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Le Cheval 




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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/lecheval1934sain 



It Cfcetoal 



SENIOR CLASS YEARBOOK 




Volume I 



PUBLISHED BY 

CLASS OF MNETEEX-HU.NDRED THIRTY-POUR 

SAINT AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



L E C H E VAL 




DEDICATION 

AS on evidence of the high esteem in which he was 

held, and proof of the reverence with which we regard 

his memory, and as an expression of our appreciation 

for all he has done for us, we dedicate this first volume 

of "Le Cheval" to the late Rev. A. B. Hunter, D.D. 



Two 



LE CHEVAL 



FOREWORD 

TV W ANY colleges issue an annual publication of the graduating class portraying 
iVl the activities of each individual member during his stay under the wings 
of Alma Mater. This attempt is the first of the classes graduating from the stand- 
ard four year college course of St. Augustine's. 

We are conscious of the errors, both in arrangement and material, that follow, 
hut trust that they will he looked upon as errors of omission and not ot comrmss.on. 
Our zeal and earnestness in creating a new spirit of good will toward our Alma 
Mater in all previous graduates and former students in the sixty-seven years 
of the history of the institution is our primary purpose. 

The desire to express gratitude and appreciation of the services of those who have 
either materiallv or spiritually aided us in our sincere endeavor is paramount. 1 he 
hope that subsequent classes will fall in step with this endeavor and make construc- 
tive improvements gradually is our criterion. 

We acknowledge with thanks and gratitude the financial aid of the advertisers 
the guidance of the Administration of the College, and the splendid cooperation of 
the staff of the Annual, as well as the student body at large. A P C 



//,,., 



L E C H EVAL 




Four 



L E C H E V A L 




ADMINISTRATION OFFICIALS 



Rev. Edgar H. Goold . 



. President 



D E P A R T M E X T H E A D S 

Charles H. Bover Dean 

Bertha Richards Dean at Bishop Tuttle School 

Jessie E. Guernsey History 

E. Doreex Frost English 

Arthur P. Chippey Science 

L. Thaddeus Caldwell Music 

Cecil D. Halliburton" Social Science 

Percy Young Education 

G. H. Mitchell, Jr ithletics 



Five 



LE C H E VAL 



A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 

Dear Seniors : 

As to those about to leave their Alma Mater allow me as President to offpr congratulations to you 
on your achievements and to wish yon well in the opportunities and tasks that lie ahead. You have 
maintained a good class spirit and organization as evidenced by your ability to produce this Class Annual. 
a new achievement in the history of the College. In it you tell something of your past and try to gaze into 
the future. I share with you in the hope that your future will be a happy and useful one, 

You will have an opportunity, each of you, to do your duty, which is your best, and wherever and 
whatever you may be to reflect upon yourself, your class and Alma Mater. I hope thai you are 
taking steps to form a permanent class organization so that you can always keep in touch with one another 
and with Saint Augustine's College. As the years go on your Alma Mater will need more and more the 
interest and help of its loyal graduates if it is to make the progress that we all hope to see. May the 
class of 1934 ever be among those in the forefront of the ranks of those who are bringing this to pass. 

We shall miss you as you leave us now. A warm welcome will await you here whenever you can 
return to renew the memories of your college days. 

As you go out from our doors I hid you farewell and repeat the words of the Psalmist: "We wish you 



good luck in the name of the Lord." 

Faithfully your friend and President, 



Edgar H. Gooi.d. 



A MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN 

To the Class of 1934 : 

You have for a brief period, a very important peri oil of your life, been under (he fostering care of 
this institution your Alma Mater; and "believe it or not," your welfare, physical, intellectual, moral and 
spiritual has rested heavily on the hearts of your instructors, 

You are about to emerge into a larger life of responsibility and trust in the great world beyond the 
walls of the institution which has thus far borne much of your responsibility. 

As you go forth. 1 urge you to carry the following view of life witli you: 

From Milbou : "Nor love thy life nor hate, but whilst thou livst Live well; how long, how short, permit 
to Heaven." 



Your teacher and friend. 



Chas. H, Boyek, Dean. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

As editor of this the first graduating <das^ annual in the history of St. Augustine's College, 1 wish 
to take this opportunity of expressing my sincere appreciation of and heartiest gratitude for the wonderful 
cooperation given by the whole senior class, faculty, and other classes. And to fellow members of my 
staff I wish to humbly offer my thanks for the great support they have given me throughout. Needless 
to say without the full support and cooperation of all mentioned it would have been practically impossible 
to put this annual over. 

Though hampered by financial difficulties and lack of precedent I have attempted to make this small 
effort worthy of the name of '34's Class Annual. And though not as extensive as it might he I have at- 
tempted to embody those features which seemed most cordial to a souvenir of this type and may it ever 
serve to bring back fond memories of the glorious undergraduate days at dear ole' St. Augustine's. 

H. Henderson, Editor. 



Six 



LE CHEVAL 



Class Colors : 



\\ 



CLASS OF '34 



7E know not now, in the hist day 
We the class of thirty-four 



What joys or sorrows will bo ours, 

Or what fate has in store. 

We know not whither our paths may lead. 

Nor when our journey's cease 

But this we know, for you St. Aug". 

Our love will never cease. 

We say good-bye to each dear friend, 

Hearts filled with vain regret. 

Yet in our sorrow, duty calls, 

"Onward," we may not forget. 

We give our work, our hopes, our lives. 

We cannot offer more, 

May we each battle bravely fight, 

Old class of thirty-four. 



Katie Lou Haywood. 



CLASS SONG 



W 



Weak May Be Our First Flight 

jTEAK may lie our first flight in the coming yes 
Which will bring trials, defects and tears: 
By which we ourselves may strive to climb 
To render service and subdue our fears. 

Ambition sets our eager hearts aflame, 

And starts our feet upon the path to fame 

And though to all those who begin— 

It is not given to reach the highest aim 

Or outward vestige of a fair success, 

Still shall our reward he not the less 

Who Faithful to the first conceived ideal. 

Give of life, years and earne t toils the best. 

Mary E. Staples. 



Class Flcweb : Red Carnation 
Class Motto: In Yevitate Victoria 



Seven 



L E C H E VA L 




i/r- 




' ' : 1 





/ 












Eight 



LE CHEVAL 



JANICE LOUISE ALEURY 
"Precious" 
"Thy neatness is a candle to thy merit." 
Garden Club, Delta Sigma Nu, Junior Auxiliary. 



MIRIAM LEONIE DUKE 

"Honeybuncu" 

"With valleys of eternal bubble." 

(Jar Ji -ii Club, Ammeno Ed. Society, Delta 
Sigma Nu, Assistant Secretary of Class. 



IDA MACKYE ALLEX 

"Mackye" 

"Ser air, her manner, her neat attire 
She's a girl whom we all admire.'' 

1 >elta Sigma Nu, Garden Club. Ammeno Ed. 
Society. 



CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH CALLAWAY 

"Bunk" 

J jolly unselfish personality is the greatest gift 
of ail." 

W. A. A., Delta Sigma Xu, Ammeno Ed. Society. 



NELLIE BREWINGTON COBLE 
"The mildest manner* and the gentlest heart." 

HUBERT HENRY GREET, Jr. 

"Dr. Yak" 

''He fired in a lovers quarrel." 

Acies Club, Varsity Club, Eta Sigma Mu, Varsity 
Tennis Team, Varsity Football. 



B. FRANK DAVIS 
"Then he will talk ye Gods how he will talk." 
Ferguson Club, Young Men's Layman's League. 

LLOYD HOWARD DAVIS 

"Slick" 

"He flitted 'til he lit in the Iodine Stater 

President Senior Class, President Student Body. 
Acies Club. Executive Committee of Student Body, 
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Ammeno Ed. Society, 
Business Manager Le Cheyal. 



ANNA BALL GILL 
"// / am aoar friend, there is nothing too much 

for mr In do." 
Ammeno Ed. Society. 

LEMUEL EUGENE GRAVES, Jr. 

"Lem" 

"Young fellows will be young fellows." 

Acies Club, Eta Sigma Mu. Varsity Track Team, 
Varsity Tennis Team, Assistant Editor Pen, Class 
Treasurer. 

KATIE LOU HEYWOOD 
"Thy smile is sweet." 

OWEENA LaGRANDE HAYWOOD 

"The world is a wheel 

And it 'rill come your way." 

WILLIAM HOWARD HENDERSON 

"Deep" 

"A sax-tooter and philosopher." 

Editor of Le Cheval, Alpha Phi Alpha Fra- 
ternity. 



ALMA ELIZABETH HERNDON 

"For they will win 
Whu think they can." 

Ammeno Ed. Society. 



CLARA MAE JACKSON 

"The world •■on'/ twirl 
Without an attractive girl." 

Ferguson Club, Garden Club, Delta Sigma Nu. 



HENRY MAKE 

'■Slaw 



Choral Club. 



PEACE JOHNSON 

but sure." 



Nine 



LE CHEVAL 




Ten 



LE CHEVAL 



HALLIE V. JONES MILDRED ELEASE SMITH 

•M tender heart "Millie" 

A loyal mind." 



Delta Sigma Xu. 



"When she will she will." 

W. A. A.. Delta Sigma Xu. Varsity Basketbal 
Team. 



THEODOSHIA LEE JONES 
"Theo" 
"Life, bring me a fresh rose." 
Garden Club, Delta Sigma Xu, W. A. A. w - A - A - Delta si S ma *"• Garden Club - 



MARY EVELYN STAPLES 
'She tickles the ivories and she sings 



ARXOLD RUPERT JOSEPH 

"Knollv" 



ELDORA ASPASA STEVENS 
"Dora" 



"Here's to u girl with a heart and a smile, 
"In the midst 0} everything: xhat ma kes the bubble of life worthwhile." 

Pali's Editor-in-Chief, Varsity Club, Acies Club, \y A a., Garden Club, Delta Sigma Xu. Varsity 

Executive Committee, Dramatic Club, Eta Sigma Basketball Team 

Mu. Varsity Track Team. Vice President of Class. 



ORA AXITA MANX 

"Fibee" 



ANNIE AWll.llA STILES 
"Miss Anne" 



"Quiet hut friendly, thoughtful and sweet, 
'l.i she business-like? Knowing more than she lets herself speak.' 



And she's a pal: 



Delta Sigma Xu, Ferguson Club, Ammeno Ed. 



Delta Sigma Xu. Ammeno Ed. Society. Society, Garden Club, Executive Committee of Stu- 

dent Body, Secretary of Class. 



WILLIAM AUGUSTUS PAYTON 
"Mouse" 

"A great lover, but bad feet." 
Scroller, Ferguson Club. 



LILA MAE TAYLOR 

"Nunc" 

"There is sunshine ia the heart of Arc" 

Choral Club, VY. A. A., Garden Club, Delta 
Sigma Nu, Junior Auxiliary. 



ALICE LOUISE PERRY DORIS ELIZABETH TELFAIR 

"Fall of life, sense and wit. I,, youth and beauta 

Lots of inn and plenty of grit." Whilom is but rare." 

Junior Auxiliary, Ammeno Ed. Society, Garden Ammeno Ed. Society, Ferguson Club, Delta 

Club. Delta Sigma Xu. Pen Staff. Executive Com- Sigma Xu, Dramatic Club, 
mittee of Student Bodv. 



CORXELIA RAXD SAUDERS 
"Persevere anil you trill win." 



WILLIAM DAYIS TURNER 

"Bill" 

■■Be would be a priest." 



i.BTVi'i- uin'BT OTiv,rMr>XTa Scroller. Young Men's Laymen's League, 

1 hTN< h ALBhRT SIMMONS Ferguson Club. Choral Club, Acies Club. Dramatic 

"Rome" Club. 

"He made Borneo look cheap." MABLE GRAY" WILLIAMS 

Acies Club, Scroller, Ela Sigma M11. "/ chatter, chatter as I go." 

LOTTIE MARGARET WILLIAMS 

"i'rue to herself, true to her duty, always." 

Delta Sigma Xu, Garden Club. Junior Auxiliary, 

Ferguson Club. 



Eleven 



LE C H E VAL 



CLASS HISTORY 

THE history of the class of nineteen hundred and thirty-four of Saint Augustine's College, 
City of Raleigh, County of Wake, State of North Carolina is this wise: 

In the month of September in the year of nineteen hundred and thirty there entered upon 
these grounds about eighty young men and young women who said that they came in search 
of knowledge. 

They hailed from the various parts of the world from the Sunny Southland, from the 
mountainous regions of New England, the rolling billows of the Atlantic, and the sweltering 
sun of the West Indies. Xot all of these seekers of knowledge were in new surroundings 
for several of them were escapees of the School of Dean Lynch. Therefore organization of 
these young freshmen was not a great task. They organized themselves so that they might 
gain strength and had as their leader Earl Alston. 

Full of zeal and courage they at once became active in student activities — showing their 
capabilities as politicians and noble leaders. The young men organized the Aeies Club so 
as to instill into the minds of other students, "The Power of Vision." Toward the end 
of the year the class of nineteen hundred and thirty-four planned for the orientation of the 
incoming Freshmen. 

Alas — at the beginning of their second year a few had dropped out and lagged behind. 
They found themselves under their same leader who brought them through the warfares of. 
that mighty freshman year. As a decreasing host, they found themselves strong and a solid 
unit. To this day they will remember the Freshman-Sophomore Football Classic, in which 
their solid unity was unending. 

As these seekers of knowledge entered the third year of their warfare they found them- 
selves decreasing but gaining more strength and courage. To this happy hand were added 
two studious young ladies, Doris Telfair and Alice Perry. 

This year brought the change of leadership to Lloyd Davis, who is now full of zeal and 
struggling to the end. During this year we find the class has played an important role in the 
campus life. Most of the organizations had members of this zealous class as their leaders. 
We find them in the following activities — St. Augustine's I'm, Ferguson Club, Dramatic Club, 
Choral Club, Varsity Basketball and Football and College Student Organization. 

Toward the end of the year these seekers of knowledge decided to entertain the graduating 
class. This was given in the form of a Garden Party, which delighted the hearts of the 
graduating class. 

As time drifted slowly onward we find these seekers of knowledge landing their anchor in 
the fourth year of their college warfare. This host full of courage had decreased to the 
number of thirty-three and we find them still waging their warfare. 

The young women of this class organized themselves into the Delta Sigma Nil Society 
and had as their aims — Dignity, Sociability, and Neatness. They regret to leave lint wish 
that the society might linger on. 

The first annual of the college was forwarded by this class of seekers of knowledge. This 
Annual was a way of expressing their love and devotion id' St. Augustine's, and that they 
never wanted to be forgotten. Now we find that out of that host of eighty that thirty-three 
of the Juniors remain and are now hoping to depart. And in looking over the courses taken 
we find seven in the Science Department and twenty-six in the Arts Department. 

And now for four years the class of nineteen hundred and thirty-four has roamed these 
"rounds and sought to get the knowledge for which it came in search. Now it must depart 
into the various parts of the world to show. "In Veritate Victoria." 

Clara M. Jacksox, Historian. 



Twelve 



LE CHEVAL 



PROPHECY FOR THE SENIOR CLASS 

THE class of 1934, being no exception to other college classes, in their bold and daring as- 
sumption that the class has every type of genius, with all confidence, nine attempts to make 
easily possible whal has heretofore been impossible, and spreads before your eager eyes the 
wondrous panorama of thai which lias never been seen — the future. 

Just 10 prove the undeniable powers of this stage or savant who knows very little about any- 
thing and practically everything about nothing, you may look as tar into the future as you wish. 
Well, since you are just a mere mortal and not a member of I he class of 1934 you probably 
can only see as far as 1940. 

The problem of reducing or increasing distance in a minimum of time was almost most easily 
solved by this dynamic group. Heboid them then in six short non-existent years, starting out. 
situated in every conceivable place. 

On the morning of May 1. 1940 thirty-three of this nation's most learned, talented and 
cultured men and women find a letter from the Registrar, Ora Maim at St. Augustine's. 
The letters state that the wish of the administration is to honor the greatest class in the 
history of the college at the commencement of 1940. 

In New York, Howard Henderson, whose orchestra was making a howling success and 
creating a screeching sensation, or so the critics said, walked into a very modern establishment 
displaying an arresting sign. "A Princely Haircut and a Close Shave." Manager Prince 
Simmons rushed up to ascertain if Henderson were going back to the reunion. 

They decided to round up all the classmates in the big city and to plan the trip together. 
Having had no breakfast they went to Bond's "Coffee Shop" where that artist of the kitchen 
served the world's best breakfast on the shortest possible notice. After six years Bond was 
really homesick for bis old haunt. Before leaving the cafe the boys called up Katie Lou 
Haywood, the designer, at her studios at Greenwich Village, tint on learning that she had 
an appointment at Hallie Jones' Beauty Parlor, they went there to see her, telling Bond that 
they would round up Mildred Smith in her dancing Salon and that they would all meet at 
eight at Radio City to see Doris Telfair act in a play "Whispered Words" written bv 
Alice Perry. 

Meanwhile in Chicago, Editor Earl Alston (even after six years he still handles papers) was 
checking a report that Mary Staples was returning from a year's study of music in Europe 
and that Lila Taylor, still awed into speechlessness over French, had been in France and was 
now returning to America. 

Out in Detroit, Annie Stiles executive Secretary of the Y. W. C. A. waited impatiently for 
her assistant Janice Albury, to see if they could make the trip together. They planned to go 
by way of Pittsburgh where Doctors Creft and Joseph were attracting world-wide attention 
for their astonishing treatment for a very dangerous malady, known as "Spring Fever" 
most often contracted by students in the heat of the pursuit of a higher education. Mrs. 
Creft was none other than Eldora Stevens. 

In New Jersey, Philadelphia and Savannah, Charlotte Callaway and Clara Jackson and 
Lottie Williams were also upholding the humanitarian spirit of the class by efficient service 
in social work. 

On this same eventful day, Mrs. Mabel Gray Williams, in Virginia, wrote to Cornelia 
Saunders and Owena Haywood that her household duties might prevent her attendance. She 
also sent the information that Theodosia Jones, Dean of Women, at Virginia State would 
make the trip with Georgia Pugli and Henry Johnson who were going to give a Musicale or 
Recital at Virginia State. 

On the same day Bishop William Turner almost lost his ecclesiastical dignity in the heartv 
welcome he accorded William Paytou who was just back from hunting "Moose" in Africa. He 
was on the yacht of Frank Davis who bad taken the same trip to complete his search for 
the "missing hook" which St. Augustine's Library would so much appreciate. 

In Philadelphia Lloyd Davis is honoring his class and school by his leadership of the United, 
Loyal. Progressive and Cooperative Stores. Gene Graves is his publicity agent and every 
evening he gets the supreme satisfaction in lift — when lie broadcasts to an audience, numberless. 
Anna Gill, Alma Herndon, teachers at Washington High School and Mrs. Nellie Coble, the 
proud mother of a promising son Cecil Jr., were on hand to welcome Ida Mackye Allen, Super- 
visor of Music at Atlanta University and Miriam I.. Duke, librarian at Atlanta University. 

Now here arc all the members of this glorious class, once more together at our Alma Mater. 
If looking at them here you cannot believe that they have achieved all that you have seen, just 
consider that Class Prophecies are like biscuits: many ingredients go into the making but the 
height of the biscuit depends on the amount of "elevating power" used. 
Nothing is impossible — to the class of LI34 — in the future. 

Miriam Lkoxie Duke. 



Thirteen 



L E C H EVA L 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 

WE, the Senior Class of St. Augustine's College, city of Raleigh, State of North Carolina, being sound 
of mind and body, realizing that our college days are drawing to a close, do take this means of 
disposing of some of our treasures which we have laid away in the preceding four years. Realizing the 
value of these said treasures, we do charge our legatees to guard them as they would their lives. In our 
years of college we have accumulated many of the mere valuable assets of life, and these we do bequeath 
as follows : 

Article 1, Section 1. To St. Augustine's College, our most sincere love ami loyalty. 

Article 2, Section 1 . To the Faculty, our deepest appreciation for their untiring efforts to guide 
us through our maze of studies. 

Article 3, Section 1. To Mr. Halliburton, Misses Boyd and Snodgrass, our utmost admirations for 
their timely help in all our need-. 

Article 4, SECTION 1, To the underclassmen we bequeath our neatly carved desks in Mr. Halliburton's 
room, with our hopes that they will lie as entertaining to them as they have been to us. 

To the Juniors we leave our dignity. 

To the Sophomores v\~e leave our difficult studies in Calculus and Political Science, the long exams 
in these subjects, and other pleasant tasks. 

We do hereby exclude the Freshmen from our will for the following justifiable causes: 

1. Their self-confidence would reject anything of value we might bequeath to them. 

2. Their total irresponsibility and disrespect for their present privileges would make it unwise for 
us to leave them any of our highly prized items. 

To the Freshmen to he, we leave all the sympathy that is within us for what they have to face. 

Article 5, Section 1. To the many clubs we bequeath all tiresome joke-;, borrowed themes and all 
music except jazz. 

Article 6. Section 1. The following are gifts made by members of the Senior Class to the various 
pupils of the lower classes. They may seem trivial beside other things of life, but they consist of the 
graduates' most prized and valuable possessions obtained during their college career, and we hope they 
are received in the exact spirit in which they are given. 

Katie Lou Haywood, wills her shyness to Amanda Freeman. 

Alma Ilerndon. leaves her record of being to class on time to Susie Morton. 

William Turner, wills his chapel seat in the choir to John Perry hoping that he will keep faithful at- 
tendance, he also wills the position of chief lay reader to John Perry. 

Arnold Jostph, bestows upon Harold BurusiuV the position of Editor-in-Chief of the St. Augustine's Pen, 
and all the trouble connected with the honor of this esteemed office, hoping thai lie will have a successful year. 

Cornelia Sanders, leaves her vim and vigor to Sally Sills. 

O ween a Haywood, hereby wills her seat in the Library to Beatrice Fletcher who never finds time to 
go there until the day before Biology notebooks are due. 

Annie Stiles, leaves her sweet disposition to Kathleen Williams. 

Lottie Williams, leaves Cora Duren to take Chapel attendance. 

Hubert Creft. her* by wills his left end position on the football team to D. P. Lane, all of his college 
notebooks to Edgar Colson and his ability to be ruled by a woman to Leroy Perry. 

.Mary Staphs, our Musician, bestows her position of playing for the girls in the Delany Building to 
Stella Jones, she also bestows upon Gertrude Arthur her job as monitor. 

Nellie Coble and Hallie Jones, leave to Helen KorneuMy their ability to extract chewing gum from 
whosoever the possessor may be. 

Lottie Williams and Annie Stilts, leave to Cora Duren and Gertrude Arthur their room next to the 
Dean of Women hoping to save Mrs. Latham the trouble of climbing up stairs to check their noise. 

Eowaid Henderson, bequeaths upon the following persons, the following tilings; to Russell Blunt the 
position of Lyman Building fireman, to St. Julian Simpkins head saxaphone player and the other parts 
of his estate to the forgotten. 

Prince Simmons, willeth to Arthur Risdon his dignity. 

Alice Perry, wills her ability to gel French to her brother John Perry and James Johnson, she also 
wills her job on supper set to Dorothy Harris. 

Doris Telfair, bestows to Julia Macbeth her oratorical ability. 

Mildred Smith, leaves her place on the basketball team to Julia Macbeth. 

Mabel Gray Williams, bestows upon Oscar Applewhite her ability to keep secrets. 

Lloyd Davis, doth will to anyone who would like to grow old in one night the presidency of the 
student body. 

Clara Jarksnn, leaves her slenderness to Vermay Battle. 

B, Frank Davis, leaves James Mask to close the windows in the Library, hoping this will not interfere 
with his social affairs. 

llallic Jones, doth leave to Etta Faison and John Jones her seat mi the Delany Building. 

Anna Gill, wills her friendship with Alma Herndon to Oliver Denning. 

William Payton. wills to James Mask his nonchalance on every occasion. 

Li a Taymr. wills her job at the "Teachers' Cottage" to her sister Minnie Belle Taylor, and her will 
power to stay awake in class to Fernando Oger. 

Theodosia Jones, leaves a pari of her height to Ollie Saxon. 

Ida Allen, leaves her job as housekeeper to Gertrude Arthur hoping she will be on time or on duty 
some time. 

< >ra Mann. wiTs to Myrtle McDonald her clownish ness. 'o Leonora Slade her unused brain and her 
ability to sleep soundly in class, hoping that Leonora will get more out of her classes than she did. 

Miriam Duke, leaves' her job at the. Library to Dorothy Washington, hoping that she will enjoy the work 
as much as she did. 

Henry Johnson, leaves his place in the Choral Club to Allen Mask, hoping that his voice will change from 
one key. 

Eldora Stevens, wills her seriousness in Ethics class to Charlotte Galloway. 

Charlotte Callaway, leav. s her seat in the dining loom to Helen Kornegay and to Francis Organ, Joe 
Ha i ris. 

Eugene Graves, leaves all his old tennis paraphernalia including his worst tennis racket to Leroy 
Perry. His spirits he wills to William Scott, his high jumping ability to Eric Clarke. His youth he 
leaves to Leo Oxley and his leisure in his senior year to Oscar Applewhite. 

Janice Albu'ry, wills her neatness to Wilma Levister. 

Article 7. Section 1. We hereby charge to the Junior Glass the task of executing our last will, hereby 
declaring null and void all and any former wills made by us. 

In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hand, and seal (his eventful day of May. in the year of our 
Lord, One Thousand Xine Hundred and Thirty-four. 

Witnesses: THE Senior Cr.ASS OF 1934. 

M. M. Lathaji. Jani.e Albvry, Testator. 

Cecil D. Halliburton. 
Arthur P. Chippet. 

Fourteen 



LE CHEVAL 




JUNIOR CLASS 



OFFICERS 

Helen Harris ....President 

Lekoy Perry Vice President 

Vera Gang - Secretary 

Gladys Allyn Treasurer 

A Lit ira J. Kennedy - - - Reporter 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Margaret Geneva Adams, Earl Carl Alston, Olivia Beat rite Brown ins, Eric RudVph C ark ■, Gloria 
Marguerite Corbett, Oliver Trenton Denning, Ade'.e Jones Dent. Amanda Jane Fr eman, Abraham Frank 
Gadsden, Rebecca Alice Greene, Stella Christina Jones, Charles Dotson Keck, Helen Elizabeth Kornegay, 
David Pulaski Lane, James Washington Mask, Jr., John Benjamin Miller, Eliza Ann Morgan, Susie 
Lee Morten, Fernando Paul Oger, Leo OxLy, Daniel David Sawyer, Gretchen Shavers, Annie Marie 
i iinn.on , f i.liani Stirrup, Josephine Louise Thomas, Edwa.d James Tims, Dorothy Mae Washington, 
Henry Robert Williams, Kathleen Merceline WiJiams, Mary Eliza Wilson, George Scott Wimbish, Joseph 
V\ inters. ', * j 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



OFFICERS 

Harold S. Burn side President 

Edward Pitt rice Presid nl 

Mary Clifton Secretary 

James Johnson - Treasurer 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Harold A'bury, Ellen Rebecca Allen, Ell. it Anthony. Oscar Applewhite, Ger'rude Mac Arthur, Edna 
Ernestine Baker. Holmali Leo Baker. John Bur-is Blount. Russell Dur n, Evans Blt.nt, Ruth Frazer Boyer. 
Lottie Mae Chavis, Frank Hermit Davis, Mai ion Austina Davis, William Ewart Davis, Cora Le ■ Dui-en. 
Lucy Lee Edwards. Louis Von Evans, Etta Faison, Theola Aida Ford, Charlotte May Galloway, Louise 
Eleanor Graves. John Jacob Hannibal, Joseph Howard Harris. Joseph Henry. Woodrow Wilson Jacobs. 
Eula Jane Jefferson, John Lee Jones. Wilma Cortez Levister, Julia McKi'nley Macbeth, Allen Green 
Mask, Amos Thelmon Mills. Eric Gaston Mi'chell. Cecelia Constance McCaleb, Emma Louise Perry, 
John Logan Perry, Katherine Delany Perry. Mary Elizabeth Perry, Nathan (Men Perry, Julio Augustus 
Petioni. Lawrence Edward Scales, William Daniel Severs, Birney Walker Smith. Jr., Edward Prescott 
Syms, Minnie Belle Taylor. 



Fifteen 



L E C H E VAL 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



The class of nineteen thirty-seven boasts of a versatile, persevering element that makes success a 
certainty. 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Pearl Daphne Barclay. Vertnay liattle. Leroy Burroughs, Gloria tie Octavio Codrington, Edgar Pulton 
Colson, Jr., Joseph Cleveland Commander, Sherman Theodore Davis, Aurven Colston De Berry, Theresa 
Malease Everett, Beatrice Elizabeth Fletcher, Charles Ward Froneberger, Luetta Grady, Leonard Bernard 
Hardie. Fannie Mae Heard. James Felton Herndon. Dora Devolia Hilliard, Annie lit Hoggard, Edward 
Move Holley, Dollie Mae Hopkins, Charles Merchaut Johnson, Lucille Lottie Jones, Matthew Aurelius 
Jones, Henrietta Hamilton Hazel Kennedy, Wilhelmina Elizabeth Kennedy, William Edgar Knight, Jr., 
Rosa Belle Manuel, John Garfield Markley. Joseph Cheshire Mask. Raphael Millin, Alma Pearson Mitchell, 
Myrtle Young McDonald, Effie McKinney, Floyd Lee Newsoine. Jasper Newsome, Pencie Catherine 
Nixon, Mary Francs Organ, Martha Elizabeth Paige. Harold Hilton Phipps. H. Watha Pryor. Clarice 
Suzzanne Reeves, Arthur Benjamin Risdon, Wilhelmiua Zelitha Roberts, Frederick Robinson, Virginia 
Lee Saunders, Ollie Mae Saxon, William Henry Scott, Sallie Belle Sills, Rozia Singletary, Lenora 
Dorothea Slade, George Ernest Smith. Cornelius Garfield Stewart, Frank Maurice Stewart, James 
Lewis Stover, Dorothy Magnolia Tin. mas. Margaret Virginia Turner, Maxwell Sinclair Virgil, Henryne 
Annette Walker. Ma\ine Rebecca Walker, Bettic Lou "Watson, Bessie Lee Wilson. John Augustus Woods. 



LE CHEVAL STAFF 



H. Howard Henderson - -. ._. - Editor-in-Chief 

Arnold Joseph Assistant Editor 

Lloyd H. Davis Business Manager 

Lemuel E. Graves. Jr .- Assistant Business Manager 

William Turner Subscript ion Manager 

Henry Joh nson Advertising Manager 



Sixteen 



LE CHEVAL 




THE ST. AUGUSTINE'S PEN 

(The College Newspaper) 

Arnold Joseph, '34 : Editor-in-Chief 

LtMVEL Graves, Jr., '34 Assistant Editor 

ASSOCIATK EllITOKS 

Harold S. Burnside, '36 

Helen Harris, '3.3 Helen Turner, '35 

R. Saunders, '34 

Leo Oxley. '35...- Business Manager 

Lerov Perry, '35 .. - Assistant Business Manager 

Jam i:s Johnson. '36 - Circulation Manager 

Mary Clifton, '36- - Typist 

Aiice Perry. '34 Typist 

C. Ii. Halliburton - Faculty Adviser 




ACIES CLUB 



Lloyd H. Davis 

Lemuel E. Graves. Jr.... 

Harold S. Burnside , 

Eric Gaston Mitchell.. 
Daniel I>. Sawyer 



--.President 

Vice President 

...Secretary 

..Assistant Secretary 
Treasurer 



John Jones 
Frank Stewart 
James E. Johnson 
Prince A. Simmons 



MEMBERS 
H. Leo Baker 
Arnold Joseph 
Fernando Oger 
Hubert H. Creft, 



William Turner 
Eric Clarke 
Abraham Gadsden 
E.\rl C. Alston 



Seventeen 



LE CHEVAL 



ORGANIZATIONS 

FEKGUSON CLUB 

Harold Stanley Bi'Rnside President 

Arnold R. Joseph _ Vice President 

Dorothy M. N. Thomas Secretary-Treasurer 

Lottie Williams Assistant Secretary-Treasurer 

.Inns L. Perry Chaplain 

ETA SIGMA SIC SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 

Lemuel E. Graves President 

Arnold R. Joseph Vice President 

Hubert Creft Secretary 

Prince A. Simmons Treasurer 

WOMAN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Dorothy Washington President 

Stella Jones Tice President 

SCROLLERS CLUB 

Fernando Oger President 

William Turner _ Secretary 

Members 

Prixoe Simmons Abraham Gasden 

William Payton Charles Johnson 

Russell Blvnt 

BROTHERHOOD OF ST. ANDREW 

Rkknik Smith Director 

William Turner vice Director 

I" vri.es Johnson Secretary-Treasurer 

YOUNG MENS LAYJIEX LEAGUE 

William Turner President 

Eric Clarke Secretary 

John Perry Chaplain 

LES ELITES 

Almiea Jessie Kennedy President 

Dorothy' Washington Secretary 

Cora Lee Dvren...'.. Assistant Secretary 

Katii i.e en Williams Treasurer 

DELTA SIGMA XU 

Annie Stiles .President 

Li i a Taylor .....Secretary 

■Tank e Ai.bury Treasurer 

Ida M. Allen Reporter 



Ei ah teen 



LE CHEVAL 



THE ATHLETIC PARADE 



IX retrospective the I!i3:i-:i4 athletic season offers an interesting picture. A variety of feelings are 
aroused ns we review the parade. As our warriors pass the reviewing stand \vi> observe mingled 

emotions Pathos here ami overwhelming joy over there. But everywhere there is a sharp glint in the 

eye that murks a true crusader, one who has given his all in the game, and who counts not the score 
but the playing. As an envelope of all the feelings, the showings, the sums of victories, and defeat, we 
have a picture of premise, of able, willing and experienced men. This encouragement serves to brighten 
the perspective of the reviewer, and we feel, that in the season to come, St. Augustine's Athletic 
representative will earn that place in the sum of complete achievement. 

tin back with me to the middle of September. Hay aft r day brought witli it seme young men anxious 
to feel the. leather or I.) plow open holes for the "ball-tntcr." When training bit its peak along the 
middle of October, several interesting things wire noticed. Captain "Bill" Severs was laid up with a 
cracked arm. "Red" Perry had forsaken the flanks and was doing signal duty. ".lay Bird" Blount 
was showing promise and a bit of running ability. Louis Von Evans had drawn out of the front ranks 
and was doing a mean piece of line bucking. Numerous new fellows were trying with varying degrees 
of success. Everybody was working hard and the grid squad looked good from the "grandstand." 
Then came October 7 and the Blue and White took the held looking like a million bucks and full of tire 
Kittrell College was game and fought the horses all of the way but a 7-6 count gave St. Augustine's one 
point margin and its first victory. 

In the Thanksgiving Classic the Shaw University grid squad turned the tables on a Saint team thai 
lacked everything, punch, tight, coordination ami all the other essentials of a good football squad. The 
Saints were humbled 13-6 in the concluding gam.' of the season. 

As we go back to the Basketball season we find virtually the same pattern. Heart breaking d, deals 
accompanied by startling victories. But the learn looked good throughout the season. Anion- the 
most interesting of the games was the St. Paul game, which was neck and neck until the whistle. In 
this contest the Saint*, emerged the victor with the count 59-56. Another was the Virginia S'tate en- 
counter where St Augustine's came up on the long end of a 33-32 score. This game was a real scrap 
and the tension of the gallery was relieved only once when "Busty" Blunt brought the stands to their 
feet by a R'ring shot from the center of the huge State cage. Three classic games with Shaw provided 
thrillers. The Saints took the first in their own pen 30-29 but dropped the other two — one at Shaw and 
tip. other in the City Auditorium. In other court games the St. Augustine tossers showed up well losing 
and winning with the ease of true sportsmen anil deporting themselves creditably. In the other games: 
S*t. Augustine took one from Winston-Sa'.eni Teachers' Coll,--,, to the tune of 37-23. The loeal quint 
bow,,; to Virginia State en tin- home court 24-lfi. They lost to Henderson in a good smif — 32-28. Smith 
tool; the Saints for a rid? twice. 41-23 was the first score and 41-39 was the final score of the series. 
In the Shaw gymn the St Augustine hasketeers dropped the second of the Shaw series 30-27. Union 
topped the Saints twice during the season. 26-20 was the first count and tin' whistle found the score 
38-17 in tile second scrap. St. Paul avenged its earlier defeats as they took the Saints in 31-15 on their 
home lot. To conclude the first C. I. A A. season for St. Augustine the boys played a thriller in the 
City Auditorium against their arch rivals, the Shaw Cagers. Each team bad one victory under the belt 
and each was out for blood, A thrilling contest that wast decided in the last 15 seconds, with a beautiful 
field goal. Williams brought the game to a close, with Shaw leading 19-17. 

The tennis team composed of Hubert Creft, Leroy Perry. John Jones anil Lemuel Graves, Jr., is 
looking forward to a few dual matches anil lite C. I. A. A. Tournament at A. and T. in Greensboro. 
The team is fairly good and hopes to achieve something before school closes. 

The track team is concentrating on the C. I. A. A. track meet at Howard. Captain Arnold .1 pli 

Rozii Sineletary. Eric Clarke. Raphael Mi'lin and Frank St, -wart nun all gel a chance to compete 
in tin- cinder path's events. Russell Blunt is trying lor one field event, the shot-put. 

And as we come to the end of the parade, as the athletes pass in review and go on to the pursuit of 
prowess, achievement, or honor, or what have you.' We find the picture interesting and encouraging and 
indicative of greater athletic endeavor and accomplishments by the representatives of St. Augustine. 

Lemuel, E. Graves. Jr. 



Nineteen 



Humphrey: Who was that lady I saw you with last night? 
Moose: Ha, ha! That was Miss Thorpe. 




NEW BENSON LIBRARY 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Founded 1867 



A four year college course is offered, accredited by the Southern As- 
sociation of Colleges and the North Carolina State Department of 
Education, leading to degrees of B.A. and B.S.. including Pre-Medical 
work and Teacher Training for State High School Teacher's certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department. Training School for Nurses and 
School of Religious and Social Workers are connected with the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences. 

Moderate terms. Opportunity for self-help. 

For catalogue and information write the Registrar. 

St. Augustine's College, Raleigh. N. C. 



Tlico: Have you seen my tablemate? 
Dora: Is that what they call them now? 



Rusty: Gee, I'm so hungry tonight. 

Cora": You had as much to eat as you did last night. 
Rusty: Yes, but I saw Henry V 1 1 I today. 



THE BISHOP TUTTLE SCHOOL 

A NATIONAL CENTER FOR THE TRAINING OF 
YOUNG WOMEN FOR CHRISTIAN LEADER- 
SHIP IN CHURCH AND COMMUNITY 

SOCIAL WORK 
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 
A COLLEGE DEGREE 




THE BISHOP TUTTLE SCHOOL 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ADDRESS 

MISS BERTHA RICHARDS, DEAN 

BISHOP TUTTLE SCHOOL 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Ollie: Wasn't that a good sermon in chape] Sunday? 
Honeybunch: That was just a review of our Ethics lesson. 



A Junior: It' you wear an old grey suit to a formal affair, what would you wear to an 
informal one? 

A Senior: Your underwear, dumbbell ! 



ALLEN'S MARKET 

FINE GROCERIES 

"Service With a Smile" 
101 Fayetreville Street Raleigh, North Carolina 



Your Patronage Solicited 

T. H. BRIGGS b SONS, INC. 

THE BEST IN HARDWARE 

LAWN MOWERS, GARDEN TOOLS, AND ACCESSORIES 
220 Fayetreville Street Raleigh, North Carolina 



LEWIS SPORTING GOODS COMPANY 

THE FINEST SPORTING EQUIPMENT 



112 West Hargett Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS b COMPANY 

EVERYTHING FOR SCHOOL OR OFFICE 

"WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS" 
1 19 Fayetreville Street 



"What shall I say in the weleome address to the seniors?" 

"Oh, just tell them that the dance is for them; they've been here four years; and we're 
glad to see 'em go." 



Will the freshman girls now listen to an up per classman when she speaks to them about 
the noise thev make after ten-thirty? 



"ALWAYS A WELCOME" 

DARLING SHOPS 

Ladies' Ready-to-Wear, Ready-to-Wear Millinery 

and Hosiery 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

ROYAL BAKING COMPANY 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Say "BAMBY" 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

RALEIGH SMOKELESS FUEL CO. 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



RECREATE AT 

JIMMY TAYLOR'S BILLIARD PARLOR 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



"So you run a duck farm. Business picking up? 
"No, picking down." 



We wonder what is L. B.'s line for the city girls as he has a whole string of them 
believing him. 



W. H. KING DRUG COMPANY 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Compliment's of 



RALEIGH LOAN CO. 

207 S. Wilmington St. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



COLLEGE 
SWEET SHOP 

CANDIES, CAKES, CIGARETTES, 
and DAINTIES OF ALL KINDS 

Ernest A. McCaleb 
Solomon Bethea 

"Just Off the Campus" 



ROYAL THEATRE 



WE SHOW THE LATEST 

AND THE BEST IN 

PICTURES 



FOR OVER TWENTY YEARS 
SERVICE TO ALL 

Our service knows no limits or creed or 
class. We are prepared to serve any 
family in the community in a consider- 
ate, dignified manner. 

Lightner's Funeral Parlor 

C. S. LlGHTVER. Prop. 

Ambulance Sercicr Lady Attendance 

RALEIGH. N. C. 
Nite Phone 256 Dav Phone 1215 



We wonder why it worries T. F. to see someone talking to her "first boy friend," F. X.