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Full text of "Lee University Graduate Catalog"

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NIVERSIT 



2002-2003 
GRADUATE 
CATALOG 



PENTECOSTAL RESOURCE CENTER 




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LEE (JUNIVERS 




2002-2003 
GRADUATE 
CATALOG 



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2 Lee University 







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Lee University 







The university welcomes visitors to the campus at any time. 
Offices of the university are open Monday through Friday 
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Appointments for other hours may be 
arranged in advance. 

No person in whatever relation with Lee University shall be 
subject to discrimination because of race, color, national origin, 
age, gender, or disability. 

The Graduate Catalog is published annually by Lee 
University at Cleveland, Tennessee. This graduate catalog issue 
contains announcements for the eighty-fourth year of the univer- 
sity, 2002-2003. The university reserves the right to make 
changes affecting policies, fees, curricula, or any other matters 
announced in this catalog. 



4 Lee University 



CONTENTS 



I. INTRODUCTION 

Accreditation 12 

Mission Statement 12 

Institutional Goals 15 

Faith Statement 16 

Graduate Studies at Lee University 19 

Subject Areas 20 

Graduate Faculty 20 

Statements of Compliance 21 

Library 22 

Music Resource Center 23 

Media Resources 23 

Curriculum Library 24 

Computers 24 

II. ADMISSIONS 

Criteria for Admissions 25 

International Students 26 

Policy Regarding False Information 26 

Change of Program 26 

Admissions Testing 27 

III. FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Itemized Semester Expenses for Full-time Students 29 

Residence Hall Students 29 

Other Special Fees 29 

Special Music Fees 30 

Itemized Semester Expenses for Part-time Students 30 

Summer School 30 

Settlement of Accounts 31 

Deferred-Payment Plan 31 

Deferred Payment Plan for Summer School 32 

Refund Policy 32 

Refund Policy for Summer School 33 

Group Discount for Employer- Assisted Enrollments 33 

Stafford Loans 33 

Lifetime Learning Credits 34 

Graduate Assistantships and Scholarships 34 

Employment 34 



Lee University 

IV. STUDENT LIFE 

Residential Life 35 

Counseling, Testing, and Career Services 35 

Chapel 36 

Lifestyle Expectations 36 

Athletics 36 

Commuter Services 37 

Recreation and Fitness 37 

Intramurals 37 

Health Clinic 37 

Campus Safety 38 

Student Grievance and Appeals 38 

V. ACADEMIC POLICIES 

Course Numbering System 41 

Study Load 41 

Auditing 41 

Transfer Credit 41 

Grading 41 

Academic Probation and Disqualification 42 

Time Limits 42 

Withdrawing from the University 42 

Withdrawal From Courses 43 

Release of Transcripts 43 

Confidentiality of Student Records 44 

Collaborative Statement 45 

Project/Thesis Statement 45 

Policies for Theses 46 

VI. COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY AND 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SCHOOL COUNSELING 

Statement of Purpose 49 

Program Goals 50 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY 51 

Program Objectives 51 

Program of Studies 52 

Required Courses 53 

Typical Two-Year Curriculum 54 

Clinical Experiences 55 

Practicum 55 

Internship 55 

Manual 55 

Liability Insurance 56 



6 Lee University 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SCHOOL COUNSELING 56 

Statement of Purpose 56 

Program Objectives 57 

Program of Studies 58 

Required Courses 59 

Typical Two-Year Curriculum 60 

Clinical Experiences 61 

Practicum 61 

Internship 61 

Manual 62 

Admission 62 

Ethical Standards 65 

Course Offerings 66 

The Counseling Psychology Graduate Committee 71 

VII. HELEN DEVOS COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING AND 
MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Statement of Purpose 73 

Philosophy 73 

Assumptions 74 

Outcomes 74 

Conceptual Framework 75 

Admission Requirements 11 

Completion Requirements 78 

Course Requirements 80 

Course Descriptions 88 

The Education Graduate Committee 94 

VIII. SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

MASTER OF CHURCH MUSIC 

Statement of Purpose 96 

National Association of Schools of Music 91 

Admission Requirements 91 

Completion Requirements 101 

Final Project Committee 102 

Transfer Students 102 

Program of Study 102 

Course Descriptions 105 

The Music Graduate Committee Ill 



Lee University 

IX. SCHOOL OF RELIGION 

MASTER OF ARTS IN BIBLICAL STUDIES AND 
MASTER OF ARTS IN THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

Purpose and Philosophy 113 

Goals of the Programs 114 

Goals of the Student 114 

Programs of Studies 116 

Course Descriptions 118 

Admissions Requirements 125 

Completion Requirements 128 

Transfer Credit 128 

The Bible and Theology Graduation Committee 129 

MASTER OF ARTS IN YOUTH AND FAMILY MINISTRIES 

Purpose and Philosophy 130 

Goals of the Program 130 

Program of Study 134 

Course Descriptions 135 

Admission Requirements 139 

Completion Requirements 141 

Transfer Credit 141 

The Youth and Family Ministry Graduate Committee 142 

X. ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

Board of Directors 143 

Senior Officers of the University 144 

Academic Deans 144 

Graduate Council 145 

Graduate Faculty 146 

Associate Graduate Faculty 150 

Administrative Staff 152 

XL UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 153 

XII. CONTACT INFORMATION 157 

XIII. INDEX 158 



Lee University 



MESSAGE FROM 
THE PRESIDENT 



1 elcome to Lee University! 




Today is a great time to be part of this growing, exciting institu- 
tion. Here at Lee, there is such a wonderful positive spirit! We believe 
that God's hand is on us, and we are working hard to earn the trust of 
our expanding public. 

One of the reasons for the high level of expectation at Lee is the 
quality of our faculty. Those of us who have been on the Lee team for 
many years are energized and stimulated by the many new professional 
colleagues who arrive each year with such talent and vision. 

Lee University is assembling a graduate faculty who can deliver 
excellent master's-level instruction with the sensitivity and perspec- 
tive of seasoned Christian disciples. These men and women form the 
critical core of any graduate program. As president of Lee, my confi- 
dence in our quality as a graduate institution is based primarily on the 
exceptional quality of this team. 

We also are attracting superb students, and we expect this trend to 
continue as we begin new graduate programs. 



iLc &v 



Paul Conn 
President 



10 Lee University 




Lee University 1 1 



MESSAGE FROM THE 
GRADUATE COUNCIL 

The Graduate Council, working with the faculty and graduate 
program committees, seeks to implement the mission of Lee 
University by offering advanced studies that are relevant, chal- 
lenging, and rewarding. Each program emphasizes the integration of 
Christian faith with the body of knowledge appropriate to the scope of 
the degree. 

College graduates who are interested in professional preparation in 
counseling psychology, school counseling, classroom teaching, church 
music, or youth and family ministry will find in these programs the 
combination of scholarly and practical expertise relevant to the profes- 
sional needs of contemporary practitioners. The graduate programs in 
religion offer advanced study in the disciplines of Bible or theology. 

As the graduate faculty develops these and other graduate pro- 
grams, commitment to academic quality combined with attention to 
individual student needs will be paramount in the planning efforts. 
Inquiries and suggestions from current and prospective graduate stu- 
dents will be an essential part of planning for program effectiveness. 

Explore with us a future enriched by Lee University master's degrees. 



1 2 Lee University 

INTRODUCTION 

ACCREDITATION 

Lee University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane; 
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; Telephone number 404-679-4501) to 
award bachelor's degrees and master's degrees. Teacher Education pro- 
grams are approved by the Tennessee State Department of Education 
for licensure. The School of Music is accredited by the National 
Association of Schools of Music. Lee also holds membership in the 
American Council on Education, the Council of Independent Colleges, 
the Tennessee College Association, Tennessee Association of 
Independent Colleges and Universities, the Council for Christian 
Colleges and Universities and the Appalachian College Association. 

LEE UNIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT 

Lee University is a Christian institution which offers liberal arts 
and professional education on both the baccalaureate and master's lev- 
els. It seeks to provide education that integrates biblical truth as 
revealed in the Holy Scriptures with truth discovered through the study 
of the arts and sciences and in the practice of various professions. A per- 
sonal commitment to Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior is the controlling 
perspective from which the educational enterprise is carried out. The 
foundational purpose of all educational programs is to develop within 
the students knowledge, appreciation, understanding, ability and skills 
which will prepare them for responsible Christian living in the modern 
world. 

Founded as Bible Training School in 1918 by the Church of God, 
Cleveland, Tennessee, the institution was renamed in 1947 to honor its 
second President, the Reverend F. J. Lee, and attained university status 
in 1997. The original purpose was to provide both general and biblical 
training for those persons entering the Christian ministry, and through 
the years lee University has continued this purpose of "ministry," ever 
more broadly defined to include both church and non-church vocations. 

Enrollment consists primarily of recent high school graduates, and 
fifty-two percent of the students reside on campus. In order to maintain 
a sense of Christian community and enhance the personal, spiritual, 
academic, emotional and physical development of students, Lee 
University seeks to foster a residential campus experience, with special 



Lee University 13 

focus on the needs of freshmen and sophomores. The university works 
to create common space on the campus and a common core of residen- 
tial events around which the entire community operates. Most of the 
students are affiliated with the Church of God, although many come 
from other denominations. Lee University serves the Church and soci- 
ety by offering graduate programs in various professions and academic 
disciplines. These post-baccalaureate programs are designed to deepen 
one's understanding of a discipline and/or strengthen one's skills as a 
professional. The goal of all graduate degree programs is to nurture 
scholars and professionals who will better serve the kingdom of God 
and the world. In this way, the graduate programs are a natural exten- 
sion of the university's commitment to undergraduate education. The 
graduate student body is relatively new and is in the process of defining 
its own identity. 

As an independent institution, Lee University is controlled by a 
Board of Directors appointed by the General Executive Committee of 
the denomination. The President is responsible to this board for facili- 
tating an educational program presented from a theological perspective 
that is conservative, evangelical and Pentecostal. In keeping with the 
amended Charter of Incorporation (1968) and the Bylaws of Lee 
University (article I, sections 2 and 4), all board members, administra- 
tors and faculty members certify annually by contract that they will not 
advocate anything contrary to the Church of God Declaration of Faith. 

Lee University endeavors to employ scholars with the highest acad- 
emic credentials who present their disciplines from a distinctly 
Christian perspective. All truth is perceived to be God's truth, and the 
effective presentation and integration of truth is the goal. Lee 
University values teaching as the most important faculty role, and 
excellence in teaching is the primary standard for retention, tenure and 
promotion. Faculty research is seen as essential to teaching excellence. 
It, too, is an important criterion for faculty advancement. Lee 
University values and rewards Christian community service and service 
to humankind as significant faculty responsibilities. 

Lee University identifies its public service region as being generally 
coterminous with the geographic scope of the denomination. While 
most students come from the United States, the student body typically 
consists of representatives of a broad range of socioeconomic back- 
grounds from all fifty states and more than twenty countries in Central 
and South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. Because of this geographic 
span, the university serves a racially, ethnically and culturally diverse 



1 4 Lee University 

student body with ten percent international or minority students. The 
institution has adopted the policy that no person in whatever relation 
with Lee University shall be subject to discrimination because of race, 
color, national origin, age, gender or disability. 

Lee University has both open admissions and a rapidly expanding 
scholarship program, attracting students with widely varied academic 
skills. The university is committed to serve under-prepared students 
with a variety of support services. While the primary source of funding 
is from student revenues, the Church of God provides for the university 
in its annual budget. The university also receives support from alumni, 
businesses, churches, foundations and friends. 

All baccalaureate degree students at Lee University must complete 
a general education core including eighteen semester hours of religion. 
The general education courses foster intellectual development by 
enhancing the student's ability to observe, read, and think critically and 
to communicate effectively. The courses also cultivate awareness, 
understanding and respect for cultural diversity. The religion core cours- 
es are predicated on the Reformation principle of the priesthood of all 
believers. The courses are designed to enable the student both to under- 
stand and articulate the Christian faith. The campus curriculum is 
enriched by American, Latin American, European and Asian studies 
programs, study tours, and service-to-humankind projects, as well as 
external studies for non-resident students. 

Lee University takes seriously the task of preparing students for 
responsible Christian living in the modern world. The goal is pursued 
within a variety of structures provided within the widest campus con- 
text, such as classroom instruction, extracurricular activities, student 
development services and residential living. The university realizes that 
the knowledge, appreciation, understanding, ability and skill for such 
resourceful living will be evident in its students in direct proportion to 
the success of its programs and services whereby a healthy physical, 
mental, social, cultural and spiritual development is fostered. 

The Lee University experience intends to demonstrate that there is 
a positive correlation between scholarship and wholeness,- that one 
must approach all learning with a sense of privilege and responsibility 
under God; that truth is truth wherever it is found, whether test tube, 
literary masterpiece or Holy Scripture; that appropriate integration of 
truth is both intellectual and behavioral in nature,- and that the pursuit 
and application of truth is, indeed, "ministry." 



Lee University 1 5 

INSTITUTIONAL GOALS 

The nature and range of this commitment are demonstrated in the 
objectives of the institution. Lee University seeks to: 

1 . Provide a general education program which will equip students 
with quantitative, verbal and technological skills; enhance their 
appreciation of their cultural and religious heritage; strengthen 
their commitment to the liberal arts; and give them a view of 
their responsibility as Christian scholars in the community and 
the wider world. 

2. Provide sufficient religious education to enable students to be 
conversant in the Christian faith, to articulate their own beliefs 
and to actualize their faith through consistent growth and prac- 
tice by the integration of faith with all aspects of life. 

3. Provide undergraduate programs of sufficient quality to prepare 
students for success in graduate and professional schools and in 
the early stages of their careers. 

4. Provide graduate programs in various areas which will prepare 
students for success in post graduate programs. 

5. Achieve the quality of instruction and resources necessary for 
the national accreditation of selected areas and the development 
of additional graduate programs where appropriate. 

6. Provide academic support through computer facilities, library 
resources, student support services and faculty development 
opportunities to ensure quality instruction and a challenging 
academic environment. 

7. Provide a campus environment that supports and encourages 
students in their personal, social, spiritual, cultural and physical 
development. 

8. Prepare students for successful personal and professional life by 
developing in them a commitment to Christian values in voca- 
tional goals and lifestyle choices. 

9. Increase the diversity of the faculty and student body, address 
the unique needs of a diverse campus population, and encourage 
academic inquiry into minority concerns. 

10. Recruit, develop and retain a diverse community of teaching 
professionals, administrators and support staff who demonstrate 
excellence in their professional roles and effectively implement 
the mission of the university in their lifestyles and co-curricu- 
lar involvement. 



16 Lee University 

1 1 . Continue the growth of student enrollment and development of 
capital assets to optimize student opportunities. 

12. Preserve the evangelical and Pentecostal heritage and message 
of the Church of God and provide positive direction for its 
future. 

13. Provide quality academic, spiritual, cultural and recreational 
services to its various publics. 

FAITH STATEMENT 

As a Christian university operated under the auspices of the Church 
of God, Lee University is firmly committed to the conservative, evangel- 
ical and Pentecostal religious position of its sponsoring denomination. 
This position is expressed in the "Declaration of Faith" as follows: 

We believe: 

In the verbal inspiration of the Bible. 

In one God eternally existing in three persons,- namely, the Father, 
Son, and Holy Ghost. 

That Jesus Christ is the only begotten Son of the Father, conceived 
of the Holy Ghost, and born of the Virgin Mary. 

That Jesus was crucified, buried, and raised from the dead. 

That He ascended to heaven and is today at the right hand of the 
Father as the Intercessor. 

That all have sinned and come short of the glory of God and that 
repentance is commanded of God for all and necessary for forgive- 
ness of sins. 

That justification, regeneration, and the new birth are wrought by 
faith in the blood of Jesus Christ. 

In sanctification subsequent to the new birth, through faith in the 
blood of Christ, through the Word, and by the Holy Ghost. 

Holiness to be God's standard of living for His people. 

In the baptism with the Holy Ghost subsequent to a clean heart. 

In speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance and that 
it is the initial evidence of the baptism of the Holy Ghost. 

In water baptism by immersion, and all who repent should be bap- 
tized in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy 
Ghost. 



Lee University 1 7 

Divine healing is provided for all in the atonement. 

In the Lord's Supper and washing of the saints' feet. 

In the premillennial second coming of Jesus; First, to resurrect the 
righteous dead and to catch away the living saints to Him in the air; 
second, to reign on the earth a thousand years. 

In the bodily resurrection,- eternal life for the righteous, and eternal 
punishment for the wicked. 



1 8 Lee University 




Lee University 19 

GRADUATE STUDIES AT 
LEE UNIVERSITY 

A Christian environment and personally committed professional 
instructors are the "natural surroundings" that encompass all pro- 
grams in Lee's graduate studies. Lee University's graduate programs 
provide an educational experience that meets the most important 
requirement— a profitable engagement of the student's time, purpose, 
and personal resources. 

Lee's graduate programs serve adult students with various profes- 
sional interests and diverse personal histories. Flexible scheduling for 
part-time and full-time students and personal attention from experts 
and practitioners in wide-ranging professional fields enable students to 
find a niche for their personal goals and for intellectual progress in a 
field of study. 

Seven degree programs are offered at Lee University for the level of 
Master in those fields within the colleges or schools as listed. In the 
College of Arts & Sciences: The Master of Science in Counseling 
Psychology prepares students for careers in counseling. The Master of 
Science in School Counseling prepares students to be counselors in 
public and private schools. In the Helen DeVos College of Education: 
The Master of Arts in Teaching provides preparation for professional 
licensure in education for graduates from liberal arts and other non-edu- 
cation fields. The Master of Education program extends to classroom 
teachers an opportunity for in-service professional training and 
advanced development in area knowledge and practical skills. In the 
School of Music: The Master of Church Music degree program develops 
the potential of musicians while providing leadership in music training 
for ministry. In the School of Religion: The Master of Arts in Biblical 
Studies and in Theological Studies offers advanced graduate study in the 
respective disciplines. The Master of Arts in Youth and Family Ministry 
is designed to provide students with pastoral skills as well as social sci- 
ence insights needed to minister to families in this challenging time. 

After reading the following descriptions of the degree programs, 
students are encouraged and challenged to investigate the possibilities 
of the program that meets their goals. The graduate faculty encourages 
any students, wherever placed in their professional intellectual devel- 



20 Lee University 

opment, to join the Lee community of adult learners. Lee University 
faculty members are confident that education is the key to broadening 
a person's future and invite all prospective students to explore its grad- 
uate programs. 

SUBJECT AREAS 

The current graduate curriculum includes courses from the follow- 
ing disciplines and areas designated by these subject codes: 

BIB Bible 

BUS Business 

CHA Applied Music Lessons 

CHM Church Music 

CSL Counseling 

EDU Education 

ENG English 

GER German 

GRE Greek 

HEB Hebrew 

HIS History 

HUM Humanities 

IDS Interdisciplinary Studies 

LAT Latin 

PAS Pastoral Studies 

SCI Science 

SPE Special Education 

THE Theology 

YFM Youth and Family Ministry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

The purpose of the graduate faculty of Lee University is to set stan- 
dards for graduate work and to provide graduate instruction. Only 
members of graduate faculty or associate graduate faculty may teach 
courses numbered 500 or above, and only members of the graduate fac- 
ulty may serve on Final Project Committees for candidates for the mas- 
ter's degree. 

Members of the graduate faculty must meet the following criteria: 

1 . Hold a doctorate or hold candidacy status in a doctoral program,- 

2. Hold the rank of assistant professor or higher; and 



Lee University 21 

3. Demonstrate teaching competence, continuing interest in the 
graduate program and research or creative productivity. 

Associate graduate faculty are those who do not satisfy the above 
criteria but are approved to provide instructional services for graduate 
students because of their unique competencies and professional roles. 

STATEMENTS OF COMPLIANCE 

Lee University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil 
Rights Acts of 1961 and Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 
1972, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, 
gender, age, disability, status as a veteran or any other characteristic 
protected by law in any of its policies, practices or procedures. The 
Vice President for Student Development is the campus coordinating 
officer for Title IX, and all inquiries should be made to the Office of 
Student Development. 

In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 
Lee University does not discriminate on the basis of disability in the 
recruitment and admission of students, or in the operation of any of its 
programs and activities, as specified by federal laws and regulations. 
Persons with questions about the Rehabilitation Act may contact the 
Office of Academic Support Programs. 

Lee University complies with the provisions of the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. This Act assures students 
attending a post- secondary educational institution that they will have 
the right to inspect and review certain of their educational records, 
and, by following the guidelines provided by the university, to correct 
inaccurate or misleading data through informal or formal hearings. It 
protects students' rights to privacy by limiting transfer of these records 
without their consent, except in specific circumstances. Students also 
have the right to file complaints with the Family Policy Compliance 
Office,- U.S. Department of Education,- 440 Maryland Avenue S.W.; 
Washington, D.C. 20202-4605. Copies of this legislation are available 
from the Office of Student Records and Registrar on request by stu- 
dents or parents. A statement of Lee University policy relating to the 
maintenance of student records is also available on request from the 
Office of Student Records and Registrar. 



22 Lee University 

LIBRARY 

The William G. Squires Library, which serves undergraduate and 
graduate programs of Lee University, is housed in the Pentecostal 
Resource Center. This modern functional facility with open bookstacks 
offers seating for 365, including individual study carrels, tables, reading 
areas, computer workstations, computer lab, group study and seminar 
rooms, and a chapel. An added feature of the building is the Dixon 
Research Center, which houses a comprehensive collection of materials 
pertaining to the Church of God and the Pentecostal/Charismatic 
movement. 

Students, faculty, alumni, church and community members have 
access to services which include telephone and in-person reference 
assistance, library instruction for classes, organizing and providing 
access to a collection of more than 165,000 volumes, 610 current peri- 
odicals in print format and 53,000 microforms and other media. 

The library utilizes the latest in electronic resources. These 
include an automated circulation system and online catalog, which 
provide the ability to search the library's holdings and those of the 
Cleveland Public Library, as well as the online catalogs of selected aca- 
demic libraries throughout the United States. 

Periodical research is served by both print and electronic indexes. 
CD-ROM access is provided in the library to Current Issues Sourcefile. 
Online access through the library's Web home page is provided to a wide 
variety of databases including American Theological Library Association 
(ATLAS), Christian Periodical Index (CPI), Educational Resources 
Information Center (ERIC), FirstSearch (vendor of about 60 specific data- 
bases), the Modern Language Association (MLA) bibliography, Psyclnfo, 
RILM (a music resources index), Religious and Theological Abstracts 
(RTA), and the Tennessee Electronic Library (which includes InfoTrac 
and other key indexes). Some additional databases, all of which give full- 
text access to journal and newspaper articles, are American Chemical 
Society, PsycArticles, JSTOR, NewsBank and Project Muse. Authorized 
students and faculty can access many of these resources off campus. The 
library's catalog is also accessible on the Internet. The World Wide Web 
is available for research purposes at all of the library's 20 networked 
patron computer workstations. 



Lee University 23 

The library provides 89 hours of service weekly as follows: 
Monday-Thursday 8:00 a.m. - midnight 

Friday 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

Saturday 11:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Library hours may be adjusted during semester breaks and other 
school holidays. These times are posted on the doors, the home page, 
and the auto-answer phone. 

MUSIC RESOURCE CENTER 

The Music Resource Center (MRC) in the Curtsinger Music 
Building is a library designed to meet the music reference and research 
needs of the university and community. The collection consists of 
scores, technological resources and audio-visual materials including 
videos, CDs, cassettes and LPs. The audio-visual materials, technologi- 
cal resources and reference materials do not circulate outside the 
Music Resource Center to students but are checked out for two-hour 
in-house use. Circulating scores may be checked out for a 14-day loan 
period to undergraduate students. A valid library card is required. 

MRC Hours: 

Monday and Wednesday 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

Tuesday and Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. 

11:30 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 

Friday 8:00 a.m.- 7:00 p.m. 

Saturday 12:00 noon- 5:00p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

MRC hours are adjusted during convocations and school holidays. 

MEDIA RESOURCES 

Media equipment is available in the Squires Library, the Music 
Resource Center, the Education Curriculum Library and various acade- 
mic departments. This includes standard audio-visual equipment, 
including overhead projectors, VCRs and monitors and cameras. These 
centers also have limited computers and software. 



24 Lee University 

CURRICULUM LIBRARY 

The Curriculum Library (Education Building) contains elementary 
and secondary textbooks as well as other curriculum materials. 
Professional journals and practical resources are available in this 
hands-on work center, which provides students and teachers a place to 
develop instructional aids. A variety of instructional materials may be 
checked out. 

COMPUTERS 

Lee University encourages students to have their own computers 
for word processing, searching information databases and research on 
the Internet. The library catalog and other licensed databases are avail- 
able through dial-in-access with a computer and a modem. In addition 
to public access stations available in the library, there are computer 
labs in Walker Memorial and in the Paul Conn Student Union for gen- 
eral student use with payment of a fee. 




Lee University 25 



ADMISSIONS 



CRITERIA FORADMISSIONS 

Graduate programs at Lee University are open to persons holding 
the bachelor's degree from accredited colleges and universities whose 
undergraduate or graduate work has been of sufficient quality and 
scope to enable them to profitably pursue graduate study. 

Lee University offers equal educational opportunity to all persons 
without regard to race, religion, gender, age, creed, color, national ori- 
gin or disability. Applicants are required to meet the specific admis- 
sions criteria established by each of the graduate programs. All applica- 
tions must be accompanied by a $25.00 non-refundable application fee. 

An application to a graduate program is reviewed by the graduate 
faculty in each program before an admission decision is recommended. 
The applicant is advised to have all credentials on file well in advance of 
the registration period for the semester in which the application is made. 

The various Lee University graduate programs have different 
requirements for admissions. Applicants are advised to refer to appro- 
priate sections in this catalog for specific graduate programs' admis- 
sions requirements (or go to www.leeuniversity.edu/acad/graduate). 

Graduate students applying for admissions are required to provide 
proof of the following immunization records: 

1 . Measles Immunization Proof (MMR) - An applicant born after 
January 1, 1957, must provide documented proof of receiving 
two MMR vaccinations given after 12 months of age. 

2. Tuberculin PPD Skin Test - Provide proof of a Tuberculin PPD 
Skin Test taken within a one-year period prior to the date of 
admission application. 

If an applicant does not meet the admissions requirements of a grad- 
uate program, he/she may be considered for probationary acceptance. 



26 Lee University 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

The university is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immi- 
grant alien students on an F-l or J-l visa. International applicants are 
expected to apply well in advance of their projected beginning date. All 
academic records, transcripts and other credentials must be accompa- 
nied by an official English translation. In addition to admissions 
requirements described in each graduate program, international stu- 
dents must supply the following: 

1. TOEFL Scores: All applicants who will be attending the uni- 
versity on a student visa and who are not graduates of an 
American college or university must supply a minimum score 
of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 
Information on this test can be attained by writing to TOEFL 
Educational Testing Service; Princeton, New Jersey 08540; 
U.S.A. (or go to www.toefl.org). All test scores should be sent 
directly from the testing agency to Lee University. (Lee 
University Code: 1401) 

2. Financial Statement: An applicant on an F-l student visa must 
supply, on the form provided by the university, sufficient evi- 
dence of financial support for the applicant and all members of 
his/her family who will accompany the applicant to Lee. This 
requires that the applicant certify that his/her intent is to 
attend full time and that no employment will be required. 

All credentials must be received and approved before an INS Form 
1-20 can be issued to the applicant. 

POLICY REGARDING FALSE INFORMATION 

Any applicant who fails to acknowledge attendance or who sub- 
mits false records from any college or university where he/she has pre- 
viously registered is subject to dismissal from the university. 

CHANGE OF PROGRAM 

Students who have previously declared a program of study but 
desire to change should apply to the appropriate graduate program 
director. A change in program is considered the equivalent of reapply- 
ing for admissions. All admissions requirements of the new graduate 
program must be satisfied and approved before a change can be granted. 



Lee University 27 

ADMISSIONS TESTING 

A student who has completed a bachelor's degree within the past 
seven years must submit results from their Graduate Record 
Examination Aptitude Test (GRE) scores indicating they scored at least 
in the 35th percentile or above; or, the student may take the Miller 
Analogies Test (MAT) and score at least in the 35th percentile. The 
MCM program requires students to submit results from the GRE 
Subject Test in Music and score at least in the 35th percentile. This 
test score requirement may be waived for applicants in the MCM pro- 
gram who have held the baccalaureate degree for more than five years. 

The MAT is offered quarterly in the Lee University Office of 
Counseling and Testing (www.hbtpc.com/mat). 

The GRE is not administered at Lee University, but informational 
materials are available (www.gre.org). 




28 Lee University 







Lee University 29 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

ITEMIZED SEMESTER EXPENSES 

Tuition per semester hour $335 

Tuition per semester hour over 12 hours 168 

Registration Fee (per semester, nonrefundable) 10 

Yearbook Fee (optional) 40 

Health Fee (per semester) 25 

Student Activity Fee (per semester) 25 

RESIDENCE HALL STUDENTS 

Room and Board Per Semester 
Room Rent: 
Residents of B.L. Hicks, Keeble, Livingston, 

O'Bannon, Storms and new men's residence $1,265 

Residents of Atkins-Ellis, Cross, Davis, 

Sharp, Tharp and Auxiliary Housing 1,100 

Residents of Chambers, Hughes, Medlin, Simmons 1,050 

Board: 

All 21 Meals $1,140 

Any 15 Meals 1,080 

Any 10 Meals 995 

Any 5 Meals 928 

Telecommunications Fee (per semester) 50 

Breakage Fee 30 

Carroll Court— monthly apartment rent for married and single parent 
students including all utilities: 

One Bedroom $395 

Two Bedroom 410 

OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Late Registration Fee $20 

Audit Fee (per semester hour) 50 

Incomplete 100 

Graduation Application Fee 75 

Extra Transcript (one given free) 5 

Returned checks (per check) 20 

Auto Registration and parking (per year) 30 

Schedule change 10 



30 Lee University 



SPECIAL MUSIC FEES 

Applied Lessons (per credit hour) $200 

Accompanist Fee (per semester) 125 

Class Voice or Piano (semi-private) 90 

Instrument Rental 60 

ITEMIZED SEMESTER EXPENSES FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Semester hour $335 

Registration 10 

Late Registration 20 

Optional: 

Health Fee (per semester) 25 

Student Activity Fee 25 

Yearbook Fee 40 

DISCOUNTS 

In those cases where more than one member of an immediate 
household is registered full time (at least 12 hours), a 25% discount on 
tuition only is permitted for all except the first student, provided the 
full accounts are paid by the last date under the deferred-payment plan. 
Those involved must call the matter to the university's attention in 
order to be assured of receiving the discount. This policy does not 
include married children or students considered independent for finan- 
cial aid purposes. 

SUMMER SCHOOL -2002 

Basic Fee (for graduate students who are taking 12 hours) $3,668 

This includes the combination of courses in the three summer sessions. 

Note: Graduate students who, for reasons of personal enrichment or 
remediation, choose to enroll in undergraduate courses outside the 
parameters listed in "Course Offerings" will pay according to the 
undergraduate catalog. 

Tuition per semester hour $306 

Registration Fee 10 

Room 370 per term 

Board 425 per term 



Lee University 3 1 

SETTLEMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Where possible, students should be prepared to pay full-semester 
charges on or before registration. All students are required to pay at 
least one-third down on or before registration. 

Students who are unable to pay their accounts in full must either 
borrow the necessary funds or subscribe to the university's deferred- 
payment plan. Students who anticipate difficulty paying the full 
charges within the semester are encouraged to make advance arrange- 
ments for borrowing the needed funds. 

Persons needing to borrow funds should apply for a Stafford Loan 
through the Financial Aid office. The university also offers Visa, 
MasterCard and American Express services by which students may pay 
.on their accounts. 

Accounts must be paid before final examinations are taken. No 
student will be allowed to graduate, receive a diploma or transcripts 
until his/her account is paid in full. 

DEFERRED-TAYMENT PLAN 

Full-time, on-campus students desiring to participate in the uni- 
versity's deferred-payment plan are required to make a down payment 
of $2,200 at the time of registration. The balance of the semester's 
charges is to be paid in three equal payments. Off-campus and part- 
time students are required to pay approximately one-third of the total 
charges at the time of registration and the balance of the semester's 
charges in three equal monthly payments. 

The same financial requirements apply to veterans and others 
where money is not sent directly to the university. In all cases, when 
the student does not have the down payment, a commitment letter is 
required from those underwriting the student's account. 

FALL SEMESTER 

First payment by September 15 
Second payment by October 15 
Final payment by November 15 



32 Lee University 



SPRING SEMESTER 

First payment by February 15 
Second payment by March 15 
Final payment by April 15 

If payment is not made on or before the due date, a $20 fee will be 
assessed. 

DEFERRED-PAYMENT PLAN FOR SUMMER SCHOOL 

Ordinarily students are required to pay the full charges for the sum- 
mer sessions at registration. However, those unable to pay the full 
amount may defer up to 50% of the charges for a maximum of 30 days. 
Students who do not register for all sessions at the time of the first regis- 
tration must pay an additional registration fee of $10.00 for each session. 

REFUND POLICY 

No reduction of charges will be granted unless application is made 
within two weeks of any change in program or departure of the stu- 
dents. STUDENTS WHO WITHDRAW FROM THE UNIVERSITY 
AFTER THE FIFTH WEEK OF CLASSES WILL RECEIVE NO ADJUST- 
MENT ON TUITION AND FEES. Those whose study is interrupted by 
the university for discipline reasons will receive no adjustment on 
tuition and fees after the fifth week of classes. Room and board charges 
will be prorated from date of withdrawal. If a student withdraws during 
a semester and requests a refund of advanced payments, the following 
rules will determine the amount of adjustment, provided the student 
withdraws formally through the Office of Student Development. 

1 . Room and board will be adjusted by the full amount unused at the 
date of withdrawal. 

2. Tuition and fees, with the exception of matriculation and registra- 
tion fees, will be adjusted on the following percentages: 

• During first two weeks of semester 80% 

• During third week of semester 60% 

• During fourth week of semester 40% 

• During fifth week of semester 20% 

• After fifth week of semester No Adjustment 

3. NO REFUND ON MATRICULATION FEE, REGISTRATION FEE, 
OR LATE REGISTRATION FEE. 

4. No person who registers as a full-time student and is later permit- 
ted to drop enough courses to place him/her in the classification of 



Lee University 33 

a part-time student will be entitled to an adjustment or prorated 
tuition after the fifth week. 

5. Mandatory refunds and repayments to Federal Title IV student 
financial aid programs will be calculated based upon earned and 
unearned aid percentages as outlined by the Federal Government. 
The formula for such calculations is based on the number of days 
in a given semester and the number of days attendance completed 
by the student prior to his/her withdrawal. Refunds mandated by 
the calculation could possibly increase the amount a student must 
pay after he/she withdraws from school. 

Accounts with the school must be settled in full before a diploma 
or a transcript of credits is issued or a letter of honorable dismissal is 
granted. ACCOUNTS MUST BE PAID BEFORE FINAL EXAMINA- 
TIONS ARE TAKEN. NO STUDENT WILL BE ALLOWED TO GRAD- 
UATE UNTIL HIS/HER ACCOUNT IS PAID IN FULL. 

REFUND POLICY FOR SUMMER SCHOOL 

1. Withdrawals during the first week of classes will receive 50% 
credit on tuition. There is no refund after the first week. 

2. There is no refund for the Registration Fee or Late Registration 
Fee. Refund for room and board will be prorated by the day. 

3. Students who register for more than one term and officially 
withdraw prior to the first day of class of a later term will 
receive full refund for the later term. 

GROUP DISCOUNT FOR 
EMPLOYER-ASSISTED ENROLLMENTS 

Any organization with three or more employees concurrently 
enrolled in Lee University graduate courses with employer contribu- 
tions toward tuition expenses will be eligible for a discount of 25% of 
the tuition for that semester. 

STAFFORD LOANS 

Eligibility for financial aid is determined by filing the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) through the Federal 
Processor. The FAFSA can be completed online at www.fafsa.ed.gov/. 



34 Lee University 



Graduate students are eligible to apply for Stafford Loans. 
Maximum annual loan amounts are indicated below: 

Subsidized Stafford $8,500 

Unsubsidized Stafford 10,000 

These amounts will be subject to the student's filing for federal 
aid, showing eligibility for loans based on income and cost of atten- 
dance for school. Students may or may not be eligible for the maxi- 
mum possible award based on these criteria. 

LIFETIME LEARNING CREDITS 

A family may claim a 20% tax credit for the first $5,000 of tuition 
and fees paid each year through 2002, and thereafter 20% of the first 
$10,000. This credit may be claimed for any number of years, starting 
July 1, 1998, provided students and taxpayers meet the criteria for each 
credit. If eligible, this credit can be applied to an individual annual tax 
return. The program is administered by the Internal Revenue Service. 
Questions should be addressed to a local IRS representative. 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Assistantships and scholarships are available for full-time and part- 
time graduate students. Assistantship information can be obtained 
from the Director of the Graduate Program in each area of study. 

EMPLOYMENT 

Off-campus employment opportunities are available to graduate 
students through the Career Planning and Placement Office located on 
the third floor of the Watkins Building. 



Lee University 35 



STUDENT LIFE 



RESIDENTIAL LIFE 

Lee University has a Residential Life program that exists to meet 
the housing needs of graduate students who desire this service. On- 
campus housing may be provided for graduate students who send their 
housing application and deposit of $200 in before July 1 of each year. 
Space will be granted according to availability. Married/family housing 
is available but limited. 

All graduate students are expected to abide by all rules and regula- 
tions governing residential life as established by the Student 
Handbook. These include regulations regarding care of room, safety 
concerns, and special services, among others. Graduate students inter- 
ested in securing on-campus housing should go by the Office of 
Residential Life to secure and sign a copy of Residential Life rules and 
regulations. Married students may wish to contact the Office for 
Commuter Services/Non-Traditional Students for assistance. 

COUNSELING, TESTING, AND CAREER SERVICES 

Lee University's Counseling, Testing and Career Services Center is 
located on the third floor of the Watkins Building on the corner of 
Church and Eighth Streets. 

COUNSELING 

A professional staff with training and experience offers counseling 
for a wide variety of needs for graduate students and their families. 
Counseling is by appointment and is confidential. For issues of a more 
serious nature, students may be referred to an off-campus agency. 

TESTING 

The Office of Counseling, Testing and Career Services coordinates 
a testing program designed to assist students in learning more about 
themselves. Individual testing for purposes of counseling is also avail- 
able in the Counseling Center. 

This office serves as a national testing center for the ACT and 
MAT. Registration materials are also available for other national tests 
including the GRE, MCAT, GMAT, PPST, and NTE. Personality and 
career testing is also administered by request. 



36 Lee University 

CAREER SERVICES 

This office will assist graduate students in career endeavors by 
offering seminars, interest inventories and individual counseling. 
Master's degree candidates may activate a personal file with reference 
letters, copies of transcripts and a resume to be used in their job search. 

Students who desire to work while attending classes may want to 
visit the computerized "Job Board" which lists part-time as well as 
full-time positions in the local area. A Graduate School Fair and a 
Career Fair are held each year. 

CHAPEL 

Although graduate students are not required to attend chapel ser- 
vices, they are invited to participate. Chapel is held in the Conn 
Center on Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 
a.m. and on Sunday evenings at 6 p.m. Spiritual life counseling is also 
available in the Campus Pastor's office. 

LIFESTYLE EXPECTATIONS 

Graduate students will be expected to adhere to all rules and poli- 
cies of Lee University while on campus. Every student is provided a 
copy of the Student Handbook at registration and is encouraged to read 
it thoroughly. 

Lee University is a smoke-free, alcohol-free, drug-free campus. 
Graduate students are expected to respect campus norms. 

Sexual harassment, unwelcome sexual advances, premarital or 
homosexual conduct, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or 
physical conduct of a sexual nature will not be tolerated on campus. 
Students who are subjected to harassment should promptly contact the 
Vice President for Student Life. 

Questions regarding student lifestyle expectations can be directed 
to the Dean of Students. This office is located on the third floor of the 
Higginbotham Administration Building. 

ATHLETICS 

Graduate students are invited to attend intercollegiate athletic 
activities. Varsity teams compete in men's and women's basketball, 



Lee University 37 

tennis, soccer and cross country; women's softball and volleyball; and 
men's golf and baseball. Students interested in participating in inter- 
collegiate athletics should contact the university's Athletic Director to 
verify eligibility. 

RECREATION AND FITNESS 

The DeVos Recreation Center offers a wide range of equipment and 
activities from treadmills and weights to racquetball and billiards. 
Graduate students have full use of the facility and its services with a 
minimal additional fee for some features such as lockers and supplies. 
Immediate family members (i.e. spouses and children of graduate stu- 
dents) may purchase memberships by the semester or calendar year. 
Fees for adults are $25 per year. Children (15 and up) are $15 per year. 
Membership includes full use of the facilities and the same privileges 
as students. Children under the age of 16 must have adult supervision 
at all times. The DeVos Recreation Center is not appropriate for pre- 
school age children. Participants must present a valid ID at the recep- 
tion desk prior to use of facilities. 

COMMUTER SERVICES 

Non-resident students may get assistance from the Office for 
Commuter Services/Non-Traditional Students. This office will assist 
in locating apartments and roommates for interested graduate stu- 
dents. This office also provides other services to all "non-traditional" 
students on campus. 

INTRAMURALS 

Graduate students and their spouses may participate in intramural 
contests by paying the Intramural Activity Fee and registering for the 
events of their choice. The fee must be paid each semester they wish 
to compete. Intramurals include: basketball, softball, racquetball, foot- 
ball, table tennis, billiards, bowling, pickleball, etc. 

HEALTH CLINIC 

Lee University maintains a Health Clinic which provides a variety 
of medical services including certain lab tests and medicines. Students 
are treated by a registered nurse, campus or local physician or taken to 
the emergency room. The Health Clinic fee is mandatory for full-time 
students and optional for part-time. 



38 Lee University 

The primary objective of the Health Clinic is to give first aid and 
medical treatment. No student is refused treatment, and all informa- 
tion is confidential. There are no in-patient beds or isolation facilities 
available on campus. Students with communicable diseases are assist- 
ed in making arrangements to return home to recover. 

Students with health-related problems requiring ongoing care are 
strongly encouraged to contact the Director of the Health Clinic prior 
to registration so arrangements can be made for medical supervision. 

The Health Clinic is located in the house on the north end of the 
Sharp Pedestrian Mall across from the Behavioral and Social Sciences 
Building and DeVos Tennis Center. 

CAMPUS SAFETY 

All graduate students are required to have a valid Student ID made 
each school year, and must present this ID to any campus safety officer 
upon request. Additionally, all motor-driven vehicles must be regis- 
tered with the Campus Safety Office. Student vehicles are assigned to 
an off-the-street parking area but are not assigned specific parking 
spaces. Parking is on a first-come, first-served basis. Automobiles 
parked illegally will be ticketed and in some cases "booted" or towed 
at the owner's expense. 

STUDENT GRIEVANCES AND APPEALS 

Lee University is committed to a policy of responsiveness to stu- 
dents who express that actions and decisions of university personnel 
are inappropriate and detrimental. 

A student grievance or complaint should be discussed with the uni- 
versity employee responsible for the specific decision or having authori- 
ty for the condition in the institution giving rise to the complaint. If the 
discussion does not resolve the issue, the student should submit a 
signed written complaint stating the facts as perceived and the request- 
ed action or change of decision. The written complaint may be submit- 
ted to the original employee and/or to the employee's supervisor. Each 
supervisor is committed to assist in resolving problems and complaints 
in accordance with professional standards. The standards include 
respect for differences in viewpoint; protection of the right of students 
to seek clarification of policy or changes in policy; and delivery of satis- 
factory service in accordance with stated program objectives. 



Lee University 39 

Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate respect in both 
oral and written complaints. When a member of the faculty, adminis- 
tration, or staff renders a decision that is in accordance with institu- 
tional policy, the student should recognize that an appeal for excep- 
tions to policy and recommendations for changes in policy involve 
privileges that usually exceed the authority of a given employee. 

Graduate students should seek resolution of complaints with the 
director of their respective graduate program. If a satisfactory resolu- 
tion cannot be reached, the student may appeal to the program direc- 
tor's supervisor or to an appropriate university vice president. 




Lee University 4 1 

ACADEMIC POLICIES 

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Graduate courses are identified by a departmental abbreviation fol- 
lowed by a three digit 500-level course number. 

STUDY LOAD 

To be classified as a full-time graduate student, one must be 
enrolled in at least nine hours per semester. Maximum graduate enroll- 
ment is 12 hours per semester. Students enrolled in summer sessions 
may take a maximum of six hours per session. For sessions shorter 
than four weeks, the maximum load is four hours. 

AUDITING 

A qualified student may apply for permission to audit a class. The 
student must meet the regular university entrance requirements and 
pay the audit fee per credit hour. Students may not change their audit 
classification to obtain credit after the last date to register. Students 
may not change from credit to audit after the last day to register. Such 
a change to audit would not entail a refund. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

Lee will allow up to six semester credit hours of a program to be 
comprised of transfer credit from a regionally accredited graduate pro- 
gram, when the grade received is a "B" or better. The individual pro- 
gram committee must approve application of transfer credits. 

GRADING 

The Lee University graduate programs will use the following sys- 
tem of grading and quality points for all graduate-level courses. These 
letter grades are assigned grade point values as follows: 

A Excellent 4.0 quality points 

A- Excellent 3.7 quality points 

B+ Good 3.3 quality points 

B Good 3.0 quality points 

B- Good 2.7 quality points 

C+ Passing 2.3 quality points 

C Passing 2.0 quality points 

F Failing quality points 

I Indicates the student's work was incomplete 



42 Lee University 



P Passing Credit (no quality points) 

S Satisfactory progress, no credit 

W Student officially withdrew from the class without penalty 

A grade of "I" will become an "F" if the student's work is not com- 
pleted by the end of the following semester or unless a written exten- 
sion has been approved by the Dean or the Vice President for Academic 
Affairs. The "I" may be awarded only in rare cases involving extenuat- 
ing circumstances. 

A grade of "W" (withdrawal) is assigned to a student who, for any 
reason, officially withdraws or is withdrawn by the official semester 
date. This " W" is assigned without quality point penalty to the student. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND DISQUALIFICATION 

Satisfactory progress toward the degree is required. A student may 
be disqualified from further graduate work if a 3.0 grade-point average 
is not maintained. In the event that the grade-point average drops 
below the minimum level, the student may be given one enrollment 
period to raise it to the satisfactory level. 

TIME LIMITS 

Course work completed more than 10 years prior to admission is 
not accepted toward meeting degree requirements. The student has a 
maximum of six years from the date of admission to degree standing 
(and registration for course work) in which to complete the require- 
ments for the master's degree. Please refer to specific program sections 
within the catalog for detailed policies. 

WITHDRAWING FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

Students may withdraw from the university at any time beginning 
the first day of classes until the final day of classes for the semester. 
Withdrawals will not be processed after final exams have begun. 
Following is the procedure: 

1. Students wishing to withdraw from the university must make 
an official request to do so to the graduate program director. 
The student must also complete an exit interview in the 
Student Financial Aid Office and will be given a form indicat- 
ing the exit interview has taken place. 



Lee University 43 

2. The Financial Aid Exit Interview form and the student's cur- 
rent University I.D. card must be presented in the Student 
Development Office. The student will be given a Permission 
to Withdraw Request form to complete. 

3. The Vice President for Student Development must approve the 
withdrawal request. Upon approval, the Registrar's Office, the 
Business Office and the residence director will be notified. 

Withdrawn students will not be allowed to continue on the meal 
plan or remain in campus housing and should make arrangements to 
move immediately upon withdrawal. 

Students who withdraw from the university will receive the grade 
of "W" for all courses. 

The Business Office will issue a final statement of the student's 
account. See the Financial Information section of this catalog for pro 
rata billing information. 

Students who have preregistered and have been early billed but 
decide not to return to school should contact the Business Office to 
clear their accounts. No action is required for preregistered students 
who did not early bill and decide not to return to school. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES 

Students may withdraw from a class without grade penalty until 
the official withdrawal deadline date in the university calendar. The 
student must secure the appropriate form from the Office of the 
Registrar and obtain an approval signature from the professor. The stu- 
dent will receive a "W" grade in the course from which he or she with- 
draws. A student who never attends or stops attending a course for 
which he or she is officially registered will receive an "F" in that 
course if accepted procedures for withdrawal are not followed. 

RELEASE OF TRANSCRIPTS 

Transcripts of Lee University course work are available approxi- 
mately four weeks after the completion of courses. Requests must be 
made in writing and should include the following information: the last 
semester attended, where the transcript is to be sent, date of gradua- 
tion (if applicable), social security number, and signature. A Lee 



44 Lee University 



University Transcript Request form is available for the student's con- 
venience. A $5 per copy fee applies. Transcripts, diplomas, and/or veri- 
fications of degrees will not be released until all the student's financial 
obligations to the university are met. 

CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT RECORDS 

In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
of 1974, Lee University students have the right to review, inspect, and 
challenge the accuracy of information kept in a cumulative file by the 
university unless the student waives the right. The law further ensures 
that records cannot be released except in emergency situations without 
the written consent of the student other than the following: 

1 . to other school officials, including faculty within the education- 
al institution who have legitimate educational interest; 

2. to officials of other schools in which the student intends to 
enroll, upon condition that the student be notified of the trans- 
fer, receives a copy of the record if desired, and has an opportu- 
nity for a hearing to challenge the content of the record; 

3. to authorized representatives of (1) the Comptroller General of 
the United States, (2) the Secretary, (3) an administrative head 
of an educational agency, or (4) state educational authorities; 

4. in connection with a student's application for, and receipt of, 
financial aid; and 

5. in cases of information classified as "directory information." 
The following categories of information have been designated 
by the university as directory information: name, address, tele- 
phone listing, e-mail address, date and place of birth, major 
field of study, participation in officially recognized activities 
and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, 
dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the most 
recent previous educational institution attended by the stu- 
dent. If the student does not wish such information released 
without consent, the student should notify the Office of 
Student Records prior to the first day of classes each semester. 

Questions concerning this law and the university's policy concern- 
ing release of academic information may be directed to the Director of 
Student Records. 



Lee University 45 

COLLABORATIVE STATEMENT 

Lee University and the Church of God Theological Seminary have 
complementary programs in graduate and professional education. The 
schools have established a cross-registration policy that allows stu- 
dents at either institution to enroll in courses at the other school. The 
cross-registration policy expands the curricular offerings available to 
students in both institutions. Courses taken by cross-registration are 
not considered transfer credits. 

The student who chooses to cross-register for a course must have 
the permission of the school in which he or she is seeking a degree. As 
a general rule, electives can be taken by cross-registration with the 
approval of the academic advisor. Courses within concentrations can 
be taken with the approval of the academic advisor and the program 
director. However, core classes cannot be taken except in extraordi- 
nary circumstances. These exceptions must be approved by the dean. 

The student who cross-registers for a course must meet the qualifi- 
cations for the course. Qualifications include both the stated prerequi- 
sites of the course and the necessary background preparation. The stu- 
dent's advisor, in consultation with the course professor and/or program 
director will determine eligibility for cross-registration. Any student 
cross-registering for a course must have adequate proficiency in English 
as determined by a TOEFL score of 550 or the approval of the professor. 

Lee University and the Theological Seminary will distribute copies 
of their course schedules for each semester at least one week prior to 
pre-registration. Copies of the schedules are available to students 
through their advisors. 

PROJECT/THESIS STATEMENT 

Once the master's candidate has completed all required course 
work, registration is required each succeeding semester toward the 
completion of the final project or thesis. During the semester(s) that 
this occurs, enrollment will be in the graduate course entitled "Final 
Project Extension" for which no credit will be awarded. This course 
will not count toward the student's graduate program requirements but 
will rather continue active status as a graduate student. The cost of 
the course is equal to one graduate credit hour. 



46 Lee University 

Each graduate program has specific Final Project and Thesis 
requirements. A copy of these requirements may be obtained from the 
graduate program directors. 

POLICIES FOR THESES 

Theses will be cataloged using the following procedures: 

1. An OCLC constant data template will be used for cataloging on 
a level to be determined by the technical services librarian. The 
call number will contain the LC classification number for Lee 
University or Church of God Theological Seminary, as the case 
may be ; a cutter number for the school; a cutter number for the 
author; and the year. This will give global access to the thesis. 

2. Specific subject headings will be used. 

3. The library will keep two copies for the institution. One copy 
would be for preservation and be placed in either Squires 
Library Special Collection, or the Hal Bernard Dixon, Jr. 
Pentecostal Research Center, or at some other place that the 
institution designates for an archives. A copy is also recom- 
mended for the Squires Library circulating collection. 
Graduates in the church music program must make one addi- 
tional copy for the Music Resource Center. 

4. A microform copy of the thesis should not be held. 

5. The cost for binding library copies should be covered by the 
student, who makes payment to the institution. The depart- 
ment or school receiving payment should credit the funds to 
the proper Squires Library account. The charge for binding is 
$8.00 per copy. A fee totaling $15.00, in addition to the sum 
for binding, will be paid to the library for handling the bindery 
process. Should a student, at a later date, bring additional 
copies of the thesis to be bound, a fee of $5.00 will be added to 
the total of the binding bill to cover processing a second order. 

6. The student should submit six copies of the thesis to the 
school or department of student's major field, which will have 
theses for all students delivered at one time to the library for 
binding. A form having the student's name, thesis title, school 



Lee University 47 

and department, payment collected, number of copies, and 
other relevant information should be included with each thesis. 

7. The library will be responsible for preparing bindery orders and 
sending the theses to the bindery (library copies, additional 
institution required copies, and students' personal copies). 
The library will send all bound copies, when returned, to the 
proper department or school except for copies to be cataloged 
by the library. 

8. The library copy and the archival copy should be on paper 
that is acid free and 25% rag content. 




7?m 






- 9i 




* JT 

^ :J SmiBifl 


COLLEGE OF 
ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 

Master of Science in 
Counseling Psychology 

Master of Science in 
School Counseling 



Lee University 49 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
SCHOOL COUNSELING 

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 

The counseling faculty at Lee University affirms its commitment 
to counseling as an effective, viable means of assisting individuals and 
families through normal development, in the prevention of problems, 
and in coping effectively with personal, social and spiritual problems. 

We believe that God exists, that He is the source of all truth, and 
that He calls us into relationship with Himself and others. The theo- 
logical paradigm which portrays human nature as created by God, sin- 
fully altered by the fall, and redeemed in Jesus Christ, provides the 
foundation upon which psychological understanding of human nature 
is rightfully based. These truths serve to inform counseling theory and 
practice. Therefore, the major purpose of the Master of Science in 
Counseling Psychology Program is to train students in the discipline of 
counseling psychology from a Christian perspective. The program is 
designed to prepare highly knowledgeable and skilled professional 
practitioners who have developed Christian character, personal integri- 
ty and a healthy personality. 

The practice of counseling is based on theory and research infor- 
mation, an understanding of ethical practices, and a set of professional 
and interpersonal skills. Exposure to conceptual frameworks, research 
findings and informed practice is the basic curriculum model 
employed. It is recognized that an interaction of these components is 
essential. 

The counselor, regardless of his/her theoretical stance, functions as 
a change agent. Effective and positive change is brought about by assist- 
ing clients to examine and modify their behavior for more effective liv- 
ing, and by assisting clients to cope with, adjust to, or otherwise negoti- 
ate the environments affecting their psychosocial well-being. For opti- 
mal change to occur, the counselor must also be sensitive to the spiritu- 
al needs of the individual. We believe that the Grace of God and the 



50 Lee University 

indwelling of the Holy Spirit are the ultimate experiences through 
which individuals can achieve wholeness and maturity. 

The counseling faculty, while representing diverse views, is in 
agreement that individual beliefs and theoretical patterns must be fos- 
tered in graduate counseling students. Faculty members represent an 
array of models and information which they make available to stu- 
dents to help them clarify their own philosophical, theoretical, and 
practical positions. Special emphasis is given to the enhancement of 
self-awareness and personal value clarification regarding such issues as 
the nature of humankind and the meaning of life. Students are contin- 
ually assisted in the process of maturation in the image of Christ. The 
opportunity to consider and refine a personal perspective on life is 
encouraged as an evolving aspect of individual development. 

An interdisciplinary approach is espoused in the education of 
counselors. Truth as revealed in the Bible serves as the foundation for 
all knowledge. All the social sciences are considered important to the 
understanding of the complexity of human behavior. Informed eclecti- 
cism is encouraged, and the student is assisted in formulating a person- 
al theoretical model which considers sound scientific research and the- 
ological insights. 

PROGRAM GOALS 

The counseling programs at Lee University are based upon the fol- 
lowing goals which reflect both programmatic and individual needs: 

1. To provide a curriculum which contains an appropriate bal- 
ance between both didactic and experiential learning. 

2. To provide a curriculum which reflects faculty expertise and 
competencies,- students' needs for credentialing; and the com- 
munities needs for well-trained counselors. 

3. To provide students with the opportunity to test out their 
newly acquired skills in a structured, supervised environment 
prior to applying these skills in the work world. 

4. To provide a comprehensive program which is open to change 
and revision based upon the changing needs of students, facul- 
ty, the institution and society. 

5. To provide a comprehensive program that enables students to 
gain knowledge and experience that will enhance their identi- 
ty as a professional counselor. 



Lee University 5 1 

6. To prepare the student for ongoing graduate study in a doctoral 
program. 

7. To provide a program that teaches the theory and practice of 
counseling in conjunction with application of biblical princi- 
ples and values. 

8. To provide a learning environment which is sensitive to the 
person and work of the Holy Spirit. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY 

The Master of Science in Counseling Psychology prepares profes- 
sionals to work in a wide variety of community agencies such as men- 
tal health centers, probation and parole departments, substance abuse 
centers, residential treatment centers, church related counseling cen- 
ters and private practice. Completion of this program is the first stage 
toward licensure as a Professional Counselor. The MS degree is also a 
preparatory degree for doctoral study in Counseling Psychology and 
Clinical Psychology. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

At the end of the master's program, the graduate should have 
acquired the necessary advanced skills, knowledge, and experience to: 

1. Counsel individuals and groups relative to personal issues, 
social problems, and educational and vocational objectives. 

2. Provide individual and group counseling services in a wide 
variety of community service settings. 

3. Conduct counseling or therapeutic interviews to assist indi- 
viduals in gaining insight into personal problems, in defining 
goals and to plan actions which reflect their interests, abilities 
and needs. 

4. Provide occupational and educational information to enable 
individuals to formulate realistic vocational and educational 
plans. 

5. Collect data about individuals through the use of interviews, 
case histories, psychometric instruments, observational tech- 
niques and related methods. 

6. Select, administer, and interpret tests designed to assess indi- 
viduals; and apply the knowledge of statistical analysis in 
doing so. 



52 Lee University 



7. Evaluate data to identify the causes of problems of individuals 
and to determine the advisability of counseling or referral to 
other specialists or institutions. 

8. Demonstrate an understanding of special needs populations 
(e.g. persons in poverty, physical abuse victims, substance 
abusers, juvenile offenders). 

9. Interpret and evaluate research data. 

10. Demonstrate a sensitivity to, and an appreciation of, the spiri- 
tual needs of individuals. 

1 1 . Demonstrate an understanding of the issues and concerns sur- 
rounding the integration of Christian faith and counseling the- 
ory and practice. 

12. Articulate a personal approach to counseling which integrates 
faith and learning. 

13. Discuss the dynamic of the Holy Spirit which is central to the 
Pentecostal/Charismatic tradition. 

PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

The Master of Science in Counseling Psychology prepares profes- 
sionals to work in a wide variety of community agencies such as men- 
tal health centers, probation and parole departments, substance abuse 
centers, residential treatment centers, church related counseling cen- 
ters, and private practice. The Master of Science degree is also a 
preparatory degree for doctoral study in Counseling Psychology and 
Clinical Psychology. Additionally, this degree is the first stage toward 
licensure as a Professional Counselor. 

The program is composed of a minimum of four semesters of 
approved graduate study. The typical full-time student will complete 
the program in approximately two full years. A minimum of 48 semes- 
ter hoursjs required. The program core provides educational preparation 
in human growth and development, cultural foundations, a Christian 
perspective on psychology, helping relationships, group work, career and 
lifestyle development, appraisal, research and professional issues. The 
clinical portion of the program provides supervised counseling experi- 
ence working in the community with culturally diverse clients. The 
program furnishes additional training in community systems, family 
systems and diagnosis and pathology. 



Lee University 53 

Many faculty members are practitioners who bring real world 
experience into the classroom. Faculty are selected to teach courses 
according to their expertise, and emphasis is on practical application of 
concepts and theory. 

I. REQUIRED COURSES 

A. CORE AREAS (33 hours) 

CSL 500 Introduction to Professional Counseling (3) 

CSL 508 Personality Theory (3) 

CSL 512 Psychological Research Methods (3) 

CSL 516 Human Growth and Development (3) 

CSL 520 Counseling Theories and Techniques (3) 

CSL 524 Psychopathology (3) 

CSL 550 Group Process and Practice (3) 

CSL 554 Measurement and Appraisal in Counseling (3) 

CSL 558 Social and Cultural Foundations in Counseling (3) or 

CSL 559 Cross-Cultural Issues in Counseling Seminar (3) 

CSL 562 Lifestyle and Career Development (3) 

CSL 571 Christian Perspectives on Counseling (3) or 

THE 518 Integrative Theology (3) 

B. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE (9 hours) 
CSL 548 Practicum in Counseling (3) 
CSL 572 Counseling Internship I (3) 
CSL 590 Counseling Internship II (3) 

II. ELECTIVES (6 hours minimum) 

A. SPECIALTY - Marriage and Family Therapy 
CSL 551 Marriage and Family Therapy (3) 

CSL 555 Advanced Marriage and Family Therapy (3) 
CSL 557 Marriage and Family Systems (3) 
CSL 563 Human Sexuality (3) 

B. GENERAL 

CSL 558 Social and Cultural Foundations in Counseling (3) or 

CSL 559 Cross-Cultural Issues in Counseling Seminar (3) 

CSL 561 Counseling Adolescents: Developmental Issues 

and Interventions (3) 

CSL 571 Christian Perspectives on Counseling (3) or 

THE 518 Integrative Theology (3) 

CSL 575 Advanced Techniques of Counseling (3) 

CSL 579 Matters of Life and Death (3) 

CSL 581 Clinical Psychopharmacology (3) 

CSL 583 Advanced Assessment and Treatment Planning (3) 



54 Lee University 




CSL 


585 


CSL 


587 


CSL 


589 


CSL 


591 


CSL 


593 


CSL 


595 


CSL 


597 



Assessment and Treatment of Personality Disorders (3) 
Special Topics in Counseling (1) 
Special Topics in Counseling (2) 
Special Topics in Counseling (3) 
Directed Research (1) 
Directed Research (2) 
Directed Research (3) 
III. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS (0 hours) 
Comprehensive Examination (0) 

TYPICAL TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM 

Several configurations or sequences for completing required course 
work are possible. There are a variety of considerations and restrictions 
that limit the flexibility of these options and demand close attention 
when developing a program of study. Several of the more important fac- 
tors to consider are the prerequisites or corequisites of each course, the 
availability of a given course in a specific semester, individual interests, 
and ability and desire to enroll during the summer. 

The following sequence is a possible program of study. This 
sequence is not required, but is simply an example. Several assump- 
tions underlie this program: (1) the desire to complete in four semesters, 
(2) enrollment only during fall and spring semesters, and (3) no transfer 
work being applied. 

Year One 

Introduction to Professional Counseling (3) 
Personality Theory (3) 
Psychopathology (3) 

Christian Perspectives on Counseling (3) OR 
Integrative Theology (3] 

Human Growth and Development (3) 
Counseling Theories and Techniques (3) 
Practicum in Counseling (3) 
Measurement and Appraisal in Counseling (3) 



Fall 




CSL 


500 


CSL 


508 


CSL 


524 


CSL 


571 


THE 


518 


Spring 




CSL 


516 


CSL 


520 


CSL 


548 


CSL 


554 



Lee University 55 

Year Two 
Fall 

CSL 550 Group Process and Practice (3) 
CSL 558 Social and Cultural Foundations of Counseling (3) OR 
CSL 559 Cross-Cultural Issues in Counseling Seminar (3] 
CSL 572 Counseling Internship I (3) 
Elective (3) 
Spring 

CSL 512 Psychological Research Methods (3) 
CSL 562 Lifestyle and Career Development (3) 
Elective (3) 
CSL 590 Counseling Internship II (3) 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES 

Clinical experiences are an integral part of a degree in counseling at 
Lee University. The counseling practicum and internship placements 
provide an opportunity to practice skills and to utilize acquired knowl- 
edge in real life situations. Fieldwork activity follows a developmental 
model consisting of a sequence of training experiences of increasing 
complexity and responsibility. Each level of training is designed to 
accommodate the student's particular level of professional development. 

PRACTICUM 

Practicum refers to the experience of working with clients within 
the setting of a formal course, under direct supervision of a faculty 
member. Students are required to complete a minimum of 100 hours of 
practicum prior to entering an internship. A minimum of 40 hours 
must be in direct contact with clients. The remaining hours can be 
indirect in nature, i.e. the student may participate in role playing, 
observe counseling sessions, review taped sessions, and so on. 

INTERNSHIP 

Internship refers to a formalized arrangement by which the stu- 
dent is assigned to a community agency in order to gain experience in 
the many facets of the role of a counselor, including but not limited to 
direct services to clients. 

MANUAL 

Manuals are available for students which contain specific policies 
about arranging, conducting and evaluating practicum and internship 
experiences. These manuals include lists of competencies the student 
must achieve in the placement, along with various forms to be used 
during the placement. 



56 Lee University 

LIABILITY INSURANCE 

Students are required to obtain liability insurance prior to begin- 
ning field experiences. The American Counseling Association, the 
American Association of Christian Counselors and other professional 
organizations offer group rates and special student rates for such 
insurance. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SCHOOL COUNSELING 

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 

At the heart of the M. S. program in School Counseling is the recog- 
nition of the inseparability of the school and the community and the 
role that counselors have in being advocates for all children and adoles- 
cents within these contexts. The program is designed to prepare highly 
knowledgeable and skilled professional practitioners who have devel- 
oped Christian character, personal integrity and a healthy personality. 
The program will lead students to develop skills in guiding and counsel- 
ing children and adolescents, in facilitating team-building efforts, col- 
laboration and coordination between teachers, parents, support person- 
nel, and community resources, and in developing and implementing 
school guidance and counseling programs. Therefore, the purpose of the 
Master of Science program in School Counseling (PreK-12) is two-fold: 
1) to provide a route to initial school counselor licensure and 2) to edu- 
cate school counselors to become advocates and systems specialists 
who are capable of assessing, developing, implementing, and sustaining 
programs for youth PreK-12 from diverse backgrounds. 

Students who successfully complete the degree program and meet 
all standardized test requirements and other conditions set by the state, 
are eligible for school counselor licensure in grades PreK-12 (NTE 
Praxis-School Counselor Exam) and for certification by the NBCC 
(Licensed Professional Counselor Exam). 

The M.S. program in School Counseling would benefit students 
with undergraduate degrees in psychology, sociology, human develop- 
ment or teacher education that are seeking to become a licensed school 
counselor in the PreK-12 school setting. Students entering the program 
may often be mature students embarking on a career change or those 
who begin immediately upon completion of the undergraduate degree. 
Applicants must have earned a baccalaureate degree. The program 



Lee University 57 

offered by the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences includes 
integrated academic and field-based experiences that provide the knowl- 
edge base and develop the skills, abilities, and understanding needed for 
success as a school counselor in an elementary or secondary school 
environment. The curriculum is designed to equip graduates to assume 
roles as professional counselors who will emerge as leaders in the field 
of school counseling. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

One of the main tasks of the school counselor is to integrate the 
school counseling program into the total school curriculum, by system- 
atically providing knowledge and skills to assist preK-12 students in 
maximizing their academic, career, and personal/social development. 
The Tennessee State Department of Education has established stan- 
dards and goals for school counselor preparation programs. Therefore, 
based on licensure standards set by the Tennessee State Department of 
Education, the M.S. in School Counseling degree program at Lee 
University will provide the prospective candidate with the knowledge 
and skills to develop the following outcomes: 

1. An understanding of the nature and needs of students in grade 
levels PreK-12 as well as the ability to apply knowledge from 
the area of human growth and development and learning theo- 
ries,- to identify learning problems; and to assist teachers and 
parents in responding to counseling and guidance interventions 
with students. 

2. An understanding of the process of social and cultural change 
with respect to various racial, gender, and ethnic groups, and 
knowledge of differing cultural and lifestyle patterns and the 
ability to develop plans and programs to prevent person and 
substance abuse, discrimination, and dropping out of school. 

3. An understanding of the philosophical basis underlying the 
helping process and the ability to facilitate student growth and 
development through both counseling and consulting activi- 
ties, including contributing to the development and implemen- 
tation of the individualized educational programs (IEPs) for stu- 
dents with special needs. 

4. The ability to lead large and small group counseling and guid- 
ance activities related to personal and interpersonal growth, 
self-help and problem solving, and career development. 



58 Lee University 



5. An understanding of changes in society and technology and the 
influence of changes on work and learning as well as the ability 
to develop and implement a comprehensive career development 
program. 

6. The ability to assist in curriculum advisement and career coun- 
seling using a variety of materials, strategies, and technologies. 

7. An understanding of appropriate test and other assessments to 
assist students and their parents in making effective education- 
al, social, and career decisions as well as the ability to use 
group-administered educational and psychological measure- 
ment and appraisal instruments. 

8. An understanding of research and research design as well as the 
ability to conduct research and evaluation projects related to 
the outcomes of counseling and guidance services. 

9. The ability to plan, manage, and evaluate a comprehensive 
PreK-12 program of guidance and counseling services. 

10. An understanding of the ethical and legal standards of guidance 
and school counseling professionals. 

11. The ability to work with teachers, school social workers, 
school psychologists, and family resource center staff in meet- 
ing student needs. 

12. The ability to inform students, teachers, parents, and the com- 
munity about the purposes and activities of the school guid- 
ance and counseling program. 

13. The ability to work with parents and conduct parent education 
activities. 

14. The ability to use community resources and referral processes, 
and develop effective partnership arrangements with communi- 
ty agencies. 

PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

The Master of Science in School Counseling (PreK-12) prepares 
individuals to work as school counselors. Requirements lead directly to 
licensure as a School Counselor by meeting all of the requirements of 
the Tennessee State Department of Education. The requirements for 
this track include a 48-semester hour curriculum that includes a full 
year placement in a school setting. This curriculum includes 42 semes- 
ter hours of required courses and six semester hours of elective courses. 
The program is composed of a minimum of four semesters of approved 
graduate study. The typical full-time student will complete the program 
in approximately two full years. 



Lee University 59 

The program core will provide educational preparation in school 
guidance and counseling programs, human growth and development, 
social and cultural foundations of counseling, cross-cultural issues in 
counseling, a Christian perspective on psychology, helping relation- 
ships, group work, career and lifestyle development, appraisal, research 
and professional issues. The program core will also provide supervised 
counseling experience working in schools with culturally diverse stu- 
dents in grades PreK-12. The program furnishes additional training in 
family systems, human sexuality, crisis intervention, collaboration, and 
approaches to working with children and adolescents with disabilities. 

I. REQUIRED COURSES 

A. CORE AREAS (33 hours) 

CSL 502 School Counseling Programs: 

Principles & Administration (3) 
CSL 508 Personality Theory (3) 
CSL 512 Counseling Research Methods (3) 
CSL 516 Human Growth & Development (3) 
CSL 520 Counseling Theories &. Techniques (3) 
CSL 5 1 7 Policies and Procedures (2) 
CSL 550 Group Process and Practice (3) 
CSL 554 Measurement and Appraisal in Counseling (3) 
CSL 558 Social and Cultural Foundations in Counseling (3) or 
CSL 559 Cross-Cultural Issues in Counseling (3) or 
EDU 561 Multicultural Education (3) 
CSL 562 Lifestyle & Career Development (3) 
CSL 561 Counseling Children and Adolescents (3) 
CSL 592 Seminar in Guidance & Counseling ( 1 ) 

B. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE (9 hours) 

CSL 546 Practicum in School Counseling (3) 

CSL 570 Internship in Elementary School Counseling (3) 

CSL 588 Internship in Secondary School Counseling (3) 

II. ELECTIYES (6 hours minimum) 

CSL 524 Psychopathology (3) 

CSL 561 Human Sexuality (3) 

CSL 5 7 1 Christian Perspectives on Counseling (3 ) 

CSL 557 Marriage and Family Systems (3) 

SPE 520 Nature and Characteristics Mild/ 

Moderate Disabilities (3) 
EDU 596 Internship I (3) 



60 Lee University 

III. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS (0 hours) 
NTE Praxis - School Counselor Exam 

TYPICAL TWOYEAR CURRICULUM 

Several configurations or sequences for completing required course 
work are possible. There are a variety of considerations and restrictions 
that limit the flexibility of these options and demand close attention 
when developing a program of study. Several of the more important fac- 
tors to consider are the prerequisites or co requisites of each course, the 
availability of a given course in a specific semester, individual interests, 
and ability and desire to enroll during the summer. 

The following sequence is a possible program of study. This sequence is 
not required, but is simply an example. Several assumptions underlie this 
program: (1) the desire to complete in five semesters and (2) no transfer work 
being applied. 

Year One 

School Counseling Programs: 
Principles & Administration (3) 
Personality Theory (3) 
Counseling Children and Adolescents (3) 



Human Growth &. Development (3) 
Counseling Theories & Techniques (3) 
Counseling Research Methods (3) 
Practicum in School Counseling (3) 

Policies and Procedure (3) OR 

Year Two 

Social and Cultural Foundations of Counseling (3) or 

Cross-Cultural Issues in Counseling (3) or 

Multicultural Education (2) 

Group Process and Practice (3) 

Internship in Elementary School Counseling (3) OR 

Internship in Secondary School Counseling (3) 



Fall 




CSL 


502 


CSL 


508 


CSL 


561 


Elective (3) 


Spring 




CSL 


516 


CSL 


520 


CSL 


512 


CSL 


546 


Summer 




SPE 


517 


Elective (3) 


Fall V 




CSL 


558 


CSL 


559 


EDU 


561 


CSL 


550 


CSL 


570 


CSL 


588 



Lee University 6 1 

Spring 

CSL 554 Measurement and Appraisal in Counseling (3) 

CSL 570 Internship in Elementary School Counseling (3) or 

CSL 588 Internship in Secondary School Counseling (3) 

CSL 562 Measurement and Appraisal in Counseling (3) 

CSL 592 Seminar in Guidance and Counseling ( 1 ) 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES 

Clinical experiences in a school setting are an integral part of a 
degree in school counseling at Lee University. The counseling 
practicum and internship placements provide an opportunity to practice 
skills and to utilize acquired knowledge in both elementary and sec- 
ondary school settings. Fieldwork activity follows a developmental 
model consisting of a sequence of training experiences of increasing 
complexity and responsibility. Each level of training is designed to 
accommodate the studentOs particular level of professional develop- 
ment. 

PRACTICUM 

Practicum refers to the experience of working with students and 
teachers within the setting of a formal course, under direct supervision 
of a faculty member. Students are required to complete a minimum of 
100 hours of practicum prior to entering an internship. A minimum of 
40 clock hours must be in direct contact with clients. The remaining 
hours can be indirect in nature, i.e., the student may participate in role- 
playing, observe counseling session, review taped sessions, and so on. 

INTERNSHIP 

Internship refers to a formalized arrangement by which the student 
is assigned to a school in order to gain experience in the many facets of 
the role of a school counselor, including but not limited to direct ser- 
vices to clients. The internship experience includes two separate place- 
ments: (1) an elementary school and (2) a secondary school. Students are 
required to complete a minimum of 600 clock hours of internship. A 
minimum of 240 clock hours must be in direct contact with clients. 
The remaining hours can be used to provide the student with opportuni- 
ties for a variety of professional activities in addition to direct service 
(e.g., record keeping, supervision, information and referral, in-service 
and staff meetings, IEP meetings and consultation, etc.). 



62 Lee University 



MANUAL 



Manuals are available for students that contain specific policies 
about arranging, conducting and evaluating practicum and internship 
experiences. These manuals include lists of competencies the student 
must achieve in the placement, along with various forms to be used 
during the placement. 

ADMISSION 

PROCEDURES 

1. Application materials for the Master of Science Degree in 
Counseling Psychology may be obtained from the office of the 
Program Director. 

2. Applications will not be acted upon until all required docu- 
ments have been received (including transcripts, letters of rec- 
ommendation, and entrance exam scores). Applications are 
processed monthly. In order to allow time for the university 
and the program admissions committee to process the applica- 
tions, it is advisable to have applications completed by the fol- 
lowing dates: 

April 1 for Fall matriculation 
September 1 for Spring matriculation 

REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants who are granted regular admission must meet mini- 
mum requirements. Among those elements of the total evaluation 
process are the following: 

1 . A bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or uni- 
versity. 

2. An undergraduate cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or 
above on a 4 point scale. 

3. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or above on a 4 point 
scale for any graduate work competed. 

4. A minimum of five classes in psychology at the undergraduate 
level. Recommended courses are General Psychology, 
Developmental Psychology, Personality Theory, Abnormal 
Psychology, and Behavioral Statistics. Applicants not meeting 
this requirement may be admitted, but would have to complete 



Lee University 63 

any deficiencies as a part of their program. These courses would 
be in addition to the 48 hours required for the program. 

5. A minimum of two classes in biblical education. It is recom- 
mended that one course be in the area of Christian Thought, 
and the other in the area of Christian Ethics. Applicants not 
meeting this requirement may be admitted, but would have to 
complete any deficiencies as a part of their program. These 
courses would be in addition to the 48 hours required for the 
program. 

6. Scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) OR the 
Miller Analogies Test (MAT). Scores must be no more than 
five years old. The GRE Advanced tests and Subject tests are 
not required. For regular admission, scores should be in the 
50th percentile or higher. 

Each applicant must submit the following: 

1 . $25.00 application fee (non-refundable). 

2. Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended. 

3. Scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
OR 

Scores from the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) 

NOTE: Individuals who have completed a graduate degree at 
an accredited college or university are not required to submit 
test scores. 

4. Three recommendation forms, two of which must be from for- 
mer professors familiar with your work (recommendation 
forms are included in the application packet). 

5. Autobiographical information (guidelines are included in the 
application packet). 

6. Personal interview for those who are finalists in the applica- 
tion process (phone interviews may be conducted in cases 
where face to face interviews are impossible). 

HOURS REQUIRED 

A minimum of 48 semester hours are required for graduation. 



64 Lee University 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

A maximum of nine semester hours of transfer credit may be 
applied toward the Master of Science in Counseling Psychology. 
Approval for the substitution of required course work is made on an 
individual basis in consultation with the student's advisor and the 
Program Director. The courses must have been completed before 
beginning studies at Lee University. 

NON-DEGREE STATUS 

Students desiring to take courses without full admission status in 
our program may choose one of the following options. With any catego- 
ry of non-degree status, students will be required to complete a non- 
degree status application and submit official transcripts from all col- 
leges and universities attended. If at any time non-degree students 
wish to pursue the Master of Science program, full admission status 
will be required, including a separate application and all other full 
admission status requirements. Completion of course work under non- 
degree status does not guarantee that students will be granted full 
admission status. 

1. A maximum of nine semester hours may be taken at the appli- 
cant's risk as an unclassified student. Enrollment will be limit- 
ed to specific entry level courses. Courses must be approved by 
the director of the Counseling Psychology Program. 

2. Professionals who hold a master's degree in counseling or a 
closely related field but do not satisfy state requirements for 
licensure may take a maximum of six courses through the 
Counseling Psychology Program. 

3. Professionals who hold a master's degree in counseling or a 
closely related field, AND hold state licensure as a counseling 
professional, may take any course offered by the Counseling 
Psychology Program. 

ADMISSION WITH DEFICIENCIES 

Students may be admitted into the program with deficiencies if 
they lack appropriate course work in their undergraduate programs. 
Deficiencies should be completed during the first year of study. 
Credits taken to make up deficiencies do not count toward the 48 hour 
credit requirement. 



Lee University 65 

FULL-TIME VS. PART-TIME 

1. Although it would be the faculty's preference, students need 
not always take a full-time course load. They should know, 
however, that whereas program requirements are substantial, 
the time Lee University allows for completing a master's 
degree is limited (six years). 

2. Once students are admitted they are expected to maintain con- 
tinuous enrollment (a minimum of three hours during both 
the fall and spring semester), and make satisfactory progress 
toward their degree. If a student has not maintained continu- 
ous enrollment, he or she must go through the RE-ENTRY 
process and contact the Program Director at least ten weeks 
prior to the semester in which he or she wishes to re-enter. 
The admissions committee can: 

A. Grant re-entry without conditions. 

B. Grant re-entry conditionally (e.g. require additional 
course work or adherence to time lines for completion 
of degree requirements), or 

C. Deny re-entry. 

Generally, if the student is making satisfactory progress 
toward their degree, re-entry will be approved without condi- 
tions. However, evidence of delayed progress without reason- 
able grounds (e.g. multiple requests for re-entry, several semes- 
ters not registered) may result in option (B) or (C) above. 
Students who anticipate discontinuities in registration should 
inform their advisor in writing. 

ETHICAL STANDARDS 

The program endorses and abides by ethical standards of service 
delivery and research established by the American Psychological 
Association, the American Counseling Association, Lee University 
and the State of Tennessee. In accordance with these ethical stan- 
dards, master level students are not permitted to engage in the inde- 
pendent practice of psychology or counseling. Information on profes- 
sional ethics is distributed to and reviewed with each incoming class 
on an annual basis, and reiterated in counseling psychology courses 
and seminars. 



66 Lee University 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

CSL 500. INTRODUCTION TO Three hours credit 

PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING 

An overview of professional counseling with an emphasis on counselor 
role and function, the counseling process and client problem conceptualiza- 
tion. Legal, ethical and spiritual integration issues will be covered. Offered 
Fall semester. 

CSL 502. SCHOOL COUNSELING PROGRAMS: Three hours credit 

PRINCIPLES & ADMINISTRATION 

A study of the management of comprehensive school counseling pro- 
grams (PreK-12) to include needs assessment, program goals, resource identifi- 
cation, evaluations, and use of computer-based management software. This 
course also includes an examination of professional practice issues in school 
counseling related to education, research, standards of practice, credentialing, 
and policy. 

CSL 508. PERSONALITY THEORY Three hours credit 

An in-depth examination of the major theoretical approaches to the study 
of personality. Personality development, dynamics and differences will be 
studied with special emphasis on application of each theoretical view to the 
counseling setting. Offered Fall semester. 

CSL 512. COUNSELING Three hours credit 

RESEARCH METHODS 

Methods and tools of research and evaluation, focus on research data inter- 
pretation, and emphasis on application to professional practice. Utilization of 
the computer for data analysis will be emphasized. Offered Spring semester. 

CSL 516. HUMAN GROWTH Three hours credit 

AND DEVELOPMENT 

Current research and theories in development relating to the preschool 
child, elementary school child, adolescent and adult. Emphasis on social, cog- 
nitive and affective development including implications for counseling strate- 
gies over the lifespan. Offered Spring semester. 

CSL 520. COUNSELING THEORIES Three hours credit 

AND TECHNIQUES 

An in-depth consideration of major counseling theories and techniques, 
with special emphasis on comparative analysis. Offered Spring semester. 

CSL 524. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY Three hours credit 

An in-depth approach to the study of psychopathology. The course uses 



Lee University 67 



case presentations to expose the student to a variety of psychiatric disabili- 
ties. Offered Fall semester. 

CSL 546. PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL COUNSELING Three hours credit 

This practicum experience provides a broad, general perspective of school 
counseling in an area school. The practicum is a prerequisite for school coun- 
seling internship experiences. Special attention is given to assessment, basic 
counseling skills, guidance skills, and collaboration skills. 

CSL 548. PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING Three hours credit 

Practical experience preparatory to Counseling Internship. Special atten- 
tion is given to obtaining a case history, assessment, treatment planning and 
basic counseling skills. Prerequisite: PSY 500. Prerequisite or Corequisite: 
PSY 520 and full admission status in the graduate counseling program. 
Offered Spring semester. 

CSL 550. GROUP PROCESS AND PRACTICE Three hours credit 

Theory and types of groups, descriptions of group practices, methods, 
dynamics and facilitative skills. Prerequisites: PSY 500 and PSY 520. Offered 
Fall semester. 

CSL 551. MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY Three hours credit 

A study of the literature and practice of marital and family therapy with 
special attention given to a Christian perspective on family structure and 
function. Prerequisite: PSY 520. 

CSL 554. MEASUREMENT AND Three hours credit 

APPRAISAL IN COUNSELING 

History, purpose and use of tests and other assessment methodologies in 
counseling. Prerequisite: PSY 524. Offered Spring semester. 

CSL 555. ADVANCED MARRIAGE AND Three hours credit 

FAMILY THERAPY 

A study of the literature and practice of marital and family therapy with 
emphasis on diagnostic procedures and the application of specific therapeutic 
techniques to dysfunction within the marital dyad. Prerequisite: PSY 551. 

CSL 557. MARRIAGE AND FAMILY SYSTEMS Three hours credit 

An introduction to general systems theory. Special attention is given to 
the history of marriage and family therapy and the basic theories of and models 
of family interaction. Implication for interactional patterns, functional and 
dysfunctional family systems, life cycle issues, and ethnicity are discussed. 



68 Lee University 



CSL 558. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL Three hours credit 

FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR 

The study of the influence of culture, society, and contemporary social 
values on human behavior and social interaction. The course examines the 
sociological nature, bases and consequences of social values and social prob- 
lems and their relationship to the self. Social issues such as the culture of 
poverty, violence, drug use and societal and family dysfunction are examined. 
Offered Fall semester. 

CSL 559. CROSS-CULTURAL ISSUES IN Three hours credit 

COUNSELING SEMINAR 

A seminar to address and evaluate the various models of therapy as they 
relate to ethnic minorities and mass modern culture. The influence of the 
mores and values of various ethnic minority populations upon the counseling 
process will be examined as well as the influences of popular American culture. 

CSL 561. COUNSELING CHILDREN AND Three hours credit 

ADOLESCENTS: DEVELOPMENTAL 
ISSUES AND INTERVENTIONS 

An examination of the interpersonal dynamics of adolescents who come 
to counselors for help due to the severity of their spiritual, emotional, motiva- 
tional, behavioral, and adjustment problems. Counseling procedures for nor- 
mal developmental concerns and issues of adolescents, as well as clinical pro- 
cedures, treatment methods and counseling approaches for the more resistant 
and recalcitrant youth will be covered. Prerequisite: A minimum of one 
course in human development. 

CSL 562. LIFESTYLE AND Three hours credit 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT 

A study of sources, methods, and techniques for gathering, evaluating, 
and disseminating occupational, technological and educational information 
through career counseling. Offered Spring semester. 

CSL 563. HUMAN SEXUALITY Three hours credit 

The study of contemporary theory, research, and practice of counseling 
relatedvto the study and understanding of the biological, cognitive, socioemo- 
tional, cultural, and spiritual dimensions of human sexuality. 

CSL 570. INTERNSHIP IN ELEMENTARY Three hours credit 

SCHOOL COUNSELING 

Closely supervised counseling practice in an approved field placement in 
an area elementary school. Interns gain competence in core areas of school 
counseling, assessment, consultation, and professional functioning. 



Lee University 69 



CSL 571. CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVES Three hours credit 

ON COUNSELING 

A survey of Christian approaches to counseling. Emphasis on the devel- 
opment of Christian approaches as they relate to theoretical and clinical 
advances in the field of counseling. Focus on the theological underpinnings of 
each approach. Offered Fall semester. 

CSL 572. COUNSELING INTERNSHIP I Three hours credit 

Closely supervised counseling practice in approved field placement. Interns 
gain competence in core areas of counseling, assessment, consultation and pro- 
fessional functioning. Special application required. Offered Fall semester. 

CSL 575. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES Three hours credit 

OF COUNSELING 

Study of advanced counseling techniques from various theoretical per- 
spectives. Understanding the essential qualities and skills of counseling rela- 
tionships and counseling techniques. Emphasizing efficiency of care. 
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 520 and PSY 550. 

CSL 579. MATTERS OF LIFE AND DEATH Three hours credit 

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to study issues related to 
death and dying. Aspects of death and dying will be examined through the 
lenses of different disciplines and cultures. 

CSL 581. CLINICAL PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY Three hours credit 

An in-depth look at the drugs used to treat the major psychiatric disabili- 
ties and the major drugs of abuse. Understanding the actions, uses and side 
effects of psychoactive drugs. Prerequisites: This course requires completion 
of a course in Physiological Psychology or approval of the instructor. 

CSL 583. ADVANCED ASSESSMENT AND Three hours credit 

TREATMENT PLANNING 

This course is intended to train students to use advanced assessment 
instruments and write integrated psychological reports. Prerequisite: PSY 554. 

CSL 585. ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF Three hours credit 

PERSONALITY DISORDERS 

This course covers diagnosis and treatment of personality using both cog- 
nitive and interpersonal approaches. Prerequisite: PSY 524. 

CSL 587. SPECIAL TOPICS IN COUNSELING One hour credit 

A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic will 
change to meet student demand and interest. 



70 Lee University 



CSL 588. INTERNSHIP IN SECONDARY Three hours credit 

SCHOOL COUNSELING 

Closely supervised counseling practice in an approved field placement in 
an area secondary school. Interns gain competence in core areas of school 
counseling, assessment, consultation, and professional functioning. 

CSL 589. SPECIAL TOPICS IN COUNSELING Two hours credit 

A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic will 
change to meet student demand and interest. 

CSL 590. COUNSELING INTERNSHIP II Three hours credit 

Closely supervised counseling practice in approved field placement. 
Interns gain competence in core areas of counseling, assessment, consultation 
and professional functioning. Special application required. Prerequisite: PSY 
572. Offered Spring semester. 

CSL 591. SPECIAL TOPICS IN COUNSELING Three hours credit 

A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic will 
change to meet student demand and interest. 

CSL 592. SEMINAR IN GUIDANCE & COUNSELING One hour credit 

This course is designed to prepare students to plan, manage, and evaluate 
a comprehensive PreK-12 program of guidance and counseling services. 

CSL 593 DIRECTED RESEARCH One hour credit 

This course enables the student to pursue topics of interest in greater 
depth than is done in the regular curriculum. Prerequisite: Approval by 
Director of Graduate Studies in Counseling Psychology. 

CSL 595. DIRECTED RESEARCH Two hours credit 

This course enables the student to pursue topics of interest in greater 
depth than is done in the regular curriculum. Prerequisite: Approval by 
Director of Graduate Studies in Counseling Psychology. 

CSL 597. DIRECTED RESEARCH Three hours credit 

Thjs course enables the student to pursue topics of interest in greater 
depth than is done in the regular curriculum. Prerequisite: Approval by 
Director of Graduate Studies in Counseling Psychology. 

EDU 561. MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION Two hours credit 

This course is designed to help students develop the strategies to be effec- 
tive teaching professional in multicultural settings. They will evaluate cur- 
rent programs and will be encouraged to evaluate their own approaches to 
dealing with students form a variety of cultural backgrounds including ethnic, 
economic, religious, and regional. 



Lee University 71 



EDU 596. INTERNSHIP I Three hours credit 

This internship will provide a broad, general perspective of an area school 
to the student. Interns will experience the multiple roles of the classroom 
teacher, as well as the organization of operation of the elementary, middle, or 
high school. 

SPE 517. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Three hours credit 

This course emphasizes the understanding of legislation, regulations, and 
litigation related to the field of special education. 

SPE 520. NATURE AND CHARACTERISTICS Three hours credit 

MILD/MODERATE DISABILITIES 

An introduction to mild/moderate disabilities, covering history, defini- 
tions, characteristics, identification procedures and problems in the fields of 
learning disabilities, mental retardation and behavior disorders. 

THE 518. INTEGRATIVE THEOLOGY Three hours credit 

This course is an integration of biblical, systematic and historical theolo- 
gy into a unified system of theological thought. It focuses on the self-revela- 
tion of God, the nature and attributes of God, and theological considerations 
that inform psychology and counseling. 

THE COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE COMMITTEE 

The Counseling Psychology Graduate Committee's responsibility 
is to give administrative oversight to the graduate program. The com- 
mittee considers and recommends curricular changes to the Graduate 
Council, approves all program policies, assesses effectiveness of the 
graduate program, serves as the Admissions Committee, reviews can- 
didacy, and approves applicants for graduation. The Counseling 
Psychology Graduate Committee consists of Doyle R. Goff, Ph.D., 
Graduate Committee Chair,- Dewayne Thompson, Ph.D., Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences,- Robert W. Fisher, Ph.D.; H. Edward 
Stone, Ph.D.; Trevor Millir on, Ph.D.; Murl Dirksen, Ph.D.; and Mike 
Hayes, M. Ed. 





HELEN DeVOS 
COLLEGE OF 
EDUCATION 

Master of Arts in Teaching 
Master of Education 



Lee University 73 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 
IN EDUCATION 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING (MAT) 
MASTER OF EDUCATION (M.ED.) 

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 

The Master of Education in Classroom Teaching or Special 
Education (M.Ed.) degree program is designed to provide post-baccalau- 
reate study for persons preparing for careers in professional education 
and for those teachers who want to refine their teaching skills. 
Specifically, the degree will: 

1. Provide advanced preparation, theory, integration of faith and 
learning, and practical application. 

2. Encourage students to solve professional problems by inde- 
pendent investigation through study and research. 

3. Further develop the professional competencies attained in 
undergraduate programs. 

For those school personnel who have a need for further profession- 
al training but who may not be interested in pursuing a graduate 
degree, this program of study will provide in-service educational 
opportunities. 

The purpose of the Master of Arts in Teaching degree (M.A.T.) in 

Elementary, Secondary, or Special Education is to provide a route to 
initial teacher licensure with graduate work leading to a master's 
degree. Students who successfully complete the degree program and 
meet all standardized test requirements will be eligible for licensure by 
the Tennessee Department of Education. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Classroom teachers are the key to American education and are con- 
sequently integral to the future of the country and the world. For this 
awesome responsibility they must be prepared to discern wisely, to 
think creatively, to teach effectively, and to demonstrate the qualities 
of integrity and love. The Lee University Graduate Education programs 
are designed to encourage problem finding, problem solving and reflec- 



74 Lee University 

tive practice within the framework of biblical truth and a commitment 
to serving the kingdom. The program should enhance the candidates' 
present teaching skills, help them develop new skills and improve their 
current educational research skills. The result should be scholarly con- 
tributions to their professional field of education, improved classroom 
teaching and a model of what it means to be a teacher who integrates 
Christian faith and learning in daily practice. 

ASSUMPTIONS 

1 . Education is a life-long process. 

2. Educators comprise a community of learners. 

3. Effective teachers are creative problem solvers. 

4. Teaching is a profession, not an occupation. 

5. Teachers should be involved in life-long learning— a commit- 
ment which affects teaching performance. 

6. Teachers must be able to think critically, analyze logically, 
decide appropriately and deal effectively with change. 

7. Teachers have special gifts that enhance performance. 

OUTCOMES 

The following outcomes will be developed and documented in 
portfolio form by each student: 

1. Extended knowledge and experience in the area of classroom 
teaching, including conceptual and practical applications of 
practices that support learning. 

2. Understanding and utilization of research methods that 
improve practices in schools and classrooms. 

3. Ability to apply knowledge of multi-media technology to 
school and classroom practices. 

4. Understanding and application of practice of inclusive educa- 
tional opportunities for learners from diverse backgrounds and 

for those with disabilities. 

5. Enhancement and extension of knowledge of current trends 
and issues in education. 

6. Demonstration of professional contributions, such as leadership 
in professional organizations, provision of in-service education 
for peers and mentorship of beginning teachers (M.Ed. only). 



Lee University 75 

7. Articulation of a Christian worldview of teaching. 

Principle means of assessment utilized include portfolio, perfor- 
mance in individual courses, thesis or major project, oral defense of 
thesis or major project and a comprehensive written exam. 

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK 

The organizing theme for the undergraduate Teacher Education 
Program is "Teacher as Facilitator of Student Growth." The undergrad- 
uate program emphasizes development of this specific role of the 
teacher and focuses on development of skill in classroom management, 
instructional strategies, communication, evaluation strategies, affec- 
tive development, organization and knowledge of content. The novice 
teacher is thus equipped to function as a beginning teacher. 

The Teacher Education Program model, undergraduate and gradu- 
ate, embodies the developmental process of becoming a teacher. Based 
primarily on the research of Frances Fuller and David Berliner, the pro- 
gram should force students to analyze where they are in the continu- 
ous process of becoming a teacher, thus facilitating passage to more 
advanced levels. 

Berliner identified five specific levels through which teachers may 
pass in their development. The first level is the novice, followed by the 
advanced beginner, competent teacher, proficient teacher, and finally, 
the expert teacher. According to Berliner, teachers typically are not 
competent until about the fifth year of teaching, and most never reach 
the expert level. However, experiences may be arranged so that the 
teacher's development is not only facilitated, but also accelerated. 

The model for the Master of Education degree is a natural extension 
of the model for the undergraduate program. The graduate program 
emphasizes self analysis and reflection and creates activities and assign- 
ments, synthesizing an environment that will facilitate passage toward 
higher levels of excellence in teaching for the students/teachers. 

The organizing theme of the graduate program, "Emerging Roles of 
the Teacher," emphasizes multiple roles that are important for the 
expert teacher to master. In the course of the graduate program, stu- 
dents will directly encounter the specific roles of learner, facilitator, 
creative problem solver, reflective practitioner and professional. They 



76 Lee University 



will also be encouraged to explore other roles and especially to identify 
and develop special abilities related to teaching that they may have. 

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM MODEL 



EXPERT TEACHER 



CREATION OF 
NEW KNOWLEDGE 



ACQUISITION OF TOOLS 
TO MAKE KNOWLEDGE 



PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 




CONCERN FOR 
COMMUNITY 
OF LEARNERS 



CONCERN FOR CHILD 
AS A MEMBER OF 
COMMUNITY 



CONCERN FOR CHILD 



NOVICE TEACHER 



PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 
W 
H 

J^5 Admission to 

Q Student Teacher Program 



S SPECIALITY STUDIES 



Admission to 
Teacner v Education Program 

GENERAL STUDIES 



CONCERN FOR CHILD 




CONCERN FOR SELF 
AS TEACHER 



CONCERN 
FOR SELF 



DEVELOPMENTAL ASPECTS OF THE LEARNER 

cognitive, emotional, moral, physical, 

social, and spiritual 



BEGINNING STUDENT 



Lee University 77 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The following criteria must be met by all applicants to the Master 
of Education program: 

1 . Completion of admissions application materials. 

2. Undergraduate degree from an accredited institution. (Official 
transcripts must be submitted.) 

3. Completion of an approved teacher education program. 

4. Minimum grade point average of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale. 

5. Scores (within the last ten years) on either the Miller 
Analogies Test (MAT) or the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) that fall within one standard deviation of the national 
mean. 

6. Recommendations from three professional sources including 
one from an undergraduate professor or current supervisor or 
employer. 

7. Acceptable interview with Graduate Admissions Committee. 

The following criteria must be met by all applicants to the Master 
of Arts in Teaching program: 

1 . Completion of admission application materials. 

2. Undergraduate degree from an accredited institution. (Official 
transcripts must be submitted.) 

3. Minimum grade point average of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale. 

4. Scores (within the last seven years) on either the Miller 
Analogies Test (MAT) or the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) that fall within one standard deviation of the national 
mean. 

5. Recommendations from three professional sources including 
one from an undergraduate professor or current supervisor or 
employer. 

6. Acceptable interview with Graduate Admissions Committee. 

The application will include questions which require a writing 
sample to be assessed by the Committee. 

The following categories of admission are possible: 

1. Full Admission - Applicant meets all admission requirements. 



78 Lee University 



2. Provisional Admission - May be granted if one or more of the 
following deficiencies exists: 

a. All requirements met except the minimum score on the 
GRE or MAT. 

b. All requirements met except GPA below 2.75. In this 
case, evidence of exceptional ability must be presented. 

c. Applicant has deficiencies in undergraduate coursework. 

Prerequisite courses may be required for full admission to 
the program. No more than nine hours may be taken 
while the student is in provisional status. When a student 
has completed these courses, the Graduate Committee 
will make a decision regarding regular admission status. 

Admission will be made by the Graduate Admissions 
Committee and may require prescriptive courses and/or 
experiences before degree candidacy will be granted. 

3. Non-degree Status - Students who wish to take courses but not 
pursue a degree must: 

a. Be a graduate of an accredited college or university. 

b. Present official transcripts for all completed coursework. 

Students may take a maximum of nine hours in a non- 
degree seeking status. Seniors who have completed stu- 
dent teaching may enroll in graduate courses with the 
approval of the Graduate Admissions Committee. 

A maximum of six hours of transfer work from an accredit- 
ed institution, approved by the Director of the Graduate 
Education Program, may be counted toward this degree. 

COMPLETION REQUIREMENTS 

1. Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average 
With no grade below a "C." No more than two "C's" will be 
accepted. Possible grades to be awarded are A, A-, B+, B, B-, 
C+,C,C-,F,I,P,SandW. 

2. Students must apply for graduation in accordance with the uni- 
versity's published deadlines. 

3. In an open public forum, students must successfully present 
the completed thesis/project during the Thesis Seminar. This 



Lee University 



79 



5. 



constitutes the oral examination. No "\" (incomplete) grade 
will be awarded. If the student does not complete the project 
by the semester deadline, he or she must continually enroll in 
the seminar until the project is completed. 

Students must complete comprehensive written examinations 
during the last semester of their program. 

Students must complete the program within six calendar years 
from the completion of the first course. 

All projects and the written work that supports them must be 
submitted to the Dean's office two weeks before graduation. 




80 Lee University 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN CLASSROOM TEACHING MECT 
CORE REQUIREMENTS 



EDU 


501 


Research Methods in Education 


2hrs. 


EDU 


502 


Philosophy of Education 


2hrs. 


EDU 


505 


Critical Thinking 


2hrs. 


EDU 


506 


Current Issues in Education 


2hrs. 


EDU 


561 


Multicultural Education 


2hrs 


EDU 


562 


The Inclusion Classroom 


2hrs 


EDU 


563 


Testing and Assessment 


2hrs 


EDU 


570 


Current Instructional Strategies 


3hrs 


EDU 


575 


Technology in the Classroom 


3hrs 


EDU 


580 


Teaching Reading Skills 


2hrs 


EDU 


581 


Writing Across the Curriculum 


2hrs 


EDU 


595 


Thesis Seminar 


2hrs 


IDS 


599 


Christian Worldview: 








Implications for Teaching 


2hrs 



Subtotal Core Requirements 28 hrs. 

SUBJECT SEMINAR ELECTIVES 6 hrs. 

(To be approved by the Director and advisor.) 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 34 hrs. 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 
(Additional License to Elementary Certificate) MS IT 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS 

Research Methods in Education 2 hrs. 
The Inclusion Classroom 2 hrs. 

Current Instructional Strategies 3 hrs. 
Thesis Seminar 2 hrs. 

Christian Worldview: Implications 

for Teaching 2 hrs. 

Subtotal General Education Core Requirements 1 1 hrs. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS 

SPE 517 Policies and Procedures 2 hrs. 



EDU 


501 


EDU 


562 


EDU 


570 


EDU 


595 


IDS 


599 



SPE 


524 


SPE 


531 


SPE 


550 


SPE 


581 


SPE 


582 


SPE 


596 


SPE 


598 



Lee University 8 1 

SPE 520 Nature and Characteristics of 3 hrs. 

Mild/Moderate Disabilities 

Diagnostic/Prescriptive Teaching 3 hrs. 

Behavior Management 3 hrs. 

Instructional Methods for Students 3 hrs. 
With Mild/Moderate Disabilities 
Assessing and Guiding 

Reading Instruction 3 hrs. 

Related Services 2 hrs. 

Internship I 3 hrs. 

Collaboration Seminar 2 hrs. 
Subtotal Special Education Core Requirements 24 hrs. 

Choose one of the following specialty areas : 
Severe 

SPE 521 Nature & Characteristics of 3 hrs. 

Severe Disabilities 
SPE 551 Instructional Methods for Students 3 hrs. 

With Severe Disabilities 
SPE 597 Internship II 6 hrs. 

Subtotal Severe Specialty 12 hrs. 

Emotional/Behavioral Disorders 

SPE 522 Nature & Characteristics of 3 hrs. 

Emotional & Behavioral Disorders 
SPE 552 Instructional Methods for 3 hrs. 

Emotional & Behavioral Disorders 
SPE 597 Internship II 6 hrs. 

Subtotal Emotional/Behavioral Disorders Specialty 12 hrs. 

Special Education Early Childhood 

SPE 523 Nature & Characteristics of 2 hrs. 

Children (0-6) with Developmental 

Disabilities 
SPE 553 Intervention Strategies & Methods 2 hrs. 

for Children (0-6) with 

Developmental Disabilities 
SPE 554 Early Childhood Methods 2 hrs. 

SPE 597 Internship II 6 hrs. 

Subtotal Early Childhood Specialty 12 hrs. 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 47 hrs. 



82 Lee University 



MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 
(Additional License to Secondary Certificate) 



MSAT 



EDU 503 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS 

EDU 501 Research Methods in Education 2hrs. 

Student Development & Diversity 

in Education 2 hrs. 

The Inclusion Classroom 2 hrs. 

Elementary Methods 3 hrs. 

Current Instructional Strategies 3 hrs. 

Christian Worldview: 

Implications for Teaching 2 hrs. 

Subtotal General Education Core Requirements 

SPECIAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS 



EDU 


562 


EDU 


569 


EDU 


570 


IDS 


599 



SPE 


517 


Policies and Procedures 


2 hrs, 


SPE 


520 


Nature and Characteristics of Mild/ 








Moderate Disabilities 


3 hrs, 


SPE 


524 


Diagnostic/Prescriptive Teaching 


3 hrs, 


SPE 


531 


Behavior Management 


3 hrs 


SPE 


550 


Instructional Methods for Students 








With Mild/Moderate Disabilities 


3 hrs 


SPE 


581 


Assessing and Guiding 








Reading Instruction 


3 hrs 


SPE 


582 


Related Services 


2 hrs 


SPE 


596 


Internship I 


3 hrs 


Subtotal Special Education Core Requirements 




Choose one 


of the fc 


>llowing SDecialtv areas: 





Severe 



SPE 521 Nature & Characteristics of 
Severe Disabilities 

SPE 551 Instructional Methods for Students 
With Severe Disabilities 

SPE 597 Internship II 

Subtotal Severe Specialty 



Emotional/Behavioral Disorders 

SPE 522 Nature & Characteristics of 3 hrs. 

Emotional & Behavioral Disorders 
SPE 552 Instructional Methods for 

Emotional & Behavioral Disorders 3 hrs. 
SPE 597 Internship II 6 hrs. 

Subtotal Emotional/Behavioral Disorders Specialty 



14 hrs. 



22 hrs. 



3 hrs. 
3 hrs. 

6 hrs. 



12 hrs. 



12 hrs. 



Lee University 83 



Special Education Early Childhood 



SPE 


523 


Nature & Characteristics of Children (0-6) 

with Developmental Disabilities 2 hrs. 


SPE 


553 


Intervention Strategies & 

Methods for Children (0-6] 

with Developmental Disabilities 2 hrs. 


SPE 


554 


Early Childhood Methods 2 hrs. 


SPE 


597 


Internship II 6 hrs. 



Subtotal Early Childhood Specialty 12 hrs. 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 48 hrs. 

MASTER OF EDUCATION 

(Emphasis in Severe Disabilities, Emotional/Behavioral 
Disorders, Early Childhood, and/or Inclusion) ME ST 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS 



EDU 


501 


Research Methods in Education 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


562 


The Inclusion Classroom 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


570 


Current Instructional Strategies 


3 hrs. 


EDU 


595 


Thesis Seminar 


2 hrs. 


IDS 


599 


Christian Worldview: Implications 








for Teaching 


2 hrs. 



Subtotal General Education Core Requirements 1 1 hrs. 

Special Education Core Requirements 

SPE 532 Applied Behavior Analysis 2 hrs. 

SPE 581 Assessing and Guiding 



Reading Instruction 


3 hrs. 


SPE 582 Related Services 


2 hrs. 


SPE 598 Collaboration Seminar 


2 hrs. 


Subtotal Special Education Core Requirements 


9 hrs 


Choose two of the following specialtv areas: 




Inclusion 

SPE 520 Nature and Characteristics of 


3 hrs. 


Mild/Moderate Disabilities 
SPE 550 Instructional Methods for Students 


3 hrs. 


With Mild/Moderate Disabilities 
SPE 597 Internship IT 
Subtotal Inclusion Specialty 


6 hrs. 

12 hrs 



Lee University 








Severe 








SPE 


521 


Nature & Characteristics of 








Severe Disorders 


3hrs, 


SPE 


551 


Instructional Methods for Students 
With Severe Disabilities 


3 hrs, 


SPE 


597 


Internship II* 


6hrs, 



Subtotal Severe Specialty 12 hrs. 

Emotional & Behavioral Disorders 

SPE 522 Nature & Characteristics of Emotional 3 hrs. 

& Behavioral Disabilities 
SPE 552 Instructional Methods for Emotional 3 hrs. 

& Behavioral Disorders 
SPE 597 Internship II* 6 hrs. 

Subtotal Emotional/Behavioral Disorders Specialty 12 hrs. 



j Child 

SPE 


hood 

523 


Nature & Characteristics of 
Children (0-6) with 
Developmental Disabilities 


2 hrs. 


SPE 


553 


Intervention Strategies & Methods 
for Children (0-6) with 
Developmental Disabilities 


2 hrs. 


SPE 


554 


Early Childhood Methods 


2 hrs. 


SPE 


597 


Internship II* 


6 hrs. 



Subtotal Early Childhood Specialty 12 hrs. 

*Only one internship is required. It will be designed to give students 
adequate experience in both of the specialty areas they choose. 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 38 hrs. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING MAET 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAM (K~8 LICENSE) 



EDU 


501 


Research Methods in Education 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


502 


Philosophy of Education 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


503 


Student Development and 
Diversity in Education 


2 hrs, 


EDU 


561 


Multicultural Education 


2 hrs, 


EDU 


562 


The Inclusion Classroom 


2 hrs, 


EDU 


563 


Testing and Assessment 


2 hrs, 


EDU 


568 


General Methods 


2 hrs, 


EDU 


569 


Elementary Methods 


3 hrs, 









Lee University 85 


EDU 


570 


Current Instructional Strategies 


3 hrs. 


EDU 


575 


Technology in the Classroom 


3 hrs. 


EDU 


580 


Teaching Reading Skills 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


581 


Writing Across the Curriculum 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


595 


Thesis Seminar 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


596 


Internship I 


3 hrs. 


EDU 


597 


Internship II 


6 hrs. 


IDS 


599 


Christian Worldview: Implications 
for Teaching 


2 hrs. 



TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 40 hrs. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAM 
(7-12 LICENSE) 



Biolog) 


r 


History 




Business 


Mathematics 




Chemistry 


Music (K-12) 




English 


1 


Physical Education (K-12) 


Foreign Languages 




Health (K-12) 






EDU 


501 


Research Methods in Education 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


502 


Philosophy of Education 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


503 


Student Development and 








Diversity in Education 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


561 


Multicultural Education 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


562 


The Inclusion Classroom 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


563 


Testing and Assessment 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


568 


General Methods 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


570 


Current Instructional Strategies 


3 hrs. 


EDU 


575 


Technology in the Classroom 


3 hrs. 


EDU 


581 


Writing Across the Curriculum 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


595 


Thesis Seminar 


2 hrs. 


EDU 


596 


Internship I 


3 hrs. 


EDU 


597 


Internship II 


6 hrs. 


IDS 


599 


Christian Worldview: 








Implications for Teaching 


2 hrs. 



EDU 


516 


EDU 


517 


EDU 


518 


EDU 


519 


EDU 


520 



86 Lee University 

SPECIALTY AREA METHODS (SELECT ONE) 2 hrs. 

EDU 515 Teaching Business, 7-12 

Teaching Social Studies, 7-12 

Teaching English, 7-12 

Teaching Languages, 7-12 

Teaching Mathematics, 7-12 

Teaching Science, 7-12 
SPECIALTY AREA SEMINAR (SELECT ONE) 3 hrs. 

BUS 560 Business Seminar 
ENG 530 Language Arts Seminar 
HIS 560 Social Sciences Seminar 
SCI 540 Natural Sciences Seminar 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 40 hrs. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 

(Initial licensure) MIST 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS 

Research Methods in Education 2 hrs. 
Philosophy of Education 2 hrs. 

Student Development and Diversity 2 hrs. 
in Education 

The Inclusion Classroom 2 hrs. 

Elementary Methods 3 hrs. 

Current Instructional Strategies 3 hrs. 
Christian Worldview: Implications 2 hrs. 
for Teaching 
Subtotal General Education Core Requirements 16 hrs. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS 

SPE 517 Policies and Procedures 2 hrs. 

SPE 520 Nature and Characteristics of 3 hrs. 

Mild/Moderate Disabilities 
SPE 524 Diagnostic/Prescriptive Teaching 3 hrs. 
SPE 531 Behavior Management 3 hrs. 

SPE 550 Instructional Methods for Students 3 hrs. 

with Mild/Moderate Disabilities 
SPE 581 Assessing and Guiding 

Reading Instruction 3 hrs. 

SPE 596 Internship I 3 hrs. 

Subtotal Special Education Core Requirements 20 hrs. 



EDU 


501 


EDU 


502 


EDU 


503 


EDU 


562 


EDU 


569 


EDU 


570 


IDS 


599 



Lee University 87 



Choose one of the following specialty areas : 
Severe 

SPE 521 Nature & Characteristics of Severe 3 hrs. 

Disabilities 
SPE 551 Instructional Methods for Students 3 hrs. 

with Severe Disabilities 
SPE 597 Internship II 6 hrs. 

Subtotal Severe Specialty 12 hrs. 

Emotional & Behavioral Disorders 

SPE 522 Nature & Characteristics of 3 hrs. 

Emotional & Behavioral 

Disorders 
SPE 552 Instructional Methods for 3 hrs. 

Emotional & Behavioral 

Disorders 



SPE 


597 


Internship II 


6 hrs. 


Subtotal Emotional & Behavioral Disorders 


12 hrs 


Early Childhood 






SPE 


523 


Nature & Characteristics of 
Children (0-6) with 
Developmental Disabilities 


2 hrs. 


SPE 


553 


Intervention Strategies & Methods 
for Children (0-6) with 
Developmental Disabilities 


2 hrs. 


SPE 


554 


Early Childhood Methods 


2 hrs. 


SPE 


597 


Internship II 


6 hrs. 



Subtotal Early Childhood Specialty 12 hrs. 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 48 hrs. 



Lee University 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

BUS 560. BUSINESS SEMINAR Three hours credit 

A course on the role of communication in organizational leadership. This 
course examines organizational behavior from the standpoint of historical and 
contemporary theories along with examples and case studies. Emphasis is 
placed on the role of communication in the development, maintenance and 
management of organizational structures. 

EDU 501. RESEARCH METHODS IN EDUCATION Two hours credit 

This is a fundamental research course designed to help students become 
intelligent consumers of educational research. This course will cover the 
basic methods of research design, measurement and evaluation, and the inter- 
pretation and communication of results. Based on personal interest and expe- 
rience, the student will select one professional educational topic/concern as a 
guiding emphasis throughout the master's program. 

EDU 502. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION Two hours credit 

This course reviews philosophical foundations of education with an 
emphasis on synthesizing and refining a personal philosophy of education. 

EDU 503. STUDENT DEVELOPMENT Two hours credit 

AND DIVERSITY IN EDUCATION 

This course will examine the role of human development in the educa- 
tion of children from pre-kindergarten through high school. Students will 
explore the historic and contemporary theories of human development with 
special emphasis placed on the application of theory in multicultural educa- 
tional settings. 

EDU 505. CRITICAL THINKING Two hours credit 

This course is designed to describe, explain and apply critical thinking as 
a creative problem solving tool. Fundamental skills in creativity, reasoning, 
personal conflict resolution and content thinking will be integrated in this 
general review of the critical thinking process and its applications in creative 
problem solving. Prerequisites: EDU 501 and EDU 502. 

EDU 506. CURRENT ISSUES IN EDUCATION Two hours credit 

This course will apply the student's skills and experiences in critical 
thinking and creative problem solving to the unresolved issues of education. 
The students will examine a variety of current topics and evaluate the under- 
lying assumptions of each. Students will construct alternative solutions based 
on their findings. Prerequisites: EDU 501 and EDU 502. 



Lee University 89 



EDU 515. TEACHING BUSINESS, GRADES 7-12 Two hours credit 

A course designed to help business teachers develop techniques and 
locate materials which will enable them to be more effective teachers of busi- 
ness subjects. Students will be helped individually to resolve particular prob- 
lems through research, group discussions, and demonstrations. 

EDU 516. TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES, Two hours credit 

GRADES 7-12 

A survey of the principle methods, techniques, and problems of teaching 
the social studies on the secondary level. Students demonstrate various teach- 
ing methods and techniques, and a survey of available material is made. 

EDU 517. TEACHING ENGLISH, GRADES 7-12 Two hours credit 

The organization and use of appropriate materials, methods, and tech- 
niques as related to the teaching of English in secondary schools. 

EDU 518. TEACHING LANGUAGES, GRADES 7-12 Two hours credit 

The organization and use of appropriate materials, methods, and tech- 
niques as related to the teaching of language in secondary schools with 
emphasis on each student's language area. 

EDU 519. TEACHING MATHEMATICS, Two hours credit 

GRADES 7-12 

A preliminary survey of major theories and practices of instruction in 
American secondary schools; aims, materials, teaching methods, learner activ- 
ities, and evaluation procedures in the mathematic discipline; how these 
relate to the program of the school. 

EDU 520. TEACHING SCIENCE, GRADES 7-12 Two hours credit 

A preliminary survey of major theories and practices of instruction in 
American secondary schools; aims, materials, teaching methods, learner activ- 
ities, and evaluation procedures in the science discipline,- how these relate to 
the program of the school. 

EDU 561. MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION Two hours credit 

This course is designed to help students develop the strategies to be 
effective teaching professionals in multicultural settings. They will evaluate 
current programs and will be encouraged to evaluate their own approaches to 
dealing with students from a variety of cultural backgrounds including eth- 
nic, economic, religious and regional. Prerequisites: EDU 501 and EDU 502. 

EDU 562. THE INCLUSION CLASSROOM Two hours credit 

This course examines the contemporary classroom and the task of the 
teacher in teaching students with divergent abilities, needs, interests and 
backgrounds. Prerequisites: EDU 501 and EDU 502. 



90 Lee University 



EDU 563. TESTING AND ASSESSMENT Two hours credit 

This course addresses traditional and current trends in educational test- 
ing and measurement. Prerequisites: EDU 501 and EDU 502. 

EDU 568. GENERAL METHODS Two hours credit 

Effective teaching research will be presented in this course, which is 
designed to equip teachers with methods, skills and strategies for teaching in 
all disciplines. 

EDU 569. ELEMENTARY METHODS Three hours credit 

Effective methods and materials for teaching reading, writing, listening, 
speaking, science, math, and social studies in the elementary classroom will 
be presented in this course. Required for elementary licensure only. 

EDU 570. CURRENT INSTRUCTIONAL Three hours credit 

STRATEGIES 

This course examines current and emerging instructional strategies and 
popular curricular approaches. Prerequisites: EDU 501 and EDU 502. 

EDU 575. TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM Three hours credit 

An introduction to various technologies used in classrooms with empha- 
sis on microcomputer-based systems. Prerequisites: EDU 501 and EDU 502. 

EDU 580. TEACHING READING SKILLS Two hours credit 

This course is designed to provide graduate students with research-based 
methods and materials for reading instruction, along with principles to help 
them choose among these options for their specific students and situations. 
Prerequisites: EDU 501 and EDU 502. 

EDU 581. WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM Two hours credit 

This course will help professional teachers develop strategies for ways to 
use writing activities as a tool of learning within their specific classroom set- 
tings. Prerequisites: EDU 501 and EDU 502. 

EDU 591. DIRECTED RESEARCH One hour credit 

This course enables the student to pursue topics of interest in greater 
depth than is done in the regular curriculum. The course may be repeated. 
The Pass/Fail grade scale will be used. Approval by the Director of Graduate 
Studies in Education is needed. 

EDU 592. DIRECTED RESEARCH Two hours credit 

This course enables the student to pursue topics of interest in greater 
depth than is done in the regular curriculum. The course may be repeated. 
The Pass/Fail grade scale will be used. Approval by the Director of Graduate 
Studies in Education is needed. 



Lee University 9 1 



EDU 593. DIRECTED RESEARCH Three hours credit 

This course enables the student to pursue topics of interest in greater 
depth than is done in the regular curriculum. The course may be repeated. 
The Pass/Fail grade scale will be used. Approval by the Director of Graduate 
Studies in Education is needed. 

EDU 595. THESIS SEMINAR Two hours credit 

This course will provide the structure, the format, the support, and the 
encouragement for the student to complete the thesis and present it to col- 
leagues. Prerequisite: Passing of mid-program evaluation. 

EDU 596. INTERNSHIP I Three hours credit 

This internship will provide a broad, general perspective of an area school 
to the M.A.T. student. Interns will experience the multiple roles of the class- 
room teacher, as well as the organization and operation of the elementary, 
middle, or high school. 

EDU 597. INTERNSHIP II Six hours credit 

The internship will provide extensive instructional experiences to the 
M.A.T. student. The intern at this level will, under the direction of a cooper- 
ating teacher and principal, assume responsibility for instructional planning, 
implementation and evaluation. 

ENG 530. LANGUAGE ARTS SEMINAR: Three hours credit 

OUR APPALACHIAN HERITAGE - 
LITERATURE & CULTURE OF SOUTHERN 
APPALACHIAN REGION 

This course will provide an overview of Appalachian history and culture, 
emphasizing the way in which the history of the region has impacted its art, 
music and literature, as well as the ways in which the culture of the 
Appalachian region has significantly affected American culture. 

HIS 560. SOCIAL SCIENCES SEMINAR: Three hours credit 

SOCIAL, CULTURAL, AND POLITICAL 
HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

A consideration of prominent social, cultural and political developments 
in American History from the Puritans to the Progressives with an emphasis 
on the roles the ideas and practices of these movements played in shaping the 
national character. 

IDS 599. CHRISTIAN WORLD VIEW: Two hours credit 

IMPLICATIONS FOR TEACHING 

This course is designed to expose graduate students to various Christian 
views with an emphasis on encouraging the adoption and adaptation of those 
principles that could be practiced in order for Christians to most effectively 
serve others. 



92 Lee University 



SCI 540. NATURAL SCIENCES SEMINAR Three hours credit 

This course examines, depending on the individual class, such aspects of 
the natural sciences as life science, physical science and mathematics. 

SPE 517. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Two hours credit 

This course emphasizes the understanding of legislation, regulations and 
litigation related to the field of special education. 

SPE 520. NATURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF Three hours credit 

MILD/MODERATE DISABILITIES 

An introduction to mild/moderate disabilities, covering history, defini- 
tions, characteristics, identification procedures and problems in the fields of 
learning disabilities, mental retardation and behavior disorders. 

SPE 521. NATURE AND CHARACTERISTICS Three hours credit 

OF SEVERE DISABILITIES 

An introduction to the nature and needs of individuals with severe dis- 
abilities. It is a study of a broad group of developmental disabilities that have 
lifelong implications and that substantially limit many life functions. 

SPE 522. NATURE AND CHARACTERISTICS Three hours credit 

OF EMOTIONAL & BEHAVIORAL 
DISORDERS 

An introduction to the nature and needs of individuals with emotional 
and behavioral disorders. Attention will be given to the approaches that can be 
used to give students with these disabilities self-discipline and responsibility. 

SPE 523. NATURE AND CHARACTERISTICS Two hours credit 

OF CHILDREN (0-6) WITH 
DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES 

An introduction to the nature and needs of young children with develop- 
mental disabilities. A non-categorical approach will be emphasized. 

SPE 524. DIAGNOSTIC/ Three hours credit 

PRESCRIPTIVE TEACHING 

Identification and the use of diagnostic test materials and procedures to 
assess functional levels of ability of individuals with disabilities, followed by 
specific developmental or remedial recommendations. 

SPE 531. BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT Three hours credit 

A study of the approaches to classroom management of students as indi- 
viduals as well as in groups. Behavior modification, behavior support plans 
and specific techniques for strengthening and reducing behaviors will be 
addressed. 



Lee University 93 



SPE 532. APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS Two hours credit 

A study of the principles of behavior analysis in a structured environment 
and how these principles can be used to teach academic skills, functional 
skills, and appropriate social behavior. 

SPE 550. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR Three hours credit 

STUDENTS WITH MILD/ 
MODERATE DISABILITIES 

Effective methods and materials for teaching functional and life skills to 
students with mild and moderate disabilities. 

SPE 551. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR Three hours credit 

STUDENTS WITH SEVERE DISABILITIES 

Effective methods and materials for teaching functional and life skills to 
students with severe disabilities. 

SPE 552. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR Three hours credit 

EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS 

Effective methods and materials needed for teaching behavioral and social 
skills and self -discipline to students with emotional and behavioral disorders. 

SPE 553. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES AND Two hours credit 

METHODS FOR CHILDREN (0-6) WITH 
DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES 

Effective methods and materials for allowing and enabling infants and tod- 
dlers with disabilities to progress developmentally. Procedures for inhibiting 
the progress of atrophy and complications due to disabilities will be examined. 

SPE 554. EARLY CHILDHOOD METHODS Two hours credit 

Effective methods and materials for teaching and promoting develop- 
mentally appropriate skills to young children with disabilities. 

SPE 581. ASSESSING AND GUIDING Three hours credit 

READING INSTRUCTION 

A study of the various approaches to teach reading skills to students with 
reading disabilities. 

SPE 582. RELATED SERVICES Two hours credit 

An examination of the various services, as outlined in IDEA, provided to 
individuals with disabilities. 

SPE 596. INTERNSHIP I Three hours credit 

This internship will provide a broad, general perspective of local schools 
and early childhood programs. Interns will experience the multiple roles of 



94 Lee University 



the special education teacher, as well as the organization and operation of 
early childhood service providers, elementary, middle, or high schools. 

SPE 597. INTERNSHIP II Six hours credit 

This internship will provide extensive instructional experiences. The 
intern will, under the direction of a cooperating teacher, principal or director, 
assume responsibility for instructional planning, implementation of the IEP, 
and evaluation of students. 

SPE 598. COLLABORATION SEMINAR Two hours credit 

This course provides content that focuses on the development of collabo- 
rative partnerships in school and community settings. Course content focuses 
on the role of the special educator in various service delivery models, the skills 
necessary to facilitate successful collaboration, and various theoretical models 
of collaboration. The role of the teacher will be examined, as well as new 
research on the role of emotions in the learning process. Prerequisite: SPE 522 

THE EDUCATION GRADUATE COMMITTEE 

The Education Graduate Committee's responsibility is to give 
administrative oversight to the graduate program. The committee 
considers and recommends curricular changes to the Graduate 
Council, approves all program policies, assesses effectiveness of the 
graduate program, serves as the Admissions Committee, reviews can- 
didacy, and approves applicants for graduation. The Education 
Graduate Committee consists of the Dean of the College of Education, 
the Director of Graduate Programs in Education, the Chair of the 
Department of Teaching and Learning, three faculty members, two 
current students, and three program graduates. 




SCHOOL OF 
MUSIC 



Master of 
Church Music 



96 Lee University 

MASTER OF CHURCH MUSIC 

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 

The Master of Church Music degree program is designed to provide 
graduate professional education for men and women involved in or 
preparing for Christian service in music ministry. 

The program gives attention to four areas vital to the success of 
the music minister: administration, teaching, performance and spiri- 
tual growth. 

Through this program, the Lee University School of Music seeks to 
provide competent leadership to churches, colleges, denominational 
agencies and mission fields. 

PROGRAM OUTCOMES 

Upon the completion of the Master of Church Music degree, an 
individual should possess the following qualities, abilities, and skills: 

1. The ability to organize and lead worship in a contemporary 
Pentecostal and evangelical service which includes all appro- 
priate styles and genres of instrumental and vocal music. 

2. The ability to function effectively as a choral and instrumen- 
tal conductor. 

3. An understanding of basic vocal production with adequate 
vocal skills to demonstrate and communicate these to 
church vocalists. 

4. Comprehensive musical skills which demonstrate an under- 
standing of the wide variety of styles potentially encoun- 
tered in the Pentecostal and evangelical tradition. This 
includes standard choral literature as well as various con- 

- temporary styles. 

5. Sufficient keyboard skills (a) to prepare choral and instru- 
mental literature to be used in worship and, (b) to accompa- 
ny simple congregational songs. 

6. A basic working knowledge of music technology including 
MIDI, sound amplification, acoustics, etc. 



Lee University 97 

7. Familiarity with the principles of music drama/pageantry in 
a church worship setting. 

8. Organizational skills necessary to plan and administer a full- 
scale church music program. 

9. Interpersonal skills necessary for functioning effectively in a 
multi-staff church as well as dealing with volunteer staff and 
church members. 

10. An understanding of the Scripture as it relates to Christian 
living and worship. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF MUSIC 

The Lee University School of Music is an accredited institutional 
member of the National Association of Schools of Music; 11250 Roger 
Bacon Drive, Suite 21; Reston, Virginia 20190; (703) 437-0700. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. Each applicant must complete and submit: 

• the Master of Church Music Application for Admission,- 

• a resume; 

• a two-page essay explaining the rationale concerning 
his/her desire to become a graduate student in the Lee 
University Master of Church Music program; 

• three reference forms (two academic and one personal); 

• and the Lee University Health Clinic Certificate of 
Immunization. 

2. Each applicant must submit transcripts verifying the comple- 
tion of an undergraduate degree equivalent to one conferred by 
the School of Music. If the applicant holds an undergraduate 
degree in an area other than music, conditional acceptance 
may be granted after placement auditions and examinations 
have been completed and remedial courses have been assigned. 
Prerequisite to full acceptance is the successful completion of 
the required remediation. No more than 12 hours of graduate 
courses may be completed before all deficiencies are removed. 

3. Each applicant must complete all proficiency auditions, place- 
ment exams and other required auditions provided by the 
Graduate Music Office. These include the church music histo- 
ry placement exam,- the theory placement exam; and the profi- 
ciency auditions in voice, keyboard and conducting. 



98 Lee University 



4. Each applicant must have a minimum grade point average of 
3.0 for admission to the Master of Church Music program. If 
the applicant has a grade point average less than 3.0, the stu- 
dent may petition for admission on the basis of tenure as a 
minister of music for a cumulative period of not less than 
three years. Action on this petition will be determined by the 
Music Graduate Committee. 

5. Each applicant is required to have an interview with the 
Director of Graduate Studies in Music and the Music 
Graduate Committee. 

6. Each applicant must complete all placement exams and audi- 
tions in order to be advised for registration. 

7. Each applicant must audition in an applied area of study. If 
any deficiencies are detected, specific remedial courses may be 
recommended or required. 

a. Applied music lessons are available to all students (subject 
to submission of the Graduate Applied Lesson Request 
Form and teacher availability) in the following categories: 

Brass Guitar Strings 

Composition Organ Voice 

& Arranging Percussion Woodwinds 

Conducting Piano 

To register for applied music lessons, a Graduate Applied 
Lesson Request Form must be submitted with the Trial 
Schedule Form to the Graduate Music Office when classes 
are entered for registration. The Graduate Applied Lesson 
Request Form is available from the Graduate Music Office. 

b. Jury Requirements - An Applied Jury Examination is 
required for all applied areas of study. 

8. Each applicant is required to take Music Placement Auditions in 
voice, conducting and keyboard. Also, Music Placement 

v Examinations must be taken in music theory and church music 
history. If any deficiencies are detected, specific remedial courses 
may be recommended or required. An audition/examination study 
guide is available upon request from the Graduate Music Office. 

a. Vocal Admission Requirements - A Vocal Placement 
Audition will be administered to each student to deter- 
mine whether the student's vocal skills are appropriate for 



Lee University 99 

the graduate program in church music. Each student will 
sing one song of his/her choice. As a minimum admission 
requirement, each student must be able to demonstrate a 
well-produced pleasant tone quality and the ability to sing 
on pitch. 

b. Keyboard Admission Requirements - A Keyboard 
Placement Audition will be administered to each student 
to determine whether the student's keyboard skills are 
appropriate for the graduate program in church music. As 
a minimum admission requirement, each student must be 
able to demonstrate functional piano skills including the 
ability to harmonize simple melodies, sight-read a four- 
part hymn and play two octave scales, hands together, in 
all major and harmonic minor keys. 

Entering students must take the piano placement exam at 
matriculation. Based on the piano placement exam, the 
student will be required to enroll in one of the following: 

1 . No additional piano study. 

2. CHA 550PI Piano Proficiency - 1 st Semester. 

3. CHA 551PI Piano Proficiency - 2 nd Semester, CHA 
552PI Piano Proficiency - 3 rd Semester, or CHA 553PI 
Piano Proficiency - 4 th Semester. 

4. Piano study at the undergraduate level until approved 
for CHA 550PI. 

Students must enroll in the piano study until the require- 
ments are fulfilled. 

c. Conducting Admission Requirements - A Conducting 
Placement Audition will be administered to each student 
to determine whether the student's conducting skills are 
appropriate for the graduate program in church music. 
Worship Festival track students will conduct a required 
work for choir or band. All other students will conduct 
one hymn and worship chorus suitable for congregational 
singing. As a minimum admission requirement, each stu- 
dent must demonstrate conducting patterns with clarity 
and precision, communicate appropriate conducting ges- 
tures and portray a sense of leadership. 



100 Lee University 

d. The Music Theory Placement Examination will include 
such areas as: 

1 . Melodic harmonization 

2. Figured bass realization 

3. Formal and harmonic analysis 

4. Melodic and harmonic dictation 

5. Sightreading 

e. The Church Music History Placement Examination will 
include recognition of works, composers, performance and 
worship practices from post-New Testament through con- 
temporary periods.. 

NON-DEGREE-SEEKING STATUS 

A student desiring to take courses without full admission status in 
the Master of Church Music degree program will be required to com- 
plete an application and submit official transcripts from all colleges 
and universities attended. A maximum of six semester hours may be 
taken at the applicant's risk as a non-degree-seeking student, and 
enrollment will be limited to specific entry-level courses. The Director 
of Graduate Studies in Music must approve any course selected by the 
applicant. Completion of course work under non-degree-seeking status 
does not guarantee that a student will be granted full admission status. 

If at any time a non-degree-seeking student wishes to pursue full 
admission status, the following requirements must be completed 
before the student may continue coursework in the program: 

a. application for admission 

b. resume 

c. two-page essay 

d. three reference forms (two academic and one personal) 

e. Lee University Health Clinic Certificate of Immunization 

f. v interview with the Director of Music Graduate Studies 

g. interview with the Music Graduate Committee 
h. vocal placement audition 

i. keyboard placement audition 

j. conducting placement audition 

k. music theory placement exam 

1. church music history placement exam 



Lee University 101 

COMPLETION REQUIREMENTS 

1. Nine semester hours of graduate courses is considered full- 
time. It is possible for full-time graduate students in residence 
to complete the degree program in one year. It is suggested 
that this optimal course load will be as follows: 

Fall 12 hours 

Spring 12 hours 

Summer 8 hours 

In addition to this traditional approach to scheduling, courses 
will be offered so that non-traditional students may attend 
classes one day a week (specifically Thursday) and may com- 
plete course requirements over a two-year period. 

Another option is the modular two-week "J-term" summer 
courses offered each June and July. Distance students may 
complete course requirements over a three-year period using 
other creative options during the regular academic calendar to 
meet Music Elective, Ministerial Elective and Advanced 
Technical Music Studies requirements. 

2. A cumulative average of 3.0 or above (on a 4.0 scale) is 
required in the graduate program. Course credits with a grade 
below a "C" may not be counted toward the degree. 

3. Graduate students will have an internship requirement in 
which they will serve in a local church or other appropriate 
venue under the supervision of a qualified professional and the 
Director of Graduate Studies in Music. 

4. Students must successfully complete a final project which 
may be a graduate recital, a thesis or a worship festival. The 
final project must be completed 15 days prior to graduation. 

5. A student is admitted to candidacy for the Master of Church 
Music degree only after the completion of 28 hours of course 
work and the successful completion of the written and oral 
comprehensive exams. 

6. If a student completes all course work as well as the final pro- 
ject, but still must successfully complete written and oral 
comprehensive examinations, enrollment in CHM511-DS 
Comprehensive Exams or in another course of the student's 
choice is required until all degree requirements are met. 



102 Lee University 

7. Once a student begins course work towards the Master of 
Church Music degree, the degree program must be completed 
within a six-year period. 

FINAL PROJECT COMMITTEE 

1 . Once the master's candidate has completed all required course 
work, registration is required for each succeeding semester 
toward the completion of the thesis, recital or worship festival. 
During the semester) s) that this occurs, enrollment will be in 
Final Project Extension for which credit hours is awarded. 
This course will not count toward the student's 32 hour require- 
ment but will continue his/her active status as a graduate stu- 
dent. The cost of the course is equal to one graduate credit 
hour. 

2. The graduate student's Final Project Committee will include a 
chairperson and two members. This committee will give over- 
sight and direction for the final project: either a thesis, recital 
or worship festival. The student may refer to this committee 
as his/her "Final Project Committee." 

3. The Music Graduate Committee will assign two graduate fac- 
ulty members to serve on the student's Final Project 
Committee. 

4. Each student will choose a third faculty member to serve on 
his/her committee. The student must seek approval from the 
faculty member before submitting his/her name to the 
Director of Graduate Studies in Music. 

5. The Music Graduate Committee must approve all members of 
the student's Final Project Committee. 

6. Detailed requirements for the worship festival, thesis and 
recital can be acquired from the Graduate Music Office. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students may transfer up to six hours of graduate credit from other 
accredited graduate-degree granting institutions. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

The Master of Church Music degree is comprised of 32 hours. An 
asterisk (*) indicates required courses. 



Lee University 103 



CHURCH MUSIC STUDIES (10 Hours) 

* CHM 590 Congregational Worship 2 hrs. 

* CHM 592 Church Music Media/Technology 1 hr. 

* CHM 594 History of Church Music 2 hrs. 

* CHM 595 Seminar in Church Music 1 hr. 

* CHM 598 Music Ministry Internship 2 hrs. 

* CHM 599 Final Project 2 hrs. 

ADVANCED TECHNICAL MUSIC STUDIES (12 Hours) 

CHM 500 Final Project Extension Ohrs. 

CHM 510 Music Theory Review 2 hrs. 

CHM 511 Special Topics in Music 1 hr. 

CHM 512 Special Topics in Music 2 hrs. 

CHM 513 Special Topics in Music 3 hrs. 

CHM 521 Music in Christian Education 2 hrs. 
CHM 522 Church Music Organization 

&. Administration 2 hrs. 

CHM 523 Hymnology 2 hrs. 

* CHM 530 Graduate Conducting I 2 hrs. 
CHM 531 Graduate Conducting II 2 hrs. 
CHM 541 Orchestration and Arranging 2 hrs. 
CHM 542 Seminar in Advanced Orchestration II 2 hrs. 
CHM 543 Seminar in Advanced Orchestration III 2 hrs. 
CHM 544 Seminar in Advanced Orchestration IV 2 hrs. 
CHM 545 Seminar in Choral Arranging 1 hr. 
CHM 546 Seminar in Recording Studio Accompanying 1 hr. 

* CHM 547 Concepts of Analysis I 1 hr. 

* CHM 548 Concepts of Analysis II 1 hr. 
CHM 553 Music Explosion 1 hr. 
CHM 575 Seminar in Songwriting 1 hr. 
CHM 591 Music Business 2 hrs. 

* CHM 593 Introduction to Graduate Research in Music 1 hr. 
CHM 596 Church Music Literature and Sources 2 hrs. 

MUSIC ELECTIVES (4 Hours) 

CHM 551 Music Drama Workshop 1 hr. 

* Ensemble 1 or 2 hrs. 

* Applied Lesson 1 or 2 hrs. 



104 



Lee University 



MINISTERIAL ELECTIVES (6 Hours] 

Students will elect six hours of classes in religious studies repre- 
senting an area of interest in support of their church music ministry. 
Typical areas would be youth ministry, leadership, worship, or theolo- 
gy. Any graduate-level course offered by the Lee University School of 
Religion or by the Church of God Theological Seminary may be con- 
sidered, with the approval of the student's faculty advisor and the con- 
sent of the instructor. A list of suggested courses may be obtained 
from the student's faculty advisors or from the Graduate Music Office. 

Courses taken at the Church of God Theological Seminary for 
equivalent credit at Lee University must be approved by the Director 
of Graduate Studies in Music before the student enrolls. 




Lee University 105 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

CHA 550, 551, 552, 553. PIANO PROFICIENCY One hour credit 

A course designed to address deficiencies identified by the keyboard sec- 
tion of the Music Placement Audition. Grading for this course is pass/fail. 
Credit does not apply toward the Master of Church Music degree. 

CHA 560, 561, 562, 563, 564, 565. APPLIED MUSIC One hour credit 

CHA 570, 571, 572, 573, 574, 575. APPLIED MUSIC Two hours credit 

Applied music in the sixty and seventy series designates the secondary 
instrument in the graduate's program. Private lessons for the secondary instru- 
ment are available to all students (subject to submission of the Graduate 
Applied Lesson Request Form and teacher availability) in the following cate- 
gories: 

Brass Percussion 

Composition & Arranging Piano 

Conducting Strings 

Guitar Voice 

Organ Woodwinds 

CHA 580, 581, 582, 583, 584, 585. APPLIED MUSIC One hour credit 

CHA 590, 591, 592, 593, 594, 595. APPLIED MUSIC Two hours credit 

Applied music in the eighty and ninety series designates the principal 
instrument in the graduate's program. This series is intended for students pur- 
suing a graduate recital in a performance area. Attention is given to the devel- 
opment of repertory and intensive study of style. Admission by audition only. 
Private lessons for the principal instrument are available to all auditioned stu- 
dents (subject to submission of the Graduate Applied Lesson Request Form 
and teacher availability] in the following categories: 

Brass Percussion 

Composition & Arranging Piano 

Conducting Strings 

Guitar Voice 

Organ Woodwinds 

Graduate Applied Lesson Request Forms are available from the Graduate 
Music office during the week of registration each semester. Students must reg- 
ister for applied lessons before obtaining forms. All Graduate Applied Lesson 
Request Forms must be turned into the Graduate Music office by Thursday of 
the week of registration. 

CHM 500. FINAL PROJECT EXTENSION No hours credit 

An extension on the Final Project which will allow a student to continue 
an incomplete project in subsequent semesters until completion. Student's 
status continues as active. 



106 Lee University 



CHM 501-502CC. CAMPUS CHOIR One hour credit 

Study and performance of a wide variety of sacred choral literature of the 
worship tradition and in a worship setting. Open to all students by audition. 
A minimum 3 hours of rehearsal per week. 

CHM 501-502CH. CHAPEL CHOIR One hour credit 

Open to all students. No audition is required. Rehearsals are one per 
week. Performances are in chapel and local churches only. 

CHM 501-502CU. CHORAL UNION One hour credit 

Study and performance of major choral master works as well as newly 
composed works for festival chorus. Open to all music majors, general college 
students and members of the local community with the consent of the 
instructor. One major concert each semester. One rehearsal per week. 

CHM 501-502ES. EVANGELISTIC SINGERS One hour credit 

Study and performance of a wide variety of sacred choral literature rang- 
ing from the Negro Spiritual to traditional and contemporary Black Gospel 
settings. Admission by audition. A minimum 3 hours of rehearsal per week. 

CHM 501-502LC. CHORALE One hour credit 

Study and performance of choral literature with emphasis on standard 
classical choral repertoire. Concerts given each semester. Membership by 
audition only. Open to all students. Two rehearsals per week. 

CHM 501-502LL. LADIES OF LEE One hour credit 

Training and performance in choral music for treble voices. Various per- 
formances each semester. Open to all female students by audition. A mini- 
mum 3 hours of rehearsal per week. 

CHM 501-502LS. LEE SINGERS One hour credit 

Study and performance of a wide range of choral literature. One major 
tour each semester in addition to other off-campus appearances. Membership 
by audition only. Open to all students. A minimum 4 hours of rehearsal per 
week. 

CHM 501-502OW. OPERA WORKSHOP One hour credit 

Experience in the practical application of musical and dramatic prepara- 
tion and performance of opera within a workshop format. Open to all stu- 
dents (performance roles and chorus by audition only]. 

CHM 501-502VL. VOICES OF LEE One hour credit 

A 16-voice ensemble designed to study and perform a variety of a cappela, 
jazz and contemporary choral stylings - both sacred and secular. A minimum 



Lee University 107 



of 5 hours rehearsal per week with extensive off-campus performances. 
Membership by audition. 

CHM 503-504BR. CHAMBER MUSIC - BRASS One hour credit 

Study and performance of music for small ensemble. Instrumentation 
based upon student interest and availability. 

CHM 503-504HB. CHAMBER MUSIC - HANDBELLS One hour credit 

Study and performance of music for small ensemble. Instrumentation 
based upon student interest and availability. 

CHM 503-504JE. JAZZ ENSEMBLE One hour credit 

Utilizing standard stage band instrumentation, this ensemble studies and 
performs the best of the popular repertory. Open by audition. A minimum 2 
hours of rehearsal per week. 

CHM 503-504OR. CHAMBER ORCHESTRA One hour credit 

Study and performance of music for string ensemble and string orchestra. 
Open by audition. One major concert per semester. 

CHM 503-504PB. PEP BAND One hour credit 

Training, practice and performance of commercial and marching band 
literature. 

CHM 503-504PE. CHAMBER MUSIC - PERCUSSION One hour credit 

Study and performance of music for small ensemble. Instrumentation 
based upon student interest and availability. 

CHM 503-504SB. SYMPHONIC BAND One hour credit 

Training and practice in the wind band literature. Open to all students with 
the consent of the instructor. A minimum of 3 hours of rehearsal per week. 

CHM 503-504WE. WIND ENSEMBLE One hour credit 

Training, practice and performance of concert wind ensemble literature. 
Membership is by audition only. One major concert to be given each semester. 
A minimum of 3 hours of rehearsal per week. 

CHM 510. MUSIC THEORY REVIEW Two hours credit 

A course designed to assist the entering graduate student to prepare for 
the study of music theory at the graduate level. Grading for this course is 
pass/fail. Credit does not apply toward the Master of Church Music degree. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Music Theory Placement Exam. 



108 Lee University 



CHM 511. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MUSIC One hour credit 

A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic 
will change to meet student demand and interest. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the Director of Graduate Studies in Music. 

CHM 512. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MUSIC Two hours credit 

A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic 
will change to meet student demand and interest. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the Director of Graduate Studies in Music. 

CHM 513. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MUSIC Three hours credit 

A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic will 
change to meet student demand and interest. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
Director of Graduate Studies in Music. 

CHM 521. MUSIC IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Two hours credit 

A course designed to instruct the student in integrating all church activi- 
ties, developing music in churches through the church music school and the 
multiple choir system. Graded music is studied for use in Sunday Schools, 
Vacation Bible Schools, etc. 

CHM 522. CHURCH MUSIC ORGANIZATION Two hours credit 

& ADMINISTRATION 

A study of the administrative role of the minister of music in a fully 
developed music program at the local church level. 

CHM 523. HYMNOLOGY Two hours credit 

A survey of the various periods and styles of hymnody in the history of 
the Western church. Includes textual analysis and a study of the role of con- 
gregational singing in worship. 

CHM 530. GRADUATE CONDUCTING I Two hours credit 

A course designed to provide the student with opportunity to improve the 
conducting gestures required for any style of music. Emphasis for the course is 
on conducting mixed meters, expressive gestures and rehearsal techniques. 

CHM 531. GRADUATE CONDUCTING II Two hours credit 

A course designed to provide students practical conducting experience of 
various styles of church music from chant to modern-day song. Emphasis is 
placed on the appropriate conducting technique and performance practice 
required for the period. 



Lee University 109 



CHM541. ORCHESTRATION AND ARRANGING Two hours credit 

A detailed study of instruments of the orchestra including range, tech- 
nique, timbre, transposition and orchestration. Study of various principles of 
arranging for church instrumental ensembles. 

CHM 542. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED Two hours credit 

ORCHESTRATION II 

An in-depth study of orchestrating for strings and woodwinds. This course 
will focus on bowing techniques, alternate clefs, specific scoring problems for 
double reed instruments, review of ranges and transpositions, and special 
effects for string instrumentation. Prerequisite: Orchestration and Arranging. 

CHM 543. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED Two hours credit 

ORCHESTRATION III 

An in-depth study of orchestrating for brass, percussion, and infrequently 
used instruments. This course will focus on brass techniques, alternate clefs, 
specific scoring problems for percussion instruments, review of ranges and 
transpositions, and special effects for percussion instruments. 
Prerequisite: Orchestration II. 

CHM 544. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED Two hours credit 

ORCHESTRATION IV 

An advance study of orchestration that will include preparation of major 
orchestration projects. Includes in-class presentations arranged by each stu- 
dent. Prerequisite: Orchestration III. 

CHM 545. SEMINAR IN CHORAL ARRANGING One hour credit 

An introduction to the aspects of choral arranging. The choral arranging 
will include two-, three- and four-part writing. 

CHM 546. SEMINAR IN RECORDING One hour credit 

STUDIO ACCOMPANYING 

An emphasis in accompanying for the recording studio musician. 
Development of intensive study of style and the techniques utilized in record- 
ing sessions will be covered on an experiential basis. Proficiency on the key- 
board is required. Pre-requisite: Permission from the instructor. 

CHM 547. CONCEPTS OF ANALYSIS I One hour credit 

A course designed to provide the church musician with the necessary 
analytic techniques to function effectively in the wide-ranging musical styles 
of the contemporary Christian church. Emphasis is on contemporary commer- 
cial forms of analysis, including chord charts, melody charts, etc. Prerequisite: 
a passing score on the Graduate Music Theory Placement Exam. 



110 Lee University 



CHM 548. CONCEPTS OF ANALYSIS II One hour credit 

A study of analytic systems and concepts appropriate to the various styles 
of the standard repertoire of Western music. Prerequisite: A passing score on 
the Graduate Music Theory Placement Exam. 

CHM 551. MUSIC DRAMA WORKSHOP One hour credit 

A practical laboratory course which involves the production of music dra- 
mas. Work includes casting, rehearsing, designing and constructing sets, 
lighting, costuming, and publicity for recitals and public presentations. 

CHM 553. MUSIC EXPLOSION One hour credit 

A church music seminar that includes special interest workshops, wor- 
ship services, concerts and music reading sessions. Offered in the Spring 
semester. 

CHM 590. CONGREGATIONAL WORSHIP Two hours credit 

A course designed to provide students with an in-depth study of corporate 
worship, giving attention to the theological foundations of music in worship, 
the function of music in worship, the role of the worship leader, the practical 
elements of creativity in worship design and the production of materials for 
congregational worship in evangelical and Pentecostal church services. 

CHM 591. MUSIC BUSINESS Two hours credit 

A course designed to provide an introduction to the field of Music 
Business in general and to the Christian Music Business in particular. 

CHM 592. CHURCH MUSIC One hour credit 

MEDIA/TECHNOLOGY 

An introduction to the use of media and media technology in the church, 
including the use of MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface], computer 
programs for the musician and the creative use of slides, videos, films and 
related areas of interest for the church musician. 

CHM 593. INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE One hour credit 

RESEARCH IN MUSIC 

An introduction to the methodology of scholarly research and writing 
in music. 

CHM 594. HISTORY OF CHURCH MUSIC Two hours credit 

A course designed to provide students with an overview of the historical 
church traditions (from Hebrew to contemporary) and to demonstrate the influ- 
ence of these traditions on the music of the evangelical and Pentecostal church. 



Lee University 1 1 1 



CHM 595. SEMINAR IN CHURCH MUSIC One hour credit 

A course designed to discover the latest innovations in church music 
ministry and also to cover "non-music" areas of church music ministry that 
are vital to the success of the evangelical/Pentecostal church music minister. 
Management of these "non-music" areas is essential to the daily life of the 
music minister and will be approached from a pragmatic, real-life perspective. 

CHM 596. CHURCH MUSIC Two hours credit 

LITERATURE/SOURCES 

An overview of sacred literature from the major periods of church music 
history with selected representative composers and their works from each 
period. This will include a significant section on contemporary sacred litera- 
ture for the church and school. 

CHM 598. MUSIC MINISTRY INTERNSHIP Two hours credit 

A course designed to give graduate students an opportunity to interact 
with a competent music minister in all areas of church music ministry. The 
student will be given opportunities to increase his/her knowledge and skill 
levels in areas of interpersonal relationships, administration, leadership and 
planning, as well as musicianship. 

CHM 599. FINAL PROJECT Two hours credit 

A course which gives the student a choice of vehicles for demonstrating 
his/her mastery in either individual performance, research and writing or 
planning, preparing and directing the worship festival concert. The work of 
the student will be closely directed and supervised by designated graduate fac- 
ulty as arranged by the Director of Graduate Studies in Music. 

THE MUSIC GRADUATE COMMITTEE 

The Music Graduate Committee's responsibility is to give admin- 
istrative oversight to the graduate program. The Committee considers 
and recommends curricular changes to the university faculty, approves 
all policies, assesses effectiveness of the graduate program, serves as 
the Admissions Committee, reviews candidacy, and approves appli- 
cants for graduation. Members of the Music Graduate Committee are 
Jim Burns, D.M.A.; Phillip Thomas, Ph.D.; Mark Bailey, D.M.E.; David 
Horton, Ph.D.; and Walt Mauldin, D.M.A. 



.' 



SCHOOL OF 
RELIGION 



Master of Arts in 
Biblical Studies 

Master of Arts in 
Theological Studies 

Master of Arts in 

Youth and Family Ministry 



Lee University 113 



SCHOOL OF RELIGION 



GRADUATE PROGRAM IN BIBLE AND THEOLOGY 

Master of Arts in Biblical Studies 
Master of Arts in Theological Studies 

PURPOSE AND PHILOSOPHY OF THE DEGREES 

The School of Religion at Lee University offers a program of 
advanced studies in the academic disciplines of Bible and Theology. 
These degrees will provide students with post-baccalaureate study for 
the purpose of preparing for further graduate work or for other voca- 
tional interests. Through its Master of Arts degrees in Biblical Studies 
and Theological Studies, Lee University provides a quality graduate 
program for Christian scholars in the designated disciplines. 
Committed to life and learning from an Evangelical/Pentecostal per- 
spective and within the context of the Church of God, its sponsoring 
denomination, Lee University welcomes to the program all students 
from the Christian community who qualify for admission and sub- 
scribe to its stated goals and objectives. 

Academic rather than professional in nature, the Master of Arts 
degree constitutes an option to professional degrees for the student 
seeking advanced study in the disciplines, preparing for work in the 
educational ministry of the church, and/or anticipating the research 
doctorate. This program is designed for the collegial engagement of 
peers whose concerns are constructive conversation and productive 
scholarship and whose goal is disciplinary competence. 

Predicated upon the conviction that rigorous academic inquiry 
both ennobles and enables the participants, Lee University intends that 
the community of scholars engaging the Master of Arts in Biblical 
Studies and the Master of Arts in Theological Studies curriculum be 
more serviceable to the kingdom of God in the world. 

Within the United States, most degrees designated as M.A. in Bible 
or Theology are offered by seminaries. Such programs accept appli- 
cants from various disciplines of undergraduate studies and therefore 
are usually two years in length (48 hours-64 hours). The program 
offered by Lee University is distinctive in that it will be offered at two 
levels. The first is for applicants whose undergraduate degrees are in 
the related areas of religious, biblical, theological, or pastoral studies. 



114 Lee University 

Therefore, the usual first year of general introductory studies in reli- 
gion is not offered, but instead the program begins with upper level 
graduate courses and requires 36 credit hours for completion. The sec- 
ond level admits students whose undergraduate work is in an area 
other than those specified in the first level, and therefore this level 
requires up to 48 hours. 

GOALS OF THE 

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN BIBLE AND THEOLOGY 

The School of Religion offers the M.A. in Biblical Studies and the 
M.A. in Theological Studies with several goals in mind. We aim: 

1. To foster the continued development of research and writing 
skills in the area of biblical and theological studies. 

2. To contribute to the body of biblical and theological knowl- 
edge and literature. 

3. To assist the student in developing a personal hermeneutical 
and exegetical position to be used in acquiring a comprehen- 
sive understanding of Old and New Testament content. 

4. To develop an understanding of the philosophical foundations 
for theological reflection. 

5. To prepare the student for the teaching enterprise, whether in 
the educational ministry of the church or in the context of the 
academy at large. 

6. To prepare the student to engage in more advanced degrees, 
ultimately leading to doctoral studies. 

7. To integrate faith and learning in such a way as to develop the 
individual in mind and spirit in order to enhance the spiritual 
development of the body of Christ. 

STUDENT GOALS FOR THE 

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN BIBLE AND THEOLOGY 

Upon completion of the program, M.A. students in Biblical Studies 
and Theological Studies should have the skills and ability to: 

1. Analyze biblical and theological writings at a level commensu- 
rate with other graduate students in religion programs. 



Lee University 115 

2. Produce written work which portrays a knowledge of primary 
and secondary literature in the discipline. 

3. Compare and contrast the various hermeneutical options for 
biblical exegesis. 

4. Demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical founda- 
tions for biblical and theological reflection. 

5. Provide evidence of analytical and critical skills which are pre- 
requisite to further graduate studies in Bible or Theology. 

6. Demonstrate rudimentary capacity for a specified language for 
biblical or theological research (primarily Greek, Hebrew, or 
German). 

STUDENT OUTCOME GOALS 

FOR THE MA. IN BIBLICAL STUDIES 

Upon completion of the program, students in the M.A. in Biblical 
Studies Program should be able to: 

1. Demonstrate an understanding of the continuity and the ten- 
sion between the Old and New Testaments. 

2. Give an overview of the history of the New Testament canon 
from its formation to its present status in various faith tradi- 
tions. 

3. Distinguish between the tenets of first century Christianity 
and other first century religions. 

4. Exegete biblical texts, utilizing sound hermeneutical princi- 
ples. 

5. Interact with various models of revelation from a Pentecostal- 
evangelical perspective. 

6. Demonstrate the ability to do valid research which contributes 
to the knowledge-base in the discipline of biblical studies. 

STUDENT OUTCOME GOALS 

FOR THE MA. IN THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

Upon completion of the program, students in the M.A. in 
Theological Studies Program should be able to: 

1 . Explain the development of the history of doctrine with special 
consideration of the major theologians of the last two millennia. 

2. Dialogue with the fundamental issues in the philosophy of 
religion. 



116 Lee University 

3. Rehearse the views of the early Church Fathers on various 
doctrines. 

4. Demonstrate an understanding of the major thinkers of the 
Reformation. 

5. Integrate Pentecostal faith and experience with doctrinal 
reflection. 

6. Articulate the thought of contemporary theologians. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDIES 

LEVEL ONE ADMISSION STATUS REQUIREMENTS 

M.A. CORE 9 hrs. 

Biblical Criticism/Hermeneutics 
History of Doctrine 
Philosophy of Religion 

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT 6 hrs. 

Biblical Greek (Second Year for Biblical Studies) 

or Biblical Hebrew (for Biblical Studies] 
Theological German (for Theological or Biblical Studies) 

or Ecclesiastical Latin (for Theological Studies) 

SPECIAL CONCENTRATION 9-12 hrs. 

(for Biblical or Theological Studies) 

ELECTIVES 6 hrs. 

THESIS 3-6 hrs. 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 36 hrs. 

LEVEL TWO ADMISSION STATUS REQUIREMENTS 

Level Tw v o is for those students who do not have one year of NT Greek 
and a degree in the field of religion before entrance to the graduate pro- 
gram. In addition to the requirements of Level One, requirements for 
Level Two must be fulfilled with the guidance of the Director of 
Graduate Studies in Religion. In order to determine the correct 
Admission Status, see the section on Admission Requirements. 

Elementary New Testament Greek (GRE 501/502) 6 hrs. 



Lee University 117 



Biblical/Theological/or Historical Coursework up to 6 hours 

(see course selections below) 



TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM up to 48 hours 

* Students may choose from the following (or similar) courses with the 
evaluation and assistance of the Director of Graduate Studies in 
Religion (All of these courses are offered through the undergraduate 
program but require additional work for graduate credit.): 

BIB 501 Intertestamental Period 

BIB 502 Romans and Galatians 

BIB 505 Psalms 

THE 534 Doctrine of Christ 

THE 535 Doctrine of the Holy Spirit 

THE 536 Doctrine of the Church 

THE 537 Systematic Theology 

THE 538 Systematic Theology 

CHH 542 History & Thought of Eastern Christianity 

CHH 544 Major Thinkers in Western Christianity 

CHH 545 Major Thinkers in European Reformation 

In addition, students who have had an adequate philosophy back- 
ground or desire further study, may be allowed to enroll in some of the 
undergraduate philosophy courses at the graduate level (e.g., PHI 
341/541- Major Thinkers in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy,- PHI 
342/542 - Major Thinkers in Modern and Contemporary Philosophy; 
and PHI 442/543 - Kierkegaard). This may only be done with the 
approval of the Director of Graduate Studies in Religion. 



1 1 8 Lee University 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
Core Courses 

All students will take the following three core courses: 

BIB/THE 550. BIBLICAL CRITICISM/ Three hours credit 

HERMENEUTICS 

This course will explore several schools of biblical criticism (source, reac- 
tion, and form criticism), and various hermeneutical approaches. Particular 
attention will be given to tracing the influence of German philosophy on con- 
temporary continental theology. Martin Heidegger's role in forming the 
hermeneutic of Rudolph Bultmann and the resultant schools of interpretation 
arising from the latter will be studied in detail. In addition, more recent forms 
of criticism will be considered, including reader-response, social-scientific, 
and postmodern theory. 

THE 551. HISTORY OF DOCTRINE Three hours credit 

This course provides a study of major Christian doctrines as understood 
through the writings of seminal theologians of the Church. By placing each 
theologian within a historical context, this course will allow the controversies 
of each period to dictate the doctrines to be discussed. Nevertheless topics 
such as creation, original sin, the Trinity, the Church, the Sacraments, and 
Pneumatology will be considered. 

THE 552. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION Three hours credit 

This course will introduce the student to the main frameworks of philo- 
sophic thought, especially as they relate to religious studies. Particularly 
important will be the thought of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas 
Aquinas, Immanuel Kant, and the Modern/Postmodern area. Topics consid- 
ered will be the arguments for the existence of God, religious experience, the 
problem of evil, problems with religious language, miracles, immortality, free- 
dom and determinism, faith and reason, and religious pluralism. 



Lee University 119 



Course Offerings for Biblical Studies Concentration 

Students in the M.A. in Biblical Studies program will take 9-12 
hours in their concentration. Students in the M.A. in Theological 
Studies program may choose from these courses to fulfill the elective 
requirements. 

BIB 560. PEOPLE GROUPS IN Three hours credit 

EARLY FIRST CENTURY JUDEA: 
SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND RELIGIOUS REFLECTIONS 

This course will examine the role and function of various people groups 
mentioned in the gospels for the purpose of better understanding the message 
of Jesus, the struggles of the first believers and the experience of Paul. The 
Pharisees, Sadducees, Zealots, "People of the Land," tax collectors, sinners, 
Hellenists and Hebrews will all be studied. 

BIB 561. THE OLD TESTAMENT IN THE NEW: Three hours credit 

NT WRITERS AS INTERPRETERS 
OF SCRIPTURE 

This course will explore the ways in which New Testament authors read 
and interpret Scripture: What methods do they employ? What relation does 
their practice have to other modes of first-century Jewish exegesis? Which 
Old Testament passages/words are used and why? Should the interpretive 
methods used by the New Testament writers serve as models for the church's 
continuing task of interpretation and preaching? We will pursue these ques- 
tions through exegesis of specific New Testament passages. Special attention 
will be given to Paul, Mark and John. 

BIB 562. GRECO-ROMAN RELIGIONS 

AND CHRISTIAN ORIGINS Three hours credit 

This course provides an occasion for the student to become inundated 
with a number of literary texts from the Greco-Roman world, to acquire a gen- 
eral sense of religiosity in the period, and to understand the background of the 
Hellenistic world for comprehending the emergence of Christianity. We will 
pay special attention to the emperor cult, Greco-Roman philosophies, mystery 
cults, and novels. 

BIB 563. SEPTUAGINT STUDIES Three hours credit 

This course examines the social and political factors of the third centu- 
ry B.C.E. that gave rise to the Septuagint. The critical role this translation 
had for Hellenistic Jews of the Diaspora and the birth and expansion of the 
early church will also be studied. Selected portions of the text will be trans- 
lated, compared to the original Hebrew and related to the New Testament 
where applicable. 



1 20 Lee University 



BIB 564. JESUS AND THE GOSPELS Three hours credit 

This course provides opportunities to study two interrelated areas of 
research: (1) the life and teaching of Jesus of Nazareth; and (2) the nature of the 
canonical Gospels. We will survey important, "classic" works of the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries that bear upon questions relating to Jesus and 
the Gospels. Such works will include the following: Schweitzer's The Quest 
of the Historical Jesus, Wrede's The Messianic Secret, Kahler's The So-C ailed 
Historical Jesus and the Biblical-Historical Christ, Dibelius's From Tradition 
to Gospel, Bultmann's History of the Synoptic Tradition, Dodd's Apostolic 
Preaching and Its Developments, and other recent modern studies. 

BIB 566. THEOLOGY OF PAUL: Three hours credit 

REVELATION, EXPERIENCE 
AND CHARISMATA 

This course will examine the influence that revelation, personal experi- 
ence and charismatic gifts had on the formation of Paul's theology. Special 
attention will be given to Paul's persecution of the church, his calling on the 
Damascus road and the manner in which the spirit worked through Paul and 
the ones he discipled. Paul's own words in his epistles will be the focus of 
study, but Luke's account of Paul in Acts will also be referenced. 

BIB 568. ADVANCED PAULINE STUDIES Three hours credit 

This course will examine the major contours of Paul's thought through 
an intensive study of the primary sources, as well as extensive readings in the 
secondary literature. Its method will be to identify, organize and examine 
such key elements as the theology, anthropology, soteriology and ecclesiology 
of the Apostle Paul. 

BIB 570. BOOK STUDIES: EXEGESIS SEMINAR Three hours credit 

This course will focus on a careful exegetical analysis of the Greek text of 
the book under discussion. Matters of interpretation and elements of advanced 
grammar will be discussed. The specific book chosen for the seminar may 
vary from year to year. 

BIB 593. DIRECTED STUDY IN 

BIBLICAL STUDIES Three hours credit 

A study of an approved area of biblical or theological studies, in which 
the student contracts with the director of the study concerning course require- 
ments, course scheduling and evaluation procedure. This course may not be 
used to substitute for core courses. 

BIB 598. THESIS Three hours credit 

This course is designed for students to conclude their graduate program in 
religion by writing a thesis that provides evidence of ability to do independent 
research and compile it in the form required by the faculty of graduate studies 
in religion. 



Lee University 121 



BIB 599. THESIS Six hours credit 

This course is designed for students to conclude their graduate program in 
religion by writing a thesis that provides evidence of ability to do independent 
research and compile it in the form required by the faculty of graduate studies 
in religion. 

Course Offerings for the Theological Studies Concentration 

Students in the M.A. in Theological Studies program will take 9-12 
hours in this concentration. Students in the M.A. in Biblical Studies 
program may choose from these courses for their electives. 

THE 518. INTEGRATIVE THEOLOGY: Three hours credit 

REVELATION AND GOD 

This course integrates historical, biblical, systematic, apologetic and 
applied dimensions to selected theological matters offered for investigation. It 
proceeds according to the following method: (1) defining the problem under 
consideration, (2) identifying alternative approaches to solving it, (3) summa- 
rizing the biblical teaching regarding it by applying sound hermeneutical prin- 
ciples, (4) articulating a cohesive doctrine respecting it, (5) defending that doc- 
trine, and (6) applying those convictions to Christian life and ministry. 

THE 570. PATRISTIC THEOLOGY Three hours credit 

This course is a study in the historical development of selected theologi- 
cal topics from the second to the fifth centuries. It concerns, in particular, 
matters relating to canonicity, the Trinity, Christology and Pneumatology, 
and identifies the relevance of those matters to the further (i.e. medieval and 
modern) history of the Church. Special attention is given to Irenaeus, 
Tertullian, the Cappadocian Fathers and Augustine. 

THE 571. THEOLOGY OF THE REFORMERS Three hours credit 

This course focuses on Luther, Calvin, Simons and Cranmer as represen- 
tative of four major streams of Reformation tradition. It (1) explores the per- 
sonal and historical contexts of each principal, (2) discusses the emphases of 
each on selected theological matters, (3) compares their theological postures, 
and (4) assesses the immediate and extended impact of their work upon the 
wider European experience. 

THE 572. NINETEENTH-CENTURY Three hours credit 

AMERICAN RELIGIOUS AND 
SOCIAL THOUGHT 

Concerned with the interconnection of theological formulation, revival- 
ism and social reform, this study traces the course of American democratic 
thought and expression in the milieu that was nineteenth-century America. It 



1 22 Lee University 



addresses the roots and development of the Second Great Awakening, 
Christianity and antebellum slavery, the Enlightenment tradition, the 
Romantic impulse, the Princeton Theology, the challenges of Darwinism and 
Marxism, the emergence of Holiness and Pentecostal phenomena, and efforts 
at Christian unity. 

THE 573. PENTECOSTAL THEOLOGY Three hours credit 

This course will consider the historical and theological development of 
the Pentecostal movement, with a view to rehearsing past theological views 
as well as future systematic possibilities. Topics to be examined will be clas- 
sical doctrines as well as issues of healing, the five-fold Gospel, the relation- 
ship with evangelicals and charismatics, the role of glossolalia and gifts of 
the Spirit. 

THE 575. CONTEMPORARY THEOLOGY Three hours credit 

This course will survey the theological and philosophical trends from the 
nineteenth century to the present. The major doctrinal themes examined will 
be the doctrines of God and revelation,- the Trinity,- and Christology. In addi- 
tion, various approaches to theology will be considered: liberation theology, 
narrative theology, feminist and womanist theology, African-American theol- 
ogy, African theology, Asian theology and evangelical theology. Rigorous 
study in the philosophical foundations of these theologies and their represen- 
tatives will be examined. The hermeneutical and theological methods of these 
systems of theology will offer a basis for comparison and evaluation. 
Important philosophical themes to be considered are existentialism, mod- 
ernism, and postmodernism. 

THE 576. SEMINAR IN THEOLOGY (CALVIN) Three hours credit 

This course is a seminar focusing on selected portions of Calvin's 
Institutes of the Christian Religion. It considers the successive editions of the 
work in both Latin and French, ascertaning the purpose for such and the 
nuances of the Reformer's thought therein. Students will attend to the lec- 
tures on various aspects of Calvin's personal and professional life and will 
interact by papers and discussion with portions of Calvin's work. 

THE 577. SEMINAR IN THEOLOGY (WESLEY) Three hours credit 

THE 578. SEMINAR IN THEOLOGY (BARTH) Three hours credit 

This course is a seminar that will focus on a selected portion of the pri- 
mary writings of Karl Barth. Barth's theological views will be placed within a 
larger framework of his thought, but the focus will be on a limited section of 
his Church Dogmatics 1/1 and 11/ 1. Students will "exegete" passages from 
Barth's writings and will discuss in a seminar setting the implications for his 
doctrine of God. 



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THE 593. DIRECTED STUDY IN Three hours credit 

THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

A study of an approved area of biblical or theological studies, in which 
the student contracts with the director of the study concerning course require- 
ments, course scheduling and evaluation procedure. This course may not be 
used to substitute for core courses. 

THE 598. THESIS Three hours credit 

This course is designed for student to conclude their graduate program in 
religion by writing a thesis that provides evidence of ability to do independent 
research and compile it in the form required by the faculty of graduate studies 
in religion. 

THE 599. THESIS Six hours credit 

This course is designed for student to conclude their graduate program in 
religion by writing a thesis that provides evidence of ability to do independent 
research and compile it in the form required by the faculty of graduate studies 
in religion. 

Course Offerings for Language Studies 

GREEK 

GRE 501. ELEMENTARY NEW TESTAMENT GREEK Three hours credit 

A basic vocabulary and grammar study of New Testament Greek with 
drills in simple Greek reading. 



GRE 502. ELEMENTARY NEW TESTAMENT GREEK Three hours credit 

A continuation of GRE 501 with more attention to syntax and reading. 

THEOLOGICAL GERMAN 

GER 501. THEOLOGICAL GERMAN Three hours credit 

An introduction to theological German designed for the student who has 
little or no previous knowledge of the language. The course will focus on the 
basics of German grammar and syntax, while acquisition of vocabulary and 
translation drills will concentrate on religious and theological selections. 

GER 502. READINGS IN THEOLOGICAL GERMAN Three hours credit 

Continuing the course on introduction to theological German, this course 
reviews and extends the grammatical and syntactical aspects of the German 
language. Students will be exposed to a variety of philosophical and theologi- 
cal texts meant to prepare them for comprehension and reading of German for 



1 24 Lee University 



research in future work. With this goal in mind, the emphasis is on reading 
comprehension and extensive exposure of as many theological and biblical 
readings as possible. The prerequisite is GER 501. 

HEBREW 

HEB 501. ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW Three hours credit 

This course is an introduction to Hebrew that is designed to introduce 
students to the basic vocabulary and grammar of the Hebrew Bible. 

HEB 502. READINGS IN BIBLICAL HEBREW Three hours credit 

This course is a continuation of HEB 501. It builds on the vocabulary and 
grammar of HEB 501 and gives students a working knowledge of the standard 
grammatical and lexical resources for exegetical work. Students will also 
begin reading the text of the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisite: HEB 501. 

LATIN 

LAT 501. ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN Three hours credit 

This course will introduce the student to the basic grammar, syntax, and 
vocabulary of the Latin language, with special attention towards ecclesiastical 
Latin. 

LAT 502. READINGS IN ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN Three hours credit 

This course will build upon the introduction to basic Latin grammar and 
focus on extending vocabulary and reading skills. Its special emphasis will be 
on writings of an ecclesiastical nature from the early church fathers through 
the 17 th century. Prerequisite: LAT 501. 



Lee University 125 

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS 

There are two levels of admission for the M.A. in Biblical 
Studies/Theological Studies. These levels are determined by the 
prior work of the applicant. Since this M.A. degree is an 
advanced study within the disciplines of Biblical Studies or 
Theological Studies, a certain amount of preparation and apti- 
tude is required in this program. Both admissions levels will 
require the same 36 hours, but those without adequate prepara- 
tion will be admitted under the condition of taking up to 12 
more hours to complete this degree. 

An applicant should have a bachelor's degree in Biblical and/or 
Theological Studies or its equivalent from an accredited college 
or university. With regard to the United States, this means 
regional accreditation or that of the AABC (Accrediting 
Association of Bible Colleges). With regard to undergraduate 
degrees from other countries, each applicant will be considered 
on his/her own merits. However, it is expected that at least 
three years of college level work has been gained and that some 
form of accreditation is granted to the applicant's school within 
his/her country. Those with an appropriate degree and back- 
ground will be accepted into the first level of the program (36 
hours). 

Applicants in Biblical Studies who meet these criteria must also 
have had at least one year of New Testament [koine] Greek 
before entry into the program. Many of the textual studies in 
this program require a working knowledge of Greek; therefore, 
students are encouraged to have two years of Greek before enter- 
ing the program, but may be accepted with only one year of 
Greek with a grade of 80% (B) or better in their Greek work. 

It is important to note that the first year of Greek may be taken 
during two summer semesters of the university's program before 
entering the program in the fall semester. The second year of 
Greek may be taken during the course of the program or in two 
summer intensive sessions, and thereby fulfill the language 
requirements for the program (6 hours). For those Biblical 
Studies students who already have two years of Greek, the six 



1 26 Lee University 



hours language requirement may be met by taking Biblical 
Hebrew or Theological German. 

Applicants in Theological Studies who meet these criteria may 
take New Testament Greek during the program. However, they 
must also complete six hours of the language requirement, either 
fulfilling Elementary and Intermediate Greek (2 years equivalent) 
or one year of Greek and six hours of Theological German. It is 
strongly recommended that students in theology have a strong 
background in modern or ancient foreign languages (especially 
German, French, or Latin). Since further graduate study in theol- 
ogy requires facility with these languages, the program requires 
six hours of the appropriate language for each student. 

If an applicant has a B.A. or B.S. in pastoral studies, Christian 
education, intercultural studies, youth ministry, or another area 
of practical ministry, each transcript will be considered individu- 
ally for its appropriate status for entering the program. Any defi- 
ciencies that the Director of Graduate Studies in Religion may 
discover may be rectified during the completion of the first year 
in the program. Whatever courses may be recommended to pre- 
pare the student for graduate work within these disciplines may 
be taken concurrently with certain graduate courses within the 
program; the amount of hours to rectify the deficiencies may not 
exceed 12 hours. Usually, the deficiencies with these degrees in 
religion will only be the Greek language. 

The second level of admission status is for those who have not had 
a bachelor's degree in some form of religious studies. Each appli- 
cant's background and coursework (especially in the area of 
humanities, philosophy, and religion) will be evaluated by the 
Director of Graduate Studies in Religion. Applicants may be 
accepted into this level and be required to take up to 48 hours of 
work, that is, the regular 36 hour program and up to 12 hours of 
studies in religion as assigned by the Director. Six (6) hours of 
these twelve (12) hours must be NT Greek (GRE 501/GRE 502). 
The remaining hours will be determined by the Director and cho- 
sen from a variety of biblical, theological, and/or historical studies. 



Lee University 127 

4. Official undergraduate and graduate transcripts of credit earned 
at all institutions of higher education. 

5. GRE (Graduate Record Exam) or MAT (Miller Analogies Test) 
scores are required. Scores must be sent to the office of Graduate 
Studies in Religion and must be no more than five years old. 

6. Minimum G.RA. of 3.0 in undergraduate studies. 

7. Two letters of reference from professors familiar with your work 
and one personal reference from someone familiar with your 
character. 

8. An essay of 1000 words (about 5 pages, typed and double-spaced), 
which will provide the Director and admissions committee with 
a description of the candidate's future goals. Included in the 
essay should be a discussion of the following components: 

a. A description of one's spiritual educational journey. 

b. A summary of one's past and current involvement in 
the life of the local church. 

c. Future goals and use of this degree. 

Although the M.A. in Biblical Studies and the M.A. in 
Theological Studies are not seminary degrees that would require 
pastoral training or emphasis, it should be noted that they are 
connected to the life and ministry of local churches and the 
church universal. Therefore, the program strongly encourages 
involvement of its students in the body of Christ, especially in 
the areas of teaching (which is this program's emphasis). 

9. An interview, either by phone or in person, with the Director of 
Graduate Studies in Religion or a designated faculty member of 
the program. 



128 Lee University 

COMPLETION REQUIREMENTS 

1 . 36 Credit Hours / 48 Credit Hours 

2. Three-six hour thesis. 

Each student will be evaluated by the Director of Graduate Studies 
for his/her readiness for the research and writing required of a the- 
sis. Depending upon a student's abilities and goals, a three hour 
thesis or a six hour thesis will be recommended. Specific informa- 
tion regarding thesis work is available from the Graduate 
Secretary. 

3. Language requirements: Those students whose degree is the M.A. 
in Biblical Studies will complete 6 hours Biblical Greek at the 
Intermediate or Second Year level (or its appropriate substitute). 
Those students whose degree is the M.A. in Theological Studies 
will complete 6 hours of Theological German (or its appropriate 
substitute). Substitutions are granted by the Committee for 
Graduate Studies in Religion. 

4. Maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA throughout the program. 

5. The degree must be completed within four years of its inception. 
Exceptions to this will be evaluated by the M. A. Committee and 
the Director of Graduate Studies in Religion. 

NON-DEGREE SEEKING AND SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students may register for non-degree or special status without 
being formally admitted into candidacy in the M.A. program. Such 
students may take a total of nine credit hours from courses offered in 
the program. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

A student may transfer up to six hours credit from an approved 
graduate institution or seminary. The courses must have been in the 
areas of Bible and/or theology and must be approved by the Director of 
Graduate Studies in Religion. In addition, transfer students need to be 
interviewed by the director before admittance into the program. 

Lee University Graduate Studies in Religion works cooperatively 
with the Church of God Theological Seminary. Therefore, from time 



Lee University 129 

to time, certain courses may be offered through the seminary for credit 
in this program. These are not considered transfer credits, but will be 
viewed as equivalent to those courses offered by Lee University. Only 
specifically designated courses will be allowed such equivalency; they 
will be announced clearly in the course schedules in advance. See the 
Collaborative Statement on page 45. 

MA COMMITTEE FOR THE 

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN BIBLE AND THEOLOGY 

The M.A. Committee for the Graduate Program in Bible and 
Theology oversees the entire course of study for the M.A. in Biblical 
Studies and the M.A. in Theological Studies. The committee considers 
all needed changes and makes recommendations to the Graduate 
Council; it serves as the Admissions Committee and reviews candidacy. 




130 Lee University 

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN MINISTRY 

MASTER OF ARTS IN YOUTH AND FAMILY MINISTRY 

PURPOSE AND PHILOSOPHY OF THE DEGREE 

The Master of Arts degree in Youth and Family Ministry at Lee 
University provides a program of study designed to enable men and 
women to minister effectively to youth and families in the present cul- 
ture. The program is offered in both traditional and non-traditional 
formats. It prepares students in the foundational theory and praxis of 
ministry as well as in the social and psychological contexts of the peo- 
ple to whom they will minister. Interdisciplinary in nature, this pro- 
gram offers youth pastors, pastors, and others interested in youth and 
family relations the foundations and skills of such a ministry. The pro- 
gram is distinctive in that there are very few like it in the United 
States and none offered by a Pentecostal institution. While the degree 
program will provide an academically challenging curriculum, its 
essential focus will be professional rather than academic. 

GOALS OF THE GRADUATE PROGRAM IN MINISTRY 

The overall goal of the program is to provide advanced understand- 
ing of youth and family issues in order to prepare men and women 
seeking long-term professional commitment to youth and/or family 
related ministry. From this broader outcome goal, the following specif- 
ic goals are suggested. Each program goal is matched to related cur- 
riculum and student outcome goals. 

THEOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS 

PROGRAM OUTCOME GOAL #1: 

The M.A. in Youth and Family Ministry Program will provide a 
basic theological framework that will be used to interpret contempo- 
rary issues related to youth and family concerns. 

COURSES RELATED TO THIS GOAL: 

Theological Issues in Youth and Family Ministry 
Foundations of Youth and Family Ministry 
Discipleship 
Principles of Leadership 



Lee University 131 

STUDENT OUTCOME GOALS: 

Students will be able to 

1 . Identify dominant models of youth and family ministry. 

2. Identify/construct a framework for understanding theological 
issues in youth and family ministry. 

3. Discuss, critique, and apply these models of ministry by using 
a theological framework suited for the task. 

4. Articulate and implement a theologically sound, individually 
designed rationale for youth and family ministry. 

BIBLICAL CONSIDERATIONS 

PROGRAM OUTCOME GOAL #2: 

The M.A. in Youth and Family Ministry Program seeks to provide 
•biblical foundations through examination and application of key bibli- 
cal texts related to youth and family concerns. 

COURSES RELATED TO THIS GOAL: 

Inductive Bible Study 
Discipleship 
Principles of Leadership 
Creative Preaching and Teaching 

STUDENT OUTCOME GOALS: 

The student will be able to 

1. Examine and apply principles derived from key biblical texts 
in a variety of educational ministerial settings (e.g., Bible 
study, small groups, preaching, and teaching). 

2. Articulate a plan or rationale for a discipleship program in 
youth and/or family based ministries in a local congregation. 

3. Identify and implement a model of leadership training in a 
local congregation. 

4. Understand and apply various techniques in communicating 
the Gospel through preaching and teaching. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE CONSIDERATIONS: 

PROGRAM OUTCOME GOAL #3: 

The M.A. in Youth and Family Ministry Program will attempt to 
establish, from a social science perspective, key components for under- 
standing and applying theories and methods concerning contemporary 



132 Lee University 



aspects of youth and family. This will be integrated into the ministeri- 
al setting of the student. 

COURSES RELATED TO THIS GOAL: 

Adolescent Development 
Counseling Adolescents 
Family Systems 

STUDENT OUTCOME GOALS: 

A student will be able to 

1. Identify various methods and models for youth and family 
ministry. 

2. Demonstrate an understanding of specific skills related to 
youth ministry (e.g. music ministry, drama ministry, preaching 
to youth, creating disciples of adolescents). 

3. Develop a plan for the implementation of a youth program in a 
local church. 

4. Demonstrate an understanding of specific skills related to fam- 
ily ministry. 

PROGRAM OUTCOME GOAL #4: 

The program for the M.A. in Youth and Family Ministry will pro- 
vide practical skills for ministering to youth and families with the cur- 
rent cultural and social context. 

COURSES RELATED TO THIS GOAL: 

Leadership Dynamics 

Discipleship in Contemporary Culture 

Creative Preaching and Teaching 

Music in Youth Ministry 

Drama in Youth Ministry 

Worship in Youth and Family Ministry 

Parenting Skills 

Communication in the Family 

Legal Issues in Youth Ministry 

STUDENT OUTCOME GOALS: 

Students will be able to 

1. Identify various methods and models for youth and family 
ministry. 



Lee University 133 

2. Demonstrate an understanding of specific skills related to 
youth ministry (e.g. music ministry, drama ministry, preaching 
to youth, creating disciples of adolescents). 

3. Develop a plan for the implementation of a youth program in a 
local church. 

4. Demonstrate an understanding of specific skills related to fam- 
ily ministry. 




134 Lee University 



PROGRAM OF STUDY 

CURRICULUM AND DELIVERY FOR THE 
M.A. IN YOUTH AND FAMILY MINISTRY 

Theological Foundations For Ministry 6 hrs. 

Theological Issues in Youth Ministry 3 hrs. 

Principles of Bible Study 3 hrs. 



Practical Foundations For Ministry 12 hrs. 

Foundations of Youth and Family Ministry 3 hrs. 

Leadership Dynamics & Development 3 hrs. 

Discipleship in Contemporary Culture 3 hrs. 

Creative Preaching and Teaching 3 hrs. 

Social & Developmental Foundations For Ministry 9 hrs. 

Adolescent Development 3 hrs. 

Counseling Adolescents 3 hrs. 

Family Systems 3 hrs. 

Aspects of Ministry: Electives 6 hrs. 

These courses are 1-3 credit hours each. They will be provided through 
Youth Institutes or regular semester classes. 

Music in Youth Ministry 

Youth Ministry Resources 

Drama in Youth Ministry 

Ethics and Legal Issues in Youth Ministry 

Communication in the Family 

Worship in Youth & Family Ministry 

Special Project in Youth & Family Ministry 

Project/Internship 3 hrs. 

TOTAL HOURS IN PROGRAM 36 hrs. 



Lee University 135 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

YFM 501. FOUNDATIONS OF Three hours credit 

YOUTH AND FAMILY MINISTRY 

This course will examine the biblical and theological foundations of the 
family with specific focus on the place of adolescents within the family 
structure. Various models of youth and family ministry will be examined, 
and through the use of lectures, research, and case studies, the student will 
develop a family ministry program which will be applicable in his/her minis- 
terial setting. 

YFM 502. LEADERSHIP DYNAMICS Three hours credit 

AND DEVELOPMENT 

This course will provide an overview of various models of leadership, 
"secular" and "sacred" (e.g. MBO, Servant-leader), and their appropriateness 
for use within a community of faith. Once foundational material is presented, 
an analysis and critique of each model will be provided and will result in the 
student being able to articulate a theology of leadership that is biblically and 
theologically sound. From this basis, students will implement a leadership 
development program in their ministerial settings. 

YFM 503. DISCIPLESHIP IN Three hours credit 

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE 

This course will equip youth leaders for the task of carrying out the Great 
Commission in a postmodern society. Included will be an examination of key 
New Testament texts of discipleship, an identification of vital principles used 
by Christ and the first century church, and a critique of contemporary models. 
Special consideration will be given to the unique challenges presented by con- 
temporary culture. The goal for each student will be to develop a discipleship 
model that will systematically take a student from the initial stage of being 
evangelized through the steps of Christian growth and formation. 

YFM 504. CREATIVE PREACHING Three hours credit 

AND TEACHING 

This course will seek to approach a study of homiletics from a non-tradi- 
tional perspective, while at the same time retaining the integrity of the pul- 
pit. It will integrate various forms of media and styles into sermon prepara- 
tion so the student will be able to communicate the gospel to a wide cross- 
section of people. 

YFM 510. ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT: Three hours credit 

CHANGE AND CONTINUITY 

This course is an examination of the developmental phenomena of ado- 
lescence, its physiological, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual dimensions, and 



136 Lee University 



the influence of context such as family, peers, schools, and community. 
Consideration of the needs of youth and interacting societal institutions, with 
a focus on continuity of development as viewed within the framework of life- 
span development will be studied. 

YFM 555. THEOLOGICAL ISSUES IN YOUTH Three hours credit 

AND FAMILY MINISTRY 

This course will provide students with an overview of the task of theolo- 
gy as it relates to the ministry of the church. It will focus on several issues of 
particular importance to youth and families, offering a theological basis and 
dialogue for each issue. Some issues and their concomitant theological areas 
that may be investigated are the following: human personality and theological 
anthropology; sexuality and a theology of sex ; estrangement and a theology of 
reconciliation; abuse/disorders/violence and a theology of wholeness of life; 
suffering and a theology of suffering; school related issues and a theology of 
learning; and other miscellaneous issues that may arise. 

YFM 556. PRINCIPLES OF BIBLE STUDY Three hours credit 

This course is designed to prepare students for personal and small group 
Bible study, using the inductive method. Emphasis will be on learning the 
method for studying a book of the Bible and on delivery of that information to a 
small group. Some consideration will be given to Bible study for youth groups. 

YFM 557/PSY 557. FAMILY SYSTEMS Three hours credit 

An introduction to general systems theory. Special attention is given to 
the history of marriage and family therapy and the basic theories of and models 
of family interaction. Implication for interactional patterns, functional and 
dysfunctional family systems, life cycle issues, and ethnicity are discussed. 

YFM 561/PSY 561. COUNSELING ADOLESCENTS Three hours credit 

An examination of the interpersonal dynamics of adolescents who come 
to counselors for help due to the severity of their spiritual, emotional, motiva- 
tional, behavioral, and adjustment problems. Counseling procedures for nor- 
mal developmental concerns and issues of adolescents, as well as clinical pro- 
cedures, treatment methods, and counseling approaches for the more resistant 
and recalcitrant youth will be covered. 

YFM 590. PROJECT/INTERNSHIP Three hours credit 

Information regarding the project or internship may be obtained from the 
Office of Graduate Studies in Religion. 



Lee University 137 

ELECTIVES 

All electives are variable credit, depending upon the length of the course 
and the requirements for the particular session that it occurs. Schedules will 
post whether the credit will be one or two hours. Usually, these electives will 
occur during Youth & Family Ministry Institutes. 

YFM 530. MUSIC IN YOUTH MINISTRY One-Two hours credit 

This course will examine the relationships that exist between music and 
adolescent culture and how these relationships are presented through various 
forms of media (e.g. pop teen magazines, MTV). The course will then proceed 
to develop an understanding of the theological implications of music - secular 
and sacred. Various pieces of music (printed and audio) will be critiqued, ana- 
lyzing lyrics, tempo, style, etc., for message content and cultural impact. 

YFM 531. DRAMA IN YOUTH MINISTRY One-Two hours credit 

This course presents an overview of several components of drama min- 
istry, including acting, staging, and casting, with primary attention given to 
the basic features of a drama ministry. Included will be an examination of the 
increased use of drama in church settings and how drama in youth ministry 
can be used as a tool for evangelism and discipleship. Students will be expect- 
ed to participate in impromptu skits and in class presentations of various 
forms of drama. A plan for implementing their discoveries in drama ministry 
will be developed for their own ministerial setting. Resources for drama min- 
istry will also be considered. 

YFM 535. YOUTH AND FAMILY One hour credit 

MINISTRY RESOURCES 

This course explores the numerous resources available to youth 
pastors/leaders and their ministries in the areas of leadership training, education 
in youth culture, mentoring, funding, music ministry, drama ministry, personal 
enrichment, speakers, student missions, retreat and camping sites, curriculum, 
preaching and teaching aids, ideas, games, crowdbreakers and more. In addition, 
consideration will be given to the funding of a youth ministry. 

YFM 536. ETHICS AND LEGAL ISSUES One-Two hours credit 

IN YOUTH MINISTRY 

This course concentrates on critical ethical and legal issues that concern 
all youth leaders - paid or volunteer. Particular attention will be given to 
appropriate conduct, issues of accountability, preventive safeguards, current 
statutes, and relevant case studies. 



138 Lee University 



YFM 538. WORSHIP IN YOUTH AND Three hours credit 

FAMILY MINISTRY 

A biblical and theological rationale for worship will be given as a founda- 
tion for this course. In addition, students will examine various ways in which 
worship can be incorporated into youth ministry. This course will consider 
traditional aspects of worship as related to youth and family ministry. 
Students will be expected to develop a series of worship events that will incor- 
porate both traditional and non-traditional aspects of worship. 

YFM 539. PARENTING SKILLS One-Two hours credit 

This course will focus on developing skills for Christian parenting, espe- 
cially focusing on the adult-adolescent relationship. In addition, students will 
be trained how to set up parenting seminars and training in their local church- 
es. An examination of family relations, family communication, discipline, 
and conflict resolution will also be a part of this course. Resources for parent- 
ing will be examined. 

YFM 540. COMMUNICATION IN One-Two hours credit 

THE FAMILY 

This course will examine the skill of communication with particular atten- 
tion given to patterns of communication within family culture. Consideration 
will be given to healthy and unhealthy styles of communication as well as to 
the development of the skills needed for constructive communication within a 
family system. 

* The following three courses may be taken for elective credit as well, but 
since they are more like directed study no more than three hours total may 
be taken for elective credit. 

YFM 541.* SPECIAL TOPICS IN YOUTH & 

FAMILY MINISTRY One credit hour 

A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic will 
change to meet student demand and interest. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
Director of Graduate Studies in Religion. 

YFM 542/ SPECIAL TOPICS IN YOUTH & 

FAMILY MINISTRY Two credit hours 

A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic will 
change to meet student demand and interest. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
Director of Graduate Studies in Religion. 

YFM 543. * SPECIAL TOPICS IN YOUTH & 

FAMILY MINISTRY Three credit hours 

A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic will 
change to meet student demand and interest. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
Director of Graduate Studies in Religion. 



Lee University 139 



YFM 590. FINAL PROJECT Three credit hours 

This course is intended as a final research project within the MAYFM 
program. Students will research a specific area within youth and/or family 
ministry and provide evidence of biblical, theological, or social science 
research. In addition, students will prepare a project presentation based on the 
questions raised by the foundational research. 

YFM 593. INTERNSHIP Three credit hours 

This course is designed for students who have not had practical experi- 
ence in youth and family ministry. It may be done in lieu of a final project so 
that students may experience supervised ministry with youth and families. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. There are two levels of admissions status. The first level is for 
those who have a bachelor's degree in religion, theology, Bible, 
or practical ministry areas from an accredited college or univer- 
sity. The second level is for those who have a bachelor's degree 
in an area other than those listed above. 

2. Applicants with a bachelor's degree in religion or practical min- 
istry areas from an accredited university, college, or Bible col- 
lege, may apply for acceptance into the first level of admission. 
This level requires 36 hours for completion as outlined in the 
Program of Study cited above. Accreditation must be from a 
regional accrediting association or from AABC (Accrediting 
Association of Bible Colleges). If the applicant's education is 
from outside the United States, each applicant's transcripts and 
status of his/her school will be evaluated by the admissions 
committee and the Director of Graduate Studies in Religion. It 
is preferred that schools from outside the United States be 
accredited in some formal fashion by their country. 

3. Applicants without a bachelor's degree in religion or practical 
ministry areas may apply for acceptance into the second level of 
admission. This level requires up to 48 hours for completion. 
The Director of Graduate Studies in Religion may require as 
many as 12 hours of work in biblical, theological, historical, or 
practical studies at the graduate level (500 level). The Director 
will prepare a plan of courses for the applicant in order to make 



140 Lee University 



up for any deficiencies in his/her religion background. Students 
admitted at this second level will take the same 36 hours as 
those admitted at the first level, but will also take courses 
along with these in order to provide a deeper background in reli- 
gious studies. 

Applicants who believe they can demonstrate equivalency for 
religious work or study should petition the Director of 
Graduate Studies in Religion for consideration. It should be 
noted that in no case does Lee University grant life experience 
as "credit" for coursework. However, in the case of work prepa- 
ration for deepening one's background in religious studies, con- 
sideration may be given to a student's proposal to consider 
some aspect of his/her work or ministry as equivalent to cours- 
es in this second level. 

4. Official undergraduate and graduate transcripts of credit earned 
at all institutions of higher education. 

5. GRE (Graduate Record Exam) or the MAT (Miller Analogies 
Test) scores are required. The results should be sent to the 
office of Graduate Studies in Religion. 

6. A preferred G.RA. of 3.0 in undergraduate studies. 

In addition to two letters of reference from professors familiar with 
your work, a letter of reference from your pastor or ministry supervi- 
sor is required. 

If an applicant is currently a youth pastor or a minister in a staff 
position, he/she must obtain written acknowledgment and approval 
from the ministry supervisor before entering this program. 

7. An essay of about 1000 words which will provide the Director of 
Graduate Studies in Religion and the Admissions Committee with 
a description of the candidate's future goals. Included in the essay 
should be a discussion of the following components: 

a. a description of one's calling 

b. a summary of one's past and current involvement in the 
life of the local church 

c. future ministry goals with the use of this degree 



Lee University 141 

8. An interview, either by phone or in person, with the Director of 
Graduate Studies in Religion or a designated faculty member of the 
program. 

COMPLETION REQUIREMENTS 

1. 36 credit hours / 48 credit hours. 

2. Three hour project. 

3. A minimum 3.0 [B] GPA throughout the program. 

4. The degree must be completed within 6 years of its inception. 
Exceptions to this will be evaluated by the M.A. Committee in 

• Religion and the Director of Graduate Studies in Religion. 

NON-DEGREE SEEKING AND SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students may register for non-degree or special status without 
being formally admitted into candidacy in the M.A. in Youth and 
Family Ministry Program. Such students may take a total of nine cred- 
it hours from courses offered in the program. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

A student may transfer up to six credit hours from an approved 
graduate institution or seminary. The courses must have been in 
areas related to the curriculum of the program and must be approved 
by the Director of Graduate Studies in Religion. In addition, transfer 
students need to be interviewed by the director before admittance into 
the program. 

Lee University Graduate Studies in Religion works cooperatively 
with the Church of God Theological Seminary. Therefore, from time 
to time certain courses offered at the seminary may fit our program 
and students will be able to take these courses as if they were taken at 
the university (in other words, not as transfer credit). Courses taken at 
the seminary for equivalent credit at the university must be approved 
by the Director before students take them. See Collaborative 
Statement on page 45. 



142 



Lee University 



THE MA COMMITTEE FOR THE 
GRADUATE PROGRAM IN MINISTRY 

The M.A. Committee forms the Admissions Committee for this 
program. It also oversees the program and its development, offering 
changes to the Graduate Council of the university. 




Lee University 143 

THE ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 
OF LEE UNIVERSITY 

The guidance, instruction, and assistance you will receive at Lee 
will come primarily from the people listed on the following pages. 
Each member of the faculty, administration, and staff possesses great 
individual devotion to Lee University and our students. Whether con- 
versing with you over coffee in the Student Center, assisting you with 
your career planning, or working behind the scenes insuring the 
smooth operation of the school, you will find the Lee University fami- 
ly's devotion genuine and contagious. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Raymond F. Culpepper, Chair Birmingham, Alabama 

Bill F. Sheeks, Executive Liaison Cleveland, Tennessee 

Cecil N. Brown Kennesaw, Georgia 

Patricia Carroll Ft. Myers, Florida 

Raymond Crowley Chincoteague, Virginia 

H. Bernard Dixon Cleveland, Tennessee 

Bill W. Higginbotham Norman, Oklahoma 

Edward E. Hollowell Raleigh, North Carolina 

B. Kenneth "Deacon" Jones Smithfield, North Carolina 

Dennis Livingston Matthews, North Carolina 

Stephen L. Lowery Ft. Washington, Maryland 

Ronald D. Martin Arvada, Colorado 

N. Don Medlin Caruthersville, Missouri 

Quan L. Miller Cocoa, Florida 

M. Darrell Rice Chicago, Illinois 

Samuel Robeff High Point, North Carolina 

Gary Sharp Hendersonville, Tennessee 

Lee Storms Ft. Mill, South Carolina 

John B. White West Palm Beach, Florida 



PRESIDENT 

Charles Paul Conn, Ph.D., President 
B.A., Lee College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Emory University 



144 Lee University 



CABINET 



Carolyn Dirksen, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs 
B.A., M.A., Northern Arizona University,- 
Ph.D., University of Arizona 

Dale W. Gofi, M.S., Vice President for Institutional Advancement 
B.S., Lee College; 
M.S., University of Tennessee 

Walter C. Mauldin, D.M.A., Vice President for Student Life 

B.M.E., Lee College,- M.M., University of Southern Mississippi; 
D.M.A., University of Miami 

David M. Painter, M.B.A., Vice President for Business and Finance 
B.S., Tennessee Wesley an College,- 
M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

Gary T. Ray, M.Ed., Vice President for Enrollment Management 
B.S., Lee College,- M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

ACADEMIC DEANS 

Jerome Boone, D.Min., Dean, School of Religion 
B.A., Lee College,- 
M.A., Wheaton College; 
Th.M., D.Min., Columbia Theological Seminary 

Jim W. Burns, D.M.A., Interim Dean, School of Music 
B.C.M., Lee College; 
M.C.M., D.M.A., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Deborah Murray, Ed.D., Dean, Helen DeVos College of Education 
B.S., Lee College; 
M.S., Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 



Lee University 145 



Dewayne Thompson, D.B.A., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
B.S., Lee College,- 

M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University; 
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University 

GRADUATE PROGRAM DIRECTORS 

Jim W. Burns, D.M.A., Director, Graduate Studies in Music 
B.C.M., Lee College; 
M.C.M., D.M.A., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Terry L. Cross, Ph.D., Director, Graduate Studies in Religion and 
Associate Dean, School of Religion 
B.A., Lee College; 

M.A., M.Div., Ashland Theological Seminary; 
Th.M., Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary 

Doyle R. Goff, Ph.D., Director, Graduate Studies in Counseling 
B.A., M.S., Florida International University; 
Ph.D., Florida State University 

Gary L. Riggins, Ed.D., Director, Graduate Studies in Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Georgia Southern University,- 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

GRADUATE COUNCIL 

Jerome Boone, D.Min., Dean, School of Religion 
B.A., Lee College,- 
M.A., Wheaton College,- 
Th.M., D.Min., Columbia Theological Seminary 

Donald N. Bowdle, Ph.D., Professor of History and Religion 
B.A., Lee College; M.A., Ph.D., Bob Jones University,- 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
Th.M., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 

Jim W. Burns, D.M.A., Director, Graduate Studies in Music 
B.C.M., Lee College; 
M.C.M., D.M.A., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 



146 Lee University 



Terry L. Cross, Ph.D., Director, Graduate Studies in Religion and 
Associate Dean, School of Religion 
B.A., Lee College; 

M.A., M.Div., Ashland Theological Seminary; 
Th.M., Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary 

Carolyn Dirksen, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs 
B.A., M.A., Northern Arizona University; 
Ph.D., University of Arizona 

Murl Dirksen, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Behavioral and 
Social Sciences 

B.A., M.A.T., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Doyle R. Goff, Ph.D., Director, Graduate Studies in 
Counseling Psychology 
B.A., M.S., Florida International University,- 
Ph.D., Florida State University 

Ollie J. Lee (1967], Distinguished Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Berea College; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Deborah Murray, Ed.D., Dean, Helen DeVos College of Education 
B.S., Lee College,- 
M.S., Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Gary L. Riggins, Ed.D., Director, Graduate Studies in Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Georgia Southern University,- 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Dewayne Thompson, D.B.A., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
B.S., Lee College,- M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University,- 
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University 

GRADUATE FACULTY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Laura Anderson (1996), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A., M.A., Furman University; 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 



Lee University 147 



Mark Bailey (1989), Associate Professor of Music 
B.M.E., Lee College; 
M.M., Wright State University,- 
D.M.E., University of Cincinnati 

Robert E. Barnett (1995), Associate Professor of History 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech University 

Bob R. Bayles (1994), Assistant Professor of Christian Education 
B.A., East Coast Bible College; 
M.Div., Church of God School of Theology,- 
Ph.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

Donald N. Bowdle (1962), Professor of History and Religion 
B.A., Lee College; M.A., Ph.D., Bob Jones University; 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia 

Pamela G. Browning (1989), Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., Lee College; M.A., University of South Florida,- 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Jim W. Burns (1967), Professor of Music 
B.C.M., Lee College; 
M.C.M., D.M.A., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Charles Paul Conn (1970), Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Lee College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Emory University 

Terry L. Cross (1997), Associate Professor of Theology and Philosophy 
B.A., Lee College; 

M.A., M.Div., Ashland Theological Seminary,- 
Th.M., Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary 

Carolyn Dirksen (1968), Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Northern Arizona University; 
Ph.D., University of Arizona 

Murl Dirksen (1972), Professor of Anthropology and Sociology 
B.A., M.A.T., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,- 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 



148 Lee University 



Evaline Echols (1984), Professor of Business Education 
B.S., Lee College,- 

M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

William E. Estes (1998), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Wheaton College,- M.S.E., University of Central Arkansas; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Robert W. Fisher (1983), Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Lee College,- 
M.Ed., Georgia State University,- 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Doyle R. Goff (1987), Professor of Psychology 
B.A., M.S., Florida International University; 
Ph.D., Florida State University 

Robert Graham (1997), Associate Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Lee College; M.S., Miami University,- 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Jo Ann Higginbotham (1981), Professor of Education 
B.S., Tennessee Technological University; 
M.Ed., Ed.S., D.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

Daniel Hoffman (1994), Associate Professor of History 
B.A., Moody Bible Institute,- B.S.Ed., Miami University; 
M.A., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; 
Ph.D., Miami University 

David Horton (1969), Professor of Music 
B.M.E., University of Southern Mississippi; 
Ph.D., George Peabody College for Teachers 

Vernon M. Kraus (2000), Assistant Professor of Special Education 
B.S., Southwest Missouri University; 
M.S., Arkansas State University; 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 

Ollie f. Lee (1967), Distinguished Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Berea College; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



Lee University 149 



Walter C. Mauldin (1989), Professor of Music 
B.M.E., Lee College,- 

M.M., University of Southern Mississippi; 
D.M.A., University of Miami 

Nadine McHugh (1995), Associate Professor of Special Education 
B.S., Mankato State University; 
M.A., University of Northern Colorado,- 
Ed.D., University of South Dakota 

Trevor Milliron (1998), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,- 
M.A., Ph.D., Fuller Theological Seminary 

Karen Carroll Mundy (1979), Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Lee College,- 
M.A., Ph. D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Deborah Murray (1980), Professor of Education 
B.S., Lee College,- 
M.S., Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

George Nerren (2002), Professor of Education 
B.S., Northrop University; 
M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Emerson Powery (1996), Assistant Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Lee College; M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Gary L. Riggins (1992), Professor of Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Georgia Southern University; 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

David Roebuck (1991), Assistant Professor of Religion and 
Director of Dixon Pentecostal Resource Center 
B.A., West Coast Christian College; 
M.Div., Church of God School of Theology; 
M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 



150 Lee University 

William A. Simmons (1986), Associate Professor of New Testament 
B. A., Lee College; M. A., Church of God School of Theology,- 
M.Div., Ashland Theological Seminary,- 
Ph.D., University of St. Andrews, Scotland 

H. Edward Stone (1998), Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology 
B.A., Lee College,- 
M.Ed., Georgia State University; 
Ph.D., University of Alabama 

Donna Summerlin (1988), Associate Professor of English 
B.A., Lee College; 

M.A., M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,- 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Phillip E. Thomas (1977), Professor of Music 

B.A., Lee College; M.M., Peabody Conservatory of Music; 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Dewayne Thompson (1981), Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., Lee College; M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University,- 
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University 

Sabord Woods (1966-68, 1969), Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Georgia Southern College; 
M.A., Church of God Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

ASSOCIATE GRADUATE FACULTY 

Frances L. Arrington (1953-57, 1964), Professor and 
Director of Squires Library 
B.S., Jacksonville State College,- 
M.A'jL.S.), George Peabody College for Teachers 

Jerome Boone (1976), Professor of Old Testament and 
Christian Formation 
B.A., Lee College; 
M.A., Wheaton College; 
Th.M., D.Min., Columbia Theological Seminary 



Lee University 151 



Michael C. Brownlee (1980-82, 1983), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M.E., Lee College,- 
M.M., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Herbert G. Cannon (2000), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., Lee College,- 
M.Ed., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

Dale M. Coulter (1999), Instructor in Theology 

B.A., Lee College; M.Div., Reformed Theological Seminary 

Jerald J. Daffe (1987), Professor of Pastoral Ministries 
B.A., Northwest Bible College; 
M.A., Wheaton College; 
D.Min., Western Conservative Baptist Seminary 

Michael E. Fuller (2000), Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies 
B.A., Lee College; M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary 

Carlanna Gill (1992), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S.E., University of Arkansas,- 
M.Ed., Northeast Louisiana University 

Virginia Horton (1979), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M.E., University of Southern Mississippi; 
M.M.E., George Peabody College for Teachers 

Philip Morehead (1966), Associate Professor of Music 
B.M., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,- 
M.M., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 

Frank Walker (1994), Assistant Professor of Accounting 
B.S., University of Tennessee at Martin,- 
M.Div., Mid- America Baptist Theological Seminary,- 
M.B.A., University of Tennessee at Knoxville 



152 Lee University 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Courtney Ashley-Wilkes, B.A Assistant Director of Admissions 

Phillip Barber, B.A Director of Student Records and Registrar 

Bruce Bonham, B.S Director of Physical Plant 

Marsha Brantley, B.S Director for Commuter/ 

Non-Traditional Students 

Kevin Brooks, B.S Director of Alumni Relations 

Tracey Carlson, B.A Director of Residential Life 

Larry Carpenter, B.S Athletic Director 

Dara Carroll, M.A Director of Special Academic Projects 

Virgil Clark Director of Campus Safety 

Phillip Cook, M.Div Director of Admissions 

Suzy Deaton, B.S Director of Academic Services 

John B. Dixon, M.B.A Director of Information Systems 

Michael Ellis, M.A Director of Student Financial Aid 

Gayle Gallaher, Ph.D Director of Academic Support Programs 

Ronald Gilbert, M.Ed Video Coordinator 

Nadine Goff, B.M.E Director of Music Events 

Jennifer Griffin, B.S Assistant Director of Admissions 

Suzanne Hamid, M.A Director of First-Year Programs 

Vanessa Hammond, M.A Director of Grants 

Jimmy Harper, M.Div Campus Pastor and 

Director of Campus Ministries 

Mike Hayes, M.A Director of Student Development 

Kevin Hudson, B.S Director of Intramurals and Recreation 

Tracey James, B.S Assistant Director of Financial Aid 

Keith LeCroy, B.S Associate Director of Business and Finance 

Gail Lemmert, M.A Director of Counseling and Testing 

Kelly Lumpkin, M.S Head Athletic Trainer 

Marian Malone-Huffman, M.Ed. . .Associate Director of Financial Aid 

Alan McClung, M.A Dean of Students 

Danny Murray, B.A Director of Church Relations 

Taz Randies, M.Ed Counselor 

Anita Ray, B.S Director of Human Resources 

Tonia Schuman, B.S Director of Health Services 

Kathy Sirnmons, M.Ed Director of Teagle Project 

George Starr Director of Sports Information 

Stephanie Taylor, B.A Administrative Assistant to the President 

J.B. VanHook, M.A Director of Institutional Research 



Lee University 1 53 

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 
2002 - 2003 

FALL SEMESTER 2002 

AUGUST 

3 Summer residence halls close 

6-7 Gateway Retreat 

12-13 New Faculty Orientation 

12-13 Student Leadership Development Conference 

14-16 University Faculty Seminar 

16 Residence hall check-in for new students 

17-18 New Student and Parent Orientation 

18 Residence hall check-in for returning students, 10:00 a.m. 

19-20 New student advising and registration 

20-21 Registration for returning students 

Registration for students receiving VA benefits 
22 Classes begin 

22 Opening Chapel 

27 December Graduation Applicants: Graduation applica- 

tions due (applications received after this date will include 
a late fee) 

SEPTEMBER 

2 Final day to register or add class 

9 Final day for completion of External Studies by 

Resident students 
9 May Graduation Applicants: Graduation Applications due 

13 Final day to apply for admission to student teaching for 

spring 
26 & 28 Academic Profile Assessment Test 

27 December Graduation Applicants: Due date for grades to 

be posted for course work with External Studies, Transfer 
courses, and removal of "I" grades 
27-29 Parents' Weekend 

OCTOBER 

6-10 Fall Convocation 

17-18 Fall Break 

18 Offices closed 

21 Classes resume, 8:00 a.m. 

25 July Graduation Applicants: Graduation applications due 

29 Final day to drop a class with a grade of "W" 



154 



Lee University 



NOVEMBER 

1-2 
5 

7-15 
20-22 

21-22 



Homecoming 

VP for Academics posts December Graduation 

candidate list 

Pre-Registration for Spring/Summer semesters 

Thanksgiving Holidays 

Offices closed 



DECEMBER 

5 Final day to withdraw from the University 

6-11 Final Examinations 

7 Lee University Employee Christmas Banquet 

13 Graduation: Commissioning 

14 Graduation: Commencement 
14 Residence Halls close, 9:00 a.m. 

20- Jan 1 University closed for Christmas holidays 

SPRING SEMESTER 2003 



JANUARY 

2 
8-9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14-15 

16 
16 
20 

24 
28 

29 

FEBRUARY 

9-13 
14 

20&22 
28 



Offices reopen 

Faculty Seminar 

Department/school faculty meetings 

Opening of Residence halls, 9:00 a.m. 

New Student and Parent Orientation 

New Student Advising and Registration 

Registration for returning students 

Registration for students receiving VA Benefits 

Classes begin 

Opening Chapel 

May Graduation applicants: Graduation applications due 

(applications received after this date will include a late fee) 

Final day a student may register or add a class 

Final day for completion of External Studies by Resident 

students 

Final day to apply for student teaching for the Fall semester 



Winter Convocation 

July Graduation applications: Graduation applications due 

(applications received after this date will include a late fee] 

Major Field Assessment test 

May Graduation Applicants: Due date for grades to be 

posted for course work with External Studies, Transfer 

courses, and removal of "I" grades 



Lee University 155 



MARCH 



5-7 Music Explosion 

10-14 Spring Break 

14 Offices closed 

17 Classes resume, 8:00 a.m. 



APRIL 



2 Final day to drop a class with a grade of "W" 

3-11 Pre-Registration Summer/Fall Semesters 

8 VP for Academics posts May Graduation candidate list 

8 Honors Chapel 
11-12 Lee Day Weekend 

14 Priority deadline for Financial Aid application 
17-21 Easter Break 

18 Offices closed 

22 Classes resume, 7:45 a.m. 

MAY 

1 Final day to withdraw from the University 

1-6 Final Examinations 

9 Graduation: Commissioning 
10 Graduation: Commencement 

10 Residence halls close, 9:00 a.m. 

SUMMER SESSIONS 2003 

FIRST SUMMER SESION: MAY 12 - JUNE 6 

12-13 Faculty Seminar 

12 Registration for Summer Session I 

13 Classes Begin Summer Session I 

15 Final day to register or add a class for SS I 
19-30 Faith/Learning Seminar 

26 Final day to drop a class with grade of " W" for SS I 

JUNE 2003 

6 Summer Session I: Final Examinations 

SECOND SESSION: JUNE 6 - JULY 3 

6 July Graduation Applicants: Due date for grades to be 
posted for course work with External Studies, Transfer 
courses, and removal of "I" grades 

9 Registration and Classes begin for Summer Session II 

1 1 Last day to register or add a class for SS II 
12-15 Music, Art and Drama Camp 

23 Last day to drop a class with a grade of "W" for SS II 
30-July 1 1 Summer Honors 



156 



Lee University 



JULY 2003 

1 VP for Academics posts July Graduation candidate list 

3 Summer Session II: Final Examinations 

4 Holiday 

THIRD SESSION: JULY 7 - AUGUST 2 

7 Registration and Classes begin for Summer Session III 

9 Last day to register or add a class for SS III 

21 Last day to drop a class with a grade of "W" for SS III 

31 Summer Session III: Final Examinations 



AUGUST 

1 
2 
2 



Graduation: Commissioning 
Graduation: Commencement 
Summer Residence halls close 




' ■''■■' ■■■■■ 

■■-■■■.-<:... '"-*m. 



48. «»*.. "^ *%8&l 



Lee University 157 



CONTACT INFORMATION 
FOR GRADUATE STUDIES 

Graduate Program Directors 

Dr. Jim Burns 

Director, Graduate Studies in Music 

Curtsinger Music Building 

Suite #4, Office A 

Telephone: 423-614-8245 

E-mail: jburns@leeuniversity.edu 

Dr. Terry Cross 

Director, Graduate Studies in Religion 

Vest Building 204A 

Telephone: 423-614-8141 

E-mail: tcross@leeuniversity.edu 

Dr. Doyle Goff 

Director, Graduate Studies in Counseling 

Behavioral & Social Sciences Building 201 

Telephone: 423-614-8126 

E-mail: drgoff@leeuniversity.edu 

Dr. Gary Riggins 

Director, Graduate Studies in Education 

Education Building 230 

Telephone 423-614-8184 

E-mail: griggins@leeuniversity.edu 

Mailing Address: 

Lee University 

1120 Ocoee Street NW 

P.O. Box 3450 

Cleveland, TN 37320-3450 



158 Lee University 



INDEX 



Academic Deans 144 

Academic Disqualification 42 

Academic Policies . .41 

Academic Probation 42 

Accreditation 12 

Administration 143 

Administrative Staff 152 

Admissions 25 

Admissions Testing 27 

Associate Graduate Faculty 150 

Athletics 36 

Auditing 41 

Calendar 153 

Campus Safety 38 

Career Services 36 

Change of Program 26 

Chapel 36 

Collaborative Statement 45 

College of Arts & Sciences 48 

Commuter Services 37 

Computers 24 

Confidentiality of Student Records 44 

Contact Information 157 

Counseling 35 

Counseling, Testing and Career Services 35 

Course Numbering System 41 

Criteria for Admissions 25 

Curriculum Library 24 

Deferred-Payment Plan 31 

Discounts 30 

Employer- Assisted Enrollments .33 

Employment 34 

Faith Statement 16 

Financial Aid 33 

Financial Information 29 

Grading . v . 41 

Graduate Assistantships and Scholarships 34 

Graduate Council 145 

Graduate Faculty 20, 147 

Graduate Program Directors 145 

Graduate Studies 19 

Group Discounts 33 

Health Clinic 37 

Helen DeVos College of Education 72 

Institutional Goals 15 



Lee University 159 



International Students 26 

Intramurals 37 

Itemized Expenses: Full-time Students 29 

Itemized Expenses: Part-time Students 30 

Library 22 

Lifestyle Expectations 36 

Lifetime Learning Credits 34 

Master of Arts in Biblical Studies 113 

Admission Requirements 125 

Bible and Theology Graduate Committee 129 

Completion Requirements 128 

Course Descriptions 118 

Level One Admission Requirements 116 

Level Two Admission Requirements 116 

Non-degree Seeking Students 128 

Philosophy 113 

Program Goals 114 

Programs of Studies 116 

Purpose 113 

Special Students 128 

Student Goals 114 

Transfer Credit 128 

Master of Arts in Teaching 73 

Admission Requirements 77 

Assumptions 74 

Completion Requirements 78 

Conceptual Framework 75 

Course Descriptions 88 

Course Requirements 80 

Education Graduate Committee 94 

Outcomes 74 

Program Model 76 

Statement of Purpose 73 

Master of Arts in Theological Studies 113 

Admission Requirements 125 

Bible and Theology Graduate Committee 129 

Completion Requirements 128 

Course Descriptions 118 

Level One Admission Requirements 116 

Level Two Admission Requirements 116 

Non-degree Seeking Students 128 

Philosophy 113 

Program Goals 114 

Programs of Studies 116 

Purpose 113 

Special Students 128 

Student Goals 114 



160 Lee University 



Transfer Credit 128 

Master of Arts in Youth and Family Ministry 130 

Admission Requirements 139 

Biblical Considerations 131 

Completion Requirements 141 

Course Descriptions 135 

Non-degree Seeking Students 141 

Philosophy 130 

Program Goals 130 

Program of Study 134 

Purpose 130 

Social Science Considerations 131 

Special Students 141 

Theological Considerations 130 

Transfer Credit 141 

Youth and Family Ministry Graduate Committee 142 

Master of Church Music 96 

Admission Requirements 97 

Completion Requirements 101 

Course Descriptions 105 

Final Project Committee 102 

Music Graduate Committee Ill 

National Association of Schools of Music 97 

Non-degree Seeking Status 100 

Program Outcomes 96 

Program of Study 102 

Statement of Purpose 96 

Transfer Students 102 

Master of Education 73 

Admission Requirements 77 

Assumptions 74 

Completion Requirements 78 

Conceptual Framework 75 

Course Descriptions 88 

Course Requirements 80 

Education Graduate Committee 94 

Outcomes 74 

Program Model 76 

Statement of Purpose 73 

Master of Science in Counseling Psychology 49 

Admission Requirements 62 

Clinical Experiences 55 

Course Descriptions 66 

Ethical Standards 65 

Graduate Committee 71 

Internship 55 

Liability Insurance 56 



Lee University 161 



Manual 55 

Non-degree Status 64 

Practicum 55 

Program Goals 50 

Program Objectives 51 

Program of Studies 52 

Required Courses 53 

Statement of Purpose 49 

Transfer Credit 64 

Two-year Curriculum 54 

Master of Science in School Counseling 49 

Admission Requirements 62 

Clinical Experiences 61 

Course Descriptions 66 

Ethical Standards 65 

Graduate Committee 71 

Internship 61 

Manual 62 

Non-degree Status , 64 

Practicum 61 

Program Goals 50 

Program Objectives 57 

Program of Studies 58 

Required Courses 59 

Statement of Purpose 56 

Transfer Credit 64 

Two-Year Curriculum 60 

Media Resources 23 

Mission Statement 12 

Music Fees 30 

Music Resource Center 23 

Policy Regarding False Information 26 

Project Statement 45 

Recreation and Fitness 37 

Refund Policy 32 

Residential Life 35 

School of Music 95 

School of Religion 112 

Settlement of Accounts 31 

Special Fees 29 

Stafford Loans 33 

Statements of Compliance 21 

Student Development 35 

Student Grievances and Appeals 38 

Study Load 41 

Summer School 30 

Testing 35 



162 Lee University 

Theses Policies 46 

Thesis Statement 45 

Time Limits 42 

Transcripts 43 

Transfer Credit 41 

Withdrawal from Courses 43 

Withdrawing from the University 42 



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