or 111, 112; and MA 161 
or 1 1 1 . Bl 111/112 are pre-requisites for all courses beyond the biology 1 12 
level unless noted otherwise. 



Cooperative Programs 

Forestry and Environmental Studies 

Students completing a three-year program at Lebanon Valley College 
studying the liberal arts and the sciences basic to forestry and environmental 
sciences may apply for admission to the cooperative forestry program with 
Duke University. Upon completion of the first year of the two-year (plus one 
summer) program at Duke University, the student will receive the Bachelor of 
Science degree from Lebanon Valley College. After completion of the 
program at Duke, the student will receive the professional degree of Master 
of Forestry (M.F.) or Master of Environmental Management (M.E.M.) from 
Duke University. Students may major in biology, economics, political science, 
or mathematics at Lebanon Valley College. 

REQUIREMENTS: Required courses, regardless of major, include Bl 111/11 2, 
302; EC 1 10/120; MA 161 or 1 1 1, and MA 170, plus those courses necessary 
to meet the general requirements of the College. Additional required course- 
work varies depending upon whether the student majors in economics, 
biology, mathematics or political science. 

Allied Health Sciences 

The College maintains a cooperative program ("2 -I- 2") with Thomas Jeffer- 
son University in Philadelphia, PA for students interested in nursing, physical 
therapy, occupational therapy, dental hygiene, radiologic technology, 
diagnostic medical sonography, cytotechnology, and medical technology. 
Students spend two years at Lebanon Valley College taking required courses 
in the basic sciences and other areas. During the second year, application is 



35 



made to Thomas Jefferson University where the students take courses in 
their area of specialty. Admission to the lefferson phase of the program is 
not automatic and depends upon grades, recommendations, and an inter- 
view. Upon successful completion of the program, the student is awarded 
the baccalaureate degree from Thomas lefferson University. 

Medical Technology and Nuclear Medicine Technology 

The College has its own major in medical technology. The student takes 
three years of courses to fulfill the requirements of the College and of the 
National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Before or 
during the third year of the program, a student applies to a hospital with a 
CAHEA approved school of medical technology where he/she spends the 
fourth year in training. Admission is not automatic and depends upon the 
academic record, recommendations and an interview. Upon satisfactorily 
completing the clinical year, the student is awarded the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Medical Technology by Lebanon Valley College. The College is 
affiliated with the following hospitals: Abington Memorial Hospital, Sacred 
Heart Hospital (in Allentown), Harrisburg Hospital, Polyclinic Medical Center 
of Harrisburg, Jersey Shore Medical Center-Fitkin Hospital, Lancaster General 
Hospital, and Reading Hospital and Medical Center. However, the student is 
not limited to these affiliations and may seek acceptance at other approved 
hospitals. (Refer to the Allied Health Sciences section for additional pro- 
grams in medical technology.) 

The College offers a program for students interested in nuclear medicine 
technology ("3 + I "). The College is affiliated with the schools of nuclear 
medicine technology at the University of Virginia Medical Center and J.F. 
Kennedy Medical Center, Edison Nl. Admission is not automatic and de- 
pends upon the academic record, recommendations and an interview. 
Application may also be made to other accredited programs. Upon successful 
completion of the program, students are awarded the baccalaureate degree 
by Lebanon Valley College. 

Courses in Biology 

100. Biology Orientation. A general discussion of the various skills 
necessary for success in the biological sciences. Topics will include data 
presentation and interpretation, biological illustration, the biological litera- 
ture and library resources, scientific writing, abstracting, laboratory proce- 
dures, preparation for examinations, independent study, and career oppor- 

36 



tunities in biology. Required for all freshman biochemistry and biology 
majors, and allied health science students. Open to students enrolled in BI 
11 1 . No prerequisite. One credit. 

101. Human Biology I. This course, designed for the non-science major, 
utilizes the human organism as the primary focus for elucidating physiologi- 
cal principles. Topics include nutrition, homeostasis, major organ systems, 
immunity, and exercise physiology. Laboratory exercises include sensory 
physiology, respiration, blood pressure, and ECG. 4 credits per semester. 

102. Human Biology II. This course, also designed for the non-science 
major, emphasizes the mastery of certain biological principles as applied pri- 
marily to humans. Topics include reproduction, development, classical and 
molecular genetics, and ecology. Laboratory exercises supplement lecture 
topics. 4 credits per semester. 

111/112. General Biology 1, II. These courses, designed for science 
majors, involve rigorous studies of basic biological principles. Biology 1 1 1 
emphasizes cell biology, genetics, taxonomy, and evolution. Biology 1 12 
covers concepts in physiology, embryology, botany and ecology. 4 credits 
per semester. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

201. Genetics. A study of the principles, mechanisms and concepts of 
classical and molecular genetics. The laboratory stresses key concepts of ge- 
netics utilizing both classical and molecular approaches. Prerequisites: one 
year of chemistry or permission. 4 credits. 

221. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. The comparative anatomy of 
vertebrates with emphasis on the evolutionary relationships among the 
various lines of vertebrates. Intensive laboratory work involves dissections 
and demonstrations of representative vertebrates. 4 credits. 

29 1 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits . 

302. Survey of the Plant Kingdom. The development and diversity of 
plants and the relationships between them. Field and laboratory work will 
familiarize the student with the structure of plants and with the identification 
of flowering plants in the local flora. Prerequisite: Biology 1 12 or permission. 
4 credits. 

304. Developmental Biology. The study of basic descriptive phenomena 
in the development of typical invertebrate and vertebrate embryos, with a 
consideration of modern embryological problems. 4 credits. 

305. Vertebrate Histology and Microtechnique. A study of the micro- 



37 



scopic anatomy of vertebrate tissues, with illustrations of basic tissue 
similarities and specialization in relation to function. The laboratory work 
includes the preparation of slides utilizing routine histological and histo- 
chemical techniques. 4 credits. 

306. Microbiology. A study of the morphology, physiology, and biochem- 
istry of representative microorganisms. Prerequisite: three semesters of 
chemistry or permission. 4 credits. 

307. Plant Physiology. A study of the functioning of plants, with emphasis 
on vascular plants. Prerequisite: three semesters of chemistry or permission. 

4 credits. 

312. Fundamentals of Ecology. An examination of the basic concepts of 
ecology with extensive laboratory work and field experiences in freshwater, 
marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. Prerequisites: Bl 1 1 2 or permission. 4 
credits. 

322. Animal Physiology. A study of the principles of vertebrate body 
function, with emphasis on the mechanisms by which cells and organs 
perform their functions and the interactions of the various organs in main- 
taining total body function. Prerequisites: Bl 101 or 112 and one semester of 
chemistry, or permission. 4 credits. 

323. Introduction to Immunology. An introduction to the anatomical, 
physiological, and biochemical factors underlying the immune response. The 
course begins with a discussion of non-specific immunity, cellular immunity, 
and antibody-mediated immune responses. The course then moves into a 
study of contemporary immunological topics which are discussed with 
respect to major research papers in each area. Topics include auto-immunity, 
histocompatibility. Immunogenetics, and acquired immune deficiencies. A 
research paper is required. Prerequisities: Bl 111/112 and CH 111/113 or 
equivalent or permission of instructor. 4 credits. - 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

400. Internship. Provides on-site research and study opportunities in 
medical research, veterinary medicine and applied ecology (conservation, 
forestry, and water quality control). Prerequisite: permission. 1 -4 credits per 
semester. 

401. Molecular Biology. A study of the functioning of cells, including 
energetics, mechanisms and control of cell transport, metabolism, irritability, 
biological rhythms and photophysiology. Prerequisite: three semesters of 
chemistry or permission. 4 credits. 

402. Invertebrate Zoology. A study of most of the invertebrate phyla, 
38 



concentrating on movement, metabolism, information and control, repro- 
duction and association between animals. 4 credits. 

404. Electron Microscopy. An introduction to the use of techniques for 
scanning and transmission electron microscopic studies. Through laboratory 
experience the students will learn the proper use, application, and limita- 
tions of the appropriate instruments. Prerequisite: Biology 305 or permission 
of instructor. 4 credits. 

409. Quantitative Ecology. An intensive study of ecological processes 
emphasizing the quantitative aspects of ecology at the population and 
community levels. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 4 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

499. Seminar. Each senior student is required to do independent library 
research on an assigned topic and to make an oral presentation to the 
biology faculty and students. This course may be repeated. 1 or 2 credits. 

500. Independent Study. Prerequisite: Permission. 1 -9 credits per semes- 
ter. 

Chemistry 

The aims of the Department of Chemistry are to provide its majors with 
rigorous training in the principles and applications of modern chemistry. The 
department offers two degrees, the B.S. with a major in chemistry and the 
B.S. in Chemistry which partially meets the requirements of the American 
Chemical Society. Both degree programs offer the necessary preparation for 
industry, graduate study or professional schools of medicine, dentistry, 
optometry, osteopathic medicine, or podiatry. Courses are designed to 
present the interaction of theoretical and experimental chemistry. In all lab- 
oratory courses emphasis is given to the use of instrumentation, including 
electronics. An independent study course is required of all chemistry majors. 

DEGREES: B.S. degree with a major in chemistry. B.S. in Chemistry degree 
(partial fulfillment of American Chemical Society certification). 

MAJOR: Students must take 111, 112, 113, 114, 213, 214, 215, 216, 222, 
305, 306, 307, 308, 311, 312, 321, and 322; MA 161, 162; PHY 111, 112; total 
of 47 -49 credits. 

B.S. in Chemistry candidates must take 111, 112, 113, 114,213,214,215, 
216, 222, 305, 306, 307, 308, 311, 312, 321, 322, 41 1 , and 6 credits from the 
following 421, 422, 491-498, and 4 credits of 500; MA 161, 162; PHY 111, 
112; total of 60-62 credits. 



39 



Courses in Chemistry 

100. Introduction to Chemistry. An introduction to the basic principles of 
chemistry including mathematical tools, atomic structure, reactions, stoichi- 
ometry, bonding, and aqueous systems. Laboratory experience included. 4 
credits. 

Chemistry 109. A step-by-step approach to solving chemical problems. 
Topics include the application of mathematical tools in introductory chemis- 
try and techniques for finding the proper approach to solve problems. The 
course is designed to be taken concurrently with Chemistry 111.1 credit. 

Ill, 112. Principles of Chemistry 1, 11. A systematic study of the funda- 
mental principles and concepts of chemistry. 3 credits per semester. 

113, 114. Introductory Laboratory 1, 11. Laboratory courses to accompany 
1 1 1 and 1 12 respectively. Prerequisite or corequisite: 1 1 1 and 1 12. 1 credit 
per semester. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

213, 214. Organic Chemistry I, 11. An introduction to the structure, 
nomenclature, and properties of the major classes of organic compounds, 
with emphasis on the principles and reaction mechanisms describing their 
behavior. Prerequisite: 1 12 and 1 14. 3 credits per semester. 

215, 216. Organic Laboratory I, 11. Investigations of methods of synthesis 
and analysis of organic compounds including some physical organic studies. 
Prerequisite: CH 2 1 3. Corequisite: CH 2 1 4 or 2 1 6. 1 credit for 2 1 5, 1-2 
credits for 216. 

222. Introductory Inorganic Chemistry. The application of theoretical 
principles to the understanding of the descriptive chemistry of the elements. 
Prerequisite: CH 1 12 and 1 14. 3 credits. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

305. Analytical Chemistry. Gravimetric, volumetric, and electrochemical 
methods of chemical analysis are covered. Included are statistical methods of 
data treatment and rigorous considerations of complex chemical equilibria. 
Prerequisites: CH 1 12 and MA 161. 3 credits. 

306. Instrumental Analysis. Basic types of chemical instrumentation, and 
their applications in analytical chemistry are examined. These include: gas 
and liquid chromatography: infrared, UV-VIS, fluoresence, atomic absorption, 
and plasma emission spectrophotometry: nuclear magnetic resonance and 
mass spectrometry: and radiochemical methods. Prerequisites: CH 1 1 2 and 
MA 161. 3 credits. 

40 



307. Quantitative Analysis Laboratory. Techniques of gavimetric, 
volumetric, and electrochemical analysis are applied to the analysis of 
unknowns. Prerequisite or corequisite: CH 305. 1 credit. 

308. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. Chemical instrumentation is 
utilized in analytical method development and analysis. Prerequisite or 
corequisite: CH 306. 1 credit. 

31 1, 312. Physical Chemistry I, 11. A study of the physical theories of 
matter and their applications to systems of variable composition. Prerequi- 
sites: CH 2 1 4 or 2 1 6, MA 162 and PHY 112.3 credits per semester. 

314. Instrumental Analysis. An examination of instrumental analytical 
methods, including spectrophotometry, electroanalysis, coulometry, and po- 
larography. Prerequisites: CH 31 1 and 319. Corequisite: CH 312. 3 credits. 

316. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. The use of instrumental tech- 
niques for investigating chemical systems. Prerequisites: CH 214 and 216. 
Corequisites: CH 3 1 1 , 3 1 2. 1 credit. 

319. Chemical Equilibria. A rigorous mathematical description of the role 
of a chemical equilibrium in chemical systems emphasizing reactions involv- 
ing ionic substances and using modern analytical methods. Prerequisites: CH 
214 and 216. 4 credits. 

321, 322. Physical Laboratory I, II. Physical-chemical investigations of 
chemical systems. Corequisite: CH 31 1 or 312. 1 credit per semester. 

323. Chemical Equilibria Laboratory. A laboratory study of the applica- 
tion of equilibrium concepts to chemical systems. Corequisite: CH 3 1 9. 1 credit. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

400. Internship. Supervised chemistry laboratory experience in an in- 
dustry, government agency, or hospital. Prerequisites: permission of chair- 
man of department. 1 -6 credits. 

41 1. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. A study of bonding theories, 
molecular structure, spectroscopy, and reaction mechanisms with special 
emphasis on transition metal complexes. Prerequisite: CH 312. 3 credits per 
semester. 

421, 422. Biochemistry I, II. A course in the physical and organic aspects 
of living systems. Prerequisites: CH 214, 216, and 312 or permission. 3 
credits per semester. 

430. Biochemistry Laboratory. Investigations of the properties of pro- 
teins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. Prerequisites: CH 214 and 
216. 1 credit. 



41 



480. Biochemistry Seminar. Readings, discussions, and reports on special 
topics in biociiemistry. 1 credit. 

491 -498. Special Topics. One or more of the following courses will be 
offered each semester: analytical, industrial chemistry, kinetics, organic 
synthesis, physical organic, polymers, or quantum mechanics. However, 
other options are available. Prerequisite: CH 312, 319 or permission. 1-6 
credits. 

500. Independent Study. Intensive library and laboratory study of special 
interest to advanced students in the major areas of chemistry. For students 
preparing for secondary school teaching, the emphasis is placed on methods 
of teaching chemistry. Prerequisites: Permission of Department. Upon 
approval may be certified as a leadership internship. 1 -9 credits per semester. 



Education (Teacher Certification) 

Elementary Education 

The teacher preparation program builds upon a strong foundation in the 
liberal arts and includes intensive training in teaching all school subjects. The 
field-centered component in the program provides the elementary education 
major with extensive and carefully sequenced opportunities to work with 
teachers and children in a variety of school settings. During the first three 
years students spend time off campus making observations, tutoring, and 
providing small-group instruction. Seniors spend a full semester in full-time 
student teaching. Coursework allows sophomores, juniors and seniors the 
opportunity to work with nursery school children and/or with exceptional 
children in selected locations. 

DEGREE: B.S. degree with a major in elementary education. 

MAJOR: Elementary education majors must take: ED 110; EE 220, 250, 270, 
332, 341, 342, 344, 361, 362, 440, 499; AR 401 ; GO 11 1 ; one of the follow- 
ing: HI 125, 1 26; MA 1 00 or equivalent; PSY 1 00, 220, 32 1 , for a total of 66 
hours. 

MINOR: ED 110, GO 112; one of EE 270, EE 341, EE 361; one of EE 250, EE 
332, GO II 1 ; one of ED 346, ED 391 , ED 420, ED 442; and EE 280 or ED 
280, 1-3 credits. (16-18 credits) 

42 



Secondary Education 

There is no separate major for those interested in secondary education. 
Interested students major in a subject area and also enroll for courses in the 
Education Department. This program is designed to meet the requirements 
for teacher certification in Pennsylvania and many other states. Programs 
that lead to certification include biology, chemistry, English, French, German, 
Spanish, mathematics, physics, and social studies. 

DEGREE: B.A. or B.S. degree in the chosen major. 

Secondary Teacher Certification: Candidates must complete 2 1 credits 
in professional education courses and the approved program in the chosen 
major. ED 110 should be taken in the sophomore year and ED 430 in the 
junior year. ED 420 and 440 comprise the student teaching semester of the 
senior or postgraduate year. To qualify for student teaching, the student 
must have completed ED 1 10 and 430, the courses required for the major, 
and must have a grade point average of 2.0 plus permission of his advisor 
and the director of secondary student teaching. 

MINOR: see program outlined under elementary education. 

Courses in Elementary Education 

220. Music in the Elementary School. Fundamentals of music instruction, 
including a survey of approaches to developing conceptual learning; move- 
ment; playing classroom instruments; introduction of Orff and Kodaly 
techniques; creative applications; guided listening; and the child voice. 3 
credits. 

250. Mathematics for the Elementary Grades. An introduction to 
fundamental concepts and processes in mathematics vi^ith emphasis on their 
application in the elementary school. 3 credits. 

260. Principles and Practices in Early Childhood Education. An intro- 
duction to contemporary research, theories, programs, curricula, methods, 
and materials in early childhood education, nursery school through grade 2. 
Includes required field experience in a local early childhood center. 3 credits. 

270. Children's Literature. A study of literature for children from infants 
through grade 8, including extensive classroom examination of books, 
poetry, storytelling, and audiovisual resources in children's literature. 3 credits. 

280. Field Practicum in the Elementary School. Supervised field experi- 
ences in appropriate school settings. Prerequisite: Permission. 1 -3 credits. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 



43 



332. The Physical Sciences in the Elementary School. A study of basic 
concepts in biology, chemistry, physics, and geography. Innovative curricula 
and methodology emphasize the experiential nature of science in the 
elementary classroom. Prerequisites: EE 250 and one semester of a labora- 
tory science. 3 credits. 

341/342. Teaching of Reading 1, 11. The fundamentals of teaching 
children to read, from the readiness programs of early childhood education 
to the more comprehensive techniques required to teach reading in all 
subject areas of the curricula in elementary and middle schools. Effective 
reading programs, methods, and materials are examined first hand. Attention 
is given to the classroom teacher's diagnosis of reading difficulties with an 
eye to preventive and prescriptive teaching. Includes during each semester 
one hour per week of tutoring of selected elementary school students. 
Prerequisite: EE 270. 3 credits per semester. 

344. Health and Safety Education. A study of basic health and safety 
practices and procedures as applied to the elementary school, including a 
program of physical education for elementary school children, an American 
Red Cross-approved program of first aid, and an evaluation of sources and 
use of materials. Prerequisites: ED 110; PSY 220. 3 credits. 

361. Language Arts in the Elementary School. The content, methods 
and materials for teaching oral and written language beginning with early 
childhood: listening, speaking, creative and practical writing, as well as the 
related skills of creative dramatics, handwriting, grammar and usage. The 
course is designed to assist teachers in helping children to communicate ef- 
fectively and responsibly in a creative manner. 3 credits. 

362. Social Studies in the Elementary School. An examination of the 
content, methods and role of social studies in the elementary school, 
beginning with early childhood. The curriculum is examined from two van- 
tage points: the daily lives of children as they relate to developing values 
and attitudes, and the planned study of people as they live and have lived in 
our world. The development of a teaching unit and the examination of 
learning resources contribute to a sound instructional program. 3 credits. 
391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

440. Student Teaching. Each student spends an entire semester in a 
classroom of an area public school under the supervision of a carefully se- 
lected cooperating teacher. Open to seniors only. A cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 during the first six semesters in college is required. Prerequi- 
sites: ED 1 10; PSY 220; EE 250, 270, 332, 341, 342, 361, 362, and permission. 
3- 12 credits. 

44 



49 1 - 498. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

499. Senior Seminar. Special topics related to pertinent problems in 
student teaching or to further professional growth in the profession are re- 
searched. 3 credits. 

500. Independent Study. 1 - 3 credits per semester. 

Courses in Education 

1 10. Foundations of Education. A study of the social, historical and 
philosophical foundations of American education correlated with a survey of 
the principles and theories of influential educators. 3 credits. 

191-198. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

280. Field Practicum in the Secondary School. Supervised field experi- 
ences in appropriate school settings. Designed to offer practical experiences 
for prospective secondary teachers or students planning an educational 
ministry. Prerequisites: Permission. 1-3 credits. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

346. Educational Technology and Instructional Media. A study of the 
preparation and use of instructional technology, media, and equipment. 3 
credits. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

442. The Education of the Exceptional Child. An introduction to current 
research and practices concerning exceptionalities in children, including the 
handicapped and gifted. The course includes attention to policies, legisla- 
tion, programs, methods and materials. Various resource personnel are 
invited to address pertinent issues. The course includes a minimum of one 
hour per week field experience in local programs designed to meet the 
needs of exceptional children. Prerequisites: ED 110, PSY 100. 3 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

Courses in Secondary Education 

420. Human Growth and Development. A survey of human characteris- 
tics, research in developmental psychology and their implications for teach- 
ing and learning. Prerequisite: ED 110. 3 credits. 

430. Practicum and Methods. A study of the basic principles and proce- 
dures for secondary classroom management and instruction. Prerequisite: 
ED 110. 3 credits. 



45 



431. Social Studies in Secondary Education. A study of curricular 
patterns for areas within the social studies. Students will prepare instruc- 
tional objectives, select and organize subject matter, investigate a variety of 
learning activities and strategies for developing inquiry skills, decision-mak- 
ing ability and values. 1 -2 credits. 

440. Student Teaching. Each student spends one semester in a classroom 
of an area school under the supervision of a carefully selected cooperating 
teacher. Open to seniors only. Requirements are: (1) a grade point average of 
at least 2.0 in the major field; (2) completion of methods in the major field; 
and (3) approval of the major advisor and the director of secondary student 
teaching. Prerequisites: ED 110, 430 (ED 420 is taken concurrently). 3-12 
credits. 



Geography 

Courses in geography are offered to acquaint students with the physical and 
cultural aspects of the world in which they live. The courses are recom- 
mended for all students who wish to broaden their understanding of the world. 

Courses in Geography 

111. Physical Geography. A survey of the physical aspects of the earth, 
its place in the solar system, earth movements, waters, landforms, climate, 
soil types, weather, and processes that form and change the earth's surface. 
3 credits. 

1 12. Regional Cultural Geography. A survey of the various geographic 
regions of the world and their cultural features. The natural resources and 
economy of each area are studied as well as such factors as religion, social 
customs, food supply, populations, and ecology. 3 credits. 



Reading and Study Skills 

Occasionally, an incoming student may have had insufficient preparation for 
study and concentration at the college level. It is for this student that the 
reading and study skills course is intended. 

1 10. Reading and Study Skills. A study of techniques intended to 
improve those skills important to reading and to study at the college level. 

46 



Texts assigned for students' own classes are utilized. Students who have 
SAT verbal scores below 450 are strongly advised to take the course. 1 credit. 



English 

The major in English introduces students to the humanistic study of literature 
or to the humanistic practice of writing. While English majors may choose to 
concentrate either in literature or communications, the basis for both 
concentrations is the systematic and analytic study of literature. All majors 
also learn clear, concise, and coherent expression as well as effective collec- 
tion, organization, and presentation of material. Such study prepares the 
student for more advanced work in many fields. Graduates of the Department 
of English are prepared for work in such fields as journalism, teaching, 
editing, public relations, publishing, advertising, government, industry, the 
ministry, and law. 

DEGREE: B.A. with a major in English. 

Major core requirements: All students must take EN 200, EN 331, EN 499, 
one major authors course, and three courses from EN 220, EN 225, EN 226, 
EN 227, EN 228. 

Literature Concentration: Beyond the core courses, the student will take 
two additional survey courses and three additional major authors or special 
topics courses. Students planning to teach secondary school will also take 
EN 218 and EN 334. 

Communications Concentration: Beyond the core courses the student will 
take EN 213, and three additional courses in communications. The student 
will also take at least one internship. 

Literature Minor: EN 200, 220, two courses from 225/226, 227/228, and two 
additional literature courses. (18 credits) 

Communications Minor: EN 200, 213, 220 and three additional communica- 
tions courses. (18 credits) 

Courses in Englisli 

111/112. English Composition, 1, II. Both semesters help the student find 
her or his own voice within the demands and expectations of public expres- 
sion. These courses emphasize the development of clear, organized, and 
rhetorically effective prose. 3 credits per semester. 



47 



1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

200. Introduction to Literary Studies. An introduction to the basic 
methodology, tools, terminology, and concepts of the study of literature. 3 
credits. 

210. Management Communications. The development of reading, 
writing, and listening skills for management in the business community. 
Prerequisites: EN 111, 1 1 2 or permission. 3 credits. 

213. Journalistic Writing. The development of the basic skills of journalis- 
tic writing. 3 credits. 

214. Media Writing. The application of basic journalistic skills to maga- 
zines, public relations, publicity, radio, and television. 3 credits. 

216. Technical Writing. The development of writing skills within the 
context of technical and scientific writing, with emphasis on style and forms. 
3 credits. 

218. Oral Communications. Introduction to oral communication, with 
emphasis on effective public speaking. 3 credits. 

219. Creative Writing. The making of fiction or poetry (in alternate 
offerings) in a workshop setting. 3 credits. 

220. Masters of American Literature. A study of selected major authors 
representing various periods of American Literature. 3 credits. 

225/226. Survey of English Literature I, II. An examination of English 
literature from the beginnings to about 1800 (1) and from there to the 
present (11). 

227/228. World Literature I, II. An examination of major themes in 
Western thought through major literary works from the ancient Greeks to the 
moderns. 3 credits per semester. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

331. History of the English Language. An examination of English sounds, 
grammatical forms, and vocabulary, as well as a brief survey of standards of 
correctness and current usage. 3 credits. 

334. Modern Grammars. A review of traditional grammar and a survey of 
recent grammatical concepts resulting from developments in structural 
linguistics. Prerequisite: EN 331. 3 credits. 

335. The Novel. A study of the development of the English novel from 
Richardson to Joyce. 3 credits. 

336. Theatre Workshop. A study of the elements of theatre as oriented 
48 



toward stage presentation, with classroom practice in production of scenes 
and whole plays. 3 credits. 

338. Contemporary Drama. A survey-workshop of Continental, British, 
and American drama from Ibsen to the present. 3 credits. 

339. History of the Theatre. A selection of Western and some Oriental 
dramas from Aeschylus to Ibsen presented historically, with attention to 
theatre modes and techniques. 3 credits. 

340-349. Major Authors. An examination of works of individual important 
authors in American, English and World literature. 3 credits each. 

391 -398. Special Topics. I -6 credits. 

400. Internship. Supervised field experience in communications work. 
1-15 semester hours credit. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

499. Seminar. This capstone course for English majors varies in content. 3 
credits. 

500. Independent Study. For the student who desires to engage in a 
project of independent work, whether enrolled in the departmental honors 
program or not. Prerequisite: Permission. I -3 credits per semester, (maxi- 
mum of 9) 

Foreign Languages 

The study of a foreign language has three aims: to develop fluency in the 
basic communication skills, to provide an understanding of the cultural 
heritage of the people who use the language, and to understand language as 
the fundamental medium in which mankind thinks and interacts. 

The Department of Foreign Languages prepares the language major for a 
career in a variety of fields: teaching, diplomatic and governmental service, 
foreign trade, business and social service. For many of these careers the 
study of a foreign language is often combined with majors in other disciplines. 

The Department encourages students to avail themselves of the College's 
opportunities for foreign travel and study, including the International 
Student Exchange Program. 

DEGREE: For the student who majors in foreign language, French, German 
or Spanish, the B.A. is offered. 

MAJOR: A student may elect to major in one language or in foreign lan- 



49 



guages. A major in one language requires FL250 and 24 hours above the in- 
termediate level in the language studied. A major in foreign languages has 
the same requirements plus 1 2 hours above the intermediate level in a 
second language. For prospective teachers, PL 440 is required. 

MINOR: A student may elect to minor in one language by completing 18 
credits above the 200 level. Courses in advanced conversation and composi- 
tion as well as in culture are strongly recommended. 

Courses in Foreign Language 

250. Introduction to Linguistics. An introductory study of language as a 
communication system, designed for majors and non-majors and taught in 
English. 3 credits. 

260. Approaches to Culture. A survey of contemporary life in French, 
German and Spanish speaking countries. Topics may include customs, 
values, social structures, geography, and current issues. Taught in English. 3 
credits. 

440. Methods of Teaching Foreign Language. A comprehensive study of 
modern teaching methods, with emphasis on basic skills for secondary 
school level instruction. Prerequisite: PR 3 1 6, or SP 3 1 6, or GER 316.2 credits. 

Courses in French 

101, 102. Elementary French I, 11. Introductory courses in French. 3 
credits per semester. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits 

201 , 202. Intermediate Conversational French I, 11. A review of French 
grammar, emphasizing practice in conversation, comprehension, reading, 
and writing. Prerequisite: FR 102 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

29 1 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits 

311. Introduction to French Literature. Practice in the careful reading of 
literary texts and in the basic language skills. Prerequisite: FR 202 or equiva- 
lent. 3 credits. 

312. Contemporary Literature. Readings in the works of living French 
authors. Attention both to individual style and the relationship of the writer 
to current problems. Prerequisite: FR 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

315. French Culture. A study of modern France. Special attention is paid 
to those qualities, characteristics, and traditions which are uniquely French. 
Prerequisite: FR 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

50 



316. Advanced Conversation and Composition. Intensive practice in 
spoken and written French. An advanced grammatical and stylistic level with 
emphasis on the use of language in practical situations. Prerequisite: FR 202 
or equivalent. 3 credits. 

320. Business French. An introduction to the language of business and 
business practices. Prerequisite: FR 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

400. Internship. Field experience in a business, governmental or social 
organization. 1-15 credits. 

410. French Literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. A study of 
medieval French literature to 1600. Prerequisite: FR 31 1 or 316 or permis- 
sion. 3 credits. 

420. French Literature of the Age of Louis XIV. A study of major French 
authors of this era, the apogee of French civilization, including Corneille, 
Racine, Moliere, La Fontaine, and Pascal. Prerequisite: FR 31 1 or FR 316 or 
permission. 3 credits. 

430. French Literature of the Enlightenment. A study of the main literary 
and philosophical currents of the Eighteenth Century. Emphasis will be 
placed on the works of Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire, and Rousseau. 
Prerequisite: FR 31 1 or FR 316 or permission. 3 credits. 

440. The Modern French Novel. A study of the French novel. Limited to 
the study of novels of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Prerequisite: 
FR 31 1 or FR 316 or permission. 3 credits. 

450. Modern Theatre and Poetry of France. A study of theatre and 
poetry of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Prerequisite: Fr 311 or FR 
316 or permission. 3 credits. 

491 -498 Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

500. Independent Study. Prerequisite: FR 316 or equivalent. 1 -6 credits. 

Courses in German 

100. Elementary German. Self-paced. A beginning course for the student 
who wishes to proceed at his own pace. A student may earn from 2 to 6 
credits, depending on the amount of work completed. The student does not 
attend class but uses specially developed materials and may call on the 
instructor for aid. With the approval of the instructor, a student may enroll 
in this class for more than one semester until a total of 6 credits has been 
earned. 



51 



101, 102, Elementary German I, II. Introductory courses in German. 3 
credits per semester. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

201, 202. Intermediate Conversational German 1, II. A review of German 
grammar, with practice in conversation, compreiiension, reading and writing. 
Prerequisite: GR 102 or equivalent. 3 credits per semester. 

210. Scientific German. An introduction to scientific writing in German. 
The vocabulary and syntax of scientific writing with emphasis on the accurate 
translation of texts. Taught in English. Prerequisite: GR 102. 3 credits. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

311. Introduction to German Literature. Practice in the careful reading of 
literary texts and in the four basic language skills. Prerequisite: GR 202 or 
equivalent. 3 credits. 

312. Contemporary Literature. Readings in the works of living German 
authors. Attention both to individual style and the relationship of the writer 
to current problems. Prerequisite: GR 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

315. German Culture. Study of the major features of contemporary 
German life. Prerequisite: GR 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

316. Advanced Conversation and Composition. Intensive practice in 
spoken and written German on an advanced grammatical and stylistic level, 
with emphasis on the use of the language in practical situations. Prerequi- 
site: GR 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

320. Business German. An introduction to the language of business and 

business practices. Prerequisite: GR 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

400. Internship. Field experience in a business, governmental or social 

organization. 1-15 credits. 

410. The German Heritage. A survey of German culture and civilization 

including history, music, art, literature, and philosophy. Prerequisite: GR 31 1 

or 316 or permission. 3 credits. 

420. The Age of Heroes. An exploration of the idea held by writers from 
the medieval through the baroque periods that an exemplary individual is 
the proper measure and focus of human aspiration and achievement. 
Prerequisite: GR 31 1 or 316 or permission. 3 credits. 

430. Goethe and Schiller. A detailed study of these literary figures, with 
an examination of their society and artistic achievements. Prerequisite: GR 
311 or 316 or permission. 3 credits. 

52 



440. The German Novelle. The novelle as a literary genre, as well as its 
development through the Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries. Prereq- 
uisite: GR 31 1 or 316 or permission. 3 credits. 

450. German Literature of the Twentieth Century. A study of represen- 
tative works by leading authors of the century and current literary move- 
ments. Prerequisite: GR 311 or 316 or permission. 3 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

500. Independent study. 1 -6 credits. 

Courses in Greek. 

101, 102. Elementary Greek I, II. Introductory study in the basics of 
ancient Greek. 3 credits per semester. 

201, 202. Intermediate Greek I, II. Readings from Greek literature. First 
semester includes readings from the New Testament Gospels. Second 
semester includes readings from Xenophon's Anabasis. Prerequisite: GK 102. 
3 credits per semester. 

321. Readings from the Book of Acts. Prerequisite: GK 202. 3 credits 

322. Readings in Hellenistic Greek. Prerequisite: GK 202. 3 credits. 

431. Readings from the Epistles of Paul. Prerequisite: GK 202 3 credits. 

432. Readings from the Greek Philosophers. Prerequisite: GK 202. 3 
credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

Courses in Latin 

101. Elementary Latin I. Basic grammar and syntax, including some 
readings of ancient writers. 3 credits. 

102. Elementary Latin II. A review of grammar and translation. Translation 
of English into Latin and reading of Latin prose selections, including Cicero. 
Prerequisite: LT 101 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

201. Intermediate Latin I. A review of grammar and selected readings. 
Readings from such prose works as Cicero's essays. Prerequisite: LT 102 or 
equivalent. 3 credits. 

202. Intermediate Latin II. Selected readings. A reading of passages 
selected from the writings of Virgil and Ovid. Prerequisite: LT 201 or equiva- 
lent. 3 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 



53 



Courses in Spanish 

101, 102. Elementary Spanish 1, II. Introductory courses in Spanish. 3 
credits. 

191-198. Special topics. 1 -6 credits 

201, 202. Intermediate Conversational Spanish I, II. A review of Spanish 
grammar, and practice in conversation, comprehension, reading and writing. 
Prerequisite: SP 102 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

311. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Practice in the careful reading of 
literary texts and in the four basic language skills. Prerequisite: SP 202 or 
equivalent, 3 credits. 

312. Contemporary Literature. Readings in the works of living Spanish 
authors. Attention both to individual style and the relationship of the writer 
to current problems. Prerequisite: SP 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

315. Hispanic Culture. A study of Hispanic culture and language, with 
emphasis on the culture as found in modern Spain and its reflection in 
America. Prerequisite: SP 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

316. Advanced Conversation and Composition. Intensive practice in 
spoken and written Spanish on an advanced grammatical and stylistic level, 
with emphasis on the use of language in practical situations. Prerequisite: 
SP 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

320. Business Spanish. An introduction to the language of business and 
business practices. Prerequisite: SP 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. 

39 1 - 398. Special Topics. I - 6 credits 

400. Internship. Field experience in a business, governmental or social 
organization. 1-15 credits. 

410. Spanish Literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. A study 
of the outstanding works of the period. Prerequisite: SP 31 1 or 316 or 
permission. 3 credits. 

420. Spanish Literature of the Golden Age. A study of the major works 
of the period. Prerequisite: SP 31 1 or 316 or permission. 3 credits. 

430. Spanish Literature of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. 

Readings from the Enlightenment in Spain, and an examination of the major 
works of romanticism and realism. Prerequisite: SP 31 1 or 316 or permission. 
3 credits. 

440. Spanish Literature of the Twentieth Century. A study of the literary 

54 



movements of this century, starting with the Generation '98 and modernism. 
Prerequisite: SP 31 1 or 316 or permission. 3 credits. 

450. Spanish-American Literature of the Twentieth Century. A study of 
the important writers of the century, with emphasis on recent developments 
in the literature of Spanish-America. Prerequisite: SP 31 1 or 316 or permis- 
sion. 3 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

500. Independent Study. 1 -6 credits. 



General Studies 

Bachelors Degree 

The bachelors degree program in General Studies is intended for students 
who desire the widest possible choice in selecting a program of study. 
Students may choose their courses freely from among the arts, humanities, 
sciences, and social sciences. 

DEGREE: B.A. or B.S. degree with a major in General Studies. 

REQUIREMENTS: 27 credits from the general requirements (including 
EN 1 1 1 , 1 1 2, LC 1 00 or 1 1 1 , and one course from each of the other General 
Requirement areas, except physical education; 33 credits of free electives 
and a cumulative grade point average of 2.00. 

Associate Degree 

The associate degree program in general studies is intended for students 
who do not wish to concentrate in a single area, in this program they may 
select their courses freely from among the arts, humanities, sciences, and 
social sciences. 

DEGREE: Associate of Arts or Associate of Science with a major in General 
Studies. 

REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits from the general requirements (with at least one 
course from each area listed under the General Requirements Program); 36 
credits of free electives; and a cumulative grade point average of 2.00. 



55 



Health Care Professionals, Administration 

The major in administration for health care professionals is designed for 
people in the health care fields who possess associate degrees or profes- 
sional certification. The program combines studies in the liberal arts and 
management, plus business practices common to the health care industry. 

DEGREE: B.S. degree with a major in Administration for Health Care Profes- 
sionals. 

MAJOR: AC 1 5 1 , CS I 30 or 147, EC 11 0, 1 20, EN 1 1 1 , 2 1 0, LC 1 00, MA 1 70. 
MG 330, 37 1 , PH 260, plus 9-12 credits in sociology, psychology, or other 
disciplines approved by the Dean of Continuing Education, and concentra- 
tion requirement. 

Management concentration: MG 497 and 12 credits chosen from EC 201, 
MG 340, 361 , 372, 384, 460 or 485. 

Human resources concentration: MG 420, 425, PSY 346, PSY 337 or 
MG 350, plus one 300 or 400 level course approved by the Dean of Continu- 
ing Education. 



Health Professions 

Lebanon Valley College offers pre-professional training in the medical 
(medicine, osteopathy, optometry, podiatry, pharmacy, chiropractic, and 
dentistry) and veterinary fields. Students interested in one of these careers 
usually follow a science curriculum with a major in biochemistry, biology or 
chemistry. 

in addition to the basic natural sciences suited to advanced professional 
study, the student who is interested in veterinary medicine may participate 
in a cooperative program between the College and local veterinarians, 
specializing in both small and large animal medicine. Students not only 
receive credit for the work, but also gain valuable experience in the field. 

For those students interested in podiatry, Lebanon Valley College and the 
Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine have established an accelerated 
curriculum consisting of a minimum of 90 undergraduate semester hours 
and four years of podiatric medical education. Following three years of study 
at Lebanon Valley College a student may be recommended for further study 

56 



at the Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine. Lebanon Valley College 
then awards the baccalaureate degree, with a major in biochemistry, biology 
or chemistry, to those students who complete successfully one year of basic 
science education at the Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine. 

A health professions committee coordinates the various plans of study in 
addition to offering advice and assistance to those persons interested in 
health professions careers. 

Lebanon Valley College graduates have been admitted to some of the 
nation's finest schools including lohns Hopkins University Medical School, 
The University of Pennsylvania, The University of Pittsburgh, Jefferson 
Medical School, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Temple University, 
The University of Maryland, The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medi- 
cine, The Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine and the Pennsylvania 
College of Optometry. 



History and Political Science 

The Department of History and Political Science is a dual department, but 
each curriculum is distinct and taught separately. By examination of human 
behavior of the past, the study of history can help human beings to a better 
understanding of themselves and others. Political science deals with the 
political behavior of individuals, groups, institutions, and nations. 

The Department encourages supervised academic and field experience in a 
variety of internships in related work. Interns earn between 1 and 1 5 credit 
hours. 

DEGREES: B.A. degree with a major in history; B.A. degree with a major in 
political science. 

MAJORS: (History) HI 125, 126, 213, 499, 500; one course from among HI 
225, 227, 229, 241-249, and 310; two courses from among HI 201-209, 
331 -339, and 341 -349; three elective courses in history and one in political 
science (36 credits). (Political Science) PS 111, 1 12, 210, 220, 230, 240, and 
310; five courses from among PS 312, 315, 316, 320, 330, 350, 400, 415, and 
500; and HI 125 or 126 (39 credits). 

MINORS: (History) HI 125, 126, 213; two courses from among HI 201-209, 
331-339, and 341 -349; one elective course in history (18 credits). (Political 
Science) PS 1 1 1 , 1 1 2, 2 1 0, 220, 230, 240 ( 1 8 credits). 



57 



Courses in History 

125/126. Survey of United States History I, 11. The first semester covers 
the development of America to 1865, the second semester from 1865 to the 
present. 3 credits per semester. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

201 -209. Epochs of the Past, in successive years this course will cover 
Greek and Roman History (the origins, structures, and values of Greek and 
Roman societies from 1200 B.C. to 500 A.D.); The Middle Ages (the emer- 
gence of European society from 500 to 1 300 A.D., emphasizing social and 
intellectual life); Early Modern Europe (the emergence of a secular society of 
science, liberty, and national states). 3 credits. 

213. History and Historians. An investigation of the lives and ideas of the 
great historians. 3 credits. 

225. The Colonies and the American Revolution. A study of how Euro- 
peans seized the New World, transformed themselves into Americans, and 
fought to build a republic in a world of monarchy. 3 credits. 

227. Civil War and Reconstruction. A study of how sectional divisions 
plunged Americans into a bloody war and a bitter postwar effort to reshape 
Southern society. 3 credits. 

229. America in the Atomic Age. The impact of world war, cold war, 
social change, and international responsibilities upon America in the modern 
age. 3 credits. 

241 -249. American Regional Studies. The history of one geographic 
region from colonial days to the present. In successive years the course will 
cover Pennsylvania history, the frontier, and the South. 3 credits. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

310. American Business History. A survey of the lives and ideas of 
business leaders, the development of the American economy, and the rela- 
tionship between business, society, and government, from colonial days to 
the Twentieth Century. 3 credits. 

331 -339. European Studies. Thematic treatments of European history, 
focusing on one topic per semester. 3 credits per semester. 

341 -349. Regional Studies. An in-depth study of the histories of various 
important regions of the world. In successive years this course will cover 
Russia and the Soviet Union, and the Far East. 3 credits per semester. 

39 1 - 398. Special Topics. I - 6 credits. 

58 



400. Internship. Supervised academic and field experience. Participants 
will be selected by members of the department staff. 3-6 credits per semes- 
ter; maximum of 1 5 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

499. Seminar. Readings, discussions, and evaluations of significant works 
of history. Open to history majors; open to others by permission. 3 credits. 

500. Independent Study. Permission required. 1 - 3 credits per semester; 
maximum of 9 credits. 

Courses in Political Science 

1 10. American Political Culture. A study of the ideas and values that 
shape the structure and institutions of the American political system. 3 credits. 

111/112. American National Government 1, II. In the first semester the 
following are covered: the nature of American democracy, constitutional 
foundations of American government, the federal system, civil rights and 
liberties, political behavior, political parties, and campaigns and elections. 
The following are studied in the second semester: the structures and func- 
tions of American government (Presidency, Congress, courts, and bureauc- 
racy), and the foreign and domestic policy-making process. 3 credits per 
semester. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

210. Comparative Government. A comparative study of important 
political systems of the world, including an introduction to the basic meth- 
odologies. PS 111/112 strongly recommended as preparation. 3 credits. 

216. Quantitative Methods. See PSY 216 3 credits 

220. Political Theory. A survey of the different philosophies and theories 
of government, ancient and modern, but especially since the Sixteenth 
Century. Prerequisite: PS 1 1 1/1 12. 3 credits. 

230. International Politics. The origin, forms, dynamics, and prospects of 
the international political pattern, with emphasis on current developments 
and changing concepts in world politics. 3 credits. 

240. Public Administration. An examination of the structures through 
which governments try to carry out their policies. The course covers both the 
practical matters of accountability and efficiency, and the analytical concerns 
of organizational theory and bureaucratic culture. 3 credits. 

29 1 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits 



59 



310. Scope and Methods of Political Science. A course in the conduct 
and interpretation of research in political science. Topics covered include 
formulation of a research problem, research design, techniques of scaling and 
measurement, data collection and analysis, and writing the research report. 
Prerequisite: permission; MA 170, elementary statistics, is strongly recom- 
mended. 3 credits. 

312. American Foreign Policy. A survey of the external relations of the 
American government, emphasizing Twentieth Century developments. 
Subjects include diplomacy, military affairs, geographic and regional prob- 
lems, trade and aid, technology and underdevelopment, alliances, nuclear 
problems, and opposing ideologies. PS 111/112 strongly recommended as 
preparation. 3 credits. 

315. American Constitutional Law 1. The development of American 
constitutional law from 1776 to 1947. Topics include judicial review, national 
supremacy, private property, contracts, commerce powers, equal rights, and 
civil liberties. Required of all pre-law students. 3 credits. 

316. American Constitutional Law II. The development of American 
constitutional law from 1947 to the present. Emphasis is given to civil 
liberties, equal rights, and rights of the accused, with some treatment of 
presidential powers, the commerce clause, and the contract clause. Required 
of all pre-law students. 3 credits. 

320. Electoral Politics. The dynamics of the electoral process, with 
emphasis on presidential and congressional elections, and including the role 
of parties, public opinion, and interest groups. 3 credits. 

330. State and Local Government. This course covers the governmental 
institutions and political characteristics of state and local political systems, 
and the major inter-governmental problems in state and local relations with 
the federal government. 3 credits. 

350. Select Problems. A course to give students a chance to explore in 
depth a topic of -special interest. 3 credits. 

39 1 - 398. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

400. internship. Supervised academic and field experience. Prerequisite: 
PS 1 1 1/1 12 and permission. 3-6 credits per semester; maximum of 15 credits. 

415. Foundations of American Law. An historical survey of the Western 
legal tradition from classical times through the Eighteenth Century. The 
course examines conceptions of English common law and its relationship to 
the evolution of American law. Strongly recommended for pre-law students. 
Prerequisite: permission. 3 credits. 

60 



491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

500. Independent Study. Permission required. 1 - 3 credits per semester; 
maximum of 9. 



Hospitality Programs 

Tlie programs in food service administration, hotel administration, and travel 
administration are designed for people who wish to prepare for positions of 
responsibility in the hospitality industry. Each program provides students 
with the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for promotion to 
supervisory-level positions. In addition, students have the opportunity to 
apply training and concepts learned in the classroom to work experience in 
actual industry settings. Each program can normally be completed in four 
semesters of full-time study. 



Food Service Administration 

DEGREE: A.A.S. degree with a major in food service administration. 

MAJOR: 30 credits of FS courses, including FS 100, 101, 102, 103, 200, 203, 
204, 205, and 207: AC 151; EN 1 11, 210; GE 120, 140; MA 100 or equivalent; 
MG 100, 371; PH 260; PSY 100. 

Courses in Food Service Administration 

100. Introduction to Foods and Nutrition. A study of the basic food 
groups and the factors that affect nutrient content. The course surveys the 
biological basis of human digestion; preparation of food for optimum 
nutrition, flavor, and appearance; and the nutritional health of human beings 
as related to food and metabolism. 3 credits. 

101. Dining Service Procedures. An introduction to the various aspects 
of dining room operation. The course covers the essentials of table service, 
the needs of patrons, the duties of staff personnel, and the responsibilities of 
supervisors. 3 credits. 

102. Food and Beverage Management. The essential principles of 
planning, preparation, and service of food and beverage. Subjects addressed 
include standards of quality and grade, purchasing, yields, costing of mate- 



61 



rials and labor, sanitation, nutrition, safety, regulatory and legal aspects, and 
quality control. 3 credits. 

103. Food Sanitation and Safety. A survey of federal, state, and local 
regulations governing food service. The course covers the identification of 
food-borne diseases and methods of prevention and control, as well as 
principles of health, hygiene, and safety related to food handling. Emphasis 
is on practical application. Satisfactory completion of the course should 
qualify the student for required certification by the NSF. 3 credits. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

200. Internship. 1-12 credits. 

203. Quantity Food Purchasing. Principles of bid preparation, specifica- 
tion, purchasing, sanitation, and storage of commodities for food service 
installations. 3 credits. 

204. Supervision and Training. Concepts and methods of employee 
supervision and development. The emphasis is on supervisory practice, per- 
sonnel administration, law and labor relations, and concepts of organization 
as applied to the hospitality and travel industries. Subjects include interper- 
sonal skills in communication and group interaction; motivation; incentive 
systems; performance evaluation; and the development, implementation, 
and evaluation of training programs. 3 credits. 

205. Food Service Planning, Layout and Equipment. A survey of the 
principles involved in the layout, design, and selection of equipment for 
quantity food service installations. 3 credits. 

206. Executive Development. The theory and practice of leadership as 
applied to the hospitality and travel industries. 3 credits. 

207. Advanced Food Production Management. Principles and problems 
of organization and administration related to quality food service. The 
emphasis is on the practical application of management principles to meal 
service and special functions. Prerequisites: FS 100, 101, 102, 203, 204, 205; 
or permission. 3 credits. 

29 1 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits 



Hotel Administration 

DEGREE: A.A.S. degree with a major in Hotel Administration. 

MAJOR: 30 credits of HA courses, including HA 100, 101, 102, 200, 203, 204, 

62 



and 205; AC 1 5 1 ; EN 1 1 1 , 2 1 0; GE 1 40; MA 1 00 or equivalent; MG 1 00. 
371 + PH 260, plus 6 hours of electives in approved area. 

Courses in Hotel Administration 

100. Introduction to Hotel Management. The history, organization, 
problems, opportunities, and trends of the industry. The emphasis is on the 
operating departments of hotels, restaurants, and institutions, including 
basic functions, procedures, and the management of personnel and re- 
sources. 3 credits. 

101. Client Services. Responsibilities of the front office staff, including 
sales and promotion, reservations and registration, financial control and ac- 
counting techniques, processing of mail and information, and emergency 
procedures. 3 credits. 

102. Food and Beverage Management. The essential principles of 
planning, preparation, and service of food and beverage. Subjects addressed 
include standards of quality and grade, purchasing, yields, costing of mate- 
rials and labor, sanitation, nutrition, safety, regulatory and legal aspects, and 
quality control. 3 credits. 

191-198. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

200. Internship. 1-12 credits 

203. Facilities Management. The management of facilities essential to 
the hospitality industry. Subjects included, among others, are maintenance, 
basic engineering systems and principles, work schedules, energy conserva- 
tion, and cost control. 3 credits. 

204. Supervision and Training. Concepts and methods of employee 
supervision and development. Emphasis is on supervisory practice, person- 
nel administration, law and labor relations, and concepts of organization as 
applied to the hospitality and travel industries. Subjects include interper- 
sonal skills in communication and group interaction; motivation and incen- 
tive systems; performance evaluation; and the development, implementa- 
tion, and evaluation of training programs. 3 credits. 

205. Hospitality and Travel Marketing. Marketing concepts and prac- 
tices. Subjects include market analysis, marketing media, merchandising and 
promotion, incentives, group and individual sales, packaging, pricing, and 
relations with clients. 3 credits. 

206. Executive Development. The theory and practice of leadership as 
applied to the hospitality and travel industries. 3 credits. 

29 1 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 



63 



Travel Administration 

DEGREE: A.A.S. degree with a major in travel administration. 

MAJOR: 24 credits of Travel Administration courses, including TA 100, 101, 
102, 200, 204, and 205; AC 1 5 1 ; EN 1 11 , 2 1 0; GE 1 40; 9 credits from among 
GE 1 20, Geo 11 2, FL 260, HI 1 25, RE 1 40, AR 203; MA 1 00 or equivalent; MG 
371 ; PH 260; and 6 credits of a foreign language (6 credits in one language 
or 3 credits in each of tvi^o languages). 

Courses in Travel Administration 

100. Introduction to the Travel and Tourism Industry. The history, 
organization, problems, opportunities, and trends of the industry. The em- 
phasis is on the basic functions, procedures, and management of personnel 
and resources in travel agencies, convention and tourist bureaus, and 
ticketing operations. 3 credits. 

101. Ticketing and Reservations. Fundamentals of preparing domestic 
and international reservations, computing fares, and issuing tickets. The 
course includes a study of relations with clients, handling and accounting of 
revenues, and an introduction to computerized operations. 3 credits. 

102. Tour Planning. Fundamentals of assisting clients in planning domes- 
tic and foreign itineraries. The course includes terminology; booking trans- 
portation by air, sea, or land; booking accommodations; arranging surface 
travel and transfers; arranging and packaging independent and escorted 
tours. 3 credits. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

200. Internships. 1-12 credits. 

204. Supervision and Training. Concepts and methods of employee 
supervision and development. The emphasis is on supervisory practice, per- 
sonnel administration, law and labor relations, and concepts of organization 
as applied to the hospitality and travel industries. Subjects include interper- 
sonal skills in communication and group interaction; motivation; incentive 
systems; performance evaluation; and the development, implementation, 
and evaluation of training programs. 3 credits. 

205. Hospitality and Travel Marketing. Marketing concepts and prac- 
tices. Subjects include market analysis, marketing media, merchandising and 
promotion, incentives, group and individual sales, packaging, pricing, and 
relations with clients. 3 credits. 

64 



206. Executive development. The theory and practice of leadership as 
applied to the hospitality and travel industries. 3 credits. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 



International Business 

Coadvisors: Dr. Alan Heffner, Department of Management; and Dr. lames 
Scott, Department of Foreign Languages 

The program in international business provides an opportunity to integrate 
the study of business with the knowledge of a foreign language and culture, it 
is designed to equip students with the background and skills necessary to 
work with foreign corporations within the United States and with American 
corporations abroad. While acquiring a strong liberal arts background, 
students who elect this major will receive training in accounting, manage- 
ment, economics and political science. They also will become familiar with a 
foreign culture and will acquire proficiency in French, German or Spanish. 
International business majors are encouraged to apply for internships in 
order to gain valuable field experience. 

DEGREE: B.S. degree with a major in international business. 

MAJOR: AC 151, 152; EC 110, 120, 332; MG 330, 340, 361, 376, 485; PS 210, 
230, 312; RE 140; CS 147 or 170; MA 150 or 160 or 161 or 111; MA 170 or 
270 or 372; FR, GER, SP 315, 316; and two other courses in the selected 
foreign language above the intermediate level (201, 202). 



Management 

The Department of Management offers major programs in accounting, 
management, economics, and international business (coadvised with Foreign 
Languages Department). 

The Department's programs of study are designed to provide the student 
with not only a sound and integrated knowledge of the principles of ac- 
counting, management, economics, and international business, but also with 
a broad liberal education that will enable graduates to play an active leader- 
ship role in the changing world of the 1980's and beyond. The majors are so 
designed as to allow a student to double major within the Department, or to 
take a second major in another department. 



65 



Regardless of major, a set of core courses is required for all, to ensure that 
everyone will have a common framework of reference as well as common 
tools of analysis to pursue special interests within the particular major. The 
Department also offers three advising concentrations in business information 
systems (computer applications in business), marketing, and human resource 
management. These courses are in addition to the major requirements. 

DEGREE: B.S. degree with a major in accounting or management or eco- 
nomics or international business. 

Department Core requirements: AC 151, 152; EQ 1 10, 120; MG 330, 485; 
CS 147 ores 170; MA 1 50 or 160 or 161 or 111; MA 170 or 270 or 372. 

Accounting: core plus AC 251, 252, 353, 451, 455, plus one 3 credit hour 
accounting elective; MG 222, 361, 371, 460; EN 210; PSY 100. 

Management: core plus MGiJ^222, 340, 361, 460, 483; EN 210; eS¥-TnCr 

Economics: core plus EC 201, 203, 312, plus 6 additional credit hours in 
Economics; MG 222; EN 210; PSY 100. 

International Business: core plus MG 340, 361, 376; EC 332; PS 210, 230, 
3 1 2; RE 1 40; FR, GER, SP 3 1 5, 3 1 6; and two other courses in the selected 
foreign language above the intermediate level (201, 202) 

Advising Concentrations: (Business Information Systems) CS 147 or CS 170; 
CS 244, 345, plus 9 credits in CS courses at the 300/400 level. (Marketing) 
MG 34 1 , 364, 366, 384, EC 20 1 , SO 25 1 . (Human Resource Management) MG 
420, 350, 415, HI 310, SO 110, and PSY 346 or SO 251. 

Courses in Accounting 

151. Principles of Accounting 1. The fundamental principles and concepts 
of accounting involving business transactions, the accounting cycle, and 
classified financial statements including discussion of various topics relating 
to items on the balance sheet and income statement. 3 credits. 

152. Principles of Accounting 11. Financial accounting as applied to 
partnerships and corporations; also an introduction to managerial accounting 
topics. Prerequisite: AC 151. 3 credits. 

191-198. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

251. Intermediate Accounting I. An advanced course in accounting 
principles stressing the environment and the conceptual framework of finan- 
cial accounting, statement presentation, revenue recognition, and valuation 
problems in accounting for assets. Prerequisite: AC 152. 3 credits. 

252. Intermediate Accounting II. An analysis of financial statements, 
66 



effects of errors and changes on statements, preparation of funds flow 
statement, and valuation problems in accounting for liabilities (including 
specialized issues of accounting for leases and pensions) and stockholders 
equity. Prerequisite: AC 251. 3 credits. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

351. Advanced Accounting. Study of theory and standards with applica- 
tion to special topics such as income presentation, interim reporting, and 
per share disclosures. Emphasis on business combinations and consolidated 
financial presentations. Prerequisite: AC 252. 3 credits. 

352. Government and Non-Profit Accounting. Basic concepts of fund 
and budgetary accounting used for the financial activities of federal, state, 
and local government units; systems for achieving accounting and adminis- 
trative controls for service organizations, such as hospitals, educational 
institutions, and other non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: AC 152. 3 
credits. 

353. Cost Accounting I. The accumulation and recording of the costs 
associated with the manufacturing operation including job-order, process 
and standard cost systems, and joint and by-product costing. Prerequisite: 
AC 152. 3 credits. 

354. Cost Accounting II. Topics covered include budgeting, cost-volume- 
profit analysis, decision models, pricing decisions, and segmental analysis. 
Prerequisite: AC 353. 3 credits. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

400. Internship. Field accounting or auditing experience in a business, 
government or other organization. Alternatively, participation in the Practi- 
cum in Accounting, a campus program performing accounting services with 
participating area businesses. Ordinarily open only to junior and senior 
accounting majors. Prerequisite: G.P.A. of 2.75 in major and permission of 
Department chairman. 1-15 credits. 

451. Individual Income Tax. Analysis of the federal income tax laws as 
they apply to individuals; case problems, preparation of returns. Prerequisite: 
AC 152. 3 credits. 

452. Corporate Income Tax. Analysis of the federal income tax laws as 
they apply to corporations, partnerships and fiduciaries; case problems, 
preparation of returns. Prerequisite: AC 451. 3 credits. 

455. Auditing. A study of the process of evaluation of internal controls 
and interpretation of financial information in order for an auditor to express 
a professional opinion on financial reports. Prerequisite: AC 252. 3 credits. 



67 



491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

500. Independent Study. A course to allow the student to investigate an 
accounting subject not incorporated into the curriculum. Ordinarily for 
juniors or seniors only. By permission of department chairman. 1 -6 credits. 

Courses in Management 

100, Business and Its Environment. A survey course examining all 
aspects of American business. In addition to study of the traditional func- 
tional areas of business, special attention is given to the rapidly changing 
environment in which the modern organization — profit and nonprofit — 
operates. 3 credits. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

222. Quantitative Methods. An introduction to some of the quantitative 
methods used in modern management science and economics. Topics 
include probability concepts, forecasting, decision theory, linear program- 
ming, queuing theory, network models, and Markov analysis. Prerequisites: 
MA 150 and 170. 3 credits. 

250. Real Estate Fundamentals and Practice. This course acquaints the 
student with aspects of listing, selling, and leasing property. Includes listing 
and selling techniques; contracts; financing, including FHA and VA; qualify- 
ing the customer; settlement procedures, including prorations; and special 
fields of real estate such as development and construction. 4 credits. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

330. Principles of Management and Organizations. A study of manage- 
ment principles, organizational theory, and administrative techniques as 
they apply to the effective and efficient operation of both profit and non- 
profit organizations. Emphasizes the organization's structure, leadership, in- 
terpersonal relationships, and managerial functions. Prerequisite: junior 
standing or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

340. Principles of Marketing. An overview of marketing from the man- 
agement perspective. Topics include marketing strategies; marketing re- 
search; consumer behavior; selecting target markets; developing, pricing, 
distributing, and promoting products; services and non-profit marketing. 
Prequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

341. Consumer Behavior. Analysis of factors affecting purchase decisions 
in the marketplace; application of behavioral and social science concepts to 
the study of consumer behavior. Emphasis on use of knowledge of consumer 

68 



behavior for marketing decisions. Prerequisite: MG 330 and MG 340, or 
permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

350. Organizational Behavior and Development. A detailed study of 
theories and models of organizational behavior and development, with 
emphasis on the practical application of these models in the workplace to 
improve individual, group, and organizational performance. Prerequisite: 
junior standing and MG 330, or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

361. Managerial Finance. A study of financial management covering 
analysis of asset, liability and capital relationships and operations; manage- 
ment of current assets and working capital; capital planning and budgeting; 
capital structure and dividend policy; short- and intermediate-term financing; 
internal and external long-term financing; mergers and acquisitions; multina- 
tional operations; and corporation failures and liquidation. Prerequisite: AC 

1 52; EC II 0, 1 20; MG 222. 3 credits. 

362. Investments. An analysis of investment and its relation to other 
economic, legal, and social institutions. The course includes discussion of 
investment principles, machinery, policy, management, investment types, 
and the development of portfolios for individuals and institutions. Prerequi- 
site: MG 361. 3 credits. 

364. Advertising. A study of the role of advertising. The course includes 
analyses of various media in retail and industrial settings, the organization 
and function of advertising agencies and departments, and creativity in 
various media. Prerequisite: MG 340. 3 credits. 

366. Retail Management. Analysis of retail institutions with regard to 
market structure, store development, merchandising, staffing, promotion, 
customer service, record keeping, and security. Prerequisite: MG 340. 3 credits. 

371. Business Law I. Elementary principles of law relating to business. 
Includes contracts, personal property, sales, government regulations. 
Prerequisite: AC 152 highly recommended. 3 credits. 

372. Business Law II. Elementary principles of law relating to business. 
Includes agency, employment, commercial paper, security devices, insurance, 
partnerships, corporation, estates, bankruptcy. Prerequisite: AC 152 highly 
recommended. 3 credits. 

376. International Business Management. A study of the management 
techniques and procedures necessary in international and multinational 
organizations. Prerequisite: MG 340. 3 credits. 

380. Small Business Management. A study of small business, including 
organization, staffing, production, marketing, and profit planning. Cases are 



69 



used extensively in presenting the course material. Prerequisites: AC 152 
and MG 330, or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

384. Marketing Research. An introduction to the methodology of mar- 
keting research. Specific topics covered include problem formulation, 
research design, sample design, data collection, analysis and interpretation 
of data, and presentation of research findings. Prerequisites: MG 330 and 
340. 3 credits. 

39 1 - 398. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits 

400. Internship. Field experience in a business, government or other 
organization. Ordinarily for juniors or seniors only. Prerequisite: G.P.A. of 
2.75 in major and permission of Department chairman. 1-15 credits. 

420. Personnel Management. This course examines the problems in 
effectively recruiting, selecting, training, developing, compensating, and dis- 
ciplining human resources; it includes both equal employment opportunity 
and labor-management relations. Prerequisite: MG 330 or permission of 
instructor. 3 credits. 

425. Labor and Industrial Relations. Emphasis on the origin, growth, and 
development of labor organizations and the impact of such organizations on 
management practices. Topics included are: legislation affecting industrial 
relations; collective bargaining process; contract administration; industrial 
jurisprudence; and arbitration. Prerequisite: MG 330 or permission of instruc- 
tor. 3 credits. 

460. Management Information Systems. Examines data sources and the 
role of information in the organization for purposes of management plan- 
ning, operations, and control in various types of business environments. 
Treats information as a key organizational resource parallel to people 
money, materials, and technology. Views information and its uses within a 
general systems framework. Prerequisite: AC 152, CS 147 or 170; MG 330; or 
permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

483. Production and Operations Management. An overview of the 
production/operations management function as applied to both manufac- 
turing and service organizations. It provides a background of the concepts 
and processes used in the production/service operations area. Integrated 
throughout are considerations of the information systems, the people 
involved, the quantitative techniques employed, and the international impli- 
cations. Prerequisites: MG 222; MG 330; or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

485. Business Policy. A capstone course to study administrative processes 
under conditions of uncertainty, integrating prior studies in management, 

70 



accounting, and economics. Uses the case metFiod and a computer manage- 
ment simulation. Prerequisite: senior standing; or permission of instructor. 3 
credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

500. Independent Study. A course to allow the student to investigate a 
management subject not incorporated into the curriculum. Ordinarily for 
juniors or seniors only. By permission of Department chairman. 1 -6 credits. 

Courses in Economics 

100. Basic Economics. An introductory study of the historical, cultural 
and theoretical basis of economics. A survey of economic decision-making 
tools and applications. Areas surveyed include: economic systems, allocation 
of resources, inflation, employment and national income policies and 
international trade. Not for management, economics or accounting majors. 3 
credits. 

110. Principles of Economics I. An introductory study of economic 
principles and the American economy, with emphasis on the elementary 
concepts of national income, price level, business fluctuations, banking, 
money supply, and economic growth. 3 credits. 

120. Principles of Economics II. An introductory study of economic 
principles and the American economy, with emphasis on the elementary 
concepts of the consumption function, production function, product pricing, 
factor pricing, resource allocation, labor economics, public finance, and 
international economics. 3 credits. 

130. Economics of Public Issues. A survey and economic analysis of 
public issues. 3 credits. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

201. Microeconomic Analysis. Managerial and economic decision-making 
of business firms, with emphasis on sales, costs, profit, and resource alloca- 
tion. The course provides a study of the tools of analysis, with stress on 
computer programming. Prerequisites: EC 1 10 and 120. 3 credits. 

203. Macroeconomic Analysis. A study of contemporary theories of the 
macro-economy. Emphasis is placed on policy applications of the models. 
Prerequisites: EC 1 10 and 120. 3 credits. 

29 1 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

312. Money and Banking. Nature and functions of money and credit. The 
course includes the development and role of commercial and central bank- 



71 



ing and structure and functions of the Federal Reserve System, as well as 
monetary and banking theory, policy, and practice. Prerequisites: EC 1 10 and 
120. 3 credits. 

321. Public Finance. A study of the economic functioning of government, 
including public sector efficiency, principles of taxation, influence of public 
policy, and economic and social aspects of public spending. Prerequisites: 
EC 1 10 and 120. 3 credits. 

332. International Economics. A study of theories and empirical analysis 
of international economic relations. Topics include analyses of free ex- 
change of goods, factors, and money; restrictive trade policies; and freer 
economic practices. Prerequisites: EC 1 10 and 120. 3 credits. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

400. Internship. Field experience in a business, government or other 
organization Ordinarily for juniors or seniors only. Prerequisite: G.P.A. of 
2.75 in major and permission of Department chairman. 1-15 credits. 

401. History of Economic Thought. The evolution of economic thought 
through the principal schools from mercantilism to the present. Attention is 
given to the analysis of the various theories of value, wages, interest, rent, 
profit, price level, business cycles, and employment, and to the influences of 
earlier economic ideas upon current thinking and policy-making. Prerequi- 
sites: EC 1 10 and 120. 3 credits. 

411. Economic Growth and Development. Analysis of classical and 
modern theories and models of economic growth; study of theory and impli- 
cations of alternative development policies. Prerequisites: EC 1 10 and 120. 3 
credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

500. Independent Study. A course to allow the student to investigate an 
economic subject not incorporated into the curriculum. Ordinarily for juniors 
or seniors only. By permission of Department chairman. 1 -6 credits. 



Mathematical Sciences 

The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers major programs in actuarial 
science, computer information systems, computer science, and mathematics, 
as well as a concentration in operations research. The major in mathematics 
can be tailored to prepare the student for graduate school, secondary school 

72 



teaching, work in business or industry, or to dovetail with a second major in 
another department. 

A rigorous study of mathematics is the common foundation of the majors in 
actuarial science, computer science and mathematics. The structure of the 
required core courses allows each student complete flexibility in the choice 
of one of the three majors, usually by the end of the second year of study. 
The major in computer information systems substitutes an applications area, 
of the students choice, in place of the strong mathematics core. A strong 
effort is made not to differentiate among the students in the department by 
majors. 

The major in actuarial science is unique. Lebanon Valley College is the only 
four-year college east of the Mississippi which offers courses specifically 
designed to prepare for the first four examinations of the Society of Actuaries 
and the Casualty Actuarial Society. Independent study offers the opportunity 
to work towards Exam 5 of the Society of Actuaries. 

The major programs in computer information systems and in computer 
science implement the recommendations of the Association for Computing 
Machinery and of the Data Processing Management Association. PASCAL, 
BASIC-PLUS, FORTRAN and COBOL are taught and used in a broad range of 
courses in scientific computing and in business applications of computer 
methods. Other languages such as ADA, C, Forth, Lisp, and Prolog are 
available. Particular emphasis is placed on microcomputers and on computer 
graphics. The computer science laboratory is equipped with microcomputers, 
including a PDP 1 1/23, and a z-1 58 with a 20 mega-byte hard disk, and 
various other pieces of hardware including equipment with graphics capabil- 
ity. A unique computer science lecture room facilitates presentation of the 
various languages and computer techniques. Terminals are located in the 
laboratory and the computer center, which operates a VAX and a PDP 1 1/84 
for academic and administrative support. Other equipment is located 
throughout the campus, including both terminals and microcomputers. A 
college micro-computer lab includes Apple lie and IBM-PC microcomputers 
as well as Zenith 1 50 microcomputers. 

DEGREES: B.S. with a major in mathematics; B.S. with a major in actuarial 
science; B.S. with a major in computer information systems; B.S. with a 
major in computer science. 

MAJORS: Core requirements for actuarial science, computer science and 
mathematics MA 1 1 1, 1 12, 202, 211, 222, 499 and CS 147, plus additional 
requirements by major. 



73 



Mathematics: Core plus 1 5 hours in courses numbered above 300, as 
approved to include a balance between abstract and applied courses. 

Actuarial Science: Core plus MA 335, 371, 372, 463, 471; AS 385, 481, 482; 
AC 1 5 1 , 1 52; EC 1 1 0, 1 20; also Exam 1 of the Society of Actuaries must be 
passed by the fall of the senior year. 

Computer Information Systems: CS 147, 248, 243, 244. 345, and 342 or 346 
(18 hours) and one CS course numbered above 400 (three hours) or six-hour 
internship. MA 150, 170 and MA 160, 161 or 1 1 1. EN 210 or 216. Five 
courses numbered above 200, approved by the advisor, in an applications 
field of interest. 

Computer Science: Core plus two courses from among MA 335, 371 , and 
463, plus the following: one from CS 242, 243, or 244; three additional 
computer science courses CS 248, and numbered above 300 including at 
least one numbered above 400; EN 216 and PSY 337. 

Concentration in Operations Research: Satisfying the major in mathematics 
but specifically including MA 335, 336, 37 1 , 372 and one computer science 
course numbered above 300. Students interested in an individualized major 
additionally should select courses from the following: MG 180, EC 201, EN 
216, PH 228, and PSY 337. 

Minor in Mathematics: 1 1 1, 1 12, or 161, 162, 211; 147, 202, 222 and one 
math course above 300 level approved by the advisor. 

Courses in Mathematics 

100. Basic Concepts of Mathematics with Computers. A study of a 
variety of topics from mathematics and the use of the computer as a tool. 
Topics include: patterns and inductive reasoning, calculators, number 
systems, nature of algebra, interest, installment buying, metric system, 
geometric concepts, computer word processing, and writing a computer 
program. 3 credits. 

102. Algebra and Trigonometry. An introduction to college algebra and 
trigonometry. Algebraic expressions and equations, inequalities, absolute 
value, exponents, logarithms, functional notation, graphs of functions, 
systems of equations, modeling and word problems. Angular measurement, 
trigonometric functions, identities, formulas, radian measure, graphs of 
trigonometric and inverse functions. 3 credits. 

Ill, 112. Analysis 1, If. A rigorous calculus sequence for majors of the 
department. 5 credits per semester. 

74 



1 50. Finite Mathematics. Introduction to finite mathematics with empha- 
sis on economic and business applications. Topics include: sets and algebra, 
lines and systems of equations, matrices, linear programming, probability, 
statistics, Markov processes, mathematics of finance. 3 credits. 

160. Calculus for Business. Introduction to differential and integral 
calculus with emphasis on concepts and techniques most applicable to 
business and economics. 3 credits. 

161. 162. Calculus 1, II. A calculus sequence with emphasis on applica- 
tions. Topics include: functions and limits, differentiation, integration, 
logarithm and exponential functions, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic 
functions, improper integrals, I'hopitals rule, infinite series, and conic 
sections. 3 credits. 

170. Elementary Statistics. Elementary descriptive and inferential statis- 
tics. Topics include: graphical presentation, measures of central tendency, 
probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, hypothesis testing, 
estimation, comparison testing, linear models and correlation, analysis of 
variance, and contingency tables. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

202. Foundations of Mathematics. Introduction to logic, set theory and 
real and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MA 1 12. 3 credits. 

211. Analysis 111. Continuation of Analysis I, II. Prerequisite: MA 1 1 2 or 

162. 3 credits. 

222. Linear Algebra. Vectors, matrices, systems of equations, applica- 
tions. Prerequisite: MA 1 12. 3 credits. 

261. Calculus III. Continuation of Calculus I, II. Topics include: polar 
coordinates, parametric equations, vectors in the plane, three-dimensional 
space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: 
MA 162. 3 credits. 

266. Differential Equations. First and second order differential equations, 
partial differential equations. Prerequisite: MA 211 or 261. 3 credits. 

270. Intermediate Statistics. An advanced version of MA 1 70. Prerequi- 
site: MA 1 12 or MA 162. 3 credits. 

29 1 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

322. Abstract Algebra. Fundamentals of groups, rings, fields. Prerequisite: 
MA 222. 3 credits. 

325. Geometry. Axiomatic development of Absolute, Euclidean and 
non-Euclidean geometries. Prerequisite: MA 1 12. 3 credits. 



75 



335, 336. Operations Research I, II. Linear programming, dynamic 
programming, queueing theory, decision theory, and selected topics. MA 
335 includes material for the part 3 Society of Actuaries and Casualty 
Actuary Society examination. Prerequisites: MA 222, 371. 3 credits. 

371. Mathematical Probability. Random variables, probability law and 
distributions. Prerequisite: MA 211.3 credits. 

372. Mathematical Statistics. Generating functions, decision theory, tests 
of hypotheses. Prerequisite: MA 371. 3 credits. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

412. Functions of a Complex Variable. Analytic functions. Cauchy 
theorem, conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MA 411.3 credits. 

452. Seminar for Teachers. Issues of concern to the prospective second- 
ary school teacher. 1 credit. 

463, 464. Numerical Analysis I, II. Numerical integration, interpolation, 
differential equations, matrix methods. MA 463 includes material for part 3 
Society of Actuaries, Casualty Actuarial Societies examination. Prerequisites: 
MA 266, CS 140. 3 credits per semester. 

471. Applied Statistics. Linear regression and correlation analysis, 
analysis of variance, sampling, time series analysis. Prerequisite: MA 372. 3 
credits. 

490-498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

499. Seminar. Problem solving techniques and other selected topics. 
Prerequisites: MA 211.1 credit. 

500. Independent Study. Independent study and research. Variable credit. 

Courses in Actuarial Science 

385. Theory of Interest. Study of material for the part 4 Society of Ac- 
tuaries, Casualty Actuarial Society, and Enrollment Actuaries examination. 
Prerequisite: MA 211.3 credits. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

481, 482. Life Contingencies I, II. Study of material for the part 4 Society 
of Actuaries, Casualty Actuarial Society and Enrollment Actuaries examina- 
tion. Prerequisite: MA 372. 3 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

500. Independent Study. Study of material for further Society of Actuaries 
or Casualty Actuarial Society examinations. Variable credit. 

76 



Courses in Computer Science 

130. Microcomputers, Hardware and Software. The components of a 
microcomputer, introduction to operating systems, languages and software 
pacicages. 3 credits. 

147. Computers and Programming in Pascal. Introduction to the basic 
concepts and terminology of computer hardware, software, operating 
systems and languages. Programming in Pascal. 3 credits. 

1 70. Computers and Programming in BASIC-PLUS. Introduction to the 
basic concepts and terminology of computer hardware, software, operating 
systems and languages. Programming in Basic-Plus. 3 credits. 

242. Scientific Computing with FORTRAN. Number representation, 
multi-dimensional arrays, data manipulation, extensive computation. 
Prerequisite: CS 147 or 170, MA 102. 3 credits. 

243. Interactive Systems with BASIC-PLUS. Time-sharing systems, 
microcomputers and BASIC; arrays, strings, virtual arrays, random access 
files, elementary graphics. Prerequisite: CS 147 or 170. 3 credits. 

244. Business Computing with COBOL. Processing of data, the storing 
and manipulating of files; sorting, and merging of records. Prerequisite: CS 
147 or 170. 3 credits. 

248. Advanced Programming with Pascal. Advanced features of Pascal. 
Developing large programs. Libraries, units, etc. Prerequisite: CS 147. 3 credits. 

250. Survey of Computers and their Impact. Computer hardware and 
software from the microcomputer to the mainframe. The social, economic 
and ethical impact of computers. 

341 . Computer Architecture with MACRO. The organization of com- 
puters, the CPU, memory, disks, interfaces, interrupts, macros, device 
drivers. Prerequisite: CS 248. 3 credits. 

342. Data Structures. Discrete mathematical structures and their use in 
computer software. Stacks, lists, queues, hash tables, sorts, linked lists. 
Prerequisite: CS 248, MA 222, or permission. 3 credits. 

345. Business Computer Systems. An overview of computer hardware 
and software from micro- to main-frame. Batch processing, time sharing, 
word processing, spreadsheets. Data processing and communication. 
Management of and with computers. Prerequisite: CS 147. 3 credits. 

346. Data Algorithms. Methodology of data processing. Representation, 
storage, and retrieval of data. Methods to sort, merge, and match data. 



77 



Sequential, random, indexed, and hash files. Prerequisite; one 200 level 
course. 3 credits. 

400. Internship. 1-15 credits. 

441. Computer Languages and Compilers. Syntax and semantics of 
languages. Lexical analysis, parsing, and translation. Compiler design. 
Prerequisite: CS 342. 3 credits. 

442. Microcomputer Systems. The architecture of microcomputers. 
Programming in assembly language. Interfacing microcomputer components. 
The design of microcomputer operating systems. Prerequisite: CS 147. 3 
credits. 

445. Database Management. The organization of files. Database structure 
and implementations. Integrity and security of data bases. Major DBM 
systems. Prerequisite: two 300 level courses. 3 credits. 

446. Computer Systems Analysis and Design. Principles of computer 
management. Design tools and techniques. Hardware, operating systems, 
languages and their interrelations. Implementation and evaluation of com- 
puter systems. Prerequisite: CS 345 or MA 335 and two 300 level courses. 3 
credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

500. Independent Study. Individual work on one of a large choice of mini 
and microcomputers, languages, software packages, and graphics. Variable 
credit. 



Military Science 

The Military Science Program adds another dimension to a Lebanon Valley 
College liberal arts education by offering courses which develop a student's 
ability to organize, motivate, and lead others. 

Participation in Military Science courses during the freshman and sophomore 
years results in no military obligation. Courses during these years orient 
students on the various roles of Army officers. Specifically, these courses 
stress self development: written and oral communication skills, leadership, 
bearing, and self-confidence. 

Individuals who elect to continue in the program during the junior and 
senior years will receive a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. 

78 



Army upon graduation. They will be required to serve three months to four 
years in the active Army, depending upon the type of commission. 

Options are available for those individuals who encounter scheduling 
conflicts or who desire to begin participation after their freshman year. 
Contact the registrar for further information. 

Program participants may take part in various enrichment activities during 
the academic year: rappelling, rifle qualification, cross-country skiing, 
white-water rafting, leadership exercises, land navigation, orientation trips, 
and formal social functions. Program participants may also apply for special 
training courses during the summer: Russian language, flight orientation, 
airborne, air assault, and northern warfare schools. 

Financial Assistance: Books and equipment for military science courses 
and the ROTC program are provided free of charge to all cadets. (However, 
all cadets do pay an activity fee of $1 5 per semester.) All juniors and seniors 
in the ROTC program (Advanced Course) and scholarship cadets are paid a 
tax-free subsistence allowance of $100 per month and receive certain other 
benefits. 

Scholarships: Army ROTC scholarships based on merit are available. 
Recipients receive full tuition, academic fees, a semester allowance for books 
and supplies, and a $100 per month subsistence allowance. Cadets and 
other Lebanon Valley students may compete for three-year (starts in sopho- 
more year) and for two-year (starts in junior year) scholarships. Recipients 
agree to a service obligation. Scholarships are also available for students 
entering medical school or pursuing graduate studies in the basic health 
sciences. Selected ROTC graduates are also eligible for scholarships to 
pursue graduate studies in other academic disciplines. For additional infor- 
mation, contact the department chairman. 

Corresponding Studies Program: Students participating in an off-campus 
study program in the United States or abroad may continue participation in 
either the Army ROTC Basic Course or Advanced Course and receive the 
same course credit and benefits as a student enrolled in the on-campus pro- 
gram. Scholarship students are also eligible to participate in this program. 

Advanced Leadership Practicum: The practicum consists of a six-week 
summer training program at an Army installation which stresses the applica- 
tion of military skills to rapidly changing situations. Participants are evalu- 
ated on their ability to make sound decisions, to direct group efforts toward 
the accomplishment of common goals and to meet the mental and physical 
challenges presented to them. Completion of this practicum is required prior 



79 



to commissioning and it is normally attended between the junior and senior 
years. Participants receive room, board, travel expenses, medical care, and pay. 



Departmental Courses: 

101, 102. Introduction to Military Science. Emphasis on developing 
self-confidence and bearing. Instruction and weekly practical training in basic 
skills such as map reading, rappelling, weapons, communications, first aid, 
tactical movements, customs and courtesies, public speaking, and leadership. 
Meets one hour per week each semester. Also four to six Saturdays of 
voluntary adventure training and one formal social event each semester. 1 
credit. 

201, 202. Application of Military Science. Advanced instruction in topics 
introduced in the first year. Participation in operations and basic tactics to 
demonstrate leadership problems and to develop leadership skills. Meets 
two hours per week each semester. Also four to six Saturdays of voluntary 
adventure training and one formal social event each semester. 1 credit. 

301, 302. Advanced Application of Military Science. Emphasis on lead- 
ership. Situations require direct interaction with other cadets and test the 
student's ability to meet set goals and to get others to do the same. Students 
master basic tactical skills of the small unit leader. Meets two hours per week 
and selected weekends each semester. Prerequisite: Open only to advanced 
course cadets. No credit. 

311. American Military History. Survey of American military history from 
the initial settler/Indian conflicts to the post-Hiroshima, post-Vietnam world 
of today. Critical analysis of the changes in the ways American armies 
fought, organized to fight, and planned to fight the enemy. Also includes a 
study of the evolution in strategic thinking, civil-military relations, and the 
status of reserve forces. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. No credit. 

401, 402. Command and Staff. Emphasis is placed on developing plan- 
ning and decision-making capabilities in the areas of military operations, 
logistics, and administration. Meets two hours per week and selected 
weekends each semester. Prerequisite: Open only to Advanced Course 
cadets. No credit. 

.Students who wish to receive a commission must complete all of the above 
courses (or receive advanced placement credit for 101 -202), the advanced 
leadership practicum, an advanced writing course, and an approved course in 
human behavior. 

80 



Music 

Students in the Department of Music may major in one of five areas: music, 
music performance, sacred music, sound recording technology and music 
education. Each student, regardless of major, is required to take a core of 
courses in theory and music history. Each student also completes additional 
course work particular to his area of interest. 

Attendance at some faculty and student recitals is compulsory. All students 
in the department are required to take private instruction on campus in their 
principal performance medium (one-half hour of private instruction is 
included in the basic tuition). Students whose major applied instrument is 
organ are required also to study piano, continuing until they have attained a 
level of proficiency satisfactory to the organ faculty. Participation in music 
organizations is also required of all majors. 

The music major (B.A.) is designed for those students desiring a liberal arts 
context in their preparation for a career in applied music. All majors are 
required to take an hour lesson per week in their principal performance me- 
dium and expected to perform a half recital in the junior year and a full 
recital in the senior year. 

The music performance major (B.M.) is designed for those students 
desiring a maximum concentration in music courses in preparation for a 
career as a performing musician. All majors are required to take a weekly one 
hour lesson in the principal performance medium; they are also required to 
perform a half recital in the junior year and a full recital in the senior year. 
Majors whose performance medium is a band or orchestral instrument are 
required to study voice and piano as well. 

The sacred music major prepares students for careers as directors of church 
music, ministers of music, or college teachers. The program is open to those 
individuals whose interests are voice or organ. All majors are required to 
acquire sufficient skill to assume responsibilities as a qualified parish church 
musician. Majors whose principal performance medium is organ are required 
to study voice for at least two years, one of which may be a year of class 
experience. Majors whose principal performance medium is voice are ex- 
pected to show sufficient keyboard proficiency upon admission to the 
program that after two additional years of piano study (normally by the end 
of the sophomore year) they may benefit from a year of organ study. 

The music education major, approved by the Pennsylvania Department of 
Education and the National Association of Schools of Music, is designed for 

81 



the preparation of public school music teachers, kindergarten through 
twelfth grades, instrumental and vocal. The music education curriculum 
requires voice instruction (class or private) for a minimum of one year and 
piano instruction (class or private) for a minimum of two years. A competency 
jury must be passed in each area. Students participate in student teaching in 
area elementary and secondary schools. Each student is responsible for 
transportation arrangements to and from the teaching location. 

DEGREES: Bachelor of Arts with a major in music. Bachelor of Music, 
Bachelor of Music in Sacred Music or Sound Recording Technology, and 
Bachelor of Science with a major in music education. 

MAJORS: Core courses of all music majors are MU 1 1 5, 11 6, 11 7, 11 8, 2 1 5, 
217, 226, 246, 316, 341, 342, 530 or 540, or 550 for the B.M. 

Music (B.A.) Core courses plus MU 224, 315, 329, 462, 510, plus 132 for 
voice majors, and 306 for piano majors for a minimum of 50 credits. 

Orchestral and Band Instruments (B.M.): Core courses plus 224, 315, 329, 
400, 403, 123/124 or 231/232 or 227/328, 416, 462, 510 or 530, 520 or 530, 
plus ensembles for at least 81 credits. 

Piano (B.M.): Core courses plus 224, 306, 315, 329, 347, 400, 406, 411, 416, 
462, 520 or 530, plus ensembles (4 credits) and accompanying (6 credits) for 
at least 80 credits. 

Sacred Music (B.M.): Core courses plus MU 224, 315, 329, 347, 462. Organ 
track; MU 132, 321, 322, 351, 352, 354, 421, 422, 520, 530 (voice and piano) 
for at least 81 credits. Voice track; MU 132, 321, 322, 326, 327, 351, 421, 
422, 530 (organ and piano) for at least 79 credits. 

Music Education (B.S.): Core courses plus MU 1 23, 1 24, 227, 23 1 , 232, 328, 
333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338, 345 or 347, 402 or 404, 416, 441, 607, and 609 
for at least 66 credits. Students whose performance medium is piano are 
required to study 1 year of voice. Students whose performance medium is 
voice are required to complete 2 years of piano study. Students whose 
performance medium is band or orchestral instrument are required to com- 
plete 2 years of piano study and 1 year of voice study. All study includes 
class or private instruction. All students may earn up to 12 credits for 
ensemble participation. 

MINOR: MU 115, 116, 117; 341 or 342; 6 credits of Private Instruction (MU 
530) and 4 additional credits in music ensembles or elective courses (19 
credits). All programs must be approved by the Chairman. 

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Sound Recording Technology 

Because of the continuing technological revolution — as exemplified by such 
new distribution media as cable networking, digital compact discs, Dolby 
stereo recordings and films, satellite broadcasting and narrowcasting, and 
stereo television — the field of sound recording technology is expanding at 
an enormous rate. The program in sound recording technology is designed 
for students who wish to gain the theoretical and practical knowledge 
necessary for careers with responsibility for recording technology in the 
fields of radio and television, film, and audio production. 

DEGREE: Bachelor of Music with a major in sound recording technology. 

MAJOR: 56 credits of music courses, including MU 115, 116, 117, 118, 123, 
215, 217, 226, 227, 231, 246, 287. 328, 337, 345, 388, 400, 416, 489, 500, 
510, 520, 530, and one credit of music above 600; AC 151; nine hours in 
computer science approved by advisor; MA 100; MG 100, PHY 1 10, 212, 350. 

Courses in Music 

115. Harmony I. A study of the rudiments of music and their notation. 
Harmonization of melodies and basses with fundamental triads. Analysis. 2 
credits. 

116. Harmony 11. A study of inversions of triads, seventh chords, the 
principles of modulation and figured bass. Analysis of hymns and standard 
literature. 2 credits. 

117. Ear Training and Sight Singing I. The singing and aural recognition 
of intervals, scales, triads and simple harmonic progressions. 2 credits. 

118. Ear Training and Sight Singing 11. A continuation of the above, 
emphasizing clef reading, modality, modulation and more complicated 
rhythmic devices and harmonic patterns. 2 credits. 

215. Harmony III. The writing and analysis of exercises and literature 
which include secondary dominant, diminished seventh chords and substi- 
tutes for diatonic harmony. Analysis and discussion of Twentieth Century 
compositional techniques. 2 credits. 

217. Basic Concepts of Structure and Style. An advanced ear training 
course using literature representing various stylistic periods and performance 
media as the basis for analysis, discussion and aural recognition. 2 credits. 

224. Counterpoint. Introductory work in strict counterpoint through three- 
and four-part work in all the species. 2 credits. 



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226. Form and Analysis I. A study through analysis and listening of 
simple and compound forms, variations, contrapuntal forms, rondo and 
sonata forms. Emphasis is placed primarily upon structural content. The 
course provides experience and skill in both aural and visual analysis. 2 credits. 

315. Harmony iV. Elementary Composition. Exposure to the composition 
of various forms, including theme and variation, rondo, song and dance 
forms; exploration of Twentieth Century compositional techniques. 2 credits. 

316. Keyboard Harmony, Score reading and the realization of figured 
bass at the keyboard, transposition, and improvisation. The successful 
completion of a piano jury is required for admission to the course. 2 credits. 

329. Form and Analysis 11. A study through analysis and listening of fugal 
forms, suite, complex sonata forms and techniques for analysis of certain 
contemporary styles of music. 2 credits. 

416. Orchestration. A study of instrumentation and the devices and 
techniques for scoring transcriptions, arrangements and solos for orchestra 
and band, with special emphasis on practical scoring for mixed ensembles as 
they occur in public schools. Laboratory analysis and performance. Scoring 
of original works. 2 credits. 



Materials and Methods 

220. Music in the Elementary School. A course designed to aid elemen- 
tary education majors in developing music skills for the classroom, including 
the playing of instruments, singing, notation, listening, movement, and 
creative application. 3 credits. 

280. Field Practicum in Music Education. Supervised field experiences in 
appropriate settings. Required pass/fail. Prerequisites: ED 1 10 and permis- 
sion. 1 -3 credits. 

326. Vocal Literature. A survey of solo vocal literature, with emphasis on 
teaching repertoire. Extensive listening is required. Students may have 
opportunities to perform works studied. 2 credits. 

327. Vocal Pedagogy. This course is designed to prepare the advanced 
voice student to teach private lessons at the secondary school level. Stu- 
dents in the class are expected to develop vocal exercise procedures, 
become familiar with suitable teaching repertoire and apply teaching proce- 
dures in a laboratory situation. Selected writings in vocal pedagogy and 
voice therapy will be studied. 2 credits. 

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333. Methods and Materials, General Music: Elementary. A compre- 
hensive study of general music teaching at the elementary school level, the 
philosophy of music education, varied approaches for developing conceptual 
learning and music skills, creative applications, and analysis of materials. 3 
credits. 

334. Methods and Materials, General Music: Junior High/Middle 
School. A study of materials and approaches appropriate for general music 
classes in the junior high/middle school, including adolescent voices, 
musically-oriented learning experiences, and planning a general music cur- 
riculum. 3 credits. 

335. Methods and Materials, Instrumental. A study of methods and 
materials used in teaching band and orchestral instruments from elementary 
through high school, including organizing and directing school ensembles. 
Both individual and class techniques are studied. 3 credits. 

336. Music Education Field Practicum. Students are placed in schools 
one hour per week vi^here they are involved in various situations and teaching 
experiences. They are required to keep a log of their experiences and meet 
with college supervisors who visit them in the schools. 1 credit. 

400. Chamber Music. Under the guidance of an instructor, the student 
studies and performs chamber works appropriate to his performance me- 
dium. Prepared works may be presented in recital. 1 -2 credits. 

402. Seminar in Advanced Instrumental Problems. A study of problems 
confronting the director of school orchestras, bands and instrumental 
classes including: organization and management, selection of beginners, 
rehearsal scheduling, budgeting, marching band drills, evaluation of mate- 
rials, and organization of festivals, contests and public performances. 2 credits. 

403. Pedagogy. Orchestral and Band Instruments. A survey of literature 
and teaching materials which relate to the student's performance area. 
Students may be expected to apply teaching procedures in a laboratory 
situation. 2 credits. 

404. Music Education Seminar, Secondary Level. A study of the high 
school vocal music curriculum and related course offerings. 2 credits. 

406. Piano Pedagogy. A practical course which explores fundamental 
principles necessary to be an effective piano teacher. Subjects include 
practice techniques, memorization and the selection of appropriate technical 
materials for both beginners and advanced students. Laboratory teaching 
may be required of the student. 2 credits. 



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411. Piano Ensemble. A course designed to acquaint the students with 
problems related to piano ensemble performance. Practical experience will 
be gained through study and performance of appropriate literature. 2 credits. 
422. Church Music Methods and Administration. A course designed to 
acquaint the student with the total church music program. Topics include 
the development of a choir program, methods and techniques of rehearsal, 
budget preparation, and committee and pastoral relationships. 2 credits. 
441. Student Teaching. Music education majors spend a semester in the 
music department of an area school district under the supervision of cooper- 
ating teachers. Prerequisites: (1) a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 
during the first six semesters in college; (2) successful completion of piano 
and voice juries; (3) completion of Music 333, 334, 335, 336 including field 
experiences; (4) approval of the music faculty. 1 2 credits. 
600. Accompanying. Under the guidance of a piano instructor the piano 
major prepares accompaniments for recital performance. One credit per 
semester is given for one solo recital or two half recitals. A maximum of six 
credits, usually distributed over the last three years, may be earned. 

Instrumental Courses 

Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments. Practical courses in 
which students, in addition to being taught the fundamental principles 
underlying the playing of all band and orchestral instruments, learn to play 
on instruments of each group: string, woodwind, brass, and percussion. 
Problems of class procedure in public schools are discussed; transposition of 
all instruments is taught. Ensemble playing is an integral part of these 
courses. Bibliographical materials are surveyed. 

Brass Instruments (trumpet, horn, trombone, baritone, tuba) 

123. Brass 1. A study of two of the above instruments. 1 credit. 

124. Brass 11. A study of the remainder of the above instruments. I credit. 
Percussion Instruments (snare drum, timpani, bass drum, and others) 

227. Percussion I. A study of the snare drum. '/2 credit. 

328. Percussion II. A study of the remainder of the above instruments. '/2 
credit. 

Woodwind Instruments (clarinet, flute, oboe, saxophone, bassoon) 

231. Woodwind 1. A study of the clarinet. 1 credit. 

232. Woodwind II. A study of the remainder of the above instruments. 1 
credit. 

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string Instruments (violin, viola, cello, string bass) 

337, String I. A study of all the above instruments. 1 credit. 

338. String 11. A continuation of the study of all of the above instruments. 
1 credit. 

Music Organizations 

Opportunities for individual performance in a group experience are provided 
by music organizations. Membership in the organizations is open on an 
audition basis to all students of the College. 

601. Symphonic and Marching Band. The symphonic band performs 
original literature as well as arrangements of standard repertoire. During the 
football season it presents half-time performances. Membership is by 
audition and is dependent upon the instrumentation needs of the organiza- 
tion. All music education majors, regardless of performance medium, are 
required to be in marching band for a minimum of two semesters. 1 credit. 

603. Symphony Orchestra. A wide variety of symphonic literature is 
studied and performed. In the second semester the orchestra accompanies 
soloists in a concerto-aria concert and on occasion combines with choral 
organizations for the performance of a major work. 1 credit. 

604. Concert Choir. The Concert Choir is composed of approximately fifty 
voices, selected by audition. All phases of choral literature are studied 
intensively. In addition to local concerts, the choir tours annually. I credit. 

605. College Chorus. The College Chorus offers the opportunity to study 
and perform literature of various styles and composers including major 
choral works. Choral experience is preferred but not required. Required of all 
majors in the department. '/2 credit. 

606. Chapel Singers. Composed of approximately twenty voices. The 
singers provide leadership during selected Chapel Convocation programs 
and present concerts for local churches and civic organizations. '/2 credit. 

607. Beginning Ensemble I. A training band in which students play 
secondary instruments and become acquainted with elementary band litera- 
ture. Opportunity is given for advanced conducting students to gain con- 
ducting experience. No credit. 

609. Beginning Ensemble II. A training orchestra in which students play 
secondary instruments and become acquainted with elementary orchestral 
literature. Opportunity is given for advanced conducting students to gain 
experience in conducting. No credit. 



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Instrumental Small Ensembles. Open to the advanced player on an 
audition basis. 

611. String Trio. ^2 credit. 

612. String Quartet. '/2 credit 

613. Clarinet Choir. Vi credit 

614. Woodwind Quintet. '/2 credit. 

615. Brass Ensemble. Vi credit. 

616. Percussion Ensemble. '72 credit. 

617. Saxophone Trio. Vi credit. 

618. Saxophone Quartet. '/2 credit. 

619. Saxophone Quintet. '/2 credit. 

620. Saxophone Ensemble. '/2 credit. 

621. Flute Ensemble. '/2 credit 

622. Horn Ensemble. '/2 credit. 

623. String Ensemble. Vi credit 

624. Woodwind Trio/Quartet. '/2 credit. 

The History and Appreciation of Music 

100. History and Appreciation of Music. For the non-music major, a 
survey of Western music from ancient to modern times. The course is 
designed to increase the individual's musical perception. May not be taken if 
the student has completed MU 341 and/or 342. 3 credits. 

306. History and Literature of the Piano. A survey of the development of 
the piano and its literature, with emphasis on piano methods books and 
related materials. 2 credits. 

321. Hymnology. A study of the historical development of hymns and 
hymn singing, as well as an in-depth analysis of the current hymnodical 
practices of the Christian churches. 2 credits. 

322. Sacred Choral Literature Seminar. A study of standard oratorios, 
requiems, cantatas and anthems, with emphasis on the development of 
aesthetic judgment in selecting literature for various liturgical settings. 2 
credits. 

341/342. History and Literature of Music 1, 11. A survey course in the 
history of Western Music, with emphasis on stylistic developments and 



illustrative musical examples. The first semester ends with Bach; the second 
semester covers Handel to the present. May not be taken if student has 
completed MU 100. 3 credits per semester. 

351, 352, 353, 354. Organ Seminar I, II, III, IV. Four semesters of study, 
preferably in sequence, based upon the investigation of the following: 
351 -Organ Design and Tonal Evolution; 352-Organ History and Literature. 
(Early times through the mid-Baroque); 353-Organ History and Literature. (An 
investigation of organ literature from the time of J.S. Bach to the present); 
354-Church Service Playing. 2 credits per semester. 

421. Liturgy. A study of the music and its form as related to the historical 
development of the current practice of the service of the Christian churches. 
2 credits. 

462. Music Literature Seminar. A study of music literature to extend the 
student's familiarity with selected works. Application of accumulated knowl- 
edge of theory, music history, form, and twentieth-century music. Each 
student pursues an individual project of particular interest. 2 credits. 

Conducting 

246. Principles of Conducting. The principles of conducting and baton 
technique. Students conduct ensembles derived from class personnel. 2 
credits. 

345. Instrumental Conducting. Emphasis on practical work with instru- 
mental groups. Rehearsal techniques are applied through individual experi- 
ence. 2 credits. 

347. Choral Conducting. Basic conducting techniques applied to the 
choral idiom. Rehearsal procedures, materials and specific problems of the 
choral conductor are stressed through laboratory experience. 2 credits. 

Applied Music Instruction 

132. Diction for Singers. An introduction to the pronunciation of singer's 
English, German, French, Italian, and Latin, utilizing the International 
Phonetic Alphabet. Required for sacred music majors and for voice students 
majoring in music; open to other students with approval of the instructor. 1 
credit. 

510. Class Piano Instruction. 1 credit. 

520. Class Voice Instruction. 1 credit. 



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530. Individual Instruction (Voice, Piano, Organ, Orchestra and Band 
Instruments). Piano study (private or class) is required for a minimum of 
two years. 1 credit. 

340. Individual Instruction (Voice, Piano, Organ, Orchestra and Band 
Instruments). A charge is made for the second half-hour of instruction. 2 
credits. 

550. Individual Instruction. Private instruction for Bachelor of Music 
majors. A charge is made for the second half-hour of instruction. 3 credits. 

Courses in Sound Recording Technology 

287. Recording Technology I. An introduction to the fundamentals of 
sound recording technology. Topics include sound and listening, the basic 
audio chain, microphones, tape machines, basic mixers, and equipment 
interfacing. By the conclusion of the course the student will be able to 
engineer a multi-microphone two-track stereo recording. Prerequisite: per- 
mission of the instructor and the department chairman. 3 credits. 

388. Recording Technology II. A continuation of MU 287. The course 
begins with multi-track consoles and tape machines and goes on to cover 
reverberation, equalization, compressors and expanders, noise reduction, 
and the db. The emphasis is on critical listening and practical applications. 
Prerequisites: MU 287; permission of the instructor and the department 
chairman. 3 credits. 

489. Recording Technology III. A continuation of MU 388. This course 
examines sophisticated techniques of recording, microphone placement, 
special effects, digital audio, digital processors, and tape machine alignment, 
as well as introductions to electronic music and audio for video. Prerequi- 
sites: MU 388; permission of the instructor and the department chairman. 3 
credits. 

350. Audio Electronics. A study of electronics as used in audio engineer- 
ing. The course examines RC and LC circuits, filters, impedance, audio 
frequency amplifier circuits, and basic digital theory. Laboratory work is 
included. Prerequisite: PHY 212. 3 credits. 

Departmental Honors and Independent Study 

500. Independent Study. A course designed for the student who desires 
to engage in independent study, either with or without departmental 
honors. 1 - 3 credits per semester. (Maximum of 9) 

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student Recitals 

The student recitals are of inestimable value to all students in acquainting 
them with a wide range of the best musical literature, in developing musical 
taste and discrimination, in affording the experience of appearing before an 
audience, and in gaining self-reliance as well as nerve control and stage 
demeanor. Students at all levels of performance appear in these student re- 
citals. 

Physical Education 

Although the College does not offer a major in physical education, two 
courses are required for graduation. The program encourages attitudes and 
habits of good health, while developing physical capacities and skills that 
will enrich life. 

Courses in Physical Education. 

102. Aerobic Dance. A combination of exercise and dance steps in 
rhythmic movements. The course promotes the value of a total fitness 
program, including diet and weight control and heart rate monitoring. 1 credit. 

107. Badminton. Instruction in the tactics, techniques and rules of bad- 
minton. I credit. 

110. Basketball. Instruction in the tactics, techniques and strategies of 
the game. 1 credit. 

113. Bowling. Instruction in the techniques, etiquette, history and method 
of scoring. 1 credit. 

122, Fitness. Examination of varied programs for fitness, with emphasis on 
diet and weight control, cardiovascular efficiency, strength improvement, 
and flexibility training. 1 credit. 

125. Golf. Instruction in the techniques, tactics, rules and etiquette of golf. 
1 credit. 

131. Racquetball. Instruction in the tactics, techniques and different 
forms of competition used in racquetball. 1 credit. 

140. Softball. Instruction in the techniques and tactics of softball. 1 credit. 

146. Tennis. Instruction in the techniques, rules and tactics, with extensive 
practice in singles and doubles. 1 credit. 

152. Volleyball. Instruction in the techniques, tactics and varied forms of 
competition. 1 credit. 



91 



Physics 

The Department of Physics attempts to develop in the student an increased 
understanding of the basic laws of nature as they relate to the physical 
environment and to indicate the possible extent, as well as the limitations, 
of our knowledge of the physical world. As the natural science dealing with 
forces, motion, energy, heat, sound, light, electromagnetism, electronics, 
atomic structure, and the structure and interaction of all matter, physics 
underlies work in all other natural sciences as well as such applied sciences 
as engineering. 

The department offers comprehensive introductory courses for students 
majoring in any of the natural sciences. Laboratory work is an integral part 
of many physics courses and is designed to acquaint the student with the 
experimental techniques and the measuring instruments appropriate to the 
various areas of investigation. 

DEGREE: B.S. degree with a major in physics. 

MAJOR: PHY 111,112,211,311,312,321,322, plus six additional semester 
hours (at least two in experimental physics), for a total of 30 hours. Also 
required are MA 1 6 1 , 1 62, and 266 or MA 1 1 1 , 1 1 2, 2 1 1 and 266. 



Engineering (Cooperative) 

In the cooperative 3-2 engineering program a student may earn a B.S. 
degree from Lebanon Valley College and a B.S. degree in one of the fields of 
engineering from the University of Pennsylvania (or at another cooperating 
institution). Students who pursue this cooperative engineering program take 
three years of work at Lebanon Valley College and then, if recommended by 
the College and accepted by the engineering school, they may take two 
additional years of work in engineering. After the satisfactory completion of 
the fourth year of the program, the student receives from Lebanon Valley 
College the B.S. degree with a major in one of the areas of science or 
mathematics. At the completion of the fifth year, the student is granted the 
appropriate engineering degree from the engineering school. 

Requirements: Required courses at Lebanon Valley College in the 3-2 
program include MA 161, 162, 261. and 266; PHY 111, 1 12, and 21 1; CH 111 
and 1 13; CS 147 and 242; and ten selected courses in humanities and social 
sciences. 

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Additional courses in physics, mathematics, chemistry and biology appropri- 
ate for the particular area of engineering are elected in planning the total 
program to meet the particular needs of the individual student. For mechani- 
cal, civil, and electrical engineering, PHY 311, 312, 321 and 322 are among 
the needed courses. 

At the University of Pennsylvania the student may select from among many 
different engineering fields: bioengineering, chemical engineering, civil and 
urban engineering, computer science and engineering, electrical engineering 
and science, mechanical engineering and applied mechanics, metallurgy and 
materials science, and systems science and engineering. These and other 
engineering curricula are available at other engineering schools where the 
student may complete the final two years of the 3-2 program. 

Some students decide to complete a four-year program at Lebanon Valley 
College, earning their baccalaureate degree with a major in physics, chemis- 
try, or mathematics and then moving into a graduate program in the engi- 
neering school at a university which leads to a Master of Science degree in a 
field of engineering. 

Courses in Physics 

100. Physics and Its Impact. A course designed to acquaint the student 
with some of the important concepts of physics, both classical and modern, 
and with the scientific method, its nature and its limitations. The role of 
physics in the history of thought and its relationships to other disciplines 
and to society and government are considered. The weekly two-hour labora- 
tory period provides experience in the acquisition, representation, and 
analysis of experimental data, and demonstration of the physical phenomena 
with which the course deals. 4 credits. 

103, 104. General College Physics 1, II. An introduction to the funda- 
mental concepts and laws of the various branches of physics, including 
mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and atomic and nu- 
clear structure, with laboratory work in each area. 4 credits per semester. 

110. The Physics of Music. A study of wave motion, analysis and synthesis 
of waves, resonance, physical characteristics of music sounds, musical 
instruments, the reproduction and amplification of sound, and the acoustical 
properties of rooms. A working knowledge of algebra is required. 3 credits. 

111, 112. Principles of Physics I, II. An introductory course in classical 
physics, designed for students who desire a more rigorous mathematical 
approach to college physics than is given in Physics 103, 104. Calculus is 



93 



used throughout. The first semester is devoted to mechanics and heat, and 
the second semester to electricity, magnetism, and optics, with laboratory 
work in each area. This course should be followed by Physics 211. Prerequi- 
site or corequisite: MA 1 11 or 161 . 4 credits per semester. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

211. Atomic and Nuclear Physics. An introduction to modern physics, 
including the foundation of atomic physics, quantum theory of radiation, the 
atomic nucleus, radioactivity, and nuclear reactions, with laboratory work in 
each area. Prerequisite: PHY 104 or 112. 4 credits. 

212. Introduction to Electronics. The physics of electrons and electronic 
devices, including diodes, transistors, power supplies, amplifiers, oscillators, 
switching circuits, and integrated circuits, with laboratory work in each area. 
Prerequisite: PHY 104 or 112, or permission. 4 credits. 

29 1 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits 

31 1, 312. Analytical Mechanics I, 11. A rigorous study of classical me- 
chanics, including the motion of a single particle, the motion of a system of 
particles, and the motion of a rigid body. Damped and forced harmonic 
motion, the central force problem, the Euler description of rigid body 
motion, and the Lagrange generalization of Newtonian mechanics are among 
the topics treated. Prerequisites: PHY 1 1 1 and MA 266. 3 credits per semester. 

321 , 322. Electricity and Magnetism 1, 11. Theory of the basic phenomena 
of electromagnetism, together with the application of fundamental principles 
to the solving of problems. The electric and magnetic properties of matter, 
direct current circuits, alternating current circuits, the Maxwell field equa- 
tions, and the propagation of electromagnetic waves are among the topics 
treated. Prerequisites: PHY 1 12 and MA 266. 3 credits per semester. 

327, 328. Experimental Physics 1, II. Experimental work selected from the 
area of mechanics, A.C. and D.C. electrical measurements, optics, atomic 
physics, or nuclear physics, with emphasis on experimental design, measur- 
ing techniques, and analysis of data. Prerequisite: PHY 211.1 credit per 
semester. 

350. Audio Electronics. A study of electronics as used in audio engineer- 
ing. The course examines RC and LC circuits, filters, impedance, audio 
frequency amplifier circuits, and basic digital theory. Laboratory work is 
included. Prerequisite: PHY 212. 3 credits. 

391-398. Special Topics. 1-6 credits 

400. Internship. 1-15 credits. 

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421, 422. Modern Physics I, 11. A study of selected topics in modern 
physics, utilizing the methods of quantum mechanics. The Schrodinger 
equation is solved for such systems as potential barriers, potential wells, the 
linear oscillator, and the hydrogen atom. Perturbation techniques and the 
operator formalism of quantum mechanics are introduced where appropriate. 
Prerequisites: PHY 21 1 and MA 266, or permission. 3 credits per semester. 

430. The Teaching of Physics in Secondary Schools. A course designed 
to acquaint the student with some of the special methods, programs, and 
problems in the teaching of physics in secondary schools. Required for 
secondary certification in physics. 1 credit. 

490-498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

500. Independent Study. 1 - 3 credits 

Psychobiology 

This cross-disciplinary major emphasizes the physiological determinants and 
consequences of behavior. Consisting of a balance of psychology and 
biology course work, the program prepares students for graduate study in 
medicine, veterinary medicine, graduate programs in psychology, animal 
behavior, physiological psychology, psychopharmacology, behavior genetics, 
and neuroscience, as well as research positions in industry, universities, 
hospitals, and government laboratories. 

DEGREE: B.S. degree with a major in psychobiology. 

MAJOR: Bl 111, 1 12, 201, 322 (20 hours); PSB 444, 499 (4 hours); PSY 100, 
120, 216, 236, 335,443 (18 hours); CH 111, 112, 113, 114, 21 3, 214, 215, 216 
(16 hours); PHY 103/104 or 111/112 (8 hours); MA 161 (3 hours); CS 170 
(3 hours). 

MINOR: 100, 120, 200, 216 and three electives. For an emphasis in Clinical/ 
Counseling two of the electives should be from 332, 343, 431, 432. For an 
emphasis in Experimental/Physiological two of the electives should be from 
225, 236, 335, 444. For an emphasis in Organizational/Industrial two of the 
electives should be from 332, 337, 339, 346. For an emphasis in Develop- 
mental/Life Span two of the electives should be from 321, 322, 324, 343. 

Courses in Psychobiology 

1 9 1 - 1 98. special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 
29 1 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 



95 



39 1 - 398. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

400. Internship. Provides supervised research and study opportunities in 
an industry, government, or hospital setting. Prerequisite: permission. 1 -6 
credits. 

444. Physiological Psychology. A study of physiological explanations of 
behavior. The laboratory includes sheep eye and brain dissections, stereo- 
taxic surgery, and histological examination of the brain. Prerequisite: PSY 
1 00 or 1 20 or permission. 3 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

499. Psychobiology Seminar. Readings, discussions, and reports on 
selected topics in psychobiology. This course may be repeated. 1 credit. 

500. Independent Study. Prerequisite: Permission. 1 -9 credits per semes- 
ter. 



Psychology 

Psychology has as its objectives the understanding of people and the 
fostering of their well-being. The study of psychology, therefore, may be an 
important part of a liberal education as well as preparation for varied ca- 
reers. Upon graduation, some psychology majors pursue graduate study in 
clinical, experimental, or industrial psychology programs; others obtain 
professional degrees in social work, medicine, business, education, and the 
ministry; still others hold responsible positions that make use of their 
training in industry, government, hospitals, and community agencies. 

To assist students in selecting a program that fits their individual career 
goals, the department has identified seven concentrations: clinical, counsel- 
ing or school psychology, experimental psychology, human development, 
industrial/organizational psychology, social psychology, psycho-biology, and 
general psychology. 

Students are also encouraged to pursue individual studies, which may 
involve an experiment in the laboratory, the use of library sources, or obser- 
vation in a school, agency, or other setting. Internships are available. 

DEGREE: B.A. degree with a major in psychology. 

MAJOR: Psychology 100, 120, 236, 343, and 443; three or four additional 
courses in psychology are required, with different courses designated for dif- 
ferent concentrations. The general concentration requires a minimum of 24 

96 



credits; all others require 27. Students with particular career goals or special 
academic programs may request departmental approval to adjust major 
requirements to individual needs. 

Courses in Psychology 

100. Psychology: The Individual and Society. An introduction to psy- 
chology as a social science. The emphasis is on the interactions of the 
individual and society which influence development, learning, motivation, 
sexuality, and identity, as well as social and emotional adjustment. 3 credits. 

120. Psychology: By Experiment. An introduction to psychology as a 
science, emphasizing laboratory research. Topics may include perception, 
learning, memory, thinking, and social behavior, as well as research tactics. 3 
credits. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits 

200. Advanced General Psychology. A survey course examining the 
relationship between research and theory in the field of psychology. The 
course is intended to give the students an overview of the areas of speciali- 
zation with psychology. 3 credits. 

216. Quantitative Methods in Behavioral Science. Evaluation of behav- 
ioral research, with descriptive and inferential statistics used in experiments 
and correlational studies. Prerequisite or corequisite: PSY 1 00 or 1 20. 3 credits. 

220. Educational Psychology. Studies of cognitive, behavioral, emotional 
and social processes in the school; required for certification in elementary 
and music education. Prerequisite; PSY 100 or 120. 3 credits. 

235. Sensory and Perceptual Processes. Psychological investigations of 
visual, auditory, and other sensory systems; the perception of color, space, 
pictures, and objects. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 120 or permission. 3 credits. 

236. Learning and Memory. A study of classical and instrumental condi- 
tioning, skills acquisition, information retention and loss, and the learning of 
concepts. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 120. 3 credits. 

237. Laboratory Investigations I: Sensory and Perceptual Processes. A 

series of experiments and demonstrations on vision, hearing, propriocep- 
tion, and the skin senses. Topics are coordinated with those in PSY 235. 
Corequisite or prerequisite: PSY 235 or permission. 

238. Laboratory Investigations II: Learning. An experimental study of 
learning, including operant conditioning. Corequisite or prerequisite: PSY 
236. 1 credit. 



97 



291-298. special Topics. 1-6 credits. 

321. Psychology of Child Development. A study of the cognitive, social 
and emotional changes during childhood, as well as the psychological effects; 
of physical growth. Special attention is given to research studies, develop- 
mental mechanisms and theories of development. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 
120. 3 credits. 

322. Psychology of Adolescent Development. A study of the characteris- 
tics of adolescence as well as the research literature and theories concerned 
with psychological change during adolescence. Topics may include psycho- 
logical development, social influences, cognitive and intellectual develop- 
ment, emotional development, identity and self-concept, sexual develop- 
ment, values, transition to adulthood. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 120. 3 credits. 

326. Psychology of Adult Development. A study of research literature 
and theories concerned with psychological change in the adult, from late ad- 
olescence to death. The course includes the works of such theorists as 
Maslow and Erikson. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 120. 3 credits. 

332. Psychological Testing and Assessment. A review of the principal 
tests of ability and personality and an introduction to the principles of 
measurement, methods of test construction, and applications and interpre- 
tations of psychological tests. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 120. 3 credits. 

335. Research Design and Statistics. An evaluation of published studies 
and an analysis of the design and execution of laboratory experiments and 
field studies. Factorial designs, multivariate techniques, and non-parametric 
statistics are analyzed in clinical, educational, organizational, and laboratory 
settings. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 120, 216 or permission. 3 credits. 

337. Organizational Psychology. A study of psychological principles as 
applied to problems of organizational behavior, with emphasis on personnel 
selection, human engineering, group dynamics, systems design, training, 
leadership, and evaluation. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 120. 3 credits. 

339. Career Counseling. The student will go through the process of career 
counseling in learning the functions of the career counselor. Includes 
self-assessment of skills and competencies, occupational research, decision- 
making, and job search strategies. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 120 or permis- 
sion. 3 credits. 

343. Personality. A study of the major theories of personality, with 
emphasis on psychoanalysis and ego psychology, humanism and existential 
phenomenology, social learning, and trait theory. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 
120: junior or senior standing, or permission. 3 credits. 

98 



346. Social Psychology. A study of the inter- and intra-personal relation- 
ships between individuals and groups, with emphasis on theories and 
research studies. The topics covered may include attitude development and 
change, conformity, persuasion, person perception, attribution, attraction, 
norms, and small groups. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 120: junior or senior 
standing, or permission. 3 credits. 

348. Investigations of Social Psychological Processes. Studies of social 
psychological processes which are associated with topics included in PSY 
346. Laboratory exercises and demonstrations, as well as independent and 
group research projects, are included; students will design studies, collect 
and analyze data, and write research reports. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 120. 
PSY 216 highly recommended. Corequisite: PSY 346. 1 credit. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

400. Internship. An applied academic program combining work in commu- 
nity mental health and related organizational settings, hospitals and 
schools, with discussions, guided reading, and systematized observations. 
Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 120, junior or senior standing, permission of 
department and agency involved. 1 -9 credits per semester (15 maximum). 

431. Abnormal Behavior and Experience. A study of mental, emotional 
and behavioral problems, including alcohol and drug abuse, brain disorders, 
criminal and psychopathic behavior, neuroses, psychophysiological reac- 
tions, psychoses, sexual deviations, subnormal intelligence, and suicide. Pre- 
requisites: PSY 100 or 120; junior or senior standing or permission. 3 credits. 

432. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. A study of the ways psycholo- 
gists assist persons and groups. Particular attention is given to assessment, 
individual and group therapy, marriage and family counseling, and commu- 
nity psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 120; PSY 431 or nursing training 
with psychiatric affiliation, or permission. 3 credits. 

443. History and Theory. A study of philosophical concepts and problems 
of relevance for psychology; of early schools of psychology; of theories of 
learning and personality; and of trends of investigation in different areas, in- 
cluding developmental, social, abnormal, and cognitive psychology. Prereq- 
uisites: PSY 100, 120, 236; junior or senior standing; or permission. 3 credits. 

444. Physiological Psychology. A study of physiological explanations of 
behavior. The laboratory includes sheep eye and brain dissection, stereotaxic 
surgery, and histological examination of the brain. Prerequisite PSY 100 or 
120 or permission. 3 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

I 99 



500. Independent Study. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 1 20; one additional 
psychology course and permission. 1 -6 credits per semester (maximum of 9 
credits). 



Religion and Philosophy 

Tiie study of religion is designed to give students insight into the meaning 
of the religious dimension of human experience. Coursework introduces 
students to various historical and contemporary expressions of the Judaeo- 
Christian heritage as well as to the diverse religious traditions of mankind. Ini 
general, students major in religion to ready themselves for theological 
seminary, for careers in Christian education, or to acquire the theological 
maturity which, in combination with another major, will enable them to 
function as lay ministers in their chosen profession. 

The study of philosophy directly involves the student in the process of 
sharpening critical and analytical abilities, in all classes emphasis is placed 
upon the writing of critical and analytical essays dealing with various aspects 
of philosophical thought as it pertains to the questions and issues of knowl- 
edge, human values and conduct, history, politics, religion, science, society, 
and the nature of human beings. 

The study of philosophy may prepare the student for postgraduate activities 
such as legal studies, business, or theological and seminary training. 

DEGREES: B.A. degree with a major in philosophy. B.A. degree with a major 
in religion. B.A. degree with a major in religion, concentration in Christian 
education. 

MAJORS: Philosophy: PH 120 plus an additional 21 credits of philosophy 
courses for a total of 24 credits. 

Religion: RE 11 0, 1 1 1 , 11 2, 222, 33 1 , 499, one course from among 202, 2 11 , 
212, and electives (including GK 32 1 , 43 1 ). The following courses, though 
recommended, are not required for a major in religion: BI 101; GK 101/102, 
111/112; HI 111/112; PH 110, 231; PSY 100; SOC 110, 231. Christian 
Education: RE 110, 111, 112, 120, 211, 202 or 212, 222, 241, 242, 243, 331, 
400 (minimum of 3 hours). Other courses in areas such as communication, 
education, and the social sciences are strongly recommended in consultation 
with the program advisor. 

MINORS: (Philosophy) 1 10, 220 and four additional courses 18 credits. 
(Religion) 1 1 0, 1 1 1 , or 1 1 2, 1 20 or 1 40, 222, and two electives. 1 8 credits. 

100 



Courses in Philosophy 

110. Problems of Philosophy. Examination of major piiilosophicai issues 
and tFie ways major piiilosopiiers have dealt witli them. 3 credits. 

120. Basic Logic. An introduction to the rules of clear and effective 
thinking. Attention is given to the logic of meaning, the logic of valid infer- 
ence, and the logic of factual inquiry. Main emphasis is upon deductive 
logic, and students are introduced to the elements of symbolic logic as well 
as to traditional modes of analysis. 3 credits. 

191-198. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

220. Ethics. An inquiry into the central problems of values applied to 
human conduct, with an examination of the responses of major ethical 
theories to those problems. 3 credits. 

230. Philosophy of Religion. A study of the issues raised for philosophy 
by contemporary religious and theological thought. The course includes 
critical examinations of such problems as faith and reason; the meaning of 
revelation, symbolism, and language; the arguments for the existence of 
God; faith and history; religion and culture. 3 credits. 

240. American Philosophy. A survey of philosophical thought in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the 
work of Peirce, lames, and Dewey. 3 credits. 

260. Ethical Issues in Management. An examination of ethics and values 
within the context of modern corporate organizations. The course considers 
issues pertinent to corporate responsibility, whistle-blowing, the profit 
motive, consumerism, bribery, conflict of interest, and cost/benefit analysis. 
Some attention is given to classical ethical theories; a considerable portion 
of the course is devoted to case analysis. Prerequisite: MG 100 or PH 1 10 or 
by permission. 3 credits. 

291 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

323. Ancient Philosophy. A study of the evolution of philosophy from the 
pre-Socratic nature philosophers to the Hellenistic philosophers of the 
fourth century, with emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Prerequisite: PH 110, 
or permission. 3 credits. 

326. Medieval Philosophy. The history of philosophy from the decline of 
the Hellenistic Age to the Renaissance, with emphasis on the schoolmen of 
the late Middle Ages. Prerequisite: PH 110, or permission. 3 credits. 

10! 



333. Modern Philosophy. The development of philosophy from the 
Renaissance to the Nineteenth Century, with emphasis on Hume and Kant. 
Prerequisite: PH 110, or permission. 3 credits. 

336. Twentieth Century Philosophy. An examination of representative 
American, British, and Continental philosophers from 1900 to the present. 
Prerequisite: PH 1 10 or permission. 3 credits. 

391-398. Special Topics. 1-6 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

499. Seminar. 

500. independent Study. Prerequisite: permission. 1 -3 credits per semes- 
ter (maximum of 9). 



Courses in Religion 

1 10. Introduction to Religion. An exploration of the many dimensions of 
religion as a central human experience through an examination of such 
topics as: varieties of religious experience and expression, religious knowl- 
edge, the self and meaning, religion in its sociocultural context, religion and 
the natural order, and universal issues such as death, the End, evil, suffering, 
and the moral order. 3 credits. 

111. Introduction to Biblical Religion. An examination of some of the 
basic themes of biblical religion in relation to their historical context and 
their contemporary implications. 3 credits. 

1 12. Introduction to Christianity. A study of the rise and development of 
the major forms of Christianity (Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Protes- 
tant) in Europe and America, including doctrine and theological expression, 
ethics, worship, church structure, and relationship to culture. 3 credits. 

120. Religion in America. A study of the origin and development of reli- 
gious expression in America, with particular attention to Protestantism, 
Roman Catholicism, and ludaism. 3 credits. 

140. World Religions. An examination of the rise and development of 
religion along with a study of the ideas and cultic and ethical practices of the 
great world faiths. Special attention given to Asian religions. 3 credits. 

191-198. Special Topics. 1-6 credits. 

202. The Prophets. A study of the lives and writings of the Old Testament 
prophets and an analysis of their contributions to Hebrew-Christian religious 
thought. 3 credits. 

102 



I 



206. Near East Archaeology and the Bible. An examination of archaeol- 
ogy in biblical lands, its methods, objectives, and contributions to the areas 
of history, culture, and religion. 3 credits. 

211. Life and Teachings of Jesus. An intensive study of the life and 
message of )esus as set forth in the Gospels. 3 credits. 

212. Life and Epistles of Paul. A study of the life, writings, and theological 
thought of Paul and their relationship to the practices, problems, and beliefs 
of the early Church. 3 credits. 

222. Christian Ethics. A systematic analysis of the implications of the 
Christian faith, both for personal moral decision and for social policy in such 
areas as marriage and family, government and political life, work and the 
economic order. 3 credits. 

230. American Folk Religion. A study of the folk traditions of selected 
American denominations and sects and of the theological implications of 
secular folklore. Emphasis will be placed on field work as well as on analysis. 
3 credits. 

241. Principles of Christian Education. A study of the overall structure 
and meaning of Christian education, including education as ministry, history 
of religious education, theoretical approaches, the impact of other disci- 
plines (sociology, psychology, education), developmental theories, the role 
of Bible and theology, and contemporary concerns and expressions of 
Christian education. 3 credits. 

242. Methods of Christian Education. A study of elements involved in 
the implementation of a program of Christian education in the local parish, 
including planning, evaluation, leader development, teaching and learning, 
resources, skills, and work in the age levels. 3 credits. 

243. Selected Problems in Christian Education. A study of important 
themes and issues in Christian education, such as theology and education, 
conversion and nurture, indoctrination and reflection, developmental 
models and theological teachings, content-centered or student-centered 
approach, and the role of the professional. 3 credits. 

29 1 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

331. Christian Tradition and Reform. A study of the major and continuing 
strains in the history of Christianity and the principal reform movements. 
Required of majors and strongly recommended for all pre-theological 
students. 3 credits. 



103 



332. The Sacred in Modern Writing, Identification, analysis, and interpre- 
tation of issues of special theological import raised by thinkers representing 
non-theological disciplines. Prerequisite: RE 110 or permission. 3 credits. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

400. Internship. An extension and application of knowledge through a 
supervised experience in an appropriate church school, agency, or organiza- 
tion. 1 -6 credits. 

403. Classical Christian Thinkers. An intensive study of the thought of 
such classical religious thinkers as Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, and others. 3 
credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

499. Seminar: Selected Religious Problems. A study of selected prob- 
lems arising from recent theological efforts. Research methodology is 
stressed. Required of majors and strongly recommended for all pre-theologi- 
cal students; others by permission. Prerequisite RE 1 11 and 112. 3 credits. 

500. Independent Study. Request guidelines from advisor. 1 - 3 credits per 
semester, (maximum of 9). 



Sociology and Social Service 

Students major in sociology to benefit from a richer understanding of social 
processes and experience, and to apply that understanding both to contem- 
porary issues and to the development of their personal identity. Graduates 
in sociology are qualified to attend graduate school in basic or such applied 
social science areas as urban planning and organizational behavior, or to 
assume positions in government or industry in which knowledge of human 
behavior is valuable. 

The major in social service is designed to enable those who are motivated to 
care for the needs of others to pursue their interests in a variety of profes- 
sional social work settings. Concentrations available in the department 
include those in criminal justice, family intervention, gerontology/thana- 
tology. 

DEGREES: B.A. degree with a major in sociology, B.S. degree with a major in 
social service. 

MAJORS: (Sociology) SO 1 10, 31 1, 421, 499, plus 15 additional credits in 
sociology. 

104 



(Social Service) SO 1 1 0, 3 1 1 ; SV 262, 33 1 , 34 1 or 342, 499; 9 credits of SV 
400; 4 additional courses in sociology or social service. 

MINORS (Sociology) SO 11 0, 3 1 1 , 42 1 ; one course from SO 2 1 0, 278, or 33 1 ; 
one course from SO 21 1, 230, 322, 333, 362, 382; one elective course in 
sociology. 

(Social Service) SO 110, SV 262, 331, 341; 6 credits of SV 400; two courses 
from SO 210, 211, 230, 261, 278, 331, 333, 351, 362. SV 345, 499. Students 
majoring in sociology shall elect SV 499 and one course in sociology in 
addition to their major requirements. 

Courses in Sociology 

no. Introduction To Sociology. Survey of the major perspectives, 
methods and topics of sociology, including the nature of society, groups and 
institutions, socialization, social control and deviance, social change, and 
the impact of society on individuals. 3 credits. 

120. Introduction To Anthropology. A survey of the topics and methods 
of anthropology with emphasis on the interaction of physical, economic and 
cultural factors in the development of people and their behavior. 3 credits. 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 Credits. 

210. Social Problems. Selected problems of contemporary life as seen 
through different analytical perspectives. Prerequisite: SO 110, or GE 140, or 
HC 202. 3 credits. 

21 1. Urbanology. An analysis of the city as a unique form of social 
organization. From a multi-disciplinary perspective, the course presents the 
nature of urbanization and the impact of urbanism on contemporary society. 
Prerequisite: SO 110, or GE 140, or HC 202. 3 credits. 

230. Sociology of Marriage and the Family. An overview of marriage 
and the family as institutions. The interpersonal dynamics of marriage and 
family life are studied from sociological, historical, and cross-cultural per- 
spectives. Prerequisite: SO 110, or GE 140, or HC 202. 3 credits. 

261. Gerontology. An investigation of the ways in which individuals, 
families and communities respond to aging and the aged. Prerequisite: SO 
110, or GE 140, or HC 202. 3 credits. 

278. Juvenile Delinquency. An empirical and theoretical examination of 
juvenile delinquency, the juvenile justice system and treatment programs for 
the juvenile offender. Prerequisite: SO 110, or GE 140, or HC 202. 3 credits. 

29 1 - 298. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 



105 



31 1, Research Methods. A study of the basic skills needed to criticize and 
carry out social science research. Prerequisite: SO 110, junior standing, or 
permission. 3 credits. 

322. Sociology of Religion. The structure and functions of religious 
organizations and phenomena with emphasis on the varieties of religious 
expresssion in America. Prerequisite: SO 110, or GE 140, or HC 202. 3 credits. 

331. Criminology. An examination of the nature, causes, and correlates of 
criminal behavior. Prerequisite: SO 110, or GE 140, or HC 202. 3 credits. 

333. Criminal Justice. A sociological, historical, and philosophical exami- 
nation of punishment and the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: SO 1 10, 
or GE 140, or HC 202. 3 credits. 

340. Group Structure and Dynamics. Overview of theory and research on 
small group organization and process. Application of basic principles to 
practical situations. Exercises designed to improve group leadership and 
participation skills. Prerequisite: SO 110, or GE 140, or HC 202. 3 credits. 

351. Thanatology. Exploration of the basic legal, medical, ethical and so- 
cial issues related to the contemporary understanding of death and dying. 
Prerequisite: SO 110, or GE 140, or HC 202. 3 credits. 

362. Social Inequality. An examination of the patterns of structured 
inequality in American society, including the class system and racial and 
ethnic groups. Consideration will be given to basic social processes, unique 
historical contexts, and emergent contemporary developments. Prerequisite: 
SO 110, or GE 140, or HC 202. 3 credits. 

382. Sociology of the Mass Media. Seminar on the mutual shaping of the 
mass media (television, film etc.) by social forces of society by the media. 
Critical analysis of current research and theory on contemporary media 
issues. Prerequisite: 6 credits in sociology, or permission. 3 credits. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

400. Internship. Prerequisite: 18 hours in sociology and permission. 1-15 
credits. 

421. Social Theory. An intensive examination of the major sociological 
theorists and movements. Prerequisite: 12 credits in sociology. 3 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits 

499. Seminar. A critical analysis of selected themes and issues in contem- 
porary sociology. Prerequisite: SO 421. 3 credits. 

106 



500. Independent Study. Prerequisite: 18 hours in sociology, a 2.5 cumu- 
lative grade point average, and a contract with the instructor prior to regis- 
tration for the course. 1 - 3 credits per semester. Maximum of 9. 

Courses in Social Service 

1 9 1 - 1 98. Special Topics. 1 - 6 credits. 

262. Social Welfare. An introduction to social welfare policies and 
institutions. Prerequisite: SO 1 10. 3 credits. 

291 -298. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

331. Social Service Theory. Consideration of the theories which underlie 
social service intervention at the individual, familial, group, community, and 
societal level. Prerequisite: SV 262. 3 credits. 

341. Social Work Practice: Direct Methods. An examination of the 
knowledge, attitudes, and skills required for professional social work practice, 
emphasizing the methods of social casework, social group work, and family 
therapy. Prerequisite: SV 331. 3 credits. 

342. Social Work Practice: Indirect Methods. An examination of the 
knowledge, attitudes, and skills required for professional social work practice, 
emphasizing the methods of community organization, social action, and 
social planning. Prerequisite: SV 331. 3 credits. 

345. Family Therapy. The theory and practice of family therapy, focusing 
on the work of prominent family therapists such as Satir, Minuchin, Haley, 
and others. Prerequisite: SO 230 and SV 341, or permission. 3 credits. 

391 -398. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

400. Internship. A supervised field placement in a public or private social 
service agency or program. Prerequisites: SV 341 or 342, 40 hours of volun- 
teer work, and permission. 1-15 credits. 

491 -498. Special Topics. 1 -6 credits. 

499. Seminar. Detailed study of a selected social work area. Prerequisite: 
SV 341 or 342. 3 credits. 

500. Independent Study. Prerequisite: SV 341 or 342, a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.5, and a contract with the instructor prior to registration 
for the course. 1 - 3 credits (maximum of 9). 



107 



DIRECTORY 

The Board of Trustees 

Officers 

ELIZABETH K. WEISBURGER, President 
THOMAS C. REINHART, First Vice President 
ELAINE G. HACKMAN, Second Vice President 
E. D. WILLIAMS, IR., Secretary 

E. PETER STRiCKLER, Treasurer 
HARRY B. YOST, Assistant Secretary 

F. ALLEN RUTHERFORD, )R., immediate Past President 
ELMER N. FUNKHOUSER, President Emeritus 
ALLAN W. MUND, President Emeritus 

ARTHUR L. PETERSON, President of the College 

Emeriti 

WILLIAM D. BRYSON, L.L.D.; Retired Executive, Walter W. Moyer Com- 
pany; Ephrata, PA. 

WOODROW S. DELLINGER, B.S., M.D.; General Practitioner; Red Lion, PA. 

DEWITT M. ESSICK, A.B., M.S.; Retired Executive, Armstrong World 
Industries; Lancaster, PA. 

EUGENE C. FISH, Esq., B.S., L.L.B., I.D.; President, Peerless Industries, 
Inc.; Chairman of the Board, Eastern Foundry Company; Attorney, 
Romeika, Fish and Scheckter; Senior Partner, Tax Associates; lenkin- 
town, PA. 

E. N. FUNKHOUSER, A.B., L.L.D.; Retired President, Funkhouser Corpora- 
tion; Hagerstown, MD. 

PAUL E. HORN, A.B., B.D., D.D.; Retired Pastor, United Methodist Church; 
Harrisburg, PA. 

HERMANN W. KAEBNICK, B.A., M.Div., S.T.M., D.D., L.L.D., L.H.D.; 
Retired Bishop, Harrisburg Area, United Methodist Church; Hershey, PA. 

ALLAN W. MUND, Ph.D., L.L.D.; Retired Chairman, Board of Directors, 
Ellicott Machine Corporation; Baltimore, MD. 

HAROLD S. PEIFFER, A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D.; Retired Pastor, United 
Methodist Church; Lancaster, PA. 

lESSIE A. PRATT, B.S.; Retired Administrative Assistant, Legal Division, 
City of Philadelphia; Philadelphia, PA. 

108 



EZRA H. RANCK, A.B., B.D., D.D.; Retired Pastor, United Methodist 

Church; Mt. Joy, PA. 
MELVIN S. RIFE; Retired Executive, Schmidt and Ault Paper Company, 

Division of St. Regis Paper Company; York, PA. 
RALPH M. RITTER; President, Ritter Brothers, Inc.; Harrisburg, PA. 
F. ALLEN RUTHERFORD, IR., B.S., Honorary Degree from LVC; Retired 

Principal, Arthur Young and Company; Richmond, VA (1987). 



Honorary 

lEFFERSON C. BARNHART, Esq., A.B., L.L.B.; Attorney, McNees, Wallace 

and Nurick; Harrisburg, PA. 
BERNARD I. PENTURELLI, B.S.; Corporate Consultant; Laureldale, PA. 
HORACE E. SMITH, Esq., A.B., L.L.B.; Attorney, Smith and McCleary; 

York, PA. 
ANNE B. SWEIGART, CEO, Denver and Ephrata Telephone Co., Ephrata, PA. 
WOODROW W. WALTEMYER; Business Executive; York, PA. 



Trustees 

EDWARD H. ARNOLD, B.A.; President, Arnold Industries; Lebanon, PA 

(1987). 
WILLIAM D. BOSWELL, Esq., Ph.B., L.L.B.; Attorney, Berman and Boswell; 

Harrisburg, PA (1989). 
MILDRED A. BOWEN; Cafeteria Manager, Northeastern School District; Mt. 

Wolf, PA (1987). 
G. HAROLD BUCHER, B.S.; President, People's National Bank; Lebanon, 

PA (1989). 
DONALD E. BYRNE, IR., B.A., M.A., Ph.D.; Professor of Religion; Chairman 

of the Department of Religion, Lebanon Valley College; Annville, PA 

(1988). 
RAYMOND H. CARR; President, Pickering Creek Industrial Park, Inc.; 

Lionville, PA(1988). 
RUTH A. DAUGHERTY, B.A.; Church Volunteer; Chairman, General Com- 
mission on Communications, United Methodist Church; West Chester, 

PA (1989). 
lAMES ). DAVISON; Owner, Davison Motor Car Company; Freehold, N) 

(1987). 



109 



CURVIN N. DELLINGER, B.S.; President, I.C. Hauer's Sons, Inc.; Lebanon, 

PA (1988). 
JOHN R. EBY, B.S.; Vice President, Controller and Secretary, Common- 
wealth Communications Services, Inc.; Mountville, PA (1989). 
ALBERT L. EVANS, JR., B.S.; President, Evans Delivery Co., Inc.; Schuylkill 

Haven, PA (1989). 
RUFUS A. FULTON, Executive Vice President, Fulton Bank, Lancaster, PA 

(1989). 
ARTHUR L. GOLDBERG, Esq., A.B., L.L.B.; Attorney, Goldberg, Evans and 

Katzman; Harrisburg, PA (1989). 
THOMAS W. GUINIVAN, A.B., B.D., D.D.; Retired Pastor, Colonial Park 

United Methodist Church, Mechanicsburg, PA (1988). 
ELAINE G. HACKMAN, B.A.; Vice President, Tess El Corp., Ephrata, PA 

(1988). 
BRYAN V. HEARSEY, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.; Professor of Mathematics, Leba- 
non Valley College; Annville, PA (1988). 
PHILIP C. HERR, II, Esq., A.B., L.L.B.; Attorney, Herr, Potts and Herr; 

Philadelphia, PA (1988). 
GERALD D. KAUFFMAN, A.B., B.D., Honorary Degree from LVC; Pastor, 

Grace United Methodist Church; Carlisle, PA (1988). 
ANDREW W. KREIDER, B.S.; President, H.H. Bealler & Co., Inc.; Wyomis- 

sing, PA (1988). 
CONSTANCE W. LEITNER, B.S.; Musician, Trinity United Methodist 

Church; Harrisburg, PA (1986). 
lEFFREY A. LESHER, Student, Lebanon Valley College, Lebanon, PA (1987) 
lEAN W. LEVY, B.A.; Retired Businesswoman; Mt. Gretna, PA (1989). 
LEON E. MARKOWICZ, A.B., M.A., Ph.D.; Professor of English, Lebanon 

Valley College; Annville, PA (1989). 
LEROY MARLOW, B.S., M.A., Ed.D.; Assistant Director of Continuing 

Education; Director of the Pennsylvania Technical Assistant Program; 

Head of Management Development Services, The Pennsylvania State 

University; State College, PA (1987). 
JOAN C. McCULLOH, A.B., M.A.T.; Chairperson, Department of English, 

Annville-Cleona High School; Annville, PA (1989). 
lOHN G. McELLHENNEY, A.B., B.D., D.D.; Pastor, Ardmore United Meth- 
odist Church; Ardmore, PA (1987). 
RONALD NAGY, B.S.; Vice President, New Era Ribbon and Carbon; West 

Chester, PA (1987). 
GRANT T. NICHOLLS, B.A., B.S.; President, Personal Financial Advisors; 

Hackettstown, NJ (1987). 

110 



DOUGLAS L. NYCE, Student, Lebanon Valley College, Harrisburg, PA ( 1 987). 
lOHN D. NORTON III, A.B., M.A., PhD.; Professor of Political Science, 

Lebanon Valley College, Annville, PA (1989). 
PETER G. OLENCHUK, B.S., M.S., M.B.A.; Chairman of the Board, Newport 

Institute, Newport, RI; Retired Major General, United States Army; 

McLean, VA(1986). 
KENNETH H. PLUMMER; President, E.D. Plummer Sons, Inc.; Chambers- 
burg, PA (1987). 
RHEA P. REESE; Community Volunteer; Hershey, PA (1989). 
MILDRED M. REIGH, B.A., M.Ed.; Professor of Mathematics, Indiana 

University of Pennsylvania; Indiana, PA (1987). 
THOMAS C. REINHART, B.S.; President T.C.R. Packaging, Inc., Albee- 

Campbell, Inc., and People Seekers; West Lawn, PA (1987). 
ANDREW G. SCHULTZ, District Superintendent, Eastern Pennsylvania 

Conference, United Methodist Church, West Chester, PA (1989) 
DANIEL L. SHEARER, A.B., B.D., S.T.M.; Executive Assistant to the 

Bishop, Harrisburg Area, United Methodist Church; Harrisburg, PA (1986). 
F. HERBERT SKEETE, A.B., M.Div., S.T.M., D. Min.; Bishop, the Philadel- 
phia Area, United Methodist Church; Valley Forge, PA (1989). 
HARVEY B. SNYDER, B.S., M.D.; Retired, Exxon Corporation; Lebanon, 

PA (1987). 
MORTON SPECTOR; Vice President and Treasurer, D & H Distributing Co.; 

Harrisburg, PA (1989). 
ARTHUR W. STAMBACH, A.B., B.D., D.D.; Pastor, First United Methodist 

Church, Hershey, PA (1988). 
PAUL E. STAMBACH, A.B., B.D., S.T.M., Ph.D.; Pastor, Asbury United 

Methodist Church; York, PA (1989). 
E. PETER STRICKLER, B.S.; President, Strickler Insurance Agency, Inc.; 

Lebanon, PA (1989). 
SUSAN E. VERHOEK, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.; Associate Professor of Biology, 

Lebanon Valley College; Palmyra, PA (1987). 
lOHN A. WALTER, B.S., I.D.; ludge, Lebanon County Court of Common 

Pleas; Lebanon, PA (1989). 
lULIANNE WEBBER, B.A.; Admissions Assistant, Franklin and Marshall 

College; Lancaster, PA (1987). 
ELIZABETH K. WEISBURGER, B.S., Ph.D.; Chief of Carcinogen Metabolism 

and Toxicology Branch, National Cancer Institute; Bethesda, MD (1988). 
HARLAN R. WENGERT, B.S., M.B.A.; President, Wengert's Dairy; Lebanon, 

PA (1987). 
E. D. WILLIAMS, IR.; Private Investor; Lebanon, PA (1987). 



Ill 



I. DENNIS WILLIAMS, B.A.. M.Div., D. Min.; Pastor, United Methodist 

Church of West Chester; West Chester, PA (1988). 
SAMUEL A. WILLMAN, B.S., M. Com.; Vice President, Marketing, York 

Container Company; Red Lion, PA (1987). 
STEVEN H. WITMER, Student, Lebanon Valley College, Gardenville, PA 

(1987). 
CHARLES W. WOLFE, V/P for University Relations, Bucknell University, 

Denver, PA (1989). 
THOMAS W. WOLF, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.; Wolf Management Service Company; 

York, PA (1988). 
HARRY B. YOST, Esq., L.L.B., L.L.M.; Attorney, Hassell, Yost and Sorren- 

tino; Lancaster, PA (1988). 
NANCY C. ZIMMERMAN; Community Volunteer; Hershey, PA (1987). 



Administration 
President 

ARTHUR L. PETERSON, 1984-; President. A.B., Yale University, 1947; 

M.S. P. A., University of Southern California, 1949; Ph.D., University of 

Minnesota, 1962. 
MARY N. ESHLEMAN, 1979-; Executive Secretary to the President. 

Presidential Staff 

HOWARD L. APPLEGATE, 1983-; Dean of Continuing Education and 
Special Programs, 1984-. B.A., Drew University, 1957; M.A., Syracuse 
University, I960; Ph.D., 1966. 

ROBERT E. HAMILTON, 1986-; Vice President and Controller, 1986; A.B., 
Messiah College, 1962; M.Ed., Shippensburg University, 1966; D.Ed., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1972. 

RICHARD T. lOLLY, 1986-; acting Vice President for Institutional Ad- 
vancement; B.A., University of Delaware, 1970; M.Div., Andover Newton 
Theological School, 1974. 

GEORGE R. MAROUETTE, 1952-; Vice President for Student Affairs, 
1984-. A.B. Lebanon Valley College, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 
1951; Ed. D., Temple University, 1967. 

WILLIAM 1. McGILL IR., 1986-; Vice President and Dean of the Faculty. 
A.B. Trinity College, 1957; M.A. Harvard University, 1958; PhD. 1961. 

112 



I 



JOHN ABERNATHY SMITH, 1980-; College Chaplain and Church Relations 
Officer. B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1961; M.Div., Drew University, 1965; 
M.A., lohns Hopkins University, 1967; Ph.D., 1971. 

GREGORY G. STANSON, 1966-; Dean of Enrollment Management Ser- 
i vices, 1980-. B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1963; M.Ed., University of 
Toledo, 1966. 

Administrative Staff 

Academic Affairs 

WILLIAM 1. McGILL, Vice President and Dean of the Faculty. 

HOWARD L. APPLEGATE, Dean of Continuing Education and Special 
Programs. 

BARBARA JONES DENISON, 1987-; Director, Leadership Development 
Institute, 1987-. B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1979; M.A., University 
of York, 1981; PhD, Northwestern University, 1985. 

TIMOTHY M. EBERSOLE, 1986-; Director, Summer Athletic Camps, 
1986-. B.S., Shippensburg University, 1983. 

DALE 1. ERSKINE, 1 983-; Director, Youth Scholars Institute, 1983-. 
B.A., University of Maine at Portland, 1974; M.A., SUNNY College at 
Buffalo, 1976; PhD., University of Oklahoma, 1981. 

SUZANNE CALDWELL RIEHL, 1 982-; Director, Music Preparatory 
Department, 1984-. B.A. Lebanon Valley College, 1979; M.M., West- 
minster Choir College, 1982. 
ROBERT A. CLAY, I978-; Registrar, I986-. A.B., St. Mary's Seminary and 

University, 1962; S.T.B., Pontifical Gregorian University, 1964; M.A., 

Cornell University, 1974; PhD. 1982. 
DEBORAH R. FULLAM, 1 982-; Academic Computer Coordinator, 1986-. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1981; Data Processing, Harrisburg Area 

Community College, 1982. 
WILLIAM E. HOUGH, III, I970-; Librarian; Associate Professor, A.B., 

King's College, 1955; Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary, 1959; M.S.L., 

Columbia University, 1965. 
ELOISE P. BROWN, 1961 -; Readers' Services Librarian. B.S.L.S. Simmons 

College, 1946. (On leave, 1986-1987) 
ALICE S. DIEHL, 1 966-; Technical Processes Librarian. A.B., Smith College, 

1956; B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1957; M.L.S., University of 

Pittsburgh, 1966. 



113 



DONNA L. HEVENER, 1986-; Readers' Services Librarian. B.S., Millersville 

University, 1984; M.L.S., Drexel University, 1986. 
WARREN K. A. THOMPSON, 1967-; Director, Leadership Studies, 1986-. 

A.B., Trinity University, 1957; M.A., University of Texas, 1963. 
lOHN I. UHL, 1980-; Director of Media Services. B.S., Lebanon Valley 

College, 1979. 
GLENN H. WOODS, 1965-; Director of Hospitality Programs, 1985-. A.B., 

Lebanon Valley College, 1951; M.Ed., Temple University, 1962. 

Admissions and Financial Aid 

GREGORY G. STANSON, Dean of Enrollment and Management Services. 

RUTH E. ANDERSEN, 1986-; Admissions Counselor. B.S., Lebanon Valley 

College, 1986 
WILLIAM I. BROWN, IR., 1980-; Associate Dean of Admissions, (1984) & 

Director of Financial Aid, (1986). B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1979. 
RONALD K. GOOD, 1983-; Assistant Dean of Admissions. B.S. in Ed., 

Millersville State College, 1959; M.Ed., Millersville State College, 1966. 
lANET E. LYONS, 1985-; Admissions Counselor. B.S., University of 

Pittsburgh, 1981. 
lAMES P. MONOS, )R., 1986 -Admissions Counselor/Head Football Coach. 

B.S., Shippensburg State College, 1972; M.Ed., Western Maryland 

College, 1978. 

Institutional Advancement 

RICHARD T. lOLLY, acting Vice President. 

M. STEVEN BORTNER, 1986; Director of Annual Giving, 1986; B.A., 
Shippensburg State College, 1976. 

lOHN B. DEAMER, JR., 1986-; Assistant Director of Communications, 
1986. B.A., La Salle University, 1985. 

TIM EBERSOLE, 1986-; Sports Information Director, 1986; B.S., Shippens- 
burg University, 1983. 

KAREN McHENRY GLUNTZ, 1984-; Executive Director of Development, 
1984; B.A., Marymount College, 1973; B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 
1982; M.A. in Business Administration, The Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity, 1984. 

FRANK TAVANI, 1986-; Director of Alumni Services; B.A., Lebanon Valley 
College, 1976. 

MARILYN A. WEISTER, 1985-; Director of Communications, 1986; Assist- 
ant Director of Communications, 1985; B.A., Penn State, 1979. 

114 



Business Affairs 

ROBERT E. HAMILTON, Vice President and Controller 

JOANNE M. CURRAN, 1983-; Assistant Director of Food Service and 
Conferences. 

ROBERT J. DILLANE, 1985-; Administrative Coordinator, Computer 
Services, 1986; Administrative Assistant, 1985. B.S., Lebanon Valley 
College, 1977. 

HAROLD L. FESSLER, 1984-; Supervisor of Maintenance. 

ELIZABETH M. FOX, 1975-; Manager, Snack Shop. 

DEBORAH R. FULLAM, 1982-; Academic Coordinator, Computer Services, 
1986; Adjunct Instructor Mathematical Sciences, 1985; Assistant Direc- 
tor, Computer Center, 1982. B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1981; Data 
Processing, Harrisburg Area Community College, 1982. 

ROBERT E. HARNISH, 1967-; Manager of the College Store. B.A., Ran- 
dolph Macon College, 1966. 

DONALD R. HIRNEISEN, 1986-; Printer. 

ELVIN P. lACKSON, 1986-; Director of Food Service and Conferences. 

MARK M. MANNO, 1984-; Coordinator of Mail Services, 1986. 

DELLA M. NEIDIG, 1962; Director of Housekeeping, 1972. 

STEPHEN SHOOP, 1977-; Technical Coordinator, Computer Services, 
1986. B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1974. 



WALTER L. SMITH, 1961-1969 
Lebanon Valley College 1961 



1971 -; Director of Special Services. B.S., 
M.S. in Ed., Temple University, 1967. 
DANE A. WOLFE, 1977-; Associate Controller. B.S., Lebanon Valley 

College, 1974. 
KEVIN R. YEISER, 1982-; Director of Grounds. 

SAMUEL I. ZEARFOSS, 1952-; Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, 
1969-. 



Student Affairs 

GEORGE R. MARQUETTE, Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students 

ROBERT F. EARLY, 1971 -; College Physician. B.S., Lebanon Valley 

College, 1949; M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1952. 
DAVID C. EVANS, 1981 -; Director of Career Planning and Placement. 

B.A., Slippery Rock State College, 1969; M.Ed., Rutgers University, 1970. 
VERONICA FABIAN, 1984-; Staff Nurse. R.N., Spencer Hospital, Mead- 

ville, 1961. 



15 



EILEEN N. FRANKLAND, 1986-; Director of Student Activities and adjunct 

instructor of Sociology. B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1973; 

M.S.W., Barry University, 1982. 
RUSSELL L. GINGRICH, 1971 -; College Physician. B.S., Lebanon Valley 

College, 1947; M.D., lefferson Medical College, 1951. 
ROBERT M. KLINE, 1970-; College Physician. B.S., Lebanon Valley 

College, 1950; M.D., lefferson Medical College, 1955; B.A., Lebanon 

Valley College, 1971. 
LOUIS A. SORRENTINO, 1971 -; Director of Athletics/Assistant Men's 

Basketball Coach, 1981 -; B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1954; M.A., 

Bucknell University, 1961. 
lULIANA Z. WOLFE, 1975-1978; 1979-; Head Nurse and Director of 

Health Center. R.N., St. Joseph's Hospital, Carbondale, 1963. 
ROSEMARY YUHAS, 1973-; Associate Dean of Students, 1 983-. B.S., 

Lock Haven State College, 1966. M.Ed., West Chester State College, 1970. 
lEAN W. ZELEK, 1983-; Staff Nurse. R.N., St. Anthony's Hospital, Louis- 
ville, 1952. 



Athletic Staff 

LOUIS A. SORRENTINO, Director of Athletics, Assistant Men's Basketball 
Coach. 

RANDY BEHNEY, 1985-; Soccer Coach. B.S., Lock Haven State College, 

1978. 
MARK BREZITSKI, 1986-; Assistant Football Coach. B.A., Shippensburg 

University, 1986. 
LEWIS COOKE, JR., 1985-; Equipment Manager. 
TIMOTHY EBERSOLE, 1986-; Director of Sports Information; Assistant 

Football Coach. B.S., Shippensburg State University, 1983. 
GORDON E. FOSTER, 1982-; Head Coach, Men's Basketball; Admissions 

Counselor. B.A., Elizabethtown College, 1951; M.S., Bucknell University, 

1968. 
lODI FOSTER, 1985-; Women's Basketball and Track Coach. B.S. Milliken 

University, 1984; M.S., Eastern Illinois University, 1985. 
THOMAS JORDAN, 1986-; Assistant Football Coach. B.S., Millersville 

State University, 1976. 
lAMES MONOS, 1986-; Head Football Coach; Assistant in Admissions. 

B.S., Shippensburg State College, 1972; M.Ed., Western Maryland, 1978. 

116 



GERALD I. PETROFES, 1963-; Associate Professor of Physical Education; 
Director of Intramurals. Golf Coach; Wrestling Coach; B.S., Kent State 
University, 1958; M.A., Kent State University, 1962. 

O. KENT REED, 1971 -; Associate Professor of Physical Education; Chair- 
man, Department of Physical Ed.; Head Coach, Men's Track and Field; 
Head Coach, Men's and Women's Cross-Country. B.S., Otterbein 
College, 1956; M.A. Eastern Kentucky University, 1970. 

FRANK REICH, 1986-; Assistant Football Coach. B.S., Pennsylvania State 
University, 1956. 

LOUIS A. SORRENTINO, 1971 -; Football Coach. B.A., Lebanon Valley 
College, 1954; M.A., Bucknell University, 1961. 

ED SPITTLE, 1985-; Baseball Coach. 

lAMES E. STARK, 1986-; Athletic Trainer. B.S., Lock Haven State Univer- 
sity, 1983; M.Ed., Shippensburg State University, 1986. 

FRANK TAVANl, 1986-; Director of Alumni Relations and Parent Programs, 
Assistant Football Coach. A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1976. 

KATHLEEN TIERNEY, 1983-; Head Coach, Women's Softball and Field 
Hockey. B.S., University of New York at Brockport, 1979. 



Faculty 

Emeriti 

lAMES O. BEMESDERFER, 1959-1976; Chaplain Emeritus. A.B., Lebanon 
Valley College, 1936; M.Div., United Theological Seminary, 1939; S.T.M., 
Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, 1945; S.T.D., Temple 
University, 1951. 

RUTH ENGLE BENDER, 1918-1922; 1924- 1970; Professor Emerita of 
Music Education. A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1915; Oberlin Conserva- 
tory; graduate New England Conservatory. 

D. CLARK CARMEAN, 1933- 1972; Director Emeritus of Admissions. A.B., 
Ohio Wesleyan University, 1926; M.A., Columbia University, 1932. 

CHARLES T. COOPER, 1965-1979; Associate Professor Emeritus of Span- 
ish. B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, 1942; M.A., Middleburg College, 1965. 

HILDA M. DAMUS, 1963- 1976; Professor Emerita of German. M.A., 
University Berlin and lena, 1932; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1945. 

ROBERT S. DAVIDON, 1970-1984; Professor Emeritus of Psychology, 
1985. A.B., University of Illinois, 1940; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1946; Ph.D., 1951. 

117 



CARL Y. EHRHART, 1947-1983; Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and 

Dean Emeritus. A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1940; M.Div., United 

Theological Seminary, 1943; Ph.D., Yale University, 1954. 
ALEX 1. FEHR, 1951-1982; Professor Emeritus of Political Science. A.B., 

Lebanon Valley College, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1957; Ph.D., 

Syracuse University, 1968. 
GLADYS M. PENCIL, 1921-1927; 1929- 1965. Registrar Emerita. A.B., 

Lebanon Valley College, 1921. 
DONALD E. FIELDS, 1928-1930; 1947-1970: Librarian Emeritus. A.B., 

Lebanon Valley College, 1924; M.S., Princeton University, 1928; Ph.D., 

University of Chicago, 1935; A.B. in Library Science, University of 

Michigan, 1947. 
ELIZABETH M. GEFFEN, 1958-1983; Professor Emerita of History. B.S. in 

Ed., University of Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., 1958. 
lUNE EBY HERR, 1959-1980; Associate Professor Emerita of Elementary 

Education. B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1943; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania 

State University, 1954. 
THOMAS A. LANESE, 1954- 1978; Associate Professor Emeritus of 

Strings, Conducting, and Theory. B.Mus., Baldwin-Wallace College, 

1938; Fellowship, luilliard Graduate School; M.Mus., Manhattan School 

of Music, 1952. 
lEAN O. LOVE, 1954-1985; Professor Emerita of Psychology. A.B., 

Erskine College, 1941; M.A., Winthrop College, 1949; Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina, 1953. 
ANNA D. FABER MCVAY, 1954-1976; Professor Emerita of English. A.B. 

Lebanon Valley College, 1948; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1950; 

Ph.D. 1954. 
HOWARD A. NEIDIG, 1948-1985; Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. B.S., 

Lebanon Valley College, 1943; M.S., University of Delaware, 1946; Ph.D., 

1948. 
SARA ELIZABETH PIEL, 1960-1975; Professor Emerita of Languages. 

A.B., Chatham College, 1928; M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1929; 

Ph.D., 1938. 
lACOB L. RHODES, 1957-1985; Professor Emeritus of Physics. B.S., 

Lebanon Valley College, 1943; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1958. 
ROBERT C. RILEY, 1951 - 1986; Professor Emeritus, Economics and 

Business Administration; Vice President and Controller, Emeritus; Con- 
sultant for Grants. B.S. in Ed., Shippensburg State College, 1 94 1 ; M.S., 

Columbia University, 1947; Ph.D., New York University, 1962; C.P.M., 

1976. 



MALIN Ph. SAYLOR, 1961 - 1980; Professor Emerita of French, 1985. Fil. 

Kand., Universities of Upsala and Stockholm, 1938. 
RALPH S. SHAY, 1948-1951; 1953- 1984; Professor Emeritus of History 

and Assistant Dean Emeritus. A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1942; A.M., 

University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ph.D., 1962. 
ROBERT W. SMITH, 1951-1983; Professor Emeritus of Music. B.S., 

Lebanon Valley College, 1939; M.A., Columbia University, 1950. 
GEORGE G. STRUBLE, 1931-1970; Professor Emeritus of English. B.S. in 

Ed., University of Kansas, 1922; M.S. in Ed. 1925; Ph.D., University of 

Wisconsin, 1931. 
lAMES M. THURMOND, 1954-1979; Professor Emeritus of Music Educa- 
tion and Brass. Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music, 1931; A.B., American 

University, 1951; M.A., Catholic University, 1952; Mus.D., Washington 

College of Music, 1944. 
L. ELBERT WETHINGTON, 1963- 1983; Professor Emeritus of Religion. 

B.A., Wake Forest, 1944; B.D., Divinity School of Duke University, 1947; 

Ph.D., Duke University, 1949. 

Active 

MADELYN ). ALBRECHT, 1973-; Associate Professor of Education. B.A., 
Northern Baptist College, 1952; M.A., Michigan State University, 1958; 
Ph.D., 1972. 

MIRZA W. ALl, 1984-; Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences. B.A., 
University of Rajshahi, 1967; M.A., University of Rajshahi, 1968; M.Sc, 
University of British Columbia, Canada, 1978; Ph.D., State University of 
New York at Albany, 1984. 

DONNA ANDERSON, 1986-; Assistant Professor of Economics; B.S., 
Lehigh University, 1981; M.A., University of Colorado, 1985. 

RICHARD ARNOLD, 1984-; Assistant Professor of Management. B.S., 
Bucknell University, 1963; M.B.A., 1980; C.P.A., Pennsylvania, 1984. 

SHARON ARNOLD, 1 986-; Associate Professor of Sociology and Hospi- 
tality Programs; B.A., University of Akron, 1964; M.A., 1967. 

RICHARD C. BELL, 1 966-; Assistant Professor of Chemistry. B.S., Lebanon 
Valley College, 1941; M.Ed., Temple University, 1955. 

PHILIP A. BILLINGS, 1970-; Professor of English. B.A., Heidelberg College, 
1965; M.A., Michigan State University, 1967; Ph.D., 1974. 

lAMES H. BROUSSARD, 1983-; Associate Professor of History; Chairman 
of the Department of History and Political Science. A.B., Harvard 
University, 1963; M.A., Duke University, 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 



119 



DONALD EUGENE BROWN, 1983-; Associate Professor of Political 

Science. B.S., Western Illinois University, 1969; M.A., State University of 

New York at Binghamton, 1973; Ph.D., 1982. 
DONALD E. BYRNE, |R. , 1 97 1 - ; Professor of Religion; Chairman of the 

Department of Religion and Philosophy. B.A., St. Paul Seminary, 1963; 

M.A., Marquette University, 1966; Ph.D., Duke University, 1972. 
VOORHIS C. CANTRELL, 1968-; Professor of Religion and Greek. B.A., 

Oklahoma City University, 1952; B.D., Southern Methodist University, 

1956; Ph.D., Boston University, 1967. 
SHARON CLARK, 1986-; Assistant Professor of Management. B.A., 

University of Richmond, 1969; I.D., 1971. 
ROBERT A. CLAY, 1978-; Associate Professor of Sociology and Chairman 

of the Department of Sociology and Social Service. A.B., St. Mary's 

Seminary and University, 1962; S.T.B., Pontifical Gregorian University, 

1964; M.A., Cornell University, 1974; Ph.D., 1982. 
RICHARD D. CORNELIUS, 1985-; Professor of Chemistry; Chairman of the 

Department of Chemistry. B.A., Carleton College, 1969; Ph.D., University 

of Iowa, 1974. 
DENNIS CREEDEN, 1986-; Instructor of Management. B.S., Pennsylvania 

State University; M.S., 1975; M.B.A., 1976. 
SALVATORE CULLARI, 1986-; Assistant Professor of Psychology. B.A., 

Kean College, 1974; M. A., Western Michigan University, 1976; Ph.D., 1981. 
GEORGE D. CURFMAN, 1961 -; Professor of Music. B.S.. Lebanon Valley 

College, 1953; M.M., University of Michigan, 1957; D.Ed., Pennsylvania 

State University, 1971. 
DONALD B. DAHLBERG, 1980-; Associate Professor of Chemistry. B.S., 

University of Washington, 1967; M.S., Cornell University, 1969; Ph.D., 1971. 
BARBARA I. DENISON, 1986-; Assistant Professor of Sociology. B.A., 

Lebanon Valley College, 1979; M.A., University of York, 1981; Ph.D., 

Northwestern University, 1985. 
SCOTT H. EGGERT, 1983-; Assistant Professor of Music. B.F.A., University 

of Wisconsin (Milwaukee), 1971; M.A., University of Chicago, 1974; 

D.M.A., University of Kansas, 1982. 
VIRGINIA E. ENGLEBRIGHT, 1 97 1 - ; Assistant Professor of Music. B.M.E., 

Florida State University, 1969; M.M., 1970. 
DALE 1. ERSKINE, 1983-; Assistant Professor of Biology. B.A., University 

of Maine at Portland, 1974; M.A., SUNY College at Buffalo, 1976; Ph.D., 

University of Oklahoma, 1981. 
WILLIAM H. FAIRLAMB, 1947-; Associate Professor of Music. Mus.B., cum 

laude, Philadelphia Conservatory, 1949. 

20 



ARTHUR L. FORD, 1965-; Professor of English; Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of English. A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1959; M.A., Bowling 

Green State University, I960; Ph.D., 1964. 
MICHAEL D. FRY, 1983-; Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences. 

B.A., Immaculate Heart College, 1975; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1980. 
PIERCE A. GETZ, 1959- ; Professor of Music. B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 

1951; M.S.M., Union Theological Seminary School of Sacred Music, 

1953; A.M.D., Eastman School of Music, 1967. 
MICHAEL A. GRELLA, 1980-; Associate Professor of Education; Chairman 

of the Department of Education. B.A., St. Mary's College, 1958; M.A., 

West Virginia University, 1970; Ed.D., 1974. 
KLEMENT M. HAMBOURG, 1982-; Associate Professor of Music. A.T.C.M., 

Royal Conservatory of Music, 1946; L.R.A.M., Royal Academy of Music, 

1962; A.R.C.M., Royal College of Music, 1962; L.T.C.L., Trinity College of 

Music (London), 1965; Fellow, 1966; D.M.A., University of Oregon, 1977. 
CAROLYN R. HANES, 1977-; Associate Professor of Sociology and Social 

Service; Chairman of the Department of Sociology. B.A., Central Michigan 

University, 1969; M.A., University of New Hampshire, 1973; Ph.D., 1976. 
BRYAN V. HEARSEY, 1971 -; Professor of Mathematical Sciences. B.A., 

Western Washington State College, 1964; M.A., Washington State 

University, 1966; Ph.D., 1968. 
ROBERT H. HEARSON, 1986-; Assistant Professor of Music. B. Music, 

University of Iowa, 1964; M.A., 1965; Ed.D., University of Illinois, 1983. 
ALAN G. HEFFNER, 1980-; Associate Professor of Management, Chairman 

of the Department of Management. B.A., Sonoma State College, 1970; 

M.A., California State University at Chico, 1973; Ph.D., Purdue University, 

1976; M.B.A., York College of Pennsylvania, 1983. 
lOHN H. HEFFNER, 1972-; Professor of Philosophy. B.S., Lebanon Valley 

College, 1968; A.M., Boston University, 1971; Ph.D., 1976. 
BARRY L. HURST, 1982-; Assistant Professor Physics. Chairman of the 

Department, B.S., luniata College, 1972; Ph.D., University of Delaware, 

1982. 
DIANE M. IGLESIAS, 1976-; Professor of Spanish; Chairman of the 

Department of Foreign Languages. B.A., Queens College, 1971; M.A., 

1974; Ph.D., 1979. 
RICHARD A. ISKOWITZ, 1 969-; Associate Professor of Art; Chairman of 

the Department of Art. B.F.A., Kent State University, 1965; M.F.A., 1967. 
RICHARD A. lOYCE, 1966-; Assistant Professor of History. A.B., Yale 

University, 1952; M.A., San Francisco State College, 1963. 
lOHN P. KEARNEY, 1971 -; Professor of English. B.A., St. Benedict's 



121 



College, 1962; M.A., University of Michigan, 1963; Ph.D., University of 

Wisconsin, 1968. 
DAVID 1. LASKY, 1974-; Professor of Psychology; Chairman of the De- 
partment of Psychology. A.B., Temple University, 1956; M.A., 1958; 

Ph.D., 1961. 
ROBERT C. LAU, 1968-; Professor of Music; Chairman of the Department 

of Music. B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1965; M.A., Eastman School of 

Music, 1970; Ph.D., Catholic University, 1979. 
LEON E. MARKOWICZ, 1971 -; Professor of English. A.B., Duquesne 

University, 1964; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1968; Ph.D., 1972. 
lOERG W. P. MAYER, 1970-; Professor of Mathematical Sciences. Dipl. 

Math., University of Giessen, 1953; Ph.D., 1954. 
OWEN A. MOE, IR., 1973-; Associate Professor of Chemistry. B.A., St. 

Olaf's College, 1966; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1971. 
PHILIP G. MORGAN, 1969-; Assistant Professor of Music. B.M.E., Kansas 

State College, 1962; M.S., 1965. 
lOHN D. NORTON, 1971 -; Professor of Political Science. B.A., University 

of Illinois, 1965; M.A., Florida State University, 1967; Ph.D., American 

University, 1973. 
AGNES B. O'DONNELL, 1961 -; Professor of English. A.B., Immaculata 

College, 1948; M.Ed., Temple University, 1952; M.A., University of 

Pennsylvania, 1967; Ph.D., 1976. 
1. ROBERT O'DONNELL, 1959-; Associate Professor of Physics. B.S., The 

Pennsylvania State University, 1950; M.S., University of Delaware, 1953. 
DWIGHT PAGE, 1982-; Assistant Professor of French and German. B.A., 

Davidson College, 1975; M.A., Harvard University, 1976; Ph.D., 1981. 
GERALD 1. PETROFES, 1963-; Associate Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S., Kent State University, 1958; M.Ed., 1962. 
SIDNEY POLLACK, 1976-; Associate Professor of Biology. B.A., New York 

University, 1963; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1970. 
O. KENT REED, 1971 -; Associate Professor of Physical Education; Chair- 
man of the Department of Physical Education. B.S., in Ed., Otterbein 

College, 1956; M.A., in Ed., Eastern Kentucky University, 1970. 
KEVIN C. REIDY, 1981 -; Instructor in Management. B.A., Gettysburg 

College, 1975; I.D., SUNY at Buffalo, 1978. 
C. ROBERT ROSE, 1981 -; Associate Professor of Music. B.M.Ed., Southern 

Illinois University, 1964; M.M., 1966; D.M., Indiana University, 1978. 
RONALD I. RUSZCZYK, 1987-; Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., SUNY at Buffalo, 1978; B.A., SUNY at Buffalo, 1979; Ph.D., SUNY at 

Buffalo, 1985. 

22 



GAIL SANDERSON, 1983-; Assistant Professor of Accounting. B.A., Ho- 

bart and William Smith Colleges, 1970; M.B.A., Boston University, 1977. 
JAMES W. SCOTT, 1976- ; Professor of German. B.A., luniata College, 

1965; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1971. 
DAVID S. SEITZ, 1981 -; Assistant Professor of Accounting and Manage- 
ment, B.S., University of Delaware, 1957; B.S., York College of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1977;M.B.A., 1980. 
lULlE SURfS, 1983-; Instructor in Spanish and French. B.A., University of 

Minnesota, 1969; M.A., 1971. 
DENNIS W. SWEIGART, 1972-; Associate Professor of Music. B.S., 

Lebanon Valley College, 1963; M.M., University of Michigan, 1965; 

D.M.A., University of Iowa, 1977. 
WARREN K. A. THOMPSON, 1967-; Associate Professor of Philosophy 

and Director of Leadership Programs. A.B., Trinity University, 1957; 

M.A., University of Texas, 1963. 
C. F. lOSEPHTOM, 1954-; Professor of Economics. B.A., Hastings College, 

1944; M.A., University of Chicago, 1947; Ph.D., 1963. 
HORACE W. TOUSLEY, 1981 -; Assistant Professor of Mathematical 

Sciences; Chairman of the Department of Mathematical Sciences. A.B., 

Ripon College, 1951; M.S., University of Alabama, 1970. 
MARK A. TOWNSEND, 1983-; Assistant Professor of Mathematics. B.S., 

Bethany Nazarene College, 1965; M.A., Oklahoma University, 1969; 

Ed.D., Oklahoma State University, 1983. 
PERRY J. TROUTMAN, I960-; Professor of Religion. B.A., Houghton 

College, 1949; M.Div., United Theological Seminary, 1952; Ph.D., Boston 

University, 1964. 
SUSAN E. VERHOEK, 1974-; Professor of Biology. B.A., Ohio Wesleyan 

University, 1964; M.A., Indiana University, 1966; Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1975. 
THOMAS VILBERG, 1 986-; Assistant Professor of Psychology. B.S., 

University of Wisconsin, 1972; M.S., North Dakota State University, 

1974; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University, 1979. 
STEPHEN E. WILLIAMS, 1973-; Professor of Biology. B.A., Central 

College, 1964; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1966; Ph.D., Washington 

University, 1971. 
PAUL L. WOLF, 1966-; Professor of Biology; Chairman of the Department 

of Biology. B.S., Elizabethtown College, I960; M.S., University of 

Delaware, 1963; Ph.D., 1968. 
ALLAN F. WOLFE, 1968-; Professor of Biology. B.A., Gettysburg College, 

1963; M.A., Drake University, 1965; University of Vermont, 1968. 



123 



GLENN H. WOODS, 1965-; Associate Professor of English. A.B., Lebanon 
Valley College, 1951; M.Ed., Temple University, 1962. 



Adjunct in Music Department 

DAVID V. BILGER, 1974-; Adjunct Instructor in Music. B.M., Ithaca 

College, 1967. 
TERESA M. BOWERS, 1978-; Adjunct Instructor in Music. B.M., Susque- 
hanna University, 1973; M.S., Ohio State University, 1974. 
ERWIN P. CHANDLER, 1978-; Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music. B.S., 

Ithaca College, 1966; M.M., Indiana University, 1971. 
lAMES A. ERDMAN, II, 1983-; Adjunct Instructor in Music. 
lAMES R. KLOCK, 1981 -; Adjunct Instructor in Music. B.M., West Virginia 

University, 1979. 
NEVELYN 1. KNISLEY, 1954-1958; 1963; 1 970 -; Adjunct Associate 

Professor of Music. Mus B., Oberlin Conservatory of Music, 1951; M.F.A., 

Ohio University, 1953. 
STEPHEN G. LAVENDER, 1985-; Adjunct Instructor in Music. B.A., 

Castleton State College, 1978. 
lUDITH M. McLEAN, 1986-; Adjunct Instructor in Music, B.A., Marshall 

University, 1964. 
ROBERT T. MEASHEY, 1980-; Adjunct Instructor in Music. B.A., Lebanon 

Valley College, 1977. 
SUZANNE CALDWELL RIEHL, 1982-; Adjunct Instructor in Music and 

Director of Preparatory Music. B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1979; 

M.M., Westminster Choir College, 1982. 
DAVID STAFFORD, 1981 -; Adjunct Instructor in Music. B.M., Combs 

College of Music, 1967. 



Adjunct in Hospitality Management 

LARRY R. ALBRIGHT, 1 986-; Adjunct Instructor in Food Service Adminis- 
tration. A.D.S., Culinary Institute of America, 1966. 

BARRY L. MARCH, 1985-; Adjunct Instructor in Hotel Administration; 
B.A., Millersville University, 1980. 

THOMAS MILLER, 1986-; Adjunct Instructor in Hotel Administration; 
B.A., Dickinson College, 1966. 

DIANE NICHTER, 1986-; Adjunct Instructor in Travel Administration. 

124 



DONALD C. PAPSON, 1 985-; Adjunct Assistant Professor in Hotel 

Administration; B.A., Gettysburg College, 1974; M.A., Cornell University, 

1976. 
JAMES P. SCHALL, 1985-; Adjunct Associate Professor of Food Service 

Administration; B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1955; M.B.A., 

Indiana University, 1968. 
THOMAS P. WRIGHT, 1 985-; Adjunct Associate Professor of Travel 

Administration. 

Faculty and Administrative Staff Support 

CHARLES R. BEAMESDERFER, Science Center 

HELEN S. BECHTEL, Library 

MARILYN E. BOESHORE, Alumni Office 

ELIZABETH J. DAY, 125th Anniversary Campaign Office 

NAOMI R. EMERICH, Development Office 

BEVERLY J. GAMBLE, Music Department 

DORIS L. GERLACH, Library 

JOYCE A. GUERRISI, Registrar's Office 

WENDY JO HALDEMAN, Athletic Department 

JOANN Y. HAUER, Registrar's Office 

MARY E. HERVEY, English, Foreign Language Departments 

DONALD R. HIRNEISEN, Printer 

CHRISTINE M. HOPPLE, Library 

JOANNE I. HUTTON, Admissions Office 

DOROTHY 1. KLINE, Registrar's Office 

ANNMARIE L. LIGHTNER, Institutional Advancement Office 

MARK M. MANNO, Mail Services 

CAROL A. MAYA, Business Office 

KAREN R. McLUCAS, Admissions Office 

H. GRACE MORRISSEY, Chaplain's Office; Religion, Philosophy Departments 

GWENDOLYN W. PIERCE, Vice President and Controller's Office 

CHARLOTTE J. RITTLE, Management Department 

SALLY A. RIVERA, Biology, Psychology, Sociology Departments 

MARIAN C. ROGERS, Assistant to the Dean of Continuing Education 

ANITA Y. SAUERWEIN, Financial Aid Office 

CAROL L. SCHAAK, Vice President of Student Affairs/Dean of Students 

Office 
PATRICIA A. SCHOOLS, Career Planning and Placement Office 
JACQUELINE F. SHOWERS, Telephone Console Attendant 

125 



REBECCA L. SHOWERS, Business Office 

BARBARA A. SMITH, Vice President and Dean of the Faculty Office 

TAMMY L. STEELE, Dean of Continuing Education Office 

LINDA L. SUMMERS, College Store 

BERNICE K. TEAHL, Physics, Chemistry, Art Departments 

BONNIE C. TENNEY, Buildings & Grounds Office 

lUNE S. ZEITERS, Student Activities Office 



126 



INDEX 



Academic 

advising 16 

calendar 4,5,6 

disinonesty 23 

dismissal 24 

honors 22 

probation 23 

procedures 14,15 

programs 27 

regulations 14 

Accounting 

certificate program 11 

course descriptions 66,67,68 

Accreditation 9 

Actuarial science, course descriptions .... 76 

Adjunct faculty directory 1 24 

Admissions 

application procedure 9,10 

early decision policy 10 

fiigfi schiool preparation for 9 

Office 10 

Administration directory 112 

Advanced placement 20 

Advisors 16 

Affiliation, churcfi 9 

Allied healtfi sciences 35 

American College Tests 10 

American University, Tfie (Washington, 

D.C.) 26 

Application 

fee 9 

form 9 

Art 

course descriptions 33 

department of 33 

Athletic directory 116 

Audit (AU, grade of) 18 

Auditing courses 

registration procedure 18 

Baccalaureate degrees conferred 14 

Banking 

certificate program 11 

Biochemistry 

course descriptions 34 

department of 34 

Biology 

course descriptions 36-39 

department of 34,35 

Board of Trustees 8,9 

Board of Trustees directory 108 



Business computing 
certificate program 11 

Business Office 12 

Calendar, academic 

1986-1987 4 

1987-1988 5 

1988-1989 6 

Certificate programs 11 

Challenge examinations 19 

Chemistry 

course descriptions 40-42 

department of 39 

Christian education 100-104 

Class 

attendance 19 

standing 16 

College Level Examination Programs 

(CLEP) 20 

Computer science, course 

descriptions 77,78 

Continuing Education 10,1 1 

Courses 

auditing 18 

concurrent. 18 

repetition of 18 

description of 33-107 

Credit 

challenge exams 19,20 

for life experience 21 

hours 15 

transfer 17 

Criminal justice 106 

Cytotechnology 35 

Dean of the Faculty 23,24,26 

Dean's List 22 

Degrees 
conferred at Lebanon Valley College ... 14 

Dental hygiene 35 

Diagnostic medical sonography 35 

Directory 

administration 112-117 

athletic staff 116,117 

Board of Trustees 108- 1 1 2 

faculty 117-126 

adjunct faculty 1 24, 1 25 

staff support 1 25, 1 26 

Discontinuance of courses 17 

Dishonesty, academic 23 

Dismissal from College 24 

Duke University 35 



127 



Early Decision 

admissions policy 10 

Economics, course descriptions 71,72 

Education 
Christian, course descriptions ... 102-104 

department of i 00 

elementary, course descriptions . . . 43-45 

music, course descriptions 83-87 

physical, course descriptions 91 

secondary, course descriptions 45 

Elementary education 42 

Engineering, cooperative program 92 

English 

course descriptions 47-49 

department of 47 

Environmental studies, forestry and 35 

Evening School II 

Extension classes. University Center at 

Harrisburg 11 

Faculty directory 1 1 9 - 1 24 

adjunct 124-125 

Family Rights and Privacy Act of 1 974 .... 15 

Fees 9,10 

Finances, student 12 

Financial Aid Office 12 

Food service administration 

course descriptions 61,62 

Foreign Languages 

department of 49,50 

French 50,51 

German 51-53 

Greek 53 

Latin 53 

Spanish 54,55 

Foreign studies 26 

Forestry and environmental studies 35 

French, course descriptions 50,51 

General education 

course descriptions 28,29 

program 27 

requirements 27,28 

General studies, department of 55 

Geography, course descriptions 46 

German, course descriptions 51-53 

Germantown Metropolitan Semester . . 25,26 

Gerontology 1 04 

Governance 9 

Grade point average 21,22 

Grading 

policy 16 

systems 21,22 

Graduation 

honors 22 



Graduation (continued) 
requirements for 15,16 

Greek, course descriptions 53 

Health care professionals, major in 

administration 56 

Health professions 56,57 

History and political science 

course descriptions 58-61 

department of 57 

Honors 

courses 31 

departmental 32 

graduation requirements 32 

independent study 31,32 

program 30,31 

seminars 31 

Hospitality programs 61 

Food service administration 61 

Hotel administration 62 

Travel administration 64 

Hotel administration, course 

descriptions 63 

Human Resources 
certificate program II 

International business 65 

Introduction 7 

Latin, course descriptions 53 

Management 

certificate program 11 

course descriptions 68-7 1 

department of 65-66 

Marketing 
certificate program II 

Mathematical sciences 

course descriptions 74-78 

department of 72-74 

Mathematics, course descriptions .... 74-76 

Medical technology 36 

Metropolitan Collegiate Center of 

Germantown 25,26 

Military Science 78-80 

course descriptions 80 

Morphology 35 

Music 

appreciation 88,89 

conducting 89 

course descriptions 83-90 

department of 81 ,82 

education 81 -82 

history 88 

individual instruction 89-90 

instrumental 86-87 

organizations 87-88 



128 



Music {continued) 

performance 81 

recitals, student 91 

sacred 8! 

sound recording technology 83 

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical 

Laboratory Sciences 36 

National Association of Schools 

of Music 81 

Non-matriculated students 25 

Nuclear medicine technology 36 

Nursing 35 

Occupational therapy 35 

Off-campus programs 

Germantown 25, 26 

Study abroad 26 

Washington semester 26 

Pass/fail 18 

Philosophy 

course descriptions 101, 102 

department of 1 00 

Physical education 

course descriptions 91 

department of 91 

Physical therapy 35 

Physics 

course descriptions 93-95 

department of 92 

Physiology 35 

Political science 59-61 

Probation, academic 23 

Programs 

academic 27 

Allied Health Sciences 35, 36 

certificate 11 

cooperative 35 

engineering 92, 93 

general education 27 

honors 30-32 

off-campus 25 

pre-professional 56, 57 

Psychobiology 

course descriptions 95, 96 

department of 95 

Psychology 

course descriptions 97-100 

department of 96, 97 

Public relations 

certificate program 11 

Radiologic technology 35 

Reading and study skills 46, 47 

Readmission to College 24 

Recitals, student 91 



11, 16, 17, 18, 22, 24, 



Refund policy . 

Registrar 

Registration 

of courses . . 

change of 17 

Religion 

course descriptions 102- 

department of 

Repetition of courses 

Rules and regulations 

Schedules 

Scholastic Aptitude Test 9 

Secondary education 43- 

Serviceman's Opportunity Colleges 

(SOC) 

Social Service 

course descriptions 

department of 104, 

Sociology 

course descriptions 105, 

department of 104, 

Sound recording technology 83- 

Spanish, course descriptions 54 

Special programs 10 

Statement of Purpose 

Student records, privacy of 

Student recitals 

Student services 

Study abroad 

Study skills, reading and 46 

Summer sessions 

Suspension 23 

Teacher certification 

for non-matriculated students 

Thanatology 

Thomas lefferson University 35 

Transcripts 

Transfer 

credit 

procedures 

Travel administration 

course descriptions 64, 

United Methodist Church 

University Center at Harris- 
burg 10, 11, 16, 

Veterans' services 24, 

Vice President for Student Affairs .... 13, 

Washington semester 

Weekend College 

Withdrawal 

from the College 

from course 17, 

of course by College 



12 
25 



17 
, 18 

104 

100 

18 

14 

16 

, 10 

-46 

25 

107 
105 

106 
105 
-91 
, 55 

, 11 



15 
91 
13 
26 

,47 
11 

, 24 

25 
104 
, 36 

24 

17 
16 

,65 
. 9 



19 
25 
23 
26 
11 

24 
18 
17 



129 








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Lebanon 

Valley 

College 




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Administration Building (Controller, History & Political Science, Management, 
Mathematical Sciences, Registrar) 

Allan W. Mund College Center « 

Arnold Field 

Art Studio 

Blair Music Center (Education, Music) 

Bollinger Plaza (South Entrance) 

Carnegie Building (Admissions, Financial Aid) 

Centre Hall 

English House (112 College Avenue) 

Fencil Building (Conference Center) 

Foreign Language House (104 College Avenue) 

Funkhouser Hall 

Garber Science Center (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, Sociology) 

Gossard Memorial Library (Computer Center) 

Hammond Hall 

Health Center 

Heating Plant 

Keister Hall 

Laughlin Hall 

Lynch Memorial Gymnasium 

Maintenance Annex 

Maintenance Center and Special Services (Security) Office 

Mary Capp Green Hall 

Miller Chapel (Chaplain, Philosophy, Religion) 

North College 

Silver Hall 

United Methodist Church 

Vickroy Hall 

Wagner House (124 College Avenue) 




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