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Full text of "Lee University Catalog"

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LEE UNIVERSITY a 

UNDERGRADUATE ■ 

CATALOG I 



2001-2002 



1 i V^ 



Pentecostal Resource Center 




3 1838 00221 8275 




LIBRARY 

PUIIVERSITY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/leeuniversityca200102leeu 





II 



)stal Research 



CONTENTS 



INTRODUCTION 

Accreditation 6 

Mission Statement 6 

Institutional Goals 8 

Faith Statement 9 

Historical Sketch 10 

ADMISSIONS 

Procedure 16 

International Students 20 

Veterans 20 

Transfer Students 20 

Special Students 21 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

Colleges, Schools and Departments of Instruction 24 

General Curricular Information 28 

Academic Resources 32 

Academic Policies and Procedures 34 

Special Academic Programs 44 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Itemized Expenses 52 

Settlement of Accounts 54 

Deferred Payment Plan 54 

Refund Policy 55 

FINANCIAL AID PROGRAM 

Satisfactory Progress 57 

General Financial Aid Programs 60 

Lee University Scholarships 63 

Alumni Scholarship Funds 11 

Institutional Loan Programs 78 

Other Financial Assistance Programs 78 

Veterans Educational Benefits 19 

CAMPUS LIFE: STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES 

Christian Commitment 84 

Opportunities for Christian Service 84 

Chapel 84 

First- Year Experience 85 

Intramurals and Recreation 85 



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^'-^Z CONTENTS 

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University Performing Groups 86 

Student Organizations 86 

Student Publications 88 

Student Housing 88 

Counseling, Testing and Career Exploration 91 

Health Clinic 92 

Campus Safety 92 

Student Lifestyle Expectations 92 

Community Covenant 93 

UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

College of Arts and Sciences 96 

Pre-Law Emphasis 97 

Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 99 

Department of Business 123 

Department of Communication and the Arts 141 

Department of English and Modem Foreign Languages 159 

Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 177 

Helen DeVos College of Education 209 

Department of Health and Human Performance 216 

Department of Teaching and Learning 229 

School of Music 243 

School of Religion 259 

Department of Christian Ministries 260 

Department of Theology 279 

Department of External Studies 292 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 296 

ADMINISTRATION, FACULTY AND STAFF 302 

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 327 

TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 331 

The university welcomes visitors to the campus at any time. Offices of 
the university are open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
Appointments for other hours may be arranged in advance. 

No person in whatever relation with Lee University shall be subject to 
discrimination because of race, color, national origin, age, gender or disability. 

Published annually by Lee University in Cleveland, Tennessee, this issue 
of the annual catalog contains announcements for the institution's eighty- 
third year, 2001-2002. The university reserves the right to make necessary 
changes without further notice. 



Introduction 



INTRODUCTION 



ACCREDITATION 

Lee University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award Bachelor's 
degrees and Master's degrees. Teacher Education programs are approved 
by the Tennessee State Department of Education for licensure. The 
School of Music is accredited by the National Association of Schools of 
Music. Lee also holds membership in the American Council on Edu- 
cation, the Council of Independent Colleges, the Council of Christian 
Colleges and Universities and the Appalachian College Association. 

LEE UNIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT 

Lee University is a Christian institution which offers liberal arts and 
professional education on both the baccalaureate and master's levels. It 
seeks to provide education that integrates biblical truth as revealed in 
the Holy Scriptures with truth discovered through the study of the arts 
and sciences and in the practice of various professions. A personal com- 
mitment to Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior is the controlling perspective 
from which the educational enterprise is carried out. The foundational 
purpose of all educational programs is to develop within the students 
knowledge, appreciation, understanding, ability and skills which will 
prepare them for responsible Christian living in the modern world. 

Founded as Bible Training School in 1918 by the Church of God, 
Cleveland, Tennessee, the institution was renamed in 1947 to honor its 
second President, the Reverend F. J. Lee, and attained university status 
in 1997. The original purpose was to provide both general and biblical 
training for those persons entering the Christian ministry, and through 
the years Lee University has continued this purpose of "ministry," ever 
more broadly defined to include both church and non-church vocations. 

Enrollment consists primarily of recent high school graduates, and 
fifty-two percent of the students reside on campus. In order to maintain 
a sense of Christian community and enhance the personal, spiritual, aca- 
demic, emotional and physical development of students, Lee University 
seeks to foster a residential campus experience, with special focus on the 
needs of freshmen and sophomores. The university works to create com- 
mon space on the campus and a common core of residential events 
around which the entire community operates. Most of the students are 
affiliated with the Church of God, although many come from other 
denominations. Lee University serves the Church and society by offer- 
ing graduate programs in various professions and academic disciplines. 
These post-baccalaureate programs are designed to deepen one's under- 
standing of a discipline and/or strengthen one's skills as a professional. 
The goal of all graduate degree programs is to nurture scholars and pro- 



Introduction 



fessionals who will better serve the kingdom of God and the world. In 
this way, the graduate programs are a natural extension of the universi- 
ty's commitment to undergraduate education. The graduate student 
body is relatively new and is in the process of defining its own identity. 

As an independent institution, Lee University is controlled by a 
Board of Directors appointed by the General Executive Committee of 
the denomination. The President is responsible to this board for facilitat- 
ing an educational program presented from a theological perspective that 
is conservative, evangelical and Pentecostal. In keeping with the amend- 
ed Charter of Incorporation (1968) and the Bylaws of Lee University (arti- 
cle I, sections 2 and 4), all board members, administrators and faculty 
members certify annually by contract that they will not advocate any- 
thing contrary to the Church of God Declaration of Faith. 

Lee University endeavors to employ scholars with the highest acad- 
emic credentials who present their disciplines from a distinctly 
Christian perspective. All truth is perceived to be God's truth, and the 
effective presentation and integration of truth is the goal. Lee University 
values teaching as the most important faculty role, and excellence in 
teaching is the primary standard for retention, tenure and promotion. 
Faculty research is seen as essential to teaching excellence. It, too, is an 
important criterion for faculty advancement. Lee University values and 
rewards Christian community service and service to humankind as sig- 
nificant faculty responsibilities. 

Lee University identifies its public service region as being generally 
coterminous with the geographic scope of the denomination. While 
most students come from the United States, the student body typically 
consists of representatives of a broad range of socioeconomic back- 
grounds from all fifty states and more than twenty countries in Central 
and South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. Because of this geographic 
span, the university serves a racially, ethnically and culturally diverse 
student body with ten percent international or minority students. The 
institution has adopted the policy that no person in whatever relation 
with Lee University shall be subject to discrimination because of race, 
color, national origin, age, gender or disability. 

Lee University has both open admissions and a rapidly expanding 
scholarship program, attracting students with widely varied academic 
skills. The university is committed to serve under-prepared students 
with a variety of support services. While the primary source of funding is 
from student revenues, the Church of God provides for the university in 
its annual budget. The university also receives support from alumni, 
businesses, churches, foundations and friends. 

All baccalaureate degree students at Lee University must complete a 
general education core including eighteen semester hours of religion. 
The general education courses foster intellectual development by 
enhancing the student's ability to observe, read, and think critically and 



Introduction 



to communicate effectively. The courses also cultivate awareness, 
understanding and respect for cultural diversity. The religion core cours- 
es are predicated on the Reformation principle of the priesthood of all 
believers. The courses are designed to enable the student both to under- 
stand and articulate the Christian faith. The campus curriculum is 
enriched by American, Latin American, European and Asian studies pro- 
grams, study tours, and service-to-humankind projects, as well as exter- 
nal studies for non-resident students. 

Lee University takes seriously the task of preparing students for 
responsible Christian living in the modem world. The goal is pursued 
within a variety of structures provided within the widest campus con- 
text, such as classroom instruction, extracurricular activities, student 
development services and residential living. The University realizes that 
the knowledge, appreciation, understanding, ability and skill for such 
resourceful living will be evident in its students in direct proportion to 
the success of its programs and services whereby a healthy physical, 
mental, social, cultural and spiritual development is fostered. 

The Lee University experience intends to demonstrate that there is 
a positive correlation between scholarship and wholeness; that one must 
approach all learning with a sense of privilege and responsibility under 
God; that truth is truth wherever it is found, whether test tube, literary 
\Tiasterpiece or Holy Scripture; that appropriate integration of truth is 
both intellectual and behavioral in nature; and that the pursuit and 
application of truth is, indeed, "ministry." 

INSTITUTIONAL GOALS 

The nature and range of this commitment are demonstrated in the 
objectives of the institution. Lee University seeks to: 

1 . Provide a general education program which will equip students 
with quantitative, verbal and technological skills; enhance 
their appreciation of their cultural and religious heritage; 
strengthen their commitment to the liberal arts; and give them 
a view of their responsibility as Christian scholars in the com- 
munity and the wider world. 

2. Provide sufficient religious education to enable students to be 
conversant in the Christian faith, to articulate their own beliefs 
and to actualize their faith through consistent growth and prac- 
tice by the integration of faith with all aspects of life. 

3. Provide undergraduate programs of sufficient quality to prepare 
students for success in graduate and professional schools and in 
the early stages of their careers. 

4. Provide graduate programs in various areas which will prepare 
students for success in post graduate programs. 



Introduction 

5. Achieve the quahty of instruction and resources necessary for 
the national accreditation of selected areas and the develop- 
ment of additional graduate programs where appropriate. 

6. Provide academic support through computer facilities, library 
resources, student support services and faculty development 
opportunities to ensure quality instruction and a challenging 
academic environment. 

7. Provide a campus environment that supports and encourages 
students in their personal, social, spiritual, cultural and physi- 
cal development. 

8. Prepare students for successful personal and professional life by 
developing in them a commitment to Christian values in voca- 
tional goals and lifestyle choices. 

9. Increase the diversity of the faculty and student body, address 
the unique needs of a diverse campus population, and encour- 
age academic inquiry into minority concerns. 

10. Recruit, develop and retain a diverse community of teaching 
professionals, administrators and support staff who demon- 
strate excellence in their professional roles and effectively 
implement the mission of the university in their lifestyles and 
co-curricular involvement. 

11. Continue the growth of student enrollment and development 
of capital assets to optimize student opportunities. 

12. Preserve the evangelical and Pentecostal heritage and message 
of the Church of God and provide positive direction for its 
future. 

13. Provide quality academic, spiritual, cultural and recreational 
services to its various publics. 

FAITH STATEMENT 

As a Christian university operated under the auspices of the Church 
of God, Lee University is firmly committed to the conservative, evangel- 
ical, Pentecostal rehgious position of its sponsoring denomination. This 
position is expressed in the "Declaration of Faith" as follows: 

WE BELIEVE: 

In the verbal inspiration of the Bible. 

In one God etemally existing in three persons; namely, the Father, 
Son, and Fioly Ghost. 

That Jesus Christ is the only begotten Son of the Father, conceived 
of the Fioly Ghost, and bom of the Virgin Mary. That Jesus was cru- 
cified, buried, and raised from the dead. 



10 Introduction 



That He ascended to heaven and is today at the right hand of the 
Father as the Intercessor. 

That all have sinned and come short of the glory of God and that 
repentance is commanded of God for all and necessary for forgive- 
ness of sins. 

That justification, regeneration, and the new birth are wrought by 
faith in the blood of Jesus Christ. 

In sanctification subsequent to the new birth, through faith in the 
blood of Christ, through the Word, and by the Holy Ghost. 

Holiness to be God's standard of living for His people. 

In the baptism with the Holy Ghost subsequent to a clean heart. 

In speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance and that 
it is the initial evidence of the baptism of the Holy Ghost. 

In water baptism by immersion, and all who repent should be bap- 
tized in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy 
Ghost. 

Divine healing is provided for all in the atonement. 

In the Lord's Supper and washing of the saints' feet. 

In the premillennial second coming of Jesus. First, to resurrect the 
righteous dead and to catch away the living saints to Him in the air. 
Second, to reign on the earth a thousand years. 

In the bodily resurrection; eternal life for the righteous, and eternal 
punishment for the wicked. 

HISTORICAL SKETCH OF LEE UNIVERSITY 

In response to its need for trained Christian workers, the Church of 
God considered the establishing of a Bible training school at its sixth 
annual General Assembly in 1911. The Assembly appointed a commit- 
tee to locate a site and erect a building and established a board of educa- 
tion consisting of seven men. However, six years passed before these 
early plans bore fruit. The General Assembly of 1917 passed measures to 
institute a school, with classes to meet in the Council Chamber of the 
Church of God Publishing House in Cleveland, Tennessee. The 
Reverend A. J. Tomlinson, Superintendent of Education, opened the first 
term on January 1, 1918. There were twelve students with Mrs. Nora B. 
Chambers as the only teacher. 

By the beginning of the fifth term one room was no longer sufficient 
to house the school. A vacant church building on Twenty-Fourth and 
Peoples Streets was converted into classrooms and a dormitory in 1920. 
Again the school outgrew its facilities. In 1925 it was moved to the 



Introduction 1 1 



Church of God Auditorium on Twenty-Fourth and Montgomery 
Avenue. 

A high school division was added in 1930 and continued to be a part 
of the school's program until 1965. In 1938 the Murphy Collegiate 
Institute was purchased, and the Bible Training School moved from 
Cleveland to Sevierville, Tennessee. A junior-college division was added 
in 1941. This division was accredited by the Commission on Colleges of 
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools in 1960. The school 
returned to Cleveland in 1947 after purchasing the Bob Jones College 
campus, a site which as early as 1885 had housed Centenary College and 
Music School, a Methodist institution. Upon returning to Cleveland, 
Bible Training School received its new name, Lee College, in honor of its 
second President, the Reverend F. J. Lee. 

The college curriculum was expanded in 1953 with the institution 
of a four-year Bible College offering a Bachelor of Arts degree in Biblical 
Education. In 1959 this program achieved accreditation by the American 
Association of Bible Colleges. An effort was made in 1957 to expand the 
junior college to a four-year college of liberal arts, but it was abandoned 
after two cohorts were graduated. In 1965 plans were successfully initi- 
ated to expand the junior-college division to a four-year college of liberal 
arts and education. This college received approval of the Tennessee State 
Department of Education in 1968. It then became possible to combine 
the Bible College and the College of Liberal Arts and Education into one 
school consisting of three divisions of instruction: Arts and Sciences, 
Religion, and Teacher Education. In December 1969, Lee College was 
accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southem Association 
of Colleges and Schools as a Level n institution. 

The needs of an increasing enrollment were met with a building and 
remodeling program which began in 1962. The Fiigginbotham 
Administration Building was completed in 1963 and replaced what was 
then known as Old Main. The Science Building was constructed in 1965 
and in 1988 was named for Dr. Lois Underwood Beach, a leader of the 
science faculty for four decades. Student housing has been an emphasis 
of the building program at Lee. Hughes Hall, a men's dormitory, was 
built in 1967, and Cross Hall was built in 1969. 

Throughout the decade of the 1970s, Lee College continued to grow 
and prosper, adding major programs and expanding campus facilities. 
During this time, Lee also became a member of the Council of Christian 
Colleges and Universities and of the Tennessee Independent Colleges 
and Universities. The Pentecostal Research Center was instituted in 
1972 as a collection of materials by and about Pentecostals. Now housed 
in the Squires Library, this collection is used for research by scholars 
from around the world and is considered to be one of the most complete 
compilations of Pentecostal materials in the world. 



12 Introduction 



Carroll Court, an apartment complex for married students, was 
completed in 1973, and the Charles W. Conn Center for the Performing 
Arts and Christian Studies was completed in 1977. By 1979, the college 
endowment had reached $2,000,000; teaching facilities had been signifi- 
cantly upgraded; the enrollment had climbed to 1,342; and the percent- 
age of faculty with terminal degrees had reached forty-five percent. 

The 1980s began with a financial crisis which saw a downturn in 
enrollment, loss of a portion of the endowment through fraud by the 
investment company, sky-rocketing inflation and utility costs, and loss 
of a sizeable government grant. From 1980-1983, the college struggled to 
regain its equilibrium. Enrollment reached a low of 1,026 in the fall of 
1983 as faculty and staff positions were cut and promotions and tenure 
were frozen. Despite the austerity, a capital funds campaign resulted in 
the construction of the Pentecostal Resource Center in 1984, the refur- 
bishing of a men's residence hall, and the remodeling and expansion of 
the gymnasium which was renamed Paul Dana Walker Arena. 

In the fall of 1984, enrollment began to increase, and the college 
began a vigorous recruitment and development program. In 1985 Lee 
entered into an exchange agreement with Henan University in the 
People's Republic of China and also launched the Summer Honors 
Semester, bringing promising high school juniors and seniors to campus. 
In 1987 the campus began to undergo a physical transformation of stag- 
gering proportion. A city street running through the middle of the cam- 
pus was closed and converted into a pedestrian mall with seating areas 
and an amphitheater. The old auditorium, abandoned when the Conn 
Center was completed, was demolished; and the old library was renovat- 
ed into a classroom and office building. 

Enrollment continued to climb, jumping by more than 200 between 
1987 and 1988. A new tennis center was completed in 1989, and Sharp 
and Davis Residence Halls were ready for occupancy in 1990. In 1992 
Lee added the Dixon Center, which includes a theater and communi- 
cations complex with offices, a TV studio and an editing suite; and the 
Watkins Building. The curriculum expanded with the facilities as did 
study-abroad opportunities which now include a semester in Cambridge 
and summer experiences in countries around the world. 

In November of 1993, arsonists destroyed Ellis Hall. Although sev- 
enty-eight residents were sleeping in the building at the time of the sud- 
den inferno, no one was killed as residents jumped from the second story 
to safety. Full recovery took several months, and a significant amount of 
energy and effort went into caring for the young men affected by the 
blaze, but by August of 1994 a new men's residence, Atkins-Ellis, 
replaced the demolished residence. 

The back of the campus was also refurbished, and in 1994 the 
Curtsinger Music Building was dedicated along with a new women's 



Introduction 



13 



apartment building, Livingston Hall. In 1996, Lee added the Deacon 
Jones Dining Hall and a men's apartment building, Hicks Hall. These 
added facilities made it possible for Lee to serve as the Olympic Village 
for the white-v^ater events in the 1996 Olympics. 

With the new Curtsinger Music Building, Lee was in a position to 
offer its first graduate program in Church Music in the fall of 1995. With 
full approval from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Lee 
moved from a Level U to a Level IE institution. A Master of Education in 
Classroom Teaching was added the following year, and a Master of 
Liberal Arts was begun in the spring of 1998, with a Master of Science in 
Counseling Psychology beginning in August. In 1997 the faculty 
approved a new general education core which went into effect in the fall 
of 1998. 

In May 1997 Lee made the transition from Lee College to Lee 
University, organized into a College of Arts and Sciences, a College of 
Education, a School of Music, and a School of Religion. This year also 
saw the publication of the first graduate catalog and the appointment of 
the first Graduate Council. Construction completed in 1998 included 
the Helen DeVos College of Education and the complete remodeling of 
East Wing, once a residence hall, to create new office space. 

Keeble Hall, a women's apartment building, opened in the fall of 
1999, and construction began on the Paul Conn Student Union and 
Storms Men's Apartments in the same year.The Board of Directors also 
approved the addition of two new master's degrees, an M.A. in Bible and 
Theology and an M.A. in Youth and Family Ministry, following the 
addition of a Master of Arts in Teaching, added in the summer of 1999. 

With a record enrollment of more than 3,000 students, Lee is grow- 
ing faster than ever before in its history. Although the curriculum has 
changed dramatically since 1918 and the campus has been almost totally 
reconstructed since the 1960s, Lee's purpose remains unchanged — 
preparing individuals to do God's work in the world, whether through 
traditional Christian ministry or secular professions. 

PRESIDENTS OF LEE UNIVERSITY 



A. J. Tomlinson 

F. J. Lee 

J. B. ElHs 

T. S. Payne 

J. H. Walker, Sr. 

Zeno C. Tharp 

J. H. Walker, Sr. 

E. L. Simmons 

J. Stewart Brinsfield 



1918-1922 
1922-1923 
1923-1924 
1924-1930 
1930-1935 
1935-1944 
1944-1945 

1945-1948 
1948-1951 



John C. Jemigan 
R. Leonard Carroll, Sr. 
R. L. Piatt 
Ray H. Hughes, Sr. 
James A. Cross 
Charles W. Conn 
Ray H. Hughes, Sr. 
R. Lamar Vest 
Charles Paul Conn 



1951-1952 
1952-1957 
1957-1960 
1960-1966 
1966-1970 
1970-1982 
1982-1984 
1984^1986 
1986- 



16 Admissions 



ADMISSIONS 



If you want to learn about any university, a good starting point is 
finding out what kind of students attend. You will find Lee University 
students to be spiritually aware participants, not spectators. Although 
most of our students come from the Southeast, our student body repre- 
sents almost every state and more than 30 countries. All have attended 
accredited high schools and have prepared for college in much the same 
way you have. 

You will find that the costs for attending Lee are generally less than 
those at equivalent quahty colleges. For those students who need financial 
assistance, Lee provides extensive financial aid programs which are 
explained in detail in the following pages of this catalog. 

Admission to Lee University is based on evidence that the applicant 
possesses the qualities needed for satisfactory achievement in terms of 
character, ability, academic foundation, purpose and personality. The 
university admits students regardless of race, color, national origin, reli- 
gious preference, or disability. 

To be eligible for admission the applicant must have graduated from 
an approved high school or satisfactorily completed the GED test. All 
persons who register at Lee University are required to file an application. 
Acceptance of students is based upon discemable qualities and potential 
without reference to any perceived notion of an ideal class. 

PROCEDURE 

Application forms are mailed on request to all prospective students. 
All students expecting to enroll at Lee University for the first time must 
submit the following: 

1 . An application for admission on a form provided by the university. 

2. An official high school transcript mailed directly from the high 
school. All students must have achieved a C average or above on all 
high school work, and a composite score of 17 or above on the 
American College Test or 860 or above on the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test. Students transferring with more than 15 semester hours are 
not required to furnish a high school transcript. 

3. A test score report from American College Test. Transfer students 
having fewer than 1 6 semester hours are required to submit ACT or 
SAT test scores. Applicants who have not already taken the entrance 
examination (ACT or SAT) will be required to take it prior to accep- 
tance. The ACT/SAT should be taken on a national test date. 
Exceptions to this policy should be forwarded to the Director of 
Admissions for consideration. The SAT will be acceptable if the stu- 
dent cannot take the ACT. To be eligible for Academic Scholarship, 
ACT/SAT exams must be taken on a national test date. 



Admissions 1 7 



4. An advance matriculation fee of $25 (not refundable). The matricula- 
tion fee may be applied to the account of the student or the account 
of a member 6f the immediate family for a period of two semesters 
following the date of payment. 

5. An advance housing fee of $200. Rooms are not assigned until the 
acceptance becomes official. (This is refundable up to thirty days 
prior to registration). 

6. Any applicant bom after January 1, 1957, must provide documented 
proof of receiving two (2) MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccina- 
tions given after 12 months of age. (Collected after acceptance). 

7. Proof of a Tuberculin PPD sldn test taken within a one-year period 
prior to the date of admission application. (Collected after acceptance). 
When the above regulations have been completed, a student will be 

notified of his/her acceptance or rejection by the Office of Admissions. 
The university may refuse admission and registration to students not 
meeting the minimum requirements for college, or may admit them on 
probation for limited work. The admissions policies are reviewed annu- 
ally by the Admission and Retention Committee. 

GED EQUIVALENCY CERTIFICATION 

Applicants who have not completed high school will be required to 
take the General Education Development tests. These tests cover 
English, natural science, social sciences, literature, and mathematics. 
The tests are given in many major cities throughout the nation. With an 
average score of 50 or above, one may apply for admission. For details 
concerning the use of the General Education Development tests for 
entrance to college, contact: Director of Admissions, Lee University, 
Cleveland, Tennessee 37320-3450. 

ADVANCED ACADEMIC WORK FOR CREDIT 

Superior students with advanced work in high school are encour- 
aged to work at more advanced academic levels. 

All university academic credit will be granted on the basis of accept- 
able documentation under the following conditions. 

1. At least one semester of work (12 semester hours) must be complet- 
ed at Lee University before credit earned by testing will be recorded 
on the transcript. 

2. Credit earned by testing will be designated on the transcript by a 
grade of "P" (Pass). 

3. A maximum of 32 semester hours can be earned by advanced testing. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP COURSES) 

Lee University will accept a score of three or above on the Advanced 
Placement Tests of the College Entrance Examination Board. Students 



Admissions 



may submit scores on AP examinations taken through these programs 
to the Registrar for evaluation. (See chart on page 34). 

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) 

Subject examinations should be submitted to the Registrar for evalu- 
ation. Academic credit for each CLEP exam is reviewed by the Registrar. 

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMME (IBP) 

The university does accept academic credit from the IBP classes. 
Students v^ishing to receive credit from this program should write to the 
Registrar for evaluation. 

EARLY ADMISSION 

Early admission to the university may, under strict conditions, be 
granted to students before graduation from high school. The student 
applies for early admission with the advice and approval of his/her prin- 
cipal and guidance counselor. To be eligible for this early admission pro- 
gram, the student must have a minimum 3.5 high school grade point 
average and must score at least 22 on the ACT or 1070 on the SAT. 

A letter of recommendation from the high school principal must 
accompany application for admission. 

DUAL ENROLLMENT 

The Lee University High School Dual Enrollment Program's pur- 
pose is to provide local high school students a means of beginning 
their college careers while simultaneously earning high school credits. 
Students must be high school juniors or seniors with a cumulative 
GPA of 3.0 or higher and have an ACT score of 19 or higher in the sub- 
ject to be taken (if applicable). They must also complete an admis- 
sions application and provide approval from a parent or guardian and 
high school principal or counselor. 

PROBATIONARY ADMISSION 

Applicants who are accepted as first-time freshmen whose high 
school grade point average is below C (2.0) or with an ACT score lower 
than 1 7 are accepted on probationary status. Such persons will normal- 
ly be limited to a 12-14 hour course load and may be required to enroll 
in special sections for the first semester. Enrollment of such students at 
the university is sufficient proof of the student's acceptance of the pro- 
bationary status. 

Transfer students who have eamed more than 15 semester hours with 
a grade point average less than 2.0 will be accepted on academic probation. 

READMISSION 

Students who are in good standing will be eligible for readmission. 
However, readmission after suspension is never automatic. The student 
must apply for readmission and be approved by the Committee on 
Admission and Retention. Any student who is dropped for academic 



Admissions 19 



reasons is ineligible to apply for readmission until one full semester has 
elapsed. The summer session is not considered a semester. Readmission 
requires new application and a written letter explaining the reason for 
returning to Lee. Application fees are required at the time of application. 

TEST REQUIREMENTS 

All freshmen are required to submit scores on the American 
College Test or the Scholastic Aptitude Test. High schools should have 
registration forms for these tests. If these registration forms are not 
available in your high school, they may be obtained by writing to the 
Registration Department, American College Testing Program, P.O. Box 
414, Iowa City, Iowa 52240. The registration form is accompanied by a 
Student Information Bulletin which describes the test, gives the dates 
and places for test administrations, and the procedures for registration. 
Test centers are located throughout the United States, and tests are 
administered on five specific dates established by the testing service 
each year. Scores are reported to the colleges and universities as 
requested by the student. 

Applicants are advised to take the ACT as early as possible in the 
junior or senior year of high school. ACT test results are used as an aid 
in predicting the applicant's prospects for a successful college career and 
as a basis for planning the student's program of studies. Registration for 
ACT or SAT should be made at least one month in advance of the test 
date. Where it is impossible to take the ACT in the local schools, the 
SAT test will be acceptable. 

PLACEMENT TESTING 

In order to effectively place entering students in certain courses, we 
require some students to take additional placement tests prior to enroll- 
ment. These tests help to determine which students may need additional 
help in the areas of reading or mathematics. Students with standardized 
test scores which fall within a certain range will be notified of the need to 
take the Nelson-Denny Reading Test and/or the Math Placement Test. 

NELSON-DENNY READING TEST 

Students with the following scores are required to take this test: 
ACT English subscore, 1-12; SAT Verbal subscore, 330 and below. 
Students scoring below the 12th-grade level on the Nelson-Denny 
Reading Test will be required to take REA 101: College Reading during 
the first semester at Lee University. This course carries institutional 
elective credit. 

MATH PLACEMENT TEST 

Students with the following scores are required to take this test: 
ACT Math subscore, 1-18; SAT Math subscore, 100-400. The mathemat- 
ics faculty grades the test and indicates the appropriate mathematics 
course in which the student will be required to enroll. Not all students 



20 Admissions 



taking the Math Placement Test are required to take a developmental 
mathematics course. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

Highly qualified students are considered for admission as freshmen 
and transfer students. Applicants with a native language other than 
English are required to submit scores earned on the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL), designed to ascertain proficiency in English 
and administered in many overseas testing centers. Students who wish 
to take the test should write directly to TOEFL, Educational Testing 
Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 

All international apphcants must submit official transcripts from all 
previous colleges and/or secondary schools. An Affidavit of Support must 
be submitted with the apphcation. These forms are available upon request. 

All these must be received and approved before a student can be ac- 
cepted to Lee University and an BSTS Form 1-20 (student visa) can be issued. 

An international advisor works with all students in matters relating 
to admission and residency at Lee. Arrangements can be made for meet- 
ing a student upon arrival provided complete information is sent in 
advance to the Director of Admissions. 

VETERANS AND DEPENDENTS OF VETERANS 

Lee University is approved for veterans and dependents of disabled 
or deceased veterans under existing public laws. Eligible persons should 
contact the Veterans Administration regional office of the state in which 
they maintain a permanent residence. One must have authorization for 
VA or vocational rehabilitation training before registering. If in doubt 
about the procedure, check with the local VA office (800-827-1000 or 
888-442-4551). All questions concerning getting your VA benefits started 
at Lee University should be put in writing and sent to the Director of 
Admissions. 

Transcripts containing any college credits acquired through USAFI 
courses and the College Level Examination Program (CLEP tests) or 
through colleges in the various branches of the military should be sub- 
mitted with application. The transcript will be reviewed by the Registrar 
to determine the number of hours and the specific courses acceptable. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

A student from an accredited college or university will be admitted 
without examination, provided he/she withdrew in good standing and 
has completed 16 hours of college work. If the student has fewer than 16 
hours, he/she will be required to take the ACT. Fle/she must present an 
official transcript showing evidence of at least a 2.0 average in all acade- 
mic work previously taken, and should request that ACT or SAT scores 
be sent to the Undergraduate Admissions Center. A high school tran- 
script is not required if a student has eamed 1 6 semester hours of college 



Admissions 21 



work. Transfer students who have less than a 2.0 grade point average can 
be accepted on academic probation. 

An official transcript must be sent from each institution attended, 
regardless of whether credit was earned or is desired. A student who fails 
to acknowledge attendance in any college or university where he/she has 
been previously registered is subject to dismissal from Lee University. 

No credit or transcripts will be issued until all previous transcripts 
are on file in the Registrar's Office. 

A student in good standing at an accredited college or university who 
wishes to enroll in the summer term only may be considered for admis- 
sion as a nonmatriculated student. Such admission will terminate at the 
end of the summer term and does not presuppose acceptance by the uni- 
versity. A nonmatriculated student may submit, in lieu of official tran- 
scripts of college credits, a statement of good standing from the Dean or 
Registrar of the last school attended. This statement must include the 
total number of semester or quarter hours previously earned. 

All work from previous schools is reviewed and evaluated for accep- 
tance. The cumulative average includes credit hours attempted on all 
accepted courses. 

Except in special cases, any student who has failed in another insti- 
tution and who cannot remain in that institution will not be admitted 
to Lee University. 

Removal of entrance conditions must be accomplished by the end of 
the first year. 

A maximum of 32 semester credits may be awarded for prior learn- 
ing at an unaccredited institution provided Lee University has sufficient 
evidence of the quality of the prior learning experiences. Such credit will 
be placed on the Lee University transcript only after the successful com- 
pletion of a semester at Lee University and will be subject to an evalua- 
tion of the appropriate application of such prior leaming credits to the 
specific program of studies chosen by the transfer student. 

All of the courses completed at an accredited junior college by a 
transfer apphcant may be accepted provided the courses are submitted at 
the time of the original apphcation. A junior college graduate, however, 
must complete the minimum of 60 additional hours at a senior level 
institution with the last 30 hours required to be taken in residence at Lee. 

Once a student has reached junior status at Lee University he/she 
must have special prior approval to take any courses at a two-year college 
to be transferred toward a degree program at Lee. 

SPECIAL STUDENT (NON'DEGREE SEEKING) 

Under certain circumstances an applicant over twenty-one years of 
age and not qualified for admission may be admitted as a special student 
by permission of the Director of Admissions. 




* .'# 



SJr^.,, * J:r_.^ 



24 Academic Programs 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



The total development of an individual can only be achieved by build- 
ing a firm academic foundation. The quality education provided by Lee 
University helps build that foundation. 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

There are four colleges and schools v^ithin Lee University: the College of 
Arts and Sciences, the School of Religion, the Helen DeVos College of 
Education, and the School of Music. Each college and school is organized into 
departments. The College of Arts and Sciences is organized into five depart- 
ments. The School of Religion includes three departments. The Helen DeVos 
College of Education is divided into two departments, and the School of 
Music includes one department. Students may select courses from any of 
these departments and should select a major area of concentration from a 
subject matter discipline provided within one of the departments. 

The university offers the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, and 
the Bachelor of Music Education degrees at the undergraduate level. Degrees 
and programs offered by the respective colleges and schools are listed below: 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

BEHAVIORAL AND SOCLM SCIENCES CODE 

B.A. History HISA 

B.S. History (Economics Emphasis, HEST 

Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 

B.S. History (Political Science Emphasis, HPST 

Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-11) 

Psychology PSYA 

Sociology SOCA 

Human Development HUDA 

Political Science PSCA 



B.A. 


B.A. 


B.A. 


B.A. 


ISIN 
B.S. 


B.A. 


B.S. 


B.S. 



Accounting ACCS 

Business Administration BADA 

Business Administration BADS 

Business Administration (Business Education/ BAST 

Corporate Training, Teacher Licensure in 

Business, Grades 7-12) 

B.S. Business Administration (Business Education/ BDST 

Corporate Training, Teacher Licensure in Business 
and Business Technology, Grades 7-12) 

B.S. Computer Information Systems CISS 



Academic Programs 25 



COMMUNICATION AND THE ARTS 

B.A. Communication (Communication Studies) COMA 

B.A. Communication (Joumalism/ Media Writing) CMWA 

B.A. Communication (Public Relations) CPRA 

B.A. Communication (Drama) CDRA 

B.A. Communication (Advertising) CADA 

B.A. Telecommunications CTCA 

B.S. Telecommunications CTCS 



ENGLISH AND MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

B.A. English 

B.A. English 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.A. French 

B.A. French 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.A. Spanish 

B.A. Spanish 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 



ENGA 

ENAT 

FREA 
FRAT 

SPAA 
SPAT 



NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

B.S. Biochemistry 

B.S. Biochemistry 

(Pre-Med, Pre-Dental, Pre- Vet, or 

Pre- Pharmacology Emphasis) 
B.S. Biological Science 

B.S. Biological Science 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.S. Biological Science 

(Pre-Med, Pre-Dental, Pre-Vet, or 

Pre-Pharmacology Emphasis) 
B.S. Biological Science 

(Environmental Science/Biodiversity Emphasis) 
B.S. Chemistry 

B.S. Chemistry 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 



BCHS 
BCMS 



BIOS 
BSST 

BMDS 



BEBS 

CHYS 
CHST 



26 



Academic Programs 



B.S. 


Chemistry 




(Pre-Med, Pre-Dental, Pre- Vet, or 




Pre- Pharmacology Emphasis) 


B.S. 


Health Science 


B.S. 


Mathematics 


B.S. 


Mathematics Education 




(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12| 


B.S. 


Medical Technology 


B.S. 


Mathematics/Science Education 




(Teacher Licensure, Grades K-8) 



CMOS 



HSCS 

MATS 

MAST 

MEDS 
MSST 



HELEN DEVOS COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE 

B.S. Health Education 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 
B.S. Health Science (Fitness/Wellness Emphasis) 

B.S. Physical Education 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 
B.S. Physical Education 

(Non-licensure, Recreation Emphasis) 

TEACHING AND LEARNING 

B.S. Human Development 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades K-8) 
B.S. Human Development 

(Non-licensure, Business Emphasis) 
B.S. Special Education 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 
B.S. Special Education 

(Non-licensure, Support Services Emphasis) 



HLST 

HEWS 
PEST 

PERS 



HDST 
HDBS 
SEST 
SESS 



The Helen DeVos College of Education and other academic depart- 
ments cooperate to offer the following programs of study. These pro- 
grams are fully described in this catalog under the department offering 
the specialty area: 



B.S. History (Economics Emphasis, 

^Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.S. History (Political Science Emphasis, 

Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.S. Business (Business Education, Corporate 

Training, Teacher Licensure in Business, 

Grades 7-12) 
B.S. Business (Business Education, 

Corporate Training, Teacher Licensure in 

Business Technology, Grades 7-12) 



HEST 
HPST 
BAST 

BDST 



Academic Progr-\ms 27 



B.A. English 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.A. French 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-l2| 
B.x\. Spanish 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.M.E. Music Education > Instrumental, 

Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 
B.M.E. Music Education jVocal 'General, 

Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 
B.S. Biological Science 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-121 
B.S. Chemistr\^ 

iTeacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.S. Mathematics Education 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.S. Mathematics/Science Education 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades K-8) 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

B.A. Music (Performance Emphasis) 

B.A. Music (Church Music Emphasis) 

B.M.E. Music Education (Vocal/General, 

Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 
B.M.E. Music Education i Instrumental, 

Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 

SCHOOL OF RELIGION 
CHRISTL\N MINISTRIES 



B.A. 


Christian Education 


B.S. 


Christian Education 


B.A. 


Intercultural Studies 


B.A. 


Pastoral Ministr\' 


B.S. 


Pastoral Ministr)^ 


B.A. 


Youth Ministry 


B.S. 


Youth Ministry 



THEOLOGY 

B.A. Bible and Theolog)^ (Pastoral Studies Emphasis^ 

B.A. Bible and Theology^ 

(Pre-graduate Studies Emphasis) 

EXTERNAL STUDIES 

B.A. Christian Ministry' 

B.S. Christian Ministr)' 

B.C.AL Christian Ministry' (Charlotte Center^ 



ENAT 

FR.\T 

SPAT 

MIET 

MUET 

BSST 

CHST 

NL\ST 

MSST 



MUSA 
MUCA 

MUET 

MIET 



CEDA 

CEDS 

ISPA 

PASA 

PASS 

YCEA 

YCES 

BBPA 
BBTA 



MIXA 
MINS 
BCM 



28 Academic Programs 

GENERAL CURRICULAR INFORMATION 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE 

The Lee University General Education Core has been designed to pre- 
pare Lee graduates to take their place in a rapidly changing world which is 
both technologically complex and culturally diverse. Lee has developed a 
program which is intended to ground students in their faith while intro- 
ducing them to the interrelatedness of the humanities, the complexity of 
contemporary society, the wonder of the natural world, and the diversity 
of culture. 

Experiences in the General Education Core will guide students toward 
the following goals: 

Developing Biblical Faith and Lifestyle (18 hours) 

• BIB 110 - Message of the New Testament (3) 

• BIB 11 1 - Message of the Old Testament (3| 

• THE 230 - Christian Thought (3) 

• THE 331 - Christian Ethics (3) 

• BIB 334 - Foundations for Christian Discipleship (3) 

• An integrative capstone course in the major or a religion elective 
chosen from a list designated by the student's major department (3) 

Each full-time student must be enrolled in a religion course every 
semester until the total requirement is completed. If a student has 
taken a religion course during summer school, this may be applied to a 
following semester. 

Acquiring Fundamental Academic Skills (10-14 hours) 

• GST 101 - Gateway to University Success (2) 

• CIS 100 - Computer Literacy and Applications (2) 

• MAT 101 - Contemporary Mathematics (3) 

Other mathematics options include any higher mathematics class 
except MAT 201 and MAT 202. Placement in higher mathematics 
classes is by examination. 

• ENG 105 - College Writing Workshop (4| 

Entry-level course for students with ACT English scores between 14 
and 19 or SAT verbal scores between 370 and 470. Students who suc- 
cessfully complete ENG 105 (grade of "C" or above) will also take 
ENG 110. 

• ENG 106 - College Writing (3| 

Entry-kvel course for students with ACT English scores between 20 
and 28 or SAT verbal scores between 490 and 630. Students who 
sucessfully complete ENG 106 (grade of "C or above) will also take 
ENG 110. 

• ENG 1 10 - Rhetoric and Research (3| 

Entry-level course for students with ACT English scores of at least 29 
or SAT verbal scores of at least 660. Students placed in ENG 110 are 



Academic Programs 29 



required to take only one composition course. A grade of C or better is 
required for successful completion of this course. 

Exploring the Humanities (12 hours) 

• HUM 201 - Foundations of Western Culture (3) 

• HUM 202 - The Rise of Europe (3) 

• HUM 301 - Foundations of the Modern World |3| 

• HUM 302 - Twentieth Century Western Culture (3) 

As an option to the humanities core, students may take the following 

(16 hours): 

Literature (choose 2 courses) (4) 

ENG 21 1 - Masterpieces of the Western World I 

ENG 212 - Masterpieces of the Western World II 

ENG 213 - Masterpieces of the Western World HI 
History (6) 

HIS 1 1 1 - Survey of Western Civilization 

HIS 1 12 - Survey of Western Civilization 
Fine Arts (6) 

ART 1 1 1 - Art Appreciation 

DRA 1 1 1 - Drama Appreciation 

MUS 133 - Music Survey or MUS 134 Introduction to Music Lit. 

Understanding Contemporary Society (9 hours) 

• HIS 212 - Recent American History and Government (3) 
Choose two of the following: (6) 

• PSY 200 - Understanding Human Behavior 

• SOC 200 - Understanding Contemporary Society 

• ECO 200 - Understanding Economic Issues 

Respecting the Natural World (5 hours) 

• Lab Science (4) 

Students may select any lab science course, but the following courses 
are recommended for non-science majors: 

• BIO 103 - Human Biology 

• BIO 104 - Environmental Science 

• BIO 123 - Ornamental Horticulture 

• PHS 1 1 1 - Physical Science 

• AST 1 1 1 - Astromony 

• PED 100 - Healthy and Effective Lifestyles (1) 

Seeking a Global Perspective [5-10 hours, depending on degree program] 

Choose one of the following: 

• GST 200 - Global Perspective Seminar (1) 

• GST 201 - Global Perspective Seminar/ International Students (1) 



30 Academic Programs 



Choose one of the following: 

• GST 251 - Cross-Cultural Experience (1) 

• GST 252 - Cross-Cultural Experience (2) 

• GST 253 - Cross-Cultural Experience (3) 

Students need to complete only one hour of Cross-Cultural 
Experience for the General Core Requirement. One hour is given 
for all domestic experiences; two hours for international experi- 
ences; and three hours for full-semester, study-abroad programs. 

GST 200/201 must be completed before GST 251/252/253 

Students enrolled in Bachelor of Science programs 

• LIN 201 - Language and Culture (3| 

Students with the appropriate background in high school foreign 
language may take one semester of intermediate foreign language in 
lieu of Language and Culture. 
Students enrolled in Bachelor of Arts programs 

• Intermediate foreign language (6 hours) 

PRE 21 1 and 212 - Intermediate French 

GER 211 and 212 - Intermediate German 

GRE 311 and 312 - New Testament Greek 

SPA 2 1 1 and 2 1 2 - Intermediate Spanish 
Two years of high school foreign language, six hours of elementary 
foreign language, or proficiency demonstrated on the departmental 
foreign language examination are prerequisites for the intermediate- 
level courses in modern foreign languages. For students taking New 
Testament Greek, the first-year requirement is eight hours. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

By the beginning of the junior year, each student should select one sub- 
ject area as his or her major field of study (sometimes called the specialty 
area) and will complete not fewer than thirty (30) semester hours as his/her 
major area requirement. A minimum cumulative average of "C" (2.00) must 
be maintained in the major area (2.5 in teacher education programs). Each 
transfer student must earn at least 6 semester hours in his/her major area 
while in residence at Lee University; Business majors must earn 1 5 hours at 
Lee University, 6 at the upper level. Students desiring to apply transfer work 
or work done through correspondence or continuing education to a major 
program must^file an academic petition through the office of the dean of the 
school in which the major is offered. 

MINORS 

A minor consists of a minimum of eighteen hours in one discipline and 
is used to complement the student's major. Every student graduating from 
Lee University completes a minor in religion, but most majors allow enough 
flexibility for student's to select a second minor. For specific minor require- 



Academic Programs 31 

ments, check the Usting in the appropriate department. The university offers 
the following minors: 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

• Behavioral and Social Sciences: anthropology, counseling, history, 
philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, human services 

• Business: accounting, business, computer information systems 

• Communication and the Arts: communication, drama, art, 
drama ministry, telecommunications 

• Enghsh and Modern Foreign Languages: English, French, Spanish, 
linguistics. Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) 

• Natural Sciences and Mathematics: biological science, chemistry, 
mathematics, computer science 

HELEN DEVOS COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

• Health and Human Performance: physical education, fitness/ wellness 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

• Music 

SCHOOL OF RELIGION 

• Christian Ministries: Christian education, intercultural studies, 
youth ministry 

• Theology: religion, New Testament Greek 

GENERAL AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

GST 101. THE FRESHMAN SEMINAR: GATEWAY 

TO UNIVERSITY SUCCESS Two hours credit 

This course is designed to equip first-year students for success in the Christian universi- 
ty community. It will acquaint students with the academic, social, and critical thinking 
skills necessary to succeed in college. All first-time Lee students who have completed fewer 
than 16 credit hours of resident college work are required to take GST 101. 

GST 137. TECHNIQUES FOR TUTORS One hour credit 

A course designed to prepare tutors for the Academic Support Program by exploring the 
traits of effective tutors and the various facets of the tutorial process. Prerequisites: registra- 
tion with Academic Support Program as a tutor, GPA of 3.0 or higher in course desired to 
tutor, and two faculty recommendations. 

GST 199. RESIDENT ASSISTANT TRAINING SEMINAR One hour credit 

A seminar and in-service training to provide prospective Resident Assistants the neces- 
sary skills in order to effectively confront the variety of issues of campus life. 

GST 200. GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES SEMINAR One hour credit 

This seminar is intended to prepare students for cross-cultural travel and living by pro- 
viding a list of opportunities to do so and addressmg such issues as cultural differences and 
similarities, cross-cultural interaction and communication, cultural shock and adjustment, 
and basic language skills. 

GST 201. GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES SEMINAR FOR One hour credit 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

This seminar is intended to prepare international students for living in the United States 
by addressing such issues as cultural differences and similarities, cross-cultural interaction 
and communication, and cultural shock and adjustment. While completing their living expe- 
rience (GST 251), students will discuss their encounters. International students must com- 
plete the seminar within the first two years of residence in the United States. 



32 Academic Programs 



GST 25 1 . CROSS-CULTURAL EXPERIENCE One hour credit 

GST 252. CROSS-CULTURAL EXPERIENCE Two hours credit 

GST 253. CROSS-CULTURAL EXPERIENCE Three hours credit 

Participating in a cross-cultural experience including traveling, living and studying 
abroad; service learning in an ethnic neighborhood; or first-year residence in the United 
States for international students. Proposals for independently arranged experiences must be 
approved by the Global Perspectives Committee before enrollment in this course. 
International students may consider their encounter with American culture as their cross- 
cultural experience if previously approved by the Global Perspectives Committee. One hour 
credit will be awarded for all domestic experiences (GST 251); two hours credit for all inter- 
national experiences (GST 252); and three hours credit for involvement in a full-semester, 
study-abroad program (GST 253). Prerequisite: GST 200 or 201. 

ELECTIVES 

Subject to approval of the faculty advisor and to regulations requiring a 
minimum of 130 semester hours for graduation, remaining hours and cours- 
es needed for graduation may be selected from any in the Lee University cat- 
alog for which the student is qualified to register. 

ACADEMIC RESOURCES 

ACADEMIC ADVISING 

At Lee University we see academic advising as a support service, making 
available the best possible guidance tools to assist the student in making life 
choices which will be personally rewarding and fulfilling. 

After admission each student is assigned a faculty advisor in his/her 
major area of interest who assists in planning programs of study and in 
selecting specific courses that meet graduation requirements in the normal- 
ly prescribed sequence. Students with undeclared majors are assigned to spe- 
cially trained general advisors. Students are encouraged to meet with the 
advisor at least twice during the semester for planning sessions and preregis- 
tration approval. 

For questions about the advising process or to request reassignment to a 
new advisor, contact the Office of Academic Services. 

ACADEMIC SUPPORT PROGRAMS 

The Office of Academic Support Programs offers a variety of services 
designed to increase the opportunities students have to complete their col- 
lege education successfully. Eligibility is determined by a combination of 
academic need, documented disability, and other personal factors. 

The Academic Support Program coordinates the provision of reason- 
able accommodations for otherwise qualified students with disabilities, 
when these se'rvices are requested, in order to ensure access for these stu- 
dents to services, programs, and activities provided by Lee University. 
This program also provides support and assistance to students with acade- 
mic need and certain personal factors. 
TUTORIAL PROGRAM 

Tutors are provided free of charge for any student who is having difficul- 
ty with a class and requests help. Tutors are, in most cases, recommended 
by faculty members. 



Academic Programs 33 



Tutorial services are provided for any student needing academic assis- 
tance. Student tutors are screened and recommended by faculty members. 
After selection, tutors are trained and carefully supervised as they deliver 
services. All tutorial services are monitored and evaluated for effectiveness. 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES 

Lee University is committed to the provision of reasonable accom- 
modations for students with disabilities, as defined in Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Students who think they may qualify for these 
accommodations, should notify their instructor immediately. Students 
may also contact the Office of Academic Support Programs at 614-8182. 

LIBRARY 

The William G. Squires Library, which serves Lee University and the 
Church of God Theological Seminary, is housed in the Pentecostal Resource 
Center. This facility offers seating for 365, including individual study car- 
rels, open bookstacks, reading areas, group study and seminar rooms, audio 
and video rooms, a computer lab, and a chapel. 

An added feature of the building is the Dixon Pentecostal Research 
Center, which houses a comprehensive collection of materials pertaining to 
the Church of God and the Pentecostal/Charismatic movement. 

Students, faculty, alumni, and church and community members are 
served by a staff of eighteen and a student staff of about thirty-five. Services 
include telephone and in-person reference assistance; library instruction for 
classes; organizmg and providing access to a collection of more than 153,000 
volumes; 835 current periodicals in print format; 63,000 microforms; and 
mterlibrary loan access to 43 million titles. 

Electronic resources include the on-line catalog and automated circula- 
tion system, which provides the ability to search the local holdings and 
those of the Cleveland Public Library in the library, on the World Wide Web, 
or by modem. Membership in the Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) 
gives interlibrary loan access to 40 million titles. Electronic subscriptions 
via the Internet and CD-ROM give access to more than 1,300 periodical 
titles in full text as well as indexing to many others. The Internet is accessi- 
ble on workstations throughout the library. 

Library hours: 

Monday-Thursday 8:00 a.m. -12:00 midnight 

Friday 8:00 a.m.- 9:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

WRITING CENTER 

The Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages offers spe- 
cial assistance in composition and grammar through the Writing Center. 
Staffed by faculty members and trained peer instructors, the center offers 
assistance on four levels. Students with basic writing problems can find help 

Hal Bernard Dixon, ir ^ ^ ^ 



34 Academic Programs 



with composition, grammar and mechanics. Intermediate students are 
assisted in organization and in paragraph and theme development. More 
advanced students are aided in research techniques, documentation, and 
planning the long paper. Students may bring in creative works for evaluation 
and professional suggestions. The Writing Center also provides assistance 
for students whose native language is not English. 

The Writing Center is equipped with Gateway 2000 computers. Any 
Lee University student may use these facilities by making an appointment 
in the center. Tutorial sessions are conducted on a one-to-one basis, last for 
thirty minutes, and must be scheduled in advance. 

COMPUTER LABS 

The Lee University Academic Computer Lab, located in the Walker 
Memorial Building and managed by the Business Department, is a modern 
computer lab open to all students. All computers in the lab are IBM compat- 
ible using Windows 95 and are connected to a central server and the World 
Wide Web with Novell NetWare 5.0. There are dozens of software packages 
available for use including a large selection of popular productivity items 
like Microsoft Word, Access, PowerPoint, Excel, Office 2000, Internet 
Explorer, FoxPro, and SPSS. A wide variety of programming and other sys- 
tems development packages are also available for those who are more tech- 
nically inclined. Available hardware includes digital cameras, digital scan- 
ners, headsets for multimedia applications, and multimedia presentation 
systems. 

Three student computer labs can be found in the Paul Conn Student 
Union. Both of the labs located on the main floor have 12 new Gateway 
computers and a HP Laser Printer that is connected to the network and 
Internet with high speed connection. The Janet Rahamut Room, located on 
the first floor, is a computer lab reserved for commuter students. The lab 
includes 10 new Gateway Computers, an HP Laser Printer connected to the 
network and the Internet, a fax machine, and a copier. During peak use 
times, lab assistants are available in all three computer labs to help students 
solve technical problems. 

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

PROFICIENCY AND CLEP 

Students taking proficiency examinations will be required to present 
evidence th^t they have developed those abilities and aptitudes expected of 
students who have taken the course involved. When possible, this evidence 
should be in the form of recognized standardized tests and must be approved 
by the school dean and the Director of Academic Services. Upon passing the 
examination with a minimal grade of "B," the student may be given credit 
toward graduation provided this does not duplicate credit accounted for 
admission to Lee University and the course is acceptable in his/her curricu- 
lum. Proficiency examinations may not be taken to repeat coursework or be 



Academic Programs 35 



used in lieu of the "I" or "V" grades. In order to take a proficiency examina- 
tion, the student must be enrolled for other courses and may take the profi- 
ciency test only once. Credit earned through proficiency and advanced place- 
ment shall be recorded with a grade of "F" and will not affect the student's 
grade pomt average. 

Transcripts containing college credits acquired through USAFI courses 
and the College Level Examination Program (CLEP tests) or through colleges 
in the various branches of the military should be submitted at the time of 
the application. Lee University accepts the CLEP subject tests only. The 
transcript will be reviewed to determine the number of hours and specific 
courses acceptable. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT POLICY 
AP CREDITS AWARDED 



APTEST 


SCORE 


COURSE/CREDIT HOURS AWARDED 


Biology 


3 


BIO 103 (4) 


4,5 


BIO 111, 112(4,4) 


Calculus AB 


3 


MAT 271 |4) 


4,5 


MAT 271, 272 (4, 4) 


Calculus BC 


3 


MAT 271, 272 (4, 4) 


4,5 


MAT271,272,363(4, 4, 4) 


Chemistry 


3 


CHY111(4) 


4,5 


CHYIU, 112(4,4) 


Computer Science A 


3-5 


CIS 201 (3) 


Computer Science AB 


3-5 


CIS 202 (3) 


Economics - Macro 


3-5 


ECO 31 1(3) 


Economics-Micro 


3-5 


ECO 312 (3) 


English Lang./Comp. 


3 


ENG 106 (3) 


4,5 


ENG106, 110(3,3) 


English Lit./ Comp. 


3 


ENG 106 (31 


4,5 


ENG106, HUM201 (3,3) 


Environmental Science 


3-5 


BIO 104 (4) 


European History 


3 


HIS 111 (3) 


4,5 


HIS 111, 112(3,3) 


French Language 


3 


FRE211 (3) 


4,5 


FRE211,212(3, 3) 



36 



Academic Programs 



French Literature 


3 


PRE 21 1(3) 


4,5 


PRE 21 1,212 (3, 3) 


German Language 


3 
4,5 


GER211(3) 

GER 21 1,212 (3, 3) 


Government and Politics 
(Comparative) 


3-5 


POL 345 (3) 


Government and Politics 
(United States) 


3-5 


POL 255 (3) 


Music Theory 


4,5 


MUS 141 (3) 


Physics B 


3 


PHY 211 (4) 


4,5 


PHY 21 1,212 (4, 4) 


Physics C 
Psychology 


3 


PHY 281 (4) 


4,5 


PHY 281, 282 (4, 4) 


3 


PSY200(3) 


Spanish 


3 


SPA 211 (3) 


4,5 


SPA211,212(3,3) 


U.S. History 


3 


HIS 211 (3) 


4-5 


HIS 211, 212 (3, 3) 



REQUIRED OR PERMITTED LOADS 

The minimum academic load for classification as a full-time student is 
12 semester hours. For a class load beyond 17 hours, there is an additional 
tuition charge, and the schedule requires the approval of the school dean. 
This approval is granted only on the basis of superior academic achieve- 
ment. The maximum course load is 19 hours. This course load for summer 
is seven hours. 

To qualify for the Honor Scholarship for the sophomore year a student 
must complete 30 hours the first year, including summer school. 

A student on academic probation will normally register for 12 hours. 
Probationary students cannot enroll for more than 14 hours without the 
special pern\ission of the Director of Academic Services. 

REGISTRATION 

It is important that students register during the stated registration peri- 
ods. Students who fail to complete registration (including financial arrange- 
ments) by the first day of classes will be charged a late registration fee. 
Registration is not complete until the student has made arrangements for 
payment of the semester charges at the Business Office. Until such settle- 



Academic Programs 37 



ment has been made, the student is not entitled to participate in any class or 
other activities at the university. 

Change in credit status for any course (from audit to credit or from cred- 
it to audit) must be done by the last day to register. 

CHANGING A SCHEDULE 

Adding or dropping courses and changing from credit to audit or audit 
to credit may be accomplished only between registration and the final date 
to add a course listed in the university calendar. Change of Schedule forms 
must be delivered to the Registrar within 48 hours after securing the appro- 
priate signatures. 

If the student drops a course after the final date to add a course and prior 
to the eleventh week of the semester, he/she will receive a "W" grade for the 
course. The last day to drop a course is published in the university calendar. 

There is a five-dollar charge per change for all schedule changes begin- 
ning with the first day of classes. The tuition refund policy for dropping 
courses after classes have begun is explained under Financial Information. 

WITHDRAWING FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

Students may withdraw from the university at any time beginning the 
first day of classes until the final day of classes for the semester. 
Withdrawals will not be processed after final exams have begun. Following 
is the procedure: 

1 . All students wishing to withdraw from the university must complete 
an exit interview in the Student Financial Aid Office. The student will 
be given a form indicating that the exit interview has taken place. 

2. The Financial Aid Exit Interview form and the student's current Univer- 
sity I.D. card must be presented in the Student Life Office. The student 
will be given a Permission to Withdraw Request form to complete. 

3. The Vice President for Student Life must approve the withdrawal 
request. Upon approval, the Registrar's Office, the Business Office 
and the residence director will be notified. 

Withdrawn students will not be allowed to continue on the meal plan 
or remain in campus housmg and should make arrangements to move 
immediately upon withdrawal. Withdrawn students will be assigned the 
grade of "W" for all courses. 

The Business Office will issue a final statement of the student's 
account. See the Financial Information section of this catalog for pro rata 
billing information. 

Students who have preregistered and early billed but decide not to 
return to school should contact the Business Office to clear their accounts. 
No action is required for preregistered students who did not early bill and 
decide not to return to school. 



38 Academic Programs 



CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Regular attendance is essential to realize the purposes and objectives of 
the student's academic program. Each student is responsible to the teacher 
for class attendance and participation. Specific requirements for each course 
will be determined by the instructor and announced to the class during the 
first week of each semester. 

The teacher may develop a system by which grade reduction can be 
made, not to exceed one letter grade per semester based on absence alone. 
Absences because of university-related events will be a part of the teacher's 
regular absence policy. It will be the student's responsibility to contact the 
teacher in case of such absence and to do whatever reasonable make-up 
work may be required to keep the student current with the class progress. 

Sponsors of off-campus activities should use only students who are 
capable of maintaining their regular classwork and participating in extra- 
curricular activities. It is the sponsor's responsibility to supply the teachers 
with a list of all students participating in extracurricular events with all per- 
tinent details, including verification that the event has been officially 
approved by the university. This notification should be supplied to the 
teachers well in advance of the scheduled event. 

It is generally assumed that students who engage in official activities off 
campus are involved in the educational process. For this reason, teachers are 
encouraged to cooperate with these efforts. However, the teacher is at no 
time to give unearned credit in order to pass a student because of his/her 
participation in any university-related activity. 

GRADES 

Grades and quality points are assigned and recorded as follows: "A," 
Excellent, four quality points per semester hour; "B," Good, three quality 
points per semester hour; "C," Average, two quality points per semester 
hour; "D," Passing, one quality point per semester hour; "¥," Failure, no 
quality points awarded. "I" indicates the student's work is incomplete. The 
grade becomes "F" if the work is not completed by the end of the following 
semester or unless a written extension has been approved by the Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs. 

A grade of "W" is assigned to a student who, for any reason, officially 
withdraws from the university or is dropped from a course at any time after 
the last day to drop. This "W" is assigned without academic penalty to the 
student. 

A grade change must be requested in writing by the student and approved 
by the instructor. Grade changes must be made within one semester. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 

A schedule for final semester examinations is prepared by the Vice 
President for Academic Affairs and is listed in the schedule of classes each 
semester. Students and teachers must adhere to this schedule. No exams are 
to be given other than at the time designated in the published schedule. 



Academic Programs 39 

ACADEMIC STANDING 

Academic standing is computed by dividing the total number of quality 
points by the total hours attempted by a student. Continuance and promo- 
tion from one academic classification to another is based on completion of 
the following number of hours: 

Freshman 0-29 

Sophomore 30-59 

Junior 60-89 

Senior 90-130 

ACADEMIC PROBATION 

To graduate from Lee University a student must have a minimum grade 
point average of 2.0 overall, as v^ell as a 2.0, or higher if specified, in the major. 
In order to continue in residence at Lee, students must earn a minimum grade 
point average in accordance w^ith the following scale of attempted hours: 

Hours attempted Grade Point Average Required 

0-29 1.5 

30-59 1.7 

60-89 1.9 

90-130 2.0 

Any student failing to achieve this average will be placed on academic 
probation. This probation may be removed during the rext semester by 
bringing the grade point average up to the required standard. Students who 
achieve the required cumulative grade point average for the hours attempted 
are considered to be in good standing. Those who fail to achieve the required 
average will be subject to the following action: 

1. A student on academic probation is limited to 12-14 credit hours 
each semester. 

2. All students on academic probation are reviewed by the Admissions 
and Retention Committee. This committee will grant an extension 
to probation only when a student's record demonstrates that such an 
extension would benefit the student in removing the probation and 
progressing toward graduation. 

3. No student will be continued on probation more than two consecu- 
tive semesters, unless approved by the Admissions and Retention 
Committee. 

4. A student who has been authorized by the Admissions and Retention 
Committee to continue on probation may be required to register for 
a specified class schedule. 

ACADEMIC SUSPENSION 

A student will be subject to academic dismissal after it becomes evident 
to the Admissions and Retention Committee that he/she lacks the necessary 
academic qualifications or discipline. Any student who is dismissed for acade- 
mic reasons is ineligible for readmission until after one full semester. The 



40 Academic Programs 



summer sessions are not considered a semester. Students who are suspended 
have the right to appeal for reentry if they beheve there are vahd extenuating 
circumstances responsible for their poor academic performance. Appeals 
should be put in writing and forwarded to the Chairman of the Admissions 
and Retention Committee for review by the committee. 

EXTERNAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

Lee University offers an External Studies Program, which is an under- 
graduate program designed to utihze non-traditional methods of study. Its 
basic purpose is to prepare Christian workers in the areas of Bible, theolo- 
gy, pastoral studies. Christian education, and Urban Ministries. 

The program is especially designed for persons who cannot pursue a 
traditional resident college program. A bachelor's degree may be earned 
from Lee University through the Department of External Studies . 

Students pursuing traditional resident degrees at Lee University 
may participate in the External Studies Program according to the follow- 
ing provisions: 

A. No full-time student may be concurrently enrolled in External 
Studies and classroom studies. 

B. All summer External Studies courses must be completed by Sep- 
tember 11 of each academic year if the student is to be a full- 
time resident student in the fall. 

C. All independent study courses applied to the major must be 
approved by the department chairperson in the department in 
which that course would normally be taken. 

D. No student is eligible for more than a maximum 32 hours 
credit through independent studies, proficiency, and advanced 
placement. 

E. The academic policy of the university requires that the last 30 
hours be completed in residence. AJl students who have complet- 
ed 90 semester hours toward a residence degree program and who 
seek to enroll in External Studies between semesters will be limit- 
ed to a maximum of one Extemal Studies course at a time. This 
requires a recommendation from the student's advisor and special 
approval from the school dean. Seniors taking Extemal Studies 
courses must observe the September 10 deadline and may not be 
concurrently enrolled in Extemal Studies and classroom studies. 

Information related to the Extemal Studies Program may be obtained by 
writing to the Department of Extemal Studies, 100 8th Street, Cleveland, 
Tennessee 3 73 1 1 -2235 . 

EVALUATION OF FOREIGN CREDENTIALS 

Lee University encourages applications from international students 
who have attended other institutions. Normally the university is able to 
evaluate these credentials for possible transfer of credit in a timely and 



Academic Programs 41 



accurate manner. However, in some cases the nature of the curriculum 
and/or the method of recording academic work makes it impossible for the 
university to accurately evaluate foreign credentials. In such cases the stu- 
dent will be asked to submit his/her credentials (at the student's expense) 
to an external evaluating agency for professional evaluation. The Registrar 
will make this determination and refer the student to the appropriate pro- 
fessional service. 

COURSE SUBSTITUTIONS 

Any substitutions for, changes in, or exceptions to courses which are 
required for the granting of a degree from Lee University must be recom- 
mended by the department chair and approved by the dean of the college or 
school in which the course is offered. 

REPEATING A COURSE 

When a student elects to repeat a course, only the grade received for the 
repeat will be counted in the computation of the cumulative grade point 
average. This is true even if the second grade is lower than the first. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF CREDIT 

A transcript of credits will be issued by the Office of Student 
Records upon written request of the student. An official transcript will 
be sent to another institution or other authorized person or agency. No 
transcript will be furnished until all accounts have been satisfactorily 
settled. Transcript copies require prepayment of $5.00. 

CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT RECORDS 

In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
of 1974, Lee University students have the right to review, inspect, and 
challenge the accuracy of information kept in a cumulative file by the 
university unless the student waives the right. The law further ensures 
that records cannot be released except in emergency situations without 
the written consent of the student other than the following: 

1 . to other school officials, including faculty within the educational in- 
stitution who have legitimate educational interest; 

2. to officials of other schools in which the student intends to enroll, 
upon condition that the student be notified of the transfer, receives a 
copy of the record if desired, and has an opportunity for a hearing to 
challenge the content of the record; 

3. to authorized representatives of (1) the Comptroller General of the 
United States, (2) the Secretary of Education, (3) an administrative 
head of an educational agency or (4) state educational authorities; 

4. in connection with a student's application for, and receipt of, finan- 
cial aid; and 

5. in cases of information classified as "directory information." The 
following categories of information have been designated by the 



42 Academic Programs 

university as directory information: name, address, telephone listing, 
e-mail address, date and place of birth, major field of study, participa- 
tion in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of 
members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards 
received, and the most recent previous educational institution attend- 
ed by the student. If the student does not wish such information 
released without consent, the student should notify the Office of 
Student Records prior to the first day of classes each semester. 

Questions concerning this law and the university's policy concerning 
release of academic information may be directed to the Director of 
Student Records. 

GRADUATION 

TERMS OF GRADUATION 

In order to graduate from Lee University the applicant must meet the 
conditions of graduation listed below on the dates announced in the univer- 
sity calendar. 

1. A minimum of 130 semester hours credit with a minimum GPA of 
2.0 (2.5 for teacher education). 

2. The satisfactory completion of all General Education and Religion 
Core requirements. 

3. The admission to and satisfactory completion of a departmental 
major with a minimum GPA of 2.0 (2.5 for teacher education). 

4. The removal of all incompletes and completion of all correspon- 
dence, proficiency credit, or independent study credits (in required 
areas) in compliance with the published deadlines. 

5. The completion of the required academic assessment tests. 

6. The completion of the National Teachers Examination by educa- 
tion students. 

7. The completion of the final 30 hours of credit in residence at Lee 
University. 

8. The filing of an application for graduation with the school dean in 
compliance with the published deadlines. 

Because of the transitional nature of university curricula, a number of 
changes in the graduation requirements may take place during one's tenure 
in college. The purpose of such changes is to improve the university pro- 
grams; consequently, it is expected that students will adapt their course plan- 
ning to new graduation requirements established during the course of their 
training. The curriculum changes introduced in the course of the student's 
enrollment will be included in the student's curriculum, provided that this 
inclusion does not increase the number of hours required for graduation. 

Students who complete the requirements of more than one program of 
study will have verification of each major program on the official transcript. 
Only one diploma is awarded upon graduation. 



Academic Programs 43 



HONOR GRADUATES 

Students who achieve certain academic distinctions through earned 
grade point averages will be graduated upon recommendation of the faculty 
with institutional honors. The following standards apply: 3.4 with honor 
(Cum Laude), 3.7 with high honor (Magna Cum Laude), 3.9 with the highest 
honor (Summa Cum Laude). These averages are computed only at the close 
of the penultimate semester. 

The Lee University faculty nominates the recipient of the F.J. Lee 
Award, which is given to the "most outstanding senior"; the Zeno C. Tharp 
Award, which is given to the senior "most likely to make the greatest contri- 
bution to the Church of God"; and the Charles Paul Conn Award, which is 
given to the senior who demonstrates the greatest promise of achievement in 
graduate/professional studies after graduating from Lee University. 

Departmental awards and honors are generally confirmed by the faculty 
and presented to the students at an annual Honors Day award program. 

AWARDING DIPLOMAS 

Students who have completed all academic requirements and fulfilled 
all other university requirements will receive their diplomas at the time of 
graduation. 

Deficiencies which cause a diploma to be held must be corrected within 
thirty days following the date of commencement. If the deficiency is not 
removed by the deadline, the diploma will be redated reflecting the next 
graduation date following the removal of the deficiency. 

ADMISSION TO SECOND DEGREE PROGRAM 

Normally students who graduate from Lee University may receive only 
one degree and one diploma regardless of how many major programs of 
study are completed. 

Special exception may be made for Lee alumni who wish to return to the 
university to complete a second program of studies if the former student sat- 
isfies the following minimum requirements: 1) To be admitted as a second- 
degree-seeking student, the graduate must have been away from the universi- 
ty for a minimum of three years after having completed the previous degree; 
2) The major of the desired second degree must be in a program of studies 
that is distinctively different from the previous program of studies. It must be 
in a different discipline, and the bulk of the required courses for the major 
must be different from those required by the previous program of studies; 3) 
To qualify for the second degree a minimum of forty-five additional semester 
hours of credit must be eamed. 

STUDENT GRIEVANCES AND APPEALS 

Lee University is committed to a policy of responsiveness to students 
who express that actions and decisions of university personnel are inappro- 
priate and detrimental. 



44 Academic Programs 

A student grievance or complaint should be discussed with the univer- 
sity employee responsible for the specific decision or having authority for 
the condition in the institution giving rise to the complaint. If the discus- 
sion does not resolve the issue, the student should submit a signed written 
complaint stating the facts as perceived and the requested action or change 
of decision. The written complaint may be submitted to the original 
employee and/or to the employee's supervisor. Each supervisor is commit- 
ted to assist in resolving problems and complaints in accordance with pro- 
fessional standards. These standards include respect for differences in view- 
point; protection of the right of students to seek clarification of policy or 
changes in policy; and delivery of satisfactory service in accordance with 
stated program objectives. 

Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate respect in both oral 
and written complaints. When a member of the faculty, administration, or 
staff renders a decision that is in accordance with institutional policy, the 
student should recognize that an appeal for exceptions to policy and recom- 
mendations for changes in policy involve privileges that usually exceed the 
authority of a given employee. 

SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

DIRECTED STUDIES 

PURPOSE OF A DIRECTED STUDIES PROGRAM 

Directed study should enrich the program of the above-average student 
by allowing him/her to pursue an area of specific interest. 

The opportunity to be involved in a directed study should foster initia- 
tive, resourcefulness, and creativity. 

INITIATION OF DIRECTED STUDIES 

A directed study should be generated by the interest of the student. A 
student should indicate to a faculty member his/her interest in doing a 
directed study in a specific area. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATING ENf A DIRECTED STUDY 

1 A student must have a minimum overall grade point average 
of 2.5. 

2. He/she must have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in his/her 
major field. 

3. He/she must be at least a junior at the time he/she registers for the 
study. 

4. Each student must be approved by a faculty member, his/her advi- 
sor, and the head of the department in which he/she wishes to con- 
duct the study. A special form for this purpose may be obtained in 
the office of the school dean. 



I 



Academic Programs 45 



SUPERVISION OF THE STUDY 

1 . The study will be conducted under the supervision of a committee 
consisting of the following members: a faculty member who will 
serve as a supervisor, the chairperson of the department in which 
the course is offered, and one other faculty person. 

2. The number of directed studies supervised by any one faculty mem- 
ber will not exceed one per semester. 

RESTRICTIONS 

1. A student may take no more than three hours of directed studies 
during his/her junior year and no more than six hours during 
his/her senior year. 

2. Directed studies may be conducted only in the major or minor field. 
Students acquiring teacher certification may conduct a study in 
either education or their field of emphasis. 

3. A student may apply for and complete a directed study only during 
the regular registration period. 

4. Courses offered by the External Studies Program may not be taken 
by directed study. 

5. Students may not take a directed study course which is offered dur- 
ing the academic semester. 

REQUIREMENTS OF STUDY 

1 . The student must meet with his/her committee regularly at times 
designated by the faculty supervisor. 

2. The student must submit to each committee member a written pre- 
sentation of the study. 

GRADING 

The grading of the directed study will be a committee endeavor with 
the faculty supervisor making the final decision 

OFF'CAMPUS STUDY PROGRAMS 
UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS 

• Semester in Europe — The Lee University Semester in Europe pro- 
gram presently provides cross-cultural experiences for students who are 
interested in studying in England or Germany. Students may study in 
Cambridge, England, during the spring semester, or spend a summer 
semester in Rudersberg, Germany. Both programs are open to any major, 
but applicants must have at least a 2.8 GPA. As part of these programs, 
students travel to various cultural, historic, and religious sites in Europe. 
Plays, concerts, and interesting lectures add a rich dimension to the lives 
of the students who participate. 

• Spring Break Israel Study Tour — The School of Religion offers a 
study tour to Israel every spring semester during the spring break. The 
study tour provides an opportunity for students to experience the land of 



46 Academic Programs 



the Bible. The trip to Israel is preceded by weekly lectures that review 
the major contours of biblical history and geography. The weekly lec- 
tures culminate in a 10-12 day tour that visits the major sites of biblical 
events. Sites related to the life and ministry of Jesus Christ are given pri- 
ority, but places of significance in both the Old Testament and the New 
Testament are visited. The Israel Study Tour may be taken for university 
credit by registering for the tour in the School of Religion during the fall 
semester and enrolling in BIB 398: Historical Geography and Archaeology 
of the Bible during the spring semester. A similar program is also offered 
during the summer. 

• Washington DC Practicum in Political Science—During spring 
break, students interested in a political science major have the opportuni- 
ty to travel to Washington DC for an intensive look at US history, policy 
and government. The trip is sponsored by the Department of Behavioral 
and Social Sciences. 

• Israel Education Trip — The May session of summer school offers an 
opportunity for education majors to travel to Israel. The Israel Education 
Trip is sponsored by the Helen DeVos College of Education and offers stu- 
dents a unique opportunity to learn about Israeli education systems. An 
emphasis is placed on the area of special education. As students compare 
Israeli and American instructional techniques, they have many opportu- 
nities to interact with local children. 

• England/Scotland/Ireland Study Tour — Each May, Lee University 
offers an intensive study tour of England, Scotland and Ireland. Students 
may earn up to six hours of upper-division credit in Political Science and 
History while visiting sites pertinent to topics under discussion. Special 
emphasis is placed on the histories of Medieval and Roman Britain and 
the development of the British parliamentary system. The program is 
open to all Lee University students regardless of major. 

• Summer Study in Russia — Students majoring in Business or 
Education may apply for this trip which offers an opportunity to learn 
about educational systems and business philosophies in Russia. The 
group travels to Russia during the May term of summer school. The trip 
is co-sponsored by the Helen DeVos College of Education and the 
Department of Business. 

• Southwest-Native American Tour — Priority for this trip is given to 
Human Development and Physical Education majors. The group will 
spend the May term of summer school on a Navajo Indian Reservation 
(three weeks). The first week will be spent working with school children. 
Students will do service projects during the second week. The final week 
will be spent visiting other reservations and the many natural wonders in 
New Mexico and Arizona, including the Grand Canyon. The trip is co- 
sponsored by the Helen DeVos College of Education and the Department 
of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 



t 



Academic Programs 47 

• Communication &. Arts Study Tour— The tour is designed for 
Communication majors who want exposure to the international media. 
Students take six hours of upper-division communication courses and 
earn cross-cultural experience credit. The first two weeks of the May 
term of summer school are spent taking courses on-campus. Once in 
Europe, students visit several major media outlets in London, Paris and 
Munich. The trip is sponsored by the Department of Communication 
and the Arts. 

• Study in France — Students interested in the French language and 
culture may spend six weeks in France in June and July. Beginning with a 
10-day home stay with a French family in Paris, students then travel to 
Normandy where they study at the Universite de Caen in an intensive 
program of French as a second language. While in Normandy, they stay 
in a Christian facility near the university. Students can earn six hours of 
upper-division French credit as well as two hours of cross-cultural experi- 
ence for this trip. 

• Business Internship in Paraguay — Business majors with a GPA of at 
least 2.5 may apply. In addition to six hours of upper-level business cours- 
es, students serve as interns in various Paraguayan businesses. Students 
live with host families so they have a unique opportunity to learn about 
the Paraguayan culture and way of life. Excursions to neighboring South 
American countries truly make this a once-in-a-lifetime trip. 

• Summer New England Study Tour — The program, scheduled for the 
May term of summer school, consists of two weeks in the classroom at 
Lee University and two weeks traveling in the New England region. In 
New England, the group has the opportunity to visit historical, cultural, 
and literary sites in New Bedford, Plymouth, Boston, Salem, Concord, and 
Amherst, Massachusetts. Through this four-week experience students 
may earn up to six hours of credit in a combination of history, literature, 
and humanities courses. 

• Summer of Study Medical Missions — Each summer students major- 
ing in pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, and pre-pharmacology participate in a 
Summer of Study Medical Mission (SOS) which includes medical service 
in third-world clinics. Medical doctors, usually Lee alumni, accompany 
the team and direct the medical procedures. With a strong evangelistic 
emphasis, the SOS program gives students practical experience while 
they earn 12 hours credit in parasitology, medical entomology, and tropi- 
cal medicine. 

• Summer in Ukraine — The Helen DeVos College of Education spon- 
sors this trip, but it is open to any major. Students live in host homes 
and have a unique opportunity to experience the Ukrainian culture as 
they earn credits in education or health and study the Russian language. 

• Middle East Study Tour — During June, students have the opportuni- 
ty to travel to the Middle East. This trip, sponsored by the Department of 
Behavioral and Social Sciences, is open to all majors and is a great option 



48 Academic Programs 



for students interested in history or Bible/Theology. Students visit several 
v^ell-known historical sites in the Middle East, but spend most of their 
time "off the beaten path", studying the history and culture of a region 
that played a large role in shaping the culture of the rest of the world. 

• Summer Study 8k Teaching in China — The trip offers students an 
opportunity to travel to China and teach English. It is not reserved for 
education or English majors: anyone can apply. Students have a rare 
opportunity to learn about Chinese culture from the inside out, and 
excursions to well-known sites in Chinese/world history enhance the 
experience. 

• Summer Spanish Institute — Each summer Lee University students 
have the opportunity to spend five weeks in Ecuador, studying Spanish 
while immersed in Latin American culture. Students may complete their 
Intermediate Spanish language requirement through this experience, or 
they may earn upper-division credit toward a Spanish minor or a Modern 
Foreign Languages major. They spend several hours each day in the class- 
room with a Lee University teacher, but they also have structured inter- 
action with native speakers and frequent trips to places of interest 
throughout Ecuador. 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS 

• The American Studies Program — This program is sponsored by the 
Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and provides an 
exciting opportunity for juniors and seniors to make Washington, D.C., their 
classroom for one semester. Students earn 16 hours credit while participat- 
ing in internships individually designed, based on the student's interests 
and major. In addition, students are involved in public policy seminars 
which are based on the current political agenda. Applicants must have a 
2.75 cumulative GPA or higher and have successfully completed a mini- 
mum of one semester in American Government. Applications for the pro- 
grams are due by mid-March for the fall semester and mid-September for the 
spring term. 

• China Studies Program — Students interested in China will have the 
opportunity to engage this intriguing country from the inside. Jointly spon- 
sored by Lee University and the Council for Christian Colleges and 
Universities, the semester will include study of the Chinese language, geogra- 
phy and history, religion and culture, and China's modern development. 
Participants will travel throughout China to such places as Beijing, Shanghai, 
Xi'an, and the Guangzhou/Hong Kong region. They will have ample opportu- 
nity to interact with Chinese faculty and students on the campus of the host 
university and with students of English whom they will assist as conversa- 
tion partners. As with the other semester programs, there will be 16 semester 
credit hours for participants in the China Studies Program. 



Academic Programs 49 

• Latin American Studies Program — Lee University students are given 
the opportunity to discover firsthand the richness of the Latin American cul- 
ture through a unique Hving-leaming semester abroad — the Latin American 
Studies Program sponsored by the CCCU. To apply for the program, students 
must be full-time juniors or seniors with a 2.75 or higher GPA and have at 
least one year equivalency of college-level Spanish. The program is based in 
Costa Rica but allows for three weeks of travel to other countries in Latin 
America. Students may participate during the fall or spring semester. 

• Los Angeles Film Studies Center — Sponsored by the CCCU, the Los 
Angeles Film Studies Center prepares students to serve with professional 
skill and Christian integrity in the film industry, including both the creative 
and business aspects. Lee University juniors and seniors with 2.75 or higher 
GPA's are qualified to apply to the program. The program, conveniently 
located in the Hollywood area, is designed to provide for a supportive 
Christian community with all persons working toward the goal of quality 
learning, training, and research in a setting of Christian nurture. Programs 
are held each semester. 

• Middle East Studies Program — Cairo, Egypt, is the setting for the 
Middle East Studies Program sponsored by the CCCU. Seminar courses 
dealing with topics unique to this region, conversational Arabic, and 
community service projects give students exceptional opportunities for 
learning and serving. Two weeks of travel in Israel is also included in the 
program schedule. Applicants must be juniors or seniors with a minimum 
2.75 GPA. This program is offered both fall and spring. 

• Russian Studies Program — This program, sponsored by the CCCU, 
makes it possible to experience Russia firsthand and become acquainted 
with the citizens on a personal basis. Through travel, learning the Russian 
language, studying the literature, current issues, events, and watching the 
changing impact of political and economic developments, participants will 
begin to become familiar with the forces involved in shaping Russia of 
tomorrow. More importantly, they will witness how the Holy Spirit is at 
work building His Church in another part of the world. Students reside with 
a Russian family during four weeks of their stay. Applications are available 
for both the fall and spring semesters. 

• Summer Institute of Journalism — The Summer Institute of Journal- 
ism, jointly sponsored by Lee University and the Coalition for Christian 
Colleges and Universities, is a Christ-centered program that brings students 
to Washington, D.C., for seminars with over 25 top professional journalists 
from the media. It blends classroom experience with hands-on news-gather- 
ing and news-writing opportunities over an intensive four weeks from mid- 
May to mid-June, for which participants receive four semester hours of cred- 
it from their home campuses. 

• Au Sable Institute — This Christian institute, endorsed by Lee 
University, endeavors to bring healing to the biosphere and the whole of 



50 Academic Programs 



Creation through academic programs for college and university students, 
research projects, environmental education for local school children and 
information services for churches and the wider vs^orld community. In natur- 
al settings of the Great Lakes Forest of northern Michigan, Puget Sound in 
the Pacific Northw^est, and Tangier Island in the Chesapeake Bay, partici- 
pants take courses, engage in scholarship, gain field experience, confer, and 
develop practical tools for environmental stewardship. 

• Focus on the Family Institute — Focus on the Family Institute, com- 
missioned by Focus on the Family, exists to provide a unique Christian edu- 
cational community that nurtures passionate and persuasive leaders who are 
committed to Jesus Christ, equipping them to promote healthy families, 
vibrant churches and a civil society. Sessions are held summer, spring and 
fall semesters, earning 16 credit hours. This program is made available to Lee 
University students as a cooperative effort of the university and the institute. 

PRE'ENROLLMENT PROGRAMS 

SUMMER HONORS SEMESTER 

Summer Honors Semester is a two-week program of intensive study in 
July on the Lee University campus which affords rising and graduating high 
school seniors the opportunity to earn six hours of college credit before 
enrolling in college. Participants will experience a first-rate academic challenge 
while living in the university dormitory, getting acquainted with professors 
and fellow students, and enjoying many extracurricular activities. Applicants 
must have a minimum designated GPA and score on the ACT or SAT. 

MUSIC, ART AND DRAMA CAMP 

The Lee University Music, Art and Drama Camp is sponsored by the 
School of Music. This event invites high school students to the Lee University 
campus for intensive study in the arts. This camp provides: 1) clinics for 
improving individual skills in the area of performance, 2) ensemble experience 
for musicians and dramatists, and 3) a variety of social activities. High school 
juniors or seniors who participate in this may receive one hour credit to be 
applied to their transcript when accepted to Lee as full-time students. 



52 Financial Information 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



ITEMIZED EXPENSES FOR EACH SEMESTER 

• Basic Fee (for full-time students who are taking 12-17 hours) $3,668.00 

This includes tuition and post office fee; this does not include registra- 
tion, student teaching, private music fees, or certain other special fees. 

• Registration Fee (per semester, non-refundable) 10.00 

• Yearbook Fee (required, payable in full first semester attended) 40.00 

• Health Fee (per semester) 25.00 

• Student Activity Fee (per semester) 25.00 

• Estimated cost per semester, exclusive of room and board 3,768.00 

• All work under 12 hours &l over 17 hours, each semester hour 306.00 

The above charges do not include BOOKS and SUPPLIES which are sold 
in the Lee University Bookstore and the Sertoma Bookstore. Students must 
be prepared to pay cash for books and supplies on registration day. BOOKS 
AND SUPPLIES WILL NOT BE CHARGED TO STUDENT ACCOUNTS. 

DISCOUNTS 

In those cases where more than one member of an immediate household 
is registered full time (at least 12 hours), a 25% discount on tuition only is 
permitted for all except the first student, provided the full accounts are paid 
by the last date under the deferred payment plan. Those involved must call 
the matter to the university's attention in order to be assured of receiving the 
discount. This policy does not include married children or students consid- 
ered independent for financial aid purposes. 

DORMITORY STUDENTS 

• Room and Board Per Semester 

ROOM RENT: 

Residents of B.L. Hicks, Keeble, Livingston, and Storms $1,200.00 

Residents of Atkins-Ellis, Cross, Davis, Sharp, andTharp 1,045.00 

Residents of Hughes, Medlin, Nora Chambers, and Simmons ....1,000.00 
BOARD: 

All 21 Meals 1,075.00 

Any 15 Meals 1,018.00 

Any 10 Meals 938.00 

Any 5 meals 875.00 

• Telecommunication Fee (per semester) 50.00 

• Breakage Fee 30.00 

• Key and Social Fee (payable at check-in time) 35.00 

Estimated average cost for full-time boarding students per semester, excluding 
personal expenses, books, and special fees for certain programs $6,123.00 



Financial Information 53 

Single freshmen students are required to occupy dormitory rooms until 
they are filled, unless living with parents or relatives. All local freshmen 
v^ho wish to live off campus must live with their parents. 

Carroll Court — apartment rent for married students per month includ- 
ing all utilities: 

One Bedroom $395.00 

Two Bedroom $410.00 

All freshman dormitory students are required to eat in the university 
cafeteria. Exceptions are made only to those with work schedule conflicts or 
students who have a specific medical condition that would not permit them 
to eat in the cafeteria. A student who wishes exemption must complete the 
necessary forms in the Residential Life Office. 

SPECIAL FEES 
SPECIAL MUSIC FEES 

• Private Lessons $150.00 

• Accompanist Fees 85.00 

• Orchestral Instrument Rental 52.00 

• Class Voice (semi-private) 75.00 

• Registration fee for students who register for private lessons only 10.00 

• Special fee for Music Majors 150.00 

This includes 3 credit hours of private lessons and practice fees. Available 

only to full-time students in music. 

Private lessons are taught on the semester basis. Students are charged 
for the semester instead of for each individual lesson. There will be no 
refund on private music lessons after the last day of registration. 

OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Other expenses for all students, when applicable, include: 

• Late Registration fee $20.00 

• Proficiency exams (for each hour's credit established) 30.00 

• Audit fee (per semester hour) 50.00 

• Student teaching fee 60.00 

• Graduation application fee 75.00 

• Extra transcript (one given free) 5.00 

• Returned checks (per check) 20.00 

• Auto registration and parking fee (per year) 30.00 

• Schedule change (per transaction) 10.00 



54 Financial Information 



ADDITIONAL FEES FOR CERTAIN COURSES 

• Laboratory fees: 

All divisions (Chemistry, Biology, Physics, & Physical Science). ...$25.00 

All foreign languages 25.00 

General Science 25.00 

•Skiing 150.00 

• Physical Education Activity 20.00 

• Outdoor Recreational Activities Fee (PED 132) 150.00 

• Computer Lab Fee 25.00 

• Taekwondo and Self-Defense 25.00 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Students who register for a part-time load will be charged as follows: 

• Semester hour $306.00 

• Registration (each semester) 10.00 

• Late registration 20.00 

SETTLEMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

When possible, students should be prepared to pay full semester charges 
on or before registration. Money may be submitted in advance to the 
Business Office. This will facilitate registration. All students are required to 
pay at least one-third down on or before registration according to the 
deferred payment plan which follows. 

Students who are unable to pay their accounts in full must either bor- 
row the necessary funds or subscribe to the university's deferred payment 
plan. Parents and students who will have difficulty paying the full charges 
within the semester are encouraged to make advance arrangements for bor- 
rowing the needed funds. Students intending to borrow up to half of their 
actual college expenses should apply for a Perkins Loan. Persons needing a 
larger amount should apply for a Stafford Loan through their local bank. The 
university also offers Visa, MasterCard, and American Express services by 
which students may pay on their accounts. 

UNIVERSITY DEEERRED PAYMENT PLAN 

Any full-time, on-campus student desiring to participate in the univer- 
sity's deferred payment plan is required to pay $2,000.00 down at registra- 
tion and the balance of the semester charges in three equal payments. Any 
part-time student or off-campus student desiring to participate in the 
deferred payment plan is required to pay approximately one-third of the total 
charges at registration and the balance of semester charges in three equal 
monthly payments on the dates mentioned below. The same financial 
requirements apply to veterans and others in cases when money is not sent 
directly to Lee University. In all cases, when the student does not have the 
down payment, a commitment letter is required from those underwriting 
the student's account. 



Financial Information 55 



FALL SEMESTER 

Full-time, on-campus students must pay $2,000.00 at registration; off- 
campus students must pay one-third. The balance must be paid as follows: 

• First payment by September 15 

• Second payment by October 1 5 

• Final payment by November 15 
SPRING SEMESTER 

The same down payment ($2,000.00) is required at registration. The bal- 
ance must be paid as follows: 

• First payment by February 1 5 

• Second payment by March 1 5 

• Final payment by April 1 5 

• If payment is not made on the due date, a $20.00 fee will be assessed. 
ACCOUNTS MUST BE PAID PRIORTO FINAL EXAMINATIONS 

Written commitments for aid from Lee University or other sources are 
the only substitutes for the required down payment. Therefore, students 
should assume responsibility for applying for aid in advance and for seeing 
that the proper letters or cash arrive at the Business Office by registration day. 

While we recognize the problems involved in increasing costs to the stu- 
dent, education with a Christian emphasis is the greatest personal invest- 
ment available today. The university will assist students in every way possi- 
ble to finance their education. If you need financial assistance, please check 
with our Office of Student Financial Aid. 

REFUND POLICY 

No reduction of charges will be granted unless application is made with- 
in two weeks of any change in program or departure of the students. STU- 
DENTS WHO WITHDRAW FROM THE UNIVERSITY AFTER THE FIFTH 
WEEK OF CLASSES WILL RECEIVE NO ADJUSTMENT ON TUITION 
AND FEES. Those whose study is interrupted by the university for discipline 
reasons will receive no adjustment on tuition and fees after the fifth week of 
classes. Room and board charges will be prorated from date of withdrawal. If 
a student withdraws during a semester and requests a refund of advanced 
payments, the following rules will determine the amount of adjustment, pro- 
vided the student withdraws formally through the Office of Student Life. 

1 . Room and board will be adjusted by the full amount unused at the date 
of withdrawal 

2. Tuition and fees, with the exception of matriculation and registration 
fees, will be adjusted on the following percentages: 

• During first two weeks of semester 80% 

• During third week of semester 60% 

• During fourth week of semester 40% 

• During fifth week of semester 20% 

• After fifth week of semester No Adjustment 



56 Financial Information 



3. NO REFUND ON MATRICULATION FEE, REGISTRATION FEE, OR 
LATE REGISTRATION FEE 

4. No person who registers as a full-time student and is later permitted to 
drop enough courses to place him/her in the classification of a part-time 
student will be entitled to an adjustment or prorated tuition after the 
fifth week. 

5. Mandatory refunds and repayments to Federal Title IV student financial 
aid programs will be calculated based upon earned and unearned aid 
percentages as outlined by the Federal Government. The formula for 
such calculations is based on the number of days in a given semester 
and the number of days attendance completed by the student prior to 
his/her withdrawal. Refunds mandated by the calculation could possi- 
bly increase the amount a student must pay after he/she withdraws 
from school. 

Accounts with the school must be settled in full before a diploma or a 
transcript of credits is issued or a letter of honorable dismissal is granted. 
ACCOUNTS MUST BE PAID BEFORE FINAL EXAMINATIONS ARE 
TAKEN. NO STUDENT WILL BE ALLOWED TO GRADUATE UNTIL 
HIS/HER ACCOUNT IS PAID IN FULL. 

SUMMER SCHOOL COSTS 

The cost of attending Lee University for the summer 2001 is: 
•Tuition $280.00 per hour 

• Registration Fee 10.00 per term 

•Room 350.00 

• Board 400.00 

DEFERRED PAYMENT PLAN FOR SUMMER SCHOOL 

Ordinarily students are required to pay the full charges for all terms at 
registration. However, those unable to pay the full amount may defer up to 
50% of the charges for a maximum of 30 days. Students delaying registra- 
tion for second term must pay an additional registration fee of $10.00. 

REFUND POLICY FOR SUMMER SCHOOL 

1. Withdrawals during the first week of classes will receive 50% credit 
on tuition. THERE IS NO REFUND AFTER THE FIRST WEEK. 

2. There is no refund for Registration Fee or Late Registration Fee. 
Refund for room and board will be prorated by the day. 

3. If you register for both terms and withdraw prior to the beginning of 
the second term, you will receive full refund for the second term. 



Financial Information 57 



FINANCIAL AID 



Lee University offers a wide variety of financial aid to eligible students 
including endowment scholarships, federal and state grants, loans, employ- 
ment opportunities, private scholarships — as well as a combination of these 
programs. Since a large portion of Lee University's resources for financial aid 
is tied to federal funding, it is required that eligibility, or need, be estab- 
lished as an initial step in applying for financial aid (along with the Lee 
University Financial Aid Application). 

To determine need, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
(FAFSA) MUST BE FILED through the Federal Processor. This will allow a 
student to be considered for the range of financial aid options available 
through the Lee University Financial Aid Office. All information must be 
received by Lee University before April 15 to be included in the priority 
group. 

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY 

All students who receive Federal Financial Aid must be working toward 
an eligible degree from Lee University. In order to assure that the student 
makes progress toward that degree both in terms of number of hours com- 
pleted and cumulative GPA, Lee University will utilize the following 
progress policy in evaluating the 2001-02 academic year. 

PROGRESS STANDARDS 

A. Quantitative Standard per year: Students must, as a minimum, receive a 
satisfactory grade in the courses attempted during the fall and spring 
semesters as outlined below: 

Hours Attempted Hours Satisfactorilv Completed 

24 or more hours 1 7 hours 

18-23 hours 13 hours 

12-17 hours 9 hours 

Fewer than 12 hours complete hours attempted 

Satisfactory grades are A, B, C and D. Unsatisfactory grades are W, F, 
or I. 

B. Qualitative Standard: Financial aid recipients must maintain the fol- 
lowing cumulative grade point averages to be considered making satis- 
factory progress. 

Total Hours Attempted Minimum Required G.P.A. 

0-29 1.5 

30-59 1.7 

60-89 1.9 

90 - above 2.0 



58 Financial Information 



C, Maximum hours: Any undergraduate student who has attempted 195 
hours will become ineligible for financial aid even if he/she did not 
receive financial aid for prior hours attempted. 

D. Transfer students: All transferable credits will be counted toward the 
maximum number of hours allowed to be eligible for financial aid. 
Satisfactory progress will be evaluated at the end of the first academic 
year attended at Lee University. 

REVIEW OF ELIGIBILITY 

A. Initial Review: Satisfactory academic progress is reviewed for all finan- 
cial aid applicants to insure that they meet the required qualitative, 
quantitative, and maximum time frame standards as outlined in 
Section I. Applicants who do not meet these standards will be notified 
in writing. 

B. Subsequent Review: All satisfactory progress standards are monitored 
and reviewed at the end of the academic year. (Summer sessions are 
excluded). 

REMOVAL FROM FINANCIAL AID 

A. A student who fails to meet the above standards of progress will be 
removed from financial aid for the next period of enrollment. 

B. Any student who receives all F's, W's or I's in courses attempted in 
either semester will be removed from financial aid for the next period of 
enrollment. 

C. A student placed on academic suspension from Lee University will 
automatically be removed from financial aid for the next period of 
enrollment. 

D. Removal from financial aid does not prevent students from enrolling at 
Lee University without financial aid assistance if they are eligible to re- 
enroll. 

APPEALS 

Students placed on financial aid suspension can appeal to the Financial 
Aid Office. The appeal must be submitted in writing and be accompanied 
by appropriate supporting documents, if necessary. Reasons that may be 
acceptable for the appeal are: 1 ) serious illness or accident on the part of the 
student; 2) death, accident or serious illness in the immediate family; 3| 
financial difficulties forcing incomplete and premature withdrawal; 4) other 
extenuating circumstances directly affecting academic performance. 

REINSTATEMENT OF FINANCIAL AID 

A. A student who is removed from financial aid may be eligible to have 
his/her financial aid reinstated if he/she enrolls without financial aid 
in a minimum of nine hours one semester and passes all courses 



Financial Information 59 



attempted with a minimum 2.0 semester G.P.A. It is the student's 
responsibiUty to mform the Financial Aid Office if this requirement has 
been met. 

B. Eligibihty for financial aid will be reinstated if an appeal is approved. 

C. Returning students who have a leave of absence greater than five years 
will be allowed one academic year without penalty. However, the stu- 
dent must make satisfactory progress during that year in order to con- 
tinue to receive financial aid. 

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENTS 

Along with the monetary awards received by individual students, there 
are certain other rights and responsibilities to be observed: 

1. Students receiving awards must accept or reject awards within twen- 
ty days from the receipt of the award letter. Otherwise, the award is 
void. 

2. Financial aid recipients should be enrolled at least half-time in a 
degree program. Full-time enrollment of recipients is expected. 

3. Students awarded Federal Work-Study (FWS) should report to the 
Financial Aid Office for work assignments. Any changes in FWS 
placement (or number of hours awarded, etc.) MUST be cleared 
through the Financial Aid Office prior to changes taking place. 
Students must have all documents completed and submitted to the 
Financial Aid Office prior to beginning work. A contract, 1-9 and W- 
4 are required prior to working. 

4. All loan recipients must assume repayment responsibility upon leav- 
ing school. Prior to graduation (or withdrawal), an exit interview 
should be scheduled to ensure full understanding of loan terms and 
repayment provisions (including deferment options). 

5 Financial aid recipients are expected to maintain satisfactory acade- 
mic progress for continuation of aid. 

6. Students anticipating funds from sources other than the Financial 
Aid Office should notify the office as soon as an award is made. This 
includes scholarships, loans, etc. 

7. Students planning to withdraw or to drop any course work must 
notify the Financial Aid Office prior to doing so. Students may be 
asked to repay part or all of any aid received. 

8. Students must re-apply for financial aid each year. The Lee 
University Financial Aid Application and the Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must be submitted each year. The 
annual re-applying priority deadline is April 15 for fall enrollment. 

9. The Financial Aid Office will process financial aid requests without 
regard to race, religious affiliation, gender, age, or disability. All 
funds are subject to individual student need as well as to the avail- 
ability of funds. 



60 Financial Information 



10. Financial aid recipients must maintain good standing within the uni- 
versity community. The Financial Aid Office reserves the right (on 
behalf of Lee University) to review and cancel any financial aid award 
in the event of academic, financial or disciplinary misconduct on the 
part of the recipient. 

GENERAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS 

The following website includes information on all Federal Student 
Financial Aid Programs: www.ed.gov/prg info/sfa/studentguide . 

FEDERAL PELL GRANT PROGRAM 

This program, previously known as the Basic Educational Opportunity 
Grant, was established under the Higher Education Act of 1972 and was 
implemented during the 1973-1974 academic year. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: The amount of the student's award is based on 
the student's eligibility index, the cost of attendance, and a payment 
schedule issued to Lee University from the Department of Education. The 
applicant must submit a Lee University Financial Aid Application and 
Federal Application. This program is restricted to U.S. citizens, or those in 
the U.S. for other than temporary purposes, who are undergraduates main- 
taining satisfactory academic progress. 

FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL 
OPPORTUNITY GRANT PROGRAM 

Grants ranging from $100 to $500 a year are awarded to students with 
exceptional financial need who for lack of financial means would not be able 
to attend college. Supplemental Grants are restricted to undergraduates. A 
FSEOG may be received through the period required for degree completion. 

FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAM 

This is a federal aid program administered by Lee University which pro- 
vides part-time employment on campus for a limited number of students 
with demonstrated need. Some positions are available through the 
Community Service Learning Program. Each student worker is normally 
employed for 10 hours a week at the current minimum wage rate. Work- 
study earnings are applied to the student's school account as long as an out- 
standing balance remains. On-campus students may elect to retain 25% of 
their monthly earnings for personal expenses while off-campus students 
may retain 50%. 

FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM 

Perkins Loans are available to students who are enrolled on at least a 
half-time basis (6 semester hours) and who demonstrate a financial need. 
Subject to the availability of funds, an eligible undergraduate may borrow up 
to $3,000 per academic year or a maximum of $15,000 in undergraduate 



Financial Information 61 



studies. While the borrower is at least a half-time student, there is no repay- 
ment of the loan and no interest accrues. Repayment of the loan begins nine 
months after graduation or termination of studies. The interest rate is five 
percent (5%) on the unpaid balance. However, deferments extending the 
repayment period may be made for a member of the armed forces of the 
United States, a volunteer under the Peace Corps, a member of VISTA or a 
full-time law enforcement officer. 

FEDERAL SUBSIDIZED STAFFORD LOAN PROGRAM 

This program enables a student to borrow directly from a bank, credit 
union, savings and loan association, or other participating lender who is 
willing to make educational loans. The loan is guaranteed by a State or pri- 
vate non-profit agency and insured by the federal government. The maxi- 
mum amount which may be borrowed per year is $2625 for freshmen, $3500 
for sophomores,and $5500 for juniors and seniors. 

The total amount which may be borrowed for undergraduate study is 
$23,000. Repayment is made to the lending institution, and payments begin 
between six (6) and seven (7) months after the student graduates or leaves 
school. The amount of repayments depends upon the size of the debt, but at 
least $600 per year must be paid. Deferment from repayment is granted for 
up to three (3) years while a borrower serves in the Armed Forces, Peace 
Corps, VISTA or while he/she is studying full-time. Information and applica- 
tion forms are available from schools, lenders. State Guarantee Agencies, 
and Regional Offices of the U.S. Department of Education. 

FEDERAL UNSUBSIDIZED STAFFORD LOAN PROGRAM 

A new federal law called the Higher Education Amendment of 1992 cre- 
ated a new program of Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans for students who 
do not qualify, in whole or in part, for Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans. 
The terms of the unsubsidized loan are the same as the terms for subsidized 
Federal Stafford Loans, except that the federal government does not pay 
interest on the student's behalf. Monthly or quarterly interest payments 
must be made during the time of enrollment in school, during the grace 
period, or during any period of deferment or repayment. 

FEDERAL PLUS LOAN PROGRAM 

The Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Student program enables 
parents to borrow a non-deferred loan for an amount up to the Cost of 
Education less other aid received. Parents may borrow for dependent under- 
graduate students. Forty-five days after the loan is processed, a minimum of 
$52.00 monthly payments begin for up to a ten (10) year repayment period. 
Applications may be secured from lending institutions or from the Financial 
Aid Office. 

TENNESSEE TEACHING SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

The Tennessee Teaching Scholars Program was established by the 
Tennessee General Assembly in 1995 to encourage exemplary students to 



62 Financial Information 



enter the teaching force. Participation in this forgivable loan program is lim- 
ited to college juniors, seniors and post baccalaureate candidates admitted to 
a teacher education program in Tennessee. Recipients of the awards incur an 
obligation to teach one year in a Tennessee public school for each year the 
award is received or repay the loan with substantial interest. Applications 
are available in the Financial Aid Office. 

LOAN ENTRANCE COUNSELING 

Federal Regulations require all students who participate in one of the 
Federal Student Loan programs to attend a Loan Entrance Counseling ses- 
sion conducted by the Financial Aid Office. The purpose is to provide loan 
information to students who anticipate receiving a Federal Student Loan. 
All first-time borrowers at Lee University are required to complete Loan 
Entrance Counseling prior to receiving the first disbursement of their loan. 
This requirement may be fulfilled online at www.leeuniversitv.edu . 

LOAN EXIT INTERVIEW 

Federal regulations require all students who participated in one of the 
Student Loan programs to attend an Exit Interview conducted by the 
Financial Aid Office. The purpose of the Exit Interview is to review loan 
history and repayment terms with each student borrower. The Exit 
Interview is required for graduation and must be completed before a diplo- 
ma will be issued. 

STATE PROGRAM (TSAC) 

The Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation (TSAC) is a non-profit 
organization established by the Tennessee General Assembly to further 
post-secondary education opportunity for Tennessee residents. In adminis- 
tering the Tennessee Student Assistance Award, TSAC reviews all 
Tennessee resident applicants who are enrolled in an eligible post-secondary 
institution. The awards range from $1,500 to $3,300. The average received at 
Lee University is approximately $2,000. Students apply for the TSAC award 
by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Following the 
submission of the FAFSA, TSAC will review the student's application based 
on family need in the same manner as the Pell Grant. Students should apply 
for both Pell Grant and TSAC if they are Tennessee residents. For more 
information, go to www.State.tn.us/tsac . 

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 

In order to qualify for Federal Financial Aid, students must be either a 
citizen of the United States or an eligible non-citizen and must have a diplo- 
ma from a state accredited high school or a GED. 

Students with a diploma from a non-accredited high school program or 
who have not completed high school may be eligible for Federal Aid with a 
minimum ACT score of 17. Students applying for early admission must 
meet early admissions standards in order to receive Federal Aid. 



Financial Information 63 

LEE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS 

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Centennial, Presidential and Dean's scholarships are awarded to 
first-time freshmen each year based upon ACT or SAT Scores. Composite 
scores for scholarship consideration are taken only from a single test date; 
tests must be taken on one of the published national test dates set by The 
College Board. Students who take the ACT residual test on campus are 
NOT eligible for academic scholarship consideration. Each student must 
maintain a full-time class load of 12-17 semester hours each semester. 
Academic scholarships do NOT cover the cost of summer camps or 
Summer Honors. SAT composite scores taken in April 1995 or later require 
the recentered composite score for scholarships. Students older than tradi- 
tional high school graduates are eligible for academic scholarships if they are 
first-time college attenders. 

CENTENNIAL SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to any student who has 
graduated from an approved high school and who scores 31-36 on the ACT 
or 1400-1600 on the SAT. Those students who qualify must carry more than 
eleven credit hours per semester and maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point 
average or higher in order to continue receiving the award. The scholarship 
is distributed in two phases. In the first phase, all Centennial Scholars 
receive an amount equal to standard tuition. This phase lasts for the recipi- 
ent's freshman year. The second phase is in effect from the recipient's 
sophomore year until he or she graduates. In the second phase, Centennial 
Scholars are separated into two categories. Centennial Gold and Centennial 
Silver. Those Centennial Scholars with a cumulative grade point average of 
3.0 to 3.69 will be designated as Centennial Silver. Those with a cumulative 
grade point average of 3.7 and above will be designated as Centennial Gold. 
A Centennial Silver Scholar receives a half tuition scholarship for each 
semester that he or she qualifies. A Centennial Gold Scholar receives a full 
tuition scholarship for each qualifying semester. If at any time the student 
should lose the scholarship for falling below the 3.0 or the 3.7 cumulative 
grade point requirement, it can be reinstated at either level once the GPA is 
equal to or above the original level. This scholarship can be used in any 
semester including the summer (must take 4 credit hours in any one sum- 
mer session), but not after graduation. The Centennial Gold Scholarship is 
awarded in place of, not in addition to, the Honor Scholarship. If a student 
enrolls in another college/university as his or her primary choice in his or 
her projected beginning date, this student will forfeit his or her eligibility 
for the Centennial Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded by the 
Admissions Office. 

PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to any student who has 
graduated from an approved high school and who scores 27-30 on the ACT 
or 1230-1390 composite score on the SAT. This scholarship is equal to stan- 
dard tuition for the freshman year. The scholarship must be used in the aca- 



64 Financial Information 



demic year immediately following graduation. Students who enroll in 
another college/university as their primary choice in their projected begin- 
ning date forfeit eligibility. Presidential scholarships are awarded by the 
Admissions Office. 

DEAN'S SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to any student who has graduated 
from an approved high school and who scores 24-26 on the ACT or 1120- 
1220 composite score on the SAT. This scholarship is equal to one-half stan- 
dard tuition for the freshman year. The scholarship must be used in the aca- 
demic year immediately following graduation. Students who enroll in 
another college/university as their primary choice in their projected begin- 
ning date forfeit eligibility. Dean's scholarships are awarded by the 
Admissions Office. 

HONOR SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to any incoming applicant or 
returning student who has passed a minimum of 30 semester hours, whose 
cumulative GPA is at least 3.7 and who is currently enrolled as a full-time 
student. The scholarship provides one-half standard tuition for the semester 
awarded. This scholarship can be utilized in an unlimited number of semes- 
ters as long as all criteria mentioned above are met. Students returning to 
Lee after graduation for recertification or enrichment classes are still eligible 
to use this scholarship if all requirements are met. Honor scholarships are 
awarded by the Office of Records. 

LEADERSHIP SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

The Roberson Memorial Leadership Scholarship Program will annually 
award 25 scholarships of $2,000 each to full-time applicants who have shown 
outstanding leadership ability in high school or college careers. Special consid- 
eration will be given to students who have demonstrated successful leader- 
ship, character and service in either school activities, church ministry or com- 
munity service programs. Inquiries or questions can be answered by the 
Admissions Center at 1-800-533-9930. Applications or letters of recommenda- 
tion should be submitted directly to the Director of Admissions. 

MUSIC SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Presser Foundation Scholarship is a $3,000 scholarship awarded 
annually to the School of Music's outstanding music major at the end of the 
student's junior year to be used for his/her senior year. The Presser Scholar 
is selected by the President of the University and the Dean of the School of 
Music who shall be guided soley by consideration of merit. 

In addition, a limited number of scholarships are awarded to students 
demonstrating performance ability in applied music. Interested individuals 
should write to the Dean, School of Music, Lee University. 

HICKS SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

The Hicks Scholars Program honors the memory of the late B.L. Hicks. 
It has been funded by a gift from members of the Hicks family. Each year 13 
one-year scholarships are awarded granting $1,500 to a sophomore selected 
for the honor by the faculty of his/her academic discipline as directed by the 



Financial Information 65 



department chair. These 13 winners are announced in April of each year. 
(Winners may not be Centennial Scholars or children of Lee faculty). 

Hicks Scholars will be expected to volunteer for a work assignment with- 
in the department for five hours each week under the supervision of the chair. 

Hicks Scholars will be selected in the following areas: 

• History • Computer Information • English 

• Human Development • Communication • Foreign Languages 

• Psychology • Special Education • Biology/Chemistry 

• Sociology • Physical/Secondary Education • Mathematics 

• Business 

lOOBLACKMEN OF BRADLEY COUNTY SCHOLARSHIP 

Lee University will offer a $1,000 annual, renewable scholarship to a 
male or female applicant of color. Applicants must be full-time students, 
U.S. citizens and maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA. Applications may be 
obtained by writing to the 100 Black Men of Bradley County, Inc., P.O. Box 
5656, Cleveland, TN 37320-5656. 

ENDOWMENT SCHOLARSHIPS 

Applicants must submit a Lee University Application for Financial Aid 
and be enrolled as a full-time student with a minimum GPA of 2.5. The Lee 
University Student Aid Committee is wholly responsible for the selection 
of the endowment scholarship recipients. In this selection, academic and 
leadership qualities are considered, but the major consideration is given to 
financial need. Application for these scholarships is initiated by completing 
all of the required financial aid applications. Students may receive only one 
endowed scholarship per academic year. Scholarships shall be discontinued 
any time a recipient withdraws from Lee University or fails to meet the col- 
lege requirements regarding academic progress. 



66 Financial Information 



The Delton L. Alford Music Scholarship 

is endowed by students, colleagues and 
friends of the honoree. Awards are based on 
scholarship, performing ability, and need. For 
additional information see the Dean of the 
School of Music or contact the Office of 
Financial Aid. 

The Harold and Jean Ashlock Family 
Scholarship was endowed by Mr. and Mrs. 
Harold Ashlock and family. Special consider- 
ation shall be given to applicants studying for 
the ministry. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

Lois Beach Science Scholarship, initiated 
by Roderick Justice, was endowed by science 
alumni. The scholarship is based upon the 
number of laboratory assistants needed as 
well as the scholastic performance of the 
applicant in this area. Recipients are limited 
to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with 
majors in Chemistry and/or Biology. 

The Linda Bullins Beavers Scholarship 
was established by friends and family of 
Linda Bullins Beavers. First priority will be 
given to students from the Cleveland, 
Tennessee area. This scholarship is open to 
any academic division. No recipient shall re- 
ceive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The Diane Belisle Scholarship was 
established by friends and family of Diane 
Belisle. First priority will be given to imme- 
diate family members and relatives, then to 
students studying to become full-time music 
ministers. 

Cletus Benton Memorial Scholarship 
was endowed by the friends of Cletus 
Benton. One recipient will be selected from 
one of the following area schools: Bradley 
Central High School; Cleveland High School; 
or Cleveland State Community College. 
Majors in the Department of Business will 
receive primary consideration. 

The Lorene Hall Biggs Scholarship was 
established by^ family and friends of Lorene 
Hall Biggs. Applicants must be enrolled as 
full-time students majoring in business. 

Dr. Jimmy W. Bilbo Scholarship was 
endowed by Dr. and Mrs. Bilbo and family. 
Apphcants for this scholarship must be edu- 
cation majors considered worthy and be 
enrolled as full-time students. No recipient 
shall receive the scholarship for more than 
eight semesters. 



The Ofelia and Hiram Bobo Scholarship 

was established by Mr. and Mrs. Hiram 
Bobo. Priority shall be given to students who 
are dependents of a minister or who are 
studying to be a pastor, youth minister, 
music minister or missionary. 

The Donald N. Bowdle Scholarship was 
established on January 23, 1986, by the men 
of Alpha Gamma Chi and their alumni. The 
fund honors Dr. Donald Bowdle, one of the 
founding sponsors of the organization. 
Priority for awarding the scholarship shall go 
first to a senior Alpha Gamma Chi member 
based upon merit and hnancial need. Next 
priority will be to a freshman, sophomore or 
junior Alpha Gamma Chi member based 
upon merit and financial need. 

Cheryl Brewer Memorial Scholarship, 
initiated by Delta Zeta Tau, was endowed by 
family and friends. Applicants must be 
enrolled as full-time students in any area of 
study. Priority shall go to members of the 
volleyball team who are Church of God 
members from the state of Florida. No recipi- 
ent may receive the scholarship for more 
than eight semesters. 

The Claude V. Bridges Scholarship was 
endowed by family and friends. Applicants 
must be enrolled in the Helen DeVos College 
of Education. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The William E. Brown Scholarship was 
endowed by Mr. William E. Brown of Mt. 
Carmel, Illinois. Scholarships shall be award- 
ed on an annual basis to full-time seniors 
who are enrolled in the School of Religion 
and studying for the ministry. 

The Hubert C. and Melvina N. Buie 
Scholarship was endowed by Hubert C. and 
Melvina N. Buie of Tyler, Texas. An annual 
scholarship may be awarded to a freshman, 
sophomore, junior or senior enrolled at Lee as 
a full-time student. Major consideration shall 
be given to the academic performance, out- 
standing qualities to succeed, and the finan- 
cial need of each student. Special considera- 
tion shall be given to a student attending 
from the Church of God Home for Children 
at Sevierville, Tennessee. Applicants may be 
enrolled in any academic division of Lee 
University leading to a Bachelor's degree. No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 



Financial Information 67 



Dr. Jim Bums Scholarship was endowed 
by the Collegiate Sertoma Club, Lee Singers 
alumni, and friends. Priority shall be given to 
members of the Lee Singers. Award is based 
primarily on musical abilities, financial need 
and service to the ensemble. 

Archie L. Burroughs Scholarship was 
endowed by Archie and Marilyn Burroughs 
of Birmingham, Alabama. Priority shall be 
given first to Burroughs' relatives, then to 
applicants from the Metropolitan Church of 
God, then to applicants from Birmingham, 
Alabama, then to applicants from the state of 
Alabama. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

Dr. Stanley L. Butler Scholarship was 
endowed by the Collegiate Sertoma Club and 
hiends. Priority shall be given first to a golf 
scholarship, secondly, to a general athletic 
scholarship. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Susan and Bob Card, Jr., Scholarship 
was established by Susan and Bob Card, Jr. 
Priority will be given to customers or employ- 
ees of Easy Auto Credit or their family mem- 
bers and then to Bradley County residents. 

The Floyd D. Carey, Jr., Excellence in 
Christian Education Award Scholarship was 
endowed by family and friends. Applicant 
must be considered worthy and be enrolled 
as a full-time student majoring in Bible and 
Christian education and must be classihed as 
a graduating senior. 

The R. Leonard Carroll Ministerial 
Scholarship was established by the Church 
of God General Board of Education. First pri- 
ority will be given to students enrolled in 
the School of Religion and studying for the 
ministry. 

The Troy and Gladys Chandler Mem- 
orial Scholarship was endowed by the 
Henrietta, Texas, Church of God. Applicant 
must be enrolled as a full-time student in 
any academic division of Lee University. 
Priority shall be assigned first to students 
from Henrietta, Texas, Church of God; sec- 
ond from Greater Wichita Falls, Texas, area; 
third from the state of Texas. No recipient 
shall receive the scholarship for more than 
eight semesters. 

The Citizens' Scholarship Foundation of 
Bradley County, being vitally interested in 
working for a better community and a better 
America through higher education, has 



established a scholarship at Lee University. 
Those applying for this scholarship must be 
high school graduates of the Bradley County 
area or those students who are already 
enrolled at Lee University. Major considera- 
tion shall be given to academic performance, 
leadership capability, and the hnancial need 
of each applicant. 

The Reverend Winston Clark Scholar- 
ship was endowed by Ron and Joy Moore. 
Applicant must be enrolled as a full-time 
student in the area of religion or music at Lee 
University. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Cleveland Sertoma/Collegiate 
Sertoma Scholarship was established by the 
Cleveland Sertoma Club and the Collegiate 
Sertoma Club of Lee University. Applicants 
must establish financial need and be enrolled 
as full-time students. Priority will be to those 
students who are hearing and speech 
impaired, then to students from the Bradley 
County area. 

The Collegiate Sertoma Club Scholar- 
ship was endowed by the Collegiate Sertoma 
Club of Lee University. Scholarships shall be 
awarded on an annual basis to full-time 
freshmen, sophomores, juniors or seniors. 
Priority shall be given to students who indi- 
cate an interest in human services careers. 
No recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than two semesters. 

The Reverend J. B. Collins Scholarship 
was endowed as a bequest from his estate. 
First priority will be given to students from 
South Carolina. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Sue and Bernie Collins Scholar- 
ship was endowed for Sue and Bernie 
Collins. AppUcants must be enrolled on a 
full-time basis for the purpose of serving as 
a foreign missionary for the Christian min- 
istry or in pulpit ministry. Christian educa- 
tion or pre-med. 

The Carl Colloms Scholarship was 
endowed by Mr. Carl Colloms. Applicants for 
this scholarship must be enrolled as full-time 
students graduating from Bradley Central 
High School, Cleveland High School or 
Charleston High School. First priority of the 
scholarship shall be assigned to a qualifying 
Charleston High School student. Applicants 
for the award must be majoring in a pre -pro- 
fessional area, not including education, music 



68 Financial Information 



or ministerial studies. The criteria for selec- 
tion shall include academic performance, 
extracurricular involvement, and good citi- 
zenship. No recipient shall receive the schol- 
arship for more than eight semesters. 

The Charles Edward "Rick" Compton 
Scholarship was endowed hy Dr. Charles B. 
Gilbert, and the Logan, West Virginia, 
Church of God. Priority shall be given first to 
the siblings of Rick Compton, then appli- 
cants from the West Logan Church of God, 
then applicants from the state of West 
Virginia. Special consideration shall be given 
to applicants enrolled in the School of Music, 
and the intent to minister in the Church of 
God shall be considered a positive factor. No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

Dr. Charles W. Conn Scholarship was 
endowed by the Collegiate Sertoma Club of 
Lee University. Scholarships will be awarded 
on an annual basis. Major consideration will 
be given to the potential academic perfor- 
mance and financial need of each applicant. 
No recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

The Melody Conn Scholarship was 
estabUshed by family and friends of Melody 
Conn. The scholarship is open to full-time 
students in any academic division. No recipi- 
ent shall receive the scholarship for more 
than eight semesters. 

The Henry Crosby Scholarship was 
established by the family and friends of 
Henry Crosby in his memory. This is made 
available to rising Lee University juniors to 
be awarded during the junior and senior 
years. Selection of recipients will be made by 
the Payne/Crosby Scholarship Committee. 

The James Euell and Cuba Culpepper 
Scholarship was endowed by Mr. James Euell 
Culpepper of Lake Park, Georgia, as a memo- 
rial fund. Priority shall be given first to a stu- 
dent from the Forrest Street Church of God, 
Valdosta, Georgia; then to a student from the 
Valdosta, Georgia, area,- and then to a student 
from the state of Georgia. 

The Robert Payne Culpepper 
Scholarship was established by Harold and 
Beth Woodard. Applicants must be enrolled 
in the School of Religion, preparing for a 
pulpit ministry. 

The Dr. and Mrs. J. Patrick Daugherty 
Science Scholarship was established to 



assist students majoring in the area of 
Natural Science (Biological Sciences and 
Physical Sciences). Selection of the recipi- 
ent is made by the Lee University Financial 
Aid Committee from recommendations 
received from the Chairperson of the De- 
partment of Natural Sciences and Mathe- 
matics. Recommendation from the chair- 
person will be based on academic and lead- 
ership records, with major consideration 
given to the science laboratory abilities of 
the applicant. 

The Brady and Florence Dennis 
Scholarship was established by family and 
friends of Reverend Brady and Florence 
Dennis. First priority will be to nieces and 
nephews of Reverend and Mrs. Dennis, then 
to students from South Carolina. 

Department of Music Ministries Scho- 
larship was endowed by the Church of God 
Music Committee, Lee University School of 
Music and faculty. Applicants for this schol- 
arship must be music majors. Recipients 
shall receive the scholarship for no more 
than eight semesters. 

The J. E. DeVore Scholarship for Foreign 
Students was endowed by Reverend J. E. 
DeVore. Primary consideration shall be given 
to foreign students. Secondary consideration 
shall be given to students majoring in mis- 
sions or a missionary student who is current- 
ly studying at Lee University. No recipient 
shall receive the scholarship for more than 
eight semesters. 

The Hal Bernard Dixon, Jr., Scholarship 
was endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Hal Bernard 
Dixon of Cleveland, Tennessee. Priority for 
scholarship shall be assigned first to students 
from the Wake Forest, North Carolina, 
Church of God; Middlesex, North Carolina, 
Church of God; and the North Cleveland 
Church of God, and then to students from 
other locations. After the above priorities are 
satisfied, scholarships may be awarded to 
qualihed students enrolled in any academic 
division of Lee University. Scholarships will 
be awarded on a one-year basis to freshmen, 
upperclassmen, or graduate students, and 
may be granted for a total of four years. 

The Sam and Patty Evans Scholarship 
was endowed by Sam and Patty Evans of 
Cleveland, Tennessee. Applicants must be 
enrolled in the School of Religion, preparing 
for a pulpit ministry as either pastor or evan- 



Financial Information 



69 



I 



gelist, or for a ministry of world missions. 
Priority shall be assigned first to students 
from the southeastem region of the United 
States. No recipient shall receive the scholar- 
ship for more than eight semesters. 

The First American Bank Scholarship 
(Cleveland, Tennessee). Entering freshmen 
must have an ACT score of 25. Those appli- 
cants who qualify must maintain a 3.0 grade 
point average to continue qualifying for the 
scholarship. Priority given to local high 
school graduates. 

First Citizens Bank, being vitally inter- 
ested in working for a better community and 
a better America through higher education, 
has established THE FIRST CITIZENS 
BANK SCHOLARSHIP FUND at Lee 
University. In the selection of the scholar- 
ship recipients, academic and leadership 
records shall be considered. However, major 
consideration shall be given to the financial 
need of the applicant. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

Karen Hanks Folino Charter Member 
Scholarship was established by the 
Collegiate Sertoma Club and Karen Hanks 
Folino. First priority will be given to full- 
time students from the Department of 
Business. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Rick and Karen Folino Business 
Scholarship was endowed by Mr. and Mrs. 
Folino. Selection is made by the Lee Univer- 
sity Financial Aid Committee. Major consid- 
eration will be given to full-time students 
from the state of Florida who are enrolled in 
the Department of Business and maintain a 
minimum GPA of 3.0. Special consideration 
will be given to the Ladies of Delta Zeta Tau 
and the Men of Upsilon Xi. No recipient 
shall receive the scholarship for more than 
eight semesters. 

Bill and Mary Windham Ford Scholar- 
ship was endowed by the children of Bill and 
Mary Windham Ford. Selection is made by 
the Lee University Financial Aid 
Committee. Applicants must be enrolled as 
full-time students in Christian education or 
communication at Lee University. Major 
consideration will be given to the potential 
academic performance and financial need. 

Chancel and Ellen French Scholarship 
was endowed by Reverend and Dr. French 



and the Collegiate Sertoma Club. Applicants 
must be enrolled at Lee University as full- 
time students in any academic division. No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

The Melisha Gibson Memorial Scholar- 
ship was endowed by citizens of Cleveland/ 
Bradley County, Tennessee. Applicants for 
this scholarship must be from Cleveland/ 
Bradley County area going into the field of 
human services. First priority of the scholar- 
ship shall be assigned to siblings of Melisha 
Gibson. In the selection of the scholarship 
recipient, academic and leadership records 
shall be considered. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The Gilbert Scholarship was endowed 
by Mr. and Mrs. Elzie L. Gilbert. Applicant 
must be enrolled as a full-time student in 
any academic division of Lee University and 
applicant's average family income shall not 
exceed 150% of the amount of the U.S. 
Government poverty level index. Applicants 
shall be from the states of Kentucky, West 
Virginia or Maryland. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

Rev. and Mrs. F. W. GofI Scholarship 
was endowed by Rev. and Mrs. F. W. Goff of 
Cleveland, Tennessee. Applicants must be 
full-time students with major consideration 
being placed on the financial need and acad- 
emic performance. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The W. C. and Leona Gore Scholarship 
was endowed by family and friends. 
Applicant must be considered worthy and be 
enrolled as a full-time student in the School 
of Religion at Lee University. Preference of 
consideration shall be given to ministerial 
students from Alabama. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

Len and Brenda Graham Scholarship 
was endowed by family and the Collegiate 
Sertoma Club. One scholarship is designated 
as an athletic scholarship in the area of golf, 
and the other is a Christian Ministries schol- 
arship in the area of missions. The athletic 
scholarship shall be available to applicants 
enrolled in any academic division of Lee 
University. The Christian Ministries schol- 



70 Financial Information 



arship will be available to applicants enrolled 
in the School of Religion of Lee University, 
with the intent of concentration in 
Intercultural Studies. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The Craig Hagmaier Scholarship was 
established by the family of Craig Hagmaier. 
The scholarship is open to all students with 
first priority to a student from the 
Department of Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics, the Department of Business or 
a student from the state of Pennsylvania. 

Duane and Joy Hall Science Scholarship 
w^as endowed by the Lee University Sertoma 
Club and the family and friends of Duane 
and Joy Hall. Recipients will be selected from 
a list of qualified candidates prepared by the 
Chairperson of the Department of Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics. These candidates 
must be majoring in one of the Natural 
Science areas (biological or physical). No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than three years. 

Dr. and Mrs. Earl Kent Hamilton Science 
Scholarship was estabhshed by Dr. and Mrs. 
Hamilton of Severna Park, Maryland. 
AppUcant must be a full-time student and be 
majoring in one of the Natural Science areas 
(biological or physical). Major consideration 
shall be given to the science laboratory abili- 
ties of the applicant. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than two 
years. 

The Roy Earl and Nora Hamilton Scho- 
larship was established by the family on 
April 4, 1987, the 68th anniversary of Mr. 
Hamilton's graduation in the first class of 
Bible Training School. Applicants must be 
full-time juniors or seniors majoring in 
Christian Education or Biblical Studies, who 
maintain a GPA of 3.0 or above, and who 
show promise for ministry in the local 
church. No recipient shall receive the award 
for more than four semesters. 

The Rev. John L. Hanks Memorial 
Scholarship was endowed by the Collegiate 
Sertoma Club of Lee University and Rick and 
Karen Folino. Selection is made by the Lee 
University Financial Aid Committee. 
Priority will hrst be given to full-time stu- 
dents hom the Bob White Boulevard Church 
of God in Pulaski, Virginia, and then to stu- 
dents from the state of Virginia. Special con- 



sideration will be given to full-time students 
who are dedicating themselves to the min- 
istry. No recipient shall receive the scholar- 
ship for more than eight semesters. 

The Jeffery Graham Harvard Scholarship 
was endowed by Upsilon XI and friends. 
Priority shall be given to Upsilon XI men and 
children of Upsilon XI alumni. No recipient 
shall receive the scholarship for more than 
eight semesters. 

The Harold Hawkins Scholarship was 
endowed by Mr. Harold Hawkins. 
Applicants for this scholarship must be 
enrolled as full-time students from north- 
eastern Tennessee. First priority of considera- 
tion shall be given to Knoxville, Tennessee, 
area students. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

Schaunell R. Herrin Memorial Scholar- 
ship was endowed by the Virginia State 
Council. Applicants must be enrolled as full- 
time students in any academic division of 
Lee University. No recipient shall receive 
the scholarship for more than eight semes- 
ters. 

The Bill and Betty Higginbotham 
Scholarship was endowed by Mr. and Mrs. 
Bill Higginbotham of Norman, Oklahoma. 
Priority for scholarship shall be assigned first 
to students from the Southern Hills Church 
of God, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and 
then to students from the state of Oklahoma. 
After the above priorities are satisfied, schol- 
arships may be awarded to high school grad- 
uates entering Lee or to freshmen, sopho- 
mores, juniors or seniors already enrolled in 
Lee. Applicants may be enrolled in any acad- 
emic division of Lee University leading to a 
Bachelor's degree. However, one scholarship 
shall be awarded in the area of golf. 

Ed and Sunshine HoUoweli Scholarship 
was endowed by Edward and Loretta 
HoUoweli. Recipients of said scholarship will 
be designated "HoUoweli Scholars". 
"HoUoweli Scholars" must maintain an aca- 
demic grade point average of 3.0. Applicants 
must be actively pursuing an education in 
religion with the intent of becoming a pulpit 
minister. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Honor Endowed Scholarship was 
endowed by Lee University. Applicants must 
be considered worthy and enrolled as full- 
time students in any academic area of Lee 



Financial Information 71 



University. In the selection of the scholar- 
ship recipients, the applicant must have a 4.0 
grade point average in any department, and 
consideration will be given to the financial 
need of each applicant. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The Ruby Horton Scholarship has been 
established by the children and friends of 
Ruby Horton to help promising young pia- 
nists in their study at Lee University. The 
scholarship is to be awarded to the accompa- 
nist for the Lee University Campus Choir 
and will be selected by the Director of 
Campus Choir. 

The Dale Hughes Scholarship was 
endowed by family and friends. Applicants 
must be Bradley Central High School gradu- 
ates pursuing a career in the field of educa- 
tion. No recipient shall receive the scholar- 
ship for more than eight semesters. 

Ray H. Hughes, Sr., Scholarship was 
established by the Collegiate Sertoma Club 
to honor Dr. Ray H. Hughes, Sr. Applicants 
must be enrolled as full-time students at Lee 
University in any academic division. No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

The Dr. Robert D. Humbertson Scholar- 
ship was endowed by Mrs. Jo Ann 
Humbertson and family. Applicants for this 
scholarship must be enrolled as full-time stu- 
dents majoring in communication. The 
scholarship shall be limited to sophomore, 
junior or senior level students with a GPA of 
3.0 or above. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

A.T. Humphries Music Scholarship was 
established by the Collegiate Sertoma Club 
and friends of the honoree. Applicants must 
be enrolled as full-time students in the 
School of Music. Major consideration will be 
given to the potential academic performance 
and financial need of each applicant as rec- 
ommended by the faculty of the School of 
Music to the Financial Aid Committee. 
Selection of the recipient is made by the Lee 
University Financial Aid Committee. No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

The Redverse, Joseph and Edna Jackson 
Scholarship was established to honor the 
ministry of Dr. Joseph E. Jackson and his par- 
ents. First priority will be full-time, black 



ministerial students in the School of 
Religion. Nominations will be made by the 
department chairperson. 

Kelland Jeffords Scholarship was en- 
dowed by Nelia Jeffords, family, and friends. 
Applicants for this scholarship must be stu- 
dents from the state of Georgia and must 
have completed at least one year of college, 
with an average of B or higher. No recipient 
shall receive the scholarship for more than 
eight semesters. 

Nelia Jeffords Scholarship was estab- 
lished by Nelia Jeffords and friends and the 
Collegiate Sertoma Club. Applicants must 
be enrolled full-time pursuing a graduate 
degree in music. 

J.P. and Helen Johnson Scholarship was 
established by the Collegiate Sertoma Club 
and J.P. and Helen Johnson. Priority will be 
to descendants of J.P. and Helen Johnson, 
then to descendants of R.P. Johnson and J.H. 
Hughes. Next priority will be to students 
majoring in natural sciences who maintain a 
minimum 3.0 GPA. 

The L.B. Johnson Scholarship was 
endowed by Mr. and Mrs. L.B. Johnson of 
Grant, Alabama. Schoiorships are awarded 
on an annual basis to full-time freshmen, 
sophomores, juniors and seniors. Preference 
is given to students from the state of 
Alabama. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than four semesters. 

The Doyle B. and Doris Justice Scho- 
larship was endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Doyle 
B. Justice. Applicants must be enrolled as full- 
time students in the Department of Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. Contact the Chairperson, 
Department of Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics, for further information. 

The R. Edwin King Scholarship was 
endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Jim Rigsby. 
Applicants for this scholarship must be 
enrolled as full-time students in any academ- 
ic division of Lee University. First priority of 
consideration shall be given to ministerial 
students from Texas. Secondary considera- 
tion shall be given to any student from 
Texas. No recipient shall receive the scholar- 
ship for more than eight semesters. 

The Joe Kitchens Scholarship has been 
established by family and friends of Joe 
Kitchens. First priority will be given to mis- 



72 Financial Information 



sionary children enrolled full-time in any aca- 
demic division. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Reverend Ralph F. Koshewitz 
Scholarship was endowed hy the Reverend 
Ralph F. Koshewitz family. Applicants for 
this scholarship must be enrolled as full-time 
students in the School of Religion or study- 
ing for the ministry. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The Dee Lavender Scholarship was 
endowed in memory of Dee Lavender in con- 
junction with the Collegiate Sertoma Club. 
Priority will be given to students preparing 
for world missions. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The Joey Lawson-Keil Scholarship was 
established by friends and family of Joey 
Lawson-Keil. Apphcants must be enrolled as 
full-time students in any academic division. 
Major consideration will be given to the 
potential academic performance and finan- 
cial need of each applicant. No recipient 
j;hall receive the scholarship for more than 
^ight semesters. 

The Lee Singers Scholarship was estab- 
lished by the Sertoma Club, Guy and Lee 
Marley and alumni and friends of the Lee 
Singers. Applicants may be enrolled in any 
academic division with recommendations 
made by the Director of Lee Singers. 

The James R. Lemons Scholarship was 
endowed by Dr. James R. Lemons. 
Applicants must be male students enrolled 
in the Helen DeVos College of Education 
majoring in early or middle child education. 
No recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

The Cecil and Edna Lewis Scholarship 
was funded by Mr. and Mrs. Lewis. 
Applicants must be enrolled in the School of 
Religion. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship forjmore than eight semesters. 

The Sherry Bray Lewis Scholarship was 
primarily funded by the Ladies Ministries of 
Illinois along with family and friends. This 
scholarship is limited to students majoring 
in science areas. Priority will be given to stu- 
dents from Illinois. No recipient shall receive 
the scholarship for more than eight semes- 
ters. Contact the Chairperson, Department 
of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, for 
hirther information. 



The Rev. William Randolph and Frances 
Baker McCall Honorary Mission Scholarship 

was endowed by Rev. and Mrs. William 
McCall. Priority shall be given to individuals 
recommended by Church of God World 
Missions, or that are under a World Missions 
appointment or have successfully completed 
training at a WEAC Center. After the above 
priority is satisfied, applicants for this schol- 
arship must be considered worthy and be 
enrolled as full-time students in the School 
of Religion with the intent to minister in a 
foreign missions held. Major consideration 
will be given to potential academic perfor- 
mance and financial need. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The Lesa Karean (Carey) McClennahan 
Scholarship was endowed by family and 
friends who are interested in the preparation 
of young men and women for Christian ser- 
vice. Applicants must be full-time students 
in any academic division. Preference will be 
given to those pursuing a degree in psycholo- 
gy. The recipient must be classified as a 
junior or senior with a grade point average no 
less than 2.9. 

The Roland and Betty C. McDaniel 
Scholarship was established by Roland and 
Betty McDaniel. Applicants must be full- 
time students in any academic division with 
first priority assigned to descendants of 
Charles J. McDaniel, and then to descendants 
of James McDaniel and spouse, Nancy Gray 
McDaniel. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

James M. McPherson Science Scholar- 
ship was endowed by the Lee University 
Sertoma Club and the family and friends of 
Dr. James M. McPherson. Scholarships may 
be awarded to qualihed Lee University stu- 
dents who are majoring in one of the natural 
science areas. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than three years. 

The Anna Mainiero Scholarship was 
endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Guy P. Marley of 
Atlanta, Georgia. Scholarships are limited to 
students majoring in science areas. No recip- 
ient shall receive the scholarship for more 
than eight semesters. Contact the 
Chairperson, Department of Natural Sciences 
and Mathematics, for further information. 

March of Dimes Scholarship was estab- 
hshed in memory of the late Cletus Benton. 



Financial Information 73 



The applicant must be a resident of Bradley 
or Polk County and must be enrolled in a 
major which prepares him/her for a career in 
a specialized health held. This shall include, 
but is not Hmited to, nursing, medical tech- 
nology, psychology, social work, or physical 
therapy. No recipient shall receive the schol- 
arship for more than two semesters. 

The Celeste Ann Marley Music Scholar- 
ship is endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Guy P. 
Marley of Atlanta, Georgia, in memory of 
their daughter. Celeste Ann. The scholarship 
is awarded on the basis of performance, 
scholarship and need. Contact the Dean, 
School of Music, Lee University, for further 
information. 

The Lee Marley Vocal Performance 
Scholarship is endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Guy 
P. Marley and is open to all high school 
seniors with demonstrated ability in vocal 
performance. For additional information con- 
tact the Dean, School of Music. 

The Mary Marley Scholarship was 
endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Guy P. Marley of 
Atlanta, Georgia. Scholarships are limited to 
students majoring in religious education. No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

The S.D. and Nellie E. Martin 
Ministerial Scholarship was established by 
Ronald D. Martin and N. DeVonde Martin. 
Priority will be given to a Church of God 
student from North Carolina preparing for 
the ministry. 

The Don and Carolyn Medlin Scholar- 
ship was endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Don 
Medlin of Caruthersville, Missouri. 
Scholarships are awarded on an annual basis 
to full-time freshmen, sophomores, juniors 
or seniors. Preference shall be given to stu- 
dents from the state of Missouri. No recipi- 
ent shall receive the scholarship for more 
than four semesters. 

Frank Miles Memorial Scholarship was 
endowed by friends and family of Frank 
Miles. Apphcants must be enrolled as full- 
time students in the Department of Busi- 
ness. No recipient shall receive the scholar- 
ship for more than eight semesters. 

The Roosevelt Miller Scholarship was 
endowed by family and friends. Applicant 
must be enrolled as a full-time student in any 
academic division of Lee University and a 
member of the Ladies of Lee. First priority 



will be student conductor, then for an accom- 
panist, next for any music major in the Ladies 
of Lee. No recipient shall receive the scholar- 
ship for more than eight semesters. 

The Houston R. and Mabel E. Morehead 
Scholarship was endowed by family and 
friends. Apphcants must be senior-level stu- 
dents with a grade point average of 3.75 or 
above. The scholarship will be rotated 
among various departments on an annual 
basis. No recipient shall receive the scholar- 
ship for more than eight semesters. 

The William F. and Bernice Morris 
Family Scholarship was endowed by the 
William F. and Bernice Morris family. 
Academic and leadership records will be con- 
sidered in the awarding of this scholarship. 
Major consideration will be given to the 
hnancial need of the applicant. Scholarships 
may be awarded to high school graduates 
entering Lee or to freshmen, sophomores, 
juniors and seniors already enrolled at Lee. 
No recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

The Northwest Memorial Scholarship 
was established by the Board of Directors of 
Northwest Bible College. The selection of 
the recipient is the responsibility of the Lee 
University Financial Aid Committee. Prior- 
ity for the scholarship shall be assigned first 
to students from the states of North Dakota, 
South Dakota and Minnesota, and then from 
the Northwest region of the United States. 

Dr. Robert O'Bannon Science Scholar- 
ship was initiated by Dr. J. Patrick Daugh- 
erty and by the Collegiate Sertoma Club in 
the area of natural science. Selection of the 
recipient is made by the Lee University 
Financial Aid Committee from recommen- 
dations received from the Chairperson of the 
Department of Natural Sciences and Math- 
ematics. Recommendation will be made 
with major consideration given to the sci- 
ence laboratory abilities of the applicant. 

The Leroy Odom Scholarship was 
endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Odom of 
Mayo, Florida. Priority will be given to stu- 
dents from the state of Florida, recommenda- 
tions by the family of Leroy Odom and 
descendants of Leroy Odom. 

The Carl M. Padgett Scholarship was 
endowed by the Orange Avenue Church of 
God of Orlando, Florida. Recipients of the 
scholarship will be selected on the basis of 



74 Financial Information 



information provided by the Orange Avenue 
Church of God Scholarship Committee. No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

The Mary S. Painter Scholarship was 
endowed by David and Mary Painter. 
Recipients of the scholarship must be full- 
time students majoring in elementary educa- 
tion with a grade point average of 3.0 or 
above. No recipient shall receive the schol- 
arship for more than eight semesters. 

The Larry and Rhonda Parker Scholar- 
ship was endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Larry 
Parker of Tyler, Texas. Applicants must be 
enrolled as full-time students in any academ- 
ic division. Priority will be given to students 
from the Rose Heights Church of God, Tyler, 
Texas. No recipient shall receive the scholar- 
ship for more than eight semesters. 

Pathway Press Journalism Scholarship 
was endowed by Pathway Press. Applicants 
must be enrolled as full-time students at Lee 
University majoring in communication with 
emphasis in journahsm. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

Clarence Emmitt Paxton Scholarship 
was established by the friends and family of 
Clarence Emmitt Paxton. Recipients of the 
scholarship must be full-time students in 
any academic division of Lee University. No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

Clarence Sebert Paxton Scholarship was 
endowed by the friends and family of 
Clarence Sebert Paxton. Recipients of the 
scholarship must be full-time students in the 
Department of Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics of Lee University. No recipient 
shall receive the scholarship for more than 
eight semesters. 

The Elizabeth Ann Mamoran Paxton 
Scholarship was established by the family 
and friends of Elizabeth Mamoran Paxton. 
Applicants must establish financial need and 
be enrolled as full-time students in any acad- 
emic area. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Georgia Marie Payne Paxton 
Scholarship was established by friends and 
family of Georgia Marie Payne Paxton. 
Recipients must be full-time students 
enrolled in any academic division. 



The Carolyn Payne Scholarship was 

established by the family and friends of 
Carolyn Payne in her memory. This scholar- 
ship is made available to rising Lee Univer- 
sity juniors to be awarded during the junior 
and senior years. Selection of recipients will 
be made by the Payne/Crosby Scholarship 
Committee. 

The PhiUips, Craig, and Dean-Sparrow 
Foundation Scholarship Fund was estab- 
lished by Phillips, Craig, and Dean-Sparrow 
Foundation. Priority will be given to music 
students majoring in Music Performance, 
Music Education or Church Music. Second 
consideration will be to religion students 
majoring in pastoral ministry. 

The H. B. Ramsey Scholarship was 
endowed by Reverend and Mrs. H. B. 
Ramsey, family and friends. Applicants must 
be enrolled in the School of Religion. No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

Kimberly Rausch Memorial Scholarship 
was established by family and the Collegiate 
Sertoma Club and is available to full-time 
students preparing to teach in elementary 
education. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Redman, Jr., 
Scholarship was endowed by Mr. and Mrs. 
W. S. Redman, Jr. Applicants for this scholar- 
ship must be enrolled in the Department of 
Business. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The William S. and Orine V. Redman, 
Sr., Scholarship was endowed by Mr. and 
Mrs. William S. Redman, Sr. Applicants may 
be enrolled in any academic division of Lee 
University leading to a Bachelor's degree. No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

Evert E. Rhodes Memorial Scholarship 
was established by friends and family. 
Applicants may be enrolled in any academic 
division of Lee University. 

The Rice Scholarship was established by 
friends and family of Darrell and Marsha 
Rice. Priority will be given to ministers' chil- 
dren who plan to go into church ministries. 

Lori Jo Roberts Memorial Scholarship 
was established by the Roberts family. 
Applicants for this scholarship must be con- 
sidered worthy and be enrolled as full-time 



Financial Information 75 



students. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Lois Sharp Rose Scholarship was 
established by family and friends. This schol- 
arship is available to full-time students 
majoring in physical education. Selection of 
the scholarship recipient is the responsibility 
of the Lee University Financial Aid 
Committee. 

The Dr. Donald D. and Helene S. Rowe 
Business Scholarship was endowed by the 
Lee University Department of Business 
alumni, faculty, staff and friends. Applicants 
for this scholarship must be of Pentecostal 
faith (with preference given to Church of 
God or Church of God of Prophecy mem- 
bers) and must be enrolled in one of the 
majors in the Department of Business. 
Recipients must have a minimum GPA of 
3.2 and maintain this level. No recipient 
shall receive the scholarship for more than 
eight semesters. 

The Dr. Stanley B. and Dorothy G. Rupy 
Ministerial Students Scholarship was 
endowed by Dr. and Mrs. Stanley B. Rupy of 
Raleigh, North Carolina. It is designed for 
students in all majors preparing for Christian 
ministry. 

The Rymer Scholarship has been estab- 
lished to assist students in the quest for high- 
er education. This scholarship is open to 
graduating high school seniors from the 
Bradley County area. Those interested in 
applying for the Rymer Scholarship may do 
so through the Admissions Office. 

The Michael C. and Mary E. Salmon 
Ministerial Students Scholarship was 
endowed by the Reverend and Mrs. Michael 
C. Salmon. Scholarships shall be awarded on 
an annual basis. Applicants for this scholar- 
ship must be enrolled in the School of 
Religion and studying for the ministry. 
Priority will be given to those ministerial 
students indicating a willingness to minister 
in home mission states. Major consideration 
shall be given to the potential academic per- 
formance and the financial need of each stu- 
dent. No recipient shall receive the scholar- 
ship for more than eight semesters. 

The Jim Sharp Scholarship was estab- 
lished by the Collegiate Sertoma Club and 
friends. This scholarship is open to all fresh- 
men, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 



Application for this scholarship may be 
made through the Financial Aid Office. 

The Esther Joyce Stout Scholarship was 
established by James B. and Alice E. Stout. 
Applicants must be enrolled as full-time stu- 
dents in the School of Religion pursuing a 
career in world missions or intercultural 
ministry. Recipients must maintain a mini- 
mum 3.0 GPA in their major course work 
and a 2.75 GPA overall. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The John T. and Fay Sullivan Scholar- 
ship was endowed by John T. and Fay 
Sullivan of Atlanta, Georgia. Applicants may 
be enrolled in any academic division of Lee 
University. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

Avis Swiger Scholarship was endowed 
by the colleagues and friends of the honorce. 
Apphcants must be full-time students with 
major consideration being placed on finan- 
cial need, academic performance and campus 
leadership. 

The A. J. Taft Life Foundation Scholar- 
ship was endowed by Mr. A. J. Taft of 
Cordova, Alabama. Scholarships will be 
awarded to students who are enrolled full- 
time in any academic division of Lee 
University. The selection of the recipients is 
wholly and strictly the responsibility of the 
Alabama State Director of Youth and 
Christian Education in consultation with the 
State Youth and Christian Education Board. 
Eligibility is based upon participants working 
at the Alabama State Youth Camp. No recip- 
ient shall receive the scholarship for more 
than eight semesters. 

The Earl M. and Ruby J. Tapley Pre- 
medical Scholarship was endowed by Dr. 
and Mrs. Earl M. Tapley. Dr. Tapley was the 
first Dean and Academic Vice President of 
Lee College (1946-53). He served as interim 
president of Lee College during the second 
semester of 1950-51. Awards will honor their 
son, Dr. Dwight Lowell Tapley and their 
granddaughter. Dr. Holly Sue Tapley. First 
preference will be given to students aspiring 
for the M.D. degree who wish to become 
family practitioners on the mission field or 
in areas of the United States with little or no 
medical services. 

The Anna Marie Thacker Music Scho- 
larship was endowed by Lee University and 



76 



Financial Information 



friends. Applicants shall be majoring in 
music with piano as their primary area of 
performance. Applicants must apply to the 
Dean of the School of Music and be prepared 
to audition. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Zeno C. Tharp Family Scholarship 
was endowed by Mildred E. Tharp Jones, 
Jewell W. Tharp Blair, Zeno C. Tharp, Jr., 
Novella M. Tharp Hopkins, and Melda L. 
Tharp Marvel. Applicants must be enrolled 
in the School of Religion and studying for the 
ministry. Major consideration will be given 
to the potential academic performance and 
financial need of each student. No recipient 
shall receive the scholarships for more than 
eight semesters. 

The E. C. and Alice Thomas Scholarship 
was endowed by Dr. and Mrs. E. C. Thomas. 
A number of scholarships, amounts to be 
determined by the Student Aid Committee, 
are awarded on an annual basis to full-time 
freshmen, sophomores, juniors or seniors. 
No recipient shall receive this scholarship for 
more than four semesters. 

The Mamie O. Tucker Scholarship was 
endowed by Mrs. Mamie O. Tucker of 
Dawsonville, Georgia. The number and 
amounts of these scholarships are to be 
determined by the Student Aid Committee. 
Scholarships are awarded on an annual basis 
to full-time freshmen, sophomores, juniors 
or seniors. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Ronald L. and Margaret Tyner 
Scholarship was endowed by Mr. and Mrs. 
Ronald L. Tyner. Applicants must be 
enrolled as full-time students in any academ- 
ic division with the exception of music. 
Priority will be given to students from the 
Laurens Road Church of God, Greenville, 
S.C; then students from the Tremont 
Avenue Church of God; then students from 
the state of South Carolina. No recipient 
shall receive the scholarship for more than 
eight semesters. 

The Reverend James L. and Lonie Mae 
Underwood Science Scholarship was 
endowed by family and friends in their mem- 
ory. The scholarship is awarded on the basis 
of Laboratory Assistants needed as well as 
scholarship and performance of the applicant 
in this area. Applicants are limited to sopho- 
more, junior and senior students, with 



majors in chemistry and/or biology. Contact 
the Chairperson, Department of Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics, for further infor- 
mation. 

The Dr. Laud O. Vaught Scholarship 
was established by the Collegiate Sertoma 
Club, the School of Religion and Dr. Laud 
Vaught. Applicants must be enrolled as full- 
time juniors or seniors in the School of 
Religion. First priority will be given to stu- 
dents from West Virginia, then to students 
from the North Central states. Nomination 
will be by the Dean of the School of Religion. 
No recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

The Forrest J. and Adnie P. Walker 
Scholarship was endowed by the family of 
Forrest J. and Adnie P. Walker. Applicants 
must be enrolled as full-time students in any 
academic division of Lee University. No 
recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

J. H. Walker Scholarship (known as the 
Herbert and Lucille Walker Scholarship 
Fund) was endowed by the family and friends 
of J. Herbert Walker, Jr. AppHcants must be 
enrolled as full-time ministerial students at 
Lee University majoring in either sociology 
or intercultural studies. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The Paul Dana Walker Athletic 
Scholarship was endowed by family and 
friends. Scholarships shall be awarded to 
sophomores, juniors, or seniors enrolled full- 
time at Lee University. Scholarships shall be 
awarded on an annual basis to students par- 
ticipating in the intercollegiate athletic pro- 
gram at Lee University, who demonstrate 
academic excellence, athletic skills, with 
qualities to provide leadership among fellow 
students. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

The Ralph Walston Memorial Scholar- 
ship was endowed by Ralph and Linda 
Walston of Salisbury, Maryland. Applicants 
shall be enrolled in the School of Religion 
and committed to pulpit ministry in the 
Church of God in the area of either pastoral, 
foreign missions, or evangelism. No recipi- 
ent shall receive the scholarship for more 
than eight semesters. 



Financial Information 



11 



The Reverend Gordon R. Watson 
Scholarship was endowed by the relatives 
and friends of Reverend Gordon R. Watson. 
An annual scholarship may be awarded to a 
freshman, sophomore, junior or senior 
enrolled full-time at Lee University. Major 
consideration shall be given to academic per- 
formance, outstanding possibilities to suc- 
ceed and the financial need of each student. 
No recipient shall receive the scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

The Sara Conn Wesson Scholarship was 
initiated by Mrs. Ben R. Maples of Pigeon 
Forge, Tennessee, in memory of Sara 
Elizabeth Conn Wesson. It has been funded 
by Mrs. Maples and Dr. and Mrs. Charles W. 
Conn and family. Scholarships are awarded 
on an annual basis to sophomores, juniors, or 
seniors who are enrolled as full-time students 
in the School of Religion. 

The Stella Mae Wilhite Scholarship was 
endowed by Reverend and Mrs. M. P. 
Wilhite. Applicants for this scholarship must 
be enrolled as full-time students in any divi- 
sion at Lee University. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The Melody Williams Memorial 
Scholarship was established by the Collegiate 
Sertoma Club and friends. The scholarship 
has been designated as a minority scholarship 
for full-time students enrolled in any academ- 
ic division. No recipient shall receive the 
scholarship for more than eight semesters. 

Robert H. (Bob) Williams Scholarship 
was established by the Collegiate Sertoma 
Club and Bob and Ruth Williams. Applicants 
must establish financial need and be enrolled 



as full-time students. Priority will first be 
given to Men's Basketball and secondly to 
general athletics. Special consideration will 
be given to a rising senior who shows 
Christian leadership. No recipient shall 
receive the scholarship for more than two 
semesters. 

The H. D. Williams Scholarship was 
endowed by the family and the Department 
of General Education of the Church of God. 
Applicants shall be enrolled in the School of 
Religion and studying for the ministry. No 
recipient shall receive this scholarship for 
more than eight semesters. 

The Raymond C. and Joanne R. Wolf 
Scholarship was endowed by Raymond and 
Joanne Wolf of Mansheld, Ohio. Applicants 
shall be enrolled in the School of Religion 
with plans to minister in the Church of 
God upon graduation. No recipient shall 
receive this scholarship for more than eight 
semesters. 

The Harvey F. Woodard Family Scholarship 
was established by the Harvey F. Woodard 
Family. Applicants must be enrolled as a stu- 
dent in the School of Religion, preparing for a 
pulpit ministry. 

Heinrich Christoph Woodson Science 
Memorial Scholarship was established by the 
family and friends of Heinrich Woodson. 
Applicants must be full-time students at Lee. 
First consideration will be given to individu- 
als who have a disability and who are 
enrolled in the Department of Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics. No recipient 
shall receive the scholarship for more than 
eight semesters. 



STATE ALUMNI CHAPTER SCHOLARSHIP EUNDS 

State Alumni Chapter Scholarship funds are available from the follow- 
ing State Alumni Associations: Florida, Georgia (North), Georgia (South), 
Delmarva-D.C, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia and Virginia. 
These State Alumni Scholarships have been established by each State 
Alumni Association. Selection of the scholarship recipients will be made by 
the Lee University Student Aid Committee from recommendations received 
from the State Alumni Associations. Application for these scholarships 
should be made through the respective state alumni chapters. 



78 Financial Information 



INSTITUTIONAL LOAN PROGRAMS 

COLLECTION PROCEDURES DUE DILIGENCE PROGRAM 
STATEMENT OF PURPOSE: 

Lee University is genuinely concerned that the students of this institu- 
tion have accessible to them an appropriate short-term loan program. It is a 
requirement of the Lee University institution to establish active procedures 
insuring the repayment of temporarily lent funds. As good stewards, effi- 
ciency and due diligence are essential to quality institutional programs, uti- 
lizing the Due Diligence Program of Collections as outlined by the National 
Association of Secondary School Financial Aid Administrators and the 
National Association of College and University Business Officers. The col- 
lection procedure will be administered systematically, uniformly, and with 
empathy and compassion. Individual cases that warrant extraordinary actions 
of deference will be reviewed with Christian care. 

WINTERS FOUNDATION REVOLVING FUND PROGRAM 

Due to an initial contribution from Dan and Mary Nell Winters, Lee 
University established a Winters Foundation Loan Program. Any enrolled 
student with bona fide need may apply for a short-term 90-day loan. A grad- 
uated service charge of $5.00 for $100.00, $10.00 for $200.00, and $12.50 for 
$250.00 is applied. 

C.I.O.S. FOUNDATION REVOLVING STUDENT LOAN FUND 

The C.I.O.S. Foundation Revolving Student Loan Fund will make avail- 
able a $1,000 interest-free student loan for full-time students enrolled in any 
academic division. The loan will be deferred during enrollment at Lee 
University with repayment beginning six months after graduation or less 
than half-time enrollment. 

OTHER FINANCL\L ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS 

STATE SCHOLARSHIP AND TUITION GRANT PROGRAMS 

Many states now have scholarship or tuition grant programs. In most 
states, these scholarships or tuition grants may be used only for attendance 
at post-secondary educational institutions within the particular state. A few 
may be used for attendance at any school. To obtain the particulars of these 
programs, contact your high school counselor or state student assistance 
agency. 

MARYLAND RESIDENTS should contact: 
Maryland Higher Education Commission 
The Jeffrey Building 
16 Francis Street, Suite 219 
Annapolis, Maryland 21401-17^1 



Financial Information 19 



MICHIGAN RESIDENTS should contact: 
The State of Michigan 
The Department of Treasury 
Michigan Merit Award 
Post Office Box 30716 
Lansing, Michigan 48909 

NEW JERSEY RESIDENTS should contact: 

New Jersey Higher Education Assistance Authority 
1474 Prospect Street 
Post Office Box 141 7 
Trenton, NJ 08625 

PENNSYLVANIA RESIDENTS should contact: 

Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency 
Towne House 
660 Boas Street 
Harrisburg, PA 17102 

TENNESSEE RESIDENTS should contact: 

Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation 
404 James Robertson Parkway, Suite 1950 
Nashville, TN 37243 

VERMONT RESIDENTS should contact: 

Vermont Student Assistance Corporation 
Champlain Mill 
Post Office Box 2000 
Winooski, VT 05404-2601 

VETERAN EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS 

Lee University has been approved by the Tennessee Higher Education 
Commissions each year to be able to certify eligible veterans and depen- 
dents for educational benefits. Each student who thinks that he/she is eligi- 
ble for veterans' educational benefits can call for current VA information by 
dialing 1-800-827-1000. This number is available from any location in the 
United States and will connect the caller to the nearest regional office. For 
more information, go to www.gibill.va.gov. 

MONTGOMERY GI BILL (CHAPTER 30) 

The Montgomery GI Bill, known as the MGIB, is a program of educa- 
tional benefits for individuals who entered active duty for the first time 
after June 30, 1985, and who received an honorable discharge. Active duty 
includes full-time National Guard duty performed after November 29, 1989. 
To receive the maximum benefit, the participant generally must have 
served continuously for three years. 



80 Financial Information 



MONTGOMERY Gl BILL (CHAPTER 1606) 

MGIB-SR (Montgomery GI Bill-Selected Reserve Educational Assistance 
Program, chapter 1606, of title 10, U.S. Code) is an educational benefits pro- 
gram. This program is for members of the Selected Reserve. The Selected 
Reserve includes the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, 
Army National Guard, and Air National Guard. The reserve components 
decide who is eligible for the program. 

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION ASSISTANCE (CHAPTER 31) 

Vocational Rehabilitation is a program of services for service members 
and veterans with service-connected physical or mental disabilities. 

POST'VIETNAM ERA VETERANS' EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE 
PROGRAM (CHAPTER 32) 

Under VEAP, active duty personnel voluntarily participated in a plan 
for education or training in which their savings were administered and 
added to by federal government. Service persons were eligible to enroll in 
VEAP if they entered active duty for the first time after December 31, 1976, 
and before July 1, 1987. 

DEPENDENTS' EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 
(CHAPTER 35) 

This program provides education and training opportunities to eligible 
dependents of certain veterans. Students who want to check to see if they 
are eligible under this program should get a copy of the veteran's service 
dates and the VA file number and then call the regional office. 

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION BENEFITS 

Students should contact their local office of Vocational Rehabilitation 
to see if they qualify for any educational assistance. 



Financial Information 81 



LEE UNFVERSITY 

FINANCL\LAID BUDGETS 

2001-2002 (9 MONTHS) 





Commuter 
(with parents) 


On-Campus 


Off-Campus 


Tuition 
Fees 


$7,336 
160 


$7,336 
260 


$7,336 
160 


Room 
Board 
Sub-Total 


1,280 

1,224 

10,000 


2,400 

2,150 

12,146 


4,515 

3,049 

15,060 


Personal 
Travel 

Books/Supplies 
Total 


775 

1,150 

; 675 

$12,600 


1,190 

1,189 

675 

$15,200 


1,785 

1,880 

675 

$19,400 



NOTE: These are estimated Cost of Attendance figures which are used for 
Financial Aid purposes. 

THINGS TO REMEMBER . . . 

• April 15 is the deadline for priority awarding. 

• Federal Regulations mandate that students receiving financial aid must 
maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress. 

• Adding/dropping courses may affect eligibility for funds. Contact the 
Financial Aid Office if there are changes. 

• The Financial Aid Office should at all times have a local phone number 
and address at which students can be reached. 

• If family/individual situations change during the school year, the 
Financial Aid Office should be notified. You may qualify for special 
conditions revision. 

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT FINANCIAL AID, PLEASE 
COME BY THE FINANCIAL AID OFFICE IN THE CENTENARY 
BUILDING (ROOM 217) OR CALL 423-614-8300 OR 800-533-9930. 



84 Student Activities &. Services 



CAMPUS LIFE: STUDENT 
ACTIVITIES & SERVICES 



The goal of Lee University is to be a Christian community— a place 
w^here people share their lives w^ith one another and meet v^hatever 
needs are present: academic, spiritual, and social. Such a community 
calls its members into accountability for their actions, their theology, 
and their lifestyles. This quest for Christian community is the founda- 
tion for the mission and purpose of Lee University, including campus 
life and student activities. The services provided, as well as the rules and 
regulations by which we live, evolve from the commitment to the 
Christian community. 

CHRISTIAN COMMITMENT 

Lee University gives full allegiance to Jesus Christ as Lord and 
desires that each member of the university community grow in 
Christian discipleship. The university takes pride in its heritage of ser- 
vice in the Kingdom of God and in its affiliation with the Church of 
God. Based upon this commitment and tradition, the university provides 
a wide variety of opportunities for spiritual enrichment and service. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHRISTIAN SERVICE 

Practical Christian service opportunities are provided through the 
Spiritual Life office. Religious clubs and music and drama groups con- 
duct outreach ministries in the local community and in many areas 
throughout the nation. Prayer and Bible study groups are available for 
interested students. One of the strong areas of emphasis is the opportu- 
nity for students to travel throughout the world participating in short- 
term mission trips. 

CEiAPEL 

The university is firmly committed to corporate worship and views 
chapel as an integrated and indispensable part of the leaming experience. 
Chapel services are conducted on Tuesday and Thursday mornings and 
on Sunday^ evenings. Altemative chapels are provided on Tuesday morn- 
ings in the Dixon Center and Wednesday nights at "The House." Weeks 
are set aside for special convocation during the fall and spring semesters. 

All full-time students (12 hours or more) are required to attend 
chapel services including convocations. Students requiring work 
exemptions for chapel may complete the appropriate forms in the 
chapel coordinator's office located in the Conn Center. Freshmen are 



Student Activities (Si Services 85 

not eligible for exemptions. Students who do not comply with chapel 
requirements may not be allowed to register for another semester. 

FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE 

Lee University provides a comprehensive program designed to assist 
first-year students in adjusting to university life. A special freshman 
course — Gateway to University Success — embodies and expresses the 
central goals and purposes of the First-Year Experience. This course 
introduces students to essential academic skills, the application of criti- 
cal thinking skills, and a personal Christian world view to life decisions. 
It is taught by an "all-star" team of faculty and administrators under the 
leadership of the Director of First-Year Programs. 

FINE ARTS AND CULTURAL EVENTS 

Each year the Fine Arts and Campus Events Committees bring to 
the campus a wide array of programs designed to enrich the student's 
cultural life. Included are concerts by professional entertainers, musical 
festivals, lectures, drama, film series, and art exhibits. 

In addition, student organizations sponsor special cultural events for 
the enjoyment and enrichment of the Lee University community. Most 
of these events may be attended without charge upon presentation of a 
current student identification card. 

SOCL\L AND ENTERTAINMENT ACTIVITIES 

Consistent with its desire to develop the whole person, Lee Univer- 
sity offers a balanced program of social opportunities which provide 
social interaction for the entire student body. A number of events are 
underwritten by the Campus Events Fund, which is funded by student 
activity fees. These events may be attended without charge upon presen- 
tation of a current student identification card. 

intercollegiate athletics 

Lee University engages in intercollegiate athletic competition as a 
member of the TranSouth Athletic Conference, the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, and the National Christian 
College Athletic Association. Basketball, tennis, golf, softball, soccer, 
volleyball, cross country, and baseball are available on an intercollegiate 
basis. All events are free to all students upon presentation of a current 
identification card. 

INTRAMURALS AND RECREATION 

To promote physical well-being Lee University encourages partici- 
pation in various forms of athletics and outdoor recreation. Intramural 
sports for both men and women attract a large percentage of students 



86 Student Activities &i Services 



who compete individually and as members of class, club, dormitory, or 
independent teams. In addition to team sports like softball, volleyball, 
soccer, basketball and football, many individual sports are provided (i.e. 
table tennis, bowling, aerobics, pickleball, racquetball). 

Students and their spouses may participate in intramural contests by 
paying the Intramural Activity Fee and registering for the events of their 
choice. The fee must be paid each semester a student wishes to compete. 

The DeVos Recreation Center provides a wide range of social and 
recreational opportunities. These opportunities include TV viewing, 
weight and physical fitness equipment, racquetball, and games such as 
table tennis, air hockey and billiards. 

UNIVERSITY PERFORMING GROUPS 

MUSIC GROUPS 

Music is an important part of life at Lee University. Whether a music 
major or just fond of music, students have the opportunity to become 
part of a choral group, a small ensemble, or an instrumental group. 

The Lee University music groups provide a wide range of spiritual 
and cultural experiences for their members. These groups minister in 
churches, schools, and concert halls both in this country and abroad. 
Both music majors and non-music majors are encouraged to audition 
for one of the following groups: Campus Choir, Chamber Orchestra, 
Chorale, Choral Union, Evangelistic Singers, Ladies of Lee, Lee Players, 
Lee Singers, Opera Workshop, Pep Band, Symphonic Band, Voices of 
Lee or the Wind Ensemble. Chapel Choir welcomes participation with- 
out audition. 

DRAMA GROUPS 

The Lee University Theater Program offers students an opportunity to 
develop artistic excellence through individual attention, a wide variety of 
technical and performance opportunities, and outstanding facilities. 
Students are involved in musicals such as "Annie," "The Sound of 
Music," and "Fiddler on the Roof"; dramas including "Romeo and Juliet," 
"The Miracle Worker," and "The Crucible"; and comedies such as 
"Arsenic and Old Lace." In addition, Lee has an active Drama Club which 
provides entertainment for on- and off-campus events, and a ministry 
troupe which performs in chapel and travels throughout the nation minis- 
tering in worship services and conducting drama ministry seminars. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Lee University provides more than fifty student clubs and organiza- 
tions designed to enhance the student's spiritual, intellectual, and social 
development. Membership in these groups is voluntary. Some organiza- 
tions have open membership while others are by invitation only. Among 
the various student organizations are the following: 



Student Activities &. Services 87 

ACADEMIC COUNCIL 

• Alpha Chi - Honor Society 

• Alpha Kappa Delta - Sociology Honor Society 

• Alpha Phi Delta - Pre-Med Honor Society 

• Alpha Psi Omega 

• College Bovv^l 

• Data Processing Management Association 

• Debate Club 

• Ecology Club 

• Kappa Delta Pi - Honor Society for Education 

• Kappa Lambda Iota - History Club 

• La Societe Francaise 

• Lambda Pi Eta 

• Lee University Historians 

• Math Club 

• Music Educators National Conference 

• National Council of Teachers of Math 

• Opera Club - Aria da Capo 

• Phi Beta Lambda - Business Club 

• Phi Delta Psi - Psychology Club 

• Phi Kappa Nu - Communication Club 

• Philosophy Society 

• Pi Alpha Sigma 

• Pi Delta Gamma - Education Club 

• Pi Delta Omicron - School of Religion 

• Pi Lambda Eta - National Communications Honor Society 

• Psi Chi - Psychology Honor Society 

• Sigma Delta Pi - Spanish Honor Society 

• Sigma Tau Delta - English Honor Society 

• Sociology Club 

• Student Chapter of American Association of Christian Counselors 

GREEKCOUNCIL SOCIAL SERVICE COUNCIL 

MEN'S CLUBS • Amnesty International 

• Alpha Gamma Chi • Collegiate Sertoma 

• Pi Kappa Pi • Family Life 

• Tau Kappa Omega • Rotaract Club 

• Theta Delta Kappa • Society for Law and Justice 

• Upsilon Xi • Student Leadership Council (SLC) 
WOMEN'S CLUBS * University Democrats 

• Delta Zeta Tau * University Republicans 

• Epsilon Lambda Phi DIVERSITY COUNCIL 

• Kappa Psi Nu , Divas 

• Omega Alpha Phi . pamilia Unida 

• Sigma Nu Sigma . International Student Fellowship 

• UMOJA 



Student Activities &. Services 



SPIRITUAL LIFE COUNCIL 

• Acts of God 

• Baptist Student Fellov^ship 

• Backyard Ministries 

• Big Pal/Little Pal 

• Church of God of Prophecy Student Alhance 

• Collegians for Life 

• Deaf Ministry Association 

• Fellowship of Christian Athletes 

• Kingdom Players 

• Ministerial Association 

• Missions Alive 

• Pioneers for Christ 

• Trinity Collegiate Fellowship 

• Youth Leaders Association 

FAMILY LIFE FELLOWSHIP 

Family Life exists to minister to the needs of married couples as well 
as single parents. This group provides activities such as Welcome Back 
parties, a Christmas banquet, and game nights, just to mention a few. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Lee University student publications serve to inform, entertain, and 
promote understanding among the various publics of the university com- 
munity. They reflect the university's mission and purpose and are in keep- 
ing with the doctrinal commitments of the sponsoring denomination. 

The Vindagua is the university yearbook, edited and published by 
the students. The Collegian is a campus newspaper. The Anthology is 
the student literary magazine published each semester. A student video 
yearbook is produced each year. 

STUDENT HOUSING 

ON CAMPUS 

Lee University is primarily a residential campus. Non-Iocal freshmen 
are required to live in university housing. All non-local freshmen are 
required to participate in the university's meal plan. No exemptions are 
made for these policies. All local freshmen who wish to live off campus 
must hve with their parents or immediate relative, not including sibhngs 
who are also college students. 

All new students (freshmen and transfer) are required to pay a $200 
housing deposit to secure a room in on-campus housing. Sophomores, 
juniors and seniors who wish to live on campus will be required to pay a 
$200 housing deposit by April 15. Requests for refunds for housing 
deposit ($200) must be in writing to the Residential Life Office 60 days 
prior to registration. 



Student Activities &. Services 89 

ROOM RESERVATIONS 

Residence hall assignments are made by the Director of Residential 
Life in the following order of preference: 

( 1 ) Returning sophomores, juniors and seniors who have applied for 
housing and who have paid a room deposit of ($200) by April 15 
are assigned according to their classification on a first-come, 
first-served basis. 

(2) New students are assigned on a first-come, first-served basis 
using the date of their completed application and deposit. Room 
assignments within the residence hall are made by the Residence 
Director. An effort is made to assign roommates based on writ- 
ten mutual request on the housing application. The university 
reserves the right to change residence hall assignments. 

(3) On Monday morning after new student check-in (the first day of fall 
registration), all students who have not checked into the residence 
halls but who have paid housing deposits will lose the room that has 
been reserved for them unless they have radicated to their Residence 
Director that they are definitely on their way to campus. 

MARRIED STUDENT HOUSING 

The university provides Carroll Court for its married and single-par- 
ent students. This apartment complex contains a number of one- and 
two-bedroom units. Applications for married student housing are avail- 
able by contacting the Office for Commuter/Non-Traditional Students. 
Rent includes utilities. Laundry facilities are available in the apartment 
complex. 

OFF CAMPUS 

The Office for Commuter/Non-Traditional Students provides assis- 
tance to students who live off campus while encouraging them to main- 
tain a connection with campus life. Students who need to find off-cam- 
pus housing; who need information about the community; who are look- 
ing for a roommate; or who need guidance about leases, utilities or other 
matters relating to commuter status should contact the Office for 
Commuter/Non-Traditional Students. This office also coordinates activi- 
ties for married students and single parents, as well as sponsoring pro- 
grams dealing with subjects from adult learners to women's issues. 

Additionally, students who wish to be approved to move off campus 
must make application to do so in the Office for Commuter/Non- 
Traditional Students. Students must meet one of the following criteria 
in order to be considered eligible for off-campus approval: 

(1) local students living with parents or immediate relative, not 
including siblings who are also college students; 

(2) students who have completed 26 hours (not including Advanced 
Placement, Summer Honors, or dual enrollment) and are not on 
social, academic, or chapel probation; 



90 Student Activities &l Services 



(3) students w^ho are 21 years of age or older; 

(4) students w^ho are U.S. veterans or v^ho have served a minimum 
of two years in the reserves; 

(5) students enrolled for less than 12 hours; 

(6) students who are married, divorced or widowed. 

Students who are on social probation will not be approved to move off 
campus. The Demerit Reduction Program can be used to work demerits 
down so that application can be made. Additionally, students who have 
already been approved but display a disregard for the lifestyle expectations 
of the university can be required to move back onto campus. 



Student Activities &. Services 91 

COUNSELING, TESTING & CAREER EXPLORATION 

This office at Lee University has developed services to help students 
deal more effectively with themselves as part of the university experience. 

Students and their families, faculty, staff and administrators are 
served by this component of the Student Life sector. 

COUNSELING 

A professional staff with training and experience offers counseling for 
a wide variety of needs. Counseling is by appointment and is confidential. 
For issues of a more serious psychological nature students may be 
referred to other agencies. 

TESTING 

The Office of Counseling and Testing coordinates a comprehensive 
standardized testing program designed to assist students in knowing 
more about themselves. Individual testing for counseling purposes is 
also available in the Counseling and Testing Center. 

Testing services are provided for the Lee University community 
through this office. We serve as a national testing center for ACT and 
the Miller Analogies Test. 

Personality and career testing is also available. 

Registration materials are also available for the following national tests: 

• Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) 

• Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) 

• Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) 

• Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) 

• National Teacher's Exam (NTE) 

CAREER EXPLORATION 

This office will assist the student in career endeavors by offering 
seminars, interest inventories and individual counseling. Graduating 
seniors may activate a personal file with reference letters, an unofficial 
copy of their transcript, and a resume to be used in their job search. 

For students who desire to work while attending school, a job board 
listing local part-time and full-time positions is available on-line 
through the school's website. 

Pastors, school officials, and others desiring the services of college 
graduates are encouraged to report vacancies to the appropriate universi- 
ty personnel, and available persons may be recommended. 

Exploration is an annual career fair, occurring in the spring semes- 
ter. The fair offers students and alumni an opportunity to network with 
prospective employers and graduate schools. A graduate school fair is 
held during the fall semester. 



92 Student Activities ^ Services 

UNIVERSITY HEALTH CLINIC 

Lee University maintains a Health Clinic which provides a variety 
of medical services including certain lab tests and medicines. Students 
are treated by a registered nurse, campus or local physician, or taken to 
the emergency room. The Health Clinic fee is mandatory for full-time 
students and optional for part-time. 

The primary objective of the Health Clinic is to give first aid and 
medical treatment. No student is refused treatment, and all information 
is confidential. There are no inpatient beds or isolation facilities avail- 
able on campus. Students with communicable diseases are assisted in 
making arrangements to return home to recover. 

Students with health-related problems requiring ongoing care are 
strongly encouraged to contact the Director of the Health Clinic prior to 
registration so arrangements can be made for medical supervision. 

The Health Clinic is located in the house on the north end of Sharp 
Pedestrian Mall directly across from the Behavioral and Social Sciences 
Building and DeVos Tennis Center. 

CAMPUS SAFETY 

The university maintains a safety force to provide protection for stu- 
dents, staff and property. Safety officers perform a variety of duties, 
including regulating traffic and parking, filing vehicle accident reports, 
securing all buildings, maintaining order, providing assistance in times of 
emergency, and contacting local law enforcement authorities when need- 
ed. By calling with a ten-minute notification when escort services are 
needed, students will be escorted from parking lots to the residence halls. 

The university provides parking facilities for students who bring auto- 
mobiles onto the campus. Each student who owns or operates an automo- 
bile on campus must register it with the Campus Safety Office and must 
carry liability insurance. A driver's license and proof of insurance must be 
presented in order to register a vehicle on campus. This includes non-resi- 
dent students who commute to the campus. Upon payment of an automo- 
bile registration fee the student is entitled to park in an assigned area. 

All students enrolled at Lee University are required to have a cur- 
rent student identification card. The card is issued during registration 
and is used for a number of university activities such as library use, cafe- 
teria, campus events, recreation center and chapel. 

STUDENT LIFESTYLE EXPECTATIONS 

Lee University seeks to maintain an environment in which whole- 
some attitudes and proper conduct can flourish. The university is fully 
committed to serious educational goals and welcomes those students 
who in attitude, appearance and behavior indicate their desire for a qual- 
ity education in a Christian environment. 



Student Activities &. Services 93 

Whenever any group is closely associated for the accomplishment of 
a definite purpose, rules and regulations are necessary. Lee University 
attempts to maintain equitable rules, developed with the participation of 
the student body and the university administration. Registration is held 
to be the student's written agreement to comply with the rules and regu- 
lations of the university. 

The ideals of Christian character should be foremost in private 
deportment and all social relationships. Stealing, cheatmg, lying, use of 
tobacco, pornography, extra- or pre-marital sexual activity, drmking of 
alcoholic beverages, use of illegal drugs, attending establishments of ill 
repute, immorality, disrespect for school authorities, commission or 
conviction of a criminal offense, discrimination or harassment of anoth- 
er person will not be tolerated. 

Students are subject to all school and residence hall regulations from 
the time they arrive on campus, whether they have registered or not. 
Students are also subject to these rules during holidays. 

A student handbook is distributed at the beginning of each fall 
semester. Students should refer to this for more specific information 
regarding behavior codes and expectations. 

COMMUNITY COVENANT 

Students are required to sign the following Community Covenant 
indicating their agreement with these principles: 

Lee University is a Christian community dedicated to the highest 
standards of academic achievement, personal development and spiritual 
growth. Together the community seeks to honor Christ by integrating 
faith, learning, and living while its members' hearts and lives mature in 
relationship to Jesus Christ and each other. Faith in God's Word should 
lead to behavior displaying His authority in our lives. Scripture teaches 
that certain attributes such as love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, good- 
ness, faithfulness, gentleness and self control are to be manifested by 
members of the Christian community (Galatians 5:22-23). 

1 . Community life at Lee University should be marked by personal 
stewardship of abilities and resources and sensitivity to the God- 
given worth and dignity of each individual. Respect for the worth 
and dignity of each individual regardless of any differences is a 
foundational tenet of the Christian community of faith. The 
University does not allow and will not condone discrimination or 
harassment of another person because of race, color, national or 
ethnic origin, religious background, age, gender or disability. 

2. Corporate worship aids in community building and support of 
the body of Christ. We gather as a community at special times 
for nurture and instruction in the truths of God's Word. These 
activities include required attendance at chapel and spiritual 
emphasis weeks. Personal devotions and local church involve- 
ment are encouraged. 



94 Student Activities & Services 



3. Scripture condemns such attitudes as greed, jealousy, pride, lust, 
needless anger, an unforgiving spirit, harmful discrimination, and 
prejudice. Furthermore, certain behaviors are expressly prohibited 
by Scripture. These include theft, lying, cheating, plagiarisin, gos- 
sip, slander, profanity, vulgarity, adultery, homosexual behavior, 
premarital or extramarital sex, sexual promiscuity, pornography, 
drunkenness, gluttony, immodesty and occult practices. 
(Galatians 5:19-21, 1 Corinthians 6:9-10). 

4. Scripture teaches that all our actions (work, study, play) should 
be performed to the glory of God. We endeavor, therefore, to be 
selective in the choices of clothes, entertainment and recreation, 
promoting those w^hich strengthen the body of Christ and avoid- 
ing those which would diminish sensitivity to Christian respon- 
sibility or promote sensual attitudes or conduct. 

5. Since the body of the Christian is the temple of the Holy Spirit, it 
deserves respect and preservation of its well-being. Therefore, the 
use of alcohol, illegal drugs, tobacco in any form, and the abuse of 
prescriptions and over-the-counter drugs violate our community 
standard. 





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 
Department of Business 
Department of Communication and the Arts 
Department of English and 

Modern Foreign Languages 
Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

HELEN DEVOS COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

► Department of Health and Human Performance 

► Department of Teaching and Learning 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

SCHOOL OF RELIGION 

► Department of Christian Ministries 

^ Department of Theology 

^ Department of External Studies 




96 



College of Arts and Sciences 



COLLEGE OF 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 

DEWAYNE THOMPSON, Dean 



Department of Behavioral &. Social Sciences 

Murl Dirksen, Chairperson 

Department of Business 
Evaline Echols, Chairperson 

Department of Communication & the Arts 

Matthew Melton, Chairperson 

Department of English & Modern Foreign Languages 

Jean Eledge, Chairperson 

Department of Natural Sciences & Mathematics 

Eddie Brown, Chairperson 




College of Arts and Sciences 97 

PRE-LAW EMPHASIS 

The American Bar Association does not recommend any specific 
pre-law major. Instead, it suggests that students focus on general skills, 
values, and knowledge which may be attained through almost any pro- 
gram of study. Although any major may prepare a student for further 
study of the law, majors offered at Lee which are frequently taken by 
students intending to enter law school include business administration, 
communication, English, history, political science, and sociology. 
Departments offering these majors have designated pre-law advisors. 
Students interested in pursuing careers in law should contact their 
department chairperson to be assigned to the appropriate advisor. 

English English and Modem Foreign Languages, Dr. Jean Eledge 

History, Sociology, 

Political Science Behavioral and Social Sciences, Dr. Robert Bamett 

Business Administration Business, Dr. Evaline Echols 

Communication Communication and the Arts, Dr. Matthew Melton 

The American Bar Association suggests that students interested in 
entering law school and pursuing careers in law should seek courses 
which provide the following: 

1 . Analytic and problem-solving skills 

2. Critical reading ability 

3. Writing skills 

4. Oral communication and listening abilities 

5. General research skills 

6. Task organization and management skills 

7. The values of serving others and promoting justice 

It also recommends that students have a good background in the follow- 
ing areas of knowledge: 

1 . American history and the social, political, economic and cultural 
factors which have influenced American society. 

2. Political thought and theory and the contemporary American 
political system. 

3. Ethical theory and theories of justice. 

4. Micro-economic theory and the interaction between economic 
theory and public policy. 

5. Basic mathematics including pre-calculus. 



98 College of Arts and Sciences 

6. Human behavior and social interaction. 

7. Cultural diversity and the increasing interdependence of the nations 
of the world. 

The American Bar Association's final recommendation is that serious 
pre-law students be active in community service projects and in 
extracurricular service activities. Lee offers a wide variety of service 
opportunities, and pre-law students are encouraged to take an active 
part in the Society for Law and Justice. 

PRE-LAW SEQUENCE 

The following courses comprise a pre-law sequence which can be insert- 
ed into relevant majors such as Business Administration, 
Communication, English, History, Political Science, and Sociology. 

Credit Hours 

ACC 241 - Principles of Accounting I 3 

COM 341 - Rhetoric and Public Discourse 3 

ENG 350- Nonfiction Writing 3 

PHI 241 - Introduction to Philosophy 3 

PRE-LAW MINOR 

The following courses comprise a pre-law minor which can be taken 

with any major. 

Credit Hours 
ACC 241 - Principles of Accounting I 3 

ECO 3 1 1 - Macroeconomics 3 

COM 341 - Rhetoric and Public Discourse 3 

ENG 350 -Nonfiction Writing 3 

PHI 241 - Introduction to Philosophy 3 

POL 255- American Government 3 

POL 40 1 - Legal Intemship 1 -3 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 99 



DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL 
AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 



Murl O. Dirksen, Chairperson 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

Assistant Professor Richard Jones 

HISTORY 

Associate Professor Robert Bamett; 
Assistant Professors Daniel Hoffman and Mary Waalkes 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

Instructor Jerome Hammond 

PHILOSOPHY 

Instructor Brad Frazier 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Assistant Professors H. Lee Cheek Jr. and Ruth Ediger 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Paul Conn; Associate Professors Robert Fisher and Doyle Goff; 
Assistant Professors Trevor Milliron, Kelly Powell and H. Edward Stone 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professors Murl Dirksen, Ollie Lee and Karen Mundy; 
Assistant Professor Robert Graham 

DISCIPLINES 

Anthropology 

Geography 

History 

Human Development 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

The Behavioral and Social Sciences Department at Lee University 
has as its mission preparing students for occupations such as social 
work, counseling, law, teaching, and pastoring as well as for graduate 
and professional schools in areas concerned with human behavior and 
the social world. We believe our students should be taught the Christian 
perspective of the behavioral and social sciences and should plan to be 
involved in vocations that fulfill the great commission of Jesus. A broad 
liberal arts undergraduate education should expand the students' under- 
standing of their own historical context, increase their knowledge of 



100 College OF Arts AND Sciences 



individual behavior, and facilitate their adjustment to a rapidly changing 
social world by preparing them to recognize and appreciate cultural 
diversity. We offer majors in HISTORY, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, 
POLITICAL SCIENCE, PSYCHOLOGY, and SOCIOLOGY. Teacher 
licensure can be obtained in history with an emphasis in political sci- 
ence or economics for 7th through 12th grade. Practical minors are 
offered in human services and counseling with courses in social work, 
and counseling with practicums. Other minors include anthropology, 
history, political science, psychology, and sociology. 

HISTORY 

Students electing to major in history have the opportunity to select 
from a varied field of study designed to provide instruction and direction 
that will enable graduates to succeed in future endeavors such as graduate 
programs and professional careers. The program also offers students the 
opportunity to gain teacher licensure. Students are taught to think critically, 
to communicate (in both written and verbal form) in an articulate manner, 
and to respect opinions and ideas unlike their own. Finally, the program 
seeks to instill in students an appreciation of their own history as well as 
the histories of others. 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

A major in Human Development prepares students for a profession 
working with younger children in agencies and schools where teacher licen- 
sure is not required or graduate studies in child and family studies. The 
courses in psychology, sociology, cultural anthropology, linguistics and 
health provide the knowledge in the stages of early human development and 
family organization as well as an understanding of how these stages are 
influenced by culture. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science is designed to prepare 
the students for numerous post graduation experiences. The most obvious of 
these include government services, graduate school in Political Science, and 
law school. In addition, this degree provides students with the skills neces- 
sary to compete in such widely diverse career fields as public and interna- 
tional affairs, campaign management, lobbying and issue advocacy, and 
many others. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

The psychology major is designed for those students who feel a call to 
work in the mental health field as therapists, counselors, social workers, or in 
research. Psychologists work in a variety of settings including churches, 
business, government, schools, mental health centers or hospitals. The pro- 
gram at Lee emphasizes specifically how the Christian faith interacts with 
the theories and practices of psychology. The psychology major is designed 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 101 



primarily for those intending to continue their study of psychology at the 
graduate level. However, knowledge of psychology is an asset in such fields 
as management, sales, personnel work, information systems, pastoral care, 
law, computer science, and public relations. Psychology helps individuals to 
understand human behavior and enhances social skills, communication and 
problem solving skills. 

SOCIOLOGY 

The Bachelor of Arts in Sociology will prepare students for employ- 
ment in various occupations as well as equip them to enter graduate or law 
school. The sociology student may pursue a general course of study in soci- 
ology or focus on one of the five emphases in the discipline: ( 1 ) criminology 
and law (2) graduate studies (3) family studies, (4) human services (social 
work), and (5) cross-cultural studies. Sociology is a major which encourages 
a liberal arts perspective and broad discipline-training, with required courses 
in social theory, statistics, and research methods. Students develop skills in 
writing, critical thinking, and quantitative methods and are prepared to 
enter a culturally diverse world. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences offers the follow- 
ing programs of study: 



egree 


Major 


Code 


B.A. 


History 


msA 


B.S. 


History (Economics Emphasis, 
Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 


HEST 


B.S. 


History (Political Science Emphasis, 
Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 


HPST 


B.A. 


Human Development 


hud; 


B.A. 


Political Science 


PSCA 


B.A. 


Psychology 


PSYA 


B.A. 


Sociology 


SOCA 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY HISA 

SPECIALITY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

HIS 1 11 - Survey of Western Civilization 3 

HIS 1 12 - Survey of Western Civilization 3 

HIS 21 1 - American History 3 

HIS 212 - Recent American History and Government 3 

HIS 3 1 - Modern Europe 3 

CHH/HIS 342 - Renaissance and Reformation 3 

HIS 41 1 - 20"^ Century American History 3 

History Electives 15 
Subtotal specialty 



36 



102 College of Arts ano Sciences 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 38 

This program requires six hours of language 
at the intermediate level. Three hours in the 
category of Understanding Contemporary 
Society are fulfilled by HIS 212. Any six 
hours of Exploring the Humanities are ful- 
filled by HIS 1 1 1 and HIS 112. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the Biblical Faith and Lifestyle 
requirement are fulfilled by CHH/HIS 342. 

ELECTIVES 41 

TOTAL HOURS IN THE PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HISTORY HEST 

(ECONOMICS EMPHASIS, TEACHER LICENSURE, 

GRADES 7-12) 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

HIS 1 1 1 - Survey of Western Civilization 3 

HIS 1 12 - Survey of Western Civilization 3 

HIS 21 1 - American History 3 

HIS 212 - Recent American History and Government 3 

CHH/HIS 342 - Renaissance and Reformation 3 

HIS 355 - Asian History and Culture 3 

HIS 410 - The Emergence of Modern America 3 

HIS 41 1 - 20th Century American History 3 

The remainder of the 12 hours of electives in history 12 

must come from the following courses: 

HIS 301 - History of Colonial America (3) 

HIS 310 - Modern Europe (3) 

CHH/HIS 323 - History of Christianity (3) 

CHH/HIS 324 - History of Christianity (3) 

HIS 350 - History of Latin America (3) 

HIS 421 - History of the South (3) 

HIS 430 - Ancient History (3) 

CHH/HIS 440 - Rome and the Early Church (3) 

HIS 445 - Medieval History (3) 

HIS 450 - History of Political Thought (3) 

HIS 460 - Tudor and Stuart England (3) 

HIS 480/490 - Seminar in History (3) 

History subtotal 36 

ECONOMICS EMPHASIS 

ECO 301 - Consumer Economics 3 

ECO 31 1 - Macroeconomics 3 

ECO 312 - Microeconomics 3 

ECO 35 1 - Money and Banking 3 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 103 



Economics Subtotal 12 

Subtotal Specialty 48 

ENHANCED PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 
POL 255 - American Government 3 

GEO 312 - Human Geography 3 

(cross-listed in Anthropology) 
Subtotal Enhanced General Education 6 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 199 - Introduction to Teaching Profession Seminar 1 

EDU 201 - Foundations of Education 3 

SED 312 - Educational Psychology 3 

EDU 316 - Exceptional Child (cross-listed in Special Ed.) 3 

SED 412 - Teaching Social Studies, Grades 7-12 2 

SED 419 - General Secondary Methods 2 

SED 444 - Student Teaching 5 

SED 445 - Student Teaching 5 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 
Subtotal Professional Education 26 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 32 

Six hours in the category of Understanding 
Contemporary Society are fulfilled by HIS 212 and 
ECO 311. Any six hours of Exploring the 
Humanities are fulfilled by HIS 1 1 1 and HIS 1 12. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the Biblical Faith and Lifestyle 
requirement are fulfilled by CHH/HIS 342. 

ELECTIVES 3 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



104 College of Arts and Sciences 



Credit Hours 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
12 



BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN HISTORY HPST 

(POLITICAL SCIENCE EMPHASIS, TEACHER 
LICENSURE, GRADES 7-12) 
SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS 

HIS 1 1 1 - Survey of Western Civilization 

HIS 1 12 - Survey of Western Civilization 

HIS 21 1 - American History 

HIS 212 - Recent American History and Government 

CHH/HIS 342 - Renaissance and Reformation 

HIS 355 - Asian History and Culture 

HIS 410 - The Emergence of Modern America 

HIS 41 1 - 20th Century American History 

The remainder of the 12 hours of electives in history 

must come from the following courses: 

HIS 301 - History of Colonial America (3) 

HIS 3 1 - Modern Europe (3 ) 

HIS 323 - History of Christianity (3) 

HIS 324 - History of Christianity (3) 

HIS 350 - History of Latin America (3) 

HIS 421 - History of the South (3) 

HIS 430 - Ancient History (3) 

HIS 440 - Rome and the Early Church (3) 

HIS 445 - Medieval History (3) 

HIS 450 - History of Political Thought (3) 

HIS 460 - Tudor and Stuart England (3) 

HIS 480/490 - Seminar in History (3) 

History subtotal 

POLITICAL SCIENCE EMPHASIS 
POL 255 - American Government 
POL 345 - Comparative Governments 
POL 470 - History of Political Thought 
Political Science Electives 
Political Science Subtotal 
Subtotal Specialty 48 

ENHANCED PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 
ECO 311 - Macroeconomics 3 

GEO 312 - Human Geography 3 

(cross-listed in Anthropology) 
Subtotal Enhanced General Education 6 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 199 - Introduction to Teaching Profession Seminar 1 

EDU 201 - Foundations of Education 3 

SED 312 - Educational Psychology 3 

EDU 316 - Exceptional Child (cross-listed in Special Ed.) 3 

SED 412 - Teaching Social Studies, Grades 7-12 2 

SED 419 - General Secondary Methods 2 

SED 444 - Student Teaching 5 



36 

3 
3 
3 
3 
12 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 105 



SED 445 - Student Teaching 5 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 

Subtotal Professional Education 26 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 32 

Six hours in the category of Understanding 
Contemporary Society are fulfilled by HIS 212 
and ECO 311. Any six hours of Exploring the 
Humanities are fulfilled by HIS 1 1 1 and HIS 112. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the Biblical Faith and Lifestyle 
requirement are fulfilled by CHH/HIS 342. 

ELECTIVES 3 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



106 College of Arts and Sciences 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HUDA 
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

SPECL\LTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

PSY 302 - Personality Theory 3 

PSY 309 - Developmental Psychology 3 

PSY 3 1 - Child Psychology 3 

PSY 31 1 - Adolescent Psychology 3 

PSY 341 - Psychology of Learning 3 

SOC 320 - Sociology of the Family 3 

see 32 1 - Behavioral statistics 3 

SOC 322 - Social Research Methods 3 
ANT 310 - Cultural Anthropology (cross-listed in Sociology) 3 

HSC 357 - Human Sexuality (cross-listed in Health) 3 
HSC 365 - Child Health and Social Behavior 

(cross-listed in Health) 3 

MAJOR ELECP/ES 

(choose six hours from any of the courses listed below) 

SOC 212 - Social Problems 3 

SOC 220 - Courtship, Marriage and the Family 

(cross-listed in Psychology) 3 

SOC 380 - Juvenile Delinquency 3 

EDU 3 16 - Exceptional Child (Cross-Hsted in Special Education) 3 

SOC 330 - Social Psychology (cross-listed in Sociology) 3 

PSY 340- Gerontology (cross-listedd in Sociology) 3 

Subtotal Specialty 2>9 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

MAT 111 -Algebra 3 

BIO 103 - Human Biology 

or 
HSC 292 - Human Anatomy and Physiology 4 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 7 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 40 

This program requires 6 hours of language at the 
intermediate level. The 4-hour lab science requirement 
and the 3 -hour math requirement are fulfilled through 
the program's collateral requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 8 

ELECTROS 26 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 107 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE PSCA 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

POL 255 - American Government 3 

POL 330 - International Relations 3 
Choose one of these two: 

POL 321 - Behavioral Statistics 

POL 322 - Social Research Methods 3 

POL 345 - Comparative Governments 3 

POL 470 - History of Political Thought 3 

POL 495 - Capstone Course: Christianity and Politics 3 

Political Science Electives 18 
Subtotal Specialty 36 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 47 

This program requires 6 hours of language at the 
intermediate level. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the Biblical Faith and Lifestyle 
requirement are fulfilled by POL 495. 

ELECTIVES 32 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY PSYA 
SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

PSY 201 - Foundations of Psychology 3 

PSY 302 - Personality Theory 3 

PSY 305 - Physiological Psychology 3 

PSY 309 - Developmental Psychology 3 

PSY 325 - Psychological Research Methods I 3 

PSY 326 - Psychological Research Methods H 3 

PSY 330 - Social Psychology 3 

PSY 341 - Psychology of Learning 3 

PSY 401 - Abnormal Psychology 3 

PSY 495 - Capstone for Seniors 3 

Major Electives 6 
Subtotal Specialty 36 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQLFIREMENTS 47 (48 ) 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign language 
at the intermediate level. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 15 

Three hours of the Biblical Faith and Lifestyle requirement 
are fulfilled by PSY 495. 

ELECTROS 31 (32) 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



108 College of Arts and Sciences 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY SOCA 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

SOC 2 1 2 - Social Problems 3 

see 321 - Behavioral Statistics 3 

SOC 322 - Social Research Methods 3 

SOC 330 - Social Psychology 3 

SOC 370 - Social &l Cultural Change 3 

SOC 461 - History of Sociological Theory 4 

SOC 495 - Seminar in the Integration of 

Sociology & Christian Faith 3 

Major Electives 14 
Subtotal Specialty 

Sociology majors should take SOC 200 as part 
of their General Education Core. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign language at the 
intermediate level. (Human Anatomy &. Physiology is 
recommended to fulfill lab science requirement.) 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 

Three hours of the Biblical Faith and Lifestyle requirement 
are fullfilled through SOC 495. 

ELECTTVES 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 



36 



47 (48) 



15 



28 (29) 
130 



MINORS 

The Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences offers minors in 
anthropology, counseling, history, political science, psychology, sociology, 
and human services. A minimum of eighteen hours is required for a minor 
in anthropology, counseling, history, political science, psychology, or soci- 
ology and at least twenty-four hours for a minor in human services. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

The Anthropology minor is designed for those who intend to work 
internationally or among ethnic Americans in business, education, min- 
istry, or diplomacy. It can be completed as part of the Intercultural 
Studies major. Any 18 hours of anthropology will constitute a minor. 

COUNSELING 

The Counseling minor (18 hours) is designed to be a preprofessional 
sequence of courses that will prepare students for entry level positions in 
mental health facilities and social service agencies, or prepare them for 
graduate studies in counseling. The required courses are Psychology 230, 
302, 431, 451, 452, 453, and 454. 

HUMAN SERVICES 

The Human Services mmor (24 hours) is intended to be a pre- 
professional sequence of courses that will prepare students for employ- 
ment in human service agencies, or prepare them for graduate work in 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 109 



social work or counseling. Psychology and Sociology majors may count six 
hours of the following courses toward the required 36 hours in their major: 
SOC 212, 311, 312; PSY/SOC 412 and 413; and PSY 302, 451, 452. 

PHILOSOPHY 

The Philosophy minor (18 hours) is designed to prepare students for 
graduate work in philosophy, theology (including seminary studies), politi- 
cal science, history and other disciplines that require a strong background in 
philosophy, including law. The required courses are PHI 241 and 341, in 
addition to three hours from PHI 242, 342, 351 or 352; three hours from PHI 
361 or 442; and six additional hours from any of the above courses not yet 
taken or PHI/POL 471, 472 or 473. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The Political Science minor (18 hours) is a sequence of courses intend- 
ed to prepare students for graduate work, law school, public administra- 
tion, or other occupations which require a strong political science empha- 
sis. The minor requirements include Political Science 255 and 15 hours of 
elective courses. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 
ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANT 310. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY Three hours credit 

An introduction to various aspects of culture including material, social, economic, esthetics, 
political, religious, and linguistic factors. 

ANT 312. HUMAN GEOGRAPHY Three hours credit 

This course examines cultural change and cultural regionalism, concepts and models of spa- 
tial interaction, and spatial behavior including geographical patterns of languages, religion, eth- 
nic groups, folk and popular culture, and population geographical distribution of economic, 
urban, and political organizations. 

ANT 351. CULTURE AND PERSONALITY Three hours credit 

Survey of the approaches to the interrelation between the personality system and the socio- 
cultural environment with emphasis on mental disorder and cultural change. 

ANT 354. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS Three hours credit 

A study of the relationship between communication and culture with emphasis on factors 
affecting the processes and quality of interpersonal communications between those of differing 
cultures and subcultures. Offered Fall Semester. 

ANT 355. ASIAN HISTORY AND CULTURE Three hours credit 

A survey of Asian Civilization from ancient times to the present, with special emphasis on 
changes in centuries-old forms of social, economic, and political organizations. Offered Spring 
Semester. 

ANT 360. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS Three hours credit 

An introduction to scientific language study including morphology, phonology, syntax, prag- 
matics, and the nature of language. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ANT 370. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CHANGE Three hours credit 

Study of past, present, and future changes in social structures and cultural patterns. A cross- 
cultural/comparative approach will be used to examine such topics as modernization, industrial- 
ization, cultural ecology, world systems, revolutions, economic development, information soci- 
ety and robotics. 



110 College OF Arts AND Sciences 



ANT 410. MINORITIES Three hours credit 

The significance of ethnic minorities in American society and the world with an intro- 
duction to sociological and anthropological theory as well as an interpretation of dominant- 
minority relations. Prerequisite: SOC 212. Offered Fall Semester, even years. 

ANT 420/430. PEOPLES AND CULTURES Three hours credit 

OF A SELECTED REGION 

A broad investigation of the cultural unity and diversity of a selected region, its peoples, 
culture areas, and traditions. This course is designed to give students a general knowledge of 
a selected region, i.e. Latin America, American Southwest, Central Asia-China, Appalachia, 
through the use of ethnological, archeological, and historical material including topics on vil- 
lage organization, technological change, urbanization, religious systems, and social relations. 

GEOGRAPHY 

GEO 311. INTRODUCTION OF GEOGRAPHY Three hours credit 

The physical world, regional similarities and differences, and the settlements of 
mankind. 

GEO 312. HUMAN GEOGRAPHY Three hours credit 

A course that examines cultural change and cultural regionalism, concepts and models of 
spatial interaction, and spatial behavior including geographical patterns of languages, reli- 
gion, ethnic groups, folk and popular culture, and population geographical distribution of eco- 
nomic, urban, and political organizations. 

HISTORY 

HIS 111. SURVEY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION Three hours credit 

A general historical survey of the economic, religious, cultural, geographical, and politi- 
cal developments of western civilization from the Greeks through 1660 A.D. Offered every 
semester. 

HIS 1 1 2. SURVEY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION Three hours credit 

A continuation of History 1 1 1, from 1660 A.D. to the present. Offered every semester. 

HIS 2 1 1 . AMERICAN HISTORY Three hours credit 

A history of the American people and their relationship to the world with a special 
emphasis on the United States and its development through the Civil War and 
Reconstruction. Offered every semester. 

HIS 2 1 2. RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY & GOVERNMENT Three hours credit 

An introduction to American History and the operation of our political system at the fed- 
eral level in the twentieth century. Those people, events, ideas, and policies that have signif- 
icantly influenced contremporary society will be emphasized. 

HIS 301. HISTORY OF COLONIAL AMERICA Three hours credit 

The development of America to 1775. Offered Fall Semester, odd years. 

HIS 302. THE EARLY NATIONAL PERIOD Three hours credit 

OF THE UNITED STATES 

The development of America from 1776 to the Compromise of 1850. Offered Spring 
Semester, even years. 

HIS 310. MODERN EUROPE Three hours credit 

A study of feurope from 1815 to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on the roles 
of liberalism, conservatism, nationalism, socialism, imperialism, the industrial revolution, 
the world wars, and the cold war in shaping Europe today. Offered Fall Semester, even years. 

HIS 323. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY Three hours credit 

A study of the Christian Church from the apostles to the present age. Special emphasis 
will be given to the major reform movements of the church. Offered Fall Semester. 

HIS 324. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY Three hours credit 

A continuation of History 323. Offered Spring Semester. 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 1 1 1 



HIS 332. RELIGION AND CULTURE Three hours credit 

A historical study of the prohlematic relationship between the Christian religion and the 
varying positions and practices which have evolved in the Christian church as a result of the 
Church's double wrestle with its Lord and with the culture of the society with which it lives 
in symbiosis. 

HIS 340. A HISTORY OF THE BIBLE Three hours credit 

A historical study of the text, canon, transmission, and translations of the Bible from the 
close of the New Testament to the present with a special emphasis on the history of the 
English Bible. Offered on demand. 

HIS 342. THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION Three hours credit 

A study of political, economic, religious, and cultural developments of the Renaissance 
and Reformation eras. Offered Spring Semester. 

HIS 350. HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA Three hours credit 

A study of the exploration, discovery, settlement, development, and independence of 
Latin America, with special emphasis on the social, cultural, political, economic, and reli- 
gious contributions. Offered on demand. 

HIS 355. ASIAN HISTORY AND CULTURE Three hours credit 

A survey of Asian Civilizations from ancient times to the present, with special emphasis 
on changes in centuries-old forms of social, economic, and political organizations. Offered 
Spring Semester. 

HIS 399. HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY One-four hours credit 

An independent examination supervised by three faculty members that provides the stu- 
dent who qualifies under the honors guidelines the opportunity to pursue a special topic of 
his/her choice. 

HIS 410. THE EMERGENCE OF MODERN AMERICA Three hours credit 

An in-depth study of the United States from 1850 to 1900. Special emphasis will be 
placed on the American Civil War, Rise of Labor, Farmers and Native American Indians. 
Offered Fall Semester. 

HIS 411. 20th CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY Three hours credit 

An analysis of the economic, social, and political history of the United States since 1900. 
Offered Spring Semester. 

HIS 421. HISTORY OF THE SOUTH Three hours credit 

A examination of the economic, social, political, and cultural development of the South. 
Offered Fall Semester, even years. 

HIS 430. INTRODUCTION TO THE ANCIENT WORLD Three hours credit 

An introduction to Near Eastern, Greek, and early Roman societies. Special emphasis 
will be given to archaeological information illustrating the interrelationships between the 
Old Testament and the history and culture of these civilizations. Offered Fall Semester. 

HIS 440. ROME AND THE EARLY CHURCH Three hours credit 

A study of early church history and thought in the context of the classical culture of 
Rome from the late Republic until 476 A.D. Special emphasis will be given to church/state 
relations after the New Testament era. Offered Spring Semester. 

HIS 445. MEDIEVAL HISTORY Three hours credit 

A study of the political, social, and religious history of the Middle Ages (c. 300-1400) in 
Europe with a special emphasis on England and Ireland, Jewish history, women's roles in 
society, and popular religion and heresy. Offered Fall Semester. 

HIS 450. HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT Three hours credit 

A survey of the major works in political theory from ancient times to the more modern 
theories which impact the world. 



112 College of Arts and Sciences 



HIS 451. CULTURAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF Three hours credit 

THE UNITED STATES 

A consideration of prominent intellectual systems in American history from Puritanism 
to progressivism, and their contributions to the molding of national character. Offered Spring 
Semester, odd years. 

HIS 460. TUDOR AND STUART ENGLAND Three hours credit 

A history of England from the twilight of Medievalism at the end of the fourteenth cen- 
tury to the overthrow of James n in 1688. Special attention will be given to cultural, econom- 
ic, religious, and political developments during the Tudor and Stuart periods. Offered Spring 
Semester, odd years. 

HIS 480/490. SEMINAR IN HISTORY Three hours credit 

An intensive study of selected topics, including research in the materials of history and 
the writing of analytical reports. 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHI 24 1 . INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY Three hours credit 

This course introduces students to major philosophical questions, perennial philosophi- 
cal debates, and main areas of philosophical inquiry through the reading, analysis and discus- 
sion of classical and contemporary philosophical works. 

PHI 242. INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC AND CRITICAL REASONING Three hours credit 

This course will focus on the analysis of arguments expressed in natural language, and 
will also introduce students to formal deductive logic and informal fallacies of reasoning. It 
is especially recommended for students who plan to pursue graduate studies and those who 
want to sharpen their critical reasoning skills. 

PHI 34 1 . MAJOR THINKERS IN ANCIENT AND Three hours credit 

MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY 

This course offers an in-depth treatment of selected major philosophers of modern and 
contemporary Western philosophy. Prerequisites: PHI 241 or approval of instructor. 

PHI 342. MAJOR THINKERS IN MODERN AND Three hours credit 

CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY 

This course offers an in-depth treatment of selected major philosophers of modern and 
contemporary Western philosophy. Prerequisites: PHI 241 and 341. 

PHI 35 1 . PHILOSOPHY OF HUMAN NATURE Three hours credit 

This course offers an intensive study of prominent theories of human nature and relat- 
ed philosophical problems, such as the mind-body problem,- the unity, purpose, and dignity 
of human nature,- the emotions and their interplay with intelligence and volition; the origin 
and nature of human evil; and the human person in and with/against society. Prerequisites: 
PHI 241. 

PHI 352. PHILOSOPHY OF FREEDOM Three hours credit 

This course examines the concept of freedom of the will in the history of Western phi- 
losophy. Contemporary philosophical discussions of freedom and moral responsibility also 
will be treated with a view to how these discussions are anticipated and illuminated by the 
contributions made to the philosophy of freedom by leading thinkers from different historical 
periods. Prerequisites: PHI 241. 

PHI 361. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION Three hours credit 

This course undertakes a critical analysis and evaluation of reasoning about God. 
Topics covered mclude a philosophical analysis of the concept of God, arguments for God's 
existence, the relation between faith and reason, the problem of evil, and God's relation to 
morality and the meaning of life. Prerequisites: PHI 241. 

PHI 442. KIERKEGAARD Three hours credit 

This course is an intensive study of the thought of Soren Kierkegaard. Special emphasis 
will be placed on Kierkegaard's moral philosophy, philosophy of religion, and philosophy of 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 1 13 



human nature. Prerequisites: PHI 241 and one other philosophy course, or the approval of 
the instructor. 

PHI 471. ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THEORY Three hours credit 

A focused study of key themes of political theory (power, authority, tyranny, ohligation. 
Church and State, citizenship, etc.) in major ancient and medieval philosophers and thinkers. 

PHI 472. MODERN POLITICAL THEORY Three hours credit 

A focused study of key themes of political theory (authority, tyranny, ohligation. 
Church and State, citizenship, etc.) in major modern philosophers and thinkers. 

PHI 473. POST-MODERN POLITICAL THEORY Three hours credit 

A focused study of key themes of pohtical theory (power, knowledge, authority, femi- 
nism, the self, relativism, etc.) in major post-modern philosophers and thinkers. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

POL 23L CURRENT INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Three hours credit 

A course designed to explore all facets of the most current issues that affect the international 
community. The actual topics will he determined by what events and issues seem to have the 
greatest influence on world affairs. (Formerly POL 25 1 ) 

POL 252. MORALITY AND POLITICS Three hours credit 

A course that examines the moral and political responsibihties of govemment and Christian 
citizens with regard to a variety of social, economic, and cultural public poUcy problems. 

POL 255. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Three hours credit 

A survey of the structure and operation of government in the United States at all levels: 
national, state, and local. (Formerly POL 211) 

POL 257. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ISSUES BEFORE THE COURT Three hours credit 

A study of the changes being wrought through the judicial process as to rights of individuals 
with special focus on minorities. Such issues as fundamental hberties, the criminally accused, 
family matters, morahty, consumer rights, environmental pollution, sex discrimination and poht- 
ical representation are also examined. (Formerly POL 230) 

POL 32 L BEHAVIORAL STATISTICS Three hours credit 

A study of descriptive statistics, which includes frequency distributions, measures of central 
tendency and variability, the normal curve and standard scores, and inferential statistics with the 
emphasis on hypothesis testing using the normal deviate test, t-test, one-way analysis of variance, 
and chi-square. The course also introduces regression, correlation, and probability. 
Recommended: MAT 111. Offered Fall Semester. 

POL 322. SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS Three hours credit 

Methods and techniques of research in the social sciences, including methods of collection , 
analyzing and presenting data. Recommended: POL 321 . Offered Spring Semester. 

POL 330. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Three hours credit 

An introduction to intemational politics and the challenges that face the global community 
including a brief overview of the major subfields of Intemational Political Economy, Intemational 
Organizations, and Intemational Law. Offered Spring Semester. (Formerly POL 311) 

POL 332. U.S. FOREIGN POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY Three hours credit 

A survey of the history, structure, instmments, and operation of U.S. Foreign Policy including 
the place of the United States in the global community. (Formerly POL 440) 

POL 333. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY Three hours credit 

A course focused on the politics of international economic relations. Various theories, 
processes, stmctures, and issues will be examined for their value in helping to understand and 
evaluate the historical development and current operation of the world economy. 



114 College of Arts and Sciences 



POL 334. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS Three hours credit 

An exploration of the many and various kinds of international organizations both political 
and economic that dominate the global community with special focus on the United Nations, the 
European Union, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. 

POL 345. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTS Three hours credit 

A comparison of differing forms of govemment in the international community with a look 
at the science of comparative politics. Recommended: POL 2S5. Offered Fall Semester. 

POL 346. THE DEVELOPING WORLD Three hours credit 

A course that explores the unique issues, challenges, and solutions as faced by countries in 
the developing world. Various theories, processes, structures, and issues will be examined for 
their value in helping to understand and evaluate the historical development and current position 
of the two-thirds world. 

POL 35 1 . STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Three hours credit 

A survey of the structure and operation of all branches of govemment in the United States at 
the state and local levels. Recommended: POL 255. (Formerly POL 437) 

POL 353. THE CONGRESS Three hours credit 

A study of the legislative branch of the United States govemment focusing on its history, polit- 
ical institutions, leadership, and the legislative processes in general. Recommended: POL 255. 

POL 355. THE PRESIDENCY Three hours credit 

A study of the office of the U.S. President focusing on its political structures, politics, institu- 
tions, history, and the men who inhabited the office as well as focusing on leadership in general. 
Recommended: POL 255. 

POL 357. THE COURTS Three hours credit 

A study of the judicial branch of the U.S. govemment with special emphasis on its history, 
political stmctures, influential leaders, and institutions. Specific landmark cases and legal proce- 
dures will also be examined. Recommended: POL 255. 

POL 359. PARTIES AND ELECTIONS Three hours credit 

An introduction to the American party system as well as to the strategies and tactics of mod- 
em pohtical campaigns. Recommended: POL 255. 

POL 391. FOUNDATIONS FOR POLICY ANALYSIS 

AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT T One hour credit 

Introduction of important foundational concepts conceming Christian involvement in public 
affairs. This unit includes the study of biblical revelation as a framework for analysis. The histo- 
ry of evangelical public involvement is also explored. Prerequisites: Admission to the American 
Studies Program and POL 255. (Formerly POL 341) 

POL 392. FOUNDATIONS FOR POLICY ANALYSIS 

AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT IV One hour credit 

Introduction of important foundational concepts conceming Christian involvement in public 
affairs. This unit includes the study of biblical revelation as a framework for analysis. The histo- 
ry of evangelical public involvement is also explored. Prerequisites: Admission to the American 
Studies Program and POL 255. (Formerly POL 342) 

POL 393. TOPICS IN DOMESTIC POUCY* Three hours credit 

Examination of domestic political issues and important foundational concepts of pohtical sci- 
ence. This course will explore various biblical perspectives on societal involvement within evan- 
gelical, social, and political activism. The biblical demand for doing justice then becomes the 
point of departure for focusing on current domestic issues facing our nation. Prerequisites: 
Admission to the American Studies Program and POL 255. (Formerly POL 350) 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 115 



POL 394. TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL POLICY * Three hours credit 

Examination of major international issues, mtroduction to members of Washington's interna- 
tional community and development of a biblical perspective on foreign policy, especially justice 
and peacemaking. Prerequisites; Admission to the American Studies Program and POL 255. 
(FomierlyPOLSZO) 

POL 399. HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY One-four hours credit 

An independent study supervised by three faculty members that provides the student who 
quahfies under the honors guidelines the opportunity to pursue a special topic of his/her choice. 

POL 40 1 . LEGAL INTERNSHIP One hour credit 

A course designed for any student with an interest in law and the courts. This is the super- 
vised internship placement of a student at each level of the U.S. Court, federal, state, and county 
court systems of the United States, as well as in the different types of courts including criminal, 
civil, and appellate courts for practical experience. At least 40 hours of internship clock time are 
required for awarding of credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor only. 

POL 402. LEGAL INTERNSHIP Two hours credit 

A course designed for any student with an interest in T' and the courts. This is the supervised 
internship placement of a student at each level of the U.S. Court, federal, state, and county court 
systems of the United States, as well as in the different types of courts including criminal, civil, 
and appellate courts for practical experience. At least 80 hours of internship clock time are 
required for awarding of credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor only. 

POL 403. LEGAL INTERNSHIP Three hours credit 

A course designed for any student with an interest in law and the courts. This is the super- 
vised intemship placement of a student at each level of the U.S. Court, federal, state, and county 
court systems of the United States, as well as m the different types of courts including criminal, 
civil, and appellate courts for practical experience. At least 120 hours of intemship clock time are 
required for awarding of credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instmctor only. 

POL 408. INTERNSHIP IN POLITICAL SCIENCE* Eight hours credit 

PoHtical intemship in student's field of interest in order to integrate faith with practice in a 
professional setting and for the purpose of providing exposure to the many governmental agencies 
in Washington. Prerequisites: Admission to American Studies Program and POL 255. (Formerly 
POL 410) 

POL 410. MEDIA LAW Three hours credit 

Examination of the legal and ethical aspects of publishing and broadcasting, with emphasis on 
freedom of the press, the right to know, copyright, libel, privacy, and obscenity. Prerequisites: 
COM 201 and COM 202 or POL 255 or permission of instmctor. 

POL 445. EUROPEAN POUTICS Three hours credit 

An examination of the politics and issues in Western, Central, and Eastem Europe focusing 
on the most recent events in the region and how these affect the states of Europe and the world. 
Recommended: POL 345. (Formerly POL 425) 

POL 460. POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY Three hours credit 

A study of the social bases of political phenomena, including electoral processes, the institu- 
tions of govemment, power stmctures, and political ideologies. 

POL 470. HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT Three hours credit 

A survey of the major works in Political Theory from ancient times to the more modem theo- 
ries which impact the world. Offered Spring Semester. (Formerly POL 450) 

POL 47 1 . ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THEORY Three hours credit 

A focused study of key themes of political theory (power, authority, legitimacy, obligation, 
citizenship, etc.) in major ancient and medieval philosophers and thinkers. 



116 College of Arts and Sciences 



POL 472. MODERN POLITICAL THEORY Three hours credit 

A focused study of key themes of poUtical theory (authority, tyranny, ohhgation, Church and 
State, citizenship, etc.) in major modem philosophers and thinkers. 

POL 473. POST-MODERN POLITICAL THEORY Three hours credit 

A focused study of key themes of pohtical theory (power, knowledge, authority, feminism, 
the self, relativism, etc.) in major post-modem philosophers and thinkers. 

POL 480/490. SEMINAR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE Three hours credit 

An mtensive study of selected topics, mcluding research in the materials of political science 
and the writing of analytical reports. 

POL 495. CAPSTONE COURSE: CHRISTIANITY AND POLITICS Three hours credit 

A course that seeks to provide students the opportunity to integrate the concepts and theories 
of political science with Christian theology. Students will be challenged to confront and resolve 
key issues they will face as they seek to live out their biblical faith in their profession and m their 
civic and personal lives. Prerequisite: THE 331 or pennission of instmctor. 

* Under the supervision of the American Studies Program CCCU as an educational hiboratory in 
Washington, D.C. (16 hr. off-campus program) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSY 200. UNDERSTANDING HUMAN BEHAVIOR Three hours credit 

A course designed to introduce the general student to the major topics and themes of 
psychology. A focus will be given to applying psychological principles to help students better 
understand themselves and others. Topics covered include biological influences on behavior, 
sleeping and dreaming, learning and memory, abnormal psychology, human development, 
and personality. Offered every semester. (This course is an option for the core curriculum but 
is not required for the psychology major. Majors may not apply it as a psychology elective or 
take it in place of PSY 201.) 

PSY 201. FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

A foundational course designed to orient and prepare students to major in the field of 
psychology. Historical context will be given while surveying the fundamental content areas 
in the field. Coverage will also be given to writing skills, career paths, graduate preparation, 
integrating psychology with one's faith, and other discipline issues. Offered every Semester. 

PSY 220. COURTSHIP, MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY Three hours credit 

An introductory study of dating, courtship and marriage, preparation for marriage,- the 
selection of a marriage partner, the roles of members of the family, family rituals, and pat- 
terns of interaction. Offered Fall Semester. 

PSY 230. CRISIS INTERVENTION COUNSELING Two hours credit 

A survey of principles and techniques for telephone counseling. Designed especially to 
prepare non-professionals for crisis intervention based on Christian values within the limits 
of telephone contact. Offered Fall Semester. 

PSY 302. PERSONALITY THEORY Three hours credit 

A survey of the major theories on how personality develops. Theories are examined from 
a Christian perspective, and students are encouraged to formulate their own theoretical point 
of view. Theorists include Freud, Jung, Rogers, Maslow, and Skinner. Prerequisite: PSY 200 
or PSY 201 .Offered every semester. 

PSY 305. PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

A course designed to give an overview of physiological psychology with specific empha- 
sis on the brain and its functions, and to explore the many ways biology influences human 
experience. Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 201. Offered every semester. 

PSY 309. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

An introductory course in developmental psychology, emphasizing the important develop- 
mental issues and changes that occur physically, cognitively, and socially across the lifespan. 
Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 201. Offered every semester. 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 1 1 7 



PSY 310. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

A review of the principles of behavior in infancy and childhood; physical, intellectual, 
social, emotional and language development in the normal child. Prerequisite: PSY 200 or 
PSY 201. Offered every semester. 

PSY 311. ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

A review of the principles of behavior of the adolescent; the physical, intellectual, social, 
and emotional development specific to this period of maturation. Prerequisite: PSY 200 or 
PSY 201. Offered every semester. 

PSY 312. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

A study of the psychological foundations for learning and the procedures by which learn- 
ing is accomplished. Also covered is an evaluation of teaching methods and learning tools. 
Offered every semester. 

PSY 318. PSYCHOLOGY OF IDENTITY Three hours credit 

A study of contemporary post-adolescent personality development, organized around 
Erikson's fifth and sixth stages, with emphasis on middle-adult outcomes of the post-adoles- 
cent identity crisis. 

PSY 325. PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS I Three hours credit 

The first of a two-course sequence covering research methods for psychology. This first 
section covers primary statistical methods, how and when statistics are used, and also helps 
the student to better understand and evaluate research studies that use statistical data. A 
computer lab component is an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: PSY 201. Offered 
every Semester. 

PSY 326. PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS II Three hours credit 

The second course in the research sequence covering how research is done, pitfalls in 
research, how to design research studies, collecting data, and writing research reports. 
Students will then participate as either research assistants or as collaborators on a psycholog- 
ical research project. Prerequisite: PSY 325. Offered Spring Semester. 

PSY 330. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

A study of social dynamics, interpersonal relationships, and the influence of the social 
environment on behavior. Offered every semester. 

PSY 340. GERONTOLOGY Three hours credit 

An analysis of aging as a social process in modern society. Areas included are theories of 
the process of agmg, the various issues and problems of being older, and the experience of 
death and dying. 

PSY 341. PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING Three hours credit 

Explores the many types of learning from simple conditioning to more complex forms of 
cognitive behavior. Emphasis is placed on areas of cognitive psychology such as memory, lan- 
guage, intelligence, problem solving and motivation. Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 201. 
Offered every semester. 

PSY 350. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT Three hours credit 

AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE 

Presents the application of behavioral principles, motivational research, personality factors 
and cognitive processes to the area of sport. It introduces students to this discipline and pro- 
vides knowledge to enhance their own performances and the performances of others. 

PSY 352. DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR Three hours credit 

A study in the basic principles of drug effects and influence on the behavior of the indi- 
vidual and on society. Emphasis will be given to substance abuse and to common psy- 
chotherapeutic drugs. Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 201. Offered Fall Semester. 

PSY 401. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

Examines the causes, symptoms, classification, diagnosis and treatment of the many 
types of mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 302. Offered every Semester. 



118 College of Arts and Sciences 



PSY 412. HUMAN SERVICES PRACTICUM I Three hours credit 

Supervised field work involving placement of student in a human-services agency for 
practical experience. Prerequisites: SOC 3 1 1 and 3 12. Offered every semester. 

PSY 413. HUMAN SERVICES PRACTICUM II Three hours credit 

Supervised field w^ork involving placement of student in a human services agency for 
practical experience. Prerequisite: PSY 412. Offered every semester. 

PSY 423/424. ADVANCED INDEPENDENT RESEARCH Three hours credit 

Supervised undergraduate research work to provide students hands-on research 
expeirence and to prepare them for doctoral study in psychology. Students will conduct all 
aspects of a selected research project and thorough evaluation of the research literature relat- 
ed to the project. Prerequisite: PSY 326. Registration by approval of application and permis- 
sion of instructor. Offered every semester. 

PSY 431. MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING Three hours credit 

An exploration of the lives, issues and potential counseling problems of various cultural 
groups. Prerequisite: PSY 302. 

PSY 442. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS Three hours credit 

A study of the theory and principles of diagnostic testing which give teachers and coun- 
selors direction for their educational and guidance efforts. 

PSY 451. THEORIES OF COUNSELING Three hours credit 

A survey designed to acquaint the student with the underlying principles, major theories 
and methods commonly employed in individual counseling. Prerequisite: PSY 302. Offered 
Fall Semester. 

PSY 452. TECHNIQUES OF COUNSELING Three hours credit 

A course that deals with becoming and being a counselor by examining the various agen- 
cies, styles, techniques, problems and categories of counseling. Prerequisite: PSY 451. Offered 
Spring Semester. 

PSY 453. COUNSELING FIELD EXPERIENCE I Two hours credit 

Supervised work experience in a social agency or community program which provides 
counseling services. Prerequisite or corequisite: PSY451 and permission of instaictor required. 
Offered Fall Semester. 

PSY 454. COUNSELING FIELD EXPERIENCE II Two hours credit 

Supervised work experience in a social agency or community program which provides 
counseling services. Prerequisites or Corequisite: PSY 452, PSY 453 and permission of 
instructor. Offered Spring Semester. 

PSY 460/470. PRACTICUM IN TEACHING PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

A practicum which gives qualified students the opportunity to gain teaching experience, 
enhance their knowledge of psychology, and acquire skills that make them more attractive 
to graduate schools. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 12 hours of required PSY major courses. 
Registration requires approval of application and permission from instructor. Offered every semester. 

PSY 480/490. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY One-three hours credit 

Special seminars on specific issues related to psychology, taught on an occasional basis 
by lecturers with qualified training. 

PSY 495. CAPSTONE FOR SENIORS Three hours credit 

A course designed to be a culminating experience to the psychology major, with particu- 
lar emphasis on integrating psychology and Christian faith, hnding one's place of ministry, 
and a discussion of ethical and professional issues. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 24 
hours of required PSY major courses. Offered every semester. 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 119 



SOCIOLOGY 

SOC 200. UNDERSTANDING CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY Three hours credit 

A study of sociological concepts and social institutions with an emphasis on social proh- 
lems and social and cultural change. The course is taught within the context of Christian 
responsibility and social action. 

SOC 212. SOCIAL PROBLEMS Three hours credit 

A study of major contemporary social problems, their nature, bases, consequences, and 
alternative solutions. Required of all students majoring in sociology or social science. Offered 
every semester. 

SOC 220. COURTSHIP, MARRIAGE, AND THE FAMILY Three hours credit 

An introductory study of dating, courtship, marriage, preparation for marriage, the selec- 
tion of a marriage partner, the roles of members of the family, family rituals, and patterns of 
interaction. Offered Fall Semester. 

SOC 310. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY Three hours credit 

An introduction to various aspects of culture including material, social, economic, 
esthetics, political, religious, and linguistic factors. 

SOC 311. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES Three hours credit 

A study designed to promote understanding of and to stimulate students' interest in 
human services by exploring the nature, roles, values and responsibilities of "people helpers." 
Offered Fall Semester. 

SOC 312. SOCIAL WORK METHODS Three hours credit 

A study of techniques, methods, and procedures of social work. Prerequisite: SOC 311. 
Offered Spring Semester. 

SOC 320. SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY Three hours credit 

A study of the origin and ethology of the family, background of the modern American 
family, social changes and the family roles of members of the family, and problems of fami- 
ly life. 

SOC 321. BEHAVIORAL STATISTICS Three hours credit 

A study of descriptive statistics, which includes frequency distributions, measures of 
central tendency and variability, the normal curve and standard scores, and inferential statis- 
tics with the emphasis on hypothesis testing using the normal deviate test, t-test, one-way 
analysis of variance, and chi-square. The course also introduces regression, correlation, and 
probability. Recommended: MAT 111 - College Algebra. Offered Fall semester. 

SOC 322. SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS Three hours credit 

Methods and techniques of research in the social sciences, including methods of collect- 
ing, analyzing, and presenting data. Recommended: SOC 321. Offered Spring Semester. 

SOC 330. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

Social basis of human behavior and interaction, and factors which underlie the processes 
of socialization. Special emphasis is placed on personality development and adjustment. 
Offered every semester. 

SOC 340. GERONTOLOGY Three hours credit 

An analysis of aging as a social process in modern mass society. Areas included are the 
theories of the process of aging; the social problems of being old, i.e., economics, crime, vic- 
timization, medical care, and housing; and the experience of death and dying. 

SOC 351. CULTURE AND PERSONALITY Three hours credit 

Survey of the approaches to the interrelation between the personality system and the 
socio-cultural environment with emphasis on mental disorder and cultural change. 



120 College of Arts and Sciences 



SOC 360. DEMOGRAPHY Three hours credit 

This course provides a systematic introduction to the study of human populations. 
Designed for students interested in the subject regardless of their major discipline. Examines 
social, economic, and biological factors associated with fertility, morality, and migration. 
Prerequisites: SOC 200 and MAT 111 or SOC 321. 

SOC 370. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CHANGE Three hours credit 

Study of the past, present, and future changes in social structures and cultural patterns. A 
cross-cultural/comparative approach will be used to examine such topics as modernization, 
industrialization, cultural ecology, world systems, revolutions, economic development, infor- 
mation society, and robotics. 

SOC 375. LAW AND SOCIETY Three hours credit 

A study of the relationship between law and society with particular emphasis on the 
major classical and contemporary theories of law and society, the organization of law, law 
and social control, and law and social change. 

SOC 380. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY Three hours credit 

An examination of delinquent behavior and the general operation of the juvenile control 
system. 

SOC 399. HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY One-three hours credit 

An independent study supervised by three faculty members that provides the student who 
qualifies under the honor guidelines the opportunity to pursue a special topic of his/her choice. 

SOC 410. MINORITIES Three hours credit 

The significance of ethnic minorities in American society and the world with an intro- 
duction to sociological and anthropological theory as well as an interpretation of dominant- 
minority relations. Prerequisite: SOC 212. 

SOC 412. HUMAN SERVICES PRACTICUM I Three hours credit 

Supervised field work involving placement of the student in a social-welfare agency for 
practical experience. Prerequisites: SOC 311 and 312, PSY 451. (PSY 451 may be taken con- 
currently.) Offered every semester. 

SOC 413. HUMAN SERVICES PRACTICUM II Three hours credit 

Supervised field work involving placement of student in a human-services setting for prac- 
tical experience. Prerequisites: SOC 412 and PSY 452. (PSY 452 may be taken concurrently.) 
Offered every semester. 

SOC 420. THE URBAN COMMUNITY Three hours credit 

The form and development of the urban community; the growth, development and prob- 
lems of cities, the metropolitan region and social characteristics of fringe and suburban areas; 
sustenance organization, demographic, geographic, and technological variables. 

SOC 430. SOCIAL ORGANIZATION Three hours credit 

A study of structure and function of groups and an analysis of both the formal and infor- 
mal organization. 

SOC 440. CRIMINOLOGY Three hours credit 

A study of the problems, theory, cause, control, statistics, prevention, and treatment of 
criminal behavior. 

SOC 450. MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY Three hours credit 

An analysis of health, illness, and the health professions and institutions from a socio- 
cultural perspective. Topics will include social epidemiology, health attitudes and behavior, 
mental health, the socialization of health professionals, the organization of health care, and 
patient-professional relationships. Offered Spring Semester. 

SOC 460. POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY Three hours credit 

Study of the social bases of political phenomena, including electoral processes, institu- 
tion of government, power structures, and political ideologies. 



Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 121 



SOC 461. HISTORY OF SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY Four hours credit 

A review of the works of major social theorists and the impact of their ideas on current 
sociological thought. Emphasis is placed on the contributions of various schools of sociologi- 
cal theory in the nineteenth- and the twentieth-century period. Offered Fall Semester. 

SOC 480/490. SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY Three hours credit 

An intensive study of selective topics, mcluding research in the materials of sociology 
and the writing of analytical reports. 

SOC 495. SEMINAR IN THE INTEGRATION OF Three hours credit 

SOCIOLOGY AND CHRISTIAN FAITH 

An exploration of the potentials for and problems of a distinctively Christian social sci- 
ence, emphasizing the need for individual integration of one's social science perspective into 
his/her own experience of Christian discipleship. The most prominent (i.e., non-theistic) 
views of religion from the literature of secular sociology are critically reviewed, and alterna- 
tive models of integration are offered. Prerequisites: THE 230, THE 331, and SOC 461. 



Department OF Business 123 




DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS 

EVALINE ECHOLS, Chairperson 

ACCOUNTING 

Assistant Professor Frank Walker 
Instructor Ingrid Hart 

BUSINESS 

Professors Evaline Echols and Dewayne Thompson 
Assistant Professors Alan Bums and Hermilo Jasso 

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Assistant Professors Ken Griffith, Bill Jaber, and Mava Norton 

DISCIPLINES 

Accounting 

Business 

Computer Information Systems 

Economics 



124 College of Arts and Sciences 



In keeping with one of the goals of Lee University, the Department 
of Business seeks to provide major programs of sufficient quality to pre- 
pare students for success in graduate and professional schools and in the 
early stages of their careers. 

The Business Department offers programs of study designed to pre- 
pare men and women for positions of leadership in business, govern- 
ment, the teaching profession, and the community at large. This is done 
by imparting to them the ethical and philosophical principles upon 
which our society and our economy rest and by equipping them with 
the knowledge and skills needed for success. Since a significant dimen- 
sion of the business curriculum includes the integration of one's faith 
with the discipline, graduates should demonstrate a Christian world- 
view as they discharge the duties of their vocation or profession. 

The department offers majors in ACCOUNTING, BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION (with an emphasis in Business Ediication with 
teacher certification), and COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 
Minors are offered in Accounting, Business, and Computer Information 
Systems. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION/CORPORATE TRAINING 

The Business Education program prepares graduates for initial 
employment as business teachers in secondary schools, careers in business, 
corporate training and for graduate school. Given the diverse and dynamic 
nature of today's world, the program emphasizes decision making, prob- 
lem-solving, technological skills, and pedagogical skills. 

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The CIS curriculum is designed to prepare the student for either a 
career in computer technology in a business environment or for graduate 
studies in the computer field. The CIS graduate will have a broad under- 
standing of business processes and how computer technology is used in 
these processes. The curriculum leads a student through a learning 
process that prepares the student for entry level positions in a variety of 
computer fields such as programming, networking, database design, help 
desk services, and system analysis. 

ACCOUNTING 

The A^ccounting program prepares graduates for careers in account- 
ing and for graduate or professional school. Graduates will be prepared 
for the various fields of financial accounting, cost accounting, auditing, 
and taxation, and to sit for the CPA Exam. Graduates will be trained in 
a Christian worldview so that they can have a significant impact in 
their vocation. 



Department OF Business 125 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The Business Administration program takes seriously the commit- 
ment to produce graduates who are well prepared to enter a professional 
career in business or to pursue graduate studies. Students who graduate 
with the Business Administration major are expected to perform compe- 
tently and ethically in entry-level positions in such fields as manufactur- 
ing management, customer service, financial services, retail manage- 
ment and bank inanagement. Since a significant dimension of the 
Business Administration curriculum includes the integration of one's 
faith with the discipline, graduates should demonstrate the Christian 
worldview as they discharge the duties of their vocation. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The Department of Business offers the following programs of study: 



Degree 

B.S. 
B.A. 
B.S. 
B.S. 

B.S. 



B.S. 



Major Code 

Accounting ACCS 

Business Administration BADA 

Business Administration BADS 

Business Administration (Business BAST 

Education/Corporate Training, 

Teacher Licensure in Business, Grades 7-12) 

Business Administration (Business BDST 

Education/Corporate Trainng, 

Teacher Licensure in Business and 

Business Technology, Grades 7-12) 

Computer Information Systems CISS 



BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS 
ACC 241 - Principles of Accounting I 
ACC 242 - Principles of Accounting n 
ACC 341 - Intermediate Accounting I 
ACC 342 - Intermediate Accounting n 
ACC 343 - Cost Accounting 
ACC 344 - Federal Income Tax: Individuals 

or 
ACC 345 - Federal Income Tax: Partnerships 

and Corporations 
ACC 410 - Auditing 
BUS 303 - Business Law I 
BUS 304 - Business Lawn 
BUS 305 - Principles of Business Management 



ACCS 

Credit Fiours 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



126 College of Arts and Sciences 



BUS 307 - Business Finance 3 

BUS 341 - Business Statistics 3 

BUS 351 - Business Communications 3 

BUS 409 - Principles of Marketing 3 

BUS 432 - Business Ethics 3 

BUS 46 1 - Production and Operations Management 3 

BUS 498 - Business Policy/Strategic Management 3 

ECO 312 - Microeconomics 3 

Choose 6 hours of electives in Accounting from the 
following courses: 6 

ACC411 - Advanced Auditing (3) 
ACC 440 - Advanced Accounting (3) 
ACC 443 - Advanced Cost Accounting (3) 
ACC 450 - CPA Review and Advanced Problems (3) 
ACC 490 - Accounting Information Systems (3) 
ACC 492 - Internship in Accounting (3) 
Subtotal Specialty 60 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

CIS 101 - Intro, to Computer-based Syst. or higher level 3 
ECO 311 - Macroeconomics 3 

MAT 111 - College Algebra 3 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 9 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 33-39 

The 3 -hour computer, economics, and math requirements 
are fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of religion are fulfilled through BUS 432 
in the specialty area. 

ELECTIVES 7-13 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



Department of Business 127 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BADA 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

SPECIALTY AREA Credit Hours 

ACC 241 - Principles of Accounting I 3 

ACC 242 - Principles of Accounting H 3 

BUS 101 - Intro, to Business 3 

BUS 303 - Business Law I 3 

BUS 305 - Principles of Business Management 3 

BUS 307 - Business Finance 3 

BUS 341 - Business Statistics 3 

BUS 345 - Quantitative Methods 3 

BUS 351 - Business Communications 3 

BUS 353 - International Business 3 

BUS 409 - Principles of Marketing 3 

BUS 420 - Organizational Behavior 3 

BUS 432 - Business Ethics 3 

BUS 461 - Production & Operations Management 3 

BUS 498 - Business Policy/Strategic Management 3 

CIS 43 1 - Management Support Systems 3 

ECO 312 - Microeconomics 3 

Choose 9 hours of electives in business 9 

from the following courses: 

ACC 341 - Intermediate Accounting I (3) 

ACC 343 - Cost Accounting (3) 

BUS 452 - Office Professional Procedures (3) 

BUS 453 - Administrative Office Management (3) 

BUS 460 - Human Resource Management (3) 

BUS 462 - Business Research Methods (3) 

BUS 470 - Investments (3) 

BUS 480 - Princ. of Insurance/Risk Management (3) 

BUS 492 - Lntemship in Business (3) 

CIS 230 - Systems Analysis Methods (3) 

CIS 330 - Business Information Systems (3) 

CIS 422 - Information Technology Management (3) 

COM 270 - Web Page Design (3) 

COM 330 - Introduction to Public relations (3) 

COM 340 - Principles of Advertising (3) 
HSC 310 - Principles of Health Care Administration (3) 

ECO 301 - Consumer Economics (3) 

ECO 351 - Money and Banking (3) 
Subtotal Specialty 60 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

CIS 101 - Intro, to Computer-based Syst. or higher level 3 
ECO 311 - Macroeconomics 3 



128 College OF Arts AND Sciences 

MAT 1 1 1 - College Algebra 3 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 9 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 36-43 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign language at the 
intermediate level.The 3-hour computer, economics, and math 
requirements are fulfilled through the collateral requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of religion are fulfilled through BUS 432 
in the specialty area. 

ELECTIVES 6-13 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BADS 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

SPECIALTY AREA Credit Hours 

ACC241 - Principles of Accounting I 3 

ACC 242 - Principles of Accounting n 3 

BUS 101 - Intro, to Business 3 

BUS 303 - Business Law I 3 

BUS 305 - Principles of Business Management 3 

BUS 307 - Business Finance 3 

BUS 341 - Business Statistics 3 

BUS 345 - Quantitative Methods 3 

BUS 351 - Business Communications 3 

BUS 353 - International Business 3 

BUS 409 - Principles of Marketing 3 

BUS 420 - Organizational Behavior 3 

BUS 432 - Business Ethics 3 

BUS 461 - Production &L Operations Management 3 

BUS 498 - Business Policy/Strategic Management 3 

CIS 43 1 - Management Support Systems 3 

ECO 312 - Microeconomics 3 

The remainder of the 9 hours of electives in business 9 

must come from the following courses: 
ACC 341 - Intermediate Accounting (3) 
ACC 343 - Cost Accounting (3) 
BUS 452 - Office Professional Procedures (3) 
BUS 453 - Administrative Office Management (3) 
BUS 460 - Human Resource Management (3) 
BUS 462 - Business Research Methods (3) 
BUS 470 - Investments (3) 

BUS 480 - Principles of Insurance/Risk Management (3) 
BUS 492 - Internship in Business (3) 
CIS 230 - Systems Analysis Methods (3) 



Department OF Business 129 



CIS 330 - Business Information Systems (3) 

CIS 422 - Information Resource Management (3) 

COM 270- Web Page Design (3) 

COM 330 - Introduction to Public Relations (3) 

COM 340 - Prmciples of Advertising (3) 

HSC 310 - Principles of Health Care Administration (3) 

ECO 301 - Consumer Economics (3) 

ECO 351 - Money and Banking (3) 

Subtotal Specialty 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

CIS 101 - Intro, to Computer-based Systems 

or higher level 
ECO 311 - Macroeconomics 
MAT 111- College Algebra 
Subtotal Collateral Requirements 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 
The 3-hour computer, economics, and math 
requirements are fulfilled through 
the program's collateral requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 

Three hours of religion are fulfilled through BUS 432 
in the specialty area. 

ELECTIVES 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 



60 



9 
33-39 



15 



10-16 
130 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

(BUSINESS EDUCATION/CORPORATE TRAINING, 

TEACHER LICENSURE IN BUSINESS, GRADES 7-12) 

SPECIALTY AREA 

ACC241 - Principles of Accounting I 

ACC242 - Principles of Accounting II 

BUSlOl - Intro. To Business 

BUS303 - Business Law I 

BUS305 - Principles of Business Management 

BUS307 - Business Finance 

BUS341 - Business Statistics 

BUS351 - Business Communications 

BUS409 - Principles of Marketing 

BUS432 - Business Ethics 

BUS461 - Production and Operation Management 

BUS492 - Internship 



BAST 



Credit Hours 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 



130 College of Arts and Sciences 



BUS498 - Business Policy/Strategic Management 3 

ECO301 - Consumer Economics 3 

EC0312 - Microeconomics 3 
Subtotal Specialty 43 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU199 - Intro. To the Teaching Profession Seminar 1 

EDU201 - Foundations of Education 3 

EDU316 - The Exceptional Child 3 

SED312 - Educational Psychology 3 

SED4 1 1 - Teaching Business, Grades 7-12 2 

SED419 - General Secondary Methods 2 

SED444 - Student Teaching 5 

SED445 - Student Teaching 5 

EDU434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 
Subtotal Professional Education 26 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

CISlOl - Intro. To Computer-based Systems 3 

(or a higher level course) 
EC0311 - Macroeconomics 3 

MATlll- College Algebra 3 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 9 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 33-39 

The 3-hour computer, economics, and math requirements are 
fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of religion are fulfilled through BUS432 
in the specialty area. 

ELECTIVES 4 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130-136 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BDST 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

(BUSINESS EDUCATION/CORPORATE TRAINING, 

TEACHER LICENSURE IN BUSINESS AND BUSINESS 

TECHNOLOGY, GRADES 7-12) 



:CIALTY 
ACC241 
ACC242 
BUSlOl 


AREA 

- Principles of Accounting I 

- Principles of Accounting II 
- Intro. To Business 


Credit Hours 
3 
3 
3 


BUS303 
BUS305 
BUS307 


- Business Law I 

- Principles of Business Management 

- Business Finance 


3 
3 
3 



Department of Business 13 1 



BUS341 - Business Statistics 3 

BUS351 - Business Communications 3 

BUS409 - Principles of Marketing 3 

BUS432 - Business Ethics 3 

BUS461 - Production and Operation Management 3 

BUS492 - Internship 1 

BUS498 - Business Policy/Strategic Management 3 

ECO301 - Consumer Economics 3 

EC0312 - Microeconomics 3 
Subtotal Specialty 43 

EMPHASIS IN BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY 

In addition, 9 hours of CIS courses to include two of the 

following, plus one 3-hour CIS elective above the 200 level. 

CIS201 - Applications Program Development (3| 

CIS230 - System Analysis Methods (3) 

CIS320 - Software and Hardware Concepts (3) 

CIS330 - Business Information Systems (3) 

Subtotal Business Emphasis 9 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU199 - Intro. To the Teaching Profession Seminar 1 

EDU201 - Foundations of Education 3 

EDU316 - The Exceptional Child 3 

SED312 - Educational Psychology 3 

SED411 - Teaching Business, Grades 7-12 2 

SED419 - General Secondary Methods 2 

SED444 - Student Teaching 5 

SED445 - Student Teaching 5 

EDU434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 
Subtotal Professional Education 26 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

CISlOl - Intro. To Computer-based Systems 3 

(or a higher level course) 
EC0311 - Macroeconomics 3 

MAT 111 - College Algebra 3 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 9 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 33-39 

The 3-hour computer, economics and math requirements 
are fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of religion are fulfilled through BUS432 
in the specialty area. 

ELECTIVES 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 135-141 



132 College of Arts and Sciences 



BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN CISS 

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

ACC 241 - Principles of Accounting I 3 

ACC 242 - Principles of Accounting II 3 

BUS 303 - Business Law 3 

BUS 305 - Principles of Business Management 3 

BUS 307 - Business Finance 3 

BUS 341 - Business Statistics 3 

BUS 35 1 - Business Communications 3 

BUS 409 - Principles of Marketing 3 

BUS 432 - Business Ethics 3 

BUS 46 1 - Production and Operation Management 3 

BUS 498 - Business Policy/Strategic Management 3 

CIS 201 - Applications Program Develop. I 3 

CIS 202 - Applications Program Develop. 11 3 

CIS 230 - Systems Analysis Methods 3 

CIS 240 - Structured Sys. Analysis & Design 3 

CIS 341 - Database Design 3 

CIS 450 - Applied Software Develop. Project 3 

ECO 312 - Microeconomics 3 

Choose 9 hours of electives in computers 
from the following courses: 9 

CIS 301 - Advanced Program Development (3) 
CIS 320 - Software and Fiardware Concepts (3) 
CIS 321 - Software and Fiardware Concepts n (3) 
CIS 330 - Business Information Systems (3) 
CIS 381 - Special Topics in CIS (1) 
CIS 382 - Special Topics in CIS (2) 
CIS 383 - Special Topics in CIS (3) 
CIS 411 - Advanced Information Systems Concepts (3) 
CIS 412 - Network Design (3) 
CIS 421 - Information Systems Planning (3) 
CIS 422 - Information Technology Management (3) 
CIS 431 - Decision Support Systems (3) 
CIS 432 - EDP Audit and Controls (3) 
CIS 492 - Intemship in CIS (3) 
COM 270- Web Page Design (3) 
Subtotal Specialty 63 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

CIS 101 - Intro, to Computer-based Systems 3 

or higher level 
ECO 311 - Macroeconomics 3 

MAT 1 1 1 - College Algebra 3 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 9 



Department OF Business 133 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 33-39 

The 3-hour computer, economics, and math requirements 
are fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of religion are fulfilled through BUS 432 
in the specialty area, 

ELECTT/ES 4-10 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

MINORS 

The Business Department offers a minor, which consists of 18 
hours, in three disciplines: Accounting, Business, and Computer 
Information Systems. 

ACCOUNTING 

The requirements for a minor in Accounting are ACC 241, 242, 341, 
342, with the remainder of the 6 hours of electives to be chosen from 
any accounting course higher than Accounting 342. 

BUSINESS 

The requirements for a minor in Business are ACC 241, BUS 101, 
BUS 305, ECO 311, with the remainder of the 6 hours of electives in 
Business to be chosen from any business course. 

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The requirements for a minor in Computer Information Systems are 
CIS 101, 201, 230, 341 with the remainder of the 6 hours of electives in 
computers to be chosen from any CIS course above the 200 level. 



I 



134 College of Arts and Sciences 

COURSE OFFERINGS 
ACCOUNTING 

ACC 241. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I Three hours credit 

An introductory study of accounting principles and procedures with emphasis on finan- 
cial accounting. 

ACC 242. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II Three hours credit 

A continuation of Accounting 241 in which emphasis is placed on managerial account- 
ing. Prerequisite: ACC 241. 

ACC 341. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I Three hours credit 

A detailed study of the theory and practice of financial accounting and reporting with 
^emphasis on current assets, current liabilities, investments, plant and equipment, and their 
related revenues and expenses. Prerequisite: ACC 242 with a grade of C or better. 

ACC 342. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II Three hours credit 

A continuation of Accounting 341 with emphasis on long-term liabilities, stockholders' 
equity, and special problems and topics relating to accounting. Prerequisite: ACC 341 with a 
grade of C or better. 

ACC 343. COST ACCOUNTING Three hours credit 

A detailed study of accounting for management including cost-profit-volume relation- 
ships, inventory cost methods, budgeting, standard costing, direct costing, capital budgeting, 
and other contemporary cost problems. Prerequisite: ACC 242. 

ACC 344. FEDERAL INCOME TAX: INDIVIDUALS Three hours credit 

A study of the federal laws governing taxation of individuals with concentration m the 
preparation of tax forms. 

ACC 345. FEDERAL INCOME TAX: Three hours credit 

PARTNERSHIPS AND CORPORATIONS 

A study of the federal laws governing taxation of partnerships and corporations with con- 
centration in the preparation of tax forms. 

ACC 410. AUDITING Three hours credit 

A course introducing the fundamental concepts of auditing with an emphasis on under- 
standing audit methodology through the conceptual framework of audit program design. The 
public accounting environment, the audit report, professional ethics, and related matters are 
studied. Prerequisite: ACC 342. 

ACC 411. ADVANCED AUDITING Three hours credit 

A continuation of ACC 410 with emphasis on specific tests of controls and substantive 
tests performed in audit practice. Attention is given to the types and application of audit tests 
needed for evidence-gathering purposes and completion of the audit process. Prerequisite: 
ACC 410 with a grade of C or better. 

ACC 440. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING Three hours credit 

An advanced study into the problems of accounting for partnerships, business combina- 
tions, governmental units, and non-profit organizations as well as other issues encountered 
by accountants. Prerequisite: ACC 342. 

ACC 443. ADVANCED COST ACCOUNTING Three hours credit 

An advanced study of accounting for management, focusing on the use of accounting 
information in managerial decisions, performance evaluation, and cost control. Prerequisite: 
ACC 343. 

ACC 450. CPA REVIEW AND ADVANCED PROBLEMS Three hours credit 

A capstone course in professional accounting problems providing comprehensive review 
of principles, theory, and applications. The course is designed to integrate the concepts and 



Department of Business 135 



techniques the student has previously acquired in the areas of Accounting Applications, 
Theory, Auditing and Business Law. Prerequisites: ACC 342 and ACC 343. 

ACC 490. ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS Three hours credit 

A study of Accounting Information Systems concepts and applications mcluding concep- 
tual foundations of AID, design processes and AIS applications in several functional areas. 

ACC 492. INTERNSHIP IN ACCOUNTING Three hours credit 

A course designed to provide practical field experience for the business student. The 
course is designed for junior and senior departmental majors and mmors. 

BUSINESS 

BUS 101. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS Three hours credit 

A survey of the various fields of business designed to acquaint the student with the basic 
principles and practices involved in the interrelated functions of business and to point out 
career possibilities. 

BUS 303. BUSINESS LAW Three hours credit 

A study of the principles of law most frequently involved in business transactions with 
emphasis in the Uniform Commercial Code, including Contracts, Bailments, Sales, and 
Government Regulation. A basic aim is to develop techniques in the analytical, decision- 
making capacity of the students. 

BUS 304. BUSINESS LAW Three hours credit 

Continuation of BUS 303. Includes Commercial Paper, Partnerships, Corporations, 
Agency, Employment, and Secured Transactions. 

BUS 305. PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Three hours credit 

A study of the managerial process which emphasizes the management functions of plan- 
ning, organizing, decision-making, and controlling with an integration of the concepts of the 
behavioral sciences as applied to managing people in organizations. 

BUS 307. BUSINESS FINANCE Three hours credit 

A study of the nature and scope of business finance. Emphasis is on sources and costs of 
short-term and long-term financing, financial analysis and interpretation, capital budgeting, 
and the cost of capital. Prerequisite: ACC 242 and BUS 341. 

BUS 341. BUSINESS STATISTICS Three hours credit 

A study of statistical analysis and business decision theory. The topics covered include 
decision making under uncertainty, sampling, probability concepts, statistical inference, clas- 
sical statistical decision theory, and the economics of decision rules. Prerequisite: MAT 111 
or 121. 

BUS 345. QUANTITATIVE METHODS Three hours credit 

A further study of statistical and quantitative techniques used in business decision-mak- 
ing. Quantitative techniques and business applications include but are not limited to the fol- 
lowing: hypothesis testing, forecasting, linear programming, PERT, CPM, queuing models, 
and inventory models. Prerequisite: BUS 341. MAT 342 recommended. Offered Fall 
Semester. 

BUS 351. BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS Three hours credit 

A study of the principles, practices, and mechanics of writing effective business letters 
and reports. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

BUS 353. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Three hours credit 

A study of the special problems involved in doing business across national boundaries, 
with emphasis on the economic basis for trade and the impact of religious, cultural, and 
political environment on business practice. Includes an evaluation of the management, mar- 
keting, and financial practices of multinational corporations from a Christian perspective. 



136 College of Arts and Sciences 



BUS 399. HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY One-four hours credit 

An independent study supervised by three faculty members which provides the student 
-who quaUfies under the honors guidehnes the opportunity to pursue a special topic of his 
/her choice. 

BUS 409. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING Three hours credit 

A study of the principles and methods of marketing including the activities utilized in 
the movement of goods and services from producer to consumer while addressing govern- 
mental and consumer relationships. The course investigates the processes of product devel- 
opment, promotion, distribution, and pricing. 

BUS 420. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR Three hours credit 

Emphasis is placed on the importance of work, process and content theories of motiva- 
tion, job satisfaction, organizational structure, organizational climate, social systems, 
and quality of work life. Prerequisite: BUS 305 or permission of instructor. Offered Fall 
Semester. 

BUS 432. BUSINESS ETHICS Three hours credit 

Application of basic Christian principles to modern standard business practices. 
Emphasis will be placed on ethical decision-making in the business arena. The course is 
taught jointly by faculty from the School of Religion. 

BUS 452. OFFICE PROFESSIONAL PROCEDURES Three hours credit 

A study of the proper role of the office employee in facilitating managerial operations 
including human relations, information retrieval systems, handling correspondence, arrang- 
ing schedules and itineraries, using communication media effectively, and the simplification 
of office tasks. Offered Spring Semester. 

BUS 453. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE MANAGEMENT Three hours credit 

Management of human resources and administrative services. Focuses on increased pro- 
ductivity by integration of office technologies. Prerequisite: BUS 305 or permission from 
instructor. Offered Fall Semester. 

BUS 460. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Three hours credit 

Theory and practices relative to the management of people. Major attention is devoted to 
the basic human resource management processes that are involved in the recruitment, train- 
ing, and maintenance of human resources. Prerequisite: BUS 305. 

BUS 461. PRODUCTION & OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Three hours credit 

Fundamental concepts, models, and techniques of operations in the business firm. 
Materials cover development and control of the system's output (goods, services, and ideas), 
the transformation process (flows, facilities, and operating centers), and the system's inputs 
(materials, time, and energies). Prerequisites: BUS 305 and BUS 341. Offered Spring Semester. 

BUS 462. BUSINESS RESEARCH METHODS Three hours credit 

A course to help students develop research skills and provide concepts and methods for 
developing effective reports through data collecting and analysis. 

BUS 470. INVESTMENTS Three hours credit 

An introduction to the basics of inventory, ranging from descriptive material on how 
securities are bought and sold to theoretical material on how securities are valued in an effi- 
cient financial market. 

BUS 480. PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE Three hours credit 

AND RISK-MANAGEMENT 

A study of the principles of insurance and risk-management to identify risk exposures 
and the appropriate risk-management techniques. 

BUS 490. SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR One-three hours credit 

A seminar and course of directed studies dealing with specialized topics related to 



Department of Business 137 



accounting, business, and economics selected on the basis of research value and the interests 
and needs of the student. 

BUS 492. INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS Three hours credit 

A course designed to provide practical field experience for the business student w^ho will 
explore the application of theory to practice. The course is designed for junior and senior 
departmental majors and minors. 

BUS 498. BUSINESS POLICY AND STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT Three hours credit 

A course designed to assist the student in the development of conceptural skills needed 
by mid- and upper-level managers and leaders. Emphasis is placed on the integration of ethics 
in the application of subject matter w^ith accounting, finance, management, marketing, eco- 
nomics, and statistics. The primary tool will be the analysis of busmess case studies. 
Prerequisites: ACC 242, BUS 305, BUS 409, BUS 307, BUS 461, BUS 341, ECO 311-312. 

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

CIS 100. COMPUTER LITERACY AND APPLICATION Two hours credit 

A computer literacy course to introduce students to basic computer concepts, hardware, 
software, and computer applications and to provide essential hands-on computer experience. 
The course schedule is a one-hour lecture followed by a two-hour lab each week. Business 
majors cannot take this course for credit. 

CIS 101. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER-BASED SYSTEMS Three hours credit 

An overview of computer information systems. This survey course introduces computer 
hardware, software, procedures, systems, and human resources and explores their integration 
and application in business and in other segments of society. The fundamentals of computer 
problem-solving and programming in a higher-level programming language are discussed. 

CIS 102. WORD PROCESSING CONCEPTS One hour credit 

A hands-on class for those with little or no knowledge of word processing. This course 
introduces the student to word processing and progresses to a level of proficiency so the stu- 
dent will be able to create documents without assistance. Prior knowledge of computers or 
word processing is not necessary. 

CIS 103. DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CONCEPTS One hour credit 

A fundamental hands-on course in the design, creation, and use of databases using a 
microcomputer and a database management system (dBase IV). This course introduces the 
student to databases and database management systems and progresses so the student will be 
able to create and use databases without assistance. 

CIS 104. ELECTRONIC SPREADSHEETS CONCEPTS One hour credit 

A hands-on class for those with little or no knowledge of electronic spreadsheets or elec- 
tronic spreadsheet processing. This course introduces the student to electronic spreadsheets 
and progresses to a level of proficiency so the student will be able to create and use electronic 
spreadsheets. Prior knowledge of computers is not necessary. 

CIS 201. APPLICATIONS PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT I Three hours credit 

An introduction to computer programming in a business environment. Emphasis on the 
fundamentals of structured program design, development, testing, implementation, and doc- 
umentation of applications programming. Prerequisite: CIS 101 or permission of instmctor. 

CIS 202. APPLICATIONS PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT n Three hours credit 

A continuation of CIS 201. Emphasis on stmctured methodology of program design, 
development, testing, implementation, and documentation of common business-oriented 
applications programming. Includes coverage of sequential and random access files and pro- 
cessing techniques and development of programs and systems of programs for batch and 
interactive environments. Prerequisite: CIS 201. 



138 College OF Arts AND Sciences 



CIS 230. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS METHODS Three hours credit 

Overview of the system development life cycle. Emphasis on current system documenta- 
tion through the use of both classical and structured tools/techniques for describing process 
flov^s, data flovs^s, data structures, file designs, input and output designs, and program specifi- 
cations. Prerequisite: CIS 201 or permission of instructor. 

CIS 240. STRUCTURED SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN Three hours credit 

Advanced study of structured systems development. Emphasis and techniques of struc- 
tured analysis and structured design for producing logical methodologies for dealing with 
complexity in the development of information systems. Prerequisites: CIS 202 and CIS 230. 

CIS 301. ADVANCED PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT Three hours credit 

An advanced presentation of the principles of program design and computer program- 
ming using a modern high-level programming language other than those languages used in 
CIS 201 and CIS 202. Designed for the student who wishes more exposure to advanced tech- 
niques of programming using a variety of modern computer languages. 

CIS 320. SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE CONCEPTS I Three hours credit 

A survey of technical topics related to computer systems with emphasis on the relation- 
ship between hardware architecture, system software, system board, memory, and data stor- 
age. Prerequisite: CIS 202. 

CIS 321. SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE CONCEPTS II Three hours credit 

A continuation of CIS 320. Asurvey of technical topics relatedd to computer systems 
with emphasis on data stoq ge, the relationship between architecture, system software, virus 
and disaster recovery, and applications software. Prerequisite: CIS 320. 

CIS 330. BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS Three hours credit 

Office information and decision support systems are examined as emerging and critical 
elements in business data and information systems. Emphasis is given to information pro- 
cessing considerations at the systems level, including analysis and management of support 
activities such as data and records management, electronic filing and retrieving systems, 
word processing, micro and reprographics, and telecommunications. Prerequisite: CIS 101. 

CIS 341. DATABASE DESIGN Three hours credit 

Introduction to application program development in a database environment with an 
emphasis on loading, modifying, and querying the database using a host language . 
Prerequisite; CIS 311. 

CIS 38 1, 382, 383. SPECLVL TOPICS IN CIS One-three hours credit 

A course presenting topics in current technology. Topics may change each semester. 

CIS 41 1. ADVANCED INFORMATION SYSTEMS CONCEPTS Three hours credit 

Investigation and application of advanced and current concepts being used in the com- 
puter arena. This includes advanced design techniques, data structures, database technolo- 
gies, recent development and management tools, latest generation of computer languages, 
and other current topics in the literature. Prerequisite: CIS 312. 

CIS 412. NETWORK DESIGN Three hours credit 

The features of distributed systems, especially local area networks, will be examined. 
The impact of distributed systems on the business enterprise will be exposed via the medium 
of case studies using local area networks. Prerequisite: CIS 230. 

CIS 421. INFORMATION SYSTEMS PLANNING Three hours credit 

An introduction to the financial, technical and strategic information systems planning 
processes. Emphasis on the relationship of the information systems planning process to the 
overall business goals, policies, plans, management style and industry condition. 
Prerequisite: CIS 311. 



Department of Business 139 



CIS 422. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT Three hours credit 

A seminar course providing a broad overview of the information systems management 
function. The course emphasizes information systems management, v^ith particular atten- 
tion to planning, organizing, and controlling user services and managing the computer infor- 
mation systems development process. Prerequisite: CIS 230 or approval by instmctor. 

CIS 431. DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS Three hours credit 

An analysis of the highest level of information support systems v^^hich serve the manager 
user. This includes support systems such as Decision Support Systems and Expert Systems. 

CIS 432. EDP AUDIT AND CONTROLS Three hours credit 

An introduction to the fundamentals of EDP auditing. Emphasis on EDP controls, types 
of EDP audits, and concepts and techniques used in EDP audits. Prerequisite: CIS 312. 

CIS 450. APPLIED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT PROJECT Three hours credit 

Application of computer programming and systems development concepts, principles 
and practices to a comprehensive system development project. A team approach is used to 
analyze, design and document realistic systems of moderate complexity. Prerequisites: CIS 
311 and CIS 312. 

CIS 492. E^JTERNSHIP IN COMPUTERS Three hours credit 

A course designed to provide practical field experience for the business student. The 
course is designed for junior and senior departmental majors and minors. 

ECONOMICS 

ECO 200. UNDERSTANDING ECONOMIC ISSUES Three hours credit 

A basic course in economics designed to expose students to the fundamentals of econom- 
ic analysis. Course presentation will consider current economic issues such as inflation, 
unemployment, poverty, urbanization, social stratification, economic growth, international 
trade, finance, and development from the perspective of modern economic paradigms. 

ECO 301. CONSUMER ECONOMICS/PERSONAL FINANCE Three hours credit 

An investigation of consumer behavior and of the different markets where consumer pur- 
chases of goods and services occur. The economic, legal, political, and social aspects of con- 
sumerism will also be explored. 

ECO 311. MACROECONOMICS Three hours credit 

A study of the principles and problems associated with the production, exchange, and use 
of wealth. Offered Fall Semester. 

ECO 312. MICROECONOMICS Three hours credit 

The study of how small economic units (household, business firms, and government 
units) deal with scarcity. Offered Spring Semester. 

ECO 351. MONEY AND BANKING Three hours credit 

A study of the economics concerned with the nature, history, and functioning of money- 
creating institutions. 



140 College of Arts and Sciences 

CAMPUS COMPUTER LABS 

The Lee University Academic Computer Lab, located in the Walker 
Memorial Building and managed by the Business Department, is a modern 
computer lab open to all students. All computers in the lab are IBM compat- 
ible using Windows 95 and are connected to a central server and the World 
Wide Web with Novell NetWare 5.0. There are literally dozens of software 
packages available for use including a large selection of popular productivity 
items like Microsoft Word, Access, PowerPoint, Excel, Office 2000, Internet 
Explorer, FoxPro, and SPSS. There is also a wide variety of programming and 
other systems development packages for the more technically inclined. 
Available hardware includes digital cameras, digital scanners, headsets for 
multimedia applications, and multimedia presentation systems. 

There are three computer labs in the Paul Conn Student Union dedicat- 
ed to student use. The computers in each of the labs use Windows 98 and 
are connected to the internet and the University network with Novell 
NetWare 5.0. Each of the computers has Microsoft Office 2000 and Internet 
Explorer software installed. Two labs are on the main floor,- each one has 12 
Gateway computers and an HP Laser Printer that is connected to the net- 
work and Internet with a high-speed connection. The computer lab (the 
Janet Rahamut Room) on the first floor is designated for commuter use. It 
has 10 new Gateway computers and an HP Laser Printer, all of which are 
connected to the network and the Internet, as well as a fax machine and a 
copy machine. All university computer labs are staffed at peak use times 
with lab assistants to help students with computer-related problems. 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS INTERNSHIP 

Students interested in international business experience may partici- 
pate in the Business Department's international internship, which is 
offered each summer. Students stay with local families or at other facili- 
ties provided by the hosting institution during this two-week program. 
In addition to visits to several indigenous sites of interest, opportunities 
include site visits to various local companies. The experience may 
include presentations by governmental leaders and business leaders and 
hands-on work experience. (One example is two weeks in Paraguay in 
the summer.) Candidates must be approved by the Business 
Department faculty and must have a minimum GPA of 2.5. 



Department of Communication and the Arts 141 




DEPARTMENT OV COMMUNICATION 
AND THE ARTS 

MATTHEW MELTON, Chairperson 
ART 

Assistant Professor John Simmons 
COMMUNICATION 

Associate Professors Matthew Melton and Joel Railing 

Assistant Professors Ron Gilbert and Patty Silverman 

DRAMA 

Associate Professor Sharon Carbaugh 

Instructor Shane Fuller 

HUMANITIES 

Assistant Professor Matthew Sims 

Instructor Randy Wood 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

Assistant Professor Michael J. Laney 

Instructor Mary Dukes 



DISCIPLINES 

Art 

Communication 

Drama 

Humanities 

Telecommunications 



142 College of Arts and Sciences 



The Communication and the Arts Department at Lee University 
exists to provide instruction and training to individuals pursuing knowl- 
edge and/or professional development in the wide variety of fields asso- 
ciated with the communication discipline. As an integral part of an 
institution that bases its educational practice on the discovery of truth 
found in Scripture, the faculty of Communication and the Arts seek to 
guide students through programs of professional, technical, and voca- 
tional education with a view toward the intergration of faith in daily life 
and learning. 

Communication and the Arts offers three majors. Bachelor of Arts 
and a Bachelor of Science in TELECOMMUNICATIONS and a Bachelor 
of Arts in COMMUNICATION. The B.A. in Communication offers 
emphases in the following areas: COMMUNICATION STUDIES, 
DRAMA, MEDL\ WRITING, PUBLIC RELATIONS and ADVERTISING. 

The Department of Communication and the Arts also houses aux- 
iliary programs and disciplines including the Lee University Theatre 
Program, Art, and Humanities. The Lee University Theatre Program 
sponsors two major theatrical productions each semester as well as 
two traveling drama troupes. The Art Program features courses in art 
appreciation, history, and studio techniques. The Humanities offerings 
consist of the four humanities core curriculum courses. 

COMMUNICATION 

The Communication major helps students maximize their options 
for graduate school or a professional career. The emphases offered seek 
to give students the opportunity to craft their own program of study, 
within reasonable academic limits. Regardless of which emphasis the 
student may choose, the core courses in the major provide the tools nec- 
essary for success in a diverse field, including speech, writing and basic 
communication skills. The professional and religion capstone courses 
demonstrate how all these elements come together to equip the student 
for faith and living. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

The B.A. and B.S. in Telecommunications are designed to train stu- 
dents interested in professional or academic work in the areas of mass 
communiqations, including television, radio, video and audio produc- 
tion, as well as church media ministries. The B.A. provides additional 
training in foreign language studies, and the B.S. focuses more on devel- 
oping technical skills. Both degrees share a common core of courses that 
prepare the student in the writing and presentation aspects of the field, 
as well as in the basics of production. The senior seminar and religion 
capstone demonstrate how these elements come together to equip the 
student for faith and learning. 



Department of Communication and the Arts 143 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The Department of Communication and the Arts offers the follow- 
ing programs of study: 

Major Code 

Communication COMA 

(Communication Studies) 

Communication CDRA 

(Drama) 

Communication CMWA 

(Journalism/Media Writing) 

Communication CPRA 

(Pubhc Relations) 

Communication CADA 

(Advertising) 

B.A. Telecommunications CTCA 

B.S. Telecommunications CTCS 



Degree 

B.A. 

B.A. 
B.A. 
B.A. 



B.A. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATION 
(COMMUNICATION STUDIES) 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS 

COM 105 - Communication Practicum 

COM 201 - Understanding Mass Media 

COM 202 - Fundamentals of Human Communication 

COM 21 1 - PubUc Speaking 

COM 215- Writing for the Media 

COM 390 - Communication Theories 

COM 410- Media Law 

COM 495 - Christianity and Communication 

COM 499 - Communication Research Seminar 



COMA 



Credit Hours 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



COMMUNICATION ELECTFVTS (9 hours within emphasis) 14 
COM 220- Scriptwriting for the Media (3) 
COM 323- Desktop Publishing (3) 
COM 341 - Rhetoric and Public Discourse (3) 
COM 352 - Organizational Communication (3) 
COM 354- Intercultural Communication (3) 
COM 365 - New Technologies and Society (3) 
COM 405 - Communication in Society (3) 
Subtotal Specialty 39 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 47 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign 
language at the intermediate level. 



144 College of Arts and Sciences 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the religion requirement 
are fulfilled through COM 495. 

ELECTIVES 29 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATION CDRA 

(DRAMA) 

SPECL\LTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

COM 105 - Communication Practicum 1 

COM 201- Understanding Mass Media 3 

COM 202 - Fundamentals of Human Communication 3 

COM 215- Writing for Media 3 
or COM 220- Scriptwritingfor the Media (3) 
*: orDRA260 - Sketch Writing (3) 

i: ' DRA211 - Introduction to Acting 3 

'! DRA212 - Intermediate Acting 3 

DRA450 - Directing 3 

COM 390 - Communication Theories 3 

COM 495 - Christianity &. Communication 3 

COM 499 - Communication Research Seminar 3 

Drama Electives 1 1 

Emphasis electives 

Emphasis electives hours may be filled 

with any other drama courses. 
Subtotal specialty 36 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 47 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign 
language at the intermediate level. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the religion requirement 

are fulfilled through COM 495. 

ELECTT/ES 32 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATION CMWA 

(MEDIA WRITING) 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

COM 105 - Communication Practicum 1 

COM 201 - Understanding Mass Media 3 

COM 202 - Fundamentals of Human Communication 3 

COM 215- Writing for the Media 3 

COM 31 1 - Newspaper Production 3 



Department of Communication and the Arts 145 



COM 323 - Desktop Publishing 3 

COM 390 - Communication Theories 3 

COM 402 - Communication Internship 2 

COM 410- Media Law 3 

COM 495 - Christianity &. Communication 3 

COM 499 - Communication Research Seminar 3 

MEDIA WRITING ELECTIVES (choose any 6 hours) 6 

COM 220 - Scriptwriting for Media (3) 
COM 303 - News Writing (3) 
ENG350- Nonfiction Writing (3) 
ENG 35 1 - Creative Writing (3) 
Subtotal Specialty 36 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 47 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign 
language at the intermediate level. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the religion requirement 
are fulfilled through COM 495. 

ELECTROS 32 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATION CPRA 

(PUBLIC RELATIONS) 

SPECLALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

COM 105- Communication Practicum 1 

COM 201 - Understanding Mass Media 3 

COM 202 - Fundamentals of Human Communication 3 

COM 245- Public Relations Writing 3 

COM 330- Introduction to Public Relations 3 

COM 335 - Pubhc Relations Cases 3 

COM 390 - Communication Theories 3 

COM 402 - Communication Internship 2 

COM 410- Media Law 3 

COM 495 - Christianity 5;^ Communication 3 

COM 499 - Communication Research Seminar 3 

PUBLIC RELATIONS ELECTIVES 9 

(choose any 9 hours) 

COM 21 1 - Pubhc Speaking (3) 

COM 215- Writing for the Media (3) 

COM 250 - Principles of Photography (3) 

COM 260 - Radio and Television Speech (3) 

COM 270 - Graphic Web Page Design (3) 

COM 323 - Desktop Publishing (3) 



146 College of Arts and Sciences 



COM 340 - Principles of Advertising (3) 
COM 341 - Rhetoric/Public Discourse (3) 
COM 352 - Organizational Communication (3) 
COM 354 - Intercultural Communication (3) 
BUS 305 - Principles of Business Managment (3) 
BUS 409 - Principles of Marketing (3) 
ENG350- Nonfiction Writing (3) 

Subtotal Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 

ELECTIVES 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 



39 
46 
15 
30 
130 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATION 
(ADVERTISING) 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS 
COM 105 - Communication Practicum 
COM 201 - Understanding Mass Media 
COM 202 - Fundamentals of Human Communication 
COM 215- Writing for the Media 
COM 340 - Principles of Advertising 
COM 390 - Communication Theories 
COM 402 - Communication Internship 
BUS 409 - Principles of Marketing 
COM 410- Media Law 
COM 495 - Christianity <S;!. Communication 
COM 499 - Communication Research Seminar 

ADVERTISING ELECTTVES (choose any 9 hours) 
ART 216 - 2-D Design (3) 
ART 220 - Graphic Design (3) 
ART 310 - 3-D Computer Graphics (3) 
COM 250 - Principles of Photography (3) 
COM 252- Advanced Photography (3) 
COM 270- Graphic Web Page Design (3) 
COM 323 - Desktop Publishing (3) 
COM 375 - Digital Video Production (3) 

Subtotal Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 

ELECTIVES 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 



CADA 

Credit Hours 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 



39 
46 
15 
30 
130 



Department of Communication and the Arts 147 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN TELECOMMUNICATIONS CTCA 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS 

COM 105- Communication Practicum 1 

COM 201 - Understanding the Mass Media 3 

COM 230 - Introduction to Broadcasting 3 

COM 235- Broadcast Techniques 4 

(Lab Required) 
COM 370 - Basic Television Production 4 

(Lab Required) 

or 
COM 380- Audio Production (4) 

(Lab Required) 
COM 240- Broadcast Writing 3 

COM 260- Radio a TV Speech 4 

(Lab Required) 
COM 327 - Electronic Broadcast Management 3 

COM 403 - Communication Internship 3 

COM 410- Media Law 3 

COM 495 - Christianity &l Communication 3 

COM 499 - Communication Research Seminar 3 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS ELECTROS (12 hours within emphasis 

On-Campus Courses: 

COM 191 - Music Industry Survey 3 

COM 250- Principles of Photography 3 

COM 270- Graphic WebPage Design 3 

COM 3 1 5 - Video Field Production & Editing 3 

COM 365 - New Technologies & Society 3 

COM 375- Digital Video Production 3 

COM 405 - Communication in Society 3 

COM 470- Applied Broadcast Media 3 

COM 480- Intemational Broadcasting 3 

COM 485- Media & Religion 3 

Los Angeles Film Studies Program: 

Telecommunications courses 16 

Subtotal Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign languages 
at the intermediate level. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 

Three hours of the religion requirement are 
fulfilled through COM 495 . 

GENERAL ELECTROS 24 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



49 
39 



15 



148 College of Arts and Sciences 



BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN 
TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS 

COM 105 - Communication Practicum 

Understanding the Mass Media 

Introduction to Broadcasting 

Broadcast Techniques 

(Lab Required) 

Basic Television Production 

(Lab Required) 

or 

Audio Production 

(Lab Required) 
COM 240 - Broadcast Writing 
COM 260 - Radio &. TV Speech 

(Lab Required) 
COM 327 - Electronic Broadcast Management 
COM 403 - Communication Lntemship 
COM 410 - Media Law 
COM 495 - Christianity 8^ Communication 
COM 499 - Communication Research Seminar 



COM 201 
COM 230 
COM 235 

COM 370 



COM 380 



CTCS 

1 
3 
3 
4 



COMMUNICATION ELECTIVES ( 1 2 hours within emphasis) 1 2 
On-Campus Courses: 

COM 191 - Music Industry Survey (3) 

COM 250 - Principles of Photography (3) 

COM 252 - Advanced Photography (3) 

COM 270 - Graphic Web Page Design (3) 

COM 315 - Video Field Production a Editing (3) 

COM 365 - New Technologies a Society (3) 

COM 375 - Digital Video Production (3) 

COM 405 - Communication in Society (3) 

COM 470 - Applied Broadcast Media (3) 

COM 480 - Intemational Broadcasting (3) 

COM 485 - Media &L Religion (3) 
Los Angeles Film Studies Program: 

Telecommunications courses 16 

Subtotal Speciality 
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 
RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 

Three hours of the religion requirement are 

fulfilled through COM 495. 
GENERAL ELECTIVES 
TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 



49 
36 
15 



27 
130 



Department OF Communication AND THE Arts 149 

MINORS 

The Department of Communication and the Arts offers courses for a 
minor in Communication, Drama, Drama Ministry, Art and 
Telecommunications. 

ART 

The total course load for a minor in art would be eighteen credit 
hours. Six hours of upper division Art History are required as well as 
twelve hours in a variety of studio classes of the student's choice. 

COMMUNICATION 

The student minoring in Communication shall complete a mini- 
mum of eighteen hours, including nine hours in upper-division courses. 
Requirements for the minor include COM 202 Fundamentals of Human 
Communication, COM 201 Understanding the Mass Media, and COM 
215 Writing for the Media. 

DRAMA 

The student minoring in Drama shall complete a minimum of eigh- 
teen hours including DRA 211 Introduction to Acting, DRA 212 
Intermediate Acting, DRA 450 Directing, DRA 451 Advanced 
Directing, and six hours of electives chosen from the following courses: 
DRA 320 Stage Make-up or 331 Survey of Drama Literature and 
Theater History I, DRA 352 Advanced Acting or 332 Survey of Drama 
Literature and Theater History IL 

DRAMA MINISTRY 

The student minoring in Drama Ministry shall complete a minimum 
of eighteen hours including DRA 211 Introduction to Acting, DRA 212 
Intermediate Acting, DRA 251 Concepts of Drama Ministry, DRA 352 
Advanced Acting, DRA 450 Directing, and three hours of electives cho- 
sen from the following courses: DRA 451 Advanced Directing, DRA 320 
Stage Make-up, and DRA 260 Sketch Writing for Ministry. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

The student who desires to minor in Telecommunications shall com- 
plete a minimum of 18 hours including COM 230 Introduction to 
Broadcasting, COM 235 Broadcast Techniques, COM 240 Broadcast 
Writing, COM 410 Media Law, and six hours of electives chosen from 
the following courses: COM 105, Communication Practicum, COM 250 
Principles of Photography, COM 260 Radio a TV Speech, COM 270 
Graphic Web Page Design, COM 370 TV Production, COM 380 Audio 
Production and COM 401, 402, 403 Communication Internship. 



150 College of Arts and Sciences 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



ART 



ART 111. ART APPRECIATION Two hours credit 

An introduction to the visual arts of the Western World with an emphasis on the art of 
the twentieth century and the relationship of art to our society. 

ART 191. BEGINNING DRAWING Three hours credit 

A beginning drawing class open to students at all levels. Students will learn the basic 
techniques of drawing using a variety of dry media. Emphasis will be on developing creativity 
and individual styles. Students will be responsible for providing their own materials for out- 
of-class assignments. 

ART 192. ADVANCED DRAWING Three hours credit 

A continuation of Beginning Drawing. Students will experiment with advanced tech- 
niques of drawing using a variety of dry media. Emphasis will be on developing creativity and 
individual styles. Individual projects and independent studies will be assigned based on stu- 
•'--' ' dent interests and goals. Students will be responsible for providing their own materials for 

^,.. , out-of-class assignments. Prerequisite: ART 191 or its equivalent. 

..:!:: ART 211. LANDSCAPE OF ART Two hours credit 

*"■ A combination of the study of aesthetics and studio work. Class will meet twice weekly. 

"^i ; One session will be a one-hour study of landscapes as created by great artists of the past. The 

*j ; second session will be a two-hour studio class where students will create landscapes in the 

'' i medium of their choice. Subject matter will be derived from a combination of class discus- 

if' ' sion and personal observation. Students will be responsible for providing their own materials. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore or above or with teacher approval. 

ART 213. WATERCOLOR PAINTING Three hours credit 

A studio class where students will study the fundamentals of watercolor painting. 
Various skills and techniques will be taught such as paper preparation, dry brush, 
wet-on-wet, mixed media and matting of finished paintings. This class will culminate with 
a student display on campus. Students will be responsible for providing their own materials. 
Prerequisite: ART 191 or equivalent. 

ART 214. ADVANCED WATERCOLOR PAINTING Three hours credit 

A studio class where students will study advanced concepts of watercolor painting. 
Individual projects and styles will be explored. This class will culminate with a student dis- 
play on campus. Students will be responsible for providing their own materials. This course 
is an extension of ART 213. Prerequisite: ART 213 or its equivalent. 

ART 216. 2-D DESIGN Three hours credit 

A fundamental, non-computer studio course designed to introduce students to the basic 
visual concepts needed to create graphic designs on a two-dimensional surface. Includes color 
theory and composition. 

ART 220. GRAPHIC 2-D COMPUTER GRAPHICS Three hours credit 

A hands-on class that will offer a general overview as well as develop basic skills and 
understanding of computer graphics and the graphic arts industry. This course will include 
design projetts ranging from Logo and Corporate ID to Brochure and Package Design. 
Prerequisite: CIS 100 or equivalent experience. 

ART 240. BEGINNING CERAMICS Three hours credit 

Studio class in beginning techniques in ceramic skills. Focus will be on design and cre- 
ative hand building with an introduction to glazing and wheel throwing. No prerequisite. 
Materials fee: $50. 



Department of Communication and the Arts 151 



ART 244. ART HISTORY I Three hours credit 

A chronological survey of the visual arts and their cultural and historical context, begin- 
ning with pre-historic art and going up to the Renaissance. Offered Fall Semester. 

ART 245. ART HISTORY II Three hours credit 

A chronological survey of the visual arts and their cultural and historical context, begin- 
ning with the Renaissance and going through the modern era. Offered Spring Semester. 

ART 260. EASEL PAINTING Three hours credit 

A studio class that will offer experience in painting with either oil and/or acrylic media on 
canvas and other types of grounds. A variety of techniques represented with the emphasis 
being on individual creativity. This class will culminate with a student art display on cam- 
pus. Students will provide their own materials. Open to sophomore level and above, or with 
permission of instructor. Prerequisites: ART 191, ART 216. 

ART 261. ADVANCED EASEL PAINTING Three hours credit 

A studio class that will offer advanced experience in painting with either oil and/or acrylic 
media on canvas and other types of grounds. Emphasis will be on the development of a par- 
ticular theme by the student to be explored during the entire course. Prerequisite: ART 260. 

ART 310. 3-D COMPUTER GRAPHICS Three hours credit 

This class will provide a development of computer skills and fundamental design basics 
to create 3-D graphic designs. This course will include design projects ranging from produc- 
tion unit to conceptual model. Prerequisite: ART 220 or permission of the instmctor. 

ART 330. RENAISSANCE ART HISTORY Three hours credit 

A study of the history of the visual arts in Europe from mid- 14^^ century to the end of 
the 16^^ century. 

COMMUNICATION 

COM 105-106, 205-206, 305-306. COMMUNICATION PRACTICUM One hour credit 

Laboratory course in student publications and productions. Emphasis on practical appli- 
cation of development, design, editing and production of a wide variety of campus publica- 
tions and productions in addition to classroom exercises. Open to all students with consent 
of the instructor. 

COM 191. MUSIC INDUSTRY SURVEY Three hours credit 

A course designed to give the student an overview of the music industry and to 
acquaint him/her with the major aspects of the various career opportunities within the 
music industry. 

COM 201. UNDERSTANDING THE MASS MEDIA Three hours credit 

Basic instruction in the origin, history, development, regulation and social responsibili- 
ties of the mass communication media and agencies. Appraisal of selected theoretical orien- 
tations relating to the mass media. This course, along with COM 202, is a general prerequi- 
site for further Communication study. 

COM 202. FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN COMMUNICATION Three hours credit 

A course providing a broad overview and understanding of human communication. 
Included are a survey of the levels of communication (interpersonal, small group, organiza- 
tional, public, and mass); a survey of types of communication (speaking, writing, and non-ver- 
bal); and a survey of the field of communication theory. This course, along with COM 201, is 
a general prerequisite for further Communication study, unless otherwise noted in the cata- 
log description. However, it is not required for Telecommunication majors. 

COM 211. PUBLIC SPEAKING Three hours credit 

A course for beginners in the basic principles of speech directed toward the establishment 
of habits of good speech. There are no Communication prerequisites for this course. 

COM 215. WRITING FOR THE MEDIA Three hours credit 

An introduction to the form, style, and content of numerous categories of "media" writ- 
ing. The course includes practical application of writing strategies and subjects for public 
relations, advertising, magazines, newspapers, television, radio, and others. Prerequisites: 



152 College of Arts and Sciences 



English 110 and 25 wpm typing. Requires enrollment in a publications lab. Prerequisites: 
COM 201, COM 202. 

COM 220. SCRIPTWRITING FOR MEDIA Three hours credit 

A course in conceiving, developing, and writing scripts for television, film, and video. 
Uses a step-by-step approach to developing and pitching ideas as well as formats and tech- 
niques for writing short and long scripts. The course also covers marketing strategies for 
potential scriptwriters. Prerequisite: ENG 110. There are no Communication prerequisites. 

COM 230. INTRODUCTION TO BROADCASTING Three hours credit 

An introduction to the history and structure of the public and commercial broadcasting 
industries. Discusses the operation of broadcasting on the local and national levels in news, 
programming, and sales. Examines radio, television, cable, satellite, electronic print, and new 
technologies. Prerequisite: COM 201. 

COM 235. BROADCAST TECHNIQUES Four hours credit 

An introduction to basic principles and terminology associated with television and radio. 
The content includes laboratory experience with lecture, demonstration and production 
requirements to cover technical and creative aspects of electronic media. Prerequisites: 
^^ COM 201, COM 230. Includes a one-hour lab. 

COM 240. BROADCASTING WRITING Three hours credit 

^|;| A course that provides instruction and practice in the specialized field of writing for 

^>;| ■ broadcast. Course content includes news, commercials and public-service announcements 

C!; for radio and television. Class is held in a production/workshop environment. Prerequisites: 

-|' . COM 201, COM 230, ENG 1 10, and 25 wpm typing. 

%\\ 

li i COM 245. PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING Three hours credit 

III I This course emphasizes writing used in public relations using controlled and uncon- 

f ' trolled media to reach various target publics. The class will focus on research, techniques and 

production of news releases, backgrounders, fact sheets, features, newsletters, annual reports 
and media kits, along with writing for web sites and corporate advertising. Persuasive jour- 
nalistic writing is the foundation of this course. Prerequisite: COM 201, COM 202, ENG 
110, and 25 wpm typing. 

COM 250. PRINCIPLES OF PHOTOGRAPHY Three hours credit 

An introduction to the processes of visual media (including photography) with emphasis 
on practical applications. Prerequisites: COM 201. 

COMC 252. ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY Three hours credit 

An advanced course in photography, including black and white darkroom techniques, 
basic color photography and an introduction to photojournalism. Emphasis will be placed on 
the relationship between the art of photography and the rapidly changing technological and 
professional environment of the photographer. Prerequisite: COM 250 or equivalent. 

COM 270. GRAPHIC WEB PAGE DESIGN Three hours credit 

An introduction course in graphic and web page design and development. This course 
introduces computer software for creating interactive Web pages and Web sites, featuring 
color schemes and basic design principles. Prerequisite: CIS 100. 

COM 260. RADIO AND TELEVISION SPEECH Four hours credit 

A course that covers microphone techniques, voice problems, and use of equipment. 
This includes equipment care, capabilities and limitations. The course content includes a 
survey of the historical context of the announcing profession. Prerequisites: COM 201, 
COM 230, COM 240, or permission of the instructor. Includes a one-hour lab. 

COM 303. NEWSWRITING Three hours credit 

Basics of news gathering and writing under deadline. Observation, interviewing and 
reporting for mass media. Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 202, COM 215. 

COM 311. NEWSPAPER PRODUCTION Three hours credit 

A course designed to develop production and layout skills for the newspaper editor and 
production manager. Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 202. 

COM 315. VIDEO FIELD PRODUCTION AND EDITING Three hours credit 

A course designed to introduce the student to video post-production skills, practices, and 
equipment. Emphasis will be placed on the technical aspect of editing as well as creative pos- 



Department of Communication and the Arts 153 



sibilities which can be achieved through manipulation of the camera and video image. 
Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 235, COM 370. 

COM 323. DESKTOP PUBLISHING Three hours credit 

A course that concentrates on the techniques of layout, writing, and production of vari- 
ous publications, using prescribed computer hardware and software. Students will first 
become familiar with the computer and appropriate applications. Emphasis is then placed on 
the preparation of camera-ready publication projects. There are no Communication prerequi- 
sites for this course. 

COM 327. ELECTRONIC BROADCAST MANAGEMENT Three hours credit 

A survey of the operational structure of the public, secular and Christian electronic 
broadcasting industries. This course shall discuss the operation of radio, television, and cable 
organizations at the local and national levels as it pertains to news, programming, and sales. 
This course shall examine various aspects of management principles and theories relevant to 
electronic media management of personnel programming, sales, and promotion. 
Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 230. 

COM 330. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC RELATIONS Three hours credit 

An introduction to public relations for profit and nonprofit organizations. Topics include 
the history, principles, theories, practices, planning and research of the public relations feild. 
This is the foundational course for all subsequent study in public relations. Prerequisites: 
COM 201 and COM 202. 

COM 335. PUBLIC RELATIONS CASE STUDIES Three hours credit 

An investigation of pubhc relations practice based on reviewing important case studies 
in the field. Examples are used to demonstrate how public relations practitioners engage in 
research, define objectives, develop programs, and conduct evaluation in a wide variety of sit- 
uations. Prerequisites: COM 330 or permission of instructor. 

COM 340. PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING Three hours credit 

Advertising in society. Types and functions of advertising, fundamentals of broadcast and 
publications advertising. Stress on communications aspects of advertising. Prerequisite: 
COM 201. 

COM 341. RHETORIC AND PUBLIC DISCOURSE Three hours credit 

The principles of argumentation and debate, analysis and discussion of current public 
questions, briefing, inductive and deductive reasoning, strategy and refutation, debates. 
Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 202, COM 211. 

COM 351. SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION Three hours credit 

Methods of procedure in committees, round-table discussions, lecture forums, sympo- 
siums, panels, and other types of discussion. Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 202. 

COM 352. ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION Three hours credit 

An introduction to the theory and practice of communication in organizations. Examines 
organizational behavior from the standpoint of historical and contemporary theories along 
with examples and case studies. Emphasis is placed on the role of communication in the 
development and maintenance of organizational structures. Prerequisites: COM 201 and 
COM 202, or permission of instructor. 

COM 354. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION Three hours credit 

A study of the relationship between communication and culture with emphasis on fac- 
tors affecting the processes and quality of interpersonal communication between those of dif- 
fering cultures and subcultures. There are no Communication prerequisites for this course. 

COM 365. NEW TECHNOLOGIES AND SOCIETY Three hours credit 

A course designed to introduce students to new communication technologies and 
explore the impact of the new technologies on our daily lives. New and developing interper- 
sonal, group, and mass communication technologies will be covered as well as the historical 
origins of the new technologies. Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 202. 

COM 370. BASIC TELEVISION PRODUCTION Four hours credit 

This course provides practical experience in studio television production and associated 
skills with emphasis on "team" approaches. Topics to be covered include personnel func- 
tions, equipment functions and the creative functions of visual programming. Prerequisites: 
COM 201, COM 230, COM 235, or permission of instructor. Limit 16 students per semes- 
ter. Includes a one-hour lab. 



154 College of Arts and Sciences 



COM 375. DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION Three hours credit 

This course provides a Christian introudction to digital video production, its apphcations 
and functions. Emphasis is placed on digital video, camera, processmg and editing, with con- 
sideration given to the dynamic nature of digital video desktop technology. Topics to be cov- 
ered include the benefits, theory and skills of digital editing as they relate to the telecommu- 
nications and broadcast industry. Prerequisites: COM 230, Com 235, COM 315, COM 370 
or permission of instructor. 

COM 380. AUDIO PRODUCTION Four hours credit 

A course designed to introduce the student to basic audio production skills, practices and 
equipment. Emphasis v^ill be placed on sound reinforcement and recording studio environ- 
ments. Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 230, COM 235 or permission of instructor. Includes a 
one-hour lab. 

COM 381. ADVANCED AUDIO PRODUCTION Four hours credit 

A course designed to build upon the student's knowledge of basic audio production 
skills, practices and equipment. Emphasis will be placed on acoustics, reinforcement strate- 
gies and analog, as well as digital studio applications. Requires enrollment in one-hour lab 
session. Prerequisites: COM 235, COM 380 or permission of instructor. 

COM 390. COMMUNICATION THEORIES Three hours credit 

A study of the major sources of communication theory together with specific, contempo- 
rary examples of each approach. Attention is given to the nature and progress of scientific 
inquiry in the communication field, the process of theory building, and the impact of the var- 
ious types of communication on society. Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 202. 

1;; ; COM 399. honors INDEPENDENT STUDY One-four hours credit 

*;i '. An independent study supervised by three faculty members that provides the student 

'I'i \ who qualifies under the honors guidelines the opportunity to pursue a special topic of his/her 

,jll; : choice. Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 202. 

COM 401. COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP One hour credit 

A course designed for upper-class students in Communication and for others who have a 
special interest in attaining practical skills in a specific communication-oriented occupation. 
At least 75 hours of internship clock time are required for awarding of credit. Internship 
opportunities will be posted prior to each preregistration period. Open to juniors and seniors 
only, and consent of the instructor is required. 

COM 402. COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP Two hours credit 

A course designed for upper-class students in Communication and for others who have a 
special interest in attaining practical skills in a specific communication-oriented occupation. 
At least 150 hours of internship clock time are required for awarding of credit. Internship 
opportunities will be posted prior to each preregistration period. Open to juniors and seniors 
only, and consent of the instructor is required. 

COM 403. COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP Three hours credit 

A course designed for upper-class students in Communication and for others who have a 
special interest in attaining practical skills in a specific communication-oriented occupation. 
At least 200 hours of internship clock time are required for awarding of credit. Internship 
opportunities will be posted prior to each preregistration period. Open to juniors and seniors 
only, and consent of the instructor is required. 

COM 405. COMMUNICATION IN SOCIETY Three hours credit 

Explores the theoretical and practical aspects of human communication and mass com- 
munication within culture. Both critical and institutional approaches will be studied. 
Specific areas will include the critical hinctions of language, relationship between interper- 
sonal communication and the media, media values, and mediated reality within societies in 
both developed and underdeveloped countries. Prerequisite: COM 201. 

COM 410. MEDIA LAW Three hours credit 

Examination of the legal and ethical aspects of publishing and broadcasting, with empha- 
sis on freedom of the press, the right to know, copyright, libel, privacy, and obscenity. 
Prerequisite: COM 201, and permission of instructor. 

COM 470. APPLIED BROADCAST MEDIA Three hours credit 

This course is intended to give students hands-on experience m all facets of television 
production and broadcasting. The fundamentals covered include camera operation, begin- 
ning directing and location shooting. Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 230 or permission of 
instructor. 



Department of Communication and the Arts 155 



COM 480. INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING Three hours credit 

An introduction to the culture, economy and structure of the global electronic media. 
This course shall discuss the operation of international broadcasting at the national level as it 
pertains to regions of North America, South America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, the 
Middle East, Africa, Asia, and Australia in the areas of news, programming, and sales. This 
course shall examine radio, television, cable, satellite, microwave, fiber optics, electronic 
print, information systems, and new technologies emerging in the countries that comprise 
these regions. Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 230, COM 327, and permission of instructor. 

COM 485. MEDIA AND RELIGION Three hours credit 

A comprehensive analysis of fundamentalist/evangelical Christianity's appropriation of 
media in a comparative context, giving attention to similarities and differences in various 
religious traditions. The course uses a range of analytical perspectives (theological, historical, 
sociological, and psychological) to facilitate a multi-level interdisciplinary approach to the 
topic. Students will learn about the history of religion and media use in America (with par- 
ticular focus on the 20th century), examine the divergent paths of evangelicalism and media 
use in America, and explore the theoretical and psychological dynamics of religious media 
usage in America. Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 230, COM 327, THE 331. 

COM 490, 491, 492. CONTEMPORARY TOPICS One-three hours credit 

IN COMMUNICATION 

A course presenting various topics of contemporary interest. Topics will change each 
semester. Prerequisites: COM 201, COM 202. 

COM 495. CHRISTIANITY AND COMMUNICATION Three hours credit 

A course providing a theoretical integration of the Christian faith with the field of 
Communication. Reviews fundamental themes connecting faith with communication prac- 
tice for Christians from the time of the early church to the present, with special emphasis on 
practical responses to cultural and historical shifts in worldviews. Prerequisite: Senior sta- 
tus or permission of instructor. 

COM 499. COMMUNICATION RESEARCH SEMINAR Three hours credit 

A course to introduce the Communication major or minor to the techniques and proce- 
dures of research in communication and their application in a major research project under 
the guidance of the teacher. For upper-division majors and minors only. Prerequisites: COM 
201, COM 390. 

DRAMA 

DRA 101-102, 201-202, 301-302, 401-402. THEATER PRODUCTION One hour credit 

Experience in the practical aspects of play production as an actor and/or technician. 
Requires a minimum of 45 hours as a cast and /or crew member of a theatrical production. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Offered every semester. 

DRA 105, 205, 305, 405. DRAMA LAB One hour credit 

Laboratory course in drama. Emphasis on the application of acting and production skills 
in a variety of settings including drama ministry. Offered every semester. 

DRA 133. CHOREOGRAPHY AND THE STAGE One hour credit 

A practice course which involves a variety of creative activities to help the student devel- 
op the art of choreographing movement for stage. 

DRA 21 1 . INTRODUCTION TO ACTING Three hours credit 

An introduction to the development and the skill training of the actor with focus on the 
basic techniques which form the foundation for further study and performance,- physical and 
mental relaxation techniques,- and an introduction to vocal work and character study. 

DRA 212. INTERMEDIATE ACTING Three hours credit 

A continuation of Introduction to Acting. This course concentrates on the relationship 
between actors and an in-depth look into character interpretation. Contemporary and stan- 
dard plays and dialogues will be taught and acted out. Prerequisite: DRA 21 1. 

DRA 220. STAGECRAFT Three hours credit 

An introduction to the theory and craft of construction and design for the theater. Topics 
to include set construction, scene painting, light, sound and props. Must register for Theater 
Production credit. 



156 College of Arts and Sciences 



DRA 251. CONCEPTS OF DRAMA MINISTRY Three hours credit 

A study of the theological backgrounds, history, and philosophy of church drama min- 
istry. How to use the dramatic arts as a mmistry tool in teaching bibhcal principles. 

DRA 260. SKETCHWRITING FOR DRAMA MINISTRY Three hours credit 

How to formulate ideas and materials for writing short sketches and plays for the min- 
istry. Publishing companies and their requirements will be studied, and the actual writing of 
scripts and the performance of those scripts will be a part of the class. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

DRA 305. LIGHTING AND SOUND DESIGN Three hours credit 

A study of lighting and sound design and application for the threatre. Emphasis will be 
on design theory, technical application, and equipment installation, maintenance, and opera- 
tion. Prerequisite: DRA 220. 

DRA 311. ACTING: PERIOD STYLES Three hours credit 

A continuation of DRA 211. The student will develop natural skill within the context of 
various period styles including Greek, Commedia Dell' Arte, Shakespeare, Restoration 
Comedy and Melodrama. Prerequisite: DRA 211. 

DRA 3 1 2. ACTING FOR CAMERA Three hours credit 

A study of the techniques and methods of acting for the camera. The primary focus of 
the class will center on dramatic performances for single camera productions. Prerequisites: 
DRA 211 and DRA 212. 

DRA 315. SCENE AND SET DESIGN Three hours credit 

A study of scenographic design for theatre. Emphasis will be on practical application and 
design from the initial conception to the firal product. 

DRA 320. STAGE MAKE-UP Three hours credit 

Styles of make-up and characterization will be learned and developed. How to apply the 
principles of make-up for street, clown, mime, or full productions. 

DRA 321. VOICE, DICTION, AND DIALECT: Three hours credit 

THE EXPRESSIVE VOICE 

Designed to develop and improve the speaking voice. Background discussion and individ- 
ual and group exercise and drills. 

DRA 33 1 . SURVEY OF DRAMA LITERATURE Three hours credit 

AND THEATRE HISTORY I 

A survey of dramatic literature within its historical context. This course will emphasize 
the development of theatre practices that have had an impact upon the playwrights through 
analysis of selected plays from ancient Greek, Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration, 
and Classical Asian Theatre. 

DRA 332. SURVEY OF DRAMA LITERATURE Three hours credit 

AND THEATRE HISTORY II 

A survey of dramatic literature within its historical context. This course will emphasize 
the development of theatre practices that have had an impact upon the playwrights from the 
rise of realism to contemporary theatre, including non-westem theatre and plays. 

DRA 352. ADVANCED ACTING Three hours credit 

A continuation of DRA 211 and DRA 311. The study of various acting styles and meth- 
ods will be explored through the development of improvisational techniques. Contemporary 
means of developing character and intensity outside the realm of traditional acting will be 
presented. Prerequisites: DRA 21 1 or DRA 31 1. 

DRA 433. HtSTORY OF AMERICAN THEATRE Three hours credit 

A chronological study of the history of American theatre in its social, political, and his- 
torical contexts from colonial times to the present. Emphasis will be placed on theatre devel- 
opments and philosophies with regards to acting, directing, writing and producing. 

DRA 450. DIRECTING Three hours credit 

Introduction to the techniques of directing for the theater including blocking, character 
development and play production. Prerequisite: DRA 21 1 or permission of the instructor. 



Department of Communication and the Arts 157 



DRA 451. ADVANCED DIRECTING Three hours credit 

Planning and preparing a full production utilizing lights, make-up, sound, budget and 
programs with skilled actors in a church or theatre setting. Prerequisite: DRA 450. 

DRA 490. CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN DRAMA One-three hours credit 

A course presenting various topics of contemporary interest. Topics will change each 
semester. 

DRA 499. SENIOR SEMINAR/PROJECT One-three hours credit 

The student will engage in research or skill development appropriate to his/her career 
goals. A major project or performance is required. Prerequisite: DRA 352. 

HUMANITIES 

HUM 201. FOUNDATIONS OF WESTERN CULTURE Three hours credit 

An integrative survey of the history, art, music, literature, and drama which form the founda- 
tion of western culture, reaching from approximately 4000 BC to the fall of Rome. Prerequisite: 
ENGllO. 

HUM 202. THE RISE OF EUROPE Three hours credit 

An integrative survey of the historic foundations of Western culture and its artistic, dramatic, 
Hterary, and musical representations from the beginnings of Christianity through the end of the 
Middle Ages. Prerequisite: ENGllO. 

HUM 301 . FOUNDATIONS OF THE MODERN WORLD Three hours credit 

An integrative survey of the historic foundations of Western culture and its artistic, dramatic, 
literary, and musical representations from the Renaissance through the eighteenth century. 
Prerequisite: ENGllO. 

HUM 302. MODERN WESTERN CULTURE Three hours credit 

An integrative survey of the historic foundations of Western culture and its artistic, dramatic, 
literary, and musical representations from the nineteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: 
ENGllO. 



c:: 

x: 
it 
a I 



Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages 159 



f 



I 




DEPARTMENT OV ENGLISH AND 
MODERN EOREIGN LANGUAGES 

JEAN ELEDGE, Chairperson 

ENGLISH 

Professors Carolyn Dirksen and Sabord Woods; 

Associate Professors Ruth Lindsey 

and Donna Summerlin; 

Assistant Professors Jean Corey, Christopher Coulter, 

Reginald Gunnells, Sarah Kane, 

Susan Rogers, and James Washick; 

Instructors Vanetta Bratcher, Vanessa Hammond, 

Andrew Lee, and Rachel Reneslacis 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Associate Professors Jean Eledge, Dora Vargas, and James Wilkins; 
Instructors Jose Minay and Alejandra Hoffer 

TEACfflNG ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES 

Instructor Paula Stone 
READING 

Instructor Gloria Brownlee 

DISCIPLINES 

English 
French 
German 
Linguistics 
Reading 
Spanish 
TESOL 



160 College of Arts and Sciences 



The Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages has the 
primary mission of preparing students for vocations and graduate study 
in disciplines which emphasize the verbal arts. It offers majors in ENG- 
LISH, FRENCH, and SPANISH. It also prepares students who wish to 
obtain a broad liberal arts undergraduate background before beginning 
specialized training for such professions as law and theology or simply as 
a means to an in-depth understanding of the function of human beings 
in the world. The faculty believes strongly in a Christian world view and 
insists that such a view has practical implications for both content and 
pedagogy. All facts, concepts and understandings relevant to each field 
are presented from the perspective of the Christian view of a divinely 
created and ordered world under the lordship of Jesus Christ. 

ENGLISH 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in English (ENGA) prepares students for 
graduate work in the discipline or careers in research, writing, and edit- 
ing, and a variety of other related occupations. The program provides a 
broad overview of world literature with emphasis on English and 
American writers. In addition to the survey courses, students take 
courses in literary theory and advanced grammar. The capstone course, 
English in Christian Perspective, assists students in integrating their 
Christian faith with scholarship in the discipline. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in English with teacher certification 
(ENAT) prepares students to teach English at the middle and high school 
levels. In order to develop a knowledge base for their teaching, students 
take survey courses in English, American, and World Literature, as well 
as linguistics, writing, and advanced grammar courses. Courses such as 
Literature for Adolescents and Methods of Teaching English provide 
pedagogical applications. In addition to these courses housed in the 
department, students complete the professional education sequence, 
including a semester of student teaching at the secondary level. 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

The Bachelor of Arts in French or Spanish programs (FREA, SPAA) 
prepares students for graduate work in the target language, or for work 
in a variety of careers, including political science, business, and acade- 
mia. In addition to language learning and practice, upper-level course- 
work in literature, stylistics, and special topics, students will take a 
capstone course which will engage and motivate them to integrate their 
faith and their chosen disciplines. 

The Bachelor of Arts in French or Spanish teacher certification pro- 
grams (FRAT, SPAT) prepares students for careers as teachers of French 
or Spanish in grades 7 through 12. Courses at all levels are designed to 
increase students' proficiency levels in all skills, enabling them to teach 
effectively with an advanced knowledge of the target-language culture. 



Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages 161 



Study-abroad programs are available and encouraged for all teaching 
licensure candidates. 





PROGRAMS OF STUDY 




The Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages offers 


the following 


programs of study: 




Degree 


Major 


Code 


B.A. 


English 


ENGA 


B.A. 


English 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 


ENAT 


B.A. 


French 


FREA 


B.A. 


French 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 


FRAT 


BA. 


Spanish 


SPAA 


B.A. 


Spanish 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 


SPAT 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 



ENGA 



All applicants to the English major must pass the departmental 
grammar exam with a minimum score of 70. 

SPECLVLTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

ENG300 - Writing about Literature 3 

ENG301 - English Literature 3 

ENG302 - English Literature 3 

ENG 311 - American Literature 3 

ENG312 - American Literature 3 

ENG 321 - World Literature 3 

ENG 322 - World Literature 3 

ENG 391 - Introduction to Modem Literary Criticism 3 

ENG 410 - Shakespeare 3 

ENG 482 - Advanced Grammar 3 

ENG 495 - English in Christian Perspective 3 

English Electives 3 

Subtotal Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign language at the 
intermediate level. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement 
are fulfilled through ENG 495 . 

ELECTD/ES 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 



36 

47 

15 

32 
130 



162 College of Arts and Sciences 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH ENAT 

(TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES 7-12) 

All applicants to the English major must pass the departmental English 
grammar exam with a minimum score of 70. 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

ENG300 - Writing about Literature 3 

ENG301 - English Literature 3 

ENG302 - English Literature 3 

ENG310 - Literature for Adolescents 3 

ENG 311 - American Literature 3 

ENG 3 1 2 - American Literature 3 

ENG 321 - World Literature 3 

^„„ ENG 322 - World Literature 3 

'!" . ENG 482 - Advanced Grammar 3 

c; ! ENG 495 - English in Christian Perspective 3 

ci i Three hours chosen from the following: 3 

1::: ; ENG 360 - Introduction to Linguistics (3) 

c\ ENG 361 - Language Acquisition and Development (3) 

Jj: ! ENG 481 - History of English Language (3) 

*;;; • English Electives (300 or above) 3 

Subtotal Specialty 36 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 1 99 - Intro, to the Teaching Profession Seminar 1 

EDU201 - Foundations of Education 3 

EDU 316 - Exceptional Child 3 

SED 312 - Educational Psychology 3 

SED 413 - Teaching Enghsh, Grades 7-12 2 

SED 419 - General Secondary Methods 2 

SED 444 - Student Teaching 5 

SED 445 - Student Teaching 5 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 
Subtotal Professional Education 26 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 47 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign language at the 
intermediate level. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement 
are fulfilled through ENG 495. 

ELECTEES 6 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages 163 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH FREA 

SPECLALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

PRE 211 - Intermediate French I 3 

FRE212 - Intermediate French n 3 

FRE341 - Advanced French Conversation 3 
FRE 342 - Advanced French Grammar &. Composition 3 

FRE351 - Aspects of French Literature 3 

FRE 441 - French Civilization 3 
FRE 490 - Studies in French Literature: 

Middle Ages through 18th Century 3 

FRE 491 - Studies in French Literature: 19th Century 3 

FRE 492 - Studies in French Literature: 20th Century 3 
LIN 495 - Foreign Language and Faith: 

A Capstone Course for Majors 3 

Six hours chosen from the following: 6 
FRE 399 - French Honors Independent Study (3) 
FRE 481 - Advanced Stylistics and Phonetics (3) 
FRE 493 - Special Topics (3) 
Subtotal Specialty 36 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 41 

The 6-hour foreign language requirement is fulfilled 
through the program's major requirements. 

RELIGION REQLTIREMENTS 15 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through LIN 495. 

ELECTROS 38 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



164 College of Arts and Sciences 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH FRAT 

(TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES 7-12) 

SPECLMTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

PRE 211 - Intermediate French I 3 

ERE 212 - Intermediate French n 3 

FRE341 - Advanced French Conversation 3 

FRE 342 - Advanced French Grammar &. Composition 3 

ERE 35 1 - Aspects of French Literature 3 

FRE 441 - French Civilization 3 

FRE 48 1 - Advanced Stylistics and Phonetics 3 
FRE 490 - Studies in French Literature: 

Middle Ages through 18th Century 3 

FRE 491 - Studies in French Literature: 19th Century 3 

"^'* FRE 492 - Studies in French Literature: 20th Century 3 

|:::j ; LIN 495 - Foreign Language and Faith: 

^~sj i ' A Capstone Course for Majors 3 

x: ; Three hours chosen from the following: 3 

2 I FRE 399 - French Honors Independent Study (3) 

<:i i FRE 493 - Special Topics (3) 

J.; '. Subtotal Specialty 36 

-'' ' PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 1 99 - Introduction to Teaching Profession Seminar 1 

EDU201 - Foundations of Education 3 

SED312 - Educational Psychology 3 

EDU 316 - Exceptional Child 3 

SED 413 - Teaching Language, Grades 7-12 2 

SED419 - General Secondary Methods 2 

SED 444 - Student Teaching 5 

SED 445 - Student Teaching 5 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 
Subtotal Professional Education 26 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 41 

The 6-hour foreign language requirement is fulfilled 
through the program's major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through LIN 495. 

ELECTEES 12 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages 165 



BACHELOROFARTS IN SPANISH SPAA 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

SPA 211 - Intermediate Spanish I 3 

SPA 212 - Intermediate Spanish n 3 

SPA 341 - Intermediate Conversation (Sl Composition 3 

SPA 35 1 - Aspects of Spanish Literature 3 

SPA 361 - Studies in Latin American Literature: 

Colonial through 18th Century 3 

SPA 441 - Spanish Civilization 3 

SPA 48 1 - Advanced Spanish Grammar & Conversation 3 
SPA 490 - Studies in Spanish Literature: 

Middle Ages through the Renaissance 3 

SPA 492 - Spanish Literature: 19th a 20th Centuries 3 

LIN 495 - Foreign Language and Faith: 

A Capstone Course for Majors 3 

Six hours chosen from the following: 6 

SPA 31 1 - Foreign Studies in Spanish (3) 
SPA 312 - Foreign Studies in Spanish (3) 
SPA 362 - Studies in Latin American Literature: 

19th Century through the New Novel (3) 
SPA 363 - Studies in Latin American Literature: 

Post- Boom and Contemporary Literature (3) 
SPA 399 - Spanish Honors Independent Study (3) 
SPA 491 - Spanish Literature: Golden Age - 18th Century (3) 
Subtotal Specialty 36 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 41 

The 6-hour foreign language requirement is fulfilled 
through the program's major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through LIN 495. 

ELECTTVES 38 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



166 College of Arts and Sciences 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPANISH SPAT 

(TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES 7-12) 

SPECLALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

SPA 211 - Intermediate Spanish I 3 

SPA 212 - Intermediate Spanish n 3 

SPA 341 - Intermediate Conversation &. Composition 3 

SPA 351 - Aspects of Spanish Literature 3 

SPA 361 - Studies in Latin American Literature: 

Colonial through 18th Century 3 

SPA 441 - Spanish Civilization 3 

SPA 490 - Studies in Spanish Literature; 

Middle Ages through the Renaissance 3 

SPA 491 - Spanish Literature: Golden Age - 18th Century 3 
•^it SPA 492 - Spanish Literature: 19th a 20th Centuries 3 

c£ ' LIN 495 - Foreign Language and Faith: 

>< ! . A Capstone Course for Majors 3 

;;;; , Six hours chosen from the following: 6 

iii; ; SPA 31 1 - Foreign Studies in Spanish (3) 

1^ ; SPA 312 - Foreign Studies in Spanish (3) 

Ciii; I SPA 399 - Spanish Honors Independent Study (3) 

jij! I SPA 481 - Advanced Spanish Grammar and Conversation (3) 

Subtotal Specialty 36 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQIHREMENTS 

EDU 199 - Introduction to Teaching Profession Seminar 1 

EDU201 - Foundations of Education 3 

SED312 - Educational Psychology 3 

EDU 316 - Exceptional Child 3 

SED 413 - Teaching Language, Grades 7-12 2 

SED419 - General Secondary Methods 2 

SED 444 - Student Teaching 5 

SED 445 - Student Teaching 5 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 
Subtotal Professional Education 26 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 41 

The 6-hour foreign language requirement is fulfilled 
through the program's major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through LIN 495. 
ELECTIVES 12 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 1 30 



Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages 167 



MINORS 

The Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages offers 
courses for minors in English, French, Linguistics, Spanish, and 
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. 

ENGLISH 

The student minoring in English must complete a minimum of 
eighteen hours in English courses, exclusive of the composition 
sequence, including nine hours of upper-division courses, plus three 
additional hours of studies in the English language. 

FRENCH 

The student minoring in French must complete a minimum of 
eighteen hours in French, exclusive of French 111-112. 

LINGUISTICS 

The student minoring in Linguistics must complete a minimum of 
• eighteen hours which include the following courses: LIN 360 
Introduction to Linguistics, LIN 361 Language Acquisition, LIN 460 
Linguistics for TESOL, LIN 481 History of the Enghsh Language, LIN 482 
Advanced English Grammar, and either ANT 310 Cultural 
Anthropology, or COM 354 Intercultural Cominunication. 

SPANISH 

The student minoring in Spanish must complete a minimum of 
eighteen hours in Spanish, exclusive of Spanish 111-112. 

TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES 

The student minoring in Teaching English to Speakers of Other 
Languages must complete a minimum of eighteen hours which include 
the following courses: ENG 120 Basic English Grammar or ENG 482 
Advanced English Grammar, ENG 360 Introduction to Linguistics, ENG 
361 Language Acquisition, ENG 460 Linguistics for TESOL, COM 354 
Intercultural Communication, and LIN 462 Methods of TESOL Pre K-12. 



168 College of Arts and Sciences 



COURSE OFFERINGS 
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

ENG 090. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE Three hours credit 

An individualized course in English comprehension, conversation, and composition for 
non-native speakers. ENG 090 is required of all non-native speakers scoring below 500 on the 
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). Credit earned in this course will not count 
toward the composition requirement, and grading will be pass/fail. This course is offered for 
institutional credit only. 

ENG 09 1 . BASIC WRITING SKILLS Four hours credit 

A course intended to diagnose deficiencies and strengthen skills related to grammar, 

usage, sentence structure and writing. It introduces students to the writing process, promotes 

writing based on readings, and encourages writing with confidence. ENG 091 is the entry 

level course for students scoring 13 or below on the English section of the ACT (American 

College Testing) or 350 or below on the SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test). Students earning a 

grade of C or above are eligible for College Writing Workshop,- students who earn less than a 

""'«• C grade will receive a grade of "No Credit." English 091 involves three classroom hours and 

C;;;' ' two hours of supervised writing center activities. This course does not apply to the English 

O; composition core requirement. 

^::1| I ENG 105. COLLEGE WRITING WORKSHOP Four hours credit 

vj« ; A writing course which seeks to teach students to develop clean, well-organized prose. It 

i;;|; '. emphasizes the writing process with an introduction to rhetorical strategies such as narra- 

<X ', tion, description, definition and argument-persuasion and culminates with an introduction to 

Ct ■ the library, research and documentation. The course involves 3 classroom hours and 2 hours 

-(iili ; per week in the writing center. A grade of C or better in this course allows the student to 

-jl '• enroll in Rhetoric and Research, ENG 110. Prerequisite: ACT English score of 14-19; SAT 

recentered verbal score of 370-470; or completion of ENG 091 Basic Writing Skills with a 

grade of C or better. 

ENG 106. COLLEGE WRITING Three hours credit 

A writing course which seeks to teach students to develop clean, well-organized prose. It 
emphasizes the writing process with an introduction to rhetorical strategies such as narra- 
tion, description, definition and argument-persuasion and culminates with an introduction to 
the library, research and documentation. A grade of C or better in this course allows the stu- 
dent to enroll in Rhetoric and Research, ENG 1 10. Prerequisite: ACT English score of 20-28 
or an SAT recentered verbal score of 490-630. 

ENG 110. RHETORIC AND RESEARCH Three hours credit 

A course that focuses on four major writing projects and enables students to review the 
creative process as it applies to composition, learn the research methodologies and proce- 
dures of their chosen discipline (including computer-generated research), internalize 
approaches to critical thinking, apply basic principles of public speaking, and perform literary 
analysis. A grade of C or better is required for successful completion of this course. 
Prerequisites: ACT English score of 29 or better or an SAT recentered verbal score above 660 
or completion of ENG 105 or 106 with a grade of C or better. 

ENG 120. ENGLISH GRAMMAR Three hours credit 

Thorough review of formal grammar and grammatical usage which employs traditional 
terminology and which is designed for all students — major or non-major — whose pre-col- 
lege backgrounds in English grammar are insufficient to enable them to master the skills 
of written expression or otherwise pursue satisfactorily their personal and professional devel- 
opment. No credit toward the English major. Offered Spring Semester. Majors who score 
below 70 on the departmental grammar exam must take this course. 

ENG 201. ASPECTS OF LITERATURE Two hours credit 

Aspects of literature, in the various genres, in both English and foreign languages (in trans- 
lation) based, according to the individual class, on specific themes, on distinctive periods, on 



Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages 169 



individual or types of authors, or on significant literary movements m the ancient hterary 
forms (epic, saga, mythology, biblical masterpieces), the medieval, the modern, and/or the 
contemporary literary forms. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 202. ASPECTS OF LITERATURE Two hours credit 

A continuation of, the same as, or a variation on 201. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 

ENG 211. MASTERPIECES OF THE WESTERN WORLD I Two hours credit 

Selected literary masterpieces from ancient, medieval, and Renaissance world literature 
studied in relation to their cultural context. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. Offered every semester. 

ENG 212. MASTERPIECES OF THE WESTERN WORLD II Two hours credit 

Selected literary masterpieces of the Enlightenment and the nineteenth century studied 
in relation to their cultural context. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. Offered every semester. 

ENG 213. MASTERPIECES OF THE WESTERN WORLD III Two hours credit 

Selected literary masterpieces of the twentieth century studied in relation to their cultur- 
al context. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered every semester. 

ENG 300. WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A study of the techniques of writing about fiction, drama, and poetry with an emphasis on 
literary analysis and documented research. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. Offered every semester. 

■ENG 301. ENGLISH LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A survey of English literature from Beowulf to the late eighteenth century. Prerequisite: 
ENG 1 10. Offered Fall Semester. 

ENG 302. ENGLISH LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A continuation of English 301 with a survey of English literature from the Romantic 
Movement to the present. Prerequisite: English 1 10. Offered Spring Semester. 

ENG 310. LITERATURE FOR ADOLESCENTS Three hours credit 

A survey of books and stories for the adolescent with emphasis on the use of literature in 
the junior and senior high school classrooms. Required for teacher licensure in English. This 
course does not fulfill the core literature requirement. Offered Spring Semester. 

ENG 311. AMERICAN LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A survey of American literature from the founding of the colonies to the Civil War. 
Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered Fall Semester. 

ENG 312. AMERICAN LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A continuation of English 311 with a survey of American literature from the Civil War to 
the present. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. Offered Spring Semester. 

ENG 321. WORLD LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A survey of World literature with emphasis on Greek and Roman Classicism, Middle 
Ages, and the European Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. Offered Fall Semester. 

ENG 322. WORLD LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A continuation of English 321 with emphasis on the Enlightenment, varieties of 
Romanticism, nineteenth-century Realism and Naturalism, and varieties of twentieth-centu- 
ry Modernism. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. Offered Spring Semester. 

ENG 325. LITERATURE OF THE BIBLE Three hours credit 

An introduction to the literary forms of the Bible, such as short stories, epics, drama, 
poetry, proverbs, the Gospels, parables, epistles, satire, and visionary literature, Prerequisite: 
ENG 110. Offered Fall Semester, even years. 



t: 



1 70 College of Arts and Sciences 



ENG 350. NONFICTION WRITING: Three hours credit 

THE CRAFT OF WRITING ARTICLES 

A survey of the techniques of news, editorials, feature, technical and research writing 
with an emphasis on the preparation of materials for publication. Prerequisite: ENG 1 10. 
Offered Fall Semester. 

ENG 351. CREATIVE WRITING Three hours credit 

A study of the techniques of writing essays, fiction, and poetry with primary emphasis 
on the short story. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 

ENG 360. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS Three hours credit 

An introduction to scientific language study including morphology, phonology, syntax, 
pragmatics, and the nature of language. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered Fall Semester, odd 
years. 

ENG 361. LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND DEVELOPMENT Three hours credit 

An investigation of the cognitive processes of first and second language acquisition and 
i^„ development with special attention to the acquisition of literacy, language diversity, and 

"^"' bilingualism. Offered every semester. 

c:;:"' 

S ENG 391. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN LITERARY CRITICISM Three hours credit 

Qj , ' A study of literary theory in the 20th century with a brief overview of the history of criti- 

cism. Students will apply critical theories to a number of literary texts. Prerequisite: At least 
^■jiiii j one upper-division literature course. Offered Fall Semester. 

«:;:;' : 

S : ENG 399. HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY One-four hours credit 

C!l'"' ' An independent study supervised by three faculty members that provides the student who 

"(iiiii i qualifies under the honors guidelines the opportunity to pursue a special topic of his/her choice. 

«!!> ' 

ENG 405. THE AMERICAN NOVEL Three hours credit 

The reading and in-class analysis of representative American novels with some attention 
to related literary history and with a written analysis of one additional novel by each student. 
Offered Spring Semester, even years. 

ENG 406. THE BRITISH NOVEL Three hours credit 

The reading and in-class analysis of representative British novels with some attention to 
literary history and with a written analysis of some aspect of one of the novels. Offered Fall 
Semester, odd years. 

ENG 410. SHAKESPEARE Three hours credit 

A study of Shakespeare's histories, comedies, tragedies, and poetry. Offered Fall Semester. 

ENG 415. MILTON Three hours credit 

A study of John Milton's poetry, with major emphasis on Paradise Lost, and a brief sur- 
vey of his prose. 

ENG 421. RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH Three hours credit 

CENTURY LITERATURE 

A study of Restoration and eighteenth century British poetry and prose, with special 
attention to Dryden, Pope, Swift, and Johnson. Offered Spring Semester, even years. 

ENG 431. ENGLISH ROMANTIC PERIOD Three hours credit 

A study of the Romantic Movement with emphasis on the poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats, and on the essays of Lamb, Hazlitt, De Quincey, and 
Landor. Some attention will be given to the critical writing and letters of the period. Offered 
Fall Semester, even years. 

ENG 441. VICTORIAN LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A study of the literature of Victorian Britain including representative authors of poetry, 
prose and fiction. The poetry of Tennyson, Brownmg and Arnold will be emphasized. Offered 
Sprmg Semester, odd years. 



Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages 17'. 



ENG 451. EARLY MODERN LITERATURE Three hours credit 

Selection and examination of representative authors who wrote hetwcen 1850 and World 
War 11. 

ENG 452. RECENT MODERN LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A continuation of ENG 45 1 with special attention to authors who wrote between World 
War II and the present. 

ENG 453. WOMEN WRITERS Three hours credit 

Selected literary masterpieces by women of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the 
seventeenth, eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, studied in relation to their cul- 
tural context. Prerequisites: ENG 110 and permission of the instructor. Offered Fall 
Semester, odd years. 

ENG 460. LINGUISTICS FOR TEACHING ENGLISH Three hours credit 

TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES 

A presentation of the linguistic, psycholinguistic, and sociocultural dimensions of sec- 
ond language teaching and learning. Prerequisites: ENG 360 and ENG 361. Offered Spring 
Semester. 

ENG 462. METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS Three hours credit 

OF OTHER LANGUAGES (TESOL) 

A comprehensive study of the knowledge and skills necessary for students to become 
•effective teachers of English to speakers of other languages in grades Pre-K through 12. 
Course topics focus on classroom methods, approaches, and strategies to facilitate acquisi- 
tion of English as a second language. The course includes a 30 clock-hour practicum. 
Prerequisite: English/Linguistics 460. 

ENG 47L INTRODUCTION TO SOUTHERN LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A chronological survey of Southern writers from John Smith to Lee Smith. This course 
examines Sou them American fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama in its cultural context from 
colonial times to the present. Prerequisite: English 110. Offered Spring Semester, odd years. 

ENG 479. SENIOR HONORS STUDY Three hours credit 

A special advanced study course for seniors who meet the qualifications to graduate 
with honors. Courses approved for this listing may be graduate courses, or they may be spe- 
cially designed by the department faculty. Prerequisite: Senior status and cumulative GPA 
3.4 or higher. 

ENG 48L HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE Three hours credit 

An introduction to the historical development of the English language from its Indo- 
European background through Old, Middle, and Modern English. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 
Offered Spring Semester, odd years. 

ENG 482. ADVANCED GRAMMAR Three hours credit 

A survey of modern theories of English grammar with time devoted to the study of tradi- 
tional approaches. Prerequisite: ENG 110 and a minimum score of 70 on the departmental 
grammar exam. 

ENG 485. INTRODUCTION TO CHAUCER Three hours credit 

Reading of The Canterbury Tales in Middle English, with brief consideration of other 
works in the Chaucer canon and attention to medieval English language and custom. 

ENG 490. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGLISH Three hours credit 

A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic will change to meet 
student demand and interest. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

ENG 495. ENGLISH IN CHRISTLVN PERSPECTIVE Three hours credit 

Through readings, oral discussion, a journal, and a paper, English majors are assisted in 
the integration of the various facets of the major in relation to fundamental disciplinary 



1 72 College of Arts and Sciences 



concepts and overarching philosophical, theological, and ethical concepts, guided by 
Christian perceptions of truth. 

ENG 499. RESEARCH SEMINAR Three hours credit 

Mastery of the techniques and procedures of research in language and literature and their 
application in a major research project. For upper-division English majors and minors only. 

FRENCH 

PRE 1 1 1. ELEMENTARY FRENCH I Three hours credit 

A proficiency-oriented course designed to provide a functional elementary foundation in 
the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French along with an integrated 
study of French culture. No prerequisite. Elective credit only. No proficiency credit. One 
clock-hour lab required per week. Offered Fall Semester. 

PRE 1 1 2. ELEMENTARY FRENCH II Three hours credit 

A continuation of the proficiency-oriented elementary course. Prerequisite: French 1 1 1 
or placement exam. Elective credit only. No proficiency credit. One clock-hour lab required 
w per week. Offered Spring Semester. 

C| FRE 211. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I Three hours credit 

^>jij. > A proficiency-oriented course designed to review essential stmctures in further detail and 

O'' to improve the student's ability in speaking, listening, reading, and writing the French lan- 

X"" ! guage. Prerequisite: FRE 112 or placement. One clock-hour lab required per week. (Speakers 

cCij i who demonstrate near-native oral proficiency in the target language may not enroll m any 

5;;:;; • course below the 300 level.) Offered Fall Semester. 



CiC 



FRE 212. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II Three hours credit 



J!;2i: ; A continuation of the proficiency-oriented intermediate sequence. Prerequisite: FRE 21 1 

or placement. One clock-hour lab required per week. (Speakers who demonstrate near-native 
oral proficiency in the target language may not enroll in any course below the 300 level.) 
Offered Spring Semester. 

FRE 341. ADVANCED FRENCH CONVERSATION Three hours credit 

A course designed to develop advanced oral comprehension skills as well as minimally 
intermediate-high level proficiency in spoken French through exercises, drills, conversation 
in class and in small groups. Prerequisite: FRE 212 or equivalent. Conducted in French. 

FRE 342. ADVANCED FRENCH GRAMMAR & COMPOSITION Three hours credit 

A post-intermediate study of French grammar and written composition. Prerequisite: 
FRE 212 or equivalent. Conducted in French. 

FRE 351. ASPECTS OF FRENCH LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A study of selected masterpieces from the great hterary movements and countermove- 
ments of French literature. Prerequisite: FRE 341 or placement. Conducted in French. 

FRE 399. HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY One-four hours credit 

An independent research project, directed by one French faculty member and supervised 
by the chairperson of the English and Modern Foreign Languages Department, providing the 
student who qualifies under the honors guidelines the opportunity to pursue a special topic 
of his/her ir^terest. The final results of this study will be submitted both orally and in written 
form in French. Conducted in French. 

FRE 441. FRENCH CIVILIZATION Three hours credit 

A history of literature and the arts correlated with the geography and history of the coun- 
try, including events of scientific, political, social, and economic significance. Prerequisite: 
FRE 351 or approval of instructor. Class conducted in French. 

FRE 481. ADVANCED STYLISTICS AND PHONETICS Three hours credit 

A course designed primarily for teacher licensure candidates and for students who wish 
to refine competency in oral and written French through continued study of selected areas of 



Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages 1 73 



French language and linguistics. Prerequisite: FRE 341 and FRE 342, or approval of instructor. 
Conducted in French. 

FRE 490. STUDIES IN FRENCH LITERATURE: Three hours credit 

MIDDLE AGES THROUGH 18TH CENTURY 

A survey of selected topics and genres, including epic literature, women writers, 
Renaissance and Reformation prose and poetry, 17th century classicism, the philosophical 
writings of Pascal, Voltaire, and the theater of Beaumarchais. Requirements include the 
research and writing of an analytical paper. Prerequisite: FRE 35 1 or approval of instructor. 
Conducted in French. 

FRE 491. STUDIES IN FRENCH LITERATURE: 19TH CENTURY Three hours credit 

A study of representative prose writers, such as Stendhal, Flaubert, Balzac, and Maupas- 
sant, as well as poets and playwrights, including Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Musset, and Hugo. 
Requirements include the research and writing of an analytical paper. Prerequisite: FRE 35 1 
or approval of instructor. Conducted in French. 

FRE 492. STUDIES IN FRENCH LITERATURE: 20TH CENTURY Three hours credit 

A study of selected French and francophone writers, such as lonesco, Sartre, Camus, 
Cesaire, Hebert and Oyono. Requirements include the research and writing of an analytical 
paper. Prerequisite: FRE 351 or approval of instructor. Conducted in French. 

FRE 493. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FRENCH Three hours credit 

A course offering a variety of topics and research concerns. The topic will change to meet 
student or current academic demand and interest. Course may be repeated once for credit, 
provided the topic is different than that taken the first time. Prerequisite: FRE 351 or 
approval of instructor. Conducted in French. 

GERMAN 

GER 111. ELEMENTARY GERMAN I Three hours credit 

A proficiency-oriented course designed to provide a functional elementary foundation in 
the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in German along with an 
integrated study of German culture. No prerequisite. Elective credit only. No proficiency 
credit. One clock-hour lab required per week. 

GER 1 12. ELEMENTARY GERMAN II Three hours credit 

A continuation of the proficiency-oriented elementary course. Prerequisite: German 1 1 1 
or placement exam. Elective credit only. No proficiency credit. One clock-hour lab required 
per week. 

GER 211. INTERMEDL\TE GERMAN I Three hours credit 

A proficiency-oriented course designed to review essential structures in further detail and 
to improve the student's ability in speaking, listening, reading, and writing the German lan- 
guage. Prerequisite: GER 112 or placement. One clock-hour lab required per week. (Speakers 
who demonstrate near-native oral proficiency in the target language may not enroll in any 
course below the 300 level.) 

GER 212, INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II Three hours credit 

A continuation of the proficiency-oriented intermediate course. By the end of this course, 
the student should be prepared for more advanced study in the language and feel confident in 
being able to get along independently in a German-speaking country. Prerequisite: GER 211 
or placement. One clock-hour lab required per week. (Speakers who demonstrate near-native 
oral proficiency in the target language may not enroll in any course below the 300 level.) 

LINGUISTICS 

LIN 201. INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE AND CULTURE Three hours credit 

A course introducing students to the concept of the interaction of language and cul- 
ture m a specific target language. The course will also provide a basic and limited oral 



1 74 College of Arts and Sciences 



introduction to the target language and its use in specific contexts. This course meets 
the language requirement for Bachelor of Science students only. (Bachelor of Science 
students with two years of high school foreign language or proficiency at the 112 level 
may take three hours of a foreign language at the intermediate level to fulfill the lan- 
guage requirement.) Course may be repeated once for elective credit, provided the topic 
is different than that taken the first time. 

LIN 360. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS Three hours credit 

An introduction to scientific language study including morphology, phonology, syntax, 
pragmatics, and the nature of language. Prerequisite: ENG 110. Offered Fall Semester, odd 
years. 

LIN 361. LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND DEVELOPMENT Three hours credit 

An investigation of the cognitive processes of first and second language acquisition and 
development with special attention to the acquisition of literacy, language diversity, and 
bilingualism. Offered every semester. 

^ LIN 460. LINGUISTICS FOR TEACHING ENGLISH Three hours credit 

"""i' TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES 

Cif A presentation of the linguistic, psychohnguistic, and sociocultural dimensions of second 

^;| language teaching and learning. Prerequisites: LIN 360 and LIN 361 . Offered Spring Semester. 

o 

.,, , LIN 462. METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS Three hours credit 

JjjSji OF OTHER LANGUAGES (TESOL) 

s;::::| ; A comprehensive study of the knowledge and skills necessary for students to become 

<;i!:| [ effective teachers of English to speakers of other languages in grades Pre-K through 12. 

CI'' I Course topics focus on classroom methods, approaches, and strategies to facilitate acquisi- 

"(iiiiiil ! tion of English as a second language. The course includes a 30 clock-hour practicum. 

-f'' ' Prerequisite: English/Linguistics 460. 



LIN 481. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE Three hours credit 

An introduction to the historical development of the English language from its Indo- 
European background through Old, Middle, and Modern English. Prerequisite: ENG 110. 
Offered Spring Semester, odd years. 

LIN 482. ADVANCED GRAMMAR Three hours credit 

A survey of modem theories of Enghsh grammar with time devoted to the study of tradi- 
tional approaches. Prerequisite: ENG 110 and a minimum score of 70 on the departmental 
grammar exam. 

LIN 495. FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND FAITH: 

A CAPSTONE COURSE FOR MAJORS Three hours credit 

A capstone seminar focusing on the Christian foreign language major's perception of 
God's creative purpose in second-language learning and instruction, linguistics and cul- 
tural expression, and methodologies of integration. This course affords students, as 
Christian professionals, the opportunity to develop and articulate appropriate responses 
to questions arising from the interaction of their discipline and faith. Required of all for- 
eign language majors. 

READl^NG 

REA 101. COLLEGE READING Two hours credit 

A course designed to improve comprehension and reading rate and to enhance vocabu- 
lary and study skills. Individualized instruction is provided with computer programs. REA 
101 is required for students scoring 12 or below on the ACT (English) or 330 or below on the 
SAT verbal. 

REA 361. LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND DEVELOPMENT Three hours credit 

An investigation of the cognitive processes of first and second language acquisition and 
development with special attention to the acquisition of literacy, language diversity, and 



Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages 175 



bilingualism. Offered every semester. 

REA 371. SURVEY OF READING Three hours credit 

A study of the reading process and the history and philosophy of the various models of 
reading instruction. 

REA 450. ASSESSMENT OF READING PERFORMANCE Three hours credit 

An introduction to formal and informal procedures and instruments used in assessment 
of reading, including a practicum in diagnosis of reading difficulties. 

REA 490. SPECIAL TOPICS IN READING One hour credit 

An intensive study of selected current topics in reading featuring a workshop conducted 
by experts in the field of reading. 

REA 495. SEMINAR IN READING RESEARCH Two hours credit 

An intensive study of selected topics, including research in the material of reading, and 
the writing of an analytical paper. Offered Spring Semester. 

SPANISH 

SPA 111 . ELEMENTARY SPANISH I Three hours credit 

A proficiency-oriented course designed to provide a functional elementary foundation in 
the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish along with an 
integrated study of Spanish culture. No prerequisite. Elective credit only. No proficiency 
credit. One clock-hour lab required per week. Offered Fall Semester. 

SPA 1 12. ELEMENTARY SPANISH II Three hours credit 

A continuation of the proficiency-oriented elementary course. Prerequisite: Spanish 1 1 1 
or placement exam. Elective credit only. No proficiency credit. One clock-hour lab required 
per week. Offered Spring Semester. 

SPA 211. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I Three hours credit 

A proficiency-oriented course designed to review essential structures in further detail and 
to improve the student's ability in speaking, listening, reading, and writing the Spanish lan- 
guage. Prerequisite: SPA 112 or placement exam. One clock-hour lab required per week. 
(Speakers who demonstrate near-native oral proficiency in the target language may not enroll 
in any course below the 300 level.) Offered Fall Semester. 

SPA 212. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II Three hours credit 

A continuation of the proficiency-oriented intermediate course. By the end of this course, 
the student should be prepared for more advanced study in the language and feel confident in 
being able to get along independently in a Spanish-speaking country. Prerequisite: SPA 211 or 
placement. One clock-hour lab required per week. (Speakers who demonstrate near-native 
oral proficiency in the target language may not enroll in any course below the 300 level.) 
Offered Spring Semester. 

SPA 311. FOREIGN STUDIES IN SPANISH Three hours credit 

Offered within its cultural context, this course is a comprehensive history of Hispanic 
culture and its contributions to the world. Prerequisite: Spanish 212 or placement exam. 

SPA 312. FOREIGN STUDIES IN SPANISH Three hours credit 

A continuation of Spanish 311. Offered within its cultural context, this course is a com- 
prehensive history of Hispanic culture and its contributions to the world. Prerequisite: 
Spanish 311. 

SPA 341. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH CONVERSATION Three hours credit 

AND COMPOSITION 

A course designed to improve oral and written proficiency in the Spanish language 
through appropriate conversational strategies based on authentic materials and an introduc- 
tion to the writing process. Prerequisite: SPA 212 or placement. Offered Fall Semester. 



1 16 College of Arts and Sciences 



SPA 351. ASPECTS OF SPANISH LITERATURE Three hours credit 

Aspects of Spanish literature, including Spain and Latin America, in the various genres, 
according to the individual class. Materials will cover specific themes, distinctive periods, 
individuals or types of authors, and significant literary movements in the modern and/or con- 
temporary literary forms. Prerequisite: SPA 341. Offered Spring Semester. 

SPA 361. STUDIES IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE: Three hours credit 

COLONIAL THROUGH THE 18TH CENTURY 

An intensive study in Spanish based on a selection of literary pieces from Colonial Latin 
America through the 18th century, including research and writing of an analytical paper. 
Prerequisite: SPA 351 or approval of instructor. 

SPA 362. STUDIES IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE: Three hours credit 

VANGUARDISM (19TH CENTURY) THROUGH THE NEW NOVEL 

An intensive study in Spanish based on a selection of literary pieces by Latin American 
19th century authors, including research and writing of an analytical paper. Prerequisite: 
SPA 361 or approval of instructor. 

^ SPA 363. STUDIES IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE: Three hours credit 

Cf; POST-BOOM AND CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE 

CjJ An intensive study in Spanish based on a selection of literary pieces by Latin American 

•^:;:, 20th century authors, including research and writing of an analytical paper. Prerequisite: 

",,,, SPA 362 or approval of instructor. 

5::::; ; spa 399. honors independent study One-four hours credit 

J;;[;; ii An independent research project, directed by one Spanish faculty member and supervised 

Cl'^ " by the chairperson of the English and Modern Foreign Languages Department, providing the 

•"(jliij; ii student who qualifies under the honors guidelines the opportunity to pursue a special topic 

!!!%■ ' • of his/her interest. The final results of this study will be submitted both orally and in written 

form in Spanish. Conducted in Spanish. 

SPA 441 . SPANISH CIVILIZATION Three hours credit 

A history of literature and the arts correlated with the geography and history of the coun- 
try, including events of scientific, political, social, and economic significance. Class 
conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA 351 or approval of instructor. Offered Fall Semester. 

SPA 481. ADVANCED SPANISH GRAMMAR & CONVERSATION Three hours credit 

A course designed to improve oral and written proficiency in the Spanish language 
through the use of specific aspects of grammar not studied in other classes. Prerequisite: 
Spanish 351 or approval of instructor. 

SPA 490. STUDIES IN SPANISH LITERATURE: Three hours credit 

MIDDLE AGES THROUGH THE RENAISSANCE 

An intensive study in the target language based on a selection of literary pieces from the 
Middle Ages through the Renaissance, including research and writing of an analytical paper. 
Prerequisite: SPA 351 and approval of instructor. 

SPA 491. STUDIES IN SPANISH LITERATURE: Three hours credit 

GOLDEN AGE THROUGH THE 18TH CENTURY 

An intensive study in the target language based on a selection of literary pieces from the 
Spanish Gblden Age through the eighteenth century, including research and writing of an 
analytical paper. Prerequisite: SPA 351 and approval of instructor. 

SPA 492. STUDIES IN SPANISH LITERATURE: Three hours credit 

19TH & 20TH CENTURIES 

An intensive study in the target language based on a selection of literary pieces from the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including research and writing of an analytical paper. 
Prerequisite: SPA 35 1 and approval of instructor. 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 177 




DEPARTMENT Of NATURAL SCIENCES 
AND MATHEMATICS 



EDDIE BROWN, Chairperson 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Milton Riley 

Associate Professor Robert West 

Assistant Professor Erik Lindquist 

Instructor John Hisey 

CHEMISTRY 

Associate Professors Eddie Brown and Penny Mauldin 

Assistant Professors Paul DeLaLuz and Johnny Evans 

Senior Adjunct Professor Lois Beach 

HEALTH SCIENCE 

Professor Robert O'Bannon 
Assistant Professor Jeri Veenstra 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Steven Lay 

Associate Professor Robert Griffith 

Assistant Professors Jerry Adams and Mary Walkins 

Instructor Sheila Schriver 

PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Associate Professor Ron Harris 



Astronomy 

Biochemistry 

Biological Science 



DISCIPLINES 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Health Science 



Mathematics 

Medical Technology 

Physical Science 



178 College of Arts and Sciences 



In harmony with the mission statements of Lee University and its College 
of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
strives to equip students for success in mathematics and science through its 
commitment to excellence in teaching, interdisciplinary studies, and innovative 
research. Majors are provided with a foundation in the sciences and mathemat- 
ics to enable them to think critically, communicate clearly, and perform suc- 
cessfully in their vocational calling. Through the integration of faith and its aca- 
demic disciphnes, the department promotes the highest standards of professional 
and ethical behavior. Students are challenged to discover and use their God- 
given gifts and talents to make a positive impact in their world. 

The department offers majors in BIOCHEMISTRY, BIOLOGICAL SCI- 
ENCE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE EDUCATION, CHEMISTRY, CHEMICAL 
EDUCATION, HEALTH SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, MATHEMATICS EDU- 
CATION and MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY. Foundation courses in botany, zool- 
ogy, chemistry, computer science, health sciences, mathematics, and physics 
Ci* present opportunities for both majors and non-majors to become acquainted 

fi 

ciSi! 



c: 
c: 

Qi with basic principles and concepts of the biological and physical sciences 

SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 

:. The science and mathematics education programs (BSST, CHST, MAST, 

Q[;;,li : MSST) prepare graduates for initial employment as science and mathematics 

•",j;i;;:|i ; teachers in junior high and secondary schools and entrance to graduate schools. 

'■*■" The program emphasizes critical thinking, problem solving, and development of 

curriculum and pedagogical skills. 

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 

The chemistry and biochemistry curriculum (BCHS, CHYS) is designed to 
prepare students for graduate studies or a career in industry. The program 
emphasizes development of analytical thinking skills, cooperative problem solv- 
ing and independent investigation of chemical principles. 

PRE'PROFESSIONALAND HEALTH SCIENCE 

The pre-professional tracts and health science major (BCMS, BMDS, CMDS, 
HSCS, MEDS) prepare students for entrance into health professions schools, grad- 
uate studies, or entry-level positions in health care systems, managed-care organi- 
zations, long-term care settings, public health sectors, business and industry. 

ENVIRONMENTAL 

The Environmental Science and Biodiversity program (BEBS) primarily 
trains students in disciplines ranging from organismal to ecosystem biology. 
The core philosophy of this program is that Creation holds great value to God, 
and as such, we should promote its wise stewardship. Students in this program 
are encouraged to solidify their understanding of organisms and the environ- 
ment through individual research, problem solving, and exploration of the sci- 
entific literature. 

MATHEMATICS 

The mathematics program (MATS) prepares students for graduate study and 
careers in research, statistics, and actuarial science. 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 1 79 



» 



OFFICIAL ACCEPTANCE INTO 
PRE'PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 
(BCMS, BMDS, CMOS) 

Students may not declare the programs BCMS, BMDS, or CMDS 
until they have received formal approval from the Pre-Professional 
Program Acceptance Committee, generally at the end of their sopho- 
more year. Please obtain detailed information from the office of the 
Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. It is recommended 
that students who desire to enter a pre-professional track should follow 
the BCHS program until accepted. 



Degree 

B.S. 
B.S. 



B.S. 
B.S. 



B.S. 
B.S. 



B.S. 
B.S. 

B.S. 



B.S. 
B.S. 
B.S. 

B.S. 

B.S. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 
Major Code 

Biochemisty BCHS 

Biochemistry BCMS 

(Pre-Med, Pre-Dental, Pre- Vet, or 

Pre-Pharmacy Emphasis) 

Biological Science BIOS 

Biological Science BEBS 

(Environmental Science and 

Biodiversity Emphasis) 

Biological Science BSST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 

Biological Science BMDS 

(Pre-Med, Pre-Dental, Pre- Vet, or 

Pre-Pharmacy Emphasis) 

Chemistry CHYS 

Chemistry CHST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 

Chemistry CMDS 

(Pre-Med, Pre-Dental, Pre- Vet or 

Pre-Pharmacy Emphasis) 

Health Science HSCS 

Mathematics MATS 

Mathematics Education MAST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 

Mathematics / Science MSST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades K-8) 

Medical Technology MEDS 



180 College of Arts and Sciences 



3 
cdi: 

&,; 

"iiiiili 



BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN 
BIOCHEMISTRY 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS 
CHY 11 1 - General Chemistry I 
CHY112 - General Chemistry n 
CHY 281 - Organic Chemistry I 
CHY 282 - Organic Chemistry n 
CHY 289L- Organic Chemistry Lab 
CHY 321 - Biochemistry I 
CHY 322 - Biochemistry n 
CHY 323 - Biochemistry m 
CHY 329L - Biochemistry Lab 
CHY 35 1 - Quantitative Analysis 
CHY 431 - Physical Chemistry I 
CHY 490 - Senior Seminar 
Subtotal Specialty Requirements 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 



BCHS/BCMS 

Credit Hours 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
38 



BIO 112 
BIO 251 
BIO 285 
BIO 303 
BIO 342 
HSC 495 

or 
BIO 433 
PHY 211 

or 

PHY 281 
PHY 212 
or 

PHY 282 



Animal Biology 

Microbiology I 

Pre -professional Seminar (BCMS majors only) 

Cell Biology 

Genetics 

Faith and Practice (BCMS major only) 

Science and Scripture (BCHS majors only) 
General Physics I (Trig.Based) 

General Physics I (Calc. Based) 
General Physics n (Trig.Based) 



General Physics n (Calc. Based) 
MAT 144 (4) and MAT 271 (4) 
or 

MAT 1 1 1(3) , MAT 1 12 (3), and MAT 341 (3) 

MAT 241 - Computer Applications in Math/Science 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 
Nine hours are fulfilled through the program's 
major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 

fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 
ELECTFVTS 

It is recommended that electives be chosen from 

upper level biology courses. 



8-9 
3 



39-40 
35 



15 



2-3 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 181 



TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

Note: Students must be accepted into the BCMS program (during the 
sophomore year) before declaring that major. 

BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN BIOS 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

BIO III - Plant Biology 4 

BIO 112 - Animal Biology 4 

BIO 251 - Microbiology I 4 

BIO 303 - Cell Biology 3 

BIO 342 - Genetics 4 

BIO 45 1 - Evolutionary Biology 4 

BIO 490 - Senior Seminar 1 

Biology Electives 13 
The remaining hours of the 37-hour major 
must be selected from course offerings in biology 
with at least 8 hours being 300 level or above. 
Subtotal Specialty Requirements 37 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

BIO 433 - Science and Scripture 3 

MAT 1 1 1 - Algebra and MAT 1 12 - Trigonometry* 6 

or 

MAT 144 - Precalculus and MAT 271 - Calculus I 8 

MAT 241 - Computer Applications 3 

CHY 1 1 1 - General Chemistry I 4 

CHY112 - General Chemistry n 4 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 20-22 

*MAT 341 course may be substituted 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 35 

Nine hours are fulfilled through the program's 
major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement 
are fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

ELECTIVES 21-23 

CHY 281, CHY 282, and CHY 289L are strongly recommended 
electives for this major. 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



i 



182 College of Arts and Sciences 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BEBS 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

(ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND BIODIVERSITY EMPHASIS) 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

BIO ill - Plant Biology 4 

BIO 1 12 - Animal Biology 4 

BIO 251 - Microbiology 4 

BIO 342 - Genetics 4 

BIO 393 - Ecology 4 

BIO 45 1 - Evolutionary Biology 4 

BIO 490 - Senior Seminar 1 

Biology Electives 12 
The remainder of the 37-hour major must be selected from 
designated BEBS course offerings at the 300 level or above. 
Three of these electives (nine hours) must be chosen from 
the following four courses: BIO 309; BIO 310; any two 



x:;ii' upper level botany courses. Another elective course must 

c§l: be taken through the AuSable Institute of Environmental 

aiiil Studies, a Council for Christian Colleges and Universities 

^f;;;,,; endorsed program. An updated list of Lee University and 

3;;;:: : AuSable Institute BEBS electives can be obtained through 

the office of the Department of Natural Sciences and 

Mathematics. 

Subtotal Specialty Requirements 37 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

BIO 433 - Science and Scripture 3 

CHY 1 1 1 - General Chemistry I 4 

CRY 1 1 2 - General Chemistry E 4 

CHY 1 13 - Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry* 3 

CHY 1 19 - Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry Lab* 1 

CHY 221 - Toxicology (proposed course under development) 3 

MAT 1 1 1 - College Algebra and 

MAT 1 12 - Trigonometry 6 

or 
MAT 144 - Precalculus and MAT 271 - Calculus I* * 8 

MAT 241 - Computer Applications 3 

MAT 341 - Elementary Probability and Statistics 3 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 30-32 

* CHY 281 may be substituted 

* * Highly recommended for continuing on to graduate school. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 35 

Nine hours are fulfilled through the program's 
major requirements. SOC 200 and ECO 200 are required 
for this emphasis. 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 183 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 15 
Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

ELECTT/ES 11-13 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN BSST 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

(TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES 7-12) 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

BIO 111 - Plant Biology 4 

BIO 112 - Animal Biology 4 

BIO 251 - Microbiology I 4 

BIO 303 - Cell Biology 3 

BIO 342 - Genetics 4 

BIO 393 - Ecology 4 

BIO 451 - Evolutionary Biology 4 

BIO 490 - Senior Seminar 1 

Biology Electives 4 
The remaining hours of the 32-hour major must be 
selected from course offerings in biology. 

Subtotal Specialty Requirements 32 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

BIO 433 - Science and Scripture 3 

MAT 1 1 1 - Algebra and MAT 1 12 - Trigonometry 6 

or 

MAT 144 - Precalculus and MAT 271 - Calculus I 8 

MAT 241 - Computer Applications 3 

PHS112 - Earth and Space Science 4 

PHY 211 - Physics I 4 

CHY 1 1 1 - General Chemistry I 4 

CHY112 - General Chemistry n 4 

HSC 354 - Personal and Community Health 3 

or 

HSC 291 - Principles of Nutrition 3 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 3 1 -33 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 199 - Intro, to the Teaching Profession Seminar 1 

EDU 201 - Foundations of Education 3 

SED312 - Educational Psychology (cross-listed in PSY) 3 
EDU 316 - Exceptional Child (cross-listed in Special Ed.) 3 

SED415 - Teaching Science , Grades 7-12 2 

SED419 - General Secondary Methods 2 

SED 444 - Student Teaching, Grades 7-8 5 

SED445 - Student Teaching, Grades 9-12 5 



184 College of Arts and Sciences 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 

Subtotal Professional Education Requirements 26 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 34 

Ten hours are fulfilled through the program's 
major and professional requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 15 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

ELECTD/ES 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 138 

,1 BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN BMDS 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 
""■"■ (PRE-MEDICAL PRE'DENTAL, PRE'VET, OR 

ci; PRE'PHARMACY EMPHASIS) 

Q, SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

x:ii; BIO 112 - Animal Biology 4 

II BIO 251 - Microbiology I 4 

S::;ii BIO 303 - Cell Biology 3 

^!l;;;;!|. bio 342 - Genetics 4 

::(;::!:!;: : BIO 451 - Evolutionary Biology 4 

BIO 490 - Senior Seminar 1 

Biology Electives 13 
The remaining hours of the 33 -hour major must 
be selected from course offerings in biology with 
at least 8 hours being 300 level or above. 
Subtotal Specialty Requirements 33 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

BIO 285 - Pre-professional Seminar 2 

CEiY 1 1 1 - General Chemistry I 4 

CEiY112 - General Chemistry n 4 

CEiY 281 - Organic Chemistry I 3 

CEiY 282 - Organic Chemistry n 3 

CEiY 289L - Organic Chemistry Lab 3 

HSC495 - Faith and Practice 3 

CEIY 321 - Biochemistry 3 

PHY 211 - General Physics I (Trig based) 4 

or 

PHY 281 - Physics (Calc based) 4 

PHY 212 - General Physics n (Trig based) 4 

or 

PHY 282 - Physics (Calc based) 4 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 185 

MAT 1 1 1 - College Algebra and 

MAT 112- Trigonometry 6 

or 
MAT 144 - Precalculus and MAT 271 - Calculus T 8 

MAT 241 - Computer Applications 3 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 42-44 

"" MAT 341 may be substituted for MAT 271 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 35 

Nine hours are fulfilled through the program's major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

ELECTIVES 3-5 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

Note: Students must be accepted into this program (during their sopho- 
more year) before declaring this major. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY CHYS 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

CHY 1 1 1 - General Chemistry I 4 

CHY 1 1 2 - General Chemistry II 4 

CHY 28 1 - Organic Chemistry I 3 

CHY 282 - Organic Chemistry II 3 

CHY 289L - Organic Chemistry Lab 3 

CHY 351 - Quantitative Analysis I 4 

CHY 43 1 - Physical Chemistry I 4 

CHY 432 - Physical Chemistry E 4 

CHY 490 - Senior Seminar 1 

4 hours of electives in chemistry 

must come from the following courses: 4 

CHY 321 - Biochemistry I (3) 
CHY 322 - Biochemistry H (3) 
CHY 329L - Biochemistry Lab (3) 
CHY 352 - Quantitative Analysis H (4) 
CHY 390 - Special Topics in Chemistry (1-4) 
CHY 491 - Senior Research (1-4) 
CHY 492 - Professional Presentation ( 1 ) 
Subtotal Specialty Requirements 34 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

BIO 433 - Science and Scripture 3 

MAT 144 - Precalculus 4 

MAT 241 - Computer Applications 3 



186 College of Arts and Sciences 



General Physics I (Trig based) 
Physics (Calc based) 



c:: 
O 
cell: 



PHY 211 - 

or 
PHY 281 - 
PHY 212 - General Physics E (Trig based) 

or 
PHY 282 - Physics (Calc based) 
MAT 271 -Calculus I 
MAT 272 - Calculus H 
Subtotal Collateral Requirements 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 
Nine hours are fulfilled through the program's 
major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

ELECTIVES 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 
(TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES 7-12) 

SPECL\LTY AREA REQUIREMENTS 
CHY 1 1 1 - General Chemistry I 
CHY112 - General Chemistry n 
CEIY281 - Organic Chemistry I 
CHY 282 - Organic Chemistry n 
CHY 289L- Organic Chemistry Lab 
CHY 351 - Quantitative Analysis I 
CHY 431 - Physical Chemistry I 
CHY 432 - Physical Chemistry n 
CHY 490 - Senior Seminar 
3 hours of electives in chemistry 
must come from the follow ving courses: 
CHY 329L - Biochemistry Lab (3) 
CHY 352 - Quantitative Analysis H (4) 
CHY 390 - Special Topics in Chemistry ( 1 -4) 
CHY 491 - Senior Research (1-4) 
CHT492 - Professional Presentation (1) 
Subtotal Specialty Requirements 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 
BIO 433 - Science and Scripture 
MAT 144 - Precalculus 
MAT 241- Computer Applications 
MAT 271 - Calculus I 



4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
26 

35 
15 

20 
130 

CHST 

Credit Hours 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 
1 



32 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 187 



PHS112 - Earth and Space Science 4 

PHY 211 - General Physics I (Trig based) 4 

or 

PHY 281 - Physics (Calc based) 4 

PHY 212 - General Physics n (Trig based) 4 

or 

PHY 282 - Physics (Calc based) 4 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 26 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 199 - Intro, to the Teaching Profession 1 

EDU201 - Foundations of Education 3 

SED312 - Educational Psychology (cross-listed in PS Y) 3 

EDU 316 - Exceptional Child (cross-listed in Special Ed.) 3 

SED415 - Teaching Science, Grades 7-12 2 

SED419 - General Secondary Methods 2 

SED 444 - Student Teaching, Grades 7-8 5 

SED445 - Student Teaching, Grades 9-12 5 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 
Subtotal Professional Education Requirements 26 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 35-36 

Nine hours are fulfilled through the 
program's major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

3 hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

ELECTT/ES 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 134 



188 College of Arts and Sciences 



BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY CMDS 

(PRE-MEDICAL. PRE-DENTAL, PRE^VET, OR 
PRE'PHARMACY EMPHASIS) 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

CHY 1 11 - General Chemistry I 4 

CHY 1 12 - General Chemistry E 4 

CHY 28 1 - Organic Chemistry I 3 

CEIY 282 - Organic Chemistry H 3 

CHY 298L - Organic Chemistry Lab 3 

CHY 35 1 - Quantitative Analysis I 4 

CHY 32 1 - Biochemistry I 3 

■ : CHY 43 1 - Physical Chemistry I 4 

i ; CHY 432 - Physical Chemistry H 4 

CHY 490- Senior Seminar 1 

- Subtotal Specialty Requirements 33 

Jl COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

C> BIO 1 1 2 - Animal Biology 4 

II BIO 25 1 - Microbiology I 4 

g;;. BIO 285 - Pre-professional Seminar 2 

clill BIO 342 - Genetics 4 

-^B HSC 495 - Faith and Practice 3 

-^'"'" PHY 21 1 - General Physics I (Trig based) 4 
or 

PHY 281 - Physics (Calc based) 4 

PHY 212 - General Physics E (Trig based) 4 

or 

PHY 282 - Physics (Calc based) 4 

MAT 144 - Precalculus 4 

MAT 241 - Computer Applications 3 

MAT 271 -Calculus I 4 

MAT 272 - Calculus E 4 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 40 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 35 

Nine hours are fulfilled through the program's major 
requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

ELECTIVES 7 

It is recommended that electives be chosen from 
upper-level biology courses. 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

Note: Students must be accepted into this program (during their sopho- 
more year) before declaring this major. 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 189 



BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN HEALTH SCIENCE HSCS 

(ALLIED HEALTH: PRE^NURSING, PRE-PHYSICIANS 
ASSISTANT. PRE'PHYSICAL THERAPY, PRE-DENTAL 
HYGIENE. PRE'HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION) 

SPECLA.LTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

HSC 221 - Intro, to the Health Professions 2 

HSC 241 - Statistics for the Health Sciences 3 

HSC 250 - Microbiology for Health Sciences* 4 

HSC 285 - Pre-professional Seminar 2 

HSC 291 - Principles of Nutrition 3 

HSC 292 - Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 

HSC 293 - Human Anatomy & Physiology E 4 

HSC 321 - Health Intemship I 

HSC 398 - Medical Terminology 3 

HSC 495 - Faith & Practice 3 

Health Science Electives 13 
The remaining hours of the 36-hour major must be selected course 
offerings in HSC with at least 8 hours being 300 level or above. 

Subtotal Specialty Requirements 42 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

BIO 112 - Animal Biology 4 

MAT 1 1 1 - College Algebra 3 

PSY 309 - Developmental Psychology 3 

PSY310 - Child Psychology 3 

PSY 340 - Gerontology 3 

CHY 1 10 - Fund, of Chemistry and 
CHY 1 13 - Introduction to Organic & Biochemistry and 
CHY 1 19 - Introduction to Organic &. Biochemistry Lab 

or 
CHY 1 1 1 - Gen. Chemistry I and 

CHY 1 1 2 - Gen. Chemistry H 8 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 24 

*BIO 251 may be substituted in some cases. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 37/38 

Seven hours are fulfilled through the program's 
major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 
ELECTT/ES 11-12 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



190 College of Arts and Sciences 

BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN MATS 

MATHEMATICS 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

MAT 1 1 1 - Algebra and MAT 1 I2-Trigonometry 6 

or 

MAT 144- Precalculus 4 

MAT 241 - Computer Applications 3 

MAT 271 - Calculus I 4 

MAT 272 - Calculus E 4 

MAT 363 - Calculus m 4 

MAT 461 - Intro, to Modem Algebra 3 

■; ; MAT 490 - Senior Seminar 1 

ii; Mathematics Electives 12-14 

^.. The remaining hours of the 37 hours of specialty area 

^.- requirements must be comprised of mathematics 

Q electives at the 300 level or above. 

Q, Subtotal Speciality Requirements 37 

II COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

p;:;. BIO 433 - Science and Scripture 3 

d::'!i or 

ISS EDU 495 - Faith and Learning 3 

' (or other religion couse approved by departmental chair) 

PHY 211 - General Physics I 4 

PHY 212 - General Physics n 4 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 1 1 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 35/36 

Nine hours are fulfilled through the program's major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18-hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

ELECTT/ES 31-32 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



Department of Natural Sciences ane:) Mathematics 191 

BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN MAST 

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 
(TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES 7-12) 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

MAT 1 1 1 - Algebra and MAT 1 12 - Trigonometry 6 

or 
MAT 144 - Precalculus 4 

MAT 241 - Computer Applications 3 

MAT 271 -Calculus I 4 

MAT 272 - Calculus E 4 

MAT 3 1 - Logic and Sets 3 

or 
MAT 461 - Intro, to Modern Algebra 3 

MAT 33 1 - Geometry 3 

MAT 341 - Elementary Probability and Statistics 3 

MAT 35 1 - Intro, to Linear Algebra 3 

MAT 490 - Senior Seminar 1 

Math Electives 1-9 

The remainder of the required 37 hours must be 
comprised of mathematics electives at the 300 level or above. 
Strongly recommended: 
MAT 342, MAT 363, MAT 45 1 . 
Subtotal Specialty Requirements 37 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 495 - Faith and Leaming 3 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 3 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 199 - Intro, to the Teaching Profession 1 

EDU 201 - Foundations of Education 3 

SED 312 - Educational Psychology (cross-listed in PSY) 3 

EDU 316 - Exceptional Child (cross-listed in Special Ed.) 3 

SED 415 - Teaching Math, Grades 7-12 2 

SED 419 - General Secondary Methods 2 

SED 444 - Student Teaching, Grades 7-8 5 

SED 445 - Student Teaching, Grades 9-12 5 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 
Subtotal Professional Education Requirements 26 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUTIREMENTS 39/40 

Five hours are fulfilled through the program's major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUTIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through the program's collateral requirements. 

ELECTTVES 10 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



192 College of Arts and Sciences 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS/ MSST 

SCIENCE (TEACHER LICENSURE. GRADES K'8) 

SPECL\LTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

Mathematics Requirements 

MAT 1 1 1 - Algebra 3 

MAT 201 - Concepts of Mathematics 3 
(Take before MAT 1 1 1 Algebra) 

MAT 241 - Computer Applications 3 

MAT 331- Foundations of Geometry 3 

MAT 341 - Elementary Probability and Statistics 3 

MAT 393 - History of Mathematics 3 
] ; (MATl 44 - Pre-calculus may be substituted for MATl 1 1 ) 
<■ ■ Science Requirements 

2=;; BIO 111 - Plant Biology 4 

c;:" BIO 112 - Animal Biology 4 

S HSC291 - Principles of Nutrition 3 

C"*' HEA 354 - Personal and Community Health 3 

vsji BIO 393 - Principles of Ecology 4 

£;::. PHS 112 - Earth and Space Science 4 

0:;;ii. Subtotal Specialty Requirements 40 

J^;|i> COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

EDU495 - Faith and Leaming 3 
Subtotal Collateral Requirements 3 

PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 199 - Intro, to the Teaching Profession 1 

EDU201 - Foundations of American Education 3 

ELE300 - Children's Literature 2 

ELE310 - Child Psychology 3 

EDU 316 - The Exceptional Child 3 

ELE400 - Teaching Creative Arts 2 

ELE 401 - Teaching - Reading and Language Arts 4 

ELE 402 - Teaching - Science, Math, and Social Studies 4 

ELE 410 - Teaching in the Kindergarten 2 

ELE 432 - Student Teaching in Kindergarten 5 

or 

ELE 433 - Student teaching in the Early Grades (1-4) 5 

ELE 438 - Student Teaching in Middle Grades (5-8) 5 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 
Subtotal Professional Education Requirements 36 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 32-38 

Nine hours are fulfilled through the program's major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18-hour religion requirement are fulfilled 
through the program's specialty area requirements. 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 193 

ELECTIVES 0-4 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN MEDS 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 



SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS 


Credit Hours 


CHY 1 1 1 - General Chemistry I 


4 


CHY112 - General Chemistry n 


4 


BIO 251 - Microbiology I 


4 


BIO 252 - Microbiology n 


4 


BIO 342 - Genetics 


4 


HSC292 - Human Anatomy a Phys. I 


4 


HSC293 - Human Anatomy a Phys. n 


4 


HSC495 - Faith and Practice 


3 


Med Tech Internship 


30 


Subtotal Specialty Requirements 


61 


COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 




• MAT 1 1 1 - College Algebra 


3 


MAT 112 - Trigonometry* 


3 


CHY 281 - Organic Chemistry I 


3 


CHY 351 - Quantitative Analysis I 


4 


MAT 241 - Computer Applications 


3 


PHY 21 1 - General Physics I 


4 


PHY 212 - General Physics n 


4 


Subtotal Collateral Requirements 


22-24 


*MAT 144 Precalculus (4) can substitute for MAT 111/112 





GENERAL EDUCATION 35 

Nine hours are fulfilled through the program's 
major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement are 
fulfilled through the program's specialty area requirements. 

ELECTTV^S 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 1 35 



194 College OF Arts AND Sciences 

MINORS 

The Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics offers minors 
in Biological Science, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Computer Science. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

The Biological Science minors shall complete 18 hours in biology, 
with at least eight hours in courses numbered 300 and above. 

CHEMISTRY 

The Chemistry minor shall complete 1 8 hours in chemistry, with at 
least eight hours in courses numbered 300 and above. 

■. MATHEMATICS 

!; ; The Mathematics minor shall complete 1 8 hours in mathematics, 

including Mathematics 271 and 272 and at least six hours in courses 
numbered 300 and above. 

q COMPUTER SCIENCE 

CiS ' The Computer Science minor shall complete 18 hours in com- 

x.^ puter science. 

6;;j Any minor should be approved by the department chair prior to a 

c'nc:''! student's senior year. 

-^ COURSE OFFERINGS 

ASTRONOMY 

AST 111. PRINCIPLES OF ASTRONOMY Four hours credit 

A descriptive course designed to present the hindamental principles, as well as the his- 
torical underpinnings, of modern astronomy. A subtitle for the course could be "astronomy 
through space and time." The course will treat foundations, the solar system, our sun and 
other stars, the milky way and other galaxies of the universe. Recent discoveries will be high- 
lighted, and the subject will be presented descriptively from an experimental and observa- 
tional perspective. Prerequisite: College Algebra or its equivalent. 150 minutes lecture and 
1 10 minutes lab per week. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

BIO 103. HUMAN BIOLOGY Four hours credit 

A foundations course in biological science which focuses on the general concepts of life 
as demonstrated by the human body through its chemistry, organization, and continuity. A 
practical and relevant approach to understanding and maintenance is presented. 150 minutes 
lecture and 110 minutes of lab. Biology 111 or 112 recommended for students with strong 
biological science background. Non-science majors only. Offered every semester. 

BIO 104. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Four hours credit 

A course that presents elementary concepts of scientific methodology and discusses 
issues relevant to understanding the natural environment and human activity. Scientific, 
political, and socioeconomic aspects of human activity related to the environment will be 
introduced and examined. This course will aim toward instilling an understanding of how 
and what scientifically-based points of view have contributed to the current climate of dis- 
cussion regarding the environment. This course will emphasize the development of critical 
thinking as well as investigative and comprehension skills. 150 minutes lecture and 180 
minutes of laboratory /field experience. Offered every semester. 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 195 



BIO 111. PLANT BIOLOGY Four hours credit 

Nature and development of plants, with emphasis on hasic biological principles, physi- 
ology, anatomy, morphology, inheritance, and life histories. 150 minutes lecture and 110 
minutes lab per week. Offered every semester. 

BIO 112. ANIMAL BIOLOGY Four hours credit 

A study of the fundamental animal types and zoological prmciples. The morphology, 
physiology, behavior, reproduction, ecology, and embryology of each phylum are presented. 
150 minutes lecture and 1 10 minutes lab per week. Offered every semester. 

BIO 123. ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE Four hours credit 

An application of the basic principles of horticulture employed in the science and care of 
landscaping and home gardening. On-site learning opportunities are provided, including site 
selection and preparation, plant selection, planting and care, and economic considerations. 
Each student is required to complete one landscape project from start to finish. Offered in 
summer. 

BIO 25 1. MICROBIOLOGY I Four hours credit 

An introduction to the principles and techniques for the study and identification of bac- 
teria and other microorganisms. Laboratory work consists of techniques m isolation, cultur- 
ing, staining, and identification. 150 minutes lecture and 150 minutes lab per week. 
Prerequisites: BIO 1 1 1-1 12; CHY 111-112. Offered Fall Semester. 

BIO 252. MICROBIOLOGY II Four hours credit 

A continuation of BIO 25 1 with emphasis on the principles and techniques for the study 
and identification of microorganisms associated with human health. Laboratory work con- 
sists of techniques in isolation, culturing, staining, and identification. 150 minutes lecture 
and 150 minutes lab per week. Prerequisite: BIO 251. Offered Spring Semester. 

BIO 285. PRE-PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR Two hours credit 

A course designed to prepare pre-health professions students for the rigors of applying to 
and attending graduate school. It is intended to enhance entrance exam scores for health pro- 
fessions schools. Recommended for second-semeters sophomores or first-semester juniors, 
this course is a prerequisite for admittance into the pre-medical tracks in biology, chemistry 
or biochemistry. Recommended for sophomores or first-semester juniors. Offered every 
semester. 

BIO 290. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY One-four hours credit 

A course used to comply with requests for special topics and studies in biology. Lecture 
and laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisites are specified in major. Offered on demand. 

BIO 292. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I Four hours credit 

A systematic study of the structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, 
integumentary, and endocrine systems and their role in support, movement, integratory, 
and control of the human body. An emphasis upon cells, cell processes, and tissues precedes 
consideration of the systems. 150 minutes lecture and 135 minutes lab per week. 
Prerequisite: BIO 1 12. Offered every semester. 

BIO 293. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II Four hours credit 

A systematic study of the structure and function of the human cardiovascular, lymphat- 
ic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Lecture and laboratory empha- 
size the role of these systems in the maintenance and continuation of life. 150 minutes lec- 
ture and 135 minutes lab per week. Prerequisite: BIO 292. Offered every semester. 

BIO 300. SCIENCE COLLOQUY One hour credit 

A series of formal lectures, position papers, and/or debates focused on a contemporary 
scientific issue. Presenters are normally recognized leaders holding a particular view. No pre- 
requisites. Offered on demand. 

BIO 303. CELL BIOLOGY Three hours credit 

A study of the relationship of cellular structure and function, with emphasis upon cellu- 
lar energetics, biosynthesis, and reproduction. 150 minutes lecture per week. Prerequisite: 
BIO 251 or permission of the instructor. Offered every semester. 



196 College OF Arts AND Sciences 



BIO 305. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY Four hours credit 

A study of the development of typical vertebrates, v^ith emphasis upon humans. 150 
minutes lecture and 135 minutes lab per week. Prerequisite: BIO 112. Offered Spring Semes- 
ter, odd years. 

BIO 306. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY Four hours credit 

The morphology, physiology, and phylogeny of the organ systems of vertebrates. 100 
minutes lecture and 220 minutes lab per week. Prerequisite: BIO 112. Offered Spring 
Semester, on demand. 

BIO 309. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY Three hours credit 

A survey of the invertebrate taxa of Kingdom Animalia to provide a foundation for further 
studies in environmental science and biodiversity. There will be an emphasis on field-related 
experiences in the laboratory component of this course. Prerequisites: BIO 111,112. 

|: BIO 310. VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY Three hours credit 

•i; : A survey of the vertebrate taxa of Kingdom Animalia to provide a foundation for further 

[."■ ■ studies in environmental science and biodiversity. There will be an emphasis on field-related 

experiences in the laboratory component of this course. Prerequisites: BIO 111,112. 



::c: 



^.; BIO 311. ENTOMOLOGY Four hours credit 

Cii An introductory study of the basic structures, functions, development, behavior, diversi- 

.il;t ty and control of insects. Emphasis will be placed upon biodiversity and the major roles 

C-'* ' I played by these arthropods. When offered as a part of the Summer of Studies in Medical 

"C^l Missions, the emphasis will be on medical relationships and identification. Prerequisite: 

cirji: BIO 111, 112, and formal acceptance to attend the course (Bio-diversity Field Study Program.) 

w' Offered Summers on demand. 

^J;!' BIO 321. HEALTH PROFESSIONS INTERNSHIP One hour credit 

«^;i:l A course that provides opportunities for students entering the delivering of health care at 

a variety of health facilities prior to entering professional schools. These supervised opportu- 
nities will allow students to better understand the distinctions of their chosen profession and 
to become more aware of how their profession will integrate into the larger health care deliv- 
ery environment. Limited to juniors and seniors who possess a strong commitment to a 
given health profession. Offered every semester. 

BIO 342. GENETICS Four hours credit 

Basic principles of heredity with emphasis on their application to plant and animal 
breeding and human birth defects. Drosophila are used in laboratory experiments. 150 min- 
utes lecture and 1 10 minutes lab per week. Prerequisites: BIO 1 1 1-1 12. CHYl 13 or CHY 281 
recommended. Offered every semester. 

BIO 351. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY Three hours credit 

A course designed to present the fundamental principles of physiology for students m 
biology, nursing, pharmacy, pre-med, pre-dental, or other allied health professionals. It is 
designed to integrate and synthesize physiological processes among the different systems. 
Prerequisites: BIO 112, CHY 111-112. Offered Fall Semester, on demand. 

BIO 380. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH Two hours credit 

Fundamentals of scientific research including the scientific method, experimental design, 
statistical analysis, scientific literature, and writing a scientific paper. Offered on demand. 

BIO 381. RESEARCH One hour credit 

The aptplication of the fundamentals of scientific research including the utilization of 
proper procedures, techniques, and equipment deemed necessary to effectively conduct a 
selected research project, gather data, and prepare a written and oral presentation of the 
research findings. Prerequisite: BIO 380. Offered on demand. 

BIO 382. RESEARCH One hour credit 

Continuation of BIO 381. Offered on demand. 

BIO 383. RESEARCH One hour credit 

Continuation of BIO 382. Offered on demand. 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 197 



BIO 390. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY One-four hours credit 

A course used to comply with requests for special topics and advanced studies in biology. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisites are specified in major. O^ered on demand. 

BIO 392. TROPICAL BIODIVERSITY Four hours credit 

A course that covers themes pertaining to the rich diversity of life in the tropics. 
Ecology, evolutionary biology, and natural history of tropical organisms will be explored in 
depth. This course will present the use of scientific methodology and discuss issues related 
to the natural environment and human activity in the tropics. There will be an emphasis on 
attaining foreign experience in the field component of this course. Prerequisites: BIO 
111,112 and formal acceptance to attend the course (Biodiversity Field Study Program). 
Offered summers on demand. 

BIO 393. PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY Four hours credit 

Relationships within natural populations, communities, and ecosystems with reference 
to energy flow, limiting factors and behavior patterns of organisms in their environment. 
Human population ecology, global resource availability and exploitation, human environ- 
mental impacts and methods of stewardship of God's creation. 150 minutes lecture and 170 
minutes lab per week. Field trips will be required. Prerequisites: BIO 111-112 or BIO 104. 
Offered Fall Semester, even years. 

BIO 395. HEALTH PERSPECTIVES: CANCER AND AIDS Three hours credit 

A survey of the nature, causes, prevention, treatment, and future prospects of each dis- 
ease. Although intended primarily for aspiring health professionals, it would be of benefit to 
everyone interested in learning more about these conditions and their impact on human soci- 
ety. Cancer will be the focus in even years and AIDS will be the focus in odd years. 
Prerequisites: BIO 103 (non-majors); BIO 111, 112, 251 (majors); BIO 292, 293 (strongly sug- 
gested for majors). Offered Fall Semester. 

BIO 403. CELL BIOLOGY LAB Two hours credit 

A course that offers an introduction to the principles and techniques for the study of 
cells, their organelles, and their molecular composition and distribution. The four types 
of cellular macromolecules are manipulated via various techniques in electrophoresis, 
chromatography, capillary blotting, centrifugation, and biochemical reduction. 
Additionally, selected recombinant DNA techniques will introduce students to molecu- 
lar cloning strategies and procedures. 180 minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 
BIO 251, 303; or permission of instructor. Offered on demand. 

BIO 421. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY Four hours credit 

Cellular and organismic process occurring in plants, including transport phenomena, 
metabohc processes and regulation of growth and development. 150 minutes lecture and 110 
minutes lab per week. Prerequisites: BIO 111-112 and CHY 111-112. Offered Fall Semester, 
on demand. 

BIO 43 1 . STRUCTURAL HISTOLOGY Three hours credit 

An introductory course in the study of cells, tissues, and organs. Special emphasis will be 
placed on the relationship between stmctural organization and function. This course will meet 
for 1 10 minutes lecture and 1 10 minute laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO II 1-1 12, CHY 
1 1 1-1 12, or permission of the instmctor. Offered Spring Semester, even years. 

BIO 432. IMMUNOLOGY Three hours credit 

A foundation study of current concepts and procedures in immunology. An examination 
of the immune system in both health and disease is emphasized. Prerequisites: CHY 111-112 
or 113, BIO 251, BIO 303 and BIO 252, 292, 293 (strongly recommended). Offered Spring 
Semester. 

BIO 433. SCIENCE AND SCRIPTURE Three hours credit 

Comparative study of related scientific and theological ideology with emphasis upon 
areas of apparent discrepancy. Through lecture, research papers, and guided class discus- 
sion, an attempt is made to demonstrate the necessity and possibility of harmonizing scien- 
tifiic and biblical truth. Not to be counted toward an endorsement for teacher certification 
in biology. Offered every semester. 



198 College OF Arts AND Sciences 



BIO 441. PARASITOLOGY Four hours credit 

Life cycles, epidemiological factors, interrelationships of parasite and host, and underly- 
ing principles of treatment and prevention. 150 minutes lecture and 110 minutes lab per 
week. Prerequisites: BIO 111-112. Offered on demand. 

BIO 451. EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY Four hours credit 

A course covering themes pertinent to observational and theoretical evidences of 
contemporary evolutionary biology. The major conceptual underpinnings of modern 
evolutionary thought v^ill be extensively discussed in light of a Christian world view. 
This course will approach evolutionary biology and biblical thought philosophically and 
scientifically, emphasizing areas of corroboration. This course will stress the develop- 
ment of critical thinking, as well as investigative and comprehension skills. 100 min- 
utes lecture, 100 minutes discussion, and one required field trip. Prerequisites: BIO 1 12 , 
BIO 342 (strongly recommended). Offered Fall Semester. 

BIO 490. SENIOR SEMINAR One hour credit 

A weekly presentation by staff and/or senior science and mathematics majors on matters 
of current interest in the science and mathematics field. Participants gain experience in eval- 
uating scientific literature and presenting scientific papers. One hour per week. One semester 
required of all department majors. Offered every semester. 

BIO 491. SENIOR RESEARCH One hour credit 

Experience in science research projects under supervision of staff members. Prerequisite: 
Senior status and permission of department chairperson. Grade point average of 3.0 is recom- 
mended. Offered on demand. 

BIO 492. PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATION One hour credit 

A course designed to give academic credit to those students who excel by preparing a 
research paper worthy of publication in a reputable scientific journal and/or presentation to 
an annual meeting of a recognized scientific society. Prerequisites/ Corequisites: BIO 380, 
381, 490, or permission of instructor. Offered every semester. 

CHEMISTRY 

CHY 1 10. FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY Four hours credit 

Chemistry 110 is the entry level chemistry course based on no high school chemistry, 
science and mathematics ACT scores, and testing. Classification and properties of matter, 
early atomic theory and structure, nomenclature, quantitative composition, chemical equa- 
tions, stoichiometry, predictions from the periodic table, chemical bonds, and gases are stud- 
ied. 150 minutes lecture and 110 minutes lab per week. Prerequisite: High school algebra 
or equivalent. Offered Fall Semester. 

CHY 111. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I Four hours credit 

Matter and measurement, early atomic theory, nomenclature, stoichiometry, aqueous 
reactions, thermochemistry, electronic structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding the- 
ories, molecular geometry, gases, intermolecular forces, liquids and solids are studied. 150 
minutes lecture and 1 10 minutes lab per week. Prerequisites: MAT 111, 1 12 or Math ACT 
of 24. Offered every semester. 

CHY 112. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II Four hours credit 

Properties of solutions, reaction rates, chemical kinetics, equilibria, acid/base equilibria, 
qualitative analysis of common cations and anions, solubility, environmental chemistry, 
electrochemistry, thermodynamics, radioactivity and nuclear chemistry, organic and bio- 
chemistry are studied. 150 minutes lecture and 110 minutes lab per week. Prerequisite: 
CHY 111. 

CHY 1 13. INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY Three hours credit 

Fundamentals of organic and biochemistry as observed m living systems in health and 
disease. Prerequisite: CHY 1 10 or 1 1 1. Offered Spring Semester. 

CHY 119. INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC & BIOCHEMISTRY LAB One hour credit 

Introductory concepts in organic and biochemistry will be reinforced by the use of basic 
qualitative techniques to identify various organic functional groups, proteins, carbohydrates, 
and lipids. In addition, the synthesis and isolation of naturally occuring organic and bio- 



I 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 



chemical compounds will be introduced. 1 10 minutes of lab per week. Prerequisite: Chy 
1 10 or 111. Corequisite: Chy 113. Offered Spring Semester. 

CHY 281. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I Three hours credit 

The reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, molecular orbital theory, carbonium 
ion, carbanion and free radical reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry and molecular confor- 
mation, transition state theory and techniques of organic synthesis. Introduction to spec- 
troscopy. 150 minutes of lecture per week. Prerequisite: CHY 1 12. Offered Fall Semester. 

CHY 282. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II Three hours credit 

A continuation of CHY 281. The chemistry of polyfunctional aliphatic compounds, 
amino acids and proteins, sugars, carbohydrates, polycyclic and heterocyclic compounds. 150 
minutes of lecture per week. Prerequisite: CHY 281. Offered Spring Semester. 

CHY 289. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY Three hours credit 

The reinforcement of selected material from CHY 281 and 282 will be accomplished m 
the laboratory by the isolation of naturally occurring organic compounds and the synthesis of 
other organic compounds. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I (CHY 281). Corequisite: Organic 
Chemistry II (CHY 282). 360 minutes of lab per week. Offered Spring Semester. 

CHY 290. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY One-four hours credit 

A course used to comply with requests for special topics and studies in chemistry. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisites are specified in major. Offered on demand. 

CHY 321. BIOCHEMISTRY I Three hours credit 

Emphasis on human biochemistry and a study of the chemical composition of living 
matter and of the chemical and biological changes that occur in it during life processes: the 
chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleotides, and the biosyn- 
thesis of nucleic acids and proteins. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I (CHY 281). 150 min- 
utes of lecture per week. Offered Spring Semester. 

CHY 322. BIOCHEMISTRY II Three hours credit 

A continuation of CHY 321 with emphasis on human biochemistry of hormones, vita- 
mins, enzymes, blood, urine, nutrition, chemistry of respiration, citric acid cycle, and the 
electron transport chain. Prerequisite: CHY 321. 150 minutes of lecture per week. Offered 
Fall Semester. 

CHY 323. BIOCHEMISTRY III Three hours credit 

A continuation of CHY 322 with emphasis on human chemical and biological changes 
that occur including biosynthesis of lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides in relation to metab- 
olism and gene replication and expression. Prerequisite: CHY 322. 150 minutes of lecture per 
week. Offered Spring Semester. 

CHY 329. BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY Three hours credit 

An introduction to biochemical technique, which will include isolation, classification 
and quantification of both proteins and genetic material. These experiments will serve to 
reinforce material learned from the lectures. 360 minutes of laboratory per week. The course 
is designed for juniors or seniors with CHY 321 as a prerequisite and CHY 322 as a corequi- 
site. Offered Fall Semester. 

CHY 351. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS Four hours credit 

Acid-base equilibria in water, stoichiometry, oxidation-reduction system, applications of 
volumetric titrations, elementary spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods, and prin- 
ciples of gravimetry. 100 minutes lecture and 220 minutes lab per week. Prerequisite: CHY 
112. Offered on demand. 

CHY 352. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS Four hours credit 

A continuation of CHY 35 1 . Offered on demand. 

CHY 380. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH Two hours credit 

Fundamentals of scientific research including what science is, the scientific method, 
experimental design, statistical analysis, scientific literature, and writing a scientific paper. 
During the semester, the student will be responsible for conducting a literature search per- 



200 College of Arts and Sciences 



taining to an aspect of ongoing research in the department at that time. In addition, a 
research proposal will be prepared by the student in preparation for participation in the 
departmental research program the following semester. Offered Fall Semester. 

CHY 381. RESEARCH One hour credit 

The application of the fundamentals of scientific research learned in CHY 380. The stu- 
dent will conduct the research described in his/her research proposal under the supervision 
of a research advisor. The student will initially become familiar with the procedures,tech- 
niques, and equipment involved in the project. Subsequently, the research will be conducted, 
data gathered, and the analysis and interpretation of data will be initiated in preparation for a 
written and oral presentation of the research findings. Prerequisite: CHY 380. Offered every 
semester, on demand. 

CHY 382. RESEARCH One hour credit 

Continuation of CHY 381. 

CHY 383. RESEARCH One hour credit 

Continuation of CHY 382. 

CHY 390. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY One-four hours credit 

A course used to comply with requests for special topics and advanced studies in chem- 
istry. Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught. May be repeated for 
credit. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Offered on demand. 

CHY 43 1 . PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I Four hours credit 

Gases and liquids,solid state, first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics, thermo- 
chemistry, free energy and equilibrium, chemical equilibrium solutions, colligative proper- 
ties of solutions, and phase rule. 150 minutes lecture and 180 minutes lab per week. 
Prerequisites: CHY 351, PHY 212, MAT 271. Offered Fall Semester, odd years. 

CHY 432. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II Four hours credit 

Conductance and ionic equilibria, electrochemical cells, kinetics of homogenous reac- 
tions, atomic structure, nature of chemical bonding, molecular structure, nuclear chemistry, 
photochemistry, catalysts and colloids. 150 minutes lecture and 180 minutes lab per 
week.Prerequisites: CHY 431, MAT 271, 272. Offered Spring Semester, even years. 

CHY 490. SENIOR SEMINAR One hour credit 

A weekly presentation by staff and/or senior science and mathematics majors on matters 
of current interest in the science and mathematics field. Participants gain experience in eval- 
uating scientific literature and presenting scientific papers. One hour per week. One semester 
required of all department majors. Offered every semester. 

CHY 491. SENIOR RESEARCH One hour credit 

Experience in science research projects under supervision of staff members. Prerequisites: 
Senior status and permission of department chairperson. Grade point average of 3.0 is recom- 
mended. Offered on demand. 

CHY 492. PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATION One hour credit 

A course designed to give academic credit to those students who excel by preparing a 
research paper worthy of publication in a reputable scientific journal and/or presentation to 
an annual meeting of a recognized scientific society. Prerequisites/Corequisites: CHY 380, 
CHY 490, and permission of instmctor. Offered every semester. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

CSC 260. INTRODUCTION TO PASCAL PROGRAMMING Three hours credit 

An introduction to computer science and Pascal programming with an emphasis on 
structured design, top-down algorithm development, and hands-on problem-solving. 
Prerequisite: High school algebra. 

CSC 265. APPLICATION PROGRAMMING IN C Three hours credit 

An introduction to the C programming language with an emphasis on ANSI C using 
structured design, top-down algorithm development, and hands-on problem-solving. 
Prerequisite: High school algebra. Offered Fall Semester. CSC 260 recommended. 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 201 



CSC 270. INTRODUCTION TO DATA STRUCTURES Three hours credit 

An advanced programming course which includes data structures and standards algo- 
rithms and integrates top-down design and stmctured programming with Pascal. Basic com- 
puter science concepts are reviewed and expanded using clear, real-life examples and applica- 
tions to demonstrate problem-solving in a practical context. Prerequisite: CSC 260. 

CSC 311. OPERATING SYSTEMS Three hours credit 

An introduction to the concepts and design of various operating systems including 
microcomputer as well as minicomputer and mainframe computer operating systems. 
Emphasis is placed on concepts rather than the design of any particular operating system. 
Prerequisite: CSC 270. 

CSC 321 . NUMERICAL ANALYSIS Three hours credit 

A course that provides both a mathematical and computational emphasis on the cre- 
ation, assessment, implementation, and modification of numerical algorithms in science and 
mathematics. Prerequisite: MAT 271. 

CSC 341. DATA BASE DESIGN Three hours credit 

Introduction to analysis and design of databases. Emphasis is on the use of modern data- 
base management systems and the design of database to be used with them. Prerequisite: 
CSC 270. 

HEALTH SCIENCE 

HSC 221. INTRODUCTION TO THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS Two hours credit 

An introduction to the major health professions and paraprofessions utilized in meeting 
the health care need of modern society. Offered every semester. 

HSC 241. RESEARCH METHODS & STATISTICS Three hours credit 

FOR HEALTH SCIENCES 

Application of descriptive and inferential statistical methods to health-related data and 
problems. Prerequisite: MAT 111. Offered Fall and Spring Semester. 

HSC 250. MICROBIOLOGY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES Four hours credit 

A beginning course in basic microbiology and epidemiology for students preparing for 
allied health professions. The character of microbial organisms and infectious diseases is 
studied with emphasis on modes of transmission, diagnosis, treatment, management and 
control. Prerequisites: CRY 1 10, CHY 1 13, CHY 119, or CHY 1 1 1, CHY 112. 

HSC 260. CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES Three hours credit 

An introduction to sports medicine/athletic training. It covers basic anatomy and the 
knowledge, abilities, and skills required to assess, treat, and rehabilitate athletic injuries. 
Prerequisite: BIO 103 or HSC 292. 

HSC 261. EVALUATION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES Three hours credit 

A course presenting the knowledge and skills needed by the athletic trainer to properly 
evaluate and manage various athletic injuries. 

HSC 285. PRE-PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR Two hours credit 

A course designed to prepare pre-health professions students for the rigors of applymg to 
and attending graduate school. It is intended to enhance entrance exam scores for health pro- 
fessions schools. Recommended for second-semester sophomores or first-semester juniors, 
this course is a prerequisite for admittance into the pre-medical tracks in biology, chemistry 
or biochemistry. Recommended for sophomores or first-semester juniors. Offered every 
semester. 

HSC 290. SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTH SCIENCE One-four hours credit 

A course used to comply with requests for special topics and studies in health science. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the course taught. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisites are specified in major. Offered on demand. 



202 College of Arts and Sciences 



HSC 291. PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION Three hours credit 

Study of food and its relationship to the well-being of the human body with emphasis 
upon metabolism, nutritive value, and quantitative requirements of food at different age and 
development levels. The selection and eating of foods at different economic, social, and cul- 
tural levels are also studied. 150 minutes lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIO 103, 112, or 
HSC 293. Offered every semester. 

HSC 292. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I Four hours credit 

A systematic study of the structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, 
integumentary, and endocrine systems and their role in support, movement, mtegratory, and 
control of the human body. An emphasis upon cells, cell processes, and tissues precedes con- 
sideration of the systems. 150 minutes lecture and 135 minutes lab per week. Prerequisite: 
BIO 1 12. Offered every semester. 

HSC 293. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II Four hours credit 

_^,. A systematic study of the structure and function of the human cardiovascular, lymphat- 

<:!■ ic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Lecture and laboratory empha- 

/' size the role of these systems in the maintenance and continuation of life. 150 minutes lec- 

.,', ture and 135 minutes lab per week. Prerequisite: HSC 292. Offered every semester. 

lit; 

!!; HSC 310. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION Three hours credit 

'' An introduction to the nature, organization and functions of the continum of health ser- 

vices found in the U.S. health care system. The roles played by providers, managers and con- 
•' sumers of health care will be explored. Special interest will be paid to the operational side of 

health care administration - what people in this field do on a day-to-day basis. Current issues 
will also be analyzed. 

' HSC 321. HEALTH PROFESSIONS INTERNSHIP One hour credit 

A course that provides experience for students entering the delivery of health care at a 
) variety of health facilities prior to entering professional schools. These supervised opportuni- 

ties will allow students to better understand the distinctions of their chosen profession and 
to become more aware of how their profession will integrate into the larger health care deliv- 
ery environment. Limited to juniors and seniors who possess a strong commitment to a 
given health profession. Offered every semester. 

HSC 330. FITNESS, WELLNESS, & LIFESTYLE MANAGEMENT Three hours credit 

A course designed to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the assess- 
ment and development of physical fitness, with emphases on both personal application and 
group leadership. 

HSC 331. CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH Three hours credit 

An in-depth study of heart disease, circulation, heart structure and function, and training 
responses. Emphases will be on health-related concepts including obesity, nutrition, and 
stress. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or 112. 

HSC 345. THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE AND MODALITIES Three hours credit 

A class addressing the plans, procedures, and implementation of a comprehensive 
rehabilitation and reconditioning program for injuries and illnesses sustained by the 
competitive athlete. Prerequisites: HSC 260 and 261. 

HSC 352. SUBSTANCE USE AND ABUSE Two hours credit 

A study in the basic principles of drug action, side effects, and toxic effects. Implications 
for the health education professional will be emphasized. Offered Fall Semester. 

HSC 353. SAFETY AND FIRST AID Two hours credit 

The nature and causes of accidents and safety measures for the prevention of common acci- 
dents in the home, school, industry, transportation, and recreation. Offered every semester. 

HSC 354. PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH Three hours credit 

This course is related to the health of the whole community, such as sanitation of the 
water supply, occupational health hazards, food control, health agencies and their work, and 
a study of most major communicable and infectious diseases. Personal health includes the 
general study of the body organs, systems, functions, and mental health; however, it is pri- 
marily a study of those habits and practices which result in buoyant personal health. Offered 
every semester. 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 203 



HSC 355. COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Three hours credit 

This course is designed to enrich the understanding of students preparing for health 
teaching as well as other health-related careers. Emphasis is on the perspectives and content 
of community and environmental health,, preventive medicine, public health, school health, 
and self-care. 

HSC 357. HUMAN SEXUALITY Three hours credit 

A study of the sociological, psychological, biological, ethical, and legal components of 
human sexuality. Offered every semester. 

HSC 361. KINESIOLOGY Three hours credit 

Reviev^ of basic anatomy, primarily the muscular system; relationship of the fundamen- 
tal laws of physics to human movement, and mechanical principles of skill instmction and 
analysis. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or HSC 292. Offered Fall Semester. 

HSC 365. CHILD HEALTH & SOCIAL BEHAVIOR Three hours credit 

A study of the physical and psychosocial growth and development of children,- includes 
methods of organizing and implementing health measures, determining health status 
through screening processes; detection of remedial defects, referral procedures, and follow-up 
for correction; the promotion of physical, mental, social, and emotional health through envi- 
ronmental and special health services. 

HSC 390. SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTH SCIENCES One-four hours credit 

A course used to comply with requests for special topics and advanced studies in health 
science. Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught. May be repeated for 
credit. Prerequisites specified in major. Offered on demand. 

HSC 391. PRINCIPLES OF PHARMACOLOGY Three hours credit 

A study of basic principles of drug action and the therapeutic application of the major 
pharmacological classification of drugs in the treatment of disease. Side effects, toxic effects 
and implications for the health professional are emphasized. Prerequisites: CRY 110, 113, 
119 or CHY 111,112; HSC 292, 293. Offered Fall semester, even years. 

HSC 395. HEALTH PERSPECTIVES: CANCER AND AIDS Three hours credit 

A survey of the nature, causes, prevention, treatment, and future prospects of each dis- 
ease. Although intended primarily for aspiring health professionals, it would be of benefit to 
everyone interested in learning more about these conditions and their impact on human soci- 
ety. Cancer will be the focus in even years and AIDS will be the focus in odd years. 
Prerequisites: BIO 103 (non-majors); BIO 251 or HSC 250, HSC 292, 293 (ma)ors). Offered Fall 
Semester. 

HSC 398. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY Three hours credit 

An introduction to the basic principles of medical terminology and assistance in learning 
the terms by applying them in clinical case histories, practice examples, and programmed 
instruction. The course is intended primarily for students entering the health-related profes- 
sions, although it would benefit any student of the biological sciences. Prerequisites: BIO 103 
(non-majors), BIO 251 or HSC 250, BIO/HSC 292, 293 (majors). Offered every semester. 

HSC 400. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPORTS MEDICINE Three hours credit 

A course that addresses a variety of subjects germane to sports medicine. Most of 
the emphasis is placed on reading and analyzing current research of sports medicine top- 
ics and on preparing for the national certification exam for athletic trainers. 

HSC 417. THE TEACHING OF HEALTH, GRADES 7-12 Two hours credit 

This course presents methods, materials, techniques, and strategies needed to teach 
health topics and behaviors in grades 7-12. 

HSC 441. PARASITOLOGY Four hours credit 

Life cycles, epidemiological factors, interrelationships of parasite and host, and underly- 
ing principles of treatment and prevention. 150 minutes lecture and 110 minutes lab per 
week. Prerequisite: BIO 112. Offered on demand. 



^ < 



204 College of Arts and Sciences 



HSC 444. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE Three hours credit 

This course provides the physiological background that is necessary for an understanding 
of the acute and chronic responses to exercise in humans. Prerequisite: HSC 361. Offered 
Spring Semester. 

HSC 450. EXERCISE TESTING AND PRESCRIPTION Three hours credit 

A course providing knowledge and practical experience in exercise testing procedures 
and in the principles and guidelines of safe and effective exercise prescription. Prerequisite: 
HSC 331 or 444. 

HSC 451. PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH/FITNESS Three hours credit 

PROGRAMMING AND LEADERSHIP 

A course designed to cover knowledge and skills needed for establishing and administer- 
ing effective health/fitness programs. For senior majors in physical education. 

i \ HSC 470. FITNESS/WELLNESS INTERNSHIP Five hours credit 

ci; Practical experience in an approved fitness/wellness agency. Senior students are assigned 

^' to selected directors in local fitness/wellness oriented community organizations under the 

' ' general supervision of a university supervisor. Weekly seminars deal with problems encoun- 

"^; . tered in the internship program in such areas as instruction, management, records and 

reports, program development, and supervision. No more than 7 additional hours may be 

taken with the internship. Prerequisites: HSC 450 and 451 or concurrent enrollment. 

HSC 495. INTEGRATION OF FAITH AND PRACTICE Three hours credit 

A capstone course designed to provide senior health science majors with opportunities 
to study, discuss, defend and integrate Christian ethics in the health care arenas. 
Prerequisite: THE 331. 

MATHEMATICS 

MAT 096. BASIC MATHEMATICS Three hours credit 

An introduction to basic arithmetic with a primary emphasis on sets and set operations, 
fractions, percent, decimals, graphs, basic equations,ratio and proportion, and basic metrics. 
This course will not meet any university mathematics requirements but will serve the pur- 
pose of preparing students for MAT 101. Offered every semester. 

MAT 097. ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA Three hours credit 

A beginning course in algebra for students who have not had algebra in high school. The 
course includes a review of general arithmetic, the real number system, the fundamentals of 
algebra, linear equations, graphing, exponents and radicals, factoring, functions, systems of 
linear equations, rational expressions and equations, and quadratic equations. The applica- 
tions of these concepts to real-life situations will be examined throughout the course. The 
course will count as an elective in terms of credit hours (3 semester hours), but it will not 
satisfy the general requirement of three hours of Mathematics for graduation. 

MAT 099. INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA Three hours credit 

A preparatory algebra course designed for students who have had only one year of algebra 
in high school or those who need a review in algebra before enrolling m Math 111. The 
course includes basic algebraic principles and techniques as applied to number systems, poly- 
nomials, factoring, and systems of equations and graphs. The applications of these concepts 
to real-life situations are examined throughout the course. The course will count as an elec- 
tive in terms of credit hours (three semester hours), but it will not satisfy the general require- 
ment of three hours of mathematics for graduation. 

MAT 101. CONTEMPORARY MATHEMATICS Three hours credit 

A survey of mathematical topics designed to develop an appreciation of the uses of math- 
ematics. Selected topics will include problem solving, mathematical modeling, logic and 
sets, statistics, and the mathematics of finance. 

MAT 111. COLLEGE ALGEBRA Three hours credit 

The real number system,- relations and functions; algebraic functions; linear, quadratic, 
and higher degree equations; complex numbers; graphing; systems of equations; and applica- 
tions through the use of word problems. Prerequisite: ACT mathematics score of 18 or SAT 
equivalent or completion of MAT 099 with a grade of C or better. Offered every semester. 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 205 



MAT 112. TRIGONOMETRY Three hours credit 

Measurement of angles, solution of right triangles, applications to the "real world," iden- 
tities, graphs of trigonometric functions, solution of oblique triangles, law of sines, law of 
cosines, trigonometric form of complex numbers, DeMoivre's Theorem, and polar coordi- 
nates. Offered every semester. 

MAT 144. PRECALCULUS Four hours credit 

Accelerated course designed to review the basic concepts of algebra and trigonometry for 
students who have studied these subjects in high school and for students who have an excep- 
tional ability in mathematics who wish to complete the course in one semester. May be 
taken instead of MAT 111-112. No one may receive credit for both MAT 144 and MAT 1 1 1 
or MAT 144 and MAT 112. Prerequisite: At least two years of high school algebra and 
trigonometry or the equivalent. Offered Fall Semester. 

MAT 201. CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS Three hours credit 

Develops the real number system (including natural numbers, whole numbers, integers, 
rational numbers, and irrational numbers) stressing properties and algorithims. 
Problem-solving and set theory are emphasized. Elementary algebra will be stressed with 
application to problem solving. Course is designed to equip students to teach mathematics m 
elementary school. Prerequisite: ACT 18 or SAT equivalent or completion of MAT 096 with 
a grade of C or better. Offered every semester. 

MAT 202. CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS Three hours credit 

A continuation of MAT 201. Decimals and percents, elementary probability, methods of 
counting, statistics and the normal curve, plane and solid geometry, and the Cartesian coordi- 
nate system. Problem-solving is emphasized. Prerequisite: MAT 201. Offered every semester. 

MAT 241. COMPUTER APPLICATION IN Three hours credit 

MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE 

A presentation of the fundamentals of digital computations including symbolic logic, 
Boolean algebra and binary arithmetic, followed by a discussion of basic machine languages 
and compilers. A scientifically oriented language will be introduced and used to solve simple 
problems. Required for an endorsement m mathematics. Prerequisite: MAT 111 or its equiv- 
alent. 150 minutes lecture and 1 10 minutes lab per week. Offered every semester. 

MAT 253. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS Three hours credit 

An introductory course in discrete mathematics stressing problem-solving techniques 
using an algorithm approach. Connections with computer science will be analyzed. The course 
will include hash functions, algorithms, recursive algorithms, and analysis of these algorithms. 
Decision trees,Petri nets, graph theory, and Boolean algebra concepts will also be included. The 
course is required for students mmoring in Computer Science. Offered on demand. 

MAT 271. CALCULUS I Four hours credit 

Definition and formulas, rate of change, derivatives, and application of functions. The 
study and application of indefinite and the definite integrals. Prerequisites: MAT 111-112 or 
144, with a minimum grade of C. Offered Spring Semester. 

MAT 272. CALCULUS II Four hours credit 

Polar coordinates, transcendental functions, methods of integration, hyperbolic func- 
tions, vectors, and parametric equations. Prerequisite: MAT 271 with a minimum grade of C. 
Offered Fall Semester. 

MAT 290. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS One- four hours credit 

A course used to comply with requests for special topics and studies in mathematics. 
Lecture and laboratory hours will very with the courses taught. May be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisites are specified in major. Offered on demand. 

MAT 310. LOGIC AND SETS Three hours credit 

A cohesive treatment of foundational mathematics including the topics of elementary 
mathematical logic, mathematical proof, set theory, relations, and functions. Prerequisite: 
MAT 1 11 or MAT 144 with MAT 271 recommended. Offered Spring Semester, even years. 



206 College of Arts and Sciences 



MAT 321. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS Three hours credit 

A course providing both a mathematical and computational emphasis on the creation, 
assessment, implementation, and modification of numerical algorithms in science and math- 
ematics. Prerequisite: MAT 271. Offered on demand. 

MAT 331. FOUNDATIONS OF GEOMETRY Three hours credit 

Axiomatic method, triangles and circles, parallelism, constructions, and modern con- 
cepts of both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: One year of university 
mathematics. Offered Spring Semester, odd years. 

MAT 341. ELEMENTARY PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS Three hours credit 

Measures of central tendency,measures of dispersion, distributions of random variables, 
probability, joint probability, conditional probability, regression and correlation, discrete 
probability functions, continuous probability functions, estimation, and hypothesis testing. 
Prerequisite: MAT 1 11 or equivalent. Offered Fall Semester, odd years. 

■^ii MAT 342. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS Three hours credit 

<3'l Confidence limits, analysis of variance, inferences concerning two or more variables, lin- 

^'' ear correlation and regression analysis, sign test, Mann-Whitney U test, runs test, and rank 

4. correlation. Prerequisite: MAT 341. Offered Spring Semester, even years. 

'V' 

!;; MAT 351. INTRODUCTION TO LINEAR ALGEBRA Three hours credit 

'j; An introduction to the algebra of matrices, advectors, determinants, solutions of systems 

C, of linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, Eigenvectors, Eigenvalues, and 

canonical forms. Prerequisites: MAT 271 and MAT 272. Offered Fall Semester, even years. 

MAT 361. BUSINESS CALCULUS Three hours credit 

it A course designed primarily for business majors as well as other students who need an 

'i ■ increased quantitative emphasis in their program, particularly for those students planning to 

ij enter graduate school. Topics include functions, derivatives, graphing, optimization, exponen- 

'.'. - '■ tial and logarithmic functions, integration, and applications specific to management and eco- 

nomics. Prerequisite: MAT 1 1 1 or permission of the instructor. NOTE: Mathematics majors 
may not substitute this course for MAT 271, 272, or 363. Offered on demand. 

MAT 363. CALCULUS III Four hours credit 

Vectors and vector calculus, partial derivatives, gradients, double and triple integrals, 
centroids, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, line integrals, surface integrals, and Stroke's 
theorem. Prerequisite: MAT 272. Offered Spring Semester. 

MAT 371. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Three hours credit 

First order and simple higher order differential equations with applications, linear differ- 
ential equations, systems of DE, Laplace transform, series solutions, numerical methods, and 
partial differential equations. Prerequisites: MAT 271-272 with MAT 363 strongly recom- 
mended. Offered Fall Semester. 

MAT 390. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS One-four hours credit 

A course used to comply with requests for special topics and advanced studies in mathe- 
matics. Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught. May be repeated for 
credit. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Offered on demand. 

MAT 393. HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS Three hours credit 

Study of major contributors and their contributions to mathematics; early beginnings to 
modern day,'»-and how certain areas of mathematics began. Offered Fall Semester, odd years. 

MAT 441. REAL ANALYSIS Three hours credit 

A rigorous introduction to the foundations of real analysis: real numbers, sequences, lim- 
its, continuity, differentiation, intergration, and series. The emphasis is on establishing and 
correlating the various properties rather than numerical problem solving. Prerequisites: MAT 
310 (Logic and Sets) and MAY 272 (Calculus H) 

MAT 451. LINEAR ALGEBRA Three hours credit 

Applications of elementary linear algebra to real world problems including Leontief 
Economic Models, Markov Chains, theory of games, convex sets and linear inequalities, cor- 



I 



Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 207 



ner-point method and linear programming, the simplex method, matrix applications in genet- 
ics applications in population control, constructing of curves as surfaces, equilibrium of rigid 
bodies, and computer graphics. Prerequisite: MAT 351. Offered Spring Semester, odd years. 

MAT 461. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ALGEBRA Three hours credit 

An introduction to the basic concepts of abstract algebra, including the topics of map- 
ping, relations, number systems, groups, rings, fields, and integral domains. Prerequisite: 
MAT 310 or MAT 351; one year of university mathematics above 200-level. Offered Fall 
Semester, even years. 

MAT 490. MATHEMATICS SEMINAR One hour credit 

A weekly presentation by staff and/or senior science and mathematics majors on matters 
of current interest in the science and mathematics field. Participants gain experience in eval- 
uating scientific literature and presenting scientific papers. One hour per week. One semester 
required of all department majors. Offered every semester. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

PHS 111. PHYSICAL SCIENCE Four hours credit 

Chemical phenomena, introduction to methods of elementary chemistry and physics, 
with stress on kinetic theory, molecular phenomena,and energy relations. (Not recommend- 
ed for students who studied high school chemistry and physics.) 150 minutes lecture and 1 10 
minutes lab per week. Offered Fall Semester. 

PHS 1 12. EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE Four hours credit 

Introduction to astronomy, geology, meteorology, and physical geography. Emphasis on 
the structure of the universe, theories of cosmology, the Milky Way, and the solar system. 
The shape, structure, and composition of the earth; earthquakes, vulcanism, theories of plate 
tectonics, seafloor spreading, and continental drift. The earth in space and time; composition 
and structure of the earth's atmosphere; weathering erosion, sculpturing the land, topograph- 
ic maps, oceanography, and glaciation. Fossil fuels and alternate sources of energy, environ- 
mental pollution, and conservation of natural resources. 150 minutes lecture and 110 min- 
utes lab per week. Offered every semester. 

PHYSICS 

PHY 211. GENERAL PHYSICS (TRIG BASED) Four hours credit 

Principles and applications of mechanics, heat, and sound. 150 minutes lecture and 
110 minutes lab per week. Prerequisite: Proficiency in algebra and trigonometry. Offered 
Fall Semester. 

PHY 212. GENERAL PHYSICS (TRIG BASED) Four hours credit 

Principles and applications of light, electricity, magnetism, atomic and nuclear 
physics. 150 minutes lecture and 1 10 minutes lab per week. Prerequisite: PHY 21 1. Offered 
Spring Semester. 

PHY 281. PHYSICS (CALC BASED) Four hours credit 

A study of fundamental calculus-based classical physics which addresses vectors, forces, 
energy, conservation laws, linear and angular momentum, oscillatins and waves, electric 
charge and fields, and introductory circuits. 150 minutes lecture and 110 minutes lab per 
week. Prerequisite: MAT 271, 272 or permission of instructor. Offered Fall Semester. 

PHY 282. PHYSICS (CALC BASED) Four hours credit 

A study of Maxwell's equations, special and general relativity, and major experimental 
results including the photoelectrics effect, Compton scattering, muon decay, and waveparti- 
cle duality. The main contributions of atomic and nuclear physics together with quarks, lep- 
tons, the Standard Model, and recent astrophysical discoveries will be treated. 150 minutes 
lecture and 110 minutes lab per week. Prerequisites: MAT 271-272 and Physics 281, or per- 
mission of instructor. Offered Spring Semester. 



Si 

'6 I 



Helen DeVos College of Education 209 



HELEN DeVOS 
COLLEGE OF 
EDUCATION 

DEBORAH MURRAY, Dean 



Department of Health and Human Performance 

Mark Wickam, Chairperson 

Department of Teaching and Learps[ing 

Pamela Browning, Chairperson 




210 Helen DeVos College of Education 



HELEN DeVOS 
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

The Helen DeVos College of Education seeks to promote practices 
and programs that facilitate teaching and learning. This occurs in the 
classroom and outside of the classroom through modeling best practice, 
encouraging experimentation and innovation, research, and facilitating 
programs that positively affect the learner in his/her environment. 

At the heart of the Helen DeVos College of Education is the Teacher 
Education Program, which is the mechanism that governs all teacher 
preparation and licensure programs. Thus, the College collaborates with 
other departments on campus to provide a broad-based curriculum of 
liberal arts, specialty area study, and professional education. Experiential 
learning is highly valued as students construct understandings and 
develop problem solving skills in the context of real-world situations. 

The Helen DeVos College of Education includes the Department of 
Health and Human Performance and the Department of Teaching and 
Learning. The Department of Health and Human Performance offers 
majors in HEALTH EDUCATION, HEALTH SCIENCE with an emphasis 
in Fitness/Wellness, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, and PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION with an emphasis in Recreation. The Department also offers 
minors in FITNESS/WELLNESS and PHYSICAL EDUCATION. The 
Department of Teaching and Learning offers majors in HUMAN DEVEL- 
OPMENT and SPECIAL EDUCATION. The faculty of the Department of 
Teaching and Learning collaborate with the faculty of the respective disci- 
pline specialties and staff the courses of the professional studies sequences 
for each of the curricula. 

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The prevailing purpose of the Lee University Teacher Education 
Program is to prepare dedicated and competent teachers who are life- 
long learners. The objectives are to provide (l) a broad general back- 
ground in liberal education, (2) a thorough preparation in a specific acad- 
emic discipline, (3) professional preparation including an understanding 
of the responsibilities and procedures of effective teaching, and (4) a per- 
ception of teaching as an area of Christian service. 

Students desiring to teach in the elementary grades should select a 
major in Human Development or Mathematics/Science (offered in the 
Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics). Students desiring to 
teach on the secondary level should select a major in the academic 
departments' sections of this catalog. 



Helen DeVos College of Education 21 1 



OFFICIAL ACCEPTANCE INTO THE 
TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

All students who desire to prepare for teaching are required to apply 
for and be accepted into the Teacher Education Program. This application 
is to be filed during the first semester of the sophomore year, or when the 
student is enrolled in EDU 199 or 225. Applications are completed as a 
part of the course requirement in EDU 199, or application forms may be 
obtained in the office of the Director of Teacher Education. Students may 
not enroll in methods courses without admission to the Teacher 
Education Program. Requirements for acceptance of a student to the 
Teacher Education Program are as follows: 

1 . General 

Computer Proficiency - Successful completion of a course or 
demonstration of skills. 

2. Academic Achievement 

a. Have completed 30 hours in general education plus EDU 199 or EDU 
225 for Music Education (including 20 clock hours of observation). 

b. Have a 2.5 average for all courses completed. 

c. Have a 2.5 average in the specialty area completed. 

d. Have a 2.5 average in the professional education courses completed. 

e. Have no grades below "C" in the professional education courses. 

3. Personal-Social-Physical Status 

a. Satisfactory ratings from the University Health Clinic. 

b. Completion of the Personality Screening. 

c. Satisfactory scores on Praxis I, assessment of academic skills. 
Students may take the test in one of two formats: PPST (Pre- 
Professional Skills Test, a pencil-and-paper format with mini- 
mum scores of Mathematics 173, Reading 174, and Writing 173) 
OR the Computer-Based Academic Skills Assessments (a com- 
puter delivered format with minimum scores of Mathematics 
318, Reading 321, and Writing 319). Students may be exempt 
from taking Praxis I if ACT/SAT scores are: ACT composite = 21 
or above; Enhanced ACT = 22 or above; combined SAT = 920 or 
above; recentered SAT= 1020 or above. 

d. A recommendation from three full-time professors who are well 
acquainted with the student. 

e. Statement from the Dean of Students concerning 
disciplinary status. 

f. Satisfactory results from a hearing test. 

4. Communication 

a. Have a 2.5 average in English Composition with no grade below C. 

b. Submit a handwritten theme entitled "Why I Want to Be a 
Teacher" to accompany application for admission. 



212 Helen DeVos College OF Education 



c. Have satisfactory ratings on three Interview Forms: one from a 
cooperating teacher, one from advisor, and one from the Director 
of Teacher Education OR the Coordinator of Educational Field 
Experiences. 

Majority vote of the Teacher Education Committee prevails when 
appHcations for the Teacher Education Program are voted on. Once the 
Teacher Education Committee meets and has approved the applicant for 
admission, the student is admitted to the Teacher Education Program. 
The student is informed in writing of the Committee's decision to 
accept or reject the applicant. 
-;,: If an applicant is denied admission to the Teacher Education 

^^■•. Program, he/she may appeal the Teacher Education Committee's deci- 

sion by requesting to appear before the Committee. There is no appeal 
beyond the Teacher Education Committee. 

STUDENTS IN TEACHER EDUCATION MUST COMPLETE THE 
REQUIREMENTS OF THEIR PROGRAM OF STUDIES AS SHOWN IN 
THE CATALOG CURRENT AT THE TIME THE STUDENT IS OFFI- 
CLALLY AND COMPLETELY ADMITTED TO THE TEACHER EDU- 
CATION PROGRAM. 

ALTERNATIVE ROUTE (APPEAL PROCESS) FORADMISSION TO 
THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

For students who have failed the PPST but have demonstrated 
potential for teaching in other areas, the following criteria must be met: 

1 . Must have failed PPST twice. 

2. Must meet all other admission requirements. 

3. Must come to the Teacher Education Office and write a two-page 
theme entitled "Why I Think I Should Be Admitted to the Teacher 
Education Program." 

4. Must have participated in a PPST workshop. 

5. Must be recommended by one cooperating teacher to whom the 
student was assigned for a field-based experience. 

6. Must make a personal appearance before the Teacher Education 
Committee. 

7. Must be approved by majority vote of the Teacher Education 
Committee. 

OFFICIAL ACCEPTANCE TO STUDENT TEACHING 

Lee University has entered into cooperative agreements with the 
Cleveland City School System, the Bradley County School System, and 
several other school systems for the placement of student teachers in 
selected schools. 

Student teachers are required to attend the public school on a sched- 
ule similar to that followed by the cooperating teachers. A minimum of 
15 weeks of observation and responsible participation is required of each 



Helen DeVos College of Education 213 



student. There is no provision for early completion of the experience. 
Student teaching and seminars carry twelve semester hours credit. 

Application for Student Teaching must be filed by January 30 for the 
Fall Semester and September 15 for the Spring Semester. Application 
must be filed the semester preceding the one in which the student plans 
to do his/her student teaching. Application forms should be completed 
while students are enrolled in methods courses, or they may be obtained 
in the office of the Director of Teacher Education. 

For admission to the professional semester, including student teach- 
ing, the student must have fulfilled the following requirements: 

1. Full admission to the Teacher Education Program (i.e., all condi- 
tions relative to admission satisfied and maintained). 

2. Pass the appropriate parts of the National Teachers Examination 
(Praxis H) 

3. Satisfactory completion of the professional foundation courses - 
EDU 201 and either PSY 310 for elementary hcensure or PSY 312 
for secondary licensure. A 2.5 GPA in the professional courses is 
required. 

4. Completion of required methods courses before engaging in student 
teaching. 

5. Satisfactory completion of at least 80 percent of course work in the 
teaching area (major). 

6. Satisfactory evaluation of pre-professional observation experience 
(minimum of 40 clock hours). 

7. Recommendation from major professor. 

8. Membership in an education club during senior year is highly rec- 
ommended. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

1. Satisfactorily complete required courses, lab experiences, and 
practicum. 

2. Maintain the standards for admission to the program. 

COMPLETION OF THE SPECIFIED COURSES IN THE TEACHER 
EDUCATION PROGRAM DOES NOT GUARANTEE A RECOM- 
MENDATION FOR LICENSURE AND/OR A TEACHING POSITION. 



214 



Helen DeVos College of Education 



i'li; 



.*;: '■'■ 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The Helen DeVos College of Education offers the following teacher 
licensure programs: 

Degree Major Code 

B.S. Health Education (Teacher Licensure, HLST 

Grades K- 12) 
B.S. Human Development HDST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades K-8) 
B.S. Physical Education PEST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 
B.S. Special Education (Teacher Licensure, SEST 

Grades K-12) 

The Helen DeVos College of Education and the other academic 
departments/schools cooperate to offer the following teacher licensure 
programs of study. These programs are fully described in this catalog in 
the section of the respective sponsoring department or school. 

Degree Major Code 

B.S. History (Economics Emphasis, HEST 

Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.S. History (Political Science Emphasis, HPST 

Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.S. Business (Business Education, BAST 

Teacher Licensure in 

Business/Accounting, Grades 7-12) 
B.S. Business (Business Education, BDST 

Teacher Licensure in Business/ 

Accounting/Data Processing, Grades 7-12) 
B.S. Business (Business Education, Teacher BOST 

Licensure in Business/Accounting/ 

Office Technology, Grades 7-12) 
B.A. Enghsh ENAT 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.A. French FRAT 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.A. Spanish SPAT 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.M.E. Music Education (Instrumental MIET 

Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 
B.M.E. Music Education (Vocal/General MUET 

Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 
B.S. Biological Science BSST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.S. Chemistry CHST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 



Helen DeVos College of Education 215 



B.S. Mathematics Education MAST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades 7-12) 
B.S. Mathematics/Science MSST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades K-8] 

ADDITIONAL ENDORSEMENTS 

Teacher Education Program students may take additional courses 
and obtain teaching licenses in more than one area. Information about 
these programs may be obtained in the Helen DeVos College of 
Education office. Additional endorsements are available in the following 
areas: Elementary Education K-8, English as a Second Language K-12, ij 

Enghsh 7-12, French 7-12, Spanish 7-12, Mathematics 7-12, Biology 7-12, ] 

Business 7-12, Chemistry 7-12, History 7-12, Vocal/General Music K-12, > 

Instrumental Music K-12, Physical Education K-12, and Special ] 

Education K-12. ! 






216 



Helen DeVos College of Education 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 
AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE 



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MARK WICKAM, Chairperson 

HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE 

Professors David Altopp and JoAnn Higginbotham; 
Associate Professors John Bratcher and Mark Wickam; 
Assistant Professors Kay McDaniel and Jack Southern- 
Instructors Andrea Orr Hudson and Rick Hughes 

DISCIPLINES 

Fitness/Wellness 

Health 

Physical Education 

Recreation 




Department of Health and Human Performance 217 



The Department of Health and Human Performance places great 
value on the benefits of exercise as part of a person's daily life. The 
department prepares students for graduate school and careers as 
Physical Education teachers (grades K-12) and fitness/wellness profes- 
sionals. In addition to major classes, the department offers a variety of 
activity, sport, and lifetime fitness classes, including Healthy and 
Effective Lifestyles. This required class mirrors the department's goal of 
encouraging daily healthy choices to help students stay physically fit 
for a lifetime. 

The Health Science major with an emphasis in Fitness and Wellness 
prepares students for careers in corporate, commercial, community, and 
hospital based settings. Knowledge of the human body and the effects of 
exercise and general self-care are emphasized. Students are encouraged 
to prepare for and take one of the American College of Sports Medicine 
(ACSM) certification examinations immediately after graduation. 

The Physical Education and Health Education majors prepare pro- 
fessionals for successful and productive careers in teaching grades K-12. 
The program emphasizes knowledge of the human body, self care, and 
methods and techniques to motivate all students to lead healthy and 
productive lives throughout their lifespan. 

An emphasis in Recreation is offered for students wanting to work 
in various recreational settings. A leadership track prepares students for 
careers in city and county agencies, YMCAs, or on college campuses. A 
second track focuses on outdoor recreational experiences and empha- 
sizes safety, skills, and teaching styles in canoeing, backpacking, and 
several other outdoor venues. 

GUIDELINES FOR FITNESS/WELLNESS MAJORS 

The following guidelines must be followed by students majoring in 
Health Science with emphasis in Fitness/ Wellness (HEWS): 

1. No grade below a "C" will be accepted in the following courses: 
HSC 330, 331, 450, or 451. 

2. All major Fitness/Wellness requirements must be successfully com- 
pleted before enrolling in HSC 470 Fitness/Wellness Intemship. 

3. A student enrolled in HSC 470 Fitness/Wellness Intemship cannot 
concurrently enroll in more than 7 additional hours. In rare circum- 
stances exceptions are made through an appeal process, which 
should be initiated through the Department of Health and Human 
Performance. 



218 Helen DeVos College OF Education 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The Department of Health and Human Performance offers the following 
programs of study: 

Degree Major Code 

B.S. Health Education HLST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 
B.S. Health Science with Fitness/ HFWS 

Wellness Emphasis 
B.S. Physical Education PERS 

with Recreation Emphasis 
B.S. Physical Education PEST 

(Teacher Licensure, Grade K-12] 

€: BACHELOR OF SCIENCE HLST 

§: IN HEALTH EDUCATION 

^j; (TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES K-12) 

SPECLALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

HE A 291 - Principles of Nutrition 3 

HEA 352 - Substance Use a Abuse 2 

HEA 353 - Safety &l First Aid 2 

HEA 354 - Persoanl &. Consumer Health 3 

HEA 355 - Community 6^ Environmental Health 3 

HEA 357 - Human Sexuality 3 

HEA 365 - Child Health a Social Behavior 3 

HEA 292/293 - Human Anatomy & Physiology 8 

EDU 495 - Faith and Learning 3 
Subtotal Specialty Requirements 30 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

PED 106 or 107 - Swimming 1 

PED 115 - Basic Concepts of Fitness 1 

PED 201 - Foundations of Health a PE 3 

PSY310- Child Psychology 3 

or 

PS Y 3 1 1 - Adolescent Psycholgoy 3 

PSY 442 - Tests 8^ Measurements 3 

PED 444 - Physiology of Exercise 3 

PED 445 - Seminar in Health &l PE Research 1 
Subtotal Collateral Requirements 15 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 199 - Introduction to the Teaching Profession 1 

EDU 201 - Foundations of Education 3 

PSY 3 1 2 - Educational Psychology 3 

EDU 3 1 6 - Exceptional Child 3 

HEA 347 - Teaching Health in Elementary School 2 



Department of Health and Human Performance 219 

HE A 417 - Teaching Health in Secondary School 2 

SED419- General Secondary Methods 2 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 

ELE 433 - Student Teaching in Elementary 5 

SED 444 - Student Teaching, Grades 7-8 5 

or 

SED 445 - Student Teaching, Grades 9-12 5 
Subtotal Professional Requirements 28 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 36-42 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the Religion requirement are fulfilled through 
EDU 495 in the specialty area. 

ELECTIVES 0-6 



TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 i 

> 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE HFWS ^? 

IN HEALTH SCIENCE i^ 

FITNESS/WELLNESS EMPHASIS t 

y' 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours § 

HSC 221- Intro, to the Health Professions 2 |; 

HSC 241 - Statistics for Health Sciences 3 

HSC 291 - Principles of Nutrition 3 

HSC 292 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 

HSC 293 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 

HSC 398 - Medical Terminology 3 

HSC 495 - Faith and Practice 3 

CHY 110, CHY 113, and CHY 119 8 

or 

CHY 1 1 1 and CHY 112 Chemistry 8 

HSC 250 - Microbiology for Health Sciences 4 
Subtotal Specialty Requirements 34 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

HSC 330 - Fitness, Wellness and Lifestyle Mgmt. 3 

HSC 33 1 - Cardiovascular Health 3 

HSC 353 - Safety &. First Aid (CPR cert.req.) 2 

HSC 450 - Exercise Testing and Prescription 3 

HSC 451 - Principles of Health Fitness Pro. and Lead. 3 

HSC 470 - Fitness/Wellness Internship 5 

PED 1 15 - Basic Concepts of Fitness 1 

Physical Education Activities 2 

PED 201 - Foundations of Sports and Recreation 3 

PED 341 - Administration of Physical Education 2 

HSC 361 -Kinesiology 3 






220 Helen DeVos College of Education 



HSC 444 - Physiology of Exercise 3 

HSC 445 - Seminar in PE Research 1 

MAT 1 1 1 - College Algebra 3 
Subtotal Collateral Requirements 37 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 36-37 

Eight hours are fulfilled through the program's 
major requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 5 

Three hours of the 18 -hour religion requirement 
are fulfillled through the program's specialty area requirements. 

ELECTIVES 7-8 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE PERS 

IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

WITH AN EMPHASIS IN RECREATION 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

PED - Activity Electives 2 

PED 106 or 107 - Beg. or Int. Swimming I 

PED 1 15 - Basic Concepts of Fitness 1 

PED 201 - Foun. of Health, P. E. and, Rec. 3 

PED 341 - Administration of Phy. Ed. 2 

PED 361 -Kinesiology 3 

PED 440 - Motor Leaming 2 

PED 441 - Tests & Measurements in P.E. 2 

PED 444 - Physiology of Exercise 3 

PED 445 - Seminar in Research 1 
Subtotal Specialty Requirements 20 

HEALTH EMPHASIS REQUIREMENTS 

HE A 291 -Nutrition 3 

HEA 352 - Substance Use &l Abuse 2 

HEA 353 - Safety &l First Aid 2 

HEA 354 - Personal &l Consumer Health 3 

HEA 357 - Human Sexuality 3 

HEA 365 - Child Health & Social Behavior 3 

HSC 292 - Human Anatomy & Physiology 4 

Subtotal Health Emphasis 20 

CHOOSE ONE OF THE TWO TRACKS LISTED BELOW: 

RECREATIONAL LEADERSFilP TRACK REQUIREMENTS 

REC 301 - Recreation Programming &. Development 3 

REC 342 - Recreation for Special Population 3 

BUS 101 - Introduction to Business 3 



Department of Health and Human Performance 221 

BUS 305 - Principles of Business Management 3 

REC 132 - Outdoor Recreational Activities 1 

REC 470 - Recreation Practicum 3 
Subtotal Recreational Leadership Track 1 6 

OUTDOOR RECREATION TRACK REQUIREMENTS 

REC 301 - Recreation Programming &. Development 3 

REC 342 - Recreation for Special Population 3 

BIO 393 - Principles of Ecology 4 

or 

BIO 104 - Environmental Science 4 

REC 132 - Outdoor Recreational Activities 1 

REC 232 - Backpacking & Camping 3 \ 

or * 

REC 233 - Water Based Recreation 3 I 

REC 470 - Recreation Practicum 3 J 

Subtotal Outdoor Recreation Track 1 7 ] 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 54-60 I 

./' 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 18 ■]: 

ELECTEES 17-20 | 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE PEST 

IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
(TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES K-12) 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

Choose two electives from PED 101-132 2 

PED 1 06 - Beginning Swimming 

or 
PED 107 - Intermediate Swimming 1 

PED 1 1 5 - Basic Concepts of Fitness 1 

PED 1 1 6 - Gymnastics 1 

PED 1 1 7 - Rhythmic Activities 

or 

PED 1 19 - Creative Movement 1 

PED 201 - Foundations of Physical Education, 3 

Sports and Recreation 

PED 341 - Administration of Physical Education 2 

PED 361 - Kinesiology . 3 

PED 440 - Motor Learning 2 

PED 441 - Tests and Measurements in PE 2 

PED 444 - Physiology of Exercise 3 

PED 445 - Seminar in PE Research 1 
Subtotal Specialty 22 



222 Helen DeVos College of Education 



HEALTH EMPHASIS REQUIREMENTS 

HEA 291 - Principles of Nutrition 3 

HEA 352 - Substance Use & Abuse 2 

HEA 353 - Safety & First Aid 2 

HEA 354 - Personal a Consumer Health 3 

HEA 357 - Human Sexuality 3 

HEA 365 - Child Health & Social Behavior 3 

HSC 292 -Human Anatomy & Physiology 4 
Subtotal Health Emphasis 20 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

£f' EDU 199 - Introduction to the Teaching 1 
/JUj] Profession Seminar 



9:: ■ . or 



O Ci: 



EDU 201 - Foundations of Education 
PSY 310 - Child Psychology 



$E , PSY 3 1 2 - Educational Psychology 3 

EDU 3 1 6 - Exceptional Child 3 

% ; PED 342 - Teaching Adopted PE 2 

5 1 ELE 346 - Teaching PE in Elementary School 2 

% \ SED 4 1 6 - Teaching PE in Secondary School 2 

i \ SED 4 1 9 - General Secondary Methods 2 

ELE 433 - Student Teaching in the Early Grades (1-4) 5 
SED 444 - Student Teaching, Grades 7-8 

or 

SED 445 - Student Teaching, Grades 9-12 5 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 
Subtotal Professional Education 30 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 39 

The five hours of the Respecting the Natural World 
requirement are fulfilled through the Health emphasis. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 8 

ELECTIVES 1 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 1 30 

MINORS 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The minor in Physical Education consists of 18 hours with 12 of 
those hours taken as courses at the 300 level or higher. The 12 required 
hours are PED 115, 201, 361, 444, and HEA 353. Two hours must be 
chosen from any activity course (PED 101-132) with no duplications. 
The remaining 4 hours must be chosen from the following: PED 342, 
440, 441, HEA 352, 354, and SED 416. 



Department of Health and Human Performance 223 



FITNESS/WELLNESS 

The minor in Fitness/Wellness requires 21 semester hours. HSC 
330, 331, 444, 450, and 451 are required. The remaining 6 hours may be 
selected from the following courses: HSC 291, 361, 440, 441, HEA 353 or 
PED 342. (* Kinesiology and Nutrition are highly recommended for this 
minor.) 

COURSE OFFERINGS 
HEALTH 

HEA 291. PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION Three hours credit 

Study of food and its relationship to the well-being of the human body with emphasis 
upon metabolism, nutritive value, and quantitative requirements of food at different age and 
development levels. The selection and eating of foods at different economic, social, and cul- 
tural levels are also studied. 150 minutes lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIO 103, 112 or ' 
HSC 293. Offered every fall semester. : 

HEA 292. HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I Four hours credit I 



A systematic study of the structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, 
_ integumentary, and endocrine systems and their role in support, movement, integratory, and 
control of the human body. An emphasis upon cells, cell processes and tissues precedes con- 
sideration of the systems. 150 minutes lecture and 135 minutes lab per week. Offered every 
semester. 

HEA 347. THE TEACHING OF HEALTH, GRADES K-6 Two hours credit 

This course is designed to introduce methods, techniques, and resources needed to teach 
appropriate health topics in a comprehensive elementary school setting. 

HEA 352. SUBSTANCE USE AND ABUSE Two hours credit 

A study in the basic principles of drug action, side effects, and toxic effects. Implications 
for the health education professional will be emphasized. Offered Fall Semester. 

HEA 353. SAFETY AND FIRST AID Two hours credit 

The nature and causes of accidents, safety measures for the prevention of common acci- 
dents in the home, school, industry, transportation, and recreation. Offered every semester. 

HEA 354. PERSONAL AND CONSUMER HEALTH Three hours credit 

This course emphasizes the concepts, anatomical knowledge, risk factors, and behaviors 
that profoundly affect personal health and self-care. It addresses consumer issues and criteria 
for evaluating health products and services in the private, industry, and government sectors. 

HEA 355. COMMUNITY AND ENVRIONMENTAL HEALTH Three hours credit 

This course is designed to enrich the understanding of students preparmg for health 
teaching as well as other health-related careers. Emphasis is on the perspectives and content 
of community and environmental health, preventive medicine, public health, school health, 
and self-care. 

HEA 357. HUMAN SEXUALITY Three hours credit 

This course is a study of the sociological, psychological, biological, ethical, and legal 
components of human sexuality. Offered every semester. 

HEA 365. CHILD HEALTH & SOCIAL BEHAVIOR Three hours credit 

A study of the physical and psychosocial growth and development of children; includes 
methods of organizing and implementing health measures, determining health status 
through screening processes; detection of remedial defects, referral procedures, and follow-up 
for correction; the promotion of physical, mental, social, and emotional health through envi- 
ronmental and special health services. Offered every semester. 



I.. 



224 Helen DeVos College of Education 



HEA 417. THE TEACHING OF HEALTH, GRADES 7-12 Two hours credit 

This course presents methods, materials, techniques, and strategies needed to teach 
health topics and behaviors in grades 7-12. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PED 100. HEALTHY AND EFFECTIVE LIFESTYLES One hour credit 

A course that focuses on the Christian's perspective toward physical fitness, wellness, 
personal health and effectiveness, and the additional daily lifestyle choices which each per- 
son makes. This class has lab and lecture sections and meets two times each week. 

PED 101. BEGINNING BOWLING One hour credit 

Designed to teach the basic skills and techniques of bowling using the shadow bowling 
technique. A course designed for beginners only. Offered every semester. 

^: PED 102. BEGINNING TENNIS One hour credit 

dj! Designed to teach the non-player the basic skills of tennis through the use of the back- 

^'' board and court practice. A course designed for beginners only. Offered every semester. 

v:; I PED 103. BEGINNING GOLF One hour credit 

oJ ; Introduces the fundamentals of golf and stresses the importance of individual skill devel- 

SJ opment rather than course play. A course designed for beginners only. Offered every semester. 

a: 

I -^r PED 104. BEGINNING RACQUETBALL One hour credit 

Theory and practice of skills in racquetball. Offered every semester. 



j^ 'Hi: 



PED 106. BEGINNESJG SWIMMING One hour credit 

Introduction to fundamental skills for basic swimming strokes, safety, and survival tech- 
niques. Offered Fall Semester. 

PED 107. INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING One hour credit 

Continuation of PED 106 with an emphasis on advanced stroke and diving development. 
Prerequisite: PED 106 or consent of instructor. Offered Spring Semester. 

PED 108. AEROBICS One hour credit 

Exercises designed specifically for improving cardiovascular function and physical fitness 
through the mode of dynamic rhythmic movements. Offered every semester. 

PED 109. BEGINNING SKIING One hour credit 

Acquaints and instmcts the student in the skills and techniques of skiing. Designed for 
beginners only. An extra fee is required for this course. Offered Spring Semester. 

PED 110. INTERMEDIATE SKIING One hour credit 

Continuation of PED 109. An extra fee is required for this course. Prerequisite: PED 109 
or permission from instructor. Offered Spring Semester. 

PED 111. INTERMEDLVTE RACQUETBALL One hour credit 

Continuation of PED 104. 

PED 1 12. INTERMEDIATE TENNIS One hour credit 

Greater "depth with the strategy of course play, more detail and perfection of the skill and 
emphasis on tournament play. Prerequisite: PED 102 or permission from instructor. Offered 
every semester. 

PED 1 13. INTERMEDIATE GOLF One hour credit 

Greater depth with the strategy of course play, more detail and perfection of the skill and 
emphasis on tournament play. Prerequisite: PED 103 or permission from instructor. Student 
must provide golf clubs. Offered Fall Semester. 



Department of Health and Human Performance 225 



PED 1 14. BEGINNING BASKETBALL One hour credit 

A study of the rules, skills, and techniques relative to the development of successful 
offensive and defensive play. Not open to varsity basketball players. 

PED 1 15. BASIC CONCEPTS OF FITNESS One hour credit 

A course designed to teach the basic principles of physical fitness such as cardiovascular 
endurance, vs^eight control, strength, flexibility, and stress management. Offered Fall 
Semester. 

PED 1 16. GYMNASTICS One hour credit 

Introduces the fundamentals of -gymnastics and stresses the importance of safety and 
strength development. Balance beam, uneven bars, vaulting, and floor exercises will all be 
covered in this course. Offered Fall Semester. 

PED 1 1 7. RHYTHMIC ACTIVITIES One hour credit 

A course designed to teach the use of the body as an instrument for rhythmic movement. 
Offered Spring Semester. 

PED 118. EDUCATIONAL GAMES AND TRADITIONAL SPORTS One hour credit 

A survey of educational games that can be used as developmental games in the elemen- 
tary school setting and a review of traditional sports m physical education with emphasis on 
skills, rules, and actual playing experience. Offered Fall Semester. 

PED 1 19. CREATIVE MOVEMENT One hour credit 

Experiences in human movement through manipulation of time, energy, and space. 
Activities promote the use of the body as the medium of communication and expression. 
Movement experiences include exploration, improvisation, and creation of small group stud- 
ies, as well as development of technique. 

PED 120. WEIGHT TRAINING AND CONDITIONING One hour credit 

A course designed to provide instruction in safe and sensible weight-training techniques 
with emphasis on individual needs and appropriate progressions. Aerobic fitness is also 
emphasized. 

PED 121. ADVANCED BASEBALL One hour credit 

An activity course for varsity baseball team members who compete intercollegiately. 
Course work includes conditioning, practice, instruction, field work, and game participation. 
The course includes 121, 221, 321, 421- all advanced baseball. Offered Spring Semester. 

PED 122. ADVANCED BASKETBALL One hour credit 

An activity course designed to serve varsity basketball team members who actually par- 
ticipate in the intercollegiate sport. The course includes 122, 222, 322, 422 - all advanced bas- 
ketball. Offered Fall Semester. 

PED 123. ADVANCED CROSS-COUNTRY One hour credit 

An activity course designed for varsity cross-country team members who participate in 
intercollegiate meets. The course work includes conditioning, practice, instruction, and field 
work. This course includes 123, 223, 323, 423 - all advanced cross-country. Offered Fall 
Semester. 

PED 124. ADVANCED CHEERLEADING One hour credit 

An activity course designed to serve varsity cheerleading squad members who actually 
participate in the activity. This course includes 124, 224, 324, 424 - all advanced cheerlead- 
ing. Offered Fall Semester. 

PED 125. ADVANCED TENNIS One hour credit 

An activity course designed for varsity tennis team members who participate in intercol- 
legiate tournaments. This course includes 125, 225, 325, 425 - all advanced tennis. Offered 
Spring Semester. 



226 Helen DeVos College of Education 



PED 126. ADVANCED GOLF One hour credit 

An activity course designed for members of the varsity golf team. This course mcludes 
126, 226, 326, 426 - all advanced golf. Offered Spring Semester. 

PED 127. ADVANCED SOCCER One hour credit 

An activity course designed for varsity soccer team members. This course includes 127, 
227, 327, 427 - all advanced soccer. Offered Fall Semester. 

PED 128. ADVANCED VOLLEYBALL One hour credit 

An activity course designed for varsity volleyball team members. This course includes 
128, 228, 328, 428 - all advanced volleyball. Offered Fall Semester. 

PED 129. ADVANCED SOFTBALL One hour credit 

An activity course designed for varsity softball team members. This course includes 129, 
229, 329, 429 - all advanced softball. Offered Spring Semester. 

PED 130. RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES I: One hour credit 

ARCHERY, HORSESHOES, BADMINTON, TABLE TENNIS, PICKLEBALL 

A course designed to provide know^ledge and skill development in a variety of recreation- 
al activities. 

PED 131. RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES IL One hour credit 

SOFTBALL, SOCCER, VOLLEYBALL, TEAM HANDBALL 

w; X- A course designed to provide knovs^ledge and skill development in a variety of recreation- 

al activities. 






PED 132. OUTDOOR RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES One hour credit 

A course designed to provide knov^ledge and skill development in a variety of outdoor- 
recreational activities, including camping, hiking, backpacking, vs^hitewater rafting and orien- 
teering. An extra fee is required for this course. 

PED 133. CHOREOGRAPHY AND THE STAGE One hour credit 

A practical course which involves a variety of creative activities to help the student 
develop the art of choreographing movements for stage productions. A part of the course will 
be devoted to training in the university musical-drama productions. 

PED 134. BEGINNING BALLET One hour credit 

An introductory course in ballet technique that includes familiarization with basic con- 
cepts and vocabulary , stretching, and barre work. Students provide their own appropriate 
attire, as designated by the instructor. This class is designed for students who have little or 
no former ballet training. 

PED 135. BEGINNING SOFTBALL One hour credit 

An introductory activity course in which the basic fundamentals, skills, and rules of soft- 
ball are taught and applied. Not open to varsity softball players. 

PED 136. BEGINNING TAEKWONDO AND SELF-DEFENSE One hour credit 

A course designed to introduce a beginning student to the basic terms and movements of 
Taekwondo and self-defense. Emphasis is on the discipline, appropriateness, and attitude of 
the martial arts. Additional charge required. An extra fee is required for this course. 

PED 137. INTERMEDIATE TAEKWONDO AND SELF DEFENSE One hour credit 

A continuation of PED 136 with emphasis on building upon a beginner's abilities and 
understanding of Taekwondo in terminology and techniques. Students will have an opportu- 
nity to test for the green belt. An extra fee s required for this course. Prerequisite: Successful 
completion of PED 136, yellow belt status, or permission of the instructor. 



Department of Health and Human Performance 227 



PED 201. FOUNDATIONS OF HEALTH, Three hours credit 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 

An introduction to the field of health, physical education and recreation including aims, 
objectives, history, philosophy, programs, principles, basic concepts of organization and 
administration, professional organizations, and the relationship of Christian commitment to 
the fields. 

PED 260. CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES Three hours credit 

An introduction to sports medicine/athletic training. It covers basic anatomy and the 
knowledge, abilities and skills required to assess, treat and rehabilitate athletic injuries. 
Prerequisite: BIO 103 or HSC 292. 

PED 261. EVALUATION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES Three hours credit 

A course presenting the knowledge and skills needed by the athletic trainer to properly 
evaluate and manage various athletic injuries. 

PED 320. THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES OF COACHING Three hours credit 

This class presents the application of coaching principles, methodology, organization, 
and communicative skills needed for coaching youth. It introduces students to this discipline 
and provides knowledge on planning, teaching sport skills, training, and team management 
to enhance their future coaching performance. 

PED 341. ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION Two hours credit 

A course focusing on administrative practices in the area of legal responsibility, person- 
nel, finance, public relations, equipment, facilities, and intramural athletics. 

PED 342. TEACHING ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION Two hours credit 

A course to prepare education majors to work with the atypical physical education and 
special needs student. Emphasis is on identification, evaluation, monitoring of medication 
and appropriate delivery of services. This includes those students who are medically fragile 
in inclusive settings. 

PED 350. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT Three hours credit 

AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE 

This class presents the apphcation of behavioral principles, motivational research, personal- 
ity factors, and cognitive processes to the area of sport. It introduces students to this discipline 
and provides knowledge to enhance their own performances and the performances of others. 

PED 361. KINESIOLOGY Three hours credit 

A review of basic anatomy, primarily the muscular system,- relationship of the funda- 
mental laws of physics to human movement, mechanical principles of skill instruction and 
analysis. Prerequisite: HSC 292 or BIO 102. Offered Fall Semester. 

PED 440. MOTOR LEARNING Two hours credit 

A study of theoretical constructs of learning and knowledge of motor learning principles 
relating to neuromuscular and response mechanisms, feedback motivation, stress anxiety 
factors, and the variable influences to the acquisition of motor skills. 

PED 44 1 . TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS Two hours credit 

IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A course designed to assist future teachers in understanding the place, types and impor- 
tance of measurement in the teaching process. Offered Fall Semester. 

PED 444. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE Three hours credit 

This course provides the physiological background that is necessary for an understanding 
of the acute and chronic responses to exercise in humans. Prerequisite: PED 361. Offered 
Spring Semester. 



QJt 



228 Helen DeVos College of Education 



PED 445. SEMINAR IN HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND One hour credit 

RECREATION RESEARCH 

A directed intensive study on selected problems or special topics dealing with health 
physical education, and/or recreation. 

PED 450. EXERCISE TESTING AND PRESCRIPTION Three hours credit 

A course providing knowledge and practical experience in exercise-testing procedures 
and in the principles and guidelines of safe and effective exercise prescription. Prerequisite: 
PED 331 or 444. 

PED 451. PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH/FITNESS Three hours credit 

PROGRAMMING AND LEADERSHIP 

A course designed to cover knowledge and skills needed for establishing and administer- 
ing effective health/fitness programs. For senior majors in physical education. 



S PED 470. FITNESS/WELLNESS INTERNSHIP Five hours credit 

^' Practical experience in an approved fitness/wellness agency. Senior students are assigned 

•^!|i, to selected directors in local fitness/wellness oriented community organizations under the 

general supervision of a university supervisor. Weekly seminars deal with problems encoun- 
tered in the internship program in such areas as instruction, management, records and 
reports, program development, and supervision. Not more than 7 additional hours may be 
taken with the internship. Prerequisites: PED 450 and 451 or concurrent enrollment. 

RECREATION 

REC132. OUTDOOR RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES One hours credit 

A course designed to provide knowledge and skill development in a variety of outdoor 
recreational activities, including camping, hiking, backpacking, Whitewater rafting, and ori- 
enteering. An extra fee is required for this course. 

REC 232. BACKPACKING AND CAMPING Three hours credit 

A recreational and wilderness skills course in backpacking and camping. Topics include 
low impact camping techniques, orienteering and environment preservation. Emphasis is on 
safety, skill development, trip planning and development of personal teaching style. An extra 
fee is required for this course. 

REC 233. WATER BASED RECREATION Three hours credit 

A recreational skills course in flatwater and Whitewater kayaking and canoeing. 
Emphasis is on safety, skill development, trip planning and teachmg experience. An extra fee 
is required for this course. 

REC 301. RECREATION PROGRAMMING AND DEVELOPMENT Three hours credit 

This class presents principles, practices and program planning for a variety of recreation 
and leisure activities and programs. This course will give the class hands on opportunities in 
leadership, design and application in a variety of leisure settings. 

REC 342. RECREATION FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS Three hours credit 

A study in the benefits, issues, methods and techniques related to leisure and recreation 
for special populations. The elderly or aging, physically and mentally impaired, and socially 
at risk poputations are targeted. Other topics include cultural and ethnic differences and gen- 
der issues in leisure and recreation. 

REC 470. RECREATION PRACTICUM Three hours credit 

One class meeting per week and 150 hours of participation in a recreation setting. Students 
will be actively involved in leadership, planning and execution of a recreation program. 



Helen DeVos College of Education 229 



DEPARTMENT OF 
TEACHING AND LEARNING 

PAMELA BROWNING, Chairperson 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Professor Deborah Murray; 

Associate Professor Pamela Browning; 

Assistant Professors Laura Anderson and Carlanna Gill 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Professors Gary Riggins and Cliff Schimmels; 
Assistant Professors Herb Cannon and William Estes 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Associate Professor Nadine McHugh; 
Assistant Professor Vem Kraus 



DISCIPLINES 

Education 

Elementary Education 

Secondary Education 

Special Education 




230 Department of Teaching and Learning 



The Department of Teaching and Learning provides training for 
those students wishing to obtain teacher hcensure in elementary edu- 
cation (K-8), secondary education (7-12), and special education (K-12). 
The department also provides the professional education courses for 
post-baccalaureate students seeking licensure on the undergraduate 
level. Students wishing to work with children in institutions and 
agencies other than public schools may choose majors that do not 
lead to teacher licensure. 

The major in Human Development, Teacher Licensure Emphasis, pri- 
^. marily prepares students for a profession as an elementary teacher (K- 

§5 8). A major in Human Development, Business Emphasis, prepares 

^'. students for working with younger children in agencies and schools 

cr where teacher licensure is not required or for graduate work in child 

g'i'll and family studies. The courses in psychology, sociology, cultural 

a;! anthropology, linguistics and health provide knowledge in the stages 

of early human development and family organizations as well as an 



O;:: 



Jg r; understanding of how these stages are influenced by culture. 



The major in Special Education, Teacher Licensure Emphasis, pre- 
pares students for a profession as a special education teacher (K-12) in 
a resource setting, in a self-contained class, or as an inclusion teacher 
in a general education classroom. A major in Special Education, 
Support Services Emphasis, is appropriate for students who wish to 
pursue a career in a child care area, alternative schools or education 
facilities housed within psychiatric hospitals, as well as in the mental 
health or social services areas. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The Department of Teaching and Learning offers the following pro- 
grams of study: 



Degree 


Major 


Code 


B.S. 


Human Development 


HDST 




(Teacher Licensure, K-8) 




B.S. 


Human Development, 
Business Emphasis 


HDBS 


B.S. 


Special Education 
(Teacher Licensure, K-12) 


SEST 


B.S. 


Special Education, 
Support Services Emphasis 


SESS 






DeVos College OF Education 231 



BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN HOST 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

(TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES K'8) 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

ANT/SOC 310 - Cultural Anthropology 
or 

ANT/GEO 3 1 2 - Human Geography 3 

EDU/SPE 3 1 6 - Exceptional Child 3 

HSC/HEA 365 - Child Health and Social Behavior 3 

ELE/PS Y 3 1 - Child Psychology 3 

PSY 341 - Psychology of Learning 
or 

PS Y/SED 3 1 2 - Educational Psychology 3 

ENG/LIN 361 - Language Acquisition &. Development 3 

PSY 442 - Tests and Measurements 3 

SOC 320 - Sociology of the Family 
or 

SOC/PSY 220 - Courtship, Marriage and the Family 3 

Three hours of electives in Sociology should be 3 j 

chosen from the follow^ing courses: !t SJ 

SOC/PSY 330 - Social Psychology (3) 

SOC 212 - Social Problems (3) 

SOC 380 - Juvenile Delinquency (3) 

Six hours of electives should be chosen from 6 

the following courses: 

ANT/SOC 351 - Culture and Personality (3) 

PSY 302 - Personality Theory (3) 

PSY 309 - Developmental Psychology (3) 

PSY 31 1 - Adolescent Psychology (3) 

PSY 318 - Psychology of Identity (3) 

ENG/LIN 360 - Introduction to Linguistics (3) 

ANT/SOC 410 - Minorities (3) 

Subtotal Specialty 33 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

MAT 111 -Algebra 3 

HIS 212 - Recent American History and Government 3 

PSY 200 - Understanding Human Behavior 3 

BIO 103 - Human Biology 4 
Subtotal Collateral Requirements 13 

ENHANCED GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

MAT 201 - Concepts of Mathematics 3 

PHS 1 12 - Earth and Space Science 4 

Subtotal Enhanced General Education 7 



'•II 



232 Department of Teaching and Learning 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 1 99 - Introduction to Teaching Profession Seminar 1 

EDU 201 - Foundations of Education 3 

ELE 300 - Children's Literature 2 

ELE 400 - Teaching Creative Arts 2 

ELE 401 - Teaching Reading and Language Arts 4 

ELE 402 - Teaching Science, Math and Social Studies 4 

ELE 410 - Methods of Teaching Kindergarten 2 
ELE 432 -Student Teaching (Kindergarten) 
or 

^ ELE 433 - Student Teaching (Grades 1-^) 5 

§ ELE 438 - Student Teaching (Grades 5-8) 5 

^ EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 

o Subtotal Professional Education 30 

S : GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 28 

aji; The 4-hour lab science, the 3 -hour math requirement, 



C 



three hours of the Understanding Human Behavior 
requirement and three hours of Recent American History 
and Government are fulfilled through the enhanced general 
education and collateral requirements. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 8 

ELECTTVES 1 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE HDBS 

IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 
WITH BUSINESS EMPHASIS 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

ANT/SOC 310 - Cultural Anthropology 

or 
ANT/GEO 3 1 2 - Human Geography 3 

EDU/SPE 3 1 6 - Exceptional Child 3 

HSC/HEA 365 - Child Health and Social Behavior 3 

ELE/PS Y 3 1 - Child Psychology 3 

PSY 341 - Psychology of Learning 

or 
PSY/SED 3 1 2 - Educational Psychology 3 

ENG/LIN 361 - Language Acquisition & Development 3 

PSY 442 - Tests and Measurements 3 

SOC 320 - Sociology of the Family 

or 



DcVos College of Education 233 



SOC/PSY 220 - Courtship, Marriage and the Family 3 

Three hours of electives in Sociology should be 3 

chosen from the following courses: 

SOC/PSY 330 - Social Psychology (3) 

SOC 212 - Social Problems (3) 

SOC 380 - Juvenile Delinquency (3) 

Six hours of electives should be chosen from 6 

the following courses: 

ANT/SOC 351 - Culture and Personality (3) 

PSY 302 - Personality Theory (3) 

PSY 309 - Developmental Psychology (3) 

PSY 3 1 1 - Adolescent Psychology (3 ) 

PSY 318 - Psychology of Identity (3) 

ENG/LIN 460 - Linguistics for Teaching 

English to Speakers of Other Languages (3) 
ANT/SOC 410 - Minorities (3) 
COM/ ANT 354 - Intercultural Communication (3) 
Subtotal Specialty Requirements 33 

BUSINESS EMPHASIS REQUIREMENTS 

ACT241 - Principles of Accounting I 3 

BUS305 - Principles of Business Management 3 

BUS409 - Principles of Marketing 3 

EC0311 - Macroeconics 

or 
EC0312 - Microeconomics 3 

Subtotal Business Emphasis Requirements 12 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

MAT 1 1 1 Algebra 3 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 3 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 38 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 8 

ELECTIVES 26 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



, 1- 






<p 



234 Department of Teaching and Learning 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE SEST 
IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 
(TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES K-12) 

SPECLALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

PS Y 3 1 - Child Psychology 3 

PSY 3 11 - Adolescent Psychology 3 

SPE 3 1 6 - Exceptional Child 3 
SPE 320 - Students with Mild to Moderate Exceptionalities 3 

SPE 33 1 - Behavior Management 3 

SPE 335 - Education of Gifted, Talented, &l Creative 2 

SPE 345 - Secondary Students with Mild/ 2 



di Moderate Disabilities 

SPE 390 - Collaborating with Parents, Teachers, 2 

H &. Other Professionals 

SPE 41 7 - Policies, Procedures &. Practices 2 

SPE 424 - Diagnostic Prescriptive Teaching 3 

PED 342 - Teaching Adaptive Physical Education 2 

RE A 371 - Survey of Reading 3 

Subtotal Speciality 3 1 

ENHANCED GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

MAT 201 - Concepts of Mathematics 3 

(in addition to General Core) 

LAB SCIENCE (In addition to General Core) 4 

Subtotal Enhanced General Education 7 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 199 - Introduction to the Teaching Profession Seminar 1 

EDU 201 - Foundations of Education 3 

ELE 401 - Teaching — Reading, Language Arts 4 

ELE 402 - Teaching — Science, Math, Social Studies 4 

SPE 404 - Instructional Methods for Exceptional Children 2 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 

SPE 450 - Student Teaching in Special Education 5 

SPE 45 1 - Student Teaching in Special Education 5 
Subtotal Professional Education 26 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 44 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 8 

ELECTWES 4 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 1 30 



DeVos College of Education 235 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 
SUPPORT SERVICES EMPHASIS 



SESS 



SPECIALITY AREA REQUIREMENTS 
PSY 310 - Child Psychology 
PSY 31 1 - Adolescent Psychology 
SPE 316 - Exceptional Child 
SPE 320 - Students with Mild to 

Moderate Exceptionalities 
SPE 331 - Behavior Management 3 

SPE 335 - Education/Gifted, Talent, Creative 2 

SPE 345 - Secondary Students with 2 

Mild/Moderate Disabilities 
SPE 390 - Consulting Parents, Teachers, 2 

and Other Professionals 
SPE 417 - Policies, Procedures &. Practices 2 

SPE 424 - Diagnostic Prescriptive Teaching 3 

PED 342 - Teaching Adaptive Physical Education 2 

RE A 371 - Survey of Reading 3 

Subtotal Special Requirements 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

SPE 435 - Field Experience Seminar 2 

SPE 452 - Field Experience I 5 

SPE 453 - Field Experience II 5 

Subtotal Professional Requirements 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 

ELECTIVES 

Electives in Health, Psychology, Sociology, 

and Education are strongly recommended for this major. 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 



Credit Hours 
3 
3 
3 
3 



f) 



31 



12 
42 
18 
27 

130 



COURSE OFFERINGS 
EDUCATION 

EDU 111. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE Two hours credit 

A course presenting the most current materials available of teaching techniques on man- 
ual communication. A collection of drill materials on fingerspelling, or dactylology. 

EDU 1 12. ELEMENTARY AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE Two hours credit 

A manual for learning sign language in sentence form. It is designed to teach sign lan- 
guage in the easiest, fastest, and most practical way. 



236 Department of Teaching and Learning 



EDU 199. INTRODUCTION TO THE One hour credit 

TEACHING PROFESSION SEMINAR 

A course consisting of 20 clock hours of lahoratory assignments in the pubHc schools and 
a 50-minute seminar each week for the entire semester. The course is designed to provide a 
general survey of the education profession. Required for teacher education majors except 
music. Offered every semester. 

EDU 201. HISTORICAL, PHILOSOPHICAL, AND SOCIOLOGICAL Three hours credit 
FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION 

A course designed to provide an understanding of the significance of the influence of his- 
torical, philosophical, and sociological factors and trends in school administration, materials 
and methods of instruction, the needs of the pupil and society and to provide a broad cultural 
background for participation in professional and education activities. Offered every semester. 

2 EDU 225. INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC EDUCATION Two hours credit 

^ A course designed to give the prospective teacher an overview of the music education 

(J> profession and to acquaint him/her with the major theories of classroom management with 

£■:: attention to their applicability to music classes. This course includes 20 clock hours of labo- 

$£ ratory assignments m the public schools. 

EDU 234. AMESLAN DEAF COMMUNICATIONS Three hours credit 

A course designed to present the American Sign Language (Ameslan), the deaf language 
for social and informal conversation. This includes the English idioms made into the lan- 
guage of signs, sign language idioms in sign language syntax, and the grammatical aspects of 
Ameslan. Prerequisite: EDU 111 or EDU 112. 



EDU 299. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT SEMINAR One hour credit 

A course consisting of 20 clock hours of laboratory assignments in the public schools and 
a 50-minute seminar each week for the entire semester. The focus is classroom management. 
General principles as well as specific theories are presented. 

EDU 301. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS FOR TEACHERS Two hours credit 

A course designed to equip the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to uti- 
lize computer software in the classroom as a means of improving instruction and classroom 
management. Prerequisite: CIS 100 Computer Literacy and Application or demonstrated 
computer proficiency. 

EDU 316. EXCEPTIONAL CHILD Three hours credit 

An introduction to special education including historical foundations, special education 
law, and current practices. The course will introduce all current information pertinent to 
those who will work with special needs students. Included will be issues and trends along 
with descriptions of each handicapping condition. Techniques and procedures for working 
with the exceptional child using school and community resources will be emphasized. A 
service learning module is included. 

EDU 343. MULTISENSORY EDUCATION Three hours credit 

A presentation, demonstration, and discussion of various types of audiovisual meth- 
ods. Preparation, application, and evaluation of multisensory aids will be given. The use 
and care of equipment are also included. May be taken for Christian Education credit. 
Offered Spring Semester. 

EDU 350. CHRISTIAN DAY SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION Three hours credit 

A study of the principles of organization and administration of a Christian Day School. 
May be taken for Christian Education credit. 

EDU 365. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION One-three hours credit 

Designed specifically for the upper-division student in the field of education; learning the 
techniques of problem solving; conducting research and study on an individual and/or group 
basis. Prerequisite: Permission from the Director of Teacher Education. 



DeVos College of Education 237 



EDU 402. SCHOOL LAW Three hours credit 

An introduction to the legal issues related to American education including cases dealing 
with church and state relations, employment and dismissal practices, and student and 
teacher rights. 

EDU 434. STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR Two hours credit 

A seminar designed to be taken by all student teachers durmg their enhanced student 
teaching semester. The purpose is to help bridge the gap between coursework and enhanced 
student teaching. Discussion of a variety of topics related to instructional management and 
interaction is the focus of the seminar. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education 
Program, admission to Student Teaching, and completion of all methods courses. Offered 
every semester. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

ELE 300. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE Two hours credit 

A survey of books and stories according to the educational development of children. 
Required in all elementary education programs. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher 
Education Program. 

ELE 310. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

A review of the principles of behavior in infancy and childhood; physical, intellectual, 
social, emotional, and language development in the normal child. Offered every semester. 

ELE 346. TEACHING PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN Two hours credit 

THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

A study of the elementary school physical education curriculum and methods and their 
place in the total school program. A part of the semester is devoted to practical experiences 
with public school elementary physical education classes. Prerequisite: Admission to 
Teacher Education Program. 

ELE 347. THE TEACHING OF HEALTH, GRADES K-6 Two hours credit 

This course is designed to introduce methods, techniques, and resources needed to teach 
appropriate health topics in a comprehensive elementary school setting. 

ELE 400. TEACHING THE CREATIVE ARTS Two hours credit 

Effective methods and materials for teaching art, music, movement, and drama in the 
elementary school. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. 

ELE 401. TEACHING - READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS Four hours credit 

Effective methods and materials for teaching reading, writing, listening, and speaking m 
the elementary school. An intensive practicum is an integral part of the methods block. 
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. 

ELE 402. TEACHING - SCIENCE, MATH & SOCIAL STUDIES Four hours credit 

Effective methods and materials for teaching science, math, and social studies in the ele- 
mentary school. An intensive practicum is an integral part of the methods block. 
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. 

ELE 405. METHODS OF TEACHING MUSIC IN Two hours credit 

THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Fundamentals of music and the teaching of music from kindergarten through sixth grade. 
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. 

ELE 410. TEACHING IN THE KINDERGARTEN Two hours credit 

Emphasis on the methods, materials, and equipment for teaching in a kindergarten pro- 
gram. This course is required for licensure in kindergarten. A 20-clock-hour practicum is 
required. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. 



238 Department of Teaching and Learning 



ELE 432. STUDENT TEACHING IN THE KINDERGARTEN Five hours credit 

Upon completion of all education courses, students will complete student teaching 
practicums for a total of 15 weeks in the public schools under the guidance of public school 
teachers and a university supervisor(s). The student will be assigned to at least two different 
classrooms, which may be at different schools. Students must enroll in two student teaching 
sessions and the appropriate seminar for a total of 12 hours. This will constitute the maxi- 
mum load for the student teaching semester. No other classes may be taken during the stu- 
dent teaching semester. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program, admission 
to Student Teaching, and completion of required methods courses. Offered every semester. 

ELE 433. STUDENT TEACHING IN THE EARLY GRADES (1-4) Five hours credit 

Upon completion of all education courses, students will complete student teaching 
practicums for a total of 15 weeks in the public schools under the guidance of public school 
^ teachers and a university supervisor(s). The student will be assigned to at least two different 

2J classrooms, which may be at different schools. Students must enroll in two student teaching 

C sessions and the appropriate seminar for a total of 12 hours. This will constitute the maxi- 

(^ mum load for the student teaching semester. No other classes may be taken during the stu- 

^ dent teaching semester. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program, admission 

O to Student Teaching, and completion of required methods courses. Offered every semester. 

3? ELE 438. STUDENT TEACHING IN THE MIDDLE GRADES (5-8) Five hours credit 

^! Upon completion of all education courses, students will complete student teaching 

practicums for a total of 15 weeks in the public schools under the guidance of public school 
teachers and a university supervisor(s). The student will be assigned to at least two different 
classrooms, which may be at different schools. Students must enroll in two student teaching 
sessions and the appropriate seminar for a total of 12 hours. This will constitute the maxi- 
mum load for the student teaching semester. No other classes may be taken during the stu- 
dent teaching semester. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program, admission to 
Student Teaching, and completion of required methods courses. Offered every semester. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

SED 312. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Three hours credit 

A study of the psychological foundations for leaming and the procedures by which learn- 
ing is accomplished. Also covered is an evaluation of teaching methods and learning tools. 
Offered every semester. 

SED 411. THE TEACHING OF BUSINESS, GRADES 7-12 Two hours redit 

A course designed to help business teachers develop techniques and locate materials 
which will enable them to be more effective teachers of business subjects. Students will be 
helped individually to resolve particular problems through research, group discussions, and 
demonstrations. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. 

SED 412. THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES, GRADES 7-12 Two hours redit 

A survey of the principal methods, techniques, and problems of teaching the social stud- 
ies on the secondary level. Students demonstrate various teaching methods and techniques, 
and a survey of available materials is made. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education 
Program. 

SED 413. THE TEACHING OF LANGUAGE, GRADES 7-12 Two hours credit 

The organization and use of appropriate materials, methods, and techniques as related to 
the teaching of languages in secondary schools with emphasis on each student's language 
area. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. 

SED 415. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE AND Two hours credit 

MATHEMATICS, GRADES 7-12 

A preliminary survey of major theories and practices of instruction in American sec- 
ondary schools; aims, materials, teaching methods, learner activities, and evaluation proce- 
dures in the sciences and mathematics disciplines,- how these relate to the program of the 
school. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. 



Helen DeVos College of Education 239 



SED 416. THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL Two hours credit 

EDUCATION, GRADES 7-12 

A study of the physical education curriculum and methods for grades 7-12. Includes prin- 
ciples, objectives and constmction of curriculum plans, unit plans, lesson plans, and methods 
for physical education. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. 

SED 417. THE TEACHING OF HEALTH, GRADES 7-12 Two hours credit 

This course presents methods, materials, techniques, and strategies needed to teach 
health topics and behaviors in grades 7-12. 

SED 418. GENERAL SECONDARY METHODS (Music Education) One hour credit 

A course designed to introduce students to the knowledge of methods, skills, and strate- 
gies they will need as they become effective teachers in secondary classrooms. The course 
unites theory and practices by using the instructional methods of classroom discussion and 
presentations, simulated teaching opportunities and a teaching assignment in area schools. 
Students in all teaching areas will share common experiences for part of the semester and 
will also take the appropriate specialty methods the same semester under the supervision of 
a designated professor from their major field of concentration. Prerequisite: Admission to 
Teacher Education Program. 

SED 419. GENERAL SECONDARY METHODS Two hours credit 

A course designed to introduce students to the knowledge of methods, skills, and strate- 
gies they will need as they become effective teachers in secondary classrooms. The course 
unites theory and practices by using the instructional methods of classroom discussion and 
presentations, simulated teaching opportunities and a teaching assignment in area schools. 
Students in all teaching areas will share common experiences for part of the semester and 
will also take the appropriate specialty methods the same semester under the supervision of 
a designated professor from their major field of concentration. Prerequisite: Admission to 
Teacher Education Program. 

SED 421. THE TEACHING OF VOCAL AND Two hours credit 

GENERAL MUSIC, GRADES 7-12 

A comprehensive study of the materials and techniques of developing the junior high and 
senior high chorus: tone, blend, balance, diction, recruitment, and rehearsal procedures. 
Further, the course will cover teaching general music, music theory, and music appreciation. 
Prerequisites: Acceptance to advanced standing in the School of Music (passed sophomore 
hearing); admission to Teacher Education Program. Offered Fall Semester. 

SED 422. METHODS AND MATERLVLS OF Two hours credit 

TEACHING MARCHING BAND 

Principles, practices, and materials for the marching band are studied including the role 
in the total music program: organization and maintenance; planning and executing of the 
field show; basic maneuvers and rehearsal procedures. Prerequisites: Acceptance to advanced 
standing in the School of Music (passed sophomore hearing); admission to Teacher Education 
Program. Offered Fall Semester. 

SED 423. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING Two hours credit 

CONCERT BAND AND ORCHESTRA 

A comprehensive study of the various techniques which are significant for the development 
of the concert band and orchestra: intonation, tone, blend, balance, bowings, and rehearsal 
procedures. Appropriate music literature from beginning to advanced will be introduced. 
Prerequisites: Acceptance to advanced standing in the School of Music (passed sophomore 
hearing); admission to Teacher Education Program. Offered Fall Semester. 

SED 444. STUDENT TEACHING, GRADES 7-8 Five hours credit 

Upon completion of all education courses, students will complete student teaching 
practicums for a total of 15 weeks in the public schools under the guidance of public school 
teachers and a university supervisor(s). The student will be assigned to at least two different 
classrooms, which may be at different schools. Students must enroll in two student teaching 
sessions and the appropriate seminar for a total of 12 hours. This will constitute the maxi- 



<p 



240 Department of Teaching and Learning 



mum load for the student teaching semester. No other classes may he taken during the stu- 
dent teaching semester. Students must make application the semester prior to the student 
teaching semester. Prerequisites: Completion of all education coursework, admission to the 
Teacher Education Program and to Student Teaching. Offered Fall and Spring Semesters. 

SED 445. STUDENT TEACHING, GRADES 9-12 Five hours credit 

Upon completion of all education courses, students will complete student teaching 
practicums for a total of 15 weeks in the public schools under the guidance of public school 
teachers and a university supervisor(s). The student will be assigned to at least two different 
classrooms, which may be at different schools. Students must enroll in two student teaching 
sessions and the appropriate seminar for a total of 12 hours. This will constitute the maxi- 
mum load for the student teaching semester. No other classes may be taken during the stu- 
dent teaching semester. Students must make application the semester prior to the student 
teaching semester. Prerequisites: Completion of all education coursework, admission to the 
Teacher Education Program and to Student Teaching. Offered Fall and Spring Semesters. 

S SPECIAL EDUCATION 

O SPE 316. EXCEPTIONAL CHILD Three hours credit 

<X^ An introduction to special education including historical foundations, special education 
^ law, and current practices. The course will introduce all current information pertinent to 
^1' those who will work with special needs students. Included will be issues and trends along 
, with description of each handicapping condition. Techniques and procedures for working 

with the exceptional child using school and community resources will be emphasized. A 

service learning module is included. 

SPE 320. STUDENTS WITH MILD TO Three hours credit 

MODERATE EXCEPTIONALITIES 

An introduction to mild/moderate exceptionalities; an introduction to the literature, his- 
tory, definitions, characteristics, identification procedures, and problems of the fields of 
learning disabilities, mild mental retardation, and behavior disorders. This course includes a 
field experience. 

SPE 321. NATURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS Three hours credit 

WITH SEVERE DISABILITIES 

This course provides information on the nature and needs of individuals with severe/pro- 
found disabilities. It is a study of a broad group of developmental disabilities that have life- 
long implications and that substantially Umit many life functions. A directed observation m 
a school setting is required. Prerequisite: SPE 316. 

SPE 331. BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT Three hours credit 

Approaches to classroom management of students with disabilities and groups of chil- 
dren. Applied behavioral analysis is studied, including specific techniques such as task 
analysis, along with strategies for strengthening and reducing behaviors. 

SPE 335. EDUCATION OF GIFTED, TALENTED, AND CREATIVE Two hours credit 

Characteristics and special needs of the gifted individual. Definitions, identification pro- 
cedures, and educational provisions are considered, along with career development. 
Emphasis is placed on structuring a supportive learning environment within the school set- 
ting as well^s in the community. 

SPE 345. SECONDARY STUDENTS WITH MILD Two hours credit 

TO MODERATE DISABILITIES 

Alternatives to segregated special education services and interface between regular and 
special education. Characteristics of the adolescent with mild/moderate disabilities and pro- 
cedures for teaching academic, study and social skills in the resource room or inclusive class- 
room. School-to-work transition is studied, looking at career and vocational development of 
life skills. 



Helen DeVos College OF Education 241 



SPE 390. COLLABORATING WITH PARENTS, TEACHERS, Two hours credit 

AND OTHER PROFESSIONALS 

An introduction to the concept of collaboration as a means to meet the special needs of 
students. Issues such as due process, least restrictive environment, support services, organi- 
zations, advocacy groups, family dynamics, educational planning and delivery of services are 
emphasized. 

SPE 404. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR Two hours credit 

EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 

Alternatives to segregated special education services and interface between regular and 
special education. Emphasis on materials and methods to meet the needs of exceptional 
learners. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. 

SPE 405. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR STUDENTS Three hours credit 

WITH SEVERE DISABILITIES 

This course seeks to provide students with general instructional procedures for teaching 
individuals with severe disabilities. Information-gathering procedures along with formal and 
diagnostic assessment will be examined in order to determine the appropriate instructional 
curriculum for these individuals with the goal of implementing a functional curriculum that 
will enhance the quaUty of life. A laboratory experience is required. Prerequisites: SPE 316, 
SPE 321, SPE 331. 

SPE 417. POLICIES, PROCEDURES & PRACTICES Two hours credit 

Emphasizes the understanding of legislation, regulations and litigation related to the field 
of special education. 

SPE 424. DIAGNOSTIC PRESCRIPTIVE TEACHING Three hours credit 

Approaches involving identification and the use of diagnostic test materials to assess 
functional levels of ability of individuals with disabilities, followed by specific developmen- 
tal or remedial recommendations consistent with ability level. Emphasis on matching deficit 
to appropriate program or technique which will yield optimum results. 

SPE 435. FIELD EXPERIENCE SEMINAR Two hours credit 

This seminar is designed to assist the students in transitioning from course work and 
observational experiences to practical application in the area of support services. Discussion 
of a variety of topics related to the field experience will be the focus of this seminar. 
Prerequisites: successful completion of course work and approval of the Director of Field 
Experiences. 

SPE 450/451. STUDENT TEACHING IN SPECIAL EDUCATION Ten hours credit 

Upon completion of all education courses, students will complete student teaching 
practicums for a total of 15 weeks in public schools and/or private facilities under the guid- 
ance of public school teachers/private practitioners, and a university supervisor(s). The stu- 
dent will be assigned to at least two different settings, which may be at different sites. 
Students must enroll in two student teaching sessions and the appropriate seminar for a total 
of 12 hours. This will constitute the maximum load for the student teaching semester. No 
other classes may be taken during the professional semester. Prerequisites: Completion of 
all education course work, admission to the Teacher Education Program and to Student 
Teaching. Students must make application the semester prior to the student teaching 
semester. Offered fall and spring semesters. 

SPE 452. FIELD EXPERIENCE I Two hours credit 

This course is designed to provide students with practical experiences in the area of sup- 
port service working with at-risk students and thier families in community settings. The stu- 
dent will be assigned to two placements for the semester. Application for this experience 
must be made a semeser in advance. Five hours credit will be given for each placement. 
Prerequisite: successful completion of course work and approval of the Director of Field 
Experiences. 



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242 Helen DeVos College of Education 



SPE 453. FIELD EXPERIENCE II Two hours credit 

This course is designed to provide students practical experiences in the area of support 
service working with at-risk students and their famiUes in community settings. The student 
will be assigned to two placements for the semester. Application for this experience must be 
made a semester in advance. Five hours credit will be given for each placement. Prerequisite: 
successful completion of course work and approval of the Director of Field Experiences. 



School of Music 243 



SCHOOL OF 

MUSIC 

WALT MAULDIN, Dean 



Professors Jim Bums, David Horton, 
Walt Mauldin and Lonnie McCalister 

Associate Professors David Holsinger, Philip Morehead 
and Phillip Thomas 

Assistant Professors Mark Bailey, Michael Brownlee, 
Anthony Deaton, Andrea Dismukes, 
Virginia Horton and LuAnn Holden 

Instructors Sanford Garren, Angela Greeson, 
Donald LeRoy and Alan Wyatt 




244 School of Music 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



The Lee University School of Music is an accredited institutional 
member of the National Association of Schools of Music; 1 1 250 Roger 
Bacon Drive, Suite 21; Reston, VA 20190; (703) 437-0700. 

The School of Music offers programs of study designed to prepare 

men and women for the performance or instruction of the musical arts 

by developing skills needed to become music performers, educators, 

ministers, or private instructors. The School of Music offers majors in 

55 MUSIC and MUSIC EDUCATION. 

g OFFICIAL ACCEPTANCE INTO THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

rr Requirements for acceptance of a student to the School of Music, 

which must be completed prior to registration, are the following: 

1 . The completion of a music theory placement exam. 

2. An audition in the principal area of study (voice, keyboard, or instru- 
mental). 

3. The demonstration of skills that can be developed to enable the stu- 
dent to successfully serve as a performer, music educator or music 
minister. 

Any deficiencies must be completed, without credit, during the first 
year. 
Requirements for admission into upper-division study are as follows: 

1 . A minimum 2.0 overall grade point average in all music courses. 

2. The attainment of a 2.0 overall grade point average at the comple- 
tion of 58 semester hours. 

3. The successful completion of an Upper-Division Admission 
Examination, a special hearing before a committee of full-time 
music faculty members given during the fourth semester of applied 
music study. 

4. The successful completion of a piano proficiency exam by the end of 
the sophomore year. 

5. Transfer students with more than 58 hours must have a minimum 2.0 
grade point average in music as well as a minimum 2.0 overall grade 
point average and must audition before a committee of full-time 
music faculty members for admission to the upper division of study. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The School of Music offers the following undergraduate programs of 
study: 

Degree Major Code 

B.A. Music MUSA 

B.A. Music (Church Music Emphasis) MUCA 

B.M.E. Music Education (Vocal/General, MUET 

Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 



School of Music 245 



B.M.E. Music Education (Instrumental, 

Teacher Licensure, Grades K-12) 



MIET 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

SPECLVLTY AREA 

MUS 085 - Recital Class 



MUSA 

Credit Hours 




Seven Semesters 

MUS 088 - Upper-Division Examination 

MUS 141 -Theory I 3 

MUS 142 - Sight Singing/Ear Training I 1 

MUS 143- Theory n 3 

MUS 144 - Sight Singing/Ear Training n 1 

MUS 241 - Theory m 3 

MUS 242 - Sight Singing/Ear Training m 1 

MUS 243 - Theory F^ 3 

MUS 244 - Sight Singing/Ear Training IV 1 

MUS 330 - Fundamentals of Conducting 2 

• MUS 333 - History of Western Music 3 

MUS 334- History of Western Music 3 

MUS 393 - Applied Literature (394 or 395) 2 
MUS 486 - Pedagogy Practicum (487 or 488) 2 or 3 

MUS 493 - Senior Recital 

Upper Division Music Elective 2 

Applied Study - Principal Instrument 12 

Performance Ensemble - Principal (6) and Secondary (4) 10 

Piano Proficiency Examination 

Subtotal Specialty 52-53 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 40 
This program requires 6 hours of foreign language at the 
intermediate level. 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 8 

ELECTROS 20 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130-131 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 
(CHURCH MUSIC EMPHASIS) 

SPECLALTY AREA 

MUS 085 - Recital Class - Seven Semesters 

MUS 088 - Upper-Division Examination 

MUS 141 -Theory I 

MUS 142 - Sight Singing/Ear Training I 

MUS 143- Theory n 

MUS 144 - Sight Singing/Ear Training E 



MUCA 

Credit Hours 


3 
1 
3 
1 



246 School of Music 



MUS241 - Theory m 3 

MUS 242 - Sight Singing/Ear Training m 1 

MUS 243 - Theory IV 3 

MUS 244 - Sight Singing/Ear Training IV 1 

MUS 322 - Church Music Administration 2 

and Organization 

MUS 330 - Fundamentals of Conducting 2 

MUS 333 - History of Western Music 3 

MUS 334- History of Westem Music 3 

MUS 421 - Hymnology 2 

g MUS 422 - History and Philosophy of 2 

g Church Music Seminar 



^ MUS 425 - Practicum in Church Music 

^ o MUS 494 - Senior Recital 

c g Upper-Division Music Elective 4 

.>< Q> Applied Study - Principal Instrument 10 

^ ^ Performance Ensemble - Principal (6) and Secondary (4) 10 

{5 3 Piano Proficiency Examination 

6^ g Subtotal Specialty 54 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 40 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 18 

ELECTIVES 18 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION MUET 

(VOCAL/GENERAL TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES K-12) 



SPECLALTY AREA 


Credit Hours 


MUS 085 - 


Recital Class - Seven Semesters 





MUS 088 - 


Upper-Division Examination 





MUS 141 


- Theory I 


3 


MUS 142 


- Sight Singing/Ear Training I 


1 


MUS 143 - 


Theory n 


3 


MUS 144 - 


Sight Singing/Ear Training n 


1 


MUS 241 - 


Theory m 


3 


MUS 242 - 


Sight Singing/Ear Training EH 


1 


MUS 243 - 


Theory r/ 


3 


MUS 244 - 


Sight Singing/Ear Training IV 


1 


MUS 292- 


Introduction to Instrumental Music 


2 


MUS 330 - 


Fundamentals of Conducting 


2 


MUS 331 - 


Advanced Conducting 


2 


MUS 333 - 


■ History of Western Music 


3 


MUS 334 ■ 


■ History of Western Music 


3 



School of Music 247 



MUS 341 - Orchestration and Arranging 2 

MUS 495 - Senior Recital 

Applied Study - Principal Instrument 8 

Applied Study - Secondary Instrument 4 

Performance Ensemble - Principal (6) and Secondary (4) 10 

Piano Proficiency Examination 
Subtotal Specialty 52 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 201 - Historical, Philosophical, and Sociological 3 

Foundations of Education 
EDU 225 - Introduction to Music Education 2 

SED312- Educational Psychology (Cross-listed under PSY) 

or 
ELE 310 - Child Psychology (Cross-listed under PSY) 3 

EDU 316 - The Exceptional Child (Cross-listed under 

Special Education) 3 

ELE 405 - Methods of Teaching Music in the 

Elementary School 2 

SED 418 - General Secondary Methods 1 

SED 421 - The Teaching of Vocal and General Music, 

Grades 7-12 2 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 

ELE 433 - Student Teaching in Elementary Grades 
SED 444 - Student Teaching, Grades 7-8 5 

or 
SED 445 - Student Teaching, Grades 9-12 5 

Subtotal Professional Education 28 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 32 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 8 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOROF MUSIC EDUCATION MIET 

(INSTRUMENTAL TEACHER LICENSURE, GRADES K-12) 

SPECLVLTY AREA Credit Hours 

MUS 085 - Recital Class - Seven Semesters 

MUS 088 - Upper Division Examination 

MUS 141 -Theory I 3 

MUS 142 - Sight Singing/Ear Training I 1 

MUS 143 - Theory E 3 

MUS 144 - Sight Singing/Ear Training E 1 

MUS 241 - Theory m 3 

MUS 242 - Sight Singing/Ear Training IE 1 

MUS 243 - Theory F^ 3 



248 School of Music 



MUS 244 - Sight Singing/Ear Training IV 1 

MUS 293 - Brass Techniques 2 

MUS 294 - Woodwind Techniques 2 

MUS 295 - String Techniques 2 

MUS 296 - Percussion Techniques 1 

MUS 330 - Fundamentals of Conducting 2 

MUS 33 1 - Advanced Conducting 2 

MUS 333 - History of Western Music 3 

MUS 334- History of Western Music 3 

MUS 341- Orchestration and Arranging 2 

g MUS 495 - Senior Recital 

§ Applied Study - Principal Instrument 8 

^ Applied Study - Secondary Instrument 4 

o Performance Ensemble - Principal (6) and Secondary (4) 10 

g Piano Proficiency Examination 

Q> Vocal Proficiency Examination 

•^ Subtotal Specialty 57 






g PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 201 - Historical, Philosophical, and Sociological 3 

Foundations of Education 
EDU 225 - Introduction to Music Education 2 

SED 312 - Educational Psychology (Cross-listed under PSY) 

or 
ELE 310 - Child Psychology (Cross-hsted under PSY) 3 

EDU 316 - The Exceptional Child (Cross-listed under 

Special Education) 3 

SED 418 - General Secondary Methods 1 

SED 422 - Methods & Materials of Teaching Marching Band 2 
SED 423 - Methods & Materials of Teaching Concert Band 

and Orchestra 2 

EDU 434 - Student Teaching Seminar 2 

ELE 433 - Student Teaching in the Elem. Grades (5-8) 5 

SED 444 - Student Teaching, Grades 7-8 

or 
SED 445 - Student Teaching, Grades 9-12 5 

Subtotal Professional Education 28 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 32 

RELIGION REQUIREMENTS 1 8 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 135 



School of Music 249 

MUSIC MINOR 

The School of Music offers a minor in music consisting of eighteen 
credit hours. Courses comprising the eighteen hours for a minor in music 
are selected from those listed on the following pages and are designed to 
create a balanced musical experience. Thus, students complete the mini- 
mum indicated from each category: Music Theory, 3-8 hours; Applied 
Music, 4-6 hours; Ensemble, 2-4 hours; Conducting, 2-4 hours; Church 
Music, 2-4 hours. The student desiring to minor in music may request an 
appointment with a music advisor for requirement clarification. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

MUSIC RESOURCE CENTER 

The Music Resource Center (MRC) in the Curtsinger Music Building 
is a Hbrary designed to meet the music reference and research needs of the 
university and community. The collection consists of scores, technological 
resources and audio-visual materials including videos, CD's, cassettes and 
LP's. The audio-visual materials, technological resources and reference 
materials do not circulate outside the Music Resource Center to students 
but are checked out for two-hour in-house use. Circulating scores may be 
checked out for a 14-day loan period to undergraduate students and a 28- 
day loan period to graduate students. A valid Hbrary card is required. 

MRC Hours: 



Monday and Wednesday 


8:00 a.m. 


- 10:00 p.m. 


Tuesday and Thursday 


8:00 a.m. 


- 10:30 a.m. 




11:30 a.m. 


- 10:00 p.m. 


Friday 


8:00 a.m. 


7:00 p.m. 


Saturday 


12:00 noon 


5:00 p.m. 


Sunday 


2:00 p.m. 


5:00 p.m. 



MRC hours are adjusted during convocations and school holidays. 

PERFORMANCE ENSEMBLES 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Music, Bachelor of Arts in 
Church Music, or Bachelor of Music Education with an emphasis in 
voice are required to take six semesters of Chorale and four semesters 
of secondary ensemble. If a student is not selected to participate in 
Chorale, Choral Union may be substituted for the primary ensemble. 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Music, Bachelor of Arts in 
Church Music, or Bachelor of Music Education with a non-keyboard 
emphasis are required to take six semesters of Wind Ensemble or 
Chamber Orchestra and four semesters of secondary ensemble. If a 
student is not selected to participate in Wind Ensemble, Symphonic 
Band may be substituted for the primary ensemble. 



250 School of Music 



Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Music, Bachelor of Arts in 
Church Music, or Bachelor of Music Education with an emphasis in 
keyboard are required to take six semesters of Chorale, Choral Union, 
Chamber Orchestra or Wind Ensemble and four semesters of sec- 
ondary ensemble. 

Students majoring in Music Education will not participate in a 
performance ensemble during the student teaching semester. For 
transfer students, the six/four semester requirement is determined on 
an individual basis by the Dean. Students must be enrolled in at least 
12 hours to participate in touring ensembles. 

i RECITAL REQUIREMENTS 

O Every student majoring in music is required to enroll in and success- 

or 
o 



fully complete Recital Class for seven (7) semesters. Graded on a pass/fail 
c5 basis, this course receives hours credit. A passing grade is based on the 

(f> attendance of 12 approved recitals per semester. Exceptions to this policy 

cc: require an approved academic petition. The requirements for transfer stu- 

"§ dents are determined on an individual basis by the Dean. 

A student majoring in music presents a thirty-minute recital pro- 
gram in the senior year. The student may choose to do a one-hour senior 
recital with approval of the Area Coordinator and faculty representatives. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Music Education students may not present a Senior Recital or be 
enrolled in course work outside of student teaching during the student 
teaching semester. Students will not be allowed to student teach if they 
have not completed the piano proficiency requirement. For information 
on official acceptance to student teaching, see the appropriate section in 
the DeVos College of Education. 

Music Education students must make application for and be accept- 
ed into the Teacher Education Program prior to registering for 400-level 
methods courses. There will be no exceptions to this requirement. 

OFFICIAL ACCEPTANCE INTO THE 
TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

All students who desire to prepare for teaching are required to apply 
for and be accepted into the Teacher Education Program. This applica- 
tion is to be filed during the first semester of the sophomore year or 
when the student is enrolled in EDU 225. Application forms may be 
obtained in the office of the Director of Teacher Education, DeVos 
College of Education. 

PIANO PROFICIENCY 

Upon entrance to the School of Music as a music major, each stu- 
dent is required to take the Piano Placement Exam. Based on the stu- 



School OF Music 251 



dent's performance, the keyboard faculty recommend semesters of piano 
study needed for the student to successfully complete the School of 
Music piano proficiency requirement. 

The piano proficiency requirement is part of a continuing effort to 
prepare graduates for respective careers in the most thorough manner 
possible. It is included in the program because the development of basic 
keyboard skills is considered essential to success in all musical careers. 
The piano proficiency courses will cover those skills considered neces- 
sary for all music majors and those skills which address special compe- 
tencies relating to the specific degree programs. 

All music majors play specific required portions of the exam at the 
end of each semester (beginning with the first semester freshman level) 
in order to complete the requirement by the end of the sophomore year. 
The course, MUS 163, or its approved equivalent, is required of all music 
education majors as a prerequisite to student teaching. All other music 
majors must complete MUS 1 63 or its approved equivalent before gradu- 
ation. 

AP ' ADVANCED PLACEMENT IN MUSIC THEORY 

Students receiving a score of four or better on the 1996 version (or 
later) of the Advanced Placement Examination in Music Theory will be 
granted proficiency credit for Theory I (MUS 141, 3 credit hours) and 
Sight Singing/Ear Training I (MUS 142, 1 credit hour). Evidence of quali- 
fication for such placement must appear in the student's advising folder 
and will take the place of a score on the Music Theory Placement 
Examination required by the School of Music. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 
APPLIED MUSIC 

MUS 085. MUSIC RECITAL CLASS Zero hours credit 

A class designed to expose students to various types of music in the vocal, instrumental, 
and keyboard genres. This course is required of all music majors for seven semesters. Graded 
on a pass/fail basis. 

MUS 088. UPPER-DIVISION EXAMINATION Zero hours credit 

Successful completion of the Upper-Division Examination is required for admission into 
upper-level applied study. The Upper-Division Examination is to be performed before a com- 
mittee of music faculty at the end of four semesters of applied study. The student is to per- 
form, in the apphed area, music of contrasting styles, totaling ten minutes of performance. 
For transfer students, the applied study may or may not have been done at Lee University. 

MUS 120VO. CLASS INSTRUCTION- VOICE FOR THE Two hours credit 

NON-MAJOR + MINOR 

MUS 120PL CLASS INSTRUCTION-BEGINNING PIANO One hour credit 

FOR THE NON-MAJOR 

MUS 123PL CLASS INSTRUCTION-INTERMEDIATE PIANO One hour credit 

FOR THE NON-MAJOR 



252 School of Music 



MUS 1 30PI. CLASS INSTRUCTION- BASIC PIANO One hour credit 

FOR MUSIC MAJORS 

MUA 150. APPLIED MUSIC FOR THE NON-MAJOR One hour credit 

Applied music in the fifty series (150-451) is intended for non-music majors. Technical 
studies and a variety of literature are selected at a level appropriate to the student's ability. 

MUA 151; 250-251; 350-351; 450-451. ADDITIONAL STUDY 

IN APPLIED MUSIC FOR THE NON-MAJOR One hour credit 

MUS 1 60PI. PLVNO PROFICIENCY I One hour credit 

MUS 161PL VIANO PROFICIENCY II One hour credit 

MUS 162PI. PL\NO PROFICIENCY III One hour credit 

C MUS 163PL PL/VNO PROFICIENCY IV One hour credit 

a; 
u 

^ MUA 154. APPLIED MUSIC FOR THE NON-MAJOR Two hours credit 

O Designed for students who have been accepted as a music major with conditional status. 

S5 MUS 160VO. VOICE PROFICIENCY CLASS Two horns credit 

^ For BME majors whose principal instrument is not voice and who have had no previous 

voice training. Designed to fulfill the vocal proficiency requirement for that degree. 

[ '^^ MUA 170. APPLIED MUSIC FOR THE MAJOR AND MINOR One hour credit 

;, O Applied music in the seventy series designates the secondary instrument of the music 

'■ "" major. Appropriate technical studies and literature are selected from the classics with empha- 

sis on development of performance techniques. 

Brass Percussion 

Composition & Arranging Piano 

Guitar - Classical String 

Guitar - Commerical Voice 

Organ Woodwind 

MUA 171; 270-271; 370-371; 470-471. ADDITIONAL STUDY 

IN APPLIED MUSIC FOR THE MAJOR AND MINOR One hour credit 

MUA 174. APPLIED MUSIC COMPOSITION AND ARRANGING Two hours credit 

MUA 175; 274-275; 374-375; 474-475. ADDITIONAL STUDY 

IN COMPOSITION AND ARRANGING Two hours credit 

MUA 1 80. APPLIED MUSIC FOR THE MAJOR One hour credit 

Applied music in the eighty series is intended for students majoring in music in their 
principal performance area. Development of repertory and intensive study of style. 
Admission only by audition. 

Brass Piano 

Guitar - Classical String 

Guitar - Commercial Voice 

^ Organ Woodwind 

Percussion 

MUA 181; 280-281; 380-381; 480-481. ADDITIONAL STUDY 

IN APPLIED MUSIC FOR THE MAJOR One hour credit 

MUA 184. APPLIED MUSIC FOR THE MAJOR Two hours credit 

Applied music in the eighty series is intended for students majoring in music in their 
principal performance area. Development of repertory and intensive study of style. 
Admission only by audition. 



School of Music 253 



MUA 185; 284-285; 384-385; 484-485. ADDITIONAL STUDY Two hours credit 

IN APPLIED MUSIC FOR THE MAJOR 

MUA 190-191; 290-291; 390-391; 490-491. Three hours credit 

APPLIED MUSIC FOR THE MAJOR 

Applied music in the ninety series is intended for students majoring in music in their 
principle performance area. Development of repertory and intensive study of style. 
Admission hy audition only. 

Brass Piano 

Guitar - Classical String 

Guitar - Commercial Voice 

Organ Woodwind 

Percussion 

MUS 396. JUNIOR RECITAL Zero hours credit 

One half-hour of public recital. 

MUS 493. SENIOR RECITAL Zero hours credit 

One half-hour of public recital, for Music majors with Applied Emphasis. 

MUS 494. SENIOR RECITAL Zero hours credit 

One half-hour of public recital for Church Music majors. 

MUS 495. SENIOR RECITAL Zero hours credit 

One half-hour of public recital for Music Education majors. 



CHURCH MUSIC 

MUS 321. MUSIC IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Two hours credit 

A course designed to instruct the student in integrating all church activities, developing 
music in churches through the church music school and the multiple choir system. Graded 
music is studied for use in Sunday Schools, Vacation Bible Schools, etc. Offered Spring 
Semester. 

MUS 322. CHURCH MUSIC ORGANIZATION Two hours credit 

AND ADMINISTRATION 

A study of the administrative role of the minister of music in a fully developed music 
program at the local level. This course is designed for the upper-division students in Church 
Music. Offered Fall Semester. 

MUS 421. HYMNOLOGY Two hours credit 

A survey of the various periods and styles of hymnody in the history of the Western 
church. Includes textual analysis and a study of the role of congregational singing in worship. 
Offered Fall Semester, 

MUS 422. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF CHURCH MUSIC Two hours credit 

A historical survey of the major philosophies and practices (personages, musical forms 
and types, styles, and literature) of church music with emphasis on determining, evaluating, 
expressing and applying the basic facts and principles involved in an integrated and consis- 
tent attitude toward church music. Offered Spring Semester. 

MUS 425. PRACTICUM IN CHURCH MUSIC Zero hours credit 

This course is designed to provide the church music student with practical experience in 
a local church under the supervision of his/her major professor. The student will observe a 
working professional and participate on an expanding level of responsibility. 



c 



254 School of Music 



SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTION 

MUS 221. DICTION FOR SINGERS Two hours credit 

For applied voice majors. It covers study of the International Phonetic Alphabet, Italian, 
French, and German diction. To be taken during the freshman or sophomore year. 

MUS 222. DICTION FOR SINGERS Two hours credit 

A continuation of MUS 221. Prerequisite: MUS 221. 

MUS 251. A,B,C,D. MUSIC DRAMA WORKSHOP One hour credit 

A practical laboratory course which involves the production of music dramas. Work 
includes casting, rehearsing, designing and constructing sets, lighting, costuming and publici- 
ty for recitals and public presentations. 

MUS 401- 403. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MUSIC One-three hours credit 

A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic will change to meet 
55 student demand and interest. Prerequisite: Permission from the mstmctor. 

U 

■g MUS 416. IMPROVISATION Two hours credit 

j= Designed to develop the theoretical and performance skills necessary in learning the art 

Q} of improvisation. This performance-oriented course is specifically for intermediate and 

oJ advanced instrumentalists. Prerequisites: MUS 243 and MUS 244. 

MUS 489. MUSIC THEATRE WORKSHOP Three hours credit 

Experience in the practical application of the art of singing on the Broadway stage. The 
course is designed as a continual master class setting with emphasis in performance. Offered 
every semester. 

MUS 499. SENIOR SEMINAR IN MUSIC Three hours credit 

A survey of the various academic disciplines of musical study, their basic assumptions 
and the relationship of those premises to Christian principles. Emphasis is placed in develop- 
ing personal integration of the study and practice of music with Christian faith. 
Prerequisites: MUS 243, MUS 244, THE 331, MUS 333 or 334, MUS 331 or 332 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

MUS 292. EVTRODUCTION TO INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC Two hours credit 

An introductory survey of orchestral instruments focusing on developing a functional 
knowledge of wind, string, fretted, and percussion instruments. Basic skills are emphasized 
through hands-on instruction. 

MUS 293. BRASS TECHNIQUES Two hours credit 

A course designed to prepare students for teaching the brass/wind instruments at the 
beginner to intermediate levels. Performance on the instruments is included. Offered Spring 
Semester, odd years. 

MUS 294. WOODWIND TECHNIQUES Two hours credit 

A course designed to prepare students for teaching the woodwind instruments at the 
beginner to intermediate levels. Performance on the instruments is included. Offered Fall Se- 
mester, odd years. 

MUS 295. STRING TECHNIQUES Two hours credit 

A course designed to prepare students for teaching string instruments at the beginner to 
intermediate levels. Performance on the instruments is included. Offered Spring Semester, 
even years. 

MUS 296. PERCUSSION TECHNIQUES One hour credit 

A course designed to prepare students for teaching percussion instruments at the begin- 
ner to intermediate levels. Performance on the instruments is included. Offered Fall Se- 
mester, even years. 



School of Music 255 



MUS 330. FUNDAMENTALS OF CONDUCTING Two hours credit 

Basic techniques of conducting simple and complex beat patterns, use of the left hand for 
cuing and introductory baton techniques. Offered Fall Semester. 

MUS 331. ADVANCED CONDUCTING Two hours credit 

A continuation of Fundamentals of Conducting. Prerequisite: MUS 330. Offered Spring 
Semester. 

MUS 486. VOCAL PEDAGOGY PRACTICUM Three hours credit 

Designed to introduce the prospective voice teacher to the basic techniques of vocal ped- 
agogy and to provide the student with experience in teaching voice to beginning vocal stu- 
dents while under supervision. Offered Spring Semester. 

MUS 487. KEYBOARD PEDAGOGY PRACTICUM Three hours credit 

A basic course for upper-level music majors in the B.A. program. The course is designed 
to equip students with the pedagogical skills of keyboard instruction and provide an opportu- 
nity for supervised teaching. Offered Spring Semester, even years. 

MUS 488. INSTRUMENTAL PEDAGOGY PRACTICUM Three hours credit 

This course is designed to introduce the prospective instrumental teacher to basic tech- 
niques of instrumental instmction and to provide the student with experience in teaching 
while under supervision. 

MUSIC HISTORY AND APPRECIATION 

MUS 133. MUSIC SURVEY Three hours credit 

An introductory survey of the principal Western forms and styles from antiquity to the 
present. Extensive use of recordings supplemented by live performances. 

MUS 333. HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC Three hours credit 

A study of the history of music and musical style in their social, political and historical 
contexts from antiquity to c. 1750. Extensive score study and listening are involved. 
Prerequisite: MUS 241 and 242. Offered Fall Semester. 

MUS 334. HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC Three hours credit 

A study of the history of music and musical style from c. 1725 to c. 1990. Offered Spring 
Semester. 

MUS 393. VOCAL LITERATURE Two hours credit 

A survey of the art song in Western music from 1600 to the present. Attention is given to 
style and analysis in a historical frame. Religious solo vocal music appropriate for formal 
worship ceremonies will also be covered. Offered Fall Semester. 

MUS 394. KEYBOARD LITERATURE Two hours credit 

A course designed to enlarge the student's knowledge of keyboard literature with an 
emphasis on the literature that features his/her applied major instrument. Offered Spring Se- 
mester, odd years. 

MUS 395. SYMPHONIC LITERATURE Two hours credit 

A course designed to enlarge the student's knowledge of symphonic literature with an 
emphasis on the literature that features his/her applied major instrument. Offered Spring 
Semester, odd years. 



Ip 



<0 



256 School of Music 



MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS 

MUS 101-102. LC - CHORALE One hour credit 

Study and performance of choral literature with emphasis on standard classical choral 
repertoire. Concerts given each semester. Membership by audition only. Open to all stu- 
dents. Two rehearsals per week. 

MUS 101-102. CC - CAMPUS CHOIR One hour credit 

Study and performance of a wide variety of sacred choral literature of the worship tradi- 
tion and in a worship setting. Open to all students by audition. A minimum 3 hours of 
rehearsal per week. 

MUS 101-102. CH - CHAPEL CHOIR One hour credit 

Open to all students. No audition is required. One rehearsal per week. Performances are 
in chapel and local churches only. 



S MUS 101-102. CU- CHORAL UNION One hour credit 

O Study and performance of major choral master works as well as newly composed works 

for festival choms. Open to music majors, general university students, and members of the 
local community with the consent of the instructor. One major concert each semester. One 
rehearsal per week. 



MUS 101-101. EV - EVANGELISTIC SINGERS One hour credit 

'^ Study and performance of a wide variety of sacred choral literature ranging from the 

t^ Negro Spiritual to traditional and contemporary Black Gospel settings. Admission by audi- 

O tion. A minimum 3 hours of rehearsal per week. 

IE* 

^; MUS 101-102. LL - LADIES OF LEE One hour credit 

4^ Training and performance in choral music for treble voices. Various performances each 

semester. Open to all female students by audition. A minimum 3 hours of rehearsal per week. 

MUS 101-102. LS - LEE SINGERS One hour credit 

Study and performance of a wide range of choral literature. One major tour each semester 
in addition to other off-campus appearances. Membership by audition only. Open to all stu- 
dents. A minimum 4 hours of rehearsal per week. 

MUS 101-102. OW - OPERA WORKSHOP One hour credit 

Experience in the practical application of musical and dramatic preparation and perfor- 
mance of opera within a workshop format. Open to all students (performance roles and cho- 
rus by audition only). 

MUS 101-102. VL - VOICES OF LEE One hour credit 

A 16-voice ensemble designed to study and perform a variety of a cappella, jazz and con- 
temporary choral stylings — both sacred and secular. A minimum of 5 hours rehearsal per 
week with extensive off-campus performances. Membership by audition. 

MUS 103-104. CM - CHAMBER MUSIC One hour credit 

Study and performance of music for small ensemble. Instrumentation based upon stu- 
dent interest and availability. 

MUS 103-104. HB - HANDBELL CHOIR One hour credit 

Study and performance of a variety of music for handbell choir. Open to all students with 
consent of the instructor. 

MUS 103-104. JE - JAZZ ENSEMBLE One hour credit 

Utilizing standard stage band instrumentation, this ensemble studies and performs the 
best of the popular repertory. Open by audition. A minimum 3 hours of rehearsal per week. 



School OF Music 257 



MUS 103-104. OR - CHAMBER ORCHESTRA One hour credit 

Study and performance of music for chamber orchestra in a variety of settings. Three 
rehearsals per week. Open by audition to any university student. 

MUS 103-104. PB - PEP BAND One hour credit 

Training, practice and performance of commercial and marching band literature. 

MUS 103-104. PI - PIANO ENSEMBLE One hour credit 

The study and performance of music for piano ensemble. Open to all piano majors. 

MUS 103-104. SB - SYMPHONIC BAND One hour credit 

Training and practice in the wind band literature. Open to all students with the consent 
of the instructor. A minimum of 3 hours of rehearsal per week. 

MUS 103-104. WE - WIND ENSEMBLE One hour credit 

Training, practice and performance of concert wind ensemble literature. Membership is 
by audition only. Major concerts given each semester. A minimum of three hours of 
rehearsal per week. 

MUSIC THEORY 

MUS 121. MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS Two hours credit 

A course that acquaints students with the rudiments of music. While not applicable 
"toward a major in music, it is designed to prepare students for enrollment in MUS 141. 
Prerequisite: Completion of the Music Theory Placement Exam. 

MUS 122. SIGHTSINGING/EAR TRAINING FUNDAMENTALS One hour credit 

An introduction to basic skills of sightsinging and dictation. While not applicable toward 
a major in music, it is designed to prepare students for enrollment in MUS 142. Prerequisite: 
Completion of Music Theory Aural Placement Exam. 

MUS 141. THEORY I Three hours credit 

A course that emphasizes written and analytical skills of the basic elements of music. 
Prerequisite: MUS 121 or passing score on Music Theory Placement Exam. 

MUS 142. SIGHTSINGING/EAR TRAINING I One hour credit 

Practice and trainmg in application of aural skills. Prerequisite: MUS 122 or passing score 
on Music Theory Aural Placement Exam. 

MUS 143. THEORY II Three hours credit 

Continued study of the materials of music that emphasizes writing and analysis of music 
of the common practice period. Prerequisite: MUS 141 or its equivalent. 

MUS 144. SIGHTSINGING/EAR TRAINING II One hour credit 

Further practice and training in application of aural skills. Prerequisite: MUS 142 or its 
equivalent. 

MUS 241. THEORY III Three hours credit 

Continued study of the materials of music emphasizing writing and analysis of chromat- 
ic harmonies. Prerequisite: MUS 143 or its equivalent. 

MUS 242. SIGHTSINGING/EAR TRAINING III One hour credit 

Further practice and training in application of aural skills,- special emphasis is given to 
modulation, chromaticism, and syncopation. Prerequisite: MUS 144 or its equivalent. 

MUS 243. THEORY IV Three hours credit 

Continued study of the materials of music including an introduction to counterpoint, 
form and 20th-century techniques. Prerequisite: MUS 241 or its equivalent. 



258 School of Music 



MUS 244. SIGHTSINGING/EAR TRAINING IV One hour credit 

Further practice and training in apphcation of aural skills. Prerequisite: MUS 242 or its 
equivalent. 

MUS 341. ORCHESTRATION AND ARRANGING Two hours credit 

An introduction to the instruments of the orchestra including range, technique, timbre, 
and transposition. Study of various principles of orchestrating for church instrumental 
ensembles. 

MUS 342. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED ORCHESTRATION II Two hours credit 

An in-depth study of orchestrating for strings and woodwinds. This course will focus on 
bowing techniques, alternate clefs, specific scoring problems for double reed instruments, 
review of ranges and transpositions, and special effects for string instrumentation. 
Prerequisite: MUS 341. 

t MUS 343. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED ORCHESTRATION III Two hours credit 

[3 An in-depth study of orchestrating for brass, percussion, and infrequently used instru- 

^ ments. This course will focus on brass techniques, alternate clefs, specific scoring problems 

^ for percussion instruments, review of ranges and transpositions, and special effects for per- 

g cussion instruments. Prerequisite: MUS 342. 

0) 

g MUS 344. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED ORCHESTRATION IV Two hours credit 

^ An advanced study of orchestration that will include preparation of major orchestration 

(5 projects. Includes in-class presentations arranged by each student. Prerequisite: MUS 343. 

*^ 

g MUS 345. SEMINAR IN CHORAL ARRANGING Two hours credit 

IP An introduction to the aspects of choral arranging. The choral arranging will include 

^ two-, three- and four-part writing. 



School of Religion 259 



SCHOOL OF 

RELIGION 

R. JEROME BOONE, Dean 
TERRY L. CROSS, Associate Dean 

Department of Christian Ministries 

R. Jerome Boone, Chairperson 

Department of Theology 

Terry L. Cross, Chairperson 

Department of External Studies 




^ 



i 




260 School of Religion 



DEPARTMENT Of 
CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES 



R. JEROME BOONE, Chairperson 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Professor R. Jerome Boone 
Assistant Professors Andrew Blackmon and Bob Bayles 

INTERCULTURAL STUDIES 

Associate Professor Ridley Usherwood 
Assistant Professor Edley Moodley 

PASTORAL MINISTRY 

Professor Jerald Daffe 

YOUTH MINISTRY 

Instructor James Harper 

DISCIPLINES 

Christian Education 

Evangelism 
Intercultural Studies 

Pastoral Studies 

Youth Ministries 




Department of Christian Ministries 261 



The Department of Christian Ministries offers majors in CHRIST- 
IAN EDUCATION, INTERCULTURAL STUDIES, PASTORAL MIN- 
ISTRY, and YOUTH MINISTRY. Each program combines 
biblical/theological knowledge with practical ministerial skills, 
enabling students to succeed in graduate and professional studies as 
well as in church ministries. The distinctives of each of these areas of 
practical ininistry are described below. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The Bachelor of Science/ Arts in Christian Education seeks to pre- 
pare men and women for educational ministry, primarily in the local 
church context. This includes, but is not limited to, programming in 
Sunday School, mid-week services, day schools and education boards. 
It is a generalist degree in design, giving the student breadth in a vari- 
ety of areas most often associated with the local church. The degree 
program seeks to provide foundational understanding of the various 
age groups and programs related to the overall life of the congregation. 
It seeks to integrate theory and practice and is considered a sub-disci- 
pline of theology. Majors in the Christian Education program are pre- 
pared for ministerial roles in the local church in the following areas: 
Christian Education Director or Minister of Education,- children's pas- 
tor,- youth pastor; adult pastor; singles director; administrator and/or 
teacher in Christian schools. Each of these areas has been filled by 
past graduates of the program. 

INTERCULTURAL STUDIES 

The Intercultural Studies degree is designed to train men and 
women for ministry in a culture other than their own. This could be 
the arena of foreign missions or it could be with different ethnic 
groups that live in certain cities or geographical regions of the United 
States. The degree program combines biblical-theological knowledge 
with skills in cross-cultural communication. It also includes course- 
work concerned with the biblical basis of missions, strategies for evan- 
gelizing specific people groups and key issues in fulfilling the Great 
Commission. The central focus of the degree program is understand- 
ing people groups and discovering ways to communicate the gospel 
effectively to them. This major requires a knowledge of a foreign lan- 
guage and is therefore offered only as a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

PASTORAL MINISTRY 

The Pastoral Ministry majors are designed to prepare individuals 
to serve in the ministry role of senior, associate, and assistant pastor. 
Individuals intending to work in other areas of full-time ministry, 
such as evangelist, will also find this major very beneficial due to the 
practical methodologies and the biblical content of the program. 



262 School of Religion 



Individuals in the Pastoral Ministry program can choose between a 
B.A. or a B.S. The only difference is the Greek language requirement 
for the former degree (the B.A.). Distinctives of the specialty areas for 
both are the pastoral seminars, ministry practicums, the Ministry of 
Worship course, and the Church and Social Problems elective. The 
pastoral seminars provide for further reflection on oneOs calling and 
an introduction to spiritual gifts. The practicums provide for 150 
hours of ministry experience within a local church under the supervi- 
sion of a mentor/pastor. Since worship and social care are key min- 
istry areas and concerns of the church, the worship and social prob- 
lems classes provide the opportunity to study issues within each and 
to develop ministry principles based on biblical guidelines. 

YOUTH MINISTRY 

The Bachelor of Science/Arts in Youth Ministry is designed to 
prepare men and women for the specific ministerial role of working 
with adolescents in a variety of settings, including local church and 
para-church ministries. The major is a hybrid of the Christian 
Education and Pastoral Ministry majors, since much of what a youth 
pastor does involves both areas. Youth Ministry, as a vocational min- 
isterial calling, is in high demand in many denominations and is typi- 
cally one of the first staff positions added by senior pastors. In the 
early stages of the major, the program gives the ministerial student 
foundational information on the various age groups with specific 
attention given to adolescent development. As the student progresses 
through the major, focus is given to more advanced topics (e.g.. Youth 
Problems; Models of Youth Ministry; Strategies of Youth Ministry). A 
portfolio of class assignments and practicum experience is required 
and becomes a part of the evaluation and overall program of the Youth 
Ministry major. This valuable resource can be used in the interview 
and hiring stages upon graduation to give an overall portrait of the stu- 
dent's academic and ministerial experiences while at Lee University. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The Department of Christian Ministries offers the following pro- 
grams of study: 



I 



Degree 


Major 


Code 


B.A. 


Christian Education 


CEDA 


B.S. 


Christian Education 


CEDS 


B.A. 


Intercultural Studies 


ISPA 


B.A. 


Pastoral Ministry 


PASA 


B.S. 


Pastoral Ministry 


PASS 


B.A. 


Youth Ministry 


YCEA 


B.S. 


Youth Ministry 


YCES 



I 



Department of Christian Ministries 263 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CEDA 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

CED 241 - Educational Ministry of the Church 3 
CED 252 - History and Philosophy of 

Christian Education 3 

CED 340 - Spiritual Formation and Discipleship 3 

CED 341 - Principles of Teaching C.E 3 

CED 342 - Christian Education of Children 3 

CED 365 - Practicum 2 

CED 442 - Christian Education of Adults 3 

CED 444 - Ministry to the Christian Family 2 

CED 465 - Practicum 2 

ISP 262 - Foundations for Intercultural Ministry 3 

CHH 321 - Church of God History/Polity 2 

THE 336 - Doctrine of the Church 3 

YCE 245 - Christian Education of Youth 3 

Subtotal Specialty 35 -f.. 

i"" 
COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS ..t:i 

PAS 101 - Foundations for Ministry 1 -" 

PAS 201 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 301 - Foundations for Ministry 1 c;j 

PAS 401 - Foundations for Ministry 1 -'i' 

BIB 101 - Old Testament Survey 3 

BIB 102 - New Testament Survey 3 

BIB - Gospel Elective 2/3 

BIB - Old Testament Elective 2/3 

BIB 402 - Romans and Galatians 3 

THE 230 - Christian Thought 3 

THE 33 1 - Christian Ethics 3 

THE 335 - Person/Work of the Holy Spirit 3 

EVA 161 - Personal Evangelism 2 

Choose 6 hours from: 6 
THE 337 - Theology of the Old Testament (3) 
THE 338 - Theology of the New Testament (3) 
THE 437 - Systematic Theology (3) 
THE 438 - Systematic Theology (3) 
Subtotal Collateral Requirements 34/36 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 47 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign language 
at the intermediate level. 

ELECTIVES 12/14 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130/132 



264 School of Religion 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 



CEDS 



SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

CED 241 - Educational Ministry 

of the Church 3 
CED 252 - History and Philosophy 

of Christian Education 3 

CED 340 - Spiritual Formation and Discipleship 3 

CED 341 - Principles of Teaching C.E 3 

CED 342 - Christian Education of Children 3 

CED 365 - Practicum 2 

CED 442 - Christian Education of Adults 3 

CED 444 - Ministry to the Christian Family 2 

CED 465 - Practicum 2 

ISP 262 - Foundations for Intercultural Ministry 3 

CHH 321 - Church of God History/Polity 2 

THE 336 - Doctrine of the Church 3 

YCE 245 - Christian Education of Youth 3 
Subtotal Specialty 35 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

PAS 101 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 201 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 301 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 401 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

BIB 101 - Old Testament Survey 3 

BIB 102 - New Testament Survey 3 

BIB - Gospel Elective 2/3 

BIB - Old Testament Elective 2/3 

BIB 402 - Romans and Galatians 3 

THE 230 - Christian Thought 3 

THE 331 - Christian Ethics 3 

THE 335 - Person/Work of the Holy Spirit 3 

EVA 161 - Personal Evangelism 2 

Choose 6 hours from: 6 

THE 337 - Theology of the Old Testament (3) 

THE 338 - Theology of the New Testament (3) 

THE'437 - Systematic Theology (3) 

THE 438 - Systematic Theology (3) 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 34/36 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 44 

ELECTIVES 14/16 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



Department of Christian Ministries 265 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN 
INTERCULTURAL STUDIES 



ISPA 



SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

ISP 250 - Introduction to Missions 3 

ISP 253 - Principles of Church Growth 3 

ISP 262 - Foundations for Intercultural Ministry 3 

ISP 320 - Urban Ministries 2 

ISP 354 - Theology of Missions 3 

SOC 310 - Cultural Anthropology 

(cross-listed in ANT) 3 

PAS 261 - Introduction to Preaching (2) 2/3 

or 
CED 341 - Principles/Practices Teaching C.E. (3) 
ISP 465 - Practicum 6 

A 6-hour practicum in a culture or 
urban setting other than the student's 
home culture or setting must be taken 
after the sophomore or junior year. 
Ten or Eleven hours chosen from: 10/1 1 

ISP 254 - History of Missions (3) 
ISP 352 - Contemporary World Religions (3) 
ISP 360 - Area Studies (2 or 3) 

ISP 430 - Peoples and Cultures of Selected Regions (3) 
ISP 451 - Principles &. Practices of Missions (3) 
COM 354 - Intercultural Communications (3) 
PAS 464 - Pastoral Counseling (3) 
THE 332 - Religion and Culture (3) 
THE 336 - Doctrine of the Church (3) 
SOC 410 -Minorities (3) 
PSY 351 - Multicultural Counseling (3) 
ENG/LIN 360 - Introduction to Linguistics (3) 
EVA 161 - Personal Evangelism (2) 
Subtotal Specialty 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

PAS 101 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 201 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 301 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 401 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

BIB 101 - Old Testament Survey 3 

BIB 102 - New Testament Survey 3 

THE 230 - Christian Thought 3 

THE 331 - Christian Ethics 3 

THE 335 - Person/Work of the Holy Spirit 3 



36 



266 School of Religion 



CHH 323 - History of Christianity 

or 
CHH 324 - History of Christianity 
Bible Electives (5 hours): 
BIB - Gospel Elective (2/3) 
BIB - Old Testament Elective (2/3) 
Choose 6 hours from: 

THE 337 - Theology of the Old Testament (3) 
THE 338 - Theology of the New Testament (3) 
THE 435 - Contemporary Theology (3) 
THE 437 - Systematic Theology (3) 
THE 438 - Systematic Theology (3) 
Subtotal Collateral Requirements 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign language 
at the intermediate level. 

ELECTIVES 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 



36 

47 

11 
130 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN 
PASTORAL MINISTRY 



PASA 



SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

PAS 102 - Seminar 1 

PAS 202 - Seminar 1 

PAS 261 - Introduction to Preaching 2 

PAS 262 - Ministry of Preaching 2 

PAS 35 1 - Ministry of Worship 3 

PAS 365 - Practicum 2 

PAS 461 - Pastoral Ministry 3 

PAS 462 - Pastoral Ministry 3 

PAS 464 - Pastoral Counseling 3 

PAS 465 - Practicum 2 

ISP 253 - Principles of Church Growth 3 

CED 241 - Educational Ministry of the Church 3 

EVA 161 - Personal Evangelism 2 

CHH 321 - Church of God History/Polity 2 

Three hours chosen from: 3 
PAS 352 - Church and Social Problems (3) 
PAS 363 - Expository Preaching (3) 

CED 341 - Principles of Teaching in Christian Education (3) 
THE 336 - Doctrine of the Church (3) 
Subtotal Specialty 



35 



Department of Christian Ministries 267 



COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

PAS 101 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 201 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 301 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 401 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

BIB 101 - Old Testament Survey 3 

BIB 102 - New Testament Survey 3 

BIB 402 - Romans and Galatians 3 

THE 230 - Christian Thought 3 

THE 331 - Christian Ethic 3 

THE 335 - Person/Work of the Holy Spirit 3 

CHH 323 - History of Christianity 3 

or 

CHH 324 - History of Christianity 3 

ORE 21 1 - New Testament Greek 4 

ORE 212 - New Testament Greek 4 

GRE 31 1 - New Testament Greek 3 S 

GRE 312 -New Testament Greek 3 '""^ 

Choose 6 hours from: 6 ic 

THE 337 - Theology of the Old Testament (3) -^ 

THE 338 - Theology of the New Testament (3) | 

THE 437 - Systematic Theology (3) '^'^ 

THE 438 - Systematic Theology (3) 

Bible electives (at least 2 hours in Old Testament) 5 
Subtotal Collateral Requirements 50 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 41 

ELECTIVES 4 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PASS 

PASTORAL MINISTRY 

SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

PAS 102 - Seminar 1 

PAS 202 - Seminar 1 

PAS 261 - Introduction to Preaching 2 

PAS 262 - Ministry of Preaching 2 

PAS 351 - Ministry of Worship 3 

PAS 365 - Practicum 2 

PAS 461 - Pastoral Ministry 3 

PAS 462 - Pastoral Ministry 3 

PAS 464 - Pastoral Counseling 3 

PAS 465 - Practicum 2 



268 School of Religion 



ISP 253 - Principles of Church Growth 3 

CED 241 - Educational Ministry of the Church 3 

EVA 161 - Personal Evangelism 2 

CHH 321 - Church of God History/Polity 2 

Three hours chosen from: 3 

PAS 352 - Church and Social Problems (3) 

PAS 363 - Expository Preaching (3) 

CED 341 - Principles of Teaching in Christian Education (3) 

THE 336 - Doctrine of the Church (3) 

Subtotal Specialty 35 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

PAS 101 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 201 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 301 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 401 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

BIB 101 - Old Testament Survey 3 

BIB 102 - New Testament Survey 3 

BIB 402 - Romans and Galatians 3 

THE 230 - Christian Thought 3 

THE 331 - Christian Ethics 3 

THE 335 - Person/Work of the Holy Spirit 3 

CHH 323 - History of Christianity 3 

or 

CHH 324 - History of Christianity 3 

GRE 21 1 - New Testament Greek 4 

GRE 212 - New Testament Greek 4 

GRE 3 1 1 - New Testament Greek 3 

GRE 3 1 2 - New Testament Greek 3 

Choose 6 hours from: 6 
THE d>d>7 - Theology of the Old Testament (3) 
THE 338 - Theology of the New Testament (3) 
THE 437 - Systematic Theology (3) 
THE 438 - Systematic Theology (3) 

Bible electives (at least 2 hours in Old Testament) 5 
Subtotal Collateral Requirements 36 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 44 

ELECTIVES 15 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



Department of Christian Ministries 269 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN 
YOUTH MINISTRY 



YCEA 



SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS 



Credit Hours 



CED 241 - Educational Ministry of the Church 3 

CED 340 - Spiritual Formation and Discipleship 3 

CED 341 - Principles of Teaching C.E. 3 

YCE 245 - Christian Education of Youth 3 

YCE 351 - Outdoor Youth Ministry 2 

CED 365 - Practicum in C.E. 2 

YCE 431 - Models in Youth Ministry 3 

YCE 432 - Strategies of Youth Ministry 3 

YCE 433 - Youth Problems 3 

CED 444 - Ministry to the Christian Family 2 

CED 465 - Practicum in C.E. 2 

ISP 320 - Urban Ministry 2 

Choose 3 hours from: 3 
CED 342 - C.E. of Children (3) 
CED442-C.E. of Adults(3) 
Subtotal Specialty 35 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

PAS 101 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 201 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 301 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 401 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 261 - Introduction to Preaching 2 

BIB 101 - Old Testament Survey 3 

BIB 102 - New Testament Survey 3 

BIB - Gospel Elective 2/3 

BIB - Old Testament Elective 2/3 

BIB 402 - Romans and Galatians 3 

EVA 161 - Personal Evangelism 2 

THE 230 - Christian Thought 3 

THE 331 - Christian Ethics 3 

THE 335 - Person/Work of the Holy Spirit 3 

CHH 321 - Church of God History and Polity 2 

Choose 6 hours from: 6 

THE 337 - Theology of the Old Testament (3) 

THE 338 - Theology of the New Testament (3) 

THE 437 - Systematic Theology (3) 

THE 438 - Systematic Theology (3) 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 41/43 



«::) 






270 School of Religion 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 47 

This program requires 6 hours of foreign language 
at the intermediate level. 

ELECTIVES 5/7 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130/132 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
YOUTH MINISTRY 



YCES 



SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

CED 241 - Educational Ministry of the Church 3 

CED 340 - Spiritual Formation and Discipleship 3 

CED 341 - Principles of Teaching C.E. 3 

YCE 245 - Christian Education of Youth 3 

YCE 35 1 - Outdoor Youth Ministry 2 

CED 365 - Practicum in C.E. 2 

YCE 431 - Models in Youth Ministry 3 

YCE 432 - Strategies of Youth Ministry 3 

YCE 433 - Youth Problems 3 

CED 444 - Ministry to the Christian Family 2 

CED 465 - Practicum in C.E. 2 

ISP 320 - Urban Ministry 2 

Choose 3 hours from: 3 
CED 342 - C.E. of Children (3) 
CED 442 - C.E. of Aduks (3) 
Subtotal Specialty 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

PAS 101 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 201 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 301 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 401 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 261 - Introduction to Preaching 2 

BIB 101 - Old Testament Survey 3 

BIB 102 - New Testament Survey 3 

BIB - Gospel Elective 2/3 

BIB -,01d Testament Elective 2/3 

BIB 402 - Romans and Galatians 3 

EVA 161 - Personal Evangelism 2 

THE 230 - Christian Thought 3 

THE 331 - Christian Ethics 3 

THE 335 - Person/Work of the Holy Spirit 3 

CHH 321 - Church of God History and Polity 2 



35 



Department of Christian Ministries 271 

Choose 6 hours from: 6 

THE 337 - Theology of the Old Testament (3) 

THE 338 - Theology of the New Testament (3) 

THE 437 - Systematic Theology (3) 

THE 438 - Systematic Theology (3) 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 41/43 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 44 

ELECTIVES 8/10 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 

MINORS 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

A minor in Christian Education consists of eighteen hours includ- 
ing CED 241, three semester hours; CED 341, three semester hours; 
CED 342 or YCE 245, three semester hours; CED 444, two semester 
hours; and CED or YCE electives, four semester hours. 

INTERCULTURAL STUDIES 

A minor in Intercultural Studies consists of eighteen hours. A 
person who majors in Bible and Theology or Pastoral Ministry and 
minors in Intercultural Studies may elect to take a modern foreign 
language instead of a biblical language. Course requirements for the 
minor in Intercultural Studies are Introduction to Missions, ISP 250, 
three semester hours; Theology of Missions, ISP 354, three semester 
hours; Principles and Practices of Missions, ISP 451, three semester 
hours; and nine additional hours from the intercultural course listings 
in this catalog. 

PROFESSIONAL CONCENTRATION IN YOUTH MINISTRY 

A professional concentration in Youth Ministry consists of eigh- 
teen hours. Nine hours required for Christian Education majors are 
CED 340, YCE 432 and YCE 433. Twelve hours required for the non- 
Christian Education major are CED 340, YCE 245 and YCE 433. The 
six to nine additional hours are to be selected from CED 320, CED 
344, YCE 351, YCE 431, COM 250, COM 323, DRA 105 and DRA 
250. Courses taken for the concentration must be separate and apart 
from other Christian Education courses required in the specialty area. 
This concentration is designed for individuals who will serve as youth 
pastors, Christian Education directors and lay youth leaders. A cer- 
tificate will be awarded upon completion of the required courses. 



272 School of Religion 



EVANGELICAL TEACHER ASSOCIATION DIPLOMA 

As a member of the Evangelical Teacher Association, Lee 
University is qualified to offer the ETA diploma in teacher training in 
church education. While the student is enrolled at Lee, he/she can 
meet requirements for the ETA diploma as he/she meets other 
requirements for graduation. 

The ETA diploma indicates that the holder is sufficiently profi- 
cient in Bible and Christian Education to qualify as an instructor of 
local church teachers in a leadership training program. It is recog- 
nized throughout the world by evangelical Christians. Over two hun- 
dred schools of higher learning and graduate seminaries belong to 
ETA. The courses required for this award are twelve hours of Bible 
and fifteen hours of Christian Education, including the following 
courses: Principles of Teaching in Christian Education, Christian 
Education of Children or Youth, Educational Ministry of the Church, 
Intercultural Studies and Personal Evangelism. 

The student must make application for the diploma to the 
Chairperson of the Department of Christian Ministries at the begin- 
ning of the semester in which he/she plans to graduate. The cost for 
the diploma is $10.00. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

For each of the preceding programs of study in this department 
the GPA is computed from the specialty area. Transfer students 
should consult with Department Chairperson concerning which 
Foundations of Ministry courses should be taken. 

Students with significant cross-cultural experience may petition 
the ISP Program Director for permission to substitute other courses 
for the practicum in lieu of a cross-cultural practicum. Substitutions 
require the approval of the Department Chairperson and Program 
Director for Intercultural Studies. 

BIB 101, 102, and THE 230 are prerequisites to 300- and 400-level 
courses in the disciplines of Biblical Studies and Theological Studies. 



Department of Christian Ministries 273 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

CED 241. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY OF THE CHURCH Three hours credit 

A study of the basic principles and practices of organizing, administering, and 
supervising a balanced program of Christian Education. All the educational agencies of 
the church will be included. The functions of the board of Christian Education and the 
role of church workers will be considered including the work of the director of Christian 
Education. Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week. 

CED 252. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF Three hours credit 

OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

A brief survey of the historical roots of Christian Education including Hebrew, 
Greek, and Roman systems. Christian Education is then traced from the beginning of 
the Christian era through the Sunday School movement to recent developments. 
Concurrently, religious and secular educational philosophies will be compared. 
Designed to aid students to form a biblical philosophy of Christian Education. 
Prerequisites: CED 241. 

CED 300. RELIGION COLLOQUY One hour credit 

Weekly discussion of selected topics to be continued throughout the semester. Not 
"open to freshmen. 

CED 320. MULTIPLE STAFF MINISTRY Three hours credit 

Students will review the ministry roles of a church staff and will seek to under- 
stand the basic concepts of human relationships in the context of ministry. Through 
personality profile tests students will seek a better understanding of their personal devel- 
opment and role as a staff member. Psychological and scriptural approaches to resolving 
conflict will be considered. 

CED 321. MUSIC IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Two hours credit 

A course designed to instruct the student in integrating music into all church activ- 
ities, developing music in churches through the church music school and the multiple 
choir systems. Graded music is studied for use in Sunday School, Vacation Bible School, 
and other Christian Education ministries. 

CED 340. SPIRITUAL FORMATION AND DISCIPLESHIP Three hours credit 

This course briefly surveys the human life-span and relates this to moral and faith 
development. A Christian perspective of Piaget and Kohlberg will be considered. 
Christian discipleship will be examined seeking implications for Christian Education in 
the life of the individual and church. Each student will seek to develop a theology of 
Christian spiritual formation. 

CED 341. PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING IN 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Three hours credit 

The relation of the teaching-learning process to Christian Education. How to study 
the Bible and teach it to individuals in relationship to their interests and needs. 
Observations and practice teaching are required. 

CED 342. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION OF CHILDREN Three hours credit 

A study of the characteristics, interests and needs of children under twelve years of 
age. Emphasis is placed on the organization, administration, methods, and materials of 
the children's division of the church. 

CED 343. MULTISENSORY EDUCATION Three hours credit 

A presentation, demonstration, and discussion of various types of audiovisual 
methods. Preparation, application, and evaluation of multisensory aids will be given. 
The use and care of equipment are also included. 



274 School of Religion 



CED 344. SOCIAL RECREATION Three hours credit 

A study of the qualifications of recreation leaders and of the organization and pro- 
motion of recreational activities for all age groups. Emphasis is on socials, crafts, and 
summer camp activities. 

CED 350. CHRISTIAN DAY SCHOOL ADMINISTATION Three hours credit 

A study of the principles of organization and administration of a Christian Day 
School. 

CED 365. PRACTICUM I Two hours credit 

In this practicum the student will carry out an intensive field experience in 
Christian Education. A total of 100 hours of work in a local church or another Christian 
Education situation approved by the Department Chair is required. Prerequisites: Major 
in Christian Education, completion of eighteen hours in the major, and junior classifica- 
tion or permission of the professor. 

CED 442. CHRISTIAN EDUATION OF ADULTS Three hours credit 

A course to introduce students to the characteristics and expanding needs of young, 
middle-aged, and older adults in a continuing program of adult Christian Education. 
Special emphasis is placed on the role of parents and the home in Christian Education. 

CED 444. MINISTRY TO THE FAMILY Two hours credit 

An examination of the contemporary Christian family will be conducted. Biblical 
principles will be examined, along with a study of the whole and fragmented family 
within the church. The course will also examine the methods and programs of the 
church and their contribution to the Christian home, along with the resources and tech- 
niques available to parents. Intergenerationai ministry will also be examined. 

CED 465. PRACTICUM II Two hours credit 

In this practicum the student will carry out an intensive field experience in 
Christian Education. A total of 100 hours of work in a local church or another Christian 
Education situation approved by the Department Chair is required. Prerequisites: Major 
in Christian Education, completion of eighteen hours in the major, and junior classifica- 
tion or permission of the professor. 

EVANGELISM 

EVA 161. PERSONAL EVANGELISM Two hours credit 

A study of the basic principles of personal evangelism. Special attention is given to 
the particular problems confronted in personal soul-winning. Considerable Scripture 
memorizing is required. 

EVA 363. CONTEMPORARY EVANGELISM Three hours credit 

A study of contemporary concepts of evangelism related to the local church while 
reaffirming the biblical foundations and mastering personal witnessing. Emphasis is 
placed on the major strategies for evangelism such as network, small groups, prayer, 
home visitation, cross-cultural, and media usage. 

INTERCULTURAL STUDIES 

ISP 250. INTRODUCTION TO MISSIONS Two hours credit 

An introduction to the world mission of the church including its biblical and theo- 
logical foundations, historical development, cultural perspectives, and present practices. 

ISP 253. PRINCIPLES OF CHURCH GROWTH Three hours credit 

A survey of the theological, sociological, and statistical dimensions of the church 
growth movement as they related to evangelism, church development, and Christian 
Education. 



Department of Christian Ministries 275 



ISP 254. HISTORY OF MISSIONS Three hours credit 

A history of Christian missions, including that of the Church of God. 

ISP 262. FOUNDATIONS FOR INTERCULTURAL MINISTRY Three hours credit 

A structural multicultural learning experience which involves the intentional 
crossing of cultural, ideological, racial, language, gender, and other borders in an effort to 
understand "otherness" in its ov^n terms. 

ISP 320. URBAN MINISTRIES Two hours credit 

A study of the problems and opportunities related to the church in the modern city, 
including urban characteristics, the church and social service agencies, and implications 
for church growth and church planting. 

ISP 332. RELIGION AND CULTURE Three hours credit 

See course description under THE 332. 

ISP 352. CONTEMPORARY WORLD RELIGIONS Three hours credit 

A study of the history and teachings of the major non-Christian religions of the 
world with an attempt to relate them to their cultural backgrounds. 

ISP 354. THEOLOGY OF MISSIONS Three hours credit 

An introduction to the study of missions with a stress upon what the Bible teaches 
about the plan of God for the propagation of the Gospel from Genesis to Revelation. 
Prerequisites: ISP 250, ISP 262, and THE 230. 

ISP 360. AREA STUDIES Two-three hours credit 

Directed study of the culture and the secular and ecclesiastical history of a certain 
geographical area, with specific attention to the mission work of the Church of God. 

ISP 430. PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF SELECTED REGIONS Three hours credit 

A broad investigation of the cultural unity and diversity of a selected region, its 
peoples, culture areas, and traditions. 

ISP 451. PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF MISSIONS Three hours credit 

A practical study of missions work, including a detailed study of the Church of 
God's missions policies. 

ISP 465. INTERCULTURAL STUDIES PRACTICUM Six hours credit 

A guided ten-week service experience service experience in a culture other than the 
student's own in the U.S.A. or abroad, planned and supervised by the faculty of the inter- 
cultural Studies program in connection with one of the following church agencies: 
Church of God World Missions, Cross-Cultural Ministries, or International Department 
of Youth and Christian Education. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES 

Intercultural Studies is an interdisciplinary major that requires and recommends 
subjects in other academic areas. The following courses comprise part of the ISP offer- 
ings. Course descriptions are found in the appropriate academic sections of this catalog. 
These courses do not count toward the 18-hour religion requirement. 

ANT 310 Cultural Anthropology 

COM 354 Intercultural Communication 

LIN 360 Introduction to Linguistics 

PSY 351 Multicultural Counseling 

SOC3I0 Cultural Anthropology 

SOC 410 Minorities 

Other related courses may be substituted upon prior written request by the student 
and approval by the Program Director and Department Chairperson. 



276 School of Religion 



PASTORAL STUDIES 

PAS 101. FOUNDATIONS FOR MINISTRY One hour credit 

An exploration of the biblical foundation for ministry, the "call" to ministry and 
the basic rationale and approach to ministry preparation. Open to freshmen and current 
transfers. Required of all majors in the department. Other students may be allowed to 
take this course with the permission of the Department Chairperson, but this course 
does not count toward the 18-hour religion requirement. 

PAS 102. PASTORAL MINISTRY SEMINAR One hour credit 

An overview of the implications of divine "call" upon a human life and an intro- 
duction to the holistic model for a God-called person. The methodology will include an 
off-campus retreat. Required of all freshmen and new transfers majoring in Pastoral 
Ministry. Prerequisite: PAS 101. 

PAS 201. FOUNDATIONS FOR MINISTRY One hour credit 

A study of the biblical and classical Christian disciplines and their relationship to 
effective contemporary ministry. Open to sophomores and current transfers. Required 
of all majors in the department. Other students may be allowed to take this course with 
the permission of the department Chairperson, but this course does not count toward 
the 18-hour religion requirement. Offered Fall Semester. 

PAS 202. PASTORAL MINISTRY SEMINAR One hour credit 

An assessment of one's ministerial identity in view of God's call, personal abihties 
and spiritual giftedness. The methodology will include an off-campus retreat. Required 
of all sophomores majoring in Pastoral Ministry. Prerequisites: PAS 101, 102, 201. 

PAS 261. INTRODUCTION TO PREACHING Two hours credit 

A study of the basic principles of preaching and sermon preparation. The student 
will prepare and deliver a sermon in class from an assigned text. 

PAS 262. THE MINISTRY OF PREACHING Two hours credit 

A workshop in sermon construction and delivery. Special attention will be given to 
those elements of craftsmanship, style, and theological understanding basic to persua- 
sive preaching. Students will preach and participate in feedback with fellow students 
and the instructor. Prerequisite: PAS 261. 

PAS 263. THE LAITY Two hours credit 

A study of the ministry of the laity in the life of the church. Special attention will 
be given to description, biblical example, theological mandates and current 
models/methodologies. 

PAS 291, 292, 293. COMTEMPORARY ISSUES IN One-three hours credit 

PASTORAL MINISTRY 

A course presenting varied issues, trends, and methods of ministry which are of 
contemporary interest but beyond the scope of established courses within the disci- 
plines. 

PAS 301. FOUNDATIONS FOR MINISTRY One hour credit 

A study of Pentecostal Christian formation. It focuses on both the content and the 
process of Christian formation in the Pentecostal faith tradition. Open to juniors only. 
Required of all majors in the department. Other students may be allowed to take this 
course with the permission of the Department Chairperson, but this course does not 
count toward the 18-hour religion requirement. Offered Fall Semester, 

PAS 351. THE MINISTRY OF WORSHIP Three hours credit 

A biblical and practical approach to Pentecostal worship in the local church with 
emphasis on special occasions such as weddings, funerals, baptisms, communion, and 
dedications. The study includes development of a biblical theology and practical philos- 
ophy of worship, a historical and contemporary overview, and the planning of each 



Department of Christian Ministries 277 



aspect of a service as well as the various types in order for w^orship to be developed and 
maintained. 

PAS 352. THE CURCH AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS Three hours credit 

A consideration of the church's role and function in the light of history and with 
special reference to the rapidly changing aspects of human need and social resources. 
Emphasis will be on the church's involvement in the emerging problems in American 
life. Prerequisite: SOC 21 1. 

PAS 363. EXPOSITORY PREACHING Three hours credit 

The problems and methods of expository preaching will be explored and selected 
passages studied with a view to discussing and using their exegetical and expository 
values. 

PAS 365. PRACTICUM IN PASTORAL STUDIES Two hours credit 

A practicum giving the student supervised experience in a ministry setting. It is 
designed to give a broad-based foundation in Christian ministry through a combination 
of participation, observation, and reflection under supervision. A minimum of 150 hours 
in the ministerial setting is required. Prerequisites: Major in Pastoral Ministry or Bible 
and Theology; completion of 18 hours in the major, including PAS 301,- and junior classi- 
fication. 

PAS 401. FOUNDATIONS FOR MINISTRY One hour credit 

A capstone course providing an opportunity for the senior student to reflect on per- 
sonal relationships, theological development and methods of ministry. Developing a 
resume, further education, and ministerial placement are also topics of discussions. 
Each student will present a 15-20 page paper on his/her Theology/Philosophy of Ministry 
which will remain on file in the department. Other students may be allowed to take 
this course with the permission of the Department Chairperson, but it does not count 
toward the 18-hour religion requirement. Offered Fall Semester. 

PAS 461. THE PASTORAL MINISTRY Three hours credit 

A study of pastoral ministry with emphasis on the shepherding model. It will also 
include the issues of credibility, leadership styles, mission, vision, compensation and 
housing, as well as those related to the model. 

PAS 462. THE PASTORAL MINISTRY Three hours credit 

A study of pastoral ministry with emphasis on the enabling model. Particular 
attention will be given to areas of pressure and pitfall (problem people, temptations and 
burnout), budgeting, and administration. 

PAS 464. PASTORAL COUNSELING Three hours credit 

The pastoral practice of counseling emphasizing context, attitudinal orientation, 
techniques, procedures, and essential information. Prerequisites: PSY 211 and PAS 461, 
462. 

PAS 465. PRACTICUM Two hours credit 

A continuation of PAS 365. The experience is largely determined by the area of 
vocational choices. A total of 150 hours work in the local church is required. 
Prerequisites: Major in Pastoral Ministry or Bible and Theology, PAS 401, and senior 
classification. 

YOUTH MINISTRY STUDIES 

YCE 245. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION OF YOUTH Three hours credit 

A study of the characteristics and needs of adolescents: junior high, senior high, 
and older youth. Consideration is given to the development of a sound, practical 
Christian Education program that will win and hold young people. Emphasis is placed 
upon preparation and presentation of youth worship services. THIS COURSE IS A PRE- 
REQUISITE TO ALL OTHER YCE COURSES. 



278 School of Religion 



YCE 351. OUTDOOR YOUTH MINISTRIES Two hours credit 

This course places an emphasis on developing resources for camping, backpackmg, 
hiking, and retreat ministries with youth. Included will be program design, program 
planning, the use of worship, counseling, and location direction. Prerequisite: YCE 245. 

YCE 431. MODELS OF YOUTH MINISTRY Three hours credit 

An examination of contemporary models of youth ministry, considering their theo- 
logical bases and ministry implications. The objectives, leadership styles, decision-mak- 
ing processes, programming approaches and relevant resources of various models will be 
considered. These aspects of youth ministry practice will be the object of theological 
reflection and practical experimentation. This course is intended to assist students in 
adopting or developing a personal model of youth ministry. Prerequisite: YCE 245. 

YCE 432. STRATEGIES FOR CHURCH YOUTH MINISTRY Three hours credit 

{5 A study of the organization and administration of principles, methods, and materi- 

C als for effective ministry in the local church and Christian youth organizations. 

g Prerequisite: YCE 245. 

,C 
I o 

r (5 A study which focuses on helping teens and families of teens who are in problem 

i % situations. Prerequisite: YCE 245. 

1 a> . 



5^ ; 



YCE 433. YOUTH PROBLEMS Three hours credit 



Department of Theology 279 



DEPARTMENT OF 
THEOLOGY 



TERRY L. CROSS, Chairperson 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

Associate Professor William Simmons 

Assistant Professor Emerson Powery 

Instructors Michael Fuller and Todd Hibbard 

HISTORICAL STUDIES 

Professor Donald Bowdle 

Assistant Professor David Roebuck 

Instructor Dale Coulter 

THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

Professor John Sims 

Associate Professor Terry Cross 

Instructor Barb Searcy 



DISCIPLINES 

Biblical Studies 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Historical Studies 

Philosophy 
Theological Studies 




280 School of Religion 



The Department of Theology encompasses the disciphnes of bib- 
lical, theological, and historical studies, as well as philosophy and bib- 
lical languages. It offers a major in BIBLE AND THEOLOGY. 
Students may choose one of two tracks in this major: the first is a Pre- 
Graduate Studies Emphasis in which further training at the graduate 
level or seminary is anticipated; the second is a Pastoral Studies 
Emphasis in which some skills requisite for pastoral ministry are 
offered. Students are strongly encouraged to speak with their advisors 
concerning the difference between these two degrees and the other 
programs offered in the School of Religion so that they nay choose the 
one that best reflects their calling and gifts. 

The Department of Theology also serves the university as a whole 
by providing an 18 -hour minor to all university graduates. This is 
described as the "Religion Core". The goal of this core is to enable all 
graduates to be conversant in the Christian faith and to begin inte- 
grating the faith in all aspects of their lives and vocations. 

BIBLE AND THEOLOGY 

The major in Bible and Theology is intended for the person who 
wants a thorough preparation in biblical and theological knowledge. 
It is the recommended degree program for those who plan to continue 
their education at the graduate level. The degree with Pastoral 
Studies Emphasis may also be useful for thorough preparation in bibli- 
cal and theological studies as well as some training in the skills of 
pastoral ministry. The Bible and Theology degree provides a founda- 
tion of Bible content, Christian doctrine, biblical languages (especially 
New Testament Greek), and Church history. Elements from the dis- 
cipline of philosophy are also introduced to students for the purpose 
of making them conversant in the major issues of thought throughout 
the ages. This program is ideal for those who plan to work in the edu- 
cational ministry of the church. 

RELIGION CORE 

As part of the university's general core of courses, the Religion 
Core is a set of eighteen hours in the following courses: BIB 110, 
Message of the New Testament; BIB 111, Message of the Old 
Testament; THE 230, Christian Thought; THE 331, Christian Ethics; 
BIB 334, ^foundations for Christian Discipleship; and finally, a "cap- 
stone" course within one's major that integrates the Christian faith 
with one's chosen discipline. 

Religion Core courses should be taken in the order in which they 
are listed here. Any variance to this order may result in a student not 
being prepared for the work in an upper level course. This sequence, 
therefore, is crucial since material in the upper level courses pre- 
sumes knowledge of the lower level courses. The only possible varia- 



Department of Theology 28 1 



tion is between BIB 110 and BIB 111. These courses can be taken in 
either order, but both must be completed before taking THE 230. In 
addition, THE 230 must be completed before taking THE 331. 

Any student who majors within the Department of Christian 
Ministries or the Department of Theology does not follow the same 
pattern as the rest of the university. To fulfill their Religion Core, 
majors within the School of Religion take the following courses: BIB 
101, Old Testament Survey; BIB 102, New Testament Survey,- THE 
230, Christian Thought; and THE 331 Christian Ethics. The other 
hours are combined within the biblical or theological electives in all 
School of Religion disciplines. As a result, students within these dis- 
ciplines do not take BIB 334, Foundations for Christian Discipleship 
or a "capstone" course. 

GRADUATE STUDIES IN RELIGION 

The Department of Theology also oversees the graduate programs 
in religion, specifically the M.A. in Biblical Studies, the M.A. in 
Theological Studies, and the M.A. in Youth and Family Ministry. 
The Director of Graduate Studies in Religion provides direction for 
the work of these academic disciplines at the graduate level. 



PROGRAM OF STUDY 

The Department of Theology offers the following program of 
study: 

Degree Major Code 

B.A. Bible and Theology BBTA 

(Pre-graduate Studies Emphasis) 

B.A. Bible and Theology BBPA 

(Pastoral Studies Emphasis) 



282 School of Religion 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN 
BIBLE AND THEOLOGY 
(Pre-Graduate Studies Emphasis) 



BBTA 



SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS Credit Hours 

BIB 202 - Synoptic Gospels (3) or 

BIB 210 -Luke/Acts (3) 3 

BIB 212 - Johannine Literature 3 

BIB 402 - Romans and Galatians 3 

PHI 241 - Introduction to Philosophy 3 

THE 437 - Systematic Theology 3 

THE 438 - Systematic Theology 3 

Doctrinal Studies Option: 3 hours chosen from: 3 

THE 334 - Doctrine of Christ 

THE 335 - Doctrine of the Holy Spirit 

THE336 - Doctrine of the Church 

Historical Studies Option: 3 hours chosen from: 3 

CHH 340 - Medieval Spirituality 

CHH 344 - Major Thinkers in Westem 

Christianity (200-1400) 

CHH 345 - Major Thinkers in the 

European Reformation (1500-1600) 

CHH 440 - Rome and the Early Church 

CHH 442 - The History and Thought of 

Eastern Christianity 

CHH 448 - Reformation Spirituality 

Theological Studies Option: 6 hours chosen from: 6 

THE 332 - ReHgion and Culture 

THE 337 - Theology of the Old Testament 

THE 338 - Theology of the New Testament 

THE 434 - Christian Apologetics 

THE 435 - Contemporary Theology 

Biblical Studies Electives: 6 hours 6 

(at least one course in Old Testament) 

Subtotal Specialty 36 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

BIB 101 - Old Testament Survey 3 

BIB 102 - New Testament Survey 3 

CHH 321 - Church of God History/Polity 2 

CHH 323 - History of Christianity 3 

CHH 324 - History of Christianity 3 

GRE 21 1 - Elementary New Testament Greek 4 

GRE 212 - Elementary New Testament Greek 4 



Department of Theology 283 



GRE 31 1 - Intermediate New Testament Greek 3 

GRE 312 - Intermediate New Testament Greek 3 

PAS 101 - Foundations for Ministry ' 1 

PAS 201 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 301 - Foundations for Ministry I 

PAS 401 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

THE 230 - Christian Thought 3 

TFiE 331 - Christian Ethics 3 

Choose 5-6 hours from: 5/6 

CED 341 - Principles of Teaching in 

Christian Education (3) 

COM 21 1 - PubHc Speaking (3) 

PAS 261 - Intro, to Preaching (2) 

Subtotal Collateral Requirements 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

ELECTIVES 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BBPA 

BIBLE AND THEOLOGY 
(Pastoral Studies Emphasis) 



44/43 
41 

9/10 
130 



SPECIALTY AREA REQUIREMENTS 
BIB 202 - Synoptic Gospels (3) 

or 
BIB 210 -Luke/ Acts (3) 
BIB 212 - Johannine Literature 
BIB 402 - Romans and Galatians 
PHI 241 - Introduction to Philosophy 
THE 437 - Systematic Theology 
THE 438 - Systematic Theology 

Doctrinal Studies Option: 3 hours chosen from: 
THE 334 - Doctrine of Christ (3) 
THE 335 - Doctrine of the Holy Spirit (3) 
THE336 - Doctrine of the Church (3) 

Historical Studies Option: 3 hours chosen from: 

CHH 340 - Medieval Spirituality (3) 

CHH 344 - Major Thinkers in 

Western Christianity (200-1400) (3) 

CHH 345 - Major Thinkers in the 

European Reformation (1500-1600) (3) 

CHH 440 - Rome and the Early Church (3) 



Credit Hours 



284 School of Religion 



CHH 442 - The History and Thought 
of Eastern Christianity (3) 

Theological Studies Option: 3 hours chosen from: 3 

THE 332 - ReUgion and Culture (3) 

THE 337 - Theology of the Old Testament (3) 

THE 338 - Theology of the New Testament (3) 

THE 434 - Christian Apologetics (3) 

THE 435 - Contemporary Theology (3) 

Biblical Studies Electives: 6 hours 6 

(at least one course in Old Testament) 

Subtotal Specialty 33 

COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS 

PAS 261 - Introduction to Preaching 2 

PAS 262 - Ministry of Preaching 2 

PAS 461 - Pastoral Ministry 3 

PAS 462 - Pastoral Ministry 3 

PAS464 - Pastoral Counseling 3 

BIB 101 - Old Testament Survey 3 

BIB 102 - New Testament Survey 3 

CHH 321 - Church of God History/Polity 2 

CHH 323 - History of Christianity 3 

CHH 324 - History of Christianity 3 

GRE 21 1 - Elementary New Testament Greek 4 

GRE 212 - Elementary New Testament Greek 4 

GRE 3 1 1 - Intermediate New Testament Greek 3 

GRE 312 - Intermediate New Testament Greek 3 

PAS 101 -Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 201 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

PAS 301 - Foundations for Ministry I 

PAS 401 - Foundations for Ministry 1 

THE 230 - Christian Thought 3 

THE 33 1 - Christian Ethics 3 
Subtotal Collateral Requirements 51 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 41 

ELECTIVES 5 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 130 



Department of Theology 285 



MINORS 

RELIGION 

A minor in religion consists of 18 semester hours, according to 
the following distribution: BIB 110; BIBlll; THE 230; THE 331; BIB 
334; and one three-hour religion elective or discipline capstone course 
(as required by individual departments). 

NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

The minor in New Testament Greek consists of Elementary New 
Testament Greek 211-212 (eight semester hours); Intermediate New 
Testament Greek 311-312 (six semester hours); and grammatical exe- 
gesis electives (four semester hours). These total 18 semester hours. 
While Biblical Hebrew is offered, it is not available for a minor. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

For each of the preceding programs of study in the Department of 
Theology, the GPA is computed from the specialty area. 

Although transfer students may have already acquired the hours 
required in Bible and Theology for a specific program, the Department 
of Theology requires its students to take the following courses here at 
Lee University: Systematic Theology 437-438 and two semesters of 
book studies, one of which must be BIB 402, Romans and Galatians. 
If the transfer student has already taken two semesters of Systematic 
Theology, the courses may be retaken or THE 337 (Theology of the 
Old Testament) and THE 338 (Theology of the New Testament) may 
be taken instead. In addition, students taking this major on campus 
may not take Systematic Theology (THE 437-438) or Romans and 
Galatians (BIB 402) from External Studies, except under extreme cir- 
cumstances. 

Any Bible and Theology major who chooses an Intercultural 
Studies mmor may take a modern foreign language in lieu of Greek. 

BIB 101, 102, and THE 230 are prerequisites to all 300- and 400- 
level courses in Bible and Theology. 



286 School of Religion 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



BIBLE 



BIB 101. OLD TESTAMENT SURVEY Three hours credit 

A study of the Old Testament, its translations, and historical background. This 
course is primarily a survey of Old Testament history and literature. FOR MAJORS IN 
THE DEPARTMENT. 

BIB 102. NEW TESTAMENT SURVEY Three hours credit 

A study of the intertestamental period and the development of the Gospels with 
attention given to the life and teachings of Christ continuing with Acts through 
Revelation. Special attention is given to the early development of the church. FOR 
MAJORS IN THE DEPARTMENT. 

BIB 110. MESSAGE OF THE NEW TESTAMENT Three hours credit 

This course is designed to explore the essential message of the New Testament 
with regard to key passages, persons and events. This study is set into the historical 
context of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ and its resultant missionary movement. 
Special emphasis is given to biblical principles for Christian living from an Evangelical- 
Pentecostal perspective. DESIGNED FOR NON-MAJORS. 

BIB 111. MESSAGE OF THE OLD TESTAMENT Three hours credit 

A study of the essential message of the Old Testament with regard to key passages, 
persons and events in the context of Israel's history. Special emphasis is given to bibli- 
cal principles for Christian living from an Evangelical-Pentecostal perspective. 
DESIGNED FOR NON-MAJORS. 

BIB 201. MAJOR PROPHETS Three hours credit 

A brief study of the life and times of the major prophets. An outline study is made 
of each book, with some attention given to present-day and homiletic use. 

BIB 202. SYNOPTIC GOSPELS Three hours credit 

A course designed to look at the interrelatedness of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark 
and Luke. 

BIB 203. MINOR PROPHETS Three hours credit 

A brief study of the life and times of the minor prophets. An outline study is made 
of each book with some attention given to present-day and homiletic use. 

BIB 208. COMPUTER-BASED BIBLE STUDY Three hours credit 

A practical, hands-on approach to Bible study and research using the latest computer 
technology and software. Students will develop sermons, Bible studies and designated 
research projects by accessing computer programs and Christian research sites on the Web. 

BIB 210. LUKE-ACTS Three hours credit 

This course will study the books of Luke and Acts as a two-part narrative. 
Attention will be given to Luke's use of Christian traditions, to the literary character 
and structure of the work, and to theological and socio-cultural theme in the Lukan nar- 
rative. 

BIB 212. JOHANNINE LITERATURE Three hours credit 

This course concerns an investigation of the Gospel of John in terms of authorship, 
date, logistics, and introduction to critical problems. Respecting the Fourth Gospel it 
also concerns theology of the prolog, exposition of the miracle narrative/discourse 
sequencing comprising the larger part of the book, and appropriate comparisons to the 
Synoptic Gospels. It includes, furthermore, a thematic study of the Letters of John, 
focusing on Christian community, false teaching and church order, urgent concerns in 
the late apostolic period. The course does not consider the Book of Revelation. 



Department OF Theology 287 



BIB 301. DEUTERONOMY Two hours credit 

A detailed study of Deuteronomy. Special emphasis will be given to the place of 
the book in the Pentateuch, the use of it by Jesus and the early Church, and the Jewish 
rabbinic interpretations of the book. 

BIB 302. PRISON EPISTLES Three hours credit 

An expository study of the Epistles to the Ephesians, Colossians, Philemon, and 
Philippians. Date, authorship and the occasion are briefly considered for each book, but 
the major part of the course is devoted to the interpretation and relevance of the Pauline 
Epistles. 

BIB 303. WISDOM LITERATURE Three hours credit 

A study of the Old Testament books generally recognized as wisdom books: 
Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Job. Consideration will be given to the relation of these 
books to the Old Testament as a whole and their individual theological and ethical 
thrusts. 

BIB 304. PASTORAL EPISTLES Two hours credit 

An expository treatment of the Epistles to Timothy and Titus, supplemented with 
appropriate exegetical material. Special attention is given to the position, qualifications 
and office of both the elder and the deacon. 

BIB 305. THE PSALMS Two hours credit 

A sectional study of this Old Testament poetical book. Special attention is give to 
matters of background, outlining the Psalms and determining historical context and theol- 
ogy. The Hebrew text is consulted periodically for purposes of illustration and clarification. 

BIB 306. HEBREWS Two hours credit 

A verse-by-verse study of this doctrinal epistle. Special attention is given to matters 
of background and outlining, with constant reference to the Old Testament structure. 
The Greek text is consulted periodically for purposes of illustration and clarification. 

BIB 334. FOUNDATIONS FOR CHRISTIAN DISCIPLESHIP Three hours credit 

A study of selected biblical texts which focus on God's plan of salvation and 
Christian discipleship. The inductive Bible study method is the primary approach to 
studying the texts. The course emphasizes the development of personal skill in under- 
standing the biblical text and seek to sponsor Christian discipleship. 

BIB 398. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY AND 

ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE BIBLE Three hours credit 

A travel-study program in Israel designed to provide the student with an on-the- 
scene study opportunity to correlate biblical and historical materials with Palestinian 
sites. Lectures, on campus and on-site, presume a working knowledge of the biblical 
text. Priority will be given to graduating seniors in the School of Religion, but the travel 
program in Israel is open to other students, faculty and friends of the university as space 
allows. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102 or BIB 110 and 111. 

BIB 399. BIBLICAL LANDS STUDY TOUR Six hours credit 

A summer travel-study program in Israel and other biblical lands designed to pro- 
vide the student with an on-the-scene study opportunity to correlate biblical and histori- 
cal materials with biblical sites. Lectures, on campus and on-site, presume a working 
knowledge of the biblical text. Priority will be given to graduating seniors in the School 
of Religion, but the travel program in Israel is open to other students, faculty and friends 
of the university as space allows. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102 or BIB 1 10 and 111. 

BIB 401. INTERTESTAMENTAL PERIOD Three hours credit 

A study of the history and literature of the intertestamental period leading up to 
the first advent of Christ. In addition to the apocryphal books, the Qumran scrolls will 
be read and discussed and their significance for the New Testament period considered. 



288 School of Religion 



BIB 402. ROMANS AND GALATIANS Three hours credit 

A comparative, expository, and theological study of the Epistles to the Romans and 
Galatians with emphasis on the cardinal Christian doctrines as formulated in these doc- 
uments. The course includes a study of the influences of both Judaism and Hellenism 
on the cultural and religious scene in the first century A.D. 

BIB 404. 1 AND II CORINTHIANS Three hours credit 

An expository and theological study of I and II Corinthians. Special attention is 
given to the doctrinal and practical issues faced in the early Christian community in the 
Hellenistic world, taking into account the cultural and religious environments of the 
day. 

BIB 406. GENERAL EPISTLES Two hours credit 

An English Bible book study in I and II Peter, James, Jude, and the Johannine 
Epistles. Primary emphasis is placed on an inductive study of the contents of each book. 

BIB 408. REVELATION Two hours credit 

A study of the book of Revelation with appropriate consideration of Daniel and 
other apocalyptic passages. Special attention is given to the Christology of the book. 

CHURCH HISTORY 

CHH 291-293. PERSPECTIVES ON CHRISTIANITY One-three hours credit 

A course presenting geographic, theological, biblical and current perspectives of 
Christianity which are beyond the scope of courses within the major disciplines of the 
department. CHH 291, one hour credit; CHH 292, two hours credit; CHH 293, three 
hours credit. 

CHH 321. CHURCH OF GOD HISTORY AND POLITY Two hours credit 

A history of the Church of God and a scriptural study of church government with 
an emphasis on the organizational structure of the Church of God. 

CHH 323. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY Three hours credit 

A study of the Christian Church from the apostles to the present age. Special 
emphasis will be given to the major reform movements of the church. 

CHH 324. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY Three hours credit 

A continuation of CHH 323. 

CHH 340. MEDIEVAL SPIRITUALITY Three hours credit 

This course provides a study of spirituality in the Middle Ages. By focusing on 
major movements and figures, it seeks to identify and explain the rise of medieval spiri- 
tuality, its development, and its distinctive features. Particular attention will be given 
to the relationship between mysticism and spirituality; St. Francis of Assisi and 
Franciscan spirituality; and Julian of Norwich spirituality among women. 

CHH 342. THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION Three hours credit 

A study of political, economic, religious, and cultural developments of the 
Renaissance and Reformation eras. Offered Spring Semester, odd years. 

CHH 344. MAJOR THINKERS IN 

WESTERN CHRISTIANITY (200-1400) Three hours credit 

This course provides an in-depth examination of majors figures within the Latin 
West from 200 to 1400 C.E. Seminal works from a selected group of thinkers during this 
period will be read to allow a close analysis of the various sources, contours, and influ- 
ence of each author's own theology. The course will be structured to highlight similar 
themes among the theologians being discussed. Theologians to be considered include 
the following: TertuUian, Augustine, Pelagius, Boethius, Anselm, Aquinas, 
Bonaventure, and Duns Scotus. 



Department of Theology 289 



CHH 345. MAJOR THINKERS IN 

EUROPEAN REFORMATION (1500-1600) Three hours credit 

This course provides an in-depth examination of majors figures in European 
Protestant Reformation. Seminal works from a selected group of thinkers during this 
period will be read to allow a close analysis of the various sources, contours, and influ- 
ence of each author's own theology. The course will be structured to highlight similar 
themes among the theologians being discussed. Theologians will be considered from 
three groups such as the Anabaptists, the Magisterial Reformers, and the Catholic 
Reformers. 

CHH 442. THE HISTORY AND THOUGHT 

OF EASTERN CHRISTIANITY Three hours credit 

This course provides a basic introduction to the shape and contour of Christianity 
as it evolved primarily in the Greek East. By focusing on major movements, events, and 
figures, it seeks to identify and explain the emergence of Eastern Christianity and its dis- 
tinctive figures. 



GREEK 

GRE 211. ELEMENTARY NEW TESTAMENT GREEK Four hours credit 

A basic vocabulary and grammar study of New Testament Greek with drills in sim- 
ple Greek reading. 

GRE 212. ELEMENTARY NEW TESTAMENT GREEK Four hours credit 

A continuation of GRE 211 with more attention to syntax and reading. 

GRE 311. INTERMEDIATE NEW TESTAMENT GREEK Three hours credit 

A continuation of GRE 212. Special attention is given to the handling of irregular 
verbs and more in-depth readings in Greek will be assigned. 

GRE 312. INTERMEDIATE NEW TESTAMENT GREEK Three hours credit 

A continuation of GRE 311. A course in reading New Testament Greek, beginning 
with the simpler portions and advancing to more difficult areas of text. 

GRE 417. GRAMMATICAL EXEGESIS OF GALATIANS Two hours credit 

An exegetical study from the Greek, with an emphasis on the grammar of the text. 

GRE 418. GRAMMATICAL EXEGESIS OF JAMES Two hours credit 

A study of this practical epistle from the Greek text. Special attention is given to 
matters of interpretation and elements of advanced grammar. 



HEBREW 

HEB 301. ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW Three hours credit 

This course is an introduction to Hebrew that is designed to introduce students to 
the basic vocabulary and grammar of the Hebrew Bible. 

HEB 302. ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW Three hours credit 

This course is a continuation of HEB 301. It builds on the vocabulary and grammar 
of HEB 301 and gives students a working knowledge of the standard grammatical and 
lexical resources for exegetical work. Students will also begin reading the text of the 
Hebrew Bible. 



290 School of Religion 



PHILOSOPHY 



PHI 241. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY Three hours credit 

A survey of the types of philosophy (the chief schools and movements) and the 
basic problems of philosophical thought. Emphasis is placed on modern philosophical 
trends and their treatment of the basic quests within mankind. 



THEOLOGY 

THE 230. CHRISTIAN THOUGHT Three hours credit 

An introduction to the general field of Christian thought with emphasis on the bib- 
lical doctrines of the Triune God, of man, of salvation, of the Church, and of the 
Scriptures. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102. 

THE 291-293. RELIGION COLLOQUY One-three hours credit 

A course or seminar which focuses on special topics or themes. The topics will 
vary from semester to semester. Variable credit is available and will be determined by 
the nature of the course or seminar. 

THE 300-301. RELIGION COLLOQUY One hour credit 

Weekly discussion of selected topics to be continues throughout the semester. 

THE 331. CHRISTIAN ETHICS Three hours credit 

A study of values and their influence on social and individual behavior. Special 
emphasis is placed on the development of Christian values, congruent with the teach- 
ings of Christ, and the application of these values to everyday living. Prerequisite: THE 
230. 

THE 332. RELIGION AND CULTURE Three hours credit 

A historical study of the problematic relationship between the Christian religion 
and Western culture. The specific topics for the course vary, but the general intent is to 
clarify the Christian's role and responsibility in living out his/her faith in the world. 
Various positions and practices are discussed which have been set forth in the Christian 
Church as a result of the Church's double wrestle with its Lord and the cultural society 
in which it lives. 

THE 334. DOCTRINE OF CHRIST Three hours credit 

A historical and systematic study of the doctrine of the person and work of Jesus 
Christ. This course surveys the primitive Christologies of the New Testament and the 
Christological controversies of the early church and continues by examining the various 
reconstructions of Christologies in the modern era. The centrality of Christ for other 
doctrines and for Christian proclamation will also be stressed. 

THE 335. DOCTRINE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT Three hours credit 

A study of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit with emphasis upon the Spirit's relation- 
ship to Christ. The work of the Holy Spirit in relation to other fundamental doctrines 
will also be considered (e.g. creation, salvation, ecclesiology, eschatology, etc.). Special 
attention will^be focused on the work of the Holy Spirit as teacher, helper, discipler, and 
on the experience of Spirit baptism with the initial evidence of glossolalia. Some atten- 
tion will be given to the meaning of "living in the Spirit" and spiritual gifts. 

THE 336. DOCTRINE OF THE CHURCH Three hours credit 

This course will examine the various models of the Church proposed by the New 
Testament and later throughout the history of Christianity. Special attention will be 
given to these areas of ecclesiology: governmental structures and leadership,- the nature 
and mission of the church; sacraments; and the church empowered by the Spirit. 
Relating these studies to the contemporary Body of Christ will always be a central goal. 



Department OF Theology 291 



THE 337. THEOLOGY OF THE OLD TESTAMENT Three hours credit 

An exegetical, historical study of the theology of the Old Testament emphasizing God, 
man, and the interrelation between the two. 

THE 338. THEOLOGY OF THE NEW TESTAMENT Three hours credit 

An exegetical, historical study of the theology of the New Testament with special atten- 
tion given to Pauline, Johannine, Petrine and Jewish-Christian formulations thereof. 

THE 432. BUSINESS ETHICS Three hours credit 

This course applies basic Christian principles to modern standard business practices. 
Emphasis will be placed on ethical decision-making in the business arena. 

THE 434. CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS Three hours credit 

An introduction to the Christian strategy for setting forth the truthfulness of the 
Christian faith and its right to the claim of the knowledge of God. Some attention is 
given to the history of apologetics, but the primary focus is upon current apologetical 
problems (e.g. the problem of evil, biblical criticism, harmonizing scientific and biblical 
truth, etc.) with which the student is expected to grapple. Especially recommended for 
juniors and seniors who anticipate graduate work. 

THE 435. CONTEMPORARY THEOLOGY Three hours credit 

A study of the major men, movements and issues in contemporary religious thought and 
an evaluation of these in the light of conservative evangelical Christianity. The course 
seeks to clarify the structure and method of contemporary theological thinking. It 
explores the relationship between contemporary religious thought and the broader intel- 
lectual and cultural context of modern life. Especially recommended for juniors and 
seniors who anticipate graduate work. 

THE 437. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY Three hours credit 

An advanced study of theology from a philosophical and biblical standpoint. The course 
consists of a study of the doctrine of God, His being and works; the doctrine of man, his 
original state and state of sin; and the doctrine of Christ, His person, states, and offices. 

THE 438. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY Three hours credit 

A continuation of THE 437 consisting of a study of soteriology, ecclesiology, the sacra- 
ments, and eschatology. Prerequisite: THE 437. 

THE 450. DIRECTED STUDY IN RELIGION One - four hours credit 

A study of an approved aspect of biblical-theological inquiry in which the student con- 
tracts with the director of the study concerning course requirements, evaluation proce- 
dure and course credit. Open only to juniors and seniors in the major. 



292 Department of External Studies 



DEPARTMENT OF 
EXTERNAL STUDIES 



CHRISTIAN MINISTRY 

Senior Adjunct Professor Henry Smith 

Assistant Professor Terry Johns 

Instructor Robert Debelak 



The Department of External Studies offers an undergraduate curricu- 
lum designed specifically for adult leamers. Its basic purpose is to offer 
training in the areas of Bible, Christian Education, Pastoral Ministry, 
Theology, and Urban Ministry. 

The program is especially designed to prepare persons for ministry 
who cannot pursue a traditional resident college degree program, as well 
as to offer general studies courses to those students who are unable to 
schedule a resident program. 

Students enrolled in the External Studies program are entitled to the 
same library and media center privileges as resident students. All other 
privileges such as student activity events, which are available to resident 
students, do not apply to enrollment fees. However, students may pur- 
chase a yearbook by making the proper payment to the Lee University 
business office. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Lee University offers the following programs of study through the 
Department of External Studies: 

Degree Major Code 

B.A. Christian Ministry MINA 

B.S. Christian Ministry MINS 

B.C.M. Christian Ministry BCM 

(Charlotte Center) 

Program descriptions and requirements are described in the External 
Studies catalog. To request a catalog, contact the Department of Extemal 
Studies at the address listed under application procedure. 

METHOD^ OF STUDY 

Course work in the Extemal Studies Program is delivered in a vari- 
ety of ways. These include Independent Study, Group Study, Extension 
Classes, Thursday-Only Classes, on-line and the Ministerial Intemship 
Program. 



Department of External Studies 293 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations are supervised and may be taken at the Department of 
External Studies or under the supervision of an approved proctor. 

The Department of External Studies reserves the right to reject any 
proctor, regardless of his/her academic qualifications. No relative of a 
student may proctor that student's examinations. No proctor fees are 
authorized. 

GRADUATION CRITERIA 

The total number of semester hours which must be eamed in order 
to qualify for a degree through this program is 130. A maximum of 90 
semester hours of non-resident credit may be applied toward graduation 
requirements. A minimum of 40 hours must be completed through an 
accredited resident program (this includes Extension, Thursday-Only 
Classes, and on-line courses). The final 30 semester hours must be eamed 
through the Department of External Studies or in residence at Lee 
University. 

ELIGIBILITY 

Acceptance into the program is determined by using the following 
criteria: 

1 . An application for admission must be completed by all students. 

2. An official high school transcript must be mailed directly from the 
high school. All students must have achieved a C average on all high 
school work or a composite score of 17 or above on the American 
College Test, or 745 (Recentered 860) on the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test. 

3. Students transferring more than 15 semester hours from an accredited 
college or university are not required to furnish a high school tran- 
script. Official college/university transcripts are to be mailed directly 
from the institutions to Lee University Department of External 
Studies. Transfer students with fewer than sixteen semester hours are 
required to submit ACT or SAT test scores. AppHcants who have not 
already taken the entrance examination (ACT or SAT) will be required 
to take it prior to acceptance. The ACT/SAT should be taken on a 
national test date. Exceptions to this poHcy should be forwarded to the 
Chairperson of the Department of Extemal Studies for consideration. 

4. Required is an advance matriculation fee of $15 (not refundable). 
The matriculation fee may be applied to the account of the student 
for a period of two semesters following the date of payment. 

When the above regulations have been completed, a student will be 
notified of his acceptance or rejection. The University may refuse admis- 
sion and registration to students not meeting the minimum require- 
ments, or may admit them on probation for limited work. 



Si 



294 Department of External Studies 



APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

Application forms may be obtained by writing to Lee University 
Department of External Studies, 100 Eighth Street, NE, Cleveland, TN 
37311-2235. 



296 Alumni Association 



LEE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCL^TION 



From its early beginnings in 1918, Lee University has enriched the 
lives of thousands of alumni. Decades of tradition become an insepara- 
ble part of all who enter here. Lee University has been for many an 
unforgettable and life-changing experience. 

Reminiscing about Bible Training School, Lee Academy, Lee Junior 
College, Lee College and Lee University is at the heart of the Alumni 
Association. Upholding the traditions of our past and preparing for the 
hopes of tomorrow are the foundation on which we stand. Nurturing 
alumni loyalty, building lifelong relationships and cultivating alumni 
support ensures the very standard of excellence by which all Lee alumni 
are united. 

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 

The Lee University Alumni Association exists for all who have been 
educated at Bible Training School, Lee Academy, Lee Junior College, Lee 
College and Lee University. Its purpose is to provide fellowship for its 
members and to cultivate support for and loyalty to the University. 

CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS 

The Lee University Alumni Association is governed by a published 
Constitution and Bylaws written by alumni representatives and ratified 
by the university administration. 

CHAPTER OFFICERS 

Chapter officers serve regional and state chapters. These officers 
play a major role in the promotion and support of Lee University 
through national and state sponsored projects. Current chapters include 
Alabama; South Carolina; Del-MarVa-DC; Eastern North Carolina; 
Florida State; Florida-Tampa Bay; Georgia (North); Georgia (South); 
Kentucky; Rocky Mountain; Virginia; and West Virginia. 

HOMECOMING WEEKEND 

The most important campus-wide weekend of the fall semester is 
Homecoming when alumni from around the world are welcomed back 
to their alma mater. Held the first weekend of each November, the 
schedule includes class reunions, club and organization anniversaries, 
specialty reunions, athletic competitions, drama productions and the 
music festival - a traditional highlight of the weekend. 



Alumni Association 297 



DISTINGUISHED ALUMNUS AWARD 

The announcement of the Distinguished Alumnus Award recipient 
each year concludes a nomination process that begins months earlier. 
The purpose of the award is to give annual recognition to an alumnus or 
alumna for outstanding accomplishments which reflect the values of 
Lee. The purpose of Lee University is to exemplify Christ-centered liv- 
ing. The recipient is selected to bring distinction to the University and 
the accomplishment to be a part of the zenith of his/her profession. 
Critieria for selection include ( 1 ) an individual who has totally exempli- 
fied a living pattern of high Christian ideals Lee University seeks to 
sponsor; (2) an individual who has brought recognition in some way to 
Lee University either by personal honor, through a notable publication, 
scientific achievement, or through similar worthy contributions to 
church, national or world betterment; (3) an individual who has con- 
tributed in a direct way to Lee University, either through influence, 
recruitment, finance, or prestige. 

The Distinguished Alumnus Award is presented by the President of 
Lee University during the annual Homecoming festivities. A written 
citation accompanies the award. 

Written nominations are accepted by the Director of Alumni 
Relations before August 10 of each year. The nomination should list the 
nominee's accomplishments and qualifications. Any alumnus or alumna 
of any class is eligible for nomination. 



298 Alumni Association 



DISTINGUISHED ALUMNUS AWARDS 



1960 


Charles W. Conn 


1986 


R. Lamar Vest 


1961 


James A. Cross 


1987 


Billie Jones 


1962 


J.H. Walker, Sr. 


1988 


Don Medlin 


1963 


R.E. Hamilton 


1989 


Robert Daugherty, Sr. 


1964 


Charles R. Beach 


1990 


Kenneth E. Hall 


1965 


James A. Stephens 


1991 


Loran Livingston 


1966 


Paul H. Walker 


1992 


J. Patrick Daugherty 


1967 


David Lemons 


1993 


Raymond A. Conn 


1968 


O. Wayne Chambers 




Gary Sharp 


1969 


W.C. Byrd 


1994 


Dennis McGuire 


1970 


W.E. Johnson 




Jim Sharp, Honorary 


1971 


Dora P. Meyers 


1995 


Mark Harris 


1972 


Ray H. Hughes, Sr. 




Paul Duncan, Honorary 


1973 


J.H. Walker, Jr. 


1996 


Robert J. Jenkins 


1974 


Odine Morse 




Henry &. Iris Atkins, 


1975 


Bill Higginbotham 




Honorary 


1976 


Ralph E. Williams 


1997 


Bill F. Sheeks 


1977 


Jerry Lambert 




H. Bernard Dixon, 


1978 


Charles Paul Conn 




Honorary 


1979 


Cecil B. Knight 


1998 


C. Dewayne Knight 


1980 


Bennie S. Triplett 




Mark L. Walker, 


1981 


Zeno C. Tharp 




Honorary 


1982 


E.C. Thomas 


1999 


Raymond F. Culpepper 


1983 


Paul L. Walker 




Betty W. Baldree, 


1984 


Robert White 




Honorary 


1985 


Lucille Walker 


2000 


Bill Balzano 



In 1994, a new tradition began with the selection of an Honorary 
Alumnus, recognizing exceptional friends of the institution, who exem- 
plify the ideals of Lee University. 



HONORARY DISTINGUISHED ALUMNUS AWARDS 

1994 Jim Sharp 1998 Mark L. Walker 



1995 


Paul Duncan 


1999 


Betty W. Baldree 


1996 


Henry &l Iris Atkins 


2000 


J. Hoyle Rymer 


1997 


vH. Bernard Dixon 







Alumni Association 299 

ANNUAL ALUMNI FUND DIUVE 

Each year a project is selected for funding through the annual giving 
program for the university. Although alumni giving has been a signifi- 
cant part of the history of the institution, the present annual giving pro- 
gram was established in 1986. The projects and dollars raised are listed. 



2000 


$241,023 


Paul Conn Student Union 


1999 


$226,253 


Keeble Hall 


1998 


$201,743 


Centenary Building Renovation 


1997 


$190,031 


East-West Pedestrian Mall 


1996 


$156,700 


Deacon Jones Dining Hall 


1995 


$151,635 


Curtsinger Music Building 


1994 


$125,372 


Atkins-Ellis Hall 


1993 


$101,823 


Alumni Terrace 


1992 


$81,202 


DeVos Student Recreation Center 


1991 


$ 90,585 


Dixon Center Seating 


1990 


$ 56,204 


Pedestrian Mall Extension 


1989 


$ 71,486 


Student Center Renovation 


1988 


$33,415 


Alumni Amphitheater 


1987 


$ 45,302 


Alumni Office Budget 


1986 


$ 40,322 


Alumni Office Budget 



Lee alumni have the potential to literally change the course of stu- 
dents' lives by their continued support and giving. Through their dedica- 
tion to their alma mater, alumni continue to change the world-one stu- 
dent at a time. 

ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIPS 

One of the services of State Alumni Chapters is funding scholar- 
ships. Application for these scholarships is made through the respective 
state alumni presidents. Active scholarships exist for Florida State 
Chapter; Georgia (North); Georgia (South); Del-MarVa-DC; North 
Carolina; South Carolina; and Virginia. The selection of the scholarship 
recipients is made from nominations from the funding alumni chapter. 
These nominees must be students who have been accepted by Lee 
University as full-time students. The Scholarship Committee of Lee 
University will make its selection from the list of nominees. 



302 Administration, Faculty &. Staff 



THE administration, FACULTY 
AND STAFF OF LEE UNIVERSITY 

The guidance, instruction, and assistance you will receive at Lee 
will come primarily from the people listed on the following pages. 
Each member of the faculty, administration, and staff possesses great 
individual devotion to Lee University and our students. Whether 
conversing with you over coffee in the Student Center, assisting you 
with your career planning, or working behind the scenes insuring the 
smooth operation of the school, you will find the Lee University 
family's devotion genuine and contagious. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Raymond F. Culpepper, Chair Birmingham, Alabama 

Bill F. Sheeks, Executive Liaison Cleveland, Tennessee 

Cecil N. Brown Kennesaw, Georgia 

Patricia Carroll Ft. Myers, Florida 

Raymond Crowley Chincoteague, Virginia 

H. Bernard Dixon Cleveland, Tennessee 

Bill W. Fiigginbotham Norman, Oklahoma 

Edward E. Hollowell Raleigh, North Carolina 

B. Kenneth "Deacon" Jones Smithfield, North Carolina 

Dennis Livingston Matthews, North Carolina 

Stephen L. Lowery Ft. Washington, Maryland 

Ronald D. Martin Arvada, Colorado 

N. Don Medlin Caruthersville, Missouri 

Quan L. Miller Cocoa, Florida 

M. Darrell Rice Chicago, Illinois 

Samuel Robeff High Point, North Carolina 

Gary Sharp Fiobe Sound, Florida 

Lee Storms Ft. Mill, South Carolina 

John B. White West Palm Beach, Florida 

PRESIDENT 

Charles Paul Conn, Ph.D., President 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University 

CABINET 

Carolyn Dirksen, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs 

B.A., M.A., Northern Arizona University; 

Ph.D., University of Arizona 

Dale W. Goff, M.S., Vice President for Institutional Advancement 
B.S., Lee College; M.S., University of Tennessee 



Administration, Faculty &. Staff 303 

David M. Painter, M.B.A., Vice President for Business and Finance 
B.S., Tennessee Wesleyan College; 
M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

Gary T. Ray, M.Ed., Vice President for Enrollment Management 

B.S., Lee College,- M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

David W. Tilley, Ed.D., Vice President for Student Life 
B.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 
M.Ed., Georgia State University; 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

ACADEMIC DEANS 

Jerome Boone, D.Min., Dean, School of Religion 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., Wheaton College; 

Th.M., D.Min., Columbia Theological Seminary 

Walter C. Mauldin, D.M.A., Dean, School of Music 

B.M.E., Lee College; M.M., University of Southern Mississippi; 
D.M.A., University of Miami 

Deborah Murray, Ed.D., Dean, Flelen DeVos College of Education 
B.S., Lee College; 
M.S., Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Dewayne Thompson, D.B.A., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
B.S., Lee College; M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University; 
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT CHAIRPERSONS 
Edward L. Brown, Ph.D. 

Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

B.S., Lee College; 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Pamela G. Browning, Ph.D. 

Department of Teaching and Learning 

B.S., Lee College; M.A., University of South Florida; 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Murl Dirksen, Ph.D. 

Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

B.A., M.A.T., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 



304 Administration, Faculty 6k Staff 



Evaline Echols, Ph.D. 

Department of Business 

B.S., Lee College; M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Jean Eledge, Ed.D. 

Department of English and Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Carson Newman; 

M.A., Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

J. Matthew Mehon, Ph.D. 

Department of Communication and the Arts 
C.B.A., C.M.A., International Institute; 
M.A., Ph.D., Regent University 

Mark Wickam, D.A. 

Department of Fiealth and Fiuman Performance 

B.S., Lee College; M.Ed., University of Southwestern Louisiana; 

D.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

ACADEMIC PROGRAM DIRECTORS AND ASSOCIATE DEANS 
Jim Burns, D.M.A. 

Director, Graduate Studies in Music 

B.C.M., Lee College; 

M.C.M. D.M.A., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Herb Cannon, M.Ed. 

Director, Field Placements 

B.S., Lee College; M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

Terry L. Cross, Ph.D. 

Associate Dean, School of Religion and 

Director, Graduate Studies in Religion 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., M.Div., Ashland Theological Seminary; 

Th.M., Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary 

Doyle R. Goff, Ph.D. 

Director, Graduate Studies in Counseling Psychology 
B.A., M.S., Florida Intemational University; 
Ph.D., Florida State University 

Edley Moodley, D.Min. 

Acting Director, Intercultural Studies Program 

B.Th., University of South Africa; 

M.Div., Church of God Theological Seminary 



Administration, Faculty &. Staff 305 



Gary L. Riggins, Ed.D. 

Director, Graduate Studies in Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Georgia Southern University; 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

FACULTY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Evelyn Adams (1996), Special Adjunct Instructor in Biology 

B.S., Lee College; M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

Jerry Adams (1989), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., University of Tulsa; 
M.S.T., University of Missouri at Rolla; 
Ed.D., Nova University 

David P. Altopp (1996), Head Baseball Coach and 
Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Greenville College; M.S., Arizona State University; 
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 

Laura Anderson (1996), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A., M.A., Furman University; 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

R. Mark Bailey (1989), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M.E., Lee College; 
M.M., Wright State University; 
D.M.E., Univiversity of Cincinnati 

Robert E. Barnett (1995), Associate Professor of History 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech University 

Bob R. Bayles (1994), Assistant Professor of Christian Education 
B.A., East Coast Bible College; 
M.Div., Church of God School of Theology; 
Ph.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

Andrew Blackmon (1989), Assistant Professor of Christian Education 
B.A., Lee College; M.C.E., Reformed Theological Seminary 

R. Jerome Boone (1976), Professor of Old Testament and 
Christian Formation 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., Wheaton College; 
Th.M., D.Min., Columbia Theological Seminary 



306 Administration, Faculty & Staff 



Donald N. Bowdle (1962|, Professor of History and Religion 
B.A., Lee College; M.A., Ph.D., Bob Jones University; 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 

John D. Bratcher (1989), Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B.A., Grace College; M.S., Saint Francis College; 
D.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

Vanetta B. Bratcher |1996|, Instructor in English 
B.A., Seattle Pacific University; 
M.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

Edward L. Brown (1990), Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Lee College; 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Pamela G. Browning (1989), Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., Lee College; M.A., University of South Florida; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Gloria Brownlee (1988), Instructor in Reading 
B.S., Atlantic Christian College; 
M.Ed. University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

Michael C. Brownlee (1980-82; 1983), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M.E., Lee College; M.M., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

C. Alan Burns (1979), Assistant Professor of Business 
B.Ch.E., Georgia Institute of Technology; 
M.S.O.R., Naval Post Graduate School; 
M.B.A., Golden Gate University 

Jim W. Burns (1967), Professor of Music 
B.C.M., Lee College; 
M.C.M., D.M.A., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Herb Cannon (2000), Assistant Professor of Education and 
Director of Field Placements 
B.S., Lee College; M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

Sharon S. Carbaugh (1995), Associate Professor of Drama 
B.M.E., DePauw University; 
M.M.E., North Texas State University; 
D.A., Ball State University 



Administration, Faculty a Staff 307 

H. Lee Cheek (2000|, Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Western Carolina University; M.Div., Duke University; 
M.P.A., Western Carolina University; 
Ph.D., The Catholic University of America 

Charles Paul Conn (1970), Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Lee College; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University 

Jean Corey (2000), Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Duke University; 
D.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

Christopher A. Coulter (1994), Assistant Professor of English 
B.S., George Peabody College for Teachers; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Dale M. Coulter (1999), Instructor in Theology 

B.A., Lee College; M.Div., Reformed Theological Seminary 

Terry L. Cross (1997), Associate Professor of Theology and Philosophy 
B.A., Lee College; M.A., M.Div., Ashland Theological Seminary; 
Th.M., Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary 

Jerald J. Daffe (1987), Professor of Pastoral Ministries 

B.A., Northwest Bible College; M.A., Wheaton College; 
D.Min., Western Conservative Baptist Seminary 

Anthony Deaton (1996), Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Lee College, M.M., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Robert P. Debelak (2000), Instructor in Biblical Studies and 
Assistant Director of Extension Programs 
B.S., East Coast Bible College; 
M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 

Paul DeLaLuz (1997), Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Lee College; Ph.D., University of Kentucky 

Carolyn Dirksen (1968), Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Northern Arizona University; 
Ph.D., University of Arizona 

Murl Dirksen (1972), Professor of Anthropology and Sociology 
B.A., M.A.T., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 



308 Administration, Faculty 8k Staff 



Andrea Dismukes (1992), Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M.E., Lee College; M.M., Austin Peay State University 

Mary Dukes (1999), Instructor in Communication 
B.A., M.A., University of Central Florida 

Evaline Echols (1984), Professor of Business Education 

B.S., Lee College; M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Ruth Ediger (1996), Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A., Pacific Lutheran University; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln 

Jean Eledge (1990), Associate Professor of French 
B.A., Carson Newman College; 
M.A., Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

William E. Estes (1998), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.S.E., University of Central Arkansas; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Fiill 

Johnny Evans (2000), Assistant Professor of Physics and Chemistry 
B.S., Georgia College; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Robert W. Fisher (1983), Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Lee College; M.Ed., Georgia State University; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Brad Frazier (2000), Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., Reformed Theological Seminary 

Michael E. Fuller (2000), Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies 
B.A., Lee College; M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

Shane Fuller (1999), Instructor in Drama 

B.S., Oi;al Roberts University; M.A., Regent University 

Gayle Gallaher (2000), Assistant Professor of Psychology and 
Director of Academic Support Programs 
B.S.Ed., Georgia Southern University; 
M.Ed., Ed.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia; 

Sanford M. Garren (1994, 1997), Instructor in Music 

B.M.E., Lee College; M.M., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 



Administration, Faculty &. Staff 309 

Ronald E. Gilbert (1994), Assistant Professor of Communication 
B.S., Lee College; M.Ed., Johns Hopkins University 

Carlanna Gill (1992), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., University of Arkansas; 
M.Ed., Northeast Louisiana University 

Doyle R. Goff (1987), Professor of Psychology 
B.A., M.S., Florida International University; 
Ph.D., Florida State University 

Jean Goforth (1974), Associate Professor and 
Technical Processes Librarian 
B.S., M.S.L.S., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Robert Graham (1997), Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Lee College; M.S., Miami University; 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Angela Greeson (1999), Instructor in Music 

B.A., Berry College; M.M., Indiana University 

Kenneth Griffith (1999), Assistant Professor of 
Computer Information Systems 
B.S., Tennessee Technological University; 
M.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

Robert Griffith (1970), Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Tennessee Wesleyan College; 
M.M., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Reginald F. Gunnells (1995), Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.A., Memphis State University; 
D.A., University of Mississippi 

H. Jerome Hammond (1997), Instructor in Fluman Development 
B.A., Lee College; M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 

Vanessa C. Hammond (1993), Instructor in English 
B.A., Lee College; M.A., Wake Forest University 

Jimmy Harper (2000), Instructor in Youth and Family Ministry 
B.A., Lee College; M.Div., Church of God School of Theology 



310 Administration, Faculty &. Staff 



Ingrid Hart (2000), Instructor in Accounting 
B.S., Lee College; 
M.B.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

Ronald Harris (1966), Associate Professor of Science Education 

B.S., East Carolina College; M.A.T., University of North Carolina 

Michael A. Hayes (1995), Instructor in Psychology 

B.A., Lee College; M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

J. Todd Hibbard (2000), Instructor in Biblical Studies 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., Reformed Theological Seminary 

Jo Ann Higginbotham (1981), Professor of Education 
B.S., Tennessee Technological University; 
M.Ed., Ed.S., D.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

John Hisey (1996), Instructor in Biology 

B.A., University of Washington; M.S., Arizona State University 

Alexandra Hoffer (2000), Instructor in Spanish 

B.A., University of Chile; M.A., University of Akron 

Daniel Hoffman (1994), Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Moody Bible Institute; B.S.Ed., Miami University; 
M.A., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; 
Ph.D., Miami University 

LuAnn Holden (1997), Assistant Professor of Music Education 
B.A., Wesleyan College; M.M., Georgia State University 

David Holsinger (1999), Associate Professor of Music 
B.M.E., Central Methodist College; 
M.A., Central Missouri State University 

David Horton (1969), Professor of Music 

B.M.E., University of Southern Mississippi; 
Ph.D., George Peabody College for Teachers 

Virginia Horton (1979), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M.E., University of Southern Mississippi; 
M.M.E., George Peabody College for Teachers 

Andrea Orr Hudson (1991), Instructor in Physical Education 
B.S., Lee College; M.Ed., Trevecca Nazarene College; 
M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 



Administration, Faculty &. Staff 311 



Rick D. Hughes (1999), Instructor in Physical Education 
B.S., Bryan College; M.S., United States Sports Academy 

William Jaber (1999), Assistant Professor of 
Computer Information Systems 
B.S., Lee College; M.A., West Virginia College; 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

Hermilo Jasso, Jr. (1987), Assistant Professor of Business 
B.A., Lee College; M.B.A., Laredo State University 

Terry Johns (1993), Assistant Professor of Christian Ministry 
B.A., University of Alabama in Birmingham; 
M.Div., Church of God School of Theology; 
D.Min., Columbia Theological Seminary 

Richard Jones (1998), Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., M.A., Oakland University; Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Joel Railing (1994), Associate Professor of Communication 
A.B., University of Georgia; M.Div., Emory University; 
Th.M., Asbury Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Kentucky 

Sarah Kane (2000), Assistant Professor in English 
B.A., Carson Newman College; 
A.B.T., M.A., Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Vern Kraus (2000), Assistant Professor of Special Education 
B.S., Southwest Missouri State University; 
M.S., Arkansas State University; 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 

Michael Laney (1995), Assistant Professor of Communication 
B.A., Southeastern Massachusetts University; 
M.A., Michigan State University; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Steven Lay (1998), Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Aurora College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles 

Andrew Lee (1996), Instructor in English 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., Wake Forest University 



3 1 2 Administration, Faculty a Staff 



Ollie J. Lee (1967), Professor of Sociology 

B.A. Berea College; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Gail Lemmert (1989), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.S., M.A., Oakland University 

Donald T. LeRoy (2000), Instructor in Church Music 
B.A., Lee College; M.M., Florida State University 

Erik D. Lindquist (1998), Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.S., Southern Illinois University; 
M.S., Ph.D., The Ohio State University 

Ruth Crawford Lindsey (1975), Associate Professor of English 
B.A., Lee College; M.A., Arkansas State University 

John Lombard (1978-82; 1984), Special Adjunct Instructor in 
Pastoral Studies 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., Samford University; 
M.D., D.Min., Vanderbilt University 

Penny Mauldin (1990), Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Lee College; M.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 
D.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

Walter C. Mauldin (1989), Professor of Music 

B.M.E., Lee College; M.M., University of Southern Mississippi; 
D.M.A., University of Miami 

Lonnie McCalister (1987), Professor of Music 

B.S., Lee College; M.M.E., Central State University of Oklahoma; 
D.M.A., University of Oklahoma 

Barbara McCuilough (1969), Associate Professor and 
Assistant Director of Squires Library 
B.S., Shippensburg State College; 
M.S.L.S., Drexel Institute of Technology 

Kay McDaniel (1991), Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., Lee College; M.S.S., United States Sports Academy 

Nadine McHugh (1995), Associate Professor of Special Education 
B.S., Mankato State University; 
M.A., University of Northern Colorado; 
Ed.D., University of South Dakota 



Administration, Faculty &. Staff 313 



J. Matthew Melton (1995), Associate Professor of Communication 
C.B.A., C.M.A., International Institute; 
M.A., Ph.D., Regent University 

Trevor Milliron (1998), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 
M.A., Ph.D., Fuller Theological Seminary 

Jose Minay (1994), Instructor in Spanish 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Edley Moodley (1999), Assistant Professor of Intercultural Studies 
B.Th., University of South Africa; 
M.Div., Church of God Theological Seminary 

Philip Morehead (1966), Associate Professor of Music 
B.M., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 
M.M., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Henry Moyo (1988), Special Adjunct Instructor in Religion 
Dip.Th., Overstone College, Northampton, England; 
M.A., M.Div., Church of God Theological Seminary 

Pat Moyo (1999), Special Adjunct Instructor in Religion 
B.A., Manchester Metropolitan University, England; 
M.A., Church of God Theological Seminary 

Karen Carroll Mundy (1979), Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Lee College; 
M.A., Ph. D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Deborah Murray (1980), Professor of Education 
B.S., Lee College; 
M.S., Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Mava Norton (2000), Assistant Professor of 
Computer Information Systems 
B.B.A., Radford University; M.S., Nova Southeastern University 

Robert O'Bannon (1963, 1967), Professor of Biology 
B.S., East Tennessee State University; 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida 

David M. Painter (1968), Assistant Professor of Business 
B.S., Tennessee Wesleyan College; 
M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University 



3 1 4 Administration, Faculty &. Staff 



Mary Painter (1999), Special Adjunct Instructor in Education 
B.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; 
M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University 

Kelly Powell (1999|, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Emerson Powery (1996), Assistant Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Lee College; M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Rachel Reneslacis (1999), Instructor in English 
B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; 
M.A., Washington University at St. Louis 

Gary L. Riggins (1992), Professor of Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Georgia Southern University; 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Milton Riley (1978), Professor of Biology 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., University of Georgia; 
Ph.D., University of Kentucky 

David Roebuck (1991), Assistant Professor of 

Religion and Director of Dixon Pentecostal Research Center 
B.A., West Coast Christian College; 
M.Div., Church of God School of Theology; 
M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 

y. Susan Rogers (1989), Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama 

Clifford D. Schimmels (1991), Professor of Education 
B.A., Oklahoma Baptist University; 
M.A.T., Southwest Oklahoma University; 
Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Sheila Schriver (1995), Instructor in Mathematics 
B.S., M.M., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Barbara Searcy (1997), Instructor in Religion 

B.A., Lee College; M.Div., Church of God School of Theology; 
Th.M., Princeton University 



Administration, Faculty &. Staff 315 

Allison Sharp (2000), Instructor and Serials/Processing Librarian 
B.S., University of Alabama; 
M.L.I.S., University of Alabama 

Patricia Silverman (2000), Assistant Professor of Public Relations 
B.S., Western Carolina University,- M.A., Regent University 

John Simmons (1997), Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., Berea College,- M.A., Louisiana State University 

William A. Simmons (1986), Associate Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Lee College,- M.A., Church of God School of Theology; 
M.Div., Ashland Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of St. Andrews, Scotland 

*John Sims (1971), Professor of Religion and History 
B.A., Lee College, Roosevelt University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University 

Matthew Sims (2000), Assistant Professor of Fiumanities 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 
Ph.D., Florida State University 

Henry Smith (1986), Senior Adjunct Professor of Christian Ministry 
B.A., Atlantic Christian College; 
M.A., California State University at Fresno; 
D.Min., California Graduate School of Theology 

Orin A. Souther (1983), Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., Wilmington College; M.Ed., Xavier University 

Joyce H. Stanbery (2000), Special Adjunct Instructor in Music 
B.A., Tennessee Wesleyan College; 
M.M., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

Wayne H. Standifer (1998), Special Adjunct Instructor and 
Reference Librarian 

B.A., Berea College; M.S.L.S., University of Kentucky; 
Ed.S., University of Georgia 

H. Edward Stone (1998), Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology 
B.A., Lee College; M.Ed., Georgia State University; 
Ph.D., University of Alabama 



3 1 6 Administration, Faculty &. Staff 



Paula Stone (2000), Instructor in TESOL 

B.A., Lee College; M.S., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

C. Michael Sturgeon (19961, Instructor and 
Multimedia Librarian, PRC 
B.S., Palm Beach Atlantic College,- 
M.L.S., Florida State University 

Donna Summerlin (1988), Associate Professor of English 
B.A., Lee College,- 

M.A., M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Phillip E. Thomas (1977), Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Lee College; M.M., Peabody Conservatory of Music; 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Dewayne Thompson (1981), Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., Lee College; M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University; 
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University 

Ridley N. Usherwood (1991), Associate Professor of 
Intercultural Studies 
B.A., Lee College; 

M.Div., Gordon-Conv^ell Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., Columbia Theological Seminary 

Dora del Carmen Ruiz Vargas (1991), Associate Professor of Spanish 
B.A., Lee College; 
M.A., M.S., Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Laud O. Vaught (1980), Senior Adjunct Professor of Education 
B.A., M.A,, Concord College and Bob Jones University; 
Ph.D., University of North Dakota 

Jeri Veenstra (1999), Assistant Professor of Fiealth Science 
B.A., University of Nebraska at Omaha; 
D.D.S., Creighton University; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

George D. Voorhis (1999), Professor of Biblical Studies 

B.A., Northwest Bible College; M.Ed., Winthrop University; 
M.Div., D.Min., Luther Rice Seminary 



Administration, Faculty & Staff 3 1 7 



Mary Waalkes (2000), Assistant Professor of History 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder 

Frank Walker (1994), Assistant Professor of Accounting 
B.S., University of Tennessee at Martin,- 
M.Div. Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary,- 
M.B.A., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Mary B. Walkins (1992), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Lee College; 
M.S., Ph.D., Northeastern University 

James Washick (1997), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Robert Paul West (1990), Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., Clemson University,- Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Charles Mark Wickam (1987), Associate Professor of 
Physical Education 

B.S., Lee College,- M.Ed., University of Southwestern Louisiana; 
D.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

James Wilkins (1997), Associate Professor of French 
B.A., Indiana University Northwest; 
M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University 

Janet Williams (1997), Instructor and Reference Librarian 
B.S., Troy State University; 
M.L.S., Florida State University 

Randy R. Wood (1998), Instructor in Humanities , 

B.A., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 
M.T.S., Harvard Divinity School 

Sabord Woods (1966-68, 1969), Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Georgia Southern College; 
M.A., Church of God Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Alan Wyatt (1996), Instructor in Music 

B.M., M.M., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Paula Wyatt (1997), Special Adjunct Instructor in Music 
B.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

* On Leave 



3 1 8 Administration, Faculty &l Staff 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



Phillip Barber, B.A Director of Student Records and Registrar 

Bruce Bonham Director of Physical Plant 

Marsha Brantley, B.S Director for Commuter/ 

Non-Traditional Students 

Kevin Brooks, B.S Director of Alumni Relations 

Larry Carpenter, B.S Athletic Director 

Dara Carroll, M.A Director of Special Academic Projects 

Virgil Clark Director of Campus Safety 

Phillip Cook, M.Div Director of Admissions 

Suzy Deaton, B.S Director of Academic Services 

John B. Dixon, M.B.A Director of Information Systems 

Michael Ellis, M.A Director of Student Financial Aid 

Ronald Gilbert, M.Ed Video Coordinator 

Nadine Goff, B.M.E Music Coordinator 

Suzanne Hamid, M.A Director of First-Year Programs 

Vanessa Hammond, M.A Director of Grants 

Mike Hayes, M.A Director of Student Development 

Kevin Hudson, B.S Director of Intramurals and Recreation 

Keith LeCroy, B.S Associate Director of Business and Finance 

Gail Lemmert, M.A Director of Counseling and Testing 

Marian Malone-Huffman, M.Ed. . .Assistant Director of Financial Aid 

Tony Marchese, B.S Director of Residential Life 

Alan McClung, M.A Dean of Students 

Danny Murray, B.A Director of Church Relations 

Taz Randies, M.Ed Counselor 

Anita Ray, B.S Director of Human Resources 

Tonia Schuman, B.S Director of Health Services 

Wendell Smith, M.Div Campus Pastor and 

Director of Campus Ministries 

George Starr Director of Sports Information 

Stephanie Taylor, B.A Administrative Assistant to the President 

R.B. Thomas, M.S. . . .Director of Special Projects, School of Religion 
J.B. VanHook, B.A Assistant Director of Admissions 



Administration, Faculty &. Staff 319 



PRESIDENT EMERITUS 



Charles W. Conn (1999) 
Litt.D., Lee College 

FACULTY EMERITI 

J. Martin Baldree (1998], Professor Emeritus of Christian Education 
A.B., Asbury College; 

M.R.E., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Ed.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Lois U. Beach (1993), Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 
B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee; D.Sc, Lee College 

Jimmy W. Bilbo (1996), Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.A., Lee College; M.A., George Peabody College of Teachers; 
Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi 

Eugene Christenbury (1995), Professor Emeritus of Education 
B.A., M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; Ed.D., 
University of Tennessee; M.S., Church of God School of Theology 

Clifford Dennison (1993), Professor Emeritus of Science Education 
A.B., M.A., Marshall College; Ed.D., University of Florida 

Ellen French (1991), Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Southern California College; M.A., Butler University; 
D.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

Beatrice Odom (1986), Professor Emeritus of Christian Education 
B.A., Bob Jones University; 
M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers 

Donald D. Rowe (1984), Professor Emeritus of Business Lav/ and 
Political Science 
B.A., M.A., J.D., University of Miami 

William R. Snell (1999), Professor Emeritus of History 
B.A., M.A., Samford University; B.D., 
Th.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Alabama 



320 Administration, Faculty & Staff 



EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AWARD 



1972 Carolyn Dirksen 1987 

1973 Donald N. Bowdle 1988 

1974 Charles R. Beach 1989 

1975 French L. Arrington 1990 

1976 Lois Beach 1991 

1977 Myrtle Fleming 1992 

1978 J. Martin Baldree 1993 

1979 William Snell 1994 

1980 Robert O'Bannon 1995 

1981 Charles Paul Conn 1996 

1982 R. Jerome Boone 1997 

1983 Karen Carroll Mundy 1998 

1984 John Sims 1999 

1985 Sabord Woods 2000 

1986 William T. George 



Dewayne Thompson 
Ellen B Trench 
Robert Flerron 
Jerald Daffe 
Murl Dirksen 
Pamela Browning 
Lonnie McCalister 
Clifford Schimmels 
Jean Eledge 
Penny Mauldin 
Robert Fisher 
Eleanor Sheeks 
Michael Laney 
Terry Cross 



EXCELLENCE IN SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 



1986 


Donald N. Bowdle 


1994 


William Simmons 


1987 


William Snell 


1995 


John Sims 


1988 


Karen Carroll Mundy 


1996 


Milton Riley 


1989 


Robert O'Bannon 


1997 


Jerome Boone 


1990 


Kathleen Reid 


1998 


Dora Vargas 


1991 


Evaline Echols 


1999 


Daniel Hoffman 


1992 


Carolyn Dirksen 


2000 


Erik Lindquist 


1993 


Murl Dirksen 







EXCELLENCE IN ADVISING AWARD 



1996 Janet Rahamut 

1997 CarlannaGill 

1998 Robert Barnett 

1999 Jerald Daffe 

2000 Matthew Melton 



Administration, Faculty &. Staff 321 

SUPPORT STAFF 

NAME TITLE 

Jason Adams Network Technician 

Marishell Alarcon Residence Director 

Evan Albertyn Residence Director 

Cecil Allen, Jr Safety Officer 

Marlon Allers Safety Officer 

Daniel Ammons Preventative Maintenance Technician 

Hector Avendano Custodian 

Eric Ayala Public Services Assistant, PRC 

Jonathan Baker Safety Officer 

Betty Baldree Switchboard Operator 

Beth Bartram Assistant Women's Basketball Coach 

Susie Battle . . .Secretary to Department of Communication and the Arts 

Michelle Bingham Secretary, Helen DeVos College of Education 

Isaac Bird Campus Print Shop Manager 

Sheila Bird Secretary to Director, Alumni Relations 

Aaron Bird Press Operator, Campus Print Shop 

Georgetta Black Custodial Crew Leader 

Marcia Black Secretary to Department of Business 

Teresa Blakemore Student Loan Coordinator 

Thomas Bland, Jr Custodian 

Ryann Bobeda Transcript Clerk, Student Records 

Brandon Boggess Safety Officer 

Jean Bowdle Executive Secretary to the 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Chris Bowen Residence Director 

Forestine Bowerman Custodian 

James Bradford Carpenter's Helper 

Bill Breland Post Office Manager 

Kim Brooks Coordinator of Special Projects 

Cybil Brown Secretary to Director of Student Development 

Sarah Burrows Office Assistant, Campus Safety 

Wendy Burton Residence Director 

Albert Cardona Residence Director 

Matthew Carlson Assistant to the President 

Tracey Carlson Administrative Assistant to the 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Jose Carrasquillo Custodian 

Kim Carter Secretary to Graduate Programs in Counseling 

Carlos Castro Custodian 

Melva Castro Custodian 

Tony Cavett Head Tennis Coach 

Beauliere Champagne Safety Officer 



322 Administration, Faculty &. Staff 



Carrie Christmas Admissions Counselor 

Matthew Clark Safety Officer 

Lyn Clayton Secretary to Department of English and 

Modern Foreign Languages 

Regenia Collier Coordinator, Data Management/SACS Liaison 

Steven Collier Safety Officer 

Victor Colon Custodial Crew Leader 

Sara Conover Classroom Teacher LUDIC 

Tonya Cook Residence Director 

Matthew Covert House Manager for Conn and Dixon Centers 

Bonnie Creekmore Receptionist, Health Clinic 

Mary Creekmore Work Study /Verification, Financial Aid Office 

Pedro Crespo Custodian 

Chris Criswell Safety Officer 

Margaret Crooms Registered Nurse, Health Clinic 

Dana Crutchfield . . .Executive Secretary to the Dean, School of Religion 

Phyllis Daffe Collections Clerk 

Carrie Dailey Office Assistant, DeVos Recreation Center 

Amanda Davis MIP Secretary/Grader, External Studies 

Linda Davis Secretary to Department of 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

Nanette Davis Secretary, Academic Support Services 

Elba De Los Santos Custodian 

Joseph DeBusk Custodian 

Vicki Dennison Secretary, Graduate School of Religion 

Donna Dixon Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Chris Duggan Network Technician 

Jennifer Dyson Residence Director Assistant 

Kathy Eaton Coach, Cheerleading 

Eric Eledge Assistant Intramural Coach 

Staci Elliott Residence Director 

Karen Epperson Secretary to Director of Human Resources 

Matt Farmer Assistant Cross-Country Coach 

Nathan Forde Custodian 

Wanda Franks Custodian 

Amy Frazier Secretary, Campus Safety 

Dana Fultz ^ Central Gifts Bookkeeper 

Norma Fuster Serials Assistant, PRC 

Eric Gabourel Custodian 

Lauren Gallaher Multi-Media Assistant 

Evelyn Galloway Staff Assistant, Charlotte Center 

Chris Gee Admissions Counselor 

Judy Gee Office Assistant, External Studies 

Geoff Goodman Custodian 

Roxanne Gravlee Residence Director 



Administration, Faculty &. Staff 323 

Jennifer Griffin Admissions Counselor 

Linda Guisinger Secretary to Director of Academic Services 

Gloria Hale Switchboard Assistant 

Dwight Hamilton Maintenance Supervisor 

Janie Hand Secretary, Dixon Research Center 

Dedra Hanks Admissions Counselor 

Jason Helms Multi-Media Assistant 

Philip Henson Safety Officer 

Jackie Higgins, Jr Computer Laboratory Manager 

Jack Higgins Electrician 

Jill Hopkins Receptionist/Registrar, External Studies 

Annis Home Secretary to Director of External Studies 

Vicki Hudson Technical Processor, Financial Aid Office 

Pam Hulgan Secretary to Director of Physical Plant 

Audra lannarone Administrative Assistant to the 

Vice President for Student Life 

David Impellizzerri Residence Director 

Judith Issacs Secretary, Charlotte Center 

Susanna Istomin Custodian 

Tracey James Assistant Accountant 

Tracy Jenkins Secretary to Director of First-Year Programs 

Dorcas Joyner Administrative Assistant to the 

Vice President for Enrollment Management 

Paul Kany Custodian 

Samuel Keys Network Technician 

Kevin Knight Technical Director, Conn & Dixon Centers 

David LaBine HVAC Technician 

Tammy Lambert Executive Secretary to the Dean , School of Music 

Scott Lantrip Safety Officer 

Evelyn Lastra Safety Officer 

Renee Lastra Secretary to the Registrar 

Rafael Lastra Safety Officer 

Rhode' Lastra Residence Director 

Gary Lawhon Coordinator of Career Services, Safety Officer 

Al Lemmert Safety Officer 

Brian Lobb Custodian 

David Looper Groundskeeper 

John Loudermilk Safety Officer 

Jon Lowery Safety Officer 

Brandy Lynn Assistant Residence Director 

Melaine Lyon Secretary, School of Religion 

Constance Manely Residence Director 

Christian Mann Safety Officer 

Michael Mathis Safety Officer 

Chrisnel Mathurin Assistant Coach, Men's Soccer 



324 Administration, Faculty (!k Staff 



Lori Mattace Cataloger, PRC 

Frances McCall Indexer, PRC 

Janine McClung Custodian 

Harless McCoy Carpenter 

Anthony McDonald FiVAC Technician 

Ann McElrath Administrative Assistant to the 

Vice President for Business and Finance 

Dwayne McKee Custodian 

Angeline McMullin Residence Director 

EHzabeth McMurry Cataloger, PRC 

Kylie Machasek Secretary, Graduate Studies, College of Education 

Vernon Meador Groundskeeper 

Brandy Meier Data Entry Specialist, Admissions 

Chris Miller Postal Clerk 

Owen Mitchell Assistant Computer Lab Manager 

Donna Moore Campus Tour Coordinator, Admissions Center 

Renee Moore Secretary to Director of Church Relations 

Louis Morgan Archivist, PRC 

Zandra Morris Assistant Women's Basketball Coach 

Pam Murphy Secretary to Director of Information Systems 

Kristen Murray Admissions Counselor 

Celia Narus Administrative Assistant to the 

Vice President for Institutional Advancement 

Anita Norton Registered Nurse, Fiealth Clinic 

Richard Norton Groundskeeper 

Donice Oakley Special Projects, Dixon Research Center 

Robert O'Bryan Head Cross-Country Coach/ 

Assistant Men's Basketball Coach 

Greg Ortiz Safety Officer 

Jim Osterman Coordinator of Administrative Technology 

Melva Pearcy Custodian 

Stephen Phelps , Network Technician 

Jeffery Pitts Safety Officer 

Connie Polen Reference Clerk, PRC 

Timothy Pope ASO/400 Programmer 

Sharon Pope Executive Secretary to the Dean, 

DeVos College of Education 

Jay Pratt Assistant Student Loan Officer 

Phillip Price Academic Network Technician 

Linda Ray Accounts Payable Bookkeeper 

Barbara Rhyne Secretary to Director of Health Services 

Todd Richardson Postal Clerk 

Benjamin Riley Safety Officer 

Jeff Ringer Commencement Secretary 

Victoria Rivera Secretary to the Director of Student Financial Aid 



Administration, Faculty &. Staff 325 

Jeff Russell Coordinator of Academic Technology 

Shelia Russell Secretary to Director of Counseling & Testing 

Paul Sausville Residence Director 

Darald Schaffer Custodian 

Niki Schuman Transcript Clerk, Student Records 

Reyahna Schuman Office Assistant, Health Clinic 

Linda Seaman Chapel Secretary 

Irene Shahan Cataloger, PRC 

Deanna Sheffey Office Assistant, Physical Plant 

Frank Shroyer Circulation Coordinator, PRC 

Dlamini Sikelela Preservation Assistant, PRC 

Stephanie Skinner Teacher Assistant, LUDIC 

Angela Slusher Residence Director 

LaTane Smith Secretary to Director of Residential Life 

Oneta Smith Secretary to Campus Pastor 

Joshua Smith Safety Officer 

Emma Stanley Federal Funds Bookkeeper 

Lisa Steverson Coordinator of Music Resources 

Sergey Strelkov Custodian 

Vera Strelkova Custodian 

Sharon Stubbs Receptionist/Acquisitions Assistant, PRC 

Andrew Taylor Multi-Media Technician, PRC 

Cassandra Terry Classroom Teacher, LUDIC 

Sara Thoemke Custodian 

Christen Thomlinson Assistant Tennis Coach 

Bill Thompson Carpenter 

Julie Tilley Secretary, Institutional Research 

Robin Tirey Financial Aid Counselor 

Chris Townsend Residence Director 

Nathaniel Tucker Webmaster 

Danny Varghese Computer Operator 

Christy Viviano Payroll Bookkeeper 

Matt Wagoner Press Operator, Campus Print Shop 

Cayolyn Walker Interlibrary Loan Assistant, PRC 

Tena Walker Secretary to Athletic Director 

Luther Walton Plumber 

Willard Walton Groundskeeper 

Ben Weeks Custodian 

Judy West Secretary, Curriculum Library 

Rebecca West Custodial Supervisor 

Ann Whitlock Registered Nurse, Health Clinic 

Gary Whitman Preventive Maintenance Technician, Physical Plant 

Autumn Willemsen Secretary, College of Education/ 

Head Coach Women's Softball 
Renee Williams Admissions Coordinator 



326 Administration, Faculty a Staff 

Carolyn Williams Transcript Analyst, Student Records 

Jonathan Wills Theatrical Technical Director 

Kellie Wilson Safety Officer 

Jonathan Wilson Safety Officer 

Vannessa Wood Coordinator of Public Relations 

Martha Wong Secretary to Graduate School of Music 

Janet Wright Registered Nurse, Health Clinic 



University Calendar 327 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 2001-2002 

SUMMER SESSIONS 2001 

FIRST SESSION MAY 8 - JUNE 1 

May 7 Registration 

May 8 Classes begin 

May 10 Final day to register or add a class 

May 21 Final day to drop a class with a grade of "W" 

June 1 Final Examinations 

SECOND SESSION JUNE 4 - JUNE 29 

June 4 Registration (classes begin) 

June 6 Final day to register or add a class 

June 8 July Graduation Applicants: Due date for grades to be 

posted for course work with External Studies, transfer 

courses, and removal of "I" grades 
June 1 1-22 Faith/Learning Seminar 
June 14-17 Music, Art and Drama Camp 
June 18 Final day to drop a class with a grade of "W" 

June 29 Final Examinations 

THIRD SESSION JULY 2 - JULY 27 

July 2-13 Summer Honors 

July 2 Registration (classes begin) 

July 4 Holiday 

July 5 Final day to register or add a class 

July 16 Final day to drop a class with a grade of "W" 

July 27 Final Examinations 

July 27 Graduation: Commissioning 

July 28 Graduation: Commencement 

August 4 Summer Residence Halls close, 9:00 a.m. 

FALL SEMESTER 2001 

AUGUST 

7-9 Gateway Retreat 

13-15 New Faculty Orientation 

15-16 Pre-session seminar - University Faculty 

15-16 Student Leadership Development Conference 

1 7 Residence Hall check-in for new students 

18-19 New Student and Parent Orientation 

19 Residence Hall check-in for returning students 



328 University Calendar 



20-21 

21-22 

23 
23 
28 



New Student advising and registration 
Registration for returning students; 
Registration for students receiving VA benefits 
Classes begin 
Opening Chapel 

December Graduation Applicants: 
Graduation applications received after this date 
will include a late fee 



SEPTEMBER 

3 

10 

10 

27&29 
28 



28-30 



Final day to register or add class 

Final day for completion of External Studies 

by Resident students 

May Graduation Applicants: Graduation 

applications due 

General Education Assessment Test 

December Graduation Applicants: 

Due date for grades to be posted for course work 

with External Studies, transfer courses, 

and removal of "V grades 

Parents' Weekend 



OCTOBER 

7-11 Fall Convocation 

18-19 Fall Break 

19 Offices closed 

22 Classes resume, 8:00 a.m. 

26 July Graduation Applicants: 
Graduation Applications due 

30 Final day to drop a class with a grade of "W" 



NOVEMBER 

2-3 
8-16 

21-23 

22-23 



Homecoming 

Pre-Registration for Spring/Summer semesters 

Thanksgiving Holidays 

Offices closed 



DECEMBER 

6 

7-12 

14 

15 

15 

Dec. 20 - Jan. 1 University closed for Christmas Holidays 



Final day to withdraw from the University 
Final Examinations 
Graduation: Commissioning 
Graduation: Commencement 
Residence Halls close, 9:00 a.m. 



University Calendar 329 



JANUARY 

2 
9-10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

16 

17 

21 



25 
29 

30 



FEBRUARY 

10-14 
15 



21 &23 

MARCH 
1 



11-15 

15 

18 

Mar. 28 

29 



Apr. 1 



APRIL 

2 

3 

5-6 

9 

11-19 

15 



SPRING SEMESTER 2002 



Offices reopen 

Faculty Seminar 

Department/School faculty meetings 

Opening of Residence Halls, 9:00 a.m. 

New Student and Parent Orientation 

New Student advising and registration 

Registration for returning students; 

Registration for students receiving VA benefits 

Classes begin 

Opening Chapel 

May Graduation Applicants: 

Graduation applications received after this date 

will include a late fee 

Final day a student may register or add a class 

Final day for completion of External Studies 

by Resident students 

Final day to apply for student teaching 

for the Fall semester 



Winter Convocation 

July Graduations Applicants: 

Graduation applications received after this date 

will include a late fee 

Major Field Assessment Test 

May Graduation Applicants: Due date for grades to be 

posted for course work with External Studies, transfer 

courses, and removal of "I" grades 

Spring Break 

Offices closed 

Classes resume, 8:00 a.m. 

Easter Break 

Offices closed 



Classes resume, 7:45 a.m. 

Final day to drop a class with a grade of "W" 

Lee Day Weekend 

Honors Chapel 

Pre-Registration Summer/Fall Semesters 

Priority deadline for Financial Aid application 



330 University Calendar 



MAY 

1 Final day to withdraw from the University 

2-7 Final Examinations 

10 Graduation: Commissioning 

11 Graduation: Commencement 

1 1 Residence Halls close, 9:00 a.m. 

13-14 Faculty Seminar 

SUMMER SESSIONS 2002 

FIRST SESSION MAY 14 'JUNE 7 ' 

May 13 Registration 

May 14 Classes begin 

May 16 Final day to register or add a class 

May 20-31 Faith/Learning Seminar 

May 27 Final day to drop a class with grade of "W" 

June 7 Final Examinations 

June 7 July Graduation Applicants: Due date for grades 

to be posted for course work with External Studies, 
transfer courses, and removal of "I" grades 

SECOND SESSION JUNE 10 - JULY 5 

June 10 Registration (Classes begin) 

June 12 Last day to register or add a class 

June 13-16 Music, Art, and Drama Camp 

June 24 Last day to drop a class with a grade of "W" 

June 30 - July 13 Summer Honors 

July 4 Holiday 

July 5 Final Examinations 

THIRD SESSION JULY 8 - AUGUST 3 

July 8 Registration (Classes begin) 

July 10 Last day to register or add a class 

July 22 Last day to drop a class with a grade of "W" 

August 2 Final Examinations 

August 2 Graduation: Commissioning 

August 3 ^ Graduation: Commencement 

August 3 Summer Residence Halls close, 9:00 a.m. 



University Telephone Directory 331 



LEE UNIVERSITY 
TELEPHONE DIRECTORY LISTING 

SWITCHBOARD/INFORMATION (423)614-8000 

1-800-533-9930 

ADMINISTRATION 

President 614-8600 

Vice-President for Academic Affairs 614-8118 

Vice-President for Business &. Finance 614-8102 

Vice-President for Enrollment Management 614-8500 

Vice-President for Institutional Advancement 614-8310 

Vice-President for Student Life 614-8400 

ACADEMIC OFFICES 

Vice-President for Academic Affairs 614-8118 

College of Arts &l Sciences 614-8115 

Helen DeVos College of Education 614-8175 

School of Religion 614-8140 

School of Music 614-8240 

DEPARTMENTS 

Behavioral &. Social Sciences 614-8125 

Business 614-8160 

Christian Ministries 614-8140 

Communication &i the Arts 614-8341 

English and Modem Foreign Languages 614-8210 

Extemal Studies (Local Calls) 614-8370 

(Toll Free) 1-800-256-5916 

Health and Human Performance 614-8479 

Natural Sciences <Sl Mathematics 614-8275 

Teaching and Learning 614-8479 

Theology 614-8140 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Graduate Programs in Education 614-8184 

Graduate Program in Church Music 614-8245 

Graduate Program in Counseling Psychology 614-8124 

Graduate Programs in Religion 614-8140 

ADMISSIONS 614-8500 



332 University Telephone Directory 



REGISTRAR 

Office 614-8200 

Transcripts 614-8202 

STUDENT SERVICES 

Academic Support Programs 614-8181 

Academic Services/Advising 614-8121 

Accounts Payable 614-8104 

Athletics 614-8440 

Business Office 614-8100 

Campus Pastor 614-8420 

Campus Safety 614-8390 

Campus Bookstore 614-8095 

Counseling &. Testing 614-8415 

Dining Hall 614-8587 

Health Clinic 614-8430 

Housmg 614-6000 

Information Systems 614-8020 

Library 614-8550 

Music Resource Center 614-8248 

Pentecostal Research Center 614-8576 

Physical Plant 614-8085 

Post Office 614-8030 

Public Information 614-8621 

Recruitment 614-8500 

Student Accounts 614-8100 

Student Financial Aid 614-8300 

Teacher Education and Field Experiences 614-8175 

GENERAL SERVICES 

Alumni 614-8316 

Central Gifts 614-8314 

Collections 614-8109 

Church Relations 614-8320 

DeVos Recreation Center 614-8450 

Human Resources 614-8105 

Payroll...^ 614-8107 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

Atkins-Ellis Hall 

Director 614-6005 

Lobby 614-2400 

Cross Hall 

Director 614-6024 

Lobby 614-2521 



University Telephone Directory 333 



Davis Hall 

Director 614-6030 

Lobby 614-2573 

Hicks Hall 

Director 614-6069 

Lobby 614-2826 

Hughes Hall 

Director 614-6037 

Lobby 614-2650 

Keeble Hall 

Director 614-6074 

Lobby 614-6078 

Livingston Hall 

Director 614-6042 

Lobby 614-2710 

Medlin Hall 

Director 614-6046 

Lobby 614-2721 

Nora Chambers Hall 

Director 614-6016 

Lobby 614-2461 

Sharp Hall 

Director 614-6055 

Lobby 614-2806 

Simmons Hall 

Director 614-6059 

Lobby 614-2864 

Storms Hall 

Director 614-6080 

Lobby 614-6083 

Tharp Hall 

Director 614-6063 

Lobby 614-2896 

Married Student Housing 

Carroll Court 478-7800 



334 Index 



INDEX 



Absence Policy 38 

Academic Advising 31 

Academic Policies and Procedures 34 

Academic Probation 39 

Academic Programs 24 

College of Arts and Sciences 24, 96 

Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences 24, 99 

Department of Business 24, 123 

Department of Communication and the Arts 25, 141 

Department of English and Modem Foreign Languages... 25, 159 

Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 25, 177 

Helen DeVos College of Education 26, 209 

Department of Health and Human Performance 26,216 

Department of Teaching and Leaming 26, 229 

School of Music 27, 243 

School of Religion 27, 259 

Department of Christian Ministries 27, 260 

Department of Theology 27, 279 

Department of Extemal Studies 27, 40, 292 

Academic Scholarships 63 

Academic Standing and Continuance 39 

Academic Support Program 32 

Academic Suspension 39 

Accounting Courses 134 

Accreditation 6 

Administration 302, 318 

Admissions 16 

Advanced Placement 17, 34 

Alumni Association 296 

Anthropology Courses 109 

Applied Mu^sic Courses 251 

Art Courses 150 

Astronomy Course 194 

Attendance Policy 38 

Awards (Zeno C. Tharp, F.J. Lee, and Paul Conn Awards) 43 

Bible Courses 286 

Biology Courses 194 

Business Courses 135 



Index 335 



Calendar 327 

Campus Life: Student Activities and Services 84 

Campus Safety 92 

Career Exploration 91 

Changing a Schedule 37 

Chapel Services 84 

Chemistry Courses 198 

Christian Education Courses 273 

Church History Courses 288 

Church Music Courses 253 

Class Attendance 38 

CLEP 34 

Communication Courses 151 

Community Covenant 93 

Computer Information Systems Courses 137 

Computer Labs 34, 140 

Computer Science Courses 200 

Confidentiality of Student Records 41 

Correspondence Courses (External Studies) 27, 40, 292 

Counseling 91 

Course Substitution 41 

Deferred Payment Plan 54 

Directed Studies 44 

Discounts 52 

Drama Courses 155 

Early Admission 18 

Economics Courses 139 

Education Courses 235 

Electives 32 

Elementary Education Courses 237 

Endowment Scholarships 65 

English Courses 168 

Estimated Cost of Attendance 81 

Evaluation of Foreign Credentials 40 

Evangelical Teacher Association Diploma 272 

Evangelism Courses 274 

External Studies 27, 40, 292 

Faculty 305 

Faith Statement 9 

Final Examinations 38 

Financial Aid Program 57 



336 Index 



Financial Information 52 

Fine Arts and Cultural Events 85 

First-Year Experience 85 

FJ. Lee Award 43 

French Courses 172 

GED Tests 17 

General Education Core 28 

General Studies 31 

Geography Courses 110 

German Courses 173 

Grades 38 

Graduation 42 

Greek Courses 289 

Health Clinic 92 

Health Courses 223 

Health Science Courses 201 

Hebrew Courses 289 

Historical Sketch 10 

History Courses 110 

Honor Graduates 43 

Housing 88 

Humanities Courses ....157 

ID Cards 92 

Institutional Goals 8 

Intercollegiate Athletics 85 

Intercultural Studies Courses 274 

International Baccalaureate 18 

International Students 20 

Intramural Sports 85 

Itemized Expenses 52 

Library 33 

Lifestyle Expectations 92 

Linguistics Courses 173 

Loan Fund^. 60 

Major Requirements .30 

Mathematics Courses 204 

Maximum Loads 36 

Minors 30 

Mission Statement 6 

Music Education Courses 254 

Music History and Appreciation Courses 255 



Index 337 



Music Organizations 256 

Music Scholarships 64 

Music Theory Courses 257 

Off-campus Study Programs 45 

Parking 92 

Part-time Students 54 

Pastoral Studies Courses 276 

Paul Conn Award 43 

Pell Grant Program 60 

Performing Groups 86 

Philosophy Courses 112 

Physical Education Courses 224 

Physical Science Courses 207 

Physics Courses 207 

Placement Testing , 19 

Political Science Courses 113 

Pre-Enrollment Programs 50 

Pre-Law Emphasis 91 

Probationary Admission 18 

Proficiency Exams 34 

Psychology Courses 116 

Reading Courses 174 

Readmission 18 

Recreation Courses 228 

Refund Policy 55 

Registration 36 

Registration Fees 52 

Religion Core 28 

Repeating a Course 41 

Required and Permitted Loads 36 

Responsibilities of Financial Aid Recipients 59 

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy 57 

Secondary Education Courses 238 

Semester in Europe 45 

Settlement of Accounts 54 

Schedule Changes 37 

Scholarships 63 

Social Life 85 

Social Service Clubs 86 

Sociology Courses 119 

Spanish Courses 175 



338 Index 



Special Academic Programs 44 

Special Education Courses 240 

Special Fees 53 

Specialized Music Courses 254 

Special Students 21 

Student Organizations 86 

Student Publications 88 

Students with Disabilities 33 

Summer School Costs 56 

Support Staff 321 

Teacher Education Program 210 

Telephone List 331 

Test Requirements 19 

Testing 91 

Tharp Award 43 

Theology Courses 290 

Transcripts 41 

Transient Students 21 

Transfer Students 20 

Tuition Costs 52 

Tutorial Program 32 

Veteran's Benefits 20, 19 

Withdrawing from Classes 37 

Withdrawing from the University 37 

Writing Center 33 

Youth Ministry Courses 277 



Key Contacts 339 



KEY CONTACTS - QUICK REFERENCE LIST 



Lee University 



Academic Affairs 



Admissions 



Alumni Office 



Athletic Office 



Business Office 



Campus Safety 



External Studies 



Financial Aid 



Health Clinic 



Records Office 



(800) 533-9930 or direct (423) 614-8000 

Fax Number (423) 614-8016 

Web Page Address: www.leeuniversity.edu 

(423)614-8118 

Fax Number (423) 614-8625 

E-mail address: academics@leeuniversity.edu 

(423) 614-8500 

Fax Number (423) 614-8533 

E-mail address: admissions@leeuniversity.edu 

(423)614-8316 

Fax Number (423) 614-8016 

E-mail address: alumni@leeuniversity.edu 

(423) 614-8440 

Fax Number (423) 614-8443 

E-mail address: athletics@leeuniversity.edu 

(423)614-8100 

Fax Number (423) 614-8016 

E-mail address: accountspayable@leeuniversity.edu 

(423) 614-8390 

Fax Number (423) 614-8016 

E-mail address: safety@leeuniversity.edu 

(800) 256-5916 or direct (423) 614-8370 

Fax Number (423) 614-8377 

E-mail address: study@leeuniversity.edu 

(423) 614-8300 

Fax Number (423) 614-8083 

E-mail address: finaid@leeuniversity.edu 

(423) 614-8430 

Fax Number (423) 614-8435 

E-mail address: health@leeuniversity.edu 

(423) 614-8200 

Fax Number (423) 614-8016 

E-mail address: records@leeuniversity.edu 



TEET FIVERSITY 

,ili 1 m \m^ MAIL TO: 




P.O. Box 3450 

Cleveland, TN 37320-3450 

ATTN: Admissions 



i PLEASE SEND ME: 

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n External Studies Information D Catalog 



Name (please print) 
Address 



City State 



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I Zip Phone 



Birthday 



Email Address 



High School/College 
Graduation date 



Local Church 



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I Semester Planning to Attend D Fall D Spring D Summer Year 

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