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B 463451 



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NE 



SUI 



INDREDi 



Vol.: 



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NEW YORK 



LEGISLATIVE DOCUMENTS 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FOURTH SESSION 



1921 



VOL.XIII—NOS. 47-48— PART 1 




ALBANY 

J. B. LYON COMPANY. PRINTERS 

1921 



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STATE OF NEW YORK 

PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION 

FOR THE FIRST DISTRICT 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1920 



ALFRED M. BARRETTt 

MORGAN T. DONNELLY, 

Deputy CoaunlHioficr 
CHARLES V. HALLEY, JR., 

Deputy Gwimtiaionef 
TERENCE FARLEY, 

Couiuel 
JABAES B. WALKER, 

SecMtary 



Rq>ort and Appendix 



TRANSMITTED TO THE LEGISLATURE JANUARY 10, 1921 



ALBANY 
;. B. LYON COMPANY, PRINTHRS 
t 93 f 



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Exchange 
N w YcHk 
State Library 



STATE OF NEW YORK 

Public Sebvicb Commission fob the Fiest Distbiot 

New Yoek, January 10, 1921 

Honorable Jeremiah Wood, President of the Senate 
Honorable H. Edmund Machoij>, Speaker of the Assembly 

SiBs: The Public Service CommisBion for the First District 
of the State of New York herewith transmits to the L^slature 
its report for the year endod Deoember 31, 1920. 

Respectfully, 

ALFRED M. BARRETT, 

Commissioner. 
[3] 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAOB 

Chapter I. General 7 

II. Litigation 37 

III. Formal Cases Relating to Transportaticm, Heat, Light and Power 

Companies 51 

IV. Regulation of Transportation Corporations 84 

V. Labor Disputes 112 

VI. Franchise and Tariff Bureaus 118 

VII. Capitalisation of Public UtiUties 123 

VIII. Equipment Inspection, Etc 132 

IX. Regulation of Light, Heat and Power Corporations 153 

Appendi.x: Statistics of Public Service Corporations, prepared by the Bureau 

of Statistics and Accounts 177 

(For Analysis of Contents, see page 179.) 
[5] 



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CHAPTER I 



GENERAL 



New York City, January 10, 1921. 

To the Honorable the Legislature of the Staie of New York: 

The Public Service Commiaaion for the Fii»t District herewith 
presentB to the Legislature its Fourteenth Annual Report, for the 
year ended December 31, 1920. At the opening of the year the 
Commission was constituted m follows: Commissioner, Lewis 
Nixon; Deputy Commiesioners, Edward J. Glennon, Alfred M. 
Barrett and Morgan T. Donnelly. On April 26, 1920i, Deputy 
Commissioner Gleimon resigned, owing to hia appointmemt by the 
Governor as Justice of the Supreme Court, On April 26, 1920, 
Commissioner Nixon appointed Charles V. Halley, Jr., in his 
place. On November 4, 1920, CommisBioner Nixon resigned, 
and on Novemiber 6, 1920, tihe Governor appointed' Deputy Com- 
missioner Barrett to succeed him. At the oloee of the year, there- 
fore, the Commission was oonstituted as follows: Commissioner, 
Alfred M. Barrett ; Deputy Commiesioners, Morgan T. Donnelly 
and Charles V. Halley, Jr. The vacancy in the office of Deputy 
Commiissioner has not been filled. 

During the year the Commiasion has held 382 hearings in 
formftl cases involving various matters relating to transportation, 
gaS) electric, steam and baggage-transfer cases. The number of 
new proceedings started during the year was 113. The Commis- 
sion held 140 formal sessions and adopted 236 formal orders. 
At the end of the year 37 proceedings were still open and 35 pro- 
ceedings were closed but not yet decided. 

As an index of the volume of work transacted during the year 
the figures from the Commission's mailing department are sig- 
nificant The incoming mail for the year exceeded 30,000 pieces, 
an average of more than 2,500 pieces per mcmth. The outgoing 
mail was in excess of 28,000 pieces. Printed and mimeographed 
publications of the Commission distributed through the mails, 
express companies and by messenger totaled 20,000 pieces. The 

[71 

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8 Public Sbbvicb Commission — Fibst Distbict 

total number of letters and documents filed and indexed during 
the year, including 382 transcripts of testimony, aggregated 
58,000 pieces. 

Expensei of the Comnussion 

For the expenses of the Public Service Commission for the First 
District for its regular work the legislature has appropriated 
for the fiflcal year ending June 30, 1921, a total of $711,334. 
In addition, as elsewhere explained, extra appropriations to enable 
tfie Oommiasion to defend the gas rate litigation were made to 
the extent of $82,000. 

The budgetary requests of the Commission for its regular work 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1922, call for $822,480.94. 
Of this total $676,610 is for salaries and $145,870 for main- 
tenance and (^ration. The increase is due to necessary increases 
in salaries and to the higher cost of supplies, traveling expenses, 
etc., which having been underestimated last year resulted in 
deficits. Owing to the increased rates on railroads and street 
railroads and to an unusual amount of traveling by inspectors and 
others due to strikes, last j^ar's appropriation for traveling ex- 
penses fell short about $3,000, and the Comm-iesion has asked a 
deficiency appropriation this year to make up the deficit. It 
may also be required to pay higher rates for telephone service. 

The increases in salaries asked for aggregate $63,126, or 
approximately 10 per cent over the appropriation for the current 
fiscal year. The increases apply only in cases where the Com- 
mission believes a higher compensation necessary to retain in its 
employ competent employes and to make their recompense some- 
where near what they could command in private employment In 
the few instances where increases in excess of $1,000 a year are 
requested the professional and technical men •affected are and have 
l)eou for some time underpaid. 

Durin/a: the \^ar 1919, as previously reix>rted, the Commission's 
work was considerably hampered by the scarcity of competent 
employes and the difliculty of obtaining them in comjxjtition with 
private business concerns. These conditions prevailed during the 
first half of the year 1920, but for the last six months considerable 
improvement has been shown. Nevertheless the Commission has 
not l>een able yet to fill all the positions required by its budget 



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FOUBTEBNTH AnNUAL HbpOBT 9 

From January 1 to June 30 tbe average number of employes was 
242 out of a budget total of 812. From July 1 to December 81 
liie average number was 255 out of a poesible total of 302. It 
will be eeen, therefore, that the Cominiiesion'g force is still 47 
employees short of what it should be. 

In spite of theee conditionB the Comonission has done a great 
deal of work and has handled some ujiusually important matters. 
The di9tuil)ed eoonomiG situation following the conclusion of the 
World War produced more or less chaotic conditions in the field 
of public utilities. These conditions were reflected in proceed- 
ings before the Commission and before the courts upon applica- 
tions for increased ratea The law empowering the Public Ser- 
vice Commissions to treat such matters has been further clarified 
during the year by court decisions, but further legislation or 
adjudication is necessary to give this Commission a clearer idea 
of the extent of the power over rates delegated to it by the 
Legislature. 

Bates Fixed by Statute 

Perhaps a word here as to rates fixed by statute may not be 
amiss. Under luws enaoted in 1906 and subsequently, the 
statutory maximum rate for gas manufactured and sold in the 
City of New York, except in outlying districts, has been 80 cents 
per thousand cubic feet. Under its present powers the Commis- 
sion may reduce the rate but may not increase it above the 
statutory limit. The gas c(»npanies, faced with the increased 
costs due to war and post-war conditions, not being alble to obtain 
relief from the Oommission, have appealed to the courts upon 
the ground that the rates fixed by statute are confiscatory. In 
the great majority of cases the courts have held the statutory 
rate confiscatory and have authorized the gas oompanies to 
increase their prices, and have restrained the Public Service 
Commission from enforcing the statutory rate. This has resulted 
in the destruction of uniformity. Gas oompanies operating 
within the city are now chai^ng $1, $1.10, $1.20, $1.26, 
$1.40 and $1.50 per thousand cubic feet It is difficult for 
the average consumer to reconcile these variations. The man 
who is called upon to pay $1.50 cannot understand why his 
neighbor shoiild be able to get gas for $1.10 or $1.20. While 

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10 Public Sbkvice Commission — Fibst District 

thare is some practical justification for a diflforence in rates, owing 
to the varying costs of production and the difference in the char- 
acter of the territory served (i. e., whether densely or thinly popu- 
lated), it would seem that the existing divergence is altogether 
too great for the cost of a neoessaiy article nuanufactured by all 
companies within the same city and under generally the same 
circumstances. 

From the court rulings it is evident that the statutory prices 
fixed fourteen years ago do not fit present conditions. It 
is for the Legislature to determine whether new maximtmi rates 
shall be established by it or whether the Public Service Com- 
missions shall be empowered to fix such rates after proper investi- 
gation. In this connection there should be considered the cost 
to the conmmnity, through a multiplicity of legal proceedings, 
of the efforts of companies to obtain relief from a statutory 
mandate, which in the course of years may become arbitrary and 
obsolete. Elsewhere a detailed description is given of the Com- 
mission's work in defending the SO^eent statute against these 
assaults. 'No less than sixteen different cases before the courts 
approximately at the same time d'emanded the attention of the 
Commission. In consequence the Commission had to make 
an emergency appeal to the last session of the Legislature for 
extra appropriations. In the Consolidated Gas case the Com- 
mission retained William Hayward, Esq., as Special Couneel 
to defend the attack on the 80-cent rate, and the Legislature 
appropriated $32,000 for Iftie payment of Colonel Hayward^s 
retainer and the expense involved in obtaining stenographic 
transcripts of the testimony. In the sixteen other cases in 
which the Commission was compelled to make defense, the last 
Legislature appropriated $50,000 for the payment of additional 
counsel, engineers, accountants and clerks necessary to the proper 
discharge of this duty. As tfhe cases have not yet been finally 
adjudicated, these extra expenses will continue at least during the 
next fiscal year, and therefore the Commission is obliged to apply 
to your honorable body for the further grant of such extra appro- 
priations as may be necessary. 

The expense of such litigation adds greatly to the cost of Public 
Service Commission regulation. There is no doubt that if the 



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FOUBTEBNTH AnHTUAL RbFOBT 11 

OoumiisBionB themiBelves were given complete power over public 
utility pates, crises such as the present oould te met in the orderly 
procedure of the Commission and recourse to the courts for relief 
from a statutory burden, with the consequent expenses it imposes 
upon the state, would be nmde unnecessary. 

The maximum rate for electric current was also fixed by the 
statutes of 1906 at 10 cents per kilowatt-hour, except in outlying 
districts. The Public Service Oonunission for the First District 
has from time to time ordered reductions in this rate so that 
art the present time the ten-eent rate has been reduced to 8 cents 
per kilowatt-hour by the Oommiasion. In this case the statutory 
limit fixed fourteen years ago is too high to fit present conditions, 
but the necessary changes in it have been made through orderly 
procedure before the Public Service 'Coramiasion and without 
expensive litigation. This was possible, however, only because the 
Commission h>as the right to redujce the rate under the statutory 
maximum. If the electric rate, however, as fixed by statute, had 
been too low, there would undoubtedly have been expensive litiga- 
tion as to whether it was high enough to give the companies an 
adequate return. 

The Transportation Situation 

In response to a concurrent resolution of the Senate and Assem- 
bly of the 19'20 Legislature, Commissioner Nixon on March 1, 
1920, submitted a special report upon the traction situation in 
New York City. The resolution called upon him for the results 
of his investigations '^ and information as to w'hetfier it is possible 
for the traction companies to give adequate service at the present 
rate of fare." In that report a complete review of transportation 
conditions in Greater New York was given and the financial 
reports of all street railroad companies for the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1919, were summarized. So far as possible figures 
were given for the last six months of 1919, but these necessarily 
were not as complete as the figures for the entire fiscal year. That 
report has been printed by order of the Legislature and is accom- 
panied by a set of maps of all boroughs of the Greater City show- 
ing the existing transportation lines. It will be useful to the 
Legislature or any comimittee thereof called upon to consider trans- 
portation conditions in New York City. 



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12 Public Sbevicb Comicission — Fibst District 

Herewith the Oommiflsion is able to present summaries of IJie 
reports of the oompanies for the fiscal year eoded June 30, 1920. 
Surprising as it may seem, in view of the improvement in general 
conditions and the large inorease in traffie, the total deficit of aH 
the street railroad oompanies is larger by more than $2,000,000 
for the fiscal year just closed than it wae for the previous one. 
For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1919, lie total deficit of all 
companies operating within the Greater City, that is, the amount 
by which the companies fell short of paying all operating expenees, 
interest, rente and other fixed charges, was $8,556,408. The 
deficit for the fiscal year en<^ June 30, 1920, was $10,735,399. 
There were several causes for the increased loss, among them 
considerable increases in the wages of employes, a substantial rise 
in the prices paid for coal and generally increased cost of main- 
tenance. Under an order of the Oonmiission issued several years 
ago one of the large surface car companies of the city was directed 
to set aside each year 20 per cent for depreciation. Out of this 
fund it was expected to pay for all repairs and to keep the surplus 
as a reserve. During the last fiscal year the actual expenditure 
of this company for maintaining its property in proper condition 
was upward of 25 per cent of its gross earnings, so that it not 
only used up the entire 20 per cent allowance for depreciation, but 
in additi<Hi had to draw upon its reserve fund. It is probably 
true that a greater amount of maintenance work was done during 
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920, than in the preceding year, 
and it is also true that the same work cost more than it did in 1919. 

In the report of March 1, 1920, above referred to. Commis- 
sioner Nixon stated that it was not possible for all of the traction 
companies to give adequate service at the present fare if present 
conditions continue. From the foregoing paragrap^hs your honoi^ 
able body will see that the outstanding feature of the " present 
conditions " referred to by Commissioner Nixon is still the out- 
standing feature in the fiscal year just closed. 

Some relief has been extended by this Commission during the 
year 1920. But this applies only to some of the smaller com- 
panies and was made possiUe solely by the action of the courts. 
After the Richmond Light and Bailioad Company, which operates 
a system of trolley cars on fitaten Island, went into the hands 

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FOUBTEBNTH AnNUAL BbPOBT IS 

of a receiver, 'Ooirnniaaioner Nixon, following a deoiflioii of the 
Court of Appeals, which held that the Oomimarion had power to 
regulate rates fixed in. certain classes of franchises, authorized 
the Receiver to charge an 8-cent fare. The road at the time was 
crippled by a strike. The fare previously had been 6 cents. 
Under this order the Receiver was able to settle the strike and 
resume the operation of the system and is still continuing it. 
So far as the reports show, the increase^} fare has more than paid 
the actual cost of operation. 

In December, 1920, Commissioner Barrett, after full investiga- 
tion, authori25ed the Receivers of the Manhattan' and Queens 
Traction Corporation to establish two zones and to charge a 6-cent 
fare in each zone. Previously the comipany had been limited to a 
5-cent fare over the entire line. This company operates a trolley 
railroad from the Manhattan end of the Queenslboro bridge to 
Elmhurst and Jamaica in Queens Borough. The total distance 
is about lOyo miles. By ihe new order the company is charging 
5 cents for a rid<e from Manhattan to Elmhurst, and 5 cents from 
Elmhurst to Jamaica. It id estimated that the increase in fare 
will net the company about $106,000, which will ju«t about offset 
the total deficit claim-ed for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920. 
This decision also was made possible by eoart decision. The 
petition of the Receivers was submitted to the Commission on 
August 30, 1919, but consideration of it was prevented by a writ 
of prohibition issued by the Supreme Court on the application of 
The City of New York. Proceedings were halted until the Court 
of Appeals on July 7, 1920, decided the case. The court held 
that the Commission had the right to regulate fares under the 
franchises held by thi« company. 

Beceiverships and Abandoned Lines 

As to receiverships the situation j^mainis unchanged from that 
reported in the report of March 1, 1920. The following oomr 
panics are still in the hands of receivers: 

New York Railways Company ; Job E. Hedges, Receiver. 

Second Avenue Railroad Company; Charles H. Chalmers, 
Receiver. 



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14 Public Sbbvice Commission — Fiest District 

Manhattan and Queens Traction Corporation ; W. R. Begg and 
A. C. Hume, Receivers. 

New York Consolidated Railroad Company; Lindley M. Gai> 
risen. Receiver. 

Brooklyn Heights Railroad Company; Lindley M. Garrison, 
Receiver. 

Nassau Electric Railroad Company; Lindley M. Garrison, 
Receiver. 

Coney Island and Brooklyn Railroad Company; Lindley M. 
Garrison, Receiver. 

Brooklyn, Queens County and Suburban Railroad Company; 
Lindley M. Garrison, Receiver. 

*Staten Island Midland Railway Company; Jacob Brenner, 
Receiver. 

Richmond Light and Railroad Company; John J. Kuhn, 
Receiver. 

These companies operate about 700 miles out of a total of 1900 
miles operated in the Greater City. 

At the time this report is made, namely, the close of the year 
1920, the following lines had ceased operation chiefly because they 
could not pay expenses: 

New York RaHways Company: 
Avenue O Line. 
Madidon Street Lina 
Spring and Delancey Street Line. 
Belt Line Railway Corporation : 

East Belt Line. 
Mid-Cro88town Railway Company, Inc. : 

Twenty-eighth and Twenty-ninth Streets Line. 
Pelham Park and City Island Railway Company: 

Pelham Park-City Island Line. 
Third Avenue Bridge Company: 

Queenf/boro Bridge Line. 
New York and North Shore Traction Company. 

Whitestone and Little Neck Lines. 
Brooklyn and North River Railroad Company: 
Brooklyn and North River Line. 

* (Lines of this comr ny now under lease and operated by The City of New 
York.) 

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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAL RePOBT 16 

*Staten Island Midland Railway Company : 
All lines. 
Brooklyn, Queens County and Suburban' Railroad Company: 
fMetropolitan Avenue Line. 
Wyckoff Avenue Line. 
Nassau Electric Railroad Company: 
fOcean Avenue Line. 

fThirty-ninth Street Ferry-Conoy Island Line. 
Church Avenue Line. 
Park Avenue Line. 
Rogers Avenue Line. 
Hicks Street Line. 
Seventh Avenue Line. 
Ralph Avenue Shuttle. 

The following lines by order of the courts have been separated 
from the parent systems: 

Xew York Railways System: 

Eighth Avenue Line. 

JS'inth Avenue Line. 

Fourth and Madison Avenue Line. 
Brooklyn Rapid Transit System : 

All lines of Brooklyn City Railroad Company. 

New Sapid Transit Lines Needed 

The time is at hand when extensive additions to the present 
transit facilities must be made. The rapid transit lines (subways 
and elevated railroads) of the Tnterborough Rapid Transit and 
Brooklyn Rapid Transit Systems, the two leading transportation 
facilities of the city, are now overburdened. Notwithstanding 
the operation of ten-car trains every two minutes or less on the 
Interborough subways during rush hours, the congestion is almost 
as bad as it was three years ago before the new lines were opened. 
The growth of traffic bas been so great that the additional facilities 
provided under the Dual System contracts have been almost 
entirely absorbed. Either the City of New York or the operating 
companies, or both, must provide in the near future extensive 



• Operation resumed by The City of New York. 
tPartial operation resumed. 



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16 Public Sxbvigs Commission — Fibst Distbict 

additions to the rapid transit eystemss. The Transit Construction 
Commissioner has received and nuade public a report from his 
Chief Engineer outlining various extensions of and additions to 
the city^s existing rapid transit lines, which, if buUt, will require 
an expenditure of $300,000,000 or $860,000,000. Where this 
immen-se amount of money is to come from it is difficult to say. 
The City of Xew York is at present too close to the constituticmal 
limitation of indebtedness to warrant it in issuing bonds for any 
large amount for rapid transit purposes. Operating companies 
certainly cannot be expected to build the necessary extensions with 
their own capital when they are struggling to make ends meet. 
In considering possible legislation affecting the transit situation 
in this city, your honorable body should not overlook the necessity 
of providing means for the enlistment of the vast amount of 
capital required to provide additional facilities. 

Large Traffic Increase 

As above stated, the street railway traffic in New York City 
for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920, shows a large increase 
over the previous fiscal year. For the year ended June 30, 1919, 
the total number of i-evenue passengers carried by all the street 
railroads in the city, including subway, elevated and surface lines, 
was 2,079,944,297. The same traffic for the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1920, was 2,364,775,067. This was an increase of 
284,830,770 passengers, or 13.69 per cent. Reduced to months, 
this means an average increase of aJbout 23,000,000 per month, or 
a daily average increase of about 763,000. This seems incredible 
and it would be impossible had it not been for the large additions 
to the transportation facilities opened for operation within the 
last three years. The immensity of the figures is ominous of the 
future. Unless New York City takes prompt steps to plan and 
nuild new rapid transit lines and have them ready for operation 
within four or five years, the traffic situation in the city will have 
become little less than terrible. Even at present the congestion 
on all lines during the rush hours is extreme, and if the ratio 
of increase shown last year should continue, the present facilities 
will be overwhelmed within a very few years. 

The largest increase during the year was recorded on the sub- 



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FOUBTSEKTH AnNUAL RbPOBT 17 

way division of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company. On 
this division the number of revenue passengers increased from 
461,147,058 in 1919 to 586,098,633 in 1920 — an increase of 
124,951,575, or 27.1 per cent The next largest increase was 
shown on the elevated and subway lines of the Brooklyn Rapid 
Transit System, operated by the New York Consolidated Railroad 
Company. Here the numlber of revenue passengers increased 
from 308,879,791 to 376,782,685 in 1920— an increase of 
67,902,844, or 21.98 per cent. 

The elevated railroads operated by the Interboroug"h Rapid 
Transit Company showed an increase from 348,188,600 to 
369,034,477 — an increase of 20,845,877, or 5.99 per cent In the 
previous year, owing to the opening of new subway lines, the 
elevated traffic had fallen off more than four millions and the 
increase for 1920 shows that they have not only recovered that 
lo», but have made a substantial increase over the figures for 1918. 

The Hudson and Manhattan Railroad Company, which operates 
the McAdoo tubes between Manhattan and New Jersey, showed 
an increase in passenger traffic from 86,050,815 in 1919 to 
92.250,836 — an increase of 6,200,021, or 7.21 per cent The 
above constitute all the so-called mpid transit lines in the city. 
The total increase upon all was 219,900,317, or an average of 
18.26 per cent 

The street surface lines make a different showing. Those in 
the Borough of Manhattan ehow an actual decrease, the traffic 
falling from 370,084,711 in 1919 to 348,960,461 in 1920 — a 
decrease of 21,124,250, or 5.71 per cent It is easy to account 
for the d-ecrease. The principal surface railway system in Man- 
hattan, the New York Railways Company, has been in the hands 
of a receiver for some time and by permission of the court several 
unprofitable lines have been abandoned and others have been cut 
off from the system to operate independently, which involved the 
discontinuance of free transfers in many cases, and the City 
of New York has placed in operation several omnibus lines which, 
undoubtedly, took considerable traffic away from the street 
railroads. 

In the Borough of The Bronx, surface car lines showed an 
increase from 80,806,261 in 1919 to 94,141,991 in 1920 — an 



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18 Public Service Commission — Fiest Disteict 

increase of 13,335,730, or 16.5 per cent In the Borough of 
Brooklyn an even larger increase was shown, the traffic growing 
from 362,105,288 to 432,936,277 — an increase of 20,830,939, 
or 19.56 per cent. 

In the Borough of Queens the surface lines, exclusive of the 
Brooklyn Rapid Transit routes, increased from 46,723,577 to 
49,562,574 — an increase of 2,838,999, or 6.08 per cent. In 
the Borough of Richmond, owing to the closing down of the 
trolley lines for a considerable period of time and the competition 
of municipal buses, there was a positive decrease in the surface 
car traffic. It fell off from 15,958,198 in 1919 to 15,007,233 
in 1920 — a decrease of 950,965, or 5.96 per cent. For the 
entire system of surface lines in all boroughs, the total increase 
in traffic was 64,930,453, or an average of 7.41 per cent. 

That the use of the street railway facilities by the people is 
increasing proportionately with the increase in traffic is shown 
by comparing the latter with the increase in population. In 
1918, with a population estimated at 5,450,299, the number of 
paid fares per capita was 362. In 1919, with an estimated popu- 
lation of 5,535,724, the per capita portion was 376. In 1920, 
with an estimated population, based upon preliminary census 
reports, of 5,621,157, the fares per capita had grown to 421. 
In other words, on the average, every citizen of greater New 
York took 421 street car rides during the year. 

Eates of Fare 

Court decisions in various cases involving applications for 
increased fares have to some extent clarified the law as to the 
scope of the Commission's powers in determining such applica- 
tions. At the Ix'ginning of the year the Commission took the 
position that its i)owers to increase fares beyond the maximum 
rate fixed by municipal franchises based on constitutional con- 
sents were not clearly defined and for that reason had refused to 
entertain some such applications. Its attitude in this i*espect was 
based upon the decision of the Court of Appeals in the well-known 
Quinby ca^e (People ex rel. City of Eoehester v. Public Service 
Commission for the Second District). In brief, this decision 
was to the effect that there was nothing in the Public Service 



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Fourteenth Annual Bbfobt 19 

Ooimnissioiifi Law which showed that the Legislature had dele- 
gated to the Public Service Commieeions the right to increase 
fares fixed in municipal franchises. 

On March 30, 1920, Lindley M. Garriaon, as Receiver of the 
N'aflsau Electric Railroad Company, the Brooklyn, Queens County 
and Suburban Railroad Company and the Coney Island and 
Brooklyn Railroad Company, made application to the Conmiis- 
sion for permission to increase the rate of fare charged on the 
lines of those companies from 5 to 8 cents. Commissioner Nixon 
held a formal hearing upon the applications March 31, 1920, and 
made orders denying each of them upon the ground that the Com- 
mission had no jurisdiction or power upon the facts alleged. 
The Receiver immediately made applications for a rehearing in 
each case. The Commission promptly denied these applications. 
The Receiver at once appealed to the courts by writ of certiorari 
and on April 10, 1920, the Appellate Division, First Department, 
affirmed the decision of the Commission as a matter of law and 
made an order dismissing the wi'its of certiorari. The case was 
taken to the Court of Appeals which, on July 7, 1920, handed 
down a decision which gave the Commission larger powers than 
had been conceded to it by the decision in the Quinby case. The 
Court of Appeals held in effect that the Commission had the power 
to change the rate of fare on lines operated under franchises 
granted directly by the Legislature; on lines operated under fran- 
chises granted by municipal authorities prior to January 1, 1875, 
when the constitutional amendment requiring the consent of the 
local authorities took effect; on lines operated under franchises 
granted by municipal authorities subsequent to July 1, 1907, 
when the Public Service Commissions began work under the 
statute creating them; and on lines operated under franchises 
granted by municipal authorities which did not fix the rate of fare. 

At the same time the Court of Appeals handed down a decision 
in the Manhattan and Queens Traction Corporation case above 
referred to. As the franchise involved in this case was granted 
by the municipality after the Public Service Commissions Law 
went into effect, the Court held that the Commission had ample 
power to hear the application and change the rate of fare. 

These decisions apply entirely to companies operating street 
surface railroads. The companies operating rapid transit lines 

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20 Public Sbbvigs Commission — Fiest Distbict 

aJao made a/pplication to the 'Commission for increased fares. 
Their status, however, is somewhat different from that of tfae 
surfaee car companies, for the reason that eadh has entered into 
a contract with the City of New York for the lease and opera- 
tion of certain lines built and owned by the municipality. These 
contracts, known as Oantracts No. 3 and No. 4, are otnmnonly 
called the Dual System Contracts. They specifically provide 
for a 6-cent fare. 

The application of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company 
was made May 28, 19*20, and was in the shape of a complaint that 
the maximum fare of 5 cents was insufficient to yield a reason- 
able compensation for the service rendered. The company applied 
to the Commission to hold a hearing and to determine the just 
and reasonable rate for lihe service performed. Comimissioner 
Nixon promptly denied the application for want of jurisdiction 
to fix a rate of fare different from Aat fixed by Contract No. 3, 
under which the Interborough is operating city-owned linea. The 
company immediately applied for a rehearing. The application 
was denied by the Commission and the company obtained from 
the Supreme Court a writ of certiorari. At the close of the year 
the action was pending before the Appellate Division, First 
Department. 

The application of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Comtpany was 
made in a complaint filed by Lindley M. Garrison, Receiver of 
the New York Consolidated Railroad Company, on May 13, 
1020. Commissioner Nixon on June 10, 1920, denied the appli- 
cation for want of jurisdiction to fix a rate of fare different from 
that fixed by Contract No. 4, under which the New York Con- 
solidated Railroad Company is operating city-owned lines. The 
company applied for a rehearing, wiiidh was denied, and on 
June 15, 1920, the company obtained from the Supreme Court 
a writ of certiorari. When the year ended' this action was ^ill 
pending before the Appellate Division, First Department. 

In the meantime, namely, between May 17 and June 15, the 
Corporation Counsel of the city had applied to the Supreme 
Court for a writ of prohibition to prevent the Commission from 
considering this application. The Supreme Court, however, on 
hearing the petition, denied the Coi-poration Counsel's application. 



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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAL RePOBT 21 

There has been one instance of a decrease in fare made effective 
during the year. This was on the lines of the New York Con- 
solidated Bailroad Company leading from Manhattan to Coney 
Island. Under Contract No. 4 it wias provided that, after certain 
lines had been bnilt and it was possible to have through opera- 
tion from Manhattan to Coney Island over certain lines, the 
operating company riiould reduce the fare from 10 cents, at which 
it was then operating, to 5 cents. This took place May 1, 1920, 
when through train operation w.as possible over the reconstructed 
Culver Line between Manhattan and Coney Island, and since 
that time the 5-cent tare has been in forca The distance from 
Times Square, Manhattan, to Coney Island is about 16 miles, 
and through trains make the run in forty minutes. 

Hnnieipal Onmibns Idnei 

As reported in the Special Traction Report dated March 1, 
1920, the City of New York established motor omnibus servioe 
at a 5-cent fare upon routes over which service or operation had 
been suspended. This operation began when the storage battery 
lines of the New York Railways System closed down. At first 
the Board of Estimate and Apportionment granted a temporary 
permit to one Louis Riedl for the operation of a motor bus line. 
Riedl, in accordance with the law, applied to the Public Service 
Commission for a certificate permitting him to operate. This was 
grants by the Commission. Riedl, however, failed to inaugurate 
the service and the city, acting through the Department of Plant 
and Structures, authorized private omnibus owners to perform the 
work. None of these owners had any formal permit from the 
city nor did any of them obtain certificates of convenience and 
necessity from the Public Servioe Commission as required by law. 
The city took tihe position that it has power under the Home Rule 
Law to establish such transportation lines in an "emergency." 
Following the municipal lines established on routes where storage 
battery car operation had been suspended, the city gradually 
extended the omnibus operation to other lines upon which street- 
car operation had been discontinued and also established some 
lines in direct competition with existing street railroad operation. 

After these municipal omnibus lines began operation on routes 



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22 Public Service Commission — First District 

pai'allel with operating street railroad lines, the railroad com- 
panies set np the claim that sudh operation by the city was 
in competition with the street railroads and caused them con- 
siderable loss by diversion of traffic. The Brooklyn City Rail- 
road Company and the New York Bail^vays Company brought 
injunction suite against the Commissioner of Plant and Structures 
of the City of New York to restrain the operation of the omnibus 
lines. The Brooklyn City Company's case was brought in Decem- 
ber, 1919, and argument was made before Justice Cropsey in 
the Supreme Court, Kings county. On April 2, 1920, Justice 
Cropsey rendered his deci'sion, holding tlhat the operation of 
omnibus lines by the city was illegal, as the city had failed to 
comply with the provisions of the Transportation Corporations 
Law and the Public Service Commissions Law governing the 
operation of motor omnibus lines. Justice Cropsey pointed out 
that l3ie city was not free to act as it pleases any more than was a 
private individual, that each is governed by statute and that each 
must comply with the law. 

Pursuant to this opinion he entered an order on April 3, 1920, 
restraining the Commissioner of Plant and Structures from 
operating certain routes. The city appealed to the Appellate 
Division, Second Department, which on May 11, 1920, handed 
down a decision sustaining Justice Cropsey's order. The city 
again appealed and the Court of Appeals on June 11, 1920, with- 
out opinion, affirmed the action of the lower courts and sustained 
Justice Cropsey's order. 

The action by the New York Railways Company was brought 
by its Receiver, Job E. Hedges, who applied for an injunction 
against the Department of Plant and Structures to restrain the 
operation of motor omnibus lines paralleling the 14th Street 
Crosstown Line of the Railways Company. An injunction order 
was granted by Justice Lydon on May 25, 1920. The city 
appealed to the Appellate Division, First Department, which on 
June 18, 1920, upheld Justice Lydon's order. On July 9, 1920, 
the Appellate Division denied the application of the city for per- 
mission to appeal to the Court of Appeals. 

Following these decisions, the city suspended operation of the 
lines complained of paralleling or substantially paralleling the 



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FOUETEENTH AnNUAL RePORT 23 

routes of operating street railroad companies, but continued the 
operation over a few routes where street-oar servioe had been 
abandoned, as well as over the 86th Street line, where there is 
also trolley operation. 

Soon after the establishment of the first municipal omnibus 
line the Public Service Commission received complaints from 
property owners in Brooklyn and held hearings to investigate the 
same. Considerable testimony was taken and the facts as to eiuoh 
operation were placed upon the record. Eepresentatives of the 
City of New York were subpoenaed and they appeared to testify 
and produced their records. The investigation was largely for 
the purpose of determining the nature of the operation and 
whether the City of New York as a municipality was responsible 
therefor. No order was made by the Commission, Commissioner 
Nixon taking the position that he did not wish to interfere with 
such transit facilities xmless directed to do so by the courts. Any 
further proceeding under this order was rendered unnecessary by 
the court decisions just referred to. 

In a few cases where long hauls were required the municipal 
omnibuses charged a 10-cent fare, collecting 5 cenits for one zone 
and 5 cents for the second zone. This was true of the municipal 
lines operated during the summer from Manhattan to Jamaica 
during the time the operation of the Manhattan and Queens 
Traction Corporation's railroad was suspended. Such operation, 
however, lasted for only a short tima In Staten Island, how- 
ever, where municipal bus lines were operated for a considerable 
period of time, the 10-eent fare was applied. 

Electric Eatei 

There was no change in the maximum rates for electric light, 
heat and power during the year. Owing to a largely increased 
consumption, which was met without corresponding increase of 
facilities, the electric companies were able to come through lihe 
war period without appealing to the Commission for relief. 

The New York Edison Company and the United Electric Light 
and Power Company, which supply all of Manhattan and a por- 
tion of The Bronx with electric current, have charged 7 cents per 
kilowatt-hour as the maximum rate since July 1, 1917. The 
maximum rate, as fixed by the Commission in 1916, was 8 cents, 



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24 Public Service Commission — Fibst Distkict 

but by negotiation the company reduced it first to 7V^ and then 
to 7 cents. The Brooklyn Edison Oompany, which supplies the 
greater part of Brooklyn, has a maximum rate, fixed by the Com- 
mission, of 8 cents. The Flatbush Gas Oompany, which supplies 
a section of Brooklyn, charges 9 cents plus a service charge, the 
Bronx Gas and Electric Company, which serves a large part of 
The Bronx, charges 12 cents, the New York and Queens Gas and 
Mectric Oompany and the Queensboro Gas and Electric Com- 
pany, which serve the Borough of Queens, charge respectively 

9 cents and a service charge and 13 cents, the Richmond Light 
and Bailroad Co., in Staten Island, charges 10 cents, and the 
Westchester Lighting Co., which serves a portion of The Bronx, 

10 cents. 

During the latter part of the year 19*20 all companies were 
compelled to pay greatly increased prices for bituminous coal, 
which they Use extensively for steam and power purposes. In 
1916, when the Edison Compan/s rate was fixed at 8 cents, the 
average price of this kind of fuel was $3 per ton. In the year 
1920 the utilities paid from $6 to $15 per ton. In the fall the 
Edison and the United companies notified the Commission that 
they must have some relief on account of this great advance in 
the cost of fuel. Following consultation with Commissioner 
Nixon, the companies decided to file coal surcharge riders pro- 
viding for a small increase in the basic rate with every 10 per 
cent increase in the price of soft coal above $3 per ton. After 
conference with the Commission's counsel and engineer, the com- 
panies agreed to fix the surcharge applicable to the retail rates 
at 50/1000 of a cent and for large consumers at 35/1000 of a cent 
for every 10 per cent increase. This kind of a surcharge has 
been levied since 1917 upon rates for large consumers, but it 
had never been applied to retail rates, under which the large 
body of domestic consumers is served. 

Under the Commission's standing order governing the filing 
of tariflFs, the companies on November 1, 1920, filed new surcharge 
riders, effective December 1, imposing the increased charges 
according to the scale above indicated. The ridere provided for 
a sliding scale, so that the charges should go up or down as the 
price of coal advanced or receded. The maximum of the sur- 
charge, however, was fixed at 1 cent. 

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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAL RbPOBT 25 

Early in December the Corporation Counsel of the City of 
New York attacked the new eurcharge on the ground that it was 
an unwarranted increase in rates and applied to the Supreme 
Court for injunctions against the two companies and also against 
the Brooklyn Edison Company, which had filed a similar rider. 
These actions were still pending at lihe end of the year. 

Orade Crotting EliminatioB 

During the war, and since the Armistice, the Commission has 
suspended the work of grade crossing elimination ; that is, no new 
proceedings looking to the elimination of crossings were insti- 
tuted. This was in deference to a ruling by the Director-General 
of Railroads of the United States Government, during the war, 
deferring all proposed capital expenditures by the railroads except 
those vitally necessary. 

In the last annual report of this Commission it was pointed 
out that the war emergency had passed and that tihe Railroad 
Administration had declared in favor of the resumption of 
improvements. On that account, the Commission again recom- 
mends that the sum of $250,000 be appropriated by your honor- 
a;ble body to be applied upon the State's share of the cost of 
eliminating grade crossings, and that all balances, if any, of pre- 
vious appropriations made for this purpose and not yet expended, 
be reappropriated. 

The Public 'Service Commission took up the matter of grade 
crossing elimination soon after its creation in 1907 tnd in 1909 
brought it to the attention of the Legislature. At the request of 
the Conxmission the Legislature appropriated $250,000 in 1910, 
$250,000 in 1911, $200,000 in 1915, and $250,000 in 1917, 
making a total of $950,000 appropriated for this purpose up 
to date. 

In addition to the above, an act was passed by the Legislature, 
being chapter 771 of the Laws of ;1913, providing that there 
shall be deposited with the City Chamberlain moneys received as 
mortgage recording tax upon certain mortgages made by the 
Interborough Rapid Transit Company and the New York Munici- 
pal Railway Corporation to be applied to cover the State's one- 
quarter share of the cost of the elimination of grade crossings. 
The latest report shows the money available from this source is 

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26 PuBiiic Seevicb Commission — First District 

$699,696.50, making the total money available for grade crossing 
eliminations $1,649,696.50. 

The following grade crossing eliminations have been completed 
and payments made by the State, as follows : 
Huguenot Elim. (Staten Island Ry.), 1 crossing. . $18,070 71 
Great Kills Elim. (Staten Island Ry.), 1 crossing. 25,313 71 
Flushing Elim. (Long Island R. K.), 10 crossings 200,000 00 
Bushwick Junction Elim. (L. I. R R.), 2 crossings 120,821 70 
Railroad Ave. Foot subway (L. I. R. R.), 1 cross- 
ing 2,067 52 

HoUis Elim. (L. I. R. R), 2 crossings 53,033 73 

Pennsylvania Ave. Elim. (Staten Island Ry.)? 

3 crossings 17,000 00 

$436,307 37 

Balance of appropriations now in the hande of lihe 

State Comptroller and City Chamberlain $1,213,389 13 

This has been all expended on work already done or pledged 
for work ordered but not yet done, except about $13,000. 

Final orders have been issued on the following grade crossing 
eliminations, work on which, however, has not yet been begun 
or completed, and on which no State money has as yet been 

expended : Egtimated State's 

One-qiiaxter Share 

Far Rockaway Elim. (L. I. R R), 10 crossings. . $600,000 00 

Queens Elim. (L. I. R R.), 5 crossings 216,270 00 

Pleasant Plains Elim. (Staten Island Ry.), 6 cross- 
ings 128,551 00 

Pennsylvania Ave. Elim. (Staten Island Ry.) . . . 7,000 00 
Gun Hill Road Bridge, change in existing struc- 
ture (N. Y. Central R. R), 1 crossing 5,000 00 

East 241st St., Wakefield, change in existing struc- 
ture (X. Y. Central R R.), 1 crossing 200,000 00 

Virginia Ave., change in existing structure (S. I. 

Ry.), 1 crossing 4,010 00 

Morris Ave., change in existing structure ("N". Y. 

Central R. R.), 1 crossing 40,000 00 

$1,200,831 00 



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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAL RePOBT 27 

It will be noted that Pennsylvania avenue is shown twice. 
This is explained by the fact that, although the elimination is 
entirely completed, the accounting has not yet been settled. 
Partial payments, to the extent of $17,000, have been made and 
it is estimated that when the final settlement is made, the State's 
additional ahare will be $7,000. 

From the above it will be seen that there is but albout $13,000 
left for new work. This sum is not sufficient to take care of any 
grade crossing elimination in the Oity of New York, and, indeed, 
with prices varying so greatly at the present time, this item may 
be wholly taken up in the estimates of cost of eliminations ordered 
by the Commission. 

There have been eliminated since the Commission came into 
being 19 grade crossings, and one foot subway has been built at 
Railroad avenue across the Long Island Railroad. The average 
cost per grade crossing amounted approximately to $100,000. 

Final orders have been issued, in addition to grade crossing 
eliminations completed, for the elimination of 21 grade crossings 
and for the changing of four existing structures to meet new con- 
ditions of travel on highways. 

Exclusive of the Borough of Manhattan, where 106 grade 
crossings on the west side are subject to special legislation, there 
are still 273 public grade crossings in the City of New York. 
In the last ten years the Commission has idsued orders for the 
elimination of 21 grade crossings in addition to the 19 already abol- 
ished. From this it can be seen that, unless the Legislature 
appropriates much more money, it will be a great many years 
before the grade crossings in the city will be entirely eliminated. 

In addition to eliminating grade crossings, the Commission has 
issued orders determining the manner in which new streets shall 
cross railroads after the city has made applications for such deter- 
minations. Thirteen new streets were determined upon, of which 
five have been actually constructed. 

During the B. R. T. strike last summer, in the confusion and 
congestion caused by the effort of people who are normally 
B. R T. passengers, to reach the city center by way of the Long 
Island Railroad, a boy was killed in East New York in attempt- 
ing to board a train. East New York is rapidly increasing in 



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28 Public Sbevicb Commission — Fibst Disteict 

population and the vehicular and pedestrian traflSc across the rail- 
road at East New York avenue is very heavy. This was the sub- 
ject of a Commission hearing recently, and changes have been 
begun for better railroad passenger accommodations and greater 
safety for travel across the tracks of the Long Island railroad at 
East New York. All this is only a temporary expedient and it is 
most vital that the grade crossing should be eliminated at the 
earliest possible moment. The changes made by the Dual Sub- 
way Contracts in the Brooklyn Rapid Transit elevated structures 
across Atlantic and East New York avenues have intensified the 
dangerous conditions existing at this point. It is estimated that 
the cost of the elimination will be approximately $1,000,000 and 
the State's share about $250,000. 

Actual construction work was continued on projects it had been 
found possible to get started during the difficult conditions pre- 
viously noted and also two new streets were carried across the 
Long Island railroad by foot-bridges. 

The following is a brief summary of work either practically 
completed, actively in progress or alx)ut to he instituted : 

Cases Nos. 1756 and 1797. — This proceeding involved the 
elimination of three grade crossings at Pennsylvania avenue, 
Clifton avenue and Maryland avenue, Rosebank, Borough of 
Richmond, on the Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway. The 
construction work was completed and accepted in 1918. Claims 
for damages, however, have been filed, but as yet no action has 
been taken by the City of New York with respect to them, aaid 
the Commission, therefore, is unable to proceed with the final 
accounting. Just as soon as these damages are adjudicated the 
final accounting can be closed. 

Case No. 2006 — Oun Hill road over the tracks of the New 
York Central Railroad. — Work was begun in August, 1918, and 
completed in October of this year. The final accounting i« now 
under way. This proceeding involved the widening and length- 
ening of the bridge as well as the reconstruction of the existing 
bridge in order to fit in with the improvements made by the City 
on Gun Hill road on both sides of the railroad. 

Case No. 2^3^. — Roach place, across the Long Island Railroad 
at Elmhurst, Borough of Queens. — The Commission determined, 



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FouBTSBNTH Aknuat Repobt 29 

after an application made by the City of New York, that an over- 
head foot-bridge should be erected across the tracks about ten feet 
in widlb. The improvement was completed in October of this 
year and the final accounting is under way. 

Case No. £390. — The final order was issued on August 1, 1919, 
after an application had been made by the City of New York 
to provide an overhead foot-bridge at Card place, Elmhurst, 
Borough of Queens, across the tracks of the Long Island Railroad. 
The improvement was comjdeted in October of this year and 
the final accounting is under way. 

Cases Nos. 1936 and 1936- A — Elimmation of ten dangerous 
grade crossings on the Long Island Railroad at Far Bockaway, 
Borough of Queens. — The final order was issued in January, 
1916, specifying that the railroad tracks shall be depressed to 
suoh an ext^it as to cause little or no change in the street grades. 
The company found the water table very close to the proposed grade 
of the railroad, which, in its opinion, would cause serious difficul- 
ties in carrying out this work, and called the attention of the 
Conuniesion to this condition, as well as to its contention that 
there would be great cost in connection with damage to property 
on account of certain street grade changes, and requested the 
reopening of the proceedings in order that it may submit testi- 
mony to show that an elevated structure is the most desirable way 
of eliminating these grade crossings. After careful consideration 
of the matter the Commission ordered the reopening of the case. 
After hearings before Deputy Commissioner Charles V. Halley, 
Jr., the Commission on his recommendation reaffirmed the original 
order for the depression of the tracks. 

Case No. 2123 — Third avenue and 189th street across the 
tracks of the New York Central Railroad at Fordham, Borough 
of The Bronxa — All detail plans have been submitted to the Com- 
mission and approved, but actual construction work cannot be 
begun until the matter of property is settled. Deputy Commis- 
sioner Halley has pressed the company to proceed, and specifica- 
tions have been approved. Condemnation of property is now in 
court and a decision is expected soon. Afterward construction can 
be b^n. 

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30 Public Sbbviob Commission — Fibst Distbict 

Case No. 1929 — 2Jl^l8l street, across the tracks of the New 
York Central Railroad and the New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford Railroad at Wakefield, in the Borough of The Bronze. — In 
1915 the Coimnissioii issued a final order directing that East 
241st sti^eet shall be carried across tihe tracks of the two railroads 
mentioned by a viaduct and that certain changes shall be made in 
the layout of the tracks of the two railroads in the vicinity. The 
track changes have been made but no work has been done in the 
way of actual construction on the viaduct. Kepeated efforts made 
by Deputy Commissioner Halley to accelerate action resulted after 
many hearings in the approval of a general plan bringing into 
agreement diverse views of the Bronx Parkway Commission, the 
Public Service Commission for the Second District, The City of 
New York and the railroads. A change in the City map is made 
necessary, and The City of New York has been requested to take 
the required action. Unless some unforeseen emergency arises, 
there is no reason why construction cannot begin in tho Spring. 

Case No. 225S — East 2S8th street, across the tracks of the 
New York Central Railroad and the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad in the Borough of The Bronx. — This case 
involves the construction of a highway viaduct over the tracks 
of the two railroads mentioned. Many hearings have been held 
before the Commission in order to have the necessary detail plans 
prepared and constniction begun. There are many interested 
parties to this improvement, particularly the Bronx Parkway 
Commissioner, over whose property the proposed viaduct i« to be 
erected, and the Bronx Parkway Commission is most desirous of 
having a structure sufficiently ornamental in appearance to be 
in keeping with the contemplated improvements of the Bronx 
Parkway. As a result of the hearings the railroad company has 
submitted to the Commission detail plans showing a concrete 
arch viaduct of a decidedly ornamental character whicb is satis- 
factory to all parties concerned. The next step toward having 
work begun is the making of specifications and letting of con- 
tracts, but the railroad company has contended that before this 
can be done the city must acquire the necessary easements acroBS 
the railroad right of way. The City of New York contends that 
such acquisition of easements is not necessary. 



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Fourteenth Annual Report 81 

Case No. ^^Od-A. — The City of New York made application 
to the Oommifision for a determination as to how the existing 
structure crossing the New York Central Railroad at Morris 
avenue in the Borough of The Bronx shall be changed. Morris 
avenue crosses the railroad tracks by an overhead bridge of the 
so-called half through construction with wooden flooring. It is 
approximately thirty years old and the design of the structure 
is such that it will not carry the present-day heavy loadings. An 
order was issued during the latter part of this year directing 
that the bridge shall be reconstructed on the so-called deck tj^ 
leaving the roadway sidewalks free and unobstructed by any 
steel members, of a design suflScient to take care of present day 
traflSc The estimated cost of this improvement is $170,000, of 
which the State's share will be about 142,500. 

The railroad has prepared plans and Deputy Commissioner 
Ilalley has urged the company to submit them for formal approval 
at the earliest possible moment. It is expected that the Spring 
will see the work begun. 

Case No. 2130. — An order issued by the Commission on August 
15, 1920, made provision for the depression of Virginia avenue, 
Rosebank, Borough of Richmond, allowing an under-clearanoe 
of fourteen feet beneath the tracks of the Staten Island Rapid 
Transit Railway. The present under-clearanoe is insuflScient and 
unsafe. Repeated efforts have been made by the Commission to 
get this work under way, but the railway company has not given 
a satisfactory answer as to why the work do^ not proceed aud the 
matter has been referred to counsel for proper action. 



The Commission has issued final orders in cases entimerated 
below but actual construction work has not been begun, particu- 
larly on account of the railroad companies' claim of their inability 
to raise the necessary funds and difficulties in obtaining necessary 
labor and material as well as the great cost. 

Cases Nos. 1264 omd 1880. — Elimination of five grade croe»* 
ings on the main line of the Long Island railroad in the vicinity 
of Queens Station, Borough of Queens. 

Cases Nos. 1780 and 1811. — Elimination of six grade crc^s- 
ings in the Borough of Richmond on the Staten Island railway 
at Princes Bay and Pleasant Plains. 



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32 Public Seevicb Commission — Fibst District 

The Oommission 'has made several determinations as to the 
manner in which new streets shall cross the railroads as provided 
for by the Railroad Law. The expense of such construction of 
new streets across railroads is borne one-half bj the railroad com- 
panies and one-half by the City of New York, no funds of the 
State being utilized for this purpose. These are: 

Case No. 1971. — Eighty-second street and New Utrecht avenue 
across the tracks of the New York Municipal Railway, Borough 
of Brooklyn. 

Case No. £037. — Fourteenth avenue, West street and Cortel- 
you road across the New York Municipal Railway, Borough of 
Brooklyn. 

Case No. 2082. — One Hundred and Ninety-fifth street across 
th emain line of the Long Island Railroad at HoUis, Borough of 
Queens. 

Case No. 2300. — Eighty-fourth street (Digby street) across 
the main line of the Long Island Railroad, Borough of Queens. 

Case No. H02. — Ashland street across the New York and 
Rockaway Beach division of the Long Island Railroad, Borough 
of Queens. 

Case No. 1567. — Lambertville avenue across the tracks of the 
old southern branch of the Montauk division of the Long Island 
Railroad, Borough of Queens. 



Case No. 2518 — Sixth avenue across the tracks of the Long 
Islamd Railroad <md the New York Municipal Ratlioay at Bay 
Ridge, Borough of Brooklyn. — Hearings are now being held in 
this case on application of The City of New York for a determina- 
tion as to the maimer in which this street shall cross the railroads 
and a decision will be rendered in the near future. 



Considerable progress has been made under the amendment 
made to the law in 1919 (chapter 438 of the Laws of 1919) rela- 
tive to approach warning signs near railroad crossings. The bill 
was introduced at the request of the Commission, in accordanioe 
with a plan for a nation-wide uniformity in the protection of 
grade crossings as approved by the National Association of Rail- 
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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAI, RepORT 33 

way and Utilities Cammissioners. This amendment provides 
that the authorities charged with the duty of maintaining high- 
ways where crossed by a railroad shall install and maintain 
approach warning signs at each such grade crossing, at a dis- 
tance from the crossing of not less than 300 feet on each side, 
and that the railroad companies shall furnish signs as specified 
in the law. The Commission has power to determine the exact 
location of the signs and to exact obedience to the provisions of 
the law. Early in the year the Commission issued an order 
determining the location of the signs and it was provided that 
13 signs shall be furnished and installed in the Borough of Man- 
hattan, 18 signs in the Borough of The Bronx, 67 signs in the 
Borough of Brooklyn, 305 signs in the Borough of Queens and 
173 signs in the Borough of Richmond. Whereas the law pro- 
vides that the railroad companies should have furnished the signs 
by March 1, 1920, the companies were unable to live up to this 
requirement because of the great difficulties in obtaining the 
necessary material for making these signs. However, signs have 
been furnished and installed at all points in the Borough of 
Brooklyn and the Borough of Queens, as directed by the Com- 
mission's order, and signs have been furnished and are now being 
erected in the Borough of Richmond. Signs have been received 
from the manufacturer by the railroad companies in the Borough 
of The Bronx, and are now about to be delivered to the munici- 
pality for erection. As to the Borough of Manhattan, the New 
York Central Railroad Company has received from the manu- 
facturer the necessary number of signs for delivery to the munici- 
pality, and it is expected that they will be erected in a very 
short time The railroad companies and the municipality have 
been diligent in having these approach warning signs placed 
as provided in the Commi-ssion's orders as soon as possible, com- 
sidering the difficulties of the post-war period. 



The Grade Crossing Bureau has been engaged also on other 
matters of an engineering nature that have come before the Com- 
mission for attention, as follows: 



2 



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34 PuBMc Sbbvicb Commission — First District 

Case No. 2463. — ^A final order was issued by the Commission 
affecting conditione on the Atlantic division of the Long Island 
Eailroad, specifying that certain improvements be made at the 
Flatbush Avenue terminal whereby the capacity of the waiting- 
room has been materially increased. At the East New York 
station it was ordered that high platforms shall be erected and 
an overhead fOot-bridge installed and controls provided for the 
selling and taking of tickets on the station rather than on the 
trains. By this arrangement much delay and confusion will be 
overcome, as the walking through crowded cais by ticket collectors 
is to be done away with. Further improvements wore ordered 
at the Kailroad Avenue station, where the platforms are 
lengthened to accommodate longer trains and the same ticket 
control will be installed as at East New York station. These 
improvements are now under way and it is expected that the 
whole work will be completed in the near future. 

A complaint was received late in 1919 with respect to condi- 
tions at Eastern Parkway where it crosses the Atlantic division 
of the Long Island Railroad. At this point the railroad emerges 
from a tunnel under Eastern Parkway into an open cut with 
retaining walls. On the east side of Eastern Parkway an iron 
fence, about four feet in height, was replaced by a concrete fence, 
about seven feet high, in order to restrain mischievous boys from 
throwing objects into the open cut and breaking car windows and 
possibly doing injury to passengers. This wall, however, created 
a dangerous condition on the highway in that it was impossible 
for an automobilist traveling on one highway to see an automobile 
traveling in a transverse direction. The railroad company's 
attention was called to this case and, in place of the solid concrete 
fence, a wire mesh fence was substituted which would give suflS- 
cient vision to automobiles, thereby making the crossing reason- 
ably safe. The change was made in a satisfactory manner last 
summer. 

After investigating complaints r^arding the overcrowded con- 
dition of the stairway at the Murray Hill station on the Long 
Island Railroad at Flushing, the Commission was of the opinion 
that an additional exit stairway should be erected. The railroad 
company's attention was called to the matter and the stairway 
was completed in April of this year. 

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FOUBTBBNTH ANNUAL RbPOBT 85 

A complaint was received as to the condition of the wooden 
stairway at the Cleveland Street end of the Warwick Street station 
on the Atlantic division of the Long Island Railroad. An examina- 
tion disclosed that the stairway was safe and adequate, nothwith- 
standing the comiplainants' statemient to the contrary, but the 
stairway treads had been badly worn and were in need of renewal. 
The railroad company's attention was called to this fact and the 
treads were renewed. 

Oomrplaints have been received by the Commission with regard 
to the dangerous situation existing at the Aubumdale station of 
the Long Island Kailroad on its North Side division, due to the 
fact that passengers living south of the railroad must cross the 
tracks to board trains from New York and are likely to be 
struck by trains going in the other direction. In order to relieve 
this condition it was suggested that an overhead foot-bridge be 
erected and the crossing at grade closed up. It appears that the 
city authorities contemplated carrying a new street at the 
westerly end of the Aubumdale station across the railroad by 
means of a foot-bridge and that plans have been prepared by the 
city engin-eers aihowing such a foot-bridge. It is expected that an 
application will be made by the city under section 90 of the Rail- 
road Law for a determination as to the manner in which this new 
street shall be carried across the railroad in the near future and 
the erection of this foot-bridge will take care of the conditions 
complained of at the Aubumdale station. 

Due to the very heavy winter of 1919-1920, the tracks of the 
Long Island Railroad and of the New York and Long Island Trac- 
tion Company at Laurelton, Borough of Queens, were flooded, as 
were also several houses in the immediate vicinity. The Com- 
mission's attention was called to this matter on complaints 
received and it appeared that the natural drainage of the water 
was impeded because of the railroad embankment of the New 
York and Long Island Traction Company. This embankment 
was washed down so that now the water is unretarded and any 
flooding of houses is xmlikely. 

Complaints have been received with regard to the congested 
condition of the stairways on the north-bound platform of the 
57th Street station of the Second Avenue "L," Interborough 



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86 Public Sbbvice Commissiost — Fiest Distkict 



Rapid Transit Plans were prepared by the Oommission^s 
engineers showing suggested additional stairways to relieve this 
congestion and these plans have been submitted to the railroad 
company. The company has informed the Commission that it 
is giving this matter serious attention. 

Further hearings were held with r^ard to conditions obtain- 
ing at the Morris Park station on the Harlem Edver branch of 
the New York, Ifew Haven and Hartford Railroad. Passengers 
at the present time are required to cross the track at grade in 
order to arrive at the station platform, which is considered 
dangeroua One way of relieving this condition is by extending 
the existing foot-subway to pass under this track. This treat- 
ment involves considerable expense, and, further, the railroad 
company is bound by an agreement, knovm as the six-track agree- 
ment with the city, to build foot-bridges at Home and Lurting 
avenues, a short distance from the crossing complained of, which, 
when erected, will give access to the station platform vTithout 
crossing the tracks. It has been the Commission's endeavor to 
get these bridges at Home and Lurting avenues erected as soon 
as possibla Detail plans have been prepared by the railroad 
company and submitted to the Board of Estimate and Apportion- 
ment, and it is expected that action will be taken on them in the 
very near future, after which the railroad company intends to 
proceed with the erection of the bridges. 



Grads Crossino Accidbmts in Wbxch P«R80jf8 Wbrb Killkd or Injured 

KILLED 




Company 


1908 


1009 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


New York Ontral R. R 


is' 
1 

5 


1 
12 

4 
6 


1 
13 

1 
1 


4 
24 


1 
7 


1 
8 
2 
2 


6 
5 
2 


3 
5 
3 

1 








3 

7 

1 


1 


Long Island R. R 


3 

1 
2 


3 
2 
1 


13 
2 
2 





Staten Island R. T 


2 


New York Cons. R. R 


2 


2 










Totals 


21 


23 


16 


30 


10 


13 


13 


12 


6 


6 


17 


11 








New York Central R. R. 

Long Island R. R 

Staten Island R. T 

New York Cons. R. R. . 

Totals 



11 


5 


2 


6 


2 


5 


5 


4 


6 


4 


4 


4 


13 


10 


19 


11 


6 


7 


9 


11 


4 


5 


12 


5 


2 


4 


9 


8 


4 


5 


6 


1 


3 


21 


4 


4 


15 


16 
85 


2 


3 


2 


1 


6 


6 


5 


5 


3 


3 


41 


32 


28 


14 


18 


26 


22 


18 


35 


23 


16 



4 
6 
6 



14 



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CHAPTER II 



LITIGATION 



Litigation, mainly over rate cases in which the Commission was 
compelled to engage, has increased greatly within the year, owing 
to the efforts of various public utility corporations to obtain relief 
from the statutory restrictions as to rates. Cases brought by gas 
companies constituted the bulk of thlis litigation, but there were 
ako several actions due to the applications of street railroad cor- 
porations for increased fares. 

A great part of the Commission's activity in this connection 
has been devoted to taking appeals to the courts in an attempt to 
secure light as to the extent of its powera Of necessity, the 
power to act at all must be established before the Commission 
can take up the question as to what rates are reasonable. As 
the prime function of the Commission is administrative, i. e,, 
determining what is reasonable as a matter of fact, it is to be 
regretted that it should have been barred from the effective exer- 
cise of that function by the uncertain state of the law, and that 
its energies should have been so extensively devoted to arguing 
questions of law as to the extent of its powers. 

Bailroad Bate Cases 

The questions of law on which the jurisdiction of the Oommid- 
sion depends fall into three classes: 1, those relating to surface 
street railroads ; 2, those relating to rapid transit railroads ; and, 
3, those relating to ordinary steam railroads. While certain 
questions of law are common to all three classes, the remainder 
are so far different that a determination as to one class is not 
conclusive as to the other classes. The effect of the well known 
Quinby case (223 N. Y. 244) is supposed to be confined to street 
surface railroads, which are operated under franchises granted 
since January 1, 1875, the date on which the provisions of sec- 
tion 18, article III, of the State Constitution became operative. 
It is, however, contended that the Quinby decision applies also 
to steam railroads ; but this contention has been decided adversely 
by the Appellate Division, First Department, in People ex rel. 

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88 Public Sbbvicb Commission — Fiest District 

New York, Westchester and Boston Railway Company v. Public 
Service Commission, 193 App. Div. 445. Although the various 
uncertainties have not been cleared up as completely as could be 
wished, the courts during the past year have in several notable 
respects sustained the power of the Commission over rates. 

Case No. 2^33. — On January 30, 1920, the Commission made 
an order disallowing the increase, from five to seven cents, of the 
fare between stations in New York City, which had been con- 
tained in the tariff schedules filed by the New York, Westchester 
and Boston Railway Company on October 20, 1919, to become 
effective on November 19, 1919. This order was made after the 
hearings by the Commission, which had followed its suspension 
of the operation of the company's tariff schedule; and, as appears 
from the opinion of the Deputy Commissioner, was based on the 
doubt which existed as to the power of the Commission. 

An application for a rehearing having been made and denied, 
the company obtained a writ of certiorari to review the order 
of the Commission. On July 2, 1920, the Appellate Division, 
First Department, holding that the Commission had been dele- 
gated authority in the premises, reversed the order of the Oom- 
mission, and referred the matter back to the Commission to deter- 
mine the reasonableness of the fare of seven cents proposed to 
be charged by the company (People ex reL New York, Westchester 
and Boston Ry. Co, v. Public Service Commission, 193 App. Div. 
445). 

The Commission has since reopened the case and taken further 
evidence as to the reasonableness of the proposed rate. The city 
has obtained permission to appeal to the Court of Appeals. 

Case No. 2389 — Cases Nos. 1801, 2323-2327.— On March 
16, 1920, Mr. Justice Greenbaum decided that the motions of the 
Commission to quash two writs of certiorari obtained by the City 
of New York should be granted. These writs had been obtained 
by the city to review two orders made by the Commission on 
July 15, 1919, and July 17, 1919, authorizing the New York 
Railways Company and certain, surface lines of the Brooklyn 
Rapid Transit system to charge two cents for transfers, except 
in the case of transfers required by the terms of a municipal 
franchise, agreement or consent. The Commission had moved 

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FOUBTBENTH AnNUAI. RePOBT 39 

to quash th«s© writs on the grounds that the city was not 
a party a^rieved and that the petition for the writ was insuffi- 
cient to justify its allowance. Orders dismissing these writs 
were entered respectively on March 22, 1920, and March 28, 
1920. The opinion of Mr. Justice Greenbaum is reported in 
Matter of City of New York v. JVirow, 111 Misc. 224. 

An appeal from these ordei^ has been taken to the Appellate 
Division, First Department. 

Cases Nos. U77-2479.— On March 80, 1920, Lindley M. Gar- 
rison, as receiver of the Nassau Electric Railroad Company, of 
the Brooklyn, Queens County and Suburban Railroad Company, 
and of the Coney Island and Brooklyn Railroad Company, 
made three applications to the Commission for authority to 
increase the cash rate of fare charged upon the lines of the 
respective companies from five to eight centa On March 31, 
1920, the Commission made orders denying the applications for 
want of power and jurisdiction, and denying applications for 
rehearinga 

Writs of certiorari to review these orders were obtained by the 
receiver. On April 10, 1920, the Appellate Division, First 
Department, made orders dismissing the writs of certiorari and 
ajffirming the orders of the Commission. The Court of Appeals, 
on July 7,' 1920, also affirmed the orders of the Commission, with- 
out prejudice to the right of the receiver to make separate appli- 
cations as to the franchises which come within the jurisdiction 
of the Commission, as indicated in its opinion (229 N. T. Memo. 
63). In its opinion the court indicated that the Commission 
has jurisdiction over the followiog classes of franchises: 

1. All franchises granted directly by the L^slaAure; 

2. All franchises granted by municipal authorities prior to 
January 1, 1875; 

3. All franchises granted by municipal authorities subsequent 
to the passage of the Public Service. Commissions Law on July 1, 
1907; and 

4. Certain fran<*hises granted between January 1, 1875, and 
July 1, 1907. 

^o applications have since been made in accordance with l!he 
snggeaiion. contained in the opinion ; but a motion by the receiver 



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40 Public Sbevicb CoMMissioisr — Fiest Disteiot 

for a reargument, and a motion by the City of New York to 
amend the remittitur, have been made and denied. 

Case No. 2605. — Lindley M, Garrison, as recseiver of the New 
York Consolidated Railroad Company, complained to the Com- 
mission, by petition dated May 7, 1920, that the maximum rates^ 
fares and charges chargeable upon the railroad operated by him 
are insujBBicient to yield reasonable compensation for the service 
rendered and are unjust and unreasonable, and applied, by peti- 
tion verified May 12, 1920, for a hearing and determination as 
to the just and reasonable rates, fares and charges to be obs^red. 
The City of New York, having been advised that the application 
had been presented and that no action would be taken for tiie 
present, applied to the iSupreme Court for a writ of prohibition 
commanding the Commission to desist and lefrain from enter- 
taining said application. This application was denied by the 
court. 

On June 10, 1920, the Commission made an order denying the 
application of the receiver for want of jurisdiction to determine 
and fix a rate of fare different from that fixed in Contract No. 4, 
and on the same day denied an application for a rehearing. 

The Receiver has obtained a writ of certiorari to review the 
order of the Commission. The Transit Construction Commis- 
sioner and the City of New York have obtained leave to intervene, 
to be made parties, and to file returns. Returns have been filed 
by the Commission, by the Transit Construction Commissioner, 
and by the City of New York. A delay in bringing the case 
Qfa for argument has been due to a motion made by the city to 
compel the Oomm.ission to make a further return containing 
numerous documents which the city desires to present to the 
court. The Commission was compelled to oppose this motion 
because most of the documents which the city wishes to have 
in the further return are not in the possession of the Commission, 
and it would, therefore, be impossible for it to return them. 

Case No. 2500.— On May 28, 1920, the Interborough Rapid 
Transit Company presented a complaint to the Commission that 
the maximum fare of five cents chargeable by it is insufiicient to 
yidd a reasonable compensation for the service rendered by it 
in the operation of the subway, and applied for a hearing and 



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FOUETEENTH AnNTJAL RbPOBT 41 

deteimination as to the just and reasonable rate. On the same 
day the Commission dismissed the complaint and denied the 
application for want of jurisdiction to fix a rate of fare different 
from that fixed by Contract No. 3. 

The company has secured a writ of certiorari to review the 
order of the Commission. The Transit Construction Commis- 
sioner and the City of New York have secured leave to intervene, 
to be made parties, and to file returns. Returns have been made 
by the Commission, by the Transit Construction Commissioner, 
and by the City of New York. The case has been set down for 
argument before tho Appellate Division on January 14, 1921. 

Gas Sate Litigation 

During the year 1920 the Law Department of the Commission 
was engaged in actively defending (the actions instituted in 1919 
and 1920 by sixteen companies within the jurisdiction of the 
Commission to have the maximum rates for gas prescribed by 
statute set aside as confiscatory and unconstitutional. 

Similar actions had been begun in 1916 by the Brooklyn 
Borough Gas Company and the Kings County Lighting Company 
which had attacked the constitutionality of chapter 604 of the 
Laws of 1916, amending chapter 125 of the Laws of 1906, re- 
ducing the price from one dollar to eighty cents for gas supplied to 
private consumers in the terriiory served by those two companies. 

In August, 1918, the Brooklyn Borough Gas Company obtained 
a judgment, entered upon the report of Hon. Charles E, Hughes 
as referee, declaring the eighty-cent rate confiscatory, and from 
that judgment the defendants have appealed. 

In the case of the Kings County Lighting Company, Mr, 
Justice Greenbaum at Special Term, New York 'County, dis- 
missed the complaint, and from the judgment entered on Mar<sh 
29, 1920, the plaintiff has appealed. 

The only case brought to trial in 1919 was that of the Consoli- 
dated Gas Company of New York, the trial of which began about 
the middle of July, 1919, and terminated on March 30, 1920. 
The suits of the New York and Queens Gas Company, the Kings 
County Lighting Company (second action) and the New York 
and Richmond Gas Company were tried during 1920. No 



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42 Public Sebviob Commission — Fibst Distkict 

decision has yet been rendered in the Richmond Company's suit 
In the other three cases judgments were entered declaring the 
statutory rate confiscatory and enjoining the defendants from 
enforcing the same, and from those judgments appeals have been 
taken to the United States Supreme Court. 

The trial of the actions of the Brooklyn Union Gas Company 
and of the Central Union Gas Company are now going on before 
Special Masters. Fourteen of the gas companies made applica- 
tions for and succeeded in obtaining preliminary injunctions in 
the Federal District Court, although all such motions were 
vigorously opposed by the Commission as one of the defendants. 
The Jamaica Gas Light Company and the New York and Rich- 
mond Gas Company were denied injunctions pendente lite in the 
Stete Supreme Court, the Richmond Company making a second 
unsuccessful attempt to obtain such an injunction. 

A summary of the important steps taken in the various gas 
rate litigations follows: 

Consolidated Oas Company of New York v. Newton and 
Others. — Action instituted in January, 1919, in the United States 
District Court, Southern District of New York, to have declared 
unconstitutional and to enjoin the Attorney-General of the State, 
the Public Service Commission for the First District and the 
District Attorney of New York county from enforcing chapter 125 
of the Laws of 1906, prescribing eighty cents per thousand cubic 
feet as the maximum rate to be charged to plaintiff's private con- 
sumers. Abraham S. Gilbert, Esq., was appointed Special 
Master to find fully the facts and report to the court all the 
testimony and evidence together with his findings of fact and 
conclusions of law. The trial was begun in July, 1919, and ter- 
minated in March, 1920. Almost 16,000 printed pages of testi- 
mony were taken and numerous and many voluminous exhibits 
introduced in evidence. 

On May 5, 1920, the Master filed his report, recommending 
that chapter 125 of the Laws of 1906, in so far as it limits plain- 
tiff to the eighty-cent rate, be declared unconstitutional. About 
the same time plaintiff made application for a temporary injunc- 
tion before three judges of the Federal Court, as provided 
by section 266 of the Judicial Code, and on June 29th an order 

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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAX RbPOBT 43 

was made granting such an injunction, pending final decree, and 
permitting the charging of the rate of one dollar per thousand 
cubic feet to private consumers after July 1, the excess twenty 
cents to be deposited with a Special Master. 

Exceptions having been filed by the defendants to the Master's 
report, the matter came on for argument before Judge Learned 
Hand, United States District Judge, in July, 1920. On 
August 4th Judge Hand filed his opinion and entered a decree, 
which was amended on August 11, 1920, sustaining many of the 
defendants' exceptions, declaring chapter 125 of the Laws of 1906 
confiscatory and imconstitutional since January 1, 1918, restrain- 
ing the defendants for a period of five years from the date of 
the entry of the decree from in any way attempting to enforce 
the said act or from taking any action under the Public Service 
Conunissions Law to enforce said act, and directing the plaintiff, 
as a condition of the continuance of the injunction and until 
March 1, 1921, or imtil the earlier promulgation of a gas rate 
applicable to the plaintiff by some competent authority of the 
State of New York, to charge not more than $1.20 per thousand 
cubic feet, and requiring the plaintiff to deposit with a Special 
Master all suma collected in excess of 80 cents or, in lieu of cash, 
to deposit Liberty bonds or other proper securities for said excess 
amounts. A further order was entered by Judge Hand providing 
that, if the defendants should, within 30 days after the entry of 
the final decree, appeal to the United States Supreme Court, in 
that event the conditions imposed upon the continuance of the 
injunction in the decree should continue until the determination 
of the appeal. Thereafter the defendants appealed within the 
time allowed and on November 10, 1920, an appeal was also 
taken by the plaintiff from certain provisions of the decree. 

Central Union Oas Company v. Newton and Others — Northern 

Union Oas Company v. Newton and Others — The Standard Oas 

Light Company of the City of New York v. Newton and Others — 

The New York Mutual Oas Light Company v. Newton and Others 

— New Amsterdam Oas Company v. Newton and Others — The 

East Biver Oas Company of Long Island City v. Newton and 

Others. — Actions were begun in the Federal court by these six 

suhsidiary companies of the Consolidated Gas Company System 



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44 Public Sebviob Commissiobt — First Distbict 

to have the 80-cent law declared confiscatory and the defendants 
enjoined from enforcing that rate. In May, 1920, these com- 
panies made motions for preliminary injunctions which were 
argued before Hon. Henry G. Ward, Circuit Court Judge, and 
Hon. Julius M, Mayer and Hon. John C. Knox, District Court 
judges, on June 14th. On June 29th the Court granted each of 
the plaintiffs a preliminary injunction and, as a condition thereof, 
permitted the charging and collecting of $1 per thousand cubic 
feet after July 1, 1920, and, pending final determination of their 
actions, provided the excess 20 cents be deposited with a Special 
Master. An appeal from th« order pendente lite waa duly 
allowed on July 27, 1920. On August 26th the plaintiffs moved 
for modifications of the injunction orders, so that they might 
charge $1.30 per thousand cubic feet to private consumers and 
substitute Liberty bonds or other securities in place of the excess 
collected over the statutory rate. These motions were argued 
on November 4, 1920, and a decision handed down on Xovem- 
ber 26th, allowing the collection of a rate of $1.10 pending the 
final determination or further order of the Court, and the sub- 
stitution of proper securities for the amounts collected above 80 
cents, Tho trial of the action of the Central Union Gas Com- 
pany was b^un in September, 1920, before Special Master A. S. 
Gilbert and is now going on. 

Brooklyn Union Oas Company v. Nixon and Others. — Suit 
was b^un in May, 1919, m the Federal court to have declared 
unconstitutional and to enjoin the defendants from enforcing 
the 80-cent rate prescribed by chapter 125 of the Laws of 1906. 
An application for a preliminary injunction was argued before 
Hon. Henry G, Ward, Circuit Court Judge, Hon. Julius M. 
Mayer and Hon. John C. Knox, District Court judges, in Janu- 
ary, 1920. On February 25, 1920', an order was entered grant- 
ing a preliminary injunction and allowing the plaintiff to charge 
97 cents per thousand cubic feet to its private consumers pending 
fimal dotermination of the action, the ex!cess 17 cents to be 
deposited with a Special Master. The trial of the action was 
begun before Special Master James C. Graham, in September, 
1920, and is now going on. On September 3, 1920, plaintiff 
moved for a modification of the preliminary injunction order so 



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FoUETEENTH ANNUAL RbPORT 45 

that it might charge $1.30 per thousand cubic feet and substitute 
bonds or other securities instead of depositing the excess over 
the 80-cent rate. Argument was had upon this motion on 
October 22, and a decision was rendered on November 26, 1920, 
permitting plaintiff to charge its private consumers $1.10 per 
thousand cubic feet and to deposit securities in lieu of the excess 
collected over the statutory rate. 

Newtovm Oas Company v. Nixon and Others. — This suit was 
begun in the Federal court in May, 1920, to have the $1 rate 
declared unconstitutional as to plaintiff, a subsidiary of the 
Brooklyn Union Gas Company. A motion for a preliminary 
injunction was argued on October 22, 1920, and the motion 
granjted by decision rendered on November 26th, whereby plaintiff 
is permitted to charge $1.10 pending final determination or the 
further order of the Court, and deposit securities for the amounts 
collected above the statutory rate. 

Flaibush Gas Company v. Nixon and Others. — This suit was 
commenced in May, 1920, in the Federal court to have the 80- 
cent rate declared unconstitutional as to plaintiff, another sub- 
sidiary of the Brooklyn Union Gas Company. This plaintiff 
was also granted a preliminary injunction on November 26, 
1920, upon the same conditions as those prescribed in the case 
of the Newtown Gas Company. 

Richmond Hill and Queens County Gas Light Company v. 
Nixon and Others — The Woodhaven Gas Light Company v. 
Nixon and Others. — These actions were brought by two other 
companies in the Brooklyn Union System to have the $1 rate 
for gas declared confiscatory. The complaints were filed in the 
Federal court in April, 1920. No further action was taken 
until November 10, 1920, when motions were made for the 
appointment of a Special Master in each case, which motions 
came before Hon. Julius M. Mayer, District Court Judge, on 
November 26, 1920. 

The Jamaica Gas Light Company v. Nixon and Others. — This 
suit was begun by another subsidiary of the Brooklyn Union Gas 
Company in the State Supreme Court in November, 1919, to 
have declared confiscatory the $1 statutory rate for gas. A 
motion for a preliminary injunction having been argued before 



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46 Public Sbevice Commission — Fibst District 

Mr. Justice Greenbaum, an opinion was rendered on February 13, 
1920, denying the motion. Thereafter the plaintiff moved for 
a discontinuance of its action. By an order entered on March 29, 
1920, it was provided that, if all or any of the defendants should 
fail to sign a stipulation that the testimony taken in the action 
of the Brooklyn Union Gas Company pending in the United 
States District Court, so far as said testimony concerns the capital 
invested by said Brooklyn company and the cost of production 
of gas, may be read into the record upOn the trial of the Jamaica 
company's action with the same force and effect as if taken 
therein, the motion to discontinue was granted upon the further 
conditions that plaintiff (1) should stipulate not to move anew 
for a preliminary injunction in any similar action it might there- 
after bring, (2) should stipulate to make the City of New York 
a party in any similar suit brought by plaintiff and not thereafter 
move to oust the city, and (3) should pay taxable costs, "and 
failing to comply with the three last mentioned conditions, the 
motion is denied, with ^10 costs to each of the defendants." 
Plaintiff having appealed from that order, the Appellate Division 
for the First District on June 18, 1920, modified the order of 
March 29, 1920, by striking out the conditions numbered " 1 " 
and "2" and otherwise affirmed said order. 

Neiu York and Queens Gas Company v. Newton and Others, — 
This action was instituted in the Federal court in April, 1919, 
to have declared confiscatory and to enjoin the defendants from 
enforcing chapter 125 of the Laws of 1906, fixing $1 as the 
maximum rate lawfully chargeable by plaintiff, a subsidiary of 
the Consolidated Gas Company. The trial of this suit was held 
before Special Master A. S. Gilbert, during the months of April, 
May and June, 1920. A report having been filed recommending 
that the statute prescribing the $1 rate be declared confiscatory 
as to plaintiff, exceptions to the report were filed by defendants 
and also by plaintiff. Argument of the motion upon the excep- 
tions was heard by Hon. Julius M. Mayer, District Judge, 
on AuguFt 21, 1920, who on Xovember 3, 1920, rendered 
an opinion confirming substantially the Master's report. A 
decree declaring the $1 rate confiscatory as to this company and 
enjoining the enforcement thereof was entered on November 19, 

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FOUETEBNTH AnNUAL BeFOBT 47 

1920. An appeal from the decree will be taken by the defen- 
dants to the United States Supreme Court. 

Kings County Lighting Compamy v. Newton and Others. — 
This action was brought in the State Supreme Court in July, 
1916, to have chapter 125 of the Laws of 1906, as amended by 
chapter 604 of the Laws of 1916, fixing 80 cento as the maximum 
rate to be charged plaintiflFs' private consumers, declared con- 
fiscatory. The action was finally tried before Mr. Justice Green- 
baum from October, 1918, to April, 1919. About 10,000 pages 
of testimony were taken, together with numerous exhibits. On 
January 27, 1920, the court rendered an opinion holding that 
the complaint must be dismissed without prejudice to reopen the 
case by appropriate proceedings if, after an adequate experimenta- 
tion under an 80-cent rate, plaintiff believed it could prove that 
rate confiscatory as to it. On February 7, 1920, plaintiff made 
a motion to reopen the case for the purpose of showing its operat- 
ing resulte for 1919 and "at the present time," which motion 
was denied on March 29, 1920. Plaintiff thereupon appealed 
from that order and from the judgment, entered also on 
March 29th, dismissing the complaint. An application to the 
Appellate Division for a stay, pending the appeals from the 
judgment and order, was denied on April 23, 1920. 

Kings County Lighting Company v. Nixon and Others.* — This 
suit was commenced in the Federal court on May 24, 1920, to 
have the 80-cent statutory rate declared confiscatory. Plaintiff 
having asked for a preliminary injunction, the motion was heard 
by Hon. Henry G. Ward, Circuit Court judge, Hon. Julius M. 
Mayer and Hon. John C. Knox, District Court judges, who on 
June 29, 1920, entered a decree granrfiing the injunction and 
allowing plaintiff to charge and collect a rate of $1 pending 
final decree, the excess 20 cents to be deposited until the final 
disposition of the case. The trial of the action took place in 
August and September, 1920, before Special Master Gordon 
Auchincloss, who, on September 22, filed his report, based upon 
the operating results for 1919, and the first six months of 1920, 
recommending that the 80-cent rate be declared void and ill^al 
as to plaintiff. Exceptions to the Master's report having been 
filed by both plaintiff And the defendants, the hearing on said 

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4'8- Public Sbbviob Commission — Fibst District 

report was held by Hon, Charles M, Hough, sitting as a District 
Court Judge, who on October 14 handed down an opinion 
modifying in some respects the Master's report, but confirming 
the finding as to the conficatory character of the 80-cent rate. 
A final decree was entered on October 19, 1920. The Commis- 
sion and the Attomey-Gteneral will appeal to the United States 
Supreme Court. 

New York and Richmond Gas Company v. Nixon and Others. 
— This suit was begun in the State -Supreme Court in February, 
1920, to have the $1 statutory rate declared unconstitutional. At 
the same time, plaintiff moved for a preliminary injunction 
which was argued before Mr. Justice Callaghan of Kings Coumty 
Supreme Court on February 28 and denied on April 12, 1920, 
as the case was about to go to trial. An oflScial referee, Hon. 
Albert H. Sewall, having been appointed to hear and determine 
the case, the trial started before the official referee in July and 
terminated in November, 1920. No decision has yet been ren- 
dered. On July 22, 1920, plaintiff made a second motion for a 
preliminary injunction, which was denied by Mr. Justice Scudder, 
Supreme Court, Kings county, by an order entered August 18, 
1920. 

Bronx Gas and Electric Company v. Public Service Commis- 
sion, First District, and Others, — This action was commenced 
on March 12, 1919, in the State Supreme Court to have the $1 
statutory rate for gas to private consumers and the 75-cent statu- 
tory rate to the city declared unconstitutional. The counsel to 
the Commission having moved for a separation of the alleged 
causes of action, the motion was granted by Mr. Justice Hotch- 
kiss, of the Supreme Court, New York county, on April 15, 1919, 
whose order was afiimied by the Appellate Division on May 9, 
1919. Plaintiff having served an amended complaint, the Com- 
mission demurred to one of the alleged causes of action. Plain- 
tiff then moved for judgment on the pleadings, which was denied 
by Mr. Justice McAvoy on July 23, 1919. The Appellate 
Division, First Department, on December 19, 1919, reversed Mr. 
Justice McAvoy's order, and overruled the demurrer with leave 
to answer. In the meantime a motion for a preliminary 
injunction had been argued before Mr. Justice Mullan, who on 

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FOTIBTBENTH AnNUAL RkPOBT 49 

August 1, 1919, entered an order granting the injunction. The 
plaintiff thereupon put into effecst a rate of $1.50 per thousand 
cubic feet, and in August, 1920, filed a schedule showing a rate 
of $1.75, effective September let, which schedule the Commission 
rejected as unauthorized. An order to show cause why the 
injunction should not be vacated or modified was then obtained 
by the Commission and some of the other defendants, and a stay 
preventing an increase over the $1.50 rate was granted, pending 
argument before Mr. Justice MuUan to whom the matter was 
referred. Plaintiff then applied for a vacation of the stay to Mr. 
Justice McAvoy, who refused to interfere pending the decision of 
a motion for a temporary injunction by the city and certain con- 
sumers in a separate action instituted to prevent the plaintiff 
from charging more than $1.50. On September 9 Mr. Justice 
Mitchell granted a temporary injunction restraining the collection 
of a rate in exceas of $1.50. In November, 1920, a motion was 
made to have the case tried before an ofiicial referee, which motion 
has not yet been decided. The defendants have appealed from 
the order made by Mr. Justice MuUan on August 1, 1919, grant- 
ing a preliminary injunction and the appeal will be argued in 
the near future. 

Brooklyn Borough Gas Company v. Public Service Commission 
for the First District, — This action was commenced in the 
Supreme Court, New York county, shortly after the enactment 
of chapter 604 of the Laws of 1916, amending chapter 125 of 
the Laws of 1906, prescribing 80 cents as the maximum rate 
chargeable for gas sold to private consumers after July 1, 1916, 
in the territory served by plaintiff. The latter attacked not 
only the 80-cent statute but also the statutory rate of $1 fixed 
by chapter 125 of the Laws of 1906, the 75-cent rate to the City 
of New York, as prescribed by chapter 736 of the Laws of 1905, 
and an order of the Public Service Commission, adopted July 8, 
1913, fixing 95 cents as the maximum rate to be charged in the 
31st ward of the Borough of Brooklyn, which order had been 
duly accepted and complied with by plaintiff. The case was 
tried before Hon. Chas. E. Hughes, as referee, who on July 24, 
1918, filed his opinion and report, holding that the 80-cent rate 
was palpably confiscatory, that because of the special conditions 



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50 Public Sbbvioe Commission — FntsT Disteiot 

no case had been made for invalidating the 76-cent rate to the 
city, that the 95-cent rate fixed by the Commission's order was 
no longer effective, and that the $1 rate prescribed by chapter 125 
of the Laws of 1906 did not survive the enactment of chapter 604 
of the Laws of 1916 which repealed the provision of the Laws 
of 1906 fixing $1 as the maximimi rate for gas sold in plaintiff's 
territory. A judgment was entered upon the Eeferee's report 
on August 13, 1918. Shortly after the Eeferee's report had been 
filed plaintiff attempted to put in force a rate of $1.25. The 
Commission thereupon instituted a summary proceeding under 
section 74 of the Public Service Commissions Law, and on 
August 16, 1918, obtained an injunction preventing the collecting 
of more than 95 cents, which injunction was later modified by 
the Appellate Division, Second Department, so as to make the 
injunction order effective until September 8, 1918. In January, 
1919, the Appellate Division, First Department, graated the 
Commission's motion for a stay of proceedings pending the appeal, 
which had been taken from the judgment entered on August 13, 
1918. In October, 1919, plaintiff moved for a vacation of said 
stay, which the Appellate Division, First Department, denied 
'^ without prejudice to plaintiff to apply to the Public Service 
Commission for the relief sought.'^ In January, 1920, plaintiff 
obtained leave to appeal to the Court of Appeals from the order 
denying the stay of proceedings, and served a notice of appeal 
in February, 1920, but that appeal has not been prosecuted. The 
record on appeal from the judgment entered upon Referee 
Hughes' report has been printed and it is expected that it will be 
arpied in the near futura 



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CHAPTER III 



FORMAL CASES RELATING TO TRANSPORTATION, 
HEAT, LIGHT AND POWER COMPANIES 



The foUowiDg synopses cover the principal features of some 
of the more important formal cases before the Commission during 
1920: 

Bates of Fare 

Case No. 2^16 — ManhcUtan and Queens Traction Corporation 
— Application to increase raie of fare. — This case began in 1W9 
upon application by the Receivers of the company for permission 
to establish a zone-fare system with two 5-cent zones instead of 
the existing single 5-cent fare zone at that time covering the entire 
route. On the day, early in September, 1919, the tearing was 
to be held upon this application, the Oonmdssion was served 
with an order, granting the motion of the City of New York, 
to show cause why a writ of prohibition should not issue restrain- 
ing it from taking any action upon the application. The writ 
on the order to show cause was obtained in the Supreme Court, 
New York county. Special Term, Part I, October 14, 1919. It 
temporarily stayed all proceedings by the Commission in this 
case. The Commission took an appeal from this order to the 
Appellate Division for the First Judicial Department. That 
court on or about January 23, 1920, handed down a decision 
affirming the order of the Special Term. Appeal was then taken 
from the Appellate Division's decision to the Court of Appeals, 
which on July 7, 1920, reversed the order of the Appellate 
Division and the Special Term aforesaid. In its opinion the 
Court of Appeals reviewed the franchises granted to the Man- 
hattan and Queens Traction Corporation and its predecessor, the 
South Shore Traction Company, and after a discussion of the 
provisions of law, particularly provisions of the Public Service 
Commissions Law applicable in the premises and the powers and 
duties of the Commission therein, held as follows {People ex rel. 
City of New York v. Nixon et al, 229 N. Y. 356) : 

At the date of this franchise the Public Service Commission 
was empowered by statute to increase the maximum rates, fares, 

[51] 



.uy Google 



52 Public Seevicb Commission — First District 

or charges chargeable by any * * * street railroad corpora- 
tion when found to be inadequate to yield a fair return 
(Section 49, Public Service Commissions Law; Consol. Laws, 
Chap. 48). * * * Contracts fixing rates, if made before 
the enactment of these statutes, were subject at the utmost to the 
possibility of the exercise by the state of its police power in the 
future. Contracts made thereafter wiere subject to a possibility 
which had became merged in a reality. It was no longer a 
question of what the state might do at some indefinite and unknow- 
able time. It was a question of what the state had already done, 
drawing upon sources of energy, reserves of power, till then latent 
and potential, and manifesting its will in law. A new public 
policy had been initiated. A new right had been declared. 
Rates were thereafter to be just and reasonable alike for carriers 
on the one side ajid for passengers or shippers on the other. 
Neither class would be permitted for its own benefit to set the 
rule at naught. The state through its delegate, the Commission, 
would lower the charges if too high. It would raise them if too 
low. * * * Rate-making was to be no longer an affair of 
predominantly private interest, fn which the state would inter- 
fere without system and with spasmodic and intermittent action. 
A superintending agency of government had taken the matter 
in hand. 

Following the Court of Appeals' decision, the Receivers' appli- 
cation was again brought on for a hearing before the Commission. 
Hearings thereon were held at which evidence adduced sustained 
the allegations contained in the Receivers' application that they 
were not realizing sufficient income from the operation of the 
railroad in their custody to pay operating expenses. An order 
therefore was made in this case on December 7, 1920, establish- 
ing zones on said company's lines and rates of fares therefor, 
as follows: 

ZOKBS 

Zone Xo. 1 shall extend from the Manhattan terminal of said 
Manhattan and Queens Traction Corporation's lines to Grand 
street, Elmhurst, and 

Zone No. 2 shall extend from Grand street, Elmhurst, to the 
present terminal of said Manhattan and Queens Traction Corpo- 
ration's lines at Jamiica, New York. 



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FOUETBBNTH AnNUAL RepOBT 63 

Rates op Fabs 

1. For a single ride from any point in Zone 1 to any other 
point in Zone 1, five cents (5 cents), 

2. For a single ride from any point in Zone 2 to any other 
point in Zone 2, five cents (5 oentts). 

The ordor contained a provision that nothing therein should 
change or affect or be deemed or construed to authorize, direct or 
permit any change in the rates of fare on the Bridge Local Line 
or the Industrial Centre Line of the Manhattan and Queens 
Traction Corporation as described in its Passenger Tariff No. 3 
on file with the Commission. This is a special 3-cent fare for 
a short rida 

Cases Nos. ZJfll, 2Jf78 and 2Jf79 — The Nassau Electric Baitr 
road Company; the Brooklyn^ Queens County and 8tbburba/n 
Railroad Company; the Coney Island and Brooklyn Railroad 
Company — Applications for increases in rates of fare from five 
cents to eight cents. — These cases came before the Commission 
upon complaint of Lindley M. Garrison, as Receiver of the cJom- 
panies named, as to the rate of fare on the lines thereof. He 
petitioned for an increase from 5 to 8 cents. His petitions 
were filed with the Commission on March 30, 1920, on which 
date the Commission made orders directing that a hearing be 
had in the matters on March 31, 1920. The hearing was held 
on that date on all three applications, and orders were made 
denying ealch of them upon the ground that the Conmiission had 
no power or jurisdiction upon the facts alleged' in each of the 
complaints and applications to determine the questions presented 
or to grant the prayer thereof or to increase the rates, fares or 
charges, charged or cheargeable upon said lines of said railroads, 
and not upon the merits. Following the making of these orders, 
the Receiver immediately mad*e applications in all three cases 
for a rehearing. The Commission promptly denied these appli- 
cations by orders also made on March 31, 1920. 

On the same day that the applications for a rehearing in these 
cases were made and denied, the Receiver obtained in the Supreme 
Court, New York county. Special Term, an order for a writ of 
certiorari to review the Commission's determinations. The City 



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64 Public Sebvicb Commission — Fibst District 

of New York secured, on consent, an order, also from Special 
Term, permitting it to intervene and making it an additional 
party defendant. On April 10, 1920, the Appellate Division, 
First Department, made an order dismissing the writ of certiorari, 
affirming the proceedings of the Commission as a matter of law 
and not in the exercise of its discretion, granting leave to appeal 
to the Court of Appeals and certifying that in its opinion a ques- 
tion of law was involved, which ought to be reviewed by the Court 
of Appeals. Thereupon an appeal was taken to the Court of 
Appeals. On July 7, 1920, that Court handed down a decision 
in effect holding that the Commission has power to change the 
rate of fare on lines operated pursuant tto franchises granted 
directly by the Legislature, on franchises granted by municipal 
authorities prior to January 1, 1&75, on franchises granted by 
municipal authorities subsequent to the taking effect of the Public 
Service Commissions Law on July 1, 1907, and certain other 
classes of franchises described therein. 

Case No. ZJf,52 — South Brooklyn Railway Company- — New 
local freight tariff increasing rates applicable to chartered trolley 
freight cars for handling newspapers, — This case is practically 
a continuation of Case No. 2435, which was decided in the year 
1919. In both cases the South Brooklyn Railway Company 
sought to obtain from the Commission permission to increase its 
freight charges on cars handling newspapers. In the case before 
the Commission in 1919 the rate asked for was $5 per car per 
hour, with a minimum charge of $15. In that case the Com- 
mission held that the charges were unreasonable and unjust and 
refused permission to the company to put same into effect Such 
decision was made in December, 1919. The opinion in that case 
was written by Hon. Alfred M. Barrett, then Deputy Commis- 
sioner, and the order entered was pursuant to Commissioner Bar- 
rett's opinion. 

Not until the beginning of the year 1920 did the railroad 
company again seek to obtain permission to charge an increased 
rate for this particular service. Under date of January 2, 1920, 
the South Brooklyn Railway Company, by Mortimer B. Hoffman, 
addressed a communication to the Commission referring to Case 
No. 2435, advising the Commission that the South Brooklyn 



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Fourteenth Annual Report 55 

Railway Company withdrew and canceled the proposed tariff 
in question in that case and setting forth, as indicated at the hear- 
ings, that it was the intention of the company to withdraw the 
special service provided by such tariff schedule, if it was denied 
the right to charge the rate proposed, the reasonableness of which 
be said the company deemed' clearly shown by the evidence. How- 
ever, he stated, the call for moderation and an honest spirit of 
co-operation had been weighed and in that spirit, without accept- 
ing or agreeing with the statements of the opinion of Commis- 
sioner Barrett, but in an attempt to seek a practical adjustment, 
his company bad decided to file a new tariff providing for an 
increase more in line with what the opinion indicated would be 
reasonable, effective on short notice, but without prejudice to its 
rights to file other and revised tariffs covering this particular 
service, if experience with the actual workings of the rate pro- 
posed proved the increase inadequate. He concluded by making 
application to the Commission for special permission to put into 
effect on three days' notice, namely, January 10, 1920, a new 
tariff, making the charge per car per hour 50 cents less and the 
minimum charge $1.50 less than requested in 1919. 

On January 7, 1920, ike Commission made an order in Case 
No. 2452, directing that a hearing on the application be held on 
January 9, 1920. The hearing was held on that date and closed. 
The testimony being satisfactory as tx) the reasonableness of the 
rate proposed to be charged, the Commission made an order grant- 
ing special permission to the company to put the new tariff into 
effect upon short notice. 

Case No. 2JiS5 — Van Brunt Street amd Erie Basin Railroad 
Company — New tariff schedule providing for increased rate of 
fa/re from S cents to Jf cents, — This case arose on the filing 
by the Van Brunt Street and Erie Basin Railroad Company of 
a new local passenger tariff issued April 3, 1920, effective May 6, 
1920, providing for an increased rate of fare from 3 cents to 4 
cents, and for tickets in packages of 8 for 25 cents, 16 for 50 
cents and 32 for $1. A somewhat similar tariff was filed in the 
year 1919 and disapproved by the Commission. The facts as to 
this proceeding in 1919 are found in Case No. 2374 (Vol. I, 
Thirteenth Annual Report of the Commission, page 32). 



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66 Public Sbevicb Commission — Fiest Distbict 

On April 9, 1920, the Commission made an order directing 
that a hearing be held on April 19, 1920, to inquire into and 
determine the lawfulness and propriety of the proposed changes 
in tie new tariff schedule. The hearing was held that date 
and continued on April 27, 1920, when the hearings were closed. 
Two days before the said proposed new tariff was to take effect, 
namely, on May 4, 1920, the Commission made an order sxur 
pending it until May 20, 1920. Later orders continued the 
suspension to July 15, 1920. On July 13, 1920, the Commission 
made an order annulling said tariff, for the reason that the com- 
pany had failed to show that the increase in rates proposed was 
just and reasonable. The hearings were held before Deputy 
(commissioner Morgan T. Donnelly, whb submitted an opinion 
reviewing the facts and pointing out the company's failure to 
sustain the burden of proof that the rate of 3 cents was unjust 
and unreasonable. The Deputy 'Commiissioner found that the com- 
pany was making more money in 1920 than it made in 1919, when 
the previous application for an increase of fare was denied. The 
company had offered very little evidence upon the merits of its 
application, but rested chiefly upon the contention that a contract 
existed between the State of New York and the company by 
virtue of the special legislation enacted in 1867, authorizing an 
extension of the company's line and the right to charge a rate of 
fare not exceeding 4 cents for each' passenger transported on its 
route, and that the Commission was without power to interfere 
with such contract. This contention the Commissioner thought 
could not be sustained', it being well settled that when a rate is 
fixed by the Legislature, no railroad company obtains any con- 
tract right to continue to charge such rate, but the rate (and the 
right to put the rate into effect) is always* subject to change by 
the Legislature or by its authorized agent. 

Case No. 2500 — Interborough Rapid Transit Company — 
Complaint as to rate of fare. — In this case the Interborough 
Rapid Transit Company complained to the Commission under 
date of May 28, 1920, that the maximum fare of 5 cents charge- 
able by it on its lines of railroad was insufficient to yield a 
reasonable compensation for the service rendered and that such 
rate of fare was unjust and unreasonable and petitioned the Corn- 
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FOTTBTEBNTH AnHTTAL RbPOBT 57 

miaeion to hold a hearing pursuant to the statute to determine 
a just aud reasonable rate for the service performed by it. The 
complaint was presented to the Oommiasion at its meeting on 
May 28, 1920, and the application of the company was denied 
for want of jurisdiction to fix a rate of fare diflFerent from that 
fixed by Contract No. 3. Immediately following this action of 
the Commission, the company made application for a rehearing, 
which the Commiasion also denied at its meeting on May 28, 
1920. The company on the nexit day obtained from the Supreme 
Court, New York county, Special Term, Part II, an order for 
a writ of certiorari. At the close of the year the proceedings in 
oonnection with the writ of certiorari were pending before the 
Appellate Division of the Supreme Court, First Judicial Depart- 
ment. Arguments in respect thereto had not been heard. 

Cases No8. 2501 and 2602 — The Long IsUmd Railroad Com- 
pany — New tariff schedvles shovnng increased commutation 
rates amd local passenger rates. — These cases concerned an 
increased rate of fare on lines of The Long Island Railroad Com- 
pany as indicated by new tariff schedules filed with the Com- 
mission, issued as of May 29, 1920, effecftive July 1, 1920. In 
Case No. 2501 the tariff schedule showed increased commuta- 
tion fares between stations on The Long Island Railroad in the 
Boroughs of Queens and Brooklyn; and also to the Penosylvania 
station in the Borough of Manhattan, New York City. In Case 
No. 21502 the tariff schedule showed increased one-way and 
20^trip ticket fares on The Long Island Railroad Oomipany's 
local electric trains between Flatbush avenue and Queens, N. Y., 
and intermediate points and for Rockaway Beach trains stopping 
at stations as set forth in said schedule. Orders suspending 
these tariffs and directing a hearing to be held in regard thereto, 
were made in both these oases by the Commission on June 1, 1920. 
The hearing was set for June 9, 1920. The two cases were con- 
sidered together, testimony taken applying to both. The hearings 
extended over a period including August 24, 1920, at which 
timp the railroad company withdrew the schedules and asked 
that these cases be discontinued, stating as the reason for its 
action that, because of wage increases which haa been ordered by 
the United States Labor Board under the Transportation Aci 



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68 Public Seevioe Commission — Fiest Distbiot 

of 1*^20 since the proceedings in these cases were started, the 
tariffs would be entirely inadequate to meet the company's wage 
demands. The record would seem to indicate that the with- 
drawals were in all probability for the purpose of seeking 
increased rates from the Interstate Commerce Commission. The 
Commission made orders on August 24, 1920, discontinuing these 
cases. 

Case No. 2505 — New York ConsoUdaied Railroad Compaivy 
— Application for increase vn rate of fare from 5 cents to 8 
cents. — The company^s receiver complained to the Commission 
that the rate of fare charged on its lines of railroad was inade- 
quate to yield a reasonable compensation for the service rendered 
and that such fare was unjust and imreasonable and petitioned 
the Commiasion for an increase from 5 cents to 8 cents. The 
company's petition was presented to the CommisBion at its meert;- 
ing on May 13, 1920, at which time the petition was ordered filed. 
Under date of May 13, 1920, the Hon. Lewis Nixon, then Com- 
missioner of the First District Commission, addressed letters to 
the lion. John F. Hylan, Mayor of The City of New York, and 
Hon. John H. Delaney, Transit Construction Commissioner, 
notifying them of this action, A letter was also addressed to 
the Hon. Lindley M. Garrison, as Receiver of tihe New York 
Consolidated Railroad Company, on the same date by the Secre- 
tary to the Commission to the same effect 

On June 10, 1920, the Commission made an order dismissing 
the Receiver's oomiplaint and denying his petition for want of 
jurisdiction to determine and fix a rate of fare different from 
that fixed by Contract No. 4' with the City of New York. On 
the same day there was presented to the Commission an applica- 
tion for a relhearing, which was also denied. Before orders were 
entered in this case and any action taken therein by the Com- 
mission, the City of New York, by its Corporation Counsel, made 
application in Special Term, Part I, New York county, for an 
order to show cause why an alternative writ of prohibition should 
not issue out of and under the seal of that court, directed to 
Mr. Nixon, constituting the Public Service Commission, the New 
York Consolidated Railroad Company and its Receiver, and the 
New York Municipal Railway Corporation and its Receiver, to 



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YoTJB.TBBl^'r^ ^^l^VAL EepOBT 



59 



desist and ref raiu from any further proceedings in the matter 
of the said application of Hr. Garrison. On May 17, 1920, 
Mr. Justice Whitaker, of the Supreme Court, New York county, 
issued an order to diow cause on May 20, 1920, why said writ 
ehould not be allowed, and staying all the proceedings in this 
matter, pending a further order of the court. The motion came 
on to be heard before Mr. Justice Tiemey, sitting in the court 
aforesaid, who, on May 24, 1920, denied the Corporation Coun- 
sel's motion, stating that Mr. Nixon could not entertain and act 
f'avorably upon Mr. Garriipon's application without prior notice 
to the Corporation Counsel, except in the exercise of bad faith, 
and as that was not to be anticipated, there was no need of 
examining the said motion and thus it ohould be denied. 

Following the action of the Commission denying the company's 
application, the company obtained on June 15, 1920, in the 
Supreme Court, New York county, in a Special Term thereof, 
an order for a writ of certiorari to review the Commission's order. 
At the close of the year the proceedings in connection with the 
writ of certiorari were pending before the Appellate Division of 
the Supreme Court, First Judicial Department. Arguments in 
respect thereto had not been heard. 

Case No. 2512 — Coney Island and Brooklyn Railroad Com- 
pany and The Nassau Electric Railroad Company — New tariff 
showing changes in second fare point on lines to Coney Ishmd — 
Inauguration of single fare zone on S9th Street Ferry-Coney 
Island Line. — In this case the Coney Island and Brooklyn Rail- 
road Company and the Nassau Electric Railroad Company filed 
with this Commission under date of June 10, 1920, a new tariff 
schedule issued as of June 12, 1920, effective July 12, 1920, 
on account of the changing of the southbound second fare point 
from Kings highway and Coney Island avenue to Neck road 
and Coney Island avenue and changing the northbound second 
fare point on the DeKalb-Coney Island and Franklin Avenue 
lines from Malbone street and Flatbush avenue to Park circle, 
and on the Smith Street Line from Ninth avenue and Ninth 
street to Park circle, and also on account of the inauguration of 
the single fare zone on the 39th Street Ferry-Coney Island Line. 
Prior to the spring of 1909 the northerly zone limits of the 

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60 Public Sbbviob Commission — Fibst Distbict 

Coney Island and Brooklyn Lines were at Park circle, and these 
limits were changed to Ninth street and Ninth avenn/e on the 
Smith Street Line and to Flatbush avenue and Malbone street 
on the Franklin Avenue Line. One of the objects of the new- 
tariff schedule was to move these points back to Park circle. The 
placing of these zones at the extended points was voluntary on 
the part of the company and not by order of the Commission. 
So far as moving the second fare point from Kings hi^way and 
Coney Island to Neck road was concerned, such change made no 
differenoe in the operating arrangements of the company, as 
passengers had the privilege of riding from Neck road to New 
York for a 5-cent fare. 

Respecting the inauguration of a single fare zone on the 39th 
Street Ferry-Coney Island Line, passengers at the time the new 
tariff schedule was filed could board cars on this line at any point 
between 39th Street ferry and Coney Island and ride for a fare 
of 5 cente. The new tariff, however, would require passengers to 
pay a total of 10 cents if they desired to ride for the entire length 
of the line. The northerly point of the single fare zone inaugu- 
rated by the new tariff was placed at 39th street and Fifth avenue 
and the southerly point at Bay 19th street and Bath avenue. 

The basis for the request for the inauguration of the zone plan 
on this particular line was the fact that cars on that line were 
operated over the tracks of the Brooklyn, Bath and Coney Island 
Railroad Company between Bath Junction and Stillwell avenue, 
which company, it is claimed, had a legal right to charge a fare 
of 3 cents per mile, its franchise being that of a steam railroad. 

On June 15, 1920, the Conmii«ision made an order deferring 
the operation of said new tariff schedule until August 12, 1920, 
and directing that a hearing be held in the matter on July 1, 
1920. A hearing was held on that date as well las on July 15, 
1920. On August 10, 1920, the 'Commission made a second 
order suspending the operation of the new tariff to October 12, 
1920, and on August 13, 1920, a further order suspending it 
to October 12, 1920, except as to the provisions thereof applicable 
to the DcKalb Avenue-Coney Island Line, the Franklin Avenua 
Line and the Smith Street Line of the Coney Island and Brook- 
lyn Kailpoad Company, which the Commission directed should 



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FoTTBTEBNTH AnNTTAL RepORT 61 

be* allowed, effective on August 17, 1920. Thia order took effect 
nunc pro time as of August 10, 1920. In reality it superseded 
the order aforesaid, made on August 10, 1920. Later orders 
made in this case on October 11, 1920, and November 9, 1&20, 
further suspended the operation of this tariff, except as stated, 
to the close of the year 1920. By order of the United States 
District Court for the Southern District of New York, dated 
October 16, 1920, the Receiver of the Nassau Electric Railroad 
Company was directed to suspend the operation of the 39th Street 
Ferry-Coney Island Line and to substitute therefor the so-called 
86th Street Shuttle Line operating from Bath avenue and Bay 
19th street, by way of Bath avenue, 14th avenue and 86th street, 
to Fifth avenue. At the close of the year such operation was 
taking place. In effect, this ordier of the District Court brought 
about a condition as to fares for a ride from 39th Street ferry 
to Ooniey Island identical to that intended to be effected by the 
new tariff schedule concerned in this casa 

Cases Nos. 2529, 2680 and 2631 — Long I stand Railroad Com- 
pany, New York Central Railroad Compwny, Staten Island Rapid 
Transit Company, New York, New Haven and Hartford Rail- 
road Company, New York Connecting Railroad Company, and 
the New York, Westchester and Boston Railway Company — 
Applications for authority to increase freight rates on less than 
statutory notice; for relief from the provisions of section 36 of 
the Pvhlic Service Com/missions Law of the State of New York, 
as amended June 9, 1917, with respect to freight rates and 
charges; for authority to publish on less than 30 days' notice 
reconsigning rules applicable to ail freight in openrtop cars and 
coal and coke in ail cars, respectively. — In these cajses applica- 
tions (in Case No. 2529) were made by the above mentioned 
companies for authority to file with the Commission on less than 
thirty days' notice to it and to the public, certain new tariffs or 
supplements to tariffs, providing for an increase in freight rates 
on the respective railroads of said companies, the increase desired 
being one of 40 per cent in all existing freight rates, except rates 
on fluid milk, cream and larticles taking the- same rates as milk 
and cream, whether transported in ordinary freight trains or 
special milk trains; an increase of 20 per cent in rates on fluid 



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62 Public Sbbviob Commission — FntsT District 

milk« cream and articles taking the same rates, and an increase 
of 40 per cent in duarges for switching, transit, weighing, diver- 
sion, reconsigning, lighterage, floatage, storage (not including 
track storage) and transfer, where said companies provide sepa- 
rate charges against shippers for such services; also for the 
revision of switching absorption tariffs so as to provide for the 
revision of switdhing absorptions in accordance with the increased 
switching charges petitioned for; subject to the rules and condi- 
tions prescribed by the Interstate Oommerce Commission as to 
interstate rates and charges contained in its opinion in the matter 
of the application of carriers for authority to increase rates 
(ex paHe No. 74) dated July 29, 1920; (in Case No. 2530) for 
relief from the provisions of section 36 of the Public Service 
Commissions Law, as amended June 9, 1917, to tho exitent that 
any of the increased rates involved may be leas for a longer than 
for a shorter distance over the same line or route in the same 
direction, and to the extent that any suoh rates may be greater 
than the aggregate intermediate rates over the same line or route 
in the same direction, until such time as the Commission may 
reach a decision ats to the lawfulness and reasonableness of such 
rates; and further (in Case No. 2531), for permission to file, on 
less than thirty days' notice to the Commission and to the public, 
tariffs or supplements to tariffs containing reconsigning rules 
applicable to all freight in open-top cars, and to coal and coke 
in all cars, as authorized by the Interstate Commerce Commission 
as to interstate traflBc in its Special Permission No. 50,321 
(amended), dated August 9, 1920. 

TJpon the receipt of the above petitions the Commission on the 
same day, August 19, 1920, made an order for a hearing 
thereon, said hearing to be held the next day, August 20, 1920. 
At the hearing the carriers, the shippers and the City of New 
York were represented. It was stated for the carriers that 
similar applications had been previously acted upon favorably 
by the Interstate Commerce Commission with certain exceptions, 
and had likewise been acted upon favorably by the Puiblic Service 
Commission for the Second District. The carriers requested 
that favorable action be taken by the Commission for the First 
District in order that there might be no conflict with the rates 



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FOUETBBNTH AnNTTAJL RePOBT 63 

allowed by the Interstate Commerce Commiasion and by the 
Public Service Commission for the Second Disti-iet Commie- 
sioaer Alfred M. Barrett, who presided at the hearing, gave ample 
opportunity to all pereons preseurti to express their views, but no 
one appeared in opposition to the applications. Indeed, the rep- 
resentative of the sfhippers stated that he appeared in favor of 
the carriers' application. 

Under the law, the jurisdiction of the Public Service Commis- 
sion for the First District over freight rates extends only to those 
rates which apply to shipments wholly within the First District 
(Greater New York). That being the case and the Interstate 
Commerce Commiasion and the Public Service Commission for 
the Second District having acted favoralbly upon the companies' 
applications, and the record of the proceedings before those bodies 
having been made a part of the record before this Commission, 
aud as even the shippers appeared to favor the increase proposed, 
this Commission did not deem it necessary to require the presenta- 
tion of evidience de novo^ which would in all probability have 
resulted in protracted hearings and might have hampered the 
carriers in carrying out the general policy of the Interstate Com- 
merce Commiasion, to the possible detriment not ondy of the car- 
riers but also of the public generally. 

In the proceeding before the Public Service Commission for 
the Second District upon similar applications of these companies 
(as made in Case No. 2529), the same were not granted in toto. 

The exception pertained to the proposed increase of 20 per 
cent in rates on fluid milk, cream and articles taking the same 
rate, the Interstate Commerce Commission having treated the 
rates for this traffic on the same basis as passenger rates, and the 
Public Service Commission for the Second District being of the 
opinion that the equipment and movement of milk trains harmo- 
nize more closely with passenger operation than with freight opera- 
tion. This ttrception, however, has little eflPect so far as carriers 
are concerned operating within the First District, as there is no 
operation of milk trains over which the First District Commiasion 
has jurisdiction. However, it was the opinion that, in order that 
there might be no conflict between the two Commissions, the order 
for the First District should make the same provision in respect 

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64 Public Seevicb Commission — First District 

to milk, cream, etc., as did the order of the Second District Com- 
miflsion. A reoommendatioai' therefore was made to the Com- 
mission that the applications in Case !N'o. 2529 be granted as 
indicated above, but with the understanding that the Commission 
did not approve or disapprove the rates proposed to be put in 
force, as under the law and un<ter the express stipulation of the 
carriera m<ade at the hearing, such rates were held to be still sub- 
ject to complaint, investigation, regulation and suspension in any 
caae where the propriety of euispension is made to appear. The 
order so provided. 

So far as the desire for relief from the provisions of section 36 
of the Public Service Commissions Law was concerned, it was 
the opinion of the Commission that there would probably be no 
situation within the First District which would require such 
relief, such situation being mostly confined to the jurisdiction of 
the Second District Commission. However, lest such a situation 
might arise, and in order that there would be no possibility of 
any lack of uniformity in respect to the matter throughout the 
State of New York, the Commjission granted such relief to llie 
company. As regards changes in reconsigning rules applicable 
to all freight and open-top oai^, and to coal and coke in all cars, 
tihese applications were also granted. The purposes of this 
change was to facilitate" and hasten the unloading of cars, and 
the return of empty cars to the sources of supply, in order that 
movement of coal and other freight might be expedited-. Orders 
in all three cases were entered granting permissions as indicated 
August 20, 1920. 

Case No. 25S2 — The New York Central Railroad Company — 
Application to increase passenger rates. — Under date of August 
19, 1920, the New York Central Railroad Company addressed 
to the Commission a petition for authority to file blanket supple- 
ments to existing tariflPs on less than statutory notice, covering 
passenger rates for the so<;alled "Eastern District." The 
increase was for 20 per cent above the rates then in force, such 
passenger rates to include standard local or interline fares, 
excursion, convention and other fares for special occasions; com- 
mutation and other multiple forms of tickets; extra fares on 
limited trains; club car charges. The company set forth in its 



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FOUETEENTH AnNUAX RepOBT 66 

petition that, beginning May 24, 1920, the Interstate Commerce 
CommisBion, in aocordance wiith the directions of section 13 (a) 
of the Interstate OonMnerce Act, laa inserted by the Transporta- 
tion Act of 1920, held hearings, took the testimony of many wit- 
nesses and received nuanerous exhibits relating to the facte as to 
the railroads of the continental United States with a view of 
determining whether, under the provisions of said section 13 (a), 
aad under the facts as presented to them, increased rates should 
be panted to the carriers in order that the rate of return pre- 
scribed by said section 13 (a) abould be received by the carriers; 
that on July 20, 1920, the United States Railroad Labor Board, 
a board duly appointed in puisuan<ce of the provisions of the 
Transportation Act, rendered a decisioa rdative to the oompensa- 
tion of the employees of carriers by railroad in the United States, 
among others, carriers by railroad in the State of New York, 
whereby large additional increases in operating expenses resulted 
in said railroads, and that thereupon the steam railroad companies 
filed with the Interstate Commerce Commission supplementary 
suggestions relative to additional revenue, which would be needed 
to meet 0U<^ additional expenses; that on July 31, 1920, the Inter- 
state Comonerce Commi^on rendered its decision in the above 
matter, granting increases in freight rates, passenger rates, 
and charges for certain incidental service detailed in the opinion. 
The increases authorized by the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion were permitted to become effective on five days' notice to 
the public. The company also in its petition set forth that it 
had made application to the Public iService Commission for the 
Second District and that that Commission was then cansidefring 
its application. The company requested this Commission to con- 
sider such testimony as had been taken before the Second District 
Commission in the disposition of its application before the First 
District Commission for permission to file such new tariffs and 
suppleonents thereto so as to provide for an increase of 20 per cent 
in all its existing passenger rates on its lines upon one day's 
nodce. The Commission, without holding a hearing, mude an 
order on August 20, 1920, denying the company's application. 

Cases Nos. S6S5 and 25S7 — New York Transfer Company 
{Dodffs Express Company) and Westcott Express Company — 
3 



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66 Public Sbbviob CoMMissioisr — Fiest Distbict 

Strike of employees and applications for increase in baggage rates 
respectively. — The two mentioned cases are cloeely related to 
each other, in fact Oase No. 2537 resulted from the strike settle- 
ment in Case No. 2535. On or about August 24, 1920, the 
drivers and helpers of the albove named companies struck for 
more wages and shorter hours. Upon receipt of such informa- 
tion at the offices of the OonHnission it promptly directed that 
a hearing be had in the matter on August 25, 1920 (Case 
No. 2535) for the purpose of investigating same and the incon- 
venience caused to the general public. The hearing was held 
before Commissioner Alfred M. Barrett. It developed at the 
hearings that these companies on account of their financial condi- 
tion could not meet the increased wage demands of their strik- 
ing employees unless their rates were increased. On August 30, 
1920, Commissioner Barrett made an announcement that he had 
held conferences with representatives of these baggage companies 
and of the local union of their striking employees and, as a result, 
terms of settlement between said companies and their striking 
employee had been arrived at and th^at it was no longer necessary 
to continue the Commiaeian's investigation in the matter. He, 
therefore, declared Oase No. 2585 closed. 

While the investigation in Case No. 2535 was in progress the 
New York Transfer Company and the Westcott Express Com- 
pany, in Case No. 2537, under date of August 28, 1920, made 
applications to the Commission for permission to increase their 
rates. The companies requested an increase of twenty-five cents 
per trunk and ten cents per piece on hand baggage, wiiih a maxi- 
mum charge of one dollar per piece on hand 'baggage. They 
asked for permission to put such new rates into effect on one 
day^s notice. A hearing thereon was held by the Commission. 
In considering these applica'tions the Commission not only took 
into consideration the testimony taken in Case No. 2537, but that 
taken in previous cases before it upon similar applications by 
these companies for increase in baggage rates. The Cormnission 
found that the facts unquestionably justified some sort of an 
increase in rates. Commdssioner Barrett, however, was not satis- 
fied that the companies' applications should be granted in toto, 
as the need of saane was not fully establisfhed. This was particu- 

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Fourteenth Annual Report 67 

larly true respecting the increase requested on hand baggage. 
He was of the opinion that an increased allowance on trunks 
only would provide suflScient revenue for the companies to settle 
with their striking employees and continue their business. Allow- 
ance was therefore granted for the increase asked for on trunks, 
special permission being issued for filing on short notice. This 
disposition of the matter was the means of ending the strike of 
tihe companies' employees and of comipletely restoring the service 
they were giving to the pnfblic. 

Case No. 2521 — The Long Islcmd Railroad Company — New 
local passenger tariff schedules.* — In this caa© the Long Island 
Railroad Company filed seven (7) Local and Interdivision 
Passenger Tariffs, five of which provided for an increase of ten 
(10) per cent on all classes of passenger fares except in instances 
where the increased rates would exceed three (8) cents per mile 
per passenger. The sixth tariff proposed to make certain changes 
in rules and regulations governing optional routes and stopover 
privileges and the last tariff proposed to cancel the one-way and 
round-trip tariff then in effect. The seven proposed tariffs bore 
the issuing date as of July 2, 1920, effective August 3, 1920. On 
July .9, 1920, these tariffs were presented to the Commission 
which by order made on that date, suspended the tariffs and 
directed that a hearing be held in regard thereto on August 2, 
1920. The hearing was held on that date and adjourned to 
August 24, 1920, when the tariffs above de«»ribed were taken up 
in connection with the tariffs described in Cases Nos. 2501 and 
2502. These tariffs were withdrawn on that date, along with the 
tariffs in Cases Nos. 2501 and 2502 for the same reason pointed 
out in those cases. The Commission made an order discontinuing 
this case at the time the tariffs were withdrawn. 

Service and Facilities 

Case No, 2J/.63 — The Long Island Railroad Company — Ser- 
vice, equipment and facilities on Atlantic division, — This case was 
brought on motion of the Commission to inquire into and deter- 
mine the regulation, facilities, equipment and service of The Long 
Island Railroad Company upon its line of railroad at and between 
the Atlantic Avenue station. Borough of Brooklyn, and Jamaica. 



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68 PuBuc Sbbviob Commission — Fiest Disteict 

Boroiigli of Queens, or generally on its Atlantic division. The 
first hearing was held on February 13, 1920, and other hearings 
eirtended into Mardh, 1920. The hearings were closed on March 
25, 1920. On April 21, 1920, the Commission made an order 
requiring The Long Islaud Railroad Company to nmke cfhanges 
and repairs, improvements land additions to and in conneotion 
with its Flatbush Avenue station and station platformB as indi- 
cated on a certain plan marked as Company's Exhibit No. 26, 
offered in evidence at the hearing ibefore the Commission on 
March 19, 1920, in this case; directing the comipany to make 
cshanges and repairs, improvements and additions to and in cosx- 
nection with its Warwick Street station and station platforms 
also as indicated on said plan; directing it to miake changes and 
repairs, improvements and additions to and in connection witb 
its Railroad Avenue station and station platforms as indicated 
on a certain plan marked Company's Exhibit No. 30, aLeo offered 
in evidence, and directing it to make the said changes and repairs, 
improvements and additions as already described and complete 
the same not later than July 1, 1920. The requirements of thi« 
order were conditional upon The Long Island Railroad Company 
obtaining the consent and the approval of the Board of Estimate 
and Apportionment of the City of New York in so far as the 
changes and repairs, improvements and additions stated required 
encroachments upon or changes in the public highway. The com- 
pany obtained such consent late in the year. The work is now in 
progress. 

The changes ordered at the stations mentioned had to do with 
arrangements for collecting tickets so as to eliminate the necessity 
for doing so on trains of the company by its conductors. It was 
found that the conductors ini the performance of their duties of 
collecting tickets from passengers on trains experienced difficulty 
in making their way through the trains before reaching stations 
and that frequently the trains had to be slowed up to permit the 
fonductors to collect all the tickets. This practice interfered with 
the service and often made it very irregular. Therefore the 
Commission decided to have tickets collected at stations. 

Case No. 2^68 — New York and North Shore Traction Cotrir 
pany — Discontinuance of service. — The Commission on March 

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Fourteenth Annuai. Report 69 

1, 1920, was informed by t!he New York and North Shore Trac- 
tion Company that it w^s without funds and on that account 
would be unable to continue operation -and that it proposed to 
suspend operation on its lines of railroad at midnight of that date. 
The Commission at once made an order directing that a hearing 
be held in the matter on March 2, 1920. At the hearing the 
testimony showed' that during the month of February, 1920, the 
company found it impossible to operate except on a small portion 
of its lines, due to snow and ice on its tracks, and that as a result 
its receipts had not been sufficient to take care of its pay-roll. 
Furthermore, the company was financially in very bad condition 
and was experiencing considerable difficulty in obtaining funds. 

The company suspended operation of its lines for several weeks, 
during which Commissioner Alfred M. Barrett made a personal 
study of the company's affairs and the condition of its property. 
On March 16, 1920, Commissioner Barrett addressed a letter to 
the president of the company calling attention to the fact that 
weather conditions were about normal and directing the company 
to resume operation immediately, in accordance with its schedules 
on file with the Commission. 

The reply to Commissioner Barrett's letter indicated the com- 
pany's willingness to resume operation provided it could get some 
assistance from its bondholdens and stockholders. On April 15, 
1920, the company resumed operation. Operation continued into 
May, 1920, when it again ceased, this time owing to the fact 
that the company was unable to secure coal, largely for the reason 
that it had no funds on hand to purchase same and somewhat 
due to the fact that the coal supply in Greater New York was very 
much restricted. The Commission on May 4, 1920, held a 
further hearing, whereat it again developed that the company was 
without the necessary financial means to continue operation of its 
liuies and that such means, so far as its eflPorts extended, were not 
forthcoming. At the end of the year the lines were still shut 
down. 

Case No. 2Jlf91 — Interborough Rapid Transit Company — 
Installation of new electric pneumatic doors in subway cars, — In 
this case, on February 16, 1920, the Interborough Rapid Transit 
Com-pany, by Frank Hedley, its president and general m-anager, 



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70 Public Skbviob Commission — Fikst District 

advised the Cdmniseion that he desired to put into operation a new 
electric-pneumatic door apparatus for subway cars and requested 
the approval of suoh device by the Coimnission. The Commission 
made an order directing that a hearing be had in the matter on 
April 30, 1920. The hearing was held on that date, and 
adjourned subject to call by the 'Oommission. The Transit Con- 
struction Commissioner, on April 23, 1920, had made an order 
approving this particular device. The purpose of the device was 
to enable the company to cut down the number of men in each 
train crew. By its operation two trainmen are enabled to operate 
a train instead of seven or eight as were previously required. 

It developed at the hearing before the Oommission that a train 
equipped with the new device for doors of tihe subway cars had 
been in operation and had made several trips for test purposes. 
In view of this the Commission deemed it advisable, before tak- 
ing further action in the matter, for its engineers to inspect the 
operations of the train equipped with the improved door devioe. 
Inspections were made by the engineers, and their reports sub- 
mitted to the Commission were favorable. Thereupon the Oom- 
mission on May 18, 1920, made an order granting the company's 
application with these reservations — that nothing contained in 
such order e^hould be construed to place the approval of the Com- 
mission upon the manner of operating trains of cars on which 
the multiple unit car door control (the new device) should be 
installed, nor should anything in the order be construed to preju- 
dice the right of the Commi-ssion to make any further order rela- 
tive to the manner of operation of trains composed of cars on 
which the said multiple unit car door control should be inistalled. 
At the close of the year the Interborough Company was engaged 
in re-equipping the doors of its subway ears with the control 
device approved in this caisa 

Case No. £Jff.S8' — Railroad corporations — Warning signs at 
crossings. — This case was instituted under chapter 438 of the 
Laws of 1919, which added to the General Railroad Law a new 
section 53-a, which requires every municipality or political sub- 
division or State Highways Commission, charged with the duty 
of maintaining a highway at places where a highway crosses a 
railroad at grade, to install and maintain an approach warning 

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FOUBTBENTH AnNUAL EbpOBT 71 

sign at each each highway on 6a<^ side of such railioad grade 
croasing at a distanoe liierefram of not leas than 300 feet. The 
law also requires the railroad companies at their own expense 
to fumist to such municipality or political subdivision or State 
Commissioner of Highways a sufficient number of approach warn- 
ing signs of the character described in said law for each grade 
oroflsing on its line, and confers upon the Public Service Oom- 
miasion for the district in which firuch railroad crossing is situ- 
ated the power to determine the exact locations of such signs. 
In the event of a violation or refusal of any suah municipality 
or political subdivision or railroad corporation to install or fur- 
nish such signs as provided for in said law, the Public Service 
Commission is empowered to take court prooeedings as indicated 
in said law to ooonpel dbedience to the provisions thereof. The 
bearing order in the case was made on December 1, 1919, and 
served on aU steam railroad companies, terminal railroad com- 
panies and sooxe rapid transit railroad companies operating 
within the First District, the City of New York, including the 
secretary of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, the Cor- 
poration Counsel and the borough presidents of its different 
boroughs. The first hearing was set for December 15, 1919. 
A number of hearings thereafter followed during which the Oom- 
nussion made careful studies of all such crossings within the 
territorial limits of its district. 

On February 24, 1920, an order was made by the Commission 
in this case prescribing tbe location for approach warning signs 
required under and in pursuance of the provisions of the law 
stated. In the Borough of Manhattan on the railroad of the 
New York Central Railroad Company, signs were ordered at four 
crossings. In the Borough of The Bronx, on the railroad of the 
NTew York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Comipany, signs 
were ordered at one crossing. In the Borough of Brooklyn, on 
the railroad of the Long Island Railroad Company, signs virere 
ordered at twenty-KUie crossings, and on the railroad of the Brook- 
lyn Eastern District Terminal, signs were orttered at two cross* 
ings. In the Borough of Queens, on Ihe railroad of the Long 
Island Railroad Company, signs were ordered at sixty crossings. 
In the Borough of Richtawmd, on the railroad of the Staten Island 

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72 Public Service Commission — Fibst District 

Rapid Transit Railway Oompany, signs were ordered on twenty- 
five crossings. At the close of tihe year practically all signs 
ordered had been furniahed 'by tJie oompanies and installed. 

Cdbse No. 2Jf67 — Belt Line Rdilway Corporaiion — Discorir 
tinuance of transfers with Fourth and Madison Avenue line. — 
On February 20, 1920, the Belt Line Railway Corporation, by 
Walter C. Burrowes, secretary, applied to this Commission for 
permission to file a new revifi»ed tariiF schedule providing ioc dis- 
oomtinnance of transfers from the 69tli Street Crosstown line to 
the Fourth and Madioon Avenue line. Mr. Burrowes advised 
the Commission that the New York and Harlem Railroad Com- 
pany, operating the Fourth and Mudison Avenue line, had noti- 
fied his comfpany that, on and after March. 1, 1920, the New 
York and Harlem Railroad Company would refuse to accept 
transfers from the 59th Street Crosstown line. The situation 
was brought about in this way. The property of the New York 
and Harlem Railroad Company, wihidh had 'been a part of the 
New York Railways Company, was returned to its owners pur- 
suant to an order of the United States District Court for the 
Southern District of New York. The receiver of the New York 
Railways Company prior to the delivery of this property posted 
notices in the cars thereof informing the public that after Janu- 
ary 31, 1920, transfers would niot be issued at certain points along 
the line of the Harlem Campiamy. The owners of the Harlem 
Company, however, accepted transfers from: the Belt Line Com- 
pany at 59th street for a sihlort time «after they took over their 
property. This was done to give the Belt Line Company an 
opportunity to notify its passengers that a change was to take 
place in the old transfer arrangement. In the meanitime the Belt 
Line Company had been advised as stated above, by the Harlem 
Company, of the intended non-acceptance of transfers from the 69th 
Street Crosstown line. The Belt Line Company had no alterna- 
tive therefor but to revise its tariff to meet this changa The 
Commission on February 24, 1920, miade an order for a hearing 
in this case, tlie first hearing to be held on Febnxary 26, 1920. 
After this hearing the Commission, on February 27, issued 
Special Permission No. 657, which granted permission to Ae 
Belt Line Railway Corporation to put said tariff into effect 

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FOUBTEENTH AnnUAL RepOKT 73 

Case No. 2^5 Jf — The Long Island Railroad Company — New 
Bridge Over Flushing Creek, — Investigations having been made 
by the Commission as to delays to trains of the Long Island Rail- 
road Company operating over the drawbridge over the Flushing 
Creek at or near Flushing, in the Borough of Queens, the Com- 
mission upon its own motion, on January 16, 1920, made an 
order directing a hearing to determine the cause of such delays, 
whether any repairs, improvements or changes in the structure 
of said bridge should be made and whether additional equipment 
or change of facilities was required. 

The hearing was held on January 19, 1920. The testimony 
showed that barges and scows operating in Flushing Creek fre- 
quently came in contact with the abutments of the railroad draw- 
bridge at Main Street, Flushing, putting it out of alignment and 
preventing the opening and closing of it, thus causing delays to 
trains ranging from one-half hour to one hour. 

The Commission made an order on January 28, 1920, direct- 
ing the Long Island Railroad Company to replace its existing 
bridge, over which are operated trains of the North Shore 
division, with a steel bridge with masonary abutments and founda- 
tions. The estimated cost of such a bridge is about $550,000. 
This order permitted the company, if it should find it advisable, to 
raise the road-bed and tracks at or near Flushing Creek. 

Upon service of this order the company advised the Commis- 
sion that it did not have available at the time sufficient money 
to build a new bridge. It oflFered, however, to dredge Flushing 
Creek, north of the drawbridge, and deepen and straighten the 
channel so as to permit scows and barges approaching the bridge 
to do so in a straight alignment and thus practically eliminate 
the danger of striking the piers. The company agreed to do this 
work and to spend in the neighborhood of $80,000, provided the 
Commission would hold in abeyance its order as to replacing the 
drawbridga This the Commission agreed to do, upon condition 
that the company prepare plans for a new drawbridge to be con- 
atmcted later, such plans to be prepared and filed with the Com- 
mission for approval during the current year. These plans have 
hem filed and approved by the Commission. 



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74 Public Skevicb Commission — Fibst District 

Oas and Electric FomiAl Cases 

Case No, 2S76 — The Woodhaven Oas Light Company — 
Extension of gas mains to serve residents of Springfield, Laurel- 
ton and certain other localities in the Borough of Queens. — Thie 
case was brought upon tihe Comauission's own motion to inquire 
and determine whether an order should be made directing the 
Woodhaven Gas Light Company to extend its gas mains, services 
and other apparatus to suidh extent as might be necessary to 
furnish needed gas to the residents of Springfield and several 
other districts in the territory covered by the company's franchise 
in the Fourth ward, Baro\i^ of Queens. The order for a hear- 
ing was made in 1919 and most of the hearings were held during 
that year. Some, however, were carried over into 1920. The final 
order in the caae was made on April 20, 1920. The Cormnission 
instituted the case because of numeirous complaints by residents 
of Springfield and the surrounding districts, these people claim- 
ing that they were entitled to be supplied with gas by the Wood- 
haven Company, as thiey resided within the franchise territory 
of that company, and the franchises thereof obligated it to fur- 
nish them with gas. The comipany's only contention was that 
the service requested would not be profitable either now or in 
the immediate future. Deputy Camaniasioner Edward J. Glen- 
noii, before whom the hearings were held, after a careful con- 
sideration of all the facts, concluded Iftbat an order should be 
entered requiring an extension of mains, so as reasonably to serve, 
at the least, the districts known bb Locust manor, Locuet lane, 
South Jamiaica place, Springfield and Laurelton. His reasons 
for arriving at these conclusions were set forth in a miemorandum 
submitted by him to the Ocwmnission and approved by it on the 
same date as the final order in lihe case. The final order, in addi- 
tion to requiring service to th-e districts indicated by Deputy 
Commissioner Glennon, stipulated that it was entered without 
prejudice to any further or other proceeding or proceedings an<l 
order or orders Iftierein in respect to the extension of the mains 
and services of the Woodhaven Gas Light Oomipany to the com- 
munities known as Etogedale, Rosedale Terrace, St. Albans, Idle- 
wild Park, Sheffield Manor, Springfield Park, Hickview Park, 

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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAL RepOBT 76 

Jamaica Junction, Jamaica Gardens and Bay View Landing. 
The company did not accept the order, but made application for 
a rehearing thereon by petition verified April 29, 1920. The 
application for a rehearing was denied by the Commission in an 
order made Mtay 4, 1920. The company then sought an order 
for a writ of certiorari in the Supreme Court, New York county, 
Special Tenn, Part I. This writ was allowed on the 16th day 
of July, 1920, by the Honorable George V. MuUan, Justice. At 
the close of the year arguments on the writ before the Appellate 
Division, First Judicial Department, had not been heard. 

Case No, 2Jt71 — Kings County Lighting Compomy — Service 
to new consumers, — The Commission instituted this case on its 
own motion and on March 9, 1920, made an order directing that 
a hearing be held on March 12, 1920, to inquire into and deter* 
mine whether the Kings County Lighting Company was comply- 
ing with the requirements of the law in respect to tihe extension 
and furnishing of sei'vice to new consumers. The hearing was 
held that day and continued later. The testimony showed that 
this company was not complying with the law in respect to 
extending its service. Whereupon the Commission at the close 
of the second day's hearing made an order designated " Order A," 
directing the said Kings County Company to extend its service 
to all applicants w'ho had made or might thereafter make appli- 
cation to it for the supply of gas in conformity with section 62 
of the Transportation Corporations Law. The company upon 
service of this order advised the Commission it could not accept 
it, as it did not have the plant capacity to take care of new cus- 
tomers, nor sufficient money to enlarge its plant. It also advised 
the Commission that it would be difficult for it to obtain the 
necessary funds to make changes in its plant to supply all addi- 
tional customers who had made application to it for service. 

The Comtmission upon receipt of this advice directed further 
hearings in this case, largely for the purpose of ascertaining what 
could be done in respect to requiring the company to enlarge its 
plant so as to assure service to the many applicants. These hear- 
ings continued through the month of March, 1920. Little satis- 
faction having been obtained from the company as to assurances 
along the line of this investigation, the Commission at its meet- 



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76 Public Sbbviob Commission — Fikst Disteict 

ing on April 6, 1920, authorized and directed its counsel to com- 
mence a mandamus suit against the Kings CSounty Lighting Com- 
pany to require it to comply with- its said "Order A/' The 
motion for an order to show cause why a writ of mandamus should 
not issue against this company requiring it to comply with the 
Commission's order aforesaid was made at Special Term of the 
Supreme Couil:, Kings county, before Mr. Justice M-anning. 
Later and on or albout May 17, 1920, he sent the papers to 
Ex-Justice Ketcham, aa referee. 

On June 11, 1920, the Commission made another order in this 
case designated "Order B," which required this lighting com- 
pany to make certain changes, alterations, additions, improve- 
ments and repairs in its plant and to complete the same not later 
than December 1, 1920. The object of this order was to com- 
pel the Kings County Lighting Company to enlarge its plant 
capacity so that it could extend service to suc'h new customers as 
had already at that time made application to it for service. Fol- 
lowing the entry of " Order B " in this case and on or about 
June 12, 1920, Ex-Justice Ketcham, as referee in the mandamus 
suit, made a report to the court, recommending that the writ of 
mandaonus be denied. On November 23, 1920, an order waa 
signed by Mr. Justice Callaghan of the Kings County Supreme 
Couil; discontinuing the proceedings in the mandamus suit At 
the close of the year hearings in Case 2471 were stall in progress. 

Case No. 21^75 — Gas corporations — Hearings as to the 
quality^ power, purity, pressure amd standards of gas manufao 
tured, distributed or sold by gas corporations within the First 
District, — This proceeding was upon motion of the Commission 
to investigate the gas oil situation in regard to the manufacture 
and distribution of gas by gas corporations within the Greater 
City of New York. The hearing order was made on March 10, 
1920, and directed that the first hearing be held in the matter 
on March 16, 1920. Following the first hearing further hear- 
ings in this case were held during the year. All gas corporations 
subject to the jurisdiction of the Commission were represented 
at this investigation. The object of it was to determine the 
situation as to the supply of oil for gas manufacture, the market 
price thereof, contracts in conneotion with the purchase of same. 

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Fourteenth Annual Repoet ^ 77 

as oil plays a prominent part in the manufacture of gas. Much 
testimony has been taken and the situation thoroughly studied. 
Though no order had been entered in the case at the close of the 
year, nevertheless the investigation has not been without its value. 
It has brought about a clearer understanding among the general 
public, gas corporations and oil dealers as regards the needs of 
the community of the greater City of New York respecting this 
commodity. In many respects the results have been beneficial 
to the gas consumers. The scarcity of good oil has had its effect 
upon the standard of gas supplied to the community, somewhat 
lowering the same during the past year. As the Commission 
cannot control the oil supply, no order was made. 

Soft Coal Shortage 

As was told in the annual report for 1919, a serious shortage 
of soft coal supplies was threatened late in the year by reason of 
an extensive strike of coal miners. The Federal authorities 
immediately took steps to promote coal conservation and to co- 
ordinate shipments with the view of preventing dangerous short- 
ages in any locality. The National Fuel Administration asketi 
for the co-operation of the State of New York, and the Governor 
designated the Public Service Commission for the First District 
to act for the State. The Commission immediately issued an 
order promulgating the order of the Fuel Administrator and took 
other steps to enforce coal-saving regulations. 

The electrical engineer of the Commission was directed to 
ascertain the exact condition of all public utilities under the 
jurisdiction of the Conmiission in regard to their coal supplies. 
By the authority of the Commission he co-operated with the 
Regional Coal Committee established by the National Fuel 
Administration through the ofiioe of the Director-General of Rail- 
roads, and with the representatives of the public utilities, in a 
common effort to conserve the fuel supply and insure continuity 
of shipments. Bituminous coal, or " soft coal " as it is generally 
known, is universally used as fuel by all such utilities. Oom^ 
missioner Nixon also asked and received the co-operation of the 
chambers of commerce, merchants' associations and boards '"x 
trade of the greater City. 



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78 Public Seeviob Commission — Fibst District 

On February 6, 1920, ConunisBioner Nixon held a conference 
with representatives of tihe principal public utilities under the 
Commission's jurisdiction and was advised by them that the situa- 
tion was desperate; that some of the companies had only a few 
days' supply of soft coal on hand and that the utmost economy in 
its use would be necessary if the companies were to continue liieir 
service to the public. Commissioner Nixon authorized the street 
railroad companies to cut down to the minimum the heating of 
cars and trains, as electric heatdng causes a large consumption of 
fuel and a considerable saving could 'be made in this way. The 
Commissioner on the same day sent telegrams to the President 
of the United States, the Senators from the State of New York 
and the National Railroad Administration urging prompt steps 
to supply the utilities of New York City with necessary coal. 
Senators Wadsworth and Calder replied, pledging their co-opera- 
tion, as did also Max Thelen, Director of Public Service of the 
National Railroad Administration. 

By Februaiy 11, 1920, the situation had so improved that 
Commissioner Nixon lifted the ban upon the free use of coal 
by the transportation companies and sent word to them that the 
ci'isis had passed and that the Commission expected the resump- 
tion of full service. 

With the coming of spring and better weather conditions the 
coal movement into New York City improved. This result was 
in part due also to the efforts of the Interstate Commerce Commisr 
sion. The government surrendered control of the railroads on 
March 1, 1920, and at the same time the National Railroad 
Administration ceased to exercise the powei-s of the Federal Fuel 
Administrator. This left the control of coal shipments entirely 
in charge of the Interstate Commerce Commission, which issued 
various orders to provide cars for coal shipments and to direct 
such shipments to the places where coal was most needed. The 
Interstate Commerce Commission issued Service Orders Nos. 7, 
9, 16 and 21, dealing with this subject. 

On June 22, 1920, in the absence of Commissioner Nixon, 
Acting Commissioner Barrett called a conference of representa- 
tives of the various public utility companies of the city, many of 
whom had complained to the Commission of another crisis in the 



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FOUBTBEITTH ANNUAL BSPOBT 79 

coal situation. At ihis conference all agreed that the coal dbort- 
age was acute and that some utilities were in danger of closing 
down unless prompt relief were given, OommisBioner Barrett 
sent telegramfl to President Wilson and to the ohairmian of the 
Interstate Ooonmerce OonHnissdon, stating that the soft coal sup- 
ply in Xew York wais so short that some of the public utilities 
must either close down or seriously curtail service unless tb^ 
could obtain additional supplies, and urging upon the President 
and the Federal Commission to give priority to public utilities 
in the matter of coal car assignmenta By Conmiissioner Bar- 
rett's direction, Deputy Commissioner Morgan T. Donnelly and 
James B. Walker, Secretary of the Commission, went to Wash- 
ington on June 23 to lay the situation before the Federal author- 
ities. Commissioner Donnelly and Secretary Walker were unable 
to see the President, but they had interviews with Commissioner 
Clyde B. Aitchison, of the Interstate Commerce Commission, and 
with the executive board of the railroad presidents, of which 
Daniel L. Willard, president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
C(Hnpany, was chairman. After these conferences Commissioner 
Donnelly and the Secretary were assured by the spokesman for 
the Interstate Coraanerce Conranission that the public utilities of 
Xew York City would not be permitted to close down and that 
the Federal Commission would see that the railroads provided 
such service as to insure a continuous supply of coal to those 
utilities. 

Following these developments further conferences were held 
in New York City by representatives of the railroads, the Public 
Service Commission for the First District, and representatives 
of the utilities. In July the Interstate Commerce Commission 
issued Service Order No. 9, amending Service Order No. 7, and 
directing the railroads to furnish ears for coal ^ipments for 
sixty consecutive days and to give preference to coal shipments 
to public utilities, including street and interurban railroads, elec- 
tric light and power plants, gas plants, water plants, ice plants, 
sewer works, also hospitals, schools and other public institutians, 
to the extent of supplying their needs for current use but not for 
storage purposes. Under this order the situation quickly mended 



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80 Public Seeviob Commission — Fiest District 

and accessions to the coal supplies of the utilities were soon 
obtained. On Jully 23, 1920, Coanmissioner Barrett, by invita- 
tion, appeared before the United States Senate Special Committee 
on Heconetruction and Reproduction at a meeting in New York 
City, when he advised the committee of the amount of coal used 
by the public utilities of New York City and gave the quantities 
then on hand. 

At the expiration of the sixty days covered by the Interstate 
Commeroe Commission's Service Order No. 9 that Commission 
issued Service Order No. 16, amending all previous orders in 
r^ard to ooal shipments. Service Order No. 16 repeated the 
provisions of Service Order No. 9, but provided that the Public 
Service Commissions or Railroad Coramiasions of the States where 
utilities and kindred institutions in need of soft coal were in 
operation, should police the requests for priority and car ship- 
ments and give permission therefor. This order became eifective 
September 9, 1920. Tinder it the Public Service Commission for 
tihe First District issued a number of permits to different public 
utilities under its jurisdiction, requiring the applicant companies 
to make affidavit with the applications that the number of cars 
requested were sufficient only to provide for current needs and 
not for storage. This method of handling these permits was 
submitted to and approved by the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. 

In October, 1920, the Interstate Commerce Commission issued 
Service Order No. 21, which suspended Service Order No. 16 
and provided that all public utilities and public institutions 
should thereafter apply to the Interstate Commerce Commission 
or its agent instead of to the Public Service or Railroad Com- 
missions for pi^ferential treatment in the nmtter of coal ship- 
ments. The National Committee on Gas and Electric Service 
at Washington, a committee maintained by the gas and electric 
utilities of the country, was empowered to work with the Inteiv 
state Commerce Commission and receive applications for coal 
priority. The Interstate Commerce Commission itself assumed 
responsibility for all future assignments of cars. 



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FOUKTEENTH AnNUAL KepOBT 81 

TTtility Coal Committee Appointed 

In the month of October the Commiasion was informed that 
the Interstate Oomaneroe Oammiflsion had been appealed to by 
Aippers of manufactured products to end the priority in coal 
shipments and the assignment of open-top cars granted to public 
utilities by Order No. 16. Under that order the utilities of 
New York City had been receiving enough coal for tfieir daily 
requirements, but h-ad been unable to accumulate any appreciable 
reserves to meet winter conditions. 

On being apprized of the situation Commissioner Nixon sum- 
moned the heads of the utility companies to a conference in his 
office and, after an exchange of views, appointed the following, 
representative men to act as a comanittee to study the situation 
and take such steps as were necessary to insure all utilities an 
adequate supply of coal: 

J. W. Lieb, Vice-President New York Edison Co., Chairman. 

W. R. Addicfcs, Vice-President Consolidated Gas Co. 

C. Andrade, Jr., President Wholesale Coal Trade Association. 

Frank Hedley, President Inter'boroug'h Rapid Transit Co. 

R. H. Nexsen, Electrical Engineer Public Service Com. 

M. S. Sloan, President Brooklyn Edison Co. 

Wm. J. Welsh, President New York and Richmond Gas Co. 

Commissioner Nixon designated Mr. Lieb as chairman, and 
the committee organized under the name of the New York Fuel 
Distribution Comanittee. Mr. C. W. Wilder was chosen for 
secretary. Mr. W. F. Curley, of the Corporation Counsel's office, 
was invited to join the coanmittee to represent the City of New 
York, but he did not qualify. 

In the meantime, namely, on October 15th, the Interstate Com- 
merce C>mmission canceled Order No. 16, and immediately coal 
shipments to the utilities in New York City fell off more than 
60 per cent, and in some instances were entirely discontinued. 
The situation was met by intelligent and timely work by the 
Fuel Committee. From a report made to Commissioner Barrett 
on December 11, 1920, when Chairman Lieb informed the Com- 
mission that its work was done and asked for the discharge of 
the committee, the following information is taken : 



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k 



82 Public Sekviob Commission — First Distbiot 

By sending out questionnaires the ooimnjtttee learned that 
several of the utilities were facing critical conditions. The 
Interboiough Rapid Transit Company had only a two days' 
supply of coal on hand; the Richmond Light and Railroad Com- 
pany, three; the Kings County Lighting Company, three; the 
New York and Ridhmond Gas Company, four and a half; the 
Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company, twelve, and the Brooklyn 
Borough Gas Campany, twelve. On this account many utilities 
were obliged to purchase '^spot coal" in the open market at 
exorbitant prices. Members of the committee thereupon pooled 
their reserve floipplies and allowed the utilities short of coal to 
draw upon them for a supply sufficient to tide them over and 
prevent a shut-down. 

A suspension of operations by the New York and Richmond 
Gas Company was prevented in this way, an emergency supply 
of coal for gas-making purposes being rushed to its plant by fhe 
Kings County Lighting Company and the Consolidated Gas Com- 
pany. Through the efforts of tfie committee, seconded by the 
work of the National Committee on Gas and Electric Service 
in Washington, the Richmond company was enabled to get s^hip- 
ments of contract coal resumed. 

The Queensboro Gas and Electric Company, which receives 
its coal by water, was short of its winter supply and feared it 
would not be able to acquire a large enough reserve in advance 
of the freezing of Jamaica bay. Through the Fuel Committee's 
work it was able to obtain some "spot coal " as well as increased 
shipments from its r^ular contractors, so that by December 6th 
it had received enough coal to last it through the winter. 

Coal for the Richmond Light and Railroad Company moving 
over the Baltimore and Ohio railroad was delayed in transit to 
such an extent as to endanger its operations. The committee 
locHited' the coal and succeeded in having it moved to the com- 
pany's docks before it was necessary to draw on the general 
reserves. In like manner the committee had shipments of coal 
for the New York Steam Company resumed, after they had been 
discontinued following the repeal of Order Na 16. In this it 
was aided by the Washington comanittee and the Nattional Coal 
Association. 

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Fourteenth Annual Bepobt 88 

After the Interstate Commerce Commission canceled its order 
giving preference to the Great Lakes region and the Northwest, 
in November, the situation in New York City eased perceptibly 
and coal began to move to the city in larger quantities. In its 
report to the Commiesion the committee stated that there appeared 
to be no further cause for anxiety in regard to this winter's 
supply of coal for the utilities of the city. It acknowledged with 
appreciation the aid extended by the Commaission's Electrical 
Engineer and by the Secretary of tihe National Committee on 
Gas and Electric Service at Washington. 

Commissioner Barrett on December 15th discharged the com- 
mittee with the thanks of the Commission for its efiPeotive work. 



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CHAPTER IV 



EEGULATION OF TRANSPORTATION CORPORATIONS 



The total number of corporations under the jurisdiction of the 
Commission during the year 1920 was 103. Of these 79 were 
operating and 24 lessor companies. They included common car- 
riers, light, heat and power corporations. 

Of the total number of corpoTations the transportation com- 
panies numbered 73, divided as follows: Street and electric rail- 
road companies, 58; steam railroads, 11; baggage transfer com- 
panies, 2 ; stage-coach companies, 2. 

The street and electric railroad companies operate about 1,900 
miles of single track railroad, including subway, elevated and 
srurface railroads. In the operation they use about 13,000 pas- 
senger cars. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920, they 
carried 2,364,775,067 passengers, an increase of 284,830,77(J 
passengers, or 13.69 per cent over the previous year. Their total 
operating revenue for the year was $127,880,161, an increase of 
more than $17,000,000 over the previous year. Their operating 
and maintenance expenses were $96,059,605, which was an 
increase of nearly $22,000,000 over the previous year. The 
combined net corporate income for all companies showed a deficit 
of $10,735,399, as against a deficit for the previous year of 
$8,556,408. The increase in the deficit in the face of a large 
increase in operating revenue is ascribed to a greater propoi> 
tionate increase in operating expenses, including large advances 
in the wages of employes. 

The following table shows the operating revenue, expenses, 
taxes, operating income and net corporate income of these com- 
panies for the fiscal year ended June 30th from 1908 to 1920, 
inclusive : 



84] 



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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAL RepORT 



85 



ESULTS OF OPERATION OF STREET RAILWAY COMPANIES IN THE FIRST 

DISTRICT 

Yean ended Juae 30. 1008-1920 

Street railway Ezpenaee of Net 

Fiscal operating maintenance Taxes, tolls, Operating corporate 

year revenue and operation etc. income (a) income (b) 

1908 $69,026,612 $40,129,956 $4,330,227 $24,566,429 $2,665,764 

1909 72,432.715 41.606.428 4,982.677 25.843.609 6.386.037 

1910 79.593.910 43.585.932 5,148,324 30.858,654 9.559.816 

1911 83.751.415 45.993,964 5.496.881 32.261,570 10,171.074 

1912 88.242,144 (c) 47,487,562 5.303.790 34.950.792 12.073,641 

1913 92.141.605 (c) 48.244.147 6.095.520 37.801.938 12.229.271 

1914 94.155.521 50,117.712 5.895.935 38.141.874 11,849,985 

1915 93,644.428 50,324.095 5.811,290 37.509.043 11.501.157 

1916 98.628.185 52.038.312 6.238.461 40.351,412 12.352.438 

1917 100,185,796 55,960.722 7.185.113 37.039.961 9.457.886 

1918 103,499.463 60.699.402 8.232.851 34.567.210 5.266,496 

1919 110.198.575 76,986.007 7,907.358 26,306.210 Loes 8.566,408 

1920 127,880,161 96.059.605 7,353,877 24.466.679 LonlO.735,399 

(a) Excess of revenue over expenses and taxes. 
Cb) Balance after interest, rents and other fixed charges. 

(c) Does not include depreciation expense r^x>rted as income deductions by Third Avenue 
Railway companies ($180,000 in 1912 and $431,500 in 1913). 

Traffic generally showed a tealtihy increase for the year, as 
expkined in the introduction to this report All rapid transit 
lines, that is, sulbway and elevated' railroads, showed increases, 
as did all of the street railroad lines, with the exception of those 
in the Borough of Manhattan <and in the Borough of Richmond. 
The following table shows the number of revenue passengers 
carried by the different lines for the fiscal years ended June 30, 
1918, 1919 and 1920: 



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86 Public Sekviob Commission — Fikst Disteict 

STRBBT railway TRAFFIC OF NEW YORK CITY, 1918-1920 
Number of revenue paBsexigers (cash fares) 

Inorease* of 1020 
Fiaoal year ended June 30 — over 1919 

' - p^ 

1918 1919 1920 Number cent 

Subway and Elevated Linee: 

Interborouch Subway.. 418,337.666 461.147.a'>8 686,098,633 124.961.575 27.10 

Elevated. 352,660,669 348,188,600 369.034.477 20.846.877 5 99 
B. R. T. elevated and 

aubway 258.167.313 308.879,791 376.782,635 67.902.844 21 98 

Hudaon and Manhattan 

tubes 76,348,998 86,050,815 92,250.836 6.200.021 7.21 

Total 1.105.514.646 1.204.266,264 1.424.166.581 219,900.317 18.26 

Street Suifaoe Linee in -^ 

Borough of Manhattan. . 371.136,389 370.084,711 348.960.461 D 21.124.250 D 5.71 
Boroush of The Bronx.. 79.917,071 80,806.261 94.141.901 13.335.750 16.50 
Borough of Brooklyn. .. . 360.207,555 362.105,288 432.036,227 70.830.050 10.56 
Borough of Queena (Ex- 
cluding B. R. T.) 43.448.206 46,723.575 40.562.674 2.838,000 6 08 

Borough of Richmond... 15.287,022 15.058.108 15.007.233 D 050.065 D5.96 

Total 869.997.143 875.678.033 940,608.486 64.930.453 7.41 

Or nd total 1.975 .511,789 2 .079.944.29 7 2.364.775.067 284.830,770 18.69 

Populationt 5.450.299 5.535,724 5.621,151 

Fares per capita 362 376 421 

* The prefix D indicates decrease. 

t Federal census preliminary total, 1920; estimated for 1918 and 1919 on basis of one-tenth of 
decennial increase of 854.268. 

The per capita use of the street railroads continues to increase, 
the figure being 421 for the year ended June 30, 1920, as against 
376 for the previous fiscal year. As indicating the increased use 
of the transportation facilities of the city, the following table, 
showing the traflSc by decades from 1860 to 1920 and the traiBc 
each year from 1911 to 1920, is of interest: 



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FOUBTXSNTH AnNXTAI RepORT 



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88 Public Sbevice Commissioit — Fiest District 

Deferred Maintenance 

Deterioration or deferred maintenance of the street railway coan- 
panies, operating within this district, has continued during tihe 
past year and has assumed an alarming aspect. Unless the com- 
panies soon procure the money to have the necessary up-keep work 
done, there will be an increase in tihe numiber of accidents and a 
further decrease in service. 

The Electrical Engineer of the Commission estimated that the 
amount of deferred miaintenance on the lines of the principal 
operating companies, including rapid transit and surface lines, 
is $10,945,091. This is an increase of $4,134,091 over last year. 
In ol3ier words, the (Companies have been unable to provide, in a 
number of cases, the necessary money to properly maintain their 
equipment. 

The amount stated above should be immediately available for 
repair and maintenance work. As wear and tear go on, this 
delayed maintenance is constantly accumulating and will con- 
tinue to accumulate, although the companies are trying to keep their 
equipment in a safe operating condition. Property which has 
not been properly maintained wiM naturally deteriorate more 
quickly than that which has been given adequate maintenance. 
Not only does this involve a high operating cost, but the question 
arises as to how muoh longer the companies can continue to 
operate without adequate maintenance. 

If the work is deferred too long, there will come a time when 
the cost to put the present equipment in first-class condition will 
approach the cost of buying new equipment Such conditions 
exist now, practically, on all the lines operating in Queens county, 
as well as certain lines in Ridmiond and other boroughs. Such 
replacements cannot be financed as new capital because it is 
properly chargeable to deferred maintenance, even though the 
ooraipanies should be in a position to raise the money. 

The following table gives the figures estimated at present of 
removing deferred maintenance from the companies named. The 
estimates must be regarded as approximate only : 



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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAI. RePOBT 89 

Estimated Deferred Maintenance of Street Railway 
Corporations as of January 1, 1920 

Brooklyn Rapid TraBsit System $4,292,399 

Nefw York Railways Company 734,513 

Third Avenue Railway System 2,891,356 

New York and' Queens County Railway Company. 820,403 

Second Avenue Railroad Company 254,521 

New York and Long Island Traction Company. . . 100,833 

Long Island Electric Railway Company 57,481 

Manhattan and Queene Traction Corporation. . . . 131,830 

New York and Harlem Railroad Company 254,336 

Ninth Avenue Railroad Company 487,575 

Eighth Avenue Railroad Company 46,832 

Manhattan Bridge Three Cent Line 750 

Ocean Electric Railway Company 5,412 

New York and North Shore Traction Company. . 75,938 

Van Brunt Street and Erie Basin Railroad Co. . 3,981 

Bush Terminal Railroad Company 926 

Staten Island Lines 534,668 

Marine Railway Company 2,952 

Interborough Rapid Transit Company 118,800 

New York Consolidated Railroad Company 129,585 

Total $10,945,091 



The transit system of New York City has expanded with the 
growth of the city during the thirteen years the Public Service 
Commission has 'been in existence. The number of operating 
street railroad companies has increased from 29 in 1908 to 40 
in 1920. The revenue from passenger fares, whidh was $67,126,- 
122 for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1908, has grown to $118,- 
886,957 for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920. 

The following tables give a comparative summary of street 
railway operations for each year from July 1, 1907, to June 30, 
1920: 



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POUBTEENTH AnNUAI, RePOST 



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92 Public Service Commission — Fibst District 

Street Kailroad Service and Facilities 

The Commission keeps informed of conditions upon the various 
transportation lines of the city through its Transit Bureau, whi<3i 
is in charge of a chief who supervises the work of 35 inspectors. 
This 'bureau investigates all complaints received by the Comr 
mission against railroad and street railroad companies, and 
endeavors to bring about satisfaction of such complaints whien 
well founded. This is done informally through oorreapondence 
and gratifying results have been reached. In cases where it is 
impossible to settle complaints by this method and where the comr 
plainant shows good cause, the Commission orders formal hear- 
ings and the complaint then becomes a case. 

The Transit Bureau also makes original investigations of all 
transportation lines and its inspectors report to the Commission 
any situation which calls for relief. Upon such reports the Com- 
mission takes up the matter with the companies and if the desired 
improvement is not obtained by informal correspondence, the 
questions at issue are brought out in formal hearings. In this 
way improvements of service and facilities are made during the 
year and causes for complaint removed as far as possible. 

Boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx 

Interborough Rapid Transit Company. — Important changes 
in the service operated by this company occurred at various times 
througjhout lihe year, in part caused by the opening of new lines 
or parts of lines, and in part on account of orders and directions 
issued by the Commission as a result of its studies in relation to 
service requirements. 

The additions to lines in operation included the Eastern Park- 
way subway and its N^osftrand Avenue branch in Brooklyn, va 
part of the Pelham Bay Park branch of the Lexington Avenue 
subway, and the Webster Avenue extension of the Third Avenue 
Elevated Line. The Eastern Parkway subway, which is a four- 
track underground extension of the Interborough line in Brooklyn, 
runs from Atlantic avenue out Flatbush avenue, to Eastern 
Parkway and thence to Buffalo avenue. It was opened on 
August 22d from the former terminus at Atlantic avenue to Utica 



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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAL EbpOBT 98 

avenue, and a part of the two-track elevated branch of the same 
line, on Livonia avenue from Buffalo avenue eastward to Junius 
street, was opened on Monday, November 2Sd. The remainder of 
the Livonia Avenue branch to New Lots road is nearing comple- 
tion. 

On the aame day that the main stem of the Eastern Parkway 
Line was opened, the Noetrand Avenue subway biianoh of that 
line, extending to Flatbush avenue, was also placed in service. 
The openii^ of the sulbway portion of the Eastern Parkway and 
the Nostrand Avenue itnites was of material benefit to the reed- 
dents in the areas travei«ed by these lines, and was of particular 
moment to the traveling public of Brooklyn, in view of the fact 
that the great Brooklyn street railroad strike occurred leas than 
a week later, thousands of persons being carried to and from their 
destination by the Literborough lines during the general cessation 
of operation on practically all B. R. T. routes. 

The elevated portion of the Pelham Bay Park branch of the 
Lexington Avenue subway wae p]nced> in service as far as l77th 
street from the terminus of previous operation — Hunts Point 
road — on May 30, 1&20. On October 24th the operation of 
trains was extended to Westchester square. The remainder of 
the line, extending to Pelham Bay Park, was opened in December. 

The Webster Avenue extension of the Third Avenue Elevated 
Line was opened on October 41Jh, establishing a connection between 
the former terminus of the Third Avenue Elevated Line at Bronx 
Park and the White Plains Boad exitension of 1^ first subway. 
It extends via Welbeter avenue and Ghin Hill road through a 
territory not previously served by a rapid transit route. TraflSc 
on tEis line has already grown to sudi an extent that increases 
in the amount of servioe have been required of the operating 
company. 

As a result of its investigation over a period of several months 
the Commission, on March 20, 1920, issued Order "E" in its 
formal Case No. 2311, directing lihe Interborough to operate a 
certain number of trains on the East and West Side subway 
trunk lines during ru^ and non-rush hours on week days. This 
order called for the operation of teuKsar trains, the longest that 
can be operated, througihout the day. At the time this order was 



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94 Public Seevice Commission — First District 

drafted it was believed it would provide EPervioe to meet probable 
requirememts for a long tima Traffic, however, is shown to be 
growing eo rapidly that additional cais and more servioe will 
seemingly ibe necessary in the near future. In addition to the 
extra service called for by Order "E," increases were made in 
the number of trains operated and reduction in headways was 
effected on several other lines, notably on the Jerome Avenue 
branch of the Lexington Avenue subway and the Queensboro sub- 
way. On the route last named, by the provisions of Order " C " 
in Case No. 2311, the company was directed to and did install six- 
car trains on a four-minute headway in place of five-car trains on a 
four-minute headway. A material reduction in congestion was 
the immediate result By direction of the Oomonisaion service 
on the West Side subway was increased between noon and 3 p. m. 
on Saturdays, providing practically a rush-hour service in those 
hours. Saturday evening and early Sunday mioming service on 
the Third Avenue Elevated Line was ineieased as a result of 
negotiations by the Commission, by the addition of 34 cars. 
Additional service increases have been made on the Sixth Avenue 
Elevated Line, and the ComnnisBion hasi taken up with the comr 
pany the indiciated need of further increases on the Sixth Avenue 
Line, and, in the morning rush hour, express service on the Ninth 
Avenue Elevated Line. 

New York Railways Company. — On March 6, 1920, by order 
of the Court, the Receiver of the New York Railways Company 
ceased operation over the WiUiamsburg bridge to Brooklyn, ter- 
minating all service on tlhe 14l2h Street Crosstown Line, the 8th 
Street Crosstown Line and the 8th Street-Seventh Avenue Cros&- 
town Line on the Manhattan side of the bridge. The Court held 
that the operation across the bridge was unwarranted, on account 
of the great cost. During the year the company resumed operar 
tion of a portion of the Spring Street Line between Broadway 
and Lewis street. This line was one of several operated by 
storage battery cans, which suspended operation during 1919. 

New York and Harlem Railroad Company. — By a court order 
to iihe Receiver of tihe New York Railways Company, the latter 
returned to the New York and Harlem Railroad Company, on 
February 1, 1920, the lines operated on Fourth and Madison 

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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAL RepOET 95 

avenues and crosstown on Sftth street The reversion of this 
leased ronte to its owneiB caused tbe operation of the Fourdi 
and Madison Avenue-Brooklyn Line to be eliminated, and had 
the effect of cutting out practically every transfer between the 
Fourth and MadiBon Avenue Line and the line^ of other com- 
panies^ with llie exception of certain restricted transfer privil^es 
at 23d street and 34th street, Manhattan. The New York and 
Harlem (Company, however, after assuming operation of its 
Fourth and Madison Avenue Line, inaugurated a new and much 
needed short-line eervice 'between the post-office and Grand Central 
station. 

Ninth Avenue Railroad Company. — This company was segre- 
gated from the New York Railways System in 1919, and has 
since been separately operated. Some improvements have been 
made in the service during the year, and changes have been made 
in the equipment and facilities. 

Third Avenue Railway System. — Improvements put into effect 
by this company during the past year included extensions of 
service on the Kingsbridge, Broadway, and Broadway~145th 
Street Line, with increases of 32 and 37 per cent, respectively, 
in service on the Poet-Office and Grand Street Lines; restoration 
of service from Hancock place to Fort Lee feny on the 110th 
Street Line. 

On the lines of the Union RaUwuy Company, included in the 
same system^ increases were made in the service of the Tiemont 
Avenue Line, the 207th Street Crosstown Line, the 163d Street 
Crosstown Line, the White Plains Avenue Line, the Willis 
Avenue Line and the Southern Boulevard Lina Changes were 
made in the operating route of the Sedgwick Avenue Line, pro- 
viding additional facilities for passengers using that route. 

BoBouQH OF Brooklyn 

BrooTelyn Rapid Transit System. — The opening of certain por- 
tions of the new lines of the Dual System of rapid transit allocated 
to the New York Consolidated Railroad Company, one of the 
B. R. T. subsidiary corporations, for operation, brought an 
important measure of relief to trafSc conditions in Brooklyn 
during 1920. 



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96 Public Sebvicb Commission — Fibst District 

On May Ist, thiough operation on tihe reconstracted Culver 
Line between Coney Island and Park Row was inaugurated. With 
tlra beginning of such through servioe a universal S-oent fare 
to and from Coney Island on tftevated and subway line© became 
effective, as provided in the Dual System contracts. The through 
operation resulted in a demand, which was met, for increase in 
the service on 1ih«e Culver Line; the car consist of trains in evening 
rush hours being increased from three and four cars to four and 
five cars. 

The most important changes in operation, however, were due 
to the opening, on August let, of the Montague Street tunnel 
route between Manhattan and Brooklyn and the 60th Street tun- 
nel route between Manhattan and Queena By the opening of 
these tunnels and the reconstructed Brighton Line, through ser- 
vice was inaugurated between Queens Plaza station, Long Island 
City, and Coney Island. 

The Brighton Line was formerly operated in connection with 
the Fulton Street Line, Brooklyn, wooden cars being used. The 
new service provided for a wooden car local service, together with 
an express service of steel cars operated over the reconstructed 
line through the two-track Brighton connecting subway, so called, 
past the DeKalb Avenue station, where connection is poflsible 
with all other trains of the B. R. T. Company's subway system, 
and thence into Manhattan throngh the Montague ^reet tunnel 
connection at Whitehall street with the Broadway, Manhattan, 
subway, opened two years ago. The running time between Man- 
hattan and points on tihe Brighton Beacfh Line was reduced by 
from five to ten minutes or more in rush hours. 

The opening of the 60th Street tunnel line to Queensboro 
Bridge Plaza makes central Manhattan much more accessible to 
Queens passengers. A considerable measure of relief was also 
provided for passengers using the Fulton Street Elevated Line 
in Brooklyn, and the diversion of the Brighton service to the 
new route provided opportunity for the operation of several addi- 
tional passenger trains and also of longer trains on the Fulton 
Street Line. The Brighton Line, Which had formerly operated 

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FOUETEENTH AnNUAL RepOBT 97 

no further than West 8th street, was operated through to Stillwell 
aveaue. 

Midrday aerviee was increased during the year on the Sea 
Beadi and West End Lines, and upon the opening of the Monta- 
gue Street tunnel route a new and additional rush hour service 
yia the West End Line was installed. On the Fourth Avenue- 
86IJ1 Street Line non-rush hour service was increajsed, and at the 
opeaing of the new tunnel routes ali trains of this line were re- 
routed from Oham'bers street into the Broadway subway, with 
tennini at 69th street or Long Island City, and at 86th street, 
Brooklyn. 

Many changes and improvements were made in the rush-hour 
service on lines operating over the Broadway, Brooklyn, elevated 
route. On the Broadway-Jamacia Line the installation of what is 
believed to be the longest non-stop rapid transit express service 
in New York, namely, between Chambers street, ManhattJin, and 
Eastern Parkway station (East New York) in Brooklyn was 
effected. A non-stop express service 'between Essex street, Man- 
hattan, and Eastern Parkway is also now operated on the 
Broadway-Canarsie Line and non-stop express service between the 
Bowery and Myrtle avenue on the Broadway-Myrtle Avenue Line. 
These changes were recommended by the Commission, as was 
further rearrangement of local service on the Broadway Line 
by which the terminus of such service was extended from Eastern 
Parkway to Atlantic Avenue station, markedly relieving 
ooDgestion. 

lit was aUso possible further to improve the headway on the 
Broadway-Jamaica and other lines operating out of the Chambers 
Street terminal at the time the Fourth avenue trains were diverted 
via the Montague Street Tunnel Line into the Broadway subway. 
Physical conditioos at Sutter Avenue and Eastern Parkway sta- 
tions were abo materially improved, and at Marcy Avenue station 
two additional etairways were constructed for the relief of very 
serious conditions of overcrowding. 

In addition to the improvement previously referred to, which 

was made possible on the Fulton Street Line when the Brighton 

Beach lines were eliminated from that route during the summer 

months for the convenience of beach-bound passengers, a special 

4 



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98 Public Service Commission — First District 

shuttle service was installed between East New York and Frank- 
lin avenue. At the direction of the Cominiflfiion, cars were added 
to trains in the mid-day service on the Myrtle Aventie and Lex- 
ington Avenue Elevated lines, and six cars have been substituted 
for five upon trains on the latter line, in rush hours. 

Some of the improvements in service upon the srurface lines 
of the B. R. T. system during 1920 included : 

New short-line service on tihe Bergen Street Line; through 
operation to Fort Hamilton and improved service through the 
industrial section of lower Brooklyn on Fifth Avenue Line; 
through operation to 2(Mih Street on 15th Street Line; improvetl 
headways and increase in service on Smith Street Line; installa- 
tion of now Park Slope Line ; additional morning and evening 
ruflh-hour service on Park Avenue Line; additional service on 
Seventh Avenue Line; increased number of sitops on West End 
(surface) Line; additional stop on Jamaica Avenue Line; regu- 
lar headways installed on TJtica Avenue Shuttle Line; increase 
of 16 per cent in trips in morning, and 17 per cent in tripe in 
evening rush hour on DeKalb Avenue Line. 

Following the serious railroad strike in Brooklyn, in August, 
the company did not resume the operation of several linea The 
Commission attempited to enforce operation of these routes, but 
was prevented by injunction obtained by the company. The 
Commission by negotiation, however, brought about the paittial 
resumption of operation of the Metropolitan Avenue and Ocean 
Avenue lines. 

Brooklyn City Railroad Company. — Evening rush-hour ser- 
vice on Nostrand Avenue Line supplemented by 12 per cent 
increase in trips ; morning and evening rush-hour service increased 
8 and 11 per cent respectively on Graham Avenue Line; 13 per 
cent increase in service on Greene and Gates Avenue Line; m^om- 
ing rush-hour service on Grand Streeit Line increased by 9 per 
cent. 

Borough of Queens 

The Next) York and North Shore Traction Company ceased 
operating all its lines on May 3, 1920, because of inaibility to 
meet operating expenses and overhead charges. The company had 
lines extending from Flushing eastward through Little Neck 



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FOUETEENTH AnNUAL RepOET 



99 



Naifisau county, and nortihward from Flushing to Whitestone. 
8 understood that the company plans to sell ks property and 
idon its route, provided a eufficient sum can be obtained. 
'he Manhattan and Queens Traction Corporation was seriously 
2ted by a strike of its employees last summer, and service was 
)ended from August 13 to SeptenKber 19, 1920. In August, 
9, the receivers of this company 'had petitioned t!he Commis- 
for permission to establish two zones with a separate fare 
each, one zone extending from Manhattan to Elmhurst, 
jnts, and a second zone, from Elmhurst to Jamaica, 8 cents, 
\ total 13-oent fare. The CSommission was prevented from 
ng any acftion on this application by a writ of proihibdtion 
lined by the City of New York. The case was taken to the 
ler courts and in July of this year the Court of Appeals 
ded that the Commission had jurisdiction to establish the 
s of fare. In December the Commission authorized the 
blishment of the two zones firtst petitioned for, but at a 5-oent 
\ for each zone. The case is reviewed in full elsewhere in 
report. 

BoEOUGii OF Richmond 
)n January 10, 1920, Jacob Brenner was appointed receiver 
the lines of the Stolen Island Midland Railway Company, 
on Monday, January 19, 1920, lines of this company ceased 
rating. These lines were the Port Richmond-Concord Line, 
Qor Road Line, Richmond Line, Midland Beach Shuttle Line, 
(part) Silver Lake Lina Several attempts were made dur- 
the year to work out a plan by which the road could be re- 
ned and service restored ; a bus service estalblished by the cily 
ving insufficient to handle the traffic, and many of the pas- 
sers being unable to provide for themselves otiher methods of 
isportation. The City of New York, through the Commis- 
ler of Plant and Structures, following an agreement between 
Board of Estimate and Apportionment and the Receiver of the 
road company, made arrangements to lease tihe lines of the 
ten Island Midland Company and to operate them as munici- 
lines. For such purpose twenty-eight safety or one-man cars 
e purchased by the city and the new operation was begun on 
ember 1st. 



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100 Public Sbbvice Commission — First District 

On April 27, 1920, the lines of the Richmond Light and Bail- 
road Compamf were placed in iihe hands of Johm J. Knim as 
receiver, but operation has continued, owing to the grant of an 
8-cent fare by the Public Service Coimndfision. 

Steam Railroads 

Long Island Railroad Company. — Reference was made in the 
last annual report to the heavy increase in travel on the lines 
of the Long Island Railroad Company. During the past year 
this increase haa continued and officials of the company have 
experienced considerable difficulty in providing facilities to take 
care of the rapid growth. The Coimnission worked out with the 
company a method of allocating the cars in greatest percentage 
to the lines bearing the heaviest loads. In addition, the com- 
pany has purchased 100 new cars by order of the Commission, 
and more cairs are ui'gently needed. The company contracted 
for sevenrty cars for deetric service in 1919, and thirty cars for 
steam service. The first of the electric cars were delivered in 
August, and all by the end of Novemiber. Some are in servioa 
It is believed that all will 'be in- use by the beginning of 1921, 
or shiortly tihereafter. The thirty coadhes purchased for steam 
service have not yet been received. The placing of new electric 
service cars upon the rails as soon as equipped has enabled the 
company to improve its express service to and from the Pennsyl- 
vania station and Flatbush avenue, and the 'heavy overloading to 
and from these terminals which dbaracterized the rush hours 
of last winter has been reduced. Either by directiion of or at 
the request of the Commission the comspany has restored aban- 
doned train service in some instances, has arranged to make addi- 
tional stops of several trains in others, and bias made several 
station and platform changes to add to the comfort and con- 
venience of its patrona 

Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway Company. — Additional 
week-day service on the North Shore division and improved Sun- 
day service on the main lines of the South Beach divisions were 
put in effect at the request of the Commission, and bad sanitary 
conditions on trains and at certain stations were corrected. 



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Fourteenth Annual Report 



101 



^ew York Connecting Railroad Company. — Changes were 
ie in th© methods of operation of freight trains «o as to reduce 
>ke and noise to a minimum. 

^ew York Central Railroad Compomy. — Increases were made 
the service of the Harlem division during rush hours, and 
nges for the convenience of patrons were made at Grand Cen- 

Terminal and other stations. 

^ew York, Westchester and Boston Railway Company. — 
iiflScient platform facilities at the 180th Street station, which 
m important transfer point, were made the subject of an 
?stigation by the Commission and directions were issued for an 
itional waiting-room on the northbound plaftform, for wihich 
k a contract has already been let. Ventilators and heaters 
e installed in the existing waiting-rooms on the platforms of 

station. 

Electrification Recommended 
'or several years transportation conditions in Richmond 
lugh (Staten Island) "have become less and less adequate to 
t the needs of that community, as the population has steadily 
inued to increase. Only a few j'ears ago Staten Island was 
)llection or aggregation of small villages, served, as far 
passenger service is concerned, by two lines of steam 
•oads, later combined into one, with some hoi-se-cAT service 
the early days, which later became electric-car service. 

steam railroads have continued to function, but loss and less 
f actorily, no comprehensive scheme being pro];x>sed nor plan 
ced out to render these lines of more use to the community 
h.y as it grew, took on the character of a great suiburban dis- 
, former village lines lai'gely having been wiped out and a 
t projwrtion of the island having gi-o^vn into a single con- 
?d settlement. Improvements were miade in the street rail- 

OT trolley lines from time to time, new lines wore built and 
ities added, but again not synchronizing with the great growth 
opulation. 

iring the period of the war great shipbuilding interests were 
ed on Staten Island, and to and from these yards there were 
ed daily thousands upon thousands of ship workers. A 



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102 Public Service Cohmissioit — First District 

great many, if not M of these workers, came from ou'tside the 
Borough of Kidmiond. Many were 'hauled to and from the plan4a 
by the steam railroad lines; others utilized tiie trolleys, Which 
within a short time proved totally inadequate for the tremendous 
traffic offering. The trolley oompanies were all practically held 
by franchise or other contracts to a S^cent £are and, the costs of 
operation having materially increased, stated to the Oommissioii 
that they were unable to provide the necessary additional cars 
and facilities to transport the ship workers. In this connection 
it ehould be stated that the Commiasion received repeated requests 
from the shipping authorities of the government for its aid and 
co-operation in bringing about improvement in the transportation 
conditions from the standpoint of the shipyard officials and em- 
ployees. The Commission was able to assist in this matter, 
and a plan wias finally worked out by whidi the United States 
Shipping Board tarranged for the purchase or rental of cars whidh 
were placed in this service. This move was a temporary ex- 
pedient during the war. With the close of the war and the letting 
down of the shipbuilding work there was shown to have grown 
up a tremendous increase in the local traffic of these lines. Costs 
of operation had again increased, the companies found themselves 
in financial straits and eventuadly both the trolley lines went 
into the hands of receivers, and the operation of one, the Staten 
Mand Midland Railway Company, ceased altogether on Januaiy 
19, 1920, and has not been generally operated since by the com- 
pany, although the City of New York has purchased cars and is 
operating these lines under an agreement with the Receiver. 

Commissioner Nixon made every possible effort to prevent the 
discontinuance of operation of these lines, and appointed a com- 
mittee of citizens, following hearings held in Staten Island, to 
take up the matter with the Board of Estimate and Apportion- 
ment in an effort to obtain a modification of the franchise whidh 
would give the company the right to charge such a fare as would 
cover operating and other expenses. The Board of Estimate 
refused to grant this relief, however, and the company, as stated, 
suspended operation on January 19th, leaving the residents of 
* a large section of Staten Island without transportation facilities 
other than those provided by the irregular and largely inefficient 
bus service. 

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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAL RbpOBT 103 

Commissioner Nixon decided upon a general investigation of 
tte transportation eituation on Staten Mand, and called' upon 
Mr. R. H. Nexsen, the electrical engineer of the CSommission, 
for a report as to the practicability of the electrification of the 
syBtem of the Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway Oompany, 
which ^has been operated as a «team railroad. In a report sub- 
mitted to Commiagioner Nixon on March 15t4i, the electrical 
engineer pointed out that he ^had prepared two estimates, one 
covering the complete electrification of the existing linee, and the 
other including the necessary items of electrification, with the 
exception that power be purchased and supplied to the company 
from some outside source. This system has a road approximately 
twenty-three miles in length, with about forty-five mileB of track. 
The etationa are at frequent intervals and traflSa is heavy. 

The engineer assumed, under the plan proposed, that a maxi- 
mum flchedule of eighty-five or ninety cars operated in multiple- 
unit trains would be necessary after electrification, as with the 
change there would probably be an increase in the number of 
passengers carried. The electrical engineer recommended a type 
of car similar to the large steel cars operated upon the subway 
and certain of the elevated lines of the B. K. T. system, with a 
seating capacity of ninefty-eight. The seating capacity of the 
present equipment of this company is only fifty-three. 

A further reason for the recommendation of this type of equip- 
ment was based on the expectation that at some future time a 
physical connection will be made "between the existing B. R T. 
sulbway lines and the railroad© in Staten Island, with an operat- 
ing agreement which would be of mutual benefit to both companies 
as well as to the traveling public and the City of New York. It 
was also pointed out that in the general characteristics of the elec- 
trical equipment included in ^e estimates such a joint operation 
and the interchange of equipment ajid power between the two 
systems would become possible. 

The Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway is owned by the 
Baltimore and Ohio railroad, whidh uses some tracks for the trans- 
portation of large quantities of freight handled at waterside ter- 
minals along the Staten Island shore. The engineer, howevei^ 
did not include the question of the electrification of the freight 

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104 Public Service Commission — First District 

and terminal yards of the Baltimore and Ohio Company, consist- 
ing of about 50 miles of tracks. He stated, however, that the 
use of a 6 50- volt direct current, which he had considered as a 
propulsion medium for the steam railroad lines, if electrified, 
could also be utilized for the operation of the freight yard tracks. 
In fbrief , the report of the engineer considered the tentative loca- 
tion of power and substations, three of ihe latter and one central 
station, which, it was estimated, would meet the requirements in 
this respect. A duplicate high-tension transmission line of over- 
head type was recommended, in order to prevent unnecessary 
interruption of service through equipment failure. 

New automatic block signals would be required, with electro- 
mechanical interlocking switch plant As to the tracks, the 
engineer estimated that one mile of new track construction would 
be necessary, and rerailing of 23 miles of track wilJi 90-pound 
rail, with some reballasting and other construction work. 

The plan also included the construction of a new terminal at 
St. George, in order to simplify the platform^ train movement 
and passenger control. New stations were provided in the scheme 
at Port Richmond and Mariners Harbor, and the station plat- 
foiTTLs were to be lengthened and modified at the several stations 
along the line in order to accoammodate the new type of equipment. 

Including these several elemente, the engineer made the fol- 
lowing estimates: 

Estimate 1. — This scheme contemplates the complete electrifi- 
cation of the existing lines, using a 650-volt direct-current third 
rail, from which a propulsion current is taken for operating 
multiple-unit trains, together with the substations, transmission 
lines, power stations and other necessary equipment — total cost 
of olectrification, $13,338,662. 

Estimate 2. — This estimate includes the same items outlined 
in Estimate 1, except that since the power would be purchased 
from an outside source, no ]:x)wer station was included — total 
cost of electrification, $8,380,247. 

The engineer made certain comparisons as to cost of operation 
of the existing road with the cost of operation of the Xew York 
Consolidated Railroad Company, from which the following deduc- 
tions were drawn : 



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Fourteenth Annual Report 



105 



L. For the same operating expense, it is probable that very 
ch improved service oould be rendered on the lines of the 
ten Island Railway Company if these lines were operated elec- 
jally rather than by steam locomotives. 

I. Such betterment of servix»e would almost surely result in 
apid accelemtion in population growth in Staten Island along 

lines of this company, which would in turn make possible 
peasied revenues for the comipany and better service for the 
^'eling public. 

I. The provision of better transportation facilities in Staten 
ind will almost surely result in a great increase in the resident 
^ulation, which will cause land values on the island to increase 
siderably, and should also result in the development of a 
iing and shipping district, which would help to relieve the 
gestion of the present shipping facilities of the harbor. Land 
les resulting from both these causes would mean a very wel- 
le increase in revenue accruing to the city from taxes and 
irf rentals. The development of the residence districts would 
• tend to relieve the congested housing conditions in Manhat- 

and the lower part of Brooklyn. For these reasons it is 
eved that a further study of the proposed transportation system 
Staten Island is advisable. 

a a supplementary report to Commissioner Nixon the engineer 
li^hed general data concerning Staten Island transportation 
iitions as considered in connection with the scheme of elec- 
cation. In this report attention was given to the various 
Importation facilities of the island. The population density 
Staten Island he estimated at about 3.6 per acre, as against 
average density of population in the Borough of Manhattan 
Lboiit 29 per acre. Consideration was also given to the con- 
t increase in traffic and to the fact that the Staten Island 
a do not possess sufficient equipment to increase the service 
that now given, which shows marked congestion in the 
-hour periods. Attention was allso paid in this report to the 

that under the plans for the development of Staten Island, 
aid out by the city authorities, a tremendous increase in 
rfage districts, and con-sequently in freight traffic, may be 
cted in the future. If this estimate is borne out, the engineer 
1 in his second report that it will be necessary to add materially 



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106 Public Service Commission — First District 

to tihe existing tracks, new tracks being required on both the north 
and east shore diviBions. 

The engineer stated that if serious consideration i^ to be given 
to a comprehenrive, self-contained rapid transit system for Staten 
I-sland under existing conditions, the following steps are necesh 
sary to bring about its development. These steps were outlined 
as follows: 

1. An interborough connection, by tunnel or other means, with 
Brooklyn or Manhattan, preferalbly Brooklyn, w'hich will provide 
the necessary connecting link with the existing rapid transit lines 
of the city. 

2. The electrification of the existing rapid transit lines on 
Staten Island. 

3. Additional tracks to be provided on the north and east shore 
divisions of the existing lines. 

4. The elimination of grade crossings when additional tracks 
are provided on the nortjh 'and' east shore divisions. 

5. The construction of a new terminal wt St. George to provide 
better a<*commodations than are now afforded and one which can 
be readily used for the transfer of passengers when the inter- 
borough connection is made with the city rapid transit lines. 

6. The construction of a line between Tottenville and Arling- 
ton on the west shore and the developmenrt of belt line operation. 

7. The extension of trolley or bus lines in the interior of the 
island as feeders to the completed Belt Line System. 

8. The construction of a mid-island rapid transit line in a 
general southavesterly direction from Tompkinsville. 

The engineer further stated that the completion of electrifica- 
tion of the Staten Island Rapid Transit lines would provide for 
an increased and grealiy im,ppoved service, upon which, as 
economic conditions improved, a 5-cent fare would be possible, 
except for a few of the outlying stations where the long haul would 
probably compel a higher rate. Assuming that a tunnel would 
be built under the Narrows between Brooklyn and Staten 
Island, the engineer stated in his report, such a connection would 
immediately give those who live within reach of the Staten Island 
lines access to the business sections of Brooklyn and Manhattean. 
The express train time from St George or Stapleton would 



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FOUBTBENTH AnNUAX RepOBT 107 

be approximately thirty minutes to the Municipal Building in 
Manhattan. Trains would run more frequently than the exist- 
ing ferry-boats between Manhattan and Staten Island ; the fare 
would not be as high as the combined railroad and ferry fares; 
there would not be the delays due to water-front traffic which are 
now encountered by the ferry-boats, and the running time would 
compare favorably with similar service on existing rapid transit 
lines. For through service to Manhattan the fare would prob- 
ably have to be 10 cents from most stations. 

In conclusion, the engineer pointed out that the interior of 
Staten Island is relatively sparsely settled, and that oonsidera- 
tion can be given at the present time only to rapid transit lines 
which will skirt the shores and tap the more thickly settled por- 
tions of the island, with busses or trolley lines utilized as feeders 
from the interior to the rapid ti*ansit lines along the margin of the 
island. 

This report has been given oonsideratioii, and it is hoped that 
as financial conditions improve, the company will be able to find 
a way to finance tlie improvement itself, or the city to undertake 
an arrangement by which control and operation of these lines 
should pass to it, and the improvement be made and the road 
operated as a part of the Dual Rapid Transit System. 

Freight Congestion Belief 

Previous reports of this Comanission to the Legislature have 
indicated in more or lees detail the participation of the Commis- 
sion in the work of reli<eving freight eongestion througjh the 
medium of the Freight Congestion Committee, appointed during 
the emergency of the war. In 1918, aa is well known, the glut 
of freight about the port of New York became so serious that at 
times it was feared the work of carrying forward the war 
activities might be seriously impeded. In addition, the trans- 
mission of freight for local needs was even more seriously inter- 
fered with, as war requirements had first call upon all sihipments. 

The situation, however, continued to improve during the latter 
part of 1918 and throughout 1919 until, particularly in the lat- 
ter part of 1919, tibe freight movement, with the exception of a 
Um classes of f rei^t, was approximating noi-mal and it appeared 



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108 Public Service Commission — First District 

that with the passing of the winter of 1919-1920 the advent of 
normal conditions could be expected. 

At the beginning of April, 1920, Federal control of railroads 
was relinquished and the roads were returned to private owner- 
ship. Freight traffic conditions were much improved at that time, 
with the exception that an abnormal amount of freight was being 
moved generally throughout the country. With tbia condition 
prevailing, and also with a certain amount of confusion caused 
by the return of the roads to corporate control, the railroads were 
plunged into a tremendous strike of employees, 'beginning with 
a strike of switchmen. On April 3, 1920, the marine workers, 
yard crews, a laige majority of the trainmen and freight bandJers 
of the railroads operating into the port of New York, together 
with the coastwise steamship companies docking at New York, 
left their work, demanding increases in pay. 

After a few days the strike resulted in a substantial paralysis 
of railroad and shipping traffic, the situation becoming so critical 
at one time that it was feared a serious shortage of food products 
might occur in New York. The strike assumed such proportions 
and congestion of freight in railroad terminals became so great 
that the carriers generally sought the aid of the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission early in May, with the request that it exercise 
its full authority to remedy the situation whidh had been created. 
The Interstate body on May 8 appointed several terminal com- 
mittees to function at all important shipping terminals in con- 
junction with the operating officials of the carriers, with a view 
to providing relief. One ccwmnittee was appointed for New York 
and was in effect su'bstantially a revival of that freigjht relief 
organization, though differing somewhat in personnel, which had 
done such effective work during 1918 and in 1919. The commit- 
tee as originally appointed consisted of B. C. Craig, of the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission, as chairman; Deputy Public Ser- 
vice Commissioner Alfred M. Barrett, representing the Public 
Service Conunission for the First District; A. J. Miller, repre- 
senting the carriers; A. L. Viles, representing New York shipping 
interests; James Maybury, representing the Public Utility Com- 
mission of New Jersey, and A. H. Wolff, representing the ship- 
ping interests of the adjacent New Jersey territory. Subse- 

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FOUKTEENTH AnNUAI. RepOBT 



109 



atly Mr. Craig was succeeded as ohairman by J. P. Kelley, 
later by J. B. Ford, all representing the Interstate Commerce 
midssion and under whom siuccessively the work was carried 
mrd. 

he Interstate Commerce Commiasion appealed to this Com- 
mon to do aU in its power to further the work of the committee 

to render fullest ajasistanice in relieving the general freight 
ip. Commissioner Nixon placed the facilities of' the Com- 
ion at the command of the committee and headquarters were 
blished at the offices of the Commission. Inspectors of 
CJommission who had been familiar with the work done in the 

emergency in 1918 and later were temporarily assigned to 
rt the oommittee. A complete survey of the railroad and pier 
ition throughout the port of New York was at onoe made and 
committee obtained from the carriers detailed reports as to 
[itions prevailing on their several lines. The survey and 
rt revealed that the operating department employees of the 
ierB were in no way as efficient as the men on strike whoan 

replaced, and that this was proving a serious drawback to 
attempt to restore conditions to normal. Run-down rolling- 
: and other equipment was found to be in part responsible 
he situation. On the other hand, a part of the responsibility 
irith consignees through their failure to release equipment 
iptly. The abnormal volume of freight in movement already 
Ted to further complicated the congested condition. While 
lal passenger service was resumed by practically all of the 
oads within two weeks after the beginning of the strike, 
ht service had shown no marked improvement at the time the 
nittee b^an work. The committee iminediately directed its 
tion to the following matters: 

version of freight cars from badly congested lines and ter- 

fe to those offering the best facilities and opportunities for 

ht handling, irrespective of original route. 

crease of working forces of carriers to capacity of station 

I freigiit stations. 

ovision of additional tracks and efforts to compel consignees 

ew York City to take delivery at terminals along the New 

y shore. (This produced very satisfactory results.) 



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110 Public Sbbviob Commission — First Distbict 

Diversion of through freight so as to prevent routing thiougih 
the congested terminal area of New York. 

Berouting of tshrough cars for back-haul to connecting lines 
for delivery without encountering congested territory'. 

Emergency operation through Pennsylvania tunnels of perish- 
able freight and also coal en route to or from the Eastern States, 
Long Island and The Bronx. (This operation reached a maxi- 
mum of nearly 600 cars per day.) 

Beduction of time consumed in loading and unloading marine 
equipment at carriers' terminals and at steamehip docks. 

Pooling marine equipment in order to increase loading approxi- 
mately to capacity and to increase eflBciency of operation. 

The committee also found it necessary to assist the carrieiB in 
obtaining from the originating points duplicate waybills for over 
4,000 loaded cars, the original billing of which had been lost or 
destroyed during the first few days of the strike. Until such 
bills could be received^ it was practically impossible to unload 
and release the cars. 

The committee also directed its attention to obtaining permits 
from the City of New York authorizing tlie New York Central 
Railroad Company to unload freight from cars on that company's 
rails upon certain streets and thoroughfares. This made it pos- 
sible to speed up the unloading and ilJease of cars by approxi- 
mately 50 per day. The committee also, owing to scarcity of 
fuel, found it necessary to take steps V) relieve the coal situation 
in New York City, and during the latter part of June completed 
arrangements by which one carrier company operated daily for 
four days two trains of 50 cars each of bituminous coal from 
Maryland to tidewater, New York; action which undoubtedly 
prevented at least one public utility company in the city from 
being obliged to shut down. 

Soon after the committee started work rapidly increasing 
percentages of car movements and freight loading and unloading 
were shown, until a normal freight movement was reached late 
in July. The committee, however, is still continuing its work 
and is accomplishing important results through co-operation with 
the organizations and representatives of carriers and shippers. 
The importance of this work is now so firmly established that the 

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FOUETEENTH AnNUAL RepOET 



111 



►mmission has been informed that the Interstate Commerce Com- 
Lssion, through its enlai^ed powers under the Transportation 
;t, contemplates and is in fact preparing to organize the country 
k) eig'hteen inspection districts, and will maintain a permanent 
^anization for work of the nature undertaken by the existing 
jw York Terminal Committee and by the previous Freight Con- 
stion Conmiittee. It is believed that when this work is put 
on a permanent basis in the manner described it will be poesible 
Lterially to increase the efficiency of freigtht handling in New 
>rk. 



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CHAPTER V 



LABOR DISPUTES 



During the year 1920 the Commission was confronted with 
strikes of employees of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit System, the 
Manhattan and Queens Tractiom Corporation, the l^ew York 
Transfer Company and the Westcott Express Company. 

The cause of the strikes in all cases was mainly demands on 
the part of the employes of the above companies for an increased 
wage. 

The Commission has no power to prevent strikes. It can only 
officially intervene when cessation of operation is threatened or 
has actually occurred. In the three strikes of 1920 the Commis- 
sion ordered formal hearings in each case, in which all sides to the 
labor disputes were heard. 

A temporary cessation of operation of the B. R. T. system 
followed the strike of the operating and shop employes, which 
tied up all subway, elevated and surface Hues of the sj^teni 
operating in large part in the Borough of Brooklyn. The strike- 
went into effect at one minute after midnight of August 28, and 
on Sunday morning, August 29, a large portion of the population 
of Brooklyn was forced to walk. All tliat saved Brooklyn from 
a complete paralysis of its transit facilities was the continued 
oj^cration of the Intcrborough subway lines and tlie Long Island 
Railroad, upon which there were no strikes. On that day the 
Conmiission ordered an investigation and hearing for Monday 
afternoon, August 30, and notices were served upon the B. R. T. 
Receiver, upon the executives of the Brooklyn companies which 
were not under the receivership, and upon representatives of the 
striking employes. Simultaneously the railroad officials received 
a formal letter from Commissioner Alfred M. Barrett, callin«j 
U'i)on them to issue instructions that green or inexperienced men 
must not be used in the oj)eration of cars or trains, as thciv 
emplojonent might lead to accident. 

The Commission assigned thirty of its insj)ector8 to the car 

[112] 

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Fourteenth Annual Report 



113 



rns and depots of the companies, to observe the situation at 
irioiis local points along the lines. These inspectors reported 
dly to the Commission, which kept its finger on the pulse of 
e strike's progress every hour for more than two weeks. 
The hearing was opened on the second day of the strike, and 
as based upon the authority vested in the Commission by the 
ablic Seiyice Commissions Law to compel adequate service by 
iblic utilities operating in the First District. The Brooklyn 
apid Transit system was, and still is, in the hands of a receiver, 
)pointed by the United States District Court for the Southern 
istrict of New York. The Receiver, Lindley M. Garrison, was 
e first witness examined, and he made it evident that the dif- 
rences between the railroad companies and their men were 
fiicult of adjustment. The Receiver's attitude was that the 
rikers had broken their contract. Tlie existing agreement 
tween the men and the railroad called for one month's notice 

any changes desired, to be given after July 24, failing which, 
3 working agreement made in 1919 was to stand. The strike 
iders insisted that they gave this notice by submitting new 
ledules of demands thiity days before the strike b^an. The 
^ceiver contended that this notice was not of changes in the old 
reement, but was a proix>sed new agi^eement. The strikers 
lintained that the Receiver had violated a clause in their work- 
T agi'ecment to submit all differences that may *' heruafter " 
Lse to arbitration. The Receiver insisted that he must be gov- 
ned by the orders of the United States District Court. Judge 
ilius M. Mayer had taken the position that while other matters 

controversy might be submitted to arbitration, the court must 
tain its power to keep wages within reasonable bounds, to bring 
em within the financial ability of the railroad. Without such 
wer retained by the Court, the Receiver told the Commission, 
E* wage awards might absorb every cent of gross income, com- 
lling a cessation of operations because of inability of the system 
pay other costs. 

Commissioner Barrett, after a conference with representative;^ 
the strikers, called upon United States District Judge Mayer 
his chambers, in an effort to effect a settlement of the dispute 
i a resumption of service in Brooklyn. There was read into 



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114 Public Sebvice Commission — First District 

the record at the hearing a letter from Judgje Mayer to the Com- 
missioner, in which he said that the proper way for the strike 
to be settled was for the men to return to work. After that, 
Judge Mayer said, the Receiver and the Court would be pleased 
to receive any duly constituted committee which truly represented 
the men. Judge Mayer wrote that he could not emphasize too 
strongly that there would be no negotiations, directly or indi- 
rectly, by the Receiver or the Court, with those leaders who 
" either instituted the strike or were powerless to prevent it." 

Commissioner Barrett announced the Federal Court's posi- 
tion at a later session of the hearing, and said: 

" The Cononission finds that the public is being seriously 
inconvenienced ; that the people are not being carried on the cars 
in Brooklvn: that disorder exists in connection with the trans- 
portation system thera The Conunission has no power to order 
either side to do anything. All the Commission can do is to 
recommend to either .or both sides to do certain things. 

" The necessity of the people in a matter of this kind is para- 
mount The Commission's sole purpose is to restore the service 
so that the people may not be inconvenienced. The Commission 
recommends that these men who are now on strike return to 
work and perform their duties; that they appoint a committee 
to represent them, and that this committee wait upon the Receiver 
and notify him of their grievances. I believe he will meet the 
men in a friendly spirit and that he will act reasonably. I 
therefore recommend that the Receiver hear these men, and that 
he grant them such relief, with the consent of the Court, as the 
circumstances of this case demand. If they are unable to agree,' 
their differences will have to be settled in some way. 

"Arbitration is now looked upon as a most effective method 
of adjusting disputes. Irrespective of any agreement between 
the parties, if a situation arises in which the public is incon- 
venienced by lack of transportation facilities the superiority of 
these interests demands that the conflicting claims between the 
railroad companies, on the one hand, and their employes on tht 
other, be settled. Ordinarily arbitration is considered a fair 
way of adjusting disputes of this nature, but in this particular 
instance we have a rather peculiar situation. It is impossible 

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FOTTBTESNTH ANNUAL RePOBT 115 

for the Receiver, without the consent of the Court, to arbitrate 
the question of wages. The Receiver is the repreeentative of the 
Court and must obey its instructions. In my opinion, it would 
be improper for the Receiver to submit to arbitration a matter 
which might possibly exhaust all the financial resources of the 
ownpany. With that exception, I think that all the other mlatters 
in controversy, of which I am aware, are arbitrable, and that 
they should be settled by this method." 

No attempt was made by the companies in the early days of 
the strike, to run surface cars. Some service was maintained on 
the subway and elevated lines. As days passed, the company 
reported the return of a number of former employes and the 
addition of new men to its working forces, and service was grad* 
ually improved to the previous operating standards, with the 
exception of a few lines — the latter being discontinued by 
direction of the United States District Court, on account of the 
contention of the Receiver that the operation thereof impaired 
' the revenues of the system and resulted in a financial loss. In 
short, the company won the strike. 

The Weetoott Express Company and the New York Transfer 
Company advised the Commission, in August, that their service 
had been interrupted by a general strike of teamsters, chauffeurs 
and baggage wagon helpers. These -employes had demanded 
increased wages, which meant an added ccst to the Westcott 
Company of over $150,000 a year, and to the New York Trans- 
fer Company of $185,000 to $200,000 a year. The companies 
stated that their revenues did not justify a substantial in- 
crease of wages. The employes demanded from 25 to 40 per 
cent advances. The companies after discussion with the men, 
who said they would not recede from their original demands, 
declared that they would cease operation permanently and go out 
of business. These companies have contracts with the trunk line 
railroads entering New York City, for the handling of baggage 
at the terminals. They handle more than 1,350,000 pieces of 
baggage a year. The heaviest month is September, when the 
baggage of returning siunmer vacationists always taxes the 
capacity of the receiving rooms at the terminals. The strike 
occurred late in August, and the Conmiission at once called a 
hearing, which opened on August 25. 

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116 Public Sebvice Commission — Fiest Distbiot 

It was brought out that the Transfer Company had made 
$31,000 in 1919, less than six per cent on its capital of $600-,000. 
The Westcott Company's year, ended June 30, 1920, showed 
a deficit of over $7,000, and the previous year had shown a simi- 
lar deficit. The companies had been permitted to charge $1.00 
for the handling of trunks in a wide zone embracing the railroad 
terminals, and the officials said that to meet the demands of the 
men, a $1.75 rate must be allowed, else, as one company president 
testified, " we will all quit together." Representatives of the 
employes showed that advanced costs of living, and the wages 
paid by other express companies justified them in demanding an 
increase. 

The Commission's attitude, as expressed at the public hearing 
by Commissioner Barrett, was that some concessions should be 
made to the men, and that the companies should not be forced 
out of business. The tremendous inconvenience to the public 
caused by the cessation of operations was the paramount issue 
before the Commissicoi. The hearing was followed by a series 
of informal conferences with Commissioner Barrett, in whidi 
the company ofiicials and the employes' representatives took 
part. As a result of these conferences the labor difficulties were 
adjusted and the men went back to work before the early 
September baggage congestion at the terminals had further aggra- 
vated the situation. The employes received an increase in wages, 
and the Commission decided that the rate of $1.00 a trunk was 
insufficient to yield reasonable comix^nsation, and an advance in 
the tariffs of the companies to $1.25 was allowed. 

The Commission received infomiation in August, that opera- 
tion had been discontinued on the trolley line from Second ave- 
nue, Manhattan, over the Queensboro bridge, through Elmhurst 
to Jamaica. The Manhattan and Queens Traction Corporation, 
which oj)erates the line, has l)een in the hands of a receiver since 
1916. The financial condition of the corporation made it impos- 
sible to pay a 25 per cent advance in wages demjuided by the 
employes. When the men struck, the Commission ordered a 
hearing, and this brought out in detail the inability of the rail- 
road to bring its scale of wages even up to the scale paid on other 
transit lines in contiguous territory within the City of New York. 



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Fourteenth Annual Report 



117 



rhe road had been showing a deficit and was in need of more 
noney for necessary betterments. 

A year previously the Receiver made application to the Com- 
mission for an increase in fare, and a court order, obtained by 
The City of New York, restrained the Commission from holding 
I hearing to consider it. Later the Court held that the Commis- 
jion had the right to take up this application for a rate increase 
it a hearing; but the employes, who had waited several months 
n the ho[)e that the Corporation's financial condition might be 
)ettorcd to an extent which would permit their wage advance, 
lecided to quit work. The Commission's accountants, after 
examining the books and annual statements of the line in roceiver- 
diip, testified that an increase in wages to meet the standard 
jcale was not justified by the financial condition and the current 
ncome from operation of the Manhattan and Queens Traction 
IJorporation. In the meantime, while operation of the road had 
leased, The City of New York operated buses between the Queens- 
>oro bridge and Jamaica, on which a ten-cent fare was charged. 

Following the hearing, a series of informal conferences was 
leld and, at the direction of Commissioner Barrett, the Receiver 
n September resumed operation of the i-oad pending the termina- 
ion of the rate proceedings instituted the year before. The 
mployes received an increase in wages, and in December the 
orp<>ration was authorized to put a new rate tariff in operation, 
irith Elmhurst the dividing line of two fare zones, in each of 
irhich a five-cent fare is charged. 



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CHAPTER VI 



FRANCHISE AND TARIFF BUREAUS 



The Corninission maintains a Franchise Bureau, to which is 
assigned the work of analyzing the franchises of the several public 
utility corporations under the jurisdiction of the Oommiasion and 
of compiling data conioeming them, to aid the Oommission in its 
work. On account of the unusual number of rate cases which 
were heard by the Comimission in 1920, the volume of this work 
was greatly increased as compared with previous years. 

In practically every such case disposed of during the past 
twelve months the Franchise Bureau was called upon to prepare 
for the Oommiasion reports as to the provisions of the franchise 
grants of ihe particular public utility corporation concerned. 
Such reports dealt in detail with the terms of the franchise grants, 
particularly in railroad cases, as to the transfer and fare clauses, 
including such grants as were obtained directly by the operating 
companies as well as their predecessor and constituent companies. 
Each grant was separately studied, not only to ascertain the limits 
of transfer and fare provisions as applied to operated routes, but 
also as to the nature and breaddi of such provisions. It was 
necessary to examine upward of one thousand of these grants 
during 1920. 

In Cases Nos. 2477, 2478 and 2479, relating to applications 
of the Receiver of the Nassau Electric Railroad Company, the 
Brooklyn, Queens County and Suburban Railroad Company and 
i!he Coney Island and Brooklyn Railroad Company, respectively, 
for permission to charge an increased fare upon their lines, the 
Franchise Bureau examined and reported upon all franchise 
grants claimed by such companies as the authority for the opera- 
tion of their respective roads, and reported in analytical fonn on 
their terms, not only as to the direct transfer and fare provisions, 
but as to such additional provisions as seemed to bear upon the 
fare and transfer clauses. 

In Case No. 2416, arising from the application of the Receivers 
of the Manhattan and Queens Traction Corporation to increase 

[1181 

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FOUBTEENTH ANNUAL RSFOBT 119 

&]B rate of fare on the lines of that company, a similar study 
was made of the company's fmnohise grants. 

In Cases Nob. 2356 and 2433, involving the applications by 
the New York, Westchester and Boston Railway Company, the 
Richmond Light and Railroad Company, and the Staten Island 
Midland Railway Company, respectively, for increaeed fares, the 
Bureau made separate studies of each franchise grant obtained 
directly by these corporations and by their predecessor companies. 
In view of the decision of the Court of Appeals defining the 
powers of the Commission in reference to franchise grants, with 
particular reference to such grants as were made before and since 
the creation of the Commission, it was necessary to make separate 
and special studies of these grants. The decision in question 
materially enlarged the powers of the Commission over fare and 
transfer provisions of the francihiseB of several of the railroad 
companies and segregated such grants in relation to certain 
periods. It was held that the Commission has power to regulate 
fares under franchises granted before the enactment of the con- 
stitutional amendment in 1875, requiring consents of local authori- 
ties, and under those granted subsequent to the establishment of 
the Commission in 1907, as well as under those granted between 
those dates which did not fix a specific rate of fare. 

The Bureau prepared a large number of documentary exhibits 
for presentation in formal cases before the Commission, including 
maps, charts, etc., and, for the special report of Commissioner 
Nixon to the L^islatuie on the traction situation in New York 
City, prepared two exhibits, one, a map of each borough in the 
dty, showing all street and electric railroad lines, including sulb- 
way and elevated routes operating therein ; also lines upon whiclh 
service had been abandoned, or where the lines had been returned 
by Court order to corporate owner. The second exhibit was a 
general statement as to operating companies by boroughs, includ- 
ing a brief description of the franchise and documentary history 
of each company. The Frandhise Bureau has in its files more 
than 10,000 documents relating to the public utility companies 
in New York City, the number of which' was increased by the 
addition of many important papers during the year. 
The Franchise Bureau, as in the past, continued to prepare 

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120 Public Sekvice Commission — First District 

for publication the monthly advance sheets of reports of decisions 
of the Commission, and the annual volumes of such reports for 
the immediate two years of 1918 and 1919. Material for these 
is now with the printer and in process of publication. The 
Commission maintains a libraiy which is fiiiii)ervised in connection 
with the Bureau. This library contains many hundreds of vol- 
umes relating to the regulatory^ work of State commissions and 
similar bodies in this country and in other countries, and other 
volumes relating to corporation management, accounting, etc. 
Practically every feature of the varied and complicated manage- 
ment, accounting and operation of public utility corporations is 
covered by documents on file in the Franchise Bureau or volumes 
in its library. 

Tariff Bureau 
During the calendar year 1920 there were filed with the Com- 
mission rate, fare and oharge schedules, as follows: 

Street railroads, freight 26 

Street railroads, passenger 69 

Steam railroads, freight 868 

Steam railroads, passenger 99 

Express and baggage companies 58 

Total 1,110 



For the first eight months of 1920 no tariff schedules of more 
than passing importance were filed' in respect to passenger fares 
or commodity rates, but in August last the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, Docket 74 (ex parte) ^ authorized a general increase 
of 40 per cent in commodity rates, effective August 26th, and also 
allowed an increase of 20 per cent in passenger rates. The Com- 
mission took these rates under consideration and, in accord 
with the Commission for the Second District, issued special per- 
missions allowing the general 40 per cent commodity rates to go 
into effect, except as to milk and cream and certain milk producta 
It refused to sanction the proposed increase in passenger rates, 
and presented its objections thereto to the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, the action -and its results 'being discussed more fully 
under the extracts of formal oases 'before the Commission, given 



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Fourteenth Annual Keport 121 

elsewhere in this volume. Blanket tariffs were tiled by the car- 
riers to conform their schedules to the cihanges permitted as to 
commodity rates. 

A plan for blanket tariifs was also worked out by which it was 
jx)8sible for the carriers, upon the relinquishment of Federal 
control, to aseaune the authority for t^ariffs previously issued by 
the Director-General of Railroads, thus reducing to a minimum 
the number of tariffs requisite to complete th© records. 

The numiber of tariffs filed showed a large increase over pre- 
vious years, w^iich fact was due to several cau»es, some of which 
may be enumerated, as follows : New rapid transit lines placed 
in service; changes in routing, control, etc., of street railroad 
lines; partial discontinuance of certain street railroad lines; 
changes in passenger and commodity rates; changes in baggage 
and express rates; change from Federal control of steam railroad 
lines. The several companies affected filed sixteen notifications 
of postponement of effective dates of tariffs. Twenty-six revised 
classification schedules were filed. 

The principal changes reflected by the filing of tariff schedules 
during the year were the resumption by the New York and Har- 
lem Railroad Company, now a part of the New York Centn^l 
Railroad System, of the Madison Avenue Surface Line, owned 
hv it, but previously operated by the old Metropolitan Street 
Railway Company and later by the New York Railways Com- 
pany, by w'base Receiver control was relinquis^hed on February 1st 
last. The R«eceiver of the Staten Island Midland Railway Com- 
pany discontinued service on January 19, 1920. Subsequently, 
under an arrangement with the Receiver, The City of New York, 
through the Department of Plant and Structures, undertook the 
operation of the lines of this company, filing the necessary sched- 
ules effective as of December 1, 1920. 

The Tnterbopough Rapid Transit Company inaugurated service 
over 21.16 track miles of new rapid transit lines, and the New 
York Municipal Railway Corporation (B. R. T.) over 15.2 miles 
of similar new lines, as shown by tariffs filed Iby the companies 
for sucfh operation. Following the street railroad strike in Brook- 
lyn last August, in which practically all lines ceased operation 
for a time, nine lines which were closed down remained so by 



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122 Public Sebvicb Commission — First District 

order of the Federal court to the Receiver. Resumption of partial 
operation on some of these lines was permitted by the Commission 
under a particular type of tariff drawn to meet this case and 
fully protecting the Commission in reference to the company's 
franchise obligations. 

Following hearings by the Ooiimiission as to their rates, the 
New York Transfer Company and the Westcott Express Com- 
pany filed tariffs showing increases from 15 per cent to 30 per 
cent in their rates. 

During the year 53 special permissions were granted authoriz- 
ing the issuance and filing of tariff schedules and regulations by 
transportation companies operating in the First District. 



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CHAPTER VII 



CAPITALIZATION OF PUBLIC UTILITIES 



The cambined capitalization, that is, the total arnoimt of out- 
standing stocks and bonds of all oommon carriere, light, heat and 
power companies under the jurisdiction of the Oommiesion in 
1920 (common earners as of June 30 and steam railroads as of 
January 1, 1920) amounted to $1,638,553,030. Of this total 
common carriers had $l,232,38&,<yr7 and the light, heat and 
power companies $306,164,943. Included in the total for com- 
mon carriers is an item of $213,250,000, representing the capital 
of the City of New York invested in the rapid transit railroads. 

The following table shows in detail the number and kind of 
these companies and the total capitalization of each: 

NUMBER AND CAPITALIZATION OF PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATIONS 

Number CapitaliBation ^ 

Rapidtanaitmihray owned by City of New York 1 $213,260,000 

Street and dectrio railroadi > 57 020.661.950 

Stetmniboada 11 149.824.118 

Baoace ftod traoafer oompanies 2 1. 130.000 

8tage-ooacfa oorporatioiifl 2 230,800 

Aaammonearriera 73 81,285.086.868 

Same, txduding duplieatima $1 .232.388,077 

Ga» ramx)ani«a 16 $250. 111,247 

Gas-dectrie companiea 3 5.828.600 

Eleetrie light and power companies 8 158.075, 101 

Beefarie eondnit companies 2 21 .544.000 

Stoam companies 1 10.154.466 

Total Ught^hMl and pover 30 $445,713,404 

Same,exdwding duplicaiiotu $306,164,948 

Giand toUl 103 $1,730,800,272 

Same, exdudins ditplications 1.538,553.020 

1 Common eairien as of June 30, 1920, with exception of ateam railroada, which are as of Jan. l' 
1920. the date of the data relative to gas and electric companies. Steam supply company as of 
April 3D. 1920. 

'Richmond Light A Railroad Co. is here treated as a street railway company and omitted from 
uc eleetrieal companies. 



[1231 

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124 Public Service Commission — Fiest District 

It is interesting to note that the total capitalization of these 
companies in the year 1920 is more than double their total capital- 
ization in 1907, the year in whioh the Public Service Commission 
was created. In that year the aggregate capitalization was 
$710,042,460. 

The following tables show the capitalization, number of passen- 
gers and total operating revenues of the several transportation 
companies for the year ended June 30, 1920 : 



capitalization and revenue op transportation companies reporting 
to the public service commission for the first 
district. year ended june 30, 1990 

Capitalisation 

in stocki Number of Total 

Company and Ions passengers operatins 

(Names of lessor companies are indented) term debt * (cash fares) * revenues 

Strxvt Railways 

Rapid TRANsrr Companies $799,4S6,B97 1,494,166,581 $79,183,077 79 

Intcrborough Rapid Transit Company 228 . 962 , 000 955 , 133 , 110 51 , 478 . 4 10 81 

Rapid Transit R. R. (City of New York) 126 .000 , 000 586 . 008 . 633 31 . 622 .973 04 

Manhattan Railway Co 105.200,463 369.034.477 19,855.437 77 

New York Consolidated R. R. Co., Rec'r 

(B. R. T.) 66.621,794 376,782,635 19.519,077 55 

New York Municipal Ry. Corp., RecV. . » 73.892,385 

Rapid Transit R. R. (City of New York) 87,250,000 

Hudson ft Manhattan R. R. Co 121,659.655 92,250,836 « 8.135,589 43 

Street Surface Companies 

Manhamn and The Bronx 216,668,099 44S, 102 , 462 24 , 774 ,707 47 

Third Avenue Railway Co., The 63,174,500 50,662,665 4.155.779 32 

Kingsbridge Railway Co 2, 2.57.393 

Belt Line Railway Corporation, The 2 , 557 , 091 17 , 358 , 397 593 . 950 78 

Dry Dock, E. B'way ft Battery R. R. Co. . 3,978,200 11.863,020 638.452 68 
42d St., Manh. ft St. Nich. Ave. Ry. Co., 

The 11.602.153 37.225.398 1.871.879 28 

Third Avenue Bridge Co 112,909 

Mid-CroBstown Railway Co., The 150.000 94,989 4. 861 95 

N. Y. City Interborough Ry. Co 7,084,358 16,267,628 810,160 67 

Pclham Park ft City Island Railway Co., 

Inc 74.645 51.113 2,693 15 

Southern Boulevard R. R. Co., The 686 . 473 6 . 771 . 178 290 . 340 51 

Union Railway Co. of New York City 8,716.064 69.331 .682 3. 137.375 73 

Bronx Traction Co.. The 370,806 

Westchester Electric Railroad Co., The. ... 2.952.161 12.720.540 724,809 01 

Brooklyn ft North River R. R. Co., The. . 100,000 1.550,880 68.019 35 
Second Ave. R. R. Co. in the City of N. Y., 

Rec'r '. » 7,493.000 17.520.828 870.680 80 

1 Includes unmatured funded debt, matured funded debt held bv affiliated companies, and 
notes held in investment account of the creditor companies. Bonos held in amortiiation and 
sinking funds have been deducted whenever disclosed m the returns; for example, Interborough 
Rapid Transit Co.. S6.248.000. Third Avenue Ry. Co.. S2.942.000, Hudson ft Manhattan R. R, 
Co., SI. 103.529, New York RaUways Co.. Sl.041.342. etc. 

*In addition, the following two-oent transfers were sold: New York Railways. 20,310.384, 
Eighth Avenue. 812,309, Brooklyn Heights. 7,269,932, Brooklyn. Queens Co. ft Suburban. 
2,686,259. Coney Island ft Brooklyn, 5,408,193, Coney Island ft Gravesend. 139,340, Nassau 
Electric, 10.754..'>06. 

* Includes 813,000,000 receiver's oertificates, which are the joint liability of respondent and tha 
New York Consolidated. 

< Includes SI, 888,394.73 revenue from auxiliary operations, principally rent from Hudson 
Terminal Buildings. 

* Includes S89,000 debenture bonds matured and unpaid and 83,140,000 of receiver's certificates. 



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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAI, RepOBT 125 

CAPfrALOUTiDN AMD Rsvuffua 07 Tbansporation Companxxs, Etc. — Cmiiinxied 

CKutaliMtion 



COMPANT 

Nev Talk RaUways. Ree'r 


m stocks 

and lone 

term debt > 

$74,876,746 

1.600.000 

11.750.000 

860.000 

8.000.000 

748.000 

2.000.000 

2.000.000 

2.478.000 

1.646.700 

800.000 

•2.500,000 

111,446,004 

18.925.000 

13.822.650 

100,000 

11.329.567 

9,306,308 

10,000 

2,987.000 

36,022.115 

$3,376,570 

1.630.500 

100.000 

50.000 

366.045 

450.000 

50.000 

231.000 

6.235.000 

1. 200.000 

2.000.000 

343.809 

1.749.350 

'1,170.000 

7, 40*, 660 

5.152.750 

2.000.000 

249.800 


Number of 
(oash faras) « 
$177,098,262 


Total 

operatinc 

revenues 

$9,772 806 56 


fileecker St. ft Fulton Ferry R. R. Co.. 
Tl» 




Bradmy ft Seventh Are. R. R. Co., 
Rae'r 






Cbuteiiher ft Tenth St. R. R. Co.. The 






Ft Geoue ft Eleventh Avenue R. R. Co. 






Fortjr-eeeond St. ft Grand St. ly. R. R. 
Co., Tlie 












TUrtj'foarth St. Crontown Ry. Co. . . . 






Twenty-third St. Ry. Co 








18.658.603 
5.954,818 

11.472.601 
489,498,801 
142.956.708 

67.788,736 

13,821,444 

34,076.888 
45.290,853 


961.575 80 


Ninth Avenue RaOroad Co.. The 

New Toik ft Harlem Railroad Co 

Bnokljn A Qutena 


299.376 13 

581.965 75 

M, 001, 904 SO 

7.236.287 99 

3.052.494 05 

232.570 96 


Brooklyn aty Railroad Co., The 

BrooUyn HeightB R. R. Co.. The. Ree'r. . . 
Bridie Opemtinc Co 


Co..Beo'r 


1.776.936 99 


CoDqr Unnd ft Brooklyn R. R. Co., The. 

Ree'r 

De Kalb Ave. ft North Beach R. R. Co. 


2.376.769 42 


Coney Uand ft Oraresend Ry. Co 

1 Soath Brooklyn Railway Co 


2,248,866 

118,721.632 

5.069.934 


114.733 66 

6.202.449 €4 

$903,032 00 






New YoriK ft COMv bland R. R. Co.. The 






! PKspeot Ptek ft South Brooklyn R. R. 
! Co 






BiMh Terminal Raihoad Co 


5.680 

9.507.749 

256,757 

3.192.130 

22.595.975 

5.573.933 

9.516.689 
4,375,632 
1.678.986 

5.821.359 
16,007,t5S 
10.484.155 

4.323.283 
249.795 


213.414 89 


Manhattan Bridge Thne Cent Line 

Marine Raflway Co., The.... 

Van Brunt St. ft Erie Basin R. R. Co.. The 
New York ft Queens County Railway Co. . 


241.449 27 

12.837 85 

83,267 13 

1.166.989 97 

304.817 32 


New York ft Lone Island Traction Co.. 
The, Ree'n 


535.858 06 


Ocean Electric Railway Co 


222,980 96 


New Yoric ft North Shore Traetion Co.. The 

Msnhattan ft Queens Traction Corporation. 

Rec-is 

Richmond Light ft R. R. Co.. Ree'r 

Staten Island Midland Ry. Co.. Ree'r 

Southfidd Beach Railroad Co 


114.738 96 

269.575 20 
799,666 tS 
567.907 68 
218.868 70 
12,789 85 






All eompaniin 


>$920.651.950 
218.250.000 


2.364.775.067 { 


1129.768.556 79 


Gitv of Htm York 










Total 


$1,183,901,960 











* * See foot-notes on page 121 

•One-fourth of the entire capital stook ($12,000,000) is estimated to represent this company's 
itreet railway, which is ezeluded from mortgace securing its bonds. 

. 'Includes a demand note of $1,150,000 for construction advances dated October 1. 1917, which 
■ nierged in a judgment secured by the Qas and Electric Securities Co. 

■ laehides $52,608,791, intercompany holdings. 



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126 Public Sebvicb Commission — Fiest Disthict 



CAPtTALisi.TioN AND RarBNUB OP Tbakbpobtation CouPANmi, Eto. — ConelutM 



COMPANT 

(Names of loasor oompanies are mdented) 



Capitalisation 
rnatook 
and long 
term debt & 



Staqk-coacb Corpobatioms 



City Island Motor Bus Co., Inc. 
Fifth Avenue Coach Co 



$5,800 
225.000 



Number of 
passengers 
(oaah fares) « 



533,848 
42.552,709 



Total. 



$230,800 



Total 
operating 



$105,183 60 
4.353,950 14 



48.086,057 $4,450,133 74 



BAaaAOB AND Transpbr Coupanxbs 



New York Transfer Co. 
Westcott Express Co. . . 



ToUl. 



$480,000 
650,000 

$1,130,000 



$596,224 36 
637.948 86 

$1,234,173 22 



Stbam Railboads • 



Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal 

Degnon Terminal Railroad Corporation . . . 

Jay Street Connecting Railroad, The 

New York Dock RaUway 

New York Connecting R. R. Co 

Stoten Island Rapid Transit Ry. Co., The. 

Staten Island Railway Company 

Glendale & East Rirer R. R. Co., The 

New York & Rookaway Beach Ry. Co., The 
New York, Brooklyn A Manhattan Beach 

Ry. Co., The 

Pennsylvania Tunnel A Terminal R. R. Co. 



Total. 



$115,250 $1,030,871 40 



25.660 

20.000 

469.610 

27.020.000 

6.075,000 

1.687.472 

100.549] 
2.964.000 

2.726.000 J 
108.620,577 

S14V.tt24,118 



10.204.511 



18.110 76 

99.483 81 

463.771 93 

N. R. 
,234,671 44 



Lessor Company 

Lessor oompanies not (q>erated by 
First District oorpocatioDs 



10,204.511 $3,846,909 34 



Stock and Bond Iiiaei Anthorized 

During the year 1920 the Ooimnission passed upon several 
applications for permisBion to issue stocks and bonds. Up to 
December 31, 1920, the total amount of authorizations granted 
by the Commission for such purpose was $58,397,000, as com- 
pared with $25,713,564.30 in the year 1919. The total of such 
authorizations granted 'by the Commission since it began work 
July 1, 1907, is $1,036,578,543.78. 



1 s See foot-notes on page 124 

• Figures for the year ended December 31, 1919. 



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FOUBTBENTH ANNUAL RepOBT 127 

The following tables ahow the names of the companies and the 
nature and amounts of the securities authorized during the year 
1920: 

STOCK AND BOND ISSUES AUTHORIZED BY THE COMMISSION IN 1920 



OOMPANT 

Brooklyn, Queens Co. A Sub. 
R.R.CO 


Class 
ofseeurity 

rRANSPOHTATION Co* 

{See. 66) 

Reoeirer's etfs 

Receiver's otfs 

LlCHriKQ COHPA 

(Sec. 69) 

Bonds 

Boads 

Bonds 

Sto-k 


Date of 
authorisation 

iPAirm 

Jan. 16.1920 
Jan. 15.1920 

NXBB 

Oct. 29,1920 
Jan. 21.1920 
Dee. 4.1920 
Feb. 13,1920 
Sept. 21, 1920 
Jan. 9. 19J0 
Sept. 14. 1020 
Deo. 15. 1920 
Dec. 21. 1920 
. Dec. 21, 1920 


Amount 

foraind 
authorised 
(par value) 

$36,000 
325.000 

274.003 
5,000.000 
8.000,000 
2,000.000 
88.000 
25.000.000 
3,500.000 
2.000.000 
8.825,000 
3,400,000 


Case 
No. 

2448 


NaaniiEI«elrioR.R.Co 

Bronx Gas ft Eleetrie Co 

Brooklyn Edison Co.. Ino 

Biooklyn Ediaon Co., Ino 

Brooklyn Union Gas Co 


2447 

2549 
2443 
2557 
2443 


Brooklyn Uoion Qas Co 

CowoUdated Gas Co 


Boods 

Conv. bonds 

Stock 

Stock 

Bonds 

Bonds 


2504 
2446 


New York Edison Co 

Kiosi County Lichting Company. 

United Eleo. licht A IV. Co 

Hi Y. A Queens Etec. Lt. & Pt. Co. 


2449 
2550 
2460 
2461 


Total (to Dec. 31. 1920) 


f 58. 397. 000 





The Brooklyn, Queens County and Suburban Railroad Com- 
pany, one of the subsidiaries of the B. R T. System, made appli- 
cation to the Commission through its Eeoeiver, Lindley M. Gar- 
rison, under date of December 22, 1919, for an order authorizing 
the issuance of Receiver's certificates to an amount not exceeding 
$35,000. The purpose of the issue was to provide funds to pay 
for the purchase of new ears and for the labor and materials 
necjessary to put them into operating condition. The Commission, 
on January 16, 1920, upon the re(!onmiendation of Deputy Com- 
missioner Edward J. Glennon, granted the authorization requested 
and allowed $1,000 for the expenses of the sale of the certificates. 
The order directed that the certificates be sold at not less than 
95 per cent and should 'be issued on or before June 30, 1920. 

The Xasseu Electric Railroad Company, also a subsidiary of 
the B. K. T. System, «applied through its Receiver, Lindley M. 
Garrison, under date of December 22, 1919, for the Commissicm<'s 
authorization of the issue and sale of $325,000 of Receiver's cer- 
tificates to be sold at a discount of not exceeding 5 per cent and 
the proceeds thereof to be devoted to the purchase of new cars 
and the payment for labor d(Hie and materials furni&fhed in equip- 

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128 Public Service Coaimission — First District 

ping them. The Oommis&ion, upon the recommendation of 
Deputy Commissioner Edward J. Gleimon, issued its order on 
January 15, 1920, authorizing the Receiver to issue the certificates 
in the amount proposed and allowed $11,400 for the expenses of 
sale. The certificates were to be sold at not less than 95 per cent 
and issued on or before June 30, 1920. 

The Bronx Gas and Electric Company made application to 
the Commission on September 22, 1920, for permission to issue 
first and refunding mortgage bonds to the amount of $274,000, 
face value, payable July 1, 1960, and to bear interest at 5 per 
cent per annum. The bonds wei-e to be secured by the company's 
first and refunding mortgage, dated July 1, 1910. The proceeds 
were to 'be applied to the acquisition of property, improvement of 
plant and distribution system. The Commission on October 29, 
1920, upon the reoonmiendation of Deputy Commissioner Morgan 
T. Donnelly, issued its order granting permission for the bond 
issue in the amount named. The order required that the com- 
pany sell the bonds so as to net not less than 50 per cent of the 
face value, allowing $137,000 for the acquisition of property 
and improvement of plant. It required the establishment of a 
sinking fund into which the company must pay in cash each 
year 5 per cent of the face value of the bonds until the fund shall 
have accumulated $1*37,000, any surplus in said fund to be used 
for the retirement of other bonds of the company. The bonds 
were to be issued on or befoi-e December 31, 1920. 

The Brooklyn Edison Company made application to the Com- 
mission, on December 17, 1919, for permission to issue $5,000,000 
in bonds to be dated January 1, 1920, and payable ten years from 
that date and to bear interest at 6 per cent per annum. Hearings 
were held before Deputy Commissioner Edward. J. Glennon and 
upon his recommendation the Commission, on January 21, 1920, 
adopted an order granting the authority requested. The com- 
pany was ordered to sell the bonds so as to net not less than' 88 
per cent of the face value and was required to devote $3,080,000 
of the proceeds to the reimbursement of moneys expended from 
income or from money in the treasury for the acquisition of prop- 
erty or improvement of plant between October 1, 1912, and 
December 21, 1918; to devote $1,320,000 of the proceeds to the 
reimlbursement of moneys expended from income or moneys in 

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FOUETEENTH AnNUAI. RepORT 129 

the treasury for the acquisition of property or improvement of 
plant after January 1, 1919, and to devote $600,000 of the pro- 
ceeds for expenses of sale and discount The order required that 
the $600,000 shall be amortized out of income before January 1, 
1980. The bonds were to be iasued on or before December 31, 
1920. 

The Brooklyn Edison Company made application to the Com- 
mission on October 14, 1920, for permission to issue its general 
mortgage bonds to the amount of $8,000,000 face value, the bonds 
to be dated December 1, 1920, to run for twenty years and to 
hear interest at 7 per cent per annum. The bonde were to be 
secured by the company's general mortgage, dated January 1, 

1919, Of the total $4,600,000 was to be uaed for reimbursement 
of expenditures for the acquisition of property and improvement 
of plant between January 1, 1919, and September 30, 1^20, and 
$3,400,000 to be used after September 13, 1920, for improve- 
ments and additions to its plant and distributing system. Hear- 
ings were held on the application before Deputy Oammissioner 
Moigan T. Donnelly, on whose recommend>ation the Commission, 
on December 4, 1920, adopted an order consenting to the proposed 
iasae of $8,000,000 in bonds, of which $800,000 was allowed to 
pav expenses of sale and make up discount. The company was 
oidered to sell the bonds so as to net not less than 90 per cent of 
their face value, and to issue the same on or before December 31, 
1921. 

The Brooklyn Unien Gas Company, on October 17, 1919, 
petitioned the Commission for permission to issue its capital stock, 
common, in the amount of $2,000,000 par valua Hearings were 
held before Hon. Alfred* M. Barrett, then Deputy Commissioner, 
upon whose recommendation the Commission, on February 13, 

1920, issued an order granting permission for the issue of 
$2,000,000 in common stock for tihe purpose of converting or 
retiring any convertible debenture bonds of the same company 
dated November 1, 1919. The stock was to 'be issued dollar for 
dollar for tiie bonds retired and was to 'be issued on and after 
November 1, 1924, and on or before December 31, 1929. 

In another petition the Brooklyn Union Gas Company under 
date of June 2, 1920, asked the Ooonmission for authority to 
iaeue $38,000 in bonds bearing 5 per cent interest and payable 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



130 Public Service Commission — Fiest District 

May 1, 1945, the proceeds thereof to be used for the reimburse- 
ment of money actually expended from income or money in the 
treasuiy of the company for the discharge of certain of the com- 
pany's obligations which fell due January 1, 1920. The company 
waa ordered to sell the bonds so as to net not less than par value, 
the bonds to be issued on or before December 31, 1920. 

The Oonsolidated Gas Company, on December 2-7, 1919, 
petitioned the Public Service Commission for authority to issue 
$25,000,000 in bonds, payable February 1, 1925, and to bear 
interest at 7 per cent per annum. A hearing thereon was held 
before Comonissioner Lewis Nixon, and the Commission, on 
January 9, 1920, adopted an order authorizing the issuance by 
the Consolidated Gas Company of a mortgage or trust agreement 
to the National City Bank of New York, dated January 31, 1920, 
to secure an issue of $25,000,000 in convertible bonds of the Oonr 
solidated Gas Company. The bonds were to be dated February 1, 
1920, and payable February 1, 1925. The order also authorized 
the issuance of the bonds by the company, provided that 
$24,278,247.50 should be u-sed to discharge the 6 per cent con- 
vertible debentures of the Consolidated Gas Company maturing 
February 1, 1920; $153,752.50 for the reimbursement of moneys 
actually expended to make up the deficiency necessary to secure 
the discharge of the collateral trust and demand notes of the 
Consolidated Gas Company, and $568,000 to be need for the 
acquisition at par of additional capital stock of the New York 
Edison Company out of a total proposed issue of $3,500,000. 
The Commission also authorized the company to issue its capital 
stock for the purpose of converting the proposed issue of bonds 
if necessary. 

The New York Edison Company, under date of Decemiber 30, 

1919, petitioned the 'Commission for permis»ion to issue its com- 
mon stock in the amount of $3,500,000. Hearings were held 
and upon the recommendation of Hon. Alfred M. Barrett, Deputy 
and Acting Commissioner, the Commission, on September 14, 

1920, adopted an order granting the company the right to issue 
its stock in that amount. The company was directed to sell the 
stock at not less than par and to apply the proceeds to the repay- 
ment of money 'borrowed from the Oonsolidated Gas Company 

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FOUETEENTH AnNTTAL RbpOBT 131 

for necessaTy construction purpoeeB. The company was given the 
option to deliver the Btock in kind to the Coneolid'ated Gas Com- 
pany for the full amount. The stod^ was to be issued on or before 
December 31, 1920. 

On December 15, 1920 on the recommendation of Deputy Com- 
missioner Morgan T. Donnelly who held hearings in the case, the 
Commission adopted an order authorizing the Kings County 
Lighting Company to issue $2,000,000 in 8 per cent cumulative 
preferred stock and to sell the same at not less than par value. 
Of the proceeds the company was ordered to expend $1,750,000 
for the improvement of its plant and was allowed $250,000 for 
additional working capital. The improvement of the plant was 
made necessary by orders of the Commission requiring the instal- 
lation of additional facilities to care for the growing business of 
the company. 

The United Electric Light and Power Company on January 31, 
1920 submitted a petition asking for authority to issue debentures 
bearing 7 i)er cent interest in the amount of $8,825,000, the pro- 
ceeds of which were to be used for the discharge or legal refund- 
ing of its obligations. After hearings held upon the application. 
Commissioner Barrett on December 21, 1920 recommended and 
the Commission issued an order granting the authority to issue 
such debentures in the amount named and requiring the company 
to sell the same at not less than par. The proceeds were to be 
used to repay the Consolidated Gas Company for money borrowed 
for construction purposes. The debentures are to be issued on or 
before December 31, 1921. 

The New York and Queens Electric Light and Power Company 
submitted a petition dated January 31, 1920 asking for authority 
to issue debentures bearing 7 per cent interest in the amount of 
$4,300,000. After hearings held by Commissioner Barrett and 
on his recommendation the Commission on December 31, 1920, 
issued its order authorizing the issue of such debentures in the 
amount named to be sold at not less than par. The company was 
authorized to use the proceeds in repayment of money borrowed 
from the Consolidated Gas Company for construction purposes. 
The debentures are to be issued on or before December 31, 1921. 



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CHAPTER VIII 



EQUIPMENT INSPECTION, ETC. 



The Commiseion maintaina a Bureau of Equipment and Elec- 
trical Engineering, in charge of its Electrical Engineer. To thia 
bureau is assigned the duty of informing the Commission regard- 
ing the physical condition of the tracks, road-bed, rolling-stock, 
signals and other equipment used by the railroad and street rail- 
road companies, as well as the equipment of the lighting and 
steam companies. This involves periodic inspection of the equip- 
ment, as well as the investigations of accidents; the study of 
accident prevention measured; a checking of capital expenditures; 
the making of appraisals of public utility properties; the inspec- 
tion and approval of electric meters, and the inspection of locomo^ 
tive boilers. 

During the year this bureau has far exceeded in volume the 
work of any year since the creation of the Commission. It has 
been seriously handicapped, however, by the fact that higher 
salaries were paid by outside engineering firms and the loss, for 
that reason, of a number of men who, by their education and 
experience, were exceptionally well qualified for this line of work. 

The work is divided among eight divisions, as follows : Division 
of Accident Prevention and Equipment Inspection; Division of 
Power Equipment and Special Investigations; Division of Con- 
struction Accounts; Division of Appraisal; Division of Electrical 
Laboratory; Division of Locomotive Boiler Inspections; and 
Division of Engineering Statistics. 

On August 1, 1920, the Commission transferred to die Elec^ 
trical Engineer of the Commission all of the complaints bearing 
on the subject of electric service, as well as all schedules covering 
rates for electric service furnished to consumers and public utili- 
ties. These were formerly handled by the Bureau of Oas and 
Electricity. This was done in order to avoid overlapping of 
functions. 

Diviiion of Accident Inyestigation and Equipment Inspection 

Under the Public Service Commissions Law, the Conmiission is 
directed to investigate the causes of all accid«its which have 

[1321 



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Fourteenth Annual Rbpoet 133 

resulted in loss of life, injury to personfl or damage to property 
throng the operation of public utilities under its jurisdiction 
and which, in its judgment, require investigation. It has been 
the practice of 1he Commission to examine into tho causes of each 
such accident through the agency of this »bureau, in addition to 
personal investigations which are made by the Commission itself. 

An expert study of the conditions surrounding each accident is 
made, particularly if the accident is one of unusual importance 
or presents features which have not Jbeen covered in the previous 
reports and recommendations. In order to facilitate this work, 
the Commission keeps its oflBces open twenty-four hours of each 
day, although this is not required by the law, with telephone 
operators in constant attendance and with inspectors either on 
duty constantly or within easy reach. The Commission requires 
from the companies telephone reports of all accidents causing 
delay in traflSc or interruption to service on the lines of the rail- 
road and «treet railroad companiea These informal reports are 
charted and are supplemented later by detailed reports in writing 
forwarded by the companies and filed by the Commission. These 
reports are subject to constant inapeoftion and study, and when 
a serious condition, such as the occurrence of an unusual number 
of aocidents within a short time, is shown in reference to any 
particular company, a special investigation is made in an endeavor 
to determine what measures may be taken by the Commission, 
to prevent a recurrence of an accident from similar causes, 
or to remove those causes, in bo far as may be possible. An 
investigation of accidents covers not only those w<hieh occur on 
lines of railroad companies but also those which occur on the 
properties of electrical, gas and steam corporations. 

Tie study of accidents hias resulted in the collection of valuaWe 
statistics of each »adh company under the Commission's juris- 
diction. Charts have been prepared on a car mileage basis, 
showing the number of accidents under the varous classifications 
for the larger railroad and street railroad companies. 

In the following tables the accidents which have occurred dur- 
ing 1920 are classified by months, according to the nature of the 



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134 Public Sebvicb Commission — First District 

accidents, as to line, in reference to car miles operated, and 
again mibdivided as to those occurring on subway and elevated 
lines, trunk lines and terminal lines. The accidents occurring 
upon grade crossings of railroads, and accidents relating to gas, 
electric and other corporations will be found tabulated elsewiiere 
in this report 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Fourteenth Annual Report 



135 



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136 



Public Sebvice Commission — First District 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Fourteenth Anisttai. Report 

Accidents on All Lines 
For the year ended December 31, 1920 



187 



ons 

ruck 

truck 


Surface 
lines 

1,200 
1,911 
17,781 
2,261 
3,774 
112 
3,258 
9,206 

39,503 

9,990 
3,518 
3,447 

16,955 

76 

65 

14 

122 

521 


Subway 
and 
"L" 
lines 

52 

85 

1 

3,228 

1,299 

155 

71 

7,835 

12,726 

10,141 

2,420 

111 


Trunk 
lines 

16 
57 
58 
90 

158 
37 

253 
4,973 

5,642 

1,006 
3,742 

277 


Ter- 
minal 
lines 

i 

7 

"■'56 
107 


Bus 
lines 

23 
15 
504 
76 
76 

■'387 


All 
lines 

1,291 

2,069 

18,351 

5,655 




5,307 


locks 

ts 

dents 


304 

3,638 

22,506 


9 


171 

' m 

3 


1,081 

389 
34 
12 


59,123 


Injuries 
i 

3 


21,526 
9,875 




3,850 






3 


12,672 

61 
21 
6 
54 
60 


5,025 

49 
2 

7 
22 

77 


164 
2 

i 

3 
20 


435 

2 

1 

7 

20 


35,251 


= 

acluded in the above) 


190 


skulls 

i limbs 


89 
28 


lbs 

)U8 


208 
698 


) 


798 


202 


157 


26 


30 


1,213 







Accidents on Subway and " L " Lines 
For the year ended December 31, 1920 



N.Y. 


Int. Rapid 


Hudson 


Cons. 


Transit 


AMan. 


R.R. Co. 


Co. 


R.R. 



Totals 



>ns... 
•uck.. 
ruck. 



ocks. 
ts.... 
ients. 



30 

28 
1 

118 
92 
26 
65 

552 



912 



Injubieb 



638 

101 

10 



749 



22 . 
55 


'""2 


52 

85 
1 


3,059 

1,183 

128 

6 . 

7,191 


51 
24 

1 

"'92 


3,228 

1,299 

155 

71 

7,835 


11,644 


170 


12,726 

= 


9,350 
2,302 
101 . 


153 
17 


10,141 

2,420 

HI 


11,753 


170 


12,672 



III 



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138 Public Seevice Commission — First District 



AcG DENTS ON SuBWAT AND "L" LiNxs — Condudtd 
For the year ended December 31, 1920 



N. Y. Int. Rapid 
Cons. Transit 
R. R. Co. Co. 



Serious (included in the above) 

Killed 23 

Fractured skulls 7 

Amputated limbs 1 

Broken limbs 10 

Other serious 12 

Totals 63 



36 


2 


14 .. 




5 .. 




42 


2 


24 


24 


121 


28 

- ■ 



Hudson 
A Man. 
R. R. Totals 



61 
21 
6 
54 
60 



202 



Accidents on Trunk Lines 
For the year ended December 31, 1920 



Car collisions 

Persons struck 38 

Vehicles struck 8 

Boarding 72 

Alighting 106 

Electric shocks 34 

Derailments 

Other accidents 1 ,425 







N. Y., 








L. I. 


N.Y. 


N.H. 


N. Y., 






R.R. 


Cent. 


&H. 


W. & 


Penn. 


S. I. 


Co. 


R.R. 


R.R. 


B. Ry. 


R.R. 


R.T. 




Co. 


Co. 


Co. 


Co. 


Co. 


1 


7 






8 





13 

49 

18 

52 

1 

2 

2,002 



Injuries 



Employees . 
Others 



577 

906 

68 



263 

1,711 

119 



Serious (included in 
the above) 

KiUed 22 

Fractured skulls 2 

Amputated limbs .... 2 

Broken limbs 2 

Other serious 3 

Totals 31 



1 
17 

7 



33 



2 

247 

1,194 



Totals 1,684 2,144 1,443 



80 

926 

14 



Totals 1,551 2,093 1,020 



3 
2 

47 



56 



3 

299 



313 



82 

154 

66 



302 



1 
20 



24 



1 
53 



4 
45 
10 



12 

"i 



13 



Totals 

16 

57 

58 

90 

158 

37 

253 

4,973 



58 5,642 



1,006 

3,742 

277 



59 5,025 



49 

2 

7 

22 

77 



167 



This division also makes detailed inspections of car equipment 
periodically, covering more than fifty car bama In cases where 
defective conditions of equipment ai^e noted as likely to cause 
accidents or interruptions to service, the attention of the lespon- 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



FOUBTEBNTH AnNTTAI. RePOET 189 

sible officials of th« particular company concerned is immediately 
called to the condition complained of, by informal means, and 
later confirmed by letter. 

A scarcity of labor and extreme difficulty in dbtaining materials 
have interfered to a considerable degree with the proper main- 
tenance of their rolling-stock by transportation companies during 
the last year. This condition became noticeable in the equip- 
ment of certain companies, and the attention of the Commission 
was called to it. Conferences were held with representatives of 
the companies, and in some instances agreements were reached, 
without the necessity of the issuance of formal orders, to provide 
the improvements desired by the Commission. In other instances 
the Commission found it advisable to approve formal orders 
requiring general overhauling of rolling-stock, changes in methods 
of inspection, in methods of overhauling, etc. Investigations 
were made of numerous complaints regarding the operation of 
ears, and when those complaints were found to be justified the 
companies were required to take such action as might be neoes- 
saiy to remove the source of the complaint. 

Division of Power Equipment and Spoeial Investigsatioiu 

This division during the year conducted a number of investiga- 
tions, arising from complaints or questions of operation. New 
schedules and riders to such schedules affecting rates for elec- 
tricity and steam h^ave been considered and after due considera- 
tion reconmiendations made to the Commission as to the advisa- 
bility of allowing such rates to remain in effect after the thirty- 
day filing period has expired 

Consideration has also been given to the formulation of rules 
for the safety of employes and the general public, where danger 
might exist through proximity to moving machinery, electric 
feeders, falling poles or similar matters. Reports upon the venti- 
lation of cars, tunnels and terminals, as well as tfhe heating and 
lighting conditions in such cars and structures, have been made. 
Special attention has been paid to the provisions of independent 
emergency sources of light supplied in cars and tunnels, where 
the normal source of supply through accident or emergency might 
be interrupted. 



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140 Public Sebviob Commission — Fiest District 

The general supervision of the capacity of generating equip- 
ment, feeder eystems and ooal supply of public utility companies 
is under this division reporting to the Commission in this dis- 
trictj and reoammendations have ibeen made with a view to insur- 
ing continuity and reliability of flervice. Studies have also been 
made in connection with speed control in subway and on elevated 
lines and also of the necessary train capacity. Conferences were 
held with the officials of the various transportation companies 
and recommendations made leading to the installation and modi- 
fication of block signal systems. 

Investigations have been made of the rates for steam supplied 
to consumers by public utility companies which come under the 
jurisdiction of this Ooimnissioiu Biecomanendations have been 
made regarding the approval of types of steam meters and other 
devices used in connection with the supply of steam to consumers. 

Examinationfl have 'been made of mechanical devices and pro^ 
posed methods of locomotion and the bureau has also co-operated 
with the Gas Engineer to investigate a proposed method of gas 
generation, which have been submitted to the Commission by 
inventors. This division has also cooperated in the preparation 
of information as to proposed transportation systems in localities 
not formerly adequately supplied. This part of the work requires 
an especially high degree of technical abilil^^. 

Inspections and study of explosions in caible manholes in the 
neighborhood of Lexington avenue east of 60th street and West 
26th sitreet have been made. The cause of these explosions was 
very difficult to determine, except after extended study of a very 
technical nature. Recommendations were made r^arding rules 
and methods to be used in preventing a recurrence of this trouble. 

Numerous complaints have been received and investigated, 
most of which were due to failure to obtain service or high rates 
of service, to misundferetanding or objection to the surchai^ 
included in the bill to take account of excess cost of coal and 
misunderstanding of the specifications controlling the arrange- 
ment of customers into contract groups or classes, or similar 
matters. 

Richmond Light and Railroad Company. — Adjustments have 
been made of complaints from consumers regai-ding the quality 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



FOUBTBBNTH AkKUXL BbpOBT 141 

of Bervi<58, use of meters not approved by the Oommission, method 
of determining maximum demand, and the amount of dharge for 
such demand as based on meter readings. Consideration has 
also been given to complaints r^arding refusal of service and 
investigation of the schedule of rates and of the method of deter- 
mining the average cost of coal which i^ used as the base figure 
in computing the coal surcharge to 'be applied on bills rendered 
within a given month. 

New York Steam Company. — Investigation has been made of 
complaints r^arding d«tmage to water pipes in streets; excessive 
charges for steam supplied to consumers ; and regarding the heated 
condition of manholes in streets. 

CSorrespondence was had with the Bureau of Highways regard- 
ing a schedule for the repaving of streets so that the disturbance 
of new pavements because of repairs to steam mains would be 
avoided as far as possible. Arrangements were made for the 
continued supply of steam to consumers supplied by means of 
mains which h<ave to be removed on account of being located on 
private property. 

Information was prepared for consumers and other persons 
regarding the S0K»lIed' sunsharge to take account of excess cost 
of cod and also regarding the terms of service under which the 
company supplies its customers. A report to the Commission 
was prepared regarding the supply of service to adjacent build- 
ings under common ownership or leasehold and the billing for 
sudi service. 

Long Island Railroad Company. — Consideration was given 
during the year to tihe train facilities provided by the company 
on its Atlantic Avenue Division, to the illumination of the south 
stairway of the Livonia Avenue bridge, and to the proposed 
modification of the names of stations of the company and those 
of tha Interborough Rapid Transit Company, as well as of the 
Xew York Consolidated Railroad Company, which, because of 
their similarity, had caused confusion to the traveling pulblic 

Brooklyn Edison Company, Inc. — As a result of a complaint, 
arrangements were made to facilitate the installation of electric 
service on consumers' premises. Investigation of the basic 
conditions resulting in the coal surdiarge included in the rate 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



142 Public Sbbviob Commission — Fibst District 

schedule of the oompaBj and of the dieriyatiofQ of the actual 
.amount of such surcharge, waa made in order to deteimine the 
reasonableness of action taken by the Ooimnission r^arding such 
surcharge. Information regarding rates was prepared and trans- 
mitted in answer to requests for such information, as well as 
investigation being made of the relations between public utility 
companies and the United States government with regard to the 
supervision exercised by this Commission, 

New York Consolidated Badlroad Compamf. — During the year 
consideration lias been given by this division to a number of 
important subjects, some of which were the passenger count at 
the Canal Street station, in whidh this division cooperated with 
the Transit Bureau; dangerous conditions resulting from lack 
of signals or inoperative conditions of signals and track trips 
on the lines; safety conditions at the Canal Street station; the 
ventilation of oars operated by the company, as well as conditions 
resulting from lack of signals or inoperative conditions of signals 
and track trips on the lines; safety. 

This division co-operated with the Division of Appraisal and 
the Accident Division in the preparation of infonnation regard- 
ing the valuation of street railway companies reporting to the 
Commission within this district. The deferred maintenance on 
their property and cost of material and lalbor, as well as the 
increased cost of operation due to war prices, were prepared and 
transmitted to t!he Commission for submission to the L^slature. 

In co-operation with the Health Department, Cily of New 
York, an extended study was made by this division of tests of 
the ventilation in various types of cars used throughout the city, 
with a view to formulating rules for the ventilation of such cars 
to be used in emergency conditions. 

In connection with the coal emergency existing during the 
early part of the year and extending in modified form, throughout 
the summer and fall, this division put into execution the require- 
ments of the regulations prepared by the Commission covering 
the use of coal by non-essential industries and made recommenda- 
tions to be submitted through the Public Service Commission to 
the Interstate Commerce Commission regarding modifications of 
the rules formulated by the latter Commission. 

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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAI, RepOBT 



143 



m 



Division of Track and Cable Inspection 

' 2,000 miles of track have been inspected periodically by 
vision during the year. Inistances of need of repairs have 
Lsclosed and these conditions called to the attention of the 
i companies. The inspections of track have been general 
acter, covering the lines of all companies. Owing to the 
e of labor and materials, several of the companies have 
&d the Conmiission that it has been impossible to make 
lal repairs and replacements, much work being carried 
tttil the next season, when, it is hoped, conditions will 
e. 

track conditions in the Borough of Queens are very bad 
) Commiasion has found it necessary to hold several hear- 
connection with this matter and issue a number of orders 
Qg the companies to rehabilitate their track, 
ections and recommendations regarding the type, main- 
I and tests of existing signals with special regard to changes 
tion of existing signalis and the installation of additional 

leading to the protection of curves and crossings, have 
ade, as well as the investigation of accidents where signals 
ivolved and where the possibility of signal failure might 
*en responsible for the accident. 

ections have been made of the drainage and ventilating 
sent of the subway operating companies to determine if 
ere maintained in proper condition. There are approxi- 
485 drainage pumps and some 63 blowers, which must be 
cally inspected to see that they are kept in good operating 
on, ready for emergencies which may arise, 
•e are within the jurisdiction of this Commission 168 
and substations which are inspected regularly by this divi- 

eee that they comply with all of the requirements of the 
ssion's orders and also to see that the equipment is properly 
ined in order to insure continuity of service, as well as the 
of the employees. 

>f these stations, with the exception of the property of the 
>nd Light and Railroad Company, are well maintained 
>erated» During the past year the Livingston Powex 



^ 



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144 Public Sbbvioe Commission — First District 

station of the Richmond Light and Railroad Company has had 
a number of interruptions to ^rvice, which have been caused by 
defective equipment and lack of operating judgment. Detailed 
studies hftve been made of these conditions, hearings held and a 
number of suggestions offered which, when the contracts for 
new equipment are completed, should remedy some of the existing 
difficulties. 

Periodic inspections have been made during the year of the 
stations on the rapid transit lines of the city, of which there are 
about 1,200, covering station ligMing, comfort facilities, collec- 
tion of inflammable material, ventilating equipment, station 
signs and other conditions affecting the health of the traveling 
pulblic Investigations have been made of complaints as to 
station conditions and, where complaints have been well founded, 
suggestions have been made for the improvement of conditions. 

Division of Construction Accounts 

Investigations of the current expenditures of several companies 
have been made by this division in connection with reports made 
periodically to the Commission providing necessary data for the 
information of the Commission in any future applications for 
bond issues Which may be made by these corporations. Investi- 
gations and checks have been made of the expenditures of other 
companies in connection with applications for permission to issue 
securities. 

Corporations concerning whose current expenditures investiga- 
tions have been made include The Brooklyn Edison Company, 
Inc. (Cases 2442 and 2557) ; Kings County Lighting Company 
(Case 2559); Queensborough Gas and Electric Company; 'New 
York and Richmond Cras Co. ; Brooklyn Union Gas Co. ; Pennsyl- 
vania Tunnel and Terminal Co. ; New York Connecting Railroad 
Co.; New York Edison €o, (Case 2449) ; Brooklyn Queens Co. 
and Suburban Railroad Co. (Case 2448) ; Nassau Electric Rail- 
way Co. (Cajse 2447) ; United Electric Light and Power Ca 
(Case 2640) ; New York and Queens Electric Light and Power 
Co. (Case 2641). Upwards of $40,000,000 were involved in 
the class of investigations just mentioned. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



FOUBTEENTH ANNUAL EbPOET 



145 



Division of Appraisal 

ck was made of the total footage of steam mains relaid 

few York Steam Company (Case No. 1763). 

aneotion with tihe petition of the Brooklyn Union Gas 

jT, dated March 28, 1919, for an order authorizing the 

of $2,800,000 debenture bonds, the engineers of this 

have completed the examination of the expenditures 

the company during the period from February 1, 1914, 

siry 31, 1919, submitted in connection therewith and a 

)rt has been filed with the Commission. (Case No. 2366.) 

mection with a petition to this Commission for an exten- 

gas mains to eerve localities in the so-called Springfield 

of the Fourth ward of Queens county, the engineers of 

ision continued their study which was started in the 

irt of 1919 and finished the study of the engineering 

involved in this case diiring the early part of the present 

ales were prepared showing the estimated cost of making 
»ary extensions and an estimate of the additional income 
rived therefrom. The sohedules were submitted in evi- 
rfore the Comm.is8ion and an order was issued by the 
sion requiring the company to supply gas in certain 
localities in this so-called S'pringfield district of Queens 

►nnection with the application of the Manhattan and 
fraction Corporation for an increase in rates, an appraisal 
pared by engineers representing lihe company and sub- 
n evidence before the Commission. The valuation so 
d was checked in the field by engineers of this division 
ndependent appraisal was prepared showing the estimated 
construct the property of this company, based- upon an 
y dated August 1, 1920. 

inection with schedules submitted in evidence by the oom- 
lowing the present operating revenues and operating ex- 
nd in addition the revised estimated eamings and expenses 
)on an assumption of an increased fare ihe engineers of 
ision checked and prepared an independent estimate of 



Digitized by 



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146 Public Sebvicb Commission — Fibst District 

the probable revemies under the proposed inereaBe in fare. (Caae 
No. 2416.) 

In connection with the complaint of the Edenwald Taxpayers' 
Association relative to extension of gas mains, conferences 
were held with representatives of the legal and accounting depart- 
ments of the Commission in regard to methods of procedure to 
be followed in presenting the engineering features of tiie case 
before the Commission. (Case 2478.) 

Oas rate UtigcUion. — ^At the b^inning of this year there were 
pending in the State and Federal courts seventeen gas company 
cases to declare confiscatory and void the statutory rate for gas 
(chapter 125, Laws of 1906, State of N^ew York). In these 
various suits the eomplainan/ts named as defendamts the Attorney- 
General of the State of New York, the district attorney of the 
particular county in which the gas company was operating, and 
the Public Service Cammission of the State of New York for the 
First District. In order to properly defend these suits a request 
for a special appropriation was made to the Legislature which 
was approved. Under the appropriation assigned to this division 
additional mechanical engineers, assistant mechanical engineers 
and engineering clerks were appointed in order to prepare the 
engineering data necessary to a proper presentation of these 
various gas cases in behalf of the defendant. Public Service 
Commission. 

The work done by the engineers appointed under this special 
appropriation received from the Legislature has been briefly as 
follows: 

Consolidated Gas Compamf. — In connection with the presenta- 
tion of this case before a Special Master uppoimted by the Federal 
court, the engineers of this division prepared operating statistics 
of the company and co-operated witih the legal department by 
appearances in court and advice to the counsel representing the 
Commission on quesrt:ions for cross-examination of witnesses on 
matters pertaining fto the engineering features of the case. This 
case is now closed and an opinion has been rendered by the Federal 
juidge to whom it was assigned. 

Brooklyn Union Gas Company. — This case is now being tried 
before a Special Master appointed by the Federal court and will 
not be completed by the end of this year. 

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FOUBTBJCNTH ANNUAL BkPOBT 147 

In oonnectian with the piepaxation of the rate base for this 
company, the ConKmiasion'e enginieers have analyzed the expendi- 
tures made by this company during the years 1914 to 1920 and 
have prepared schednles showing the laotual cost of the various 
items of property acquired by this company during the war 
period. In addition, study hae been m-ade of the reasonableness 
and propriety of the various charges made by the company to 
operating expenses during the years 1918, 1919 and 1920, and 
are preparing schedules on this subject for the use of counsel. 
During the various legal steps in the procedure followed in pre- 
senting this case before the court, the engineers of this division 
have prepared the engineering data neoeesary for the trial counsel. 

New York and Qvsens Oas Company, — This case has been 
heard before a Special Master, testimony closed, and opinion has 
already been filed by the District Judge. 

In the preparation of the engineering features involved in the 
presentation of this case before the court, the engineers of this 
Commission cooperated with the engineers representing the 
Attomey-General'e oflSce in the preparation of the rate base sub- 
mitted in evidence on behalf of the defendants. The engineers 
of thie division were present during the trial of the case and 
sdviee was given and questions were prepared for counsel during 
the examination and cross-examination of witnesses. 

Oeniral Union Oas Company, — This case is at present being 
tried before a Special Master and it is questionable whether the 
Special Master sitting in this case will be able to file his report 
this year. 

Conferences between representatives of the ■Commission, the 
Attorney-General's oflfce and the corporation counsel of the City 
of New York have been held at various times in connection with 
the methods of procedure to be followed in presenting the legal, 
accounting and engineering features involved in this case. 

Engineers of this division have co-operated in the preparation 
of necessary preliminary engineering data and have, under the 
direction of counsel, conferred on all engineering matters involved 
in the preparation of the necessary legal papers. Hearings be- 
fore the Special Master have been attended and advice has be«i 
given to counsel and questions have been prepared in connection 
with the ^camination and cross-examination of witnesses. The 
engineers have prepared a preliminaiy study to Sflosa^,4^Jt^e^g{e 



148 Public Sbbviob Commission — Fiest Distbict 

reasonableness or unreasonableness of the operating expenses as 
shown by the books of the company for the years 1918, 1919 and 
1920. 

Kings County lighting Company. — The case was heard before 
a Special Master appointed by the Federal court, report filed by 
the Special Master and an opinion rendered by the Federal Dis- 
trict Judge. In the presentation of this case before the Special 
Master various appraisal data available in the Oommission's file 
were at the disposal of the court and certain preliminary schedules 
were made up. Testimony was given in the trial of this case by 
engineers representing the Commission and advice given to 
counsel on the methods of presenting the engineering features and 
in connection with the examination and cross-examination of 
witnesses. 

Bronx Oas and Electric Company. — ^Application for the 
appointment of a speicial referee has 'been made. Preliminary 
work has been done in connection wi^th the examination of the 
engineering data now available in the files of this division and 
conferences have been held with engineers representing the city 
of New York in connection with the original appraisal made by 
this Commission in 1910. 

The following gas cases are still pending: the Brooklyn 
Borough Gas Company, the Jamaica Gas Light Company, the 
East River Gas Company of Long Island City, New Amsterdam 
>as Company, New York Miitual Gas Light Company, Northern 
Jnion Gas Company, Standard Gas Light Company, Richmond 
Hill and Queens Gas Light Company, Woodhaven Gas Light 
Company and the Newtown Gas Company. 

Requests for information from outside sources. — Requests 
have been received from time to time from the Special Franchise 
Bureau of the State Tax Department in reference to the Com- 
mission's method of procedure in inventorying, pricing and de- 
preciating the property of utility companies. Expert appraisers 
representing the Special Franchise Bureau have called at this 
office at various times in order to obtain the valuations of certain 
utility properties which have been submitted in evidence before 
the Commission in connection with various rates and capitaliza- 
tion cases which have been decided by the Commiesion. 

Requests have been received from other State Commissions dur- 
ing the past year in connection with the methods of valuaition 

XV uiyiiizeu uy "H^j v^' v^pc iN^ 



FOUBTEENTH AnNUAI. BbPOBT 149 

foUoived bj this OonmuBsion and particalarlj the methods fol- 
lowed in depreeiating the property of various utilities ^ich have 
been appraised. 

Division of Electrical Laboratory 

The testing of electric meters upon complaint and other matters 
of a similar nature have been handled by this division. In addi- 
tion it has checked monthly the primary standards, which are 
certified once during the year by the United States Bureau of 
Standards, and the secondary standards^ which are used for certi- 
fying the test standards of the Flatbush Gas Company and the 
Queens Borough Gas and Electric Company and the Richmond 
Light and Bailroad Company. 

Meter tests ' — Case 2202. — The work of the meter departments 
of the various lighting companies has been kept under surveillance 
to insure complianee with the requirements of the order in the 
above case. When conditiona seemed to warrant, an investiga- 
tion has been conducted! to ascertain fixst-hand facts, and in this 
connection a survey of the records of the Richmond Light and 
Railroad Company disposed the fact that tJhe only class of tests 
being carried on by that company were upon complaint, periodic 
and office tests having ceased owing to shortage of help. Tests 
have been made on current and potential instrument transformers 
for the various companies to determine data for ratio and phase 
aagle curves. 

Tests of new types of nDeters — Case 1099. — A number of new 
types of wattrhour meters were submitted' by the various com- 
panies for the standardizing laboratory tests prescribed for their 
aooeptanoe under the order. 

Order certifying meters if acceptable under the specifications 
of Case 1099. — After analysis of curves and data prepared from 
acceptance tests a number of watt-hour meters have been oertified 
for use on t&e circuits of companies within this district The 
various orders issued from time to time in this case h'Sve been 
assembled and compiled with a revamping of nrnterial to facilitate 
issuance of a complete and compact order covering the work in 
this case for the past twelve years. 

Approval tests on ivatt-hawr maociwwrn demwnd devices — Case 
H5L — Tests have been made and approvals issued on several 
maximum demand measuring instruments. uiymzeuuyGoOQle 



150 Public Ssmrios CoMiciseioN — Fibst District 

InstallcUion of elecirical devices in buildings — Case SI IS. — 
In ooimection with the requirementB of the order in Case 2115, 
examinations were condnoted at intervals during the inflPtallation 
of twenty high voltage service equipments in plants of customers 
of lighting companies. Twenty-one appliances have been tested 
and approved and certifioates of approval issued to the companies 
permitting the use of these appliances. Revision of the material 
in this order is in progress. 

Installaiion and use of electric equipment by jnAlic service 
corporations — Case 2062, — Approximately 180 applications 
have been made in connection with the orders in above case and 
about 26 applications are now on file pending the result ot 
inspections being made from time to time as to the ereotion of 
machinery and the progress of electric wiring. A revision of the 
wording in this case is now being arranged. 

Illumination tests, — Investigations involving photometric 
measurements in the field have been made of the lighting condi- 
tions of stairway passageways, ticket booths and platforms in 
stations of the New York Municipal Railway Corporation, Inter- 
borough Rapid Transit Company and the Long Island Railroad 
Company, regarding which complaints have been received. 

An investigation was also made of all lighting at stations on 
the New York Municipal Railway Company's line from Gold 
street to 86th street, Brooklyn. 

Electrolytic investigations. — In\iesftigations have been made 
and tests conducted to learn the extent of electrolytic corrosion 
on water pipes and structures. Surveys have been made in the 
section of New York City bounded by 58th street to 68th street 
and Lexington and Third avenues. At No. 1784 Pitkin avenue, 
BrookljTi, an investigation was made into the conditions sur- 
rounding the erosion of lead water pipe services to the building. 
Electrical measurements were taken to secure data as an aid to 
the analysis of the problems invoilved. 

Service investigations, — The work carried on in connection 
with service investigations has been extremely difficult, having 
involved approximiately 850 inspections at as many different 
premises located throughout all the boroughs. In connection 
with this work, chart-drawing instniments have been installed 
at complainant's premises and kept under periodic observation, 

uiyiiizeu uy "%_j v^ v^pt i^- 



FOUBTEBNTH AwNUAI, RbPOBT 



151, 



a by field meaBurements for eetimates of validity of 
ameetion char^ges and checks for distanoe of premises 
5. Lack of service, due to failure of lines, burning out 
rmers, etc., has been investigated and reported. Service 
IS have been secured for many complainants, and in 
lisputed bills satiflfactory adjustments made involving 
p^ate lai^ amrm of money. 

^tion of meter practices in idie Borough of Richmond 
dicated an error in the use of register constants in con- 
ith type R. O. Maximum-Power Demand meters, a sur- 
nade which finally resul'bed in the return of thousands 
to consumers. 

Division of Locomotive Boiler Inspeotions 

)rk of locomotive boiler inspectione hias been increased 
B year, as 233 locomotives have been added to the num- 
>usly reported to this Commission. At present there are 
lotives being reported to this Commission for inspection 



investigations have been made by the Commission's 
3 boiler inspector and there 'have been received and 
ng the year certificates and reports of inspection in 
» with the order of the Commission in Case 1301. 
cs <as to the numfcer and condition of locomotive boilers 
B jurisdiction of this Commission are shown in the 

tables : 

erage age, the number and the distribution of locomo- 
)rding to their ownership, are given below: 

ilers reported undar 10 yean of ace 112 

ilers reported between 10 and 20 yean of age 132 

Uere reported between 20 and 30 years of age 119 

'Hen reported between 30 and 40 years of age 19 

ilers reported over 40 years of age 2 

884 

Number of 

locomotives Average 
MPAXT reported age 

1 8 9.6 

•d of New JeneF 1 8 

nal 1 12 

kawanna A Western R. R 20 

em District Terminal 10 24 

8 12.3 

{apid Transit Company 4 30 



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152 Public Sbbvice Commission — Fibst Distbict 



Number of 

looomotives Ayerace 
CoMPANT — Conduded reported aoe 

Jay Street Connecting Railroad 

I^ehigh Valley Railroad 

Long Island Railroad 

New York Central Railroad 

New York Dock Railroad 

New York. New Haven and Hartford Railroad 

Pennsylvania Railroad 

Staten Island Rapid Transit Railroad 

Proctor & Gamble 



Total. 



2 


25 


11 


11 


163 


26.8 


ao 


19.6 


8 


16 


26 


10.6 


8 


12 


63 


11 


8 


6 


384 


19.3 



The following table shows defects in locomotive equipment 
reported during the year : 

Number of locomotives in operation 384 

Number of locomotives in shop undergoing repairs 3® 

Number of inepections made of looomotives 1 .675 

Boilers, flues and fire-boxes leaking 70 

Foundation rings leaking 20 

Air, steam and vacuum brake equipment, defective 18 

Safety appliances, defective 30 

Boiler mountings in cab, defective 36 

Boiler mountings outside of cab, defective 28 

Metalic packing leaking 75 

Steam chests leaking 60 

Cylinder beads leaking 10 

Feed pipes to injectors leaking 30 

Tank hose leaking 16 

Steam heat pipes leaking 16 

Water glasses without guards 6 

Lubricator glasses without guards 6 

Number of boilers found with broken stay-bolts 22 

Number of boilers not conforming to our regulations 2 

Number of defective gange>aocks reported 40 

Number of defective water-glass cocks reported 38 

Burst flues found and reported 6 

Number of locomotives found with leaks which would tend to obstruct the vision of the 

engineer 32 

Number of locomotives found with sharp flanges and flat spots on engine truck and 

tender truck wheels 14 

Number of looomotives found with defective plates in boilers 3 

Number of locomotives taken out of service onjaccount of^def ects which were considered 

dangerous by inspector 20 

Division of Engineering Statistiot 

During the year, in addition to the work of maintaining the 
unit cost file of the Oommission, assistance was given in the prepa- 
ration of testimony in rate and other casiea where &ie subject of 
costs came into consideration. Special studies and investigations 
were made in connection with the subject of transportation con* 
ditions in Staten Island, the electrification of the Staten Island 
Rapid Transit System (Case 2455), and in reference to existing 
and new equipment of the Richmond Light and Railroad Com- 
pany, and in other matters coming within the scope of this 
division. 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



CHAPTER IX 



ELATION OF LIGHT, HEAT AND POWER 
CORPORATIONS 



; the year 1920 the Commiasion continued its regulation 
B light, gas, heat and power companies. Owing to the 
the fiscal year for gas and electric companies ends with 
iar year, the last oompilete figures available for these 
3 are those for the year ended December 31, 1919. 
owth of the gas and electric business in New York City 
Commission was organized in 1907 is shown by the 
comparative figures as to the number of employees, the 
f wages paid, the number of consumers and revenues, 

1908 1919 

ployeB 13,377 22.290 

eyes $10,856,991 $28,223,606 

iflumera 1,194,218 2,067,009 

sales $63,806,023 $90,992,769 

me $13,196,912 $16,184,374 

income $9,164,296 $13,864,066 



1919 the gas companies sold to the public 51,220,- 
jubic feet of gas, and received therefor the sum of 
96, representing an average price of 82.13 cents pet 
dc feet. The increase in the amount of gas sold was 

00 cubic feet, or 1.10 per cent more than in the previous 
revenue from sales was $821,151, or 1.99 per cent more 
918. 

9 the electrical companies (exclusive of the Long Acre 
liverside, which are public service corporations only by 
of legal definition) sold to the public 1,103,466,493 
iours, and received therefor $48,927,373, an increase 
5,850 kilowatt hours, or 14.49 per cent over the previous 
le revenue received in 1919 was 18.27 per cent more 
918. 

he operating income, or excess of revenues over expenses 
, of the gas companies decreased from $3,625,410 in 
i63,730 in 1919, the operating income of the electrical 

1 increased from $12,796,462 in 1918 to $16,120,644 

[153] 



d^Cj 



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154 Public Seevice CoMifissioN — First District 

in 1919. The combined operating incomes of the two services, 
however, show a decrease of $237,498, or 1.46 per cent below the 
figure for 1918. 

While no figures are available for the curient year, there are 
indications that the respective positions of the gas and electric 
companies, with respect to income, may be reversed, in view of the 
fact that while the cost of coal for both esrvices has materially 
advanced, several of the gas companies dnring the year were 
allowed by the courts to make important increases in their rates, 
which will donibtless be reflected in the reports of their revenue 
for the present year. 

The following table gives the capitalization, output and sales 
of the gas, gas-electrical and' electrical companies, and also the 
capitalization of and rentals received by the two conduit eom- 
panies which operate in New York, as of the beginning of 1920 : 

capitalization, output, and sales op gas and electrical companies— 
year ended december 31, 1919 

Qas (M cu. it.) and 
Capitalisation Elbctricitt (kw. hrs.) — Amount of 

(stocks and > • ^ consumera* 

CoMPANT bonds) Oanerated Distributed bills > 

Canaolidated gat eompaniet 9204.653.247 84.208,134 81.899,649 $26,162.90^ 

Consolidated Gas Co. of N.Y.. 124,278.247 7,221.664 18.576,440 14,846.90S 

Astoria L., H. db P. Co 15.000.000 11.093,887 1.219 97< 

New Amsterdam Gas Co.* 40.300.000 6,230,168 8.688.410 2.941,193 

Central Union Gas Co 7,055.000 3,451.475 2.816.976 2,262, 22* 

Stondard Gas Light Co 10.444.300 2,514.786 2.331.739 1.864.801 

N. Y. Mutual Gas Lt. Co 3.409,700 8,316.068 1.811,202 1.448.274 

Northern Union Gas Co 2.750,000 1,843.422 1.473.956 

N. Y. ft Queens Gas Co 1.416.000 380.086 336.241 884.614 

BrooHyn Union oat eompaniet* 35.680.000 18.928.231 15.669.116 12.836.850 

Brooklyn Union Gas Co 35.000.000 18.928.231 18.725,602 10.978.082 

Newtown Gas Co 60.000 1.079,492 1.017,461 

Woodhaven Gas Lt. Co 20,000 891,808 888,454 

Jamaica Gas Light Co 200.000 808,916 297,648 

Richmond HUI A Q. C. G. Lt. 

Co 250.000 168,798 166,218 

Other gat companiM 9.928.000 . 2,881.058 2,488.087 2.405,826 

Kings County Ltg. Co 5,178.000 1,566.688 1.279,846 1,204.898 

Brooklyn Borough Gas Co 1,750,000 682,766 609.601 647.416 

N. Y. ft Richmond Gas Co. . . . 3.000.000 631,664 668,691 668,012 



Total, gas companies $250,111,247 56,017,428 49.501.802 640,404.086 



NoTB. — At their face value, the total securities outstanding, ezelusiYe of th« Richmond light 
and Railroad Co. (included in the corresponding summary for transportation companies) aggr^ate 
$435,558,948. of which $139,548,461 are held by associated gas or electrical oompamesrieaTiiig 
$296,010,487 in the hands of the outside public. 

1 For energy only. Does not include the sale and renting of appliances, etc. Fractions of a 
dollar were included in summation but are omitted in publication. 

* Includes business conducted under name of East River Gas Co., capital stock of which ($1,000,- 
000) is held by New Amsterdam, and not included in table. 

* Flatbush Gas also belongs to Brooklyn Union system. 



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FotTBTEENTH AnNT7AL RbfOICT 



155 



ClFTCALUUnON, OlTTPtTT. AND £UlJM Ov GaB AND ElBCTBICAL CoMPANIBS — YeaR ENDBD 

DscBUBBB 31, 1910 — Concluded 

Oas (M cu. rr.) and 

Compavt Cspitalbaticm Blbotuoitt (kw. bbs.)^ Amount of 

(stoeks and — ■ oontumers' 

GbKiisdrioal eominniM bonds) Qenerated Diotribated bills 

FhtbudiOssCo. CaOO.m /° 1.037.1W S828.521 

0«»o.ll«r««hn AF Hn A im lAn /^ 627. 5«7 471.981 (82.408 

Qneen. Borough G. A E. Co... 4.088.100 ^^ 7.456.400 5.072.474 566.004 

BmMG-AEOo 1 MflMO /^ ^'•^^ 209.688 260.880 

BranxGts&E.Co 1.508.600 |g 3.^7.280 2.606.044 226.262 

ToUl lomiJxxtriniLl m'. 15 828 1100 / ^ ^**'^ 1.718.638 $1,681,810 

ToUl, cn»Hdectncal cos. $5,828,800 ^g 22.005.069 14.182.172 1.495.635 

EUttrieal campanin 

N.T.Edison Company $104,067,417 787.599.562 619.300.503 $28,172,881 

Brush Elec Hie. Co 999,000 (Lessor company) 

United Elec. L. db P. Co IQ. 177.684 831.172,000 141,015,752 4,995,117 

N. Y. A Queens E. L. ft P. Co. 5,025.000 4,054.690 54.680.368 2.780.336 

Totat, Con«o<. nf<<«m 120,269,101 1,123,826.252 814,996.623 35.956,836 

BrooUyn Edison Co., Inc.« 36.451.000 338,060.000 255.716.888 10,611,175 

Amsteidam E. L. H. ft P. Co. 800 . 000 (LesMV company) 

Richmond L. ft Railroad Co... M5.071.750l 30.628.850 M8. 620. 800 •863.726 

LoQCAcrsE. L. ftP. Co.' 550.000 113.441 81,941 3,071 

RivenideL. ftP.Co.' 5.000 29.694 2.601 

Total, electrical companies. $158,075,101 1.500.628,543 1.080.445.946 $47,437,410 

Total of forecoiiig* $414,014,948 G 56.781.687 51.220.440 $42,065,396 

E 1.522.633.612 1.103.578.118 48,933.046 

CoMdusI somfnntM 21.544.000 ) f •2.023.260 

ComdidatedTeLftELSub.Co. 4.810.000 f (Conduits rented) ] 

Empire aty Subway Co 16,734.000J { M. 802. 173 

Qfsndtotal $435,558,948 $04,823,866 



■ nstbush Gms also belonp to Brooldyn Union system. 

* Edison Eleo. Illc. Co. of Bklyn. and Kings Co. £. L. ft P. Co. merged Jan. 27, 1010, under name 
of BrooUjm Eiison Co., Inc. 

* Capitalisation of both railway and lighting departments; included in transportation sununary 
sod excluded from these totals. 

* Enncr (12,525,408 kw. hrs.) supplied to company's railroad department and associated railways 

' Theie two small companies are not included in the extended tables of the statistical report. 

* Includes a small amount of electiicity furnished free to the City under franchise requirements. 
' Rent of conduits, etc. 

The following comparative summary gives the details of the 
results of the .operations of the gas and electrical companies for 
the years ended December SI, 1908 to 1919, inclusive: 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



156 Public Sebvicb Commission — Fiest District 



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158 Public Ssbyigb Commission — Fibst Distbict 

Gas Bureau 

The Commksion maintains a Gas Bureau in charge of the 
chief gas engineer, who has under his supervision a staff of 
inspectors, meter testers, chemists, etc The force comprises 
fifty-one employees. 

During the year 1920 more than 6,000 complaints were inves- 
tigated, 5,489 gas meters were tested upon application of gas 
users, and 326,999 additional meters were tested under the pro- 
vision requiring that all meters before being installed should be 
tested and sealed by the Commission. A large number of the 
complaints received by the Commission require personal atten- 
tion by its inspection force, whereas other complaints are adjusted 
by correspondence. All matters are satisfactorily explained to 
the complainants, and numerous letters of thanks are on file 
with the Bureau, showing the appreciation of the public of the 
Commission's efforts in this direction. 

Inspection of gas plants, study of raw miaterial, analysis of 
coal and oil, tests of gas, surveys in connection with gas main 
extension, surveys in connection with gas pressure, advice to th'e 
Commission and counsel on gas matters, preparation of matteis 
in connection with gas proceedings, etc., and the study of new 
methods of gas production are all included in the Bureau's 
activities. i * 

The year just closed has furnished the Commission with a wide 
variety of gas problems, the most serious of which was the diffi- 
culty experienced by some companies in gas manufacture. This 
was due to a scarcity of suitable gas oil. In some instances ibe 
gas production problem was so acute that continuance of service 
was doubtful. The situation is not yet entirely relieved. In this 
respect, and because of the scarcity of coal (which means an 
increased use of gas), the furnishing of adequate service during 
the winter threatened to become a serious problem. A substantial 
improvement is now apparent. 

Kings County Lighting Company. — A typical illustration of 
the difficulties caused by the scarcity of good gas oil and the 
high costs of nmnufacture is given in the case of the Kings 
County Lighting Company, which serves an important part of 
the Borough of Brooklyn- The affairs of this company have 



I 
I 

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Google 



FOUBTEENTH AnNUAL RePOKT 159 

been given a great deal of attention by the Oonuuiseion during 
the year. 

In January last, Justice Greenbaum, of the State Supreme. 
Court, decided against the company in the latter's suit to have 
the statutory rate of 80 cents per thousand cubic feet declared 
oonfiflcatory. The company wa^ charging 95 cents by order of 
the Oonxmission, but it was impounding the 15 cents difference. 
Failii^ to get relief in this action, the company claimed that it 
was financially unable to assuime any additional burden in the 
matter of extensions and addirtions to its existing plant and dis- 
tribution system which our gas engineer had found to ibe inade- 
quate to the demands of the citizens entitled to gas service from 
the company. 

On March 8, 1920, the company announced that ilt would not 
be able to furnish gas servioe for applicants thereafter. The 
PuUic Service Commission immediately ordered a hearing, and 
as a result of its investigation issued an order on March 13, 1920, 
directing the Kings County Lighting Company to supply vnth 
gas all applicants living within the prescribed legal distance of 
its mains. The company, alleging financial inability, refused 
to obey the order of the Connmission. Thereupon- the Commit 
siiHi applied to Justice Fawcett, of the Supreme Court, Kings 
eounty, for a writ of mandamus to compel the company to comply 
with lits order. Justiee Fawcett referred the nmtter to Hon. 
HeAert T. Ketcham as referee, who reported against the Com- 
nuasion, finding that the company had not the financial ability, 
under its existing rates, to provide the service ordieped. Upon 
the referee's report the Commission's application for mandamus 
was denied, and in consequence the enforcement of the order 
was made imipoesible. 

On May 8, 1920, the company notified Conmussioner ^N'ixon 
that it was about to close down its gas plant. As the shutting 
down of such an important utility would have caused great hard'- 
ship to the public, Commissioner Nixon ordered an immediate 
investigation. The investigation disclosed tha4; the productive 
capacity of the plant had been materially lessened, because of 
the inferior quality of the gas oil then obtainable and of 
the fact that the company bad mo reserve equipment. In view 



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160 Public Sbevicb Commission — First District 

of the seriousness of the situation, and upon the advice of the 
gas engineer, the management of the company was authorized 
to reduce the quantity of oil used in the process of gas maiiuf ae- 
ture so that the diificulties might be minimized. This instruc- 
tion was given with the full knowledge that a reduction in the 
quantity of oil would mean a lower candle-power in the gas sup- 
plied. It was a choice, however, between taking this step and 
permitting the company to close its plant and thus deprive 
thousands of people of their gas supply. 

The Commiasion's engineering force then made a complete 
investigation of the company's plant and facilities, and their 
report to the Commission showed that its gas production equip- 
ment was inadequate to supply its rapidly growing business. 
In June, 1920, the Commission* issued an order directing the com- 
pany to begin immediately the installation of adequate equip- 
ment and auxiliaries to meet the needs of the people in its terri- 
tory. The company did not comply with this order, daiming 
that its financial condition rendered it incapable of so doing. 

Meanwhile the company had instituted a proceeding in the 
United States courts to obtain relief from continued operation 
at the rate then allowed. This proceeding culminated, in 
October, 1920, in a decision by Judge Charles F. Hough, who 
hdd that the statutory rate was confiscatory, gave the company 
permission to fix a. reasonable rate and restrained the Public 
Service Commission and other authorities from interfering with 
the company's collection of a charge in excess of that fixed by 
statute. On October 22, 1920, the company filed with the Com- 
mission a new tarijBF providing for a rate of $1.50 per thousand 
cubic feet Under the law the Commission had no right to sus- 
pend this tariff. However, the law provides that no such change 
in rate can be made until after thirty days' notice to the public 
and filing with the Commission, except on special permission 
granted by the Commission, for good cause shown. In the absence 
of cause for such special permission the Commission formally 
notified the company that even if the rate of $1.50 were allowed 
to srtaand it could not tdsB effect until November 22, 1920, or 
thirty days after the tariff had been filed with the Commission. 
The Commission made application to the Federal Court for a 

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FOUBTEENTH ANNUAL EbfOBT 161 

modification of the decree, but its application was denied late in 
December, Judge Hough holding that the rate of $1.50 was not 
inequitable. 

Since March, 1920, approximately 2,500 applicants have been 
unable to obtain gas fiom the Kings County Lighting Oompany. 
The company is furnishing gas to its old customers and to 
emergency oases among new applicants. It is alao beginning 
work in improving its plant in conformity with the orders of the 
Commission, and expects to be in a position to inci^ease its gas 
production by approximately 25 per cent in the near futura 
The Conmiission on December 15, 1920, gave it authority to issue 
$2,000,000 in prefen*ed stock, and the proceeds to the extent 
of $1,750,000 are to be immediately exp^ided upon the improve- 
ment and extension of its plant and facilities. 

There has been some complaint as to the failure of this com* 
pany and other gas companies in Brooklyn to ffupply gas of a 
t\9enty-two candle-power standard. On account of the inferior 
quaUty of the gas oil available the Commission has recognized 
that some of the gas companies were not complying with the 
candle-power standard, while other companies, which were able 
to get better oil, were continuing to supply gas of high candle- 
power. The question of the candle-power standard has been con- 
sidered in litigation in various courts. The United States 
Supreme Court, in passing upon the original Eighty-Cent Gas 
Law, held that the penalty provision of the statute for non-com- 
pliance with the candle-power standard was unconstitutional. 
In various gas proceedings 'before the State and Federal courts dur- 
ing the last year the question of candle-power violation was raised 
by the Commission's counsel, but in no instance did the courts 
recognize this question as material. Oenerally speaking, the 
deterioration in the candle-power of the gas supplied by certain 
companies has not inflicted any hardship on the public. For 
cooking purposes and for use with mantle burners the lower 
candle-power gas has been practically as satisfactory as that of 
high candle-power, and only in the cases of those who use open- 
flame burners has there been cause for dissatisfaction. There is 
no question that with this class of burners the lower candle-power 
gas does not give the same illumination as the high candle-power 
6 

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162 Public Sebvioe Commission — First Distuict 

quality, but the tendencgr for years has been to discard open-flame 
burners and substitute mantle lampa In a great many cases 
the chief gas eoogineer found that adjustments of gas apparatus 
had to be made in order to get the best results out of the lower 
candle-power gas, and the Commission's inspectors have been 
the means of making such adjusiments in a great many cases. 

There is now every prospect that the Kings County Lighting 
Company will be able to improve its plant and distribution system 
so as to serve properly all consumers in its territory. 

Brooklyn Borough Gas Company. — The high price of gas oil 
also figured prominently in the operations of the Brooklyn 
Borough Gte^ Oompany. This company, after litigation, was 
relieved from the obligation of charging 80 cents per thousand 
cubic feet, which was fixed as the maximum price by the Legis- 
lature in 1916. The company then brought the matter before 
the Commission for the fixing of a proper rate. The case is 
known as Case No. 2320 and it came up originally in 1918. 

The order entered late in that year fixed the maximum price 
to 1>e charged by the above company for gas as follows : 

(A) On and after the date of said order (Decemiber 12, 
1918) to and including December 31, 1919, $1.10 per 1,000 
cubic feet of gas sold and delivered to consumers. 

(B) On and after January 1, 1920, to and including 
June 30, 1920, 95 cents per 1,000 cubic feet of gas sold 
and delivered to consumers. 

By an order entered late in 1919 and orders entered early in the 
year 1920 the $1.10 rate aforesaid for the Borough Company 
was continued to and including March 20, 1920. On that date 
the Commission made an order increasing the $1.10 rate to $1.15, 
said increase to extend to and including December 31, 1920. 

This rate the Commission considered at that time to be just 
and reasonable and sufficient for the needs of the company. How- 
ever, it was based in part upon the expectation that the cost of 
gas oil to the company would remain as fixed in its then existing 
contract, namely, at the price of 7'% cents per gallon. The com- 
pany's old contract for gas oil expired in August, 1920, 

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FOUBTEENTH AnNUAL RepOBT 163 

UiKJer date of June 18, 1920, the company addressed a lettei 
to the Commiesion stating that in nc^tiating for a new contract 
for gas oil, the beet possible price it could obtain was 14 cents 
per gallon, an increase over the old price of 6% cents. The 
Commission, upon receipt of this letter, made an order directing 
that a hearing be held to further consider the need for an increase 
in this company's rate on account of the increase in the cost per 
gallon of gas oil. At the hearing the Commission verified the 
fact that 14 cents per gallon for gas oil was the prevailing price 
in the market and the best that could be obtained. 

The Commission thereupon on July 2, 1920, made an order 
increasing this company's rate from $1.15 per thousand culbic 
feet of gas sold and delivered to $1.40, same to take effect on 
and after August 1, 1920, and continue to and including July 31, 
1921. As it takes four gallons of gas oil to manufacture 1,000 
cubic feet of gas, the 25 cents' increase in rate offset the 6^ cents' 
increase per gallon of gas oil. The July order also granted to 
this company permission to change not later than October 1, 
1920, its standard of gas from that of 22 candle-power to that of 
the British Thermal Unit (B. T. U.). This first departure in 
change of standard by the Commission was made upon recom- 
mendation of its Gas Engineer. 

By changing the gas standard to the British Thermal Unit the 
gas engineer stated that a lesser amount of oil would then be 
required in the manufacture of gas at that standard than 
at the 22 candle-power standard and the proportionate amount 
saved would about equal the increased cost thereof. As the Com- 
mission desired very much to keep the rate of gas down to the 
West posfiibile rate under the condition® that prevailed, the 
change of standard was decided upon. The order of July 2, 
however, made this provision, that immediately upon the in- 
auguration of such change of standard and concurrently there- 
with and continuously thereafter, during the term of the Com- 
mission's order, the Borough Company shall make such reduction 
in the maximum rate of $1.40 as shall be warranted by the 
economies effected by the change and shall make such reasonable 
reduction in such maximum rate as shall- be prescribed by the 
Commission by supplemental order and shall chai^ for the gas 



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164 Public Sbbvicb Coii mission — Fibst District 

manufactured, distributed and sold under such new standard not 
to exceed a reasonable rate and not to exceed such reasonable rate 
as shall be fixed ^by the Oommiission by supplemental order. 

Furthermore, the order provided that the company shall keep 
and file promptly with the Commission records to show, month 
by month, the revenues, expenses and resources of the Borough 
Company and its additions to and deductions from its capital 
account. This provision was embodied so as to permit the Com- 
mission to keep in close touch with the company^s affairs, and 
to determine whether the maximum rate fixed was reasonable or 
whether suA rate fiftiould be reduced by virtue of the change in the 
standard. 

Ods illuminating and heating value tests, — In the exercise of 
its power to investigate and ascertain the quality of gas supplied 
by gas companies, the Commission has made daily tests of gas 
with the purpose of determining the illuminating and heating 
value contained in the gas furnished to consumers in the First 
District. In this work it has had the co-operation of the Depart- 
ment of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity of the City of New 
York. The data collected has been used by counsel to the Com- 
mission in the course of various court proceedings instituted by 
the gas companies; also in proceedings before the Commission, 
relative to the comparative value between illuminating and heat- 
ing factors as a standard for gas. » 

The tables appended hereto show the results of tests made dur- 
ing the year 1920, and cover all gas companies within the juris- 
diction of the Commission. 



Summary of iLLuMnvATiNa Valus Tsstb of Qas Made durinq 1920 



Company 


Number of 
stations 
at which 

teste 

were 

made 


Total 
number 
of teste 

made 


Number 

of days 

on which 

teste 

were 

made 


Number 

of days 

below 

22 

power 


Maad- 
mum 
candle- 
power 


Minn 
mum 
candle- 
power 


Aver- 


CoDBolidated Gas Co 

New Ameterdam Gas Co. . . 
N.Y. Mutual Gas Lt. Co.. 

Standard Gas Lt. Co 

Central Union Gas. Co 

N.Y. A Queens Gas Co... 


6 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1,787 
569 
301 
296 
298 
313 


302 
302 
301 
296 
298 
299 


108 
111 
131 

96 
101 

67 


26.8 
26.4 
26.5 
23.9 
25.1 
26.4 


16.9 
17.3 
18.7 
17.4 
19.2 
17.2 


22.4 
22.3 
22.2 
22.2 
22.1 
22.8 




12 


3,664 


302 


131 


26.8 


16.0 


22.4 



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FOUBTEBNTH AnNUAL RepOET 



165 



BBOOKi^Tir Uniow Ststbii 



OOHPAHT 


Number of 
stations 
at which 

testa 

wen 

made 


Total 
number 
of tests 

made 


Number 

onirludi 

testa 
were 
made 


Number 
of days 
below 

22 
eandk 
power 


Man- 

mum 
oandle 
power 


Mini- 
mum 
eandle 
power 


Aver- 


BrooUyn Union Gas Co.... 


5 


1.463 


303 


802 


22.6 


1.7 


12.0 



BraniGas^ElecCo 

Kin«i Coonty LL Co 

Brooklya Boro Gaa Co 

QoeeoB Boro Gas ft El. Co . 
N. Y. ft Riehmond Gaa Co 



Afl 



Indbpbndbit Com pANns 



804 
340 
208 
206 
300 



1.538 



6.565 



303 



206 



303 



303 



27 
207 
205 
132 
200 



200 



302 



20.8 
22.4 
23.1 
24.3 
10.8 



20.8 



20.8 



18.0 
2.6 
5.0 

14.4 
8.5 



2.6 



1.7 



23.1 
10.2 
14.4 
21.1 
15.5 



16.8 



18.0 



SumiABT OF Hbahmg Valub Tbbts of Gas Maab nusma 1020 
Results in British Thermal Units 



CoaiFAKT 


Number of 

station 

at which 

tests 

are 

made 


1 

Total 
number 
of tests 

made 


Number 

of days 

on which 

tests 

were 

made 


Maxi- 
mum 

b.t.u. 


Mini- 

mum 

B.T.U. 


Aver- 


Conclidated Gas Co 


3 
2 
2 


503 
283 
420 
105 
01 
118 
170 
108 
106 


258 
222 
261 
105 
01 
118 
170 
108 
106 


607 
604 
601 
503 
701 
702 
680 
677 
705 


506 
621 
603 
633 
632 
571 
617 
528 
618 


655 




663 


N.Y.MutualGaJco^.. .:..:.... 


645 


Studard Gaa Lt. Co 


664 


Central Union Gab Co 


668 


N. Y. ft Queena Gas Co 


640 


Northero Union Gas Co 


653 


Worteberter Lt. Co 


644 


E*t River Gaa Co 


661 






ConwBdated Gas Co. System 


13 


2.183 


261 


705 


528 


654 


Brooklyn Union Gas Co 


Bbooklt] 
1 


Iff Ststbii 

673 
205 
180 
203 
181 
170 


236 
205 
180 
203 
181 
170 


678 
647 
658 
634 
636 
584 


308 
501 
468 
400 
517 
477 


551 


RiOwMh Gaa Co 


561 


Newtown Gaa Company 


557 


Woodhaven Gas LtTCo 

Richmond HjU ft Q. Co. Gaa Lt. Co. 
Jamaiea Gaa Lt. Co 


566 
558 
548 






Brooklyn Union System 





1.621 


236 


678 


308 


573 






I: 
Brofut Gas ft Elec. Co 


KDBPBNDBin 


'COMPANIBI 

87 
107 
214 

86 
205 


\ 

87 
105 
214 

86 
205 


716 
630 
601 
670 
604 


601 
466 
607 
505 
512 


686 


Kn» County Lt. Co 


548 


Brooklyn Boro Gas Co 


577 




610 




561 








5 


780 


214 


716 


466 


503 






AD fMMnpanies. ...... 


27 


4,503 


261 


716 


308 


611 







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166 Public Sejbvice Commission — Fiest Distkict 

Gas and electric meter tests. — During the year ended Decem- 
ber 31, 1920, the Commission tested 326,999 gas meters- Of 
these, 5,489 were tested upon complaint 

The following tables give the results of these tests: 

(Tables A to I inclusive give the results of these tests in 
detail.) 



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168 Public Sbbvice Commission — Fihst Distkict 



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170 Public Sebvicb Commission — First District 



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FOUKTEBNTH AnITUAI. BxPOBT 



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APPENDIX 
STATISTICS Oir PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATIONS 

PREPARED BY THB 

BUREAU o:b^ statistics and accounts 



( . 



IT' ^^^^^^^ATiVE Transfortatton Summaries 

III ^'^^^'^ liAiLWAY Companies, 1920 

IV ^^^^^''^s AND Bagoage Transfer Companies, 1920 

. bTEAM: Xt^LROAD COMPANIES, 1920 

. Gas CozftitpAj^iEs and Electrical Companies, 1920 

VI. Steam: Oompanies, 1920 

(Deta^il^d table of contents follows) 



[1771 



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NOTE 



The increase in the cost of printing, which necessitated con- 
densation of the matter contained in the statistical reports of 
1918 and 1919 in order to keep within the appropriations, ha^ 
continued In those reports all of the statistical matter derived 
from the annual returns of public utility companies was pre- 
sented in one volume instead of two; this year the statistical 
report is combined in one volume with the general rei>ort of the 
Commission. Space has been saved through the presentation in 
the street railway tabulations of additional material that for- 
merly appeared in the abstracts of the individual returns of 
transportation companies. Balance sheets, fixed ' capital, other 
investments, and taxes are given in new or expanded tables, while 
details concerning revenues and expenses, heretofore included in 
the abstracts, have been omitted, with the result that the abstract 
as now constituted covers only the items of corporate organiza- 
tion, intercorporate relationship, change in fixed capital and other 
important changes within the year, corporate surplus or deficit, 
and electric power transactions. Few changes have been made 
in the form of the statistics of gas and electrical companies. 

A. F. Weber, 

Chief Statistician. 

[178] 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PART I. COMPARATIVE TRANSPORTATION SUMMARIES 
Taiu 1. OBoirni 07 oitt TBAwnr ni mnr tobk oarr soroB 1800: paob 

A. Ai indicBted by nnmber of rsv«nue prnMnn ga n 180 

B. Aiindioftted by pa«eiiflsr reoaiptt 102 

C. AiiDdiaatod by milw of tnok 103 

D. Ai indioated by number of passenger oars owned or leased 104 

Tabls 2. raw TOBX ott isbxt PASSBiroui TBAFrzc, 1008-1020 106 

Tabu 3. oowdtatioii tbatil to mbw touc drr. 1000-1017 : 

A New York Railxoeds 108 

B. New Jersey Railroads 108 

Tabls 4. sububbah tbatbi» oir Loira iblamd abd btatbh island: 

A Pt iss ongpr toafflo and p a s sen ge r oar miles in p a ssen ge r trains of the Long Island Hailroad, 
1012-1020 100 

B. Csr and passenger movement, steam-road passenger serrioe on Staten Island, 1008-1020 100 
Tabu 5. uovob omnBus opbbationb: 

A. Traffic of Fifth Avenue Coaeh Company, 1000-1020 200 

B. Aeoidente; employees and wages, Fifth Avenue Goaoh Company, 1000-1020 200 

C. Opeiating revenues and expenses of Fifth Avenue Coach Company, 1000-1020 200 

D. Income of Fifth Avenue Coach Company. 1000-1020 201 

E. Oftpitel of Fifth Avenue Coach Company, 1000-1020 201 

F. Data for City Island Motor Bus Company, 1017-1020 201 

Tabu 6. obnbbal srnunrr baxlwat suiimabt, tbabs bndbd junb 80, 1010-1020 202 

Tabu 7. boad abb tbaox milbaob, junb 30, 1008-1020: 

A Length of road and track 20i 

B. Inereaee in road and track 204 

C. Length of road or line divided between surface and rapid-tranmt compcmies 204 

D. Length of trade divided between surface and rapid-transit oompanie^ 206 

E. Distribution by mode of operation 205 

F. Geographical location of surface and n^id-trmnait railway track 200 

Tabu 8. stbbvt baii.wat powbb flamts: 

A Cspaeity and output, 1008-1020 207 

B. Quantity and coat of coal used in power plants, 1015-1020 207 

Tabu 0. fassbnobb oabb, junb 30, 1008-1020: 

A. Number owned or loseod, by type of car 208 

B. Bapid-transit cars, by road 208 

C. Surface oars classified with reference to protection of motormen 200 

D. Seating capacity 200 

Tabu 10. trafvio btatibticb: 

A. Transfer paasengers. 1008-1920 210 

B. Revenue car-miles, 190&-1020 210 

C. Psswnger-car miles, 1008-1020 210 

D. Car«eat miles (active) , 1010-1020 212 

E. Pissenger oar hours, 1008-1020 212 

F. Average number of passenger cars used per day, 1010-1020 212 

Tabu 11. bibbbt bailwat oasuaj/tibs, 1008-1920: 

A Number reported each year 214 

B. Fktal acoidents reported each year 214 

C. PeisooB killed, distributed as passengers, employees and others 215 

D. ATBrage amounts expended in settlements for personal injury claims 215 

[179] 



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180 Table of Contents 



Tabus 13. offiovbs and auPLOTBBS and tbbib oobcpbnbation: pagb 

A. Number, by chief oooupational groups, 1906-1030 210 

B. Aorecate salaries and wages, 190^-1920 216 

C. Distribution of operating payrolls, 1910-1930 216 

D. Ratio (per cent) of pasrroUs to total expense of eaoh department. 1910-1930 217 

£. Average wages of oar-platform men and ticket agents on June 30, 1900-1920 217 

TaBLB 13. rXKANOlAL SUMlfABT OF 8TRBBT BAILWAT OPBBATXONB. 1010-1020 218 

Tablb 14. OFBBAmrO batkm iob sblbotbd oompanibs 230 

TaBIA 16. OPBBATXNO BBYBNUB AB1> BXPBBrBB BATKOS. ALL OOMPAJTZBa 222 

Tablb 16. oHAiroBa ih iiAXNTBirAiraB obabobs DUBma tkb tbabs 1000-1030 224 

Tablb 17. dbtailb or opbratdtq bxpbnbbs on aooount or iNnmns and damaobb, 1013- 

1920 230 

Tablb 18. bbvbnubs and bzpbnsbs or thb zntbbbobouoh subway pob ybars bndbd junb 

80. 1005-1020 232 

Tablb 10. rxNANctAL bbsuios or opbbation ab bbpobtbd bt tbb nbw tobx oonbolidatbd 

BAiLBOAD (lbsbbb undbb CONTBACT NO. 4), 1014-1020 284 

PART II. STREET RAILWAY COMPANIES, 1030 

CORPORATB ObOANIZATION, IMPORTANT ChANOBB, EtC 235 

(Individual companies, in alphabetical order) 
Tabulations: 

i. tbaok mxlbaqb ownbd 312 

n. BOLLXNG stock: 

A. Number of can available June 30. 1020, and change during the year 318 

B. Seating capacity and average weight of passenger oars 320 

C. Age of passenger cars and protective equipment 322 

DL POWEB PLANT BQUZPMBNT 324 



A. Electric energy produced and fuel oonsumed, by generating stations of street 

railway companies 327 

B. Source and disposition of A.C. power 328 

C. Source and diaposition of D.C. power up to distribution to line 320 

D. Power distributed to line and car miles operated thereby 330 

V. TBAmc BTATisnas: cab movbicbnt 332 

VT. TRArnc statsbtxcb: passbnobb movbmbnt 338 

Vn. TBAFPIC BTATiaTXOB: CAB AND PASaBNOBB MOVBMBNT BT MONTHS: ' 

A. Number of revenue passengers 342 

B. Passenger earnings > . . 344 

C. Transfers 346 

D. Passenger-car hours (active and idle) 348 

£. Passenger-car miles (active) 360 

P. Cap«eat miles (active) 362 

Q. Revenue car miles 354 

vxn. TBAPno statibtzob: cab and passbnobb movbmbnt bt boutbs 356 

iz. TRAPnc statibtiob: subway and blbvatbd station rbcoros by halt ybabb 

AND YBABS: 

A. Ticket sales at Interborough subway division stations 374 

B. Tickets sales at Manhattan Railway (Interborough elevated division) stations 380 

C. Fares collected at Brooklyn Rapid Transit elevated-subway division stations 385 

D. Ticket sales of typical months of the Hudson A Manhattan — aggregate for 

New Jersey and by stations for New York city 300 

X. CASUALTJBS: PBB80N8 XILLBD OB INJURKO AND BXTBNT OP INJURY 302 

XI. CLAIMS ON ACCOUNT OP INJURIBS: 

A. Damage suits 304 

B. SetUementi aeoording to period of accident 306 



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Table op Contents 



181 



*tJiATiOKB — Continued: 

Xn. ■MPIX>TK1I8 AND '«V-Jk<aB8: FAGB 

A. Number of ofl3.oer8 and employees, by oocupatioiial groups, at oIom of fiscal 

year 398 

B. Distribution, of total compensation for the fiscal year: 

% 1. By flkooounts 400 

% 2. By c lfinoB a of employees 402 

C. Average hc>%ax-ly rates and number receiving specified rates: 

% 1. Cocadixotors and guards 404 

i 2. Motx>]rmen 406 

D. Classified wreeldy earnings of employees for last week in June: 

fi 1. A«er«^a^te by companies 408 

i 2. All csoxxxpanies combined, by occupations 410 

xm. BBvnNUBs FBOic arr^jiBr railway opirations 412 

XIV. OPBRATINa BXPSBI^SBS: 

A. Summary for ^U corporations by accounts of class C classification (the- least 

detailed) 416 

B. Complete ci«t;«fcils for selected corporations ....... ! 428 

XV. TAXBS: 

A. Tax char^os 432 

B. Tax payia^Kx^;^ 434 

C. Taxes due caxx<i unpaid 436 

XVl. OOKDBNBK, DCCO*«,| (AND SURPLUS) BTATBliBNTB: 

A . Operating ooxnpanies 488 

«. Lessor oonai>«ijiieB 442 

xvir. BAi^NCB BHRRra. r 

ondenaetl. ^t;c^tements for operating and lessor companies: 

9 1 . Anm^ ^tm side 444 

B ChBM^ ^i«-*^ilities side 450 

«*?*^ ****^«^xig year and balance at the dose for operating companies : 

t 1. Ras»2<1 transit companies 456 

* o tt^^**^* -Avenue system companies 460 

t 3. ?5*>^=>lclyn Rapid Transit surface companies 464 

5 4. J^i»<»^Ujuieous Manhattan and Brooklyn companies 470 

8 o. Vcuocsixxs and Richmond compcmies, and grand total 476 

XVm. VTXKD OAPnAL.Z 

A.. Summary off aunount at beginning of year, changes during year and amount 

atcloBck c>f year 484 

B. Details of ^.xaaounts at close of year: 

* ^" ^^?**^^ transit companies 488 

4 *• 'F*^*-B'<i Avenue Railway companies 492 

% 3. BroeJclyn Rapid Transit surface oompaniee 494 

% 4. ^^Woelljtneous Manhattan and Brooklyn companies 490 

I 5. Quo^xia and Richmond companies 498 

^^X^. UiaCBLLANBOtJB ^Mrt^^^^rumsTB 602 

^x- ■«cxjRrnii»CcA^xrrAU8ATiON): 

A. Total outftt^a^^Q^ 508 

B. Capital stook 512 

C. Funded debt. 616 

D. Certifio&tea of indebtedness, to controlling corporations 620 

£. DeUilB of oori>orate stock and corporate stock notes of the City of New York 

outstanding and allotted for construction of rapid transit railroads 621 

F. CapitaUsation as affected by securities issued and retired during the year. . 623 

^ttl. VALUA.TION 0» PROPSXTT OF STRBBT SURFAOB RAILWAYS FOB PURPOSB8 0» TAXATION: 

A. Assessed valuation of street-surface railways, year ended June 30. 1920 624 

B. Estimated vcklue of property of street surface railways . as reported to the State 

Tax Commission under date of December 31, 1919 fi^ 



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182 Table of Contents 

TABULAnom — Conduded: 

joai. opnuTDra RATxot: paob 

A. Per oar mile , . . . 580 

B. Proportionate diaposition of revenues 832 

C. MisoeUaneous 684 

PART III. OMNIBUS AND BAQQAQB TRANSFER COMPANIES, 1020 

TaBLB I. PHT8I0AL AND OraSATINa DATA 630 

TaBUB II. VHrANGZAL DATA 640 

ABSTRAOra or ANNUAL BETUBNS 642 

PART IV. STEAM RAILROAD COMPANIES, 1920 

Z. SUMMABT or ANMXTAL BBTUANB Or riBBT DZaTBICT UM80B COMPANIB8 606 

n. SUMMABT or ANNUAL BBTU11N8 Or TOST DIBTBICT OFBEATZNO COMPANIBS: 

A. Physical and operating statisties 668 

B. Financial data 670 

IIL DBTAIL or OPBBATING BZFBNSB8 Or riBST DISnUCT STBAM BOAOS: 

A. Class I roads 572 

B. Class III roads 574 

IT. VSBniHT OABBXBD BT STATBN ISLAND BARD TSANBIT BAILWAT COMPANY 675 

▼. 8UBUBBAN TBAFnc: 

A. Lone Island Railroad Oncludins rapid transit) : 

§ 1. Total passengers by classes, and conunuters by stations 576 

§ 2. Pkssenger-oar mileace 678 

B. FBnnsylTania Railroad paasengen in and out of Pennsylvania terminal: 

§ 1. By years and half years 680 

§ 2. By months 681 

C. New York Central Railroad OBoIuding West Shore) 582 

D. New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad 584 

E. New York, Westchester and Boston Railway 686 



PART V. QAS COMPANIES AND ELECTRICAL COMPANIES, 1920 
Tabulations: 

i. coal-oa8 wobks, bt companibb and stationb 689 

il wa1vb-oa8 8btb, and tbab's incbbabb, bt companibs and btationb 600 

in. auxiuabt gab-works apparatus 692 

iv. oab-boldbiui, bt companibb and stations 605 

V. GAS mains: 

A. Chances within the year, and sUtus December 31, 1920 598 

B. Lengths, by diameter of pipe 600 

VL GASBBRVICBS: 

A. Changes during the year, cost of services added, and sUtus Deoembsr 81, 1920 604 

B. Number, by diameter of pipe 605 

Vn. CONSUMBBS' GAS MBTBRS: 

A. Number owned, by sise 606 

B. Net increase in number owned 608 

C. Disposition at dose of 1920 609 



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Table of Contents 183 

TABULAmun — ConlmiMel: 

Tm. fWDircnoir or qmm (m ou. ft.), bt oouwAiam amd srAnoon: paob 

A. Maks and Mnd-out durinc the y«ar 610 

B. Daily umJkm and lendKmt — mawimim, imnimum and aTonoa. with dataa.. . . 613 

C. PhMtnetioD imtioa 614 

xz. (ua mMum rmMwomMAMcm WLATom: 

A. Coal-caa canaration 615 

B. Water-caa CBDeration 616 

C. BoilmandboUflrfual 618 

z. QAB MAiruFAoruBoro AMB natLAom mxprnxoBB, bt ooiiPAinaa and sTATioifa 690 

XL MAIBUAIA OV OAB MAWUFAOTUBBt OfOLUDINO CBBTADf BiaiDUALB: 

A. Coal (cwt.) 622 

B. Qaa oa (saUooa) and tarms of oil oontraet 624 

C. Coka and breeaa (owt.) 626 

D. Tar (gallooa) 626 

£. Valua of prinapal naiduali bought andaold 627 

zn. aouBca axd DUPoamoxf or oas (qab ACcoum m m cu. it.) 628 

ZZn. CUMaUMFTIOlt OF QAM: 

A. Number at conauman and atreet lanipa, and taa aupplied to the MTeral oon- 

annption nliMni, by oompaniea and borooi^ 681 

B. Matend taa (M ou. ft.) diatriboted to private eonaumera, by montha 633 

ziv. QAB APPUANcaa HBBD BT comuMBBa: 

A. Number owned by «x>mpaniee and rented out, with ohancea durins year, for 

the Conaohdated ayatem 686 

B. Number aoM during year, by oompaniea 686 

XT. BLBCTRIC POWBB PLA2fT APTABATXra: 

A. Boikra and enginea, by oompaniea and etationa 637 

B. Eleetrio equipment at generating atatione 688 

ZTL BLBCnUC TBANaiOiaiOXf AND DiaTBXBUTIOir aTaTBICB: 

A. Length of feedera and maina at oloae of year 630 

B. Polea and line tranaformen 640 

xm. zucTRxc aBBTxcBa 641 

zvhl BLBcmc mbisbb: 

A. Number and amperMBe of meten owned at doae of year 642 

B. Number bought and number condemned, loat or deatrayad, together with net 

inereaee during year# by amperea 648 

C. Dupoaition of meten owned at eloae of year 644 

XDL DTCAMSBaGBirr LAMPB FUBCHABBD AND SMUBD, BT WATTAOB: 

A. Tungrten lampa 646 

B. Gem« and other Umpe of a lower effiolenciy than tungsten 647 

ZX. OONIIBCTBD LOAD: 

A. Summary by oompaniea, and proportion primarily for lighting and for power.. 648 

B. Number of unite and rating in kilowatta: 

§1. Lighting (number of kmpe) 640 

§2. Power 651 

XXL PBODuenoN or blboisic bnbbot, bt ooMpANZBa AND btahonb: 

A Energy generated in relation to fuel conanmed and to generating eapadlgr 658 

B. Net output fa relation to station eiyadty, eonnectedload and maximum load. . . 664 

3an. paoDucnON or biactbio oubbbnt: quantitt (cwt.) and cost or ruBL 655 

mn. TAaunoN or oirrrur and or load: 

A Total, daily average, maximum day'a and minimum day'a output (kw. hra.) of 

eaeh oompany and statloa, by montha 686 

B. Monthly maximum peak load (kw.) of each aUtion, with data aad time of day... 660 



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184 Table of Contents 



Tabulations — Continued: 

ZXZV. ▼ABIATION OF OUTPUT AND OF LOAD; OUTPUT (KW. HB8.) FOB BACH BOUB OF THB 

MAXIMUM WBBX AND OF TBB MINIMUM DAT: PAGE 

A. New York Bdiaon ." 662 

B. United Electric Light & Power 663 

C. Brooklyn Edison 664 

D. Richmond Light & Railroad 665 

E. FlatbttBh Gab 666 

F. Queens Borough Gas dt Electric 667 

XXy. 80UBCB AND DISFOBITION OF BLBCTRIC BNBBGT 668 

XXYI. CONSUMPTION OF BLBCTBICITT: 

A. EleotricitysuppliedtothepubUc, and related data, by companies and boroughs. 670 

B. Sales by months 672 

xxYii. CASUAiynss: total numbbb killxd ob inxubbo 674 

XXyiU. CASUALnCS: DUBATION of DZSABIUTT of BMPLOTBBS of gab OOMPANIB0 injubkd. . . . 676 
XXIX. OABVAVPOS: DUBATION OF DISABILITT OF BMPLOTBBS OF BLBCTRIOAL 0OMPAN1B8 

INXUBBO 680 

XXX. BMPLOTBBS AND WAOBS: CLAB8IFIBD WBBXLT BABNING8 OF BMPLOTBBS IN GBOUFS OF 
OCCUPATIONS, BT OOMPANZBS, SECOND WBBX OF DBCBMBBB: 

A. Managers and superintendents 682 

B. Technical staff 683 

C. Clerical employees 684 

D. Wage earners 686 

E. Superannuated employees 687 

F. Grand total, all empk>yees 688 

XXXI. BMPLOTBBS AND WAOBS: DISTBIBUTION OFCOMPBN8ATION OF OFFICERS AND EMPLOTEBS 
BT ACCOUNTS AND OBJBCTS: 

A. Gassupply 690 

B. Electrical supply 691 

XXXn. GAB OPBBATINO BBTBNUBS 692 

XXXm. GAS OPEBATDTG EXPENSES: 

A. Manufacturing and storage expenses: 

§ 1. Consolidated system, water gas. 606 

§ 2. Consolidated system, water gas and coal gas combined 098 

§ 3. Companies outside of the Consolidated system and grand total for all 

companies 700 

B. Manufacturing and storage expenses per M ou. ft. made (cents) 702 

C. Expenses other than manufacturing and storage expenses, and total operatinc 

expenses: 

i 1. Consolidated system 704 

§ 2. Brookbm Union system 706 

§ 3. Minor compcmies, and grand total for all companies 708 

XXXIY. SUMMABT OF GAB BALES, GAB EXPENSES, AND FIXED CHABGBS, AFTER ELIMINATINO 
DUPLICATIONS FBOM INTEBOOMPANT SALBS: 

A. Absolute amounts 710 

B. Relative amounts: Unit costs per M ou. ft. sold to oonsumers, and per cent 

distribution of xeo«pts and expenses 712 

XXXy. ELBCnUCAL OPBBATENG BBTENUBB 714 

XXXrt. ELECTRICAL EXPENSES AND UNIT COSTS: 

A. Details of operating expenses and other revenue deductions 716 

B. Unit costs and operating ratios: 

§ 1. Generating ooel per 10 kw. hrs. generated 722 

I 2. Unit cost per 10 kw. hrs. sold 722 

§ 3. Distributive ratios 724 

xxxvn. INCOME (and subplus) statements 726 



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Table op Contents 



185 



K^TxoNB — Conduded: 

^^* BA.L\NOB SHWrS. BT OOBCPAJHT OBOUPB, AS 09 DIGBIIBBB 31, 1020: PAQB 

A. Aaaets aide 732 

B. Liabilitieff side 736 

^^^- VIXKD QJM AND BLB<7rXfcKC3 CAPITAL (COflT OF PLANT AND PBOPBBTT) 740 

^^ OONSTTMBIta' DBPOBTTB A.XTX> TTNCOLLBCTIBLB BILLS 744 

*^l*l. SBCTTRITXBB (CAPITAX.ISA.'X*K0K) ! 

A. Funded debt 746 

B. Stocks and total o&pitalisatioD (gross) 748 

C. Net oapitalisatioza., \yy systems 749 

D. Stock and funded debt issued or retired during the year 750 

E. Construction ad-v^uc^oes owing to associated companies 751 

• '♦"ALUATION of PBOPBRW. I>BCBIfBBB 31. 1919: 

A. Estimated value SMMording to the latest company report to the SUte Tax 

Commisfldon .. . 752 

B. Assessed valuatiox^ 754 

^ • TAX OBABOBS. AND OH.A.«K»m dISPUTBD AND UNPAID 766 

_J«OABDlNa DbpBB CIATZOIW 763 

*'*^ow OF Annual Rvrumvrm 765 

p^ PAJirr VI. STEAM COMPANIES. 1920 

• 1921 **' '^'""^^^ Rwpuittr o^ Nrfwr York Siibaii Compant foe Ybab Endbd Afbil 

962 

*^^ OP CORPORATION'S 979 



LANATION OP Al^IBHEVIATIONS AND SIGNS USED IN THE TABLES 
=Anegative number, i. e_ ^ decrease or a deficit. 

(-eixnation, eithsr by the company concerned or by the Bureau of 



-Number obtained by 

ttios. 



r'Zm^ ^«ord or not >^X>ox-t;od. 

Z^—^T^^"^^^*^^^^^^^^ with some other number. 
•^^^J==^<;m or not «^»x>iicftble in the sense of none. 

«. ,.ij ^ interpreted l>y reference to associated numbers as, e. g., for a total under an 

, or under maxima. 



Digitized byCjOOQlC 

i 



_ \ 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



PART I 

Comparative^ 



TRANSPORTATION SUMMARIES 



[187] 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Comparative Sui^aiAAJUES of Transportation Statistics 189 

^^^* 1. GROWTH OF emr transit in new YORK PITYi SINCE i860: (A) As 
in d i c:m^ ^^ by iiiunb«r of roTMUio paiiiiiws 

Snunr Subfact Railwatb, bt Bobouobb 




l^%Vo 38.4S6.242 

laao' 114.101,639 

}^ :;i 48 

1%H12 373.6W.t'»77 

IfftQQ' 3Sft.947j6» 

lOoS* 396.670.432 

J^oS" :m.n^.4M 

If^oS'T n4,i4l,i>7« 

1007 3'JI,TD«.iMB 

JttOa 377,017,102 

JttOg" 3 a;!. 3112*06 

}lilO*" 357,7^0, 430 

l«ll ^i71Jd5.fi96 

;»12 '• 3j^3.046,S46 

i«l3 1 395.a3s,<Me 

}»U: • I *I9JK.263 

J»15 * I 420,6S:£.533 

J»I7." / i^7.m,U7 

J»I9.;- / 37lJ3o.3» 

1«20. •• / 3?O.CJ«4.7U 

' I a4ft,772,7W 






TTI^tt SroiiZ> 



10-'20 

Peroeat 



75,646,207 

^ 196.71 

34,513.668 

^^ 80.26 

66,681.641 

44.87 

144. 706. 024 

67.21 

11.163.024 

^ 8.10 

I> 21 .302.935 

D5.70 



1000 



1010 



p--:\ t> 6,531 .076 I 



1011 
1012 
1013 




13.406.206 

3.75 

10,881.149 

2.93 

13.191.181 

aj£ 

24.484.227 
6.19 
940.280 
0.22 
I> 6.111,417 
D1.22 
11.822.731 
2.85 
1>77.685,733 
1 D 18.15 

191* T.;^- A 21.348.275 

\9l*t»L:- \ ^1.061.678 
** P«««nt\ DO 28 

tfljO-v; \D20.311.950 

Vf^ ¥«tt«iit\ D5.49 



1 
1 

«?• 

2e 

28 
30 
34 
3T 
39 

»i, 
Z^' 



088.014 
776.486 
304.726 
364.000 
902.990 
mn,!85 
7U,7fel 
1*-a ,809 



,3 



16 
33 
29 
79 
61 

' 66 
45 
«9 

( 33 

m 

/ 37 
.•^.jSO 
917.071 
306.261 
141.991 



BrooUgra 



12. 374 /m 

»S7,303.281 

< 77.^12?!. 3 W 
10gjHS,&47 
2[H,liHi.:i97 
2*^U'J.a88 
yi6.S^f4.408 
223,433,771 
233.134,407 
242, 7»0, till 
265,204.^11 
2a2.44t},::53 
274,7&6.:91 
275.038>27 
2l^,3lM.i«5 
3{)5,9n,:i50 
a*J.32l.m 
34J5.ya7,401 
aSl.*05,lS84 
354.71K»^113 
^163,630,177 
373.a7U.a61 
:t*Sa.207,556 
3l^Jt)6.288 
ia'j,L(:iti.227 



(exel. B. R. T.) 



1,052,380 

2.U7ti,185 
11.441.751 
ll.^?i4,062 
18.71L4,:J87 
18.0ftVt,210 
16,701.^58 
20, ^'i^. 487 
26,1.^1. 1754 
28, :» Li, 743 
29,7117,760 
30.^5,776 
> 34. 1:^0,(174 
4S, 515^.29 
411/182,732 
47.463/382 
41,ii:3,&96 
69.^.108 
64/137.403 
56,aiMK!>81 
43,448,J06 
48.7;>;i,575 
49 iii:^^^74 



RaehmoDd 



I>xcBinfiAL Incbeabb OB (D) Dbcbbabb 



1. €38.014 

737.471 

71.05 

1» 619.241 

91.20 

• 960.964 

d«. 159.571 

-»^ 164.57 

37.617.730 

66.65 

€». 434.580 
14.55 
4S. 862.482 
11.56 
e. 268.705 
11.06 
». 050,279 
8.06 
e. 866.064 
10.12 
4.049.824 
6.63 
1 .860.670 
2.32 
3.032.934 
3 72 
^ 13,382,707 
r> 15.83 
8.764.041 
12.32 
889.190 

13,335.730 
16.50 



24,828,360 

200.63 

40.725,114 

109.47 

31,360.252 

40.24 

94.817,760 

86.76 

85,201,688 

41.74 

143.628.142 

40.65 

Incbeabb OB (D) 

272.036 

0.10 

14.260.258 

5.19 

16.669.265 

5.76 

16.344.631 

5.34 

23.665.420 

7 34 

5.917.883 

1.71 

2,794.829 

0.79 

8.930.064 

2.52 

9.449.474 

2.60 

D 12.872.096 

D3.45 

1.897.733 

0.53 

70.830.939 

19.56 



1.052.380 

1.923.805 

182.81 

8.465.566 

284 44 

22.988,323 

200.92 

15,132,500 

43.95 

Dbcbbabb I 

748,026 

2.51 

3.884,298 

12.72 

8.085.555 

23.48 

2.667.103 

6.27 

2,280.650 

5.05 

2.510.314 

5.29 

2.712.412 

5.43 

1.481.295 

2.81 

D 3.260.722 

D6.02 

D 7.458.475 

D 14.65 

3.275.360 

7.54 

2.838.999 

6.08 



121.086 
213.905 
287.325 

0.S72.856 
6.752,416 
7aitt,Ul3 
7.4;i&, 136 
7J*2,677 
7,743.tJ87 
8.945/.114 
il.tt7k«62 
t{),9M,i52 
11,367,091 
n .7l2.t.23 
12.301.757 
12.950.799 
13.&«gj!66 
14.011,414 
14.;}!^. 1109 
14.B84.334 
lS,2a»,l57 
lS,2S7.ii22 

15,007,235 



121.086 

92.819 

76.66 

73.420 

34.32 

6.586.531 

2.292.01 

4.839.767 

70.42 

3.294.612 

28.13 



400.239 

3.66 
345.532 

3.04 
689.134 

5.03 
658.042 

6.35 
608.267 

4.69 
443.348 

8.27 
300.695 

2.15 
572.525 

4.00 
353.623 

2.38 
49.766 

0.33 
670.276 

4.38 

D 950.963 

D5.97 



ToUl 



50.830 173 
162.468.920 
229.585.272 
331,243.631 
603.788.366 
637.998.818 
654.400.168 
673.843.320 
682.341.010 
682.736.966 
730.902.968 
720.150.378 
723.061.028 
725.383.908 
763.140.739 
805.619.547 
843.539.783 
901.443.411 
916.205.060 
918.752.140 
944.591.608 
860.165.633 
869.997.143 
875.678.033 
941,420.788 



101.633.747 

199.95 

77,121.352 

60.58 
101.658.259 

44.28 
272.644.835 

82.28 
150,352.373 

26.30 
178.380.049 

23.36 



2.322.875 

0.32 

37.756.836 

5.21 

42.478.808 

5.57 

37,920.236 

4.71 

57,003.628 

6.06 

14,761.649 

1.64 

2,647.080 

0.28 

26.839.549 

2.81 

D 84,426.065 

D8.94 

9,831.610 

1.14 

5.680.890 

0.66 

66.742.756 

7.51 



^OT footnotet, tee cloee of table. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



190 PUBUC SbBVICB COIOCISSION — PiBST DiSTBICT 

TABLB X. Growth of dty traiwit in New Tork City i aiaoe x86o: 



•60-70.. 



•70-*80.. 



Percent., 



•80-'00.. 



Percent. 



•OO-'OO. 



Percent. 



•OO-'IO. . 



Percent.. 



•lO-'20 



Percent. 



Percent. 



1000. 
1010.. 



Percent. 



1011. 
1012.. 



Percent. 



Per cent. . 



1013. 
1014.. 



Percent. 



Percent. 



1015.. 
1016. 



1017.. 
1018. 



Percent.. 



Percent.. 



Percent. 



Percent. 





Rapid Tranbit Railwatb 


YiabEndbd 
Juki 30 


Interborough 

Elevated 

diTifliqn 

(Manhattan 

Ry.kmat) 


diYiaion 


Brooklyn 


Total 

I.R.T. 

andB.R.T. 


Hudeoaft 
Manhattan' 


Total 


I860 














1870 














1880.. 


60.831J67 
189,974.848 
184. UH. 110 
lot 1, 04.^1. 741 
2]'-^ •'''.'■ ■\i& 
24 122 
2{ 06 
2e 30 
2! '64 
2J 173 
2C «4 
27 06 
M SO 
30j I.- «2 

304,1:, H41 

30iVNi.-.. 106 
811.47. .,68 
30lJ'kJ,517 
31;^ ■►4.;. 706 

3&-.u»,uyo 

348.188.600 
360.034.477 






60.S,11.757 
237 'I- V. |«0 
24 102 
21 188 
2^ 402 
3J ,64 
Se 00 
44 ..,731 
53 ■ ;:k.217 
5fl ' .K016 
63 --^,1^7 
6e ■■'■[ :587 
72 !06 
74 '16 
77 26 
8C 28 
83 06 
82 63 
8fl 83 
Oil 07 
1.0 48 

1,1;, -...i- ;40 
l,ajl,yla./45 




60.831.757 
237,906 0S9 


1800 




47.031,181 

«3.30(i,J47 
6S.M0.457 
80,357,132 
07.009.706 
109.140,111 
125.22! S31 
14A, 114.^.^1 

U:- ^ii: 117 

U 145 

le m 

U 128 

n ao 

17 , 12 

186.11^^1, ;3S 
182,535,S07 
207,im.^,{60 
22fi,51.'j 12 
2fi8,lt^7.;l3 

30fi,ft7ij roi 

37ft, 782, ti35 




1000 







842.564.689 
253 346 068 


1001 






1002 






284.588.808 
326 884 1S4 


1008. 






1004 


'72.72-2,800 
U7.&li(,(B2 
166,3^1,^11 
20n rv>.776 
23 146 
2fl il5 
27 ro6 
30 i56 

32 . ;io 

34^r,4L).i03 
846,585,740 
871,^5.318 
414.l9:?,y02 
418,337.666 
461.147.058 
58'3. 0^8,633 




383.848 900 


1006 




448,245.731 


1006 




620.938.817 
505.331.015 
634.938.879 


1007 




1008 


4,36.1.722 

H,vn:.\S2 

4i.^:'.*i.'l70 
v.^'. .134 
06 
160 
«0 
^4 
i34 
100 
108 

■ a5 

^1.' , ;£^j , S36 


1000 


677,033 739 


1010 


768,122 175 


1011 


798.281.850 
837.374.152 
868.438.097 


1012 


1013 


1014 


896,909 296 


1016 


8^.880,'577 


1016 


954,148^817 


1017 


1.058.646,196 
1.105;»14,«46 


1018 


1010 


1.304,206,264 


1030 


1.434,166,581 



DacwniiAL Ino 



1010. 


Percent 


10^ 


Percent 




Percent 



60,831.757 

120.143.001 

212.30 

D 5,810.738 

D3.06 

100.662.170 

50.55 

75,208.107 

25.6. 



D6.505.668 

D2.33 

1< .576.084 

6.36 

7,623,012 

2.50 

2.821,540 

0.04 

2.574.165 

0.85 

4.628.562 

1.51 

DO.681.051 

D3.11 

10.454,270 

3.46 

37.133,207 

11.80 

3,280.576 

0.04 

D 4.472,060 

D1.27 

20,845,877 

5.00 



268.062.115 

317,136,518 
117.01 



47,031,181 

10.460.401 
21.84 

104,003,210 
178.24 

214.288.834 
131.88 



60.831.757 

177,074,272 

201.00 

4.668.663 

1 06 

482.717.504 

100.01 

606.633.540 

83.64 



42,830,070 

40,410,857 
115.34 



00.831,757 

177.074^272 

281.09 

4.668.663 

1 96 

526.557,483 

216.67 

656.044.406 

85.41 



37,000,370 


871.028 


32.265.730 


18.05 


0.50 


5.12 


30.531.060 


14.332.766 


62.440.800 


12.81 


0.67 


0.42 


7,742.681 


4.877,527 


20.243,220 


2.88 


3.00 


2.70 


26.260.069 


4.823.031 


33.014.510 


0.40 


2.88 


4.55 


24.407.654 


3.051.283 


30.123.102 


8.00 


1.77 


3.86 


12.041.503 


0,814.223 


27,384,378 


3.05 


5.60 


3.38 


5.172.646 


D 2,524,838 


D7.033.243 


1.52 


D1.36 


DO. 84 


25,010,560 


24.562,372 


60.036.220 


7.50 


13.46 


7.34 


42,688.674 


10.417.243 


00.230.214 


11.40 


0.38 


11.14 


4.143.674 


31.661.801 


30.076.051 


1.00 


13.07 


8.05 


42.800.302 


50.712.478 


80,040.801 


10.23 


10.64 


8.65 


124.051,575 


67.002.844 


213.700.206 


27.10 


21.08 


10.11 



0,828.630 

225.24 

28.647,627 

301.85 

0.016.455 

23.15 

5,177.702 

0.81 

035.843 

1.62 

1.181.821 

2.01 

D 1,085.476 

D1.81 

4.327.120 

7.34 

5.263.465 

8.82 

7.701.000 

11.37 

0.701.817 

12.71 

6.200.021 

7.21 



01.0 



43.094.360 

6.63 

18,436 

13.45 

80.150,675 

3.93 

30.002.302 

4.90 

31.068.845 

3-71 

28.666.189 

3.29 

D8.118.719 

DO. 91 

65.883.340 

7.34 

104.502.679 

10.96 

46.868.060 

4.43 

08.751.618 

8.93 

210.900.317 

18.26 



For footnotea, see cloee of table. 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



CA> 



^MP^K^TIVB SuMMAIirBSS OP TRANSPORTATION. STATISTICS 191 
:_^^_^^cated by number of r«r^«nae pMiencen — Coackad%d 



''fe^^SH" SUBFACl AMD 



"^ 






UtCLUDIIia BDD. A IgAltUg 



Number 









277,303,498 

642,(M9,877 

^ 75.W 
784.013.M8 

S2.73 

OE (D) Diooabb X 
34.588.0O6 

2.56 , 
100.197.Mft 

7.aa 
*n 

71.83*.74ft 

o*i.ry5.7«a 

g4,730.Ml 

^.^ 443,061 
«^' 14.01 



W.830J73 
lS2,4tia,l'2» 

S46,35:i.i)A8 
SSl.344.aoi 

1,000,767.483 
I-««,ttS4,yiO 
M30,9^.69fl 

1.313, 381, :t88 
1,35S, 00(^407 
J. 1^3.417. t>42 
^A3l,362.U14 
J,fiM,90i,3ft7 
;.«80.flia,tf3B 
K769,g7fj,iio« 

1.807,632,72? 

a*e75,jsj^7so 

?.07g,M4.2tt7 



10l,dS3.747 
,— IW.M 
137.953.109 

278,732.531 

277.203.498 
•« «-70 
084.900.866 

834.324.466 
64.49 1 



44.417,236 l 
8.27 
128,846.272 
9.19 
72,638.483 ', 
^ *-74 
77,012,688 

^,962.678 

6.29 
48.327,848 

1> 5.671,630 
D0.31 
91.102.889 
6.04 
20.076.614 
1.06 
66.609.660 
2.96 
104.432,608 
5.29 
286.643,072 
13.73 



48 
108 
163 
218 
246 
248 
2«6 
2e6 
274 
2S3 
301 
306 
306 
304 
321 
331 
340 



StetenUttKl 
•tMinroMis 



8«6 
348 

3«0 
3^ 
302 
376 



140 
4W 

4^ 

€M 

*» 
28 
13 
76 
30 
100 
31 



I> 1 

17 

« 
10 
3 

3 
12 
3 
8 

I>2 
12 

I> 1 

1 
14 

4 
4ft 
12 



63.641 

33^,706 
:}!J0,i51 
fl-&3U.3l8 
4,4ai<.506 
4.21J,303 
*/i:3fi.03O 
4.:tU2.868 
4,3Stl,182 
4,724.041 
A,l6Kli4 
5,y4l.ii96 
5, My, 116 
Ji, 237 ,373 
§,«HJ28 
6,21H.3I6 
0-4(^,636 
&,63tk:{36 

~MiAm 

B,:J7B,7T9 

*0, 208,002 

"io-m.5ii 
•u.on.cis8 



373.066 

429.07 

68.446 

16.87 

6.149,167 

1,676.10 

D2.009.812 

D32.il 

1,676.422 

36.49 

6.997,030 

116.33 



D 411.743 

D7.29 

777,666 

14.86 

303,388 

3.38 

243.319 

3.91 

174,701 

2.70 

342.790 

6.17 

D36.824 

D0.61 

619,764 

8.93 

816,713 

10.70 

•891.123 

M0.64 

"934,609 

•10.08 

•3,807.447 

•27.61 



Fifth Aiwnw 

CoMh 

ComiMuiy 



N a. 

t.^^7y,floa 

1.749.<i2l 
1,742,773 
LamV.043 

i.3is.3ao 

L. 214. 598 
IJS3.7S2 
a.&OUj04 
<JJfl6,n6 

S.8^.534 
11,27^.430 
i4.0&IK47l 
16.223.<>42 
2:.\E>'^0,764 
20.l!3.fi7fl 
30,488,447 
43.S5;i,7M 



N.R. 

nTr! 

36.347^ 
674.89 



1.866,623 

106.80 
3.606,871 

74.69 

D 307.803 

D4.88 

341.700 

6.70 

2.646,462 

40.16 
2.391.886 

26.92 
2.774,041 

24.60 
2,172,571 

16.46 
6.867.722 

36.11 
4.032.812 

18.26 
10.374.871 

39.73 
6.064.362 



Total of 
fonsgoing 



S87 

S44 

1,<NM 

1,»7J 

1,137 

l.;}23 
1.366 
1,411 

l,61fl 

178fi 
1.^1 

}M2. 

IM^. 
•2,010, 
•2,I2fl. 



,536,707 
,B7i,217 
>R13,U4 

1157. L36 
.044.586 
.317,639 

540.683 

264.319 
583,017 
n7,F)86 
7l4.ft42 
^7.378 
450, yi2 
Q2&,499 
521,723 
271,772 
BOa.267 
d;i7,266 
152,036 



877,669.019 
66.86 



46.861.014 

3.36 

132.318.698 

9.38 

72.634.068 

4.70 

77,697.667 

4.80 

91.682,786 

6.41 

46.062,634 

2.68 

D 2,833,413 

DO. 16 

93.896,224 

6.13 

26,760.049 

1.39 

•61,623.496 

•3.16 

■115,741,988 

^. •5 76 

294.614,781 

13.86 



YiAB Bin«D 
JmtM 30 




..'60-70 
...... Per eeat 

..70-'80 
Peroent 

. .'ao-'oo 

Peroent 

.•90-'00 

Peroent 

.*00-'10 

Peroent 

'10-*30 
Pereent 



..1909 

..Peroent 

..1910 

..Peroent 

..1911 

..Peroent 

..1913 

..Peroent 

..1913 

..Peroent 

..1914 

..Pttoent 

..1916 . 

. .Ptt oent 

..1916 

..Peroent 

..1917 

..Peroent 

..1918 

..Peroent 

..1919 

. .Per oent 

..1920 

..Peroent 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



192 Public Service Cobimission — Fibst District 

TABLB z. Growth of dty trandt in New York Cityi 



•60-'70.. 
•71)- '80.. 
•83- '00.. 
'00 '00.. 
•OO-'IO. 
•lO-'ll.. 
•11-12. 
•12-'13.. 
•13-'14.. 
•14-^15. 
•15-'16. 
•16-'17. 
•17-'18. 
'18-*10. 
•10-'20., 



I860.. 
1870.. 
1880.. 
1890.. 
1900.. 
1010.. 
1011.. 
1912.. 
1013.. 
1014.. 
1015. . 
1016.. 
1017.. 
1018.. 
1010.. 
1020.. 



•60-70.. 
•7(>-^80.. 
•80-'00.. 
•90-^00.. 
V00-*10.. 
•l(h'20.. 



Tear Ent»ii> 
JtmttSO 


Qramn Surpacb Riilwatb or — 




ImuBOBOuoH Rams Tkaksit 


MftobtttHa 


TlieBron»» 


Bnakija 


RkltiDciid 


Elevftted 

divWon 

(Manhattan 

Ry.UMor) 


Subway 

diviaon 

(Ci^ of Hew 

Yori leant)* 


1810 


11,963.677 ' 
6.74:1,013 
7,0&6,50a 
ID. 761, 792 
IS, 231 .226 
18.^.2SS 
10.092.821 
19,754.426 

20,318, lao 
2o,m.m 

10, SOT. 083 
26.286.073 
16.689.7&fi 
17.6$g,Sll 
17.088.797 
17.298.167 




tflos.iei 

>a.l63,^& 

«4, 150.280 

6,^^5,483 

» 10,4619,309 

tUfi,tl:?3,896 

1 1116,850.341 

"17.8M.S20 

ui8.i^2S.tt6£ 

i»19.lB2,M2 

"10,;)3b.fl9e 

■il0.7lrt*,585 

"20.149.166 

"19.212,252 

l0,Mi1.Wl 

Zi,7\Y2M2 








t8TO 


173,661 
I24,2ft4 
160.^78 
t,QD8,aB3 
3.SD6,58fl 
3,100.470 
3.348.522 
3.«01.4)BO 
3.M5.313 
4,032, l&fi 
4.i8l.«70 
a. 426. 24! 
3.»a4.4a3 

4.6^,830 


SU, Igg 
10.043 
14,142 
341.621 
584,272 
6i:i,4ll 
a4(K i7« 
tt7(>.3a7 
OAtB.373 
713.276 
741.767 
740.923 
762,395 
705, 9&2 
784,721 






IBiO 


$4,575,431 
0.498.742 
0.123.076 
14,684.845 
15.063.327 
15.203.210 
15.331.503 
15.562,365 
15.078,231 
15,600.001 
17.458,510 
17,620.570 
17,402.061 
18.440.572 




IMCh.^k .. 




1900 




ItU 

mi 


$13,435,535 
13.818.943 


1913 „,. 


15.120.810 


Ifli 


16,352.766 


iffi::::;::: 


16.996.704 


im., 


17.256,315 


ifit, 


18,550.565 


HIT ,. 


20,689.283 


IfIS 


20,898.226 


Sil::::::::: 

tm. 


23.043.701 
29.299,777 



4,7»0,.136 


72.661 


l..'ri»iJ.S34 


:u::;.490 


51.623 


1,1^5,J94 


3.70,'), ■289 


56.094 


l.2:jfj,l93 


7,4rMK^34 


827.704 


5,l»:2,in7 


.^.■;7.i*9 


1.798.506 


5,lrtr>.497 


^y,i,-M 


302,982 


l.2U'.,:i45 


im.mi 


238.952 


t+7i.K,^>88 


Ki,763 


342.568 


l,lU7.it36 


D 2^.^1166 


254.223 


■1-::\,M7 


D4'jh\jA0 


87,142 


1H1,166 


47.'^,Ljgo 


140.515 


^n:,H87 


D3,4!»o.ai8 


D655.720 


■■.'V.Km 


^'.^4.756 


438.102 


i) i^o.aH 


J86 


55.815 


328.679 


D:i'.iO.t330 


670.501 


4,162,021 


67.88 




70.70 


130.26 


10.00 


•103.02 


183.29 


6.51 


«330.26 


244.50 


21.48 


360.47 


281.83 


06.01 


564.14 


314.54 


181.00 


"651.51 


300.88 


188.47 


u 602.48 


303.16 


206.03 


"605.03 


300.70 


211.76 


"710JW 


300.76 


223.06 


"716.28 


305.46 


218.24 


"720.60 


306.00 


219.71 


"725.85 


304.76 


219.34 


"733.58 


301.02 


217.18 


"741.46 


204.31 


212.70 


"771.47 


293.32 


214.90 


770.05 


71.381 


10.00 


114.13 


44.03 


D3.49 


145.34 


61.21 


14.97 


21.21 


37.33 


75.43 


203.67 


32.71 


84.89 


87.37 


D 21.22 


38.00 


118.64 



11.188 

4.855 

D 1.001 

327.470 

242,651 

20.130 

32.767 

30,170 

22.016 

14.003 

28,401 

18,156 

2 472 

33,507 

D 10,271 



4.575.431 

4,023.311 

D 375.666 

5,561.760 

378,482 

130.883 

128.383 

230.772 

D 484.134 

521,860 

1.858.410 

162.060 

D 218.500 

1.047.511 



laereaae or 



13.435.535 

383.408 

1.310.876 

1.222.947 

645.938 

257.611 

1.204.250 

2.138,718 

208.943 

2.145.565 

6.255.986 



(C) Aa indicated 



7.50 






8.00 


70.35 
04.05 
100.50 
118.03 




10.10 




50.62 




65.63 


81.94 


65.63 


118.00 


85.31 


68.24 


118.00 


85.36 


65.08 


118.00 


85.34 


65.98 


117.08 


85.34 


65.78 


117.08 


87.87 


65.89 


120.64 


88.15 


65.80 


120.64 


136.62 


65.80 


134.32 


142.17 


65.80 


135.20 


105.13 


65.80 


135.18 


201.26 



7.60 
0.50 
2.10 
40.52 
6.01 
0.26 



Absolute Increase 



81.04 
110.32 



Per Cent Increase 



'60-'70 


105.16 
31.62 
33.40 
15.27 
11.61 

D6.75 


220.05 

351.16 

87.70 

18.14 


143 04 
74.05 
6.25 
56.50 
15.40 
18.10 


6.67 
26.25 
400.30 
10.08 
0.40 






•70-'80 


18.53 
16.52 
7.70 
14.53 




•80-'00 




•OO-'OO 




•oo-'io 




•10-'30 


145.62 



For footnotes, see dose of table. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Comparative Summaries op Transportation Statistics 193 

since z86o: (B) As indicated by ptMtnger rectipta 



BrooklTii 

Tl-AUAt 

elvnted* 




Total 9nam IUilwatb 














•team roads 


Fifth Avwue 
Coaeh Company 


TlAB 


AbttdBt« 


P^ 


JumSO 


fliviaoD 




uootmt 


«»pil»* 












a,jnm,s67 

15J.W1.560 
:M, 4: 1,196 
4:i.«nj:i.ii09 
7o,^>7::,728 


62.18 
6.08 
8.33 
10.90 
12.22 
15.94 


$15,672 
78.584 
79.167 
432.710 
323.518 
472.637 


N.R. 
N.E. 

VW3,tB0 


I860 






1870 






1880 


S2, 670.660 




1890 


^0 2,841.206 




1900 


118.128.308 


$2JV1,^ 


1910 


11 8,376.790 


2M-:,m 


7. .1,501, 134 


16.40 


487.407 


596, T87 


1911 


118.618.031 


3.10-3,794 


M,iV^4.799 


16.95 


501.455 


633,307 


1912 


"8,771.309 


3.44i*.:i90 


>i7Jirt,;{59 


17.46 


527.029 
546.564 


Sl^.453 


1918 


119,282.675 


3..ifHj,l77 


KU ,:it>i /m 


17.49 


l.u:,643 


1914 


119,126.796 


3.4i3,t59 


^y.T-ili.ilW 


17.09 


553.206 


1,41)5.047 


1915 


n 10.364.913 


3j>i^l.252 


y: 1,171), ^16 


17.65 


591.666 


l.fl-i2.l^04 


1916 


1111.380,420 


3,11^7,1^12 


■i4.5.KM^16 


U.62 


660.988 


a.9)H.tl(76 


1917 


11 12.913.010 


4.;kh,822 


'^:.;i'-4,225 


17.87 


* 821.574 


2.flU,:!58 


1918 


16.448.639 


5,2ti8,714 


lija,20tJ,l73 


18.64 


>939.466 


3.64H.H45 


1919 


18,842.994 


5,*ijr.y35 


U^>Sail<057 


21.15 


M.169.248 


4,255,1:71 


1920 



D) I>eore 



2.570.660 

270.645 

6.287.103 

247.491 

242.222 

163.288 

401.360 

D 136.880 

1,228.118 

976.513 

1.682.590 

2.636.623 

3.394.356 



by miles ct timck 



2.141.999 
495.823 
525,972 
284.596 
59.787 
D 76.018 
229.093 
286.360 
387.210 
033.892 
539.221 



111.33 
110.73 
» 160.10 
u 169.43 
1* 170.81 
"173.72 
" 176.55 
u 196.49 
"221.51 
"231.06 
» 244.76 
i« 236.46 
244.06 

(D) Deereaae 



111.33 

DO. 60 

68.37 

74.96 



or (D) J 



D0.54 
62.71 
44.33 



13.08 
17.54 
18.77 
18.77 
18.77 
18.77 
18.77 
18.77 
18.77 
18.77 
18.77 



18.08 
5.69 



43.50 



0,425,019 


3.90 


6,<4a.993 


2.25 


VUmj'M 


2.57 


n.^^iAiz 


1.32 


.i:i,^j70,119 


8.72 


:t..^S!5.J06 


0.46 


4,12^865 


0.55 


4.o:.i:j.^ 


0.51 


L*iS2/J03 


0.(}3 


Diri,250 


DO. 40 


4.393,204 


0.56 


1.374.700 


D0.03 


2.843,309 


0.25 


5.814.948 


0.77 


15.677.784 


2.51 



147.67 


•12.57 


350.68 


23.73 


616.41 


32.24 


841.93 


32.29 


1,222.82 


35.58 


1.595.73 


33.48 


1.646.74 


33.94 


1.666.30 


33.75 


1.684.65 


33.54 


1.705.62 


33.39 


1.730.28 


33.31 


1.775.61 


33.63 


1.839.66 


34.29 


1.866.47 


34.25 


1.930.01 


34.87 


1.943.43 


34.58 



203.01 


11.16 


265.73 


8.51 


225.52 


0.05 


380.89 


3.29 


372.91 


D2.10 


3.47.70 


1.10 



137.48 
75.78 
36.59 
45.24 
30.50 
21.79 



89 



10 

D6 

3 



2.48 
203.07 
35.60 
45.19 
34.71 



62.912 




•6a-'70 


583 




70-'80 


353.543 




'80-'90 


D 109.192 


rr. 


•90-'00 


149.119 


N.R. 


'00-*10 


14.T70 


t)3,383 


'lO-'ll 


14.048 


:U;i70 


*11-*12 


25.574 


354,546 


•12-'13 


19.535 


339.190 


•13-'14 


6.642 


277,404 


•14-'15 


38.460 


317,357 


•15-'16 


69,322 


5^5,772 


•16-'17 


•160.586 


4<Hi,382 


•17-18 


•117,892 


Li>;i7,487 


•18-'19 


•229.782 


609,426 


•l9-*20 


13.33 




1860 


13.83 




1870 


13.66 




1880 


41.40 




1890 


56.14 




1900 


81.51 




1910 


84.48 




1911 


89.04 




1912 


89.04 




1918 


93.25 




1914 


94.06 




1915 


96.79 




1916 


102.07 




1917 


•108.75 




1918 


• 109.74 




1919 


•109.80 




1920 






'60-70 


0.33 




70-'80 


27.74 




'80-'90 


14.74 




'OO-'OO 


25.37 




'00-' 10 


28.29 




'10-'30 



'60-'70 
70-'80 
'80-'90 
'90-'00 
'OO-'IO 
'ia-'20 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



194 



Public Sbbvice Commission — Fibst District 

TABLB X. Ofowth of dty transit in New Toric City t since i860: 





Smnr SoBrici Railyats or — 


ImiBBOBOuaH Hapid Tbaiwit 


JunbSO 


ManhattsD 


TheBrooz* 


Brooklyn 
udQoeeos 


Biohmoiid 


EI«yKt«l 

di virion 

(Manhattan 

Ry.lMMT) 


BobiTBy 

diviflion 
(City of New 
YarklesMr)* 


1360. . .. 


453 
1.075 
1.562 
2.365 
3.524 
3.105 
3.495 
3.406 
3.243 
3.263 
3.155 
3.121 
3.145 
2.932 
2,932 
2.632 




209 
•603 
« 1.524 
2.684 
3.783 
3.368 
3.438 
3.455 
3.463 
3.504 
3.548 
3.553 
3.553 
3.510 
3.508 
3.795 








1870 


17 
35 
76 
433 
036 
495 
551 
690 
746 
776 
740 
721 
681 
682 
713 


8 
13 
22 
168 
193 
193 
193 
193 
192 
224 
224 
220 
220 
215 
152 






1880 


542 
947 
1.122 
1.667 
1.748 
1,782 
1.781 
1.780 
1.775 
1.880 
2.249 
2.248 
2.217 
2.213 




1890 




1900 




1910 


017 


1911 


1.130 


1912 


1.144 


1913 


1.144 


1914 


1.143 


1915 


1.152 


1916 


1.520 


1917 


1,241 


1918 


1.584 


1919 


1.806 


1920 


1.816 



•60-70 


622 


70-'80 


487 


80-'90 


803 


'90-'00 


1.159 


•oo-'io 


D329 


'lO-'U 


300 


•11-'12 


D89 


•12-'13 


D163 


•13-'14 


20 


•14-'15 


D108 


15-'16. 


D34 


•1^*17 


24 


•17-'18. 


D213 


18-'19 




'l»-'20 


bsoo 



17 

18 

41 

857 

503 

D441 

56 

139 

56 

30 

D36 

D19 

D40 

1 

31 



394 

921 

1.160 

1.099 

D415 

70 

17 

8 

131 

D46 

5 



D43 
D2 
287 



8 

5 

9 

146 



Dl 

32 



D4 



D5 
D63 



542 

405 

175 

545 

81 

34 

Dl 

Dl 

D5 

105 

309 

Dl 

D31 

D4 



ASOOLCTS 



017 

213 

14 

' Di 

8 

369 

D279 

343 

222 

10 



*60-70 


137.31 
45.30 
51.41 
40.01 
D0.34 
D 17.62 


105.88 
117.14 
469.74 
116.17 
D23.82 


188.52 

152.'.4 

76.12 

40.95 

D 11.97 

12.68 


62.50 

69.23 

663.64 

14.88 

D21.24 




PaMCmm 


'70-'80 


74.72 
18.48 
48.57 
32.75 




•80-*90 




•OO-'OO 




'OO-'IO 




•10-'20 


08.04 



> Present corporate limits. Tlie table includes all operating oompames and all tlieir lessor 
companies now reporting to the Public Service Commission for the First District, and all prede- 
cesBors of such companies. 

• Includes the Westchester Electric. 

• Brooldyn surface includes 404,739 passengers, $63,541 passenger receipts. 17.50 miles of track 
and 34 cars, returned by roads primaruy engaged in shore^esort traffic, which roads in later years 
became part of the B. R. T. devated division, and the statistios of which from 1890 on are included 
with those for tliat division. 

« Brooklyn surface includes 1.061.078 passengers. $266,344 passenger receipts, 41.26 znilee of 
track and 104 cars of the steam roads described in preceding note. 

•The 701,072 psasengere carried by the New York A North Shore in 1910. when this road's 
operation witliin the city limits had not yet begun, are disregarded in this table. 

• Opened Oct. 27. 1904. 
' Opened Feb. 26. 1908. 

•The 1918. 1919 and 1920 figures for the Staten Island steam roads are for the oaloidar year. 

• Mileage ratios are per 100.000 population. See aiso t- 

10 The receipts for 1900 for the B. R. T. system have been divided between the streetp«urface 
and elevated divisions on the basts of an estimated proportion of 76 per cent for the fonner and 
26 per cent for the latter. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Comparative Summaries of Ttansportation Statistics 

As iiuiicated by number of ptuenger cars owned or leaBod 



195 



Sroddya 

Rapid 

Trandt 

9ieyated- 

diTuioD 



4Q1 

667 

9%8 

928 

928 

934 

961 

1.029 

1,164 

1.228 

1,876 

1.417 

1,614 



OB (D) D» 



HudM>n& 



140 
190 
226 
226 
226 
226 
226 
226 
226 
226 
226 



Total 



RilLYATB 



Ahiohito 
number 



662 

1.703 

8.676 

6,686 

9,687 

11,344 

11.617 

11.686 

11.674 

11,896 

11.886 

12,418 

12.583 

12,776 

13,003 

18,061 



Fbr 
100,000 
popub. 

tiont 



66 
116 
192 
263 
282 
238 
289 
237 
232 
233 
229 
236 
236 
284 
236 
282 



Statu labnd 
steam roads 



491 
166 
271 



6 
17 
78 

126 
74 

147 
42 
97 



140 
60 
36 



1,041 


69 


1,973 


77 


2,909 


61 


8.102 


27 


1.667 


D44 


273 


1 


68 


D2 


Dll 


D6 


221 


1 


DlO 


D4 


633 


6 


166 




193 


Dl 


227 


1 


68 


D3 



6 

8 

10 

64 

101 
93 
93 
91 
91 
91 
91 
91 
91 

•91 

•91 



2 
2 

64 

37 

D8 



FifthAvenuA \ 15St> 




D2 



I> 11 
19 

1 
24 
20 

8 
1> 1 



l«fiO 
1«70 
\«BO 

IHQO 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1013 

1914 

1916 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 



•60-'70 
•70-'8a 
•80-'9o 

•00-lS 

•l^'J^ 

•13-.»J^ 



WOLAtM OB (D) DbCBUJB 



38.81 
41.26 
63.16 



61.43 



167.26 


106 


16.86 


67 


79.13 


32 


47.11 


11 


17.11 


D16 


16.14 


D3 



33.33 

26.00 

640.00 

67.81 

D7.92 

D2.16 



The 1010-1015 figuroB differ slichtly from those shown in Reports prior to 1910, t>eoau8e ^^ 
Dse in the basis of approximation. The fisures formerly used, included under B. R> ^^ • f'®!^-! 
N. Y. Coiwolidated (or predeoeesore) and the South Brooklyn roads. They now ji^^lude ^^ 
IT. Ckmsolidated or predeceasora (except Sea Beach surface), the Culver elevAted of tne Sc^^^,^^_, 
Dklyn (which line reported considerably more than one-half of the toted Soutb •B'^Vilj^:^^ 
ipts) and the West ^d line of the Nassau Electric " elevated '*. The latter bne was tr^;^i»^^^ 
ed to the surface division after June 24. 1016. In 1018 the elevated division also molnded^^^^^^ 




ion's Point " elevated " of the South Brooklyn. . , 

The division of the trackage of the B. R. T. system between street surface »na, efevBte^ 

• kte. The 1010 to 1016 ficuies for the elevated include the New York Cqnsohdijl^ :^_^ 
I) , the South Brooklyn, and the West End line of the Nassau. The latter la ezcli«^|^^^ 

,u Eleetrio was 



rl916.. 
Operation of 



elevated " trains over track of West End line of the Na 



izkued and of surf aoe cars bccun on June 24, 1016. This traok'is ixMduded ^^. *^^ ^*^^^!^^ 



f June 30, 1016. while passenger receipts on this Une, up to June 24. 1010. are included 

ated receipta. 

See general note to Table 7, F. 

Leas than 4 of 1 per cent. 

Fisurea suheequent to 1010 revised on basis of 1020 census. 

Fox 1001 to 1006. see 1017 Report. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



196 



Public Service Cobcmission — First District 



TABLS 2. HBW YORK CXTT FBRRT 

(FScures were aubatantiAUy all obtained from the United States Steamboat Inspection Service 
to which the companies report, and embrace all |MiaBen£er traffic except a relatively inooneiderable 
amount on ferries plyins from Staten Island to New Jersey or from Brooklyn to the Rockaway 
peninsula, and the Twin City Ferry (See note 0). Also omitted are several city-owned or gov- 
emment-owned ferries plying to small islands in the harbor, since no fare is charsed, and no record 
of passengers kept. Begmmng with the opening of the first H. A M. tubes in 1006. the figures for 
the Lackawanna ferries and the aggregates into which they enter have probably been increasuigly 

Bmrmi UmHAnAx 



Taut BiTDBD Juira 30 — 
1908' 


N. y. ft PAT 
Hoboken . — 
Ferry Co. 

R.R.)» 1 
41.500.000 


onia vkbbt CO. (aaa ajL) 

Actual 

rioket sales' ^'w^S? 
m:m^^i7\ 18,882,724 
lyJTLnuS 18.455,455 
lfl.75a,151 10,691,632 
H.5«5,2fll 9.208.671 
2 J, toy, 052 9.659,582 
17,i&n,;m2 10.229,871 
21,692,0$5 10,853.610 
2L,4»7.a&a 9.609.993 
21.9^3,735 9.556.915 
22,i>7l,«&J 9.322.393 
i2,2:UMm 8,417.766 
2341'^^ t^yf 8.360.538 
IN. E.1 9.612,235 


Pennsylvania 

ferries « 
34.945.175 
33.335,522 
24,482.566 
17.965.857 
12.354.779 
9.651.020 
8,730,985 
8,185,894 
7.463,379 
6.981.139 
5.790.192 
5.182.386 
5.984.537 

mkltn 


Cent^J^R. 
ferries* 
14.018.406 


1909 

1910 


... 39.000.000 
37.900.000 


13.5S7.179 
14,400.427 


1911 

1912 

1918 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 


36.480.000 
... 36.480,000 
... 37,700,000 
... 37.340,000 

36,570,000 
... 36.290,000 

36.154.320 


14.259.020 
14.824.101 
15.143,834 
14.794.610 
14.299.766 
15,152,S33 
15,700,130 


1918 

1919 


... 37.360.000 
37.459.023 


16,051.445 
15.030.S49 


1920 


40.687.649 


17.376,911 




BiTWiBN Manhattan and B« 




YlAB ElfDBD JUMl 30 — 

1908'.. ., 

1009 


B'Uyn 
AManh. 
Ferry Co. 

Thdoa Bldyn 
Ferry Co.w ferries) » 
24.942.347 13,756,772 

16.320.706 9.217.463 
14,134,089 7,158.2^ 

12.723.707 7,537.239 
9,356.528 8.331.348 
7.716.972 6.950.038 
7.130.275 6.703.541 
6.489,649 7.254.058 
6.679.953 6.346,472 
6.697.066 4.930,225 
6.536.159 4.929.948 
6.399,749 3,619.629 
7.422.593 3.034.212 


Nassau 

Ferry Co. 

(E. Houston 

St) 

811.289 
, 1.299.000 
1.825.000 
1.784.000 
1.385.000 
1.830.000 
1,830,000 
1,449.286 
1.143,954 
1.105.656 
853.894 

a—. —.^=^ = 


Municipal 
ferry (to 
39th street. 
Brooklyn) 
1,847,041 
1,293.350 
1.602.181 
1.536,798 
1,524,717 
1,609.266 
1.946,327 
1.892,410 
1,365,219 
1,226,816 
1,118.380 
949.232 
1.004.726 


Total 
41.857.449 
28.130.528 


1910 


24,619.492 


1911 


28,581.744 


1912 


20.597.593 


1918 


18.106.275 


1914, 


17.610.143 


1915 


17.065.403 


1916 


15.535.598 


1917 


13.950.763 


191g 


13.438.381 


1919 


10,968,610 


1920 


11.461,530 



1 Close estimates, based on the sale of local-ferry and N. Y. railroad tickets, operating conditions 
not permitting an exact record. Apparently the estimated element is an allowance alone for com- 
muters not using their full train privileges. See also headnote. In all years of table, three lines 

* The figures in this column, which do not enter into totals, represent all Erie passengers entitled 
to ferry transportation; the following coliunn shows approximately the number actually using the 

sThe figures for 1008 and lOOO are close estimates. Two lines operated in all yean of table. 
« Sinoenscal year 1911. two Unes operated. Previously, four. 

* At least two lines operated in all years of table. For several years the West Shore has operated 
a third line (the 42d Si-West New York). 

• Differences from figures previously published are due to either earlier use of ticket sales for the 
Erie traffic, or omission here of the Twin City Ferry traffic, or both. 

7 With the exception of the Municipal Ferry figxires. the first six months of fiscal 1908 are esti- 
mated by dividing the known figures for calendar 1007 in the same proportion as held for the two 
tiz-months periods of calendar 1908. 

• May have been in operation before 1915. but no data are available. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



COMPABATIVE SXTMMARIES OF TrANSPOBTATION STATISTICS 197 

PASSBNGBR TRATVIC, zgo^-xpao 

inaeeavMto m indatd by the inereMins diierepMioy between the Erie ticket salei and aotoal pes- 
aeagBn owriea. The Laokawanna " has mode no estimate of the number of their raiboad paieen- 
sen (whoee tioketa entitle them to ferriaffej that use the H. A M. tub« instead of the ferry." It 
** * that subsequent to 1913, less than one-half of the Lackawanna's N. Y. City train 
led their terry privilege. For ferry data prior to 1008. and for the numerous ferries 
prior to 1916, see Btlrotp&ct of Nn - .... ^ 



Annnal Beport for 1916. y. II. p. 33 ff.J 
AMD Nav JnoR 



vstp York hvbor ferry traffic in this Commission's 



Westfibore BiTwside 

fjomes* 4FortLee DydcasuiSt 

(K. T. Ceoteal Feny Co. t Englewood 

B.iL) (W. 130th St.) Ferry Co. Total* 

8.8S3.495 8.531,790 122.801.520 

0.066.662 3.055.726 117.342,544 

10.110.140 4.671.314 102.156.088 

10.652.792 4,625,124 03.102.364 

11.753.424 4,855.436 80.427.322 

13.168.507 5.108.584 01.001.825 

U.887.553 5,100.360 00.806.118 

13.561.256 5.500.434 MO.IOS 87.826.526 

14.618.560 6.242.247 301.375 80.624.718 

15.414.406 6.858.527 311.352 00.751.267 

17.510.123 8.215.540 208.556 03.652.622 

16.824.067 0.032.377 535.006 02.425.638 

13.605.707 0.224.340 670.871 102.252.340 



ftRfehmond Brooklyn * 

(monicipal Riohmond 

feny) Fenry Co. 

10.804.823 

10,450.418 

11,381.327 

11,017.810 

12,206.571 

12.784.886 

13.482.480 

14,107.866 • 104.061 

15.364.330 N.R. 

16.435.704 N. R. 

18.502.412 •383.482 

18,306.456 U072.122 

10.471.584 » 1.062.671 



BiTVBn MAmAmv oa tbi Bbohz un Qcmcs" 



R.R. 



20.216.105 
17.968,868 
14,425.075 
8^911.204 
6.296.228 
5.088.511 
4.160.564 
8.5M.826 
2.268.707 
1.606.576 
1.69B.530 
1.580.268 
1.381.328 



New York 
4EM 

Rmr 
Ferry Co. 
(B.02dSt) 
5.860.185 
6.253.000 
4.687.200 
3.713,000 
3.348<0M 
S.24M85 
3,088.810 
3.860.430 
3.785.713 
3.834.068 
1,754.838 



NewYock 
ACoUege 
Point 
Ferry Co." 

725.208 
623.241 
632.086 
560.860 
402.185 
426,640 
430.006 
367.800 
310.430 
270.173 
36.518 
u 10,021 



Total* 
26.840.678 
24.820.100 
10.746.161 
13.225.073 
10,006.432 
8.714.076 
7.570.300 
6.771.574 
5.364,858 
5.100.717 
3.450.800 
1.570.180 
1.321.328 



Grand total* 

201.303.070 

180.761,500 

157,803,068 

141.016,000 

132.417,018 

130,607.062 

120.478.050 

125.085,410 

125.880.513 

126.247,451 

120.517.787 

124.333,015 

135.550.403 



Ayorafe 
per day* 
550.257 
405.287 
432.337 
388.814 
361.708 
357.828 
354,784 
345.166 
843,060 
345.883 
354.843 
840,638 
370.381 



Nvmbsr* fWeent* 



D 30,632.371 

022.058,531 

D 15.886,078 

D 0,400.072 

D 1,810.866 

D 1.120,003 

D 8,403,640 

D 05.807 

357.038 

3,270,386 

D 5.184,772 

11.226.388 



D 10.24 

D 12.70 

D 10.07 

D 6.60 

D 1.87 

D 0.86 

D 3.70 

D 0.08 

0.28 

2.50 

D 4.00 

0.03 



* Foot paesengen only. 

" Indodes passengers in yehides. 

u Not induded is the trafllo of Twin City Ferry Co.. which for several years operated in a 

fron Clsson Point to Collece Fbint The reported number of passengers on this ferry was 85,777 

is 1915; 21.449 in 1916; and 11.968 in 1917. 

^JFhnn Whitehah st. to Hamilton and At antic aves. and from Fulton st, liianh., to Fulton st., 

"After June 1, 1918. only the ferry from E. 23d st. to Qreenpoint ave.. the line from Booaeveli 
it to Broadway. Brooklyn, having dosed down. The predeoessor company operated neariy all 
the Ian fleet of femr-boats formerly plying the East river north of Fulton ferry and south of the 
LoQlUsod's 34th fittreet ferry. 
"Aior to 191S. from K 99th and from E. 134th st. to College Point, and in summer only, to 
Horth Beach. In 1918 only to College Point 
"Mot in operation. The N. Y. A E. R. although not dosing down until December 28. 1918, 

cBd not report the paaMOgers carried after June 30, 1918. This ferry was restored by the munid- 

pOty, SeSmtb^ 27/1020. 
^fk«n to November 9, 1918, when operation oeaeed. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



198 



Public Servicb Commission — First District 



TABLB 3. commutation TRAVEL TO HBW TORK Cmr, 1900-1917 

on 60-trip monthly oommutataon tickets. nnksB otharwiM atated. The index number 
the Telative inoreeae in t»vel over the yearly arerage in 1000-1902 taken as 100.) 

(A) Nbw Yobs IUilboass 



























irawTOEX CB!rnui.R. b. 






LONG ISLAND RAIIAOAD (e 




X. B. 












Total trips 


















in and out 






Total Average 




Total 


Average 




of Grand 






ticket 


per 


Index 


ticket 


per 


Index 


Central 


Index 


Ykab 


salee 


month 


number 


sales 


month 


number 


Termina 1 


number 


1900.. 


Est. av. 
50.000 






82,681 


6.800 


91.02 


2.132.774 


93.56 


1901.. 


4.167 


100.00 


91.987 


7.666 


101.27 


2.278.918 


99.97 


1902.. 






97.830 


8.153 


100.70 


2.427.196 


106.47 


1903.. 








101,750 


8.479 


112.01 


2.576.902 


113.04 


1904.. 








107,083 


8,924 


117.89 


2.673.225 


117.27 


1905.. 


76,644 


6.387 


153.28 


120.627 


10,052 


132.79 


2.930.864 


128.57 


1906.. 


88.794 


7.399 


177.56 


130.286 


10,857 


143.42 


3.185.103 


139.72 


1907.. 


106.208 


8.851 


212.41 


116.034 


9.670 


127.74 


3.479.124 


152.62 


1908.. 


108.429 


9.036 


216.85 


106,565 


8.880 


117.31 


3.876.100 


170.03 


1900.. 


125.873 


10.489 


251.72 


119.077 


9.923 


131.08 


4.198.690 


184.18 


1910. . 


142,427 


11.869 


284.83 


124.441 


10.370 


136.99 


4.211.936 


184.76 


1911.. 


162.318 


13.626 


324.60 


129.253 


10.771 


142.29 


4.083,417 


179. IS 


1912.. 


182.046 


15.170 


364.05 


141.475 


11.790 


155.75 


4.003.954 


175.64 


1913.. 


203.886 


16.990 


407.73 


154,851 


12.904 


170.46 


3,892,380 


170.75 


1914.. 


216.728 


18.060 


433.41 


161,980 


13.498 


178.31 


3.983.610 


174.75 


1916.. 


226.391 


18.866 


452.75 


100.145 


14,095 


186.20 


4.199.425 


184.22 


1916.. 


254,803 


21.233 


600.55 


191.671 


15,973 


211.00 


14.084.861 


195.48 


1917.. 


275.712 


22,976 


551.37 


200.348 


16.696 220.55 


4.741.536 


208.00 




(B) NewJbbskt 






CBNTBAL RAILBOAD OF 


■Rxa 


LBHIOH 


DBLAWABB. LACICA- 




N«W JBBSKT 




BAILBOAD 






1900.. 


62,011 


4.334 


97.17 




6.631.060 


02.54 


1901.. 


63.632 


4.469 


100.20 








7.441.602 


99.66 


1902.. 


64.934 


4,578 


102.65 








7.724.360 


107.80 


1903.. 


67,680 


4,807 


107.78 








8.302.130 


115.86 


1904.. 


61.619 


6.135 


113.13 








8.838.880 


123.35 


1905.. 


67.169 


6.507 


125.49 








9.554.024 


133.33 


1906.. 


78.033 


6.503 


145.81 








10.653.196 


147.27 


1907.. 


85.383 


7.115 


159.53 


Total 




Total 


11.649.552 


161.18 


1908.. 


86.547 


7.212 


161.70 


ticket 




Ucket 


12.236.124 


170.76 


1909.. 


90.334 


7.628 


168.79 


saleb 




sales 


13.522.012 


188.70 


1910.. 


90.369 


7.631 


168.86 


234.849 


1.401 


13.855.340 


193.35 


1911.. 


92.586 


7.715 


172.98 


239.188 


1,295 


13,102.460 


182.85 


1912.. 


94.650 


7.888 


176.86 


245.685 


1.313 


12,767,120 


178.17 


1913.. 


96.474 


8.039 


180.25 


251.900 


1.281 


12,837,760 


179.66 


1914.. 


92,208 


8.184 


183.50 


254.307 


1.256 


12.774.670 


178.28 


1915.. 


09.946 


8.329 


186.76 


257.000 


1.278 


12.847,490 


179.29 


1916.. 


106,199 


8.850 


198.43 


1247,120 » 


1.145 


13,384,720 


186.29 



> For 11 months. 

s ** Number of passengers carried between New York city and points in New Jersey as oomxmtad 
from 10. 46. 50. and 60 trip tickets sold." 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



CO 



H^pARA^XM-VTB SUMMARIES OP TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS 199 






TRAVEL ON LONG ISLAND AND 8TATBN ISLAND: (A) Pas- 
;er-car mileB in pfttsenger trains of the Lone Island Railroad, xpia- 



^pfipJ^*^*^ 30 



Sg:-.--.. ■--• 



Monthlj' 
oomroutation 
tickets 
within 
New York ^ 
city 
limits! 
84.213 
96.844 
109.939 
114.571 
122.761 
142,810 
143.272 
167.236 
236,187 



I. Passbngkbs 



Passbnokbs 



Commuter 

11.126,984 
12.030.876 
13.051,627 
13.648.675 
14,707.874 
16,549.170 
18,565,644 
21,937.212 
26,273,989 



Local 
electric* 
7,017,651 
8.374,064 
7.924,039 
7.899.202 
8.381.082 
8.864,904 
9.122.213 
8.304.976 
10.285.202 



All other 
17,619.607 
18.794.550 
20,276.828 
20.794,376 
20.817.240 
22.271.938 
26.619,064 
26.388.253 
28,710.605 



Total 



II. PASBBNaCR-CAR MXLBAOB * 



SiBAii Trains 






3^rN»30— < 



ki^""/.- 



Passenger 
10.624,007 
9.966.314 
9,150,094 
8.209,469 
8,470.749 
8.855.744 
10.674.366 
10.229.710 
10.633.632 



Parlor 
761,144 
694,859 
639,691 
627,072 
660,137 
696,644 
630,002 
304.868 
681.850 



Motor 

trains — 

passenger < Trolley 

8.518.815 

8,903.009 
10.454.515 
10.788.287 
11,334.096 
12.108.487 
13,106.666 
13.856.223 
16.148.261 



9.627 
12.868 
13,318 
13,096 
14,968 
27.699 
33,972 
42,203 



Local 
eleotrio * 
1,287,020 
2,059,334 
2,249, 50B 
2.440, 37S 
2,545,081 
2,632. Oe7 
2,678. e08 
2,397.580 
2.581.433 



2\, 







5.649.116 
6.237,373 
6.014,928 
6.218.316 
6.461,635 
6.636,336 
6.979.126 
6,943.302 
7.663,066 
8.378.779 
9,269.902 
10,204,511 
13.011.958 



Pl 

37.50O, 
34,274, 
38.045 

.;i'i , «3 1 

-\i s\:->& 
1 \ VH >5 

WA . 7 1 T 

If .V^3 
M..V.>4 
6t>,6l4 



.310 
.324 
,21T 
.441 
,011 
.514 
.724 
l025 
.076 
133 
,069 1 



472, o; 

501. f^^^5 ^5 

Its :^*::i.^ * :2» 



PER CENT UCCRBA8X OR (d) 



D30.17 
14.81 



1S}?:IS}J::::::::::::::::::::: vi.ii 

I9t3-U;13 

l9H-nH5 

loi^tjae 

I9lft-U'l7 

1917-1918 

l9lMfll9 

191B-1920 




I pfcures represent approximately twelve times the number of intraeity commuters. 
> Traffic from Flatbush Avenue terminal, via Jamaica, to Queens as limit on one branch, and 
VaUav Stream on another, at a straight 5-cent or 10-oent fare. ' . 

sEzdusive of mileage in mixed and special trains (relatively inooniiderabie except durins the 

• Ftooi 19l^> includes an inconsiderable number of parlor-oar miles, 

• Includes chartered-car miles, an inconsiderable item. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



200 



PuBUC SsBVicE Commission — First District 



TABIDS. MOTOR omnibus OPERATIONS: (A) TniBc of Fifth ATwiue Coach Comiway 



Lensth 

of routes 

Ybab Endbd operated 

June 30 — (mileB)' 

1909 ,. N.R. 

1910 :. 18.76 

1911 18.76 

1912 19.16 

1913 19.16 

1914 19.16 

1916 19.20 

1916 19.20 

1917 22.62 

1918 24.77 

1919 24.77 

1920 24.77 



Number 
of 



190^1920 



omni- 

bU8M 

61 
61 
80 
81 
«105 
126 
138 
132 
176 
239 
279 
271 



4 
2 
5 
6 
8 
33 
36 
49 
50 
61 



Non- 
revenue ear 
Tehielee milea * 



796, »76 
1.320.432 
1.354.391 
1.440,841 
2.176,790 
2.919.110 
4.113,625 
4,966,995 
5,843.052 
7,740,826 
8.022.026 
8,758.493 



hours* 

112.096 
177.832 
178,076 
188,621 
275,675 
363.513 
478,516 
585,289 
718.050 
946,576 
1,002,006 
1.099.851 



Number 
of revenue 

paoBengers TraoBfeiv 

3.609,304 

6,3a'i,175 

6.997.372 

6.339.072 

8.884.534 «44i>.573 

11.276.430 353,578 

14.050.471 620,429 

16,223.042 793,750 

22,080,764 863.381 

26.113.676 1.437.865 

36,488,447 2.034.005 

42,552.709 2.541.413 



(B) Accidents; employees and wages, Fifth Avenue Coach Company, 1909-1930 



Ykar 
Ekded 

Junk 30 — 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1916 

1916 

J917 

1918 

1019 

1920 



AcciDBim 



Persons 
killed 

3 

1 

i 

1 
3 
4 
5 
5 
1 
4 



injured 
9 
26 
. 34 
21 
28 
13 
15 
85 
27 
40 
22 
47 



ElCPLOTSBB AT JuNS 30tn 



Con- 
ductors 
62 
72 
82 
89 
115 
133 
204 
224 
360 
446 
411 
400 



Drivers 

67 

70 

80 

90 

133 

188 

200 

217 

334 

380 



Others 
53 
99 
115 
149 
189 
232 
265 
292 
373 
431 
391 
412 



Total 

172 

241 

277 

328 

437 

501 

660 

733 

1,067 

1.257 

1.192 

1.194 



Total annua 
salaries and 

wages of 

offioera and 

emi>lo3reea 

•6104.928 14 

181,509 76 

218.330 03 

2.'».306 28 

354.288 25 

418,269 26 

528,238 35 

636.885 44 

882.901 61 

1.209.644 90 

1,520,980 41 

2.049.682 13 



(C) Operattng revenues and expenses of Fifth Avenue Coach Company, 1909-1920 

Total Net 

YeasEndxd Passenger operating Operating operating Operating 

Junk 30 — revenue revenue expenses revenue Taxes ineome 

1909 $351,601 $369,406 $291,160 $78,245 $19,829 $58,416 

1910 603,019 630,325 7530,945 99,480 34,059 65.421 

1911 599.737 631,311 692,204 39,107 36,832 3,275 

1912 633,907 675,447 553.915 121,532 38.869 82.663 

1913 888.458 935.668 716.521 219.147 54,692 164.455 

1914 1.127,643 •1,176.650 •830,022 346.628 72,767 273.861 

1915 1.405.047 1.451,508 920.097 531.411 91.801 439.610 

1916 1.622.304 1,669,726 1.064,690 605.036 105.267 409.769 

1917 2.208,076 2.243,817 1,457,936 785.882 163,874 623,508 

1918 2.611.358 2.654,458 1.984.289 670.169 271.021 399.148 

1919 3,648.845 3.742.697 2,347,594 1,395.103 486,790 908,313 

1920 4,255.271 4,353.950 3.126.493 1.227.457 409.725 817,732 



> Prior to Sept. 4. 1916. the only opatkting omnibus company in the city. On that date the 
City Island Motor Bus Co. began operations. 
•Excluding duplications of parts of streets traversed. 

• Includes 00th " aetive " and *' idle " (loaded and empty) mileage and hours made by buses 
on reeular routes, on the same basis ss number of passengers and passenger revenue. None of 
these items included the small amount of traflSc in special or private hire " buses. 

• In addition. 6 extra coach bodies vrere reportea. 

• Issuance of transfers began April 26, 1912. No record, however, was kept prior to August, 1913. 

• Includes $3,000 estimated compensation for 5 officers. 

T Differs by $1,929 from 1910 Report due to a credit returned subsequently to that tabulation. 

• Includes rental of equipment to Felham Park A City Island Railway, $2,060. 

• Rents amounting to $47,188.29 have been transferred by Bureau of Statistics of this Com- 
mission from Operating expenses to Income deductions. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Ck)MPARATIVE SUMMABIES OF TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS 201 



TABLE 5. Motor onmibus 



opentioiiB: (D) Income 
1909-1930 



Operating 

Ykab Endkd Junk 90 — income 

1909 958.416 

1910 65,421 

1911 3,275 

1912 82,663 

1913 164.455 

1914 273.861 

1915 439,610 

1916 499.769 

1917 622.508 

1918 399,148 

1919 008,313 

1920 817.732 



of Fifth ATenue Coach ContptAy, 



Net 

oorporato 

inoome 

$22,040 

29.431 
D^.821 

47.189 
130,352 
190,438 
364,174 
442.997 
582,536 
342,818 
843.959 
784,782 







Interest 


• 




and rent 


other 


GroBB 


ofaarsee. 


inoome 


inoome 


etc 


9871 


959,287 


937.247 


11725 


66,146 


36,716 


294 


3.569 


37,390 


1.381 


84.044 


36.855 


2,752 


167,207 


36.855 


4.473 


278,334 


•87,896 


10,861 


450.471 


86,297 


23.168 


522,937 


79.940 


19,736 


642.244 


50.708 


50,443 


449,591 


106,773 


41,409 


949,722 


105.763 


49,625 


867.357 

'^^^ •- 


82.575 



Cost of zeal 



JwndO 
or 

YSAB 

equipment 

1909 9358.705 57 

1910 394.149 75 

1911 580.140 89 

1912 579,622 22 

1913 712.093 12 

1914 835.667 12 

1915 896,312 54 

1916 879.767 50 

1917 1,037.763 42 

1919 1.327,671 18 

1919 2.535.992 55 

1920 2,563.953 26 



(B) Capital of Fifth ATenne Coach Company, 1909-1930 
Fexbd Cafttai. 



Aoenied 
depredation 
992.911 71 
208,659 63 
305.679 17 
379,727 77 
424.625 67 
407,906 06 
449.868 30 
442. 8S2 00 
478.185 33 
560,640 52 
483.600 35 
716.845 24 



Unexpired 

capital 

outlay 

9265.793 86 

185.400 12 

274.461 72 

199.794 45 

2S7.467 45 

427.761 06 

446.444 24 

438,885 50 

559,678 09 

758,030 66 

2,052.392 20 

1.847,108 02 



Materials 

and 

supplies 

918.543 91 

22.433 16 

45.196 68 

43.443 15 

77.993 47 

71.085 34 

74,706 63 

108.679 63 

174.833 97 

886.238 73 

432.558 54 

317.662 22 



Capital 
stook 
950.000 
50.000 
50,000 
50.000 
50.000 
50.000 
50,000 
50.000 
50.000 
50.000 
50,000 
50.000 



Corporate 

surplas 

or (D) deficit 

D 9458.216 54 

D 430.896 77 

D 465.007 99 

D 416.977 82 

D 286,057 23 

D 105,794 67 

251.965 28 

706.094 51 

1.274.823 66 

1.466.617 78 

2.082.514 84 

2.719,679 94 



(F) Data for City IsUmd Motor Bos Company, Z9i7-i9>e 
Ybab ENDcn Jdn« 30 — 



Item 

length of route (miles) 

Komber of omnibuseB 

Si«Is trips 

OffiroB and employees .... 
Anniial salaries and wages . 
Reremie passengeis 



Ried capital - 

Aeemed depreciation. 

fatd capital — net 

Cifiital stock outstanding 

Corpoiate surplus or (D) deficit. 



1917 " 

7.5 

7 

9,696 

12 

94,506 13 

77,000 



1918 

7.5 

13 

19.302 

32 

915,515 06 

247,225 



1919 

7.5 

4 

43.560 

16 

925.765 19 

495.279 



1920 

7.5 

3 

42,011 

8 

914.758 04 

533,348 



910.831 39 


935,313 90 


945.017 60 


93.921 94 


1.705 00 


10.291 23 


42,758 32 


3.272 42 


0.126 39 


25.022 67 


2.250 28 


649 52 


10,000 00 


8,000 00 


5.800 00 


5.800 00 


775 57 


D 9.616 99 


19.803 55 


27.608 76 



Revenue 


.. 913,544 39 

11,667 62 

1,070 70 

806 07 

806 07 

30 60 

775 67 


937,089 22 983,660 81 

40,248 03 89,723 23 

2,941 48 6,250 30 

D6,100 29' D 12.312 72 

D 6. 100 29 D 12.312 72 

292 27 


9105,183 60 


Operating expenses 


105.665 63 


Tax aocroalsr 


7,888 68 
D 8.370 71 


GroH inoome or (£» kias 


D 7.715 21 






Net corporate income or (I>) deficit. . . 


D 6.392 56 D 12.312.72 


D 7.715 21 



* See tfaifl note on preceding page. 

i( Difference (rom 1010 Report due to a correction by company subsequent to that tabulation. 

"Ten months' operations, beginning September 4, 1916. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



202 Public Service Commission — First District 

table 6. gbnbral street raawat 

[Non.— For financuU nnunaiy oov 

Item 1910 1911 1912 1913 
Nuxnber of reports: 

Operating oompuies S4 86 30 86 

LeeBoroompuuea* 23 21 22 ' 31 

Inehottte or dormant oompttDiei> 22 21 17 14 

AU oompaniee* 79 78 75 71 

Length of Uiie(niilee) 766.86 795.87 801.68 806.74 

Year's mcrease* 11.81 18.76 8.16 6.61 

Length of track (miles) 1,595.78 1.646.76 1.666.30 1.684.65 

Year's increase* 29.16 40.88 1937 14.30 

Number of passenger oars' 11.364 11.617 11.685 11.674 

Year's increase'. 242 253 68 D 11 

Number of other ears 927 964 979 965 

F«BOimel(oper. companies) at dose of year 37.339 39.937 39,275 40.713 

Year's increase' 539 2.598 D662 1.438 

Anregate salaries and wages > $26,990,702 $28,974,787 $29,373,093 $20,580,054 

Year's increase 941.427 1.984.085 398.306 206.961 

Persons kiUed" 228 231 216 220 

Year's increase D37 3 Dl5 4 

nuffic: 

Berenue passengers 1.531.263,914 1,606.901.397 1,680.913.935 1,769.876.508 

Year's increase 128,845,272 72.638.483 77.012.538 88.962.573 

Pareent 9.19 4.74 4.80 5.20 

Revemie passengers per day 4.195,2il 4.394.250 4.692,661 4.848,977 

Year's increase 353,001 199.009 196.4U 256.316 

Transfers collected 327.410,218 318.902.033 333.787.138 338.223.257 

Year's increase 13.069.997 D8.508,185 14,885,105 4,436.119 

PassengeiHsarmUes* 284.244.431 300.295.396 314.831.717 317.445.451 

YearVinerease 13,849.766 16.050.965 14.536.321 2,613.734 

Percent 5.12 5.65 484 0.83 

OAPiTAXizjLnoif:" 

Capital stock outstanding $302.8]5,995 $303,378,100 $269,487,360 $268,428,660 

Funded debt« 376.154.917 379.391,869 400,099.943 4n.270,619 

Unfunded permanent debt owing to system 

' 60.032,202 60.927.182 54.481.784 58,605.646 



Total gross o^ritaliaation $739,003,114 $743,697,151 $724,069,037 $804,304,925 

Year's increase $895,808 $4,694,037 D $19,628,114 $80,235,888 

Less intercorporate hoMings: 

Capitalstock 18.512,600 18,512.600 19.497.100 21.m.000 

Fundeddebt 4.230.123 2.717.123 4.653.123 6.653.123 

Unfunded peimanent debt 30.225.109 30.185.734 24.818.472 23,716.806 

Total $52,967,832 $51,415,457 $48,968,695 $51,540,931 

Approximate net capitalisation $686,035,282 $692,281,694 $675,100,342 $752,763,994 



^ Exdusive of City of New York as owner of rapid-traosit and bridge track. 

* Figures originally published for 1908-1910 corrected by exduaion of Penn. Tunnel dc TenninaL 

* The ratio Is D 0.48 when Brooklvn ft North River is included for 1014 as well as 1915. 

* Includes Rapid Transit bonds of the City of New York for lines in operation. The figures 
originaUy publisned for funded debt for the earlier yean have been revised to make them more 
nearly comparable with those for later yean. Reacquired securities have been excluded and lone 
term notes, certificates of indebtedneos of B. R. T. companies, and matured funded debt transferred 
to the unfunded permanent debt classification, which also includes interest bearing construction 



advances. Includes also I. R. T. bonds re p r esenting investment of depreciation r e ser v e and 
interat thereon as follows: 1916, 1719.000; 1017, $756,000; 1918, $800,000; 1919, $853,000; and 
1920. $825,000. 

• * Includes notes treated by creditor companies as permanent, interest bearing eonstruotion ad- 
vances, and matured funded debt held by system companies. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



%. 



^MPXRATIVE SXJMMARIBS OP TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS 203 











^^mmpmiod, aee Tmble 13]. 










WW 1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


S ^^ 


30 


36 


36 


86 


40 


22 22 


22 

4 


22 
3 


22 


21 


17 


«t. s •* 


82 


61 


58 


57 


57 


M]S «2a.ii 


827.27 


851.79 


861.43 


875.34 


883.66 


*« 10.43 


4.77 


23.12 


9.64 


13.91 


5.15 


^•'SS 1.730.2S 


1.775.61 


1.839.66 


1.866.47 


1.930.01 


1.943.43 


i}*iS 31.78 


46.34 


63.36 


26.81 


63.54 


12.04 


"'!S 11-8SS 


12,418 


12.588 


12.776 


13.002 


13.061 


»1 1> 10 


533 


165 


193 


226 


09 


•i'Hl 1.040 


1.070 


1.066 


1.003 


1.005 


993 


».658 40.930 


40.478 


45.702 


44.564 


43.848 


41.991 


«,2iH5 i'»*» 


D458 


5.224 


D 1.138 


D716 


D 1.857 


*'S-5S «32.TT0.410 


634.163.166 


839,589.541 


844.347,001 


856.384.537 


869.714,464 


••^•115 1.3^4.881 


1.893.756 


5.426.375 


4,757,430 


12.037.536 


12.829.927 


217 2oe 


189 


226 


243 


307 


168 


Da 1>11 


D17 


37 


17 


64 


D139 


^dU.m.3Sft 1.807,4132.726 1.898.735,015 1.918.812.229 1.975.511.789 


2.070.944.297 


2.865.587.369 


#^ «.«7S48 I> ».J»^1.03O 


91.102.889 


20.076.614 


56,699.560 


104.432.508 


285.643.072 


. . 2-45 I>>0.31 


5.04 


1.06 


2.95 


5.29 


13.73 


4.«7,683 4,1»52.418 
„ 118.706 1> 15.265 


5.187,802 


6.257,020 


5.412.361 


5.698.478 


6.468.358 


235.384 


69,218 


155.341 


286.117 


764.875 


#4|.»l.«63 350.048.154 


364.219.050 


827,753.016 


320,419.738 


294.397,790 


165.222.445 


7.0W.TO6 13.766.191 


5.170.896 


D 36.466,034 


D 7.838,278 


D26.021.948 


D 129.175.345 


'>19.2».»4 32S.867.247 


835.161.928 


327.517.928 


338.990.244 


340.949.288 


343.486.648 


1.8S0.383 6.571.413 


9.294.681 


D 7,644.000 


1.472.316 


11.959.044 


2.587.360 


0.58 2.06 


2.85 


D2.28 


0.45 


3.64 


0.74 


ia»,4ai.UO 8268.615.710 


8288.615.710 


8268.615.710 


8268.015.710 


8 267.415.710 


8267.415,510 


IU.288,442 554.751.302 


624.850.579 


656.890.533 


681,323.234 


775.205.966 


792.209.106 


9ft.n\,Ma 89.540.432 


60.415.712 


61.515.498 


» 64,816.258 


64.920.429 


64.594.060 


mi.50\,\QO $882,907,404 


8953.882.001 


8867.021.741 81.014.155.197 81.107.542.105 81.124.218,676 


1».IM,1TS 940,406.304 


870.974.597 


833.139.740 


827,033.456 


893.386.908 


816.676.571 


11,896,400 25,446,000 


25.480.200 


26.348,900 


26,406.800 


26.87V,200 


26.889.200 


6.«n.6QO 7.968.900 


7.962.900 


7,941,400 


9.121.239 
20.077,662 

855.605,701 


6.860.839 


6.932,339 


21.«S7.2aO 21,028.373 


22.388.126 
855.831.226 


22,380,626 
856,671.926 


19.450.253 
852.600.292 


19,430.253 


/ 883.416,120 666.332.273 


852.751.792 


/ S7».021,980 6887,575.131 


8896,050.775 


8930.349.815 


8958,549,496 81.054.851.813 81.071.466.884 



• Cbaaces due to rameanneineiit are in cenaral excluded. Thin inereaaes are in general not 
antboaeCical differenoea. Some acorea have been reviaed ainoe original publication. 

_S o mBb Mie figures have been reviaed ainoe Qriginal pubUoation on account of comotiona by 

"Differenoea from figorea originaUy published, due to induaion here of wagea of H. 6c M. office 



• A^ve uid idle, but exdoding chartered-ear. 

» Mas* of the cepitaaaation figuree differ eomewhat from thoee publvhed prior to the 1918 tabu- 

S^B- ^^S** ^ ^ re-aaabwa made in eonneotion with the latter Oiee also footnote 4) . 

Knudmc fatalities ooourrin* outeide New York city limits. Figuree published in earlier 

— E geneimUy included them. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



204 Public Service Commission — Fibst District 

TABLE 7. ROAD AND TRACK MILBAGB, JUNE 30, x^oS-xoao: (A) Lencth of iMd 

and track 
Bo4D OS Fnn TkicK 

Onstreets On 

or other private Third to Sidings, Total Inoar- 

publio right Second fifth tomouts, running houiee, Qtaod total 

Jura 30— wayi of way track tracks etc. traok yardi,ete. tnek 

19081 0M.092 80.1U 600.052 47.145 68.192 1.464.595 86.254 1.540.&40 

1909 667.886 80.913 608.919 48.005 68.477 1.474.200 86.902 1.661.102 

1910 674.520 92.344 618.494 48.021 71.490 1.604.869 90.868 1.695.732 

1911 701.316 94.063 631.618 48.134 71.046 1.646.161 100.686 1.M6.746 

1912 706.660 96.030 645.664 4JS.365 54.226 1.649.824 116^^ 1.666.297 

1913. 709.952 96.786 652.398 48.866 64.106 1.561.601 123j049 1,684.«90 

1914 718.603 93.443 663.640 48.939 48.369 1.572.884 132.736 1.705.620 

1916 733.256 88.856 667.746 57.686 ' 52.049 1.509.492 130.787 1.730.279 

1916 739.216 88.052 673.700 96.802 45.261 1.643.031 132.682 1.776.613 

1917.... 762.173 89.621 606.749 114.220 44.861 1.707.614 132.048 1.839.662 

1918 773.195 88.237 708.289 122.601 43.095 1.735.417 131.050 1.866.467 

1919 786.251 89.085 725.306 149.029 45.618 1.795.289 134.720 1.930.009 

1920* 793.700 89.957 732.328 152.217 44.822 1,813.024 130.406 1.043.429 



(B) Ihcreaaa in road and track * 

Naw Lira OFaran * iNosajiaB iir All TaACKS 



Jura 30 ~ Bapid-Tranrnt Surface Total Rapid-transit Surface Total 

1908 5.820 8.582 14.402 23.600 15.286 38.976 

1909 8.440 6.161 9.601 7.696 12.557 S0.263 

1910 4.090 7.220 11.310 6.260 13.900 80.160 

1911 1.230 17.621 18.760 8.136 32.694 40.^0 

1912 8.158 8.158 1.806 17.666 19.372 

1913 6.612 6.612 DO.020 14.316 14.296 

1914 1.204 3.322 4.526 2.813 11.664 14.4n 

1915 8.320 2.108 10.428 25.161 6.618 81.779 

1916 6.960 D2.193 4.767 49.576 D3.238 46.337 

1917 19.893 3.226 23.119 58.024 5.332 63.366 

1918 8.806 0.832 9.638 23.929 2.876 26.805 

1919 23.180 D9.276 13.904 77.008 D13.466 63.542 

1920* 4.971 0.182 6.153 13.636 D1.693 12.043 



(C) Length of road or line divided between surface and rapid-transit companiea 
MiLBS or Lira OpaaATso Bt Suarica CoMPAinia 

ASBIQMBD TO BoaOUQH « OV — 

' Total Rapid- Qraad 

Jura 30 ~ Manhattan Bronx Brooklyn Queens Bichmond surface transit* total 

1908 154.964 93.678 232.460 97.910 36.690 616.592 123.614 789.206 

1909 156.244 98.376 233.336 98.200 36.600 621.746 127.064 748.799 

1910 158.096 100.848 237.173 102.990 36.620 635.727 131.137 766.864 

1911 153933 104.093 238.907 129.440 36.620 662.993 132.376 705.360 

1912 148.212 112.664 239.072 130.041 39.050 669.939 131.741 801.6M 

1913 146.298 116.907 240.048 134.281 37.010 673.644 133.193 806.737 

1914 143.214 121.069 239.925 136.341 37.010 677.649 134.307 811.946 

1916 147.785 118.793 241.241 136.321 36.910 681.060 141.063 822.113 

1916 148.226 119.569 241.401 133.706 36.930 679.831 147.437 827.268 

1917 147.487 120.072 245.430 134.545 36.930 684.464 167.330 851.794 

1918 145.629 119.038 248.634 135.065 36.930 685.296 176.136 861.432 

1919 139.629 117.331 256.806 135.065 36.930 685.760 189.576 875.336 

1920* 141.787 118.858 256.751 134.465 36.930 688.791 194.866 W3.66? 

1 FSgurea differ from those originaUy published owing to reolassifioation. 

1 Changea due to remeasurement or reclaasification are in general excluded. Thus i no p oases are 
in general not arithmetical differencea. Some figures have been revised since original publication. 

'For rapid-transit, gross and net increase are the same; for surface, net after deducting track 
removed. 

« Generally these borough groups include some road and traok extending into another borough 
and not all of their own. For strict physical division of track by boroughs, see Div. F. 

* Includes Hudson A Manhattan. For dassification of traok m Brooklyn used for both rapid- 
transit train and surface car operation, see note. Div. F. 

* See general note to Table I. Part II of this volume. Figures for 1920 include track of four 
companies which have discontinued operation, as follows: Div. A. First track. 37.806; running track, 
48.802; all track, 40.202; Div. C. Manhattan. 5.499; Bronx. 2.887; Queens. 29.420; Total surface. 
37.806; Div. D, Manhattan. 7.839; Bronx. 3.283: Queens. 38.060; total surface. 49.202; Div. £. 
Underground. 2.776: storage-battery. 5.063; overhead contact. 41.363 and total, 49.202; Div. F. 
Manhattan, 6.660: Bronx, 3.283; Brookb^. 1.280; Queens. 16.760; Outside dty (Nassau Co.), 
21.320 and total. 40.202. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



COMPARATIVB SUMMARIES OP TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS 205 



TABLB 7. Roftd and track mfleace* June 30, xpoS-xaao: (D) Length of trade divided 
turface and rapid-tFanait coimpaaiea 

MILI8 OF TUlCK QpSBAnO BT SUBFACa 

COMPANXBS AbUOIOID TO BOBOUGH 0F«— BAmnnUHR 

Man- Rieh- Total 

JuifB30— hattan Broni Brooklyn Queens mond rarfkee ' Total* IJLT. 

1908 310.336 lft6.483 404.817 148.520 94.630 1.184.786 856.068 197.800 

19O0 310.806 176.006 406.841 148.880 64.630 1,107.843 363.750 190.090 

1010 314.537 181.001 503.515 150.160 65.630 1,224.744 870.088 100.070 

1011 300.882 188.i68 507.012 106.630 65.(00 i;267.622 370.124 208.310 

1012 303.161 206..^ 507.008 100.080 68.240 1.284.515 881.'782 203.360 

1013 300.7^ 211.759 514.543 206.000 65.080 1^00.984 384.666 208.340 

1014 300.762 223.058 51^.860 212.572 65.080 1.318.141 387.470 233.320 

1015 305.455 218.230 518.842 213.012 65.780 1,321.328 408.951 205.850 

1016 306.093 219.710 517.047 208.806 65.890 1.317.546 458.067 217.790 

1017 304.761 219.338 523.512 210.070 65.890 1,323.571 516.091 266.260 

1918 301.923 217.179 529.725 211.730 65.890 1.326.447 540.020 276.490 

1010 294.312 212.698 559.691 211.783 65.890 1.344.374 585.635 330.420 

1020* 293.316 214.904 558.925 211.123 65.890 1.344.158 599.271 386.440 



B.R.T 
151. 96S 
156.069 
157.940 
158.270 
159.654 
162.556 
165.891 
184.333 
221.509 
231.063 
244.762 
236.447 
244.063 



Third* 
raU 

JuNB 30 — oontaoi 

1008 296.435 

1000 302.407 

1010 306.653 

1011 316.459 

1912 317.845 

1913 317.825 

1914 320.638 

1015 840.095 

1916 416.354 

1917 478.547 

1918 503.469 

1919 680.4n 

1920* 594.261 



(B) Distribation by mode of operation 
OvBBHBAS Contact 



'El" train 

operation* 

^59.628 

61.352 

62.335 

62.665 

63.937 

66.841 

66,841 

68.856 

41.713 

37.544 

36.551 

"5.158 

"5.010 



Other 

operation 

867.8i42 

879.839 

903.715 

95^5.065 

978.804 

996.111 

1.013.731 

1.010.435 

1.000.015 

1.013.379 

1.019.093 

1.044.631 

1.066.341 



Under- 

ground Storage- 

contact battel 

236.678 

237.438 

239.703 

239.886 9.039 

241.317 17.407 

237.123 36.252 

238.210 u 50.091 

241.500 U54.895 

241.908 u 55.636 

241.373 u 62.062 

241.188 62.098 

241.101 u 54.589 

237.069 39.101 



Hoiae Other 

76.106 >8.960 

76.QD3 U.OOS 

78.334 102.992 

62.532 ^U.IOO 

44.257 u 3.730 

29.398 "1.100 

11.164 M4.94S 

9.663 M 4.835 

9.710 "4.277 

2.480 M 4.277 

"4.118 

"4.053 

"1.647 



Total 
L540.849 
1.561.102 
1JW5.782 
M46.746 
1.666.297 
1.684.650 
1.705.620 
1.730.279 
1.775.613 
1.839.662 
1.866.467 
1.930.009 
1.943.439 



^ ^ * See tiiese notea on preceding page. 

• Cluefly West End and Culver surface extensions of B. R. T. elevated division. 
"* TnffhKiwi 1.83 of the South Brooklyn operated by steam. 

■ Consists of 2.992 reported as " having no overhead construction ** and 0.968 cable. 

• Consists of 2.992 reported as '* having no overhead oonstruotion.*' and 1.071 oable. 
!• Reported in 1910 as " unused track." 

u Monorail electric, an experimental mode of operation. In 1915. changed to storage-battery. 

u Gonsiets of 1.1 monorail elootrio (see preoeding note) and 1.63 in car houses without power 
oonatmotion. 

» Inohides 0.042 horse and storage-battery. 

M Conststs of 1.21 in oar bams used by underground-contact ears but without oonduetor rails. 
0.32 suifaoe traok with no provision for motive power in 1914 and 1916 (0.315 in 1916 and 1917), 
and track not operated aa follows: 1914. 3.415; 1015, 3.305; 1916, 2.752; 1917. 2.752. 
k-v» Includes 13.099 simultaneously operated by horse and storage batterv, of which 7.142 was 
claaaod, in the 1917 Report, as horse. Indeflmteneas of olasiifioation is due to gradual change 
being; in process at dose of year. 

^Composed of 1.21 miles in oai^aras; 0.333 surface traok with no provision for motive power 
and miles not operated as follows: 1918. 2.575; 1919. 2.510. . 

" Also usable as third-rail oontaot. 

IS inehides 15.178 miles of storage4>att6ry tracks of New York Railways, not operated, for 1919 

wrtonly. 

• Composed.of 1.21.1nlcar bams and 0.437 not operated. 



Report! 
*Coi 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



206 



Public Sekvice CJobqcission — First District 



TABLR 7- Road and liack milMce, June 30, 1908^1920: (F) Geocnpidcal location of foiftce 
and rapid-tranait railway track ^ 
[Nora. — Prior to 1910 th« divkion of track between " street-eurf aoe '* and ** mpid4zaiiait " 
waa uDBatisfactory, owing to the existence of a eonaiderablie nuleace having mixed eharactenstics. 
There were four quasi rapid-traiisit routes to Coney Island originally built on private right of way 
under steam raihoad charters — the Brighton Beach, Sea Beach, West End and Culver lines of 
the B. R. T. Elevated Division. On each aide of much of this track a street waa aubsequently 
constructed, rendering the* track virtually street-surface. Most of the track was uaed not oaly 
for the operation of single trolley cars but also for trains continuing from an elevated structure. 
The Brignton Beach and Sea Beach lines were rebuilt either above grade or sub grade, wliile the 
City of New York pursuant to Contract No. 4 constructed the New Utrecht and Gravesend Avenue 
elevated rapid-transit railways over the West End and Culver lines, respectively, and the latter 
surface tracks are now used by their owners or leasees (Nassau Electric R. R. and South Brooklyn 
Ry. Co.) solely for trolley car operation, the transition having taken place on June 24. 1916, and 
Mkffch 16, 1919, respectively. The apparent decrease of 10.71 miles of rapid transit track in 
Brooklyn in 1919 is due almost entirely to the transfer of the South Brooklyn Ry. Co. to the atreet- 
Burfaee group, thereby eliminating 30.23 miles of track (one-third of which was yard and storage 
track), as compared with the 20.68 miles (net) of new elevated track. All Nassau Electric R. R. 
track is here daasified as surface track throughout, although the portion at one time used by West 
End ** L *' trains is included down to 1915 in the B. R. T. Elevated Division in the Growth of City 
Transit summary (Table 1). in harmony with the grouping of passenger traffic] 



SUBTACB R&ILWATB 



173J 



173.549 
167.868 
167.914 
167.701 
167.701 
166.046 
109.706 



Juiia aa— Manhattan Brooz 

1908 314.731 129.547 

1909 315.291 139.160 

1910 320.912 143.624 

1911 317.848 140.854 

1912 310.181 153.234 

1913 310.998 

1914 311.876 

1915 315.183 

1916 316.102 

mi 314.423 

1918 311.806 

1919 304.165 

1920* 303.637 

1908 168.228 

1909 169.609 

1910 171.662 

1911 172.423 

1912 172.314 

1913 172.294 

1914 175.107 

1915 178.633 

1916 186.466 

1917 187.186 

1918 205.598 

1919 243.785 

1920* 249.091 

1906 482.959 159.727 

1909 484.900 172.290 

1910 492.574 176.754 

1911 490.271 177.314 

1912 482.495 189.744 

1913 483.292 192.892 

1914 486.982 210.060 

1915 493.816 204.878 

1916 502.568 208.584 

1917 501.609 234.241 

1918 517.404 240.251 

1919 547.960 251.899 

1920* 552.628 261.689 



Brooklyn 
432.108 
434.132 
440.816 
444.312 
445.065 
460.554 
449.148 
452.607 
451.168 
456.875 
457.066 

•487.032 
486.266 



Qoeens 

176.470 

176.830 

* 191.381 

•207.321 

204.027 

211.152 

218.477 

220.808 

»216.989 

219.011 

226.615 

226.598 

225.968 



Biohmond 
64.630 
64.680 
65.630 
65.630 
« 68.240 
65.980 
65.980 
65.780 
65.880 
65.800 
65.880 
65.890 
66.800 



RAPiD^TBAmrr Railwatb 



30.180 
33.130 
33.130 
36.460 
36.510 
36.510 
36.510 
36.510 
40.670 
66.540 
72.550 
85.853 
91.983 



152.585 
155.950 
156.029 
157.299 
158.792 
158.792 
159.124 
m.475 
206.053 
211 .447 
208.966 
•198.251 
200.451 



2.400 

2.490 

2.489 

2.489 

2.489 

5.393 

5.061 

4.716 

13.201 

39.241 

41.229 

46.069 

46.069 



All Sibsit and ELicnuc Railwatb 



584.693 
590.082 
597.745 
601.611 
603.857 
609.346 
608.273 
630.022 
657.221 
668.322 
666.032 
685.283 
686.717 



178.960 
179.320 
* 193.870 
•209.810 
206.516 
216.545 
223.688 
225.519 
280.190 
258.252 
267.844 
272.667 
272.027 



64.630 
64.630 
65.630 
65.630 
68.240 
65.960 
65.980 
65.780 
65.890 
65^.800 
65.800 
65.890 
65.800 



Outdde 
eity« 
67.300 
67.300 
•62.381 
•01.657 
103.768 
104.918 
90.112 
00.087 
00.483 
00.671 
07.360 
04.643 
02.801 



2.580 
2.580 
6.778 
10.453 
11. 6n 
11.677 
11.677 
11.677 
11.677 
11.677 
11.677 
11.677 
11.677 



60.880 
60.880 
•60.150 
•102.110 
115.445 
116.605 
110.789 
110.764 
111.160 
111.848 
100.046 
106.320 
104.478 



Total 
1.184.786 
1.107.343 
1.224.744 
1,267.622 
1,284.515 
1.300.084 
1,318.141 
1,321.338 
1.317.546 
1.333.571 
1.SSI6.447 
•1.344.374 
1.344.158 



366.063 
363.759 
370.088 
379.124 
381 .782 
SS4.666 
387 479 
406.951 
468.067 
616.091 
640.020 
585.635 
599.871 



1,540.849 
1.561.103 
1.505.732 
1.646.746 
1.666.297 
1,684.«50 
1.706 .630 
1.7S0 270 
1.775.613 
1.830.668 
1,866.467 
1,«30.009 
1.043.430 



1 Except for Manhattan surface, the several trifling decreases are likely to be due to i 

ment or reinventory. It has not been practicable to correct earher returns except in ilie case 
referred to in note 3. 

> Approximately one-half of the surface track outside the city is in Westchester county and one- 
half m Nassau county. The rapid-transit track outside the dty is in New Jersey (Uudson A 
Manhattan). 

I The figures for 1910 and 1911 differ from the Reports for those years on acooimt of subsequent 
corrections of returns by the New York A Long Island. 

« Temporary increase due to rerouting on parallel streets while the old tracks were still in place. 

• Deenwse due principally to abandonment, and later removal, of the two tracks on the roadway 
of the Queensboro bridge. 

« See general note for explanation of increase in surface and decrease in rapid transit track. 

*See this note on second preceding page. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



CoifPARATTVE SUMMARIES OF TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS 207 



TABLB a. STRSBT-SAILWAY POW£R PLANTS: (A) Ctpici^ and output, X9»»-X9ao 



CAPAcmr AT Closb or Ybab 



Engines Turbo- A. C. 

Boileni (recipr.) units ceneratora* 

Yeab (h.p.) (h.p.) (kw.) (kw.) 

1908 185,530 906.050 49.250 213.050 

1909 219.516 301.700 85,600 250.300 

1910 218.066 307.005 122,600 292.300 

1911 218,466 384.725 147,625 354,825 

1912 218,866 363.525 142.000 349,200 

I9I3 203,830 322.775 140,000 323.200 

1914 203.326 286,775 160.000 320,700 

1915 203.325 274.775 220.000 373.200 

1916 198.825 260.775 242,500 388.200 

1917 189.325 243,800 242.500 388.200 

1918 183.325 233.800 332.500 478.200 

1919 183.325 232,800 392.500 538.200 

1920 183,325 226.800 423.000 568,700 



Substations 

(rotary 

oonverters) 

(kw.) 

256.400 
280.900 
295.900 
820,970 
331.850 
340.070 
352.012 
389.612 
409,612 
429.612 
461.612 
544,012 
544.512 



Energy (A. C.) 

generated 

during year * 

(kw. hrs.) 

N. R. 

eR6.582,2SB 
U0:j],Qtl3,UA6 
K00;!,:f72,44fl 
1,120, OT2.64fl 
1,019J10,0S1 
lH0tK5,4S8.2Ot 
l,(Hl.S19.43S 
1,122,790.774 
l,0^rt.:iH;!,348 
l,T4!^.i;i4,447 

i.___..._.:8fi 



(B) Qoaatity and coat of coal oaed in power plants, xpis-x^ao 

Tons of 2.000 
YaABEiTDKD Pounds Total Ck)«T AvcbaobCoot 

JCKSSO — ^ • ' ^ * s 

Anthra- Anthra- Bitu- 

dte Bituminous Anthracite Bituminous cite minous Total 

1915 341.182 971.852 $577,340 $2,811,268 $169 $2 89 $2 58 

1916 320.984 941,057 546,183 2.719.623 170 2 89 2 59 

1917 336.724 941,717 690.551 2.877.129 2 05 3 06 2 79 

1918 351.223 1.024.566 1.086.070 3.710.158 8 00 3 62 3 49 

1919 299.368 1.129.978 1,147,980 6.073.848 3 83 5 38 5 05 

1920 254,594 1.173,775 966.045 6.717.362 8 79 5 72 5 38 



Lbs. 

per 

kw. hr. 



2.45 
2.19 
2.27 
2.35 
2.32 
2.19 



NoTB. — Included throughout the period are the generating plants of the New York Railways 
and Staten Island Midland, both closed down in 1915 but not yet in 1919 dismantled. The 
plant of the Third Avenue is included to Nov. 7. 1912. the date of its transfer under lease to 
tbe New York Edison. The Richmond Light A Railroad's plant \b not included, being classed 
vith bffht and power companies. 

^ Where, after 1913, square feet of heating surface is reported instead of horse-power, the former is 
redoeed to the latter on the basis of the ratio of the corresponding horse-power returned in 1913. 

* In addition there were D. C. generators with aggregate capacity of 36.520 kw. in 1908. declining 
to 11.400 kw. in 1918. and D. C. kw. hrs. generated aggregating approximately 77.000.000 in 1909. 
46i)00.000 in 1910, 31,000.000 in 1916. 22.000.000 in 1918. 11.000.000 in 1919, and 12.000.000 
in 1020. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



208 Public Service Commission — First District 

TABLB 9. PASSBNOBR CARS, JUNB 30, 1908-1930: (A) Number owned or leased, by type 

€i cir 

[Nomben in pereDtheieB indioate open ewa inoluded in following figure.] 
Jum Rapid- Ov«rfaMd- Storage- 

30— tnndt Conduit trolley battery Horae ToUl 




2,626 ... 




160) 
160 


451 


(2.699) 
(2.6O81 
(2.603) 


10.805 


3,008 ... 
3,006 ... 


1 


422 
427 


11.122 
11.364 


3,048 ... 


<34 


160 


423 


(2,489) 


11.617 


3.006 ... 


•84 


n 


328 


(2.418) 
(2,416 


11.68S 


2,810 ... 


»126 


82> 


11.674 


2,881 ... 


209 


(50) 


M82 


(2.85fl 


11.895 


2,791 ... 


209 


(62) 


170 


(2.283 


11.885 


2,760 ... 


209 


167 


(2.283) 
(2.283 
(2,226 
(2.216) 


12.418 


2.727 ... 


266 


167 


12.S8S 


2.668 ... 


279 






12.7T6 


2.666 ... 


276 






13,003 


2.409 .... 


276 






(2.015) 


13.061 



NoTB. — Tbe oars tabulated as underground-oonduit oompriae all dectrio-oontact can reported 
in poaaeosion of Manhattan oompaniea, although certain of tnoae cani may not actually have been 
in uae. Obsolete can of all typea have been k^t. unused, for some yean before being sold or 
scrapped. The marked decrease in trolley can in 1911 is chiefly due to the Union Railway's sellins 
or scrapping 258. The trifling change in the number of surface can from 1908 to 1920. notwith- 
^ — M 4A — ^j^^ inorease in surface-car passengen carried, ia explained by the marked inerease 



standing a 30 per 
in aise of can. 



(B) Rapld-traniit cars, by road 
Ikikbbobouob Rapid Nkw York Con- 
TRANsrr Co. solidatbd R.R. 

* • V • ^Hudson A 

Elevated Subway Elevated Subway Manhattan 

JuNiSO— A B C D R. R.C0. ToUl 

1908 1,501 837 927 60 3.405 

1909 1,691 823 927 50 3.391 

1910 1,667 917 928 140 3.652 

1911 1,748 1.130 928 190 8.996 

1912 1.782 1.144 928 226 4,060 

1913 1,781 1,144 928 226 *4.087 

1914 1,780 1,143 928 226 * 4.100 

1915 1.775 1.162 928 101 226 4.182 

1916 1,880 1.520 928 226 226 4.780 

1917 2,249 1.241 928 800 226 4.944 

1918 2.248 1,584 919 456 226 5.433 

1919 2.217 1,806 917 500 226 5,666 

1920 2.213 1.816 917 697 226 5.769 

A — To 1915 the figures represent can owned by the Manhattan Ry. Co. and held by the 
Interborough under ita lease of that company's property. Thereafter thor include alao can 
bought by the Interborough and held under the agreement of March 19. 1913 (Elevated Extenaion 
Certificate) with the City of New York as follows: 1916. 108; 1917 and 1918. 477; 1919 and 
1920. 476. 

B — To 1916 the figures represent can instaUed and owned by the company under Contract 
No. 2. Thereafter they include also can held by the company under Contract No. 3 aa follows: 
1917. 102; 1918. 446; 1919, 669; 1920. 679. 

C — Csn owned by the ccmpany since 1913: previously by Brooklyn Union Elevated R. R., 
Canarsie R. R. and Transit Development Co. Additional can leased from tbe Long Island R. R. 
in 1913 and 1914 are specified in a separate note. 

D — Can leased from the New York Municipal Ry. with right of reversion to the City of New 
York under Contract No. 4. 

1 Indudea 14 cable can, 6 of. which are open. 

> Includes 1 mononil electric. 

* Includes 2 omnibuses temponiily operated by Pelhem Park A City Island during reconstruc- 
tion of track. 

< Indudea also can temporarily leased by tbe N. Y. Consolidated from the Transit Devdop- 
ment C^o. and the Long Island R R. (in 1913, 2 frcm T. D. Co. and 6 from L. L R. R; in 1914. 
23 from latter). In November. 1914, the N. Y. Consol. returned to L. I. R. R. 23 trailer can 
of iRhich 6 had been hired in January, 1913, and 17 in November, 1913. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Comparative Summaries of TrainSportatton Statistics 209 



TABLB 9. PasMnf er can, June 30, x^oS-xpao: (C) Smrface can dastifled with reference to 

pretectton of xnotonnen 



Pre. 
payment 

JuKK 80 — platforms 

190S • 165 

1909 • 728 

1910« 1,376 

1911 1.626 

1912 1,550 

1913 1,538 

1914 1.582 

1916 1.722 

1916 1.697 

1917 1.706 

1918 2.041 

1919 2.160 

1920 2.621 



Front of 
platform 



Without Pbotsction 



Other 


(but not 




encioaed 


sides) 


Total 


platforms 


enclosed 


protected 


98 


4,005 


4.268 


169 


3,888 


4.776 


142 


3.294 


4,812 


»212 


'3.182 


4.920 


»271 


»3.172 


4.993 


327 


3.117 


4.982 


•697 


8.069 


5.348 


710 


2.912 


5.344 


721 


2.864 


6.282 


774 


2,806 


5.286 


749 


2.371 


5,161 


743 


2.246 


5.139 


896 


2,017 


5,234 



Open 




Total 


(summer) 


AU 


sxirfaoe 


cars* 


other 


cars 


2.663 


479 


7,400 


2.672 


384 


7,731 


2,557 


343 


7.712 


2.443 


258 


7,621 


2.372 


240 


7.605 


2.370 


235 


7.687 


2,310 


•137 


7,795 


2.237 


122 


7,703 


2,237 


119 


7.638 


2.237 


116 


7,689 


2.182 .. 




7,348 


2.198 .. 




7.337 


2.058 .. 




7.292 



JUMS 

30- 

1908... 

1909... 

1910... 

1911... 

1913... 

1913... 

1914... 

1915... 

1915.... 

1917.... 

1918... 

1919..., 

1920... 



NuiCBn OF Cabs 



(D) Seathig capacity 
Total SsATOfo Capacitt 



ATBBAOa SaATWG CATACtrr 



Total 

10.805 

11.122 

11.864 

11.617 

11.685 

11,674 

11.895 

11.885 

12,4ia 

12,588 

12,776 

13,003 

13,061 



Open Closed 



3.600 
2,608 
2,603 
2,489 
2,418 
2,416 
2.356 
3.383 
3^ 
372to 
2,236 
2.316 
2,015 



6,687 
6,0B3 
6,896 
7,002 
7,327 
7.223 
7.416 
7,171 
7.703 
7.811 
8.057 
8.836 
8,668 



Other •Allcars 
1.660 481.748 
1,821 501,831 
1,865 518.742 
3,086 536,894 
3,040 528,305 



3,086 
3.133 
3,431 
3.433 
3,489 
3.493 
3.451 
3.378 



627,917 
541.486 
543,664 
670.458 
680,844 
600.853 
613.163 
636,375 



Open 

148.054 

147,484 

146,104 

139,949 

138.078 

188,398 

136,458 

131,781 

128,367 

l3r,267 

136.987 

134.786 

116.870 



Closed 
361.686 
370.679 
381,890 
393,185 
296,600 
396,043 
806,506 
398,653 
339,806 
838.789 



Other • All ears 

71.108 44.6 

83.668 

86.348 

93.760 

93.537 

93.477 

99.630 
113,330 
113,386 
113.788 



45.1 
45.3 
46.4 
46.3 
46.3 
46.5 
46.7 
46.9 
46.3 
47.0 
47.0 
48.0 



Open Closed 
65.3 40.0 



66.6 
56.1 
56.3 
57.1 
67.8 
57.6 
57.7 
56.3 
56.3 
56.6 
56.0 
68.0 



40.4 
40.8 
41.8 
41.0 
41.0 
41.8 
41.6 
43.8 
48.4 



Other 
45.3 
45.9 
46.3 
46.1 
45.9 
45.9 
46.9 
46.2 
46.2 
45.7 



• Excludes 10 open oars reported by Ocean Electric, which are included in precedinc oolumns 
as "protected." *^ "^^ ' *«.>««»* 

• Figures for 1908, 1900 and 1910 as originally published contained certain duplications which 
have been eliminated. Prepayment ears, which were tabulated with oars having other types 
of platforms for those srears, are here shown separately. 

'An error in the returns of the Metn»olitan Street Ry. for 1911 and of the N. Y. Rys. for 
1912 necessitated a transfer of 913 and 939 oars, reepectively, from column 2 to oolumn 3t •> 
compared with the Reports for those years. 

•The difference from figure published in 1914 Report is due to fact that N. Y. Rys, described 
219 new cars installed in 1914 incorrectly. The figure here given is based on the 1915 reviaed 
description. 

•That is, convertible or semi-convertible. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



210 



Public Service Coboobsion — Pibst District 



Ybar Endbd 

JUNB 30 — 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 



TABLE 10. HEW YORK CITY STREET RAILWAY 

[For revenue paasensera. 

SnUBn^URTACB RULWATS 



Manhattaa Bronx 



196.072,167 
130,607,266 

i:i9,o;i.S8l 

i;i7 . sTKi , r»:^o 
144.48I,H14 

1:U.U«.226 

1:57.U1MK2^ 
i:if^,419, T.K) 

1U4 , r»ri.s , 4ft6 
1C14 . ;w;-i . S78 

ViK4i)7,7l6 
4ii,iJ94»tHU 



21.001.412 
20.190,400 
21.527.010 
26.371.862 
32.191.198 
86,201,616 
3?),&73,S47 
89.*95.0rH6 
3^,451,516 
30^50^^00 
34. 352.. TJ 7 
31,160,077 
3U.22y.S0l 



BrooUjrn 

133.680.401 
136,200.546 
148.403.623 
136,343.719 
137.299.568 
147.032.064 
149,771.682 
161,256,691 
168.831,541 
174,035.125 
165.516.676 
158,744.862 
78.877.194 



Queens* 

5.224,935 
5,313.039 
8.609.593 
8.943.846 
9.297,493 
9,442.049 
9,014.497 
8,592.673 
9.460.126 
8.087.115 
6.861,266 
6,454.683 
6,550.903 



Richmond 

1.650.964 
1.648.217 
1.699.JB26 
1.833.587 
2,016,516 
2.134,860 
2.076,964 
2,178,144 
2,262,910 
2.432,107 
2,816,363 
3,112.997 
2.396.857 



Total 

348.878.879 
301,950,468 
319.151,532 
311,383.544 
326.286.588 
328,928.823 
334,606.474 
348,621.668 
356.416,283 
319,614.103 
313,856.600 
290,980.235 
164.158.710 



(B) 

lOOg ^,n^J24 Il»6fl5»2SS 61.328.714 7,021.819 2,871.188 133 

tSoQ ... 54.9«3.496 12.926,653 61.154,«H7 6,774,^)25 '2.^*7 .^M 128 

iSio 55,426,013 13,624.786 52,370,500 7.li5-H,f)65 .1 , (KM) . .173 132 

tflJl r>K\,4l0.121 14.020,774 54,809,118 0.470,443 3,001,186 137 

S12"" 57,290,2^ H,S.'>8,906 66,40*^,065 10.088,006 3,060, ?i23 141 

IQ13 56,678.125 16,207.597 58,047,603 9,953 J66 3.12;l.iJ00 143 

1914 . ... 5:^,001, 0^5 16,642 J45 *7 , W40. 060 10, 4^4 , 528 :i . ,365 , L35 141 

{Sl5 M. 545, 6^1 I6,S73.6flO 59.211,411 10, S70.g54 3,357.124 144, 

IoTa'"; 53,571,066 16,701.841 60.172.813 10, 8fll*.007 S.3l.^,*103 144, 

{017 44.641 .IHS 14.087.460 60.764.785 10.411.860 ;j.2lP.031 133, 

IQig ... 42,5^41.901 1*. 727. 024 56,832,487 9, 40^,290 2,iW3.167 126, 

1919""' H7, 690, 584 12,240,279 52.477,335 0.24^,142 2.ft:H.a26 114, 

1920" 33,220p345 IE, 436, (Hi 55.913.750 &.50I.J06 2.4«>d,i»43 111, 



,506,733 
816.415 
079.737 
720.642 
725.015 
009.481 
416.580 
858,639 
620.530 
126.993 
462.878 
350.966 
538.196 



(C) Pasaencer 

[" Active " mileage only, except in 1908 when i^ecial or chartered-car and ** idle *' or ** dark** 

terminal, etc.. durinc which paaaengen are not earned. In 1920 the idle mileage was 6.429.650 and 

1908 60.^:5,^56 11 '^^ "88 5C 'M49 7.001.669 2.R71.18S 132.744.240 

1909" 54,'Jl7.;i48 12 W 5C 94 6.643,356 2,903.928 127,858,727 

1910" ■ 54.174 356 13 50 51 50 7.432,955 2.987.960 129.640.680 

1911 ■ 56.2i^S.453 13 71 53 18 9.163.601 2,9SJrt,477 135.225.620 

1912"" 66.a:iKJtlO 14 24 5B : 1 i » 0,710,437 a.rj65,785 130,161.476 

1913 ' 5&.17S,.7>5 16 TO 50-96 0,634.316 3,120,,'>00 140,360.405 

1914*'" 62J^n.\m lfl,i : '97 50 'I ! 13 0.073,653 a.3rt2,080 138.561.340 

1916!! 63 f'58.091 10.371 51 57 11 10.351.363 a,3,'W,215 141.002.721 

1916 52,^."rj4.g61 16 -i. 12 5S'im 71 10,347.166 ft,312,286 141.806,896 

1917 44.107,418 18 iS 5e.0?%I.C34 0,004,605 3, 218, ,579 130,786,669 

1918 42,051,574 U 16 56.sij7.4lO 9.186,688 2,mCi.5^ 124.365.753 

1919 37,2*38.846 12 59 61. 718.685 8.968.412 2jm.\2ry 112.500.137 

1920 32.877.010 ll,i:,iJ,4B8 55.026.417 8.238,077 U.^^w.a^ 100,848.344 



1 Aa shown by number of transfer sHps collected. 

> Exclusive of B. R. T. surface Unes (included under Brooklyn), figures not being separable. 

* Transfer slips are collected at Third avenue and 140th street for passengers changing between 
elevated and subway and lUso at Grand Central for passengers changing between the Queemboro 
and main-line subways. The number has not been regularb^ reported. The Queensboro subway 
began operations June 22, 1015. The figures for 1017 and 1018 include also tranafen oollected at 



, Digitized by LjOOQIC 



COMPARATIVB SUMMARIES OF TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS 211 



TSAITIC, X90S-X930: (A) Tnuufer pMMnf en 1 
sae Table 1.] 

Rapid-tbanstt Railwats 



I. RT. 
8ubfray» 



12.244.059 
15.470.880 
22,556.472 
34.007.609 
10.619.439 
11.200*064 



I. RT. 

Elevat4sd * 



12.595.486] 
12.261.495 
12.251.966 
11,702,724 
10,480.008 
10.966.252 



B. RT. 

Elev.-eubway * 

10.948,728 

12.380.753 

8.258.686 

7.518,480 

8,500.550 

9,294,434 

10.775.480 

10,426,486 

8.803.767 

8.138,913 

6.563,238 

3.417.555 

1.063.729 



Hudson A 
Manhattao 



Total 

10,948,723 

12,380.753 

8.258.686 

7.518.489 

8.500.550 

9.294.434 

10.775,489 

10.426.486 

8.803,767 

8.138.913 

6.563,238 

3.417.555 

1.063.729 



Grand total 

'/is 

una 

,IM 
,05(1 

,738 
,7»0 
,445 



.{] 1 ..iJi.i 
3:^:3, 7H7 

2iH,3i*7 
10^ . 222 



44.005,213 
46.220,888 
50,258.774 
57,110.868 
64.544.520 
65,697,992 
66,454.810 
68.375,144 
72,041.136 
73,671.808 
75,082.272 
80,688.422 
93.387.094 



64.676.504 
62,612,507 
63,646,232 
66,220.938 
67,985,130 
67,829,134 
67,791,697 
68.158,932 
69.306.009 
72.250,243 
76,343.492 
79.013.929 
74.134,450 



29.971,220 
31.670.505 
33,480.023 
33.307.043 
33.894.032 
33.902,073 
36.703,942 
37.455.933 
42.049,223 
40,973,193 
43.251.488 
49.516.080 
55.607,622 



618,742 
1.700.902 
5.542.601 
6.823.891 
7,625.707 
7.956.696 
7.981.350 
7.860.524 
7.967.712 
8.178,711 
8.408.584 
8.820.599 
9.212.144 



139,271.679 
142.204.802 
152.927.630 
163.462.740 
174.049.389 
175.385.895 
178.931.799 
181.850.533 
191.366.080 
195.082.955 
203.085,836 
227.039.030 
232.341.319 



272.778.412 
271.021.217 
285.007.367 
301.183.382 
315.774.404 
318.395,376 
320.348.388 
326.709.172 
335.986.610 
328.208.948 
329.538.714 
341.398.996 
343.879.514 



mileage of regular oars were included. " Idle " mileage ia that between cai^houae and initial route- 
the spedal-car, 21,942.] 



44,005,213 
45.782.984 
49,755,909 
56.435.048 
63.210.703 
64.282,385 
64.715.993 
66.535.245 
70,132.538 
71.737.694 
73.060.979 
88.142,872 
91.788.562 



64, 
61, 
62, 
65, 
66, 
66, 
66, 
66, 
67, 
70, 
74, 
76, 
71, 



584.609 
476.853 
504,996 
000.949 
381.059 
145.579 
075.979 
398.656 
592.485 
605.164 
462,605 
887,032 
740.047 



29.971.220 
« 30,824,610 
32,815,745 
32,544.643 
32.976.889 
32.926.563 
35.702.636 
36.857.681 
41.264.529 
40,360,052 
42.844,867 
48.737,932 
54.694,450 



618,742 
* 1,701,211 
5,482,810 
6,737.363 
7.438.201 
7.750.341 
7.804.233 
7.689.285 
7.788.953 
7.999.089 
8,223.027 
8,628,016 
8,985,595 



139,179,784 
139,784,658 
150,559.460 
160.718.003 
170.006.852 
171.104,868 
174.298.841 
176.980.867 
186.778.505 
190.701.999 
198.591.468 
222.395,852 
227,208,654 



271 i 924. 024 
267.643.385 
280.200.140 
295.943.623 
309.168.327 
311.474.273 
312.860.190 
318.973.588 
328.585.401 
321.438.668 
322.957.221 
334.994.089 
337.056.998 



Times square from Seventh avenue subway passengers. Figures in brackets are excluded from 
totah. this company's transfers are generally made without slips. 

* Embodies oorreotion made subsequent to original publication. 

* Account is kept only of transfer slips from the surface to elevated lines. Other transfers are 
made wrthout slip, as are a large part from the surface lines. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



212 



Public Sbrvicb CJobcmission — First District 



TABLB xo. New Tofk City ftreet nilwmy tnfflc, 
[A oar^eat mile ie the prodaot of a oar 
Braxwrt^vumFAcm Razlwats 



YSAB 

Endbd 

JuNB 30 — Manhattan Bronx Brooklyn 

1910 2.088.031 577.00ft 2.332.205 

1911 2.206.133 618.431 2.410.672 

1912 2.271,384 660.960 2.441.333 

1913 2.261.417 724.230 2.518.617 

1914 2.216.194 738.708 2.528.606 

1915 2.322.581 748.490 2.601.374 

1016 2.283,883 724.382 2.602.631 

1917 1.897.500 602.668 2.621,872 

1018 1.808.852 649.184 2.413.566 

1919 1.562.628 555.323 2,225.394 

1920 1.380.952 516.102 2,374.515 



Queens > Richmond 



321.169 
395.606 
418.297 
400.488 
426.933 
452.669 
447.494 
435.794 
406.157 
397.422 
362.344 



110.035 
115.185 
115.869 
122.469 
132.108 
139,343 
152.703 
140.815 
124.445 
114.992 
100.428 



Total 

5,42^,535 

5,^1^ '-.r 

5 

6 . 

6,'>4:^.rri9 

6.:iM.457 

6.:Mi.a!»i 

5 7 -■.-,-, 

5 

4 

4..«,.^*. 



(B) 

1908> N.R. N. R. 6,760.437 748.536 330.620 

1909 7,7^1.410 1,547.560 6.560,606 703.420 346.558 

1010 7.H5^,7Z5 1.572.451 6.725.197 780.254 361.088 

1911 7. 97a, 92^ 1.612,940 6.940.513 061.307 362.384 

1912 S. 443, 263 1.725.187 7.016.416 1,023.542 368.560 

1913 8,029.864 1.868,488 7.176.267 1.005.480 363.000 

1914 7.777,56^ 1,935.979 7.197,800 1,030.554 370,518 

1915 7,763,0&3 1,947.211 7,261,604 1,087,674 366,900 

1016 7.509,646 1,046,824 7,386.310 1,088.886 362,747 

1917 6,674,W\l 1,687.062 7,384.772 1,047.031 353,059 

1918 f>,235.H3^1 1,684,232 6.993.201 959.933 320,447 

1919 ^/^J,7ii) 1,381,882 6.398,284 903,208 300.472 

1920 4.822.060 1.264.223 6.879.850 818.684 290.504 




1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 
1919. 
1920. 



,850 
.905 
986 
901 
.829 
.867 
883 
657 
556 
381 
331 



201 
297 
353 
495 
533 
544 
521 
508 
453 
389 
428 



1,719 
1.769 
1.765 
1,822 
1.840 
1.872 
1.004 
1,801 
1.800 
1,625 
1.701 



(F) ATerage number ol 
[Allowance is made for the operation of 
130 
200 
204 
203 
224 
243 



236 
102 
184 
167 



80 


4,070 


78 


4,249 


73 


4,381 


77 


4.498 


74 


4,500 


85 


4,611 


84 


4.644 


86 


4,378 


70 


4,071 


70 


3.658 


61 


3.688 



No returns pnor to 1010. 

Exclusive of B. R. T. surfaoe lines CmoKided under Brooklyn), Bgures not beim sepanbla. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



COMPABATnrB SuiiMABIBB OF TbANBPOBTATION STATISTICS 213 



1908-1990: (D) Ictivo atf*«oat mllM Oa thmiMiidt) ^ 
mfle multipliod by ieatiag eopooity.] 

RAnD^numrr Railways 







B.H.T. 








I.B.T. 


LH.T. 


fSlBv.- 


Hudooa* 






rabwBy 


elmted 


nibway 


-^^wtWtt^^w* 


Total 


Qrand total 


3.0fr7.»S 


8.000.230 


1.711.088 


241,244 


7,530,820 


12.063,864 


2.834.«23 


8.120.046 


1.606.080 


206.444 


8.047.201 


18.702,228 


3.286.M0 


8.186.201 


1.718.654 


827.281 


8.510.182 


14,427.084 


3.842.684 


8.174,088 


1.715.874 


841.015 


8.574.561 


14.610.782 


3.365.282 


3.171.647 


1.877.844 


348.386 


8.758.100 


14.800.668 


3.450,833 


8.187,135 


1.030.760 


338.820 


8.025,057 


15.180.514 


8.646.802 


3.244.430 


2,426,410 


842.714 


0.660,455 


15.871,548 


3.780.360 


3.801,390 


2.403.687 


851.060 


0.067.307 


15.673,046 


8.700.288 


3.574.206 


2,751.637 


861.818 


10,486,037 


16.880.141 


4.683.A26 


8.600.577 


8.815.066 


870.683 


11,068,801 


16.824.660 


4.773.000 


3.448.522 


3.851.710 


305.866 


12,463.613 


17.206.054 


2.420.183 


4,332.701 


2.745.662 


N.R. 






2.568.105 


4.148,374 


2.725.570 


110,888 


0.552.837 


26.444^ 


2.765.265 


4.237.634 


2.844.004 


322.848 


10,170.146 


37,473.771 


3.110.475 


4,418.271 


2.821.577 


408.853 


10.754.176 


. 38.605.346 


3.460.175 


4.523.082 


2.855,577 
2,856,482 


485.706 


11.274.540 


20.851,508 


3.625.748 


4.517.038 


488.853 


11.388.121 


20,781,210 


3.647,004 


4.518.025 


3.071.485 


438.010 


11.571.414 


20.802,828 


3.655.152 


4.542.027 


3.118.801 


432.012 


11,747.582 


80.173.034 


3.830.570 


4.601.341 


8.326.862 


431.640 


12.100.431 


80.583.644 


3.046.443 


4.768.225 


8.126.102 


442.704 


12.288.664 


20.430.440 


4.040.008 


5.015.266 


3.238,530 


458. 188 « 


12.751.082 


28.045.620 


4.860.471 


5.100.687 


3.670.608 


474.414 


14,214.270 


28.606.865 


5.160.562 


4.865,463 


4,051.253 


403,077 


14.580.244 


28.685.564 


Vtaoeoiv cars vood per dayi 














713 


1.421 


855 


111 


8.100 


7,170 


841 


1.481 


858 


112 


3.202 


7.541 


012 


1.408 


852 


02 


8.264 


7.645 


073 


1.487 


884 


118 


3.462 


7.060 


085 


1.512 


880 


115 


8.501 


8.001 


085 


1.548 


003 


115 


3.551 


8.162 


1,009 


1.548 


024 


122 


3.603 


8.247 


1,072 


1,677 


083 


133 


8,865 


8,248 


1.100 


1,603 


1.105 


133 


3.040 


8,020 


1,494 


1.701 


1.131 


144 


4,660 


8,218 


. 1.600 


1.708 


1,100 


157 


4,654 


8,842 



f Dite for 1908 ok inoompleto and inMounte. SpoobJ or chartored oar boon aro inohidoci for 
"■year only. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



214 



Public Sbrvicb Commission — Fibst District 



TABLE XX. STREET RAILWAY CASUALTIES, ipofr-xgao:- (A) Number ^ported aMh jeur 

SURFACX RaILWATB 



Yeab Ended Man- 

JuNE 30 — hattan 

1908 2,908 

1909 13,253 

1910 12,800 

1911 13.253 

1912 12,973 

1913 13,447 

1914 13,487 

1916 13,769 

1916 12.351 

1917 14,481 

1918 12,076 

1919 9,226 

1920 6,358 



Bronx! 


Brooklyn 
R.T. 

(part) 


Other 


Totel 


Rapid- 

transit 

rail- 

ways 


Grand 
toUli 


1,339 


8,279 


383 


12.909 


5.515 


18.424 


1.066 


7,918 


354 


22,591 


6.652 


29.243 


1.225 


7.945 


1.630 


23.600 


7,582 


31,182 


1.728 


8,567 


1.733 


25.281 


9,613 


34,894 


1,980 


9,124 


1.873 


25,950 


10,699 


36,649 


2,225 


9.731 


2.145 


27.548 


11,429 


38,977 


1,905 


11.227 


2,067 


28.636 


12,160 


40,846 


2.154 


10.004 


2.120 


28.047 


12.016 


40.063 


1,984 


10.097 


2,231 


23,633 


13.015 


39.678 


2.619 


9,905 


2,422 


29,427 


15.652 


45.079 


2.060 


9.341 


2.955 


26,432 


13.681 


40.113 


1.876 


8,566 


1.240 


20,903 


13.270 


34.178 


2,543 


6,954 


1.261 


17.116 

■ " - = 


12.990 


30.106 



(B) Fktal toddents rejiorted each year' 

SCBFACB RaILWATS RAPtD-TBANBlT RaILWATS 

Year Brook- Inter- Brook- Hudson 

EvDED lyn bor- lyn A 

June Man- R. T. ou«h R. T. Man- 

30 — hattan Bronx (part) Other Total R. T. (part) hattan Total 

1908.. 180 19 97 8 301 53 31 84 

1909.. 116 19 60 10 203 39 20 1 60 

1910.. 76 8 57 6 147 51 28 2 81 

1911.. 81 12 65 10 163 42 20 1 63 

1912.. 79 IS 39 6 142 59 15 74 

1913.. 84 14 53 13 13i 4( 12 56 

1914.. 64 11 58 5 133 43 31 79 

1915.. 55 11 44 8 113 68 21 1 83 

1916.. 56 11 33 7 107 53 28 1 82 

1917.. 73 20 42 12 147 52 27 79 

1918.. 66 12 53 32 163 33 41 80 

1919.. 52 14 32 8 106 64 128 1 193 

1920.. 31 12 35 12 90 48 28 2 78 



Grand 
total 

388 

265 

228 

231 

216 

220 

217 

206 

189 

226 

243 

299 

168 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



'Comparative Sxtmmabdbs of Tbansportation Statistics 215 

TABLS II. StTMt nilwmy ctnftltiM. 1908-19M: (C) P«wiit Ultod, d to tiil w tad m ] 



YsAB Endko Jmn 30 — Pimi^wi Employees OUien Total 

190S 86 66 248 388 

1909 42 46 177 266 

1910 68 61 119 228 

1911 63 46 123 231 

1912 66 36 115 216 

1913 68 46 117 220 

1914 60 38 119 217 

1915 67 47 102 206 

1916 60 61 88 189 

1917 , 69 41 126 226 

1918 70 60 123 243 

1919 163 46 90 299 

1920 64 47 01 162 



(D) Avence eiHimnti expended in tettleaMnti for penoMl Injofy ckdnM 

flait 
SetUement oompro- All 

Ybab^ Endbd Jimn 30 — before suit mised Judgmente eettlemente 

19H« 64896 1288 62 $678 72 $8156 

1915 60 26 223 37 603 46 93 82 

1916 62 46 236 43 665 62 96 84 

1917 69 10 216 63 689 96 96 39 

1918 67 88 237 13 732 46 110 26 

1919 76 24 297 66 886 28 134 10 

1920 78 00 822 59 1.267 00 119 39 

^ Some fiffuree slightly exceed those previously pablished in Annual Report text tables, which 
IfUer excluded Westchester Eleotrio. For all groups the large increases prior to 1914 were chiefly 
due to increasing thoroughness of returns. 

* Rguzes for 1908, 1909. and 1910 may include a few f^taUties on New York City roads in NaaMu 
county. Thereafter only those occurring within the <Aiy are included. 

' Figuns not available prior to 1914. 

* Data not complete. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



216 



Public Service Coboobsion — First District 



TABLE X3. OFnCBRS AND BMPLOTBBS, AND THEIR COMPENSATION: (A) Number, 
by chief ocenpatioiuU gronpe, ipoS-xgao 



Ybar mmwD Offioe 
Ji7ifB30~ OlBoen emplojeM 

1908 120 l.TZB 

1909 227 2,197 

1910 157 1,726 

1911 M66 *iMl 

1912 173 1,821 

1913 169 1,748 

1914 147 1.748 

1915 152 2,103 

1915 135 2.162 

1917 155 2,609 

1918 122 2,782 

1919 123 2,767 

1920 164 2,484 



iommO 


ondueton 


Other 










ud 
itven 


giutrds 


tnnqtor. 


Ftower 


Shopeand 
eerfaoaiei 


AU 
others 


Total 


7,485 


11,020 


10,708 


2.667 


5,140 




38.027 


6,799 


9,706 


9,882 


2,405 


5,493 




86,799 


6.766 


10,248 


10,602 


2.396 


5.424 


20 


37,389 


7.006 


10.696 


11.510 


2,495 


6,218 


6 


80,037 


7,186 


10,986 


10.906 


2,471 


5,618 


114 


30,275 


»7,466 


•11.230 


11.960 


2,348 


5.659 


134 


40,713 


7,216 


10,920 


11.224 


2.175 


5.998 


185 


80,588 


7,180 


10.816 


12.175 


2.464 


5,813 


283 


40,036 


6,919 


10,406 


11.804 


2,137 


6.519 


306 


40.478 


7.032 


11,292 


13.983 


2,604 


7.600 


328 


45.702 


6,078 


10,782 


14,120 


3,632 


6,777 


271 


44,664 


6,777 


11,624 


12.860 


2,667 


6.004 


126 


43,848 


6.407 


11.422 


12,023 


2,325 


6,060 


197 


41,001 



(B) Acsregate Mlaries and wases, xpoS^zpao 



Ybak 

■NDBO 

Juira 

30— OflSoen 

1008 8702,763 13 

1900 880,558 91 

1910 772,550 32 

1011 822,112 08 

1012 891,432 18 

1913 908,776 62 

1914 1.018,99142 

1915 985.318 49 

1916 975,034 89 

1917 965,233 38 

1918 060,037 80 

1010 038.867 00 

1020 1,625,070 83 



Oflloe 
employees 
$1,106,203 87 
1,814,084 05 
1.563.502 22 
1.504,152 10 
1,661,663 81 
1,910.328 14 
2,135,292 13 
2.711.403 30 
2,867,115 01 
3,295.660 30 
3,535,863 14 
3,786.816 68 
4,068.295 96 



Other 
empioyess 
$20,757,728 09 
23,354,631 82 
24,654,640 75 
26,558,522 84 
26.819.997 99 
26 J60,949 08 
28,356,245 91 
29.073.687 83 
30,321,015 74 
35.328.647 13 
39,850.700 27 
51.658,853 65 
64,021.088 24 



Total salaries 
and wages 
$22,656,695 09 
26,049,275 18 
26,990,702 29 
28.974,786 52 
29.373.003 48 
20.580.053 84 
31.505.520 46 
32.770.400 62 
34.163,165 64 
30,580,540 81 
44.347,001 80 
56,384,537 33 
60.714,463 52 



Portion not 
inohided 
instry. 
operating 



Balance induded 

in street-railway 

operating 



N.8. 

N 8 
$1,356,045 87 
1,471.766 04 
1,241,047 05 
1,435,883 73 
1.677,841 28 
2,843,043 40 
2,056,380 71 
4.843.106 63 
6.060.178 01 
5.152,815 08 
4.644.010 35 



N.8. 

N 8 
$25,634,'656 42 
27,503.017 58 
28,131,145 53 
28,144.170 11 
20,827.688 28 
20.027.366 22 
31.206.784 03 
34.746.344 18 
38.286,823 29 
51,231,721 35 
65,069,544 17 



(C) Diatribntion of operatiiig payrolls, xgxo-xgao 



YiarEnsu) 

Juini30— Mabtenaaoe 

1910« 4-5, ?2:^. 1578 76 

1911 tjJTi,505 38 

1912 rt, 1:^4.338 67 

1913 i>J-0,l79 18 

1914 0.4:ij«6 23 

1915 «.,:r J:i00 45 

1916 'J,1J2M32 68 

1917 7,Mli},rAl7S 

1918 H,fhVi,E00 27 

1919 i:;,:>i)^',468 72 

1920 15.1]Uli/377 18 



Power plant 

operation* 

$1,564.194 54 
1.560.488 70 
1.506.712 06 
1,498.168 62 
1,410.335 65 
1.360,457 70 
1.251,512 61 
1,395,265 81 
1,708,710 38 
2.358,058 07 
3.020.104 86 



Operation of cars* 
$16,245,003 34 
17.465,655 53 
18,275.008 12 
18,383.005 76 
19.238.948 53 
19.358.059 64 
20.604.916 27 
22,899,392 52 
25.053.412 66 
33,016,664 86 
42.200.220 11 



Other operating 



82.001.579 78 
2.034.366 97 
2.134.406 68 
2.136.816 55 
2.356.717 82 
2.444.548 43 
2.428.223 37 
2.832.144 07 
2.871,590 98 
3,347.629 71 
3.858.542 02 



Total compensation 
included In 
street railway 
operating OTpenses 

$25,684,656 42 
27.503.017 58 
28,131.145 63 
28.144,170 11 
29.827.688 28 
29,927,866 22 
31.206.784 03 
34.746,844 18 
38,286.828 20 
51.281,721 36 
66,060,644 17 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



1 



CoMPARAHVB Sttmmaribs OF Transpobtahon Statisticb 217 

TIBLB 13. Ofleera and omployMS, uid th«lr o on p t aM fUmi (D) Ratio (par cant) of payrolli 
to total azpoaaa of Mch dapaftmant, z^zo^xpao 

OtlMT All 

MiiA- Power Operation opcntinc operatiiv 

Tbak Eaoao Jum 30 — tenaxwo plant ofean expenaef 



1910« 47.25 19.18 06.44 32.91 58.81 

1911 49.34 18.77 94.93 32.84 59.80 

1912 45.92 18.37 95.11 34.17 5924 

1913 43.45 17.62 94.04 32.75 57.82 

1114 45.18 15.65 95.57 36.68 59.52 

WIS 44.21 16.14 94.92 39.72 59.47 

1916 44.04 14.50 96.15 38.79 59.97 

1917 49.94 15.08 95.66 37.69 62.09 

1918 53.67 15.26 95.59 40.05 63.08 

1919 66.50 16.17 95.66 41.47 67.42 

1910 55.96 17.79 96.01 45.61 67.74 



(X) Avaiaca wagas of car-platform man and tkkat aganta on Juna 30. 1909-1920 ' 

I MotOnCBM COHDVORWS, OVABM AMD 

\ AKD Dritibs Ticot Aoiim 



Number perhour Ntfmber perhovr 

Jina30— ineeryiee (oenta) imerrioo (eenta) 

1909* 7,099 24.03 10,874 

1910 7,087 24.99 11,429 

1911 7,551 25.82 12,276 22.42 

1912 7,597 25.74 11,928 22.40 

1918 7,171 26.87 11,009 22.96 

19M 7,532 27.24 11,717 23.36 

191$ 7.341 27.52 11,738 22.22 

1916 7,350 28.67 12.246 24.63 

»I7 7,482 30.99 13,111 27.52 

1918 6.554 33.98 12,843 28.53 

1919 7,231 47.43 13,953 41.28 

1920 6.848 61.88 14.007 55.03 

> Inehidee inspeotom, train darka, diapatoham, atartera, depot maateia, ticket agenta, Ngiatar 
taken, latamen. platfoim men. tranafer amenta, awitchmen, fla«men, yvdman. road and track 
, channelrrail men, atation portera and watchmen, freight kborera. hoaUen and 



>Qffioeia of Interborough not aeparatdy returned from office employeea. Aaaumed aama aa in 
]9ia 

*Fh>bably aKoeaaiva owing to unexplained inoreaaea in numbera reported by New York Rya. Co. 

<Chama to oonatruction account, auxiliary operationa, other oompaniea, etc. 
-^1 The diatribation between power plant and operation of cara aa publiahed in Table ZII of 
Ammal Repcnla for 1014 to 1017 haa been reviaed to bring eatimatea made therein for the Inter- 
borough into eloaer amement with the achedule of operating expenaea. 

• figurea not available prior to 1910. 

' Kxcmt for 1013 (for which aee note 3) the number of employeea aa given in Div. E axceeda 
that of Dhr. A. efaiefly beeauae Div. E giyea the number on the roUa at the ckiae of the fiaoal year; 
DiT. A, the number who actually worked and received pay during the laat week. 

• Kguiaa not available prior to 1000. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



218 PXTBLIC SeBVIGB CiOlfMlBSION — FiRST DISTRICT 

TABLE u. FINAIICIAL SUMMARY OF STRBBT RAILWAY OPBRATIONS 



Inn 



]^910> 



1911 



1912 



1913* 



Opmnting itiwnnw 

Fuasiiierreventte 

Other ^.ly. operating r«v«Di]e 

Total at ry. operating revenue 

Opvding Bxpnu9$ and Taxe$ 

Maint. of way and airact.— expended 

Biaint. of way and nniet.— reeonred 

Maint. of etiuipment — expended 

Klaint. of equipment— leeerved 

Total maintenanoe 

Horoe power, revmue-ear servioe 

Operation of power plant 

Operation of oare 

Injuriea and damages 

General (ind. traflSc) expenees 

Total et. ry. operating expenees 

Street railway taxes 

Total expenses and taxes 

Ineome and SvrpUu 

Income from st. ry. operations 

Other ineome 

QrosB ineome 

Dedttotions from ineome: 

Interest on funded debt 

Other interest 

Rent for lease of road« 

Other rents 

Other dedufitione* 

Total 

Net corporate ineome 

Dividends declared (operating eoe.) 

Surplus after dividends (operating eoe.) 

Aomunulated surphis (operating eoe. j 

Dividends deelared (lessor oos.) 

Aooumulated surplus (leesor cos.) 

Total dividends (operating and lessor cos.) 

Total aooumulated surphis (op. and lessor cos.). 



$75,973,728 
3(620,182 



179.561.935 
4Ji89.480 



883,684.799 
4,557,345 



179,583,910 



883,751,415 



888,242.144 



86.280.880 

181.221 

5.453.625 

411,241 



86,190,916 
039,467 
6,985,536 
Or 96,733 



85.870.850 

276:575 

6,048.772 

1.140,570 



812,326,1167 
435.107 
7,722.019 
17,020,731 
&.169.071 
2.913,037 



813,040,252 
410,;835 
7,,Q50,034 
18,399,082 
3.279^416 
2.914.945 



813.336,767 
' 437.694 
8,25^.658 
19^14,460 
3)309.340 
2,936.643 



843^586,932 
5,148,324 



845,993.964 
5,495'881 



$47,487,562 

5,803,990 



$48,735,266 



851.489,845 



$58,291,352 



880,868.664 
1,964,943 



832,261,570 
2.101,083 



884,950.792 
3,n5,967 



832,823,597 



$3«,363,263 



$38,726,759 



$87,718,350 
4,423,246 



892.141.605 



86.589.516 
Cr 151 .907 
5.716.646 
1,945^303 



814,000.558 
333,349 
8,170,228 
19,547,763 
3.464^15 
3,060.434 



848,675.647 
6.095.620 



$54,771,167 



$37,370,438 
8,768.925 



$41,139 363 



$7,537,449 
2,164,255 

11,672,535 

1,629,196 

260,346 



$7,828,597 
2,528.756 

11.644.521 

1.777.665 

412.650 



$9,058,540 

> 3.371,969 

11,739.174 

1,783.0«5 

700,370 



811.734,606 

8,605,855 

11.723.594 

1.801,650 

475.797 



$23,263,781 



$24,102,189 



826,653.118 



$29,341,592 



89,559,816 
4,328,635 
5.231.181 
9,865,527 
6.036,823 
9,055,391 
10,365.458 
18,920,918 



$10,171,074 
4.376,044 
5.795.030 
14.855.186 
6.580.673 
8,932,640 
10,056,n7 
23,787,826 



812.073,641 
6.922,462 
5,151,179 
18,185,236 
7,259,086 
8,903.036 
14.181.548 
26,388.272 



$11,797,771 
7.182.227 
4,615.544 
17.239.496 
6,448.140 
7.939,408 
13.630.367 
25.178.904 



1 For ospitaliaation data, eee table 0. 
<For 1908 and 1900 see 1018 Report. 

* The originally published figures for operating expenses and surplua adjustments of 1913 have 
been revised by the transfer from the latter group to the former of $431,600. depreciation chai«eB 
reported by the oompanies of the Third Avenue system as inoome oharges. but originally tabulated 
as charges to Surplus. 

* Rents have been reclassified throughout the period through the restriotion of this item to 
oompensation accruing under long-term leases (or agreements) transferring exclusive ] 
of entire ralhoad properties to the 1 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



**I*AIUTIVE SXJMMARIES OF TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS 219 

^ THB CITV rv» 

xOTinrar yQ^^ ,qj^ YEARS BlfDBD JITNB 30, X910-Z9JO » 




^\S&i^tearv^,^y^;Ji:Atabto (XVII) thfouih omiwion of deficit of $589,e98 of Second 
w«ng^ «x«stiit^(^^u«lZ^«^0<i l^ receiver; and deduction of $18,000 dividend accrual of Twenty- 
t^%tara£\«^^^^S?^^^M, 1918, not vet taken into company's balance sheet. , . , 






'^Ajky ani. ^'a.'oe< 



in 1920. $1,000,000 dividends of N. Y. dc Harlem, applicable to steam 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



220 PuBuc Servicb Combossion — First District 

TABLB Z4. OPBKATnrO RATIOS FOR 8BLSCTBD COMPANIBS 

Inter- New York 

boroush Con- New York New York Richmond 

Rapid Bolidated Railways Union Brooklyn A Lon« (Staten 

Trannt R. R. Co. Co. Railway Heiffute bland Island) 

FsiCAL YmiB Co. (i) (s) Co. R. R. Co. R. R. Co. oompanies 

OFBRATDfO BATIO OF ■XnOISM (BWORB TAXXS) TO OPBBATINa BBTBinjaS 

1010 38.00 62.60 70.40 67.70 01.60 60.60 84.40 

1911 41.66 60.63 64.86 70.80 61.08 62.21 80.80 

1912 41.76 60.17 68.07 72.06 60.66 76.63 83.70 

1018 40.80 60.63 67.02 67.13 67.81 87.87 88.48 

1014 38.60 63.31 63.20 76.71 67.06 82.04 96.47 

1016 38.71 64.72 63.82 70.24 60.80 72.62 70.26 

1016 30.03 66.42 61.06 66.60 68.09 70.03 77.74 

1017 41.60 64.83 68.46 82.06 60.86 86.64 82.06 

1018 47.20 67.36 68.22 76.01 63.72 82.06 91.84 

1010 60.72 67.70 83.63 80.61 74.00 87.73 102.79 

1020 61.67 77.26 100.30 70.64 86.84 100.10 112.40 

OPBBATINO BBTBiriTB (CBHTS) PBB CAB MILB 

1010 26.46 26.48 36.41 22.82 20.20 

1011 24.18 26.46 36.60 24.61 20.64 

1012 23.68 26.68 36.16 26.18 80.81 

1013 24.34 26.60 30.37 26.10 31.68 

1014 24.06 26.04 40.10 26.81 31.78 

1016 24.48 26.00 38.40 26.76 30.64 

1016 26.30 26.28 30.02 27.27 31.07 

1017 27.32 28.62 30.74 27.64 31.80 

1018 26.76 30.07 44.16 20.40 32.66 

1010 26.61 32.26 46.60 37.26 36.11 

1020 30.73 36.10 64.00 46.07 37.60 

OPBBATXNO BXPBKSE0 (CBMTS) PBB CAB MILB 

1010 0.67 18.30 24.01 16.46 18.02 

1011 10.03 13.37 23.15 17.30 18.00 

1012 0.84 13.38 21.32 18.30 18.86 

1013 0.03 13.42 22.80 16.86 18.26 

1914 0.61 18.83 26.34 10.64 18.42 

1016 0.48 13.73 24.61 18.08 18.34 

1016 0.01 14.01 24.37 18.16 18.33 

1017 11.36 16.60 27.21 22.84 10.00 

1018 12.62 17.76 30.12 22.68 20.74 

1010 16.66 21.84 30.06 30.00 26.08 

1020 18.02 27.11 66.16 36.61 32.66 

OPBBATXKa BXPBirSBS (CBNTS) PBB BBTBNUB PASSBNOBB 

1010 1.06 2.74 3.61 3.64 3.10 

1011 2.14 2.66 3.33 3.76 3.14 

1012 2.16 2.63 3.06 3.00 3.06 

1013 2.00 2.60 2.07 3.66 2.04 

1014 1.08 2.73 3.21 4.01 2.94 

1016 2.00 2.80 3.21 3.71 3.03 

1016 2.06 2.82 3.06 . 3.64 2.06 

1017 2.17 2.80 3.43 4.43 3.03 

1018 2.48 2.06 8.41 4.12 3.21 

1919 3.24 3.48 4.18 4.33 3.72 

1920 3.82 4.00 6.64 4.21 4.69 

For footnotes see following page. 



28.38 


10.84 


26.96 


20.81 


26.07 


21.43 


24.93 


22.14 


26.16 


21.24 


26,i4 


21.80 


26.21 


22.06 


i:ii 


24.31 


27.41 . 


32.30 


30.26 


32.69 


32.42 


17.19 


16.76 


16.16 


18.58 


18.96 


17.94 


21.91 


10.59 


20.86 


20.49 


19.18 


17.28 


20.16 


17.85 


21.49 


10.94 


23.36 


25.04 


28.33 


31.11 


32.62 


36.43 


8.08 


4.20 


3.11 


4.53 


8.79 


4.25 


4.39 


4.51 


4.16 


4.92 


3.67 


4.06 


4.07 


8.98 


4.83 


4.21 


4.66 


4.69 


6.01 


5.25 


6.64 


5.09 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



GOMFARATiyB SuMBCARIBS OF TbANSPOBTATION STATISTICS 221 
TABLB 14* OpofBtiBg imtlM for lelectid tmmtndm — Comdudtd 



teOAL YBABf 
1910 


Inter- New Yoik 
boroosh Con- New York New Yoik £ 
B^ind aoUdated RaUwaye Union Brooklyn A Lone 
Trnnait R. R. Co. Co. Railway Heichto lalanT 
Co. {}) i>) Co. R. R. Co. R. R. Co. o( 

OPBBATUrO BXFSllBBa PBB OAB HOUB 

$1.57 $1.50 $1.79 $1.31 $1.85 $3.05 

1.04 1.57 1.00 1.48 1.87 1.98 
1.03 1.68 1.43 1.55 1.41 3.13 

1.05 1.58 1.54 1.45 1.43 3.48 
l.OO 1.04 1.09 1.07 1.43 3.60 
1.58 1.04 1.70 1.58 1.44 3.30 

1.00 1.77 1.70 1.57 1.43 3.40 
1.90 3.05 1.80 1.93 1.51 2.03 
2.11 2.37 2.03 1.99 1.03 2.78 

2.01 2.95 2.72 2.05 2.07 8.39 
3.10 3.73 8.37 8.80 3.00 8.87 

OOOT OF OPHBATIOIf OF CABS PBB OAB HOUB 

$0.05 $0.55 $0.05 $0.57 $0.57 $0.55 
0.05 0.58 0.08 0.01 0.00 0.60 
0.05 0.57 0.04 0.03 0.01 0.09 
0.00 0.50 0.05 0.01 0.03 0.09 
0.00 0.57 0.07 0.03 0.00 0.05 
0.00 0.57 0.08 0.04 0.00 0.07 
0.71 0.08 0.70 0.05 0.07 0.09 
0.89 0.74 0.81 0.70 0.74 0.78 
l.Ol 0.85 0.90 0.80 0.79 0.77 
1.34 1.18 1.31 1.13 1.06 1.30 
1.54 1.54 1.49 1.40 1.34 1.60 

. $143,371 $74,069 $88,078 $19,895 $33,583 $8,004 
147.053 70.145 83.705 30.074 85.115 9,439 
170,333 70.303 90.953 30,047 38,155 9,458 
177.904 08.070 93,560 31.034 39.470 9.060 
183.834 71,479 89.015 30.163 39.180 9,743 
181,460 71,837 88,353 30,333 37.003 10,384 
182,792 02,920 80.907 21.193 38.494 9^957 
180,081 03,014 70,505 18,400 88.999 9,805 
155,005 05,830 79.973 30,600 37,403 11.408 
130.700 73,073 81.433 31,539 38,113 13.400 
155.994 83,573 89,059 35,010 43.917 13,733 

OF MAXMTBNAMOB OF WAT AND BTBUCTUBBi PBB MILB OF TBAOK 

$7,701 $3,320 $13,948 $1,580 $2,804 $523 
8.043 8.292 9.549 2,031 2,941 590 
9.453 8.880 7.325 1.949 8.340 769 
9.522 8,003 8.300 1,804 8.452 781 
9.672 4,329 10.^920 2.455 3.794 970 
9.749 4,404 10.^25 1.913 4.212 1.189 
9.772 3,848 10}832 3,810 4:311 1.315 
9,^385 8.804 9.318 1.583 4.131 1,308 
8.730 4«050 9.050 3.177 3,811 1.384 
8,983 4,108 13.435 3.011 3.590 1,372 

11.105 7.010 19.730 8.405 4.903 1.193 


(SUten 
laland) 
impaniea 

81. 3P 


1911 

1913 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1910 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1930 

1910 


1.54 
1.49 
1.08 
1.80 
1.58 
1.03 
1.83 
3.34 
3.71 
8.09 

$0.54 


1911 

1913 

1913 

1914 


0.57 
0.58 
0.00 
0.58 


1915 


0.5$ 


1910 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1910 

1911 

1912 


0.59 
0.07 
0.70 
1.07 
1.39 


1918 

1914 

1915 

1910 

1917 

1918 


10.573 
10.918 
11.100 
11.010 
11.901 
11.933 


1919 

1920. 


13.459 
10.004 

$1,199 


COCT 

1910 


1911 


1.818 


1913 

1913 


1,553 
1,990 


1914 


3.607 


1915 


1,048 
900 


1910 


1917 

1918 


1.300 


1919 

1920 


1.473 
3.003 






(I) On Deo. 1. 
tofoimtheN. r 


1912, Brookhm Union B1.R.R., Sea Beaoh Ry.. and Ouianie R. R. qombined 
, CoiMoUdatod R. R. Go. Figuiea hera tabulated for yean prior to 1913 are for 



C<)££Kvtedaa tha'Metropolitan Street Ry. (Reo'n) for the yean 1910 and 1911. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



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238 Public Service Commission — First District 



NOTE REGARDING DEPRECIATION ACCOUNTS 

The Uniform System of Accounts prescribed by the Commission for street 
railway companies provides that operating expenses shall include under 
the head of maintenance the estimated amount of capital consumed, which 
is defined as ^* the amount estimated to be necessary to cover such wear and 
tear and obsolescence and inadequacy as liave accrued " during thp fiscal 
period. Until otherwise ordered, such estimated deterioration is based on 
a rule determined by the accounting corporation and filed with the Com- 
mission. From the total estimated deterioration during the period, there 
is deducted the actual amount expended in repairs, and the remainder is 
charged to depreciation or credited if the actual amount expended for repairs 
exceeds the estimated deterioration. Three depreciation accounts have been 
provided in operating expenses, " Depreciation of Way and Structures," 
" Depreciation of Equipment," and ** General Amortization " ; amounts 
charged to these accounts are concurrently credited to the account *' Accrued 
Amortization of Capital," the official title of the depreciation reserve. 

Under paragraph 30, where the term " amortize " is first used in the 
accounting order, there appears the following explanatory note: 

Note. — By " amortization " of any charge or credit is meant its gradual 
extinction. The word is broader than the word " depreciation," since the 
latter is restricted ordinarily to tangible property. The word " depreciation *' 
also imports more of tlie idea of fluctuating value and is complicated some- 
what with the question of cost of replacement at market prices. Because 
it is considered unnecebsary in connection with the gradual consumption 
or expiration of life of capital to consider the question of cost of replace- 
ment until the replacement is actually made, at which time the cost of 
replacement is duly charged to the appropriate account, and because pro- 
vision is necessary' for the gradual extinction of certain charges (such as 
those for some kinds of capital, those for extraordinary casualties, for dis- 
count on debt, etc. ) . to wliicli the term " depreciation " does not well 
apply, it is considered advisable to use the term '' amortization *' in connec- 
tion with the extinction of such cliarges, and of certain corresponding 
credits, such as premiums on debt outstanding. 

The text of the depreciation accounts is as follows: 

(730.) DEPR>X)IATION OF WAY AND STRUCTURES. 
Each month the sum of the amounts charged for that month to the fore- 
going repair accounts in Maintenance of Way and Stmctures shall be com- 
pared with the amount estimated to be necessary to cover such wear and 
tear and obsolescence and inadequacy as have accrued during the month on 
all way and structures of the accounting corporation. If the estimated 
deterioration exceeds the total repairs, the account " Depreciation of Way 
and Structures " shall be debited and the reserve account "Accrued Amorti- 
zation of Capital " shall be credited Avith an amount equal to the excess. 
If the sum of the repairs exceeds the estimated deterioration, the account 
*' Accrued Amortization of Capital" shall be debited and "Depreciation of 
Way and Structures" credited with an amount equal to the excess. WTiere 
capital is substantially oontinuous, such as tracks, and can not he satis- 
factorily individualized, the capital shall be kept in efficient operating con- 
dition through repair, and the renewals and replacements of parts thereof 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 239 

shall be considered repairs. In the case of buildings, towers, bridges, tres- 
tles, and other separate structures capable of being readily individualized, 
charges to this account must be sufficient to provide (in respect of such 
capital) in the account "Accrued Amortization of Capital " by the time 
such structures go out of service a reserve equal to the original cost thereof, 
less salvage, to which account such original cost, less salvage, may be 
charged, except as provided in account (No. 8100) "Fixed Capital, Decem- 
ber 3L 1908." 

XoTE. — Until otherwise ordered, the *' amount estimated to }ye necessary 
to rover such wear and tear and obsolescence and inadequacy as have accrued 
during any month shall be based on a rule determined by the accounting 
corporation. Such rule may be derived from a consideration of the said 
corporation's history and experience during the preceding five years and 
the accrual may be on the basis of revenue car-miles. Whatever may be 
its basis such rule and a sworn statement of the facts and expert opinions 
and estimates upon which it is based shall be filed with the Public Service 
Commission on or before July 1, 1909; each amendment of such rule and 
a Bworn statement of the facts and expert opinions and estimates upon 
which such amendment is based shall be filed %rith the Public Service Com- 
mii^sion before it is used by the accounting corporation, and shall show the 
date when it is to be effective. Such rules and statements shall be filed 
upon sheets S^^ x 11 inches or 9^^ x 12 inches and shall be entitled "Rule 
of the (here naming the accounting corporation) concerning Depreciation 
of Way and Structures.*' 

(Uniform system of accounts for street and electric railways, page 54.) 

(760.) DEPRECTATIOX OF EQUIP^IENT. 
Each month the sum of the amounts charged for that month to the fore- 
iroing repair accounts in ^kfiaintenance of Equipment shall be compared with 
the amount estimated to be necessary to cover such wear and tear and 
c4»oIe$cence and inadequacy as have accrued during the month on all 
equipment of the accounting corporation. If the estimated deterioration 
exceeds the total repairs, the account " Depreciation of Equipment *' shall 
be debited and the reserve account ''Accrued Amortization of Capital " 
credited with an amount equal to the excess; if the sum of the repairs 
exceeds the estimated deterioration, the accoimt "Accrued Amortization of 
Capital *' shall be debited and " Depreciation of Equipment *' credited with 
an amount equal to the excess. Tlie net amount charged (or credited) to 
this account for any month, and concurrently credited (or charged) to the 
reserve account "Accrued Amortization of Capital," must be sufficient, ex- 
cept as provided in the account (No. SlOO) "Fixed Capital, December 31, 
1908,*' to provide in that account, in respect of the several items of equip- 
ment by the time such items go out of ser\'ice. a reserve equal to the 
original cost thereof, less salvage. When any capital is retired from service, 
the amount (estimated if not known) originally charged to a capital ac- 
count in respect thereof shall be credited to such capital account, and 
(except as provided in the account "Fixed Capital, Dec. 31, 1908") the 
original money cost of such capital le8» salvage, if any. shall be charged to 
the account "Accrued Amortization of Capital," any necessary adjusting 
entry being made in the proper account under " Corporate Surplus or 
Deficit." 

^OTE.— Until otherwise ordered the " amount estimated to be necessary 
to cover such wear and tear and obsolescence and inadequacy as have accmcd 



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240 Public Service Commission — First District 

during" any month shall be based on a rule determined by the aocountiiig^ 
cckrporation. Such rule may be derived from a consideration of the said 
corporation's history and experience during the preceding five years &nd 
the accrual may be on the basis of revenue car-miles. Whatever may be its. 
basis such rule and a sworn statement of the facts and expert opinions and 
estimates upon which it is based shall be filed with the Public Service Oom- 
mission on or before July 1, 1909; each amendment of such rule and a 
sworn statement of the facts and expert opinions and estimates upon which 
such amendment is based shall be filed with the Public Service Commission 
before it is used by the accounting corporation and shall show the date 
when it is to be effective. Such rules and statements shall be filed upon 
sheets 8% x 11 or 9% z 12 inches and shall be entitled " Rule of the (here 
naming the accoimting corporation) concerning Depreciation of Equipment.'* 
(Uniform system of accounts for street and electric railways, page 59.) 

(S842.) GENERAL AMORTIZATION. 

Charge to this account at the close of each fiscal period and credit to the 
account "Accrued AnK>rtization of Capital ** such amount as is attributable 
to the period in respect of amortiEation of intangible capital not assignable 
to Maintenance of Way and Structures or to Maintenance of Equipment. 
This includes such matters as amortization of limited franchisee, amorti- 
zation of organization, eto. which shall be based on rule to be filed with the 
Public Service Commission on or before July 1, 1909. 

(Uniform system of accounts for street and electric railways, page 68.) 

(374.) ACCRUED AMORTIZATION OF CAPIllAL. 

Credit to this account such amounts as are charged from time to time to 
" Operating Expenses," or other accounts to cover depreciation of way and 
structures, depreciation of equipment, and other amortization of capitals 
When any capital is retired from service, the original money cost thereof 
(estimated if not known, and where estimated, tliat fact and the facta 
upon which the basis is estimated shall be stated in the entry), less salvage^ 
shall (except as provided in the account " Fixed Capital, December 31*. 
1908") be charged to this accoimt. The amoimt originally entered or con- 
tained in the charges to any capital account in respect of such capital so 
going out of service shall be credited to such capital account, and any 
necessary adjusting entry made to the appropriate sub-account under the 
account " Corporate Surplus or Deficit." 

(Uniform system of accounts for street and electric railways, page 31. > 



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Street Railway Companies 



241 



BELT LIKE RAILWAY CORPORATION 

Incorporated December 24, 1912 (successor to Central Park, North and Bast Elver 
B. B. Co.) 

Hie Tliird AFenne By. Co. controls the respondent through ownership of the 
capital stock acquired August 4, 1913. 

Important Changet durino the Year.— No new powers or franchises were acquired. 



Fimed Capital Changet during Year 
(For balance in each fixed capital account at close of year, see Table XVIII.) 



TITLK or ACCOUNT 

Grading 

Ties 

Rails, rail fastenings and Joints. 

Special work , 

Underground construction 

Track laying and surfacing 

Paving 

Underground conduits 

Distribution system 

Reyenae cars ,.. 

Electric equipment of cars 



INSTALLED DURING TSAR 



Additbna RepUoemcots 



1823.00 



1823 09 



Retired 
during year 

121.460 00 

4,96100 

34,292 00 

17,669 00 

11,818 00 

11,109 00 

95.517 00 

594 00 

1,065 00 

84,607 43 

68,337 29 

|3U,849 72 



Bspenditures for Principal Projects.— Paving renewed on two-foot strip outside 
tracks. Fifty-ninth street, between Second and Fifth avenues, 1823.09. 

Property Retired during the year from Fimed Capital, Dec. SI, 19(W.— None. 

Sguiptnent Betired during Fear.— 60 closed storage battery passenger cars bodies 
bought in 1913 ; 60 sets of single car trucks. 

Power Bought, Bold or Bmehanged.— See abstract of Third Avenue Railway Co., 
Ibid. 

Corporate Deficit.— Debit balance June 30, 1919, 1105,306.51; debit balance for year 
transferred from income, 120,814.82; Second Avenue R. R. Co., Receiver, adjustment 
of 1913 charges, $82.91 ; to write off track and roadway abandoned along the Bast 
Belt Line, $122,046.66; total debits, $248,248.90. Credit adjustment of 1916 State 
fnnchise tax, $5,241.27. Deficit, June 30, 1920, $243,007.63. 

Oifteer*.— President, S. W. Huff; Vice-President, L. Sutherland; Secretary, W. C. 
Barrows; Assistant Secretary, J. Maroney; Treasurer, A. D. Sage; Assistant 
iTeasurer, F. Kessel ; Auditor, B. 6. Steinets ; Assistant Auditor, W. Farrington ; 
Attorney, A. T. Davison ; Claim Agent, J. W. Tenson ; Superintendent of Trans- 
portation, W. O. Thompson; Cteneral Purchasing Agent, C. WItael. 

IHreotort.— B. M. Burghard, O. W. Davison, S. W. Huff, A. Iselin, Jr., B. A. 
Manice^ J. W. Flatten, W. B. Roosevelt, J. H. Seaman, F. H. Shlpman, L. F. 
Straus, A. S. Webb, A. R. Horr, J. M. Jarvls. 

Main Busfnest Office.— fa»% Third Ave., New York, N. T. 

Report verified by A. D. Sage, Treasurer, September 80, 1920, 



THE BLBBCKER STRBBT AND FULTON FERRY RAILROAD COMPANY 

Lbs SOB 

Organised December 12, 1884, under the New York SUte Railroad Law of 1860. 
^e New \ork Railways Company through title to securities acquired May 16» 
1917, has the right to exercise the major part of the voting power in this company 
(bolMng $863,600 out of $800^000 par value of outstanding stock] .^ It la also the 
operator. 



*ftom report of New York Railways Co. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



242 Public Service Commission — First District 

The Bleeoker Street and Fulton Ferry Bailroad Corporation 

Terms of Lease,— See 1917 Report. 

important Changes during Year.— Hone. 

Fixed Capital Changes during Year.— None. 

Corporate Surplus.— Credit balance at beginning of the year. $113,000.08 ; net 
income for year, |14,008. Surplus, June 90, 1920, $127,012.03. This includes rental 
accrued but unpaid (2 years. $27,000, and allowance for corporate expenses, IB months 
$900), not shown on the balance sheet. 

Officers.— President, II. IT. Vreeland ; Vice-President, W. Leon Pepperman ; Secre- 
tary, H. M. Fisher : Assistant Secretary, H. C. Wigren ; Treasurer, J. H. Campbell ; 
Auditor, F. Samuelson ; General Attorney, James L. Quaclcenbush. 

Directors.— J. H. Campbell, H. M. Fisher, E. F. J. Oaynor, Frank Hedley, George 
Keegan, W. Leon Pepperman, H. H. Vreeland, Charles B. Warren, D. W. Ross. 

Main Business Office.— 19o Broadway, New York City. 

Report verifled by H. II. Vreeland, President, September 28, 1920. 



BRIDGE OPERATING COMPANY 

Incorporated July 29, 1904, under the Business Corporation Law of the State of 
New York. Stock control of the company has been held Jointly by the Brooklyn 
Rapid Transit Company and the New York Railways Company, each of whom held 
$50,000 par value of its $100,000 of capital stock. Until Jun« 1, 1920, when the tem- 
porary permit of the company to operate over Wllliamsburgh Bridge expired, the 
Brooklyn Heights Railroad Co., acted as operating agent for the owners, recelvins 
therefor an administration fee of $5,000 per annum, and for depot, storage and shop 
facilities, $2,600 per annum.^ 

Important Changes during Year.— None. 

Fixed Capital Changes during Year, — None. 

Corporate Surplus.- Surplus, June 30, 1919, $16,541.77 ; credit balance transferred 
from income, $5,670.59; surplus, June 30, 1920, $22,212.36. 

Officers.- President, T. S. Williams ; Vice-President, W. Leon Pepperman ; Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, C. D. Meneely ; Auditor, Frank Samuelson. 

Directors.— G. D. Youmans, C. D. Meneely, T. S. Williams, W. Leon Pepperman, 
1'. T. Wood, Ralph Norton. 

Main Business Offi-ees.— So Clinton St., Brooklyn, and 1€5 Broadway, New Tork 
City. 

Report verified by C. D. Meneely, Treasurer, October 28, 1920. 



BROADWAY AND SEVENTH AVENUE RAILROAD COMPANY 

liGSSOR 

Incorporated May 26, 1864 under the Railroad Law. The New York Railways 
Company, through title to securitieB acquired December 30, 1911, in the reorganisa- 
tion of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company has the right to exercise the 
major part of the voting power in this company, holding $1,399,300 out of $2,100,000 
par value of outstanding; stock. It Is also the lessee of the property. 

Terms of Lease.— See 1917 Report. 

Important Changes during Year.- Job E. Hedges was appointed Receiver, effective 
as of midnight September 30, 1919. No new powers or franchises were acquirted. 

Fixed Capital Changes during Year.— None. 

Corporate Surplus,- Credit balance at beginning of year, $80.170.41 ; net corporate 
Income of year, $209,815.92. Surplus June 30, 1920, $289,986.33. This includes rental 
accnied but unpaid (l yoar, 9 months, $367,500), not shown on balance sheet. 

* [From documents on file with the Transit Commission.] 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 243 

Broadway and S«Tent]i Avemie Railroad Company 

Officert.— President, H. H. Vreeland ; Vice-Preaident, W. Leon Pepperman ; Secre- 
tary, H. M. FUher ; Assistant Secretary, H. C. Wlgren ; Treasurer, J. H. Campbell ; 
Aadltor, F. Samaelson; General Attorney, James It. Qaackenbush. 

Additional officers were appointed by the Receiver as follows : General Manager, 
Frank Hedley ; Counsel, Wlnthrop & Stimson ; Secretary, W. H. Anderson ; Director 
rf Welfare, IT. H. Vn^land ; Real estate officer, H. W. Warrea 

Directors.— J. H. Campbell, H. M. Fisher, E. F. J. Gaynor, Phoenix Ingraham, W 
Leon Pepperman, Alfred Skitt, H. H. Vreeland, Chas, E. Warren, D. W. Ross. 

ifoln Bu9in€99 Oi)fce.— 165 Broadway, New Tork City. 

Report verifled by Job E. Hedges, Receiver, September 30, 1920. 



THE BRONX TRACTION COMPANY 

Lessor 

Incorporated May 20, 1904, as a consolidation of the Suburban Traction Company, 
Van Nest, West Farms and Westchester Traction Company, Wakefield and West- 
cheater Traction Company, West Farms and Westchester Traction Company, and 
Williamsbrldge and Westchester Traction Company. The Union Railway Company 
or New York City controls this company through ownership of its stock, and it is 
also the operator under lease or agreement. 

Impartitnt Changet during Tear.— None. No new powers or franchises were ac- 
Qoired. 

Fifed Capital itutalled since Dec. SI, /908.— Additions and betterments: Ties, 
n.nO^: Rails, rail fastenings and jointH. $96.'}.40: Paving, 112.579.55 : Poles and 
flxtnr«s, 11,068.93; Transmission system, $101.78; Distribution system |107.^ ; Total, 
»532J7. 

Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fixed Capital, Dec. SI, 1908. To write 
off the estimated original cost of the overhead trolley on Port Morris avenue be- 
tween East Tremont avenue and Van Buren street. D. T. center pole construction, 
0.1S9 iftiles, 1244.73; 13 iron poles at $26.50, $344.50; toUl, $589.23, credited to electric 
line construction. 

Corporate Deficit.— Debit balance at beginning of year, $99,444.43; net corporate 
\09» for year. $1,265.32. Deficit, June 30. 1920. $100,709.95. 

O^lcert.— President, S. W. Huff; Vlce*^President, L. Sutherland; Secretary, W. C. 
Burrows ; Assistant Secretary, J. Maroney ; Treasurer, A. D. Sage : Assistant Trea- 
surer, F. Kessel ; Auditor, B. G. Steinetz ; Assistant Auditor, W. Farrington ; Gen- 
eral Counsel, A. T. Davison. 

Direeton.— 'B. M. Burghard, G. W. Davison, 8. W. Huff, A. Iselln, Jr., J. W. 
Flatten. W. E. Roosevelt, J. H. Seaman, L. F. Straus, F. H. Shipman. 

ilaln BusincM Office^— 2396 Third avenue. New York City 

Report Terlfled by A. D. Sage, Treasurer, September 30, 1920. 



THE BROOKLYN AND NORTH RIVER RAILROAD COMPANY 

Incorporated January 2, 1912. The company Is controlled Jointly by the follow- 
in; corporations : The Brooklyn Heights Railroad Company, 125 shares ; The Nassau 
Electric Railroad Company, 125 shares; The Coney Island and Brooklyn Railroad 
Company, 2oO shares ; New York Railways Company, 250 shares ; Third Avenue Rail- 
way Company, 250 shares. 

Important Changes during Year.— Tlie franchise granted by the City of New 
York under contract dated September 9, 1913. was declared forfeited by resolution 
of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, January 9, 1920, approved by the 
^layor, January 24.' 1920. Operation of the company's line had been discontinued 
October I, 1919. No new powers or franchises acquired. 

Fixfi Capital Changes duy-ing Year.— None. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



244 



Public Sbbvicb Commission — Fibst District 



Th« Brooklam and Korth Kiver Kailroad Company 
Popper Bought 



NAME OF COMPANY 

Tlilrd Ave. Ry System.. 
Receiver New York Rys. 

Co 

Receirer Nassau Electric 

R. R. Co 

Manhattan Bridge Zf 

Line 



Total namber of 
kw.hrs. delivered 


Average price 

per kw.hr. 

(cents) 


Total 

amount 


Amount 
debited «o 


D. C. 


444.087 


1.10 


14,884 40 


I4.8S4 4» 


D. C. 


81,754 


1.10 


899 32 


89»32 


D. C. 


22.270 


1.10 


244 97 


244 97 


A. C. 


108.-889 


1.33S7 


1,454 60 


1,454 50 



Total 



$7,483 19 



Corporate Deficit 

Deficit June 30, 1919 

Debit balance for year transferred from income 

Adjustment of city taxes — gross earnings, for the year ended Sept. 
30, 1918 



$7,483 19 



$464,229 74 
47.774 «7 



29S13 



Corporate deficit, June 30, 1920. 



$512,: 



I 51 



Oi)lcer8.— President, Slaughter W. Haff; Vice-President, Bdward A. Maher, Jr.; 
Secretary, George Keegan ; Assistant Secretary, Ralph Norton ; Treasurer, Charles 
D. Meneely ; Assistant Treasurer, F. S. Richards ; Auditor, Frank Samuelscm ; Qen- 
eral Attorney, J. L. Quackenbush. 

Director:^ Slaughter W. Huff, Edward A. Maher, Jr., Walter C. Burrows, Charles 
D. Meneely, Timothy S. Williams, William Subert, Charles L. Woody, George D. 
Yeomans, Lincoln Van Cott, W. Leon Pepperman, George Keegan, Ralph Norton. 

Main Business OJftoe.'-165 Broadway New York City. 

Report verified by Slaughter W. Htiff, President, October 30. 1920. 



THE BROOKLYN CITY RAILROAD COMPANY 

Incorporated December 17, 1853, under the General Railroad Laws of 1850. 

The twenty principal stockholders as of October 7, 1919 and the number of votes 
to which they were entitled, were as follows : 

The Mutual Life Insurance Co. of N. Y., 123,700; The Equitable Life Assurance 
Society of the U. S., 46,691; Emily A. Watson, 30,100; Brooklyn Trust Co., 29,925; 
J. J. Studwell BsUte, 27,760; David G. Liggett, 96,150; Lucy D. Rice, 19.000; Robert 
W. Goelet, 18,000; White, Weld ft Co., 15,6<»; Estate of Ludarie Benet, 15,(W0; The 
Continental Insurance Co., 14,009 ; Charlotte B. Wllbour, 12,600 ; United States Trust 
Co. of N. Y., 11,085; Dick S. Ramsey, 10,000; W. A. & A. M. White, 9.520; United 
States Fire Insurance Co., 8,000; Gertie A. German, 7,500; Westchester Fire Insur- 
ance Co., 7,500; Robert Goelet, 7,000; Philomena A. Curron, 7,000. 

The company controls through direct stock ownership the Brooklyn City Derelop- 
ment Corporation. 

Important Changes during Tear.— Investments mad« during the year, and held at 
cloae of year, were as follows : Brooklyn City Development Corporation stock, par 
and cost $345,000; U. S. 6% certificates of indebtedness, par and cost, $100,000; real 
estate bonds and mortgages, variaus, $74,000. U. S. Liberty bonds, 4^*s, par value, 
$88,000, cost, $86,453.40 were sold March 5, 1920, for $78,765; loss, rr.688.40. The 
Hengan Realty Co. mortgage for $24,000, the Davidson mortgage for $19,500 and 
the Felder mortgage were transferred to the Trustees of Insurance Reserve 
Fund. The Sherrill mortgage for $10,006 was also sold. [The lessor company also 
reperted the sale of U. S. Liberty bonds, $20,000 4V4's for $19,128. at a loss of $972. 
and U. S. Victory notes, $30,000 4%'b for $89,832, at a loss of $168. Real estate mort- 
gages showed a net decrease of $69,250.] 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 245 

Tbe Bzooklya Olij Eailroad OompaBy 

AgreemeDts were made as foUowa : With L. M. Garrison, Receiver of the Broolclyn 
Heights R. R. Co. whereby th« Brooklyn City R. R. Co. will take poBseasion of its 
properties and take the place of the Brooklyn Heights R. B. Co. in all its contracts, 
igreemen'ts, etc, other than trackage agreements, and generally providing for opera- 
tion and power, dated and approved October 16, 1919, which contract was consented 
to by L. H. Garrison as Receiver of the other companies of the B. R. T. system, and 
by the other companies of that system not In receivership. The transfer was effec- 
tive from midnight October 18. 

With the Receiver of The Nassau Electric R. R. Co. for the lease of 13 trailer 
ctrs, dated October 19, 1919. 

With the RecelTer of the Brooklyn Heights R. R. Co. for the use of S4 trailer cars 
and IW safety cars, dated December 22, 191S ; assigned, April 22, 1920, to the Brooklyn 
City Deveioxment Corporation. 

With tbe New York Consolidated R. R. Co. for the exchange of transfers at 
Fonrth avenne and 86th street, dated October SI, 1919. 

With the Poet Office Department, March 25, 1920, effective April 1, for the trans- 
portation of letter carriers and special delivery messengers. 1,155,000 tickets for 
whkh 188,500 Is to be paid in qnarterly installments — one-half each to The Brooklyn 
City B. R. Co. and Lindley M. Garrison as receiver and agent ; and under vert>al 
agreeiBent this amount is apportioned among the various companies on tbe basis of 
tbe actual number of such tickets honored by each company. 

Under the order of tbe Public Service Commission In Case No. 2431, dated Novem- 
ber 19, 1919, the collection of a second fare on the Flatbush avenue line was dis- 
coBtfnued, but court proceedings were pending. 

No new powers or ftancfaises were acquired. 

Fixed Capital Installed since December si, 1908,— Additions within the year : Street 
TtUway land, other, $6,338.70 ; ties, $256.45 ; rails, rail fastenings, and Joints, 847^ ; 
special work, 87»484.64; track laying and surfacing, 8728.30; paving, 8426.64; roadway 
tools, 818.49 ; poles and fixtures, $251.53 ; distribution system, 81.710.70 ; shops and 
car-houses, 81*363.10; stations, waiting-rooms and miscellaneous buildings, 863.88; 
revenue cars, 8194.57; electric equipment of cars, $1,857.24; total, $20,73149. 

Expenditures for Principal Projects 

AsRssment, account of sewers, Maspeth avenue 

Single-track connecting curve at Palmetto st. and St. Nicholas ave 

Installation of toilet room in Gates avenue house 

Bqnlpment of 6 service cars with springs for snow removal, etc.. 

Installation of crossover Classon ave. north of Myrtle ave 

Initallation of crossover in Empire Boulevard between Flatbush and 

^V'ashington avenues 

Initallation of connecting curve, Flatbush ave. and Cortelyou road 
Minor projects — less than $600 each 

Total 



Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fiaed Capital December SI, 1908.— 
Removal of poles, etc., from Yemon avenue yard, $1,988.20 ; 500,000 c. m. cable from 
Broadway between Rodney and Roebling streets, $681.57; loss by fire, surface pas- 
Rnger car No. 625, $1,453.78. Total, $4,123.50. Accounts credited : Track, roadway and 
electric line construction, $2,669.77 ; shop tools, machinery and cars, $1,453.71 

Pomer Bought.— Trom the Receiver of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. 68,950,187 
kwjiis., at the average price of 1.404 cts. per kw.hr., $827,591.63, charged to expense. 

CORPOBATE SCSPLC8 

Credit balance, June 80. 1919 $841,44636 

Net corporate income June 80 to October 18, 1819 K9,«8810 

Total credits to surplus $901 J96 46 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



$5.686 30 


1,307 06 


1,034 93 


1,857 24 


2,056 24 


2,595 64 


3,276 40 


2,917 66 


$20,781 49 



246 Public Service Commission — First District 

The Brooklyn City Railroad Oompany 

COBPORATE SURPLUS — COtlCtudcd 

DividendB declared on stock July 15 |300, 000 00 

Lo8s on sale of securities 1,040 00 



iaoi.040 oo 



Credit balance. October 18, 1919 9G00.286 46 

Reported by lessor for the period June 30 to October 18, 1919 

Net corporate income for the period October 18, 1919 to June 80, 1920. 31,469 62 



ToUl credits 1631,776 08 

Appropriation to reserves $143,333 34 

Amortization elsewhere unprovided for l, 961 37 

Real estate taxes and interest thereon, 1889, 1890 and 1891.. 276 63 

Loss on sale of U. S. Liberty bonds, $30,000, 4^8 3,108 75 

Loss on sale of U. S. Liberty bonds, $58,000, 2nd, 4^s 4,579 65 



Total debits for the period October 18, 1919 to Jun« 30, 1920 153, 259 74 



Surplus, June 30, 1920 $478,516 34 



Officers.— President, Frank Lyman ; Vice-Presidents, Henry P. Noyes and 
H. Hobart Porter ; Secretary, S. B. Olney ; Treasurer and Assistant Secretary. 
George VV. Jones ; Auditor, Edwin H. Reed ; Assistant Treasurer and Assistant 
Auditor, L. E. Sharpe; General Counsel, Cullen & Dykman ; General Manas:er, 
H. Hobart Porter ; Assistant General Manager, C. E. Morgan ; Superintendent of 
Transportation, William Siebert. 

Directors.— B'tederick L. Allen, William N. Dykman. Richard L. Edwards. Crowell 
Ifadden, Alfred R. Horr, Frank Lyman, Edwin P. Maynard, Henry F. Xoyes. H. 
Hobart Porter, Dick S. Ramsey, Hiram R. Steele, James Simpson, Harold T. White. 

Main Bua^ncss OjflUcc— 168 Montague St., Brooklyn, N. T. 

Reports verified by George W. Jones, Treasurer, September 30, 1920. 



THE BROOKLYN HEIGHTS RAILROAD COMPANY 

Incorporated April 1, 1887. The Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company on January 24, 
1896, acquired control of the company by purchasing its capital stock from the 
reorganisation committee of the Long Island Traction Company. 

Important Changes during year.— Lin dley M. Garrison was appolnte<l Roeciver 
by the United States District Court, effective July 14, 1919. The lines leased from 
The Brooklyn City Railroad Co. were returned to that company October 18, 1919. 
upon abrogation of the lease. New investments were made by the purchaso of 
U. S. certificates of indebtedness, &H%, $400,000 at par and Second lilberty Loan 
4M% bonds, $9,000 par for $6,096.63. 

Agreements or contracts were made as follows : With J. G. Brill Co., covering 
108 single-truck safety cars, July 29, 1919. 

With the Coney Island & Gravesend Ry. Co., October 16, 1919, terminatin;? the 
car lease dated July 1, 1914. 

With the Nassau Electric R. R. Co., October 16. 1919, terminating the car It^nse 
dated August 24. 1906, and transferring obligations under the lease of July 1, 1914. 

With The Brooklyn City Railroad Co. whereby The Brooklyn City R. R. Co. will 
take possession of its properties and take the place of the Brooklyn Heights R. R. 
Co. in all contracts, agreements, etc., under condition of lease dated February 14, 
1893 ; likewise In the maintenance agreement of February 28, 1907. 

With Receivei- nf Nassau Electric R. R. Co., October 19, 1919, a lease to Nassau 
Electric R. R. Co. of ten c«'ntro-en trance cars. Noa. '•070-5079. 

With Brooklj-n City R. R. Co.. Deceuber 22. 1919, leases to Brooklyn City R. R. 
Co. of 64 trailer cars, Nos. 6000 to 6053 and 108 safety cars, Nos. 7000 to 7107. 

With the Brooklyn, Queens County & Suburban R. R. Co., Coney Island & Brooklyn 
R. R. Co. and Nassau Electric R. R. Co., June 1, 1920, covering temporary arrange- 
ment to operate Bridge local cars on the WiUlamsburgh Bridge. 

With Receiver of Nassau Electric R. R. Co., June 15. 1920, leasing to Brooklyn 
Heights R. R. Co. 9 motor cars and 9 trailers for operation on the WlUlam.sburgh 

Bridge. 

* uiyiiizeu uy "v^j v-/ v^pt iv^ 



Street Railway Companies 247 

The BroeUam Helffhti Railroad Compaay 

Vnth American Coin Register Co., December 20, 1919, covering 180 Vogelsang fare 
bozei. 

For contract witli the Post Office Department see abstract of Tbe Brooklyn City 
Bailroad Co. 

The order of the Public Service Commission dated July 17, 1919, efFective August 1, 
modified Order No. 1901 and authorized a charge of 2 cents for transfers issued by 
the Brooklyn Heights [and other B. R. T. companies]. No new powers or franchises 
^re acquired. 

FU^4 Capital Changei during Year 

(For balance in each fixed capital account at close of year, see Table XVIII.) 

nCllTALLATIONS NRTIREUBNTB 



Tma OF ACCOUNT Owned I^eaaed Owned Leased 

Right of way U47 06 $247 06 

Street raQway land, other 113,750 00 36.397 91 36,397 91 

Ballast 8665 86 36 

Tlei 1,608 11 1.200 54 $15 00 

Rails, rail fastenings and Joints 5,21131 4,28129 715 00 

Special work 7,563 88 3,267 02 

Track laying and surfacing 4.216 18 2,647 44 140 00 

Paring 11,20163 862 80 

Roadway tools 62 25 62 26 

Interlocking and otber signal 

apparatus 3.623 91 3,623 91 

Poles and fixtures 6,204 39 5,107 34 

Distribution system 9,340 80 8,487 47 140 oo 

Shops and car-houses 211,606 76 210.957 83 228,223 70 

Stations, waiting room and mis- 

ceUaneous buUdings 12 00 7,796 74 7.258 10 

Docki and wharves 3,216 23 

Shop equipment 10,296 44 476 47 

Revenue cars 1.727,812 84 1,671.080 67 

Electric equipment of cars 1,491,063 62 1,477,296 49 

Other rail equipment 6 00 

Mltcellaneous equipment 136 60 136 60 



Total 113,762 00 $3,536,080 00 $3,433,353 63 $229,233 70 



Exprndiiurcs for Principal Projects 
Lines Owned 
Account of purchase of property, south side of Centre street, west of 

Walker street $13.750 00 

Credits due to transfers to account of The Brooklyn City Railroad Co. : 

Property at Myrtle avenue and Tesla place, lots 63, 64 and 65 $6,816 25 

Property Juniper and Washington avenues, block 2407, lot 1 9.613 25 

Property on 63rd street, Nos. 96, 97 and 99, block 804, lots 49, 50 and 61 11,747 85 

Surface passenger cars, 499 fully equipped 3, 009,062 62 

Westinghouse motors. 224 No. 93 139,320 44 

Storage yard. Fresh Pond property 7,787 10 

Inspection shed and pits. Fresh Pond property 126.68S 35 

Shop building, etr.. Fresh Pond property 92,079 48 

Trolley line, single track from Avenue *' N " to plant of Gulf Refln- 

ing Oo. and tbe National Lead works 12.834 81 

Items less than $5,000 17,505 48 

Total credits $3,433,353 ^ 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



248 Public Sbbvicb Commission — Febst District 

The BrooklTii Beichts Xailroad Oompany 

Leased Lines 

Installation of vestibnles, Indoding prepayment fare proTlsions, etc. |6S,$06 64 

Installation of improved pavement on 86th, 2l8t avenue to Bay 89th st. 10,211 98 

Installation of machinery and tools at Fresh Pond shop 8,08(^95 

Payment on account of improvonents, Fresh Pond property Or 228.223 70 

(Other items, under $5,000 each, are here omitted.) 



Detail of Property Retired during Tear from Fiaed Capital, December SI, 1908^ 

and AceauntM Credited 
Real Estate used in operation of road 
Assessment a/c paving Flatbush Ave. & Beverly Road. 

Transferred to B. City a/c $656 94 

Coat •/ Road and Equipment 
Substitution of wood ties in place of cable yolce con- 
Btructlon, Montague St 304 00 



$882 94 



Leased Lines -^ 
Real Estate used in operation of road 
Transfer from B. H. R. R. Co. a/c. assessment a/c paving Flatbush 

Ave. and Beverly Road Dr. 568 94 

Track and Roadway Construction 
R^noval of track and turnouts Fulton St. Ferry Terminal 

at Furman and Ferry Sts $3,493 86 

Removal of special work from Rldgewood Terminal 6,568 62 



10,046 88 



Electric Line Construction 
Removal of 2—500,000 C. M. feeders Grant St. between 

Kent and Graham Aves $4,282 47 

Removal of trolley wire from over unused tracks at 

Fulton Ferry 243 00 

Removal of feeders and switches from JunctU^n of 

Myrtle and Classen Aves 664 89 

Removal of manhole from 4th Ave. over Sea Beach R/W. 200 00 

Removal of overhead work from sidings 25th Ave. and 

Ulmer Park U3 30 

Removal of one trolley pole from 62nd St. Dock 66 68 

Removal of trolley wire 52nd St. Dock 22 29 

Removal of underground conduits from Halsey St. sub- 
way between Ralph and Tompkins Aves 8,169 45 

13,691 93 

BuQdings and flmtures used in operation of road 

Payment a/c lines and track building 13,694 49 

Poxoer Plant Equipment 

Removal of an engine and generator from Eastern Power Station.. 48,713 00 

Cars 
Removal of 18 Peckham No. 6 single trucks and 1 Diamond single 
truck 6,72992 



$91,308 28 



Power Bouffht.— Trom Receiver of Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co., 26,987,004 kw.hrs. 
(calculated on monthly car mileage), average price per kw.hr. 1.169 cts. ; total, 
$312,759.02 charged to operating expenses. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 249 

The Brooklyn Heiffbta Ballroad Company 

Corporate Dejtoit 

Deficit June 30, 1919 |9«,193 11 

Defidt transferred from income account 1,006,912 69 

Amortisation elsewhere unprovided for : Bnsrine and generator remored 
from east power house, $18,619.71; 19 trucks demolished, 13,174.35; 
spar track work and construction remored from Ridgewood Terminal, 

$3,139.01; other items, |1^.68 26,19160 

Other deductions from sarplns: Advances to committee on ways and 
means to obtain additional revenne, |6,067^; allowance made to 
Bush Terminal Co. for trackage and power on Second avenue between 
SSth street and 4lBt street for passenger cars operated Jan. *n to 

Jane '18, 12,612.10; other items, 1751.79 9.451 32 

Bad debts written off 2,72106 

Appropriation to reserve for employer's liability 1, 256 10 

ToUl debits $1,948,725 77 

Less credits to sarplns : 
Adjustment of rental of 6 cars to South Brooklyn Ry. 

Co. $1,004 63 

Excess of deposit by Dock Contractor Oo. account of 

repairs to trolley poles on Nostrand avenue 414 80 

Jury fees returned 860 00 

Income accrued prior to receivership covered by Re- 
ceiver's bills against Brooklyn Edison Co., Inc 358 01 

Minor items 46 88 

2,183 82 

Deficit, June 80, 192D $1,946,54196 

OJ^cerr— President, T. S. Williams; Vice-Presidents, C. D. Meneely and J. J. 
Dempsey ; Secretary, J. H. Bennington ; Assistant Secretary, H. R. Potts ; Treasurer, 
C. D. Meneely ; Assistant Treasurer, F. 8. Richards ; Comptroller, Howard Abe! ; 
General Counsel, O. D. Teomans ; Claim Agent, I. Isaacscn ; (General Manager, W; 8. 
Mendea; Assistant General Manager, A. R. Piper; Chief Engineer, C. Ik Crabbs; 
Supeiiatendent, W. Slebert; Purchasing Agent, L. Tan Cott. 

Mrcotors.— N. F. Brady, T. S. Williams, C D. Meneely, W. G. Oakman, J. H. 
Hardiag, H. O. DuVal, Q. B. Gallagher, J. C. Brady, Colgate Hoyt, G. W. Davison. 

Msim Bmtinet* Offiee.— 85 Clinton street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report verified by C. D. Meneely, Treasurer, September 29, 1920. 



BROOKLYN, QUEENS COUNTY AND SUBURBAN RAILROAD COMPANY 

Incorporated November 24, 1893. The company is controlled by the Brooklyn 
Rspid Transit Company, whjch purchased a majority of the stock on January 24, 
^. Undley M. Garrison was appointed Receivt*r and begun operation of the 
rtspoDdent's property July 14, 1919. 

InporUint ChangcB during Year.— Agreements were made as follows : July 29, 
WW with J. G. Brill Co. covering the purchase of eight safety single-truck cars, 
consideration $44^00 ; December 20, 1919, between American Coin Register Co., Hubert 
P«rry and L. M. Garrison as Receiver, covering 10 Vogelsang fare boxes ; March 25, 
Wao, vith the United States Government (by Postmaster General), for the tran»- 
portation of mail carriers and special delivery messengers for one yenr from April 
1, 1920, superseding agreement dated July 1, 1917; consideration is $38,500 for 
1.155,000 tickets, payable quarterly July, October, January and April, one-half each 
to the Brooklyn City R. R. Co. and L. M. Garrison as Receiver. Under verbal 
agreement the amount is apportioned among the companies on basis of actual num- 
^r of tickets honored by each company at Z%^ each ; May 25, 1920 between South 
Brooklyn Railway Co. and Receiver of Brooklyn, Queens Co. and Suburban Rail- 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



250 Pl'blic Service Commission — First District 

Brooklyn, duaeni County and Suburban Railroad Company 

road Co. terminating track agreement of March 1, 1907 as amended December 7. 
1909 ; June 1, 1920 between L. M. Garrison, as Receiver of Brooklyn Heights Railroad 
Co.; Brooklyn, Queens Co. and Suburban Railroad Co., Coney Island and Brooklyn 
Railroad Co. and Nassau Electric Railroad Co., covering temporary arrangement 
to operate Bridge Local cars on Williamsburgh Bridge. Effective August 1, 191S, a 
charge of two cents each for transfers was authorised by the Public Service Com- 
mission. The lease dated September 3, 1908, whereby Brooklyn, Queens Co., and 
Suburban Railroad Co. leased 47 open cars from Nassau Electric Railroad Co. was 
terminated November 1, 1919. No new powers or franchises were acquired. Lind- 
ley M. Garrison was appointed Receiver and began operation of the respondent's 
liroperty July 14, 1919. 

Fixed Capital Changea during Year 
(For balance in each fixecL capital account at close of year, see Table XVIII I) 

INSTALLED DURIKO TSAB 

. . Retired 

TITLE OF ACCOUXT Additloos Replacements during yesr 

Other street railway land 114,029 28 

Ties 25'56 11000 

Rails, rail fastenings and Joints 17 60 Dr. €9 00 

Special work 1,127 28 1. 040 00 

Track laying and surfacing 312 60 140 00 

Paving 400 25 

I*oles and fixtures 135 

Distribution system 2,166 78 129 00 

Stations, waiting rooms, and misc. buildings. 624 32 

Docks and wharves 800 00 

Revenue cars 1, 228 48 



Total $20,733 49 $1.290 00 



Expenditures an Prtncipal Projecta 

-Purchase of property Center and Walker sts.... $13,750 00 

Installation feeder from Richmond Hill Substation to Metropolitan 

avenue 1, 742 68 

Installation single track connecting curve at Bergen st. and Troy ave. 1,96S 52 

Minor projects S. 277 29 



Total $20.738 49 

Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fiwed Capital, DeoenU>er SI, IMS.— 
Removal of Standard R. U. Crossover, Jamaica avenue, west of Crescent street., 
$770 ; removal of 13 poles from Ralph avenue, at 98th and 99th streets, $439.94 ; total, 
$1,209.94. 

Equipment Retired during Year from Picked Capital, aince Dec. SI, 1908. — None. 

Power Bought J Sold or Exchanged.— See abstract of Brooklyn Rapid Transit Com- 
pany. 

CORPORATE DEFICIT 

Deficit, June 30, 1919 $153,832 86 

Debit balance for year transferred from income 415.258 13 

.\mortization elsewhere unprovided for '. 239 44 

Bad debts written off 271 74 

Other deductions from surplus 279 07 

Additions to surplus : $569, S81 84 

Accrued dividend tax 1917 $2,550 00 

Increase In Bill No. 14, Dec. 1918, Brool«lyn Ellison Co. 2 25 

Jury fee returned 78 00 

2,630 25 

Corporate deficit, June 30, 1920 $567.25159 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



251 






'-n, Queens County and Suburban Railroad Company 



^ x-esident, C. D. MeiK'ely ; Secretary, J. H. Bennington ; Assistant 
Potts ; Treasurer, C. 1). Meneely ; Assistant Treasurer, F. S. 
^^^r-olter, Howard Abel: General Counsel, G. D. Yeomans ; Claim 
■; ^^^^'^'^^^^ » General Manager. W. S. Menden ; Assistant General Manager, 
t^X'^^w^^^''^ Engineer Way and Structure, C. L. Crabbs; Superintendent, Wm. 
(^^-^ ^^^^i«g Agent, L. Van Cott. 

'^^ ^- 5^. Williams. H. C. Du Val. G. B. Gallagher. C. D. Meneely. G. D. 
At^l,^^^'' ^B'lower, F. E. Gunnison, N. F. Brady, Wm. Siebert. 
v^^.^*« Office.— S5 Clinton street, Broolilyn, N. Y. 

^^^1 by C. D. Meneely. Treasurer, Septemb»»r 27, 1920. 



^rr 



BROOKLYN RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM 



^T ^ ^^^yn Kapid Transit Company is a business corporation which has con- 

Ck\^^ ^^o\i8 street railroad companies through stoclc ownership as shown in 

tx^ ■^^^®^^*- Through merger of the Transit Development Co.. August 1, 1918, 



K>^^. ^^'^er plants and facilities, which are pooled with those of the subsidiary 
^X\ *• By virtue of other operating agreements, also published in previous 
i^^y ^^^pecially that of 1917), it undertalces the maintenance worlc of the sub- 
^^ "i^J^^^^Panies. The cost of power and maintenance as reported for the fiscal 
^ Is shown in the following statements : 



Poirer Charge Distributed by Accounts 

\f«i * I"**- (+) *>'' 

diaiDtenance of way and structures : 1920 1019 Dec. {— ) 

Repairs of buUdings and structures 131,04155 129,872 70 + |1,168 85 

Ifaioteoance of equipment : 

Repairs of furnaces, boilers and accessories. 1253.110 67 1240.284 50 + 112.826 17 

Repairs of steam engines 181,728 26 154,404 03 + 27,324 23 

Repairs of power plant electric equipment. 5,888 15 21.174 93 — 15,286 78 
Repairs of miscellaneous power plant equip- 
ment' 8,966 82 6.62355 + 2.343 27 

Repairs of cable power equipment 1.386 13 — 1,386 13 

Repairs of substation equipment 17,112 69 8,800 00 + 8,312 69 

Total 1466,806 59 1432,673 14 + 134,133 45 

>wer supply : 

Power plant labor $652, 234 62 $.541. 453 58 -f $110,781 04 

Substation labor 175. 411 49 141, 614 83 4- 33.796 66 

Fuel for power , 3,102,598 26 2,820,846 33 + 281,75193 

Water for power / 60,338 63 71,87145 — 11,532 82 

Lubricants for power 13. 746 S-T 6. 53o 66 + 7, 210 67 

Miscellaneous power plant supplies and ex- 
penses ., 79.423 50 47,816 18 -^ 31,607 32 

Substation supplies and expenses 33.748 79 7,600 71 + 2G.148 08 

Power purchased 1136 115 93 — 104 57 

Total $4,117,512 98 $3,637,854 67 -f $479,658 31 

rand total, opera tlngr expenses $4, 615, 361 12 $4, 100, 400 51 -|- $514. 960 61 

ixed charges (rent for B. R. T. Co. plant).... 1,233,231 96 1,108.940 34 -f 124,291 62 

Total debits $5, M8, 593 08 $5,209,340 85 -f $639,252 23 



Digitized hvCiOOQlC , 



252 Public Service Commission — FrRSTiDisTRicr 

>ro«kljn Bapid Tranilt System 

Power Charge Di^rtinUion 6tf Aeeounie — Cocduded 

Inc. (+) or 
1920 1919 Deo. (— ) 

Cve4ited for ^ower sold (to nooHBystem enter- 

prl«C8) |6B,0?O41 |68,811 16 + |S.» » 

AjBtmnt of ebargCB by B. B. T. Co. to system 

operating companies and the B. C. R. R. Co. 6.696,946 16 6,160.529 69 + 545,416 47 
Addustments, etc.,— Coal on other than fuel 
account 90,676 51 + 90,576 61 

Total credits 16,848,693 08 |6, 209. 840 85 + K39,25S 23 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



253 






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Digitized byCjOOQlC 



254 



Public Service Commission — First District 



Brooklyn Sapid Transit Bsntom 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



255 






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iiS4. 



BUSH TERMINAL RAILROAD COMPANY 

January 17, 1908. The company is controlled by the Bush Terminal 
o^^svnership of stock acquired December 3, 1904. 
^rTmangci during Year.— None. 

t^M-Z installed since December Si, 1908.— For improvement of rails, 1285.54, 
c*<:ount rails, rail fastenings and Joints. 

CfWt,t,^ From the Edison Electric Illuminating Co., 156,620 kw.hrs. for 
ZKm Brooklyn Heights R. R. Co.» 198,800 kw.hrs. for 13,006.75. Totnl 
O ; total price 16,050.87, charged to operating expense. 



UX3 

% 
% 

ll 

8 ^<» 

Iclt: , 



COBPORATB DEFICIT 

30, 1919 1396.548 35 

s transferred from income account 81,527 57 

?><fi^t revenue for prior years 17,944 43 

for prior years 13,335 12 

. 1509,356 47 

tajrplus: Adjusting freight revenue for prior years 6,793 28 

xme 30, 1920 1502,562 19 



I. — I^* ar^^«ldent, Irving T. Bush ; Vice-Presidont, R. S. Slraoud : Secretary, R. 
ams ^ .Assistant Secretary and Assistant Treasurer, M. L. Collin; Treourer 
aitor* «Xohn A. Heinrich. 

^or». :inrving T. Bush. R. S. Slmonds, R. S. Williams, M. L. Collin, H. F. H. 

.. ti- "^^ «s,Kichester, John A. Heinrich, W. L. Sturges, L. C. Kendell. 

Bii«<«m.«?«« Ojfllc©.— 100 Broad street. New York City, 
ft 'V^i'^<A«'<l by John A. Heinrich, Treasurer, October 8. 1920. 



jS CHlStXSTOPHER AND TENTH STREET RAILROAD COMPANY 

Lessor 

fga.nV»e^ 'A.prll 25, 1873. The Ne%v York Railways Company is thfe present opera- 
nt Die property under the lease of April 26, 1890. 

^ocK'*^^^^*"* and J/embcr*. — Total %'otiug |M>w«»r of nil miMub«*rH of tho eonipany. 

pQ, The tvrenty principal stockholders, with the number of votes controHod by 

•to. ^^if<i as foUows: Geo. F. Morgan, 231; Estate of Henry A. Barry. 220; Geo. 
Stetson, 200; Q. Warrington Curtis, 197; Atherton Curtis, 181; Maud W. Bald- 

*• ^ * Mabel W. Hatfield, 156 ; Wra. Rockefeller, 150 ; Sarah A. Stevens, 150 ; 

^*^^' Selmes, 150; Timothy Page, 133; Lydia Page Monteagle, 132; Julia Pyle, 

* ♦ ?* Brokaw, 126; O. U Hassey, Annie 8. Ingham, Glen Falls Insurance Co., 
^^ o^ ^' Scheftel. A. H. Tillinghast, and Union Trust Co., 100 each. 
^l^Jd^^ CAan(7«?» during Year.- None. 

^or^?**^^' C*fliii)rr« during year.- None. 

xxfte ^ ^ fl^wrpliM.— Debit balance at beginning of year, $14,088.68; net corporate 

^ X^^ ^ y**^' 162,000. Surplus, June 30. 1920, $.37,911.32. This includes rental sc- 

l>a.la>« ^^^ ^**'' •"*' three months, but unpaid, $65,000, which was not includeil on 
■^ **«ce sheet. 

\\^l\T^^^J^^* Alfred Wagstaff; Vice-President and General Counsel, Tracy 
trecto * ^^^^^y and Treasurer, H. N. Curtis. 
^ Cyxrtw'^^^^^^^^^'^^^ ^- ^- B'^'«">'. »^'>.v<I H. Miller. Irving Brokaw, Henry 

• ^lon/^r T f' ^'■^»*'"»' Tra<^y ". "arrlH. William .T. Worcester, Frank H. 
^^r«»^n8. H-enry J. Brlstow, Henry C. Ilarni^Uell 

^am BuHnesB Office.-- S45 East 14th street. New York Citv 
^.port verified by II. n. curtiss. Treasurer, SeptlJr1),?9^: 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



256 Public Service Commission — First District 

THE CONST ISLAND AND BROOKLYN RAH^ROAD COMPANY 

Lm«b op Db Kalb Avbrux and Nobth Bbacr Railroad Compart 

Incorporated December 10, 1860. The majority voting power in this company is 
held by the Coney Island and Gravesend Railway Company, through purchase of 
capital stock on January 16, 1914. The respondent is lessee of the De Kalb Avenue 
and North Beach Railroad Company, which it controls through ownership of en- 
tire capital stock. 

On July 14, 1919, Llndley M. Garrison as Receiver began operation of the com- 
pany's property. 

Important Changes during Year.— Agreements were made as follows: July 29, 
1919, with J. G. Brill Co., covering the purchese of 11 single truck safety cars, con- 
sideration 161,600; April 8, 1920, with the Brooklyn City R. R. Co., and Llndley M. 
Garrison, as Receiver of the Nassau Electric R. R. Co., for the operation of the 
Park Slope Line on Coney Island avenue from Avenue C to 15th street, to 9th arenne 
(Prospect Park West), to Flattrash avenue, to Pulton street, and thence back to 
Court street and Livingston street to Flatbush avenue; June 1. 1920, with M. L. 
Garrison, acting as Receiver for the Nassau Electric R. R. Co., Brooklyn Heights 
Railroad, and the Brooklyn, Queens Co. & Suburban Railroad Co., covering tem- 
porary arrangement to operate Bridge Local cars on the Williamsburg Bridge. 
Effective August 1, 19W, the charge of two cents «»aoh for tmnsfers waa au- 
thorized by the Public Service Commission. In March, 1920, the company acquired 
116,000 United States 2Dd Lil^erty Loan iM% bonds cost $14,393.20. Track mileagp 
was decreased .128 miles, consisting of .027 siding removed on De Kalb avenue and 
.101 mile abandoned on River street from South lat street to Grand street. Fbr 
contract with tho Post-Ofllre Department see abstract of the Brooklyn City R. R. 
On July 14, 1919, Llndley M. Garrison as Receiver began operation of the oonapany's 
property. No new powers or franchises were acquired. 

Fiwed Capital Installed since Dec. SI, 1908.— Additions within the year : Other 
street ralhvay laud, $13,750 ; ties, $15.40 ; rails fastenings and Joints, 1145.17 ; special 
work, $1.56 : track laying and surfacing, |75.23 ; paving, $108.88 ; interlocking and 
other signal apparatus, $217.21 ; distribution system, $80.76 ; revenue cars, $1,013.26 ; 
electfic equipment of cars, $38.82; total, $15,446.30. 

Expenditures for Principal Projects.— Purchase property Center and Walker street. 
New York City, $13,750; installation additional metal fuse box, etc., on 259 cars. 
$863^ ; minor projects under $600, $842.6S ; total, $16,44«.80. 

Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fired Capital Dec. SI, 1966. — Removal 
of 168 feet 5 inches track construction and one-half R. H. crossover from Pulton and 
Water streets, $1,320.54; removal of two No. 2 iron trolley poles from Main and 
Front streets, $60 ; removal of 1 New Haven single register, $18 ; 9 Brill 22 E3 trucks, 
$1,233, and 2 Brill 21 B single trucks, $600. Accounts Credited.— TrAck and roadway 
construction, $1,320.54 ; electric line construction, $50 ; curs, $1.851 ; total, $3,221.&4. 

Equipment Retired during Year from "Fixed Capital,'^ since Dec. SI, 1908. — None. 

COBPORATB SURPLUS 

Surplus, June 80, 1919 $587,360 60 

Accrued dividend tax at June 30, 1919 1,77« 48 

Billed Brooklyn Edison Co. accruals prior to 7/1/19 72 82 

Billed N. T. Telephone Co. accruals prior to 7/1/19 ) 

Billed Flatbush Gas Co. accruals prior to 7/1/19 \ "^ 

Rental for prior period 616 ST 

Jury fees returned 90 00 

Minor adjustments 2 70 

$5W.997 47 

Debit balance for year transferred from income $46,97129 

Amortisation elsewhere unprovided for 1,123 71 

Employees liability reserve 365 00 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbkbt Railway Companies 257 

The Coney Islaad sad Brooklytt BailMad Oempany 

CORPOHATK SUEPLU8 Concfde4 

Bad dAU written off 1« W 

Other deductions from saiphiB 280 60 

$47,874 69 

Corporate surplus June 30, Wao $552,062 88 

Oj^c«r».— President, T. 8. Williams; Vice-President, C. D. Meneely; Vice-Presi- 
dent, J. J. Dempsey, refrigned September 1, 191S; Secretary, J. H. Benninirton; 
Assistant Secretary, H. R. Potts; Treasvrer, C. D. Meneely: Assistant Tteasnrer, 
F. S. Richards; Comptroller, Howard Abel; General Counsel, G. D. Teomans; 
Claim Agent, I. Isaacsen ; General Manager, W. S. Menden; Assistant General 
Manager, A. R. Piper; Chief Bngineer, C. L. Crabbs; Superintendent, Wm. Siebert; 
Parchasing agent, L. Van Cott. 

ZHrecton.— Howard Abel, B. W. Clncas, C. W. Meneely, C L. Woody ; W. S. Bene- 
dict, P. D. Tut tie, J. H. Hallock. G. B. Gallagher, F. S. WMlIams, G. D. Teomans, 
Wm. Siebert, J. H. Bennington, L. Van Cott. 

Main Butineas Ojjice.— 85 . Clinton street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report Termed by C D. Meneely, Treasurer, September 24, 1920. 



CONET ISLAND AND GRAVBSSND RAILWAY COMPANY 

Incorporated March 22, 1893. The company exercises direct control over Tlie Coney 
Island and Brooklyn Railroad Company, through stock ownership. Control over 
req>ondent was acquired by the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company, March 15« 1907, 
throngh the ptrrchase of stock, and on June 25, 1907, the entire Issue of 3,500 shares 
had been acquired. 

Important Chmnfft^ during Year,— Tot new agreements with the Brooklyn 
Reights Railroad Co. see the abstract of that company's report. An order of the 
Pnbllc Serrice CoBUBlssioa dated July 17, 1919, modifying Order Na liOl. aothorislng 
a charge of 2 cents for transfers, became effective August 1. No new powers or 
franchises were acquired. 

Fixed Capital Changeg during Tear.— (For balance In each fixed capital at close 
of year, see Table XVIII) .— Installed during year, additions : Paving, $108.89 ; dte- 
tribntlon system, $1,243.80 ; revenue cars, $90.88 ; total, $1,448.57. 

Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fixed Capital, Dec. U, 1908.— Btectric 
line construction. Removals of 13 trolley poles from West 6th street, $277.68. 

Power Bought.— Trom L. M. Garrison, Receiver of Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co., 
758,587 kw.hrs. (calculated on monthly car mileage) at the average price 1.5336 cents, 
$ll,e33.97, charged to expense. 

CORPOSATB UBriCIT 

Debit balance for year transferred from iaoosKe $123,964 43 

I^tti on 14 poles removed 11$ 28 

Interest on special franchise tax, 1919 IB J7 

Total debits $124,096 06 

Credit balance at begianlng of year $24,624 46 

Jnry fees returned 2190 

Adjustments to bills of prior years 31 12 

Total credits 24.676 68 

Deficit, June 30, 1920 $99,419 60 



Oifleers.- President, H. C. Du Val; Vice-President and Treasurer, C. D. Meneely; 
w^crrtary, J. H. Bennington ; Assistant Secretary, H. R. Potts : Assistant Treasurer, 
^ S. Richards ; Comptroller, Howard Abel ; General Counsel, G. D. Teomans ; Claim 
•*wnt. I. Isaacsen ; Purchasing Agent, L. Van Cott. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



258 Public Service Commission — Fibst District 

Coney IsUad and OrmTetend Railway Company 

Dircctort.— T, 8. Williams, H. C. Du Val. Howard Abel, G. D. Yeomans, N. F- 
Brady. F. S. Flower, W. S. Benedict, C D. Heneely, J. H. Hallock. 
Main Bu%inesa Ojfftoe.— 86 Clinton street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Report Terifled by C. D. Meneely, Treasurer, September 24, 1920. 



DS KALB AVENUE AND NORTH BEACH RAILROAD COMPANY 

Lessor 

Incorporated June 24, 1897. The control of this company is held by the Coney 
Island Brooklyn Railroad Company through the ownership of its entire capital stock 
which was acquired March 19, 1910. It is also the lessee and operator of the prop- 
erty. 

Important CJutngea during Tear.— None. 

Fixed Capital Changes during Year.-— None. 

Corporate Surplus,— Credit balance at beginning of year, $60.37 ; net Income of 
year, 99.77. Surplus, June 30, 1920, $70.14. 

OJ^ccrs.— President, T. S. Williams; Vice-President and Treasurer, C. D. Meneely; 
Secretary, J. H. Bennington ; Assistant Secretary, H. R. Potts ; Assistant Treasurer, 
F. S. Richards ; Comptroller, Howard Abel ; General Counsel, G. D. Yeomans. 

Directors.— T. S. Williams, C. D. Meneely, G. D. Yeomans, W. S. Menden, J. 
H. Bennington, A. M. Williams, Wm. Siebert, Howard AbeL 

Main Butinewa Oj0Voe.— 85 Clinton street,' Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report verified by C. D. Meneely, Treasurer, September 24, 1920. 



THE DRY DOCK, EAST BROADWAY AND BATTERY RAILROAD 

COMPANY 

Incorporated December 8, 1863. Stock control is held by the Third Avenue Railway 
Company. 

Important Ohange% during the Year,— U. S. Government bonds purchased : 4th 
4%*s, $4,600 at par. No new powers or franchises were acquired. 

Decreases in track mileage as follows : 

On Canal street. East Broadway to Bowery 0.019 

On Beach street. West Broadway to Greenwich O.OSS 

On North Moore street, Washington street to West Broadway 0.081 

On Walker street. West Broadway to Canal street 0.150 

Total 0.228 



Fitped Capital Changes during Year.— (For balance in each fixed capital account at 
close of year, see Table XVIII.) Paving, $210.23; general office building and fixtures, 
$9,8S4i»; total, $10,064.62. No retirements. 

BwpendUure for Principal Pro/ec^s.— Building at Nos. 6-11 Corlears street 
altered to provide offices and recreation rooms, $9,864.39. Paving on Grand street 
from Centre street to Baxter street renewed In 2-foot strips by granite blocks on 
concrete, $210.28. 

Property Retired during thie Year from Fimed Capital^ December 91, 1906.— None. 

Power Bought, Sold or Bmehanged.— Bee abstract Third Avenue Railway Co., Ibid. 

cobpobath deficit 

Debit balance at beginning of year $491,779 86 

Debit balance transferred from income 202. 757 32 

Adjustment of claim against Receiver of Second Avenue R. R. Co.... 634 47 

Total $695,171 64 

Less adjustment of special franchise tax for years 1910 to 1917 16. €75 67 

Deficit June 30, 1920 $679,096 OT 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 259 

The Dry Book, Zatt Broadwaj uid Battery Billroad Oompany 

O^lcer*.— Pr«Bid<nt, S. W. Huff; Vice-President, L. Sutherland; Secretary, W. C. 
BuRows; Aaaiatant SecreUry, J. Maroney; Treaaurer, A. D. Sage; AnlataAt 
TRtflurer. F. Kesael; Auditor, B. O. StelneU; Aaslstant Auditor. W. Farrington; 
General Counsel, A. T. Daviaon: Claim Agent, J. W. Jenson; Superintendent of 
Ttusportatlon, W. E. Thompson ; General Purchasing Agent, C. WItiel. 

Direeton.— E. M. Burghard, G. W. Davison, S. W. Huff, A. Iseiin, Jr., J. W. 
Flatten, W. E. Soosevelt, J. H. Seaman, F. W. Shipman, U F. Strauss. 

Main ButmetM Offiee.— taM Third avenue, New Tork, N. Y. 

Report verified by A. D. Sage, Treasurer, September 30, 1920. 



mOHTH AVENUE RAILROAD COMPANY 

Incorporated January 10, 1865. [On November 28, 1896, the property and franchlso 
rights of the company were leased for 90 years from January 1, 1890, to the 
Hetrop<^tan Street Railway Company, which latter company was succeeded 
Jtnnary 1, 1912, by the New Tork Ballwaya Company.] 

Hie twenty principal stockholders as of January 5, 1920, and the number of 
Totet to which they were entitled were: Anna W. Peter, 1^,226; Batate of Anna 
P. Wright, 020 ; Batate of Sara Williams, «24 ; Alga Law, OU ; Trutteea M. P. C. 
Blossom, GOO ; George Henry Warren, 475 ; Mary L. Haya, 406 ; Mary J. Lasala, 886 ; 
Kate F. Hays, 337; Armiatead Peter, Jr., 226; Blla H. Meyers, 217; F. Bianchl 
Tompkins, 219; U. S. Tlrnst Co., Tlrustee, 103; Henry Block, 100; Trust Bstate 
W. H. Tompkins, 148; Georgia W. Warren, 139; Alfred B. Maclay, 110; M. Bell 
Huen, 100; Helen Herriman, 108; Henrietta Herriman, 108. 

Imfortant ChangeM during 7eof-.— Pursuant to an order of the United States 
District Court dated July 16, 1919, the lease of the respondent's property to the 
Metropolitan Street Railway Company was cancelled and certain of Its property 
VIS suirendered and turned over to the respondent by the Receiver of tha 
New York Railways Co., at midnight, July 31.Jlugust 1, 1919. 

On March 31, 1920, the respondent acquired a mortgage on the property at S15 
West 60th street, amount $10,000 at 6^ per cent. It purchased ittf own certiflcatea 
of indebtednesa, |3,100. The company's property at 231-887 Hudson street and 
4 and 8 Renwick street was mortgaged to the Red Diamond Realty Corporation 
for 126^000, at 6^ per cent, to secure a 3 year loan. 

Owing to a aevere storm the operation of the road was suspended from February 
4 to March 18, 1920. 

Fifed Capital mttalled 9inee Deeember SI, 1908.— Additions during year: Other 
street railway land, $77,600.68; lails. rail fastenings and Jointo, $9,588.82; roadway 
tools. $7,982.78; general office buildings and fixtures, $6,760,011; stations, waiting 
rooms and miscellaneous buildings, $70.00; shop equipment, $13.16; revenue caes, 
&1.};9.06; electric equipment of cars, $6,688.06; other rail equipment, $1,001.22; 
mlieellaneons equipment, $10,108.67 ; miscellaneous construction expenditures, $161.66 ; 
total. $146387.90. 

P9V€r Bought.— From the Interborough Rapid Transit Co., 1,281,199 kw.hr8., 
average price 8.283 cents per kw.hr., and 300,086 kw.hr8., average price 2.818 cents 
per kw.hr., total price, $85,188.68; from the Receiver New York Railways Oo.» 
i»7,572 kw.hrs., average price 2.287 cents, and 1,286,047 kw.hrs., average price 2.813 
o'nti; total, $144,061.n. Charged to expense, $179,260.24. 

COBPORATE 8UKPLVS 

Sorplus July 31, 1919 $7,018 19 

Interest on investments 4,816 54 

Profit on sale of rpal estate, 315 West 50th street 14.G0O0O 

Increase In value of equipment and tracks 3.460,466 68 

loCTease in value of land, 1906 1,341,778 87 

Increase in value of land, since 1900 8,206 81 

Total crpdlts $4,888.872 08 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



260 Public Sebvicb Commission — Fibst District 

Eighth Avenue Bailroad Oompaay 

COBPORATE BURPLDS — €onelud€d 

Debit Italance for year transferred from Income $193,777 31 

Paid directors ....: 900 (» 

Interest on bills payable 2,1358S 

Interest on certificates of indebtedness 3,760 60 

Ofiiicers' salaries for July 350 00 

Total debits '. $a80»913 U 

Surplus June 30, 1920 |4,632»45S 8S 



Officer%.— President, Josepb Tate ; Vice-President, William H. Hays ; Secretary 
and Treasurer, James G. AfOeck ; Assistant' Secretary and Assistant Treasurer, 
William Affleck; Auditor, B. T. Baker; General Counsel, Michael Kirtland/; 
Special Agent, Wm. G. Wheeler ; General Manager and Chief Engineer, W. B. 
Yereance; Purchasing Agent, Ralph Newman. 

Directors.— James Gclston Affleck, J. Gelston Affleck, Jr., William Affleck, WlUJam 
H, Hays, Michel Kirtland, Joseph J. O'Donohue, Jr., Armlsted Peter, Jr., Joseph 
Tate, F. Btanchi Tompkins. 

Main Business O$ioe.— 1 Madison avenue. New York City. 

Report verified by W. B. Yereance, General Manager, December 18, 1920. 



FORT GEORGE AND ELEVENTH AVENUE RAILROAD COMPANY 

Lbssob 
Incorporated [on November 21, 1898, as a consolidation of three companies]. 
The entire capital stock of this company is owned by the New York Railways Co., 
which acquired it under agreement of December 29, 1911, and which operates the 
property. 
Imfiortmht Changes during Year.— Non p. 
Fimed Capital Changes during Year.— None. 
Corporate Surplus.— None. 

OjJI«r«.— President, H. H. Vreeland ; Vice-President, W. Leon Pepperman ; Secre- 
tary and Assistant Treasurer, H. M. Fisher; Assistant Secretary, H. C. Wigren; 
Treasurer and Assistant Secretary, J. H. Campbell ; Auditor, F. Samuelson ; General 
Attoniey, Jas. L. Qoackenbusb. 

Directors.-^ H. M. Fisher, B. F. J. Gaynor, Frank Hedley, George Keegan. W. 
Leon Pepperman, H. H. Vreeland, H. C. Wigren, Fredericlc T. Wood, D. W. Ross. 

Main Business Office.— 165 Broadway, New York City. 

Report verified by H. H. Vreeland, President, September 28, 1920. 



THE FORTY-SECOND STREET AND GRAND STREET FERRY 
RAILROAD COMPANY 

Lbs BOB 

Incorporated February 16, 1863. The New York Railways Company, through title 
to securities acquired December 30, 1911, in the reorganisation of the Metropolitan 
Street Railway Co., has the right to exercise the major part of the voting power 
of the company, holding $399,400 out of $748,000 par value of the outstanding stock. 
It is also the operating company. 

Important Changes during Year.— None. 

Fiaed Capital Changes during Year.— None. 

Corporate Surplus.- Credit balance at beginning of year, $330,762.02 ; net corporate 
income of year, $134,549.10, surplus, June 30, 1920, $466,311.12. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 261 

Th« Forty-B«OMid BtMet maA Qnmd. Strtet Feny Eftilroad Oompasr 

OMcers.— President, H. H. Vreehmd ; Vice-PreBldent, W. Leon Pepperman ; Secre- 
tary, H. M. Fisher ; Assistant Secretary, A. C. Wlgren ; Treasurer, J. H. (Mnpbell ; 
ADditor, l\ Samaelson; G«n«rttl Attorney, Jas. L. Qnaekenbush. 

Direeton.— J. H. Campbell, Charles B. Dunlap, H. M. Fisher, Caleb F. Fox, 
E. P. J. Gaynor, W. Leon Pepperman, Freling H. Smith, H. H. Vreeland, Charles 
E. Warren. 

Main Business Office.— les Broadway, New Torlc City. 

Report verified by H. H. Vreeland, President, September 28, 1920. 



THE FORTY-SECOND STREET, MANHATTANVILLE AHD 
ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE RAILWAY COMPANY 

Ineorporated August 29, 1878. Stoclc control was obtained by Third Avenue Rail- 
road Company in November, 1S85, and under its plan of reorganization control 
passed to the Third Avenue Railway Company on January 1, 1912. 

Important Changes durinff the Year.— Operation of cars over the track and 
franchises of the Third Avenue Bridge Co. was discontinued September 1, 1919, 
12 M a. m. U. 8. Liberty bonds, 4th 4^, were acquired; |18,000 at par. No new 
powers or franchises were acquired. 

Decrease in track mileage as follows : On 110th street, from St. Nicholas avenue 
to Pleasant avenue, 1.062. 

Fiwed Capital Changes during Year 
(For balance in each fixed capital account at close of year, see Table XVIII.) 



Fiwed Capitol Installed aincr December SI, 1998 

INSTALLBD DURINO TKAB 



Retired 



TTTLK OF ACCOUNT Additions Replacements during year 

Tlea 18000 |1,230 00 

lUilii, rail fastenings and joints 923 25 6,270 00 

Paving 15894 

Transmission system 2. 632 20 

R^enue cars 3,579 25 

Electric equipment of cars 5,080 38 

'Hher rail equipment 66 86 

HiscellaDeous construction expenditures 176 40 



19.888 68 $9,308 60 



E^enditures for Principal Projects 

iDattllation of head regulators on 75 cars |3, 579 26 

Improvements installed on Broadway, 69th to 65th streets 923 25 

Iwtallaticm of a gasoline- electric generator set 5,147 24 



Detail of Property Retired during the Year from Fixed Capital, Deo. SI, 1908.— 
To write off the estimated original cost of traclss and pavement on 110th street, 
Mwtxn First and Fifth avenues, which have been abandoned, 138,284.77. To write 
off the estimated original cost of the cable which has been removed from ducts on 
Broadway between 96th and 105th streets, 14,715.75. Accounts credited : Track and 
roadway construction, $38,284.77; electric line construction, $4,715.75. 

Pover Bought, Sold or Exchanged.— See abstract of Third Avenue Railway Co., 
tbld. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



262 PuBUc Service CoidifissioN — Fibst Distbict 

The Forty-Moond Street, lUnSiftttaniill* and St. VlohoUi ATenne Xallway Oamyany 

CORPOBATB BUEPLUB 

Credit balance June 80, 1»I9 I7C444 28 

Be8«rve for doubtful accounts — amount collected 3.366 07 

Total credlte 879,81085 

Debit balance transferred from income 87.646 82 

Retirement of tracks and pavement on 110th street 30,737 75 

Adjustment of unpaid special franchise taz^ 8,668 53 

Adjustment of claim of Receiver, Second Avenue R. R. Co. 6,283 43 

Amortisation of Fort Lee Ferry franchise 1,628 78 

Materials supplied in 1916 188 10 

Total deblU 64.154 41 

Surplus. June 80. 1920 825.655 94 

Oilers.— President, S. W. Huff; Vice-President, L. Sutherland; Secretary. W. C. 
Burrows; Assistant Secretary. J. Maroney; Treasurer, A. D. Sage; Assistant 
Treasurer, F. Kessel; Auditor. B. G. Stelnetz; Assistant Auditor. W. Farrington; 
General Counsel. A. T. Davidson ; Claim Agent. J. W. Yensou ; Superintendent of 
Transportation* W. B. Thompson ; General Purchasing Agent, C. Witsel. 

Directors.— B. M. Burghard, G. W. Davison, S. W. Huff, A. Iselln, Jr., B. A. 
Manice, J. W. Platten. W. B. Roosevelt. J. H. Seaman. F. H. Shipman, L. J. Strauss. 
A. S. Webb. A. R. Horr. J. M. Jarvis. 

Main BuMineta Office.— 2896 Third avenue. New York, N. Y. 

Report verifled by A. D. Sage. Treasurer, September 30. 1920. 



HUDSON AND MANHATTAN RAILROAD COMPANY 

Incorporated December 6, 1906, under the general railroad laws of New York 
and New Jersey. 

Stock control of this company is held by the Hudson Companies which on June 
30, U920, was the holder of record of 251,712 shares of common and 23,076 shares of 
preferred stock. Voting control has been exercised by Felix Warburg. Charles 
Francis Adams, 2nd, and Albert H. Wiggln, as voting trustees under a voting 
trust agreement (applicable to common and preferred stock) for 5 years nominally 
expiring August 21, 1918. 

Importa-nt Changes during Year,— The work of waterproofing the tunnels was 
continued. The mortgage on the company^s property at 54 Dey street was reduced 
by a partial payment from 880,000 to 875,000. Car purchase agreements were dis- 
charged as follows: No. 1 (last installment paid March 1, 1919), 846,000; No. 2, 
850,000 ; No. 3, 842,000. The interstate fare to and from points in New Jersey changed 
from 5 cf'nts downtown and 7 cents uptown to 6 cents downtown and 10 cents 
uptown, effective April 19, 1920. The property of the Company was returned to It 
by the Federal Government March 1, 1920. Bonds held as Investments in funds 
matured during the year and were paid as follows : Property amortization fund, 
N. Y. Central 5*s 810.000 and Baltimore & Ohio 5's 85,000. Debt amortisation fund. 
Baltimore & Ohio 5's, 816.000. The profit on these bonds, aggregating 8412.60, was 
credited to the respective funds. U. S. Liberty bonds, 865,000, were sold at par to 
amortisation funds and others bought at par to the amount of 82,650. No new 
powers or franchises were acquired. 

Piwed Capital InataJlcd since December 31, 1908.— Additions during year: Street 
railway land, other. 8^*769.03; tunnels, 876,298.46; Interlocking and other signal 
apparatus. 813,353.88 ; distribution system, 86,491.66 ; stations, waiting rooms and 
miscellaneous buildings, 8686.30; farnnces. boilers and accessories, 826,934.94; sub- 
station equipment, 861.692.13; shop equipment, 82,102.00; total. 8222,218.40. 

» Consists of taxes for yenrs 1909 to 1918, and 1915, $6,814.37 ; Interest thereon. 
11,854.16. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



263 



HndMik uid lUnSiftttui Bailroad 0«mpftii7 

E9p€uditureM for Prineipal IVoieeif.— Signal equipment for speed eontroli, IIS,- 
176.71; reUalng tunnels, 115,0800; 8,000 kw. rotary conrerter, |61,MS.U; antomatlc 
stokers. |8,4t7; 600-YOlt D. C. dis. cable, |6,4n.«6; ash conveyor, M. P. H., nO,8SO^; 
parehase of land in Jersey City, 144,759.08 ; minor projects, 16,514.69. Total, 1222,218.40. 

Power Botiight, Sold and Mmchanged 

Total Avence Amount 

number price per Amount debited or 

of kw.hn. kw. hr. Total credited (Cr.) credited 

SAMm or coMPAMT deliyered (cents) amount to revenue to ezpenae 
Power porchased from 

PennsylvanU R. R. Co. 82,900 2.00 1678 00 1878 00 

Power sold to Brie R. R. 

Co.. Brie station, J. C. 48,086 4.75 2,046 56 $2,046 56 

21,907 4.75 1.040 59 1,<M0 59 

Power exchanged — bal- 
ance: 

Pennsylvania R. R. Co. 90,150 2.00 1,803 00 1.803 00 

Pennsylvania R. R. Co. 48,760 2.00 875 00 Cr. 875 00 

Undiotributed Income Bamed on Adjuetment Income Sonde 

Credit balance at beginning of year 164,919 93 

Credit balance for year transferred from income 665,629 26 

Income guaranteed by the U. 8. Government for the four months 

»^ded June 80, 1920 22,547 69 

Adjastment of expenses in period prior to January 1, 1918 4.22128 

Total credits |7B?7,318 IS 

Appropriation to reserve for operating contingencies.... 1688,000 00 

Bad debts reserve 1,000 00 

689,000 00 

Balance available for distribution June SO, 1920 968, 318 18 

OiUcert.— President, Oren Root; Secretary, Assistant Treasurer and Claim Agent, 
R. B. Kay; Treasurer. J. S. 0*Neale; Comptroller, F. H. SlUick; Chief Engineer, 
J. V. Davies; General Superintendent, C. S. Klumpp; General Purcharing Agent, 
H. W. Webber; Real Bstate Agent, P. Compton Miller. 

Directors." h. L. Clark, W. C. Fisk, W. M. Bamum, J. J. Hanauer. A. J. Hemp- 
hill. W. 0. Oakman, J. W. Platten, Oren Root, A. H. Wiggln.^W. H. Williams. 

-Vflfe Buiinete Office.— 30 Church street. New York City. 

Report verified by Fletcher H. SilUck, Comptroller, October 22, 1920. 



INTERBOROUGH RAPID TRANSIT COMPANY 
Lbssbb 

Incorporated May 6, 1902, under the laws of 1890 and 1892. 

The Interborongb Consolidated Corporation controls the respondent through the 
ormenhip of a majority of the capital stock. 

Respondent operates the lines of the Manhattan (elevated) Railway Company 
under a lease expiring November 1, 2874. Respondent also operates the transit rail- 
roads (subways) built by the City of New York, under Contracts No. 1, 2 and 3, 
aod related certificates, under leases each of which is for a term of forty-nine 
.^earg from January 1, 1917J or date of completion of construction. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



264 Public Sebvice Coioosbion — Fibst District 

ZBtarb^rourk Bayid Tnuutt Company 

Sole stock control is held bjr this company of the fallowing corporations: N^\fr 
York St Queens County Kallway Campany, Rapid Ttanait Subway Conatmctiou 
Company and Subway Realty Company. Joint stock control of the Lob? Islancf 
Electric Railway Company and The New York k, Long Island Tractioa Company 
is held by this company and the Long Island Consolidated Electrical Companies. 

Important Changes during the Year.— The following section of subway routes, 
was put into operation : Pelham Bay Park line, from Wbltlock avenue to Kast 
177th street, on May 30, 1920; track mileage 6.13 and length of roule 2.01 miles. 

The company abandoned .05 miles of structures, tracks and turnouts at Morris 
street and also abandoned the crossovers at 53rd street and Sixth avenue (.04 miles), 
and at Bleecker street and Sixth avenue (.02 miles). 

During the year there was deposited with the Trustee $409,370 in cash, wbicl» 
was used for the purchase and retirement of $493,000 par value three-year notes. 
Thereupon there was withdrawn from the collateral to the notes and used for 
sinking fund purposes, $611,000 par value of the first and refunding mortgage tivc 
per cent bonds. 

The distribution of bonds issued and notes retired was as follows : 

Bonds iBsued Notes retired 

Contract No. 3, equipment $328,453 $264,341 

Manhattan third tracking 191.112 153.890 

Elevated extensions 52.608 43.5r.7 

Manhattan power plant improvements 38,827 31.21? 

Total $611,000 $49a.00O 



Securities were pnrchnBed as follows : Rapid Transit Subway Construction Com- 
ppny, bond ant. mortgage, par, cost and book vahie, $2,000,000; Manhattan Railwav 
second mortgage four per cent bonds, par value, $1,000, cost and book value, $601.25. 
Elevated extension real estate mortgage, par, cost and book value, $50,000: UniterT 
States certificate of indebtedness, par. cost and book value. $298,000: Interborougn 
Rapid Transit Company, first and refunding mortgage five per cent gold bonds^ 
par value, $1,356,000, cost and book value, $779,007.50. 

The mortgage on the Stebbins avenue property, amounting to $13,500 was can- 
celled and the following securities disposed of: United States Liberty bonds, par 
value $6,600. disposed of for $6,595.93, United States certificates of indebtedness, 
par value $1,000 and disposed of for same. 

Property at No. 2471 Westchester avenue, New York City, was purchased on 
September 25. 1919, at a cost of $7,758.91, to be used as a site for sub-station No. 48. 

Frank Hedley, Vice-President and General Manager, was elected President an^T 
General Manager, October 21, 1919, to succeed ThPodore P. Shouts, deceased 
September 21, 1919. 

» 

FUped Capital Installed since December SI, IMS 

(Exclusive of Expenditures under Contract No. 3 and the Allied Certificates.) 

INSTALLED DURINO YEAR 



Retired or 



Additions Renewals ^ithdrai*-!! 

and and during year 

TITLE OF ACCOUNT betterments replacement* (deducted) 

Street railway land $251,969 7J 

Distribution system $67.378 27 

Stations, waiting rooms and misc. bnildings.. 5.709 14 

Furnaces, boilers and accessories Cr. 505 00 

Sub-Btation equipment 4,528 51 

Revenue cars 278 47 

Electric equipment of cars 1,106 13 



Total $78,492 52 $251.9697J 



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Street Railway Companies 



265 



Intwborovffli BftpM Transit Oompaay 

Figed Capital Fnstalled since December SI, IMS — Concluded 

(Expenditures under Cdntract No. 8 and the Allied Certificates.) 

XNBTALLBD DUUNO TKAB 

o' -...* ^ Retired or 

Renewals withdrawn 

and during year 

replacements (deducted) 



Additions 
and 
TTTLm OP ACCOUNT betterments 

Intangible street railway capital |79, 093 68 

Rl^t of way 164.462 95 

Street railway land 9,883 59 

Grading 1,276 00 

Ballast 15 79 

Ties 14,669 39 

Rsfls. rail fastenings and Joints 17,116 81 

Special work 9.716 43 

Track laying and surfacing 38.176 26 

Roadway tools 1,999 71 

Tunnels 648.275 85 

Elerated structures and foundations 293,908 37 

Interlocking and other signal apparatus 624,295 85 

TdeiAone and telegraph lines 31,062 19 

Undergronml conduits 22,740 93 

nansmisalon system 283.717 64 

Distribution system 888.23089 

Power plant buildings 60, 819 56 

Ssb^Utlon buildings 105,100 10 

Shops and car-houses 18.878 69 

Stations, waiting rooms and misc. buildings.. 144.597 44 

Famaces, boilers and accessories 124, 628 15 

Stean engines 271,274 04 

Power plant electric equipment 294.540 33 

Miscellaneous power plant equipmen t 7. 770 70 

8ab>>tation equipment 660,677 66 

Shop equipment 62,478 44 

BcTcnoe cars 40,657 56 

Electric equipment of cars 5.360 73 

Other rail equipment 2,879 06 

Mlacellaneous equipment 2,395 74 

Engineering and superintendence 374.652 72 

Law expenditures during' construction 18. 408 00 

Injnries during construction 23. 938 64 

Interpst during construction 1, 424, 353 71 

Hlficellaneous construction expenditures Cr. 1,271, 279 55 



Total 15,330,585 95 



Bettermente on Leaeehold i*rop0H<e«.~ Manhattan Railway Company balance 
Jnne 90, 1919, $222,617.18; installed during year, 15.230.84; amount paid by lessor 
dortngr the year. 1128.289 J6 ; balance June SO, 1920, 1104,557.66. 

Deeeription of Principal Profecte 
ExdmiTe of ezpenditurecf on Contract No. 3 and Allied certificates : 

Van Cortland t Park terminal property Cr. $261,969 73 

Substation equipment 4,528 51 

Seoiote circuit breakers at i»nd of all underground feeders 62,722 31 

Uorable subway station platforms 6,066 28 

Six hundred feet safety zones between sub-stations 14,648 81 

Alterations to revenue cars 1,38160 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



266 Public Service Commission — First District 

Interboroufh Bayid Traaiit Oompaasr 
Description of Principal Pro/eota — Concluded 
Expenditures under Contract No. 3 and Allied Certlflcatet : 

Contract No. 3: 

Contribution to construction 11,287,497 88 

Equipment 8. 422, WO 74 

Third tracking: 

Plant and structures 448.046 18 

Equipment 48,530 06 

Elevated extensions: 

Plant and structures 796,983 58 

Equipment 43,689 43 

Manhattan power plant : 
Improvements 301.641 62 

Additions to company lines: 

Plant and structures Cr. 6.336 12 

Equipment 40,60 96 

Additions to Contract No. 3: 
Construction '. 2, 978 61 



Equipment Retired during the Tear.— Power plant equipment consisting of 1 
superheater, 2 economixers, 2 switchboard A. C. line panels, 2 switchboard D. C. 
rotary panels, 16 switchboard feeder panels and 31 other switchboard panels removed. 
Three motor car bodies, cost, 117,746.98; amount of salvage, 12,413.46; insurance, 
810.^92.27 ; amount charged to depreciation reser^-e. $4,736.26 : one closed trailer, cost, 
83.9f>0.82; amount of salvage, Cr. $26.80; insurance, $3,987.12. Total credit to Man- 
hattan Railway Equipment Reserve, $21,707.80. 

Power Bought, Sold or. Exchanged 

Total Amount 

number Amount debited or 

NAMS OF OOJIPANT of kw.brt. Total credited (Cr.) credited 

delivered amount to revenue to f 

Sold IIANHATISX RAILWAY DIVISI017 

KcM^eiver of New Yorlc Railways Co. 59,018,688 ^ $672,848 30 $672,848 90 ... 

New York Edison Co 931,000 »11,764 00 11,764 00 ... 

Pennsylvania R. R. Co 423,600 ^8,47200 8.47200 ... 

New York Central R. R. Co 8,100 •, M62 00 162 00 ... 

Receiver of Second Ave. R. R. Co. 2,564,020 ^ 56,900 85 66,900 85 ... 

Eighth Avenue R. R. Co 1,537.666 ^35,241 58 35,21168 ... 

Ninth Avenue R. R. Co 966.389 ^ 22, 184 62 22,184 62 ... 



Total »65,439.361 $807,573 35 $807,573 35 



Ewchanged 

Received from subway division.... 111,289,598 $581,658 53 $681.668 63 

^Seiit to subway division 244,821,074 1,279,564 93 Cr. 1.279, 664 93 



Sent to subway division (net).... 133.531,476 $697.906 40 Cr. $697,906 40 

Purchased 

New York Central R. R. Co 2.150 »$909O $90 90 

United Electric Light & Power Co. 846 59 22 •69 22 

New York Edison Co 411,000 4.110 00 4.11000 

New York Central R. R. Co Cr. «1 54 



Total »413,996 $4.258 58 $4,26018 

» Consists of 58,736,281 kw.hrs. A. C. power. 6.703.080 kw.hrs. D. C. power. 

' Includes charge of $26.40, adjustments made dnrlng the year. 

^ Consists of 412,472 kw.hrs. A. C. power, and 1.524 kw.hrs. D. C. power. 

* This item covers adjustments during the year and credited to capital. 

^ Debited to shop expenses. 

" Minimum rate as per contract. $2,000 per annum tot 100,000 kw.hrs. 

' Debited to accounts receivable. 



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Street Railway Companies 



267 



Interborouf h Bftyld TraiiBtt Oampaay 

Power Bought, Sold or Exchanged — Concluded 

Total Amount Totol amount 

number credited debited or 

of kw.bift. Tote] to (Cr.) credited 

NJUiE OF COX7AXT delivered amount revenue toe 

Sold 
>'ew York k Queens Co. R. R. Co. 
Beceirer of New York Railways Co. 
N«w Yotk Conaolidated R. R. Co. 

New York Central R. R. Oo 

New York Edison Co 

Keceirer of N. Y. Municipal R. R. 

Co 

Long Island R. R. Co 

Other than public utilities 

Capital account 

Suspense 





SUBWAT DITUUON 


19.861,452 i 


u $148,886 89 


1148.886 89 


82.298,515 


"363,203 58 


368,208 69 


•54,534,496 


"678,829 90 


678.829 90 


7,060 


•."1.838 OD 


1,838 00 


544.100 


"10,882 00 


10,882 00 


1.084 


"20 00 


20 00 


100 


"4 00 


400 


43,358 


1,091 31 


1,091 31 


•24,930 


340 76 


340 75 


79.210 


1,033 36 


1.033 36 



Total : ^•107,384,505 11.206,128 80 11,206,128 80 



For FoiDtr exchanged, see Elevated Divieion, ante. 



Purehaeed 
United Electric Light k Pow«r Co. 

New York Edison Co 

Loog Island R. R. Co 

New York Edison Co 

Nassau Electric R. R. Co 

Unioo Railway Co 

Brooklyn Edison Co 

Brooklyn City R. R. Co 

Brooklyn, Queens and Suburban 
R. R. Co 



12.460 
6,873 
16,9)6 
38,200 
11,341 
38,451 

10 



113,400 40 

4,268 06 

498 00 

",»»433 23 

at 388 72 

","787 03 

","631 88 

"769 02 

"20 



Adjustments Cr."l6632 



ToUl 



» 123,261 120.962 22 



$13,400 40 

4,869 06 

498 00 



$18,167 46 



CORPORATE Sl'RrLUS 

Surplus, June 30. 1919 "$10,162.092 63 

Profit on real estate sold during the y^^ar 79,156 64 

Proportion of rental of equipment of substation No. 12 applicable to 

period prior to January 1, 1919 3.609 30 

Ai^ustment on sale of supplies 836 84 

'Minimum rate, as per contract, $2,000 per annum for 100,000 kw.hr8. 

^ Includes 190.380 kw.hrs. furnished during the months of January to June 1919, 
lurlngire, being an adjustment not made until October 1919 and not Included in 
WW report. 

' Excinslve of 26,650 kw.hrs. reported bv the motive power department as a charge 
to capital account but which was subsequently determined to be an operating 

"Consiatg of 66.591,137 kw.hrs. A. C. power, and 50,793.368 kw.hrs. D. C. power. 
"Debited to accounts receivable. 

"Minimum charge as per contract, $13,183.56. adjustments during year. $216.84. 
''Hfnimum charge as per contract, $36.24. adjustments during year, $645.06. 
|Mnclu<!e8 debit adjustment of $22.12 made during the year. 
'Mncludea debit adjustment of $440.83 mad«> during the year. 
"Includes credit adjustment of $275.40 mnde during the year. 
••Comprlseg 17.214 kw.hrs. A. C. power and 106,047 kw.hrs. D. C. power. 
^Charged to Capital. 
BxclnalTe of deficit accruals under the provisions of Contract No. 3 and the 
wlated ceitlflcatea. 



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268 Public Service Commission — Fibst District 

Int^rborongli BayiA Trftiuit Company 

CORPORATE SURFLVS — CoHcluded 
DiiCerence between cost and amount received from city for Installing 

additional ladders throngli existing fan chambers Contract No. 2. $645 47 

Miscellaneous 34 70 

Total 110,236,375 48 

Deductions from surplus : 
Deficit for the year transferred from the income ac- 
count ^ $2, 235, 835 69 

Loss on real estate sold during the year 888,347 34 

Obsolete supplies 8,575 03 

Loss account of fire at Dyckman street tower, July 7, 

1917 8.142 87 

Loss account of dismantling Highbridge yard 1.616 62 

Loss on Liberty bonds sold to Guaranty Trust Co 715 37 

Miscellaneous 41 85 

Total deductions $3,143,274 77 

Surplus, June 30, 1920 »$7,093,100 71 



Officers.— President and General Manager, Frank Hedley ; Vice-President, 
(vacant) ; Assistant to President, W. Leon Pepperman ; Secretary and Assistant 
Treasurer, H. M. Fisher; Assistant Secretary, A. C. Wigren ; Treasurer, J. H. 
Campbell; Auditor, B. F. J. Gaynor; General Counsel and General Attorney, Jamt^ 
L. Qnackenbush ; Claim Agent, Thomas Gerehart; Chief Engineer, George Y. Pegram. 

IMrectors.— August Belmont, Morgan Belmont, Edward J. Berwind, Mortimer N. 
Buckner, Thomas De Witt Cuylf'r, H. M. Fisher, Frank Hedley, Alexander J. Hemp- 
hill, W. Leon Pepperman, F. de C. Sullivan, Guy B. Tripp, Comellue VandeTl)llt, 
Harvey D. Gibson, two vacancies. 

Main Business Offlce.— 165 Broadway, New York City. 

Report verified by Prank Hedley, President and General Manager, September 30, 
1920. 



KINGSBRIDGE RAILWAY COMPANY 

Lbssob 

Incorporated January 25, 1898. The control of this company is held by the Third 
Avenue Railway Company, which acquired u majority of its capital stock January 
1, 1912, and which also operates the property. 

Important Changes during Year.— None. 

Fiaed Capital Installed since December SI, 1908: Additions during year.— Rails, 
rail fastenings and Joints, 156.03; special work, noi.82; underground conatnictlon, 
$2,^3.16 ; track laying and surfacing, |2,890.13 ; paving, $2,781.96 ; underground con- 
duits, 1108.89; distribution system, 137.78; engineering and superintendence, |120; 
total, $8,669.76. 

Corporate Surplust.— None^ since income is not accrued — the proposed lease not 
having been approved by the Public Service Commission. 

OiJlccr*.— President, S. W. Huff; Vice-President, L. Sutherland; Secretary, W. C. 
Burrows ; Assistant Secretary, J. Maroney ; Treasurer, A. D. Sage ; Assistant 
Treasurer, F. Kessel ; Auditor, B. G. Steinetz ; Assistant Auditor, W. Farrington ; 
General Counsel, A. T. Davison. 

Directors.— B. M. Burghard, G. W. Davison, S. W. Huff, A. Iselln, Jr., J. W. Plat- 
ten, W. E. Roosevelt, J. II. Seaman, F. H. Shipman, L. F. Frans. 

Main Business OjOlcc— 2396 Third Avenue, New York City. 

Report verified by A. D. Sage, Treasurer, September SO, 1920. 

» Exclusive of deficit accruals under the provisions of Contract No. 3 and the 
related certificates. 



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Street Railway Companies 



269 



LONG ISLAND ELECTRIC RAILWAY COMPANY 
n corpora ted March 5. 1^4. [On January 19, 1916, the stock of this company was 
lulred by the Interboruugh Rapid Transit Company and the Long Island Con- 
Ida ted Blectrlcal Companies (a subsidiary of the Long Island R. R. Co.) in 
wtantlally equal portions.^] 

mparta'nt Ohanoes during Year.— On December 15, 1919, a through rate of 15 cents 
Kar Kockaway and a lOcent rate from City Line, Brooklyn to Belmont Park 
axne effective. No new powers or franchises were acquired. 
iwea Capital In$talled »ince Dec, SI, 1908— Poles and fixtures, $1,442.10. (For bal- 
le in eacb fixed capital account at close of year, see Table XVIII.) 



Power Bought nnd Sold 



If AMK OP COJhfPANT 

Power purchased 

IS laland R. R. Co 

ag laUnd R. R. Co 

vf York A L. I. fraction 
CO 

Total r 



Total number 
of kwJiTB. 
delivered 



Average 

price 

er kw.hri 

(cents) 



price 
of kwJiTB. per kw.hrs. Total 



Amount 
Amount debited or 

credited (Cr.)credited 
to revenue to expense 



A.C. 2.954.900 M.60 $46,006 44 
D.C. 1.609,300 2.50 40,232 50 

D.C. 51.250 2.60 1.281 25 
- $87,610 19 



4,615,450 



$46,09) 44 
40.232 50 

1.281 25 
$87.6 30 



Power molct 
ew York A L. I. Traction 
Co 

lew York & Queens Co. 
By. Co 



D.C. 2.004.240 2.60 $50.106 00 
D.C. 8.340 2.50 208 fiO 



$2,172 70 Cr. $47,933 30 
41 70 Cr. 166 80 



Total net. 



2.602 870 



$37,295 69 $2,214 40 



$39,510 09 



Corporate De/Ici^.— Debit balance at beginning of year, $136,486.71; debit balance 
for year transferred from income, $38,845.47. Deficit June 30, 1920. $174,332.18. 

Ojricers.— PresWent, C. L. Addison; Vice-President and General Manager, W. O. 
'Wood; Secretary and Treasurer, P. B. Half; Auditor, Wm. Harti ; Counsel, J. L.. 
Quackenbush. 

DWectorM.— C, L. Addison, August Belmont, B. J. Berwind, A. J. County, Ralpb 
Peters. Q. D. Dixon. Prank Hedley, H. H. Vreeland, W. O. Wood. 

Main Bu«ine«s Otfice.— 7 Borden avenue. Long Island City, N. Y. 

Report verified by W. O. Wood, Vice-President, September 29, 1920. 



MANHATTAN AND QUEENS TRACTION CORPORATION 

Incorporated November 2, 1912. Prank J. Petura holds subscription rights to 192 
•hares of stock while W. W. Lowe. P. H. Adlcr. H. B. Weaver, A. C Hume, L. O- 
Coleman, r. p. Carbutt, C. B. Wedum, and W. B. S. Wlnans hold subscription 
»iKht» to one share each. 

■'"•pertan* Changes during Year.— No new powers or franchises were acquired. 

^toe* Capital Chonget during Year.— (Por balance la each fixed capital account 
*t close of year see Table XVIII)— Additions to owned lines : General office buildings 
^^ fixtures, calculating machine, $75 ; Revenue cars, emergency valves, $46d.«4 ; 
Miscellaneous eqnipment, Gasoline truck, $1,846.78 ; wekler, service tanks, etc., $333 J-T ; 
TOtal, $2,704.59. Betterment on leasehold property (covered hy limited- term fra«i- 
«*»*•€ acquired from City of New York, October 29, WU), Ralls, rail fastenings a-^^ 
joints, haul of rails, $427.70; Injuries durlngr construction, credit for adjustment o« 
tngurance, $881.66. 

> See Documentary Hl.story, Annual Report, 1913. vol V oages 593-603 and c^^nrt 3. 
• pins 4 per cent line loss. • » * » 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



270 



PuBUC Service Commission — Fikst District 



JCaaliAttaii and Qne^nB Traotion OcrpontioB 



NAlia OF OOMPANT 

Power Bought 

Long Island R. R. Co.. D. C 

New York & Queens Electric L. & P. Co., D. C. 



Total 
numb«r 

c^ kw.hn. 

oeliverad 

> 2, 593. 560 



Average Total Amount 

price debited or 

per kw.lir. (Or.) credited 

(cents) to expense 



(') 



1.915 



I500M 
49.e89e6 



Total . »0,1«9 70 

Power Brchanged 
Brooklyn, Queens County & Suburban R. R. 

Co N.R. N.R. 172858 

N. Y. & Queens County Ry. Co N.R. N.R. 7 04 

N. Y. & Queens County Ry. Co N.R. N.R. Cr. 11 00 

Total 1724 63 

CORPORATE DEFICIT 

I>eblt balance at beginning of year 1276,387 57 

Debit balance for year transferred from income 103,553 4» 

Adjustment of inventory March 1, 1920 15,143 44 

Estimated cost of electric line wagon less proceeds from sale of 

chassis and salvage 3, 458 66 

Christmas gratuities 288 15 

1398.83131 
Less adjustment of insurance prior to June 30, 1919 982 73 

Deficit, June 30, 1920 $397.848 58 

. OJ^ccrs.— President, W. H. Lowe; First Vice-President, H. B. Weaver; Second 
Vice-President, R. P. Carbutt; Secretary and Treasurer, Lindley G. Coleman; 
Assistant Secretary, Auditor and Assistant Treasurer, F. H. Adler ; General Counsel, 
Frueauff, Robinson & Sloan ; Claim Agent, H. Schomber ; General Manager, B. 
Waller Duncan; Superintendent of Transportation, W. M. Tillotson. 

Director*.— W. H. Lowe, Robert F. Carbutt, Harold B. Wearer, Arthur C. Hume, 
F. H. Adlor, Andrew Kiefer, Chas. B. Wedum, Ftank J. Petura, Lindley G. Coleman. 

J2ecelt?er«.— Arthur C. Hume and William R. Begg. 

Main Bu8ino99 Oj0lce.— Queens, Plasa Court, Long Island City, N. Y. 

Report verified by B. Waller Duncnn, General Manager for Receivers, December 29. 
1920. 



MANHATTAN BRmOE THREE-CENT LINE 

Incorporated December 30, 1909. Control of the company was held by three trus- 
tees under a 5year voting trust terminating November 1, 1920. The principal stock- 
holders, with the number of votes to which they were entitled, were : K D. Baird, 
F. W. Rowe and E^ T. Horwill, voting trustees, 2,281 ; M. Dean, 110 ; B. A. Ames, 
100 : M. Samuel & Sons, Inc., 100 : estate of B. R. TuttlP. lOO ; estate of H. Roth, 100 ; 
A. L. J. Smith, 80 ; J. H. Hurley, 70 ; estate of J. H. Browning, 60 ; Dudley Clarke, 
60 ; James Sweeney, 60 ; J. C. Breckenridgo, 55 ; C. R. Tilley, 60 ; Chas. J. Edwards, 50 ; 
Charles Jacobs, 50 ; Charles Samuel, 50 ; A. V. Woodruff, 50 ; W. C. Bolton, 40 ; R. H. 
Tiebout, 38. 

Important Change$ during Year.— None. 

1 Minimum charge per month, $41.67. 

* Current measured at Jamaica and Long Island City. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 271 

lUakattMi Bride* ThrM-Otat Use 

Fimed Capital Change9 during Year 

(For balance in each fixed capital account at close of year, see Table XVIII.) 

Fimad CapUal iMtalled tinoe December 91, 1908 



XNSTALLBD DUBINO TXAB 



Retired 



TRUS OF ACCOUMT Additions RepUoemenU durint year 

Street railway land, otber 11,000 00 

Ties 625 W 1105 00 1105 00 

Raili, rail fastenings and Joints 53 92 

Special work 2.54122 3.326 90 4,22190 

Ttack laying and surfacing 4,564 63 1.603 37 1,603 37 

Telephone and telegraph lines 65 91 576 03 576 03 

Poles and fixtures 27 22 

Underground conduits 1,697 60 

Dlstribation system 736 09 300 58 300 58 

Shop equipment 114 74 15 00 15 00 

ReTenne cars 9.227 68 

Electric equipment of cars 4,288 01 



Total 124,700 88 $3,980 80 |6,849 10 



Bgptndituret far Principal Pro jecU.— Replacement of three d. t. crossings, $12,- 
3SL12; two passenger cars with electric equipment (estimated cost $22,500), $12,114JU. 

Power Bought and Sold.— From Brooklyn Edison Co., D. C. current, 1,863.800 
kw-hn. at the average price of 1.286 cents per kw.hr. $26,279.61, less discount, etc., 
12,319^ net charge to expense, $23,960.03. Sold to Brooklyn & North River R. R. Co., 
14M,884 kw.hr. at the average price of 1.247 cents per kw.hr., $1^177.46, credited to 
expense. Rent of rotary converter, $100 per month, $1,200 charged to power purchased 
less 977.04 charged to the Brooklyn & North River R. R. Co. 

CORPORATE SrHPLCS 

Sarplns, June 30, 1919 $12,385 84 

Oedlt balance for year transferred from income 23.804 94 

Total credits $36,190 78 

DiTidends declared (5 per cent on $450,000 of stock) 22.500 00 

Surplus, June 30, 1920 $13,690 78 



Oi|te<r«.— President. Frederick W. Rowe; Flrsf Vice-President, Frederick D. Mac- 
Kiy ; Second Vice-President, Chas. J. Edwards ; Secretary, Walter Hammitt ; 
Treasurer, Edward T. HorwiU; Auditor, J. Lee Nicholson k Co.; General dounsel, 
Latson & Tiamblyn ; General Superintendent, Arthur Porter. 

Director*.— Andrew D. Balrd, John C. Brackenrldge, Walter Hammitt, Edward T. 
Horwill, Charles J. Edwards, Simon J. Harding. Stanley P. Jadwin, William F. 
Xeo, C. C Tompkins, Thomas P. Peters, Frederick W. Rowe, Frank H. Tyler, Rus- 
sell 8. Walker, Frederick D. MacKay, George W. Rasch. 

Main Bu9tne99 Offlee.— iSS Gold street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report verified by Bd|rard T. Horwill, Treasurer, September 27, 1920. 



MAimATTAN RAILWAY COMPANY 

Lessor 

Incorporated [December 29], 1875. Leased to the Interborough Rapid Transit Com- 
pany for a 999-year term expiring November 1, 2874. 

StaekhoUert and MemherB,— Total voting power of all members of the respondent, 
5»,899. Twenty principal stockholders, with their voting powers, were as follows : 
Estate of Jay Gould. 81,801 ; Henry I. Cammann, 22,890 ; Genera) Education Board. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



272 Public Service Commission — Fibst District 

Hanbattea BaUwmy (kmyuj 

14,514; Bertram Cutler, 11,410; Univeraity of Cliieago, 11«000; J. M. Amory & Son, 
10,000 ; Rockefeller FoundatioD. 9,900 ; Harry P. Flah, 9,342 ; Whltehouse & Co., 8.310 ; 
C. W. MacQnoid & Co., 6,886 ; Rockefeller Instltnte, 6.656 ; Bessemer Investment Co.. 
6,630; Robert W. Oambl«, MOO; Jolin Qtichiist and LouU M. Bailey, 5,600 «ach; 
Frank J. Irving, 5,000; Adolpb Miller, 4,130; D. T. Moore & Co., 2.650; Estate of 
Horatio N. Slater, 2,400 ; Jacob H. Schiff, 2,100. 

Important Changet during Year.— Miscellaneons Inrestments were reduced by the 
payment of a mortgage, |325,000 and U. S. Certificates of Indebtedness, 116,000, and In- 
creased by tbe transfer of 1665.34 to the Amortisation fund; total net reduction, 
^349,334.66. 

l^iwed Capital Chanffct during Year,-^ (fV>r balance in each fixed capital accoant 
at close of year, see Tnble XVI II.— Installed during year, accoant of legal ex- 
penses and damages to property, |10,623.42 ; charged to other street railway capital. 
Substation equipment. 1353.60. A credit of |1,563.87 to shop and car hooses repre- 
sented an adjustment of a charge in a prior year. 

Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fimed Capital, Deo. SI, 1S08. — Motor 
passenger cars, trailer passenger cars and motor and trailer service cars, $S2,784.17, 
credited to equipment. See abstract of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company. 

CORPOaATE SURPLUS 

Credit balance at beginning of j-ear 17,628,766 48 

Net corporate income 4,221,900 61 

Total credits fU.SSO.^W 09 

Less dividends of 7 per cent on 160,000,000 consolidated capital stock.. 4,200,000 00 

Surplus, June 30, 1920 |7,650,6?B00 



OJBficere.— President, Alfred Skitt ; Assistant Secretary and Assistant Treasurer, P. 
V. Trainque ; Auditor, Boyce, Hughes & Farrell ; General Counsel^ Murray, Prentice 
ft Howland. 

Directors.^ George J. Gould, Alfred Skitt, E. T. Jeffrey, S. J. Murphy, W. A. I>ay» 
J J. Slocum, J. D. Greene, A. W. Krech, H. G. Phlpps, J. H. McClement, r>. H. 
Taylor, E. L. Ballard, Frederick Strauss. 

Main Bueineas Office.-— 1^ Broadway, New York Citr 

Report verified by Alfred Skitt, President, September 29, 1920. 



THE MARINE RAILWAY COMPANY 

Incorporated February 27, 1878. The control of the eompany is held by Manhattan 
Beach Park, Inc., which acquired a majority of the capital stock May 30, 1918. 

Important Changes during Year.— "Sone. 

Poicer Bought.^ Prom Edison Electric Co., 12,922.44, charged to expense. 

Corporate Deficit. — Debit balance at beginning of year„ 183,270.81 ; debit balance 
for year transferred from Income, 1891.40, less obligation of Manhattan Beach Slstate 
under agreement of July 1, 1917, $891,40 ; deficit June SO, 1920, 183,279.81. 

Officert.— President, Joseph P. Day ; Vice-President, Frederick Cook ; Secretary, 
William L. Sayers ; Treasurer, H. S. Sayers ; Assistant Treasurer, T. C. Horton ; 
General Superintendent, Austin T. Wright 

Directors.— Frederick Cook, M, Armstrong. Joseph P. Day, H. S. Sayers, t. ^ 
Horton, W. L. Sayers. 

Main Business Office.— ^ Liberty street, New York, N. T. 

Report verified by William L. Sayers, Secretary, October 13, 1920. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbeet Railway CoMPAifiES 



273 



MID-CROSSTOWN RAILWAY COMPANY, INC. 
>ra.ted February 14, 1912. The company l8 controlled by the Third Avenue 
OTompany, which acquired all of its capital stock on April 17, 1914. 
cs9»« Chanoe^ during the Year.— Operation of cars on all routes was diseon* 
aji^S^st 9, 1919, at 12 .Dl a. m. No new powers or franchises were acquired. 
Ll^^Age decreased on 28th and 29th streets by 0.061. 
^CK j9ital Changes during Year.— None. 

'-^^ Deflcit.— Debit balance June 30, 1919. |m,764.12 ; debit balance trans- 
>Mxn income, 14,44401. Total deflcit June 30, 1920, |19249S.2a. 

■ President, S. W. Huff; Vice-President. L. Sutherland; Secretary, W. C 

^^%.^si8tant Secretary, J. Maroney ; Treasurer. A. D. Sage ; Assistant Treas- 
^^ssel; Auditor, B. Q. Steinets ; Assistant Auditor. W. Farrington ; General 
^- . T. Davison ; Claim Agent, J. W. Yenson ; Superintendent of Transporta- 
-^sa. Thompson ; General Purchasing Agent, C. Witxel. 

'-'S. — B. M. Burghard, G. W. Davison. S. W. Huff, A. IseliD, Jr., J. W. PUt- 
•<. Soosevelt, J. H. Seaman, A. S. Webb. 
'«««#ite«« O Dice— i.396 Third avenue. New York, N. Y. 
"v- trifled by A. D. Sage, Treasurer, September 30, 1920. 



THE NASSAU ELECTRIC RAILROAD COMPANY 
*^^ated March 13, 1893. 

^^ntrol of this company is held by the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. through 
^^hase, on February 16, 1899, of a majority of the preferred and common 

wrtant Changes during Ycor.— Llndley M. Garrison was appointed Receiver 
is company, effective July 14, 1919. Investments were increased by the pur- 
I of 116.000 of U. S. 2nd Liberty Loan 4^% bonds, and also by |1,000 in miscel- 
us U. 8. Liberty Loan bonds acquired through deposit in escrow of such bonds 
16 Surf Avenue Building Co., Inc. Receivers* certificates were issued Novem- 
., 1919. to the amount of 1225.000. Agreements or contracts were made as fol- 
: With J. G. Brill Co., covering 73 single-truck safety cars, July 29, 1919. With 
y Island and Gravesend Ry. Co., October 16, 1919, to lease to that company 
ient cars for its operation. With Brooklyn City R. R. Co., October 19, 1919. 
isg to that company 13 trailer cars. 

leases were cancelled as follows : November 1, 1919. the lease of 10 cars to 
:oney Island and Gravesend R. R. Co. dated July 1, 1914. and the lease of 
rs to the Brooklyn, Queens County and Suburban R. R. Co.. dated September 
8. 

contract with the Post Office Department see abstract of the Brooklyn City 
oad Co. 

other agreements and order authorising a charge of two cents for transfers, 
le abstract of the Brooklyn Heights R. R. Co. 
new powers or franchises were acquired. 



Fimed Capital Changes during Year 
r balance in each fixed capital account at close of year, see Table XYIIL) 
Fi^ed Capital Installed since December SI, 1908 

INSTALLED DURINQ TSAR 
TFTLB or ACCOUNT 



of way 

street railway land. 



rail fastenings and joints. 

\l work 

laying and surfacing 



Additions Replaoements 

$8,426 47 

13,77019 

7.117 02 

26.5ieS9 

3,684 65 

24,70196 



Retired 
during year 



$29 73 

680 

817 24 

322 OS 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



i 



274 Public Service Commission — Fibst Distiiict 



I 



.n 



The KMian Electric &ailroad Company 

INSTALLED DURING YBAX 



Retired 



TITLE OF ACC9U>fT Additions Replaoaments duriog year 

Paving |21,5U1» >5280 

Roadway tools 119 23 CO 

Poles and fixtures 

Distrtbution system I,fi00 45 112 35 

Shops and car-houses 

Revenue cars 

Electric equipment of cars 



Additions 
121.514 19 


119 23 


1.924 59 


l.fi09 45 


2.238 95 


118.236 09 


24*148 38 



Total 9253,00656 11.34160 

Exptnditure$ for Principal ProjeeU.^ Purchase of property. Centre and Walker 
streets, Borough of Manhattan, 818,760; assessment, year 1919, for regnlating, 
paving, grading, etc., Fifth avenue, section 18, lot 17, bloclc 6051, $8,167.41; Improve- 
ments, construction of d. t. trolley line on New Utrecht avenue, between 39th and 
81st streets, $38,400.54; preparation of cars for multiple unit operation, $29,262.03: 
construction of vestibules on cars, Including prepayment fare provisions, $107,955.38 ; 
installing improved rails, etc., on Rogers avenue, between Empire boulevard and 
Flatbush avenue, $39,501.40. 

Detail of Property Retired during Y}par from Ftocd Capital, December SI, 1993, 

and Account$ Credited 
Track and Roadtcap Construction: 
Removal double track skew from New Utrecht avenue 

and private R/W $4,036 90 

Removal of 81' rail construction from Fulton Ferry at 
Water street 370 49 

$4, 405 39 

Electric Line Construction: 

Removal of poles from West End Line — New Utrecht 
avenue, 41st street to 86th street $2,998 12 

Removal of 716 lbs., 600,000 C. M. cable, Broadway, be- 
tween Havemeyer and Roebling streets 117 47 

Removal of one No. 2 trolley pole from front of 84 to 92 
Front street 20 00 

Removal of feeder wire, between Coney Island substation 
and West End Line 3,24115 

6,376 74 

BuUdinffB and Fixture*: 

Removal of two water meters from West Bud Terminal.. $495 80 

495 SO 

Cars: 

Removal of five Dupont single trucks $1.600 00 

1,500 00 

Cost of Road and Equipment: 

Removal of miscellaneous piping and sundry connections 
to engines, generators, etc., engineering, etc.. Third 

Avenue Power Station $209.514 38 

209.514 33 



Total $222.293 31 

Power Bought,-^ From the Receivers of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. 54.042,952 
Kw.hrs. (calculated on monthly car mileage), at an average of 1.58 cents per kw., 
$854,250.89, charged to expense. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



275 



The VM«m ElMtrio Bailroad CompAny 

COBPORATE DEFICIT 

^Al^nce transferred from income 1748,656 44 

1.^1 on elsewhere unprovided for: Loss on d. t. skew crossing 

f^i. from New Utrecht avenue, $2,020.04; on water meters re- 

"^V. B. Terminal, 1153.92; on 5 Dupont single trucks demol- 

9S33; on poles removed, W. E. Line, New Utrecht avenu"?, 

Z on coppeMeed wire removed, $332.69; on minor items, $80.17. 4,937 19 

ci.^«d to Employers' Liability Reserve 336 75 

trsi written ofic 8,646 3(h 

'<iK YJBCtions from surplus 148 25 

^:i debits $762,724 8» 

^Xcfe.nce at beginning of year $127.726 07 

Ea. <?<;rued prior to receivership : From Brooklyn 
<2To., Inc., $295.97 ; from N. Y. Telephone Co. and 
^'t^ Gas Co., $12.78; Jury fees returned, $303; ad- 
at«, $10.08 62183 

«^l credits 128,347 90' 

^vine 30, 1920 $634,376 9d- 



* President, T. S. Williams; Vice-President and Treasurer, C. D. Meneely ; 

^^\d«nt, J. J. Dempsey ; Secretary, J. H. Bennington ; Assistant Secretary, 
^otts; Assistant Treasurer, F. S. Richards; Comptroller, Howard Abelr 
^ Counsel, G. D. Yeomans ; Claim Agent, I. Isaacsen ; Qeneral Mannirer, 
. Menden ; Assistant General Manager, A. R. Piper ; Chief Engineer, C. L. 
E>t; Superintendent, W. S. Siebert; Purchasing Agent, L. Van Cott. 
rector^.— T. S. Williams, N. F. Brady. O. D. Yeomans, C D. M«nee1y, F. IX 
le, F. S. Flower, J. H. Hallock, Wm. Siebert, W. S. Benedict, 
lifi Bu$ines8 Office.-^ 96 Clinton street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
iport verified by C. D. Meneely, Treasurer, September 29, 1920. 



THE NEW YORK AND CONEY ISLAND RAILROAD COMPANY 

Lbssob 
:orporated February 5, 1879. 

>ck control of this company was acquired July 5, 1912, by the South Brooklyn 
nray Co. which owns 820 shares, under-operates th-e property under leasr> to 
pect Park and Coney Island Railroad Co. 
portant Change^ during Year.— None. 
9€d Capital Changes during Yeor.— None. 

rparate tsurplus.— Credit balance at beginning of year, $6,809.17 ; net corporate 
ne for year, $10,198.82. Surplus, June 30, 1920, $17,007.99. 

\cer$,— President, T. S. Williams ; Vice-President and Treasurer, C D. Meneely ; 

Btary, J. H. Bennington ; Assistant Secretary, H. R. Potts ; Assistant Treasurer, 

. Richards ; Comptroller, Howard Abel ; General Counsel, G. D. Yeomans. 

•ectora.— T. S. Williams, C. D. Meneely, O. D. Y«omans, C. L. Woody, A. M. 

lams, J. H. Bennington. 

in Business Oj0lce.— 85 Columbia street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

port verified by C. D. Meneely, Treasurer, September 24, 1920. 



NEW YORK AND HARLEM RAILROAD COMPANY 

orporated pursuant to a special act April 25, 1881, and amendments. The 
any is controlled by the New York Central Railroad Company, which operates 
team railroad portion of the property. 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



276 Public Service Commission — First District 

Kew Tork and Rariem Railroad Gomyany 

Important Changes during Year.— On January 31, 1920, the " City Line *' was 
returned to the company by order of the United States District Court and has been 
operated by it rince that date: [For deicriptloa of th« road, aee 1^17 abstract] 

Agreements as subsequently revised were made as follows : Jaaimry 31, IdSO. 
with J. B. Hedires, as Receiver of the New York Railways Ca, for the purchase of 
power from the latter at 9.194 cents per car mile for the Fourth and Madison Atcdup 
Line and 7.128 cents per car mile for the 86th Street Line ; for the use of respondent's 
ducts by the latter at 1.5 cents per duct foot ; for the use of one of the tracks on 
Park Row from Centre street to Broadway and Ann street, terminals and car 
house properties, question of rental, undetermined, but in the e^ent of dispute to 
be submitted to the United States District Court, for the exchange of transfers at 
Fourth avenue and 14th, 23rd and 34th streets, and for the remoyai of mow by 
the latter, the respondent to pay its portion of the cost oo the basis of ownership: 
January 31, 1920, with both the Second Avenue Railroad Company and the Third 
Avenue Railroad Company for the purchase of power from them at cost on car 
mileage basis ; February 1. 1920, with the New York Car Advertising Company for 
one year, covering use of advertising space in cars, consideration, $20,000; March 
IS, 1920, with C. B. Chalmers, Receiver, Second Avenue Railroad Co., for use of 
shop and office space on latter's property on Bast 96th street near Second avenue, 
consideration, $3,000 per month. 

No additional rights or franchises were acquired. 

Fiwed Capital Installed ainoe December SI, 1908.— Installed during year : Tunnel!^. 
$733.36; general office buildings and dxtures, $4,569.82; shop equipment, $19,323.89; 
miscellaneous equipment, $6,816.60. Total, $31,433.67. None retired. 

Expend Uurcs for Principal Projects 
Miscellaneous track and roadway tools, including blacksmith shop 

equipment $733 86 

Desks, chairs, typewriters, calculating machines, coin-counting ma- 
chines and general equipment for office 4; 560 S3 

Six 6-ton, two 2-ton and three %-ton hoist 2,503 00 

Two blowers, three forges 419 40 

One 5-h.p., two 15-h.p. and one 20-b.p. motors l.KSOO 

One gear lathe, one Rockford drill 1,398 00 

One 300-ton wheel press 3.000 00 

One 36-iiich radial drill 1.856 00 

Miscellaneous shop equipment 7,051 31 

Six minor projects, each less than ?500 1.482 1^ 

Miscellaneous equipment 0,816 69 



Total $31.438 67 



Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fixed Capital, December Zl, J96S.— 
None. 

Power Bought, Sold or Exchanged.— Bought : from .Second Ave. R. R. Co. 7.W2 
kw.hrs. at 10^, total price $.70 ; from Second Ave. R. R. Co. 10.0$ kw.hra at 7.1264<'. 
total price $.72 ; from Third Ave. Ry. Co. 13,132 kw.hrs. at 2.284^, total price $299.96 : 
from New York Railways Co. 5,009,672 kw.hrs. at 2.281^ total price $114,27S.85. Total 
amount debited to expense $114,578.22. 

CORPORATE SrHPLCS 

Surplus June 30, 1920... $1,375.766 33 

Credit balance for year transferred from income 813, 540 42 



Total credits $2,189,306 75 

Dividends declared, 5% semi-onnually on preferred and common stock.. 1,000,000 00 

Corporate surplus June 30, 1920 $1,189,306 75 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbeet Railway Companies 



277 



Vew York and Hajrlem Ballroad Comiuuiy 

r. Trealdent. Alfred H. Smith; Flrgt Vlce-Preaident, Albert H. Harris; 

% JEdw. F. Stephenson; Afigistant Secretary, J(Jteph M. O'Mahoney ; Treai- 
tt:oi:i S. Barger; Assistant Treasurer, Harry G. Snelling; Assistant Treas- 
Sa-P Freeman ; Comptroller, W. C. Wishart ; Assistant Comptroller, Leroy 
r ; Assistant Comptroller, Frederick H. Meeder; General Manager, J. F. 
Z Ohief Engineer, C. F. Cadle ; General Purchasing Agent, P. J. Honold ; 
■:2€^^nt of Transportation, Sigmund Sachs. 

-,^_ Frederick W. Yanderbilt, Chauncey M. Depew, Harold S. Vanderbilt, 

^«a-Eiderbilt, Jr., Walter P. BUss, Wm. Rockefeller, Robert S. Lo^^ett, George 

iJT. Pierpont Morgan, Ogden Mills, Alfred H. Smith, Albert H. Harris. 
M.,9^tiesa Office.— Gr&ud Central Terminal, New York City, 
k^^irifled by A. H. Smith, President, November 1, 1920. 



S JSTEW YORK AND LONG ISLAND TRACTION COMPANY 

="^^«d February 27, 1899, under the New York State Railroad Law. [Jokrt 

^xrol of this company wm acquired on June 19, 1905, by the Interborou^h 

^CLZAsit Company and the Long Island Consolidated Electrical Companies, 

^-»ry of the Long Island Railroad Company.]* 

■»»« ChangcB during Year.— None. 

^«Kfl»^aZ IiutaUe4k since December SI, X906.-- Poles and fixtures : Two Irom 

ti^^lled, 1113.79. 

*^-la.iice in each fixed capital account at close of year, see Table XVIII.) 
^^u-lfht and Sold— Purchased : From Long Island Electrical Ry. Co., D. C., 
Vw.brs. at 2% cents, $50,106; from Long Island R. R. Co., D. C., 2,492,834 

• at 1% cents, |4S,<24.63: total, $98,780.63, charged to operating expennes. 

To Long Island Electric Ry. Co., D. C.« 51,2S0 kw.tin. at 2% cents, tl,2S1.25, 

»1 $384.39 credited to revenue and $886.86 to expense; Great South Bay FVrry 

D. C, 14,100 kw.hrs. at 6 cents, $846, whereof $M4 credited to revenue and $282 

Epenae. 

rpiirate Surplue and De/loit.— Credit balance at beginning of year, $79,404.04: 

t balance for year transferred from income, $101,663.68; deficit June 30, 1920, 

i9.64. 

leers.— President, C. L. Addison ; Vice-President and General Manager, W. O. 

i; Secretary and Treasurer, Frank B. Halt; Auditor, Wm. Harts; Counsel, 

. Quackenbush. 

•ector$.— C. L. Addison, August Belmont, E. J. Berwlnd, A. J. Coiiii4r« 

h Peters, G. D. Dixon, Frank Hedley, H. H. Vreeland, W. O. Wood. 

in BuHneee Office.— 7 Borden avenue, Long Island City, N. Y. 

?ort verified by W. O. Wood, General Manager, September 29, 1920. 



THE NEW YORK AND NORTH SHORE TRACTION COMPANY 

orporated August 6, 1902. February 6. 1920, the princiiMil stockholders Xit 
company, with the number of votes to which each was entitled, were as 
wn : Geo. A. Stanley, 2,354 ; W. C. Scofleld, 1,170 ; John J. Stanley, 649 ; T. «. 
with, 624 ; Fanny T. King. 624 ; Roy A. Rainey, o46 ; Louis D. Beaumont, 
*. Palmer and Geo. F. Scofield, 390 each ; Cleveland Trust Co. and Dfivid C. 
le, 812 each ; Chas. H. Stanley, 260 ; John N. LanHer, 234 ; Elizabeth S. Sweeney, 
John S. Sweeney, 187; A. 8. Chlsholm, Geo. W. Crile, W. G. Pollock, W. A. 
» and Fanny S. Seabrook, 156 each. 

portant Changes during Tear.— Rates of fare were increased as follows : Oa 
ist 29, 1919, In New York City, 6 cents to 6 and upwards to 11 cents ; on AprU 
W), in Nassau county, 5 cents to 7 cents, 10 cents to 14 cents, 6 cents to 8 cents, 
nts to 16 cents and 20 cents to 28 cents. Operation was suspended on the entire 
May 3, 1920, and May 8 foreclosure proceedings were instituted by the trustee 
he bondholders, 
new powers or franchises were acquired. 



om documents on file with the Commission. 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



278 



Public Service CoMmssiON — Fibst District 



The Kew York and Horth Bhon TnuttloB Company 

Fixed Capital Installed »1nee December SJ, Jt90S.^ Additions as follows : Rails, 
rail fastenings and joints, $66.02 ; roadway tools, |21.32 ; furnaces* boilers and acces- 
sories, 128.00; power plant and electric equipment, $64.00. Total, $159.34. 

Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fimed Capital December W, 2906.— 
One trolley wire on the Port Washington division was sold and the first payment 
of $600 was credited on the account Electric line construction. 

Potcer Bought,— From the New York and Queens Electric Light and Power 
Company, 1,663 kw.hrs. at 5.6 cents per kw.hr., $85.84, charged to expense. 

Corporate JDe/Icit.— Debit balance at beginning of year, $64,099.86; debit balance 
tor year transferred from income, $69,779.04; credit to Suspense (12 monthly charges 
of $242.89 under order of P. S. C. in Case No. 1398), $2,914.68; special franchise tax 
tot year 1919. $3,686.81; total deficit, June SO, 1920, $140,979.39. 

Oi^cer«.— President, George A. Stanley; Vice-President, Elmer G. Story; Secre- 
tary and General Manager, John 0. Moran ; Assistant Secretary, George P. Allen ; 
rrreasurer, George F. Scofleld; Auditor and Assistant Treasurer, John G. Moran: 
General Counsel, Frueauff, Robinson & Sloan; Superintendent, Harry Tappen. 

Directors.— George A. Stanley, George F. Scofleld, Elmer G. Story, John G. 
Moran, Joseph H. Bogart, Charles S. Colden, George P. Allen, Jules P. Kunz, 
lEVatson B. Robinson. 

Main Bueineee Oj0loe.— Roslyn, Nassau €\>., New York. 

Report Terifled by John G. Moran, General Manager, November 3, 1920. 



NEW YORK AND QUEENS COUNTY RAILWAY COMPANY 

Incorporated June 6, IWk The Interborough Rapid Transit Co. acquired control 
«f this company on December 29, 1908» through the purchase of a majority of Its 
capital stock. 

Important Changes durhag Yeor.— None. 

Fixed Capital Installed since December SI, 1906.— Additions and betterments: 
Rails, rail fastenings and Joints, $1,982.88; track laying and surfacing, $403.24; 
roadway tools, $1,960.00 ; revenue cars, $568.30 ; total, $4,844.49. Retired during year : 
SpecUl work, $1,741.66 ; paving, $14,634.33 ; total, $16,876.89. 

Detail of Property Retired during Tear from Fixed Capital, December SI, 1908, 
«ti<l Accounts Credited.— Tra.ck and roadway construction: Two crofLs-overs written 
off, $2,026. Cars : Six steel J. G. Brill cars which began service in 1908 were sold in 
June, 1920, for $34,200. CredH to capital, $61,260.34. Charge to Accrued amortization of 
capital, $10,236.20; to Surplus, $6,824.14. 



PoiDer Bought, Sold, Exchanged ot\ Transferred 



Total Average 
number prioe 
of kw.hn. per kw.hr. 
delivered (cents) 



NAIOB OV COMPANT 

JPower Bought: 

Interboroui^ R. T. Co., A. C. 19.851,462 

Long Island R. R. Co., D. C. 30,220 

L.ong Island Blectric, D. C. 8.340 

Penna. Tunnel & Ter. R. R.. 74,000 



Total prioe 



Amount 
credited 
to revenue 



Amount 
debited or 
(Or.) credited 
to< 



.75 
4.00 
2.50 
2.00 



19,964,012 



JPoicer Sold: 

Long Island R. R. Co., D. C. 
Long Island R. R. Co., D. C. 
Penna. Tunnel & Ter. R. R.. 



8,600 
36 

1.622,766 

1,626,300 



2.00 
2.00 
2.00 



$148.886 89 $148,885 89 

1,208 80 1.S08 80 

206 50 208 60 

1,480 00 1.480 00 

$161,783 19 $151.783 19 

$7000 $7000 

70 (Cr.) 1070 

30, 466 30 i9,034 55 (Cr.) 11,420 75 



$30,526 00 $19,104 56 (Cr.)SU.421 45 



Net 18,437,712 



$121,257 19 $19,104 55 



$140,361 74 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



»- '-^ «d a,-,. o„^^ «._ ^ ^^ 

«Q Bale af tij!' ^^^^orers, WoOiV^fl " * '... '*'*-■*■ m.7lS£t 

»-acit. j„„« ,„_ ^ t"* «>^"«., »uou9 ^_^^ 

'^<''"*— President «„rt /> «.935.3J8>2 

=«^".ir£-'" - •.'./s'.r « 

'-""ntr^" --::rr it'- -^-^ — ^■"' 

^ .Me 

J ear, s^^ Ttble XVtir t 
^orlc *' •^^J joints 2.54,-60 ,.[[ '■■--....., 

'• V. ...V ^" <jo '.y^'"^ - 

^fixture,...:: : •••■ — 

"®^ system "" ^^*m jh ■"-■* 11,^00 

^««-s ....... ^.:^T2o ^ ■' _ 

^^ipment of'cara' ••••.'' , J-'^' ^7 .V.".". ' "'^ ' "^ -.,.' 

' ^^■2e97s . 

wed from Union B«i, _^.47i &i 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



1 



280 



Public Service Commission — Fibst District 



New York City InierlMrDiifli RailiMiy Cmapuy 
Eofpenditures for Principal Profeets.— 

On E. 177tb 8t. from E. Tremont to Rosedale ave P0,9ffl U 

On bonttaern Bonlevard from lH2d 8t. to ISdth st 5,U4 71 

Alteration of 14 cars «ach to be controlled by one man 6,61S 51 

Detail of Property Retired during Tear from Pimed Capital, Dec. St, 190B.— 
To write ofP the estimated original cost of the double track overhead trolley re- 
mored from 189th «t. between Third ave and Sonthem Boulevard, |8,W2 ; to write off 
estimated original cost of one R. H. surface crossover removed from 163d st. at 
Intervale ave., $1,300. Total, 14,392, credited to the cost of road built by contract. 



Power Bought 



NAMB OF COMPANY 

Third Ave. By. Co., A. C 

Third Ave. Ry. Co-. D. C 

Union Ry. Co. of N. Y. City, D. C 
Yonkers R R. Co., D. C 



Total 



Total 

numbw of 

kw.hn. 

delirei«d 

5.415 

ino,e6o 

4,851,411 
271.311 

5,448,797 



Averase 

(cents) 
1.85 
1.68 
1.58 
1.63 



Amouat 
dfibitedto 



173 44 
5,072 25 
77.021 61 
4.425 62 



186.692 82 



COUPORATE DBTICIT 

Debit balance, June 30, 1919 

Debit balance transferred from income 

Bad debts written off 

To write off cross-overs and overhead, electric line removed. 



Deficit, June SO, 1920. 



1695.368 40 

136,280 73 

550 82 

727 40 

1832.927 35 



OJ*ccr«.— President, S. W. Huff; Vice-President, L. Sutherland; Secretary, W. 
C. Burrows; Assistant Secretary, J. Maroney; Treasurer, A. D. Sage; Assistant 
Treasurer, F. Kessel; Auditor, B. Q. Steinets; Assistant Auditor, W. FYirrington; 
General Counsel, A. F. Davison ; Claim Agent, J. W. Yen son ; Superintendent of 
Transportation, W. B. Thompson ; General Porchasing Agent, C Witsel. 

Directors.— B. M. Burghard, G. W. Davifson. S. W. Huff. A. Iselin. Jr., J. W. 
Flatten, W. E. Roosevelt, J. N. Seaman, L. F. Straus, B. A. Maurice. 

Main Business Office.— 2396 Third Av«nue, New York, N. Y. 

Report verified by A. D. Sage, Treasurer, September 30, 1920. 



NEW YORK CONSOLIDATED RAILROAD COMPANY 

LttsaB or Nsw Yobk Municivai< Railway Cobpohation (GRAimra TnTosR Rafid Tbaksit 
Railroad CoNrsACT No. 4) 

Incorporated November 30, 1912. This company controls through ownership of its 
entire capital stock the New York Municipal Railway Corporation and leases from 
it the property constructed under Contract No. 4. Stock control over respondent is 
held by Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company through ownership of 179,654 shares de> 
posited with Central Trust Company, trustee, and 2513 shares held directly. 

Important Changes during Tear.— Extensions of road put into operation : Broad- 
way subway. Times Square to 57th street station ; operation begun July 10, 1919, 
3.130 miles ; 57th st. station to liexington avenue station ; operation begun Sept. 1, 
1919, 2.247 miles ; northerly track at Lexington avenue station, GOth street line ; 
operation begun Oct. 30, 1919, 0.10 miles. Culver line, from Avenue X to point of 
switch of Brighton line at Coney Island ; operation begun May 1, 1920, 2.2 miles. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



281 



Kew York Conaolidated Kailroad Company 

2^e^w York ConBolidated R. R. Co. under the agreement of consolidation iasued 
^es of its common stock in exchange for an equal number of shares of the com- 
bo oJc 01 the Brooklyn Union Elevated R. R. Co. Bonds ^-^re acquired aa fol- 
f>Mr employers' liability reserve: U. S. 2d Liberty Loan, 4^s, par value, 
XT. S. certificate of indebtedness, |l,74O,00O. The mortgage investment, A. & 
^i^Kcaan, $4,000, was retired Oct. 1, 1919. Under order issued Aug. 1, 1919, by 
^«:alf.u8 M. Mayer, and the approval of the Public Service Commission in Case 
►» :i<)int 2-year, 6 per cent Receiver's certificates of the New York Municipal 
^v^d the New York Consolidated R. R. Co. to the amount of $13,000,000 were 
^S. Date of issue, August 1, 1919. 
■=k:^ ^»ts were made a« follows : With the South Brooklyn Ry. Co. Oct. 10, 
^ ^lie lease of four parcels of land owned by that company — the periods of 
»^^ being from 3 to 21 years. With The Brooklyn City R. R. Co., Oct. 31, 
^tiiTe to the exchange of transfers with the subway at Fourth ave. and 86th 
'^=^ the New York Telephone Co., Dec. 19, 1919, for the installation of public 
'^^^ in subway stations. The fare to Coney Island was reduced to 5 cents, 
^ "^tfay 1, 1920. No new powers or franchises were acquired. 

Fixed Capital Changes durinff Year 
■^l.^j<l during year, under addition and betterments to other street railway 
^^^^'^ filling and grading of a MO ft. strip on Ocean Parkway, $917.12. 
**« of Property Retired during Year from Fiaed Capital, Dec. SI, 1908, and 
***« Credited.— Miscellaneous equipment: Removal from Newtown Dock of 
*^*tr-leg derricks installed in 1898, $6,000. Cost of road and equipment : 63d 
^ ^ock property requisitioned by the U. S. Ooverament, $364,700l 



Potper Bought, Sold, Exchanged or Transferred 

Total Price per Amount 

number of kw. fir. debited to 

NAiix or coHPAMT kw.hrs. (cents) Total price ezpenae 

. M. O., Rec. B. R. T. Co > 195.406,974 1.604 $2,133,966 08 $3,183.965 08 

iterboro Rapid Transit Co., A. C. 
delivered and measured at Canal 

St sub-station 3,890,659 0.7 27.234 62 27,234 62 

iterboro Rapid Transit Co., D. C 
delivered and measured at I. R. 

T. sub-station No. 12 50,644,604 ' 0.825 417,818 00 417,818 00 

Iterboro Rapid Ttanslt Co., adj. 

a/c cost of coal, A. C 8,242 10 8,242 10 

Iterboro Rapid Transit Co., adj. 

B/c cost of coal, D. C 106,679 40 106,679 40 

Lterboro Rapid Transit Co., adj. 

a/c load conditions, A. C 1,87073 1,870 73 

Iterboro Rapid Transit Co., adj. 

B/c load eond!tion«, D. C 85,010 28 85,010 28 

iterboro Rapid Transit Co. Re- 
serve set aside for adjustment 

B/c coal, A. C 2,240,146 • 0.75 16,80110 16,80110 

i terboro Rapid Transit Co. Re- 
serve set aside for adjustment 

n/c coal, D. C S2.413,20f7 0.525 170,169 34 170,169 34 

Y. ft Queens Elec. Lt. ft Power 

Co 2,709 (•) 25105 25105 

ew York IJdison Company 1,124 (*) 15 32 15 32 

Total 284,609,423 1.394 $3. 968, OCT 08 $3,968,057 02 



Calculated on monthly car mileage. 

.09 + V per day service charge. 

.<M975 + 6% a/c B. R. T. Co. making payment. 



Digitized byCjOOQlCl 



282 Public Service Commission — Fibst District 

Kftw York CoBMlidated S&ilroad Oompany 

CORPORATE STTRPLUS AmOUOt 

Surplus, June 30, 1919 fl, 298. 239 75 

Distribution of balance rf U. S. Government award (63d street prop- 
erty) 1,088,740 03 

Adjustment of excess tax accruals — land 1917 88189 

Adjustment of excess tax — land improvements 1917 525 80 

Adjustment of unearned rentals at December 31, 1919 2,64167 

Miscellaneous 463 47 

Total 12.330,94161 

Debit balance for year transferred from income $1,076,710 34 

Amortisation elsewhere unprovided for, loss on sale of 

derricks, etc 1,50000 

Bad debts written off 2,534 65 

Appropriation to employ liability rogerve 2,890 38 

Trustee's fee for disbursement of interest 1,683 64 

Adjustment of Brooklyn Edison Co., rentals 643 25 

Expense in connection with sale of 63d streot property — 1.450 80 

Adjustment of bills to N. Y. Telephone Co 741 14 

Miscellaneous 236 80 

Total deductions ■ 1.088,29100 

Surplus, June 30, 1920 11,242,65061 

Officert.— Presidont, J. H. Hallock ; Vice President and Treasurer, C. D. Meneely ; 
Vice-President, J. J. Dempsey ; Secretary, J. H. Bennington ; Assistant Secretary, 
H. R. Potts; Assistant Treasurer, F. 8. Richards; Comptroller. Howard Abel; 
«^neral Counsel, G. D. Yeomans ; Claim Agent, I. Isaacsen ; Qeneral Manager, W. S. 
Menden ; Assistant General Manager, A. R. Piper ; Purchasing Agent, L. Van Cott ; 
Bipceiver, L. M. Garrison ; Chief Engineer of Way and Structures, C. L. Crabbs ; 
Superintendent of Transportation, J. F. Egan. 

ZMrf ctor».— T. S. Williams, C. D. Meneely, G. D| Yeomans, W. S. M«»nden, N. F. 
Brady, J. H. Hallock, G. W. Chauncey, H. C. Du Val, F. S. Flower, C. A. Boody, 
G. B. Gallagher, W. S. Benedict, J. J. Dempsey. 

Main Bu9inc98 OJBHoe.— 85 Clinton street. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

leoport verlfled by C D. Meneely, Treasurer for Jj. M. Garrison, Receiver, Septem- 
ber 27. 1980. 



NEW YORK MUNICIPAL RAILWAY CORPORATION 

Lessor 

Incorporated September 27, 1912. The entire capital stock of this company is 
held by th« lessee, the New York Consolidated Railroad Company [and the capital 
stock of the latter is in turn almost entirely owned by the Brooklyn Rapid Transit 
Company.] 

Important Change$ during Year.— United States Certificates of Indebtedness, 4H%, 
par value, $950,000, were acqulrei^ in August, 1919. They matured in December, and in 
January, 1920, the company reinvested in i%% certificates. A real estate mortgage 
for 16,600 was acquired, November 29, 1919. August 1, 1919, Receiver's certificates were 
issued Jointly with the New York Consolidated maturing in 2 years with interest at 
6 per cent, par value,* 113,000,000. On October 10, 1919, the South Brooklyn Ry Co. 
leased four parcels to the Nf^w York Municipal Ry. Corp., the New York Consolidated 
R. R. Co. and the City of New iork for .various terms from 3 to 21 years. 

For the extensions of the road put into operation see abstract of the New York 
Consolidated Railroad Company, ibid. 

No new powers or franchUes were acquired. 

^The 5 per cent discount on this issue, 1660,000, Is written off as follows: t39O,O0O 
was charged to construction under the contract, and 1/24 of (260,000 Is charged 
otr monthly to the lessee company. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



283 



Vaw York If mielpal Xallway OorponttlOB 
Fi^d Capital ChanQe9 during Year 
(I'or bilance in each fixed capiUl account at clow of year, see Table XVIII.) 
Fised Capital Installed tinoe Deoemher SI, i9M 

nrarALLBD Dusma tias* 



BAPD TRANBIT ILBTATBD UZCBS 

Reconatniotion 

and City owned tines 

Elevated additional UnaUocated Contract No. 4 
TTTLK OP ACCou3rr eztensions tracks expenditures Additions 

Patent righU $22 10 

Debt discount 1390,000 00 



Debt expense 

Right of way $2.i.9T0 45 17.214 27 

Otlier street railway land Cr.20,574 3l 



6,293 65 



Griding 

BalUst 

Ties 

Btila rail fastenings and Joints.... 

Special work 

Track laying and surfacing 

TonnelB 

Elerated structures and founda- 
tlODS 

Bridges, trestles and culverts 

Crossings, fences and signs 

Interlocking and other signal ap- 
paratus 

Telephone and telegraph lines 



359 19 



96 8S 



113,073 71 
4.400 67 
29.927 28 
36.619 57 
33.667 36 
40,SO4 59 



419 06 Or. 97,660 M 

7.59671 

332 94 



Cr. 210 20 

519 86 



281,106 13 
1,738 26 



Poles and fixtures Cr.l.283 4o 

UnderfTOund conduits 43,45145 

Tranifflisslon system 12.86196 

Dlstribotion system 2.367 88 95.069 65 

Sobetotion buildings 360 40 6,013 00 

Geaeral ofllce buildings and flxturee Or. 5:2 62 

Shops and car-houses 133,229 30 

Stations, waiting rooms and misc. 

bniidlngs 24,510 97 257,400 19 ^ 

Power plant electric equipment Cr. 116 46 

Snb^Ution equipment 2,953 92 4,794 73 

Shop equipment 3.040 36 

Rerenue cars 18,613 63 

Electric equipment of cars Cr. 367 94 

Other rail equipment 16 67 

EDgineerlng and superintendence 40, 805 03 83, 119 64 

Law expenditures during construc- 
tion 23,954 60 

Materials and supplies Cr. 126,306 44 

Injuries during construction 1,223 06 

interest during construction 1, 636, 603 02 

Ulicellaneous construction expendi- 
tures Cr.1.85082 17,623 79 141,467 60 



n 15 
Cr. 5,655 02 



Cr. 720 61 
883 40 

2.400 88 

I.Ota 43 

7,448 88 

70.099 38 



tnm 



386,744 78 
69,616 42 



62.344 64 

32,198 89 

457,622 09 

1,668 86 



145,736 53 



7,325 37 



1,741.210 34 

770,609 81 

7.846 61 

6,384 41 



Cr. 1,839 61 



209,006 77 



Total 

'No withdrawals. 



$65,987 61 11,060,660 81 $2,155,131 97 $8,969,283 10 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



i 



284 Ptblic Servicb Commission — Fibst District 

Hmt York Mwiiotpal Baltwaj ConMmtloa 

Expenditures for Prinefpal Projects (ty gr^upe): 

(A) New Subway line — Broadway-Fourth avenue line, ^,929,849.37 ; Htta. street 
Eastern line, 178,060.82; Culver line, 131,522.91. Total, $3,969,233.10. 

(B) Reconstructioii of existing lines — Brighton Beach from Church avenue to 
Malbone street [Empire boulevard], 128,627.20; Sea Beach, $6,715.90; Coney Island 
Terminal, $261,596.63 ; yards, shops and terminals, $334,412 ; equipment, $8,620.15 ; 
miscellaneous, $41^2.69; Fulton street, Cr. $7,082.70 ; Brighton Beach (general), 
$119^07.81; Canarsie, $6,867.16. Total, $799,916.73. 

(C) Additional Traclu. ]?\iUon street, $29,090^29; Broadway, $22,992.02; Myrtle ave- 
nue, $12,771.61; East New York, $216,890.96. Total, $280,744.08. 

<D) Elevated Extensions. Liberty avenue, $2,136.60; Jamaica avenue, 963,1999.^. 
Total, $56,987.61. 

Total expenditures on leased lines as above, $5,105,881.52; in addition there were 
unallocated expenditures during the year, $2,166,131.97. Grand total of capital in- 
vested during year, $7,261,013.49. 

Corporate Surplus.— Credit balance at beginning of year, $69,531.28; net corporate 
income for year, $50,964.62; deductions from surplus, $39,076.58; Surplus, June ^90, 
lS»i, $71,409.32. 

OiPccr*.— President, T. S. Williams; Vice-Presidents, C. D. Meneely and J. H. 
Harding ; Assistant Secretary, H. R. Potts ; Tteaaurer, C. D. Meneely ; As«iatant 
Treasurer, F. S. Richards; Auditor and Comptroller, Howard Abel; Oeneral Coun- 
sel, G. D. Yeomans ; General Purchaaing Agent, L. Van Cott. 

For manager appointed by the Receiver L. M. Garrison, see abstract of the lesaee 
oompany. 

Directors — J. Horace Harding, W. G. Oakman, T. S. Williams, C A. Boody. J. C. 
Brady, C. D. Burdick, G. W. Davison, N. F Brady, G. B. Gallagher, C. D. Meneely, 
Colgate Hoyt. 

Main Business Office.— 86 Clinton street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report verified by C D. Meneely, Treasurer, for Lindley M. Garrison, Receiver, 
^ptember 24, 1920. 



. KEW YORK RAILWAYS COMPANY 

Incorporated December 29, 1911, under sections 9 and 10 of the Stocic Corporation 
Law, as a reorganisation of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company. The New 
Yodc Railways Company holds the properties of the following-named companies 
under leases or operating agreements: 

Bleecker Street and Fulton Ferry Railroad Company. 
Broadwav and Seventh Avenue Railroad Company. 
Christopher and Tenth Streets Railroad Comjjany (agreement). 
For George and Eleventh Avenue Railroad Company (agreement). 
If^rty-Second Street and Grand Street Ferry Railroad Company. 
Sixth Avenue Railroad Company. 

Thirty -fourth Street Croastown Railway Company (agreement). 
Twentjt-third Street Railway Company. 

The respondent holds direct control of these companies throat ownecskip «f a 
majority of their capital stodos, except for the Christopher and Tenth Streets wad 
the Sixth Avenue companies. It also has a one-half interest, represented by 50i) 
shares of stock, in the Bridge Operating Company. 

Stock control of this company is held by the Interborough Consolidated Corpora- 
tion tfrhlch acquired the majority of its shares June 1, 1916. 

Important Changes during Year.— By the terms of the following-named orders of 
the U. S. District Court the Receiver ceased to operate certain leased lines ^ return- 
ing them to their owners : 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Strbbt Railway Companies 285 

Older of July 14, 1M9, effeetire midnight jBly SI, trackage of the Bighth Avenue 
R. R. Co. as f oUows : 

On From To Feet 

Vndacroand eleotnc: 

Wtft Broadway S « Barday street Canal street 2.048.75 

Caaal street* Broadway Variok street 1.704.68 

Cualstreet Varickstr«et Hudsonstreet 1.172 

Hadsonstreet Canal street Eichth avenue 9.676.42 

Eighth avenue Hudson street Harlem river 70,880.62 

Church street i. « Vtfey street Barclay street 132 

MeCombs lane Eighth avenue 155th street 3.087.42 

Biihth arenue In front of ear house at.. . 50th street 200 

Stonse. dwtric: 

CSkoreh stveet * Barelay street Chambers street 306.75 

Chambers street \* Church street West Broadway 222. 10 



Total — tracks in public ways — feet 00,310.64 



MUes 18,811 



Older of September 26, 1010, effective midnight September 30, trackage of the Ninth Avenue 
Rs&oad Company, as follows: 

UsdcrgrottDd electric: 

Greenwich streets C. L. Fulton street G. L. Beach street 1.670 

Qfeenvieh street C. L. Beach street C. L. Ninth avenue 6,000 

Waduogton street* C. L. Fulton street C. L. No. Moore street. .. . 1,408.76 

Wsihington street > C. L. No. Moore street. . . G. L. Oansevoort street ... 7 .048 

Gamevoort street C. L. Washington street. . C. L. Ninth avenue 426 

Nisthavenue C. L. Oansevoort street. . C. L. Oreenwioh street 28.81 

Ninthavenue C. L. Oreenwioh street. . . C. L. 53d street 21,638.42 

Cdumbus avenue C. L. 53d street C. L. Broadway 6,217.42 

Bnsdway C. L. Columbus avenue. . C. L. Amsterdam avenue. . 3.843 

Attrtffdam avenue C. L. Broadway 8. H. L. 126th street 20.386.42 

^ihoB street^ G. L. Church street C. L. Oreenwich stieet 601.50 

€iBal street Greenwich street Was ington street 274 

^8treet« C. L. Seventh avenue C. L. Ninth avenue 3.600 

Ninth avenue In front of oar house at 54th street 103 



Total — tracks in public ways — feet 83,044.32 



MUes 15,728 



Older of January 31, 1020, effective midnight of January 31, trackage of tiie New York and 
Btrien R. R. Co., as follows: 

On From To Feet 
UBdffnoand electric: 

^^ row Broadway and Ann st Brooklyn bridge 2,210.75 

Centre street Brooklyn bridge G. L. Grand street 6.481.84 

<^d street C. L. Centre street C. L. Bowery 1,130 

Bo»ery C. L. Grand street C. L. Broome street 402.75 

Centre street C. L. Grand street C. L. Broome street 454 

Broomestreet C. L. Centre street C. L. Bowery 1.018.50 

B«wwy» C. L. Broome street C. L. Fourth avenue 6.118.82 

'^Mrthave. and Park awe. C. L. Bowery C. L. 42d street 10,046.50 

'Mnt Ownerthip with The Sixth Avenue Railroad Co. 

Joint Ownership with Dry Dock, East Broadway & Battery Railroad Company. 
[Operated over full lengths shown. 

Washington Street — Chrlatopher Street to West 10th Street only ISO teet. 

"•wery- Spring Street to Delancey Street only 222 feet. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



286 Public Service Commission — First District 

Haw York Kallwmyt Company 

On From To Feet 
Undercround Electric : 

42d street G. L. Park avenue C. L. Madison avenue 1 .020 

Madison avenue C. L. 42d street C. L. 135th street 49.650.40 

Madison avenue * C. L. 185ih street Madison avenue bridge 620 

86th street C. L. Madison avenue C. L. Second avenue 4 ,646 . 42 

84th street * C. L. Lexington avenue . . C. L. Second avenue 2, 502 . 50 

84th street * C. L. Second avenue East river 2,232 . 84 

Astor place Connecting with Second avenue track 350 

Park row Within Third avenue .... Railroad company loop 84 

Fourth avenue In front of car house at 33d street 142 . 50 



Total — tracks in public ways — feet 98.929 .91 

Miles 18.736 



Note. — Fdlowing track sections still operated by receiver. New York Railway's Company: 

Other track changes — owned or operated over: 

Decreases: On IVom To Total single 

Underground electric: track, feet 

Belt Line Ry. Corp.: 

Greenwich street . . . North of Fulton street . . . Vesey st. and W. B'way ... 122 . 50 

Greenwich street.. . . West track, Fulton street. Dey street 203 . 50 

Day street Greenwich street Washington street 195 .00 



Totel 521.00 



Dry Dock, Esst Broadway & Battery Railroad Co.: 

Washington street. . Fulton street Cortlandt street 490 

Cortlandt street Washington street West street 440 

Cortlandt street Greenwich street Washington street 255 

Greenwich street . . . Cortlandt street Fulton street 483 

Greenwich street .. . Fulton street Beach street 1,579 

Washington street. . Fulton street No. Moore street 1,408.75 



Total....: 4.655.75 



Bleecker Street & Fulton Ferry Railroad Co.: 
Eleventh avenue . . . 23d street Car barn . 



Houston, West Street ft Pavonia Ferry Railroad Co.: 

42d street Lexington avenue 72i ft. east of C. L. Park 

avenue 33.21 



Union Railway Company of New York: 

135th street Lenox avenue Madison avenue 30.60 



City of New York: 

Transverse road Eighth avenue Fifth avenue 5 ,873 

85th street Fifth avenue Madison avenue 1 ,020 



Total 6.893 



Second Avenue Railroad Co.: 

86th street Second avenue Avenue " A " 2,926 

Avenue " A " 86th street 92d street, Astoria ferry. . . 3.438 

Astor place Broadway Fourth avenue 8S5 

Stuyvesant street. . . Third avenue Fourth avenue 222 



Total 7,471 

Storage electric: 

Christopher and Tenth Street Railroad Co.: 

10th street Washington street West street 81.20 



Surface Track — not slotted. 
* Operated over full lengths shown. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



288 Public Service Commission — Fibst District 

irew York Ballwsyi Ck«ip«a3F 

Permits were issued by the City of New Torit, dated May 1, tBTKK «ffectlTe May 1, 
1920, for one year, for privileges on the Marginal street areas at the foUowlng named 
locations : 

AnMUBt 
per sBuam 

Christopher street — North riv«r HU 00 

W«st 2Sd street ~ North river 1,<K5 00 

Chambers street — North river 1»00 

Desbroeses street — North river 137 00 

Bast 23d street — Bart river 404 26 

East 118th street — Harlem river 86 00 



Effective August 1, 1919, by and under the terms of an ord«r of the Pnblie Service 
Commission .in Case No. 2380, a charge of 2# was authorised for each transfer de- 
manded by a passenger except in the case of transfers required by the terms of a 
municipal franchise agreement or consent. 

Effective September Ifi, 1919, by order of the District Court al the United States 
for the Soutb«n District dated June 30, 1919^ Job B. Hedges, aa Receiver of the 
New York Railways Company, was directed to terminate agreement dated September 
9, 1914, between the City of New York and New York Railways Company providing 
for transfers between the Municipal Ferry, operated between Staten Island and 
the foot of Whitehall street, and the several lines of the New York Railways Com- 
pany described in said agreement so terminated. 

Effective October 1, 1919, by and under the terms of an order of the District 
Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York, dated November 
26, 1919, the Receiver was directed to issue free transfers at certain points along the 
route of the Ninth Avenue Railroad Company as required by the terms of municipal 
franchise or consent. 

Effective October 5, 1919, interchange of transfers with The Brooklyn & North 
River Railroad Company was discontinued, due to cessation of the operation of 
that company's line. 

No new powers or franchises were acquired. 

Fiwed Capital Chamges during Year 

INSTALLATIONS KXTIRBMaNTS 



Tirui or ACCOUNT Owned Leised Owned Lesaed 

Land, other than railway |1,170 67 |4,130 «2 

Roadway tools Cr.39 20 

Transmission system Cr. 1,250 74 

Shops and car-houses 1,755 33 2,958 58 

Substation equipment 862 26 

Shop equipment 6 76 

Revenue cars Cr. 103 00 

Electric equipment of cars 188 

Miscellaneous equipment 3, '900 74 



16,384 89 17.050 00 



Bwpenditure for Principal Proyccts.— Assessments by City of New York account 
of improvements on West 46th street, 110,016.9). 

Detail of Property Acquired January 1, 191t, Buhaequently fi^oM.— Balance at be- 
ginning of year, 1115,071.93; sold during year: 1 safe, |75 ; 2 horses, |40; 1 watch- 
man's clock, |40 ; 1 register, ^0 ; old office furniture, $164 ; old wagons, trucks, etc., 
$360 ; car motors from demolished cars, 110,497.60 ; car wheels, axles and scrap from 
demolished cars, 112,798.02 ; old rails and ties fremi 218th street yard, |0,965 ; miscel- 
laneous tools and machinery, |1,540; cable scrapped, $1,697.70; total, $37,131.32; tme 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway CoMPAmES 280 

K«w Yorik Bmilways Campany 

single track closed car reported in 1919 as to be returned by tbe New York & 
Queens County R. R. Co. not returned to date, |150 ; balance at close of year, |152,- 
353.25. 

Power Bought, Sold and Exchanged 

Total Average 

number of prbe Amount Amount debited 

kw. fan. perkw.hr. Qre<fited to or (Cr.) credited 

jun or ooicPAiTT deKmred (eesM Tbtalaaoant retwue to expense 
Powtrb(mgH 

iBterbcctngfaBapidTnnaitCo. A.C. 89,4flft,QM 1.127 $1,010,889 10 $1,010,888 10 

lattfboroagli Rapid ThBBtCD. D.C. 1,645,006 1.583 28,20162 36,90162 

ToUl 11,036,580 81 $1,036,689 81 



PsmraoM 

)icvYarkBd»onCo AC. l,43i»lX» 2.000 82a,684 00 $28,684 00 

Len^tonbiukfiBg AC. 1,701,433 1.928 32,805 06 Cr. $82,805 06 

CdOeboildi^ AC. 258,648 1.927 4.984 55 Cr. 4.984 55 

CahkWkfiag. D.C. 73.712 1.928 1,42112 Cr. 1.42112 

Elsltt]iAT«neB.R.Co D.C. 6,735,966 2.293 154.476 68 154,476 68 

MatbATeiuieILS.Co D.C. 2.065.953 2.296 47,439 17 47,439 17 

BrooUyn k North Rhrcr R. R. 

Co D.C. 81.753 1.100 899 83 899 32 

S««Yak4HaricBR.R.Cb.. D.C. 5.067.542 2.060 104,668 25 104.668 25 

D.C* 1.933 3.9T8 76 89 76 89 



Total $375,45004 $336.239 31 Cr. $39,210 73 



DeJhBed to Tlurd Atcbiio Ry. 

C« D.C. 1,836,971 2.292 $30 1 643 83 Cr. $30,642 83 

Beeaved from Third Avenue Ry. 

Co D.C. 1,330.228 2.298 30,563 43 30.563 43 

I>&mtd to receiver Second 

ATa»ieR.R.Co D.C. 3,849,002 2.197 84.566 33 $30.914 85 Cr. 53.65148 

Beomd from receiver Second 

ATeQfKlLR.Co D.C. 304,848 1.980 6.034 49 6,034 49 

Bihaee $80,914 85 Cr. $47,697 39 



CORPORATE DBFICIT 

DehitB 

Balance at beginning of year $3,285,281 81 

Balance for year transferred from Inoome Acccmnt. 3,648,033 63 

L<»B in final settlement with Lessee of Employees Stores 24,923 89 

AppUcable to period prior to Mardi 21^ 1919 : 

Operating Expenses 17,742 86 

Accidents and Damages 93,298 88 

Rent of Tracks and Terminals 

Und and Building Privileges 

Xon-operatlng Revenue Cr. 

Non-operating Revenue Deductions / Cr. 

Other Contractual Deductions 

Taxes assignable to Street Railway Operations Cr. 

rneollectlble Accounts written off 

Additional Federal Taxes for Calendar year 1917 and year ended June 

», ms 

Miwllaneous 

f^ettlement of Claim against Subway Contractor 

Interest on Special Franchise Tax Refunds assigned to New York & 

Harlem Railroad Company -. 

Appropriation to Reserve for Doubtful Accounts 



271 90 


6 67 


8,444 91 


649 59 


171 60 


489 


9.98S42 


4.616 21 


138 39 


397 80 


7.218 81 


12,000 00 



10 



17.096.067 9« 



.Google 



290 Public Sbbyica Cobcbiission — First District 

ir«w Yoik Ballwmyt Oompaiiy 

COBPOBATB DEFICIT — OOHCluded 

Credits 

Unexpfended Balance of payment for restoration of cable. $8,934 87 
Adjustment of Federal Tax Accruals for Calendar y«ar 

1918 * 37,443 47 

Settlement of C^aim against Subway Contractor 4, 600 00 

Bieallsation of Accounts Receivable, previously written 

off as uncollectible 364 86 

Adjustment of Federal Tax Accruals for period January 1 

to March 20, 19U 48.227 49 

Chrerhead Service, etc., account of material sold 7, 819 63 

Scrap Material sold 52B 00 

Material returned to stock 30 87 

Adjustment of Accrual of Federal Taxes for period March 

a to June 80, 1919 54.826 12 

1162, 170 a 

Deficit, June 30, 1920 |6.W2,8B775 

Officers.— President, vacant ; Vice-President and General Manager, Ftank Hedley ; 
Vice-President and Assistant to President, W. Leon Peppennan ; Secretary, H. M. 
Fisher: Assistant Secretary, A. C. ^gren; Treasurer^ J. H. Campbell; Auditor, 
B. F. J. Gaynor ; General Attorney, James L. Quackenbush ; Chief Engiiteer, George 
H. Pegram ; Superintendent of Bquifmient, J. S. Doyle. 

Direotors.— August Belmont, Edward J. Berwind, Henry W. Bull, John dandier 
Cobb, Thomas DeWitt Cuyler, Frank Hedley, Charles P. Howland, George B. 
Lelghton, WiUlam H. Remick, Richard H. Swartmont, F. DeC. Sullivan, Job E. 
Hedges. 

Main Business Office.— 1^5 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Report verified by Job B. Hedges, Receiver, November 1, 1920. 



THE NINTH AVENUE RAILROAD COMPANY 

Incorporated July 28, 1868. 

Principal Stockholders.— The twenty largest stockholders, January 6, 1920, and 
the number of votes of each were: Anna W. Peter, 2,000; Estate of Sarah Wil; 
liams, 687; Alga Law, 467; Mary L. Hays, 874; George Henry Warren, 266; George 
Henry Warren, Trustee, 266 ; Georgia W. Warren, 162 ; James J. (VDonohue, Jr., 211 ; 
Kate F. Hays, 185 ; Estate of Bmmn. L. Moller, 161 ; Mary E. Hayes, 162 ; Francis B. 
Hitchcock, 160; Thomas Hitchcock, 160; Armistead Peter, Jr., 150; G. H. Warren, 
Trustee, 149; Estate of Anna F. Wright, 130; W. B. Isham, 126; Mary J. LaSalla. 
Ill; Title Guarantee and Trust Co., Trustee, 100; Ida E. Bites, 75. 

Important Changes during Year.— Pursuant to an order of the United States 
District Court, dated August 28, 1919, the lease of the company's property to the 
Metropolitan Street Railway Company was cancelled and certain of its property 
was surrendered and turned over to the company by the Receiver of the New 
York Railways Company, the successor of the Metropolitan Street Railway Com- 
pany, at midnight September 30, 1919, when the company resumed operation. 

The company on March 26, 1920, sold its property at 1824-8 Amsterdam avenoe. 
book value 19,929.48, for $60,000.00 accepting from the Hermes Amusement Co. in 
part payment therefor a 6% mortgage for $35,000.00, due March K, 1925. No new 
powers or franchises acquired. 

Fixed Capital Installed since December SI, JXN^8.— Installed during the year: 
general office buildings and fixtures, $64.84; revenue cars, $239.83; miscellaneous 
equipment, $884.78; total, $1,128.90. 

Equipment Retired during Year from Fixed Capital since December 31, i906.— 
None. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 291 

The HfiaXh At»iiim BftllrMd Oompany 

Power Bott^AI.— Interborouffh Rapid Transit Co., 964,986 kw.hrs. at 2.294 cents, 
total price, $22,142.70; Receiver, New York Railways Co., 1,835,143 kw.hrs. at 2.292 
ccDts, total price, $42,082177; Third Avenue Railway System, 206,970 kw.hrs. at 
t.2iA cents, total prlce^ $4^70131. Total purchased : 8,006,048 kw.hrs., amount 
168309.78. 

COEPORATB 8CRPLUS 

Profit on sale of land and improvements, Nos. 1824 to 1828 
Amsterdam avenue: 

March 25, 1920, sold for $60,000 00 

Lns orii^al cost 9,929 48 

$40.070 62 

Estimated value of tracks in streets ^$2,987,453 00 

Estimated value of equipment ^161,240 57 

$3,148,693 67 . 

Less original cost $341,48162 

Charged to New York Railways Co 68,816 60 

410.247 12 

2.738,446 45 

$2,778,616 97 

Defldt October 1, 1919 $366,689 19 

Debit balance for year transferred fk-om income 64, 621 62 

Other deductions — salary of general manager 600 00 

430,810 71 

Corporate surplus June 30, 1920 $2,3<7,706 26 



Oiflccrt.— President, Joseph Tate; First Vice-President, William Henry Hays; 
Secretary, James G. Affleck ; Assistant Secretary, William Affleck ; Treasurer, 
James G. Affleck; Assistant Treasurer, William Affleck; Auditor, B. T. Baker; 
Attoni«r, Michael Kirtland ; Special Agent, William G. Wheeler; Chief Engineer. 
W. B. Yereance; General Manager, W. B. Yereance; Purchasing Agent, Ralph 
Newman. 

Directors.— James Gelston Affleck, J. Gelston Affleck, Jr., William Affleck, Wil- 
liam Henry Hays, Michael Kirtland, Joseph J. O'Donohue, Jr., Armistead Peter, ,Jr., 
Joseph Tate, F. Bianchl Tompkins. 

Main BuHnesB Olfiee,— 1 Madison avenue. New York City. 

Report verified by W. B. Yereance, General Manager, October 8. 1920. 



OCEAN ELECTRIC RAILWAY COMPANY 

Incorporated May 1, 1897. The Long Island Railroad Company acquired the 
'tock of the company in 1896. 
It^portant OHanges during the Year.— None. 

Fiated Capital Changes during Tear 
(For balance in each fixed capital account at close of year see Table XVIII.) 

DTSTALLBD DURING TBAS 

. • s Retired 

TiTLB OF ACCOUNT Additions Replacements during year 

Ti« 112460 110980 

KaUa, ran fastenings, and Joints 3,994 17 5,851 88 

Tnck laying and surfacing 4,01873 3,465 00 

Paving 36,14694 17.829 60 

Diitribution system 599 86 820 00 

Keroine cars $4,557 00 

Electric equipment of cars 2,048 00 



Total 16,600 00 |44,884 80 127.575 73 



^Estimated value of original property and additions and improvements thereto, 
vhlch by the terms of the lease was to be turned over to the lessor, upon it» 
ttrminttion. ^ j 

uiyiiizeu uy VjOOv? IC 



292 Public Service Combubsion — Fibst District 

OcoaA Ele«trlc Bailway Gompaay 

Expenditures for Prinoiftal Projects.^ Purchase of 3 cars, 16,600/ Rei>lAeemeii^ of 
tracks on Rockaway Beach Boulevard between Eastern and Remsen arenues, 

Potoer Bought.-^ From Long Island Railroad Companj, 1,541,875 kw.hr& (incladini^ 
4,800 for stop lights) at the average price of 2.06 cents per kw.hr., $3132d-n> 
charged to exi>ense. 

Corporate Surplus.— Credit balance at beginning of year, 1168,884.89; debit bal- 
ance for year transferred from income, |29,957.88 ; surplus, June 30, 1920, |128,927.01. 

Oi^cer*.— President, Ralph Peters; Vice-President, C. L. Addison; Secretary. 
Frank E. Haff ; Treasurer, J. F. Fbhnestock ; Comptroller, E. A. Stockton ; General 
Solicitor, J. P. Keany ; Chief Engineer, L. V. Morris ; General Superintendent, 
J. R. Savage; Purchasing Agent, H. B. Hodges; Assistant Comptroller, J. S. 
Donaldson and F. J. Fell, Jr. 

Directors.— C. L. Addison, Benjamin Evans, Frank B. Hoff, J. J. Kenny, T. J. 
Ludlam, Ralph Peters, R. G. Richardson, J. R. Savage, P. H. Woodward. 

Main Business Office.— Broad Street Station, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Report verified by J. F. Fahnestock, Treasurer, October 11, 1920. 



PELHAM PARK AND CITY ISLAND RAILWAY COMPANY, IHC. 

Incorporated May 10, 1913, under sections 9 and 10 of the State Corporation 
as a reorganised company ; successor to the City Island R. R. Co. and tbe 
Pelham Park R. R. Co. Control of the company was acquired July 9, 1914, 
by the Third Avenue Railway Co. through the purchase of all its stock. 

Important Changes during Tear.— "So cars were operated after August 9, 1919, 
at 12:01 a. m. The six leased cars were returned to their owners. No Dew 
powers or franchises were acquired. 

Fiaed Capital Changes during Year.— None. 

Poicer Bdught.— From Westchester Lighting Co., A. C, 12,646 kw.hrs. at 2.49 cents, 
1316; charged to expenses. 

Corporate Dejlcit.— Beblt balance, June 30, 1919, 1105,058.03: debit balance trans- 
ferred from income. n,404.62 ; deficit, June 30, 1920, $106,457.65. 

Oj(?!c€r«.— President, S. W. Huff; Vice-President, L. Sutherland; Secretary, 
W. C. Burrows; Assistant Secretary, J. Maroney ; Treasurer, A. D. Sage; Afislstant 
Treasurer, F. Kessel ; Auditor, B. G. Stelnetz ; Assistant Auditor, W. Farrington ; 
General Counsel, A. T. Davison ; Claim Agent, J. W. Yenson ; Superintendent of 
Transportation and General Purchasing Agent, W. E. Thompson. 

Directors.— B. M. Burghard, G. W. Davison, S. W. Huff, A. Iselin, Jr., j. w. 
Platton, W. E. Roosevelt, J. H. Seaman, F. H. Shipman, L. F. Strauss. 

Main Business Ojplce.— 2396 Third avenue. New York, N. Y. 

Report verified by A. D. Sage, Treasurer, September 30, 1920. 



PROSPECT PARK AND CONEY ISLAND RAILROAD COMPANY 

Lessor 

Incorporated October 9, 1874, under the Laws of 1874, as a consolidation- oC two 
other companies. Stock control of this company is held by the Lons Island 
Railroad Co. through the ownership of a majority of its capital . stock acquired 
in 1893. (See 1917 Report for abstract of lease to the Brooklyn Heights R. R. Co. 
which was later assigned to the South Brooklyn Ry. Co.) 

important Changes during Year.— None. 

Fixed Capital Changes during Year.— None. 

Corporate Deficit.— Debit balance at the beginning of year, |542,828.49 ; net cor- 
porate loss for year, $5,398.88. Deficit, June 30, 1920, $548,227.37. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



-Street Railway Companies 2G5 

Prosp«ct P«rk and Coney Island 'Bailroad Company 

Oiflocr*.— President, A. J. County; Vlce-Pre«ident, C. L. Addison; Secretary, 
Wm. P. Brown; Treasurer, Geo. A. Walker; Assistant Treasurer, H. H. Lee; Gen- 
eral Counsel, F. I. Gowen ; Assistant Oomptroller, F. J. F«ll, Jr. 

Dinctor$.— Gear«e . J. Adams, C. L. . Addlaon, W. F. Brown, A. J. Coaiity„ 
Benjamin Svans, Henry Tatnall, George W. Wingate. 

Main BuHneas 0#ce.-> Pennsylvania Station, New York City. 

Report verified by J. F. Fatanestock, Treasurer, September 20, 1980. 



PROSPECT PARK AND SOUTH BROOKLYN RAILROAD COMPANY 

Lessor 

Incorporated June 15, 1888; controlled by the South Brooklyn Railway Co., 
(a B. R. T. flubeidiary), through the ownership of 495 shares of Its capital stock 
acquired Jnly 5, 1912. The South Brooklyn By. Co. is also the operator under 
the lease. 

Important Changes during Yeor.— None. 

Detail of Property Retired during Tear from Fiaed Capital, December «, i»08.— 
Tenth avenue interlocking signal tower, 18,500; waiting rooms, $1,300; platforms, 
1825; total. 110,625, covered by award paid by City of New York for easement 
acquired by condemnation, and credited to track and roadway oonstructlon. 

Corporate Surplus.— Credit bahmce at beginning of year, 11,388.83; net corporate 
income, IM87^. Swplas, June 30, 1920, ^TllM. 

Ofieere.-^ President, T. S. Williams ; Vice-President and Treasurer, C. D. Meneely ; 
SMretary, J H. Bennington ; Assistant Secretary, H. R. Potts ; Assistant Treasurer, 
T. S. Richards ; Comptroller, Howard Abel ; General Counsel, G. D. Yeomans. 

Directors — T. S. Williams, C. D. Moneely, G. D. Yeomans, C. Lu Woody, A. M. 
Williams, J. U. Bennington. 

Main Business 0Mce,— 2S Clinton street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report verified by C. D. Meneely, Treasurer, September 24, 1920. 



RICHMOND LIGHT AND RAILROAD COMPANY 

Incorporated [as an electric lighting company] August 1, 1902, under the Trans- 
portation Corporations Law, chapter 566, Laws of 1890, as amended. On August 
^ 1M2, an amended certificate was filed enabling the company to build and 
operate an electric railroad. 

Tbe twenty principal stockholders and the number of votes to which they 
were en«Ued were : Leslie M. McCrum, 4,400 ; fi>. J. Boyd, 4,000 ; W. B. Cardosa, 
iOflO; Thoe. F. Ryan. 2;3S2; George B. M. Harvey, 1,971; N. D. Putnam, 1,836; 
Austin B. Fletcher, 1,431; Lewis B. Franklin, 719; J. K. Rice, Jr. & Co., 550; 
Sidney AronsCein, 900; Lehman Bros., 600; Bro>wn Bros. & Co.. 349; Albert C. 
BBrrage, 312 ; Orviss Bros. & Co., 200 ; Chandler Bros. & Co., 247 ; A. J. Hemphill, 
»l; Levi Holbrook, 200; W. C. Bradley, 200; H. B. Rodeson, 172; Harold Stanley, 
3». 

J^pwrtant Changes during Year.— J. J. Kuhawas appointed Federal . Receiver and 
N^Q operating the road April 28, 1320. iBatea of fare were chaaged >May 5, 1930, 
n foUows : Cash fares from 6# to 8<, regular tickets from 5^ to 7^, school ti^^eta 
^n 4^ to 3#. The company purchased cars' for |67,60O.00, of wlilch 361,000.00 was 
in the form of eiiaiiMBieiit oblligatieas. No new powers or franchises. were aoqnired. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



294 



Public Service CoioassioN — First District 



Richmond lAghi and Railroad Company 

Fined Capital Changes during Tear,— (For balance in each fixed capital account 
at close of year, see Table XYIII.) 

Eapenditurea during the Year on Railroad Property 

Partiai payment on Schmidt property $2,600 00 

Installing switch at E. Pt. Ferry 1980 12 

Installing crossover at Sou. Beach Ijoop 26142 

Installing mats for L. H. B. O. at Rich. Ter. & Jer. St. . 240 12 

1,521 "A 

Extend track and flU In meadowland, Arlington 146180 

Install inside rail Rich. Ter. and Holland Ave 748 99 

Install side traclE at S. I. Shipbldg. and replace crossover 1,728 82 
New track at Brook St. car barn 862 00 

2,776 71 

22 cars purchased from S. I. Midland Ry. Co 104.000 00 

Electric improvements 104,000 00 

Improving cars from Emerg. Fleet for service 669 23 

Minor projects 1« 168 95 

Total 1217,746 63 



Accounts charged: Other street railway land, 12,600.00; rails, rail fastenings 
and Joints, 13,776.71; special work, 11,531.74; paving, $308.39; distribution system. 
1621.95; general office buildings and fixtures, $66.63; stations, waiting rooms and 
miscellaneous buildings, $190.45; shop equipment, I8L53; rerenne cars, $104,669.23; 
electric equipment of cars, $104,000.00; total, $217,746.63. 

Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fimed Capital, Decemlter SI, 1998.— 
Eleven closed passenger cars, $15,31L17 ; one open passenger car, $1,119.67 ; electric 
equipment of cars, $22,476.74; sale of two change carriers^ $4.60. Total, $39,912.08. 

Account 8 credited.— Cars, $16,430.84 ; electric equipment of cars, $23,476.74 ; miscel- 
laneous equipment, $4.60. 

Equipment Retired dwring Year from Fined Capital, sinoe December 91, S908.— 
Shop equipment (kitchen utensils), $79.45. 

Power Bought, Sold or Bnchanged.— Received from the lighting d^artment. 
^ 6,867,358 kw.hrs., at .0136 cents per kw.hr., $94,102.91, charged to operating expenses. 



:!i 



COBPORATE DEFICIT 

Deficit June 30, 1919 $213,314 67 

Expenses elsewhere unprovided for: 

Trimming and towing coal barges $562 24 

Court costs for track extensions 1,548 00 

Claim vs. City of New York 4,746 21 

Adjustment of freight charges on coal 648 22 

Tax on bonds — 1918 1,196 40 

Directors' fees 100 00 

Dues to American Elec. Ry. Assoc 46 88 

Coal burned up by fire 2,874 50 

Errors In posting 528 68 

Unpaid Judgments 5, 106 85 

Donations 15 OO 

Registrar of bonds 100 00 

Telephone tolls, previous year 207 81 

Retirement of poles 3, 160 68 

"This item does not include 3,799,219 kw.hrs. reporti^l ns delivered to the Staten 
Island Midland Railway Company, and 72.089 kw.hrs. delivered to the Sonth field 
Beach Railroad Company. Electric energy is furnished by the lighting department 
of the Richmond Ught and Railroad Company to its railway department and to the 
associated Staten Island Midland and Southlleld Beach Railroad Companies, and in 
apportioned on the basis of car miles operated by the companies. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



295 



Slehmond Light and Ballroad OomiMUiy 
COBPOBATB imviciT — Concluded 
Expenaes elsewbere unprovided tor — OoneJudtd: 

Retirement of reciprocating engine 17,079 19 

LoM doe to sale of Liberty bonds 920 00 

Consumen' meter deposits 406 16 

$29.233 88 

Total debits 1242,548 49 

Credit balance for year transferred from income 9160, 764 06 

Other additions to surplus : 

Errors in distribution IS, 789 88 

Insurance adjustment 14,779 96 

Interest due from S. I. Midland 96148 

Other adjustments 957 56 

196,242 98 

Defldt June 30, 1920 $46,806 66 



OJtoert.— President, C. W. Huntington ; Vice-President, R. L. Rand ; Secretary, 
J. E. Phillips; Treasurer and Auditor, J. E. PbUllps; Attorney, B. O. Badle; 
Chief Engineer, W. H. Rudlsill ; General Superintendent of Railway, H. J. Black- 
bam; Oeneral Purchasing Agent, J. F. Fltsgerald, Jr. 

Direetart.— C, W. Huntington, R. L. Rand, A. J. Hemphill, H. W. BuU, 
A. H. Larkin. 

Main Bu9ine9S OJftee.— Terminal Building, St. George, Staten Island, New York. 

Report verified by J. E. Phillips, Auditor, October 27, 1920. 



SRCORD AVENUE RAILROAD COMPANY IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK 

Incorporated January 21, 1858. The twenty 'principal stockholders and the 
number of votes to which each was entitled were : Interborough-Metropolitan Co., 
1451; Henry W. Curtis, 660; Walter P. Bliss, 560; German American Insurance Co., 
Und Title and Trust Co., Geo. H. Prentiss & Co., Augusta Bliss R«e8e, Rhode 
Inland Iloap. Trust Co., 500 each ; Estate of George W. Bliss and Gilford Agnew 
et al.. 400 ; Isaac V. Brokaw, 310 ; Francis R. Hitchcock, Thomas Hitchcock, Paterson 
Sole Dep. and Trust Co., Wm. H. Sage, Trustee, Benjamin B. Knight, 800 each; 
Habbard H. Warren, 265; Estate of Chas. Danford, 259; Joseph W. Ryle, 259; Geo. 
S. Coe, Trustee, BenJ. Knower, 230 ; Fred Kaiser, 225. 

Important Changes during Year.— Agreements were made as follows : [January 31, 
1920, with the New York and Harlem Railroad Company for the sale of power to 
that company at cost on a car mileage basis] ; March 15, 1920, with the same com- 
Ptay for its use of part of the car house of the Second Av-e. R. R. Co., consideration 
6,000 per month. 

Agreement with New York Rys. Co. whereby transfers issued by that company's 
Eighth aTcnue line and honored by the 59th street line of Belt Lln« Ry. Corp. 
would be accepted by the Second Are. R. R. Co., was discontinued September SOj^ 
1919, by the Eighth Avenue R. R. Co. 

There was default in payment of principal and interest on Receiver's Certificates 
issued October 1, 1918, and due October 1, 1920. On February 5, 1920, Charles E. 
Chalmers was appointed Receiver, succeeding Mr. Kalbach, who died February 2, 

\m. 

No new powers or franchises were acquired. 

Fited Capital installed $ince December SI, 1908.— Installed during year : General 
offlce buildings and fixtures, 185.00 ; Revenue cars, ^2,787.94 ; Miscellaneous equip- 
ment, 18,788.70. Total, $6,611.64. None retired. 

E^enditures for Principal Projects.— 

One auto emergency wagon 13,788 70 

S lets manual operating door equipments 1,864 08 

12 sets manual car equipments 938 86 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



296 



Public Service Commission — Fibst District 



hi 

ili5 



Second Avenme &«ilio«d Cfimfaay in the Oity of Kew York 

Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fimed Capital, J)eeember SI, 008.— 
No record of its Fixed Capital, December SI, 1908. 

Equipment Retired during Year from " Fiwed Capital, since Deo, SI, 1S08."— 
None. 

Power Bought, Sold or Exchanged 





Total 


Average 




Aj 


mount 




number 


pnoe 


Amount 


dented or 




of kw.hrs. 


per kw.hr. 


Total credited to 


(Or.) credited 


NAME or COMPAirr 


deUvered 


(oenta) 


amount revenue 


to 


expend 


Interborough Rapid Tran- 


D. C. 




, 






sit Co 


658,660 


0.9 


$5,927 04 




13,927 04 


Interborough Rapid Tran- 










sit Co 


1,504,510 


2.284 


34,363 00 




34.363 Di* 


Interborough Bapid Tran- 












sit Co 


390,950 


2.313 


9,042 68 




9.042 6S 


Receiver, New York Rys. Co. 
Receiver, New York Rys. Co. 
Receiver, New York Rya. Co. 
Receiver, New York Rys. Co. 
Receiver, New York' Rys. Co. 
Receiver. New York Ryfi. Co. 


1,018,070 

407,616 

56; 804 


1 25 


12.663 88 




12,663 38 


2 284 


9, 309 94 




9.309 94 


2.818 


1,902 82 




1,302 32 


584,208 


7 126 


41,630 67 




41,630 67 


176,054 


7.a7 


12,705 83 




12,706 83 


102,656 


1.U18 


1.14082 


Cr 


1,140 82 


Receiver, New York Rys. Co. 


141,894 


2.284 


8,34087 


Cr 


3,240 87 


Receiver, New York Rys. Co. 
N. Y. & HaflemR. R. Co... 


60,297 


1.^ 


753 70 


Ct 


753 70 


7 


10.00 


70 


Cr 


70 


N. Y. & Harlem R. R. Co... 


. 10 


7.1264 


72 


Cr 


72 


Third Avenue Rv. Co 


66^083 


1.62 


1,4K)4 46 




1,004 46 


Third Avenue Rv. Co 


26,092 


7.126 


2,571^ 




2,671 89 


Third Avenue Ry. Co 


10,475 


7.217 


755 94 




755 94 


New York Rys. Co. Rec. 












June, 1915, A. C 






19 


Cr 


19 



»n26.140 15 



COttPORATE BEPICIT 

Deficit, June 30, 1919 

Debit balance for year transferred from income 

. Power payments and adjustments : 

Year 'ended June 30, 1917 

Year ended June 30, 1919 



$947, 
251, 



222 71 
692 6S 



130 62 
3,014 65 



Interest paid applicable to year ended June 30, 1919. 
Accident claims and expenses sett led. applicable to: 

Year ended June 30, 1912 4 

Year ended June 30, 1916 

Year ended June 30, 1917 



$217 50 
125 00 
315 00 



Judgments entered — Casualty : 
Applicable to year ended June 30, 1912. 
Applicable to year ended June 30, 1917. 



$32,893 00 
62 93 



Pavement replacement — City of New York : 
Applicable to year ended June 30, 1919 



1.045 17 
63 03 



657 &n 

!,956 02 
.,705 96 



Total $1,247,343 12 

Joint maintenance charges and adjustments applicable to prior 
years, viz., debits: 1912, $214.21; 1913, $82.15; 1914, $323^; 1915, 
$133.98; 1916, $1,366.06; total. $2,120.05. Credits: 1917. $304.U; 1918, 
$256.35; 1919. $3,745.37; total, $4,805.83. Net credit 2,185 78 



Corporate deficit, June 30. 1920 $1,245,157 81 

* Consists of power purchased. $84,451.33; power exchanged — balance, $41,688.82. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Strset Railway Comfantis 297 

Second A^eone BftUVMid Oonpuiy in th«-.CitF' of New York 

Ojfieers.-^ President, G. Sw' Coe? Vlde-PnoMent^ W* P. BUbs ,* Secretary and Treas- 
urer, F. M. Patchen ; Auditor to Receiver, Wm. J. Bradley ; General Attorney » W. 
D. CuBhman ; General Superintendent, A. Synstrnp ; Purchasing Agent, J. Hensbaw. 

Directmrr.— Q, S. Coe, W. P.' Bfiss, H. Evans. J. W. Griggs, H. H. Vreeland, 
B. Wrft T. Hltcboock, E. W. Sayre. 

Mam BuHnest Office,— 1874 Second Avenue. New York. 

Report verifld by Cbarles E. Cbalmerv, Receiver, September 80, 1920. 



SIXTH AVEmJE RAILROAD COMPAWT 

LSSflOR 

iBfioipozated December 27, 1861. 

At the date of tbe annual meetng, Jannavy 20^ 1920, the tw<enty principal stock<> 
holders were as follows: United States Trust Co., trustee, 3,19T; Mutual Llfe- 
Iniarance Company of New York, 2,000; Trustees for G. W. Bamham, 898; T. B. 
BnrDbam, 780 ; Bmily A. Watson, 773 ; Gordon W. Bumham, 490 ; Wood, Struth^ers 
k Cb., 480; Estate of B. Bi B«imhanL» 400; Estate of Samu^ Thome, 320; Itetate 
of AbQah CurtlBS, 244 < Geoiiv O. Moore, 299: Estate of A. W. Green, 220; Charles J. 
Carpenter, WlUlam Carpenter, Ella F. Scott, Thomas Thacber, trustee, and Estate 
of Frcdertek IVowbrfdge, 208 < each; Estate of Q^rge G. Lake, 196; Bbtate of Ctiaries 
A Smith, 1B4, and George Zabrlskie, trustee, 160. 

At the^lose of the* fiscal jresr'the lease *had notbeea adopted by the Receiver of 
the NHp YozkiRailvays Cb*, and none of the annual rental, 814&,000^ bad been paid. 

Important ChangcB during Year.— None. 

Ptesd Oto#ital Ohtrnge^ AuHng Year.-- None, 

Corporate Atvpta*.— Credit balance at beglnninir of year, 88&8,027.80; net corporate 
lois of year, |44Mi27. Surplus, June 80^ 1920, $383,841.03. 

QJIoefs.^ President, WiUlam' Carpenter ; Vice-President, Adrian H.- Lapkln; See- 
tctny and Treaauzer, E. H. Garrison; 

IHreetoroi—WfiMumi Carpenter, E.. H. Garrison^ Gordon W* Bumham, Roy A; 
Cnrtiss, Wlllllun M: Eiingaley,, AdriaA> H.. Lackin, Geonge G. Meore^ Ed^^in Tfiorne, 
Charles J. Catpeateri 

Mokt-BmHrnaea Ot|Ree<— 28 . BmMdttray, New York City. 

BepoBt verified by EV. H. GairlaoB, Treasurer, September^ 29, 1920u 



SOUXH.BReOBLYIf IBtAILWAY COMPAJfY 

Lemec or PaosPBCT Pabk and CoNsr Island Railboad CbMPANY akd rrj Libasxd Livj^ 

Incorporated January 13, 190a 

The control of this company was acquired August 31,. 1B02^ by the Brooklyn Rapid 
Transit Company which owns all its stocks exeept the directors* shares. 

Important Change* dwn i n g Yeawj— Investments were changed by the> aoquioitlon 
of t&fiM U. S. 2nd Uberty Loan^ 4)4% bonds and the retirement of the $1,080 O'ReiUy 
mortgage. This company leased^. to> the New York' Municipal -Railway Oo., the New 
Vork Consolidated Railroad Co.. and the City of New Yoi^c the- dtth- street repair 
shops for a period of twenty -one years ; the 39th street shop for a period of ten 
mrs, and also two other parcels foi^ periods of ten and three years respectively. 
For the- contract with the Post Ofllce Department see the abstract of 'the Brooklyn 
City Railroad Co. A contract for the purchase of six safety single truck cars was 
made November 28, 1918. No new powers or franchises were acquired. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



298 



Public Service Comiossion — First District 



South Brooklyn BaUwiy Oomvaj 

Fiwed Oai^Ual Ohanget during Tear 

(For balance In each fixed capita) account at close of year, see Table XVIII.) 

nrSTALLATIOVB 



TITLB OF ACCOT7NT 

Right of way 

Grading 

CroBsinga, fences and signs 

Interlocking and other signal ap- 
paratus 

Poles and fixtures 

Distribution system 

Stations, waiting rooms, and mis- 
cellaneous buildings 

Sub-station equipment 

Locomotives 

Revenue cars 

Electric equipment of ears 

Other rail equipment 



Total 



Owned 
$19 78 
20O0O 
494 22 

57175 

137 98 

1,880 48 

105 72 



26 89 
22.606 10 
U.OOOOO 

12 00 

136,953 87 



Leased 



Owned 



Leased 



1976 30 



$8119 



1,094 11 



21 20 



$16,700 04 



1102 d8 116,700 04 



12.070 41 



\^ 






B9penditureB for Principal Project9,— Bix safety cars, $22,000; equipment do, 
ni.000. 

Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fimed Capital, Deo, SI, 1M6.— Sale of 
3 snow plows, 119,319.76 and one electric locomotive, $8,888.25 ; total owned, $28468.01. 
credited to cars. 

Leased Lines.— Removal of interlocking device from Culver Une at Kensington 
junction, $18,120.46, credited to track and roadway construction; removal of cables 
from Coney Island sub-station, $1,883.44, credited to electric line construction; total, 
$18,508.90. 

Bquipment Retired during Tear.— Fifteen dump cars, cost $16,700.04 ; sold to other 
companies for $7,600; charged to amortisation of capital, $9,200.04. One electric 
locomotive, cost $8,888.25, charged to Receiver, N«w York Municipal Ry. Corp., 
$5,867.87, to accrued amortisation of capital, $24Kt6.47 and to surplus, $638.91. 

Power Bought.— From L. M. Garrison, Receiver of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit 
Co., 3,791,676 kw.hrs. (calculated on monthly car mileage) at average price of .845 cts. 
per kw.hr., $32,040.37 ; charged to expense. {Of. abstract of Brooklsm Rapid Transit 
report.) 

CORPOBATB DEFICIT 

Deficit at beginning of year $631,956 23 

Debit balance transferred from income 65,273 96 

Amortisation elsewhere unprovided for: Loss on Culver line at Ken- 
sington June, $3,756.39; on electric locomotive, $683.91; on cables re- 
moved from C. I. sub-station, $254.69 4.544 99 

Bad debts written off 87 ?r 

Other deductions from surplus : Adjustment of bill of N. Y. Municipal 
Ry. Corp., $6,260 ; refund of rental paid by N. Y. Municipal Ry. Corp., 
$3,897.84 ; rental of 6 cars (B. Hgts. R. R. O).) in prior year, $1,004.63 ; 
State tax on excess dividends, N. Y. & C. I. R. R. Co., 1918. $180 ; do. 
P. P. & S. B., $90 ; interest on taxes, accrued In prior years, $1,821.66 ; 
state tax on excess dividends, 1919, N. Y. &. C I., $60 ; do. P. P. & S. 
B., $60; appropriation to Employers' liability reserve, $281.61; minor 
items, $24.82 13,620 56 



Total debits 



$715,482 71 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 299 

Sovtli Brooklyn wtKj OomvMj 

CORFORATB DBFICIT — 0<mClUded 

Bad d«bt8 coUected 165 50 

Other additioDB to surplus : Adjastment of bill of N. Y. 
Mnnieipal Ry. Corp., 16^250; inter-line corrections 
(freight), 13,668.61; reclaimed reTenne under authority 
of D. M. Gray, traffic asst. U. S. RaUroad Administra- 
tion on coal traflic, etc., |5,906.30 ; Bush Terminal Co., cor- 
rectiona account freight, 16,118.04 ; do. increased arbitrary 
allowances charged, 9436 J5; minor items, $289.23 20,579 33 

Total credits $20,634 83 

Deficit, Jane 30, 1920 1694,847 88 



Oj^era.— President, A. R, Piper; Vice-President and Treasurer, C. D. Meneely; 
Secretary, J. H. Bennington ; Assistant Secretary, H. R. Potts ; Assistant Treasurer, 
K S. Richards; Comptroller, Howard Abel; General Counsel, G. D. Yeomans; 
Claim Agent, I. Isaacsen ; Purchasing Agent, L. Van Cott. 

Dirwton.— V. S. Flower, O. D. Yeomans, W. S. Menden, J. H. Bennington, A. R. 
Piper, W. S. Benedict, O. J. Covell, Wm. Siebert. 

Main Jlsaineaa Ojfflce.— 86 Ciinton street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report yerifled by C. D. Meneely, Treasurer, September 27, ^S20. 



THE SOUTHERN BOULEVARD RAILROAD COHPANT 

Incorporated June 27, 1886; controlled by Third Arenue Ry. Co. through stock 

ownenhip. 
Important Changes dufi$iff Fear.— None. 
Figed Capital Inttalled since December SI, 1908.— Ties, 11,681.60; rails, fastenings 

and Joints, $1,159.67 ; poles and fixtures, 1989.47 ; total, 13,680.74. No replacements or 

retirements. 

Bmpendituree for Principal Projects 

Soathem Boulerard, 138th to 147tli sts., improvements during recon- 
struction 11,671 67 

SoQtbem BoulCTard, 174tli to 182d sts., improvements during recon- 
stniction of track and pavement 1,069 60 

Southern Boulevard, 174th to 182d sts., reconstruction of overhead 
electric Hue 788 40 



Power Bought.— From Union Ry. Co. of N. Y. C, D. C, .2,234,886 kw.hrs., average 
price 1.6 cents, total price 185,884.29. Charged to expense, 1^,884 29. 

CORPORATB DBFICIT 

Deficit, June 30, 1919 1108,608 76 

DeMt balance for year transferred from Income 138, 163 94 

Corporate deficit, June 80, 1920 246,772 70 



OiHoera.— President, 8. W. Huff; Vice-President, L. Sutherland, Secretary, W. C. 
Borrows; Assistant Secretary, J. Maroney; Treasurer, A. D. Sage; Assistant 
Xnasurer, F. Kessel ; Auditor, B. G. Steinetz ; Assistant Auditor, W. Farrington ; 
Attorney, A. T. Davison ; Claim Agent, J. W. Yenson ; Superintendent of Transporta- 
tion, W. E. Thompson ; General Purchasing Agent, C Witzel. 

Directors.— B. M. Burghard, G. W. Davison, 8. W. Huff, A. Iselin, Jr., J. W. 
Flatten, W. B. Roosevelt, J. H. Seaman, T. H. Shipman. 

Main Business OSicc—tm Oliird Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Report verified by A. D. Sage, Treasurer, September 30, 1920. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



300' Public Service Commission — First District 



SOUTHFIELD BBACH RAILROAD COMPANY 

Incorporated Augmt 10, 1899; controHed by the Richraoad Light & Railroad Cool- 
pany through the ownerships of a majority of its capital stock, which waa acquhed 
from the Reorganization Committee In 1902. 

Important Change* dwHni^ ■ T^ar}— Nbwe.- 

Fiwed Capital Changes during Year.— Right of way item of December 3t, 1908, waa 
decreased by |200. 

Power Bought.— From the Richmond Light & Railroad Co., 72.089 kw.hrs. at the 
average price of 1.36 cts per kw.hrs., 1970.98, charged- to expense. 

Corporate Surplus.— Credit balance at beginning of year, $20,081.31 ; debit balance 
for year transferred from income, $12.14 ; insurance adjustment, Dr., $41.74. SnrploB, 
Jnire 30, 1920, $19,967.43. 

Oi)l<?cr«.— President, C. W. Huntington; Vice-President, R. L. Rand; Secretary 
and Tteasurer, J. E. Phillips ; Attorney, B. G. Eadie ; General Superintendent, H. J. 
Blackham. 

Directors.— C. W. Huntington, A. L. Rand, A. J. Hemphill, A. H. Larkin, H. H. 
BuU, B. G. Eadie. 

Main Business Oj0lce.— Terminal Bldg^ St. George, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Report verified by J. E. Phillips, Treasurer, October 27, 1820. 



STATEN ISLANI> MIDLAIID RAILWAY COMPAlfY 

Inoori>osated iJamaary 16, 1907: Tht stockiiolders and the. number of TOtes to 
-which they were entitled were as follows: Estate of H. H. Rogers, 9,084; W. B« 
Benjamin, 1; W. R. Coe, 1; E. C. Lacklannlr Jr., 1; Gee HI: Cfancch, 1 ; Jnai. T. 
Doolfing, 1 ; Noel McYlckar,. 1 ; C. W. Htintingtan, 1; A. H. Lirkin, 1 ; R. L. Rand, 8. 

Impmrtmtt- Changes during Ytfan-^ Jacob Brenner' was appelated Reeeiver - and 
began operation of the property January 19, 1920. Steel cars Nos. 300 to 3St wove 
sold to the Richmond Lt. A R. RJ Co:» which aasuaued the i obligation to pay the 
balance of the obligation tlierefor, via., $81,000. OpeEatioofi were diacon tinned Janu- 
ary 18, 1920, and the trackage of the Richmond Light & R. R. Co. surrendered; on 
May 21, operation, waa resumed on tha Concoxd line only. No new franchiaes or 
powers were acquired. 

Fixed Capital installed ' since- December SI, i908.^ Sheps and car-houaea, $6S8l43. 
WUhdtfaum or retired during year.— Revenue cars, $114,492.33 ; Electric eqaipmeot of 
cars, $58,144. Total retired, $172,636.33. 

Detail of Property Retired during Year from Fiwed Capital, Dec. SI, 1908.— 38 open 

i, caiB, acquired 1896^4900, St. Louia^siagle truck cross' seats, 10 closed cars, 

U I acquired 1896-1900, St. Louis — single track lengthwise seats, total value $59,163.71 

|| I and 18 General Electric No. 1000 motors, acquired 189^1900, $20,691. Total property 

"^ retired, $79,854.71. Accounts credited.— Cslts, $69,163.71 and electric equipment of 

cars, $20,691. 

Equipment Retired during Year from Timed Capital, since. Dec. 31, 1908.— 32 dosed 
passenger revenue cars, placed in service 1915, double trucks, vestibule platform, 
cost, $114,492.33; 32 car equipments, quadruple motor), with both hand, .and air 
brakes, cost $58,144. 

Power Bought.— Y^rom the Richmond Light & R. R. Co., 3,799,219 kw.hrs. average 
price 1.2^, total price $45»560.S7. 

CORPORATK DRTICIT 

Deficit, June 30, 1919 $^3,44577 

Debit balance for year transferred from income. 114, 530 01 

Unpaid Judgments prior period 8,749 91 

Minor adjustments 96143 

Total debits $587,67717 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 301 

StotoiL.<I«lmd. JCMlftBd iUilway 0«mpas7 

CORPORATB DEFICIT ~ ConCludcd 

AddidODS to surplus: 

Sale of 32 Osgood Bradley cars 1101.167 48 

insarance refund 1, SOS 09 

Insurance adjustment 2^fi66 44 

106,000 Ot 



Corporate deficit, June 30, 1920 4482,«7 IS 



OJ)lcw«.— Not reported. 
DinotwBj— Not Mported. 

Ot^ of RecHver,— 2& Court at, Brool^jrn, N. Y. 

Report verified bj-H. C. :>l*ore, Jr., acooaatant for .the.Beoeiver of the fitaten 
liiaad Midland Railway Co., Norember 10, 1920. 



TBa3U> AVENUE BRIDGE COMPAinr 

LKsaoB 

Incorporated May 29, 1909. The entire capital stock of the respoftdent was ac- 
quired by the Third Avenue' Railway Company on March '25, 191& 

Important Chanffet faring Fear.— The agrennent under which the Forty-Secmid 
Stmt, Manhattanrllle A St. Nicholas Avenue R. R. Co. operated cars over the 
franchise and tracks of this company was terminated July 3, 1919, and rental for 
the lease was not received after November 1, VM. 

rnie Board of Estimate of the City of New York In • a' reMhttioo adopted •©« 
Isnaary 80, 19B0, deiclared forfeited the contract- which "granted 'franchise to 'tUa 
rampany to operate from Third Avetrae, B^h'- 'street 'and 60th -street 'across -the 
Qseenabonr Bridge.] 

In July and December, 1919,- the- company bought -for Investment of tts sinking 
fttttd, yOfOOO, par vahie, of the Third Avenue Ry. Co. 1st and ref. 4% mortgage bonds; 
dne Jan. 1, 1900, at a cost of $23,412.40. No new powws or franchises were acrinlred. 

Fixed Capital Changes during Year.— None. 

Corporate Burplus.— Credit balance at beginning of year, |S,000 ; loss for year, 
|S26iO. Surplus, June 30, 1920, $6,173.20. 

OiJIcer*.- President, 8. W. Huff ; Viee^Presidenty .L. Sutherland; Secretary, W. C. 
ttnrrowy; w^saistant Secretary, J. Maroney ; Treasurer, A. D. Sage; Assistanf 
Trfasurer, F. Kessel ; Auditor. B. G. Steinetz ; Assistant Auditor, W. Farrington; 
General Counsel, •.A.' T.' Dwvisen. 

Directon.^E. M. Burgbard, G. W. Davison, S. W. Huff, A. Iselln, Jr., E. A. 
UaaicQ, J. A. £tetten, W. E. Roosevelt, J. H. Seaman. 

Main ButiHe98 Officef—TSBK Third Avenue, New York City. 

Report verified by A. D. Sage, Treasurer, September 30, HBO. 



THISD AVENUE RAILWAY COMPANY 

Incorporated Aptil 21, I910I, under sections 9 and 10 of the Stock Corporations 
Law. as a reorganization of /The Third Avenue Railroad Company. 

Respondent controls the following corporations through ownership of a maiorUy 
of their capital stock : 

Bi^lt Line Railway Coivoratlan. 

The Dry Dock East Broadway and Battery Railroad Company. 
Hie Forty-second Street, .Manhattan viUe inid St.. Nicholas Avenue Railway Com- 
PMy. 
Klngabridge Railway OMapaay. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



302 



PuBUC Service Commission — Fibst District 



Third ATenne Hallway Oomj^maj 

Mld-CroB8town Railway Company, Inc. 

New York, Westchester and Connecticut Traction Company. 

Pelham Park and City Island Railway Company, Inc. 

The Southern Boulevard Railroad Company. 

Third Avenue Bridge Company. 

Union Railway Company of New York City. 

The Westchester Electric Railroad Company. 

The Yonkers Railroad Company. 

Hastings Railway Company, Inc. 

New York City Interborough Railway Company. 

It also controls the Bronx Traction Company indirectly through its control of 
the Union Railway Company of New York City. Together with other companies it 
has joint control of the Brooklyn and North River Railroad Company. 

The twenty principal stockholders and voting bond holders and the number of 
votes to which they were entitled on November 11, 1919 were: N. Y. Life Ins. Co., 
15,900; A. Iselin Co., 14.840; Equitable Life Int. Co., 14,000; Metropolitan Life Ins. 
Co., 6,625 ; Harvard College, 5,560 ; Roosevelt & <fton, 5,400 ; James Ann, 5^000 ; George 
Ehret, 2,880; Clark, Childs & Co., 2,005; Christopher Gallafi^er, 2,000; L. F. Straus, 
1,800; U. F. aews, 1,619; Dominick & Dominick, 1,625; Lewis A. Gaining, 1,200: 
Mrs. A. N. Harkness, 900; G. H. Kindall, 700; W. F. Armstrong, 700; Post & FUgg. 
634; W. H. Douglas, 600; G. A. Dickley, 600. 

Voting rights are also attached to adjustment 5 per cent income bonds. Until 
interest at 5 per cent per annum, together with accumulations have been paid for 
five consecutive years, registered wners have one vote for each |100 par value of 
bonds. 

Important Changes during Year.— Purchased : New York City Interborough Rail- 
way Company, common stock par value $10,000 for $300 ; City of New York corporate 
stock, $5,000 at par ; 2d Liberty loan bonds, $187,S60 at par ; 3d Liberty loan bonds. 
$133,250 at par ; 4th Liberty loan bonds, |263,0G0 at par ; and Victory notes, $8,350 at 
par. Subscribed for $2,000 stock of Hastings Railway Co., Inc. at par. Brooklyn 
and North River stock, par and book value, $26,000, reduced in book value to $1.00. 

There was a decrease of .046 in mileage due to removal of track from Ninth 
avenue between 218th and 220th street. 

No additional powers or franchises were acquired. 



1 

m 






Assets and Liabilitibs 

Fimed Capital Changes during Tear 

(For balance in each fixed capital account at close of year, see Table XVIII.) 

Fiwed Capital installed since December Si, JI99S 



TITLB OF ACCOUNT 

Street railway franchises 

Right of way 

Grading 

Ties 

Rails, rail fastenings, and joints 

Special work 

Underground construction 

Track laying and surfacing 

Paving , 

Underground conduits 

Distribution system 

General ofiUce building and fixtures 

Shops and car-houses 

Stations, waiting rooms, and misc. bldgs. 

Shop equipment 

Revenue cars 



ZKBTALLBD DURINO TBAB 



Additions Replacements 



$95 40 

2,866 22 

610 00 



492 82 
2,408 90 



20,013 89 
12,796 16 
7,649 67 
^315 14 
25,543 80 



Retired 
during year 

$378 06 

1.690 40 

128 53 



520 55 
4.962 39 
13,690 09 
20,913 87 
4.285 58 
2,975 93 
3,110 W 



1,750 00 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



303 



Third A^eniie Railway Oompany 
Fiwed Capital iMtalled tinee Deeemher SI, 1808 — Concluded 



TTTUB OF ACCOUNT 

Electric equipment of can 

Other rail eqaipment 

MisceUaneoos equiionent 

Engineering and superintendence.. 
Misc. construction expenditures... 



UnrtAlAMD DUBINO TBAB 

^ i » ^ 

Additions Replacements 

|&,53586 

25296 

11,6»«1 

42 38 



Retired 
during yesr 



Total 



$92,151 80 



12,922 96 
168 66 
244 80 

|67»727 88 



B^pendituret on Prinoipal ProjectB 
CoDTerting top floor <tf office building, 130th st. and Third ave., for 

general office use 16,769 14 

Additions and betterments of the 3 frame dwellings at 2, 4 and 6 

West 6th St.. Mt Vernon 7.649 67 

Additions and betterment of the steam plant, office bldg., 180th st. 

and Third ave U, 828 84 

Installation of heat regulators on B64 cars 28,849 72 

InsUllation of 2— l>-ton Packard truck chassis with special bodies, etc. 10,970 11 

Addition to steam plant; alteration to provide office for starters at 

car-house, 129th st. and Amsterdam ave 11,887 68 



Details of Property Retired duHng Year from "Piwed Capital, Doe, 81, 1908."-^ 
Original cost of tracks on Fort George avenue which became the property of the 
City of New York fire years after March 4, 1909, $2,442.12; estimated original cost 
of insolated lead covered cable removed from 96th street, between First and Third 
avvnues, $2,460 ; Two fully equipped open cars sold, $6,600 ; total, $11,402.12. Aoeountg 
credited: Track and roadway construction, $2,442.12; electric line construction, 
X^m; cars, $6,600. 

Detail of Bquipment Retired during Tear from " Fiwed Capital, ainee Dee. SI, 
iSW."— None. 

Povfer Bought, Bold or B9ohanQ9d 



Total Average 
number prioe 
ofkw.hrs. perkw.hr. 
XAMZ OF covPAKT delivered (cents) 

42d St, Manh. & St. N. 

ATe. Ry. Co.. A. C 306,868 1.35 

Dry Dock, B. B'way & B. 

R. R. Co.. A. C 981,607 1.35 

B«lt Une Ry. Corp., A. C. 369,742 1.36 

MId-Crosstown Ry. Co., 

A. C 31.493 1.30 

Tnlon By. Co. of N. Y. 

City, A. C 33,268.935 1.36 

^'. Y. City Interborough 

Ry. Co., A. C 5,416 1.36 

Westchester Electric R. R. 

Co., A. C 8.194,000 1.36 

Yonkers R. R. Co.. A. C. 8,476,000 1.36 

•N'ew York Edison Co., 

A.C 91.005,600 .881 

42d St.. Manh. & St. N. 

Are. Ry. Co.. D. C 9,261.546 1.69 

Dry Dock, E. B'way & B. 

R. R. Co., D. C 3,178,504 1.60 

Belt Line Ry. Corp., D. C. 2,398,687 1.59 



Amount 
Amount debited or 

Total credited to (Cr.) credited 

amount revenue to eapense 

$4,134 80 $4,134 80 

13.307 40 13.307 40 

4,88278 4,882 78 

409 41 409 41 

452.980 40 462.980 40 

73 44 73 44 

1U,624 70 m,624 70 

116,432 97 115,432 97 

802.66808 $802,668 08 

148.14635 148.146 86 

60.88206 60,88206 

38,09496 88,09496 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



3C4 



PrsLic Service Commission — Fibst District 



jPou^er Bought J Sold or Bmohawf^d — Coxududed 
Average 



Total 
number price 
of lew. hrs. per kw.hr. 
NAME OF coMPAKT delivered (cents) 

Union Ry. Co. of N. Y. 

City, D. C. 727,461 1.59 

N. Y. C. 'intertorough 

Ry. Co., D. C 320,660 1.58 

Second Ave. R. R. Co., 

D. C 208.964 2.07 

New York Bdlson Co., 

D. C 28,400 1.50 

Brooklyn & North River 

R. R. Co., D. C 444,037 1.10 

Ninth Ave. R. .R. Co., 

D. C 204.693 2.80 

New York & Harlem R. 

R. Co., D. C 29,914 2.30 

New York Ry. Co., D. C. 1,380,904 • l.«9 
Wew York Ry. Co., D. C. 1,264,870 l.«4 

Wew' York Edison Co., ad- 

ditioBal amoiint paid' for 

year ended Jnne 30, 

1980 as per terms of 

contract 



Amount 
Amount debited or 

Total credited to (Or.) credited 
amount revenue to < 



111.591 94 ni.59l 94 
5,072 25 5,072 25 



4,345 55 

428 40 

4,886 40 

4,719 46 



4,345 55 

428 40 

4,886 40 

4,719 46 



69083 «K)83 

22.578 21 Cr. 122,578 21 

20,799 78 20,T99 78 



2.400 00 



2,400 OO 



Total 



«m,7D2 59 ^ (M3.279 6S 



CORPOSATB DEFICIT 

DefieLt, June 80, 1M9 

Bebllt kaianee for year transferred -from Income 

Second Ave. Receiver, adjustment of claim 

Broolcl|in;& North River Co., connnon stock reduced' from't25,fNK) book 

value to H 

Loss on surplus adjustmegnts >of controlled, compantes 



•Total 

Materials supplied in 1915 to 42d St, Manh. & St. N. Ave. 

Ry. Co. 

Sale of automobiles, Union Railway Co. of New York City. 

To adjust overcharge on rent of equipment in 1918 

Adjustment of unpaid Special Franchise taxes 



Amount 
* 1972,^1 95 
750; 655 02 
12,698 82 



24,999 00 
148.405 10 

n, 909. 009 89 



$1^ 10 

1.816 66 

600 00 

41,706 80 



Total deductions 



43,814 « 



Corporate deficit, June 30, 1920 $1«86S»1A5 33 



^J?1cer».— President, S. W. Huff; Vice-President, L. Sutherland; Secretary, W, C. 
Burrows; Assistant Secretary, J. Maroney ; Treasurer, A. D. Sage; Assistant 
Treasurer, F. T Kessel ; Auditor, B. G. Stolnetz : Assistant Auditor, W. Farrinjrton : 
Attorney, A. T. Davison ; Claim Apent, J. W. Yenson ; Superintendent of Trans- 
portation, W. B. Thompson: Qeneral' Purchaslnjr Apent, C. Witzel. 

Directors.— E. M. Burghard, G. W Davison, A. R. Horr, S. W. TTttff, A. Iselln. Jr.. 
J. W. Jarvis, B. A. Manice, J. W. Flatten, W. B. Roosevelt, J. H. Seaman. F. U. 
Shipman, L. F. Straus, A. S. Webb. 

Main Businest Ojjlcc?.— 2896 Third avfnue, New York, N. Y. 

Report verified by A. D. Sapre, Treasurer, September 30, 1920. 

* Consists of power purehasod $806,058.08 ; power exchanged, Cr., |1,778.43. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbeet Railway Companies 805 

Jhlrd ^va— t Ball wj • Coapmy 
. ADDENDUM 

COSBOUBAXBD GWTBBAI.. BAI.ANCm ShMKB, ThIMD AvWUB IL4ILWA.T COMPANT AND CON- 
TBOU.SX> COMPANiaS, JUKA 90, 1020 



fts&oads and sqnipiiient |80,M8.10122 



asking fundfl |167,<M2 80 

l^ulds tor depr«elati<m, etc., securiUes at cost 2,022.408 U 

iBvMtmentfvnd— securttiefl at coat 164,388 97 

Liberty bonds 688, WO 00 

MiicellaBeoiis sectirities deposited under franchise and 

other reqnirements 223,800 00 



CuiTHit assets : 

Caflh |8M,378U 

Spedal depostts 721,06862 

AcQoants reeelvid>le 976,32098 

Materials and' svpfplies T81;«99 04 



Deferred debit Hem : 

Isniranee premiiims and rents — unexpired proportion.. 1^3,488 73 

Uoamortixed debt, discount and expense 1,812,220 66 

' tflscellaneons • 32, 737 75 



S,24t048 88 



2,773,061 72 



1,398.392 14 



TWal |88,«10,604 96 



Capital stock: 

Tlrifld Avenue Railway Company — stock $16,590,000^ 

Stock of controlled companies in hands of public 499,100 00 

n7.«89,100 00 

^''inided 'debt 3 
Third Ayenue Railway Company bonds: 

FIrBt mortgage '«% boilds |S,'000.'000 4X) 

First refunding mortgage ^ bonds 81,990, MO 00 

Adjustment mortgage 6% income bonds '21, 636, 000 00 

^449,618,600 00 

Bonds of controlled companies -in hands of public 6,628,881 16 



Current and accrued liabilities : 

Acooonts and wages payable 1688,986 49 

Interest matured and unpaid 688,88115 

Intefest accrued — (not including interest on adjustment 

mortgage bonds) 78,605 00 

I^Wxes accrued 668,822 91 



66,154,«612& 



1,949.235 65 

tnterest on adjustment mortgage bonds 3«610,1OOOO 

Keterres : 

For depreciation adjustments, injuries, etc : |9^010| 480 65 

Excess of book Talue over cost of controlled companies 
•ecurltles owned 1,849,337 75 

10, 868. 818 30 

Corporate deficit: 

Balance at July 1, 1919 $tOB,991 SO 

Profit and loss charges — net 204,125 39 

$WtiUki» 

Deikcit from opexatioBS — year aided June 80, 1920 845,895 £ff 

i.858,5i0 U 



Total $88,410,604 96 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



306 



Public Servicb Ck>^£Mi8siON — Fibst District 



Third At»iiii» Railway Oompany 

Addendum — Concluded 

CoNsoLiDATBO Statbmbmt OF Incomb, Thxbd AvaNus Railway Comfant aitd CoimtoixBD 

COMFANIBS, YbASS EnDKD JuNB 30, 1920 AND 1919 

Operating revenue: 1920 

Transportation $11,431,401% 

Advertialng 108,244 38 

Rent of equipment 6,326 85 

Rent of trackB and terminala 68,886 83 

Rent of buildings and other property.... 122,163 19 

Sale of poTi-^r 26,046 66 





Inoreaaeor 


1919 


a>) daexMM 


no, 023, 387 67 


$1,408,064 IS 


100.000 00 


8.244 38 


20.428 80 


D IfiwlOLdS 


77.992 57 


D 19.105 74 


108,018 34 


19.144 85 


38,670 35 


D 12.623 79 



Total operating revenue $11,762,060 67 $10,363,447 73 $1,388,62194 



Operating expenses: 
Maintenance of way and structures $1,607,496 81 



Maintenance of equipment. 

Depreciation accruals 

Power supply 

Operation of cars 

Injuries to persons and property 

General and miscellaneous expenses. 



1.218,980 69 
112.320 15 
923,433 94 

4,102,992 43 
832,414 96 
487,083 26 



$1,121,666 67 

1,013.662 U 

69.769 68 

822,477 61 

3,424.466 89 

846,663 82 

463,497 60 



$486,940 14 
a06.S18 68 
62.660 47 
100.966 33 
678,626 64 
13.838 86 
38.686 66 



I 
I 



Total operating expenses $9,284,722 24 $7,741,083 38 $1,543.638 86 



Net operating revenue $2,467.347 43 $2,622,364 36 D $156,016 92 

Taxes 816.938 68 818.060 36 D 1.12178 



Operating income $1,650,408 95 $1,804.303 99 D 8163,895 14 

Interest revenue 191,909 01 156,882 73 36.026 28 



Cross income $1,842,317 86 $1,961,186 72 D $118,868 86 



Deductions from gross Income : 



Tntereflf on first mortease bonds 


$648,080 00 


$648,080 00 






TntikrMtf on ftmt mtse bonds. 


879.620 00 


879,620 00 






Interest on adjustment mtge. bonds 

TtapIc And t<erminal DrlvileffeA. 


1,126,800 00 


1,126,800 00 






12,462 94 


12,500 07 


D 


$37 13 


Miscellaneous rent deductions 


12,902 64 


10,773 82 




2.129 32 


Amortisation of debt discount and ex 










pense 


19.786 66 


19,320 30 




466 35 


Amortization of limited franchises 


23,286 48 


8,273 30 




16.013 18 




83,480 00 


33,480 00 






Miscellaneous 


31,294 70 


42.395 80 


D 


11.10110 



Total deductions 

Net income (deficit) 

^ot«.— Figures in italics denote deficits. 



$2,687,713 41 $2,681,242 79 



$6.470 62 



1845,395 55 $780,056 07 D $126,339 48 






THIRTY-POURTH STREET CROSSTOWN RAILWAT COMPANY 

Lessor 
Incorporated [March 18, 1896] as a consolidation of two companies. Tbe New 
York Railways Company owns all the capital stock of this company, which was 
acquired December 30, 1911, by purchase and reorganisation of the Metropolitan 
Street Railway Co. ; it is also the operator of the property. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 307 

Thirty-fourth Street CroMtown AaUway Oompany 

Important Changes during Ycor.— None. 
Figed Captlol Changes during Year.— None. 
Citrporate Surplus.— yone, 

O^en .— Pretideiit, H. H! Vreelmnd; Vice-President, W. Leon Pepperman; 
Secretary, H. M. Fisher; AssisUnt Secretary, A. C Wigren ; Treasurer, J. H. 
Campbell ; Auditor, F. Samuelaon ; General Attorney, Jas. L. Quackenbusb. 

Directors.— J. H. Campbell, CharleB E. Dunlap, H. M. Fisher, E. F. J. Gaynor, 
B. J. Pepperman, W. Leon Peppenpan, H. H. Vreeland, Charles B. Warren, 
D. W. RoflB. 

Main Business OJBfice,— 166 Broadway, New York City. 

Beport verified by H. H. Vreeland, President, September 28, 1920. 



TWBNTY-THIRD STREET RAILWAY COBiPANY 

Lessor 

Incorporated June 29, 1872; controlled by the New York Railways Co., which 
holds 5,oe( oat of 6,000 shares of capital stock outstanding. The New York Railways 
Co. as lessee has not paid that part of the rental consisting of 18% dividends 
on the capital stock ($108,000 per annum) since February 1, 1919, and th^e 
Receiver of that company to June 80, 1920, had neither aflirmed nor disaflirmed the 
lease. 

Important Changes during Year.— The trustee of the sinking fund acquired 16,000, 
par value, improvement and refunding mortgage "0% bonds of this company at a 
cost of f3,606.89. No new powers or franchises were acquired. Track In the Twenty- 
third Street yard was removed to the extent of 1,450 feet. 

Figed Capital Changes during Tear.— None. 

Corporate Surplus.- Credit balance at beginning of year, |U0,677.06 ; net corporate 
incoine of year, |110,816.97. Surplus, June 90, 1920, $231,394.08. This includes rental 
accmed but unpaid, I1554S60, which was not included in* the balance sheet 

OfHeert.— President, H. H. Vreeland ; Vice-President, W. Leon Pepperman ; Secre- 
tary, H. M. Fifiber ; Assistant Secretary, A. C. Wigren ; Treasurer, J. H. Campbell ; 
Auditor, F. Samuelson ; General Attorney, James L. Quackenbusb. 

Directors.— J. H. Campbell, H. M. Fisher, B. F. J. Gaynor, Frank Hedley, W. Leon 
Pepperman, B. B. 8tart>oard, H. H. Vreeland, Charles B. Warren, D. W. Ross. 

Main Business OJBMe.— ies Broadway, New York City. 

Report verified by H. H. Vreeland, President, September 30, 1920. 



UNION RAILWAY COMPANY OP NEW YORK CITY 

Incorporated April 20, 1892. [In January, 1899, control of the company tlirough 
acquisition of its capital stock was obfained by the Third Avenue Railroad Company, 
which was succeeded, January 1, 1912, pursuant to a plan of re-organisation, by 
tbe Third Avenue Railway Company.] 

The company controls the Bronx Traction Company through entire stock owner- 
ship. 

Important Changes during Year.— The length of track operated was decreased 
-2K miles due to removal of connecting curves and sidings. Investments wero as 
follows: Advances to Bronx Traction Co. were increased over 1919 by ^15,402.94. 
Purchased Hiird Avenue Railway Co. let refunding 4% mortgage bonds, par value 
W,5», actual money cost and amount nt which carried on books, ^14,675.54. No 
WW powere or franchises were acquired. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Public SmRvicoB Commission — ^ First Distbict 



TFnlon Hallway Oomp au y of New Tork' Olty 

Fi^ed Capital Changet during" YeBT 

(For balance In each fixed capital account at close of year, see Table XVIII.) 



rrruB of account 

Street railway franchises 

Ralls, rail fastenings and Joints 

Ties 

Special work 

Track laying and surfacing 

Paying 

Poles and fixtures 

Distribution system 

Stations, waiting rooms, and misc. buildings. 

Revenue cars 

Electric equipment of cars 

Engineering and soperlntendence 



INSTAIXBD DURXNO TXAB 

Additions BeplacementB 
n68 



Batirad 
duiiagyear 



1,620 73 

2,428 00 

1,605 76 

586 14 

1,919 55 

70 58 

1,052 82 

340 12 

67,081 02 

71,708 98 

135 «Q 



Total 1148,600 37 



1316 20 
226 SO 



1543 0>> 



Eapenditures for Principal Projects 

Purchase of. fifty ca» 4fi4«612 36 

Making alterations for control by one man 71,086 87 

▲Iterations of Mx cars, Nob. 311 to 31£, for control by one man 1,397 5$ 

Bumalde airenue from Creston to Anthony, • improvements installed 

. during reconstruction 1,060 22 

Installation of heat regulators on. 31 cars 1,308 19 

169th street west of Boston road — installation of a cross over 1«C64 83 

Macombs Dam bridge, and approach. Improvements installed .during 

re-construction .1,120 6^ 

Minor projects 5,&K 50 



Total 



$U8/M0 37 



t\ 'l 



DetaU of Property. Retired during Year front Fimed GapiUd, Btoemher il, JMB.— 
Estimated original coats as follows: One .double track ocossover removed taam 
Boston road north of 178th street, 12,660; third track and special work removed 
from Webster avenue at Bedford Park station, consisting of these items: 491. ft. 
straight track at $2.31, $1,134 ; 1 crossover and 2 turnout ends, |2,400 ; 4M ft asphalt 
block pavement at $2.90, $1,433; total, $4,967; 1 wrecker, less electrical equip- 
ment, $1,500; 6-28 foot P. A. Y. B. cars Nos. 385 to 390, less electrical equipment 
$18,900; 6 open cars, each equipped with two W. H. 56 motors, $16,800; total retired. 
$44,827. 

Accounts Credited: Track and roadway construction, $7,627.00; cars, $37,200.00. 

Detail of Equipment Retired during Year front Fiwed Capital since Deoetmher SI, 
'»W.— None. 

Power Bought, Sold or Exchanged 



Total 

number of 

kw.fan. 

delivered 



Mim OF OOMPANT 

. Third ArenMiBy. Co AC. 

TUrd Awnm Jly. Co D.C. 

Total 88i966.396 



borage 
ixioe 
per kw.hr. 
(cents) Total price 



— AnottDtdefaiteil 

credited to or (Cr.) crediied 
revenue tD< 



83.268,985 1.36 SftS2,ll80 40 



727,461 



1.B9 11,<91 04 



$464,672 84 



'•SIO',9I(^40 
1I,I0I>M 

$464,67214 



.11 



ii;. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbett Railway Companies 



Umlra Bmilvagr CompMqr of Vew York CUty 
Power Bought, Bold or JViveAaii0e<l i— Conoladed- 
TeUI 



kw. hrs. per kw. hr. credited to or (Cr.) credited 

lun OF ooMPAifT deliTcred (oentB) Total prioe revenae to e 



West8facrterElee.R.R. 


. D.C. 

D.C. 

D.C. 

D.C. 
. D.C. 

= 
. D.C. 

. D.a 


305.625 
548,001 

4.851,411 
140,280 

2,234.835 


li» 

1.50 
1.58 
1.61 
1.60 


15,036 00 
8.730 34 

77.021 51 
2.267 75 

35.884 29 




Cr. 
Cr. 
Cr. 
Cr. 


15.086 90 






8.730 34 


N.Y.CIiilerboroa^ 


77,021 51 


YaakmlL^R 


2.267 76 
35,884 29 






R^^ftnee...................... 




8.0D 

2.20 
5.00 < 




$451.36 

740 74 

61 25 


Cr. 


$117,079 00 






PtrntwM 
N. Y.. N. H. A H. R. R 


5.64A. 
32.310 
1,225 


MSL36 
741^74' 
61 25 






InteboNickBaind'nMnt 

Hnpfdi 
















Totel 


8M77. 


SUBPLUe 


$MB8J5i 


$ty253 8& 












Surplus, June 80, 1920.. 


COBPORATB 




• 


1757,872 71 


Sbares of selUtag prices 


of ant 


omobiles — 


Third Avenue Railway Co. 


758 00 






$168,628 71 



Debit balance for year transferred from income* account.. $86,266 91 

Bad debts written off 1,88T76 

Otker deductions from surplus : adjustment of special 

franchise tax accruals for years 1900, 1910 to 1917, inclusive 84,369 18 
TUlrd Avenue Ry. Co., adjustment of credit for use of 

26 revenue cars in 1918 606 06 

Tb write off 13 cars, cross-over track, and overhead trolley 

rettred 13,775 23 

186.889 08 

Corporate surplus June 30, 1920 $571,733 68 



Oj;Scflr«.— President, S. W. Huff; Vice-President, L. Sutherland; Secretary, W. C. 
Burrows; Asalstant Secretary, J. Maroney ; Treasurer, A. D. Sage; Assistant 
Tnasurer, F. Kesael ; Andltor, B. 6. Steinets ; Assistant Auditor, W. Farrington ; 
Attorney, A. T. Davison ; dnim Agent, J. W. Yenson ; Superlutendent of Trans* 
portation, W. B. Tluunpson; General Purchasing Agent, C. Witwd. 

Direetors.-'K. M. Burghard, O, W. Davison, S. W. Huff, A. Iselln, Jr., J. W. 
Platten, W. E. Roosevelt, J. H. Seaman, F. H. Shipman*. U. F. Straus. 

Maim BuHness OJHUse.— 2896 Third avenue, New York City. 

Report verified by A. D. Sage, Treasurer, September) 36, 1920l 



THE VAir BRUNT STREET AND ERIE BASIN RAILROAD COMPANY 

Inc(ttpoEated Febniasy 15, 186L 

The stockholders and the number of votes to which they were entitled January 
28, IWO, were as follows*: John F. Murphy; Wyllys Tferry, Dennis W. Sullivan, 
udJoha A. Foulda r as. Trustees,' ia,$Sl; Joseph' C. Hseker, Jr.. 2,410; Andrew. D: 
Parker, 2,278; MartliL J. Bii]ms,.668; £mma.O. Tajlorv 666; Bsther C. M. McCuliougii.. 
*>; Pomroy Bros., 18»; John J. AUcm,. 120? Mai^B; Terry, 36; John F. Murphy, 
J*Bei J. Terry, Dennis W. SuliiniB, D. W. Elans, Thomas J. Cunningham, and 
Edward M. De -CastoB, 1 each. 

Important Ohangea during , Year.-- XransCers. to. and .frmn tke- Haa&llton< Avenue 
Line weie.diseontiDued. No n«w powers or franchises were acquired. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



310 



Public Sbkvicb Commission — First District 



The Van Brunt Street and Erie Bailn Railroad Oompany 

Fimed Capital OhanffCB during year.— None. 

Power Bought — From the Brooklyn Heights R. R. Co. on the basis of i^k cents 
per car mile traveled, 110,492.63, charged to operating expenses. 

CORPORATE SURPLUS 

Surplus June 30^ 1919 187,075 42 

Credit balance for year transferred from income account 11,737 72 

Total 178.813 14 

Dividends, 5 per cent declared on $200,000 capital stock 10,000 00 

Surplus, June 80, 1920 168,813 14 



Oj0leer«.~ President and General Superintendent, John F. Murphy; Vice-President, 
Dennis W. Sullivan ; Secretary and Treasurer, Wyllys Terry. 

IMrectorff.— John F. Murphy, WyUys Terry, Dennis W. Sullivan, Bdward M. 
De Castro, James T. Terry, John A. Foulds, Andrew D. Parker. 

Main BushiesB Office.— 2M Van Brunt street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report verified by Wyllys Terry, Treasurer, September 30, 1920. 



THE WESTCHESTER ELECTRIC RAILROAD COMPANY 

Incorporated March 27, l^L [In January, 1899, control of the company was 
acquired through acquisition of its capital stock by the Third Avenue Railroad 
Company, which was succeeded, January 1, 1912, pursuant to plan of re-organisation, 
by the Third Avenue Railway Company.] 

Important Change a during Year, — The length of the company's entire track was 
increased by 0.403 miles, of which 0.115 was in New York City on Webster avenue 
to crossover at 198th street ; 0.287 miles in Mt. Vernon on North Third avenue from 
Bast 1st street to Oakley avenue ; O.OOl miles in Ekistchester due to remeasurement of 
White Plains road from Mill road to Scarsdale line. Road was put Into operation 
as follows: from North 4th avenue and 1st street in Mount Vernon to White 
Plains road and Scarsdale line, in Bastchester, known as the BronxviUe line; 
length of road, 4.964 miles and of track 5.40 miles ; operation was begun February 
26, 1920. No new powers or franchises were acquired. 

Fi^ed Capital Changes during Year 
(F\)r balance In each fixed capital accoimt at close of year, see Table XVIII.) 

INSTALLED DURING TSAB 



Retired 



TITLB or ACCOUNT 

Ties 

Rails, rail fastenings and Joints 

Paving 

Crossings, fences and signs 

Interlocking and other signal apparatus. 

•General ofiice buildings and fixtures 

Revenue cars 

Blectric equipment of cars 



AdditionB Replacements during year 

120000 

297 60 

8,73366 

25,00000 

445 06 ^. 

$46,917'5 

4,06639 

5,159 46 



138,90105 



146,917 68 



Betpenditures for Prinoip<a Projects 
Alteration of 15 cars, Nos. 836 to 350, to be controlled by one man.... |6,302 68 
Main street. Highland avenue, to Hall avenue, Bastchester, improve- 
ments installed during reconstruction of tracks and pavement 3,263 53 

Alteration of 5 cars, Nos. 881 to 885^ to be controlled by one man 1,977 43 

Payment to City of Mt. Vernon in settlement of claims for cost of 
changing grade croasinta 26,000 00 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbbet Railway Ck>i[PANiB8 



311 



The WtftdhtiUr Zltetrio HaUrmid Oompany 

DttaU of Property Retired dnrino Tear from Fiwed Oopital December Si, 1908.— 
Reduction In yaluation of land on South Fifth avenue, Mt. Vernon, by the dUfer- 
«nce between the amount received for land and offlce building, which have been 
•old i(|tS,00O.OO, less expense, I14L60) and the original cost of the offlce building 
(9«^17.68). n8,940L82. ^oeoimt credited — Purchase of constructed road, 118,940.82. 



Power Bought, Sold or Exchanged 



ma ov ooMPAmr 
TUidATaraeSjr.Co 



Total 

mimbffof 

lew. hn. per kwJir. 
delivered (eente) 



Amount Amoant debited 
flre(fited to or (Cr.) credited 
Total ainoaBt raveane toeaqienee 



A.C. 8,194.000 1.8S $111,024 70 



$111,084 70 



UwmBy.CaofN.Y.C 

Uw»By.Co.rfN.Y.C 

TodkmR.lL Co 

N.T., Wflrteherter k Conn. Trae- 
tioaCo 



D.C. 
D.C. 
D.C. 



To«id.. 



548.991 
895.885 
784,094 



D.C. 690,006 



1.50 $8,739 84 88,789 84 

1.50 5.98699 O. 5.986 99 

1.50 12,455 66 Cr. 12,455 66 



N.T.48UiiifanlR.R.Co D.C. 168.082 

WeMdiNtcr Street R.R. Co D.C. > 184.280 



8.408 21 Cr. 



$8,120 82 
8.679 58 



$8.120 82 
8,579 58 

$8,009 90 



8.408 21 



Cr. 818.121 52 



COBPORATB DBPICIT 

Defldt June 30, 1819 

Debit balance for year transferred from income 

A^jQitments : 

Reserve for doubtful accounts 

Tickets sold in 1917 credited to income instead of to 
tickets outstanding as liability. 



$83,706 04 
900 00 



,408.198 26 
129,320 32 



84,606 04 



Corporate deficit, June 30, 1920 $1,667,119 62 



Oi|k;ert.— President, S. W. Huff; Vice-President, L. Sutherland; Secretary, W. C. 
Burrowe: Assistant S<«cretary, I. Mnroney ; Treasurer, A. D. Sage; Assistant 
Treasarer, F. Kessel; Auditor, B. Q. Steinetx; Assistant Auditor, W. Farrington ; 
Attorney, A. T. Davison ; Claim Agent, J. W. Yenson ; Superintendent of Trana- 
pertation, W. E. lliompson; General Purchasing Agent, C. Witael. 

IMrertor*.— B. N. Burghard, G. W. Davison, S. W. H\iff, A. Iselin, Jr., J. W. 
Flatten, A. E. Roosevelt, J. H. Seaman, F. H. Shipman, L. F. Straus. 

Voja Butine89 Oj0lce.— 2396 OAird avenue. New York City. 

Report verified by A. D. Sage, Treasurer, September 80, 1920. 
I . — ...... . — ,■■ - ,-,,,. 

^ The charge for power is based on a price of 4.9 cents per car mile. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



312L Public SioaricD Commission — Prasrr District 

TABES I. TRACK MIUSAGB 






OrwELMODn km Lmsob Sibsbt Rjjlwatb 
(Leasora indented) 



Rapid Transit 
Interborougfa Rapid Tranat: 
CitsyofNewYork: 

<>>»'«*•» --Hli^SSr'-.:::::::: 

Contract 3: 
Queenflboro subway 

Astoria Draneh, elevated 

Corona branch, elevated 

Lexington Avenue line { ^SSedT""^ 

Seventh Avenue line, underground 

PelhanUPtek Jinel ^^5g^^ ■;;;;; ; 

White Plains Roaa line, elevated 

B'klyn line- (Atlantic Avenueatation), und 

Total— Subway division 

Underground 

Elevated 

Manhattan Rulwm and extensions^ 

City of New York: Queensboro bridgo. . . . 

Total — Elevated division » 

Total — Interborough Rapid Transit. 

New York Consolidated 

CHf of New York: Brooklyn bridge. 

New York Municipal' 

aty of New York 

Centre Street loop 

WiUiamsborg bricm 

4th Ave. (Bn.), New Utrecht Ave. and 

Culver linos 

Manhattan bridge « 

B'way (Mn.) and Canal street* 

Total — New York Consolidated. . . 
Htidson A Manhattan 



Total — Rapid Transit. 

City owned 

Company owned... 



trRotiAoaJtear 



On 



ovtraier 
public 



19.560 
ft. 160 

8.7S0 
1.370 
0.820 
2.330 
4.210 
6.050 
5.000 
6.420 
3.050 
2.010 
3.770 



90.750 
36.450 
H.SOO 
36.020 
1.350 

ss.tro 

99.080 
27.064 
1.248 
6.658 
g9.iSS 
1.125 
1.635 

17.364 
2.524 
6.1 

64.4^8 
3.437 



166.880 
9t.801 
74.079 



On 
l^vata 
right' of 



0.4BO 
0.340 
0.110 



0.530 
0.010 
0.080 
0.050 



0.720 



1.840 
1.000 
0.840 
1.870 



1.870 
8.710 
16.719 



4.125 



19.8U 

4.'"" 



27.986 

1.840 

W.14S 



Toteii 



19.560 
6.160 

9A80 
1.710 
0.930 
2.330 
4.210 
6.580 
5.010 
6.500 
3.100 
2.010 
4.490 



e%,B90 
S7.4S0 
96.140 
38.700 

1.350 
JiO.140 
108.790 
42.783 

1.248 
10.783 
89.4SS 

1.125 

1.635 

17.364 
2.5M 

6.805 
84.867 

7.f" 



194.866 
94.641 
100.885 



MiuB or Maxn.T&sjck 



OIBKR THAN flBSr 



Second 
track 



18.930 
6.160 

9.180 
1.710 
0.930 
2.330 
4.210 
5.980 
5.010 
6.420 
3.100 
2.010 
4.490 



61.880 
96. W 
86.140 
38.790 

1.350 
40.140 
101.480 
42.755 

1 244 
10!780 
89.840 

1.125 

1.63& 

17.251 
2.624 
6.805 

84.119 
7.882 



193.421 
99.814 
100.807 



Thizd 
toEfth 
tracks 



16.940 
5.240 

6.410 



0.480 

2.020 

3.910 

11.230 

5.380 

6.560 

2.870 

2.010 

4.490 

0.250 

61.980 

97.850 

89.690 

33.560 



35.550 

94-950 

9.172 



22.364 
1.735 



15.130 



7.775 
66.184 
0.765 



151.879 
86.088 
65.851 



Total 



65.490 
17.560 

3.420 

2.340 

6.680 

12.330 

23.790 

15.400 

19.480 

0.070 

6.030 

13.470 

0.250 

iss.Msa 

75,810 

111.130 

2.700 

119.830 

999.080 

04.710 

2.402 

43.927 

8S.441 

3.085 

3.270 

49.753 

5.048 

21.385 

MS4S70 

16.516 



540.166 
irTS.88S 

toe.tss 



Note. — Where track is owned jointly, only the proportionate share of each company is induded 
under eaoh. Where track is operated under a joint franchise, it is assigned to the owning oompcunr 
if definitely known; otherwise it is divided between the partinipatinc ooonpaniea. Track owned 
under franchise with ri«(ht of reversion in the ci^ is dassad as " owned." Miieaoe under traoka^o 
rights that involve duplicate use of tracks, is, of course, not included under the coni|>any ex^-ciains 
mm rights. 

Returns of trackage have often been slightly inaoenrate and inoonsiatentk Prior to the 1017' 
tabulation, the published figures were those returned for the eloaa'of the year. In the 1917 to 
1019 tables, they were the 1916 figures as modified by returns of new or removed track. In the 
1920 tabulation, the earlier method has been resumea; but the north pair of ** surface *' txaaeka 
on the Williamabur^ bridge has been apportioned between the N. Y. Rys. and the Dry Dock on. . 
the basis of tolls paid, instead of aasignina them entirely to the former as being the com]>any wiUi 
which the city directly entered into the bridge privilege agreement. By reason of these chances, 
the 1920 mileage of some surface companies is not comparable with previously published figures. 

^ Includes underground, 0.290 miles of first track and 0.290 miles oi second. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



fiXBEBT BaILWAT CoUFANIES 



313 



OWJWD, 


JDHB 39, 


igao 
















Moji or Rumraro 

TkACK 


MilM 

oftnckin 
ibopB,afte. 


TotiU 

■UlMOf 

tUtndc 


Milk Addbd 
oDBno Ybab 


MiLW or Track Clambd Accobdino 
TO MoDB or OmunoN 


Other 
tkumttin 

tomoiii^ 


Total 


New 

TOtd 


New 

track 


OverheMl 
ooDtaet 


Third- 

reU 
eoDtaet 


Under- 
ground 


Rtorace 
bftttery 


2.320 


57.750 
18.880 

2.500 

6.870 

12.610 

24.920 

16.670 

20.400 

9.320 

6.130 

13.800 

0.270 

199.100 

118.140 

76,980 

117.060 

2.730 

119.810 

811.910 

100.074 

2.986 

43 .927 

8SM1 

3.985 

3.270 

49.753 
6.046 
21.386 
980.498 
10.B48 


6.120 
3.940 


62.970 
22.320 

2.560 

6.870 

12.610 

24.920 

15.670 

20.400 

9.320 

6.180 

13.800 

0.270 

901.960 

191.880 

79.900 

132.450 

2.730 

186.180 

3.866 
60.120 
88.U1 
3.985 
3.270 

49.753 

5.048 

21.885 








62.970 
22.320 

96.490 

3.480 

2.500 

6.870 

12.610 

24 920 

15.670 

20.400 

9.320 

6.130 

13.800 

0.270 

901.990 

191.880 

79.900 

132.450 

2.730 

198.180 

* 106.686 
3.866 
50.120 

lis 

3.270 

49.753 

5.048 

21.385 

18.768 






0.820 












0.890 












0.060 














0.160 














0.190 














0.280 














1.130 














0.270 














920 














0.2SO 














100 




2.010 


6.130 








0330 










o.oao 














8.880 


9.180 
6.990 

16!87D 


9.010 


8.190 








4.700 








9 ISO 


9.010 


8.190 
DO. 110 








5.900 








QBO 










6 980 


lff.57D 

0.880 
6.196 




D 0.110 
8.090 








19 880 


9.010 








5384 








0.404 














0.362 
9.699 


0.784 
8.899 












































0.738 


1.476 






















1.861 
9.98i 


5.416 
7.818 








< 868 


18.886 
1S20 








0.332 




















I9.0B0 


569.186 
981 .fsr 

977.999 


10.085 
10.040 
80.046 


599.271 
991.997 
807.974 


4.971 
4.809 
0.998 


13.686 
18.099 
0.814 




699.271 
991197 
807.974 






7.374 








tl.848 








m ^^ 









• Of this mileage. 5.010 is also usable for orerliead trolles^. 

'Coorists of Myrtle Avenue connection, between Broadway (Bn.) and Myrtle Avenue lines; 
nihon Street, from Nostrand avenue to Sackman street (third track only); Broadway (Bn.)i 
' from Bvroneyer street to Bast New Yxirk <tfaini track only) ; Jamaica avenue from Crescent street 
V) CUfiude avenue; Liberty Avenue, from borough line to Lefferts avenue; Lutheran line^ from 
JAyitie avenue to Fresh Pond road; Lutheran yard and yard at 38th street; Sea Beach line, from 
nuctum of Fourth Avenue subway and Bca Beach line to SOth street (third to fifth tracks only) 
y W est End line, from Siillwdl avenue and Avenue Y to south end of platform of Btilhrell 
kvone terminal; Oaney Isluid tetminal from Stillwell avenue to Neptune avenue. 

t pmen from nrior Reports in that both pairs of rapU-transit tracks are included, the noitfaerly 
^'^V'^fi^no^ been induded on next line. 

•Indttdei Brooklyn track from GoU street to Manhattan bridge, but this year excludes that 
ondce. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



314 



Public Service Commission — First District 



TABLE L Tnck 



OmuTnra amd Lmoft Snnr Railwatb 
(Leason indented) 



or Road OK Fan 
Tback 



OTHB THAN TTBBT 



On 
■treeto 

or other 
poblie 



On 
ri^tof 



Total 



MxuB OF Madt Tback 



Second 
tnek 



Tliird 

to fifth 

traok 



Total 



Mamhatcah AMD Bborx SuwAca I 

TTrird Avenue 

IQncifaridn Railinor 

Total — Tiurd Avenue 

Belt Line 

Dry Dook, E. B'wajr A B 

aty of New York: WiUiamsbars bridn* 

Total >- Dry Dock, E. Fmtyft B. 

42d8t.Maiih.ASt.N.Ave 

Thud Avenue Bridse* 

City of New ^ik; QoeeiMboro faridn«. . . 
Total — 42d St, Maah. A St N. Ave. 

Mid-Croartown* 

New York City Interborongh • 

Fdham Park i City lahu?' 

Southern Boulevard , 

Union , 

New York City Interborough ' 

Bronx Thwstion , 

aty of New Yoik 

Total — Union 

Wcatohester Electrie 

N. Y.. Westoh. k Conn. Traetion ^ 

To tal — Westeheeter Eleetr o 

Third Ave. eyrton in N. Y. City 

City of New York: Manhattan bridge* 

Second Avenue, Reoeiver 

New York Railways, Reoeiver 

Bleeoker Street A Fulton Feny 

Broadway k Seventh Avenue 

Christopher k 10th Street 

Fort George k Eleventh Avenue 

42d Street k Grand Street Ferry 

Kxth Avenue 

34th Street Crosstown 

23d Street 

City of New Yoik: Williamsburg bridge' 

Total — N.Y. Railways 

Eighth Avenue 

Ninth Avenue 

New York 4 Harlem 

City of New York: Transverse road 

Total — New Yoik k Harlem 

Total 



12.968 
3.343 

ie.S96 
8.824 
9.862 
0.639 

10. m 
9.267 
0.240 
0.242 
9.7S9 
4.219 

17.482 
2.887 
4.881 

47.942 
1.963 

12.306 
0.260 

69.470 

29.666 
1.236 

30.790 

ieS.019 

1.280 

12.214 

24.804 
1.468 
6.147 
3.034 
0.840 
3.667 
6.161 
0.824 
2.231 
1.079 

49.*SS 
9.618 

10.336 
9.039 
0.667 
9.896 



0.348 



0.S48 
0.S48 



12.963 

3.343 
16.996 

8.824 

9. 

0.639 

lo.m 

9.267 
0.240 
0.242 
9.7S0 
4.219 

17.482 
2.887 
4.881 

47.942 
1.963 

12.806 
0.209 

'if 

1.236 

S1.1S8 

168.867 

1.280 

12.214 

24.804 
1.468 
6.147 
3.034 
0.840 
3.667 
6.161 
0.824 
2.231 
1.07» 

49.98e 
9.518 

10.336 
9.039 
0.667 
9.896 



12.681 
3.343 

16.97A 
8.186 
6.468 
0.607 
5.J 
8.1 



0.241 
9.188 
0.944 
16.261 



4.848 
47.693 

1.946 
11.337 

0.269 

0.028 
7.78J 
180.181 
1.280 
11.692 
18.238 
1.311 
4.806 
1.067 
0.840 
2.332 
6.802 
0.826 
1.947 
1.012 
88.169 
9.290 
6.232 
8.437 
0.666 
P. 005 



260.297 0.348 260.646 206.837 



26.614 

6.686 

5f .800 

16.960 
16.824 

1.046 
18.870 
18.140 

0.940 

0.481 
i8.87i 

6.161 
S3.733 

2.887 

9.729 
06.686 

8.898 
23.648 

0.638 
198.814 
87.667 

1.268 
M.8i0 

28.806 

43.0tt 

2.760 

0.M8 

4.001 

1.680 

5.080 

11.90 

1.649 

4.178 

2.001 

87.404 

18.806 

lo.oer 

17.478 

1.816 

18.789 



406.482 



* The Brooklyn k North River lost its franchise before cloae of year and never owned any tniok ; 
aee alao note 0. 

* Includes entrance traok, 0.447. 

' North pair of tracks apportioned to the two operating companies on basis of oar toUa: N. Y. 
Rys., i: Dry Dock, }. 

« Included in order to aooount for all track in First Distriot although lessee ceased operatioa 
August 31, 1910, and Third Avenue Bridge subsequently forfeited its franohise. 

* Operation discontinued Aug. 0, 1919. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



316 



Public Service Cobcmibsion — First District 



TABLB I. Track nikace owidmI, 



mi 



OPBRATmO AND LUSOR StRXKT RaILWATB 

(LflHon indented) 



Bbookltn AicD Qunm SuRnici 
BrooUyn City. . 



CityofNewYork{^J^^ 



Total — Brook^ City 

Brooklyn Heights 

Brooklyn, Queens Co. k Sub., Reodver * 

Coney Isliuul A Brooklyn, Reoeiver 

De Kalb Ave. A North Besch 



atyofNewYoAJg^gS^bi^. 
Total — Coney Island ABra 



oridce.... 
BrooUyn. 



Loney 1 

Coney Mand A Oravesend 

Nassau Electric, ReodTer* 

City of New York: Brool^ bridge. . 
Total — Nassau Elootrie. . . . 

South Brooklyn 

IVoepeet Pfcrk & Connr Island 

New Yoik k Coney Island. 

IVoapeet Park & South Bro 

Total— South Bn 

Total — B.R.T. surface 

Bush Terminal 

Manhattan Bridge 3-Cent Line 

City of New Yoik: MMhstlan bridge 

Total — Manh. Bridge 3-Cent Line . 

Marine 

Van Bnmt St. A Erie Basin 

Other Brooklyn surfooe 

New York A Queens County 

City of New York; (^eensboro bridge 

Total — N.Y. A Queens Co 

Long Island Electric 

New Yoric A Long Island 

Ocean Eleotric 

RoduwurElBctrie 

Total -Ocean Electric 

New Yoric A North Shore • 

Manhattan A Queens, Receivers 

City of New York: Queensboro bridge 

Total — Manhattan A Queens 

Other Queens surface 



Total . 



'KienfoifD Dtthvacb 
Richmond Light A R. R., Receiver. . . 

gtaten Island Midland. Receiver* 

rkmUifield Beach 



Total 

Total, street-snriaee roads. . 
Grand total 



MiLBfi or Road ob Fibst 
Track 



On 

streets 

or other 

public 

ways 



98.725 
0.836 
1.501 

101 .oet 

0.520 
20.249 
21.330 
0.440 
0.223 
0.286 
88.t79 
4.156 
63.722 
0.335 
64.067 



0.337 



0.8S7 
818.860 
0.982 
0.795 
1.437 
8.888 
0.650 
1.060 

i-m 

31.80a 
0.764 
88.664 
12.170 
28.590 
4.1 
0.165 
4.861 
26.030 
9.980 
0.274 
9.864 
114.069 



831.643 



16,940 
17,940 



84 880 



026.820 



793.700 



On 
private 
right of 

way 



7.662 



7. €68 
2.564 
10.997 
1.286 



1.886 
5.949 



6.949 
0.459 
5.934 
1.855 
1.155 
9.Mi8 
87.811 
0.546 



0.710 
0.100 
1.S66 
5.620 



6.680 
3.530 
7.7f0 
0.152 
0.014 
0.166 
3.890 



80.406 



59.573 



0.350 
0.130 
1.570 



2.060 



61;971 



89.957 



Total 



106.287 
0.886 
1.501 

108.784 
8.084 

31.246 

22.566 
0.440 
0.223 
0.286 

88.616 
4.156 

69.671 
0.335 

70.006 
0.459 
6.271 
1.855 
1.155 
9.740 
860.471 
1.528 
0.796 
1.437 
8.888 
1.800 
1.160 
6.880 

37.420 
0.764 

88.184 

15.700 

36.290 
4.838 
0.179 
6.017 

29.420 
9.580 
0.274 
9.864 
184.466 



891.216 



17.290 
18.070 
1.870 



36.980 



8.791 



883.657 



MiuB or Maik TnkVK. 



OTSXR THAN rXBBT 



Second 
track 



101.665 

0.831 

1.402 

108.978 

1.780 

30.521 

21.078 

0.440 

0. 

88.984 

3.307 

68.' 
0.382 

68.416 
0.450 
6.271 
0.073 
1.155 
8.858 
889.788 
O.l 
0.795 
1.425 
8.890 
0.788 
1.160 
6.160 

32.560 
0.764 

88.894 
7.700 



3.281 
0.178 
8.4i9 
7.780 
9.870 
0.274 
9.844 
61.877 



306.810 



12.540 
12vl60 
1.670 



26.860 



£38;007 



732.328 



Third 
to fifth 
tack 



0.168 

b.iw 



0.188 



0.170 



0.170 



0.888 



0.388 



152.217 



Total 



208.042 

1.667 

2 993 

818.708 

4.864 

61.767 

44.544 

0.880 

0.445 

0.570 

46.489 

7.463 

137 922 

667 

188 569 

0.918 

12.542 

2 828 

2.310 

18.598 

490.4St 

2 510 

1.590 

2.882 

2.148 
2.320 
11.480 
69.980 
1.528 
71.508 
23.570 
36 290 
8.110 
0357 
8476 
37.170 
18.950 
0.548 
19.498 
196.518 



088.364 



29.830 

80 220 

3.140 



63.190 



1,388,036 



1,768.202 



. * This Brooklyn bridge track used by surface lines is apportioned in aooordance with the terms 
of the acreement between the city and the companies having right thereon. The per cent of the 
Brooklyn Heights is 60, of the Nassau Electric, 24. and of the C. I. A Brooklyn, 16. 

* The mileage appertaining to the south pair of surface tracks on Williamsburg bridge (used by 
Brooklvn companies) is apportioned in accordance with the terms of the agreement with companies 
granted right thereon by tne city. The formal division assigns to the Brooklsm City (as successor 
of the Brooklyn Heights), 84 per cent, and to the C. I. A Brooklyn, 16 per cent. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



318 



Public Sbkvice Commission — First District 



TABLE IL ROLLINO STOCK: (A) Namber ot 











PAanont 


OmuTDfo Qramn Rulwatb 


noPuiAoif 


roBMOFmu 


Electric 
contact 


Otheri 


Owned 


LesMi 


RafidTrimbit 


2.770 

1.254 

22« 


U.250 
S280 


1.187 
017 
140 


* 2.802 




507 


Hmhon ^ Mf^tl^ttan ' 


•86 


• 






Totol 


4.250 


1.610 


2.104 


3.575 


Makhattan akd Bbohx Suvacb 
TMrd ATnuQB 


357 
40 
60 

140 




357 
26 
50 

106 




lUt T41W . 


26 
60 
31 


40 


Dry Dook. £ B'war A B . 


60 


4ari BtTMfm»>, * Bt N Av« 


65 


Mi<M3ro«town. 




New York Ci^ Interborough 


124 




54 


70 


Pfdhftm ?^k Ik Citr InluifT 








114 
/.MO 






40 


Union 


60 


147 
20 
790 


288 


Wflftoheirtflr Elwrtm 


04 


Third Ave. ayitem in city 


157 


m 


Brooklyn A North Riv«r7 7. 




Seeond Aveoae, Reoetrer 


211 

1,333 

85 

40 

143 




•211 

M.440 

'85 

'40 

'143 




New York Railways. Beoeiyer T 


' 116 




Eighth Avenue 7 7 '. 




Ninth Avenue' 






NY* Hftrlfm 7 , 












Total 


3.072 


273 


2.688 


657 


Bbookltn akd QunMB Subtacb 
Brooklyn City 




1.273 
31 
20 
287 
470 


t54 

«0 


688 
8 
20 
201 
475 


644 


Brooldyn Heighla, Reeeiver 


32 


Viri*J£c Or*'f si IPi ,..,--. ...,,,.,.... 




Brooktyn , Qm^neCo. A Stib., Kjjoeiver ' 


S5 








QgJifiy iiikiiH ^ HrnTiwncI ■< 




N^HDD Elflrtnc Rrwiirr 


1.226 
12 

5.529 
3 
14 


<28 


1,203 

6 

f.585 

3 

14 


51 


Soitllii BrtnkJYn .... ... 


e 


BroDkJ>>ti Rapid Trinnt sorfiMe 


100 


755 


Biuh Tcrmiiutt ' ' 




^iwhittaTi Bridge 3-r'"ei3t LLth- 






Marine . . 


3 


3 


Van Bnint St. A Erie Bairin , 


16 
55 

106 
36 
36 
27 
13 
32 

S40 


16 
55 

106 
86 
36 
27 
13 
32 






5 


5 


New York A Queens County 




T^nir Tffli^nd RlffT^f ' 






New York 4 Long Island 






Ocean Electric 






New York 4 North Shore .... 






Manhattan A Queens, ReoeiverB 






Other Queens lurfaoer 












Total 


3.602 


103 


3.050 


736 


Richmond Surf acb 
Richmond Light 4 R R.. Receiver 




141 

7 
4 




141 

7 




RiNit^ rfflftn<rM;din^ ' 






8onthfield B«a<;h 




4 








Total 


152 




148 


4 










6.016 


376 


5.805 


1.307 






Grand total 


11.160 


1.805 


8.08r 


4.072 



Note. — " Owned " means held under complete title; " leased ", under some other form of title. 
The rolling stock used by the C. I. A Gravesend is reported by the Nassau Electric. 

1 Storage-battery unless otherwise specified. * Non-motor or " trailer." ' Of these, 1,737 

are leased from Manhattan Ry.» 476 are held under Elevated Extension Certificate, and 679 
under Contract 3. • Held under purchase agreement with Quarantsr Trust Go. • In 1919. 

the rolling stock used by Southern Boulevard was reported by the Union, from which comp«iiy 
it was leased bv the month; in 1920 the 40 cars reported are leased from the Third Avenue by the 
year. * Excludes 64 not used. ' Rollinc stocJc shown under Eighth Avenue, Ninth Avenue 
and N. Y. A Harlem was turned over by N. Y. Railway " the question as to ownership being 
one which is to be determined by an appropriate action m ' Receivership proceedings ' ". * N. 
Y. Ilailwajrs' figures include 260 cars (seating capacity, 9,224) actually retired during year; the 
r^naining decrease represents the cars turned over to three former lessor companies. See notes 
7 and 9. ' Decrease of N. Y. Railways cars represents cars turned over to three {former lessor 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



320 



Public Sebvicb CoMMiasiox — Fbbst Distbict 



TABLB n. RoUiiif stock 


: m Seatlac caiM 


citfand 




NxTMBBB OF Cabs, AviaaGB Cafacrt amo 


Ofbutikq Snwn Railwatb 


Opn 


Convert- 
ible or 

CkMd semi. 

(mnfa«> oon. 
laUUe 
(number) 


Number 


Avenge 


(5.) 


Rafed Transit 
Tntflrbormigh Rapid Transit 


8 


80 


36.0i» 


4.021 

1,100 

226 




NmrYork 0<HMoK<lAt.m1. Rmmvffl' . 


>414 






















Total 


8 


80 


36.056 


5,347 


414 






Manhattan and Bbonx SusrACS 
Third Avnue 


35 


55 


26.750 


130 
66 
110 
«31 
62 
20 
•171 
44 

es4 

110 
864 
85 
40 
143 


• 192 


BdtLine 




Drv niw>lr E R'va.T A R. 










42dSt MAnh ASt N Ave 








* 140 


Nfiv York Citv Tnt^rhfrroiMb 


28 
20 
130 
50 

rrt 

101 
291 


59 
55 
56 
55 
66 
55 
49 


26.821 
26.750 
25.220 
26.750 
$6,976 
27,000 
27.817 


*34 






Umm s 


' 125 




* 20 


ThiTrf Av«». HWiiem in citv 


61 1 


Second Avenue. Rsoeiver 




K«» Ynrlr Pftilw^ini RiWunvAr 


'294 


Eighth Avpmiff . . 




Ninth Avenue 










N.V. ^Hsp^m 





















Total 


664 


53 


26.719 


1.876 


806^ 






Bbookltn and Qttunb Surface 
BrookLvn Citv 


255 


62 


28.648 


597 
19 


'475 


Brooklyn Heights! Receiver 


■21 


Bridge Operating 








•20 


BkbiL Queens Co. ft Sub.. Receiver 


100 
250 
657 


65 
61 
61 


29.870 
25.000 
26.602 


14 

343 

12 

1,180 


•177 


Consy Island ft Brooklyn , Receiver 


"21 


Nsanan EJeetrie Receiver 


»354 


Sottth Brooklwi 




^Brooldyn Rapid Transit surface 


i,ni 


et 


»6,96l 


1,068 


Biish Tflpninal . ' ' 


*3 


Manhattan Bridite 3-Cent Line .' 








14 

3 

9 

t6 

110 

11 

11 

12 




Marine 










Van Brunt 8t ft Erie Basin . . 


7 

7 

45 

20 


50 
60 
50 
54 


21.750 
»1,760 
13.730 
15.370 






9 


Ne w York ft Queens County 


>a4l 


T'ong Island Elpftric . . 


*5 


Nfw York ft T^ng Tii^nd 


•25 


Owan Electric 


11 


48 


34,700 


S4 


New York ft North Shore 


• 13 










32 
176 




Other Queens surface 


76 


61 


17,197 


sg. 






Total 


1.254 


61 


26,330 


1,382 


1,150 






RlCBUOND SuRrACE 

Richmond Light ft R. R., Receiver 


83 
2 

4 


63 
50 
45 


17,000 
10,500 
17.000 


58 
5 




Staten Island Midland, Receiver 




Southfield Beach* 










Total . . . 


80 


53 


16.854 


63 








Total street-surface lines 


2.007 


58 


26.039 


3,321 


1 064 






Grand total 


2.015 


58 


26,079 


8,668 


2.378 





> All cars in this column have a seating capacity of 76-*^, except the 597 of the N. Y. Caneolidated, 
which seat 7&-^0. 
2 Conaiata of 215 convertible and 190 semi-ooDvertible. 
•Convertible. 

* Storage-battery. 

* Includes 50 storage-battery. 

* Semi-convertible. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



hi 



ii; 



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111/,:. 



\i\ : \ 



322 Public Service Commisbion — Pebst District 

TABLE n. RoIBiis stock: (C) Age of vimamft 









Km 


BBOfCAMBmiff — 






Omumra &aamt Railwatb 


Prior 
to 
1801 


18»1- 
1806 


1806- 
1000 


1001- 
1006 


100(h 
1010 


1011- 
1016 


1017- 
1010 


ino 


Total 


RAFIDnAmR 

Interborowh Rapid Tnoat 


717 
3M 


100 
02 


"itf 


1,220 
366 


326 

6 

100 


081 

301 

36 


«6«7 
•207 




4.029 




1 614 


Hwti^f^ * Mmbftttan 


226 


















Totol 


1,023 


261 


148 


1.686 


620 


1,266 


064 




6.769 






MlHHAnAir AMD BaOHZ SUWACT 

Third ATBirae 










266 
40 
60 

171 
42 
20 

200 
06 

m 


02 
26 
60 






367 


Belt Line 














66 


Dry Dock, E. B'ww A B 














110 
















171 












82 
20 

186 
18 

47S 






124 
















40 


Union 










«60 




436 


Weetohoster Electric 










114 


Third Art, qvtem in city. .* 










80 




1,41? 


Second ATemie, ReoorerT! .'. 






211 
416 
86 
40 
23 




211 


NewYoricRaawayB,ReoeiT« 




88 


386 


317 


203 






1,449 


V\ghih \ymm ^ ' . . 








86 


Ninth Avenue 
















40 


N . y . 4 Harlem (bom Feb. 1, '») 








120 








143 
















Total 




38 


774 


386 


1,831 


766 


60 




3.345 








Ehooilth ahd Qnmi Subiacb 
BrooWynCity. 




63 


667 


177 


208 
13 


70 


<1«2 
«10 




1,327 


Broot^ Hflchts, Hueimr 


8 


40 


Bridge Opentitu 






20 
277 
110 
208 


20 


BrooUyn, QufwaaCo. & Sob^ Receiver 




2 


"880 
717 






*4 

*16 
*86 
*12 


8 


291 


Confy labqd A BrodkJjm, RecciTer 




10 
110 


"32 


476 


NgHuu Electric, Rf^civer 




12 


1.264 


South Brooklyn. 




12 


BrMklyiiRi«)id'ftan«itiarfaoe 

Buflh Tcfminal 


8 


77 


1,913 


m 


^i 


lOi 


S,419 


Mankbttau Bridge 5-( \nt Line 










12 
3 
2 

17 


«2 




14 


Marine " 












3 


Van Brunt St. A Erie Basin 






7 
7 
41 


1 

1 

20 

36 

18 

6 


6 
9 
00 






16 








f 




39 


New York A Qneeu County 




46 


196 


1^1^ Inland KTfctrifl 










36 


Ni.w Yorlf A Trf>ng tiiland 








12 
16 



6 






36 


Ocean Electric. . .7 






7 






27 


New York A North Shore 






4 
32 

4i 






13 
















33 


Other (Queens Burikoe 




4S 


4S 


79 


im 






940 












Total 


8 


122 


1.668 


062 


666 


161 


800 


8 


3.795 






Richmond Suwact 
Richmond Light A R. R., Receiver 






70 
2 
4 


..... 


30 


""i 


732 




141 


S Uten Iflbiid Midland, Receiver 






7 


Bouthfield Beach 










4 




















Total 






86 


1 


80 


4 


82 




152 










Total, streetwrfaee lines 


8 


160 


2,627 


1.340 


1.027 


031 


382 


8 


7,292 






Grand total 


1.031 


421 


2.676 


2.034 


2.447 


2.100 


1,346 


8 


13,061 







> Does not r<j p rc s e nt total number of prepagrment cars, aa probably all thoae vrith center entrances 
are included under " Other enoloeed pUtfonna *'. 
* In 1017, 306: in 1018, 360. 
» In 1017, 200; in 1010, 97. 



M 



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Digitized by LjOOQIC 



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330 



Public Sbrvicb Cobocbsion — Pibst District 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



332 Public Sehvic?e Commission — First District 

tablb v. trafvic statistics: 









RBVBlfX7B 


Opsbatino Street IUu<wats 


BBGUIJUt PAaSENQEB 0/BB 




Active 


Idle 


ToUl 


Rapid TsAifarr 


163,388,609 

91.788.562 

71.740,047 

54.094.450 

8.985.595 


3,998,944 

1.508.5^ 

2.394.412 

912.449 

226.549 


167,581,663 

93.387.094 

74,134.459 

55,606.899 

9,212,144 


Subway divimon 

Elevated dmrion 


New York Conaolidated. Receiver 


Hudson & Manhattan 




Total 


227.208.654 


5,131.942 


232,340.596 




^^. _ MA2VBA1TAN AND BbONX SURFACB 

Third Avenue 


4.110.931 

796.671 

1.276.860 

2.442,859 

16.115 

1.886.297 

8.926 

731.137 

6.726.666 

1,886.462 

19,888,984 

183,683 

1.798.694 

17.546.313 

2.480,841 

968.973 

1.266.679 


18.306 

49 

14.010 

27.945 


4.129.236 

796.720 

1,290.870 

2,470.804 

16.115 

1.924.671 

8.926 

746.039 

6.806.655 

1.930.867 

80,180,903 

199.235 

1.820.127 

17.770.296 

2.499,096 

958,973 

1.268.873 


Belt Line 


Dry Dock. E. B'way & B 


42dSt., Manh. A St. N. Ave 

Mid-CroBBtown {to Aug. 9, '19) 


New York City InteiSoroVh. 


38.374 


Pelham Ptork 4 City laland (to Aug. 9, '19) 


Southern Boulevard. 


14.902 
79.989 
44.405 

837,979 
15.552 
21,433 

223.983 
18.255 


Union 


Weetcheeter Electric 


3d Ave. system in city 


Brooklyn A North River (to Oct. 6, '19) 


Second Avenue, Receiver 


New York Railways. Receiver 


Eighth Avenue (from Aug. 1,'19) 


Ninth Avenue (Jrom Oct. 1, '19) 


N. Y. A Harlem (Awn Feb. 1,'iO) 


3.194 




Total 


44.117.107 


520.396 


44.637,503 




BROOXI.TM AMD QUEBNS SURFAOE 

Brooklyn City (frtim Od 19, '19)* 


17.270,827 

8.068,733 

680.648 

4.907,312 

5.903,766 

237.902 

16.373,757 

784.886 

54,887,830 

16.494 

508.945 

s 39.979 

233.169 

798,687 

4.087.251 

864.662 

1,560,213 

497,959 

375.272 

853.620 

8,838,977 


181.907 
40.298 
47.002 
66.708 
4.548 

"isi'.sso 


17.452.734 

8.109.031 

727.650 

4.974.020 

5.908.314 

287.902 

16.565.187 

784.885 

54,749,673 

16.494 

609.638 

•39.979 

233.160 

799,880 

4.226.356 

880.873 

1.643.787 

504,810 

376.511 

861.416 

8,493,763 


Brooklyn Heights, Receiver • 


BtiflfB OpprntiTnir * 


Brooklyn, Queptis Co. di :§ub.. Receiver 


Coney rsliincl & Brooklyn, Receiver 

Congy Uluod A CJravisiend 


NassAu Electric, RetMsiver 


South Brooklyn 


Brooklyn Rapid Transit surface 

Bush T^m^iii^ , 


581,843 


Manhattan Bridge 3<ient Line 


693 


Marine 


Van Brunt St. A Erie Basin 




Other Brooklyn surface 


693 

139.105 

16.211 

83.674 

6.851 

1.239 

7.796 

864,776 


New York & Queens County 


Long Island Electric 


New York & Long Island 


Ocean Electric 


New York A North Shore (to May S,'eO) 


Manhattan A Queens, Receivers 


Other Queens surface 




Total 


63.265.394 


777^312 


64.042.706 




Richmond Subfaob 
Richmond Light A R. R., Receiver 


1.496.737 

947,643 

21.463 




1.496.737 

947.643 

21,463 


SUtwi MandMidUnd, Receiver 




Southfield Beach 








Totol 


2.465.843 




2.465.843 






Totol, street surface lines 


109.848,344 


1.297.708 


111.146,052 




Grand total 


337,056.998 


6,429,650 


343.486.648 





'Freight. 

s Includes 486 shifting car miles. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



334 



Public Service Cobibcission — First District 



TABLE y. Traffic statistics: 



Opbratzno Stbbbt Railways 



ACTIVB CaB-SbAT MlIiBB 

(Rboular Passbnobb Cabs) 



Total 


Per car 


8,Bie,6$7,684 


60.25 


4.773,005.328 


52.00 


3.443,522.256 


48.00 


3.851.719,064 


70.42 


395,366.174 


44.00 


12.463,612,822 


54.86 


200,697.314 


51.01 


29,706.856 


37.29 


43,237,197 


33.86 


121,097,680 


49.57 


386,760 


24.00 


86,348,135 


45.78 


232,076 


26.00 


30.766.344 


42.08 


318.183,712 


47.30 


80.571.235 


42.71 


9$0,Bt7,S08 


48.28 


6.806.207 


37.05 


81.488.245 


45.30 


719,265,749 


40.99 


83.587.508 


33.69 


34.523,028 


36.00 


51.161.606 


40.42 


1,897.054.651 


43.00 


600.434,586 


39.98 


395.697.583 


49.04 


27,989,375 


41.12 


208,587,383 


42.51 


263,594.929 


44.65 


11.173.201 


46.97 


706.920.456 


43.17 


35.026.180 


44.63 


B,S59,4MS,e9S 


48.14 


659.815 


40.00 


24.429.360 


48.00 


"959.496 


24.00 


9.042.566 


38.78 


S6,091,eS7 


n:u 


170.384.812 


35.182.932 


40.69 


68.797.401 


44.09 


24. 801. .507 


48.81 


18,013.056 


48.00 


45.164,405 


52.91 


seg,suJi3 


48.98 


2,736.859.043 


43.26 


70.040.563 


46.80 


38.424.877 


40.55 


962.506 


44.84 


109.427,946 


44.38 


4.743.341.640 


43.18 


17.206.954,462 


51.05 



Rapid Tbanbit 
Inteiborough Raiud Transit 

Subway divisioD 

Elevated division 

New York Consolidated, Reoeiver 

Hudson & Manhattan 



Total. 



Manhattan and Bbonx Subfacb 

Third AvBduc. *».,.. 

Belt JAue. » . - ^ 

Dry Dock, E. B'way AH.. 

42d St.. Manb, & St. N. Avu 

Mid-CrotttitovrD {to A Uff. 9, '19) 

Mew York City Interborouah 
" :ACitv'- ^' 
diouthcru Boulevard. 



IVJhain PuTk k City Island" {to Auif. P, *19) . 



Cn . . 

WcBiichiTflter Electric 

3d Ave. system in city 

Brooklyn & North River (to Oct. 6, *19) . 

Second Avenue, Receiver 

New York Railwasrs, Receiver 

Eighth Avenue {fnm Avg. 1, *t9) . 



Ninth Avenue {from Oct. 1, *1S) . . . 
N. Y. & Harlem {frwn FA. 1. *90) . 



Total. 



Bbookltn and Qxtbbns Subfacb 

Brooklyn Cit^ {from OeLl9,*lff) 

Brooktyn Ilirigbta, RnoelT-^r. ,. 

Bridge Op«ratinf: ^^ . , 

Btlya,, QuMUi Co. A Sub,, Reomver 

Coi^ey lajjind &. BtorjktyQ, Rooeiv<!r 

Conoy Iftland & GravfiseDd ...» 

Nassau Elcctnc, Rcceivor ....... ^ ' 

Scmth Brooklyn 

Brooklyn Eikpid Tfansit surface 

BuAh Tdrouiut] - 

Mflnhattan Btid^v- 3-Coiit Lino 

iMarihG, 

Vflfl Brunt St. & Erie Bwin 

Other Brooklyn surface 

New York & Queens County 

Ijong Island Electric 

New York & Long Island 

Ocean Electric 

N. Y. & North Shore (to May S,'iO) 

Manhattan & Queens, Recetvers 

Other Queens surface 



Total. 



Richmond Subvacb 

Richmond I^igfat A R. R., Receiver 

Staten Island Midland, Receiver 

SouthfieldBeaoh 



ToUl 

Total, street surface lines. 
Grand total 



* Allowance is made for the operatio 

'Discontinued. «Freifht. • Figures of 1918 i 



1 For this ratio, the active passenger car miles are used. 

of certain lines, for less than a full year. • Discontinued _ 

absence of a return for 1919 and 1920. * Of which 12 lines were discontinued during the srear. 

7 The 33 routes operated by the Brookbm City at the end of the year were operated by the 
Brooklyn Heights to October 19, 1919. * The avenue of cars per day for the Brooklyn Bridge 
locals is divided as follows: Brooklyn Heights, 4; Nassau, 1, and Coney Island & Brooklyn, 1. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



336 



Public Service Ck)ioci88ioN — First District 



TABLE v. Tnfflc stetisdcs: 



Opb&atxno Stbekt Railways 



Year'B 
Bverase 
of owned 
orleMed 

winning 

tnok 

uaed 

(mileB)^ 



PASSBirasR Car 



Total 

regular 

(aetaveand 

idle) 



Per mile 
of tiack 



Rapid TxANBiT 
Interborousli "ELKpid Transit 

Subway division 

Elevated division 

New York Consolidated, Receiver 

Hudson & Manhattan 



Total 

Manhattan and Bronx Subfacb 

Third Avenue 

Belt Line 

Diy Dock, E. B'way A B 

42d St., Manh. A St. N. Ave 

Mid-Crosstown (to Att^. ^. 'i^) 

New York City Inteii>oroush 

Pelham Pai'k & City Island (to Aug. 9, '19) 

Southem Boulevaitd 

Union 

Westchester Electric 

3d Ave. systcon in city 

Brooklyn A North River (to Oct. 6, '19) 

Second Avenue, Receiver 

New York Railways, Receiver 

Eighth Avenue U^om Atig. i, 'id) 

Ninth Avenue {from Oct. i, *19) 

N. Y. & Hartem (Jrtnn Feb. l/w) 



Total. , 

BucHrmLVN and Quebns Subfaob 

Bmoklyrj City (frf^m Oct. 19, '19) 

HrtKiklyii HeUehU^ iioceiver 

Briflpe Otjeratinit * 

HrDokJyD, Quoe^T^f^ < '<*. A Sub., Receiver 

ConeylAlAnd A }ii <>klyn, Receiver 

C&ncy Iflland A Li r^iiresend 

Noaaau Klectric^ Rcmver 

South Brooklyn . . . . , 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit surface. 

Bush TermicLal 

Maahattau Bridgu :$-Cent Line 

Marine 

Van Brunt St. A Erie Basin 

Other Brooklyn surface 

New York A Queens County 

Long Island Electric 

New York A Long Island 

Ocean Electric 

N. Y. A North Shore (to May S,'£0) 

Manhattan A Queens, Receivers 

Other Queens surface 



Total 

Richmond Surfacis 
Richmond Light A R. R., Receiver . . . . 

Staten Island Midland. Ileceiver 

Southfield Beach 



Total. 



Total, street surface lines . 
Grand total 



S0e.B9 
186.48 
119.81 
228.21 
16.85 



107,691,663 

93.887.004 

74,134.450 

55.606.890 

9.212.144 



551.35 



232.340.506 



32.71 
12.96 
10.13 
16.98 

0.59 
28.30 

034 

9.73 

116. 5S 

34.75 

963.07 

0.85 

23.23 

102,39 

17.42 

U.52 

7.91 



4,129,236 

796.720 

1.290.870 

2,470.804 

16.115 

1.924,671 

8.926 

746.039 

6.806 j655 

1.930.867 

20,190,p03 

199,235 

1.820,127 

17.770,296 

2,499.096 

958^3 

1. 268^73 



427.39 



44.637,503 



145.63 

69.10 

[3.09] 

62.95 

47.29 

7.70 

139.55 

20.04 

499. B6 

2.84 

4.36 

2.15 

2.32 

11.67 

73.30 

24.62 

41.38 

8.67 

31.40 

19.59 

198.96 



702.89 



30.03 

17.69 

1.23 



48.95 



1.179.23 



1.730.58 



17,452.734 

8.109.031 

727,650 

4,974,020 

5.908.314 

237.902 

15,555,137 

784.885 

64,749,673 

16.404 

509.638 

•39.979 

233.169 

799,980 

4.226.356 

880.873 

1.643.787 

504.810 

376,511 

861.416 

8,493,763 



64,042,706 



1.496.737 

947.643 

21.463 



2,465.843 



111.146.052 



343.486.648 



646,940 
500.791 
618,767 
243.664 
546.780 



421.405 



126.253 
61.456 

127.418 

145,495 
27,453 
68.012 
26,099 
76.658 
58.385 
55.566 
76,484 

235.224 
78.363 

173.562 

143,445 
76.608 

160.515 



104.442 



119.841 

117,357 

235,485 
79^015 

124,938 
30.908 

U8,637 
39.164 

111,991 
5,810 

116,943 
18.612 

100,504 
68^490 
57.660 
35.779 
39,724 
58.211 
11.991 
43,981 
49,691 



91.113 



49,841 
53.569 
17.450 



50,375 



94.253 



198.481 



1 Allowance is made for date and amount of new track and for part-year use. 

* Ratios computed on the basis of 366 days; the average per day for the actual number of days of 
operation for each company operating less than the full year is as follows: Mid-Croestown. 403; 
I^ham Park A City Isktnd. 223; Brooklyn A North River. 2.075; Eighth Avenue. 7.460; Ninth 
Avenue, 3,500; New York A Harlem, 8.403; Brooklyn City. 68,175; Bridge Operating. 2,166: Bush 
Terminal, 59; New York A North Shore. 1,222; Richmond Light A R. R., 4,169; Suten Island 
Midland. 3.900; and Southfield Beach. 148. 

* Ratios computed on the basis of 366 days; the aversge per day for the actual number of days 
of operation for each company operating loss than full year is as follows: Mid-Crosetown. 83; 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



338 



Public Service Ck)MMissioN — Fibst Disxaicrr 



TABLE VL TRAVnC STATISTICS: 



OpEnA.TUSO Stbxet Eailwath 



NmiB 



t or HflVKMUB 



5-DflJlt f ftTflS 



4-Ofttit 



21'Qent 



(iiutj«t«d la 



EArm TfLLNBrr 
Intfirborough R^pid Traoait . . 

Bubn'ay aiviaion. , , 

Elevated dividion. ....,.,..,.,. 
New York Oaiuaotidatcd, Receiver. 
Hudjion A. M^i^hatloD ,.«.»..,... ^ 



Total 

Manhattan anh Biioi*x ^^urtacb 

Tbird Avenue. , ^ ,.♦... , 

Jicit Line. ► . . . 

Dry Dock. E, BVay & E 

42d Ht.. Mint. A yt. N. Ave . .., 

Mid-Cro«atoi*Ti (to Aug. 3, '/^l 

New York City ItiterboroiiRb 
I'FUuun I'nrk & City Uliind (;^i , I ..£/ .', / 
Houthern Koultvord .,..,...-.. 

UniQa. ^ K ..... * 

WcsteliBfitfflf EJectrie 

3d Ave, Bystepi in city . . 
Brooklyn & North RiyoT (to Oft. 5, ^//?> 

Second Avenue, Hoceiver. 

New York Railwaye* Rooeivci . ^ ...»., . 
Eighth Avenue f/ri?m Auff, /, '19}.* , . . - 
Ninth Avpnue (/rtwi Ori. 1^ *t9}. ...... 

N. Y. & Hmrlein <fr&m Fdf. l.'gO) 



9S4n40MMt 
585,583.173 
368,810,238 
376,78:2,635 
32,348,349 



*5l5.4d0 
*215,: 



•S&.002.487 



1,363,533,305, 



730.690 



5d.M2.4g7 



Total , 

Brooklyn asd Queenr Sui^faoe 

Brooklyn City (fr<tm Oci.i9,'19} 

Brooklyn Hstebta 

Bridge f ^perfltiuB i' , .... 

Brooklyn, Cjueenii Co. A. Bub., Enocivcr 
Coney IfllJind & Brooklyn. Receiver — 
Coney la land dt CraveBond. ,,..,..,.. 
NaasAU EleothCt EeccivafK ,>,......, 

South Brooklyn 

Brooklyn Rapid Tr&nflit 

■urfsoe ....,..,,.,, 

Biuh Termin&l - ^ 

MmhatUn Bridfte 3-Cent Line 

Mu-lne. . ♦ - . ^ - 

Van Brunt St ft Erie Baain. , , 

OtticT Brooklyn aurtaco 

Now York & Queens County 

LonK Island Electric ,-.... 

.New York A Lon« Uland. 

Ocefln Electric .,,...-..... 

New York i& North tshare (to May S, 'JO) 

Manhattan ^ Quoentf, Reed vera 

Queena nurface 



Totul. 

KicHUONn RuitrACE 
BJchinond Li^ht & H. H.. Receiver, 
^taten Laland Midland, Receiver. . 
Southfiicld Beach , ...... 



49.181 

7*186 

11,362 

35h402 

94 

15,541 

."jl, 

5,771, 

50 .331 , 

12,720 

19&JI It. 

493 

15,8(i5 

160. ai3, 

18,658 

5,568, 

11,472, 



.4S9 
,613 

:*eo 

.273 
,939 
,409 
113 
178 
(i32 
540 
im,f 
817 
146 
328 
603 
171 
601 



n, 428. 543 



n, 823, 126 



* 726.050 



Total. 



398.740,631 



140.2,10.881 
47.154,530 



30,697,624 
38.003,188 

2.035,1175 
104,604,352 

5,069,934 

^d7,894,S84 



3.077,7S7 

'3.464 

'1,655.682 

'6,306,428 



272.410 



11,943.301 



T 2,716.827 
'043.664 



^691,&55 

M. 035. 377 

'74,451 

'2,029,267 



272.410 



1,773.078 



153,033 

' 10.171 ,7B4 

<35l 



i0,m4.788 
»7Sl,iaO 



t> 20.753, 506 
■8L2.309 
» 306,047 



32.05S.41O 



472,821 



7.^/ ,Sit 



256.757 

22,5tJ5,075 
5,573.033 
8.234,923 
4.375.632 
500,000 
4.860,651 

4^ J SB, IMS 



414,310,464 



9.075.560 

4.261.404 

249,707 



Tota!, BtrMlHiurface lin«a, 826 , 637 , 046 



13,586,851 



Grand total .,.,.., 2.190.171,341 



'401.059 



'2.310,860 
S,7lg,SM8 



*525 

f 28,088 

$8,613 



10.232.OS2 



« 112.963 
'57,692 



170.655 



22.346,933 



23.077,637 



709.231 



» 7,917.461 

J* 13.821,444 

1*2.686.259 

» 5,779.467 

^> 139,340 

"11,2S3,682 



M.BS&jm it, €39. ess 

,,_ •5,680 

9.105,700 , 



9,imjaa 



47,890 



12,840 
923.A20 
mi. 540 



13.045.260 



13,317.670, 



13.317,670 



" 881 .201 
$m.B4i 



>*1.233.386 

>i 1^156^012 



44.910.095 



■^1.245.032 
"•4,007 



1.249.T39 



79.118.234 



139.030,721 



1 Ezoluaive of chartered oar pasaengers. > The 7-cent fares (except for tb« H. db M.) referrsd 
to in notes represent 5-cent passengers purchasing ^cent transfers. * Ratios are oomputed on 
the bnflia of 366 days; the average per day for the actual number of days of operation for each 
company operating leiis than the full year is as follows: Mid-Crosstown 2,375: Pelnam Pftrk & City 
Island. 1,278; Brooklyn db North River. 16,155; Eighth Avenue. 58,122; Ninth Avwiue, 21.783; 
New York ft Harlem, 75.977; Brooklyn City, 568.425; Bridge Operating, 41,135; Buah Twmi- 
nal. 20; New York & North Shore. 5,451 ; Richmond Light & R. R., 29.064; SUten Island Midla&ct 
17,701 ; and Southfield Beach. 1,723. « At 4 cents. • From provisional daily figuros submitted 
by respondent. • ConaistB of 7,480.061 passengers at 6 cents. 20.351.420 at 6^7, 27,038,909 a4 7. 
876.433 at 8.67 and 4. 155,574 at 10. ' At 3 cenU. ■ At If cents. • At 2 cents. ^At 3i 

cents. >* Figures taken from 1919 returns. No report this year. ^* Consists of 388.047 paa* 
sengors at 1^ cents. 56,475 at 1 i and 20,310,384 at 7 (5-ceut fare and 2-ceiit transfer). » R«pr»- 



.^.v 



340 PuBUc Service CoMidissiQN — First District 

TABLB VL TraAc ttetiBtics 



Opbsatimo Stbbbt Railways 



Amount or Fammb 



Total 



Awnge 

per 
revenue 

(cenU) 



Rapid Transit 
InterboTouch Rapid Transit 

Subway division 

Elevated diviiion 

New York Consolidated, Receiver 

Hudson A Manhattan 



Total 

Mamhattan and Bbonx SusFAca 

Third Avenue 

Belt line 

Dry Dook. E. B'way A B 

42dSt., Manh. A St. N. Ave 

Mid-CrosstowD (to Aug, 9,*19) 

New York City Interboroush 

Pelham Park k Citv Island (to Aug . 0, '19) 

Southern Boulevard 

Union 

Westchester Electric 

3d Ave. system in city 

Brooklyn & North River (to Oct. 5, '19) 

Second Avenue, Receiver 

New York Railways, Receiver 

Eighth Avenue (from Aug. 1, *19) 

Ninth Avenue (from Oct. 1, '19) 

N. Y. 4 Harlem (from Feb. 1, '20) 



Total 

Brooklyn and Qussns Surtacb 

Biookbrn City (from Od. 19/19) 

Brooklyn Heights. 



Bndge Operating " 

Co. & Sub., Receiver. 



Bklyn., Quet . _, _ _ 

Coney Uand &■ Brooklyn, Receiver. 

Coney Uand &. Qravesend 

Nassau Ellectric, Receiver 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit suifaoe. 

Bush Terminal 

Manhattan Bridge 3-Cent Line 

Marine i,- •.-,;• •. 

Van Brunt St. &. Ene Basm 

Other Broddyn surface 

New York &. Queens County 

Long Island Electric 

New York 4 Long Island 

Ocean Electric 

New York 4 North Shore (to May S.'SO)... . 
Manhattan 4 Queens, Receivers 

Queens surface 



Total 

Richmond Surpacb 

Richmond Light 4 R. R., Receiver 

SUten Island Midland, Receiver 

Southfield Beach 



Total. 



Total, street-surface lines. 



947,749,348 SI 
29,209,777 06 
18.449.571 46 

s 18.842,994 31 
6,807,934 80 



$72,400,277 71 



f2.602 

662 

608 

1,824 

806 

2, 

288 

2.966, 

<636 

10,iSS 

67, 

842 

9,118 

949 



673 



.807 94 
.766 38 
.139 81 
.807 40 
749 46 
116 81 
.666 65 
,658 90 
.681 60 
027 00 
109 89 
644 36 
927 76 
.417 13 
.176 30 
,101 14 
.630 06 



821.998.006 12 



•$7,102, 

•2.968, 

231 

'1,746. 

•2,836 

•113, 

^•6,090, 

263, 

g0,83g, 

239 
12, 
»82 
S55, 
1.129 
278, 
626, 
218, 
114, 
267, 



898 10 
660 16 
670 96 
463 61 
,235 88 
885 14 
,260 57 
,946 01 
4084M 
113 60 
,703 62 
,837 85 
,817 13 
,47i 10 
,798 76 
,606 65 
177 40 
,781 68 
,201 70 
415 60 
071 87 



$23,702,962 39 



$657,663 89 

215,666 73 

12.489 85 



$785,720 47 



$46,486,678 98 



S.OO 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
6.30 



5.08 



4.94 
3.24 
5.00 
4.90 
5.00 
4.96 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
4.8t 
3.72 
4.81 
5.15 
4.87 
4 93 
5.00 



4.96 



4.97 
5.12 
1.68 
5.13 
5.16 
5.06 
5.13 
5.01 
4.96 
2.00 
2 52 
500 
2.59 

t.sy 

5.00 
5.00 

5 53 
5.00 

6 80 
4 50 
6.11 



4.91 



5.34 

4.99 
5.00 



Grand total $118,886,956 69 



5.24 
4.94 
503 



I Points where transfer (either free or 2-eent) slips are used to effect a change of ears. The 
locality bssis involves no duplication except in tae ease of exchange of transfers between oompanieB. 
in which esse each company counts each locality. With a few exceptions, saoh inter-company 
transfers occur only among associated companies. The second bssb uised rdates to the viewpcint 
of the car line by which the transfer slip is issued and counts eaoh point where two or more linee 
exchange transfers. Data entered above are compiled from tariff reports instead of from the 
annual returns of the companies. Returns for transfer points elasnfied with reference to whether 
the transfer is made to otner lines of the same companv, to lines of aesodated oompanies, or to 
those of companies not associated; are presented in Table VIII as retamed by the companies for 
individual lines. With one exception (see note 2) change from one line to another of npid transit 
compani^ is made without transfer slips. * At 149tn street and Third aveaua change between 
subway and elevated divisions of the Interborough is made by transfer slip. See last sentenee 
of note 1. *-^* Includes post-office revenue: > $3,862.50; « $1,279.80; •$8.899ii4; • $3,568.16; 

uiyiiizeu uy x^_j v^' v^'pc iv^ 



Street Railway Ck>iiPANiE8 



341 



1930 — Concluded 



NuiiBXB or 
Traicbtsb Poumi 


Number off 
trenafers 
coUeeted 


Revenue 
andtrensfer 

combined 


Ratio (Pnn Cmrr) 
or TRANsrsBS to — 


Pa«. 

aencera 
(empIoveM 

and 
othen) 
carried 

free 


Loeibtiet 
eompMy) 


pointe 
Uoreftch 
car line) 


Revenue 

and 

transfer 

paasencers 

combined 


Revenue 


f 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
2 


• '1 
» 1 
« 1 
»2 


tt, 176,816] 
" 11.209,064 
"[10.966.252 
1.063.729 


966,138,110 
586.098.633 
369.034.477 
377,846,364 
92.250.836 


.28 


.28 


N.R. 

N. R. 

N. R. 

1.103.943 

N. R. 








"2 


2 


1,063.729 


1.425.330.310 








11 
12 
8 
14 

33 


20 
12 
13 
20 

44 

16 

124 
»I401 

is 

IT 82 

3 

6 


5.886.642 
531.876 
1,368.994 
4.684.049 
37.481 
4.496.545 


56.549.307 

17.800.273 

12.732.014 

41.909.447 

132.470 

20.764.073 

51,113 

8.288.536 

80.130.608 

15.137.462 

268,686,803 

2.483.036 

18.069.078 

207.226.122 

20.411.407 

5.974.426 

12.490.142 


10.41 
2.97 
10.75 
11.18 
28.29 
21.66 

36;37 
26.96 
15.97 
16.86 
37.54 

3.03 
14.54 

4.61 
.33 

8.15 


11.62 
3.06 
12.05 
12.58 
39.46 
27.64 

43!62 
35.06 
19.00 
80.87 
60.11 

3.13 
17.11 

4.83 
.33 

8.87 


N. R. 
N. R. 
N. R. 
N. R. 
N.R. 
N. R. 
N. R. 


10 
60 

"1221 
»tll 

7 

41 

3 

4 


2.517.358 

20.798.976 

2.416,922 

4£,788,84S 

932.165 

548,250 

30.127.860 

940.495 

19,608 

1.017.541 


N. R. 
N. R. 
N. R. 



N. R. 
N. R. 
N. R. 
14.130 
4,004 
N'. R. 


"IS? 


347 


76.324.762 


520.239.514 


14.67 


17.19 


— 


28 

1 


i«64 
»»1 

"«50 

«S 

».»«168 

»»6 

S4M 

n i 

/ 

45 

3 

4S 


7.963.526 
21.564.322 


150.91 34 

79.3 «8 

13. a 44 

41.8 72 

54.4' 62 

2.5 77 

150.5 31 

5.2 127 

498,8! 106 

9.5«i7 749 

2«o.;57 

3.192.130 

IB, 962,316 

28.846.867 

5.735.281 

9.692.080 

4.375.994 

1,760.896 

5.821.359 

66,188,477 


5.28 
27.18 

isiso 

16.86 
12.14 
21.17 
3.60 
16.81 

* 2i'.67 

2.81 

.79 

.01 

4.11 

"ii'.69 


5.57 
37.32 

■ '22:84 
20.29 
13.81 
26.85 
3.73 
18.78 

27.M 

2.89 

.79 

.01 

4.28 

"iis'.84 


979.195 
387,626 


29 

«40 

3 

«87 

1 

11 13S 


7.783.634 

9.187.609 

310.611 

31.878.399 

189.093 

78,877,194 


286.501 

413,609 

19,190 

986.836 

27.747 

3,100,704 

N. R. 






17,105 






N. R. 


«1 




3.508 


1 






14 
2 


6.260.892 

161.348 

75.391 

362 

71,910 


N.R. 

N. R. 
98.198 
27.090 
18.940 
16.603 






18 


6,669,008 




»«151 


391 


85.437.097 


567.935.898 


15.04 


17.71 




13 
12 


19 
19 


1.808.524 
498.333 


12.332.679 

4.821.616 

249.797 


15.30 
10.34 


18.20 
11.53 


03.746 

35.413 

178 


"21 


38 


2.396,857 


17.404.092 


13.77 


15.97 


129.337 


»329 


776 


164.158.716 


1.105.579.504 


14.85 


17.44 




t 


'330 


778 


165.222.445 


2.530,809,814 


6.53 


6.98 





;t2,775^: > 62.785.47 :M144X)6:i« $8,747.44. u Collected at 149th street station from Third 
Areniie Elevated paaaencerB. u CoUeeted at 149th atreet sUtion from Subway Division passen- 
VM. u Tranifer with surface lines. See laat aentence of note 1 . ^* Exclusive of inter-company 
fowcatioDs. u Oiitaide of First District. » Localities for the system, consisting of 32 in Man- 
pun ud 79 in The Bronx. i^ Consists of 10 free transfer points. 56 2-cent and 16 points, both 
>r« ud 2-oeot. M Free transfer pointa. i* See note 10 on first double-page of Table XIV. A. 
"Uosigto of 11 free tranafer pointa. 36 2-cent and 4 pointa both free and 2-cent. '^ Includes 

F^ ^ ^^'^v* joint-vate tioketa are interchanged between B. R. T. linea and Van Brunt St. A 
1^1 q**^' "Indudea 3 free transfer points. 45 2-cent and 1 point, both free and 2-cent. 
-^Z-^CDt transfer pointa. •* Includes 20 free transfer pointa, 133 2-cent and 14 pointa. both 
n«ttda<ent. • Includes $272.10 for 13,605 transfers at 2 centa each, which were issued ' 
*>toied. 






i 'I' 



l!!^Led by Google :.|i 



342 Public Service Commission — First District 

TABLE Vn. traffic STATISTICS — CAR AND PASSBNGBR 



OpDUTDta &mxsT BAi'.WAn 


July 


AUffDSi 




OeM» 


Koraalv 


Rjf'iD Tiumrr 


39.527.523 

27,831.095 

2«.475,«e3 

7.223J46 


37,3»4.205 

26.S9l,d£3 

26,003,571 

7,236>6I8 


n, in, 478 
42,3IIS.10J 
20,136,2S^r 
i6,Q2fi,0!53 
7,612,850 


n,m7,^ 

4S,007,aO 

31,300.002 
»,203,e87 
8«604,404 


TS,4S8J4t 


Subwuj" diyinaD .,.,......,... 

}ifw York CoiuoUdabfld, Rflodrer. ,......,,, 


48, ISO, 653 

30,087,i«> 

», 860.808 

8,171.596 






ToUl ... .. 


104,060.307 


97,279,017 


107,166,381 


117,206,913 


110.481,675 


Tbird Atcpuc. ......_ 

Belt line ,. ., 

Drv Dock, E. B'wiy A Battery. 

42d St.. M»ah. A St. R Ayv , ....... 

Uid-Cr<>fsti>irn Ho Auff. 9. '19} ... , 


4,5219.2«0 

l,4BO,022 

S00.74fi 

3,242,126 

75315 

1,333,243 

42,106 

439,392 

5.107,435 

l,m.H57 

ISJ4iJ94 

500,0fiJ 

1,S02,TI>4 

21,65fl,eaj 


4.606.192 
1.306,703 
1.022,643 
3.321.301 
10,174 


4.515,088 

1.555,758 

040.342 

3,247,077 


4,«16.]86 
1.716.863 
l,Oi3.237 
3.521,228 


4,^0,877 

1.610,968 

9S2.971 

3.264JIO 


Nnr Yorfc Citf IntCTbarough ,,..... 

P^Qum Park A Citv Uluid {^ AHg. 9, 7f) .... 


1,337.034 

ip015 

463.881 

5,3PO.O06 

1.138,760 

503,404 

1.010.646 

18,250,452 

'2,349,100 


1,3S«,241 


1.42l.»» 


L3«7,605 


475,293 

4,001,411 

1,019,370 

/»,/«?, iSfi 

489,230 

1,626,056 

16.245.900 

< 2,416,567 


474,485 

4,005.169 

»69,B77 

58,176 

L783.413 

17,474,302 

2.139.031 

IH0,S31 


4€2,S8l 


Unioti. . , , 


4,600.973 


Wistf h»ttr Eloclf ifl , 

24 Art iTiteni in city . 

Brooklyn & North Rivw {io (ki.S,'S9) 

Bcstontl .\vpime, Eoeejver , 


007,331 
I7,9t7,im 


New Yflfk FUil«s)i. Keceiv^ 

Hjehth Avf^nue [Jr^im Avg. /, 'iSh . . 

Ninth .Avenue ifrim Oct 1, 'IflJ , . . . . 


15,975,405 

1,058,042 

872,913 


N. Y. 4 Uirlem {/r^qn f «£, //lO) . . 






















ToUJ , 


42,305,195 


41,631,210 


41,101,145 


ii.oa.oM 


37,084.616 






BftDDELTK ANA QCTSEHe SUKT A UE 

Bro&klyu Cit^ xfrm O'L SB, '19}. 

BroaklynH^cightB, ReoeiVfr _. ., , _ 

Bfliigt Operaliiia • , 

BriX)k]_vTi. QuDcns Ca & Sub. . Hweivtf ^ . . , , - . 

Cui3fy Island A Brooklyn, Rflxiver 

Coney laUnd ik ( jrqve«i<^niJ , . 

Nwuu Electee, Rectivcr , 

So^tti Brooklyn 

Brooklyn Rftjiid Twuit eurfiici? , , 
BuBh Termjiml . . . , , . . , , . ^ » , 








7,304,533 
10,10fl.275 
1,114,643 
2,844,063 
3.fi37,4ai'i 
06,624 
10. 066. 739 
234,370 

230 

853.502 

12,583 

256.071 

i.sn,sss 

1.939. 064 
446.701 
832,745 
215,362 
215,003 
631,827 


10 79s, SIS 


16,166,524 
051,.'^ 
2.664.257 
4,625.037 
512,148 
10JD2.7fi6 
1,263,137 


13.706,871 

92S.7S0 

2.323,670 

3.643,073 

384.143 

6,538,029 

084,708 


16,537,612 

1.058,SM 

;. 715.^03 

3.752,343 

228.523 

0.947.028 

645,081 

S4,8^,014 

130 

556.281 

28,218 

303.721 

2,047.405 
525,023 
972,398 
427,369 
£48,424 
551,800 

4J74,om 


106.3n 
]J83,tfB 
2.6S5.II4 
3.453.436 

83.^7 
9.861,097 

167,614 

$4.9m,ut 


MuiluttKn Bridge 3-CeDE Uoe , 

Marina ,,,.*, 

Vkd BniJit St. k Erie Buia . , 

Other Brooklyn jurrnce, 

Naw York A Queens Couoty 

Lang Iibnd Eketrio ...... . . 

New Yofk 4 T^« laknJ .,..,.. , . . 

Ctieean Elec'iric ...... , , 

Nev York ^ North Shore (la May S, *SOi. .... 
Manbattui & Queeoi. AeedvcfB... ,, 

Other Qui'viii surfAco. , , 


496J18 
54.204 
290.812 
S41JS4 
J,076j5ti 
510 J5l 
036,472 
J70.20;i 
^6,iU 
499,830 


5S5. UO 

49,709 

326. L2U 

9S7,m& 

2.l01.09t^ 
320,000 
S25,O03 
804,525 
260,602 
£33,77fi 

S,S54,8m 


863,066 

9,111 

254,118 

s.i47,m 

1.833,552 
397,601 
100,346 
1»,XI2 
106,665 
603 JOS 


Total , ., ,, 


4U972.639 


36.625,017 


40.648,372 


40,710,470 


80,713,284 


RichniomJ iJKht A R. R , R««ver 

BLfitun Inljind MidLud, Rrreiver. ■ , 

SouthfirUBeMti. . ..., 


l.OiSJv;! 

82tl,r>27 

S4,;303 


1,(^,221 
846.133 
85,12! 


021,74ft 
697,253 
41,407 


S76,e60 

A6E,g78 

1. 179 


616. n>3 
927.821 
t"J 


T&td. ,,,. ,..., 


i.osy,i»9 


1,050,535 


l,e«0.4DI» 


1,430,817 


i.U4,il7 


Total. itnxt-flurfue lines . . ^ . . ^^..^..^ . 


8fi,237j23 


80.215,762 


63,310.019 


83J03,S73 


70,041,516 


Grand total 


iyo.297.5:^ 


177,404,770 


100.476,307 


200,399,266 


196. 536, Iff] 



1 Operation of all surface lines affected by heavy snow. 

* Operations affected by strike (especially April 10-19). 
> Includes 399,838 2-oent fares. 

< Includes 412.471 2-cent fares. 

• Owing to heavy snow, respondent suspended operations, from Feb. 4 to Mar. 18. 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



344 Public Service Commission — First District 

tABLB Vn. Tnfflc ttatittics — car and pastenser moTemeot 



OFBRATma Snunr IUilwats 



July 



August 



September 



October 



Noycsnber 



RinoTaAMBiT 
Interbarooffh Ra|Hd TnjmX 

Rubway oiTinoD 

Elevated divuion 

New Tcric Cooaolidated, Reoehrer . . . 
Hudaon k Manhattan 



08 is 



tS, 969,621 

1.975.318 27 

1,391.202 81 

1.474,170 M 

440,513 62 



19R,0^7 68 
1,868,753 M 
1,329,293 92 
1,303.566 07 

442,443 13 



is, 674, 866 SO 

2,118.510 31 

1,456.344 99 

1.401,640 17 

464,972 38 



77 «5 



iS,9e3,70f 

2.399.135 97 

1.564.566 80 

1.465,071 86 

523,73^99 



,9tO,81i 15 

2.410.716 74 

1.504,007 99 

1.493.882 42 

400.403 50 



Total. 



35.281,205 36 



14,944,056 78 



35,441,467 85 



15,952,513 62 



15.014,100 05 



KLurRAtTAzv iufp Bbpnx SuRPAoa 

Tlurci Air<st]e, 

Belt Line. 

Dry Dock, E. Wwty A B 

A2d St.. Mum. & St N, Ave 

Mid-CnwUiTii {io Avg. 9, '19) 

New Yorlc City iDl-eiboruuKh 

iVIhain Pfc. « C. I. (to .4 ufl. 9, '19) 

SoiitbefD BoulcvarJ 

Unian. .......... 

V't'r- ■ "^v^rrr Elfiitrtc . 

3d Ave. system in city 

Brooklyn A North Riyer (to Od. 5, '19) . . 

Second Avoiue, Beceiyer 

New York Railways, Receiycr 

Eighth Avenue (from Aug. 1, '19) 

Ninth Avenue (fnm Od. 1, '19) 

N. Y. A Harlem (from FA. 1, 'tO) 



1223, 
42, 
44, 

159, 

3, 

65, 

2, 

21, 

259, 

56, 

879, 

18 

87 

1.058 



728 46 
046 35 
533 97 
821 06 
,790 75 
139 49 
109 90 
969 60 
871 75 
384 13 
..W5 48 
364 96 
,177 42 
517 44 



1227.752 83 
41.013 17 
51,127 87 

163.949 81 

958 70 

65,432 15 

445 75 

23,194 05 

269,549 90 
56,927 17 

900.55/ 40 
19,133 50 
92,580 84 

959.699 26 

105.459 86 



1222,948 62 
49.719 77 
47,463 70 
159.933 59 



6228,023 15 
54.879 51 
51.161 42 
172.578 32 



$214,437 31 

61 .527 71 

40.148 55 

150,657 82 



67.793 01 



60.551 03 



87.257 83 



23,764 65 
249,570 55 

50,969 78 
87t,19S 87 

18,007 44 

88,176 26 
959,161 98 
108.454 22 



23.724 25 
245.258 45 

48.408 73 

898,684 88 

2,138 45 

85.435 06 
906.915 15 
106.801 55 

44.620 55 



23.144 05 
234.548 65 

45.286 80 
8U,808 ti 



74.210 53 

826.841 59 

07.002 09 

41.668 60 



Total. 



$2,043,455 28 



12.077.224 86 



12.045.963 57 



$2,039,495 61 



$1,885,440 03 



BiiooV4dT9i iKU QiTEEJSA SuRritn 

Bfooklyn City \ftim Qd. U*, '/&) 

Brooldyn Hrl^lita. Rwejvef . ., + 

Bridge Operri Ling* 

Bklvii., QuaeiiB Co. & &jb., Rwriyer. . . . 

Coney uJaod Sl Brooklyti, R^fi^ivf? 

C^nty Idand k Grav^wuid 

T^iamu Electric^ ReGeiver 

South Brocltlyu , , 

Brooklyii Rapid Thuuit iurfaoe. 

Ru?;li Terminxl ...,., 

MaahattAD Bridgt 3-Cent Line. .. , 

Marine 

Van Brunt St. A Ekie Barin 

Other Brooklyn surface 

New York & Queens County 

Long Island Electric 

New York A Long Island 

Ocean Electric 

New York k North Shore (io May 5, 'tOl 
Manhattan k Queens, Receivers 

Otner Queens surface 



$794,483 59 

15.957 61 

132,043 00 

221.053 50 

25.320 03 

497,029 67 

63.208 99 

1,749,096 48 



$725,325 80 

15,576 61 

124.582 48 

190.893 82 

19.908 15 

449,776 03 

40,288 00 

1,676,860 89 



12,521 89 
2,710 20 
7,059 73 
88,991 88 
98.807 95 
25.507 55 
54.053 45 
38.810 40 
14.350 60 
22,918 15 
864, 44S 10 



14.784 15 

2.339 95 

8.112 29 

U,89e 89 

105.054 50 
26,495 00 
52,820 45 
40,226 25 
15,556 05 
24,544 28 

844,696 68 



$873,277 42 

17.740 41 

145.721 74 

108.026 24 

11,824 09 

523,427 14 

32.292 82 

1,808,809 86 

2 60 

14.048 83 

1.410 90 

7,177 57 

88,689 90 

. 102,374 75 

26,296 15 

55.302 86 

21.868 45 

18.165 03 

24.867 22 

888,874 46 



$36/, 

532, 

18, 

148, 

185, 

4, 

624, 

11, 

1,794, 

21, 

6, 
88, 
96, 
22, 
45, 
10, 
15, 
24, 
816, 



602 79 
275 62 
676 07 
746 11 
889 86 
878 75 
684 89 
340 89 
085 M 
460 
530 43 
629 15 
319 12 
W 90 
998 20 
335 06 
945 55 
768 10 
518 79 
074 47 
64P 16 



4. 

10, 

140, 

178, 

4, 

505, 

0, 

/.70f, 

22, 

6, 

01 
10 
43, 
0, 
14 
22, 
908 



037 44 
341 35 
810 84 
517 79 
136 87 
,104 92 
600 87 
,403 97 
,OCf OS 
10 12 
,352 81 
456 20 
,853 78 
,5» 91 
.677 60 
,879 &5 
,018 40 
,015 10 
,036 69 
,000 83 
,988 17 



Total. 



$2,025,836 40 



$1,865,283 81 



$2,073,323 71 



$2,038,207 44 



$1.034,«1 13 



RlGHMONO SURTACI 

Richmond Lignt & R. R., Receiver .- . 

Staten Island Midland, Receiver 

Southfield Beach 



$52,421 65 
41.323 44 
4,215 15 



$51.409 73 
42,306 60 
4.256 05 



$46,013 28 
34.758 27 
2.074 85 



$43.720 50 

27.937 88 

58 96 



$40,742 73 
20.288 69 



Total. 



$97.960 24 



$97,972 38 



$82.846 40 



$71,717 42 



867.011 42 



Total, street-surfaee lines. . 
Grand total 



$4,167,251 92 



$4,040,481 05 



$4,202,133 68 



$4,140.420 47 



$3,880,082 58 



$9,448,457 28 



$8,984,537 83 



$9,643,601 53 



$10,101,934 09 



$9,801,082 63 



For footnotes, see first double-page of this table. 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



346 



Public Sbbvicb Commission — I*ib8T Distbict 





TABLE VtL ThOBc ststislki 


1 — car and 


poseogv 


QnBLLTDro Snnr Bailwatb 


July 


Ansust 


Septonbs 


October 


Novenber 


RinDTBAlOR 


N.R, 
244.872 


N.R, 

N.R. 

N.R. 

172,921 


N.R. 

N.R. 

N.R. 

212,055 


N.R. 

N.R. 

N.R. 

116.947 


N.R. 


Sobro dmSoii 


kS; 




N. R. 


Nfiw Yfvk- rflmnHHmtfld. Rmnmr . . , , . 


34.721 


Hwfaan h Manhftttan 
















IVrtal 


244,872 


172.921 


213,065 


110,947 


84.721 






lilUIRATrAN AMB BtONX SOWAOB 

Third Avenue 


642,018 
81.239 

142.318 

494.296 
29.349 

417.252 


579.487 
111,608 
129.408 
475,288 
8.132 
412,033 


540,703 
181.858 
128.979 
440.541 


587.107 
87,672 
133,170 
450.456 


509.160 


Bdtline 


33.482 


Drv Dodc E. B'wrnv & B. 


121.665 


4M Bt. Umh. A Bt, ff AvA 


414.467 


Mkl-Crantown (to Ava. 9'iff) 




Nov York Citf tntflKborauah 


406.168 


399,221 


388.341 


VM^nt PIr Jk'n r .In Au^ *fOl 






2i6.287 

2.151.447 

325.477 

^•^:^ 

70.188 
0.623.061 


214.173 

2.067.998 

348.906 

74.808 

3.738.211 

416.123 


227.776 
1.846.041 

258.869 
8,999,499 

290.038 

74.864 

8,495.647 

524,372 


£17.035 

1.768,393 

207.422 

8,749,688 

39.127 

58.991 

3.867.850 


301.336 


Uakm 


1,644.351 


Weetcherter Bleetrio 


180.603 


3d Atol qyatem in dty 


8,497^404 


Brooklyn A North Birer^foOei. 5. '/«) 

RnHinn AvmitM Rennrrar 




50.250 


New York Baihrays. Reoeiver 


2.563,517 


Eishlh Ave. (IromAva. 1. *t9) 




Ninth Ave (^nmOti.'i 'JfP) 




2.540 


2 539 


N Y Jk TTurifim (irnm FA. t.'iff\ 






















Tobd 


11.478,696 


8.837.20O 


8.376.860 


6.718.048 


6,113,710 






Bbookltn and Qubbnb Surtacs 
Brooklyn City (/rom OcL 19/19) 








454.996 
3.261.748 


881.918 


BrooSm Hashts. Seoovw 


7.631.963 


4.912.548 


5.745.287 


1,784 


Bridge OperatinK* 




BrooUyD.Qu^Go.&8ab..Beeeiver 

Cooeilafaad A Brooklyn. Reo^ 


1,600.383 

1.455.440 

129.997 

5.140.046 

13.115 

1S,970,9U 


906.302 

805.733 

69,457 

3,063,991 

10,989 

9,861,090 


1.159.076 

940.04^ 

36.262 

3.560.660 

23,536 

11,489,886 


811,886 

823.229 

7.868 

2.923.067 

24.329 

8,807,078 


401.605 
633.632 


Coney laland A Gnveeend 


5.789 


Nemu EleeMo. BMeiver 


2.213,375 




14.232 


Brookbrn Rapid TVanni eorfaoe.. . 
Rwh Temi«fti , ■ 


4.14M,8S6 














Marine TT 












Van Bnmt St. A ErieBaan 
























New York & Qaeeu County 




8,203 


596,753 
26,650 
8.300 


560.410 

23.786 

7.088 


530,^88 
18.947 
6.890 


825,232 


Long Island Eleetrio 


141064 


New York & Lmg Idand 


6.603 


Ocean Eleotrio 




New York & North Shore ((oJfay 8. 'JWj 

Manhattan A Qvieenff. Rwrnm 


12.881 


12.782 


11.845 


8,679 


8.778 


Other Queens BU&oe 


dK^ue 


644,461 


601,679 


666,401 


664,697 






Total 


16.599.470 


10.505.491 


12.064.444 


8.872.474 


4,608,982 






RlOBMOlTD SURFAOI 

Richmond liidit & R. R., Recover 


223,080 
85,153 


224.317 
82.008 


197.174 
78,358 


175.906 
80.398 


165,316 




78.118 


Southfield Beach 
















Total 


308.233 


306.325 


275.582 


256.304 


237.434 








28.386.899 


19,649.016 


20.736.826 


15.846.821 


11,048.076 






Qraod total 


28.630. m 


19.821.987 


20.948,881 


15.968.768 


11.082.797 







For footnotes, see first double-page of this table. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



348 Public Service Commission — First District 

TABLE Vn. Tnillcttetiiiics — cuaad 



Orratxko Shut Railwatb 



July 



AugOBfc 



S^tenbcr 



Oetobar 



Novcnber 



Bapid TkAivarr 



InterboroughBapidTtannt 

BubwBy diviiion 

ElervteddhnBon 

New Yoik Couobdated. BMciver. 
HudaoB A ManhfttUii 



Total.. 



Manhattan and Bbonx SmtrAOi 

Third Avemie 

Botftline 

Dry I>o«k. E. B'iray A B 

42d8t..li£uih.A8t.N.ATe 

MkU}ro«town(toAiv.«.'/0) 

New Ycric atj Interboroii«h 

PelhamFk.AC.L((oAiv.P.'/«) 

Boothem Boulevud 

Unkn 

Westohostcr Electrio 

3d Ave. qystem in city 

Brooklyn A North Riyer (to Od.S,'t9) 

Seoond ATenue, ReoeiTer 

New York Railways, Reoeiver 

Eighth Ave. (Jhm Aug, 1,'19} 

Ninth Ave. (fmn Od. i*19) 

N.Y.AHariem(/romr«6./,'«0} 



Beookltn and QvnNB Surtacs 

Brooklyn G^ (from Od, 19,'iSf) 

Brooklyn Hevbts, Reoeiver 

Bridge Operating^ 

Brooklyn, Queene Ca A Sub., Reoeiver 

Coni^ldand A Brooklyn, Receiver 

CoDcy Idand A GraveBend 

Nanan Eleetrie, Reoeiver 

South Brooklyn 

Brooklyn Rapid Tranat wriiMe . 

Buah Terminal 

Manhattan Bridge 3<3ent Line 

Marine "> 

Van Bnmt St. A Erie Baain 

Other Brooklyn aorfaoe 

New York A QueeiiB County . . .^ 

Long laland Eleotrie 

New York A Long Idand 

Ocean Electric 

New Yoric A North Oiore (to Man 8, *90) 

Manhattan A Qneena. Reorivere 

Other Queens surfaoe 



Total., 



RlOmiQiND SUBTAOI 

Richmond Light A R. R., Reoeiver. . . 

Staten Island MkDand, Reoeiver 

SouthfieU Beach 



Total.. 



490,060 

428.780 

888,171 

40.668 



799,m 
807.404 
402.280 
808.081 
41 .f" 



«<8.8Sf 
410. 
418,888 
819.848 
40.619 



8SS,m 
429.n4 
434.280 
828,126 
44.516 



81^.890 
414,280 
402.041 
838,821 
41,087 



1.282.606 



1.148.700 



.184.194 



i .226.460 



1.192.088 



62.600 
11.800 
16.879 
82.604 

2.688 
18,224 

1.204 

5.685 

66.870 

18.679 

MS, 976 

9.188 
25.082 
813,402 



58.000 
11.870 
17.168 
83.724 
684 
17.1 

6.005 

67,228 

18.780 

998,999 

9.284 

25.044 

278.653 

33.536 



48.871 
12.166 
16.200 
31.800 



48.416 

12,701 
17.881 
88.788 



16.188 



16.824 



5.661 
58.194 
17.485 
905,888 
8.705 
24.248 
275.605 
84. 



Total 678.448 



Total Btreet«]rlisoe lines 1,822.478 



578.785 



292.703 

6,550 

53,783 

65.811 

4.667 

186.824 

13.145 

899,999 



257.953 

5.918 

48.402 

56.897 

8.688 

164.1 

11.543 

848,988 



4.388 

878 

2.767 

7,988 

42.877 
7,575 

12.240 
8.006 
4.476 
7.976 

89,880 



713,625 



16.765 

18.927 

718 



85.406 



Grandtotal .... 2.555,048 



4.362 

878 

2.887 

8,i97 

42.897 
7.880 

12.148 
7.554 
4.600 
7.674 

89,987 



680.667 



15.027 

19,557 

710 



86.104 



1.249.596 



2.898.856 



5. 

60,276 

17,920 

918,079 

1.166 

24,606 

260.7B6 

34.850 

18.805 



548.641 



842.801 



278,842 

6.828 

51.676 

57.106 

2.679 

176.462 

9,000 

889,058 

528 

4,195 

878 

2.805 

8,Mf 

80,247 

7.566 

12.407 

4.006 

4,628 

7r^ 

75,088 



666.001 



14.960 

16.640 

585 



82.075 



1.246,807 



2,481.001 



114.288 

160.430 

6.810 

52.829 

56.082 

1.^ 

174.: 

5.620 

880,757 

744 

5.406 

489 

2.802 

9,481 

89.280 

7.405 

11.888 

4.067 

4.6n 

7.843 

74,4H 



664.782 



14.827 

18.561 

56 



28.446 



46.on 

11,604 
16.6QS 
81.5S8 



16.168 



5.813 
58.837 
17.62S 



24.816 

229.5n 
88.721 
17.488 



1.710 



260.106 

1.891 

6.770 

50.468 

53.268 

1.881 

166.0» 

4.894 

845,988 

670 

5.434 

410 

2.781 

9,975 

86.690 

7.185 

11.872 

3.887 

4.428 

6.640 

80,077 



628.637 



18.668 
12.808 



26.061 



1.235.479 1.166.8M 



2.461.035 2.860.486 



i« Estimated. See note 14 on seoond double-pace of Table V. Division by months made oo 
basis of twice the number of car hours in July, August. September and June as in the other 
months. 

For other footnotes, see first double-page of this table. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



350 



Public Service CoBOiiBSiON — First District 



TABLB Vn. Tralllc ttatistics — car and passenfer 



Opbuhnq SnxiT Railwatb 



JoJtF 



AngiHt 



Oetober 



NofODBbcr 



Rapid TiAiniT 
Intcrborough Rai»d Tnnmi 

SubwBy (fiviaaii 

Eleratod (firiaioii 

New York Conaolidatod, ReoeiTer . 
Hudflon A Manhattaa 



iS,8S4»4S8 

6,340.107 

4.506.S8O 

744.784 



7,185.108 

5.858,-^* 

4,130.818 

7fi3,118 



7.870.ff74 

8.101.741 

4.321.088 

741.160 



i5.M0.Mf 
7.687.708 
6.383.888 
4,807.842 
800.680 



15.tiP.780 

7,m.4S4 

6.038 J88 

4.488.644 

764.046 



Total.. 



10.106.503 



17.866.630 18.584.670 10.168.164 



18.608.388 



MAMHAnuf AMB Bronx Subtaci 

Third Avenue 

Belt Line 

Dnr Dock, E. B'lvay dr B 

42d8t.Maak.A8t.N.ATe 

Mid^Voatown (to Amq, 9,'t9) 

New York City bterborough 

Peiham Pk. & C. I. (to iinff. P, 'IP) 

SoothemBouleTwd 

Union 

Wertchester Efeetrie 

8d Ave. BVBtem in dty 

Brookhm and North RiTer (to Oct 5. '/P). . 

Seoond ATenne. Reoenrer 

New York Bailwuyi, Recetrer 

^th Ave. Unm Amq. i/19) 

J^th Art, (from OeL 1*19) 

N.Y.&HtfUm(/h»iF«6./.'P0) 



411.063 

06.863 

110.606 

382.484 

18.038 

168.543 

7.148 

57.704 

615.788 

166.305 

1,837,907 

50.734 

178,641 

2.104.157 



407.706 

70.108 

111.436 

384,331 

8.087 

167. 

1.778 

68.380 

631.070 

168, 

l,m»991 

60.478 

178.738 

1.007,606 

261.864 



868.636 

71.646 

104.006 

210.820 



863.846 

72. 

111.868 

234.632 



838,791 

70.471 

106.051 

215.026 



161.751 



168.285 156.601 



58.1 

640.288 

147.^ 

l,eet,4S9 

57.062 

160.120 

1,805.766 

261.720 



64.686 

568.826 

160.278 

i,689,e07 

7.404 

178.085 

1,726.185 

358.628 

127.416 



56.637 

588.829 

146.033 

1,690,899 



178.293 

1.607.904 

261.085 

186.610 



Total.. 



4.270.420 



4.252.861 



4.046.146 



8.968.170 



8.790.431 



BtooWya a^ (from Odt.l9,*19) 

BtdoM^ Hedtthtflf R^Difter 

Bndfie O^wsthiK • 

Brookbii, QuntiB Co. & Bub., Reoeirer 

Cgucy liknd 4 Brwl; b n. RMaver 

Cffiuy Lttiuid k GnvE»eiid 

Nanmt Eluctric, Rwcivcf 

6faiith BriiokJyti 

Br^iUy'ii Rapid Transit MirfiMe. 

Biiah Terminil , , 

ManJnttaD BridgD 34^«at line 

Marine" 

Van Brunt St. k &ie Basin 

Other Brooklyn surfaoe 

New York A Queens County 

Long Isbnd Eaeetrio 

New York &Laig Island 

Ocean Eleetrie 

New York k North Shore (to May 8, '80) 

Manhattan k Queens. Reoorers 

Other Queens surfaoe 



2.884.661 

56.603 

446.830 

685.604 

34.888 

1.687,084 

125,460 

6,119,908 



3.051.160 

60.066 

307.053 

512.883 

37.663 

1.850.684 

111.314 

4,810,669 



36,449 

4,997 

19,074 

80,680 

401,066 
72.154 

141.878 
61,834 
46,521 
80,037 

808,010 



87.197 
4.007 
21.110 
88,818 

408.031 
76.361 

140.868 
60.680 
48.022 
80.648 

811,089 



2.231.506 
54.546 

426.486 

609.570 

20.888 

1.460.178 

86.604 

4,778,187 

1.544 

85.000 

4.007 

22.248 

88,888 

371,701 

74.084 

187.766 

48.817 

48.706 

76.601 

768,686 



005.078 

1.868.638 

57,874 

430.337 

480.840 

16.006 

1.432.842 

40.730 

4J86,887 

2.858 

44.785 

2.400 

21.611 

71,168 

870.817 

75.648 

186.036 

87.660 

40.636 

77.415 

747,408 



2.068.863 

11.778 

56.854 

416.010 

468.053 

16.145 

1.358.203 

45.314 

4,491,619 

8.123 

44.677 

2.499 

17.601 

08,800 

834.068 

73.549 

130.761 

85.403 

47.775 

n.817 

898,968 



Total. 



5.088.488 



6.884.011 



5.060.576 



5.554.806 



5.101.273 



RiOBMONn SUKTAOB 

Riohmond Lkht 4( R. R.. Reoeiver. 
Staten IslandMidland, Reoeirer. . . . 
SouthfieldBeaoh 



182,070 

178.787 

6.066 



132,418 

180,686 

6.100 



125,228 

161.076 

6,077 



125.265 

125.880 

516 



116.030 
115.814 
(») 



Total 

Total, street-florfiaoe lines . 
Grand total 



816.923 



810,247 



282.281 



251.610 



831.744 



10,670,700 



9,056,619 



9.934.001 



0.789.176 



0.833.437 



29.706.292 



27,822,148 



28,468.571 



28.047.880 



27.725.806 



u Estimated. See note 3 on first double-page of Table V . Diviaion by montha made on bm 
of twioe the number of active car miles in July. August. September and June aa in the other months. 
For other footnotes, see first double-page of this table. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



352 



PuBUc Service CoifMissioN — First District 



TABLE Vn. Traillc itatistics — ctr and passancer moTement 



OnSlU-n^Q ^TftllT RtJLWATB 



July 



Aufdii 



SrpUsmhif Oolober NovbbiIh^ 



TUmi TuAMtT 
InterboTDikeb ^jdd l>viii(. - 

Subwuy diyinoij ,..,... 

dllevrnted diviaioD. ........ ^ . 

New York CoiunUdited, Receiver . 
Hudioii k Mvntiattpii 



ess AW, m 
290.52^.130 



Total. 



I.OiB,|04,fiad 



Manhattu! aitd Bxohx SmrA€f 

Third Avenue . . . , ,.*.-..... 

BpULine , ....... 

Dry rtodc. E. B'witf St B 



Dry [J«k. K. amy * B , . . . 

43d St.p Maab. & ^ K Ath . . ., 

Mid-Oro«town fl^ ^vp. i*. "i^K , ,, , - ...* 

N<?w Yorlc City [mterbofougn . , . 

Pdb™ Pk. A C. 1. {to Avff. 9, rt0) 

lathers Btmlevmni ..... 

Vaiaa , * ^ ...... . 

Wcstcheskir Elecuio 

Zd Are. ty^tem in citj. . .,^, 
Brualdyn uid North River Uo (kL S, '10) . 

^^cond ATcmie, Recdver 

New Yttfi lUilwBys. BcctiTer , . , 

Kighth Avt [from Aug / /Ifi) 

Ninth Ave. (/rem (M. i, 'IB) , 

N. Y. * Hirlem {from rob. 1. 'M) 



2ap9SS,Oi2 
2,M«,B22 
3, Ml. 631 

lt,4?0,«Z3 

312,672 

S>DaD»21? 

ISS.S4S 

3,101,804 

30.558,08/ 
a,314,1]» 

2,200,088 
9.761,719 
88,775,022 



ToUl 



leg, 905, 721 



Brookltk kkh Qitiehi! Sdor^Oi 
BrookJyn City (/rom OJ. Iff/ J^} ,.-,.., . 

BrookJj-n UeigfaLt, Receiver 

Bridipe'UpeniUna* ^^.-.... 

fik^yiL^QtK^EiB €q. 1 Risb., Reeavef 

Qoaey lund ^ Brooklyn. Ewcfvor, , , _ 

CaD«r Idand A: GrBV«94!Qii . . , 

Nasuti Ebctrk. Rrceivtr ...» , , 

South Brooklyn . 

Brooklyn REpid Tnoynt Aurfuc, 
Bunb Terminal .........,...,..,,,...,.... 

Mouhattan Bridge S-wnt Line r . 

Maritie ' - 

Van Brunt iSt, A Eric Buqn . . , , , 

0(ber Brooitljrn aorEiiDC- 

New Vurk db Queeni County , . 

Lung [nhLod Electrit ....,,......_.. 

Ntw Yofk 3t Lcng JiJaiid , , , , 

CJwan E.liM'triD ,,,,,, 

Nrw York Jl Norl-h ?(inre (to flfav 5, '*0) 
Niftiihi^ttaii & CJjiipfus, Kecrivcrfl. 

Other Quociu ffurraoc. ...... 



ToEal 



RiCFlSIO.ND SuliFACIl 

Richnkjond Li);h^ di K. R. , Receiver . 
Stattm Inland ^li[lluld, Rec«LV«f .. , . 
Sa Lit Wield Br»ch , _ 



Tolil , 

Tot&t itre^t-fforfice Unei . . 
Grand lotaT 



120,010,915 

I, 983,012 

20.209,012 

34,813,004 

2. 186.284 

80,7«1,317 

7. 124. 852 

H77,fliJ,4*ff 



1,749,683 

119,635 

9fl3,KC 

i^SMS, m 

lfl»773,890 

3,Q0e,57Si 

6,»64,257 

3,206.743 

^,233,008 

4,241,921 



306.269,081 



6,SS9,6^ 

7,488,692 

273,001 



14,650,088 



£10,915,790 



1,559,020,358 



371,030,039 

281,184,0(10 

286.352,788 

S3, 093, 190 



€7S,15S.0I6 
383.272,448 
292,883.568 
301.301.89Q 
32,610.909 



399,765.518 
300.618,384 
307.112.893 
35,633,715 



110,977, 1« 

319.2l4,2Si 
33.ft57.45S 



971,660,014 



1,010,068,901 



1,043. S20, MO 



1,014,107, ISO 



20,830,311 
2,574,804 
3,71?7,714 

11,576,850 

74,688 

a,0i5,960 

46, ;L38 

3,123,883 

31, 770. (^ 
8,351,640 

lfO,l5i,&Si 
2.200,501 
9,720,258 

n, 704.976 
9,427,104; 



18,535,102 
2.626.523 
3,491,35S 

10,396,939 



18,046.159' 
2,«81,768 
3,740,787 

11.064,006 



17.277, 2S1 
?,5ftt,7ft& 
3,509.7^ 

io«6eo,7M 



7, 486, £21 



7,323,75a 



7,003 « 576 



2,607,723 
20,23^,578 
7,133,250 

2,122,034 
10.995.294 
77,603,3S6 

9.122.244 



3. 161, MO 
25, no. ISO 

6.ou,m 

273,914 
9,679. «7 
70,129,893 
9,310,433 
i,«80,f76 



34,iM,«7B 



6,400, 8«3 

B4,38t,SSt5 

9,10».|]00 

4,fl«,390 



189.164,403 



171, 646. 945 



170,8IS,SIZ 



U<»,Si,333 



106,778,645 
1.770,918 
17,953,090 
30.440,544 
1,765,965 
70,836,420 
0,340,413 



1,785,456 
119,930 
1,055,950 
i,9et .Hi 
16,865,018 
3,887,262 
6,164,824 
2.939.046 
2,948,256 
4,269.044 



374,339,824 



6,S90,0aS 

7,838,381 

:;78,677 



14,797.440 



478,321,675 



1,449,981,086 



169,634.924 
1,943,004 
18.665,^60 
28.311.856 
1J95,3Q1 
72,619,814 
4,509,032 

01 .753 
1,684,752 
119,936 
1,113.150 
S.97S.SSO 
15.536,710 
3.514.574 
0,222,904 
2.(23.930 
2,337,888 
46.50,853 



273,714,838 



6,344,889 

6,761,193 

228. 0S3 



13,331.115 



1,475,763,799 



36,202.170 
57,111,140 
2,044,964 
17.613, 
18,106, 

520,185 

56,642, m 

1.011,130 

190J6GMS 

04," 

2.140, 

59 

15, 468, 436 
2,613,788 
6.074/"" 
1,730,775 
2,377.738 
4,025.5ar 



2,0^7,7:- I 
17,0il0.23il 
l6«41O,0Qa 
47».M9 
6l,7ii»t55 

l,«».il0 

84,930 

;,I44,4»6 

a9,99.> 

455, 02d 

tJU.ift 

1,518.104 
6,740,000 
1,7^,441 
S,l8S«iCV 

3,n9,aoi 



225.513,8^ 



IM,I53 ^^ 



5.593,4 

4,745,601 

23,174 



10,361,803 



404,093,039 



1,430, 014,474 



»,0M,f83 
4,174. QESV 



S,|A0,n9 



367,010,713 



1,3^1,397,^ 



^ Estimated. See note 13 on second double-pase of Table 
For other footnotes, see first double-page of this table. 



V. Division by months made on basis 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



354 



Public Service Commission — First District 



' TABLE Vn. Trmfflc statistics — car and passaagar 



Opbrattno Siuut Railwatb 



1 I 

July August I September 



October 



Nofrmbcr 



Rapid Tkanbit 
Interborofugh Rapid TVinnt 

Subway oivincm 

Elevated diviakm 

New York Conaolidated. Reeehrer. 
Hudson it Manhattan 



7.741.326 

6,421.790 

4,670.590 

761.822 



tSJRt,080 
7,263.538 
6.028.64:b 
4.184.504 
769.345 



lSje7,878 
7,492,170 
6.275.708 
4,390.216 
758.655 



7.819,139 

6.450.031 

4.474.637 

829.289 



15.«7.574 

7.446.481 

6.001,093 

4.554,813 

781.618 



Total. 



19,595.528 



18,235.929 



18.916.749 



19.573.096 



18.874.Q(» 



MimUTTAJt LUD BnONX SXTRTAOl 

Tbird Avcmie 

Bolt litii? 

Dtv T'kKk, E. B'way A B 

42d St. , Manh. k St. N. Ave 

Mid-Trowtowii i> Au^. 9. '19) 

New York Chy Intefborou^ 

Pelham i ark i Citr laJaml (to Aug. 9, '19). 

Soutberii BotilEVonJ 

IMon 

Wc^kit Alef Eleciric . 

3d Aye. system in city 

Brooklyn it North Riyer {to Od. 6, '19) .... 

Second Avenue. Receiver 

New York Railways, Receiver 

Eighth Avenue \Jrim Avg. 1, '19) 

Ninth Avenue ijrom Od.1,'19) 

N. Y. k Harlem (from Feb.l/tO'^ 



Total. 



Brookltn and Qusknb Sdrtaoi 

Brooklyn Citjr (from Od. 19,'19) 

Brooklyn Heights. Receiver 

Bridge Operating* 

Bldyn. Queens Co. A Sub., Receiver 

Coney Island & Brooklyn, Receiver 

Coney Island ± Gravesend 

Nassau Electric, Receiver 

South Brooklyn 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit surface . 

Bush Terminal . .' 

Manhattan Bridge 3-Cent Line 

Marine" 

Van Brunt St. A Erie Basin 

Other Brooklyn surface 

New York A Queens County 

Long Island Electric 

New York it Long Island 

Ocean Electric 

New York A North Shore (to May S, 'iO) 

Manhattan A Queens. Receivers 

Other Queens surface 



Total. 



RlCnMOTO) SURFAOa 

Richmond Lii^t A R. R., Receiver . 
Staten IslanoMidland, Itsceiver . . . 
Southfield Beach 



Total 

Total, street^irface lines. 
Grand total 



412.731 

65.380 
112.563 
235.077 

13,028 

172,308 

7.148 

58.887 
624.252 
159,962 
,861,836 

64.819 
180.245 
,223.320 



4.329.720 



i, 361, 177 

58.738 

452,442 

586.065 

34.338 

1.550,098 

154.656 

6,187,614 

1.013 

36.497 

4.997 

19.074 

61,681 

414.962 

73.493 

149.061 

62.611 

46.712 

81.152 

827,991 



409.580 

70.219 

112,932 

236.793 

3.087 

171.498 

1,774 

59.467 

640.-320 

161.807 

1,867,477 

64.580 

180.461 

1,933.400 

264,122 



364.826 

71.656 

105.170 

213.262 



8&5,313 

72.952 

112.511 

227,116 



338.926 

70.471 

106.057 

218,305 



165.396 



167.276 



160.009 



4.310.040 



6.077.086 



132.205 

179.214 

6.066 



317.485 



10,724.291 



3 0.819,819 



2.062,703 

52.636 

403.467 

513.391 

27.652 

1.369.860 

137.165 

4,666,874 

1.031 

37,248 

4,997 

21,119 

64,696 

416.884 

/7.641 

148.706 

61.290 

49.152 

81.452 

836, m 



5.466.394 



132.419 

180.822 

6,199 



819.440 



10.095.874 



28.331,803 



54.980 

556,672 

150.718 

i,68i,680 

61.754 

170,620 

1.917,736 

264,099 



55.505 

567.175 

153,532 

1,711,380 

8,082 

175.614 

1.745.901 

260. R91 

127.416 



57.450 

546.110 

150.311 

1,660,6^8 



4.096.889 



2.242.942 

57.298 

432.109 

509.611 

20.338 

1,460.475 

116,966 

4,839,799 

2.605 

35.146 

4.907 

22.243 

64,991 

383.594 

76,675 

146.238 

44.507 

48.882 

77,422 

777,318 



5.682,108 



125.244 

152.170 

5.077 



282.491 



10.061,488 



28.978.237 



4.029.284 



920.448 

1,359.481 

60,788 

436.175 

489.849 

16.995 

1,446.356 

83.632 

4f81S,7t4 

8.655 

44.846 

2.499 

21.511 

7t,Sll 

381.418 

76.962 

144,333 

38.075 

49.718 

78.012 

768,613 



5.654.748 



125.272 

125.830 

515 



251,617 



9.935.649 



29,508,745 



174.709 

1.615.643 

263.279 

136.510 



3.840.799 



2.079,688 

11.778 

60,616 

421.378 

469.042 

16.145 

1,374.228 

74,975 

4,607,860 

3,248 

44.736 

2.499 

17.501 

((7,984 

345.523 

74.771 

137.665 

35,928 

47,951 

71,880 

713,688 



5,289.522 



115.933 
115.828 



231,761 



0.362.062 



28.236.087 



u See note 11, Division £. 



For other notes, see first double-page of this table. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



356 Public Sbbvige Commission — Ptrst District ] 

TABLB Vm. TRAFFIC STATISTICS: CAR AIQ 



Ombaomq Simr RuLWAn 

AND RoUfli 



of route 
(miles)! 



Aver- 



ofoue 
perdey* 



Recohr 



yw» 



Garmilee 
otregniar 




B^dtf 



(Ktm 
aadidk) 



bRBBOBOUOB RaRD TiARBIT 

EkT»ted difuion 

Seeond ATemie eknreted* , 

Third aTenue elevsted * , 

Sxth ftTenue devated , 

Ninth ayenne elevated 

OuDway (uviBon 

Weet Bide line 

East Side line 

Grand Centnl ihuttle 

White Flaine road iobway 

Qnewaboro linea 

Total 

Nnw YoBK CoNBOUDAnD, Rnovm 

Bricfaton Beadi 

Broadway, (B^dyn) — Chamben etreet. . . 
Broadway ^VyiO — TCTngtnn avenue. . 

Canarae 

CuWer 

Fifth aTenoe— Bay Ridge 

Fnlton street 

Myrtle aTenoe — Park row 

Myrtle avenue— Chamben etreet 

Broadway (Manhattan) 

Fourth avenue— Sea Beaeh 

Fourth avenue — Seth Street 

Weet End— Fourth avenue 

Total 

HuseoN AMD Mameatian 

Hbboken-SSditreet 

Ciortlandt- Hbboken 

drove itreet — 33d etreet 

Summit avenue— 88d etreet 

Summit avenue — Ovtbndt etreet 

Total 



12.17 

18.12 

18.61 

10.14 

11.08 

7.88 

11.87 

7.54 

7.25 

5.63 

16.19 

8.08 

16.70 



8.58 
2.06 
4.40 
5.79 
8.24 



t,798 
876 
777 
372 
878 

t.too 

722 

700 

•9 

14 

55 



n8.804 

1.827.678 

772.081 

080.437 

1.601,158 

1.804.814 

524.125 

112.848 

270.001 



71J40M7 

M2.757.708 

« 80.050,646 

16.290.766 

12.681.882 

91,788,502 

47,345.888 

89.840.791 

461.190 

054,202 

3.186.546 



S,44S,89S 

•612.-^ 

« 1.442.482 

782.388 

606.333 

4,778,005 

2,461.983 

2.0n.731 

28.988 

49.619 

165.700 



4.8U.# 

>907,18 

'i.UUtSi 

i.iu.n 

i,lS9M 

2.170,if 
MM 

i89.ttl 



3.296 



8.140.886 



163.528.609 



8.216.628 



10,035.01) 



152 

143 
60 

147 
52 
26 

156 
55 
85 
74 

100 
60 
99 



219.006 
423.296 
978.682 
288.484 
215.781 
653.210 
440,676 
182.737 
679.164 
466.807 
372.916 
471.883 



6.554.905 
2.565.689 
4.869.687 
7,080.416 
2.650.789 
1.288.768 
6.402.819 
2.889.588 
1.296.100 
8.580.564 
6.681.616 
2.990,112 
6.191.608 



342.028 
139.786 
263.958 
575.063 
146.671 

69.888 
324.483 
154,260 

95.227 
822.251 
502.340 
260.110 
557.200 



467.efl 
214,» 
».M 
549.75: 
210.0U 
112.7S 
5K.« 
242.3n 
99.4« 
tSOM 

st.ni 
aos.oM 

3tt.MQ 



1.199 



5.960.715 



54.094.450 



3.851.719 



4.051.20 



27 
85 
24 
40 
31 



237.191 
804,889 
15.058 
280.108 
838.461 



1.674.566 
1,804.060 
148.687 
3.193.128 
2.169.364 



73.681 
79.418 
6.318 
140,497 
96.462 



110.90 
99.6C 
8,918 

182.068 

e.64i 



167 



1.176,692 



8.985,695 



493,977 



> Unleae otberwiae indioated. the length of route 
entered in the table is, in the case of several sub- 
routes, the longest one regularly operated. For 
the Interborougn. however, the length of route 
given is the one considered moet representative of 
the sub-routes. 

> Allowanoe is made for routes not operated the 
entire year by usin^ weighted averages whioh take 
into account duration of operation. The figures 
in brackets represent these aversges. 



•Includee 943.689 oar mil«. 45,292,272 cu- 
seat milee and 42.484 ear houn made by TUrd 
avenue trains over Second avenue line. 

* Does not include car miles, oar-aeat milea, or 
oar hours made over Second Avenue line. See 
notes. 

• Interchange of transfers at 149th street umI 
Third avenue is made between the Third AveBue 
El. and the east branch of the Lexington sTeoue 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbbet Railway Companibs 

M OVSMXIIT BT BOUTES^ i^o 



367 



^tlT«-or 


PAflaran 


TwkmnaB 


Bflvmoe 

and tnorfen 
eonUned 


PimoB 


Raovn 




Aiothtf 
thu6 
eento 


Nvnbv 
eoUeotod 


ponraiTO OAMor— 


AmooBt 


oar 
nfle 

(Ottti) 


Per 


AtJeak 


B^ 

•^ 


A»>- 

dated 
oom- 

IMlte 


Fofw 
agn 
aom- 


^:SS:1S 


9.818 

100,887 

00,087 

14.62. 

616,480 

616.400 


[/O.MO.«6f] 


67 
11 
10 
18 
17 
88 

28 




tf 


140.778.070 

123.874.289 

40.408.187 

698,008,888 

\ 601.068,861 

0.114.741 
18.900.041 


7.087,896 18 
0.107.814 08 
2.024.461 08 

80,899,777 06 

28,040.087 96 

806.787 06 
946.002 06 


86.7 
26.2 
28.4 
87.8 
10.0 
81.0 

82.0 

82.1 
29.7 


88.79 
8.99 


»:SI» 


•[10.900,288] 




2 
2 

2 
8 

6 


8.29 
6.M 


<i9.477.0ia 




2.82 


sas^sa9^i78 

66O.5aB.801 
•,114,741 


Ul,»09,084] 
} 1(11,209.0041 { 


6.87 
6.00 
6.72 


18.000.041 






4.96 










S64.4Q8.411 


730.090 


[22,176.816] 


-86 




12 


966,188.110 


847.740.848 61 


29.2 


84.70 


























8 
























8 






















t 



































































































1 


1 


































'176.782.C85 




M,008.720 


00 


7 


1 


'877.840.804 


'818,842,994 81 


84.6 


84.06 


























































__ 



































__ 




















•8S.34S.S40 


••60.902.487 










•02.260,880 


•86.807.834 80 


04.0 


811.70 















mbwmj or the Lenox Avenue branch of the Seventh 



•No report for 1020. Entry taken from 1919 

■QXXt. 

'Flgares eaooot be subdivided amonc routes, 
Miatkeeaeeo/aarmovementdata. Forthedistribu- 
tka of Iftiw igr stations, see Table IX. C. Total 
nemptM include •3,862.60 postroffiee 



• Ficurea cannot be aubdxvided by routea aa in 
the caae of car>nioventent data. 

• Conaiata of 7,480,001 at 6 centa, 20.861.420 at 
6.67, 27,088,090 at 7. 876.433 at 8.67, and 4,166.674 
at 10. 

^•Bepreaenta the number of stationa at which 
paaaencera maa t^anaf er from txaina (»)erated over 
one route to tnoae operated over another route, or 
from local to ezpreaa traina or vice veraa. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



iBLic Servicb CoBfMissiON ^ FmsT Distrk: 




■e nt I 



gitized by Google 



Street Railway Companies 

ii«nt by nmtM, ipao — Cootiiiiied 



359 



NuMBn OP 


PAMKOUi 


TBANsrau 


ReraDue 
oonbined 


PAMBNom Rbobrs 




AtoUMT 

UiMi5 
oenti 


Number 
eolketad 


Nmani or nAmrm 


Amount 


Per 

mUe 

(oante) 


Per 
£r 


At5eeDto 


Re- 
spond- 
ent 


Amo- 
etttad 
oom- 

PUUM 


For- 

dcn 
oom- 
xmmm 


33,505.041 
4.886,040 


•1.481.176 


4,054.339 
886.220 
516,298 
301,157 
128.628 


4 

2 

4 
4 
3 


10 
3 

1 
1 
1 




39.040,556 
5.772.260 
6.762,680 
2.430,745 
2.552.709 


81.718.065 54 
244.308 00 
318,319 10 
106,479 40 
121.304 05 


65.4 

68.2 
48.8 
463 
49.1 


84 68 

4 91 


6.246,882 




4 26 


2,129.588 




3 31 


2,424.061 




4 36 






•49,181,489 


1.481.176 


5,886.642 


17 


16 




•66,549.307 


•12.602.807 94 


60.9 


84 51 


6.888,539 
801,300 


10.171.784 


484.192 
97,6M 


2 

1 


3 

4 


5 
2 


16.994.515 
808,984 


8522.862 68 
40,065 00 


88.8 

83.1 


84 95 
1 32 








•7.186,613 


10,171.784 


531,876 


3 


7 


7 


•17.890.273 


•8562,766 83 


70.6 


84 14 


4.541.824 


(At t «-1 cetttt) 


831.381 
283.222 
314.391 


2 

4 
2 


1 
2 
3 


2 

1 

6 


6.363.305 
3,340,695 
4.025,517 


8227.091 20 
155.661 96 
185.556 30 


43.4 
48.4 

43.0 


82 76 


3.113.122 
3.711.126 


351 


838 
3 43 








711,362.669 


351 


1.868.994 


8 


6 


9 


* 12.732,014 


'8568.130 31 


44.5 


82 77 


12.211,121 


(AtSeM) 


2.430.547 

1.347,161 

627,097 

279.244 


3 

1 


6 
6 
2 
2 


2 


14.641,668 

20.622.502 

5.600,023 

1,055.013 


8610.556 05 

987.304 55 

248,646 30 

38.788 45 


97.6 
74.6 
55.8 
30.0 


85 81 


17.452.216 
4.972,986 


1,823,135 


634 
446 


775,769 




1 80 








* 35,402 ,273 


1.823.125 


4.684.049 


11 


16 


2 


•41.909.447 


•81,824.807 40 


74.7 


85 09 


94.989 




37.481 


,. 


7 




132.470 


84,749 45 


29.5 


81 43 








2,279,785 
5.432,002 
1.217.293 
1.083.185 
5,488.007 
63,516 


(At 4 0/^) 

22,090 

501.886 

141.001 

61.063 


853.579 
1,503.790 
159,554 
166.060 
1.788.972 
24.600 


4 
2 

5 

1 
2 


8 
10 
5 
5 

4 
1 




3.155.454 
7,437,678 
1.517.848 
1.310.317 
7,270.979 
78.116 


8114.872 85 

291.675 54 

66.604 69 

56.602 53 

274.100 35 

2,675 80 


29.4 
46.4 
35.8 
38.8 
68.7 
6.1 


83 95 

4 72 
312 
263 

5 09 




38 








> 15,541,460 


726.059 


4,496.545 


14 


33 


— 


"20.764.073 


u 8806, 115 81 


42.7 


83 94 



'Ezdudea 3.403 fares returned amounting to 
8170.15. 

•EzeludM 0,750 fares returned amounting to 
8487.05. 



• Discontinued Aug. 0, 1010. 
^•Exoludes 6.310 fares returned amounting to 
$315.95. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



360 Public Service Cohbossion — Fibst Dktbict 

TABLE vm. Tnfflc stetistfcs: Car and 



OPBUnNO SXREBT RaILWATB 
Ain> ROCIBB 



Length 
of route 
(imlee)^ 



Aver- 
age 



of oan 
per days 



Regular 



rtnpe 
during 
year 



Car miles 
(active) 
of regular 



Car^eat 

milei 

(active) 

01 regular 



cars 
(thouaanda) 



Pblham Pabk a Cttt Islakd * 
Storage-kiatteiy 

SomreiRN BOULKVAKD 

138th street and Third ave. to Pelham ave 

UmoN 

Boston road 

Westchester avenue 

177th street 

188th street 

Sedgwick avenue 

Fort Schuyler 

Morris avenue 

163d street crosstown , 

Fordham Height* 

iraiiainsbridM. 

Webster and white Plains avenue 

Jcnne avenue 

a07th street crosstown 

167th street crosstown , 

Clason point 

St. Ann B avenue— Harlem 

Pelham Bay Park 

Willis avenue and Bedford park 

Shuttle, 128th-188th streets 

Total 

WwrcBmvR Eucnuo 

Bedford park 

Fifth avenue and Mt Yemon 

Fifth avenue and 6th street 

Pelham Manor 

North Pelham 

East Main street 

North sbeet and Fifth avenue 

Beaehmont park 

Olen Island 

New Rochelle — Mt. Yemon 

New RoeheUe — 229th street 

Tuckahoe line 

Webster avenue and Hudson park 

NewRocheUe- Hudson park» 

BronzviUe • 

Conductor's shorts 

Tickets sold 

Total 

YomuiBB Railroad 
Getty Square — subway at 242d street. . . , 

Bbookltm a NomrH Rxvxr 
Mainfinea^ 

SaooMD AvsHVJ, RacnvBR 

Second avenue 

First svenue 

80th street 

Total 



2.89 



[1] 



(Aound) 
1,587 



8,926 



232 



6.81 



27 



(Round) 
62.601 



731,137 



30,766 



.6.07 
6.61 
4.20 
2.65 
4.79 
96 
1.74 
8.78 
2.16 
7.28 
8.72 
8.50 
2.40 
3.70 
3.21 
2.20 
1 

10.04 
.49 



(Round) 
51,788 
75.406 
65,622 
55.086 
15,730 
44,L54 
36,630 
50.431 
6,730 
15,417 
56.146 
24.055 
37,707 
46.907 
32,383 
29.600 
28.871 
56.678 
19.527 



525.087 
846.078 
550.409 
291.885 
151.669 

85.064 
127.438 
381.280 

29.083 
224.489 
979.112 
409.199 
180.996 
347.126 
207.865 
133.874 

67.572 
1.142.678 

45,762 



287 



748,863 



6,726.666 



4.82 
2.04 
2.13 
2.23 
3.39 
1.47 
2.07 
1.60 
1.77 
4 " 
6.45 
5.44 
2.77 
1.05 
5.40 



3 
2 
2 

4 
4 
3 
1 
3 
1 

10 
4 
2 



(Round) 
39.447 
25,615 

5.067 
12,270 
17.666 

2.685 
26.252 

8.477 
27.019 

1.719 

43.440 

19.709 

23.401 

829 

6,866 



368.811 

105.200 

21.824 

55,445 

121,001 

7.992 

109.862 

11.292 

96.318 

16.009 

562.522 

214.386 

130,362 

1,762 

73,686 



[49] 61 



265.482 



1.886,462 



2.60 



N.R. 



(Round) 
34,441 



191.996 



3.03 



[8J29 



(Round) 
80.541 



183.683 



7.73 
6.28 
0.56 



•40 



(Round) 
74.929 
67.124 
27.376 



1,009.403 
768.682 
30.669 



•77 



169.429 



1.798,604 



For notes 1 and 2 see first double-page of this 
Ubla. 
• Discontinued Aug. 9, 1019. 
«Exdudea 29.681 fans returned amounting 



26.(m 

42.044 

24,043 

11.864 

6.176 

3.702 

4.865 

17.000 

1.304 

9.160 

48.652 

18.741 

9.069 

17.712 

9.277 

6.201 

2.867 

58.282 

1.791 



318.184 



15.627 
4.470 

926 
2.264 
5.160 

323 
4.630 

439 
4.026 

624 
24.019 
9.178 
5.510 
95 
3.280 



80.571 



8.883 



45.790 

34.650 

1.043 



81.483 



to 11,476.66. 

• Operation begun Feb. 22. 1920. 

•Includes transportation of Letter Carriers, 
26.696 fares amounting to $1,279.80. and a credit 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbebt Railway Companies 

Bt by routM, zgao — Cootlttaed 



361 



NUMB»0F 


Pabsmom 


TBANBmS 1 


ReveDue 

PMNngon 

tSinSSn 

oombinad 


PAMUfon RioHPn 




At other 
tluui6 
eenti 


Nnmber 
eolketad 


Ninan Of TKAMBns 
ronm to o&m o»— 


Amount 


Per 

mile 
(oeDti) 


1^ 


At5oaiti 


Re- 


Amo- 
ebtod 
eam- 


eign 


61.113 












61.113 


82.655 65 


».6 


81 70 
















6,771.178 




2.617.358 




11 




8.288.586 


8288.568 90 


805 


88 75 








4.938.218 




1.876.778 

2.600.330 

2,456.969 
920.333 
199,676 
660.436 
406.011 

1.409.240 
39.420 
341.230 

2,358.033 
543.917 
772,463 

1,303.361 
487,466 
448.260 
3C4.738 

3.387.035 
270.805 


15 
7 
8 
3 
7 
1 
2 
6 
3 
3 
9 


6 
3 
5 

1 
3 




6.816.081 
9.559.802 
7.280.268 
8.621.991 

001.876 
1.479.282 
1.380.661 
5.566.321 

126.801 

896,717 
11.261.669 
1,876.927 
2.461.729 
5.259.562 
1.706.897 
1.341.016 

662.366 
17.613.602 

720.069 


8846,912 40 

848,463 10 

241,214 06 

180.082 90 

24.610 00 

41,442 30 

42.177 60 

207.854 06 

4.823 65 

27.774 36 

446.481 80 

66.660 60 

84,468 30 

197.810 06 

68.471 66 

44.688 80 

17.881 00 

711.828 85 

22.488 20 


47.0 
41.2 
43.8 
44.6 
16.2 
48.7 
33.1 
54.4 
14.9 
12.4 
45.6 
16.3 
46.7 
57.0 
30.6 
88.8 
26.7 
02.8 
49.1 


83 79 


0.960.068 




3 66 


4.824.290 




3 92 


2.601.668 




4 11 


482.200 




1 46 


828,846 




8 44 


843.650 




2 
8 
8 
2 
4 
5 
3 
2 
1 
1 




8 01 


4.147.081 




4 86 


86,471 




1 16 


556.487 




1 49 


8.900,686 




4 44 


1,338.010 




1 71 


1.089.266 




8 76 


8.056.201 




4 62 


1.260,481 




8 44 


802.766 




3 87 


347.680 




2 29 


14.226.607 




6 

1 




5 89 


440,764 




2 78 








«50.331.632 




20.798.976 


94 


61 




« 80.180.608 


« 82.966.681 60 


44.1 


83 94 








2.632.329 




831.827 

158.114 

28.710 

31.018 

124.520 

4.399 

141.065 

6.365 

180.004 

7.898 

747.628 

267.461 

289.000 

24,230 

74,063 


2 
3 

4 
3 
4 
2 
2 

1 

6 
7 
2 
2 
2 


1 
1 

1 


1 


2.964.156 

829.147 

144.183 

172.649 

718.368 

29.481 

934.446 

83.940 

861,883 

31.745 

5.007.719 

1.365.000 

1.267.903 

78.186 

642.140 

20»469 

72.463 


8131.616 46 
38.651 65 

6.778 66 

7.08155 
29.44190 

1.261 60 
89.668 06 

3.878 76 
34.066 46 

1.192 36 

213.004 55 

54.876 96 

48.946 16 

2.697 80 
23.878 86 

1.023 45 

8.623 15 


86.7 
31.9 
26.5 
12.8 
24.3 
15.7 
36.1 
84.8 
85.4 
7.4 
87.9 
26.6 
37.5 
154.0 
81.7 


83 80 


671.033 




2 46 


115.473 




2 10 


141.631 




91 


588.838 




2 


1 


1 76 


26.082 




97 


793.861 




i 

1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 


2 72 


77.576 




2 51 


681.829 




243 


23.847 




81 


4.260.091 




8 71 


1.007.589 




207 


078.903 




242 


53.956 




8 33 


467.477 




2 68 


20.460 




— 


— 


— 




72:463 




__ 








•12.720.540 




2.416.922 


43 


8 


13 


•15.137.462 


•8686.027 00 


33.7 


82 79 








2.817.848 




206.570 


N.R. 


N.R. 


N.R. 


s 3.088,418 


8140.802 40 


73.4 


86 84 








403.817 


>^iWi. 


932.165 




14 




•2.483.086 


•867.644 35 


31.4 


82 04 


0.156.547 

0.601.403 

18,196 


930.791 


290.440 

246.634 

11.167 


2 
3 
2 




3 
4 


10.170.887 

7.868.826 

29.868 


8479.684 08 

862.493 88 

909 80 


47.5 

47.8 

8.0 


83 36 
835 
17 












15,866.146 


1.666.682 


548,250 


7 




7 


18.069.078 


8842.927 76 


46.9 


83 29 



for 6.402 imret rctamed amounting to $320.10. 

> Operation discontinued Oct. 4. 1910. 

•Of thew. 3.468 were at 3 cents, and 272.- 
410 at 2|c 



• Figures of 1918 in absence of a return for 
1919 and 1920. 
!• Operation discontinued Sept. 22. 1919. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



^362 Public Sebvtcb Combobsion — First DisTRicr 

TABLB vm. TnlHc statisties: Car tad 



OnBAnra Smnr Ratlwatb 

AMD ROUIBB 



Nbw York Railwatb. RicnnR 

Lexinston avenue 

FourtA and Madison avenae ' 

Sxth and Amsterdam avenue* 

Sixth ave.. 50th St.. Corthndt St. Br." .... 

Broadway and CiihimbuR avenue * 

Broadway and 7th ave." 

Cohunbin and Lenox ave." 

Broadway and Amsterdam ave • 

Seventa ave. and Brooklyn" 

Eighth avenue" 

Ninth avenue • 

145th street 

116th street 

106th street «« 

86thstreetT 

53d street" 

34th street 

28d street 

14th street" 

8th street 

Canal street" 

Total, Electric — conduit .... 

Avenue C (storage-battery) * 

Sixib avenue ferry (storage-battery) » 

Spring and Ddancey sts.fstorage-batteiy) * 
Madison street (storage-hattery) " 

Total, Storage-battery 

Total — New York Railways 

ElOBTH AVSNTTB 

Eighth avenue" 

NiNIH AVINUB 

Ninth avenue'^ 

New York ft Hablbm 

Fourtii ft Madison avenue** 

86th street crosstown** 

Total 



Length 
of route 
(milea)« 



9.83 
9.14 
9.32 
5.27 
10.26 
5. 

4 58 
6.90 
5.87 
10.34 
4.12 

.89 
2.28 

.67 
1.72 

.34 
2.35 
244 
4 
2.26 

.65 

3.48 

.93 

2.29 

2.23 



10.267 



4.12 



8.400 
1.708 



Aver- 

nuober 
of cars 
per day* 



78 
1701119 



Il7l66 
46 
84 
67 
16 



m 



43 
74 
77 
[5119 
6 
15 

[111 19 
1 
30 
36 
76 
15 
1 



[57/ 
[2 

.a 

[S6 



[596] 947 



[64] 60 



[24] 32 



[3i] 82 
[7] 16 



[41] 98 



Regular 



car trips 
during 



Car miles 

(active) 

oil 



Car-seat 

miles 

(active) 

otr - 



(thooaanda) 



(ftoufi^ 

121.470 

107.234 

31.494 

102.314 

84.822' 

144,236' 

73.678 

28.286 

148.968 

11,415 

19.444 

127.149 

141.013 

28.431 

96.52L 

63.639 

171.160 

171,427 

258.572 

87.185 

15,102 

11.049 
3.489 
55.465 
20.797 
90,800 



2.064,361 



(Round) 
183.637 



{Rmnd) 
105.850 



(Bound) 
120.936 
60.789 



181.725 



2.637.827 

2.284.529 

541.111 

1.075.180 

733.556 

1.422.154 

670.835 

389.784 

1,546.436 

241.509 

166.136 

227.506 

632.178 

19.153 

329.609 

18,009 

808,587 

965.503 

2.126.916 

398.050 

20.130 

17Ji9,S?8 

74.200 

6.488 

134,375 

81.366 

996, 4S6 



17.546.313 



2.480.841 



958.973 



1,087,632 
178,047 



1,265.679 



100,624 

101.950 

20.796 

40.501 

37.304 

73.836 

29.866 

19.810 

54.417 

9.108 

5.640 

9.104 

23.615 

651 

11.210 

612 

30.466 

40.723 

85.051 

14.217 

564 

710,079 

2.301 

SOI 

4.166 

2.522 

9,190 



719.286 



83,588 



34.523 



44.665 
6.497 



51.162 



(aetiTe 
and idle) 



S59,9S0 

399.848 

79.003 

168.777 

110.580 

259.043 

82.302 

57,780 

230.783 

30.384 

25.647 

33.908 

85.816 

2,889 

48,625 

5.705 

127.749 

149.264 

326.246 

64.320 

3.517 

i,56IJ9S 

15.:il 

1.456 

33.612 

19.280 

e9.SS9 



For notea 1 and 2 see first double-page of this 
table. 

■ Unless otherwise specified. 

<The 7-qent fares referred to in several of the 
following notes represent 5-oent pansengers pur- 
ohasing 2-cent transfers. 

* Consists of free transfers collected and whole 
and portions of 2-oent transfers collected. 

•Of which 2.157.522 were at 7 cents and 4,589 
at II. 

7 Operation discontinued Feb. 1, 1920. 

* Of which 1.848,659 were at 7 cents and 3.039 
atli. 



2.630.754 



337.704 



182.011 



15:.888 
28.089 



178,977 



• Operation discontinued Oct. 1. 1919. 

i«Of which 581.580 wei« at 7 cento and 18.609 
at II. 

" Operation begun Ooi. 1. 1919. 

" Of which 1.879,438 were at 7 oento and 735 at 
1|. 

» Of which 382,441 were at 7 cento and 17.703 
at II. 

"Of 



at II, 

uConsii 
at 1.2. 



which 1,231.302 were at 7 cento and 495 
•naisto of 191,012 at 7 cento and 144.179 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbxbt Railway CJompanhs 



363 



t hf fovtot, igao -^ ContimMd 



Nmosi or 


PAHBMiai 


TftANims 


Revwnw 
oomfaiDed 


VAmnnm 


Rbobirb 




At Other 

thMl6 
OOltl 


NmnlMr 
ooUeeted 


mnanorisAmni 
MomTOoiBsor— 


Amoont 


■ P* 

(cmU) 


Fer 
ear 
hour 


At5oeiito 


^ 


A»>- Fof^ 
dated «igD 


20.648.378 
18.808,816 


(AiSemti)*} 

•3.840.186 

■2.881,940 

1*1,288.000 

"2.862.736 

»1.300.811 

M 1,401 .068 

u 835. 191 

» 286,642 

i>l,921,794 

••278,200 

•1236,888 

••318.034 

••662.980 

••4.047 

»466.283 


3,410.368 

3,361,668 

1.238,0M 

2,014.484 

048.810 

1.606.640 

U7.363 

620.198 

1.884.116 

632.7U 

404.806 

854.010 

1.437.722 

98 

1.515.370 

24.302 

2,410,780 

3,070.868 

3.460.008 

865.868 

6.192 

1.478 
315.460 
168.488 
884,4i8 


9 




1 


37.916.922 

25.137.423 

6.686.184 

13.493.683 

9.388.812 

18.054.578 

5.444.608 

4.634.060 

14.287.012 

2.050.107 

1.631,266 

1.768,101 

7,612.110 

5.061 

4.568.075 

41.767 

13,003.810 

15,705,547 

27.220,216 

3,925.744 

25.704 

505.157 

7.024 

1.386.049 

047.259 
8,988,889 


61.284.134 44 

1.106,066 11 

366.811 68 

501.866 89 

410.705 48 

882.356 37 

268.708 69 

206.036 82 

641,802 65 

110.630 39 

66.666 41 

77.064 78 

303.150 76 

94 36 

161.690 01 

873 25 

671.476 82 

684.296 11 

1.251,382 91 

171.389 88 

1.068 40 

8,998,841 81 

23,721 29 

294 96 

57,271 96 

41.287 41 

188,678 88 


46.8 

48.4 
40.1 
55.0 
56.0 
62.0 
38.6 
53.1 
41.5 
45.8 
30.5 
83.9 
48.0 

0.5 
49.1 

4.8 
71.1 
70.9 
58.8 
43.1 

5.8 
88.8 
82.0 

4.5 
42.6 
50.7 
41-8 


83 43 

3.60 


4,110.146 








3.36 


8.616.314 
7.184.101 


7 




1 


8.51 
8.71 


16.706,071 
4.873.164 
3.827,220 


7 
8 




1 

1 


3.41 
8.14 
3.58 


10.481.103 
2.048.116 


18 




1 


2.67 
3.64 


080.67^ 








2.66 


1.006.0M 


1 
8 






2.27 


6.411.399 
916 




» 


3.58 

.03 


2.682.422 
17,465 








3.33 


1 
4 

4 
8 
8 




1 
2 
2 

1 


.15 


8,601,969 
10,321,606 
20,688.186 

2.175.107 


••2.001,091 

••2.408.183 

••3.m.088 

••894.770 

••2.140 

ee,685,988 

••70.722 

••883 

•> 184.896 

•• 117,443 

875,946, 


4.47 
4.68. 
8.84 
2.66 


18.372 






0.80 


'^'iJS;Jg 


88 




18 


8.81 
1.56 


4W 








0.20 


886.682 


8 






1.70 


681.328 






2.14 


i.8f7,M8 


8 






1.78 










160.038.328 


27.060.034; 


30.127.860 


71 




12 


207.236.122 


89.118.417 13 


52.0 


63.47 


18.668,603 


'^"IS%' 


940,495 








20.411.407 


8949.176 80 


38.3 


83.81 












5.668.171 


(AtS.8e0U9) 1 
386,647 


10.608 




8 




5.074«426 


8808,101 14 


80.6 


82.22 


10.808.616 


1 


667,482 
360.000 


1 
1 




' 3 


10,860,007 
1,629.145 


8610,175 75 
63.454 30 


46.0 
35.6 


88.34 


l!260;066 




2.43 












11.478.601 




1.017.541 


2 




3 


12.490.142 


8673.680 05 


45.3 


63.21 









M Of whieh 174.380 wen at 7 oento. 

" Operation diaoontinued March 6, 1020. 

»Of wliieh 1,492.092 w«re at 7 oenta. 

**Operatioa diaoontinued Auguat 1. 1919. 

••Of whidh 9.102 were ai H oenta. 

•1 Of which 237.760 were at 7 oenta and 2,323 
atH. 

"At 7 oenta. 

•Conaiata of 424,668 at 7 oenta and 238,431 
at 1.2. 

••Operatkm begun March 7, 1930. 

••At 1.3 



••Operation diaoontinued March 6, 1930 and 
reaumed Mai>oh 7. 1920. 

•'Operation t^nporarily diaoontinued Dec^ 1. 
1919. 

•• Operation diaoontinued Sept. 21. 1919. 

••Operation diaoontinued Sept. 21, 1919 and 
reaumed Feb. 1, 1920. 

••Operation begun Auguat 1, 1919. 

" Operation begun October 1. 1919. 

•• Operation begun Feoruary 1, 1930 . 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



364 Public Sbbvigb Coioiibsion — Fnu9T Dibtbict 

TABLE Vm. Tinffle ttatisdcs: Cw and 



OpaRABira 9nB>r Railwatb 

AXD ROUIM 



of route 
(nilei)! 



munbflr 
ofean 
perd»y« 



Regular 



CarmUeB 

(eotiTe) 
ot regular 



Car^nt 

mileB 

(active 

01 regular 

eaia 

(thoOHIKlB) 



Regular 



(aetire 
and idle.) 



BROOII.TNCnTS 

Ayemw C 

Beraen Beaeh ShutUe 

BusDwiek avenue 

CUvary Cemetery 

Court street 

CroMtown 

^preaBHilb 

Fhtbuah avenue 

Flatbuah avenue shuttle 

Floahing avenue 

Fhiflhiog — Bidgeirood 

Fulton street 

Gates avenue 

Qrand street shuttle 

Qrand street 

Qrabam avenue 

Qreenpoint 

Hamilton avuiue 

Lorimer street 

Meeker avenue 

Myrtle avenue 

Nassau avenue 

Nostrand avenue 

Noatrand avenue shuttle 

Putnam avenue 

RiehmondHiU 

Sfarteenth avenue 

6ftth 8t~ Bay Ridge avenue. . . 
6ftth St— Fort Hamilton ave. . . 

Third avenue 

Tompkins avenue 

Unioaaven 
Park Slope 

Total 



.64 
1.81 
4.74 
1.41 
3.14 
9.07 
1.72 
8.68 

.84 

10.17 

8.18 

7.78 

6.89 

.96 
9.81 
6.59 
4.94 
4.10 
6.41 

.98 
6.78 
1.16 
7.67 
1.23 
7.32 
4.23 
1.22 
6.07 
8.47 
4.96 
6.41 
4.69 
1.56 



50.004 

85.706 
100,998 

47,846 
176,202 
196.192 

58.648 
804,942 

29.344 
128,363 
111,286 
180.864 
812.162 

26.383 
100.171 
214.953 

52.989 
183,888 
182.714 

59,450 
133,301 
123,536 
158,597 

87.576 
291.210 
149.291 

40.316 

06,505 
104.604 
121.116 
148,696 

91.150 

10,864 



32.188 

67.005 
480.810 

64.149 

512.408 

1.228,800 

06,802 
1.858.100 

29.472 

776,781 

670,086 

1,017.712 

1.494,004 

24.672 
661.313 
1.226.839 
222,574 
458.942 
641.636 

52.959 
545.027 
137.668 
779,325 

43.403 

1.429,471 

563.679 

48,205 
394,921 
226.594 
480,372 
650,992 
864.680 

44,854 



970 

2,084 
14.278 

1.984 
18,941 
50.088 

3.129 
85,631 
884 
33.086 
23,184 
40.048 
67.418 
746 
21.1 
46,815 

6.028 
15. 
21.707 

1.632 
20.584 

4,326 
36,663 

1.834 
61.417 
23.632 

1,445 
12.472 

7.227 
16.878 
80.889 
13,258 

2,146 



[5511797 



8.948,089 



17.270.887 



690.435 



4.968 

6.355 
56.343 
11.118 
69.145 
m.770 
13.546 
234.059 

4. 158 
92.376 
09.321 
137.879 
196,915 

4.678 
70.431 
173.121 
29.254 
59.873 
90.342 

8.970 
72.639 
25.050 
09,482 

4.930 
187.219 
56.970 

6.748 
41.096 
28,0S5 
63.200 
80.261 
56.415 

5.708 



2.238.43^ 



For notee 1 and 2 see first doubla-page of this 
Uble. 

• The Brooklyn City Railroad began operation 
Oct. 19. 1910, its property having been previously 



held under lease and operated by the Brooklyn 
Heights R. R. Co. 

«The Park Slope line is operated (operation 
beoun April 12, 1920) on the traoks of the Coney 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbbbt Railway Companies 

by roatM, ipao — ConfbiiMd 



365 



Nmam w 




TBAltBiaBS 


Revanie 

nStmSn 
oomfained 


pABin« 


RlOKRI 




Atotiicr 
thaaS 
oentB 


^SS 


HUHBm Of ntAiiBffm 
ponnsTOouaov— 


Amount 


Per 

ear 
mile 

(ceata) 


Per 
ear 
hoar 


At5eaiti 




a»>- 

dated 

OOOft- 


For- 

CtOf 

pufas 


140.306 


7,820 

80.906 

5.410 

89.570 

180.307 

15.093 

203.818 

7.864 

93.363 

113.391 

147.881 

331.334 

618 

138.507 

190.168 

6.696 

43.047 

145.481 

3.578 

04.680 

11.788 

108,010 

8.360 

340.187 

143.706 

1,380 

31.260 

19.548 

41.131 

158.987 

71.370 

4.080 


74.003 

07,417 
108,330 
1.841 
514.483 
671.876 
48 
976.060 

76.368 
804.381 
141.733 
311.196 
363.686 

36,840 
194.963 
713.936 
103,960 
325.168 
450.991 
321.583 

87.886 

1.118.089 

385.164 

40.507 
435.434 

15.147 

10 

3.040 

90.922 

31.446 

800.825 

180.444 

417 








381.534 

301.433 
3,673.470 

800.304 
5.808.137 
14.583,804 

480,149 
14,373,009 

186.853 
6.104.040 
8.560.470 
6.0fl0;739 
13.738.813 
81,077 
4.386.003 
13.337.636 

031,088 
4,790,877 
6,346.348 

441.161 
5.017.340 
3,308.813 
7.031.101 

137.806 
13,401.760 
6.084.640 

137.800 
1.017.881 

836.568 
3.409.361 
6.934.770 
3,147,008 

384,800 


87,008 40 

0,644 40 

171.474 84 

10.800 88 
308.040 07 
008.970 01 

33.086 40 
060.571 14 

6.367 17 
388,186 &9 

108.901 38 
414.619 38 
008.980 72 

3,881 48 
199.683 06 
631.800 14 

41.348 73 
337.874 70 
360.608 33 

10,937 39 
344,000 80 

08.807 80 

868.437 05 

4.190 16 

040.383 50 

360.000 66 

6.806 17 

80.100 98 

41,041 84 
173.608 18 
888,107 90 

140.902 38 
14.137 83 


38.9 
0.8 
89.8 
80.1 
61.6 
60.7 
34.0 
86.5 
18.3 
37.1 
36.3 
40.7 

80.3 
60.7 
18.6 
49.7 
44.7 
30.0 
44.9 
46.8 
46.0 
0.7 
46.3 
44.6 
14.3 
30.8 
18.1 
35.9 
43.6 
40.3 
31.5 


81 64 


120.190 






1.08 


3.377.342 
362.947 




1 


3.04 
1.74 


6.240ib00 


10 






3 61 


13.771.362 






8.90 


404.114 






1.75 


13.088,138 






3.88 


'ioeioai 






1.39 


6.708.370 






3.13 


8.312.468 
8,201.060 






3.44 






3.01 


13.388.904 






3.40 


45.319 






0.40 


3.914.483 






3.68 


12,318.422 






8.60 


621.517 






1.41 


4.681,087 






3.81 


6.043,870 






3.17 


317.001 






1.38 


4.8S5.8S6 






3.37 


il238!066 






3.48 


7^1 367 
70.013 




1 


3.00 
8.53 


12.780.189 






3.46 


4.n6,788 
136.470 






4.40 








1.03 


1.684.665 








1.06 


600,096 






1 


1.40 


3 436,685 


3 




3.78 


5.670.967 
3.805.288 




1 


3.63 
3.0O 


380.308 






3.48 












140.339.881 


3.710.837 


7.003.620 


86 





4 


160,930.334 


•87.108.396 10 


41.1 


88.17 



laland A Brookl<'zi, Brooklyn City and Naoeau 
Electrie, the pereentace of the traok mileaceof eaoh 
eompany uaed beins 38 yer oent, 34.2 per oent and 
27^ per oent roepeotively. The revennea and es- 



penaea are ahared by the oompaniea in thia pro- 
portion, aa are the operating data bereahown. 
I Indudea Poat Ofl9oe revenuea, $8399.24. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Public Sebvige Commibsion — Fibst Distbigt 



TABLB Vm. Tnmc ttatistfet: Cw and 






Lfngth 
ofraute 



AVH^ 

numlxir 



R«sukr 



oar tnpB 
during 



CiT miles* 



Cu-^ieat 
Biilea 

of rtgulm: 



Ef«tikr 



car liaiini 
ind idle J 



Bh£>ou.t» Hnaim, Rxobitiit ■ 

AvDiiue C *,.,,,... ^ H ,,.... . 

Bmfawiclc »Yetiue * * « . 

CkWmry Cflmoteiy * - ^ - ^ - , 

CoiPiF trect .., , 

i^fptimBWM 

Fmi^ nfitUf 

rUtbiufa ftvenne ibuttle ,...,.......,, 

Flti^limK ftvf nue 

Fliuhinx-Ktiickpj'bocko' >....,. 

Fluflhina-lUdeewood 

FqttD& itr«t „,_,.,.,., 

Gatn a¥«HJe. ..,...,.,... 

GitFfl pv«nyc"IVofpect pirl , 

Grmhrnto it^utie , 

Qrud itncl _....*..,.*,.,. 

Oreemjobi, 

Bamiftco ■renttift h .. ^ . «... . 

Larimer Btmt 

Meeker aveQui! 

MoalaKue street, ................... 

Myrtl« ivenu*, . ......... 

NtMSU MT«DU« - 

Hostnnd »venae 

Noitruid ATeoue ihatUo . - - 

Noitnrad ivenue-PtoBpact park ....... 

Tuia^m ivcnue 

Eicbmobd Hil I 

iixtoaitb KrtavK. ......... — ....... 

««ik ftiwt-Bty Ridge 

Wk ibfltft-Fort BmiUtiio iveniM , 

Thkd BTQiitie ..... 

Sftli Btreet^Fort Himilton svtum. .... 

Tompkiiu wenue , 

Tacpi>kiJie^i4lTcr. .................. 

Union hif^iie. 

Wjekoff ftTcnne — ................. 

Brooklyc Bridge" 

Total.. 

Wiffiamilmrg Bridge ...... 



10 
« 
7 
9 
7 
5 

« 
5 
5 

D 
7 
1 

10 
2 
5 
7 
3 
6 
4 
2 
% 

e 
s 

6 

»*1 



[10] 33 

tl]5 
[6123 
17 W 

mr 

(27]fli 

, [I]l 
1*140 

{3112 

K] IS 
riJ^ S3 

21 7i 



m 

[1QI33 

111? 

[181 02 

[em 

[8 27 

111? 

rj2e 

[112 
t6l22 



I 



23.32« 

43,ao» 

81,742 

25,504 
ISO. 744 

17, 

18.240 
8. 

4S; 

78,905 

104.2fln 

1^^ 

42,027 
J0.1ft3 
54.S71 
67,530 
23.78^1 
82.28ti 
flO.STfl 
44,912 
93,423 

UB.4% 
4SJ12 
51,393 
33,8«7 
4Jt.^ 
58,457 

a.l55 
68.728 

4.422 
32,052 

7,346 



17.W* 
247,101 

^,1I3& 
lB7,fl07 
M7,9iB' 

42,307 
S34.021 

14,500 
aiK314 

45,9^3 
255,661 
409.129 
655.281 
8.«^ 
SIU907 
298.993 
128.223 
195^408 
Ift4,317 

2L,166 

58.135 
325,027 

50.42S 
354,527 

25.335 
4. 
595.445 
177,443 
279.252 
15t,S49 

91, 358 

35,631 

tl.Odl 
272,948 

30.2«d 

176.088 

2.952 

121.121 



001 
11.147 

1.052 
]0,12» 
26.i47 

l.O 

48, 7W 

493 

15,B20 

2,535 

8,770 
2L,862 
38.341 
581 
25,275 
12.110 

4. 
10.660 

720 

1,54a 

15.171 

1.715 

15,700 

862 

217 

31,534 

9.3fl8 

11,053 

5.171 

3,050 

13.29L 

316 

13,092 

2.1M 

8.134 

4,012 



[2591 873 



1,851.250 



8,068,733 



m.ofis 



i.eo 



18 



445,418 



580.048 



3.03O 
31.60r> 

5.024 
26.29S 
72.940 

5.711 
07.26(1 

2,1S4 
35,. W3 

5.734 
22,377 
112.449 
81,205 

T,159 
68.239 
31,762 
10,563 
24,496 
41,894 

3.697 
10.^58 
42,005 

8,600 
44,198 

3,408 
747 
74.3^ 
19,256 
31.097 
15,882 
11.7i5 
30,074 

1,563 
32.352 

4,498 

24,300 

8S4 

17.623 



1,014,867 



13,107 



1 See note 1 on first double pace of this table. 

>FisureB in brackets represent the weighted 
ayerage of the oompany's and receiver's entries on 
a yearly basis. Figures not in brackets are the 
weighted average for the combined returns of the 
oompany and receiver for the time operated. 

•With the exception of the Montague Street 
route and the Brooklyn Bridge route, these data 
oover the period from July 1, 1919 to Oct. 19, 1919. 
at which date the Brooklyn City resumed operation 
of its own property. See note 3 on preceding 
double page. 

« Unless otherwise specified. 

• See note 4 on fourth double-page of this table. 

• Of these 90,827 were at 7 cenU. 



'Of 
•Of 

at 7. 
•Of 

at 7. 
»«0f 
»»0f 
"Of 
"Of 

at 7. 
"Of 

at 7. 
"Of 
"Of 
»'0f 



these 178,758 were at 7 cents. 

these 118,384 were at 1} cents, and 789,338 

these 32,156 were at 1| cents and 423,120 

these, 359,698 were at 7 cents. 

these, 47,621 were at 7 cents. 

these. 88,465 were at 7 cents. 

these, 51,056 were at 1} cenU and 502,391 

these. 34,175 were at 1} cents and 778.866 

these, 9,165 were at 7 cents, 
these, 839.430 were at 7 cento, 
these, 135,914 were at 7 cento. 



Digitized byV^OOQlC 



Stb£bt Railway Companies 

•, ipao — Continoed 



367 



NlTMBHiOr 


Pambigwis 


TRAMBnaa 






Revenue 

paaaeogera 

and traaaferB 

oombiDed 


pABBBiran Raonm 




At other 
thanO 
cents 


Number 
ooQeeted 


NUMBKB or nuLKBras 


Amount 


car 
mile 
(centa) 


Per 
ear 
nour 


At6e0iite 


Re- 
spond- 
ent 


AsKy. 
dated 
oom- 
panies 


For- 
eign 
oom- 
panie. 


105.388 

1.082.770 

174,443 


iAtSeefdt)*,* 

3,100 

• 125.010 

4,276 

M02,222 

■048.542 

7,370 

•530,885 

4,176 

>• 300, 674 

»»48,i00 

"117,004 

« 010.368 

M 880,708 

»11,054 

1*882,680 

" 178,883 

U04,664 

» 384,005 

••562.553 

1.002 

»841 

••481.060 

8,800 

••560,300 

3.485 

•« 3.013 

••622.502 

••45,240 

"108,396 

a 18,184 

5,141 

••330,074 

607 

•0 350,303 

» 27,400 

••156.400 

105 

••1,826,833 


85,186 
404,331 
108,181 
571.368 

1.773.468 
106.005 

1.852.672 

83,744 

841.544 

111.772 

823,114 

1.101.320 

1.604.105 
34,558 

1,764.431 
587.724 
215.514 
558.324 

1,133,001 
113,022 
108,600 

1,028,366 
471,271 

1.173,300 

34,668 

8.460 

027.060 

084,012 

463,060 

244,117 

138,678 

612,050 

8,636 

561,214 

53,749 

506.506 

3,377 


1 
23 

6 
15 
35 

7 
13 

2 
23 
24 

8 

20 
25 
22 
20 
15 
26 

6 
23 

2 
12 
29 

6 
22 

2 
17 
10 

7 
16 

4 

3 
15 

3 
16 
30 
27 

8 


4 

12 




103.764 
2,303.026 

286,000 
2,253.088 
6,645,453 

425,577 
6.062,445 

168,734 
3.050. /52 

431.104 
1,861,505 
4,870,330 
6,808,488 

103,176 
6.402.411 
2.241,386 

606,304 
2,460,996 
3,172,784 

221,188 

299,749 
3,641,825 

087,451 
3,386.047 
74,270 
35.487 
5,356,382 
1,865.073 
1.085,354 

801.503 

501.506 

2.420,266 

45.635 

2.460.827 

238.464 

1,660,314 

6,589 

1.826,833 


$5,305 10 

01.540 45 

8.850 43 

87.441 88 

254.623 40 

11.331 02 

261.367 00 

4.165 06 

117.484 84 

16.000 06 

53,118 07 

100,077 88 

273,177 67 

3,558 42 

247.823 42 

84.542 00 

25,568 84 

02.586 51 

111.110 63 

5,370 26 

0.546 57 

136.100 18 

25,631 02 

120,243 45 

1.030 40 

1.383 33 

220.238 68 

43.745 55 

77.300 74 

32.131 12 

18.038 68 

04,777 30 

1,838 01 

100,388 35 

0,307 61 

60,264 82 

156 70 

45,030 63 


20.0 
37.0 
38.6 
44 3 
40.2 
26.7 
31.3 
28.7 
37.7 
36.8 
20.8 
40.7 
41.7 
30.8 
48.4 
88.3 
10.0 
47.4 
37.8 
25.4 
16.4 
41.0 
50.8 
33.0 

7.6 
30.6 
38.6 
34.7 
.7.7 
21.2 
10.7 
40.2 
15.8 
36.8 
25.9 
84.2 

5.3 
37.0 


11 77 
200 
1 76 


1,400.406 
3,023.443 

222,103 

4.678.888 

80,814 

1,827,534 

271,123 

021,387 
3.060,048 
4.817,405 
50.664 
3.756.341 
1,474,770 

380.216 
1.618,007 
1.480,240 

100,204 


13 
37 

3 
20 

1 
22 
23 

2 
10 
22 
16 
22 
10 
23 

8 
20 


...... 

i 

i 

1 

i 


333 
3 40 
1 08 
260 

1 01 
3 30 

2 05 

2 37 

3 06 
336 
307 
3 63 

2 66 
1 54 

3 78 
265 
1 45 


100.200 

2.132.400 

507,281 


16 
21 


i 


87 
3 10 
3 08 


1.653,281 
37,117 


16 




272 

57 


23.114 

8.805.830 

834.012 

1.323,878 

030,202 

357,080 

1,470,342 

36.402 

1.540,410 

157,346 

1.006.300 

3,017 


18 

20 

3 

20 

7 

5 
18 
28 
18 

1 


i 

i 

i 


1 85 

308 

2 27 
242 
202 
1 58 

3 15 

1 18 
8 10 
200 
243 
18 

2 61 














47.154.530 


10,634.206 


21.564.322 


571 


501 





79,353,058 


"12,058,660 15 


36.7 


82 02 




{At n cenU,* 
••13.821,444 










13.821,444 


1231,570 06 


34.0 


82 78 
















"Of 
»Of 

at 7. 
••Of 
««Of 
••Of 

at 7. 
••Of 
"Of 
••Of 

at 7. 
••Of 
«»Of 

at 7. 
••Of 
••Of 

At 7. 



theae, 85,453 were at 7 centa. 

theae, 274,972 were at 3i centa and 93,964 

theae. 506,776 were at 7 oenta. 

theae. 272 were at 7 centa. 

theae. 39,239 were at 1} centa and 389,515 

theae, 519.215 were at 7 centa. 

theae. 2.756 were at 7 centa. 

theae, 39.394 were at 1} centa and 519.867 

theae. 16,062 were at 7 centa. 

theae, 31.343 were at 1} centa and 141,797 

these, 3,026 were at 7 oenta. 

theae. 26.813 were at 1| oenta and 284.712 



•• Of theae. 314.794 were at 7 oenta. 

•1 Of these, 17,781 were at 7 centa. 

•s Of these, 131,360 were at 7 cento. 

«• The Brookjvn Bridge local service is operated 
jointly by the Coney Island A Brooklvn, Brooklyn 
Heijghta and Nassau Electric: with the exception 
of lenisth of route data are here apportioned by 
theae companiea on the basis of 16 per cent, 60 per 
cent and 24 per cent reapectively. 

>< Represento entire length of route. 

•^ Of these. 1,773,078 were at 2^ cento. 

M Includes poet office revenue, 83,568.16. 

" See note 10 on first double-page of Table 
XIV, A. 

*• Of theae, 304,068 were at 2 centa. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



368 



Public Sebvicb Comubsion — First District 



TABLB vm. Tinffle statistics: Csr sad 



Onnunif a Smnr Railwatb 
AMD Romas 






Length 
of route 
(milee)! 



age 



of 
perdsy* 



Rogolar 

carteips 
dorins 



CarmileB 
laetivie) 
otragukr 



Csr-aeat 
miles 
(sctiTe) 
off 



(thoiModf) 



Rccnlar 



BsooKLTR, Qdsbrb Countt A Sub., Rsob. 

Broadway 

Bioadway feny ihuttle 



Motrapolitaii avenoe . 
Reida 



Utka svcnoe ahuttle . 
Wyokoff avenue. . 
Ralphs 



Total. 



Const Islaiid A Bsooxltn, RsoanrsR 

De Kalb avenue 

Ftanklin avenue 

Sknith street 

Fkrkdope» 

Brooklyn bridge » 



Total.. 



CoMST Island A Obatbssnd 
SesGate 



Nassau Elboibio, Rbcsivsb* 

Bergen street 

Chnreh avenue 

Eighth avenue 

nfteenth street 

Fif til avenue : 

Flatbush-Seventh avenue 

HiekB street SI 

Hoyt and &«kett streets 

New Lota avenue 

Ooean avenue 

Park avenue 

Ralph-Rockaway avenue 

Rogers avenue 

Seventh avenue 

69th street and 86th street* 

St. John's plaoe 

89th street-Coney Island 

Union street 

Yanderlxlt avenue 

West End surface 

WUson avenue (Hamburg avenue) 

Parkstope" 

Brooklyn bridge » 



Total. 



•8.00 
•.49 

•6.15 
0.34 
9.23 
4.61 
2.27 

•4.72 
1.42 



(SingU) 

226.375 

98.779 

153.493 

118.860 

208.110 

115.764 

18.218 

62.389 

22.492 



1,288.476 

81.395 

847.045 

701.950 

1.228.402 

445.740 

40,906 

241.511 

31.878 



61.346 

2.752 

35.052 

25.029 

58.970 

15,061 

1.415 

7.952 

1.010 



182 



1.018.480 4.907.312 



206.587 



16.77 

U.92 

13.00 

1.73 

•[1.141 



[171] 175 



3.18 



9.86 
6.39 
2.72 
2.71 
9.65 
3.74 

«0.87 
4.04 
1.74 
10.04 
6.24 
7.10 
6.45 
5.58 
3.76 
4.59 
7.54 
4.23 
5.32 
5.59 
9 
1.27 

"(1.141 



73 

34 

61 

1216 



429.319 

198.278 

351.287 

12.067 

28.795 



1.019.746 



46 

5 
10 
38 
26 
1315 

9 
10 
26 
22 
61 
29 
15 

4 
51 
17 
17 



37 

[1]6 



— [5271533 



83.752 



369.937 

225.186 

82.765 

90.160 

334.972 

221,790 

22.861 

75.272 

177,924 

154.968 

115.555 

282.535 

171.014 

90.399 

73.463 

438.999 

81.871 

112.286 

149.558 

107.445 

189,887 

8,829 

43.192 



3.620,863 



2.145,382 

1.188.206 

2,488,040 

49,839 

32,299 



99,446 

53,756 

107.063 

2,270 

1.070 



5.903.766 



263.595 



237,902 



11,173 



2.076.! 

1,891.946 
212.245 
236,755 

1,289,265 
657,479 
49.270 
303.042 
301.746 

1.140.410 
501,748 

1.868.925 
737.942 
404.570 
200,336 

1.532.084 
525,917 
463.034 
740.309 
463,131 

1,192.398 
36,461 
48.449 



16,373,757 



90.125 
58.628 

6.1 

7.636 
57.994 
28.578 

1.675 
10.029 
11.254 
54.622 
17.247 
88.950 
30.796 
14.799 

6. " 
77.794 
26.170 
20.718 
31.177 
14.851 
47.096 

1.859 

1,605 



706.920 



163.454 

14.314 

96.773 

75.613 

140.309 

63.909 

4.701 

35.074 

3.776 



596.013 



274.911 

185.413 

265.109 

6.3S9 

4.606 



686.408 



29.715 



359.898 

152.787 
37.264 
38.008 

173,513 

103.835 

7.219 

43.880 

36.960 

119.718 
73.689 

229.518 
96.818 
55.714 
28.041 

197.468 
54.983 
58.181 
03.540 
45.014 

144.183 
4.088 
7.060 



2.044,951 



For notes 1 and 2 see first double pace of this 
tabfe. . 

• See note 4 on fourth double page of this table. 

• Unless otherwise specified. 

• Indicated decrease from 1919 represents por- 
tion of route operatei over tracks of Brooklsm City 
Rd.Co. 

•Of these, 1.063,174 were at 7 cents. 
' Of these, 1, 756 were at 7 cents. 

• Of these. 39.656 were at 7 cents. 

• Of these 174.972 were at 7 cento. 
M Of these, 1.018.762 were at 7 cento. 
" Of these. 354.272 were at 7 cento, 
u Of these. 83,677 were at 7 cento. 

» Inoludes Post Office revenue. $2,775.63. 



u See note 2 on preceding double psce. 

u Of these. 67.028 were at 1| cento and 2.687.905 
at 7. 

M Of these. 1.201.755 were at 7 cento. 

" Of these. 49,880 were at 1| cents. 253.516 at 
3». and 1.518,443 at 7. 

» See note 4 on second preceding double p 

^* See note 33 on preceding double page. 

>o See note 34 on preceding double page. 

" Of these. 472,821 were at 2i cento. 

» Includes Post Office revenue. 02,785.47. 

» Of these. 139.340 were at 7 cento. 

M Includes Post Office revenue. $144.06. 

■Changes in figures for current srear due to 
re-routing. e£Fective October 19. 1919. . 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



StBBBT RaILWAT COKPANIIiS 



369 



» zgao — Continiiod 



NUMBSB OV 


PMnNoua 


T^umms 




1 


lUveme 

«£diri!S» 
canbined 


PAWfliron Raomra 




At other 
t&an5 

OQDti 


Number 
collected 


WMBMR Of IBAimnB 
POOmiOOABSOP — 


Amount 


P*r 

ev 
mile 

(centi) 


Per 
oar 
hour 


AtSeeDti 


Re- 


Amo- 
ebted 


Pofw 

eom- 
puie. 


8,961,206 

219,027 

6.164.880 


iAtSct^U)*,* 

•1.242,484 

'8.798 

•157.714 

•265.556 

M 1.202,431 

u 437.493 

4,598 

"58.464 

676 


2.471,044 
266,097 

1.399.462 
604.206 

2.000.625 

587.829 

135,717 

202,595 

26.559 


8 
5 
8 

7 
7 
6 

1 
6 


8 

4 


4 


12.674.786 

493.922 

7.7&2.065 

4.590,006 

10.545.065 

4.142.235 

140,431 

1.304.108 

56.904 


8527,861 88 

11.285 58 

314,562 11 

196.477 76 

443.923 46 

183.166 32 

5.143 74 

59.753 45 

1.503 73 


41.0 
13.9 
87.1 
28.0 
36.1 
41.1 
12.6 
24.7 
4.7 


18 28 
070 
3 85 


8,630,244 
7,842.009 
3.117.418 
100.116 
1,133,049 
29.660 


5 
14 
8 

1 
7 


'.'.'.'.'.'. 


260 
3 17 
2 91 
1 09 
1 70 
40 












30,097.624 


8.378.214 


7.783.634 


43 


47 


4 


41.859.472 


u 81.746.458 61 


35.6 


82 98 


16,617,353 

6,651,777 

14,422,607 

311.451 


(At Scents)* 

u 3.114. 121 

» 1.442,371 

"2,239,479 

4.538 

487.156 


3.798.722 

2.088.616 

3.299.806 

468 


3 

4 
4 


18 
16 
20 




23.530.196 

10.182.764 

19.961.894 

316.452 

487.156 


81.030,905 36 

423.930 18 

849,656 61 

15,706 60 

12,260 67 


48.1 
85.7 
84.1 
31.5 
37.9 


$8 75 
8 13 
320 
2 48 










2 61 














38.003,188 


7,287.665 


9,187.609 


11 


54 




64.478.461 


"82,335.235 88 


39.6 


83 40 


2,035,075 


(AtSeaUs)* 
"213.791 


310.611 




4 




2.559,477 


•« 8113.885 14 


47.9 


88 83 


13.713,707 

7.006,381 

924.299 


(AiSanU)* 

"2.049.788 

» 876. 637 

17.370 

"599.148 

"1.465,272 

"624.582 

"47,665 

••357.250 

44.111 

"1,019.957 

"449.005 

•'1.288.697 

"354,464 

"156,925 

15.627 

« 1,225,384 

« 90.740 

«289,546 

«• 964.835 

«344,242 

•1.011.878 

3.323 

« 730.733 


8.861.825 

5.941,953 
416.404 
303.800 

3.24/.640 
940,305 
65.646 
439.314 

1.619.510 

1,855.187 
439.058 

3.007.062 
933.265 
345.836 
310.981 

3,357,197 
266,270 
469.216 

1.045.288 
598.230 

2.414.016 


21 
10 
3 

tl 

10 
5 

11 
3 

12 
6 
8 

13 

13 


6 
6 




19,625.821 

13.824.971 
1,358.073 
1.932,026 

15,230.619 
7,681,221 
234,273 
1,627,698 
4.304.839 
7.766.368 
3,336.315 

17.283,581 

6,629,542 

2,602.792 

996,277 

18.506,202 
2,894,850 
3,364,457 
6.072.316 
2.470.006 

10.996.941 
231.172 
731.071 


1819.806 62 

406,800 60 

46,736 05 

80,115 30 

618,873 23 

338,299 32 

8.199 47 

115,074 80 

133,384 23 

308,749 47 

160,467 65 

730,425 93 

287.850 05 

114,981 98 

38.952 26 

772,860 63 

130,143 04 

148,450 93 

265.684 80 

98.838 56 

441,941 26 

11.492 14 

18.375 81 


919.5 
29.2 
22.0 
38.8 
48.0 
51.5 
16.6 
38.0 
44.2 
27.1 
300 
39.1 
39.0 
28.4 
16.9 
60.4 
24.7 
32.1 
35.9 
21.3 
87.1 
81.5 
37.9 


$3 15 
2 66 
1 71 


1.028,988 
10,517.707 
6.016.334 
120.963 
1,831,134 
2,641.218 


2 

4 
3 
1 
6 


1 


208 
3 59 
8 27 
1 14 
2.68 
8 61 


4.80O.224 
2.448.2S2 
12.987.802 
6.341.813 
2,100.081 
660.699 


10 

5 
3 




268 

204 
3 18 
2 97 
206 

1 47 


13.923.621 
2.537.840 


15 

5 
5 
8 
2 
8 


6 




3 91 
2 37 


2.605.695 
4,062.243 
1.587,534 


8 
8 




255 

284 
2 20 


7.571,048 
227,840 


7 




8 07 
2 48 




838 








2 61 












104.604.352 


14.027.180 


31.878.399 


182 


80 


1 


150.599.931 


« 86,090,259 57 


87.2 82 98 



" Of these, 1.816.665 were at 7 oento. 

•7 Of thew, 764.561 were at 7 cents. 

" Of these. 362.773 were at 3i cents and 223.191 
at 7. 

"Of these. 1.226.743 were at 7 cents. 

••Of these, 50.426 were at 1| oenU and 486.438 
at 7. 

•< Diaoontinued January 30. 1920. 

" Decrease due to elimination of portion operated 
by Brooklyn City Rd. Co. 

" Of these, 21,109 were at If cents, and 26,100 at 
7. 

"Of thsse. 320,016 were at 7 cents. 

" Of these, 840,080 were at 7 cents. 

"Of these, 27,339 wen at 1} oents and 373,732 
M7. 



•' Of these. 1.060.373 were at 7 cents. 

••Of these, 12.287 were at 1| cents and 267,233 
at 7. 

" Of t jese. 131 .817 were at 7 oenU. 

«• Discontinued June 1. 1920. 

^ Of these. 49.168 were at 1| cents and 1.014,341 
at 7. 

«> Of these, 13.221 were at 7 cents. 

• Of these 237.220 were at 7 cents. 

M Of these. 20.996 were at If cents, and 847.688 
at 7 cents. 

• Of these, 303,366 were at 7 cents. 

• Of these, 826.813 were at 7 oents. 
«' Of these. 700.231 were at 2^ oents. 

«• Includes Post Office zevenue, 88,747.44. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



370 Public Sbryigb Coiohssion — First District 

TiJBLB Vm. TMfflc atatiitks: Car «ad 



Opbatino SnuuT Railwatb 

AlTD RoTTTia 


Length 
of route 
(miles)' 


Avei^ 

am 

number 

of oars 

per day* 


Secular 

during 
year 


Carmilea 
passenger 


(th<S!SZul8) 


Secular 
paasenger^ 
ear hours 


Soun Bbookltn 
GraTeaend avoDue 


5.72 
1.83 
4.66 
M.67 
5.69 
5.68 


6 

11 

[ 3 32 

3 18 

720 

7 21 


iSinoU) 
46.386 
224.962 
37.490 
4.264 
12.319 
11.466 


263.890 
241.886 
123.917 
19.867 
70.381 
65.406 


8.769 
10.309 
6.961 
1.196 
4.564 
4.246 


23,161 


Norton's Point 


39.108 


Rdd arenae* 


8.931 


TompldnB — Cuhrar * 


1.493 


Unkm street* 


6,600 


Vanderbilt aruiue* 


5.437 






Total 




[471108 


336.877 


784.886 


36.026 


83.719 






BiTBH TBtmnAL > 
Seoond ave. & 28th at to First ave. 4 6l8t si 


1.69 


1 


{Rovnd) 
5.204 


16,494 


660 


5.245 


Mambattak Bkidoi 8-OJifT Una 
Ma>)hattap H<lgf 


2.01 


12 


(AwikO 
126.789 


508.946 


24.429 


60.321 






Makinb 

battery) 


1.36 


1 


(BotmJ) 
"14.698 


"39.97» 


ngSO 


>4 7.024 








1.39 


6 


{Bound) 
83.486 


283.169 


9.043 


29.018 






New Yobx d Qxmira Coumtt 


8.19 
9.60 
2.08 
4.73 
4.23 
6.39 
2.26 
2.98 
8.49 
8.18 
1.43 


27 

9 
4 
14 
2 
2 
1517 
[4 6 
5 


49.829 
27.436 
40.811 
28,406 
64.177 
26.914 
22.316 
29.657 
24.825 
66.196 


811.817 
716.012 
160.636 
356.786 
241.328 
622.667 
117.112 
116.026 
413.681 
351.084 
181.316 


34.920 
30,428 

6.106 
13.676 
10,082 
271266 

4.462 

4.460 
17.346 
14.743 

6.909 


79.816 


CoUegePoint 


00.889 


Ravenawood 


21.107 


GaWary. 


30.432 


Dutch Kilk 


28.708 


Btflinway .... 


72.638 


Braadway 


13.838 


Fhi8niiigavc>nie , , 


13.433 
42.949 


CoronaT. 


Jamaica 


37,893 


Jane street shuttle 


26.279 






Total 




[79184 


431.297 


4.067.251 


170.885 


446.020 






City line m Roekaway road 


8.66 
9.07 


7 
9 


(Round) 
26.367 
26.988 


451.278 
413,384 


16.892 
18.291 


46.896 
42.042 


Far'Rockaway 






Total 





16 


61.366 


864,662 


36,183 


87.037 




Naw York k Long Island 
Mincola A Brooklyn 


34.22 
9.64 
9.68 


26 
3 
3 


KSound) 
34.836 
12,972 
13.606 


1,084,301 
£20.678 
266.334 


48,267 
9.607 
11.023 


00 376 


Jericho tumirike 


18.486 
20.748 


Hempstead^ Jafflaiea 






Total 




32 


61.414 


1.660.213 


68.797 


138,008 





For notes 1 and 2 see first double page of this 
table. 

•Operation disoontinued October 17, 1919; 
reaumed May 29. 1920. 

* Operation disoontinued September 1, 1910. 

* Aa reported in 1919; respondent fails to report 
thia year. 

* Operation discontinued September 21. 1919; 
resumed May 29. 1920. 



1 1ncludes Post Office revenue. $448.90. 

• Operation of a ahorter route begun September 
26. 1919. 

• Unless otherwise specified. 
!• Includes 401.050 at 3 cents. 
11 From monthly report. 

» Estimated by multiplyinc 14.698 car tiipa 
reported in the June, 1920. monthly report by 2.72, 
the number of miles in a round trip. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



SntBirr Railway Companibs 



371 



PMMiit«rii» 


reanit by matm, igao — Coi 


itiaaad 














NUMBMOr 


PAflBBrans 


TBAMSmS 


ReYenue 
MSTfawSSra 


PAMUfon Rianra 




At other 
oenlB 


Namber 
ooUeetad 


mjMBMi orniifsm 
poiins TO ciBB or— 


Amount 


Per 

(oentB) 


Pff 

ear 
hour 


AtSomtB 


Re- 

Bpond- 

ent 


Amo. 
ebted 
oom- 
puiee 


For- 

dgn 
ooin- 
puie. 


782.889 
2.232.756 
923,952 
210.700 
488.386 
431,802 




67.161 
131.942 


1 
1 

1 






840,040 
2.364,697 
923.952 
210.700 
488,336 
431.802 


889.144 46 
111.637 81 
46.197 68 
10.535 00 
24,416 81 
21.565 OS 


14.9 
46.2 
87.3 
58.0 
84.7 
32.9 


81.60 








2.86 








5.17 










7 00 






1 
1 






4.36 










8 97 














5.069.984 




189.093 


5 






5.250.027 


'8268.945 01 


33.4 


88.08 












5.680 










5.680 


8118 60 


6.9 


80.02 
















'"At^.. 










9.507.749 


8289.708 52 


47.1 


83 97 














256,757 












256.757 


812.837 85 


32.1 


81.88 


















iAtScmtt)* 
tt5.192.130 


(») 






(») 


u 3.192,130 


8ffi..817 13 


35.5 


82.86 










3.898,320 




850.125 
811.870 
388.572 
353^084 
219.400 
893.880 
317,391 
203.394 
368.982 
496.662 
1.347.564 


6 

1 
4 
1 
6 
5 
6 
3 
6 
1 
2 






4.748.445 
4.186.781 
1.388.749 
2.579.972 
1,699.872 
6.630.677 
860,892 
673,198 
1,861,371 
2.347,753 
2.929.157 


$194,916 00 
166.245 55 
60.008 85 
111.340 90 
74,023 15 
236.839 40 
26.675 05 
23.490 20 
74.619 45 
92.554.55 
79.079 05 


24.0 
23.8 
31.2 
31.2 
30.7 
38.0 
22.8 
20.2 
18.0 
k6.4 
43.6 


82.44 


8.324.911 
1,000.177 








2 38 








2.87 


2.226,988 








J. 82 


1.480.463 
4.736.788 








2 67 








3 26 


533.501 








1.93 


460,804 
1.492,388 








1 75 








1.74 


1,851.001 








2.44 


1,581.603 


, 






3 01 








22,595,975 




6.250.882 


39 






28.846.867 


81,129.798 75 


27.6 


82.53 












2.419.500 




82.646 
78,702 


1 
1 






2.602.146 
3.233.135 


8120.975 00 
157.721 65 


26.8 
38.2 


$2 64 


8.154.483 








3 75 












5,573,983 




161.348 


2 






5.735.281 


8278.696 65 


32.2 


83 17 












6.535.401 


(At 10 c$nU) 
"561.620 
u 374.621 
» 345.525 


86,316 
17.955 
22.220 


2 

1 
1 






6.132.237 
1.667.603 
1,792,240 


8885.674 10 
84,722 40 
105.780 90 


81.0 
38.4 
41.4 


$3.38 


ii275!027 






4.58 


1.424.496 






5 10 








8.234.923 


1,281.766 


75,891 


4 






9,592.080 


8526.177 40 


33.7 


$3 80 










" Estimated on oar miles (see note 12 above) 
multiplied by 24. average number of car seats. 

u Estimated from monthly report figures on 
ratio of 1920 car tripe to 1919 oar trips. 

u Includes 881,261 joint-rate passengers at li 
oents. In addition, there were 13,605 joint-rate 
tickets sold (at 2 cents each) which wore not pre- 
sented. 

u Joint-rate tickets are intercbaDged between the 



Van Brunt Street A Erie Basin and the following 
B. R. T. companies: Coney Island A Brooklyn. 
Nassau and Brooklsm Heights. 

" Of these, 6.518 were at 25 cents; 16.187 at 20; 
123,878 at 15; 68,032 at 3|: and 23.960 at 2|. 

^*Ot these, 21 were at 15 cents; 235,160 at 3!; 
and 23.930 at 2}. 

^* Of these. 1 w^a at 25 cents; 4 were at 20; and 
62 at 15, 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



372 



Public Sbrvicb Coioobsion — Fibst District 

TABLE Vm. TMfflc atatistica: Car and 



OpnuTiNO SnoBR RAiLWJiTa 

AND ROUTBS 


Lsngth 
of route 
(miles)t 


Ayer- 

.Zbcr 
of oars 
perday« 


Regular 

durmg 
year 


Car miles 
.(active) 
of regular 
passenger 
ears 


Car-seat 
miles 

i» 

paaenger 

oars 
(thousands) 


Regular 

pasBogei^ 

car hours 

(actire 

and idle) 


OOBAN EUOTHO 

IVik aTenue 


7.066 

.380 

1.068 



1 

1 


7.203 
6.661 


435.041 
51.070 
11.830 


22.015 

2.203 

584 


47.114 
8.346 


Far Rockaway to beach* 


3.738 






Total 




11 


40,646 


407.050 


24.802 


« 50.108 






Naw ToBX A Noma SaoRa* 
Port WaahingtoD to Roajya 


3.00 
16.64 
6.66 
2.26 


1 
4 
1 
2 


(Rmmd} 
8.056 
4.070 
0.360 
13.038 


30.851 
137.000 
121.146 

85.276 


1.481 
6.624 
5.815 
4.003 


4.027 


Hieks^ine to eity line 


12.088 


Flm^ififf ilA in<7'lin^, 


10.378 


Fhufaing to WhiteeUme 


8.071 






Total 




8 


30.433 


375.272 


18,013 


35,464 








10.44 
2.00 
1.62 


17 
2 
2 


{Round) 
36.800 
7.456 
16.810 


767,040 
31.172 
54.400 


40.631 
1,640 
2.884 


70.181 




4.100 
7.066 






Total 




21 


61,075 


853.620 


45,164 


81.466 






RzcB¥oin> Xjobt A R. R. 
Main line — north » 


7.08 
4.15 
2.06 
2.11 
3.85 
2.06 


14 
5 

■2 

2 

8 

[218 


{Round) 
51.004 
47,417 
10.114 
20.418 
27.035 
7.027 


685.767 
371,704 
110,028 

86,172 
101,001 

41.085 


32.568 
10.021 
4.200 
3.768 
7.785 
1,710 


81.200 


Mam line -south" 

Bufl's head » 


48,888 
14.226 




12.711 


Castleton ave." 


27.378 


BiWfrT-akff» 


5.041 






Total 





[33134 


172,015 


1.406.737 


70.041 


185,330 






Riflhmond*^ 


7.04 
6.44 
2.56 
«3.61 
7.30 
8.47 


■sit 


{Round) 
18.878 
18.748 

0.883 
14.758 
14.450 

1.301 


202.084 
174,071 

53.532 
231,075 
172,833 

22,248 


11,454 
7,051 
1.735 
0.207 
7.003 
085 


20.440 


mvtr T'akf » 


20,040 


Man4?r rmd s* 


7.000 


Concofd " 


23.883 


St. George and Midland beach" 


10.728 




2.200 


Total 




[27143 


73.117 


047,643 


38.425 


102.433 






SotmnaLD Bbaoh » 
South Beadi to Midland Beach 


1.57 


[112 


{Round) 
7.744 


21.463 


063 


2.732 







For notea 1 and 2 see first double page of this 
table. 

« Discontinued September 28. 1910; resumed 
May 30. 1020. 

* Includes 9 special oar hours. 

« Operation of entire line discontinued May 3. 
1920. 

* Unless otherwise specified. 

' Of these. 2.160 vere at 2| cents; 2,348 at 7; 
283 at 14; and 3,127 at 16. 

•Of these 10.680 were at 2k cents. 525 at 4. 
252.360 at 6. 14,560 at 7. 14.617 at 8. 3.772 at 14 
and 3.900 at 15. 



• Of these 93.888 were at 6 cents. 12.469 at 7. 
151.813 at 8. and 104.978 at 10. 

1* Of these 30.497 were at 6 cents and 283.048 at 7. 

u Of these 418,316 were at 2k cents. 

u Of these 605,304 were at 2k cents. 

u Diaoontinued April 27. 1920. resumed May 5. 
1920. 

MOf these 486,381 were at 8 cents. 2.583 at 71. 
1.309 at 4i, and 2,726 at 3. 

uOf these 406.776 were at 8 cents. 1.847 at 7|, 
1,423 at M . and 6.682 at 3. 

u Of these 66.876 were at 8 cents. 204 at 7i, 5 at 
4|, and 1.011 at 3. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railwat Companies 

mofvcment hy rontes, xgjo — Cooctadad 



373 



Nuifsmof 


PAaBBrona 


Tft&HBraBS 


KfYtUOB 
pMBBOSOn 

udtrviBfcn 


TAansan Rionm 




Atoelier 
thus 
oentB 


Number 
eoUMted 


IfUMBBt OP IBAmfBB 

poi!m TO ouu or-" 


Amount 


Per 

X 

(oentB) 


Per 
ear 
hour 


AtSoeniB 


Ra- 


Aw>- 
obted 
oom- 


For. 
eign 
oom- 
Pttk. 


4,025,205 




834 
28 








4,025,589 
108,233 
182,222 


8201,260 33 
8.410 25 
9.111 10 


46.8 
16.5 
77.0 


•4 27 


168.205 










1 01 


182,222 










2.44 
















4,375.632 




362 








4,375,994 


1218.781 68 


43.0 


83.70 














34,874 


{AtiOeeidi'i* 

'35.877 

•457,407 

•363.148 

» 313.545 


U,997 
24.007 
12,844 
11.062 


1 
1 
1 
1 






94,748 
670,542 
528.652 
456,954 


85.266 63 
43,802 59 
86.781 95 
28,260 53 


17.1 
31.8 
30.4 
33.1 


81 31 


189,128 






8.68 


152,660 






8.64 


132,347 






8.15 










509.009 


1.169.977 


71.010 


4 






1,750,896 


8114,201 70 


30.4 


8.22 










4.869,651 


(AtSemU)* 
6.714 
u 421,340 
"523,654 










4,876.865 
421,340 
523,654 


8343,683 97 
10,548 02 
13,188 10 


81.7 
33.8 
24.2 


83.47 












2.51 












1 86 














4.869,651 


951. 70R 










5,821,359 


8267.415 69 


81.3 


83 28 














3.865.442 

2.618,738 

518.234 


u 513.290 
u 455.483 
U94.906 
» 58.278 
u 150,700 
••85.938 


754.762 
477.513 
243,787 
152.262 
247.185 
23.015 


3 
2 

1 
3 
6 


4 
2 




5,133,494 

3,551,734 

856,927 

833,685 

1,718,484 

238.405 


8283.288 64 
165,402 15 
32,380 04 
35,766 87 
77,647 94 
13,178 25 


34.0 
44.5 

27.2 
41.5 
40.4 
31.4 


82.87 
3.77 
2.28 


623.145 

1,320,549 

129.452 


1 
2 




2.81 
2.84 
2.22 












9.075,560 


1,358,595 


1,898,524 


15 


9 




12,332,679 


8657,663 89 


37.3 


8.01 


1,259,571 


Ut4c€nt»>* 

••85.229 

••8.136 

••1.159 

•'6.475 

••10.772 

«»18 


77,554 
100,897 

93,496 
174,108 

48,760 
3.518 


'2 

1 
1 
2 
2 
2 






1,372,354 
998,413 
243,974 

1,146,702 

965,197 

94,976 


164.398 04 
44.796 43 

7.516 07 
48.570 30 
45.716 08 

4.572 81 


22.0 
25.6 
14.0 
21.0 
26.5 
20.6 


82.19 


889,380 
149,319 
966.119 
905.665 


5 
3 

1 




2.24 
1.06 
2.04 
2.32 


91,440 






1 90 










4,261.494 


61,780 


498.333 


10 


9 




4,821,616 


8215.566 73 


22.7 


82.10 


249,797 












249.797 


812.488 85 


58.2 


84 57 

















I'Of these, 58,653 were at 8 cents; 350 at 7), 
368 at 4i and 192 at 3. 

" Of these 139.009 were at 8 cents, 1,227 at 7i. 
182 at 4i. and 1.172 at 3. 

I* Begun January 19, 1920; discontinued April 
27, 1920: resumed May 5, 1920. 

••Of these, 79.999 were at 8 cents, 2.006 at 7|. 
339 at 4i. and 688 at 3. 

•1 Discontinued January 18, 1920. 

« Of these 1.066 were at 4^ cents. 

» Of these 799 wei« at 4} cents. 

•« Of thoM 765 were at 4i cents. 



•'The route of 8.23 miles was discontinued 
January 18. 1920. a shorter route. 3.61 miles was 
begun May 21. 1920. 

••This figure is on a yearly basis: respondent 
reports 6 cars per day for operation of longer route 
and 3 ears for operation of shorter route. 

•' Of these, 1,069 were at 4} cents. 

>• Of these 390 were at 4i oenU. 

>• Of these 18 were at 4) oents. 

>• This line was discontmued on October 6, 1919 
and resumed May 15, 1920. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



374 



Public Sisbvicb Commibsion — Pnusrr Distbict 



TiJBLB DL TRAFFIC STATISnCS: SUBWAY AND SLBVATED STATION RBCOSDS BY 
HALFYBABS AND YBABS, ipao 
(A) Ticket mOm at Interboroucli Subway Diviaion atattons 
Compiled from monthly reporta 



Liinaa and Station8 



MjismATTAJH-BttoKX Lnrsa 

EAST THtTNt UN* 

South Ferry, .North. 

BowUng Oi-een ................ r .\. 

WiJI Street" {^t 

P-Jto-SM-i {^^■. 

Totals S. Fy 60 Fulton 9t. (Coa- 

Cit/HiiU...... NoTth.. 

Brooklyn firidfi; •*..... _ . . . , 

Worth street {b^/. 

C.n.l Street {^H: 



Spring Street , . 
B]B«cke>r Street. , 



North 

South. 

North 

South. .. 

North... 

South 



Aator Piacti ..,..., 

MthStrMt* 

ISthStr^t..... [^ihl 

^st^ |K: 

3Sth Street..... {^^t. 



33d Street. 



( Korth, 

'■■ ISouth. 

Grimd Centr&l* '(Contract 1 booths only? 
Total S. F'y to Grand Cent. 

(CoQtracta 1-2) 

Grand Cflntral** (Contract 3 booths ot>ljr> 

^uti^tt^t ^.^;i^ 

6<>th Street {^^il 

estb t^treet — Hunter Collie ...^, 

"thstre^t. .. ,. jK.:: 

^thStrwf --{^aihr^ 

06thStJi!flt 

I03d Street /;;-: 

( North. 

1 South, 

[North. 

■ ' ' I South. 

126th Street* , .. . 

Total, Grand Cent, to laSth St. 
(Contract 3> 



nothstr««t. 

lietb Street. 



Total » eoat trunk. South F'y to 125th 
St , 



JXBOMS AVKNUB BRANCH 

Mott Haven 

149th Street * » 

leiit Street 

167th Street 

170th Street 



Six montha, 
January - 

Jnne 



Year ended 

June 80. 

1920 



S3fl,T0Q 
3.9J0.O0O 
3,403,500 
2,l53,o00 
5,7lH,^^O0 
2,377.400 

7p90fl,200 

(isa.oso 

303,950 
1.7M.G00 

39e,7SO 
2,t>97.200 

457.170 
1,920.500 

040. S60 
3,373.3o0 
1.4g7.MH) 
g. 059. 900 

95&,.5O0 

7&5.3O0 
2,504,30(J 
2.013,500 
2,018.500 
t. 405,000 
1,941.000 
1.47S.600 
rt. 218. 900 

o.oaft.ioo 

Ma. 500 
1,304,300 
l,29fl,30O 
1.. "508. 100 
l,S5e.400 

576,800 
l,99<>.200 
1,307,100 
3,974.700 
2,322.250 
2,etta.70U 

522.400 
2,160.700 

K07,flO0 
2,231.700 
4,410,900 

38. 7£ 3, 7 SO 



101.7ft7,940 



4«5,080 
413.900 
371.640 
.022,500 
249,120 



1,610,213 
7,667,003 
6.631h090 
4.056,500 
10.729,ftM 
4,595.000 

356^241 

14,964,655 

1.307,933 

540,060 
3,216.444 

704,960 
3,B17,624 

821,660 
3,45S,S94 
1.157,400 
4,315,901 
2,724,275 
15,223,505 
1,742.214 
1,430.600 
4,668,051 
3,755,200 
3,710,072 
2,603,800 
3,613,218 
2,7^.800 
11,448,254 

I£S.&S£,05i 
16,582,080 
1,139,096 
2,362,500 
2,210,955 
2,744,100 
3,217,034 

997,316 
3,463.700 
2,262,347 
7,024.600 
4,210,663 
4,913,566 

930,723 
4.013,640 
1,516,586 
4,027,650 
7,015,969 

69,5$^, Bi 7 



Six montha, 

July- 
December 



193,1S4.56S 



890.678 
786.041 
707,742 
.946.500 
470.630 



913,400 
3,631,100 
.2,209.000 
2,579.000 
6,550.500 
1,997,100 

181 ,600 
7,561.000 

594,440 

367.770 
1,596.200 

432,820 
1,808.000 

476,500 
1.600.500 

609.800 
1.994,900 
1,174,200 
7,549.200 

807,400 

873.100 
3,217,500 
1.813.000 
1,676.000 
1.235.500 
1.766.300 
1.280.600 
6,257,600 

8,059,200 

559.700 
1,160,700 
1,107.200 
1,338,900 
1,566.000 

491.900 
1,651,014 
1,169.200 
3.5^8,700 
1,938,992 
2,, -Wis, 500 

502.100 
1.998,000 

833.000 
1.961,000 
4,333,000 



95,208,736 



499.330 
424,700 
377.760 
1.052.300 
276.580 



Year ended 
December 
31, 1920 



1,760.100 
7,580.100 
5.612.500 
4.732.500 
11.275,300 
4,374.600 

96:996,000 
B70.300 

15.470,200 

1.286,520 

671,720 

3,340.700 

829.600 

3.905.200 

933.670 

3.521,000 

1.250,660 

4.368.260 

2,661.700 

15.609.100 
1.765.900 
1.438.400 
4.721.800 
3.826.500 
3.694,500 
2.640.500 
3.707.300 
2.765,200 

11.476.500 

196,480,290 
17.995.300 
1.228.200 
2.555.000 
2.406.500 
2.847,000 
3.422.400 
1.068.700 
3.647.214 
2.476.300 
7.563.400 
4.261.242 
5.249.200 
1.024.500 
4.167,700 
1.640,600 
4,192.700 
8.750.500 

74,496,468 



199.976.676 



964.410 
838,600 
749.400 
2.074.800 
525. 70q 



Nora. — Because of the rojitins of trains of one line over sections of track of other lines, atation 
ticket sales cannot in all cases be definitely classed or equitobly apportioned by routes. Ji^eU 
sold on branches jointly operated by trains of the Subway Division and Manhattan Railwaj 
Division are shared in proportion to ton-mileage of trains operated over the respective branobea. 

* Built as express station. , ^ ^ m. 

I The separation between north and southbound traffic is as reported by the company. There 
is a passageway between the two platforms. 

> The Grand Central sUtions under Contracts 1 and 3 are separate but connected by ] 
so that a passenger can purchase a ticket at one, but board a train at the other. 

* Leads to same train platforms as the Mott Avenue station of the West Farms branch. 



.uy Google 



Street Railwat Companies 



375 



TABLB QL TMfle itatistics: Sabway and elevated atatioa records by half yean and yeara 

ijpo — Continned 
(A) Ticket aales at Interbdroogli Sabway Division stations — Continned 



LXNXS AKD SrATIONB 



Six months, 

January - 

June 



Year ended 

June 30, 

1920 



Six months, 

July- 
Deoember 



Year ended 
December 
31, 1920 



Mahhattan-Bbonx Linbs — Continued 
mtoMM AVXNUB BRANCH — Condudmi 

Belmont Street 

176th Street 

New York University (Bumside Ave.)* • 
183d Street. . . . 
Foidham Road 



Kincsbridce Road « 

Bedford Park Boulevard > 

Mosholu Parkway > 

Woodlawn * » South 

Total, Jerome Ave. branch 
(Contract 3) 



260.300 

573.100 

858,200 

740.700 

1.092,100 

562,200 

215,609 

82.542 

94.715 



496.647 

1.075.802 

1,576,138 

1.382,102 

2.034,700 

1,068,214 

395.482 

171,558 

220.327 



288.800 
580.600 
923.300 
727.500 
1.141.100 
579.700 
228.965 
103,607 
169.532 



549.100 

1.162.700 

1.781.500 

1.468.200 

2.233.200 

1,141,900 

444,564 

186,149 

264,247 



7.001,706 



13.222.561 



7,382.764 



14,384.470 



PELBAM BAT PARK BRAXCB 

Third Avenue ♦ 

BrookAvenue (S>uth:;: 

CypressAvenue (g,°J*f; 

l^dtreet (N-th... 

!*»*»» Street {sZit'. 

Umgwood Avenue {^^^ 

Hunt's Point Road * South. 

Whitlock Avenue « 

Elder Avenue * 

Sound View Avenue * 

St. Lawrence Avenue * 

177th Street* 

Castle Hill Avenue« 

Zerega Avenue * 

Westchester Square « 

Mkidletown Road * 

Burke Avenue * 

Pdham Bay Park « 



1.057.460 

208.320 

1,927.000 

51.730 

881.100 

12.680 

212.745 

82,260 

938.400 

27.855 

837.000 

1.235.300 

8.175 

13,020 

4.064 

22.660 

35.310 



1.898.680 

844.280 

3.580.200 

82.760 

1.621.400 

21,170 

371.435 

141.880 

1.762,300 

46.250 

1.562,450 

2.211.000 

8,176 

13.020 

4.064 

22.660 

35.310 



1.048.260 

176,680 

1,901,900 

44.840 

876.100 

16.410 

209,395 

40.150 

928.500 

25,110 

768,700 

1,121.000 

30,250 

64,440 

10,906 

133,580 

187,390 

67,240 

47,900 

73,771 

2,660 

3.620 

1.435 



2.105.720 

385.000 

3.828.900 

96.570 

1.757.200 

20,090 

422.140 

122.410 

1.866.900 

52.965 

1,605,700 

2.356.300 

38.425 

77.460 

14.070 

156.240 

222.700 

67.240 

47.900 

73.771 

2.660 

3.620 

1.435 



Total. Pelham Bay Park Branch 
(Contracts) 



7.555,079 



13.727.024 



7.780.237 



15«335.316 



Total. East Trunk line 



119.324.725 



220.134.153 



110.371.737 



229.696.462 



WBBT TRUNK UNB 

South Ferry North. . 

K*^^'8^ \s^l: 

Cortlandt street {^y 

ToUl, S. F'y to Cortlandt 
St 
Chambers Street* 



f^«»Win Street Jtt;. 

Canal Street (wh.:: 



Houston Street 



[North 
ChriBt«>her' Street — Sheri- } gjj^' ' * 

dan Square \south.'."* 

14th Street ♦ 

18**^ Street {^S^t'/. 

2M8*~t {^t: 



1.342,100 

963.920 

10.967 

3.963.110 
115.220 

8,996,517 

3.000.000 
784.800 
363.060 
766.700 
360.190 

1,045.200 
521.440 

1.289.600 
542.700 

4.823.900 
904.900 
543.480 

2.211.800 

1.050.000 



2,626.060 

1.776.182 

18.572 

7.109,734 

187.250 

11,717,807 
5,427.009 
1.425.007 

618.610 
1,403.551 

580.800 
1.854,634 

876,770 
2,283,190 

947.900 
8.749.222 
1.608.087 

967.893 
3.990.902 
1.872.400 



1,548.700 

934,240 

13.628 

4,112.620 
133,860 

8,748,048 

3.200.000 
749.400 
409,100 
777.500 
410.300 

1.032.000 
615.200 

1,226.600 
560,800 

4.777.900 
823.900 
571.740 

1.973.500 

1.135.500 



2.800,800 

1.898.160 

24.595 

8,075.730 

249.080 

1S,1S8,S8S 
6,200,900 
1,534.200 

772.160 
1.544.200 

770.490 
2,077,200 
1.136.640 
2.516.200 
1.103.50 
9.601.80' 
1.728.80 
1.115.22 
4.185,30 
2.185.50 



* Built as express station. 

1 During the non-rush hours, tickets for the three stations beyond are collected at Kinssbridge 
road. 
<OpenedMay80. 1920. 
« Opened October 24. 1920. 
« Opened Deoember 13, 1920. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



376 



PuBUc Sbrvicb Commission — Fibbt Dibtbict 



TABLE DL TMfflc itatistics: Subway and eleratod station records hy half yoara and yoars, 

1930 — Continned 
(A) Ticket sales at Interboroogh Subway DiTision stations ~ Continued 



Liings AND Stations 



Manhattan-Bronx Lxnbs — ConHnued 
waar trunk line -^ Concluded 

atbstr^t [s^t:: 

Pennsylvania Station * 

Times Square * (Contract 3 booths only). 
ToUl, So. F*y to Times 

Square (Contract 3) 

Times Square* i (Contract 1 / North. . 
booths only) . \ South . . 

Wth Street [^^^^f 

Columbus Circle {&SIth." 



[North.. 
\ South.. 



66th Street 

72d Street* 

7»th Street jg^jj^;. 

86th Street jsouth.- 

Wt Street \^°„'*J; 

96th Street* 

Total, Times Sq. to 96th 
St. (Contract 1) 



Six months, 

January - 

June 



Total, west trunk. So. Fy. to 
96th Street 



BROADWAY BRANCH 

103d Street. 



110th St (Cathedral p'kwsy) . [ gj[*J; ; 



Columbia Uniyersity-116th Street. 
Manhattan Street-128th Street 

Oity College- 137th Street. . . . | gSlSb .* .* 

145th Street [gojj^;; 

167th Street (^orth 



168th Street 

181st Street 

191 St Street 

Dyckman Street 

207th Street 



\ South. 



215th Street 
225th Street 



North.., 
South. . . 
North... 
South.. . 
North. . . 
South. . . 

281st Street [sZtt:'. 

238th Street South. . . 

242d Street South. . . 

Total, Broadway Branch (Con- 
tract 1) 



LBNOX AND WIST FARMS BRANCH 

110th Street 

"•th Street i^^t.'. 

125th Street (^jjh.*: 

135th Street (south.'" 

146th Street South. 

Mott Avenue ' 



1,354,900 

484.300 

10,721,340 

6,700.060 

48,868,687 
2,882,800 
5,074,400 
2,814,000 
1,644,800 
2,460.000 
1,945.000 
1,115.000 
1.532.100 
3.921.500 
772,440 
1,504.220 
1,015,500 
1,642,200 
500,500 
851,900 
4.436.200 

84,11*. 660 



77.976.247 



Year ended 

June 30, 

1920 



2.559.121 

892,240 

19.660.619 

12. £03,822 

79,689,674 
5,156.736 
9.270.641 
5.146.953 
2,876.600 
4,417.761 
3.510.500 
1.998.961 
2.621.300 
7,093,532 
1,343.826 
2.648,460 
1.767,021 
2,922,400 
896,631 
1,497,340 
8.148.340 

61, 816, SOU 



140,956.576 



2.886.900 

450.080 
1,924.100 
2.290.600 
3.019.100 

868.000 
2,464.700 

480.800 
2,634,900 

285,700 
2.516.600 
2.106.300 
3.843.300 

706.200 

1,189,900 

66,050 

845.350 
11.590 

218.000 
9.560 

242,760 
10,046 

425.424 

104.976 
1.656,500 



Six months, 

July- 
December 



1,202.700 

540.700 

11.301,750 

6,612,840 

44,686,878 
2,512,600 
4.865.700 
2.500.000 
1,477,500 
2,067,000 
1,719.500 

937.100 
1.284.900 
3.544.400 

615.100 
1.299.240 

861.000 
1,430,100 

396.090 

695.100 
3.964.102 

80,169,48e 



74.834.810 



30,246.935 



3.057,500 
1.258.400 
2.905.000 
1.040.300 
2.503.500 
1.285.200 
3.452.000 
937.450 
458.300 



4,297.202 

815,304 
3.508.900 
4.240.322 
5,843.390 

622.427 
4.669.100 

879.090 
4.860.700 

488.977 
4.700.100 
3.907.460 
7.116,034 
1.328.945 
2.330.205 

114,607 

1.584.409 

20.221 

413.846 
16.248 

460.653 
16.287 

797.934 

199.686 
3,333.273 



56.565.320 



5.612.975 
2.453.218 
5.272.200 
1.910.859 
4.586.400 
2.290.607 
6.702.600 
1.719.400 
817.658 



Year ended 
December 
31. 1920 



2.557.600 

1.025.000 

22.023.090 

13.312,900 

88,629,066 
5.395.400 
9.940.100 
5.314.000 
3.122.300 
4,527.000 
3.664.500 
2.052.100 
2.817.000 
7.465.900 
1,387,540 
2.803.460 
1.876.500 
3.072.300 
896.590 
1.547.000 
8.400,302 

64,t8t,99» 



152.811.057 



2.095.100 

380.400 
1.667.000 
2,060.800 
2.966.900 

325,100 
2.234.000 

378.800 
2.339.400 

249.700 
2.281.300 
1,853.300 
3.319.900 

620.500 

1.173.100 

58.690 

816.450 
16.130 

197.600 
7.895 

246.950 
8.355 

403.486 

100,308 
1.779,900 



27.581.064 



2.728.200 

1.153.000 

2.685.200 

928.400 

2.323.000 

1.120.600 

3.625.000 

845.500 

436.000 



4.482.000 

830.480 
3.591.100 
4.351.400 
5.986.000 

693.100 
4.688.700 

859.100 
4.974,300 

535,400 
4,797.900 
3.959.600 
7.163.200 
1.326.700 
2.363.040 

124.700 

1.661.800 

27.720 

415.600 
17.455 

489.710 
18.400 

828.910 

205.284 
3.436.400 



57.827,999 



5.785,700 
2.411.400 
5.590.200 
1.968.700 
4.826.500 
2.405.800 
7.077.000 
1.782.950 
804.300 



* Express Station. 

1 See note 1 on first pace of this table. 
> Leads to same train platforms as the 149th street station of the Jerome avenue branch. 



_ Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbbet Railway Companies 



377 



TABLB DL TadOc atatistica: Sabway and aloTftted atatbn 

1920 — Caatianad 
(A) Tkkat aalea at Intarboroncli Sabway DMaioa 



by half yaaia and yaara, 
— Continnad 



Lima AMD Stationb 



Six months, 

January - 

June 



Year ended Six montha, 
June 90, July- 

1920 December 



Year ended 
December 
31. 1920 



Manhattah-Bbonx L1NB8 — Condvded 

LBNOX AND WIBT FARMS BRANCH — 

Condvded 

ThWAvenue [s^t:: 

Jackson Avenue | North. . . 

\ South. . . 

Prospect Avenue / North. . . 

\ South... 
Intervale Avenue 

Simpson Street t 8<mth.'.'. 

Freeman Street (SSSh.".*: 

174th Street {^^::: 

177th Street 

Bronx Park (180th Street) South . . . 

Total, Lenox Ave. and West 
Farms Branch (Contract 1) . . 

WHTTB PLAIN8 ROAD UNB 

East 180th Street — Morris Park* 

Bronx Park East • 

Pelham Parkway South. . . 

AUenton Avenue 

Burke Avenue 

Gun Hill Road* 

East 219th Street 

East 225th Street 

East 233d Street South... 

East 238th Street (Nerekl Ave.) South . . . 
East 24l8t Street*' South. . . 



Total, White Plains Road Line 
(Contract 3) 



Total, Manhattan — Bronx lines. 

Manhatfan-Qubens Lines * 
qubbnbboro trunk 
Grand Central (Lexington Ave.) * 



Jackson Avenue \ East. . 



Hunters Point Avenue. 

11th Street 

Queensboro Plasa*. 



Total, Jackson Avenue to 
Queensboro PUua .... 



Total, trunk line. 



CORONA BRANCH 

Rawaon Street 

Lowery Street 

Bliaa Street 

Lincoln Avenue 

Woodaide* 

Flak Avenue 

Broadway 

25th Street 

Elm hurst Avenue 

Junction Avenue* West. . 

Alburtis Avenue West. . 



Total, Corona Branch. 



686.000 
3.197.300 

218.240 
2.323,600 

344.200 
3.577.000 
2,012.100 

146.600 
3,257,500 

248.820 
3.724,500 
47.950 
1.915.600 
1.717,600 
1,213,600 



1.214,212 
5,996,700 

387.114 
4,491.400 

628.426 
6.813,600 
3.906.690 

275,844 
6.243.000 

486.206 
7.124,000 
87,650 
3,637,300 
3,457,081 
2.375,188 



581.000 
3.088.200 

177.800 
2,271,700 

285.500 
3.364.500 
1,888,900 

123.400 
2,970,500 

199.280 
3.563.500 
46.270 
1.838,700 
1,817,600 
1,246,700 



1.267,000 
6.285,600 

391.040 
4.595.300 

629.700 
6.941,500 
3,901,000 

270,000 
6,228.000 

448,100 
7,288,000 
94,220 
3,754,300 
3,535,000 
2,460.300 



41.523.160 



78.490.028 



39.308,350 



80.831.510 



1.185.800 
105.900 
28.140 
26.545 
149.250 
206.360 
298.600 
249.600 
194.680 
665.400 



2.231.800 
213.500 
56.960 
48,037 
278.920 
411.960 
563,820 
480,960 
387,100 

1,440.700 



1.255,900 

116,800 

33,900 

34.010 

168,550 

256.340 

329,600 

262.120 

211.800 

731.300 

72,900 



2,441,700 

222,700 

62,040 

60,555 

307.800 

462,700 

628,200 

611,620 

406,480 

1.396,700 

72.900 



3.110,175 



6,113,757 



3.463.220 



6.573,395 



272,181,24? 



225,180 



502,259.834 



413.920 



255.559.181 



215,320 



527,740,423 



440.500 



1.958.600 
456.600 
354.140 
702,880 

1.372,900 



3.622,000 

771.000 

619,210 

1,246,740 

2,586,000 



2,130,700 
454.600 
359,560 
678.520 

1.307,000 



4,089.300 

911.200 

713,700 

1,381,400 

2.679.900 



4.846.120 



8,843.950 



9.775.600 



6,070,300 



9,257,870 



6,146,700 



10,216,000 



329,670 
35.160 
144.540 
182.130 
583.940 
291.300 
159.050 
428.760 
381.200 
607.100 
1.468.600 



600.670 

64.870 

318,660 

334,685 

1,047,960 

556.640 

290.530 

802.860 

729.000 

1.141,400 

2.703.200 



326.810 
41.700 
197.080 
183.515 
661,000 
294,020 
172,190 
460,940 
403.200 
628,300 
1.660,700 



656.380 

76,860 

341,620 

365.645 

1.244,940 

586,320 

331,240 

880.700 

784,400 

1.235.300 

3.129.200 



4,611,260 



8,600.175 



5.028.356 



9.639.605 



* BuiH aa expreas station. 

* Opened Dec. 3. 1920. 

* Grand Central (Lexincton ave.) ii in Manhattan, all other atataona 
fkrat pace of thia table. 



in Queena. See note 2 on 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



378 



Public Sdrvicb Coioossion — First District 



TABLE DL Trafflc atatiitici; Sobway and elevated station reeorda by half yeaia and 

zgao — Continaed 
(A) Ticket aalea at Intwboroach Sabway IHWaton atations — Contintted 



L1NB8 AND Stations 


Six months. 

January - 

June 


Year ended 

June 30, 

1920 


Six months, 

July- 
Deoember 


Year ended 
December 
31. 1920 


ABTORIA BRANCH 

Beebe Avenue 


419,600 
486,400 
1,055,200 
1,045,800 
878,200 
547.200 


791.200 

908,140 

1.953.800 

1,985,800 

1,648.200 

996.900 


370,760 
540,200 
1,008,600 
999,000 
850,100 
649,800 


790,860 


Waahinston Avenue 


1,026,600 


Broadway 


2,063,800 


Grand Avenue 


2,044.800 


Hoyt Avenue* South. . . 

Ditmars Avenue* South. . . 


1,728,300 
1.197,000 


Total. Astoria Branch 


4,432.400 


8.284.040 


4.418,460 


8,850,860 






Total, Manhattan — Queens Lines (Con- 
tract 3) 


14.113,950 


26,132,085 


14,592,515 


28,706.465 






Manhattan — Brooklyn Lxnss 
Park Place (Manhattan) 


2,088,400 
1,850,000 
5,064,800 
9,OOS,tOO 
1.024.000 
1.934,500 


3.985.840 
3,389,040 
9,237,806 
16, 6 Ig, 686 
1.768.781 
3.435,140 


2,201,000 
1,948,670 
4,723,600 
8,878,170 
1,190,700 
2.421,000 


4,289,400 


Puiton Street (Manhattan) 


3,798,570 


WaU Street (Manliattan) 


9,788,400 


Total stations in ManhatUn. 
Clark Street (Brooklyn) 


17,876,870 
2,214,700 


Borough Hall (Contract 3 booths only) >. . 


4.355,500 


Total. Park Place. William and 
Clark Sts. line (Contract 3).. 


11,961,700 


21,816,606 


12.484.870 


24,446,570 


Borough Hall (Contract 2 booths only)'. . 
Hoyt Street (Sv°^k ■ 


5,262,900 

3.276.600 

119,080 

3.961.600 

220.560 

13,249,870 


9,885,661 

6,136,241 

189,820 

7.412,301 

350,948 

25,630,457 


4.948.200 
2.716.900 

376,300 
3,785,500 

481,900 
11,563,920 


10,201,100 
5,998,500 


^ ]. South... 

Nevine Street ( S^°^>- ' ' 


495,380 
7.747,100 


\ South. . . 
Atlantic Avenue North. . . 


702,460 
24,813,790 


Total. Borough HaU to Atlantic 
Avenue (Contract 2) 


26.080.610 


49.505.428 


23,872,720 


49,953,330 


Total. Manhattan — Brooklyn lines 


38,042,310 


71.322,034 


36,357,500 


74,399,900 


Brooklyn Lines 

flatbush avknuk and eastern 

parkway unb 

Main Line 

t»*- > o« «. • / North . . . 






265,200 
55,300 
477.800 
118,400 
887.100 
587,500 
777,700 
2,103,700 


265,200 


BergenStreet* \south... 

Prospect Park Plasa « 






55.800 
477.800 
118,400 


Eastern Parkway — Brooklyn Museum * 






Franklin Avenue* « .' 






887,100 


Noatrand Avenue » 






587,500 


K"ing<iton Avenue » 






777,700 
2.103.700 


Utica Avenue* > 














TntJil, tnmk line 






5.272,700 


5.272.700 








lAumia Avenus Branch 
Suttor Avenue * 






163.000 
110,900 
200.400 
196.760 
19,700 


163,000 


Saratoga Avenue ^ 






110.900 
200.400 
196,760 


Rockaway Avenue * 






Junius Street * , . . . 












19.700 










Total Livonia Avenue Branch. . 






690,760 


660.760 



* Built as express station. 

> The Borough Hall stations under Contracts 2 and 3 are separate but oonneoted by 
that a passenger can purchase a ticket at one, but board a train at the other. 
«OpenedOct. 3, 1920. 
sQpenedAug. 28. 1920. 
«OpenedNov. 22, 1920. 
•QpenedDeo. 23, 1920. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



SxBBirr Railway Coufanhis 



379 



XABLB DL TMfflc slatlitiec: Sabwaj and etofatod atatkm neords by half yaaia aad yaaia, 

1990 — Coattnuad 
(A) Tkkat aalea at IntartMroofh Subway DMalon alatloDS — Conduded 



Lnras AKD Stationb 



Bbookltw LanB—Condudtd 

WULTBXmH. ATBTUB AND BABTBSN 

PABKWAT LDTB— Conclttdad 
Notlrand Avenue Branch 

PMsklent Street ■ 

Sterlinc Street » 

Winthrop Street » {^Jth.' 



Church Avenue* (SfjS.' .'i 

BayerlyRoad. jlSSj^:: 

Newidrk Avenue • (gS?^:: 

Flatboah Avenue * 

Total — Nostrand Ave. branoh. 

Total — Brooklyn lines 



Qraad total, Interborouth Subway 

Division stationa. 
MiMeHaneouB (add) 
Adjustment of joint traffic on Queensboro 

lines, Second Ave. elevated's share 

deducted 
AdJustinent of joint traffic on White 

Plains Road, Thiid Ave. elevated's 

share deducted 



Adjustment of joint traffic on Jerome 
Ave.. Sij 



. Sixth 
deducted .... 



Ave. elevated's share 



Grand total, Interborouch Subway div. . 



Average per day 

Number of Sundays induie i . . . . . 

Average, oountinc Sunday one-halx day. 



Six months, 

January - 

June 



324,337,502 
620.800 



3.861,720 



3.870.427 



317,236.155 



1,743.056 

26 

1,877,137 



Year ended 

June 30, 

1020 



609,713,953 
1.170.564 



7,237,280 



7,548,585 



586.098.633 



1.601,362 

62 

1.723.820 



Six months, 

July- 
Oeoember 



244.550 
328.000 
387.100 

27,420 
689,700 

44,700 
463.750 

20.660 
384,300 

14.785 
654.400 



3,255.265 



9.218.726 



315,728.011 
274.972 



3.752.841 

255,918 

3.708.687 



308.286.537 



1,675.465 

26 

1,802.839 



Year ended 
December 
81. 1920 



244.550 
323,900 
387,100 

27.420 
689,700 

44,700 
463.750 

20,660 
384,300 

14,785 
654.400 



3.256.266 



9.218.725 



640.065.613 
895,772 



7.604.561 

256.918 

7,579.114 



625.521.692 



1,709.076 

52 

1,839,770 



•Opened Aug. 28. 1920. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



380 



Public Sebvigb C!ommission — Fibst Distbict 



TABLB IZ. TMlBc statistics: Snbwsj and elevated station records, bj half jeers and ymrs» 

i^ao -— Continued 
(B) Ticket sales at Manhattan Railway (Interbonmgh Blevated Division) stations 
CompQed from monthly reports 



LiNis AND Stations 



Six months 

Januarys 

June 



Year ended 

June 90, 

1920 



Six months 

July- 
December 



Year ended 
December 
31. 1920 



SncoND Aybntts 

City Hall* North. . . 

Chatham Square* 

Canal Street i^Jit'.: 

Grand Street (&>u?h;:' 

Rivington Street (Sxith." ' 

itst.«t l^iit:: 

8th Street {^^^t. 

14th Street* i^^lt.' 



19th Street. 

23d Street. . 

34th Street. 
42d Street*. 

50th Street. 
57th Street. 



[North... 
(South.. 
r North. . 
t South.. 



(North... 
\ South... 
/North... 
\ South... 

65th Street \south.:: 

72d Street i^^it: 

80th Street {south.:: 

North... 
South. . . 



86th Street* 

9ad Street 

Wth Street ( £?f *^ 



South. 
North. 
South. 
North. 
Soutjb. 
North. . . 
South.. 
North. . 
\ South.. 

126th Street* 

Chatham Square to 125th 
Street 

Miscellaneous 

Adjustment of joint traffic on Queensboro 
subway lines; deducted from Subway 
Division 



105th Street. 
111th Street. 
117th Street. 
12l8t Street.. 



Grand total* Second Avenue line. 



Thibd AvBNun 
South Ferry (WhitehaU St.)^. 

Huiover Square 

Fulton Street 

Franklin Square 



.North... 



Total, South Ferry to Franklin 

Square 

Thereof credited to Second 
Avenue line in Table VIII 



1,935,330 
853,300 
802,720 
499.741 
802,800 
430,848 

1,570,900 
433.775 
988.680 
519,431 
987,100 
622,900 

1,085.030 
662.037 
355.900 
313.310 
556.060 
477.686 
938.920 

1.061.600 
246.585 
312,355 
692.300 
684.700 
204.659 
635.220 
335.880 

1.317.300 
249.280 

1,231.500 
181.167 

1.271.080 

748.680 

63.090 

824,100 

69,720 

677,560 

75,245 

760,600 

46.000 

656,100 

72,440 

487,780 

470.540 

43.308 



3.851.720 



3.824.828 
1.646.039 
1,536.164 

939.954 
1.516,626 

768,940 
3,006,365 

760,758 
1.854.S 

918,4 
1,876,766 
1.122,620 
2.033,720 
1.169,340 

663.937 

656,900 
1.068.603 

828,749 
1,727,850 
1,964.200 

429.337 

673.016 
1.236.720 
1.103.200 

362.839 
1,022.400 

607,580 
2,568.200 

446.044 
2,382.100 

326.848 
2,422,320 
1,427.435 

110,136 
1,649,900 

124,706 
1,275,660 

142,625 

1,487,700 

96,138 

1,269,100 

148,016 

925,400 

900.370 

48,866,899 
79,220 



7,237,289 



1,822,300 
910,600 
805.740 
513.091 
801.400 
433,712 

1,560.700 
467.6)86 
968,520 
492.021 
957,400 
612.800 

1,063.700 
632,520 
338,648 
287,980 
616,620 
452,696 
870,125 

1,005,660 
212,046 
284,000 
667,300 
556,660 
173,506 
609,160 
300,080 

1.256,200 
225,810 

1,150.500 
162,687 

1.199,020 

711,340 

49.691 

802,100 

56,930 

666.280 

73,175 

788,800 

45.630 

665.630 

64.660 

462,120 

476,620 

g5,8l9,96g 
13,636 



3.762,841 



3,767,630 
1,763.900 
1,608,460 
1,012.832 
1.604,200 

864,560 
3.137.600 

891.361 
1,947.200 
1.011.452 
1.944.600 
1.235,700 
2.148.730 
1,294,567 

694,448 

601,290 
1,071,680 

930,181 
1.809,046 
2,067.160 

468.630 

696,356 
1,369.600 
1.141,360 

378.166 
1.044,380 

635,960 
2,573,500 

475,090 
2,382.000 

343.854 
2.470,100 
1,459,920 

112,681 
1.626.200 

126,650 
1,343.840 

148,420 

1,549.400 

91.630 

1.311.630 

137,100 

949,900 

947,160 

Bt,90M,981 
56,944 



7,604,661 



31,912.777 



60,007,786 



80,808,639 



62.721.416 



2.102.134 

1,046,100 

749,600 

475,292 



4.406,880 

2,058.369 

1,458.017 

923.260 



2.842.678 

1.037.400 

736.800 

630.776 



4.944.712 
2,083.600 
1.486.800 
1.006.067 



4.373.026 
9J66,69S 



8.846.0^ 
4,S88,$S9 



6.147,068 
2,649,488 



9,620,079 

4J14,971 



Nora. — Because of the routine of trains of one line over sections of track of other lines, statio^^ 
ticket sales cannot in all cases be definitely classed or equitably apportioned by routes. Ticket^ 
soU on branches jointly operated by trains of the Subway Divfinon and Manhattan Railway 
Division are shared in proportion to ton-milea<e of trains operated over the respective branohoa. 

* Bapress station. 

1 For other sales at this station, see South Ferry onder Ninth Avenue. The north and south Unes 
of the Manhattan Railway oonverte to this station. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Stbbbt Railway Companibs 



381 



TABLE a. TnlBc ■tatiitics: S^buKj and elevated atatioii records, by half yean aad yeaia, 

• 1920 — Contiimed 
(B) Ticket aalee at Menhatfn Railway (Interbofoach Berated DMaiDii) stationa— Contiiiaed 



LmaS AND SffATIOMB 



Six months 

Januarys 

June 



Year ended 

June 80, 

1920 



Six months 

July- 
Oeoember 



Year ended 
December 
31. 1920 



Third Aybnui — Continued 
aty HaU* North. 



Chatham Square*. 

Canal Street* 

Grand Street* 

Houston Street*. . . 



9th Street* 

14th Street 

18th Street 

23d Street* 

28th Street 

34th Street 

34th Street Ferry. 
42d Street* 



Grand Central . 
47th Street 



' North... 
I South... 
[North... 
1 South... 
I North... 
i South... 
f North... 
1 South. . . 
i North... 
\ South... 
[North... 
\ South. . . 



(North... 
\ South. . . 



63d Street. . . . 
69th Street. .. 
67th Street... 
76th Street. .. 
84th' Street... 
89th Street. .. 
99th Street. .. 
106th Street*. 
116th Street. . 
125th Street*. 



Total. Chatham 
126th Street 



North. . . 

South... 

North. . . 

South... 

North... 

South 

North... 

South.. 

North. . 

South. . 

North. . 

South. . 

North. . 

South. . . 

North.. 

South.. 

North... 

South. 

North. 

South, 
f North... 
\ South 

Square to 



Total. City Hall to 126th Street. 



129th Street 

Willis Avenue South. . . 

133d Street* 

138th Street* 

143d Street* 

149th Street* 

166th Street 

leist Street 

166th Street 

169th Street 

Claremont Parkway 

174th Street 

Tremont Avenue (177th Street)* 

180th Street /North. . . 

\ South... 
183d Street f North. . . 

\ South... 

Fordham Road* 

Bronx Park* South. . . 

Total, 129th Street to 
Bronx Park 



* l^ixpreM station. 



3.336.600 



6.668.636 



3.424.600 



6.761.000 



1,436,900 

2^122.400 

4,091*900 

2*493,800 

1,636.100 

497 ,^20 

1,32S,90CJ 

729.700 

7al .070 

4Hh7B3 

1,797,700 

83QJ50 

901 .474 

7B3,r>l3 

l/iiW.OUO,! 

0^.540 

138,300 

1.043,400 

7l4,S<M)i 

767. 7(X) 

3V4 Ar2G 
444.031 
47J*,S5;i 
1.022.500 
874. 7CK) 
431,645 
654, lUf 
42VM4:.I 
904 , UMji 
.S(W.fl77| 
06;*.60i) 
4U.1IM>| 
727.S0i.> 

77.^.U),> 

734,000 
2 JtW,tO0 

759.420 
1.730.U0O 

(i7D,200 
lj2ti.900 



2.762.446 
4.072.241 
7,466.336 
4.676.370 
3.174,866 

881.691 
2,686.806 
1.291.200 
1.660.030 

742.206 
8,643.486 
1.632.668 
1,912,063 
1.358,802 
2,390,004 
1,191,130 

252.603 
2.02b.; 
1.318,: 
1.525,427 

797,431 

716,677 

826.211 

893,726 
1,967,737 
1.669.800 

804.725 
1.240.800 

813.736 
1.734.800 

957.393 
1.838.100 

783.984 
1,389.700 

666.052 
1.563.995 
1.368.704 
4.210.600 
1,481.719 
3.462.900 
1.289.922 
2.198,000 

78,9M,S06 



1.434,200 

2,133,700 

8.906,300 

2,387,400 

1,640,100 
434.832 

1,283,100 
669,300 
741,060 
370,176 

1.762.800 
803.140 
914.031 
686,024 

1,194,600 
619.331 
124,750 

1,099.600 
733.820 
760.680 
406,638 
369,655 
424.607 
421.940 

1.004,900 
801.800 
393.490 
671,300 
426.960 
816.700 
488.010 
875,200 
390.000 
646,400 
343.600 
735.814 
740,300 

2,037.400 
787.280 

1,707,600 
692,000 

1,139,200 

S9, 808,838 



2,^1.100 
4,256,100 
7.968,200 
4,^1.200 
8,176.200 

932,062 
2,612,000 
1.380,000 
1.632,130 

784.969 
3,660,600 
li 662, 290 
1,906,505 
1,449,637 
2,413,600 
1,274,871 

263 ,,610 
2,142.900 
1.448,620 
1,637.280 

832,668 

763,681 

868,638 

900,793 
2,027,400 
1,676,600 

825.136 
1,235.400 

856.105 
1.720.800 

996.987 
1.838.800 

801.100 
1.374.200 

693.700 
1.511,009 
1,474,300 
4.146,600 
1,646,700 
3.446.600 
1,371,200 
2,266.100 

81,816,970 



44,744, ri> H5. 585.941 



43,232.838 



87.976.970 



370.390 

449,441 

0^55,45^. 

1,114.800 

1,035,700 

1.778,900 

1.262.300 

1.900.900 

2.028,400 

2.640.600 

2,321.900 

1,439,500 

2,264,000 

78,860 

1,408,900 

427,000 

1,993,120 

1,280,700 

1,136,000 

26,806,760 



714,870 

909,040 
1,928.766 
2,233.023 
2,068.549 
3,499,609 
2.469,012 
3,685,166 
3.920.692 
4,918,212 
4,556.225 
2.777.189 
4.368.955 

139.926 
2.764,398 

836,400 
3,953,324 
2,483,680 
2.282,470 

60,498,JtOO 



362,740 

560.560 

929,650 

1,088,600 

991,100 

1,732.600 

1.202.600 

1.833.700 

1.911.300 

2.408.600 

2.249,100 

1.366.100 

2.123.600 

65,407 

1,390,300 

420.800 

1,950,080 

1,263.900 

1,031,000 

$4,871,887 



733,130 
1,000.000 
1,805.100 
2,203.300 
2,026.800 
3.511.400 
2,464.800 
3.743.600 
3.939.700 
4.949.000 
4,571,000 
2,806,600 
4,387,600 

144,267 
2,799.200 

847.800 
8,943.200 
2,644.600 
2.167.000 

60,676,987 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



382 



Public Ssbyigb Coioossion — Fibst Distriot 



TiJBLB n. Tjraflle itfttistics: Sabway and eleTatad itition records, bj half ymxB and yaan, 

1930 ^- Coatiaaod 
(B) Ticket salea at Maohattan Riilway (Intarboroach Elevated Difidoa) stationa ~ Coatinoad 



Ldtsb and Stationb 



Six month a 

J^anuaiy- 

June 



Year ended 

Juneao, 

1920 



Six months 

July- 
Oeoember 



Year ended 
Deoember 
81. 1920 



Thibd Avenxtb — Conctudad 

200th Street* 1 North 

\ South. 

204th Street » / North 

I South. 

Williamsbridce — 210th Street * 

Total, Webster Avenue 

Extension 

Misoellaneous ^ 

Adjustment of joint traffic on White 
Plains Road line; deducted from 
Subway division 



122,698 



229,942 



6,327 
26.160 

3,370 
89,560 
46.190 

169,607 
43.961 



255.918 



5.827 
26.160 

3.870 
80.560 
45.190 

169,607 
166,659 



255,918 



Grand total — Third Avenue line. 



Grand total — East side 
Bronx) devated 



75.045.506 



145.160,315 



73.720.614 



148.766.120 



(Manhattan- 



106.958.283 



205.168.051 



104.529,253 



211.487,536 



Average per day • . • . 

Average, countmg Simdays one-half day. 



587.683 
632,889 



560.568 
603,435 



568.094 
611.282 



577,885 
622.022 



Ninth Avbnub 

South Ferry * 

Battery Place 

Hector Street* 

Cortlandt Street* 

Barclay Street 

Warren Street* 

Franklin Street 

Desbroases Street*. 

Houston Street 

Christopher Street* 

14th Street* 

23d Street 

30th Street 

34th Street* 

42d Street 

50th Street 



North.. 

North.. 

South. . 

North.. 

South. . 

North. . 

South. . 

North.. 

South. . 

North. . 

South. . 

North.. 

South. . 

North.. 

South.. 

North.. 

South. . 

North.. 

South. . 

North., 

South.. 

North.. 

South.. 

North.. 
, South. . 
(North.. 
1 South. . 
[North.. 
\ South. . 
f North.. 
\ South.. 
..South.. 



69th Street* 

Miaoellaneous 

Grand total — Ninth avenue line <. 
Sixth Avbnus } 

Rector Streef jsouth. ;: 

CortUndt Street (skwlth " 

Park Place {g^tr 



1,051.066 
981.071 
150.700 
343.135 
124,800 

1.522,100 
500.790 
469.200 
181,200 

1,053.620 
203.260 
397.460 
196.228 
495.220 
315.660 
353.535 
212,468 
923,900 
756.000 
933, 90Q 
824.860 

1.027.600 
913.800 
459,565 
412,300 
897,700 
756.900 

1.017.769 

1.197,000 
675,559 

1,059,860 

802,960 

36.627 



2,203,499 

2,085.483 

311.240 

054.151 

250.620 

3,002.929 

970,648 

938.150 

331.300 

2.028.366 

385.364 

781.255 

366.832 

962.352 

606.866 

687.206 

424,978 

1.740,350 

1,414.539 

1.718.901 

1.527.800 

1.877.044 

1.697,100 

845.678 

777.860 

1,709.735 

1.423.100 

1.941.171 

2,197,700 

1.075.035 

1.973.620 

1.514.360 

66.905 



1.421.289 

1.079.845 
180,320 
330.412 
123.000 

1.578.00Q 
517.110 
512,400 
202.600 

1,085.400 
233.490 
383.120 
208.442 
492.280 
343,260 
373,666 
227,306 
856,800 
753.300 
867.300 
824,060 
928.400 
883.050 
418.624 
405.500 
888.700 
770.800 
999.615 

1.154.4 
537 ,.C 

1.006.£ 

760.220 

15.602 



2.472.355 

2,060.416 

331.020 

673.547 

247.800 

8.100,100 

1.017.900 

981.600 

883.800 

2.189.020 

436.750 

780,580 

404,670 

987.500 

658,920 

727T201 

439.774 

1.780.700 

1.509.300 

1,791,200 

1.648.920 

1.956.000 

1,796.850 

873.189 

817.800 

1.786.400 

1,527.200 

2.017.384 

2.351.400 

1.112.645 

2.066.440 

1.568.180 

52.229 



21.147.313 



40,492.137 



21,345.977 



42.498.790 



776.830 
631.903 
1.539.700 
315.830 
796.900 
41,8JI<2 



1.632.003 
1,203.173 
3.065.814 
624.745 
1.651.801 
77.276 



769.640 
641.306 
1,589.280 
843.679 
845.960 
54.497 



1.546.470 
1.273,209 
3.128.980 
669.509 
1.642.860 
96.309 



* Express station. 

> Opened October 4. 1920. 

s See also Third Avenue Line and note 1 on first page of this table. 

s The southbound traffic of the 59th street station is divided by the company about equally 
between the Sixth and Ninth avenue linee; all the northboimd traffic is classed asSixth avenue. 

* Ninth avenue traffic originating north of 59th street is included under Sixth Avenue Line. 
See also notes 2 and 3. above. 

* Sixth avenue traffic originating south of Rector atreet ia rrlaaaed aa Ninth avenue. 



uiyiiizeu uy 



Google 



Street Railway Companies 



383 



TABLE DL TMfflc 
(B) Ticket mOm at 



Subway and elevated atatioii recordi, by half yean and yean, 

x^ao — Continaed 
Railway (Intarboroacb Elevated Dlriaion) lUtioni— Continaed 



Lnras Ain> Stations 



Six montha 
January- 
June 



Year ended 

June 30, 

1920 



Six months 

Jubr- 
Deoember 



Year ended 
December 
31. 1920 



Sdctb Armua — Continued 

ci-"'*"^*^' {^t.: 

FHnklmatreet (North- 

G«»««8t«et (North.. 



Bleecker Street. 
8th Street 



North. 
South. . 
North.. 
South.. 

""'S'^^ jaSS^:: 

iSthStr^ (North.. 

2m 8t^ \^t: 

»«' Street (North.- 

*"Str«t (North.. 

38th Street ( £°'th. . 

1 South.. 
*2d Street JNor^th.. 

«>tl^ Street {North.. 

53d Street {o"^^^' 

\ South. . 
58th Street South. . 

Total. Rector St. to 58th Street 

59th Street » / North. . 

I South.. 
66th Street* 1 North. . 

\ South.. 
72d Street /North. . 

1 South.. 
8l8t Street / North. . 

\ South.. 
86th Street [ North. . 

\ South.. 
93d Street ( North. . 

99th Street .^.^:^'^•: 

104^»» Street {North.. 

110th Street i North. . 

116th Street* .^.^^^i 

125th Street* ( ?°^J^- 

I ooutn. . 

130th Street / North. . 

\ South.. 
135th Street / North. . 

1 South.. 
140th Street J North. . 

] South.. 
145th Street* / North. . 

1 South. . 
151st Street f North. . 

167th Street* .^.iSJJih.:; 

Total. 69th St. to 167th St.». . . . 

iok Avenue South .. . 

ierson ana Jerome Avenuee. South. . . 

Total, 162d St. Connection . . . . 

^Express station. 

*■ See footnote 8 of preceding page. 



8edj;wi( 
Anderst 



819.318 

60.090 

621.404 

104.317 

732.500 

231.812 

1.264.232 

601,02^ 

987.900 

383.353 

1.345.210 

498,540 

975.200 

417.485 

1,294.760 

671,800 

956.350 

542.180 

1,747,700 

2.022,600 

1.069.800 

684.300 

2,021,300 

1,288,620 

1,079.680 

634,140 

511,607 

613.725 

424.300 



1,602.467 

113.903 
1,225,2:^ 

196,235 
1,411.976 

414.461 
2.400.825 

940,566 
1,861,776 

744,558 
2.592J 

965,l„ 
1,869.608 

815.385 
2.471.415 
1.283.360 
1.803.166 
1,088.380 
3.431,517 
4,051,573 
2.050.374 
1.322.900 
3,848.560 
2.512.920 
1,961.869 
1.200.140 

928.997 
1.150.355 

827.995 



876.735 

60.124 

619.570 

98.702 

768.500 

221.691 

1,172,399 

511,077 

891.060 

372,807 

1.303,100 

519.099 

905.600 

409,115 

1.176,940 

631.540 

879,030 

525.360 

1,731.300 

2.126.900 

977.900 

657.600 

1,968,500 

1.321.980 

1.000.400 

603,860 

495.037 

571,915 

377,760 



1,696,053 

120,214 
1.240,974 

203.019 
1.501,000 

453,503 
2.436.631 
1.012.103 
1,878.960 

756,160 
2.648.310 
1,017.639 
1.880.800 

826.600 
? i7K700 
1 ..Eui.rHo 
l.^-S."i.riso 
] JH'.7,..:>40 

4,1 (i>.iyJO 

1.^41.800 
3.«*«J,&0(J 
2,61U,60U 
2,0ilJO.0SO 
1,2M.OOO 
J .fKJ7 , 544 
1.1H5,640 



28.608.224 



55.433.276 



28.020.763 



56.628.987 



1.081.000 

802.960 

758.900 
1.301.364 

431 . 100 

060.000 

381.400 
1.301.000 

383.500 
1,177,000 

318,300 
1,266,100 
1.790.000 

363.220 
1,785.800 

227.350 
1.284.140 
2,602,000 

883,400 
2,451,300 

148.310 
1.163,600 

118,060 
1,272.000 

102,716 
1,618.400 

189.140 

2.408,000 

57,220 

710,600 
1,652.816 



1.894.248 
1,514.360 
1,377,435 
2,477.7'24 

764.112 
1.777,200 

681,757 
2.445,300 

670,993 
2,058,000 

567,744 
2,372,600 
3,394,359 

649,677 
3.421,200 

389.250 
2.468.320 
4.961.901 
1.626,689 
4,724,600 

256,285 
2,283.800 

210.892 
2.536.700 

182.325 
3,161.500 

327.437 
4,694,500 

100,140 
1,341.300 
3.274.042 



966,400 

760,220 

688,500 
1.237,936 

377,900 

897,880 

338.700 
1,218,200 

335,600 
1.005.100 

286.400 
1,182,000 
1.728.300 

343.580 
1.687,400 

200,550 
1.198.780 
2.506.100 

833.100 
2.395.500 

112.690 
1.158.000 

114.140 

1,310.900 

93,477 

1,578.600 

197.640 

2.339.200 

56.545 

700,120 
1.919,274 



2,047.400 
1,568.180 
1.447.400 
2.539.300 

809,000 
1,857,880 

720,100 
2,519,200 

719,100 
2,272,100 

604.700 
2,449,000 
3,518.300 

706.800 
3,473.200 

427,900 
2,482.920 
5,108,100 
1,716,500 
4,846.800 

261.000 
2,321.600 

232,200 
2,582,900 

196,193 
3.197.000 

386,780 
4,747.200 

113.765 
1,410,720 
3,572,090 



30.990,696 



58,606,399 



29,859,632 



60,850,328 



419,400 
375.630 



823,615 
718,018 



427,300 
356,440 



846.700 
732,070 



795,030 



1,541,633 



783.740 



1,578,770 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



384 



Public Servicb Commission — First District 



TABLE DL TiaiBc atatiitics: Subway and elevated slatioii records, hy half yean 

1920 — Continued 
(B) Ticket sales at Manhattan Railway (Interborouch Elevated Division) stations — 



Concluded 



Lines and Stations 



Six months 
January- 
June 



Year ended 

June 30. 

1920 



Six months 

July- 
Deoember 



Year ended 
Deoember 
31. 1920 



Sixth AvnNua — Concluded 

Misoellaneous 

Adjustment of joint traffic on Lexinjgton 
Ave.; deducted from Subway Division. 



Grand total — Sixth avenue line ^ . 
Grand total — West side elevated . 



129.548 
3,870,427 



244,896 
7,548,585 



61.933 
3.708.687 



191.481 
7.579.114 



64.393,925 



123,374.289 



62.434.755 



126.828,680 



85.541,738 



163.866.426 



83.780,732 



169.322.470 



Average per da^ 

Average, oountins Sunday one-half day. 

Grand total — all Elevated Division lines 



Average per day 

Number of Simdays included 

Average, counting Sunday one-half day. 

(C) Fares collected at Brooklyn Rapid 

Transit Blevated-Subway Division 

stations 

Compiled from monthly reports 

COUPANT-OWNSD L1NB8 
BROOKLTN BSIDOB 

Park Row East. . 

Sands Street 



470.010 
506.164 



447,722 
481.960 



455,330 
489,946 



462,630 
498,007 



192,500,021 



360,034.477 



188,309,985 



380.810,006 



1,057,692 

26 

1,139,053 



1,008,291 

52 

1.085,396 



1,023,424 

26 

1.101.228 



1.040.464 

52 

1,120.029 



8,330,067 
1,186,694 



16.^99.727 
2.234,282 



7,939,742 
1.091.484 



16.269.809 
2,278.178 



Total. 



9,516,761 



18.934,009 



9,031,226 



18.547.987 



FULTON STRBBT LINE 

Fulton Feny East. . 

Court Street East. . 

Myrtle Avenue West. . 

Boer um Place ^ |^- ; 

Elm Place East.'." 

Duffield Street West.. 

Flatbush Avenue. 



Lafayette Avenue [ West 

Cumberland Street \ wSrt 

Vanderbilt Avenue (^tV ' 

Grand Avenue I ^*- ' ' 

Franklin Avenue 

Noetrand Avenue 

Tompkins Avenue 

Troy Avenue 

Reia Avenue 

Ralph Avenue 

Saratoga Avenue 

Rockaway Avenue 

Atlantic Avenue 

Hinsdale Street 

Pennsylvania Avenue 

Van Sicklen Avenue \ ^zt* ' ' 

Linwood Street ( ^^ ' ' 

Montouk Avenue ( ^^^ ' ; 

Chestnut Street ( wSt." ' 

Crescent Street | ^^ ■ • 



to 



75,636 
911.394 

30,406 
1,107,587 

16,170 
1,092,464 

10,904 

2,116,424 

264,732 

11,386 
234,805 

30,154 
275,059 

60,756 
214.069 
211,503 
705,346 
745.989 
503,884 
644,969 
741,554 
986,857 
1,027,831 
588,927 
1,289,895 
204,570 
767,036 

33,377 
957,896 

38.909 
883.370 

22,803 
546,468 

10,476 
415,806 

11,355 
202.134 
663,919 



137,984 

1,622,416 

57,225 

2,031,155 

29.945 

1.959.724 

38.612 

3,862,201 

466,497 

22,329 

425>,755 

53,012 

471,507 

104.740 

382,200 

376,096 

1,244,547 

1,296,166 

899,243 

1,143,278 

1,334,815 

1,790.635 

1,918,094 

1.106.972 

2.578.012 

451.820 

1.508.318 

64,234 

1.765,621 

76.886 

1,636.186 

44.605 

1,018.170 

19.974 

800.350 

23,148 

394,815 

1,331.398 



60.400 
560.904 

26.984 
701,712 
.15,372 
680.120 

17.619 

1,422.334 

184,344 

9,831 

181,397 

23.772 
211.435 

45,182 
169.387 
160,835 
704,582 
648,057 
448.527 
576.274 
691.141 
907,849 
953,005 
592.891 
1.317.303 
205.374 
747,365 

33,813 
957.652 

39.056 
886.684 

21,865 
548,783 

10,233 
411,466 

10,818 
203.398 
674,755 



136.036 

1.472.208 

57.390 

1,809.290 

31.542 

1,772.584 

37.523 

3.538,758 

449.076 

21.217 

416,202 

53,926 

486.494 

105.088 

383,456 

372.338 

1.409.028 

1.394,946 

952.411 

1.221.243 

1.432,695 

1,804,706 

1.980^836 

1.181.818 

2,607.198 

409,944 

1,514.401 

67,100 

1,915.548 

77,965 

1,770,054 

44.668 

1,095.251 

20.709 

827.272 

22.173 

405.532 

1.338.674 



18,666,890 



84,488,694 



16,065,419 



S4,7»9,8S9 



Grant Avenue (" City Line ") 

Total. Pulton Ferry 

Grant Avenue 

1 See footnote 4 of seoood page preceding. 

Note (Div. C). — Because of much routing of trains of one line over sections of track of other 
lines, station ticket sales cannot in all oases be definitely classed or equitably apportioned by routes. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



385 



TABLE IX. Txmfic ■tetistks: Subwtr and •Uvate4 atetifta rccoctU, by luUC jmn a 

1990 — Caotiattod 
(C) FtfM coUected at BrooUvn Rajid TcaaaU eloratad-ittbiM; divigioa atatiooa ~ Coateaed 



Lines and Stations 



Six months 

January- 1 

June 



Year ended 

June 30, 

1920 



Six monthfl 

July- 
Daoember 



Year ended 
December 
31. 1920 



CouPANT-owNBD LiNBS — Continued 
KULTON STBXET LINE — Concluded 

Hudson Street 

Boyd Avenue 

Rockaway Boulevard 

Oxford Avenue 

Grf^nwood Avenue 

Lefferts Avenue 

Total, Liberty Avenue ex- 
tension 

Total. Fulton Street Line 



62.540 
179,577 
200,138 
140.206 
210,912 
376.438 

1,175,871 



140,894 
356,862 
438,722 
297.723 
414.587 
767.025 



19.841,691 



76,798 
190, 7»7 
225.449 
158.8321 
249.324 
406. 09S 

1,807,898 



36.904.507 



I7.37U317 



LBXINDTON AVBNUB UNB 

Hich Street East. . 

Adam. Street [^- 

Bridge Street 

Navy Street 

Vanderbilt Avenue 

Washincton Avenue 

Myrtle and Grand Avenues 

De Kalb Avenue / ^wit. . 

Oreene Avenue | S?*i' ' 

Franklin Avenue i &**/ ' 

Noetrand Avenue ( ^^- • 

Tompkins AVenuc '. j^***- • 

Sumner Avenue i §?■* 



Reid Avenue. 



IWest. 



[East.... 
I West. . . . 

Gsttf»s Avenue 

Halsey Street 

ChauBoey Sireet 

lilanhattan Junction ^ 

£astem Parkway » 

Alabama Avenue 

ITan Sicklen Avenue ( V9mi ' ' ' 

CIcvelaDd Street 

Norwood Aveaiae 

Crescent Street 

•Cypress Hills 

Total, High Street to 

Cjrpress Hills 

Eklf^rt's Lane 

Forest Parkway 

Woodhaven Boulevard 

Freedom Avenue (102d Street). . . 
Greenwood Avenue (111th Street) 

Spruce Street (121st Street) 

Metropolitan Avenue 

^ueen s Boulevard 

Sutphin Road (L. I. R. R depot) . 
Newark Avenue (160th Street) . . . 
Cliffside Avenue (168th Street) . . . 

Total. Jamaica Avenue 

extension 

TotaU Lexington Avenue line. 



MTBTUI AVBNUB LIVE 

Franklin Avenue 

Nostrand Avenue 

Tompkins Avenue 

Hoaoner Avsnus 

Central Avenue 

Knickerbocker Avenue 

Wyrkoff Avenue 

Total. Franklin 
Wydccff Ave.. 



Ave. to 



83,626 

1,344.531 

12,196 

756.816 

320,469 

490,050 

501,571 

238.239 

120.434 

127.957 

73.407 

101,116 

121,873 

157,765 

162.714 

256.002 

142,262 

218,363 

195,050 

358.348 

132.807 

306.130 

2.161,688 

2.090.419 

1.400.426 



4SS,568 
215.536 
51.832 
340.163 
488,209 
547,373 
543.446 
19^.905 

14,890,461 
380.276 
758.528 
503.234 
511.846 
560,434 
287.510 
109.321 
167.990 
200.952 
716.917 
436,367 

4,798,376 



10,628.836 



431,002 
541,770 
675,855 
364,166 
681.748 
1.202.944 
1.811.788 

S,7$9,t71 



144,956 

2,318,299 

21,718 

1,338,486 

600,727 

885,535 

886,021 

418.094 

219.635 

232,634 

125.003 

180,174 

209,414 

278.451 

279.404 

456,392 

244.238 

386.079 

334.923 

631.308 

234,743 

5M.O0O 

3.965.164 

3.875.805 

2,847,801 

22.786 

735,243 

420.781 

96,596 

636.390 

923,246 

1.026.474 

1.035,619 

371.782 

$6,939,911 
724,882 

1,431.441 

1.111,150 
966.606 

1.024.672 
520.397 
195.051 
^13,827 
551.329 

1,373,846 
894.100 

9,107,801 



36,047,212 



762.318 
037,886 
1,241,668 
6/8.323 
1.266.606 
2,385.176 
8.061.382 

10,897, ten 



69,5791 

1,343.971 

14.098 

761.869 

334,840 

487,459 

491.052 

232.432 

108,716 

110. f 

70,354 

103.272 

121,291 

151.522 

163.324 

253.387 

134.398 

225.226 

185,061 

342.832 

128.359 

307,205 

1.992.764 

1.940,267 

1.417.650 



139,338 
370.374 
425.587 
305.098 
460,238 
783.136 

M, 483, 799 



37,213.008 



152.205 

2,688.502 

26.294 

1,618.685 

664.309 

986.509 

902,683 

470.871 

220.150 

238,706 

143.761 

204. 38S 

243.164 

309.277 

826,038 

509.470 

276.680 

443,580 

380.111 

701.180 

261.256 

613,335 

4.154.452 

4.030.686 

2,908.076 



465,5901 
232,245 
50,710| 
308,775. 
442, 26r 
500.200 
500.563 
1:00,315 

14 f 182, 45.5 
383,705 
693,339 
548-, 251 
480,183 
517,910 
299.607 
117,667 
162.487 
328,816 
753,187 
512,322 

4,797.894 



18.979.759 



431.232 
523,167 
635.570 
351.092 
620.544 
1.237.440 
1.680.149 

5.488,194 



931.158 
447.781 
102.542 
64S.038 
030.470 
1.047.582 
1.044.009 
387.220 

99,019,89$ 
763.081 

1.446.867 

1,141,485 
002,020 

1.068,3<4 
587,117 
226,888 
830.427 
610.768 

1.470.104 
048,689 

9,588,699 



38,608.605 



862,234 
,064.937 
311.425 
715.289 
311.292 
,630.384 
491,935 



11 .987.485 



s Manhattan Junction station was dosed on August 5, 1919. on which date the Eastern Parkway 
station was opened. 



13 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



386 



Public Service Commission — First District 



TABLE IZ. Tnflle gtatistict: Sulmmj and elevated ■tatfon records, by half yean and years, 

X9ao — Contiatted 
(C) Pares collected at B nwklyu Sapid Transit etovated-sabway division stations — Continned 



Likes and Stations 



Six months 
January- 
June 



Year ended 

June 80, 

1920 



Six months 

July- 
Deoember 



Year ended 
December 
31. 1920 



CoMPANT-owNXD LiNns — Continutd 

MTBTLB AVKNTE LINE — Condtuitd 

Seneca Avenue 

Foreet Avenue (Madison Street) 

Freeh Pond Road 

Metropolitan Avenue WoBt — 

TotaJ, Lutheran Cemetery 
extension 



976.007 
1,389.793 
1.609.728 

532.266 



1.806.528 

2.494.740 

2,711.050 

871.102 

7,885, 4^ 



937.303 
1,337.687 
1,582.949 

563,706 

4,4£l.e4S 



1.913.310 
2,727.480 
3,192.677 
1.095.972 

8,029,4^9 



ToUl. 



10,307,065 



18.210.680 



9.909.839 



20,216.904 



BROADWAT ELEVATED LINK 

Marcy Avenue \ wSt.'. *. '. 

Hewes Street 

Lorimer Street 

Flushing Avenue 

Myrtle Avenue 

Kosciusko Street 



811,106 
1.561.596 
1.673.584 
1.780.435 
2.361.806 
2.014.931 

878,932 



1.409,672 
2,406,314 
2,695,986 
3.188,158 
4,206.648 
8.745.357 
1.609.691 



804.412 
1.307,760 
1.447.984 
1.573.790 
2.202,418 
1.855.869 

815.931 



1,615.518 
2.869.365 
3.121.568 
3.354.225 
4.564.224 
3.870.800 
1.694.863 



ToUl. 



11.082.390 



19,261.826 



10.008.173 



21.090.563 



CANABSIB UNB 

Sutter Avenue 

Livonia Avenue 

New Lots Road 

East 105th Street 

Rockaway Parkway 

Flatlands Avenue ' 

Avenue L i 

Canarsie Terminal ^ West. 



2.192,111 

1.898,581 

1.649.347 

5,649 

389.802 

(0 

223.058 



066.545 
612.003 
881,582 
15,132 
726.270 

(») 
520,777 



1,973.826 

1,648.563 

1.426.300 

5,812 

433,485 

(») 



323, 



881 



165.937 
517.144 
075.737 
11.461 
823.287 
(') 
C») 
546.939 



ToUl. 



6.358,548 



11,822,318 



5.811.957 



12,170.505 



BRianroN bbach unb 

Dean Street 

Park Place 

Botanic Garden > 

Prospect Park 

Parkside Avenue 

Church Avenue 

Beverly Road 

Cortelyou Road (Avenue C) 

Newkirk Avenue 

Avenue H 

Avenue J 

Elm Avenue 

Kings Highway 

Avenue U 

Neck Road 

Sheepehead Bay 

Sheepshead Bay Speedway ' . . . . 

Brighton Beach * 

Ocean Parkway 



257 
556 
45 
402 
268 
852 
268 
478 
648 
329 
553 
394 
710 
330 
153 
742 



296 
.750 

878 

484 
,800 

078 
.031 

454 

;52i 

.34i2 
.215 
,327 
.441 
.928 
,332 
,390 



183 
411 



,560 
619 



447,828 

1.011.-372 

71.032 

763.629 

508,271 
1.425.592 

485.034 

861,643 
1.211,806 

603.112 
1.004,611 

732,414 
1.323,107 

613.322 

326.776 

1.639.372 

71.133 

535,585 
1,136.919 



155.899 
347.502 
47.037 
737.509 
234.928 

1.142.640 
231 .970 
419.668 
844.253 
272.307 
537.379 
367,728 
909,974 
334, 1U3 
145.932 

1,237,824 



413.195 

904.252 

92,915 

1.140.083 
503.728 

1.994.718 
500.901 
898.122 

1.492.n4 
601.649 

1,090.594 
762.055 

1.620.415 
665.141 
299.264 

1,980.214 



382,770 
500.254 



566,330 
911.S73 



Total. 



7.588.346 



14,771.958 



8.849,877 



16.438.223 



riFTH AVENUE (BAT RIDGB) LINB 

Fulton Street 

Atlantic Avenue 

St. Marks Avenue ^. Eiw^. . . 



588.411 
720,851 
114,000 
106,381 



1,058.829 

1.320.904 

207,407 

184,942 



632.810 
809,628 
121.123 
102.673 



1.221.221 

1,530,479 

235.123 

209.054 



1 Canarsie Terminal station closed since Oct. 18, 1020, on which date the shuttle trains operating 
beyond Rockaway Parkway station since Oct., 1917, were repUced by surface cars. Fare collec- 
tions are made by conductors and are included in the " Conductors Collections less misoeUaneous." 

3 Formerly called Consumers' Park. 

* Special trains run during police field days, July 19 and 26, 1919. 

* Fare booth dosed since 12:01 a. ra. October 17, 1920; fares of passengers boarding trains at this 
station are collected by trainmen except between 6:30 a. m. and 9:30 p. m., when they are collected 
by a speciaLagent. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



388 



Public Service Commission — First District 



TABLE n. Tnflic statistics: Sutmsy sad elevAted ststioa records, by half ystrs sad yesfs, 

1930 — Continued 
(C) Fsres collected at Brooklyn Rapid Transit elevated-subway diTision stations— Continued 



Lines and Stations 



Six months 
January- 
June 



Year ended 

June 30, 

1920 



Six months 

July- 
December 



Year ended 
December 
31. 1920 



City-owned Lines — Continued 

CENTRE STREET LOOP 

Chambers Street 

Canal Street 

Bowery 

Eaeex Street 



10,075,870 
1,699,660 
3.408.872 
5.024,012 



19.231,853 
3.298,518 
6,613,089 
9.240,620 



6.841.438 
1.374.267 
2,918.023 
4,693.690 



16.917.30S 
3.073,927 
6,326.895 
9,717,702 



Total . 



20,208.414 



38.384.080 



15,827.418 



36.035.832 



BROADWAY-FOUBTH AVENUE LINE 

Broadway Line 

Whitehall Street 

Rector Street 

CortUndt Street 

Cvty HaU.... 

Canal Street 

Prince Street 

8th Street 

Union Square 

23d Street. 

28th Street 

34th Street 

Times Sc|uare 

49th Street 

57th Street. 

Fifth Avenue 

Lexington Avenue 



784,633 
970,750 
2.671.628 
1.649.839 
1,672.078 
1.883.482 
2.042.170 
6.534.005 
4.020.620 
2.315,304 
6,214.222 
6.950,926 
1,912,568 
1.637.297 
607.475 
1,134.257 



Total. 



43,901,254 



Queens Plaxa ^ 



Queent Station 



Canal Street Connection 



Broadway . 

Fourth Avenue iBrooklyn) Stations 
Myrtle Awnue (Gold Street). 1^ ^\ • 

De Kalb Avenue 

Pacific Street. 
Union Street.. 
9th Street 



1.034,305 



Prospect Avenue . 
25th Street . .. 



36th Street 

45th Sueet 

53d Street 

50th Street. 

Bay Ridge Avenue . 

77th Street 

86th Street... 



/ East. .. 

■ \ West. . . 

. (East... 
\West... 

f East . . . 

■ \West... 
i East. . . 

• \Weat... 



West. 



939.003 

453.521 

3.331.393 

5,959,848 

429,769 

620,304 

553,869 

1,318,260 

389.263 

894,704 

198.255 

538,570 

2,053,317 

1,519.834 

1.527.180 

2.263.956 

1.381,498 

1,141,954 

760,199 



Total. 



26,274,697 



St. Felix Street and Flatbush Avenue 
Connection 

Atlantic Avenue » 

Seventh Avenue » 



Total 

1 Opened Aug. 1, 1920. 



1,267,619 

1,827,295 

4.906.471 

2,970.240 

3,012,268 

3,316.980 

5.085,365 

12,341.383 

7,283,364 

4,213,364 

11,087,119 

12,318,014 

2.957,431 

2,655,106 

854.309 

1,492,745 



1.401.296 
1,324,452 
3.662,525 
2.609,543 
1,511,872 
1.602,647 
2.329.279 
5.924.497 
3.401,336 
1,835,3" 
5.763.9^2 
6.544.603 
1.623.486 
1.340,596 
488,429 
954,350 



2,185.929 
2.295.202 
6.334.153 
4.259.382 
3,183.960 
3,486.129 
5,271,449 
12.458.502 
7,421,956 
4.150,613 
11,978.154 
13.495.529 
3,536,054 
2.977.893 
1,095,904 
2.088,607 



77,589,073 



42.318,152 



86.219,406 



546,491 



546,491 



1.761,984 



1,165.541 



2.199.846 



1,744,137 
783,310 

5.900.458 

10,937,562 

782,876 

1,144.083 
945.532 

2.402,394 

664.511 
1,633,636 

351.262 
1.013,126 
3,800,471 
2,797,827 
2,818,518 
4,370,212 
2,548,174 
2,170,610 
1.370,273 



48,178,972 



663,192 

416.631 

3.393,799 

4,505.584 

371,298 

550,864 

461,327 

1.146.394 

313,171 

841.059 

165.344 

459,517 

1.874.862 

1,411,185 

1.482,802 

2.037.861 

1,293,763 

1.039,741 

754,666 



1,602,195 

870,152 

6,725,192 

10.465,432 

801,067 

1,171,168 

1,015,196 

2.464.654 

702,434 
1.735.763 
363,509 
998.087 
3.928.179 
2,931,019 
3,009,982 
4,301,817 
2,675,251 
2,181,695 
1,514,755 



23,182,940 



49.457,637 



434.895 
390,122 



434.895 
390.122 



825,017 



825,017 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



389 



TABLB iZ. T^Afic statirtiBB: 9itkmv mn€ etovatMl stetioii recovis, by hatf yean and yean, 

1920 — Concluded 
(O Fares collected at Brooklyn Rapid Transit elerated-subway division stations— Concluded 



Lnma axd Statzonb 


Six months 
January- 
June 


Year ended 

June 30, 

1920 


Six months 

July- 
December 


Year ended 
December 
31, 1920 


CiTT-owxBD LiXES — Condudcd 

BHOADWAT-FOURTH AVSNUB MNB — 

Conclude 
New UtrwH AwnuB LifU 
9th Avenue 


660,665 
1,054,512 
818,494 
721,989 
176,097 
768.101 
579.663 
998.171 
584.758 
637,350 
107.665 
162.112 


1,188,182 

1.990.227 

1.516.797 

1,316.751 

323,086 

1,434,376 

1.108,619 

1,745,908 

1.076.328 

1.161.548 

208.747 

362.568 


621,546 
1.023,134 
772,299 
717,^26 
185^332 
769.473 
577,705 
997,283 
594,311 
664,818 
89,665 
111,265 


1. 282. 211 
2.077.636 




50th Street 


1,590,793 


55th Street 


1.439,314 


62d Street » 


361,420 


71it Street 


1,537,574 


79th Street 


1.157.368 


18th Avenue 


1.905.454 


20th Avenue 


1.170.069 


Bay Parkway 


1.302.177 


25th Avenue • 


197,330 


Bay 50th Street » 


273.377 






ToUl 


7.269.586 


13.442,227 


7.124.146 


14,803,732 






Montagm Street Tunnel Line 
Court Street » 






817.635 


817.635 










Tetal, stations on dty-owned Knes 


101,514.197 


184,501.976 


94,852.631 


196.366,828 


Grand total, aO stations 


200.956,006 


375,282,929 


190,911.215 


301.867.223 






AddiHmu 
Conductors' collections (excl. Rockaway 
Beach div.) .... 


622,467 

865,567 

3.262 
D 11,918 


1.283.963 

1.561,234 

5,909 
D 6.274 


792.137 

636,211 

1.075 
n 25,573 


1,414,604 


Oflioe ticket sales-cash (station record 
P. 1) 


1.401,778 


Office ticket sales-credit (station record 
Exp. Table) 


4.337 


IVfinfJlaneouB adjustments * 


D 87,491 






Total additions 


1,479.378 


2.844.832 


1.303,850 


2,788,228 






Gross total collections 


202.435,388 


378.127,761 


192.215,065 


394.650.451 






Deductions 

Tickets collected by trainmen (duplicated 

above) 


172.471 
385.113 


466.016 
879.110 


6.907 
307,077 


179,378 


Payments to other B. R. T. system 
companies (5-oent fares) '. . . . 


692,190 






Total deductions 


557,584 


1.345,126 


313.084 


671,568 






Net total. N. Y. Consolidated 


201.877.802 


376,782,635 


191.901.081 


393,778,883 






Average per day 


1.109,219 

26 

1.194.543 


1.029,461 

52 

1,108,184 


1.042,941 

26 

1.122,229 


1,075 890 


Namber of Sundays included 


52 


Avetrace. counting Sunday one-half day. . 


1,158,173 



1 Opened Aug. 1, 1920. 

* For one entrance only. Other entrances are included under New Utrecht Avenue station of the 
Sea Beach line. 

•Opened May 1. 1920. 

* Net figures of " over and short adjostments " and " miscellaneous petty cash adjustments." 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



390 



PuBUC Service Commission — Fibst District 



TABLE DC. TnUHc statistics: Subway and elevated statioa records, 1910— Contisuied 

(D) Ticket sales of typical months of the Hudson and Manhattan — segregate for New Jersey 
ana by stations for New York City. 

Note. — Pasoengers between New York and New Jexsey via the Christopher street tunnels 
pay a supplementary two-cent fare. All the traffic represented by the itaUo figures is therefore 
included m the figures printed in roman type, but not always in the figure just above, since the 
number of two-cent tickets sold on the Sucth Avenue branch represents not only southbound 
passengers but also some northbound. In April, 1920, the company changed its method of 
reporting ticket sales. Theretofore the distribution among stations was estimated; thereafter 
the company reported actual traflic by stations. 



Stations 


July, 
1919 


November, 
1919 


March, 
1920 


June, 
1920 


1920 • 


December. 
1920 


Hudson Terminal: 
5^ 


1,396.198 


1,538,671 
■■949;553 


1,807,081 
' 97i;i94 


54.543 
1.421,830 

"766;883 


70.215 
1.396,830 


41,530 


e^::::::::::: 


1,727,042 


6.67^ 


909,361 




8.67^ 


■*722;378 
16,590 




JiSJ ..:::;:: 








764.811 


Christopher Street: 


73,912 
147,038 


94.482 
181,039 


120,975 
220,876 


18,030 

"'58i8i2 
10,241 

604 

'721722 
15,011 


24,180 


2i 




6.67^ 


"*58;682 
10.330 

633 




loi ..::.: 








72,256 


9.2^ 








10,572 


9th Street: 

5^ 


81,490 
130,995 


105,495 
179,642 


122,976 
206,942 


1,309 


2J:: :::.::::: 




6.67rf 


■''73;i78 
15.975 

2,189 




10^ 








95.189 


9.2^ . . . 








17.862 


14th Street: 

5i 


138.693 
£99,623 


173.598 
368,667 


196,485 
410,288 


2.622 

"iisiisi 

21.057 


5,459 


2ft 




6.67rf 


* 125,032 
20.249 

1,731 




10^ 








172,036 


9.2^ 








22.885 


19th Street 

a 


79.250 
m,647 


95.108 
219,688 


106,683 
244.779 


1,999 
10,801 


2.754 


2i 




6.67^ 


'"73;686 
10,735 

441 




lOJi ^ 








86.874 


9.2^ 








12.048 


33d Street: 

5^ 


127,443 
288,690 


141.148 
332,966 


175,977 
398,436 


' 534 

"i26;i93 
23,380 


743 


2i 




6 67^ 


"i2i;897 
21,261 

55 




loi 








146,100 


9 2^ 








28.570 


28th Street: 

6t 


78,270 
187,607 


85.498 
809,824 


102,431 
248,617 


84 

■"68;249 
12.852 


108 


2?::::::::::: 




6 67^ . 


13.560 




lOi 








87.568 


9 2^ 








17.151 


33d Street: 

6^ 


529.349 
1,179,061 


664.242 
1,462,759 


730.395 
1,567,600 






2i 


■■532;7i3 
82,865 


"549;338 
117.362 

3,821,402 

138.477 

1,876,346 




6 67^ . . . . 




lOf! 








716,062 


9 2^.. 








141,830 


Stations in New 

6i 

6.67^ 

8 67^ 


3,754,180 
2.833,296 

■926;884 


4,298,741 
3,338.868 

"959;873 


4.769,943 
3.802,520 

"967;423 


3,791,789 
120,665 

1,878,192 
857,729 
758.995 
176,208 


2,191.913 




717,291 
209,472. 




10^ 








1,134.669 


7 2^ 








763,424 


9.2i 










250.914 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 391 

TABLE S. Tnfic statistics; Saliwsy ^ad slsvated stttlon rscords, xgao— Concluded 



Statxomb 


isfe 


November, 
1919 


March, 
1920 


'June, 
1920 


September. 
1920 


December, 
1920 


Total 

5^ 


7.223.146 
X 5.392.901 
*M, 489,661 

i;836i245 


8.176.536 

>6,267,110 

$,984,464 

i.'969.'426 


9.104,140 
7,165.523 
8,997,686 

i.'938.*6i7 


7.285,913 
199.081 

8.'866;622 

1.914.517 

1,519.878 

352,415 


7.312.010 
230,331 

3;273;i76 

i;049;899 

1.439,669 

418.944 


8.686.027 
226.747 


2i 




6^ 

6.67^ 

8.67* 


3.918.955 


iSf/....;::::: 








2,5i6.263 


7.2^ 

9.2^ 








1.528,235 
601.827 














1 IndodM 05X)OO 
>bichidfls3a000 


■alesof treasi 
■alesoftreM 
■alMof treasi 


arer. 
uer. 
irer. 











Digitized by LjOOQIC 



302 Public Skrvicb Commission — First I>:i:strict 

TABLE K. CASUALT-^, ipa*: WkSOJfS 



QPERATXKG StRBXT RaILWATS 



Rapid TRATfBir 

Intorboroiu^ Rapid Transit 

New York CoDBolidated, Receiver 
Hudson A Manhattan 

Firet P. S. C. District 

Outside Pint Dietriot 



Total 

Manhattan and Bronx SusrACE 

Tnird Avenue 

Belt Line 

Dry Dock. E. B'way A Battery 
42d St.. Manh. A St. N. Ave. . . 
Mid-Cro88town (to Aug. 9, 1919) 

New York City Interborough 

Pelham Pk. A C. I. (to Aug. 9, 1919) 

Southern Boulevard 

Union 

Westchester Electric 

First P. S. C. District 

Outside First District 

Third Ave. system in city 
Brooklyn A North River (to Oct. S, 1919) 

Second Avenue. Receiver 

New York Railways, Receiver 

Eighth Avenue (from Aug. 1. 1919) 
Ninth Avenue (from Oct. 1, 1919) 
N. Y. A Harlem (from Feb. 1, 1920) 



Total 

Brookltn and Queens Surface 
Brooklyn City (from Oct, 19. 1919) 

Brooklyn Heights, Receiver 

Brid«(e Operating * 

Bklyn , Queens Co. A Sub., Receiver 
Coney Island A Bklyn.. Receiver 

Coney Island A Gravesend 

Nassau Electric, Receiver 

South Brooklyn 

Transit Development Co 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit surface 
Manhattan Bridge 3-Cent Line 

Van Brunt St. A Erie Basin 

Other Brooklyn surface 

New York A Oueens County 

Longlsland Electric 

First P. S. C. District 

Outside First District 

New York A Long Island 

First R. 8. C. District 

Outside First District 

Ocean Electric 

N. Y. A North Shore (to May S, 1920) 

First P. S. C. District 

Outside First District 

Manhattan A Queens, Receivers 

Other Queens surface 

Total 

Richmond Surface 
Richmond Light A R. R., Receiver 
Staten Island Midland, Receiver 
Southfield Beach 



Total 

Total, street-surface lines 
Grand total 




Note. — Includes passengers, employees and others. Companies omitted report " Nodo." 
1 Includes deaths occurring within ten days after and resulting from accident. 
s Includes contusions, dislocations, lacerations, loss of an eye, burns resulting in deBtniotioo of 
■kin. asphyxiation, fractures, internal injuries and all injuries r^u|f,y^ m 4^^«tlMNP«'^ ^ 
three days after accident. O 



Stbebt Rau^wat Companies 













Sbbious IsjUBim* 


Total 
fataU- 

ties 

and 
serious 
injuries 


Minor 
iajuriei^ 


Total 


Prao- 
tured 
skuS 


Ampu- 
tated 

limb 


Biohen 


Other 


Total 


THXXBOr AMONO 


fatali- 
ties 
and 


limb 


injury 


Pas- 


Em- 




injuries 












sengers 


ployees 








16 




46 


31 


93 


58 


32 


141 


11.412 


11.553 


7 


1 


9 


16 


32 


23 


7 


58 


774 


832 






7 


80 


87 


69 


18 


99 


ISO 


'J! 






5 


26 


31 


28 


3 


32 


94 






2 


54 


56 


41 


15 


57 


66 


Ui 


23 


1 


62 


126 


212 


ISO 


57 


288 


12.346 


12.634 


4 


1 


11 


64 


80 


16 


10 


86 


•12 


997 


1 




t 


9 


11 


1 


3 


12 


101 


Its 


1 


i 


2 


26 


30 


3 


1 


30 


iSI 


209 


4 




8 


19 


31 


3 


7 


34 


303 








1 


1 


1 




1 


6 


7 






5 


10 


IS 


5 


1 


18 

1 


271 


289 

t 








10 


10 


7 




U) 


267 


277 


3 


3 


12 


84 


102 


39 


12 


108 


1.589 


1.697 








IS 


iJ 


6 


M 


H 


Mes 


B79 








1 


1 


1 




1 


67 


68 








11 


11 


4 


2 


13 


208 


221 


IS 


6 


SO 


as 


g9S 


80 


se 


SIS 


,.0^ 


4.sn 

27 






6 


83 


80 


34 


11 


90 


190 


20 


6 


I 


30 


81 


117 


37 


18 


134 


3,724 


8.86B 


1 


1 


1 


6 





2 


5 


12 


174 
63 


189 

•a 






4 


4 


8 


1 


7 


9 


127 


139 


19 


7 


89 


4D9 


615 


154 


77 


558 


8.143 


8.901 


8 




14 


25 


47 


M 


6 


56 


1.705 


1.760 


4 


1 


12 


3 


20 


7 


3 


26 


1,209 
63 


1.325 
69 


1 


1 




5 


7 


2 




7 


420 


«27 


4 


1 


6 


4 


15 


6 




21 


638 


650 








2 


2 


2 




2 


23 


25 


11 


2 


23 


29 


66 


21 


5 


76 


2.193 


2.2aB 


1 





3 


1 


5 




2 


8 


ae 


7Q 


1 






3 


4 




4 


8 


706 


7U 


SO 


6 


5* 


7» 


166 


48 


iff 


sot 


7,10% 


7,S10 


1 









1 


1 




1 


2 


3 




















47 


«r 


1 








1 


/ 




/ 


^ 


so 


1 




6 


24 


31 


17 


2 


37 


634 


671 


1 





i 


6 


7 


5 


i 


7 


lOA 


lU 


1 




1 


6 


7 


3 


1 


7 


94 
10 


101 
10 






J 





10 


1 


i 


IS 


196 


SOB 








9 


9 


1 




K) 


70 


88 




.'....'. 


1 




1 




1 


2 

f 

2 


126 


138 
72 

>( 
•1 

3 






1 


38 


39 


6 


4 


40 


56 


96 


2 




P 


76 


87 


«7 


ff 


M 


1,064 


ijes 


33 


5 • 67 


148 


253 


76 


26 


301 


8.221 


8.523 






1 


2 


3 


3 




4 


44 


48 


N. R. 


N. R. 


N. R. 


N.H. 

1 


N.R. 

1 


N.R. 


N.R. 


N.R. 

1 


N.R. 


N.R. 

1 






1 


3 


4 


3 




5 


44 


49 


52 


12 


148 


560 


772 


233 


103 


864 


16.608 


17.472 


75 


13 


210 


6^ 


984 


383 


160 


1.152 


28.054 


30.106 



* Indudes scratches, slight cuts, sptatns* bums cauriag only 
requiring the seryices of a physician. 

« See note 10 on first double page of Table XIV, A. 



redjMBSs of skin and otinr injuries no* 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



394 Public Service Commission — First District 

tablb zi. claims on account of 



Operating Street Railways 



ACTXTB WITRZN THE YeAR 



Pending 

at 

becinnint 

of year 



Broucht 

durinc 

year 



Total 



Rapid Transit 

Interborouch Rapid Transit 

New York Consolidated, Receiver 

Hudson & Manhattan 



Total., 



Manhattan and Bronx Surface 

Third Avenue 

Belt Line 

Dry Dock, E. B'way A B 

42d St., Manh. A St. N. Ave 

Mid-Crosstown (to Auf. 9, 1919) 

New York City Interborouch 

Pelham Park A City Island {to Aug. 9, 1919) 

Southern Boulevara 

Union 

Westchester Electric 

8d Ave. ssrstem in city 

Brooklyn A North River (to Oct. S, 1919) 

Seoond Avenue, Receiver 

New York Railways 

New York Railways, Receiver 

Eighth Avenue (from Aug, 1, 1919) 

Ninth Avenue (from Oct. /, 1919) 

N. Y. A Harlem {from Feb. 1, 1920) 



Total. 



Brookltn and Queens Surface 

Brooklyn City (Jrvm Oct. 19,1919) 

Brooklyn Heights, Receiver 

Bridge Operating « 

Brooklyn, Queens Co. A Sub., Receiver 

Coney island A Brooklyn, Receiver 

Coney Island A Gravesend 

Nassau Electric, Receiver 

South Brooklyn 

Transit Devdopment Co 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit surface 

Manhattan Bridge 3-Cent Line 

Van Brunt St. A Brie Basin 

Other Brooklyn surface 

New York A Queens County 

Long Island Electric 

New York A Long IsUnd 

Ocean Electric 

New York A North Shore (to May 5. 19iO) 

Manhattan A Queens, Receivers 

Other Queens surface 



ToUl. 



Richmond Surpacb 

Richmond Light A R. R., Receiver 

•Staten Island Midland, Receiver 

Southfield Beach 



ToUP 

Total, street-surface lines '. 
Grand total ' 



1,143 

1,187 

126 



2.856 



377 

68 

93 

90 

13 

M19 

3 

X63 

S466 

68 

1,S69 

83 

«168 

2,248 

170 



3.988 



8.860 

3 

558 

406 

42 

1,606 

87 

144 



9 

29 

8 

21 

>11 

19 

19 

107 



7,002 



88 

•N. R. 
2 



00 



11.080 



•13,436 



1.055 
412 



1.491 



290 
37 
69 
76 
5 
60 



28 

287 

28 

S80 

8 

98 

31 

1,096 

84 

40 

20 



2,257 



230 
356 



64 

180 

8 

394 

29 

40 

,U1 

1 

13 

5 

17 

29 

2 

21 

109 



1.368 



55 

N. R. 

2 



57 



3,682 



5,178 



2.198 

1,599 

50 



3,847 



667 
105 
162 
175 

18 

179 

3 

91 
753 

96 

41 

266 

2.279 

1.266 

84 

40 

20 



6,245 



230 

4.216 

3 

622 

626 

50 

2,090 

116 

184 

8JS7 

10 

13 

55 

58 

13 

38 

40 

21 

40 

£10 



8.370 



143 
N. R. 

4 



147 



14,762 



18,609 



Note. — Companies omitted report *' None." 
1 Increase of 1 over figure at close of 1919. 

* Increases in figures reported at close of 1919 due to adjustment of 1919 figures, as follows: 
N. Y. C. Interborough, 56; Southern Boulevard, 18, and Union, 75. 
« Not reported at close of 1919. 
< See note 10 on first double page of Table XIV, A. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 



395 



INJUSIBS, 


Z93o: (A) Damage suits 










Releaae 
obtained 


Settled 

before 

trial 

by 

payment 

to 
claimant 


Disposed of duuno tbb Ybab 


Pendinr 
at dose 
of year 


without* 
payment 

to 
claimant 


Judg- 
ment 
rendered 


mlsBcd 


Claim 
out- 
lawed 


Claim 

otherwise 

disposed 

of 


ToUl 




571 

113 

15 


58 

151 

6 


324 

11 

2 




208 
123 


500 

285 

8 


1.037 




1,201 




2T 








600 


215 


337 




331 


883 


2.265 








85 
24 
30 
37 

43 

ii 

132 
11 

S78 
10 
38 

382 

16 
2 
3 


7 
2 
5 
7 


100 
14 
17 
32 


3 


71 

10 

7 

21 

6 

1 

5 

21 

7 

36 

1,722 

160 

8 

3 


187 
26 
20 
60 

33 

1 

10 
07 
27 

4ro 

00 

1.736 

202 

17 

5 


805 




55 




lOS 




78 




.18 




7 


21 


loa 




2 




1 
36 

4 
99 


4 

40 

16 

£63 


70 






1,406^ 




25 




10 
14 
42 

4 


' 50 


12» 




54S 




672 




5 
2 


51 




3» 






17 












834 


130 


310 


3 


2,083 


2.535 


2.875 








25 
21 

7 

10 

7 

62 

13 

1 

166 

2 

1 

8 

22 

5 

17 

13 

6 

Of 


10* 
50 


1 
10 




16 
100 

15 

40 

5 

80 



63 

St7 

6 

io 

5 

ki 


27 
160 

31 

50 

.a 

12 

53 
478 

i 

J 
8 
1 
10 
5 

2 

te 


17a 




4.035 




5 


.< 


14 
7 
2 

37 
2 


2 
3 


584 

557 




36 




12 

1 


1.80O 




,ISl 






lit 


g9 


'•'"I 






1 
1 




11 






19^ 




2 


2& 




I 


7 






11 








22 








21 




1 

9 


1 
5 


33 




IfS 




220 


125 


32 




348 


•505 


7.645 






""nVr. 


2 


'"nVr. 


■■'nVr. 


■"nVr. 


11 
N. R. 


11 

N. R. 


106 

N. R. 

2 












28 








11 


11 


108 












' 1.082 


264 


342 


3 


2.442 


3,051 


10,629 








1.781 


470 


670 


3 


2,773 

-' ■ 


3,034 


12,804 


- 





■ Includes 1 judgment rendered in 1010 but on appeal, not included with Suits pending at close 
of 1010. 

• Reported as 56 at close of 1010. 

' EzdusiTS of Staten Island Midland. 

* See notes 1. 2, 3. 5 and 6 above. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Public Service Commission — First District 



TABLB XI. CUinM on acooont of injwiM* 19M: 



Operating Street Railways 



CLAiacs Settled (Rblbabe 
I Suit) 



Number 



Amount 



Interborough Rapid Transit 

July, 1919-Junc, 1920 

July, 1918-June, 1919 

July, 1917-June, 1918 

July, 1916-June, 1917 

July, 1915-June, 1916 

Prior to July. 1916 

New York Consolidated, Receiver. 

July, igi9-June, 1920 

July, 1918-June, 1919 

July, 1917-June, 1918 

July, 1916-June, 1917 

Hudson ^ M«.hattan { ^?tSdf ^ Si^Si^?;. 



July. 1919-June. 1920 j },^^^^fSi ^^:^ . 

July. 1918-June. 1919 { ^-it^dfiS gSS^;/. 

July, 1917-June, 1918 — Ist P. 8. C. District. . 

July, 1915-June, 1916 — Ist P. S. C. District. . 
Third Avenue system 

July. 1919-June. 1920 

July, 1918-^une. 1919 

July, 1917-June, 1918 

July, 1916-June, 1917 

July, 1916-June. 1916 

Prior to July, 1915 

New York Railways, Receiver, and former lessors'. 

July. 1919-June. 1920 

July, 1918-June, 1919 » 

July, 1917-June, 1918 • 

July, 1916-June. 1917 • 

July, 1915-June. 1916 • 

Prior to July, 1915 • 

Other Manhattan surface 

July, 1919-June. 1920 

July. 1918-June. 1919 

• July, 1917-June. 1918 

July, 1916-June. 1917 

July. 1915-June, 1916 

Prior to July, 1915 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit surface 

July. 1919-.Tune. 1920 

July. 1918-June, 1919 

July. 1917-Juno, 1918 

July, 1916-June. 1917 

July, 1916-June. 1916 

Prior to July. 1915 

Other Brooklyn surface 

July, 1919-June, 1920 

July, 1918-June, 1919 

Queens surface 

July, 1919-June. 1920 

July, 1918-June, 1919 

July, 1917-June, 1918 

July, 1916-June, 1917 

July, 1915-June, 1916 

Richmond surface 

July. 1919-June, 1920 

July. 1918-.Tune. 1919 

July, 1917-June, 1918 

Grand total 

July. 1919-June, 1920 

July, 1918-June, 1919 

July, 1917-June, 1918 

July, 1916-June, 1917 

July. 1915-June. 1916 

Prior to July, 1915 



s,47e 

3,156 

314 

3 

3 



1M9 

1,142 

287 



70 



62 

92 

8 

6 



2,621 

2.151 

414 

36 

8 



12 
1,859 
1,618 
»335 

1 
1 
1 
3 

se 

24 

11 

1 



S,S48 

3.313 

228 

6 

2 



41 
41 



i,ise 

1.030 

103 

2 



1 

18S 

156 

25 

2 

H,S97 

12,786 

1,731 

50 

14 

2 

15 



267.^53 40 

20.270 67 

240 00 

700 00 



75,760 02 

59.076 86 

20.241 24 

t Or 3.590 52 

X22 44 

7,769 IS 

5,952 85 

6,772 73 

4.465 75 

996 40 

1,487 10 



209,046 6S 

172.168 11 

32.051 02 

3.921 64 

678 90 



226 96 

197,190 47 

131.611 98 

» 53.405 25 

'7.159 08 

7 2,852 88 

926 41 

M , 174 87 

1,221 66 

935 16 

276 50 

10 00 



•271,094 79 

•220.896 48 

•28,025 39 

♦25,732 96 

•1,342 19 

•.»«Cr 2,766 58 

•, »«Cr 2.195 65 

1,114 75 

1.114 75 



70,555 69 

59,842 25 

9,526 52 

805 00 



179 92 

10,662 96 

8.925 87 

1.617 09 

120 00 

1,198,601 02 

933,063 34 

167,897 18 

34.398 16 

5.596 41 

Or 1.660 25 

Cr793 82 



< Consists of Cr. $3,599.36, unexpended balance, and $8.84, additional payments on settlement* 
previously reported. 

' Represents additional payments on settlements previously reported. 
•/. e.. New York A Harlem, Eighth Avenue and Ninth Avenue. 

* Suits compromised excludes a deduction of 2 suits, $3,600.00 and Judgments paid eashides 
a deduction of 1 judgment, $6,118.00 for " adjustments of amounts shown in (N. Y. Railways) 
report for year ended June 30. 1919, account of cancellation of Audited Vouchers Unpaid." 

• Entirely N. Y. Railways. Receiver, except 1 claim settled, $2,596.80, and $4,554.01 additional 
pajrment on claims previously reported, for N. Y. Railways Estate account. 



uigmzeu uy -^.j v.-' 



^5- 



Street Railway Companies 

(B) SetOnnntB sccordteg to periad of aeeideat 



397 



Sttits Compbokubd 


JuDOMSNTS Paid 


Total Sbttlbments 


Number 


Amount 




Amount 


Number 




671 

202 

226 

90 

46 

4 

3 


SieftJSO 00 

33.318 00 

75.198 15 

37.018 85 

16.375 00 

2.575 00 

1.675 00 

18,401 SO 

7 925 00 

10.476 50 


68 
27 
14 

11 
5 

1 

IS 

3 
9 

i 

i 

75 

16 

29 

18 

7 

2 

17 

S 

i 

1 

i 

so 

15 

10 

3 

2 

i 

1 

i 

1 

'mV9 

86 
80 
33 
16 
3 
2 


%61,S46 04 

5.938 35 

6.622 18 

13.335 04 

12 286 75 

23.164 72 


4 JOS 

3,385 

654 

104 

64 

6 

3 

1,65A 

1.212 

342 

77 

107 

63 

96 

10 

11 

3 

1 

S,069 

2.287 

588 

131 

37 

12 

14 

*2,S64 

1.866 

•492 

41 

U 

1 

3 

87 

36 

19 

22 

9 

2 

5,755 

3,450 

266 

11 

7 

1 

i 

2 

1,199 

1,067 

131 

9 

2 

211 

172 

31 

8 

16,66S 

13,666 

2.446 

289 

108 

22 

22 


8616,960 11 

300.504 75 

102.091 00 

50.588 89 

29.360 75 

26,739 72 

1.675 00 


US 
67 
46 


11,292 26 
6.708 52 
4,583 73 




106, 44S 77 

73,710 38 

35,301 47 

iCr 3.500 62 








S22 44 


7 


4,087 60 

,898 60 

SO 00 

850 00 

692 50 

1.042 50 

3,100 00 

225 00 

176,878 00 

42.907 50 

58.815 00 

51,032 50 

17.643 00 

6,175 00 

400 00 

*76,61fS 81 

33.815 46 

41.718 35 




11,806 68 


8 
I 


i,oes 12 


8.908 47 
6.792 73 


4 




5,3 5 75 


2 




1.686 90 


4 
3 


1.063 12 


3.592 72 
3,100 00 


1 




225 00 


975 

120 

145 

77 

22 

10 

1 

225 
140 


117,926 28 

7.340 93 

28.493 60 

17.086 67 

51.293 11 

8.755 07 

4.956 00 

* 14,787 AS 

6.202 §1 

8,684 64 


608,844 91 

222.416 54 

119.359 62 

72,040 71 

69,515 01 

14,930 07 

5.582 96 

* 287,461 75 

171.630 26 

■103.708 24 

4. '7.169 08 


W 


4, '2,852 88 






926 41 








U , 174 87 


j? 


6,287 00 

364 00 

1,258 00 

3.080 00 

550 00 


•16,667 08 


22,166 74 
1,299 16 


8 




1.534 50 


20 
8 


13.204 40 
60 16 


16,384 40 
610 16 


1 

122 

28 

3 

3 

1 


35 00 

^et,068 01 

49.032 93 

6.325 00 

•1,175 08 

•5.500 00 

25 00 


2.802 62 
49,680 87 
15.243 98 

9.280 95 
11,739 44 
13.415 90 


2.337 52 
•S82,77S07 
285,173 39 
•43,631 34 
•38.647 48 
•20.258 09 
•,»«Cr 2,741 58 






•,"Cr 2,195 65 


5 
1 
2 


268 40 

58 40 

210 00 

48,820 00 

17,095 00 

16.585 00 

7.560 00 


620 00 
520 00 


1,90S 16 

1,693 15 

210 00 


6f 




11S,67S 69 


27 




76,937 26 


28 




26.061 52 


7 




8.355 00 








1 


2,150 00 

6,618 86 

8.700 00 

928 25 

1,890 00 

660,889 97 

180.081 29 

213.189 25 

104.841 48 

39.968 00 

11.150 00 

2.110 00 




2.329 92 


17 

15 

5 


6,201 06 
5.201 06 


22,882 26 

17.826 92 

2,646 84 


6 




2.010 00 


i,«7 

795 

635 

206 

79 

17 

5 


277,4^2 64 
47,166 64 
68.628 22 
66,456 46 
77.054 92 
31.919 79 
7,258 62 


1,976, S'S 6S 

1,109,300 27 

439.714 66 

194,696 04 

122,619 8S 

41.400 54 

8,574 70 



•Entirely Estate account of N. Y. Railways. . , ^ ^ , „ ,«,« 

'Additional pajmients on settlements previously reported are mcluded as foUo'vs: 1918, 
$4,754.67: 1917, ^17.64 and prior to 1916. $66.60. 

• Includes $2,362.68, which represents 7 per cent in 2 eases. 

• IncludoB additional paymenU on settlements previously reported, as follows: Claims Mettled, 
1919. $8,236.68; 1918. $11,427.98; 1917. $1,242.19; 1916, $369.84, and prior to 1916, $424.58; 
suiU oompromised, 1918, $600.08. and 1917, $1,500.00. 

M Includes Or. $3,126.42, unexpended balances. 



u Includes Cr. $2,620.23, unexpended balances. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



398 Public Service Cobocission — First District 

TABLB Xll. BHPLOTBBS AlTD WAOSS: (A) Number of oflean 





Genbsal Ofticb 


OpsBATxiva Stbbwt Railways 


■- 
Officers 


CUBBICAL 


Others 






Men 


Women 


ToUl 


Rapid Tbanbit « 
Interboroush Rapid Tranait 


«8 
26 


635 
52 


'\l 


•242 

7 


1 016 


SudBon A^anhaitan 


98 






Total* 


34 


687 


144 


249 


1 114 






Manbattan and Bbonx Sctbfacb 
Third Avenue tyw^^^^tn *,•.,., , - r - - 


21 
1 
5 
(•)11 
14 
14 
15 


111 

A 

19 
13 
8 


48 

8 

26 

4 
4 
2 


60 

4 

88 

4 


240 


Brooklyn A North River ito Oct. 6/19). .. . 
Second Aveoue. Receiver . , , , 


1 
19 


New York Railways, Receiver 


217 


lEighth Avenue 


37 


Ninth Avenue 


31 


IJ. y. A Harlem 


29 






Total 


81 


250 


87 


156 


574 






Brookltn and Qubbns 
Brooklyn City 


T6 


24 

""27i 

""kbe 

i#12 

17 4 

"1 
i 

18 


1 

*'"i83 
194 

i 

ise 

17 10 

"10 

3 

S6 


26 

■'"366 
S9M 

'\t 

""S9S 
3 
1 

1 

i 

e 


57 


Brooklyn Rapid Transit: 

Elevated-eubway 




Surface 






General 


is 


788 


Total. Bklyn Rapid Tranait i« 
"Bufih Terminal 


84 


l^anhattan BridW 3-Cent Line 


Marine 77. 




Van Brunt St. A Erie Baain 


3 
80 
«2 
»»3 

2 
6 

H 


4 


Total. Brooklyn 


866 




29 


Lons Island Electric " 


18 


New York A Long Island ^ 


12 


Ooean Electric 


1 


New York A North Shore (to JIfay S, '$0)... 
^Manhattan A Queens, Receivers 


4 
9 


Total, Queens 


79 






Total 


44 


314 


171 


399 


928 






lEllCHMOND Con PANISa 


6 


5 


17 


7 


35 






Orand total, esduding Yonkers and 


164 
165 


1.254 
1,256 


419 
419 


811 
811 


2.648 
2.651 


Orand total, inol. Yonkers and Hastings. . . 



NoTB. — No segrecation of maintenance of way and struetures employees is made. For the most 
part linemen are induded under Power, and trackmen under Transportation — Others. 

i Bsospt Brooklyn ft North River and New York A North Shore, which show figures for dose 
«>f period of operation. 

> New York ConsoUdated is included under B. R. T. (Brooklyn and Queens). 

> Included with other general offioe employees are oflioials. heads of departments, eto.. 143. 
«Conmstsof lliird Avenue. Dry I>ocic 42d St., Manh. ft St. N., Belt line. AQd-CrosstowB 

^operation discontinued Aug. 9, 1919). N. Y. City Interborough, Pelham Park ft City Island 
<operation discontinued Aug. 9, 1919), Southern Boulevard. Union, and Westchester Eleetric; also 
Yonkers R. R. and Hastings Ry., two Second District companies. 

* Indudes 837 employees of the Yonkers and Hastings railroads m foUows: Officers. 1; derks 
<men). 2; conductors, w: motormen, 87; other transportation, 38; car housss and shops, 26. 

* Excludes 8 officers who hold offices in the Interborough Rapid Transit Co. 
' Aversge number for the 35 5-7 weeks from Oct. 19, 1919, to June 24, 1920. 

* Indudes 42 student motormen. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



400 



Public Sbbvicb Commi8Sion — First District 



TABLB Zn. Ib rnt ko fm aad imcm: (B) Pkhit wtton «r 



OpKuniio Snm Rawwais 



Strxbt Railway 



of way and 
structures 



Maintenanoe 

of 
equipment 



OperatioD of 

electric power 

pUnt 



Hudson A 



Rapid Tkansiti 

Kapid lYanaH 

' .ttan" 



Total*.. 



Manhaitaii akd Bnoifz Sdwacb 

Tliird Avenue tystemV 

Brooklyn k North River ttoOeL6,'19) 

Second Avenue, Receiver 

New York Railways, Rocdver , 

ESgfalh Avenue (fnm A«if. i,*ltf) 

Nindi Avenue {from Oct 1/19) 

N. Y. A Harlem Orwi^«6. 1, 'SO) 



Total. 



Brookltn AMD Qunra 

Brooklyn City {Jrom Oct. J 9, '19) 

Brool^ Rapid Transit^ 

Bush Terminal 

Manhattan Bridge 3-Cent Line 

Mtfine 

Van Brunt St. ft Erie Basin 

Total Brooklyn 

New York A Queens County 

Long Island Electric 

New York ft Long Island 

Ocean Electric .... .... 

New York ft North ShonitoMay 5. '90) '.'.'.'. 
Manhattan ft Queens, Receivers 

Total Queens 



Total. 



RlCBMOKD SuiTACn" 

Richmond Light ft R R, Receiver \ 

Staten Island Midland. Receiver / 

Southfield Beach w 



Total. 



Onmd total, rzduding Yonkers R. R. 
Onnd totol, inehiding Yonkers R. R . 



12,690,162 03 
270,782 00 



12,770,800 00 
273.440 04 



$1,270.550 80 
SIS. 900 93 



12,000,034 00 



03.050.337 02 



11.600.559 70 



0053.490 00 



0097,040 86 



$351,209 29 



88.850 82 
787,025 50 
80.282 
3.722 59 
07,003 12 



$1,085.890 07 



$1.488 34 
2,052.212 03 

5.192 59 



9,058,893 66 

109.561 57 

27,523 20 

35,468 58 

6,467 00 

8,228 19 

0,455 22 

199,703 76 



$2,252,597 32 



$75,807 23 
54 00 



$75,801 23 



00.952,873 02 
0,981,282 71 



50,905 92 

745,820 51 

0,569 40 

671 45 

38,573 49 



98.704 42 



146 60 



$1,546.186 02 



$450.060 37 



$4,087,055 

(») 

0.539 70 

892 96 



$928,240 07 



4,094,J^ 98 
124.326 78 
18,027 69 
17,223 04 
16,983 67 
10.386 48 
19.155 36 
906,103 09 



998,948 67 
16,695 64 

3.048 80 
21,830 00 

4.687 41 
13,680 90 



69,899 88 



$4,300,591 00 



$988,189 50 



$155,743 10 
61 11 



$155,804 21 



$0,087,804 16 
9.052,919 45 



$8,020,104 80 
8,088,760 06 



1 New York Consolidated included under B. R. T. 

> Collection account, $112,225.02; Suspense iteoos, S211.730.33; Investment real eaUte. 92,444.48; 
Manhattan By. Co., $4,500.45; Elevated eztexmion real estate, $1,185.61; R. C. Rathbone 4b Son. 
$63.^17.05. 

' See note 2 on f 2 of tbn division. 

« See note 4 on Drv. A of this table. 

• The toul compensation paid by the Yonken R. R. Co. was $457,006^.74, distributed as fouows: 
Maintenance of -way and stmctures, $38,400.60; maiiitenanee of equipment, $15,115.20; power. 
$8,654.80; operation of ears, $397,508.76; injuries to persons and property, $776.80; other general 
expenses, $6,451.40. 

• Includes operation of printinc plant, $10,434.71, and suspense, $10.87. 
' Includes construction m process, $10,580.94. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



402 Public Service Commission — First District 

TABLB Xn. BmplojMt and wmm: (B) Diitfilmtioii of 

§2. By 



Opbiutino Stbbst Railways 



Rapid Transit > 

Interborouch Rapid Transit 

Hudson ft Manhattan * 

Tq^l 

Manhattan and Bbonx Surpacb 

Third Avenue system > 

BrookWn St North River (to Ort. J, '/«) 

Second Avenue, Reoeiver 

New York Railways. Reoeiver 

Eighth Avenue {/rem Aug. i, *19) 

Ninth Avenue {from Oct. I^'IV) 

N. Y. db Harlem {from FA. l^MO) 

Total 

BSOOKLTN AND QUBCNS 

Brooklyn City {from Oct. 19,*19) 

Brook&n Rapid Transit 

Bush Terminal 

Manhattan Bridge 3-€ent line 

Marine 

Van Brunt St. A Erie Basin 

Totol Brooklyn 

New York ft Queens County 

Long Island Electric 

New York ft Long Island 

Ocean Electric 

N»w York ft North Shore (to May 8,*M0) 

Manhattan ft Queens, Receivers 

Total Queens 

Total 

Richmond Subfacx* 

Richmond Light ft R. R.. Receiver 

Staten Island Mkiland, Reoeiver 

South^eW Beach 

ToUl 

Grand toUl, ezdudinc Yonkers R. R 

Grand total, iaoludinc Yonkers R. R 

t ■ . ■_■ ■■ !-■ -J..L.- ■■■■ 

1 New York ConsoUdated included under B. R. T. 

s The tdUl compensation distributed here indudes $457,881.22. outride operations, and a 

f>ortion of $151 ,850.73, fixed capital and other accounts, which was paid to other than railway labor 
isted in Div. A of this table. 

' See note 5 on preceding double page and note 4 on Div. A of tlus table. 

* Includes $848.41 charged to maintenance of tracks, representing only one week's wages of 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



404 



PuBUc Sebvicb Commission — Fiiurr District 



TABLE KH. BnployeM and miges: (C) Atvnfe Iworir 

§1. 





Ratb FEB Hora (C»m) Accobdino to Dueation or Snna 


OpKunifa Stbbbt IUilwats 


First 
half- 
year 


Second 
half- 
year 


Seoond 

year 


Thinl 
year 


Fourth 
year 


fUth 
year 


Sixth 
ywr 


RAFBD T»AlfBIT» 

CoDdaeton 


53 

56.25 
46 


69 
53 

56 26 
46 


60 
54 

66.25 
46 


62 
67 

56.25 
46 


62 
57 

66.26 
46 


62 
67 

56.25 
46 


62 


Guards 


57 


Oll4^Kt4n ... 


56 25 


QwudB 


46 






Total* 






















BfAmurrAM and Bronx Sustaob 
Eleeirie-ooDfeMt 


62 
49 

52 
52 

52 
49 
52 
62 
52 


62 

49 
52 

52 

49 
52 
52 
52 


64 

82 
54 
64 

54 

62 
54 
54 
64 


57 
54 
57 
67 

57 
54 
57 
57 
57 


68 
55 

56 

68 

65 
58 
68 
68 


59 

67 
59 
69 

59 
57 
59 
59 
69 


62 






Broddyn A North River* 


59 


OowDtrATcmio, Raoeiver 


59,62 


New York RaiiWiya, Receiver: 


50,62 




57 


Eichih Av^n^if • .,. 


59.62 


Ninth Avenue* 


59,62 


New York and Hnrlem* 


62 






Totol 














. 






BnooKLTN Aim Quman SonrAon 
Rmnlrkm RAniH Tranffit mUfm* 


54 
49 
52 
52 

52 

52 
62 
68 


64 

49 
52 
62 

52 

52 
52 
52 
44 

46 


65 
50 
54 
68 
63 
52 

64 

64 

46 
48 


57 
52 
67 
54 

52 

57 
57 

48 
60 


67 
52 
62 
55 

52 

66"" 

50 
51 


57 
62 
62 

67 

52 

59 
52 
52 




yy, . J , / Conduoton 


57 


Elevated wbway 1 g;^"" 


52 




62 


KTAnhAttan Bridflre 3-Oent Line 


57 


Marine 


— ■ 


Van Brunt St. A Erie Basin 


52 


Other Brooklyn surface 

New York A Queens County 


59,62 


T-rnie Tnland Rifictrtc 


59,62 


New York A Lons Isbnd 


59,62 


Ooean RIfwtrie 


52 


Manhattan k Oueenfl. TiMfmrrm . 


52 


Other Queens surfaoe 


■ — 






Total 













' 


— 


RlCimOND COMPANIU 


50 


55 


60 


60 


60 


CO 


60 


Total. BtraeHRiHiMe lines 














— 


Grand total r 













' ' 


— 



NoTB. — Division C does not include the Bush Terminal, which did not report the necessso' 
data. It employed only 3 motormen at the close of the year. ,. 

» For some companies the number of employee^ as given in Div. C exceeds the corresponainj 
figure of Div. A, in some cases because the schedule on which the former is based contains the ni^- 
ber on the rolls at the close of the year, while that on which the latter ia baaed contains the numoer 
who actually worked and received pay during the last week; in others, beoause *PP*™?'**'.ir* 
schedule on which Div. A is based merely gives the number working on the last day <>r^lX^' 
The smaller number of Interborough ticket agents and motormen given in Div. C than in Wv. a 
are unexplained. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



406 



Public Service Commission — First District 



TABLE Zn. Bmyloyees and wagM: (C) AT«imge hoorly 





RAn na Houn (Cum) Acookkm 


TO DuKATum or Smvicb 


OpKUTIlf G SXBJOT RaILWATI 


year 


Second 
year 


Seeond 
year 


Third 
yaar 


Fourth 
year 


Rfth 
year 


fixtb 

OB 


RarbTraiikt* 
Intcrboioash Ranid Tnuuit 


08 
70 


70 


78 
70 


77 
70 


81 
70 


86 
70 


M 




70 






Total" 























Mamkattak and Bbohx SuwAoa 

"^itesr^ 


A2 
49 

52 

62 
40 
52 
52 
52 


52 
49 
52 

52 
49 
52 
52 
52 


54 
52 
54 
54 

54 
52 
54 
54 
54 


57 
54 

67 
67 

67 
54 

57 
67 
57 


58 
55 
68 

68 

58 
65 
68 
68 
58 


60 

67 
69 
50 

50 

57 
59 
SO 
59 


62 


Stonae-battenr 




Brookl^and North Biyer* 


59,63 


Soeond Atddim, Rco^ct 


69,62 


NewYofkRaaWay>.R«oeiver: 


59.62 


Storan-battery 


57 


Flgh*Mv<m?«» 


50.62 


Ninth ATeoue* 


50,62 


Now York and Harlem* 


62 






Total 
















. 






BrooUya Rapid tVanot ^yitem' 


03 
52 
52 

52 
52 
52 


63 
52 
52 

52 

52 
52 
52 
44 

46 


67 
54 
53 

63 
52 

54 
54 
54 

48 


71 
57 
54 

52 

57 
67 
67 
48 
60 


75 
62 
66 

68 
68 
68 

51 


79 
62 
67 

68 

.69 
60 
50 
62 
52 






n 


Surfam 


62 


Manhattan Bridge 8-CoDt Line 


S7 


Marine 




Van Kant 8t k Erie Bwia 


52 


New York A Queenf County 


sT^ 


Long Uaad Meetrio 


50,62 


New York A Long bland 


50,62 


CVanl^f^tri^ /* 


52 


Manhattan k Queens, Reoeiven 


52 


Other Qiieens surCaee 








Total 
















- 






RxcmoMD CoMPANna 


50 


55 


60 


60 


60 


60 


66 






Total, itreetnirfaoe line! 
















^_ 






Otaad total 


















> See note 1 on preeeding doable page. 

> New York Conaolidated ia included under B. R. T. 

• Ate8oenta. 
« At 73 cents. 

• Conaiata of 63 at 77 cents; 104 at 81 cents and 501 at 86 cents. 

• At 70 cents. 
V At 20 cents. 

• See note 5 on page 1 of thia Division. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



406 PUBUC ^3CVICE COBCMISSION — FiBST DISTRICT 

TABLE Xa Imptofves •mk wtmmi (D) 











Wbeklt 


Opbbatino Strsbt Railways 


Leas 
than $7 


under 
$10 


$10 

but 

under 

$12 


5i? 

under 
$13.50 


$13.50 

but 
under 

$15 


$15 

but 

under 
$17.50 


Rapid Thaksit 
Intvboraash Rapid Traiiait > 






20 


7 
8 


11 

27 

1 


20 


Hudson A^anhattaa 






37 






1 




127 













Total 




1 


20 


15 


30 


184 








Manhattan and Bronx Surface 
Third Awnuf^ r ...... r , r .., . 


1 




2 

1 


4 


7 


39 


Dry Dook, E. B'way 4 B 




42d St., Manh. A St. N. Ave 










1 


New York City Interborough 












1 


Union 




1 






1 


5 


Weet^jheator Electric 










3d Ave. ayBtem in city. . . 
Brooklyn 4b North River* 


1 


1 


5 


4 


8 


4tf 


Seoond Avenue, Receiver 














New York Railways. Receiver 






5 


1 




1 


Eighth AvMue* 








Ninth Avenue * 














N. Y. A Harlem 




























Total 


1 


1 


8 


5 


8 


47 






Bbookltn and Quxens Surface 
Brooklyn Rapkl Traaait 




7 


47 
3 


16 
2 


30 
2 


68 


Brooklyn City 




14 


Brooklyn Heights, Receiver 






4 
















Nassau Electric, Receiver 


















1 
8 


1 
61 


18 


1 
99 


2 


Brooklyn Rapid Transit 
surface 




88 


Manhattan Bridge 3-Cent Line 




1 


Marine .T 














Van Brunt St. & Erie Basin 


3 
S 


1 

1 
2 


1 

/ 
2 

1 








Other Brooklyn surface . . 






J 


New York 4c Queens County * 




2 


& 


Long Inland Klfvrtrin * . 






New York St Long Island 






1 






Ocrftan Kleotric . . ^ 


« 


1 


2 


1 


4 


New York A North Shore* 




Manhattan A Queens, Receivers 


i 

6 


4 
7 


i 






1 


Other Queens surface 


1 


5 


10 


Total 


9 


16 


58 


19 


36 


99 






Richmond Companies 


2 


1 


3 


1 





8 






Total, street-surface lines 


12 


18 


69 


25 


44 


154 






Grand total 


12 


19 


89 


40 


83 


333 



1 Excludes 44 superannuated employees receiving $587.48. 

* Excludes 44 salaried employees whose average earnings are $1,601.60 for the week or $36.40 
each. 

'The joint employees earned $11,711.58 during the year, or an average of $10.24 per week. 
full-time. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



410 



Public Service Commission — First District 



TABLE Xn. Employ«M and wacaf : (D) CJn—iflad waakjy 

I 2. All companiaa 











Occupations 


Leas 
than $7 


under 
$10 


$10 

but 

under 

$12 


$12 

but 
under 
$13.50 


$13.50 

but 
under 

$15 


$15 

but 

under 

$17.50 


Manar^wa and BuDarintendantv. ....... 














Claim Acanta. . . t r , , - ^ ,-,,,, . 


1 


2 

1 
9 


2 
10 
37 
30 

1 


1 

7 

11 

8 


7 

30 

10 

3 


6 


Genaral Offioa Clerka -— men 


9 






55 




2 


19 


Women Talaohona Obaratora 


14 










Totol, General 


3 


12 


80 


27 


50 


103 






Road and TVaekmen 








3 




8 


ISlectrifi Linamen 








2 


Ofcher Maint of W. A 8. Emoloveea. . 








3 




10 












Total, Engineering 








6 




20 












Machinists 














Qm^)Qntan 














Rlai^kimithft 








* 


::;:::::!:::::::: 


Pf^tnt«<r« , ^ 








1 
1 






Other SboD ESmnloyeea 








8 


14 












Total. Mechanical 








2 


8 


14 












Boiler-room Emnloveea ... 








1 


1 




Engineert ....,.., r - - . - . - . - - r --.... . 






















1 


Electrio I Abor 


























1 


Other Power-plant Labor (incl. Repair- 
men) . . . .* 






2 


1 


7 


4 










Total, Power 






2 


2 


8 


6 










XnimActfOni. Train-atarters. etc 














Panenger Motormen - - ^ ^ ^ , , * , , 


4 
6 


4 
2 


4 

3 


2 


i 


"" 5 


Conduotora — Surface Electric 

Conductors — ' Elevated or Subway. . . . 


1 


Guard 












5 


Otlier Paimengfir Trainmen 














Pr^itfht. M&il mnA 1Cxnr«Mi 














Crowing Tenders, ^acmen. etc 














Other Car Service Employees 












4 


Ticket Agents — Men 












22 


Ticket Agents — Women 










4 

4 
5 


104 


Gatemen and Platform Men 










9 












10 


Car CleanersT. ...... T. .' 










1 


Other Car House Employees 












6 


Other TransDortation Emolovees 




1 






2 


27 














9 


7 


7 


2 


16 


194 


Truck Drivers ..... . . . . ... 














Other 8table. Garaae. TVimkin* 




























Total, Stoble. Garage, Truck- 
ing, etc. . T ...... . 




































1 


1 


1 












Grand total 


12 


19 


80 


40i 


83 


33S 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



412 



Public SEmvicB Commission — Pibst DisTBicrr 



TABLB ZIH. 





• 






Opmutinq Strmt Railwats 


Paaienger 


Freight 


MmI 


Rapid Tbansit 
Tnt^rbnroiiirh Hnxnd TVanrit 


18.440,571 46 
18.842,004 31 
5,»7.034 80 






RftDid TTAiint (Submv div \ 






M^hmtUn fEleTatod diy ) 






N«w Ywk CoiuolidAtMl RBoeirw 






FTiidrm 4 Manhattan 




$11,898 30 








Total 


872.400.277 71 




S11.888 30 








Manhatian aks Bbonx Sdrpagi 
TUrd AT«nue 


82.502.807 04 

562.766 33 

568.130 31 

1.834,807 40 

4.740 45 

806.115 81 

2.555 65 

288.558 00 

2.066.581 60 

636.027 00 

10,189,109 S9 

57.644 35 

842.027 76 

0.118.417 13 

040.176 30 

203.101 14 

573.630 05 






B«U Line 






Drv DtMsk E B'w&v A B 






A<MRf M»nh ARi N Av» 












New York City Interboroush . . 






P#HiAm Park ft Citv UAnd (to Aua 9 *19) 






Souikflm Boulevara 






Union 


$2.888 84 


SIS.OOO 00 


WMtcheattf Eleotrie 






9,889 U 


16,000 00 


Brooklyn k North Biyer (Urbet 6 '/0) ** 




Second Ayenue. Receiyer 






Ni>w York RAilvKVtt RmH^iyfr 






Eiffhth Avenue ( from Aua 1 ^lO) 






Ninth Avenue (from Od 1 '19) 






New York k Herlem (from FA 1 'iO) 












Total 


$21,008,006 12 


$2.882 84 


$15,000 00 






BSOOKLTK AND QunifB SUBTAGI 

Brooklyn Citv r/rom Od /P '/P) 


87.102.308 10 
2.058.660 15 

231.570 06 
1.746.453 61 
2.335.235 88 

113.885 14 
6.000.250 57 

253.045 01 

230.703 52 

12.837 85 

82.817 13 

SSSMt 10 

1.120.708 75 
278.606 66 
526,177 40 
218.781 68 
114.201 70 
267.415 60 

9,6SS,071 87 












Bndgv Opexating ' 






Brooklyn Oueeofl Co* k Subi Receiver 






Cnnrv liiland A Brooklyn R4wm«r 






r«wv Iflknd k GravMead 






NeMaii KIrctric. Reoeiytf ... 






South Brooktyn , 


$610,006 27 
510,00$ i7 
213.801 20 




Brooklyn Rapid Traant aurfaoe 








Vf^«t»tfmw Bridre 3-Oent Linp 




Marine 






Van Brunt St k Erie Basin 






Other Brookljm aurfaoe 


918,901 m 




K«w Ynrk k OiiMkiu Hniintv 




T/onf lilandKlt^trifl, 






New York k l/mr Tiland 






r>Mn RIertric , , . , . 




' 


New York k North Shore (to Man S '90) 






Manhattan k Ouefm. Rfceiyerff 


















Total . . 


823.702.052 30 


$723.307 66 








RlCRUOND SdVACI 

Richmond Light k R. R., Receiver 


1557,663 80 

215.566 73 

12.489 85 






Staten laland Midland. Rm^iver 






Poiitl'fM'Jd nofy^h 












Total 


$785,720 47 












Total, Btreei-surlaee lines 


$46,486,678 08 


$736.100 40 


$15,000 00 






Qrand total 


$118,866,066 60 


$726.100 40 


820,898 30 







> Baggage. 

s Other car and station privileges are included under Advertising privileges. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



414 



Public Service Commission — First District 

TABLE Xm. Revemiaf from street 







OtHKB (o« KCW-TfcAKSPORTATIO!*) 


Opuumfo &taMn Railwatb 


Rent of land 
and buildings 


Rent of 
equipment 


Rentoftraekf 
andtenninals 


IUpid Tkamvt 
Interborough R*pid Tranait 


$70,962 70 
4.138 75 
66.813 95 
41.967 04 
25.810 00 


$24,S24 97 
24,324 97 


tSSS.eOO SI 


IUpid Truuii (8ubw»y div.) 


338.344 71 


Manhattan ^aevated'div.). 


255 60 






D4.182 71 


Hudson A Manhattan. .' 












Total 


1138.729 74 


$24,324 97 


$334,417 60 






Third Avenue 


$135,588 36 
21.183 33 
50.103 36 
17.463 08 


$479.328 53 
200 00 
616 25 
500 00 


$37,032 45 


BeltLme 


1.000 00 


Dry Dock, E. B'way A B 


14,263 38 


fid St. Manh. A St. N. Ave. 




Mid-Crbntown {to Aug. 9,* 19) 




New York City Interborough 




1.048 80 




Pelham Park A City Iiland (to Aug. 9,"19) 














Union : 


16.983 40 

8.168 77 

249,490 50 


43.130 12 

457 50 

626,281 20 


68,937 72 




64,317 3D 




186,560 86 


Brooklyn A North River {toOd. 6, '19) 




Seoond'AvenUe. Receiver. 


10.000 00 
117,272 11 


>4,120 92 


8,831 58 


New York Railwaye, Receiver 


7,930 63 


Kghth Avfiinr (fn^ ^*v. t, '/P) 






Ninth Avenue (from Oct. 1. '19) 








New York A Harlem (from fJb.l, '20) 
















ToUl 


$376,762 41 


$529,402 12 


$202,313 06 






BftlK>ILT?f AND QuKHra SUBTACI 

Broakt>-ii City Ifrim Ocf.. iH/im 


$30,540 84 
13.019 02 


$988 50 
3,618 74 


$18,003 32 


BrDoklyn Ife^i^htii Rectiver 


23,106 39 


Briditp t^THtniiite * 




Bnuktyn Que^^ns Co. A, Sub Receiver 


1.408 58 

895 45 

23 92 

8.256 48 

105.105 66 

169,249 96 


124 00 
99 00 


5,006 89 


r<ui*>- Itflmnrj i Brooklyn, RfctiTer 


D1.239 03 


Coney l&haA A GriTi^piid 


D822 69 


Kinui Elpptrif^r R«ei¥fJ' 


59 03 
6,112 37 
11,001 61 


D 2.257 29 


South Broaklya 


1,260 89 


Brooklyn Rapid tranat lurtMe 


48,668 1^ 


Buah Tf ftninal , ^ 




MaahftE fan Briiiflp 3J,'riil Line 




52 87 


791 73 


Marine 






Van Brunt St AErieBann 








Other Brooklyn lurfaoe 




62 87 

2,727 00 

144 00 


791 73 


New York A Queens County 


1.020 00 

325 00 

90 00 

1 00 


23 12 


T^ng Tfflan'l l^i*rtrif 


21,971 17 


New York A Long bland 


6,446 86 


Oman Eleetrie 


3.523 28 




New York A North Shore (to Mav 3 '20) 




Manhattan A Ouefns. R<weivfr 


16 65 
1,462 66 






Other Queens surface 


6,894 28 


28,441 i'> 






Total 


$160,702 60 


$17,448 76 


$72,791 36 






Richmond Subfac* 
Richmond T^ffht A R R . R^rfiv^r 


$433 42 


$3,801 93 
1,492 32 


$2,535 85 


Staten Island Midland. Receiver 


61 15 


Southfield Beach 














ToUl 


$433 42 


$5,384 25 


$2.597 00 






Total street surface lines 


$537,898 43 


$562,235 13 


$277,701 43 






Grand total 


$676,628 17 


$576,560 10 $612.119 02 







1 Several items in thia column include sales of power to other street railways, which rep< rt 
offsetting operating eq;)6nse items in Table XIV under " Power Purchased." To this extent the 
total revenues shown include an element that is not additional or new revenue to the street railwa>'s 
of the city as a whole. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 

nihniy opcnitioiis, i^ao — Coododad 



415 



Stubt Railway Opbraidio Rananm — CondiiM 




Total Snnr Railway 
QpnuTiNQ RaninTM 




Miaedkneoot 


TOTAl 


Amount 


IneraMeor(D) 

deerease 

fromprerioua 

yew 


SiJeof 


Amount 


loereMe or (D) 

deer«tM 

irompreTiow 

y«w 


$f. Of 5. rot t6 

1.206.128 80 
807.673 35 


817, 9SS 54 


95,699,084 95 

2.313.079 98 

1.386.004 95 

674.910 09 

427,361 51 


$966,449 70 

733.158 21 

333.291 49 

264.570 49 

72.429 49 


Ul, 478,410 81 

31.622.973 04 

19.865.437 77 

19.519.077 55 

6.347.194 70 


%8,ri,500 98 
6.990.765 08 


17.988 64 
293 38 

71.991 10 


1.280.435 90 
3.851.979 18 


" 3,067 i6 


613.937 46 


$2,016,789 30 


$90,217 02 


$4,801,356 58 


$1,303,449 68 


$n.344.683 06 


$12,737,117 61 


$971,702 59 




$1,652,971 38 

31.184 45 

70,313 37 

47.071 88 

112 50 

4.034 86 

37 50 

1.781 61 

150.964 14 

87,936 11 

27,753 04 

654.389 43 

12.399 60 

6.274 99 

8.335 70 


$163,530 79 

D4.133 16 

D 19.368 33 

6.630 44 

D662 50 

202 26 

D 187 50 

139 13 

D22.636 40 

D 87.766 56 

85,859 17 

D 1.106 26 

11.633 12 

397.64144 

12.399 50 

6.274 99 

8.335 70 


$4,165,779 32 
693.950 78 
638.453 68 

1.871.879 38 

4.861 96 

810.150 67 

2.593 16 

290.340 51 

3,137.375 73 

724,899 01 

15,550,585 08 

58.019 85 

870.680 80 

9.772.806 56 

961.575 80 

299.376 13 

581.965 76 


$270,884 16 






30.231 39 






109.901 36 






166,758 21 






D 31.919 15 






100.903 83 






D 16.419 50 






65.493 OS 


1.263 36 




309.337 40 


9.699 90 




101.893 86 


98S,$86 84 




1,167,054 69 






D 135.312 13 






37.931 09 


367,154 16 


$1.657 29 
368 


D2.090,794 58 
961.575 80 




299,376 13 






581,965 75 








$1,349.810 00 


$1,660 97 


$2,766,934 46 


$521,036 67 


$34,774,707 47 


8811.796 65 




$30 20 
8,195 37 


$138,610 99 

87.062 60 

1.000 00 

30.473 38 

41.316 29 

848 51 

111,958 07 

139.060 72 

6^5,»40 66 


$133,510 99 

D 114.068 53 

499 99 

7.134 68 

8.538 96 

150 99 

29.578 50 

19.950 66 

86,596 55 


$7,236,287 99 

3,052.494 05 

232.570 96 

1.776.936 99 

2.376.769 42 

114.733 66 

6.202.449 64 

903.032 00 

51,896,574 70 

213,414 89 

241,449 27 

12,837 85 

83.267 13 

560,969 14 

1.166.989 97 

304.817 32 

535.858 06 

222.980 96 

114.738 96 

269.575 20 

5,614,960 46 


$7,236,287 99 




D6.560,066 23 




10,244 06 




60 
100 50 


420.065 88 




506,084 46 




22.931 05 




30 
« 11 .091 39 

19,418 S6 


1.236.690 81 




57.634 04 




5,919,755 06 




D 89.528 28 






1.745 76 


D2,173 64 


88.388 49 






3.323 50 






45606 

M,t96 75 

34.889 43 

26.094 17 

9.391 91 

4.134 28 

480 00 

2.159 51 

77,159 SO 


50 00 
D 5,155 64 
17,336 83 
D2.826 42 
D214 97 
1.470 46 
D284 00 
D959 52 
14,655 58 


12.097 76 






67.529 88 

D 30.305 22 

48.296 32 


$19,104 65 

3.214 40 

948 39 


5,402 93 
95 15 
666 






D42,966 45 




33 01 

6,5S7 75 


D574 92 


it, 997 $4 


164,656 15 


$22,267 34 


$24,956 11 


$624,575 61 


$97,604 97 


$25,061,204 30 


$4,148,587 68 






$10,116 54 

2.803 47 

300 00 


D$974 87 

D 4.678 25 

D250 00 


$567,907 68 

218.868 70 

12,789 85 


$76,330 05 






D88.665 34 
D 8.680 75 
















$13,220 01 


D $5,903 12 


$799,566 23 


D $15,916 04 


$1,372,077 34 


$26,617 08 


$3,393,730 08 


$612,828 52 


$50,635,478 00 


$4,944,468 29 


$3,388,866 64 


$116,834 10 


$8,196,086 61 


$1,916,278 20 


$127,880,161 06 


$17,681.585 90 



' R«nt of duet*. 

* See note 10 on first double pace of Table XIV. A. 

* Ineludee $11,063.35 demurrace eharces and $28.04 storage oharies. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



416 



Public Service Commission — First District 



TABLE XIV. operating EXPENSES, xgao: (A) SunmiAry for all 



OPBRAIVfO SmSBT lUlLWATB 



Maintinanct 



Superin- 

tendence 

of 

and 
itruotureB 



Mainte- 



of 
way* 



Cleaning 
andnnding 
track, and 
removal of 
mow.ioo 
andaand 



Maintenance 

of 

eleetric 

line 



Rapid Transit 



Interborough Raind Transit . 

Rapid Transit (Subway div.) . . 

Manhattan (Elevated div.) ... 
New York Consolidated, Eeoeivar . 
Hudaoa ft Manhattan* 



ites,70t 6t 

101,035 92 

104.M6 60 

105,701 37 

9,343 25 



$i,tl9,06e 61 

1,395.121 36 

823,935 15 

787.317 «5 

311.019 59 



il9,4iS S8 
10.220 35 
9.203 03 
50.312 83 
38,042 13 



tsi4,9eo le 

221.951 08 
103,009 08 
71,035 00 
37.404 03 



Total 

Manhattan and Bronx Surtags 

Third Avtnui 

Bdl Line 

Dry Dodk. E. B way A B 

4ad St.. Miuih. k Bt N. Ave 

Mid-Crtastcuni iit; Avg. 9, *t9) 

New Yafk City 1 riterborougfa 

FdhaiD Park A C ity Island (to Aug. 9/19i 

g^ithtni Boulwajd 

Utiion. 

WHtch«tcr Electric 

3d Ave. syBtem in city 

Brooklyn k North River (to Od. 6, '19) 

Beoond Avenue, Receiver 

New York Railways, Receiver 

Ei^th Aveane {from Aug. 1,'19) 

Ninth Avenue {from Oct.l,'19} 

N. Y. A Harlem Oom Feb.l/tO) 



1380.747 14 



|3,317.993 75 



1113,778 U 



U83,399 85 



132, 
4, 

5, 
17 



571 53 
878 73 
099 30 
,542 28 

20 99 
,334 48 

12 28 
,089 30 
,379 72 
.239 43 
,768 04 



,173 00 
,889 82 
,287 48 
,313 43 
,005 60 



$180,448 39 

39,870 53 

30,925 77 

93,532 18 

3.006 45 

07.800 52 

141 77 

102.078 49 

250,982 19 

41,052 96 

816, 6i6 is 

45 52 

58,712 95 

550,012 26 

120,715 13 

35,321 96 

42,512 81 



$120,938 04 
28.190 28 
28.210 00 
57,927 12 
10 34 
23.827 48 



$42,372 02 

1.580 80 

3.447 07 

17,797 40 



10.242 75 



7.582 05 

77,807 79 

7.403 98 

$61,963 74 

220 47 

37,478 97 

•391,041 27 

03.024 15 

10.207 49 

40,034 74 



7.425 82 

38,138 72 

8,508 85 

ii9,680 09 



40.345 87 

158,276 43 

12.042 54 

90 00 

13.101 49 



Totd.... 

&«oaiu.Tir AXD QunBNS Surtacb 

Bmdtlya City (frim Oct. 19, '19) 

B!rtx>i43fn Heights, Recdver 

^ Bndfe Opi'Jiitjtjs "J 

Brooklyn . Qucoii^ Ca. A Sab., Receiver 

Conay ialjud tknti Brooklyn 

Ccniiy libifli.i aod Graye#&nd 

NasHu Elpi^trir, Itewiver 

Souih BrooUjii ... 

ijrooklyi] Ebpid Transit sur&ce" . 

BtjAh TtnciLnal 

HfljibatbiD Bridal! Z-Cani Line 

Marine 

TanBmntSt ft Erie Basin 

Other Brooklyn sorfwe 

New York ftQueens County 

Long Island Electric 

New York and Long Island 

Oeean Electric 

New Yoric k North Shore (to May S,'»0) 

Manhattan & Queens. Recdven 

Other ()aeens snrfiAce 



Total 

RlGBMOND SuRPAOI 

Richmond light ft R. R.. Receiver. . . 

Staten Island Midland, Receiver 

Southfield Beach 



$181.007 43 



$1,030.485 38 



$900,030 83 



$354,120 42 



$48.068 02 
20.580 23 



13.080 45 

15,817 21 

035 14 

44,089 48 

3.155 00 

146,641 6S 



$359, 

231, 

2, 

120, 

131, 

5, 

391, 

35, 

l,t79 

9, 

1, 



854 18 
721 56 
946 32 
,875 90 
306 71 
121 19 
,484 18 
,721 05 
OSl 09 
921 43 
140 59 



$118,708 13 

8,020 71 

909 30 

25,178 89 

28.043 01 

1.071 13 

79.088 09 

9.791 78 

$72,017 70 



1.2 



$79,035 74 

36.000 22 

2.878 00 

27.451 17 

20.958 00 

920 75 

73.744 08 

0.131 91 

U4,686 66 

1.014 10 

3,979 71 



15,501 91 

3.734 00 

3.277 88 

171 42 



it, 746 81 



4, 

16, 

75, 

37, 

35, 

20, 

2, 

4, 

181, 



059 44 
067 46 
883 58 
428 31 
173 71 
401 28 
008 88 
508 49 



1,810 71 
5,075 98 

87.115 16 
0.453 80 

11,902 38 
1.350 67 
5,058 51 
2,409 08 

64,666 IS 



271 53 
6,t66 64 

30,020 33 
5,757 28 
9,053 78 
4.400 44 
2.008 01 
1.927 70 

64,468 80 



$109,387 34 



$1,470,563 80 



$339,449 70 



$314,080 07 



$1,149 05 
373 19 
54 00 



$79,050 71 

32.398 80 

1.823 " 



$14,513 38 
306 27 



$11,069 40 

5.500 98 

102 57 



Total 

Total, street^urlace lines. . 



$1,570 84 



$113,275 00 



$14,821 60 



$17,623 01 



$352,001 61 



$3,220,313 78 



$1,260,908 19 



$085,829 50 



* Depreciation. — Inasmuch as the definition of expenaea. in the Uniform System of Acco uate 
Itreacribed by this Commission includes capitis consumed in operation, the accountinc order pro* 
vides for a charse to operating ejq;>eDaea for the estimated depreciation accrued dxirinc each month, 
in addition to actual diabursementa for repairs. Where a company has failed to make a chaz^ for 
depreciation, a reference mark (*) has been placed against the totals of the maintenance groups and 
the grand total of operating eiq>enaea. Credit entries (Or) indicate that the expenditures for main* 
tenance have exceeded the estimated depreciation (including maintenance) , the exceas being drawn 
from (or charged against) the depreciation reeerve. ^ Other than cleaning and wanding track, 

and removal of snow, ice and sand. > Class A classification is used by corporations with annual 
operating revenues of more than $500,000, and also by corporations affiliated with such Class A 
corporations, even though with operating revenues under $500,000; Class B classification is used by 
corporations with annual operating revenues of more than $100,000 but not more than $500,000, 



uiyiiizeu uy "v^jv-zv^ 



d'* 



Street Railway Companies 

corpontioas by accoanti of clan C cktsUkatioii (the leut dettltod) 



417 



or Wat and Sbvotusm 










Aaoonnt. 


Reiwin 

bdkfinBi 
Md itraeturw 


Jobt 


Depredatkn 
itruetarM 


Total, 
1020 


Total, 
1919 


Inerean 
1020 
over 
1919 


can^ 
paay« 


Ii78,f«8 79 




999,919 97 

175,578 57 

Cr81,765 20 

395,320 46 

61,745 04 


89,401,964 79 

8,160,362 16 

1.360,802 57 

1.599,743 73 

681,658 29 


89,968,110 97 

1,409,086 17 

1,159,024 10 

857,752 71 

515,900 92 


r4S,144 46 
661.275 90 

91,868 47 
741.001 02 

66,752 37 


A 


250,665 27 
218.7a 52 
184,066 36 


0878,100 30 
73,100 30 


A 


123,496 65 




A 








8785,853 80 




8550,878 87 


85.582.661 75 


84,031,763 90 


81,560,887 85 


_ 








871.168 92 


«Cr 819,326 60 
1,746 13 
4,822 82 
11,044 04 




•8434.173 90 

•88.989 41 

•84.160 67 

•196,406 48 

•8,117 78 

•107,418 42 

•827 88 

•120,376 66 

•386,976 88 

85,181 79 

• 140,398 88 
2.020.650 90 
•207.406 87 

•58.992 88 

• 107.394 26 


•8233,555 07 

•45,602 71 

•89,260 21 

•271,866 81 

•8,471 64 

•75.231 66 

•654 83 

•37.628 07 

•314.637 02 

'39.120 71 

1,066,016 79 

• 14,421 82 

•89.426 85 

1.771,185 32 


8200.617 83 

38.206 70 

44,891 46 

D 78.440 83 

D 5,853 86 

32.181 76 

DS26 45 

82.847 50 

82.340 86 

'46.062 08 

449,107 U 

D 12.052 3i 

59.967 53 

349.524 58 

207,495 87 

53.992 88 

107,394 26 


A 


7,710 94 




A 


11,649 05 




A 


563 40 




A 






A 


170 02 


1.038 17 




A 




8173 83 


A 






A 


12,870 66 


•Cr6,762 20 

« 6.658 42 

Cr779 99 

1,197 44 

« 4.449 61 

*Cr 29,693 95 




A 


8.292 03 

109,996 09 


12,966 12 
19,199 96 


A 

i" 


6.233 48 


A 


99.581 58 
1.826 57 


777,912 49 


A 
A 








A 


1.390 06 








A 












8215,056 71 


Cr 824.826 12 


8791,062 44 


84.064,520 09 


82,940,990 22 


81.113,629 87 


— 


$27,789 06 




835,080 65 
14,919 35 


8660,136 78 

388.730 04 

•6.908 02 

207.828 92 

227.736 94 

13.237 33 

654.510 01 

67.908 34 

9,189,008 98 

5.220 66 

"14.230 76 

i.Vs. « 

99,699 99 
190.484 37 
39.630 60 
49.333 14 
34.490 53 
11,492 54 
•9,914 15 
986,964 49 




8660,135 78 

D 455,822 51 

2,101 51 

54,519 89 

50,867 50 

6,065 35 

185,662 88 

13,962 37 

696,999 91 

D211 71 

9,647 35 


A 


26,824 97 




8794,561 55 

•4,806 51 

153,309 03 

177,369 35 

7,171 08 

468,857 28 

53,940 97 

1,660,018 97 

5,432 37 

"4,588 41 

(•) 

4,181 56 

208il52 99 
38,041 88 
52.595 46 
13.462 05 
10,258 29 
•10,079 01 
989,689 18 


A 


173 68 




A 


10.642 51 




10,000 00 

12.500 00 

5.000 00 

30,000 00 

5,000 00 

119,600 00 

CtB.llA 87 

"5,940 00 


A 


12.512 01 




A 


483 12 




A 


34.903 18 




A 


8.103 60 




A 


191,499 19 










C 


2.257 72 


Cr 8362 48 


B 



54 40 




Cr 2.920 52 

Cr 9, 696 99 

29.262 91 

Cr 14. 014 58 

Cr 11,074 08 

1,803 65 

1,72108 




c 


9,919 19 

2,186 94 

210 63 

280 38 

20107 


Cr969 4S 

«458 55 

69 65 

59 15 


9,496 64 

D 17.668 62 

1.598 31 

D 3,262 83 

21,028 48 

1,234 25 

D164 86 

9,766 94 


a" 

B 
B 
B 


101 46 




B 


296 36 


681 86 
1,964 ti 


B 


9,996 94 


7,998 99 




1127,111 09 


8011 73 


8117,508 59 


82,544,996 38 


82.006,803 19 


8538,193 19 




82,146 00 






» •8108,829 14 

"•40,487 96 

•3,080 60 


•851,842 45 
499,940 43 
•2,287 05 


866.96669 

547 56 
D247 45 


B 


1,912 68 






B 








c 










14,059 67 






8151,856 72 


804.060 08 


857,286 70 












8847,127 47 


Cr 883,014 39 


8908.556 03 


86.750,882 19 


85.041.872 34 


81.700,000 85 




81,132,981 27 


Cr 828.914 39 


81,459,434 90 


812,838.533 94 


80.073.636 24 


83.259,807 70 


-^^^^^== 



exoe|>t aa modified above; Claat C olaarifieation ia uaed by oorporationa with annual operating rev^ 
eauea of not more than 8100.000 aa modified abova • Under Federal Administration until 
March 1, 1920. * Net of debita and oredita. • A charge for depreoiation waa made only for 
way and strueturea. • Composed of other operationa, Cr. 830.878.29, and joint way and stnie- 
tures. Dr. $24,110.09. 'In 1919. respondent did not separate depredation between mainte- 
Dsnoe of way and strueturea and maintenanoe of eqiiimnent. It was included under the latter. 
• Under order of the Commission in Case No. 1739, this Company is amortising during the term of 
the franchise all of the capital expenditures approved by the Commission. * Includes tube clean- 
ing $102,473.18. " The operation of local cars over the Williamsburg Bridge waa discontinued 
by the Bridge Operating Company on M^ 81, 1020. Since then these cars have been operated 
by the BrooUyn Heights, ReceiTer in the mterest of the Nassau Electric Receiver, Coney laland T 
4c Brooklyn Receiver, Brooklyn. Queena Co. A Sub. Receiver, and the Brooklyn Citv R. R.v>' v LL 

"For signifiranee of maintenance figures of B. R. T. oompanies see Introduction page 263. O 

ttSee note 12, Table XIV-A, 1919, Vol. II. 

14 



418 Public Service Commission — First District 

TABLE XIV. Operating expenses, ipao: (A) Summary for all corporations 







QpnuTiNG SnuT Railways 




Superin- 
tendence of 
equipment 


Repairs of 

power 
equipment 


Repairs of 

cars and 

locomotives 


Rapid TSANBiT 
Intcrborough Rapid TrsDait 


$369, iie OS 

210.115 74 

149.100 29 

39,940 14 

12.875 92 


$369,663 60 
204.162 73 
155.490 87 


$1,846,688 64 


Rapid Trannt (Subway div.) 


1.133.431 56 


Manhattan (Elevated 3iv.) 


712.157 08 


New York ConBoUdated. Receiver 


1,648.550 36 


Hndffon k MflT^hattan * 


129.059 13 


339.013 11 






Total 


1412.032 09 


$488,712 73 


$3,833,152 11 






Manhattan and Bronx Surface 
Third Avenue 


IA.899 46 
2.673 49 
3.314 26 
8.439 77 
29 89 
3,578 04 
15 81 
1.243 43 
6.260 10 
3.052 78 

36,607 OS 


$1,906 27 
11 95 


$163,957 72 


Belt Line 


31.370 97 


Dry Dock, E. B'way 4 B 


54.246 15 


42d 8t,, Miin»», * St. N, Ay© 


98.248 22 


Mid-Crbflstown (/o Aug. 9, '19) 




423 58 


New York City Interborough 




54.227 85 


Pelham Park k City Island (to Aug. 9, '19) 




234 20 


Southern Boulevard 




19,545 54 


Union 


5.026 31 

1 76 

6,946 t9 


179,868 65 




50.922 15 


3d Ave. lystem in city 


663,046 03 


Brookljm k North River (to Oct. 6, '19) 




Second Avenue, Receiver 


3.475 48 
89.878 11 
2,295 58 
562 50 
3.320 51 


135 35 
8.545 26 




68.650 07 


New York Raihrays. Receiver 


538.569 28 


Eighth Avenue {from Aug. I, '19) 


70.577 83 


Ninth Avenue {from Oct. I'lS) 


2,274 97 


N. Y. A Harlem (/nwi Fafc. 1, 'fO) 




34.010 13 








Total 


$135,039 21 


$15,626 90 


$1,367,128 21 






BaOOKLTN AND QuXBNS SURPACS 

BrQoki>Ti City f from (ki. iO, '19) 


$13,704 54 
4.975 87 




$680,774 26 


BrDokh-u Hekbtdi Rof civir 




256.250 53 


EridgM Op^^ai \iii!. * 




3.139 30 


Bmoklvn , Qu«*onB T'o A tiub.. Receiver 


3.732 43 
4.364 29 
165 71 
11.909 99 
540 76 
S9,S9S 69 




181.904 29 


Couoy leLafliil aQci firwjklya 




215.136 34 


Cone} Ijlmd and Gmvrafiid 




8.485 82 


KaHau £3«tfiCr Ileecivef . , 




604.326 19 


fU,(tiRrt..tU„ 


75.467 53 


i'; .. !' ; id Transit surface ' 




i,og6,484 te 


Bush Terminal 




11.250 46 


Manhattan Bridge 3-Cent Line 






9,135 26 


Marine 








Van Brunt St. A Erie Basin 






4,361 46 


Other Brooklyn surface 






i4,747 18 


New York A Queens County 


11,263 12 
2.090 36 
2.262 91 


$447 59 

214 84 

3.421 43 


111.483 27 


T/ong Tftlfind Eifctrin 


20.292 52 


N^^w York A T^ng ifisuH 


19.470 32 


rVan Flfwtnn 


21 .075 91 


New York A North Shore {toMayS,'$0) 




3.046 66 


9.941 33 


Manhattan A Queens. Receivers 


2.127 21 
17,74S 60 


22,361 91 


Other Queens sur&ce 


7, ISO 6i 


204,696 t6 






Total 


$57,137 19 


$7,130 52 


$2,254,856 70 






Richmond Surpacs 


. $4,166 70 

1.182 35 

61 11 




$30,170 22 


Staten IslancfMidland, Receiver 




14.470 94 


Southfield Beach 




259 17 








Total 


$5,410 16 




$44,900 33 








Total, street-surface lines 


$197,586 56 


$22,757 42 


$3,666,885 24 






Grand total 


$609,618 65 


$511,470 U 


$7,500,037 35 





*Bee this note on preceding double page. 

1 Credit entries (Or) indicate that the expenditures for maintenance have exceeded the estimated 
depreciation (including maintenance), the excess being drawn from the depreciation reserve. 

• Under Federal Administration until March 1, 1020. 

• See note 7 on i^receding double page. 

• •* Other operations." 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies' 

by acoonalB of clus C claniilcmtioii (the toaat detailed) — Contixraed 



419 



yUnmKAVCM or Eamrnmr 



loeonothrei 


Mifloel- 

laneoos 

wpupin^nT 

expeuMB 


equipment 


DepreeUtion 
equipment 1 


Total. 1920 


Totnl. 1919 


IntreMe 

1020,OTer 

1919 


$1,179,911 ee 


8688,100 18 

258.218 70 

309.881 46 

531.298 70 

67.065 72 




Cr 319.947 82 

Cr 881.731 67 

63.271 92 


1,528.868 70 

2,109.470 59 

663.759 81 


$8,768,114 94 

2.317.638 79 

1.441,476 15 

1.484,949 66 

471,341 56 


$996,897 01 


657,725 84 




907,004 46 


522,186 32 




87.392 65 


771.413 06 




624.520 93 


62.474 01 




192.418 26 








12.008.796 73 


$1,166,464 58 




Cr $376,517 89 


$7,527,642 35 


$5,715,406 16 


$1,812,286 19 








186.046 16 


147,325 29 

4.809 32 

7.760 25 

15.057 00 

58 11 

3.135 78 

31 97 

1.204 39 

19.562 57 

4.726 40 

108,871 08 






•$306.133 90 

•53,134 45 

•88.026 05 

•170,449 58 

•627 89 

•84,656 66 

•346 04 

•30.747 97 

•291.808 50 

85,181 78 

1,111, Hi 88 

•8,561 41 

•98,405 18 

1.444.338 62 

•79.634 10 

•3,021 42 

•88,208 96 


•$243,481 40 

•45.443 38 

•63,220 24 

•125,886 89 

•7,818 82 

•79.991 68 

•4,255 49 

•22,484 61 

•256,364 95 

« 82,471 49 

551.4/5 40 

•34,348 41 

•85,775 53 

1,289,985 86 


$62,652 60 


14.268 72 






7.691 12 


22.705 39 






24.806 81 


48,704 59 






44.568 19 


116 31 






D 7, 185 98 


28.714 99 






4,664 96 


64 06 






D 3.909 46 


8,754 61 






8.263 86 


81,000 87 






35.443 55 


22,910 69 




$3.568 00 
5.555 00 


'2.710 29 


508,575 59 




179,899 48 




$8,561 41 


D 25.787 00 


19.304 05 


6.839 33 

156,105 52 

6.760 69 

183 95 

7.261 51 




12.629 65 


461.396 12 


«Cr621 49 


190.463 82 


204. 3&2 76 
79.634 10 
3.021 48 










43,616 81 








88.208 96 












1832,694 37 


$280,822 08 


$7,939 92 


$194,031 82 


$2,833,282 51 


$2,291,523 20 


$541.759 31 


8298.774 08 


$141,951 45 

62.728 03 

224 51 

47.543 69 

56.017 75 

2.251 44 

157,651 47 

12.036 83 

480,406 17 

112 53 

372 00 


Cr$882 57 
Cr 352 18 


$35,080 65 
14,919 35 


$1,169,452 41 

443.021 40 

•4,714 77 

310,500 92 

380,627 53 

19.560 00 

1,061.511 16 

119,290 62 

8,617,688 81 

13.116 93 

18.442 43 

•1.286 86 

3.000 00 

86,846 88 

126.989 58 

39.639 69 

57.555 33 

32,814 78 

20.063 06 

•36.411 30 

5/5.^75 74 




$1,169,452 41 


104.499 80 
1.350 96 


$584.135 34 

•7.237 46 

114.785 45 

130.330 06 

5.384 07 

366,925 09 

49,202 92 

1,868,000 89 

13,094 15 

11.313 03 

•4,336 53 

3,000 00 

81,749 71 

138,768 66 

38.041 88 

61,361 37 

15.705 75 

22.439 51 

•24.331 11 

500.547 75 


D 141,113 94 
D 2,522 69 


78.853 53 
92.882 21 
3.658 06 

260.486 85 
21,277 48 

86iJ8t97 


Cr 2.033 02 
Cr273 06 

on 03 
Cr 2.863 34 

Cr31 98 
Cr 5.557 18 


10.000 00 
12.500 00 

5.000 00 

80/000 00 

10.000 00 

117,600 00 

1.753 94 
'2.890 00 


204,715 47 
250,297 47 

14.165 98 
694.586 07 

70,087 70 
8,869,688 4$ 


6.089 94 
1,286 86 


Cr44 86 


7.129 40 
D 3,049 67 








Cr 1,361 46 

5,555 48 

Cr 78,254 46 

Cr 2.372 75 

9.851 07 

Cr 3,064 82 

860 53 




7.575 80 
68,305 79 


13.744 27 

2.402 28 

3.399 55 

35 75 

484 90 

2.096 27 

55,155 Oi 


Ct44 88 


4,108 61 
D 11,779 08 


17,012 44 




1.598 31 


10.150 05 
14,767 94 




D 3.806 04 




17.109 03 

D 2.376 45 

12 080 19 


5.729 64 




9.825 91 
134,791 77 






Cr 78,980 4^ 


i5.5f5 96 








11.003.451 54 


$503,052 81 


Cr $6,442 04 


$47,802 05 


$3,866,988 77 


$1,590,391 88 


$2,276,596 89 


$21 360 50 


$846 61 
160 41 




$14,968 87 
9.361 06 


$71,521 90 

35.605 16 

•338 28 


$80,767 41 

59.618 42 

•23731 


D $9 245 51 


10,430 40 
18 00 




D 24.013 26 
100 07 














131.817 90 


$1.007 02 




$24.329 03 


$107,465 34 


$140,623 14 


D $33,157 80 








$1,867,963 81 


$784,881 91 


$1,497 88 


$266,163 80 


$6,807,736 62 


$4,022,538 22 


$2,785,198 40 


S3.871.762 54 


$1,951,346 49 


$1,497 88 


Cr $110,354 09 


$14,335,378 97 


$9,737,944 38 


$4,597,434 59 



* See note 10 on precedins double paga 

* See note 11 on preceding double pa^. 

1 Amounts representing the depreciation element are included in tne charges made by the Man- 
hattan Bridge d-Cent line to the Brooklyn & North River for maintenance of jointly used equip- 
■sni. This amount is reserved by the former and charged to income deductions by the latter 
See also • note on preceding page. \r%n\(> 

uiyiiizeu uy x^_j Vv'vJV Iv, 



420 Public Service Commission — First District 

TABLE XIV. Operatiiig expenses, 1920: (A) Stuninary for all corporations 







OraSATDIQ SnUT lUlLWATB ' 


Power- 
plsnt labor 


Sub^^tion 
labor 


Fuel for 
power 


Rapid Transit 


$981,778 19 

680.420 62 

431.366 67 

6,780 66 

209.137 47 


#577, /8^ 69 

278.809 48 

98,286 16 


$l,98t,8St 98 


RapidTrannt (Subwiy div.) 


2.109.088 68 


MsnhaUftn (VnWftUyTdhr.) ' . . 


2.168.234 28 




Hudflon A Msnosttan 


39.286 02 


494.437 27 






ToUl 


$1,176,694 31 


$416,469 61 


$4,756,760 23 






Mamhattan AMD Brorx SXJVtWkC* 
Third A voaae 




$30,371 03 
1,469 07 
2,616 46 




Bel t Lid* 






Dry Dock, E. B'wuy * B 






4U Bl, Umiih. & St. N. Ave 






M^d^'Tfl»tti»ii Uo Avs. i^,'l9) 




71 76 




New Yt>Tit City IpicrboTOUnh 






Ptlhuni Park &. City lilbiid (to Avg. 9/19) 




16 70 




doudieru BottJsv'arti .... 






Union 




19.306 39 
9,327 37 
83,078 88 




Wettcbcutu- £l«trJo 






3d Ave. system in dty 






Brooklyn A North River (to Oct S, '19) 






Second Avenue, Receive 










$17,889 67 


89,130 35 




ESghth Avenue (from Aug. 1,'19) 




Ninth Avenue (/rom Oct. 1/19) 








N. Y. AHsrlem (frmFeb. 1/tO) 


197 96 












Tots! 


$17,687 63 


$162,209 21 








Brooklyn City ifrtm Oct. 19, *19) 








Brooklyn W^ightJi, ««<»»«• 








Bn^g^<'>r^n^iingi , , ., 








BrookijnT Queens Co. A Sub., Receiver 








Coney Island and Brooklyn 








Coney Island and Grsvf«»nd 








Nassau Electric. Receiver 








South Brooklyn ^ 








Brooklyn Rapid Transit surface* 








Bush Te™>»n»l 








Manhattan Bridge 3-Cent line 








SSine .: 




$892 98 




Van Brunt St A Erie Basin 






Other Brooklyn surface 




89t 98 
16.627 60 
2,996 27 
2.349 11 




New York A (Jueens County • 






Lons Island Electric 






New York and Ung Island 


$19,614 63 


$35,670 80 






New York and North Shore (to May 5, 'BO) 


12.642 15 


988 76 


24.991 66 


Manhattan A Queens, Receivers 




Other Queens surface 


St,t68 78 


it, 881 7 a 


80,88$ 56 






Total 


$32,256 78 


$23,764 71 


$60,662 86 






RlCHMOin) SiTRFACS 

Richmond Light A R. R., Receiver 








Staten Island Midland, Receiver 




$2,735 68 




SouVhfield Beach 














Total 




$2,736 68 










Total, street-surface lines 


$49,844 31 


$178,699 60 


$60,662 36 






Ckand total 


$1,226,638 62 


$506,109 11 


$4,817,422 68 







1 Several items in this column include inirchases of power from other opehitins railways, which 
report ofTsettina operating revenue items in Table XIII under " Sale of Fower. To this extent 
the total expenditures shown include an element that is not additional or new expense to the street 
railways as a whole. 

> Composed of $928 power purchased and credit of $04,003.26 other operations. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 

of clan C durfflcalioii (the tout datiitod)— CMtiatted 



421 



l^AmroBiiiioii '. 



- QminoR or Vomtm Puht 



Othtf power 

mpplieBud 

eoMOMt 


Stow 

battery 

mintenanoe 

Opedfied) 


Pbwer 
porahaaedi 


Poww 
eiehaoced 

(mToS«r 
operatioiu) 


Total. 
1090 


Total, 
1919 


InereaM 

1920 OTff 

1919 


UOO^OiJ »4 




839,868 86 

18.167 46 

4.200 90 

3.968.057 02 

678 00 




33,833,373 34 
3.754,410 16 
2.060,254 18 
3.073.837 07 
« 673,366 12 


33,334,019 18 
3.457,007 13 
1.006.022 05 
3,114.004 48 
•503,051 04 


^:SS 


119,936 57 




$607,006 40 
Cr 607,006 40 


80.084 67 




162,882 13 






859.743 19 
70,415 06 


22.903 62 




>Cr 08,075 26 








8222,924 86 




$3,991.108 38 


Cr $08,075 26 


$10,470,877 IS 


$0,072,064 70 


$1,896,812 43 








12.212 98 
139 51 


"'$«;732'65 

26,777 31 

8,914 57 

286 12 


$805.058 08 

42.977 74 

64.189 45 

152.280 15 

409 41 

86.592 82 

316 00 

35.884 29 

464.572 34 

111.624 70 

1,765,904 98 

7.483 19 

53.665 01 

l.a')3.2O0 84 

179.250 24 

68.009 78 

114.578 22 


Cr $1,778 43 


$885,868 66 

51,318 07 

03,680 06 

161.201 85 

767 28 

86.502 82 

700 21 

35.884 20 

367,100 91 

103.217 12 

1,738,636 17 

7.483 10 

126.140 15 

1.063.770 02 

170.250 24 

68.909 78 

114.776 18 


$760,104 26 

40.237 43 

66.884 50 

145,555 31 

7.378 75 

88.598 04 

4.557 47 

30.403 31 

330.306 81 

85.101 61 

1, €68, 997 68 

31.410 23 

71,000 06 

858.865 22 


$75.660 40 
2.061 54 


205 84 




26,804 47 


97 13 




15.736 54 






D 6.606 47 
D2,000 22 






206 05 


158 77 




D 3,857 25 






5.800 06 


1.297 08 




Cr 117.075 00 
Cr 18,121 52 
Cr 137,876 85 


36 808 10 


386 57 




18.116 51 


4M7 76 


43.869 4i 


168,337 89 
D23.027 04 






72,475 14 
«Crl01.252 23 


55.140 00 


6.301 40 




204.013 80 






179,250 24 










68,009 78 










114,776 18 












$10,849 25 


$42,860 42 


$3,240,001 26 


Cr $166,652 04 


$3,296,863 78 


$2,520,573 09 


$767,290 64 






$827,591 63 

312.759 02 

43.659 00 

194.414 88 

267,385 58 

11.633 97 

854.250 89 

32,040 37 

3,S4S,7S6 S4 

6.050 87 

23.705 53 

2.922 44 

10,492 63 

43,171 47 

140.361 74 

39.510 09 

92.551 77 

31.829 73 

85 84 

50.169 70 

334,508 87 




$827,591 63 

312.759 02 

43.659 00 

194.414 88 

267.385 58 

11,633 97 

854.250 89 

32.040 Z7 

3,643,736 Si 

6. aw 87 
23.705 53 

3.815 42 
10,402 63 

157 ,'683 00 
42,674 08 

151.804 71 
31,820 73 
30.276 65 
50,894 32 

474,t63 48 


8R97.501 68 








$989,799 33 

39.695 88 

177.982 82 

243.114 62 

9,777 94 

801.535 84 

76,623 21 

3,338,689 64 

5.404 73 

19.074 07 

2.012 80 

9.557 26 

S6,948 86 

155.601 11 

38.383 35 

159.595 44 

21.2.56 56 

54.549 15 

51.257 68 

480,643 39 


D 677,040 81 








3,963 13 








16,432 06 








24.270 96 








1.856 03 








52 715 05 








D 44,582 84 








306 306 70 








'646 14 








4,631 46 








902 62 








935 87 








7,116 69 


$793 75 






2,081 98 


168 62 






4,291 63 


1.618 40 






D7,790 78 








10.578 17 


568 36 






D 15.272 50 






$724 62 
734 63 


D 363 36 


S,149 IS 




D 6,479 81 








13,149 13 




$2,941.415 68 


8724 63 


$8,061,963 27 


$2,856,121 79 


$205,841 48 








S6S6 08 




'$94.102 01 

46,660 57 

079 98 




'$94,728 99 

50,606 59 

979 98 


$62,445 69 

67,600 44 

869 42 


$82,288 80 


2,399 44 






D 16,004 86 








110 56 










13,026 52 




$140,643 46 




$146,404 56 


$130,915 55 


$15,480 01 










$17,023 90 


$42.860 42 


$6,322,060 40 


Cr $165,028 82 


$6,606,231 56 


$5,516,610 43 


$088,621 18 


1330.048 76 


$42.860 42 


$10,818,163 78 


Or $250,008 58 


$16,976,108 69 


$14,588,675 13 


$2,387,483 56 



— .Judea powet oharcad to Hudaon Tonninal Build inca. 

* Compoaad of other operationa, Cr. $37,934.81. and power ezohanged, Cr. $68,317.42. 

* Sea note 10 on firat double pace of thia table. 

* See Introduction, pace 263. 

' Conaiata of power purchaaed from licbt and power department of respondent plua joint ezpenaea. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



422 Public Service Commission — First District 

TABLE ZIV. Operatiiic expoiMt, 1920: (A) Suminary for aH corpontioiis 



Opiratino Btrbbt Railways 



Superintend' 

ence of 
transportation 



Conductors, 

motormen and 

trainmen 



MisoellaneottB 

transportation 

expenses 



Interb 



Hard Transit 

erborou^ Rapid Trannt 

RapidTrannt (Subway div.) .... 

Manhattan (Elevated div.) 

New York Consolidated, Receiver 

Hudson k Manhattan > 



Total 



Maithattan and Bronx Surpaci 

Third Avenue 

Belt Line 

Dry Dock, E. B'way A B 

m St. , Manh. A St. N. Ave 

Mid-Crosstown (to Aug. 9/19) 

New York Citv Interborough . 



Pelham Park A Citv Island(/o Aitg. 9, '19) . 

Southern Boulevard 

Union 

Westchester Electric 

3d Ave. system in dty 

Brooklyn A North River {to Oct. 6, '19) .... 

Second Avenue, Receiver 

New York Railways, Receiver 

Eighth Avenue (from Aug. 1, '19) 

Ninth Avenue (from Oct. 1, '19) 

N. Y. A Harlem (from Fob. 1, '90) 



Total. 



BH4t:iJCLTN fLHl> QnBBNS SURPAOR 

Brooklyn City tjram fki!ii/19) 

BroKikb'o HeiRhtd, Rwriv^r 

Bridge ^.>p<.'r&tui|i * . 

Broakiyn, Qulveu Co. & Hub. , Receiver 

Cohcy Island arid Brfwiklyii 

Coney Ubnii and Grsvicv'^d 

H^sBiu Elpttric* Rwcivpr 

So4tb Brouklyn 

BrtKtklyn Rupid Trannt surface 

Bu^h T^TEoinal 

M4uh*tun Bhdce 3-Cent line 

Marine 

Van Brunt St. A Erie Basin 

Other Brooklyn surface 

New York A Queens County 

Long Island Electric 

New York and Long Island 

Ocean Electric 

New York and North Shore (to May S,'SO) 

Manhattan A Chieens, Receivers 

Other (Queens surface 



ToUl. 



RlOHMOND SURPACB 

Riehmond Light A R. R., Receiver 

Stoten Island Midland, Receiver 

Soathfiekl Beach 



Total 

Total, streetrflurfaoe lines . 



$598, S74 79 
290,796 20 
307,678 59 
378,168 30 
116.912 89 



$8,814,094 88 
4,012.970 82 
4,201,118 04 
3,527,656 00 
'590.487 33 



$8,653,888 14 

3.704,262 74 

2.949.575 40 

2.339.917 92 

838.608 85 



11.093.455 98 



$12,332,238 28 



19.882.364 91 



$71,127 13 

25,282 81 

26,602 48 

51.265 II 

246 86 

21.363 69 

235 41 

11,969 93 

104,070 51 

26,403 04 

338,566 97 

5.754 58 

27,086 76 

370.898 71 

2.479 20 

1,720 00 

25,219 56 



$643,597 59 

152.519 36 

229.074 68 

404.754 16 

2.943 53 

241,503 59 

823 66 

88,672 48 

888.365 93 

211.544 63 
$,863,799 61 

29.036 47 

202.545 31 
2.980.295 30 

391,706 97 
154,143 42 
210.288 



$108,908 28 

25,011 49 

46.029 43 

87,707 69 

258 80 

37.102 35 

614 15 

13.513 00 

112.803 85 

27.380 59 

459,389 81 

3,303 68 

59.086 29 

574.308 89 

101.280 90 

21.899 98 

38.671 28 



$771,725 78 



$6,921,815 10 



$1,357.880 83 



$368, 

134, 

17, 

98, 

114, 

5, 

294, 

62 

1,095 

1 

19, 

1 



319 16 

098 48 
002 75 
565 20 
572 55 
948 56 
791 52 
,063 99 
,.^ft'i il 
,908 08 
492 80 
,953 25 



23, 

86, 

17, 

28 

6, 

1 

16 

157 



35 i 13 
356 62 
752 41 
558 62 
615 45 
579 02 
211 72 
073 74 



$1,275.790 08 



$28.506 47 

10.952 66 

216 98 



$39,676 11 



$2,087,191 97 



Grand total $3,180,647 95 



$2,554, 

1.086, 

96, 

684, 

790, 

33, 

2,303, 

256, 

7,805, 

30, 

65, 

4, 

28, 

m, 

520, 
95, 

165, 
54, 
27 
82 

948 



160 00 
637 40 
409 90 
081 74 
505 31 
351 95 
657 74 
883 64 
687 68 
222 58 
756 26 
140 07 
815 12 
934 03 
371 50 
797 42 
278 37 
121 90 
,770 46 
,945 97 
,$85 6t 



$8,880,907 33 



$177,905 76 

91.708 66 

3,163 62 



$272,778 04 



$16,075,500 47 



$28,407,738 75 



$281,360 12 

140.173 93 

30.596 35 

84.947 04 

102,929 40 

3.333 83 

263.471 76 

84.049 99 

990,869 4$ 

75.581 89 

13.8S0 11 

79 42 

7.391 79 

96,933 tl 

54.033 77 

19.087 26 

26.435 01 

11,222 33 

4.515 51 

11.761 72 

187,055 80 



$1,214,851 23 



$48,291 80 

13,884 30 

128 79 



$02.305 04 



$2,535,037 10 



$12,307,402 01 



* Bee note 2 on firat doable pace of this table. 

> Under Federal Administration until March 1, 1020. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 

bf Acooonts of clan C claniilcmtioii (the leut deteiled) — Coatiiuied 



423 



Tbambpobtahon Ezramu— Opdation or Cabs 


ko- 


Joint 
opentioD 
of caw. Dr. 


Joint 

opeimUon 

ofeuH.Cr. 


Total. 
1920 


Total. 
1019 


InMM, 

1920 OTtf 

1919 


eompanyi 


8949,831 43 


8949,861 43 
249.851 43 


816,488,307 79 
7.758.184 33 
7.706.133 46 
6.245.742 31 

■1.546.009 07 


819,487,199 47 
6,070.658 07 
6,416.534 40 
4.219.960 37 
1.241.730 10 


89,979,116 89 

1.687.526 26 

1.291,589 06 

2.036,781 94 

304.278 97 


A 


249,851 43 








X 






A 








1249.851 43 


$249,851 43 


$23,258,059 17 


$17,048,882 04 


$5,309,176 23 


- 






$823.633 00 

203.818 66 

301,706 59 

543,726 96 

3.449 28 

299,969 63 

1.673 22 

114.155 50 

1.105.240 29 

265.328 26 

3,681,896 39 

38.293 75 

378,718 36 

3.925.602 90 

495.467 07 

177,768 40 

274.178 86 


$004.032 28 

176,071 71 

217.757 62 

436,146 18 

25.868 72 

263.244 57 

14.064 38 

81.080 06 

047,324 75 

222.270 06 

3,080,669 14 

120,054 71 

336,200 00 

4.430.281 50 


$128,700 72 

25.84106 

83,948 07 

107,680 78 

D 22,410 44 

86,725 06 

D 18,301 16 

33.074 52 

157.015 54 

43,067 31 

681,134 96 

D 01,660 96 

42.517 46 

D604,n8 60 

405.467 07 

177.763 40 

274,178 86 


X 






A 






X 






A 






A 






A 






A 






A 






A 






A 








8199 02 




c 






A 






A 






A 








A 








A 










$199 02 




$8,951,620 73 


$7,076,000 25 


$074,631 48 










$2,568 93 




$3,206,408 21 

1,364,665 28 

144.009 00 

857,346 54 

1.008.007 26 

42,634 34 

2,865,534 97 

402.997 62 

9,891,803 99 

107,712 55 

98,955 63 

6.172 74 

36.206 91 

949,047 83 

660.761 89 

132,637 09 

220.271 90 

71.959 68 

33.864 99 

110.919 41 

1,930,414 96 




$3,306,408 31 

D 1,060.057 13 

40,106 55 

261.426 00 

819,646 07 

14.206 74 

858.826 50 

71.667 07 

9,811,899 09 

31.034 64 

36.151 46 

567 50 

11,860 65 

79,913 93 

125.466 40 

32,424 73 

44.067 03 

21,845 07 

D 4.120 67 

2,715 44 

993,987 90 


A 


3.755 47 




$8,325,622 40 

103.000 45 

505.020 54 

688.361 10 

28.427 60 

2.006,708 47 

331.330 55 

7,080,971 90 

75,787 01 

62.804 17 

5.606 24 

24.037 26 

169,134 68 

635.306 40 

100,213 36 

175.304 87 

50.113 71 

37,086 66 

108.203 07 

1,007,197 08 


A 






A 




$10,247 44 


A 




A 






A 


3,613 95 




A 






A 


9,938 36 


10,947 U 


B 




173 54 


B 




c 






c 




m 64 






A 






B 






B 






B 






B 






B 














$9.938 35 


$10,420 98 


$11,371.066 01 


$8,256,532 84 


$3,114,583 17 


— 






$254.704 09 

116.545 71 

3.509 39 


$178,424 73 

140.722 43 

3.527 40 


$76,270 36 

D33.176 72 

96199 


B 






B 






c 












$374,759 19 


$330,674 56 


$44.084 63 










$10,137 37 


$10,420 98 


$20,697,445 93 


$16,564,206 65 


$4,138,239 28 


- 


$259,988 80 


$260,272 41 


$43,955,505 10 


$34,513,080 59 


$9,442,415 51 


— 



* IndodM BD uDdistributed credit of $125,000 appUoBble to prior year for bBck time pay whieh 
WBS ordered by R. R. Labor Board of Fedora! Railroad Adminiatration. 

* See Doto 10 on first double page of this table. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



424 Public Service Commission — First District 

TABLE ZIV. Operatiiic expenses, 1920: (A) Sninmsry for ell corpontioiis 



OrasAiiNG SnuT IUilvatb 



iNJinUlB AND DaMAOBS 



Total, 
1020 



Totel. 
1919 



1930 ore 
1919 



Rapid Tbamst 

Interboroudb Rapid Tranait 

Rapid TVanat (Subway dir.) 

Manhattan ^aievated dir.) 

New York ConMlidated, Reoeiyer. . . . 
Hodaon A Manhattan > 



Total., 



MAiqALTTAN AND BbOMX SCBrAOB 

Third Arenue 

Belt line 

Dry Dock, E. B'way A B 

42ki8t.li^.ASt N. Ave 

Mid-Oro0Btown (to Aug. 9,'19) 

•New York City Interborough 

Pelham Park A aty blandCfo Aug. 9, *19) . . . 

Southern BouleTard 

Union 

WeBtoheeter Electric 

8d Ave. syatem in dty 

Brooklyn A North River (tc Oct. 5, */9) 

Second Avenue, Receiver 

New York Railways, Receivtf 

;hth Avenue (fnm Aug. i, 'ISf) . 



Nmth Avenue Unm Oct. /. '19) .... 
N. Y. A Harlem Urm Feb. 1, ^tO). 



Total. 



BbOOKLTN AMD QUONB SURPAOl 

BpMUyr :' ' ^'19,19) 

BropttklyjL f w 

Brjdgc^ i,JpiJiiimii •■ 

Brooltlyn. Que«n» Co. A 3ub., Receiver 

Coney Lilaud k BfOdklvEi 

Coney Iskiid k (Jraveiicnd 

KaMiu EIefitno» Rectiver 

South Brookl^ 

Brocikly£i Hftpid Tranait surface. . 

Bush Tprutiuft! . 

ManhatUD Bridi^^ 3^1^'Cit line 

Marine 

Van Brunt St A Erie Basin 

Other Brooklyn surface 

New York A Queens County 

Long Island Eleotrio 

New York A Long Island 

Ocean Eleotrio 

New York A North Shore (to May 5, 'fO) 

Manhattan A (Queens, Receivers 

Other (Queens surface 



Total. 



RlOHMOm) SUBTAOI 

Richmond Light A R. R , Receiver 
Staten Island Midland, Receiver 
Southfieki Beach 

Total 

Total, street-surface lines 

Grand total 



$8SO,M4 78 
602,236 80 
328.027 98 

> 407,813 68 
40,550 79 



i7«4,066 01 
446,917 96 
317.187 05 

>492,390 53 
22,789 66 



966,909 77 

55.318 84 

10,890 03 

D 84, 576 85 

23.761 13 



81,284,629 25 



$1,279,235 20 



$5,394 05 



$140,618 11 
86.320 45 

45.556 09 
101.601 38 

138 09 

81,796 03 

111 02 

40.765 76 

238,050 03 

56.492 23 

741,449 19 

« 18,681 63 

45.859 86 

729.473 38 

11.993 56 

1,927 67 

46.557 26 



$1,595,942 55 



V $251. 534 92 
< 62,866 86 
U.287 21 
> 46.693 13 
> 67.995 49 
M0,760 73 
> 169.024 19 
>24.083 45 
634,196 98 



5.255 00 
365 00 

1.896 14 

7,618 14 
82.467 13 
13.477 46 
38.260 21 
17,397 01 

5.741 11 

12,921 24 

170, t64 16 



$811,976 28 




$177,077 10 

44,647 43 

36,961 09 

82.742 27 

3.037 52 

77.576 76 

8,560 08 

26.148 44 

274,671 53 

41,949 86 

768,878 08 

15.346 01 

58.360 14 

941.850 67 



$1,783,928 90 



>$448,066 38 

>3,636 91 

> 90.976 02 

'142,113 71 

> 3.936 67 

>281.917 19 

>45.282 06 

1,016,988 94 



1,179 25 



1,561 80 
8,741 06 
99.567 69 
22.109 54 
31,148 47 
6.063 71 
6,508 08 
14.956 74 
180,864 88 



$1,199,024 22 



D$36 

D8, 

8, 

18, 

D2, 

4, 

D3, 

14, 

D36, 

14, 

86, 

D3, 

D12 

D212 

11 

1 

46 



.458 99 
326 98 
595 00 
859 11 
899 43 
219 27 
449 06 
617 32 
621 50 
542 37 
,988 89 
.335 02 
500 28 
377 29 
993 56 
927 67 
557 26 



D $187,986 35 



$251 

D385 

D2, 

D44, 

D74, 

6, 

D112, 

D21. 

D881, 



,534 02 
,199 52 
349 70 
282 89 
118 22 
824 06 
893 00 
248 61 
751 96 



4.075 75 

865 00 

334 34 

4,776 09 

D 17,100 56 

D 8.632 08 

7,111 74 

11.333 30 

D 766 97 

D 2.035 50 

D 10,090 07 



D $387,047 94 



D $581,029 00 



^ Under Federal Administration until March 1. 1020. * Indudos charges conourrently credited 
to Employers' Liability Reserve made on the basis of ultimate liability (ss estimated at time of 
aocident to employee). ' Includes injuries to persons and property. Cr. $1,622.71. * Includes 
reqKMKlent's share of some settleiAenU made by Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company. *-!• In- 



Digitized by Google 



Street Railway Companies 



426 



bf accoimli of dasa C clawiflcatioii (the Imst d«tsil«d) — Cootbttuod 



Tiuffio Ezpucns 


QWOBUL AND MncaUAMBOOB EsnMBIi 


Total. 
1020 


Total, 
1910 


iDCNMe 

1920 over 
1919 


AdninistratioD 


Inaannee 


MineUaneoos 
expeDseiof 

general 

Danasemeiit 

fuHiLrdief 

dept.and 

penwrnt) 


a«iunl 


81,100 SS 
859 55 


88,818 67 

984 01 

2,682 56 


D 89,618 84 

D74 46 

D 2,441 78 

5,873 21 


8784,984 88 
•417,631 14 
•346,653 54 
T 330.477 43 
•149.152 97 


8118,e00 '46 
44.757 24 
73.743 21 
55.558 63 
2.739 86 


8998,934 98 
170.377 78 
125,856 90 

•203,588 01 
42.767 30 






240 78 




5,872 21 


















S6,972 54 


$3,616 57 


$3,355 97 


$1,243,915 06 


$176,798 94 


$542,590 06 














$82,018 50 

12.172 62 

11.222 33 

88,899 36 

127 91 

16,213 48 

60 92 

5.143 08 

60,525 18 

13.463 57 

940, 9ie 95 

• 1.147 93 

36,096 07 

» 384,349 60 

52.165 28 

11,582 22 

15.965 85 


$26,712 36 

4.024 13 

3.943 65 

3,189 68 

10 64 

766 98 

18 15 

652 99 

6,153 42 

962 67 

46,484 68 


$41,760 71 

3.206 62 

3,617 77 

10.920 47 

36 54 

2.848 61 

Grl5 36 

1.854 31 

14.718 90 

9.466 07 

88,499 84 

368 04 

1.208 23 

65.114 22 

1.U58 81 

340 60 

278 51 


































































































8,817 88 
46,430 41 
14,918 70 
5.605 48 
1.250 00 




























$60 70 




$69 70 










$60 70 




$69 70 


$741,563 90 


$122,457 13 


$156,797 95 











$12 73 




$12 73 


"$167,003 61 

"47,126 94 

5,063 84 

I* 36,479 33 

U41.923 22 

"2.601 07 

"87.516 06 

"10.713 69 

S98,Ur 98 

19.288 01 

"17.739 86 

286 00 

7,836 87 

U,850 74 

38,456 10 

7,363 10 

11,033 91 

1,041 76 

11.778 68 

15.013 54 

84,887 09 


$19,437 67 

11,055 47 

960 60 

4.560 65 

8.923 51 

419 00 

20.660 04 

8.200 00 

74,918 94 

199 00 

1,752 16 

25 78 

1.630 89 

8,607 88 

10.619 99 

1.368 65 

1,876 76 

1.256 23 

1.278 33 

4.287 16 

90,887 19 


$35.756 45 

50,826 41 

66 00 

21.522 25 

27,386 19 

1.114 72 

55.202 82 

3.814 89 

196,189 75 

6.949 01 

462 54 

629 87 

1.546 74 

9,588 16 

3,496 86 

950 99 

1.561 88 

11 70 

826 06 

1.893 61 

8,749 00 


























140 47 


$373 80 


D233 33 
















7 00 




700 
D 818 80 




ISO 90 


S7S80 






$2.64666 


500 


15 00 


DIOOO 


6.380 00 










600 


16 00 


DIOOO 


8,490 00 




















26 75 


D26 75 








86 05 


251 80 

878 56 


D 165 75 
D 199 60 




88 OS 








8251 26 


$667 35 


D $416 10 


$527,785 11 


$06,511 88 


$213,519 89 


$8.420 00 


1886 64 


$504 82 
1,548 08 


$381 82 
D 1,548 08 


$20,183 65 
5,986 34 
1.391 52 


$11,061 24 

4.287 50 

250 68 


"$2,417 90 
673 68 
159 10 




















1886 64 


$2.052 90 


D $1,166 26 


$27,561 51 


$15,599 42 


$3.250 68 








$1.207 59 


$2,720 25 


D $1,512 66 


$1,296,900 52 


$236,567 94 


$373,568 52 


$8.420 00 


$8,180 13 


$6,336 82 


$1,843 31 


$2,510,815 60 


$413,366 88 


$916,158 58 


$8.420 00 



dudw "joint general expense **—»Cr 836,268.17. • Dr $36,268.17. ' Cr $1,529.88. •Dr$22.- 
685,07. •Dr $14.25. ^oCr $105.98. " Cr 8660.00. » Cr $1,667.24. " Cr $130.03. i<Cr 
8140.76. "Cr$5.37. " Cr $425.72. ^Cr $15.28. '•Cr $440.04. *• See note 10 on fint 
double page of thia table. " Includes rent $521.38. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



426 



Public Service Commission — First District 

TABLB ZIV. Operatmg expenses, ipso: (A) Sammary fof all corporsti<ms 



* 




QkNSRAL AMD MlBCIL 


OpiHATiNa Snonr Railways 


General 
stationery 
and printing 


Store and 

stable 
expenses 


Undistributed 

adjustments 

balance 


Rapid Tranrtt 
Interborougli Rsoid Timnnt 


il6,e4» IS 
9.002 81 
6,639 32 
35,412 43 
15,984 11 


ttiS,6SA 14 
128,113 15 

95,420 99 
110,269 83 

14,707 40 




RapM '^anffU (A^ihvAV Hiv, ) 




Manhattan (Elevated div.) 




New York ConaolUkted, Receiver 


Cr 9257 46 










•^tal 


$67,038 67 


9348,511 37 


Cr 9257 46 






MANHATTAlf AMD BbONX SuRPACB 

Third'Avenue 


96,101 02 

1,308 48 

1,006 86 

3.908 42 

7 13 

1,657 90 

355 

740 90 

5.655 79 

1,172 14 

t 1,669 19 

27 15 

589 12 

5.963 50 

2,977 18 

778 06 

4,898 51 


929.516 82 

2,892 79 

2,483 02 

8,677 29 

885 

1,703 21 

11 76 

2,057 11 

14,154 16 

1.692 75 

69,197 76 


Cr 98.228 70 


B^lttine 


Cr79 


Drv Dock. E. B'»»y fr B , 


Cr06 


42(] St , Mfeah &Bi K Avn 


Cr40 


Mid-Croftitown '' 19) . 




New York Ciry 1 ti 


Crl9 20 


P«lhAm FftTit idr ' M . i (to Awi 9 *19) 




Sovtbrru BouLr wd 




Union. 


Cr 1,805 06 


Hr^t^tirtflt^iT FlfftriB 


Cr95 90 


8d Ave. aystem in city 


Cr 10,160 99 


BrooUyn A North River {toOci.6,*19) 




8eoon<f Avenue, Receiver. 


4.815 18 
116.927 21 


Cr 113 75 


New York Railways. Receiver. . 




ESghth Avenue (from Aug. 1, '19) 


Cr72 69 


Nmth Avenue (^om Od. i. 'i«) ' . 




Crl 37 


N. Y. AHarlem (fnmFtb. 1/MO) 


978 06 








Total 


936,795 71 


9185,918 20 


Cr 910,838 10 






BbOOELTN A?fD QUSINB SURPAOB 

BrookJyti City i/rim Oci 1^, 19) 


913.436 58 

5,312 72 

10 40 

3,879 96 

4,263 50 

191 19 

11,522 26 

1,449 81 

40,066 4t 

5.295 14 

402 05 


935.331 49 
14.969 59 


Cr957 81 


Brooklyn H^blaiBeeervct 


Cr62 23 


Bridf^ti OperEtinB ' . . 




BrmklvD, Qn^ns Co. k Sub., Reodver 


10,043 40 

11.855 25 

462 43 

33.342 12 

1.562 15 

107,666 4S 


Cr23 49 


Cra^ Ifllaiiii ujri BrooklyTi 


Cr28 60 


f!nn#>y Lilftnjl nrid VitnviFMi-iid 


Crl 32 


Kiunu EU>c'thc, Rjeanver . 


Cr78 29 


8mjtb Brookiyc 


Cr4 54 


Broqkiyn Rapid Transit surfiue 


Crt66 98 


Bu#h Terminal . 




ManhAitfln Brjdei^ 3-Geiit bine 




Cr26 34 


Mann^, , , 






Van Brunt St A Erie Baflin 


300 06 

6,997 26 

1.900 00 

1,007 41 

1,612 51 

65 61 

293 20 

663 55 

6,64$ tS 






Other BrooUyn surface 




Cr96 S4 


New York A Queens County 


12,384 42 

502 12 

1,311 79 


2,897 70 


Long Island Efectric 


372 94 


New York and Long Idand 


1,788 48 


Ocean BSeetric 




New York A North Shore (to May S 'SO) 






Manhattan A Queens, Recehftfs 


2,381 55 
16,679 88 




Other Queens surface 


6,064 19 






Total 


951,605 05 


9124,146 31 


94,771 50 






RiomfOND SuarACB 
Richmond Uffht A R. R. Receiver 


91.458 35 
360 53 
106 46 


91,995 58 
1.031 70 








Southfield Beach 










Total 


91.925 34 


93.027 28 








Total, street-surface lines 


990,327 00 


9313,091 79 


Cr 95,566 60 






Grand total 


9157,366 67 


9661.603 16 


Cr 95,824 06 







I See note 2 on first double pace of this table. 

< Under Federal Administration until March 1, 1020. 

* See note 10 on first double page of this table. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Companies 

by Aceoimls of ckM C ckHiflcation (the tetst detaitod) — Condaded 



427 



Luaoim ExFCNHH — CcKeUdei 




























Increase 






Increase 


com- 


Total. 1920 


Total, 1919 


1920 over 
1919 


1920 


1910 


1020 over 
1919 


PMJ* 


ilM8,t9e 06 
7M,882 10 


$1,197,917 96 


r $920,978 li 


) $31,698,908 98 


$26,233,326 40 


$6,461,882 68 


A 


585,566 8( 


184,315 2' 


18.161,487 35 


14,877,898 99 


3.783,588 36 


— 


648.313 M 


611,651 1( 


36.662 8( 


13.533.721 63 


11.855.427 41 


1,678,294 22 


— 


735.048 8; 


437.683 41 


297.465 41 


» 15.077.529 OC 


10.606.731 i: 


4,470,797 89 


A 


225.351 73 


158.893 4C 


66.458 32 


\ 3.736.690 81 


3.004.606 68 


732,084 13 


A 


I2.378.5M 66 


$1,793,694 76 


$584,901 8C 


$50,509,428 85 


$39,844,664 25 


$10,664,764 60 


- 


$178,789 70 


$155,562 87 


$23,236 8a 


♦$2,719,211 27 


•$2,264.792 98 


$454,418 29 


A 


23.608 85 


27,517 7J 


D 3.913 8( 


•451.180 79 


•389,510 35 


61,670 47 


A 


22.273 57 


21,543 75 


729 82 


* 635.412 03 


•445,636 5( 


189,775 53 


A 


64.100 73 


51.336 OS 


12.764 62 


•1.239.576 98 


•1,113,522 54 


126.064 44 


A 


101 07 


2,176 92 


D1.985 85 


•8.291 39 


•54,742 3; 


D46.450M 


A 


28.170 98 


20.167 55 


3,003 « 


•683,599 54 


•604,805 2< 


78,794 28 


A 


79 02 


1,030 6S 


D051 6] 


3,237 39 


•29,022 3{ 


D 25,784 99 


A 


10.448 89 


8.621 TTi 


1,827 IJ 


•852,377 57 


•206,356 6f 


146,020 89 


A 


99.402 30 


105.518 15 


D6,115 7( 


•2,498,678 00 


•2,228.813 21 


269,864 79 


A 


26.661 21 


22.678 34 


3,982 87 


622,062 39 


493,601 96 


128.460 43 


A 


US, 780 91 


4ie,li3 27 


52,S77 64 


9,818,687 SS 


7,830,804 20 


1,382,823 16 


— 


1.543 12 


2,357 4C 


D814 3^ 


• 76,032 53 


•227,838 64 


D 151.806 11 


C 


51.412 73 


47,075 52 


4.337 2C 


•849.930 16 


• 687,838 51 


162.091 65 


A 


618,784 94 


679,292 6C 


D 60.507 6( 


9,802.538 76 


9,921,411 17 


D 118,872 41 


A 


71 .047 28 




71,047 » 


•1.044,888 12 




1,044.888 12 


A 


18.304 89 




18,304 89 


•323.920 04 




323.920 04 


A 


23,370 92 




23,370 92 


•654.556 14 




654.556 14 


A 










SI. 233,184 79 


$1,144,868 86 


$88,315 93 


$21,965,493 10 


$18,667,892 52 


$3,297,600 58 


- 


1270.907 99 




$270,907 99 


$6,395,043 67 




$6,395,043 67 


A 


128.728 90 


$237,548 29 


D 108.819 39 


2,660,780 50 


$6,379,733 29 


D3.728,052 79 


A 


6.120 34 


6.231 31 


D 110 97 


•206,698 34 


• 165,508 52 


41,189 82 


A . 


76,402 10 


43,778 03 


32.684 07 


1,702,246 49 


1,176,751 89 


525,494 60 


A 


94,323 07 


65,978 87 


28.344 2( 


2,046.216 34 


1.447.641 60 


598,574 74 


A 


4.787 09 


3.706 4C 


1.080 6( 


102.603 46 


58.404 66 


44.198 80 


A 


206.165 03 


144.741 62 


63.423 41 


5,813.005 85 


4.070.685 49 


1.742,320 36 


A 


25.736 00 


25.967 99 


D231 99 


672.008 40 


582.347 70 


89,660 70 


A 


816,tSO St 


6i7,96t SI 


287,878 01 


19,688,603 OS 


13,881,073 16 


6,707,629 90 


— 


33.771 16 


31.894 82 


1.876 34 


165,872 17 


131,613 98 


34,258 19 


C 


26.710 27 


18.629 43 


8.080 84 


187.804 62 


117,598 36 


69,706 26 


B 


941 65 


1.125 42 


D 183 77 


• 12,581 67 


•13,979 99 


Dl,396 32 


C 


10.814 00 


10.540 89 


273 17 


66.591 30 


53,778 77 


12.812 53 


C 


7S,tS7 14 


6t,t90 S6 


10,046 68 


438,349 76 


316,971 10 


116,378 66 


— 


69.755 07 


68.925 22 


829 85 


1,288,141 13 


1,206,322 16 


81.818 97 


A 


11,565 21 


9.722 88 


1.842 39 


279,634 12 


246,510 89 


33.123 23 


B 


19.180 33 


16.717 02 


2.463 31 


536,405 62 


496,722 63 


39.682 99 


B 


2.375 30 


646 29 


1.729 01 


190,867 .03 


107.274 82 


83,592 21 


B 


14.177 17 


15,417 79 


D 1.240 62 


124.616 52 


147.158 48 


D22,542 96 


B 


24.239 41 


23.078 03 


1.161 38 


•245.385 88 


•232,158 34 


13.227 54 


B 


t4i,8$t 4B 


154,S07 25 


6,78S 86 


2,666,049 SO 


2,436,147 32 


228,901 98 


— 


$1,028,760 15 


$724.650 30 


$304,109 85 


$22,686,002 11 


$16,634,191 57 


$6,051,810 54 


- 


$37,116 72 


$35.399 20 


$1,717 52 


$608,659 39 


$462,278 67 


$146,380 72 


B 


12.339 75 


25.746 96 


D 13.407 21 


280,283 11 


369,046 28 


D 88.763 17 


B 


1,907 76 


945 97 


961 79 


•9.736 02 


• 6,933 86 


2.802 16 


C 


$51.364 23 


$62,092 13 


D $10, 727 90 


$898,678 52 


$838,258 81 


$60,419 71 


— 


$2,313,309 17 


$1,931,611 29 


$381,697 88 


$45,550,173 73 


$36,140,342 90 


$9,409,830 83 


— 


$4,691,905 83 


$3,725,306 07 


$966,599 77 


$96,059,602 58 


$75,985,007 15 


$20,074,595 43 


— 



*See note on Depreciation on first double page of this table. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



428 Public Service CoiiofiBsiON — First District 

TABLE ZIV. Openting e^peiiBes, x^ao : 



Nami or Aoooum 



. ImrsaBOBouoH Rapid 



Subway 
dhruioD 



Elevated 
divinmi 



KLuirraNAXcoB or W4y amd Sisvgturbs 

Superinteiufence of imy and struetures 

Ballast 

Ties 

Rails 

Rail fastenings and joints 



Qndergroond oonstniction . 
Roadway and track labor. . 



$101, 

29, 
70, 
49, 
23, 



085 92 
192 10 
854 13 
093 92 
838 77 
272 87 



8104.060 00 



15.004 40 
7.064 03 

24.167 09 
1.317 04 



Pavina 

MisoeUaneons roadway juid trade expenses 

Cleaning and sandmg track 

RonoTal of snow, ice and sand 

Repairs of tunnels 

Repurs of elevated structures and foundations — 

Repairs of birid8;e8, trestles and culverts 

Repairs of crosongs. fences and signs 

RepairB of ugnals and interlocking systems 

Telephcme and telegraph repairs 

Other miscellaneous way expenses 

Pole and fixture repairs 

Underground conduit repairs 

Transmission system repairs 

Distribution system rn^urs 

Misoelianeous electrio'Iine expenses 

R^purs of buildings and structures 

Power-plant (mcluding substation buihfings) . 

Other buildings and structures 

Jtnnt way and structures 

Dq;>reciation of way and structures' 



447,975 50 



272,195 70 



5 

5 

291 

41 



,262 96 
,188 64 
,031 71 
,401 91 
,229 57 
300 78 



372, 
20, 
19, 



275 87 
482 27 
924 71 



7, 
23 
27, 
162 
250 
35 
224 
Cr 73, 
175, 



746 13 
,756 59 
,051 61 
,790 75 
,666 tr 
,110 02 
,438 05 
,100 39 
,578 57 



Cr 



35.765 78 

2.311 35 

0,891 88 

723 

180.751 13 

10.909 08 

'2d5!26i'i3 
15,359 01 
50,072 33 

" 9;965"85 

2.400 15 

331 70 

90.305 88 

il8,74S 69 

10.002 00 

208.051 52 

73.100 39 

81.705 20 



Total.. 



$2,150,302 10 



$1,250,892 57 



MAINT1MA.NCI or EQumcurT 

Superintendence of equipment 

Repairs of furnaces, boilers and accessories 

Repurs of steam engines 

Repairs of power-plaDt electric eauipment 

Repairs of misceUaneoos powor-plant equipment 

RepMTs of substation eauipment 

Repairs of passenger and combination cars 

Repairs of freight, express and mail cars 

Repurs of locomotives 

RepMTB of service ears 

Repurs of electric (motor) equipment of cars 

R^irs of electric oqmpment of locomotives 

Repairs of shop machinery and tools 

Slop expenses 

Repfurs of vehicles 

Other miscellaneous ecjuipment expense 

Maintaining joint equipment 

Depreciation of eqmpment 



Total.. 



Transportation Ezfbnsrs — Operations or Powm Plant 

Power-plant labor 

Fuel for poww 

Water for power 

Lubricants for power 

Miscellaneous power-plant supplies and expenses 

Substation labor 

Sub-station supplies and expenses 

Power purohaMd 

Power exchanged — balance 

Other operations 



Total.. 



$210,115 74 
145,068 74 
22,598 70 
5.544 10 
8.402 92 
22.548 27 
1,128.823 49 



$149,100 29 
119,045 04 
8.043 05 
13.973 67 
0.809 14 
0.358 87 
709.229 85 



4.808 07 
057,725 34 



19,353 98 

228.484 43 

4.281 58 

0.096 71 



701.1 



I 18 



$3,225,543 25 



$530,420 02 

2.109.088 08 

18,728 94 

15,270 14 

05.315 08 

278.899 43 

20.616 41 

18.167 46 

097.906 40 



$3,754,419 10 



198 

2,925 15 

522.180 32 


21.093 39 

280.907 52 

2.863 25 

4.957 30 



Or 319.947 32 



$1,528,868 70 



Cr 



$431,355 57 

2.153.234 28 

10,167 12 

9.317 62 

43.858 30 

98,285 10 

10.741 57 

4.200 90 

697.900 40 



$2,009,254 18 



1020. 



^ Under Federal Administratioii until March 1, 

* Includes Yonkers and Hastings railways. 

* Includes " tube cleaning." $34,538.43. 

< Includea " tube deaning." $102,473.18. 

* Composed of Dr. $12,000.79. Cr. $41,049.31 and 



' other operations." Cr. $654.43. 



oogle 



Street Railway Companies 

(B) Complete detsOa for aelectod oorporations 



429 



Tbucrt 


HodsonA 
Manhattan^ 


New York 


Brooklyn 
BwidTnuMit 


Third ATe. 
syrteni> 


New York 
Baflwajre 


Toul 


S265.702 52 
102 10 


10.343 25 
86121 

6,470 20 
17,758 82 

5,588 44 
17,748 41 


$105,701 87 

81 81 

83.080 15 

3.732 78 

35.706 07 

17.407 54 


$146,641 53 
33.582 45 
26.202 74 
29.127 11 
50,720 05 
74,574 87 


$101,004 70 


$72.889 82 


44.018 58 


14.240 07 

23.569 07 

17.448 38 

6.644 54 

11.355 22 

207.905 21 

527.60108 

27.056 07 

« 82.306 84 

282.381 20 




77.157 05 

■ 74,006 46 

24.589 01 


Cr 805 11 
5.047 50 
37.034 80 
12.648 68 


720.171 20 


44,617 04 


266.05168 

022 

20,682 66 

8.563 80 

47.748 04 

44.048 68 

105,567 34 

3.651 07 

4.138 34 

228.508 58 

14.038 08 

0.818 75 

2.427 26 

5.026 43 

3.326 43 

56.343 66 

3.011 28 

mj>66S6 


474,258 37 

440.308 85 

80.824 61 

75.378 61 

106.630 00 

Cr 423 10 

216 74 

5.277 80 

3.277 87 

40.404 21 

515 53 

11.718 00 

20.231 37 

8.500 85 

4.850 10 

172.184 57 

48,610 55 

iil,4Si IS 


225.536 20 

245.280 06 

24.155 75 

60.442 64 

« 830,506 68 

045 00 


64.028 74 

7.400 00 

11.023 30 

201 .460 14 


2.618 64 

35,717 85 

2,324 28 

114,542 01 


227.080 70 






11.275 86 




17.675 27 








161 40 


577.477 00 


80.503 04 
7.030 00 
8.072 60 


704 73 




35.791 88 


651 81 


60,907 04 


12,612 42 

14.752 76 

1.052 02 

6.253 35 

110.827 35 

736 86 

U0J»6 S9 

680 02 

110.046 37 

20.571 18 








17.651 48 




6.148 20 


26.162 74 




6.074 81 


27.083 31 
253.162 63 

478,t98 79 
45,208 62 


36.835 80 

568 83 

ltS,m 66 

14,368 68 
100.120 07 


146.051 17 

225 

99,581 68 

3.238 20 


433.000 17 


184.056 36 


06.843 88 
Cr •20.603 05 


03.813 37 


61.745 04 


305.320 46 


iii.Mo 66 


777.912 49 








13.401.254 73 


8581.653 20 


$1,500,743 73 


$2,186,008 08 


$1,607,406 81 


$2,020,659 00 


1350.216 03 
264,714 38 


$12,875 02 

73.400 32 

0.632 18 

15.077 02 

20.485 05 

464 56 

338.046 77 


$30,040 14 


$30,308 50 


$40.200 02 


$89,878 11 


31 ,242 35 










10.517 67 










15.272 06 








40 37 


28,907 14 




"ii622i663 86 

45.444 30 

2,646 77 

55,299 30 

850.690 88 

1.592 00 

20.125 30 

416,550 00 

30,805 40 

Cr 72 70 

Cr 2,500 00 

117,500 00 


7.105 62 
684.667 48 


8.604 80 


1.837.853 44 


1.632.181 83 


534.764 33 


1 08 




160 15 

16,208 38 

770.833 76 

570 30 

62.015 03 

446.102 71 

22.100 00 

06 






7.733 22 
1.179.011 66 


66 34 
52.474 01 


38,268 30 
330,811 24 


3.804 05 
461.308 13 


40,447 37 

500.451 05 

7,144 83 


3.531 30 
63.534 33 


6.592 35 
65.208 28 
36.031 40 

1,007 00 


10.301 56 
87.928 56 
37.666 57 


11.056 01 




20.118 83 






Cr 7 521 40 


441,041 86 


63.271 02 


Cr 881.781 67 




100.463 82 








$4,754,411 05 


$663,750 81 


$2,100,470 50 


$3,517,668 81 


$1,218,980 69 


$1,444,338 62 


1061.776 10 


$200,137 47 

404.437 27 

10.167 06 

1,466 13 

7.500 75 

39.285 02 

3.760 68 

678 00 

028 00 

Cr 94,003 26 


$5,780 65 






$17,880 57 


4,282,322 06 
28.896 06 
















24,503 76 










100,173 44 






$149 23 

71 .888 84 

4.930 80 

805.374 08 

Cr 2,291 68 

•43,382 67 


3.478 85 


377.184 50 






80,130 35 


37,357 08 
22.368 36 


''3;968;057 62 


$1,716,143 71 
827,501 63 


2,822 64 

1,052,200 84 

Cr 63,317 42 








Cr 37,034 81 










15,823,673 34 


$673,386 12 


$3,973,837 67 


$2,543,735 34 


$923,433 94 


$1,063,770 03 



I See note on Depreciation, Div. A. Credit entries (Cr) indicate that the expenditures for main- 
tsnanee have ezoeeded the estimated Depreciation (induding maintcniDoe), the ezccM beinf drawn 
from the Depreciation reserve. 

' "Other operations.** 

• " Storage battery maintenance.** 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



430 Public Service C!ommission — First District 

TABLE ZIV. Operating ezpooses, x^ao: (B) Complete 



Nahk or AcoouNT 



IimuoBouQH lUno 



Subivay 
divinoii 



Elevated 
diviaioii 



Thansportation EznicsBB — Ofibateon or Cars 

Superintendence of transportatioR 

I^Msenger motormen 

Surfaoe-car oonduoton 

Elevated and subway trainmen * 

Freight and ezp^en motormen and trainmen 

MisoeUaneouB carHserriee employees 

Miscellaneous car-service expenses 

Station employees 

Station expenses 

Car-house employees 

Car-house expenses 

Operation of signal and interlocking systems 

(^)eration of telephone and telegraph systems 

Other transportation expenses 

Joint operation of ears 



1290.796 20 
824.903 17 



3,188,073 65 



17.969 66 

228,880 16 

2.172,531 44 

112.961 44 

634.067 56 



498,411 42 

21 .681 21 

17.759 85 

Cr 249,851 43 



ToUl.. 



$7,758,184 33 



iNnrans to Psr80N8 and Daicagrb to Propbrtt 

Claim-department expense 

Medical expense 

Claims for injuries to employees 

Other injuries and damages 

Law expenses in connection with damages 

Salaries and expenses of attorneys 

Court cost and expenses 

Law printing 

Other ex 
Reservec 



147,838 10 
16,867 40 
58.842 05 

254,882 67 

it7,ei8 es 

110,015 35 

6,805 57 

797 73 

6,187 93 



Total. 



1502.236 80 



andflolicitataon . 



TRArnC EXPRNBBB 



Parks and other attractions . . . 
MisoeUaneous traffic expenses . 



ToUl. 



General and Miscrllanrovs 

Salaries and expenses of general officers 

Salaries and expenses of general-office clerks 

General office supplies and expenses 

General law expenses 

Insurance 

Relief department and pensions 

Miscellaneous general expenses 

Joint general expenses 

General stationeiy and printing 

Store expenses 

Stable expenses 

Undistributed adjustments — balance 



Total.. 



Grand total $18,161,487 



$859 55 



$859 55 



$51 

257 
63 
81 
44 
15 

155 

Cr 36, 

9, 

128, 



,396 29 
618 08 
.445 38 
,439 56 
,757 24 
,352 68 
025 08 
268 17 
002 81 
113 15 



$709,882 10 



$307,578 59 
1,063.612 89 

3, 137,' 505 15 

* 23;698 75 
157,182 70 

1,909.737 96 
113,533 94 
319.345 01 

■ SMJiw'io 

16,278 21 

43.304 73 

249.851 43 



$7,708,123 46 



$30,585 02 
10,784 08 
37,620 32 
164,615 07 
80,467 $8 
75.606 16 
4.351 10 
510 02 
3.956 21 



$328,027 08 



$240 78 



$240 78 



$34,264 12 
171.685 87 
50.665 02 
53.769 46 
73.743 21 
17.560 98 
108,295 92 
36,268 17 
6,639 32 
95.420 09 



$648,313 96 



$13,533,721 63 



> Under Federal Administration until March 1, 1920. 
* See note 2 on preceding double-page. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railwat Coupanibs 



431 



details for selected eorpontioni 


— Concluded 








TiUlfKT 


HadsonA 
Manhattan 1 


New York 


Brooklyn 

BapidlVaofit 

nrfMo eompamei 


Third Aye. 
, lyBtems 


New York 
Baihnvs 


Total 


$598,374 79 
1.888.516 06 


$110,912 89 
194,448 20 
149.296 75 
371.742 38 


$378,168 30 
1.054.184 28 


$1,095,362 21 

3,902.098 77 

3,704,001 73 

3,694 39 

196.892 89 

214,378 47 

283,344 51 

49,036 41 

45,801 62 

343,946 35 

76,345 43 

7,211 18 

30.681 60 

50,116 95 

Cr 30009 


$383.838 64 
1.073.781 14 
1.543.326 41 


$370,898 71 
1,536,293 46 
1,455,001 84 


6,325,578 80 


2,473.471 81 

""246,097 25 
161,170 76 
1,403.637 48 
118,579 33 
140,796 00 
1.199 84 
216,746 98 
22.117 57 
29,572 71 






■* 122,026*39 

106.010 14 

1.393 19 

1.172 36 

156.065 26 

50.483 14 




41.668 41 

386.062 86 

4,082,269 40 


88.539 71 
23.211 64 

358.058 42 
36.826 67 

178,377 21 
13,172 74 
96,769 79 
5.857 37 
37.795 30 
«Cr 125.000 00 


54.668 77 
157,282 03 


226,495 38 




953.412 57 


396,718 66 
40,368 06 


864,906 52 




37.959 42 




7,633 60 


61.064 58 


65,887 86 


17,697 79 










$15,466,307 79 


$1,546.009 07 


$6,245,742 31 


$9,891,608 22 


$4,102,993 43 


$8,025,502 00 


178,423 12 
27.651 48 
96.462 37 
419.497 74 
198,086 93 
185.621 51 
11,156 67 
1,307 75 
10.144 14 


$8,021 74 

1.666 65 

9.441 70 

23.679 12 

3,037 89 

2,361 70 

408 59 

267 60 

703 69 


$54,835 37 

11.348 58 

56.017 51 

77.181 86 

g08,4te 79 

158.028 18 

45,738 34 

4.660 27 

3 57 


$82,840 16 

16.915 14 

66.324 63 

238.573 99 

136,169 8S 

92,241 41 

37,687 38 

5.224 06 

3 43 

94,385 78 


$92,017 86 
31,505 87 
33.476 87 
549.451 40 
113,739 01 
70.562 56 
36.770 53 
6.406 93 
8.420 53 
14.803 42 


$84.03136 

25,065 88 

16,430 63 

242,830 30 

117,907 SO 

116.366 83 

1,067 63 

452 86 

6,233 38 

335,446 06 










$830.264 78 


$46,550 79 


$407,813 68 


$634,195 98 


$832,414 06 


$720,473 38 






$3 36 
5,867 90 








$1,100 33 














$140 47 
19 73 










1 05 














$1,100 33 




$5,872 21 


$160 20 














$85,660 41 
429.303 95 
114.111 30 
135.209 02 
118.500 45 
32.913 66 
263.321 00 


$50,374 61 
58.473 77 

3,174 80 
14,444 72 

2.739 86 
11,605 95 
31.161 44 
22.685 07 
15,984 11 
14,707 40 


$68,897 03 

142,242 26 

75,181 60 

45.686 52 

65,558 63 

72.392 74 

131,195 27 

Cr 1.529 88 

35.412 43 

95.417 69 

14.852 14 

Cr 257 46 


$104.124 26 
153.868 08 
62,570 80 
80.937 60 
74.216 94 
72.849 37 
122.340 36 
Cr 3.053 46 
40.066 42 
92,078 49 
15,487 94 
Cr 256 28 


$74,006 36 
131,382 21 
30.384 07 
35,401 39 
46,900 88 
15,958 53 
80.448 73 


$67,471 36 
231,460 91 
41.035 55 
54.578 76 
46,430 41 
28.917 42 
36.196 80 
Cr 195 98 


15.642 13 
223,534 14 


23,364 03 

41.657 41 

27.951 81 

Cr 10.170 65 


5.963 50 
96.023 06 
20,904 15 












$1,418,196 06 


$225,351 73 


$735,048 87 


$815,230 52 


$487.063 36 


$618,784 04 


$31,695,208 98 


$3,736,690 81 j 


$15,077,529 06 


$19,588,603 05 


$9,173,402 09 


$9,802,538 76 



* Includes conductors, guards and other paasenger trainmen, except motormen, who are shown 
separately. 

* To cancel 1919 debit for back time pay. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



432 



Public Service Commission — First District 



TABLE XV. TAXB8, 
(Cents indadad in telmlation, bot omitted in 













L0OA& 


OpBBATIlfO SnBST RaILWAT 


Real 
estate 


Cor- 
porate 

real 
property 


Special 
franchise 


Per- 
sonal 
prop- 
erty 


Car 
license 


Rapid TiujTBiT 


i4Mi,011 

142,656 

278,354 

36.182 

6.046 


8.865 
122.822 
360,600 
24.192 


tl,61M,0tS 






Subwaiy div ." 






Elevated (tiv 


1.512.023 
376.396 
197,433 






New York Consolidated. Receiver. 






Hudson A Manhattan 


$40 








Total 


1463,240 


$516,481 


$2,085,853 


$40 




Manhattait and Bronx Subtacb 
Third Avenue . 




1137,965 

15,851 

21.361 

5.720 




$102,300 
17,699 
17,095 


$235 


$3,230 


Belt Line. . 


2,600 


Dry Dock* E. B'wRjr 4 B 


4.050 


4idSt Maah i^8t N Ave 




Mid-Cr«fltQwn 










Ntiw York City tntcrborough 












PclbajJi Pifk A City lejand. 






153 






Soutlif tn Boulevard 










Union .... 


16.467 
5.194 

t0»,660 


;;;;;;;; 
•< 


4.201 

11.101 

iSt,66i 

189 

29.161 

145.219 

51,956 

30.082 

20,000 






Westcbeet^ ElBCtiic 






3d Ave. system in city 


iS6 


9,880 


Brooklyn A North River 






34.836 

381,048 

19.129 


■■$ii4 






New York Railways. Receiver 




30.032 


F^ighth Avftinift ...'.' 


3.895 


Nmth Avenue 


600 


N, Y. 4 Ha'Iem 


















Total 


1637,074 


$114 


$429,163 


$235 


$44,408 


Bbookltn and QumiNB StmrACB 
Brooklyn City 




$91,903 
47.388 


$8,512 
4,076 


$120,912 
68.043 


■■$i;2i4 


$11,054 


Brooklyn Heights, Receiver 


4,772 


Bndge Operating 




Bklyn., Queens Co. & Sub., Receiver 


11,214 
36,207 


7,306 
526 


27.889 
22.563 
2,597 
39.688 
635 
882,SS1 
8.842 
2.515 


2.458 


Coney is and & Brooklyn, Kc»eciver 


3.201 


Coney Island A Gravescncl 


100 


Nassau Electric, Receiver 


21.482 
146 


23.849 

95.486 

159,767 

401 


10,020 


South Brooklyn 




Brooklyn Rapid Tninsit surface 


i,m 


31,801 


Bu»h Terminal . , , .' " 




Mannattan Bridge 3-Cent Lme 


1,532 


1.082 




Marine 




Van Brunt St. A Erie Basin 


392 

11.743 

1,367 

4.200 

374 

»4,886 


4.607 
1.310 
4,200 


2.141 
13,499 
21.001 
4.031 
9.230 
175 
4.798 
9,006 
4S,84S 






Other Brooklyn surface 


i,b8t 




New York & Queens County 




Long Island Electric 






New York A Long Island 






Ocean Electric 






New York 4 North Shore 






M^nhiLttan A Queens. Rf^ivers 






Other Queens surface 


M»,67fi 


10,117 












Total 


1232,929 


8150.276 


$344,074 


$2,296 


$31,601 


Richmond Surtaos 
Richmond Light A R. R., Receiver ... 




$1,859 
2.989 


$1,741 

617 

1.234 


$16,766 
12,430 






Staten Island Midland, Receiver 






















Total 


14.848 


$3,593 


$29,196 












Total street-surface lines 


$874,852 


$153,985 


$802,434 


$2,531 


$76,010 






Grand total 


$1,338,092 $670,466 

1 


$2,888,287 


$2,572 


$76,010 







* Includes adjustmento to surplus for taxes applicable to prior years, taxes charged to tenant, 
taxes charged to suspense, etc. 

* Includes capital stock tax. 

* Includes bond interest paymento, $27,750, subway division, $7,987.50; elevated division, 
$10,762.50. 

« Consists of New Jersey taxes: State, $121,552.54; local, $60,534.98. 

» Capital stock tax. ^^ ^ 

* Respondent reports no segregation between city gross earnings and bridge rentals. The levy 
for use of bridges for 1919 and 1920 is shown as $10,150. 

' Stipulated rents. 

* Represents adjustment of taxes on non-operatins property. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



Street Railway Covpanibs 



433 



Ipso: (A) Tax cliargM 


ia«f eento) 














• Stats 


FiSBUL 


Total 

Miignbit 

to street 

rmilwmy 

opemtkm 


Othtf 

HWMt 

inoone 




GroHre- 
afeoT 


lar 


Other 


Totel 


Qnm 
ins. 


EllMi 

dhri- 

d«Ddt 


Id- 
pome 


Hook 


Othir 
efatfseti 








88,084,789 

151.522 

1.913.300 

866.118 

409.799 


8960,488 
160.800 
199.681 
106.735 
164 


m04J818 
50.312 
54.000 




H98,898 
•74,180 
• 10.762 


88,688,410 

436.765 

2.186.645 

072.854 

418.440 


89,668 
1,206 
8,456 

4,576 
814.881 






















192.938 


«$1«.687 


$736 




i235 


$2,666 


578 


126.180 










892.938 


$182,087 


88,340.641 


8467.882 


$104,547 


$2,666 


804.460 


84.000.706 


8829,131 


$126,857 


825,352 






8269.088 

86.151 

42.943 

79.628 

262 

49.028 

144 

14.497 

182.463 

26.521 

860,716 

3.119 

74.960 

744.253 

74.962 

36.497 

20.000 


826.046 

5,790 

6,898 

18.738 

48 

8.101 

35 

2.908 

30.205 

7,044 

106,808 

589 

8,516 

99.516 

10,128 

3,006 

5,000 






85.275 
612 


8300,405 

42.553 

40.337 

99.217 

301 

67.496 

170 

17*405 

162.855 

33.566 

768,809 

3.709 

83.496 

866.647 

85-.111 

40,224 

25.000 


















$10,521 


436 














73,484 
252 


$424 








850 




13.074 








40 053 


8.974 









366 






6r9 










14,407 
















•111,705 
10,225 


(•) 








186 




45.815 
908 








t76 088 


9,899 








7,890 




70,816 
298 


2.029 










11 482 
















146.837 




'841,000 


$8,745 


$12,897 


284 


881.480 

99.616 

408 

2.703 


28,598 


5.814 






•720 
































$443,153 


89.399 


841,000 


$1,604,549 


$232,061 


89.465 


$12,897 


$7,524 


$1,866,498 


8114.208 


899.212 


8764 
317 


$28,205 
15.857 
9,716 
14.410 
14.260 


'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 


8261.448 

140.455 

10.980 

67.280 

76.760 

2.697 

150.111 

96,268 

806,897 

16.692 

26.488 


872.851 

31.715 

201 

18.828 

23.997 

1.446 

64.134 

7.855 

881,086 

3.134 

2.409 

47 

726 

6,818 

11.839 

3.050 

5.370 

1.632 

1.147 

2.674 

86,718 


$10,800 
6,445 


$129,097 

54.902 

369 




8474.192 

238.518 

11.501 

86.053 

100.758 

4.288 

214.245 

104.124 

1,888,677 

18,863 

31.917 

47 

4.638 

&^ 

13.973 
32.281 
7.065 
15.124 
11.680 
188,938 


88,152 
•Cr 1,310 


8500,129 
16.201 


3.055 


4.873 
464 
















•139 




100 


42.817 


12,253 




2.073 
6.345 

16,588 










390 


47,856 


94J04 


'w'87,448 



17,846 
135 


2.737 


$i5 

106 


616,881 


12.052 


"9.256 


71 


246 








2.533 
46,866 
46.819 
10.352 
25.169 

3.156 
13.915 

9.006 
108,410 


iw 


1.220 
8,978 


157 
868 

204 

570 

1.701 

325 

62 


66 

188 

1.635 




18,052 
0.466 
3.643 


9,856 


7,448 


»4S 














"7,529 










2.606 






1.051 






4.229 








3.585 












19,947 




7,589 




1,961 


8,868 


1,686 


8,686 


179.864 


8103.960 


$14,978 


8959.978 


8252.058 


$17,880 


$100,488 


88.231 


$1,428,062 


$17,362 


$520,653 








820.867 

16,037 

1,234 


85.635 

2.820 

30 




84.800 


"8081 
842 
107 


831.784 
19.190 
3.486 


"$37,605 




















2,115 






















$37,688 


88.486 




86.015 


$1,430 


$54,470 


837.605 












8523.008 


$113,360 


$55,978 


82.602.161 


$492,606 
$059,989 


$26,845 
$131,893 


8210.250 
$212,017 


$12,186 
$106,653 


$3,344,051