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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog: Summer School Bulletin"


LEBANON VALLEY 
■ COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



SUMMER SCHOOL ISSUE 



1955 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



Summer Session Catalogue 

1955 

Calendar 

Tune 13 Registration 

fune 14 Classes Convene 

September 2 Closing Date 

Students may register for the twelve weeks' Summer Session 
or for the first six weeks or the last six weeks only. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE BULLETIN 

VOLUME XLIII MARCH, 1955 NUMBER 3 

ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



Carl Y. Ehrhart, Editor; George G. Struble, Chairman, Publications 
Committee 



Published during the months of January, February, March, April, May, Aug., Oct., 
November, by Lebanon Valley College, Annville, Pa. Entered as second class mat- 
ter at th© Post Office at Annville, Pa., under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

Faculty 

SUMMER SESSION 



FREDERIC K. MILLER, Ph.D. 
President 

HOWARD M. KREITZER, D.Ed. 
Dean of the College 

CARL Y, EHRHART, Ph.D. 

Director of Summer School 

Professor of Philosophy 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE, Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

ALVIN H. M. STONECIPHER, Ph.D. 
Professor of German 

MAUD P. LAUGHLIN, M.A. 
Professor of History 

LUELLA UMBERGER FRANK 
Assistant Professor of French and Spanish 

HOWARD A. NEIDIG, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

GILBERT D. McKLVEEN, D.Ed. 
Professor of Education 

O. P. BOLLINGER, M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

W. MAYNARD SPARKS, B.D., Ed.M., D.D. 
Assistant Professor of Religion 

FRANCES T. FIELDS, A.B. 
Instructor in Spanish 

ROBERT C. RILEY, M.S. 
Associate Professor of Economics and Business 

ROBERT O. GILMORE, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

BARNARD H. BISSINGER, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics and Physics 

CLOYD H. EBERSOLE, D.Ed. 
Assistant Professor of Elementary Education 

ANNA B. DUNKLE, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of English 

MARY VIRGINIA BOWMAN, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of English 

JEAN O. LOVE, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 

JAMES M. THURMOND, M.A., Mus.D. 
Assistant Professor of Music Education 

—2— 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



Lebanon Valley College will offer in 1955 a twelve weeks' summer session, 
designed to meet the needs of those who desire an accelerated college course, 
cultural improvement, or teacher certification. 

Courses which carry eight hours credit (such as Science or combinations of 
mathematics courses) will begin on June 13 and continue for eight weeks, ending 
on August 5. An additional course may be taken during the second six weeks 
period. All courses, unless otherwise designated, are given three hours credit. 

The College reserves the right to withdraw any course for which there is insuf- 
ficient enrollment. 



REGISTRATION 

Registration by mail in advance of the opening date of the session is urged. 
The blank for this purpose is provided at the end of the Bulletin. 



CREDITS 

Credits will be issued to all students showing the courses attended, grades, 
and number of semester hours credit. Courses taken during the Summer Session 
are credited toward the college degrees. One hundred and twenty-six semester 
hours of academic credits ore required for the bachelor degrees. For complete 
information concerning the requirements for degrees the candidate should refer 
to the college catalogue or write to the Registrar. 



VETERANS 

All veterans planning on entering Lebanon Valley College, who are eligible 
for educational training benefits under the Servicemen's Readjustment Act (Public 
Law 346, or Public Law 550, and Public Low 16), should make arrangements in 
advance of entrance date to secure a Certificate of Eligibiltiy and Entitlement from 
the local Veteran's Administration Office, or from the business office at the College. 



EXPENSES 

A registration fee of $1.00 is charged each student. 

The tuition fee is $15.00 per semester hour credit. 

In certain courses, incidental fees ore charged. See specific course offerings 
for amounts of laboratory and other fees. 

A student teaching fee of $40.00 will be charged for Education S40. 

The charge for private lessons in instrumental or vocal music will be at the 
rate of $40.00 per semester, or at the rate of $2.50 per half hour lesson. 

A library and activity fee of $2.00 will be charged and will be used for 
the library and for the promotion of student activities. 

The fees are payable at the time of registration as a condition cf admission 
to classes. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES OF STUDY 

Lebanon Valley College offers seven courses of study leading to the Bacca - 
laureate degree: 

(1) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 

(2) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

(3) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Chemistry. 

(4) A course in Music Education leading to a degree of Bachelor of Science. 

(5) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Medical Tech- 
nology. 

(6) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

(7) A co-operative course in Forestry leading to a Master of Forestry degree 
from Duke University. 

The total number of credits required of candidates for these degrees, is in 
each case, 126 semester hours of academic credits and 4 in physical education. 

Candidates for degrees must also obtain a minimum of 130 quality points, 
computed as follows: for a grade of A, 3 points for each credit hour; for a grade of 
B, 2 points for each credit hour; for a grade of C, 1 point for each credit hour. 
No quality credit will be given for a grade of D. A grade of F shall entail a loss 
of 1 quality credit point per credit hour. 

As part of this total requirement, every candidate must present at least 24 
semester hours in one department (to be known as his Major), and at least 18 
semester hours in another department (to be known as his Minor). Both Major 
and Minor must be selected not later than the beginning of the Junior year, the 
Minor to be suitably related to the Major, and chosen with the advice and 
approval of the Head of the Major department. Majors in education must have 
two Minors. 

The A.B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the requirements for a 
Major in the following departments: English, French, German, Greek, History, 
Latin, Mathematics (Arts option). Political Science, Religion, Sociology, Spanish, 
Philosophy, and Psychology. The B.S. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling 
the requirements for a Major in the following departments: Biology, Chemistry, 
Economics and Business, Education, Mathematics (Science option). Music Edu- 
cation, and Physics. 

Certain courses embodying the fundamentals of a liberal education are re- 
quired of all students. These courses which vary slightly according to the de- 
gree sought, are as follows: 

For the A.B. and B.S. degrees, except for the B.S. with major in Music Edu- 
cation 

Semester Hours 

English 10a — 10b (Composition) 6 

Foreign Language (above beginner's level) 6 

Integrated Studies 20 (Humanities) 8 

Integrated Studies 30 (Social Studies) 8 

History 24a— 24b (United States) 6 

Hygiene (Lectures for Freshmen) (No credit) 

Mathematics (required for B.S. degree only) 9 to 15 

Orientation (Lectures for Freshmen) (No credit) 

Physical Education 4 

Psychology 20 3 

Religion 10a— 10b or 11a— lib 4 

ReUgion 32, or Philosophy 31 2 or 3 

'Science (Biology 12, Chemistry 10, or Physics 20, 21) 8 

*A general education course in science is in preparation 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

SPECIAL REQUraEMENTS 

In addition to the General Requirements listed above some of the departments 

require students majoring therein to take certain additional courses in subjects 
closely related to the Major. 

Students outlining a course for a degree should communicate at once with 
the Head of the Department in which they intend to Major. 

Candidates for the Baccalaureate degree who desire to be admitted to 
advanced standing by virtue cf work done in other institutions, should lose no 
time in having their credits evaluated by the Dean of the College, in order that 
they may be informed as to what requirements they must meet for graduation. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

As a pre-requisite to the granting of all degrees the candidate must hove 
completed a minimum of 30 semester hours v/ork in regularly conducted classes 
on the college campus. Teachers in service may meet this requirement by attend- 
ing the Summer School and Evening classes held during the year at the college. 
Credits earned in extension classes are not residence credits. 



EXTENSION AND EVENING COURSES 

For many years Lebanon Valley College, through extension and evening 
courses, has enabled teachers, state employees, and others in active employment 
to attend college courses and secure academic degrees. Through these courses 
teachers may meet the certification requirements of the State Department in the 
secondary field. 

Extension courses are offered in the V/illiam Penn High School, 3rd and Divi- 
sion Streets, Harrisburg, evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 P. M. 

A limited number of classes will be held at the College in Annville. 
evenings from 6:30 to 8:15 P. M., and from 8:15 to 10:00 P. M. 

Students interested in extension and evening class work should write to 
Director of Auxiliary Schools for information. The Director, Carl Y. Ehrhart, will 
appreciate suggestions as to what courses may be desired. 



TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Numerous inquiries have been received concerning courses for teachers 
desirous of re-entering the profession and from teachers who wish to secure 
certification in additional fields. Most of the courses offered in the Summer Session 
will serve as refresher courses in addition to offering credit for certification. 

If there is a sufficient demand, additional courses will be offered. If the 
course in which you are interested is not listed in this Bulletin, write to the 
Director of the Summer School. 



-5- 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



BIOLOGY 

S28a-28b Botany. Mr. Bollinger 

Field studies of the summer flora. Designed especially for Pre-veterinary and 
Pre-medical students and those preparing to teach Biology in secondary schools 
and others interested in the study of plant life. 

Emphasis will be given plants known to cause or cure diseases in man or 
other animals. References will be assigned on local plants from which drugs are 
derived, their preparation and use. 

Each student will need Gray's Manual 7th edition. A plant press (optional) 
if a herbarium is desired, and clothing suitable for traveling thru trackless fields 
and mountains. Laboratory fee is $10.00 per semester. Eight semester hours credit. 

CHEMISTRY 

SI 2 General Inorganic Chemistry. 

A systematic study of fundamental principles and of the sources, properties, 
and uses of the important elements and compounds. Eight hours credit. Laboratory 
fee, $24.00. Breakage deposit, $5.00. 

S35 Laboratory Techniques. Mr. Neidig 

A course designed to introduce the student to advanced laboratory methods by 
the preparation and analysis of inorganic and organic compounds. One to four 
hours credit. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per credit hour. Breakage deposit, $10.00. 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 

548 Labor Problems. First six weeks. Mr. Riley 

The nature of the labor problem; the rise of industry and labor; the new tech- 
nology and the wage earner; unemployment; the problem of child and woman 
labor; industrial accidents; unemployment insurance; old age pensions; economic 
program of organized labor; industrial conflict; agencies of industrial peace; 
modern industrial policies; international control of labor relations. 

549 Personnel Administration and Industrial Management. 

First six weeks. Mr. Riley 

The nature and problems of business administration and management; per- 
sonnel policies and practices; techniques in organizing, planning, performance, 
supervision, budgeting, and control. Recruitment and training; employee evalua 
tion and placement; labor wage scales and turnover; factors of harmonious em- 
ployer-employee relations; efficiency records and incentives; time and motion 
study; work simplification; standards; office management. 

S45 Investments. First six weeks. Mr. Riley 

The development and place of investment in the field of business and its 
relation to other economic, legal, and social institutions. The fundamental princi- 

—6— 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

pies are presented along with a description of investment machinery. An analysis 
is made of the various classes of investments. 

EDUCATION 
S20 Introduction to Education. First six weeks. Mr. McKlveen 

An introduction to the field of education through the study of the American 
educational system, the place of the school in society, the training and function of 
the teacher. 

S40 Student Teaching. 

This course is designed to meet the minimum student teaching requirements for 
Pennsylvania certification in public school teaching on the secondary level. In addi- 
lion to the regular summer school tuition, a laboratory fee of $40.00 is charged. 
This course will be given in Hershey, Pa., starting Monday, June 13, and running 
for six weeks. 

Dr. Eugene Jacques, Supt. of Derry Township School, is the Director in charge 
of the Hershey program and is directly responsible to Lebanon Valley College. 
Mr. George D. Lange, the High School principal, and a selected corps of instructors 
from the same system act as Master Teachers. Six semester hours credit. 

S45 Visual and Sensory Techniques. First six weeks. Mr. McKlveen 

Psychological bases for sensory aids: use of apparatus; sources of equipment 
and supplies. Laboratory fee of $4.00. 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
S31 Teaching of Arithmetic. First six weeks. Mr. Ebersole 

This course presents the historical development of mathematics, the results of 
educational research in the field, and methods of teaching. It acquaints the student 
with the use of child psychology in the development of functional arithmetic, diag- 
nostic methods, and remedial instruction. 

S33 Teaching of Social Studies. First six weeks. Mr. Ebersole 

A study of the principles underlying the use of social studies in the elementary 
school, and desirable methods of teaching. 

S41 Teaching of Reading. First six weeks. Mr. Ebersole 

This course deals with the principles, problems, materials and techniques 
involved in teaching reading, speaking, listening, and writing in the elementary 
schools. 

ENGLISH 
SlOa-lOb English Composition. Mrs. Bowman, Mr. Struble 

First and second six weeks. 

—7 — 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

S20a-20b World Literature. Miss Dunkle, Mr. Struble 

First and second six weeks. 

A survey of outstanding pieces of literature of the various peoples of the 
world. This course, along with Ethics, meets the Humanities requirement for students 
in Extension and Evening programs. 

S21a American Literature: From the Beginnings to the Civil War. 

Second six weeks. Mr. Struble 

An attempt, through the study of native authors, to see in perspective the 
evolving American mind; to observe how Puritanism, the Cavalier spirit, and the 
Romantic Movement have contributed to making us what we are; and to under- 
stand the spiritual resources of which we are the heirs. 

S24 Contemporary American Literature. First six v/eeks. Mrs. Bowman 

A study of American thought as it is expressed in the literature produced in 
America since World War I. 

S30a Shakespeare. First six weeks. Miss Dunkle 

A survey of English drama from its beginnings to the time of Shakespeare, a 
study of the life and times of Shakespeare, and an analysis of Shakespearean 
comedy. 

S30b Shakespeare. Second six weeks. Mr. Struble 

A study of the Elizabethan stage and an analysis of Shakespearean tragedy. 

FRENCH 

SIO Intermediate French. First six weeks. Mrs. Frank 

This is a continuation and extension of the Elementary French course, and 
includes further drill in the principles of grammar, practice in conversation, compo- 
sition, and dictation, and more extensive reading. Prerequisite: French 1 or two 
years of high school French. 

GEOGRAPHY 

SlOa-lOb World Geography. First and second six weeks. Mrs. Laughlin 

The purpose of this basic course in geography is to develop a knowledge and' 
an appreciation of the worldwide physical factors in man's environment and of hi<5 
adjustment to them. The course will include a study of the motions of the earth, 
land forms, bodies of water, soil, climate, vegetation, with special emphasis on^ 
man's political, economic, and social responses to them. 

GERMAN 

SIO Intermediate German. First six weeks. Mr. Stonecipher 

This course includes readings selected from nineteenth and twentieth 
century literature plus some study of the social and historical background. These 
readings form the basis for grammatical study, written compositions, and conversa- 
tional practice. Six semester hours credit. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



HISTORY 

S24a-24b Political and Social History of the United Slates and Pennsylvania. 

First and second six weeks. lAxb. Laughlin 

A general survey of American history from Colonial times to the present. A 
study of the importance of Pennsylvania's contribution to the development of the 
nation will be stressed. This course is designed to fulfill the state requirements 
for United States and Pennsylvania history. Six semester hours credit. 

S32 Europe from 1914 to the Present. Second six weeks. Mrs. Laughlin 

A study of World War 1 and V/orld War II. Attenion will be given to the 
problems of the post-war period. 



MATHEMATICS 

Slla Analytical Geometry and Differential Calculus. 

First six weeks. Mr. Bissinger 

Concepts of sequence, one-to-one correspondence, limit of a sequence, limit of 
a function, derivative, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, 
indeterminate forms and I'Hospital's rule, maxima and minima, points of inflection, 
partial differentiation. Four semester hours credit. Pre-requisite: Plane Trigonom- 
etry. 

522 Advanced Calculus. Second six weeks. Mr. Bissinger 

Partial derivatives, multiple integrals, infinite series, and the expansion of 
functions into power series are the main topics studied. Prerequisite: Math. 11. 

523 Differential Equations. Second six weeks. Mr. Bissinger 

The ordinary type of differential equations are studied and solved, especially 
those of the first and second orders, with emphasis on applications to mechanical, 
electrical, and chemical problems, as well as biological growth. Prerequisites: 
Math. 11, 22. 

Any other mathematics course listed in the College catalogue will be given 
if sufficient demand exists. 



MUSIC 

S42 Advanced Instrumental Teaching. First six weeks. Mr. Thurmond 

Actual experience with practical problems involved in the following activities: 
teaching advanced instrumental classes, conducting sectional rehearsals and full 
band rehearsals, organizing and developing an exploratory instrumental class, 
training a young marching band, scheduling, preparing and presenting a public 
concert. 

Private Instruction. 

The following professors will be available during the summer for private in- 
struction in their respective fields: R. Porter Campbell in organ; Harold Malsh in 
violin; Alexander Crawford in voice; James M. Thurmond in brass; and Mrs. 
Nevelyn Knisley in piano. Persons interested in private instruction should address 
them individually and complete arrangements in advance of the opening date of 
the Summer Session. 

—9— 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



PHYSICS 
S20 General College Physics. Mr. Gilmor© 

The conventional course in general college physics will be offered during the 
summer session. There ■will be at least nine hours of lectures and recitations to- 
gether with a minimum of eight hours of laboratory work per week. Credit 8 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $20.00. Eight weeks. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

S32 Contemporary World Affairs. First six weeks. Mrs. Laughlin 

The purpose of this one-semester course is to acquaint students with current 
developments in the field of public affairs, literature, science, religion, music, 
drama, art. Students are instructed in procedures useful in evaluation of material 
received through various media of communication, such as publications, motion 
pictures, radio. No prerequisite required. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

520 General Psychology. First six weeks. Miss Love 
Restricted to sophomores and upper classmen except by consent of the de- 
partmental adviser. A beginning course in general psychology, designed to acquaint 
the student with the fundamental psychological principles and their application in 
daily life. 

521 Psychology of Childhood. First six weeks. 

A study of the psycHological development of the child from the begin- 
ning of life to adolescence. Throughout the course emphasis is placed 
upon practical problems of child care and training. Topics considered 
include the development of proper physical and health habits, children's questions, 
religious and sex instruction, emotional and personality problems, problems of 
family life and relationships, behavior problems and discipline and problems of 
school life and relationships. Laboratory fee of one dollar. Pre-requisi*e: Psychol- 
ogy 20. 

S23 Educational Psychology. First six weeks. Miss Love 

A psychological study of the nature of the learner and of the learning process. 

The course includes suc^ topics as individual differences, motivation, emotion, and 

transfer of training. Pre-requisite: Psychology 20. 

RELIGION 
Slla or Sllb Introduction to Religion. Second six weeks. Mr Sparks 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the place and signi- 
ficance of religion — what it is and does. Included are studies in the nature of 
God, the worth of man, science and religion, personal religious living, the Judaeo- 
Christian tradition as found in the Old and New Testaments, the place of the 
Church in our modern life, and contemporary problems in the field of religioii. 

S32 The Teaching of Jesus. First six weeks. Mr. Ehrhart 

This course attempts an intensive study of the religious concepts of Jesus as 

set forth in the Gospels. This course or Philosophy 31 required of all proceeding to 

a college degree at Lebanon Valley College. 

SPANISH 

SIO Intermediate Spanish. Second six weeks. Mrs. Fields 

This is a continuation and extension of course SI and includes further drill in 
the principles of grammar, practice in conversation, composition, and dictation, and 
more extensive reading. For entrance to Spanish 10, the preparatory course 1, or 
its equivalent (two years of high school Spanish) will be required. Six semester 
hours credit. 

—10— 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
Summer Session 

APPLICATION AND ADMISSION CREDENTIALS* 

Fill in the appropriate sections and mail this page as early as possible to the 
Director of the Summer School. 

Date of Application 

(Miss) (Mr.) (Mrs.) 

Home Address . 

■ Phone Number 



City State 
Check here if you expect to commute. □ 
College Address (if known) 



COURSES REQUESTED 
Course Number Subject Credit Hours 



I. Students Working for Degrees at Lebanon Valley College 

(a) Students planning to matriculate at Lebanon Valley College for programs 
leading to degrees must submit complete credentials to the Director of Admissions 
in accordance with the regulations of the winter session catalogue. 

(b) If a student has already matriculated, the signature of the major adviser 
must be obtained approving the courses selected. 



Major Adviser 

II. College Students from Other Institutions 

The student named in this application is in honorable standing at this institu- 
tion and is eligible to return for further academic work. The courses indicated are 
approved for this student. 

Signature of Dean or Registrar 

Name of College or University 



*Nole: Admission to the Summer Session does not include acceptance for the winter 
session. 



HI. Special Student — Summer Session 

Are you a four year high school graduate? Yes □ No □ 
Name and address of high school 



IV. Purpose of Summer Session Work 

Toward Degree at College 

Name University 

Teacher Certification: Certificate now held 

For what certificate are you working? 

Other: (specify) . 



V. Occupational Status 
State present position 



VI. Are you enrolling under the G. I. Bill? Yes □ No □ 

Public Law 346 D 550 □ 16 Q 

Students who wish to transfer credit to other institutions and teachers who wish 
transcripts mailed to State Departments of Education will indicate below where 
transcript is to be mailed. 



Name 
Title _ 



Address 



City and State 






LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE CAMPUS | 




Armville 


Pa. 






KEY TO NUMBERS | 


1. 


Administrotion Building 




8. Conservatory Annex 


2. 


Engle Hall 




9. Sheridan Hall 


3. 


North Hall 




10. Washington Hall 


4. 


Men's Dormitory 




11. Infirmary 


5. 


Ccrnegie Library 




12. College Church 


6. 


Lynch Memorial Physical 




13. South Hall 




Education Building 




14, VickroyHall 


7. 


West Hall 




15. Central Heating Plant 




MAiN S TREE T EAST-^US HIGH WA Y 422