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Full text of "Lee's standard guide to Paris;"

DC 

708 
/1 45 



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VJWSS ^i V--.- I LJ Q^ 

Book_J±4i£_ 



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X Rennes 



Ul« of Wigl 

-Havre' 'I'eV 

-328 K. 6 H.35 :: «^ * \6'5 

-456 K. S H.40 __^ ««' 



Cobient 

.503 K. 8 H.45_ 




Mane; 



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*■•?«, 



^- p/^.' '^v» Berne 

• ntj^ausanne 
LANB 



\Ail-ler-' '''^ 

\i,^^ Bainsv _3 
Grenoble ^•j,T..,r:, 

AvignoB '•^•. 

Nimea \ 

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GOING TO PARIS. 

Distances and time required by shortest routes. 

228 K. 3 H.35 reads: 228 kilometers, 3 liours 35 min. 

8 kilometers = 5 miles. See page 135. 



New, Revised Edition 



LEE'S 
STANDARD 

Guii^e to Paris 

ILLUi .RATED CITY ROUTES 
and 

ilVERY-DAY 
FRENCH CONVERSATION 



ESPECIALY COMPILED 
For/American Tourists 



v^ 



BY 



MAX MAURY, A. B., LL. M. 

*t AUTHOR OF THE 

.ittre-Webster French-English, English-French Dictionary 

oi Lee's American Tourist's Maxi 

of Paris, Etc 

WITH 

German and Italian Tourist's 
Vocabularies 

Official Plan of the Exposition Grounds in Colors 

Fifteen Half-tone Illustrations 

Twelve Diagrams and a Map Showing Distances 

to Paris 



COPYRIGHT, I89S. BY WM. H. LEE 
COPYRIGHT 1900 BY WM. H. LEE 



CHICAGO' '■ 
LAIRD & LEE, Publishers 



61138 

RAILROAD FARE TO PARIS 



From Forty-eight Important Places 

(See Frontispiece) 



Aix-les-Bains 

Angers 

Anvers (Antwerp). . . 

Bale (Basel) .. 

Barcelone 

Berlin 

Berne . 

Bordeaux 

Boulogne s M 

Bruxelles (Brussels) 

Calais 

Cherbourg 

Cologne 

Dieppe 

Dijon 

Francfort s. M 

Geneve (Geneva) 

Granville 

Lausanne 

L,e Havre ... 

Leipzig (Leipsic) 

Liege 

Lille 

Linioges 

Lisbon 

Londres (London) . . 

Luchon 

Lyon 

Madrid 

Marseille 

Milan 

Munich. 

Nancy 

Nantes 

Nice 

Reims 

Rennes 

Rome 

Rouen 

Sja'asbourg 

Toulon 

?lir".;.:.-::::: 

Turin 

Vienne (Vienna) . . . 
Ziirich 



I. St Class. 


fr. 65 05 


34 50 


38 35 


59 05 


130 05 


118 40 


63 20 


64 20 


28 45 


34 60 


33 05 


41 55 


52 90 


18 50 


35 30 


77 75 


70 25 


36 75 


58 70 


25 55 


115 50 


38 95 


27 65 


44 80 


213 40 


43 25 


lOl 60 


57 25 


164 65 


96 65 


104 85 


103 70 


39 55 


44 35 


121 85 


17 45 


41 90 


187 55 


15 25 


56 70 


104 15 


79 85 


26 20 


90 75 


152 20 


68 85 



2d Class, 



fr. 43 90 
23 30 

26 75 
40 10 
89 65 
86 30 

42 40 

43 30 
19 20 
23 90 

22 30 

28 05- 

37 60 
12 70 

23 30 
54 75 
47 30 

24 80 
39 y-5 

17 25 
84 20 

27 20 

18 65 
30 25 

154 75 
32 00 
68 55 

38 65 
116 65 

65 25 
72 25 
70 85 
26 70 

29 95 
82 25 
11 80 

28 25 
130 15 

10 30 
38 60 
70 30 
53 90 
17 70 
61 60 
103 15 
47 10 



SECOND COPY. 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Railroad Fares to Paris frcm 48 places 
Itineraries from Ne>v York to Paris 

Steamship Ofifices .... 

Watches on Board Ship . 
Concerning Passports 

I. — Pronunciation and Every-Day Phrases. 
Pronunciation . 
Cardinal Numbers . 
Ordinal Numbers, etc. 
Days, Months . 
Seasons; Holidajs 
The Verb "avoir" . 
The Verb "etre" 
Common Adjectives 
Parts of the Body . 
The Weather . 
Sensation and Feeling 
Dress (male) 
Dress (female) 
Traveling Requisites 
The Time 
Phrases of Time 

II. — Conversations for Tourists. 
On Board Ship 
At the Custom House 
Asking One's Way 
• Railroads and Trains 
Cabs and Cabbies 
'Buses and Street Cars 
Post and Telegraph Offices 
About Hotels . 
Baths 
Barbers 
Restaurants 
Cafes, 

Tobacco Stores 
With the Doctor 
Money Matters 
Shopping 
Social Customs 

in. — Twelve City-Routes with Diagrams 
Route I. Over the Grands Boulevards 
Route 2 Around the He de la Cite and the He St 

Louis ....... 

Route 3, A Visit to the Bois de Boulogne 

Route 4 To les Gobelins, le Pantheon and le Ouar 

tier Latin ^ 

R6ute 5. Quays and Bridges, from Pont-Neuf to Pon 

National ........ 

Route. 6. Old Paris, from Palais-Royal to Place de 

la Bastille 
Route 7. To Cimetiere du Pere La Chaise and the 

Bois de Vincennes 



8 TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Route 8. To Montmartre and the Eglise du Sacre- 

Coeur 141 

Route 9. Quays and Bridges, from Pont-Neuf to 

Pont-d'Auteuil .147 

Route 10. To Las Abattoirs de la Villette and les 

Bnttes-Chaumont ....... 151 

Route II. To Le Luxembourg and TObservatoire . 155 

Rou;e 12. From Le Palais-Royal to Le Trocadero 157 

Suburban Places of Interest 161 

Versailles, St- Cloud, Fontainebleau, Ch^intilly. 

Opening Days and Hours of Museums. Public Build- 
ings, Etc. .... 162 

Church Calendar: R C. Churches .... 163 
American and English Churches . .163 

French Protestant Churches 163 

Synagogues 163 

Theaters and Other Places of Amusements . 164 

IV. — Tourist's Necessary Words and Sentences in 

German and Italian . . 165 

V — Telegraph and Cable Code ... 183 

VI- -Exposition Notes ... . . 188 

Alphabetical Index of Public Buildings, Monuments, 

Bridges, Churches, Theaters, Parks, etc, . . igi 

List of Hotels in Paris, 194 



ILLUSTRATIONS 



Distances by Rail to Paris . . 

Place (et Statue) de la Republique 
Dome des Invalides ..... 
Palais de Justice and Sainte-Chapelle 
Monument to Amiral de Coligny 
Place de Clichy (Statue de Moncej-) . 
Place de la Bastille (Colonne de Juillet) . 
Pavilion de Flore (Tuileries) 
Moulin-Rouge (Montmartre) 

Pantheon 

Tour St. Jacques ...'.. 

12 City Routes 

Map of the Bois de Boulogne 

Theatre Frangais ..... 

Statue of Leconte de Lisle 

Bird's-Eye View of Exposition Grounds, . 

Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel , 

Ferd. W. Peck. U. S. Commissioner-General 

Statue of Etienne Dolet .... 

Official Plan of the Exposition Grounds . 



Frontispiece 

OPP PAGE 



13 
30 
31 
40 

41 
90 

91 

98 

99 

12-158 

120 

164 

165 



189 



191 
The End. 



GOING TO PARIS 



There are so many steamship Hnes plying 
between the New World and the Old, all vying 
with each other to attract passengers, that each 
individual taste and circumstance can be suited. 

The prices vary considerably, not only as 
between the several lines, and according to the 
location of berth or cabin, but each line changes 
its rates at will and without notice. We cannot 
quote any figures, therefore, and must refer our 
readers to the companies or their agents. 

A reduction of 5% to 10% is made on all return 
tickets, generally good for one year. It is wise to 
secure a return cabin or berth in advance, if pos- 
sible. 

Tickets issued in the U. S. are at present sub- 
ject to a war tax of ^5.00 where the Ocean fare 
exceeds $60.00, $3.00 over $30.00 and not exceed- 
ing $60.00, and $1.00 not exceeding $30.00. This 
tax is collected in addition to the regular passage 
rate. 



ITINERARIES 

FROM NEW YORK TO PARIS. 

American Line. Every Wednesday. 

From New York to Southampton, six to seven 
days; from Southampton to Havre, bv 
sea, six hours; from Havre to Paris, b_, 
rail, four hours. 

Bremen-American Line (Norddeutscher Lloyd). 
Every Saturday. 
From New York to Southampton, seven" to 
eight days ; from Southampton to Havre, 
9 



lO GOING TO PARIS 

by sea, five hours ; from Havre to Paris, 
by rail, four hours. 

Cunard Line. Every Saturday. 

From New York to Liverpool, seven to eight 
days; from Liverpool to London, by rail, 
four hours; from London to Dover, by 
rail, three hours; crossing the Channel, 
one and one-half to two and one-half 
hours ; from Calais or Boulogne to Paris, 
by rail, six hours. 

French Line (Compagnie Generale Transat- 
lantique). Everj^ Thursday. 
From New York to Havre, eight days ; from 
Havre to Paris, by rail, four hours. 

Hamburg-American Line. Express service, every 

other Thursday. 
From New York to Cherbourg, seven days ; 

from Cherbourg to Paris, by rail, six and 

one-half hours. 
A weekly service of this line crosses the ocean 

in ten days. 

Holland-American Line. Every Saturday. 

From New York to Boulogne-sur-Mer, nine 
days; from Boulogne to Paris, by rail, 
four hours. 

Red Star Line. Every Wednesday. 

From New York to Antwerp, nine to ten days ; 
from Antwerp to Paris, by rail, seven 
hours. 

White Star Line. Every Wednesday. 

From New York to Liverpool, seven to eight 
days; from Liverpool to London, by rail, 
six hours; from London to Dover, by 
rail, three hours; crossing the Channel, 
one and one-half to two and one-half 
hours; from Calais or Boulogne to Paris, 
by rail, six hours. 

There are a few minor steamers, but little known 
and somewhat cheaper, starting from New York, 
Boston and Philadelphia. They are not especially 
recommended. 



GOING TO PARIS 



II 



STEAMSHIP OFFICERS. 

The Captain is to be addressed as "captain," 
except on the French line, where the word "com^ 
mandant" is used. He is the master of his ship, in 
law and in fact, during the trip. His will is supreme 
law and the sole authority in all serious matters. 
Do not bother him with com.pl aints about trifles. 

The Doctor is supposed to render his services 
free of charge, but in cases of treatment other 
than for sea-sickness, it is customary to send him 
a fee. Socially he ranks next to the captain and 
is a good companion, as a rule. 

The Purser will take care of your valuables, 
free of charge, and will procure access to your 
baggage "down in the hold" (don't say "down 
cellar" or "down stairs"). He also takes care of 
your letters to be mailed through pilot boats, etc. 

The Chief Steward is the manager, clerk and 
head waiter of the hotel -part of the service. If 
you wish to have a particular seat at meals, see him 
as soon as you get aboard. If rightly approached, 
he is in a position to add to your comforts. 

THE WATCHES ON BOARD SHIP. 

For purposes of discipline, and to divide the 
work fairly, the crew is mustered in two divisions : 
the Starboard Watch (right side, looking forward), 
and the Port Watch (left). The day commences 
at noon, and is thus divided; 



Afternoon Watch 

First Dog 

Second Dog 

First 

Middle 

Morning 

Forenoon 



noon to 4 p.m. 

4 P.M. to 6 P.M. 
6 P.M. to 8 P.M. 
8 p. M. to midnight. 

12 A.M. to 4 A.M. 
4 A.M. to 8 A.M. 

8 A.M. to noon. 



This makes seven Watches, which enables the 
crew to keep them alternately, as the Watch 
which is on duty in the forenoon one day has the 
afternoon next day, and the men who have only four 
hours' rest one night have eight hours the next. 

Time is kept by means of "Bells," the first half 
hour of each Watch being marked by "one bell," 
the second half hour by ' 'two bells, ' ' etc. 



CONCERNING PASSPORTS 

Americans will find it to their interest to pro- 
vide themselves with passports before setting out 
on a trip to Europe. They are obtainable from 
the State Department, Washington, D.C., direct, 
or through any of the U. S. Commissioners 
located in the larger cities of the country. 

A visa, or official verification, by the nearest 
French consul will be a finishing touch, not indis- 
pensable, but of no mean value. 

In the European countries passports are not 
required (except in Russia and Turkey), but as a 
means of identification in case of an emergency or 
accident, the}'- will prove invaluable. 

Certain museums, monuments and public and 
private galleries, otherwise closed on certain days, 
will yield admittance to the open sesajne of a pass- 
port. 

The New York Herald, of Paris, Avenue de 
rOpera, opposite the U. S. Consulate, cables 
every day to New York all the names of Amer- 
icans who arrived and registered at the office that 
day. As all the leading dailies in the U. S. 
copy this list, you will not neglect to notify your 
friends of your safe arrival in this quick and gra- 
tuitous way. 

The American Consulate in Paris is located 
36 Avenue de 1' Opera. 

The consul is not supposed to be at your beck 
and call, whenever you think that a cabby or 
waiter overcharges you. In serious trouble, how- 
ever, you should certainly summon him to protect 
you from injustice. 

Remember that when traveling in foreign coun- 
tries one must abide by the law of the land, and 
neither consul nor ambassador can prevent the 
punishment of a transgressor. 






ice de la I\epubi!-que. 



LEE'S 

GUIDE TO PARIS 

AND 

EVERY-DAY FRENCH CONVERSATION 



I. PRONUNCIATION AND SIMPLE 
PHRASES 

YOU can't very well expect to find here a com- 
plete and learned — and useless — treatise on 
French pronunciation, but you have a right 
to look for a few practical hints. 

There are Fiench sounds for which there is no 
equivalent in English. You know that well 
enough. It is therefore absurd to try to represent 
them by means of English sounds. All the 
Anglo-French pronouncing g-uides I know have 
attempted it, and have only succeeded in making 
people be'ieve that "restywrong" is the correct 
pronunciation for restauraiil, which, of course, is 
utterly absurd. 

These totally different sounds are only six in 
number, and can be mastered in a few minutes. 
They consist of four nasal sounds — on, an, in, un, 
of the u (German U) and eu sounds. Get hold of 
any Frenchman (an anarchist will do, for want of 
any one better), and ask him to pronounce the 
following, for which there is 

No Equivalent in English. 

a. Nasal Sounds. 
On — as in 7non (my), son (his), 7nouton (sheep, 
mutton). 

13 



14 PRONUNCIATION 

An — as in maiiteaii (cloak), ainiant (loving), 
tant (so much). 

In — as in vin (wine), matin (morning), coqui?i 
(rascal). 

Un — as in un (one), britfi (brown). 

b. "U" Sottnd. 

U — as in muse (muse), flMe (flute), tohubohu 
(hubbub). 

c. "Eu" Sou7id. 

E = long eu sound in hetireux (happy), deux 
(two). Also in Monsieur, which is pronounced 
as if spelt meusieu. 

E = Short eu sound in heure (hour), docteuf 
(doctor). 

For the nasal sounds the following is good 
practice: Get ready to pronounce the English 
words lo7ig, hang, etc., like "Chappie, don't ye 
know," but stop in the middle of the n, or sooner, 
the mouth wnde open. Trying to hold a glass in 
one eye before the mirror will greatly lighten the 
task. When you tire of this, vary the exercise. 
Pose your lips for oo in boot, and in this position 
pronounce ee as in beet. Watch your lips in the 
mirror. If they rem_ain in position during the 
operation, you will hear the French u. Ditto, 
pose your lips for o in lone, and in this position 
pronounce a as in pane (resp. e in pen). The 
result will be the French long eu (resp. short eu). 

The last two sounds are represented in this book 
by e and e. All the other sound signs or dia- 
critical marks are explained below: 

VOWEL SOUNDS. 

Long a (a) = English a in balm. 
Short a (a) = English a mfat. 
- Long e (e) = English ey in obey. 
Short e (e) = English e in jnet. 

For e and e, see above. 
Long i (i) = English i in machine. 
Short i (i) =^ English i in pit. 
Long o (5) = English o in ore. 
Short o (6) = English o in lot. 
"^ For u see above. 



PRONUNCIATION 15 

French oi (6a) = French o and a, pronounced in 
rapid succession. 

French ou (00) = EngHsh 00 in doof. 

CAUTION. 

a in French never is the English a mfafe. 
i " " " i in viiiie. 

e " " " e in he. 

u " " " u in viule. 

CONSONANTS. 

ch = English sh, as in English chagrin, but never 
as in child. 
j is only the second half of the Eng'i^h j, the 

first, the d part, being omitted. 
c = English c. When it is to be pronounced 
like c in ice before a ox o ox ?/, it is written and 
printed 5. 
th =t. 

r is rolled back in the mouth, except after ou. 

re at the end of a word is not er. Theatre is 

teatr\ not teater. Get ready for the e as in 

Trent, but do not pronounce it. The same 

holds good of the endings cle, ble, and others. 

g = English g in go before a, o, u ; like French 

j before e, i. 
s = English s in sole; between two vowels like 

English z. 
h is silent. 

SIGNS. 

The sign - over a vowel shows it is long. 

The sign ^j over a vowel shows it is short. 

Italics show that a word or a syllable has a nasal 
sound. 

The hyphen joins words or syllables that should 
go together. 

CAUTION. 

The tonic accent in French is very slight. Raise 
the voice a little — but only just a little — on the last 
syllable of words connected by sense and uttered 
in one breath. In poussez fort = poo-se-for 
(push hard), the tonic accent is on "for," those on 
"poo" and "se" being secondary. In poussez la 
porte =: poo-s6-la-p6rt, the tonic accent is cr 



l6 PRONUNCIATION 

"port," as the final "e" is mute. For other 
syllables observe, as far as you can, the quantity 
indicated by the signs - or ^j, remembering that e 
is sharp and short, and ^ is broad and long. 

A LAST PIECE OF ADVICE. 

If, in spite of all these precious hints, you can 
not make yourselves understood— and I shouldn't 
scold you if you couldn't — show to the person 
addressed the sentence you cannot speak. I did 
that once in a German postoffice at Darmstadt, 
and the native official thereof smiled a broad 
smile. 

And, if that won't do, well, stick to dumb show, 
like Thomas Hood: 

" Moo! I cried for milk. 
I got ray sweet things snugger, 
When I kissed Jeannette; 
'Twas understood for sugar. 
If I wanted bread, 
My jaw«; I set a-going, 
And asked for new-laid eggs 
By clapping hands and crowing!" 



WORDS AND PHRASES 



Cardinal Numbers. 


^NOMBRES CaRDINAUX. 




Nonhf car-di-n6. 


One 


un. 




un. 


Two. 


deux. 




de. 


Three. 


trois. 




troa (6a-diphthong). 


Four. 


quatre. 




catr'. 


Five. 


cinq. 




sm)^ [sin bef . consonants. 


Six. 


six. 




sis (si bef. consonants). 


Seven. 


sept. 




set (se bef. consonants). 


Eight. 


huit. 




iiit (iii bef. consonants) 


Nine. 


neuf. 




nef (ne bef. consonants). 


Ten. 


dix. 




dis (di bef. consonants) . 


Eleven. 


cJnze. 




onz. 


Twelv? 


douze. 




dooz. 


Thirteen. 


treize. 




trez. 


Fourteen. 


quatorze. 




ca-torz. 


Fifteen. 


quinze. 




kinz. 


Sixteen. 


seize. 




sez. 


Seventeen. 


dix-sept. 




diz-set. 




17 



i8 



NUMBERS 



Eighteen. 
Nineteen. 
Twenty. 
Twenty-one. 
Twenty-two. 
Twenty-three. 
Thirty. 
Thirty-one. 
Thirty-two. 
Forty. 
Fifty. 
Sixty. 
Seventy. 
Seventy-one. 
Eighty. 
. Eighty-one. 
Ninety. 
Ninety-one. 
One hundred. 
One hundred and one. 



dix-huit. 
diz-iiit. 

dix-neuf. 
diz-nef. 

vingt. 
vin. 

vingt et un. 

vin-te-un. 

vingt-deux. 

vint-^e. 

vingt-trois, et', 

vint-ivoa., etc, 

trente. 

irant. 

trente et un. 

tran-te-un. 

trente-deux 

quarante. 
ca.-rant. 

cinquante. 
sin-cmit. 
soixante. 
soa-j'^/zt. 
soixante-dix. 
s6a-i'^?zt-diss. 
soixante et onze. 
^ok-s an-\,h.-onz . 

quatre-vingts. 

ca-tre-T//;?, 

quatre-vingt-un. 

Q.di-\xQ-vin-un. 

quatre-vingt-dix. 

ca-tre-i?/;z-diss. 

quatre-vingt-onze, 

Q.'k-'ixQ.-vin-onz. 

cent. 
san. 

cent un. 
san-un 



NUMBERS 



19 



Two hundred- 



Three hundred. 



One thousand. 



One thousand and one. 



Ten thousand. 



deux cents. 

trois cents. 
troa.-sa^i. 

mille 
mil. 

mille un. 
mi\-t/n. 

dix mille. 
di-mil. 



Ordinal Numbers. 

First. 

Second. 

Second of two. 

Third. 

Fourth. 

Fifth. 

Sixth. 

Seventh. 

Eighth. 

Ninth. 

Tenth. 

Eleventh, 

Twelfth, 



NOMBRES OrDINAUX. 

Nonhf 6r-di-n6. 

premier. 

pre-mie. 

deuxieme. 
de-ziem. 

second. 
se~£-on. 
troisieme. 
troa-ziem. 

quatrieme. 
ca-triem. 

cinquieme. 
sm-kiem. 

sixieme. 
si-ziem. 

septieme. 
se-tiem. 

huitieme. 
iii-tiem. 

neuvieme. 
ne-viem. 

dixieme. 

di-ziem. 

onzieme. 

on-ziem. 

douxieme. 

^00-ziem. 



20 



NUMBERS 



Thirteenth. 

Fourteenth. 

Fifteenth. 

Sixteenth. 

Seventeenth. 

Eighteenth. 

Nineteenth. 

Twentieth. 

Twenty-first. 

I'wenty-second. 

Twenty-third, etc. 

Thirtieth. 

Thirty-first- 

Thirty-second. 

Fortieth. 

Fiftieth. 

Sixtieth. 

Seventieth. 

Seventy-first. 

Eightieth. 



treizieme. 
tre-ziem. 

quatorzieme. 
ca-tor-ziem. 

quinzieme. 
kin-TAhm.. 

seizieme. 
se-ziem. 

dix-septieme. 
dis-se-tiem. 

dix-huitieme. 
diz-iii-tiem. 

dix-neuvieme. 
diz-ne-viem. 

vingtieme. 
vin-Whm.. 

vingt et unieroe. 
^'^>^-te-ii-niem. 

vingt-deuxieme. 
•^'//zt-de-ziem. 

vingt-troisieme, etc, 

z^2>zt-tr6a-ziem. 

trentieme. 

/?'a?2-tiem. 

trente et unieme. 

tra7i-\.k.-Vi-m.h.YQ.. 

trente-deuxieme. 
/r(3:7zt-de-ziem. 

quarantieme. 
ca-r«;z-tiem. 

cinquantieme. 
sin-c a7i-i\hvsi. 
soixantieme. 
s6a-j"^;z-tiem. 

soixante-dixieme. 
soa-i'(^;/t-di-ziem. 
soixante et onzieme. 
s6Q.-saii-\.h-on-z\hr^^. 

quatre-vingtieme. 
ca-tre-z/2>z-tiem. 



NUJIBERS 



21 



Eighty-first. 

Ninetieth. 

Niliety-first. 

One hundredth. 

One hundred and first. 

Two hundredth. 

Three hundredth. 

One thousandth. 

One thousand and first. 

Ten thousandth. 

Once. 

Twice, 

Three times. 

Simple. 

Double. 

Threefold. 

Whole. 

Half. 

One-third. 

One-fourth. 



quatre-vingt-unieme. 
ca-tre-6//;z-ii-niem. 

quatre-vingt-dixieme. 
ca-tre-'Z//>/-di-ziem. 

quatre-vingt-onzieme. 
ca-tre-z^/;/-6';z-ziem. 

centieme. 
san-tiem. 

cent unieme. 
san-vL-niem.. 

deux centieme. 
de-san-tiem. 

trois centieme. 
troa-i'«;?-tiem. 

millieme. 
mil-iem. 

mil unieme. 
mil-ii-niem. 

dix millieme. 
di-mil-iem. 
une fois. 
iin-foa. 
deux fois. 
de-foa. 

trois fois. 
troa-foa. 

simple. 
sm-pV. 

double, 
doo-bl'. 

triple, 
tri-pl'. 

entier, entiere. 
au-tie, a/i-tiev. 
demi, demie. 
de-mi, de-mi 

un tiers. 
i^n tier. 

un quart. 
un car. 



22 



DAYS-MONTHS 



The Days of the 


Les Jours de la 


Week. 


Semaine. 






Le-joor-de-la-smen 


Sunday. 




Dimanche. 
di-7nansh.. 




Monday. 




Lundi. 
/ 2(71 -di. 




Tuesday. 




Mardi. 
mar-di. 




Wednesday. 




Mercredi. 
mer-cre-di. 




Thursday. 




Jeudi. 

je-di. 




Friday. 




Vendredi. 
van-dre-di. 




Saturday. 




Samedi. 
sam-di. 




Months. 


Les 


Mois. 






Le- 


moa. 


January. 




Janvier. 
j'an-vie. 




February. 




Fevrier. 
fe-vrie. 




March. 




Mars, 
mars. 




April. 


May. 


Avril. 
a-vril. 


Mai. 

me. 


June. 


July. 


Juin. 


JuilUt. 






ju-m. 


jiii-ie. 


August. 




Aout. 
oo. 




September. 




Septembre. 
sep-/«;zbr'. 




October. 




Octobre. 
oc-tobr'. 




November. 




Novembre. 
n6-vanhv\ 




December. 




Decembre. 
de-sanhr'. 





THE YEAR 



^Z 



Seasons. 
In the spring. 

In the summer. 
In the autumn. 

In the winter. 



Bank Holidays 
IN France. 



New Year's Day. 

Easter Monday. 

Ascension Day. 

Whitmonday. 

The National Holiday. 

The 14th of July. 

Assumption Day. 
All Saints' Day. 
Christmas Day. 

Other Holidays. 

Shrove Tuesday. 
Mid-Lent. 



Les Saisons. 
Le-se-s-^;?. 

Au printemps. 
o-prin-tan. 

En ete. 
an-ne-te. 

En automne. 
«;z-n6-ton. 

En hiver. 
a;?-ni-ver. 

Jours Feries en 

France. 

Joor-fe-rie an-frans. 

Le jour de I'an. 

le-joor-de-/rt;/. 

Le lundi de Paques. 

le-/z^;z-did-pac. 

L'Ascension. 

\s^.-sa7i-s\.oii. 

Le lundi de la Pentecote, 

le-/««-did-la-/«7Zt-c6t. 

La fete nationale. 
la-fet na-sio-nal. 

Le quatorze Juillet. 
le-catorz-jiii-ie. 

L'Assomption. 
Vk-son^-^\on. 

La Toussaint. 

\di-\.oo-sin. 

Noel. 

noel. 

Autres jours Feries. 
otr' joor-fe-rie. 

Le Mardi gras. 
le-mar-di-gra. 
La mi-careme. 
Ia-mi-c3,-rem. 



24 



TO HAVE 



Three Tenses 


Trois Temps d'Avoir 


OF "Have." 


Tr6a-/rt;z-d a- voar. 


(Present.) 


(Present. ) 
Pre-zan. 


I have. 


J'ai. 




je. 


He has. 


11 a. 




il-a. 


We have. 


Nous avons. 




noo-za-von. 


You have. 


Vous avez. 




voo-za-ve. 


They (m.) have. 


lis ont. 




il-zon. 


(Future.) 


(Futur. ) 
Fu-tur. 


I shall not have. 


Je n'aurai pas. 




je-no-re-pa. 


She will not have. 


Elle n'aura pas. 




el-no-ra-pa. 


We shall not have. 


Nous n'aurons pas. 




noo-n6-?-(9;z-pa. 


You will not have. 


Vous n'aurez pas. 




voo-no-re-pa. 


They (f. ) will not have. 


Elles n'auroiit pas. 




el-no- ron-pSL. 


(Perfect.) 


(Parfait.) 
Par-fe. 


Have I had? 


Ai-je-eu? 




ej-ii ? 


Has he had? 


A-t-il eu? 




a-til-u ? 


Have we had? 


Avons-nous eu? 




a-von-noo-z\i ? 


Have you had? 


Avez-vous eu? 




a-ve-voo-zii. 


Have they (m. ) had? 


Ont-ils eu? 




^«-til-ii. 



TO BE 



25 



Three Tenses of "Be. 

(Present.) 
I am. 
He is. 
We are. 
You are. 
They (m.) are. 

(Future.) 

I shall not be. 
She will not be. 
We shall not be. 
You will not be. 
They (f . ) will not be. 

(Perfect. ) 

Have I been? 
Has he been? 
Have we been? 
Have 3^ou been? 
Have they (m.) been? 



Trois Temps d'Etre. 
Tr6a-/rt:?z-detr'. 

(Present.) 

Pre zan. 
Je suis. 
je-siii. 

II est. 
il-e. 

Nous sommes. 
noo-som. 

Vous etes. 
voo-zet. 

lis sont. 
\\.-son. 

(Futur.) 
Fii-tiir. 

Je ne serai pas. 
jen-sre-pa. 

Elle ne sera pas. 
eln-sra-pa. 

Nous ne serons pas. 
noon-j-r^;z-pa. 

Vous ne serez pas. 
voon-sre-pa. 

EUes ne seront pas. 
e\n-sron-pa.. 

(Parfait.) 
Par-fe. 

Ai-je ete? 
ej-ete? 

A-t-il ete? 
a-til-ete ? 
Avons-nous ete? 
a.-von-noo-zete ? 

Avez-vous ete? 
a-ve-voo-zete ? 

Ont-ils ete? 
on-ti\-etQ ? 



26 



ADJECTIVES 



Common Adjectives. 
(<^) Color. 

Black. 
Blue. 
Green. 
Red. 

White. 



Adjectifs Usuels. 
Ad-jec-tif-iiziiel. 

(a) Couleur. 
Coo-ler. 

(m.) (f.) 

Noir, noire, 
noar, noar. 

Bleu, bleue. 
ble, ble. 

Vert, verte. 
ver, vert. 

Rouge, rouge, 
rooj, rooj. 

Blanc, blanche. 
dlan, d/ansih. 



{b) Dimension. 

Broad, wide. 

Great, large. 

Long. 

Narrow. 

Round. 

Short. 

Small. 

Square. 

Thick. 

Thin. 



{b) Dimension. 
Di-?nan-s,ion. 

Large, large, 
larj, larj. 

Grand, grande. 
gran, gran^. 

Long, longue. 

1 071, 1 071%. 

Etroit, etroite. 
4-tr6a, e-troat. 

Rond, ronde. 
ro7^, 7^071^. 

Court, courte. 
coor, coort. 

Petit, petite, 
pe-ti, pe-tit. 

Carre, carree. 
ca-re, ca-re. 

Epais, epaisse. 
e-pe, e-pes. 
Mince, mince. 
?)ims,, 7nin%. 



PARTS OP BODY 



27 



Common Adjectives 
{continued). 

(<f) Miscellaneous. 
Clean. 
Dirty. 
Dusty. 
Left. 
Muddy. 
Right. 
Torn. 

Unsewn, ripped. 
With holes in it. 

The Human Body 
The ankle. 
The right arm. 
The calf. 
The chest. 
The chin. 
The elbow. 
The eyes. 
The eyelids. 



Adjectifs Usuels 
{suite) (Jiiit). 

{c) Divers. 
Di-ver. 

Propre, propre. 
propr', propr'. 

Sale, sale, 
sal, sal. 

Poudreux, poudreuse. 
poo-dre, poo-drez. 

Gauche, gauche, 
gosh, gosh. 

Crotte, crottee. 
cro-te, cro-te. 

Droit, droite. 
droa, droat. 

Dechire, dechiree. 
de-shi-re, de-shi-re. 

Decousu, decousue. 
de-coo-zii, de-coo-zii. 

Troue, trouee. 
troo-e, troo-e. 

Le Corps Humain 
Le-c6-rii-;;z/;?. 

La cheville, 
la-shvi-ye. 

Le bras droit, 
le-bra-droa. 

Le mollet. 
le-mo-le. 

La poitrine. 

Ia-p6a-trin. 

Le menton. 

\Q.-i)ian-ton. 

Le coude. 

le-cood. 

Les yeux. 

le-zie. 

Les paupieres. 

le-po-pier. 



PARTS OF BODY 



The Human Body 
{^continued). 
The foot. 

The forehead. 

The hair. 

The right, left hand. 

The instep. 

The knee. 

The leg. 

The lips. 

The mustache. 

The mouth. 

The neck. 

The nose. 

The shoulder. 

The teeth. 

The throat. 

The thumb. 

The toes. 

The tongue. 

The whiskers. 

The wrist. 



Le Corps Humain 

{suite) (siiit). 

Le pied. 

le-pie. 

Le front. 

\e-fron. 

Les cheveux. 

le-she-ve. 

La main droite, gauche. 

\a.-mz7t-&roM., gosh. 

Le cou-de-pied. 

le-cood-pie. 

Le genou. 

le-jnoo. 

La jambe. 

Isi-JaTib. 

Les levres. 

le-levr'. 

La moustache. 

la-moos-tash. 

La bouche. 

la-boosh. 

Le cou. 

le-coo. 

Le nez. 

le-ne. 

L'epaule. 

Ie-p6l. 

Les dents. 

\Q-dan. 

La gorge. 

la-gorj. 

Le pouce. 

le-poos. 

Les doigts de pied. 

le-doad-pie. 

La langue. 

la-/<:?;/g. 

Les favoris. 

Ie-fa-v6-ri. 

Le poignet. 

Ie-p6a-nie. 



THE WEATHER 



29 



Fine and Bad 
Weather. 

y 
It is fine (weather). 

It is bad. 

It is hot. 

It is cold. 

It is muddy. 

It is sunny. 

It is foggy. 

It is misty. 

It is clear. 

It is dark. 

It is raining. 

It is raining hard. 

It is lightning. 

It is thundering. 

It is getting too cool for 
me. 

It is freezing. 
A shower. 



Beau et Mauvais 

Temps. 

Bo e-mo-ve tan. 

II fait beau, 
il fe bo. 

II fait mauvais, 
il fe mo-ve. 

II fait chaud, 
il fe sho. 

II fait froid, 
il fe froa. 

II fait de la boue. 
il fe de-la-boo. 

II fait du soleil. 
il fe dii-s6-leye. 

II fait du brouillard. 
11 fe dii-broo-iar. 

II fait de la brume, 
il fe de-la-briim. 

II fait clair, 
il fe cler, 

II fait sombre, 
il fe so7ihr\ 

II pleut. 
il pie. 

II pleut a verse, 
il ple-a-vers. 
I] eel aire, 
il e-cler. 

11 tonne, 
il ton. 

II commence a faire trop 

froid pour moi. 
il-c6-m««-sa-fer tro-froa 

poor-moa. 

II gele, 
il-jel, 

Une ondee. 
iin-^;z-de. 



30 



THE WEATHER 



Fine and Bad 

Weather 

{conthiued). 

A storm (on land). 

A storm (at sea). 

A rough passage. 

A smooth passage. 

The glass is rising. 

The glass is going 
down. 

The heat is intolerable. 

The heat is oppressive. 

A thunderstorm is com- 
ing. 

It will bring relief. 

It is very damp. 

It is hotter than yester- 
day. 

There is no breeze. 

A breeze is springing 

up. 
How delicious! 



Beau et Mauvais 
Temps 

{suite) (siiit). 

Un orage. 
un-no-rsi]. 

Une tempete. 
iin-/rt/z-pet. 

Une mauvaise traversee. 
iin-mo-vez tra-ver-se. 

Une bonne traversee. 
iin-bon tra-ver-se. 

Le barometre monte. 
le-ba-ro-metr' inont. 

Le barometre descend, 
le-ba-ro-metr' de-j'^/z. 

La chaleur est intoler- 
able, 
la sha-le-re-t/;2-to-le-rabl. 

La chaleur est etouf- 

fante. 
la sha,-le-re-te-too-f«/z-t. 
Nous allons avoir un 

orage. 
Tioo-zoX-lon a-v6ar un-nb- 

raj. 

Cela rafraichira 1' atmos- 
phere. 

sla ra-fre-shi-ra lat-mos- 
fer. 

II fait tres humide. 

il fe tre-sii-mid. 

II fait plus chaud qu' 

hier. 
il fe plii-sho ki-er. 

II n'y a pas de vent, 
il m-a--pad-v an. 

Voila une brise d'air. 
via iin-briz-der. 
C'est delicieux! 
se de-li-si- e. 




palais de Justice ef Sfe. Chapelle, 



I 




V/??>'/V/<' 



PHRASES 



31 



Sensation and 
Feeling. 



A Few Phrases. 

I am cold. 
He is hot. 
We are hungry. 
You are thirsty. 
They are sleepy. 

I shan't be right. 



She won't be wrong. 



We shan't be afraid. 

You won't be twenty 
years old. 

They (f.) won't need 
any money. 



My feet are cold. 

His hands are warm. 

We have got a head- 
ache. 



Sensation et 

Sentiment. 

San-ssi-sion e Sa^i-ti- 

■i)ia7i. 

Quelques Locutions. 
Kel-ke-lo-cii-sii?;/. 

J'ai froid. 
je-froa. 

11 a chaud. 
il-a-sho. 

Nous avons faim. 
VLOO-zk-von-fin. 

Vous avez soif . 
voo-za-ve-s6af. 

lis ont sommeil. 
il-5'6';/-s6-meye. 



Je n'aurai pas raison. 
je-n6-re-pa-re-2'6';/. 

Elle n'aura pas tort. 
el-no-ra-pa-tor. 

Nous n'aurons pas peur. 
noo-no-r^'/z-pa-per. 

A'^ous n'aurez pas vingt 

ans. 
voo-n6-re-pa-7//>z-/(r7;z . 
Elles n'auront pas besoin 

d' argent. 
el-n6-?-6';z-pa-be-zo/>z-dar- 

Jan. 



J'ai froid aux pieds. 

je-froa-o-pie. 

II a chaud aux mains. 

il-a-sho-6-w/;?. 

Nous avons mal a la 

tete. 
noo-za-T/^^z-ma-la-la-tet. 



32 



DRESS 



She is shivering. 
I am catching cold. 
You will catch cold. 



You are sitting in a 
draught. 



I am in perspiration. 

Are you comfortable? 

Wrap yourself u p 
better ! 

I am as warm as can 
be. 



EUe grelotte. 
el gre-lot. 

Je m'enrhume. 
je ;;m;z-riim. 

Vous allez vous 

enrhumer. 
voo-za-le-voo-2'<2/2-rii-me. 

Vous etes assis dans un 

courant d'air. 
voo-ze-ta-si dan-ztm-koo- 

ran-der. 

Je suis en nage. 
je-sUi dn-na,]. 

Etes-vous a votre aise ^ 
et-voo a votr-ez. 

Couvrez-vous d a v a n - 

tage! 
koo-vre-voo da-van-ta.-}. 
J'ai aussi chaud que 

possible, 
je-o-si-sho ke po-sibl. 



Dress (Male). 

The belt (the buckle). 

The bicycling shoes. 

The buttoned boots. 

The cap. 

The collar. 

The collar-button. 

The cotton shirt. 



Les Vetements 

(HOMMES). 

Lie-vet-^nan (dm). 

La ceinture (la boucle), 
la-S2>/-tiir (la-boocl'). 

Les souliers de bicyclette. 
le-soo-lied-bi~si-clet. 

Les bottines a boutons. 
le-bo-ti-na-boo-/^;^. 

La casquette. 
la-cas-ket. 

Le faux-col. 
le-fo-col. 

Le bouton de col. 
le-boo-/(?;z-de-c61. 
La chemise de coton. 
Ia-shmiz-de-c6-/i?;z. 



DRESS 



33 



Dress (Male) 

{continued). 
The cuffs. 
The cutaway coat. 
The Derby hat. 

The drawers. 
The fancy shirt. 
The flannel shirt. 
The gaiters. 
The garters. 

The jacket. 
The kid gloves. 
The laced boots. 
The linen shirt. 
The links. 

The mackintosh. 
The neckerchief. 
The necktie. 
The overcoat. 



Les Vetements 

(HOMMES) 

{suite) (siiit). 

Les manchettes. 
le-;//rt;/-shef. 

La jaquette. 
la-ja-ket. 

Le melon, le chapeau 

rond. 
le-mV^*;/, le-sha-po-rt?;;. 

Le calegon. 
le-kal-5^;/. 

La chemise de couleur. 
la-shmiz-de-coo-ler. 

La chemise de flanelle. 
la-shmiz-de-fla-nel. 

Les guetres. 
le-getr'. 

Les jarretieres. 
le- jar-tier. 

Le veston. 

Les gants de peau 
le-^rt7zd-po. 

Les brodequins. 
le-brod-/^/;/. 

La chemise de toile. 
la-shmiz-de-toal. 

Les boutons de man- 
chettes. 
le-boo-/6';/d-w^;z-shet. 
Le caoutchouc, 
le-ca-oot-shoo. 
Le foulard, 
le foo-lar. 

La cravate. 
la-cra-vat. 
Le pardessus. 
le-par-de-sii. 



34 



DRESS 



Dress (Male) 
{continued). 
The pair of trousers. 

The patent leather 
shoes. 

The Prince Albert coat. 

The pumps. 

The shoes. 

The sleeves. 

The suspenders. 

The slippers. 

The socks. 

The soft felt hat. 

The stockings. 

The straw hat. 

The tail (dress) coat. 

The silk hat. 

The ulster. 

The under-vest (flan- 
nel). 

The waistcoat (the 

buttons). 
The white shirt. 



Les Vetements 

(HOMMES) 

{suite) (siiit). 

Le pantalon, 
\Q,-pan-\A-lon. 
Les souliers vernis. 
le-soo-lie ver-ni. 

La redingote. 
la-re-^//;/-got. 
Les escarpins. 
le-zes-car-Z'/zz. 

Les souliers. 
le-soo-lie. 

Les manches. 
le-;;/a;/sh. 

Les bretelles. 

le-bre-tel. 

Les pantoufles. 

le-pan-tooH' . 

Les chausettes. 
le-sho-set. 

Le chapeau de feutre. 
le-sha-pod-fetr'. 

Les bas. 

le-ba. 

Le chapeau de paille. 
le-sha-pod-paye. 

L' habit noir. 
la-bi-noar. 

Le chapeau haut de 

forme. 

le-sh a-po-6d-f orm. 

L 'ulster, 
liil-ster. 

Le gilet de flanelle. 
le-ji-led-fla-nel. 

Le gilet (les boutons). 
le-ji-le (le-boo-/^;z). 
La chemise blanche, 
la-shmiz t?/ansh. 



DRESS 



35 



Dress (Female). 

The bodice. 

The bonnet. 

The cap. 

The chemise. 

The c'oak. 

The drawers. 

The dress. 

The dressing-gown. 

The dust-cloak. 

The ear-rings. 

The fancy petticoat. 

The hat. 

The open-work stock- 
ings. 

The opera cloak. 

The ring. 

The shawl. 

The silk stockings. 

The skirt. 

The stays. 

The white petticoat. 



Les Vetements (Femmes). 
L,€-\et-nian (fam). 

Le corsage. 
Ie-c6r-saj. 

La capote, 
la-ca-pot. 

Le bonnet, la toque, 
le-bo-ne. la-toc. 

La chemise. 

la-shmiz. 

Le manteau. 

\e-nian-to. 

Le pantalon. 

\e-pa?i-t^-lon. 

La robe. 

la-rob. 

Le peignoir, 

le-pe-nyoar. 

Le cache-poussiere. 

le-cash-poo-sier. 

Les boucles d'oreilles. 
le-boo-cle-do-reye. 
Le jupon de couleur. 
le-j n-pond-coo-ler. 
Le chapeau. 
le-sha-po. 
Les bas a jour, 
le-ba-a-joor. 

La sortie de bal. 

Ia-s6r-tid-bal. 

La bague. 

la-bag. 

Le chale. 

le-shal. 

Les bas de sole. 

Ie-bad-s6a. 

La jupe. 

la- j lip. 

Le corset. 

le-cor-se. 

Le jupon blanc. 

\e-]\x-p07i-dlan. 



36 



TRAVELING REQUISITES 



Traveling Requisites. 

The trunk. 
The button-hook. 
The clothes-brush. 
The comb. 
The hair-brush. 
The hat-box. 
The nail-brush. 
The needle. 
The pins. 
The razor. 
The scissors. 
The soap. 
The straps. 
The sunshade. 
The thread. 
The tooth-brush. 
The traveling-rug. 
The umbrella. 
The valise, 



Articles de Voyage, 
Ar-ticl' de-v6a-iaj . 

La malle. 

la-mal. 

Le tire-bouton. 

le-tir-boo-/6';z. 

La brosse a habits, 
la-bro-sa-a-bi. 

Le peigne. 

le-penye. 

La brosse a cheveux. 

la-bro-sa-shve. 

Le carton a chapeau. 

le-car-/^;z-a-sha-po. 

La brosse a ongles. 
la-bro-sa- ongV. 

L'aiguille. 
le-giiiye. 

Les epingles. 
le-ze-^/;zgr. 

Le rasoir. 
Ie-ra-z5ar. 

Les ciseaux; 
le-si-zo. 

Le savon. 

Les courroies. 
le-coor-roa. 

L'ombrelle. 

/on-brel. 

Lefil. 

le-fil. 

La brosse a dents. 

Ia-br6-sa-<f«;^. 

La couverture de voyage, 
la-coo- ver-tiir-de-v6a-iaj, 

Le parapluie. 
le-pa-ra-pliii. 
La valise. 
la-va-lia. 



THE TIME 



37 



To Ask and Tell the 
Time. 

What time is it? 

It is 12 o'clock (noon). 

It is midnight. 

It is I o'clock a. m. 

It is a quarter past i. 

It is half past i. 

It is a quarter to 2. 

It is 2 o'clock p. m. 

It is 5 minutes past 2. 
It is 25 minutes past 2. 

It is 25 minutes to 3. 

It is 5 minutes to 3. 

Have you the right time? 

Have you got the rail- 
way time? 

Is your watch right? 



Pour Demander et 
Dire L'Heure. 
Poor-de-W(7;/-de-e-dir-ler 
Quelle heure est-il? 
kel-er-e-til ? 
II est midi. 
il-e-mi-di. 
I] est minuit. 
il-e-mi-niii. 

II est une heure du matin, 
il-e-tii-ner dii-raa-////. 

II est une heure et quart, 
il-e-tii-ner-e-car. 

II est une heure et demie. 
il-e-tu-ner-ed-mi. 

II est une heure trois 

quarts, 
il-e-tii-ner-troa-car. 

II est deux heures de 

I'apres-midi. 
il-e-de-zer-dla-pre-midi. 

II est deux heures cinq. 
il-e-de-zer-j'/;/k. 

II est deux heures vingt- 

cinq. 
il-e-de-zer-vrnt-sink. 

II est trois heures moins 

vingt-cinq. 
il -e-troa-zer-mo/;/ vmt- 

s/nk. 
II est trois heures moins 

cinq. 
il-e-tvoa-zeT-mom-smk. 

Avez-vous I'heure juste? 
a-ve-voo-ler jiist ? 

Avez-vous I'heure du 

chemin de fer? 
a-ve-voo-ler dush-mmd- 

fer. 
Votre montre va-t-elle 

bien? 
votr montf va-tel hlin ? 



38 



THE TIME 



My watch is 5 minutes 



slow. 



My watch is half an 
hour fast. 



What time do 
make it? 

Two to 2. 

[ am 2 to 2 too. 



you 



Ma montre retarde de 

cinq minutes. 
msi-pwntv' re-tard' de sm 

mi-niit. 
Ma montre avance d'une 

demi-heure. 
ma-montf a.-va;is diin 

de-mi-er. 

Quelle heure avez-vous? 
kel-er-ave-voo ? "^ 

Deux heures moins deux. 
de-zer m6/>z-de. 

J'ai deux heures moins 

deux aussi. 
je-de-zer moz'n de 6-si. 



Phrases of Time. 

To-day. 

Yesterday. 

The day before yester- 
day. 
To-morrow. 

The day after to-mor- 
row. 
In a week. 

In a fortnight. 

A week ago. 

A fortnight ago. 

Now. 

Later on. 



Locutions de Temps. 
Lo-cii-sit?;; de-tan. 

Aujourd'hui. 

o-joor-diii. 

Hier. 

ier. 

Avant-hier. 
SL-van-tiev. 

Demain. 
de-;;^z>z. 

Apres-demain. 
a.-pTed-mm. 

Dans huit jours, 
rt'^ai/z-iii-joor. 

Dans quinze jours. 
dan-kinz-]oox. 

II y a huit jours, 
il-ia-iii-joor. 

II y a quinze jours, 
il-ia-z^zV/z-joor. 

Maintenant. 
7nznt-nan. 

Plus tard 
plii-tar. 



THE TIME 



39 



This morning. 

This afternoon. 

This evening. 

Next Sunday. 

Last Sunday. 

Next week. 

Last week. 

Next month. 

Last month. 

To-morrow week. 

To-morrow fortnight. 

A week ago yesterday. 

Two weeks ago yester- 
day. 

Every day. 

Ever}- morning. 

Every evening. 

The whole day. 

Half an hour. 

Half a day. 

Three quarters of an 
hour. 



Ce matin. 

sma-/2>z. 

Cette apres-midi. 

set-apre-mi-di. 

Ce soir. 

se-s6ar. 

Dimanche prochain. 

di-;;/<^;/sh-pr6-j' ///;/. 

Dimanche dernier. 
di-;//<a:;^sh-der-nie. 

La semaine prochaine. 
la-smen-pro-shen. 

Le semaine derniere. 
la-smen-der-nier. 

Le mois prochain. 
le-mosL-pro-s/tm . 

Le mois dernier, 
le-moa-der-nie. 
De demain en huit. 
de-de-7nm an-nit. 

De demain en quinze. 
de-de-»n'n an- kin z. 
II y a eu hier huit jours 
il-ia-ii-ier-iii-joor. 

II y a eu hier quinze 

jours. 
il-ia-ii-ier-/^z>zz-joor. 
Tous les jours, 
too-le-joor. 
Tous les matins 
too-le-ma-/z>/. 
Tous les soirs. 
too-le-soar. 
Toute la journee. 
toot-la-joor-ne. 
Une demi-heure. 
iin-de-mi-er. 
LTne demi-journee. 
iin-de— mi-joor-ne 
Trbis quarts d'heure. 
troa-car-der. 



40 



THE TIME 



The whole morning 

The whole evening. 

It is late. 

I am late. 

You are late. 

It is getting late. 

I am early. 

You are early. 

It is too early in the 
day. 

Early this morning. 

The night before. 

The following morning. 

Don't hurry. 

Hurry up. 

Let us be quick. 

Let us take it easy. 

There is plenty of time. 

Wait a minute. 

Wait for me, please. 



Toute la matinee, 
toot-la-ma-ti-ne. 

Toute la soiree, 
toot-la-soa-re. 

II est tard. 
il-e-tar. 

Je suis en retard. 
je-sui-2'«;2r-tar. 

Vous etes en retard, 
voo-zet-^-a^/r-tar. 

II se fait tard. 
ils-fe-tar. 

Je suis en avance. 
je-sm-2an-TiSi-vaHS. 

Vous etes en avance. 
voo-zet-zan-nsi-vans. 

II est trop matin, 
il-e tr6-ma-/2>7. 

Ce matin de bonne heure. 
se-msi-/znd bon-er 

La veille. 
la veye. 

Le lendemain. 
le /an6.-7;im. 

Ne vous pressez pas. 
ne-voo-pre-se-pa. 

Pressez-vous! 
pre-se-voo. 

Depechons-nous. 
de-pe-sAon-noo. 

Ne nous foulons pas 
ne-noo-foo-/^;z-pa. 

II y a bien le temps. 
il-ia-bi/;z-le-/^«. 

Attendez une minute. 
a.t-ta7i-de iin-mi-niit. 

Attendez - moi, s'il vous 

plait. 
at-/<2;/-de-m6a si-voo-ple. 




de eiiav 









/?a5////e 



II. CONVERSATIONS FOR TOURISTS 

ON BOARD SHIP 

The American tourist, crossing over on the 
French, German, Dutch or Belgian lines of 
steamers, will have no trouble in making himself 
understood, since the officers and stewards all 
speak English to some extent. But it will be both 
pleasant and advantageous to have on hand a few 
sentences in the French language on which to 
practice with friends and companions. It will 
be an opening wedge, so to speak, into the treas- 
ure-house of a foreign language. Nothing could 
be more practical than to get hold of a fellow- 
passenger, also anxious to "improve his French," 
and to employ a portion of the six or eight days of 
absolute leisure in looking over Lee's Guide to 
Paris and becoming thoroughly familiar with 
its contents. If the party of the second part 
should know a little more French than the party 
of the first part, all the better, as many minor 
difhculties could be effectually smoothed over, and 
satisfactory results more quickly secured. 
Remember, the only possible preparation for 
speaking French is — speaking French. 

Good morning, Sir, Bonjour, Monsieur, Ma- 
Madam, Miss.* dame. Mademoiselle.* 

bon-]ooT me-si-e ma- 
dam, mad-moa-zel. 
How do you do? Comment vous portez- 

vous. 
con-ma7i-voo--por-te-vool 
Well — not well, thank Bien — pas bien, merci, 
you. Sir, etc. Monsieur., etc. 

bi - in — pa-bi-2>^ mer - si 
me-si-e. 



*When speaking French, do not tack the family name to 
the "Monsieur." etc. It is bad form. 

41 



42 



On board ship 



Have you had the luck 
to escape sea-sick- 
ness? 



I am never sea-sick. 



I am always sea-sick. 



Captain, what kind of 
a trip do you expect? 



I think the crossing will 
be pleasant, this time. 



Head-steward, where is 
my seat? 

Here, at the Captain's 
table, Sir, Madam, 
etc. 

Bring me the wine list, 
please. 



Steward, I do not feel 
well ; bring me some 
biandy. 



Avez-vous eu la chance 
d'echapper au mal de 
mer? 

a-ve-voo-zii la,-s/mns-de- 
sha-pe 5 mald-mer. 

Je ne suis jamais malade 

en mer. 
je-ne-siii ja-me ma-lad an 

mer. 

J'ai tou jours le mal de 

mer. 
je too-joor le-mald-mer. 

Commandant, sur quel 

genre de traversee 

comptez-vous? 
con - man - dan, siir-kel- 

y'rt/zr-de-tra-ver-se C07i- 

te-voo. 

Je crois que la traversee 
sera agreable, cette 

fois-ci. 
je-croa ke la-tra-ver-se 

sra a-gre-abl, set-foa- 

si. 

Maitre d'hotel, ou est ma 

place? 
metr-do-tel oo-e ma-plas. 

Ici, Monsieur, etc., a la 
table du Commandant. 

i-si-me-si-e, a-la-tabl dii 
co-man-dan. 

Donnez-moi la carte des 
vins, s'il vous plait. 

don-ne-moa la -cart -de 
vin si-voo-ple. 

Gargon, je ne me .sens 

pas bien ; apportez-moi 

un cognac. 
%2Cs:-son je-ne vci^-san pa 

bi- 171 ; a-por-te-moa un 

co-nyak. 



ON BOARD SHIP 



43 



Mr. Purser, I have 
some valuables which 
I wish to place in 
your care. 



Steward, what was the 
day's run this noon? 



They have just posted 
the day's run. 



Captain, do you think 
we shall be in port 
to-morrow? 



At what o'clock? 

Shall we arrive in time 
for the tide? 



I am afraid we'll be too 
late, and obliged to 
use the tender to 
land the passengers. 



Shall we miss the train 
for Paris? 



Monsieur le Commis- 
saire, j'ai quelques 
objets de valeur que 
je desire vous confier. 
me-si-e le co-mi-ser, je 
kelk-zob-jed-va-ler ke 
je-de-zir voo-co7z-fi-e. 

Gargon, combien avions- 
nous fait, a midi? 

gar-son con-hl-m a-vl-on- 
noo fe a mi-di. 

On vient d'afficher le 
parcours accompli 
dans les dernieres 
vingt-quatre heures. 

on-vl-m da-fi-she le-par- 
coor SLC-con-pli dmt le- 
dern-yer vint-coXx-QX. 

Commandant, croyez- 

vous que nous arrive- 

rons demain? 
co-nian-dan, croa-ie-voo 

ke noo-za-ri-ve-r^?z de- 

mm. 
A quelle heure? 
a-kel-er. 
Arriverons-nous a temps 

pour la maree? 
a - ri - ve - 7'-on - noo - a-tan 

poor-la-ma-re. 
J'ai peur que nous 

n'arrivions trop tard. 

Les passagers seront 

debar ques sur le 

remorqueur. 
je-per ke-noo-na-ri-vi-^;/ 

tro - tar. le pa-sa-je 

sro7i de-bar-ke siir le 

re-mor-ker. 

Manquerous-nous le train 

de Paris? 
ina?i-\^e-ron-r\oo \e-trznd 

pa-ri. 



44 



ON BOARD SHIP 



No, there is a special 
train waiting. 

How long does it take 
from Havre to Paris? 



About four hours. 

How large a tip must 
be given to the cabin 
steward — ■ 



the cabin stewardess, 

the dining-room 
steward. 

the deck-steward, 

the bath-boy? 

The first three ought to 
be given about lo to 
1 5 francs apiece ; 



The others, 5 francs 
apiece. 

And the smoking-room 
steward ? 

It depends on the time 
you spent there, and 
the number of drinks 
you ordered. 



Non, il y a un train 
special. 

non il-ia z^n-frm-spe-sial. 
Combien dure le trajet 

du Havre a Paris? 
con-hi-m-dnv le tra-je dii- 

havr a-pa-ri. 

Environ quatre heures. 
a9i-Vi-ron catr-er. 

Quel pourboire faut-il 
donner au gargon de 
cabine — 

kel-poor-boar fo-til don- 
ne o gav-so72d ca-bin, 
a la femme de chambre, 
a.-\a.-fsimd- s/iandr, 
au gargon de table, 
6 gar-i-^;2d'tabl, 
au gargon de pont, 
o gar-^i9;/d pon, 
au gargon de bain? 
o gaT-so7id bin. 

Aux trois premiers on 
donne generalement 
de 10 a 15 francs, 
chaque ; 

o troa pre-mi-e on-don 
je-ne-val-man de-di-za- 
kmzfra7i shac. 

Aux deux autres,- cinq 
francs, chaque. 

6-de-zotr sinfraji shac. 

Et le gargon du cafe? 
e le gdiV-son dii ca-fe. 

Cela depend du temps 
que vous avez passe au 
cafe, et du nombre de 
vos consommations. 

'^Vkdk.-pan dxx-taii ke-voo- 
za-ve-pa-se o-ca-fe, e 
dvi- no7ihx de-vO'Con- 
s6m-ma-si-^/z. 



ON BOARD SHIP 



45 



f hope you did not play 
cards for money. 



I never do so, among 
strangers; it is too 
dangerous. 



Goo d-by, Captain; 
many hearty thanks? 
for this charming- 
trip ; we shall remem- 
ber it for a long time. 



Well, we had a charm- 
ing trip, didn't we? 



Yes, indeed, ladies, and 
you have made it so 
pleasant for me that 
I do not know how to 
thank you. 



Good-by, till then. 



J'espere que vous n'avez- 

pas joue aux cartes 

pour de I'argent. 
jes-per ke-voo-na-ve-pa- 

joo-e-o-cart poor - de - 

\^x-jan. 

Cela ne m' arrive jamais 

avec des etrangers ; 

c'est trop dangereux. 
sla-ne-ma- riv-ja-me a- 

vek de-ze-/r<2;z-je se- 

tro-rt'«;z-je-re. 

Adieu, Commandant ; 
recevez mes meilleurs 
remerciements pour 
cette charmante trav- 
ersee dont nous nous 
souviendrons 1 o n g - 
temps. 

a-di-e co-man-dati re-se- 
ve me-me-yer - re - mer- 
sl-7na7i poor - set-shar- 
mant tra-ver-se, don 
noo - ViO<d-'~>oo-V\-in-dron 
Ion-tan. 

Eh bien, nous avons eu 
un charmant voyage 
n'est-ce pas? 
e-bi/;z VLOO-iAvonz ii un 
shsLT-ma^t voa-iaj nes- 
pa. 

Oui vraiment, Mesdames, 
vous me I'avez rendu 
si agreable que je ne 
puis assez vous en re- 
mercier. 

ooi vTe-ma7i me-dam voo 
me-la-ve ran-du si- 
a-gre-abl' kej-ne piii-za- 
se voO'zan re-mer-sie, 

Au revoir, alors. 
or-v6ar, a-16r. 



AT THE CUSTOM-HOUSE 

Custom-house officers are a nuisance in all 
countries, but I verily believe that French 
officials are the least aggravating of them all. If 
you don't understand "their nasty gibberish," as 
that sweet-tempered lady, Mrs. Caudle, christens 
the French language, ask for an interpreter. 
These speaking machines are to be found in most 
custom-houses, and are generally in fairly good 
working order. 

Of course, when you arrive at Havre, Cher- 
bourg, Calais or Boulogne, you must be prepared 
for the worst. It may be your luck to see your 
boxes rummaged and turned topsy-turvy, your 
shirts crumpled by dirty hands. Buxom ladies 
may even run the risk of being spun into another 
room and searched. It is no good making a fuss, 
you must stand by submissively, looking as meek 
as Moses and never uttering a hasty word. 

Greatcoats provided with deep pockets, and 
plenty of them, have been known to prove useful 
receptacles for cigars and cigarettes, although a 
box of 50, or even 100, especially if a few are 
wanting, is not usually charged for. 

All things considered, tell as few lies — begging 
your pardon — as you possibly can, and be law- 
abiding, even abroad. N. B. — French Custom- 
house officers are not, as a rule, open to tips. 



At the Custom-House. 



A LA DOUANE. 

A-la-doo-an. 



Is this yours? 

Is this all you have? 



Est-ce a vous ga? 
e-sa-voo sa? 

Est-ce tout ce que vous 

avez? 
es-toos-ke-voo-za-ve? 
46 



AT THE CUSTOM-HOUSE 



47 



Have you anything to 
declare? 



What have you got in 
here? 

Have you any tobacco, 
cigars? 



Open your box. 

Open your portman- 
teau. 

Is your bicycle new? 



What have I to pay? 

I am going to Ger- 
many, and back 
through Belgium. 



Where do I go now? 



Where shall I get my 
money back? 



Whom shall I write to? 



Where is the inter- 
preter? 

May I skip now? 



Avez-vous quelque chose 

a declarer? 
a - ve - voo-kel-ke-sh 6z a- 
de-cla-re? 

Qu'avez-vous la-dedans? 
ca-ve-voo-ladV<:7«? 

Avez-vous du tabac, des 

cigares? 
a - ve - voo - dii - taba, de 

sigar? 

Ouvrez votre malle. 
oo-vre vot mal. 

Ouvrez votre valise, 
oo-vre vot va-liz. 

Votre bicycle est-il 

neuf? 
vot bi-sicl' e-til-nef? 

Qu'ai-je a payer? 
kej-a-pe-ie? 

Je vais en Allemagne, et 
je rentre par la Bel- 
gique. 

je-ve-2'<?;/-nal-manye, e- 
ie-rantv' par-la-bel-jik. 

Ou faut-il aller main- 
tenant? 
oo-fo-til a-le 7n/nt-nau7 

Ou me rendra-t-on mon 

argent? 
oo-me-ran-drsi-l07i mon- 

nav jan7 

A qui faudra-t-il que 

j'ecrive? 
a ki fo-dra-til ke-je-criv? 

Ou est I'interprete? 
oo-e-//;z-ter-pret? 

Puis je me tirer des flutes 

maintenant? 
piiij-me-ti-re de-fliit mmt- 

nanl 



ASKING ONE'S WAY 

Once upon a time — this is not a fairy tale, though 
— in the vicinity of Moorgate Street Station, in 
the county of Middlesex, London, E. C, a 
bearded foreigner, whose mustache looked like a 
circumflex accent turned up at the ends, was talk- 
ing to a bur]y policeman. (They are all burly, it 
would seem.) 

"Sir," quoth the foreigner, "would you have the 
obligingness to say me where is it that I am?" 

"I believe you are in the street. Where do you 
want to go to?" 

And the foreign wanderer answered unto him : 

"I desire to go somewhere, in order to see some 
one, but I have forgotten his name and also the 
name of the street in which he inhabitates. But I 
know that he is a maker of frames." 

And looking complacently down, the p'l iceman 
said: 

"Go straight on, turn to the right, then to the 
left, go through the Wool Exchange and you will 
find yourself in Basinghall Street ; Gus Rochefort 
is the name of the man. No — -(Whoa ! back ! no 
free advertisements here) — and there you are !" 

And there I was indeed ! Wonderful ! 

Well, if I had put the same questions to a 
French "agent de police" he would either have 
laughed me to scorn or scattered all the features 
of my face. 

So, if you ever want to know the time, or ask 
your way about, even when knowing the name of 
the street to which you want to go, don't ask a 
French policeman. For goodness' sake, don't! 
He is not supposed to know anything, and he 
knows it, and is proud of it, and will feel greatly 
insulted if asked for any information. 

If he is at all conscientious, he will give you such 
directions as may take you right enough to the 
end of the street, but beyond that you must take 
your chances. "But then?" you are asking. 

48 



ASKING ONE S WAY 



49 



Then go tip to a working-man, he may only have 
a blouse and a cap on, but don't mind that; touch 
your hat — yes, sir, I am not joking, touch your hat 
on going up to him — however reluctantly, and 
don't forget to say s'il voiis plait or merci, 
monsieur. He will tell you your way readily, 
politely and correctly. Don't be afraid of his pro- 
nouncing French badly, his pronunciation is sure 
to be as good as that of any educated man. Shop- 
keepers and students, if you find yourself in the 
Latin quarter, are also reliable persons; but in all 
cases, do not forget the touching of the hat, the 
"please" and the "thank you." 

One piece of advice: When you are gazing at a 
shop-window, beware of boldfaced pickpockets, 
native and foreign — English especially. 

And now — my sermon is over — look at the 
following phrases : 



Phrases of Place. 
(«) Questions. 



Where is 
the—? 



the — the- 



Which is the way to go 
to the cathedral? — 
to the museum? — 
park? — railway sta- 
tion? 



How far is it? 



Expressions de Lieu. 
Ex-pre- si^*?? de-lie. 

{a) Questions. 
Kes-ti^«. 

Ou est le — la — les — ? 
oo-e le — la — le — ? 

Quel est le chemin pour 
aller a la cathedrale? — 
au musee? — au pare? — 
a la gare? 

kel-el-she-;;//>z poor-ra-le 
a-la-ca-te-dral? — o-mii- 
ze? — 6 -pare? — a-la-gar? 

Quelle distance y a-t-il? 
kel-dis-/<rr;zs ia-til? 



Is this the right way to Est-ce bien la route pour 
Paris? Paris? 

es-bi/;/ la- root poor Pa-ri? 

May I go through here? Puis-je passer par ici? 

piiij pa-se pa-ri-si? 



50 



ASKING ONE S WAY 



May I go this (that) 
way? 

Which is the best wa}-? 



Which is the shortest 
way? 



(Are there) any hills to 
go up? 

(Are there) any hills to 
go down? 

Is the hill long — steep — 
good — bad? 



Is the road paved — ? 
Any stones? 



What's the distance 
to—? 



Can you tell me of some 
hotel, not too expen- 
sive? 



What street is it in? 

Which way shall I (we) 
go? 

Can you go with me? 



Puis-je aller par la? 
piiij a-le par-la? 

Quel est le meilleur 

chemin? 
kel-el-me-yer she-7mnl 

Quel est le chemin le 

plus court? 
kel - el - she - mm le - plii- 

coor? 

Y a-t-il des c6tes a 
monter? 

ia-til de-cot a-fnon-tel 

Y a-t-il des c&tes a 
descendre? 

ia-til de-cot a-de-sandT'l 

La cote est-elle longue — 
raide — bonne — mau- 
vaise? 

la-cot et-el long — red — 
bon — movez? 

Y a-t-il du pav6 — ? du 
caillou? 

ia-til dii pa-ve — ? diic a- 
ioo? 

Combien y-a-t-il pour 

aller a — ? 
con-him ia-til-poor a-le 
a—? 

Pouvez-vous m'indiquer 
un hotel pas trop 
cher? 

poo-ve-voo mm-di-ke un- 
no-tel pa-tro-sher? 

Dans quelle rue? 
dan-khX-xv?. 

Par ou faut-il-aller? 
pa-roo fo-ti-la-le? 

Pouvez-vous aller avec 

moi? 
poo - v6 - voo - za-le a-vec- 

m6a. 



ASKING ONE S WAY 



SI 



{b) Answers. 

Here. There.' 

On (to) the right. 

On (to) the left. 

Further. Nearer. 

Straight on. 

In front of you. 

Behind you. 

Next to the post-office. 

Near the town-hall. 

Opposite the station. 

Come this way. 

Go that way. 

Go straight in front of 
you, take the first 
street on the right, 
then the second on 
the left. 



Follow the street R. R. 
line. 

Follow the telegraph 
line as far as the 
bridge, 



{d) Reponses. 

Ici. La. 

i-si. la. 
A droite. 
a-droat. 

A gauche, 
a-gosh. 

Plus loin. Plus pres. 
plii-16/;z. plii-pre. 

Tout droit, 
too-droa. 

Devant vous. 
de-van-YOO. 

Derriere vous. 
de-rier voo. 

A cote de la poste. 
a-c6-te-dla-p6st. 
Aupres de la mairie. 
o-pre-dla-me-ri. 

En face la gar©. 
«;^-fas-la-gar. 

Venez par ici. 
ve-ne-pa-ri-si. 
Allez par la. 
a-le-par-la. 

Allez tout droit devant 
vous, prenez la pre- 
miere rue a droite, 
puis la deuxieme a 
gauche. 

a-le too-droa &e-van-xoo, 
pre-ne la-pre-mier-rii 
a-droat, piii la-de-ziem 
a-gosh. 

Suivez le tramway, 
siii-vel- tra-mooe. 

Suivez le fil telegraph- 

ique jus-qu'au pont. 
siii - vel - fil-te - le - gra -fie 
jias-ko-/(?/;. 



RAILROADS AND TRAINS 

The French Bradshaw or Indicateur des 
Cheinins de fer does not always indicate the 
trains clearly. T-o understand the book, training 
is required. Like its English brother it contains 
several trains that leave and even reach stations, 
and a great many that seem neither to leave nor 
to arrive, but which appear to be always running 
on the line. Very puzzling. All stations are pro- 
vided with a large time-table pasted up on the 
wall, but usually out of sight. Very practical. 

If you have any baggage and want to catch a 
train, you m.ust be in the station at least twenty 
minutes before the time fixed for departure. The 
distribution of tickets and the registration of bag- 
gage are supposed to cease, the former five min- 
utes, the latter ten minutes, before the time of 
leaving. When you have done with all this, you 
are shut up in a first, second, or third class wait- 
ing-room {salle d' at tent e), with padded, semi- 
padded or wooden benches to sit upon. In a 
republic, this is very appropriately called 
equality, fraternity. The- waiting-room is her- 
metically closed; you may not leave it, any more 
than the musty smell can, nor may you see what is 
going on on the line, as the panes are of corrugated 
glass. This is what is called liberty. 

Passengers under three years of age and "in 
arms," ride free of charge. 

Grown-up passengers are allowed 30 kilogrammes 
(64 pounds) of baggage free ; the fee for checking 
\enregistrement) being o fr. 10 (= 2 cents). 

Each station is provided wnth a small parcel- 
room {Consz'gne). The fee is o fr. 05 per article 
and per day. Minimum charge: o fr. 10, to be 
paid when you take out the article, not when you 
receive the ticket on depositing it. 

Passengers have a right — a legal right — to the 
portion of the seat which they have reserved by 
placing there a hat-box, umbrella, book or news 
paper. They have also a right to the portion of 

52 



RAILROADS AND TRAINS 53 

the rack or the portion of the floor of the carriage 
above and under their seat. All trains are not 
provided with "smoking" carriages, marked out- 
side : Fumenrs. Smoking is allowed in all com- 
partments, unless objected to by one of the 
passengers. (Always ask, touch your hat and 
make use of inerci, if favorable answer received.) 
You are not supposed to smoke inside the station, 
but the rule is more honored in the breach than 
anywhere else. 

French trains, generally speaking, travel slowly, 
and safely, if not smoothly. 

Don't be alarmed by the proceedings at depart- 
ure. The station-master whistles, then the guard 
blows a tiny trumpet, and lastly the engine-driver 
whistles, too, and lets on the steam. It would not 
be safe to start a French engine otherwise. 

Important stations and all junctions have a 
refreshment-room. Their reputation as drinking 
and eating places is, like the weather, variable; 
they are far ahead of British or American refresh' 
ment-rooms, however. 

At most railway bookstalls you can buy tobacco, 
cigarettes, cigars, matches, stamps, postal and 
letter cards, and even note-paper. A packet of 
tobacco or of cigarettes costs o fr. lo more than at 
tobacco stores; matches, o fr. 05 more; stamps 
and postal-cards the regular price. Most English 
newspapers (o fr. 25) are to be found at the Paris 
Gare Saint-Lazare and in the kiosqties round the 
Opera. The "New York Herald" costs o fr. 15 in 
Paris, o fr. 20 in the D^pa^'tements, the "Galig- 
nani's Messenger " o fr. 20, and o fr. 25. 

Railways and Trains. Chemins de Fer et 

Trains. 
She-W2>zd fer e-trm. 

Where is the railway Ou est la gare du 
station? chemin de fer? 

oo-e-la-gar dii-she - ?;z2>?d 
fer? 

When is the train Quand part le train pour 
to X—? X—? 

can-'^ax le trm poor X — ? 



54 



RAILROADS AND TRAINS 



Is it a slow train? 

Is it a fast train? 

Is it a through train? 

Have I got to change? 

Where? 

When does it get to 
Paris? 

Where is the time-table? 

Where is the ticket- 
ofifice for Dieppe? 



Where is the luggage- 
office? 

Where is the cloak- 
room? 

Where are the toilet- 
rooms? 

A first (second, third) 
single to Rouen. 



A first (second, third) 
return to Dieppe. 



How much? 



Est-ce un train omnibus? 
e-sun-frm-6ni-m-hns7 

Est-ce un train express? 
h-sun trill ex-press? 

Est-ce un train direct? 
e-su?t-trm di-rect? 

Faut-il changer de train? 
fo-til ska7i-]e de-tri'n'^ 

Ou? 
oo? 

Quand arrive - 1 - on k 

Paris? 
can-tSi-r\v-/on a-Pa-ri? 

Ou est I'indicateur? 
oo-e /2>?-di-ca-ter? 

Oii est le bureau des 
billets pour Dieppe? 

oo-el-bii-ro de-bi-ie-poor 
Diep? 

Ou est le bureau des 

bagages? 
oo-el bii-ro de ba-gaj? 

Ou est la consigne? 

oo-e-la-V^/z-siny? 

Ou sont les cabinets? 
oo-son le-ca-bi-ne? 

Une premiere (seconde, 

troisieme) aller pour 

Rouen. 
iin pre-mier (se-^^/zd, 

troa - ziem a - le poor 

'R.oo-an. 

Une premiere (seconde, 
troisieme) aller et 
retour pour Dieppe. 

iin pre - mier (se-^6'?zd, 
troaziem) a-le er-toor 
poor Diep. 

Combien? 
con-bmil 



Railroads and trains 



55 



Porter, get me a corner. 

Where is the guard? 
Are you the guard? 



Look after my bicycle, 
will you? 



Employe, trouvez-moi un 

coin. 
an-p\6-ie, troo-ve-moa iin- 

com. 

Ou est le chef de train^ 
oo-el-shef de-^rml 

Est-ce vous le chef de 

train? 
es-vool-shef de-/r/;z? 

Prenez soin de mon 
bicycle, s'il vous plait, 
pre-ne som de-mon bi- 
sicl', si-voo-ple. 



(And so saying— or even without saying any- 
thing — the wise traveler tips the guard ten or 
twenty cents — 50 centimes, or i franc.) 



There is no room in the 
second class. 

Can I go first? 

My baggage is lost. 

I saw it at Dieppe. 

It was labeled. 



II n'y a pas de place en 

seconde. 
il-nia-pad-plas ans-gofd. 

Puis-je aller en premiere? 
piiij a-le an premier? 

Mes bagages sont perdus. 
me ba-gaj son per-dii. 

Je les ai vus a Dieppe, 
je-le-ze-vii a Diep. 

lis etaient enregistres. 
il-ze-te rt?zr-jis-tre. 

Puis-je attraper un train 

pour — ? 
piii] - a- tra -pe un - trzn 

poor — ? 

La fumee vous derange- 

t-elle? 
la-fii-me voo de-ranytell 

Would you like me to Voulez-vous que je ferme 
shut— open— the win- — j'ouvre— la fenetre? 
dow? voo - le - voo - kej - f erm — 

joovr' — la-fe-netr? 



Can I catch 
for—? 



a train 



Do you mind smoking? 



56 



RAILROADS AND TRAINS 



May I shut— open — the 
window? 



Have you got the tick- 
ets, my dear? 



We shall arrive in about 
fifteen minutes, my 
dear. 



They collect the tickets 
at the gate. 

Get your hand baggage 
ready, and roll your 
rug tight. 



Are you sure you forget 
nothing? 



Porter, a cab. 
A four-wheeler. 
A small omnibus. 
I have no baggage. 
I have some baggage. 



Voulez-vous me permet- 

tre defermer — d'ouvrir 

— la fenetre? 
voo - le - voom - per - metr" 

de-fer-me — doo-vrir— 

la-fe-netr? 

Avez-vous les billets, mon 

cher? 
a ve-voo le-bi-ie mon 

sher. 

Nous arriverons dans a 
peu pres quinze mi- 
nutes, ma chere. 

noo-za-ri-ve-r^;/ dan-iA- 
pe-pre ki7iz-ni\-rivX ma- 
sher. 

On prend les billets a 

I'arrivee. 
oii-pr an\h-\y\-\Q a-la-ri-ve. 

Preparez vos petits bag- 
ages, et roulez bien 
votre couverture de 
voyage. 

pre-pa-re v6-p'ti-ba-gaj 

e roo-le-bi/?z votr coo-ver- 

tiird voa-iaj. 

Etes-vous sur que vous 

n'oubliez rien? 
et-voo-siir ke voo-noo-blie 

xiin. 

Employe, un coupe. 
<2;z-pl6-ie, //?z-coo-pe. 

Un fiacre a galerie. 
un fi-acr' a gal-ri. 

Un omnibus de famille. 
un om-ni-biisd'fa-miye. 
Je n'ai pas de bagages. 
je-ne-pad-ba-gaj. 

J'ai des bagages. 
je-de-ba-gaj. 



CABS AND CABBIES 

There are two sorts of cabbies in Paris: those 
who will drive you at a decent pace, and those 
who will tear along the crowded streets regardless 
of their freight and of the passers-by ; those who 
will take you where you want to go with a certain 
amount of care, and those who will spill you on 
the asphalt or at a street corner ; those who have 
an idea, however vague, of the street, the name 
of which you called out on getting in, and those 
who ask you where it is ; in short, there are cabbies 
who can drive, and cabbies who cannot. The 
percentage of the latter is extraordinarih^ high ! 
So I feel rather nervous about recommending you 
cabs as a non-emotional as well as a safe means of 
conveyance. 

Of course, if you have insured your life for the 
benefit of your relatives, or if you are in the habit 
of carrying about you an illustrated paper that 
will guarantee the bearer so much, on the strict 
understanding that he loses one or two limbs and 
a couple of eyes, oh, then, it is a very different 
matter! By all means do take ^.fiac7'e. 

On the other hand, if you are in no hurry to 
depart this wicked world, and more particularly 
this abominable (but nice) place, Paris, go on foot, 
or take a 'bus. These are heavier vehicles, and 
they don't upset as a rule, although they will now 
and then overthrow a growler, but what does it 
matter, so long as you yourself are not bodily or 
mentally upset by them? 

There are seasons in the 3^ear when the Parisian 
coachman is polite and meek, others when he is 
the reverse. When Paris is overflowing with 
"distinguished" foreigners, and the air is balmy 
and gay, you must approach a disengaged coach- 
man with a pleasant smile and due reverence for 
his elevated position, and let him understand that 
you will acknowledge his valuable services by a 
"good-for-a-drink" (tip). 

57 



5^ CABS AND CABBIES 

There are two sorts of carriages : first, Voiiures 
fennees — v6a-tiir-f er-me — (hackney - carriages) ; 
second, Voitures decouvertes or Victorias — 
voa-tiir de-cou-vert — victoria — (open carriages). 
The latter are in great demand in the summer, 
and not easily found, especially in the afternoon. 
It is very enjoyable to take a drive in one of 
them round the boulevards or in the Bois de 
Boulogne (boad-boo-lonye). 

Inside the Paris walls, the legal fare is not per 
distance but per drive {a la course — a la coors), 
that is: i fr. 50 before 12:30 p. m. (after, 2 fr. 25); 
tip, o fr. 25. If two or three people are going in 
the same carriage and mean to drive from one end 
of Paris to the other, say from Montmarte 
(;;z^;z-martr') to Montrouge (mon-rooj), the tip 
should be made proportionate to the distance. By 
the hour the rate is 2 fr., with a tip of 25 centimes 
per hour. The above tariffs apply to all cabs 
having a conspicuous number painted on their 
lamps. Cabs with inside seats for four passengers 
cost a trifle more ; there are no open carriages of 
that kind. 

N B. — If you are in a cafe, restaurant or hotel, 
and in need of a cab, always send the waiter for it. 



To Get a Cab. 



Pour Avoir Une 

VOITURE. 

Poor a-voar tin voa-tiir. 



Waiter, call me a cab, Gargon, appelez-moi une 
please. voiture, s'il vous plait. 

gar - son, ap-le-moa iin 
voat-tiir, si-voo-ple. 
Waiter, get me a cab, Gargon, allezmechercher 
please. une voiture, s'il vous 

plait. 
gav-son, ale me-sher-she 
iin voa-tiir, si-voo-ple. 

— a closed carriage. — une voiture fermee. 

— iin voa-tiir-ferme. 

— an open carriage. — une voiture decouverte. 

— iin voa-tiir de-coo-vert. 



CABS AND CABBIES 



59 



—a warmed carriage. 

— a four - wheeler for 
my baggage. 



Tell the cabby to come 
and wait for me here 
at noon. 

— at one o'clock sharp, 

—a quarter past two. 

— half -past twelve p. m. 

— half past twelve a. m. 

A cab with a good 
horse. 

Coachman, by the hour. 

Wait for me here. 

Coachman, Saint- 
Lazare station. 

Don't drive so fast. 

A franc extra if I catch 
the train. 

Here is the tariff. 

You can't cheat me, 
that's an over-charge. 



— une voiture chauffee. 
— iin voa-tiir sho-fe. 

— une voiture a galerie 
pour mes bagages. 

— iin voa-tiir a gal-ri poor 
me-ba-gaj. 

Dites au cocher de venir 
m'attendre ici a midi. 

dit 6-c6-she dev-nir ma- 
tandiV is-i a mi-di. 

— a une heure precis. 
— a iin-er-pre-si. 

—a deux heures et quart. 
— a de-zer e car. 
— a midi et demie. 
— a mi-di e de-mi. 
— a minuit et demie. 
— a mi-niii e de-mi. 

Une voiture avec un bon 

cheval. 
iin voa-tiir a-vec ti7i bon 

she-val. 

Cocher, a I'heure. 
co-she, a-ler. 

Attendez-moi ici. 
a-/rt;z-de-moa i-si. 

Cocher, gare Saint- 

Lazare. 
co-she, gar-j/>z-la-zar. 

N'allez pas si vite. 
na-le-pa-si-vit. 

Un franc de pourboire si 
j'attrape le train. 

tin /ran de- poor-boar si 
ja-trap \e-trm. 

Voila le tarif . 

v6a-lal-ta-rif. 

Vous ne pouvez pas me 
refaire, c'est trop. 

voon-poo-ve-pa mer-fer, 
se-tro. 



'BUSES AND STREET CARS 

There are eighty-five lines of omnibuses and 
street cars (called tramways in France and Eng- 
land) in Paris. As a means of conveyance, 'buses 
and cars are safe and comfortable enough, but 
extremely slow, and there are not nearly enough 
of them. Hours: 7 or 7:30 a. m. till 12:20 a. m. 

'Buses and cars stop at certain stations, called 
Bureaux des Omnibus. These are very useful 
places when it is raining. On the busiest lines, it 
is safe to go in and ask for a number, naming the 
direction of the 'bus you want to take. (Buy a 
map of the car and 'bus lines.) An official, with 
an O on his cap, will give you a number. Look 
out for the next 'bus, follow the other passengers, 
and if your number is called out, get in. 

"Inside" and ''plate-forme'' (where the con- 
ductor stands), o fr. 30; "outside," o fr. 15, all the 
way. If your 'bus or car does not take you 
straight to the place where you want to go, but 
crosses another line which will suit you, say, on 
paying your fare: ''Correspojidajice'' {co-res-pon- 
dajis), which means "a transfer." If you are 
inside or on the plate-forme^ it is given you free 
of charge; if outside, on payment of 15 centimes 
extra. 

At the proper station for changing lines, go to 
the O man in the Bureau, get another number, etc. 

The coachmen in the service of the Coinpagnie 
Generate des OmJiibus drive well. Always try to 
get into a 'bus or car as near to its starting-point 
as possible. The direction followed by the 'bus, 
both on outward and return journey, is shown by 
a movable board at the back. When the 'bus is 
"full" you will see the word complet at the back, 
above the entrance. But this means that the 'bus 
is complet "inside" only. A glance will tell you 
if it is "complet" outside, also. 

No one is ever allowed aboard above the number 
of passengers for whom seats are provided. 

60 



BUSES AND STREET CARS 



6i 



'Buses and Cars. 

Where is the Omnibus 
station for — ^ 



A number for — 

What's the color of the 
'bus for — ? 



Is this right for — ? 



How long does it take 
to get to — ? 



Any room inside? out- 
side? 



A transfer, please. 



Where have I to change 
to go to — ? 



Where do I get out? 

Put me down street. 

Have you got a plan o"^ 
the tram and 'bus 
lines? 



How much? 



Omnibus et Tramways. 

Om-ni-biis e-tram-oo-e. 

Ou est le Bureau des 

omnibus pour — ? 
oo-el bii-ro de-zom-ni-biis 

poor — ? 
Un numero pour — ? 
?/;/-nii-me-r6 poor — ? 
Quelle est la couleur de 

I'omnibus pour — ? 
kel-e la-coo-ler de lom-ni- 

biis poor — ? 
Est-ce bien la voiture 

pour — ? 
es-bi/;/ la-v6a-tiir poor — ? 

CombJen de temps faut-il 

pour aller a — ? 
co7i-\Ain ^e-tan fo-til poor 

a-le a — ? 

Y a-t-il de la place a 
I'interieur? I'imperiale? 

ia-til de-la-plas a-//«-te- 
rier? a-//7Z-pe-rial? 

Une cor r e spon dance, 

s. V. p. 
xm-Q6-res-p07t-dans, s.v.p. 

Ou faut-il que je change 

pour aller a — ? 
oo-f5-til 'keys/ian] poor 

a-le a — ? 
Ou faut-il descendre? 
oo-fo-til d-j"rt;/dr'? 

Arretez-moi, rue — . 
a-re-te-moa, rii — . 
Avez-vous un plan des 

lignes de tramwa}^ et 

d'omnibus? 
a-ve-voo itn-plaii de-liny- 

de tram-oo-e e-dom-ni- 

biis? 
Combien? 
con-hunl 



POST AND TELEGRAPH OFFICES 

Bureaux de Poste (Blue lamp outside). 
Hours: Summer, 7 a.m.; Winter, 8 a. m. till 9 
p. M. ; Sundays, till 6 p. m. 

When you get into a post-office in Paris, or in 
any large French town, the first thing you. notice 
is the foulness of the air. So, take a long breath 
before you go in. Another thing which you can 
hardly help being struck by, is the amount of time 
that will elapse before you are served. While No. 2 
is hard at work. No. 3 and No. 4, and occasionally 
No. 5, will gaze idly at you with a condescending 
air, through the railings, or chat pleasantly 
together. If you want to send, or cash, a money- 
order, they will politely refer you to No. 2, 
who seems to be the only creature doing any 
work at all in the establishment. Wait patiently, 
if you can, till the people who arrived before 
you are served. (No smoking allowed, of course; 
it might corrupt the atmosphere !) They man- 
age these things better in America and other 
countries. 

There are not nearly enough post-offices in 
Paris, and the result is that at certain hours of 
the day they are crowded beyond endurance. 
Moral: Never go to a post-office to buy a stamp; 
go to a tobacco store. 

N. B. — Most post-offices are provided with a 
public telephone closet {Cabinet telephonique 
public. ) 

Postage. 

France, Algeria, Corsica: 

Letters: o fr. 15 — per 15 grammes (about ^ oz.). 
Lettei'-cards: o fr. 15. 

Postal-cards: o fr. 10 — with "reply," o fr. 20. 
Registered Letter: o fr. 25, in addition to 
postage. 

62 



POST AND TELEGRAPH OFFICES 6^ 

Foreign Postage. 

To the United States and all other countries 
included in the Postal Union : 

Letters: o fr. 25 per 15 grammes (^ oz.). 
' Letter-cards: o fr. 25. 

Postal-cards: o f r. 10 — with "reply," o fr. 20. 

Registered letter: o fr. 25, in addition to 
postage. 

Newspapers for America: o fr. 5 per 50 
grammes. 

Stamps are to be had at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 50 
centimes. 

The proper way of addressing a letter for France 
is as follows : 

Monsieur Jean de Mussy, 

Rue des Champs, 37, 

Montmedy, 
(Meuse). 

(Meuse, the department, in parenthesis.) 

Sending or Cashing] Money-Orders. 

The fee for sending a money-order within 
France or to Algeria or Corsica is i centime per 
franc. 

The fee for sending a money-order to the United 
States is 25 centimes per 25 francs or fraction of 
25 francs.* 

I. Sending a Money-Order {Emissioji de Mait- 
dats). 

Get your letter ready for posting, address and 
all. On entering the post-office of a large town, 
go to that part of the railings where you see the 
words Emissioti de Mandats written. When your 
turn comes say to the official : Mandat de — 
francs (see Numbers, p. 17) — Mdn-^2L-^Q—fraji — 
"Money-order for — francs" — and add: Je paie les 
frais — je-pe-le-fre — "I'll pay the fee." Then the 
official will ask you: Qui envoie? — ki-rt;z-v5a? — 



* You can't send more than 252 francs (50 dollars) by 
each money order,— but you will more likely want to cash 
that sum than send it. 



64 POST AND TELEGRAPH OFFICES 

"Who is the sender?" You are expected then to 
give your name and address. The best plan is to 
have both written out on a piece of paper. 

To send a money-order — inland or abroad — you 
have no form to fill up. 

Postal -orders are also obtainable for the value of 

1, 2, 5, lo, and 20 francs, but for France only. 

2. Cashing a Money-Order {Paiemeiit de Man- 

dats). 

You must prove your identity by producing 
whatever bo7ta fide documents you have relating 
to yourself. This is very important, especially if 
you are not staying at a hotel, A passport is 
always a valuable thing to have in such cases. 
Sometimes, officials will be satisfied with being 
shown the envelope containing the order to be 
cashed, but these thinking-a-lot-of-themselves 
gents are versatile in the extreme. On entering 
the post-office, make straight for the man whose 
face you perceive through the railings, under the 
words: Paiement de Mandats. 

3. Telegraph Money-Orders {Mandats Tele- 
graphiques) can be sent or received. The fee is i 
centime per franc, plus cost of telegram, and a 
fixed fee of 50 centimes for notifying the 
receiver. 

General Delivery (Poste Restante). 

In France letters can be sent Poste Restante to 
all provincial and Parisian offices. Letters 
addressed only: A. Jones, Esq., or Monsieur 
Jones, Poste Restante, Paris, are only to be had 
at the Hotel des Postes (General Post-Office) in 
the Rue du Louvre, between the hours of 7 or 
8 a. m. and 10 p. m. (5 p. m. on Sundays) Let- 
ters addressed to other offices should bear the 
address of the office. A letter addressed to you 
by name at a Poste Restante can onlj^ be handed 
to you on proof of your identity. The best plan is 
to have it addressed in your own initials, or to 
any initials you like: ^. ^., W.H.A.T. C.H.E.E.R., 
or to a number. Letters thus addressed will be 
delivered to you without any difficulty. 



POST AND TELEGRAPH OFFICES 65 

A chemical formula is often used (the use of 
formulse of explosives being strongly deprecated 
just now). 

Letter-Boxes (Hours of Collection). 

In Paris and in all the large cities of France, 
you find on the letter-boxes indications when the 
next mail will be distributed in the city and when 
the next mail leaves for the country (departements) 
and for abroad (etranger). These indications run 
as follows: Les lettres jet^es d, la botte rnain- 
tenant seront dtstribuees cl Paris aujourd' hin 
(or deinam) entre (say) hitit heures et 7ieiif 
heures et deniie die soir — "Letters posted now will 
be distributed in Paris to-day {or to-morrow) 
between (say) 8 and 9:30 p. m." 

For Departements and Etranger, the notice 
runs as follows: Les lettres pour les Departe- 
ments et V Etra7iger partirojit aujourd' hui 
(if the collection is not made) or demain (if 
made). "Letters for the country and abroad will 
leave to-day or — as the case may be — to-morrow." 

In Paris there are eight collections and eight 
deliveries per diem. On Sundays, only the 
eighth is omitted. 

Every letter-box has an indicator showing the 
number of the collection last made, as follows: 
La I ^re {2 e., je.) levee est faite. 

The last collection for country and abroad, in 
Paris, takes place at 4:30 in pillar-boxes and boxes 
outside tobacco stores, at 5:30 in most post-ofhces. 
At 6 (as late as 7:30 in a few) by putting on an 
extra stamp of 15 centimes (3 cents). 

Letters for England. 

They can be posted without extra charge as late 
as 8:30 p. M. at the post-ofhce branch in the Rue 
d'Amsterdam, 19 (alongside the Gare Saint- 
Lazare), or in one of the two letter-boxes inside 
the large hall of Gare Saint-Lazare, first floor. 

Letters for the United States. 

By posting them before 5 p. m. on Tuesda3^s and 
Fridays you make sure of their departure by the 
Wednesday and Saturday steamers. For other 
steam^rg, ask the hotel interpret©?. 



66 POST AND TELEGRAPH OFFICES 

There are a few pillar-boxes after the American 
style in Paris, but these have been painted a dark 
green color, so they are not very conspicuous. 
They also sometimes have advertisements posted 
at the top of them ; hence the pillar-box looks like 
an ordinary pillar, and not a receptacle for 
letters. There is a box in every tobacco-store. 

In villages not provided with a post-office, the 
letter-box and the local tobacco store, where stamps 
are to be had, are generally to be found in the 
vicinity of the church. 

Telegraph Offices. 

Te:le:graphe (Blue lamps outside). 

Hours: Summer, 7 a. m. ; Winter, 8 a. m. till 9 
p. M. Sundays, till 6 p. m. 

The office at 4 Avenue de 1' Opera, Paris, is open 
till 12 p. m. , also that of the Grand Hotel, Boule- 
vard des Capucines. The office at the Bourse 
(Stock-Exchange) is open all night. 

Telegraph and post offices are usually in the 
same building. Telegrams must be written in 
ink, not in pencil. If you cross out any words, 
you are required to state the fact and the number 
of words crossed out over your signature on the 
blank. Example: Biffe, trois mots. John Q. 
Beanbody. Forms are to be found on tables, with 
pens which sometimes won't write. Minimum 
charge for France (20 words or less), o fr. 50. 
Each additional word, 5 centimes. For England, 
o fr. 20 per word. For New York, i fr. 25 per 
word from Paris. Special rates for every Ameri- 
can city. For instance, Chicago, i fr. 55 per 
word. No minimum, and codes may be freely 
used.* A telegram with "prepaid answer" is 
charged o fr. 50 cent, extra for ten words. The 
letters R. P. {repo?ise payee = "answer prepaid") 
to be written before the address ; they count as one 
word and are charged for. AU telegrams to be 
signed, except those for foreign countries. A tele- 
gram to be called for can be sent Poste Rest ante 
or Telegraphe Rest ant. In large telegraph-offices 
in Paris, telegram cards for Paris (open, o fr 30; 

•See Code, pages 170-74. 



II 



POST AND TELEGRAPH OFFICES 



67 



closed, o fr. 50) can be sent by pneumatic tube. 
They are supposed to be delivered within two 
hours. No limit to number of words. There is a 
special box for these cards, inside or outside the 
telegraph-office, and bearing the words: Cartes 
Te;le^grammes. These are to be obtained from the 
telegraph clerk. 



Post-Offices. 



Is there a post-office 
near here? 



"Where is the General 
Post-Office? 

One postal-card for 
England, please. 



Two 5-cent stamps. 

Three 3-cent letter- 
cards. 



Four 5-cent letter- 
cards. 

Two postal cards with 
"reply," 



Will letters for England 
leave to-day? 



Bureaux de Poste. 
Bii-rod-post. 

Y a-t-il un bureau de 

poste par ici? 
ia-til un bii-rod-post pa- 

ri-si? 

Ou est la Grande Poste? 
00-e X^rgran^ post? 

Une carte postale pour 
I'Angleterre, s'il vous 
plait. 

iin cart pos-tal poor lan- 
gle-ter, si-voo-ple. 

Deux timbres a cinq sous. 
de-/z>zbr' 2.-sin-^oo. 

Trois cartes-lettres a trois 

sous, 
troa cart-letr' a-troa soo. 

Quatre cartes-lettres a 

cinq sous. 
cat cart-letr a-j"z>^-soo. 

Deux cartes postales avec 

reponse. 
de-cart-p6s-tal a-vec re- 

p07lS. 

Les lettres pour I'Angle- 
terre partiront - e 1 1 e s 
aujourd' hui? 

le letr' poor /rt?z-gle-ter 
par - ti - ron-t^\ o-joor- 
din? 



68 



POST, TELEGRAPH. TELEPHONE 



Have you got any let- 
ters General Delivery 
for Mr. Jones? 



Have you got any let- 
ters General Deliverv 
initialed F.R.O.G.?' 



Please register this 
letter. 



Will one stamp be 
sufficient? 

How much have I got 
to pay for sending 
this? 

Please give me a tele- 
graph blank. 



I wish to pay for the 
answer, twenty 
words. 

Please ring up Central, 
and ask to be con- 
nected with -number 



All right, good -by. 



Avez-vous des lettres 

Poste-restante pour M. 

Jones?* 
a-ve-voo de-letr' post-res- 

tant poor Me-sie jons 

(not Z>jones) ? 
Avez-vous des lettres 

P o s t e -restante a u x 

initiales F.R.O.G. 
a-ve-voo-de-letr post-res- 

tant 6-zi-ni-sial, ef, er, 

6, je. 
Veuillez recommander 

cette lettre. 
ve-ie Te-c6-ma7i-de set- 

letr'. 

Un seul timbre suffira- 

t-il? 
tin-s,e\ tmhr' sii-fi-ra-til? 
Combien faut-il payer 

pour envoyer §a? 
con-blin fo-til pe-ie poor 

a7i-v6-ie sa? 

Veuillez me donner une 

forme telegraphique. 
ve-iem'-don-ne iin form 

te-le-gra-fic. 
Je desire payer la re- 

ponse, vingt mots, 
je-de-zir-pe-ie la Te-_pons 

vin-mb. 

Veuillez sonner le Bureau 

Central et demandez 

le numero . 

ve-ie s6n-ne le bii-ro san- 

tral e dmrt;z-de le-nii- 

me-ro . 

Cela suffit, adieu, 
sla sii-fi, a-die. 



*If you have no card with your name thereon, be careful 
to spell it and pronounce it in the French way. 



ABOUT HOTELS 

"Sare, eef you af no 'otel, I shall recommend you 
milor, to ze 'Otel Betfort, in ze Quay, close to ze 
bazing-machines and custom-ha-oose, goot bets 
and fine garten, sare: table d'hote, sare, a cinq 
heures; breakfast, sare, in French or Amayrican 
style; — I am ze comvitssioriaire (porter), sare, 
and will see to your loggish. ' ' 

These cursed fellows, as Thackeray calls them, 
usually besiege you at Calais, Dieppe or Boulogne, 
when you land, and in fact, whenever you come 
out of a railway station in France. 

Many .guides contain lists of "recommended" 
hotels, and the author usually assures us that this 
"recommendation" has not been paid for. It has 
been inserted, mind, for the sole benefit and wel- 
fare of the traveler, from the pure and unalloyed 
pleasure of making you snug and comfortable. 
So, you confidently step in, are sometimes uncom- 
fortable, often fleeced, and finally you swear at the 
guide and its author. 

"Attendance" and especially "light" (bougies) 
are the two items which often unduly raise the 
amount of the bill. Knowing the not unreason- 
able objection that American (and French) people 
have to paying i fr. 50 for using a penny-worth of 
candle, we advise you to always ask in advance 
that both these charges be included in the price of 
the rooms. 

At Petit Dejeuner, or what we call in America 
breakfast, the tourist may have either chocolate, or 
coffee and milk, or tea and milk, with bread and 
butter. 

At Dejeuner (luncheon) and Diner, wine or 
cider is included in the price, unless otherwise 
stated. Coffee is always considered an extra. 
The usual tip for a single meal at Table d'Hote is 
o fr. 30; for a day or two, i or 2 francs, to be 
divided between the chamber-maid and the waiter, 

6q 



70 



ABOUT HOTELS 



In most hotels you are requested to put down 
your name in a book and to state whence you 
come {venant de), whither you are going {alla7it 
a), your age {age), profession {profession), the 
place of your birth {lieu de naissance). This book 
is supposed to be inspected now and then by the 
police ; so, look out ! 



About Hotels. 



Where is the — Hotel? 



Can you tell me of a 
hotel where the 
charges are moder- 
ate? 

Can you tell me of a 
hotel at moderate 
charges, but very 
clean? 



Can you tell me of a 
hotel where you get 
good cooking? 



Can you tell me of a 
hotel near the rail- 



way? 



Can you tell me of a 
hotel where there is 
a table d'hote? 



Des Hotels. 
De-z6-tel. 

Oii se trouve 1' Hotel 

du— ? 
oos-troov 16-tel dii — . 
Pouvez-vous m'indiquer 

un h6tel pas trop cher? 
poo-ve-voo ;;z//2-di-ke un- 

no-tel pa-tro-sher? 
Pouvez-vous m'indiquer 

un hotel pas trop cher, 

mais tres propre? 
poo-ve-voo ;;z2>z-di-ke un- 

no-tel pa-tro-sher, me 

tre-propr'? 

'Pouvez-vous m'indiquer 

un hotel ou Ton mange 

bien? 
poo-ve-voo 7;2z>z-di-ke un- 

no - tel oo - lori man] 

hiini 
Pouvez-vous m'indiquer 

un hotel pres du chemin 

de fer? 
poo-ve-voo 7;z/;z-di-ke un- 

no-tel pre dvish.-fnind.- 

fer? 
Pouvez-vous m'indiquer 

un hotel ou il y ait une 

table d'hote? 
poo-ve-voo ;;«/>?-di-ke un- 

no-tel ou-il-ie tin tabl' 

d5t? 



ABOUT HOTELS 



71 



Can you tell me of a 
good " resty wrong ' ' 
at fixed price? 



Which way shall I (we) 
go? (see pp. 48, 49). 

Will you take me for 8 
francs a day, every- 
thing included? 



Can you give me a bed- 
room for the night? 



How much for a bed, 
light and attendance 
included? 



I propose to stay here 
two, three (see p. 17) 
days. 



What is the charge per 
day, everything in- 
cluded, with light 
and attendance? 



How much for bed and 
breakfast inclusive? 



Pouvez-vous m'indiquer 

un bon restaurant 

a prix-fixe? 
poo-ve-voo ?;//;z-di-ke un 

bo7i res-t6-r«« a-pri- 

fix? 

Par ou faut-il aller? 

(v. pp. 48, 49). 
pa-roo fo-ti-la-le? 

Pouvez-vous me recevoir 
pour huit francs par 
jour, tout compris? 

poo - ve - voo mer-se-v6ar 
poor '-mfran par joor, 
\oo-con-'^r\l 

Pouvez-vous me donner 
une chambre pour la 
nuit? 

poo-ve-voo me do-ne iin 
shan\)x' poor la-niii? 

Combien une chambre, 
bougie et service 
compris? 

con-\Ain iin shanhr' boo-ji 
e ser-vis ^(?;z-pri? 

J'ai I'intention de rester 
ici, deux, trois (v. p. 17) 
jours. 

]Q-lm-tan-'&\on de-res-te 
i-si, de, troa, — joor. 

Combien la pension par 
jour, tout compris, 
bougie et service? 

coii-\Ain \a.-pait-'&wn par 
joor, too-con-^v\, boo-ji 
e ser-vis? 

Combien pour la chambre 

et le petit dejeuner, 

tout compris? 
con-bim poor la-s/ianhr' 

e lep-ti de-je-ne, too 

con-prll 



72 



ABOUT HOTELS 



Will you call me to- 
morrow at — o'clock? 



Have you got a railway 
time-table? 



I wish to wash my 
hands, where is my 
room? 



What floor? 
number? 



What 



At what o'clock is 
luncheon? 

At what o'clock is din- 
ner? 

Is there a bath-room in 
the house? 



Where is the porter? 

Tell me where the W. 
C. is. 



I have got some bag- 
gage at the station, 
here is my check. 



Can I have my baggage 
in l)y to-night? 



Voulez-vous me reveiller 
demain a — heures? 

voo-le-voo me-re-ve-ie de- 
7nin a — er? 

Avez-vous un indicateur 
des chemins de fer? 

a-ve-voo ?/7Z-;z/;z-di-ca-ter 
de-she-;;z/>?d-fer? 

J'ai besoin de me laver 

les mains, ou est ma 

chambre? 
je be-zoz>^ dem la-ve le 

mill, oo e ma shan\yc'l 
A quel etage? Quel 

numero? 
a-kel e-taj? Kel nii-me- 

ro? 

A quelle heure dejeune- 

t-on? 
a-kel er de-jen-fonl 
A quelle heure dine-t-on? 
a-kel er din-/^;z? 

Y a-t-il une salle de bains 

dans la maison? 
ia-til iin sal de-dm dan la 

vcih-zon?. 

Ou est le portier? 
oo-el por-tie? 

Dites-moi oii sont les 

cabinets? 
dit-moa oo-son le-ca-bi- 

ne? 

J'ai des bagages au 
chemin de fer, voici 
mon bulletin. 

je de-ba-gaj 6-she-;;z/;zd- 
fer, v6a-si i?ion hnl-/m. 

Puis-je avoir mes bagages 
ce soir? (see Traveling 
Requisites, p. 36). 

piiij a-v6ar me ba-gaj se- 
soar? 



ABOUT HOTELS 



73 



Tourists will often want to have some clothes 
washed. At most hotels they can get this doxie 
on the premises. If it is only a matter of wash- 
ing a few handkerchiefs, a pair of stockings, or the 
like, ask the chamber-maid. 



Where can I put my 
satchel? 



Might I have a flannel 
shirt washed? 



Might I have a pair of 
stockings washed? 



Will it be ready by to- 
morrow morning? 



It does not matter if it 
is not dry. 

— if it is not ironed. 

I have got a button to 
sew on, can you give 
me some thread and 
a needle? 



— white thread? — black? 

What's interesting to 
see here? 



Oii pourrais-je mettre ma 

valise? 
ou poo-re j metr' ma-va- 

liz? 

Mademoiselle, pourrais- 
je faire laver une che- 
mise de flanelle? 

mad-moa-zel, poo-rej fer 
la-ve iin she-miz de- 
fla-nel? 

Mademoiselle, pourrais- 
je faire laver une paire 
de bas? 

mad-moa-zel, poo-rej fer 
la-ve iin per de-ba? 

Est-ce que cela sera pret 
pour demain matin? 

es-ke-sla sra-pre poor de- 
nim mk-tui} 

Cela ne fait rien si ce 

n'est pas sec. 
slan-fe riz/z sis-ne pa-sec. 

— si ce n'est pas repasse. 
— sis ne pa-re-pa-se. 

J'ai un bouton a recou- 

dre, pouvez - vous me 

donner du fil et une 

aiguille? 
. je - un - hoo-toii ar-coodr' 

poo-ve-voom-do-ne dii- 

fil e-iin e-giiiye? 
— du ill blanc? — noir? 
— dii fil blaiP. — noar? 
Qu'3^-a-t-il d'interessant 

a voir ici? 
kia-til din - te - re - sa7i a 

voar i-si? 



BATHS 

The morning bath is an American institution, a 
fine one too, but from the fact that it is Uttle used 
in France it does not follow that the French 
never wash. Public baths are to be found in every 
town, and are patronized by all classes of society. 

A "complete" bath, in Paris, or in the prov- 
inces, includes a. fond de bain (large piece of linen 
covering the inside of the bath-tub), two or three hot 
or cold towels, and a sort of linen dressing-gown. 

The average cost is i fr. 50 (tip, 20 cent. ). 

In "simple" haXh^,, fonds de bain and dressing- 
gowns are not provided. Always ask for a bain 
complet. 

Soap is generally to be had from the attendant. 

If you want your hands to be white and fair, 
your complexion bright and clear, your skin as soft 
and smooth as velvet, and as fresh as seabreezes, 
you must expect to pa}^ at least 2 fr. 50 per cake. 

vSoaps, like ices, are manufactured in all sorts of 
co'ors and sizes. But if you are not particularly 
anxious that people should recognize that the sort 
of soap you have been using was expensive when 
you shake hands with them, or say "Good morn- 
ing" to them, a five-cent cake will answer your 
purpose cleanly enough, and will float on water 
besides. 

At most public baths there is a chiropodist on 
the premises, who extracts corns, "while you 
wait. ' ' 

Baths. Bains. 

Bin. 



Where are the public 
baths, please? 

Are there any 

near here? 
A cold bath, complete. 



Ou se trouvent les bains, 

s. V, p.? 
oos-troov \e-bin, si-voo- 

ple? 
baths Y a-t-il des bains par ici? 
ia-til &e-bin pa ri-si? 
Un bain froid, complet. 
un-bifi froa con-^\€* 

74 



BATHS 



75 



A warm bath, complete. 

Waiter, a piece of soap. 

Waiter — How do you 
like your bath, sir? 



Guest — Warm — hot — 
tepid — cold — nearly 
cold. 



W. — Would you like to 
have your linen now, 
sir? 

G. — Yes, please. 

W.— Will you kindly 
ring for your linen? 



G.— All right. Where 
is the W. C? 

G. (shouting) — Waiter! 
Waiter! I can't turn 
the tap, I shall be 
drowned and the 
room will be flooded !* 



Un bain chaud, complet. 
un-bin sho con-i^\k,. 
Gargon, un savon. 
^x-son-lln-'S^'k-von. 

G argon — Comment 

voulez-vous votre 

bain, monsieur? 
QO-maji voo-le-voo vot- 

bm, m'sie? 
Client — Chaud, — t r e s 

chaud, — tiede, — froid, 

— presque froid. 
sho, — tre-sho, — tied, — 

froa, — presk froa. 

G. — Monsieur veut-il son 
linge maintenant? 

me - sie ve - til son - lin] 
mint-nan'^ 

C. — Je veux bien. 

je-ve-bi/;?. 

G. — Monsieur voudra 
bien sonner pour le 
linge? 

me-sie voo-dra him s6-ne 
poor \e-lm]. 

C. — Bien. Ou sont les 
cabinets? 

bi/;z. Oo-son le-ca-bi-ne? 

C. (criant) — G a r § o n ! 
Gargon I je ne peux 
pas tourner le robinet, 
je vais me noyer et la 
salle de bain va etre 
inondee ! 

{cr\a7t) gav-sonl ga.r-son\ 
jen pe-pa-toor-ne le-ro- 
bi-ne, je-vem noa-ie e- 
la-sal de-bm va-etr' i- 
no7i-de. 



*If a Frenchman found himself in this awful predicament 
in England he would very likely cry out : I will be drowned, 
and the room shall be flooded. Bother the use of "shall" 
and "will"! 



BARBERS 

The sign of a barber in France is not a pole 
painted red, white and blue, as in the United 
States, but a copper shaving-dish, hanging outside 
the shop. This, of course, in small cities and vil- 
lages — elsewhere there is only a regular sign over 
the door. 

You must not expect a French barber to cut 
your hair in ten minutes. Unlike his American 
brother, he is an artist, he is a Professor of 
Coiffure ! and he must be allowed a good half -hour 
for his work. If you want to have your beard cut 
as well, you must allow three-quarters of an hour. 
Of course, he. will make himself very pleasant, and 
congratulate you on the color of your hair, if you 
have any left. Like his American confrere, he 
will probably draw your attention to the weather, 
and inform you that there has been a "fine shower 
after the rain." 

By this time he will certainly have discovered 
that your hair is falling out, and will offer you, as 
he is by business bound, all sorts and colors of 
washes. Now, please yourself, but these luxuries 
have to be paid for. Hereby hangs a tale which is 
not a story. 

An English gentleman of haughty mien — he was 
of royal descent, being (distantly) related to 
Edward III. — was, when in Paris, wont to pass 
himself off as a lord. His name was Robinson. 
(Milord Robinson sounds rather well in French.) 
One day he entered a barber shop on Place de la 
Madeleine. Two assistants pounced at once upon 
his lordship, and were soon engaged in pouring 
upon his royal head the most costly perfumes. As 
he had only studied French for ten years, and 
could only answer otiz'to the questions put to him, 
he was somewhat surprised at receiving one franc 
change out of the napoleon (four-dollar gold piece) 
which he had carelessly thrown on the counter, 
and at being presented with a rather heavy parcel, 
consisting of valuable scent and of a never-failing 

76 



BARBERS 



77 



hair restorer. Being a milord, he left the one 
franc change on the counter to the bowing assist- 
ants. But once out of the shop he uttered most 
unlordly words, and waxed very wroth, uttered 
great oaths in a very ungentlemanly way, and 
came back to England with an idea that French 
barbers are a sacre bad lot. 

If you should ever want a shave, and find your- 
self in some far, far away country village in Nor- 
mandy or Brittany — and I am now addressing my 
brother cyclists — don't miss the possible chance of 
being performed upon by the local barber. He, or 
she, will most probably introduce a spoon into 
your mouth, or, for want of this utensil, apply his, 
or her, thumb against your cheek — inside your 
mouth, of course — or pinch 3^our nose, just to pre- 
vent a gash on the cheek or upper lip. You will 
find this great fun. 

With a few exceptions payment is to be made at 
the counter. When the operation is over, the 
artist accompanies you to the cash-box, and the tip 
is given either to the man or lady in charge, or 
dropped into a sort of urn placed for that purpose 
on the counter. 

The average charges made by first-class and 
second-class barbers are as follows: 



Haircutting 
Shaving 
Beard . . 
Shampooing 
Tip . . . 
N. B.— In 



First-class, 
o fr. 75 or i fr. 
o fr. 40 
o fr. 60 
o fr. 60 
o fr. 40 
barber parlance, 



Second-class. 
o fr. 30 or o fr. 40 
o fr. 20 
o f r. 25 
o fr. 40 
o fr. 20 
a compiet is the 



name given to a series of operations, consisting in 
cutting the hair and beard, and in shampooing 
both with quinine, or portugal, or lilac water. 

Coiffeurs. 
Coa-fer. 

Y a-t-il un coiffeur par ici? 
ia-til 2in coa-fer pa-ri-si? 
Question. — Les cheveux, 

monsieur? 
Q. — 16sh-ve, m'sie? 



Barbers. 

Is there a hairdresser 

near here? 
Question. — The hair, 

sir? 



78 



BARBERS 



Answer. — ^Yes. 



Q. — How do you like it? 
Rather short or very 
short? 



A. — No. Just trim it. 



Q. — Do you make a 
parting? 

A. — Yes, in the middle 
— on the right — on the 
left. 

Q. — Would you like to 
have your beard cut 
as well? 

A. — Yes, rather short 
at the sides, but don't 
you touch the mus- 
tache. 



Q. — Your hair is falling 
out, sir, would you 
like to be shampooed? 
— with quinine water? 
(o fr. 30. ) — with 
Portugal water? 
(o fr. 40). — with lilac 
water? (o fr. 75). 

Q. — A shampoo to the 
beard as well? 



Reponse. — Oui, les 

cheveux. 
R. — 001, lesh-ve. 

Q. — Comment les voulez- 
vous? Assez courts ou 
tres courts? 

Q. — QO-inan le-voo-le voo? 
a-se-coor 00 tre-coor? 

R. — Non, rafraichir 

seulement. 
R. — no7i, ra-fre-shir sel- 

man. 
Q. — Faites-vous une raie? 
Q. — fet-voo iin-re? 

R. — Oui, au milieu — a 
droite — a gauche. 

R. — 001, o-mi-lie— a-droat 
— a-gosh. 

Q. — Faut-il aussi vous 
tailler la barbe? 

Q. — fo-til 6-si voo ta-ie la- 
barb? 

R. — Oui, assez courte sur 
les cotes, mais n' allez 
pas toucher a la mous- 
tache. 

R. — 001, a-se coort' siir 
le c6-te, me na-le-pa 
too-she a-la moos-tash. 

Q. — Vos cheveux tom- 
bent, monsieur, voulez- 
vous une friction? — a 
la quinine? — au Portu- 
gal? — au lilas? 

Q. — v5-shve tonh, m' sie, 
voo-le-voo iin fric-sw??? 
— a-la-ki-nin ? — 6-p6r- 
tii-gal? — 6-li-la? 

Q. — Une friction a la 

barbe egalement? 
Q. — iin f ric-si^;^ a la-barb 



RESTAURANTS 

Voltaire says somewhere that the English have 
a hundred religions and one sauce, whereas the 
French have a hundred sauces and — no religion. 

There is a great deal of truth in this remark, 
especially as to the sauces, and an American who, 
for the first time, enters a French Bouillon 
(another name for a cheap restaurant a la carte) is 
sure to be bewildered by the number of dishes 
that are provided for the "inner man." Although 
most Americans (especially ladies) of the so-called 
upper class dress and eat in French, and are 
rather well up in dressmakers' parlance and in the 
names of dishes a la somebody or something, they 
will often come to grief in presence of a French 
menu. 

"What on earth can that be, I wonder?" is a 
phrase that I have pretty often heard falling from 
the lips of a puzzled American when gazing at a 
French bill of fare. But before I venture on a few 
explanations on the nature and composition of 
some French dishes, I should like to ask you, dear 
sir — or madam — just one question about a little 
French word you will have to use often, and which 
you might perhaps use wrongly. 

"What's the French for 'thank you'?" 

"Mercz\ of course," you answer. 

"Well, you are wrong." 

"No, I am 710 tf' 

"Yes, you areP' and I'll prove it to you: 
Sapiens nihil affirniat quod nonprobet. (Tumblez- 
vous?) 

I. A Frenchman named Durand, who had only 
been a few months in England, was asked to lunch 
one day by an English gentleman who was living 
in the same house. "Have you ever tasted 
curry?" said mine host. "No," answered the 
invited one. "Well, you shall have some, and I 
am sure you will like it." The guest got through 

79 



8o RESTAURANTS 

a large plateful, thinking all the while it was an 
awful mixture. There was sweat on his brow 
when he swallowed the last mouthful. Then came 
the usual question : "Have some more?" "Thank 
you," answered the thirsty guest, translating 
inerci literally, while he should have said: "No 
more, thank you." Then, to his horror, he found 
himself face to face with another plateful. He 
ate it, but he swore — that he would never touch 
curry again. "Thank you," then, is not always 
equivalent to inerci. Here endeth the first lesson. 

2. A famous Englishman named Jones — the 
name, I dare say, is familiar to you — was dining 
one day at the Restaurant de la Monnaie at Brus- 
sels. Although it hurt his insular pride, he con- 
fessed (to himself) that Belgian cooking ''savez- 
vous'' was first-class and that the wine (drunk in 
Belgium, grown in France) was exquisite. 

Round came the waiter with the cheese ; good, 
honest-looking cheese it was, too. Quoth the 
man: Voulez-vous du frontage, m'szeu? — Merci, 
answered Sir W. Jones, who spoke the language 
fluently. And both waiter and cheese, retreated to 
the kitchen, to the amazement of the Englishman, 
who would have liked to curse the one (as a 
matter of fact, he did) and to eat the other. 
Mercz, therefore, is not equivalent to "thank you." 
Here endeth the second lesson. ''Et nunc 
ertidimzmf" or in "U. S.": "And don't you 
forget it." 

MORAL. 

Mercz aXone in French means, "No, thank you." 
"Thank you" is in French either ouz\ je veux 
bien, or ouz, 7nerci. Q. E. D. 

And never try to use mercz or the verb reinercier 
in the sense of "I will thank you" when asking 
some one to pass you the bread or the sugar. 

The foreigner who thinks that Frenchies live 
almost exclusively on frogs will be sorely disap- 
pointed when he gets into a Paris restaurant, for it 
is a hundred to one that he will not find this 
delicacy on the menu. (Don't you sneer when I 
say "delicacy"! If you only knew!!) But there 
are heapi of other dishes that will enable him 



RESTAURANTS , 8l 

to stay his hunger in a Christian and gentle 
way. 

If you are staying in a provincial town, the best 
arrangement is to put up at some hotel (see p. 69). 
In Paris tourists will find it both economical and 
convenient to hire a furnished room for a week or 
two in an Hdtel Meiible (furnished apartments) 
and to take their meals wherever they happen to 
be in the course of the day. In all Bouillons a 
good, substantial meal can be had for 2 fr. 50 or 
3 fr. Some Marcha?ids de vm, or bar-restaurants, 
deserve also to be patronized, but cannot be recom- 
mended as a whole. Never go to a railway 
refreshment-room, unless you are very much 
pressed by time or hunger, as when actually "en 
route." 

Tourists who are passing through a town at 
lunch time (from 11 to 12) will do well to go to a 
table d'hote where a good dejeuner, consisting of 
four or five courses, is to be had for 2 fr. 50 or 3 
fr. In Normandy and Brittany cider is usually 
included in the price. At first-class tables d'hote 
wine only is served, and has to be paid for. In 
Auberges (inns) where there is accommodation 
for man and beast (/«', 071 loge a pied et a cheval) 
cyclists, tourists and dogs will find cheap and 
generally good fare. 

N. B. — The average tip for a meal of 2 fr. 50 or 
3 fr. is 25 or 30 centimes. In Paris Bouillons you 
may pay to the waiter or waitress and get the bill 
''eturned to you with "paid" {paye) on it, or pay it 
at the cashier's office {Caisse), but before you go 
out. In any case, the bill is to be handed over to 
the man or woman at the door. This is the rule 
in Bouillons only, not in the ordinary restaurants. 



Restaurants, Restaurants. 

Res-t6-r«;z. 

N. B. — The following list includes most of the 
dishes that are served up in good middle-class 
restaurants. U71 or une, before names of relishes 
or side-dishes, does not imply that you get only one 
radish, sardine, etc., but means a plate of them. 



82 



RESTAURANTS 



Side Dishes. 

Anchovies. 
Butter. 
Radishes. 
Sardines. 
Smoked sausage. 

Soups. 



HORS d'ceuvre. 
6r-devr'. 
Un anchois. 

Un beurre. 
tin ber. 

Un radis. 
un ra-di. 

Une sardine, 
iin sar-din. 

Un saucisson. 
U7l so-si-j^?/. 



POTAGES. 

P6-taj. 

Broth (no bread crumbs). Un consomme. 

2171 con-so-me. 

Soups with chips of 

vegetables. 
Soup made of early 
vegetables. 



Une. soupe a la julienne, 
iin soop a-la-jii-lien. 
Une soupe a la prin- 

taniere. 
iin soop j^r/;z-ta-nier. 



Fish. 

Eel — sauce made of 
yolk of an egg vt-ith 
oil, ^^inegar, salt, pep- 
per, sweet herbs and 
mustard. 

Eel — sauce made of 
butter, bay leaves, 
parsley, pepper and 
wine. 

Fresh cod. 

Fried sole. 

Frogs — cream, butter, 
5'olk of an egg. 



POISSONS. 

^oa-son. 

Une anguille sauce 

tartare. 
iin a7i-glye sos tar-tar. 



Une matelote d'an- 

guilles. 
iin mat-16t-^«/z-giye. 

Du cabillaud. 
dii ca-bi-io. 
Une sole frite. 
iin sol frit. 

Des grenouilles, sauce 

poulette. 
de gre-nooye sos-poo-let. 



RESTAURANTS 



83 



Grilled mackerel with 
butter. 



Half a dozen oysters. 

Lobster. 

One dozen OA^sters. 

Red mullet. 

Salmon. 

Skate fried in browned 
butter. 

Skate with cream sauce. 

Smelts. 

Snails ! 1 ! 

Sole cooked in white 
wine and done brown 
with bread crumbs. 



Vn . maquereau a la 

maitre d'hotel. 
ini-msi-'kro a-la metr' do- 

tel. 
Une demi-douzaine 

d'huitres. 
iin de-mi-doo-zen diiitr'. 

Du homard. 

dii o-mar. 

Une douzaine d'huitres. 

iin doo-zen-diiitr". 

Un rouget. 

zai roo-je. 

Du saumon, 

dii s6-7non. 

De la raie au beurre 

noir. 
dla re-6-ber noar, 

De la raie a la sauce 

blanche, 
dla re-a-la-sos dlansh. 
Des eperlans. 
de-ze-peT-/an. 

Des escargots ! ! I 
de-zes-car-go. 

Une sole au gratin. 
iin sol o-gTR-fm. 



Tuibot. 


Du turbot. 




dii tiir-bo. 


Whiting. 


Un merlan. 




U7i-n\hr-la7i. 


Eggs. 


CEuFs. 




E. 


A boiled egg. 


Un beuf a la coque. 
uii nef a-la-c6k. 


Boiled eggs. 


Des oeufs a la coque. 
de-ze a-la-c6k. 


Plain omelet. 


Une omelette nature, 




iin om-let na-tiir. 



84 



RESTAURANTS 



An omelet with herbs. 

An omelet with jam. 

An omelet with kirsch. 
An omelet with rum. 
A savory omelet. 
Fried eggs. 

Beef, Etc. 

Beef cooked in pot with 

carrots. 
Beefsteak. 

Boiled beef. 

Fillet of roast beef. 

Leg of mutton. 

Mutton chop. 

Piece of meat from the 

ribs. 
Shoulder of mutton. 

Calf's brains fried in 
browned butter. 

Calf's head. 

Stewed kidneys, 



Une omelette aux fines 

herbes. 
iin om-let o-fin-zerb. 
Une omelette aux 

confitures, 
iin om-let d-con-ii-tm\ 

Une omelette au kirsch. 
iin om-let 6-kirsh. 

Une omelet au rhum. 
iin om-let o-rom. 

Une omelette au sucre. 
iin om-let 5-siicr'. 

Des oeufs sur le plat, 
de-ze siir le-pla. 

BcEUF, Etc. . 
Bef. 

Du bceuf a la mode, 
dii bef a-la-mod. 

Un bifteck. 
2^;^-bif-tec. 

Du b(£uf bouilli. 
dii bef boo-yi. 

Du filet de boeuf roti. 
dii fi-led-bef ro-ti. 

Du gigot. 
dii-ji-go. 

Une cotelette de mouton. 
iin cot-let de-moo-^on. 

Une entrecote. 

iin-^7Z-tre-c6t. 

De I'epaule de mouton. 

de-le-p6l de moo-/<9;/. 

De la cervelle au beurre. 

noir. 
dla ser-vel 6-ber-n6ar. 

De la tete de veau. 
dla tet de vo. 

Un rognon saute. 
un-vQ-nion so-te. 



RESTAURANTS 



85 



Larded veal. 
Roast kidney. 
Sweetbread. 
Veal cutlet. 
Veal with sorrel. 
Roast veal. 
Black pudding. 
Sausage with cabbage. 



Un fricandeau. 
U7'i-fvi-can-d6. 

Un rognon brochette. 
iin-vb-nio?i bro-shet 
Un ris de veau. 
ttn-Tid-MO. 

Une cotelette de veau. 
iin cot-let de-v5. 

Du veau a I'oseille. 
d{i-v5 alo-zeye. 
Du veau roti. 
dii v6 ro-ti. 

Du boudin noir. 
AvL-hoo-dm noar. 

Une saucisse aux choux. 
iin-s6-sis o-shoo. 



Game. 



Duck with green peas. 



Jugged hare. 



Partridge 
bage. 

Stewed rabbit 



with 



cao- 



GlBIER. 

Ji-bie. 

Du canard aux petits 

pois. 
dii-ca-nar op-ti-p6a. 

Du civet de lievre, 
dii-si-ve de-lievr'. 

Une perdrix aux choux 
iin-per-dri 6-shoo. 

Du lapin saute. 
dvi-\si-p 171 so-te. 



Poultry. 
Giblets of fowls. 
Goose. 
Larks. 
Pigeon. 



VOLAILLE. 

Vo-laye. 

Des abatis de volaihes. 
de-za-ba-tid-v6-laye. 
De I'oie. 
de-16a. 

Des alouettes. 
de-za-loo-et. 
Un pigeon. 
un-yi-Jon. 



1^6 



RESTAURANTS 



Plover. 

Quail. 

Roast fowl. 

Chicken fricassee. 

Thrush. 

Turkey. 

Vegetables. 
Artichokes. 
Asparagus. 
Cauliflower. 
French beans. 
Fried potatoes. 
Green peas with sauce. 

Haricot beans. 
Mashed potatoes. 
Stewed potatoes. 
Stewed salsify. 
Sorrel with sauce. 
SDinach with sauce. 



Un pluvier. 
z^;z-plii-vie. 

Une caille. 
iin-caye. 

Du poulet roti. 
dii-poo-le ro-ti. 

Une fricassee de poulet 
iin-fri-ca-sed-poo-le. 

Une grive. 

iin-griv. 

Du dindon. 
du-din-don. 

Legumes. 
Le-giim. 

Des artichauts. 
de-zar-ti-sho. 

Des asperges. 
de-zas perj. 

Du chou-fleur. 
dii choo-fler. 

Des haricots verts. 
de-a-ri-ko-ver. 

Des pommes frites. 
de-pom frit. 

Des petits pois a la 

f rangaise. 
de p'ti-poa Si-\si-fra7i-'=>ez. 

Des haricots blancs. 
de Si-rl-cb-blan. 
Une pomnie puree, 
iin-pom pii-re. 

Des pommes sautees. 
de-p6m-so-te. 

Des salsifis sautes, 
de-sal-si-fi so-te. 
De I'oseille au jus. 
de 16-zeye o-jii. 
Des epinards au juSo 
de-ze-pi-nar o-ju. 



RESTAtJRANTS 



87 



Dessert. 

Apple. 
Currant jam. 

A peach. 
A pear. 
Plums. 
Prunes. 
Stewed apples. 

Strawberries. 

White grapes — black. 

Ice cream. 



Dessert, 

De-ser. 

Une pomme. 
iin-pom. 

De la confiture de 

grozeires. 
dla-(f6';z-fi-tiirde-gro-zeye, 

Une peche. 
iin-pesh. 

Une poire, 
iin-poar. 

Des prunes, 
de-priin. 

Des pruneaux. 
de-prii-no. 

De la marmelade de 

pommes. 
de la-mar-me-lad de-pom, 

Des fraises, 
de-frez, 

Des raisins blancs — 

noirs. 

de-re-s'm blan — noar. 

Une glace, 
tin glas. 



In a Restaurant. 



Au Restaurant, 
0-res-t6-rrt?z. 



Waiter, the bill of fare, Gargon, la carte, s'il vous 
please. , plait. 

gar-j-*?;/, la-cart' si-voo- 
ple. 

The menu, miss, please. Mademoiselle, le menu, 

s. V. p. 
mad-moa-zel, l^m-nii, 
s. V. p. 
The wine-list, please. La carte des vins, s. v. p, 

la-cart 6.e-vm. 
A steak, underdone. Un bifteck saignant. 

un-bli-tok se-nian. 



RESTAURANTS 



A steak, to a turn. 
A steak, well done. 
Have you any beer? 
Give me some water. 
Give me some bread. 
Give me some pepper. 
Give me some salt. 
Give me a knife. 
Give me a fork. 

Give me a spoon. 
Give me a teaspoon. 

Give me a napkin. 

Coffee in a cup. 

Coffee in a glass. 

Coffee and cognac. 

Coffee and milk. 

Give me some coppers. 

There is a mistake in 
the bill. 



Un bifteck a point. 
un-hif-tek a ip6m. 

Un bifteck bien cuit. 
t^n-hif-tek him ciii. 

Avez-vous de la biere? 
a-ve-voo dla-bier. 

Donnez-moi de I'eau, 
do-ne-moa de-16. 
Donnez-moi du pain, 
do-ne-moa du-^i'n. 

Donnez-moi du poivre. 
do-ne-moa dii poavr'. 

Donnez-moi du sel. 
do-ne-moa-dii-sel. 
Donnez-moi un couteau. 
do-ne-moa un-Qoo-tb. 
Donnez-moi une four- 

chette. 
do-ne-moa iin-foor-shet. 
Donnez-moi une cuillere. 
do-ne-moa iin cii-ier. 

Donnez-moi une cuillere 

a cafe. 

do-ne-moa iin cii-ier a- 
ca-fe. 

Donnez-moi une ser- 
viette. 

do-ne-moa iin-ser-viet. 

Un cafe dans une tasse. 
un-ca-ie dajt-zun-tSiS. 

Un cafe dans un verre. 
un-ca-ie dan-zun-ver. 

Un cafe cognac. 
z^?z-ca-fe-c6-nyak. 

Un cafe creme. 

z^n-ca-fe-cvera. 

Donnez-moi des sous. 

do-ne-moa de-soo. 

II y a erreur dans 

I'addition. 
il-ia-er-rer dan-la-dl-sion. 



I 



RESTAURANTS 



89 



Can I leave my bag 
here for two hours? 



I want to see the man- 
ager. 

At what time do you 
open in the morning? 

When do you close? 

Can I get a cup of 
chocolate or coffee 
here, in the morning? 



Can I have my letters 
addressed here? 



Can I leave a note here 
for a friend of mine? 



Waiter, where is the 

wash-hand stand?* 
Where is the W. C. ?t 



Puis-je laisser mon sac 

ici pendant deux 

heures? 
piii j le - se mon - sac - isi 

Pan-dan de-zer? 
Je voudrais voir le gerant. 
je-voo-dre voar le-je-r«;z. 
A quelle heure ouvrez- 

vous, le matin? 
a-ke-ler 00-vre voo, le- 

ma-//;z? 
Quand fermez-vous? 
<frt;/-fer-me-voo? 
Puis-je avoir une tasse 

de chocolat ou de cafe 

ici, le matin? 
piiij avoar iin tas de-sho- 

c6-la 00 de-ca-f e i-si, le- 

ma-//;z? 
Puis-je me faire adresser 

des lettres ici? 
piiij me-fer a-dre-se de 

letr' i-si? 
Puis-je laisser un mot ici 

pour un de mes amis? 
piiij le-se //;/-mo i-si poor 

itn de-me-za-mi? 
Gar§on, ou est le lavabo? 
gar-s<?;z oo-e le-la-va-bo? 
Ou sont les cabinets? 
00-son le ca-bi-ne? 



In the Country. 

Could you direct me to 
a place where I could 
find something to eat? 



A LA Campagne. 
a-la-cam-pa-n. 

Pourriez-vous m'indiquer 
ou je pourrais trouver 
a manger? 

poo-rie-voo w/;z-di-ke ooj- 
yoo-Th.troo-vesi-jnan-]Q} 



* In country places and small inns or restaurants, it is 
called la fontaine. 

t Don"t be afraid of putting the question to the girl who 
is waiting on you. In French the use of any word is unob- 
jectionable, as long as the purpose is proper. 



go 



Restaurants 



Could you give me 
something to eat? 



Have you got any eggs? 

Could you make me an 
omelet of three or 
four eggs? 



Give me 

wine. 



a bottle of 



Pourriez-vous me donnef 

quelque chose a man- 
ger? 
poo-rie-voo me do-ne kel- 

ke shoz Si-?nan-]el 
Avez-vous des ceufs? 
a-ve-voo-de-ze? 
Pouvez-vous me faire une 

omelette de trois ou 

quatre oeufs? 
poo-ve-voo me-f er iin om- 

let de troa oo catr' e? 
Donnez-moi une bou- 

teille de vin. 
do-ne-moa iin boo - teye 

de-7//;/. 
Donnez-moi un litre de 

cidre. 
do-ne-moa tni Htr de- 

sidr'. 
Avez-vous du beurre? — 

du f romage ?-des fruits? 

— de la salade? 
a-ve-voo dii-ber? — dii fro- 

maj? — de-friii? — de-la- 

sa-lad? 
Donnez-moi ce que vous 

avez, n'importe quoi. 
do-ne-moa ske-voo-za-ve, 

?2z>z-port' koa. 
Ou puis-je mettre ma 

machine? 
oo piiij' metr' ma-ma- 

shin? 
Est-elle en surete, a la 

porte? 
e-tel «;z-siir-te, a-la-p6rt'? 

As you are likely to be served by the landlady 
herself, no tip should be given. If you wish to be 
pleasant, ask the landlord to prejidre ini verre 
(have a drink), and tip the landlady's little boy a 
penny. Your meal will be all the better, and, 
very likely, the cheaper. 

N. B. — For the names of dishes, see p. 82. For 
the names of drinks, see p. 92. 



Give me a litre (one 
pint and three quar- 
ters) of cider. 

Have you any butter? — 
any cheese? — fruit? — 
fruits? — salad? 



Give me anything 3-ou 
have. 



Where can 
bicycle? 



I put my 



Will it be all right out- 
side? 




pavilion de flcre - Minisfere des Qolcnies 




Jfioulin rouge. 



CAFES 

Drinks of all kinds, but only drinks, are seived 
in cafes, unless they are cafes- restaurants. In 
large towns, most cafes of any pretension have 
a terrasse (te-ras), i.e., a place outside with chairs, 
tables, and an awning. 

On going into or out of a cafe, it is customary 
to raise one's hat to the lady-cashier at the counter. 

One way of calling the waiter is to shout gargDn 
(gar-son — lay a forcible stress on the so7t) or to 
knock on the table with the handle of a stick or 
umbrella. If you are outside, on the terrasse, 
give a knock against the pane, but gently. The 
price of those windows or panes, as you are per- 
haps aware, generally varies directly as the cube 
of their area, as mathematicians would say. 

The waiter usually answers the call by bellowing 
out, ''voildi" (= coming), or simply "Oh" (which 
does not mean that he is suffering bodily pains; 
nor does it correspond to the resurrection of the 
Latin O, which started about six years ago in 
Cincinnati, O., or some other place in O-hi-O, 
and which is running its course like the measles 
all over the U. S., where the O ! John, O ! Henry, 
O ! Bill, O ! Peter have effectually displaced the 
old worn-out "say, John," etc., and the more 
modern and insolent "I say, John," etc.). He then 
comes round with a qii' est-ce gii'zl faut vous 
servir? or, que pre7iez-vous? (What will you have?) 

In all cafes you may ask for writing materials. 
Cards, dominoes, chess, billiards (without pockets) 
are played. For the latter a charge of from o fr. 
30 to o fr. 50 per hour is "usually made. News- 
papers, cigars (cigarettes in packets only) are also 
procurable. Also stamps, generally. Tip, not 
less than 2 cents (10 centimes) per person in good 
middle-class cafes ; 4 cents (20 centimes) at least 
in swell places. As no charge is made for paper, 
ink and pen, it is usual to tip the waiter a few 
cents extra when use has been made of them. In 
most cafes there is a letter-box. 

91 



92 



CAFES 



At a Cafe. 

(Before Lunch or 
Dinner.) 



A glass of water. 

A glass of soda-water. 

Waiter, a vermouth, 
straight. (o fr. 30) 

Waiter, a vermouth, 
with syrup. 

(o fr. 30) 

Waiter, a vermouth, 
with curagao. 

(o fr. 40) 

Waiter, a glass of 

Madeira. (o fr. 60) 

Waiter, a glass of 

Malaga. (o fr. 60) 



Au Cafe- 
O-ca-fe. 
(Avant le Dejeuner 
ou le Diner. ) 
Si-va7i le-de-je-n6 
00 le-di-ne. 
Un verre d'eau. 
uji ver do. 
Une eau de seltz. 
tin 6d selts. 

Gargon, un vermouth sec. 

ga.r-so7i, uii ver-moot sec. 

Gargon, un vermouth 
gomme. 

gar-.y^;/, un ver-moot go- 
me. 

Gargon, un vermouth 

curagao. 
gar-j-^;/, ini ver-moot kii- 

ra-s6. 

Gargon, un Madere. 
gar-j-<?;/, uii raa-der. 
Gargon, un Malaga. 
%kr-so7i, yn ma-la-ga. 



(After Lunch or 
Dinner. ) 



Waiter, a cup of coffee. 

(o fr. 30) 
Waiter, a cup of coffee 
in a glass. 

(o fr. 30) 

Waiter, a cup of coffee 
in a cup. 

(o fr. 30) 

Waiter, a cup of coffee 
with milk. (o fr. 30) 



(Apres le Dejeuner 
ou le Diner. ) 
a-pre le-de-je-ne- 
00 le-di-ne. 
Gargon, un cafe. 
^dir-son, un ca-fe. 

Gargon, un cafe, dans un 

verre. 
%kx-son, un ca-fe daft- 

zun. ver. 

Gargon. un cafe, dans 

une tasse. 
ga.r-so7i, un ca-fe daw 

zlin tas. 
Gargon, un cafe creme. 
ga.v-son, un ca-fe crem. 



CAFES 



9Z 



Waiter, a glass of rum. 
(o fr. 30) 
Waiter, a glass of cog- 
nac, (o fr. 30) 
Waiter, a glass of old 
cognac. (o fr, 50) 
Waiter, a glass of char- 
treuse, (o fr. 75) 
Waiter, a glass of bene- 
dictine. (o fr. 60) 
Waiter, a glass of 
kummel. (o fr. 50) 
Waiter, a glass of gin. 

(o fr. 40) 
Waiter, a pot of tea. 

(ofr. 75) 

Waiter, a pot of tea 

with rum. (o fr. 75) 

Waiter, a pot of tea 
with milk, (o fr. 75) 



Gargon, 

G argon, 
ga.v-so?t, 

Gargon, 

Gar§on, 

G argon, 

Gargon, 
gar-j"^;?, 
Gargon, 
^a.r-son, 
G argon, 
^a.T-son, 
Gargon, 
gsiv-son, 
Gargon, 
gas-son, 



un rhum. 
un rom. 
un cognac. 
un c6-niac. 

une fine, 
iin fin. 

une chartreuse, 
iin char-trez. 
une benedictine. 
iin be-ne-dic-tin. 

un kummel. 
un kii-mel. 
un genievre. 
un ge-nyevr. 

un the. 
un te. 

un the au rhum. 
un te-o-rom. 
un the* au lait. 
un te-o-le. 



(In the Afternoon or 
Evening. ) 

Waiter, a glass of beer, 
(o fr. 30) 
Waiter, a glass of lemon 
juice. (o fr. 40) 

Waiter, a glass of gren- 
adine, (o fr. 30) 
Waiter, a glass of gren- 
adine with kirsch. 

(o fr. 40) 

Waiter, a glass of pep- 
permint, straight. 

(o fr. 30) 
Waiter, a glass of pep- 
permint with water, 
(o fr. 30) 



(L'Ap res-mi di ou 

le Soir.) 

la pre-mi-di-ool-soar. 

Gargon, un bock. 
gar-5(?«, ttn-boc. 

Gargon, une citronade. 
gar-J'^?z, iin-si-tro-nad. 

Gargon, une grenadine. 
g&v-son, iin gre-na-din. 
Gargon, une grenadine 

au kirsch. 
gar-S(?;?, iin gre-na-din 

6-kirsh. 

Gargon, une m e n t h e 

seche. 
ga.v-so7i, iin niant sesh. 

Gargon, une menthe a 

I'eau. 
ga.v-son, iin ?nant a-l6. 



94 



CAFES 



Waiter, a, cup of choco- Gargon, un chocolat. 
late. (o fr. 60) gar-son, z^/z-sho-co-la. 

Waiter, a bottle of Gargon, une bouteille de 
champagne. champagne. 

gar-son, iin boo-teye de 
sMn-pdnye. 

N. B. — The prices given in brackets are those 
charged in good middle-class cafes, either in Paris 
or in provincial towns. 

In French cafes the customer sits down to 
imbibe whatever he has ordered. Only in the 
wine shops for the working classes, or in so-called 
"American bars," are drinks served and drunk «/ 
M^ counter. 



Miscellaneous. 

A friend of mine was to 
meet me here ; I can- 
not wait for him any 
longer. If he calls, 
please hand him this 
note. 



Waiter, give me an illus- 
trated paper. 



Waiter, give me some 
ink and paper. 



Have you got a st^mp? 

Is there a letter-box 
here? 



Divers. 
Di-ver. 

Un de mes amis devait 
me rejoindre ici. Je ne 
peux I'attendre plus 
longtemps. S'il vient, 
ayez I'obligeance de 
lui remettre ce billet. 

un dme-za-mi de-vem-re- 
jo/>z-dr' i-si. Jen-pe 
la-t<7;;zdr 'p;ii-l^;?-t<3;;«. 
Sil vi/?2 e-ie 16-bli-j«;zs 
de-liiir-metr' se bi-ie. 

Gargon, donnez-moi un 

journal illustre, 
^r-son, do-ne-moa un- 

joor-nal i-liis-tre. 

Gargon, donnez-moi de 

quoi ecrire, s'il vous 

plait. 
gar-son, do-ne-raoa de- 

koa e-crir, si-voo-ple. 
Avez-vous un timbre? 
a-ve-voo un-tmhf ? 
Y a-t-il une boite aux 

lettres ici? 
la-til iin-boat o-letr' i-si? 



TOBACCO STORES 

Tobacco, like colors and things to eat and drink, 
is a matter of taste which it would be idle to dis- 
pute about: De giistibus, coloribus et . . . 
tobacco non est dispiitatiduin. 

Of course, the French "stuff" is a thoroughly 
despicable thing in the eyes of any decent Ameri- 
can. I beg to reserve judgment, and not to give 
my casting vote. But it is just possible that 
tobacco to you is 

" Sweet when the morn is gray, 
Sweet when they've cleared away 
I/Unch, and at close Of day 
Possibly sweetest." 

And if so, and you have been unable to smuggle 
into anti-free-trade France a sufficient supply, you 
will be tempted (or compelled, or eager) to try the 
article which in France is distributed by the 
government alone. 

The sign of a tobacco store in villages and small 
towns is a small red cask, painted over with pipes 
and playing-cards. It is hung up at the entrance 
of the shop, often a grocer's shop, with the usual 
display of cigar-cases and pipes, of the church- 
warden description, in the window. 

In Paris a tobacco store ( Tabac or Bureau de 
Tabac) is easily recognized by the red lamp out- 
side. Red is also the official color of police sta- 
tions {Co77iinis s ariats de police'). Do not confound 
these two establishments ! 

There is, in Paris, a tobacco store which I'm 
afraid (why am I afraid?) I must recommend — 
free of charge — to foreigners, and that is La 
Civette. It is on the Place du Theatre Fran- 
gaise, opposite the omnibus station. It is con- 
sidered the best place in Paris for tobacco and 
cigars, domestic and imported. 

Tobacco is commonly sold in packages of o fr. 50 

95 



96 TOBACCO STORES 



and o fr. 80, but you can also ask for 10, 15, 20, 
25, etc., centimes' worth of the same. 

A packet of Scaferlati ordinaire costs o fr. 50 
(gray paper). 

A packet of Scaferlati siiperieur costs o fr. 80 
(blue paper). 

A packet of Maryland costs o fr. 80 (yellow 
paper). 

You can get cigars for o fr. 5 or o fr. 10, and, 
truly, they are no worse than many of those for 
which you pay 5 cents in the States. The 
demi-londrh (o fr. 15) is smokable, and the 
Lond7'h is a thoroughly good weed ... if dry, 
far superior to what is sold in America . . . but, 
hush, this is again a matter of smoke. 

Cigarettes are sold in packets of 20, at o f r. 50; 

fr. 60 ; o f r. 70 ; o f r. 80, according to the quality 
of Scaferlati, of which they are made. 

Hand-made cigarettes are now to be found at 
most tobacconists'. Cigarettes are never sold one 

01 two at a time. 

French matches enjoy a world-wide reputation 
for badness. But you can't possibly realize how 
bad they are, especially the "safety*' ones (/. e., 
those which won't light, whether you rub them 
gently or roughly on the box) until you have tried 
them. So buy a box of these for fun — not for 
light ; but for fear of using bad language, only do 
so when you are in a good temper, by no means 
otherwise. Remember that a box of a thousand 
only costs 5 cents in New York and does not take 
up much room in a great-coat pocket. Of course, 
you will pay the slight custom-house duty. But, 
for your own sake, don't support our home 

INDUSTRIES. 

At all tobacco stores you can find postage 
stamps, postal and letter-cards and a letter-box. 
But as the letter-box is carefully hidden away in 
the front of the shop — French people are so prac- 
tical, you know ! — it is probable that you will miss 
the tiny aperture of the tiny box, if you don't 
search for it energetically. 

Playing-cards and stamped paper (for drafts, 
legal documents, etc. ) are also found here. 



I 



TOBACCO STORES 



97 



Tobacco Stores. 

Where is there a tobac- 
co-store, if you please? 



A lo-ceni packet of 
tobacco. 



A packet of superior 
Scaferlati. 



A packet of Maryland. 

A packet of cigarettes 
at lo cents. 



A packet of cigarettes 
at 12 cents. 



A packet of cigarettes 
at 70 centimes (14 
cents). 

A packet of cigarettes 
at 16 cents. 



A packet of hand-made 
cigarettes, at 50, 60, 
80 centimes. 



A packet of Havana 
cigarettes. 

A 2-cent cigar. 



Marchands de Tabac. 

Msir-s/ia7i de-ta-ba. 

Oii y a-t-il un bureau de 

tabac, s. v. p.? 
00 ia-til z^?z-bii-r6d-ta-ba, 

si-voo-p^e? 
Un paquet de tabac a 

cinquante. 
z^;z-pa-ked - ta - ba a sm- 

rant. 

Un paquet de Scafer- 
lati superieur. 

7^n - pa - ked - sea- f er-la-ti 
sii-pe-ri-er. 

Un paquet de Maryland. 
zin-pa-ked-ma-n-/ an. 
Un paquet de cigarettes 

a cinquante. 
?^;z-pa-ked-si-ga-ret a,-sm- 

cant. 

Un paquet de cigarettes 

a soixante. 
?/;z-pa-ked-si-ga-ret a-soa- 

sa7tt. 

Un paquet de cigarettes 

a soixante dix. 
2^;z-pa-ked si-ga-ret a soa- 

sajit dis. 

Un paquet de cigarettes 

a quatre-vingts. 
z/;2-pa-ked-si-ga-ret a-ca- 

tve-vin. 

Un paquet de cigarettes 
faites a la main, a 50, 
60, 80. 

z^;?-pa-ked-si-ga-ret fet a- 
\sL-min, a 50, 60, 80. 

Un paquet de cigarettes 

Havane. 
z/;z-pa-ked-si.ga-ret a van, 
Un cigar de dix centimes. 
2^«-si-gar de-di-j-a^^-tim. 



q8 



TOBACCO STORES 



Two demi-londres. 

Three londres. 

Abox of Swedish 
matches. (o fr. lo) 

A box of wax matches, 
(o fr. 15) 

Abox of common 
matches. (o fr. lo) 



A box of fusees. 

(o fr. lo) 
Is there anything else? 

No, thanks, that's all. 

Let me look at some 
pipes, — clay, — briar, 
— meerschaum. 



These cigars look very 
strong. 



I like them mild, 
medium. 



How much a dozen, a 
box? 



We have no imported 
cigars. 



Deux demi-londres. 

ded-mi- ion-dres. 

Trois londres. 

troa /6';i!-dres. 

Une boite d'allumettes 

suedoises. 
iin boat da-lii-met siie- 

doaz. 
Une boite d'allumettes 

bougies, 
iin boat-da-lii-met boo-ji. 
Une boite d'allumettes 

ordinaires. 
iin boat-da-lii-met 6r-di- 

ner. 
Une boite de tisons. 
iin b6at-de-ti-2'<?;z. 
Et avec ga? 
e-a-vec-sa? 
C'est tout, merci. 
se-too mer-si. 
Montrez-moi des pipes en 

terre, — en bruyere, — 

en ecume. 
inoii-tve-mbSi de pip an 

ter, — a7t brii-yer, — a7t 

e-kiim. 

Ces cigares ont I'air 

d'etre tres forts, 
se-si-gar oji ler detr' tre 

for. 

Je les prefere legers, 

demi-forts. 
je-le pre-fer le-je, de-mi- 

for. 
Combien la douzaine, la 

boite? 
con - him la - doo - zen, la 

boat? 
Nous n'avons pas de 

cigares etrangers. 
noo-na.-z'on pad-si-gar €- 

tran-je. 




Vour SL Jacques. 



WITH THE DOCTOR 



It is all very well to sit upon doctors and say 
they are no good, when you feel as fit as a fiddle, 
but if you find yourself seriously ill, especially if 
you are alone in a big town, the best thing for you 
to do is to have yourself taken to a hospital, and 
try to get admitted there. It is safer and cheaper 
in everyway. If you should "kick the bucket," 
or as the French phrase runs, "break your pipe," 
you have a chance of being buried at the expense 
of the State. How nice! And, what is really 
unique, this end may be attained without having 
to tip any one ! 

If you are only seedy, or not up to par, and if 
the various pick-me-ups to be had in French cafes 
have not set you right, send for a doctor, or better 
still, go and see one yourself. 

In Paris and large towns the usual fee is 5 or 10 
fr., and in most provincial towns 3 fr. for a con- 
sultation. Consultation hours are generally from 
12 to 2 or 3. French doctors do not supply their 
patients with medicines. You must take the 
prescription to a druggist's. 

If you want to get a doctor's address, ask some 
one in the hotel where you are staying, or in tb 
restaurant where you are dining. If you shoul( 
feel indisposed when out of doors go to the neares 
drug store. The dispenser of pills and soothing 
syrups will at once direct you to a doctor, who 
will "happen to be a friend of his." 



With the Doctor. 

Could you recommend 
me a doctor? 



Do you know a doctor 
in this part? 



t. §fc 



Chez le Me^decin. 

Shel-med-i-zVz. 

Pourriez-vous m'indiquer 

un medecin? 
poo-rie-voo w/w-di-ke it7i 
med-sin? 

Connaissez-vous un 
medecin dans 1 e 
quartier? 

c6-ne-se-voo U7i med-j"/;? 
dan le-car-tie? 

99 



lOO 



WITH THE DOCTOR 



Is Dr. X. at home? 



How long will it be 
before he comes back? 



May I see him? 
May I wait for him? 

I'll call again in one — 
two — three hours. 



I'll come again to-mor- 
row at his consulta- 
tion hours. 



Question. — Where do 
you feel pain? 

Answer. — In the side, 
in the head, in the 
abdomen, in the 
chest. 



Q. — How long have you 
been feeling the 
pain? 

A. — Since this morning, 
yesterday. 

Q. — Do you feel any 
pain when you are 
breathing? 



Le Docteur X. est-il chez 

lui? 
le doc-ter X. e-til she liii? 

Dans combien de temps 

va-t-il rentrer? 
dan-con-\Ai7i de-tan va-til 

ran-\xk?. 

Puis-je le voir? 
piiij le-v6ar. 

Puis-je I'attendre? 
piiij la-/rt;zdr' ? 

Je repasserai dans une — 
deux — trois heures. 

jer-pas-re dan-zmi—&Q — 
troa-zer. 

Je reviendrai demain 
a I'heure de sa consul- 
tation. 

jer-vi/;z-dre de-mm a-ler 
de sa-r6';z-siil-ta-si(9;z. 

Demande. — Ou souffrez- 

vous? 
D. - oo-soo-fre-voo? 

Reponse. — Au cote, a la 

tete, dans le ventre, 

dans la poitrine. 
R. — 6-c5-te, a-la-tet, dan- 

le vantv\ dan-\a,-p6a,- 

trin. 

D. — Depuis quand souf- 

frez-vous? 
D. — de-pm-can soo-fre- 

voo? 

R. — Depuis ce matin, 

hier. 
R. — de-piii-sma-tz>/, ier. 

D. — Souffrez-vous quand 

vous respirez? 
D. — soo-fre-voo can voo 

re-spi-re? 



WITH THE DOCTOR 



lOI 



A. — Yes, no. 

— A little. Very much. 

Q. — Show me your 
tongue. 

—Take a long breath. 



Am I well enough to 
travel? 



Do you advise me to 
go back straight to 
America? 



Shall I be well in a day 
or two? 



Am I feverish? 

Must I go to bed? 

Can you tell me of a 
private hospital? 



Do I only want a day's 
rest? 



How much do I owe 
you, Doctor? 



R. — Oui, non, monsieur. 
R. — ooi, no7i, me-sie. 

— Un peu. Beaucoup. 
— till pe. bo-coo. 

D. — Montrez-moi votre 

langue. 
D . — moil - tre - moa vot - 

— Respirez 1 o n g u e 

ment. 

— res-pi-re lo7i^-man. 

Vais-je-assez bien pour 

voyager? 
vej a-se h\in poor v5a-ia- 

je? 

M e conseillez-vous d e 

retourner de suite en 

Amerique? 
me - coil - se-ie-voo de-re- 

toor-ne de siiit an A- 

me-rik? 

Irai-je bien dans un jour 

ou deux? 
i-rej \Ain dan zun joor oo 

de? 

Ai-je la fievre? 
ej la-fievr' ? 

Faut-il que je me couche? 
fo-til kej-me-coosh? 

Pouvez-vous m'indiquer 
une maison de sante? 

poo-ve-voo W2>/-di-ke tin 
vae-zoii d.e-san-tel 

N 'ai-je besoin que d'un 

jour de repos? 
nej-be-zo/>z ke-di^n joor 

der-po? 

Combien vous dois-je, 
monsieur le docteur? 

con-h\in voo-doaj me-sie 
le doc-ter? 



MONEY MATTERS 

". . . Their cash was strange, 
It bored me every minute. 
Now here's a ho^ to change, 
How many sows are in it ! " 

(Hood's Comic Poems.) 

All French measures— of dimensions, weight 
value, etc.— are based on the decimal sy stein. 
The American dollar being also divided up into 
one hundred cents, the only difficultv is to remem- 
ber the relative value of the two units, dollar and 
franc. 

Leaving aside for a moment the minute and 
ever-changing exchange rate (see further) for all 
practical purposes 

I dollar equals 5 francs. 
I cent equals 5 centimes. 
And, as in ordinary conversation with shopkeepers 
and tradespeople, 5 centimes is called i sou {soo"), 
10 centimes deux sous {soo), 25 centimes cinq 
sous, 50 centimes dix sous, 75 centimes quinze 
sous, etc. . it is well to remember that 

a Sou is a Cent. 

The decimal system is carried out to the extent 
that all coins and banknotes are of denominations 
which are multiples of 10, or of which 10 is a 
multiple. This gives the following series: i, 2, 5, 
10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1,000, 2,000, 5,000, etc. 

COINS IN USE. 
Copper. 

5 centimes or i sou = i cent. 
10 " "2 sous =1 2 cents. 

Silver. 

20 centimes or 4 sous = 4 cents (rare). 

50 " " 10 " = 10 " 

1 franc " 20 " =20 " 

2 francs " 40 " =40 " 

5 " " 100 " =1 dollar. 



MONEY MATTERS IO3 

Gold. 

5 francs = i dollar. 
10 " =2 dollars. 
20 " = 4 " 

There are also gold pieces of 40 fr. and 100 fr. ; 
they are but rarely met with, except at the 
Monte Carlo gaming tables. 

In America it is customary to write $0.20 for 
"20 cents." In France "20 centimes" (= 4 sous) 
IS written and printed, o fr. 20. 

BANKNOTES. 

The only kind of paper currency issued in 
France consists of notes of the Bank of France. 
They are of the following denominations : 50 fr. , 
100 fr. , 200 fr., 500 fr., and 1,000 fr. 

USEFUL HINTS. 

American bills or gold are readily exchanged 
for the currency of the country everywhere in 
Europe, and as you are in no danger in France of 
being cheated in the transaction, the banks being 
all solid institutions, we advise you to make the 
change over there. 

American gold is a little higher than the 
French, so that the exchange rate is: 

I franc =: $0. 193 
instead of being $0.20. When buying French 
money, you will, therefore, get more than 25 
francs for $5, and, of course, when selling French 
money you must give more than 25 francs for $5. 
To this difference you must add the bank's, or the 
broker's, commission. 

The Credit Lyonnazs, the Cojuptoz'r d' Kscompte, 
and the Societe Generate have branch offices all 
over Paris and in all the larger French cities, and 
are entirely reliable. 

CAUTION. 

Copper, silver, and gold coins from Switzerland, 
Belgium and Greece, circulate in France at the 
same rate as French coins. 

But Refuse at all places Italian coins of 2 lire, 
I lire, o 1. 50 and o 1. 20 centesimi, bearing the 



I04 MONEY MATTERS 

effigies of Vittorio Emanuele and Umberto I 
from 1863 to the present day. Italian gold and 
5 lire pieces must be accepted, as legal tender. 

Refuse all coins from the following countries- 
Austria, Saxony, Bavaria, Spain, The Nether- 
lands, Sardinia, Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, Peru, 
Hayti, Chill, Roumania, and the Argentine Re- 
pubhc. Also all Papal pieces. Beware more 
especially of the following, which are continually 
palmed off on unwary travelers, native as well as 
foreign : Mexican, Peruvian, and Papal. 

Don-t look askance at English or Italian cop- 

W^' ^l^^^y ^^® accepted by every one, except at 
Post-Offices. 

Don't trust your money into a stranger's hands 
unless you are perfectly sure that all is right. 

In this connection we will say a few words 
about other measures, all based on the decimal 
system: 

A ce^itimeter is about 0.3937 of an inch. 

A meter is about i yard and 3 inches. 

A kilometer is about >^ of a statute mile. 

A kilogram is about 2 pounds. 

A gram is about 151^ grains troy. 

A liter is about a quart. 

Try to appreciate the decimal system while you 
are m France, and once back in the United States 
write to your best local daily and advocate its 
immediate adoption in America. 

Money Matters. La Question d'Argent. 

La-kes-ti*??/ ^ox-jan. 
Is giere an exchange- Y a-t-il un bureau de 
office near here.? change par ici? 

la-til un-hvi-xodi-shan]^^- 
ri-si? 
How much do you give Combien donnez-vous en 
m French money for argent francais pour 
a dollar? un dollar? 

con-\Ain do-ne-voo a7i- 
Vikv-jafi fran-se poor 
uji do-lar-a-me-ri-k2>/? 



MONEY MATTERS 



105 



I want to change 2, 3, 
4, 5 dollars. 



Can you give me two 
fifty-franc notes, in- 
stead of a hundred- 
franc note? 



Is this coin all right? 



Can you give me small 
change tor 10 francs? 



Can I cash this check 
here? 

What commission do 
you charge? 



I can give you one, two 
references in Paris. 



Je voudrais changer 2, 

3, 4, 5 dollars. 
je- voo - dre shaii - je de, 

troa, catr, sink — do-lar. 
Pouvez vous me donner 

deux billets de 50 

francs, au lieu d'un 

billet de 100 francs? 
poo - ve - voom-do-ne de- 

bi-ied-j'/k - kaii\. /ran, 

o - lie - dim - hl-ioA-san- 
frafil 
Est-ce que cette piece-la 

est bonne? 
es-ke-set-pies-la e-bon? 
Pourriez-vous me donner 

dix francs de petite 

monnaie? 
poo - rie - voom-do-ne di- 

fran dep-tit-mo-ne? 
■Puis-je toucher ce cheque 

ici? 
pii-ij too-she se-shek isi? 
C o m b i e n faites-v o u s 

payer de commission? 
con-hun fet-voo pe-ie de- 

co-mi-si^;z? 
Je peux vous donner 

I'adresse d'une, de 

deux personnes a Paris, 
je-pe voo-do-ne la-dres 

diin, de-de per -son a 

Pa-ri. 



The most convenient way of carrying money is 
a letter of credit, obtainable at any large bank. 

As a rule, you cannot get your money back after 
it has once passed out of your hand. Before you 
pay, therefore, be sure you get the articles you 
have purchased. 

If in shopping you have the goods sent to the 
hotel, take a receipt, and see that it reads right, and 
that it is on a proper billhead, indicating the firm's 
name and location, and the name of the cashier. 



SHOPPING 

You must expect to be "done" in making pur- 
chases. It is the prerogative of all foreigners. 
But it is just as well to try and be done as rarely 
as possible. 

The shops in the vicinity of the Rue Royale, 
Avenue de I'Opera, Rue de EivoH and other 
"swell" streets, should be entered with a sense of 
warinesst> The storekeeper and his attendants 
know you are his helpless victims and have been 
taught that all Americans have an unlimited bank 
account. Besides, the rent is enormous, and 
profits, therefore, must be in proportion ! Make 
up your mind calmly how much you will give, 
and then stick to it. Just repeat the figure until 
the attendant consents or politely retreats. 

This does not apply to the so-called English 
shops, where you can haggle as much as you 
please in your own lingo, and where you will be 
done no more than you would be in any shop in 
London. 



Shopping. 
I want a — 
Show me some — 
How much? 
It's too dear. 
Have you got cheaper? 



Have you another 
color? 



All right, I'll take this. 



Achats. 
Asha. 
Je voudrais un — 
]e-voo-dre-z2in — 

Montrez-moi des — 
;;z6';/-tre-moa de-^ 

Combien? 
con-hun? 
C'est trop cher. 
se-tro sher. 

Avez - vous m e i 1 1 e u r 

marche? 
a-ve-voo me-ier mar-she? 

Avez-vous une autre 

couleur? 
a-ve-voo zii-n5 tre-coo 

ler? 

Bien, je vais prendre 9a. 
him, jWh prandr' sa. 



106 



SOCIAL CUSTOMS 

PHRASES OF POLITENESS AND 
GREETING 

It was Steele, I think, who said that one may- 
know a foreigner by his answering only no or yes 
to a question, while a Frenchman generally uses 
a whole sentence. So, never answer oui or no?t 
alone to a question; that's English; but always 
add: Monsieur, Madame, or Mademoiselle; 
that's French. 

The word Monsieur is as appropriately used in 
speaking to a counter-jumper as to the President 
of the Republic. They are both monsieur. So, 
use the words Monsieur, Madame, Made7noiselle 
freely, and do in France as the French do. Take 
off your hat to men as well as to ladies, when 5-ou 
meet them or come up to speak to them. If you 
have been introduced to a person, lady or gentle- 
man, older than yourself, take off your hat first, 
when you meet him or her. Contrary to what is 
the custom in America, never wait for a lady to 
bow to you before taking off your hat to her. 

When you are going to pay a call put your gloves 
on. When you are asked to dinner, keep them 
on after being shown into the drawing-room until 
you go into the dining-room. Don't excuse your- 
self for wearing gloves when 3-ou are shaking 
hands. It is not only permissible but customary 
to shake hands with gloves on. 

Never shake hands with a lady or gentleman on 
being introduced. Bow gracefully, if you can, 
and do not say: Co?nme?it-vous portez-vousf— 
a phrase that most English people know, and that 
French people use very little. In many cases ' 'how 
d'ye do" should be rendered by a bow. or by 
bonjour, inonsieur (or i?tadame, iuadejnoiselle). 

A frock coat, not evening dress, is usually worn 
at the dinner table, in cases in which a dress suit 
would be worn in American uppertendom. 

If you get married while in France you will be 
expected to go through the ceremony in evening 
dress. (Beware of the French mother-in-law!) 

107 



I08 SOCIAL CUSTOMS 

When dinner is over you must take out into the 
drawing-room the lady you took into the dining- 
room and look very pleasant and much pleased all 
the time. The English ceremony which consists 
in bowing the ladies out of the dining-room, in 
order to allow the gentlemen to "stay over their 
wine," to put their elbows on the table, cross their 
legs, talk racing, betting, club scandal, etc., etc., 
and get groggy, and half seas over, is unknown in 
France. 

When you are at table, don't talk about Joan of 
Arc, Waterloo, the battle of Trafalgar, Egypt, the 
Spanish- American war, the needs of your navy, 
and — above all — never threaten any one to write 
to the New York Herald, the London Times, or 
to your ambassador. French vanity is highly 
explosive. The slightest shock may cause strange 
changes. 

SPECIAL DON'TS. 

If you think you are a gentleman in America : 

Don't be a cad in France. 

Don't be negligent in dress, language, etc. 

Don't walk about in churches, with this little 
book in your hand, during divine service. 

Don't go about in knickers or wear a cycling 
cap in the streets unless you are a gentleman of the 
wheel. 

Don't look like a conqueror in a conquered land. 

Don't show your contempt for the manners and 
customs of "darned foreigners"; you are the 
"foreigner" as long as you tread the French soil. 

Don't sneer at the practices of the Roman 
Church and proclaim them degrading and 
idolatrous. 

Don't jeer at priests and processions, 

" The moment that you land in France 
lyike 'Arry in Belong." 

So that we may not wrong 

" The Yankee folk, and judge them all 
By 'Arry in Bolong. " 

And you, Mesdatnes les Ainiricaines, you know 
what your reputation in France is, Yes, the solid 



SOCIAL CUSTOMS 



109 



comfort, the neatness and artistic taste evident on 
and about the American girl and her ma, are pro- 
verbial even among les Parisiennes, the trimmest 
"of the world," as they say in Chicago. 

A GENERAL DON'T. 

Whatever you say. 

Don't forget to tack on Monsieur, Madame, 
Mademoiselle, to Oui, Non, Merci. At bed time 
repeat fifty times; Oui, Monsieur; Non^ 
Madame; Merci, Mademoiselle (No, thank you, 
see p. 79). 

Never fails ; success guaranteed ; acts as a lubri- 
cator, avoiding all friction; saves money, time, 
and temper. 

In English they say, it's money that makes the 
mare go. Well, then, remember that every man 
or woman in France, high or low, expects this 
"small change of politeness" at every turn. 



Politeness and 
Greeting. 

Good morning. 
Good day. 
Good afternoon. 
How do you do? 
Good evening. 
Good night. 
How are you? 



How are 
on? 

Allow me. 



you getting 



How is your father? 



How is your sister? 



Politesse et Salu- 
tations. 
P6 li-tes e-sa-lii-ta-sw/?. 
Bonjour, monsieur, ma- 
dame, mademoiselle. 
bon-]oox, me-sie, madam, 

mad-moa-zel. 
Bonsoir, monsieur, etc. 
bon-'S,02cs:, me-sie, etc. 

Comment allez-vous? 
co-?;za;z-ta-le-voo? 

Comment 9a va-t-il? 
Q.o-man sa-va-til? 
t*ermettez-moi. 
per-me-te-moa. 
Comment va monsieur 

votre pere? 
CO - mail - va me - sie-vot- 

per? 

Comment va mademoi- 
selle votre soeur? 

c6-?na/t-v.Si mad-nioa - zel 
votr' ser? 



no 



SOCIAL CUSTOMS 



Remember me to your 
mother. 



Kind regards to your 
brother. 



Thank you very much 
for meeting me. 



Thank you for your 
kind invitation. 



Dont mention it. 

It is not worth speak- 
ing of. 



Can I do anything for 
you? 

Do you mind smoking? 



I'll see you by and by. 

Till to-morrow. 

Till this evening. 

Pardon me. 

I beg your pardon. 

Thanks. 



Mes hommages a ma- 
dame votre mere 

me - z6 - maj a - ma - dam 
votr' mer. 

Bonjour a (monsieur) 

votre frere. 
<^^;/-joor a (me-sie) vot 

frer. 

Merci beaucoup d'etre 
venu a ma rencontre. 

mer-si bo-coo detr' ve-nii 
a-nia-ra7t-contT\ 

Merci bien pour votre 
amiable invitation. 

mer-si bun poor v6-tre- 
zemabr zn-vi-tsL-sion. 

II n'y a pas de quoi. 
il nia pad koa. 

Cela ne vaut pas la peine 

d'en parler. 
slan - vo - pa - la-pen dan- 

par-le. 

Puis-je vous etre utile? 
piiij voo-zetr' ii-til? 

La f umee vous derange • 

t-elle? 
la-fii-me voo-de-ranj-tell 

A tout a I'heure. 
a-too-ta-ler, 

A demain. 
ad-7/im. 

A ce soir. 
as-s6ar. 

Pardon. 
par -don. 

Je vous demande pardon. 
je-vood.-mand--pav-don, 

Merci. 
nier-§i. 



SOCIAL CUSTOMS 



III 



Thank you. 
Good-bye. 


Merci bien {o7c 

monsieur). 
mer-si-bi/>z (or 

me-sie). 

Au revoir. 
or-voar. 


merci, 
mer-si 


Farewell, a pleasant 
journey 


Bon voyage. 
bon voa-iaj. 




Will you do me a favor? 


Voulez-vous me 


rendre 




un service? 
voo - le-voo TXivan - Cmiii 




ser-vis? 




With pleasure. 


Volontiens. 
v6-l^;z-tie. 





Please call again. 

I am ever so much 
obh'ged to you. 

T shall be only too 
happy. 



Veuillez revenir. 
ve-iye re-vnir. 
Je vous suis fort oblige, 
je voo siii for 6b-li-je. 

Cela me fera le plus 

grand plaisir. 
sla me fra le-plii-gr^-z/z 

ple-zir. 



After Treading on Somebody's Bad Corn 
beg 



Treador — "I do 
your pardon." 



Treadee — "It's all 
right." 

{synipathetic- 
-"Did I hurt 



Treador 
ally)- 
you?" 

Treadee 



{aside) — "I 
ratherthink 70U did"; 
{aloud a7id smiling), 
"Oh! not at all!!" 



"Je vous demande bien 
pardon. ' ' 

je-vood - mand. - hiin par- 
don. 

"11 n'y pas de mal." 
il nia pad-mal. 

"Vous ai-je fait mal?" . 
voo-zej fe-mal? 

{apart) — "J'te crois"; 
{haiit souriani) ; "O, du 
tout ! — monsieur ! — an 
contraire! !" 
(a-par) j'te-croa (5, soo- 
rlan) 6, dii-too! — me^ 
sie I — o-con-trhv ! ! 



112 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



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mi 



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rs 



^'^/S.."<^: 






■-iy- ft, J 



'St^ 



"^^^v 



'iluc 



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'■??/ 



.iSi''- 



s>^ 



V 



Theatre de I'Ambi^u -Gomiqne 
Theatre de laPorle St. Martin 
Theatre de la Renaissance 

Porte 51. Martin 
Porte St. Denis 



Theatre du 

Gymnase 
Gomploir d'Escomple 




.A 



C^ 



S^ 






Xun|9 ap aasnyyj 
U9!|npepsaiuj9iji 

9U!D3pa[i^ap8|0D3 



S8J(l-S3p-UieuiJ3I)"lg 



Concorde Concorde 




III. 

OUR TWELVE ROUTES 

FOR VISITING PARIS AND ITS HISTORICAL^ ARCHITECT- 
TURAL AND ARTISTIC TREASURES. 

We present to the reader I2 Routes, carefully 
laid out by a Parisian thoroughly familiar with 
every nook and corner of Paris. They cover all the 
places of interest in the famous capital. We have 
chosen as a central starting point the square called 
Place du Palais-Royal, on account of its being 
practically surrounded by the majoiity of hotels 
patronized by American tourists. Routes start 
from here and return here, avoiding as much as 
possible, going twice over the same thorough- 
fares. The diagrams have been drawn expressly 
for Lee's Standard Guide to Paris, and descrip- 
ions of buildings etc., will be found at their proper 
places. As it is not desirable to repeat these 
descriptions, whenever a name will come up a 
second time, a figure between brackets, will tell in 
what Route all necessa y details ma}^ be found. 
The French names are preserved, since, to ask 
your way about Paris, you need the French names, 
pronounced in the French way. For easy and 
accurate pronunciation, we refer you to the alpha- 
betical List of A^aines of Streets etc. annexed to 
Lee's American Tourist's Map of Paris. 

The abbreviations in our Routes have the following mean- 
ings: R. = RTie = street. B. = Boulevard. P. = Pont = bridge. 
Q. = Quai = embankment. PI. = Place = square. A.=Avenue. 
Th.= Theatre. 



•ROUTE No. 1. 

OVER THE "GRANDS BOULEVARDS." 

Palilis-Royal. — Palace erected by Cardinal Richelieu 
(1619-36). Later occupied by the Orleans Branch of the 
Bourbon family. Now devoted to the Council of State 
and Court of Accounts. Around a superb garden are found 
stores and restaurants under covered galleries. The Pl. du 
PALAis-Royal has to the right, the Hotel du Louvre; to the 
left, the Grands Magasins du Louvre, and opposite, the 
Palais du Louvre. 

113 



114 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



Rue de Rivoli. Northern fagade of the Louvre. 
Jardiiis des Tnileries. — The favorite part of the 
Parisians, replete with finest pieces of classical statuary. 
Stretches between the Louvre and the PL de la Concorde. 
Laid out by Le Notre at the end of the 17th ceatury. 
Among the orange trees in the Orangerie, forty-one date 
back to the i6th century. The northern terrace is the Ter- 
RASSE DES Feuillants; the southern one the Terrasse dc 
BoRD DE l'Eau. 

R. de RivoH. PI. de RivoH. 

Statue lie Jeanne d'Arc. — A modern equestrian 
statue of Joan of Arc (1412-1431) by Fremiet. 

Jen de Paunie. — A marble tablet bears witness that 
on that spot stood the Tennis Hall in which the Revolution- 
ary Assemblies sat from 1789 to 1793. and where che first 
republic was proclaimed (Sept. 22, 1792). 

Ministere de la Marine.— On the N. E. corner of 
the PI. de la Concorde and the R. Royale ; forms part of the 
monumental facade of this famous square. Erected by 
Louis XV., 1762-70; Gabriel, architect. 

R. Royale. Cercle de la Rue Royale (ultra-fashion- 
able club). R. Royale. 

lia Madeleine, or Church of St. Mary Magdalen; an 
adaptation of a Greco-Roman temple. Ei ected 1764-1842 ; first 
built (by Napoleon L) as a Temple of Glory. Dimensions : 352 
ft. long, 151 ft. wide, 100 ft. high. Paintings by great modern 
artists; superb bronze doors. Visited from i to 6. 

liCS Oraiids Bonlevards. — Known the world over 
as "the Boulevards," and the center of much of the Pari- 
sian gayety and life. Were traced by Louis XIV. (17th cen- 
tury) on the rased fortifications that encircled the city (bul- 
wark — stronghold). They terminate at the PI. de la Bastille, 
in all 2/^ miles long by 33 ft. in width. They are continued 
by the modern boulevards Henri IV. and St. Germain, form- 
ing thus a complete oval from Madeleine to Madeleine. 

B. de la Madeleine. B, des Capucines, Jockey 
Club. Grand Hotel. Th. Isola. Olympia. 
Orand Opera, or "Academie Nationale de Musique et 
de Danse." Architect, Charles Garnier. Built of stone and 
marble, 1861-74. Covers 13.596 sq. yards; seats only 2,156 
persons. Total cost including site, $9,500,000. Subsidized 
by State. Grand opera only. Performances Monday, Wed- 
nesday, Friday and Saturday, all the year round. Large 
school of dancing. Fine library and museum. The grand 
staircase is world-famed. The acoustic is poor. 

Cercle des Armees de terre et de mer (Army and 
Navy Club). Th. des Nouveautes. Credit Lyon- 
onais, one of the largest bank building in the 
world. B. de*^ Italiens. Th. du Vaudeville. Pas- 
sage des Princes, B. Montmartre, Theatre des 
Varietes. Passage des Panoramas. Passage 
Jouffroy. Musee Grevin. B. Poissonniere. Pari- 
siana, Comptoir d'Escompte (near by). B. 
Bonne-Nouvelle. Th. du Gymnase. 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES I15 

Porte St. Denis. — A triumphal arch erected by the 
city of Palis to commemorate the victories of Louis XIV. in 
1672. Architect, Blondel. Height, 81 ft. 

B. St. Denis. B. St. Martin. 

Porte St. Martin. — Erected to Louis XIV. 's glory, in 
1674. Height, 57 ft. Architect, Pierre Bullet. : 

Th. de la Renaissance, Th. de la Porte St. Mar- 
tin, Th, de I'Ambigu Comique, Th. des Folies 
Dramatiques, 

Bourse €entrale tin Travail, or Labor Exchange, 
built by the city (1889-90) to harbor the offices of Trades 
Unions ("Syndicats professionels ") recognized by law. 

Place de la Republique (310 yds. long). Caserne 
du Chateau d'Eau. 

Statue <le la Republique, by the brothers Morice ; 
erected 1883 ; 82 ft. high (with pedestal). Around the main 
effigy are statues of Liberty. Equality Fraternity, and at its 
feet a lion holding a ballot box. [See illustration.] 

B. du Temple. Th. Dejazet. B. des Filles-du-Cal- 
vaire. Cirque d'Hiver. B. Be umarchais. 
Place <le la Bastille. — Occupies the spot where 
stood the royal stronghold, la Bastille-St.-Antoine, levelled 
to the ground by the people, July 14, 1789. A line drawn on 
the pavement in 1880, bet. B. Henri IV. and R. St. Antoine, 
gives its exact measurements. This storming of the Bastille is 
celebrated yearly, July 14th, as the national feast of France. 

Colonne tie Juillot. — In the center of the PI. de la 

Bastille; 154 ft. high. Erected 1831-40, in honor of those 
who died fighting for liberty in July, 1830, in the uprising that 
drove King Charles X. from France and unseated the eldei 
Bourbon dynasty. Small fee to be allowed on top of plat- 
form. [See illustration.] 

B. Henri IV. Caserne des Celestins. 

Bibliotheque de 1' Arsenal. — One of the richest 
libraries in Paris. Open free E. W. D., 10-4; especially rich 
in old dramatic literature. Occupies ground of old arsenal. 

P. Sully. B. St. Germain; this great artery has a 
length (including the B. Henri IV) of 2^ miles 
from the Bastille to the P. de la Concorde. 
St. Xicolas-<lu-€liarclonnet. — A church built at the 
end of the 17th century. 

Statue d'Etienne Bolet, in bronze, by Guilbert. 
Erected, 1889, to the memory of a famous printer and author, 
burned at the stake (1546) for " impiety and atheism." [See 
illustration.] 

Musee de Cluny, one of the finest collections of 
medieval curios of all kinds : ancient carvings, furniture, 
household goods, ivories, musical instruments, etc. ; over 
ri,ooo objects. Deserves a long visit. Exquisitely well- 
preserved building erected by Benedictine Monks after 1340. 
The two floors divided into 21 exhibition rooms. Organized 
in 1842 by M. du Sommerard, a famous collector. Built on 
the ground formerly occupied by the 



Il6 TWELVE CITY ROUTES 

Thermes de Julien, or Baths of the Roman Empe- 
ror Juhan the Apostate, who made Paris (then called Lute- 
tia) his favorite residence. Fine ruins, still extant, show 
the enormous size of the palace, since the " Frigidarium" 
(cold bath room) is 65 ft. long, 37% ft. broad and 59 ft. high. 
Visitors admitted free. 

Crossing the B. vSt. Michel ; new fasade of the 

Ecole cle Medecine, the seat of the largest official 
School of Medicine in France. A huge block of buildings, 
with a Library of 90,000 volumes, and the Musee Dupuy- 
TREN (open 10 to 4). Close' to it is the Ecole Pratique, 
for anatomical purposes. Thousands of students of both 
sexes, of every nationality, obtain here M. D. degrees after 
studies of not less than 5 years. 

Continuing on B. St. Germain we reach the church of 
St. CJermain-des-Pres.— Founded in 6th century, but 
rebuilt 1001-14, and much modified and redecorated in the 
i6th century and again in 1856-62. Admirable mural paint- 
ings by H. Flandrin (i860). Behind the church are the ruins of 
the Abbot's Palace. The Abbey Prison, now destroyed, was 
the scene of the frightful massacre of Sept , 1792. In front of 
the church, statue of Bernard Palissy, the great pottery 
maker and enameler (i6th century). 

On B. St. Germain, on the corner of R. du Bac the 

Statue de Cliappe, the inventor of aerial telegra- 
phy (1763-1805), which rendered such services before the 
invention of Morse. 

Ministere de la Guerre, the War Office, a stately 
building 160 ft. long, completed on this boulevard in 1877; 
on the cor. of the R. de Solferino, fine tower with monumen- 
tal clock. 

On the^ corner of the Boulevard and the Q. d'Orsay, 
le Cercle Agricole, a superb mansion occupied 
by the most select club in Paris. This part of 
the city was always known as the Faubourg St. 
Germain, i.e. , the center of the old aristocracy. 
_€hauibre des I>e|>ute«», on the Q. d'Orsay, oppo- 
site the P. de la Concorde; called also "Palais Bourbon-" 
erected in 1722; architect, Girardini. Confiscated by the 
Revolution. Occupied since by successive Legislative bodies. 
Greek front Peristyle completed in 1807. The hall where the 
present Representatives meet was built in 1832 by Tolv 
Filled with statuary and paintings. 

P. and PI. de la t^oucorde.— This bridge and the 
square at its northern end count among the finest public show 
places in the world ; the square is 390 yds. long by 235 wide, and 
was designed by architect Gabriel under Louis XV., whose 
equestrian statue was erected at the center. The row of 
buildings on the north side were also built in those days. In 
1792 the statue was removed and melted and the guillotine 
stood in its place. King Louis XVI., Marie-Antoinette, and 
over 2,800 victims from all social ranks were beheaded on 
this very spot, then dubbed "Place de la Revolution." Now 
an Egyptian obeHsk (or Cleopatra's Needle) stands at the 
center, two stately bronze fountains adorn the south and north 
ends, and eight statues emblematic of French cities occupy 




First Floor 



MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE MUSEUMS 

1 . Hall of Italian Ceramics. 

2. •' Bionzes, Ironware and Weapons. 
3 Oriental Hall. 

4. Hall of 17th Century Furniture. 

5. " 16th 

6. " French Ceiamicp. 

7. " " and German Ceramics. 

8. " Ivories. 

9. " GlasMware. 



MUSEUMS 



RvLe de E.1V0I 

o Mmio 37r^ '1.,' M., ririey ' I 



Second Floor 





R va e 



R. i V o 1 i 



[tj "^ "rjk: 



Louvre Museums 

K.iviUon Dra.on p,, J 

E Vg]' Calene Molhen '>•■,'„.' CaltncDSru I " ^ 

rPI"^ t'^l 

■r.-'M COUK fjSJI.. J COUK 

M Sf ._.-_. ■ *- ■':,^- — p-^ 




DU LOUVRE 



I'- 
ll 

liy: 



i 



raT^ 



Gal er i e 



Pemt-ur- e 




■^; ^: -A.C. . , l r.l„nn... l / . // .III. /I I n^ 



First Floor 



Q ir EL- 1 

ANCIENT CERAMICS 



Oovinthlau Viti 
ItaloQixH-k Vn 



i_i o u. -v r e 

Ui'll of Itnlo-Orwlf Vafc*. 



EGYPTIAN ANTIQUITIES 
lUIl uf theOuds. 

Funeral MonuinonCs. 
Monuments relatlnfr to everyday lift-. 
" HUtorlcal Monumvnis. 
Copynght, 1900. by Am. H. Lm 



MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE MUSEUMS 

I. Hall ..I luli«n CVrnmlr" 

•J, DiKiiiv*. Irunware oDil Wenpjjna 

:{ Orienlal llall- 

4 H»llof ITihCenlunrKomllore. 



DIAGRAM OF THE UPPER FLOORS OF THE LOUVRE MUSEUMS 




IE MUSEUMS 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES I17 

points of ■''antage. The famous Avenue des Champs Ely- 
s^ES starts from its western limits, and to the east are seen 
the tei races of the Tuileries Gardens. Note the statue of 
Strasbourg, always adorned with flags and mourning wreaths, 
in remembrance of the never-to-be-forgotten loss of Alsace- 
Lorraine, conquered by the Germans (1870-71). 

R. Royale. R. St. Honore. Palais Royal. 



ROUTE No. 2 

AROUND THE " ILE DE LA CITE" AND THE 
"ILE ST. LOUIS" 

Palais-Royal. R. de Rivoli. R. du Louvre. 

Palais du Lionvre.— This old Palace of the French 
kings was begun by Philip Augustus (1220). The foundation 
of the present east portion was laid by Francis L and his 
architect, Pierre Lescot (1541). His successor continued the 
task, but to Henri IV. is due the magnificent " Gallerie 
d'ApoUon" (1595). Louis XIV. advanced the work (1660), 
which remained suspended until Napoleon I. and his archi- 
tect, Fontaine, and finally Napoleon III., who completed the 
connection between the oiiginal palace and the Tuileries 
Palace (burnt May, 1871). The " Old Louvre " includes the 
quadrangle of buildings at the east end v'ith a fafade 190 
yds. long. The "New" Louvre extends from the "Old" to the 
remaining pavilions of the Tuileries. All these palaces 
cover 48 acres of ground, the most magnificent aggregation 
of buildings. The Ministry of Finances (Treasury De- 
partment) is located in the north portion of the new palace. 
In the south portion and in most of the old Louvre are found 
the unique Museums of antiquities, sculpture, paintings, and 
curios of all kinds, which attract visitors from the whole 
world. Guides are to be purchased at the entrances to the 
museums. We give plans of the three stories, but de not at- 
tempt to catalogue the splendors they contain. Entrance 
absolutely free, daily from 10 to 4. 

St. trerniaiii-l'-Auxerrois. — A church on the R. du 
Louvre, opposite the Old Louvre. Begun under Charlemagne 
(800). Exquisite Gothic style. The signal for the massacre 
of the Protestants on St. Bartholomew day (Aug. 24, 1572,) 
was given by the bells of this church. As a companion to it, 
Napoleon erected the handsome Mairie of the first District. 

Q. du Louvre. Q. de la Megisserie. 

Poiit-^feiif, or New Bridge, 360 yds. long, 25 yds. wide, 
built (1578-1604) of stone ; runs ovt-r the west end of the Island 
of the Cite. On it stands the 

Statue tie Henri IV,, by Lemot, erected (1818) to 
replace the one placed there in 1635 and removed, in 1793, by 
the mob who forgot the warm heart of the great Henri of 
Navarre toward tlie people he ruled. 

P]. Dauphine, on the Island of the Cite, the cradle 

of Paris. The 

C'our d' Assises, occupies the east side of this en- 
closed square Here are tried the great crim inal cases. It 
is a modern adjunct to the Palais de Justice^ with which it 
connects. 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 




TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



119 



Quai des Orfevres, We enter a smaller courtyard 

of the Palais de Justice and find there the 

entrance to the 

Sainte-Cliapelle, a gem of medieval architecture; 
two naves of perfect design, one above the other, with a 
stone spire of exquisite delicacy. Erected by King Louis 
IX. (St. Louis) and his architect, Montereau, in 1248. Not 
used for religious service. It really forms a part of the old 
King's Palace, the 

l^alais «le Jiistico, now the center of judicial France. 
Contains the halls of the Cour de Cassation (Supreme 
Court) and all the courts of the Paris judiciary district. La 
" Salle des Pas-Perdus " is the largest vestibule known, be- 
ing 240 ft. long, 90 ft. wide and 33 ft. high. The early plays 
were given here ; now the meeting place of barristers, solicit- 
ors and their clients. The halls of the various courts are 
gorgeously decorated and the costumes of the magistrates 
are so picturesque that they deserve a visit. Begun in the 
loth centuiy, fire played such havoc with it that only the 
corner Tour de l'Horloge, on the quay, can be ascribed to 
this early period. On the same quay is the Prison de la 
CoNCiERGERiE, where political prisoners spent many dreaded 
moments. One may visit there the cell occupied by Marie 
Antoinette before her execution (1794). 

Prefecture de Police, the center of the Police De- 
partment of Paris, has its main offices opposite the principal 
facade of the Palais de Justice on the Cour du Mai. 

Q. du Marche-Neuf, Caserne de la Cite, PL du 
Parvis-Notre-Dame, on which stands a colossal 
group of "Charlemagne and his Knights," by- 
Rochet brothers (1882). 

Xotre-Danie, the cathedral, recognized as the master- 
piece of medieval architecture, a description of which would 
fill volumes. (Read Victor Hugo's "Hunchback of Notre 
Dame" — as accurate as it is captivating.) Founded 1163 on the 
site of an earlier church; nave completed in 13th century. 
Statues without number stand over and all around the sev- 
eral portals. On the main facade a rose window 42 feet in 
diameter, is of lace-like delicacy. The whole church is 139 
yds. long by 52 yds. broad. The vaulting, no ft. high, is 
borne by 75 pillars ; there are 37 large stained-glass windows. 
The towers are 223 ft high and the top is reached by 397 
steps (fee 10 cents). The largest bell, called the "Bourdon," 
weighs 16 tons. The spire is 147 ft. high. The choir con- 
tains superb wood carvings. The organ is 32 ft. high, and 
contains 6,000 pipes. The Treasury (fee 10 cents) contains 
admirable jewels, vessels and vestments. Also precious 
relics of saints and martyrs. 

Hotel-Dien, on the north side of the square; one of 
the 20 city hospitals containing an aggregate of 12,000 beds 
and supplying the needs of 100,000 patients yearly, besides 
assisting financially about 467,000 persons a year. This hos- 
pital took the place of one erected in 660. It was built in 
1868-78 and cost $9,000,000. It contains 559 beds. 

Q. de I'Archeveche. Square Notre-Dame. 

lia Morg-ue. — Erected in 1864; entrance free. About 
800 bodies are exhibited here yearly. 



I20 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 




Palais-Royal'' 



CITY ROUTE No. 3 




Map of the Bois=de=Boulogne 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 121 

Q. aux Fleurs, with one of the most curious flower- 
markets in Europe (Wed. and Sat.) ; also bird- 
market (Sunday). Q. de I'Horloge where is 
the sinister entrance to the " Conciergerie 
Prison." (see above.) [Retrace your steps]. 
Opposite the fagade of the Palais de Justice 
is the main entrance to the 

Tribunal de C'<»iiimer«*e, 6r Commercial Courts of 
Paris. Renaissance building with a dome 135 feet high 
erected by architect Bailly (1860-66). 

R. de Lutece, R. du Cloitre-Notre-Dame. By the 
P. St. Louis, we cross over to the 
lie vSaint-IiOnis. — A very dull and retired part of 
Paris that seems a forgotten relic of the past centuries. 

Quai d'Orleans. Q. de Bethune. R. St. Louis. 
St. LiOiiis-eii>l^Ile. — A church of the 17th century, 
with a graceful stone spire 100 ft. high. 

Hotels Lauzun and Lambert ( superb mansions of 
the 17th century). R. du Belloy. P. et R. 
Louis-Philippe. We are agam on the right 
bank of the river. R. Frangois-Miron. PL 
Baudoyer. Maiiie du IV. arrondissement. 

St. CwervaiS"St. Protais.— A stately pile begun in 
1616 and containing remarkable stained-glass windows and 
remarkable carvings, beside modern paintings of gi eat merit. 

PI. St. Gervais. PI Lobau. Caserne Lobau. R. 
de Rivoli, Palais-Royal. 



ROUTE No. 3 
A VISIT TO THE -BOIS DE BOULOGNE" 

Palais Royal. R. de Rivoli. R. des Tuileries. 
Tiiileries — Pavilions <le Marsaii antl de^ Ro- 
han. Pavilions de Flore a«id de liesdi^'uieres. 

— All that remains of this last residence of the kings and 
emperors of France — Les Tuileries, destroyed by hre in 
May, 1871, by the defeated communards — are these four pavi- 
lions, that connected the palace with the two wings of the 
New Louvre (see plan). The old Tuileries were begun by 
Architect Ph. Delorme for Queen Catherine de Medicis. 
Pavilion de Marsan, on the R. de Rivoli side, was built by 
Napoleon I., and the Pavilion de Flore, on the river side, 
now occupied by the Colonial office [Ministere des Colonies] 
was erected by Architect Lefuel for Napoleon III. (1863-68). 

Q. des Tui-eries (south side of the Gardens) 
Orangene. P de Solferino. Legion d'Hon- 
neur. R. de Solferino. R. St. Dominique, 
Ministere de la Guerre. PI. Bellechasse, 



122 TWELVE CITY ROUTES 

Sainte-Clotilde. — One of the finest modern churches 
of Paris, in the Gothic style of the 14th century. Erected 
1846-59; Gau and Ballu, architects. Three portals; two 
towers; spire, 216ft. high. 

To the right of the Church, in the R. Las-Cases 
is the 

Miisee Social. — Founded by Comte de Chambrun, and 
containing books, models and documents of a nature to help 
better the condition of the working classes. A yearly prize 
of $5,000 is awarded to the author of the greatest progress in 
that line. 

R. de Constantine. R. de Crenelle, 

Arctieveche. — Mansion occupied by the Cardinal Arch- 
bishop of Paris; a fine specimen of Louis XIV. architecture. 

Opposite is found " Le Depot de la Guerre," or 
the War Map-Department. We pass now in 
front of the offices and ministerial residence 
of the 

Miiiistere de I'Ag'riciilture. du Coininerce, 
des Postes et Telejrraplies. — This Department has 
charge of the great French Expositions, 

Mairie du VII. Arrondi.ssement (7th district City 

Hall). We reach the 

Ministere de I'liistruction Pnblique et des 
Beanx-Arts. — Ofiices of the Department of Education 
and Fine Arts. 

Caserne du Genie. Temple Protestant. Ambas- 
sade de Russie. Societe Nationale d'Agricul- 
ture. R. du Bac. R. de Varennes. Ambassade 
d'Autriche-Hongrie. Convent du Sacre-Coeur. 
B, des Invalides. 

Il6tel des Invalides. — National home for the veterans 
of the army and navy; founded by Louis XIV. (1661-75) — 
Mansart, architect — to accommodate 5,000 inmates; hardly 
more than 200 live there now, pensions being preferred by 
old soldiers. Fafade 220 yds. long, with 133 windows. A 
battery of conquered cannons, on the front platform, are 
used to fire salvos. Included in the buildings is the 

Miisee d'Artillerie. one of the most complete collec- 
tions of ancient weapons, armors, war curios and historical 
mementos; over 10,000 numbers. Here are preserved "the 
Red Oritlamme of St. Denis," the sacred standard of the 
kings of France; also the no less sacred standard of the 
heroine Joan of Arc, white, strewn with fleurs-de-lys. The 
costume gallery is captivating. 

A. de Tourville. PI. Vauban. 

Saiiit-L<oiii««-des-Iiivalides. Tombe de Nn- 
poleon. — This is the church belonging to the Invalides 
Palace; the nave is adorned by flags taken from the enemy. 
The dome is 160 ft. high and 86 ft. in diameter; beneath it, 
in a crypt 20x36 ft. in diameter, is the sarcophagus contain- 
ing the remains of the great Napoleon; it weighs 67 tons, 
and is made of a single block of red granite from Finland. 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



123 



Pradier sculptured the 12 colossal Victories surrounding the 
the sarcophagus. A most impressive siglit. 

R. de Breteuil. Petites Soeurs des Pauvres Con- 
vent. 

Sf. Francois Xaviei*.— A modern church with fine 
carvings and paintings by Bouguereau and others. 

PI. de Breteuil. Puit Artesien (artesian well 1,800 
ft. deep; the tower over it is 180 ft. high, A. 
de Saxe. PI. de Fontenoy. Convent du Mt. 
Carmel. Casernes. A. de Lowendal. A. Du- 
quesne. A. La-Motte-Piquet, between the Ex- 
position buildings and 1' 

Ecole jflilitaire. — Now used by the Superior School 
of War where officers are trained for staff servtce. In the 
courtyard the ex-Captain Dreyfus was publicly degraded, 
Jan. 5, 1895. 

A. de Suffren. Q. d'Orsay. 
Pout de Passy. 

Allee des Cygnes, a sort of island between bridges. 
R. Albouy. R. de Passy, Chaussee de la 
Muette. Pare du Ranelagh. Here one may 
walk out of the city through the Porte de la 
Muette and enter the 

Bois <le Bonlos'iio. — The most fashionable Paris park ; 
area, 2,250 acres; laid out by Napoleon III. (1852-56). Two 
pretty artificial lakes, with wooded islands; a cascade. 
Two superb race-tracks, Longchamp (for running races and 
military reviews) and Auteuil for steeple-chases; on the 
first the Grand Prix ($40,000) is run in June ; it is an inter- 
national race, won in 1881 by the American horse Foxhall. 
Thousands of "swell" turnouts visit the park daily, espe- 
cially between 4 and 6 P. M. In the morning, horsemen and 
horsewomen are very numerous. Many excellent but expen- 
sive restaurants opened in the summer time. A side-trip to 
the Jardin d'AccLiMATATiON, at the northern extremity of the 
"Bois," is recommended. It is the largest and finest private 
collection of animals and plants to be found anywhere. No 
ferocious beasts are kept there, but only such animals as take 
kindly to man. The kennels and aviaries are superb. A 
lovely recreation-ground for children, with elephant and 
pony rides, etc. Concerts every day. A most enjoyable and 
refined entertainment. Entrance, one eranc (20 cents). We 
re-enter the city by the gate called the 

Porte Dauphine. Avenue du Bois de Boulogne, 
terminating at the PI. de I'Etoile, the center of 
a radiating star of 12 superb avenues. 
Arc <le Triomphe de I'Etoile. — The largest tri- 
umphal arch in existence; begun by Napoleon I. in honor of 
his great armies (1806); Chalgrin, architect. Finished in 
1836. 160 ft. high by 146 ft. wide and 72 ft. deep Trophies 
are sculptured on four sides. The names of all great gen- 
erals of the first Republic and the first Empire are engraved 



124 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 





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-TWELVE CITY ROUTES I25 

under the aiches. A unique work of art. 261 steps to the 
top platform (no fee). Superb panorama of Paris. 

A. des Champs-Elysees {i)4 mi- loi^g)- R- ^^ Ber- 
ry. American church. Faubourg St. Honore. 
£g-lise St. Pliilippe-du-Koule.— A very fashion- 
able church, built by Chalgrin (1769-1784) in the shape of a 
basilica. 

A. d'Antin. Rond-Point des Champs-Elysees. 

Avenue des Champs-Elysees.— From here down 
to the PI. de la Concorde extends an avenue (with small 
parks on either side) unequalled anywhere else. Is 750 yds. 
long by 400 yds. wide, planted with elms and lime trees in the 
17th century. To the right, when going toward the PI. de la 
Concorde are seen the new Palaces of Fine Arts, on either 
side of the new Avenue Nicolas II. At the termination (or 
really the entrance) stand guard the two colossal equestrian 
statues, by Couston, "The Horse Tamers" (les "Chevaux 
de Marly.") The sides of the avenue are dotted with enclo- 
sures for summer variety shows (cafes-concerts) and amuse- 
ments for children. Also restaurants and the fine Cirque 
d'Ete building, a circus of high grade, opened nightly, in 
the summer only. Thousands of people on chairs and 
benches line the avenue in the warm afternoon hours to see 
the passing show of carriages and riders. 

Place de la Concorde (I.) R. de Rivoli. Palais 
Royal. 



ROUTE No. 4 

TO LES GOBELINS, LE PANTHEON AND LE 
QUARTIER=LAT1N 

Palais-Royal. R. de Rivoli. Ministere des Colo- 
nies (II.) P. Royal. R. du Bac. 
St. Thoinas-cl'Aqiiin. — A church erected 1682-1740. 
A fine portal and some interesting pictures. 

Statue de Chapp i (III.). Missions Etrangeres 
(Central Institute of R. C. Foreign Missions). 
Mag'asins du Bon-Marehe. — This enormous dry- 
goods store, the largest in Paris, is famous on account of 
the philanthropy of the founders, Mr. and Mrs. Boucicaut, 
who left millions to charities and organized their huge 
establishment on the profit-sharing system. " 

R. de Sevres. Hopital Laennec, founded 1635 
by Cardinal La Rochefoucauld. Convent des 
Lazaristes (missionaries). 

Caisse d'Eparg'iie Postale.— The huge Postal Sav- 
ings Bank, the success of which has been so rapid and so 
astounding that enormous buildings are now under consi- 
deration for its central offices. 

Couvent des Oiseaux (most fashionable convent for 
girls' education). B. des Invalides. 



126 TWELVE CITY ROUTES 

Institut des Jennes Aveus'l«s.— A model board- 
ing school for blind boys and girls founded by the philan- 
thropist Haiiy (1734), the inventor of the printing system for 
the blind. A government institution admirably well man- 
aged and worth a visit. 

This is the region of convents, hospitals and 

schools of all grades. 

Hopital ties £nfaiits Malades.— For sick children, 
founded in 1735 by the rector of St. Sulpice church. 

Hopital XecUer. — Founded by Louis XVL (1779) in a 
Benedictine convent. Handsome chapel. 

B. Pasteur. Lycee Buffon. In the R. Dutot (a 
by-street) we find the famous 

Institiit Pasteur. — Here the great scientist presided 
over the bacteriological researches of his pupils and super- 
vised yearly the treatment of about 1,800 persons affected 
with rabies (hydrophobia). Out of 26,000 patients inoculated 
here, only 99 died, having begun the treatment too late. Fine 
statue of this good and great man in front of the Institute. 

B. de Vaugirard. PL du Maine. 

Gare Moiitparnasse. or de I'Oiiest Rive 
Oaiiche. — [Main entrance. R. de Rennes ] R. R. lines to 
Normandy, Brittany and S. W. France. 

B. Edgar Quinet. Gymnase INIunicipal (high 
gymnastic training of teachers and pupils). 
€iiiietiere Moiitparnasse. — This is the church- 
yard of the southern districts of Paris. Among the great dead 
therein buried are H. Martin (the historian), Pierre Larousse 
(the encyclopedist), Gerard (the painter), Rude (the sculp- 
tor), Edgar Quinet (the author), Le Verrier (the astronomer). 
Admiral Dumont d'Urville, etc,, etc. Many superb monu- 
ments. Admission from 7 A. M. to 7 P. M. Earlier closing 
hour in winter. No fee. 

B. Raspail. Statue de Raspail (the famous 
scientist and philanthropist). Place Denfert- 
Rochereau (named after the hero of the Defense 
of Belfort, 1870-71). 

lie liion de Belfort. — A superb bronze reduction of 
the great lion, cut by Bartholdi into the rock at the foot of 
the fortress of Belfort, the only stronghold in Alsace that 
did not surrender to the Germans in 1870-71, and is still 
owned by France. 

I^es Ciitiieombes. — Subterranean quarries of immense 
area, partly filled with human bones extracted in 1786 from 
the Cemetery of the Innocents, in the center of the city. 
Twice a month, visitors are admitted, in groups, to a long 
walk through these galleries, emerging after one hour's 
tramp on the Rue Dareau. Ask for a ticket at the Hotel 
de Ville. No fee except for a torch sold to you for 10 cents. 

B. Arago. Statue of Arago, the scientist. Ecole 
de Theologie Protestante. Prison de la Sante, 
a model prison, close to which the guillotine is 
now erected when needed, Hopital Broca 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



127 



(ex-Lourcine). From here a side excursion over 
the Avenue Montsouris may be taken to the 

Pare tie Moiitsonri^it. — A 40-acre park just outside 
the city limits; it contains an observatory for taking meteor- 
ological data. 

Mantifaetiire Rationale and Miisee ties €rol>- 
eliiis. — The state manufactory of these famous tapestries, 
on the river Bievre, whose water helps the making of the 
famous secret dyes that rendered the Gobelins famous. 
Founded by Louis XIV. A unique piocess, producing un- 
equaled results. Six sq. inches is an average day's work. 
These tapestries are worth from §10,000 to $50,000 each. 
They are not for sale, but used for decorating national 
buildings or for state gifts. Superb collection ; opened Sat. 
and Wed., i to 3. No fee. 

Avenue des Gobelins. B. de Port-Royal. Hopi- 
tal and Statue de Ricord (the great surgeon). 
Rue St. Jacques. 

"Val-de-Graee. — The great military hospital and school 
of military medicine and surgery. The church built by Fr. 
Mansart (1645-66) ; is a reduced copy of St. Peter of Rome, 
with a dome 133 ft. high and 53 feet in diameter. Contains 
the remains of Queen Herrietta, wife of Charles I. of England. 

Convent des Carmelites (the strictest of all orders 
for nuns). Musee Pedagogique (wiih materials, 
documents and a librar of 50,000 volumes 
relating to primary education.) 

Iiistitut des Sourds-et-Miiefs.— The leading Deaf 
and Dumb Institution in France, founded by Abbe de I'Espee, 
the inventor of the deaf and dumb alphabet. His statue by 
F. Martin, an alumnus, is in the court yard, next to an elm 
tree said to be 300 years old. 

On the same R. St. Jacques. 

St. Jacques-dn-Hant-Pas.— A 17th century church; 
the portal is in the classical style. A few exceptionally line 
pictures. 

R. Soufflot. PI. du Pantheon. 

Pantheon. — Once a church (Ste. Genevieve), now, for 
the second time, devoted to " the memory of great men by a 
grateful country." Designed by Soufflot. It is a stately pile 
370 ft. long and 276 ft. wide. With a dome 272 ft. high and 
75 ft. in diameter. Superb interior paintings by the masters 
of French art in the 19th century. In the vaults below are 
the tombs of Voltaire, J. J. Rousseau, Carnot, the great 
minister of war of the Revolution, his grandson Carnot, the 
murdered President of the Republic (1894), Victor Hugo, 
Gen. Marceau, Marshal Lannes, the mathematician La- 
grange, the navigator Bougainville, and several others. 
Open daily except Monday; get a ticket from the Bureau of 
Fine Arts, Palais-Royal. No fee. There are 425 steps to the 
top of the dome, and the sight is worth the fatigue. 

Opposite the Pantheon, to the left, we find a fine 
district city-hall, the 



128 TWELVE CITY ROUTES 

Mairicclii V. Arvonidisseinent (erected 1849) and, 
in front, a noble bronze statue of J. J. Rousseau, by Berthet. 

Behind the Pantheon, on the PI. Ste. Genevieve, is 

the old Gothic church of 

Sf.EtJenne-du-Mont.with an unexpected Renaissance 
fafade. Contains a stone sculptured jube (kind of partition 
between nave and choir) of most exquisite design, due to 
Biard (1600). The tomb of St Genevieve, the patron saint 
of Paris, is found in one of the side chapels. Here Arch- 
bishop Sibour was stabbed to death by an unworthy priest 
(Jan. 3, 1857). 

Separated from the church by the R. Clovis is the 
Lycee Henri IV. behind the church, stands 
I'Ecole Poly technique (for the training of the 
scientific branches of the army and the higher 
engineering professions). Lower in the R. 
Clovis is the "College Ecossais," an endowed 
Scotch-Catholic College, containing many 
Stuart relics. Resuming the R. Cujas we 
reach la 

Bibliotheqne Ste. Creiievieve. — A line modern 
library building; Labrouste, architect, 1843 50. 200,000 
books; 35,000 manuscripts; 25,000 engravings. Opened to 
all, day and evening, during the week. Specially attended 
by the students of the Soi bonne and the Law and Medicine 
schools. 

College Ste. Barbe (a private, institution, but the 
oldest boarding scht>ol in the world, founded 
1460). Lycee Louis-le-Grand. R. St- Jacques. 
At the corner of the R. des Ecoles stands the 

Colleg'e «le France^ not in the least a college in the 
usual meaning, but an institution for higher education, free 
to all, covering almost every branch of study, and conferring 
no diplomas or degrees. Founded by Francis L (1530), the 
present building was completed by Chalgrin (1771). Some 
line statuary in the courtyard. Courses of lectures by 
famed scientists or literary men are given nine months in 
the year. Large laboratories. 

R. des Ecoles. R. de la Sorbonne. We are here 
in the center of the old Latin quarter, now 
only existing in name, as most of the land- 
marks have vanished; however, la 
Sorbonne still stands, although only in name, for its 
new and majestic buildings have but few remnants of the old 
tenements of the University of Paris (founded 1253 by 
Robert de Sorbon, almoner to St. Louis). Here are granted 
(after severe examinations) the degrees in letters and 
sciences. There are 54 full professorships for post-graduate 
courses. The new buildings have a 93-yd. fa9ade but are 
really 275 yds. long. The staircases, hails and amphitheater 
are decorated with superb frescoes. The Eglise de la 
Sorbonne, built by Cardinal Richelieu (1635), contains the 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 129 

tomb of the great statesman and a number of rare old paint- 
ings and carvings. 

R. des Ecoles. R. de I'Ecole de Medeci e (I). 
• Ecole Pratique (I). 

Ecole ?fati«»iale des Arts Deooratifs. — One of 
the most remarkable specimens of the 17th century architec- 
ture ; founded, for the teaching of decorative art, by Louis 
XV. in 1768. 

B. St. Germain. R. de rAncienne Comedie. R. 
Danphine. Pont-Neuf. Q. and R. du Louvre. 
R. de Rivoli. Palais Royal. 



ROUTE No. 5. 

QUAYS AND BRIDGES, FROM PONT=NEUF TO PONT 
NATIONAL AND BACK 

Palais Royal (I). R. de Rivoli. R. du Pont-Neuf. 
P. Neuf (II). Q. de la Megisserie. 
Pont-au-Cliang'o, — Built in stone by Louis XIIL 
Formerly occupied by shops of money changers. 

At the end of the quay we turn to the left and 
find ourselves fronting the f agade of the 
Theatre <ln Ctiatelet. — The largest theatre in Paris; 
Owned by the city. Built i860; architect, Davioud. Oppo- 
site arises the graceful 

Fontaine tie la Victoire. — This fountain (by Bo- 
ziot), with its golden Victory, 24 ft. high, stands amid lofty 
horsechestnuts in the center of the 

Place <lu Chatelet, the site of which was occupied 
until 1802 by the notorious prison and court-house of tn^ 
Chatelet. There is here one of the entrances to the Egouts 
(Paris Sewers) 760 miles long; cost $20 per yard. Marvel- 
ously clean, odorless and airy. The visit lasts one hour. 

Theatre Sarah Bernhardt: belongs to the city. 
Built by Davioud (1860-64). Partly burned by the Com- 
munards; rebuilt in 1872. 

Following the Quay de Gesvres we reach now the 
Pont STotre-DaniP. — This bridge occupies theplace 
of a famous Roman bridge; rebuilt several times in the 
Middle Ages; present date of reconstruction, 1853. 

Q. de Gesvres. "L' Assistance Publique," an annex 
to the H6tel-de-Ville (City Hall) where are con- 
centrated all the services of public charities and 
hospitals. Besides yearly city appropriations, 
gifts and endowments, this department receives 
a percentage out of the daily gross receipts of 
all amusement concerns (theatres, concerts, 
balls), and all the net profits accruing to the 
"Mont-de-Piete," the only pawnbroking estab- 
lishment allowed in the city. 



I30 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 




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TWELVE CITY ROUTES 131 

Place de l*Hotel-cIe-"Villo. — Famous in French his- 
tory as la Place de Greve, where hangings, etc., took place 
until 1830. In times of revolution it is the center of popular 
excitement. Fronting west is the magnificent City-Hall, 
called the 

Hotel-tle-Ville. — Burned down by the Communards 
(May, 1871), it was rebuilt practically on the original plans 
of the great Italian architect, Boccadoro (1553). The head 
of the Paris municipality, once called " Prevot des Mar- 
chands," and now " Prefet de la Seine," resides here, where 
the city offices are accommodated. The style is pure Renais- 
sance. The description of the statuary and decoration of 
the superb halls would take pages. Tickets obtained from 
the secretary. Fee to guide. 200 statues and groups adorn the 
fayades. The "Salle des Fetes" is 164 feet long, 42 ft. 
wide and 42 feet high. 

Pont cl'Ai'Cole. — Is named after one of the heroes of 
the revolution of 1830, which caused the removal of King 
Charles X. and his dynasty. From this bridge one obtains 
an especially fine view of this ancient region of the city. 

Q. de I'Hotel-de-Ville. 

Pont liOnis-Philipne.— Rebuilt in 1862. 
Pont-Marie.— Named from its constructor (1614-28). 

Q.des Celestins. Ecole Massillon, in the "Hotel La 
VaUette," a fine mansion of the i6th century. 

Pont-Sully. — Crosses both arms of the river, passing 
over the east point of the He St. Louis. Reconstructed 
(1874-76). 

Quai Henri IV. Magasins de la Ville (City stores). 
"Archives de la Ville " (City Archives) [VI.] 
Panorama building. 

Pont ci'Ansterlitz. — Built by Napoleon I. in 1807 in 
honor of the soldiers who died at the battle of Austerlitz 
(December 2, 1806). 

Quai de la Rapee. Magasins des Fourrages Mili- 
taires (Army Fodder-Supply Stores). 
Pont cle Bercy. — Built 1894; named from the old 
suburban town, now included in the ci;y. 

£nti'e|>Ot des Vins. — A series of mammoth wine and 
spirit bonded-warehouses, intersected by streets bearing the 
names of the famous brands. City taxes on liqiiids are very 
high; they are called Octroi Municipal; such taxes are col- 
lected also on all food products, building materials, coal, 
etc., introduced into the city. 

Pont de Tolbiac.— Built 1879-84 named after the fa- 
mous victory of KingClovis over the Germans (969) that was 
followed by the Frank king's conversion to Christianism. 

Pont Xational. ' — Built 1852, just inside the fortified 
enclosure of the city. 

Cross the bridge and turn to the west to make 
your way back along the southern quays. This 
is called vhe "rive gauche" (left bank of the 
river). Quai de la Gare. From here take the 



132 TWELVE CITY ROUTES 

B. de la Gare until you reach the short R. de 
la Salpetriere, that will lead you to 1' 
Hospice lie la Salpetriere. — A city asylum for 
aged and insane women and a hospital for nervous diseases, 
made famous by the late Dr. Charcot's discoveries in the 
realm of hypnotism. This enormous establishment includes 
45 blocks of buildings, with 4,682 windows. Fronting the 
fapade is a statue of the great alienist, Dr. Pinel (1745-1826). 

Crossing the extensive grounds you reach the B. 
de I'Hopital, and turning to the right you soon 
arrive on the Q. d'Austerlitz, after passing la 

Oare <l'Orleans (ancienne). — A monumental railroad 
station. From there start the trains toward S. W France, 
Spain and Portugal. The new Gare d'Orleans is on the Q. 
d'Orsay (which see) 

Place Valhubert. Statue du General Valhubert 

(killed at Austerlitz, 1806). Quai St. Bernard. 

Here is the main entrance to le 

Jardin-des-Plaiites. — Very large and beautiful 
zoological and botanical gardens combined. The collections 
of plants and live animals (both ferocious and harmless) are 
very large and valuable. They attract thousands of visitors, 
especially on holidays. Visit the Labyrinth. Also the col- 
lections of specimens of natural history, gathered in the mu- 
seum. A corps of distinguished professors are attached to 
this garden. Lectures free. No degrees granted. Founded, 
1626, by Guy de Labrosse. Buffonwas its director from 1732, 
and remodeled the whole establishment, which now covers 
an area of 75 acres. See the famous Lebanon cedar, planted 
in 1735 by Jussieu. the botanist. Tuesday is the best day to 
visit the collections, hot-houses, etc. 

R. Geoffroy-St. Hilaire. At the corner of this 
street and the R. Lacepede, stands 1' 
Hopital tie la Pitie. — Built by Louis XIII, in 1612. 

Turning to the right, you enter the short R. de 
Navarre, prolonged by the R. des Arenes and 
reach les 
Arenes de liiit^ee ; most curious ruins of a Roman 

circus, built during the first or second century A. D. ; were 

discovered in 1870. 

R. Linne; at the corner of this street and R. Cu- 
vier stands the 

Fontaine Cn vier. — A monumental fountain represent- 
ing animals surrounding a statue of " Natural History." 

Returning to the Q. St. Bernard, you follow R. 
Cuvier between the Jardin des Plantes and la 
Halle-anx-Tins. — A number oif large bonded ware- 
houses in which are stored the wines and spirits to be sup- 
plied to the thirsty Parisians and their visitors. 

Resuming your tramp or ride along the river ; Q. 
de la Tournelle, 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES I33 

Pont «le la Touriielie.— A very ancient bridge,_ con- 
necting the island of St. Louis with the eastern extremity of 
the University (or Latin) quarter. Rebuilt in stone in 1645. 

Pont <le I'Avcliei'eohe. — Connects l.'^ rive Gauche 
with LE Parvis-Notre-Dame. 

Pharmacie Centrale of the Paris hospitals. Q. 
de Montebeho. 

Pont an I>onl>le. — So named on account of the small 
coin that used to be collected as a toll. Famous, through 
the Middle Ages, as the main artery of communication be- 
tween the Island of the City and the University (or Latin) 
quarter, a world in itself. A Roman bridge stood there once. 

Here enter the "Rue du Fouarre " (where the 
students of the University in the 12th cen- 
tury used to sit on straw to listen to their 
teachers in the open air) and visit 

St. Jnlieii-Ie-Panvre, the former chapel of the old 
Hotel-Dieu. A 12th century church, only a small portion of it 
being extant; now devoted to the Greek-Catholic rite. Very 
curious. 

Then, through the R. Gallande, reach the church of 

St- Severin. dating back to the 13th century; most of it 
rebuilt in the 15th century. Exceptionally well preserved 
sculpture and carvings from the best Gothic period. 
" Must " be visited. 

Return to the river by the R. du Petit-Pont. 

Petit-Pont. — Another historical bridge between la 
Cite and le Quartier Latin. A tablet placed here celebrates 
the bravery of twelve Parisian heroes who defended the 
bridge against Norman pirates (886). Up to 1782, stood 
there a stronghold, Le Petit-Chatelet. 

Q. St. Michel. 

P. St. Michel.— First built in 1360. Enlarged 1857. 
Continued by the B. du Palais and the P. au Change. 

Fontaine St. Michel. — A modern fountain represent- 
ing "St. Michel conquering the dragon." 84 ft. high and 
48 ft. wide. The group is by Duret, and was erected in i860. 

Q. des Grands-Augustins, Pont-Neuf [II] (which 
cross) R. du Louvre. R. de RivoL. Stop at 
the Protestant Church of 

I'Oratoire. Monnnient a. I'Amiral Coligny. 

This church (1621-30J — once owned by the Priests of the Ora- 
tory—has been given ever to the National Reformed Protestant 
Church. On the R. de Rivoli fapade stands a statue of the 
Huguenot Admiral Coligny (one of the \ ictims cf St. Bar- 
tholomew day). 

R. de Rivoli. Palais Royal. 



134 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 




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ROUTE No. 6 

OLD PARIS FROM PALAIS=ROYAL TO PLACE DE LA 
BASTILLE. 

Palais-Roy ai. R. St. Honore. R. du Louvre. 

R. Rambuteau. 

Bourse <lii Coinnierce. — Until recently Halle-aux- 
Bles (wheat exchange). Transformed 1888 ; Blondel, archi- 
tect. Four columns, 65 ft. high; dome, 106 ft. high, with 
frescoes by famous painters, emblematic of South, North, 
East and West. In front a column 100 ft. high, erected (1572) 
by Catherine de Medicis, for astronomical purposes. 

St. Eustache; a church at the corner of R. Montmartre 
and R. de Turbigo ; mixture of Gothic and Renaissance 
style (1532-1637). Famous for the excellence of its music. 
Its organ is always in charge of some prominent composer. 
Opposite stand 

lies Halies Centrales, — The central markets of 
Paris; built by Ballard, architect (1855-65), of iron and 
glass. The whole occupies an area of 22 acres. Each of 
the 12 pavilions is 182x136 yds., and contains 250 stalls, 40 sq. 
ft. each, and renting for 20 cents a day. Under the pavilions 
are sub-structures of the same dimensions, 12 ft. high, for 
the storage and preparing of goods, with electric motors, 
etc. About 15,000 vehicles bring in the daily supplies. Whole- 
sale auctions last from 5 to 8 A. M. The city is dotted with 
a number of other (smaller) public markets. It is reckoned 
that Paris spends daily for food and drink §600,000, or yearly 
nearly 220 million dollars. 

R. Pierre Lescot. Square des Innocents. 

Fontaine des Innocents, a graceful Renaissance 
fountain by Pierre Lescot; some of the figures are by Jean 
Goujon (1550) ; a fourth side was sculptured to match the 
original three when the monument was placed here in i860. 

R. Berger. R. Aubry-le-Boucher. R. St. Merri, 
R. Sainte-Croix-de-la-Bretonnerie. R. des 
Archives. All these streets contain ancient 
mansions of the aristocracv, now transformed 
into business houses. In the old palace of the 
Due de Soubise are installed les 
Archives Rationales: or collections of ancient state 
documents, gathered since 1800; 56 coupled columns sur- 
round the Court ol Honor sculptured by Robert le Lorrain; 
some of the buildings date back to 1371. Besides study- 
rooms and a Musee Paleographioue in eight rooms, there 
are a number of fine paintings and the most curious collec- 
tion of autographs of famous people, as well as originals of 
peace treatises, royal and imperial decrees, etc. 

Back of the Archives Nationales, with its main 
entrance on the R. Vieille du Temple stand the 
buildings of 1' 

Imprimerie Bfationale, or national printing office, 
originally created by Cardinal Richelieu (1640) ; not only to 



136 TWELVE CITY ROUTES 

to print state documents, but to preserve in its purity tlie art 
of fine printing, including the casting of rare type. In the 
Court of Honor, statue of Gutenberg. Here are printed 
works in ev'ery known language, not for speculation, but to 
help the publishing of works of exceptional importance 
that would not prove a paying investment for private enter- 
prise ; the library and the collection of matrices are worth a 
visit, they are probably unique. 

R. des Francs-Bourgeois. 

Mont-de-Piete. — The central Parisian pawnshop, with 
hundreds of branches all over the city. It loans money 
in any amount on portable property, from a mattress worth 
$2, to a stock of jewelry worth $50,000. The rate of interest 
is never above 8 per cent, per year, including appraisement 
and storage. Surplus profits go to the city-hospital fund. 
Pledges must be redeemed within a year; otherwise they 
are sold at auction and the balance above the loan paid to 
the borrower. 

Xotre-Dame-cIes-Blaiics-Manteaux- — A church 
that belonged to a convent of "White-Mantle" monks; 
hence the name; rebuilt in 1087. Some fine i6th century 
paintings. 

At the corner of the R. des Francs-Bourgeois and 

of the R. Sevigne, stands le 

Museo Cai'navalet in the mansion where for 20 years 
(1677-86) lived the exquisite letter-writer, the Marquise de 
Sevigne. It is now devoted to collections of historical 
Parisian antiquities and curios. The building is a fine 
aristocratic mansion of the i6th century; Lescot and (later) 
F. Mansard, architects. In the Court of Honor, bronze 
statue of Louis XIV., the masterpiece of Coyzevox. In the 
same building is the Bibliotheque de la Ville (city library) 
replete with rare books and MSS. relating to the past history 
and present statistics of the great city. 

Place ties' Vosg'es. — Under the monarchy called Place 
Royale, as it occupies the site of the Royal Palace of Les Tour- 
nelles;; here King Henri II. was accidentally killed in a 
tournament and the castle was demolished. Symetrical 
buildings in Louis XIII. style were erected in the 17th cen- 
tury and were the abodes of aristocracy. Later Victor 
Hugo, in his most famous days, lived here. Equestrian 
statue of Louis XIII., by Dupaty and Cortot, erected in the 
center in 1829; fine fountains at every corner. Running 
along the north side is the old 

R. du Pas-de-la-Mule. R. des Tournelles. R. de 
la Bastille. PL de la Bastille (I). Returning 
west, R St. Antoine. 

Eg'lise St. Paul-St. SiOuis.— Erected by the Jesuits 
in 1627-41 in the later Italian Renaissance style, called the 
"Jesuite Style" and copied all over the world. The cupola 
IS the second ever built in Paris. Tiie_ adfoining build- 
ings of the Jesuit convent are now occupied by the Lycee 
Charlemagne, a large state college. 

R. de Rivoli. IVIairie du IV. Arrondissement. 
Caserne Napoleon, Hotel de Ville (V). Square 
St. Jacques, on the site occupied by the old 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES I37 

church of St. Jacques-de-Ia-Boucherie; it con- 
tains some fine statuary, and in its center rises 
the 

Tour St. Jacqiies-fle-la-Boiicherie. — A stone 
tower, the last remnant of the church; over 170 ft. high, and 
admirable in design and sculpture. I3uilt 1508-22; restored 
under Napoleon III. A wide platform on top is used for a 
meteorological observatory in connection with the one in 
Montsouris Park (IV.) Well worth a visit. 

Palais du Louvre (V). East and north fagade. 

Ministere tlos Finances. — The offices of the treas- 
ury department and the secretary of the treasury's superb 
apartments are located in the north portion of the Palace of 
the Louvre, facing the R. de Rivoli. It may be interesting 
to know that the funded debt of France reached (1900) the 
enormous total of $6,446,793,398. 

Rue de Rivoli. Palais-Royal. 



ROUTE No. 7 

TO THE CIMETIERE DU PERE LA CHAISE AND THE 
BOIS DE VINCENNES 

Palais-Royal. R, St. Honore. R. du Louvre. 

HStel-des-Postes-et-Teleg-raplies. — Or Central 
P. O. Building of Paris. The entrance for the general deliv- 
ery (Poste Restante) is on R. Gutenberg. There are ico 
branch offices (see p. 62). Rebuilt 1880-84, and of immense 
size. Of no architectural merit, and generally believed to be 
a comparative failure in its postal arrangements. A system 
of pneumatic tubes connects it with all its branches. 

HOtel-des-TetepWones. or Central Telephone Ex- 
change ; next to P. O. on R. Gutenberg ; built of glazed brick. 

R. Etienne Marcel. R. de Turbigo. B. de Se- 
bastopol. Sq. des Arts-et-Metiers, 
Conservatoire des Arts-et-Metiers. — A large in- 
dustrial museum and a free technical school. Founded in 
1794, although the idea dates back to Descartes the philoso- 
pher (1596-1650K and the first collection to the engineer 
Vaucanson (1783). The older portion of the building be- 
longed to the Abbey of St. Martin-des-Champs, and dates 
back to the nth century. Statue of Papin, the discoverer of 
steam-power (1647-1714), by Miller. Models of machinery, 
some of them in motion. All branches of industrial sciences 
and arts repiesented by instruments, etc. Ask for the Echo 
Room. Standard weights and measures of the metrical sys- 
tem. Library of 30,000 volumes. Lectures every week 
evening by prominent specialists. Collection of plans and 
designs of machinery for copying purposes, etc., etc. 

Til. de la Oaite. on the south side of the square. Be- 
longs to the Cite. Very handsome ; built by Hittorff (1861). 

R. Reaumu-r. 

St. Nicolas-des-Champs. — A church with a Gothic 
portal (1420) and a Renaissance choir (1576). The south 



138 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 







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TWELVE CITY ROUTES 139 

portal (1575) from designs by Delorme, the famons architect 
of the Tuileries. Some beautiful carvings and paintings. 

To the east of the Conservatoire, in R. Montgol- 
fier is 1' 
Ecole Ceiitrale «les Arts and Manufactures. 

— A famed state institution for the training of civil, mechani- 
cal and electrical engineers. Founded in 1S29; rebuilt 1884. 
Admission by competitive examination. Course, three 
years. Diplomas highly prized the world over. 

Square du Temple. 

Miiii'ie <lu III. Arronrtissenient. — A handsome 
district city hall, built in 1864-67. 

Marche <lu Temple. — A large city market, the upper 
floor of which is devoted to the sale of second-hand cloth- 
ing; very picturesque Owes its name to an old stronghold 
of the Knights-Templar, which stood there until destroyed 
(with the Order) by King Philip-le-Bel (1307). A tower was 
still extant until 1811. In it King Louis XVI., his queen and 
children were held captive by the Convention (1792-93). 

R. du Temple. PI. de la Republique. Statue de 

la Republique [I]. B. Voltaire. 

Statue de Bobillot. — A bronze statue, by A. Paris, of 
an infantry-sergeant, one of the heroes of the Tonkin war 
(1883-85). 

St- Ainbroise. — A handsome church in the Romanesque 
style; erected in 1863-69; Ballu, architect. 

Place Voltaire. Statue de Ledru-RoUin, "the 
organizer of universal suffrage " (1848). 
Mairie du XI. Arrondissenient : a tasteful dis- 
trict city hall, built (1862-65) by Gamel. 

R. de la Roquette. On ths north side stood the 
Prison de la Grande Roquette (recently demol- 
ished) where convicts were kept until sent to 
the guillotine or the state penitentiary. Here, 
during the Commune days (May. 1S71). Arch- 
bishop Darboy and other prominent ' 'hostages" 
were murdered by the infuriated rioters. In the 
street opposite took place the public execution of 
criminals : the grewsome sight may be witnessed 
now, occasionally, outside the gate of the 
"Prison de la Sante" Opposite is la Prison 
des Jeunes Detenus (Boys' Penal Reformatory). 
We turn into the B de Menilmontant and find 
ourselves facing the main entrance to le 
Cinietiere du Pere L.a Chaise. — The famous grave- 
yard that does duty for the eastern districts of Paris. Lo- 
cated on what was once the country-seat of the Jesuit father 
De la Chaise, the confessor of Louis XIV. Organized as a 
cemetery in 1804. It is replete with monuments erected to 
the memory of famous dead, and is considered the most 
fashionable burying-ground in the capital. Masterpieces of 



I40 TWELVE CITY ROUTES 

architecture and sculpture can be counted here by the hun- 
dred; here are a few of the most noted names on the 
tombs: Heloise and Ab61ard, the immortal lovers; Musset 
the poet; Auber, the composer; Cuvier, the naturalist; 
Bernardin de St. Pierre, author of the exquisite "Paul and 
Virginie" ; La Fontaine, Moliere and Racine, three glo- 
rious names; Ingres, Pradier, David d' Angers, the artists; 
Balzac and Michelet, illustrious writers; Thiers, the Presi- 
dent; Rachel, the tragedienne, etc., etc. On May 27, 1871, 
the Communards fought their last fight in a corner of these 
gioundsand were shot in gieat numbers against a wall, now 
always covered with wreaths, and called " Le Mur des 
Federes." The cemetery is opened all day long, and for a 
small fee, guides may be obtained to show you the finest mon- 
uments. A visit that should not be missed. The city owns 
19 cemeteries; 13 intra-muros for perpetual grants and six 
extra-muros for short grants (5 to 20 years). 

A, Louis Philippe. Place de la Nation, Used to 
be called Place du Trone, has, on a fountain in 
the center, the group, by Dalou, "The Tri- 
umph of the Republic." Two columns, 160 
ft. high; on top, the bronze effigies of Philip- 
Augustus and St. Louis. A. Diderot. Ecole 
Arago. R. de Picpus. " Cimetiere Picpus " ; 
fee, 10 cents; a small, disused cemetery, beau- 
tifully shaded by trees, and containing tombs 
of the best aristocracy of France, many mem- 
bers of which were guillotined in 1793-94. At 
the eastern extremity is found le 
Totnbeaci cle Lafayette. — The resting place of 
"America's great friend." 

A. Daumesnil. Porte de Picpus. Here we leave 
the fortified enclosure and soon reach le 

Bois de "Vincennes, a fine park, only second to the 
Bois de Boulogne. Area. 2,250 acres; once a forest, where 
good King St. Louis used to try cases under a famous oak, 
the place of which is marked by a pyramid. Louis XV. ren- 
dered this thick wood somewhat more secure; but only in 
1857-58 did Napoleon III. have it laid out as a park. It con- 
tains three natural lakes : Daumesnil (50 acres) , des Minimes 
(20 acres) and St. Mande, the prettiest and smallest. Large 
race-track. Also Champ de Manoeuvres (drill-ground, one- 
half mile wide) and an artillery Polygone. A Mus^e 
FoRESTiER, or collection of forestry specimens, etc., com- 
pletes the many attractions. Numerous restaurants and 
cafes. Prices much lower than in the Bois de Boulogne 
establishments. The Chateau de Vincennes, once a royal 
castle (founded in the 12th century), later a state prison and 
a stronghold. The chapel begun in 1379 and completed in 
1552, is of very pure Gothic style. The Donjon, or Keep, is 
170 ft. high. The fortress may by visited only with a permit 
from the Minister of War. 

Return by rail to the Paris terminus of the Vin- 
cennes R.R., PI. de la Bastille [I]. The Grands 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



141 



Boulevards [I], up to B. des Italiens. On the 
south side or the Boulevard enter R. de Choi- 
seul, R. Monsigny. Th. des Bouffes-Parisiens. 
Place Ventadour. Succursale de la Banque 
de France (formerly the famous Th. des Ital- 
liens, devoted to Italian opera). R. Dalayrac. 
Passage Choiseul. R. Mehul. R. des Petits- 
Champs. A. de rOpera[I.]. R. de la Paix, 
one of the mest splendid streets in Paris on ac- 
count of its dazzling stores and of the bril- 
liant, artistocratic-looking crowd that patronize 
them ; it terminates on the 

Place aii<l Coloniie Ventlome. — This "place" was 
constructed by Mansart the younger in 1708; rather chilHng 
in its severely imposing aspect. The column in the center is 
14 ft. high and 13 ft. in diameter ; the bronze-coating was fur- 
nished by the melting of 1,200 Russian and Austrian cannon. 
Erected by Napoleon after the victoi y of Austerlitz. Napoleon 
in coronation robes — a statue by Chaudet — stands at the top. 
The communards (in 1871) pulled down the column, but the 
bronze plates were recovered and the monument re-erected 
at the expense of the famous landscape painter, Courbet,who 
had foolishly headed this riotous deed. 

Ministere de la Justice et des Cultes (Ministry of 
Justice and Worship offices), on the west side of 
the Place ; some very beautifully decorated re- 
ception halls. R. Castiglione, R. de Rivoli. 
St-itue de Jeanne d'Arc [I]. Palais Royal. 



ROUTE No. 8 

TO MONTMARTRE AND THE EGLISE DU SACRE 
CCEUR 

Palais-Royal. Place du Theatre Frangais. 

Theatre Fraii^ais. — This famous building, partly de- 
stroyed by fire (March 8, 1900), is one of the four theatres that 
receive yearly stipends from the state, the others being the 
Grand Opera, the Opera-Comique. and the Th. de l'Odeon. 
The '• TheStre de la Comedie Franpaise " (to give it its right 
name) is the home of a stock company of tragedians and 
comedians organized in 1681, principally from the troupe of 
Moliere (died 1673). The present theatre was built in 1782, 
and the troupe preserves the purest traditious of high dram- 
. matic art. The library and picture galleries are filled with 
treasures; most of them saved from the fire of igoo. Notice 
the statue or Voltaire, by Houdon, the sculptor of Washing- 
ington's statue, now in Washington city, U. S. A. 

R. de Richelieu. 

Fontaine Moliere. — Erected by public subscription 
in 1844. Bronze statue of the great playwright, by Seurre. 



142 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



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TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



"43 



A little farther to your right, in the sams R, 

Richelieu, la 

Bibliotlieqiic Natiojialo, the largest public )ibrary 
in the world ; with three fafades ; built by Lemuet and Man- 
sart. In 1373, this huge collection was begun by Charles V. ; 
enriched by a succession of kings; it came in i555 to its 
present site. Over 35:2 million volumes; 2^/2 million engrav- 
ings; 300,000 maps. In the " Salle du travail " (work room) 
there are seats for 344 students (admission caid is needed, 
obtained from the secretary). Over 200,000 rare coins and 
inedals in a special department. A number of other curious 
and extraordinarily valuable editions. 

Pi. Louvois. Fontaine Louvois (erected by Vis- 
conti [1844] ; emblematic figures of the great 
French rivers). B. des Italiens and INIontmar- 
tre. R. Drouot. This corner of the boulevards 
is called le " Carrefour des Ecrases" (the run- 
over crossing). 

HSf el des Ventos Mobilieres. — The central aitc- 
tion house of Paris. Here famous sales of paintings, rare 
curios, jewels, books and furniture gather wealthy amateurs 
from all parts of the world. 

R. Chauchat. Temple Protestant de la Redemp- 
tion. Hotel du "Figaro" (mansion occupied 
b}^ this famous daily). 
Mairie «lii IX. Arronclissf^inent. — In the wide 

courtyard of this district city hall, a bronze statue of Voltaire 
by Lambert. 

Faubourg Montmartre. 

Xotre-Daiiie-iIe-IiOrette. — A church built like a 
basilica of the early Christian centuries ; architect, H Lebas 
(1823-36). Very fine fiescoes decorate the nave, 225 ft. long, 
100 ft. wide, and 60 ft. high. 

R. Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. PI. St. Georges. 

Hdtel <Ip M. Thiers. — A fine mansion, formerly owned 
by Adolphe Thiers, the first president of the present French 
Republic. It was sacked and ruined by the Communards in 
May, 1871, but rebuilt and refurnished at the expense of the 
state. 

R. Fontaine. PI Blanche. A. du Cimetiere, 330 

ft. long, leads to le 

Cimetierede Montiiiartre. — This cemetery is espe 
cially devoted to the needs of the northern district of the city. 
Among the prominent dead whose monuments adorn this vast 
enclosure are Renan, Theophile Gautier, Miirger, Alexandre 
Dumas, Jules and Edmond de Goncourt, the authors; Dela- 
roche, Schetfer, Troyon, Greuze, the painters; Berlioz, 
Halevy, Masse, the composers ; and hundreds of other famous 
men and women of the 19th century, 

R. Etex. R. de Maistre. R. Lepic. 

Moulin <le la Oalette. — The quaint remnants of an 
old wind-mill now transformed into a restaurant and dance 
ball, standing almost at the top of the 'Butte" (hill of) Mont- 



144 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



martre (i,ooo ft. above the river Seine) that crowns the north 
extremity of Paris. This whole quarter is filled with artists' 
studios and with the evidence of the free and easy life of 
the craft Drink-Halls (called "cafes artistiques ") are 
found around the B, Clichy and attract visitors from all parts 
of the city. 

Continuing our ascension through the R. Norvins, 

we reach the ancient church of 

St. Pierre «le Montuiartre. — Montmartre means 
"Mount of the Martyrs," in honor of St Denis and his com- 
panions who suffered death on account of their faith (A. D. 
270). This unused church is a relic of a convent founded in 
1147. Almost in front of it stands the basilica, called I'Eglise 
Votive du 

Sacre-C«enr. a huge pile, the building of which began 
in 1876; Abadie, architect. It is built by private gifts, "to 
atone for the sins of France and appease the wrath of God 
made manifest in the terrible year 1870-71." Up to 1897, about 
five million dollars had been spent; the receipts continue 
to flow in at the rate of $20,000 a month. It needed 83 wells 100 
ft. deep to build the foundations. The church proper is 330 ft. 
deep; the dome is 200 ft. high, and behind it a large belfrey- 
tower is to be 250 ft. high; it contains "la Savoyarde," a 
bell weighing nearly 32 tons. From the steps of the church 
a superb view of the city may be obtained. (Fee, 5 cents to 
the church, 10 cents to the top of the dome.) 

Reservoir de la Ville (2,400,000 gallons), R. MUl- 
ler. R. de Clignancourt. Magasins Dufayel 
B. Rochechouart. Place d'Anvers. Statues of 
Sedaine, the dramatist (1719-1797), and of Di- 
derot, the philosopher (1713-1784), in bronze, by 
Lecointe. 

€oll^S'« RoJlln. — A beautifully equipped boarding- 
school for boys from 8 to i8; owned by the city. In the 
Court of Honor, a statue of Charles Rollin, the historian 
(1661-1741), by Debut. 

R. and Place Turgot. R. Rochechouart. Sq. 

Maubeuge. Salle de concerts Pleyel. R. 

Cadet. R. Richer. 

Folies-Berg'ere, a luxuriously appointed variety-show 
that caters to the fashionable element among the pleasure- 
loving foreigners. 

At the corner of the R. Ste. Cecile and the R. 

du Conservatoire' stands 

St. Eus,-eiie. — A modern church (1855) in the Gothic 
style; Boileau, architect; contains splendid stained-glass 
windows. 

At the cor. of the R. Faubourg Poissonniere, we 
come to le 
C-oiisi»rvatoire de Musique et de Declama- 

tioii, a world famed institution for the training of musi- 
cians of both sexes. 750 pupils are in attendance and 
receive the best tuition from 71 masters famous in their spe- 



I 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES I45 

cialities; no charge whatever. Large library and collection 
of rare musical instruments, manuscripts of scores, portraits 
of great artists, etc. The concert-hall and its orchestra are 
considered the most select in existence. Every year the 
happy winner of the Grand Prize in musical composition is 
sent to Rome for three years at the state's expense. 

R. Bergere. Comptoir d'Escompte (very large 

bank, with branches all over the world). R. 

du Faubourg Montmartre. R. Montmartre. R. 

Notre-Dame des Victoires. Here we see — not 

the fagade (it is on the R. Vivienne) but the 

reverse side of 

lia Bourse; the Paris Stock Exchange, a huge, de- 
tached building, shaped somewhat like a Greco-Roman 
temple; 161 ft. long, 234ft, deep and 165 ft. high, surrounded 
by a peristyle with columns; the main hall is 105 ft, deep by 
60 ft. wide. The brokerage of stocks and bonds is legally en- 
trusted to a company of 60 sworn brokers called "agents de 
change"; but theie are hundreds of " curb-stone brokers," 
some of them very powerful. The regular business hours 
are between 12 and 3 P. M., when a visit to the main 
hall (admission free) is one of the most curious sights in Paris. 

PI. «les Victoires. StatJie «le l-onis XIV. — 
This old-fashioned "place" of an eliptical from, with the 
original buildings built by H. Mansart (1685) in a uniform 
style, is now entirely devoted to wholesale business. In the 
center an equestrian statue of Louis XIV. by Bosio (1822); 
fine bas-reliefs by Bosio's nephew. We leave this place by the 

R. Croix-des-Petits-Champs, and pass one of the 
gates of la 

Baiiqne de Frawee, the main entrance of which is 
on R. de la Vrilliere; it was built by Mansart (1620) for one 
of the natural sons of Louis XIV. and Marquise de Moptes- 
pan. In 1892, the Republic established there the National 
Printing Office. When the Banque de France (a private cor- 
poration with about 38 million dollars capital) was organized 
(1803). it bought this palace but didn't occupy it until 1808. 
A few superb halls, with decorations and paintings of _ the 
17th and i8th centuries. Enormous amounts of precious 
metals kept here to secure the issue of banknotes of 
which the Banque has the absolute monopoly. The institu- 
tion has branches in every French city over 12,000 or 15,000 
inhabitants, and discounts commercial paper bearing three 
signatures. It is considered second only to the Bank of 
England, to which it loaned money repeatedly. 

Caisse d'Eparg-aie de Paris, or Savings Institution 
of Paris, is on the same street. It is a public establishment 
such as is found in every French city, where private savings- 
banks are not encouraged. It is managed, free of charge, 
by leading Parisian business men who hold such an appoint- 
ment as a great honor. All the funds are immediately 
invested in government s'^o bonds. The interest paid is 2^^^, 
with some rules limiting the sudden withdrawal of funds. It 
is independent from the Caisse d'Epargne Postale (IV). 

R. St. Honore. Palais-Royal. 



146 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 




TWELVE CITY RO'JTES I47 

ROUTE No, 9 

QUAYS AND BRIDGES FROM PONT=NEUF TO 
PONT=D AUTEUIL 

Palais-Royal. R. de Rivoli R. du Pont-Neuf. 
PontNeuf [II]. Q. Conti. 

Hotel des Moimaies, or the French "Mint" is a 
large and handsome mansion especially built for the purpose 
in 1775; Antoine, architect; its facade is 400 ft. long and dec- 
orated with emblematic sculptured figures. The main stair- 
case leading to the Musee Monetaire (the Monetary Mu- 
seum) is a remarkable work of art; so is the main hall, to 
which are annexed four minor rooms. In the manufactur- 
ing department, where admission is granted by ticket and 
guides are provided, are 17 stamps, turning out 600,000 coins 
a day. The medal-manufacturing department is very 
curious. In France all goldware and silverware (jewelry, 
watches, plate,) must bear the hall-mark of the mint ; the only 
accepted standard is 22 carats for gold and 900 fine for silver. 

Bibliotli^qiie Mazarine. — This library, collected 
by Cardinal Mazarin (1602-1662), is installed in a depen- 
dency of the Palais de ITnstitut (see below); contains the 
rarest specimens of early printing; also 250,000 volumes, and 
6,000 MSS., besides a number of valuable and artistic curios. 

Pont rtes Arts. — A foot-passenger bridge, between the 
Louvre and the Institut, built 1802-04; one of the best views 
of the river obtainable from here. On the left side, standsle 

Palais de I'liistitut, devoted to the five academies 
that form the Institut de France : Academie Fran^aise, 
the "French Academy" (1648), 40 members; Academie des 
Science (1666), 40 members; Academie des Inscriptions et 
belles lettres (1701), 40 members; Academie des Beaux-Arts 
(1656), 40 members; Academie des Sciences Morales et 
Politiques (1743), 40 members. They represent the elite of 
French thought and talent, and distrtbute prizes to a very 
large amount every year. They have, besides, correspond- 
ing members among the great men all over the world. 

Q. Malaquais. 

^ Ecole Rationale des Beaux-Arts.— Founded 1648. 
Without contest the leader among the the art-schools in 
the world. Titular pupils admitted onh after severe exam- 
ination, The studios and lecture-rooms open to all, but 
pupils alone entitled to diplomas or prizes. Four branches : 
Architecture, painting, sculpture and medal engraving. 
The winners of first prizes in each branch sent as state 
boarders to the French Academy at Rome. The present 
building erected (1820-38) by Debret and Duban. Entrance 
on R. Bonaparte; colossal busts of Puget, the sculptor and 
Poussin , the painter. The interior courts as well as the 
halls are replete wijh works of art, ancient and modern. In 
the amphitheatre, see the Hemicycle by Paul Delarochewith 
75 figures 23 ft. high of artists of all times and nations. 
Guides provided by concierge (janitor) ; fee. 

Q. Voltaire. 

P. du Carrousel or des Saints-Pferes.— Built in 

i834by Palonceau. Note the two statues at each extremity. 
P. Royal. — Built (1685-89) by Romain and Mansart. 



148 TWELVE CITY ROUTES 

Q. d'Orsay. Caisse des-Depots-et-Consignations 

(a government depository for private savings, 

indemnity bonds, etc). Caserne Bonaparte. 

Nouvelle Gare du Chemin du fer d' Orleans [V]. 

Palais de la fjeg^ioia cl'Honiieur. — Originally 

built by Prince Salm-Kyrburg (1786); later, inhabited by 

the famous Madame de Stael-Holstein, the authoress; now 

tho headquarters of the grand-chancellor of the illustrious 

Order of Knighthood, founded by Napoleon in 1803. Was 

burned down by the Communards (May. 1871) ; it was rebuilt 

with the money subscribed by the members of the order. A 

graceful building. No visitors admitted. 

Pont Solferino.— This bridge was_ built 1858-59 and 
named in honor of the French victories in the Franco-Aus- 
trian war of June, 1859, that freed Italy from the thraldom 
of Austria. 

Pont ele la Concorde ; this bridge was built by 
Perronet (1787-90) partly with stone from the demolished 
Bastille [I.] ; for a time it was called "Pont de la Revolution." 

Chambre des Deputes [I].. 

Palais de la Presidence de la Cliambre.— A 

very handsome palace fronting the Seine and adjoining the 
Palais-Bourbon, or House of Deputies. Therein resides the 
Speaker of the House for the time being. The office is 
elective, and the incumbent is not as frequently changed as 
the members of the cabinet. 

Ministere des Affaires Etrangeres. — Known in 
diplomatic parlance af the " Palais d'Orsay.'' This is the 
French Foreign Office, where sat lately the Spanish-American 
Peace Commission (1898) and the Venezuela Commission 
(1899). This superb mansion, wherein are located the offices 
as well as the residence of the minister, were built for the 
purpose in 1845, under King Louis-Philippe. The reception 
apartments are magnificent. 

Esplanade des Invalides; a large open space (1600 
X 825 ft.) bordered with elm trees, and occupied 
by sundry exposition buildings (see Map of the 
Exposition grounds. ) 

Pont Alexandre III.~A superb bridge erected espe- 
cially as a monument to the Exposition of 1900; first stone 
laid by Czar Nicolas II in October. 189b; length, 360 feet; 
width, 131 feet. 

Pont des Invalides.— Bridge built 1827; remodelled 
1855; adorned with two emblematic statues: "Victory on 
Land," by Dieboldt, and " Victory on Sea," by Villain. 

Manufactnro 9i^atioiiale des Tabacs.— This is 
one of the model factories in which the government manu- 
factures tobacco goods of all kinds. Tobacco is a strict 
state monopoly and brings in a revenue of 75 million francs a 
year. Tobacco stores are limited in number and granted as 
privileges to widows of officers or officials; some of them 
are very profitable. The beneficiaries are allowed to sublet 
their stores to agents In this factory some very curious 
machinery may be seen at work. Over 13 million pounds of 
tobacco, cigars and cigarettes manufactured yearly; 2,200 
work people, mostly girls. 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



149 



Ma^asiii Central dcs Hopitaux Militaires. — 

The central warehouse of supplies for the army hospitals; 
close to it is le Depot des Marbres where the government 
stores blocks of fine marble such as are to be used for sculp- 
ture ; a few artists have studios there when working on gov- 
ernment orders. 

Pout «le I'AIma, built in 1856, to celebrate the great 
Franco-English victory over the Russians, at the beginning 
of the Crimean war. Fine stone statues of soldiers adorn 
the bridge. On the left bank, Pl. de l'Alma with a bronze 
group by Chretien. 

Gai'tle-Meuble National: a fine collection of rare 
furniture, tapestries, curios, belonging to the state and used 
to decorate palaces, etc. Here is a museum to be visited 
free every day, except Monday. 

€liani)> do Mars. Exposition.— This enormous 
space, called '"Field of Mars," has been used for exposi- 
tion purposes in 1867, 1878, 1889 and 1900 [see Map of Expo- 
sition grounds]. It is 1,100 yds. long, and 550 yds. broad 
(along the river). It has been used between times as mili- 
itary drill-grounds. In 1790 the embankment side was 
planted with trees, and here, on July 14, of that year, King 
Louis XVI. swore allegiance to the new constitution. 

In the northern (or lower) part of the Champ de 
Mars stands the 

Tour EiffeS.— Built (1887-89) by Engineer Gustave Eiffel ; 
height, 984 ft. (nearly twice the height of the Washington 
Monument). The base covers 1V2 acres of land. The 
single shaft, after the four uprights unite, is 590 ft. high. 
The first platform, 5 860 sq. yds. ; the second platform, 32 
yds. sq., and the top platform, 54 ft. sq , and holds 800 people. 
The "Lantern " is still 79 ft, higher, and is reached by a 
staircase. The search-light installed there covers a radius 
of 45 miles. On clear days the view (with glasses) extends 
to 53 miles. (See Map of Exposition Grounds). 

Pont d'leua. — Built in 1809-13, in honor of the great 
victory over the Prussians. When the allied troops occupied 
Paris in 1814, an aboi tive attempt was made by the Prussians 
to blow up this bridge. 

Pout df Passy. — A foot-passenger bridge built in 
1878. It connects with the P. de Crenelle (see below) by a 
narrow island called l'Allee des Cygnes. On the w-estern 
extremity of this strip of land stands a reduction of Bar- 
tholdi's " Liberty Enlightening the World," that adorns the 
New York harbor. 

Q. de Crenelle. 

P. de Greuelle. — An iron bridge, rebuilt in 1875. 

Q. de Javel. 

Pout Miraheau. — A finely designed bridge, with an arch 
of one span, built in 1895. 

Pout-Viaduc-d'xi.uteuil. — This bridge, a'marvel of 
beauty and ingenuity, was constructed in 1866 by Bassom- 
pierre. It accommodates railroad traffic as well as vehicles 
and foot-passengers. 

Cross over here and resume your route facing 
east instead of west, but still following the 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 




TWELVE CITY ROUTES 151 

banks of the river. We shall not repeat the 
names of the bridges. 
Q. d'Auteuil. Hospitalite dn Travail (the labor- 
ing people's lodging-house). Q. de Passy. 
Pare «lu Troca«lero; a beautifully laid-out park 
down the slope from the Palace (XII.) to the Q. de Passy. 
Included within Exposition inclosure and devoted to Colo- 
nial buildings and exhibits of all nations. 

Q. de Billy. Magasins des Subsistances Militai- 
res (army-commissary warehouses and baker- 
ies). Pompe-a-feu (water-works). PI de 
I'Alma. Q. de la Conference. 

Maisoii «le Francois Premier. — An exquisitely 
pretty house, built near Fontainebleau, by King Francis I. 
(1515-47), and transferred stone by stone, in 1824, to the 
corner of Cours-la-Reine (^behind Q. de la Conf6rence) and 
R. Bayard. We cross the A. d'Antin and reach 1' 

A.Nicolas [II.]. a superb avenue opened especially 
in honor of the Exposition of igoo and connect- 
ing in a straight line the Champs-Elysees with 
the fagade of the Hotel des Invalides [HI.] 
over the stately Alexandre III. bridge. 
Crraii(l-Palai«ii-(les-Beaiix-Arts: built to take the 
place of the old Palais de l'Industrie, facing the Charnps- 
Elysees and used for Exposition purposes, especially the 
yearly " Salon of Paintings," etc., Concours Hippique 
(horse show); the Exposition des Arts-Decoratifs, etc. 
This new palace and the smaller one on the other side of 
the A. Nicolas II. cost over $4,200,000. They are included 
in the Exposition inclosure. The principal fa9ade of the 
■ large palace is 400 ft, long. Architects: Deglane, Louvet 
and Thomas. 

Petit Palais-«les-Beaiix- Arts ; to be used, after 
the Exposition, as a Museum of the City of Paris. During the 
Exposition it contains exhibits of retrospective art in all 
its branches. Architect, Charles Giraud. 

Place de la Concorde [I]. Q. des Tuileries. 
Orangerie [HI.]. Q. du Louvre. PI, du Louvre, 
St. Germain-l'Auxerrois [II.]. R. du Louvre. 
Palais-Royal. 

ROUTE No. 10 

TO LES ABBATTOIRS DE LA VILLETTE AND LES 
BUTTES=CH AUMONT 

Oaleries «ln Palais-Royal. — We described the 
palace (I.) ; the galleries that surround the gardens, and are 
lined with handsome stores, under 180 arches, are : G. Mont- 
pensier, on the west side ; G. de Valois on the east side; G. 
Beaujolais, on the north side. On the south side, the Galle- 
ries d'Orleans and de Chartres. On the corner of the G. 
Montpensier is the 



152 TWELVE CITY ROUTES 

Til. dn Palais-Roynl, a very fashionable resort 
where broad farces are acted very cleverly by a famous 
stock company. The lower row of seats are reached by a 
flight of iron stairs. Built in 1874, and long known as Th. 
Montansier. 

R. Vivienne. Bibliotheque Nationale [VIII.]. PI. 
de la Bourse [VIII.]. R. du Quatre-Septem- 
bre. R. de Grammont. R. Gretry. PI. Boiel- 
dieu. 

Opera-Comiqiie.— One of the theaters subsidized by 
the state; high-class opera, nine naonths in the year, seven 
days a week Burned down with great loss of life in May, 
1887. Reconstruction completed in 1898; Davioud, architect. 
The building runs to the B. des Italiens, along the 

R. Marivaux. B. des Italiens (Famous restau- 
rant, "le Cafe Anglais "). R. Laffitte. 
Banquo RotStschilcJ.— One of four establishments of 
this colossal firm ; the others are in Frankfort-on-the-Main, 
Vienna and London. The Paris firm is the head of the 
whole concern under, the local name of Messrs. de Roths- 
child freres. 

R. Lafayette (3,077 yds. long). Sq, Montholon 

(small but very livel}^, with exquisite "Children 

Group," by Claude Vignon). Ecole Bernard- 

Palissy (a city professional school). 

St. Viiiceiif-«lo-PanI, a church in the style of the 

early Christian basilica; built 1824-44, Hittortf and Lepere, 

architects; length 264 ft., width, 120 ft. Approached by 

graceful inclines. Over the portico a bas-ielief representing 

the Saint between Hope and Charity. Two towers 138 ft. 

high. 

Behind the church, Hopital Lariboisiere, built 
1846-53, out of a gift of $600,000 from Comtesse 
Lariboisiere. PI. Lafayette. Ecole Alsacienne 
(for the education of French- Alsatian children). 
B. Magenta. R. de Dunkerque. PI. de Rou- 
baix. 

Oare du Eford. — A monumental R. R. station, erected 
1863; Hittorff, architect. From here start lines to the North 
of France, England (over Calais or Boulogne), Belgium, 
Holland, Germany, Russia. 

R. du Faubourg St. Denis. 

Maisoii Mniiici|>ale de Saute, also called Maison 
Dubois; a private hospital, owned and luanaged by the city 
authorities. ¥*rices very low. Every comfort. Eminent 
physicians and surgeons in attendance. 

B. de la Chapelle. 

Hotel des I>ouaiies. — Central Custom-House office 
for the district. Custom-house officers, in France, are part 
of the regular army ; they occup}' their positions up to 60 years 
old, are pensioned, etc. ; no politics whatever in the French 
civil service which extends to every department. 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



153 



Pompe-a-f eu (water- works. ) Bassin de la Villette 
(a harbor of 16 acres, 75 ft. above the level of 
the Seine). Q. de Ja Seine. Church of St. 
Christophe. Pi. de Bitche. Canal de I'Ourcq 
(54 miles long, connecting the river Ourcq with 
the river Seine). Q. de I'Oise. Canal St. De- 
nis (a ramification of the above, 2^ miles long). 
Q de la Gironde. R. de Flandre. Here stands 
the monumental gate of les 

Abattoirs €rene»*Jiux <8e la Ville.— Central city 
slaughter-houses; 20 courts, 250 scalding pans. Slaughter- 
house for pigs on the other side of the city enclosure. 
Eveiything remarkably clean; cost of the building and plant, 
$15,000,000. Numerous well-dressed people are seen every 
morning drinking glasses of warm blood to cure consump- 
tion and general debility. 

B. MacDonald. R, Manin. PI. and statue d'Ar- 
mand Carrel (1800-36, a famous newspaper 
editor, killed in a duel). 

Pare des Buttes-Cliauiiiont. — A very beautiful 
park in the working classes quarter of the city. The mu- 
nicipal council, decidedly socialistic in its tendencies, gives 
the same care to the poorei parts of the city as it does to the 
richer ones. These hillocks (buttes) were made into a fine 
recreation-ground by Alphand and Barillet, on the site 
where the old kings used to keep their gibbets constantly 
loaded with victims. The area is 55 acres, with an artificial 
lake and grotto, a cascade 100 ft. high and a most picturesque 
iron cable bridge 50 yds. long. Numerous pieces of statuary 
dot the grass. There are restaurants, cafes, etc. The lower 
Parisian classes are seen there at their best on Sunday 
afternoons. 

Rue Secrt'tan. R. de Meaux. R. Louis-Blanc. 
Canal St. Martin (four miles long; continues 
the canal de rOurcq). R. du Faubourg St. Mar- 
tin, at the corner of the R. de Strasbourg. 

St. lianront; a church in excellent Gothic style, re- 
built in 1429 and enlarged in 1548, 1395 and 1865. Modern 
portal and spire; C. Dufeux, architect. Above the portal, 
the History of St, Laurent painted by Baize in enameled 
lava. 

R. de Strasbourg. 

Oare «le l'E**t. — A remarkably handsome railroad sta- 
tion known as la Gare de Strasbourg. Lines start there for 
Eastern France, Switzerland, Germany, Austria, the Balkan 
Kingdoms, Turkey. 

B. de Strasbourg (875 yds. long), near the cross- 
ing of the Grands Boulevards are found a num- 
ber of amusement halls and theatres, the lead- 
ing ones being Concert Parisian, Eldorado, la 
Scala, Tb. Antoine. B. Sebastopol,. Sq. des 



154 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



< — (S^j) 
Paldis-Rqyal 



Place 

Moument 
Arcde 




FROM 

Palais -Royal 

TO 

0B5ERVAT0!RE 



TourSt.Jacques 

Tlieafre du Chatelet 
Fontaine au Palmier 

Theatre des Nations 

Tribunal de Commerce 
Prefecture de Police 

Place et Fontaine 
St.Michel 



Thermes de JuHen 
Musce de Cluny 



Lyce'e St.Louis 
Place de la, Sorbonne 



Station de.Sceaux 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 155 

Arts-et-Metiers. Th. de la Gaite [VI]. R. 
de Tiirbigo. R. Eti'enne-Marcel. Between 
this street a d R, Tiquetonne, stands la 
Tour «le .JeaM-Srtiis-Peiir, a heavy tower, the sole 
remnant of the Hotel de Bourgogne, a 13th century man- 
sion, which became in the i6th and 17th centuries the home 
of a famous theatrical company, later merged into the 
CoMEDiE Francaise [VIIIJ organization. 

Grande Poste [VII]. R. J. J. Rousseau. R. de 
Marengo. R. St. Honore. Palais-Royal. 



ROUTE No. 11 

TO LE LUXEMBOURG AND L'OBSERVATOIRE 

Palais-Royal. Les Tuileries [III.] (Guichet du 

Pavilion de Rohan). You pass under one of 

the Tuileries pavilions and enter la 

Place cSii Carrousel, between the Tuileries Gardens 

and the Sq. du Carrousel: named from a brilliant tourney 

held there in 1662. To your left stands, le 

Momimeiit de €la«nbetta, by Boileau and Aube; 
erected 1888, showing the great patriot uiging the nation to 
the defense of the fatherland. Behind this monument ex- 
tends the Square du Carrousel, that stretches up to the 
Louvre Court of Honor. Here is to be inaugurated (Juh 
4, 1900,) le 

Moiiunient; tie I-a Fayette, presented by the chil- 
dren of the United States to the people of France. 

Looking W. we gaze upon the imposing mass of 1' 
Arc de Tr toinphe du t'arroiisel, a beautiful arch 
50 ft. high by 64 ft. wide, and 22 ft. thick; a copy of the Arch 
of Severus, at Rome. Erected by Napoleon L in honor of 
his victories of 1803-6; Percier and Fontaine, architects. 
The " quadriga " on top, by Bosio, represents the Restoration 
of Order. 

Q. des Tuileries. P. du Carrousel, or des Saints- 
Peres [IX] ; its regular entrance is on the R. 
Bonaparte, which we now enter ; we soon 
reach St. Germain-des-Pres [I.] and la 
PS. and I'Eglise St. Sulpice.^In the center of the 
"place" stands a fountain, by Visconti, embellished by 
statues of France's foremost preachers, Bossuet, Fenelon, 
Massillon and Flechier. The building on the south side is 
the leading R. C. Seminary for the higher education of can- 
didates to the priesthood. The church, on the east side of 
the place, is 462 ft. long by 183 ft. wide, and 108 ft. high; the 
higher towei is 224 ft. high : the other is unfinished. The 
church was rebuilt by Servandoni, under Louis XIV. It is 
full of artistic marvels and is the richest parish on the left 
side of the Seine. 

R. St. Sulpice. Carrefour de I'Odeon. R. et PI 
d§ rQdeon, 



156 TWELVE CITY ROUTES 

Th, tie I'Odeon, also called Second Theatre Fran- 
9AIS, is a state ( subsidized) institution for comedy and tragedy 
of a higti order. It is classical in its outlines and its colon- 
nades ; built in 1772. On the square in front is a monument 
to Emile Augier, the playwright. 

R. Corneille. R. de Vaugirard. 

Palais <l II Ijuxeinbotirg'. Seiiaf. — This palace 
was erected, in 1615-20, for Queen Marie de Medicis, widow 
of Henri IV., by Architect Debrosse. The principal fapade 
(on R. Vaugirard) is 100 yds. long. It underwent many vicissi- 
tudes, but since 1804 it has always been the seat of the upper 
branch of the legislature — Senate or House of Peers — and 
again (as now) Senate. The Hall of Sittings is most inter- 
esting and finely decorated (ask for tickets) ; so is la Gal- 
erie des Bustes and the former Salle du Trone. A western 
wing of the palace is called le 

Petit-Iiiixeiiilsourg'. — It is now the residence of the 
President of the Senate and contains some stately apart- 
ments. As a dependency of the palace is the famous 

Miisee du Liuxeitiboui'g^ where is gathered a superb 
collection of works by living artists. Visible every day 
(except Monday) from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. in summer and 10 
A. M. to 4 P. M. in winter. 

R. du Luxembourg. R. Auguste Comte. Or if 

you prefer it you may cross le 

Jardiii du L<nxeiiibourg', a most attractiva garden, 
or small park, with lofty trees, statuary galore, especially 
marble presentments of 20 celebrated French women. Do 
not fail to ask for the beautiful Fontaine de Medicis, an 
exquisite creation of Debrosse, in the early 17th century. 

A. de I'Observatoire. At the southern extremity of 

the tree-shaded portion of this avenue stands la 

Fontaine de I'Observatoire, or des Quatre 

Parties du Monde. — An emblematic group, by Car- 

peaux, of a most beautiful effect especially when the foliage 

is full and green. 

Carrefour de I'Observatoire. Station du Chemin 

de Fer de Sceaux (ancienne). 

Observatoire de Paris. — A famous institution, es- 
tablished on this site in 1672 by Louis XIV. ; Perrault, 
architect, The meridian of Paris runs through the center 
of the building; the south facade gives the latitude of Paris. 
The vaults are as deep (90 ft ) as the highest tower. The 
largest telescope is 42 ft. in diameter. The official French 
time recorded here and telegraphed alL over the world. 
Library and astronomical museums. 

In the garden of I'Observatoire and pointing to 
the north stands the statue of Le Verrier, the 
great astronomer. Returning to the Carrefour 
de I'Observatoire, over the same avenue, we 
find on our right le 

Bal Bullier, the quaint and cuiious, although decided- 
ly "rapid" students' ball (Thursdays, Saturdays -and 
Sundays). 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



157 



On the other side of the carrefour, stands la 

Statue cltt Marechal 'Ney. — An impressive bronze 
presentment, by Rude, of the famous marshal of Napoleon, 
shot, on this very spot, by order of King Louis XVIIL, for 
returning to his old chief during the Hundred Day period 
(March-June, 1815). 

B. St. Michel, 5 o famous as the resort of students, 
lined with cafes, filled at night with boisterous 
gayety; called by the boys "Boul. Mich." On 
this thorougfare and with its back to the Lux- 
embourg gardens, stands 1' 

Ecole Sfationale lies Mines.— Another famed in- 
stitution, founded in 1793, for the training of mining engi- 
neers; enlarged in 1848 and 1863. Fine laboratory for free 
assays of specimens submitted. Large Museum of Miner- 
alogy and Geology. Relief maps of curious regions of the 
earth, etc 

Lycee St. Louis (the old College d'Harcourt). 
Station duCheminde fer ds Sceiiux (nouvelle). 
Place de la Sorbonne. Fontaine St. Michel 
[II]. Prefecture de Police [I]. Tribunal 
de Commerce [IIJ. P. au Change. PL du 
Chatelet Fontaine de la Victoire [V]. Th. 
du Chatelet and Th. Sarah-Bernhardt [V]. B. 
Seb^stopol. Tour St. Jacques [V], R. de 
Rivoli. Palais-Royal, 



ROUTE No. 12 

FROM LE PALAIS=ROYAL TO LE TROCADERO 

Palais-Royal. PI. du Th. Frangais. Th. Fran- 
§ais [VIII]. Avenue de 1' Opera. Consulat- 
General des Etats-Unis (U. S. Consulate at 
No. 36). Grand-Opera [I]. R. Halevy. R. 
de la Chaussee d'Antin, terminating at la 

PI. and Eglise de la Trinite. — This church, built in 
• 1861-67, by Ballu, is in the late Romanesque style. It is 
reached by a double incline. Handsome clock-tower, 206 
ft. high between two '" lanterns." The organist, Guilmant, 
is well known in America. The square in front has three 
fountains, adorned with statues of Faith, Hope and Charity, 
by Lesquesne. 

R. St. Lazare. Passage du Havre. 

Oare St. Liazare. — One of the largest and finest R. R. 
stations in the world; accommodates the most important 
suburban traffic of Paris. Lines here start for Normandy 
and England (by Dieppe or Havre). The large Hotel Ter- 
minus connects with the station. 



158 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES 






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TWELVE CITY ROUTES 



159 



R. du Havre. Magasins - du - Printemps. B. 

Haussmann, one of the finest Paris tliorough- 

fares; continues to the Arc de Triomplie de 

I'Etoile, over the A. Freidland, its prolongation. 

Chapelle Expiatoire, in a square to the left; a 
small building erected by King Louis XVIII. to the memory 
of Louis XVI. and Queen Marie-Antoinette, guillotined by 
the Convention (1793). Their remains lay there until 1815, 
when they were transferred to the Royal Vaults of St. Denis 
church. Some fine statuary in the galleries. (Small fee.) 

Caserne de la Pepiniere (Infantry barracks). Just 

above, the church of 

St. Aiig'n««tin : a modern building by Ballard (1860-68) 
in much modified Romanesque styte. Dome, 165 ft. high, 80 
ft. in diameter. The Bonapartists celebrate here all their 
feast days commemorating the deaths of the members of the 
Napoleonic dynasty. 

B. Malesherbes — another fine thoroughfare, i}( 

miles to the city-enclosure. 

Pare Moiiceau or Moneeaux, only 22^2 acres in 
area, with its principal entrance on the B. de Courcelles. 
Princely residences adjoining this beautiful spot, purchased 
by the city from the Orleans family. The oval piece of 
water, called the " Naumachie," with its semi-circular colon- 
nade, is extremely pretty. There are here monuments 
erected to Gounod, Chopin and Bizet, the musicians; Guy 
de Maupassant, the novelist, and Corot, the painter. 

Close to the park, R. Velasquez, visit le 

Musee Ceriiuschi, a collection of rare specimens of 
Chinese and Japanese art; considered one of the finest ex- 
tant, and presented to the city by Mr. Cernuschi, a well- 
known writer on social economy and public finances. 

A short distance fiom the Pare Monceau, in the 
R. Daru, stands I'Eglise Russe (a very luxuri- 
ous though small edifice, erected in 1S61 by 
Strohm and Kouzm.ine). A. Hoche. Eglise 
CathoHque anglaise (English R. C. Church, ' St. 
Joseph"). Arc de Triomphe de I'Etoile [HI.]. 
A. Kleber. Ambassade des Etats-Unis (U. S. 
Embassy at No. 24) PI. des Etats-Unis ; in the 
center le 

GVoupe de Lia Fayette et de Washiiift-toii.— A 
fine piece of statuary, by Bartholdi, presented to the city by 
American admirers of the French "liberator." We reach 
now la 

PI. and le Palais du Trocadero.— In Exposition 
times, this palace is included within the grounds and its park 
used for colonial exhibits of all nations. It occupies the 
summit of a plateau so called in honor of a French victory 
in Spain (1823). This huge oriental building, by Davioud 
and Bourdais, was inaugurated in 1878. The circular build- 
ing in the center is 63 yds. in diameter and 180 ft. high, and 



l6o TWELVE CITY ROUTES 

the minarets at each side of the dome are 270 ft. high, The 
wings, continuing the curve, are each 220 ft. long. Colossal 
statue of Fame (by Mercie) on top of dome. Cascade fall- 
ing in a basin 196 ft. in diameter, surrounded by bronze ani- 
mals. The Salle des Fetes sits 6.000 persons, and the 
organ is colossal. There are, besides, two museums: 
MusEE DE Sculpture Compar^e (casts of famous pieces of 
statuary, etc.), and a Mus£e Ethnographique, illustrating 
the various human races, their habits, etc. 

A, du Trocadero. At the corner of the R. Pierre- 
Charron, le 

Musee Galliera. — A very handsome pavilion flanked 
by two colonaded wings and presented to the city by the 
Duchess of Galliera who gave away the enormous fortune she 
inherited from her husband, a Genoese banker who made 
Paris his home. The city filled the buildings with tapestries, 
sculpture, paintings and curios bestowed upon it by rich 
amateurs. It is already replete with admirable specimens 
of modern art. 

On the PL d'lena stands le 

Musee Gnimet. — This collection refers to the arts and 
religions of Asiatic nations, and was given to the city by 
Emile Guimet, a wealthy Lyon manufacturer. The build- 
ing is in the later Greek style with a tower 90 ft. high. 
It is unique of its kind and contains a mine of captivating 
infoimation for the student of religions, old or new. 

PI. et P. de I'Alma. A. Montaigne. Rond-Point 
des Champs-Elysees. Grand Palais des Beaux- 
Arts [IX.]. Petit Palais des Beaux- Arts [IX.]. 
Champs-Elysees [III.].^ Cirque d'Ete [I.]; a 
handsome building where the management of 
the Cirque d'Hiver transfers its performances 
from May to October. A short distance from 
it stands, all by itself, a dainty little box called 
le Th. Marigny, where variety shows, ballets, 
etc., are given through the summer months. 
A. Marigny. R. du Faubourg-St.-Honore. 
Here is the principal entrance to le 

Palais de I'ES.ysee, the "White House" of France, 
the Paris residence of the President of the Republic (elected 
in a joint meeting of the two Houses for seven years; salary 
$240,000. Summer residences: Compiegne, Rambouillet, 
Fontainebleau). Built in 1718, by Nolet, and later inhabited 
by the notorious Mme. de Pompadour. Napoleon signed 
here his abdication (i8i5'>. His nephew, when President of 
the second Republic (1849-52), resided here and prepared 
within its walls his criminal coup d'Etat of Dec. 2, 1851. In 
1889 a superb Salle des Fetes was added, extending to A. 
Gabriel (a side street of the Champs-Elysees). A monu- 
mental entrance of the palace is to be erected on the same 
avenue. La 

Pl, Bauvau separates I'Elysee from le 



TWELVE CITY ROUTES l6l 

Ministero tie rinterieur, or Home Secretary's 
residence and oflices, a handsome mansion built in the i8th 
century by Le Camus de Mezieres. 

CoDtinuing (going- east) the R. du Faubourg-St.- 
Honore, we pass on the right the portal of 1' 
Am8>;sssa4to d'Asi-Seterre. once the Borghese 
l^aiace; almost for a century occupied by H. B. M.'s ambas- 
sadors. 

We cross now the R. Royale, the Madeleine to our 
left and the PI. de la Concorde to our right and 
enter la R. St. Honore, a continuation of the 
; aubourg St. Honore; after passing the build- 
ing containing one of the four permanent cir- 
cuses of Paris, " le Nouveau Cirque," we see 
also on the right, the church of 

l.'A8sou)i>ti4>ia. a building of the 17th century, with a 
some\vhat heavy dome and a remarkable cupola painting by 
De la Fosse. ^ r & ^ 

As we proceed toward our goal, we find on our 
left the historically famous steps of 

St. Roch, from whi'ch Napoleon— then only the young 
Creneral Bonaparte— crushed the Parisian rioters arraigned 
against the Convention (Oct. 5, 1785). The church, one of 
the richest parishes in Paris, was begun in 1653, but com- 
pleted only in 1736 by Robert de Cotte. It is built and dec- 
orated in what is called the rococo stvle, not accepted now- 
adays as perfect in contours and ornamentation. Total 
depth over 420 ft. Corneille was buried here (1684). Works 
ot art many and most remarkable. The pulpit is a rich com- 
, bination of bronze and carved wood. And now our 12th and 
last trip IS over as we reach le 

Palais-Roval. 



SUBURBAN PLACES OF INTEREST 

Versaslles.--45 minutes from Paris. Magnificent Palace, 
Picture Galleries and Park. Residence of Louis XIV, XV 
XVI, Mane Antoinette, etc. Twice a month, on Sundays in 
summer, the mighty waterworks play. 

St. CJoucl.- 30 minutes from Paris. Ruins of the Palace 
destroyed during the Franco-Prussian war in 1870, superb 
park and waterworks. 

Foiitainebleaii.— One hour from Paris. Fine old palace 
built by Francis I. Large and picturesque forest; much 
frequented by artists. Race-track. 

St. Germain.— 40 minutes from Paris. Old chateau occu- 
pied by Louis XIIL and later by King James II of England 
atrer tne revolution of i588. Beautiful terrace overlooking 
the valley of the Seine. 

^*'""*'*?>'*~50 minutes from Paris. Old chateau of the 
the Princes of Conde, entirelv renovated by the late Duke 
d'Aumale and filled with gems of art. Admirably well 
laid out forest. Most fashionable race-track in France. 



1 62 



VISITING LIST 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS, MUSEUMS, ETC. 

OPENING DAYS AND HOURS 

For Descriptions see Routes marked with l Roman figure 
after each name. 



NAMES. 



Archives Nationales [VI. J 

Arts et Metiers (Conservatoire des) [VII.] 

Beaux-Arts (Ecole des) [IX ] 

BibHotheque Nationals [VIII.] 

de I'Arsenal |I.j 

Mazarine [IX.] 

Ste. Genevieve [IV.]. 

Bourse [VIII.] 

Bourse du Commerce [VI.] 

Catacombes [VI. J 

Chapelle Expiatoire | VII.] 

Deputes (Chambre des) [Ij 

Gobelins (Manufacture des) [IV.] 

Hotel de ViUe | V. | 

Imprimerie Nationale [VI.] 

Invalides (Hotel des). Tombeau de 

Napoleon [IV ] 

Jardin des Plantes — Menagerie [V.] 

" " " — Collections [V.J 

Luxembourg (Palais du). Senat [XL] . . . 

Monnaie (la) [IX. J 

Musee Artillerie (d') [II. J 

" Carnavalet [VI. J 

" Cernuschi [XII. J 

" Cluny [I ] 

" Conservatoire de Musique (du) 
[VII J 

" Dnpuvtren i Medical) | I.J 

" Gallie^ra |XII.| 

" Garda-Meuble Nation^il (du) [IX ] 
Guimet | Xil. | 

" Louvre (du) |II.| 

" Luxemuourg (du) [XL] 

" Mines (des) [XL] 

" Social nil i 

Palajs de Justice [II ] 

Panth6on | IV.] 

Sainte-Chapelle | II. ] 

Egoiits (Sewers) [V.] 

Tour St. Jacques [VI.] 

Trocadero [I.] 



Days when 
opened. 



S 
S. T. Th. 

E. D. 

E. VV. D. 

E. W. D. 

E. W. D. 

E. W. D. 

E. W. D. 

E. Vv'. D. 

ist& 3d Sat. 

E. D. 

E. D. 

W and Sat. 

E. W. D. 

Th. 

E. D. 
E. D. 

E. D. (/) 

E. W. D. [d] 

T. F. (e) 

S. T. Th. 

S. Th. 
S.T. Th. 
E. D. (y) 

M.Th. 

E. D. (e) 

E. D. ig) 

E. D. ig) 

E. D. ig) 

E. D. 

E. D. 

T. Th. Sat. 

E. W. D. 

E. D. {g) 

E. D. ig) 

E. W. D. 

2d & 4th Wd 

E W. D.(6) 

S. Th. (h) 



S = Sundays and holidays. E. D.=Every day. E. W. D.= 
Every week day. {d) When the House is not sitting, (e) Ask 
for free ticket. (/) Except Mondays and Wednesdays, {g) 
Except Mondays. (A) Included in the Exposition grounds. 
T. — Tuesday. Th. — Thursday. F.— Friday. Sat. — Saturday. 



CHURCH CALENDAR 163 



CHURCHES 

ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCHES 

[For location of all leading R. C. Churches see Index and Routes.] 

Eimlish R. €. Claui'oli of St. Joseph, 50 A. Roche; 
Mass aTe, 7, 8, 9 10, 11 130 a. in. ; sermons at 10:30 a. m. and 3 
p. m ; Confessions daily 6 tog a. m. , , ,^ c c 

In most of the other churches Sunday Low Masses from 6 
to Q • High Mass 10 to 10 130 a. m, [at the Madeleine, late Mass 
at I p. m.J ; Vespers, 3 P- m- Charge for chairs, i to 4 cents. 

The voluntary, played immediatelj after the ottertory is 
alvvavs worth listening to, especially at Notre-Dame, La Trinite, 
St. Eustache, and St. Sulpice. 

The church of any creed is entitled to your respect. You 
are quite at liberty to join heartily in the responses and psalms, 
but you must not talk loudly or walk about during services. 

AMERICAN. ENGLISH AND OTHER CHURCHES 

(not ROMAN catholic) 

American ClinroSi (Presbyterian), 21 R. de'Berri; 11 
a m Chnrch of Seotlsiiid (Presbyterian) 17 R- Bayard ; 
II a m., 3 p. m. Eus-»'Sli t'BBiircSi. 5 R- d'Aguesseau ; 8 
and II a. m., 3oO and 8 p. m. Si. «eorg-e^s (Anghcan) R. 
Auguste-Vacherie; 8 :30, 11 :45 a. m., 8p. m. tlinst linn cli 
(Anglican) 49 B. Bineau, Pare de Neuilly; 10 130 a. m., 3 P- m- ; 
in French 7:30 p.m. Hoiy TiMuKyJAmer. Episcopal) 
A de TAlma; 8:30 and 11 a. m,, 4 p. m Baplsst ISni. Cii 
lin connection with the American Baptist Missionary Union), 
48 R. de Lille; 2 p. m. Wesli-yan Methodist 1 hiireli, 
R Roquepine; 11 a. m , 8 p. m. ttullicau ChurcSi, 3 R 
d' Arras; 10 a. m., 3 :30 P- m. English C'oiigresatiotial 
<'liureh, 23 R Royale; 11:15 a.m., 7:30p.m. Secoiici 
BaaXist Church, 133 R- St.-Denis (French) ; 2 and 8 p m. 
Ans'lo- American Y. 31. C. A., 160 R. Montmartre. 

FRENCH PROTESTANT CHURCHES 
C— Calvinist; L— Lutheran ; F— Free. 
I^'Oratoire (C), i45 R- St. Honor6; lo^Sp a. m. Ste^ 
Marie (C), 216 R. St. Antoine; 10:30 a- m. lempie cie 
|-Etoile (C), A. de la Grande-Arm^e ; 10 a. m.. 4 P- m. 
TesEjple ties Batis'nolles (C) 46 B. des Batignolles ; 10:15 
a m 4 p.m. Peiiteiiiont (C), lob R. de Crenelle; 10:15 
a' m. 4 p m. St. Esprit (C), 5 R- Roquepine; 10:15 a. m., 
IP m Tempie Milton (C), R. Milton. Temple de 
Fas^T (C), 19 R. Cortambert; 10:15 a.m. Temple «e 
Neaiillv (C), 8 B. Inkermann; 10:15 a.m. Temple des 
Billettes (C), 24 R des Archives; 10:15 a m. 12:36 and 3 
p m. (in German). Temple de la Redemdptioii (L) 
16 R. Chauchat: 10:15 a.m. (German), 12, noon, (French). 
Swedish Chnrch (L), 19 B. Ornano; 2:30 p.m. J^yy 
bout(F),42R.de Provence; 10:15a. m, Eglise du J^oitl, 
J) 17 R des Petits-Hotels; 10:15 a. m. Temple du Eux- 
embourg-, (F) 58 R. Madame; 10:30 a. m., 8 p. m. 

SYNAGOGUES 

i^ R Notre-Dame de Nazareth. 44 R. de la Victoire. 2i 
bis R. des Tournelles. 28 R. Buffault (Portuguese). 



l64 PLACES OF AMUSEMENT 



THEATERS 

G-rancI Oj»er«, four times a week, all the year round 
Ol>ei'Jl-Con»iqu«>. the second home of grand opera. Tiie- 
atre Frauf ais, highest class French-spoken here. Burned 
March 8, iqoo; the troupe acts at the Odeon. Odeoii, a 
minor TheStre Fran9ais, away from the center. OyiiiiiaMc 
"Vau<le\'il5<', society plays; high-toned comedies. Eteiiai - 
sauce, Sarah Bernhardt's old theater; she is now at the 
Theatre Sarali Bernhardt. Porte-SaiiBt-Martiii, 
the home of "Cyrano de Bergerac." Amhij^n, ^'hateli-tf, 
Craite, blood and thunder dramas; spectacular plays; very 
large stages. PaIa>s-Ko.yal, Varietes, IVouveante'^, 
excellent farcical plays. CJliiiiy, the students of Quartier 
Latin's resort. Theatre <le la Regtubliqiie, popular 
dramas. Aiitoiiie, modern, sensational plays. 15<>nffe««- 
Parisiens, Noiiveaii-Theatre, l>ejazet, Athene ', 
new operettas, vaudevilles, etc. 

CIRCUSES 

C. d'Hiver. C. d'Ete. C. Medrano. Nouveau Cirque. 

LEADING VARIETY-SHOWS AND MUSIC-HALLS 

Folies-Bergere, Olympia. Parisiana. Casino de Paris. 
La Scala. L'Eldorado. Grand Concert Parisien. La Cigale. 
La Fourmi. Le Grand Guignol. Les Treteaux de Tabarin. 
Le Petit Casino. For Children : Robert Houdin. 

BALLS 

Le Moulin-Rouge. Bal Bullier. Le Moulin-de-la-Galette. 

SUMMER MUSIC-HALLS 

La Jardin de Paris. L'Alcazar. Les Ambassadeurs. 

PANORAMAS 

La Bastille. Bataille de Patay. Jerusalem. Terre Sainte. 
Pole Nord. 

VELODROMES (cycle EXHIBITIONS) 

Piste Fleurie. Pare des Princes. Palais-Sport. 

WAX FIGURES, ETC. 

Mus^e Grevin (very fine). Oiler. Nouveau Musee. Mus^e 
de la Porte St. Martin. 

And scores of minor attractions, such as Military Band 
Concerts in all the parks from May to September, from 4 to 5 
p. m. on Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. 

At the Grand Op^ra, and other leading theaters, put on a 
black coat — a Prince Albert, if possible; an evening suit is 
still better. 

Ladies, in French theaters, never wear low-neck dresses, 
except in the Boxes at the Op6ra, Opera Comique, and TheStre 
Franfais, - 








THEATEE FBANGAIS {Burned March 8, 1900). 




THE STATUE OF LEOONTE DE LISLE, THE POET. 



IV. 



THE 



American Tourists Help 

In Switzerland, Germany and Italy. 

ALL NECESSARY WORDS AND SENTENCES IN 
GERMAN A^9D ITALIAN 



As the majority of visitors to France give a portion of their 
time to Germany, Switzerland and Italy, the following will be 
found most practical and convenient : 



ENGLISH. 



I 

He, she 

We 

You 

They 

Am 

Are 

Have 

We have 

Is there? (it) . . 

Is it (he) 

Please, tell me 
Have you?. . . . 
Shall we have? 

Where is? 

Let us go 

To pay 

To buy 

Send 

Go , 

Go and fetch . . . 

Bring 

My 

My {plural). . . 
Our 



GERMAN. 



Ich 

Er, sie 

Wir 

Sie, Ihr 

Sie 

Bin 

Sind 

Habe 

Wir haben 

Giebt's? Ist's?. . . 

1st er 

Sagen Sie mir . . . 

Haben Sie? 

W e r d e n wir 
[haben? 

Wo ist? 

Gehen wir fort . . 

Bezahlen 

Kaufen 

Schicken Sie .... 

Gehen Sie 

Holen Sie 

Bringen Sie 

Mein 

Maine 

Unsere 

165 



ITALIAN. 



lo. 

Egli, essa or ella, 

Noi. 

Voi, ella. 

Essi, esse or elle. 

Sono. 

Siamo. 

Ho. 

Abbiamo. 

C'e? 

E? 

Ditemi, vi prego. 

Avete ? 

A vremo ? 

Dove e? 

Andiamo. 

Pagare. 

Comprare. 

Mandate. 

Andate. 

Andate a cercare. 

Portate. 

Mio. 

Miei. 

Nostri. 



l66 GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



ENGLISH. 



The (sing.) 



The (plural) . . . 

riease! 

Thank you, 

[thanks. 
Will it be fine 
weather? 

. Bad weather .... 
Where are we?. . 
What is that' 

place? 
What o'clock isit? 
The way to? 
How do you call 

that? 
What is the name 

of this place? 
Do you under- 
stand? 
I don't under- 
stand you 
Speak slowly if 

you please . 
Yes.... 

No 

I should like to 

have . . 
I am cold , . . 
I am hungry . 
I am thirsty. . 

I am ill 

A cane (stick) 
An umbrella 

Sir 

Mrs. (madam) 



GERMAN. 

Der(w.), Die(/.), 
Das (neuter). 

Die 

Gefalligst 

Danke 

We r den wir 
schones Wetter 
haben. 

Schlechtes Wetter 

Wo sind wir?. 

Was fiir ein Ort 
ist dies? 

Wie viel Uhr ist es 

Der Weg nach?. 

Wie heisst das?. . 

Wie heisst dieser 

Ort? 

Verstehen Sie?.. . 

Ich verstehe Sie 

nicht. 
Sprechen Sie 

langsamer. 

Ja 

A'cin 

Ich mochte . . hab- 



ITALIAN. 



Lo, il fmas.J, 
la (fern.) 
Ifmasc.Jleffem.J 
Prego! 
Grazie. 

Bel tempo? 



Brutto tempo. 
Dove siamo? 
Chelugoequesto? 

Che ora e? [ce a? 
La via che condu- 
Come si chiama 

queso? 
Come si chiama 

questo luogo? 
Capite? 

lo non vi capisco. 

Parlate adagio. 



Miss 

Good morning! 

Good evening! 



en. 
Es friert mich 
Ich bin hungerig. 
Ich bin durstig 
Ich bin unwohl . . 

Ein Stock 

Ein Regenschirm. 

Mein Herr 

Gnadige F r a u 

(Madame). 

Fraulein 

Guten Morgen, 

guten Tag. 
Guten Abend . . 



Si. 
No. 
Vorrei . . 



Ho freddo. 
Ho fame. 
Ho sete. 
Sto poco bene. 
Un bastone. 
Un ombrello. 
Signore. 
Signora. 

Signorina. 
Buon giorno! 

Buona sera! 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



167 



ENGLISH. 


GERMAN, 


ITALIAN. 


I love you 

Good bye 

Farewell (adieu) . 

Pleasant journey. 


Ich liebe Sie .... 
Auf Wiedersehen 
Leben Sie wohl 

(adieu). 
Gliickliche Reise! 


Vi amo. 
A rivederci. 
Addio. 

Buon viaggio. 


The jjiojiths and 
days. 


Die Monate und 

Tage. 


/ mesi e i giortii. 


January . 

February 

March 


Januar 

Februar 

Marz 


Gennaio. 
Febbrajo. 
Marzo. 


April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Week 

Next 


April 

Mai 

Juni 

Juli 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Dezember 

Montag 

Dienstag 

Mittwoch 

Donnerstag 

Freitag 

Samstag 

Sonntag 

Woche 

Nachsten 


Aprile. 

Maggie. 

Giugno. 

Juglio. 

Agosto. 

Settembre. 

Ottobre. 

Novembre. 

Dicembre. 

Lunedi. 

Martedi. 

Mercoledi. 

Giovedi. 

Venerdi. 

Sabato. 

Domenica. 

Settimana. 

Venturo 


The Time. 


Die Zeit. 


rOra. 


Morning 

Noon 


Morgen 


Mattina. 


Mittag 


Mezzogiorno. 
11 dopo pranzo. 
La sera. 
Mezzanotte. 
Ora. 

Ora e un quarto. 
Ora e mezza. [to. 
Ora meno un quar- 
Un minuto. [do. 
Un minuto secun- 


Afternoon 

Evening 

Hour 

Half past 

A quarter to ... . 

A minute 

A second 


Nachmiltag 

Abend 

Mitternacht 

Uhr 

Viertel auf 

Halb 

Drei Virtel auf . . 
Fine Minute .... 
Fine Sekunde. . . 



i68 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



ENGLISH. 



The Ntimbers. 

One 

Two 

Three 

Four 

Five 

Six 

Seven 

Eight . . ; 

Nine 

Ten 

Eleven 

Twelve 

Thirteen 

Fourteen 

Fifteen 

Sixteen 

Seventeen 

Eighteen 

Nineteen 

Twenty 

Twenty -one 

Twenty-two .... 

Thirty 

Thirty-one 

Forty 

Fifty. . 

Sixty 

Seventy 

Eighty 

Ninety 

Hundred 

Hundred and one 
Hundred and two 

Two hundred . . . 
Five hundred . . . 
Thousand 



GERMAN. 



Die Zahleii. 



Fin (mas.), eine 
(fern.) 

Zwei 

Drei 

Vier 

Fiinf 

Sechs 

Sieben 

Acht 

Neun 

Zehn 

Elf 

Zwolf 

Drei zehn 

Vierzehn 

Fiinfzehn 

Sechzehn 

Siebzehn 

Achtzehn 

Neunzehn 

Zwanzig 

Ein und zwanzig. 
Zwei und zwanzig 

Dreissig 

Ein und Dreissig. 

Vierzig 

FUnfzig 

Sechzig 

Siebzig 

Achtzig 

Neunzig 

Hundert 

Hundert und ein. 
Hundert und 

[zwei. 
Zwei hundert .... 
Fiinf hundert . . . 
Tausend 



ITALIAN. 



/ numeri. 



Uno (inas.), una 

ifeni.) 
Due. 
Tre. 
Quatre. 
Cinque. 
Sei. 
Sette. 
Otto. 
Nove. 
Died. 
Undici. 
Dodici. 
Tredici. 
Quattordici. 
Quindici. 
Sedici. 
Diciasette, 
Diciotto. 
Diecinove, dician- 

nove. 
Venti. 
Vent' uno. 
Venti due. 
Trenta. 
Trent'uno. 
Quaranta. 
Cinquanta. - 
Sessanta. 
Settanta. 
Ottanta. 
Novanta. 
Cento. 
Cent' uno. 
Centodue. 

Duecento. 

Cinquecento. 

Mille. 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES- 



169 



E-NGLISH. 


GERMAN, 


ITALIAN. 


The colors. 


Die Far ben. 


/ colori. 


White 


Weiss 


Bianco. 


Black 


Schwarz 


Nero. 


Blue 


Blau 


Azzuro. 


Yellow 


Gelb 


Giallo. 


Red 


Roth 


Rosso. 


Grey 

Rose 


Grau 


Bigio. grigio. 
Rosa. 


Rosa 


Green 


Griin 


Verde. 


Violet 


Veilchenblau .... 


Violetto. 


The Custom-house 


Das Zollamt. 
Nichts zu verzol- 


La dogana. 


Nothing to de- 


Niente da dichia- 


clare. 


len. 


rare. 


No tobacco 


Keinen Tabak . . 


Non ho tabaco. 


Nospirits(liquors) 


Kein Likor 


Non ho liquori. 


No lace 


Keine Spitzen . . . 


Non ho merletti. 


A box (chest) . . . 


Eine Kiste 


Un baule. 


A trunk 


Ein Koffer 


Uua valigia. [pelli 


A hat-box 


EineHutschachtel 


Unascatolladeca- 


A travelling-bag. 


Eine Reisetasche 


Una valigietta. 


Clothes 


Kleidungsstiicke . 


Abiti. 


Linen 


Leibwasche 


Biancheria. 


The luggage .... 


Das Gepack .... 


11 bagaglio. 


For personal use . 


Fur personlichen 
Gebrauch. 


Perusopersonale. 


Old articles 


Antiquitaten .... 


Oggetti antichi. 


Worn articles . . . 


Gebrauchte 

[sachen 


Roba portata. 


You may examine 


Durchsuchen Sie. 


Visitate. 


The custom-house 


Der Zollbeamte. . 


11 doganiere. 


officer 






The chief officer 


Der Zolldirektor. 


11 capo doganiere. 


of customs. 






I object 


Ich reclamiere . . 


Reclamo. 


How much is the 


Wie hoch ist der 


Quanto fa il 


duty? 


Einfuhrzoll? 


dazio? 


Which tariff? 


Welcher Tarif ? 
Miethwagen. 


Quale tariffa? 


Hired carriages. 


VetHire de Piazza 


A cab 


Ein Fiaker 


Una vettura. 



I70 



GERMAN AND IT^MAN PHRASES. 



ENGLISH. 



Coachman! . . . 
Your number ? . 
Drive me to . 
street, No . . 



How much for 

the drive? 
One straight run . 
How much? . . . . 
The rate for an 

hour. 

^y the hour 

Show me the 

tariff. 

Drive on ! 

Quicker! 

Stop! 

The town. 

The omnibus .... 
The tramway. . . . 

A cab 

The steamboat . . 
The postoffice. . . 
The telegraph . . 

A restaurant .... 
A first-class hotel. 

A second-class 
hotel. 

An inn 

A furnished house 

What building is 

this? - 
A coffee-house. . . 
A beer-house . . . 
A pastry-cook . . . 
A physician .... 

A druggist 

A purgative 



GERMAN. 



Kutscher! 

Ihre Nummer? . . 
Fiihren Sie mich 

nach der . . . . 

strasse No . . 
Was kostet die 

Fahrt? 
Fiir eine Fahrt . . 

Wie viel? . 

Was kostet eine 

Stunde. 

Per Stunde 

Zeigen Sie mir 

den Tarif . 

Gehen wir! 

Schneller! 

Halt! 

Die Stadt. 



Der omnibus .... 
Die Pferdebahn 
Eine Droschke . . 
Das Dampfschiff 

Die Post 

Das Telegraphen- 

amt. 
Eine Restauration 
Ein Hotel ersten 

Ranges. 
Ein Gasthof zwei- 

ten Ranges. 
Ein Wirtshaus . . . 
Ein moblirtes 

[Haus. 
Welches Gebaude 

ist dies. 
Ein Kaffeehaus. .• 
Ein Bierhaus .... 
Ein Kuchenbaker 

Ein Artz 

Ein Apotheker . . 
Ein Laxirmittel . . 



ITALIAN. 



Cocchiere! 
II vostro numero! 
Conducete mi Via 
. . . No . . 

Quanto si paga 
per una corsa? 

Alia corsa. 

Quanto fa? 

Quant'e il prezzo 
air ora? 

Air ora. 

Mostratemi la ta- 
riffa. 

Analamo! 

Presto! 

Fermate! 



La citta. 



L'omnibus. 
II tramway. 
Una carozza. 
II battello a vapo- 
La posta. [re. 

II telegrafo. 

La trattoria. 

La prima locanda 

Un albergo di se- 
condo ordine. 

Un albergo. 

Una stanzo am- 
mobligliata. 

Cos'e questo edi- 
ficio. 

Un caffe. 

Una birreria. 

Un pasticciere. 

Un medico. 

Un farmacista. 

Un purgante. 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



171 



ENGLISH. 


GERMAN. 


ITALIAN. 


A vomitive 


Ein Brechmittel . 


Un vomitivo. 


A blister 


Ein Zugpflaster . . 


Un vesicante. 


A mustard-plaster 

A poultice 

A cordial 


Ein Senf pilaster. 
Ein Breiumschlag 
Eine Herzstar- 


Un senapismo. 
Un cataplasma. 
Un cordiale. 


A febrifuge 


Ein Fiebermittel . 


Un febbrifugo. 


Camphorated al- 
cohol. 


Kamphergeist . . . 


Spirito canforato. 


Mint alcohol .... 


Pf effermlinzgeist . 


Alcool di menta. 


Arnica tincture. . 


Arnikatinktur . . . 


Tintura d'arnica. 


Iodine tincture . . 


Jodtinktur 


Tintura d'iodio. 


Perchloride f 


Eisenperchlorat. . 


Percloruro d i 


iron. 




ferro. 


Diachylon 

Court plaster .... 


Pflaster 

Englisches Pflas- 


Diachilone. 
Taffeta d'lnghil- 




ter. 


terra. 


Lint 


Charpie 


Fillaccia. 


Wadding 


Watte 


Bambagia ovatta. 


Some bands 


Binden 


Bende. 


Have that pres- 


Lassen Sie den A- 


Fate fare questa 


cription made 

by the druggist. 

A dentist 


potheker dieses 

Recept machen 

Ein Zahnartz .... 


ricetta dal far- 
macista. 
Un dentista. 


A hair-dresser . . . 


Ein Friseur 


Un paruchiere. 


A chiropodist . . . 


Ein HUhneraugen 


Un callista. 


A bath 


Operateur .... 

Ein Bad 

Ein Buch-handler 


Un bagno. 
Un librajo. 


A bookseller .... 


A map of the 


Eine Landkarte . . 


Una carta del pa- 


country. 


' 


ese. 


A pencil 


Ein Bleistift 


Una matita. 


A newsdealer . . . 


Ein Zeitungsver- 


Un venditore di 




kaufer. 


giornali. 


A tobacco store . 


Ein Tabaksladen. 


Un tabaccajo. 


The police-station 


Die Polizei .... 


L'ufficio di ques- 
tura. 


The American 


Der Amerikani- 


11 console ameri- 


[consul. 
A money-changer 


sche Consul. 
Ein Geldwechsler 


cano. [bio. 
Un agente di cam- 


A grocer 


Ein Kramer .,■... 


Un droghiere. 


A butcher 


Ein Metzger .... 


Un macellaio. 



172 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



ENGLISH. 


GERMAN. 


ITALIAN. 


A pork-butcher 


. Ein Wursthandler 


Un pizzicagnolo. 


Some sandwich 


es Schinkenbrodchen. 


Dei sandwich. 




A provision deal 


er Ein Esswaren- 


Un venditore 


di 




handler. 


comestibuli. 




A wine merclia 


nt Ein Weinhandler 


Un venditori 


di 


A tailor 


. Ein Schneider. . . 


Un sarto. [vini. 


A hatter 


. Ein Hutmacher . 


Un cappellajo 




A shoemaker . . 


. Ein Schumacher. 


Un calzolajo. 




Measure me . . 


. Nehmen Sir mir 


Prendete la misu- 




Mass. 


ra. 




A photographe 
The hospital . . 
A cab stand . . . 


r . Ein Photograph . 
. Das Krankenhaus 
. EineDroshkensta- 


Un fotographo 
Lo spedale. 
Una stazione 


di 


[tio 


n. tion. [tion. 


carozze[ omnibus 


An omnibus st 


a- Eine Omnibussta- 


Una stazione 


del 


A tramway st 


a- Eine Pferdebahn- 


Una stazione 


di 


tion. 


station. 


tramway. 




Drive me 


. FUhren Sie mich 


Conducetemi. 




Straight 


. Geradeaus 


Dirittamente. 




On the left . . . 


. Links 


A sinistra. 




On the right . . 


. Rechts 


A destra. 




The shortest wi 


ly Der kiirzeste Weg 


La via la p 


iu 


to? 




corta. 




For going to . . 


. L^m nach . . zu ge- 
hen. 


Per andare a . 




Yonder? 


. Dort 


Laggivi. 
La banca. 




The bank? . . . 


. Die Bank 




The public garde 


;n Der offentliche 
Garten. 


La passegiata 
blica. 


pu- 


The museum . . 


. Das Museum .... 


11 museo. 




The cathedral . 


. Der Dom 


La cattedrale. 




The Church of 


. Die (name) kirche 


La chiesa . . 




The castle .... 


. Das Schlos 


11 castello. 




The market . . . 


Der Alarkt 


11 mercato. 




The town-hall . 
The fortress. . ." 


. Das Rathaus. . . . 
. Die Festung. . . . 


11 municipio. 

11 forte (citadella) 


The barracks . . 


. Die Kaserne? . . . 


La caserna. 




The convent . . 


. Das Kloster 


11 monastei'O. 




The . . place . . . 
The . . gate .... 


. Der (name) platz 
. Das (name) thor 


La piazza . . 
La porta di . . 




The . . quay . . . 


. Das (name) Kai 


La riva . . 




..Street 


, (name) strassse. . 


La Via.. 





GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



173 



ENGLISH. 


GERMAN. 


ITALIAN. "- 


Number 


Nummer 


Numero . . 


Boulevard 


{name) Ringstrasse 


Corso or Viale. 


Suburb 


do Vorstadt . 


Sobborgo . . 


Quarter 


do Viertel . . . 


Quartiere . . 


Passage . 


Durchgang 


Galleria . . 


Blind alley 


Sackgasse 


Angipoito. . 


House . . No 


Haus . . Nummer.. 


Casa. . Numei-o. . 


On what floor? . . 


Welcher Stock?. 


Quale piano? 


The door-keeper. 
Stock Exchange. 


Portier 


11 portinajo. 
La Borsa. 


Die Borse 


The bridge 


Die Briicke .... 


11 ponte. 


The harbour .... 


Der Hafen 


11 porto. 


The theatre 


Das Theater .... 


11 teatro. 


A seat 


Ein Platz 


Un posto. 


A stall 


Ein Sperrsitz im 
Parterre. 


Una poltrona. 




A box 


Eine Loge 

Ein Operngucker 


Un palco. 

Un cannocchiale. 


An opera-glass . . 


The circus 


Der Zirkus 


11 circo. 


The music hall . . 


Das Kaflee-Kon- 

zert. 
Der Ball 


11 caffe-concerto. 


The ball-room . . 


11 ballo. 


Where is there any 


Wo giebts Musik 


Dove suona la mu- 


music to-night? 


heute Abend? 


sica ques'oggi? 


Where is there 


Wo kann man sich 


Dove c'e dadiver- 


any amusement 


diesen Abend 


tirsi stasera? 


to-night? 


gut unterhalten 




The Hotel. 


Der Gasthof. 
Ein Zimmer 


L' Alberto. 


A room 


Una camera. 


A room with two 


Ein Zimmer mit 


Camera con due 


beds. 


zwei Betten. 


letti. 


On the front .... 


Vorn heraus .... 


Verso la facciata. 


On the yard 


Auf dem Hof 

hinaus. 


Sul cortile. 


On the first floor. 


Im ersten Stock . 


Al primo piano. 


On the 2d floor. . 


Im zweiten Stock 


Al secondo piano. 


Upstairs 


Oben 


In alto. 


With a balcony . . 


Mit einem Balkon 


Col poggiuolo. 


How much is it, 


Wie viel? mit Be- 


Quanto? con il 


attendance in- 


dienung? 


servizio? 


cluded? 







174 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



ENGLISH. 



Light the fire. . . . 

To eat here 

Breakfast 

Coffee 

Milk; cold — ; 

warm — . 
Coffee with milk 

Chocolate 

Butter 

Tea , 

Eggs 

Dinner 

Supper 

Fixed price 

On the bill of 

fare. 

A light 

Change these 

sheets. 
A decanter of 

water. 
Some sugar .... 
Some hot water . . 

A towel . 

A napkin ...... 

Some soap 

A comb 

A foot-bath 

A boot-jack .... 
A button-hook . . 

The water-closets 
To clear the boots 
To sew on a but- 
ton. 

To mend 

To wash 

To clean 

To brush the 

clothes. 
Av/ake me at ... . 
Mallow tea 



GERMAN, 



Machen Sie Feuer 

Hier essen 

Friihstiick 

Schwarzen Kaffee 
Milch; Kalte — ; 

heisse — . 
Kaffee mit Milch 

Schokolade 

Butter 

Thee 

Eier 

Mittagessen 

Abendessen 

Feste Preise .... 
Nach der Speise- 

karte. 

Ein Licht 

Wechseln S i e 

diese Bettucher 
Fine Flasche 
Trinkwasser. 

Zucker 

Heisses Wasser . . 
Ein Handtuch . . 
Fine Serviette . . . 

Seife 

Ein Kamm 

Ein Fussbad .... 
Fin Stiefelknecht 
Fin Stief el knopf er 

Der Abtritt 

Stiefelputzen .... 

Finen Knopf an- 

nahen. [sern. 

Flicken; ausbes- 

Waschen 

Reinigen 

Kleider biirsten . . 

[um . . 

Wecken Sie mich 

Malventhee 



ITALIAN. 



Accendete il f uoco 

Mangiare qui. 

La colazione. 

Caffe. 

Latte; • — • fredo; 

— caldo. 
Caffe e lette. 
Cioccolata. 
Burro. 
Te. 
Uova. 
Pranzo. 
Cena. 

Prezzo fisso. 
Alia carta. 

Un lume. 
Cambiate queste 

lenzuole. 
Una bottiglia 

d'acqua. 
Zucchero. 
Deir aqua calda. 
Un asciugamano. 
Un tovagliolo. 
Del sapone. 
Un pettine, 
Un bagno di piedi 
Un cava-stivali. 
Un' uncinetto per 

abbotonare. 
La ritirata. 
Pulire gli stivali. 
Cucire un bottone 

Racccomodare. 
Lavare. 
Pulire. 
Spazzolare gli 

abiti. 
Destarmi . . 
Malva. 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



175 



ENGLISH. 



Lime tea 

Camomile tea . . . 

Rub me 

Very hard 

With a hot towel 

Warm the bed . . 

Another blanket . 

Another pillow . . 
An eider-down 

coverlet. 
I wish to perspire 
The bill 



Post. 



What's the post- 
age? 

A stamp for .... 

A money-order of 
..for.. 

To receive a mon- 
ey order. 

Here are my iden- 
tity papers. 

General delivery 

A telegram 

When is the last 

collection for. ? 
When does mail 

arrive from . . ? 
The parcel office 

The mail office . . 

When does the 
mail coach start 
for..? 

I secure, .seats. . 



GERMAN. 



Lindenthee 

Kamillenthee . . . 
Reiben Sie mich 

Sehr stark 

Mit heinem heis- 

sen Handtuch. 
Warmen Sie das 

Bett. 
Noch eine wol- 

lene Decke[sen. 
Noch einKopfkis- 
Eine Federdecke. 
[zen. 
Ich mochte schwit- 
Die Rechnung . . 

Die Post. 

Wie viel die Fran- 

kierung? 
Eine Briefmarke. 
Eine Postanwei- 

sungvon..fiir. . 
Ein Anweisung 

erhalten. 
Das sind meine 

Papiere. 
Post restante or 

Postlagernd. 
Ein Telegramm . 
W^ann ist die lezte 

Leerung fur . . ? 
Wann kommt die 

Post von . . an ? 
Das Postpacket- 

bureau. [reau. 
Das Fahrpostbu- 

Wann farht die 

Postkutsche 

nach . . ? 
Ich lose . . Platze 



ITALIAN. 



Tiglio. 
Camomilla 
Frizionatemi. 
Fortemente. 
Con un asciuga- 

mano caldo. 
Seal date il letto. 

Ancora una coper- 
ta di lana[ciale. 

Ancora un guan- 

Un coltrone di 
piuma. 

Voglio sudare . . . 

II conto. 



La Post. 



Quanto di porto? 

Un franco-bollo. 
Unvaglia di . . 

per.. 
Riscuotere un va- 

glia. 
Ecco le mie carte. 

Fermo in posta. 

Un telegram ma. 
Quando 1' ultima 

levata per. . ? 
Quando arriva il 

corriere di . . . ? 
L'uffizio di pac- 

chi posta;li. 
L'uffizio delle di- 

ligenze. 
Quando parte la 

diligenza per , . 

Ritengo. .posti. 



176 



GERMAN AMD ITALIAN PHRASES. 



ENGLISH. 


GERMAN. 


ITALIAN. 


I want to secure 


Ich lose einen 


Ritengo un posto 


a front com- 


Coupeplatz. 


di coup6. 


partment seat. 






At what o'clock 


Um wie viel Uhr 


Quando si arriva 


do we arrive at 
. .? 


kommen wir in 
. .an? 


a..? 


In a Cafe, 


Im Wirtschaff. 
Kellner! 


A I caffi. 


Waiter! 


Cameriere! [rum. 


A glass of rum. . 


Ein Glas Rum. . 


Un bicchierino di 


A glass of cognac 


Ein Glas Cognac. 


Un bicchierino di 
cognac, [ponce. 


A glass of punch 


Ein Glas Punsch. 


Un bicchierino di 


Some absinthe . . 


Ein Absinth .... 


Dell'assenzio. 


Some vermouth . . 


Ein Vermuth .... 


Un vermut. 


An ice 


Ein Eis (Gefrore- 
nes) . 


Gelato (sorbetto). 




Some lemonade. . 


Limonade 


Una limonata. 


Some hot wine . . 


Gliihwein 


Del vino caldo. 


Matches 


ZUndholzchen . . . 


Zolfanelli. 


A light, please. . 


Feuer, gefalligst. 


Fuoco, di grazia. 


Ciears 


Cigarren 

Eine Zeitung .... 


Dei sigari. 
Un giornale. 


A newspaper . . . 


An illustrated pa- 


Eine illustrirte 


Un giornale illus- 


per. 


Zeitung [tung. 


trato. [citta.'' 


A local newspaper 


Eine hiesige Zei- 


Un giornale del la 


A Directory .... 


Ein Adressbuch. . 


Un libra di indi- 
rizzi. 


A railway time- 


Ein Fahrplan . . . 


Un orario delle 


table. 




ferrovie. 


Letters. 


Brieffen. 


Lettere. 


Writing - materials 


Schreibzeug .... 


Da scrivere. 


Some letter-paper 


Briefpapier 


Carta da lettere. 


Some ink 


Tinte 


Inchiostro. 


A pen 


Eine Feder 


Una penna. 


Some wax 


Siegellack 


La ceralacca. 


An envelope .... 


Briefumschlag . . . 


Una busta. 


A postage stamp . 


Eine Brief marke. 


Un franco-bollo. 


A letter-box 


Ein Brief kasten . 


Una butta delle 
lettere. 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



177 



ENGLISH. 


GERMAN. 


ITALIAN. 


The restatirant. 


Restaiiration. 


La trattoria. 


Give me some- 


Geben Sie mir et- 


Datemi da man- 


thinw to eat. 


was zu essen. 


giare. 


The bill of fare . 


Die Speisekarte . 


La lista. 


I am in a hurry . . 


Ich habe Eile . . . 


Ho fretta. 


Breakfast 


FriihstUck 


La colazione. 


Dinner 


Mittagessen 


Pranzo. 


How much? .... 


Wie viel? 


Quanto. [ata. 


A separate table . 


Tisch a part .... 


Una tavola separ- 


A private room . . 


Zimmer a part . . . 


Cabinettopartico- 


Sipoon 


Loffel 


Un cucchiajo [lare 


Fork 


Gabel 


Forchetta. 


Knife 


Messer 


Coltello. 


Napkin 


Serviette 


Tavagliolo; servi- 


A glass 


Glas 


Bicchiere. [etta. 


A bottle 


Flasche 


Bottiglia, 


A half-bottle 


Halbe Flasche . . 


Una mezza botti- 


Some water 


Wasser 


Acqua. [glia. 


Soda water 


Sodawasser 


Acqua gazosa. 


Mineral water . . . 


Mineralwasser . . . 


Dell'acqua mine- 
rale. 


Claret wine 


Bordeauxwein . . . 


Vino di Bordeaux 


Burgundy wine . . 


Burgunderwein . . 


Vino di Borgogna 


White wine 


WeisserWein .... 


Vino Bianco. 


Red wine 


Rother Wein .... 


Vino rosso. 


Good country 


Guter Landwein . 


Vino buono del 


wme. 




paese. 


Old wine 


Alter Wein 


Vino vecchio. 


The list of wines 


Die Weinkarte . . 


11 listino dei vini. 


Beer 


Bier 


Delia birra. 


Quite fresh 


Sehr f risch 


Ben fresco. 


Warm 


Warm, heiss .... 
Ein wenig 


Caldo. 


A little 


Un poco. 


Much 


Viel 


Molto. 


Enough 


Genug 


Basta. 


Oysters 


Austern 


Ostriche. 


Lemon 


Citrone 


Un limone. 


Cayenne pepper. 


Paprika 


Pepedi Caienna. 


Soup 


Suppe 


Zuppe. 


Broth 


Bouillon 


Brodo. 


Salt : 


Cj^U 


Sale. 



178 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



ENGLISH. 


GERMAN, 


ITALIAN. 


Pepper 


Pfeffer 


Pepe. 


Side-dishes 


Vorspeise (Vores- 


Contorni antipas- 




sen). 


to. 


Sausage 


Wurst 


Salame. 


Sardines 


Sardinen 


Sardine. 


Some butter .... 


Butter 


Burro. 


Some bread . . 


Brod 


Pane. 


Some meat .... 


Fleisch 


Carne. 


Fat 


Fett 


Grasso. 


Lean (dry) 

Underdone 


Mager 


Magro. 
Sanguinante. 


Blutend 


Cooked 


Gekocht 


Cotto. 


Well done 


Genug gebraten . 


Ben cotto. 


A chop 


EineKotelett .... 


Una costoletta. 


A beefsteak 


Ein Beefsteak . . 


Bistecca [castrato. 


A leg of mutton 


Hammelkeule . . . 


Un cosciotto di 


Roasted meat . . . 


Braten 


L'arrosto. 


Some veal 


Kalbfleisch 


Del vitello. 


Some beef 


Rindfleisch 


Del manzo. 


Some mutton . . 


Hammelfleisch . . 


Del castrato. 


Some pork 


Schweinefleisch . . 


Del porco or mai- 


Some ham 


Schinken 


Prosciutto. [ale. 


Some fowl 


Gefliigel 


Pollame. 


Some chicken . . . 


Huhn 


Polio. 


Pigeon 


Taube 


Piccione. 


Duck 


Ente 


Anitra. 


Goose 


Gans 


Oca. 


Quail 


Wachtel 


Quaglia. 


Wood-cpck 


Waldschnepfe . . . 


Beccaccia. 


Partridge 


Rebhuhn 


Pernice. 


Thrush 


Drossel; Kram- 
metsvogel. 


Tor do. 


Some game .... 


Wildpret 


Delia cacciagione 


Some rabbit .... 


Kaninchen 


Coniglio. 


Some vegetables . 


Gemlise 


Legumi. 


Cabbage 


Kohl 


Cavoli. 


Cauliflower 


Blumenkohl .... 


Broccoli. 


Saut^es potatoes. 


In Butter geros- 
tete Kartoffeln. 


Patate arrostite. 


Fried potatoes . . 


Gebackene Kar- 
toffeln. 


Patate fritte. 


Peas 


Erbsen 


Piselli. 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



179 



ENGLISH. 


GERMAN. 


ITALIAN. 


Beans 


Bohnen 


Fagiuoli. 


Asparagus 


Spargel 


Asparagi. 


Sorrel 


Sauerampfer .... 


Acetosa. 


Spinage 


Spinat 


Spinaci. 


Boiled eggs 


Weiche Eier .... 


Dell' uova. 


Fried eggs 


Setzeier; Spiegel- 
eier. 


Uova al tegame. 


Hard boiled eggs 


Harte Eier 


Uova sode. 


An omelet 


Eierkuchen 


Una frittata. 


— with herbs 


— mit Griinzeug 


— alle fine erbe. 


— with ham 


— mit Schinken 


— al prosciutto. 


— with rum 


— Rum 


— al rum. 


Fish 


Fisch 


Pesce. 


Mussels 


Miesmuschel .... 


Datteri di mare. 


Pike 


Hecht 


Luccio. 


Carp 


Karpf en 


Carpione. 


Tench 


Schleihe 


Tinea. 


Eel 


Aal 


Anguilla. 


Crawfishes 


Krebse 


Gamberi. 


Salmon 


Lachs 


Del salmone. 


Trout 


Forelle 

Ein fi-ischer Har- 


Trota. 


A fresh herring. . 


Aringa. 


A red herring . . 


nig. 
Pokelharing 


Aringa affumicata 


A mackerel .... 


Makrele 


Scombro. 


A sole 


Scholle 


Sogliola. 


A pie 


Fine Pastete .... 


Un pasticcio. 


Salad 


Salat 


Deir insalata. 


Cresses 


Brunnenkregse . . 
Lattich, mit Fiern 


Crescione. [uova. 
Delia lattugo, con 


Lettuce, with eggs 


Endive salad .... 


Cichorien-Salat . . 


Cicoria (insalata). 


Oil 


Oel 


Olio. 


Vinegar . 


Weinessig 


Aceto. 




Senf 


Senapa. 


Pastry 


Zuckerbackerei . . 


Delia pasticceria. 


Jam 07' Preserve . 


Fingemachtes . . . 


Confetture or 


Dessert 


Nachtisch 


Frutta, [composta. 


Stewed fruit 


Kompott 


Composta or con- 
serva di frutta. 


Cream 


Milchrahm 


Crema. 


Tart 


Torte . . . . ; 


Torta. 


To drink 


Zu Trinken .... 


Da bevere. 



i8o 



GERMAN. AND ITALIAN PMx'^ASES. 



ENGLISH. 


GERMAN. 


ITALIAN. 


Some cheese .... 


Kase 


Del formaggio. 


A biscuit 


Zwieback 


Un biscotto. 


An orange 


Eine Apf elsine . . 


Un' arancia. 


A peach 


Eine Pfirsch .... 


Una pesca. 


Grapes 


Weintraube .... 


Deir uva. 


Fruits 


Obst 


Delle frutta. 


An apple 


Ein Apfel 


Pomo (mela). 


A pear 


Eine Birne 


Pera. [chera). 


A cup 


Eine Tasse 


Una tazza (chic- 


Some tea 


Thee 


Te. 


Some coffee .... 


Kaffee 


Caffe. 


Some sugar .... 


Zucker 


Zucchero. 


Spirits 


Likor # . . . 


Liquori. 


The bill 


Die Rechnung . . 


11 conto. 


There is a mistake 


Es ist ein Irrthum 
darin. [geld. 


C'e un errore. 


Here is your tip 


liier ist dasTrink- 
Der Bankier. 


Ecco la mancia. 


The Banker. 


// banchiere. 


The rate of ex- 


Wechselkurs .... 


11 corso del cam- 


change. 




bia. 


Here is gold .... 


Hier ist Gold . . 


Ecco deir oro. 


Bank-notes 


Papiergeld ; Bank- 


Biglietti di banca. 




noten. [Cheque. 


[sa. 


A check 


Anweisung or 


Uu cedole di cao- 


A letter of credit 


Credit brief .... 


Lettera di credito 


A bill of exchange 


Ein Wechsel .... 


Lettera di cambio 


The Washer- 


Die Wascherin. 


La lavandaja. 


zvoman. 




Here is my dirty 


Hier ist mein 


Ecco la mia bian- 


linen. 


schmutzige 
Wasche. 


cheria sporca. 


When will you 


Wan werden Sie 


Quando me la 


bring it back? 


sie wieder- 
bringen? 


renderete. 


I want it immedi- 


Ich brauche sie 


Ho fretta di aver- 


ately. 


gleich fort. 


la. 


Raihvay station. 


Der Bahnhof. 
Wo ist der Bahn- 


La stazione. 


Where is the rail- 


Dov'e la stazione 


way station? 


hof? 


della ferrovia? 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



ISI 



ENGLISH. 


GERMAN. 


ITALIAN. 


A first-class ticket 


Ein Billet erster 


Un biglietto di 


for.. 


Klasse nach . . 


primo classe 
per. . 


A second-class 


Ein Billet zweiter 


Un biglietto di 


ticket for . . 


Klasse nach . . 


secundo classe 
per . . 


A third-class tick- 


Ein Billet dritter 


Un biglietto diter- 


et for . . 


Klasse nach . . 


za classe per. . 


One trip ticket . . 


Hinfahrt 


Andata. 


Return ticket .... 


Hin- und Rlick- 
fahrt. 


Andata e ritorno. 


How much 


Wie viel? 


Quanto costa? 


Express 


Schnellzug 


Diretto. 


Slow train 


Personenzug .... 


Treno omnibus. 


Luggage 


Gepack 


Bagaglio. 


Book this for .... 


Geben Sie das auf 


Consegna questo 




fur.. 


per. . 


The cloakroom . . 


Gepack-Bureau . . 


Registrale. 


A porter 


Ein Paktrager . . . 


Fattorino. 


The station-mas- 


Der Stationsvor- 


11 capo stazione. 


ter, [ment. 


stand. 




Smoking compart- 


Fiir Rancher .... 


Per fumatori. 


Where is the la- 


Wo is dasDamen- 


Dov'e il compar- 


dies' compart- 


coupe? 


time n to per le 


ment? 




signore. 


Is smoking al- 


Darf man hier 


Si puo fumare? 


lowed here ? 


rauchen? 




Buffet 


Buffet; Restaura- 
tion. 


Buffetto. 


Do we have to 


Miissen wir um- 


Si cambia treno? 


change cars? 


steigen? 




Where? 


Wo? .^ 


Dove? 


How long do we 


Wie lange halten 


Quanto di ferma- 


stop? 


wir an? 


ta? 


The Steamboat. 


Das Dampfschiff. 
Fahrt ein Dampf- 


// vapor e. 


Is there a steam- 


C'e un vapore 


boat for . . ? 


schiff nach . . ? 


per . . ? 


At what o'clock? 


Um wie viel Uhr 


Quando e la par- 




di Abfahrt? 


tenza? 


At what o'clock 


Um wie viel Uhr 


Quando e I'arri' 


is the arrival? 


die Ankunft? 


vo? 



1 82 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN PHRASES. 



ENGLISH. 


GERMAN. 


ITALIAN. 


First cabin 

Second cabin .... 
Serve in the cabin 


Erster Platz 

Zweiter Platz . . . 
In der Kajiite be- 
<^ienen. 


Primi posti. 
Secondi posti. 
Servite nella ca- 
bina. 


On foot. 


Zu fuss. 


A piedi. 


Plain. Valley. 

Mountain. 
Where is the way 

to..? 
Where does this 

road lead? 
How long does it 

take to walk to 

? 

Point out to me a 

short cut to go 

to. . 
Are the roads 

good? 
Must I turn to the 

right? 
Must I turn to the 

left? 
Must I go straight 

on? 
Give me a guide. 

Come and show 
me the way; I 
am going to . . 


Ebene. Thai. 

Berg. 
Wo ist der Weg 

nach . . ? 
Wohin fiihrt die- 

ser Weg? 
Wie viel Zeit 

braucht man um 

zu Fuss nach . . 

zu gehen? 
Zeigen sie mir 

einen kiirzeren 

Weg nach . . 
Sin die Wege 

gut? 
Muss ich rechts 

gehen? 
Links gehen? . . . 

Geradaus gehen? 

Geben Sie mir 
einen Fiihrer. 

Kommen Sie mit 
mir, um mir den 
Weg zu zeigen; 
ich gehe nach. . 


Pianura. Valle. 

Monte. 
Dov'e la strada 

per . . ? 
Dove conduce 

questa strada? 
Quando tempo 

occorre per an- 

dare da qui a . . 

. . ? 
Indicatemi una 

scorciatoia per.. 

Le strade sono 

buone? 
Si va a destra? 

A sinistra? 

Diritto? 

Datemi una guida 

Venite con me per 
indicarmi la 
strada; vado a.. 



v.— TELEGRAPH AND CABLE CCD?: 

Tourists will iind it a great convenience to be 
L.D]e to telegraph to their friends at home, or trav- 
eling like themselves but by a different route, 
without any one knowing their business, at a great 
saving over ordinar}^ rates, and without the danger 
of misunderstandings through the fault of the 
operator. 

Such are the advantages of using a code. Of 
course eac/i of the persons interested iiucst have 
a copy of the code on his body (not in a trunk or 
satchel, that may get lost) . 

The code printed here is as complete as it can 
be made for general use. Additional words to 
convey special messages adapted to personal cir- 
cumstances can be added on the blank pages in 
the back part of this guide. In choosing additional 
ciphers remember that 

1. No cipher-word should contain more than ten 
letters. 

2. The words must be enough different from the 
others to exclude any possibility of confusion 
through faulty transmission. 

3. The words must be of such a character that 
they cannot be taken for anything but a cipher. 

Each word in small-cap. type represents the sen- 
tence printed opposite. 

The blanks in the sentences are filled out by 
proper names, dates, etc. 

Securing Passage. 

Abstruse . ...What is the fare for passage to =? 

Adamant Please send list of sailings for 



Affinity Please secure accommodation on 

steamship for self and wife. 

Agnostic ....Please secure accommodation on 
Line for self, wife and family. 

183 



l84 TELEGRAPH AND CABLE CODE 

Alembic Secure stateroom on the and 

advise number. 

Amnesty My passage is not engaged, 

Antelope ....Inside berths preferred. 
Antimony... .Outside berths preferred. 

Aquatic Adjoining rooms preferred. 

Arterial As near amidships as possible. 

Athletic ....Your passage is secured. 

Auditor We have secured the rooms by steamer 

sailing 

Autocrat.... Cannot secure the desired berth. 
Avarice We cannot secure rooms by that 

steamer. 

Departure. 

Bachelor On what date do you leave? 

Balcony I (we) sail to-day. 

Balloon I (we) sail Monday. 

Baluster I (we) sail Wednesday. 

Bandit I (we) sail per on . 

Barbecue is better, and we expect to leave 

here on the . 

Baritone Cannot sail (or leave) to-day. 

Barnacle. ...Cannot sail (or leave) to-morrow. 

Basilisk Cannot sail (or leave) till Monday. 

Bastile Cannot sail (or leave) till Friday. 

Bedizen Will not be ready to leave until . 

Benefice Departure delayed on account of . 

Benzine Urgent business prevents my leaving 

by . 

Betrayal ....I (we) think it best to postpone de- 
parture. 
Beverage . ..Do not delay your departure. 
Biology I (we) think it best to postpone 

departure until ; if no further 

advice, shall sail on that date per 

steamship . 

Bismuth We are detained here by illness, and 

cannot say when we shall be able 

to leave. 
Bitumex Cannot sail by ; will come next 

steamer. 
Bivouac Departure postponed; will wire you 

date I leave. 



TELEGRAPH AND CABLE CODE 185 

Letters and Telegrams. 

Blockade,... Any mail for me or my party? 

Blowpipe Any telegrams or cables for me? 

Bobolink ....Have you any letters forme? If so, 

please forward to . 

Bombast Have you a registered letter on 

hand? 

Boniface Have no registered letter for you. 

Botany Have the following mail matter on 

hand for . 

Brigadier. ... Have important letters for you. 

Brocade Have nothing on hand for you. 

Buffoon We have telegram for you; shall we 

forward. 
Cactus We have inquired at post office; no 

letters there. 
Cadet Please send letters to this place till 

otherwise directed. 

Caitiff Please send letters to until . 

Caldron Please send letters to this place till 

the . 

Calomel In consequence of the illness of 

we are detained here for the pres- 
ent; please send our letters here 

accordingly. 
Campaign If you wish to communicate with 

me by telegraph, do so at ' 

before . 

"Cannibal Forward no more mail here after 

Canticle Please hold my letters till further 

advice. 
Capricorn... .Have you forwarded mail matter 

according to instructions? 
Cardinal ....Have forwarded your mail matter as 

desired. 

Category.... Mail matter was sent to . 

Cavalier — ,Have not forwarded mail matter. 

Cayenne Mail matter duly received. 

Centurion... Mail matter not received. 

Cerement. ...Telegram received; have done as 

requested. 
Chalice Don't understand instructions ; please 

repeat. 



i86 



TELEGRAPH AND CABLE CODE 



Chancery. ...PJease advise by letter. 

Charade Please advise by telegraph. 

Cherubim.... Please make inquiries at the post 
office. 

Hotel Accommodation. 

Daffodil . ... Can you accommodate a party of 

Darksome.. ..Please reserve rooms for self and 

friends to-night. 
Decimate Can you accommodate self, wife and 

maid? 
Denizen Please reserve rooms for self and 

friend to-morrow. 
Deponent.... Please reserve good room; shall be 

in to-night. 
Dewdrop. ...Please reserve good room ; shall be in 

to-morrow. 
^^^DEM Please reserve rooms for me at the 

hotel. 

Diagnose Reserve my rooms; shall be with you 

on . 

Didactic We can accommodate your party. 

Digital.. Unable to accommodate your party; 

house full. 

Diocese We have reserved rooms. 

Diploma Rooms reserved for you at hotel 

named in letter. 

Express, Storage, etc. 

Eclipse Forward goods to care of . 

Effigy Forward goods so as to reach here 

by . 

Emissary Please pay all charges and debit me. 

Endemic Have forwarded your goods to . 

Exodus Goods detained at customs. 

Remittances. 

Festoon Are you in need of money? 

Flotilla Money almost exhausted. 

Fossil If 3rou do not remit shall be in trouble. 

Fragile Remit immediately by telegraph. 

Fulcrum Impossible to remit before . 



TELEGRAPH AND CABLE CODE 187 

Return, 

Galaxy Is it necessary for us to return at 

once? 

Gallop Telegraph if it is necessary I should 

return. 

Galvanic ....If agreeable, will remain another 
week. 

Garland Return by first steamer. 

Gazelle Return at once. 

Gelatine Return as soon as possible. 

Geology Advise you to hurry home. 

Geranium.... Return at once; important matters 
require your presence here. 

Gewgaw You must be here by the . 

Grenade. ..... is dangerously ill, and the doctors 

think 5.^ou should return at once. 

Hectic No necessity for you to return yet. 

Hemlock You need not return till . 

Hydrant No need to hasten home; everything 

going on well. 

Hyphen Nothing here requiring your return. 

Icicle Please prepay my passage, and tele- 
graph me name of steamer. 

Jasmine Have prepaid your passage as re- 
quested. 

Jubilee.. ,..,,.1 have prepaid your passage per . 

Miscellaneous. 

Kolokol I am (we are) urged to prolong my 

stay here weeks. I shall 

assume that you consent until I 
receive your answer by telegraph 
or letter. 

Kurdistan. .The weather has been so unfavorable 
that we (I) have not been able to 
carry out our plans, and we shall 
stay here. Letter follows. 

Labadism Have met with painful accident. 

Please hurry to my aid here at -the 
hotel (or hospital). 

LACHESis,....Your friend lies very ill at this 

point, hotel or hospital. He 

(she) speaks of you. Please tele- 
graph what you wish done. 



VI. —THE 

PARIS UNIVERSAL INTERNATIONAL 
EXPOSITION OF 1900 

This — the fifth Exposition of the kind held in 
the French Capital — opened April 14th, 1900, and 
will close November 5th. 

Twenty million dollars were raised in advance 
to build and run this gigantic Exhibition. It will 
occupy the whole of the grounds devoted to the 
same purpose in 1889; and, in addition, two new 
permanent stone Palaces, erected on the Champs- 
Elysees, in place of the Palais de I'lndustrie, 
recently razed. Included in the total area of 336 
acres (the Columbian World's Fair covered 750 
acres) is the wide Esplanade in front of the Palais 
des Invalides, wherein rest the ashes of Napoleon I. 
Americans who have a vivid recollection of the 
beauty and grandeur displayed at the Columbian 
Exhibition of 1893, will be able to make a fair 
comparison and to accord the French people all 
the praise which the enterprise deserves. 

The leading officials are: 

President: The Minister of Commerce, Indus- 
try, Post and Telegraph (for the time 
being). 

Commissioner General, in charge of everything: 
M. Alfred Picard, Vice-President of the 
Council of State. 

Director of Exploit atioji: M. Delaunay-Belle- 
ville, former President of the Paris Chamber 
of Commerce. 

All the important countries in the world (the 
Argentine Republic excepted) have sent commis- 
sioners to represent them. For the United States' 
display the sum of $1,210,000 has been voted by 

I S3 




'V'i 's^^^^^^ 




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f^s< 'Fir « t\% t-u*- 

I J y ^ < I ^l^f ; ■ 'it 4 ^* 











'/li'C de CrioniDhe du Carrousel, 



PARIS EXPOSITION OF I90O 



189 




Ferd W. Peck. 



Congress, 8250,000 of which is to be applied to 
special buildings; over 210,000 sq. ft. of space have 
been secured. 

For representatives of the American Govern- 
ment, President McKinley made the following 
appointments: 

Hon. Ferd. W. Peck {of Chicago), Commis- 
sioner-General. 
Prof. B. D. Woodward {of New York), Asst. 

Com. Gen. 
MaJ. Fred. Brackett {of Was king to?i, D. C), 
Secretary. 

And 18 honorary commissioners; amongst them, 

Mrs. Potter Palmer, of Chicago. 
The Commissioner-General in turn appointed 
twelve Directors for the various departments, 
placing at the head : 

Fred. J. V. Skiff, as Director-in-Chief of Ex- 
hibits, and 
Paul Blackmar, as Director of Affairs. 

Offices of the United States Commission. 

In Chicago (Head Office), Auditorium Building. 
In New York, Equitable Building. 
In Paris: in the United States Building, on Quay 
d'Orsay, near the Esplanade des Invalides. 

















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CBurnrd at the stake for heresy, 1546.') 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



MONUMENTS, PUBLIC BUILDINGS, CHURCHES, ETC. 



Archcveche, 112. 
Arenes de Lutece. 



132. 



Bridges : 

Pont Alexandre III., 148. 

— del'Alma, 149.^ 

— de rArcheveche, 133. 

— d'Arcole, lol, 

— des Arts, 147. 

— Au Change, 124, 

— Au Double, 133. 

— d'Austerlitz, 131. 

Viaduc d'Auteuil, 149. 

— de Bercy, 131. 

— du Carrousel, or des Saints- 

Peres, 147. 

— de la Concorde, 141. 

— de Crenelle, 149. 

— d'lena, 140. 

— des Invalides, 148. 
— Louis-Philippe, 131. 

— Marie, 131. 

— Mirabeau, 149. 

— National, 131. 
— -Neuf, 117. 

— Notre-Dame, 129. 
• — de Passy, 149. 

— , Petit, 133. 

— Royal, 147, 

— Solferino, 148. 

— St. Louis, 131. 

— St. Michel, 133. 

— Sully, 131. 

— • de Tolbiac, 1.31. 

— de la Tournelle, 133. 

Caiiu1$i : 

Canal de I'Ourcq, 153. 

— St. Denis, 1.5.3. 

— St. Martin, 153. 

Castles : 

Chateau de Chantilly, 161. 

— de Fontainebleau, 161. 

— de Saint-Germain, 161. 

— de Versailles, 161. 

— de Vincennes, 140. 

Cemeteries: 

Cimetiere Montmartre. 143. 

— Montparnasse, 126. 

— du Pere La Chaise, 139. 



Chapelle Expiatoire, 159. 

Cliiirclies: 

American Churches, 163. 

Catholique Anglaise, 159. 

English Churches, 163. 

Greek Churches, 163. 

Madeleine, la, 114. 

Notre-Dame, 119. 

N. D. des Blancs-Manteaux, 
136. 

N. D. de Lorette, 143. 

Protestant Churches, 163. 

Russe, 1.5(.t. 

Sacre-Coeur, 144. 

St. Ambroise, 139. 

St. Augustin, 159. 

de la Sainte-Chapelle, 119. 

Ste. Clotilde, 122. 

St. Etienne du Mont, 128. 

St. Eugene, 144. 

St. Eustache, 13.5. 

St. Fran9ois-Xavier, 123. 

St. Germain-des-Pres, 166. 

St. Germain-l'Auxerrois, 117. 

St. Gervais-St. Protais, 121. 

S . Jacques-du-Haut-Pas,127 

St. Julien-le-Pauvre, 133. 

St. Laurent, 153. 

St. Louis-des-Invalides, 122. 

St. Louis-en-l'ile, 121. 

St. Nicolas-des-Champs,137. 

St. Nicolas-du-Chardonnet, 
115. 

St. Paul-St. Louis, 136. 

St. Philippe-du-Roule, 1 2.5 

St. Pierre de Montmartre, 

St. Roch, 161. ^ [144. 

St. Severin, 13.3. 

St. Sulpice, 175. 

St- Thomas-d'Aquin, 125. 

St. Vincent-ds-Paul, 152 

de la Sarbonne, 128. 

Synagogues, 133. 

Trinite, 157. 

Val-de-Grace, 127. 
Circuses: 
Cirque d'Ete: 161. 

— d'Hiver, 115. 

— Nouveau, 161. 



igi 



192 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



City Institutions : 

Abattoirs-G^n^raux, 153. 
Assistance Publique, 129. 
Catacombes, les, 126 
Egouts, les, 129. 
Entrepot-des-Vins, 131. 
Halle-aux-Vins, 132. 
Halles Centrales. 135. 
H6tel-de-Ville, 131. 
Maison-de-Sante, 152. 
Mont-de-Piete. 136. 
Morgue, la, 119. 
Temple, Marche du, 139. 

Columns : 

Colonne de Juillet, 115. 

— de la Place du Trone, 140. 

— Vendome, 141. 
Conservatories : 

Conservatoire des Arts-et-Me- 
tiers, 137. 

— de Musique, 144. 

Court-Houses and Po- 
lice I>e|>t. : 

Cour d'Assises, 119. 
Palais de Justice, 119. 
Prefecture de Police, 119. 
Tribunal de Commerce, 120. 

Etats-Unis, Ambassade des, 159 

— Consulat-General des, 157 

T^xehang'es : 

Bourse, La, 14.5. 

— Centrale du Travail, 11.5 

— du Commerce, 135. 
Financial Institutions: 

Banque de France, 145. 

— Rothschild, 152. 

Caisse d'Epargne Postale,125 

— d'Epargne de Paris, 145. 

— des Depots et Consigna- 

tions, 148. 

Comptoir d'Escompte, 145. 

Credit Lyonnais, 115. 
Fountains : 
Fontaine Cuvitr, 132. 

• — des Innocents, 135. 

— Louvois, 14.3. 

— Moliere, 141. 

— de robservatoire, 156. 

— St. Michel. 133, 

— de la Victoire, 129. 

Franfois I., Maison de, 151. 

Crardens ; 

Jardin du Luxembourg, 156. 

— des Plantes, 132. 

— Tuileries, 114. 



Hospitals : 

Hopital Broca, 126. 

— des Enfants-Malades, 126. 

— Lariboisiere, 152. 

— Necker, 126. 

— de la Piti(5, 132. 

— de la Salp^triere, 1.32. 

— du Val-de-GrSce. 127. 
Hotel-Dieu, 119. 

Invalides, Esplanade des, 122. 

Liibraries : 

Bibliotheque de I'Arsenal, 115. 

— Mazarine, 147, 

— Nationale, 143. 

— ■ Ste. -Genevieve. 128. 

— dela Ville, 136. 
Mansions (smaller Palaces) : 
Hotel du Figaro, 143. 

— des Invalides, 122. 

— des Monnaies (the Mint), 
147. 

— des Telephones, 137. 

— Thiers, 143. 

— des Postes-et-Telegraphes 
[P. O.]. 137. 

— des Ventes-Mobilieres,143 

— de Ville (City Hall), 131. 

Ministeries: 

Ministere des Affaires Etran- 
geies, 148. 

— de I'Agriculture, du Com- 
merce, des Postes et des 
Telegraphes, 122. 

— des Colonies, 121. 

— des Finances. 137. 

— de la Guerre, 116. 

— de ITnstruction Publique 

et des Beaux-Arts, 122. 

— de rinterieur, 160. 

— de la Justice, 141. 
Monuments; 

Lion de Belfort, le, 116. 
Monument de Coligny, 133. 

— de Gambetta, 155. 

— de La Fayette, 15.5. 

— de La Fayette et Wash- 

ington, 159 

— au Triomphe de la R^pu- 

blique, 140. 
Ob^lisque de Louqsor, 216. 
Museums : 
Mus6e d'Artillerie, 122. 

— des Arts-et-M6tiers, 137. 
— - Carnavalet, 133. 

— Cernuschi, 159. 

— de Cluny, 115. 

■ — Dupuytren, 116. 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



193 



Mnsennis : 

— Ethnographique, 159. 

— Forestier, 140. 

— Galliera, 160. . 

— du Garde-Meuble, 144. 

— des Gobelins, 127. 

— Gr^vin, 114. 

— Guimet, 160. 

— d'Histoire-Naturelle, 132. 

— du Louvre, 117. 

— du Luxembourg, 156, 
— ■ des Mines, 157. 

— Monetaire, 147. 

— de Musique, 144. 

— Paleographique. 135. 

— Pedagogique, 127, 

— Social, 122. 

Palaces : 

Palais des Beaux-Arts (Grand), 
151. 

— des Beaux-Arts (Petit), 141 

— de la Chambre des Depu- 

tes, 116. 

— del'Elysee, 160. 

— de rinstitut, 147. 
■ — de Justice, 119. 

— de la Legion d'Honneur, 
148. 

— du Louvre, 117. 

— du Luxembourg, 156. 

— du Petit-Luxembourg, 156. 

— du President de la Cham- 
bre, 148. 

— Royal, 113. 

— des Tuileries, 121. 

— du Trocadero, 159. 

Places : 

Place de la Bastille, 115. 

— du Carrousel, 155. 

— du ChStelet, 129. 

— de la Concorde. 

— d£ l'H6tel-de-Ville, 131. 

— de la Nation, 140. 

— de rOdeon, 155. 

— St. Sulpice, 155. 

— de la Trinite, 157. 

— du Trocadero, 159. 

— Valhubert, 132. 

— des Victoires, 145. 

— Vendome. 141. 

— des Vosges, 136. 

Prisons : 

de la Conciergerie, 110. 

— des JeunesDetenus, 139. 

— de la Sante, 126. 



Pnblic Institutions: 

Institut des Jeunes Aveugles, 
126. 

— Pasteur, 126. 

— des Sourds-et-Muets, 127. 
Puits-Artesien de Crenelle, 123 

Race-TracUs ; 

Champ de courses d'Autuil, 123 

— de Chantilly, 161. 

— de Fontainebleau, 161, 

— de Longchamp, 123. 

— de Vincennes, 140. 

R. R. Stations : 

Gare de I'Est, 153. 

— Montparnasse. 148. 

— duNord, 152. 

— d'Orleans (ancienne), 132. 

— d'Orleans (nouvelle), 148. 

— de Sceaux, 156, 

— St. Lazare, 155. 

Schools and Colleges: 

Ecole des Arts Decoratifs, 129. 

— .des Beanx-Arts, 147. 

— Centrale, 139. 

— des Lettres, des Sciences 
et de Droit in La Sor- 
BONNE, 128. 

— de Medecine, 117. 

— des Mines, 157. 

— Polytechnique, 128. 

— la Sorbonne, 128. 

— Superieure de Guerre, 123. 
College Ecossais, 128. 

— • de France, 128. 

— Rollin, 144. 

— Ste. Barbe, 128. 

Statues : 

Statue de I'Abbe de I'Esp^e, 
127. 

— d'Armand Carrel, 153. 

— d'Arago, 126. 

— Bernard-Palissy, 110. 

— Bobillot. 139. 

— Bossuet, 155. 

— Chappe, 116. 

— Charlemagne et ses Preux, 
119. 

— Charles-Rollin, 144. 

— Diderot, 144. 

— Etienne-Dolet, 115. 

— Fenelon, 15.5. 

— Flechier, 1.55. 

— Gutenberg, 135. 

— Henri IV., 117. 

— • Jeanne d'Arc, 114. 



194 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



Statues : 

— Le Verrier, lo6. 

— la Liberte, 149. 

— Louis XIII., 136. 

— Louis XIV., 136. 

— Louis XIV., 145. 

— Marechal Ney, 157. 

— Massillon, 155. 

— Moliere, 141. 

— Napoleon I., 141. 
■ — Pasteur, 126. 

— Philippe-August, 140. 

— Dr. Pinel, 132. 

— Raspail, 126. 

• — la Republique, 115. 

— Ricord, 127. 

— J. J. Rousseau, 128. 

— Sedaine, 144. 

— St. Louis, 140. 

— Valhubert, 132. 

— Voltaire, 141, 143. 

Theatres; 

Theatre de rAmbigu-Comique, 
115. 

— Autoine, 15.3. 

— des Bouffes-Parisiens,141. 

— du ChStelet, 129. 

— Dejazet, 11-5. 

— des Folies-Bergere, 144. 

— des Folies-Dramatiques, 
115. 

— Franfais, 141. 

— de la Gaite, 137. 

— du Grand-Opera, 114. 

— du Gymnase, 114. 

— Isola, 114. 

— des Nouveautes, 114. 



Theatres: 

— de rOdeon- 156. 

— de rOpera-Comique, 152. 
— Olympia, 114. 

— des Palais-Royal, 1.52. 

— Parisiana, 114. 

— de la Porte St. Martin, 115. 
• — de la Renaissance, 115 

— Sarah-Bernhardt, 124. 

— des Varietes, 144 

— du Vaudeville, 114. 

Thermes de Julien, 116. 

Tombs ; 

Tombeau de La Fayette, 140. 

— de Napoleon, 122. 

Towers : 
Tour Eiffel, 149. 

— de Jean-Sans-Peur, 155. 

— St. Jacques, 137 

Triumphal Arches: 

Arc de Triomphedu Carrousel, 
155. 

— de I'Etoile, 123. 
Porte St. Denis, 115. 
Porte St, Martiu 115. 

Woods and Parlts: 

Bois-de-Boulogne, 123. 

— de Vincennes, 140. 

Pare des Buttes-Chaumont,153 

— Monceau 159. 

— de Montsouris, 127. 

— du Trocadero, 151. 

— du Ranelagh, 123- 



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