(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Leslie's history of the greater New York"

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



D0DD12ST222 



^jm 



^►"•n*. 



V • 






%_ 



» "\/ ^^^^\ \,^ -^"-^^ X/ / 



.0 



'^. 



■1 o 



V^ 



c 






<-y -^k 



^ * o « o ' V 



-Jo ' .0 ^ 



.^^ 




'0' 












V- 
















.>^"^. 



^^, 



./>. 



.<^^ 



,<°c 



■ft °^ • o , 1 • aO 

V ■i' J^ 






xO-r 






^ 
~<^^ 



.,f° ...^ V^°- .%^ ... V 



4 O 

>0 



^-. .^'^ 









■^--^0 
./^- 









^ 
^^^. 



^^/•"^r^V x'^y^'^ %/'^fry^,^^ ^- 

,\> cV<.,^;^% >\v>;>;:^,\ c°\.'^%>o 



^;> 



-.^^ 



C" 



>/ ^^ 









,'^^ 






%,^^'^ :^^:^ \/ :'^' %/ 






> 






;-■% 






<i- 












o > 



^ 

'<-^. 



O, ♦.,■,• .0 






<?■ * o » o ■ 






^<:''■ 



o 

o 



^^<^ 

^"^ 

■i^^ 



^^ 






.0^ 



•:Ptt^' 



•> 









^ 

<- ^-i- 
■^\ 



^-. 



v^ 






^0, 



^^ 



^'•./'X 












^ 





/^'^C 




'.^^^t 



LESLIE'S HISTORY 



< « 



OF THE 



Greater New York 



VOLUME III 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YOEK BIOGRAPHY 
AND GP]NEALOGY 



arkell publishing COMPANA^ 

(JUDGE BUILDING) 

110 FIFTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK. U.S.A. 



O.TTL . 



COPYRIGHTED BY 

The L. a. Williams PruLisniNG and Engraving Co. 



fl 



IjZ 



THE WINTIIROP PRESS, NEW YORK 



\, Hi 



ry\^ n^^' 



PREFACE TO THE TIIIKD VOLUME. 




IJE iiie^eiit vdhiinc conlaiiis aliout (Jiie tliousaiid brief 
sketches, giviui;' bioi;iai(liical and geuealogiral iiifoniia- 
tiou respectiuu' as many citizens, dead and living, whuse 
careers connect tlicni witli the social, couinier-cial, or official 
history of the City of Ne^^ Yoi k. The desii;ii has lieen to prodin-c a 
valnable reference volume, for i)ractical use, and not a mere compila- 
tion of <ienealo<iical lore. Co-operation has been solicited in every di- 
rection, and this occasion is tak<Mi to thank the many who have fur- 
nished information or corrects I jirodls. 

The reader will here find the most comprehensive compilation of 
New York biography which has ever been issued from the press, while 
a. notable characteristic of this volume is the fact that a. considerable 
pai-t of its contents conveys information which is not elsewhere acces- 
sible to the public. On the other hand, it is true that some omissions 
occuL' which would not have occurred but for the lack of proper co- 
operation. And this remark a])])lies to the illustrations, as well as to 
the letter-press. 

In order to serve the jjurpose of useful and convenient reference, in 
the case of the livino- the aim has been succinctly to record public 
or professional achievements, corporation or otlier business connec- 
tions, and club affiliations, together with a n-sume of genealogical 
antecedents. The simple facts, so far as they could be ascei-tained, 
liave been concisely stated. 

The Alphabetical Index gives only the thousand names of the sub- 
jects of the sketches. But the text will be found to contain numei-ous 
briefer notices of New York ancestors or other relatives of those whose 
names appear in the Index. 



INDEX. 
VOLIMK in. 



PAGE 

Alil)f, Robert 474 

Abbott, Austin 215 

Abbott, Lyman 512 

Abeel, John Howard 78 

Acker, Cliiirles Livingston o.jO 

Acker, David D 550 

Acker, Franklin 551 

Adams, Charles Henry 576 

Adams, Edward Dean . . 132 

Adams, Henry Herschel 581 

Adams, John Lanson 498 

Adee, Frederic William 283 

Adee, George Townsend 282 

Adler, Felix 565 

Agar, John Giraud 246 

Alderton, Henry Arnold 443 

Aldridge, Frederick Thurston 605 

Alexander, James 46 

Alexander, LawTence Dade 103 

Alexander, William (Lord Stirling). . . 47 

Allen, Ethan 246 

Allen, Joel Asaph 590 

Ailing, Asa Ailing 259 

Allison, Thomas 253 

Andersen, Henry 630 

Anderson, Elbert Ellery 224 

Anderson, Henry Burrall 278 

Anderson, Henry Hill 277 

Andrews, Constant A 82 

Andrews, Loring 81 

Angell, Edward L 631 

Anthony, Richard Allard 576 

Appleton, l>aniel 344 

Appleton, Willianj Henry 344 

Arkell, William J 346 

Arnold, Lemuel Hastings 229 

Arthur, Chester Alan 89 

Astor, John Jacob 66 

Astor, John Jacob 68 

Astor, John Jacob 70 

Astor, William 69 

Astor, William Backhouse 67 

Astor, William Waldorf 69 



PAGE 

Atwood, Joseph Freeman ,501 

Aiiehineloss, Hugh D 92 

Auehincloss, John W 91 

Audsley, George Ashdown 593 

Audsley, William James o9'I 

Avery, Robert 155 

Avery, Samuel Putnam 97 

Babcock, Samnel D 129 

Baelie, Jules Semon 161 

Backus, Brad}' Electus .507 

Backus, Henry Clinton 310 

Backus, J. Bayard 243 

Bacon, Gorham 442 

Baird, Andrew D 631 

Baker, George F 137 

Baker, Sewaid 267 

Baker, Stephen 139 

Baldwin, Austin 1' 576 

Bangs, Lenniel Bolton 472 

Banks, David 235 

Banta, John 545 

Banta, Theodore Melvin 382 

Barber, Amzi Lorenzo 406 

Barclay, Henry Anthony 72 

Barker, Fordyee 499 

Barlow, Peter Townsend 235 

Barnes, John Sanford 178 

Barrett, Clarence Tynan 589 

Barron, .John Conner 580 

Barrows, Charles Clift'oid 487 

Bartholomew, John Olmsted 184 

BartU-tt, Homer L 469 

Batterman. Henry 183 

Bayard, Nicholas 43 

Bayard, William 45 

Baylies, Edmund Lincoln 220 

Beach, John X 581 

Beal, William Reynolds 519 

Beaman, Charles Cotesworth 221 

Beck, Carl 425 

Beecher, Henry Waiil 505 

Beekman, Gerard .53 

Beekman, Gerardus 51 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Beekmaii, James William 52 

Beekiiian, James William 52 

Beekmaii, Willicliiuis 51 

Bend, George llottmaii 16.3 

Beldiiig, Milo Merrick .382 

Bekling, Milo Merrick, Jr 383 

Bell, Edward 107 

Bell, .James D 219 

Bell, Isaac 195 

Bell, Isaac 190 

Belmout, August lO.j 

BeliiiDiit. August 107 

Belmont, Perry 106 

Bend, George Hoffman 163 

Benedict, Charles Linnseus 228 

Benedict. Elias Cornelius 157 

Benedict, Frederic Hart 1.58 

Benedict, Heniy Harper .579 

Benedict, LeGrand Loekwood 158 

Bennett, James Gordon 347 

Bennett, James Gordon, Jr 317 

Bergmami, Signiund ()24 

Berrian, diaries Albert 578 

Betts, Frederic Henry 22.5 

Billings, Jolm Haskell -i(>9 

Bird. Joseph 609 

Bishop, George Starr 616 

Bissell, Arthur F 509 

Bissell, John Xewton 611 

Bissell, Pelhani .St. George .551 

Bissinger, Philip 174 

Blatchford, Samuel 229 

Bleything, (ieorge Dacre 425 

Bliss, Cornelius Newton 355 

Bloss, James Orville 390 

Boas, Emil Leopold 369 

Bodeeker, Carl F. W 500 

Bogart, Jolm 89 

Bond, Frank Stuart 380 

Booraem, Robert Elmer .599 

Bootli, Edwin Thomas .562 

Boothby, Jolm William 200 

Borne, John Emil 147 

Bourne, Frederick Gilbert 390 

Bowdoin, George Sullivan 109 

Bowe, Leroy E 035 

Bowers, Jolm ^lyer 221 

Bowman, Henry Hopjier 328 

Boyle, Charles Cumberland 503 

Bozeman, Nathan 481 



PAGE 

Bozeman, Nathan Gross 458 

Bradshaw, Charles 298 

Brady, James Tophaiu 229 

Branch, James Ransom 610 

Brannan, Jolm Winters 461 

Breese, James Lawrence 1 75 

Brewer, George Emerson 40,5 

Brew ster, Eugene Valentine .323 

Brice, Calvin Stewart 252 

Bristed, Charles Aster 242 

Bristow, Algernon Thomas 434 

Bronk, William Rea 290 

Broiison, Frederic . . 63 

Brower, George Vauderhoof 275 

Browai, Alexander, Jr 634 

Brown, John Crosby 103 

Brown, Vernon Howlaiid 357 

Bruggeihof, Frederick William 54.5 

Bryant, Joseph Decatur 4.51 

Buckingham, Charles Luman 210 

Buel, Oliver Prince 2.50 

Bulkley, Justus Lawrence 402 

Bull, William Lanman 007 

Bull, William Tillinghast 470 

Burden, James Abercrombie 198 

Bnrlee, William Jose])h 647 

Burr, Aaron 209 

Burrall, Frederick Augustus 439 

Biirrill, Middleton Shoolbied 203 

Burroughs, James Sehoonmaker 547 

Butler, George Henry 427 

Butler, Prescott Hall 224 

Butler, William Allen 238 

Butterfield, Daniel 604 

Cadwalader, John Lambert 60 

Cahoone, Richards Mott 269 

Cameron, Sir Roderick William 191 

Camp, Henry 32.3 

Campbell, Thomas C 331 

Caimou, Henry Wliite 152 

Carey, Henry T 98 

Carleton, George \\' 348 

Carnegie, Andrew 129 

Carnochan, Gouverueur Morris 55 

Carpenter, Herbert Sanford 183 

Carroll, Joseph William 298 

Carroll, Royal Phelps 62 

Carter, De Lancy 466 

Carter, James Coolidge 338 

Carter, Oliver Stanley 141 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Cesnola, Luigi Paliiia di 199 

Chambers, Porter Flr-wellen 489 

Chandler, Albert Krowii 525 

Chandler. Charles Frederick 387 

Chauler, Wiiithroj) 96 

Chapiii, Alfred Clark 251 

Chapiii, William Viall 180 

Chaiineey, Elihu 400 

Chesebroiigh, Robert A 528 

Chew, Beverly 538 

Choate, Joseph Hodges 210 

Church, Benjamin .Silliman ... 97 

Church, James Congdou 267 

Clatlin, Horace Brigham 596 

ClaHin,Johu 596 

Claiborne, John Herbert, Jr 459 

Clark, Alonzo 474 

Clark, John Mitchell 600 

Clarkson, John Van Koskerck 403 

Clement, George Ansel 266 

Clement, Nathaniel Holmes 292 

Clephane, John Ogilvie 266 

Cleveland, Clement 472 

Clews, Henry 363 

Clinton, Charles William 39 

Clinton, De Witt 38 

Cochran, John 226 

Coddington, Gilbert Smith. ... 402 

Coe, Henry Clark 440 

Cogswell, CuUen van Rensselaer 405 

Cole, Abram 641 

Cole, Lucius Azel 409 

Coles, Edwin Sands 582 

Colgate, James Boorman 395 

Colton, Frederick C 540 

Concanen, Richard Luke 513 

Conklin, Roland Ray 538 

Conkling, John Terry 454 

Connolly, John 514 

Counorton, Luke J 324 

Constable, James Mansell 187 

Constant, .Samuel Victor 247 

Converse, Edmmid Cogswell 585 

Cook, Henry Harvey 368 

Cooke, William Gates 237 

Cooper, Fjdward 372 

Cooper, Peter 559 

Copeland, Henrj' Clay 160 

Corhiii, Austin 371 

Corliin, ,\ustin 372 



PAGE 

Cornell, Alonzo B 353 

Cornell, John Black 108 

Cornell, John M 108 

Cornell. William AV 108 

Corrigan, Michael Augustine 517 

Corson, David T 648 

Corwin, Franklin Howard 618 

Coster, Charles Henry 162 

Cotterill, George Washington 311 

Coudert. Frederick Ren(i 283 

Courtney, John 294 

Cowdin, Eliot Christopher 104 

Cowdin, John Eliot 105 

Cowing, James Raddift'e 611 

Cox, Townsend 181 

Crane, John M 140 

Creighton, Henry James 625 

Crimmins, John D 375 

Crimmins, Jolm D.. .Jr 376 

Crimmins. Thomas E 375 

Cromwell, Frederic 381 

Cromwell, (ieorge 333 

Cromwell, Oliver Eaton 183 

Crook, Abel 287 

Crosby, F2rnest Howard 201 

Crosby, John Schuyler 200 

Cruger, .Stephen Van Rensselaer 16 

Crutchtield, .James Thimias 645 

Cullen, Edgar Montgomery 333 

Curie, Charles 302 

Curtis, George William .339 

Cushman, Don Alonzo 562 

Cushmau, E. Holbrook 562 

Cutting, Leonard 53 

Cutting, AA'illiam 53 

Cutting, William Bayard 53 

Cuyler, Cornelius Cuyler 165 

Dahlgren, John Vinton 281 

Dana, Charles Anderson 340 

Dana, Charles Loomis 463 

Dana, Paul 341 

Dana, Richard Starr 12T 

Davenport, \\'illiam Bates 294 

Davidson, George Trimble 247 

Davidson, Mathias Oliver 583 

Davies, Juliou Tappan 287 

Davies, William Gilbert 226 

Davis, Fellowes 184 

Davisou, Charles Everett 250 

Day, Clarence Shepard 1 79 



IXDEX. 



PAGE 

Day, George Lord 215 

Day, Heury 214 

Dayton, Charles Willoughby 3S6 

Deau, Mathew 542 

DeForest, George B 403 

Delirove, Edward R 30(! 

DeHart, John 633 

Delafleld, Edward 494 

Delafield, Francis 495 

Delafield, John 192 

Delafield, John 193 

Delafield, Maturin Livingston 195 

Delafield, Matnrin Livingston, Jr 195 

Delafield, Richard 194 

deLancey, Edward Floyd ... 73 

Delatonr, Heniy Beeckman 430 

Demarest, John 633 

Deming, Henry Champion 367 

Depew, Chauncey Mitchell 233 

de Peyster, Abraham 18 

de Peystei', Frederic 19 

de Peyster, Frederic James 42 

de Peyster, Johannes 19 

de Peyster, Johannis 17 

de Pey.ster, John Watts 20 

Dew, James Harvie 462 

De Witt, George Gosnian 218 

Dexter. Henry 366 

Dick, William 369 

Dickerman, Watson B 172 

Dickerson, Edward Xicoll "279 

Dickerson, Edward Nicoll 280 

Dickinson. Horace Edward 535 

Dillon, John Forrest 308 

Dinsmore, William B 545 

Ditson, Charles Healy 534 

Dix, John Adams 64 

Dix, John Morgan 64 

Dodge, Charles Cleveland 13 

Dodge, Cleveland Hoadley 13 

Dodge. David Low 10 

Dodge, (jrace Hoadley 13 

Dodge, Cirenville M 582 

Dodge, Norman W 13 

Dodge, William Earl 11 

Dodge, William I^arl 12 

Dominick. William Gayer 171 

Doremus, Charles Avery 417 

Dorennis, Robert Ogden 416 

Dorman, Orlando Porter 588 



PAGE 

Doty, Ethan Allen 522 

Donglas, Orlando Benajah 458 

Douglas, William Proctor 406 

Douglass, Andrew Ellicott 396 

Dowd, William 113 

Draper, Henry 492 

Draper, John Christopher 493 

Draper, William Henry 470 

Drexel, Joseph W 114 

Dn Bois, John 515 

Dudley, Augnstus Palmer 450 

Duer, Beverly Chew 26 

Dner, James Gore King 25 

Duer, John 24 

Dner, John 26 

Duer, William 23 

Dner, William 25 

Duer, William Alexander 24 

Duer, William Alexander 25 

Duer, ^\'illiam Denning 24 

Duffie, Cornelius Roosevelt 504 

Duffie, Cornelius Roosevelt 505 

Duffield, Howard 509 

Dun, Robert CJraham 530 

Dunlap, Robert 537 

Durant, William West 400 

Duryea, Hiram 392 

Dutcher, Andrew 296 

Dutcher, Silas Belden 407 

Dyer, Elisha, Jr 62 

Earle, Henry 597 

Earle, Joseph P 597 

Eaton, Dorman Bridgman 215 

Edson, Franklin 601 

Egbert, George Thompson 648 

Egleston, David S 80 

Egleston, Thomas 80 

Egleston, Thomas Jefferson 79 

F^gleston, ^Villiam Couch 80 

Elliot, George Thomson 435 

Elsworth. John Hughes 643 

EIwcll, James William 410 

Ely, Albert Heman 470 

Ely, George William 175 

Ely, Henry Bidwell 175 

Emmet, Bache McEvers 433 

Emmet, Thomas Addis 431 

Emmons, John Frank 181 

Englis, Charles Mortimer 603 

Engflis, John 603 



INDEX. 



Eiio. Amos F Ill 

Eiio, Amos Riehai-fls 110 

Erving, Joliu 241 

Evarts, William ilaxwell 337 

Faircliild, Charles .Stebbiiis 144 

Faiiehiia. Julian D 182 

Falconer, William Heury 599 

Fanning, William Joseph 304 

Farley, Gustaviis 410 

Farquhar, Peroival 257 

Fay, Sigourney Webster 377 

Fearing, Charles F 93 

Fearing, Charles Xye 92 

Fearing, Daniel Butlei 92 

Fearing, William Henry 93 

Feeny, John L ... 468 

Fernbaeh, Hem-y 594 

Field, I'enjamiu Hazard 71 

Field, Cortlandt de Peyster 72 

Field, Cyrus West 558 

Field, Uavid Dudley 334 

Field, William Addison 597 

Fish, Hamilto;: 2 

Fish, Hamilton 3 

Fish, Nicholas 1 

Fish, Nicholas 3 

Fish, Stuyvesant . . 4 

Fisk, Charles Joel 595 

Fiske, Haley 256 

Fiske, WUliam M. h 502 

Fiteh, Joseph 293 

Fitch, Theodore 298 

Fitzgerald, Louis 170 

Fitzgerald, Thomas W 327 

Fitzpatrick, Richard 644 

Flammer, Charles A 288 

Fleming, Jolin 276 

Fletcher, Austin Barclay 270 

Flint, Austin ... 476 

Flint, Austin 476 

Flint, Austin . 477 

Flint, Charles Ranlett 359 

Flower, Roswell Pettibone 366 

Floyd-Jones, William Chaimcey 59 

Folsom, (leorge 236 

Forbes, Hem-y Hall 466 

Fosdick, Charles B 521 

Fosdick, Lewis L 300 

Fowler, Edward Payson 437 

Fowler, George Ryerson 449 



PAGE 

Fi-ancis. John AVakefield 489 

Freeman, A\ eldon \\ inans . , 612 

Frelinghuysen, Theodore 364 

French, Amos Tuck 73 

French, Francis Ormond 73 

Fruitnight, John Henry 490 

Fulton, Robert 554 

Gallatin, Albert 14 

Gallatin, Albert A 15 

Gallatin, Frederic 1.5 

Gallatin, James 15 

Gallaudet, Thomas 507 

Garden, Hugh Richardson 263 

Gai-diner, John Lyon 17 

Gantier, Dudley Gregory 549 

Gerard, James Watson 211 

Gerard, James Watson 212 

(ierard, James Watson 212 

Gerry. Elbridge Thomas 98 

Gilbert, Alexander 148 

Gilder, Richard Watson 341 

Gilleu, William W 278 

(toddard, Joseph Warren 587 

Goelet, Ogden 3.5 

Goelet, Peter 33 

Goelet, Peter 34 

Goelet, Peter P 33 

Goelet, Robert 34 

Goelet, Robert 34 

Goffe, James Riddle 455 

Grood, John 535 

Goodridge, Frederic 405 

Goodridge, Samuel Wadsworth 405 

Gould, Etlwin 87 

Gould, George Ja\ 87 

Crtinld, Helen Miller 88 

Goidd, Howard 87 

Gould, Jay 82 

Goodwin, James Jimius 121 

Grace, Joseph P 374 

Grace, William Russell 373 

Graliam, John Andrew 231 

Gi-aham, Jolm Lorime 232 

Graham, Malcolm 232 

Griham, Malcolm, Jr 233 

Grant, Frederic Dent 377 

Gray, John Clinton 282 

Gray, John Alexander Clinton 282 

Greeley, Horace 349 

Gi-eenbaum. Samuel . 261 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

(Jreeiie, Francis Vinton 385 

(ri'eene, Joseph Warren 274 

(ireene, Richard Henry 254 

Greenoiigh, John 169 

(ireeiiwood, Isaac John 574 

(iriffin, Francis Butler 585 

Griffith, John S 264 

Griniiell, Irving 75 

Grinnell, Moses Hicks 74 

Grisconi, Clement Acton, Jr 399 

(iriswohl, Chester 109 

Griswold, Stephen M 160 

Grosjean, Florian 543 

Gross, Michael C 269 

Guernsey, Egbert 500 

Gulliver, William Curti- 310 

Hagedorn, Hermann C 620 

Hall, John 506 

Halsey, Stephen .Ailing 532 

Hamersley, James Hooker 76 

Hamerslej', John William 75 

Hamilton, Alexander 26 

Hamilton, William Gaston 29 

Harrington, Brainerd Timothy 621 

Harrison, George Tucker 415 

Hartley, Frank 477 

Hartley, Marcellus 552 

Harvey, Thomas 513 

Havemeyer, Frederick Christian 112 

Havemeyer, Henry Osborne 112 

Havemeyer, William Ill 

Havemeyer, William Frederick Ill 

Havemeyer, William Frederick 112 

Hawes, James William 284 

Hays, Daniel Peixotto 312 

Hays, Jacob 151 

Hays, William H 151 

Ilazzard, William H 154 

Heald, Daniel Addison 203 

Healy, Edmund J 323 

Hepburn, Alonzo Barton 609 

Hildreth, Jolm Homer 315 

Ilillliiiuse, Thomas 119 

Hoadly, George 227 

Hoag, Daniel T 155 

Hoagland, Cornelius Neviu- . 565 

Ilottinan, Charles Fredericl 511 

llotl'man, Eugene Augustus 509 

Hoffman, William Mitchell Vai: 623 

lliigan, Charles W 531 



PAGE 

Hogan, Jefferson 532 

Hogan, Timothy ... 531 

Hoguet, Robert Joseph 198 

HoUister, Henry Hutchinson 178 

Holt, Walter H 324 

Horrman, August 646 

Hornblower, William Butler 309 

Horton, Harry Lawrence 173 

Hottenroth, Adolph Cluistian 329 

Howland, Henry Elias 244 

Hoyt, Alfred MilleT- 177 

Hi>yt, Mark 362 

Huljbard, Thomas Hamlin 222 

Hudson, Charles 1 537 

Hughes, John 515 

Hughson, Frederick 149 

Hunt, James Moiu'oe 262 

Hunt, Richard Howland 590 

Hunter, John 118 

Huntington, C.dlis Potter 376 

Hume, Williaui Henry 591 

Hurlbut, Henry Augustus 160 

Hurst, William H 539 

Huson, Robert 536 

Hutchinson, Henry Elijal 150 

Hyde, Henry Baldwin 203 

Ingalls, Charles Henry 179 

IngersoU, Robert Green 307 

Inman, John Hamilton 132 

Inman, Samuel Martir 132 

Iselin, Adrian 618 

Iselin, Adrian, Jr 619 

Isliam, William Bradley 606 

Ives, Brayton 121 

Jackson, Frederic Wendell 607 

James, D. Willis 161 

James, Edward Christopher 245 

James, Tliomas Lemuel 552 

James, William Teft 637 

Janeway, Edward G 499 

Janvrin, Joseph Edwar'1 452 

Jarvis, Samuel Millei- 572 

Jay, John 29 

Jay, John 31 

Jay, Willm:.. 31 

Jay, William 32 

.Jennings, Frederick Beach 231 

Jesvip, Morris Ketchum 356 

Jewett, Charles 448 

Joline, Adrian Hoffman 295 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Jones, Cliarles Authou 038 

Joqiit's, Isaac 513 

Keene, James Kobert 388 

Kellogg, Luther Lafliii 266 

Kelly, Engeue 102 

Kelly, Richard 185 

Kelly, Stephen 185 

Kenned}', John Stewart 104 

Kennedy, William Cannon 465 

Kenney, Jcilin .1 326 

Kent, James 207 

Kent, William 208 

Kent, William 208 

Ketcluinu Alexander Phcenix 305 

King, Charles 48 

King, Edward 49 

King, James Gore 49 

King, John Alsop 48 

King, Rufus 47 

Kiiiniciitt, Francis P 472 

Kip, Lawrence 54 

Knapp, Jacob Herman 456 

Knapp, Sheppard 588 

Kdblniann, Anthony 513 

Kortright, Lawrence 522 

Kouwenhoven, Francis Diiryee 542 

Kress, John 643 

Laimbeer, Richard Harper 548 

Laimbeer, William 548 

Lament, Daniel Scott 549 

L'Amoreaux, Jesse Seymour 331 

Langdon, AVoodbury 383 

Langstatf, John Eliott 428 

Lanier, Charles 101 

Larocque, Joseph 316 

Lauterbach, Edward 264 

Leggett, Francis Howard 602 

Leventritt, David 315 

Levi, Joseph Charles 270 

Lewis, Daniel 460 

Lewis, Morgan 36 

Lincoln. Rufus Pratt 464 

Little, Joseph James 565 

Littlefield, Frederick M 290 

Logan, Walter Seth 237 

Loomis, Alfred Lebbeus 497 

Loomis, Henry Patterson 498 

Lord, Daniel 331 

Lord, Daniel 236 

Lord, Daniel DeForest 236 



PAGE 

Lorillard, Pierre 79 

Low, Abiel Abbott 378 

Linv, Abiel Augustus 379 

Low, Seth 378 

Low, Seth 517 

Ludlam, Edwin 600 

Lusk, William Thomi>son 421 

MacCracken, Henry Mitchell 516 

l\Lackay, John W 361 

Maekey, Charles William 523 

Maclay. Robert 142 

Maey, Josiah 119 

Macy, William H 120 

Mairs, William H 526 

Mallory, Charles 527 

Mareau, Josiah T 292 

Markoe, Francis Hartman 419 

Markoe, James W^right 420 

Markoe, Thomas Masters 417 

Marquand, Henry Gurdon 168 

Marshall, Louis 318 

Marshall, William Jerome 326 

Mayer, William Edwin Cox 292 

McAlpin, David Hunter 364 

McBreen, Patrick Francis 646 

McCall, Edward Everett 268 

McCall, John Augustine 202 

McCloskey, John 516 

McClure, David 313 

McCook, Anson George 230 

McCook, John James 230 

McCready, Benjamin W 489 

McCready, Nathaniel L'Hommedieu . 404 

JlcCullougli, John (Triftith 258 

McCurdy, Ricliard Aldrich 203 

McGlynn, Edward 513 

McKoon, Dennis Daniel 330 

McMahon, James 144 

McNaught, James 322 

McRoberts, Hugh 638 

Melville, Henry 307 

Melvin, David Neilson 625 

Merrill, John Bryant 325 

Miller, George Maccidloeh 217 

^liUer, Isaac Newton 260 

Miller, Warner 354 

Milliken, Seth Melleu 527 

Mills, Andrew 610 

Mills, Darius Ogden 189 

Minturn, Robert Bowne 45 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

bloody, Leonard 546 

IMoore. Harrison S 299 

Moure, William Henry Helme 523 

Moore, William Oliver 435 

Morgan, Edwin Deiiisoii 57 

Morgan, Edwin Denison 58 

Morgan, Edwin Denison 58 

Morgan, John Pierpont 94 

Morgan, Jnnius Sjieneer 93 

Morris, Augustus Xewbuld 195 

Morris, Frederick P 639 

Morris, Gouverneur 207 

Morris, Hermon 539 

Morris, Lewis 206 

Morris, Robert Tuttle 442 

jMorrison, David Mitchell 146 

Morse, Samuel Finley Breese 555 

Moss, Frank 289 

Mott, Alexander Krowu 414 

Mott, Jordon L 409 

Mott, Valentine 414 

Mund^, Paul Fortunatus 433 

Munu, Orson Desaix 529 

Murray, James B 317 

Mynderse, Wilhelmus 297 

Nieoll, De Lancey 242 

Xiles, \\'illiam Watson 321 

Oakley, William Hem-y 607 

O'Conor, Charles 336 

O'Donoliue, Joseph J 598 

O'Donohue, Joseph J., .Ir 599 

O'Donovan-Rossa, Jeremiah 627 

Oelrichs, Herman 357 

Olcott, Frederic Pepoon 147 

Olcott, Horatio Leonard 608 

Orr, Alexander Ector 197 

Packard, Silas Sadler 620 

Page, Charles B 300 

Page, Richard Channing Moore 423 

Park, Joseph 3S1 

Parker, James Heiuy 140 

Parker, Willard 490 

Parsons. Charles 520 

Parsons, Hosmer Buckingham 573 

Parsons, John Edward 219 

Parsons, William Henry 365 

Partridge, Edward Lassell 438 

Peabody, Charles Augustus 90 

Peckham, Wheeler Hazard 319 

Perkins, Charles Lawrence 393 



PAGE 

Peters, Augustus Winniett 570 

Phipps, Charles I>ouis 640 

Pierrepont, Edwards 49 

Pierre])ont, Henry Evelj'n 527 

Pierson, John Fred 389 

Pinney, George Miller, Jr 272 

Plant, Henry Bradley 188 

Plant, ISIorton F 189 

Polk, William Mecklenburg 422 

Poor, Edward Erie 138 

Poore, Charles Talbot 426 

Porter, William Henry 158 

Post, George B 589 

Potter, Henry Codman 508 

Powell, Seneca Daniel 496 

Power, John 514 

Pratt, Dallas Bache 168 

Preston, Thomas S '. 514 

Provost, Andrew Jackson 303 

Pryor, William Rice 437 

Pullen, Eugene Henrj- 141 

Putnam, (Jeorge Eugene 635 

Putnam, George Haven 349 

Putnam, George Palmer 348 

Putnam, William Henry 634 

Quintard, Edward Augustus 167 

Quiutard, (ieorge William 391 

Rabe, Rudolph Frederick 320 

Rae, Robert 610 

Randall, Rufus Ritch 636 

Randolph, Lewis V. F 153 

Raukine, William Birch 573 

Rapallo, Edward Sumner 271 

Rawson, Sidney Fuller 278 

Remseu, Charles 36 

Remsen, Henr}- 35 

Renisen, Henry 36 

Renwick, Edward S 551 

Rhiuelander, Frederick William 40 

Rhinelander, Frederick William 41 

Rhiuelander, Frederick William 42 

Rhiuelander, Philip Jacob 39 

Rhiuelander, Phili]) M 42 

Rhinelander, Thomas Xewbold 42 

Rhiuelander, T. J. Oakley 41 

Rhinelander, William 39 

Rhinelander, William 39 

Rhinelander, William 40 

Rhiuebuuler, William Christopher . 40 

Rhoaaes, John Harsen 142 



INDEX. 



Rithinoiid, Dean ()17 

Rickerson, Charles L 540 

Riker, John Lawrence 120 

Riker, Sanuiel 259 

Robertson, Joseph 1 529 

Robinson, Andrew J ()35 

Robinson, Samuel Adams 350 

Rockefeller, John D 204 

Rockefeller. William 205 

Rockwell. William B ()19 

Rogers, Theodore 146 

Roosevelt, James Alfred 9 

Roosevelt, Cornelius Van Sehaiek 8 

Roosevelt, Robert B 191 

Roosevelt, Tlieodoro 518 

Roosevelt, William Enilcii 9 

Root, Elihu 241 

Rossiter, Clinton L 529 

Rossiter, Walter King 013 

Rutherford, John Alexander 55 

Rylance, Josejih H 508 

Sackett, Henry Woodward 250 

Sage, Russell 131 

Sands, Benjamin Aymar 222 

Sands, Henry Berton 497 

Satterlee, Francis LeRoy 447 

Sayre, Lewis Albert 411 

Seliaefer, P^dward Charles 53(5 

Schell, Augustus 127 

Schell, Edward 164 

Schell, Edward Heartt 165 

Schell, Robert 163 

Schenek, Frederick Brett 154 

Schermerhorn, Frederick Augustus .... 6 

Schermerhorn, William Colford 6 

Schickel, William 594 

Schieft'elin, William Hem'y 60 

Schieffelin, William Jay 61 

Schley, Grant Barney 398 

Seliroeder, Frederick A 374 

Schurz, Carl 80 

Schuyler, Philiji 8 

Schwab, Gustav 186 

Schwab, Gustav H 187 

Scribner, Charles 344 

Scudder, Townseud 321 

Seabury, Robert 328 

Seaman, Louis Livingston 420 

Seamans, Clarence Walker 534 

Selignian, Henry 616 



l-AGE 

Seligman, Isaac X 616 

Seligman, Jesse 015 

Seligman, Joseph 614 

Seward, Clarence A 220 

Seward, Cieorge Frederick 149 

Shaffer, Newton Melman 453 

Sheldon, Edward Wright 332 

Sherman, William Winslow 157 

Shoemaker, Henry F 577 

Short, Fjdward Lyman 300 

Shrady, George Frederick 427 

Simmons, Joseph Edward 136 

Sims, James Marion 478 

Skene, Alexander Johnson Chalmer^ . . 445 

Slaven, Henry Bartholomew 586 

Sleicher, John Albert 627 

Slocum, Henry Warnei 255 

Slocum, Henry Warner 255 

Smith, Abram Alexander 428 

Smitli, Artemas Brigham 303 

Smith, Bryan Hooker. 152 

Smith, Charles Stewart 206 

Smith, Freling H 316 

Smith, G. Waldo. 587 

Smith, John Sabine 238 

Smith, William Alexander 118 

Snow, Elbridge Gerry 605 

Snyder, Charles B. J 543 

Soper, Arthur William 569 

Southard, George Henry 176 

Spencer, Samuel 370 

Speyer, James 166 

Spofford, Paul 393 

Spofford, Paul Xelsoa 394 

Sprague, Cliarles E 166 

Sprague, Nathan Turner 611 

Stanton, John 397 

Starin, John Henry 316 

Stearns, Henry S 474 

Stephens, George Washington 319 

Stephens, Stephen Dover 304 

Stewart, John Aikman 135 

Stewart, William Rhinelander 117 

Stillman, James 139 

Stilwell, Stephen J 326 

Stokes, Anson Phelps 57 

Stokes, James 56 

Stokes, Thomas 56 

Storrs, Richard Salter 503 

Story, Elmer Gildersleeve 326 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Stout, Charles Herman 539 

Sturges, Frederick 

Sturges, Jonathan 5 

Stiirgis, Frank Knight 10!) 

.Sullivan, Andrew Theodore 173 

.Sutphin, John H 630 

Taggart, William Rush 313 

Tappan, J. B. Coles 274 

Tappen, Frederick 1) 13G 

Taylor, Howard Augustus 301 

Taylor, Isaac E 488 

Terry, John Taylor 359 

Thiry, John H 028 

Thomas, Theodore (iaillard 486 

Thimison, William Hanna 444 

Tift'auy, Charles Lewis 115 

Tittany, Lewis Comfort 116 

Tilden, Samuel Jones 353 

Tilford, Frank 162 

Tonii)kins, Daniel D 37 

Townsend, John Pomeroy 134 

Tracy, Benjamin Franklin 335 

Trask, Spencer 177 

Truax, Charles Henry 243 

Truax, Chauncey Shatter 317 

Tucker, John Jerome 632 

Turner, Aichibald 606 

Untermeyer, Samuel 315 

Valentine, Ferdinand Charles 455 

\'an Den Toorn, Willeni Hendick 604 

Vanderliilt, Cornelius 122 

Vanderliilt, Cornelius 124 

Vanderbilt, Frederick William 126 

Vanderbilt, George Washington 120 

Vanderbilt, Joseph Mortimer 047 

Vanderbilt, William Henry 123 

Vanderliilt, William Kissam 125 

Van Der Emde. Reinhold 610 

\sii\ Name, Calvin Decker 328 

Van Nest, George Willett 287 

Van Norden, Warner 150 

^'an Pelt, Daniel 507 

Van Rensselaer, Kiliaen 4 

\"an Slyck, George Whitfield 312 

Van Vechten, Francis Helnie 307 

Van Wormer, John R 541 

^'an Wyck, Robert Anderson 280 

Vermeule, John Davis 171 

Vitt, Franklin Charles 648 

Vorgang, Charles Tobias 048 

Waite, Henry Randall 629 

Wales, Salem Howe 358 



PAGE 

Walker, Henry Freeman 473 

Wall, Charles 568 

Wall, Michael W 568 

Wall, William 568 

Walter, Martin 547 

Warner, Charles Dudley 342 

Warner, Lueien Calvin 407 

Warren, Ira Deforest 262 

Warren, Lyman Eddy 288 

Warth, Albin 622 

Watts, John 559 

Watts, John, Jr 501 

Webb, William Henry 401 

Webb, William Seward 396 

Webster, David 457 

Weed, Smith Mead 248 

Weir, Robert Fulton 490 

Weller, Augustus Noble 270 

Wells, James L 520 

Wendell, Jacob 571 

West, (jeorge 543 

Westbrook, John 180 

Westervelt, Walter 614 

Wetmore, George Peabody 65 

Wheeler, Charles Emery 617 

Wheeler, Everett Pepperell 314 

Wheeler, Jerome Byron 575 

White, Joseph Baker 540 

AVhite, Richard Grant 342 

White, Stanford 343 

White, Stephen Van Cnllen 273 

Whitney, William Collins 213 

Wickes, Edward Allen 571 

Wight, Jarvis Sherman 446 

Wilcox, Reynold Webb 438 

W'illiams, George Gilbert 133 

Williams, Lewis Alfred 345 

Wilson, Richard T 159 

Wilson, Washington 584 

Windniueller, Louis 602 

Winslow, Edward 101 

Winslow, James 101 

Winslow, Richard Henry 99 

Winters, Joseph Edcil 431 

Winthrop, Buchanan 63 

Wood, James Rushmore 493 

Woo<l, John \Valter 468 

Wood, Orrin S piire 556 

U'oodford, Stewart Lyndon 291 

Wylie, Walker Gill 429 

Yetman, Hubbard R 546 

Young, Charles Titus 156 



LIST OF STEEL ENGRAVINGS. 



FACE PAGE 

Horace Greeley Title 

.Folm Jacob Astor 66 

Joseph Hodges Choate 210 

Lewis Albert Sayre 412 

Richard Salter Storrs 504 



ILLLTSTEATIOXS IN TEXT. 



PAGE 

Nicholas Fish 1 

Hamilton Fish 2 

Van Rensselaer Arms 5 

Schuyler Arms 8 

Autograph of Nicholas Roosevelt ... 8 

Gallatin Arms 15 

t'olonel S. V. R. Cruger 16 

(iardiner Arms 17 

(ieneral John Watts de Peyster 21 

Judge William Jay 31 

Hon. John Jay 32 

DeWitt Clinton 38 

de Peyster Anns 42 

Bayard Arms 43 

Autograph of Nicholas Bayard 44 

Autograph of William Bayard 45 

James Alexander 46 

Autographs of William Alexander, Lord 

Stirling 47 

Pierrepont Arms 50 

Beekman Arms .51 

Colonel (ierardus Beekman, M.D .... 51 

James W. Beekman 52 

Kip Arms 54 

Rutherford Arms .55 

(Tovernor E. D. Morgan 57 

Edward Denison Morgan 59 

Schieffelin Arms 61 

Autograph of John Wiuthrop 63 

Rev. John ^lorgau Dix, D.D 65 

Colonel John .Jacob Astor 70 

DeLaneey Arms 74 

.loliM William Ilamersley 76 

.lanu's Hooker Hamersley 78 



PAGE 

Jay Gould 83 

Chester Alan Arthur 90 

.Junius Spencer Morgan 93 

Richard Henry ^Viuslo^v 100 

August Belmont 107 

Sturgis Arms 109 

Autograph of William Frederick Have- 

meyer Ill 

Henry Osborne Havemeyer 113 

General Thomas Hillhouse 119 

" Commodore " Cornelius Vanderbilt . . 122 

Cornelius Vanderbilt 124 

Andrew Carnegie 130 

George Gilbert Williams 134 

Frederick D. Tappen 137 

Oliver Stanley Carter 141 

Charles Stebbins Fairchild 145 

Alexander Gilbert 148 

Henry White Cannon 153 

Warner Van Nordeu 157 

William Henry Porter 159 

Frank Tilford 162 

Robert Schell 164 

Edward Augustus Quintard 167 

John Davis Vermeule 171 

Philip Bissinger 174 

George Henry Southard 1 76 

John Westbrook 180 

Julian D. Fairchild 182 

Richard Kelly 185 

Darius Ogden Mills 190 

Richard Delafield 194 

James Abererombie Burden 199 

John Augustine McCall 202 



ILLUSTRATIOXS IX TEXT. 



PAGE 

Diuiiel Addison Heald 204 

William Collins Whitney 213 

Charles Lnman Buckingham 217 

Clarence A. Seward 220 

Thomas Hamlin Hubbard 223 

George Hoadly 227 

John James McCook 230 

Chauncey Mitchell Depew 233 

John Sabine Smith 239 

Henry Elias Ilowland 244 

Smith Mead Weed 248 

Thomas Allison 253 

Oliver Prince Buel 256 

Percival Farfjuhai- 258 

Samuel Riker 259 

Ira DeForest Warren 262 

Edward Lauterbaeh 265 

Edward Everett McCall 268 

Austin Barclay Fletcher 271 

Stephen Van CuUen White 273 

(4eorge Vanderhoof Bi'ower 275 

Henry Hill Anderson 277 

Sidney Fuller Rawson 279 

John Vinton Dahlgren 281 

Frederick William Adec 283 

James William Hawes 285 

Lyman Eddy ^\"arren 288 

Frank Moss 289 

General Stewart L. Woodford 291 

Joseph Fitch 293 

Adrian Hoffman Joline 295 

Wilhelnius Mynderse 297 

Theodore Fitch 299 

Edward Ljman Short 301 

Charles Curie 302 

William Joseph Fanning 304 

Edward K. Detirove 306 

Henry Melville 308 

Henrj- Clinton Backus 310 

Daniel Peixotto Hays 312 

William Rush Taggart 314 

Freling H. Smith 316 

Loius Marshall 318 

George Washington Stephens 320 

James McXanght 322 

Luke J. Connortou 324 

John Bryant Merrill 325 

Thomas W. Fitzgerald 327 

Calvin Decker Van Name 329 

Dennis Daniel McKoon 330 



PAGE 

Thomas C. Campbell 332 

George Cromwell 333 

Benjamin F. Tracy 335 

William Maxwell Evarts 337 

Charles Anderson Dana 340 

Stanford White 343 

James Gordon Bemiett, Jr 347 

Samuel Adams Robinson 351 

Cornelius Newton Bliss 355 

John Taylor Terry 359 

Henry Clews 303 

Roswell Pettibone Flower 367 

Samuel Spencer 370 

William Russell Grace 373 

CoUis Potter Huntington 376 

Autograph of Ulysses Hiram (irant. . . . 378 

Frank Stuart Bond 380 

Woodbury Langdon 384 

James Robert Keene 388 

George William Quintard 391 

James Boorman Colgate 395 

Grant Barney Schley 398 

William Henry Webb 401 

X'athaniel L'Hommedieii McCready... 404 

Silas Beldeu Dutcher 408 

George Tucker Harrison 415 

Thomas Masters Markoe 418 

Francis Hartman ilarkoe 419 

James Wright Markoe 420 

Richard Channing Moore Page 424 

Charles Talbot Poore 426 

Walker Gill Wylie 430 

John Edcil Winters 432 

William Oliver Moore 436 

Edward Lassell Partridge 439 

Roliert Tuttle Morris 442 

William Hanna Thomson 444 

Francis LeRoy Satterlee 447 

Augustus Palmer Dudley 451 

Newton Melman Shaffer 454 

James Riddle (Joile 456 

Orlando Beuajah Douglas 458 

Daniel Lewis 461 

James Harvie Dew 462 

Rufus Pratt Lincoln 464 

DeLancy Carter 467 

John Haskell Billings 469 

William Tillinghast Bull 471 

Clement Cleveland 473 

Robert Abbe 475 



ILLUSTRATIONS IN TEXT. 



PAGE 

Frank Hartley 477 

Xiithan Bdzeiiian 484 

Nathan Gross Bozeman 486 

Cliarles Cliif ord Barrows 488 

Porter Flewellen Chambers 489 

Jdlni Henry Frnitnight 491 

Edward Delatield 494 

Francis Delafield 495 

John Lanson Adams 498 

Dr. John Hall 506 

Bishop Henry Codman Potter 508 

Deaii Eugene Augustus Hott'mau 509 

Autograph of Dean Hoffman 510 

Dr. Charles Frederick Hoffmau .... 512 

Bishop John Connolly 514 

Archbishop John Hughes 515 

Cardinal John McCloskey 516 

Archbisliop Michael Augustine Corri- 

gan 517 

Governor Theodore Roosevelt 519 

Charles B. Fosdick 521 

Charles W. Mackey 524 

Charles Mallory 527 

Jose])h L. Robertson 530 

Stephen Ailing Halsey 533 

Charles I. Hudson 537 

John R. Van Wormer 541 

George West 544 

Daniel Seott Lamont 549 

Thomas Lemuel James 553 

Samuel Finley Breese Morse 555 

Orrin Squire Wood 556 

Cyrus West Field 558 

De Peyster and Watts Arms 500 

John Watts 560 

Statue of John Watts, Jr 561 

Edwin Tliomas Booth 563 

Cornelius Nevius Hoagland 566 

Dr. Daniel Van Pelt 567 



PAGE 

Arthur William Soper 570 

Saunud Miller Jar\'is 572 

Jerome Byron Wheeler 575 

Henry F. Shoemaker 578 

Henry Herschel Adams 581 

Washington Wilson 584 

Henry Bartliolomew Slaven 586 

Clarence Tynan Barrett 589 

Joel Asaph Allen 591 

Charles Joel Fisk 595 

Josepli J. O'Donohue 598 

Louis Windmueller •. . . 602 

Daniel Butterfield 004 

William Lanman Bull 608 

Nathan Turner Sprague 612 

Jesse Seligman 615 

Dean Richmond 617 

William B. Rockwell 619 

Silas Sadler Packard 620 

AlbinWarth 622 

Sigmimd Bergmann 624 

Da^nd Neilson Melviii 626 

John H. Thiry 628 

John H. Sutphin 630 

John Jerome Tucker 632 

Alexander Brown, Jr 634 

Andrew J. Robinson 636 

William Tefft James 637 

Hugh McRoberts 638 

Charles Anthou Jones 639 

Frederick P. Morris 640 

Charles Louis Phipps 641 

Abram Cole 642 

John Hughes Elsworth 643 

John Kress 644 

Richard Fitzpatrick 645 

Patrick Francis McBreeu 646 

William Joseph Burlee 647 

Charles Tobias Vorgang 648 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF XKW YORK BTOGRAPITY 
AND GEXEAL0(;Y. 



FISH, NICHOLAS, aiicestoi- of several ilistiii.miif^lied i-itizeus of 
New York, Ava.s no less eminent in his own day. Born in this city, Au- 
gust 28, 1758, where he also died, June 20, 1833, he attended Prince- 
ton College, and subsequently studied law. In ITK;, wlien eighteen 
years of age, he was appointed Aid-de-camp to Brigadier-Cieneral 
( "harles Scott. In November, 177(i, he was commissioned Major of the 
Second New York Eegiment, and subse- 
quently became its hieuteuanl-Colonel. 
He participated in the Battle of Sara- 
toga. In 1778 he was division inspector 
under Baron Steuben. He commanded 
a light body of infantry at Monmouth. 
In 1779 he was a member of General Sul- 
livan's expedition against the Indians. 
He was active at the siege of Yorktown, 
preceding Cornwallis's surrender. For 
several years, dating from 178G, he was 
Adjutant-General of the State of New 
York. In 1791 he became Supervisor of 
Revenue. He was elected President of 
the New York Societv of the Cincinnati 




^^ N'lCUOLA.'^ FISH. 

in 1797. From 180G to 1817 he was Al- 

<lerman of this city, and iiromiuent on important public and social 
occasions. He was the personal friend of Washington and very inti- 
mate with Hamilton. 

Colonel Nicholas Fish was tlie son of Jonathan Fish and Eliza- 
beth Sackett, his father being a merchant of New York City. His 
grandi)a rents were Samuel Fish and Agnes Berrien, of Newtown, 
L. I. His great-grandfather, Jonathan Fish, born in 1080, died in 
1723, was for fifteen yeai's Town Clerk of Newtown. Nathan Fish, 
great-great-grandfatlier of Colonel Nicholas, was born in Sandwich, 
Mass., in IfioO, and in 1059 accompanied his father, Hon. Jonathan 
Msh, from Massachusetts to Newtown, L. I. The latter was born in 
England, in ICilO, early emigrated with his brothers, Nathaniel and 



2 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

John, to Lyun, Mass., subsequently removing; to Sandwich, and event- 
ually to Newtown, where for several years he was a magistrate. He 
is said to have been descended fi-om Simon Fish, a London lawyer, 
who died about 1531. Colonel Nicholas Fish married Elizabeth Stuy- 
vesaut, throuyh her father fifth in descent from Governcn' Peter Btny- 
vesant, and through her mother, Margaret Livingston, descended 
friun ]{obert Livingston, first lord of Livingston manor. The late 
Hon. Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State, was their son. 



FISH, HAMH/roN, the distinguished statesman, was the son of 
Colonel Nicholas I-^ish and Elizabeth Stuyvesaiit, was born in New 
York City, August ;|, ISOS, and died at f^arrisons, N. Y., September 
7, 1S93. He was graduated from Columbia College in 1S27, and, hav- 
ing been admitted to the bar in 1880, was a successful practitioner, 
at one time being law partner of \Mlliam Beach Lawrence. He had 
inherited a large estate from his father, and his activity in public life 
soon forced bis professional work into abeyance. He was an unsuc- 
cessful Whig candidate for the Assembly in 1834, but in 1842 was 
elected to Congress. He was candidate for Lieutenant-Governor of 
the State in 1S46, John Young being the Whig candidate for Gover- 
nor, but the ticket was defeated. The office becoming vacant in 1847, 
however, he was again the candidate of his party, and was elected 

by 30,000 majority. In the fall of 1848 he 
was the successful candidate for Governor 
of the State, and at the end of his term be- 
came United States Senator, to which office 
he had been elected by the Legislature in 
1851. He opposed the extension of slavery 
into the Teri-itories, both as Governor and in 
the Senate, and became early identified with 
the Eepublican party. In the Presidential 
campaign of 1800 lie was a conspicuous sup- 
porter of Lincoln. With Bishop Ames he 
^ was constituted a United States Commission 
in 1802 to visit the Federal prisoners confined at Richmond, and he 
successfully arranged with the Confederate authorities the plan of 
exchange of prisoners which continued until the close of the war. 
Called into the Cabinet of President Grant as Secretary of State, in 
1809. he held this portfolio continuously for eight years, during both 
terms of Grant's administi'ation. " The career of Hamilton Fish as 
Secretary of State was marked by the determination of a number of 
very gi-ave international questions. He was one of the commissioners 
on b(^lialf of the United States in tlic negotiation of the treaty of Wash- 




ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 3 

in.ntdu of 1S71 ; he settled llic old Northwestern boundary controversy 
with (Treat Britain; lie adjusted the critical questions between the 
United States and Spain i>rowin<; out of tlie Cuban insurrection, 
and it was at his instance that the Geneva tribunal for the settle- 
ment of the ' Alabama claims ' incorporated in its decisions a pro- 
vision securinu this country against claims for indirect damages re- 
sultinsi- from Fenian raids or (luban filibusterinj; expeditions." He 
married in 1830, Julia, daughter of Peter Kean, of Ursino, N. J., and 
had four married daughters — Mrs. Sidney ^^'ebster, Mrs. Fred. S. G. 
d'Hauteville, the wife of Colonel S. N. Benjamin, U.S.A., and Mrs. 
"William E. Eogers; an unmarried daughter, Edith Livingston, and 
three sons, who are ])romin('nt citizens — Nicholas, Hamilton, Jr., and 
Stuyvesaut Fish. 



FISH, NICHOLAS, eldest son of the late Hon. Hamilton Fish, has 
been engaged in banking in this city since 1887, while previous to tliat 
time he was engaged for many years in the diplomatic service of the 
United States. He was born in New York, I'ebruary l!l, ISIO, was grad- 
uated from Columbia College in 1807, and from the Dane Law School 
of Harvard in 1809. From 1871 to 1874 he was second secretary of the 
United States Legation in Berlin, and from 1871 to 1877 was first sec- 
retary. l<"'rom the latter date until 1881 be was charge d'affaires to 
the Swiss Confederation. He was United States Minister to Bel- 
gium from 1882 to 1880. jMr. Fish is a member of the Society of the 
Cincinnati, the Metropolitan, University, Tuxedo, Biding, Players", 
Lawyers', St. Anthony, Univemty Glee and University Athletic 
clubs, the Century Association, the Downtown Association, the St 
Nicholas Society, and the New York Historical Society. He married 
Clemence S. Bryce, and has a daughter living. His only son, Hamil- 
ton Fish, Jr., was the first American soldier killed in battle in the 
campaign against Santiago during the recent war with Spain. He 
was a member of Colonel Theodore Boosevelt's regiment of so-called 
" Kough Eiders." Volunteering as a ]irivate, he rose to the rank of 
Sergeant, and died gallantly in front of his coni])any in the first cliarge 
at Siboney. 

FISH, HAMILTON, second son of the late Hon. Ilamillon Fish, 
was born in Albany, April 27, 1819, while his father was Governor 
of the State, and in LSOO Avas graduated from Columbia College. 
From 1809 to 1871 he was ])rivate secretary to his father, then Secre- 
tary of State in Grant's Cabinet. In 1X~:\ he was graduated from 
Columbia College Law School, and has actively practiced law in this 
city since, except when engaged in public life, altliougli maintaining 



4 HISTORY OF THE (iREATER NEW YORK. 

his rfsidoiice at (lairisons, X. Y. He has been a pvoiiiiiieiit leader of 
tlie Kepuhlican party in. this State, and for many years lias been 
Chairman of the lve])nbli(an Cnunty Committee of Pntnam Connty. 
He was a deleji'ate to the lu'imblican National Convention of ISSi. 
In l.Slo and 1874 he was Aid-de-camp on the staff of (iovernor .Tolin 
A. Dix. He was a uiemhei- of the Assembly from Putnam County, as 
a Kepnbliran, in 1S74, ISTti, 1877, 1878, 1879, 188!), 18iKI, 181I1, 1892, 
ISii;;, 18!I4, 1895, and 189G. He became Republican leader on the floor 
by leuiith of service in 1890, and was Si)eaker of the Assembly in 1895 
and 1890. From 1S84 to 1880 he was a trnstee of tlie State Ilomeo- 
]»athic Asylnm at Middletown. From 188(1 to 1888 he was Aiineduct 
Commissioner of New Yiwk ( "ity. He is a member of the Union, Met- 
roi)()litan. Union Lea;iine. and Iie]tublican clubs, the I'atriartdis, tliP 
Bar Association of the city, and the ('olumbia. .Vlnmni Association. 
He married, in 1880, Emily M., dani;hter of the late Hon. Francis N. 
]\rann, of Troy, N. Y., and has two children. 



FISH, STUY'VESANT, third and yonnj^est son of the late eminent 
Hon. Hamilton Fish, has been iirominent as a banker and railroad 
tinancier since 1871, in wliich year he was gradnated from Columbia 
College. In that year he acceiited a responsible position with the Illi- 
noisCentral I\ailroadCompany,of which corporation he has been Pres- 
ident since 1887, and was \'ice-President from 188o to 1887. From 1872 
to 187() he was connected with I lie well-known banking house of Mor- 
ton, Bliss & ( "o. In 1877 he became a Director of the Illinois Central 
Kailroad Com]iany, and secretary of the Chicago, St. Louis and New 
Orleans Bailroad Company. In 1S82 he was elected Vice-President of 
the latter corporation. At t lie present time, in addition 1o the presiden- 
cy of the Illinois Comtral, lie is President of the Y'azoo and Mississippi 
^'alley Kailroad Company, Vice-President of the National Park Bank, 
of which he has long been a director, and is a trustee of the New 
York Life Insurance & Trust U(uu])any and the :\lutual Life insurance 
Company. He is a member of the Union, [Metropolitan, Kiding, Play- 
ers", and St. Anthony clubs, the St. Nicholas Society, the Southern 
Society, the Downtown Association, and the Columbia Alumni Asso- 
ciarion. He was born in New York City, June 24, 1851. He married 
in 187(; :Marion C., daughter of tlie late YN'illiam Henry Anthon, and 
granddaughter of dudge .Tolni .\iitlion, and has a daughti'i- and two 
sons — Stuyvesant, Jr., and Sidney Webster I'isli. 

VAN RENSSELAEB, KILIAEN, slock brok.-r, of this city, is 
President of the Grand Army Mission, President of the Sanitary Aid 
Society, President of the Dormitiu'y of the Sanitary Aid Society, and 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



a director of the Aiiierioan Tract i^ociety and the City ^Missions. He 
is a member of the Ilollaiul t^ociety, the St. Nicliohis Society, the 
Huguenot Society, the Military Order of the Loyal l>e;Liioii. and the 
Graud Army of the Kepublic. He Avas born in 
Albany in 1845, and despite his youth at Hie 
time of the Civil ^Yar he eventually enlisted, 
became a captain in the Thirty-iunth New 
York Volunteers, and particii)ated in fourteen 
en,i>a,yements, serving under (Jeneral Hancock 
and General Grant. After the war he traveled 
abroad extensively prior to eugagino- iu busi- 
ness in this city. He married iu 1870 Olivia 
Atterbury, of New York City, and has three 
daughters and two sons — Kiliaen, Jr., and 
William Stephen Y'an Rensselaer. Mrs. X'aii 
Rensselaer descends from the famous Bishop 
Atterbury, of England; is the granddaugliter 
of the late Anson Greene Phelps, founder and 
original head of Phelps, Dodge and Company, and is great-grandniece 
of Elias PxMidinot. first President of (lie United States Congress. Mr. 
Van Rensselaer is seventh in descent frcnu Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, 
the ri(di merchant of Amsterdam, who was, in 1(;;5(), created the first 
patroon of Reusselaerwyck. He is tiie son of the late AYilliani P. Van 
Rensselaer and Sarah Rogers, and is grandson of General Stephen 
'N'an Rensselaer, fifth and last palroon of Reusselaerwyck, whose wife 
was Margaret, daughter of General Philip Schuyler, of the Revolu- 
tion, and whose mother was Catherine, daughter of Phili]i Livingston, 
signer of the 1 *eilaration of Independence. 




VAN HKNSSKLAEK ARMS. 



STURGES, JONATHAN, born in Southport, Conn., in 1802, came 
to New York City in 1821, and was employed with R. ^^ 1>. Reed. 
In 1828 he became a partner in this firm. The firm style became 
Stui-ges, Bennett and Company in 1813, and Sturges, Arnold and < 'om- 
pany in 1865, Mr. Sturges remaiinng at its head under bolli names 
until his retirement from business in 18G8. He was twice Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Chamber of Commerce. One of the founders of the T^nion 
League Club, in l8r>:{ he was elected its President. He was also one 
of the founders of the Century Association. He was a director of 
the Illinois Central Railroad, the New York, New Haven and TLirt- 
ford IJailroad, and the Bank of Commerce, being one of the founders 
of the latter. He married in 1S2JI Mary, daughter of J<din Cary, and 
had four sons — Frederick, Edward, Arthur IN^nberton, and Henry 
Cady. One of his daughters is Mrs. William H. Osborne. Another 
died shortly after her marriage to John Pierjiont ^Morgan. 



6 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

.STri:(iE.S, FilEDEKlCK, eldest sou of the late Joualhaii Stuiiies, 
entered his father's mercautile tirin iu 1849 aud retired with his father 
in 1S68. He is. President of the Xew York Warehouse aud Security 
Compauy, is a director of the Xatioual Bauk of Comuierce, aud is a 
trustee of the Seaman's Bauk for Savings and the Atlantic Trust 
Compauy. He has also been a director of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road. He has been or is an officer aud liberal patron of the Ameri- 
can Bible Society, the Seameu's Fund Society, the Presbyterian Hos- 
jiital, and the Hospital for the Kuptured aud Crippled. He is a 
member of the Union Leaiiue, Century, aud Crolier clubs, aud the 
Downtown Association. He married in 1863 Mary Reed, daughter 
of Dudley B. Fuller, and lias a daughter and three sons — Jonathan, 
Arthur Pemberton, aud I'rederick Sturges, Jr. 

SCHERMERHORX, WILFIAM COLFORD, youngest and only 
surviving son of the late Peter Schermerhorn and Sai-ali Jones, was 
born iu this city iu 1821, was graduated from Columbia College, and 
adopted the profession of the law. He has had the care of a large 
inherited estate, principally invested iu realty iu this city. He has 
long been a trustee of the New York Life Insurance and Trust Com- 
pany. Recently he has erected for Columbia University one of the 
new buildings on Moruingside Heights. He is a vice-president of the 
New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, aud is 
connected with other institutions. He is a member of the Metropoli- 
tan, Knickerbocker, Century, City, aud Whist clubs, the Uolnmbia 
Alumni Association, aud the Scientific Alliance, and is a parroii of 
the museums aud of several art and scientific societies. He married 
Ann E. H. Cottenet, aud has three daughters — Mrs. Samuel W. Bridg- 
ham, Sarah Schermerhorn, and Mrs. Jolin I. Kane. Mr. Schermer- 
horn is first cousin of Mrs. William Astor, who was a datighter of 
Abraham Schermerhorn, of Yonkers. his father's younger brother. 
He is the uncle of Frederick Augustus Sehenuerhorn of this city. 
The residence of Mr. Schermerhorn on West Twenty-third Street is 
one of the very few fashionable old ri'sidences which have been main- 
tained in spite of the eucroacluuent of business interests iu sections 
which were once exclusively residential. 

SCHERMERHORN, FREDERICK AUGUSTUS, is a mining engi- 
neer by profession, but has principally devoted himself to tlu- care 
of the large real estate interests of his family. He has been a trustee 
of Columbia College, now Columbia University, since 1877, and with 
his uncle, William Colford Schermerhorn, has erected one of the Tiew 
buildings of that institution. H(> is also a manager aud Recoi-ding 
Secretary of the New York Institution for the Blind. He is a director 
of the Building and Sanitary Inspection Compauy, and of the Na- 
tional Horse Shoe Association of America. He was boi'u iu this citv 



RNCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 7 

Xovembei" i, 184:4, and entered Columbia «'ollej;e in I8f>l. In isdi he 
was commissioned Second Lieutenant of tlie One Hundred and 
Eighty-fiftli New York N'oinnteers, and in January, 1805, became 
First Lieutenant of Company C. He went to the front with the 
Army of tlie Totomac, was Aidde-cam]! on tlie staff of Major-Gen- 
eral Charles Grittin, was bievetted Captain for gallant conduct at the 
Battle of Five Forks in 1865, and served till the close of the war. lu 
1865 he entered the School of Mines of Columbia College, and was 
graduated as a mining engineer in 1868. For seven years subsequent 
to the Civil War he was a member of the Seventh Regiment, National 
Guard, and rose from juivate through the ranks of Coi*i)oral and Ser- 
geant to that of First Lieutenant of Company K. He is a member 
of the Union, Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, Tuxedo, Century, City, 
Riding, Coaching, Country, New York Yadit, Seawanhaka-Coriuth- 
ian Yacht, Rockaway Hunting, and .Mendelssohn Glee clubs, the 
Military Order of the Loyal Legion, and the Columbia Alumni Asso- 
ciation. He is the eldest siirviving son of the late Peter Augustus 
Schermerhorn, of this city, and Adelin(> E. Coster, daughter of a 
notable New York mercliant. His father was born in 1811 and died 
in 1845, and was an older brother of the present William Colford 
Schermerhorn. Their father, Peter Schermerhorn, married Sarah 
Jones, and was in turn the son of Captain IV-ter Schermerhorn and 
Elizabeth Bussing. Cai)tain Peter Schernnn-lioru was an eminent 
merchant of this city, born in 1749, his death occurring in 1826, and 
the son of another prominent New York merchant, Johannes Scher- 
merhorn, born in July, 1715, died in Septeml>er, 1708, whose wife 
was Sarali, (hiughter of Jan < "aiinon and ^laiia Le Grand, of two old 
New York families. The parents of Johannes were Arnout Schermer- 
horn and ^Maria, daughter of Johannes Beekman. Arnout Schermer- 
horn enjoyed high social position in this city. He was born in Albany 
in 4680 and removed to New York City with his parents, Symon 
Schermerhorn and Willempje, daughter of Arnout Yiele, and grand- 
daughter of Cornelis Yiele. Symon was born in Albany in 1058, sub- 
sequently resided in Schenectady, and died in New York City in 1(!96. 
He was still at Sclienectady wlien it was attacked and burned by the 
Indians on the night of February 8, 1090, and his oldest son, Johannes, 
was killed, with three negroes. Although himself wounded in the 
leg, Symon Schermerhorn rode to Albany during the night and gave 
the alaiin. This experience induced his removal to New York. 
He was one of the sons of the famous Jacob Janse Schermerhorn, 
wealthy mercliant and trader of Albany. Son of Jan Schermerhorn, 
of Waterland, Holland, where he was born in 1622, Jacob Janse 
Schermerhorn emigrated to New Amsterdam in 1636, and ilied at 
Albany in 1688. He Avas one of the wealthiest men in the colony. 



8 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 



S('lirVLI-:R. PHILIP, who sowed with distinction in the regular 
iirniy during the Civil War, after which he resigned his commission, 
is the son of the late George Lee Schuyler and his first wife, Eliza, 
daughter of the late James Alexander Hamilton, and granddaughter 

of the famous Alexander Hamilton; is the 
grandson of Philip Jeremiah Schuyler 
hy his second wife, Mary A. Sawyer, of 
Xowburyjxirt, Mass., and is the great- 
grandson of the notable General Phili]i 
Schuyler of the Revolution and his wife, 
Gatlierine Van Rensselaer. The parents 
of The Revolutionary patriot were- 
Johannes Schuyler and Cornelia Van 
Cortlandt; his grandparents were 
Johannes Schuyler and Elizabeth Staats, 
while his great-grandparents were the 
original emigrants from Holland to Xew 
Amsterdam — Philip Schuyler and ilar- 
garetta ^'an Slichtenhorst. The present 
General Schuyler receives a double strain 
from Major-General Schuyler of the 
Revolution, and the generations preceding, through the fact that his 
maternal great-grandmotlier, wife of Alexander Hamilton, was the 
daughter of General I'liilij) Schuyler and ("atherine \'an Rensselaer. 
General Scjuiyler is a member of the Patriarchs, and the Union, 
Knickerbocker. Century, Harvard, Xew York Yacht, Seawanhaka 
Corinthian Yacht, and Hudson River Ice Yacht clul>s, the Society 
of the Cincinnati, the Seventh Regiment ^'eterans, the Military Order 
of the Loyal Legion, and the Sons of the Revolution. He married 
Harriet (Lowndes) Langdon. Nevis, his country-seat at Irvington, 
was the home of Alexander Hamilton. 




SCHCVLKR ARMS 



ROOSEVELT, CORNELIUS VAN SCHAICK, was an eminent 
merchant of New York City, ai<d in 1S23 became one of the fotmders 
and original incorporators of the famous Chemical National Rank of 
New York. He was the son of Jacobus I. Roosevelt and Mary "S'an 
Schaick, his father having been commissary in the patriot army dur- 
ing the Revolution; was the grandson of Jacobtis Roosevtdt and An- 
natje Bogaei-t, was great-gramlson of J*)hannes ^'an Roosevelt, of 
New York City, and was great-great- 
grandson of Nicholas Van Roosevelt. //^'/' / y<^ 
of Esopus, N. Y., now Kingston, while ^^-/^A^^t^ yi^^t^'i 
he was removed one generation further 

from Claes Martinsen Van Roosevelt and Jannetje Thomas, who emi- 
grated fi'om Holland to New Amsterdam in KUll. Cornelins V. S. 
Roosevelt married .Margai-ct, daughter of Robert Rarnliiil, and had 




ENCYCLOPEDIA OF XEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 9 

six sons, of whom the Aoinincst, Willi.iiii W'., ilicd in vontli. Tlic oi hcis 
wtnx' tlie late Silas Weir Iloosexclt, who became prominent as a 
lawyer; James Alfred Ivoosevcdt, who died iu 189S; Cornelius \'an 
Schaiek Koosevelt, Jr., who (lie<] in 1SS7; the present IJobert I'.arnliil! 
Roosevelt, and the late Theodore Kooscvelt, father of the presiMit The- 
odoie lioosevelt. 

EOOBEVELT, JAMES ALI'K'ED, second son of Cornelius \'an 
Schaick Koosevelt, 8r., and 3Iar!:,aret Barnhill, was born in this city, 
June lo, 1825, and died in the summer of 1S9S. In 1845 he became 
a member of his father's mercantile firm, and eventually succeeded 
liim as its head. In 1878 he established the bankin<i- firm of Koose- 
velt & Sons. He was President of the Broadway Improvement Com- 
pany, \'ice-President of the Chemical National Bank, Vice-President 
of the Bank for Savings, a member of the Board of Managers of the 
Delaware and Hudson Canal ('ompany, a trustee of the New York 
Life Insurance and Trust Company, and a director of the Eagle Fire 
Company, the Greenwich Insurance Company, the Central and South 
American Telegraph Company, the New York, Chicago and St. Louis 
Railroad Company, and the Buffalo, Rochester and Pittsburg Railway 
Company, ilayor Strong ai>pointed him a member of the Board of 
Park Commissioners of this city. He was President of the Roosevelt 
Hosjjital, and was a trustee of I he Society for the Prevention of Cruel- 
ty to Children. He Avas a. member of the Metropolitan, Knicker- 
bocker, Century. Riding, Coaching, Country, New York Yacht, Sea- 
wanhaka-Corinthian A'acht. and Hudson River Ice Yacht clubs, the 
Somerset Club of Boston, tlie l>owntown Association, and the St. 
Nicholas Society. He married in 1847 Elizabeth N., daughter of 
William F. Enileu, of Philad(d])hia, and is survived by his widow, 
two daughters, and a son — William Emlen Roosevelt. The latter was 
long his father's associate in business. Another son, Alfred, prior to 
his death in 1S!I2, was a member of his father's banking house. 

ROOSEVF.LT, WILLTAIM EMLEN, only surviving son of James 
Alfred Roosevelt of this city, has long been a member of the banking 
firm of Roosevelt ,S; Sotis. aiHJ in 1898-succeeded his father as its head. 
He is an otticer i>( a largi- number of corporations. He is President of 
tlie Wessell Silver Company, \'ice-Pnsident of the Sixth National 
Bank, Treasurer of the Termina] Improvement Comjiany, Secretary 
and a Dirc-ctor of the Broadway Improvement Company, a trustee of 
the Union Trust Comjiany, the New ^'ork Life Insurance and Trust 
€omi>any, and the In.stitiition for Savings of :Merchauts' Clerks, and a 
director of the Chemical National Banlc, the (iallatin National Bank, 
tlie National Starch :\Ianufacturiiig < 'ouqiany, and the .Alexican Tele- 
graidi Comjiany. He married Chrisiiiic. daughter of John Kean, Mce- 
Pi-esident of the IManliattan Trust Company. He is a member of the 



10 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Metro])((litan, Ceutui-v, Citv, Seawnnliaka-Coriiithinn Yacht, and 
other clubs, the Downtown Association, and the Sons of tlie American 
Kevolution. 

DODGE, DAA'ID JJJW, one of the founders in New York City in 
1805 of Higginson & Dodge, at one time the largest wholesale dry- 
goods hoiise in tlie United States, with brandies at Boston and Bal- 
timore, was also the fouiuler of one of the most remarkable merchant 
families of New York, whose members have now for four generations 
not merely maintained their social jircstige, but their place in active 
business circles, and theii- jiromiucnce in the public life of the city, 
and in connection with its institutions. David Low Dodge was one 
of the founders of the .Vmerican Bible Society, as he was also of the 
American Tract Society. He was an elder of the ^^'all Street Pres- 
byterian Church. He foundi'd the New York Peace Society, the first 
organization of its kind, and was its president. He was the first 
President of the American Peace Society. At his r(»sidence was 
founded the Young Men's ("hristian Association of this city, of which 
his grandson, the present \\'illiam Earl Dodge, was long the presi- 
dent, and of which his great-grandson, ('leveland Hoadley Dodge, is 
now the president. The Young Men's Missionary Society was also 
organized in his house. One of his ]mblished works, " War Inconsist- 
ent with the IJeligion of Jesus Christ," was republisheil in England 
and translated into several European langtiages. Born in Connecti- 
cut in 1774, he was the son of David Dodge, a friend of General Israel 
Putnam, who i)lied his trade as wagon manufacturer in the interest 
of the patriot catise during the Bevolution. and was lineally de- 
scended from ^Villiam Dodge, wlio settled in Salem, 3Iass., in 1629. 
This emigrant was of a knightly family long seated adjacent to the 
city of Chester, near Liver])ool, England. A jiatent dated April f?;, 
130(1, was issued to his ancestors for having "valiantly served to- 
wards the ptiblic good and encour;iged their heirs and successors to 
follow in like virtue and noble conduct." For some years David Low 
Dodge was head of a private school at Norwich, Conn. He estab- 
lished a store at Hartf(n-d, Conn., in 1802, another at Litchtield, Conn., 
soon after, and in 180.") a third at New York City under the tirin style 
of Higginson & Dodge. Notwithstanding the immense proportions 
\\hicli this btisiness assumed, the embargo and loss of vessels during 
the War of 1812 greatly crippled the house, and this, with the appear- 
ance of the yellow fever iilague, h-d ^Ir. Dodge to return to Norwich, 
Conn., where he established one of the earliest and largest cotton 
mills in New England. Returning to New Y(n'k City permanently 
in 182r), lie organized the firm of Ludlow & Dodge. He was in retire- 
ment from active business and engaged in religious and literary 
activity from 1827 until his death in 1852. He married in 1798 Sarah, 
dauiihter of Rev. Aaron Cleveland, an ancestor of President Grover 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 11 

Clevelaml. She Avas a sister of the eminent preacber, tlic late Dr. 
Sanuiel Hanson Cox. and annt of the late Rislioii Artlnir < 'Icvdaiid 
Cox. 

DODGE, WILLIA:\r EATJL, son of David Low Dod-e and Sarah 
Clevehind, was one of the most illustrious aniony- notable New York 
merchants. He Avas a member of the New York Chamber of Com- 
merce from is.").") until his ilcath, became its Mce-Presideut in 18(13, 
and was its I'resideut from 18G7 to 1S75. He was one of the Commit- 
tee of Twenty-five of this body which in January, 1861, presented at 
Washiniiton a petition with .38,000 signatures urging a peaceful solu- 
tion of the slave question. He was also one of ten delegates accred- 
ited by the New York Legislature to the " Peace Congress " of 1801. 
During the Civil War he was active in organizing troops and raising 
funds, contributing bountifully from his own fortune. He was one of 
the founders of the Union League in support of the Federal Govern- 
ment, out of which grew the Union League Club. He was elected 
to Congress from the Eighth New York District in 1S61, and distin- 
guished himself by his advocacy of sound financial views. He refused 
a renomination. In 1872 he was a member of the Electoral College. 
Appointed by President Grant a member of a commission to investi- 
gate the condition of the Indians, he studied the situation for several 
years, touring the Indian Territory, and secured a thorough reform 
in the Department of the Interior in the care of tlie Indians, curbing 
the powers of the Indian agents and traders, and obtaining better 
educational advantages for the aborigines. He also interested him- 
self in the education of the freemen, founding one college in their in- 
terest and endowing several others. Other colleges endowed by him 
were Williams, Dartmouth, Amherst, Lafayette, Beloit, Marietta, 
Oberlin, Hamilton, Grinn<dl, and Maryville. He likewise endowed 
LTnion Theological Seminary of this city, and the theological semi- 
naries at Auburn, N. Y., Princeton, N. J., New Haven, Conn., Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, Bangor, ^fe., and Chicago, 111. He was the founder and presi- 
dent of several teni]ierance oi-ganizations. He was one of the founders 
of Union Theological Seminary, and one of its trustees from the begin- 
ning until his death. He was Vice-President of the American Bible 
Society. He was President of the Evangelical Alliance. Born at 
Hartford, Conn., September 4, 1805, he was educated at Nonvich, 
Conn., and under his uncle. Dr. Cox, at Mendham, N. J. He worked 
in his father's cotton mill at an early age, and between the ages of 
thirteen and twenty-one in his father's drygoods establishmcMit in this 
city. In 1827 he founded the drygoods firm of Huntington & Dodge, 
which at once became prosperous. He married ^Melissa P., daughter 
of Anson Green Phelps, founder of Phelps & Peck, the largest estab- 
lishment in the metal trade in the United States. In 1833 occurred 
the total collapse of the great warehouse of this firm, which had then 



12 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW VORIv. 

been nMciitly but faultily erected at ("lift and Fulton streets. In this 
crisis ^Ir. IMielps persuaded ilr. Dodge to dispose of his dryj;oods busi- 
ness and join hiui in tlie metal trade, and the tirni of I'helps, Dodge 
(S: (Jo. was establisiied. .Mr. Dodge was an iniitortant factor in the 
develoi)nient of its business, and was head of the tirm for many years 
]trior to his death in 1883. He also had other large interests. Having 
ac(|uired in IS'Si't large lr;icts of land in Tioga County, Pa., he or- 
ganized the T>ackawanna Iron and (Joal (.'ompany. He was chietiy 
instrumental in promoting the Erie Railway Company, personally 
obtaining the subscrijttions, and being a member of its oi-iginal direct- 
orate. He was likewise one of the organizers and oiigiual directors 
of the Central IJailroad of New Jersey, in 1843 turning the first spade- 
ful of soil in its construction. The Lackawanna and Western was an- 
other railroad of winch he was a founder and original director. He 
was at one time President of (he Houston and Texas Central Railroad. 

DODGE, WH>LIA.M 1:AKL, has long been senior member of the 
notable firm of Phelps, Dodge & Co., metal merchants, which was 
founded by his graudfatlier, Anson (Jreen Phelps, and of which his 
father, the late William Earl Dodge, was for many years the senior 
partner. He is also I'resident of the Ansonia Brass and Copper Com- 
pany, a Trustee of the New York Life Insurance and Trust Company, 
the Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company, and the Provident Loan 
Society, and is a director of the Copper Queen Consolidated Mining 
Company, the United (ilobes ]\[ines, the Commercial iMining Com- 
pany, and the New Jersey Zinc Company. He was one of the New 
York State Commissioners to supervise the condition of the New York 
troojts in the field during the Civil Wai', and at its close received the 
thanks of the State by joint resolution of the Legislature. He was 
one of the founders of the Union League Club, and an official of the 
Loyal I'tiblication Society. He was advisory director of the Woman's 
Central Association of Relief, which led to the establishment of the 
United States SanitaiT Commission. In respect to religious inter- 
ests, the benevolent institutions of the city and ])ublic interests, he 
has sustained a relation not unlike that of his illustrious father. He 
is a member of the executive committee of the Metropolitan Museum 
of Art, as he is also of that of the New York Botanic Garden, and 
rliat of the American iluseum of Natural History. He is a trustee of 
the Slater Fund and he has been Chairman of the National Arbitra- 
tion Committee. He has been Mce-President of the American Sun- 
day-school T'nion, and he succeeded his father as President of the 
Evangelical Alliance. He was for many years President of the Young 
Men's Christian Association of this city, and was chiefly instrumental 
in securing the erection of its building at Twenty-third Street, and 
I'ourth Avenue, — the first erected especially for the use of Y. M. C. A. 
members Iti the United States. He has also been Vice-President of the 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK RIOGRAPHY. lo 

New England Soc-iety. He is a meiiibei- of the Metropolitnii, riiidii 
League, Century, City, h'efonn, Kidini;-, Connti-y. Presbyteiian, West- 
brouk Golf ami Sontbside Si»ortsineii"s ehibs, the Downtown Associa- 
tion, Scientific Alliance, and other societies. He was born in this city 
in 1832, and became a niemlx-r of tiie firm of IMielps, Dodiic & Co. in 
18fi4. He mariied in lsr»4 Saiah Tappen, dauiiiitei- of the late David 
Hoadley, Presideni of (he Panama Railroad Comi>an,\'. 

DODGE, CHARLES CLEVELAND, who was a v.dunteer in I he 
Union Army dnrinii tlie Civil War, became one of the distintiuished 
cavalry leaders, and rose to tlie rank of Brigadier-General, is the son 
of the late William E. Dodge and his wife, Melissa P., danghter of the 
late Anson Green Phel])s. General Dodge has long had important 
business interests in this city. He is President of the Esmond Inter- 
national Traction Com]);iny, ami is a Director of the New York City 
Watch Comjiany. He was born in this city, and is a graduate of Vale 
College. Since the war he has beiMi Major of the New Vork Mounted 
Rifles. He is a member of the I'nion and Cniversity clubs and the 
Yale Alumni. 

DODGE, NORMAN W., the eminent lumber merchant of this city, 
is the sou of the late distinguished A\illiam Earl Dodge and his wife, 
Melissa P., daughter of the late Anson Gieen Pheljis. founder of 
Phelps, Dodge & ( \k Mr. Dodge is President of the Normandale Lum- 
ber Company and a Director of the Hilton & Dodge Lumber Com- 
pany. He is a member of the Union League and Country clubs and 
the Downtown Association. 

DODGE, CLE^'ELAND HOADLEY, son of the present William 
Earl Dodge, and grandson of the late eminent merchant and jihilan- 
thropist of the same name, is a member of the famous firm of I'helps, 
Dodge & Co., and an officer of a number of corporations. He is a 
Director of the National City Bank, the Farmers' Loan and Trust Com- 
pany, the Ansonia Brass and Copjter Company, the Quincy Mining 
Company, and the Copper Queen Consolidated [Mining Company. He is 
President of the Young Men's Christian Association of this city, hav- 
ing succeeded his father in that oftice. He is also identified with va- 
rious benevolent institutions. He was born in New Vork City in 1S(;0. 
and was educated at Princeton. He marrie(j (iiace Parish. He is a 

member of the Century, University, Cal I. Country, Priucclon. and 

University Glee clubs, the Downtown Association, Scientific Al]ianc(>, 
and other organizations. 

1>()DGE, <;RACE HOADLEV, daughter of the present William 
Earl Dodge, and granddanghtei- of the late William Earl Dodge, 
enjoys the distinction of being the fii'st woman a])]ioiiite<l a 
member of the Board of Education of New York City. Tlu^ dis- 
tinction was earned, however, by her earnest efforts to advance the 



14: HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

ciuise of the education of women. She founded the system of " Woi'k- 
iuy Girls' " clubs in this city, and was also the fcmnder of the Teach- 
ers College, which is now connected with Columbia University. 

GALLATIN, ALBEUT (baptized ABKAHAM ALPHONZO AL- 
BERT ) , takes rank as one of the most eminent of the flnanciere of the 
United States. ( l-'or portrait, see Volume I., p. 323, of this work. ) 
The son of Jean (iallatin and Sophie Albertine Rolaz du Rosey, he 
was born in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1761, was graduated with high 
honors from the University of Geneva in 1770, and to escape the im- 
portunity of members of his family who were deteinnined that he 
should enter the military service of Frederick of Hesse-Cassel, he 
emigrated to Boston in 1780. He served in the Kevolutionary Army, 
and later was instructor in Harvard College. Removing to Philadel- 
phia he made judicious real estate investments and engaged in busi- 
ness. In 1790 he was elected to the Pennsylvania Legislature. In 
1795 he was elected to Congress, where he became the leader of Madi- 
son's followers. Subsequently he represented Pennsylvania in the 
LTnited States Senate. He was Secretary of the Treasury from ISOl 
to 1813, in the cabinets of Jefferson and Madison. He opjiosed Jeffer- 
son's embargo policy in 1807, declaring war with England to be pref- 
erable, and, as the third with Jefl'erson and Madison, in directing the 
policj' of the Republican party and the nation at that period, was 
the first of the three to urge the War of 1812 as the only sohition of 
the difficulties with Great Britain. The loan of -f 17,000,000, nego- 
tiated by the United States in December, 1812, in support of the war, 
Av ould have been a failure but for his success in intluenciug the taking 
of over 110,000.000 by his three personal friends — John Jacob Astor, 
of New York, and Stephen Girard and David Parish, of Philadelphia. 
He was one of the commissioners who arranged the Treaty of Ghent. 
In 1815 he was United States Minister to France, and in 182(3 was 
Envoy Extraordinary to Great Britain. In 1829 he took up his resi- 
dence in New York City. The same year he became President of the 
newly organized National Bank of this city, now the Gallatin Na- 
tional, and remained at its head until his resignation in 1839, when 
he Avas succeeded by his eldest son, the late James Gallatin. He 
opposed Jackson's policy in connection with the Bank of the United 
States, and, the resulting panic of 1837 having forced all the banks 
of New York City to suspend, he was active in bringing about a con- 
vention of the banks of the country in this city, and the general agree- 
ment upon a day to resume not being obtained, the banks resumed 
in this city alone. May 10, 1838. He declined the presidency of the 
Bank of Commerce offered him in 1838. The formation of the New 
York Clearing House Association in 1853 was merely the execution 
of tlie suggestion made by him as early as 1841 that the banks regu- 
larlv settle their exchanges. He was the chief founder of the New 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 15 

York Uuiversity iu 1S;J0, aud was the tirst Pre.sideut of its Council. 
He conceived the plan of a great national uuiversity, but finding that 
*'the clergy had obtained control of the new institution, he aban- 
doned the idea he had conceived of endowing the City of New York 
with a great American Sorbonne." In lSJt2 he was elected the first 
President of the American Ethnnlogical Society, while from 1843 un- 
til his death in 184!) he Avas President of the New York Historical 
Society. He married a daughter of James Nicholson, appointed by 
Congress Commander-in-chief of the Pevnlutionary Navy in 1777. 

GALLATIN, JAMES, eldest son of the famous financier, Albert 
Oallatin, in June, 183!.t, succeeded his father as President of the 
National Bank of this city, now the C.allatin National Bank, and re- 
mained at its head for about thirty years, resigning in 18(58. He died 
abroad a few years later. His administration of the affairs of the 
bank was very successful aud he (tccupied a foremost place among 
the financiers of the city. He contributed for his bank |25,0()0 to the 
Federal Government during the (_'ivil AVar. He was one of the charter 
members of the original Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Ani- 
mals, and was an ofticer of various financial UTid benevolent insti- 
tutions. 

GALLATIN, ALBEPT A., second son of the celebrated Albert Gal- 
latin and his wife, a. daughter of James Nicholson, Commander-in- 
chief of the American Navy during the Revolutictn, died in this city 
at an advanced age in 180(». He was graduated from Princeton, bred 
to tlie law, and practiced for a time in Philadelphia. Subsequently 
he engaged in financial enterprises in New York City, being at one 
period the business partner of tlie fiist Jolin Jacob Astor. He accom- 
panied his father on his missions to France in 1815, and to England 
in 182G, and became the personal friend of the Duke of Wellington 
and other distinguished men. For some years he was Professor of 
Chemistiy in the University of the City of New York. 

GALLATIN, FEEDEKIC, engaged in the practice of law iu New 
York City, is the son of the late Albert A. Gallatin aud grandson 
of the famous Albert Gallatin. He is a college-bred man and a well- 
known yachtsman. He is a member of the -^ -y 

Metropolitan, Century, Elding, New York ^^ O ' i '^ 

Yacht, Seawanhaka-Corinthian Yacht, Larch- 

iiiont Yaclit, and Atlantic Yacht clubs, the 

Sons of the Eevolution, and the Society of 

Colonial Wars. He is also a Yice-President of 

the New Yoi'k Society for the Prevention of 

Cruelty to Animals. He married Amy G., 

, , , , .. G.\LL.\TI.\ ARMS. 

Sister of Elbndge T. Gerry and daughter of 

the late Thomas E. Gerry, U.S.N. Her mother was Hannah, dangh- 



o 



16 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



ter of Peter P. Goelet, sister of the late Peter aud Kobert Goelet, and 
aunt of the present Ogden Goelet aud the lately deceased Eobei't 
Goelet. 



\ 



CKLGEi;, tSTEPllE^ \AX liENSSELAElJ, was the manager of a 
number of large estates, having been engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness in this city from 18(57 until his death in ISltS. He was President 
of the Florida, West Coast Improvement Company, a director of the 
Illinois Central Kailroad Company, the Chicago, St. Louis and New 
Orleans Kailroad. the Yazoo and ^Iississip])i ^'alley Railroad Com- 
pany, the lr>ilver Hprings, Ocala and Gulf Kailroad Comi)any, the Title 
Guarantee and Trust Gniiipany, the New York Life Insurance aud 
Trust Company, the ('innmercial Union Fire Insurance Company, 
Barretts, Palmei- and Ileal Dyeing Establishment, and Barrett 
Nephews Company, Old Staten Island Dyeing Establishment; was 
Treasurer as well as trustee of St. Stephen's C(dlege, and a trustee 
of the [Mutual Life Insurance Company, the New York Public Library, 
and the American Bible Society. As Com])troller of Trinity Church 
Corporation since 1880 he managed all its immense real estate inter- 
ests. He was a member of the Chamber of Commerce and of the T'nion, 
__ _ M e t r o p () 1 i I a n, I'nion League, 

^^' '- ? '^^s^ Knickerbocker, Tuxedo, New York 

Yacht, Meadow Brook Hunt, and 
other clubs. In 1870 he was 
elected .Major of the Twelfth 
Begiment, National Guard; in 1875 
became Lieutenant-Colonel, and in 
1877, Colonel, commanding the 
regiment until he resigned in 
1883. As Chairman of the Army 
Committee of the Centennial inau- 
guration celebration in 1SS9, he 
had the organization of the entire 
parade. He has held the posi- 
tions of Treasurer and of Presi- 
dent of the Bepublican County 
Committee, and in 1888 was the 
Bepublican candidate for Lieuten- 
ant-Governor on the State ticket 
with Warner Miller. Appointed Park Commissioner by Mayor Strong, 
he was elected President of the Board. He was born in New Y'ork 
City, May 9, 1844, the son of the late John Church Cruger by his second 
wife, Euphemia White, daughter of Stephen Van Rensselaer, last 
Patroon of Kensselaerwycdc. He thus lineally descended from John 
Cruger, one of the most famous of early New York merchants, who 
was Alderman of this citv from 1712 to 17:'.:*., and Mayor from 17:39 



^I'-^T^ 




EXCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 17 

to ITii, aud from Kiliaeu Van Rensselaer, founder and first Patroon 
of the Colony of KeusselaerwTck on the Hudson, 1030-1646. lie was 
priucipally educated in Eui-ojje, where lie was at the beginning of the 
Civil War. Hurrying home he became First Lieutenant in Company 
E, One Hundi-ed and Fiftieth New York, at seventeen years of age. 
He distinguished himself at the battle of Gettysburg, aud in August, 
1863, became Adjutant. Assigned to the Twentieth Corps in October 
of that year he participated in Sherman's Atlanta campaign, being 
twice wounded at Resaca. Recovery seeming hojjeless he was honor- 
ably discharged, but several months later he revolunteered, was re- 
commissioned, and returned to his regiment at Atlanta in September, 
1861. A horse "nas shot under him at Averysboro during the famous 
march to the sea. He was commissioned Captain and appointed Chief 
of Ordnance, First Division, Twentieth Corps, and served in this capa- 
city until the end of the war. Mustered out in June, 1865, he was bre- 
vetted Major and Lieutenant-Colonel " for gallant and meritorious 
conduct during the cam]>aign through (Jeorgia and the Carolinas.'' 
He married Julie Grinnell, daughter of Thomas \^'. Storrow, of Bos- 
ton. Mrs. Cruger is a well-known authoress, under her pen-name of 
•' Julien Gordon." 



GARDINER, JOHN LYON, while his town house is on Madison 
Avenue in this city, maintains his residence on Gardiner's Island, of 
which he is the present proprietor, being the twelfth of his family 
who has held this once manorial estate. The 
first proprietor, Lion Gardiner, purchased the 
island from the Indians in 1630, and had his 
title confirmed both by the Dutch of New 
Amsterdam and the Earl of Stirling, while in 
1667 the island was erected under the Eng- 
lish law into a lordship and manor, and so 
remained until the Revolution destroyed the 
feudal riglits attaching to it. Colonel Gardi- 
ner is the son of the late Samuel Buell Gardi- 
ner and Mary Thompson, and grandson of John caiuuxfr arms. 
Lyon frardiner and Sarah, daughter of Joliu 

Griswold, of Lyme, Conn., and granddaughter of Governor Maltliew 
Grisw(dd. He married Elizabeth Coralie Livingston-Jones and has 
three sons — Lion, John, and ^Vinthrop — and a daughter, wife of Alex- 
ander Coxe, an English gentleman whose estate is near Sevenoaks, 
Kent. Mrs. Gardiner was one of the founders of the Society of Colo- 
nial Dames of America and its first Vice-President. 



DE PEYSTER, JOHANNIS, founder of the famous New York 
familv of this name, was the scion of an old Huguenot family of 




IS HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

gt'Utle blood, wlikli luul bei-u U)n<x sweated at Tours, Fniiu-e. Soon 
after the massacre of St. Bartholomew |ir>T2), the family removed 
to Holland, brandies being established at Amsterdam and Haarlem. 
Johannis was born in the latter place, of which his Avife, Tornelia 
Lubberts, was also a native. He r(mioved in Kiio to New Amstenlani, 
which he had previously visited (1()33), on the former occasion also 
enlisting in the New .Amsterdam Bni'gher Corps. Between tln^ yeais 
Id.").") and 1(177 lie held the offices nf Schepen, Burgomasler, .Vlder- 
iiiau. and Deputy Mayor of New Amsterdam and New York. He was 
one of the (Committee of Defense in 1(J73, when the English captured 
NeAV Amsterdam, and was one of tlu^ negotiators of the favorable 
terms of surrender, (iovernor Nicolls appointed him .Mayoi- of New 
York City, October 15, 1(>77, but he dcclinetl the oflicc, on tiic ground 
of his imi)erfect command cd' the English language. Colonel Nic(»lls 
asserted, however, that de I'eyster " could make a, better platform 
.sjx^'ch than an\ other man outside (d' I'arliameut." De I'eyster was 
a mertdiaut, ami ac(|uired a large fortune. Of an (dd and aristocratic 
armiger family, he and his still uhuc famous son. Abraham, favored 
](o]iulai- go\('rnment. 

DE TEYSTEB, ABKA11.\.M, .Mayoi- of New Yoik City from 1(;92 
to K!!)."), was one of the most eminent tigui'es in the cidonial history 
of this city and State. He held the commission of Colonel, command- 
ing the militia of the City and County of New Voik — luue companies 
(d' horse and fo(d. He was Alderman (d' the city in KiS."! and subse- 
(jueid yeais. He was a Judge of the Supreme Court, and in 170(1 be- 
came its ( 'hief -lu-^tice. He \\as a member of the King's Council from 
l(i!)S to 1702, while in 1701 he served for a time as presiding officer 
of the Council and Acting (iovernor of the Trovince of New York. 
He was Ti-easurer t>\' the ])ro\inces (d' New \'ork and New -lersey dur- 
ing the twenty years from 170(1. He was an esteenu'd friend of Will- 
iam Tenn, proi)rietor of PcTnisylvania, and was the most intimate 
friend and advisiM' of the Earl of Bellomont, New ^'ork's best Colonial 
Governor. In her well-known ■' History of New York," Mrs. Martha 
d. Lamb asserts that New York City owes its first impulse of real niu- 
ni(i]tal ju-ogress and im](i()\ement to Cobund Abraham de Peyster. 
He donated to the city the site of the original City Hall, whi're stands 
the present Sub-Ti-easury IJuildiug — the scene of Washington's inau- 
guration as t he first President id the United States. Mayor de Peyster 
was born in New V(uk ( 'ity, duly S, 1(;.~)7, and died liere August 2, 1728. 
He was the oldest son of Johannis de Peyster and C(U'uidia jjubberts. 
Dui-ing a visit to Amsterdam, Holhunk he married his kinswoman of 
that city. Catherine de I'eyster. The artistic statue of Colonel Abra- 
ham de I'eystei', whicdi adorns Bowling rjreen, was given to the City 
of N(n\' Vink by his distinguished descendant, < iemM-al John Watts de 
Pevster. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 19 

i)i: I'EYl^iTEK, JOHANNES, wealtliy iiicicliaiit of New York, was 
Mayor of the city in KJDS and ICi'.lit, as liis (ddi'i- and still more eminent 
brotlier, Chief Jnsticc Abialiam de Peyster, had been from 1<)'J2 to 
109."). His (•ont<'ni](oraries credited him with being the handsomest 
man in New York. He at onetime served as Alderman. He married 
a dau^i'liter of Gerrit T>an(dver, a rich Indian trader and merciiant of 
Albany, and died in lil'.i, leaving descendants. 

i)K PEYSTEi;, I'illOhEKlC. was horn in X.-w York City, Novem- 
ber 11. ]7!M;, and. at the lime of his death. Aii.L;nst 17, 1SS2, it was 
asserted that he had " jmibably been connected as an active oHlcer 
with more social, literary, and benevolent societies than any other 
New Yoi'ker wlm ryrv lived." lie was graduated from ("oliimbia 
College in iNKi; studied law with Hon. Pet<M' Augustus Jay and Hon. 
Peter Yixn Schaick; began piactice iii ISl'.t. and from 1S20 to 1837 was 
Master in Chancery. After 1837 lie contineil his legal business to the 
care of the large estates of himself and his father-in-law. lion. John 
Watts, Jr., devoting the rest of liis time to literary i)Uisuits and j)hi- 
lanthropy. He was Corresjionding Secretary of the Ne\\' York His- 
torical Society in 1827; was its Kecording Secretary from 1820 to 1837; 
was again Corres])onding Secretary from 1838 to 1813; was President 
of the Society from 18()4 to 18(>t>. and again, from 1873 until his death, 
in 1882; was Foreign Secretary in 1844. and Second Vice-President 
from 1850 to 18.'")3. As a young man he defeated a plan to disrupt 
the Society and dispel its c(dlections, at the same time obtaining a lib- 
eral appropriation for it from the New York Legislature. He served 
terms as Treasurer and President of the St. Nicholas Society of New 
York, and for thirty years served as Manager. He was a trustee of 
the St. Nicholas Club from its organization, having been one of its 
founders, and was its President from 1877 until his death. At the 
time of his decease he was Vice-President of the Association of the 
Alumni of Columbia College, and Chairman of its Standing Com- 
mittee. He was long a trustee of the New York Society l>ibrary, and 
President of the lioard from 1870 until his death. I'or mon- than 
fifty years he was a trustee of the Leake and Watts Oriilian Asylum, 
and Clerk of the Board. He was Vice-President of the Home for 
Incurables, and a director of tlu^ Institution for the Instruction of 
the Deaf and Dumb. He was an original incorporator, a director, 
and Mce-President of the New Voile Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Ciiildren. When he di(^d lie was the oldest member of the 
Board of Managers of the New York Bible Society, having served for 
more than fifty years. He was also senior officer of the vestry of the 
< 'hurch of the Ascension. He was an officer of the Mercantile Lilirary 
Association, and one of the oldest directors of the Sixth Avenue Kail- 
road Company. In 18G7, Columbia College conferred upon him the 



20 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

degree of Dodoi- of I^iiws, wliile, in 1S7T, the Iiot;i1 Ilistoiical Society 
of Great I'.ritaiii made him au llouorary Fellow, lie was au honorary 
member of the historical societies of Massachusetts, Maryland, Pemi- 
sylvania, NViscunsin, Florida. rSiilfah), and Chicago, and was corre- 
siJonding member of the Xe\\' England Historic-<;eneah)gical Society. 
He published "The IMoral and Intellectual Influence of Libraries" 
(18(30). " William the Third as a Keformer " (ISTi). " Representative 
Men (d" the English Hevolntion " (1870), "The Life and Adminis- 
tration of the Earl of llellomont " (1879), "The Culture Demanded 
by the Age"" (180!»). and "Early Political History of New Y(.rk "" 
(1805). He was a member of a students" militia company during the 
War of 1812, and subsequently became Captain oi' tlie 115th New York 
Regiment. He served on the staff of Governor De \\"\tt Clinton, and 
was ^lilitary Secretary to the same for the Southern District of New 
York. He was the son of Captain Frederic de I'eyster and Helen, 
daughter of Connnissary-Geueral Samuel Hal^e, <d' the British Army, 
and his wife. Helen Livingston, great-granddaughter of Kobei-t Liv- 
ingston, first lord of Livingston Manor. Mr. de Peyster's grandfather, 
James de Peyster, a Axcalthy New Yoi-k merchant, married a daughter 
of Hon. Joseph Keade, a mend)er of the Kiug"s Council, and was him- 
self the son of Hon. Abraham de Peyster, for many years Treasurer 
of New Yoi'k and Ne\\' Jersey, in which oHice he succeeded his fatlu^r, 
the famous Colonel Abraham de Peyster, Chief Justice, ,\eting Gov- 
ernor, and ;\layor of New York. The wife of Hon. Abraham de 
Peyster, Jr., was Afargaret, danghter of Hon. Jacobus Van Cortlandt. 
Mr. Frederic de I'eyster marric^l Justina, daughter of Hon. John 
Watts, Jr. She died early, leaving one child, the present General 
John Watts de Pevster. 



itE PEYSTER, JOHN WATTS, jdulanthropist and military his- 
torian and critic, is the most eminent re])resentative of his family. 
He is the author of hundreds of volumes, ])ami)hlets, and magazine 
articles on historical and military subjects, including a group of works 
on Dutch military and naval Idstory, a grou]) of works on the Ameri- 
can Revohition, a group on the American Ci^il AA'ar, amither group 
on the Thirty Years' War, another on the Wars of Frederick the Great, 
another on the Napoleonic cam]>aigns, and another on Pxdhwell and 
;\lary (^)nceii of Scots. His military writings are without jiarallel 
in any language for their exhaustive use of autliorities. Ins general 
reference libraiy of 25,(100 volumes having been supplemented by sjie- 
cial colleciions (dthe known volumes ami ]>aui])ldets in English, (Jer- 
man, French, llalian, Spanish, etc., on each subject or epoch of 
history treated. He has also ])ublished miscellaneous studies of the 
ndlitary leaders of all times, known to sacred and profane history, 
with military biographies of Torstenson, Gustavus Adoli)hus, ^Va]len- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK HIOC.RAPHY. 



21 



stein, Napulfoii, Caiaiisius, the Dutcli Admirals, (ieueial Scliuy- 
lei", (ieneral Wajue, Sir John Johnston, Marshal Bliicher, (ieneral 
rhilip Kearney, General Georye II. Tlionias, General Hooker, Gen- 
eral llaueock, < General A. A. Humphreys, General Heintzelman, and 
others. He has essayed historical tiction and historical drama, and 
has published 
many poems. He 
donated special li- 
braries to Columbia 

College, the New ^ -^ 

York Society Li- 
b r a. r y, the New 
York Historical So- 
ciety, and Franklin 
and Marshall Col- 
lege. He gave to 
New Y'ork City the 
statue of his famous 
ancestor in Bowl- 
ing Green, and 
erected in Trinity 
Churchyard the no- 
table statue of his 
grandfather, Hon. 
John ^Vatts, Jr. 
He also gave a 
beautiful statue to 
the city of lluds(»n, 
N. Y., and has 
erected several foi- 
institutions endowed by him. He built a Hosiiital for Consumptives 
and an elaborate Training School for Boys for ilic ( Mdcr of Brothers 
of Nazareth of Unionvale, Dutchess County; and lo lliis Order gave 
i;>0 acres of his ancestral domain, togetlier with a librai-y. He has 
erected and fitted u]i another and larger Home for Consumptives 
in the same county. He has donated books to the Cazenovia Lyceum 
and to St. Steplnni's College, Dutchess County. Tlu- new Methodist 
Episcopal Church, at Madalin, N. Y., was erected and donated by 
him. To the same denomination he likewise gave the buildings and 
extensive grounds for the Watts de Peyster [Missionary Home for 
Girls at Jladalin. He has built and fitted u]> a liandsoiiie Library 
Building for Franklin and Marshall College. He gave valuable 
works of art of historic interest to the States of New York, New 
Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and to the City of Kearney, Neb., also do- 
nating bocdvS to the public libraiw of the latter. He erected a chai)el 
at Nebraska City, Neb., and a church and memorial parisli school at 




GENERAL .JOHN WATTS I)K PKYSTKK. 



22 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

AltooiKi, I'm. lie crcctpd the "Annex"' to the Leake and Watts 
Orphan IJonse. (ieneral de I'eyster's inililaiy career be^an in 1S45. 
when he enlisted in the ^<tate Militia in Dntehess Connty, bein;L; tlien 
twenty-fonr years of aiie. He receiv(-d rajiid ]H'oniotions. and after 
the reorjianization of lS4()-47. for " meritorious conduct," lie was com- 
missioned Colonel of tile lllrh i{ei;imeiit, comiiiaiidiiio- the 22d Ue^i- 
meiital District. Tlie Anti-rent ai;itation was at its heii>lit, while the 
rank and tile of the militia was mutinous on account of the reorgan- 
ization tliroughotit the State, ("(doiul de Peyster was commended 
l)y (loveriior Hunt and Adjutant-* ieneral Stevens as beinii' the only 
('oloiiid in the State, with the single exception of one old army officer, 
who maintained i]isci])line dnrin.i;' this period. In 1851, Governor 
Hunt a](](ointed liim P>ri<iadier-( ieneral of New York State troops 
" for important services." ^leanwhile (ieneral de Peyster had be^un 
the ac(]nisition of his remarkable military library, while he estab- 
lished and edited a monthly, the EcJii'ircur, in which were ])ublished 
Enijjlish translations of tlie standard military treatises of ^'on llard- 
ego- and other Europeans. I'roiii 1S.")1 to 185:5 he was in Europe, 
engaged at his own expense in tlie discharge of the trust committed 
to him by his appointment as " .Military Agent of the State of New 
York, to examine and report on such of the military systems of 
Eurojie as slionid be adapted to the use of his native State of New 
York." He made two remarkal)le reports, which were published as 
Senate documents, and in an A])ii('iidix to the Kepoi't of the Adjutaut- 
Oeneral, being widely circulated. They are said to " have been the 
foundation of every improvement that our State troops have under- 
gone since that time." They set forth the value of the brass twelve- 
]iounder, and led to the introduction in our cities of the jiaid tire de- 
partment, with steam tire-engines. On January 1, 1855, General de 
Peyster was appointed Adjntant-General of the State of New York 
by (iovernor Clark, and at once inaugurate<l vigorous reforms. He 
issued revised regulations, and, for the first time, secured uniformity 
of mnskets and uniforms throughout the State, achieving a vast econ- 
omy as well as efficiency. He introduced apiirojiriate artillery, and 
prepared every branch of the service for enu-rgencies. He n^organ- 
ized the Adjutant's Department, and demanded an honest manage- 
ment of the finances. But this displeased tiie politicians, and, finding 
the Governor frightened at tlieir outcry. General de Peyster resigneil 
in disgust. Thenceforward he dexoted himself to military authorship, 
most of his studies in Dutch history being ]inblislied jirior to the Civil 
War. When this occurred, although suffering from frightful hemor- 
rhages, he offered three r(>giments to President Lincoln at one time, 
and two at anothei-. A Prigadier-Gf^neralshiji, however, was not of- 
fered him. while the hardships connected with a lower rank prohibited 
his ac<('iitance of it. Rach of his three sons enlisted before reaching 
Their majoiities, while each rose to the rank of Brevet Colonel. But 



ENCYCLOPi'.DlA OF NFW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 23 

the Geiu'iars pen tliroii^liout the war was iiiighticr tliaii the swurds 
of most of the geuerals in the tiehL Duriii"; the earlv years he ren- 
dered a service of ediu-atioii by the publication of siicli works as 
" Facts or Ideas Indispensable to the Comprehensions of War," " No- 
tions on Htratejij and Tactics," - Military Lessons," " Winter Cam- 
paigns," and " Practical Strateiiy — IMeld-iMarshal Traiin." Every in- 
cident of the war afforded a text for newspaper and magazine articles, 
while still more valuable service was performed through private cor- 
respondence with a large number of the leading Tnion Cenerals. On 
May 25, 18(i(;, theNew York Legislatni-e conferred upon him the brevet 
of Major-lJeneral of New York State troops, with rank frnni April 20, 
1802, for "meritorious services ren<lered to the National (luard and 
to the United 8tates, prior to and during the Rebellion." Tlie only 
child of the late Frederic de Peyster and Justina, daughter of the late 
John ^Yatts, Jr., (Jeneral de Peyster was born in New Y'ork City, 
3Iarch !l, 1821. He had as tutor Professor Lutz, and traveled much 
in Europe during his youtli, but was never graduated from college. 
Ue himself mastered Latin, (ireek, FrencJi, and (Jerman, also acipiir- 
ing a working knowledge of Italian and Spani-^h. He subseijuently 
received the degree of blaster of Arts from ( "ol unibia College, has twice 
received the degree of Doctor of Laws, and is the recipient of that of 
Doctor of Literature. In IS!);! he was made an Honorary Fellow of 
the iSociety of Science, Letters, and Art of London, while, in 1894, lie 
was awarded its gold medal for " Scientihc and Literary Attain- 
ments," He received three medals from Oscar 1. nf Sweden, in recog- 
nition of his work as a, military ciitic. He is a life member of the 
lioyal Historical Society of ( treat Britain, is an honorary memlter of 
the Claren(h)n Historical Society of Edinburgh, is a member of the 
]\Iaats(Iia])iiij Nederbindsche Letterkunde of Leydeu, Holland, is Vice- 
President of the Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Pliiladel- 
jdua, and is. in fact, a member, or honoraiy or cori-(^si)onding iiieudx-r, 
or fellow, of between foi-ty and fifty historical, scientitic, and literary 
societies of the ruited States, Canada, and Euro])e. 

DUEK, WILLIAAL founder of tli«' New York family of this name, 
was born in D(M'onsliii-e. lOngland. March 18, 1747, and died in New 
Y'ork City, May 7, 17!t'.l. He was the son of John Duer, a wealthy 
planter of Antigua, by his wife, Frances, daughter of (Jeneral I'red- 
erick I'rye, of the P.ritisli West India sei-vice. Having been educated 
at Eton, in 17(i2 ^^'illianl Duel' accomi)anied Lord Clive to India as 
Aid-(le-cani]i. lie iidierited his father's estates in Antigua, and, 
sto])])ing at New Yoi-k City to arrange for some sujiitlies of lumber, 
made real estate Investments and settled in the city. Here he be- 
came very prominent. He was Colmiel of tlie militia. County Judge, 
a member of the New York Provincial Congress, a member of the 
Revolutionary Comnnttei' of Safety, a delegate to the first Constitn- 



24 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

tioual ronvention of 177G-7, a delegate to the Coutiueiital ('on,i;ress 
of 1777-8, Secretai*y of the Treasury Board in 1789, and Assistant 
Seci'etary of the Treasui-j' iinder Hamilton. In 1792 he failed foi- 
$3,000,000, causing the first panic in the country due to speculation. 
He married Lad}- Catlierine, daughter of William Alexander, Lord 
Stirling, Major-General in the Revolution, and his wife, Sarah, daugh- 
ter of Philip Livingston, second lord of Livingston manor, a grand- 
daughter of the first Johannes de Peyster, and a descendant of Kobert 
II. of Scotland. Their sons, Hon. William Alexander Duer and Hon. 
John Duer, became eminent, and are the ancestors of the present well- 
known members of the family. 

DUER, WILLIAM ALEXANDER, eldest son of Colonel William 
Duer and Lady Catherine .Alexander, Avas born in Rhinebeclc, N. Y., 
September 8, i780, and died in New York City, May 30, 1858. He 
Avas bred to the law, and was the partner of Edward Livingston, both 
in this city and for a time at New Orleans. He was also at one time 
law partner of his brother-in-law, Beverly Robinson. For a time he 
removed his practice to Rhinebeck, and was elected to the Assembly. 
From 1822 to 1829 he was a Judge of the Supreme Court. From 1829 
to 1812 he was President of Columbia College. He wrote and lectured 
extensively, and in 1847 published a life of his grandfather, William 
Alexander, Earl of Stirling. He married a daughter of William Den 
uing, of New York City, and had a son, the late William Denning 
Duer. 

DUER, JOHN, second son of Colonel William Duer and Lady Cath- 
erine Alexander, was a distinguished jurist of this city. He was born 
in Albany, October 7, 1782, and died on Stateu Island, August S, 1858. 
Between the ages of sixteen and eighteen he was in the United States 
Army, subsequently studying law with Alexander Hamilton. He 
practiced in Orange County at first, and distinguished himself as a 
member of the Constitutional Convention of 1821. He revised the 
statutes of the State in conjunction with Benjamin F. Butler and 
John C. Spencer. In 1827 he was appointed United States Attorney 
at New York City, and subsequently became one of the prominent 
corporation lawyers of the city. Lie was elected to the Superior Court 
of the city in 1849, and in 1857 succeeded Thomas J. Oakley as Chief 
Justice. He edited five volumes of reports and was author of tw^o vol- 
umes of an exhaustive '' Treatise on tlie Law and Practice of :Marine 
Insurance." He married Anna Bnnner, and had a son, Hon. William 
Duer, who became prominent in public life. 

DUER, WILLIAM DENNING, son of Hon. William Alexander 
Duer and a daughter of William Denning, was born in 1812, and died 
in 1891. He married Caroline, daughter of James Gore King, the mer- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 25 

chant of this city, and graiuWaugiiter of the celebrated Kufus Kiu}-, 
aud had two daughters and live sons — Edward Alexander, James 
Gore King, a well-known banker of New York; Kufns King, an officer 
of the United States Army, now dead; William Alexander, a well- 
known lawyer of New York, and Denning Duer, of New Haven, Conn. 

DUEll, \\l Lhl A31, whih* boin in New York City, May 25, 1805, and 
while a resident during his declining years, from 1858 until his death, 
August 25, 1879, ])ursued liis more active career elsewiiere. He was 
tlie sou of the late Chief Justice John Duer and Anna Bunuer, and 
having been graduated from Columbia, College in 1824, was admitted 
to the bar, and began practice in Oswego, N. Y. In 1832 he removed 
to New York City, in 1833 removed to New Orleans, aud in 1835 
returned to Oswego, where he was District Attorney from 1815 to 
1847, was elected to Congi-ess in 1847, and re-elected in 184!). Subse- 
quently, for several years, he was United States Minister to Chile. 
Having practiced law in San Francisco, from 1854 to 1858, he retired 
to this city. He married his cousin, Lucy, daughter of Beverly (.'hew, 
of New Orleans, and .Maria Tlieodora, daughter of Colonel William 
1 >uer. She still survives him, Avith three daughters aud three sons — 
John Duer, a well-known New York lawyer; Beverly Chew Duer, and 
Alexander Duer. 

DUEE, JAMES CORE KING, who has been long engaged in the 
banking business in this city, is a Director of the Long Island Kailroad 
Company, the ^Manliattan I>each Comjiany, and the Manhattan Beach 
Hotel and Land Company. He was born in this city, was educated at 
Columbia College, and is a member of the Union and Westminster 
Kennel clubs, and the Columbia College Alumui Association. He 
married in 1804 Elizabeth Wilson, daughter of Orlando IMeads, of 
Albany, and has three daughters, one of whom is Mrs. Joseph La- 
roeque, Jr. He is the son of the late William Denning Duer and Caro- 
line, daughter of James Gore King, tlie New York mercdiant, and 
gran(hlaughter of Uufus King, the statesman; is the grandson of Will- 
iam Alexander Duer, President of Columl»ia College from 1829 to 
1842, and is great-grandson of tlie famous Colojud William Duer and 
Lady Catherine, daughter of William Alexander, titular Earl of Stir- 
ling. 



'??• 



DUER, WILLIAM ALEXANDER, has long Vieen engaged in the 
practice of law in New York City, and is prominent in its social life. 
He is a trustee of the Union Trust Comitany. and is a member of the 
Union, Knickerbocker, City, Iliding, :Mauliattan, and Lawyers' clubs, 
the City Bar Association, the Sons of the Revolution, and the Colum- 
bia College Alumni Associatioii. The son of the late William Denning 
Duer aud Caroline, daughter of James Gore King, he was born in New 



26 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

York (MtY, and in ISGlt was siradnated from Columbia College, of 
which his grand father was long president. lie married Ellen, daugh- 
ter of William II. Travers, and granddaughter of Keverdv Johnson. 
They have one child, Katherinc Alexander, who, in May, 1S!)8, became 
the wife of Clarence W. ilackay, only surviving sou of John W. 
Mackay. 

DI'EII, JOHN, who, for many years, has been engaged in the prac- 
tice of law in New York Citj', is the Treasurer of the Lawyers' Title 
Insurance Company, and is a director of the E. ^. Higgins Carpet 
Comjiany. He is a member of the Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, City, 
and other clubs, the Bar Association of the city, the St. Nicholas So- 
ciety, the Downtown Association, and the Columbia College Alumni 
Association. lie was born in the City of New York, and in 1859 was 
graduated from Columbia College. He married in 1871 Sara, daugh- 
ter of Henry Du Pont, of Wilmington, Del. Son of the late Hon. Will- 
iam Duer, and his wife, Lucy, daughter of Beverly Chew, of New 
Orleans, and Maria Theodora, daughter of Colonel William Duer and 
Lady Catherine Alexander, he receives a double strain from the 
founder of the Duer family of New York, and from Lord Stirling, the 
Revolutionary 3Iajor-General, as well as from the tii-st Johannes de 
Peyster, and the first aiul second lords of Livingston manor. Beverly 
Chew, his maternal grandfather, was a itrominent New Orleans mer- 
chant, Collector of tiie Port there from 1817 to 1829, President of the 
branch bank of the United States at New Orleans, and Yice-Consul of 
Kiissia; while through him Mr. Duer is seventh in descent from John 
Chew, a cadet of the ancient family of Chew, of Chewton. Somerset- 
shire, England, who emigrated to Mrginia in l(i20, and became a 
wealthy merchant and planter, a member of the House of Assembly, 
and of the House of Burgesses. 

DUEPv, BEYEIJLY CHEW, Cashier of the Bank of the State of 
New York, was born and educated in New York City, and is the son 
of the late Hon. William Duer and of his wife, Lucy, daughter of Bev- 
erly Chew, of New Orleans, granddaughter of Colonel William Duer, 
and great-grandilaughter of Lord Stirling, Major-General in the Revo- 
lutionary Army. From the two last-mentioned ancestors he also lin- 
eally descends through his father, as well as from the founders of the 
de Peyster and Livingston families in this country. Hon. John Chew, 
of Yirginia in 1(520, is a maternal ancestor. He is a member of the 
Union and City clubs. He married Sophie Lawrence Pool, and has a 
son, Bevcily Duer. 

11A3IILTON, ALEXANDER (see steel engraving, Yolume I. of 
this work, facing page 29(ii. wielded an intiuence in shaping the 
United States Government wliich singles him out among all the citi- 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 27 

zens el' New Yoilc < 'ity. He was liorii (in Xevis, West ludies, Jaiiiiai y 
11, 1757, and was killed in a duel by Aaron Burr at Weehawkeu 
opposite New York, July 11, I.SOL At thirteen years of age he held 
a responsible position with a ^Vest India merchant, while his eon- 
tribntions to a local newspaper led friends to send him to New York 
to be educated. Here he iiileresled himself in tiie agitation in re- 
sistance of tlie right of (Ireat Britain to levy taxes in the colonies 
at discretion. At a mass meeting in the city, July 5, 1774, he made 
an eloquent address, lie was then seventeen years of age and a stu- 
dent at King's College, now ( 'olumbia University. Soon after he pub- 
lished two brilliant pamphlets against British oppression, " A Full 
^'indication " and " The Farmer Refuted. " ^Yhe^ the Revolution 
began, he entered the ])atri<it service in command of a company of 
artillery, and in this cajiacity i>articii)ated in the battles of Long Is- 
land and \Yhite Plains. He was then ajipointed to Washington's 
personal staff, serving until a re]»rimand from ^Yashington led him 
To resign in 17S1. He studied law and began practice in New Y'ork 
( "ity, rajiidly winning a reputation in tin* courts. Soon after the Bevo- 
lurion lie was »dected to the ( "ongress of the Thirteen Colonies, as con- 
stituted under the Articles of CoTifcderation, and at once became con- 
s])icuous in this Ixidy. Kcalizing that a stable future could be hopefl 
for only through the unili'ij action (d" the Colonics, whereas this Con- 
gress could only make recommendations, the execution (d' which was 
merely ojttional with the various States, Hamilton sTreuTiously la- 
bored for the formation of a Constitution which would comjiact the 
Colonies into a nation. He was the leader of the (dement which la- 
bored for a powerful centralized (iovernment, and had his ideas pre- 
\ailed to a still greater extent than was the actual fad, the c(ndral- 
ization of power would have been still greater than the Constitution 
of the rnit(Ml States made it, and the (|uestiou of State rights which 
was settled by the Civil War, might, perhaps, have been settled from 
the beginning. On the other hand, it is of course jiossible that greater 
jKiwer might have proved a temjitation to some of our Presidents. 
Hamilton founded the Fvdvralist, and his articles contributed to it 
were influential in bringing about the adoption of the Constitution. 
Having accepted the ottice of Receiver of Taxes at New Y'ork City un- 
der the Confederation, he made a careful study of linancial (piestions. 
and upon the election of Washington as President, he entered his cabi- 
net, becoming the tirst Secre+ary of the Treasury of the Fiuted States. 
Not alone did he S(dve the great i>roblem of ]>lacing the new (iov- 
ernment upon a sound financial basis, but his intiuence was power- 
ful, if not dominant, in evei';v department of executive administration. 
He established the credit of the new Government at home and abroad 
by defeating the project to repudiate the domestic debt of f42,0()(),()()0, 
and by inducing Congress to assume the various State debts, aggre- 
gating .|2.1,()()0,()00. There was also a. foreign debt of .*!12,U(»0,()00, 



28 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Fi-nnce, Ildllaiid, and Spain beini; the creditors. Direct taxation be- 
ing nnpopuiar, lie devised a schedule of tariffs on imports and a tax 
upon the domestic nmnufacture of distilled liquors. With the res- 
toration of credit, commercial and industrial trade revived, while the 
re\enue soon exceeded the need for current expenses and to meet the 
interest on the national debt, funds accruing for the liquidation of 
the jirincipal. Hamilton also secured the establishment of a National 
bank in IT'Jl, and of a Government mint in 1792. But, despite his 
practicable and I'esourceful statesmanship, and the keenness of in- 
tellect, in which he had no peer among his brilliant contemporaries, 
he had defects of character which can not be extenuated. He was 
proud, autocratic, and selfish, and unwilling either to curb his ambi- 
tion or to temper his dislikes and animosities for the sake of the pub- 
lic good. His rupture with Thomas Jefferson, who was Secretary 
of State in the same cabinet in which he was Secretary of the Treas- 
ury, was a grief to Washington, who found it impossible to reconcile 
the rivals. Their rancor descemled to their adherents, causing the 
stiiTing up of party spirit to the perilous pitch which caused W^ash- 
ington to deplore it as a danger to the Kepublic in his famous addi'ess 
at the close of his administration. In apportioning censure, there is 
little to choose between Hamilton and Jefferson. Both wei'e ambi- 
tious to dominate ^^'nshington's administration, while they were ex- 
ponents of quite opposite theories of government. But nothing can 
be said in extenuation of Hamilton's intrigues against John Adams, 
whereby he disrupted the Federalist party. In 1788 he employed his 
influence to make the vote for Adams as Vice-I'resident as small as 
possible. Yet. as President of the Senate, Adams cast the deciding 
ballots which alone saved from defeat many of Hamilton's projects to 
establish the credit of the United States. In fact, the importance 
of Adams's support of W^ashington's administration can scarcely be 
exaggerated. At the end of Washington's second administration, 
Adams being the Federalist choice for I'resident and Thomas Pinck- 
ney for Vice-President, Hamilton unsuccessfully attempted to elect 
Pinckney to the tirsi: office by urging Adams's New England sup- 
porters to divide their votes equally betwe(Mi Adams and Pinckney, 
while he knew sonu' Soiithern Federalist electors would withhold 
votes from Adams so as to give Pinckney a majority. The scheme 
only succeeded in creating a feud which i)laced the Federalist p.arty 
permanently out of power. Hamilton's life finally paid the penalty 
of his political rancor. Aaron Burr had long been his rival in law 
practice at the New York bar, and had defeated his father-in-law, Gen- 
eral Philip Schuyler, for the United States Senate in 1791. Hamilton 
had several times retaliated by laying obstacles in the way of Burr's 
ambition, and when Burr ran for (^lovernor of New York in 1801, Ham- 
ilton was active in securing his defeat. During the campaign he had 
voiced insinuations against Burr's trustworthiness of character (no 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 29 

doubt justifiable, iu point of nww fact), and, under the atiwj; of de- 
feat, BuiT took up these rcproaehes, clialh'Uiied Hamilton to a duel, 
and killed him. ^\'e must add that it was undoubtedly Hamilton's 
inflnence which secured the election of Jefferson as President when 
the tie between Jefferson and Burr in the Electoral Collej;e 
threw the decision into Conjiress. The brilliancy of Hamilton's ca- 
reer is the more remarkable when we reflect that he was but forty- 
seven years of a,ine at the time of his death. As a practitioner at the 
New York bar he had no peer. lie was made Inspector-(ienera.l of 
the United States Army, with the rank of Major-General, in 1798. 
Two years later he was elected Trcsident of the Society of the Cincin- 
nati. He married, in 17S0, Elizabeth, dauf^hter of CJeneral riiiliit 
Schuyler, and had a number of children. Three of his sons, James 
Alexander, Jcdm Church, and Thili]) Hamilton, practiced law in New 
York City. Another son was killed in a duel at Weehawkeu, prior 
to his father's death from Burr's bullet. 

HAMILTON, WILLIAM GASTON, the well-known civil and me- 
chanical engineer, is a son of the late Colonel John Church Hanul- 
ton, and a grandson of the famous Alexander Hamilton. He has 
been prominently connected with many business enterprises and 
many public institutions of this city. At the present time he is 
President of the Kamapo Wheel and Foundry Company, and a di- 
rector of the Mexican Telegraph Company and the Central and 
South American Telegraph Company. He was formerly Presid(Mit of 
the Jersey City Locomotive Works, as well as engineer, and was 
President of the Hamilton Steeled Wheel Company. He was Mce- 
Presideut of the Mexican and Central Telegraph Company, as he 
was also of the South American Telegraph Company. He was Con- 
sulting Mechanical Engineer to the Pennsylvania Railroad. Under 
the administration of ^Mayor Strong he was Chairman of the :Mayor's 
Advisory Committee on Public Baths. He is a Manager of the 
Woman's Hospital, of the New York Cancer Hospital, and of the 
New York Blind Asylum, is Vice-President of the Deniilt Dispen- 
sai-y, and is Vice-President of the New York Association for Improv- 
ing the Condition of the Poor. He is a member of the Metropolitan. 
Tuxedo, Century, City. Players', and Church clubs, the St. Nicholas 
Society, the American Society of Engineers, and the Sons of the 
Revolution. He married Charlotte (Jeffrey) Pierson. and has two 
daughters and a son — William Pierson Hamilton. The latter is 
Treasurer of the Manhattan Trust Company, a Trustee of St. John's 
Guild, and married Juliet P.. daughter of J. Pierpont Morgan. 

JAY, JOHN (see s,teel engraving in Volume I. of this work, facing 
page 196), second Governor of the State of New York, was born in 
New York City, December 12, 1745, and in 17G1 was graduated from 



30 HISTORY ()!■ THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Kind's ( 'olli'ne ( now C'oliiuibia L'nivcrsilv i. lie was aihnittcd to the 
bar in 17G8, and practiced in i)artiiersliiii \\ itli Robert R. Livingstou, 
afterward Chancellor, day eai-jy and actively esponsed tiie cause of 
the colonists ai;ainst <ireat Ri'itain. and. next to Alexander Hamil- 
ton, was the most able and intlneiitial citizen of New York dnring 
tlie Kevohition and the formative ]ieriod of the Fnited States. He 
was a member of the Committee of Fifty appointed in 1774 to link the 
colonies together throngli coiTespondence. He was a member of the 
New York Provincial Congress in 177(> and 1777, as he was of the 
first Continental Congress, in whi(di he drafted the address to the 
people of Great Britain. He was sinularly active in the second Con- 
tinental Congress. In 1777 he drafted the first Constitution of the 
State of New York, and the same year became the first Chief Justice 
of the New York Supreme Court. While u]»oii this bench he was 
elected to the ( 'ontinental < 'ongress (d' 177S, and became its I'resident. 
The following yt^ar he was a])|)ointed .Minister from tlie Thirteen Colo- 
nies to S]»ain. H(M\'as one of the f(nir Commissioners who negotiated 
the treaty of peace with (Ireat Rritain, November :^0, 1782, Franklin, 
John Adams, and Laurens being the otliers. He st-rved five years as 
Secretary of Foreign Affairs under the Confederation of the Colonies, 
and was one of the great leaders wlio assisted in franung the Con- 
stitution of the United States. He divided witli Hamilton the honor 
of the authorship of the brilliant arti(des in the I'nit rails/, which were 
so potent in infiuencing the a<loi)tion of that document by the Colo- 
nies, creating the United States of America. Ry a])]iointment by 
President Washington, Jay became the first Chief Justice of the Su- 
preme Court of the United States in 1789. He resigned this ])osition 
in 1704 to accept his ap])ointment as Ihiited States ^finister to (Jreat 
Britain, to avert, if |)ossible, the threatened war on account of dis- 
criminations against American commeice. A treaty with (Jreat Brit- 
ain was negoti.ded by him and concluded, November lit, 17!I4. ^Vhile 
it did not cover all the causes of grievance, it was the best tjiat could 
tiien be obtained, and averted war at a tinu' when peace was of super- 
lative importance to Hk^ young nation. In A]>7-il, 1795, Jay was 
elected ( lovemor of the State of New York. In this capacity he se- 
cured the mitigation of the crinunal laws, secured the estal>lishment 
of institutions for the employment and attem])ted reformation of 
ciiminals, and brought ;tbout the abolition of slavery in the State of 
New Yoi'k, signing the bill which abolished this institution in 1799. 
He served a second term, and then determined to retire to private life, 
hiiving inherited an estate at Bedford, Westchester County, N. Y. 
Adams desired to reai>iioint him to the Chief Justiceshi]) of thefT^niti^l 
Slates Suiireme Court, but he declined. He died in lSi:9. He was the 
great-grandson of I'iei're Jay, a Huguenot merchant of Ikochelle, 
France,whofied to England n])on theRevocation of theKdict of Nantes, 
in 1085. The hitter's son, Augustus, grandfather of John Jay, immi- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



31 



grated in turn to New York. Augustus Jay was a wcallliv New York 
meroliant, and married tlie dauglitci- of IJaltliazar Itayard, an elder 
brother of Colonel Nicdicdas I5ayard. His business passed to his sou, 
Peter Jay, father of -John Jay. The latter s mother was ]\Iary, daugh- 
ter of ]Mayor Jacobus Ynu Cortlaudt, the second son of the original 
Oloff Stevensen Van Cortlaudt. Jolin Jay married Sarah Yan Rrugh, 
daugliter of Governor William Livingston, of New Jersey, and great- 
gianddaughter of the first Ilobert Livingston in America. She was 
also great-granddaughter of Philip French, ^layoi- of New York City 
in 1702. 



JAY, WILLIAM, one of the smis of Chief Justice Jolm Jay, prac- 
ticed law in New York City, and foi- about a (piarter of a century was 
first Jud'^c of Westchester County, lie was one of tlie earliest influ- 
ential ad\()cates of the abolition of 
slavery in the United States, and se- 
cured its abolition in tlie l>istrict of 
Columbia, fie also cham])ioned the 
cause of int<'rnational arbitration of 
differences, iind obtained recognition 
of the ]>i-inci]de in a substantial way 
l>y various lOurojiean nations. Tlie 
pirogress since nmde in this direc- 
tion is (diiefiy due to his efforts. He 
was one of the founders of the Amer- 
ican Pilde Society in ISlC. The lim 
attitude of France toward the Amer- 
ican Colonies during the IJenolution 
was fiist made ]>ublic by his ])ul)li- 
cation of the ■■ Life and Writings of 
J(thn Jay" in is:?3. lie also pub- 
lished an " ln(|uiiy into the ( Miaracter 
and Tendemy of the .\merican C(dou- 

ization and .\meiican Anti-Slavery Societies" (ls;Ul, a " \'iew of 
the Action of the Federal Covernment in I'.ehalf of Slavery" ( l>;:!Ti, 
"The Condition of the Free Peojde of Cohu- in the United States" 
(1S31)|, an "Address to the \on-Slaveholders of the South, on the 
Social and Political Evils of Slavery " (lS4'.tl. " War and Peace: the 
Evils of the First, with a Plan for Securing the Last " (1S4NI, and 
" Causes and Consequences of the ^lexican War " ( ISiU i. 

JAY, JOHN, next to his faiiions grandfather and namesake, the 
most distinguished m<'mber of the Jay family, was the son of Judge 
William Jay, and was born in New York ( Mty, June 2;j, 1S17. lie di<'d 
May .■"), 1S!»4. lie was graduated from Columbia College at the head 
of his class when nineteen veais of a^c. while, as a student, he had 




.rUDGK WILLIAM .J.\Y. 



32 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



been fur two yerii's manager uf the New York Young .Men"s Ami-Slav- 
ery Society. He studied law with Daniel Lord, Jr., enjiaged in prac- 
tice in this city, and enjoyed a lar,ij,e and lucrative practice. He was 
ever the zealous champion of the fui.iitive slaves, and, in addition to 
numerous cases of less note, appeared in the slave cases of Kirk, Da 
Costa. Lemon, and Lonsi'. He opposed tlie admission of Texas into the 
Union. In 1818 he visited Europe. In 1854 he became President of 
the Free Democratic Chib of this city, an ors>anizatiou which opposed 
the I'epeal of the ^Missoini Comproniise. He became one of the active 
founders of the llepublican party, supporting Fremont for tlie Presi- 
dency in 1856, wliile his address on •■ America Free or America Slave," 
was extensively used as a campaign document. He predicted Lin- 
coln's election in 18G0, and the consequence that slavery would be 

abolished, in an address on " The Rise 
and Fall of the Pro-Slavory Democracy 
and the Ilise and Duties of the Repub- 
lican Party." By appointment of Pres- 
ident Grant he succeeded the historian 
Motley as United States Ministtn- to 
Austna in April, 18011, holding the 
office until his resignation in the fall of 
1871. He was President of the Union 
League Club of New York City from 
1866 to 1869, and again in 1877. He 
was President of the American Uis- 
/ ffi^ #' / M ""- i tM'ifiil Society of America, and was 

f^fai / ji- ^5^H^ ' President of the National League for 

the J'rotection of American Institu- 
tions. He was for many years Man- 
ager and ('orresi>onding Secretai-y of 
the New Y'ork Historical Society. 
He was one of the founders of the 
Freednuin's Aid I'nion, and was a manager of the I'reedman's Aid 
Society of New York. He was one of tlie incoriiorators of the Ameri- 
can Geographical Society. As President of tlie I'nion League Club, 
he was active in tlie organization of the ^letropolitaii IMusenm of Art. 
He was a member of the Century, University, and Reform clubs, and 
of many societies of America and Europe. He maiTied, in 1887. 
Eleanor, daugliter of H. W. Fiehl. The ]pres('iit ( "nlmiel ^^■iilianl Jay is 
their onlv son. 




HON. .JOHN .LAY. 



JAY, WILLI. V^l, only son of the late Hon. .Tolin Jay and Eleanor 
Field, Mas born in New York City, was graduated from Columbia Col- 
lege, and lias been engaged in the practice of law in this city since the 
Civil War. He served witli distinction from tlie beginning of that 
conflict to the end, being attached, at various times, to the staffs of 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 33 

General ^^'ool, General Morrell, General Sykes, and General Meade, 
and attaining the rank of J.ientenant-Colonel. He is President of the 
New York Cab Company, and a director of the Continental Trnst 
Company, the Manhattan Storage and Warehouse Company, the Com- 
mercial Cable Telegraph Company, and the American Horse Ex- 
change. He is a well-known whip, and has been President of the 
Coaching Club. He is now President of the Meadow Brook Club. He 
is a member of the iletropolitan, Century, Knickerbocker, (ity, 
Church, Lawyers", and other clubs; the Bar Association of the city, 
the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, the Sons of the Kevolution, 
and tlie Columl)ia Alumni .Vssociation. 

GOELET, PETEK, founder of the fortunes of the well-known fanv 
ily of this name although in the fourth generation of the family in 
this city, was born in 1727, and became one of the most wealthy ant! 
prominent merchants of New York. Originally in partnership with 
Peter T. Curtenius, for many years sul)sequent to 17()3 he conducted 
the business alone. Hi' was an importer of hardware and cutlery, 
and was also one of the first in the city to import violins, guitars, 
flutes, and other musical instruments. His place of business was 
in Hanover Square. He was a member of New York's tirst "Com- 
mittee of Fifty" (literally, fifty-one), or Committee of Correspond- 
ence, appointed in May, 1774, to resist British oppression. He was 
also a member of the Committee of One Hundred of 1775, which had 
charge of local affairs, and issued the call for a Provincial Congress, 
upon receipt of the news of the Battle of Lexington. He married in 
1755 Elizabeth Uatse, daughter of another wealthy merchant of the 
city. He was himself the son of John Goelet and Jannetje, daugh- 
ter of Jean Cann(jn, a New York merchant of French Huguenot de- 
scent; was the grands(in of Jacobus Goelet and Jannetje Coessar, 
both of Huguenot descent, and was the great-grandson of Francis 
Goelet, of a family which had removed from La Roclielle, France, to 
Amsterdam, Holland, as early as 1(121. Francis reached New York 
in 1676, accompanied by his son, Jacobus, then ten years of age. Es- 
saying to return to Holland on liusiness soon after, Francis was lost 
at sea, while his son was brought up in the family of Frederick Phil- 
lipse, the most opulent of the New York merchants of his day, and the 
first lord of Phillipsi- manor. 

G0ELP:T, peter p., son of Peter Goelet and Elizabeth Ratse, in- 
herited from his father considerable real estate, which rapidly in- 
creased in value, and to which he added by judicious investment. 
He was born in New York City in 1761 and died in 182S. In 1790 
he married Almy, daugliter of Thomas Buchanan, ont^ of the leading 
merchants of this city and a member of the Revolutionary Commit- 
tee of One Hundred "of 1775. They had two sons— the late Peter 



34: HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

aud the late IJobeit (iiielet — aud twu daughters — Jean 1>. aud Han- 
nah, wife of the late Captain Thomas Gerry, TJ.S.N., and mother of 
the present Elbridge (lei-i'v. 

GOELET, PETEK, eldest son <>( Peter P. Goelet and Almy Bnehan- 
an, ^Yas born in New York City in ISOO and died in 1871). He was 
one of the largest holders of real estate in New York, and was an 
officer of varions financial institntions. He was one of the fonnders 
of the Chemical I>ank. Dnrin^ the Civil War he contrilmted 
liberally in aid of the sick and wonnded Union soldiers. He resided 
in the old (Joelet mansion on Broadway, at the corner of Nine- 
teenth Street, and indnli^cd liis mechanical Renins in the frequent 
forging of ingeniously contrived locks and other inventions, having 
established a forge in the basement. He never married, and left the 
bnlk of his fortune to his nephews, the present Kobert Goelet and the 
late Ugden Goelet. 

GOELET, ]{()I;EKT, the younger of the two sons of the late Peter 
P. Goelet and Almy Buchanan, and who alone married and left isstie, 
was born in this city in lS(t;» and died in 1879. In his business 
relations he was closely associated with his brother Peter, their for- 
tunes being largely invested in real estate in New York City, of 
which they were extensive owners. They were also among the 
founders and first officers of the famous ('heniical Bank. Bobert 
Goelet married Sarah, daughter of Jonathan Ugden, of the notable 
New Jersey family of that name. His two sons, the present Kob- 
ert Goelet and the late Ogden Goelet, have long been among the 
most prominent citizens of New York City. 

GOELET, KOBEKT, the present head of one of the most prominent 
of the old New York families, is the eldest son of the late Itobeit 
Goelet and Sarah, daughter of Jonathan Ogden, was born in New 
York City, September 29, 1841; in 18(;o was graduated from Colum- 
bia College, studied law, and was admitted to the bar. He has never 
practiced his profession, bnl luis devoted himself to directing the 
business policy in connectii'n with the large estates inherited by 
himself and liis brother, the late Ogden Goelet, who Avere heirs not 
only of their father, but of their uncle, Eobert Goelet, who died in 
1879. He has been a pioneer among the inheritors of extensive real 
estate holdings in this city in erecting notable and attractive build- 
ings, from au architectural stand])oint, upon tJic ](roperties under 
his control. He is also an officer of some of the most powerful finan- 
cial institutions of the city. He is a trustee of the I^nion Trust 
Company and the New York life Insurance and Trust Company, 
and a director of the Cliemical National Bank, the Bank of New 
Amsterdam, the Guaranty Trust Company, and the ^letropolitan 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 35 

()l)era and Ileal Estate Company. His fatber and his nncle were 
anionc; the founders of tlie Chemical IJank, wlule he was himself in 
1887 one of the founders of the Bank of New Amsterdam, estab- 
lished with a financial policy similar to that which has yiveu the 
older institution its novel iire-emineuce. He has country places at 
Newpoi-t, II. I., and Tuxedo, X. Y. His steam yacht, Nahma, is one 
of the most magnificent pleasure palaces afioat. He is a member 
of the Patriarchs, the Union, Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, Tuxedo, 
Racquet, Players', New York Yacht, and Southside Sportsmen's 
clubs, the City Bar Association, the Ui)town Association, the St. Nich- 
olas and Holland societies, and the Columbia Alumni Association. 
He is also a member of the Metropolitan Club of Washington, the 
Philadeli)hia Club of Philadelphia, and the Royal Cl.vde Yacht and 
Royal Northern Yacht clulis of (iiasgow, Scotland. He married in 
1870 Henrietta Louise, daughter of the late (ieorge Henry Warren, 
Sr.. an eminent lawyer of this city, and of Mary Caroline, daughter of 
Hon. Jonas Phillips I'hoenix. and has a son, Robert \\all(in Goelet, 
and a daughter, Beatrice. 

COEI.ET, OGDEN, the younger son of the late Robert Goelet and 
Sarah Ogden, was born in New York City, June 11, 181G, and died on 
board his yacht, Mayfiower, at ('owes, England, August 27, 1897. 
He gave much attention to the management of the large estates 
inherited by himself and his brotlier, and was prominent as a patnm 
of yachting. The most important annual priy-es for sloops and for 
schooners racing in American waters are the Goelet Cups, which 
he gave to the New York Yacht Club in 1882. He also gave a num- 
ber of prizes for races in European waters, one of which was won by 
the Prince of Wales's Britannia. At one time tlie owner of the fast 
schooner yacht Norseman, more recently lie built the ^layfiower, 
which, when launclied in 18!t(), had few rivals among luxurious 
steam yachts, and added tlie novel feature of mounting six rapid- 
fire guns. This craft was acquii-ed by the United States Govern- 
ment for the war with Si)ain, and equipped as a torpedo-destroyer. 
-Ml'. Goelet was a member of the Patriarchs, and of the Union, Metro- 
politan, Knickerbocker, Tuxedo, Raccpiet, Riding, Players', New York 
Yacht, Seawanhaka-Corinthian Yaclit, \Yestminster Ivennel, and 
Southside Sportsmen's clubs, as well as of the Royal Yaclit Scpiad- 
ron and other Eurojican clubs. He married in 1877 Mary E., eldest 
daughter of Richard T. Wilson, well-known bankcn- of this city, and 
had a son, Robert Goelet, and a daugliter. ]\larv. His widow and 
both children survive him. 

REMSEN, HENRY, born in Brooklyn, April .-), 178r), died in New 
York City, ^larcli 13, 1702, was one of tlie largest drygoods imjiorters 
of his day, establishing the firm of Henry Renisen iV; Comiiany. He 



36 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

was oue of the iueurporators of the Xew York fciocietj Library. He 
was active against British aggressiou duriug the Revolutiouary pe- 
riod, and iu 1774: was cue of the Committee of One Hundred, of which 
Isaac Low was Cliairman. As Deputy- Chairman, on May 18, 1775, 
Eerasen signed tlie address of the General Committee to Lieutenant- 
Crovernor Coldeu. In 1770 lie aided the Provincial Congress by im- 
Ijorting supplies for tlie patriot troops. He retired to Morristown, 
X. J., during the British occupation of New York City, subsequently 
returning and resuming business. He married, in 17G1, Cornelia, 
daughter of Charles Dickenson, and had nine children who reached 
laatnrity, although but two of them were ever married. He was the 
son of Heudiick Kemsen, also a New Y'ork merchant; was the grand- 
son of Rem J\emsen, the great-gi'andson of Ivem Vanderbeeck Ifemsen, 
and great-great-grandson of Keiii Jansen \'anderbeeck, who early im- 
migrated to New Amsterdam from Holland, and here married a 
daughter of Joris Jansen de Eapalie. 

KEMSEN, HENKY", son of Heui-y Kemsen and Cornelia Dickenson, 
became his father's partner in the drygoods importing btisiness in New 
Y'ork City under the firm st^'le of Henry Kemsen iS: Son. This was in 
171)0. Three years later he was appointed Teller in the United States 
Bank. In 1709 he became Cashier of the Manhattan Company, the 
second corporation in New Y'ork City to engage in the banking busi- 
ness, while from ISOS to 1826 he was President of this institution. He 
was Secretary to John Jay in 1786, when the latter was Secretary of 
Ft>reign Affairs under the Congress of the Thirteen Colonies. He was 
also Private Secretary to Thomas Jefferson when the latter was Sec- 
retary of State iu the CalHuct of President Joim Adams. He was 
born in New York City, No\ember 7, 17(>2, and died in February, 1843. 
He mariied, in 1808, Eliza, daughter of Captain Abraham K. de Peys- 
ter, and had four sons and five (laughters. 

KEMSEN, CHARLES, is a director of the Third Avenue Railroad 
Company, of the Forty-second Street. Manhnttanville and St. Nicholas 
Avenue Railway, of the Dry Dock, East Broadway and Battery Rail- 
road ( 'ompany, and of the Empire City Traction Company. He was 
born in New Y'ork City, February 7, 1856, and Avas educated at the 
University Grammar School in this city, at Princeton College, and 
at the New York College of Physicians and Surgeons. He is the son 
of the late William Kemsen and Jane, daughter of John Suydam, and 
is the grandson of Henry Kemsen and Eliza de Peyster. On the ma- 
ternal side he descends from Henydr\ck Rycken von Zuutdam, who 
emigrated from Holland to New Amsterdam in 1663. 

LEWIS. ]\rOR(TAN, third Governor of the State of New Y^ork (see 
cut. Volume IT., of tliis work, page J30 ), was born in this city in 1754, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 37 

and (lied April 7, 1SJ:J:. He was graduated from i'rincetun (Jollege, 
eulisted in the New York Militia, and marched to Boston after the 
Battle of Lexington. Keturning to ^ew York he raised a regiment. 
He was present at the surrender of Burgoyne. After the Revolution 
he practiced la^^■ in Xew York City, becoming one of the leaders of the 
bar. He marrii'd a sister of Chancellor IJobert il. TJvingston. He 
was elected to the Assembly, subsequently becoming Judge of the 
Dutchess County Ccnirt of Common Pleas. In 17!»1 he was appointed 
Attorney-Ueneral of the i^tate, succeeding Aaron Burr, who had been 
elected to Congress. In 1801, Lewis was appointed Chief Justice 
of tlio Xew York Sujircme T'ourl. In 1804 he defeated Aaron Bun- 
as a candidate for ( iovernor of New York, through tlie fact that Alex- 
ander Hamilton, of Bnrr's party, exerted his influence against Buit. 
The foundation of the present common school fnnd was laid during 
the adnunistration of LeAvis, the Legislature acting on his suggestion 
that 1,500,000 acres of the public lands be set aside for this purjiose. 
(iovei-noi- Lewis served as a Bi-iiiadier-(!enera] during the Wai- of 
1812. 

TOiMPKINS, DANIEL D., fourth Governor of the State of New 
York (see cut, Yolume II., of this work, page 183), was born in Scars- 
dale, Westchester County, N. Y"., June 21, 1774. and died at his home 
on 8taten Island, June 11, 1825. He was graduated fi'om Columbia 
Cidlege at the head of his class in 1795, studied law with Peter Jay 
.Munro, and j^racticed in New York City. lie married a daughter of 
Alderman Minthorne, and became active in politics as a Be]niblican. 
He was elected to tlie Constitutional Convention of 1801, and subse- 
quently to the Assembly. In 1804 he was elected to Congress, but 
did not take his seat, accepting his aiipointmeut as a Justice of the 
Supreme Court, serving until 1807. In 1800 he declined an appoint- 
ment as Justice of the United States District Court for New York. 
In the spring of 1807, when thirty-two years of age, he resigned from 
the Su])reme Court bench to accept his nomination as Governor of New 
York, and was elected, defeating Governor ]\Iorgan Lewis. He served 
in this office, by continuous re-elections, until 1817, Avhen he r(>signed 
to take the oath of office as Vice-President of the United States. He 
was re-elected Vice-Pi-esident in 1S21. As Governor he energetically 
supported President Madison throughout the War of 1812, and during 
the exciting years ]>receding the war. To prevent the incoi'])oration 
of the Bank of Nortli America in 1812, lie prorogued the Legislature 
for the first and only time in the history of the State. This action was 
not po])ular, and failed to gain the desired end. In 1810, Governor 
Tom])kins strongly advocated the construction of the Erie Canal. In 
bis later years he resided on Stateu Island. He was elected to the 
Constitutional Convention of 1821 from KiclniKind County, and was 
the President of the Convention. 



38 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



CLINTON, J)K WITT, was .Mavui- of the City of New York duiiug 
the years 1803-7, 180S-10, and lSll-15. while he was Governor of the 
State of Xew York from 1817 to ISl*:',, and from 182o until his death, 
FebruaiT 11, 1828. He was born in Little Britain, Orange County, 
N. Y., March 2, 17G9, the son of General James Clinton, of the Revo- 
lution, and the nepliew of <ieorge Clinton, the hrst Governor of the 
State of New York, who held that position durinj;- the years 1777-05, 
1801-4, and was Vice-President of the United States from 1801 to 
April 20, 1812, dyin^ in oflice. De Witt Clinton was craduated from 
Columbia College at the head of his class in 1780, and served as Secre- 
tary to Governor George Clinton from 1789 to 1795. He was elected 
to the Assembly from the City of New York in 1797, and the following 
year was elected to the Senate. In 1801 he was made a member of 
the Council of Appointment. As State Senator he advocated a con- 
stitutional amendment providing for the election of President and 
^'ice-President of the United States by dividing each State into dis- 
tricts, in each of which one Presidential Elector should be designated 
by po])ular vote. lie was elected to the United States Senate from 
New York, February 4, 1 802, but resigned at the end of two years to 
become Mayor of New York City. He was State Senator between 
1805 and 1812. while in 1810 he became a member of the commission 
whicli recommended the construction of a State canal connecting the 
Hudson River with the Great Lakes. In 1812 he received eighty-nine 
electoi"al votes as candidate for the Presidency of the United States 
against James Madison. In 1816 he organized a great mass meeting 
in New York City, Avhich petitioned the Legislature in favor of the 

Ei"ie Canal. The Legislature author- 
ized the project, and appointed Clinton 
one of five Commissioners to cari-'y out 
the enterprise. He was Governor dur- 
ing most of the i^eriod of construction, 
as he was when the canal was com- 
l)leted. His contiilintion, in this way, 
to the commercial supremacy of New 
"N'ork City can scarcely be overestimated. 
De Witt Clinton was the third son by 
his fatliei-"s first wife, Mary De Witt. 
His grandfather, Charles (Tinton, immi- 
grated to America from Ireland, and 
was in ttiru the great-grandson of Henry 
Clinton, second Earl of Lincoln, and 
also descended from the Kennedys, 
Earls of Cassilis. Admiral George Clin- 
ton, Colonial Governor of New York 
from 174.'i to 1753, and Sir Henry Clinton, British General during 
the Revohition, Mere of the same familv. 




^\ 



DE WITT CLINTON. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 39 

CLINTON, CHAKLES WILLLUI, one of tlu- prominent architects 
of New York ritv, has served seven years as Vice-Presiihmt of the 
New York Chapter of the American Institnte of Architects, and has 
given to the city a number of its most notable buildinsis, of which 
the Seventh Re.ijiment Armory and the Mutual Life Insni'ance Build- 
ing- are examples. He is a director of the Clinton Apartment Company, 
a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Architectural League, 
and the Municipal Art Society, and likewise a member of the Tuxedo 
and New York Yacht clubs, and the Centni-y Association, lie was 
born and educated in this city, studying architecture under the late 
Richard I'njohn. He was long a member of the Seventh Regiment, 
and during the Civil War three times volunteered when it was called 
into active service. He is the son of the late Dr. Alexander Clinton 
and Adeline Arden, daughter of Alexander James Hamilton, a Brit- 
ish officer, (xoveruor De Witt Clinton was his grand-uncle. His great- 
grandfather was General James Clinton of the Revolution, elder broth- 
er of Governor George Clinton, while the first ancestor in this country, 
Charles Clinton, was a descendant of Henry, second Earl of Lincoln. 

RHINELANDER, PIIILII' JACOB, founder of the New York fam- 
ily of this name, was of Hugueiujt descent, but was lioru near Ober- 
wesel, on the Rhine, over which district France then exercised sover- 
eignty. Two of his descendants, Thomas Jackson Oakley Rhineland- 
er and Philip Rhinelander, the sons of William Rhiuelander, of this 
city, have in recent years purchased for an European counti"y-seat the 
ancient Schonberg Castle at Olierwesel, overlooking the home and 
lands of their ancestors. Emigrating to New York in 1GS6, Philip 
Jacob Rhinelander settled at New Rochelle, Westchester County, 
w here he acquired considerable property. He died in 1737. 

RHINELANDER, WILLIAIM, one of the three sons of Philip 
Jacob Rhinelander, of New Rochelle, established himself as a mer- 
chant in New York City, and is the ancestor of the members of the 
family who have been prominent. He was born in New Rochelle 
in 1718 and died in this city in 1777, being buried in Trinity church- 
yard. His residence on Spruce Street was upon land which is still 
owned by the family. He was an importer of crockei^ at Burling Slip, 
and established the precedent of investing his estate in city realty. 
He married ^Ligdalen. daughter of Ste])hen Renaud, of New Rochelle. 

RHINELANDER. WILLIAM, son of the merchant of the same 
name, and grandson of the original Phili]) Jacob Rhinelander, was 
born in this city in 17r):> and died in 1S2."). He was his father's partner 
and successor in the iuiiiorting business, and continued his policy of 
investing in city realty. In 1790 he purchased the Cuyler sugar 
house in this city, wliich was sold under forfeiture, having been used 
as a British prison during the Revolution, and added greatly to the 



40 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

family fortuiips as a su^ar refluer. lie married in 1785 Mary, daugli- 
ter of Cliristopber Robert and ilary Dyer, sister of Colonel Robert, 
a Continental officer in the Revolntion, and great-granddaiijihter of 
Daniel Robert and Susanue dn Galilean, Huguenots who emigrated 
to America in IGSG. They had two daughters — Mrs. Horatio (iates 
Stevens and Mrs. Robert J. Renwick — and tive sons: Philip Rhine- 
lander, who married ^lary Colden Hoffman, and had issue; William 
Christopher Rhinelander, father of the present William Rliinelauder, 
and grandfather of T. J. O. and Philip Rhinelander; John Robert 
Rhinelander, who married but left no issue; Frederick William 
Rhinelander, whose son and grandson of the same name are well- 
known New Yorkers, and Bernard Rhinelander, wlio married Nancy 
Post. 

RHINELANDER, WILLIAAl CHRISJTc >P1IER, second son of 
William Rhinelander and Mary Robert, was born in this city in 1790 
and died in 1878. The large estate, which he inherited, was greatly 
increased by his skillful management and wisdom iu making invest- 
ments, the family policy of holding and imiuoving city real estate 
being closely adhered to. Du.ring the War of 1812 he was Quarter- 
master in Colonel t^te^ens's regiment, and rose to the rank of Lieuten- 
ant. He married in 1810 Mary, daughter of John Rogers and Mary 
Pixton, and granddaughter of John Rogers and his wife, Mary Dav- 
enport, niece of Benjamin Franklin. Their only son is the present 
William Rhinelander. Of the three daughters, Julia and Serena have 
never married. The eldest child, JMary Rogers, became the second 
wife of the late Lispenard Stewart, and was the mother of the present 
William Rhinelander Stewart and Lispenard Stewart. 

RHINELANDER, FREDERICK WILLIAM, Avas the fourth son of 
William Rhinelander and Mary Roberts. He was born in 1790 and 
died in 1830, at the early age of forty. He married Mary Lucy Ann, 
daughter of General Ebenezer Stevens, a distinguished officer of the 
Revolution and the War of 1812, and a successful New York mer- 
chant, and had three daughters and a son, the pi'esent Frederick Will- 
iam Rhinelander. Sr. The daughtt-rs became Mrs. George F. Jones, 
Mrs. Thomas H. Newbold, and ]\Irs. ^\'illiam Edgar. 

RHINELANDEi;, ^^•1LL1AM, only son of the late ^^■illiam Chris- 
topher Rhinelander and Mary Rogers, is the present head of this well- 
known family. He was boi-n in tliis city, September 19. 1S2.~». atteTided 
private schools and was graduated from the Columbia College Gram- 
mar School. He was long associated with his father in the manage- 
ment of the large vested interests of the family, and, since his father's 
death in 1878, has also been trustee of his estate. He married in 
1853 Matilda Cruger, daughter of Chief Justice Thomas Jackson Oak- 
lev and Matilda Cruger, and has two sons, Thomas Jackson Oaklev 



ENXYCLOPFDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 41 

and Philip IJliiuelander. Judge Oaldey, Mrs. Rhinelander's father, 
was graduated from Yale, and, in addition to holding the Chief Jus- 
ticeship of the 8ui)erior Court of this oitv from 1850 until his death 
in 1858, had been a Jlember of Congress in 1814 and 1815, and again 
in 1828 and 1829; was elected Attorney-General of this State in 1819, 
and had refused solicitation to become a candidate for the Presidency 
of the United States. His wife w^as the daughter of Henry Cruger, 
who was born in this city and died here, but being for some years a 
resident of Bristol, England, was ilayor of that city, served two terms 
in the Bntish Parliament as the colleague of Edmund Burke, and in 
that body opposed the taxation of the American Colonies. Upon his 
return he became State Senator from this city. He was the grandson 
of John Cruger, notable merchant and Mayor of this city, whose wife 
was Maria, daughter of Major Hendrick ("nyler, of Albany. 

RHINELANDEl^, T. J. OAKLEY, was bred to the law. but has 
long confined himself to the care of the immense real estate interests 
of the Rhinelander estate. Born in this city in May, 1858, he was 
graduated from the Columbia (/(dlcgc Academic Department in 1880, 
and subsequently from the Ci)lumbia College Law School. He is a 
member of the Union, Metropolitan, and Country Clubs, and the Co- 
lumbia College Alumni Association. He is, or has been, President of 
the Delta Phi Club, A'ice-President of the Seventh Regiment ^'eterau 
League, a Covei-nor of the Seventh Regiment Club, a De])uty Gover- 
nor of the Society of Colonial Wars, and is a member of the Seventh 
Regiment, the Society of Sons of the Hevolution, and the St. Nicholas 
Society. He is the sou of William Rliinelander, grandson of the late 
William C. Rhinelander, and lineally descended from Philip Jacob 
Rhinelander, the founder of the family in this country. Through bis 
mother, [Matilda Caroline Oakley, he is the grandson of tlie late Judge 
Oakley and great-grandson of Jesse Oakley, the Uevolulionary pa- 
triot, who raised and equipped his own company. He is also a lineal 
descendant of Mayor John Cruger. 17.'>9-44. and Major ITendrik Cuy- 
ler, of Albany, a soldier in the I'^rench and Indian wars. 

RHINELANDER, FREDERICK WILLIA:\L has for many years 
been Yice-President of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He is the 
only son of the late Frederick AX'illiam Rhinelander of this city, and 
has been occupied with the care of the estate inherited from his father 
and with various liusiness enterprises. lie is a member of the Knick- 
erbocker, City, [Mendelssohn Glee and Southside Sportsmen's clubs, 
the Downtown Association and the Columbia Alumni Association. 
He was born in this city in 1828, and in 1847 was graduated from 
Columbia College. He married in 1851 Frances D., daughter of Rev. 
Thomas H. Skinner. Of their eight children, five were daughters, 
three of them being Mrs. ^N'illiam C. Rives, [Mrs. Le Roy King, and the 



42 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

wife of Ilev. Lewis ('aiiiei-dii, while two, Frances L. and Alice K. 
Rbinelander, never married. 

Fredericlv William Iiliinelander, Jr., tlie eldest of tlie three sons, 
was gradnated from IJarvard in 1SS2, and has since been associated 
with his fatlier in the care of the large real estate interests of the 
family. He is also Vice-President of the West Point Foundry Com- 
pany, and is a member of the Knickerbocker, City, University, Har- 
vard, and Sonthside Sportsmen's clubs, and the Downtown Asso- 
ciation. 

Thomas Newbold Iiliinelander, the second son, was graduated from 
Harvard in 1887, from the Columbia College Law School, and is en- 
gaged in the practice of law in this city. He is a member of the Knick- 
erbocker, University, and Southside Sportsmen's clubs, the Down- 
town Association, the City Bar Association, and the Columbia Alumni 
Association. 

Philip M. Uhinclauder, the third son, was graduated from Harvard 
in 1891. 

DE PEYSTER, FlfEDEKlC JAjMES, is in the line of primogeniture 
of his famous family. He was born in this city, February 5, 1859, was 
graduated from the College of the City of New York in 1860, and from 
Columbia College Law School in 18G2. During the few years in which 
he practiced he did some good work at the bar, successfully arguing 
cases in the Court of Appeals. He has since been prominently con- 
nected with social organizations and benevolent institutions. He 
is President of the Holland Society, President of the St. Nicholas 
Society, President of the Orpheus Society, President of the New York 
Dispensary, Chairman of the New York Society Library, a governor 
of the Society of Colonial ^^'ars, and a member of the City, University, 

St. Nicholas, Century, and New York Yacht clubs. 

He is a trustee of the Home for Incurables, of the 






(jflt'i ! (xood Samai-itnn Dispensary, of the Institution of the 
''■■ Deaf and Dumb, and of the American School of 

Classical Studies in Athens. He was President of 
the Associate Alumni of the College of the City of 
New York from 1S82 to 1881; in'^ 1887, 1888, and 
1889 was President of the St. Nicholas Club, and 
was President of the American Arcluvolonical So- 

DE PEYSTER ARMS. '^ 

ciety from its organization to 1889. He is a graceful 
speaker, and holds the degrees of X.M. and LL.D. He married, in 
1871, Augusta McEvers, daughter of William H. Morris, grandniece 
of Gouverneur Morris; great-granddaughter of Lewis Morris, signer 
of the Declaration of Independence, and his wife, Mary, daughter of 
Jacob Walton and Maria Reekman, and also great-granddaughter 
of Augustus Van Cortlandt and Helen Barclay. They have three 
daughters and a son — Frederic Ashton de Peyster. J\lr. de Peyster 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



43 



is liiiu.self (seventh iu dese-eut from Johannes de Pej-ster, eminent 
merchant of New Amsterdam, of gentle blood, who was Scliepen, 
Alderman, and Burgomaster, and refused the appointment as lirst 
Mayor under the English; is sixth from Johannes's still more eminent 
son. Colonel Abraham de Teyster, commander of the city troops, 
wealthy merchant, Councilor, Alderman, Judge of the Supreme Court, 
Chief Justice, Mayor of New York for three terms, Acting Governor 
and Treasurer of Xew York and Xew Jersey; is fifth from Abraham 
de Peyster, who, for more than forty-five years, was Provincial Treas- 
urer, and married Margaret, daughter of Jacobus Yau Cortlandt 
and Eve Philipse; is fourth from James de Peyster and Sarah, daugh- 
ter of Joseph lieade, King's Councilor; is the grandson of Frederic 
de Peyster and Helen, daughter of General Samuel Hake, and is the 
son of the late Captain James Ferguson de Peyster, U.S.A., a member 
of the Board of Education of this city, and a trustee of the College 
of the Citv of New York, and his wife, Frances Goodhue Ashton. 



BAYARD, NICHOLAS, was one of tliree brothers (the others 
being Peter and Balthazar i , relatives of Governor Petrus Stuyvesaut, 
who, with their widowed mother, accompanied the Dutch Governor 
to Xew Amsterdam in 1647. Their mother was the sister of Stuy- 
vesaut, while Stuyvesant's Avife was the sister of their father, Samuel 
Bayard, a wealthy Amsterdam merchant of French Huguenot de- 
scent. Nicholas, wlio achieved the greatest distinction of any mem- 
ber of the family during the colonial period, was born in Alpheu, 
Holland, about 1644, and died in New York City in 1707. He was 
.Mayor of New York in 1685, and held many important positions. In 
1664 he was appointed Clerk to the Common 
Council, subsequently became Stuyvesant's pri- 
vate secretai-y, and was also made Sun'eyor of 
the Province. When the Dutch reconquered 
New York, in 1672, he was made Secretaiw of 
the Colony. He was a member of Governor 
Dongan's Council, and is said to have drafted 
the Dongan Charter, granted the year that he 
was ]\Iayor. As Councilor, he was a member of 
Dongan's Court of Exchequer, constituted in 
December, 1685. He served frequently as Al- 
derman, and was Colonel, commanding the Ne\\- 

York :\Iilitia. He was a member of the Council of Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor Nicholson, in 1688-89, when James II. fled from England, and 
William of Orange became King. The permanency of William's suc- 
cess was yet in doubt when the Leisler ti-ouble occurred, for news 
traveled slowly in that day, although at Boston Governor Andros 
had been precipitately deposed. Botli he and Nicholson had their 
commissions from James. The captains of the militia companies 




I!AY.\RI> ARMS. 



44 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

favored William, and when a, (jiiestiou of authority was raised, on 
June 3, 16S9, tliey signed an agreement to hold the fort for "NYilliam, 
refusing to recognize the authority of the Lietttenant-Governor and 
his Council, who represented James. Three days later, June 6, news 
arrived from Boston that William was King. Nicholson and his 
councilors, Bayard, Philipse, and Xnn Cortlandt, sought recognition 
as the government as now acting for William. This was refused; 
the popular party did not trtist them. The captains recommended 
the election of a Committee of Safety to maintain law and order until 
iustrtictions could come from William. This was on June 10. The 
election was held June 26, the government of the Province thus pass- 
ing into the hands of tAvelve delegates elected from the cotinties of 
New York, Kings, Queens, Westchester, and Orange, Albany and 
Ulster counties not participating. This Committee appointed Jacob 
Leisler, the senior captain, militaiw commander of the Province, sub- 
seqtiently constittiting him Lietitenant-Governor. Bayard violently 
opposed this government, and for a year was lodged in Jail. This 
form of government continued until the arrival of Governor Blotigh- 
ter. March 19, 1601. Unfortunately, however, Lietitenant-Governor 
Ingoldsby, separated from i^loughterin a storm, arrived at New York 
nearly three months before him, in Jantiary, 1691. Incited by Bay- 
ard's party he instantly demanded the surrender of the fort, which 
Leisler declined, tinless he should show credentials. He neither had 
any, or any instructions from the King respecting the <lc facto gov- 
ernment at New Y'ork. I?^ince he cottld not establish his right to 
receive the government, Leisler awaited the arrival of Bloughter. 
The latter, when he assumed control, was induced to arrest Leisler 
and his Council for treason in resisting Ingoldsby. They were inde- 
cently tried b^- tlieir enemies on these trumped-up charges, and con- 
dcniucd to death, wliile two. Leisler and his son-in-law, Jacob Mil- 
borne, were executed. The Earl of Bell- 
^-O y^j _/> /S cuO oHHint, New Y'ork's best Colonial Gover- 
(^^^^^^'^'^ T'^ nor, subsequently declared ''that the 

execution of these men was as violent, 
cruel, and arbitrary a proceeding as ever was done upon the lives of 
men in any age under an English government." He si;)oke of " Nic- 
olls. Bayard, Brooks, and the rest of the bloodhounds,'' and of *■ Bay- 
ard, Nicolls, and the rest of the murderers of these men." Leisler 
was vindicated by a Parliamentary investigation. Bayard was a man 
much like Aaron Burr, — intellectually brilliant, a born politician, but 
a narrow-minded aristocrat, who had little conscience, and was im- 
perious, cruel, and utterly unscrupulous. And his later life, like that 
of Burr, was under a cloud. He was implicated in the piracy and 
smuggling which went on under Governor Fletcher, and went to Eng- 
land to protect himself in tliis matter and plot against Bellomont. 
In 1702 he was convicted of high treason in a trial under Chief Justice 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 45 

Atwood, bis offense consisting of intiammatoi-y language in one of his 
jtoliTieal panijdilcts. His conviction was only possible because he 
had himself procured the law defining his crime at the time of the 
Leisler trouble. Having wrung a confession from him, however, his 
])ersecutors pardoned him. and tluis he escaped the liumiliating retri- 
bution of having his neck cauglit in a noose, contrived by his own 
craft. His wife, Judith \'erlet, whom he married in 1666, had been 
condemned as a witch at Hartford. (_'onn.. in 1662. 

BAYAKD, WILLIAM, was one of the eminent and wealthy mer- 
ciiants of New York City prior to the Revolution. He was born in 
Xew York, June 1, 1729, and died in Southampton, England, in ISOl. 
He was a member of the Provincial Legislature, and in 1771 a member 
of its Committee of Correspondence, in which capacity lie visited 
Massachusetts, influencing the Legislature of tliat colony to address 
a protest to the British Government against unjust taxation, similar 
to the one adopted by the New York Legislature. He was also a 
member of the first Continental Congress — the " Stamp Act Con- 
gress." He was a prominent member of the Committee of Fifty-one 
of 1771, and joined the Sons of Liber-ty. Nevertheless, when war 
seemed inevitable, he grew very cautious, be- 
came intimate with General Gage, and jjlayed 
a double i^art as long as possible. He was 
doubtless influenced by the fact that a son 
and a son-in-hiw were in the British Army, 

while another son was in the service of the East India Compan3\ 
Two of his sons, Lieutenant-Colonel John Bayard and Major Samuel 
Vetch Bayard, were British officers during the Kevolution. At the 
close of that war Bayard was himself attainted, his large estates, in 
New York City and on the present site of Hoboken, N. J., being con- 
fiscated. One of his four sons, William Bayard, established himself 
in business in New York after the Revolution, and was for many 
years at the head of the notable mercantile Arm of Bayard, Leroy & 
kcEvers. 

:\IINTURN, ROBERT ROWNE, was an equal partner with the 
late Henry Grinnell and Moses Hicks Grinnell in the notable ship- 
ping firm of Grinnell, Minturn & Company, of New York, and became 
known for his liberal charities. He was one of the founders of St. 
Luke's Hospital and its first President, was one of the founders and 
Treasurer of the New York Association for Improving the Condition 
of the Poor, and was one of the founders and Vice-President of the 
Hospital for the Relief of the Ruptured and Crippled. He was active 
in securing Central Park — a movement which his wife originated. 
He was one of the foremost supporters of the Government during 
the Civil War and was the first President of the Union League Club. 




46 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



He was oue of the iu(.oi-[K)iiit()is of the Natioual Bauk of Commerce, 
as lie was also of the EmiyTaut ludiistiial Sa^iniiS Bank. He married 
a daujj;hter of Jiid.ne John Lansing- Wench^ll, of Albany. His eldest 
son, Eobert Bowne Miuturn, Jr., died in 188'). The present Robert 
Shaw Mintnrn is the eldest son of the latter. Robert Bowne Mintnru, 
Sr., had been the partner of a well-known ]S'ew York merchant, Pre- 
served Fish, prior to the formation in 1829 of the firm of Griunell, 
Minturn & Company. He was the son of William Mintnrn, Jr., and a 
danghter of Robert Bowne, a leading merchant of this city, and was 
a grandson of William Mintnru and Penelope Greene, cousin of Gen- 
eral Nathaniel Greene, of the Revolution. His father was a promi- 
nent shipowner of New York, while iiis grandfather was a shipping 
merchant first in Newport, R. I., and subsequently in New York. 



ALEXANDER, JA.AIES, heir to the Earldom of Stirling, Avas born 
in Scotland about 1<>9(). He was an officer of engineers in the Stuart 
cause, and in 181(! was obliged to fiy to America. He became official 
recorder of Perth Amboy, N. J., in 1718, being subse(]uent]y ap- 
pointed Sui-veyor-C^eneral of New York and New Jersey. He stutlied 
law and became a leader of the bar of New York City, and at the 

same time a leader of the Whig 
faction in the colony. He and 
(^"hief Justice Morris were two of 
the principal contributors to. 
Peter Zenger's Xcir York Wccl-lii 
■hixnidl, which advocated Demo- 
ciafic principles. He was one of 
the counsel for Zeuger in tlie fa- 
mous trial in wliicli the (|uestioii 
of the liberty of tlie press was 
at issue, and, for venturing lo 
maintain that the court before 
which Zeuger was hauled wns 
not projjcrly constituted, he was 
disbarred, together with his as- 
sociate, William Smitli, Sr. I'n- 
der another administration, two 
years later, they were reinstated. 
Alexander served several terms 
in the Colonial Legislature; was 
Attorney-General liom 181il to 1823; was a member of (iovernor 
Burnet's Council, and was also Secretain' of the Province of New 
York. He was an able mathematician, a corres]t()ndeut of Halley, 
the astronomer. He was one of the founders of the American I'lii- 
losophical Society, Benjamin Franklin being another. He married 
Mrs. Samu(d Provoost, of New Y(n'k Citv, and had a sou, Major- 




.I.\MK.S .VLK.X.AXDEK. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 47 

General ^^"illi;lIll Alexauder, Lunl Stirling-. He died iu New York, 
April 2, ITuG. 

ALEXANDER, WILLIAM, titular Earl of Stirliii<;, and Major- 
General in tlic patriot ariiiv duriii;H' the Kevohitiou (for portrait, xee 
^'oluiuc II., of this work, ])aiie 'J7|, was born in New York Citv in 
1726, and died in Albany. Januaiy 15, 1783. He eng-aged in the pro- 
visidii business in New Y'ork for a time, snbse(|uentl_v beconiinji' Aid- 
de-Canip to Governor Shirley. His claim to the Earldom of Stirling- 
he prosecuted before the House of Lords with- 
out avail in 17."')7. He returned to New York, 

in 17iil mari'ving a daughter of Philip Livings- /^ ^^ ^^£-^a,^^S^C^ 
ton. He became Surveyor-General, as his 
father had been bef(ire him, and was a member of the Governor's 
Gouncil. He joined the I\ev(/lutionary Army, in October, 1775, being 
commissioned Colonel of an East New Jersey battalion. In March, 
177<i, Congress made him a Bi'igadier-Genei-al, in recognition of his 
capture of a British transport. His command was nearly extermi- 
nated, and he himself captured, in the Battle of Long Island, General 
Putnam having ordered him to attack a superior force. Having 
been exchanged, in Febiuary, 1777, he was made a Major-General, 
and, in the latter part of this year, w;is, for a time, in command at 
New' Y'ork. He captured a Hessian i-egiment at Trenton. He was 
defeated at Metuchin, Imving disobeyed Wash- 
-, ington's (U'der to retreat before the enemy. He 
vo distinguished himself at Prandywine, German- 
town, and .Monmouth, while, in 1779, he sur- 
prised a British force at I'aulus's Hook, being 
then in command of New Jersey. He commanded at Albany in 17S1. 
He was one of the founders of King's College ( luiw ( "olumbia Univer- 
sity ), and was its first Governor. He was also oik^ of the founders of 
the New Y'ork Society Library. He published " Tlie Conduct of Ma- 
jor-General Shirley, Briefiy Stated," and "An Account of the Comet 
of June and July, 1770." 

KING, RUFl'S (see steel engTaving, Volume II.. of tliis work, 
facing page 368), was a resident of New Y'oi'k City from 1788 until 
his death in 1827. In 178!» he was chosen, with General Schuyler, 
in the first election of United States Senators in this State. From 
1796 to 1803 he was United States Minister to England. He was 
again elected to the United States Senate from New Y'ork in 1813, 
while in 181!) he was re-elected. Appointed Minister to England 
once more in 1825, at the end of two years of service sickness coni- 
])elled him to resign, while his death occurred soon after his return to 
New Y'ork. He had become prominent in public life in ^lassacbu- 
setts prior to his residence in this city. He was born in Scarborough, 



48 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Me., in 1755, his father, Kichard King, being a merchant. In 1777 
he was graduated from Harvard, and in 177S was Aid-de-camp to 
General Glover, and participated in a military expedition to Rhode 
Island. He was a delegate from Massachusetts to Congress fror^. 
1784 to 17S(!, and in this body proposed the immediate prohibition 
of slavery in the Northwest Territory. (Subsequently, as Senator 
from New York, he vigorously o[»posed the ^lissouri Compromise. 
He married in 178G Mary, daughter of John Alsop, one of the most 
eminent New York mercliants of tliat day (for portrait of Mrs. Eufus 
King, see Volume II., page 112 I, and had three sous, all of whom 
became prominent — John Alsop King, who was elected Governor of 
this State in 1857; Charles King, President of Columbia College for 
many years, and James Gore King, a notable banker of this city. 

KING, JOHN ALBOr, Governor of the State of New Y'ork, was 
one of the sons of the famous Kufus King. He was born in New Y'ork 
City, January :!. 1788, and was educated in the public schools of New 
York and of Harrow, England. He studied law and was admitted 
to the bar. During the \\ar of 1812 lie was Lieutenant in a cavalry 
company. Afterward he engaged in farming on his father's estate 
at Jamaica, L. I. In 1819 he was elected to the Assembly, re- 
signing to become Secretary of the Legation at Ivondon wlien his fa- 
ther was appointed United States ^Minister to England. In 1838 he 
was again elected to the .Vssembly, while in ISlil he was elected to 
Congress as a ^Vlng from a Long Island district. He opposed the 
passage of llic fugitive slave law and advocated the admission of 
California as a free State. As a leader of the ^Vhig■ forces, he presided 
over tlie Whig Convention at Syracuse, N. Y'., in 1855, from which 
event dates the origin of the Republican party. He attended the 
National Republican Conxcntion in 1850. and favored tlie nomination 
of I'lMMiunit for tlie Presidency. The sanu' year he became the Repub- 
lican <an(li(lale for Governor of the State of New York and was 
el('(i<'(l. ruder his administratinu tlie Erie Canal was enlarged, and 
the public school system improved. At the end of his term he retired 
to private life, his death occurring July 7, 18(!7. He A\as one of the 
fduii'lers of the T'm'ou Club in is;!7, and was its second President. 

KING, CHARLES, one of the sous of Eufus King, was born in New 
York City, March 10, 1789, and died in Frascati. Italy, in October, 
18(17. He was educated at Harrow, England, and Paris, subsequently 
engaging in business in New York. He was elected to the New Y^'ork 
Legislature in 181.S, while he served as a volunteer dui'ing the year 
following. His firm having failed, lie became jiartner in the publi- 
cation of the New Y'ork Ainvricaii. while he edited this journal from 
1827 to 1815. Between the latter date and 1849 he was editor of 
the Courier and Inquirer, while from 1849 to 1803 he was President of 
C/olumbia College. 



I 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 49 

KING, JAMES GORE, third son of the (•(dcbratcd Knfus Kino-, was 
euf;aiie(l in mercantile business at Uverpnol, Eni;land, from ISIS to 
1824, after Avliidi lie letiirned to New York Gitv and beoaiue a lueiu- 
jer of the ])roinineiit bankiuti' firm of Prime, Ward & Kinj^-. He 
was elected to Coni^ress in 1S1!», and snbseqnently was I'l-esident of 
the New York Clianiber of ( 'oninierce. The resumption of specie 
payments in this country after the panic of IS.'JT was broufiht about 
by liis success in visit imj, London and inducinii' the P.ank of Entiland 
to advance sr),()(IO,(l()0 in j;old to his tirm. lie was prominently con- 
nected with many financial corporations and public institutions. 
He was the first President of the Erie Railroad. He was a member 
of the first Board of Trustees of the Astor Library. Long a member 
of the Board of Education of this city, he was one of three who 
constituted its special committee whose efforts led to the establish- 
ment in ISiiJ of the Free Academy, now tli(» Gollege of the City of 
New York. He was born in this city in IT'.tl, was educated in Europe, 
and died in 1853. He married in 1813 Sarah iJoocrs, daughter of 
Archibald Gracie. The present Edward Kiny is their sou. 

KING, EDWARD, for many years engaged in banking in this city, 
and at one time President of the New York Stock Exchange, in 1873 
acce]>ted the presidency of the Union Trust Company, at a time when 
its alTaii-s required skillful nianageinent, and iiaving made it one 
of the soundest financial institutions in the city still continues as 
its executive head, lie is a member of the Board of Trustees and is 
Treasurer of the New \'ork Library, Astor-Lenox-Tilden foundations, 
is a governor of the New York IFospital, is President of the St. Nicho 
las Society, and was formerly President of the Harvard Club. He 
is a trustee of the ilanhattan Savings Institution and the Northern 
Asstirance C()m]»any of London, and a director of the Citizens" Insur- 
ance Coni])auy. He is a member of the University, Century, Riding, 
Harvard, and University Glee clubs. He mai'ried, first, Isabella Ram- 
sey Cochrane, niece of Dean Ramsey, of Edinburgh; and. second, 
Elizabeth Fisher, of Philadelphia. He is the son of the late James 
Gore King, eminent banker of this city, and grandson of Rufus King, 
of New York, the illustrious statesman. He was born in 1833 at his 
father's country-seat, Highwood, Weehawken, N. J., and was gradu- 
ated from Harvard College. 

PIERREPONT, EDWARDS, having graduated with honors from 
Yale College in 1837, and studied in the New Haven Law School, 
practiced law in the State of Ohio from 1810 to ISKi, in ]iartnersidp 
with Hon. Phineas Bacon \Yilcox. He then rc^noved to New York 
City, where he Avon recognition as an able lawyer. In 1857 he was 
elected a Judge of the Superior Court to succeed the late Chief Jus- 







50 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

tice Oaklej, but in 18G0 resigued to i-esuuie practice. A Democrat 
prior to tlie Civil ^Var, lie addressed the meeting- of loyal Democrats 
at Union Square, April 20, 1801, convened to express sympathy with 
the policy of I'resident Lincoln, while soon after he co-operated with 
other prominent citizens in organizing the Union Defense Committee 
of New York City. With ^^'illiam M. Evai-fs and Thurlow Weed he 

acted as a Committee to convey the message of 

'\-. ^h \^ tl^ - / fidelity of New York City to Lincoln. He and 
Tf p'')^.-.^; I General Dix were in 1862 appointed a Com- 
mission to trj' prisoners confined in the prisons 
and forts of the United States on charges of 
treason. Tlirough his effective organization of 
the loyal Democrats in 1801 he materially aided 
in the re-election of President Lincoln. He 
piERREPoxT ARMS. ^^'^^'^ *^^'^ ^^ the Committee of citizens of New 
York who attended the funeral of the assassi- 
nated President. In 1867 he took charge of the prosecution of John H. 
Hurratt for the murder of Lincoln. He was a member of the New York 
Constitutional Convention of 1867, and served on its Judiciary Com- 
mittee. He was an active supporter of the Presidential candidacies of 
Ceiieral Grant from the platform in 1868 and 1872. He was appointed 
United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, but 
in 1870 resigned. In the latter year he was active in the prosecution 
of tlie Tweed ring. In April, 1875, he entered the Cabinet of Presi- 
dent Grant as Attorney-General of the United States. In 1873 he 
had declined an appointment as United States Minister to Russia, but 
in INIay, 1876, he resigned from Grant's Cabinet to become Envoy 
Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of St. James. 
\\Uh diplomatic skill he restored official relations between the two 
countries, when differences on the (juestion of the extradition of crim- 
inals had led to their suspension, while he negotiated the Trademark 
Treaty with the Earl of Derby. Iveturning, in 1878, he resumed the 
practice of law in New York, and was counsel in many important 
cases, some of them being suits prosecuted by the United States Gov- 
ernment. In 1871 he became a director and Treasurer of the Texas 
and Pacific Kailroad. He was one of the founders of the Manhattan 
Club, and one of its Governors until his resignation on account of its 
attitude during the Civil War. He then became a member of the 
LTnion Club. He received the degree of Doctor of Laws from Yale, 
and that of Doctor of Common Law from Oxford University, Eng- 
land. He was born in North Haven, Conn., November 4, 1813, and 
died in New York City, March 2, 1892. He married, in 1846, Mar- 
gai'eKa, daugliter of the late Samuel Augustus Willoughby, of Brook- 
lyn, and liad a son, Edward, who pre-deceased his fatlier, leaving no 
issue, and a daughter, Margaretta, the wife of Leonard Forbes Beck- 
witli. The son of Giles Pierrepont and Eunice, daughter of Jonathan 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



51 




Munson, Judge Pierrepont descended from Hon. John PieiTepont, 
who settled in Koxbury, Mass., in 1G50. Tlie latter was a descendant 
of Sir George Holme Pierrepont, of a notable family of Nottingham, 
England, the elder line being Dukes of Kingston. 

BEEKMAX, WILHELMUS, founder of one of the old Xew 
faniilies, came to New Amsterdam in 1647. in the same shii 
Governor Stuyvesant, and died in this city in 1707. 
He was the son of Hendrik Beeknian, r>ecretary 
under the States-General of Holland, and grand- 
son of Gerardus Beekman, of Cologne. Bcekman 
acquired lands in New Amsterdam, and filled sev- 
eral minor offices. From 18.58 to 18(>2 lie was Vice- 
Director for the West India Comjiany on tlie South 
I\is-er — the Delaware. Snbsei|nenlly he was Chit^f 
Judge at Esopus, now Kingston. IJerurning to 
New York City, lie served for some time as Alder- ~' 

man. He married Cathei-ina De Boog, and had 
several sons who became localh' prominent, one of ihem bciiu 
ing Governor of Ne^v York. 

BEEK:\IAX, GEBABDUS, son ot Willichnus Beekman and Catli- 
ei-ina De Boog, was born in New AmsterdaTu, studied medicine, and 
settled at Flatbush, Kings County. Here he became a deacon. Colonel 

of the ililitia, and Justice of tlie 
Peace. He was one of Leisler's sup- 
porters, to whom lie administered 
the oath of oftice, afterward sitting 
in his Council. He was one of those 
tried and condemned to death, two of 
which, Leisler and Milborne, were 
actually e.\ecu1e(l. ()ffei-ed his lib- 
erty if he would apidogize for su]i- 
porting Leisler, Beekman refused. 
By order of the King he was subse- 
quently pardoned. He served as 
commissioner to press tlie claims of 
the Mohegan Indians against Con- 
necticui. He was a raember of the 
Councils of Governors Coriibury and 
Ingoldsby, and Avas President of tiie 
Council and Acting Governor of 
New York, from A]iril 10, to June 
U, 171(1, lietween the removal of Ingoldsby and the ari-ival of <b)ver- 
nor Hunter. He was also ;i memlxu- of Hunter's Council. He died 
in November, 1721. 




COLONEL GER.^RDUS BEF.KMAX, M.D. 



52 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 



BKEKMAX, JAMES WILLIAM, was a moraber of tlie New York 
Assembly for oue year, wliile, iu 1850, be was elected to tbe Seuate, 
servinjj,- two terms. He effected important clianiies in the tax laws, 
and was Cliairnian of the Senate Committee wbicli rejiorted the bill 
creating Central l*aik. lie served on the New York Board of Ednca- 
tion, was a trustee of Columbia College, and was a trustee of Green- 
wood Cemetery. He was a])pointed on a committee by New Y'ork 
citizens, Thurldw Weed and Erastns Corning being the other mem- 
bers, to solicit President I>iichanan to guarantee protection for a 
steamer i)rovisi(ined by private enterinise to relieve I'ort Snmter jnst 
prior to the Civil \Yar. He was Presideiir of the Woman's Hospital, 

Vice-rresident (d' the New York Hos- 
](ital, and a trustee of tlie New York 
Dispensary. He was one of the fonnd- 
ers of the St. Nicholas Cln1>. and its 
first President. He was one of the 
founders of the Union League Club, 
and one of its \'ice-Presidents; was 
A'ice-President of the New York His- 
torical Society; was an oflicer of the St. 
Nicholas Society, and was a member of 
the Century Association. He pub- 
lished an address on " The Pounders of 
New York" (1870). delivered before 
the St. Nicholas Society, in 18()!t, and 
a " Iveport on a A'illage of Cottage Hos- 
pitals " (187C)l, made to tlie Governors 
of the New York Hospital. He was b(n-n in this city, November 22, 
1815, and died Jiere .Tune 1."), 1877. He was the son of (ierard 
Beeknian, and tiftii in <lesceiit from \\illielmus BeeUman and Cath- 
eiina He Boog. His mother was a. daughter of Captain John San- 
ders, of Scheneclady, an officer iu tlie Bevolution, and a descendant 
of Major John Alexander Glen. .Mr. Beekmaii was graduated from 
Columbia College iu 1834. He studied law, but did uot practice. He 
inherited a fortune from his father in 1833. and another from his 
uncle, James Beekman, in 1837. He traveled mucii in Europe. He 
married, in 1840, Abian Steele, daughter of Bev. Philip IMilledoler, 
D.I)., President of Rutgers College, aud granddaughter of (ii'ueral 
John Steele of t he Kevolutiou. 




.JAMES W BKEKMAN. 



BEEKMAN, JAMES WILLIA.M, sou of the late eminent citizen of 
New York of the same name, is a lawyer and trustee of his father's 
estate. He was born in this city, and in 1871 was graduated from the 
Columbia College Law School and aduutted to the bar. He is a trus- 
tee of the New York Hosjiital, and like his father devotes much atten- 
tion to the benevolent organizations of the city. For the hospitality 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 53 

extended by liiin to the olliiers of the Dutch warship, \'aii Six'ijk. dur- 
iiii; the Cidninbiau naval review uf IHiVA, the (Jneen IJegent of the 
Netherhiuds made him a Kuit;ht of the Order of Oranj;e Nassau. He 
is a member of the Union, ^Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, University, 
City, New York Yacht, and Heawanhaka-Coriiithian Yacht clubs, the 
Ontury, and Downtown associations, the Holland Society, the Sons 
of the Kevolution, and the Society of Colonial Wars. 

BEEKMAN, (iElJAlID, lawyer and joint-manaiicr with his brother, 
•Tames William Beekinan, of the lari^c est at i' left by ilieir father, the 
late distiufiuished James \\'illiam IJeekman, was born in this city, and 
is a liraduate of Columbia ( 'oHcm'. He has been for some years a trus- 
tee of this university, and is a luember of the University, City, Sea- 
wanhaka-Corinthian Yacht, and Oyster Bay clubs, the Century and 
Downtown associations, the Holland Society, the City Bar Associa- 
tion, and several historical and scientific societies. 

CUTTlN<i, l.EOXAUD, founder of the New "^'ork family of this 
name, was born and educated in Eniiland. lakinu (trders in the Church 
of Eniiland. and comiuji' to Annu'ica, served (diuiclies at New liruns- 
wick, N. J.; Hempstead, L. L, and Oyster ]>ay. E. I. He was for a 
time Tutor and subsequently I'rofessor in Kint;'s ( "olle.uc now ( 'olnm- 
bia, and later established a famous scliool at Hempstead. He mar- 
ried a daujihter of John I'intard. who in 17:58 Avas an Aldermau of 
New York. His oidy son became a prominent lawyer. 

CUTTINC, WILEIA.M, an enunent lawyer of New Voilv' City dur- 
infi' the first quarter of the present century, was the only son of Bev. 
Leonard Cutting and his wife, a dauiihtei' of Alderman John I'intard. 
He was graduated from Columbia College in 17!»o, and formed a law 
partnershiji with F. K. Tillou. In 1S07 and 1S08 he was Sheriff of 
New Y'ork <"ounty. He married (iertrude. daughter of Walter Liv- 
ingston, and niece (»f Chancellor Livingston. She was the grand- 
daughter of Peter Schuyler and of Hon. Kobert Livingston, Lord of 
Livingston Manor, County Judge and Speaker of the New York As- 
sembly, and was a sister-in-law of Tiobert Fulton, inventor of the 
steamboat. ^Ir. Cutting secured for I'ulton and the Livingstons the 
franchise for a term of years for the ferry between New Vork and 
Brooklyn, at the foot of the present Fulton Street. 

CUTTIN<!. WILLIA.M BAYABD. a i)rominent lawyer of New York 
City, has been a Civil-service Commissioner of the city, and has taken 
an active ]>art in movements looking to tln^ achievement of reform in 
municipal government. He has long enjoyed a large corporation 
l)ractice, and is an officer of many im])ortant cor])orations. lb' is 
President of the Improved Dwellings Association, Treasurer of the 



54 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

►Soutli Erooklyu iliiiii-uad aud Termiual Compauy, member of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of tlie New York Chamber of Commerce, member 
of the Advisory Committee of the Audit Compauy. aud a director of 
the Americau Exchauge Natioual Bauk, the City and Suburban 
Homes Company, the New York and South Brooklyn Ferry and Steam 
Transportation Company, the Florida Central aud Peninsula Eailroad 
Compauy, aud the Tropical Laud Compauy. He is also a Trustee of 
the United States Trust Company. He is a member of the Union, 
Metroi^olitau, Tuxedo, City, University. Riding, Church. Players'. Gro- 
lier. Lawyers', Delta Phi, Southside Sportsmen's, and ^Yestminster 
Kenuel clubs, the Patriarchs', the Downtown Association, and the 
Columbia College Alumni Association. He was born in New York 
City, January 12, 185U, aud was graduated from Columbia College and 
Columbia College Law School. He is the son of the late Fulton Cut- 
ting aud Justine, daughter nf Robert Bayard aud Elizabeth ^IcEvers; 
graudsou of William Cutting aud Gertrude, daughter of ^Valter Liv- 
ingston and Cornelia Schuyler, and great-grandson of Rev. Leonard 
Cutting, aud a daughter of Aldenuau John Piutard. He married 
Olivia, daughter of Brou.sou Murray aud Anne E. Peyton, and grand- 
daughter of James B. Murray aud Maria Bronsou. and has two 
daughters and two sous — William Bayard. Jr.. and Bronsou Murray 
Cutting. 

KIP, LA\YRENCE, is President of the Coney Island Jockey Club, 
and a director of the National Horse Show Association. He has been 
Vice-President of the last-mentioned corporation. He has been prom- 
inent in efforts to elevate the character of the turf in this country, 
and has maintained both road aud racing stables. Having attended 
the Churchill Military School at Sing Sing, X. Y., he entered 
West Point Academy in 1853, and was graduated 
four years later, receiving the commission of Second 
Lieutenant of Artilleiw. Througliout the Civil War 
he served on the staff of General Sheridan. He re- 
ceived brevets for bravei-y on the field as ^lajor and 
Lieutenant-Colonel, and in 1S6G was commissioned 
Cai>tain in the regular army. In 1867 he resigned 
from tlie service. He is a member of the Union, 
Metropolitan, Tuxedo, Suburban, and Riding and 
Driving clubs, the Patriarchs, and other organiza- 
tions. He married, in 1861, Eva, daughter of Peter Lorillard and 
Catherine Griswold, and has a daughter, Edith Kip McCreery. His 
only son, Lorillard Kip, died in 1896. He was himself bcu'n in ]Mor- 
ristowu. N. J., aud is the sou of the late Dr. William lugraham Kip, 
Episcopal Bishop of California, and his wife, Maria Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Isaac Lawrence aud Cornelia Beach. He is the grandson of 
Leonard Kip and Maria, daughter of Duncan lugraham, of Philadel- 




ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 55 

pliia, aud descends fi-om Heudrick Heudrickscu Kip, who arrived in 
Xew Amsterdam in lG4o, became a member of Govi-rnor Stuyvesanf s 
rouncil, aud was elected ychepen. 

RUTHERFUED, JOIIX ALEXANDER, well known stock bro- 
ker of this city, and member of the New York Stock Exchange, 
has been actively interested in railroad aud industrial development 
in the Southern States. He has been A^ice-President of the Rich- 
mond and West Point Terminal Company, as he has been also of the 
Richmond and Danville Railroad. He is now a director of the Wheel- 
ing Bridge and Terminal Railway aud the Sloss Iron aud Steel Com- 
pany of P.irmingham, Ala. He is a member of the Metropolitan, 
Manhattan, Players', Larchmont Yacht aud Adirondack League 
clubs, the Society of the Cincinnati, and the Sous of the Revolution. 
He was born at Edgerston, N. J., March 2, 1S48, and was graduated 

from Rutgers College. He is the sou of the 

late Walter Rutherfurd, a [irominent lawyer of 
this city; is the grandson of Robert Walter 
Rutherfurd, who was prominent in the public 
life of New Jersey; is gTeat-graudsou of John 
Rutherfurd, United States Senator from New 
Jersey, and is removed one generation further 
from Walter Rutherfurd (sixth sou of Sir John 
Rutherfurd 1, an officer of the IJoyal Scots, who. hithf.kkurd arms. 
having served in Flanders and Germany, was Ma- 
jor and Judge Advocate in tlie British Army on this continent in the 
French and Indian War; acquired a grant of 5,000 acres in N<'w Jer- 
sey, married the great-granddaughter of the Earl of Stirling, and 
after the Revolution resided in New York City, aud was a f<iuud('r of 
the Society Library. President of the Agricultural Society, and Presi- 
dent of the St. Andrew's Society. Mr. Rutherfurd's uuither was 
Isabella, daughter of David Brooks, Revolutionary officer, and origi 
nal member of the Society of the (j'inciuuati. She was granddaughter 
of Daniel Niel, another patriot officer, who was Aid on the 
staff of General Hugh Mercer, and was killed in the Battle of Prince- 
ton; and was likewise granddaughter of William Walton [Morris, Aid 
on the staff of General Autliony Wayne during the Revolution, and 
the son of General Lewis Morris, signer of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. 

CARNOCHAN, GOUVERNEUR MORRIS, banker and broker, and 
^femberof the New York Stock Exchange, is the only surviving son of 
the late eminent surgeon of New York City. Dr. John Murray Carno- 
chan. Born in this city, he was educated at Harvard, and being in- 
tended for the medical profession by his father, was matriculated at 
the Ecole de Medicine in Paris. He preferred, however, to engage 




56 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

in the banking and hidkciayc bnsiness. He is Inspeotoi* of Eifle 
I'raetioe, witli tlie rank of First Lieutenant, in the Seventli Kegiment. 
He is a member of tlie Cahimet. Military, Country, New York Athletic, 
and Delta IMii clubs; the Society of Tolonial Wars, and the Seventh 
Regiment ^'eterau Association. He married, in 188(S, Matilda Gros- 
venor, daughter of the late Frederic (xoodridge, and has living two 
sons. His grandfather, John Carnochan, was a wealthy planter of 
Georgia. His motlrer was Estelle, daughter of Brevet-Major-Geueral 
\Yilliam Walton Morris, Fnited States Army; granddaughter of Lieu- 
tenant ^Villiam Walton Morris, Second Artillery Continental line, 
and Aid-di'-camp to General Anthony Wayne in the Kevolution; 
great-granddaughter of General I>ewis Morris, signer of tlie Declara- 
tion of Independence; great-great-grand<huighter of Lewis Morris, 
Lord of the .\hinor of Morrisania, and Chief Justice of the Vice-Ad- 
miralty Court; great-great-great-granddaughter of Lewis Morris, 
Chief Justice of New York and New .Jersey, and one more generation 
removed from Ivichai-d Moi-ris, (d'ticer in CromwelTs army. 

STUKES, TH()-MAS, foiimk'r of the hrst missionary society in 
London in 1795; the associate of Robert Raikes in organizing the first 
Sunday-schools there, and one of those who fitted out the lirst mis- 
sionary ship, the Dnfl', sailing from that port, removed to New York 
City in 17"J8. Here he became a founder of the American Bible So- 
( iety in 1810, as also of the New York Peace Society and the Ameri- 
can Tract Society, serving as Chairman of the Distributing Committee 
of the latter until his death, October 10, 1832. He likewise served as 
Treasurer of the American P>ai)tist INFissionary Union. Horn in Lon- 
don, in December, 17(;5, the son of \\illiam Stokes, he was of gentle 
blood and occupied high social position. He came under I he influence 
of the famous Rowland Hill, and became a non-conformist. Although 
a layman, in early life he preached to the poor of London. His only 
brother. Judge William Armstrong Stokes, also came to New York. 
Thomas Stokes married Elizabeth Ann, daughter of James I'.oulter, 
Esq., of Lowestoff, Wales, and had twelve children, of whom one was 
the late James Stokes of this city. 

STOKES, JAMES, sou of Tliomas Stokes ami Elizabeth Ann, 
daughter of James Boulter, of Lowestoft, Wales, was born in tliis city 
in 1804, and died in 1881. In early life he was in business with his 
father. In 1837 he married Caroline, daughter of Anson (ireene 
riielps, head of the nu'tal imi)orting firm of Phelps, Dodge c& Com- 
pany, and subsequently Mv. Stcd^es became a member of this firm. 
About forty years later he became one of the founders of the New 
York banking house of IMielps, Stokes & Company. He was the co- 
adjutor of Peter Cooper in the development of the luiblic-school sys- 
tem, and was otherwise active in connection with educational and be- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



57 



uevolont institutions. Three (lani;litei's survived liim, oue of wlioiu 
bcciime ^Irs. lleury Dale, toji'etlicr witli four sons — tlie present Anson 
Phelps Stolces, the present James Stokes, the ]>resent Thomas Stokes, 
and the present William E. Dod^c Stokes. 

STOKES, ANSON I'lIELl'S, eldest son of the late James Stcdces, 
and grandson of Thomas Stokes, the noted philanthropist and reli<;- 
ious worker, who came to tliis city from London in 17!tS, was for some 
time a member of the metal house of Phelps, Dodge (& Company, siib- 
setpiently was associated with his father in the well-known banking 
firm of IMielps, Stol^es & Company, and in recent years has mainly 
confined himself to the care of his large real estate and other interests. 
He is a trustee of the Uniteil States Trust Company and a director 
of the Ansoiua Brass and Copper Comjiany and the Woodbridge 
Company. He was the first Pi-esident of the Eeforni Club, and has 
twice been Vice-Pi-esident of the New York Yacht Club. He is a 
member of the Executive Committee of the New York Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, lie is a member of the Metropoli- 
tan, Knickerbocker, Union League, Tnxedo, Century, City, Itiding, 
Reform, Lawyers", (Jhurch, New York Yaclit, and Mendelssohn (ilee 
clubs, and the Society of Colonial Wars. He married Helen L., daugh- 
ter of Isaac Newton Phelps, in his day one of the l)est known l»ank«'i-s 
of this city, and has four sons — Isaac Newton Phelps, J. (}. Phelps, 
Anson Phelps, Jr., and Harold M. Phelps Stokes, and five daughtei-s, 
of whom two are married — the wife of Baron Halkett and Mrs. Jolin 
Sherman Iloyt. 

MORGAN, ED^\ IN l>b:XlSON, engaged in business in New York 
City as a wholesale grocer in 1830, and made a large fortune. In 
1850 he was elected to the State Senate, being re-elected two years 
later. In 1850 he was Chairman (d" the Whig State Central Commit- 
tee, while from 1857 to 1800 he was Cliairman 
of the I\e])ublican State Connnitlee. lie was 
elected Governor of the State in 1858, and was 
elected again in 18()0, the first time by a ma- 
jority of more than 17.000, and the second time 
by a majority of nearly !)0,000. He was one of 
the stanchest of the "War Governors," vigor- 
ously su])i)orting Lincoln's policy. He oi-gan- 
ized and sent to the front 4!»2,000 Cinon 
soldiers. At the close of his term he wa.s 
elected to the United States Senate, where he 
serwed during the six years from 1808 to 1800. 
He Avas again the Republican candidate for 
Governor in 1877, but was (h'feated by Lu- 
cius Robinson. The son of Jasper Moi'gan, a farmer, he was b()rn \u 
Berkshire County, Massachusetts, Eebruary 8, 1811, and had only a 




58 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

common sclioul education. Bet^^■een 1822 and ISoO lie was engaged 
in the grocery business in Hai-tford, Conn., and tlien establislied liini- 
self in New Yorlc. He always remained at the head of the firm of 
E. J). Morgan & Company until his leath, in 1883, but after retiring 
from public life gave his cliief attention to financial institutions in 
which he was interested. He was long a director of the United States 
Trust Company, the National Bank of Commerce, the ^^'estern Union 
Telegraph Company, and the New York, Lake Erie and Western Rail- 
road Company. He was Vice-President of the American Tract So- 
ciety from 1875 until his death. He was President of the Board of 
Trustees of the Brick Presbyterian Church, and President of the 
Board of Governors of the Woman's Hospital. He was also President 
of the Board of Managers of the Presbyterian Hospital, and was a 
Manager of the Association for the Relief of Respectable Aged 
Indigent Females. He endowed Union Theological Seminary and 
Williams College. He was a member of the Union League Club, the 
Chamber of Commerce, and the Maritime Association of the Port of 
New- York. At the age of twenty-one he had been elected a member 
of the City Council of Hartford, while in 1849 he was elected to the 
Board of Assistant Aldennen of New Y'ork City. He was Commis- 
sioner of Emigration from 1855 to 1858. He twice declined the port- 
folio of Secretary of the Treasury, tendered him by President Lincoln 
and President Arthur, respectively. Tn the latter case his nomination 
had been confirmed by the Senate. He was eighth in descent from 
James Morgan, who emigrated from Llandalf, Wales, to Boston, 
Mass., in 1G3G. 

MORGAN, EDVk'ARD DENISON, son of Governor E. D. Morgan, 
was born in Hartford, Conn., in 1831, and died August 15, 1879. At 
the age of fifteen he made a. voyage around the world in a sailing 
vessel. He attended the Literary Institute at Suffield, Conn., and, 
from 1860 to 1862, served as Colonel on the staff of his father, then 
Governor of New York. He visited Europe in 1867, and upon his re- 
turn a year later began the study of medicine with Dr. Austin Flint. 
In 1S71 he was grmluatcd from thcBcllevne Hospital Medical College, 
while from tliat time until shortly before his deatli he devoted himself 
to the medical care of the poor in New York City, without compen- 
sation. He married Sarah E. Archer, of Suffield, Conn., who died soon 
after his decease, leaving their only son, Edward Denison Morgan. 

MORGAN. EDWIN DENISON, the third to bear this name, is the 
only surviving son of the late Dr. Edwin Denison Morgan, born in 
1834, died in 1881, who in turn was the only son to reach maturity and 
have issue in the familv of the late Hon. Edwin Denison Morgan, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



)9 



GovciiHir and United States Senator, and 
ing- tirni of E. D. Morgan & Company. Tlu- 
of the family was gradn- 
ated from Harvard in 1877, 
and since that date lias 
been engaged in banking 
in this city He is a 
director of the Corral itos 
Company, the Phillipsburg 
Coal and Land Company, 
and the Monterey and Mexi- 
can Gnif Kailroad Com- 
pany. He is a yachtsman 
and sportsman, and has 
country seats on Long Is- 
land and at Newport. He 
married Elizabeth Moran. 
He is a member of tlie 
Union, Metropolitan, Union 
League, Knickerbocker, 
Tuxedo, Racquet, Harvard, 
Country, Meadow Brook 
Hunt, New York Yacht, 
Larchmont Yacht, and At- 
lantic Yacht clubs, the New England Soiicty, and 
IJevolution. 



founder of the bank- 
present representative 




K.D\VAKI> IIK.NISON MORCJAN. 



the Sdus (d' the 



FLOYD-JONES, WILLIAM OHAUNCEY, has been long in busi- 
ness as a stockbroker in New York City, and is a member of the Stock 
Exchange. He is a member of the Union, Racquet, Country, and 
Westminster Kennel clubs, and, in addition to his city residence, 
occupies the estate which has long been in his family at Massapequa, 
L. I. He is the son of the late William Floyd-Jones, merchant of this 
city; grandson of Brigadier-General Thomas Floyd-Jones, and grand- 
nephew of Major-General Henry Floyd-Jones. His great-grandfather, 
David Richard Floyd-Jones, who married a daughter of Henry Onder- 
donk, was tlie only sou of Richard Floyd and his wife, Arabella, 
daughter of Judge David Jones and sister of Judge Thomas Jones, 
and, becoming the heir of his uncle. Judge Thomas Jones, of the New 
York Supreme Court, who died without issue, added the latter's sur- 
name to that of his father by virtue of legislative act of 1788. Rich- 
ard Floyd, father of David Richard Floyd-Jones, was a Judge and 
Colonel of militia, and, through his loyalty to the king during the 
Revolution, suffered the confiscation of his estate at Mastic, L. I. 
He was the son of Ricliard Floyd, also Judge and Colonel of the 
militia; was the grandson of Richard Floyd, Colonel of the militia 



60 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

of Suffolk Coiuity, New York, iiiid .JiuI^l' of the Court of ("oiinuon 
I'lcas, his wife beiug Marj^aret. oldest, daughter of Colonel Matthias 
Nieoll, cousin of (iovernor lUchard Xicoll, and first Secretary of the 
Eniilish province of New York; and was the grandson of Kichard 
Floyd, of Brecknockshire, Wales, Avho came over with Richard Wood- 
hull in 1()54, acquired a large estate in Suffolk County, and was 
Judge of the county and ( 'olonel of the militia. 

CADWALADEK, JOHN LA.MI'.EIJT, who has long been engaged 
in the successful practice of law in New York City, was in 1874 As- 
sistant Secretary of State of the United States. lie has a large corpo- 
ration practice and has been an officer of a number of coi-porations. 
He has also been active in connection with public and benevolent 
interests in the city. He is now I'resident of the Board of Trustees 
of the New Y'ork I'ublic Library, Astor, Lenox, and Tilden founda- 
tions, having previously for some years been a member of the Board 
of Trustees of Astor Library. I'or some years he has been counsel 
to the BoaT-d of Trustees of the Ne\v York .Vssociation for Imjiroving 
the Condition of the Poor. He is a member of the Union, Metropoli- 
tan, Knickerbocker, City, University, Biding, Lawyers', Princeton, 
New Y^)rk Yacht, and Seawanhaka-Corinthian Yacht clubs, the Cen- 
tury and r>owntown associations, and tlie Sons ol the IN'Volution, and 
is a prominent member of the Bar Association of the city. Born 
November 17, 1830, and a graduate from Princeton College, he is the 
son of the late Major-General Thomas Cadwalader and Maria C, 
daughter of Nicholas Gouverneur and granddaughter of Lawrence 
Kortriglit, both prominent citizens of New '^'ork and members of 
famous old families. The Cadwalader family of l'hilad('l]iliia is the 
peer of any in the United States in respect both to ancient lineage 
and the eminence f)f its members. Its founder in this country, John 
Cadwalader, was a member of the Pliiladelidiia Common Council 
from 1718 to 1733, and of the Provincial Assembly from 1729 to 1731, 
and traced his line through distinguished ancestors to Bhodri ^Slawr, 
who died 87(! A.D., having been King of United AVales. ]\Ir. Cadwala- 
der's grandfatlier. Colonel Lambert Cadwalader, was Colonel of the 
New Jersey line in the Kevolution, represented New Jersey in the 
Continental Congress from 1784 to 1787, and was subsequently a mem- 
ber of the Constitutional Convention and a member of Congress. He 
married ^Nfary, daughter of Ai-chibald McCall, of Philadelphia. JMr. 
Cadwalader's great-grandfather was the famous Dr. Thomas Cadwal- 
ader of Philadelphia, member of the Pennsylvania Provincial Council 
and Medical Director of all tlie Continental forces during the Revo- 
lution. 

SCHIEFFELIN, \YILLIA3f HENRY, from 1805 until his death in 
1895, Avas hea<l of W. H. Schieffelin & Comjiany, the well-known whole- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



61 






sale niiinulaciiiiiiiL; dnii; house eslahlislied ]>y liis ureat-gTandfatlier, 
Jaeeb ScliielTeliii, uioic than a hundred years aiio, and which, iu re- 
spect to its veuerahh' liistory and extent (d' business, is the most nota- 
ble house in tli is line in the Tnited States. Under his luanaiienieiit this 
tii-ni led iu intro(lucin;Li- the synthetic dru|ns of chemistry to Amei-ican 
idiysicians. In 1S(;0, at the atie of twenty-four, Mr. Schiei'feliu led an 
e.vploriniL;- ])arty across the Ko(dvy Mouidains frmu .Montana, the com- 
pany beiiiii' cai)tured by the Ciow Indians, but liberated throuuh the 
intercession of a friendly chief. In iSOi' he went to the front with the 
Seventh New ^'ork, and soon after being commissioned Major of the 
First New York Mounted Ifities, enlisted 400 
men. lie was at Suff(dk, Va., under (Jeneral 
^^'onl durin<>- its sietie by General Lon^street. 
In July, 18(13, he resii;ned his conimission. He 
was one of the first to import registered Jersey 
cattle, briniiinu- a herd in INTO to his farm at 
Katonah, X. V. lie was <'liairn)an of the Drut;- 
Trade Cleveland and Stevenson Club in 1S1>2, 
baviusi' been a Republican previous to that year. 
He was President of the Fishers Island S]i(trts- 
men's Club, and Senior \'estrymau of St. ( ieort;e's Church, Stuyvesant 
Square. Born in this city August 20, 1836, he was the son of Samuel 
Bradhni-st S(diieflelin, i^ramlson of the late Henry ITamilton Schieffel- 
in, and great-grandson of Jacob Schieflelin, all of whom preceded him 
as heads of the drug house. He was married October 15, 1803, to 
^lary, daughter of the late John Jay, and great-granddaughter of 
Chief Justice John Jay. His sou, ^\■illiam Jay Schieffelin, is now head 
of the firm. 




SCHIEFFKLIX ARMS. 



SCHIEFFELIN, WILLIAM JAY, who became head of the notable 
wholesale drug and chemical house of Schieffelin & Company ni)on 
the death in IS!).") of his father, the late William Henry Schieff(din, is 
also Vice-President of the Cereals .Alanufacturing Company. In 1S!((; 
Mayor Strong appointed him a member of the Civil-service Commis- 
sion. He has been an active member of the Chamber of (Commerce, 
has been a member of its Committee on Finance, a member of the 
Executive Committee and Chairman of the Subcommittee on Co-oper- 
ation with kindred organizations and on the formation of sound mon- 
ey clubs. He is a member of the Century, City, and Church clubs, the 
St. Nicholas Society, the Huguenot Society, tlie Society of Colonial 
Wars, the 3Iilitary Order of the Loyal Legion, the Anu^-ican ( "hemical 
Society, and the Society of Chemical Industry. He was born iu New 
York City in 1860, in 1887 was graduated from Columbia College, 
took a i)ost-graduate course in chemistry at the T'niversity of Mnniidi, 
ami iu 188!) received its degree of Doctor of Philoso])liy. He entered 
I he finu of ^Y. H. Schieffelin & Company, which, upon his father's 



62 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

death, became Schieffeliu ic Company. He married in 1891 Marie 
Louisa, daughter of the late Colonel Elliott F. Shepard and grand- 
daughter of William H. Vanderbilt. and has two sons and two daugh- 
ters, the elder sou being "^Villiam Jar Schieffeliu, Jr. 

DYEK, ELISHA. Jn., was bred to the law in Rhode Island, but 
instead of following his profession, established himself in this city 
as a banker, and is actively connected with various railroad interests. 
For some time he has been Secretary and Treasurer of the Brooklyn 
Elevated Railroad Company. He is also President of the Popp Com- 
pressed Air and Electric Power Company, and is a director of the Sea- 
side and Brooklyn Bridge Elevated Railroad. He is a member of the 
Metropolitan and Knickerbocker chibs and the Brown University 
Alumni Association. He was born in Providence. R. I., in 1S62, at- 
tended St. Paul's School, Concord, X. H., and was graduated from 
Brown University. In 1891 he man'ied Sidney (^Turner I Swan, of 
Newport, R. L. a descendant of the Turuers of Virginia and the Pat- 
tersons of Maryland, and granddaughter of a brother of Madame 
Jerome Bonaparte. Mr. Dyer is himself the son of General Elisha 
Dyer, of Newport, a graduate of the University of Giessen, Germany, 
who, in addition to other military and civil honors, was elected Gov- 
ernor of Rhode Island in 1896; is grandson of General Elisha Dyer, 
who was elected (iovernor of lUiode Island in 1857, having previously 
served five terms as Adjutant-General of the State, and is descended 
from both Edward and George Dyer, brothers who came from Eng- 
land to Massachusetts prior to 1G29, as he is also from William Dyer, 
son of one of them and nephew and son-in-law of the other, who was 
one of the seventeen purcliasers <>f Rhode Island from the Indians in 
1638, 

CARROLL, ROYAL PHELPS, is well known as a leading yachts- 
man. In addition to his activity in these waters, in 1894 his famous 
yacht Navahoe participated in the important European regattas, and 
in the race for the Brentou Reef Cup defeated the celebrated Britan- 
nia, of the Prince of Wales. He is a member of the L'nion, Knicker- 
bocker, Racquet, New York Y'acht, Larchmont Yacht, Seawanhaka- 
Corinthian Yacht, and Eastern Yacht clubs. His summer residence 
is at Newport. In 1891 he man-ied Marion, daughter of Eugene Lang- 
don and Harriet Lowndes, and has a daughter. He was born in this 
city October 29, 1862, attended French and English schools, and was 
graduated from Harvard in 1885. The son of Governor John Lee Car- 
roU of Maryland, and the only daughter of the late Royal Phelps, 
famous merchant and banker of this city, he is fifth in descent from 
the renowned Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, and seventh from Charles 
Carroll, founder of the famous Marvland familv. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 63 

\YINTHK(;)P, BUCHANAN, was boru in New York in ISil, in 1862 
was <;raduated from Yale, tAvo years later was graduated from 
Columbia College Law School, and since 1SG4 has been engaged in 
the practice of law in this city. He is a trustee of the New York 
Life Insurance and Trust Company, and has long been Treasurer of 
the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States. He was elected a Fellow of Yale University by the 
Alumni in 1891, and was re-elected in 1895. He is a member of the 
Union, Metropolitan, Tuxedo, Century, City, University, lUding, and 
New York Yacht clubs, the Patriarchs, the Downtown Association, 
the City Bar Association, the New England Society, and the Yale 
Alumni Association. He married in 1872 Sarah Helen, daughter of 
Isaac Townsend, and has a daughter and a son — Henry Rogers Win- 
throp. He is himself the sou of the late Henry Rogers Winthrop, a 
well-kuown lawyer of this city, and ^Margaret, daughter of Thomas 
Hicks of Long Island; is the grandson of John Still Winthrop, a New 
York merchant, and Harriet, daughter of ^ 
Fitch Rogers, and descends from Governor .^u/i/fC^'TTvtt^fl. 
John Winthrop, of Massachusetts, and his son, ^ -=^ 

Governor John Winthrop, of Connecticut, as well as from Governor 
Joseph Dudley and Governor Thomas Fitch. Another ancestor was 
Major-General ^\'ait Still Winthrop, Chief Justice of Massachusetts. 

BRONSON, FREDERIC, one of the prominent lawyers of New York 
City, where he has been engaged in practice for more than twenty 
years, is a director or trustee of several impoi-tant corporations. He 
stands in this relation to the New York Life Insurance and Trust 
Company, the Institution for Savings of Merchants' Clerks, the Amer- 
ican Horse Exchange, the National Horse Show Association, and the 
New Y'ork Cab Company. Since 1897 he has been President of the 
Coaching Club, succeeding Colonel William Jay. He had previously 
been its Vice-President and long one of its most prominent members, 
being well known as one of the most skillful whips in the city. He 
is also a member of the Union, Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, City, 
Racquet, Country, Riding, New Y'ork Yacht, and Delta Phi clubs, the 
Downtown Association, and the Columbia Alumni Association. He 
was born in this city, the son of the late Frederic Bronson and Char- 
lotte Brinckerlioff, and grandson of the famous Dr. Isaac Bronson, 
notable i)hysician, Revolutionaiw soldier, and New Y'ork banker, wlio 
married Maria, daughter of Colonel James B. Murray. The first pater- 
nal ancestor in this country, John Bronson, was one of the founders of 
Hartford under Dr. Thomas Hooker, and subsequently serv(>(l in the 
Pequot war. Mr. Bronson was graduated from Columbia College in 
1871, and later attended the Columbia College Law School. He mar- 
ried Sarah Gracie, daughter of the late Archibald Gracie King, and 
lins one daughter. 



64 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

DIX, JOHN ADAMS, was born in Boscawcn, N. H., July 24, 1798 
and (lied in XeAV York City, April 2i, 1870. He was the son of 31ajoi 
Timothy ])ix, of the Tiuted States Army, and participated in th( 
campaign against Canada in the War of 1812, beino- made Second 
Lieutenant at sixteen years of age. After the war lie resigned hi^ 
fomniission as Captain in the United States Army, studied law, and 
began practice at ( 'oopersto^^'n, N. Y. In 1 820 he was sent on a special 
mission to the (\iui-t of Denmark. In 1830, Governor Throop ap- 
pointed him Adjutant-dcneral of the State of Xew York, while he 
was also elected a Ktgeiit of the State University. From 1833 to 1839' 
he was Secretary of State for New York. In 1840 he was State Super- 
intendent of S(lio(ds. In 1841 he was elected to the Assembly from 
Albany Couniy. He subse(iuently visited Europe, and upon his re- 
turn was elected United States Senator from New York, in 1845. 
Three years later he was the unsuccessful I'ree-Soil candidate fori 
Governor of New York. He became Assistant Ti'easurer of the United 
States at New York City by appointment of President Pierce. In 
the spring of I8(i0, President Buchanan appointed him Postmaster 
at New York City. In January, 1861, he entered Buchanan's Cabinet 
as Secretary of the Treasury, and made a bold stand against those 
who were iilotting tieason. To the commander of a revenue cutter at 
New (hleans he gave his celebrated order: "If any one attempts to 
haul down the American flag shoot him on the spot."" When the Civil 
War bi'oke out he was one of the four Jlajor-Generals in charge of the 
troops of the State of New Yorlc. In 1862 he was transferred to T'or- 
tress Monroe. From 1863 to the end of the war he commanded the 
Department of the East, with h.eadquarters at New York City. Sub- 
sequently lie was appoinh-d N;ival Officer of the P(nt of New York. 
In Seiiteniber, 186t!, he sn( ceeded John Bigdow as United States ^Fin- 
ister to France, and served bet\\'een two and three years. In 1872 he 
was electeil ( Joveriior of New York as the candidate of the Republican 
par-ty, but two vears later was defeated as a camlichite for re-election 
by Samuel J. Tilden. He instituted some important economies in 
administration wliile (Jovernor. His oldest son. Dr. J. Morgan Dix, 
has long been rector of Trinity Parish, New York City. 

DIX, JOHN MORGAN, long Rector of Trinity I'arish, New York 
City, is the son of the late General John A. Dix and a daughter 
of the late J(din Jordan ^lorgan. He was born in this city, November 
1, 1827, resided at Albany from 1830 to 1842, subsequently traveled 
in ^Madeira, Spain, and Italy, and was graduated from Columbia 
College in 1848. He began the study of law. but soon abandoned 
it and entered the General Theological Seminary, from which he was 
graduated in 1852. He was ordained a deacon the same year and was 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



65 




KEV. .1. MOKliAX mx, D.D. 



admitted to priestliund in 185^. He served as Assistant Hector of 
St. Marlj's, Pliiladelpliia, visited Euiope, and n]ion liis return was 

elected Assistant Minister of Trin- 

ity Parish in this city. In 1SG2 
lie became Assistant Rector, and 
subsequently succeeded Dr. Ber- 
riau as Rector. He has been active 
in promoting sisterhoods and in 
improving church music. He has 
been a delegate to many general 
conventions, and President of the 
House of Deputies in several. 
Since 18G9 he has been President 
of the Standing Committee of the 
Diocese of Xew York, and a trus- 
tee of Columbia. College, Sailors" 
Snug Harbor, the Leake and 
Watts Orphan House, the General 
Theological Seminary (being- 
Chairman of its Standing C(mi- 
mitteej, the House of Mercy, the 
Society for Promoting Religion and Learning, and the Church Orphan 
House. He is Vice-President of the New York Protestant Episcopal 
Public School, and of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals. He has published commentaries on "Romans" (1864), 
and " Galatians and Colossians " (180.j), " Lectures on Pantheism" 
(1865), " Lectures on the Two Estates, the Wedded in the Lord, and 
the Single for the Lord's Sake" (1872i, "Sermons Doctrinal and 
Practical" (18781, and "Memoirs of John A. Dix " (2 vols., 1883). 

WETMORE, GEORGE PEABODY, is a director of the Metropolitan 
Opera House and Real Estate Company, the National Horse Show As- 
sociation, the American Horse Exchange (Limited), and the New 
Yoi'k (."ab Company. He is a member of the Union, Metropolitan, 
Union League, Knickerbocker, Century, University, Riding, and other 
clubs of New Y'ork; the Newport Reading Room, Casino, and Golf 
clubs; the Hope Club of Providence, the Somerset Club of Boston, the 
^Ietro]!((litan Club of ^YasllingtoIl, and many other clubs. He was 
Governor of lUmde Island in 1885-80 and 188(3-87, being defeated for 
a third term, although then receiving more votes than in either elec- 
tion in which he was successful. In 1880, he was a prominent can- 
didate before the Legislature for United States Senator from Rhode 
Island, being defeated on the eighth l)allot. On June 13, 1894. he 
was elected to the United States Senate, receiving the unanimous 
vote of both houses of the Legislature. He was first Presidential 
Elector for Rhode Island on the Republican ticket in 1880, as lie was 



66 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

;iL;;iiii in 1NS4. lie was a member of the eoiuiuittee \i> Imild a new 
.State House for IJliode Island, lie was a nieniher of the comniittee 
to receive the representatives of France on the ciccasion of tlieir visit 
to llhode Ishmd in l.SS(!. lie was graduated from Vale in IStlT, and 
from the Law !-!chool of Columbia University iu 1809, the same year 
beini; admitted to the New York and Khode Island bars. He de- 
clined the uomiuatiou as Fellow of Yale University in 1S88. He is a 
trustee of the Peabody ^luseum of Natural History in Yale University 
and is a trustee of the I'eabody Educational Fund. Horn in Loudon, 
England, Auj;ust 2, 184:0, durine, a visit of his i)areuts in Europe, he 
is the son of William Hhepard Wetmore and Austiss Derby, daughter 
of John W. Eooei-s and Austiss l)erl)y Pickman. of Salem. Mass. He 
is a grandson of Hon. Seth AYetmore, of St. Albans, Vt., as he is of 
General William Shepard, of Westtield, Mass. Mr. Wetmore married, 
in 1809, Edith 3Ialvin, daughter of Eugene Keteltas, of New Y\n'k 
City, and has two daughters and two sous — William Shejtard Keteltas 
Wetmore and Pogers Pickman Derby Keteltas Wetmore. 

ASTOP, JOHN JACOP, founder of the fortunes of this wt'U-knowu 
New^ Y'ork family, was born in Walldorf, Germany, a village near 
Heidelberg, July 17, ITO:}, and died in the City of New York, March 
29, 1848. He was the youngest son of a Gennan farmer, and was 
educated iu the village sch()(d. At the age of seventeen he went to 
London, where an elder brother and an uncle were engaged in busi- 
ness. The brother, (ieorge Peter Astor, was a member of the London 
firm of Astor & Proadwood, manufacturers of musical instruments, 
of which the uncle was the head. During the four years from 1779 
to 1783, John Jacob Astor remained with this firm iu London, while 
as their agent he landed in Paltimore, Md., in March, 1784, with a 
consignment of goods. Another brother, Henry Astor, was already 
in New Y'ork, whither the young in.nn went. The conversation of ofti- 
cers of the Hudson P>ay Com])any during the voyage over, who were 
fellow-passengers of Astor, liad interested him in the fur trade, and, 
having disposed of his goods, he entered the employ of a New York 
fur dealer named ^^■ilson. Subse(|uently be was emjdoyed by Pobert 
Bowne, after wliicli ln' established himself in the fur business in New 
Y'lU-k. In 178.J he arranged for the shii»piug of furs to London, while 
at tli(- same time organizing a Xew York branch house of the piano 
firm of Astor & l^roadwood. But his great success was in the fur 
business, and at the end of six years he had amassed a fortune of a 
quarter of a million dollars, which he mainly invested in real estate 
just bo\vond the limits of the thickly populated portion of New York 
City. He C(nitinued this ])olicy throughout life, and thus obtained 
large returns from the capital accumulated in commerce. He ](erson- 
ally traveled in Northern New York, buying peltries from the Indians 
and arranging for theii- iiurchase. In ]iartnership with f]]o father of 




;r.o,":vj:jr-.^er 



J 'J n -\ 



JACOB AS TOR 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OI- NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 67 

Uerrit Smith, he established n,iieiicies at the frontier military posts, 
iuchidiiiL' Oswego aud Detroit. He soou chartered vessels to carry 
his slaiis to Europe, aud orgauized the American Fur Comiiany, wliicli 
became a formidable riviil of tlie Hudson Hay ('onqiany and the Brit- 
ish ^.'oi-thwest ("ompauy. He attemjited to control the fur trade west 
of the Rocky Mountains, and formuhiteil a giganric >schem(^ for trade 
witli Silteria and China. He failed to enlist the < lovernment interest 
which he had hojied lo do, but conducted sm-Ji a trade on his own 
account. Asto)-ia, a jiost at the mouth of the Columbia Ifiver. was 
founded by a band of jiioneei's sent out by him, althouiih thephice was 
captured by the JUitish in the War of 1812. In his " Astoria," Wash- 
ington Irving records the facts connected with this project. Aster's 
enterprise in the Northwest laid the foundation for claims of territory 
by the United States which were subsequeutly recognized in treaty 
with Great Britain. Astor became the largest owner of real estate 
in New York City and the ricliest man in Anu-rica. He was the 
founder of the Astor Libraiy, now merged in the New York Public 
Library, Astor, Lenox, and Tilden foundations, be(jueathiug .1j!lOO,00(> 
for this ])urpose. He also endowed the German Society of New York, 
the Home for Aged Ladies, the Asylum for the Blind, the Half-orphan 
Asylum, the German Reformed Congregation, and other institutions. 
He also establisluMl a fund for the pooi- of his native village of 
Walldorf. He was a patron of several literary men. Washington 
Irving was an intimate friend, and one of the administrators of his 
estate, while he is said to have suggested the founding of the Astor 
Library. Fit/.-(4reene Halleck was for many years Aster's private 
secretary, and was a beneficiary under his will. Dr. Cogswell, an- 
other literary friend, was designated as the first superintendent of 
Astor Library. Mr. Astor married, in 1786, Sarah Todd, aiid had 
three sons and four daughters. The eldest sou, William B. Astor, 
was residuary legatee under his father's will. The other two, Henry 
and John Jacob Astor, died without issue. One of the daughters also 
died unmarried. The eldest, Magdalen, nutrried, first, the Dauisli 
Governor of the Island of Santa Cruz, Governor Bentzeu, and, second. 
Rev. John Bristed, by whom she had a son, Charles Astor Bristed, Sr., 
the well-kjuiwn author and poet. D(U-ot]iea married Walter Lang- 
ihui, of New Hamiishire. Eliza married Count A'incent l!um]dT, of 
Switzerland. 

ASTOR, WILLIAM BACKHOUSE, who inherited the greater pait 
of his father's enormous fortune, was bom in New Y'ork City. Sep- 
tember 10, 17'J2, and died November 21, ]87.'). He attended the pul)- 
lic schools of New York, spent two years at Heidelberg University, 
and also for a time attended the University of Gottingen. He trav- 
eled through Enro]ie in 1810, with the famous Baron Biinsen as his 
futor. At the age of twenty-three he engaged in business with his 



68 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

fallxLT, and soon luauifested good executive ability. From 1815 to 
1827 lie was Ms father's partner in the notable commercial house of 
John Jacob Astor & Son. In 1827 lie became the first President of 
the American Fur Compauv, but subsequently withdrew from the fur 
business and confined himself exclusively to the large real estate in- 
terests of the family. He inherited his father's fortune at the age of 
fifty-six, having already inherited the fortune of his uncle, Henry 
Astor, who also became a millionaire in New York. He was inter- 
ested in the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company and various other 
corporations. He gave more than half a million dollars to the Astor 
Library, wliich liis father had established. He also endowed St. 
Luke's Hospital. He married the daughter of General John Arm- 
strong and Alida Livingston. Her father served in the Revolution 
on the staff of General Gates, served in the War of 1812, published 
the " Jsewburgh Letters " and a " Histoi-y of the War of 1812," was 
Secretary of State and Adjutant-General of Pennsylvania, United 
States Senator from the same State, Secretai-j' of War. and United 
States Minister to France. He was the son of General John Arm- 
strong, of the French and Indian War and the Revolution. His wife 
was a niece of Chancellor Robert R. Livingston, and the daughter of 
a grandson of the first Lord of Livingston Manor, by his wife Mar- 
garet, daughter of Colonel Henry Beekman, of Dutchess County. 
^^■illianl B. Astor had three sons, the late John Jacob, William, and 
Henry Astor, and three daughters — Mrs. Ward, Mrs. Carey, and Mrs. 
Delano. The main par-t of his large estate was evenly divided be- 
tween his two older sons. 

ASTOR, JOHN JACOB, eldest son of the late William B. Astor, 
and grandson of the original John Jacob Astor, was born in New- 
York City, and died February 22, 1890, in his sixty-eighth year. Up- 
on tlie death of his father he came into a life interest in one-half of the 
immense residuary estate left by his parent, his brotlier, the late Will- 
iam Astor, enjoying a similar interest, while the estate itselfwas to 
descend in two equal portions to the children of the two brothers, and 
be administered for them by trustees. Mr. Astor was educated at 
Columbia College and traveled extensively abroad. He was an officer 
in many impoi-tant financial corporations, a trustee of many philan- 
thropic institutions, and was active in many public movements. He 
was one of the incoi-porators of the New York Society for the Preven- 
tion of Cruelty to Animals. He was also one of the most active sup- 
porters of the Federal Government during the Civil War. He was 
a Vice-President of the Union Square " Mass Convention " of April 
20, 18fil, and was an original member of the Union Defense Commit- 
tee, organized April 22, 18G1. During 1862 he also .served in the field 
with the Army of the Potomac. Between 1879 and 1881 he added 
a large wing to the Astor Library building, on Lafayette Place, pur- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK EIOGRAPHY. 69 

eliasiug three lots for the purpose, and added a story to the central 
building', at a cost of a quarter of a million dollars. The second 
printed catalogue of the library was likewise- ])repared and issued at 
his expense, the work costing about |40,000. He married Charlotte 
Augusta Gibbes, of the old South Carolina family of that name, and 
had a son, William Waldorf Astor. 

ASTOR, WILLIAM, son of the late William R. Astor, and his heir, 
jointly with his elder brotlier, the late J(dm Jacob Astor. was born 
in New York City, July 12, 1820, and died April 25, 1S92. He was 
graduated from Columbia College in 1840, and then traveled in Eu- 
rope and the Orient. He ex^ilored the coast of h'lorida in his yacht 
in 1873, and became interested in the affairs of that State. He ac- 
cept»^<l the ])osition of aid on tiie staff of its Covernor. and organized 
a gun scjuad which served against the Indians in the Everglades. He 
built a railroad from St. Augustine to Palatka, and for this and other 
services received large grants of lands froui the State The post- 
offices of Astor and Armstrong, with Lake Schermerhorn, were named 
in his honor. He refused the proposition to make him United States 
Senator from Floi-ida. He- was a. prominent member of Trinity 
Church, and gave §100,000 toward the erection of the Cathedral of St. 
John the Divine. He was an officer of many of the principal financial 
and philanthr()]tic coi]iorations of New York City, and a member of 
the leading clubs. He married Caroline Webster Schermerhorn, of 
the old New York family of that name. She survives him, with four 
of tlieir five childi-en — the present John Jacob Astor, the only son, and 
three daughters — Mrs. J. Roosevelt Roosevelt, Mrs. J. Coleunin Dray- 
ton, and Mrs. Orme Wilson. Another daughter, Mrs. Van Allen, died 
]irior to the death of her father. Mrs. William Astor has long been 
recognized as the most prominent leader of New York fashionable 
society. 

ASTOR, ^MLLIAJI WALD0R1'\ only son and heir of tlie late John 
Jacob Astor, inherited one-half of the residuai-y e.state left by his 
grandfather, AMlliam B. Astor. He was born in New York City, 
March ol, 1848, and received his early education under private tutors, 
one of whom was a Professor from the University of Marburg. He 
entered the office of the Astor estate at the age of twenty-three, serv- 
ing in each clerical depar-tment. In 1875 he was graduated from Co- 
lumbia College Law School, Avhile he served one year Avith the well- 
known law firm of Lord, Day & Lord. He was an executor of his 
grandfather's estate, and managed his father's estate under power of 
attorney. He became active in the Republican party in this city, and 
served two terms in the New York Assembly and one in the New York 
Senate. He was then a candidate for Congress, but failed of election. 
By appointment of President Arthur, he was United States Minister 



70 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW VORK^ 



to Itiily fidiu 1882 to 1885. Dviriu^ his residence at Koine lie made 
a study of Italian medieval life, the fruit of this beins;' seen in his two 
historical novels, "Valentino" and " Hforza," which attracted con- 
siderable attention and wcit favorably received. In recent years he 
lias resided in Enjiland, and for some years has been the proprietor of 
the Pall Mall Gazcltc, and the proprietor, as he was the founder, of the 
Pall Mull Gazette, which is conducted on the plan of the leadinjn illus- 
trated literary n)a,i;azines in .\.iiierica. He is a trustee of the United 
States Trust Company and of the New York Life Insurance and Trust 
Company, is a member of the Board of ;\[ana,i;ers of the Delaware, 
Lackawanna and "Western IJailroad Company, and is a director of the 
Gallatin National I'ank, the Astor National Bank, the Farmers' Loan 
and Trust Company, anil the Cnited New Jersey Eailroad and Canal 
Companies, lie is a member of the Patriarchs, the Union, ^letropoli- 
tau, I^nion Leaiiue, Tuxedo, Country, and other clubs. lie married, 
in 1878, Mary Dahljiren Paul, of Pliiladeljiliia, by whom he has sons, 
Waldorf and John Jacob Astor, and a dani^liter, Pauline. ^Irs. Astor 
died a fcAV vears a"o. 



AvSTOR, JOHN JACOB, fourth of this famous family in the United 
States who has liorne this name, is tlie only son of the late William 

Astor. His mother, )/" Caroline 
Webster Schermerhoi n. has lon,2; 
l)een the recoonized leader at hi.uh 
social rnnclions in this citv and 
New]>ort, P. I. Of an inventive turn 
of mind, Mr. Astor has secured 
several patents for inventions, nota- 
ble annuifj; them beinii' the pneu- 
matic road im]irovinii machine, which 
may be utilized in bnildinL; mac- 
adamized roa<ls or in keepinii' coun- 
try roads free fiiuu dust. Lie is also 
tlie author of a novel, in which sup- 
pusiiitious triuin](lis of science are an 
ini]Mutant feature. He served ui»on 
the statT of liovernor Levi P. ^Morton, 
with the rank of Colonel. DnriuL; the 
recent war with Spain, he jiave the 
Government free transportation for 
troops o^'er the railroad of Avhicli he 
is President, orjianized and defrayed 
ail the expen.ses of the " Astiu' Battery," which distinyuislied itself in 
the capture of ]\lanila. Philipi)ine Islands, and distin;Liiiished himself 
at the capture of Santiajio, Cuba, as Aid-de-camp, with the rank of 
Lieutenant-Colonel, on the staff of General Shaffer. Born Julv 13. 




COLONEL .lOIiX .I.\COH .\STOR. 



l£XXVCLOPHDI.A OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 71 

18G4, lie attended St. raul's Scliool iCouford, X. H. i and IIai\ard 
Uuivei'sity, and then traveled extensively in Eni-()])e, indndinu, Turkey 
and Greece, the Xorth Cape, and other nraisual points, followed by 
toius of ('nba, Mexico, and the Ifocky iMonntain region. lie lias also 
traveled widely in his steam yacht Xonrnialial. lie is a breeder of 
hackneys and carriage h(n-ses at his country-seat, I'ernclitt-on-tlie-Hiid- 
son. He is President of the Findlay, Fort Wayne and Western Kail 
way Company, and is director or trnst(-e of the National I'ark I'.aidc, 
the Second National Bank, the Plaza P.ank, the Astor National Itaidv, 
the Mercantile Trust Company, the Title Guarantee and Trust Coni- 
])any, the New York Life Insurance and Trust Company, the Western 
Union Telegraph (\>mpany, the Illinois Central JJailroad Comisany, 
the Delaware and Hudson Railroad ("oinjiany, the St. Lawrence and 
Adirondack Eailway Company, the Ann Arbor l{ailroa(l Company, 
the Niagara Junction Lailway Comjtany, the ;\[ntnal Automatic 
Telephone Company, the Cataract Construction Company, the Niag- 
ara Development Comitany, and the Kider and Driver I'ublishing 
Company. As the residuary legatee of his grandfather, he received one- 
half of the great residuary estate of William P.. Astor, the other half 
having descended to his cousin, William Waldorf Astoi', of London. 
He was mariied, Febnmry 17, \X\)1, to Ava Lowle, daughter of Edward 
S. Willing, of Philadelphia, whose family f(U*a century and a half has 
been at the head of Philadel|dna society. They have several children. 

FIELD, BENJAMIN HAZARD, was ou(> of the most eminent of 
the merchant philanthropists of New V(U-k City. He contributed 
generously to educational, religious, and benevolent interests. He 
was President of the House for Incurables from its organizatiitn in 
18(i(l until his death, Man h 17, 1S93, while he erected an Episcopal 
Church upon its grounds. He was a trustee of the New York Dis- 
pensary, of the New Y(u-k Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf 
and Duml), of the Roosevelt Hospital, of the Children's F(dd, and 
of the Sheltering Arms. He served as Preshlent of the St. Ni<diolas 
Society, of which he was a life member. In 1885 he was elected Pres- 
ident of the New York Historical Society, of which he was a life 
member and for twenty years Treasurer. He was a trustee of the 
American Museum of Natural History, and in 1859 became a life mem- 
ber' of the American (ieographical Society. He was a life member 
of the New York Chamber of Commerce, was Vice-President of the 
Bank for Savings, and was a director of the I'ulton Bank, the Atlantic 
Mutual Insurance Company, and the Greenwood Cemetery Com])any. 
Born in Yorktown, Westchester County, -May 2, 1811, he was the 
eldest sou of Hazard Field by his second wife, and descended from 
Robert Field, an early settler of Flushing, L. L, of the English fam- 
ily foumled by Hube'rtus de la Field, companion of the Comiueror. 
He also descended from Thomas Hazard, who came to New England 



r.i HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

iu 1C3G from Lyme Regis, Dorsetshire, England, and from the found- 
ers of tlie Burling and Bowne families of Long Island. After receiv- 
ing an academic education he entered the ofiice of his uncle, llickson 
W. Field, of New Yorlc City, who was prominent in tlie Cliina trade 
and also conducted a wholesale drug business. He became a partner 
in 1832 and succeeded to tlie business upon the retirement of his uncle 
iu 1838. Mr. Field remained at the head of the house until 1865, 
when he retired in favor of his son. He married Catherine M. Van 
Cortlandt, daughter of Frederic de Peyster, Sr., grandfather of Gen- 
eral J. Watts de Pe.yster and Frederic J. de Peyster, and had a son 
and successor, Cortlandt de Peyster Field. 

FIELD, CORTLANDT DE PEYSTER, under the firm style of 
Cortlandt de Peyster Meld and Company since ISlio, has been head 
of the mercantile house of which his late distinguished father, Ben- 
jamin Hazard Field, was the head from 1838 to 1865, and a firm mem- 
ber from 1832, and which was originally founded still earlier by his 
granduncle, Hickson W. Field. He was born in this city December 
28, 1839, was graduated from Columbia College in 1859, subsequently 
receiving the degree of A.INL, and at once entered his father s office. 
Like his father he has given liberally to educational and benevolent 
institutions, and is an active member of the Episcopal Church. He 
is executor of his father's estate, and is a member of the Mendelssohn 
Glee Club, the Scientific Alliance, and the Columbia Alumni Asso- 
ciation. In 1865 he married Virginia, daughter of the late John Will- 
iam Hamersley and Catherine Livingston Hooker, and sister of James 
Hooker Hamersley, of this city. They have no children. 

BARCLAY, HENRY ANTHONY, born in Astoria, L. I., December 
4, 1844, the son of the late Henry Barclay and Sarah Moore, is the 
head of an illustrious family. He is the great-grandson of Rev. Henry 
Barclay, a Yale graduate who was rector of Trinity Cliur( li. New York 
City, from 1746 to 1T()4, ami his wife Mary, da\ighter of Anthony Rut- 
gers; is the great-great-grandson of Rev. Thomas Barclay, pastor of 
the Dutch Church of Albany, and of his wife, Dorothea, daughter of 
Admii'al Andries Drauyer, of the Dutch navy; and is great-great- 
great-grandsou of John Barclay, founder of the American family, 
a brother of Robert Barclay, a proprietor and one of the governora 
of East New Jersey, and a son of Colonel David Barclay, of Uvy, Laird 
of Mathers, a, member of I'arliament and Governor of Strathbogie, 
and of Ills wife, Catherine, daughter of Sir Robert Gordon and grand- 
diiugliter of Alexander Gordon, titular Earl of Sutlierland. He is a 
niciiil>er of the Union and ;\[ctropolitan clubs. He married Clara Old- 
field, daughter of the late John Skinner Wright, head of the firm of 
Wright, Maxwell & Company, and granddaughter of Hon. Robert 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 73 

Wright, (lovernor of Maryland in 1800. They have three daughters 
and two sons — Henry Anthony, Jr., and ^Vl•igllt Barclay. 

FRENCH, FRANCIS ORMOND, from 1870 to 1873 was partner 
in New York City of the banking firm of Jay Cooke & Company', and 
New York representative of the London firm of Jay Cooke, McCul- 
lough & Company. With other capitalists he acquired control of the 
First National Bank of this city in 1871, and was active in its manage- 
ment. From 1888 until his death in 1893 he was President of the 
Manhattan Trust Company. He was prominent in the funding of 
United States loans. He was a trustee of PJiillips Exeter Academy, 
and for two years was President of the Harvard Club of this city. 
He attended Phillips Exeter Academy, w^as graduated from Harvard 
in 1857, from Harvard Law School in 1859, studied law with Thomas 
Nelson, of New Y'ork City, and was admitted to the New York Bar 
in 1860. He began practice at Exeter, N. H., and married Ellen, 
daughter of Amos Tuck, of that city, who was a member of Congress 
from 1847 to 1853, and Naval OfHcer of tlie Port of Boston from 1861 
to 18G5. Mr. French was appointed Dejiuty Naval Officer of tlie Port 
of Boston in 1862, and in 1863 became Deputy Collector. In 1865 he 
entered the firm of Samuel A. Way & Company, bankers of Boston. 
He presently founded the Boston banking fii-m of Foote & French, and 
in 1870 removed to New Y'ork. Born in Chester, N. H., in 1837, he 
was the son of Benjamin B. French and Elizabeth Smith, daughter 
of Chief Justice William Merchant Ri<-hardson, of New Hampshire. 
Beniamin B. French was Clerk of the House of Representatives from 
1815 to 1817, and by appointment of Lincoln Commissioner of Build- 
ings in Washington, D. C, from 1861 to 1865. Associated with Pro- 
fessor Morse in developing the telegraph, he was President of the 
Magnetic Telegrapli Company. Daniel French, of Chester, N. H., 
served several terms as Attorney-General of New Hampshire. The 
first American ancestor, Edward French, emigrated from England 
to Ipswich, Mass., in 1636, and subsequently settled at Salisbury, 
i\rass. 

FRENCH, AMOS TUCK, only son of the late Francis Ormond 
French, is Vice-President of the iManhattan Trust (^ompauy, having 
been its secretary from 1888 to 1893, when his father was its president. 
He was graduaied from Harvard College, and is a member of the 
Union, Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, Tuxedo, Racquet, Players'. Har- 
vai'd, and New York Yacht clubs. He resides at Tuxedo Park, N. Y. 

DE LANCE Y, EDWARD FLOYD, for a great many years engaged 
in the practice of law in New York City, has been actively identified 
with many historical organizations and has idiblished many histori- 
cal and biographical works. He was Presiihuit of the New York 




74 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Geuealogical aud Bio.ni-apbical Societ}^ from 1873 to 1877; was Presi- 
dent of the ^Yestellester County Historical Boeietv from 1874 to 1S79; 
in 1880 and 1881 was President of the 8t. Nicliolas .Society, and since 
]S8!» lias been ( V)rrespoudiui>- Secretary of the New York Historical 
Society, and is a member of its executive committee. He published 
a memoir of Chief Justice James de Lancey in 1851; " The Capture 
of Fort Washiuj^lon the K'esult of Treason," in 1877; in 1879 memoirs 
(d' James W. Beekman and Chief Justice William 
Allen, of Pennsylvania, while he was editor of 
Jones's " History of New York During- the Eevo- 
lutionary War," which appeared the same year; 
edited '' Secret Corres])oudence <jf Sir Henry Clin- 
ton," Avhi( h appeared as a serial in the Mar/azine 
(jf Aiiicrictiii /fi.slDri/ in 188:M, and in 188G ]>ub- 
r... , .x,.,, , „, lished " ( )rinin and Historv of Manors in the Prov- 

DK LANCKY ARMS. . ■ ■ 

nice of New Y'ork," and " History of Mamaroneck, 
New York." Born in ^Nfamaroneck, X. Y., October 23, 1821, he at- 
tended the ITniversity ot I'ennsylvania, was i;raduated from Hobait 
College in 1853, and from Harvard Law School in 18-t5. He has trav- 
eled in British America, Euroi>e, Egyiit, and Asia ]\Iinor. He is the 
son of Bishoj) AMlliam Heathcote de Lan<t'y and I'rances, daughter 
of Peter Jay Munro, is fourth in descent from ( 'hief Justice James de 
Lancey and fifth from the oi-iginal I'^tienne, or Stephen, de Lancey, 
and his wife Ann, second daughter of Stephanus ^'an Cortlaudt, of 
Cortlandt Manor. Among his ancestoi's were Colonel Caleb Heathcote, 
L(n-(1 of Scarsdale ^Maiior, Judge and Mayor of New York City; Colonel 
Richard Floyd, of Long Island; Dr. Henry Munro, last English Kector 
of St. Peter's, Albany, and Peter Jay, father of Chief Justice John 
Jay. He still owns tlie old Heathcote estat<' at ^lamaroneck. He 
maiTied Jose])]due ^latilda, dauglitci- of William S. de Zeng, of 
Geneva, N. Y., and gianddaughter of Baron Frederick A. de Zeng, 
Ca])tain of a Saxon IJi^giment in tiie British service during the Revo- 
lution, and has living one son, Edward Etienne de Lancey, one of the 
engineers engaged on the Croton Aqueduct. 

GEINNELL, MUSES HICKS, was one of the most eminent of the 
great New Y'ork merchants during the half century from about 1825 
to 1873. He was born in New Bedford, Mass., March 23, 1803, aud 
died in this city, November 24. 1877. His father, Cornelius Griunell, 
was a slapping merchant of New Bedford, aud lineally descended 
from Matthew Griunell, of Huguenot descent, who immigrated to New 
England in l(i32, and in 1G38 became one of the founders of Newport, 
E.I. In 1815 Joseph Grinnell, the eldest of three brothers who be- 
came prominent New Y'ork merchants, removed from New Bedford 
to this city and became a member of the firm of Fish & Grinnell, ship- 
ping merchants. Ills brothers, Henry and Moses Hicks, having en- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF Ni'W YORK BIOGRAPHY. 75 

tert'il tlie Unn iu 1825, Joseph i)rcsciitly retired. lu 1S2S tlie two 
I youugei' brothel's, with the late Kobert I'.. .Mintiirn, organized the 
j famous house of Griunell & Minturu. I'lior to the Civil ^Val■ tliey 
I owued about tifty vessels, and were the largest shipi)ing merchants in 
I America. They established jiacket lines to Liverpool and London. 
! Heni'y (irinncll oi'ganized ilic Arctic expedition to search for Sir 

John Franklin in 1S.">(I. ami joined with (ieorge l'eabo<ly in organizing 

the expedition of IS.");!. .Moses Hides (Jrinnell \Aas especially jironu- 
I nent in jjublic affairs, however, lie was tlie eigliteenth I'resident of 

the Xew York < 'handler of Commerce, and was long President of the 

I'hu.'ui.Y Uank, having been elected to tins jiosition in ISoS. Hi' was 
i also elected to Congress as a \\ liig in 18:!^. In 185<) he was a I're- 

mout Presidential Elector-at-Large. He was one of tlie founders of 
j the Union League Club, and during the (_'ivil War a member of the 

Union Defense Committee, of this city. He was a Commissioner of 
. Charities and Correction of Xew York City from 18G0 to 18()r). He be- 
j came Collector of the l*ort of Xew York by appointment of President 
j Grant in 1869. He married, in is:5(;, Julia Irving, niece of Washing- 
I ton Irving, and had a sou — Irving Griunell, of this city, and two 
I daughters — ^Mrs. George S. Bowdoin, of Xew York, and Mrs. Thomas 

F, Cushing, of Boston. 

I GIUXXELL, IKYIXG, Treasurer of iIli' Clnircli Temperance 
i Society, is the son of the late Moses Hicks Grinnell, one of the most 
j eminent of X^ew York merchants. He was horn in this city, August 
j 9, 1839, and was educated at <'olumbia College. In 18C)3 he married 
> Joanna Dorr, daughter of < Jardiuer ( 1. Ilowland and Louisa Meredith, 
and a descendant of John Howland of the Mayflower. He is a mem- 
lier of the XcAV York Yaclit and Hndson Liver Ice Yacht clubs. 

j HAMEKSLEY, JOHN WILLIAM, during the last generation the 
I bead of the welhknown X"ew York familj^ of this name, was born May 
i 24, 1808, in Hanover Square, at tluit time one of the most fashioimble 
I quarters of Xew York City, and died at his residence on Fifth Avenue, 
June 7, 1889. He was graduated from Columbia College in 182(), 
traveled extensively in all parts of the world, was bred to the law and 
successfully practiced at tlie l)ar in Xew York <Mty for s(nne years, 
and subse(|uent1y retired to manage the large family estates, and to 
occnjiy liiiiiself as a litterateur and as a jiatron (d' literary, scientitic, 
and artistic interests in Xew Y'ork City. 'Hie brilliant way in whicdi 
he made his liome the weekly rendezvous of intellectuality in all 
departments of activity, bringing togvtliei- in the most happy spirit 
of good fellowship the celebrities of the world, will ever remain one 
of the notable and pleasing features of tlie literary and social his- 
tory of the City of Xew York. ^\hrn lie i)assed away there was no one 
left wiio iiad tlie (lualiflcations, if tiiere was any one in tlie city wiio 



76 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



had the spirit, to successfully emulate his example. Writes Brevet 
Maj()r-(Jeneral J. Watts de Peyster: "At his Friday evening gather- 
ings, in what he styled his * den,' veritable Noctes Atticae, were assem- 
bled some of the most remarkable men of the daj in every branch of 
art and science, military, naval, philosophical, etc., professionals as 
well as laics, representatives of every branch of business and evei-y 
kind of specialism; nor were the reverend clergy wanting, of all ranks 
In the church hierarchy, and ability of every evangelical belief. . . . 
These Xnctoi Attirne, or Anibrosianae, can be most justly and truth- 
fully compared to those famous gatherings in certain Parisian salons, 
where brilliant companies assembled around bright hosts and thereby 
rendered the anipliytrion as renowned as the guests and their tour- 
nauKMits of wit and intellect, i^uch asseml)lages as those of Mr. Ham- 
erslev re(]uired in tlie host peculiar talents and cnnsummate tact to 
make them a triuiiii)liaiit sei'ies of successes, such as they are univer- 
sally acknowledged to have been. 
These delightful Friday evenings, 
which continued year after year 
without the slightest eclipse or 
shadow, are not likely to find paral- 
lels in New York." Mr. Hamers- 
ley planned a notable banquet in 
New York City as a demonstration 
ill faAor of Mexico at the time Avhen 
Napoleon III. sought to seat the 
Emperor ^laximilian, and as a re- 
sult, Congress was moved to recog- 
nize the Mexican Kepublic, other 
countries following, and the plot of 
the French was defeated. In re- 
turn, the Mexican 3Iinister to the 
United States pledged his govern- 
ment to ;Mr. Ilamersley to spare the 
life of ilaximilian, but popular pas- 
sion defeated the intention. Mr. 
Hamersley was a member of Grace Church. In early life he had been 
Colonel of one of the city military regiments. He mariied ( 'atlierine 
Livingston, daughter of Hon. James Hooker, of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., 
by whom he had one son, the present James Hooker Hamersley, and 
four daughters. The youngest of these died in infancy. The other 
three are Virginia, wile of Cortlandt de Peyster Field; Helen Eeade, 
wife of diaries I). Stickney, Jr., and Catherine Livingston, wife of 
John Henrv Livincston. 




.loH.N \V. HA.MKKSLKY. 



HAIMFKSLEY, JAIMFS HOOKER, only son of the late John Will- 
iam Hanu'i-sley, and the present head of the family, was born in New 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 77 

York City January 26, 18.14. He was oarefully edueated, traveling 
extensively as a boy. At the age of twelve lie bad visited nearly all 
the capitals of Europe, had seen several crowned heads, and had been 
presented to Pope Pius IX. He was graduated from Columbia Col- 
lege in 1865, delivei"ing an oration at the commencement exex'cises. 
He studied law, entering the ottice of the late James W. Gerard, and 
also attending Columbia College Law School. He was graduated 
from the latter and admitted to the bar, while for ten years he actively 
followed his profession. He has since devoted himself to the care of 
the Hamersley estates, to literary occupation, and the discharge of 
social obligations. He has been prominently identihed with the re- 
form wing of the Eepublican party in this city, and was a delegate 
to the State Couveutiou at Rochester in 1877. He was chietly instru- 
mental in the election of William Waldorf Astor to the State Assem- 
bly' some years ago, having been the original nominee of the Republi- 
can party, and withdrawing in favor of ilr. Astor. He is a conUibu- 
tor to periodical literature and a poet. His best known poems are 
" Yellow Eoses," " The Countersign," " Ronkonkoma," " Fog Cur- 
tain," " Masconomo," " The Midnight Sun,'' and '' Voice of the Break- 
ers." He was for man3' years a director of the Knickerbocker Fire 
Insurance Company-, is Vice-President of the I'abies Hospital, is a 
member of the Board of Managers and of the Executive Committee 
of the Y'oiing Men's Christian Association (Twent.y-third Street 
Branch), and for many years has been connected with the Society 
for Seamen in the Port and Harbor of New York. He is I'resident of 
the Knickerbocker Bowling Chib, and a member of the Metropolitan, 
University, City, and Badminton clubs, and the St. Xicholas Society, 
the Columbia College Alumni Association, the Society of Colonial 
Wars, the Sons of the Revolution, the American Geographical So- 
ciety, and the New York Law Institute. He married, April 30, 1888, 
Margaret Willing, daughter of William Edings Chisholm, of a distin- 
guished South Carolina family. Of their three children, the eldest, 
Margaret Rogers, died in infancy, wliile two survive, a daughter, 
Catherine Livingston, and a son, Louis Gordon Hamersley. Mrs. 
Hamersley is a descendant of Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg, Presi- 
dent of the first House of Representatives of the United States, and a 
brother of Genei-al Muhlenberg of the Revolution. She is the grand- 
niece of Rev. William Augustus Muhlenberg, the founder of St. Luke's 
Hospital of this city. She is granddaughter of the late John Rogers, 
j an eminent citizen and large real estate owner in New Yoi-k City, in 
j whose memory his widow erected the Church of the Holy Communion 
; of this city upon land donated by her. Mv. Hamersley is himself of 
distinguished antecedents, being in the eleventh generation from Rich- 
ard Hamersley, High Bailiff of Stafford, England, and in the eighth 
generation from Sir Hugh Hamersley, Lord Mayor of London in 1627. 
His great-great-grandfather, William Hamersley, was an ofQcer in the 



78 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



Bi-itisli >.'av\ win. jscttk'd iu ^ew Yuik ( 'it v iu 17i(i and became a pros- 
perous inereliant. He was a Yestrymau of Trinity Cliurcb, aud mar- 
ried Miss Yiin Briiiil), of tlie old Diitcdi family of that name. His sou, 
Andrew Haniersley, great-jirandfatber of Mr. Hamersley, was a phil- 
anthropist as well as a well-known merchant of Xew York. He was 
an Alderman of the city, a \'estryman of Trinity Chtirch, and one of 
the incorporators and tirst liovernors of the Lyinji-in Hospital of Xew 
York City. He married [Margaret Stelle, granddaughter of Hon. 
ThomasGordon.one of the I,ords Proprietors of East Jersey,and great- 
granddaughter of t^ir (ieorge (lordon. Mr. Hamersley's grandfather, 
Lewis Carrt? Hamersley, was also a merchant, and Avas interested in 
many of the leading financial institutions of Xew York City. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Finney, of a prominent family of Accomac County, 
Va. His two sons were Andrew (iordon Hamersley, father of the 
late Lewis Carre Hamersley, and John William Hamersley, father 

of the present JauH-s Hooker Ham- 
ersley. Having no children, upon 
bis death in ISSS, Lewis Carre 
Hamersley left the income from the 
large estate inherited from his 
father to his widow, now the Duch- 
ess of ^larlborough, while upon her 
death the entire property reverts to 
the male heirs of Mr. James Hooker 
Hamersley. Through his mother, 
daughter of Hon. James Hooker, of 
Poughkeepsie, X. Y., the latter 
also descends from the famous Kev. 
Thomas Hooker, of Connecticut; 
John l\eade, after whom was named 
Red Hook, on the Hudson, and 
Hon. Josejjh Eeade, after whom 
was named Reade Street, Xew York 
( 'ity. Other ancestors of Mr. Ham- 
ersley were Robert Livingston, first 
lord of Livingston Manor; Captain Filyp Pieterse "S'an l?>chuyler; Hon. 
Brant Arentse Yan ?!chlichtenhorst, (Governor of the Colony of Rens- 
selaei-wyck in KUS. and Henry Reekman, patentee under Queen Anne 
for an immense tract of land in Dutchess C(Hintv, X'. Y. 




.JAMES IIOOKKK HAMKRSLKV. 



ABEEL. JOHX HOWARD, iron merchant, with his brother. 
George Abeel. is at the head of a business which was established by 
his great-grandfather, ^lajor (Jarret Abeel, a Revolutionary patriot, 
iu ITC)."). He is a member of the St. Xicholas, X'^ew York Athletic, 
Liederkranz, and Xassau Boat clubs, the St. Xicholas Society, and 
the Seventh Rei;iment Yeteran Association. He donated to tlie Sev- 



i:XCYCLOPEDIA OF XEW YORK F.IOGKAPHV. Til 

entb Eegimeut the Abed jiri/.c Inr ritlc iiraetice. lie is niimarrie<l. 
Born in this city in 1S4(I. lie is The sou of tlie late John Howard Abeel 
and Enieline. daughter of tlie hite Dr. .T(din <\ Stobel. He attended 
Dr. ("hai-h's Antlion's famous scjiool. and at the age of eighte<^u en- 
tered liis fatliei's hiisiiH'ss as a (lei'k. subsequently bccmuing a 
partner. 

LOIULLAIJD. riEEKE. head of The famous tobaccn mauufactory 
of 1'. Lcirillard. is known in both heniis])lieres as one of The notable 
breeders and owners (if tlKUoughbred horses. A sensation was cre- 
ated some yeais ago when his Amei-ican horse. " lro(|uois." won the 
English Deiby. I'or many years he has devoted mm-h of his time to 
racing in England. By the French (tovernnumt he was made a Chev- 
alier of The Legion of Honor, and in 1.S,S3 was made an ofdcer of That 
order, in i-ecognition (d" his co-operation in titting ouT The Two (''liarney 
archieological expeditions To explore The aucieuT ciTies of YucaTan 
and Central America. He is also the founder of Tuxedo Dark. He 
is a member of the I'atri;ir(dis, and of the Fnioii. Knickerbocker. Bac- 
quet. and New York Yacht clubs. He mai-ried, in 1858. Emily, daugh- 
ter of Dr. Isaac E. Taylor, of this city, one of the founders of Bellevue 
Hospital ^ledical College, and has a son, Pierre Lorillard, Jr., and 
two daughters, Mrs. ^Villiam Kent and ^Mrs. Thomas Suffern Taller. 
Another son. Griswold N. Lorillard, died unmarried at the age of 
twenty-tive. Born October 13. 18:'>:>, Pierre Lorillard. Sr., is the eldest 
child (d' the late Peter Lorillard and Catherine, daughter of Nathaniel 
L. Griswold, is the grandson of Peter A. Lorillard. who married a 
daughter of Major Schultz, of the Continental army, and with his 
brother, (Jeorge Lorillard. established The Tobacco manufacTory of 
which his grandson is uoav proprieTor, and is greaT-grandson (d' IVTer 
Lorillard, of I'rench HuguenoT descent, who emigraTed To Tlus coun- 
try from Holland, settled in Hackensack. X. J., and was killed by the 
Hessians during the Bevolution. 

EGLEST( )X, TH( >.MA>^ JEFFEBSOX, for more than a quarter of a 
century a prominent merchant of Xew Y'ork City, was born in Lenox, 
Mass., in 1800, and died in this city in 1S<>1. He married in 1S28, 
Sarah Jesup Stebbins, and liad live sons who reached maturity — 
David S., well-known iron merchant; Thomas, distinguished professor 
of Columbia College; William Couch, railroad director; George Wash- 
ington, and the late Henry Paris Egleston. He was the son of Major 
Azariah Egleston, of Lenox, INIass., who rose to the rank of Lieutenant 
in the ilassachusetts line during the Revolution; participated in the 
battles of Bunker Hill, the Cedars, Trenton, and Princeton, with the 
Canadian campaign atid the Valley I'orge experience; was Aid to 
General Paterson, with rank of Major, in J^hay's Rebellion: was a 
founder of the Societv of the Cincinnati; for thirty years was Justice 



80 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

of the Peace aud was Deputy to the General Court, State Senator, and 
Associate Justice of tlie Court of Sessious. The founder of tlie family 
in America, Bagot Eglestou, was boru in Exeter, Devonsliire, in 1590, 
mariied in England Mary Talcott, of Braintree, Essex; arrived in 
Boston in IGoO; was made a Freeman of Dorchester in 1631, and sub- 
sequently remo\ed to Windsor, Conn. 

EGLESTON, 1)A\'ID S., eldest surviving son of the late New York 
merchant, Thomas Jefferson Eglestou, has himself been for more than 
half a century successfully engaged as an iron merchant of this city. 
He is a trustee of the Seaman's Bank for Savings and is a director of 
the Bank of America and the Hanover Fire Insurance Company. He 
is a member of the Union, Metropolitan, and New York Yacht clubs, 
the Century Association, the Downtown Association, and the New 
England Society. He Avas boru in 1830, and engaged in business at an 
early age. He married Fannie Hawley. 

EGLESTON, THOMAS, liaving been graduated from Yale College 
and from the School of Mines of Paris, France, became the founder 
of the Columbia University School of Mines of this city, and has been 
its professor of mineralogy and metallurgy from January, 1861, to 
the present time. Says the " ^Memorial History of New York " (lY., 
p. 430) : " In March, 1863, Thomas Eglestou, a recent graduate of the 
Ecole des ]\Iines of Paris, prepared a ' plan for a school of mines aud 
metallurgy in New York City," in which he succeeded in interesting 
the trustees of Columbia, so that they consented to establish such a 
branch of the college on condition of its not being a burden upon 
the funds of the college." Professor Eglestou is a meuiber of the Gro- 
lier Club, the Century Association, the Scientific Alliance, the Sons 
of the Kevolutiou, the Society of Colonial Wars, and the Yale Alumni. 
He is also an ofHcer of the Legion of Honor of France. His wife was 
a Miss MoYickar. 

EGLESTON, WILLIAM COUCH, one of several brothers who 
have long been prominent in the business, social, and educational life 
of New York City, is the son of the late merchant, Thomas Jeffereon 
Eglestou. He was born in 1839, is a graduate of Yale College, and 
has been active in connection with railroad securities. He is at pres- 
ent a director of the Cleveland and Pittsburg Ixailroad Company, the 
Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Cliicago Kailroad Company, and the 
Massillon and Cleveland Railroad. He is a member of the Union and 
Metropolitan clubs and the Yale Alumni. 

SCHURZ, CARL, formerly United States Senator from Missouri 
and Secretary of the Interioi-, has been a resident of New York City 
since 1880. For some years he was editor of the New York Evening 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 81 

Post, aud has been prominent in reform movements and as a speaker 
on important public occasions. He is a director of the Germania Life 
Insurance Company, the Sprague Electric Company, the Interior Con- 
duit and Insulation Company, and the Witte Water Placer Company. 
He was born in Liblar, Prussia, March 2, 1829, and was educated at the 
Gymnasium of (Cologne and the University of Bonn. Ilaviuy, contrib- 
uted toward the Kevolution of 1848 as a journalist, forced to tlee from 
Bonn, he joined the Bevolutionary Army in Southern (Jermany and 
helped defend Bastadt. He escaped into SAvitzerland upon its cap- 
ture, but secretly returned and succeeded in liberating a friend from 
the fortress of Spandau on the night of November 0, 1852. lie was 
Paris correspondent of several < Jernian newspajiers, taught languages 
in London, emigrated to Philadelphia, and in 1855 settled in Madison, 
Wis., where he soon became active in support of the Bepublican party. 
His s[)eeches in his nati\e tongui^ aroused the (icrman element against 
slavery. In 1857 he was the unsuccessful Bepublican candidate for 
Lientenant-(TOvei-nor of Wisconsin. He took part in the Lincoln- 
Douglas vSenatorial debate in IlliTiois, making liis first si^eech in Eng- 
lish. He was practicing law in ^lihvaukee when President Lincoln 
appointed him United States ^finister to Sjiain. In December, 1801, 
however, he resigned, returning from S]>ain to go to the front. In 
April, 1862, he became Brigadier-General of A'olunteers in command 
of a division of the corps of General Lranz Siegel. He distinguished 
himself at the second battle of Bull Bun, and ilay 11, 18((o, was coni- 
missioned Major-General of Volunteers, commanding a division of 
General O. O. Howard's coi'jjs. He ]iartici])ated at Chancellorsville, 
Gettysburg, Fredericksburg, and Clialtanooga. After the war Pres- 
ident Johnson sent him through the South to report on the work of 
the Freedman's Bureau. In 18(;8 he was temporary Chairman of the 
convention which nominated (Jrant for the Presidency. From 1860 
to 1875 he was United States Senator from Missouri. He stood with 
Charles Sumner in o])posing some of Grant's measures, and jtresided 
over the convention \Ahicli nominated Horace Greeley for President 
in 1872. He favorc^l the resumption of specie payments, and opposed 
the retention of United States troops in the South. He sui)]iorted 
Hayes in 1876, and entered his cabinet as Secretary of the Interior. 
He introduced competitive examinations and provided for the protec- 
tion of the forests on the publie domain. From the close of tlie admin- 
istration until 1881 he was editor of the New York Eiriiiiig Post. He 
actively supported Grover Cleveland for President in 1881, 1888, aud 
1892. He has published " Speeches " ( 18()1), " Life of Henry Clay " 
(18871, and "Abraham Lincoln: An Essay" (1891). 

ANDBEWS, LOIHNG, born in Windham, X. Y., January 2L 1799. 
having learned the trade of a tanner and become his employer's ]iart- 
uer, in 1829 established himself in the leather business in New ^ork 



82 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

City, lu 1832 lir Ikmjiiiic the i>;ii-tiit'i- of ^\■illi;lln Wilsou, Gideon 
Lee, and Sliepherd l\ii;i|t]>, Iml duriiit; the ii;inic nf 1837 tlie firm 
failed. Tlciiinninfi anew, .Mi-. Aiidri'ws nc(iuiivd a lariic fortune and 
made many investment!^ in city real estate. The leather firm of Lor 
ing' Andrews & Company, which he organized in 18(>1, became one of 
the most ]iromiin'nt honses in liie trade. Tie was a fonn(h'r and tiie 
first Tresident of the Shoe and Leather Bank, a fonnder and tlie first 
President of the Globe Life Insurance Company, and a founder and 
original director of the :\Ie(dmnics' Bank. He gave .ijiKMI.OUO to found 
professorships in the Cniversity of New York. He married in ISSO 
Blandina B., daughter of Rev. James B. Hardenburgh, D.D., and had 
a daughter and six sons — William r.oring, James B., Constant A., 
Loriug. Jr., Walter S., and Clarence Andrews. Loring Andi-ews, Sr., 
died in this city Jannaiy 22, 187r>. He descended from William An- 
drews, one of 1 lie founders of \ew TLiven in 1038. 

ANDREWS, (CONSTANT A., President of the United States Realty 
Comi)any, President of the Elklun-n Valley Coal Land Com])any, and 
President of the United States Savings Bank, is the son of the late 
Loring Andrews, leather merchant, and one of tlie most prominent 
busitiess men of the city of his day, and is lineally descended from 
William Andrews, one of tlie founders of the New Haven Colony in 
1(529, and the builder of its first (diurcli. ^Ir. Andrews was born on 
Barclay Street, attended the Columbia College Grammar School, and 
comitieted his education in fiermany. Returning to this city when 
eighteen years of age, upon the outbreak of the Civil War, he joined 
with the late Colonel Frank E. Howe in establishing a hospital for 
sick and wounded soldiers at the corner of Broadway and Joiin Street. 
Later on he volunteered, joining the troops on the Pamunky River. 
Subsequently, for about ten years, he was associated in his father's 
mercantile and real estate interests, and after his death with his 
brother, William, closed up the leather business in 1879, retiring from 
that trade. He spent a few years abroad, and returning established 
himself as a private banker. Upon the organization of the United 
State.s Savings Bank he became its President, while he subseciuently 
became chief executive of the other important corporations mentioned 
above. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, Treasurer of 
the New York City Mission and Tract Society, ami Treasurer of the 
Charity Organization Society. He is a charter member of the INfan- 
Lattan Chib and was first Treasurer of the Reform Club. 

GOULD, JAY, was perhaiis the im)St conspicuous figure in the 
history of American finance. He was born in Roxbury, Delaware 
County, N. Y., May 27, 183(), and while he attended the local schools 
and sennnaries between the ages of five and sixteen, he Mas largely 
self-read and self-educated. He became his father's partner in a 
liardware store at Roxburv in the wintcu' of 18.")1, and sticcessfullv 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



83 



iiiaiiiii^ed llic entire business, inolndinji all jnircliases from whole- 
sale firms at Albany and New York Citr. At the same time he 
became pioticient at surveyinji throni;h seU'-study, and the follow- 
ing spring and summer was engaged in surveying Ulster Connty, 
K. Y., prepaiatory to the jmhlication of a map. His emi)loyer 
failing, with tAX'o fellow employees he ac(|nired the business an<l 
Piieeessfully rariied through the iiroject. I'vom this time until 1S."i(; 
he made actual surveys of the ground for maps of the town of Co- 
hoes and the counties of Albany, Sullivan, ami Delaware, of this 
State; sket(died and ])ublislied ma]>s for the same; collecled data for 
his "History of Delawaic ("onnty"; turned the manuscri])t in to 
his riiiladid])hia ](idilisher in the spring of lSr>r>, ami, receiving word 
of its destruction by tire, i-e-wrote the history with sm-h ra]iidity 
that it was ]>ublisiied in Seitleudier following; undertook and directed 
expeditions for the sur\'e_\- of 
counties iti Ohio and Michi- 
gan, and personally surveyed 
the route for the railroad be- 
tween Newburg and Syr- 
acuse, and for the Albany 
and IMuscaynna ])lank road. 
These exertions, which re- 
quired about twenty hours 
out of each twenty-four, jiros- 
trated him with tyi)lioid fever 
and ]>neuinonia. With the 
capital of |r),0(l(l thus ac- 
<|uired he launched a success- 
ful tanning enteri)rise at 
(iouldsboro. Pa. He founded 
this community, built mills 
and stores in addition to tlie 
large tannery, constructed 
a plank road, established a 
stage route, erected a school- 
house, and secured postal 

facilities, receiving the appointment as postmaster. Ue formed 
a partnership with the New Y'ork City h-ather tirni of Leiipp & 
Lee, which became heavily indebted to him through loans made 
by him and the signing of the tirm's paper. Some months sub- 
sequent to the (h-ath of Mr. Leupp. unable to secure an account- 
ing, he held some of the hides of Leupp & Lee as security. Dur- 
ing his absem-e in New York, Lee appeared at (iouhlsboro and 
seized the tanneiy, discharging (Jould's men. Upon his return, 
these and the m-ighboring farmers init rnemselves at Could's serv- 
ice, and, at the liead of a stornnng party, he retook the tannery, 




.7AY COIH.D. 



84 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

and subsequeutly defeated bis opponent at every point iu the courts. 
Mr. Gould was slandered through the public prints on account of this 
affair, but the complete documentary evidence which has come to 
light demonstrates that the attempt at wrong — at robbery, in fact 
— was entirely on the side of his slanderers, while Gould honestly 
met all his obligations on this as on all other occasions. When 
he disposed of this business he had amassed a considerable fortune. 
In 1860 he acquired a controlling interest in the Rutland and Wash- 
ington llailroad, its tirst mortgage bonds having fallen to ten cents 
on the dollar as a result of the financial panic of 1857. Gould be- 
came President, Treasurer, and General Superintendent of this road, 
developed the local traffic all along the line, and finally consoli- 
dated it with several small roads, creating the Eensselaer and Sara- 
toga Railroad, the stock of which he disposed of at 120. He was 
now able to acquire a controlling interest in the Cleveland and 
Pittsburg, the stock of which lie purchased at an average of 70. He 
similarly developed its local i-esources and made valuable alliances 
Avhich enabled him to lease the road to the Pennsylvania system. 
He then disposed of his stock at a large profit. His connection with 
the Erie was next in order of time, but we will defer reference to it 
for a moment. Following hi.s connection with the Erie, Gould be- 
gan to buy the stock of the Union Pacific at a time when it was at 
the verge of bankr\iptcy and selling at 30 and less. While he was 
buying it continued to decline to 15, but he kept on until the 
tide turned. He found bonds to the amount of ten million dollars 
due in a few months, and the directors at the point of selecting a 
receiver. He inspired coui-age, and met one-half of these bonds 
himself, while the other directors raised the other half between 
them. He went along the line, started coal mines, and developed 
other resources. The road soon began to jsay dividends and the 
stock rose to nearly 80. In February, 1879, he sold one hundred thou- 
sand shares of the stock at an average of 70 to a syndicate of in- 
vestors, and a little later sold a like amount at still better figures. 
The stock continued to rise until it reached a point twenty per cent, 
higher than ^[r. Gould's selling price. His motives were twofold, as he 
himself expressed them before the ITnited States Senate Commission 
of 1883, which was investigating for sociological purposes : " There 
seemed to aiise all at once on the part of the public a great outcry 
that it was ' Jay Gould's road.' However, I thought it was better 
to bow to public opinion, so I took an opportunity whenever I could 
to place the stock in investors' hands." The other motive was ap- 
parent when he at once purchased outright from Commodore Gar- 
rison the original ^lissouri Pacific, a line between St. Louis and 
Kansas City, three hundred miles long. " I had passed the time when 
I cared about mere money-making,'' he said. " My object in taking 
the road was more to show that I could make a combination and 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. So 

make it a .succi'ss. So I took this road and comiuenoed developiug 
it, brill, yi 11 ji' in other lines which wouhl be tributary to it, extendini; 
branches into new country where I couhl develop coal mines, and 
so on. I continued to develop that road until, I think, we have now 
in the system controlled by it about ten thousand miles of railroad." 
He was also the creator of the present Western Union Teleiii-aph 
system. He liad acquired stock in the Atlantic and Pacific Tele- 
graph Company alony, with the Union Pacific stock, this line being a 
rival of the ^N'estern Union Telegraph Company, controlled by the 
late William H. A'anderbilt. Mr. Gould brought about a consoli- 
dation of these companies, under agreement that General Eckert, 
General [Manager of the Atlantic and Pacific, should become General 
Manager of the reorganized W^estern Union. This was not carried 
out, and determined, as be said, to place General Eckert in charge 
of a telegraph company as large as that from which he had been 
removed, Mr. Gould established the American Union Telegraph 
Company. A war of extermination against the new enterprise was 
attempted by the Western Union, but the older and stronger enter- 
prise was worsted, Westei-n Union stock declined and was bought 
up by Mr. Gould, and eventually there was a surrender and settle- 
ment, the control of the W'estern Union passing from the ^'anderbilts 
to Gould, under whom it has assumed the supremacy among tele- 
graphic systems on the American continent which it enjoys at the 
])i'eseiit time. Similarly, Mr. (4ould invested in the stock of the 
Manhattan itailway Company when it was in the hands of a receiver, 
with the late Cyrus W. Field developed and improved the projjerty, 
and saw the stock rise nearly to 180. Against his advice, Mr. Field 
entered upon a course of artificial inliation, and was without re- 
sources when a reaction set in. To save his friend from utter ruin, 
Mr. Gould took nearly |8,000,000 of Field's stock at 120, although 
it immediately dropped to 77, and at the same time loaned him 
11,500,000 witliout security. Instead of gaining credit for this gen- 
erosity, (lould was credited with having ruined Field. Mr. John T. 
TeiTy, Avho represented Field at the time, declares that Mr. Ciould 
came to the rescue on this large scale " most reluctantly and at 
much personal inconvenience," and adds: "This transaction not 
only saved the parties, but beyond question saved a panic in New 
York. And yet there are probably thousands and tens of thousands 
of persons here and abroad who believe that Mr. Field was wronged 
by Mr. Gould." Probably no business man in the history of the 
country has been so unjustly vilified as Mr. Gould. In the connection 
just referred to, Mr. Terry remarked upon this as follows: " Mr. Gould 
has been for years the subject of much misrepresentation and un- 
reasonable abuse, partly from misapprehension and partly from 
malice. Those of his transactions which have been prompted by the 
best motives have been turned and twisted by attributing the Avorst 



36 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

possible motives to liini." >Jr. E. Ellery Audersoii, after bis investi- 
gation of the affairs of the Union Pacific Itailroad, said: " One thing 
always iuijiressed nie, and it is interesting in connection with cur- 
rent statements and some popular imim-ssions of the man. It is 
this: I have always found, even to the most trivial detail, that Mr. 
(lould lived up to the whole nature of his obligations." Ex-Gov- 
ernor Alonzo ]?. ('<u'nell declared: "I regarded him as one of the 
most remarkable men America has ]»roduced. As a l)usiness man 
lie was the most farsighted man 1 have ever known. He was the 
sold (tf honor in his ])ersonal integrity. His word passed in honor 
was as good as any bond he could make. He was the most misimder- 
stood man in this country." fTOuld had nothing to do with the de- 
])7-i'(iation of the values of the stocks he purchased. He simply 
took up properties which others had failed to place upon a paying 
basis, and having a genius for organization, executive management, 
and tlie develoiunent of all available resources, transformed corpo- 
rations whicii had been brought to the brink of bankruptcy into 
diviilend-earning companies. The proof that he had jjlanned to re- 
juvenate the JOrie in precisely the same way in which he did every 
other road lie controlled exists in the fact that he actually acquired 
the coal fields wliich have since remained the most valuable assets 
of that corporation. P.ut he was handicapjied thi-ough having the 
unscrupulous "Jim" Fisk and Daniel Drew as his associates. Com- 
modore Vandei'bilt was also seeking to gain control of the Erie, and, 
although (iould defeated him, the resulting notoriety alarmed the 
English stockholders, and the executive control passed into other 
hands. Pxtrn in Poxbury, Delaware County, N. Y., May 27, 1836, 
Jason Gould was the son of Jidin Burr Gould and Mar^-, daughter 
of John ilore. His grandfather, Captain Abraham Gould, and his 
great-grandfather. Colonel Abraham Goidd, were officers in the Pevo- 
lution, the latter being killed while opposing the Pritish forces un- 
der General Tryon. His great-great-grandfather, Hon. Nathan Gould, 
of Fairfield, Conn., was both Chief Justice and Deputy Governor of 
the Colony of Connecticut, and was in turn the son of the eminent 
Major Nathan Gould, who, having in l(I4(i ciuigrated from St. Ed- 
iiiondsbnry, England, to Fairfield, Gonn., was fi-om 1057 to 1094 a 
member ot the Gonnecticut Council, and one of the jietitioners for 
the Connecticut Charter. He was of gentle blood and an armiger. 
Jay Gould also descend<Ml from Ca]ilain John Pun-, and the latter's 
father. Colonel John P>urr, of I'airtield, Coun., of an ancient knightly 
family of Suffolk, England, as likewise from Lieutenant-Colonel John 
Talcott, of Hartford. Conn. On January 22, 1808, Mr. Gould married 
Helen Day, daughter of Hon. Daniel S. IMiller. of Greenville, N. Y., 
who had earlier been a wholesale merchant of New York City. Both 
])a rents have pre-deceased all their children — George J. Gould, Edwin 
(iould, Helen Miller Gould, Howard Gould, Anna (Countess Cas- 
tellaue), and Frank J. Gould. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 87 

GOULD, (lEORGE JAY, eldest son of the late eminent railroad 
financier, Jay Gould, and Helen Day, daujiliter of Daniel S. Miller, 
wholesale merchant of New York City, is I'resident of the Manhat- 
tan Hail way. President of the Missouri Pacific Railway Company, 
President of the Texas and Pacific Railway Com]iany, President of 
the International and (ircat Noithern Railroad Company-, and sus- 
tains the same relation to nine other important railroad corpora- 
tions. He is also a director of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, 
the Mercantile Trust Comjiany, tlie National Surety Company, the 
New York Telephone Company, the Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany, the Pacific ^lail Stcanislii]) Com])any, the Union Pacific Rail- 
way Company, the Wabash Railroail < 'ompany, an<l a number of other 
railway companies. He has taken an active interest in yachting and 
is a mend)er of the New York Yacht, Larchmont Yacht, American 
Yacht, and Atlantic Yacht clubs, as well as of the New York, Coun- 
try, New York Athletic, Lawyers', and other clubs, and tlie Sons 
of tlie Revolution. Having ])urcliased tlie A'igilant, the successfid 
defender of the America cuji, in 18114 he sailed this yaclit in many 
international events in European waters, and in one race succeeded 
in defeating tiie Prince of Wales's celebrated P>ritannia. He was born 
in this city in 1804, was educated in private schools and under private 
tutors, and was his father's confidential assistant for many years 
prior to the death of the latter. He married Editli Kingdon, of 
Brooklyn, and has two daughters, and three sons — Kingdon, Jay, and 
George J. Gotdd, Jr. 

GOULD, ED\YIN, second son of tlie late Jay Gould, is Yice-Presi- 
dent of the St. Louis Southwestern Railway Company, First Yice- 
President of the St. Louis Soutlnvesteru Railway Company of Texas, 
and a director of the Traders' Fire Insurance Company, the Western 
Union Telegra])h Company, the INIanhattan Railway, the Missouri 
Pacific Railroa<l Company, the Wabasli Railroad Company, the Amer- 
ican Speaking Telephone Com]»any, the International Ocean Tele- 
gi-a|di Company, the International and Great Northern Railroad Com- 
])any, the Kansas City and Arkansas Yalley Railway, the Little Rock 
and Fort Smith Railway, and the Little Rock Junction Company. 
He was born in New Yoi'k City in 1860, and was graduated from 
Columbia College in 1888. He Avas at one time a member of Troop 
A, and subse(iuently was ai)pointed Inspector of Rifle Practice to 
the Seventy-first Regiment, with the raidc of Captain. He has made 
several gifts to Columbia University. He is a member of the Coun- 
try, New York Athletic, LawycM's', Atlantic Yacht, Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, and Essex County Country clubs, and the Sons of the Revo- 
lution. 

<U)ULD, HOWARD, third son and fourlli cliild of the late eminent 
Jay Gould and his wife, Helen Day :Miller, was born in New York 



88 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

City June 8, 1871. He was educated at Columbia College, but 
prior to his college oouree, as well as since, he participated in the 
executive uianagement of the large interests of his family. At the 
present time he is Vice-President of the Tyler Southeastern Eail- 
way Company, and a director of the Traders' Fire Insurance Com- 
pany of XeAV York, the (lold and Stock Telegraph Company, the 
Manhattan Railway, the Missouri Pacific IJailroad Company, the 
Texas and Pacific Railway Company, the Iron Mountain and South- 
ern Railroad C(uupany, the International and Great Northern Rail- 
road Company, the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railway, the Kansas 
City Xorthwestern Railroad Company, and the Kansas City and Ar- 
kansas "\'alley Railway. He is also ijrominently identified with the 
pneumatic-tube system operated in connection with the New York 
Postortice. He is a member of the New York Stock Exchange, of the 
New York Athletic, Lawyers', Delta Kappa Epsilon, New York 
Yacht, American Yacht, Larchmont Yacht, Atlantic Yacht, and Sea- 
wanhaka-Corinthian Yacht clubs, of New York City, and the Largo 
Yacht and Royal Alfred Yacht clubs, of England, and is an 
honorary member of the Royal Cork Yacht Club of Ireland. He 
was half-owner of the yacht Vigilant throughout her racing course 
in European waters in 18i>4, when she succeeded in winning a race 
from the Prince of Wales's Britannia. He is also the owner of the 
cutter Niagara, with which he won sixty prizes in races with English 
yachts during the seasons of 1895 and 1896. 

GOULD, HELEN AIILLER, eldest daughter of the late Jay Gould, 
has distinguished herself as a philanthropist and patriot. She 
erected a church in memory of her father near his birthplace in Dela- 
ware County, New York, and has contributed to schools and other 
causes there. She has endowed colleges and other educational insti- 
tutions, and has established many scholarships for the hel]) of yoimg 
men of limited means, notably in connection with the rnivcrsity of 
New York. She is herself a graduate of the Law Department of the 
last-named institution, having taken this course that she might be the 
more competent to discharge the responsibilities connected with the 
large fortune which she inherited from her father. She has been an 
active worker and liberal ]>atron in many movements to aid the poor, 
— es])e(ially poor children, in New York City and elsewhere, — and 
has contributed to hospital work in Westchester County. Just prior 
to tlie recent war with Spain she gave her check for .flOO.OOO to the 
Federal Government, for use in the National cause, and gave thou- 
sands of dollars tin'ough other agencies, offlcial and unofficial, to ren- 
der more comfortable the soldiers in the field, camp, and hospital. 
She also cared for many sick and convalescent soldiers at her home, 
'' Lyndhurst," Irving^ton-on-the-Hudson. In recognition of these 
services, Con^vess gave her a vote of thanks, and ordered a medal 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 89 

struck in her lioDor. She is the only womau ever so honored by the 
Congress of the United States. 

BOGART, JOHN, a civil engineer of national reputation, has been 
professionally connected with notable public enterprises in New York 
City and Brooklyn. He was engaged in the original construction of 
Central Park; laid out Prospect I'ark, Brooklyn; from 1872 to 1877 
was Chief Engineer to the 1 )e]>artment of Public Parks of New York 
City, was Engineer-in-Chief to the Brooklyn Park Commission, was 
Resident Engineer in the construction of ^Vasliington Bridge over 
the Harlem, and was Consulting Engineer to the Rapid Transit Com- 
mission. He also laid new lines for the New York Central Railroad 
Company, was engaged in the enlargement of the Erie, and other 
State canals; laid out the West Chicago parks, the State Capitol 
grounds, Nashville, Tenn.; the Albany park, wluch he likewise de- 
signed, and did similar work for New Orleans. In the engineering 
seiTiee of the Government during the Civil War he constructed the 
heavy fortifications on the Rip Raps in Hampton Roads, and incident- 
ally witnessed the duel between the ilerrimac and 31(mitor. He is a 
director and the Secretary of the American Society of Civil En- 
gineers. In 1887 he was elected State Engineer of New York. He 
declined the appointment as Commissioner of Public Works, of- 
fered him upon the resignation of General Newton in 1888. He has 
been Consulting Engineer of the State Board of Health, and to the 
Commission to Store and Develop the Water Power of the Genesee 
River. He holds a similar position with the Cataract Construction 
Company, engaged in the project for utilizing the water power of Ni- 
agara Falls. The son of the late John Henry Bogart, a prominent 
merchant of Albany and New York, and Eliza, daughter of John 
Hermans, of Albany, he was born in the latter city, February 8. 182(), 
attended the Albany Academy, and in 1853 was graduated from Rut- 
gers College. His grandfather. Johannes Bogart, was a notable nav- 
igator on the Hudson Iviver, a lineal descendant of Cornells Bogaert, 
who came from Holland to Rensselaerwyck in KJlO, and was, in turn, 
the son of Cornells, and grandson of Tennis Bogaert, both of Schoeu- 
derwoert, near Leerdam, Holland. Mr. Bogart is a member of the 
Holland and St. Nicholas societies, the Century Association, and the 
University, Lawyers', Engineers', Delta Phi, and Essex County clubs. 

ARTHUR, CHESTER ALAN, was elected Mce-President of tlie 
United States in the fall of 1880, and became its President, Septem- 
ber 20, 1881, consequent upon the assassination and death of President 
Garfield. His administration was conservative. In the National 
Republican Convention of 1881 he received 278 votes on the first 
ballot for the Presidential nomination, although James G. Blaine 
finallv received the nomination. :Mr. Arthur died at his home in 



90 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



^sew \'(>rk < 'it y, November 18, 188(>. He was boru iu Fairfield, Vt., 
October 5, 1830, the son of Rev. William Arthur and Melvina Stone. 
His fatlier was a Baptist minister, a native of Ireland, who was edu- 
cated at Belfast College, subsequently coming to America, lie held 
pastorates at Albany, N. Y., and other places, edited a magazine, 
com])iled a reference work on surnames, and did other literary work 
in connection with history and the classics. President Arthur was 
graduated from Union College in 1848, read law, was principal of an 
academy in Vermont for a short time, and. cnnijileting his law studies 
with Erastus 1). Culver, of New York City, in 1853, became a member 
of the law firm of Culver, Parker & Arthur. In 1852 he was one of 
the counsel for the negroes in the famous Lemmon slave case, being 
associated with ^Villiam M. Evarts and opposed by Charles O'Conor. 

In the suit of Lizzie Jennings in 
1855 he established the right of 
colored persons to ride in the 
street cars of this city. He was one 
of Iheorganizersof thellepiiblican 
party in the State of New York. 
In 1861 and 18G2 he served on the 
staff of (iovernor E. 1). ^lorgan as 
Engineer-in-Chief, with the rank 
of Brigadier-General. ^Mien the 
war began he also became Acting 
Quartenuaster-Geueral, with head- 
quarters in this city, and was effi- 
cient in pre])ari7ig and sending for- 
ward the troops of the State. Be- 
tween 1802 and 1867 he practiced 
law in ]>artnership with Henry G. 
Gardner, and during the next live 
years practiced alone, also serving as counsel to the Department of 
Taxes of the city. In December, 1871, President Grant appointed 
him Collector of the Port of New York, while about the same time he 
organized the law firm of Arthur, Phelps & Knevals. He continued 
as Collector until President Ha,yes, as a stroke against the Conkling 
faction in the State of New York, removed liim from office in 1S78. 
He then resumed his law practice as head of the firm of Arthur, 
Plie]]is, Knevals & Ransom. In the Republican National Convention 
of 1880 he united with Conkling in the unsuccessful attempt to nomi- 
nate Grant for a third term. The selection of Garfield as Presiden- 
tial nominee and of Arthur as candidate for 1lie Mce-Presidency was 
a compiomise arrangement in the convention. 




CHESTER AL.\X .ARTHUR. 



PEABOT)Y. CHARLES AFGUSTrS, studied law at Baltimore 
in the office of Natlianiel Williams, I'nited States District Attornev 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 91 

for Maiyhind, iind in tlu' llaiviiid Law 8ehool, and iu 1839 engaged 
in practice in New Yorlc City. He was one of the founders of the 
Kepnhlicnn party iu tliis State in 1855. In 1856 tlie (Joveruor ap- 
pointed liiui a justice of tlie t>upreine Court. Two years later he 
succeeded Horatio Seymour as tiuarantiue Commissioner. In 1802 
President Lincoln appointed liim sole Judge of the United States Pro- 
visional Court of Louisiana, jirobably the most extraordinary tribunal 
ever constituted under the United States Government. Judge Pea- 
body was (Mni>owered to make his own court rules, appoint his own 
court officers, and hear causes of every kind which could come before 
any court, while there could be no appeal from his decisions. Many 
claims of foreign governments against the United States for commer- 
cial damages sustained by their sul»jects came before him. In 1863 
he was appointed Chief Justice of Lotiisiana, but resigned in LS65 
and resunii'd the jiiactice of law in this city. He is a vice-president 
of the Association for the Keform of the Law of Nations and has 
frequently attended its annual meetings in Eurojie. He is a member 
of the American Historical Association and contributed to its collec- 
tions a monogra])!! on the extraordinary court of which he was judge. 
He is a member of the Union League, Century. Cliurch, and Harvard 
clubs, and the City liar Association. His first wife was -lulia Caroline, 
datighter of James Duane Livingston and granddaughter of llobert 
Livingston, last lord of Livingston Manor; his second wife was Mariah 
E., daughter of John C. Hamilton and granddaughter of Alexander 
Hamilton; his third wife is Athenia, daughter of Antliony Kutgers 
Livingston and granddaughter of Kobert, last loi-d of Livingston 
Manor. His surviving children include one daughter — ^Irs. Charles 
J. Nourse, Jr. — and three sons — Charles Augustus I'eabody, Jr., Pro- 
fessor George I. Peabody, M.D.. and Philip <Tlendower Peabody, 
lawyer, of Boston. All ids (dnldren were by his first wife. Mr. Pea- 
body was born in Sandwich, N. IT., July 1(1, 1811, the son of Samuel 
Peabody and Abigail Wood. His father was graduated from Dart- 
mouth College and was a prominent lawyer. His grandfathei-, Kicli- 
ard Peabody, was au officer in the Kevolution. The founder of the 
family in America, Francis Peabody, of Welch descent, canu^ to 
Massacliusetts in 1685 from St. All)aiis, England. 

AUCHINCLOSS, JOHN W., from 1880 to 1801 head of the dry- 

g Is conimissicui firm of Auchincloss Brothers, which his father, 

John Auchincloss. and his grnndfathei', Hugh Auchincloss, had man- 
aged before him, in the latter year retired from the active (Jii-ectinn 
of the Inisiness to give his attention to his many other interests. 
He is a trustee of the :\rutual Life Insurance Company, and a director 
of the National Safe Deixisit Company, the Illinois Central Railroad 
Company, the Belleville and Southern Illinois Bailroad Comi)any, 
and the Yazoo and :\lississiiii>i Valley Pailroad Comiiany. lie is a 



92 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

member of the ]Metropolitau, Uniou League, University, and other 
clubs. He was born in New Yorlc City, April 12, 1853, and was 
graduated from Yale in 1873. He married Joanna H., daughter of 
the late Charles H. IJussell. He has a summer place at Bar Harbor, 
Me. 

AUCHINCLOSt^, HliGH D., second son, and, with his brother, 
John W., the successor in the drygoods commission business of the 
late John Auchincloss, was born in Newport, K. I., July 8, 1858, and 
was graduated from Yale College in 1879. He was engaged with his 
brother from 1880 to 1801 in the management of the house their 
grandfather had founded, but in the latter year both brothers re- 
tired from active business. He is interested in many important 
corporati(ms, however, and is an officer of several. He is a trustee 
of the Bowery Savings Bank and the Consolidated Gas Company, and 
is a director of the Bank of the [Manhattan Company, the Farmers' 
Loan and Trust Company, and the Syracuse, Bingliamton and New 
York Railroad Company. He is a member of the ^Metropolitan, Union 
League, University, and New York Yacht clubs. He mai'Hed Emma 
B., daughter of the late Oliver B. Jennings. He has a summer home 
at Newport. 

FEARING, CHARLES NYE, long engaged in the drygoods com- 
mission business in the City of New York, was the brother of the late 
Daniel Butler Fearing, also a well-known New York merchant, and 
was the son of William I'earing, a sliipping merchant of ^Lassachu- 
setts, who was borii \n 1771 and died in 1815, and his wife, Elizabeth 
Nye; and was tlK^ grandson of General Israel Fearing, born in 1717, 
died in 182G, who was a Revolutionary soldier and Brigadier-( icneral 
of the Massachusetts Militia, and who married Lucy Bourne. General 
Fearing was fifth in descent from John Fearing, who came from Eng- 
land to Ilingham, [Mass., in 1()38, and was a prominent officeholder. 
Charles Nye Fearing was born in 1812, and was graduated from 
Bi-own University. Two of his sons still survive him — Charles F. 
and William Henry Fearing, of this city, while a third, the late Ed- 
ward Swan Fearing, died in 1881. Their mother was Mary, daughter 
of Benjamin L. Savjui. 

FEARING, DANIEL BUTLER, an elder brother of the late 
Charles Nye Fearing, was long a prominent merchant of New York 
City. He was born in 1801, and married Harriet Richmond, of Provi- 
dence, R. I. His surviving son. Colonel George Richmond Fearing, 
principally resides at Newport, R. I., as also did the elder son, the 
late Henry Seymour Fearing, who died in 1886. The present Daniel 
Butler Fearing, of Newport, is the son of Henry Seymour Fearing, 
and from his father inherited the Newport estate which his grand- 
father once owned. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



93 



FEARING, CHARLES F., fornu'rly an active stockbroker of New 
York City, aud more recently au extensive traveler abroad, is the elder 
survivino- son of the late ('harles Nye Fearing, well-known dryg(iods 
commission merchant of New York. He was born in this city, and in 
1863 was graduated from Harvard College. He is a member of the 
Sons of the American Revolution and the Union, Metropolitan, Har- 
vard, and Southside Sportsmen's clubs. 

FEARING, WILLIAM HENRY, importing merchant of this city, 
is a brother of Charles F. Fearing and the son of the late Charles Nye 
Feai-ing, who was long engaged in the drygoods commission trade in 
this city. Mr. Fearing is a member of the Union, iletropolitan, and 
Tuxedo clubs and other organizations. He married Gertrude, daugh- 
ter of Joseph Lea, of Philadelphia, and has three sous — Joseph Lea, 
William Henry, Jr., and Frederick Charles Fearing. Mr. Fearing was 
born in New York Citv. 



:\rORGAN, JUNIUS SPENCER, the famous London banker, and 
the father of J. Pierpont Morgan, of New York City, was himself for 
some time a resident of this city, and in the- banking business here, 
and will be rememliered for his gift to the ^Metrojiolitan Museum of 
Art of the valuable painting by 
Sir Joshua Reynolds, which he 
acijuired for the purpose of tins 
donation. He was born in Ire- 
land (now West Springfield i , 
Mass., April 14, 1S13, and di<^d 
at Monte Carlo, April 8, 1890. 
He learned the banking business 
with Alfred Welles, of Boston. 
For eighteen months subsequent 
to July, 1834, he was a member 
of the New York banking firm 
of Morgan, Ketchum & Cora- 
pany. During the next seven- 
teen years he was a drygoods iii<n- 
chant, his first partnership being 
with the firm of Howe, Mather & 
Conii)any, of Hartford. Conn., 
wiiich subsequently became 

Mather, :\rorgan i^i: Company. Witli James M. Heebe, of Boston, be 
foniied in 1851 the celebrated firm of J. M. Bcebe, :\Iorgan & (\)mpany, 
one of the largest drygoods establishments in the United States. He 
visited Europe in 1853, and, as a result, became a partner, October 
1, 1851. in tlie well-known London banking liouse of George Peabody 
& Company. Upon the retirement of Mr. I'eabody in 18(;4, he became 




a^ 



.TUXICS SrKXCER .MOR(i.\N". 



94 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

head of the lunise, its stvle rliiuiiiiug to J. S. Morgan & Company. Un- 
der this stvh' its fame and intlnence were greatly increased. During 
the Civil AVar Mr. ^lorgan rendered important financial services to 
the Federal Government, in conjunction with his son, J. I'ierpont 
Morgan, then in the banking business in New York (_'ity. Mr. Jlor- 
gau established in 188(>, in nieniory of his mother, the Sarah Morgan 
Fund for the or]dian asylum of Hartford, ('onn. He also contributed 
liberally to Trinity College, of the same city. He was lineally de- 
scended from Cai)tain Miles Morgan, l»orn in Bristol, England, in 
161(), who landed at Boston, in April, Kii'd, joined Colonel William 
Pynclion's expedition to Spiingfield, Mass., of which he became one 
of the founders, and served against the Indians in King Philip's War. 
The citizens of Springfield in 1870 ei-ected a bronze statue to his 
memory in the public s(]uare of that lity. He was the great-grandson 
of Sir John ;\Iorgan,his line including such other families of the Welsh 
nobility as the Llewellyns and Ivors, and was descended from the 
celebrated Cadivorfawr, a chieftain of Dyfed, or rembrokesliire, who 
died 1089 A.D. ilr. Morgan married Juliet, daughter of the late Rev. 
John Pier]iont, tlie versatile poet and abolitionist, a gi-aduate of Yale 
and the Harvard Divinity Scliool, ]»astor in Boston, New Y'ork, and 
elsewlieic, candidate of the Liberal party for Governor of Massachu- 
setts, and of the Free Soil ])arty for Congress, and Chaplain in 
the Civil War at the age of seventy-six. He was descended from 
the family of Pier](()nt, dukes and <'arls of Kingston, the first of the 
line in America being JoJiu l'i('i]Miut. of Boxbury. ^lass., son of James 
I'ierpont, of London, England. 

:\I()BGAX, JOHN PIEBPOXT, as senior member of the London 
banking house of J. S. 3Iorgan & Conijtany, and of the New York 
house of J. P. ^lorgan & Company, is at the head of two of the most 
powerful financial houses of the world, situated, respectively, in the 
financial capitals of the two hemisi)lieres. He was born in Hartford, 
Conn., April 17, 1837, attended the Boston High School, completed 
his education at the University of (Jottingen, Germany, and in 1857 
entered the New York banking firm of Duncan, Sherman & Company. 
In 18*)(l lie became the agent and altoniey in the United States of 
George I'eabody \; Com])any, of I^ondon, with which famous Iianking 
house his father, the late Junius S. ^Morgan, had been connected as 
partner since ls.">4. When the latter became head of the London 
house in ISCt, under the style of J. S. ^Morgan & Com|)any, Jlr. J. 
Pierjionl .Morgan became a member of the closely allied New York 
firm of Dabney, Morgan & Company, which his financial skill brought 
into great prominence. But the ci-owning stroke, in the alliance of 
capital and connections, was consummated in 1871, in the organi- 
zation of the New York firm of Drexel, Morgan & Company. In in- 
timate connection with this fiini were thus brought the firms of Drexel 



EXCVCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 95 

& Company, of Philadeliihia; J. !r^. Morgan & Company, of Londnn, 
and Drexel, Hai'jes & Company, of Paris, with tlie lesser conuettions 
of each. Mr. Autliony J. Drexel soon retired from active hnsiiicss, 
an<l liis death left 3Ir. ^lorgau nominal as well as actual head i>i tlie 
New ^■<)I•k house, which was reorganized under its jjresent style of 
J. I', .^lorgan & Company. The death of his father, in 1890, also left 
Inm licad of the London hnuse of J. 8. Morgan ic Company. In ((Hi- 
junction with his father, during the Civil War, Mr. Morgan rendered 
impoi-tant services to the Federal Government. During the second 
Cleveland administration he not nn-rely guaranteed the success of an 
immense bond issue, but to avert a jianic, at a time when tlie jMibiic 
credit had become seriously im]>aired, he accomplished the unprece- 
dented undertaking, scoffed at as chimerical and absurd, of con- 
trolling exchange, so as to prevent the witlidrawal of gold from tlie 
United States Treasury for ex])ort. l>ut the most remarkable achiinc- 
ment of ^Ir. ^lorgan has Ix^en tlie emph)\-menl of his power to gi\"e to 
tlie chief American securities a stability pre\iously unknown and 
seemingly unattainable. Fimimiers do Tiot n(»ed to be reminded of 
the ruin(uis and diaotic state of affairs a few years ago, when railroad 
companies and other great cor[)orations too often conducted tlu'ir 
affairs in the belief that good financiering re(|uired wars of exter- 
mination against all competitois. Not only was a condition of 
(diroiuc uncertainty and instability thus produced, l>ut the frecpient 
wrecking of great enterprises was constantly entailing ruin ujion in- 
vestors, and deterring others from touching these stocks. To this 
situation ^Ir. Jlorgan addressed himself. The tinnucial interests at 
his command enaliled him to form connections with great rivals, and 
to have an inii)ortant voice in the affairs of eaidi. It could not be 
expected that his interest in the one could make agreeable to him 
a raid upon his interest in the other, and he was able to firing con- 
vincing arguments in demonstration that the interests of all alike 
would be best served if the great energies Avasted in mutual brigand- 
age were utilized in developing the resources natui'ally behniging to 
each. Perhaps the first instance of this kind affecting immense in- 
terests wliicli reached tlie public ear was tlie case of the New York 
Central and Pennsylvania Railroad systems. The former had been 
poaching upon the coal preserves of Pennsylvania, while the latter, 
in retaliation, had been extending aid and comfort to the West Shore, 
the new rival of the Central in this State. In the rate-war which 
resulted the AN'est Shore was well nigh extenninated. Out of such a 
state of affairs the power and skill of Mr. Morgan were able to bring 
peace and prosperity to all concerned. The rival systems ceased their 
encroachments, A\hile the stockholders of the West Shore were saved 
by the placing of that line under the auspices of its erstwhile enemy, 
the New York Central, which now as a friend and ally was able to 
throw prosperity in its way. Not less notable was the financial resur- 



96 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

rectiou of ilie i'liiladelpliia and Iteading iu 1887, when Mr. Murgau 
formed a syndicate of capitalists and reorganized this road. For the 
Erie, tlie Xorthern Pacitic, and the Southern Kaihvay he successfully 
performed similar services, bringing them back to financial life when 
they seemed to have suffered hopeless collapse. Thus we find a policy 
inaugurated, on the principle of a great financial balance of powei*, 
whereby its author conserves interests which otherwise would be 
engaged in conflicts mutually injurious and destructive — a policy 
which enables its author to maintain in very practical ways the rela- 
tion of mutual friend toward such competitors as the Pennsylvania 
and the Philadel]ihia and Peading, and toward the New York Cen- 
tral and West ^>hore on the one side, and the Erie on the other. Who 
has not heard of the savage camiiaigiis of the past between the Van- 
derbilt and Gould interests? To-day we find Mr. Morgan upon the 
directorate of the New York Central and the Western Union Telegraph 
Company alike, tlie West Shore, and the Manhattan. If domestic 
peace and internal harmony and confidence have resulted from this 
policy, it has been no less effective in bringing foreign investors to 
our dooi's. Mr. Morgan is a director of a large number of corpo- 
rations, while the various members of his firm represent the house 
on the directorates of many nuu'e. He was a member of the syndi- 
cates that erected the Madison ^(luare <iar(len and the new Metro- 
politan Opera House. He has presented valualde paintings to the 
Metropolitan ]\luseum of Art, and for the ^Museum of Natural History 
acquired the uui(uie and exceedingly valuable collection of Ameri- 
can gems and gem minerals exhibited by Tiffany & Company at the 
Paris Exposition. He endowed the New York Trade School for half 
a million dollars, and erected St. George's Memorial House. He is 
President of the Metropolitan Club, and a member of tlie Union, 
Union League, Century, Knickerbocker, Ttixedo. Piding, l!a((iuet, 
Players', Lawyers', Whist, New Y'ork Yacht, and Seawanhaka-Cor- 
inthian Y'acht clubs. 

CHANLEPi, WlNTHKUl', is the sou of the late Hon. John Win- 
throp Chanler, a leading lawyer and Democi'atic leader of this city, 
Avho was elected to the Assembly and to Congress. His mother 
was JIargaret Astor, only daughter of Samuel Ward, Jr. He is the 
grandson of Kev. John White Chanler, an Episcopal clergyman, and 
Elizabeth Sherilfe Wiuthrop, a descendant of Governor John Win- 
throp. His great-grandfather, Dr. Isaac Chanler, a prominent physi- 
cian of Charleston, was the first President of the South Carolina Medi- 
cal Society, and a Surgeon in the Continental Army during the Pevo- 
lution. Mr. Wiuthrop ('hauler is Secretary and Treasurer of the Roan- 
oke Rapids Power Company, and a member of the LTnion, Knicker- 
bocker, Tuxedo, City, Racquet, and Players' clubs, of New York, and 
the Metropolitan Club, of Washington. He was born in New York 
City. His wife is Margaret, daughter of John Terry. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 97 

AVERY, SA:\irEL PUTNAM, li:i8 louy been ideutitied with the 
progress of art in tlie United States. lu l.SC)!, Secretary of State 
William H. Seward appointed him United States Commissioner in 
charge of the Amerieau Fine Art L)ei>artment at tlie I*aris Universal 
Exliibition. In lS(i8 he began to deal in art works, and being intimate 
with many foreign artists lie became an extensive importer and in- 
troducer of their pictures in this couutry. He retired from active 
business in 1887. In 1870 he was Secretary of the Art Committee of 
the Union League Club, which called the meeting leading to the 
foundation of the Metropolitan ^luseinn of Art. He has beeu atrustee 
of this institution from the beginning, and is Chairman of its Com- 
mittee of Art. In memory of his lamented sou, Henry Ogdeu Avery, 
the brilliant young artist-architect, he founded the Avery Architec- 
tural Library at Columbia University. He contributed to Lossing's 
*• History of New York City "" a chapter on the " Progress of the Fine 
Arts in New York during Viity Years." He was born in this city, 
:\Iarcli 17, 1822, tlie son of the \n\v Samuel P. Avery. He early learned 
to engrave on steel, with a banknote company, but soon took up wood- 
engraving, which he followed until 1860, illustrating for Harjier & 
P>rothers, and other well-known Arms. 

CHURCH, BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, the well known civil engineer, 
has been prominently connected with some of the most important pub- 
lic works in this city. Prior to the Civil ^Yar he was engaged on the 
surveys of Central Park, the Croton River, and the new reservoir in 
Central Park. He was appointed principal assistant on the Croton 
Aqueduct in 18(10, but upon the outbreak of war became Captain of 
Engineers in the Twelfth New ^"ork. He was on General Y^ates's staff 
in this capacity in 180r>. After the war he served in the National 
Guard as Colonel of Engineers on the staff of General Shaler, as also 
on that of General Louis Fitzgerald. In 1875 he prepared the plans 
for utilizing the entire Croton watershed, and in 188:J became Chief 
Engineer under the commission lia\ing in liand tlie construction of 
the new aqueduct. While he retired from the direction of the con- 
struction in 1889, his plans have been carried out in the completion 
of the work. Including tunneling under the Harlem River and for 
thir-ty miles through solid rock, this work takes high rank among 
engineering achievements. He has been occupied since principally 
in hydraulic and mining operations. He is a member of the Union 
League and other clubs and societies. He was born at Belvidere, 
N. Y., April 17, 1836, the son of the late John B. Church and a daugh- 
ter of Professor Benjamin Silliman, Sr., of Yale; grandson of Judge 
Philip Church and Anna [Matilda, daughter of General Walter Stew- 
art, of the Revolution, and great-grandson of the distinguished Revo- 
lutionary patriot, John Barker Church, Commissary-General to the 
French forces, and brother-in-law of Alexander Hamilton. Colonel 



98 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

Chxircli Avas iiiadualcd in ISod from the Eugiueeniiy Depurlmeut of 
Dartiiiimt li ( "ollege. 

CAEEY, HENE^' T., hanker and hruker, uf this< rilv, and a mem- 
ber of the New York Stock Exchange since 1868, is a director of the 
Second National T?ank, and intei'ested in various entc^rprises. He 
is a member of the Metrop<ditan, Union Leagne, Tnxedo, and South 
Side Sportsmen's ohibs. He is the sou of the late Samuel Thomas 
Carey, who, having, in 1845, married Marion, daugliter of the late 
(ieorge de Peyster, made his residence in this city, although his father, 
Samuel Carey, was of distinguished lineage and had a large estate in 
Surrey, England, where the family had been seated for many genei'a- 
tions. 

GEKKY, ELP.ini)(!E TIlo^lAS, has won an international reputa- 
tion as President of the Soeiety for the Prevention of (/ruelty to Chil- 
dren. Born in this city in 1837, he was graduated in 1857 from Colum- 
bia (College, studied law Avith the late ^Villiam Curtis Noyes, and in 
1800 was admitted to the New York bar and to iiractice in the 
Supreme Court of the United States. He became a member of the 
firm of Noyes & Tracy, and after the death of William Curtis Noyes 
formed a partnership with the late William F. Allen and the late 
Benjamin Vauglian Abbott. Witii the election of Allen to the Court 
of Appeals the firm became Abbott & Gerry. The nature of his prac- 
tice is indicated by the fact that Mr. Gerry was counsel in the Marx 
will contest, the Martin will contest, the Carman will contest, the 
Louis Bonard will contest, the Strong divorce case, the Mi-Farland 
homicide case, and the Stokes homicide case. He was a member of 
the Constitutional Convention of 1S07 and of its committee on the 
Pardoning l*ower. He was Chaii-man of the commission a])pointed 
by the New York Senate in ISSO to report on the best method of exe- 
cuting the death penalty, the result being the substitution of electro- 
cution for lianging in this Stare. He was Chairman of the Executive 
Committee having in cliarge the centennial anniversary celebration 
of the inauguration of Washington in tliis city in 1889, and was 
Chairman of the Committee on Literary Exercises. He was Chair- 
man of the commission api»ointed by ^layor (irant in 1802 to report 
on tlie best method of caring for the city's insane. He is a trustee 
of the (General Tlieological Seminary, sim-e 187S has been a governor 
of the New York Ho.spital, since 1882 has been President of the Chi 
Psi fraternity, and from 188(5 to 1893 was Commodore of the New 
York Yacht Club. He is a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance 
Company and of the Fifth Avenue Trust Company. But the great 
work of philanthropy and reform, devotion to which led him to aban- 
don his law practice, remains to be mentioned. Henry Bergh's So 
ciet}- for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals having been incorpo- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BJOGRAPKY. 99 

rated in l.Sdd, ]Mr. rreiTT early became its counsel, and was instrumen- 
tal iu securing most of the lesiislatiou in this t^tate protecting animals. 
He has long been First Vice-President of this society, as well as Chair- 
man of its Executive Committee. In 1874 this society took up a fla- 
grant case of parental cruelty which several benevolent (irganizalions 
had been afraid to toudi, and the publication of the facts brought an 
avalanche of similar apjieals. To meet this need, with other charter 
members, ilr. Gerry secured the incorporation in isl.j of the Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelt3- to Children. The late Jolin 1). Wright 
was its first President. Mi: Gerry has been its President since 1879, 
and has battled continuously, but with remarkable success, to secure 
and to retain the legislative rights under which it operates. About 
25,000 cases have been prosecuted and about 40,000 cliildren rescued 
from infamy or destitution. Something like l.jO similar societies have 
been organized in tlie United States and other countries. Mr. Gerry 
has contributed to the Xorlli American Rcrieir "Cruelty to Children " 
(July, 1883), "Capital Punishment by Electricity" (September, 
1889), and "Children of the Stage'" (July, 1890). He is a member 
of the Patriarchs, and the Metroi>olitan, Knickerbocker, Tuxedo, Kid- 
ing. Players', Manliattan, and principal yacht clubs, the City Bar 
Association, Sons of the Eevolution, New England Society, Columbia 
Alumni Association, and other organizations. He marrieil in 18G7 
Louisa M., only daughter of the late Kol»ert J. Livingston, and great- 
granddaughter of Chief Justice Lewis Morris, and has two sons and 
two (laughters. He is himself the son of the late Thomas R. Gerry, 
ofhcer in the United States Navy, and Hannah, daughter of Peter P. 
Goelet. He is grandson as well as namesake of the famous Elbridge 
Gerry, a graduate of Harvaid in 1762, member of the Massachusetts 
General Court of 1772, and of its Committee of Correspondence; mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts Provincial Congresses of 1774 and 1770; a 
continual member of the Continental Congresses throughout the Pev- 
olution and a signer of the Declaration of Independence; member of 
the Convention of 1787 which framed the Constitution of the United 
States; member of the first United States Congress of 1789, serving 
until ]79:), and in 1797 one of three special envoys to treat with the 
Fi-ench Directory at Paris; elected Governor of Massachusetts in 
1810 and again in 1811, and elected Vice-President of the United 
States in 1812. Thomas Gerry, great-grandfather of Mr. Gerry, emi 
grated from Newton, England, in 1730, became a prominent mer- 
chant of Marbleliead, :\rass., and married tlie only daughter of Enoch 
<;reenleaf, a wealthy and infiuential Bostonian. 

WIXSLOW, RICHABD HENKY, founder of the well-known New 
^'ork banking house of Winslow, Lanier & Company, was born in 
Albany, September 10, 1800, and died at Westport, Conn., February 
15, 1861. He was! educated in the public schools of Albany. He was 



100 



HISrORV OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 



clerk iij a mercautile bouse at Cauandaigua, X. Y., from 1824 to 182G, 
and tlieu removed to Marauliam, Brazil, aud entered the employ of bis 
uncle, liConard Corning, mercbaut and American consul at Maran- 
bam. A few years later be establisbed bimself in business in New 
York Cily ^vitb .Alinot Morgan, as 3Iorgan & Winslow. In 1832 be 
became a member of tbe ^^'a]l Street brokerage firm of Allen & Wins- 
low, Tilley Allen being bis partner. Upon tbe retirement of Mr. 
Allen in 1835, the firm became ^Vinslow cJi I'erkins. In 1849 tbe late 
J. r. I). Lanier succeedi'd ^Ir. I'erkins. the style of ^^'inslow, Lanier 
<Sc (\)mi)any. which has since been retained, being tlii-n adopted. It 
was in ibis year that Mr. AVinslow originated the raili-oad bond sys- 
tem. His firm became prominent in placing the securities of western 
railroads, thus contribnting to the commercial deyelopment of tbe 
We.st. In 18.">!t, .Mr. ^^'inslow retired from active business to his coun- 
try iilacc at ^Vestl)ort. Conn. Al- 
though twice married, he left no 
issue. He married, in Xew York 
("ity, in 1829, Kaclicl, daughter of 
Archibald Ilobertson. Subsequent 
to her death, he married, in 1854, 
Mary Elizabeth. daughter of 
Sti'phen Lltcb and ]Mary Ingra- 
liam Kogers, of Xew Hartford, 
Conn., and tbe adopted daugh- 
ter of Asa Fitch, of New York 
("ity. After ^Ir. Winslow's death, 
she became The wife of tlie late 
Dr. Tiichard Chaiining :\roore 
Page, of Xew York City. :\[r. Wins- 
h)w was the son of Captain Rich- 
ard \Mnslow, iron and fiour manu- 
lacturer of Albany, and Mary, sis- 
RicnAKi) H. wixsi.ow. ^cr of Jasper Corning', of X'ew 

York City. He was a brother of -Tames Winslow, also of Winslow, 
Lanier & Company, as he was also of .James Flack ^Vinslow, iron 
manufacturer, and one of the builders of tbe Monitor during tbe 
Civil ^Var; of Edward Thomas Winslow, one of tbe founders of tbe 
American Express Company; of Augustus Sydenham Winslow, a 
prominent citizen of Cincinnati, Ohio, and of Leonard Corning Wins- 
low, at one time a banker in Xew York City. Tln-se brothers were 
lineal descendants of Hon. Kenelm Winslow. who was born at Droit- 
wich, England, in 1590, and died at Salem, Mass., in 1(;72. He immi- 
grated To Plymouth, Mass., in 1(520, whitlier he had been prece(h'd by 
his elder brother. Governor Edward Winslow, who came over in the 
■Mayflower in 1(!20. Kenelm Winslow was elected Suiweyor of Ply- 
mouth in 1610. and subsequently removing to Marsbfleld, Mass., rep- 




ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 101 

resented that town in the .Alassacliusetts (lencial (Vuut lii'twccn lt;42 
and 1653. These " Pil«;nni fathers" were of <;entle bhiod, and their 
antecedents in En^lainl have been traced in an nidiroken line of an- 
cestors throniiJi many generations. Tiie present Edward Winsh)w, 
of Winshiw, Eanici- ^^ ('()ni]>an.v, is the nepliew of the hite Richard 
Henry Winshjw, tiie son of the bile James ^^'illsIo\v, and tlic liramlson 
of thehite J. F. 1). Lanier. 

WIXSLOW, JA.AIES, became a member of tlie Xew York banking 
lionse of Winsb)w, J^anier iV; ("om])any soon after its establisliment 
by his brother, the bite Eichard Ib'nr.v ^\■insio\v, and so remained 
nntil Ills deatli in this city, Jnly 18, 1874. For many years he was 
Vice-rresident of the Third National Bank of New York, and was a 
director of seyeral other banks, as he was of varhins other corpo- 
rations. He was prominently identirted with tlie establisliment of 
the present natiimal bankini; system, while dnrini;- the Civil \Var 
he was active in connection with the assistance rendered by his tinn 
to the Federal Government in connection with the negotiation of the 
war loans. He Avas born in Ilai-tford, Conn., Febrnary 17, ISl.'), and 
was one of six brothers who became prominent, — sons of Cajjtain 
Richard ^^'inslow. of Alliany ami New Y'ork City. He descended 
from Kenehn ^^'inslo^\•, of Plymouth Colony, ]\[assachnsetts, a brother 
of GoA'ernor Edward Winslow of the sami'. IIavin<i- attended the 
public schools of Albany, he learned tln' liaidware business in the 
store of the late Erastns ('orniiiii', of Allian_\. Hemovinii to New 
Y'ork City he established himself in the liarilware business, which 
he successfully followed until he became a member of the liaid<ing 
firm. He married, March 18, 1817, ^fargaret Dowidnn, daughter of 
the late J. F. D. Lanier, one of the fettinders of Winslow, Laiuer cS: 
Company. Two sons survived him — Edward AN'inslow, who succeeded 
his father as a member of tlu^ firm of \Vinslow, Laiuer ,S; C(nn])any, 
and James Norton Winslow, ^^•llo in 1871 was a member of tlie I'nited 
States Government ex])editioiL to observe^ the transit of \'enns. 

WINSLOW. EDWAKl). since 1878 has been a member of the fa- 
mous New York hanking house of Winslow. LaTiier ^; Company, of 
which his uncle, the late Kiciiard IL Winslow, his father, the late 
James Winslow. and his grandfather, the late J. F. D. Lanier, were 
the prominent original members. He is a trustee of the New York 
Skin and Cancer Hos])ital. and a niendter of the Metropolitan. Tuxedo, 
City. Keform. New York Yacht, and Larchmont Yacht dubs. He 
married, in 1873. Emma Corning, daughter of J. A. Sweetser. and has 
a daught<'r — Margtierite Lanicn- Winslow. 

LANIER, CHARLES, present head of the well-known banking 
house of Winslow, Lanier & Co.. is the youngest sou of the late James 



102 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

rriiiikliii J);iujility J.aiiici-. who was louj; at the licad of this tiim. lu 
addition to the extensi\e baulviug busiuess of his house, which ex- 
tends to all the flnanoial renters of the world, Mr. i-anier is in the 
directorate of many notable corporations. He is President of the 
Pittsburu', Fort Wa.xiie and ("iiicajio IJailway Company, as also of 
the Massiilou and ("leveland llailroad. and is director or trustee 
of the Central Trust Company, the Xational Bank of Commerce in 
New York, the Louisiana National Bank of New Orleans, the Western 
Union Telegraph Company, the Central and South American Tele- 
graph ( 'omiiany, the West Shore IJailroad. the Central llailroad Com- 
pany of New Jersey, the Housatonic Ivailroad. the Cleveland and 
I'ittsburg Eailroad Company, the Niagara Junction liailway Com- 
pany, the American Cotton Oil Company, the Cataract Construction 
Company, and the Niagara Development Company. He is a director 
likewise of the Madison Square Garden Company, being one of the 
grou]i of eminent and public-spirited citizens who erected the pres- 
ent Madison Square Garden at a cost of |3,000,000. He is Treasurer 
of the American Museum of Natural History, and a member of the 
best clubs of New York, including the Union, Metroi)olitan. Union 
League, Century, Knickerbocker, and Tuxedo. He Avas born in 1837, 
and married Sarah, daughter of Thomas Egleston, of this city. They 
have three daughters ami a son. The latter — James F. D. Lanier — 
a member of his father's firm, was married in 18S7 to Harriet, datigh- 
ter of lleberE. Bishop. 

KELLY, EUGENE, for tiiirly-tive years prior to his death in 1894 
I lie head of the New York banking firm of Eugene Kelly & Company, 
was a director of the National Park Bank, tlie Bank of New York, 
the Emigrant Industrial Savings Baidc, the Equitable Life Assur- 
ance Society, the Title Guaranty and Trust Company, and other 
cor])orations, including many railroad interests. He founded the 
Southern Bank of Georgia, and after the Civil War gave largely to 
rebuild the Town Hall of Charleston, S. C. For thirteen yeai-s he 
was a member of the Board of Education of this city, while he was 
an original life member of the National Academy of Design and a 
member of the Chamber of Commerce. Presidential Elector-at-Large 
in 1884, he was Chairman of tiie Electoral College of this State. He 
was a member of the committees having in liand the eri'ction of the 
Washington Memorial Arch and tlie Bartholdi Statue of Liberty. 
He was one of the founders of the Catholic T'niversity of America 
and one of its directors from the beginning until his death. He was 
a trustee of Seton College Hall. He was also a member of the Build- 
ing Committee engaged in the erection of St. Patrick's Cathedral. 
He married first a [Miss Donnelly, who died in 1848, and in 1857 mar- 
ried [Margaret, niece of the late Archbishop Hughes. By his first 
wife lie had a dauuhter. [Mrs. Jolin A. G. Beales, and bv his second 



EXXVCLOPKDIA OF X::W YORK BIOGRAPHY. 103 

wiff lour ^^()U^^ — Eugviie, Edward, Tlioiua!? llii,i;li('s, and ilulx'i-r •). 
Kelly. 3Ir. Kelly was born in County TyroU(% Ireland, in 1S0(), the 
son of Thomas Bove O'Kelly, of Mullaj;hinore, the family beinji one 
of the oldest of the Irish septs. Comin"' to New York at the ase 
of twenty-four, he found employment with Donnelly Brothers, mer- 
chants, and a few years later removed to Maysville, Ky., and thence 
to St. Louis. Goin.n' to California in 184!> he established a mercantile 
business in partnership with Jose])h A. Donohoe, Daniel T. Murphy, 
and Adam (Irant. In 1S50 he was active in the orfjanization of the 
(^'alifornia bankini;- firm of Donohoe, Ralston & Company, and, (-(tm- 
ing to New Yiu-k. established the related firm of Euyene Kelly & 
Comjiany. 

BEOWX, JOHX CROSBY, head of the famous bankin- house of 
Brown Brothers & ('ompany, is also President of the Newburjih, 
Dutchess and Connecticut Railroad Company, a trustee of the Bank 
for Savinjis, and a director of the United States Trust Company, the 
Bank of Xew Y'ork, and the Liverpool, London and (llobe Insurance 
Company. lie has been a member of the Board of Education and 
is I'rcsidcnt of the Board of Trustees (>f the Union Theolo;Liical 
Seminary, a trustee of Columbia College, a trustee of the Metropoli- 
tan ^luseum of Art, and a director of the Presbyterian Hos])ital. He 
is a member of the Metropolitan, Union, City, University, Riding, and 
Seawanhaka-Coi'inthian Y'acht clubs, the Downtown Association, and 
the C(dumbia College Alumni Association. He was born in this city. 
May liL', 1838, and was graduated IVom Coluinbia Colleg(% in I80U, sub- 
sequently receiving the di gree of Master of Arts. Immediately after 
his giadualion he entered the banking house which his father had 
estalilislied in 1825. He is second ui the three sons of the late James 
Bidw 11 l)y his second wife, Eliza Maiia, daughter of Rev. Jonas Coe, of 
Troy. \. Y. He himself married, in 18(U, Mary E., daughter of Rev. 
William Adams, D.D.. pastor of the :\ladis(in Squai-e Pi-esbyterian 
Church at the time, and President of the Union Theological Seminai-y, 
and has tln-ee daughters and three sons — ^Yillianl Adams, James 
Crosby, and Thatcher M. Brown, graduates of Yale. 

ALEXANDER. LAWRENCE DADE, banker and stocklmdcer. and 
son of rhe late Junius P>. Alexander, also a banker in tills city, was 
born in Meade County. Kentucky, in 181:5. He attended Washington 
University, St. Louis, and was graduated from J<-fierson College. 
Pennsylvania, after which he joined his father in New York City, and 
in 18(i!) became a member of the New Y'ork Sto<"k Exchange. He is a 
member of the University Club, the Southern Society, and the Sons 
of the Revolution, and. as an expert angler, has contributed to the 
Awcrican Aiifjler. i\m\ to the volume ou " American Sports." pub- 
lished by the Century Company. He married Orline. daughter of the 



104 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

late Xewtou ST. JoLu, a proiuiiieiir banker of Mobile. Ala., and >>ister 
of the late William I'ope St. John, for many years President of the 
Mercantile National Bank of this city. They have I wo sons, St. 
John and Lawrence Dade, Jr., and two daughters. 

KENNEDY, JOHN STEWAIJT, a native of (Jlasgow, Scotland, 
wliere he was Ijorn in 18.">(l, made his head(jiiarteis in New York dur- 
ing the years 1850 and 1S.")1 as ivpresentati^ c of a (ilasgow house in 
the iron trade; during the next four years had charge of the business 
of this firm in (Jlasgow, and, returning to America, was for ten years 
connected as partner with tlie New York firm <d' ;\[. K. Jesup & 
Company, and the Chicago firm of Jesup, Kennedy lS: ('oni](any. In 
18(57 he retired and traveled abroad. In 1808 he established in this 
city the banking firm of J. S. Kennedy & Company. In 1883 he 
retired, the management de\'ol\ing upon liis partners under the 
present style of J. Kennedy, Tod ^V: Company. He is now a trustee 
of the United States Trust (;omi>any, the Central Trust Company, 
and the Provident ]>oan Society, and a director of the Title Guaran- 
ty and Trust Company, the National P>ank of Commerce, the Manhat- 
tan Company, the J'.rooklyn .Manhattan Company, the Cleveland and 
Pittsburg Railroad Company, the New- Y'ork, Chicago and St. Louis 
Pailroad Cnmitany, and the IMttsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago 
liailroad Company. He is President of the Presbyterian Hospital, 
President of the Lenox Lilirary, President of the Board of Trustees 
of the Ameiicaii T>iblc House of Constantinoi)le; ^'ice-l*resident of 
the New York Historical Society; Manager of the Board of Home 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the Ciiited States, and a 
trustee of tlie Fiftli Avenue Presbyterian Churcli, the Princeton Theo- 
logical Semiiuiry, the New York Society for the Puptured and Crip- 
pled, and the Metropolitan ^Museum of Art. He personally erected the 
Pnited Charities Building. He is a member of the ^Metrojiolitan, 
Union League, Century, City, Beform, Grolier, Biding, New York 
Y'acht, Mendelssohn (ilee, and Southside Sportsmen's clubs, and the 
Downtown Association. He married Emma, daughter- of Cornelius 
Baker. Himself tlie son of Jolin Kennedy and Tsabelhi Stewart, he is 
descended from prominent Scotch families on botli tlic i)at<'rnal and 
maternal sides. 

COWDIN, ELIOT CHRISTOPHEB, in 1853 founded in New York 
City the ]»romineiit silk im])oiting firm of Elliot C. Cowdin iV: Com- 
pany, and remained its head until Ids death in 1880, although he had 
retired from the active management in 1877. In 1807 he was United 
States Commissioner to the Paris Exposition. He was elected to the 
New York Assembly in 187<). He presided at many ptiblic gatherings 
of note, and delivered a ntimber of effective addresses, some of which 
were printed. He was an ofiicer of the New York Chamber of Com- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 105 

luerce, was oue of the fniiiiilcis of tlu' New Kuglaiid Society, aiul its 
second President, and was Mce-Presideut of the Union Leagne Club. 
Born in Jamaica. Vt., in ISllt. lie bej;an his nHMcanlilc career in Bos- 
ton, and was a successful iniportin<; lucrcliant of that city prior to his 
removal to New York. He was President of the Mercantile Library 
Association of Boston in 1S43. He visited Eurojie more than forty 
times, and was in I'aris durino- the Franco-Prussian war. He mar- 
ried, in 1853, Sarah Katherine, daughter of Samuel NN'allis Waldron, 
of Boston. She survives hiru, with three sous — loliii Elliot, Win- 
throj*. and Elliot ( ". Cowdin. and three daughters — Mrs. ('aspar (ii-is- 
wold, Mrs. Kobert Bacon, and .Mrs. Hamilt(ui L. Hoppiu. Uf Scotch 
descent, he was the son of .Vngier Cowdin, an extensive landowner in 
Vermont, and grandson of Caittain Thomas Cowdiu, of IMtchliurg, 
JIass.. a Kevolutionary soldier, (ieneral Bobert ( 'owdin, of the Union 
Army iu the Civil War, and Hon. John Cowdin, of the Massachusetts 
Legislature, were brothers of Mi-. Cowdiu, of New York. 

<'()\VI)IN. JOHN ELLIOT, a merchant in this city since 187!), is 
the eldest son of the late Eliot Christopher Cowdin. founder, in 1853, 
of Elliot C. Cowdiu & Company, of New York City, silk importers, and 
one of the nu)st prominent merchants of his day. Mr. Cowdin was 
born in Boston in 185S, was graduated from Harvard in 187tt, and at 
once engaged in business. He is a member of the Union. University, 
Kacquet. Harvard. Players', and Rockaway Hunt clubs. He married 
Gertrude, daughter of John H. Cheever, and has a daughter and two 
sous — Elliot C. and John Cheever Cowdin. 

BELMONT, AUCUST, founder in 1837 of the famous banking 
house of August Belmont and Comi)auy, was one of the most eminent 
citizens of his day. His connection with the great Bothschihl bank- 
ing house made him a power in tinancial circdes from the beginning. 
He became naturalized as soon as jiossible after reaching this coun- 
try, and in 1811 voted for the Presidential candidate of the Demo- 
cratic party, with which he remained connected throughout life. 
From 1811 to 1850 he was Austrian Consul-Cleueral iu this city, but 
resigned in protest against the treatment of Hungary by Austria. In 
1853 he was ait]ioiTited by President Pierce United States Charge 
d'Affaires at The Hague, and became United States Minister to Hol- 
land n]ton the elevation of the mission in 1855. He negotiated an 
im})ortant consular convention and secured to the Ignited States the 
right of locating consuls in the Dutch East Indies. He deprecated 
the partisan bitterness preceding the Civil War, and with the split 
in the Democratic party in 1860, allied himself with the Douglas 
wing, was active at the Baltimore Convention, and became Chair- 
man of the National Committee. Upon the election of Lincohi he 
wrote urgent letters to the Southern leaders to dissuade them from 



106 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

secession. He was an earnest sni)poi-ter of the Federal Government 
during the war, liel[»ed to raise tlie first Gennau regiment in this 
rity, and lirouiiht all his inflnence to bear npon Enrope to prevent 
the recoi;nili<)n of the belligerenry of the South. His letters to the 
Rothschilds of London and Paris were laid befoi'e the English and 
French ^linisters of State, while he personally visited England on 
this matter in l.SCil, and France in 1SG3. He was a delegate to every 
Democratic National Convention from 1860 to ISS-t, and presided at 
the opening of those of 1S(U and 1808. He resigned as Chairman of 
the National Committee in 1S72, having lield tlie position twelve 
years. He was a member of the Union Club, President of the Man- 
hattan Club, and President of the American Jockey Club. His stable 
of thoroughbreds was witliout a. peer in the I'niteil States. In 1849 
he married a daughter of Commodore Matthew C. Perry, and had six 
children, of which four survived him — Hon. Perry Belmont, August, 
Jr., ]\Irs. Samuel S. Howland, and Oliver H. P. Belmont. He died in 
this city, November 24, 1890, having been born at Alzei, Rhenish 
Prussia, Di-cember 8, 181(;. His father was a lauded proprietor, and 
carefully educated him until he reached the age of fourteen, when 
he entered the Frankfort banking house of the Rothschild Brothers. 
At the end of three years he was given a supervisory position at 
Naples, Italy, and retained this until his removal to New York in 
1837. 

BEL^IONT, I'EKRV, has been i>romineut in public life. He served 
four terms in Congress following his election from the First District, 
embracing Staten Island and Long Island, except Brooklyn, in 1880. 
For four years he was Chairman of the Committee on I^reign Att'airs. 
He was active in connection with the Fishery Treaty and the Sand- 
Avich Islands Treaty, secured the passage of the retaliation bill in the 
fisheries' dispute with Canada, defeated the project to extend Federal 
su])port to the Nicaragua Canal Company, and carried through the 
bill to indemnify the Chinese massacred at Rock Springs. From the 
French (iovernment he received the Legion of Honor for his success 
in passing the bill making ours one of the first nations to i)articipate 
in the Paris Exposition. He advocated the claims of Washington, 
D. C, as the site for the World's Fair. Throughout his course he 
was a consistent advocate of tai-iff reform. He resigned during his 
last term to accept his appointment by President Cleveland as United 
States ^Minister to S])ain. He is a trustee of the Colonial Trust Com- 
pany, a director of the United States Casualty Company, ami the 
First Municipal Bond Assurance Company of America, and a mem- 
ber of the Union, ^Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, and a large number 
of other clubs of New York, Newport, and Paris. He was born in this 
city December 28, 1851, was graduated from Harvard in 1872, with 
honors in history aiul ])olitical economy; studied civil law at the 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY 



107 



r'niversity of Berlin, and was lii-adiialcil li-diu ('dluiiibia ('ollcjie Law 
Scliool in 1S7(). I'^roui that liiuc until liis election to ("ongress, lie 
practiced law in this cit.v in i>aitnersliip with Dndley N'intou and 
(Jeorge Frelinohnvsen. lie has ariined important cases in the Court 
of Appeals and the United States Supreme ( \nirt. 



BELMONT, AUdUST, head of the famous bankin- house of Au- 
liust Belmont .S; Company since the death of his father in 1S!MI, has 
rapidly gained recoiiuition as one of tlie ablest of New York tinau- 
oiers. lie is President id' the Hempstead National Bank, acting; Bres- 
ident of the Audit Company, \'ice-President id' the Kin<;s County Ele- 
vated Bailway Comi)any, and a director of the National Park Bank, 
the Bank of the State of New York, thi' ^Manhattan Trust Comiiany, 
the Guaranty Trust Company, the IMftli Avenue Trust Company, the 
I<](|uitab]e Life Assuranci' So 
c-iety, the Chica<;(), Milwau- 
Ivee and St. Paul Bailway. 
the Louisville and Nashville 
E a i 1 r o a d Company, the 
Zanesville and Ohio Bailway 
Com])any, the Long' Island 
Bail r o a d Company, the 
Brooklyn and Jamaica Bail- 
road, tlie Mechanical Bubber 
C m p a n y, the New Y'oi'k 
Belting and Packing Com- 
iiany, the United Electric 
Light and Power Company, 
the \Yestingliouse Electric 
IManufacturiug C o m p a n y, 
and the Westchester Bacing 
Association. He was boin in 
this city, February 18, 18.j3, 
and through his mother is 
the grandson of Commodore 
M. C. Perry, who ojiened the 

•Tapanese i»orts to commerce and commanded tiie United States 
naval forces during the war with ;Mexico; is great-grandson of Com- 
modore O. H. Perry, of Lake Erie fame, and lineally descends from 
William Wallace, the fanicms Scot, tlirougli Edward Perry, who was 
born in Devonshire, Engla7id, in IC.od, and settled in Sandwich, ^Mass., 
in 1053. He was graduated from Harvard in 1875 and entered his 
father's banking house soon afterward. One of his most notable 
achievements was tlie liandling of the bond issue during the second 
Cleveland administration in conjunction with J. Pierpont Morgan. 
He is President of the .\meiican Kennel Club and a well-known breed- 




Al'(iCST liKI.MdXT. 



108 HISTORY OF THi: GREATER NI'W YORK. 

ci- of IlKinni^liliicds. He is iilso ricsidcnl of tlio Aiiicricaii Jockey 
Chill. He was iiiariied in 1881 to Bessie H. Moiiian, and has three 
sons— .\iit;iist. i;aynion<U and Moriiaii. 

("OIJXEI.L, WILLIAM W.. lh<' late well-known iron niannfacTurer 
of New ^'ork <'ity. was a lilicral donor, liivint; to various benevedent 
inslil iiti(Mis. and csiiccially contrihutinn toward tiic erection of 
fiinrcli l)nildin;Lis of the .MctlKMlist lOiiiscopal dcuoniinatioii. He also 
founded ("orneli ("olleiii'. at .Mount N'ernon. Iowa, lie was an elder 
brother of the late -I oh n 1 Slack ( 'oriudl. and t he latter was ajiprenticed 
to him in the iron business. The son of Thoinas ( "orneli. i;randson of 
Hon. Whitcdiead ("oi'ucdl. and descended from Thomas ( 'orntdl. who 
settled at I"lushiii:n. L. 1.. in 1043. William W. Coriudl was born in 
Far TJockawav. L. 1., .January 1. 1S2:>. and died at I'lul Washington, 
New York City, .^larch IT, INTO. 

COKNELL, JOHN ULACK. founder and until his death in 1887 
the head of the famous iron-nuinufacturin<4 house of .1. H. i^t J. M. 
Coinell. did nuudi for the general development of the business of 
wliii li his OW71 tirni became so ])rominently representative. He pa- 
lenlt'd in 18r)4 a method (d' joininii the metal slats of revolving shut- 
ters for store windows, and two years later patented a metallic sur- 
face for fireproof partitions whi(di would support plaster. The use of 
ii'on in building became nuudi moi-e practii-able through these inven- 
tions. He was an abolitionist, a believer in tenijierance reform, and a 
])r(uniTUMit and liberal niend)er of the .Methodist Episco]>nl Thurch. 
For fouiteen years he was I'l'esident of the New York City < 'hun h E.\- 
teusion and Missionary Society, and was President of the Board of 
Trustees of Drew Theological Senunary. He was a. trustee of many 
benevolent institutions of this city, and connected with the Methodist 
Church elsewhere, and a generous contributor to them. He was 
lineally descended from Tluunas Corn<dl, son of Iii(diai-d. of London, 
who arrived in .Massac husetts in 1(>;>(I. and removed later to Khode 
Island, and thence to Flushing, L. I., where in 1643 he obtained a 
grant of land from Covernor Kieft. .V ](ai-t (d' his estate was known 
as Corncdl's Neck, and subse(|ueiitly as Willetfs I'oint. His de- 
scendants were locally prominent. Mr. Cornell's father was Thomas 
Cornell, and his grandfather, Hon. Whitehead Cornell, a member of 
the Assembly. Born in Far I{o( kaway, L. I., about 182."), Mr. Cornell 
served a seven years' apprenticeship with his elder brother, then at the 
head of a modest iron firm, was associated with him for several years, 
and in 1847 founded a business of his own whi(di was developed into 
the notable house oi.]. B. ^; .T. .M. Cornell. 

CORNELL. .lOlIX .M.. head and sole juoprietor of the world-re- 
nowned house of .1. B. i^ .T. .M. Cornell, iron manufacturers ami con- 
structors, is also a director of the New York Beal Estate ^Vssoeia- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK HIOGRAPHY. 



109 



linii and tlif Dear Hill Coiiipany. He was honi in New \'i)rk City. 
Ajiiil '21. lS4(i. u]) to liic a.nc of tiftt'cii attended jji'lvate schools, incliid- 
m<x Mount \\asliinj;toii C"<dl('i;iate Institute, and then enlered his 
father's iron works. He acquired proticieucy so rapidly that at the 
age of se\'enteen he became foreman, and at tjie age of twenty-one 
became his father's partner under the hrm-style which is still retained. 
He has conducted the great business aloue since his father's death. 
ITe is a member of the Sketcdi and T'.iiilding Trades clubs, and in 1S7:_{ 
married .Sarah Keen. 



STFIJCTS, FKANK K-VKIHT. in .Tanuary. lS(i!», becami- a partner 
in the New York banking tiiin of ("apron, Strong vK: (Jomiiany, 
which in 1871 became \\'ork. Strong & Company, and subsequently 
Strong, Sturgis & Company, the jjresent style. In \Si\U he became 
a member of the N<'w York Stock Exchange. In 1S1J2 he became 
its President, and the following year was re-elected. Upon the 
(U-ganization of liie •loidiey Club he became its Secretary and 
Treasurer and a member of the board of stew- 
ards. He was one of the founders of the 
Madison S(]uar<' (iarden Comjiany, and is 
its President. He is also a director of the Na- 
tional Horse Show Association, the New York 
Quotation Company, and the (Quicksilver .Min- 
ing C'ompany. He is a governor of the .Mcli-o- 
pcditan ( "lub, as he is of the Knickerbo(d<er ( "lub. 
the Turf and Field Club, and tlie West(diester 
Kacing Association. In addition to those men- 
tioned, he is a nieniber of the I'luon, Fnion League, Ccnliny, City, 
Coaching, Players", AVhist, l*o(dcaway Hunt, New York Yaidit, Larch- 
mont Ya(dit, and Country ( lubs, and the New England Society. He 
was born in this city September 19, 1S47, the son of William Sturgis 
and Elizabeth K. Hinckley. He married in 1S71.' Florence, daughter 
of Pliilii) ^fesier Lydig, of New 'S'oi-k. 




V, 



I 
/ ' 

STCI!(iI.S ARMS. 



GKISWOLD, CHESTEK, is (.ne of the leading steel and iron maii- 
ufactur(n-s in the TTnited States, lie is President of the Crown 
Point Iron (Company, and A'ice-I'resideiit of several other comjwinies. 
He is also a director of the Adininda.k Kail way Conijiany. the Knt- 
land Ifailroail Coni]iany. and the Hudson Iviver Ore and li'on Com- 
jiany. He has served many years as Treasurer of the American 
Protective Tariff League. He is a member of the Fnion. Metropoli- 
tan, Tuxedo, l{ac(|uet, Piding. Sonthside Sportsmen's, and New York 
Yacht clubs, the Downtown Association, and the Sons of the Pevolu- 
tion. He married a daughter of Colonel Le Crand P.. Cannon, (d' this 
city. He is the son of the late Hon. .I(din .\. ( iiiswold. ])rincipal own- 
er of the Peusselaer Iron Company, and one of the introducers at the 



110 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Bessemer steel ]>r(n-ess into lliis cniiiitrv; .flavor of Ti'dv, ^». V., in 
18r)(), tlie associate of C. F. Bushiicll and .loliii E. Winslow in buildiuii 
tlie ^Monitor in 1.S(>1, Tinstce of tlie IJensselaer rolvteelmie Institute 
from ISC.O to 1872, Member of ronj^icss from lS(i:5 to 18G9, and Re- 
]»ub]i(an candidate for (Tovernor of this State in 18(18. The latter Avas 
the son of Clement (rrisA\old, (.grandson of Simon (iriswold, a Revolu- 
tionary soldier, and a deseendant of Edward Griswold, who emiiLirattHl 
from Keuilwortli. Euoland, to Connecticut in 1639, and became a 
magistrate and dcjmty to the ticncral court. 

ENO, AMOS RICHARDS, for about twenty .years subsequent to 
1831 was engaged in the drygoods business in this city in partnership 
with his cousin, John J. Pheli)s. From about 1850 until his death in 
1898 he devoted his energies mainly to real estate investments, leav- 
ing a fortune of some .f2(),(MI().()00 so invested. He was the builder and 
owner of the Fifth Avenue Hotel, and a director of the Second Na- 
tional Bank and other linancial institutions, lie was a member of 
the Reform Club and the New England Society. He bequeathed 
•IfSCOOO to Amherst Colh^ijc and |ir>0,(>00 as a fund for indigent mem- 
liers of the New York Chamber of Commerce and needy widows or 
children of deceased members, witJi tlie addition of another |100,()00 
should members of the Chamber raise a like sum. He either be- 
(]Ueatlied or liimself gave before his death ft), 000 to the Cemetery 
Association of Simsbury, Conn.; fT,000 to the Congregational Society 
of the same; .|3,000 to the New York Juvenile Asylum, and -IR.^OOO eacli 
to the American Home Missionary Society, the American Sunday- 
scliool Fnion, the Colored Oipjuui Asylum, the l>eniilt Dispensary, 
the I'rotestaut Half-or])iian Asylum, the Association for the Relief 
of Respectabh- Aged and Indigent I'eniaies, the Home for Old Men 
and Aged Cou])les, the New York Cancer Hospital, the Society for the 
Relief of Ru]>iiired and Crijipled, tlie Training School for Nurses, the 
X(nv York Institution for I lie P.lind, and the New England Society. 
Born in Simsbury, Conn., in 1810, he was the son of Hon. Salmon 
Eno, a member of the Connecticut Legislature in 1834, and was de- 
scended from Dr. James Enno, a I><uidon graduate in medicine who 
settled in Windsor, Conn., in 1G48. Mr. ICno married Lucy Jane, 
daughter of Hon. Elislia IMiel])s, of Simsbury, who was long a member 
of Congress and Speaker of the House of Kejiresentatives in 1821 and 
1829. Two daughters survive him, with four sons — Amos F.,Dr. Heni-y 
Clay, John Chester, and William Pheli>s Eno. It remains to speak of 
a painful event which yet i-evealed in Mr. Eno a sense of honor in- 
ducing him to make a sacrifice so great that it has no pai'allel under 
like circumstances. In ^fay. 1884, his sou, John Chester Eno, then 
President of the Sec()nd National Bank, disclosed to its directors that 
he had used more than .|2,000,000 of the funds of the bank in specula- 
tions and the attempt to make them good. When Aunts R. Eim was 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. Ill 

iiifoniied of this lie at once yave ."|!;2.(»0(I,(»(HI to the bank, with subse- 
(luent i)ayiiieiits of 195,000 and |-t7,r)()(), iluis eiiabliufi the institution 
to meet the run made upon it. The saciifice of a fortune so immense 
to satisfy a sense of l)nsiness honor will never be forj;otten. 

EXO. A.MOS I'., the chlcst son of ihc late Amos Kichards Eno, 
is an executor of liis instate, and was ion^' associated witli Ijis father in 
the management of tlieir vei-y laryc real estate interests. Jle j-e- 
ceived a larye inlieritance in i-econnition of his s<'rvices, being referred 
to in liis father's will as having " h(d])ed me more than any one else in 
the manaj;ement of my estate." lie is a director of the (Mtizens' In- 
surance Company of New York and the Ann Arbor Railroad Com- 
pany. He is a meml)er of the Cnion Leaiiue, .Manhattan and .Men- 
delssohn Glee clubs, the ("entury Association, the Downtown Associa- 
tion, the Liederkranz, the New Eujiland Society, and other oriianiza- 
tions. He was born and educated in New York City, and early in life 
enjiaj^ed in the real estate business. 

HAVE:\IEYE1:, \YILTJAM. a desc.'ndant of Herman Havemeyer. 
who was living in Bueckebnrg. (iermany, prior to KiOO, at the a,s><' 
of fifteen emigrated from Germany to Loudon, England, in the clos- 
ing years of the last century, and having acquired the art of sugar 
refining, in 1799 immigrated to New Y'ork City. In the course of a 
few years he was engaged in business on his oavu account, and was 
joined by a younger brother, Frederick C. Havemeyer, who became 
his i)artner in 1S07 under the firm style of W. & F. C. Havemeyei-. 
William Avas the father of the late William F. Havemeyer. and 
grandfather of the present William F. HaA'emeyer. Frederick C. 
was the father of the late Frederick ( 'hristiau Havemeyer, and grand- 
father of the present Henry Osborne Havemeyer and the recently de- 
ceased Theodore^ A. Havemeyer. 

HA\'E.MEVEK, WILLIAiM FirEDEKlCK. was four times nom- 
inated for :\Iayor of New York City, and three times was elected to 
the office. He was Mayor in 1S4S and 1S49, and 
from 1S71 to 1874. He was also elected as the /y^t"^ 



Democratic candidate in 1845, served one year, and // '-'^-y/^ 

declined a renomination. In 1859 he was a candi- 
•late, but was defeated by Fernan<lo W 1. He was active in opposi- 
tion to the Tweed King in 1870, was X'ice-President of the historic 
■■Connnittee of S( venty," and subsequently its President, and became 
its successful landidate for Mayor. He died while Mayor, in his office 
in the City Hall, in November, 1874. Born in New York City in 1804, 
lie was graduated from C.dumbia in 1823, and with his cousin, Freder- 
ick Christian Havemeyer, in 1828 organized the firm of W. F. & F. C. 
Havemeyer, sugar refiners. This partnership continued until 1842. 
In 185rhe was~ elected President of the P.ank of North Amer- 



112 HISTORY OF THE (JREATF.R NEW VOKK. 

ita, aiul in l.S.")? also IxTaiiic ricsidcnt nf t he New ^'(H•U Haviiiys Hauk. 
llo was Vice-l'rcsidriii nf tlir rciiiisvhania (\ial ("oinpany, Vice-Pres- 
ident of the Lonj; Island Kailroad Company, and a diroctor of other 
forjioralions. In 1SI4 ho was a nionibor of tlio I (cinocratif (icnoral 
( "nnniiit tec of ( Ills cily. and also a I 'oik Presidcnl ial dcetor. Upon the 
(•ivalion of tlic Stale I'xiard of l"]niijii'ation Coniniissioners in 1S47, lie 
became its tiisl I'lcsident. lie was oiu' of the orij^inal members of 
the Union I >efense ( 'ommittee dining t lie ( "i\il War. He mamed. in 
1S2S. Sarah Ai^iies. daniililer of Hon. Hector Craiii. Conii'ressnian and 
vSnrveyoi- of t he Port of New ^'ork. and had t wo daiiiihters — Mrs. Hec- 
tor .\rnist roni; and .Mrs. Isa.ic W . .Maclay — and si.\ .sons — John, 
Henry, Heel or Craiu, .lames. Clia lies, a nd William I'. Ila vemeyer, Jr. 

HAVEMEYi:i;. I'KEDEKICK CHKISTIAN, son of I're.lerick C. 
ITa\iMneyer. the yonniicr of the two orininal brothers in this city. 
Mas born in New ^'ork in ISOT. and attended ("olnmbia (\dlege. lie 
learned Hie business of sn,t;ar reliniug as an a](piciilice in the estab- 
lishment of his father and uncle. \\'. i'<; E. O. llavemeyer, and with his 
cousin, the lat<' Hon. W'illi.im \\ llavemeyer, in 1.S2S established the 
suf^ar refininji linn of W. 1'. iV 1'. ('. llavemeyer. Upon the dissolu- 
tion of this jiarlnership in 1S4L'. for some time he devoted himself to 
the manaiicment of the large estate left by his father, and to tra\cl 
abroad. In 1855, however, he established the sugar refining firm of 
llavemeyer. Townsend i\; rom])any, which eventually became llave- 
meyer iK: Elder. He i-esided in Westchester County, and for many 
years was President of its School Board. He married, in 1831, Sarah 
Osborne, daughter of Christopher Townsend. and had three daugh- 
ter.s — Mrs. J. Lawrence Elder, .Mrs. Louis J. iJelloni. and Mrs. Ered- 
erick NN'endell Jackson — and seven sons — Charles, Theodore A., 
(ieorge W.. Henry Osborne. Thomas J., Warren II.. and Frederick 
Christian Havemeyer, Jr. 

nAYE:\rEYEi;. WILL1A:\I EKEHEKICK. youngest son of the late 
Hon. ^Villiam E. llavemeyer, is N'ice-I'resident of the National Bank 
of North America. N'ice-President of the Queens County Bank of Loug 
Island City. ;iiid a director of the Union Eerry Comi)any, of New York 
and Brooklyn; the Manhasset lm]irovement Comi)any. and the Eort 
Worth and Eio (irande Kaihvay Coni|)any. He was formerly N'ice- 
President of the llavemeyer Sugar Ketiidng Company, of which his 
brother. Hector Craig, Avas Presidi-nt. He is a mend)er of the Met- 
I'opolitan, Century, City, Grolier, Adirondack League, and New York 
Yacht clubs, and the Downtown Association. He was born in this 
city and educated in private schools. 

HAYEMEVEK. IIENBY OSBOBNE, the most active member of 
the notable familv which for a centurv has been identified with the 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



113 



development of sugar refiiiiiin in this coniilrv. is rrcsidciit of the 
American Sui-ar lictniini; ( "(iiiiiiaiiv. and a tlircctor of tiic American 
Coffee Company, tlie IJrookiyn Cdoperage Com[)an.v, and flic Colonial 
Trust Company. In 1809 lie became a parrncr in ilic celebrated 
sn;iiar refining; finiL id' Ilavemeyer iV Elder, of wlii( li his lather, Fred- 
erick Christian liavemever, was the head, while the othci- members 
were Theodore A. and Thomas .1. 
TTavemeyer, brothers of Henry 
Osborne; his brother-in-law, J. J>a\\- 
rence Elder, and Charles H. Senff. 
Tleiiiy ( (shnrne Ihacnn-yei- de\cl- 
ojicd reniai'kable aptitude for I lie 
management of llie firm's business, 
and the chief executive functions 
gradually devolved upon iiini. lie 
was chiefly instrumental in diiiaii- 
izin^-, in 1S!)1, the American Su<i- 
ar IJetining Company, wlii(di ef- 
fected the consolidation of nearly 
all the important refineries in the 
Cuited States, lie is (Miiiaged in 
breedinii' cattle, horses, and sheep 
U]ion his country estate at (Jreen- 
wicli, ('onn. He erected a jiublic 
school building for the village of 
Green\vi(di at a cost <d' .%'.")(),(»()( I. 

He is a member of (he IJiding and (indier clubs. He married, in 
1SS3, Louise Waldron. daughter of (ieorge \V. Elder, and lias two 
daughters and a scm — Horace liavemever. 




IIK.NHY OSISdKXE HAVKMKVKK. 



DOWI), \\'1LI.IA.M, has been eminent as a niercliant, as a baidcer 
ami financier, and in I he public life of New York City. Coming to 
New York about 1S4.") he entei-ed the eni|)loy of Lyman Cook & Com- 
l>any, subscMpuMitly became a jnnior partner umler the style of Cook, 
Dowd i; Baker, and was long head of the house under the style of 
]>o\vd, r.aker & A\liilnian. He was rresident of the National Bank 
of Xoi'lli America from ISTI until his retiremenf from the more active 
executive responsibilities in ISitl, but is still a director and assistant 
cashier. At the jireseiit time he is also \'ice-l'resident of the Mis- 
souri, Kansas and Texas Kailroad Company, a trnst<'<' of the American 
Surety Company, and a director of the Bowery Baid^, the Southwest 
Coal and Inipi-ovenieut <'onii>any, and the Soulli Ynha Water Com- 
pany, lie was elected ( 'hairman of the New York Clearing House As- 
sociation in 1878 and re-elected in 187!). He was Cliaiinian of the 
Finance Committee of the Importers" and Traders' Insuram-e Com- 
pany for twenty-one years. From LS77 to 1883 he was Tresident of 



ll-t HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

the Ilannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. For ten years a member of the 
Board of Edncation of this eity, he was Cliainnan of its Committee 
on Finance for fonr years, and for several years Chairman of its Com- 
mittee on Colored Schools. lie Avas also Chairman of the I'^xecutive 
Committee of the Trnstees of tlie College of the City of New York. 
He was Eepnblican candidate for ^Mayor of New York in 1880. From 
1883 to 1888 he was a member of the Aqnednct Commission. He is 
a member of the Union Leagne Clnb, the Downtown Association, and 
the New P^nglaud Society. He maiTied, in 1851. IMaria Eliza Merrill, 
of Clinton, Conn., and has a danghter and four sons — William B., 
Colonel Ileman, Joseph, and (Jeorge M. Dowd. Born in Batavia, 
N. Y., Angust 30, 1821, Mr. 1 »owd is the son of Joseph Dowd, merchant 
and owner of several shi]»s trading with the West Indies, by his third 
wife, Tolly, danghter of Deacon Joseph Dntton and IMiscilla Stnart, 
and granddaughter of Sir Elkanah Stnart, who was disowned by his 
family for marrying a French Iliignenot. He is the grandson of Jo- 
seph Dowd and his wife, Mary lilatchley, some of whose ancestors 
came over in the Mayflower, and is a descendant of Henry DoAvd, who. 
in in:'!), accompanied Bev. Henry Wliitfield from England to Guilford, 
Conn. 

DREXEL, JOSEBH W., Avas one of the most notable bankers in the 
history of American finance. Boin in IMiihidelidiia in 1831, he was 
one of three sons of the late l^rancis M. Drexel, an accomplished Aus- 
trian artist who. having fidlowed his [irofession in Philadel])liia until 
1840, engaged in banking. Having s[>ent several years in his fatlier's 
banking house in IMiiladelphia, Joseph W. Drexel established a 
bi-anch house in ( 'hicago. Relurningto Philadeljiliia u])on his father's 
death in 1871, he formed his notable alliance witli the late Junius S. 
Morgan, head of tiie London baulking tirni of J. S. .Morgan & Com- 
pany, and father of tlie ])res(Mit J. Fieiiiont ^lorgan. Mr. Drexel thus 
became head of the famous New Yorl< banking liouse of Drexel, Mor- 
gan & Company, and so remained until his death in 1888. He was also 
head of the allied house of Drexel. Harjes i^- (*om])any. of Paris. 
Sinularly, he retained his interest in the associated Philadelphia house 
of Drexel & Company, while he was a large owner of the Philadelphia 
Pnhlir jAiUjir. He largely retired from active lousiness in 187(1 and 
had leisure to interest himself in the musical and artistic interests of 
New York City. He was President of the Philharmonic Society and 
a director of tlie ^letropolitan 0]iera House. He was a trustee of the 
Bartlioldi Statue Fund. A generous patron of the iIetro]>olitau Mu- 
seum of Alt. he presented to it valuable paintings, a collection of 
Egyptian (uigraved stones, and other art objects, and a collection of 
musical instruments of all nations. By bis will he bequeathed to 
Lenox Librai-y his notable musical library of 7,000 v(dumes, embrac- 
iu" the historv and lili'iature of music, ancient ami modern. He was 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 115 

also a patron and a ti-ustce of the Ameii( an .Museum of Natural His- 
tory. He married, in 1865, Lucy, daughter of Thomas Lloyd Wharton, 
of Philadel]ihia, who survives Inm with tlicir four dauirhters — Airs. 
Charles Brigliam Penrose, of IMiiladelphia ; .Mrs. Erie B. Dahlgren, of 
St. Paiil; Mrs. John Viuton Dahlgren, of New ^'ork, and Josephine 
Wharton Drexel. 

Mrs. Drexel is an art and book collector, and the owner of one of 
the most notable libraries of rare books and manuscripts in the United 
States. Her ancestry is interestinn'. Her grandfather, Kearny Wliar- 
ton, was President of the Common Council of Philadelphia, and other- 
wise eminent, while her great-grandfather, Thomas Wharton, Jr., was 
President of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania. She 
is sixth in descent from the founder of the family in Amerira, Elder 
Thomas Wharton, member of the Council of Philadelphia, and son of 
Richard Wliarton, of Westmoreland, England. She also descends 
from Thomas Lloyd, tirst 1 )e))uty ( iovernor of Pennsylvania, and Pres- 
ident of the Provincial <'ou7i.il fiom ir,84 to 1C)S8, and from IdVM) to 
1603. Through him slie traces Jier lineage from Edward I. of Eng- 
land by his tirst wife. Princess Eleanor, daugliter of Ferdinand of 
Castile; from Alfred the Great, from Henry I. of France and Anne of 
Russia, from Henry ITT. of England, and from Lady Antigone Plan- 
tagenet, a descendant of Henry I\'. (d' England. 

TIFFANY, CHARLES LEWIS, head of Tiffany & Company, the 
leading jewelers and diamond importers in the United States, has been 
actively engaged in business in this city since 1837, when he laid the 
modest foundation of the i)resent house. Prior to the age of twenty- 
five he had been in business in Killingsby, Conn., where he was born 
February l.">, 1812, his fatlier. Comfort Tiffany, of New England de- 
scent, being a cotton manufacturer in that place. In 1837 Mr. Tiffany 
visited this city, and borrowing .|.")(I0 from his father established a 
partnership here with J. P. Young, from liis native town. T'nder Hie 
style of Tiffany & Young they began the sale of stationery and bric-a- 
brac at 2.~)9 Ri-oadway. In 1841 J. L. Ellis became a partner, the firm 
name changing to Tiffany, Young ^Vc Ellis. Tlu^ same year Mr. Young 
visited Europe and the importation of I'^rench imitation jewelry was 
begun, followed by that of gold jewelry and ])recious stones. Advan- 
tage was taken of the fact that dianu)n(ls sold at about one-half their 
value during the financial crisis in Paris in 1848. Investing all their 
funds at this time, they became the largest dealers in diamonds in the 
United States. \'arious < hanges occurred in the personnel of the firm, 
while the ])resent style of Tiffany & Company was adopted. A remo- 
val was made in 1847 to 271 Broadway, in 1854 to 550-52 Broadway, 
while in 1867 the present site was ac(iuired. The house are silver- 
smiths to most of the European sovereigns, and carried off the entire 
lists of awards at the Philadel))hia Centennial Exposition in 1876 and 



116 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

tlie Talis Exjwsitioii in 18TS. Mr. Tiffany was created Chevalier of 
the National I.eiiion of Honor of France and from tlie Emperor of Ifus- 
sia received the I'raemia l)ij>no. He is a liberal patron of art, a mem- 
ber of the Chamber <<( Commerce, a member of the Union and other 
clubs, and one of the founders of the Union I.eaiiue Club, havin<i- been 
an active supporter of the Federal (iovernment during the Civil War. 
He built and ])resented to his son, Louis C. Tiffany, the notable man- 
sion occupied by the latter on Madison Avenue. In addition to the 
Presidency of the corporation of Tiff'any & Company, which maintains 
branch houses in London and Paris, he is a trustee of the ^tate Trust 
Company and a director of the Bank of the Metropolis, of which he 
was an incorporator. He Avas married November 30, 1841, to Harriet 
O., daughter of Judge Young, of Killingsby, Conn. Their golden 
anniversary was celebrated in 1891 by tlicir two sons and two daugh- 
ters. 

TIFFANY, LOT^IS C():\rF<)PT, the well-known artist and architec- 
tural decorator, may almost be said to haxc created a new art. He 
has at any rate rehabilitated and improved an old one. Having estab- 
lished a reputation as an artist, his attention was given to the decora- 
tive arts in connection with architecture, and with the view of pro- 
moting decorative worl< ami the making of colored-glass windows 
he organized in 1878 the Louis C. Tift'aiiy and Associate Artists. This 
subse(]ueutly became the Tiffany Class Comiiany, and was reorgan- 
ized in 1892 as the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, the found- 
er having been All nirectorand President through all these changes. 
The chapel exiiibited by him at the ^^'orld■s Fair attracted wide atten- 
tion. " One of the most marked incidents in the artistic career of 
]\fr. Tiffany was the revival of the mosaic theory in the construction 
of a colored-glass window. Believing the work executed upon this 
principle would give ihc best results, but finding that the glass then 
obtainable in the markets (d' the world would not sup]dy him with 
a range of color and texture of mati-rial necessary to carry out his 
ideas, he immediately began a series of exjieriments thi'ough the me- 
dium of existing ghi.'^s- houses. Becoming impatient, however, of their 
failure to grasp his tlioughts, he established works of his own where 
he succeeded in producing not only many of the finest effects that were 
<>l)tained in the jiast, but also discovered new formulas by which he 
could make glass unlinuted in its range id' c(dor and texture. ^Vith 
this glass, which is known as ' Tiffany favrile glass,' he has not only 
made windows of great beauty, but also vases and diffei-ent objects 
of artistic interest, ^o marked weri' these in their departure from 
anything known, and withal, so thoroughly good, that they at once 
<-omnianded the admiration of the artistic world of Euroi>e, and in 
consecjuence he was made a member, on .lune 1.", 1894, of the Societe 
?s'ationale des Beaux Arts of Paris." In addition to the Presidency 



I 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 117 

of the Til'fauv Class and Duforatin^ Company, he is a director of Tif- 
fany & Company and the Turner MacLine Company, and a trustee of 
the American Fine Arts Society. The son of Charles L. Tiffany, of 
Tifiany & Comjiany, he was born in this city February IS, 1848, and 
studied art with Oeoriie Innes and Samuel Coleman, of New York, 
anil Leon Bailly, of Paris, lie traveled in Euro])e and Africa and re- 
turned in 1870. In J 871 he was elected an Associate of tlie National 
Academy of Desitiu. and in 1880 an Academician. His pictures in- 
lude "Dock Scene" (18()!)), "Street Scene in Tangiers " (1878), 
"Study of (^uimper, Brittany " (1877 I, " Duane Street, New York" 
(1878), " The C(dd)]ers at P.onfarick " (1888), " Feedino- the Flamiu- 
ji'oes" (1888), and " [Market Day at Nuremberg" (1802). 

STEWART, WILLIAM PJIINELANDER, born in this city, De- 
cember 3, 1852, was educated by pj-ivate tutors and at Charlier's and 
Antlion's schools; in 1873 was ^ri^duated from the Columbia College 
Law School, and while for some years he was engaged in general law 
])ractice as a memlier of a ]ironiinent law Hrm, for many years he has 
conhned liis attention to tlie family estate and charitable activities. 
Appointed by Covernor Cornell in 18S2 a member of the State Board 
of Charities, he lias served continuonsly since through re-appointments 
by Govei'uor Flower and ( Jovernoi- Black, while since 1891 he has been 
President of the Board. He has been Chairman of its Committee on 
Reformatories, as he lias also of that on schools for the deaf. He 
was President of the Twenty-tifth National Conference on Charities 
and Correction. He originated tlie idea of the tnumphal arch wliich 
spanned Fifth Avenue at Waslnngton Sipiare during the centennial 
celebration of 1889, and was Secj-etary of tlie Committee which per- 
petuated it in marlde. He lias been foi- many years a vestryman of 
Grace Church, and since 18'.i;! has been its Treasurer. He is President 
of the Tennis Building Assoc iation, a trustee of the Creenwicli Sav- 
ings Bank, and a director of tlie Corn Exchange Bank. He is a mem- 
ber of the Patriarchs, and the Union, Metropolitan. Tuxedo, Century, 
City, Reform, and Church clubs, and is Secretary of the Downtown 
Association. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce. He mar- 
ried, in 187".», Annie M., daughter of John A. Armstrong, of Baltimore, 
and has living a daughter and a son — William Rhinelander Stewart, 
Jr. He is himself tlie eldest of the two sons of the late Lispenard 
Stewart, Sr., and .Mary Rogers, daughter of the late William Chris- 
topher Rhinelander, and is grandson oi Alexander L. Stewart and 
Sarah, daughter of Captain Anthony Lispenard and Sarah Barclay. 
Alexander L. Stewart was in turn grandson of Robert Stewart, a cadet 
of the royal house of Stewart of Scotland, who settled in New York 
prior to the Revolution. 



118 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

IIUNTEE. JOHN, siuce 1850 lias beeu active iu developing the 
American thorouiilibred horse and in freeing the raceconrse in Amer- 
ica from the evils and scandals which havi' beset it. In 1800 he suc- 
ceeded the late August Belmont as President of the American Jockey 
Club, being the second to hold the position, and ujion his resignation, 
in December, 1804, was himself succeeded by the present .Vugust Bel- 
mont. In 1884 he was a Democratic Presidential elector. He was 
born on Hunter's Island, Westchester County, February 27. 1833. in 
the mansicm of his distinguished grandfather, who was one of the 
leading men of the State, and for twelve years State Senator, and is 
the son of Ellas Desbrosses Hunter and Ann, daughter of Peter J. 
Munro, Secretary of Legation to Ciuted States Minister to Spain John 
Jay, in 178(1. He was educated under private tutors, and at the 
Columbia College Grammar School. He is a member of the Union 
Club. He married Annie, daughter of Henry A, Middletou, of South 
Carolina, and has eight children. The historic family estate was pur- 
chased by this city and incorporated into its great system of " New 
parks," and the old Hunter homestead, built of stone in 1813, still 
stands in Pelham Park. 

SMITH, WILLIAM ALEXANDEI!, head of the New York banking 
firm of William Alexander Smith & Company, has beeu an active exec- 
utive officer of many institutions of this city, in which he has beeu 
engaged in business as a stockbroker and banker since 1845. He has 
been President of the New York Stock Exchange, as well as its Treas- 
urer. He is now Vice-President of the Continental Trust Comi)any. 
In 1848 he became Treasurer of the New York Bible Society; since 
1863 has been Trustee of the permanent fund of the Orphans' Home 
and Asylum; since 1804 has been Trustee of the parochial fund of the 
1'rote.stant Episcopal Church; since 1808 has been Treasurer of the 
General Clergy Relief Fund; since 1868 has been a manager of St. 
Luke's Hosi)ital, and since LSO!> Vice-Chairmau of its Executive Com- 
mittes, while .since 1803 lias been President of the Slielteriug Arms. 
He is also Vice President of the Protestant Episcopal City Mission; is 
a manager of the Home of Incurables, and is a manager of tlie Society 
for Promoting Keligion and Learning. He is a member of the Church 
and Century clubs and the Sons of the lievolution. He married, first, 
Clara JIary", daughter of Eev. Levi Bull, D.D. She died in 1857. He 
married, in 1803, ilargaret, daughter of George Jones and Serena 
Mason. He has a daughter, the wife of Kev. L. C. Stewardson, and 
two s(ms — Robert Hobart and William Alexandei- Smith, Jr. Born 
in Pottstown, Pa., September 9, 1820, he is Inmself the eldest surviving 
son of the late L'obert Hobart Smith and Mary, daughter of Joseph 
Potts and granddaughter of Judge Samuel Potts. His grandfather, 
Major Robert Smith, of the Rev(dution, was for forty-eiglit years a 
director and trustee of the United States Bank at Philadel]dna. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



11!) 



HILLHOU.se, THU3L\.S. iu 1SS1> rmiiKled tlic .Mctiopdlitaii Trust 
Compauy. of this city, auil \vat> its I'resideut until his dcatli in -luly, 
1897. He was born at Watei-vliet, X. Y., March 1(1. ISKI. was ed- 
ucated at Chase's Academy. Cliathani. N. Y.. and in IS.jl unulc (ieii- 
eva. tliis State, his residence. He actively supixirlcd I'lcninnt for 
President in 18.j(), an<l in IS.V.) was elected to the State Senate. From 
1861 to 18()3 he was Adjutant* leneral on the staff (d' (iovermir E. 1). 
Morgan, and ornaiuzed 20(1,000 men for service iu the Union Army. 
President Limidn appointed him Assistant Adjutant-! leneral of Yol- 
unteers. He was (dected ( "omittrcdJer of the State for the two years, 
18G5 and 18(;(), and was active in 
connection with the estahlishment 
of Cornell University. I'resident 
Grant bavin^H appointed him, in 
1870, Assistant Treasnrer of the 
United States at New York, he 
ahly discharged the duties of that 
important post until 1882. He was 
tiu' oldest son of Thomas Hill- 
bouse and Ann Yan Schaick Ten 
Broeck, and was descended from 
Kev. James llillhouse, who <'mi- 
grated from Ireland to Connecticui 
in 1720, being the son of John Hill- 
house, of I'leehall, Londonderry. 
Ireland, and nephew of Captain 
James Hillhouse, JMayor of Lon- 
donderry, and mentioned in Ma- 
cau lay's great history for bravery 
in the siege of Londonderry. Gen 

era! Hillhouse married Harriet, daughter of I'liinehas Prouly, the 
eminent banker of Geneva, X. Y., and had four daughters and two 
sons — Thomas (iriswold Hillhouse and Phinehas I'l-outv Ililllionse. 




GKX. THOMAS HILLIIOISK. 



MACY^ JOSIAH, was born iu Nantucket. Mass.. in 178.J. the son 
of a shipowner, and coming to New York City in 1828, with the late 
William H. Macy, his eldest son, established the shipping commis- 
sion firm of Josiah Macy & Son. Upon tlie admission to partner- 
ship of another son in 1829 the style became Josiah Macy \- Sons. 
One of the founders of the City Fire Insurance Comjiany, he was on 
its directorate from 1833 until his death in 1872. He was also a 
director of the Tradesmen's Bank. He retired from active Imsiness 
to his estate at Eye, N. Y., in 18.")3. He married, in 1805, Lydia Hus- 
sey, of an old Nantucket family. Two daughters survived him, with 
five sons — William H., Charles A., Josiah ( i.. Francis II., and Jolin H. 
Mi\c\. He descended from Thomas :\lacv. hoiii in Salisl)ury. Eng- 



120 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

laud, in 1608. who inuiiifiTatc'd to Newbury, Mass., iu 1639, aud iu 16.j9 
became cue of the uiue purcha.sers aud proprietors of Nautucket 
Island. His wife's ancestor was also one of these nine proprietors. 

MACY, WILLIAM 11., eldest sou of Josiah Macy aud Lydia Hus- 
sey, was born in Nantucket, Mass., in 1805, and there educated. He 
early entered a shipping office in New York City. In 1826 he en- 
gaged in business on his own account. Two years later his father 
came to the city and became head of a shipping firm, William H. be- 
coming his partner. Eventuallj' the latter engaged in other mer- 
cantile enterprises. He was long a member of the New York Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and was at one time its Vice-President. He was 
President of the Leather Manufacturers' Bank, President of the Sea- 
man's Bank for Savings, and Vice-President of the United States 
Trust Company. He married Eliza L., daughter of Sylvanus T. Jen- 
kins, and died iu 1887. His son, the present William H. Macy, is 
connected with some of the institutious of which his father was Jin 
officer. He is Vice-President of the Leather Manufacturers' Bank, 
aud a trustee of the United States Trust Company aud the Seaman's 
P>ank for Savings. 

RIKEK, JOHN LAAVRENCE, for many years a prominent mer- 
chant of this city, is an officer of a remarkable array of the more 
important financial institutions of New York. He is Vice-President 
of the Second National Bank, is Vice-President of the Atlantic Trust 
Company, is a trustee of the Greenwich Savings Bank, the Fifth 
Avenue Safe Deitosit Ciuupany and the Atlantic Mutual Insurance 
Company, and is a director of the Bank of New York, the Bank of 
New Amsterdam, the Plaza Bank, the Fidelity and Casualty Com- 
pany, the Eagle Fire Company, the Continental Insurance Company, 
the Greenwich Insurance Company, the Hanover Fire Insurance 
Company, the Providouco aud Stouing-ton Steamshi]) Company, the 
St. Paul and Duluth liailroad Company, the New York Zinc Com- 
pany, the New York and Boston Dyewood Company, and the Laflin 
and Band Powder Company. He is a member of the Metropolitan, 
Union League, City, Biding, New York Yacht, Seawanhaka-Corinth- 
lan Yacht, Mendelssohn Glee, and New York Athletic clubs, the Hol- 
land Society, the St. Nicholas Society, the Downtown Association, 
the Sons of the Revolution, aud the Society of Colonial Wars. He 
was born at Bowei-y Bay, L. I., in 1830, and studied under private 
tutors aud at Astoria Academy. He married in 1857 Mary Anne 
Jackson, and has living three daughtei's and four sons — John Jack- 
son, Henry Laurens, Samuel, and Charles Lawrence. He is himself 
the son of the late John Lawrence Riker, lawyer, and Lavinia, daugh- 
ter of Sylvanus Smith, and descends from Abraham Rycken, to whom 
Governor Kieft granted lauds iu New Netherland in 1638. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 121 

GOODWIN. JAMES JUNIUS, from ISOl until bis retii-cim-iit in 
1871, he was associated with his cousin, J. Pierpont Morgan, in hanJc- 
ing enterprises in this citv. as representing the London house of 
George I'eabody & Conii)any. and as a member of the New York hnn 
of Dabuey, Morgan & Company. lie is a director of the Erie Eailroad 
Company, and a member of the Union, ^[etrojiolitan. Century. City, 
liiding. and Church clubs, the New England Society, the Society of 
Colonial Wars, the Sons of the American Revolution, the Sons of the 
ReA'olution. and other organizations. He was born in Hartford, 
Conn., was educated in private schools and the Hartford High School, 
and traveled in Europe from ISoT to 1859. He married, in 1873. Jo- 
sephine Sarah, daughter of Joshua B. Lippincott. who. during the 
fifty years from 1830 to 188G. was head of the notable rhiladeli)hia 
publishing house of Lippincott & Company, and has three sons. Wal- 
ter Lippincott. James Lippincott. and Philip Lip])incott (ioodwin. 
Mr. Goodwin is hiiiiself the son of the late James (ioodwin. of Hart- 
ford, and Lucy, daughter of Joseph [Morgan. His father was for 
more than thirty years President of the Connecticut Mutual Life In- 
surance Company, and through him Mr. Goodwin is descended from 
Ozias Goodwin, who was born in England in 1596. arrived in Bostcm in 
1632, and was one of the founders of Hartford under Rev. Thomas 
Hooker. Through his mother, Mr. Goodwin descends from Captaiu 
Miles Morgan, one of the founders of Springfield, Mass. He also de- 
scends from Thomas Olcott. another founder of Ilartf(n-d. and is great- 
grandson of Captain Lemtiel Roberts, of the Revolutionary army. 

IVES. BRAYTON. was graduated from Yale in 1861. and. enter- 
ing the Federal service as Adjutant of the Fifth Connecticut Volun- 
teers, was mustered out at the close of the war with the rank of 
Brevet Brigadier-General, although but twenty-four years of age. 
Coming to New York, he established himself as a stock broker in 1867, 
and so continued until his retirement in 1889. One of the founders 
of the New Y'ork Stock Exchange, for thirteen years he was a nu-mber 
of its Governing Committee, was its Vice-President in 1876 and 1877. 
and its President in 1878 and 1879. He was for many years President 
of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. In 1890 he was elected 
President of the Western National Bank, and served fcu' several years. 
He was formerly a director of the INIerca utile Trust Company, and is 
now Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Westingh(uise El(>ctric 
Manufacturing Company, and a director of the Western National 
Bank, the United States Guarantee Company, the United Electric 
Light Company, the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, the New 
York Stock Exchange Building Company, and the Equitable Life As- 
surance Society. He is a member of the Metropolitan. Union League, 
Tuxedo. Century. LTniversity. Grolier. Riding, Players', and Lawyers' 
clubs, the New England Society, the Dunlap Society, the Yale Alumni 



122 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



Association, and tlic Military Order of thf Loyal Legion. He mar- 
ried, in 18(17, Eleanor A., daughter of Kev. B. S. Bissell, of Xorwalk, 
Coun.. and has three daughters and a son — Dr. Sherwood Bis'sell 



Ive 



(ieneral 1\ es descends from William Ives, who earlv emigrated 



from England to Boston, subsequently becoming one of the founders 
of New Haven, Conn. 



\'AXI)E1;BILT, COIJNELIUS, popularly known as " Commodore," 
laid the foundations of the fortune of this welhknown New York fam- 
ily. He was boin on Staten Island, May 27, 17;U, and died in New- 
York City, January 4, 1877. He was the sou of Cornelius Vauderbilt 
and I'liebe Hand, niece of C\)louel Hand, an otticer in the Revolution; 
was the grandson of Jacob Vauderbilt and Mary Hoogland; the great- 
grandson of Jacob \'anderbilt and Xeeltje Denyse; the great-great- 
grandson of Jacob Jause Vauderbilt and Maritje Van der Vliet, while 
he was removed one generation further from Jan Aoertsen \'an der 
Bilt, who came from Holland about 1(550, by his second wife, Dierber 
Cornelius. Cornelius Vanderbilt received a limited education, and, 
at sixteen years of age, borrowed money to buy a in-riduner, with 
which he did a ferrying business between Staten Island and New York 
( "ity. At the end of two years he owned two boats, and had an inter- 
est in another. The period of the War of 1812 was a good one for 
his business and he ]ierformed many patriotic senices. In 1813 he 
mari'ied his cousin. Sophia Johnson, and resided in New York. At 

the age of twenty-three he was at 
the head of the transportation 
business in New Y'ork Harbor. In 
1817 he became captain of a steam- 
boat plying between New Bruns- 
wick, N. J., and New York, while 
he made New Brunswick his resi- 
dence. He became manager of 
this line. In 1824 he obtained a 
lease of the New Y'ork and Eliza- 
bethpoi't Ferry, ami organized a 
profitable business. In 1829 he 
bought the interest of Thomas 
Gibbons, his former employer, in 
the line between New Y^ork and 
New Brunswick. During the next 
twenty years he built numerous 
steamboats and establhshed lines 
of boats on Long Island Sound 
and the Hudson and Delaware 
rivers. Soon after the discovery of gold in California he established 
a steamshiii line by way of Nicaragua, liis vessels ]dying in both the 




' COMMODORE CORNELIUS V.\NDERBrLT. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 123 

Atlantic uud tlie Paoitic. lu 1851 a brauoli liue was established be- 
tween New Orleans and Grey town. Wiieu the control passed out of 
his hands, he rettained it by establishing opposition lines between 
New Orleans and (ialveston and between New York and Aspinwall. 
From 1855 to 18G1 he also operated a line between New York and 
Havre. He received from Coni^ress a gold medal and vote uf thanks 
for his gift to the Federal Government, in 18(12, of Ins finest steamship, 
whicli had cost •'j^SOCOOO. In 18t;4 he retired from the sea, his fortune 
being then estimated at about §40.(10(1,000. In 1811 he had acquired 
an interest in the New Y'ork and Harlem Railroad Company, while, in 
1857, he became its President. In 18(»1 he secured a controlling in- 
terest in the Hudson River Kailroad, while, by 18()T, he had a like 
interest in tlio New Y'ork Cential, and brought about the amalgama- 
tion of the two roads. By subsequently gaining control of the Lake 
Shore and .Mi< higan Southern he extended the system westward. 
^Ir. Vanderbilt gave one nuUion dollars to Vanderbilt University, 
Nashville, Tenn. He purchased the Church of the Strangers in this 
city for its jiastor when sold under the hammer, at a cost of |50,000. 
lie was married a second time to I'rances Crawford, of Mobile, Ala., 
liis tlurteen children being by his first wife. 

Y^ANDERBILT, WILLIAM HENRY, eldest son and principal heir 
<d' the late '•Commodore" Cornelius \'anderbilt, was born in New 
Brunswick, N. J., May 8, 1821. He attended the Columbia College 
Gi'ammar School and, at the age of eighteen, entered the employ of 
tlio New York banking firm of Drew, Robinson & Company. His 
health having broken down, his father purchased for him a farm at 
New Dor]>, Slaten Island, which the son improved and made a paying 
l»roperty. Having been invited to take charge of the affairs of the 
Staten Island Railroad, which was in the hands (d' a receiver, he con- 
nected it with New Y'ork by an independent line of ferryboats, and, 
within two years, had met all outstanding claims, and had the roa<l 
on a paying basis. After this demonstration of ability lie became his 
father's associate in railroad management. In 18()1 he became Vice- 
President of the New Y^ork and Harh'ui Railroad Company, and the 
year following became Vice-President of the Hudson River Railroad 
Company. After the consolidation of the latter with the New York 
CiMilral, he became First Vice-President and Executive Officer of the 
new corporation, while, in July, 1877, he was elected its Presid(Mit. 
On IMay L 188?., he resigned the presidencies of all the roads with 
which 111' was connected, his two sons, Cornelius and William Kissam, 
becomiTig chairmen of the two boards iTi wluch the control of the 
Vandei'bilt system was vested. ^Mr. Vanderbilt also invested a por- 
tion of his fortune, .f53,000,000, in Government bonds, for convenient 
dis])os,il among his heirs. Mr. Vanderbilt gave a nullion dollai-s to 
the New York College of Physicians and Surgeons, and divided a sirai- 



124 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



lai* amoiiut between ^'an(lel•bilt Uiiiversity, the MetroiJolitau ^luseuin 
of Art, t]w Yfiimji' Men's Christian Association of New Yorlc City, St. 
Luke's Hospital, and otlier institutions. He defrayed tlie expense of 
the removal of the obelislc from Egypt to Central Park — .fiOU.UUO. 
He Avas the owner of Maud ><., Aldine, and other animals which had 
exceiitioual trottiny records. He marned Maria Louise Kissam, 
dauiihter of Eev. Samuel Kissam, a clergyman of the Dutch Reformed 
Church, and had nine children, of whom eight, four sons and four 
daughtei's, survived him. The daughters are Mrs. Elliott F. Shepard, 
Mrs^ AAllliam D. Sloane, Mrs. H. 31cK. Twombly, and :Mrs. W. Seward 
AA'ebb. Mr. Yanderbilt erected the large brownstoue double house 
on Fifth Avenue and Fiftv-first Street. 



VANDEKBILT. CUIIXELIUS, present head of the \an.lerbilt fam- 
ily, is the oldest son of the late William H. Yanderbilt. and grand- 

S(>n of tlie late "Commodore" 
Cninelius Yanderbilt, founder of 
Ihc family fortunes. Conjointly 
with his brother, William K. 
\'anderbilt, he has the huaucial 
control and management of the 
richest railroad system on the 
.\merioan continent, consisting of 
forty-three closely aftiliated cor- 
])orations, which operate si.xteen 
tliousand miles of track. He is per- 
sonally a diret-tor of fifty railroad 
companies, of many of which he is 
cither President or AMce-Pi-esident. 
He has made many liberal gifts. 
The ])ossessor of one of the 
finest private art collections in 
New York, at a cost of .f 53,000 
he purchased Rosa Bonheur's cele- 
brated painting, " The Horse 
I'air," and ])i-esented it to the Metrojiolitan Museum of Art. 
In 1887 he devoted S;75,000 to the erection of the building for 
the r;ulroad branch of the Y. M. C. A., at Madison Avenue 
and I'orty fifth Street. In conjunction with his mother, the late 
Mrs. Wiliian) H. A'anderbilt, he erected in 1891 the costly stone 
and brick building on I'cu'ty-second Street, near Third Avenue, dedi- 
cated to missionary work in connection with St. Bartholomew's 
Church. He subscribed |100,000 toward the erection of the new 
Protestant Episcojial Cathedral of St. John the Divine. With his 
three brothers he built the Yanderbilt Clinic, and donated it to the 
New York College of Physicians and Surgeons. He has erected a 




CORXKLIU.'i VANDKEBILT. 



EXCYCLOPF.niA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 125 

dui'iuitdiy for Yale Uuiversitv as a memorial of lii^; eldest sou. Will- 
iam Heury Vanderbilt, who died diiriug his college course. He was 
one of the company of eminent New York citizens who built the 
new Opera House, after the destruction of its predecessor by fire. 
August 27, 1892. Born at New Dorp, S. I., November 27, 1S43, his 
boyhood was spent upon the farm which his father at that tinu' was 
managing. Following the ac(iuisiti()n of an at-ademic education, he 
became clerk in the Shoe and Leather Bank of this city, and for three 
years was also in the euqdoy of the banking firm of Kissam Brothers. 
In ISd.j his grandfather offered him a responsible jiosition in the of- 
fice of the Hailem Jiailroad. In 1S(;7 he became Treasurer of the 
road. Upon his grandfather's death in 1S77 he succeeded his father 
as First 'N'ice-President of the New York Central and Hudson Biver 
Railroad, in charge of its tiuauces. and upon the retirement of his 
father in 1883 took the leading [)lace, which he has occupied since. 
Severe sickness in very recent years has led him to spend much time 
abroad, the responsible managenu^nt of their common interests thus 
falling more than formei-l,\" upon ^Villiam K. ^'amh'rbilt. Early in 
life yiv. ^'anderbilt married Alice (Twynne, daughter of an eminent 
lawyc^r of Cincinnati. ( »f their seven children three sons and two 
daughters survive, of whom two are married. Cornelius A'andtn'bilt, 
Jr., the oldest surviving son. is married to a daugliter of Bichard T. 
Wilson, the well-known banker; a daughter, (iertrude, is the wife of 
Harry Payne ^V]litney, son of A\'iniaiii C. A^'hitney. 

VANDEBBIBT. WILLIAM KISSA.AI. is President of the American 
Horse Exchange, a director of the American Safe Deposit Company, 
the New York [Mutual (Jas Light ('(unpany, and the ilorris llxui Coal 
Mining Company, and is a director of about forty railroad corpora- 
tions. I'or some time past the invalid condition of his brother. Cor- 
nelius, has devolved the control and direction of the affairs of the 
great Vanderbilt system entirely upon him, and he has distinguished 
liimself by his success in achieving a more intimate and compact 
afliliation of the corporations composing the system than had before 
been attained. He has long been active in promoting yachting and 
the interests of the turf. He is a prominent member of the Coney 
Island Jockey Club. He was a member of the syndicates which 
built the sloops Colonia and Defender, successful defenders of the 
America's Cup. He also built the steam yachts Alva and Valiant, the 
latter being the most elegant craft of the kind afioat. He has trav- 
eled extensively, and sumptuously entertained aboard these vessels. 
He joined with his brothers in founding the Vanderbilt Clinic. He 
was one of the organiz.ers of the Metropolitan Club, and is a member 
of the Union and other principal clubs. He built in tliis city the 
notable residence on Fifth Avenue, at the corner of Fifty-second 
Street, just north of the ^^■illiam H. Vanderbilt ilouble residence, and 



126 HISTORY OF THE (iREATER NEW YORK. 

a 11(1 less ni)tnl)lt' rewdeiicc at Xewixirt known as tlM-- " Marble House." 
Tlic second son of the late William II. N'andeiliilt and .Maria Louisa 
Kissam, be was born on Stateu Island, December 12. 1849. After 
takin,ti" an academic conrse in tliis country, he comideted bis educa- 
tion at (leneva, Swit/.erland. Jlet \irniiig be entered the office of C. C. 
Clarke, Treasurer of the Hudson Kiver Railroad, and from a book- 
keeper's api)rentice on a small salary worked his way through tlu^ de- 
Ijartments. l^rom 1S7T to 1883 he was Sect)nd \'ice-Presideut of the 
New- York Central and Hudson Eiver Kailroad; in 1882 became Presi- 
dent of the New York. Chicago and St. Louis, and from 1883 was 
Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Lake Shore and Micbiiiau 
Southern, being its executive bead. He married Alva Smith, of Mo- 
bile, Ala., now Mrs. O. II. P. Belmont, and has three (diildren — Con- 
suelo, now the Duchess of Marlborough; \\'illiam Kissam, Jr., and 
Harold. 

NAXDEBIULT. ll^EDEEICK WILLIAM, third sou of the late 
William H. A'anderbilt and Maria Louisa Kissam, was born in 1855, 
and in 1878 was graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School of 
Y'ale. Subse(]ueutly he worked his Avay through every department 
of the offices of the A'anderbilt system of railroads. His residence in 
this city, at the corner of I'ifth Avenue and I'^nlieth Street, the gift 
of his father, was built by his grandfather. He also maintains a 
Newport home, " Rough Point," and has an estate of 600 acres at 
Hyde Park on the Hudson. He is a director or member of the Board 
of Managers of twenty-six or more railroad corporations, and is a 
director of the Lincoln National Bank, the Lincoln Safe Deposit 
Company, the American Surety ( "omi)anv, the (luaranty Trust Com- 
pany, and the American Horse Exchange. He is a member of the 
Metroi)olitan, Knickerbocker, Tuxedo, University, and other clubs. 
He oMus one of the tinest steam yachts, Con(|uer(U'. built in 1889 by 
Russell & Company, of Port Glasgow. 

YAXDERBILT, GE()R(;E WASHINGTON, has been a benefac- 
tor of various institutions in this city and elsewhere. lie founded the 
Thirteenth Street branch of the New Y'ork Free Circulating Library, 
providing its building on Jackson Square. To the New York College 
for the Training of Teachers, of Avhicli he was a trustee, he gave a 
valuable property for a new site on Morningside Heights, adjoining 
the jnesent site of Columbia College. He presented the room known 
as the N'anderbilt Gallery to the American Fine Arts Society. The 
value of this donation Avas .flOO.OdO. H(> also united with his broth- 
ers in the erection and e(|ui])ment of the A'anderbilt Clinic. In addi- 
tion to his residence in this city — one of the houses which constitute 
the famous William H. Yanderbilt double house, occupying the block 
on I'^ifth Avenue between Fiftv-tirst and Fiftv-secoud streets — he has 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 127 

a summer residence at Bar llavbor, aud in 188.1 purcbasiMl KKi.ddO 
acres of mountain laud ou tlic Freucli Broad River, near Aslicvillc. 
N. C. Tliis lie has cdnvertcd into a vast park and improved estate. 
with mansion and stal)les. and stocked with blooded cattle, sheep, aud 
horses, making it perhaps the most notable country phice in America. 
The fourth son of the late William H. Vanderbilt and .Alaria Louisa 
Kissani, he was born at New Dorp, S. I., 2sovember 11, 18(;2, 
[ and was educated by private tutors and at several famous schools. 
He is a member of the Metropolitan. Century. City. Bacquet. New 
Yoi"k Athletic, New York Yacht, Urolier, aud Players" clubs, the So- 
ciety of the Sons of the American Bevolution, and other organizations. 

DAXA, IvlCHARD STABB, was born in New York City in ISoG, in 
I 1857 was graduated from Columbia College, and, entering the bank- 
ing aud commission lumse of Bussell iS: Company, of Canton, China, 
the largest American house in the China trade, became a partner in 
1863. He is a member of the Union Club, the Sons of the Revo- 
1 lution, the Society of Ccdonial Wars, the Colonial Society of the 
I Acorn, and the Columbia College Alumni Association. He married 
j Florine Turner, and has two sons — Richard T. and David T. Dana. He 
is the son of the late Richard Perkins Dana, of tins city, aud his wife 
Juliette H. Starr, aud is descended, through a line of clergynK'U, from 
j Richard Dana, who came from England to Cambridge, ]Mass.. in KJIO. 
His father was long engaged in business in Canton and Hong Kong. 
China, but after retiring, resided in New York City, where he was 
j one of the Governors of the Woman's Hospital, and served sixteen 
years as a Director of the New Y'ork Juvenile Asylum. He ])ublished 
■ accounts of some of his travels. He died in 1894. 
(I 

SCHELL, ArCrl'STrS, having been graduated from Uinon College 
in 1880, studied law in New York City and at the Litchtield Law 
i School, and in 1833 was admitted to the bar and began practice in 
this city. He became the partner of John Slossou in the law tirm 
; of Slossou c& Scliell; with Edward Slosson, brotlier of the above, 
i formed the firm of Schell & Slosson, and subsequently received Waldo 
Hutchins into pai-tnershi]> under the style of Schell, Slosson i^ Hutch- 
ins. He soon acquired a large real estate and corporation prat-tice, 
! becoming counsel for many prominent merchants, as well as cotinsel 
for a number of leading baidvs and insurance companies. He became 
active in politics, and for many years was Chairman of the Tammany 
i Hall Cleneral Committee. He came within a few votes of receiving 
the nomination as Governor of the State in the Democratic State 
: Convention of 1852. He presided over the Democratic State Con- 
' ventions of 1853, 1851, and 1855. In 1854 he refused the nomination 
as Mayor of New York, Avhich was equivalent to electimi. He was 
for four Years Collector of tlie Por-t of New York, under aiqMiintment 



128 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

by President RucIiaTuiii in 1857. Upon retiriiij;' from this office he 
(lid not resume tlie practice of law, but became active in counection 
Avitli tli(^ ^'anderbilt railroad interests. In 1862 he became a director 
of tli<' Harlem Jfailroad Company, in ISHl entered the directorate of 
the Hudson IJiver JJailmad ("onijiany, and in ISO" became a director 
of the New York Central IJailroad Company. Upon the consolidation 
of the two last-inentioned, he was elected a director of the new cor- 
poration. 'J'he i^ake Sliore and ]Michi};an Southern Ifailway Company 
was or«>anized the same year by the consolidation of four roads, and 
Mr. Schell became Vice-President of the new corporation. lie was 
also a director of many other corporations in the \'auderbilt system, 
includinfi- the CliicaiiO and Northwestern, the Michigan Central, and 
the Canada Soul hern. Tie was a director of the Union Pacific both 
before and after its consolidation with the Kansas Pacific and the 
Denver Pacific. lie was for some years one of the vice-presidents 
of the \\'estern Cnion Telegiaph Company, and was a trustee of the 
Union Trust Company and a director of the Manhattan Life Insurance 
<Jomi)any. He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 
1807. He was a member of the National Democratic Convention 
which nominated Horatio Seymour for the Presidency in 18G8. In 
1872, (rovernor Hoffman appointed him on the Constitutional Com- 
mittee which recommended important amendments to the Legislature. 
The same year he rescued Tamnmny llall from the Tweed ring, and 
was elected Grand Sachem. He was Chairman of the National Dem- 
ocratic Convention in 1872, and issued the call for the National Con- 
vention which nominated Samuel J. Tilden for the Presidency in 1870. 
Mr. Schell was a Presidential elector on the Tilden ticket in New 
York. He was an active member of the New York Historical Society, 
and served on its Executive Committee, as its \'ice-Presideut and as 
its President. From 180() until his deatli he Avas President of the New 
York Institution for i he Blind, having iii-e\iously been its Treasurer, 
and since 1849 tme of its executive officers. He was a trustee of the 
lioosevelt Hospital, as he was also of the New York Eye and Ear 
Infirmary. One of the founders of the Manhattan Club, he was its 
President from 1871 to 1877, and was its ^"ice-President from the latter 
<late until liis death, March 27, 1881. He had been its 3Iauager from 
the organization of the club in 1865 to 1871. He Avas one of the Gov- 
ernors of the St. Nicholas Club. He maiTied, in 1873, Anna M., 
daughter of George S. Fox and granddaughter of Thomas Leggett. 
His widow survived liini. Init he left no issue. Mr. Schell was born 
in Tlhinebeck, N. Y., August 1, 1812. the son of Christian Schell and 
I']lizabeth Hughes, of German and Welsh antecedents, respectively. 
His grandfather, Richard Schell, immigrated to America from Ger- 
many prior to the Uevolution. The father of Augustus Schell was a 
merchant at Khiiiebeck, and during the War of 1812 raised a comiiany 
of soldiers and iiartici])ate(l in the defense of New York City. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 129 

BAliCOCK, t>AMrjOL J)., is oue of the most emim-iit Imsiuess ex- 
ecutives and liiiaiiciers in New York ("ity, and is an officer of a for- 
midable list of important corporations, of several of which he is presi- 
dent. OftheXew York IJeal Estate Association lie is I'lesident, as he 
is also of the Manhattan Heal Eslate Association, of i lie ( 'oionial IJeal 
Estate Association, and of the Central Real Estate Association. He 
is President of the Interimtional I'xdl 'rele])iiom' Company, and of the 
Downtown Association, and is Treasnrer ui' tlie Imjiroved Ihvelliugs 
Association. He is a director or trustee (d' the .Vmerican Exchange 
National Kank, the Bank of New Amsterdam, the National Union 
Bank, the Central Trust Comx)an.v, the Ciiaianty Trust Company, the 
United States ^Mortgage and Trust Company, the Eifth Avenue Trust 
Company, the Continental Instirance Company, tlie ^lutual Life In- 
surance Company, the United Btates Lloyds, the New York Central 
and Hudson liiver Tvailroad Com])any, the Harlem IJailroad Com]>any, 
the l'ro\idence and Stonington Steamshijt Company, tlie Metroiiolitan 
Opera and IJeal Estate Company, the City and Siilmrhan Homes Com- 
pany, the Navesink Park Com]iany, tlie ^lanufacturing Investment 
Comi)any, and the Po]>nlar Photogra])li Comjiany. He is a member of 
the Union, Metroixiiitaii, and other clubs. He was horn in Khode 
Island, and is lineally descended from James Babcock, who. born in 
Essex, England, in IT^Si), was one of the Puritans that emigrated to 
Leyden, Holland, and thence to Plymouth C(dony. In his direct line 
appear (_'ai)tain .Tohn P.al)co(di, of Plymouth and Iihode Island; Cai)- 
taiu James Babcock, (d' Westerly, K. I.; Hon. Joshua Babcock, a Yale 
graduate, Chief Justice of Rhode Island and Speaker of its Assembly, 
and C(don(d Henry Babcock, Commander of the Continental forces of 
Rhode Island in the Revohition. 

CARNEGIE, ANDREW, is the largest manufacturer of pig iron, 
steel rails, and coke in the world, is a well-known writer on political 
economy, an ardent advocate of radicalism in England through the 
medium of the press, and tiie author of many benefactions in the 
United States and Great Britain. While he has long been a resident 
of this city, he is much abroad. At the cost of .'ifr)(l,00() he erected for 
the Bellevue Hospital Medical College in 1S84 a Hve-story building 
containing three general laboratories and an auditorium. He is one 
of the ten founders of the Thirteenth Street Branc h of the Free Cir- 
culating Library, each of a\ hicli contributed |5,000. It w^as his capi- 
tal which was princiiially ventured in the erection of the notable 
Carnegie :Music Hall, Seventh Avenue and Fifty-seventh Street. He 
is President of the Keokuk and Hamilton Bridge Company and a di- 
rector of tho :\rusic Hall Company and the Pittsburg, Bessemer & Lake 
Erie Railroad Company. He gave lifnoiMtOd lo Pittsburg for a ])ublic 
library in 1885, and $250,000 to Allegheny City for a music hall and 
libi'arv in ISSH. He also gave .«;250.nnn for a friM- library in Edinburgh, 



130 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



and 140,000 for a free library in Duufermline, Scotland, likewise estab- 
lisliin;Li public swiumiing batbs in tlie latter city in 1S79. He has 
established several libraries for the employees of his vvorks. He has 
owned and directed the iiolicy of as many as fourteen newspapers in 
Great Britain at one time, usinsi' them as a propaganda of the princi- 
ples of democracy. Tliis is also the theme of liis nmst famous volume, 
"Triumphant Democracy; or. Fifty Years' March of the Republic" 
dSStJl. Besides liis many contributions to ])eriodical literature he 

has likewise published 
'■ An American Four- 
in-Hand in Britain " 
(1883) and "Bound 
th.' World" (1884). 
He was born in Dun- 
fermline, Scotland, No- 
vember 25, 1835, the 
son of a humble w(^av- 
ei\ who came to the 
United States in 1845, 
settliuii' at Pittsburg. 
Here the boy in turn 
attended a stationary 
euiiine, was a t(drgrapli 
messenger, and became 
a telegraph operator, 
eventually obtaining 
the ])osition of manager 
of the telegraph lines 
and clerk to the sui)er- 
intendent in the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad office 
;it Pittsburg. His first 
stroke of fortune came 
with his activity in i)ro- 
moting ^fr. ^^'oodruff's 
invention of the sleep- 
le was appointed Sujierintendent of the Pittsburg 
Pennsylvania llailroad. His next fortunate specu- 




ANDREW CARNEGIE. 



ing-car. Later 
Division of th( 

lation was in joining the syndicate Avhich purchased for •|<40,000 the 
Storey farm on Oil Creek. The flow of oil from this property yielded 
as much as ."JiJl, 000,000 in clear ])rotit in a single year. He 
next joined with others in establishing a rolling mill, and in the 
course of some years was at the head of the greatest system of 
steel and iron works which a single person has ever controlled, in- 
cluding the Edgar Thomson Steel Works, the Pittsburg Bessemer 
Steel Works, the Union Iron Mills, the Hai-tman Steel Works, the 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OE NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 131 

Sc-otia Ore Mines, the Union Mill of ^Vilson, Walker ^: Company, the 
Luey I'ui'naces, the Friek Coke Company, and the Keystone Bridge 
Works. 

SAGE, lU'SSELL, while jirominent in Whijj, polities in this State 
early in life, has come into national prominence as a railroad financier 
in this city. Born in Verona, X. Y., in ISIG, he is the son of Elisha 
Sage and Prndence Kisley, both of New England ancestry. He at- 
tended the pnblic schools, at an eaily age entered the store of his 
brother in Troy, N. Y., and at the age of twenty-one became his broth- 
er's partner. He snbseiiuently accinired the sole interest, and in 1839 
established a wholesale business. Still later he became a produce 
commission merchant and established connections in New York City, 
which enabled him to control the produce markets of Troy and Al- 
bany. In 1845 he became an Alderman of Troy, and during seven 
years was also Treasurer of Rensselaer County. In 1848 he was a 
delegate to the Whig National Convention. He was an tinsuccessful 
Whig candidate for Congress in 1850. Two years later he was a mem- 
ber of the Troy Common Concil, the same year he Avas elected to Con- 
gress, and in 1854 was re-elected by 7,000 majority. He participated 
in the formation of the Republican party in this State. As a Councilor 
of Troy in 1852 he was active in the sale of the Troy and Schenectady 
Railroad, then owned by that city. About 1857 he became a large 
owner of the La Crosse Railroad (now the Chicago, Milwatikee and 
St. Paul), and was ele<ted a director and subsequently Vice-Presi- 
dent. About 18()1 New York City became the scene of his operations. 
He traded principally in railroad securities, and since 1808 has been 
a member of the New York Stock Exchange. In recent years he has 
been connected with many corporations with which the late Jay Gould 
was also prominently identified. At various times he has been Presi- 
dent of more than twenty-five railroad coi-]K)rations. He is now Presi- 
dent of the Standard Gas Light Company, is President of the Pough- 
keepsie and Eastern Railroad Cinnpany, Vice-President of the Albia 
and Centreville Railway, and is a director of the Fifth Avenue Bank, 
the Importers" and Traders" National Bank, the United States Guar- 
antee Company, the German-American Real Estate Title Gtiarantee 
t"oiii])any, the Hamilton Bank Note Engraving and Printing Com- 
pany, the [Manhattan Railway, tlie Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany, the American Telegraiili and Cable Company, the American 
Speaking Telephone Company, the (iold and Stock Telegraph Com- 
pany, the International Ocean Telegraph Comitany, the New York 
Mutual Telegraph Company, the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, 
the Missouri Pacific Railroad, the Union Pacific Railway Company, 
the Texas and I'acific Railway Company, the Wabash Railroad Com- 
pany, the St. Louis. Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad Company, 
the Shore Line Railwav. the Iowa Central Railway Company, and 



132 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

the Cliattaiionj;;! Sdiitliciii Railroad. Mr. Saiiv luarried, first, in 1841, 
Maria, daughter of .Moses 1. Wiiiiic, of 'I'roy, who died iu 18(57. He 
married in 1869, Mariiaret Olivia, daughter of Hon. Joseph Slocum, 
of Syracuse, aud a descendant of Captain ^liles Standisli and of 
Cohjuei llenry I'ierson, of Sag Harbor, >s. Y. In 18115, Mr. and Mrs. 
Sage erected a notable dormitory for the Troy Female Seminary, of 
wliicli ;Mrs. Sage is a graduate. 

IXMAX, JOHN HAMILTON, having served four years in the Con- 
federate Army, in the fall of 180.") came to New York City and engaged 
iu the cotton business in a moderate way, establishing a firm Avliich 
became the leading cotton house in the world, and of whicli he re- 
mained tlie head until his death in 18!K;. He was also largely inter- 
ested in Soutliern railroads and industrial enterprises. He was a 
member (d' the IJapid Transit < 'ommission in this city from its creation 
until Ins death. He was a memlier of the Metropolitan and Maidiat- 
tan clubs and of the I'ifth Avenue I'resbyterian Church, of which Dr. 
John Hal! was j)astor. He was born in Jefferson County, Tennessee, 
in 1841. and enlisted in the Confederate service at the age of seven- 
teen, haMug ]»re\ inusly been employed in a baidc in which he had risen 
to the position of assistant cashier. He married, iu 1870, Margaret 
McKinney Ccftin, of Tennessee, and had two daughters and four sons 
— Hngli ^lartin, J(djn Hamilton, Jr., Frederick Clark, and Charles 
Chade Inman. 

INMAN, SAMUEL MAimX, cotton merchant of this city and At- 
lanta, Ga., is the largest dealer in this line iu the United States. He 
is a director of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, the Southern 
Kailway Company, and the Atlanta Home Insurance Company. He 
is a founder and a commissioner of the Georgia School of Technology, 
and is largely interested in the Constitution rublishing Comi)any of 
Atlanta and the Atlanta Land ('ompany. He was born in Dandridge, 
Tenn., February 19, 1843, the son of Shadrach \V. Inman, a successful 
merchant, and Mrs. Jane (Martin I Hamilton. His great-grandfather, 
Abednego Inman, a Kevolutionary soldier, married Miss Thom])Son, 
of Virginia. He worked in his father's store aud on a farm, and at- 
tended the Maryville and Princeton colleges. The war calling him 
a^\ay from the latter, he volunteered in the First Tennessee Cavah*y 
and became lieutenant. In IStUJ he engaged in business at Augusta, 
Ga. The following year he removed to Atlanta, and with his father 
formed the cotton firm of S. W. Inman & Comjiany. ^Mth the return 
of his father to Tennessee in 1870, the firm style became S. M. Inman 
(Jt Company, under which it became the largest firm in the cotton 
trade in the South. He is a brother of John H. Inman. 

ADAMS, EDWAED DEAX, a member of the banking firm of 
Winslow, Lanier & Company from 1878 to 1893, has achieved remark- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAniY. 138 

able siircess iu reurganiziu;.'. eiubaiTas^cd corporations. At the pres- 
ent time lie is President of the Cataract Construction Company, Presi- 
dent of the Niagara Develoimient Company, President of the Niagara 
Junction I\aihvay Company, President of the Nikola Tosla (Company, 
Vice-President of the Central and South American Telegraph Com- 
pany, Chairman of tiie Executive Committee of the Chicago Terminal 
Transfer IJailroad Company, a member of the Executive Committee 
of the Northern Pacific IJailway Company and subsidiary comi)anies, 
the ^A'est Shore I\ailroad Company, the Xortheru Pacific Expn^ss 
Company, and the Oregon ilailroad and Xa\igation ('(impany, and a 
director of the Mercantile Trust Company, the New Jersey General 
Security Com]>any, and the Amei-ican Cotton Oil Company. He or- 
ganized tlie Northern Pacific Terminal Com]>any in 1SS2, and became 
its President; in 1883 organized the St. Paul and Northern Pacific 
Railway Company, becoming its Vice-President, and in 1885 organ- 
ized the New Jersey Junction Eailroad Comi)any, constructed its 
lines, and leased them to the New York Ci^itral. In 1885 he also 
accomplished the delicate operation of a reorganization of the New 
York, West Slioi-e and liuflalo Railroad, the New York, Ontario and 
Western, and the West Shore and Ontario Terminal < 'oiiijiaiiy. lie 
preserved the Central Railroad of New Jersey from a receiver by 
his reorganization of it in 1887. In 1888 he was active in fioating 
the bond issue of the Philadelphia and Reading, while in 1890 he re- 
organizeil the American Cotton Oil Company. As tlie representative 
of the Oerman bondholders he was (Chairman of the Reorganization 
Committee of the Northern Pacific Railway Company in 1893. The 
son of Adoniram Judson Adams, of Boston, he Avas born in that city 
April 9, 1840, and in 18()4: was graduated from Norwich University, 
Vermont. After spending two years abroad, from 1860 to 1809 he 
was in the employ of a Boston firm of bankers and brokers. From 
1870 to 1878 he Avas a member of the Boston banking house of Rich- 
ardson, Hill & Comi)any, which he helped to organize. In 1878 he re- 
moved to this city. He is a member of the Metropolitan, Tuxedo, 
Union League, and otlier clubs. He was married, in 1872, to Fannie 
A., daughter of William E. Gutterson, of Boston, and has a son and a 
daughter. The son, Ernest Kempton, lias been graduated from Yale 
and (I'olumbia. 

WILLIAMS, GEORGE GILBERT, in 1811, when fifteen years of 
age, entered the service of the famous Chemical Bank of New York 
City, now the Chemical National, as assistant to the Paying Teller, 
five years later became Paying Teller, being the youngest holding 
that'position in New York City; in 1855 became Cashier, and since 
January 1, 1878, has been its pVesident. He is also President of the 
New York Clearing House Building ( \>mpany, is a trustee and Treas- 
urer of the Institution foi- Savings of Mediants" Clerks, is a director 



134 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



and Treasurer of the Fabric ileas<urin,ii- aud Packing Company, is a 
trustee of the Union Trust Company, and is a director of the Bond 
and Mort,!;a,<;e Guarantee Company, the Fidelity and Casualty Com- 
pany, the Title Cuarantee and Trust Company of Brooklyn and New 
York, the United States Life Insurance Company, the Eagle Fire 
Company, the Texas Central Bailroad, the Mexican Telegraph Com- 
pany, and the Eastmans Company. He has served as President of the 

New York Clearing House Asso- 
ciation. Holding that position in 
1893, he was ex officio member of the 
historic Clearing House Committee 
which so skillfully stayed the 
i:)rogress of the panic of that year, 
preventing a complete collapse, and 
turning the tide almost at once to- 
ward a restoration of confidence. 
]\Ir. ^^'illiams was born in East 
Haddam, Conn., October !», 1820, 
and was educated in the ])ublic 
srhools and Brainerd Academy. 
His lather, 1 >r. Datus Williams, was 
for forty years the leading physi- 
cian of East Haddam. and was 
lineally descended rroiii IJobert 
Williams, of Koxbury, Mass., where 
he was admitted a freeman in 1038. 
;Mr. Williams married, in 1807, Yir- 
cKORUE (iii.HKRT WILLIAMS. giula, daughtcr of Aaron King, of 

Massachusetts, and has had five 
children, of whom but one now survives. Mrs. Williams is a graduate 
of Rutgers Female Sciiiiiiarv of New York City. 




TOWXSEND, JOHN POMEROY, for many years a member of the 
well-known mercantile firm of Duttou ^S: Townsend, from which he 
retired in 1882, was in 1883 elected President f)f the New York Mart- 
time Exchange, of Avliich he had previously been Yice-President; the 
same year became Treasurer of the New York Produce Exchange; 
from 1889 to 1894 was President of tlie Knickerbocker Trust Com- 
pany, tile ailairs of which he brilliantly administered, and from 
1891 until his deatii in 1898 was President of the Bowery Savings 
Bank, the most poweil'iil savings institution in the world, having 
assets of nearly 80'>,""<'.<"»<>- Of the latter institution he had 
been First "S'ice-Presideut for twelve years. Second Vice-President 
for eight years, and trustee for thiity years. He was consid- 
ered the greatest authority on savings institutions, having contiib- 
titeil aiticles to encyclopedic ^\orks, prei)arc(l paiiei-s for couven- 



EXCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 135 

Tioijs in tliifi counti'T and fdi- three couoresses at Paris, and writ- 
ten on " Postal Savinjis Banks " and " The t^ilver (Jnestiou." He was 
also anthor of a " History of the Bowery Savings Banli, from its 
Organization in 1834 to 1888." He was a member of the Committee 
of Seventy whicli nominated William L. Strong for Mayor, serving on 
its Execntive and Finance Committees. Since 187r) he liad Itccn a 
trustee of tlie Kocliester University, wliere he founded a scliolarslnp. 
He was a director (d" the Farmers" Loan and Trust Company, and a 
trustee of tlie Knielcerbocker Trust Company. He was a member ui 
the Chamber of Commerce. He also Avrote a history of tlie Madison 
Avenue Baptist Church, whose society he served as Trustee, Treas- 
urer, and President. Descended from Thomas Townsend. one of the 
early Puritan settlers of Lynn, Mass., he was born in New England, 
pa.^si-d !iis boyhood in Troy, X. Y., and has resided in Xew York City 
since 1850, when he entered the employ of the house id' Wilson G. Hunt 
& Conii)auy. A few years later he became one of the founders of the 
mercantile house of Dutton .S: Townsend. 

STEWART. .TOTIX AIK:\[AX, was principally instrumental in 
organizing the United States Trust Company and securing its char- 
ter in 1853; from that date until June, ISUl, was its Secretary, resign- 
ing reluctantly to acce])t his appointment as Assistant Treasurer of 
the United States at New York, which President Lincoln urged upon 
him as a patriotic dtity. Upon the death of Joseph Lawrence, Presi- 
dent of the United States Trust Company, in 1805, ^Ir. Stewart was 
elected as his successor, resigned the Assistant Treasuryship, and 
has been President of this notable corporation — the largest fiduciary 
institution in the Western Hemisphere — continuously since. Mr. 
Stewart is also a director of the Merchants' National I5ank, the Bank 
of New Amsterdam, the Greenwich Savings Bank, the Equitable 
Life Assurance Society, the London and Liverpool and <Hob(- Insur- 
ance Company of England, and the Chicago and Alton Kailroad ( "oni- 
pany. He is a ti-ustee of the John F. Slater Fund, of Princeton Uni- 
versity, and of the Brick Presbyterian Church, and is a director of 
the New York Eye and Eai- Infirmary. He was born in New York 
City. Atigust 22. 1822. Through his father, he descends from the 
famous Scotlish clan of Stewart, while his mother. Mary Aikman. 
was also of Scotch descent. His father, in 18f7, emigrated from 
Scotland to New York City, where he eventually held the offices of 
Tax Assessor and Receiver of Taxes. John Aikman Stewart attended 
the New York ])ublic schools, was graduated from Columbia College 
in 1810, at the age of eighteen, and two years later was ap])ointed 
Clerk of the Boai'd of Education of the City of New York, a i)ositioTi 
lie held for eight years. Appointed Actuary of the I'nited States Life 
Insurance Company in 1850, he at once distinguished himself in that 



136 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

IMisition. ITf rcsiiLiiied in lSr):>, however, to devote himself to tlie orgaui- 
Ziitioii of the riiited States Trust Coiupauj. 

SnrMONS, .TOSEPH EDWARD, President of the Fourth Na- 
tional Uank sinee 18SS, served two terms ( LSyi-Gl as President of the 
New York Stock Exchauge, and for nine years (1881-90) was a mem- 
ber of the Board of I'^dncation, a portion of the time being its Presi- 
dent. Jn 1885 he was the candidate of Samuel J. Tilden and others 
for Collector of the Port, and has several times declined the Demo- 
cratic nomination as Mayoi- when nomination seemed e(|uivalent to 
election. Pesides the Presidency of the Fourth National Bank, at 
the present time he is President of the Panama Bailroad Company, 
Treasurer of the Love Electric Traction Company, a trustee of the 
Bank for Savings and the Koyal Insurance Company of Eug- 
laml, and a director of the Haul; of New .Vmsterdam, the National 
Surety Comjiany, rhe XTnited States ( "asnalty Company, the New York 
Clearing House Building Company, the Ann Arbor IJailroad Com- 
pany, the Denver and Kio Grande Iiailroad Company, and the Pitts- 
burg, Bessemer and Lake Erie Kailroad Comi)any. He was a member 
of the New York Clearing House Committee during the financial panic 
of 1893 and was one of three members of the building committee which 
directed the erection of the present clearing house building. He has 
been Vice-President of the Chamber of Commerce, is President of the 
New York Infant Asylnm, and is a governor and member of the Exec- 
utive Committee of the New York IIosi)ital. B<n'n in Troy, N. Y., 
September 9, 1841, he is the sou of the late Joseph Ferris Simmons, 
]irominent business man and financier of Troy, and great-grandson of 
Christian Simmons, who emigrated from IIi>lland to Dutchess County, 
New York, in the early part of the eighteenth century. ;\[r. Simmons 
was graduated from Williams College in L*<(i2 and from the Albany 
Law School the f(dlowing year. Successfully practicing law in Troy 
until 18(17, in tlial year he removed to this city and became a member 
of the banking lii in of Crant & Company. Forced to retire and travel 
abroad on account of his health in 1872, two years later he returned 
and engaged in linanciering enterprises. His administration of the 
affairs of the I'ourth National has been very able. He was married in 
188(i to Julia, (laughter of Ceorge (Jreer, of this city, and has a son — 
Jose]!li I'erT-is Simmons — and a daughter. 

TAPPEN, FKEDERICK I)., in :\Iay, 1850, entered the service of 
the (iallatin National Bank of New York as clerk, was its Cashier 
from October, 1857, tn .Inly 1, 18t;8, and on the latter date succeeded 
the late Jann-s Callatin as its i»resideut, a position which he has 
continued to hohl during the thiity yeai-s since. He is also a trustee 
and acting juesident of the Metroixditan Trust Company, having pre- 
viously been its Mce- President; is a trustee of the Bank for Sav- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OE NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



137 



iiiiis and tlic Koyal lusnrniife ('oiuiianj of LiverjxKil, Enj;laii<l, and 
is a (liivctor of the Bank of New Anistcrdani, the Hixth National 
Rank, tlie New York Clearinii- Ilonse Rnildinii ('oni])auY, tlie <^)ii('('n 
Insuiance Corapauv of Anierica, and tlie Moliilc and Ohio Railn>ad 
("oni]iany. Dnrinii tlie ])anic of ]S~'A lie was seli'eted as Chaiiinan 
of the Loan Coniniittee of the New York ('learin^' House Asso(iati(ni. 
ami ho has served in that res]ionsil)le position during ovciw rinamial 
crisis since. His skill acconi|plislicd roniai'kahlc results in <'slal)lisli- 
iiij; ])nl)lic contidence in iSli;! and in reco,i;nition of liis services his 
colh^ifiues on the </oniniittee presented to him the oriiiinal silvei- tank- 
ard whi(di, und<M- similar ciroiun stances, had been ])resentt^d in l(I!t(! 
to 8ir John Houlon, first (Jover 
nor of the Rank of Eni^land. He f 
is a nieiid)er of the Union, Union ^ 
I>eaj;ne, Metropolitan, St. Nich 
<das, and Grolier clubs. He was 
binii in New Yorlc City, Jamiary 
1".), 1S2!», and was liradnated from 
the Uohimbia. Colleij;e Grammar 
School and the New York Univer- 
sity. His father, Charles Rarclay 
Tappen, a well-known architecr 
and builder of New York City. 
died in 1804 at the remarkable aiic 
of iiim ty-eiiiht. ]Mr. Tajipen de- 
scends from Jurian Tennisse 
Tappen, from Holland, who was 
residinii at Fort Orantie as early 
as 1062. Chi'istoi)her Ta]i])en, 
gTeat-oraudfather of Mr. Taiipeii, 
married the sister of Governor 

(leoi'ge Clinton, rejjresented Ulster County, New York, in the ( 'olonial 
and State ]>ej.;islatnres, and was a member of the first Constitutional 
Couventiou of the State of New Y(uk. 




mtliEKICK U. TAl'I'EX. 



BAKER, GP:0RGE P., Treasurer of the American Rankers' Asso- 
ciation for twenty years, from its oriianization in 1875 to 1895. is 
also an executive officer of a phenomenal array of corporations. He 
has lono- been President of the First National Rank of New York, and 
is likewise President of the Astor National Rank, President of the 
New York and Uono Rramh Railroad Company, and President of the 
Lon<; Rranch Water Supjdy ("onii)any; is Vice-President of the Rank- 
ers' Safe Deposit Company, and Mrst \'ice-Presideut of the Central 
Railroad of New .lersey; is a member of the Roard of ^lanaiiers of the 
Delaware, Lackawanna and \>estern Railroad Comiiany; is a trustee 



138 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

of the Consolidated <ias CoinpaiiY, the Mutual Life lusurauce Com- 
pany, and the Provident Loan Society; is a voting trustee of the 
Southern Railway Company, and is a director of the Liberty National 
Bank, the People's Bank, tlie Guaranty Trust Company, the Farmers' 
Loan and Trust Company, the Metropolitan Opera and Keal Estate 
Company, the Continental lusurauce Company, the Citizens' ITnion 
Insurance Company, the Baltimore and Delaware Bay Railroad Com- 
pany, the Lake Erie and Western Railroad Coiupany, the Lehigh and 
Hudson River Railroad Company, the Navesink Park Company, the 
Atlas Cement Company, the Lehigh and Wilkesbarre C(»al Company, 
the National Water Company, the East Jersey Water Company, the 
Montclair Water Company, the Spring Bi'ook Water Supply Company, 
and the Car Trust Investment Com];anv of London. He is a mendier 
of the iletropolitan. Union League, City. Tuxedo, Riding, Country, 
Players', Lawyers', Atlantic Yacht, New York Athletic, and Mendels- 
sohn Glee clubs, and the New England Society. 

POOR, EDWARD ERIE, head of the notable drygoods commission 
house of Denny, Poor & Comi)any, was elected a director of the Na- 
tional Park Bank of New York City in 1S88; in 18U;J became one of 
its vice-presi(l(-nts, and succeeded the late Ebenezer K. Wright as 
its jircsident. lie is also a trustee of the State Trust Company, and 
a. director of the <'onsolidated Coal Company, the Denver Union 
Water Company, and the Passaic Print Works. He has been a mem- 
ber of the New York Cliamber of Commerce since 1S72, and a member 
of the Union League Club since 187U. He is a life member of the New 
England Society and a member of the Manhattan and Merchants' 
clubs. He was born in I'oston, February 5, 1837, on the paternal side 
descending from John Poor, of Wiltshire, England, who settled in 
Newbury, Mass., in 1635, and on the maternal side from Lieutenant 
Francis Peabody. of Hertfoi-dsliire, England, who, in K^^.", settled in 
Ipswich, ]Mass. His grandfather, Jeremiah Peabody, was a cousin of 
the famous London banker and philanthropist, George Peabody. !Mr. 
Poor was graduateil from the Boston public schools, and in 1851 
entered the drygoods establishment of Read, Chadwick & Dexter. In 
ISGtl he established himself in the same business in New York City, un- 
der his own name. In 18()5 the business was reorganized under the 
firm style of Denny, Jones & Poor, which subsequently became Denny, 
Poor & Company. Mr. Poor has long been at the head of the house. 
Two of his sons are partners in tlie business — Edward E. Poor, Jr., 
and James Harper Poor. The house is agent f(n' several New England 
and New Jersey manufactoi'ies, and has branch establishments in 
Boston and Cliicago. Mr. Poor married, in 1850, Mary Wellington, 
daughter of TS'ashington J. Lane, of West Cambridge, Mass., and has 
five sons and two daughters. Of the sons, Charles Lane Poor is Assist- 
fint Professor of Astronomy in .Tolins Hopkins University, fnun which 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. Vo9 

he holds the degree of Doctor of Philos(»pliy. Frauk Ballou Poor, tli(- 
New York banker, aud Horace F. Poor, are also sous of Mr. Poor. 

BAKER, STEPIIEX, President of the Bank of the Manhattan Com- 
pany, came to New York City in 187r> and engaged with a drygoods 
commission tirni, receiving rapid promotions. In 18.S1 he entered the 
employ of the American Exchange National Bank, while four years 
later he accepted a position of great rcsjionsibility in the service of 
John Stewart Kennedy, the wollknown private banker. In January, 
1891, he was eleeted ^'ice-Pr('si(l('nt of the Bank of the Manhattan 
Company, and in December, LSICJ, was elected its President. Born in 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., August 12, 185;i, he is the sou of Hon. Stephen 
Baker and Auna M. Greene, both of New England descent save that 
a Dutcli strain from the ohi family of IJyerson also comes through 
Ids mother. His father, who died in 1875, was for some years a mem- 
ber of the New Y'ork mercantile firm of AN'ilson G. & Thomas Hunt, 
and dui-ing the Civil ^Yar was a member of Congress. Mr. Baker is 
a member of the Union League and Seawanhaka-Corinthian Yacht 
clubs, ami the Downtow'u Association, and is a vestryman of St. 
James's Church, Madison Avenue and Seventy-first Street. 

STILLMAN, JAMES, in 1871 began his business career in New 
Y'ork City as a member of the firm of Smith, Woodward & Stillman, 
cotton merchauts. Of this house, which rapidly became one of the 
most notable in the cotton trade in the United States, Mr. Stillman 
is now the head. Since 181J1 he has also been President of the Na- 
tional City Bank of New Y'ork, one of the largest in the city. He 
is a trustee of the United States Trust ('ompany, the New York Se- 
cuiity and Trust Company, the American Surety Company, the Con- 
solidated Gas Com])any, the American Y'eterinary College, and the 
Chicago and Northwestern Kailway Company, and is a director of the 
Hanover National Bank, the Farmers' Loan and Trust Company, the 
Audit Comiiany, the Terminal Warehouse Company, the QuecTi In- 
surance C(nn]>any of America, the Northern Pacific IJailway Com- 
pany, the Louisville, Evansville and St. Louis Ilailroad Company, the 
Mobile Street Bailroad, the Southern Pine (N)mpany, and the Deer 
Hill Comi)any. He is also an officer of the Chicago and Northwestern 
Railway, as he is of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad 
Comi)any. He is a member of the New York Chamber of Commerce, 
tlie New York Cotton Exchange, the New England Society, and the 
New York Historical Society. He is a member of the Union. Metro- 
politan, Union League, C(Mitnry, Tuxedo, Riding, Reform, Manliattan. 
Lawyers', New York Y'acht, Seawanliaka-Corintliian Yacht. Columbia 
Yaciit. Eastern Y'acht, St. Augustine Yacht, Jekyl Island, Storm 
King, aud Camera clubs, the Downtown Association, and the [Metro- 
politan Club of Washiuiiton. :Mr. Stillman was born in Brownsville. 



MO HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

T( xjis. (Imiii;^ tlie tenipoi-iu-y sojonni of his parents in that phiee, June 
'J, lN.")(f, and was (Mlncated at Hartford, Conn., and at ChnrchiU's 
School, Sinji Sin^. X. Y. His fatlier, the late Charles Stillman, Avas 
a wealthy merchant of Hartford, Conn., and throneh him he descends 
from George Stillman, born in London, England, in Kl.jJ:, who settled 
first in Hadlev, Mass., and thence removed to Wethersfield, Conn. 
Through his niothi'r he descends from William Goodrich, of Bury St. 
Edmunds. Suffolk. England, who settled in ^Yetherstield, Conn. All 
four of Mr. Stillman's great-grandfathers were Revolutionary soldiers, 
two of them being ortici'rs. 

I'AKKEE, JAMES HEXKY, is President of the Produce Exchange 
Trust ('ompany. is President of the Assured P.nilding Loan Asso- 
ciation, and is a director of the United States National Bank and 
the ^^'estern National Bank. He was for two years President of the 
New York ("otton Exchange, for one year was Yice-President of the 
National Park Bank, and for six years was President of the United 
States National Bank. He has been President of the Southern So- 
ciety of New York City, is a member of the Confederate Yetei-an 
Camp, and is a member of the New York, Tuxedo, Manhattan, New 
York Athletic, and Atlantic Yacht clubs, and the Blooming Grove 
Park Association. The son of ^latthew I'arker, he was born in North 
Carolina, January 4, 1843, and served as a commissioned officer in the 
(Confederate Army during the Civil War. He was graduated in med- 
icine and practiced for two years after the war. He then engaged in 
the cotton btisiness at Charleston, S. C, from 1S70 to 1S87, and in the 
latter year removed to New York City, where he continued in the same 
line. 

CKANE. JOHN M., President of the National Shoe and Leather 
Bank, of New York City, since February 1, 1883, was its Cashier for 
seventeen years previous to tliat date, and has been in its service for 
forty-five years, having, in 1853. become a clerk when the institution 
Avas a State Bank. He is a director of the Metropolitan Life lustir- 
ance Company, and a member of the Hardware Club. He is also a 
member of the Protestant Episcopal Church of Jamaica. L. I.. 
where he has always resided. He was. in fact, born in the village of 
Jamaica. L. I., December 8, 1833, the sou of Rev. Elias W. Crane and 
Sarah II. Wickham. Ilis ancestors on both sides, originally from 
England, were settled in America in early colonial times. His father, 
a Presbyterian clergyman, was of an old New Jersey family. His 
mother's family early settled in Rhode Island. Mr. Crane was 
educated at Union Hill Academy, Jamaica, and at the age of fif- 
teen became clerk in a store. Four years later he entered the service 
of the Shoe and Leather Bank, of NeAV York City. He was mar- 
ried, :\[ay 7, 18C>1, to Harriet Hewlett, daughter of John S. Seabury, of 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY^ 



141 



Jaiu.-iica. They have two .sous — Aldcii Scahiirv ('raue. a lawyer, and 
Warreu Seabiiry (Jraue, who is (•((iiiiectcd witli the New York ("eii- 
tral Eailroad ('nnipaDV. 

CAKTEIJ, OLn'Eli 8TAN1.EY, President of the National Bank of 
the Republic, has also long been at the head of the largest tea-import- 
ing house in the United States. He was born in New Hartford, Conn., 
in 1825, the son of Hernias Cartel' and Ilaiiiinli liooth; in I'cbruarv, 
181:5, came to New York and ac- 
cepted a clerkship with a tea tirin; 
in 1854 became a member of \Vhit- 
lock, Kellogg & ( 'arter; became its 
head as Carter, Hawley & Com- 
pany and as ( 'arter Macy & ('oni- 
Iiany, the present style, while 
being chietiy instrnmenlal in 
making it the leading lioiisc in 
the trade. Having been for 
many years a director of ihc 
National Bank of the Eepublic, 
he became its Mce-Presideut in 
1888, and on .Alarcli 1, 18))2. suc- 
ceeded the late John Jay Knox, 
ex-Comi)troller of the Currency, 
as its I'residenl. He is also a 
director of the Home Iiisiiraiur 
<'onipany and the Standard <ias 
Light Coin])any, and has been a 
director of the North American 
Fire Insurance Company, and the 

World .Mulual Life Insui-ance Company. He is a iiK^mber of the 
Union League, ()raiige, and Essex County Country clubs, and the 
T)u\\- ntown Association. 



^m 0mi 




OLIVER STANLEY CARTER. 



PULLEN, EUGENE HENKY, was President of the American 
Bankers" Association in 18!t5 and ISIHI, having jireviously held the 
imjiortant position of (^'hairman of its lOxecutive Committee. Since 
1892 he has been Y'ice-President of the National Bank of the l\e]Mib- 
lic, New York City, having been connected with this institution for 
more than thirty-six years. He entered its employ as Clerk in IStH, 
in 1874 was made Assistant Cashier, and was Cashier from IST'.I to 
1802, eight years of this period being under the Presidency of the 
late Hon. John Jay Knox. He was born in Baltimore, IMd., in :\Iai-ch, 
1834, the son of Kaiidnll Pullen ami Ann Kliodes. His father was a 
shipowner. His paternal ancestors, establisheil for many generations 
in Massachusetts, were of French descent. :Mr. Pullen was carefully 



142 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

(^ilni-ated, nnd traveled extensively prior to 1S56. He married, in I860, 
Mary Holoomb INjole, of Brooklyn. They have no children. 

KHOADES, JOHN HAKSEX, has been a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the Oreenwich Savings Bank of New York City since 
1863; from 1870 to 1878 was its Secretary, and since 1878 has been its 
President. Under his administration the resonrces of this venerable 
institution have almost trebled, now reaching nearly 14:0,000,0(10. He 
is also a trustee of the United States Trust Comijany and the London 
and Lancashire Insurance CompauA', and a director of the Bank of 
America, the Greenwich Bank, and the Woodbridge ('onipany. He 
is a trustee of sevei'al large estates, including those of the late 
George Bliss and I. X. I'helps. He is a member of the New York 
Chamber of Conimei-ce, and of the Metropolitan, Union League, Cen- 
tury, and St. Nicholas clubs. He is President of the New Y'ork Eye 
iHid Ear Infirmary, and is a trustee of the Roosevelt Hospital, and 
of the Northern Dispensary. He has been a trustee of the New York 
Hospital, the Woman's Hospital, and the New Y'ork Asylum for the 
Blind. He married, in 1862, Anne Gardiner Wheelwright, and has 
two daughters and a sou — John Harsen Rhoades, Jr. He was him- 
self born in New Y\trk City, October 25, 1833, the son of Lyman 
Rhoades and Cornelia Rachel, gi-anddaughter of the late Jacob Har- 
sen, and sister of Dr. Jacob Harsen, a well-known New York physi- 
cian who, sucessively, held the offices of Trustee, Second Vice-Presi- 
dent, and First Vice-President of the Greenwich Savings Bank. Her 
family, of Dutch descent, became established in New York at an early 
Colonial period. Mr. Rhoades's father was born at Skaneateles, N. Y., 
of Welsh descent. Coming to New Y^ork City, he became head of the 
well-known drygoods firm of Rhoades, Wood & Company. John 
Harsen Rhoades was educate<l in private schools, entered the employ 
(»f the New Y'ork drygoods commission firm of Spring, Bradley & 
Buffuni, subse(iuently engaged in the same line as a member of the 
firm of Leonard, Schofield ^; Company, which was continued under 
the styles of Leonard & Rhoades, and Leonard, Rhoades & Grosvenor. 
After a successful career, he retired from this business in 1876. 

MACLAY', ROBERT, one of the most successful business men and 
able financiers of New York City, at the time of his death, in the sum- 
mer of 1898, was President of the Knickerbocker Trust Company, 
Vice-President of the Bowery Savings P>anlc, \'ice-President of the 
Gorham Coal Conii>;niy, A'ice-President of the Monmouth County 
Horse Show, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Crocker- 
Wheeler Electric Company, member of the AdvisoiT^ Committee of the 
.\udit Company, a director of tlie Peo](le"s Bank, the National Surety 
Company, the Manhattan Life Insurance Company, the East River 
Gas Company, the New Jersey Ice ('(nnjiany, the West Su]ierior Iron 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 143 

and Stct-I Company, the Soutlinii Shilcs Land and Tinilicr ('(>ui]iany, 
the Lai;una A'alley Cnnipauy, the llainjitou Koads Hotel Company, 
and the Ashtabuha Water ComiJany. He was also a trustee of tlie 
Northern Dispensary, and a member of the Board of Edneation of the 
City of New York. He served on the Board of Education many years, 
being- always a vigorous opponent of the element whitda wished to 
make our educational system subservient to political ends. As Ciuiii-- 
mau of the Committee on Buildings he inaugurated a generous and 
progressive policy, and outlined and inaugurated plans whi(di are 
still being carried to completion, i'or several years leader of the 
"reform" movement in the Board of Education, on the issue thus 
raised he was twice elected its PresidiMit. He has also served on 
several i)ublic commissions by appointment of the Supreme Court. In 
1868 he became N'ice-President and Treasurer of the Knickerbocker 
Ice Com])any of New York, and in 1875 succeeded in the presidency 
its founder and first President, the late Alfred Barmore. This com- 
pany became the largest corporation of its kind in the world, having a 
capital of three million dollars. Mr. Maclay remained at its liead 
until the recent combinatidii with other ice companies was effected, 
creating the Consolidated Ice Company. He was Vice-President of 
the Bowery Savings Bank for many yi'ars. His achievement as Presi- 
dent (d' the Knickerbocker Trust Comitany was remarkable. In spite 
of the period of business depression, during the little more than three 
years since he became President of this corporation, in 1894, in the 
number of its clients and amount of deposits, its business more than 
doubled, making its resources move than thirteen million dollars. 
He was born in New Yoik City, June 11, 1S;U, the son of Dr. Robert 
Maclay and Eliza, daughter of Jean Marie Joseph Labatnt, an old 
New York merchant. His father was ])rominent among the physi- 
<-ians of the city, received a service of ]>late from the citizens of the 
Sixth Ward in recognition of his distinguished services during the 
cliolera e])idemic of 1832, and was for many years President of the 
New ^'ork Savings Bank. He was also one of the most ]>roniiuent 
leaders of tin- Democratic party in the city, and delivered the address 
of w<dconie on the occasion of the visit of President Polk to New York. 
He was a strong su]tporter of the Ciovernment during the Civil War. 
Ilis younger brother, Hon. William B. Jhuday, was famous as a New 
York lawyer, orator. Democratic leader, and legislator. He served 
two terms in the State Legislature, and i\\c terms in Congress. He 
was ]iractically the creator of the New York public s( hool system with 
which his nephew was so prominently connected. ^Ir. Bobert IMa- 
clay's grandfather. Dr. Archibald IMaclay, born in Killeain, on the 
banks of Loch Lomond, Scotland, was a i>rominent minister of the 
Bajitist denomination in New York City, being tlie founder and for 
tliiiiytwo years the pastor of the Tabernacle Baptist Church, origi- 
nally on .Mulberrv Sti-eet, and now on Second Avenue. Subsequ<Mitly, 



1-i-J: HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

for twelve years, lie was Viee-Presideiit and traveling Secretary of 
the American and Foreign Bible Society, and visited nearly every 
State of the Union, as well as Europe. In 1850 he became one of the 
founders of the American Bible Union, was its first Vice-President, 
and later became its President. A colhiteral line from the same com- 
mon stem, the Maclay family of Pennsylvania has furnished two 
United States Senators and other representatives scarcely less promi- 
nent. Kobert ilaclay married, May IS, 1865, Georgiana., daughter of 
Alfred Barmore. She sui'vives him, witli their two sons — Alfred 
Barmore Maclay and Robert Maclay, Jr. 

McMAHON, JAMES, President of tlie Emigrant Industrial Sav- 
ings Bank, of New Yorlv, has been connected with that institution 
for about twenty years as Trustee, member of its Finance Committee, 
Chairman of the same, and I'resideut of the bank. He is Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Savings Banks' Association of the State of New York, 
Vice-President and Chairman of the Finance Committee of the Irish 
Emigrant Society, and Vice-President and Trustee of the New York 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. He is a trustee 
of the London and Lancashire Fire Insurance ('onipany, a trustee 
of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, and a director of the 
People's Trust Company, of Brooklyn. He is a member of the New 
York Chamber of Commerce, the Catholic and Hardware clubs of 
New York, and the Columbian Club of Brooklyn. He was born in 
Franklin County, New York, October 15, 1831. and was educated in 
the public schools of Rochester, N. Y. At twenty-one years of age 
he was elected a member of the Board of Education of Rociiester, 
but resigned to go to California. He has also served on the Board 
of Education of Brooklyn, where he has long been a resident. He 
was for many years engaged in the book trade. Subsequently, for 
twenty-five years, he was engaged in the transportation business, 
under the firm style of Easton & ^IcMahon, which was superseded 
by the Easton i^- McMahon Transi)ortatiou Company. Mr. McMahou 
retired from the presidency of this corporation about ten years ago. 

FAIRCHILI), CHARLES STEBBINS, has been eminent alike iu 
the financial histoiw of the city, in the public life of the city and the 
nation, and as a leader of the independent and reform element in the 
Democratic party. Since 1889 he has been President of the New York 
Security and Trust Company, while he is also President of the Atlanta 
and Charlotte Air Line Company, is President of the Birkbeck Invest- 
ment Savings and Loan Company, a member of the Advisory Commit- 
tee of the Audit Company, Treasurer of the Manhattan East Side Mis- 
sion, manager of the State Charities Aid Association, a trustee of the 
New York Life Insurance Company, and a director of the Lawyers' 
Mortgage Insurance Company, the Erie and Pittsburg Railroad Com- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



paiiv, and the Louisville, Eviiiis\i]|c and St. Louis ( "onsolidatcd IJail- 
road ( 'omi^any. Born in Cazenovia, X. \., April 80, 1S42. hv was liradn- 
ated from Harvard in 1S63 and from Harvard Law S(diool in 1S()5. He 
continued bis law studies at Albanv, was admitted to the bar in lSiii\, 
and eventually became a member of the law tinu of Hand, Hall iV: 
Swartz, of Albany. He was ai>])oint('d hcputy Attorney-General of 
the State by Attorney-General I>aiiicl I'ratt in 1874, and the next year 
was the successful Democratic candidate to succeed Mr. Pratt, hold- 
inji the ofihce two years. He traveled in Europe in 1878 and 1879, and 
upon his return resumed the practice of law in New York City. In 
1885 President Cleveland a])poiuted him Assistant Secretary of the 
Treasury. Upon the failure of the health of Daniel IManninii' he be- 
came Actinii' Secretary, 
and in 1887 succeeded 
Manniui; as Secretary of 
the Treasury in Cleve- 
land's Cabinet. He was 
one of the most pronuncni 
leaders in tlie so-called 
" anti-snaj) "" nio\'ement in 
this State. whi(di sec>ire<l 
the nomination of Grover 
( 'leveland for the Pi-esi- 
dency in 1802. He was 
])romineut in the munic- 
ipal reform movement in 
18!)4 which brou.mht about 
the overthrow of Taui- 
many Hall and the elec- 
tion of Mayor Stronji. He 
was aii'ain active in con- 
nection with the Citizens' 
Union which nominated 
Seth Low for Mayor in 

1897, and subsequently permitted his own nomination as ('onii)lroller 
of the city to streuiitlien the ticket. He is a mend)er of the City liar 
Association, and the Metropolitan, University, Century, Keform, Law- 
yers", Manhattan, Democratic, Harvard, and other clubs. He married 
in 1871 Helen, daui;ht(n- of Ledyard Lincklean and Helen Clarissa 
Seymour, of Cazenovia. He is himself the son of the late Sidney T. 
Fairchild and Helen, daui;hter of Perry G. Childs, of Cazenovia. His 
father was finiduated from Union College in 1829, and was one of the 
eminent lawyers and Denmcratic leaders (d' his section of the State. 
He was attorney of tlie Syracuse and Utica Railroad from L8."')8 until 
his death in 1889; lienerai attorney of the New York Central, and was 
President of the Cazenovia and Canastota Railroad, Secretary and 




CHARLKS S. FAIRCHILD. 



l46 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Treasurer of the Great ^^■estern Turupike Railroad Company, a di- 
rector of the ^Madison ( 'mmty Bank, and a trustee of the Union Trust 
Oonipanv of New York City. 

MOKBTSON. DAA'IT) :\riTrnELL. who has been President of the 
AN'ashinyton Trust Company of New Yoric City since its organiza- 
tion in June, 1880. is also a trustee of the Greenwich Savings Bank 
and a director of the North River Fire Insurance Company and the 
Prefen-ed Aciident Insurance Company. He was born in New Y'ork 
City in 1S41, attended private schools, and was graduated from Gram- 
mar ScliKol and the College of the City of New York, and after one 
year as Clerk with the New York banking hotise of Drexel, \Yinthrop 
& Company, in 1864 established the AVall Street banking firm of Mor- 
rison & I'utuam, associating with him his brother-in-law, A. E. Put- 
nam. This firm continued its successful course tintil 1881, when 
Mr. Morrison retired from active business. He is a member of the 
New Y'ork Chamber of Commerce, the New York Stock Exchange, 
the Union League, Merchants", and Chi Psi clubs of New Y'ork, the 
Hamilton and Riding and Driving clubs of Brooklyn, the Dyker 
^Meadow Golf ("lub, and the St. Andrew's Society. He is a life 
member of the New York Historical Society, with which his father, 
the late James M. Morrison, was so prominently identified. He 
married, in 1877, Abbie, daughter of the late Cajitnin Nathaniel Put- 
nam, of Brooklyn, and has four children, ilr. Morrison's grandfather, 
born in Scotland, in 1790 came to America and became an extensive 
jilanti^r in Louisiana and a well-known author. His wife was the 
granddaughter of a magistrate of Aberdeen, Scotland, and great 
granddaughter of the Lord Provost of Aberdeen. Mi*. Morrison's 
father was born in New Orleans, at No. 8 Bourbon Street, his father's 
town house. His father dying when he was five years of age, he was 
taken to Aberdeen by his mother, and there educated. When twenty- 
four years of age he came to New York City and became prominent 
as a banker. He was for many yeai-s President of the famous Man- 
hattan Company's Bank, the second oldest bank in New York City, 
and was holiliiig tliat position at the time of his death in December, 
1880. 

ROGERS. THEODORE, President of the Bank of the Metropolis, 
New Y'ork City, since 1894, when he succeeded Robert Schell, had 
been its cashier from the organization of the institution in 1871 until 
1894. He was born in Jamaica, L. I., where he still resides, in October, 
1831, the son of Alexander Rogers and Elizabeth Piatt. His mother 
died when he was five years of age, and his father a year later, so 
that at an early age he was thrown upon his own resources, and 
became a Clerk in the New York silk and straw goods house of Fisher, 
Blashfield & Comiiany. In 1849 he entered the employ of the Ameri- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 147 

cau Exchauye Bank. Four years later Jic became couuected with 
the old Union Bank of Xew York, with which he remained as Clei'k 
and Assistant Teller for nine years. Subsequently, for a few years, 
he served the Shoe and Leather Bank as Eeceiving Teller and Paying 
Teller, and later filled the position of Manager of the branch institu- 
tion which the Shoe and Leather Bank established on Wall Street. 
When this branch was anialganiat<'d with the Tenth National Bank 
he became Ortifying Teller in the latter; but when it passed into 
the control of the Jay (Jonld interests, lie resumed as Paying Teller 
with the Shoe ami Leather BanU. From this position he was called 
to the Cashiership of the Bank of the Metropolis. 

BORNE, JOHN EMIL, President of the (Colonial Trust Omipany, 
is one of the prominent figures in the oil business in this country, 
in which he has been engaged since 1873. Long the head of the firm of 
Borne, Scrmyser & Company, he lias been its president since it was 
incorporated as the Borne, Scrymser (Company. He is also a director 
of the Mercantile National Bank and the Home Life Insurance Com- 
pany, and is a member of tlie I^nion and Metropolitan clubs, and 
the Downtown Association, together witli the Hamilton and Crescent 
Athletic clubs of Brooklyn. He married, in 1877, Nellie M. Law- 
r(Mice, of New York. They have no children. Mr. Borne was born 
in Brooklyn, December 1, 1852, his father having been a Russian land- 
owner before coming to the United States, while his mother was a 
German. Having been educated in New York City and (lermany, his 
first business connection was as clerk with the Queens I'lre Insurance 
Company. He was twenty-one when he engaged in tlie oil business, 
and he rapidly acquired large interests in the oil-producing country 
of Pennsylvania and establislied extensive i»etroleum works. He 
built one of the notabh' i>iiie lines, and established offices in all parts 
of the world. 

OLCUTT. FREDERIC PEPOON, was born in Albany. N. Y., in 
1841; at the age of sixteen became clerk in the Mechanics* and Trad- 
ers' Bank of that city, of which his father, the late Thomas W. Ol- 
cott, of Albany, was President; subsequently engaged in the lumber 
business on his own account in Albany, and was successively con- 
nected with the banking firms in this city id" Blake, Brothcn's & Com- 
pany and Phelps, Stokes & Company. Since 1884 he has been Presi- 
dent of tlie Central Trust Company. This corporation has been fiscal 
agent and depositary of securities in connection witii a large number 
of notable railroad reorganizations, and Mr. Olcott is a recognized 
authority in delicate questions involving the rights of investors. He 
is President also <if the (Jalveston. Houston and Henderson Railroad 
Company. Mce-President of the Bank of America, Treasurer of the 
Union Traction and Electrical Comiiauy. and a director of the Na- 



148 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



lioual Uuiuii Bank, the Brooklyn Wliarf and Warehouse Company, 
the Audit ("((in])any. the Cohirado .Midland Kailroad Company, the 
New York, (Jhica.yo and 8t. Louis Jlailrnad Company, the St. Joseph 
and Grand Island Railroad Company, the Magdeburg Fire Insurance 
Company, and the INipular rbotogi-aph Company. He was Comp- 
troller of the .State of Xew York from 1S77 to 1880. He is a member 
of the Metropolitan, Union League, Manhattan, Eidlng. Driving, Rid- 
ing and Driving, Ladies', Barnard. New York Yacht, Morristown, 
and Essex County Country clubs, and the Downtown Association. He 
is also a member of the Chamber of Commerce. He married, in 1862, 
Mary Esniay, and has a daughter, Edith, and a son, Dudley Olcott. He 
descends from Thomas Olcott, one of the founders of Hartford, Conn., 
under Rev. Thomas Hooker. 



GILBERT, ALEXANDER, elected President of the Market and 
Fulton National Bank of New York City, November 10, 1896, has been 

liir iicjirly forty years connected 
: with tliat institution. In 1859, at 

the age of twenty, he became its 
Sci-oiid Assistant Teller, and rose 
llirougli various promotions ti> be 
its Casincr in 1863 — at the time 
the youngest bank cashier in New 
York City. Solicited to become 
President of the Fnlton Bank of 
tJiis city in 1887, he instead suc- 
ceeded in bringing about its consol- 
idation with the ^Market National 
Bank, of wldcli Ik* had so long been 
an oHiccr, tlnis adding over 
$1,000,000 deposits to the latter. 
The ]>resent style was adopted at 
the time of this consolidation. In 
1892, M\: Gilbci-t was elected Yice- 
President as well as Cashier. Of- 
fered the Presidency of the South- 
ern National liank early in 189(j, he instead secured its li(]uidation and 
the transfer of its business to the Market and Fulton National Bank, 
thus adding to the lattei- .'?l,2.")n,000 of deposits. In 1891 and 189.j, 
Mr. (iilbert was Secretary of the New York Clearing House Asso- 
ciation. A resident of IMainfield, N. J., since 1866, he served many 
years as a nieniher of the ("onnnoii Council of that city, and in 1890 
was elected .Mayor as the candidate of the Kepublicau party. He 
administered tl:e aiTaiis in tliorongli independence of partisan politics, 
and was nnanimonsl_\- elecled to succeed himself, no other candidate 
being nominated. He was also unanimonsly elected for a third term, 




ALKXANDER GILBERT. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF XEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 149 

but positively refused a Court li uomination. lie was a delegate to 
the Republicau National Convention at Minneapolis in 1892, and was 
a member of its committee to notify Benjamin Harrison of his nomi- 
nation for the I'resideney. He is a member of the New York Board 
of Trade and Transp<n'tation, is one of its directors, and a member of 
its Committeee on Finance. He is also Vice-President and a director 
of the Fulton Club, of this city, and has been its Treasurer. He is 
Treasurer of the Hillside Cemetery and of the First Baptist Church, 
of Plainlield, N. J., and is a member of the Board of Trade and 
the Union County and Lincoln clubs of the same city. He is himself 
a native of Elizabeth, N. J., where he was born, Aui^ust 10, 1839. 

SEWATJD, CEOlfiJE IMJEDEIHCK, was Vice-President of the 
Fidelity and Casualty Compan\- of New York City from 1887 to 1892, 
and since the latter date has been its President. He is also Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Willson Aluminum Company. Actively engaiied in bus! 
ness in this city since 1880, during the nineteen years precedinji' he 
was engaged in the consular and diplomatic service of the United 
States in the far East. From 18<il to 18tU he was Consul at Shanghai, 
China, and from 1804 to 1875 was Consul-! ieneral, in 18G8 being also 
T'nited States Minister to Korea. In 1867 he likewise discharged a 
special mission. From 1875 to 1880 he Avas United States Minister 
to China. He has published " (^'liinese Immigration in its Local 
and Economical Aspects," and has written articles on Russia, 
on •• American Sliiifiiing Interests," " I'artition of China," " Rus- 
sian Interests in Manchuria," " Chinese Immigration," and '* Li Hung 
Chang." He is a member of the Reform, Lawyers", and University 
Athletic clubs, the Sons of the Revolution, the New England Society, 
the Township Improvement Society of Orange, N. J., and the Society 
of Civics of New Y^ork, being a member of the Executive Committee 
of the latter. He was born in Florida, N. Y., November 8, 1840, and 
was educated at the S. S. Seward Institute in Florida (founded by 
his grandfather, Hon. Samuel S. Seward, Judge of the New York Cir- 
cuit Court ) and at ITnion College. He is tlie son of George W. Seward 
and Tenii)e W., daughter of John Leddell, and is the nephew of the 
late ^Villiam II. Seward, Governor of NeAV York, United States Sen- 
ator, and Secretary of State in the cabinets of Lincoln and Andrew 
Johnson. Mr. Seward's great-grandfather, John Seward, was Ct)lonel 
of the Second Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers, in tlic Revolution. 

HUGHSON, FREDERICK, since 1893 President of the New York 
Savings Bank, was long engaged in the practice of law in New York 
City, prior to 1883, as the partner of John ^Vebber. He was born at 
Hughsonville. Dutchess County, N. Y., April 16. 1820, the son of 
William I. Hughson and Maria Wright, and attended the Hughson- 
ville Academy. coHdurtcd by llvy. Eliphalet Price, for three years 



150 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

attended the University of tlie City of New Yorlc. and in 1839 was 
graduated from Columbia College. He studied law and was for a 
areat many years in actiye practice. He had been attorney and 
counsel of the New York Savings Bank since 1867. became its Treas- 
urer in 1883, and was elected President March 11. 1803. He is de- 
scended from Thomas llughson. who came from England and settled 
at Croton, Westchester County. John, son of William, and grandson 
of this Thomas, settled at Hughsonville. Dutchess < I'ounty. giving his 
name to the place. His son John, born at Hughsonville, August 15, 
1765, was the grandfather of Frederick Hughson, and was remarkable 
for his inventive skill. He devised and constructed all the imple- 
ments for which he found use in his employments as farmer and 
sportsman — cider mills, threshing machines, fanning mills, and boats 
and tools of almost every kind. 

HUTCHINSON, HENRY ELIJAH, since 1890 has been President 
of the Brooklyn Bank, which was incorporated in 1832, and is the 
oldest banking institution in that city, and is also a director and 
Secretain" of the Excelsior Steamboat Company, President of the 
Brooklyn and Rockaway Beach Railroad Company, was an incorpora- 
tor and is a trustee of the Hamilton Trust Company, is a trustee of 
the Breevort Savings Bank, and is a director of the Long Island 
Safe Deposit Company. He is likewise a director of the Brooklyn 
Club, and is a member of the Union League Club of Brooklyn, the 
Alpha Delta Phi, Church, and Young Republican clubs of the 
same city, the Brooklyn Institute, the New England Society of 
Brooklyn, the Society of Vermonters of Brooklyn, the Long Is- 
land Histoiical Society, and tiie Brooklyn Library. Born in Wind- 
sor, Vt., July 31, 1837, he is the son of Rev. Elijah Hutchinson and 
Laura Manning, daughter of John Payson Skinner, is the grandson 
of Rev. Elisha Hutchinson, the great-grandson of Rev. Samuel Hut- 
chinson, and the great-great-grandson of Rev. Samuel Hutchinson. 
He attended the High School of Windsor, Vt.. from 1854 to 1856 at- 
tended Dartmouth College, and in 1858 was graduated from Amherst 
College. He was a teacher at Montgomery, Ala., from 1858 to 1860, 
in the latter year was admitted to the Alabama bar. and in 1862 was 
admitted to the bar at New York City. From 1863 to 1872 he was 
United States Internal Revenue Assistant Assessor, from 1872 to 
1876 was Cashier of the Mechanics' Savings Bank, and from 1877 to 
1890 was Cashier of the Brooklyn Bank, of which he has since been 
President. He was organist and director of music at St. Peter's Epis- 
copal Church. Brooklyn, from 1870 to 1882, while he was connected 
with the Brooklyn (Choral Society from 1888 to 1892 as Treasurer 
and President. In June, 1898, he was elected a member of the Advisoi-y 
Board of the Musical Department of the Brooklyn Institute. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 151 

HAYir?, >\'1L1>IAM II.. was oiu' (if tlic best kiuiwii bankers and 
brokers of New York City prior to bis deatb, December (S, 1S8G. Boru 
in tbis city iu 1814. at tifteeu years of age be entered tbe oftice of J. D. 
IJeers ^: Company, bankers and brokers, witb wliom be remained for 
Hve yeai's. In 1831: be engaged in business on bis own account, and 
wbib^ tlie struggle was severe at tirst, by 185(1 be was tinnly estab- 
lisbe(b He was a member of tbe old Board of Brokers wliicb pre- 
ceded tbe Stock Excbange, and later became one of tbe founders of 
tbe ]iresent Xew York Stock Excbange. In 18")8 be was elected 
President of tbe Dry Dock Bank, at tbe corner of Tentb Street and 
Avenue D, at tbe bead of wbicb be remained until tbe institution 
went out of business in 1805. Wbeu be acce])ted tbis responsibility be 
gave bis brokerage business into tbe bands of bis brotber, Jacob Hays, 
and bis son-in-law, Mintborne Tompkins, Jr. In 18ti() be became as- 
sociateil witb tbe banking and brokerage tirm of Closson & Hays, 
wbicb bad been establisbed Ijy bis son, Jacob Hays. In I87() be 
became President of tlie National Bank of tbe State of New York, 
retaining- tbis position until bis deatb iu 188(). One of bis latest 
acbievements was tbe reorganization of tbe Mobib' and Obio Bailroad 
Company, of wbicb be was a director. For many years be was Presi- 
dent of tbe Nintb Avenue Bailroad Conii>any, as be was also of tbe 
Eig'htb Avenue llailroad Company. He was Treasurer of tbe Peo- 
ple's Line of Steamers, and a director of tbe Seventb Aveuue Railroad 
Company, tbe Broadway Railroad Company, and tbe New York and 
Brooklyn Ferry Company. He married Mary ^'. E., daugbter of 
Alexander Moore, of New Brunswick, N. J. Sbe died in Marcb. 1887. 
Tbeir surviving cbildreu are two sons — Jacob and Ed\vai-d St. Jobn 
Hays, and two daugbters — Mai-y C, widow of .Miutborne Tompkins, 
and Ella H., wife of Cbarles A. Myers. Mr. \Mlliam H. Hays was tbe 
son of Hon. Jacob Hays, wbo emigrated to New York from England 
during tbe latter part of tbe last century, and iu 1802 was appointed 
Higb Constable of tbe City of New York by Mayor Livingston, a posi- 
tion somewbat analogous to tliat of tbe jiresent Superintendent of Po- 
lice. (For portrait of Jacob Hays see Volume I., page 356, of tbis 
work.) Being successively retained iu oftice by eacb succeeding 
Mayor, be beld tbis position for fifty years, tbe office being abolisbed 
at tbe time of bis deatb. His sons— Dewitt C. Hays, A. B. Hays, and 
William H. Hays — were all ]irominently identified witb tbe banking 
antl financial interests of tbe City of N(n\- York. 

HAYS. JACOB, eldest son of tbe late AVilliam H. Hays, and grand- 
son of Jacob Hays, for balf a century Higb Constable of tbe City of 
New York, was a member of tbe banking and brokerage firm of 
Closson & Hays from 18(;G until lie retired from active business in 
1883. and is still an officer of many financial institutions. He is now^ 
President of tbe Eigbtb Avenue Railroad Company, is also President 



152 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

of the Ninth Aveuue Kailroad Companv. is a trustee and Treasurer 
of the New -Tei-sey Steamboat Company (known as the People's Line of 
Steameis). and is a director of the Kuiikerbooker Trust Company, the 
Brooklyn and New York Ferry Company, the East River Gas Com- 
pany of Louii Island City, and the Northern Railroad of New Jersey, 
lie is a member of the New York Athletic Club. ilr. Hays was born 
in New York City. February 13. ISio. received a good elementary 
edmation. at the au:e of sixteen became clerk in the New York dry- 
goods house of Halsted. Haines & Company, and two years later be- 
came a clerk in the Old Dry Dock Bank, at the corner of Tenth Street 
and Aventte D. now known as the Eleventh Ward Bank. In 1803 he 
became clerk to the \Yall Street banking firm of Charles K. Marvin & 
Sous, and in 18(>4 became Cashier of the fiiin of Hays & Tompkins. 
In May. ISOG. he was elected a member of tlie New Y'ork Stock Ex- 
change, and in October of the same year he founded the firm 
of Closson & Hays. This fii'm niunbered among its clients. Com- 
modore Vanderbilt. Samuel J. Tilden. George Law. Marshall O. Rob- 
erts. William R. Travers, Horace F. Clark. Hugh iNIcCulloch. Samuel 
Sloan, and John B. Trevor. Mr. Hays married. December 12. lS6t3. 
Mary Jane, daughter of David Loiuleiback. of New Y'ork City, and has 
a son — William Henry Hays, who was electeil a member of the New 
Y'ork Stock Exchange. December 16. 1S97 — and a daughter. Lizzie, 
wife of John Scott Browning. 

SMITH. BRYAN HOOKER, long and successfully engaged in bus- 
iness, from whiih he retired in 1801. has been President of the Brook- 
lyn Savings Bank since 1893. and is a director of the Hanover Instir- 
ance Company. Since 1896 he has also been President of the Packer 
Collegiate Instittite of Brooklyn. While having retired from the 
active management of the business, he still retains his interest in the 
wholesale ib'ygoods establishment on Worth Street, Manhattan Bor- 
ough, with which he has been for so many years connected. He is a 
member >f the Union League and Hamilton clubs of Brooklyn, where 
he resides. The sou of Cyrus Porter Smith and I.ydia Hooker, he was 
born in the Borough of Brooklyn. January 29. 1829. and was educate*! 
in the Brooklyn public schools. On the maternal side he is lineally 
tlesc-ended from the famous Rev. Thomas Hooker, founder of the Col- 
ony of Counecticut. 

CANNON. HENRY WHITE. Comptroller of the United States Ctu- 
rency from 1884 to 1886, and President of the Chase National Bank 
during most of the peritxi since, is a director of a number of important 
corporations. These include the Manhattan Trust Company, the 
Uniteil States Guarantee Company, the Bnwklyn Union Gas Com- 
pany, the Clinton Hall Association, the Great Northern Railroad Com- 
pany, the Lake Erie and Western Railroad Company, the New York, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



153 



Ontai'id and Western Jlaihvay Company, ami the Janu'sTowii ami 
Lake Erie Railway Company. He Avas aj^pyinted Aqueduct Commis- 
sioner by Mayor Grant, and by President Harrison was appointed a 
member of the Assay Commissidiis of IS'Jl and 1892. He has b^en a 
member of the New York Cleariuii-house Committee for a number 
of years, iucludin;; the period of the panic of 1893. President Har- 
rison appointed him one of five United States (Commissioners to the 
International ilonetaiTr Conference at Brussels in 1892. The Council 
of the Bimetallic Lea<iue of Great Britain invited him to attend the 
monetary conference in London in May, 1894. He has written much 
on financial subjects. A member of the Royal Statistical Society of 
LoTidon. he has three times served on its Committee on Coina.ire, 
Wpi^hts, and Pleasures in this country. Born in Delhi. X. Y.. Sejitem- 
ber 27, 1850, he is the son of Geor<::e 
Bliss Cannon and Ann Eliza White, 
a desc-endant of Pere<irini- White, 
who was born on the Mayflower. 
In lionor of liis i:randfather, Ben- 
jamin Cannon, Tompkins, X. Y., was 
renamed Cannonsville. He beyan 
his business career in the employ of 
the First National Bank of Dellii. 
and in 1870 entered the employ of 
the Second National Bank of St. 
Paul, Minn. A little later, at the 
age of twenty-one. he organized the 
LumV)(-rman"s National Bank of 
Stillwater, ^Minn.. and for thirteen 
years was its cashier, caiTying it 
through the panic of 1873. He be- 
came known to Eastern bankers 

through liis activity in purchasing ntst-Y « . ^nncn 

Government bonds for the banks of 

Minnesota during the refunding pr<icess, and as the successful nego- 
tiator of loans for the city of St. Paul. He was accordingly sup- 
jtorted warnily as successor of the famous John J. Knox, so long 
Comptroller of the Currency, and was appointed to that office by 
President Arthur in 1884. His administration was short but bril- 
liant, and it wa.s against President Cleveland's wish that he re- 
signed in 1886. Coming to this city he was elected Vice-Piesident 
of the National Bank of the Republic, of which John J. Knox was 
then President, but resigned in November, 1886. to become President 
of the Chase National Bank. 




RANDOLPH. LEWIS A'. V.. since January. 1896, President of the 
.\tlantic Trust Company, is also President of the Excelsior Steamboat 



154 HIi'TOR'i' OF THE GREATER XEW" VORK. 

Company, is President of the Carolina and Cumberland Gap Kaihvay, 
is Pi'esident of the Kanona and Prattsburgh IJaihvay, and is a 
director of the Lawyers' Mortgage Insiu'ance Company. He was 
long in the service of the Illinois Central Eailroad Company and be- 
came its Treasurer. He was also actively connected with the settle- 
ment of the estate of the late Bamuel J. Tilden, and was Secretary 
of the Tilden Trust and of the Tilden Library corporation, his impor- 
tant services being acknowledged in John Bigelow's recently pub- 
lished " Governor Tilden and His Times." Mr. Randolph was a Union 
soldier during the Civil War, has long been a resident of Plainlield, 
N. J., and was at one time its Mayor. He is of Pilgrim and Dutch 
antecedents, and traces his line of descent for some hundreds of years. 
His ancestors participated in the colonial wars and in the Kevolution. 

SCHENCK, FlIEDERICK BRETT, born in ^'ew York City, June 
9, 1S51, was educated in the public schools of Brooklyn, entered the 
employ of a prominent New York brokerage tirm, and subsequently 
engaged in the note brokerage business, which he followed until 1881. 
He then entered the service of the Mercantile National Bank, and was 
Assistant Cashier from 1881 to 1883, Casliier from 1883 to 1896, and 
since July, 1896, has been President of the bank. He is also a director 
of the Hamilton Bank and of the Safe Deposit Company of New York. 
In 1897 he was President of the group of bankers of New York City 
and Richmond County in the New York State Bankers" Association. 
He is a member of the Hamilton Club of Brooklyn and the Holland 
Society of New Y'ork City, and for eight years has been President of 
the Brooklyn Y'oung Men's Christian Association. His father was 
a dealer in cotton manufacturers' suppUes prior to the Civil War, and 
subsequently was in Government employ and a bank official. He also 
descends from Major Henrj' Schenck of the Revolution, while the 
founder of the family in America emigrated from Holland to New 
York about 1680, and settled at Bushwick, L. I. 

HAZZARD, WILLIAM H., has been President of the Fulton Bank 
of Brooklyn since 1881, and is a trustee of the City Savings Bank of 
Brooklyn. From 1876 to 1880 he was President of the Brooklyn 
City Railroad Company. He was SupeiTisor of the Tenth Ward of 
Brooklyn from 1862 to 1865, and in 1S79 and 1880 was a member of the 
Board of City "\^■orks. He was born in Sussex County. Delaware, April 
8, 1823, the son of Stephen Hazzard, and the grandson of Jacob Haz- 
zard. The ancestor of his fanuly in Delaware was a brother of the 
founder of the Rhode Island family of Hazzard. Having worked 
upon a farm between the ages of six and fourteen, Mr. Hazzard then 
went to Philadelphia, and apprenticed himself to John Robinson, 
to learn the trade of carpenter and builder. In 1841 he removed to 
New Y'ork Citv. aud in 1847 to Brooklvn. Two rears later he started 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 155 

iu biisiuess iu JBi'uoklyu a« u buildiug coutractor, and attained a re- 
markable reputation for the character of work done. He built the 
residence of the late H. B. ChiHin. and in ISSO erected Doav's Stores, at 
that time the largest warehouses in the world. He associated one of 
his sons with him. under the style of William Hazzard & Son. 

HUAG, DANIEL T., has been President of the American Savings 
Bank, of New York City, since October 13, 1885, when he succeeded 
the late Elliott F. Shepard, and is also a director of the Columbia 
Bank, of New York City. He has been for nearly thirty years a 
prominent New Y'ork merchant, having come to this city in 18.54, and 
entered the tea brokerage biisiness with such success that the sales 
made by his firm eventually aggregated about ten million dollars in 
n single year. For more than thirty-five years he has been a member 
of St. Thomas's Protestant Episcopal Church, of New Y'ork City, for 
more than twenty years having been Senior AVarden, and for more 
than ten years a Vestryman. He is first Vice-President of the Home 
for Old Men and Aged Couples, and is a member of the Union and 
Church clubs. He is a director of the Joseph Dixon Crucible Com- 
pany. Mr. Hoag was born in Duanesburgh, N. Y., and is the son 
of Daniel Hoag and Frebon Sheldon. His ancestors came from Eng- 
land in 1(135, settling iu New Hampshire. He was himself educated 
in Duanesburgh, clerked iu a store, for three years was clerk in the 
offices of the Canal Collector in Schenectady, Utica, and Albany, es- 
tablished himself as a merchant in Duanesburgh, and subsequently 
accepted the position of Teller of the Mohawk Bank of Schenectady, 
which he held until his removal to New York City in 1854. 

AVERY, ROBERT, is President of the United Loan and Invest- 
ment Company, and is Vice-President of the Brooklyn Hygienic Ice 
Company, Vice-President of the Burlington and Hineshui-g Rail- 
road Company, Mce-President and S(Mretary of the Virginias Railway 
Company, Vice-President and Treasurer of the Pacific Pine Lumber 
Company, and Vice-President and (ieneral Counsel of Michael J. L)ady 
& Company. He has been a member of the Union League Chili of New 
York City. Born in Tunkhannock, Pa., September 22, 183'.», lie at- 
tended private schools and Wyoming Seminary at Kingston, Pa. 
From 1858 to 1861 he was Manager of tlie Dusseldorf Art Gallery of 
Paintings and Statuary. He was an officer of the volunteer army of 
the United States from 1861 to 1866, and from the latter date to 
1870 was an officer of the regular army, attaining the grades of Cap- 
tain, Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, Brevet Brigadier-General, and Brevet 
:\rajor-General. He was wounded at Cliancellorsville. at Lookout 
[Mountain received a wound resulting in the loss of tlie right leg; from 
1865 to July, 18<')6, was Assistant Commissary-General of prisoners 
of war; from 1866 to 1868 was Inspector-General in loinioction with 



156 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

the Freedmen's Bureaii; in 18(iT aud ISGS.was Judge Advocate, and 
since December 31, ISTO, has been on the retired list. IJe was ad- 
mitted to tlie New York Bar in 1871. and also to practice in tlie United 
States Supreme Court. I'rom 1871 to 1873 he was Secretary of the 
Hotistou aud Great Nortliern Kailroad, and in 1873 and 1874 was 
(Teneral Manager of the Galveston, llarrisburg aud San Antonio Kail- 
road. He is the sou of Abel 31. Aveiy and Euphemia Pell Stevens; 
is great-grandson of Soh)mon Aveiw, a KevolutionarT soldier; is sev- 
enth from Captain James Averj-, who won distinction hghtiug the 
Indians in 1675-77, and is ninth in line from Christopher Avery, who 
immigrated to New England from Cornwall, England, where the fam- 
ily had been prominent since tlie fourteenth century. Tlirough au 
ancestress, Susannah Palmes, he descends from Egbert, seventeenth 
aud last king of the West Sax(nis. On his mother's sid(^ he is related 
to the Pells aud Delaplaiues of New York City. 

YOUNG, CHARLES TITUS, entered the Internal Kevenue office. 
Second District of New York, in 1865, in 1868 was made Chief Clerk, 
and the following year resigned. In 187(1 he entered the employ of 
the National City Bank, of Brooklyn; in 1881 was appointed Cashier, 
was elected Vice-President in 1880. and in 1891 was electi^l its Presi- 
dent, a positiou which he still occupies. He is also a trustee of the 
South Brooklyn Savings Institution, is President of the Brooklyn 
Athenai'um. and a nnmiber of the ^lontauk and Marine aud Field 
clubs of that city, and the St. Nicholas Society. He was born in 
Brooklyn. November 27, 1844, and there received his education at the 
Polytechnic Institute and Clark cSc Brownell's private school. He 
is the sou of Henry D. Young and Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob, aud 
granddaughter of Isaac Doty, and is the grandson of Abraham Young 
and great-grandson of Oscar Young. 

VAN NOEDEN, WARNEP, son of a New York merchant, at an 
early age was placed in one of the largest wholesale produce estab- 
lishments in New York City, and at the age of twenty-one was as- 
signed to the management of a branch house in New Orleans. In 
that city he also had his first experience as a bank president. In 1876 
he returned to New York City and successfully engaged in business 
as a private banker. Since January, 1891, he has been President of 
the National Bank of North America in New York City, of which 
he has been a director since 1888. He is also President of the Land 
and River Improvement (,'om])any. President of the Soutli Yuba 
Water Company, a trustee of the American Savings Bank, and a 
director of the Home Insurance Company. He is a ruling elder in 
the Presbyterian Church, and is President of the Presbvterian Union 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



157 




WAKXKR VAX NiiRDKX. 



of New York City. He is a member of the New York Chamber of 
Commerce, and of tlie iletrojiolitaii and Lawyers" clnbs, and the 
Holland Society, lie was born at 
173 Franklin Street, New York 
City, Jnly 2, 1841, and descends 
from Dutch and French Huguenot 
ancestors, who were prominently 
identitied with the early history 
of New Y'ork. His paternal an- 
cestor arrived in New Amsterdam 
from Holland about IGKI. On the 
maternal side he descends from 
the two Huguenots, Abraham La 
Noy and Jean Mousnier de la Mon- 
taigne, the latter of whom was 
Yice-Director of New Netherlands 
under Covernor Stuyvesant. He 
also descends fi-om the famous 
Eev. Dr. Everardus Bogardus and 
his wife, Anneke Jans. His gTeat- 
Sireat-grandfather, Adriance Hogh- 
land, once owned all the land now 

devoted to the Kiverside Park and Dri\e. His ancestral strains also 
include the families of Koome, Kierstedt, Kip. ^'an Nest, Wahlron, 
and A'ermilye. 

SHEILAIAN, WILLIAM WIXSLOW, President of the National 
Bank of Commerce in New York since 181)1, was its Casiiier for ten 
years, and lias been conne^-ted witli it since 1858. He is a member 
of the Union League and Hiding clubs and tlie New [England Society. 

BENEDICT, ELIAS COIJNELirS, became a clerk with Conung 
& Company, bankers, on Wall Street, when tifteen years of age, and 
in 1857, but eight years later, succeeded to tlieir large business, form- 
ing the banking lirni of Benedict tV: Company, at the head of which 
lie lias remaini^d to the ]>resent time. The tirm style was Benedict, 
Flower 6i: Com] tany from 1N71 to 1875, Boswell P. Flower. subse(|uent- 
ly Governor of New Y'ork, being then a partner. The firm has largely 
handled investment secui-ities, especially railroad and gas securities. 
With his brother Mr. Benedict founded the Cold Exchange Bank. He 
has been connected with a large number <d' important corporations, 
and is now President of the Kansas City and Omaha Kail way Com- 
pany, and an otticer of other corporations. He is a devoted yachtsman, 
owner of the yacht Oneida, aiul is well known to be the intimate friend 
of ex-President < 'leveland. He is a member of the IMayers". New York 
Yacht, American Yacht, and Seawanhaka-Corintliian Yacht clubs. 



158 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

For more than ii ([iiarter of a ceutnin- be has beeu Treasurer of the Xew 
York Ophtliahiiic Hospital, and is a trustee of the Xew York Homeo- 
pathic Medical ("olle,!j;e and Hospital. He married, in lSo9, Sarah C, 
daughter of Lucius Hart, of this city, and has three datighters and a 
son — Frederic Hart Benedict. He was himself born in J^omers, West- 
chester County, X. Y., January 24, 1S34, the son of Eev. Henry Bene- 
dict and Mary Betts Lockwood, and is lineally descended from Thomas 
Benedict, wlio was at Boston in 1038, and subsequently settled at 
Xorwalk, Conn. 

BENEDICT, FBEDERIC HAET, is the only son of Elias Cornelius 
Benedict and Sarah C, daughter of Lticitis Hart, of New York City, 
and is a member of the well-known banking tirm of Benedict & Com- 
pany, of which his father has for so long a time been the head. He is 
Trea.stirer of the Johnson-Lundell Electric Company. He is a member 
of tlie New York Stock Exchange, and of the Union, Tuxedo, City, 
Manhattan, Riding, Players', Racqtiet, Country, New York Athletic, 
New York Yacht, and Seawanhaka-Corinthian Yacht chibs. He mar- 
ried, first, Jennie, daughter of Henrw M. Flagler, and subsequent to 
her death, Yirginie, daughter of Frederic R. Coudert. 

BENEDICT, LE GRAND LOCKWOOD, is the son of James 
Hoyt Benedict, long prominent as a banker in New York City, 
and grandson of Seth Williston Benedict, proprietor in turn of the 
New York EvcDnicJifit, the Kmanripafor, ami the New York Indcpcmlcnt. 
He is ninth in descent from Thonms Benedict and Mary Brigdum. the 
founder of the family in this country having between 1638 and 1685 
resided in Massachusetts Bay Colony, Huntington, Southold, and Ja- 
maica, L. I., and Norwalk, Conn., serving in one or another community 
as ilagistrate. Commissioner, Lieutenant, Town Clerk, and represen- 
tative to the Connecticut (Jeneral Assembly. ^Ir. Benedict was born 
in New York City, August 21, 1855; was graduated from the Renssel- 
aer Polytechnic Institute, and is a member of the Union and Rocka- 
way Hunt clubs. He married, in 1881, Sarah Collier Blaine, and has 
a daughter and a son — Le Grand Lockwood, Jr. 

PORTER. WILLIAM HENRY, is Yice-President of the Chemical 
National Bank of the City of New York, is Mce-I'resideut of the Pacific 
Coast Company, a trustee of the Franklin Savings Bank, and a di- 
rector of the Trow Directory, Printing and Bookbinding Company. 
After reaching the age of eighteen, for eight years he Avas connected 
with the Fifth Avenue Bank of this city, rising from one clerical posi- 
tion to another until he had filled them all. When Henry White 
Cannon resigned as Comptroller of the Currency of the United States 
in 1886, to accept the Presidency of the (^hase National Bank of this 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



159 



city, :Mi'. Porter accepted the position of Cashier in this institution. 
In ISiJl he succeeded Jolin Tlionii)son as its Vice-President. In 1808 
he became Vice-President of tlie Chemical National Rank. From 1SD4 
to LS'Jd he was t^ecretarv of the New York Clearing lluuse Asso- 
ciation, serYinf^- the maximum term in this office. He also served 
two terms, from 1895 to 1807, as Treasurer of the American Bankinii' 
Association. He is Treasurer of 
several charitable institutions, is a 
trustee of several lar^te estates, and 
is a member of the New York 
Ciiamber of ("ommerce, the City, 
New York Athletic, Trans]iorta- 
tion, Republican, Atlantic Vachi, 
and Ivy clubs, the New England 
Society, and the American Geo- 
•iraphical Society. Born in Middle- 
bury, Vt., January 3, 18()1, he is the 
son of William Trowbridge Porter 
and Martha Sampson, of colonial 
New England ancestry on botli 
sides. He was educated in a pri- 
vate school an<l an aca(h'iny. Itegan 
his business career in New York 
City in the office of the JMrsident of 
the Atlanta and ("liailotte Air Line 
Railway Company, an<l subse- 

(jui ntly entered the Fifth Avenue Bank. He married, in 1887, Esther, 
daughter of James Jackson, of New York City, and has a son — James 
Jackson Porter, and a daugiiter — Helen. 




WILMAM IIKNRY PORTER. 



WILSON. IHCHAKl) T.. head of the notable New York banking 
house of E. T. Wilson ^: Company, is of an old Georgia family, was 
born in that State, became Commissary-Genei'al in tiie Confederate 
Army dunng the Civil War. and at the close of that struggle re- 
moved to this city and entered upon his successful financial career. 
He is President of the East River Gas Company, of Long Island City, 
is a trustee of the Manhattan Trust Company, and is a director of the 
l^)urth National Bank, the Union Trust Company, the United States 
Casualty Company, the Hudson Building, the New York and East 
River Gas Company, the American Cotton Oil Company, the Bertha 
Mineral Company, the Mathieson Alkali Works, the Western Union 
Beef Company, the Y'onkers Railroad, the Denver and Rio Grande 
Railroad Company, and the Rio Grande Southern Railroad. He is a 
member of the Union. Metropolitan, and Manhattan clubs, the Down- 
town Association, and the Southern Society. :Mrs. Wilson was a ^Miss 
Johnston, of Macon. Ga. Tliev have two sons. Marshall Ornie Wilson, 



1(30 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

who iiiiinii'd Caroline, (hninhtcn- of the late William Astor aud Caro- 
liue Schermerhoru, aud Kichard T. Wihsou, Jr., aud three daughters. 
Mrs. Ogden Goelet. the wife of Hou. Michael Heury Herbert, of Mil 
ton House. Snlislnny, England, aud Mrs. Cornelius Yauderbilt, Jr. 

ORISWOLD, i^TEPHEN M., successfully engaged in the jewelry 
business in New York City since 1S.">4, has been President of the Union 
Bank of Brooklyn since it was organized. For six years he was a 
member of the Brooklyn Board of Aldermen, and subsequently was 
elected to the State Senate. He is a memlier of the [Moutauk Club, aud 
since 1851 has been a member of Plymouth Church. .Mr. (Iriswold 
was born in Windsor, Conn., November 22, 1835, the founder of his 
family in this country having come from Englaud to New England 
iu l(;;j(l. His early education was that of the New England common 
schools. 

HUKLBIT, HEN1:Y AUGUSTUS, long at the head of the hat 
trade in the United States until the dissolution of his firm of Swift & 
Hurlbut iu 18G0; from that time until his death in November, 1897, 
was lU'omiuent in connection with notable corporations of New 
York ( "ity. He was one of the founders of the Second National Bank 
of New York City, and was its first President. He was one of the 
incorporators of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, remained a di- 
rector until his death, and was a member of the Finance Committee 
wliicli supervised the erection of the Equitable Building at 120 Broad- 
way, lie was a trustee of the Mercantile Trust Company, aud a di- 
rector of the Home Fire Insurance Company, and the Mercantile 
Safe Deposit Company. He was also a member of the IN'ew York 
Chamber of Commerce. He became a member of the Eepublican 
party at tlie time of its organization, having been formerly a Whig. 
He was a delegate to the Kepublican National Convention which 
nominated (Jraut for the Presidency. Appointed by (Jovernor Dix a 
Commissioner of Emigration for the State of New York, he was 
elected President of the Boai'd, and so remained for twelve years, 
until the national government assumed full control of immigration. 
He was a trustee of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, as he was 
also of the Demilt Dispensary and the American Seaman's Friend So- 
ciety, He served as President of the New England Society, and as 
Yice-President of the Union League Club, of which he was one of the 
founders. He founded the Hurlbut Scholarship at Yale LTniversity. 
from which institution his two sons were graduated, iu 1860 and 1803. 
respe( tively. He married, in 1832, Susan llebecca KtMiuedy, of New 
Haven, Conn. She died iu 1888. Mr. Hurlbut was born in Hartford. 
Conn., December 8, 1808, the son of Ebenezer Hurlbut and Fanny 
Brewster. He descended through his father from Thomas Hurlbut. 
who cauie frcuii Eiiuhmd to Boston in 1035, and settled at Savbrook. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. IGl 

('(puii., jiiid siihscquciitly at WL'tlicrsfield. Tlirongli hit? nidtlici- lie dc- 
sceuded fruiu Elder Biewstcr, of the Majtiower. His father haviii;y, 
died wlien he was twelve years of age. he was apprenticed to a hat 
luauiifaeturer of New Haveii. Coiiu.. became (ieiieral Suiteriiiteiideiit 
of the establishment iu 1.S2S. and a partner in 1835. A branch was 
established in New York City, ,Mr. rinrlbnt taking personal (diarge. 
wbi<di was soon made the principal business. In 1843 this part- 
nershii) was dissolved, and the firm of Swift & Ilurlbtit organized, be- 
coming tlie largest house in the hat line iu the country. 

JA:MES, 1). WILLIS, couneeted with the metal 11 rm of L'helps, 
Dodge i^ Conqiany, as was his father, the late Daniel -James, is 'N'ice- 
I'resideut of the Linited States Trust Company, and a director of the 
Ausonia Brass and Copper Company, the Ausonia Clock Comi)any, the 
Ansonia Land and Water Power Comi»any, the Northern Pacific Rail- 
way Company, the United Globe Mines, the Commercial Mining Com- 
pany, and tJie Copper ( Jit een Consolidated Mining-Company. His father 
resided in or near Liverpool. England, from 18.31 until his death in 
1870, as a member of the Liverpool firm of Phelps, James t^ Company, 
the English branch of Phelps, Dodge ^; Company, and I). Willis 
James was born in Liverpool, Ajiril Lj, 1832. He is a member of the 
Jletropolitan, Century, City, Kiding, Iteform, Alpha Delta Phi, New 
York Y'acht, and Morris County Golf clubs, the Downtown Associa- 
tion, and other organizations. He married Ellen S. Curtiss, and has 
one son — Ai-thur Curtiss James. Mr. James's mother was Elizabeth 
Woodbridge. daughter of the late Anson Greene Phelps, fotinder and 
long the head of I'lielps iK: I'eck. and its successor, Phelps, Dodge & 
Company. 

BACHE, JULES SEMON, banker and stock broker, is the son of 
the late Semon Baclie, founder of the glass-impor'ting house of Semon 
Bache & C<impany. He was prominent in reorganizing the Distillers* 
and Cattle Feeders' Company as the American Spirits Manufacturing 
Company, representing the stockholders of the former corporation. 
He is now Vice-President of the American Spirits Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Chaiinian of the Board of the Detroit and Lima Northern Bail- 
May Com]iiiny, a director and Chairman of the Financial Committee of 
the American Union Life Insurance Company, and a director of the 
Spirits Distributing Comiiany. He is a member of the New York 
Sto( k Ex( hange, and the New Y'ork, Biding and Driving, Suburban 
Hiding, and Liederkranz clubs; has travided extensively, and is an art 
collector, especially of the German s(diool. He was born in New ^■ork 
City, November 9, 1801, his mother, Elizabeth Yon Praag, also being 
a native of this city. He married, in 18!>2, Florence B., daughter of 
Adolph Sheftel, a retired merchant of New Y^ork. :\rr. Bacdie's coun- 
try-seat, Arsdale IManor, Wilson T'ark. Tarrytown, embraces the scene 
of Major Andi<'''s ca])ture. 



162 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



TILFOIU), FRANK, in IS'Jl succeeded his father as Vice-President 
of Park & Tilford. In 1874 lie became a director of the Sixtli National 
Bank, in ISTG became a member of the New York Real Estate Ex- 
change, and in 1885 became a trustee of the North River Savings 
Bank. He helped to organize the Bank of New Amsterdam, has 
always been one of its officers, and is now its President, a position 
which he has held for several years. He is also Vice-President of tlie 
Standard Gas Light ('om]iany, and is a director of the Fifth Avenue 
Trust Company, the A^'ashington Assurance Company, and the Colo- 
nial Assurance Comiiany. The youngest son of the late John M. Til- 
ford, one of the founders of the 
famous mercantile house of Park 
& Tilford, he was born in New 
York City, July 22, 1852, and was 
educated in private schools and at 
]\Iount Washington Collegiate 
School. He entered his fathers 
csiablisliment at an early age, and 
worked his way iip from the hum- 
blest grade of employee. He is a 
member of the Executive Commit- 
tee of the Grant ^lonument Asso- 
ciation, is President of the New 
Amsterdam Eye and Ear Hospital, 
and is a trustee of the Babies' Hos- 
])ilal. He is a member of the 
New York Chamber of Commerce, 
the New York Board of Trade and 
Transpoi"tation, the Union League, 
Colonial. Lotos, and Republican 
clubs, the American Society, and the Society of the Sons of the Revo- 
lution. He married, in 1881, Julia, daughter of the late James A. 
Greer, of New York City, and has two daughters. 

COSTER, CHARLES HENRY, since 1883 has been a member of 
the famous banking firm of Drexel, Morgan & Company, and its suc- 
cessor, J. P. Morgan & Company, and is likewise a partner of Drexel 
& Company, of Philadelphia, and Morgan, Harjes & Company, of 
Paris. He has been active in a large number of railroad reorganiza- 
tions, and is a partici]>inil in tlie control and management of im- 
portant railroad lines in all parts of the country. He is a director of 
no less than tifty-two (lislincl railroad corporations, including such 
well-known systems as the Northei'n Pacific, the West Shore, the 
Southern Railway, the Reading, the Erie, the Lehigh Valley, the 
Chesa])eake and Oliio, the Cliicago and Erie, and the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee and St. Paul. He is a member of the Board of Managers of 




l-KANK TILFORD. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 163 

the riiiladi-lpliia and Reading. He is also a dii-ector of tlie (leueral 
Electric Company, the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, the 
Lehigh Valley Coal Company, the Philadelphia and IJcadiiig Coal 
and Iron Company, the Northern Pacitic Express Company, the Le- 
high A'alley Transportation Company, and the Puget Soimd and 
Alaska Steamship Comjiany. He is a member of the Metropolitan, 
Tuxedo, City, Reform, lJac(iuet, .St. Nicholas, and New York Yacht 
clubs, and a life member of the Academy of Sciences. Born in New- 
port, E. L, July 24. 1S.")2, he attended private sdiools, from 1867 to 
1872 was in the counting-room of Aymar iS; Company, importing 
merchants, and from 1872 to 1883 with their successors, Fabbri & 
Chauncey. He married, in ISSfi, Emily, daughter of Clarence Pell 
and Anne Claiborne, and has three daughters and a son — Charles 
Henry, Jr. ilrs. Coster is a descendant of Thomas Pell, first lord of 
Pelham Manor, Westchester County, as also of General Ferd. L. Clai- 
borne, of Mississipi»i, and William Claiborne, Secretary of A'irginia. 
Ml'. Coster is the son of the late George Washington Coster and 
Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel Oakley, aTid is the grandson of John 
Gerard Coster and Catherine ^ALirgaret Holsniaun. His grandfather 
was one of the most famous New Y'ork merchants and financiers. 

BEND, GEORGE HOFFMAN, stockbroker and member of the 
New Y'ork Stock Exchange, is of a distinguished Baltimore family. 
He was born in that city, and is the son of the late William Bradford 
Bend and Catherine Ann, daughter of Philip Thomas and Frances 
Mary Ludlow. He is the grandson of Dr. Joseph G. Bend. Rector 
of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Baltimore, whose wife Avas a grand- 
daughter of Mary, sister of Elias Boudinot. President of the Continen- 
tal Congress from 1779 to 1783. He is descended from Gabriel Lud- 
low, who was born at Castle Carey. England, in 1GG3; came to New 
York in 1691, and became a notable merchant. One of his ancestors, 
Philip Thomas, of Rockland C-ounty, Virginia, was a descendant of the 
fourth Baron Mowbray and Heniw III. of England. Mr. Bend is a 
member of the Union, Metropolitan, Union League, City, Riding, 
Players', and New York Yacht clubs. He married Elizabeth A. Town- 
send, and has two daughters. 

SCHELL, R0BI:RT, at the age of fourteen entered the employ of 
the New^ Y'ork jewelry firm of Fellows, Cargill & Company, and re- 
mained with this firm as clerk, partner, and head of the establish- 
ment, upon the same spot on INIaiden Lane, for a period of forty-two 
years. He took the business alone in 1812, but a little later was asso- 
ciated with one of his former employers under the style of Louis S. 
Fellows & Schell. The firm name subsequently became Robert Schell 
^c Company, under which style the house attained a foremost ydace 
in the wholesale jewelry and fancy hardware trade. Mr. Schell has 



164 



HISTORY Or IHF. GREATER NEW YORK. 



been a trnstce of the (Jennnii Savings Bank of Xew Yovk since 1851>, 
and is its Vice-l'i-esident, a position wliicli be lias held for many 
Tears. He was one of the founders of the Bank of the Metropolis in 
1872, was its President from 1S72 to 1894, when he resigned on ac- 
count of advancing years, and continues to be one of its directors, as 
he has been from tlie beginning. He is also a director of the New 

York and Harlem Railroad, the 
Woodlawn ('emcrery, and the As- 
sociated Land ('omi)any. He is 
Treasurer of the Xew York His- 
lorical Society, a trustee of the 
Presbyterian Hospital, one of the 
governors of the Xew Y'ork Eye 
and Ear Infirmary, one of the coun- 
sel of the X'ew Y'ork University, a 
trustee of Kutgers College, and a 
member of tlic St. Nicholas and 
^lanhatt;ui clubs, the Tptown As- 
sociation, and tlic American Geo- 
graphical Sociely. He married, in 
.March, 18.")0, Mary Sjiooner Taber, 
of N^ew York ('ity, and has a son, 
i'rancis Scliell, a lawyer, of X'ew 
York. ilrs. Sclicll died in 1806. 
Mr. Schell was born in lihinebeck, 
X. Y., October 8, 1815, the son of 
Elizabcili Hughes, and a brother of the late 




ROBERT SCriKLL. 



and 



Christian Sch 

-Vugustus Schell and liic laic i^dward Schell, of Xew York City. 



SCHELL, EDWAIM), younger brother of the late Augustus Schell 
and the present Robert Schell, was partner in the mercantile firm 
of the latter for seventeen yeai-s, and subsetiuently for over thirty 
years was President of the Manhattan Savings Institution of this 
city. He was a trustee of the Union Trust Company, and a director of 
the Xational Citizens" Bank, the Xational Butchers" and Drovers' 
Bank,the Manhattan Life Insurance Company, the Citizens" Insurance 
Company, and the Park Fire Insurance Company. He was a trustee of 
St. Lnke"s Hospital, the Xew York Society Library, and the Xew 
York Institution for the Blind. He was a life member of the St. 
Nicholas Society, as he was also of the Xew Y'ork Historical Society. 
He was a governor of the Manhattan Club, and a member of the 
Century Association. He was likewise a vestryman of the Church of 
the Ascension, of this city, and a warden of Christ Church at Rye, 
N. Y'. He was born at Rhinebeck, N. Y'., November 5, 1819, the 
youngest of the six sons of ('a])tain Christian Schell and Elizabeth 
Hughes, was educated iiinlcr I'lofessor Holbrook. of Rhinebeck. and 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 1G5 

;it scvciitccii vcjiis (if a.nc hccaiuc ;i clerk in New YOrk (Jity with !Jt- 
tlclicld iV Sli;i\\. liiH'ii iiiiporters. Seven years later he became junior 
partner in his hiother's tinn of Lewis S. Fellows \' Sclie]]. and eon- 
tinned this conneef ion for seventeen j^ears, when he was elected Treas- 
urer of the Maniiattan Savin<is Institution, of which he had then 
been ti'ustee for einlit years. lie soon became its President, and so 
remained from LSTC) until his death, December 24, 181)3. He married 
Jane L., daughter of Jonas C. Heartt, for several terms Mayor of 
Troy. >.'. Y. The ]ii-esent Edward lleartt Schell is their son. 

SCHELL, EDWAKD HEARTT, who for many years has been en- 
ga.yed in the practice of law in New York City, is the son of the late 
Edward Schell, eminent mei-chant ami tinancier of this city. He is 
a trustee of the 31anhattan Sa\ini;s Institution, of which his fatlier 
was president for more than thirty years, and is .1 director of the 
Citizens' lusuram-e ('om])any and the ^Manhattan Life Insurance 
Comi>any. He is a member of the City liai' Association, the Manhat- 
tan Club, the St. Nicholas Society, and I lie Yale Alumni Association. 
He was born in Troy. N. Y.. September :>0. ISiS, was iiradnated from 
Yale ami studied law in the Columbia Collej^e Law School under the 
late Professor Dwii;ht. He mariied. in 1SS6, Cornelia E., daughter 
of A\'illium Evarts Barnes and Mary S|>ies. 

CUYLER, CORNELIUS CUYLER, head of the New York City 
banking firm of Cnyler. ^lorgan iV: Comjiany. is ;i director of a large 
number of impoi-taiit corporations, including the following: The Mer- 
cantile Trust Company, the United States Guarantee Company, the Il- 
linois Steel Com])any. the Kings County Traction Com])any, the North 
Shore Traction (_'om]»any, the New \'orlc. Susquehanna, and Western 
Railroad Company, the Mobile and Ohio Kailroad Company, the East 
Shore Ternunal Coni]iany's Railroad, the IJnffalo Railway Comjiaiiy. 
the Crosstown Street Railway, of P.uffalo, and the Consolidatcfl Coal 
Company, of Wyoming. He is a member of the Holland Society, the 
Downtown Association, and the Union, City, University. Racqtiet, 
<'alumet, Manlialt;iu, Lawyers", Princeton, ami University Athletic 
chibs. He is also a member of llie ( "entury Association. He was born 
in Philadelpliia. was graduated from Princeton University in 1879, 
and is I he son i>\' t he l.-ite Theodore ( 'nylei-. an eminent nuMuber of the 
Philadelphia bar. and ins wife, eldest daughter of Kev. Thomas De 
Witt, for forty years Pastor of the Collegiate Dntcdi Church of New 
Y'ork City. He is grandson of Rev. C(u-nelius C. Ctiyler, D.D., of 
I'oughkeei)sie and Philadeli>hia, and is lineally descended from Major 
Ilendiick Cuyler, who, born in Amsterdam, ILdland. in It!.''.", married 
Annetje Schepmoes, and settled at Reverwyck. near Albany, in l(i(i4. 
He was an officer in the war with the French. A brother of Cornelius 
C. Cuyler. Thomas De ^Vitt Cuyler. is a iiroininenl member of the 



166 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Philadelphia bar, and is a director of the Equitable Life Assurance 
Society, and a member of a number of Xew York clubs. He is a 
member of the Society of the Cincinnati. 

COPELAXD. HENKY CLAY, is President of the Kivnside Bank, 
and a Director of the ('(uisumers' Fuel, Gas, Heat and I'owcr (_"om- 
pany. He was born at Middletown, Vt., May 23, 1844, tlic son of Lu- 
cius Copeland, and yrandson of Moses Copeland, and was e<lncate(l at 
Union ('ollege. I'roni INTO to 1883 he was Cashier of the First 
National Bank of Bran(h)n, \'t.; in 1883 organized the Sprague Na- 
tional Bank, of I'rooklyn. and was its Cashier until 188r>, and in the 
latter year organized the .Minnehaha National Bank of Sio\ix Falls, 
Dakota. In 1887 he organized the Eiverside Bank of tins city, was 
its Cashier from that time nntil 1894, and since 1894 has been its 
President. He is a mendier of the Uiuon College Alumni. 

SPRAGUE, CHARLES E., entered the service of the ITnion Dime 
Savings Institution of New York City in 1870 as junior (lerk; in 
1878 was elected Secretary; in is'.ll was elected Treasurer, and since 
1892 has been President. He is a charter member and President of 
the Institute of .V<-counts, and is State Examiner of Public Account- 
ants. He was graduated from Fnion College with iiigh honors in 
1860. During the Civil War he earned the brevet of Colonel in tiie 
volunteer service, and received a severe wound during the second 
day's light at Gettysburg. He a<-quired at college a knowledge of 
Latin, (Jreek, Hebrew, I^rencli, (leiiiian, and Spanish, and has con- 
tinued his study of these and otlier languages, lie was the first student 
of Volapiik in Ameiica, and is the author of the standard textbook 
of Volaiiiik in the Ignited States. He taught school for several years 
after the Civil War. Having a talent for mathematics, he has nmde 
an analytical study and exposition of the principle of accounts. At 
the ])resent time he is Assistant Paymaster-* leneral of the State of New 
York, with the rank of Colonel, and is a member of the Loyal Legion, 
the Old Guard of the Twelfth Kegiment of New York Volunteers, 
George Washington Post, No. 103, Grand Army of the Republic; the 
Union College Alunuu Association, and the Alpha Delta Phi Club. 
He married, in 18r)(), Ray Ellison, of New York City, and has two 
daughters, one of whom is now ]\Irs. Frank I^oster Hazard. Mrs. 
Sprague is a member of the Society of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. 

SPEYER, JA:MES, since 1885 has been a member of the New York 
banking house of Speyer & Company, formerly Philip Speyer & Com- 
pany, whicli was founded by his father, (lustavus S]ieyer, and his 
uncle, Philip Speyer, and is also a member of the allied Arm at 
Frankfort, Germany. He is President of the Provident Loan So- 
ciety of this city, of which he was one of the founders, and is a 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



167 



trustee of tlie (lerinan Saviui;s I'.aiik and the .Mutual Life Iiisurauce 
Company. He was a member of the Executive Committee of iSiU 
whicli nominated flavor Stronii; was Vice I'resident and Treasui-ci- 
of the GernianAmerican IJefoiin Union, whidi favored the candi- 
dacy of President Cleveland in 18!ti:, and in 1S!)() became a member 
of the l>oard of Education of this city. He \\;is one of the oriiani/,<'rs 
of the Citizens" Union movi'Uient for purer municipal ^ovcrnnicnt. 
lie is also Treasurer of the University Settlement Society. He is a 
member of the City, Racquet. IMnyers', .Nfanliattan, IN'forni. T>awyers", 
Lotos, \\'hist, ami New York Yacht clubs, and the Hutdi \'erein. He 
married, in 1S!)T, Ellen L., daughter of tlie hiic .bdin Dyneley Prince 
and Mary Ti-avers, widow of the late -I(dni A. Lowery. ilrs. Sjicyer 
is Vice-President of the Woman's Auxiliary of tlie University Settle- 
ment Society, is Treasurer of tiie Woman's Auxiliary of tlie Hospital 
Saturday and Sunday Association, and is a member of tlie P.oard 
of Manat;ers of the Loomis Sanitiirium foi' Consumpti\es. ]\Ir. Sp<'yer 
was born in this city in iStJl, jind was educated at Fraidd'ort, der- 
ma n v. 



QUINTARD, EDWAIH) AUGUSTUS, lias been Presi.lent of the 
Citizens" Savini^s Bank of New York City rontiiiuously since U'^dO, 
havinfi' previously been its Vice 
President. He is also a director of 
the ^fechanics' and Traders" Bank, 
the Anglo-American Canaigre 
Company, the Climax Quick Tan- 
ning Coni]i;iny, and the ITaniniiin 
and Northeastern Kailroad. He is 
a member of the Church of the 
Transfiguration of thiscity, and of 
the Union League, St. Nicludas, 
and American Lotos clubs, the New 
England Society, the Seventh Reg- 
iment N'eteian Club, and the Acad 
emy of Design. He has been twice 
manied, and has six diiughters 
and two sons — Edward aiul \\'ill- 
iani (^nintard. He was liiiusell 
born in Stamford, ( 'onn., December 
27, 182(;, the son of Isaac (^lintaid 
and Clarissa Hoyt. He is tlie 

brother of Ceorg«AMlliam (,)uintard, of tliis city, well known as a niiin- 
ufacturer and financier, and who has served terms as State Emigration 
Commissioner and Park Commissioner of the City of New York. An- 
other brother. Rev. Dr. Charles Todd (,)uintaid, is Protestant Epis- 
copal Bishoi) of Tennessee. Edward Augustus (^uintard was educated 




KDWAHD AlCiCSTCS i;ll.\lAKli 



168 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

in the common schools and the High School of Stamford, Conn., was 
a clerk in the employ of his father, a Stamford merchant, and subse- 
quently established himself in business in New York City. He has 
served in the Seventy-fii*st and Seventh regiments, National (iuard 
of the State of New York, including the period of the Civil War. For 
several years he was Captain of the Engineer Corps. He was one of 
the volunteers from the Seventy-first Iveginient who responded to the 
first call for a three months" service during the Civil ATar. 

MAEQUANI). IIENKY GUEDON. early in life took charge of the 
large estate left by his brother, Frederick Marquand, and subse- 
quently was engaged for many years in banking in this city. He is 
President of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, President of the Hu- 
guenot Society of America, and a director of the Mercantile Trust 
Company, the E(iuitable Life Assurance Society, and the Northern 
Kailroad of New Jersey. He is the first honorary member of the 
American ; Institute of Architects. He erected a wing to Bellevue 
Hospital. He donated the Marquand Chapel to Piinceton Univer- 
sity. He founded and endowed the free library of Little Eock. Ark. 
He has been one of the most liberal i^atrons of the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art. He is a member of the Mcti-opolitan, Century, Grolier, 
and Priucetdii clubs. He married, in LS.")!, Elizabeth Love, daughter 
of Jonathan Allcu. of Berkshire, Alass., and has three daughters — the 
wife of Eev. Ivoderick Terry, ilrs. Henry Galbraith ^^'ard, and Mrs. 
Harold Godwin — and three sons — Dr. Allan, Professor of Art in 
Princeton LTniversity; Frederick Alexander, and Henry ^Marquand, 
now the head of the banking firm established by his father. Mr. Mar- 
quand is himself the son of Isaac Marquand, who was successfully en- 
gaged in business in this city, and Mehitable Perry, of Fairfield, Conn., 
and is the graiidsdu of Henry Marquand, born in 1737. who, in 1761. 
emigrated from the Island of Guernsey to Fairfield, Conn. 

i'lLVTT, DALLAS BACHE, at the age of sixteen entered the em- 
ploy of the well-known banking firm of BroAvn Brothers & Company, 
of this city, and remained with the house for sixteen years, when he 
resigned his position to accept that of Cashier of the Bank of America. 
At the end of another ten years he left the service of this bank to be 
come a member of the firm of ^laithiud, Phelps & C()ini)any, now Mait- 
land, Coppell & Company, banking merchants. He has been an ex- 
ecutive officer of the Ohio Falls Car Manufacturing Company, of Jef- 
fersonville, Ind.. and is a trustee of the German Savings Bank, and a 
director of the Bank of America and the New York Warehouse and 
Security Company. He is Treasurer of the New York Society for the 
Preventiim of Cruelty to Children. He is a member of the Union 
League, Metropolitan, Eiding, and Country clubs. He was born in 
this city, February 4, 1849, and was educated in Trinity School. He 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 169 

married, iu 1881. Miuuie G., dauylitcr of Cliark's V,. Laudoii, and has 
three daughters and a son — Alexander Dallas Pratt. He is himself 
the son of the late Rev. Horace L. E. Pratt, prominent Episcopal cler- 
gyman, and descends from Lieutenant William Pratt, wko settled at 
Cambridge, Mass., in l(i32; in KJSG was one of the founders of Hart- 
ford. Conn., under Rev. Thomas Hooker; in l(i4."> was one of the 
founders of iSaybrook. Conn., which town he represented in the Gen- 
eral Court from 166G to 1678. He was the sou of Eev. William Pratt, 
born iu 15G2. died in 1629. Eector of Stevenage, England, and was 
great-grandson of Thomas Pratt, of Baldeck, England, who died in 
1539. 

( iKEENUU( ;H. JUUX. is a member of the New York banking hrm 
of Poor (it Greeuough. and previous to its formation was for many 
years engaged iu uierca utile business in this city. He is a director 
of the United States Casualty Company, the Lawyers' Surety Com- 
pany, the Consolidated Ice Company, the Southwestern Coal and Im- 
provement Company, the Knoxville and Ohio Railroad Company, and 
the Chicago. Indiauai)olis and Louisville Railway Company. He was 
born in Boston in 1846. was graduated froui Harvard iu 186."), and 
removed to this city soon after. He marricnl. iu 1879. Caroline II.. 
daughter of John M. Storey, of New York City. He is a member of the 
Tuxedo. L'uiversity. Harvard, and Adirondack League clubs, the 
Downtown Association, the Sous of the American Revolution, and 
tlie XeAV England Soci(4y. He is the sou of the late David Stoddard 
(Jreeuough, third of that name, of Boston, and Anna A. I'arkman. 
granddaughter of Samuel Parkman. the celebrated Boston merchant. 
He descends from Captain William Greeuough. wlio came from Eng- 
land to Boston iu 1642. and established a shipyard at the New Eug- 
land metropolis. He commanded one of the Boston train bauds, and 
participated iu King I'hilip's ^Var. Mr. Greeuough is a cousiu of the 
late Francis Parkman. historian, as also of Horatio Greeuough. sculp- 
tor, whose statue of Wasliiugton stands iu the National capitol. 

BOWDOIN, GEORGE SULLIVAN, for thirteen years subse(iueut 
to 1871 connected with the well-known banking house of Morton, 
Bliss i^ Company, of New York, and IMorton. Hose & Company, of 
London, and since that time conuected witli the banking iiouse of 
Drexel. .Morgan i^ Company, and its successor. .1. P. Morgan & Com- 
pany, has been a participant iu a large number of the notable finau- 
cial operations of the past quarter of a century. He has been active 
in railroad financiering, and notably in couuection with the Philadel- 
phia and Reading, and the West Shore. He has been president, vice- 
presideut, director, recei^■er. or otherwise connected with a large 
number of railroad and other corporations, and at the present time 
is Treasui'cr of the :Metrop(ditau < >p<'ra and Real Estate Com]iaiiy. a 






^ . - _ _ , ms. hi-\^ 






—ri TTTtW r Sic- TI31i- •>»nTTiTflw?WTi: II"iiK.J!£l*T; "ir 
3It- : niiT— 1-"^ ir -nt^ ^rnfrr 



li^f'-'r' niTTarr^ 



. . iimaiL jf 1-^ '«au* 






"TiK* . 'i*^"JT . • r if' - ^TTs - ~.'=^r^ Ufa: 



F.NCYCLOPKDIA OF NF.VV YORK f'.IOGK Al'Ii Y. 



171 



clcclcd |jciil(ii;iiil ( 'i.loiiil iif (lie Sc\ciil li K'c^i iiicnl , ;i ml in \ HH'I WUH 
,TI»p(»iiitc(l I{ri<,'a(lier-(iciici-iil, fotriniaridinf,' the I^'irst J5ri<<;ji(lc, coriHist- 
in^ iiC I lie Seventh, r]i<ilitli, Sixtv-niritli, and Scvcril.v-fii-st fJej^drneniH. 
I le is ;i nieiiiliei- cil I lie Tnion, .V[eli-oftolitan, (Triited Serv ice. and oilier 

clnhs, inellldinu llie Wesl minslei- Kennel, :i|id of ihe Sorjely of Colo 

niai Wars. 



\i:i.'.\li;ri.!;..|(»ll.\ l).\ \|S. has been en-;io,.,| in II,,. niannfa.lun- 
(>[ inidiei- ;ioods since ISU, ami for nearly forty years has hei-n I'res- 
idenl. Treasurer, and .Manai^er of the (ioodyeai- India Rnlihr-r (;io\'e 
Manuf.ici nrin^ roni|iany. lie is 
also l'r<-sident oft he i I nl la ml 'I'l list 
rVtrripany, rresideni of the V'ork 
A\'ater Tonijiany, I'resiilent of the 
York Cliffs rni|)i-ov('iMerif,Coini)any 
is a ti-nstee niid was formerly 
\'ice I'lesideiil of Ihe .\ n;^lo-.\ mei-i 
fan Saviniis a ml Loan .\sso<iai ion. 
and is a dir<-clor ol' i he I'niicd 




.;OIIN DAVIS VKRMKir.K. 



Rtatfs Kniilier < 'oni|>;i n,\ . I he ( 'hal- 
liani National I'lank, lln- I'.ordeii 
fowii ( 'oiii |i;i iiy, and llie I'hihidel 
|diia ami i ionlenlow n l.'ailroad 
<'oin[)an.\'. lie is a niemliei- id' I In- 

IlollamI Sociei V, ;ind I h<' K'el'olln. 

Kidini:, Ala nhal I ;i ii. ( 'nmnion 
wealth, ami Alercha ills" cl iihs. lie 
sei'vc d as Sii|iei\ isor of Itichniomi 
County while a nsideni of t'astle 
ton, S. 1. lie niairieil, in lS4t>, 

Mary < '., daiiuhler of .I(dm Kidly, a niercdiant id' I'hiladelphia. Koiii 
ill I'lainfield. .\. .1.. Septeniher 21. ]S'22. he is a "grandson of .Iiid;^e 
I'rederick Xernniile. of ihe ('111111 of Common I'leas of Somerset 
Coiiiity, .\ivv .lersey. ;iiid is jireaf-jfrandson of Corindius Vennfiile, 
who served in the i'ro\inci;il ('on<i-ress of New Jeis^-y, and w;is a 
stanch lie, oini iomii \ iMirioi, his four sons ser\ini:' in 1 he (Continental 
army. The tiisi .\meric;in ancestor. Adrian N'ernieiije, who came to 
ihis counii\ in HiD!). was the son of John Cornelissen Wrnieiile. a 
|u-oiiiimni 1 iii/.in of Xlissenecn, Zeeland. 



DOMINKK. W II.|.|.\.\r ri.WER, with Watson B. Dick.-niian, 
founded, in IMI'.), iIh- hankini; firm of Dominick & I>i<kerman, of this 
city, and was its senior |.arl mr until his death, Aii^'ust 31. 1805. He 
had lieeii a mr-iiilM r of ihe New York Stock E.xclianj,'e since 1800. 
For seveniien vears In- had lieen a member of the Seventh Regiment, 



172 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

serviim tiis Lifuteiiant for ten years, aud at the time of bis death beini; 
Cajitaiu of the Mutli Compauy of the A'eterau Association. He was 
one of the governors of the Seventh Eeginient Veteran Club, a man- 
ngcr of the New York Iluiiucnot Society, and a member of the Board 
of Managers of the Sons of tlie J\evoliition. He was one of the Advis- 
oi*y Board of the Young Woman's Cliristiau Association. In 1892 he 
was made a life member of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, with 
his brothers, George Francis and Bayard Dominiek, having presented 
to that institution Schraeder's picture, " t^neen Elizabeth Signing 
the Death Warrant of Mai-y Stuart." He was a membcn- of St. 
Thomas's Clnirch, the T'nion licague, City, TJiding, and other clubs, 
the Society of Cnl.uiial ^^■ars, that of the War of 1812, the Aztec 
Society, aud the New York Historical Society. He married, in ISTl, 
Anne l)e Witt, daughter of Henry P. Alarshall aud Cornelia Eliza- 
beth Conrad, aud a descendant of Edward Marshall, who settled in 
Virginia in 1(524, but died in this city, and lies in Trinity Church- 
yard; as also of Bev. John Butgers Marshall, Colonel Charles Be Witt, 
of the Eevolution; Hermanns Butgers, Bev. Thomas Hooker, Eev. 
Everardus Bogardus, and Anueke Jans. She survives her husband, 
with three daughters and a son — \Villiam Francis Dominiek. Himself 
born in Chicago, in 1815, Mr. Dominiek Avas the son of the late William 
Francis Dominiek, a merchant in Chicago from 1811 to 1855, but who 
was born and avIio died in this city; was the grandson of Janu^s Will- 
iam Dominiek, an eminent New York merchant, and his wife, Phoebe, 
daughtei' of Major James Cock, of the Bevolutionary Army, aud great- 
grandson of George Dominiek, or Doniinigui', a Huguenot, born in 
La Ifochelle, France, in 1739. Brought to New York City in 1742, he 
became a ])rominent merchant, wasCaphiin in ilic militia in 1775. and 
married Elizabeth Blanchard. 



DICKEBMAN, WATSON B., f.ainder, in I8t;9, with the late ^Yill- 
iam Gayer Dominiek, of the banking firm of Dominiek & Dickerman, 
and since the death of Mr. Dominiek, in 1895, its senior partner, is 
the executive head of several important mining and railroad enter- 
prises. He is I'resident of the Evening Star Mining Compauy, Presi- 
dent of the Morning Star Consolidated Mining Company, President 
of the Norfolk and Southern Bailroad Company, a trustee of the Long 
Island Loan and Trust Company, and a director of the New Y'ork 
Stock Exchange Building Company. In 1890 and 1891 he was Presi- 
dent of the New Y'ork Stock Exchange. Born in Mount Carmel, Couu., 
January 4, 184n, he is the son of Ezra D. Dickerman, the hrst Ameri- 
can ancestor having come to Massaclnisetts from England in 1635. 
He was educated at Williston Seminary, Easthampton, Mass., and 
entered the banking house of Jacob Bunn, at Springfield, 111. In 18G8 
he became a member of the Open Board of Brokers of New York City, 



K.XCVCLOPEDIA OF XKW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 173 

this organization snbsequently being- consolidated witli the Stoelc Ex- 
cliange. He married, in 18<J9. Martha E., dangliter of Samuel Swift 
and Mary Phelps, of Brooklyn. 

HOETON, HAKKY LAWKEXCE. head of the banking firm of H. 
L. Horton cK: Company, which be founded in ISG"), is Treasurer of the 
Staten Island Water Supply Company, and a director of the Staten 
Island Kapid Transit Railroad C<nnpany. For three years he was 
President of the village of Prighton, S. I., where be has his 
summer residence. He was the organizer and is the princijial owner 
of the Staten Island Water Supply Company, and was active in pro- 
moting the railroad system of the island. lie is a member of the 
Union league. .Manhattan, liiding, and other clubs; was twice mar- 
ried, and has two children. He was born in Bradford County Penn- 
sylvania, January 17. 1S:;!2. and traces descent from Pobert de Horton, 
who died in i:>l(l. The founder of the family in this country, Bar- 
nabas Horton, arrived in New England about 1(>33, and was one of 
the founders of Soutliold. L. I., in 1(140. Mr. Horton was a 
merchant's clerk at Towaiula. Pa., between tlie ages of seventeen and 
Twenty-two, after wliicli he successfully established himself in the 
produce commission business at Milwaukee. In nine years lie hud 
accumulated the means which enabled hiui to beconu' a member of 
the New York Stock and other exchanges, and establisli liimself in 
this city as a banker and broker in 1865. 

SULLIVAN, ANDREW THEODORE, formerly Postmaster of 
Brooklyn, and now President of the Nassau Trust Company of that 
city, was born in Brooklyn, August 11, ISol, the son of Andrew Sul- 
livan and Ann E. Harrington. P>oth parents were born in Ireland, his 
paternal grandfather being a schoolteacher and his maternal grand- 
father a Presbyterian clergyman. Following his graduation from St. 
Francis Xavier's College in 1872, he taught school for three years, and 
then engaged in business with bis father in the manufacture of paper 
stock for the paper collar and cuff trade. He subsequently obtained 
n position in the Department of ('harities and Corrections of Kings 
County, which be retained until October, 1886, when he was ai(])ointed 
Cashier and Accountant of the Brooklyn Postoffice under the admin- 
istration of Postmaster Joseph C. Hendrix, now President of the Na- 
tional Union Bank of New Y'ork. In March, 180:>, he was appointed 
Assistant Postmaster, and upon the death of Postmaster Collins a 
month later was appointed Acting Postmaster by the latter's bonds- 
men. He was a]>pointed Postmaster by President Cleveland, June 1, 
1893, and retained the office until September 30. 1897. Julv 1, 1897, 
lie was elected President of the Nassau Trust Company to succeed the 
late A. D. Wheelock. He is President of the Knights of ColuiuI)us 
Building Cor])orntiou, Past President and a member of the I'riendly 



174 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



Sons of St. I'ntrick, a member of the Supreme aud State Councils of 
the Catholic Benevolent Lefi'ion, and a member of the Brooklyn, Tlan- 
over, and Bushwick clubs, and the St. Francis Xavier Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 



BISSIXGEB, PHILIP, who has been engaged as a jewelry mer- 
chant in New York City since 1849, while since 1853 he has been head 
of the well-kno^^•n diamond importing firm of Philip Bissinger & Com- 
pany, has also during the thirty-four years since 1SG4 been President 
of the German Savings Bank, of whicii he was one of the organizers 
and incorporators in 1859. This institution now has total resources 
of about $45,UU0,000. He is also a director of the German Ameiicau 

Baidc, the ilanhattan Life Insur- 
ance Com])any, the German .VUi- 
ance Insurance Company, and the 
Holmes Electric Protective Com- 
pany. He is Vice-President of tlie 
New York Eye and Ear Infirmary 
of which he was an incorporator; 
is also an executive ofticer of 
the (Jerman Hospital, and is a 
member of the New York and 
German clubs, the Liederkranz, 
and the Downtown Association. 
In 1S.")4 he became an active mem- 
ber of the (ienuau Society of 
this city, which has been in ex- 
istence since 1784, and from 18(j5 
to 1871 was its President. In 18fi8 
he founded its banking depart- 
ment, and visiting Europe estab- 
lished agencies with thirty banks 
of Germany, Austrta, and Switzer- 
land. He also founded its ciiiployment bureau, whicli has found po- 
sitions for about 125,000 German immigrants. He was a Park Commis- 
sioner of the city under Mayor Havemeyer, having previously been a 
member of the Committee of Seventy, whose efforts led to the over- 
throw of the Tweed ring. He was also a State Commissioner of Immi- 
gration, and secured reform in the steerage service to this country. 
He confronted Senator Showman at Hamburg, had him censured by 
the late Emperor William, and himself received knighthood at the 
hands of the Em])eror. He was President of the Cooper Union meet- 
ing of 1884. which, by means of its protest, defeated the proposed cen- 
sure of tlie Governor of New York for alleged partiality in giving the 
German element too great representation on the State Board of Immi- 
gration. 




PHILIP KISSINGER. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 175 

BREESE, JAMES LAWJtEXCJO, hanker, of New York City, was 
graduated from the Eeussel'aer Polyteolmic lustitute as a civil engi- 
neer in 1875, and subsequently studied architecture. Later he became 
successful in his pi'esent business. He is a member of the Union. 
Tuxedo, Eacquet, Players', and Hudson l\iver Ice Yacht clubs, and 
the Blooming Grove Park Association. He has a studio in this city, 
being one of the leading amateur iihotograpliers. His artistic work 
has won many prizes and medals both in America and Europe. He 
was boi"n in New Y'ork City, December 21, ISol, the son of the late J. 
Salisl)ury Breese and Augusta Eloise Lawrence <Jne of his great- 
uncles was Eear-Admiral Samuel Livingston Breese, U.S.N. An- 
other Avas Hon. Sidney Breese, ITnited States Senator from Illinois, 
Speaker of its House of I{e])res«Mitatives, and Chief Justice of its 
Supreme Court. Their father, the grandfather of Mr. Breese, was 
Arthur Breese, a graduate from Yale, and prominent lawyer of Utica, 
N. Y., while his great-grandfatlicr, Hon. Samuel Breese, was a Colonel 
in the Eevolution, and subse(|uently a Judge of New Jersey. The 
father of the latter was born in Shrewsbury, England, about 170t», and 
having espoused the cause of the I'rctender, entered the British Navy 
as a Purser, and later became a merchant in New York, and was Mas- 
ter of the Port. Through his mother, "Mr. Breese descends from John 
Lawrence, who arrived at Plynioulh in Ki:!."), and Johannes Lowesen 
Bogert, Avho came to New Amsterdam from Haarlem, Holland, in 
1671. 

ELY, (tEOECE WILLIAM, for many years prominent as a stock- 
broker of this city, and Secretary of the New York Stock Exchange, 
Avent to the front in support of the Union with the Seventh Eegimeut 
in 1S(>2, being Captain of a Company, and the youngest Captain in the 
history of that organization. He is a member of the New York, Law- 
yers', Barnard, and Whist dubs, and the Seventh Eegimeut Veteran 
Association. He was born in this city. J;inuary (i, ISIO, and was ed- 
ucated mainly in private sdiools. He married, in 18G1, Franct^s ^Vl- 
mira, daughter of Henry AYlieeler and Nancy Hotchkiss, of Seymour, 
Conn., and has a daughter and two sous — Henry Bidwell Ely. a law- 
yer, and Leomtrd ^Y. Ely. a pliysician. Mr. Ely is the son of the late 
Josejjh ^Merick Ely and Juliette .Marie, daughter of William Camp and 
Abigail AYliittlesey, his father having been a Yale graduate and for 
more than a (piarter of a century ])riiicii(al of a classical school in 
this city. He is descended from Nathaniel Ely, who was born in 
England, in KiOo, arrived in Massachusetts in 1635. and was one of 
the tirst settlers of Hartford, Conn. 

ELY, HENEY BIDWELL, coi-poration lawyer, of this city, is one of 
the trustees of the William Astor estate, is Treasurer of the Findlay. 
Fort Wavne and Western Eailwav, and is a director of the Astor 



17() 



HISTORY Ol^ THE (GREATER NEW VORK. 



Xjitiiiiial Bank, the Mercantile Trust Compauy, the Wcstcliester 
Trust < "iiiui»auy, aud the Tidewater Buildinji' ( 'ompan.v. lie was born 
in this city in l.StiG. was graduated from (.'oluuibia ("olh';:;c in ISSS. 
aud subsequently married lillian E. Kissam. He is a member (if 
the University, New York Athletic. Church, aud Alpha Delta I'hi 
clubs, and the Columbia C(ille;Lie Alumni Association, lie is the 
eldest son of George William Ely. a prominent stockbroker, and now 
for many years past Secretary of the New York Stock Exchange; is 
graudson of Joseph .Merrick Ely, who long maintained a classical 
school in NeAV York, luning been graduated from Yale in 1S2!I. and is 
descended from Nathaniel El\'. who came over in 1()84. 



SOUTHAKi), (lEOlJliE HENBY, is President of the Franklin 
Trust Com]iany of the Borough of i*rooklyn. Avhich he heljx'd to or- 

gani/,e in 1S88, and which he 
served, successively, as Secretary 
and Second Vice-President, and is 
a trustee or directoi- of the Dime 
Savings Bank and the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Comiiany of 
ISiooklyn, and the Brooklyn 
Wharf and ^^'arellouse <'ompauy, 
the llecker-.Jones-.T<'well Milling 
("ompany, and the New York Fire 
Insurance Company of Manhattan 
Borougli. He is a trustee of the 
I'nion Theological Seminaiw aud 
of the Bro(!klyn Presbytery, and is 
a member of the Board of Home 
^Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church of America. He is a mem- 
ber of the Union League <'lnb and 
the Downtown Association of 
^Manhattan Borough, and of the 
lud iMiving clubs of Itrooklyn. 
Born in Boston, .Mass., i'ebiuary •2'^>. 1841, he is the son of Hon. /ibeou 
Southard and Helen j\Iaria, daughier of Ebenezer Trescott. His father 
was a member of the Boston ( "ommon Council in 18.")1 and 18.")2, and (d' 
the IMassacliusetts House of lleiiresentatives in 18()1 and 1S(;2. He lin- 
eally descends from Constant Sout liwort li, who emigrated from Eng- 
land to I'lymouth Colony, where he snbseciuently became a deimty, in 
1628. His widowed mother became the wife of Govennu- William 
Bradfoi-d. ^Ir. Southa.i-d was graduated from the Boston English High 
School in 1853, and received his business education with Southard. 
Ilurlbut & Comjiany, oil manufacturers, of Boston. I'rom 18(n to ISC.'i 
lie engaged ill I lie 1 umber business i n Boston, while from ISC..") to 1874 




GEORGE HENRY S()ITH.\RD. 



Hamilton, IJeml)randt, and Biding 



ENXVCLOPEDIA OF XKW YORK CIOGRAPHV. 177 

he (•(iiiliiiued ill the same biisiuoss in New hmiili, X. Y. In tlie latter 
year lie established the liiinher tirni of Soul hard & Coiupauy in Man- 
hattan Boronoh. New York City, at the same time inakins' Brooklyn 
ins residence. 

TJ;ASK, SBEM^ER, head of the bankin- house of Spencer Trask 
c^c Company, is also President of the Edisou Electric Illuminatinii- 
Company, President of the Broadway Realty Company, and director 
of the liio Graiiile Western Ilailway Company, and the Mexican Na- 
tional Construction Company. At Saratoga Springs, where he has 
a beautiful couutry-seat, he elected and donated to the Diocese of 
Albany a CoiiA'alesceut Home, where one litmdred children are recu- 
perated each summer. He is a trustee of the New Y^ork Teachers' 
Cidlege, and a member of the Union League, Metropolitan, and other 
clubs. Born in Brooklyn in 1814, he attended the Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, was graduated from Princeton in isCCi, established himself in 
the banking btisiness in this city in 18(>!l, and in April of that year 
became a member of the New "^'ork Stock Exchange. His tirm was 
successively Trask & Stone, Trask & Francis, and, since 1881, Spencer 
Trask & Company. The house has branches in Boston, Albany, and 
Providence, and maintains ]irivate wires A\ith correspondents in Phil- 
adelphia and Chicago. 

HOY'T. ALFRED :yriLLER. from 18.j4 to 1881 was a member of the 
New York hrm of Jesse Hoyt iVc Company, his brother Jesse, an<l for 
a time his brother Samuel N.. being has ))artners, together with 
Henry A^'. Smith. This firm succeeded to the business which had 
been established many years before in this city by the late James 
Moody Hoyt. father of the brothers. Owners of extensive timber 
lands in the iiortliwest, they wei'(^ acti\-e in developing that section. 
They also ac(|uired large interests in connection with the grain 
elevators of Chicago, Milwaukee, and other cities, and eventually 
became interested in railroad development. They built and Avere 
large owners of the Flint and Per*' Marguette Railroad, of the ^Yi- 
nona and St. Peter Railroad, wliich became a part of the Chicago and 
Northwestern system, and the Milwaukee and Niu-thern Railroad. 
Alfred Miller Hoyt was President of the last-mentioned road. Since 
1881 he has been engaged in banking in tins city, and is Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Produce Exchange Safe Dejiosit Company, is a trustee of 
the Bank for Savings, and is a director of the Merchants' Ex<hange 
Bank, the Continental Trust Company, the Fidelity and Casualty 
Company, and the Consolidated Ice Company. He was born in this 
city in 1828, was educated in private schools, and studied law. He 
is grandson of Colonel Jesse Hoyt, and descended from Simon Hoyte, 
who came from England to Massachusetts in 1(>28. He is a member 
of the Metropolitan, Union League. Century, Riding, and (J roller 



178 ■.:<"-<%- ^o ^ :v.: URKATER XEW YORK 

i". ;l>!v He mame«, in iSocs Kivs*» K- Kees*?, ami has ihrer^ daughters 
.-„_ ^ ...^ 11 -«,- ^^ lawwr; Alfivd William, banker, and John 



KAKNF^ ai^llX SANFOKl^. ili*tingui«hed himself in the Uniieri 

S < ^' ^--^- _ .-- >;. ;• -lA - - - -~ -^ ^;- .achieved success in 

- srT. At the preseu: 

*;iv.e fee is a direvlor of ti»e Bank i»t >vew Amste?- l the Mani:- 

^ - _ - < " y, Ue is th^ s - ' ■" - r^:" 

- , . West Point, ev. - . 

itae*'^ ami c\>tts»rtieu>r ami active th»>ughottt the Civil War. attaiv-. _ 
- ^ . >. , ., . ^r . , - ! while 

S&nfv>r\i Bame« w^as Ih>wi at West l\unt. Mar l±. ISS&S: vra;s gradnate'i 



i<e^ la^\ aaii piracuc^ at Albany and subs in New York Ciix. 

-X - -«.~ - . - - ■ - ■ -^ S. Kec- 

-V - - _ .ad ther. 

ivstumed to banking. He is . .. Metiv^>litan. 

^" ~ _ \ ■ : . _ " 'VestmimsieT 

Iwtds??- _ -r «f Oipc:^ - tSSs U-S.^-; gr, _ : 



Tlnwe «iau*&ters and ftw s - San^'smi. Jr^ aod James Barnes. 

Jfc BaKxvk. is alsw Tfeasaires- of ,t>iHE. CV- 

V " - - - - - . ^ 

Keo&mk am'd IVs Sloastes 

$if«dferi Mi, tftte Svms of tfce K- 

--ireff. and is d*^ 
H. V ., am or"_ 



KXCYCLOf'KDIA OF NEW YORK B(OGf<AFHV. 171) 

cliilrlii-ii ;iri-. fjy his fii-Hf wif'f. two fliiiif^litcrH Jiml ilir<-<- hoiik — H'-nrv 
1 1 nil li ill soil. Ji-.. I III ill llojiislci-. ;iihI I.oiijh. 

INCAM.S. (•JJ.\i;)j:s JIJ:NJ;V. J-ifsidcnt of llic FiiHf XfilioriJil 
J'.jiiik of Si;iiiii IsIjiih). ;ifir| ScciT't Jirv ;iiir] I)irfftor of tli(- Norlli Shore 
IJuihliiiji l.oiui ;iii<l Suvinj^s AsKooiiilioii. of I'oii Kichrnoiir]. waH th(t 
foimijcr of thf )ii-st-iiiirr)C(l iiisUt iilioji. in .f;iriii;ii-y. IsSfJ. raisinji: tlK- 
siihsfi-ijitioiis and orjiani/Jiiji Ih'- l)aiil<. In 1 ?<'.>2 \i<- ]>cc:nii<- itH V'if-f- 
I'lisi'hiii. ;iimI ill .Janiiai\ . 1x1)1. was f-lectfd I'rf*sid«'nt. H<- h<'carrif? a 
clcik ill lh<' .Mi'l lopoliiaii I'.aiik of N'cw V'irk City in ls(;]. and h'-l»] 
various ]»ositioiis until its faiiiir«- in ISSt. In iNsri ix? ua.s \s'il.h tbc- 
Aiisonia IJj-ass ;iii<l ( oiipii- ( onipa ny. Ii<- h;is Ic-cn Hocretarv of the 
North Shore ISiiililiii;: Loan and Sa\ii)jis .Association sinf,* ]H>-'K and 
in ly.y-i. \>'.)i. ami !nI»o was I'r<-si(h'nt af the IJoard of Ediifation of 
Port Iiicbinoiid. lie is a nieniher of the Staten Island Chamber of 
Coninieree, tlie Kill von Kiill 'k'afht. and Staten Island clubs, and The 
Society for the i'reventioii of Cruelly tti Children. He was born in 
Souiliojil. L. I., March IT. 1843, the son of Joshua K. Inj^alls and 
Amanda Cray, and was educated in the I'rooklyn jdiblic schools and 
the Mount Washington T'ollegiate Institute of S<-\\ Vork City, lie is 
descended from Elkanab lugalls. who emigrated from England to 
Massachusetts about 1000. His father has Avritten miicli upon land 
and other economic f|uestions. including the two volumes. "Social 
Wealth " and " IJeminiscences of an t)ctogenarian.'" 

]).\ v. (f.AinCNCE SIIEI'AKI). has been a prominent banker and 
stockbroker of New York City for thirty years, ami is prominently 
connected with vaiiiuis railroarl eoi^jorations. He is now \'ice-Presi- 
dent of the Home, Watertown and Ogdensburg IJailroad t'ompany, 
and a director of the South t'jirolina and TJeorgia Railroad Company. 
the St. Paul and Duluth Kailroad Company, and the Ogdensburg and 
Lake Champlain Railroad Company. He is a member of the New 
York t'haniber of Commerce, the New England Soriety. and the 
Metrojiolitaii. Cnion League, JJiding. and Lawyers' clubs. He was 
born in this citj-. August 9, 1844, and attended the jMiblic schools 
and the College of the City of New York. He man-ied. in 1873. La- 
vinia Elizabeth Stockwell. descended from the old New York family of 
Parmly. and has four sons — f.'larence Shepard. Jr.. Ceorge Panrily. 
Julian. aiKl Harold C. Mr. Day is the son of the late Benjamin Henr>- 
Day. of this city, and Eveline, daughter of Mather Shepard and Har- 
riet Day. His father founded the New YVjrk Sim in 1833. Selling it 
to his brother-in law, Moses Y'. Beach, in 1837. he established and for 
twenty years published and edited the lirother .Joiuifhiiu. The founder 
of the family in America, Robert Day. was of Welsh descent, and set- 
tled at Cambridge. :Mass.. in 103.'j. subsequently accomjianying Dr. 



180 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



Tiiumas Hooker to Hartford, Conn. Mr. Day's colonial ancestors in- 
clude Lieutenant Thomas Cooper, of Hartford; Colonel Benjamin Day, 
of West Springfield. Mass., and Elder Brewster, of riymoutb. 



WESTBROOK. JOHX, who has been at the head of a block-cuttiuii' 
establishment on Staten Island since 1869, is President of the IJich- 
mond County Savings Bank, is Pi'esident of the Staten Island Build- 
ing Loan and Savings Association, and is a director of the First Na- 
tional Bank of vStaten Island and of the Staten Island Chamber of 
Commerce. He is Treasurer of lliclimond County Lodge, No. 88. 

I.O.O.F., and for five years 
was a School Trustee of 
"SYest New Brighton. Ho 
was born in Derbyshire, 
England. August 12. 1832, 
the son of Richard West- 
brook and Sarali Jackson. 
His fatlier was a block- 
cutter, while his grand- 
father kept a large inn 
where a line of mail 
coaches stopped daily. 
:\lr. AVestbrook was edu- 
cated in the schools of 
Scotland, served a seven 
years' apprenticeship at 
block-cutting, and in 1851 
immigTated to New York 
City. At the end of a year 
he returned to Scotland, in 
1858 again removed to 
New Y'ork, returning to 
Scotland in 1801, and in 
1868 making a third and 
final removal to America. 
In 1809 he founded the 
business mentioned, w liicli lias since assumed extensive proportions. 
He married, first, in Paisley, Scotland, in 1851. :Margaret Yuill, who 
subseqtieutly died, and second, on Staten Island, in 188(1, Emma 
Springer. He has three daughters and five sons — Robert R., William, 
Josepli Y., Charles, and Ilalph (K Westln-ook. 

CHAPIN, WILLIAM YIALL, banker, of this city, and member 
of the New York Stock Exchange from 1880 to 1890, was born in Prov- 
idence, R. I., January 1, 1855. He attended St. PauFs School at Con- 
cord, N. H., and was graduated from Trinity College, subsequently 




.JOHN WKSTIiROOK. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 181 

i-pcciviiii; the (Ici;i('c nf .Mjisicr of Aii>. He has since resided in New- 
York and engaged iu banking. He is a nicniber of the Knickerbocker, 
St. Anthony, and IMii Beta Kapi)a dnbs, and the New England So- 
ciety. In 1890, lie married Mary ^\'ort li, danglit(n' of Loonus L. White, 
banker, and well known member of the New York kStock Exchange. 
She is descended from Peregrine ^Vhite, born on the Mayflower, wiule 
her great-great-grandfather was State Senator and flrst (Chancellor 
of the University of the State of New York. Mr. <;hai)in is the son 
of General Walter B. Chapin and Ann Frances Low Mall, and grand- 
son of Hon. IJoyal Chapin, Governor (d' IJhode Island. He descends 
from Samnel Chapin, one of the ])roiiiineni fonnders of Springfield, 
Mass., in 1036. 



CUX, TU\VjS'SE:N'D, banker and broker, and member of the ^'ew 
York Stock Exchange from 1805 to 1885, has been in retirement from 
bnsiness pnrsnits since the latter date. In 1809 he was President of 
the Gold Exchange. He was a Commissioner of Charities and Cor- 
rection of this city from 1874 to 1882, while from 1885 to 18l»2 he was 
President of the State Forest Commission. He was one of the fonnd- 
ers of the Mendelssohn Glee Clnb, and its I'resideut. and was a Gov- 
ernor of the Manhattan Clnb. He married Anne Helme. danghter of 
Walter AVilmot Townseud and Anne Helme, a descendant of Chris- 
ioj)her Helme. of Warwick, E. I., in 1050, and has a danghter and 
fonr sons — Wilmot Townsend, Townsend, Irving, and Daniel.' Born 
in 1828, he is the son of Daniel Townsend Cox and Hannah Wilmot, 
danghter of General Nathaniel Coles, and is descended from James 
Cock, who was at Setauket, L. I., before 1059, and snbseqneutly ac- 
quired a large estate at Oyster Bay. Annjng his ancestors were 
Henry AMsner, signer of the Declaration of Independence; John Town- 
send, an early settler of Long Island; Lieutenant Robert Feke, Avho 
married a niece of Governor Winthrop; Hon. Nathaniel Coles, Judge 
of Queens County in 1089, and Captain Daniel Coak, a Eevolutionary 
<ifficer. 



EMMONS, JOHN FRANK, since 1878 a member of the banking 
firm of H. L. Horton & Company, of this city, is President of the 
Baltimore and New Y'ork Itailway, President of the Staten Island 
Rapid Transit Company, President of the Staten Island Railway 
Company, Vice-President of the First National Bank of Staten Island, 
and a director of the IJapid Transit Ferry Company, and the Staten 
Island Ferry Company. He was educated iu Boston, where he was 
born. April 20, 1839, liis father. John \j. Emmons, being a prominent 
Boston merchant. Entering his father's store at sixteen, he presently 
became a partner under the style of J. L. Emmons & Company. He 
subsequently withdrew, however, and. coming to this city, became a 



182 



HISTORY OF 11 IE GREATER XEW YORK. 



liiciiiln r iif the rinii nf (Scnrne E. Cook & Compiiiiy, dealers in securi- 
ties, lu 187S he liecaiue a ineinber of IT. L. ITdrton i^' Coinpany. He 
has resided upon Stateii Island since ]8()<>, and lias been active in [iro- 
curing tlie present railroad system of Riclimond County. He is a 
member of the New York Stock ExcliauQe, a member of tlie Union 
Leaaue Club, and eniovs hiiili social position. In lS(i(; he married 
Mary Wiuthrop Cuok. During the Civil War (18(>3-4:) he saw some 
service in North Carolina as Lieutenant of Company E. 4r>th Massa- 
chusetts. 



1\MT;C1TTLT). .TCLTAN D., President of the Kin-is County Trust 
Conijiany, was for some years Cliaiiinan of the E.\ecutive Committee 

of the company prior to his elec- 
tion to his present position. He 
is also Treasurer of the New East 
TJiver Bridge, and a director of 
the Bedford Bank, of liroolclyn, 
and the Edison Electric Light 
Coni]iany of the same city. In 
ISHo he was offered the Demo- 
cratic nomination for Mayor, but 
his business interests would not 
permit his acceptance. He is 
Vice-President of the Brooklyn 
Central Dispensary, and is a 
member of the Brooklyn, Mon- 
tauk, and Dyker Meadow Golf 
clubs. He is also a member of 
the New York Chamber of Com- 
merce and the New York Pro- 
duce Exchange. Born in Strat- 
ford, Conn.. April 17, IS.IO, at 
thirteen years of age he entered 
the employ of a large New Haven 
hardware manufacturing com- 
with this company for about three years, occupying 
the positions of office boy, entry clerk, and assistant bookkeeper. 
TMiring these years he saved his money, an<l at the age of seventeen 
start(Ml in the tea, coffee, and si)ice business for himself with a capital 
of about four hundred (hdlars. After remaining in this business for 
a short time he sold out and went into the agricultural business, 
and four years later changed lo I he manufacture of comnu'rcial ferti- 
lizers, becoming Secretary (d' the (^)uinnii)iac l-Vrtilizer Company, of 
New^ Haven and New London, Conn. He sold out his interest in this 
company in 1874 and became connected with the E. Frank Coe Ferti- 
lizer Com]Kiny, in New Y(uk City, and eventually became the Presi- 




.JULIAX D. FAIKCMII.l) 



pany, reniaininj. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK RIOGRAPHY. 183 

deut i)f the ( \nii]);iny. In lS!»i lie disjioscd of his iiiteiext in this coni- 
piiny, and is now jiiving' his attention to the Kinns (.'onntv Tinst ("oiii- 
paiiy. He lias been a vesident of r.i'(i(d<lyn since IST.!. 

CAKPEXTER, HERBEKT lr^ AN FORD, from 1S90 to 1895, was a 
menibev of the New York banking- tirni of Charles Head & Company, 
and since the latter date has been a member of the banking firm of 
Thomas L. Manson, Jr. & Company. He was born in Brooklyn in lStt2, 
was edncated in this city, and is the sou of the eminent artist, Francis 
B. Carpenter, and Augusta Prentice, and grandson of Asaph 11. Car- 
penter aud Elmira Clark. His father made life studies of Lincoln and 
his Cabinet for his celebrated painting, " Signing of the Emancipation 
Proclamation,"' which hangs in the United States Capitol, and subse- 
quently i)ublished " Six ^Months at the White House; or. The Inner 
Life of President Lincoln." Mr. Carpenter married, in 1883, Cora 
Anderson, of one of the old families of Louisville, Ky., and has a 
daughter. He is a member of the New York Athletic, Playeis", and 
Engineers" clubs. 

BATTERMAN, HENRY, has been engaged in bu.«iness in Brooklyn 
since 18G7, and latterly has been prominently connected with a num- 
ber of important financial institutions. He is now President of the 
Broadway Bank of Brooklyn, and a director of the Manufacturers" 
Trust Company and the American Stoker Comi»any. By appointment 
of Mayor Charles A. Schieren, of Brooklyn, he served on the Bridge 
('ommission. He is a member of the Hamilton, Union League, Riding 
and Driving, and Germania clubs, of P.nxdclyn. The sou of John F. 
aud So]>hie Batterman, both of whom were born in Germany, he was 
himself born in Brooklyn, N. Y., November 5, 1840, and was educated 
in the ])ubiic scliools of that city and Renville's Commercial College 
of tlie City of New York. 

('RUMWELL. OLIVER EATON, for many years actively engaged 
in business in this city as a stockbroker, is the sou of the late Charles 
T. Crojnwell, a prominent New Vork lawyer, and grandson of J(din 
Cromwell, a merchant of New York City, and Lieutenant of Artillery 
in the War of 1812. He was born in the City of New York, October (>, 
1818, and was graduated from Columbia College as a mechanical en- 
gineer. He is a member of the T'nion. Metropolitan, Delta Phi, New 
York Yacht, American Yacht, and Seawanhaka-Coriuthian Yacht 
clubs, the St. Nicholas Society, and Holland Lodge. In 1891 he was a 
County Commissioner of Bernalillo County, New Mexico, where he 
has interests. He married, in 1890. Lucretia B., daughter of James 
H. Roberts, of Chicago, and has a daughter and two sons — Oliver 
Eaton and James Roberts Cromwell. He is lineally descended from 



184 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Joliu Cromwell, of Cromwell's Neck, Westchester Couuty. who was 
the sou of Colonel Johu Cromwell, and grandson of Sir Oliver Crom- 
well, the cousin and uucle respectively of Oliver Cromwell. Lord Pro- 
tector of England. Through his mother, Henrietta Amelia, daughter 
of Benjamin Brooks, of Bridgeport, Conn., Mr. Cromwell is also de- 
scended from Catherine Henrietta, sister of the Lord I'rotector. Her 
sou, Colonel William Jones, who came to New Haven in 16G0, is 
his ancestor, as is also Theophilus Eaton, first Governor of New Haven 
Colony. 

DAVIS, FELLOWES, has been long engaged in the handling of 
stocks in New York City, and is a director of the Cincinnati, Hamilton, 
and Dayton Eailway Company. He is a member of the Council of the 
Military Order of Foreign Wars, and is one of the Board of Managers 
of the Society of the Sous of the lievolution. He is also a member 
of the Union Club, the Society of Colonial Wai's, and the New York 
Historical Society. He is the son of William Davis. Jr.. and Maria 
Davis, his paternal and maternal great-grandfathers being two 
brothers. Captain Aaron Davis, Jr.. and Moses Davis, both of whom 
were Revolutionary soldiers, while their father. Colonel Aaron Davis, 
was also Colonel of Militia during the Eevolutiou, and a prominent 
member of the Massachusetts Legislature. The latter's grandfather, 
William Davis, settled in Roxbury, Mass., in 1G38. being of the old 
manorial family of Davis, long seated at Twickenham, England. Mr. 
Davis is also descended from Governor Johu Winthrop, Sr.. and Gov- 
ernor Thomas Dudley. He married, in 1S71. Marie Antoinette Baker, 
of Boston, and has a daughter and three sons — Fellowes, Jr.. Pier- 
pout, and Dudley. Mrs. Davis is also descended from Governor Dud- 
ley, as well as from Eobert Baker, who came over with Endicott's 
fleet, and received a grant of land from the crown at Salem, Mass.. in 
1637; from Jonathan Baker, who distinguishe<l himself in the French 
and Indian war. and from Benjamin Baker and Jesse Davidson. Revo- 
lutionary soldiers, who were her great-grandfathers. 

BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN OLMSTED, formerly engaged as an im- 
porter in this city in the British trade, and in later years engaged in 
banking on Wall Street, is a member of the L'nion and Metropolitan 
clubs, and was born in Denmark, N. Y., February 10, 1827. He is the 
son of the late Dr. Erasmus Darwin Bartholomew, a physician of 
Western New York, and ^iary Seline Brewster, a descendant of Elder 
Brewster, of Plymouth Colony. His grandfather, Dr. Sherman Bar- 
tholomew, was a Surgeon in the American Army in the War of 1812, 
while the founder of the line in this country, William Bartholomew, 
who arrived in Boston in 1634, and subsequently became a member of 
the Massachusetts General Court, was of gentle blood, the son of Will- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



185 



iam Bartlioluuiew, of ^^■al•bonnl,^ll, Oxfordshire, aud Friswede, daugh- 
ter of William Metcalf, Mayor of New AVoodstock. 



KELLY, UICHAKL). was the foimder of the Fifth National Bauk 
of New York City, aud was its President for about thii'ty-two years, 
from its oruanization in January. 1864, until bis death in his seventy- 
seventh year, April 20, 1897. In his younger davs he was connected 
with the Volunteer Fire Depait- 
ment of tlie city. He was one o! 
the old members of the Union 
League Club, and remained 
through life a stanch IJepublican. 
his first and last ballots alike 
having been cast for the candi- 
dates of that party. He also 
served upon the bench as a Jus- 
tice of New York City, and was at 
one time the Republican candi- 
date for Comptroller of the city, 
lie was for many years President 
of the School Board of the Nine 
teenth Ward. He served upon 
the Nominating Committee of the 
New York Clearing House Asso- 
ciation. He was long President 
of the Pavonia Ferry Railroad 
Company, retaining the position 
until that company disposed of 
its right of way through Lexing- 
ton Aventie to the ^letropolitan 
Traction Company. At the time 
of his death he was also Presi- 
dent (d' the Dry Dock, East 
Broadway and Battery Railroad 
Com})auy, and a director in 
va lions other enter|)rises. He 

married Jane Meeks, also of an old New York family. She sur\ives 
liim, with tlieir two children— Dr. Stephen Kelly and Richard B. 
Kelly. 




RICHARD KELLY. 



KELLY, STEPHEN, in the spring of 181)7 succeeded his father, the 
late Richard Kelly, as President of the Fifth National Bank of New 
York City, of which he had been Vice-President since 1887, and a 
director for a much longer period. He was born in New York in 1847, 
and was educated in the public schools, in 18(18 being graduated from 
the College of the Citv of New York. He studied medicine under Dr. 



& 



186 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

James K. Wood, at Bellevue Hospital Medical College, and after his 
graduation from the latter in 1871, was for several rears actively and 
successfully engaged in the practice of medicine in Xew York City. 
in 1873 he was married to Miss Julia Davis, of Natchez, Miss. While 
always retaining his legiil residence in Xew York City, he for many 
yenrs successfully engaged in cotton planting on an extensive scale 
hi .Mississippi and Louisiana. He was long a director of the Dry 
Dock, East llroadwiiy and IJnttery Railroad Company, prior to its 
sale, August 23, 18!t7, to the Third Avenue Railroad Company. He is 
a member of the New York Athletic Club. By his first wife, who died 
in 1883, he has one child— (Jeorge M. D. Kelly. On August 1, 1897. 
Dr. Kelly was married to 3liss Euinia Riley, of Cornwall, X. Y. 

Richard B. Kelly, the younger son of the late Richard Kelly and 
Jane Meeks. is engaged in the practice of law in Xew York City. 
He is Vice-President of the Fifth National Bank, as well as its coun- 
sel and attorney, and is also a trustee of the Broadway Savings Insti- 
tution, and a director of the Home Bank. 

SCHWAB, GUSTAV, was for many years one of the uiost eminent 
of New York business men. He was born in Stuttgart, Germany, 
in 1822, the son of Gustav Schwab, the well-known German author 
and poet, and the grandson of Dr. John Chiistopher Schwab, who long 
occuped the chair of Philosophy and ^Mathematics in the University of 
Stuttgart, and declined to relinquish it in order to accept his desig- 
nation by Frederick the Great to assist in establishing and directing 
the Berlin Royal Academy of Science. Having been in the counting- 
house of H. H. ileier & Company, of Bremen, between the ages of 
seventeen and twentv-two, in 1814 Mr. Schwab came to New York to 
take a position with the firm of Oelrichs & Kruger. ^A'ithin five years 
lie engaged in the shippiug business in this city on his own account 
as junior member of the firui of Wichelhausen, Recknagle & Schwab. 
In 1859 he severed this connection to enter the firm of Oelrichs & 
Company, successors to Oelrichs & Kruger. It was shortly subsequent 
to the organization of this firm that the house acquired the American 
agency of the North German Lloyd Steamship Line, the head of H. H. 
Meier & Company, of Bremen, with whom Mr. Schwab had served 
his mercantile apprenticeship, being President of the steamship com- 
pany. Mr. Schwab succeeded the late Henry Oelrichs as head of 
Oelrichs & Company, and so remained tiutil his retirement from busi- 
ness in 1887, when the present Herman Oelrichs. son of Henry, be- 
came senior partner. Mr. Schwab died in 1888. At the time of his 
death he was Vice-President of the Merchants' National Bank, as 
well as its senior director. He was also a director of the Central Trtist 
Company, the Washington Life Insurance Company, and the Orient 
Mutual Insurance Company. He was at one time a member of the 
New York Board of Education, was long Treasurer of the German 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 187 

Hospital, and was Warden of St. James's ChuiTh (Episcopal), of 
Fordbam. He married in 1850, Catherine Elizabeth, daughter of 
L. H. Von Post, of this city, a descendant from one of the German 
emigrants from the Palatinate to this country in 1710. Their family 
included the present (iustav II. and Herman C. Schwab, members of 
Oelrichs & Company; Rev. Lawrence II. Schwab, Rector of St. Mary's 
Chtirch (Episcopal), of this city, and Dr. John C. Schwab, Professor 
of Political Economy in Yale riiiv<rsity. 

SCHWAB, GUSTAV H., eldest son of the late Gustav Schwab, was 
born in New York City, May 30, 1851, was educated here and at Stutt- 
gart, Gei-uiauy, received a business training at Bremen, Germany, 
and Liverpool, England, in 1873 became connected with the firm of 
Oelrichs & Company, of this city, of which his father was long 
the head, and since 1876 has been a member of that firm. He is a 
trustee of the United States Trust Company, the Atlantic Mutual In- 
surance Company, and the Birkbeck Investment Savings and Loan 
Company, and a director of the Merchants' National Bank and the 
New York Produce Exchange and Safe Deposit Storage Company. 
He has served as Commissiimer of Emigration for the State of New 
York. He is a prominent member of the Chamber of Commerce and 
has been Cliaiinian of its Executive Committee. He was formerly a 
member of the Sub-committee on Finance, and is now Chairman of 
the Committee on Foreign Commerce and Revenue Laws. lU' is a 
member of the Jletropolitan, Century, City, Reform, Comnionwealtli, 
Tuxedo, Riding, and Mendelssohn Glee clubs, and the Liederkranz. 
He married in 1876, Caroline E. Wheeler, niece of William B. Ogden, 
of New York, Avho was the first Mayor of Chicago, and at one time 
President of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company, and 
has two children — Emilv Elizabeth and Gustav Schwab. 



CONSTABLE, JAMES MANSELL, who has long been the head of 
the notable drygoods house of Arnold, Constable & Company, and 
since 1842 has been a member of the firm, is also Vice-1'resident of 
the Institution for Savings for ilerchants' Clerks, and is a director of 
the Bank of New York. He was born in Surrey. England, in 1812. 
and having become impressed with this country while on a pleasure 
tour, came over permanently in 1810. He was the friend of the late 
Aaron Arnold, head and founder of the then existing firm of Arnold, 
Hearn ^Vc Company, and became interested with him. two years later be- 
coming a partner under the new style of A. Arnold & Company, which 
later gave place to Arnold. Constable & Company. He married, in 
1811, Henrietta, only daughter of Aaron Arnold, and has two daugh- 
ters and a son — Frederick A. Constable. As a memorial to liis wife, 
who died in 1884, Mr. Constable erected at iMamaroneck a Protestant 



l^^'^ iiiMORY Ol- TUK UKKAIKK NEW YORK, 

Kpisoopal iMuuvh. Uo is a mombor of iho Uofonn I'hib ami the Up- 
town Assoi'iatton. Tlio tinu has houses at Paris aiul l.ViMis. Fraitio. 

ri.AN T. UKNKV liKAPl.KY. has hMiji boon iho most luomimnu 
tiuuiv in oomiootiou with oxpross ami t-ailwav iutorosts in the 
8outhorn States. Kuteiiug the employ of the New Haven Steamboat 
Oompaivy at the ujiv of oishttvw, he was soon intvusttHl with the ex- 
pn^s busim^s In rail ami water betw»vti New Haven ami New 
York. I'pon the organiKation of the Adams F.xpress Company he 
Kvame its rt^v*i^^*^*M^»^'i^"^' i" ^1*^^ South. From iJsU to ISOl he was 
Superiutemlettt of its Southern division, with heailquarters; at Au- 
siusta, (.»a. In the latter year he organizeil the Southern Kxpivss 
Company, which sueiH^tnled to the busiut^ss of the Adams Expivss 
iVmpany in the Cotiftnlerate States. Illness soon after foreed him 
to spend tuueh time iu Uermmla ami Kusilaml. After the war he be- 
came active iu developing the agvucies of tiniusportatiou iu the 
Southern Statt^ He was the head of the syndicate Avhich. in 1ST9. 
acquirvHi the Atlautic and Culf Kailrvnid. and nH>rg;iniztHl it as the 
Savannah. Florida and AVestern. He also acquireil and rebuilt the 
Sjivannah and Charleston Kailrvnul. In IS^2 he securtHl the incor- 
poration of the I'lant luvt»stment Company, and thus btvame head of 
a notable syndicate of capitalists who had joiueil forces to develop 
the n^jonrvvs and facilitit^s of the South. Fast mail steamship lines 
wertM^stablishtHl betwtvn Tampa. Fla.. and Havana, Cuba; New York 
and Florida, lioston and Halifax, and ivuutvting local Southern 
porisv Large modern hotels were erei'ttnl in Floriila, and the rttil- 
wavs of that State developeii and compacteil with systems extending 
to the north and the west. The result has been the creation of the 
si>-ealUHl riaitt system, of which its originator is the extH'utive head. 
Siniv it was fouudtxl by him. in lSl>l, he has been l^^sident of the 
Siuithern Expn^ss Comivmy, while he is also l^^sident of the Savan- 
i\ah, Florida atid N\\»stern Kailway Comi^iny, l^»sident of the Silver 
Sv>ring^ Ocala and Gulf Kailrv^ul Company, l*resideut of the Charles- 
ton and Sjivauuah Railway ComiKiny. Pn^sident of the Alabama ilid- 
land Uailway Cvnu^vtity. Ihvsident of the Brunswick and Western 
Kailrv^td ComjKtny . lYesideni of the Tamjnt and Thonott^Siissit Kail- 
r\md l\nuiv»ny, and is a director of ten or twelve other rv^tds. He is 
also l*rt\?ident of the Canada. Atlantic v^ Plant Steamship Comvvtny, 
and of the Lake Alfreil Comv*any; is a trustet^ of the American Surety 
t\nuiviny. and the Metrv>politan Trust Comi^iny. and is a director of 
the Key \\\\?t Comtnereial Company-, and the Jacksonville Street 
Kailrojid Com^viny. He was born in BranfonL Conn., October 27. 
1>H>. had as tutor Kev. Timothy O. Gillette, and attended the Lan- 
castrian Si*hoi>l at New Haven. He descends fnnn John Plant, w-ho 
^- •::-^-'-aI fr\nn England to Conneeticut iu lt>3tf- His paternal and 
I srrvvAt-srrandfathers were Kevolmionarv s^ddiers. the- latter 



E.NCVCLUPiJJlA OF NEW YOKK BIOGKAIMIV, 181) 

lioldirif; tlic i"iiil< of .M;ijoi-. Ilic luiiui'i- Ijaviji"; I Ik- <Jisti;i(t iu)i of )i;iv- 
iiiji Ix'cii Ktutioned at W'asljiiijjIoii'K li<'ii<J(juarl<Ts at S>-\\\>\ir-^\i. and 
liaviiifi wrvcd on guan] at tJjo execution of Major .\u(\y(';. Mr. I'lant 
married, in 1X42, Ellen Elizabeth, dauj^hter of Jlon. Janies J{lafk- 
stone, of Connectient. by wlioni li<* had liin only nnrvis inji Kon, Morion 
F. I'lant. She died in 18(;i. and twelve years later he married Alar- 
garet Josejdiine, only dauf^hter of Martin Loujrhman. of I his city. 
.Mr. Plant is a member of the ('nion Leaj^ne Club and the New Eng- 
hiiid Society. 

I'LANT, MnirrOX F., is the only survivinj^ son of Jlenry JJrad- 
ley Plant, of this city, and is actively associated in the management 
of the immense transjjoilation system erected by his father. lie is 
second executive ofticer of many of the corporations, and a director 
of others. He is \'ice-President of the Southern J-^xpress Comy)any, 
Vice-President and .Manager of the Canada, Atlantic and Plant 
Steamsliij) Company. Nice-President of the Florida Southern Kail- 
road Comi»any. \'i<e-President of the Alabama Midland Kaihvay 
Company, Nice-President of the Brunswick and W'estenj iJailroad 
Company, X'ice-President of the Abbeville Southern Railway Com- 
pany. Vice-President of the .Nlontgornery Belt Line Railway Company, 
and N'ice-l'resident of the Sanford and St. Petersburg iJailway ("om- 
Ijauy, Avhile he is a director of the Charleston and Savannah liailway 
Company, the Savannah, I'lorida and Western Railway Company, 
the St. John's and Lake Eustis Railroad T'ompany. the Winston and 
Bone Valley Railway Company, and the Green Pond, Waterboro, and 
Branchville Railway. lie is a member of the New York Athletic 
Club. 

MILLS, iJARirs OODEN, has distinguished him.'^-lf by his prac- 
tical philanthropy. In isss he erected for the City of New York in 
the Bellevue Hospital grounds, at a cost of .«100,000, the D. O. Mills 
Training School for Male Nurses. He is one of the joint builders and 
owners of the Madison S'juare Garden and the new Metropolitan 
Opera House. He is patron of the Metropolitan Mu.seum of Art, the 
American ;Museum of Natural Histoid, and the Amei-ican GfrK^graphic- 
al Society. He is a ju-incijial proprietor of the new model tenements 
on the East and West Sides of ^aw Y'ork, in the heart of the most 
crowded districts, which now afford apartments for the familif^s of 
workingmen at a rent as low as for .squalid quarters, but giving them 
every sanitary convenience, light, air, bathroom, properly-equipped 
kitchen, and ta.stefully decorated living rooms. On Bleecker Street, 
between Sullivan and Thomp.son, he has erected an imposing ten- 
story hotel palace for tho.se whose circumstances compel them to 
study tlie strictest economy. Here a night's hidging can be had for 
twenty cents, and good inenls for fifteen cents. Nevertheless there is 



190 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



complete elevator and attendant service, scrupiilous cleanliness, 
with firebrick finish, marble corridors, spacious parlors and reading- 
rooms, baths, and lavatories, while tlie fifteen hundred bedrooms are 
handsomely car^jeted and tastefully and comfortably furnished. A 
similar hotel for women, and another for men in the so-called '' Ten- 
derloin ■■ district, are under way. lie is also proprietor of the Mills 
Building, one of the notable office-buildings of the city, with wings 
on Wall and Broad streets. ]\lr. ^Mills is President of the Virginia 
and Truckee Baili-oad, a trustee of the United States Trust Company, 
and the ]\[etropolitan Trust Cnnipany, and a director of the Bank of 
New York, the Farmers" Loan and Trust Company, the Madison 
S<|uare Garden Company, the .^letroiiolitan Opera and Beal Estate 

Comjiany, the City and Suburban 
Homes ("omi)any, the Edison Elec- 
tric Illuminating Comi)any, the 
Mergenthaler Linotype Company, 
tlie ^Minnesota Iron Comjiany, tlie 
l>uluth and Iron Kange Bailroad 
Company, the Cataract Constnic- 
lion ('ompany. the Niagara Devel- 
ojiment Conijiauy, the Niagara 
Junction Bailway Company, the 
Erie Railroad Company, the Lake 
Sliore and Michigan Southern 
Kailroad Company, and the Car- 
son and Colorado Kailway. He 
was born in North Salem, West- 
chester County, N. Y., Sei)tember 
5, 1825, the son of Janu's Mills, of 
an old WestchesttH' family. He 
htdd a clerkship in New York City 
for several years, and then became 
Cashier of the Merchants' Bank of 
Erie County, New York, being partner of his cousin, E. J. Townsend, 
in its ownership. I'pon the discovery of gold in California, he estab- 
lished himself as a general merchant at Sacramento, at the same time 
buying gold dust and dealing in exchange on New York. Subse- 
quently he established the banking firm of D. (). :\lills & Company, 
which continues to be one td' the leading financial houses of Califor- 
nia, and " the oldest bank of unbroken credit in the State." He also 
organized the Bank of California, with a capital of .f2,0n0,n00, and 
for nine years was its President. When he retired, in 1873, the bank 
was doing an immense business, but under his successor, the unfor- 
tunate Balston, it was brought to the verge of ruin in two years. Mr. 
Mills finally consented to his re-election as President, and having 
once more placed the institution on a solid basis, resigned in May, 




DARirS (). MILLS. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 11)1 

1878, aud removed to New York. He was long a Eegent and the 
Treasurer of the University of Califm-nia, aud endowed the Mills Pro- 
fessorship of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy for .'S!T5,000. He was 
a trustee of the Lick estate, and of the Lick Observatory. He pre- 
sented to the State of California the marble gi'oiip, " Columbus before 
Queen Isabella," which adorns tiie rotunda of the State House. He 
married, in 1854, Jane T., daughter of James Cunningham, of New 
York City. Their daughter is tlie wife of I Ion. Whitelaw Eeid. 

CAMEliOX, SIK EODEKICK ^YILLIAM, coming to New York 
City from Canada in 1852, established a packet line to Australia, and 
founded the firm of R. W. Cameron & Company, which maintains a 
large importing aud exporting trade between the United States and 
Canada on the one hand and Australia. He was knighted by Queen 
Victoria in 1883 for his services in promoting trade relations between 
Canada and the Australasian colonies. In 1819-50 he had been a dele- 
gate from Canada to the United States in advocacy of a reciprocity 
treaty. He was accredited to the Centennial Exposition at Pliiladel- 
phia in 187G as Commissioner of New South AYales, and was similarly 
accredited to the Exposition at Paris in 1878. He also attended the 
Exposition at Melbourne in ]88(». and that at Sydney in 1881, as Com- 
missioner from Canada. Upon his return in 1881 he prepared a valu- 
able re])ort on the trade relations between the continents of North 
America and Australia, which the Minister of Agriculture in the Ca- 
nadian Cabinet published as an a])pendix to his report for 1881. He 
has interested himself in promoting outdoor sports, and at his Avell- 
known stud at Clifton, Staten Island, has dcme much to impmve the 
American thoroughbred horse, importing some famous stallions. He 
is a member of the Metropolitan, Knickerbocker, aud New Y^ork 
Yacht, and five London clubs. Born at Glen-Nevis, Canada, July 25, 
1825, he descends from Donald (lameron, of Glen-Nevis, Scotland, 
and on the maternal side from Sir Roderick Macloud. His grand- 
father, Alexander Cameron, born at Glenmoriston, Inverness-shire, 
in 1729, emigrated to the Colony of New Y^ork prior to the Revolution, 
eventually settling in Canada. His father, Duncan Cameron, was a 
Member of Parliament, aud one of the founders of the Northwest Imh- 
Trading Company, afterward nurged into the Hudson's Bay Company. 
Sir Roderick married in 18G0, Anne Fleming, daughter of Nathan 
Leavenworth. She died July 2, 1879, four daughters and two sons- 
Duncan Ewen and Roderick Macloud— surviving her. Roderick Ma- 
cloud Cameron is a member of liis fatlier's mercantile firm. Sir Roder- 
ick is a director of the Alberta Railway aud Coal Company. 

ROOSEVELT. ROBERT B.. member of the New Y'ork Fishery Com- 
mission from 18G7 to 1888. when he Avas appointed United States Min- 
ister to the Netherlands, is well known foi' his effective crusade look- 



192 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

iuji to tlje preisei-viitioii (if the Avild liame of the United States, and 
for many piiblishe<l volumes and magazine essays on tliis and otlier 
stibjects. lie is a director of the Brigantine Company and the Broad- 
way Improvement Company, and a trustee of the Holland Trnst Com- 
pany; was First A'iee-President and stibsequently President of the 
Holland Society. He was active in the organization of the original 
" Committee of Seventy," which led in the overthrow of the Tweed 
ring, and was the first \'ice-l'resident of the Reform Club, organized 
the Citizens" Association, and one of the editors of its organ, the 
Citizen. Elected to Congress as a Democrat in 1870. he maintained 
himself in independence of party dictation. He was active in the 
organization of the paid Fire Department of this city, as also in the 
creation of the Hciiltli Department. He was a Commissioner of the 
Brooklyn Bridge, a founder of the Lotos Club, one of the oldest mem- 
bers of the St. Nicholas Society, and a member of the Manhattan and 
Democratic clubs. He refused an offer of President Cleveland to ap- 
point him United States Sub-Treasurer at Xew York. Both as a 
writer and as an organizer of protective societies, he became a pioneer 
in vigorous opposition to the indiscriminate slaughter of game. He 
has been President of the Fish Culture Association. President of the 
National Association for the Protection of Game, and President of the 
International Association for the Protection of Game. He secured 
the creation of the New York Fishery Commission, of which he was so 
long a member, and published a report covering his twenty-one years 
of service. He has published volumes on " The Game Fish of North 
America,'' *' The Game Birds of North America," and " Superior Fish- 
ing," " Fish Hatching and Fish Catching"; has edited other works, 
and been a prolific essayist and magazine writer. He has also pub- 
lished " Five Acres Too iluch," " Love and Luck," and " Progressive 
Petticoats." He is a member of a distinguished New York family, 
and was born in this city, August 7, 1829, received a collegiate and 
legal education, and was admitted to the bar at twenty-one years of 
age. He soon abandoned legal practice for activity along the lines 
indicated. He lineally descends from Klaas Martinszen Van Roose- 
velt, who, with his wife, Jannetje Samiiels Thomas, arrived in New 
Amsterdam from the province of Zeeland in August. 1019. The name 
means " Field of Roses." 

DELAFIELD, JOHN, founder of the distinguished New York fam- 
ily of the name, was at the same time of the most distinguished and 
ancient lineage and through personal force of character made him- 
self one of the most eminent of the merchant princes of New York. 
Having become one of the successful and wealthy merchants of his 
day, he retired from active business in 1789 and became President 
of the United Insurance Comi^any, and a director of the New York 
branch of the Bank of tlie ITnited States. He was an eminent mem- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 193 

ber of the Chamber of Coimuerce, while liis iiiausiou oi^posite Black- 
well's Islaud, on the Loni;- Island shore of the East Kiver, was one of 
the most notable about New York. He was born in England in 1748, 
came to New York in IT80, and died here July .">, 1824. The oldest 
son of John Delatield, Esq., of Aylesbury, Bucks, and Martha, daugh- 
ter of John Dell, he was in the line of pi'imogeniture from John de la 
Feld, living in the thirly-eightli and forty-third years of Henry III., 
and, according to Burke, was a '• Count of the Holy Roman Empire, 
as inherited from his great-great-grandfather, John." According to 
the same, this ancestor, John Delaticid, liorn in IC.oT, " having entered 
into foreign ser-rice participated in the triuniidis of Prince Eugene 
of Savoy, and at the glorious engagement of Zenta against the Turks, 
led on by the (irand Vizier in person, having taken a standard from 
the infidels, was created a Count of the Holy Koman Empire in 1097, 
with remainder of the title to his descendants, male and female, of 
his name." The origin of the English line is given by the same au- 
thority as follows: " The family of De la Feld descend from the an- 
cient Counts of La Feld in Alsace, who long resided at the chateau 
that still bi'ars tiieir name situated in a pass of the Vosges Mountains, 
three days' jotirney from Colmar. It is probable that Hubertus De 
la Feld was the first of his race that emigrated to England, and that 
he came over with the Conr|neror, his name being enrolled as the 
owner of lands in the County of Lancaster in the third of William I." 
John, Count Delafield cd' New York, married, in 1781, Ann, daughter 
of Hon. Joseph Hallett and Elizabeth Hazard, her father being one 
of the Sons of Liberty, a member of the Revolutionary Committee of 
Safety, and a member of the three first New York Provincial Con- 
gresses. They had thir-teen children, seven sons reaching maturity. 
These were John Delafield, who left issue; Major Joseph, who left 
male issue; Henry and William, twins, neither of whom left male 
issue; Dr. Edward, who left male issue; (ieueral Richard, who left 
issue, and Rufus King Delafield, father of the present Richard Dela- 
field, merchant and banker. 

DELAFIELD, JOHN, one of the sons of the first of this name in 
New York, was a prominent banker. Originally, in 1808, he had 
established himself in the banking business in Loudon, and, on ac- 
count of his American citizenship, he was for a time treated as a 
prisoner during the War of 1812. He also experienced severe finan- 
cial reverses during this period, leading to ^^'ashingtou Irving's story 
of " The Wife," which was dedicated to him. In 1820, Mr. Delafield 
returned to New York City, where he became Cashier and President 
of the Phamix Bank. Subsequently he became President of the 
New^ York Banking Company. He was one of the founders of the 
Musical Fund Society, and was the first President of the New York 
Philliarmonic Societv. He was also instrumental iu establishing the 



194 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 



Universitv of the City of New York, as he was in reviving tlie New 
York Historical Sooietv. Western repudiations involved him in finan- 
cial rnin a second time. His declining years were spent near Geneva, 
N. Y., on his model farm, '' Oaklands," and for several years he was 
President of tlie Xew York State Agricnltural Societv. 



DELAFIELD, EICHAKD, in 1880, founded the finn of Delafield 
& Company, of New York, Chicago, and San Francisco, engaged in 
the California trade, and has continued at its head to the present time. 
He has been President of the New York Mercantile Exchange, is 

Mce-President of the National Park 
Bank, a trustee of the Colonial Trust 
Comiiany, and a directtir of the 
National Surety Company, the 
I'rankfort-American T n s u r a n c e 
C(>mi)any, the Tliuringia American 
Fire Insurance Company, and the 
( 'orixtration of Trinity Church. He 
was a member of the < "ommittee of 
( >n(' Hundred in charge of the New 
York Columbian (}uadi-ocentennial 
celebration, and A\as President of 
the commission of the World's 
Columbian Exposition of the State 
of New York for the First Judicial 
District. He is President of the Sea 
Side Home of Long Island, and a 
uieinber of the ExecutiveCommittce 
of the Yarick Street Hospital. Tak- 
ing an active interest in the develop- 
ment of music in the United States, 
he has been Secretary of the New York Symphony Society, and Presi- 
dent of tlie Staten Island Philhannonic Society. He is a vestryman of 
Trinity* 'hurcli. and a member of the Union League, Tuxedo, New York 
Athletic, ^bMcliants", and Commercial clubs, and the Sons of the Reso- 
lution. Born in New Biigliton, S. I., Se|rtember (i, 18.">3. he is the son of 
the late lUifus King Delatield and Eliza, daughter of WilliamBard and 
Katharine Cruger. His father, a brother of the late General Richard 
Delafield and the late Dr. Edward Delafield, was a prominent New ■ 
Y(U'k merchant, while liis grandfather, John Delafield, the head of his 
family both in this country and England, was one of the most eminent 
merchants and financiers in the history of New York City. Mr. Dela- 
field mai'ried, in 1880, Clara (Foster) Carey, granddaughter of Philip 
Hone, eminent in the social and business life of New York City, and 
its Ma v(U- in 1826. 




RICHARD 1)KL.\HKLD. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 11)5 

DELAFIELD, MATUEIN Ln'IXGSTON, well-kuowu meichaut 
and pvomiueut in the social life of New York City, was born here 
in 1836, in 1856 was graduated from Columbia College, and four 
years later received the degree of Master of Arts, and is a member 
of the Union and Metropolitan clubs, the Sons of the Kevolution, 
the Military Order of Foreign Wars, the Scientific Alliance, the 
Columbia College Alumni Association, and other scientific or his- 
torical organizations. He married, in 1868, Mary Coleman, daugh- 
ter of Eugene Augustus Livingston and Harriet Coleman, and has 
five sons and three daughters. lie is grandson of John Delafield, 
Count of the Holy Roman Empire, the famous merchant and founder 
of the Xew York family, througli his second son. Major Joseph Dela- 
field, and the latter's wife, Julia, daughtei- of .Judge Maturin Living- 
ston, of Staatsburgh, and Margaret, daughrci- of ( ieneral Morgan Lew- 
is, and granddaughter of Francis Lewis, signer of the Declaration of 
Independence. 

DELAFIELD, MATURIN LIVINGSTON, JR., son of the merchant 
of the same name, is associated with his father in business. He was 
born in New York City, and is a member of the Union, New York, 
Badminton, and Torrey Boat clubs, tlie Downtown Association, the 
Society of Colonial ^Vars, tlie Military Order of Foreign Wars, the 
Society of the War of 1812, and the Sons of the Revolution. 

MORRIS, AUGUSTUS NEWBOLD, is Nice-President of the Tlaza 
Bank, and a director of the National Horse Show Association and the 
Coney Island Jockey Club. He is one of the gentlemen who have in- 
terested themselves in efforts to reform the American turf. He has 
long been the owner of one of the best-known stables of racing thor- 
oughbreds. He inherited a large estate. Iianded doAvn through a line 
of illustrious ancestors. His beautiful country-seat at Pelham was 
accpiired by New York City as a i»art of its system of new parks. ]\rr. 
ilorris was born in \N'estchester County, June 3. 1838. was graduated 
from Columbia in 18()0, and has been an extensive traveler in Europe 
and the Orient. He is a member of the directing boards of several 
institutions of the city. He is a member of the Union and Metrojioli- 
tan clubs, and the Columbia Alumni Association. He married Elea- 
nor C, daugiiter of General James I. Jones, and has a son. Newbold 
Morris, and a daughter. Helen S. Kingsland. He is himself the son 
of the late William II. Morris and Hannah, daughter of Thomas New- 
bold, of this city; is the grandson of James :Morris and his wife, a Van 
Cortlandt. of Youkers, and is the great-grandson of General Lewis 
^loi-ris. signer of the Declaration of Independence. 

BELL, ISAAC, was long one of the most eminent and public-spir- 
ited citizens of New York City, where he was born, August 4, 1815, 



196 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

and where he died, September 30, 1897. He was successfully engaged 
in the cotton trade at Mobile, Ala., during the twenty years subse- 
quent to 1S3G, and was a member of the Alabama Legislature, and 
served on the staff of one of the governors of that State, with the rank 
of Captain. In 1S5G he returned to New York and engaged in the ship- 
ping business. Two of his vessels, Arago and Fulton, .were used as 
transports by the Federal Government during the Civil War. He 
was one of the organizers of the New York and Havre Steam Packet 
Company, and was its President. In 1S66 he was a principal founder 
of the Old Dominion Steamship Company, and for twenty-two years 
was its Vice-President. He was a director of the Farmers' Loan and 
Trust Company. lie was the principal founder of the Bellevue Medi- 
cal College, and was President of its Board of Trustees for thirty 
yeai-s. While he Avas a prominent member of Tammany Hall, he was 
one of the stanchest " Union " men in the city dunng the Civil War; 
was one of the leaders in organizing the Union Defense Committee 
of the State, and was its Vice-President, and untiring in its work. 
The occuiTence of the Draft liiots led him to organize in 1863, in con- 
junction with Leonard Jerome and Paul S. Forbes, the Riot Eelief 
Fund for the city police, and he was its manager until his death. He 
declined nominations for Mayor and Member of Congress, but served 
in connection with city institutions. He was a member of the Board of 
Supervisors, and subsequently became one of the governors of the 
almshouse, holding tlie position until the governors were displaced 
by the creation of the Department of Charities and CoiTections, when 
he became one of the original commissioners, while from 1860 to 
1873 he was President of the Board. He also served on the Board of 
Education, as he did on the Board of Immigration Commissioners. 
He was chiefly instrumental in organizing the school jointly controlled 
by tlie Charities and School Commissioners. For years he was Chair- 
man of the Executive Committee of the Normal College, of which he 
was likewise one of the most active founders. He was a founder of 
the Manhattan Club, and, at the time of his death, was one of the 
three senior members of the Union Club. He married, in 1814, Ade- 
laide, daughter of the celebrated Dr. Valentine Mott, and had one 
daugliter, the late ilrs. Janu^s L. Barclay, and tliree sous — tlie late 
Isaac Bell and the present Louis V. and Edward Bell. He was himself 
the son of Isaac Bell of Stamford, Conn., and ^Nlary, daughter of John 
Ellis; was the grandson of Isaac Bell, mill owner of Stamford and 
shipping merchant of New York City, who was a loyalist during the 
Revolution, and subsequently for years was Cliamberlain of the city 
of St. John, N. B., and was descended from Isaac Bell, who, in 1610, 
emigrated from Edinburgh to Connecticut. 

BELL, ISAAC, eldest son of the late Isaac Bell and Adelaide, 
daughter of Dr. Valentine Mott, was born in New York City in 1816, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 197 

aud died iu 1SS9. He was successfully engaged iu the cottou trade 
in this city for some time subsequent to the Civil War. He became 
United States Minister to the Netherlands by the appointment of 
President Cleveland in 1885. He was a delegate to the National 
Democratic Convention in St. Louis in 1888. He man-ied, in 1878, 
Jeanette, daughter of James Gordon Bennett, Sr., and was survived 
by Mrs. Bell, two daughters, and a son, the present Isaac Bell. 

BELL, ED^^'AED, has for many years been a stockbroker of New 
York, a member of the Stock Exchange, and is also engaged in the 
insurance business. He has served on the Board of Park Commission- 
ers of tliis city, as well as on the Board of Education. He is also 
custodian of the l»iot Iielief Fund for the New York police, which fund 
was founded by his father and two others in 1803, and of which his 
father was custodian until his death in 1897. Mr. Bell is a trustee 
of the Knickerbocker Apartment Company, and a member of the 
Union, ^Metropolitan, Manhattan, Democratic, and Shinnecock Golf 
clubs, and the DowntoAvn Association. He married Helen A., daugh- 
ter of Henry A. Wilmerding, and has a country-seat at Southampton, 
L. I. He was born in New Y'ork City, and is the third son and the 
second surviving son of the late eminent Isaac Bell and Adelaide, 
daughter of the late Dr. Yalentine Mott, the famous surgeon. 



•^s' 



OBB. ALEXANDER ECTOB. the distinguished grain merchant 
and eminent public citizen, has been in business in this city and a res- 
ident of Brooklyn since 1851. At the present time he is President of 
the Bapid Transit Commission, and an officer of a large unml)er of 
ccu'porations. He is President of the South Brooklyn Savings Insti- 
tution, Yice-President of the Mechanics' National Bank, a trustee of 
the United States Trust Company and the Brooklyn Institute of Arts 
and Sciences, and a director of the Bond and Mortgage Guarantee 
Company, the Fidelity and Casualty Company, the Guaranty Trust 
Company, the Title Guarantee and Trust Company, the Franklin 
Trust Company of Brooklyn, the National Bank of Commerce, the 
New York Produce Exchange, the New York Produce Exchange Safe 
Deposit and Storage Company, the Continental Insurance Company, 
the Union Ferry Company, the Union Ferry Company of New York 
and Brooklyn, Bartlett & Company, the Union Pacific Eailway Com- 
pany, the Erie Bailroad Company, the Chicago, Bock Island and Pa- 
cific Bailroad Company, the Oregon Short Line Railway Company, 
and the Junction City and Fort Kearney Railroad. He has been ac- 
tively connected with the New York Produce Exchange since 1859, 
and was prominent in its reorganization in 1871-2. and in procuring 
the erection of its present building. Almost annually between 1871 
and 1882 he appeared before committees of the Legislature to urge re- 
duction of the tolls on the State canals, aud in the latter year was a 



198 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK 

member of the Committee of Fifty which demanded free canal-. 
He was one of the commission of four appointed by Governor Tilden 
in 1S75 to investigate the management of the canals, their labors re- 
snlting in the exposure of the notorious canal frauds. He has also 
served many years as Chairman of the Arbitration Committee of the 
Produce Exchange. He has been an officer of this Exchange and of 
the Chamber of Commerce. Although a Republican at the time, in 
view of his warm jjersonal friendship for Samuel J. Tilden, he was 
elected to fill a vacancy in the Electoral College in which the vote of 
this State was cast for Tilden for President in 1876. For many year-s 
he has maintained an independent jtosition in politics, and has been 
active in movements to secure reform in local government in both 
Xew York and Brooklyn. He was a member of the Committee of Sev- 
entv which nominated Mavor Strong in 1894. and a leader in the 
'• Citizen "" movement which brought about the nomination of Seth 
Low for Mayor in 1897. He refused the nomination as Comptroller of 
Brooldyn offered him by both Republicans and Democrats in 1882, 
and refused the appointment as Comptroller of New York ofifered him 
by Mayor Edson in 1883. He is a patron and trustee of a consider- 
able number of benevolent or other public institutions of Brooklyn 
and yew York. He is of Scotch-Irish descent, born at Strabaue. 
County Tyrone. Ireland, the son of William Orr. Esq.. of that place, 
and a daughter of David Moore, Esq.. of Sheephill, ('ountA- London- 
derry. He was educated for a judicial or military commission with 
the East India Company, but for several years disabled by an acci- 
dent. HaA'ing ^^sited the United States in 1850. the next year he re- 
turned with letters of introduction to Xew York business men. and 
was employed successively by Ralph Post. Wallace & Wickes. and 
Da^id Dows & Company. He has been a member of the latter fiitn 
since 1861. He has been twice married, and has three daughters. 

HOGUET, ROBERT JOSEPH, was born in this city in August. 
1839. and from an early age has been connected with the well known 
firm of Wilmerding. Hoguet & Company, one of the founders of which 
was his father, the late Henry Louis Hoguet. He succeeded to his 
father's interest in the business of this house. He is also a trustee 
and Secretary- of the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank, of which 
his father was for many years President, and is A'ice-President of the 
Mechanics" and Traders' Bank. He is a member of the Merchants" 
and Catholic clubs. He married Marie Xoel. of French descent. 

BURDEN, JAMES ABERCROMBIE. President of the extensive 
Burden Iron ^^'orks, of Troy, X. Y., and formerly President of the 
Hudson River Ore and Iron Comjmny, and (»f the Engineers" Club of 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



190 



this city, was a Kepiiblican Presidential Elector in 188S, jis he was 
on the Republieau ticket of 1880. He occnpies his residence in this 
city durins>- the winter social season. He was born in Troy, \. V., 
Jannary 6, 1833, the sou of the late Henry Burden, noted inventor 
and founder of the Burden Iron Works. Haviuf;- been educated at 
the Kcnsselaer Polyteclmic Tustittitc, ami liavinii' learned the trade 
of niacliiiast and niill- 
wri^ht, he entered his 
fat iier's establishment 
and worked his way to 
its head. He is also an 
inviiitor, haviniLi' letters 
Itatent for various con- 
trivances in makinji 
liorseshoes, m a k i n i; 
Idooms, fettling pud- 
dling furnaces, heating 
furnaci's, for an inter- 
in i 1 1 e n t mechanical 
motion, and for sep- 
arating magnetic ore 
from its gangne. He is 
a member <d' the Pa- 
tiiarchs, the Union, 
Metropolitan, T' n i o n 
League, and Riding 
clubs, the Civil Engi- 
neers' Society, the [So- 
ciety of Mechanical En- 
giners, the Society ol 
Mining Engineers, and 
several foreign associa- 
tions. He married a 

daughter of Kitliard lr\ in, a New \n\k menhani, ami 
•Tames A., Jr., Richard Irvin. William 1'.. ami .\ithin- 




.lAMKS AllKltrlloMllIK UritllKX. 



liMs Idiif suns — 
Scott. 



CESXOLA, IJKll PAL:\I.\ ni, i> well kiinwn as tli<- dis.i.verer nf 
the Cyprus antiquities and as the author of " Cyprus, its Cities. Tombs, 
ami Temi)les" iimblished in London and New \dik i, while for many 
years he has been director of the Met ro])olilaii .Museum of Art of New 
York. He is a descendant of one ol ilie oldest families of the Pied- 
mont nobility, and was born in the town of Rivarolo Canavese. Italy. 
At the age of seventeen he took ])arl in i lie waragainst Austria forthe 
in<lei)endence of Italy, distinguislu'd himself at the battle of No\aia in 
184!t, and was promoted to a lieutemimy on that battlelield f<u- merit. 
Aftei- till' war In- was sent to the [Military .\.ademy of Cherasco for 



200 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

two years. At the end of the rear ISGO, lie eini,i;rated to New York. 
In October, ISGl, he joined the Union Army as Major of the Eleventh 
Eegiment, New York Cavalry, was soon promoted to Colonel, and 
served in this capacity through the Civil War. At the battle of Aldie, 
Va., he Avas severely wounded, was taken prisoner, and incarcerated 
in Libby Prison for nine months. Such was the courage displayed by 
him in the above-mentioned battle that General Judsou Kilpatrick 
presented him witli his own sword. President Lincoln made him 
Brigadier-General, and at the end of the war appointed him Consul of 
the United States to Cyprus. During the eleven years of his residence 
at Cyprus he explored the island and discovered — together with 
thousands of other objects of great archaeological value and impor- 
tance — the statues, the inscriptions, the architectural fragments and 
sarcophagi of Oiolgoi, and the treasure of Curium, consisting for the 
most part of gold and silver jewels of niagnificeut unique workman- 
ship, all of whicli are now in possession of the Metropolitan ^luseum 
of Art. These discoveries have been recognized as forming the Cdu- 
necting link between the art of ancient Egypt and Assyria and the art 
of Greece; Sir Henry Layard, the illustrious discoverer of Nineveh, 
declared that " they add a new and most important chapter to the his- 
tory of art and archa'ology." Sir Charles Newton stated that ''they 
have revolutionized all the existing theories upon ancient art." In 
England, France, Italy, and Germany it was considered " a European 
misfortune " that these treasures should be sold to the New York 
Metropolitan Museuui of Art, and made less acessible to the savants 
of the old world. (Jeneral di Cesnola is a member of many learned 
societies of Europe and America, including the Academy of Sciences 
of Turin, the IJoyal Society of London, the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences of Boston, and the American Institute of Archi- 
tects. Columbia and Princeton universities have conferred upon him 
the degree of LL.D. The King of Italy knighted liim, also honoring 
him with a specially coined gold medal appropriately inscribed. In 
December, 1897, the Congress of the United States presented him with 
the Congressional Medal. 

CROSBY, JOHN SCHUYLER, an oflicer of the United States army 
from the outbreak of the Civil War until his resignation in 1871, since 
tliat time has held eminent positions in civil life. He has been Gov- 
ernor of Montana, under President Arthur was Assistant Postmaster- 
General of the United States, subsequently was United States Consul 
at Florence, Italy, and still later was School Commissioner of New 
York City. He received the oi'der of the Crown of Italy with the rank 
of Chevalier from King Victor Emanuel, and in 1877 received from 
Secretary John Sherman a gold medal of the first class for life-saving 
in recognition of his lira very tlie year ])i'evious in saving Edith ^lay 
from the founderinii vacht ^lohawk, owned bv William A. Garner, and 



I 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 201 

his retni'u to the cabin to save Mrs. Garuer and Miss Huuter, reuiaiu- 
ing on board until the vessel was under water. lie is a member of 
the Union, Metropolitan, Tuxedo, Knickerbocker, and St. Nicholas 
clubs of New York City, and the Metropolitan and Country clubs of 
Washington. He has been presented at the courts of St. James, 
Borne, and Constantinople. Born at Quedar Knoll, near Albany, N. Y., 
September 10, 18o!», he was educated at the University of the City of 
New York. In 1859 he crossed South America from Valparaiso to 
Montevideo. He entered the Union Army as Second Lieutenant of 
the First New York Artillery, served on the staffs of Banks, Canby, 
and Sheridan; Avas once wounded, four tiiiies was brevetted for gal- 
lanti*y, and was specially mentioned by President Lincoln for carry- 
ing dispatches to Farragut througli tlie enemy's country. He is the 
son of the late Hon. Clarkson Floyd Crosby, a member both of the 
New York Assembly and Sonat(\, nud his wife, Angelica, daughter of 
Colonel John Scliuyler and 3[aria IMiller; is the grandson of William 
Bedlow Crosby, the wealtliy pliilanthropist of this city, and liis wife, 
Harriet Clarkson, granddaughter of Floyd Clarkson, signer of the 
Declaration of Independence, and is great-grandson of Dr. Ebenezer 
Crosby, surgeon of Wasliington's Life (iuards. He married in lS(i3 
Harriet, daughter of General Stei)hen Van Rensselaer, last patroon of 
Rensselaerwyck, and great-granddaughter of General Philip Schuyler 
and Alexander Hamilton. They have a daugliter and a son, Stephen 
Van Keusselaer Crosby. 

CROSBY, ERNEST HOWARD, a lawyer of New York City, was a 
member of the New York Assi-mbly fnunilSSG to 1881), and, while a Re- 
publican, distinguished himself by his independent course in support 
of sound legislation and in opposition to that of another character. 
By appointment of President Harrison he was Judge of the Inter- 
national Court in Alexandria, Egypt, from 1889 to 1891, resigning 
during the latter year. He has been active in reform movements and 
in connection with philanthropic work in this city. He is a member 
of the Bar Association of the city, and the Sous of the Revolution. He 
married Fanny Kendall, daughter of the late Henry Maunsall Schief- 
felin, of New York City. He is the sou of the late and eminent Rev. 
Howard Crosby, D.D., LL.D., grandson of William Bedlow Crosby, 
who being the sou of the favorite niece of Colonel Henry Rutgers, be- 
came the hitter's iieir, and was one of the largest owners of real estate 
in the United States; is great-grandson of Dr. Ebenezer Crosby, who 
was graduated from Harvard in 1777; was surgeon in Washington's 
Life Guards, became a profi^ssor in Colnnihia College, and married 
Catherine, daughter of William Bedlow and niece of Colonel Henry 
Rutgers, and is great-great-grandson of Judge Joseph Crosby, of 
Braiutree, Mass. 



202 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW" YORK. 



MeCALL, JOHN AUGU^STINE, President of the Is'ew York Life 
Insnrauce Company since 1892, has made a remarlcable record in con- 
nection with insnrance institutions in this State. Born in Albany, 
:N'. Y.. in 1849. the son of the kite John Au.nustine McCall, of that city, 
he attended the Albany schools, and having- been graduated in 18GS 
from the Albany Commercial College, soon after became bookkeeijer 
in the Albany office of the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany. Later he engaged in real estate and insurance business, but 
presently became a clerk in the State Insurance Department. From 
1870 to 1872 he Avas in the actuarial division. In 1872 he had charge 
for a while of the statistical work connected with the reports, and the 

same year was appointed ex- 
aminer of comitanies. From 
187(5 to 1883 he was Deputy 
Sii]>criiitendent of the Depart- 
ment. In this capacity, in spite 
of strong opposition, he set 
himself to expose the fraudu- 
Iput luactices of many con- 
lerus, and as a result forced 
out of business some eighteen 
life insurance companies in 
this State, a large number of 
fire insurance companies, and 
lifteen (•()mi)anies of other 
States. Several insurance offi- 
cials were tried and convicted 
as a consequence. In 188:'', 
Governor Cleveland appointed 
liini Superintendent of the r>e- 
]>artu)(Mit. enabling him to 
cari-y out other reforms and to 
place the insurance business of 
the State on a sounder basis 
than it had hitherto known. 
Declining the ofler of Governor Hill to reappoint him, he became 
Com|)troller of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of this city. 
His election to his juvsent position followed the exposiire of the 
management of the New York Life Insurance Company, made 
through the medium of the Xew York Tiiins by its cashier. Theodore 
^I. lianta. Mr. McCall is also a trustee of the American Surety Com- 
pany and I he Xew York Security and Trust Company, and a director 
of the Central National Bank, the National City Bank, the National 
Surety Company, and the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. 
He is a member of the Metropolitan. City. Colonial. Manhattan. Mer- 
chants', and Lawvf'vs" clubs. I le in.iiried .M;n\ I. llarau. 




JOHN AUGUSTINE lUCALL. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 2'')3 

HYDE, HEIS'EY BALDWIN, has beeu couuected with iusuiaucc 
interests throughout nearly his entire business career, and is Presi- 
dent of the notabhi' Equitable Life Assurance Society of this city. 
Born February ."i. 1S44. lie is the sou of Henry llazeu Hyde, of Cats- 
kill, N. Y.. and Lucy Bakhviu. daughter of Kev. James Beach and 
Hannah C. Baldwin, of Winsted. Conn., and descends from William 
Hyde, one of tlie founders of Hartford. Conn., who accompanied Kev. 
Thomas Hooker from England. He is a member of the Union, ITuion 
League. Biding. Lawyers', Westminster Kennel, and Southside 
Sportsmen's elubs. Mr mariied Anna Fitch, and has a son — James 
Hazen Hyde. 

McCUBDY. IHriLVKl) ALDIHCH. President of the Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, has been connected Avith this cori)oration in vari- 
ous relations throughout nearly his entire business career. He is also 
a director of the National ITnion Bank, the Bank of New Amsterdam, 
the United States ;Mi)rtgag<' and Trust Company, the Lawyers' Surety 
C'ompany, the Guaranty Trust Company, the Continental Insurance 
Company, and the Intcin.itional Bell Tel<'i)li()ne Company. He is a 
member of the ^letropolilan. Union League. 3Ianhattan, Morristowu, 
and Lawyers' clubs, and the New England Society. He married, in 
1850. Sarah Ellen, daughter of Charles Cottin Little, of Boston, and 
has a daughter. 31 rs. Louis A. Thebaud. and a son, Kobert Henry 
McCurdy. Born January 2;t, 1835, ^h: McCurdy is himself the son 
of the late Bohert Henry ^IcCurdy. eminent drygoods commission 
merchant of this city, and Certrude Mercer, daughter of Dr. James 
Lee, of Newark, N. J., and niece of Chancellor Theodore Frelinghuy- 
seu. United States Senator fi-om New Jersey, and candidate in 1811 for 
Vice-President of the United States. 

HEALD. DANIEL A1>1)1S0N. has been President of the Home In- 
surance Company of New York since 1888, having been its General 
Agent from 185G to 1808, its Second Mce-President from 1808 to 1883, 
and its Frst Vice-President from 1883 to 1888. He is a trustee of 
the Holland Trust Company, and a director of the National Baidc of 
North America and the National Surety Comiiauy of New York. 
There are good reasons for styling him the leading fire underwriter 
of the United States. He was one of the prime movers in the or- 
ganization of the National Board of Fire Underwriters in July. 1800. 
and long served as Chairman of its Executive Committee, as well as 
President of the organization. He has delivered many addresses on 
his chosen life's work, that on " Fire Underwriting as a Profession," 
read at Chicago in September, 1880, before the Fire Underwriters' 
Association of the Northwest, being especially notable. For nearly 
forty years he has been a prominent member of the New York Board 



204 



HISTbRY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



of Fire Uuderwriters. iu ruiiUL-etiuu with whicli lie lias held mauy of- 
ficial positions. He was born at Chester, Vt., May 4, 1818, the son of 
Amos Heald and a dausihter of Captain Edwards, a Revohitionary 
soldier nnder AA'ashiniiton. His paternal ijrandfather was also a Eevo- 
Intionary soldier, and participated in the battles of Lexington and 
Bunker Hill. Tlic lirst American ancestor on the paternal side em- 
i.urntcd from IJerwick. England, to Concord, Mass., in 1635. Mr. 

Heald worked on his father's farm 
nntil sixteen rears of age, sinut 
two years at a preparatory school 
at Meriden, N. H., entered Yale 
College in 1837, and was grad- 
uated in 1811. He read law while 
at Vale nnder Judge Daggett, of 
New HaA'eii, and for two years in 
the oflice of Judge Washburn, of 
Ludlow, Vt., and in May, 1843, was 
admitted to the Vermont bar. In 
connection with his law business 
he also conducted a fire insurance 
business as agent of the ^tna and 
other companies of Hartford, 
Conn. His success led to his ap- 
pointment to the general agency of 
the Home Insurance Company, 
then a young company, iu 185(i. 
At that time this company had 
assets of less than -IfOOO.OOO. I'hey are now over $11,000,000, notwith- 
standing such coufiagrations as those of Portland, Me., St. John, X. B., 
Chicago, and Boston. 



>/-•• 




■ i 


\ 


't 


^ 0^ 




:±i 


% 


V Si 




.. fi 




Cfe 



I>ANItL ADIIISIJN HK.ALI>. 



ROCKEFELLEK, JOHN D., eldest son of William A. Rockefeller 
and Eliza Davidson, of Tioga Co., N. Y., where he was born in 1839, 
has been a resident of New York City for mauy years. He has won a 
national reputation through his financiering skill in connection with 
the industry of petroletim refining, and has amassed the largest 
private fortune owned by an individual in the United States. His 
gifts to the Chicago University aggregate four or five million dol- 
lars. He has also been a liberal patron of other educational in- 
stitutions, as well as of churches and organizations under the 
auspices of the Baptist denomination. He was educated at Owego, 
N. Y., and in the public schools of Cleveland, Ohio, whither his 
father removed in 1851. He held the positions of Clerk and 
Bookkeeper and Cashier in a Cleveland business house between 
the ages of sixteen and nineteen, and then entered the firm of 
Clark & Rockefeller. Reorganized as Andrews, Clark & Company 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF XEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 205 

io 1800, they engaged iu oil reliniug. Five .years later Clark's interest 
was acquired by the other two partners, Samnel Andrews and John 
D. Eockefeller, who combined with Mr. Kockefeller's brother under 
the style of William Rockefeller & Company. This company con- 
structed the famous Standard Oil Works in Cleveland. William 
Rockefeller came to Xew Yoik to manage the Eastern interests. In 
1867 occui'red another reorganization. Henry M. Flagler was a<l- 
mitted to partnershiji, while lioth in Cleveland and New York the busi- 
ness was transacted under the style of Rockefeller, Andrews cS; Flag- 
ler. In 1870 the Standard Oil Company of Ohio was incoi-porated, 
John D. Rockefeller becoming its President and William Rockefeller 
its Vice-President. In 1881 the Standard Oil Trust was organized 
with John D. Rockefeller as its President and William Rockefeller as 
Vice-President, while at tlie same time the Standard Oil Company 
of ^'ew York was incorpoi*ated, William Rockefeller becoming its 
President and John D. Rockefeller its Vice-President. In 1892 the 
form of a trust was abandoned, ilr. Rockefeller is a director of the 
Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad Company, and a member of the 
Baptist Club, the New England Society, and the Sons of the American 
Revohttion. 

ROCKEFELLER, WILLIAM, boin iu Tioga County, N. Y.. in 1841, 
is the second son of William A. Rockefeller and Eliza Davidson, and 
was educated in an academy at Owego, N. Y., and in the public 
schools of Cleveland, Ohio. He was bookkeeper with a Cleveland firm 
from 1858 to 1860, and in the latter year became bookkeeper with the 
produce commission firm of Hughes cS: Lester. Upon the retirement 
of one of the partners in 1862 he became a member of the firm under 
the style of Hughes & Rockefeller, and so remained until 1865. Hav- 
ing acquired considerable capital he then withdrew to become 
senior member of the oil retining business which had been established 
in a small way by his brother, John D. Rockefeller. The firm style 
became William Rockefeller & Company, and the Standard Oil Works 
were erected in Cleveland. The same year, 1865, William Rockefeller 
removed to New York City and established the allied firm of Rocke- 
feller & Company, of which he was head. Upon the organization of 
the Standard Oil Company of Ohio in 1870 he became its Vice-Presi- 
dent, his brother being its President. He was also Vice-President of 
the Standard Oil Trust during its existence from 1881 to 1802. In 
1881 was also incorporated the Standard Oil Company of New York, 
whicli is now the principal corporation. William Rockefeller has 
been its President since the beginning. He is also a member of the 
Board of Jklanagers of the Delaware. Lackawanna and Western Rail- 
road Company, a trustee of the :\Iutual Life Insurance Company and 
the Consolidated Gas Company, and a director of the Second National 
Bank, the National City Bank, the Hanover National Bank, the 



206 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Leather Mauiifacturers' >satiunal Bank, the Brooklyn Union Gas 
Company, the National Transit Company, the New York Transit Com- 
pany, the New York, New Haven and Hartford Eailroad Company, 
the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Kailroad Company, and the Chicago, 
Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad Company. He is a member of the 
Metropolitan, Union League, Riding, and New Y'ork Yacht clubs, and 
the New England Society. He married in ISGi Almira Geraldine 
Goodsell, of Fairfield, Conn., and has two sons — ^W'illiam G. and Percy 
Avery Rockefeller, and two daughters — the wife of Dr. David Hunter 
McAlpin, Jr., and Ethel Geraldine Rockefeller. 

SMITH, CHARLES STE\\'ART, for seven years President of the 
Chamber of Commerce, is eminent alike as a drygoods commission 
merchant, a financier, and an agitator for better local government. 
He was one of the most active members of the Committee of Seventy 
which nominated and secured the election of Mayor Strong, following 
the exposure of corruption by the Lexow Investigating Committee. 
Long a trustee of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, he has been one of 
its liberal supporters. At the present time he is Treasurer of Wood- 
lawn Oemeteiw, Treasurer of the City and Suburban Homes Company, 
a trustee of the United States Trust Company and the Greenwich 
Savings Bank, and a director of the Fourth National Bank, the Mer- 
chants' National Bank, the Fifth Avenue Bank, the Equitable Life As- 
surance Society, the German-American Insurance Company, the Pitts- 
burg, Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad Com])any, the United States 
Rubber Company, the Associates' Land Company, and the Mossberg 
and Granville Manufacturing Company. He was born in Exeter, N. H., 
March 2, 1S32, his father being pastor of a Congregational Church in 
that place. His ancestors were among the early settlers of Connecti- 
cut. Coming to New York at the age of fifteen, he was employed in a 
drygoods jobbing house. Subsequently he was connected with S. B. 
Chittenden & Company, being their European buyer for several years. 
In 18G5 he became a member of the firm of Cieorge C. Ricliardson & 
Company, of Boston and New York, successors of the famous firm of 
A. and A. Lawrence & Company. On January 1, 1884, the firm style 
became George C. Richardson, Smith & Company, and July 1. 1885, 
became Smith, Hogg & Gardner, [Mr. Smith being head of the firm. 
In 1887 he retired. He has been twice mari-ied and has two sons. 

:M0RRIS, lewis, Cluef Justice of Colonial New York and New 
Jersey, and founder in this country of a distinguished family (see cut 
in this work, Volume II, p. 503), was born in New York City in H171, 
and died in Kingsburw. N. J., May 21, ITlfi. His father, Richard 
]Moms, had been an officer in Cromwell's army. His parents having 
died during his infancy, he was brought up by his uncle, a large landed 
in-oprietor of :MoiTisania. Lewis ;Morris was bred to the law and was a 



EN'CYCLOPEDI A OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. "207 

leading; lawycv of bis day in New York and New Jersey. In Kiitl' be 
was appointed to tbe beneb of tlie Sui)erior Conrt of Xew Jersey. He 
also entered tbe coxmoil of Governor ( "ornbnry, but contended against 
tbe latter's corrupt procedures and wa> expelled. He tben induced tbe 
Xew Jersey Assembly to draw u]i an indicnnent of Cornbury, and, per- 
sonally presenting tbis document to (,)ueen Anne, secured Cornbury's 
recall. Jtist after baring been appointed second jtistice of the New 
Jersey Sujjreme Court, and before taking bis seat. Morris resigned tbis 
appointment to accept that of Chief Justice of New York and New 
Jersey. Coveruor Cosby subsequently removed him from tbis office 
for his temerity in deciding against tbe Governor in tbe famous case of 
Cosb,^' vs. "\"an Dam. ilorris was cbieHy instrumental in securing tbe 
separation of New Y'ork and New Jersey. He was Governor of New 
Jersey from IToS until bis death in ITiG, having been Acting Governor 
of that colony in 1731, and a member of its council from 1710 to 1738. 
One of his sons, Lewis Jlorris, was also a New Y'ork lawyer, and be- 
came Chief Justice of the Vice- Admiralty Court. Tbe latter was tbe 
father, by different wives, of Lewis ^Morris, signer of the Declaration of 
Independence, and the famous Gouverneur Morris. 

:\f()RRI8, GOU^'ERNEUR. was born in Morrisania, January 31, 
1752. and died there November 6, ISlfi. He was graduated from King's 
College, now Columbia, in 1768, and in 1771 was admitted to the New 
York bar. He practiced for some time, but presently found himself 
engrossed as a legislator, statesman, and diplomat. He served many 
terms in the New York Assembly, and was a member of tbe legislati\e 
committee which drafted tbe State Constitution of 177(j. He was 
active in the patriot cause throughout tbe lievolutionary period, and 
was a prominent and acti\e member of various Continental con- 
gresses. A delegate to tbe convention which framed tbe Cons-titution 
of the United States, tbe final revision (.f that instrument was assigned 
to him. He was tbe confidental agent of tbe Thirteen Colonies in ar- 
ranging the terms of peace at the close of tbe Revolution. He was 
United States Minister to France at tbe time of tbe French Revolu- 
tion. He was elected to tbe United States Senate from the State of 
New Y'ork, and in that body defended the judbiary system under the 
United States Constitution when its abolition was proposed. 

KENT. JAMES, did more perhaps than any other one man to estab- 
lish American equity jurisprudence on a scientific foundation. He 
was born in Philippi. Putnam County, N. Y., July 31, 1763, and 
<lied in New York City, December 12, 1847. His father. [Nfoses Kent, 
was gTaduated from Yale, practiced law in Dutchess County, New 
York, and was Surrogate of Rensselaer County. His grandfather, 
Elisba Kent, a Yale gradnate. was the son of a Connecticut farmer. 
The Chancellor's mother was a daughter of Rev. Moss, a Presbyterian 



208 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

cJeriivinau. James Keut was graduated from Yale iu ITSl, aud 
studied law with Egbert Benson. He soon after formed a legal part- 
nership with Gilbert Livingston, of Poiighkeepsie. He was a Federal- 
ist, and in 1790 A\as elected to the Xew York Assembly, in 1792 being 
re-elected. In 1793 he removed to New York City, and by Governor 
John Jay was appointed Master in Chancery. The same year he was 
appointed professor of law in Columbia College. He was elected to 
tlie Assembly from New Y^ork City in 179C. The next year he was ap- 
pointed Kecorder of New York City, but within a few months resigned 
to accept his appointment as Judge of the Supreme Court. He served 
on this bench until 1811, while from 1801 he was Chief Justice. His 
decisions have been reported by Caiues and Johnson, aud form " the 
A'ery fountain-head of common-law learning in America, and are daily 
referred to and cited iu our courts."" Appointed Chancellor of this 
State to succeed i /a using in 1814, he held the office until 1823, when he 
reached the constitutional age limit. He was the first Chancellor 
whose decisions were reported, while the range of questions which 
caiiic before him, together with the research and judicial soundness 
displayed iu his opinions, united in making these reports the basis of 
Ameiican equity jurisprudence. In 1822 he was a member of the con- 
vention which revised the State Constitution. From 1823 until his 
deatli he practiced law as chamber counsel in New Y'ork City, while at 
the same time delivering lectures on law at Columbia College. Out of 
these lectures grew his famoiis " Commentaries,"' whicli were first pub- 
lished in 1826-30, aud have been accorded a place beside those of Sir 
^Vil]iam Blackstone. 

KENT, WILLIAM!, sou of Chancellor James Kent, was a prominent 
lawyer in New York <"ity, and one of the organizers of the law faculty 
of the University of the City of New York. He was one of the original 
lecturers in the law department of this institution. By appointment 
of Governor Seward, he was Cii'cuit Judge of the First Circuit from 
1841 to 1846, and during the following year was profes^sor of law at 
Harvard College. He was born in 1802 and died at Fishkill, N. Y.. 
January 4, 1861. His mother was Elizabeth Bailey, sister of 
United States Senator Theodorus Bailey. 

KENT, WILLIAM, who has been successfully engaged in the prac- 
tice of law in this city since 1878, is the son of the late James Kent 
and Sarah Ii-viug. daughter of Edwin Clark. He is a grandson of 
Judge William Kent, great-grandson of Chancellor James Kent, and 
ninth in lineal descent from Samuel Kent, who was settled at 
Gloucester, Mass., prior to 1640. His mother was a grandniece of 
Washington Irving, and the granddaughter of his elder brother. 
Judge John Treat Irving. Through her Mr. Kent is also ninth in 
lineal descent from Egbert Van Borsum and Annetje Hendricks, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 209 

whose iiiarriagx', iu New Auisterdam iu 1G39, was the first performed 
iu ja cliurok iu this city of which there is a record. Mr. Kent was 
graduated from Columbia College in 1878, studied law, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar, and has been engaged iu active practice iu the city 
since. He was born at Fishkill Lauding, N. Y., March 19, 1858, and 
maintains his residence at Tuxedo Park. He is a member of the 
Union, Tuxedo, Fencers', Isew York Yacht, and Delta Phi clubs, the 
Columbia College Alumui Association, and the Bar Associatiou of 
the cit}'. 

P.UEK, AAl\OX, in his variegated career, affords a striking ex- 
ample of brilliant intellect without conscience in American ])ublic life. 
He was the sou of Uev. Aaron Burr and the graiulsou of Jonathan 
EdAvai'ds. His father was the founder of I'rinceton College and its 
President. Burr seems to have had deep religious couvictions himself 
when a young man, but threw thcni off, became an infidel, and dclili- 
erately decided to go through the world substituting gentlemanly 
courtesy for principle. Uis maxim in legal ]U'actice was, " Law is 
whatever is boldly asserted and i)lausibly maintained." IJe was born 
iu Newark, X. J., Februai-y (J, 1756, and died at Port Richmond, 
S. I., September 14, lS3(i. He was graduated from Princeton 
College at the age of sixteen, lie was studying law at Litchfield, 
Conn., with his brother-in-law. Tapping lleeve, when the battle of 
Lexington occurred. He joined the American forces at Boston, and 
accompanied the exiiedition of Benedict Arnold against Quebec. He 
carried a message from Arnold at Quebec to Moutgoniei-A', a pei-ilous 
task, and as aid to Montgomerj- particiiiated in the assault on Quebec. 
But he quarreled with Arnold, and retiirning to New York, became a 
member of Washington's staff. Within six weeks he rpiarreled with 
Washington, withdrawing to join Putnam's staff. In 1777 Washing- 
ton assigiied him to the command of a regiment as Lieuteuant-Colouel. 
He acted with the Conway cabal to undermine Washington, who 
nevertheless sought to favor and placate him. Burr wintered at A^al- 
ley Forge in 1777-78, subsequently comma uding a biigade at the battle 
of Monmouth. AVashingtou assigiied him to maintain order in West- 
chester County, with \\'hite Plains as his headquarters. In March, 
1770, Burr resigned from the army, while soon after he resumed the 
study of law with Judge Paterson, of New Jersey, and Thomas Smith, 
the semi-Tory, of Haverstraw, N. Y. Burr was admitted as an 
attorney at Albany in January, 1782, and as a counselor in the follow- 
ing April. He had not studied for the required period, but himself 
nioved the suspension of the rules on the ground of special privilege, 
in view of his military seiwice. He began practice at Albany, soon 
after marrying Mrs. Theodosia Prevost, widow of a British ofrtcer. 
She was ten years Burr's senior, and the mother of two sons. By her 
Burr had his'ouly child, Theodosia, who subsequently married Joseph 




(/. 



^n^AM-^ i' 





j^y^U^ M-^/i.rrUc 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 211 

111 IS'JG he succeeded agaiut^t James C. ('arter in iiiaiutaiiiinii ilic uii- 
coiistitutioiiality of the iiiconie tax law, iii the tir.st heai-iug before t lie 
ruited States Supreme Court securiui; exemi)tiou from taxation for 
corporate and vested interests, and in the second hearing obtaining 
the condemnation of the remaining features of the law. He has Ions 
been an active and intluential leader of the Republican party, fre- 
quently being at the head of the element in protest against the scan- 
dals of machine domination. At different times, and notably in 1897, 
he was prominently named as IJepubliran candidate for the United 
States Senate, lie was President of Ww ("(institutional ( "onvention of 
1894. In tlie fall of 1897 he took a prominent pai-t in advocacy of the 
election of Seth Low, the citizens' candidate for Mayor of New York 
under the new cliarter. In -lanuaiy, 1S!)!I. he was appointed by Presi- 
dent jMcKinley and conlirined by tiie Senate as United States Min- 
ister to England. He lias l)een I'resident of the Uiuon League 
Club and of the New England Society, and is also a member of the 
Metropolitan, Century, University, City, Ifiding, Harvard, New York 
Athletic, and other clubs and societies. He is a director of the New 
York Life Insurance and Trust Company, the Gennan- American In- 
surance Com])any. and tlie Eagle l''ire Com])any. He is of the same 
family as the famous Rufiis Choate, a des(<'ndant of John Choate, who 
settled at Ipswich, Mass., some time ] trior to Ififi-l, and was born in 
Salem, ]Mass.. January 2h 18.32. He was graduated from Harvard in 
1852, from the Dane Law School in 1854, and was admitted to the 
Massachusetts bar in 1855, and to the New York bar in 185fi, upon 
his removal to this city. 

GERARD, JAMES WATSON, the first of three lawyers of three 
generations who have borne this name, two of whom are still engaged 
in legal practice in this city, was one of the leaders of the New York 
Bar in his day. He w^as born in this city in 1794, was graduated from 
Columbia College in ISll, joined tlie "' Iron Greys " for defense of the 
city against the British in 1812, and was admitted to the bar in 181G. 
He retired from active practice in 18(59, although his death did not 
occur until February 7, 1871. iM-ederic R. Coudert has playfully re- 
ferred to " the ]>olish and wit of his French ancestry, his inexhanstible 
hoiilKiiiiif and good nature, his irresistible facility and felicity in win- 
ning juries over to the wrong side, on which he was most at home." 
And he adds: " • Never attack your adversary with a bludgeon,' the 
writer once heard him say, • nni him through with a rapier." He lived 
n]) to his own precept. He ran his adversary gracefnily and thorough- 
ly through the vital ])arts, and when he was sure that his victim was 
thorougiily dead he held out his hand to help him to his feet." He 
served as School Trustee and Inspector. The uniforming of the police 
force was mainly his achievement. He was a chief founder of t he first 
House of Refuge, the incorporation of wliicli he secni-eil in 1S2.".. His 



212 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

fatliei", William Gerard, son of Robert, was of a French Huguenot 
stock which had taken root in Scotland, where he was born. Coming 
to New York prior to 1780 he engaged in business, and married here 
Christina Glass, who had emigrated from Scotland to Xew York with 
her widowed mother just before the Kevolution. She was the daugh- 
ter of John Glass, of Tain, Scotland; sister of Alexander S. Glass, mer- 
chant of New York; niece of Dr. Alexander Monroe, one of the found- 
ers of the Uuiyersity of Edinburgh, and grandniece of Sir Thomas 
Hector Monroe, Governor of the East Indies. James Watson Gerard 
himself married Eliza, daughter of Hon. Increase Sumner, of Boston, 
Governor and Chief Justice of Massachusetts. Her brother, Genei'al 
William H. Sumner, was Aid-de-camp during the War of 1812 to Gov- 
ernor Strong, of ^Massachusetts. 

GERARD, JA:MES WATSON, well-kuown lawyer of New York 
City, is the son of the late eminent lawyer of the same name. He was 
born in this city, was gradtiated from Columbia College with vale- 
dictorian honors in 1843, and studied law, and long practiced in asso- 
ciation with his father, continuing the Inisiness alone after his father's 
retirement in 18<)0. He is a recognized authority in real estate law, 
with which specialty he has long been identified, and is author of the 
standard legal work, " Titles to Real Estate in the State of New York.'' 
He is author of several historical studies, including " The Peace of 
Utrecht." He has been a member of the Board of Education of New 
York, and was a member of the State Senate in 18T(! and 1877. He is 
a member of the Union, Tuxedo, and Players' clubs, the St. Nicholas 
Society, and the Columbia Alumni Association. Through his mother 
he is descended from William Sumner, who became a freeman of Dor- 
chester, Mass., prior to 1037, having emigrated from Bicester, Oxford- 
shire, England. He married in 1866 Jenny, daughter of Hon. B. F. 
Angel, who was United States ^linister to Sweden. ]Mrs. Gerard is a 
descendant of Elder Brewster of the Mayflower, and is Yice-President 
of the Society of Colonial Dames. 

GERARD, JAMES WATSON, is the son of the pre.-cnt James Wat- 
son Gerard and his wife, datighter of the late Hon. B. F. Angel, United 
Slates Minister to Sweden, and is the grandson of the late James 
Watson Gerard and his wife, daughter of Hon. Increase Sumner, 
Chief Justice of Massachusetts as well as Governor of that State. The 
third in three consecutive generations to bear his name, like his father 
and his gi'andfather, he was born in this city, was graduated from 
Cohimbia College, and has embraced the law as a profession. He is 
associated with his father in practice, making a specialty of real 
estate law. He is a member of the Country, Fencers", and New York 
Athletic chibs, the Sons of the American Revolution, the City Bar 
Association, the Society of IMcdical Jui-isprndence, and the Columbia 
Alumni Association. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



213 



WHITNEY, WILLIAM COLLINS, Secretary of the Navy during- 
the first term of President Cleveland, wliile descended from distin- 
guished ancestry and enjoying high social position, is widely known 
for his energy, vigorous administrative (lualities, reform siiirit, and 
tact and generalship withal. After graduating from Yale College 
in 1863 and spending a year at the Harvard Law School, he began the 
practice of law in New Y'ork City. In 1S71 he was one of the 
founders of the Y'oung Men's Democratic Club, and in 1872 one 
of the organizers of the County Democracy, receiving an api^oint- 
ment as Inspector of Schools. In 1875 he was appointed Corpo- 
ration Counsel of New York City, and distinguished himself in that 
office. " The field of duty upon whicli he thus entered was a difficult 
and arduous one, on ac- 
count of neglect of diity by 
his predecessors and gen- 
eral lack of administrative 
capacity and straightfor- 
ward method in the con- 
duct of affairs under pre- 
ceding conditions. He 
found no less than three 
thousand eiglit liundred 
suits pending, a weight of 
responsibility which he 
hastened to sweep awaj'. 
He at once reorganized the 
department with four 
bureaus of administration, 
introduced reforms and 
economies wherever possi- 
ble, and so rai^idly disposed 
of the pending suits that in 
two years he had handled 

them all and as many more which had arisen. Despite the great accu- 
mulation of work thus disposed of, he considerably reduced the ex- 
penses of the office, and became dis-tinguishcd for his spirit of reform. 
He resigned the position in 1882, having, during the seven years of his 
incumbency, gained various notable legal triumphs, and won a high 
reputation for legal skill and executive capacity." He warmly sup- 
ported Cleveland for President in 1884, and was called into his Cabi- 
net as Secretary of the Navy the following spring. Although a small 
nucleus for the " new navy "' had been obtained during the preceding 
administration, he must be credited with having made the country 
independent in the matter. During his term there were completed or 
under construction five double-tun-eted monitors, two coast-defense 
vessels, armorclads, three armored and five unarmored steel and 




WII.I.IAM COLI.IXS WHITXKY. 



214 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

iron rniisei-s, four iiuiihoats, and a dynamite cruiser. lUit greater by 
far was liis aebieveuieiit iu securiug tlie establishmeut uf wurlcs iu this 
country for producing armor plating aud forgiugs for guns, which 
liad i)reviuusly been imported. I'or example, he induced the Beth- 
lehem Steel ^\'orks to erect a new plant. As a result, ^ hereas at that 
time we sent abroad for our materials, foreign nations are now having 
warslii])s and large guns made in this country. In 1S!»2 he skillfully 
led the Cleveland forces in the Democratic National Convention, btit 
refused to return to public life. 

Similar energy in private life has made him a prominent figure 
iu the financial world. He is largely interested in Metropolitan Trac- 
tion securities, and is a director of the Second Avenue Kailroad and 
the Christoplior and Tenth Street Railroad. He is a director of the 
Guarantee Trust Company, the Fifth Avenue Trust Company, the 
National Union Bank, the Plaza Bank, the New York Loau and In- 
vestment Company, the Manufacturing luvestmeut Company, the 
Mergenthaler Linotype Company, the Metropolitan Opera and Real 
Estate Company, the National Horse Show Association, and the So- 
ciety for the IM-eveution of Cruelty to Children. He is likewise trustee 
of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York aud trustee of 
the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In 1888 Yale University conferred 
upon him the degree of LL.D. Born in Conway, Mass., July 5, 1841, he 
is the son of the late Brigadier-General James S. Whituey, Super- 
intendent of the Springfield Arsenal in 1861, and Collector of the Port 
of Boston in 18G0, and is descended from Brigadier-General Josiah 
Whitney, of the Revolution, and from John Whitney, a leading settler 
of Watertown, Mass., in 1635. 

DAY, HENRY, for forty-five years a member of the notable New- 
York law firm of Lord, Day & Lord, son-iu-law of Daniel Lord, its 
senior partner from the organization of the finu in 1849 until his 
death in 1868, and himself its senior partner from the latter date 
iintil his own death in 1893, was one of tlie most eminent corporation 
lawyers of the city during the well-nigh half century of his profes- 
sional career. He had charge of the legal affairs of many large es- 
tates, including those of the Astors, Edward Morgan, and Professor 
S. F. B. Morse, inventor of the telegraph. He was prominent in the 
organization of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, and was a di- 
rector, and its attorney. He was a director of the Consolidated Gas 
Company, the Mercantile Trust Company, and the Lawyers' Title and 
Guarantee Company. He was a prominent Presbyterian, active in 
conuectiou with benevolent institutions, and a director of the Union 
Theological Seminary. He published " The Lawyer Abroad," and 
" From the Pyrenees to the Pillars of Hercules." The son of Pliny 
Day aud Deborah Butts, he was born in South Hadley, Mass., in 1820, 
was graduated from Yale in 1845, taught school at Fairfield, Conn., 



» 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 215 

was graduated from Har\ ard Law t^cliui>l, aud came tu Xew York City. 
II(' married Pliebe Lueretia, daughter of Daniel Lord. Mr. Day was 
lineally descended from Ifobert Day, who was made a freeman of 
Cambridge, Mass., in KiH."), and was one of the company of Dr. 
Thomas Hooker, who founded Hartford, ("onn., in KJoU. 

DAY, GEUKCE LUKD. member of the famous law tirm of Lord, 
Day & Lord, is the son of the late Henry Day, one of the founders of 
that hrni and its head at the time of his death in 1S!J3, and is the 
grandson of the late Daniel Lord, another (d' the founders, aud the 
senior partner until his death in IStlS. He is a member of the Union, 
University. Kacquet. Manhattan. I'rinceton. Lawyers", New York 
Yacht, New York Athletic, and Meadow Drook Hunt clubs; the 
Downtown Association, and the Bar Association of the city. A severe 
accident, received in 1894: while following the iiounds, forced him to 
retii'e from active professional life. He married in England, in 1896, 
Adele Mittaut. 

ABBOTT, AUSTIN, won renown as one of the counsel of Henry 
AVard Beechcr in the suit brought against the famous preacher by 
Theodore Tiltou, and was one of the counsel for the Federal Govern- 
ment in the trial of Guiteau, the assassin of President Garfield. But 
he has won lasting fame as a legal author, having compiled numer- 
ous standard textbooks for law students and reference books for 
practitioners at the bar. He is the principal author of "Abbott's 
New York Digest" and " Abbotfs Forms," while his works which 
have become standard authorities include " Trial Evidence"' (1880), 
"Brief for the Trial of Civil Issues before a Jury" (1883), "Brief 
for the Trial of Criminal Cases "• ( 1889 ) , " :\Iodes of Proving the Facts 
in Either Class of Trials," and " Brief on Questions Arising on the 
Pleadings in Civil Actions"" (1891!. He also published "New 
Practice and Forms," " Keports of Practice Cases,"" and " Reports of 
New Cases." He was Dean of the Law School of the University of the 
City of New York from 1891 until his death, April 19, 189G. In 1889 
he received the degree of Doctor of Laws from this university. He 
was born in Boston, Mass., December 18, 1831, the son of -Tac.di Ab- 
bott, the popular author. He was the brother of Dr. Lyman Abbott 
and of Benjamin Yauglian .M.l)olt, both of whom w«o'e his law 
partners in this city at one time. He received his early education 
from his parents, who in 1813 removed to New York City. He was 
graduated from the University of tlie City of New York in L^.")1. and 
the following year was admitted to tlie bai-. 

EATON, DOEMAN BBIDGMAN, is eminent as a lawyer, a legal au- 
thor, and a political reformer. He has been identified with the his- 
tory of civil-service reform in this countiw. Having spent the yeare 



216 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

lS70-7o in the study of European civil-service systems, upon liis re- 
turn he was appointed by President Grant to succeed George W. Cur- 
tis ou the Civil-service Commission, and was made its Chairman. 
With the approval of President Hayes he went abroad, in 1S77, for a 
further study of the system of Great Britain. Ue drafted the Civil- 
service Law of 1883, providing for the National Civil-service Commis- 
sion, and was the first Commissioner under it appointed by Presi- 
dent Arthur. His essa^ys ou this subject include : " Civil-seiwice Re- 
form in Great Britain — 1880; " " Spoils System and Civil-service Ee- 
form in the New York Custom House and Postoffice; " " Term and 
Tenure of Ofiice;" " Secret Sessions, United States Senate," and " The 
Independent Movement in New York — 1880." He was instrumental in 
securing and shaping the law creating a paid Fire Department for this 
city in 1865. In 18(JG he drafted the law creating the Metropolitan 
Board of Health, and the following year formulated its sanitai-y code. 
He drafted the law under which the police courts were organized 
prior to the adoption of the constitutional amendments of 1891. At 
the request of Congress he drafted a code for the government of the 
District of Columbia. He assisted Judge William Kent in editing an 
edition of the famous " Kent's Commentaries; " prepared an edition 
of " Chipman on Contracts Payable in Specific Article," in 1852, and 
contributed many articles on administrative refonn and kindred sub- 
jects to Lalor's " Cyclopaedia of Political Science." He was born in 
Hardwick, Vt., June 27, 1823, the son of Hon. Nathaniel Eaton and 
Kuth Bridgman. He was graduated in 1818 from the University of 
^'ermont, from which he subsequently received the degree of LL.D., 
and from the Harvard Law School in 1850. For many years he was 
in active and successful practice in this city, following his admis- 
sion to the bar in 1851. 

BUCKINGHA:\I, CHARLES LUMAN, wlio has been engaged in 
the practice of law in New York City since 1880, has established a rep- 
utation as one of the leading practitioners in notable patent cases in 
the United States, standing at the head of the profession in the espe- 
cially difficult department of electrical cases. He has been counsel of 
the Western Union Telegraph Company since 1880, and is counsel of 
the General Electiic Company, of the Schuyler Electric Light Com- 
pany, and of the Delaware & Atlantic Teleplione & Telegraph Com- 
pany. He is a member of the University Club, the Ohio Society, and 
the University of Michigan Alumni Association, as well as of the Metro- 
politan and T'nion clubs, of Wasliington, D. C. He is an active mem- 
ber of tlie American Institute of Electrical Engineers, as he is of the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Ameri- 
can Academy of Political and Social Science. An article from his pen 
on " Electricity in Daily Life " apiieared in Slerih)irr\<i Marja~hic in a 
series on technical subjects contributed to tliat periodical in 1880-00 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



217 



bv leading- authorities. The scries was also published by the Srrib- 
ners in book form. In his law ])racti((' 'Sh: Buckiniihani has eou- 
ducted a notabh- line of cases, involving immense interests, with 
almost uniform success. The patent lights at issue in these cases in- 
cluded those in connection with tlie quadruplex a]iparatus, the electric 
stock printers, the ore separator, electric overhead traction, the Tesla 
patents on the multiphase alternating motors, designed to transmit 
electi-ical power from ^lingai-n Falls to great distances, and others of 
like importance in connection with the telephone, electric lighting, 
and electric railways. Many of 
these litigations Avere in process of 
trial for three or four years, the 
evidence of experts and the briefs 
sometimes occupying eight or ten 
prinred volumes, ro^al octavo, in a 
single case. In his cases i\Ir. Buck- 
ingham has ^'on victories from 
David Dudley Fiehl. Koscoe Conk- 
ling, Edward N. Dickerson, Gen- 
eral Duncan, Edmund Wetmore. 
Frederick H. Betts, C. E. Mitchell, 
G. P. Fowrey, Dyer & Seely, Kerr & 
Curtis, and others. He lineally 
descends from Thomas Bucking- 
ham, one of the founders of Mil- 
ford, Conn., in 10r>lt, and was him- 
self born in Berlin Heights, O., 
October 14, 1S52. He was grad- 
uated from the University of Mich- 
igan in 1875, for several years was an examiner in the United States 
Patent Office, at the same time attending the Columliian Law ^>chool 
at AVashington, D. C, and was admitted to the bar in the District of 
Columbia, and in New York Citv. 




CHARLES LUMAN BUCKINGHAM. 



MILLER, GEORGE MACCULLOCII, corporation lawyer and head 
of the welFknown law fiini of Miller, Peckham cV; Dixon, is also prom- 
inent as a financier. At the iirescnt time he is President of the 
Housatonic Railroad, trustee of the Central Trust Company and the 
Bank for Savings, and a director of the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad Company, the Harlem River and Port Chester Rail- 
road, the Shepaug Railroad Company, the Providence and Stoning- 
ton Steamship Company, and Greenwood Cemeteiy. He was elected 
President of the Newport and Wickford Railroad and Steamship 
Company in 1S71. a director of tlie New York, Providence and Boston 
Railroad (of which he subsequently became Vice-President) in 1873, 



218 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

iiud tVuui 1S70 to 18811 was President of the Provideuee and Stoning- 
tou Steamship Company, resigning from the latter in favor of his 
brother. He was President of the Denver, Utah and Pacifie Railroad 
Com|>any from 1881 to ISS*!, when the road was consolidated with 
another and profitably sold. He is a member of the Metropolitan, 
Union League, Century, City, Lawj'ers", and Church clubs; is Junior 
Warden of 8t. Thomas's Church; from 1869 to 1890 was Secretary of 
St. Luke's Hospital, and since 1890 has been its President; has been 
President of the Hospital Saturday and Sunday Association of New 
Yink since its organization in 1879, and, since the inception of the en- 
terprise in 187:>, a Charter Trustee and Secretary of the Cathedral of 
St. John the Divine. Born in Morristown. N. J., in 1832, he is the 
son of the late Jacob W. Miller, United States Senator from 1811 to 
1853. He was graduated from Burlington College at 18, studied 
laAv with his father, and at Harvard, and was admitted to the bars 
of ZS'ew Jersey and New York in 1853. He has resided in this city 
since 1854. 

De WITT, GEORGE GOSMAN, head of the law firm of De Witt, 
Lockman & De Witt, is an officer in a number of important corpora- 
tions. He is a trustee of the Greenwich Savings Bank and the 
Eeal Estate Trust Company, and is a director of the Eagle Fire 
Insurance ('ompany, the Lawyers' Surety Company, the New York 
and East Kiver Gas Company, and the East Kiver Gas Company of 
Long Island City. He either is or has been a governor of the Union 
Club, a governor of the New York Hospital, and Vice-President 
of the Columbia Alumni Association, and one of its Committee on 
Athletic Grounds. He was also Grand Marshal of the latter at the 
installation of Seth Low as IM-esith-nt of Columbia College. He is 
Secretai'y of the St. Nicholas Society, a trustee of the Holland So- 
ciety, and in addition to those already mentioned, a member of the 
Metropolitan, LTuion League, University, and other clubs. Born 
in Callicoou, N. Y., April 9, 1845, he is a grandson of the late Peter 
De Witt, an eminent lawyer in this city from 1804 to 1851, and 
founder of the firm of which his grandson is now head, and is lineally 
descended from Tjerck Claessen De Witt, who arrived in New Amster- 
dam in 1056, and the next year settled at Wiltwyck, now Kingston, 
N. Y. Mr. De Witt was graduated from Columbia College in 1867, 
and from the Columbia College Law School in 1869, when he entered 
the law office of his uncles, C. J. & E. De Witt. The death of Edward 
De Witt in 1872, and of Cornelius J. De Witt in 1878, followed by 
the retirement of Goelet Kip, who was also a member of the finn, 
placed Mr. De Witt at its head. He has long had a notable practice 
in the administration of estates and wills, and was counsel in the 
Hamersley. Strecker, Roosevelt, Welton, and Marx cases. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 210 

rAKSONS, JOHN EDWARD, one of tlie most eminent lawyers 
of New York ("ity, where he has been eiiiiancd in practice since 1852, 
is also President of the Knickerbocker lieal Estate Company, a trns- 
tee of the Metropolitan Trust Company and the Bank for SavinjiS, 
and a director of the American l?>ugar Keflnini; Company, the Third 
Avenue Kailroad, and the Forty-second f^treet, 31anhattanville and 
St. Nicholas Avenue Kailroad. He is President of the Woman's Hos- 
pital of the State of New York. He was formerly President of the 
New York Cancer Hospital, havinii- also been one of its founders. He 
was formerly President of the New York Bible Society, and is a 
member of the Board of the American Bible Society. He has been 
a member of the Council of the University of New York since 1865, and 
was associated with the late Peter Cooper, Edward Cooper, and 
Abram S. Hewitt on the orij^inal Board of Trustees of Cooper Union. 
He is a member of the Executive Committee of the American Trnct 
Society, as he is also of the New York City Mission and Tract Society, 
and of the Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church. He 
is a member of the Boai-d of Trustees and of the Board of Elders of the 
Brick Presbyterian Church. For twenty years he was at the head of a 
large mission school in New York City. He maintains at his own 
expense a fresh-air home at Curtisville, near Lenox, Mass., where 
one hundred children at a time are accommodated during the summer 
months. While he maintains a summer residence at Eye, N. Y., his 
]>rincipal summer liome is " Stonover," at Lenox, Mass., and he is 
a vestryman of the Episcopal Church at Lenox and a governor of 
Ihe Lenox Club. Me is President of the City Club, of New York, and 
a member of the ^Metrojiolitau, Century, University, Biding, Players', 
and Turf and Field clubs. He was born in New York City, October 
21, 1829, the son of Edward Lamb Parsons and Matilda C, daughter 
of Ebenezer Clark, of Walliugford, Conn. He was graduated from 
the New York University in 1818, at the age of eighteen, and studied 
law with James W. Gerard, being admitted to the bar in 1852. He 
practiced alone until January 1, 1851, and then formed a partner- 
ship with Lorenzo B. Shei>ard. Mr. Shepard being appointed Dis- 
trict Attorney in July of the same year, :\Ir. Parsons served as his 
assistant until tlic close of the year. After the death of Mr. Shepard, 

in 1856, he foii 1 a partnersli'ii> with the late Albon P. Man, under 

the style of Man & Parsons, which continued until 1884. He was 
counsel in the Morrill, Burr, Hamersley, Tracy, and Fayei'weather 
will cases, and tlie Jacob Sliarp case. He was prominent in tlie 
overthrow of the Tweed ring. He was counsel of the New York Sen- 
ate Committee wliicli declared Tweed's seat in that body vacant; was 
counsel of the Assembly Committee which investigated the election 
frauds in Kings County, and prosecuted Ileni^ W. Genet before an 
Assembly Committee. He was also counsel in the impeachment pro- 
ceedings'against Judges Barnard, McCunn, and Cardoza. He was 



220 



HISTORY OK THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



counsel of tlie Sugar Trust, as he has been of its successor, the 
American Sugar Refining Company. He was one of the original 
members of the Bar Association of the City of New York and one of 
its most active founders. IJe took a leading part in the proceedings 
preliminary to its organization, and submitted the draft for the 
original constitution, wlii* li was in large part adoi)ted. 



SEWARD, CLARENCE A., prior to his death in 1897, was one of 
the most prominent lawyei*s of New York City. Born in this city, he 
was reared at Geneva. N. Y., in the family of his famous uncle, the 
late William H. Seward. He was graduated from Hobart College in 

1848, in 1850 was admitted to the 
bar, and for four years practiced at 
(ieneva. In IS.jI he came to New 
York City and became a member 
of ilie law firm of Blatcliford, Se- 
ward .JcGriswold, tlie head of which 
was the late Judge Blatchford, of 
the Supreme Court of the United 
States. He became prominent in 
the celebrated Day and Goodyear 
india rubber litigations, the Bank 
of England forgery case, the Broad- 
way Railroad investigation, and 
i lie Lauderdale Peerage case in the 
British House of Lords. He was an 
expert in express cases. Lender 
Governor King and Governor Mor- 
gan he was Judge Advocate-Gen- 
eral of the State of New York. 
Upon the attempted assassination 
of his uncle, he was called to Washington, D. C, and discharged tlie 
duties of Assistant Secretary of State. At the time of his death he 
was President of the Union Club of New York City, a position he had 
held for many years. He was President of the Fifth Avenue Protec- 
tive Association and ^"ice-President of the Adams Express Company. 
He was President of the Ali)ha Delta Phi Society of New York, and 
was also President of the Alumni Association of Hobart College, from 
which institution he held the degree of Doctor of Laws. He was a 
delegate to a number of Republican State and National conventions. 
He was the First Elector on the Republican State ticket in the Presi- 
dential campaign resulting in the election of Garfield and Arthur. 




CLARENCE A. SEWARD. 



BAYLIES, EDMUND LINCOLN, member of the law firm of Carter 
& Ledyard, was born in New York City in 1857; in 1879 was graduated 
from Harvard; in 1882 fi-om the Harvard Law School, and took an 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 221 

additional c-ourse in the Columbia College Law School before engag- 
ing' in active practice in this city. He has appeared in many important 
cases, and is counsel to many corporations. He is a trustee of the 
Kew York Life Insurance and Trust Company and a director of the 
Pacific Cable Company and the ^Mexican Telegraph Company. He is 
a member of the Patriarchs, Knickerbocker, University, and City 
clubs, the DowntOAvn Association, Bar Association of the city, and 
the Sons of the American Revolution. In 1887, he married Louisa 
■^'an Eensselaer, lineal descendant of Kiliaen Van Jiensselaer, hrst 
patroou of Eensselaerwyck. He is himself the son of Edmund Lincoln 
Baylies, Sr., and Nathalie II Eay, and is the great-great-grandson of 
General Benjamin Lincoln, of the Revolution, and great-grandson 
of Colonel Hodijah Baylies, who served on General Lincoln's staff, and 
married his daughter Elizabeth. 

BOWERS, JOHN MYER, one of the eminent lawyers of New York 
City, where he has followed his profession since 1871, is also a director 
of the Corn Exchange Bank, the Coney Island Jockey Club, the New 
York Law Publishing Company, and a trustee of the Tennis Building 
Association and the New York Institution for the Blind. He has long 
enjoyed a large corporation inactice, is a leading member of the Bar 
Association of the City of New York, and is an influential Democrat. 
He is a member of the Union, Metro])olitan, ^Manhattan, Riding, and 
Whist clubs, the Downtown Association, Sons of the Revolution, and 
Society of Colonial Wars. He married Susan Dandridge, and has two 
daughters and three sons, Spotswood Dandridge, Henry Myer, and 
William Grain Bowers. Jlrs. Bowers is descended from Governor 
Alexander Spotswood, of ^'irginia, who was born at Tangiers in 1676, 
and fought under i\larll)orough, being wounded at Blenheim. The 
country place of jMr. Bowers is the old family mansion at Coopers- 
town, N. Y., where he was born, November 27, 1849. He is the son of 
John Myer Bowers and Margaret ^I. S., daughter of Robert Wilson 
and his Avife, Martha, whose father, Colonel Cliarles Stewart, of Lands- 
downe, N. J., came from Bortlee, County Doiicgal, Ireland, and was 
of the royal Stuarts. He is also lineally descended from Adoli>h :\ryei-, 
who settled in Harlem in 1661, coming from Ulsen, parish of Beut- 
heim, Westphalia. The Rays and Croinmelins, old New York families, 
were ingrafted upon tliis line. 

BEAMAN, CHARLES COTESWORTH, a member of the famous 
law firm of Evarts, Choate & Beaman, lias been engaged in Ihe active 
practice of law in this city since 1866. He was Examiner of Claims, 
State Department, Washington, in 1871, and the fcdlowiug year rep- 
resented the United States as Solicitor in the matter of the famous 
Alabama claims before the Court of Arbitration at Geneva, Switzer- 
land. He is President of the Brearlev School, a trustee of the Provi- 



222 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

dent. Luau Society', aud a dirinttir ol tlie .Mexicau Naliuual Ifaili-uad 
Company and the Denver and Kio Gi'ande Kailroad Company. He is 
of New Eno'lnnd descent, tlic son oi Rev. Charles C. Beaman and ^Mary 
Stacy, and was born at IToulton, 3Ie., May 7, 1840. He was j^raduated 
from Harvard College in 1861, attended the Harvard Law School, and 
was ailniitted to the bar in this city in ISHO. 

SANDS, BENJAMIN AYMAE, wlio lias been engaged in the prac- 
tice of law in New York City for more than twenty years and is 
eminent as a corporation lawyer, is also an officer uf a number of 
important corporations. He is ^'ice-President of the Colorado Mid- 
land Railway Company, is a trustee and Secretary of the Terminal 
Impruvement Company-, is a trustee of the Greenwich Savings Bank, 
and the New York Security and Trust Company, and is a director of 
the Hudson River Bank, the National Safety De])osit Com]>any, the 
Commonwealth Insurance Company, and the Terminal ^Varehouse 
Company. He is a member of the Executive Committee of the City 
Bar Association. He is also a member of the Union, City, University, 
Elding, Church, and University Athletic clubs, the Downtown Asso- 
ciation, the St. Andrew's Society, the Columbia Alumni Association, 
and the Society of Colonial Wars. He was born in this city, July 27, 
1853, and was graduated from Cohunbia College and from the Colum- 
bia. College Law School. Both his father, the late Samuel Stevens 
Sands, and his maternal grandfather, Benjamin Aymar, were promi- 
nent merchants and financiers of New York City. His grandfather, 
Austin Ledyard Sands, was also one of the notable New York mer- 
chants of Ills day. His great-granduncle. Comfort Sands, Avas one of 
the Revolutionary Committee of One Hundred, which ruled this city 
in 1775, and subseqtiently became President of the New York Chamber 
of Commerce. The founder of the family in America, James Sands, 
emigrated in l(i.")8 from Iieading, Berkshire, England, to Plymouth. 
Mass., and in 1660 was one of the purchasers of Block Island. Sands 
Point, L. I., was named aftei- Iiis son, .Tolin Sands. 

HUBBARD, THOMAS HAMLIN, has been (iigagcd in the i.rac- 
tice of law in New York City since the close of the Civil War, 
being for a year associated with Hon. Charles A. Rapallo, late of the 
Cotirt of Appeals bench, and. since July. 18()7, a member of the well- 
known law tirm of liarney. Butler & Parsons, aud its successor. Butler, 
Stillinan & Hubbard. He is President as well as a director of each 
of the following railroad cori)orations: The Southern Pacific Coast 
Railway, the Southern I'acitic Railroad Company of Arizona, the 
Southern Pacific Railroad Company of New ^Mexico, the California 
and Pacific Railroad, the Oregon and California Railroad, the Fort 
Worth and New Orleans Railway, the Houston and Texas Central 
Railroad, the Central Texas and Northwestern Railroa<l. the Austin 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OE NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



223 



and Xoi'thwesteru Kailroad, ainl tlic Mexican Internationa 1 IJailroad. 
He is also a director and Vice-1'n'sident of the Southern I'acific Com- 
pany, wliich controls this system, and is a director of tlu^ Chatta- 
nootia and Southern Kailroad, the Wabash liailroad. tlic I'acific Im- 
provement Company, the Western National Bank of this city, the 
Washington linilding Company, and tlie Detroit (ias Company. He 
has been one of the Vice-Presidents of the Union League Club of New- 
York, and is also a member of the Hiding, Lawyers', and Kepublican 
clubs, tlie Downtown Association, the City Bar Association, the New 
York Law Institute, and tin- .Military Order of the Loyal Legion. 
Born in Hallowell, Me.. Deceiiiher 2(1. 1S3S, lie is the grandson of Dr. 
John Hubbard, an eminent pli\si(iaii of Keadtiehl. Me., who was born 
in New Hampshire, and is the son 
of Dr. John Hubbard, the skillfid 
surgeon, who was eh^ted to the 
Maine Senate,and from 184itto IS.jo 
was GoA'ernor of that State, the 
Maim* Liquor Law being enacted 
during his administration. < Jeneral 
Hid)bard"s mother was Saiali 
Ibxlge, daughter of Oliver Barrett, 
of Chelmsfoi-d, Mass., and grand- 
daughter of a Bevolutionary soldier 
wlio was one of the " minute men " 
at Lexing-ton, and was killed in the 
second battle of Stillwater, just pre- 
ceding Burgoyne's surrender. Oen- 
eral Hubbard was graduated from 
Bowdoin College in 18.")", was ad- 
mitted to the Maine bar in ISOO, ' 
continued his studies at the Albany 
Law School, and was admitted 
to the New York bar in the spring of 1801 
with the Twenty-fifth Maine ^'olunteers in 18()2, with the commission 
of First Lieutenant and as Adjutant of his regiment. He was mus- 
tered out July 11, 1863, having also served as Assistant Adjutant- 
General of the Brigade. He was instrumental in raising the Thir- 
teenth Maine Volunteers, in which be received the comnnssion of 
Lieutenant-Colonel, November 10, 1863. He served thr<.ugli the i;ed 
River campaign; after the battle of Pleasant Hill. La., was assigned 
to the command of his regiment, and led in the assault of Abmett's 
Bluff at Cane River Crossing. He assisted in the construction of the 
Red River dam to float the stranded gunboats at Alexandria. La., and 
helped bridge the Atchafalaya River with a line of steamers. He was 
commissioned Colonel of his regiment May 13, 186-t, an<I soon after 
was transferred to the Shenandoah Valley, where he served throngh- 




THOMAS }IAMLIN HUBHARD. 



He went to the front 



224 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

out the campaiyu of 1864-6.3, also actiug as president of a court-mar- 
i' \1. After the review of his command in Washington, in April, 1865, 
Lc! was ordered to Savannah. Ga., where he conducted a board for 
examination of officers of the volunteer force who applied for com- 
missions in the regular army. He was commissioned Brevet-Brig- 
adier-Geueral July 13, 1865. and soon after mustered out of service. 

BUTLER, PBESCOTT HALL, member of the celebrated law firm 
of Evarts, Choate & Beaman, with which he has been connected for 
more than a quarter of a century, is the oldest cliild of the founder 
and original head of that firm, the late Chai'les E. Butler, who, in 
1842, with William M. Evarts established the law partnership of But- 
ler & Evarts, at the head of Avhich he remained until his retirement 
in 1879. Mr. Butler's mother, Louisa Clinch, was a sister of the late 
Mrs. A. T. Stewart, while he himself, in 1874, marned Cornelia Stew- 
art, daughter of J. Lawrence Smith and Sarah Clinch, and grand- 
niece of Mi"s. Stewart. They have a daughter and two sons — Law- 
rence and C. Stewart Butler. Mr. Butler has long enjoyed a large 
corpoi'ation practice, has been connected with various corporations, 
and is now President of the Garden City Company. He is a member 
of the Metropolitan, University, Riding, Racquet, Players', Harvard, 
Adirondack League, New York Yacht, Larchmont Yacht, Seawan- 
haka-Corinthian Yacht, and Jekyl Island clubs, the Century and 
Downtown associations, the City Bar Association, and other organiza- 
tions. He was born on Staten Island, ^March 8, 1848, and was gradu- 
ated from Harvard in 1869. 

ANDERSON, ELBERT ELLERY, has practiced law in New York 
City since 1854, and since 1868 has been head of the law firm of Ander- 
son & Man. In one of its cases this firm recovered .f2,000,000 interest 
on bonds of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad, and has been 
especially prominent in railroad litigations. Mr. Anderson is now 
Receiver and Government Director of the Union Pacific Railway 
Company, and a director of the Montana Union Railway, the Man- 
hattan, Alma and Burlingame Raihvay, and the Central Branch 
Union Pacific Railway Company. He was one of the commission 
appointed by President Cleveland in 1887 to investigate the Central 
Pacific and Union Pacific railways, and prepared the majority report. 
He was a Major of ^'oluuteers during the Civil War, was captured, 
and came home on i)arole. Although a Democrat he helped to over- 
throw the Tweed ring, and subsequently became one of the reorgan- 
izers of Tammany Hall. He was its chairman for the Eleventh Dis- 
trict for several yeai-s, but in 1879 became one of the seceders who 
founded the County Democracy. He was long Chairman of the Gen- 
eral Committee of the latter organization. As President of the Re- 



ENCYCLOI^KDiA OF NEW YORK BlOGrAPHV. 225 

fdiiii ("lull and ("hail-man of the Tariff Refonn Committee in 1892, 
he was active in publishing articles and delivering addresses. He 
was similarly active in favor of a sound currency in ISiKj. lie has 
been a member of the Kapid Transit Commission, the ("rot on A(|ue- 
duct ("ommission, the Elevated Kailroad ("ommission, and tlie r.oanl 
of Education, being ajipointed to the latter position by Mayor ^Strong 
in 18!J(;. The son of the late J)r. Henry J. Anderson, Professor in 
C"olumbia (College, he was born in this city (Jctober ol, 1833. He 
traveled in Europe with his father when ten years of age, was gradu- 
ated from Harvard in LS.ji, and in 18.")1 was admitted to the New- 
York Bar. He married Augusta ( "hauiuey. 

BETTS, FREDERIC HENRY, was graduated from Yale College in 
1SC>i, from the Yale Law Hchool in 18()."), and from the ("olumbia Col- 
lege Law School in 18G(j. He had also studied with (governor Henry 
B. Harrison, of New Haven, Conn., and Avith Man & Parsons of this 
city. He is recognized as one of the ablest patent lawyers in the 
Lnited States. He was Lecturer on this subject in the Yale Law 
School from 1872 to 1883, and has imblished a work on " The Policy 
of Patent Law '" (1870). He became counsel for the Insurance De- 
partment of the State of New York in 1871, while for sixteen years, 
from 1877 to 1893, he was counsel in the patent cases of the City of 
New York. He has conducted cases of prime imiiortance for the 
General Electric Company, the Edison Electric Light ("onipany, the 
"Western Union Telegraph Oimpa.ny, the Westinghouse Air Brake 
Company, and other corporations of like prominence, ilr. Betts was 
a member of the Republican County Committee of New York County 
in 1884. He was a member of the C"itizens' Committee of Fifty in 
1883, as he was of the Committee of One Hundred in 1884. He is a 
member of the Metropolitan, Century, City, University, Lawyers', 
(Irolier, and C'hurch clubs, the Sons of the Revolution, the Society of 
Colonial Wars, the Y'^ale Alumni, and the Association of the Bar. He 
Avas born in Newburgh, N. Y., :Mar( h 8, 1843, and is the son of the 
late Hon. Frederic J. Betts and .Mary Ward. His father became Dis- 
trict Attorney of Orange County, New York, in 1823, while from 
that year until 1827 he was ^Faster in ("hancery. Between 1827 and 
1S41 he was ("lerk of the T'nited Stat.'s ("ii'cuit and United States Dis- 
trict courts of New York. From 18(i7 to ls7(t he was a Judge of the 
Hiistings Court of Campbell County, Yirgiiiia. Mr. Betts traces his 
descent from many notable men of colonial New England. He is a 
dcsrcndnnt of (ioveruor .(ohn Hayiics. .d' C.overnor (Jeorge Wyllys, 
of <;ovei-iior William Leete, of AssislanI Edward Ixossiter. of Assist- 
ani Samui'l Wyllys, of Assistant Samuel Sherman, of ('(done! Andrew 
Ward, and Captain .l(dm Taylor, olllcers in tlie c(donial wars; (d' Snnt- 
U( 1 ("omstock Betts and T'riah Betts, lJev(diitionary soldiei-s; of ('ai>- 
1ain Andrew Ward and Lieutenant .T(diu Sc(.vine. Other ancestors, 



226 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

William Speucor, George Bartlett, Cbristopber Comstock, Xathaniel 
Stoue, and Josiali Iiossiter, were all members of the Couuecticut Pro- 
viiicial Assembly. 

I)A^'IES. WILLIAM GILBERT, eldest son of the late dis- 
tinguisbed Jndge Henry E. Davies, of Xew York City, bas been en- 
ga<;ed iu tbe practice of law in New York since 18G3, and bas long- 
been Counsel to tbe Mutual Life Insurance Company, mainly confining 
bimself to practice as Cbamber Counsel. He is a Lecturer on tbe Law 
of Life Insurance in tbe University of tbe City of Xew Y^ork, and is a 
director of tbe Cbelsea, tbe Assurance Company of America, tbe La- 
fayette Fire Insurance Company, and tbe National Standard Insur- 
ance Company. He is a member of tbe L'nion. Tuxedo, St. Nicholas, 
University, Manhattan, Lawyers', Grolier. Nineteenth Century, 
Church, and Atlantic Yacht clubs; the Century Association, the Lied- 
erkranz, the Sons of the Revolution, the Society of Colonial Wars, tbe 
New England Society, the NeAV York Historical Society, tbe Academy 
of Science, the Scientific Alliance, the Trinity College Alumni, the 
Phi Beta Kappa Alumni Association, and other organizations. He 
married, in 1S7U, Lucie C, daughter of Hon. Alexander H. Bice, who 
was Mayor of Boston, a [Member of Congress, and Governor of Mas- 
sachusetts for three terms. 



COCHRAN, JOHN, President of tbe New York Society of the Cin- 
cinnati, is one of tbe distinguished citizens of New Y'ork. He was 
graduated from Hamilton College in 1831, was admitted to the bar 
in 1S34, and taking up bis residence in New York City iu 1816, became 
one of tbe eminent practitioners at tbe bar. He was in 18.j3 appointed 
United States Surveyor of the Port of New York. From 1857 to 1861 
he was a member of Congress. In a public address in November, 1861, 
be advocated the arming of tbe slaves, and is believed to have been 
tlie first to propose this as a military measure. He recruited a regi- 
ment and served at its bead until disabilities forced him to resign 
in 1863. From 1863 to 186.5 he was Attorney-General of the State of 
New York. He was candidate for Vice-President on tbe ticket with 
John C. Fremont in 1864, but resigned prior to the election. In 186ii 
he refused an appointment as United States ^linister to Uruguay 
and Paraguay. He was elected President of the Common Council of 
New York City in 1872. and the same year was a delegate to the Na- 
tional Liberal Republican Convention which nominated Greeley for 
tbe Presidency. In 1889 he was appointed a Police Justice. He was 
born in Palatine, N. Y., August 27, 1813, the son of Walter L. Cochran 
and Cornelia, daughter of Judge Peter Smith, of Peterboro, N. Y., and 
granddaughter of Colonel James Livingston of the Revolutionary 
Armv, a descendant of the first Lord of Livingston ^lanor. He is the 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



227 



grandson of Dr. John Cochran, of Washington's Army, whom ^^■ash- 
ington appointed Surgeon-General and Congress made Director-Gen- 
eral of Hospitals in ITSl, and who married Gertrude, sister of General 
I'hilip Schuyler. 



HOADLY. GEOKGE. was graduated from Adelbert College in 
1S44, attended the Harvard Law vSchool, was admitted to the bar in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, in August, 1847, and in 1849, under the firm style 
of Chase, Ball & Hoadly, became a member of the Cincinnati law firm 
of which the late Salmon 1'. Chase was the head, and Flanien Ball the 
second partner. In February, 1851, he was elected by the Ohio Legis- 
lature sole Judge of tlie First Superior Court of Cincinnati. L^pon the 
abolition of this court in 1853 he 
foriiH^d a law partnersliip with Ed- 
ward Mills. In 1855 and 185(1 he 
was City Solicitor of Cincinnati. 
In the latter year he declined tiie 
app<)intment to the Supreme Bench 
of Oldo, offered him by Governor 
Chase. In 1850 he was elected to 
succeed Judge Gliolson on the 
bench of the Second SuperiorCourt, 
and in 1864 was elected tor a sec- 
ond term, having meanwhile de- 
clined the offer of Governor Tod to 
appoint him to the Ohio Supreme 
bench. In 18()n he resigned his Su- 
pei'ior Court Jtidgeship to resume 
the practice of law in Cincinnati as 
the head of the law fii in of Hoadly, 
Jackson & Johnson. The firm was 
reorganized as Hoadly, Johnson 
^; Colston in 1874, and became fa- 
mous throughout the West for its 

conduct of notable railway litigations. Mr. Hoadly was one of the 
counsel of Samuel J. Tilden in the Tilden-Hayes Presidential election 
contest of 1876. He personally argued the Florida and Oregon cases. 
He was one of the leading members of the Ohio Constitutional Con- 
vention of 1873-74. A Kepublican during the Civil War. and for some 
time subseqtiently, in 1872 he joined the Liberal Republican move- 
ment in support of Horace Greeley for the Presidency. He presided 
as Temporary Chairman over the Democratic National Convention, 
held at Cincinnati in 1880. In the fall of 1883 he was the successful 
Democratic candidate for Governor of the State of Ohio. He was 
re-nominated in 1885, but failed of election. In 1886 he resumed the 




GEORliE IIDADI.V. 



2'28 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK, 

pi-;i(li(L' of law, and in ISST ii'moxcd to New York City, where he has 
since lie(^n head (if tlie well-known law tivni of lloadly, Laiiterbach 
& Johnson, lie was associated with Jjimes C. Carter in arguing the 
iiucoustitntionality of the Chinese Exclusion Act. At the present 
time he represents tlie United States in the foreclosure of the Govern- 
ment subsidy lien upon the Union I'acilic Eailway. being special as- 
sistant to the Attorney-General. He was formerly a trustee of the 
Cincinnati University, and for twenty jears was a regular lectiii'er 
in the Cincinnati Law Hchool. He is a Freemason, and Knight 
Templar, and a thirty-third Degree Scottish IJite Mason. He 
is a member of ilic Metr()[)olitan, Nineteenth Century, Centui^-, 
Lawyers', Manhattan, and Democratic clubs. He was born in New 
Haven. Conn.. July 31, 1S2(>. and received his early education in the 
public schools of Cleveland. Ohio. He is the grandson of Captain 
Timothy Hoadly, of Northford, Conn., and the sou of George Hoadly 
and IMary Anne, eldest daughter of William Walton Woolsey and 
Elizabeth Dwight, of New York City. His father was graduated 
from Y'ale in 1801, was three years tutor in Y'ale, was a lawyer and 
banker of New Haven, became its Mayor, and. removing to Cleve- 
land. Ohio, also became- its Mayor. Governor Hoadly's mother was a 
niece of the first President Dwight, and the elder sister of President 
Woolsey, of Y'ale College, was a great-granddaughter of Jonathan 
Edwards, and was an aunt of Theodore Winthrop and Susan Wool- 
sey (" Susan Coolidge "). Governor Hoadly holds the degree of 
Doctor of Laws from Adelbert College. Dartmoiith College (1887). 
and Yale College (1884). 

BENEDICT. r'HAPvLES LINN.T:US, Judge of the United States 
Court of the Eastern District of New Y'ork for the long term of thirty- 
two years, from his ajjpointment to this bench by President Lincoln 
in 1805 until his resignation, July 19, 1897, was born in Newburg, 
N. Y'., in 1824, the son of the late Profesf-'or George Wyllys Benedict 
and Eliza, daughter of Stephen Dewey and Elizabeth Owen, of Shef- 
field, Mass. His father was a professor in the T'uiversity of Vermont 
as well as secretary and treasurer of its Board of Trustees, was editor 
and proprietor of the Burlington Free Prefs, and seiwed two terms in 
the Vermont Senate. Other prominent names a]ii>ear in the line from 
Judge Benedict back to Thomas Benedict, who came from Notting- 
ham, England, and died at Norwich, Conn. Judge Benedict was grad- 
uated from the University of Vermont in 1844, studied law with his 
uncle, the late l^rastus C. Benedict of New York City, and was en- 
gaged in snci-essful ju-actice as the law itartiun- of his uncle when he 
received his judicial appointment. He is a member of the Century 
Association, the Si^ma Phi Club, the Hamilton Club of Bro(jklyn, and 
the New^ England Society. He married first, in 1856, Rosalie, daughter 
of Abner Benedict, and subseoiient to her death, which occurred in 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. '129 

ISoS, iiiaiiicil travail, widdw of Ilcury B. (^i-uiinvell ami ilaiii;liU-i- of 
Dr. William i^eamaii, both of New York City. His son, Gcoriic Abiiev, 
was by the first wife. 

mi\ 1 )Y, JAM Ei^ T< )rn AiM, was ii leadiiiu lawyer in his day, being 
especially notable for his snccess before tlie jnr\in criminal cases. lie 
was constantly engaged as counsel in iaiiK.iis cases of this cliar- 
acter. He had the gift of persnasive cbKiucnce, was tactfnl in the man- 
agonent of his cases and was a good cross-examiner. He was also 
conn>-el in many notable civil cases, inclnding the litigation of 
Goodyear r.v. Day over rnbber |iatents, the Parish and .Vilaire will 
cases, the Hnntington forgery case, th(^ ( 'ole liomicide case, and the 
divoi'ce case of Eilwin Forrest, whose connsel he was. He was ap- 
pointed United States District Attorney at ]S'ew Vork in 18-13. He 
was also Corporation Counsel of New York City for a tinu'. He was 
the unsnccessfnl candidate for the governorslii]i of New ^'ork on Ihe 
ticket of the Breckinridge Democracy. lie jMiblislied a stoiw. ".V 
Christmas Dream." 

liLATCHFOKD, SAMUEL, was graduated from Columbia College 
in 1S.S7. Two years later he became private secn^tary to Governor 
Seward and military secretary on his staff. He studied law, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1842, and in 1S4."> became the law partni^r of Will- 
iam H. Sewai-d at Aul)urn. X. Y. In ]S.")4 he removed to New York 
City and became head (d' the law firm of Blatchfoid, Seward & Gi'is- 
wold. He was District Judge of the Uinted States Court for the 
Souiliern District of New Yoik from ISC.T to ISls, fiom tlie latter date 
until 1882 was iM-deral Circuit Judge, and in :Marcii, 1882, was ap- 
l)ointed by President Arthur an Associati- Jiistice of the Supreme 
Court (d' the United States. He was born in New York City, .^rarcli !), 
1820, and died in Newport, K. I., Jidy 7, 18!i:?. 

ABNOLD, LEMUEL HASTINGS, head of the law Arm of Arnold 
& Greene, of New York City, is also an officer of several corporations. 
He is President of the Fidelity Securities Company, successor to the 
I'i.lelity Loan and Trnst Comi>any, «( Sioux City, la.; is a director and 
miMuber of the Execiitive Comnnttee of tlu' Honn- Life Insurance 
Com]>any, and is a director of the E(| nit able Semrities Comjiany. He 
is President of the lTom<-o])athic Hos].ilal of P.rooklyn, and is a nn^m- 
ber of the Hamilton Club of that boi-ough, and the Lawyers" Club and 
the Bar Association of New York. He was instrumental in secunng 
a uniform system of examination for admission to tlie bar in this 
State, being'the author of the law establishing a State Boai-d of Ex- 
aminers, and being appointed a Special ("ommittee of the City Bar 
Association to urge the measure before legislative committees. He 
was born in Providence, B. I., November IT, 1S47, the son of Lemuel 



230 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Hastings Arnold and Han-iot I\ebecca Sheldon, and tho grandson of 
Lemnel Hastings Arnold, who was Governor of llliode Island in 1831- 
32, and subsequently a member of Congress. Jonathan Arnold, his 
great-grandfather, was a Eevolutionary soldier, a Congressman, and 
founder of St. Johnsbury, Yt. Daniel Lyman, a Revolutionary sol- 
dier who afteiTvard became Chief Justice of Rhode Island, was also 
his great-grandfather. During the Civil War Mr. Arnold's father 
i-emoved to Brooklyn and engaged in the warehouse business, while 
the son, at fifteen years of age, entered the Pay Department of the 
Army. In 1S70 he was graduated from the Columbia College Law 
School. He was atti>rney to Public Administrators Henry Alker, 
Algernon S. Sullivan, and Richard J. Morrison, of this city, prior to 
forming his present law jiartnership with Hon. J. Warren Greene, 
now a Justice of the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court. 

McCOOK, JOHN JAMES, member of the law firm of Alexander 
i^- (Jreeu. and enjoying a large corporation practice, is a Trustee of 
the American Surety Company, and a director of the Mercantile Trust 

Company, the Equitable Life Assurance So- 
ciety, the Sun Insurance Company, Wells, 
Fargo & Company, the New York Loan and 
Im])rnvement Company, and the American 
Pig Iron Storage Warrant Company. He was 
boin at Carroltou, Ohio, May 25, 1845. His 
fatlier, IMajor Daniel McCook, was killed in 
the Civil War, in which Mr. McCook also en- 
listed at the age of sixteen, leaving Kenyon 
College to join the 6th Ohio cavaliw. He was 
.loHx .lAMKs MCCOOK. asslgued to the staff of General T. L. Crit- 

tenden, and participated in tlie battles of 
Perryville, Stone Kivei*, Tullahoma, Chattanooga, and Chickamauga, 
and those of the Wilderness campaign, being severely wounded at 
Shady Grove. Ga. He rose to Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, though but 
twenty years old when the war closed. He was graduated from Ken- 
yon College in 1S6G, and from the Harvard Law School in 1809. He 
has received the degree of A.M. from Kenyon and Princeton, and that 
of LL.D. from the University of Kansas. He is a member of the 
Union, Metropolitan, Union League. Tuxedo, and many other clubs. 

McCOOK. AXSOX GEORGE, lawyer, is President of the New 
York Law Publishing Company, and a trustee of the State Trust 
Company. He recruited a company of Ohio Yolunteers. entered the 
Union Army as their Captain, was promoted to a Colonelcy, and at 
the end of the war received the Brevet of Brigadier-General " for 
gallant and meritorious services." From 18G5 to 1873 he was Asses- 
sor of Internal Revenue at Steubenville. Ohio. Removing to New 




ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 231 

York, he I'epresented this city iu Congress as a Republican from 1S7T 
to 1883. He acted as Secretary to the United States Senate in the 
50th, 51st, and 52d Congresses. Born in Steubenville, Ohio, October 
10, 1835, he visited California as a youth, but returned to Steubenville 
and studied law prior to the Civil War. He is the son of Dr. John 
McCook, and a cousin of John J. McCook. 

JENNINGS, FREDERICK BEACH, was graduated from Williams 
College in 1872, from the Harvard Law School in 1871, from the New 
York University Law School in 1875, founded the law firm of Jen- 
nings & Russell, of this city, and subsequently became a member of 
his present firm of Stetson, Tracy, Jennings & Russell, well-known 
corporation lawyers. He is counsel of the Erie Railroad Company, 
and of other important corporations. He is President of the Charles- 
ton City Railway Company, President of the New Y^ork, Lake Erie 
and Western Docks and Improvement Company, President of the 
Long Dock Company, Vice-President of the American Trading Com- 
pany, Vice-President of the First National Bank of North Benning- 
ton, Vt., Vice-President of the Bennington and Rutland Railway 
Company, and a director of the Chicago and Erie Railroad. He is a 
member of the Metropolitan, Century, City, University, Racquet, 
Country, Delta Kappa Epsilon, New Y'ork Athletic, and University 
Athletic clubs, the City Bar Association, the Downtown Association, 
the New England Society, and the Williams College Alumni Associa- 
tion. He married, in 1880, Laura Hall, daughter of Hon. Trenor W. 
Park, and granddaughter of Governor Ililand Hall, of Vermont, and 
has a daughter and three sons, Percy Hall, Frederick Beach, Jr., and 
Edward Phelps Jennings. Born in Bennington, Vt., in 1853, he is 
the son of Rev. Isaac Jennings, the grandson of Dr. Isaac Jennings, 
and is descended from Joshua Jennings, wlio was born in England in 
1G20, and emigrated to Connecticut twciitv-hvc years later. 



GRAHAM, JOHN ANDREW, a resident of New York City from 
1805 until his death in 1841, was a pioMiinent practitioner in the 
( rinunal courts of tlie city, and acquired a large fortune. He was 
horn in Southbury, Conn., in 1761, was admitted to the Connecticut 
Bar in 1785, and subse(iuently practiced law for many years at Rut- 
land, Vt., where he was a leader in his profession. He visited Europe 
several times. In 1700 the I'niversity of Aberdeen conferred upon 
liim the degree of LL.D. Tiie late distinguished Colonel John Lori- 
mer Graliam, of tliis city, was his son by a second wife, Margaret, 
daughter of James Lorimer, of London, while the present Malcolm 
Graham, Sr., is his grandson. He was of the family of which the 
Dukes of Montrose ai'e the heads. His grandfather, Dr. John Gra- 
ham, was graduated from the University of Glasgow, and earl\ iu 



232 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

tlie Ki^litt'eiitli ('ciitury ciiiiiiriilcd to Exeter, N. li.. .iihI iiriietieed 
mediciue. Later he studied tlieoloiiv, and was pastor of ilie church 
at Staffoi-d, <\)ini., from 1723 to 1732, and of the church at Soutlibury, 
Conu., from 1732 to 1774. He married Abijiail, daughter of Kev. 
Nathaniel Chauiicev, D.D. Their son, Dr. Andre\Y Graham, father 
of Jolin Andre^Y Graham, was a ])hYsician; for many rears repre- 
sented Woodbury, Gonn., in the General Gourt; was a member of the 
Reyolutiouary Goniniittee of Safety; was Surgeon in the patriot army 
at tlie battles of 1 >anbury and Wlute Plains, and was ca])tured by the 
British during the action last mentioned and held until the close of 
the war. He married Martha Gurtiss. 

GEAHAM, JOHN LOKHIEK, long a leader of the bar of New 
YorkGity as head of the firms of Graham, Noyes&Martin and Graham, 
Wood & Powers, wliich were especially conspicuous in connection 
with mercantile law, was also prominent in public life. He was the 
son of John Andrew (Jraham, of this city, and Margaret, daughter 
of James Lorimer, of London; was himselWborn in London, March 20, 
1707, and died in Flushing, L. I., July 22, 1876. Haying stmlied law 
with Judge Tajiping Keeye, of Litchtield, Conn., and John Anthon, 
of this city, he was admitted to the bar in 1S21. In 1817 he had joined 
the State Militia, and in 1810 was appointed Aid-de-camp on the staff 
of Goyernor De Witt Glinton, with the rank of Golonel. In 1834 he 
was appointed IJegent of the State Uniyersity. From 1840 to 1844 
he was Postmaster of New York City. In 1861 he accepted a conti- 
dcnlial [losition in the Treasury Department at Washington. He 
founded a free scholarshi]i in the Uniyersity of the City of New York, 
of the council of which he was a member. He was a life director of 
the American Bible Society and a prominent member of many organi- 
zations. He married the youngest daughter of Isaac Clason, one of 
New York's notable merchants. A daughter suryiyed liim, with four 
sons — James, Glinton, Augustus, and ^Malcolm Graham. 

GPAHAM, MAL(M)L:\r, since 18.")4, has been a member of the firm 
of Hartley & (iraham, of New York City, dealers in tirearms and 
ammunition. He is a director of the Remington Arms Company, and 
a member of the T'nion, ^r('1ro]>o]itaii. Union League, Century, Law- 
yers', Biding, ^Manhattan, New ^'ork Yacht, Atlantic Yacht, and Sea- 
wanliaka-( "orintliian ^'a<lit clubs, the Downtown Association and the 
Sons of tlie BeA'olulion. lie is also a member of the St. ^Vudn-w's 
Society and of the New York Gliaml>er of ('omnuMce. He married, 
first, Annie, daughter of George Douglas, of New York City. Slie die<l 
in 1873. In 1876 he married Amelia ;\I., daugliter of J. B. Wilson, 
of New York City. He has a daughtei- and two sons — Malcolm, Jr., 
and Robert D. Graham. He was liinisclf born in New Jersey, July 
27, 1832, the son of the late ( 'oloncl John Lorimer <iraham, of tins 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



233 



city, einineiit as a la-\vyei' and in puldic life, 
Andrew Grabani, also a New York lawyiT, 
ancestry. 



md grandson of Jolin 
and of distiniinislicd 



GEAHAM, MALCOLJI, JR., eldest son of Malcolm Grahain, well- 
known niercliant of Xew York City, is hiiusclf a director and the 
Treasurer of tlic F. O. Pierce Company, paint manufacturers. He was 
o-radiiated from Princeton University in 1890, and is a member of the 
University Athletic, New York Yacht, Lawyers', Princeton, Delta Plii, 
St. Andrew's (iolf, IJichmond County Country, and Platen Island 
Cricket clubs, and the St. Andrew's Society. He married Maud L. 
Briahtman. 



DEPEW, CHAUNCEY MITCHELL, railroad tinamh-r, lawy.r, 
leader in the councils of the Republican party, eminent in social ami 

public life, orator, and ^__ 

famous after-dinner 
speaker, is oue of the 
most distiuguisiied citi- 
zens of the United States. j 
(4raduating with higli i / 

lionors from Yale College 
in 18.50 when twenty-two 
years of age, he identified 
himself with the Republi 
can party of whicli -Tolin 
C. Fremont was then 
Presidential candidate. 
He was admitted to the 
bar in 1858, and the same 
year elected a delegate 
to the Republican State 
Convention, from li i s 
liome at Peekskill, N. Y. 
He won renown as a 
political speaker tlirough- 
out the Ninth Congressional District during the Lincoln cami)aign of 
18G0, and being nominated for the New York Assembly the following 
year received a handsome majority in llie Third District of ^VesI- 
chester County, wliicii had been previonsly overwhelmingly Demo- 
cratic. Pve-elected in 1SC>2, hewas mentioned for Speaker of the House, 
became Chairman of its Ways and :Means Committee, and acied as 
Sjteaker a i)art of the session. In 18(;:5 he received ilie Kei)nblican 
nomination for Secretary of State, made a brilliant canvass, and, 
despite the fact that Governor Horatio Seymour had sweid the State 




CIIACNCEY MITCIIKI.I, DKI'KW. 



234 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

at the bead of the Democratic ticket the year previous, he was trium- 
phantly elected. He declined a reuomination in ISOo, and, removing 
to Xew York City, served for some time as Tax Commissioner. The 
pajiers had been made out for his appointment as Collector of the Port 
of New York when a quarrel between United States Senator Morgan 
and President Johnson altered the program. Appointed United States 
Minister to Japan by Secretary Seward, he resigned after holding the 
commission four weeks, his connection with the Vanderbilt railroad 
interests having already become such as to justify tliis decision. In 
1S72 he peiTuitted his nnuiination as Lieutenant-Governor on the 
Horace Greeley ticket, suffering defeat with the great editor. In 1881, 
when Senators Conkling and Piatt endeavored to embai'rass President 
Garfield by their resignations. 'Sli: Depew was the leading candidate 
before the Legislature for election to the United States Senate, being 
the choice of two-thirds of the Republicans of both houses, and only 
lacking ten votes of election on joint ballot. At the end of eighty-two 
days, following the foiiieth ballot, in which he retained all his 
strength, he withdrew on account of the death of President Gai-field, 
declaring that " the Senatonal contests should be brought to a close 
as decently and speedily as possible." In 1881, with a Eepublican 
majority of nearly two-thirds in the Legislatui-e, all factions united 
in off'ering him the vacant T'nited States Senatorship from New York, 
lie declined on account of his business engagements. One of the most 
formidable candidates for nomination to the Presidency in the Repub- 
liran National Convention of 1888, with a solid vote of the delegation 
of his own State, he withdrew in the interest of harmony, throwing his 
strength to Benjamin Hari-isou, who received the nomination. It is 
believed that his vigorous advocacy of the reuomination of President 
Harrison, after Blaine developed the sudden rivalry which he had de- 
clared he should not do, together with his skillful leadership of the 
Harrison forces in the Republican National Convention of 1892, and 
eloquent presentation of the name of Harrison to the convention, 
turned the tide in favor of the reuomination of the President. When 
Blaine resigned as Secretaiw of State in the summer of 1802, President 
Harrison offered the post to Mr. Depew, but after a Aveek's considera- 
tion the latter declined. In Januaiy, 1899, he was elected to the 
United States Senate by the New York Legislature. 

His connection with the Vanderbilt railroad system began in 18Gt>, 
when he became attorney to the New York and Harlem Railroad 
Company. He became general counsel to the consolidated New York 
Central and Hudson River Railroad Company in 18G9, and soon en- 
tered its directorate. In 187.5 he became general counsel of the entire 
system, being also elected a director of each company composing it. 
In the reorganization of 1882 he was elected First Vice-President of 
the New York Central, and June 11, 1881, succeeded the late James 
Rutter as President both of this road and the West Shore. These 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 235 

positions he held uutil the svi^tem was still furiln'i- eompaeted b^- the 
reorganization of the spring- of 1898, when he resigned to accept the 
more responsible trnst of presiding officer of all the boards of direc- 
tors of the affiliated corporations. In addition to foily-seven railroad 
corporations of which he is director, he is trnstee or director of the 
Union Trnst Company, the ilercantile Triist Company, the National 
Snrety Company, the Western National Bank, the Schermerhoru 
Bank of Brooklyn, the Western Union Telegraph Company, the Equit- 
able Life Assurance Society of the United States, the New York Mu- 
tual Gas Light Company, the Brooklyn ^^'arehouse and Storage Com- 
pany, and several other coi"porations. He has been a trustee of Yale 
College since 1872, a regent of the State T'niversity since 1874, and is 
President of the New York Society of the Sons of the American Ivcv- 
olution. President of the St. Nicholas Society, was for seven years 
Pi'esident of the Union League Club, and for ten years President of the 
Yale Alumni of New York. In 18S7 Yale University conferre<l upon 
him the degree of LL.D. His reputation as an orator and after-dinner 
speaker is national. Born in Peekskill, N. Y., Api-il 23, 1831, he de- 
scends through his father from Huguenot ancestors who settled in 
New Eochelle, Westchester County, in the seventeenth ceninry, and 
tln-dugh his mother from Roger Shenuan, signer of the Declaration of 
Independence. 

BANKS, DAVID, head of the famous law-book publishing liouse, 
which his father, the late David Banks, founded in 1801, is also Presi- 
dent of the Building, Inspector and Sanitary Surety Company, and 
Vice-President of the East River National Bank. Of the latter insti- 
tution his father was the first President. Mr. Banks was the last Cap- 
tain of the old City Guard, and is an honorary member of the organi- 
zation which pel^letuates its memory. He is a Commander of the 
Military Order of Eoreign Wars, and was formerly Commodore of the 
Atlantic Yacht Club. He is a member of the Council of the New York 
University and a member of its Law, Library, and Building commit- 
tees. He is a member of the Union, New York, Manhattan, St. 
Nicholas, Lawyers', City, New York Yacht, Atlantic Yacht, and Ata- 
lanta Boat clubs, the Sons of the Revolution, and the societies of For- 
eign and of Colonial Wars. His yacht is the Water Witch. He was 
born in this city, December 25, 1827, and married Lucetta G., daugh- 
ter of the late Elias Plum, of Troy, N. Y. He has a daughter and a 
son. David Banks. Jr., tlie latter being his business associate. 

BARLOW, PETER TOWNSEND, member of the well-known law 
firm of Shipman. Bai'low, Larocque & Choate. is the son of one of the 
founders of that fiiiii, the late Samuel L. M. Barlow, and a daughter 
of Peter Townsend. He was born in this city, June 21, 1S.">7: was 
graduated from Harvard in 1879, studied at the Columbia College 



2;i6 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

Law School aud with his father's liriu, and has been in active practice 
since. He is a director of I he .Mount Sterling;- Railroad Company and 
the Witte Water Placer Coiupanv. He is a member of the Union, 
Metropolitan, Fniversity, Harvard, Racquet, and New York Yacht 
clubs, and the Downtown Association. In 1886 he married Viriiinia 
Louise, dauiilitcr of p]dward ^Mathews, and has two sons — Ivlward 
Matlie\\s and Samuel T>. M. Rarlow. 

LORD. DANIEL DE FOREST, eldest sou of Daniel Lord, the cele- 
brated commercial lawyer, Avho founded and was long the head of the 
New York law firm of Lord, Day & Lord, also became a prominent 
laAvyer. He was born April 17, 1819, studied law with his father, and 
became a member of his firm. He was connected with a number of in- 
stitutions, and was one of the secretaries of the immense mass meet- 
ing in this city, April 20, 1801, to greet the heroes of Fort Sumter. 
He married, in 1845, ]\Iary Howard, daughter of Benjamin F. Butler, 
one of the revisers of the code in this State, and Attorney-General in 
the Cabinets of Yau Buren and Jackson, and sister of the present Will- 
iam Allen Butler. 

LORD, DANIEL, the present liead of the famous law firm of Lord, 
Day & Lord, is the eldest son of tlie late Daniel De Forest Lord, who 
was in turn eldest son of the eminent Daniel Lord. He was born in 
this city in 1840, was graduated from Columbia in 1800, and two 
years later was admitted to the bar aud to the firm of which he is now 
senior member. He is a trustee of the United States Trust Company, 
aud a director of the Fifth Avenue Trust Company and the Equitable 
Life Assurance Society. He is a member of the LTuion, Metropolitan, 
Union League, University, Lawyers', New York Athletic, Rockaway 
Hunt, Lawrence, and Seawanhaka-Corinthian Yacht (dubs, the 
Downtown Association, the City Bar Association, the Columbia 
Alumni Association, and the Sons of tlie Revolution. He married, in 
1808, Silvie Livingston Bolton, and has a daughter, Fanny Bolton 
Lord. His only son, Daniel Lord, died in 1893, having been grad- 
uated from Yale the ]iic\ious year. 

l'OLSo:\I, <H:0R(!E, lawyer, historical writer, and diplomat, was 
born in Kennebunk, Me., in 1802; in 1822 was graduated at Harvard; 
studied law and ]irai-ticed at Saco aud Framingliam, ^le., and Wor- 
cester, .Mass., jirior to ls:>7, and in the latter year became a resident 
of New York City. He was at one time Chairman of the American 
Antiquarian Society, aud subsequently became President of the 
American Ethnological Society. He was a jsrominent nieniber of the 
New York Historical Society, and ]»nblished "Sketches of Saco and 
Biddeford," " Dutch Annals (d' New York," "Letters and Despatches 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 237 

of Cortez," "Political Coiiditiou of Mexico," and "Address on i he 
Discovery of Maine." In IS-Li be was elected to the New York Senate. 
By appointment of President Zacliary Taylor, in 1850, he was for four 
years Cliarge d'Affaires at The Ilai^ne. lie died, in lS(i<), at Home, 
Italy. He married, in l8o'J, Margaret Cornelia, daughter of Benjamin 
"^^'inthrop, and a descendant of Governor John Winthrop. 

(leorge Winthrop Folsom, his son, was born in New York City, was 
graduated from Columbia College, and is a member of the Univer- 
sity, Century, and St. Anthony clubs, and the Columbia Alumni 
Association. He resides at Lenox, JIass. Margaret Winthro]) I'ol- 
som, his sister, became a member of the Sisterhood of St. John the 
Baptist, and established the St. Jolin Baptist Foundation, which 
maintains a mi.ssion church and schools for girls in this city and on 
Long Island. 

COOKE, AVILLIA:\[ gates, was admit led to the bar in N(nv York 
City, June 7, 1872, practiced law in that city until April, 1879, and 
since the latter date has practice<l in Brooklyn. He was Counsel to 
the Kings County Board of Supervisors in ISSl and 1885, while in 189() 
and 1897 he was Assistant Cori^oration Counsel of the City of Brook- 
lyn. He is a member of the Union League and Crescent Athletic 
clubs of Brooklyn. He was born in Kingston, N. Y.. June 0. 1851. and 
is the sou of Erastus Cooke and Lucretia Boot, daughter of Silas 
Gates and Deborah McDonald, and the grandson of Holden Cooke and 
Euth Joslin. His paternal ancestor came over in the Mayflower. 
His maternal great-grandmother, Huldah Goffe, was descended from 
one of the judges who condemned Charles L, " ( loffe, the regicide." 

LOGAN. WALTEK SETII. is the head of the law firm of Logan, 
Clark & Deniond. and President of tlie Sonora and Sinaloa Irrigation 
Company. He is a member of many clubs of New York and Brook- 
lyn, as well as of the Society of the Sons of the American Kevolution, 
and enjoys high social position. He was graduated from Yale in 
1870, from Harvard Law School in 1871, and from Columbia College 
Law School in 1872. He was designated by the Dean of the Har- 
vard Law School when the latter was applied to by James C. Carter 
to recommend a graduate for a delicate trust in connection with the 
celebrated Jumel case. After an association of many years with 
Mr. Carter, he organized his present firm, with Salter S. Clark and 
Charles M. Demond. His cases include the Chesebrough estate, ^^■irt 
Fountain Pen case, Phelps Estate litigation, and the water-riglK ir- 
rigation controversies in the southwest. He was born, April 15, 
1847, in Washington, Litchfield County. Conn., where his ancestors 
were among the early settlers. His father, Hon. Seth S. Logan, was 
a prominent Democrat. He was for twenty years a member of the 
Connecticut Legislature, and held other State offices. 



238 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

BUTLEK, WILLIAM ALLEN, is one of the most ciiiiiieiit of New 
York lawyers. He was lonji' at the head of the hiw tiriu of Butler, 
Stilliuan & Hubbard, and is now the senior member of the firm of 
Butlei*, Notman, .Toline & ^lynderse. Lie was made President of the 
American Bar Association in lSN(i, and in 1886 and 1887 was Presi- 
dent of the Association of tiie Par of the Tity of New York. He has 
lonii been regarded as a leading authority on admiralty law in the 
United States. Among his cases which have decided the maritime 
laAV of the country in impoi-tant points may be mentioned those of 
the Pennsylvania (19 Wallace, 125l, the LottaAvanna (21 Wallace, 
558), the Scotland (105 United States, 24), and the Montana (129 
United States, 397). In all these cases the United States Supreme 
('ourt alMrmed the interpretation of the law argued by Mr. Butler 
before that tribunal. He has been a member of the council of the 
University of the City of New York since 18(12, and tiiroughout this 
jteriod has delivered an annual course of lectures on admiralty law 
before the Law School of the University. He has also distinguished 
Idmscdf in letters, both as a poet and \A'riter of prose. While travel- 
ing abroad, from 181() to 1848, he contributed sketches of " Out-of-the- 
Way Places in Europe "' to the Literarij World. •' The Colonel's Club " 
A\as a humorous series in the same x^eriodical. He wrote on " Cities 
of Art and the Early Artists " for the Art Union Bulhtiu. His poem, 
" The Future " (1846), was followed by many others, contributed to 
the />' niiicnith- li( i-i'ir and other i)eriodicals. " Barnum's Parnassus," 
a volume of poems, was issiu^d in 1850. Seven years later the poetical 
satire, '' Nothing to Wear," appeared anon;\'mously in Harper's Weeklii, 
and Avas reproduced in England, Germany, and France. " Two Mill- 
ions "' was published in 1858, and the '"General Average" a little 
later, while his collected poems were published in Boston in 1871. He 
lias written two successful novels, •' Mrs. Limberis Baffle " and " Do- 
mesticus." Among writings of another character are " The Bible 
by Itself" (ISGO), "Martin Van Buren " (1862), "Lawyer and Cli- 
ent" (1871), "Evert A. Duyckiuck " (1879 1, and a history of the 
revision of the statutes of New York (1888). He was born in Albany, 
February 20, 1825. His father, Hon. Benjamin Franklin Butk'r, held 
llie portfolio of Attorney-General in the cabinets of lioth Jackson 
and Van Buren. He was one of the most eminent lawyers of tlie 
State of New York, and one of the revisers of the statutes. William 
Allen Butler is a member of the Union League, Century, Grolier, an<l 
Lawyers' clubs, and the Association of the Bar. His son, William 
Allen Butler, Jr., associated witli his father in law jtractice, is Pr( si- 
dent of the Lawyers' Club, as well as a member of the University and 
Princeton clubs and the Association of the Bar. 

SMITH, JOHN SABINE, during the three years, from 1889 to 1892. 
was Vice-President of tlie Bepublican Chil) of the Citv of New York. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



239 



niid in 1893 was its President. He has Imhmi I'residcnr (if the Society 
of Medical Jnvispindenre, and for seveial years was President of llie 
NeAV York Alunuii Association of Trinity ('ollei;e. He lias been for 
many years an active member of the Ke])nbiican County ("oniniittec of 
New York, was its President in 1893, and at tlie present time is its 
Treasurer. In 1891 lie was one of the most active nuMubers of the ( 'om 
iiiitteeof Tliirty apjiointeil tit reorg^ani/.c llic llciiublican party in N<'\v 
York County, ami as counsel of tliis connuittee secured its recogintiou 
as 1 he regular Kepublican organization in New York County. He has 
served a number of years on the Republican State Committee, being 
also a member of its E.Kecutive ('ommittee. He is \'ice-President of 
the Institute of Ci\'ics; is a mendier of (!race Churcli; was one of the 
founders of the East Side House, an institiiliou on the " University 
Settlement " jilan, and is its Treasurer; was one of tin- foundeis of the 
Church Club, was active in secur 
ing its incorporation, and has sinc<' 
been one of its energetic members; 
is a trustee of Trinity College; is a 
director of the Society for Promot- 
ing Clntrch Schools and Colleges; 
is counsel of St. Mark's Hospital, 
is a member of Chancellor Wal- 
worth Lodge, Fr<^e and Accepted 
■Masons; is one of the three trustees 
of the property in New York (J'ity 
of the Scottisli Rite, and is a thirty- 
second degree Mason, and a Knight 
Templar. In addition to the <n'gan- 
izations already named, he is a 
member of the T'niversity, Law- 
yers', and Qnill clubs, the New 
England Society, the Society of 
Colonial Wars, the Phi Beta Kappa m.hn >a]:im -muh. 

Alumni Society, the Bar Associa- 
tion of the City of New York, the New York State Bar Association, 
and the American Bar Association. In 1898 he received the degree of 
Doctor of Laws. 

As the Republican candidate for Surrogate of New York County in 
1892 he received a larger vote than had ever before been received by a 
Republican in New York City on a " straight " party ticket. In the 
Republican State Convention of 1893 he received the sup])oit of llic 
delegation from New York County for the nomination as Judge of tlie 
Court of Appeals. He was active in the creation of (lie Republican 
League of the United States. As a member of the ExecutiveConimittee 
of tiie New York State League in 1888, and Chairman of its sub-Execu- 
tive Committee, he directed itseuergiesin thecami>aigu resultiugiu Ilie 





N. 












V 




■v V-' 


4 


li 


im^H^^MH 


■ 


■ 









240 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

(4('cti()n of I'residoiit Hanisou. In IS'.io he was Chairman of tlie Ke- 
ini1>lic"in Club's Committee ou Mniiicipal Elections, which advocated 
a, '• straijilit " liepiiblican municipal ticket, and brou<;ht William L. 
Sh()Ui;to public attention as a, suitable candidate for Mayor. He was 
Chairman of the Republican Club's (Jampaisin Committee of Fifty in 
the uubernatorial contest of 18'J1, i)residing at the live great mass- 
meetin<;s in New York C^ty under its auspices. In recognition of his 
services in the presidential cauijiaign of 1S!I2, a dinner was given in 
his honor by the Ivepublican <"lul> in December of that year. In the 
]iresi(lential cam|iaign of 18!J(i, as well as in the municipal campaign 
of INitT, he was ( "hairnuiu of the Committee ou Speakers of the Kepub- 
licau County (."(unmittee. 

The Constitutional Amendment, increasing the membership of 
the Xew York Senate to fifty and that of the Assembly to one hundred 
and ftfty, was originated by Mr. Suiil li in a Committee of the Eepubli- 
can Club. He advocated it before the Constitutional Convention of 
1S1I4, and it was ado]>ted. Before the Committee on ( iti(^s of the Con- 
stitutional ('(Uiventiou he also defeated the ]>ioposition to give mayors 
of cities an unlimiteil veto of State legislation alTectiug their respec- 
t'wi cities. Lie was one of three Commissionei's a]i]M)inted by the Aji- 
pellate Division of the Supreme Court in 18!lT to take testimony and 
re]iort recommendations res]iectiug the constiuclion by the City of 
New York, at a cost of |35,000,(l()0, of a system of rapid transit. The 
Commissioners recommended that such a road be built and i)ut in 
operation, 'i'he general ])lan of the ])rimary law enacted in 1898 
originated with .Mr. Smith, while he nuule the Urst draught. He also 
pre])ared a c<)iiii>eudium of it, while he is engaged at the present time 
in its I'evision. 

l!orn in Ilandidph, Vt., April 24, 1843, he is the son of Dr. Jcdiii 
S])0(iuer Smith and Catharine, daughter of Kev. Janu^s Sabine. The lat- 
ter was an Eiiiscojinl clergyman, who was a rector in London, England, 
Itoston, Mass., and I?ethel,Vt. ; while his wife was the daughter of Isaac 
l)aufor<l, a distinguished English barrister. Mr. Smith's father was a 
physician at Kandoljih, Vt., for more than fifty years, being the leader 
of his profession throughout that region. He was, in turn, the son of 
Samuel Smith and his wife, Lucy Woods, whose father was an officer 
in the IJevolutiou. Captain Steele Smith, fatlier of SannuM and great- 
grandfather of John Sabine Smith, was the founder of ^^■iudsor, Vt., 
he liaving led a band of pioneers to that place from Fanuington, 
Conn. Mr. Smith also descends from Captain James Parker, of Grotou, 
Mass., commander of the ganisou at that place in KiTti. 

Having prepared for college at the Orange County (^'t. ) Grammar 
School, ilr. Smith entered Trinity College at the age of sixteen, and 
was graduated at the head of his class four years later, although he 
had been obliged to partially support himself by teaching. He had 
charsie of a select school at Trov, N. Y., during the next four years. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OI' NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY, 241 

Avhilc (liiriiii; this time he Jilso studied iiiw with •Jiidjie (xeornc <inul<l 
and Judge Gai'diiiei- ^tow(\ He next tauglit for one rear in Harring- 
ton's famous srliool at Throgg's Xeclc, Westclie.ster ('(innty; after 
^vliicli ( in 1S()S ) lie was admitted to tlie New Yoi'Ic bar, and engaged in 
l>raetiee in tiie City of New Vorlv. He attracted attention by his sue- 
cess in a number of im])ortant and dinicult cases, ami lias since en- 
joyed a large practice. 

He has distinguished himself as Iteferee in a number of intricate 
and yerj important cases during the last few years. 

KOOT, ELIHU, prominent lawyer of New York, was grailuated 
from Hamilton College iu 1S()4, studied law there and at the Uni 
versity Law School, and since 1S()7 has been engaged in practice iu 
New York City. He was counsel for Judge Hilton in the A. T. Stew- 
ait will cases, and was counsel in the Broadway surface railroad case, 
the Sugar Trust contest, the Bedell forgery suits, and the acqueduct 
litigation. He proceeded before Mayor Grant for the removal of Mat- 
thews and Post, Dock Commissioners of New Y'ork City. He defended 
Ivobert l{ay Hamilton in the suit of Eva Mann. In 1879 he was uu- 
successfiij Republican candidate for Judge of the Court of Common 
I'leas. By appointment of President Arthur he was United States 
l>istrict Attorney for the Southern District of New York from 1883 to 
1885, and in this capacity prosecuted James D. Fish, president of the 
Marine Bank, for bis connection witli the ( Jrant and War<l frauds. In 
1880 he was Chairman of the liepublican County Committee of New 
York, having for several years been a member of its executive com- 
nnttee. He was one of the leaders of the Committee of Thirty which 
revolted against the Bepuldican macjiine in New York County in 
18!)3-!)4, and effected a reoigani/.alion. lie was a delegate-at-largv to 
the Constitutional Convention of 1S!I4, and was Chairman of its Judi- 
ciary Committee. He has been i)resi(lent of the Bepublicau Club of 
the City of New Y'ork, and of the New England Society, and Vice- 
President of the Union League Club. He is also a member of the 
iletropolitan. Century, Univei'sity. and Players' clubs. Born in Clin- 
ton, Oneida County, N. Y'., February L"), 1845, he is the son of Oren 
P(K)t, who. for tliirty-six years, was ](i'ofessor of mathematics in Ham- 
ilt<m College. His ]>aternal ancestors were long seated in New Eng 
land. 

EPiVING, JOHN, has bi-en engaged in the active practice of law 
iu this city for more than forty yeai-s. He is a member of the Bai- 
Association of the city and tlie Union League. City, and Harvard 
clubs. He married Cornelia, dauglilei- of ^Villiam Van Rensselaer 
and Sarah Pogers. of Albany, and has several daugliters and two 
sons— John Ljingdon Erving, of New York City, and William Van 
Peiisselaer Erviu". of All)anv. ^ir. IOr\ iiig was born in 1S:W. and was 



242 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

graduated from ilarvard iu 1853. He !;> the son of the late Colouel 
John Erving, United States Army, and Emily S., daughter of Hon. 
•John Laugdon. Avho. in a(hlition to many other distinguished honors, 
was Governor of 2sew Hampshire for nine years, and United States 
Senator for twelve years. He is also descended from John Win- 
throp, Thomas Dudley, and General William Shirley, all of whom 
were (lovernors of Massachusetts, and thus traces his line from sev- 
eral English kings, and from Henry I. of France and his wife, Anne 
of Russia, daughter of the Grand Duke Jaroslaus. 

XICOLL, DE LA^'CEY, was born in Bayside, L. I., in 1854, in 1871 
was gradtiated from Princeton witli high honors, in 187(> was grad- 
tiated from Columbia College Law School, and successfully practiced 
law in this city for many years. In 1885 he became Assistant District 
Attorney under District Attorney Randolph B. Martine. The inde- 
pendent and Republican candidate for District Attorney in 1887, he 
was defeated by the Tammany candidate, the late John R. Fellows. 
In the fall of 1890 he was elected to this office on the Tammany ticket. 
At the concltision of the term of three years he resumed the practice 
of law. He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1894. 
He married ^lattd Churchill. He is a member of the Union, Metro- 
politan, Ttixedo, Racqtiet, Riding, University, Manhattan, Princeton, 
Eockaway Hunting, Democratic, and Lawyers' clubs, and the Down- 
town As.sociation. He is the son of Solomon Townsend Xicoll, a stic- 
cessful merchant of this city who married his cousin, Charlotte Ann 
Xicoll; is grandson of Benjamin Xicoll and Mary M., daughter of Ed- 
ward Holland, and is descended from William X'icoll, who married 
Anna, datighter of Patroon Jeremias Van Rensselaer and Maria Van 
Cortlandt, and from William XicolFs father, Matthias Nicoll, who in 
KUU accompanied to this country his itncle, the conqueror and (tov- 
crnor of Xew York, Sir Richard Xicoll, and himself became the first 
I^nglish Secretary of the Colony of X'ew York, and was Governor's 
Cotmcilor, Mayor of this city, Speaker of the Assembly, and Judge of 
the Court of Oyer and Terminer. 

BRISTED, CHARLES ASTOR, lawyer, of this city, was born here 
in 18(19, and is the son of the late distingtiished Charles Astor Bristed 
by his second wife, Grace Ashburner. daughter of Charles Sedgwirk 
of Lenox, Mass., and granddaughter of Hon. Theodore Sedgwick, 
Member of Congress, United States Senator, and Judge of the iMassa- 
chusetts Suiueme Court. Rev. John Bristed, his grandfather, was 
born in England and died in Rhode Island, while his wife, grand- 
mother of Mr. Bristed, was a daughter of the first John Jacob Astor 
of this city. He is also eighth in descent from Major-General Robert 
Sedgwick, who came to Massachtisetts in 1G35, and from John Dwight, 
who came over in 1634. 'Slv. Bristed was graduated from Trinity Col- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 243 

Iciie, Cambridiii', Eugland, in 1S!J:>; stvidied law, and was admitted 
to practice in tliis city, aud tias followed his profession, lie is a 
member of the Knickerbocker and Catholic clubs. In 1894, he married 
Mary Rosa, daughter of Edward C. Donnelly, of Grove Mount, Man- 
hattanville, aud has two dauiihters. 

BACKUS, J. BAYAKD, loni; enjiaiivd in the practice of law in New 
York City, was boru in Schenectady, N. Y., September 20, 1853, and 
is a yradimte of Union College. He was one of the founders of the 
University Athletic Club of New York, aud was one of the seven 
incorporators of the Society of Mayflower Descendants, being' now 
a member of its Board of Assistants. He is also a member of the 
Union (College Alumni, the New England Society, and the Society of 
Colonial Wars. He married, in 1877, Cornelia N., daughter of 
Joshua C. Price, of Rockingham (/ounly, Virginia, and has a daugh- 
ter. Mr. Backus's interesting ancestry is set forth in Browning's 
" Americans of Royal Descent.'' He is the son of the late Dr. Jona- 
than Trumbull Backus and Ann E., daughter of the late Chamellor 
Walworth. His father was graduated from Columbia College, was 
a trustee of Union, and was Moderator of the Presbyterian General 
Assembly at Philadelphia in 1870, being one of the most eminent 
Presbyterian divines in the United Staters. 

TRUAX, CHARLES HENRY, was a Justice of the Superior Court 
of this city for the term of fourteen years from 1880 to 1804. and 
in the fall of 1895 was elected a Justice of the Stipreme Court for the 
term of fourteen years, beginning Jaiinary 1. ISOO. He was a member 
of the Constitutional Convention of 1S94. He either has been or is 
a trustee of the Mott Memorial Library, a trustee of the Holland 
Society, and a Governor of the :Maidiattan Club. Eor seven years he 
was a trustee of the Church of the Puritans. He owns one of the 
notable private libraries of the city, containing 10.000 carefully se- 
lected vi.luiiies, and gave a library of 1.250 volumes to Hamilton Col- 
lege. In addition to the organizations named, he is a nu'mber of tlie 
Democratic, New York Athletic, and Harlem (lubs. and the St. 
Nicholas aud Dunlap societies. ]i(u-n in Durhamville. N. Y., Oc- 
tober 31, 1840, he is the sou of Henry Philip Truax and Sarah Ann, 
daughter of Gilbert Shaffer, and sister of the late Chauncey Shaffer, 
the well-known lawyer of this city. While he left Hamilton College 
In his junior year. Judge Truax subsequently received the degrees 
of A.M. and LL.D. He taught school in Oneida County from 1802 to 
1868, and, entering the law office of Chauncey Shaffer in New York 
City, at the end of a year was admitted to the bar, and engaged iu 
]iractice. He is eighth in lineal descent from Philippe Du Trieux, one 
of the Walloons, who came over in 1023, and was Court :Marshal of 
New Amsterdam under Peter Minuet in 1038. On February 9, 1871, 



244 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



lie \v;is iiiarricd t<i Xannie C, daughter of Tlioiuas Stone. She died, 
.March 30, 1880, leaviug two sous and two daughters. 



r 



UOWLAND, HENRY ELIAS. has been engaged in the practice of 
law in New York City since 1857, as partner for twenty-one years of 
John Sherwood, and subsequently with the late Henry H. Anderson, 
under the style of Anderson, Howland \' ^Murray, of which well- 
known firm he is now the head. In 1873 Governor Dix appointed him 
to the Marine Court bench of this city, now the City Court. He was 
tlic nnsnccessful ItciMihlican candidate for this bench the same year. 

In 1S75 and 187(1 he was an Alder- 
man of New York City. In 1881 he 
was President of the Department 
of Taxes. He was the unsuccessful 
Kepublican candidate for Judge of 
the Court of < 'oiiiiiion Pleas in 1884, 
and for Judge of the Supi*eme 
Court in 1887. He is now President 
of the Board of Managers of the 
:\lanhattan State Hospital. He is 
also President of the Society for 
the Relief of Destitute Blind, Pres- 
ident of the Jekyl Island Club, 
President of the Meadow Club of 
Soutliampton, L. I.; is Governor- 
General of the Society of May- 
flower Descendants, is First Vice- 
President of the New England So- 
ciety, is a member of the Executive 
Committee of the Union League 
Club, is Secretary of the Ceutuiy 
Club, has been a member of the 
Council of the University Club since 
its organization, is also a member 
of the Metropolitan, I'layers', Kepublican, Shinnecock Hills Golf, and 
Adirondack League clubs, and the Downtown Association; is a mem- 
ber of the Corporation of Yale University, is a trustee of the New 
York Free Circulating Library, as he is also of the Marion Street 
Maternity Hospital; for many years has been connected with the 
State Charities Aid Association, is a Vestryman of the Church of the 
Ascension, Fifth Avenue, and is a member of the Bar Association 
of the City of New York. He was born in Walpole. N. H.. June 30, 
1835, the son of Aaron P. Howland and Huldah Burke. He descends 
from Governor Silas Wright, of New York, and from John Howland. 
who came over on the first voyage of the ^layllower. He Avas edu- 
cated in the common schools of New Hampshire, prejiarcd for college 




HENRY F.LIAS HOWLAND. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 245 

at KimbaH'f^ Union Acadcniy. Mciidcn, N. II.. and, cntciing Yale (Njl- 
lege at the age of lifteeu. was gi-adnatcd in 1S.")4. subsequently re- 
ceiving the degree of Master of Arts. Jlc studied law with Judge 
Frederick Vose, and in 1857 was graduated from liarvard Law School. 
Judge Howland is u director of the Lawyers' Title Insurance Com- 
pany, the Lawyers' .Mortgage Insurance Couipany. the Maritime ("anal 
Company, of Nicaragua; the Continental Filter Company, and the 
Brearley School. 

JAIMES, EDWARD CHKISTOPHEi;, at twenty years of age inter- 
rupted his law studies to go to the front as Adjutant of th.e Fiftieth 
New York Volunteers, in April, 1S(!], and served until August, ISGo, 
when he was honorably discharged on account of disability, lie had 
risen to the rank of ( .'olonel of the One Hundred and Sixth New York 
Volunteers, and at tiiues jiad been in comnmnd of his brigade. Ke- 
suniing his legal studies at ()gdeusl>urgh, N. Y., he was admitted to 
the bar in 1863, and in Jauuai-y of the following year began practice in 
partnei'sliip with Hon. Stillman I'oote. TIds association was con- 
tinued for ten years, after which Colonel James jiracticed alone at 
Ogdensburgh for seven years. In 1881 he formed a partnership with 
his managing clerk, .Vlric I\. Ilerriman, and leaving tlie ()gdensbui-gli 
business in his hands, removed to Xe\\ York City, where he has since 
practiced. He is head of the law tirm of James, Schell, Elkus&McGuire. 
In the case of People r.s. New York Central and Hudson River Railway 
Coui])any he established the right of the State to compel the operation 
of railways. He has defended many suits for the Manhattan Elevated 
Raihvay Company. He I'ecovered from Ihe New York Lif(> Insurance 
C<unpany a fifth interest in the Plaza Hotel as counsel for Mrs. Apple- 
ton, daughter of the late John Anderson, the wealthy tobacconist. 
Joseph 11. Choate and William B. Hornblower were the opposing 
counsel. He has been counsel of Russell Sage in the suits of Laid law 
r.s'. Sage, connected wdth the Norcross bomb explosion, Mr. Clioate 
being opposing counsel. He obtained a verdict of |37, 5(1(1 for Mrs. 
Ellen Pollack in her suit against her father-in-law for alienating 
her husband's affections. He W'as counsel for the minority bond- 
holders in the reorganization proceedings of the East Tennessee, 
A'irginia and Georgia Railway Company. After a year's litigation 
he secured the withdrawal of the com])laint in the suit of the bond- 
holders of the Kansas Pacific Railway Company to recover |11.0()(),()00 
from Russell Sage and the executors of the Jay Gould estate. He 
successCully defended Police Captain William S. Devei";\- and Police In- 
spector :McLaughlin from cliarges growing out of the investigation by 
the Lexow Senate Commit tee, and secured the reinstatement of the 
latter client. lie is couusid for the widow's estate and the next of 
kin in the Fayerweather will case now pending. He married, in ISfil, 
Sarah Welles, daughter of Edward H. Perkins, of Atliens. Pa., and 



246 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

has two daughters — Mrs. (irant C. Madill, of Ogdensburgh, and Mrs. 
I'auldiug Faruham. Mrs. James died in 1879. Colonel James was 
born in Ogdensburgh, Mav 1, 1841, and is the son of the late Hon. 
Amaziah Bailey James, who was a Justice of the ?sew York Supreme 
Court from 1853 to 1877, and a member of Congress from 1877 until his 
death in 1883. He descends from Dr. Thomas James, who emigrated 
from Wales to Khode Ishmd with Roger Williams. Ilis grandfather, 
Samuel B. James, was a lawyer, while his great-grandfather, Amos 
James, was also a lawyer, and was a commis.sioued cavalry officer 
during the Revolution. Colonel James's mother was the daughter 
of Cai)tain Christopher I.'ipley, of the War of 1812; was the sister of 
General Roswell S. Eiple;\', liistorian of the Mexican War, and was 
a niece of General James W. Eiph:-y, Avho distinguished himself in 
the War of 1812 and in the Civil War. Through her Colonel James 
descends from Kev. John IJobinson, pastor of the Pilgiim Fathers in 
Leyden, Holland, and from William Bradford, 8r., and William Brad- 
ford, Jr., (lovcrnors of riyiiioutli Colony. 

ALLEN, ETHAN, soon after his graduation from Blown Univer- 
sity with honors in 1860, was admitted to the New York Bar, and 
during the war period was Deputy United States District Attorney 
for the Southern District of New York. With William M. Evarts 
and others he represented the Goveimment in the prosecution of the 
officers and crew of the Savannah for piracy, and was prominent in 
other notable cases. He was also commissioned ('olonel in the recruit- 
ing service hj Governor E. D. Morgan, and recruited the Blair Brig- 
ade. He was counsel in the famous Commodore Yanderbilt will con- 
test. In 1872 lie was Chairman of the National Committee of the 
Liberal Republicans who nominated Horace Greeley for President. 
He is a member of the T'nion League and otlier clubs, the Sons of the 
American Revolution, and the Brown University Alumni Associa- 
tion. He was born in Monmouth County, New Jersey, the sou of 
Samuel Fleming Allen, a soldier in the War of 1812, and grandson of 
Captain Samuel Allen, a Revolutionary ofHc-er. He married, in 1861, 
Eliza, daughter of Darius Clagett and Providence Brice, of distin- 
giiislicd [Maryland families. 

AGAR, JOHN GIRAUD, head of the law lirm of Agar, Ely & 
Fulton, has been prominently identified with the movement for reform 
in local government of the People's ^lunicipal League of this city. In 
the State election of 1891 he was Chairman of its Campaign Com- 
mittee, and through his activity the State candidates pledged them- 
selves to supi)ort the Australian system of voting by blanket ballot. 
He also early advocated the creation of a State naval militia, and 
September 2, 1891, was appointed l)y Governor Hill Lieutenant of 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 2-17 

the First Biittalion, Xaval Kesei-ve Artilk-ry of the State of Xew York. 
Althoujili a Deiiiocrat, iu June, 18S1, he was appointed by President 
(tartield Assistant United States District Attorney for the Soutliern 
District of New York. At the end of a year he resigned to organize 
his pri s( lit hiw tirni. lie is a trustee of St. Patrick's ('athedral, a 
director of tlie Mathieson Alkali Works, and the National Starch 
Manufacturing Company, a member of the Union, Metropolitan, and 
otlier clubs, and has received the degrees of M.A. and Ph.D. from the 
University of Georgetown. ]le was Ixirn in New Orleans, June 3, 
1S56, the son of William Agar, a native of ('ounty Tarlow, Ireland, 
who became a prominent New Orleans merchant, and Theresa Price, 
of Louisville, Ky. He was graduated from the University of George- 
town, D. C, iu 18TG; in 1S7S completed a course in biology and moral 
and mental science in the IJonian Catholic University of Kensington, 
London, and iu 1S80 was graduated from the Columbia College Law 
School. 

CONSTANT, SAMUEL YICTOK. has been engaged in the practice 
of Law in New York City since 1SS2, and is solicitor in the United 
States of the Mercantile Marine Service Association of Great Britain. 
He has engaged in literary work along both scientific and historical 
lines, and is a member of the American Academy of Sciences, the 
American Oriental Society, the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Brit- 
ain, the American Historical Association, and the historical societies 
of New York and "^'irginia. He was the first to conceive and one of 
the organizers of the Society of Colonial Wars. After the death of 
Martha J. Lamb he carried on for a while the publication of the 
Magn/.iiic of American History as editor and jiroprietor. He is a 
member of the Board of Directors of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, and a member of its International Committee. He is a mem- 
ber of the Building Committee of Columbia University, and has been 
School Inspector in the Thirteenth District of the city. He is a 
member of the Lawyers', Psi Upsilon, and Baptist clubs; the Sons of 
the Revolution, the Founders and Defenders of America, tlie New 
York State Society of the Founders and Patriots of America, and the 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery (['ompany. In 1S76 he joined the 
Seventh Begiment, and is a member of the Seventh Eegiment A'eteran 
Association, lie was born in this city, attended the Charlier Insti- 
tute and Dr. Anton's School, was graduated from Columbia College 
in ISSO, and from Columbia College Law School in 18S2. He is the 
sou of the late Samuel S. Constant, a prominent manufacturer of this 
city, and traces his descent from many illustrious ancestors. 

DAYIDSON, GEORGE TRIMBLE, has been engaged in the prac- 
tice of law iu New York City since 1885, and has been prominent in 
the arrangement of a number of high social affairs. He was one of 



248 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER MEW YORK. 



the ("onuiiittet' of (Jne llmidred which received the foreign guests of 
the city at the Coliimbi.-ni ( Vlebration of 1S1J3, and has entertained 
the Infanta Enhilie. Don Antonio of 8pain, Prince Kolaud Bona- 
parte, the Due de Lerme. tlie Due de \'eragua, the ( Irand Dulce Alexis 
of liussia. I'riuce Charles de Ilatzfeldt-Wildenberg. the Duke of Marl- 
boi'ough. and the Due de 'rnnianies. He is a director of the Little 
Giant Fire Extinguisher Conipany, and a member of the Manhattan 
and Democratic clubs, the Bar Association of the city, the New Eng- 
land Society, and the Sons of the Eevolutiou. He is of distinguished 
descent, the son of the late Colonel ^lathias ()liver Davidson, civil 
engineer, and his wife, daughter of Cai)tain iMathew .Miles Standish. 
and was born in Fordham, N. Y., October 21, 1863. He was educated 
at St. Paul's School. Concord, N. H.. and in 1885 was graduated from 
the Columbia College Law School at the head of his class. 



WEED, S3IITH MEAD, was engaged in the practice of law in 
Plattsburgh. N. Y., and New York City, from 1857 to 1883. since 

which date he has not actively 
practiced. He has been identified 
with many important corporate 
enterprises, and at present is Presi- 
dent of the Hudson l\iver Ore and 
Iron (Company, has been President 
of the Chateaugay Ore and Iron 
Conipany since he organized it in 
1881, is President of the Chat<'au- 
gay IJailidad, tlie first raili-oad 
route into the .Vdirondacks, organ- 
ized and constructed through his 
eftVirts; is First Vice-President of 
the Jose])]! Ladm' Gold Alining 
and Develo])ment Company, of Yu- 
kon; is a member of the Advisory 
Committee of the Soutli American 
Exploration Coiiijiany, and is a 
director of the Mutual Automatic 
Telephoiu' Company, the Auto- 
matic Telephone and Electric Comiiany, and the Associated Colonies. 
He was a Democratic Member of the New York Assembly in 1865,1866, 
and 1867. becoming Democratic candi<late for Speaker and leader of 
the minority in ISiiC. He was a member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention of 18(i7. In 1S(>8 the State Senate enqiloyed him as Senior 
Counsel in the impeachment of Canal Commissioner Dorn. Again 
elected to the Assembly in 1871, he opposed the Tammany Hall ring, 
and was assaulted in the Assembly Chamber by Assemblyman James 
Irving, of New "\'nrk, the hitter being expelled from the Assembly 




SMITH MEAD WEED. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 249 

iu cousfqiieuce. He also served iu the Assembly iu 187::? and ISTi, 
in the latter year again being candidate of the Democratic minority 
for Hpeaker. In 1872 he organized the New York and Canada Rail- 
road Company, and arranging with the Delaware and Hudson ( 'anal 
Company, of Xew York City, to complete the road, in 1875 he saw the 
opening of a line connecting the British Provinces with New Y'ork 
City and the Pennsylvania coal fields. Becoming (ieneral Counsel 
of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company in 1873. he established 
an ottice in New Y'ork City. He has been active in connection with 
the Nicaragua Canal project. He has also been active in the com- 
mercial development of the island of .San Domingo, and iu the con- 
struction of a railroad on that island. He was successful in secur- 
ing the establishment of a United States Army post at Plattsburgh. 
N. Y., and was largely instrumental in securing the erection cd' the 
well-known Plotel (.'hamplain, three miles south of Plattsburgh. He 
was a prominent Democratic candidate for United States Senator in 
1890, being defeated by David B. Hill. He married, in 1859. ( 'arrie L.. 
daughter of Colonel il. M. Staudish. of Plattsburgh, seventli in lineal 
descent from the famous Captain ^Miles Staudish. Mrs. Weed died in 
1S8G. leaving two sons and two daughters. The second son Hon. 
George Staudish Weed, a lawyer of Plattsburgh. has serv(Ml as 
President of that village. County .Tudg(\ Collector of Customs for the 
District of Champlain,and twice as. Member of t lie New York Assembly. 
Mr. Weed was himself born in Belmont, Franklin County, N. Y.. July 
26, 1833. the sou of Poswell Alcott Weed and Sarah A.', daughter of 
Smith :Mead. a soldier of the War of 1812. He attended the jnildic 
schools of Plattsburgh, for live years engaged in mercanlile pur- 
suits, studied law with Judge Beckwith, of Plattsburgh, and in 1857 
was graduated from the Harvard Law School, having taken front 
rank in his class, and twice been elected Speaker of the Dane Law 
School Assembly. 

BELL, JAMES D., was on the editorial staff of the New York 
TI'o/'W, most of the time as Literary Editor, from Janu;iry, 1871, to 
May, 1873, and from the latter date to January. 1877, was on the 
editorial staff of the New Y'ork /)r//7// (fnipliic. He organized the 
illusti-ation department of the latter. He also contributed occasional 
editorials to the (iniiiliic and the New York TiiiKs until 1882. He 
studied law, and on September IG, 1880, was admitted to the bar, 
beconiing a member of the tii-ni of Dailey, Bell & Crane, which sub- 
sequently became Dailey & Bell. Lrom 188t) to 1887 he represented 
the Nineteenth Ward on the Board of Supervisors of Kings County, 
and was Chairman of the Law Committee. From 1888 to 1800 he was 
Commissioner of Police and Excise in the City of Brooklyn. He was 
Chairman of the Committee which reorganized the Democratic party 
in Kiui^s Countv in 1894. From 1894 to 189(i he was Cliaiinian of the 



250 HISTORY OF THE GREATER Xi:\V YORK. 

DemucintiL- Cicneral Cuimuittee of Kings Couuty, wliile he is its First- 
Vi(i--Cliaiiui;iii at the prescut time. He is a trustee and Chairman 
ol" tlie Law Library of Brooklyn, is a trustee and First Mee-President 
of the Brooklyn Bar Association, is a director and \' ice-President of 
the Hanover Clul), and is a member of the Brooklyn ("lub. He served 
in the Federal Army from October 1, IStil, to June 2G, 1865, in the 
First XeA\' York Mounted IJifles. He is now serving his fourth term 
as Commander of the Abel Smith-First Long Island Post, Xo. 435, 
Department of Xew York, Grand Army of the Eepublic. He is also 
serving his third term as Chaii'man of the Memorial and Executive 
Committee of the Grand Army of the Kepublic of Kings County. The 
son of John Bell and Anna M. Sherman, he was born in Xew York 
City, September 29, 1845. He was educated in the public schools and 
tlie College of the City of Xew York. 

DANISUX. CUABLES E\'EKETT. has been actively engaged in 
the practice of law in Xew York City since 1878, and, having made a 
special study of medical jurisprudence, is a recognized authority in 
that department. He has been counsel in a number of the famous 
cases on trial during the past twenty years. He was one of the found- 
ers of the ^ledico-Legal Society. In 1891 he was a prominent can- 
didate for the nomination for the State Senate from the First District 
of the city. He has traveled much abroad, and is an art collector. 
Me married, in 1885, Mary Eva, daughter of the late James P. Ti'av- 
ers, long a prominent mei'chant of this city. Mr. Davison was born 
in Xew Y'ork City in 1857, was educated here and at Heidelberg Uni- 
versity, Germany, and was graduated from the Law Department of 
the University of the City of Xew York in 1878. He is the son of 
the late John Garrett Davison and Sarah Amelia Stanton, his mother 
beiu"' granddaughter of a Mavor of Duliliu, Ireland, and a cousin of 
Secretary of ^Var Edwin Stanton. His father, born at Sherburne, 
X. Y^., was the son of Captain Peter I. Davison, who, although born in 
England — as was his wife, who had been a ^liss Garrett — served 
against Great Britain in the ^Var of 1812, having the rank of Cap- 
tain in the United States anuy. 

SACKETT, TTEXBY W( »( )I)\VABI>, head of the law firm of Sackett 
& Bennett, is the son of the late Dr. Solon P. Sackett, of Ithaca, X. Y'., 
and Lovedy K. Woodward. He is the great-grandson of Major Buell 
Sackett, a. Bcvolutionary olticer of an ohl Bliodc Island family, as lie is 
also of Sir Benjamin ^Yoodward, the English nattiralist. Born in 
Enfield, X, Y''., in 1853, he was graduated from Cornell College in 1875; 
while sttidying law A\as Instructor in Greek and Latin in the Monti- 
cello JMilitary Academy, and entered Columbia College Law School 
in 1876. At this period he contributed to the Xew York Trilmiic re- 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 251 

ports (»f cases in the Conrt of Appeals and United States courts. He 
was admitted to the bar in 18711, and became associated with tlie late 
Cornelius A. Eunkle, counsel of the TrUiniiv. Upon the death of Mr. 
Kunkle in 1888, lie succeeded Iiim in That relation, and since that time 
has also written the lejjal editorials which have appeared in that jour- 
nal. He is a member of the Cit.y Bar Association, the Society of iledi- 
cal Juris] )rudence. Troop A, the Society of Sons of the American 
Kevolutiou, and the City, Uniyersity, and Twilight clubs. He was 
married, in IStiG, to Lizzie, daughter of Edmund Titus, of Brooklyn. 

CHAl'lX, ALFIJED CLAIIK, has made an enviable record in jiub- 
lic life against ring and boss rule. A pronusing young lawyer of 
Brooklyn, in 1881, and at the age of thirty-three, he was elected to 
the Assembly as a Democrat by 1,200 majority in a district normally 
Republican by 2,100. This was in anticipation that he would act 
independently, and he did so, rapidly familiarizing himself with the 
legislative machinery and the measures before the body and boldly 
exposing corrupt and pernicious projects. As Chairman of a special 
committee he made a fearless report on the receiverships of insolvent 
insurance companies. He secured the passage of the so-called Chapin 
primary law, and advocated the princiiiles of home rule for cities. 
At the close of his term he was tendered a dinner at which Mayor 
Seth Low spoke. Re-elected in 1882 by 3,(i.">0 majority, he was elected 
Speaker of the Assembly. In 1883 he was elected State Comptroller 
by 1G,000 majority, although the candidate for Secretary of State on 
the same ticket was defeated by 16,000. His administration was able, 
leading to his re-election. The Western Union Telegraph Company 
having refused to pay its taxes, whih- a judgment against it was re- 
turned '• unsatisfied," he drew a bill re(iuiring the corporation to dis- 
close its property. Witinn twenty-four hours the company paid in 
•?140,000 of delinquent taxes. In 1887 he was elected Mayor of 
Brooklyn after an exciting contest, and in 1889 was re-elected by over 
9,000 majority, the largest ever received by a candidate for that office. 
" He laid more miles of granite pavement than all his predecessors 
combined; he built more schoolhouses than had been erected during 
any three previous administrations; lie increased the ])olici' force 
of the city more than one-third; he opened small attractive parks in 
different localities, and thus gave healthful resorts and additional 
breathing spaces to the people; and he inaugurated the erection of a 
memorial of the Federal dead more magnificent than any yet projected 
by any other city in the country — and all this he did without laying 
any additional burden upon the taxi)ayers." In 1891 he was elected 
to Congress. Born in South Hadley, ]\Lass., March 8, 181S, he is lineal- 
ly descended from Samuel Chapin, who was in Xew England prior 
U) 1036. He was graduated from Williams College in 1869, from 
the Harvard Law School in 1871. and after studvinti' in a New York 



252 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

law office for another year, was admitted to the bar iu 1872. In 1873 
he be.nan practice in Brooklyn. He was the first President of the 
Yonnu' Men's Democratic Clnb of that city. He now has business 
in this city, beini;- Secretary and director of the Land and Security 
Investment Company, Secretai'y and director of the Screw Dock Com- 
pany, and director of the Cereals Manufacturing Company. 

BI'JCE, CALVIX STEWAET, United States Senator from Ohio 
from 1891 to 1897, was eminent alike as a leader of the Democratic 
party and as a railroad financier. At the time of his death he was Pres- 
ident of the Lake Erie and Western Eailroad Company, President 
of the Cincinnati, Jackson and Mackinaw Kailway Company, Presi- 
dent of the Sault Ste. Marie Brid*ie Company, Vice-President of the 
Duluth, South Sliore and Atlantic Railway Company, and a director 
of the Pacific ^lail Steamship (/ompany, the Chase National Bank, 
the United States Guai'antee Company, the Homer Lee Bank Note 
Company, the Elkhorn Valley Coal Land Company, the Western 
Union Beef Company, and the Welsbach Commercial Company. In 
1888 he became Chairman of the National Democratic Campaign Com- 
mittee, and while retaining this position in 1889, succeeded the late 
W. II. Barnum as Chairman of the Democratic National Committee. 
In January, 1890, he was elected United States Senator frcjm Ohio 
to succ('e<l Henry B. Payne, his term beginning March i, 1891. Born 
in Denmark, Ohio, September 17, 1845, he was the son of a IM-esbyteriau 
clergyman, one of the Brices of Maryland, who claim descent from 
Sir Alexander Bruce, of Airth, Scotland, and his wife, Janet, daugh- 
ter of Alexander, fifth Lord Livingston. His mother, Elizabeth Stew- 
art, of Carrolltoii, .Md., is of the royal Stuarts. He temporarily left 
^liami College dniing tlie Civil War for three months' service in Cap- 
tain 1 >odd"s Uni\ersity Company, and later served in the \'irginia 
campaign with Captain ^McFarland's University Company, — Com- 
pany A of the Eighty-sixth Ohio. He was graduated in 18(>3, and the 
following year organized Company E of the (;)ne Hundred and Eight- 
ieth Ohio, and served in Tennessee, Georgia, and the Carolinas until 
the end of the war, attaining the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. He at- 
tended the law school of the University of Michigan, was admitted 
to the Ohio Bar in 1806, and began practice in Cincinnati. He be- 
came successful as a corporation lawyer and in connection with rail- 
road interests. In 1870-71 he secured in Europe a loan for the Lake 
Erie and Louisville Tiailroad, and extended it to the town of Lima. 
Afterward it became the Lake Erie and Western, and he has been 
its President since 1887. He was largely instrumental in building 
the New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railway (the " Nickel Plate "), 
between Chicago and Buffalo. At different times he had been con- 
nected with the Chicago and Atlantic, the Ohio Central, the Richmond 
and Danville, the Riclniumd and ^Vest Point Terminal, the East Ten- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



253 



nessee, the Vii"i;iiiia and (Jeoriiia. the Memphis and Charleston, the 
Mobih' and I'ii inini;hani, and the Kentneky Central. 



ALLISON. THOMAS, was born in New York City, September 19, 
ISiO; in 18(30 was i;radnated from t he ( '(dlejie of the Citr of New York, 
studied law with Hon. John W. Edmonds, and in 18(51 was admitted 
to the bar. He practiced alone for some years, was head of the law 
firm of Allison & Shaw for nine years precedinji' May, 1882, and since 
that date has practiced alone. He was noniinaTed for the IhmhIi of 
the Court of ("omnion IMeas in 188!l by the (Citizens' movement, the 
Republican party, and the County Democracy, but the Tammany 
ticket won throughout. Governor Morton a](pointed liim .Tudiie of 
the Couil: of ([Jeneral Sessions to 
succeed the late Hon. Ivandoli)h 1>. 
Martine, and dnring liis eiglit 
months' service on this bencli lie 
adjudicated a number of difticnlt 
and notable cases, includiuiLi- that 
of Sheriff Tamsen. The jurors who 
served under him ]tresented liim 
with a silver and ivory gavel and a 
set of resolutions, while nn-mbers 
of the bar, who had practiced be- 
fore him, presented a silver service. 
General Benjamin I'\ Tracy mak- 
ing the presentation. He was nom 
inated to succeed himself on this 
bench in the fall of 1895 by the lU- 
])ublican party, the State Democ- 
racy, and the Good Government 
clubs, but failed, with the rest of 
his ticket, though polling more 

votes than any other candidate on the ticket. He refused a])pointment 
as Corporation Counsel by Mayor Edson in 1885, and in 1896 refused 
appointment as District Attorney by (governor ^Morton to succeed the 
late -Tolm IJ. fellows. Early in his jiractice .Tndge Allison gained a 
reputation in cases involving important (|uesti(uis of municipal law, 
and in cases of the city he has been employed as special counsel by 
the corporation counsels from William C. Whitney to the present in- 
cumbent, irrespective of party lines. He brouglit an enjoinment suit 
for Hubert O. Thompson when Tammany Hall proposed to initiate 
one linndred and sixty-seven new meml)ers in order to control the 
Presidential nomination in the Tilden campaign. Under Mayor Ed- 
ward Coo])er he secured the rejection by the Senate Committee of the 
public burdens bill which had passed the State Assembly, and which 
Mas a device of Tammanv Hall to leuislate tlie County Democracy out 



L. 







..,.. 


-« ^ntf... 






irtr' ^^'lHav 


* 


j 


-♦i? 






-~-^JA^ 






'% 




) 


m 


U 


i 


1- 







THOMAS ALLISON, 



254 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

of office. Sole counsel for the city throuiihoiit the Broadway surface 
railroad litijiation. he obtained the llual injunction restraining the 
Board of Aldermen from iirantiug the franchise. He represented the 
city ill i>roceedings to condemn lands for the new si)eedway along the 
Harlem IJiver, and reduced the claims for damages from |3,500,000 
to |!2T5,000. He also saved many millions of dollars to the city by 
defeating the claims of upland owners to easements of access over the 
tideway in waters surrounding the city. He acted as counsel to the 
commission to frame the chai'ter of Greater New York, advised it 
upon many important points, and drew several chapters of the charter 
and several of the amendments to laws reported by the commission. 
Judge Allison married, in 1S71, Mary C, daughter of the late William 
E. ^fillet, of Xew York, and has three daughters, three sons having 
died. He is himself the son of Michael Allison and Susan Gentil, both 
natives of New York, as was also his grandfather, Eichard Allison. 
The latter's wife, Elizabeth TJuckel, was a native of St. Johns, New 
Brunswick. 

(JEEENE. EICHAIH) HENRY, engaged in the practice of law in 
Xe\A- York City from about the close of the Civil V^'av until his re- 
tirement in 1886, was long a member of the law firm of Roosevelt & 
(ircene. Later he was counsel of a number of the street railways, be- 
came active in their management, and became president of several. 
He is now Secretaiw and a director of the New York Genealogical and 
Biographical Society. He was born, January 12, 1839, was grad- 
uated from Yale in 1802, and from the Columbia College Law School. 
He is a member of the Yale and Westside Republican clubs, the So- 
ciety of [Mayflower Descendants, the Society of Colonial Wars, the 
Society of American Wars, the Sons of the Revolution, the Society of 
the War of 1812, the New York Historical Society, the Seventh Regi- 
ment War Veterans, and the Yale Alumni Association. He married, 
in 1807. Mary Gertrude, daughter of Captain Edwin Beach Muuson, 
and Amelia C. Sperry, of New Haven, and has a daughter and a son — 
^larshall Winslow Greene. Mr. Greene is himself the son of the late 
^^'illiam Webb Greene, merchant of New York City and resident 
of I'.rooklyn, who was Captain of the Tenth New York and Alderman 
and Judge in Brooklyn; is grandson of Captain Richard Greene, of 
East Haddam. Conn., an officer in the War of 1812; is great-grandson 
of Captain James Green, of the Second Connecticut Horse in the 
Revolution, and is great-great-graudson of William Greene and De- 
sire, daughter of John Bacon and Mary Hawes. He descends from 
John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley. of the Mayflower; from Kenelm, 
brother of Governor Edward ^Mnslow; from Captain John Gorham 
and Captain Samuel Marshall, of King Philip's War, and from Ed- 
mund Hawes. Rev. John Mayo, and Henry Walcott. Through his 
mother. Sarah A., daughter of Colonel William Whetten Todd, who 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 255 

was busiuL'Ss partiK^r of his uiick', the tirst Johu Jacob Astor, he de- 
scends from the fouuders of the Roosevelt, Bogaert, Herring, Slegt, 
and other Dntcli families. 

SLOCnar, henry WAKNKI;, was one of the distingnished gen- 
erals of the Civil War, and one of tiie most eminent citizens of Brook- 
lyn. He was the Democratic candidate for Secretary of State in l.Sd.j, 
at the close of the war, but failed of election. In 1SG8 he was elected 
to Congress, and re-elected in 187(1, and again in 1884. He was elected 
President of the Brooklyn Board of (_'ity Works in ISTG. He was also 
a commissioner of the Brooklyn Bridge, and favored making it free. 
In the National Democratic conventions of 1888 and 1892 his name 
was brought forward for nomination as President. He was born in 
Delphi, N. Y., September 21, 1827; was graduated in 1852, and resigned 
his commission as First Lieutenant in October, 1856. He then studied 
and practiced law in Syracuse, and in 1850 was elected to the Assem- 
bly. Promptly volunteeiing in the Ci^'il War, he was appointedColonel 
of the Twenty-seventh New York A'olunteers, May 21, 1861. At Bull 
Run he w'as w'ounded, and immediately afterward was commissioned 
Brigadier-General of Volunteers, and assigned to General Franklin's 
Division, Army of the Potomac. He participated in the siege of York- 
town and at West Point, V"a., and succeeded I^rankliu in the command 
of the division, May 15, 1862. At < Jaine's Mill he re-enforced Fitz-John 
Porter at a critical moment, and also distinguishing himself at Glen- 
dale and Malvern Hill, was commissioned Majiu'-General of Volun- 
teers, July 4, 1862. He took part in the second battle of Bull Run, 
South Mountain, and Antietam, and in October, 1862, was given the 
command of the Tw^elfth Corps, lie was active at Fredericksburg, 
Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg, with distinction to himself, leading 
the right w'ing of the army on the last-named field. In August, 1864, 
he succeeded General Joseph Hooker in command of the Twentieth 
Corps, and throughout Sherman's Jlarcli to the Sea led the left wing, 
])articipating in every action preceding the surrender of <!en- 
eral Johnston. Resigning from the army in 1865, he began the prac- 
tice of law in Brooklyn, and was successful and eminent in his pro- 
fession. 

SL0CF:\I, henry WARNEI:, eldest son of the late Major-General 
Henry Warner Slocum and his wife Clara, daughter of Israel Rice and 
Dorcas Jenkins, was born in Syracuse, N. Y., :May 28, 1862; was grad- 
uated from Yale University in 1883; studied law; was admitted to 
the bar of the District of Columbia in 1884, and since 1885 has prac- 
ticed law in Brooklyn and New York City. He is a director of the 
Williamsburgh City Fire Insurance Company, the New York and 
Brooklyn Railroad Company, and the Coney Island and Brooklyn 
Railroad. His clubs include the Rac(piet, Tennis, and I'niversity 



256 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



Athletic, and lie is a iiicnihcr of the Military Order of the Loyal Le- 
liion. He married, in 1NS8. (irace, daughter of Heury Edsall aud 
Eiiioia Jerome, aud granddaughter of Thomas Jerome, eldest brother 
of Leonard Jerome. Thev have two daughters. 



BUEL, OLIVER PRINCE, was graduated from Williams College 
in 1859, studied law with his father, the late Hon. David Buel, Jr., 
and with the late Hon. John K. Porter; was admitted to the bar in 
1801, and, with the exception of a few years at Troy, N. Y., has prac- 
ticed law since in New York 
City. lie has esi)ecially devoted 
himself to insurance aud corpo- 
ration law. He is a director of 
the LTuited States Life In- 
surance Company, having been 
its general counsel since 1878, 
and is also a director of the 
United States Fire Insurance 
Company. He is an active 
member of the City Bar Asso- 
ciation, and as Chairman of 
one of its siiccial committees 
framed a ])roposition to con- 
S(diilate the courts of this city, 
which was eventually adopted 
by incorporation in the new 
State Constitution. He is a 
member of the Reform, Hard- 
ware, and Catholic clubs, being 
Vice-President of the latter. 
Reared an Episcopalian, he 
embraced Catholicism in 1881. 
He was for four years a resi- 
dent of Yonkers, and served as 
a uu'Uiber of its Board of Education and as President of the Demo- 
cratic Club of that city. Cnder the title, "The Abraham Lincoln 
Myth," lie has i)ublished a satire on Huxley's assault on Christian 
evidences. He married, in 187L JoH'jjhiue, daughter of Cliarles [McDou- 
gall, Surgeon in the L'nited States Army. Through his mother, Har- 
riet Ilillhouse, as well as through his father, a prominent lawyer 
of Nortliein New York for neai-ly fifty years, and a member of the 
Constitutional Convention of 1821, Mv. Buel descends from old Con- 
necticut families. 




OLIVKR PRINCK BUEL. 



FISKE, HALEY, Avas graduated from Rutgers College in 1871, 
and, studying law with the New York firm of Arnonx, Ritch & 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 257 

Woodford, was in active practice as a luember of tliat firm until his 
retirement from i^rofessioual work in IS!J1 to accept tlie office of Vice- 
President of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. He was 
counsel in the Fayerweather will contest and many other notable 
cases. At the present time, in addition to the Vice-Presidency men- 
tioned, he is a director of the National Shoe and Leather Bank and 
tiie jNIetropolitan Trust Company. He is Treasurer of the Church of 
St. Mary the Virgin. He is a member of the City Bar Association, 
and tlie City, Players', (irolier, Churcli, and Delta Phi clubs. He 
married, in 1S78, ]\[ary (iarrettina Mulford, who died in 188(3, and 
by Iier had a daujj,hter. By his present wife, Marione Cowles Cush- 
man, he has a son, Arcliil)ald Falconer Cushman Fiske, and a daugh- 
ter. Mr. Fiske was born in Xew Brunswick, X. J., March 18, 1852, 
the son of the late William Henry Fiske and Sarah Ann Blakeney, 
grandson of Judge Haley Fiske, and great-grandson of Ensign Squire 
I'iske. Colonel of a Rliode Island regiment in the Revolution. His 
father was a civil engineer, and at one time connected with the Street 
Department of this city. His grandfather was Lieutenant in the 
War of 1812, and a civil engineer, who built the lower locks of the 
Delaware and Karitau Canal. The first American ancestor, William 
Fiske, who settled in Salem, Mass., in 1(>37, was a lineal descendant 
of Lord Symond Fis1<e, who died in IKU, and was in turn grandson 
of Daniel Fiske, lord of the manor of Stadhaugh, Laxfield, Sutt'olk, 
England. 

FAK(2t"HAB, PEBCIVAL, has been engaged in the practice of 
the law in New York City since his admission to the bar in 1886, 
and is an officer of several important corporations. In 1887 he 
was President of the Columbus and Hocking Valley Coal and Iron 
Company, and at the present time is Vice-President and Secretar\- 
of the McManus Construction Company; Treasurer and Secretaiw 
of the Atlantic Coast Realty Company, and a director of the New 
York and Staten Island Land Company. He has been Vice-President 
of the last mentioned corporation, lie is a member of the firm of 
A. B. Farquhar & Company, of this city, and a member of the Board 
of Managers of the A. B. Farquhar Company, of York, Pa. He 
was an unsuccessful candidate for the Assembly fi'om the Third 
City District in 1880, but was elected by 2,000 majority in 1890, and 
re-elected in 1891 and 1892. He was a prominent figure in the Leg- 
islature, and, in addition to measures relative to the National Guard 
and the revision of the penal code, was active in connection with 
ballot reform, introducing and taking charge of the New York City 
insi>ection bill, tlic jiersonal registration bill, tlie ballot reform 
amendments, and the bill providing for codification of the laws re- 
lating to the ballot. He entered the Seventh Regiment in 1887, be- 
came, in 1888, Second Lieutenant in the Second Battery, and subse- 



258 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



qiieutly First Lieutemiiit. lie is a member of the United Service, 
Tuxedo, Calumet, Reform, Manliattau, IJidiug, Lawyers', Democratic, 
and University Athletic clubs; the Southern Society, the Seventh 
Kejiiment Veteran Association, and the Yale Alumni. He was born 
in York, Pa.; was graduated from Yale in 1884, and from the Colum- 
bia Law School in lSS(i. His father, Arthur B. Farc^uliar, is the 
founder and head of the A. B. Farquhar Company, extensive manu- 
facturers of agricultural implements, and is a well-known writer on 
political economy. He was a Commissioner of the World's ("olum- 
bian Exposition, and President of the National Organization of Ex- 
ecutive Comuiissionei*s. He married Elizabeth X., daughter of Ed- 
ward Jessop, head of Jessop t^- Fulton, of Baltimore, and President 
of the Short Jlountain Coal Company- and the Tunnelton Coal Com- 
pany. Percival Farcjuliar's great-grand- 
father, Amos Farquhar, was a cotton manu- 
factui'er of Pennsylvania, wlio subsequently 
returned to his native Maryland and had 
charge of a seminary at Fair Hill. Two gen- 
erations farther back, in the latter part 
of the seventeenth (-(-ntui-y, William Far- 
(luliar emigrated from Scotland to Frederick 
County, Maryland, his ancestors having been 
chieftains of the Scottish clan of Farquhar. 
Through his mother, Mr. Farquhar descends 
from Eobert Brook, a cadet of the house of 
Warwick, who was born in London in 1602; 
in lG3r> maiiicd .Maiy iiaker, daughter of IJoger Mainwaring, Dean 
ol \\ niccstei, and in l(i50 emigrated to Charles County, Maryland, 
lie commanilcd (he troops of his county and was President of the 
Council of Maryland. 




F'ERCIVAL FAKQUIIAK. 



i\IcCULLOUGH, JOHN GRIFFITH, following a successful profes- 
sional career in San Francisco, in 1873 established himself in the 
practice of law in New York City, devoting himself to railroad, com- 
mercial, and banking business. From 1873 to 1883 he was Vice- 
President and General Manager of the Panama Railroad Company, 
wliile from 1883 to 1888 he was its President. He became a director 
of the P^rie Railroad Company in 1884. and since 1888 he has been 
Chairman of its Executive (J!ommittee. He has been President of 
the Chicago and Erie Railroad Company since its oi'ganization in 
1890. He is President of the Bennington and Rutland Railway Com- 
pany, and is President of the First National Bank of North Benning- 
ton, Yt. He is a trustee of the New York Security and Trust Com- 
pany, is a director of the Fidelity and Casualty Company, is a trustee 
of the Buffalo Creek Railroad Company, and is a director of the Erie 
and TVyoming Valley Railroad Company. He is a member of the 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



)9 



Metropolitan, rnioii League, Tuxedo, Univei'sity, Lawyers;", Faim, 
and Tiu'f and Field clubs, and the Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. He is of Scotch and Welsh descent, and was born near 
Newark, Del. He was liraduated ivoni Delaware ('ollege, and studied 
law with St. George Tucker Campbell, of Pliiladelphia, at the same 
time attending the law school of the University of Pennsylvania, from 
which he was gradiiated in 1859. <Jn account of his health he estab- 
lished himself in law practice in Mariposa County, California. He 
co-operated with General Sumner in the successful effort to prevent 
secession in California. He was elected to the Assembly of that State 
in 1861, and to the Senate the following year. In 1863 he was the 
successlid Kepublican candidate for Attorney-General of the State. 
Ketiring from this office in 1867, he became head of a. law firm in San 
Francisco, which rai)idly acquired a reputation. In 1871, he married 
Eliza Hall, daugiitcr of Trenor W. Park, and granddaugliter of Gov- 
ernor Hiland TTall, of Vermont. 



EIKER, SAMUEL, admiTted to the bar in 18.53, was engaged in the 
practice of law in New York City continuously fioui tlml date until 
his retirement, January 1, 18!)3. 

During his forty years of practice " " 

he occupied a prominent place 
among the real estate lawyers of 
New York. He is Treasurer of the 
Good Samaritan Dispensary, and 
is a member of the Bar Association 
of the City of New York and tlie 
New York State Bar Association. 
He was born in Newtown, Queens 
County, N. Y., April 10, 1832, of 
Dutch and English ancestry. His 
great-grandfather, Samuel Piker, 
was a Revolutionary soldier, while 
he is fifth in descent from Abra- 
ham Rycken, who emigrated from 
Holland to New Amsterdam in 
1638. His father, the late John 
Lawrence Rikei', and his uncle. 
Richai'd Riker, were both well- 
known lawyers, the latter especially so, being District Attorney of 
New Yorlc Count}- from 1801 to 1813, and Recorder of the City of New 
York from 1815 to 1838. Mr. Piker's mother was Lavinia Smith. 




SAMl'EL KIKKK. 



ALLING, ASA ALLING, member of the law firm of Kenneson, 
Grain & Ailing, was born in this city, May 4, 1862, and is the son of 
the late J. Sackett Ailing, a merchant of New York, and Anna E. 



260 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Bertine. He was? graduated from Cornell University in 1883, being 
one of the orators of his class, and having taken the Woodford prize 
for oratory, and in 18S5 was graduated from the Columbia College 
Law School and admitted to the bar. He has been active in Demo- 
cratic politics. He is a director of the American University Magazine 
Publishing Coinjiany, and has been a governor of the Democratic 
Club. He is also a member of tlie ^Metropolitan, University, Manhat- 
tan, Reform, Cornell University, and Dutcliess County clubs, the Bar 
Association of the city, and various societies. He is a grandson of 
Judge Asa Ailing, of Dutchess County, New York, and lineally de- 
scended from Roger Ailing, one of the pi-omincnt founders of New 
Haven Colony in 1G39, its treasurer, and sul)se'iuently a judge. 
Through his mother he descends from Pierre Bertine, a Huguenot of 
gentle blood, who fled from France to South Carolina as a religious 
refugee, and subsequently settled in Westchester County, New York. 
In 1894 Mr. Ailing married Louise Floyd-Smith, of distinguished an- 
cestry. 

BOOTHBY, JOHN WILLIAM, attended the high school of Pitts- 
field, 111.; in 1873 was graduated from Cornell Univer.sity; in 1877 was 
gradiiated from Columbia College Law School; began law practice 
in the office of Hon. Martin J. Keogh at New Rochelle; in 1879 formed 
a partnei"ship at Port Chester, N. Y. ; in 1881 became a member of the 
firm of Keogh & Boothby, of this city, and has been a member of 
other firms. From the retirement from the bench, in 1890, of Hon. 
Henry A. Gildersleeve until his election to the Superior Court Bench 
in l,s91,he was a member of the firm of Gildersleeve, Palmer& Boothby. 
He is now a member of the finn of Warren, Boothby & Warren. For 
four years he Avas a director and counsel of the New York Press. In 
Gildersleeve vs. Lester ef ah, he secured the imposition of a fine of 
fG9,000 on one of the defendants, the largest ever im^josed in the 
State, at the same time establislung in the Court of Appeals the right 
of one trustee to maintain action against the others and compel resti- 
tution of property to the corporation. In 1891 he was admitted to 
practice in the United States Supreme Court. He is a member of the 
City Bar Association and the Cornell University and Church clubs, 
and is a vestryman of Trinity Church, New Rochelle, where he has a 
country-seat. He married, in 1884, Lilla, daughter of James A. Mc- 
Dougall, United States Senator from California. He was himself born 
in Rawdon, Yorksliire, Enghuid, July 21, 1848, the son of John Booth- 
by and Eliza E. Eastwood. When be was two years of age his parents 
emigrated to Pike County, 111., where his father became a farmer and 
business man, and was president of an insurance company. 

MILLER, ISAAC NEWTON, was graduated from Hamilton Col- 
lege in 1873, from its law school the following year, and having also 
taken a post-graduate course at the Colunihia College Law School, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 261 

beyan practice in New Ydi'l; City, lie likowi,«e iiiaiut;iiiis an (illice 
in Jersey City. He was tlie unlv atlm-ney to recover damages IVdui 
tlie ProA-idence and 8tc(nini;ton Stcanisliin ('onipany for tlie loss of 
life in the Narraj;'ansett disaster, (his victory being won after eiiilit 
years of litigation. He was counsel in Ledyard vs. Bull, in which 
the administrators of the late Asa Worthington, United States ^lin- 
ister to I'eru, sought an acconnting fi-oni II. \V. Worthingtou. The 
verdict of $50,000 which he secured in the case of Buchanan vs. Foster 
is the largest amount ever awarded a. woman in an action against 
another woman for alienation of a husband's affections. He has also 
conducted important cases in the llnglish courts, one of which, now 
jiending in the British Court of Appeals, involves $2,000,000. Mr. 
.Miller was born in .\ugnsta, Oneida County, N. Y., October 22, 1851, 
the son of Isaac < '. .Miller and ICIizabeth Wood. His grandfather, 
Isaac Miller, a native of Connedicut, was the first white settler in 
Oneida. County. New York, where he acciuired large tracts of laud. 
A cousin of Mr. .Miller, Hon. W. H. H. Miller, was Attorney-Genc^ral 
in tlie ('abiiiel <il' I'resideiil itenjaiiiin Harrison, wliese law partner 
he had ]ire\i<iusly been. 

GREENBACM. SAMUEL, member of the law firm of Hays & 
Cireenbanm, and a director nf the Park Hill Company and C. Gra- 
ham tJi: Sons' Company', was bnin in Lnndon. lOngland, January 23, 
1854, the son of Lewis Greenl)aum and IJachel Schlesinger. Bi'ought 
to New Yoi-k when two years of age. he attended the public schools of 
this city, and in 1S72 was graduated from the College of the City of 
New Y'ork. During the next five years he was a teacher in the public 
schools, at tlie sann- time reading law in the offices of Van Sich'u, Gil- 
dersleeve & Baldwin, and attending the Columbia College Law School. 
In ISir. lie was graduated from the latter, and admitted to the bar. 
I'rom 1875 to 1877 lie was associated with the- firm of Van Siclen, Gil- 
dersleeve & Baldwin, for several years subsequent to 1877 was en- 
gaged in practice alone, and since 1884 has been in partnershiji with 
Daniel V. Hays under the firm style which still continues. This (irm 
were counsel for (Jeneral Daniel E. Sickles, in the investigation of the 
abuses in the Sheriff's office, after ids apjiointmeut to succeed Sheriff 
Flack, in this city. 3Ir. Greenbanni is I'resident of the Aguilar Free 
Library, is First Vice-President of the Educational Alliance, having 
been active in the erection of new buildings for the latter, and for 
several years was President of the Young Glen's Hebrew Association, 
of New York City. He is a member of the Beform and Democratic 
clubs. I lie State Bar Association, tlie l!ai' Association of the City of 
New York, the Jurisprudence and State Medical Association, the 
Legal Aid Society, the Mt. Simii IIosi)ilal, the Hebrew- Orphan Asy- 
lum, and the Hebrew Technical Inst itute. He is also a member of the 
Indi pendent Older of Odd Fellows. In .March, 1888, he mai'ried Se- 



262 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 



lina. (laii^litm- (if Israel I'lliuau. of New York City, and has two sous — 
Lawrence S. and Edward S. Ureenbanm, and two daughters — Grace 
find Isabel. 



\\AI;I;EN, ilia DEFUIJEST, has been engaged in the inaetiee of 
law in New York City siuce 1852. He was associated with Edward 
Saudford from 1852 until Mr. l8andford"s death in 1854; from 1854 to 
18(il practiced aloue, was the partner of ^Yilliam Z. Earned, under the 
style of Earned & Warren from 18G1 to 1897, and since the latter date 
has been a member of the firm of ^Yarl•ell, Boothby iV: ^Yarren. his 

partners being his brother, Lyman 
E. Warren and John W. Boothby. 
He was for uuiny years a director 
of the New York Keal Instate Ex- 
change, and is a member of the Bai- 
Association of the City of New 
York, the 8tate Bar Association, 
and the Manhattan and Lawyers' 
clubs. He was born in Albany, 
X. Y., r>ecember 31. 183L attended 
the ptiblic schools of tliat city and 
the academy at Cazenovia, X. Y., 
taught school between the ages of 
seventeen and twenty, studied law 
with Hon. Horatio r>ullard A. 
<'ortland. of Cortland County, New 
York, and was admitted to the bar 
in September. 1852. He is the son 
of Rev. Ira I). \Yarren and Eliza 
Caldwell, his father being a 
well known throughout the State of 
New York. His paternal ancestors were seated in Ifoxbury. ^lass., 
previous to 1740. 




lUA liKFUllKSl UAUltKN. 



Methodist Episcopal clcr: 



vmai 



HUNT, JAMES MONKOE, was admitted to the bar in 1882, and 
since that time has been engaged in the ju-actice of his profession in 
New Y'ork City. He has been counsel for the Elevated Kailroad 
companies of both New Y'ork and Brooklyn in the trial of important 
cases, as he has also for the Third Avenue Ifailroad Company, and 
the Tradesmen's Insurance Company of New Y'ork. Since 1892 he has 
likewise been Corporation Counsel for the city of Y'onkers, and has 
been remarkably successful with cases carried into the ('ourt of Ap- 
peals. He is a member of the City and Alpha Delta Phi clubs of New 
Y'ork City, the Palisade Boat Club of Y'onkers, and the IJochester 
University Alumni. He was born in East Clarence, Erie County. 
N. Y., April 0. 185S, tlie son of IJev. Harrison P. Hunt and Caroline 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 263 

Holmes. Uu the paternal side bis aucestoi's were origiually from 
Benuiugtou. Yt., wliile on the maternal side they were among the 
early settlers of Oswego County, Kew York. He attended the public 
schools, the Brockport State Normal School, and in ISSO was grad- 
uated from the University of Rochester, from which be subsequently 
received the degree of Master of Arts. He studied law in New Y'ork 
City, with the firms of Deaue & Chamberlain and Fraser & Minor, 
and was admitted to the bar in November, 1882. On June 5 of the 
same year he married Normie L., daughter of Abram M. Fanning, of 
New York City. 

BURKILL, MIDDLETON SHOOLBEED, since 1884 has been a 
member of the law firm of Burrill, Zabriskie & Burrill, of which bis 
father, the late John Ebenezer Burrill, was long the head. He was 
born in New Y'ork City, October 16, 1858; prepared for college under 
tutors and at a private school; in 1879 was graduated from Harvard, 
and in 1881 Avas admitted to the bar, having studied in a law office 
and attended the Columbia College Law School. He is a member of 
the Union, Knickerbocker, and Eockaway Hunt clubs, the Downtown 
Association, the Bar Association of the city, and the Sons of the Eevo- 
lutiou. He married, in 1885, Emilie Neilson, daughter of William 
Hnde and Caroline Neilson. 

GAEDEN, HUGH EICHAEDSON, lawyer, was born at Sumter. 
S. C.. July n, 1840. His paternal great-grandf:ithers were Chancellor 
de Saussur(- and Chief Justice Gibbes, of South Carolina, the former 
of Huguenot the latter of English descent. The grandfather of Mr. 
Garden, \Yilmot S. (lildies, was a South Carolina planter, one of seven 
brothers, two of whom removed to New York. Ilis mother's family, 
prior to tlie Ecvohition, was of Yirginia. Her grandfather. General 
Buford, served witli distinction under General Greene. Her grand- 
father, William Eichardson, a descendant of William Eichardson, of 
Jamestown. A'a., was a member of the South Carolina Provisional 
Congress and Council of Safety and Captain in the Continental Army. 
The name. Garden, was inherited from Major Alexander Garden, who 
marr-ied the sister of Wilmot S. Gibbes. ^Major Garden was the grand- 
son of the Ecv. Alexander Garden, head of the Church of England 
in the Caroliiias for years prior to the Eevolution. Major Garden's 
two children died without issue, and Mr. Hugh R. Garden's father, 
Alester (Jarden Ctibbes, by special Act of the Legislature, assumed 
the name of Alester Garden. The latter was graduated from South 
Carolina College in 1830, married Elizabeth Eichardson, and prac- 
ticed law at Sumter and C(dumbia. Hugh E. Garden was graduated 
from the South Carolina College in 1800. Tlie Civil War breaking 
out. he entered the service of his State, and from Sumter to Appomat- 
tox saw active service in the field. He was authorized by the Con- 



2(U HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

federatt' GoTeruiueiit to raitso and equip an artillery conipauy, to be 
named the " Palmetto Battery." In the campaigns from ^^ecoud Man- 
assas to AppomatTox tliis batteiy performed an important part. After 
the war he studied at tlie law school of the University of Mrginia. 
He commenced the practice of law with his great-uncle, Hon. W. F. 
de ISaussure, at Colunihia, S. (\ Unable to endure the misrule of 
reconstruction, he movc-d to Mrginia, and resided for fifteen years at 
Warrenton, where he practiced in the State and Federal courts. He 
married Lucy Gordon ]\obertson, daughter of the Hon. William J. 
Eobertson, formerly Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals of Vir- 
ginia, lie was counsel in the Mrginia Midland Railroad reorganiza- 
tion. In 1883 he removed to New York. The settlement of the Vir- 
ginia State Debt has engrossed much of his time. This problem had 
for tw( nty-five years i>erpl(»x(Hl the ablest financiers and statesmen 
of this country and England, but at last, through the admirable woi'k 
of a committee, at once a jieace commission and a council of equity, 
confidence was restoi-ed and a basis of settlement carried into effect. 
,Mr. (iai-den was for two years President of the Xew York Southern 
Society, and donated to it a Southern historical libraiy. In 1892 the 
I'niversity of the South (-(inferred u])on him the degree of Doctor of 
( "ivil Laws. In connection with tlie New York Columbian < 'elebration 
in October, 18'J2, Mr. <4ardcn was ajjpointed. by tlie [Mayor of New 
York, Chairman of the Special IJeception Committee, to rec(Mve and 
ent( itain the guests of the city. He is a DeuKM-rat in politics. 

GRIFFITH, JOHN S., was educated at Whitestowii Seminary. 
N.Y.; Hamilton Cdllege. and (Columbia College Law Scliool; also read 
law at Utica, N. Y., and there was admitted to the bar in 1883. In 
1879 he took the first ]iri/>e for oratory at the Ilion Opera House in a 
competition open to all undergiaduates in the State. He has for many 
years been engaged in the practice of law in Brooklyn, and is a 
member of the Democratic County Committee of Kings County. He 
has published poems which have attracted consi(leral)le attention, 
inchiding " Margaret Lee," which has been republished in Fngland. 
He was born in New York [Mills. N. Y., September 8, 18(11. and is the 
son of Lewis Grifiith and Ellen Williams and the grandson of Hugh 
th'iffith. His father was a ]ironiinenr resident of Oneida County, 
NcAv York, for more than forty years, engaged in the manufacture of 
cotton goods. His uncle, Samuel Williams, successively was editor of 
the Utica Herald, the Albany Jnuriuth and the San Francisco lltilldiii. 

LAUTERBACH, EDANAIH), a member of the New York law firm 
of Morrison, Lauterbach & Spingarn, from his admission to the bar in 
1804 until the death of Mv. S])ingarn, has been a member of that of 
Hoadly, Lauterbacli ^: Jolmson since 1887, when ex-G(5vernor lloadly, 
of Ohio, established himself in law practice in this city. Mr. Lauter- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



205 



bach has been conspieiinus in larnc corporation cases, and esitecially 
in those inA'olvinji' the affairs of railroads. He is at present a director 
and Vice-President of tlie ]\ranrice Grau Opera Company, and a direc- 
tor of tlie Third Aveune Railroad Company, the Brooklyn Elevated 
Railroad Conipany,theDry Dock, East Broadway and Battery Railroad 
Company, the Forty-second t^treet, Manhattanville and St. Nicholas 
Avenue Railway, the Consolidated Telejiraph and Electric Snbway 
Company, the Empire City Traction Company, the Safety Car Heatins; 
and Lighting' Company, the O'Donnell Steel Trnck Company and 
Abbey, Schoeffel and Gran. He has snccessfnlly promoted several 
notable enterprises. He secured the incoi-poration of the new East 
River Bridge Company, the chai'ter of which provides for the erection 
of two bridges from a single point in "New York to different points 
in Tirooklyn, with a crosstown ele- 
vated road from the New York ter- 
mimis to the Hudson River. He 
was active in effecting the consoli- 
dation of the Union and Brooklyn 
El(nat('d roads, and secured im- 
]ioi-tanl legislation favorable to the 
Consolidated Telegraph and Elec- 
tric Subway Company. He was 
active in the reorganization of the 
Philadelphia and Reading Rail- 
T'oad Comjiany. He was instrn- 
niental in obtaining government 
subsidies for the Pacific 3Iail 
Steamshi]! Comjiany. He was a 
member of the Committee of Thirty 
for the reorganization of the Re- 
IMiblican ( )i'ganization in the Conn- ~ 
ty of New \'ork, and soon after be- 
came Chairman of the Republican 

County Committee. In the Constitutional Convention of 1894 he was 
one of three delegates-at-large from New York ('ity, and was made 
(Chairman of the Committee on Public Charities. He is a member of 
the Advisory Committee of the Republican State Committee. He was 
Delegate-at-large from the State of New York in the Republican 
National ('onvention of 1S9(>, was member for New York on the Com- 
mittee on Resolutions, and was one of the sub-committee of five 
apjiointed to di'aft a platform, being especially active in connection 
with the forming of the financial plank which furnished the issue of 
the cam])aign on which President McKinley was elected. Mr. Lauter- 
bacli was born in this city, in old Greenwich village, August 12, 1811, 
was educated in the New York ])ublic schools, and was graduated 
witli honors from the College of the City of New York, of which 
institution he is now the Vice-President. 




EDWARD LAUTERBACH. 



266 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

CLEMENT, GEORGE ANSEL, Ixnii in New York ("ity, February 
22, 1S51, attended the imhlii- scIkkiIs utkI Dr. (iuaekeubos's Colle^^iate 
School, and studied law with the late famous Charles O'Conor and 
Benjamin F. Dunning. Admitted to the bar in 1872, during the next 
two years he practiced law in Orange County, New York, while also 
editor of the Port Jervis Gazette. He then returned to this city, where 
be has continuously practiced since. He was for some time a partner 
of Horatio C. King until the latter removed to Brooklyn. He assisted 
in compiling the earlier editions of Bliss's Annotated Code, edited an 
edition of " Court IJules," and is tlie author of the '' Fire Insurance 
Digest." He has been the successful counsel in many important mer- 
cantile and fire insurance cases, and is a member of the Bar Asso- 
ciation of the city, the Law Institute, and the State Bar Association. 
He was an officer of the Ninth liegiment, on the staff of Colonel Sew- 
ard. The son of William J. Clement, his ancestors on his father's side 
were among the first settlers of Haverhill, Mass., and were prominent 
in public affairs. 

CLEPHANE, JOHN OGILVIF], patent solicitor and promoter, is 
President of the Loidce Steel Belt Company, President of the Horton 
Basket Machine Company, Secretary of the National Typographic 
Company, and a director of the jMergenthaler Linotype Company, 
the New Y'ork Stenographic Company, and the Voelker Light Com- 
pany. He was born in Washington, D. C, February 21, 1842, of 
Scotch parentage. He early learned stenography, became proficient, 
and reported nearly all the important court trials in Washington at 
one time. He Avas one of the first in the country to use the typewriter, 
and aided its inventor to ini]>rove the first Remington machines. Be- 
ginning to assist inventors in taking out patents, he encmiraged Ott- 
mar to perfect his typesetting machine. In 1892 he was elected Presi- 
dent of the Linotype Reporting and Printing Company. He was also 
active in develoijing the Graphophone, while at his suggestion was 
devised the Fowler & Henkle press, which enables presswork to be 
done directly from the Linotype without the necessity of stereotyping. 

KELLOGG, LUTHER LAFLIN, head of the New York law firm of 
Kellogg, Rose & Smith, was born in Maiden, Ulster County, N. Y., 
July 1, 1819. His ancestors were English. He descends from Daniel 
Kellogg, who settled in Norwalk, Conn., in 1635. His father was 
graduated from the Troy Polytechnic Institute, was a merchant, and 
was President of the Bigelow Bhiestonc Company. Ilis grandfather, 
Luther Laflin, established notable works for the manufacture of 
powder. JMr. Kellogg was graduated from Rutgers College in 1870. 
Two .years later he was graduated fi-om the Columbia College Law 
School. He was also a student in tlic office of Hon. James Emott, 
at one time Judge of tlie Siipiciiie Court of the State of New York, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW \'( iRK BIOGRAPHY. 267 

aud also a Juil^t' ol:' the Court of AiJpcals. I'roiii 1872 to 1874 lie 
was a member of the new firmlof Emott, Ilaiiiiiiond i: Stickney. From 
1874 to 1890 he praeticed niKh'r Ids own name, lu 1890 he formed 
the firm of Kellogg, iJose & Sniiili. Wldle engagtMl in general prac- 
tice, he has made a specialty of nninicijial law. He argued before 
the Judiciary Committee of the New ^'tlrk Legislature for the passage 
of the ilechanics' Lieu Act, establishing the right for material men 
to lien city moneys. This measure, drafted by him, was enacted into 
law. He was counsel for the contractors in the Kiverside Drive liti- 
gatiou and in the Aijueduct suits. He has been a director in a num- 
ber of corporations engaged i)i the manufacture of powder, including 
the Continental Powder Manufacturing Company aud Die rho'uix 
Powder Manufacturing Comiiany. He is now a director in the AN'ash- 
ington Insuiance Comiiany ami the Coloiual Insurance Company. 
He is President of tlie Colonial Club of the City of New York, aud a 
governor in tliat club and in the Delta Phi Club. He is also a uumu- 
ber of the Manliattan, Players', Lawyers', Suburban, Coney Island 
-loekey, Fort Orange, and Norwood <i(df clubs, and the Bar Asso- 
ciation. He is a vestryman in .Ml Angels' Church. He was for 
several years Chairman of the Charily Organization Society for tlic 
Eighth District. His wife is a daughter of the late :Ma.ior-(ieueraI 
John P. :Ma(Intosli. T'. S. A. ilr. Kellogg is himself a nephew of 
John Pigelow, formerly Fnited States Audiassador to France. 

CIIFPCH, JA:\IES CONODON, lawyer, of P.rooklyn, born in Wick- 
ford, K. L, May 21, ISOl, is the son of Thomas T. and Phebe F. Church, 
botli descendants of Colonel I'.enjamin Church, who settled in Massa- 
chusetts shortly after the first voyage of the Mayflower, and was 
in military command of the colonists. PcMuoving at an early age to 
New Utrecht, L. I., ilr. Clnncli was educated in the public 
scjiools of Prooklyn, and studied law with :Morris & Pearsall. He was 
admitted to the bar in September, 188:5. Continuing with Morris & 
Pearsall tmtil 1887, he then formed the jiresent i)artuership with Cor- 
nelius I'urgueson, Jr. In connection with these corporations he was 
chielly instrumental in orgaiu/Jng one of the most iniiiortant street 
railway systems in the country. He has ajiiteaicd in many imiior- 
tant cases. He is counsel and au officer of the Nassau Electric Kail- 
road Comjiany aud the Kings County Electric Kailway Couipany. 

BAKEK, SEWAKD, educated in the public schools of Pougldceep- 
sie, stndieil law witli Hon. Milton A. Fowler and with Ilackett c& 
^^'illiams, of that city; in 1875 was admitted to the bar; practiced at 
Amenia, N. Y., from 1875 to 1881 ; during the next two years practiced 
at Ponghkeei>sie, and since 188:5 has been engaged in general civil 
practice in New Y'ork City, making corporation and real estate law 
a s])ecialty. Having become a resident of the town of West Chester, he 



2(58 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



was active iu oonnectiDii with its aiuiexatioii to New York City iu 
1SD5. He was special counsel under retainer from the former Cor- 
poration Counsel, and has been retained by the present incumbent 
of the office iu connection with lands uniler water and dock privileges, 
especially in the territory annexed in lyilo. He is a member of the 
City Bar Association, the North Side Board of Trade, and the Tax- 
I)ayers" Alliance. Born iu Union Vale, N. Y., December 30, 1S53, he 
is the son of Kausom Baker and Ophelia, daughter of Peter Lossiug, 
and descends from Thomas Baker, who emigrated from England to 
l>'h()dc Island prior to the Kevolution and subse<|nently removed to 
Dutchess County, New York. His maternal ancestors came from Hol- 
land and eventually settled in the suine cotiuty. Benson J. Loosing, 
the late historian, was Mr. Baker's secdiid cotisin. 



IMrCALT.. EDWAKD EVERETT, since his admission to the bar 
in iss.-,. lias liciMi engaged in law i)ractice in Xew York City. He was 

for some time attorney of the New 
York ^lutual Life Insurance Com- 
l)any, haA-ing charge of its real es- 
tate examinations for Brooklyn. 
He then formed the present firm of 
IMcCall cS: Arnold, of which he was 
head. They have devoted them- 
selves almost exclusively to real es- 
tate and corporation work. They 
were formerly attorneys of the 
l*jiuital)le Life .Vssurance Society. 
I'or several years ilr. McCall has 
been attorney of the New York Life 
Insuiance Comi)any. He is a di- 
rrclor of the Park Building and 
Loan .Vssociation, the Lawyers* 
Eiigiuccriug and Surveying Com- 
l)any, and the National Exhibition 
Company. ^Ir. McCall was coun- 
sel of Police Ins])ect()r AMlliam ^V. 
McLaughlin throughout his recent difficulties, and the hitter's con- 
viction before Judge Barrett he succeeded in I'eveising in the Court 
of Appt'als, with affirniancc of the same by the Ajipellate Division 
of the Supreme Court. Mr. :\IcCall is a member of the New York 
Athletic and Lawyers" clubs. He married, in 1886, Ella F., daughter 
of Thomas S. daynor, and has two children. He was himself born in 
Albany, N. Y., January 6, 1863, the son of John IMcCall and Catherine 
McCormac. He attended the Albany High School, was graduated 
from Union College; in 1884 was graduated from the Law Depart- 
ment of the T'niversity of New York, and during the following year 




KDWAKI) K\KI1KTT McCALL. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 269 

continued to read law iu the office of David R. Jaqiies, Dean of the 
Law Department of the Uuiversity of New York. 

(WnOONE, inCPIAKDS MOTT, has been engaged iu the practice 
of law iu Broiiklyu since ISiJo, during which time he has also been 
Brief Clerk in the office of the Public Administrator of Brooklyn. 
He has beeu engaged in several series of extended litigations arising 
from some half dozen important estates. He is a member of the Poly- 
technic and Crescent Athletic clubs, and the Polytechnic Dramatic 
Association. Born in Brooklyn, June 11, 1872, he was educated at the 
Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, the Columbia College Law School, 
and the New York Law School, and in 1S93 was graduated from 
the latter, ruin hiiidr, being admitted to the bar in September of the 
same year. He is the sou of Andrew Mott Cahoone and Mary Kich- 
ards, daughter of Daniel Penfield Parker and Caroline Fitch Kit li 
ards; is the grandson of Stephen Cahoone and Matilda Mott; the 
great-grandson of Stephen Cahoone and Ans-tis Sayre; the great-great- 
grandson of James Cahoone and Phoebe Wilcox, and descends from 
the Scottish clan of ("olquehoun. of whicli the famous John C. Calhoun 
was a distinguished American representative. His father, Andrew 
:\[ott Cahoone, while a resident of Brooklyn, is a well-known stock- 
broker of New Y'ork, a member of the Brooklyn and New Y'ork Yacht 
clubs, and for many years a governor of the New York Stock Ex- 
change. 

GEOSS, MICHAEL C., lawyer, was born in this city February 18, 
1838. and is of Cerman descent. He attended the German schools of 
the city until his eleventh year, and during the next three years at- 
tended English institutions. When sixteen he began the study of law 
in the office of Daniel UUmaun and Charles C. Egan. In IS.'iT he 
became the junior member of the firm of Egan & Gross, althougli not 
until 18(;o could he be admitted to the bar. In his seventeenth year 
he Ix'came interested in jtolitics. In 18(it) he was elected lirst Vice- 
J'rcsideut of the German Democratic organization of the city, and 
subsKiuently was its President. From 18t;i to 1864 he represented 
the Fifth Senatorial District as Councilman. He was elected to the 
bench of the Marine (now City i Court iu 18(35, and was re-elected in 
]8(;0 by the then immense majoi-ity of r)2.()tl0 votes. While on the 
bencli he establislied many precedents which were sustained by the 
higher courts. His sound decision u]ion tlie "Legal Tender" ques- 
tion was based upon the same grounds as given subsequently by the 
T'nited States Supreme Court. The Marine Couri had many suits in 
wliich tlie interests of tlie s]n]>ownei-s, ca]>taius, and sailors were adju- 
dicated. Th(- comidaints of sailors against ca])taius for assault ui>ou 
the high seas were numerous, and redress was souglit in this tribunal. 
It often occurred that the complaints wei-e eitlier frivolous or iin- 



270 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

foiiiuk'd, vet, if till' (•(Uii-ts were not in session, tlie defendant bad to 
s]»eii(l a ni^lit or more in jail. With the assistance of his associate, 
-Judge Alker, Judge (jvoss i-efoinied this abiise. He retired from the 
bench January 1, 1876, and resumed law practice. He is a member 
of the ytate Bar Association, Ueutscher Verein, the German Society, 
the Liederkrauz, the German Hospital, and the Isabella Home. 

LE^'I, JOSEPH CHARLES, lawyer, born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Feb- 
ruary 27, 1S39, is the son of Chai-les Levi, and grandson of George 
and Judith Levi. His father came to tlie United States from England 
about 1S29, married in New York in 1830, and was a merchant in 
Cincinnati from 1832 to 1813. In 1813 he returned to New York City. 
^fr. Levi was graduated in 1851 from the Columbia College Grammar 
Scliool, and studied law with Van Cott & Cady. He was admitted 
to the bar in May, 18(>(). Between ]May and October, 1862, he was with 
his regiment, the Thirty-seventh, as a non-commissioned officer in 
the Government service in Maryland. On February 8, 1865, he was 
married to a daughter of Dr. ilanly Emanuel, of Linwood, Pa. Dur- 
ing his professional career, Mr. Levi has been attorney for vanous 
trusts and associations, and for nuuiy years has been counsel for one 
of the principal metropolitan newspai)ers. He has given special at- 
tention to the law of Avills, real estate, and equity jurisprudence. 
He has been a member of the City Bar Association since 1875. 
He was one of the original members and examining counsel of the 
Lawyers' Title Insurance Company. He is the author of a number of 
monographs and essays, semi-legal, some of which have aiipeared in 
the Albaiiii Law Jouyinil. 

WELLER, AUGUSTLTS XOBLE, was born in Chautauqua County, 
Ne\\- York, December 5, 1836; attended the Fredonia Academy; stud- 
ied law, and was admitted to the bar in New York City in 1860. He 
commenced practice in New York in 1863, but moved into Queens 
County in 1873. He i*eceived the L^emocratic nomination as Surrogate 
of Queens County in 1885, and was elected; but the Court of Appeals 
decided that the term of .Air. Welter's predecessor had not expired. 
In 1886 he was again nominated by the Democratic Convention, re- 
cc^ived the indorsement of the Republican Convention, and was elected 
without o] (position. He married, in 1873, Miss Onderdonk, daughter 
of Ileniy ;M. Onderdonk, who was a Senator from Ohio; niece of 
William II. Onderdonk, who held the otWces of District Attorney, Coun- 
ty Judge, and Surrogate of Queens County, and granddaughter of 
Bisho]) Ouderdonk of the Protestant Episcopnl Church. 

FLETCHER, AI^STIN BARCLAY, President of a large corp(n-a- 
tion in New York City from 1882 to 1881, since the latter date has 
been engaged in the practice of law in this city. He has acquired 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



271 



a wide iei)iitiiti()n as au expert eoinineicia! reoi'i^aiiizer and represen- 
tative and adviser of tidneiary institndons. He is eonnsel for a 
larsie nnniber of banlvS, trnst oonipauies, and similar concerns, and 
is a director of tlie Eppin^er ^^ IJnssell Company, the Van Wajioner 
& Williams Hardware Company, ami the New York and ^?tateu Is- 
land Electric Company. In 1892 be succeeded the late Governor 
William E. Ilussell, of ^lassarhnsetts, as Irnstee of the Boston Uni- 
vei-sity. He is a Knight Temiilar and a meniher of the Lawyers' and 
New York Athletic clubs. He married Hortense M. Follett, of Wrent- 
ham, Mass. He was born in Mendon, ^Tass., March 13, 1852, and is 
the sou of Asa Austin Fletcher and Harriet Edna Durkee. On both 
sides he descends from old New England families. His first American 
ancestor on the paternal side, I!ob 
ert Fletclur, settled in Concord, 
Mass., in 1<j30. Mr. Fletcher at 
tended the public schools. Dean 
Academy, Bryant and Stratton's 
Commercial College, Wesleyan 
Academy, in 187G was gradtiate<l 
from Tufts College, and subse- 
quently spent three years in the 
post-graduate dei>artments of Bos- 
ton University, — the School of 
Oratory, the School of All Sciences, 
and the School of Law. He took 
all the oratorical prizes for which 
he was permitted to compete. 11 r 
succeeded the celebrated Professor 
Lewis B. ^Monroe as Professor of 
Oratory in the Boston LTniversity 
School of Theology; became Lec- 
turer on Forensic Oratory in the 

Boston University School of Law, and subsequently accepted the 
Professorship of Elocution in Brown University. He resigned from 
this chair to come to New Y'ork Citv in 1S82. 




AUSTIN BARCLAY FLETCHER. 



BAPALLO, EDWARD SUMXEE, was graduated from Colund)ia 
University in IST-l and from Columbia University Law School in 1870, 
having also studied in the law offices of Stephen P. Nash and Aaron 
J. Vanderpoel. He has practiced lavs- in New Yoi-k City, Manhattan 
Borough, since 187G, — at first in partnership witli Julien Tappan 
Davies, as Davies & Rapallo, and subsequently as a member of the 
firm of Holmes, Rapallo & Kennedy. He has been counsel to the Man- 
hattan Elevated Railway Company, the Delaware and Hudson Canal 
Company, and the Lake Shoie Railway Comi)any, and is one of the 
general counsel of the Manhattan Life Insurance Company. He is a 



272 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

member of the Ceutiiry, University, Mauliattau, and Democratic clubs, 
the New York Law Institute, the City Bar Association, and tlie State 
Bar Association. He was born in Cambridge, Mass., September 18, 
3853, and is tLie son of tlie late Hon. Cliarles A. Kapallo and Helen, 
daughter of Bradford Sumner, of Boston. His fatlier was a judge of 
the New York Court of Appeals froml8T0 until his death. His grand- 
father, Antonio Kapallo, was born on the family estate near the town 
of Ilapallo, Italy, immigrated to New Y'ork City, and engaged in huv 
practice with John Anthon, and was counsel for one of the Italian 
governments. He manied Elizabeth, daughter of Captain Benjamin 
Ciould, a Bevolutionary officer, who was elected to the Continental 
Congiess, but died before it was convened. Hannah Gould, the poet- 
ess, Avas one of his daughters, while another was the mother of Chief 
Justice Fuller of the United States Supreme Court. B. A. Gould, the 
famous astronomer of Harvard College and the Argentine Republic, 
was the nephew of Mrs. Elizabeth Gould Kapallo. Mr. Rapallo's ma- 
ternal grandmother was a daughter of Chevalier Francis Augustus 
Alfonso Bartholdi, who was educated at Padua University, studied 
medicine at the College of Vienna, and became physician to Louis 
XVIII. and a member of his household when that unfortunate sover- 
eign was the Compte de Provence. At the time of the French Revo- 
lution Dr. Bartholdi immigrated to Wreutham, Mass., changing his 
name to Bertody, and mari'ied Ursula Plym]iton, daughtci- of a 
wealthy citizen of Massachusetts. 

PINNEY, GEORGE MILLER, JR., born in AYiadsor, Dane County, 
\Vis., -March 8, lS5(i, is the son of George Miller Pinney, a native of 
Pennsylvania, and Harriet M. \Vliiln('y, of Ohio. He is a lineal de- 
scendant of Humphrey Pinney, who came to America from Somerset- 
shire, England, about 1030. He was graduated from Harvard College 
in 1S7S, spent two years as tutor, and was graduated from the Harvard 
Law School in 1882. He came to New Y'ork City, and was with the 
lii-m of Evarts, Southmayd ic Choate, and its successor, Evarts, Choate 
& Beaman, from 1882 to 1880. He then formed the firai of Pinney 
& Sterling. In 1890 he practiced alone, in 1891 became a member 
of the firm of Carter, Pinney & Kellogg, and in 1891 formed the firm 
of Pinney & Thayer, which is now Pinney, Thayer & Hadlock. 
He has resided at New Brighton, S. I., since Februai^, 1888. 
In 1893 he was active in the movement to overthrow the regular 
Democratic machine in Richmond County. Himself a Republican, 
he stumiied the county in 1893, and again in 1894, in support of suc- 
cessful fusion tickets. In 1895 he was elected Supervisor of the town 
of Oastleton. The same year be was elected District Attorney of 
Riclnnond County. On June 9, 189G, Governor Morton appointed him 
a member of the Greater New l^ork Commission fnuu Richmond 
County, and at the first meeting of the Commission he was elected 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



273 



its Secretary. He uuuried, June 27, 1887, Olive Frauces, (laii.t;liter 
of the late E. N. Child, of Worcester, Mass., and has four children. 
lie is a member of the University, Harvard, St.iteu Island Cricket and 
Baseball, Staten Island I*olo, Kill von Knll Yacht, and Staten Island 
AYhist clnbs, and of the City and State Bar associations. 



WHITE, STEPHEN VAN CULLEN, has lon^ been a conspicnons 
uieinbei' of the New York Stock Exchange. Born in Chatham County, 
North Carolina, August 1, 1831, ho was reared in IlliTiois, whither his 
parents removed shortly after his birth. In 18.54: he was ;L;raduated 
from Knox College, from which he subseipiently received the degrees 
of Master of Arts and Doctor of Laws. For one year after graduation 
he was bookkeejier for a mercan- 
tile firm of St. Louis, Mo., and then 
studied law \^itli Brown & Kasson, 
one member of which firm subse- 
quently became Governoi" of Mis- 
snuri and United States Senator, 
while the other became United 
States Minister to Austria and 
Germany. While studying law 3Ir. 
White was an editorial and liter 
aiy contributor to the St. Louis 
newspaper press. After his admis 
sion to the bar he for ten yejirs 
l)racticed law at Des ^Moines, Iowa. 
He was eminently successful, and 
argued many imiiortant cases in 
the United States courts. In 1860, 
liowever, he removed to New York 
City and established the banking 
firm of Marvin & White. At the end 

of two \ears he engaged in the batdving and l)rokeiage businc^ss under 
his own name, while since 1S82 he has l>een head of the firm of S. V. 
White cV: Company. In 1886 he was elected TO'Congress from his home 
district in Iti-ooklyn, but declined a renonnnation. For nearly thir- 
ty years he has lu^en a leading niembi r of l'l,\niontli ("hurch of 
Bro(d<lyn, of which the late Henry Ward lieecher was long the ])astor. 
He lia^- long been a nienil)er of its lionrd of trustees. He has done 
notable work asan amateur astronomer. In I8!tl he failed for |1,000,- 
(1(10 A\ hiie manipulating an ininiense corn deal, through the misappro- 
]aialion ef his funds by a famous ttrm of brokers. But within a year 
he liad made another fortune, and |)aid off every obligation, dollar 
for ilollar. with interest. !]<■ is rresi(h'nl of tiie Bower-Barff Eustless 
Ti-oii roiiipany nnd a director of ijie New -b'rsey Magnetic Concen- 




STEPHEN VAN CULLEN WHITE. 



274 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

tratiiii;' rompaiiT. llv is :i iiiciiiher of the Union League and Hamil- 
ton t-liilis of Brooklyn and tln' Lawyers' Club of New York. 

TAT*PAX, J. B. COLES, lawyer, was born in (2neens Connty, New 
York, April L 18(50, and is the son of De ^Vitt Tai>i)an and 31arjiaret 
Coles. He descends from the Tai)i)aiis and De Witts, on his father's 
side, and is of Eni^lisli descent thron<:li his mother. Amon^ his 
ancestors were Colonel Charles T)e AYitt and ^Major Christopher Tap- 
pan, Revolutionary officers. Mr. Tap]ian's father was a successful 
physician, who was educated at Yale College and the New York 
Colleiio of Physicians and Sur-^eons. Mr. Tap])an is likewise a Yale 
man. haviuii been liraduated from that university in 1880. He was also 
graduated from the Columbia Colle<;e Law School in 1882. He com- 
menced law pi-actice in this ( ity in 1883, and has followed his profes- 
sion here and in (,>ueens ( 'onnty continuously since. He is now a mem- 
ber of the tirm of Scudder, Tappan, Seaman & Cox. He resides at 
(ilen Cove, L. I., and was one (d' I lie organizers of the (lien Cove 
Bank. lie has also served as I'resident of the Village Board of Edu- 
cation. He is a member (d' a number of yachting and social org:an- 
izations, includinji the Scawaidiaka-Corinthian Y'acht Club of New 
Ynrk, the nemi)stead Harbor Ya(hr, Club, the (Queens County Golf 
Club, the :Mill Neck Clidi. and the Yale Alumm. On May 21, 1885, he 
was married to Car(dine Alice, dauiihtei- of Mr. -Tames Titus, of (ilen 
Co\i'. 

GREENE. JOSEPH WAHKEN. member of the New Yoik law firm 
of Arnold »Jc Greene, was a nuMuber of the Bro(dclyn Board of Civil 
Service Commissioners from 1SU4 to IS'.MI. and at the present tinu' is a 
director of the Home Life Insurance <'(uui)auy. the Niagara Fire In- 
surance Company, and the Soutli Brooklyn Savinjis Institution, and 
is a trustee of the Shelteiiu^ Arms Nursery ami the Brooklyn Em- 
]doyiuent Society. He is a N'estryuiau of Holy Trinity ('linrcli, 
Brooklyn, and a member of the Hamilton. Barnard, and Twentieth 
Century clubs of Brooklyn, and the Lawyers' and Al]iha Delta Phi 
clubs of New York City. He was born in Brocdvlyn. November 2. ^SiCt. 
the sou of .Tosejih Warren (Jreeue. Sr.. ami Mary Au.i;usta Smith, of 
Jamaica. L. 1. His fatlier was a manufacturer and dealer in jewi-lry. 
On the ](aTerna] side he descends from .T(din Greene, an apothei-ary 
from Salisbury. En,!iland, who origimiUy settled in ^lassachusetts, 
and subsequently immijirated to Rhode Island with Roucr Williams, 
beconnnji owner of a lariic tract of land, acquired from the Indians. 
One of his descemlants was Gem*ral Nathainel (Jreeue. of the Kevo- 
lution. ()n the paternal side ]Mr. Greene descends from Bullridi'V 
Smith, one of the early settlers nf Louii' IshnuL llavinii received his 
early education in the Brooklyn public schools. Mr. Greene was u,Tad- 
uated from Yale (_\)llege in 18(58, and from the (^'olumbia Colleii-e Law 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



275 



School iu 1870. lu ISTl he bej;an tlie practice of law, beiug the 
partner of Hon. Edward I'aterson from 1874 until the elevation of the 
latter to the Supreme Court bench in 1888. Since 1888 he has been 
associated with Lemuel TlastiTi^s Arnold, under the firm style of Ar- 
nold i^ Greene. He was married, in 1871, lo Julia S. Sherman, and has 
three sons — Joseph Warren, James Taylor, and Herbert Gouverueur, 
and two daughters — Katherinc and Julia Sherman Greene. 



BEOWER, GEORGE A'AXDERHOOF, prominent lawyer and 
l)ublic citizen of Brooklyn, was born in Paterson, N. J., October 18, 
1813, is the sou of Richard Brower and MariL-aret Van Buskirk, and is 
descended from an old family, established in Brooklyn from early 
colonial times. His creat-yrandfatlicr, Abiajiam Browei-, was an 
officer in the Continental Army, 
and was joint owner, with Jerc^- 
miali Brower, of the old tidemill 
at Gowauus. By order of General 
"\Vasliinj:ton, this mill was burned 
during- the Battle of Long Island 
to prevent the grain and other 
property from falling into the 
hands of the enemy. Mr. Brower 
was prepared for I'riiiceton Col- 
lege, although the outbreak of tin- 
Qvil War prevented him from 
pursuing his studies at That insti 
tution. He subse(|uentl\ entered 
the law office of the late Jmlgc 
Charles W. Waller, of lloncsdalc 
Pa. In 180G he was admitttMl to 
the Pennsylvania bar, while he 
was admitted to the New York 
bar, in New York City, in .March, 
1867. He has ]>racticed law in Brooklyn continuously since lln' latter 
date, ac(|uiring a large real estate and commeicial business, lie is 
counsel and one of the trustees of the Kings County Trust Comjiany. 
He was a])pointed General Ajtpraiser of the I'oit of New York by 
President Cleveland, January ;{, 1885, and adnnnistered rhe oflice with 
al)iliry until ISSII, when, ujion the exjiiratioii of Mr. Clevcdand's first 
term, he resigned. In .Inly, ISS'.i, he was aisjiointed by .Mayor Chapin 

one of the Park Goi issioner^- of the Gity of P.rooklyn, uiidei- the 

law limiting th*^ Park ( 'ommissioners to three, and by his colleagues 
was at once elected President of the Board. Subsequently, the Park 
Dejiartment being made a single-headed conmussion, Mr. Brower was 
a])pointed the ( 'oiiiiiiissione]-, and retained ( he jxisition until Pebruary 
1, Lsitl. \lv was one of the oruanizers and original members of the 




<;koki;k vandkrhoof brower. 



27(5 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Rembrandt Club of Brooklyn, and is a member of tlie Atlantic Yacht 
Club, the Brooklyn Club, the Montauk Club, and other social organi- 
zations. 

FLEMIXG, JOHN, has been engaged in the practice of law at 
Jamaica, L. I., since 1S(>(>; served for six years as a member of the 
Board of Trustees of that village, and on October 27, 1883, was ap- 
pointed by Governor Grover Cleveland District Attorney of Queens 
County, New York, to succeed B. W. Downing, wlio had been removed 
from office. In November of the same year 31 r. Flenuug became 
the Democratic nominee for the same office, and was elected for the 
term of three years. His administration was signalized by his sticcess- 
ful prosectition of a plieuomenally large number of murder cases. 
His successor in office, Thomas F. Gowan, having been removed with- 
in tliree montlis, in August, 1S87, Mr. Fleming was once more ap- 
jjointeil District ,\ttorney, this time by Governor Hill, while in the 
following November he was again elected to the office, and subse- 
quently re-elected, discharging its dttties tintil January 1, 1894. He 
prosecuted pool sellers, gamblers, and i)rize lighters in (Queens County, 
as well as the officere of the Western Union Telegraph Company for 
permitting the use of its wires in furtherance of such illegal enter- 
prises. In the fall of 189() he was the Democratic nominee for Justice 
of the Supreme Court, as successor of Hon. Charles F. Brown, but 
Avent down with the entire Democratic ticket. On January 5, 1898, 
Mayor Van Wyck appointed him, for a term of seven years, a Justice 
of the Court of Special Sessions of the Second Division of the City of 
New York. JMr. Fleming was born in County ]\Ionaglian, Ireland, 
June 1, 1842, the son of William Fleming and Mary O'Neill. De- 
prived of both parents at the age of five, he was reared by his uncle, 
James O'Neill, who carefully educated him. Coming to the United 
States at the age of fourteen, he attended the jmblic schools of Ja- 
maica, L. I., and the private school of Eev. Matthew Hunting. At the 
age of seventeen he entered the employ of a New York City hotise 
engaged in the Southern commission business, and so remained until 
the Civil War brought this business to a close. He then for three 
months studied law with John J. Armstrong, of Jamaica, and enlisted 
in Company A of the One Hundred and Sixty-tifth New York Volun- 
teer Infantry, with which he remained in active service for three 
years. He participated in movements along the James River, in the 
battles of Cedar Creek and Winchester in the Shenandoah A'alley, and 
in the engagements of Plains Store, Pouchatoula, Sabine Cross Roads, 
Pleasant Hill, Cane River, and Mausura Plains, Louisiana, and the 
assaults u]»on Port Hudson. He responded to the call of General 
Banks for volunteers for the last desperate assault upon Port Hudson. 
Returning, he resumed his law studies, and was admitted to the bar 
in Brooklvn, in December, 18(;(). 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



277 




^ 



«^ 



AADEESON, HEXRY HILL, wa« engaged iu the practice of law 
in New York City from 1849 until Ids death, September 17, 1890. 
Born in Boston, November 9, 1827, he was prepared at Phillips An- 
dover Academy; in 1S4S was graduated cum Imidc from Williams Col- 
lege; coming to New York, studied law while supporting himself as 
Instructor in the Friend's School; entered the ofUce of Henry E. Da- 
vies, then counsel to the corporation; was admitted to the bar in 1849, 
and immediately intrusted with the i)reparation and trial of important 
cases. From 1852 to 1857 he was a member of the law fii*m of Willard, 
Sweeney cS: Anderson, the head of which was subsequently Chief Jus- 
tice of South Carolina; while Claudius L. Mouell, afterward Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court, also became a member of the firm. 
Having suffered the loss of his wife and cliildren. he traveled abroad 
in 1857 and 1858. Becoming assist- 
ant to Corporation Counsel Greene 
C. Bronson in 1859, he had entire 
charge of the legal business in New 
York City, and established a sub- 
stantial reputation. He was Judge 
Bronson's law itartner until the 
death of the latter in 1803, when 
he formed a partnership with Ma- 
sun Young. Judge Henry E. How- 
land subsequently entered the firm, 
and after the retirement of Mr. 
Young, George Welwood Murray 
and Henry Burrall Anderson were 
admitted, under the present style 
of Anderson, Howland & Mui-ray. 
The Democratic candidate for the 
Supreme Court in 1871, Mr. Ander- 
son was defeated by Judge Noah 
Davis. He refused the nomination 
for the Superior Coui*t in 1872, declined an appointment as Corpora- 
tion Counsel, and refused an appointment to the Cour-t of Appeals. 
One of the founders of the University Club, he was its first President, 
serving nine years. He was twice elected a vice-president of the City 
Bar Association, and served on its Executive Committee and on the 
Committees on Grievances, on the Judiciary-, and on Judicial Nomina- 
tions. He was a vestiyman of Calvary Episcopal Church and a mem- 
ber of the Metropolitan, Century, University, Lawyers', and New York 
Yacht clubs, the Downtown Association, the New England Society, 
and the Williams College Alumni Association. He married, second, 
Sarah B., daughter of William P. Burrall, of Hartford, Conn., who sur- 
vived him with three sons — Henry Burrall, William Bun-all, and 
Charles P. Anderson, nil of wliom are lawyers. Mr. Anderson was 




HENRY HILI. AXDKRSOX. 



278 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

himself of ►Scoteli descent, the son of Rev. Rnfns Anderson, a distin- 
guished oleigyman of Boston, who was graduated from Bowdoiu Col- 
lege and Andover Seminai-y, and for over forty years was Secretai-y of 
the American Board of I'oreigu Missions, and grandson of Bev. Bufus 
Andei-son, also a prominent clergyman and graduate of Dartmouth 
College. Mr. Anderson's grandmother was a cousin of Chief Justice 
Parsons, of Massachusetts. 

ANDEBSON, HENRY BURRALL, eldest son of the late Henry 
Hill Anderson and .Sarah B., daughter of William 1'. Bnrrall, was 
born in Xew York City in 1803; in 1S85 was graduated from Yale, 
studied law and became a member of the law firm of Anderson, How- 
land & Murray, of which his father was long the head. He is a director 
and the Treasurer of the Continental Filter Company. He is a mem- 
ber of the City, University, New York, and New York Yacht clubs. 
He married Marie W., daughter of Joseph Larocque, tlie eminent law- 
yer of New York. 

GILLEN, WILLIAM W., has been engaged in the practice of law 
in Jamaica, L. I., since 1879, while, from 1876 to the present time, 
he has also occupied a clerical relation to the SuiTogate of Queens 
County, since 1885 having been Chief Clerk in the Suii'ogate's office. 
Himself a Bepublican, he has retained this office under both parties. 
He is a stockholder and director of the Bank of Jamaica, as he is 
also of the Jamaica Savings Bank. He is a member of the Jamaica 
Club, the Queens County Bar Association, the New York State Bar 
Association, and the American Bar Association. The son of Francis 
Gillen and MaiT Roe, like his father he is a native of New York 
City, where he was born, January 24, 1853. His father, long engaged 
prominently in the forwarding business in New York Cit^', was a 
representative of an old American family. His mother was of an 
old Long Island family, where her ancestors, emigrants from Eng- 
land, settled in the first half of the seventeenth century. One of 
her ancestors, Andrew Messenger, was one of the founders of the town 
of Jamaica, L. I. Upon the death of his father, in 1859, Mr. Gillen 
was reared in the home of his uncle, Henry W. Rowland, who subse- 
quently became Supei'visor of the town of Jamaica. After his gradu- 
ation from the High School at Queens, L. I., during the five years 
from 1871 to 187(1, Mr. Gillen held a ])osition in his uncle's store at 
Queens. Becoming Clerk to Surrogate Alexander Hayner in 1876, he 
also began the study of law. 

BAWSON, SIDNEY FULLER, eminent leader of the bar of Bicli- 
mond County, is a director and counsel of the First National Bank of 
Staten Island, is counsel of the Board of Commissioners of Police for 
Ricjimoud Countv. and has sustained a similar relation to the Board 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



279 



of Suiicrvisors, the Trustees of the villii:;es of New lUiulitou and I'ort 
Kicliiiioud, and to iiiudy of the priiieipal corporatious on tlie ishiud. 
lie was District Attorney of iiichinond County from ISTl to 1874, and 
attracted wide attention by his bold ])rosecution and conviction of a 
large number of jniblic officials — some of whom were members of liis 
own jiolitical ])arty — for malfeasance in office. Nominated for County 
Judge and Surrogate in 1S74, he was defeated with the rest of the 
Democratic ticket in the 
county and through(jut the 
State. He was born at 
Schroon Lake, X. Y., Decem- 
ber 15, 1843, the son of Ashley 
Tond liawsou and Adaliue 
Crego, and eighth in lineal 
descent from Edward Raw- 
son, first Secretary of Massa- 
chusetts Colony. The priuci- 
jjal of a public school when 
the Civil War broke out, he 
enlisted in the One Hundred 
and Eighteenth New York, 
and served from June, 18(>2, 
to June, ISiio. He studied 
law with Hon. Byron Pond, 
of Elizabeth, N. Y.; was ad- 
mitted to the bar in May, 
1807, and became the law 
partner of Lot C. Clark and 
Alfred De<Jroot, practitioners 
on Stateii Island and in New 
York ('ity. Mr. Clark was 
recognized as the foremost 
lawyer in Kichmond County 
until his retirement, since 

which time the firm style has been DeGroot, EaAvson & Stafford. Mr. 
Kawson was admitted to practice in the United States Supreme Court 
on motion of James C. Carter. 




SIDNEY FULLKR RAW SON. 



DICKEESON, EDWAED NI(M)LL, <Mnineut patent lawyer, was 
born in Paterson, N. J., February IL 1824, and died in Far l^ockaway, 
L. I.. December 12, 1889. He was a son of Philemon Dickerson, an 
eminent New Jersey lawyer, judge, and statesman. The founder of 
the Dickerson family in Amei'ica, Phih^non, emigrated from England 
early in the seveuteenth century, aiul was one of tlie tirst Puritan set- 
tlers of Massachusetts, being a freeholder in Salem in 1038. 'S\v. Dlck- 
erson's mother was a daughter of CaptaiTi John St(itesbiiry, an otlicer 



280 HISTURV OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

in tUe KeTolution, who participated iu many impoitaiit battles. Mr. 
Dickersou was educated at I'liiioetou Colleiie. At the aiie of twenty- 
one he Avas admitted to the bar. He decided to abandon his profession 
for a while and devote himself to travel and scientific researches. 
He visited many of the countries of Europe and Central and South 
America. la 1873 he resumed his legal practice, and became recog- 
nized as the foremost patent lawyer of the (nited States. Among 
the great suits with which Ir- M'as identified as counsel were those of 
the American Bell Telei)h()ne CompauA- and the National Improvement 
Telegraph Company, the I'an-Electric cases, and numerous others in- 
volving the best-known patents for the telephone, the telegraph, reap- 
ing machines, explosives, railways, refrigerators, ventilating process- 
es, nickel plating, planing machines, and guns. Among his clients were 
the Western I'nion Telegrai)h Company, the Gold and Stock Tele- 
graph Company, the Standard (»il ('ompany, the IMcCornuck Mower 
and Reaper Com]>aiiy, the Bell Telephone Com[»aiiy, and the Edison 
Electric Company. He was ])assi()nately devoted to astronomical 
science, and on th(^ roof of his residence in Thirty-fourth Street, near 
Eifth Avenue, he built an observatory equipped with the most ap- 
proved and recent instruments and inventions. He was tlic author of 
several useful inventions. 

DICKERSUX, EDWAKD MCOLL, i.ateut lawyer, and son of the 
late eminent patent attorney nf that name, was born in Newport, 
li. I., August 28, 1852. He was educated at Trinity ( "ollege, Hartford, 
Conn., studied law with his father, and, since his admission to the bar, 
has ])racticed law in New York City. lie has represented nuuiy cor- 
pciiatious, and has frequently appeared in patent cases. He has rep- 
res^entcd the Western Union Telegrajili Company, the Bell Telephone 
Comi)any, and the (General Electric C<)m])any. He lias also taken out 
many patents as an inventor. He is presid(Mit, vice-iiresident, or 
diicctor of a numher of inannfact niing and railroad corimrations. 

VAN WYCK, ROBERT ANDERSON, the present Mayor of the 
city, enjoys the distinction of being the iirst elected to that ottice 
under the charter creating the " (Jreater " New York. He Avas nom- 
inated by Tammany Hall, and elected by a large majority in the fall 
of 18!)7, and assumed the duties of the ilayor in January. 1898. He 
was born in the old \'an Wyck mansion on Lexington Avenue iu 
1850, the late William Van Wyck, iii-^ father, having been a prominent 
hnvyer and r>emoci'atic leader. He is also seventh in lineal descent 
from Cornelius Barents A'an Wyck. who came to New Amsterdam in 
KiSd lioni \\'y(k, Holland, and married in I'lal linsli, in Kitid, Ann, 
daughter of Kev. Johannes Theodoras I'olhemus. Bred to the law. 
and eugaged in active prat'tice in this city, he was elected a Justice 
of the City Court, and established a reputation for carefully ])i'epared 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



281 



decisions. He was upon the bench of this ctnirt when elected Mayor, 
and was Chief Justice of the Court. He is unmarried, and a member 
of the Democratic. Manhattan, St. Nicholas, and Hardware clubs, 
and the Holland Society. Judge Augustus \'an Wyck, of Brooklyn, 
is his brother. 



DAHLGEEN, JOHN VIXTOX, since 1S92 a member uf the well- 
known New York law firm of Lord, Day iV; Lord, in 189.5 and 1896 
was Attorney to the Building Department of New York City, and is 
the author of " Dahlgren's Building Law ^Lmual." He married Eliz- 
abeth, daughter of 
the late Joseph ^\'. 
Drexel, of New York, 
member of the bank- 
ing firm of Drexel, 
]\[organ & Company. 
He is a member of 
tlie New York Atli- 
1 e t i c, IJepublicau, 
and Catholic clubs. 
He was born at "S'al- 
paraiso, Chile, April 
22, 1SG8; was gradu- 
ated from the Uni- 
versity of George- 
town,'D. C, in 1SS9, 
and from its law 
scliool in 1891, and is 
the son of the late 
A d m i r a 1 .T o li :i 
Adolph Dahlgren, 
United States Navy, 
and his wife Made- 
line, daughter <ii 
Hon. Samuel Finley 
Mnton, who was for twenty-two years a Member of Congress from 
Ohio, and author of the act creating the Department of tli<- In- 
terior. His grandfather, Bernhard TMirik Dalilgreu. was a graduate 
of the University of L'psala, who, liaving been involved in a Be- 
publican movement in 1804, fled from Sweden, lb- subsequently be- 
came Swedish Consul at Oporto, I'ortugal. howevei-. and still later 
was a merchant at Philadelphia, where he married ^Lirtha, daughter 
of James Bowan. a Bevolutionary soldier. :\Ir. Dahlgren's great- 
grandfather. Dr. Johan Adolf Dahlgren, was also graduated from the 
T'niversity of Upsala, and was eminent in Sweden as a physician and 
scientist, living from 1744 to 1797. 



.wP^y' 




JOHN VINTON DAHLGREN. 



282 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

GKAY, JOnX ALEXAXDEK CLINTON, actively engaged iu busi- 
ness iu New York City for many jears prior to his retirement in 1S52, 
since that time lias been interested in railroad and other corporate 
interests. At present he is Vice-President of the People's Bank of this 
city. He was \'ice-President of the original Central Park Commis- 
sion. He is a member of the Union League < iub and other organiza- 
tions. Born in the Clinton mansion at Little Britain, N. Y., in 1815, 
he has been a resident of this city since childhood. He is the son of 
John Gray, who died in ISIG, and (irandsou of Alexander Gray, who 
emigrated from Northern Ireland to Philadelphia in 1795, dying soon 
after. The wife of Alexander Gray was a member of the Clinton 
family, and after the death of her first husband she married her kins- 
man, General James Clinton, of the Eevolution, brother of Governor 
George Clinton and father of (Jovernor I)e ^Vitt Clinton by his first 
wife. The present ilr. Gray married in 1837 ??usan M., daughter of 
George Zabriskie, of this city. Alderman and member of the Assembly. 
Of their three sons. Rev. George Zabriskie Gray was for nearly twenty 
years dean of the Episcopal Divinity School. ( 'ambridge. Mass. ; Rev. 
Albert Zabriskie Gray, D.D., was chaplain in the Civil War, held sev- 
eral pastorates, and in 1882 became wai-den of Racine College, while 
Hon. John Clinton Gray is a Justiie (d" the New York Court of 
Appeals. 

GRAY, JOHN CLINTON, was appointed to the bench of the Court 
of Appeals in this State in 1888, to succeed the late Hon. Charles A. 
Rapallo, and at the election held in the fall of the same year was 
elected to succeed himself for the term of fourteen years. The son of 
John Alexander Clinton Gray and Susan M., daughter of the late 
George Zabriskie, he was born in New York City, was graduated from 
the University of New York, was graduated from the Harvard Law 
School, and subsequently continued the study of law at the University 
of Berlin. As head of the law firm of Gi-ay •.<: Davenport of this city, 
he wiis long engaged in the pi'actice of his profession prior to his eleva- 
tion to the bench. He is a member of the Meti'opolitan, Century, 
Union League, nnd ^lanhattan clubs. ;mil tlic city Bar Association. 

ADEE, GEORGE TOWNSEND, succeeded his father as head of the 
firm of Adee, Timpson & Company, drygoods auctioneers of this city. 
He retired frf)m its active management in ISoO, and after the Civil 
War closed up its affaire. He became a director of the National Rank 
of Commerce in 1842, ami was its Vice-President for ten years, during 
much of the time being Acting President. He was one of the founders 
and a director of the United States Tinist Comjiany, was also a founder 
and a director of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, and was a 
director of the Republic Fire Insurance Company. He was born in 
All.iiny, April 7. 1804, and died in Tliis city, November 20, 1884. In 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



283 



1851 he purcLiased the ouuutry-seat of Edward I^e Hoy, on Throgg's 
Neck, Westchester County. He was a vestryman of St. Peter's 
Church ( Episcopal ), Westchester. He married, in 1844, Ellen Louise, 
daughter of Philip Henry, an old New York merchant and soldier of 
the ^Var of 1812, and had a daughter, Mrs. M. Dwight Collier, and five 
sons — George A., lawyer; Philip Henry, lawyer; Frederic William, 
lawyer; Edwin M., and Ernest R. Adee. 

William Adee, father of the late George Towusend Adee, was the 
founder and original head of the firm of Adee, Timpson & ( \)m])any. 
He married Clarissa Towusend, of Albany, and resided at West Ches- 
ter village. He was the grandson of John Adee, who emigrated from 
England to Providence, K. I., and subsequently removed to Port- 
chester, N. Y. 



ADEE, FEEDEIHC WILLIAM, was graduated from Y'ale in 1873, 
and from Columbia College Law School in IST.j. l-^u- eight years sub- 
sequent to May, 1874, he was en- 
gaged in practice in this city in con- 
nection with the well-known law 
fiiTU of Lord, Day & Lord, and since 
that time lias maintained an oftice 
of his own. He is principally 
engaged in the ]>ractice of com- 
mercial, corporation, and real estate 
law, and in matters pertaining to 
estates, and has a large clientage 
in Europe as well as in this country. 
He is a member of the Union, 
51etropolitan, Knickerbocker, Uni- 
versity, and Country clubs, the 
Downtown Association, the Y^ile 
Alumni Association, and the City 
Bar Association. He has served 
on several committees of the Bar 
Association. He was born in this 
city, April 19, 1858, of Huguenot 
and Dutch descent, the son of lln' 
late George Townsend Adee, dry- 
goods merchant and banker of this city, and Ellen Louise, daughter 
of Philip Henry, also a New Y(U-k merchant. 



1 




^ 


;x ■ 


" m 




\ E|T 


s 
r 


^^^^F 
^■V 


^1 


i^ 


m/ 





t'REDKUIC'K WILLIAM AUKK. 



COUDEKT, FREDERICK RENE, born in New Y'ork City, March 
1, 1882, was graduated from Columbia College in 1850, was admitted 
to the bar two years later, and has since practiced in New York. 
Witli two brothers he formed the laAV firm of Coudei-t Brothers. He 
lias been President of the Bar Association of the City of New York, 



284 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

and is Prosident of the Manhattan Clnb. He has been President of the 
Columbia College Ahnuni Association and of the Yoiuii; Men's Demo- 
cratic Club of New Vork City, and was the tirst President of the 
United States Catholic Historical Society. For ten years he Avas 
President of the French Benevelout Society. He is a trustee of Co- 
lumbia UniAersity and Seton Hall College, and is a member of the 
A'isiting Committee of Harvard College. For three years he was 
Government Director of the Union Pacific Railroad. He was one of 
the counsel of the United States in the Bering Sea controversy with 
Great P>ritain before the Tribunal of Arbitrators at Paris in 1S93. 
He has appeared in many important cases. He was a delegate to the 
International Congress on the Law of Nations at Antwerp in ISTT, 
and attended the session of the same at Liverpool in 1882. He was 
counsel of the Democratic Committee in the Tilden-Hayes Presidential 
contest. He supported William R. Grace both times when elected 
Mayor of New York, and supported Grover Cleveland in each of his 
Presidential campaigns. During the first Cleveland campaign he 
\\as President of the Lawyers' Campaign Club. He was prominent 
in the " Anti-Snap " movement in this State in 1892, which led to 
Cleveland's renomination. He was Chairman of the Maynard Com- 
mittee of the Bar Association in 1893. the efforts of which led to May- 
nard's defeat at the polls. Mr. Coudert has twice received the degree 
of Doctor of Laws and also the degree of Doctor of Canon and Civil 
].a\v. He is a Knight of the Legion of Honor of France, an Officer of 
the Crown of Italy, and an Oflicer of the Order of Bolivar of Vene- 
zuela. He has delivered many addresses on important public occa- 
sions. He is the son of Charles Coudert, a native of Bordeaux, France, 
who was an officer in the Guard of Honor under Napoleon Bonaparte. 

HAWES, JAMES ^\■ILLIAM. has been engaged in the practice 
of law in New York City since 1868, and has been counsel in many 
cases of note. Some years ago, as counsel of the Republican County 
Committee of New York, he applied for a writ of prohibition against 
the New Y'ork Board of Police to obtain a decision on the question 
of what constituted a quorum of inspectors of elections. As counsel 
for certain taxpayers, in 1884 he conducted an examination of the 
New Y'ork Park Commissioners. He was counsel on the defense in 
the famous case of Belden vs. Burke, involving .f8.000,000 of the 
mortgage bonds of the Columbus, Hocking Valley and Toledo Rail- 
way Company. Between 1873 and 187() he was a regular contributor 
to Appleton's "American Cyclopaedia''; in 1877 became a contrib- 
utor to Kiddle & Schem's " Cyclopjedia of Education," and for several 
years has written for Appleton's " Annual Cyclopa?dia." He has 
contributed articles on Brazil to the Overland Monthhj. and a trans- 
lation of the Brazilian romance, " The Guarany," from the Portuguese 
of Jose de Alencar. He read an important paper on Portuguese lit- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



285 



erature before the Phi Beta Kappa Alumui iu Xcw York City iu iss:j. 
lie has delivered addresses ou many public occasions in New \'ork, 
includinti one before the Board of Aldermen on the occasion of the 
dciUh of President Gartield. His address on com]iuls((ry voting' be- 
fore the Commonwealth Club in 1S92 attracted much attciitinn. 
He has frecpicntly s]K)k('n fi'om the platform d\irim; political cam- 
paiiius. He has been a member of the Kepublican ( 'ouuty Committee, 
and a Delegate to Republican State Conventions. Durinp: three 
years, from 1SS2 to 1S84, he was President of the l>e|iublican Club of 
the City of New York, this term being longer than tliat of any other 
President of the (dub. In 1885 and 1886 he was also Chairman of its 
Executive Counuittee. In 1881 and 1882 he was a member (d' the 
Board of Aldermen of Xew York 
City, and Chairman of its Commit- 
tee on the Law Department. In 
1885 he was a candidate for Justice 
of the City Court ou the Republic- 
an ticket. In 1890 he Avas anti- 
Tammany candidate for President 
of the Board of Aldermen. In 1895 
he declined the nomination for Jus- 
tice of the City Court tendered him 
by the Republican party, the Con- 
vention of Good (iovernment clubs, 
and other anti-Tammany organiza- 
tions. He was Chairman of the 
Committee of the Re])ublican Club 
which, in 1881-85, brought forward 
the name of William M. Evarts 
for the United States Senatorship, 
and, with the co-operation of 
others, secured his election. He 

was one of the principal organizers, in 1887, of the Republican League 
of the LTnited States, as also of the New York Republican State 
League, and was the first Chairman of the Executive Connnittee of 
the State League, as also of its sub-Executive Committee. In 1889 
he was one of two Delegates-at-Large from the State League to the 
Convention of the National League. In 1871 he was active in the 
overthrow of the Tweed ring. For several years subsequent to 1871 
h(^ was Secretary of the Seventeenth Ward Council of Political Re- 
form, while for many years he was also a member of the City Council 
of Political IJefovm. He was a member of the Committee of Sixty, 
chosen by a mass meeting at Cooper I'nion in 188;> to procure legisla- 
tion looking to an increased water supply for New York City by an 
economical method which should not be under iKirtisan control; and 
as a member of the sub-committee appointed to visit Albany, he ar- 




.JAMKS WILLIAM HAWES. 



286 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

jiued before (Jovei-noi- (Jrover Cleveland agaiust an objectionable bill. 
In 1884 he was (.'hainnan of the ("ooper Union mass meeting which 
supported Mr. Eoosevelt in his course at Albany, and was a member 
of its Committee of Fifty-three, and of the subcommittee which did 
the actual work. He was an active member of a committee which, 
in 1885, submitted to the Legislature a constitutional amendment sep- 
arating Municijial and State elections, substantially as embodied in 
the new coustitiition of 18!t-t. As one of a Committee of the Kepub- 
lican Club of this city he successfully advocated an increase in the 
number of delegates t() llepublican State Conventions before the 
liepublican State Committee in August, 1885. lie was chosen a 
member of the Citizens' Committee of One Hundred, at a mass meet- 
ing in the Academy of ^lusic in 188(i. and was a member of its Ex- 
ecutive Committee, a member of the Committee on Organization, and 
Chairman of the Committee on General Policy. In the same year he 
was Chairman of a Joint Committee of the Ije]publicau Club of the 
City of New York, the City Eeform Club, the Young Men's Democi'atic 
clubs of both Xew Y'ork and Brooklyn, and three other clubs, to se- 
cure an attirmative vote of the jjeople on the question of calling a 
constitutional convention. This committee secured the desired vote 
at an ensuing election. In 1893 he became Chairman of a Committee 
of the IJepublican Club of this city to draft proposed amendments 
and submit them to the Constitutional Convention of 1894. The 
document thus siibmitted was used as a basis by the various commit- 
tees of tlie Convention. lie was active in sui)port of ballot reform in 
1888 and 1889, and was a member of the Joint Comnnttee which i)re- 
pared and submitted the Ballot Act which the Legislature pas.sed in 
1891 and Governor Flower vetoed. In 1888 he was appointed a mem- 
ber of the Committee on Legislation of the Anti-Saloon IJepublican 
State League. As Chairman of a Committee of the Bepublicau Club. 
he prepared, in 1891. a bill for compulsory voting. He drafted the 
law relating to naturalization which constitutes Chapter 927 of the 
Laws of 1895 of this State. He suggested and revised the act pro- 
viding for the registration of inmates of lodging-houses (Chapter 758, 
Laws of 1895). He suggested many features of the Baines Ballot Act 
K'hapter 810. Laws of 1895). As a member of a committee of the 
Bepublit-an Club, he appeared before the Greater New Y'ork Charter 
Commission in 189(5-97. Mr. Hawes was born in Chatham. Mass., July 
9, 1811, the sou of James Hawes and Susannah Taylor. He descends 
from Edmond Hawes, who, coming from England in l(i35, became 
prominent in the government of Plymouth Colony, as also from 
Stephen Hopkins, one of the original Pilgrim Fathers who came over 
in the JIayflower in 1020. Mr. Hawes was graduated from Harvard 
College at the head of his class in 1866. During the following year he 
attended the Harvard Law School, while at the same time holding 
the ])ositiou of Instructor in Marhematics in Harvard College. Com- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 287 

iui;' to New York City, he spent several luoutlis in tlie law ottice of 
Hawkins & Cotlaen, and in November, 18(iS, was admitted to tiic New 
York bar. 

1)AVIE8, JULIEX TAPPAN, promiiuiit lawyer of New York, has 
been engaged in leiial practice in this city since 18(!7. Up has ap- 
peared as connsel in many notable cases. He has been a trustee of 
the ilntual Life Insurance Company since 1882, and during- this time 
lias had cbarge of its important litigations. Since 1884 he has also 
l)een general counsel of the Manhattan Kailway Company. He has 
In^'u a manager of the Domestic and Foreign Missionai-y Society of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church since 1880, and is a member of the 
Metropolitan, T'nion I^eague, University, Lawyers", Players", l{ei)ub- 
lican, and Southside Sportsmen"s clubs. Born in New Y'ork City, 
September 25, 1845. he was educated at the Mount Washington Col- 
legiate Institute of this eity, the Walnut Hill School of Geneva, X. Y., 
Columbia College, and the Cohimbia College Law School. He is the 
son of the late Henry E. Da vies, well-known lawyer of this city, and 
Judge of the Court of Ap^ieals. He is a brother of (leneral Henry E. 
Davies, who became Major-Ceneral of Cavalrj- in the Army of the 
Pnioiiiac at the age of twenty-nine. He is also a nephew of (leneral 
Thomas A. Davies, a graduate of West Point, as he is of Professor 
("harles Davies. the mathematician. He descends from Robert Da- 
vies, of Ciwysany Castle, Flintshin', England, who was Sheriff of 
Flintshire, and held his castle for Charles 11. against the Puritans. 
:\Ir. Davies is the son of Kebecca W., daughter of John Tappan. He 
also descends from Ca])tain John Foote of the Kevolution. 

N'AX' XEST, (JEOKCE WILLETT. was graduated from Harvard 
College and from the Harvard Law School, and since 1882 has prac- 
ticed law in New York City. He has-argued numerous cases in the 
Court of A]i]ieals. He was one of the (Hlitors of the seventh edition 
of Sedgwick on "The Pleasure of Damages,"' and contributed to the 
Aiiiiririni Ltnr h'irlcir for N<)vember, 1S82, an article on •' Im]ieach- 
ment of J\idicial ( )fficers tinder the ( "onstitution of the United States." 
He is a member of the Union, Metrojx litan. University, and Harvard 
i-hibs, the Downtown Association, and the St. Nicholas Society, lb- 
was hot II in New Y(U'k City, and is the son of Abraham Kynier \'an 
Nest and :\Iargaret Willett. His ancestors include, besides the Van 
Nests, the P.ronsons. ^^■illetts, Bamdv<'rs, Fields, and Buns<Mi. 

CPOOK, ABEL, was educated at Williams College and the Colum- 
bia College Law Scho(d, and since 18(!4 has been engaged in the i>rac- 
tice of law. During the last twenty years he has had a large practice 
as counsel for coi])orations and in will contests. He is a director in 



288 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 



various corporations. In 1880 and ISSl he was President of the New 
York State Association lor tlie Protection of Fish and Game. He 
conducted tlie tournament of 1881 at Coney Ishind. He is a. member 
of tlie American Fislieries Society, the Brooklyn, Accomack, and 
Fountain Gun clubs, the Brooklyn and State Bar associations, and 
the American Academy of Political and Social Science. He is a mem- 
ber of every INIasonic oi'der, includinji' the Xew York Consistory, 
Mecca Shrine. He was born in Brooklyn, July 6, 1812, and is the sou 
of Samuel Crook and Mary Hanson. He descends from General 
Crook, of Cromwell's Armv. 



WAEEEN. LY^MAN EDDY, a younger brother of Ira DeForest 
Warren, and his ])nrtTier in the New Y'ork law firm of Warren, Mooth- 

by & WaiTen, was born in Cort- 
land County, Xew York, Septem- 
ber 4, 1817. He was educated 
at tlie academies at Montrose, Pa., 
and Cortland, X. Y., studied 
law with Hon. Horatio Ballard, 
cx-Secretary of State of Xew 
York, and was admitted to the bar 
in 1868. He began the practice 
of law with his brother, William 
II. Warreu, at Cortland, X. Y., 
subsequently establishing himself 
successively at Ithaca and Auburn. 
His imrtner at Auburn was ex- 
Senator William B. Woodin. In 
1888 he removed to X"ew York 
City. He was counsel for the 
estate of Ezra Cornell, founder of 
Cornell University. He has vis- 
ited almost every European country to defend the patent rights of his 
clients, the Lee Arms Company. 




i.l.MAN KUhl WAUKK.N. 



FLAM:MEB, CHAKLES a., was educated in the Xew York public 
schools, in 18(Jl was graduated from the College of the City of X'^ew 
York, and since 1866 has been engaged in the practice of law. He was 
elected to the X"ew York Assembly in 1872. In 1873 he was a School 
Trustee for the Twenty-second Ward of the city, and the same year 
Avas appointed a Police Justice. In 1895 he was appointed by Mayor 
Strong a City Magistrate. He is the author of " Committing jMagis- 
trate." He is a member of tlie Anon Society, the Liederkrauz, the 
City Bar Association, and the Lutheran and Adirondack League clubs. 
He was born in Xew York Citv. June 28, 184.5, tlie son of John G. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



289 



Flammei' and Augusta W., dau^litur of Kail Kramer, ills father was 
Mce-Presideiit of the West Bide Bank. His ancestors came from 
^^'ul•tember<^■, Germany. 



MOSS, FKANK, has been a resident of New Yorl.: City since 18(57; 
attended the public schools and the College of the City of New York; 
studied law with Joseph Fettretch, while also being a member of 
the tirst class of graduates from the Chautauqua Litcraiy and Scien- 
tific Course; was admitted to the bar in 1881 ; for two years remained 
with Mr. Fettretch, and since 1883 has been engaged in law practice 
in New York City on his own account. He is executor of the wills 
and estates of the late .Maltby C. 
Lane and John Risco. and coun- 
sel of the Board of Trustees of 
Sailors" Snug Harbor. In 1885, 
as counsel for property-owners 
on West Twenty-s<n-enth Street, 
he succeeded in ridding that sec- 
tion of the ■• Tenderloin " Dis- 
trict of disre])utable resorts. In 
this connection he gaini'il his 
firsi: insight into the corrupt re- 
lations between pcdice officials 
and law-breakers. He gathei-ed 
midence. and, in 1887, boldly 
jnosecuted Ca]>tain Alexander 
S. Williams, police commander 
of the "Tenderloin" District, 
for neglect of duty. The abili- 
ties and fearlessness which he 
displayed in this case led Dr. 
Howai'd Crosby to offer him the 
position of counsel to the Society 
for the I'revention of Crime, of 
which that eminent divine wa.s 

then President. Dr. Parkhurst succeeded Dr. Crosby as its Presi- 
dent. Mr. iloss was soon made a, director of the Society, as well 
as its counsel, and was one of its Executive Committee of Three 
— Dr. Parkhurst and Thaddeus D. Kenneson being the other two — 
that inaugurated and carried through the campaign against police 
corruption, which is now a matter of history. As Associate Counsel 
to the Lexow- Senate Investigating Committee, he brought the long 
campaign to fruition, the ma]>ping out of the course of tlie investi- 
gation, tlie selection of the witnesses for the stand, and the indication 
of the testimony to be brought out, being in his hands. The political 
result was the overthrow of Tammanv Hall and the election of :Mayor 




FRANK MOSS. 



290 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Strong. Uuder the reform administration it is well known that the 
Police Board became evenly divided on questions of policy and effi- 
ciency of the force, a deadlock resulting which absolutely blocked 
the most important functions of the Board. In this crisis, upon 
the resiunation of President Theodore lloosevelt from the Board, in 
April, iS!»7, ilr. Moss was appointed by Mayor Strong in his place, 
and by his colleagues was also elected to succeed as President. The 
deadlock was brought to an end. Mr. Moss made it i)lain that he had 
knowledge of corrupt practices, and that this would not be tolerated. 
Commissioner Frederick D. (Irant resigned from the Board, on the 
ground that he would not be a party to a system of surveillance 
which did not trust to the honor of the members of the force, and 
was succeeded by a Commissioner whose views led him to co-operate 
with the reform — as distinct from the political — element in the Board. 
The Chief of Police resigned, and Chief of Police McCullagh suc- 
ceeded him; the filling of vacant positions, which had been blocked, 
was resumed, and a work of reorganization, to im])rove the morale 
of the force, was successfully inaugurated. This condition of things 
was only brought to an end by the removal of Chief McCullagh by 
the new Board of Police Commissioners a])pointed by Mayor Van 
Wyck in 1898. Mr. Moss is Professor of ^Icdical Jurisprudence in 
the New York Medical College and Hospital for \Vomen. He is a 
trustee of the City Vigilance League, a director of the New York 
Bible Society, and a member of the Ifepublican and Twilight clubs, 
the Bar Association of the City, the Law Institute, and the Medico- 
Legal Society. He was Secretary of the TJepublican Anti-Saloon 
League, of which the late Xoah Davis was President, and drafti'd 
the first temperamr plank which found its way into a IJciiublican 
platform in this State. 

LITTLEFIELD, FREDERICK >L, attended tlic high school at 
Haverliill, Mass., in 1872 was graduated from Yale University, and 
two years later was graduated from the Columbia College Law School. 
He has since been engaged in the i)ractice of law in this city. He 
enjoys an extensive estate, corporation, and real estate practice. He 
is interested in several insurance coi-jiorations and real estate im- 
provement companies. He is a member of the Colonial, Ivejiublican, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon clubs, the Yale Alumni Association, the New 
England Society, the American Geographical Society, and the City 
Bar Association. He Avas liorn in Kennebunk, ^le., November 27, 
1849, and is the son of Josiah M. Littlefield and Caroline E., daughter 
of Samuel Kimball. He descends fi'om Edmund Littlefield, who 
came to Boston in Ifioa, and died at W<'lls, ^Fc. in ir>()l. His ancestors 
include Captain John Littlefield and Lieutenant Josiah i>ittlefield, 
of the colonial wars, and Major John Littlefield, of the Revolution. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



291 



WOUDFUUJ), STENNAKT LYNDON, Uuited Htates Minister to 
Spain, was graduated from Yale iu 1S54 and from Columbia College 
Law School in IS.")!, and since tlie latter date has been actively en- 
gaged in legal i)ractice iu IS'ew York City Avhen not engaged in the 
public service. He served in the Civil War from 18ti2 to 1S(>5, rising 
to the rank of L>rigadier-(Teneral. He took the Lincoln vote to 
Washington in lS(i(l as the messenger of the New Y^ork Electoral 
< 'ollege. Tlie following year he was Assistant United States Attornej' 
at New Y'ork. In 18(JG he was tlie successful Kepublican candidate 
for Lieutenant-(ioveruor of tlie State of New Y'ork. The Tkcpublican 
candidate for Governor in INTO, he was defeated by John T. lloff- 
nian;bul befoic liis death t lie notorious Tweed confessed that Hoffman 
had been framhilently counled iu. Elected to Congress in 1S72, tlie 
same year Mr. ^Voo(lfor(l was a Ke- 
publican Elector-at-large and I'resi- 
dent of the New Y'ork Electoral Col- 
lege. From ISKi to 1SS:*> he was 
T'nited States Disirid Attorney. 
In ISliri (ioA'ernor .MortiMi ai)poiutei! 
him a m<'niber of the commission to 
draft a charter for the consoli- 
dated City of New Y'ork. In 1S!»T 
President McKinley api»ointed liim 
United States Minister to S]taiii. 
His skillful and jnudeut condmt of 
the exceedingly Llelicate negotiations 
preceding the Spanish-.Vmerican 
war is a matter of recent history. 
He is a director and (Jeiicral 
Counsid of the iMetropolitan Life 
Insurance Conijiauy, a director of 

the Webster I'iano Company and the Louisiana and Northwest Kail- 
road, and a trustee of the Franklin Trust Company of Brooklyn and 
the Ri-o(d<lyn Institute of Arts and Sciences. lie is President ()f the 
Union League Club of Bi-ooklyii, as lie is also of the New England 
Society of New Y'ork City and that of Brooklyn. His clubs likewise 
in(dude the University and Lawyers', of New Y'ork, and the Hamilton 
and Monlauk, of Hrooklyn. He has received the degrees of LL.D. 
and D.C.L., and, since IStUJ, has been a trustee of Cornell University. 
He married, in IS.")!, Julia Evelyn Capen. Of their four (diildren, 
a daughter survives. P>oin in New Y'ork City, September 3. 1835, 
Mr. Woodford is the son of the late Josiah Curtis Woodford and 
Susan Terry, his father being a merchant. He descends fi'om Thomas 
Woodford, who came from Boston, England, to Plymouth, in 1634; 
was made a freeman at Dorchester in 1G35; was a member of the 
original Colony of Hai-tford, and subseipiently became t\ proprietor 
of Northampton, ^lass. 




GKNKUAI, HTKWAKT L. WOODFORD. 



292 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

MAYEK, WILLIA.M El)^VIN CUX, was educated iu the public 
schools of >s'ew York, iu 1881 beiuy liradiiated froui the rolleye of the 
Cit}- of NcAv York; studied law with Judye \Mliiam J. Uayuor; was 
admitted to the bar iu 188*J, aud is uow a member of the Brooklyn law 
firui of (trout. Jeuks, flayer tV; Hyde. He was prouiiiu'Utly ideutilied 
with the prosecution of Jolm Y. McKaue iu the (iraveseud electiou 
cases. He is a member of the Bar associatious of Brooklyn and of 
the State of >.'ew York. In 1883 he joined the S^eveuth llegiment, 
National Guard of Xew York, aud has seen active military service, 
at Buffalo aud Fire Island in 181»2, as Captain in the Thirteenth Eegi- 
uieut, aud iu the trolley strike iu Brooklyn in 18'J5. He is uow Major 
and Inspector iu the Second Brigade. He was born iu New York City, 
January 28, 18()3, the ;^ou of Augustus C. Mayer aud Deborah T., 
daughter of U'illiam Cox. He is related to General Jacob D. Cox, 
commander of the Twenty-third Corps in the Civil \Var, and subse- 
quently Governor of Ohio. His ancestry on the paternal side is 
Swiss, Dutch, and French. His maternal ancestors were long estab- 
lished in Couuecticut. 

CLEMENT, NATHANIEL HOLMES, well-known jurist of Brook- 
lyn, was graduated from the high school of Portsuiouth, N. H., iu 1859; 
was graduated from Dartmouth College iu 18G3; studied law with 
Hon. Calvin E. Pratt, of Brooklyn, aud was admitted to the bar in 
18G7. He has practiced in Brooklyn since, when not upon the bench. 
He was Judge of tlie City Court of Brooklyn from 1883 to 1887, and 
its Chief Judge from the hitter date to 1896. From January 1, 1S9G, 
to Deceudier 31, 189(>, lie was a Justice of the Supreme Court of the 
State of New York. He is a director of the Kings County Trust Com- 
pany aud a nu^mber of the Brooklyn, Carleton, aud the Marine and 
Field clubs. He is Treasurer of the Brooklyn Central Disjiensary and 
a trustee of the Brooklyu Law Library. He was born iu Tiltou, N. IL, 
^lai'cli 23, 1841, aud is the sou of /enas ( -lemeut and Catherine Holmes. 
He is iu the eighth generation iu di*sceut from Boberi Clement, one 
of the founders of Haverliill, Mass. His grandfather, Jesse Clement, 
and his great -graudfathers, Nathaniel Holmes and Jotham Hoar, were 
all Kevolutionary soldiers. 

MA1H':AN, JOSIAH T., lawyer au<l jurist of Brooklyn, studied 
law with Euu'rsou, Goodrich ^^ Knowltou, was admitted to the bar in 
18()G, aud has since practiced iu I'rooklyu. He has served two terms 
as President of the Brooklyn Har Associatiou. He was a candidate 
foi- Justice of the Sui)reme Court on the Democratic ticket iu 1895, 
but was defeated. In 18!l7 he was elected District Attorney of Kings 
County, and in this capacity prosecuted frauds iu the City Works 
Department. In 1898 he was elected a Justice of the Supreme Court. 
He has been for several years President of tJie Brooklyn Chess Club, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



293 



aud is also a member of tliu Uiuoklvii, iiamilttni, aud Crescent Atli- 
letic clubs. He was boru in Maine, Broome County, X. Y., April 30, 
1842, and is tlie son of Chester ^larean and tlie i;rands()n of Henn- 
^Marean. His mother was Arvilla, dau!j;hter of Josiah Taylor. Judge 
ilarean received his early education in the common schools, the Bing- 
hamton Academy, the Susquehanna Seminary, and the Albany State 
Normal School. 



FITCH, JOSEPH, has been engaged in the practice of law in New 
York City since 1882, and has been active in public life in Queens 
County, New York, where 
he resides. He was elected 
to the New York Assem- 
bly as a Democrat in the 
fail of 1885 from the First 
Assembly District of 
(Queens County, and was 
re-elected the following- 
year. In 1894 he received 
the Democratic nomina- 
tion for Congress from 
the First New York Dis- 
trict, but was defeated by 
the Republican ti<lal wave 
of that year. In 1808 lie 
Iiad been appointed a 
member of the Board of 
Education of Flushing, 
L. I., to complete an un- 
expired term, and in 18!U 
was elected to succeed 
himself for the term e.x- 
piring in 1899. He was 
born in Flushing, August 
27, 1857, the son of Jo- 
seph Fitch and Avis J., 
daughter of Thomas H. 

Leggett. Through his mother he descends from Gabriel Leggett, one of 
the early settlers of Westchester County, New York, where he had an 
estate of several thousand acres. On the paternal side he descends 
from Thomas Fit(di and Anna Pew (married in Kill), of Bocking, 
near Braintree, Essex, England, five of whose sons permanently set- 
tled in Connecticut. Another son, tiie ancestor of Mr. Fitch, also 
came over, but subsequently returned to England. Eliphalet I'itch, 
of England, was tlie great-grandfather of Mr. Fitch, wlnle Ids grand- 
father, Josepli Fitcli, was Ciovernor-Cieiiernl of the Islanil of Jamaica 




.JOSKI'H FITCH. 



294 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

duriiifi' tlie tiist (Iccjulc of tlie present century. Mr. Fitch's father, 
also Joseph Fitch, was born in 1811. at Uayside, L. I., while tlie (iov- 
ernor and his wife were there on a visit. ^Ir. I'^itch attended Flushing 
Institute; in lS7t> was graduated from Swarl hiimre College, Penn- 
sylvania; studied law with Charles \\'. Pleasants, of New York City, 
at the same tinu' atieiiding tlie Columbia College Law Sclujol, and, 
in February, 1882, was admitted to the bar. He has been counsel to 
the Poard of Health of Flushing since it was organized in 1891. He is 
a. Mason and a nuMuber of various social clubs. From 1880 to 1887 
he was Second Lieuteuaut of the Seventeenth Separate Company of 
the National Cuard <d' the State of New York. In 188G he nuirried 
Anne L., daughter of Levi P. Pose, one of the most prominent citizens 
of Yonkers, N. Y. 

COrPTNFY, J(»!1X, was educated in Prooklyn, N. V., originally 
learned the trade of a coui])ositor, and I lien studied law. He was a 
Justice of Peace in Prooklyn froui LSI!) to 18!I0. From LS90 to 1804 
he was Sheriff of Kings (Vniuty. Since 18!IS lie has been a Justice of 
the S]iecial Sessions Court. He is Presidciil of the Brooklyn Volun- 
teer Firemen's Association, is a trustee of the I^irc^men's Home at 
Hudson, N. Y., and is a member of the Columl)ian, Constitution, and 
Carleton clubs, the Poyal Arcanum, and the Catholic Benevolent 
Legion. 

DAVENPOUT. WILLIAM BATES, was graduated fiom the 
Brooklyn P(dytechnic Institute in 18()2, and fi-om Yale College in 18(17, 
subsecjuently receiving from the latter the degree of Master of Arts. 
He was cashier of the Metropolitan Life hisurance Company in 1867 
and I8r)8, studied law, and in 1S7(I was admitted to the bar. He has 
practiced in Brooklyn since, giving special attention to matters relat- 
ing to corporations and estates. He has been Public Administrator of 
Kings County since l^dn-uary 20, 1889. He was a member of the 
( '(institutional Convention of 1894, serving on the ( 'ommittee on Cities 
and Corporations. He is President of the Kings County Jeffersonian 
P>uilding Association, is a trustee of the I*eo])]e's Trust Comi)any of 
Brooklyn, and is a director of the American District Telegraph Com- 
pany. He is also President of the Board of Trustees of the Polhemus 
Memoi'ial Clini<-, he having, in behalf of his ( lient, Mrs. Caroline H. 
Polhemus, evohcd ihe idea of this institution as a memorial to her 
husband, the late Henry I). Polhemus. He is President of the New 
England Society in Brooklyn, and Is a trustee of the Brooklyn Insti- 
tute of Arts and Sciences. He has been President of the Brooklyn 
Yale .Mumni Association, as he has been of the Polytechnic .Vlumni 
Association. He is a member of tln^ TTniversity and Yale clubs of 
Manhattan Borough, as he is of the Hamilton, Crescent, and Athletif 
clubs of Brooklvu, the Soeietv of Colonial Wars, the Sons of the 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



29;- 



Revolmioii, tilt" AVulfs Ilcad, and the Senior Secret Soeiety of Yale. 
Born in New York City, Mardi 10, 1S47, he is the son of Jnlins Dav- 
enport and ^fary. dansj,iiTer of ^Villiani IJates. He descends from John 
DavenjKirt, born in ('oA'entry, England, in l.jDT, educated at Majidalen 
Colle!j,e, Oxford, who was "\'icar of St. Stephen's in Coleman Street, 
London, and coming' to America became the founder of the New 
Haven Colony in 1()38. lie also descends from Thomas Benedict, 
Lieutenant in the Colonial Aimy in 10(1."), a member of the first English 
Colonial Assembly in New Y<m k, and sevei-al times a mendier of the 
Connecticut Colonial Assemblv. 



a "%.. 




JOLINE. ADRL\N HOFFilAN. has been engaged in the practice 
of law in New Y^ork City since 1S72. From 1873 to 187() he was tlie 
partner of ex-Judge William IL 
Leonard, became connected with 
the firm of Butler, Stillman & Hub- 
bard in 187<i, in 1881 becinning a 
member of the tirm, and is now a 
member of the firm of Butler, Not- 
man, Joline & Mynderse. In recent 
years be has been chiefly engaged 
in cases relating to railroads and 
other large corporations. lie has 
had charge of most of the railroad 
litigations of the Central Trust 
Com[)a uy of New York since 1888. 
He has been counsel in the reorgan- 
izations of the East Tennessee, Vir- 
ginia and <ieorgia,theNickel Plate, 
the Rio Grande Western, the Scioto 
Valley, the Houston and Texas 
Central, the St. Louis and Cidcago, 
the Minneapolis and St. Louis, th<' 
Louisville, New Albany and Chicago, the Chicago Cas, and the Brook- 
lyn Elevated. He has frecpiently appeared in the Federal courts 
in large foreclosure suits of railway mortgages. He is a director of 
tlie Lawyers' Surety Company and the American Foreign and Ma- 
rine Insui-ance Company. He was elected Bresident of the I'rince- 
ton Club of New York in 181U. and is a member of the LTniversity, Cen- 
tury, (irolier, and Delta IMii clubs, and the Downtown Association. 
He is also a member of the New York Historical Society. He was 
an active member of the commit lee to in<'rease the endowment of 
Princeton University, and in connection with that institution he, in 
1890, established the C. O. Joliue ])rize in American political history. 
Mr. Joline was born in Sing Sing. N. Y.. June 30, 1850. His grand- 
father, .John Joline, was an intliiential citizen of Princeton, N. .J. His 




ADUIAN HOFFMAN .JOUNK.. 



296 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

father, Charles Oliver Joliue, was a soldier in both the Mexican and 
Ci^il wars. His mother was a sister of the late John T. Hoffman, Gov- 
ernor of New York, and the daughter of Dr. Adrian Kissam Hoffman. 
She was the great-granddaughter of Martinus Hoffman, of Red Hook, 
Dutchess County, X. Y., and Alida, daughter of Philip Livings- 
ton, and granddaughter of Kobert Livingston. Lord of Livingston 
Manor. At the age of thirteen, Mr. Joline acted as clerk to a mili- 
tary commission at Norfolk. Va., to tiw Dr. Wright for the murder of 
Lieutenant Sanborn. In 1S04. he served as Clerk to the Militaiw Com- 
mission to try political prisoners at Fort Lafayette. In 1866 and 
1807, he was Clerk in the offices of Street Commissioner and Mayor 
of New York City. He was prepared for college at Mount Pleasant 
Academy, and in 1870 was graduated from Princeton College, where 
he had distinguished himself. He was junior orator, won the prize for 
essay of the Cliosophic Society, won the prize for essay offered by the 
Xassaii Literary Magazine, and wrote the class ode and delivered the 
literary oration at commencement. He studied law in New York 
City in the office of P>rown. Hall iV: N'auderpoel. also attending the 
Columbia College Law School, and was graduated from the latter, 
and admitted to the bar, in 1872. He was married, in 1870. to Mary 
E.. daughter of Hon. Francis Larkin, the distinguished leader of 
the Westchester bar. 

DUTCHEK, AXDKEY\', educated in i)ublic and private schools, 
was admitted to the bar at Fort Wayne, Ind., in 1815. In 1851 was 
admitted to the Xew Jersey bar, and began practice at Trenton; from 
1808 to 1870 followed his profession at Elizabeth, X. J., and since the 
latter date has practiced in Xew York City. He was a member of the 
X^eAV Jersey Legislature for three terms, and in 1857 was Speaker of 
the House. From 1850 to 1805 he was a law reporter, while from 
1802 to 1869 he was Clerk of the United States Circuit Court. He is 
a brother of Silas B. Dutcher, of Brooklyn, and was bom in Spring- 
field, Otsego County, X'. Y., August 20, 1822. He is the son of Parcefor 
Carr Dutcher and Johannah Low I'rink. His great-grandfather on his 
mother's side was a captain in the Kevolution. Among his ancestors, 
the Dutchers, Knickerbockers, and Ten Eycks were from Holland, 
the Lows and Beardsleys from England, and the Frinks from liliode 
Island. 



BROXK, WILLIAM REA, haviug prepared for college under a 
private tutor at Albany, in 1880 was graduated from Cornell Univer- 
sity, at the siime time studying hiw with ^lynderse Van Cleef, of 
Ithaca, X". Y., and in 1880 was admitted to the bar. For one year he 
was Assistant United States District Attorney in X'ew York City un- 
der General Stewart Woodford, tlieii became District Attorney, and 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



297 



ill 18S2 resigiifd and entered upon prixafc practice in New York. 
Since 1885 he has been counsel for the estate of tlu^ late Commodore 
C. K. Garrison, has been counsel for eiyht years of the New York 
Mutual Gas Light Company, and is counsel for the Hazelton Boiler 
Company and other coi-porations. He is a member of the Holland 
Society, the New Y'ork Athletic, Delta Thi, Thirteen, and other clubs, 
and of (iood Governmeut Club A. Born in New Baltimore, Greene 
County, N. Y., September 17. 1856, he is the son of Ephraim P. Bronk 
and Jane Van Slyke. He descends from Jduas Bronck, a native of 
Holland, who settled in Westidiester County in 1G39, and gave his 
name to the Bronx River. 



MY'NDEKSE, WILHELMUS. has been engaged in the practice of 
law in New York City since 1875, and is a member of the welbknown 
law firm of Butler, Notinan, Joliiic 
& Mynderse. He attended iMyn- 
derse Academy, established by his 
grandfather at Seneca Falls, N. Y., 
Mount Pleasant Military Academy, 
in 1871 Avas graduated from Will- 
iams College, delivering the salu 
tatory oration, and in 1875 was 
graduated from the Columbia C(d- 
lege Law School. He was cnn- 
nected Avith the law tirni of Butler, 
Stillman & Hubbard continudusly 
from 1875 until he joined witli the 
head of that firm in organizing liis 
]»resent firm. He has especially 
devoted himself to the department 
embracing maritime and admiralty 
law, including the steamshi]) and 
marine insurance business. He is 
Vice-President of the Sigma Phi 

Society, of New Y'ork City, and is one of the charter members of the 
Holland Society. He is a Vestryman of Grace Church, a trustee of 
the Brooklyn Hospital, a director of the Long Island Historical So- 
ciety, and a manager of the Church Charity Foundation of the Dio- 
cese of Long Island. He is a member of the University. Grolier. and 
Sigma Phi clubs, and the Downtown Association of New York City, 
and the Hamilton. Civic, and Church clubs of Brooklyn. He was born 
at Seneca Falls. N. Y'.. November 25, 18-19. the son of Edward 'Slyu- 
derse and Lilias Muir. The first American ancestor on the paternal 
side came from Holland in Kill), and settled at Albany. The grand- 
father of Mr. Mynderse, after whom he was named, was born in Al- 
bany in 17<)7. He acquired a large tract of land, with water rights. 




WILHELMUS MYNDERSE. 



298 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

(lu the Seueea River, aud in 1800 became tlie founder of the town of 
Seneca Falls. He married Jane Van Cleef. 

BRADBHAW, CHARLES, was born in Brooklyn, X. Y.. May 18, 
1854. the son of Hamilton B. Bradshaw, a lawyer, and Caroline A. 
Peck. He was educated in private schools in Brooklyn and under 
private tutors, studied la^^■ in his father's office and at the Columbia 
Collei^e Law School, and since his admission to the bar has been 
eniiaLied in ,ueneral practice in Brooklyn. His paternal ancestors 
came to America from County Antrim, Ireland, in 1715. They de- 
scended from Uchtred, a Saxon Tliane of Lancashire, England, who, 
under the name of de Bi-adsha\v was invested with otTfic(- and estates 
by AVilliam the Conqueror. The maternal ancestors came from Suf- 
folk ('ounty, Enjiland, to America in 1030. ilr. Bradshaw married, 
first, Elsie A. Lisht, and, second, Daisy Furbish. His children are 
John, Alice, y\ax. Elsie, IJ.nLdiil]>h, and Harold. 

CARROLL, JOSEPH WILLLVM, attended the Brooklyn public 
scliools until fourteen years of ajic, then studied at St. Mary's College, 
^lontreal, and St. Francis Xavier's CoUeiie, New York City, being 
gradiuited from the latter in 1870, and subse([uently receiving its 
degree of ^Master of Arts. ^^ Idle he was also graduated from the 
Columbia College Law School. Admitted to the bar in May, 1882, he 
practicrd law from that time until December, 1881, when he accepted 
an a]i]>ointment as Clerk in the Supreme Court of Kings County. On 
Januaiy 1, 1801, he became Chief Clerk in the Kings County Surro- 
gate's office. He is a trustee of the Jamaica Normal School, a director 
of the Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum of Brooklyn, the Brooklyn 
("atholic Histoiical Society, and the Bro(ddyn Discipliuary Training 
School for Boys, and is a trustee of the Catholic Seminary School of 
America. He is a member of the Columbian and Crescent Athletic 
clubs, and (d' rhe Jackson Democratic Club of the Seventh \Vard of 
Brooklyn. He was born in Bnxddyn, February 2, 18r)'.t. the son of 
Thomas Carroll and Julia Devy. Both parents were natives of ^Mount- 
melleck. Queens County, Indand. His father was a member of the 
Brooklyn Boar.l of Education from 18.59 to 1870, was Register of 
Kings County from 1880 to 188:'., and was a Police Commissioner of 
Brooklyn from 18Su to 1888. By Governor Tilden he was comniis- 
sioned in 1870 Lieutenant-Colonel of the Second Brigade, National 
Guard. Fntil his deaili, in 1S88, he was prominent in public and 
charitable moxcuieuts in Brooklyn. 

FITCH, THEODORE, for a number of years one of the leaders 
of the bar of Westchester County, New York, since 1SS3 has been 
<'ngaged in the ])ractice of law in New York City. The son of Rev. 
Silas Fitch and .Marv Anumda \Vhite, he was born in Franklin. Dela- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



299 



ware Couiitv, X. V., March ;J0, 1S44. He jiicparcd tor cdUct;!' at 
academies in I'ou^hkeepsie and Middletown, X. Y.; for two years 
subse(inent to 185!) attended Troy University; tautiht tlic^ San^erties 
(X. Y. ) Academy for one year, and enteriui;- the junior class at Y'ale 
University in 18G2, was graduated from tliat institution in 1S(!4. He 
taujilit tlie Delaware Academy at Delhi, X. Y., for three years, at 
the same time studying law wit li Hon. William Murray; in May, 18G7, 
was admitted to the bai-, and in ( )ctober of the same year engaged 
in practice at Yonkers. X. Y. He served three terms as (!'ity Attornej^ 
of Yonkers, from 1877 to 1884, and won every case which he con- 
ducted for the city, with a single exception, in which he was also 
virtually successful, greatly reducing the claim against the city. Mr. 
Fitch still resides in Y'onkers, hut. 
since 1883, has practiced law ex 
clusively in Xew York City as head 
of the firm of T. and i^. H. Fitch, in 
partnerslii]! wirh his hrotlier, Silas 
Redding Fitch. He was mairied, 
February 4, 18(;<», to Catherine 
Hawley, daughter of Kev. Sam- 
uel (loodrich ( 'oe, of Xew Haven, 
Coun., a graduate from Yale, 1838, 
au-d lias a son, Frederick Coe 
Fifcli, and three dauglitei's. Mr. 
Fitch lineally descends fiom 
Thomas Fitch, who emigrated In 
Saybrook, Conn., in 1038, and sub 
se(|uently settled at X'orwalk. Conn. 
One of his grandsons, Thomas 
Fitch, liccanie Covernor of Con- 
necticut. The enugrant Avas the 
eldest son of Thomas Mtcli and 

Anna Few, of Rocking, adjoining Braintree, Essex, England, a de 
sc( I'dant of John Fitch, of Fitch Castle, in the parish of \Yiddington, 
Northwestern Essex, where he was seati'd 12!>4 A.D. 




TllEODOKK FITCH. 



:\rO()i;F, HABBISOX' S., attended the Middletown Academy at 

Half on, Saiatoga County, X. Y'., tlie Xew York State Xormal 

School, studied law, and since his admission to the bar has practiced 
his profession in (Queens County. He has been counsel to the Board 
of Su|!ei-\ isors <ir (Queens County, and to several village boards, and 
lias been Chairman of the (,.Mieens County Kepublican Central (3om- 
nii(te<-. He has been County Judge of (^(ui'ens County since December 
-!S, 18!t(3. On December :J<». 18'.M1, (iovernor .Morton appointed him a 
Commissioner on the charter of X'e\\ ^Ork City, to succeed <iai'r(4 J. 
Carretson, resigned. He is a member of the IJeformed Dutch Church 



:iOO HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

of North Heiupstt'iul, L. I., as lie is of rorinKo]iia Lodjic, Free ami 
Accepted Mai^ons, of Flushing; the Xiautic Club of that place, and the 
Lincoln Club of Long Island City. He was at one time princii^al of 
the Union Free School of Flushing. He was born in Waterford, Sara- 
toga County, X. Y., April 23, 1849, and is the son of Lewis K. Moore 
and Lucinda -J., daughter of James Bassett. His father served 
throughout the Rebellion as Coii^oral in Comj^auy G, Twenty-eighth 
AN'iscousin ^'olunteers. On both sides Judge Moore's ancestors served 
in the Revolution and the War with Mexico. 

FOSDICK, LEWIS L., was born in Springfield, Jamaica, Queens 
County, X. Y , July 21, 1837, and attended Union Hill Academy at 
Jamaica, and the New York University. He studied law, and since 
his adniissidii to the bar has always practiced at Jamaica. His father, 
Morris Fosdick, teacher, sui'veyor, conveyancer, Judge, and Suito- 
gate, died in 1892, and was descended from ancestors who settled in 
Charlestown, Mass.. in KJS."). Mr. Fosdick's mother was Catherine J. 
IJaylis. Mr. Fosdick was himself married, first, to Julia E. Benuet, 
in 1861, and, second, to Mary Elvise Teri-y, in 1878. His children, both 
of whom reside in Jamaica, are ^lorris ^I. Fosdick and Ella L. ^lills, 
wife of William H. Mills. 



PAGE, CHARLES B., lawyer and State Senator from the Seven- 
teenth Senatorial District of X'ew York, was born at Oleaii, N. Y., 
November 4, 1851, and is the sou of Rufus L. Page and Elizabeth A. 
Hall. He attended the schools and academies of Glean, N. Y., and 
New Marlboro. Mass., and at nineteen years of age came to New 
York and commenced the study of law. In 1870 he was admitted to 
the bar, and engaged in practice. He was elected to the State Senate 
on the Republican ticket for a term of three years, beginning Janu- 
ary 1, 1806. During the session of 181(6 he served as a member of the 
committees on Cities, Railroads, Codes, Militaiw Affairs, and Public 
Health. 

SHORT, EDWARD LY.M A X. attended private schools in New York 
City and Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass.; in 1875 was graduated 
from Columbia College with first honors, having taken prizes in Greek 
during each year of the college course; studied law with the New 
York law firms of Foster & Thomson and Knox & MacLean, and in 
1878 was graduateil from the Columbia College Law School and ad- 
mitted to the bar. In 1884 he became a member of the law firm of 
Davies & Rapallo. He is now a member of the firm of Da vies. Stone 
& Auerbach, formed by amalgamation of the firms of Davies, Short 
6c Townsend and Lowrey, Stone \: Auerbach. He is general solicitor 
of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York, and has been 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



yoi 



enga.iied in a nuniln'i' of important railroad, taxation, and insiii-ance 
cases. He lias pnblislied " Tlu' Law of Jlailroad Bonds an<l Moi't- 
gages." He is a member of the Metropolitan, University, and Cain- 
met clubs, the ^<ons of the IJevolution, and the Society of <'olonial 
AYars. Born in riiiladelplda, September 30, 1854, he is tlif son of 
the late eminent classical 
scholar, Charles Short, Ll^.D., 
and Anne Jean, daughter of 
Hon. Elihu Lyman, of Green- 
field, Mass., lawyer and State 
Senator. Through his father 
lie descends from Henry 
Short, who immigrated to 
New England from England 
in 3 634, as alsf> from Henry 
Scwall, Mayor of Coventry, 
England, ances-tor of Jndgv 
Samuel Sewall, of Massaclm 
setts. Through his mother he 
descends from IJichard Ly- 
man, of High Ongar, Eng- 
land, who became one of tlie 
founders of Hartford, Conn. 
He mairiiMl, in 1887, Anna 
Livingston, rlaughter of the 
late .Tolin Jules Petit and 
Cornelia ilargaretta Livings- 
ton, and has a daughter and a 
son — L i V i u g s t n Lyman 

Short. Mrs. Sliort descends from the Livingston, Beekman, de Pey- 
sters, \'anBrugh, Koosevelt, and l>\vight families. 




EI)W.\K!> I.VMAN SIloKI. 



TAYLOR, HO\YABD .A UGLSTLS, was graduated from Harvard 
College in 1886, served for a short time as re])orter on the New Y'ork 
Tribune: studied law with AA'illiam B. Hornblower; was adnntted to 
the bar in 1888, and then became a member of the hrm. the jtresent 
style of which is Hornblower. F.yrne, Taylor & Miller. He has argued 
cases in the Court of Appeals ami the Federal courts. While at col- 
lege he was prominent in athletics, aiid notably as a tennis player. He 
won the tennis chami»i(.nsliip at Harvard, the intercollegiate cham- 
pionship, and the National Association championship at Xewjiort 
in 1881. He is a member of the [Metroiiolitan, Century, Bacquet, I'ni- 
versity. and Harvaid clubs, the Downtown Association, the Society 
of Sons of the Kevolution, and the City Bar Association. He was born 
in New York Citv. November 23. 186.-), and is the son of Henry Angus- 



302 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



tu8 Taylor ami (/atlK'iine Aujiiista Osboi-ii. On the maternal side lie 
descends troni one of the old laniilies of i^^aleni, Mass.; while Taylor 
Hill, the paternal homestead, on the Connecticut Iviver, south of Mid- 
dletowii, ("onn., has beiMi in the famih' since 1(I4S. 



CUlvlE, CHARLES, especially known as a lawyer for his successful 
conduct of tariff cases, is a director of the Patersou IJaihvay, the Pat- 
erson Central Electric Railroad, the New Jersey Electric Railroad, 
the Jersey City, Hoboken, and Rutherford Railway Company, and the 
Holtz and Freystedt Comi)any. He is a member of the Union League, 
Hamilton, Lincoln, and Riding and Driving clubs, of Brooklyn; the 
New York Athletic and I'nited Service clubs, and the Arion Society 

of New York and the Lake Hopat- 
cong Club, of New Jersey. He was 
born at Audincourt, Department 
(In Duobs, France; his parents, 
I'rederick Curie and Dorethe Mali- 
eiia ] )iemer, coming to America and 
settling at Paterson, N. J., when he 
was two years of age. He attended 
tlie Paterson public schools and 
the Bryant & Stratton Commercial 
('(dlege at Cleveland, Ohio, and 
tlicn enlisted in the Ninth New- 
York Volunteers (Hawkins's Zou- 
aves), and serv(>d until the close of 
the Civil War. He Avas mustered 
out wifli the rank of Captain, hav- 
ing i>articii»ated in the engage- 
ments of natteras,Roanoke Island, 
Camden, South ^lountain, and An- 
tietam; the Washington, A'irginia, 
and .Maiyland Caini)aigu of -Inly, ISd.'}; the cami>aign against Forrest 
in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Mississi]ipi, in the fall of 1S03; Sherman's 
raid to ^Meridian in February, 18(i4; the Missouri Campaign, from the 
3Iississippi to Kansas in the fall of 18(54, and the Red River Expedition 
in the spring of 18(>5. He is President of the Ninth Army Corps, is 
I'ast-President of the Roanoke Military Association, is Past-President 
of the HaAvkins's Zouaves Association, is a member of the Military 
Order of the Loyal Legion of New York, and of Farragut Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of Paterson, N. J., and is an Honorary Member 
of C. A. Kimball I'ost, Grand Army of the Republic, of New Y'ork 
City. He studied law with Thomas D. Hoxey, of Paterson, N. J., and 
the"^firm of Hawkins, Barnet .V: Pannes, of New Y'ork City, and in 1882 
was graduated from the College of the City of New Y'ork, in May of 
that year being admitted to tlie bar at I'oughkeepsie. N. Y. He has 




CHARLES CURIE. 



ENC\CLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 303 

beeu eugaiied in idju-tice iu this city siiu-c. He nuiriicil, Maicli 24, 
1870, Jennie, daughter of James Andrews, a ]>i<)iiiineut manufactui-er 
of Patersou. X. J., and has a datighter and a sun — Charles Ctirie, Jr. 
The latter was graduated from the New York Law School in 1893, 
and is engaged in practice with his father. Mr. Curie's winter resi- 
dence is in Brooklyn, his summer Iiouk^ being Idlcwild. Cornwall-oii- 
H ml sou. 

WMITH, AKTE.MAS BKKUIAM, of the New York law tirm of 
Smith L^ Bowman, has been contiutiously engaged in the practice of 
liis profession in New York City since his admission to the bar, in 
April, 1870. lie practiced alone for ten years, and iu 1880 formed the 
present firm. The son of (George Smith and Eunice (lartield. he is of 
New England ancestry on both sides, and w'as born in Westminster, 
^Vol•^■ester County, Mass., March 21, 1844. He was graduated from 
Amherst College in 1SG8, and began the study of law iu tlio ofiice of 
Kice & Blackmer, of Worcester, Mass. A year later lie came to New 
York City, attended the Columbia College Law School, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in the spring of 1870. He resides in Brooklyn. He 
is a member of the New York Law Institute and the Lincoln CInli of 
Brooklyn. 

PROVOST, ANDREW JACKSON, lawyer, traces his ancestry to 
AN'illiam Provost, a native of Paris, avIio escajied the St. Bartholomew 
massacre in 1572 by tleeing to Holland, where he married a Frencli 
Huguenot lady. David Provost, third in descent from this William, 
came to New Amsterdam in 16.34. and was made commandant of Fort 
Good Hope. The family was represented in the Rev(dution by tlie live 
sons of Jonathan Provost, who served as patriots during the entire 
struggle. Samuel Provost, a member of the family, was the first 
Protestant Episcopal bishop of New York, rector of Trinity Parish, 
Regent of the University of New York, and Chaplain of Congress. 
Andrew Jackson Provost, the son of David and Elizalieth Hendrick- 
son Provost, is a native of this city, and was boi-n April 2, ls:U. He 
attended the public schools of Brooklyn, and was graduated in 1851 
from Williston Seminary, at Easthampton, Mass. He studied law 
with Cram & Cornell, of New Y'ork, and for four years remained witli 
this firm. Admitted to the bar in 1855, he began practice iu Brook- 
lyn, btit since 1880 has had his main office iu Manhattan Borough. He 
served as a member of the Brooklyn Board of Education from 18(i4 
to 18G8; was School Commissioner of Queens County from 1874 to 
1878, and for five years was President of the Board of Education of 
the Fifth Dis-trict of Flushing. L. I. He was a Democratic member 
of the New York Assembly from 1859 to 18G1. In 1870 he was elected 
Justice of the Peace and Police Judge in Queens County, and served 
until 1878. He has compiled and published a volume of genealogical 



304 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



it'senrrli, eutitlfd '• Prove )st-rrovoost-Pr()Vost Family Ii<n-()i(l, 1545- 
1895." He is a member of tlie Long' Island Historical iSociety aud of 
the Hanover and Ampbion clubs of Brooklyn. He was a member of 
the consistory of the First (Dutch) Reformed Church of Brooklyn 
from 18S6 to 1895. In June, 1851, he married Harriet, dauj;hter of 
Judii'e Obadiah Tittis. of Dutchess Countv, New York. 



FANNING, ^VILLIAM JOSEPH, was engaged in the practice of 
law in Colioes, N. Y., from 1873 to 1880; as a member of the firm 
of Crawford & Fanning, and, since 1880, has followed his profession 
in New York City. He is an expert in respect to the law affecting 
inu-keepers, and since 1881 has been legal adviser of the Hotel As- 
sociation of the City of New York, 
as well as that of the State of New 
York. He has drawn up many 
statutes relating to hotel-keepers, 
and has frequently appeared before 
legislative committees to conserv^e 
the interests of his clients. His 
" Handbook of Hotel Law "' is an 
authority on the subject treated. 
An article from his pen in the 
Xorth American Rrcicic for August, 
1893, attracted wide attention. He 
has served as School Trustee in the 
Eighteenth Ward of New York 
City. In 1895 Mayor Strong ap- 
pointed him City Magistrate at a 
salary of |7,000, but he declined 
the honor. He is a Democrat, and 
a member of the Manhattan, 
Democratic, Catholic, and Lawyers' 
clubs, tlie New York lioard of Trade and Transportation, and the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art. He married, in 1881, Annie, daughter 
of A. L. Ashman, of New York City. Of Irish descent, Mr. Fanning 
was born in Crescent, Saratoga County, N. Y., July 12, 1850, the son 
of James Fanning and Jolianna Fitzgei"ald. He was educated at the 
Half Moon Institute of Middletown, Saratoga County; passed the 
Regents' examination; continued study under private tutors; spent 
a year at Rome. Italy; studied law with James F. Crawford, of Co- 
hoes, N. Y., whose partner he subseipiently became, and, in 1873, was 
graduated from the Law School of the University of the City of New 
York. 




WILLIAM JOSEPH FAXNIN(; 



STEPHENS, STEPHEN DOVER, County Judge and SuiTOgate 
of Richmond County, was born at Richmond, S. I., April 19, 1845. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY 305 

His fatlu'i- and ])at('i-iial ancestors i\n- three f;eneratious were born 
iu New York City, wliile liis mother and maternal ancestors were 
natives of Stateu Island. He pursued preparatory studies at Trin- 
ity School, New York City, and in 18GG he was graduated from Colum- 
bia College. In 18(58 he was graduated from the Columbia College 
Law School, also receiving the degree of Master of Arts. He imme- 
diately entered upon the practice of law. He is a Democrat. He rep- 
resented Richmond County in the Assembly of 1874. and served on the 
impoi'tant committees on Kailroads and on ^'i]lag■es. He was re- 
elected to the Assembly of 187."), and that year sm'ved as Chairman 
of the Committee on Villages and as a member of the conunittees on 
Railroads and on Public Lands. In 1881 he was elected County Judge 
and Surrogate of Kichmond (bounty by a. large luajority, and was re- 
elected in 1887, and again in 18!>o. Some of the most iiuportant cases 
which have ever arisen in Richmond County have come before him. 
He is a member of the Episcopal Church, a regular attendant at old 
St. Andrew's, at Riciiniond. In 1SS4 lie married Agues L. Lasar, of 
Brooklyn, a descendant of the old i'itkin family of (.'ouuecticnt. They 
have t\\d sons — Stephen D., Jr., and Richmond. 

KETCHT'M. ALEXANDER PHOENIX, was graduated in 1858 
from tlie College of the City of New York, having taken i)rizes iu 
natnral histoiy, drawing, mathematics, and oratory; for a year was 
tutor in drawing and mathematics in this institution, and in 18<!() 
was graduated from tiie Albany Law School. He entered the Fed- 
eral service during the Civil War; was staff officer of GtMieral Sax- 
ton, Military Governor of South Carolina; was transferred to the 
staff of General Howard; was acting Assistant Adjutant-General at 
Charleston and Washington, and resigned from the anny in Septem- 
ber, LS(;7, with the I'ank of Brevet (Vilonel. In 1869 President Gi-ant 
appointed him Assessor of Internal Revenue for the Ninth New York 
District. He subsequently became Collector in the same disti-ict. 
In 1871 he was made General Appraiser of Customs at the port of 
New York. In 1883 President Arthur appointed him Chief Ai)praiser. 
He resigned in 1885, and has since practiced law. He was one of 
the founders of the Mount Morris Bank, and was its first President. 
In ISUO and 1891 ho was President of the Presbyterian Union in New 
York City. For four years he was President of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the College of the City of New York. He is now President 
of the City College Club. He is also a member of the New York 
Yacht. Atlantic Yacht, Larchmont Yacht, Merchants', Central, Alpha 
Delta Phi, Quill, Harlem, Republican, Hai-lem Republican, New 
Rochelle Yacht, Riverside Yacht, and Hliode Island Yaciit clubs, 
the Ne-R- England Society, the Phi Beta Kappa Society, the Archreo- 
logical Society, the Numismatic Society, the Bar Associati<m of the 
city, that of the State, ami the ^Military Order of the Loyal Legion. 



306 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



Born ill Xpw Haven, f'onn., ^fav 11. 1839, he is tlie son of Edgar 
Ketflmni and Elizabeth riioenix, both of old New York families. 
His father was a lawyer of this eitv. He is a uraTidsoii ni' K'cv. Alex- 
ander Phoenix, and great-grandson of Daiii(d Phoenix, eminent New 
York merchant, who was the hrst Comptroller of the City (d" New 
York, a member of tlie first Chamber of Commerce, and Chairman 
of the delegation of mertdiants on the occasion of the inangnration 
of Washington. He also descends from Cornelins Van Tienhoven, 
Secretary of New Netherlands; from Guleyu Yigiie and Adrianna 
Cavilge, and from Jacob Phoenix and Anna \'an Vleck — all early 
s(>ttlers in New York Citv. 



DE GROVE, E1)^YA1^» K.. head of the law linn of 1 »e (in.ve & 
Riker, is one of tlie promineiit real estate lawyers of New York City. 

,\inong other im])ortant cases, as 
attorney of the executors, he suc- 
ceeded in sustaiiung the will of 
Sarah Bnrr, in which she had left 
.f3,0t)0,00(t to ( harity. He was born 
in New York City. May 5. 1848. the 
son of Edward ^Y. De Grove and 
Hester Strachau. His grandfather 
was Adolphns De (irove and his 
great-grandfather Pet<'r Adolphns 
De Grove, the latter being a well- 
known citizen of this city, his resi- 
(U'lice being on Franklin S(|iiare, at 
that time a fashionabh' (piarter. 
His maternal grandfather, David 
llitzema. Strachan, was descended 
from Domine Johannes Ritzema, 
from 1744 t(( 1784 minister of the 
('(dlegiate Reformed Church of this 
city, and active^ in connection with 
King's College, now Columbia Uni- 
versity. Having been graduated 
from Yale College in 18<;9, Mr. De 
Grove studied law in the office of Norwood & Coggeshall, of New York 
City, and at the Ctdnmbia Colh^ge Law School. He was graduated 
from the latter in 1871, having been admitted to the bar in November 
of the previous year. He became clerk in tlie law office of J. H. & S. 
Riker, subse(|uently was admitted to iiartnershi]i, and \\])<>n the re- 
tirement of Samuel Riker in 1S!I:? |.T. H. Riker having jireviously 
retired), he became head of the incsent firm, having Samuel Kiker, 
Jr., as partner. 




EDWARD K. DE GKOVK. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 307 

VAX ^■1•:('IITE^", 1M;AXC1S IIEI.ME, alt.-ndcd till' imhlic scliools 
(if l>i(i(ikl_\ii, the Bi'uoklyu I'olytcrlinic Institute, and an acadeniy 
at Stanilord, ("^nn. Vtn- eiyht years lie was connected wltli llie New 
^'()lk newspapers, rlsin;n from the position of police conrt reiiorler 
to tluU of nianai;inL; editor. He studied hiw witli Hon. A. N. Weller 
and Cliarh's Crar.v, also taking- the course of the ("olunibia College 
Eaw School, anil in ISTS was admitted to the bar. lie commenced 
jiractice in New York, hut durinii' the last ten years has mainly 
]»racticed in the tSecond -ludicial l>istri(t. He has been counsel in the 
interest of (Queens ('ounty in a number of important cases. He has 
appeared in cases of public interest as counsel for Justice Keogh of 
the Supreme Court; for the County Clerk of Queens County; for the 
Board of Supeivisors of Queens County, and for ^layor Gleason, of 
Lon<i- Island City. He was born in llrooklyn. N. V., July 26, ISoO, and 
is the sou of Junius K. and Helen C. \'an N'echten. His yrandfather, 
Jacob 'leu IJroeck Vnn Vechten, was a i)romiuent lawyer of Albany, 
and Grand Master iMasoe of t lie Slate of New York. His srf«'^t-iiTand- 
father, Abiaham Yau N'echteii, was the eminent New York lawyer 
of that nanH\ His ](alenial ancestors came to this country from 
Holland in 1G31. 

INGEKSOLL. KOl'.EKT (iBEEN, was educated in the <(.mmon 
schools, studied law, and bcjuan practice in Shawneetown, III., in 
partnership with his brother, Eben Ininersoll, who snbse<|uently be- 
came a conp,Tessman. They subse(|uently established a law office in 
I'eoria, 111. .Mr. In^crsipll was defeated as a Democratic candiibite 
for Conii'i'ess in lS(iO. In 1S(>2 he was commissioned Colonel of the 
Eleventh Illinois Cavalry. He had become a lieiiublicaii, and, in 1S(I(). 
was appointed Attorney-(ieneral of tlie State of Illinois. He nomi- 
nated James G. Blaine for the Presidency in the National Uepublican 
Convention of ISK! in a speech which established his fame as a 
]iolitical orator. He has been counsel in many imiMirtant cases, in- 
cluding; the "star-route" cases, in wliicli lie ajijieared fin- the defend- 
ants. He declined the ]iost as I'nited States .Minister to Germany 
offered him by President Hayes in 1S77. He is a ]>oi)ular lecturer 
ai;ainst Christianity and the Bible, relyin;L;- u])on wit and ridicule 
rather than tii)on very profonnd ar,minn'nt. We was born in Dresden. 
N. Y., August 11, ls:;:j, and is the son of a Congregational clergyman. 

:\rETA'ILLE. HENRY, was graduated from Dartnn)uth College 
with lionors in lS7!t, at twenty years td' age, for two years taught a 
^lassachnselts liigji school, was graduated from the Law Scho(d of 
Harvard Cniversity in 1SS4. re]iresenting the Law School at the Uni- 
versity commem-enn^nt. s])ent a year in tlie New York office of James 
<\ Carter, and in ISS.") was admitted to the New York bar. He be- 
came the law pai'tuer of the late Koscoe ( 'onkling, prior to the hitter's 



,3U8 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



death ill ISSIl. when lie liccaiiic a niciiihci- (if the law tirm of Dousih- 
erty, ^Ichillc, .S; Swcctzcr, Dauiel Duu.ulierty, the " silver-tongued 
orator," being its head. The death of Mr. Uouglierty dissolved tills 
association. IJe is now senior member of the firm of Melville, Mar- 
tin & Stephens, and has a 
large praetiee in the higher 
courts in corporation, patent, 
and trademark cases. He is 
a member of the Seventh 
Regiment N'eterans, now 
holds the commission of Cap- 
tain of Comjiany A iu the 
Eighth Uegiment, National 
(luaid, New York. For many 
years he was Secretary of the 
Kepublican Club of the City 
i)f New York, while he is also 
a member of the Lawyers" and 
Harvard (dubs, the New Eng- 
land Society, the Bar Asso- 
ciation of the City of New 
\(nk, the Society of Colonial 
^Vars, and the Society of the 
Sons of the l^evolutiou. He 
— was born in Nelson, N. H., 
August 2r>, 1858, the eldest 
sou of -Tosiah II. ]\I(dville and 
ills ancestors particijiated in the colonial 




IIKNHY MELVILI.K. 



Naiicv Xesniit ii 



iOl 



e\i'il (it 



wars (if the country, and nearly as many in the Uevolution, ranging 
in giade li-oni iiii\ate to Brigadier-General. 



DILLON. JOHN I'^OKKEST. was gradimtcd from the Medical De- 
partment of Iowa Cniversity, and for six mouths ]iracticed medicine, 
then took ui» the study of law, and in IS.")!* was admitted to the 
Iowa bar. He served a term as Prosecuting Attorney of Scott County 
in that State. In 1858 he was elected Judge of the Seventh Judicial 
District of Iowa, and was subse(|uently re-elected. During this 
period he published a digest of Iowa Supreme Court reports. Elected 
to the Supreme Court of Iowa by the Republican party, he served 
a term of six years from 18G;J. Fie was re-elected in 1800, and just 
afteiward was a]>i»()inted by President Grant United States Circuit 
Judge of the Eighth Judicial District, embracing six States. In 1872 
he jiublislied his famous ".Municipal Corporations." This was fol- 
lowed liy " Benioval of Causes from State to Federal Courts" (18751, 
"Municipal Bonds" (187(>), and "United States Cinuit Court Be- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 309 

ports"" ( 18Tl-l&i8U ). ilc alsu I'ouudL'd the (Jciilral Lair JoHimtl, aii<l 
for one year edited it. In September, 1879, lie removed to New Yorli 
City to beeome licueral counsel to the Thiion Pacific Kailwaj' Com- 
pany and Professor of Iieal Estate and Equity Jurisprudence in the 
Columbia College Law School. From fSSl lo 1893 he sustained a 
legal partnership with Ceneral Wager Swayiie. In 1SS2 lie resigned 
his professorship in Columbia, lie has argued many notable cases 
in the Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court of the United States. 
He is counsel of the Missouri Pacific IJailway Coiu])any. the Western 
Union Telegraph Company, the Manhattan Kailway (^'ompany, the 
Texas and Pacific llailway Company, and the estates of Jay Gould, 
Sidney Dillon, and James C. Ayer. In 1891 and 1892 he was Storrs 
Professor of Municipal Law in Yale University. In 1891 he pub- 
lished " Laws and Jurisprudence of England and Anieiica." In 1892 
he was elected President of the American I^ar Association. He was 
one of the Commissioners appointed l)y Govei'uoi' Moi-ton to prepare 
•a charter for " Greater New York." He is one (d' tlie forty members 
of the Institute de Droit International, and is a member of the asso- 
ciation for the reform and codification of the laws of nations. 

HOKXP.LOWEK, WILLIA3I BUTLER, head of the law firm of 
Hornblo^^er, I?yrne, Taylor & ^Miller, was graduated from Princeton 
College in 1871, having taken first prizes in English literature and 
belles-lettres, and in 1875 was graduated from tlie ('(dumbia College 
]jaw School. In 1890 the Governor of New York appointed him a 
member of the commission authorized by the Legislature to propose 
amendments to the jiidiciary article of the State Constitution. In 
1893, President Cleveland appointed him an Associate Justice of the 
Supreme (_'ourt of the United States to succeed Justice lUatchford, 
Vtut bitter factionists in Cleveland's own party defeated this and 
other nominations in the Senate. He has publislied "Contiict be- 
tween Federal and State Decisions" (1880 l. "Is Codification of the 
Law Expedient? " ( 1888 ). " The Legal Status of the Indian " (1891), 
and "Appellate Courts" (1892). He has been an active member 
of the Bar Association of the citj'. and is also a member of the Met- 
ropolitan, Century, University, Keform, Manhattan, and Democratic 
clubs. He was born in Paterson, N. J., ^May 13, IS.'l, and is the 
son of Eev. William H. Horidilower, D.D., Professor of TJieology in 
the Allegheny Theological Seminary, and Matilda Butler, a descend- 
ant of a Connecticut family prominent in the colonial wars and the 
Revolution. His graudfatlier, Jose])h C. Horid)lower, was Chief Jus- 
tice of New Jersey. His great-grandfatiier, Josiali Hornblower, who 
brought the first steam engine to Amei-ica Iti 17.~)0, was a ]iatriot in 
the Revolution, and a member of the National Congress in 1785. Mr. 
Hornblower is also a gTandne])he\v of Justice Bradley, late of the' 
United States Supreme Court, as he is of Judge Lewis B. Woodruff. 



310 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 






BACKUS, HEXKY CLINTON, hoin in rti.a. N. V.. .Ma.v :n, 1848, 
attended lMiillii>s Exeter Academy, in 1S71 was graduated fmm 
Harvard, was yiadualed from Cnlumliia Colleiie Law Sdioid in 1873, 
and lias since ])racticed la\\ in this city. At the outset he was con- 
nected witli I lie firm of Sanford. li(d)insoii & Woodruff, and subse- 
(jueutly for a w Idle with that of I'.eelie. Wilcox iS; Ilolihs. Ills jirae- 
tioe is largely in the domain of ]irol(ate. realty, and admiralty law, 
and lie is a manaucr of several larnc estates and of im]iortant fiduciary 
interi'sts. I'or ten years he was a member of the Leitublican County 
Committee of New York County, for live years was a member of 
its Committee on Kesolutions, and for one year was a member of its 
Executive Committee. He lias three times de( lined muninatious 
for the Assembly, and has also decline<l nominations foi- the City 

T'ourt bench and as Sui-i'ojiate. 
Kei)ublican candidale for the Con 
stitiitional ( 'on\"eiition in an over- 
whelnuniily l>emocratic district, he 
ran ahead of his ticket, but failed of 
election. ITe is a member of the 
Harvard and Chelsea lie]mblican 
( lubs, the City and JState I'ar asso- 
ciation?, the Dwiti'bt Alumni Asso- 
ciation, and oilier <n-L;;niizations, 
and is .in honorary member of the 
Tvailway Conductors" Club. He 
was one of the oriiiinal nu'inbers 
of th<^ (-(uumittee luivinti' in hand 
the er(M-tion of the Crant Tomb. 
He married, in ISitO. Hattie I. 
Davis, and has livini;- a son. He 
is himself the son of Charles Chap- 
nuin liackus and Harriet Newell, 
daujihter of Edward I'aldwin; is 
the tiiaiidson of Colonel Elisha. Bacdcus, of the War (d' islii; is iLireat- 
i>randson of ^Lijor Elisha Backus, of the Bevolution, and descends 
from William Backus, who eminrated from England in KIo."), and 
became one of the founders of Saybrook, Conn. The father of Mr. 
Backus was at one time a member of The pulilishing firm (d' Bennett, 
Backus & Hawley, of Central Law York, jiroprietors of the B(ti)ti.<tt 
Ji'cijishr, now the New York K.raiiiiinr mid Clintiih-lc. Kemoving to 
this city in 18.50, he became one of the founders td' the American Ex- 
press Company. 



y-4. , >^^-. 




UKNRV II.I.NTON liACKCS. 



GIJ>L1YEB, ^^ILL1AM CUKT18i, was graduated from IMiillips 
(Audover) Academy in 1865, from Yale College in 1870, subsequently 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 311 

leieiviiii; tlic dciiiee of Master of Arts, and \'vi<]\\ the Coliiiiihia <"()!- 
](iie Law Hcliool in 1874, liavini; also studied law with Alexander & 
<!reeu, of New York ("it.\. lie was admitted to the liar in 1S74, 
and is now a member of the well-known tirni of Alexander eV (Jreeu. 
He has been engaiied in the reori;anization of vai-ious corporations, 
inehidinp,- the 8ngar Trust, the Lead Trust, and the ('ordaiie Trust, 
with many railroads. He was one of the rounsel in the income- 
tax cases and the Broadway Surface Ifailroad liti.nations. He is a 
trustee of tlie ("ity Club, lia\inji' been one of its founders, and is a 
member of the Union, (Jentury, University, University Athlelii', <'oun- 
try, Kidint;-, and Lawyers' clubs, the Yale Alumni Association, and 
the City I>ar Association. He was lioiii in Norwich, Conn., Ajtril 8, 
1849, and is the son of -bdin I'utnam Ciulliver and Uram-es Curtis. 
Through his mother he descends from (iovernor ^Villiam I'.radford. 
His father was professor ef the relation of Christianity to the secu- 
lar scien<-es at .\ndover Tlieolo|^ical Sennnary. His li'randfather, 
.T(din (iulliver, was one of the Xinv Eniiland (itiards that iirotected 
the Chai lestown Navy \:\v<\ durinj; the ^\'ar of 181:!. His lireal-i^i-and- 
father, Ciishoni (itdliver, was one of the minute nu-n in the llatlle 
of Lexiuuton, and also ])artici]iated in the Hattle of Dorcheslei 
Heiiihts. The tiist ])aternal ancestor in America, Anthony <inlli\'er, 
was born in lOniiland in Kil'.l. and came to .Massachusetts in Ki;}.!. 
Throufih his grandmother, Sarah Putnam, he also descends from 
General Israel I'utnam. 

COTTETHLL, CEOlJfJE WASHTNCTON, was graduated from the 
University of Vermont, and studied law with I'eck 6c Colliy, leadinii 
lawyers of ^[ontjielier. ^ t. After his admission to the bar lie re- 
mained for some time with this tirm, but in 1855 connected himseli 
with the New York law tirm of I>udwi,n', Smith & Finke. Subsecim-ntly 
he formed a ])artnership with his brother. Vov many years he has 
](racticed alone. He was counsel for the Underwriters' A,nem-y, com- 
j)osed of the <ierinania, Ihiuover, Niagara, and lie]>ublic insurance 
companies, and successfully conducted the suit wlii( h subsequently 
grew out of this arrangement. In many ini]iortant cases he repiH' 
seuted the bite ^Villiam Steinway and the tirm of Steinway & Sons. 
He is counsel to tlu' Liederkranz of this city, as well as a membei. 
and was its reorgauizer. Uor thirty-five years he has been a meml)er 
of the Union League Club. He is also a member of the New Y'ork, 
Lawyers", and Insurance clubs, the New Euii'land Society, and the 
Fish and Came Association. He is a native of .AFontpelier, \'t., the 
son of Malilon Cotterill and Catherine Edmonds Couch. His father 
was one of the ori<;iuators of the A'ermout Central Kailroad. His 
mother desceiuled from tlie ICdmonds and Couch families of New 
Hampshire, and was related to the Lees of Mriiiina. 



312 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



HAYS, DANIEL PEIXOTTO. head of the law firm of Hays & 
Greenbaum, of New York City, aud a director and President of the 
Harlem l^av^- Library, was born at Pleasantville. Westchester County, 
N. Y., March 28, 1S54, the son of David Hays and Judith Peixotto. 
His t;reat-grandfathcr, Daniel Hays, was a Eevolutionary soldier, 
and at tlie close of that war purchased the homestead at Pleasant- 
ville, which has descended to the present ~Sh-. Hays. Of the same 
family was Jacob Hays, who was High Constable of Xew York City 
for half a century. Mr. Hays attended the public schools of New 
York, and in 1873 was graduated from the College of the City of New 
York. He obtained a clerical position in the law firm of Carpcntier 
& Beach, of New York City, at the same time attending the Columbia 
College Law School, and in 1875 was graduated from the latter aud 

.Tdmitted to the bar. After serving 
two years as INIanaging Clerk of 
Carpentier & Beach, he became 
junior jtnrtner of the law firm of 
Beach & Hays; and upon the death 
of ex-Judge Beach, a few months 
later, ho became the partner of his 
other former partner, James S. 
Caiqientier, under the style of Car- 
pentier & Hays. :\Ir. Carpentier 
died in 18SG, and soon after the 
present firm of Hays & Greenbaum 
was formed. He was cmnisel of 
General Adam Badeau to recover 
from the estate of General Grant 
](ayment for his services in writing 
tlie " Grant Memoirs." He was 
also counsel of General Sickles in 
several imi)ortant cases, and Avas 
principal counsel in the contest of 
He is a Democrat, and was a delegate 
to the Democratic State Convention which first nominated David B. 
Hill for Governor of New York. In 1888 he bought the Nyack City 
and Cointfy. a newspaper of Rockland County, New York, and gave its 
support to Grover Cleveland. In 1893 he was appointed Commission- 
er of Appraising, relative to the changing of grades in the Twenty- 
third and Twenty-fourth wards of New York City, aud the same year 
was appointed Civil-service Commissioner. He is a member of the 
Reform, ^lanhattan. Lawyers", Democratic, and Harlem Democratic 
clubs. 




DANIEL PEIXOTTO HAVS. 



the will of John B. Haskin. 



VAN SLYCK, GEORGE WHITFIELD, attended the academy at 
Kinderhook, N. Y''., concluded his preparatory studies at Providence, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 313 

Ik. I., aud iu 1859 entered Williams College. In 18G2 he entered the 
Union Army, having organized Company E, of the One Hundred and 
Twenty-eighth New York A'olnnteers. He served in the Lonisiana 
campaign tenninatiug in the capture of I'ort Hudson. He then served 
on the staffs of several generals. After the war he also served on the 
staff of General S^haler, of the National Guard of New York. He 
studied law with Judge John II. Keymilds, of Albany, was graduated 
from the Albany Law Schoiii, and soon after his admission to the 
bar engaged in practice in Xcav York City. He was born in Kindei-- 
hook, N. Y., in July, 1812, and is the son of Hugh Yan Slyck and 
Ormita M. Pulver. His father was locally prominent. His brother, 
the late Colonel Nicholas Yan !-^lyck, Avas a leading member of the 
Rhode Island bar. The first paternal ancestor came from Holland 
in 1640. 

McCLUKE, DAYID, was admitted to the bar in December, 18(59, 
and is a member of the law firm of Turner, McClure & Rolston. He 
was a member of the commission appointed by the Supreme Court 
in 1892 to consider the question of rapid transit in New York City 
by means of an underground railroad. Jlaycn' Gilroy appointed him 
in 1893 a member of a commission to draft laws for the government 
of the NeAV York public schools. He was a member of the Consti- 
tutional Convention of 1891. He is a. director of the Lawyers' Surety 
Company and counsel of the Farmers' Loan and Trust Company, the 
West Side Savings Bank, the Consolidated Gas Company, Saint 
Patrick's Cathedral, and the Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum. He 
was counsel in the Merrill, Schuyler Skaats, and Charles B. Beck 
will contests, the De Meli divorce case, the General Burnside and 
Livingston litigations, and in a large number of important railroad 
foreclosure cases. Lie is a member of the Jfanliattau and Democratic 
clubs and the Bar Association of the city. He was born at Dobb's 
FeiTy, W^estchester County, N. Y'., November 4, 1848. 

TAGGART, WILLIAM RUSH, practiced law in Ohio from 1875 to 
1887, aud since the latter year has practiced in New York City. From 
1887 to 1891 he was connected with the law fli-m of Dillon & Swayne. 
Since 1891 he has been Solicitor of the Western Union Telegraph 
Company, in charge of the litigations of that corporation in New York 
City. He was counsel iu the foreclosure pi-oceedings upon the lines 
of the Wabash, St. Louis and Pacific Railroad east of the Mississippi, 
and in the subsequent reorganization. He was attorney for the W^est- 
ern Union Telegraph Company in the suits of the Government to can- 
cel the contracts of his clients with the Union Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany, the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, the Central Pacific 
Railroad Company, and the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company. 



3U 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



II(* was ((luiiscl in the case of Sturges r-s. the Peunsylvauia Railroad 
('()iu])aiiy. as also in that of l.aidlaw is. Kusscll Sagc'. He is a direc- 
tor of the ("iiicinnati. Ilaiiiiltoii and Dayton llailway ("onipany, the 
Manstleld Street Kaihvay Conijiany, and the IJapid Addressing' Ma- 
chine Company. He is a member of the Colonial Clnh. the Ohio So- 
ciety, the Bar Association <i( the city, the Sons of tlie Kev(dntion. and 
the National Acadi my of Science; is a Kuight Tem])hir and a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Clmrch. 
He married, in 1877, Margaret 
Waterworlh, <>\' Salem, Ohio, and 
has two daughters and a sou — 
Knsji Taggart. Mr. Taggart was 
born in Smithville, Wayne County, 
oino, Sejitember 4. 1840, the son 
(d l»r. William ^Vil■t and ^Margaret 
^I. Taggart. I'oih jjavents, (d' 
Scotch-Irish descent, were natives 
of Ohio. Mr. Taggart attended the 
public schools, the Jiigh s( iiool. and 
the University of ^Vooster, Ohio, 
being graduated from the last- 
mentioned in 1S71. During the 
two years fidlowing he was con- 
nected with the I'nited States Oeo- 
logical Survey. He studied law 
with :Martin- Walk<'r and Charles 
M. Vacuni, distinguished Ohio 
lawyers, and in 1875 was gradu- 
ated from the Law Scluxd of the 
Cinversity of ^lichigan. He prac- 
ticed law at Wooster and Sah'Ui, Ohio. At Salem he entered the 
service of the Northwestern branch of the Pennsylvania Kailroad 
('onipany. 

WHEELER, EVE1{ETT PEPPEPELL, attended the imblic s( luxds 
of this city; in 185() was graduated from the ("(dlege of the City of 
New York, subsequently receiving the degree of Master of Arts; read 
law with his father in New York; in 18.")9 was graduated from the 
Harvard LaAV School, and in May, 18(il, was adnntted to the bar. 
I'lom 1877 to 1879 he was a member of the Ncav A'ork Board of 
Education. Eroni 1884 to 1889 he was Chairman of the Sujiervisory 
Civil-service Board of New Y'ork City. He assisted in drafting the 
Pendelton Civil-service bill and the New Y^ork State civil-service 
acts. In 1875 he was a commissioner on the Third Avenue and the 
Ninth Avenue elevated railways. He was one of the founders of 
the Association of the Bar of the Citv of New Y'ork. ami is now 




\M I. I.I AM HUSH T.\G(_i.\KT. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY, 315 

i(s I'lcsidciil. He \\;is I'lcsidcnl of llic I'rec Trade Chili lidiii 1SS2 
to 1888, as hi" was of I lie llcfonii Cluh in ISS!) and 18!»(I. lie was 
one of tliL' foiindeis of tlic I*]asl Side House and of the \\'ehstei- I'ree 
Lilirary. lie has iiiihlished "The .Moih'tii l>aw of Canieis" and 
" \\'at;es and the Tariff," besides uian\' aihlresses and ]>ani])ldcls on 
v'wU service and taiiff reform, liv has a]i]ieared as connsel in many 
inipoitant cases. I>orn in New YorU Cily, Alarcli 10, 1840, Ih' is tiie 
son id' David lOverett ^^'heeler and lOlizalictli, (hni^hter of William 
Jarvis, of \'ermont. He is I he i;real-iireal-i;randson of Sir \\'illiani 
rei)perell, tlie captor of Lonisburi;. 

ITNTEinrEYEE, SA:\rrEL, attended the New York imlilic s(diO(ds 
and the Collei;e of tin- City of New York, and in 1878 was gradnated 
from the Columbia Collej^e Law Sidniid. He has been counsel in 
many important cases. He is counscd lor I he National Wall Paper 
Company, and has organized a nnniber of Irnst and trade combina- 
tions. He represimted the brewers' associations in the State of New 
^'(lrk ill the attack on the constitutionality (d' the Kaines liipior tax 
law. lie was born in Lyuchburn', \'a., .March 2, 1858, and is the son 
of Isodor and Therese TIntermeyer. His father, a Virginia tobacco 
jdanter, lost his property throngh loyalty to the Confederacy, and 
died upon hearinii the news of Lee's surrender. 

LE^'ENTIHTT, I)A^'II), was ■iiaduated in 18(;4 from the College 
of the (_'ity of Xmv York, having taken se\'eral jirizes, and in 1870 was 
graduated fioni the rniversity Law School. He was special counsel 
for the City of New York to condemn for a jmblic park lands between 
High Bridge and Washington lii'idge. He Avas Chairman of a commis- 
sion to estimate damages in the case of lands condemned by the city 
for a bridge across the Harlem Kiver, at Third Avenue. In the fall of 
1898 he was elected a Justice of the Sniireme Couil of the State of New 
York on the Democratic ticket. He is Yice-President of the Aguilar 
Free Library. For many years he was Chairman of the Law Com- 
mittee of Tammany Hall. He mairied, in 1808, Matilda Lithauer, of 
New York City. He was himself born in \\'insboro, S. C, Januan' 
31, 1845, and is the son of C.eorgc M. Leventiitt and Betty Goldberg. 

HILDBETH, JOHN HOMEB, was prepared for college at Wes- 
leyan .\cademy, Wilbraham, Mass., and in 1809 was graduated from 
the Columbia College Law Schoid. Since his admission to the bar, he 
has ]iractic(^d in New York City, making a, specialty of commercial 
and real estate law. He has fi(M|uently served as referee and receiver. 
In 1882 he was the unsuccessful i;e]iublican candidate for the New 
York .\ssenibly from the Twenty-fourth District, that being the year 
in which Grover Cleveland sw^ept the State with a Democratic major- 
ity of 102.000. He is a member of the K. -publican Club, the New Ens- 



316 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 



land Society, the Xorth Side Board of Trade, the Dwight Alumni 
Association, and the American (leographical Society. He is a member 
of Crescent Lodge, 402, Free and Accepted Masons; Crescent Chapter, 
220, Koyal Arch Masons, and Harlem Lodge, 201, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and has been an officer in each. He was born in 
Lawrence, Mass., November 25, 1847, and is the son of Jairiis C. 
Hildreth and Euieliiic Watson. The ancestor's on both sides were 
long estal)lislied in New England. A great-grandfather on the ma- 
ternal side was a soldier at Bunker Hill. 




S:MITIL FBELTNCr H., was graduated from Union College with 
high honors in ISO."); two years later was graduated from the Cohimbia 
College Law School and admitted to the bar, and tlie same year be- 
came managing clerk for the New 
York law firm of Van Vorst & 
Beardsley. In 1S6S he entered the 
office of Moses Ely as clerk, and 
one year later became a. partner 
under the style of Ely & Smith. 
This association continued for fif- 
teen years, until the retirement of 
Mr. Ely in 1SS3, since whicli time 
Mr. Smith lias practiced alone. He 
snccessfully defended Kalli cS: Coni- 
])any in ilii' litigation growing out 
of the fraudulent acts of the cotton 
brokers, II. M. Cutter & Company. 
He is a director of the Forty-sec- 
ond Street and frrand Street Ferry 
Railroad of the city, and of the 
-" Adirondack Railway Company. 
Born in Chatham, X. Y., January 
.31, 1844, he is the son of .Joseph 
\>'illiam Smitli and Kutii Benjamin, his ancestors being of Scotch 
descent on both sides. His mother was a cousin of the late Judge 
Welcome li. Beebe, of Ncav York. 




FRELIXG H. SMITH. 



LAROCOFE, JOSEPH, well-known New York lawyer, and a nn-m- 
ber of the firm of Shipman, Larocque & Choate, was graduated from 
Columbia College in 1849, studied law^ with Griffin & Larocque, of 
which firm his brother, Jeremiah Larocque, Avas a member, and in 
1852 was admitted to the bar. He has appeared in many notable 
cases. He was elected President of the Association of the Bar of the 
City of New York in 1895 and was re-elected in 1896. He was active 
in organizing the Committee of Seventy in 1894 to wrest the munici- 
pal government out of the hands of Tammany Hall, and was made 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 317 

its rhairiuan. Availius;- of the public scnitinieiit aroused l)y tlie 
Lexow investigation. Colonel William L. Strong was uoniiuated as 
Mayor of New York and was elected. Mr. Larocque is a incinber of 
the Metropolitan, Century, City, TTniyersity, and I!eforni clubs. He 
was born in New York City, Api-il 2. 1831, and is of French descent. 
His father was born in Savannah, (ia., in 1780, the hitter's father hav- 
ing; come from France. 

MUlilJAV, JAMES L>., stmlied in Paris and Dresden, S]»ent two 
years in tlie classical and scientific courses at Columbia College, and 
in 1875 was graduated from the Columbia College Law School. He 
practiced for two years with Paddock & Cannon, of this city, and 
since 1877 has practiced alone. His practice has been mainly along the 
line of will and other equity cases. He has had a number of litigations, 
liowever, in the Sujiremf^ Court and the Court of Appeals. During 
the Presidential cami)aign of 18'.l(( he contributed papers on sound 
money to the press throughout the country, lie is a member of the 
City, I'niversity, Reform, Delta I'hi, Seawanhaka-Corinthian Yacht, 
and Larchmont Yacht clubs, the Downtown Association, and the Bar 
Association of the city. He is the eldest son of Bronson JMui-ray, of 
Kew York City, and Anne E. Peyton, of an old Yii-ginia family. He 
is grandson of Colonel James B. Murray, of New Yorl<. His father 
was the originator and financial sui)port of the Industrial League, 
Avhicli led the movement to obtain land grants from the Federal Gov- 
ernment for the establishment of State colleges, the Illinois Univer- 
sity and Cornell University being two of the institutions growing out 
of this agitation. 

TRUAX, CHAUNCEY SHAFFER, was graduated fn.m Hamilton 
College in 1875, receiving the prize for oratory on commencement day, 
ami in 1877 was graduated from the Columbia College Law Scliool. 
He tlieii accepted his appointment as Instructor in International and 
Commercial Law at Robert College, Constantinople. IJesigning at 
tlie end of a year, he returned to New Y(n-k and liegan the juactice 
of law in October, 1878. In 1890 he became head of the firm of Truax 
& Crandall. He was counsel in the Williamsbridgi' reservoir case, 
the new a(iueduct litigations, the Jacob-Sire suit, the Langley divorce 
cases, and the Adirondack Railroad litigation, lie was a delegate 
to the Democratic State conventions in 1881 and 1888, ami in the 
latter year was a member of the Committc^e on IMatform. He was 
a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1891. He is President 
of the New York Alumni Association of Hamilton College, ami in 
1886 founded the Greek Scholarship at that institution. He is a 
member of the Holland Society, the Manhattan Club, and the Har- 
lem Society, being one of the founders of the latter. A member of the 
Bar Association of the city, he was long on its Committee on Amend- 



318 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 



lueut iif the Laws. He man-ied, in 188(5, Alice ^I., (laughter of IJ. K. 
Hawlev, of rieveland, Ohio, and lias three children. He is himself 
a brother of Jud<ie Charles H. Tniax, of the Supreme Court, and was 
born in Diirhaniville, N. Y., ^larch 11, 1851. T]ir(ni;L;h liis father, 
Henry Philiji Triiax, he lineally descends from rinli])))!' Ihi Trienx, 
a W'allnon, burn rn 1585, who married Susanna du ("liiney, and in 
loss was Conrt .Marshal in New Amsterdam. His nioilici-, Saiah Ann 
Shaffer, was a sister of the late Chauncey Shaffer, a well-known New 
"idrk lawyer. 



MAKSHALL, UK' IS, bnrn in Syracuse. X. V.. December 14. 185(1. 
in 1S74 was yiailnated from the lii!.:li schiioj nf that city, stndied law 
for two years with N. 1?. Smith, of Syracnse. for one year attended 
the Columbia Collei;t' Law Scdiool. and, eompletinii his ]ireparation 

with Hon. \\illiaui C. Kuger, of 
S\racuse, was admitted to the bar 
in .January, 1S7S. and at once be- 
came a member of Jndjie I\n,t>er's 
hnv firm. He at once ap])eared as 
(■onns(d in imjiortant cases, and has 
arjiiied more than one hundred and 
fifty causes in the (_'onrt of Ap- 
peals, hi 1S!»0 (Jovernor Hill ap- 
]>oint( il liiin a memlu'r of the Con- 
stitutional ('ommission to revise 
th( -Fudiciary Arti( le,and he served 
on its committee on the Court of 
.\|i]ii'als. Elected a member of the 
Constitutional Convention of 1894, 
he was Chairman of its Committee 
on I'^uture Amendments, and sec- 
ond on the Judiciary Committee. 
He succeeded William B. Horn- 
blower as Chairman of the Commit- 
tee on Law Keform of the New York State Bar Association. The 
New York Legislature of 1895 tendered him a vote of thaid^s for his 
arduous labors in drafting the amendments to the Codes of Civil 
and Crinnnal I'rocedure, so as to conform them to the new Judiciary 
Article. Since February, 1894. he has been engaged in practice in 
Xew York City. The Committee of Seventy, which brought al»out tlie 
election of Mayor Stiong, selected him to prei)are an opiinon on the 
constitutionality of the I'olice Magistrates' Bill, and to argue in its 
support before the Legislative Committees, a task which he per- 
formed with signal ability and entire success. He has delivered lec- 
tures and imblished articles on legal, historical, and literary subjects, 
and ]>repared a number of ](a])ers for the State liar .\sso<iation. 




l.OUIS MAKSII.\I.I.. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 319 

While ;i icsideiit of l?>yracuse he lectured on ^fedical .Turi>>prudeuc-e 
at the Svracnse iNIedieal Collene. Duiiiiiii I he wiiitev of 1897-98 he de- 
livered a course of lectures on the Conslilution of the State of New 
York before the ]>wii;ht .\luniui Association. 

PECKIIAM, WHEELEK llAZAKD, attended the Albany Acad- 
emy aud Tnion ('oll(^,iie, studied law with his father at Albany, and 
practiced for some time in that city. In 18(U he became connected 
with the New York law firm of -Tohu A. Stoutenbur^ and (leor^e 
MoCulloiij^h Miller, and subsequently became a member of the lirm 
of ^Filler, Peckham & Dixon, which is one of the leadin;L; firms in New 
York. Nominated as a Justice of the Fnited States Sui)reme Court 
by President Cleveland in 1893, he failed of confirniatiou in the 
Senate through the opiiosition of Senator David B. ITill. IT<' has 
served several terms as I'resident of tlie .Vssociatiou of the l>ar of 
the City of New York, lie lias been ]u-ominent in movements lookiuf;- 
to iiolitical reform. lie was leading counsel in the Tweed prosecu- 
tions, and for a short time was Disliict Attorney of New Y'ork City. 
He was counsel in the bank tax cases, the Bell telephone litijiations, 
the Louisiana bond cases, and the cases estal)lishin,n- that le.ual-tender 
notes are exempt from taxation. He was born in Albany, N. Y., Jan- 
(lary 1, 1833, and is the sou of the late Hon. Bufus Wheeler Peckham. 
a Justice of the State Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals, aiul 
is a brother of Hon. Bufus Wheeler I'eckham. a Justice of the United 
States Supreme Court. 

STEIMIENS. (iEOB<iE WASI 1 1 X( iT(>\. well-known lawyer of 
New Y'ork City, and leader of the llepublican ]taity, was educated in 
the public schools of New York and Brooklyn; in 18(53 was tiraduated 
from the Collefie of the City of New York; was graduated from the 
Columbia College Law School in 18(!.'>, haviujj,' also studied law in the 
oftice of Hon. William E. Curtis, afterward Justice of the Su]terior 
Court of the City of New Y'ork, and since his admission to the bar in 
1865, has practiced law continuously in New York City. From 1877 
to 1892 he was associated with Walter J. Foster as a member of the 
firm of I^oster cS; Stephens. His practice has especially been in the de- 
partments of commercial, municipal, and real estate law. lie has 
been em])Ioyed in a number of cases as counsel and attorney for the 
officials of LoujLi- Island City. He has enjoyed r(Mnarkable success as 
a])pellant's counsel before the Court of A]i]ieals. He has always been 
a member of the Bepublican ]»arty, aud has lonji' been the leader of 
th(> partv or!.;anization in the Twenty-fourth Ward of the city, beiui; 
also a delegate fre(|uently to State and other conventions. In the 
Re])ublican Stat(- Convention of 189(') he was the first deleoate 
from New York City to vote for :\Ir. Black for Governor. He is 
identified with the " anti-machine " winji of the party. In June, 



320 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



1895, Mayor Stronji- appointed him Change of Grade Commis- 
sioner of the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth wards of the city, a 
commission created for the pmijose of assessing damages to property 
owners occasioned by the clianges resulting from sinking tlie trades 
of the New York and Harlem IJailroad. He lives at Kiugsbridge, and 
is a large property owner in the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth 
wards. He is a member of the Eepublican, Suburban, Progress, and 
Fordham clubs, as Avell as of the IJoyal Arcanum, for the past ten 
years having been Regent of Kiugsbridge Council of the last-men- 
tioned (u-der. He was married, in 1874, to Arline E. Lister, of New 
York City, and has a daughter — I^lizabeth K., who was graduated from 
Bryn 31awr College, and Miss Anna Brown's School, and a son — 
"NA'illiani Y. Y. Stephens. Mr. Stephens was himself born in Coeymans- 

on-the-Hudson, Albany Couuty, 
' N. Y., February 22, 1844, the son of 

•Tames Stephens and Elizabeth M. 
Rallantyne. His ])aternal ances- 
tors were settled in Coniieeticut 
from earlv colonial times, remov- 




ing first to Dutchess County, New 



York, and tlience to Albany Coun- 
ty. His m a t c r n a 1 grandfather 
eame from Scotland to America in 
the early ])art of the present cen- 
tury, settling in Albany County, 
New York. Gideon Stephens, Mr. 
Stephens's grandfather, did more 
than any other man of his time to- 
Avard building up the village of 
Coeymans and tlie neighboring vil- 
lage of Stephensville. He con- 
structed docks at Coeymans and 
did a general freighting business 
until 1842, when he failed. Removing to Xew Orleans he became a 
prominent merchant, recovering his fortune. He died at ^'ermilion- 
ville. La. Mr. Stephens's father came to New York City in 1854, and 
engaged in the bluestone business in Harlem. Later on lie established 
a coal business in Harlem and Mott Haven, which has since been con- 
tinued by his son, Oliu J. Stephens, and is the largest concern of its 
kind in the upper part of New York City. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON STEPHENS. 



RARE, RUDOLPH FREDERICK, attended a collegiate high 
sclioo] of Ottendorf, Germany, entered the law office of Conable & 
Elliott, of New York City, in 1804, and in 1809 was graduated from 
the Columbia College Law School, and admitted to the bar. He at 
once began practice. He was in partnership with Hon. Edward 



EN'CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 321 

Bruwne from 1870 until the latter was elected a Judge of the City 
Court in 1883. He then became head of the present firm of Kabe & 
Keller. He served four successive terms in the Kew Jersey Assembly 
beginning with 1874, being elected as an Independent Democrat 
from Hoboken. During his last term he was Speaker of the House. 
In 1877 he was elected to the New Jersey Senate from Hudson County 
for the term of three years. He was a delegate to the National Dem- 
ocratic Convention of 187G. He organized the Second National Bank 
of Hoboken in 1887, and has been its President since. For six years 
he was a trustee of the Hoboken German Academy. He was at one 
time one of the jn'oprietors of the Hudson Coiiiili/ ■Iniinuil. He mar- 
ried, in 18G(>, Elizabeth, daughter of John Lusby, of New York City, 
and has two children. He was himself born in Ottendorf, Hanover, 
Germany, August 4, 1841, and is the son of Charles L. Ilabe. 

SCUDDEK, TOWNSEND, was educated abroad, in I'raiicc, Swit- 
zerland, Germany, and Italy, from 187r) to 1883 studied law with 
Winthrop Parker, and in 1888 was graduated from the Columbia 
College Law School. He was admitted to the bar in Februai-y, 1880, 
since which time he has practiced in New York City. He was born 
in Northport. L. I., July 20, 1805, and is the son of Townsend Scudder 
and Sarah M. Frost. His ancestors on both sides were settled in 
America in the early colonial period, while some of them were Kevo- 
lutionary soldiers. 

NILES, WILLIAM ^^'ATS()N, was tutored by his father, attended 
Bradford Academy and Newbury Seminary, taught in schools and 
academies in New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts, and in 
1845 was graduated from Dartmouth College. He studied law with 
his brother. Judge Niles, of La Porte, Ind., at the same tinu' being- 
assistant to the Professor of Chemistry in the Indiana Medical Col- 
lege. Coming to New York City he was for a time in the law office 
of John Cochrane. After a visit to Europe he engaged in law prac- 
tice in this city. During the period of the Tweed ring he organized 
the Citizens' Association in the northern wards of the city to compel 
both parties to make more satisfactory nominations. He participated 
in the overthrow of Tweed, being one of the most active lieuteTiants 
of Samuel J. Tilden. He was elected to the New York Assembly, 
put on its Judiciary Committee, and procured the signatures of the 
entire committee to a resolution of impeachment of Judges Barnard, 
(^'ardozo, and McCunn. He was one of the managers appointed by 
the Assembly to tiw Judge Barnard. He was one of ten who organ- 
ized the Central Loyal League during tJie Civil War, the Union 
League Club of this city growing out of it. He was again elected 
to the Assembly in 1881. He was one of the Park Commissioners 
appointed in connection with the new parks of New York City. He 



322 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



assisted in the ooustruotion of tlie first i-ailroad west of Lalce Erie. 
He obtained tlie charter for the Forty-second Street Ferry, New 
Yorlv City. He oruauized the Ferry and Land Improvement Com- 
pany, was its first Secretary, and became its President. He was pri- 
vate connsel to Governor Tilden, and became connsel to Iiis law 
office after lie retired from practice. He has argued many impor- 
tant cases in the Btate and Federal courts. Ho was born at \Yest 
Fairlee, Vt., March 26, 1822, and is the son of Judtie William Xiles 
and the daughter of Colonel John Barron, of Bradford, Yt. The 
latter w-as an officer iu the French and Indian war as well as in the 
rtevolution. ilr. Niles descends through an illustrtous line from 
John Niles, who settled in Braintree, Mass., in 1G36. 



McNAUGHT, JAMES, was admitted to the Illinois bar in 18G.3, 
from 1867 to 1887 was engaged iu law practice in Seattle, Wash.; in 

1879 was appointed counsel of the 
[ ■'^iii:«m Western Division of the Northern 

Pacific Eailroad Company; in 1887 
became General Solicitor of this 
coi*poration, with headquarters at 
St. Paul, :\Iinn.; from 1881) to 1895 
was General Counsel of the same 
company, and in 1895 retired to es- 
tablish himself iu general law prac- 
tice in New York City iu partner- 
sliip with Joseph I). Ifedding, form- 
erly Western counsel of the South- 
ern Pacific Railroad Company. 
During his entire connection with 
tlie Northern Pacific Ifailroad Com- 
jyany he did not lose a single impor- 
tant case. He is President of the 
Lower Laureatiou Ifailroad Com- 
pany. He married, in 1871, ^liss 
Agnes Hyde, of Seattle, Wash., and 
has a son and a dauglilcr. .Mr. McNaught was himself born in Lexing- 
ton, McLean County, 111., September 9, 1842, and was educated in the 
public schools, at Wesleyan University. Bloomington, 111., and the 
Law University of Chicago, being graduated from the latter in 1863. 
At Seattle he had as partner for one year John J. McGilva. after- 
w-ard President of the Seattle Bar Association. Later on he was 
associated with Hon. S. S. Garfield, who became a ^Member of Con- 
gress. For seven years he had as his partner John Leary, under the 
firm style of McNaught & Leary. His younger brother joining him, 
he organized the firm of McNaught Brotliers. This firm was reor- 
sanized to receive Hon. E. P. Ferrv and John 11. .Mitchell. Jr. 'Sir. 




JAMES McN.\UUHT. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 323 

Ferry was Giiveriior of Wasliiu<;ton, Imrli as a Territory and as a 
State. Thus orgauized, the firm became one of the most notable in 
the West, participating in all the important corporation litigations in 
Washington. 

CAMI', HENRY, was long engaged in the practice of law in New 
York City as a member of the hrm of Nettleton, Gilbert .S; Camp, 
Avhich afterward became Xettleton & Camp, with offices at 111 Broad- 
way. He was born in Xorwalk, Conn., March il, 1S24, and is the son 
of Nathan Camp and Araty, daughter of Thomas Itaymond. He is the 
grandson of Stephen Camp and Rachel B. Hickok, and the great- 
grandson of Jonatliaii Camp. He descends from Nicholas Camp, 
who came from England with the New Haven Colony, and in 1G3'J 
became one of the founders of ]Milford, Conn. The ancestors on his 
mother's side settled at Salem, Mass., in Kioo. Mr. Camp attended 
the common schools and an academy at Norwalk, Conn. He removed 
to New York City at the age of eleven, and finished his education at 
an academy and under private tutors. He learned the booklnnding 
trade with a relative, W. O. Hickok, of Harrisburg, Pa., and carried 
on a branch of it until he was about twenty-five years of age. From 
that time until 18(31 he engaged in the business of stone-dressing by 
means of steam. During the Civil War he went to the front with the 
Seventy-first Regiment, with which he had been previously con- 
nected. Upon liis return he studied law. 

BREWSTER, EUGENE VALENTINE, has been engaged in the 
practice of law in Bi-ooklyn since 1894, and as attorney for the Law 
Enforcement Society of that borough in 1896-!)T gave much startling 
information to the Police Department, leading to a general shifting of 
police captains. He went on the professional stage for one year in 
1889, and is known also as an artist and writer. He has published sev- 
eral volumes of fiction, and in 189r) became i^rominent as a champion 
of the silver cause. He was born in Bay Shore, N. Y., September 7, 
1869, the sou of Henry D. Brewster and Clotilda T. Smith, and is a 
•lescendant of Elder ^Ailliam Brewster, of the Mayflower. He at- 
tended two academies in New Jersey and Princeton College. 

HEALY, EDMFND J., was graduated from St. Francis Xavier's 
College and the Columbia College Law School. He began practice 
in thfs city in the office of Hon. Richard O'Gormaii. In 1881 he was 
elected Justice of the Peace of Hempstead, L. I., and in 1885 was 
re-elected. He made Far Rockaway his home, and was the first 
President of the incorporated village of that name, sei-ving three 
successive terms. He is now City Magistrate, Borough of Queens, 
City of New York. He is a director of the Far Rockaway Bank and 
its counsel. He is a member of the Catholic and Democratic clubs. 



324 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



and is a Kuii^lit of < 'oliimliia. lie was born in New York City, July 
14, 1S4S, and is tlie son of Jolm J. Ilcaly and Jane, dauiiliter of 
James O'Mara. His brotlier, llcv. (iahrit'l A. llealy, is pastor of St. 
Bernard's ('Inircli, New Yorlc (/itv. 



COXXOKTOX, IJ'KP: J., lawyer and influential Democrat of 
Fhisliini;, Lonj;- Island, was horn in that village, November 21, 1853, 
the son of the late Luke Connorton and Hannah Curly. He was grad- 
uated from Flushing Institute in 1S72, studied law with ex-Congress- 
man J. W. Covert, and was admitted to the bar in Brooklyn in 1877. 
During the twelve years from 1878 he was annually electe<l Town 

Clerk of Flushing, 
at the same time 
practicing law. In 
1889 he was elected 
Justice of the Peace 
for a term of four 
years, and in 1893 
was re-elected. He 
holds conrt daily. 
For fifteen years he 
has also been Clerk 
to the Board of 
Trustees of the 
town of Flushing. 
Active in the Dem- 
o c r a t i c organiza- 
tion, he is a mem- 
ber of its town com- 
mittee, has been a 
frequent delegate 
to local and State 
conventions, and in 
1888 was Alternate 
D e 1 e g a t e to the 
Democratic National Convention. On January 8, 1898, he was ap- 
pointed City Magistrate by Mayor Yun Wyck under the charter of the 
Greater New York. He married Kate E. O'Brien, of Flushing, and 
has a sou — \Villiam Connorton. 




LUKE J. CONXORTON. 



HOLT, WALTER H., received an academic education at Salisbury, 
N. C, worked on a farm, taught school, was a telegraph operator, a 
railroad agent, and at nineteen became agent of the Richmond and 
Danville Railroad, at Concord, N. C. In 1880 he came to 'New Y'ork, 
but soon returned South. In 1885 he returned to New York and 
entered the employ of the ;Manhattan Elevated Railway Company 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



325 



under Colonel F. K. Hain. The following;- year he entered tlie law- 
office of Da vies & Eapallo, while in 1893 he was admitted to the bar. 
lie was candidate for the New York Assembly from Statcn Island 
in IStX), but went down wirh the rest of the Democratic ticket. 
although polliniL!,' 100 votes in his district more than ^^'illiam J. Bryan. 
In 1897, Ashbel P. Fitch, Comptroller of New York City, appointed 
him expert accountant for the Borough of ]?rooklyn. By Comptroller 
Bird S. Coler he was appointed Auditor of the Borough of Biclnnoud 
on January 1, 1898. He is an Episcopalian, a Knight Templar, and 
a member of many clubs. He was born in Salisbury, X. C, Seii- 
teniber 27, 1858, and is the son of John A. Holt, of North Carolina, 
and Augusta M. Bitter, of New York. His father lost his i>r()])erty 
during the Civil War. He was first cousin of Thomas M. Holt, who 
was Governor of North Carolina. 



Sf. 




MEERILL, JOHN BBYANT, has been engaged in the practice of 
law at Woodhaven, L. I., since 1887. He was in tlie Signal Corps, 
United States Army, from 1871 to 
1883; in 1879 being* detailed as In- T 

structor in Meteorology, Military e; 

Signaling, and Tactics at the Uni- 
versity of West ^'irginia ; in 1881 
being assigned to investigate the 
occurrence of cyclones in the West- 
ern States, and in 1882 being 
placed in charge of the Weather 
Buieau at New York City. Ee- 
signing, he was engaged in busi- 
ness in New York from 1883 to 
1887. In 1890 he was elected 
School Commissioner of the Sec- 
ond District of (^)ueens County, 
and in 1891 was elected a nuMuber 
of the Woodhaven Board of Edu- 
cation. His pi'ogressive work in 
connection with the schools lias 
given him considerable local repu- 
tation. He is a Mason and an Odd 
Fellow. He was born in Plain 

ville. Conn., Janimry 7, 18.17, and was educated in the public schools 
of AVashington, I). C. He is the son of S(|uire U. ^Merrill and Lacy 
Porter, (d" Ilai-tford County, Connecticul. His ancestors, originally 
from Scotland, have been two hundred years settled in Amei-ica. .Mr. 
]\rerrill marri( d, in 1880, Ida K. Cibson, of Washington, and has a son 
and three dani:hters. 




.JOHN BRYANT MKKIUM,. 



326 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

STOKY, ELMKK (IILDETJSLEEVE, attended the commou schools, 
Bishop's English and Classical Academy at Poiighkeepsie, X. Y., iu 
1884: was graduated from Cornell University, and was subsequently 
graduated from the Law Department of the New Y'ork University. 
From 18SG to 1894 he was United States Government Superintendent 
in the customs service. Since 1894 he has been engaged in tlie prac- 
tice of law in New York City. He is a member of the Phi Delta Phi 
and Cornell Univer.sity clubs of this city, the Niantic Club, of Flush- 
ing, and the Queens County Bar Association. He was born in Schxiltz- 
ville, Dutchess County, X. Y., April 21, 1802, and is the son of Deane 
Story and ilarietta Case. His ancestors, originally English, liave been 
long estalilished in this country. 

STILWELL, STEPHEN -T., was educated at the Union Free 
School of Y'onkers, X. Y'., and the Law School of the X'ew Y'ork 
University. Since his admission to the bar he has been engaged in 
practice at Mount Vernon. He has been counsel for the towns of 
Eastchester, Pelham, and Mamaroneck in Westchester County. He 
was formerly the owner and editor of the Mount Vernon Reformer, 
the official Democratic organ at that place. Himself a member of 
the X"^ew York .Vssembly from the First District of Westchester 
County, he is the nephew of Silas M. Stilwcll, Assemblyman, who 
passed the Stilwell Act, releasing ])risoners held for debt. He is a 
member of the I'oresters and of the Knights of St. Jolm and Malta. 
He was born iu Y'onkers, X. Y., May 10, ISGO, and is the sou of 
William J. Stilwell and ^lary D. Archer, and tlie grandson of -Tohn 
Stilwell. 

:\IA1{SHALL, WILIJAM JEIJOME, educated in the public schools 
of Eastche.ster and Blount Vernon, Westchester County, X'. Y., stud- 
ied law with Hon. \\'illiam H. Pemberton, and in May, 1879, was 
admitted to tlie bar. His practice has been largely along commer- 
cial lines. He is serving his second term of two years as ('orporation 
Counsel of Mount Vernon. He is a member of tlie City Club and the 
X'iagara Hose Comjiany of Blount Vernon, and is Past Commander 
of the Knights of Si. .Tohn .iiid .Malta. He was born in Williams- 
bridge, now a part of Xew York City, May 10, 18.58, and is the son 
of William ^M.-ii-shall and Ann DnHie. His gi-andfatlier was Cornelius 
^hnshall, and Ills great-grandfatlier Thomas .Marshall. His paternal 
gj'andparents came to tliis country- fnnu Ireland, but were originally 
of Sheffield. Enghuid. 

KEXXEY, JOIIX J., was educated in the public schoids of Rich- 
mond County and ^fanhattan Borough. He taught school in Pich- 
mond County, studied law with .Tudge Toni]>kins Westervelt, and 
took a cour.se in the Law School of the T'niversitv of the Citv of X"ew 



KXXYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY 



327 



York. lie \v;is adiuitlcd to The bar in l'\'l)i-uary, 1882, and has been 
enjiaged in practice since. ITe is attorney to the Staten Island Elec- 
tric Railroad Company and the Board of Supervisors of Eichmond 
("onnty. He served nine yeiU's as Clerk of the villai;e of New Bri.iili- 
ton, and also served as a member of its Board of Education. He 
likewise served six years as S<diool Commissioner for Richmond 
County, and secured the imjn'ovement of every schoolhouse in the 
county and the erection of many new edifices. Since February lo, 
1808, he has been Justice of the ^lunicipal Court for the Borouiih 
of Richmond by appointment of INIayor ^'an Wyck. He is the son 
(if Patrick and ^larv Kennev, and was tiorn in New York Citv, Marcli 
2, 1858. 



FITZGERALD, THOMAS W., was a clerk of the City Court from 
1884 to 1887, when President Cleveland ajijiointt'd Iiim a member of 
the Board of Pension Ap- 
peals. He was Secretaiy of 
the Board of Police C(nn- 
missiouers of Richmond 
County from March, 188!>, 
to January, 1800, when he 
resijiued to assume the office 
of District Attorney of the 
same county, to wliich lie 
had been elected in Novem- 
ber preceding'. In 1802 lie 
was re-elected District At- 
torney by the laroest majnr 
ity ever received for thai 
office in Richmond County. 
He was a member of the 
Constitutional Conventinii 
of 1804. He is a well-known 
canipaiiiu speaker, for many 
years has been a member of 
the Democratic County 
Committee of Richmon<l 
County, and Vice-Chairman 
of the Democratic General 
Committee, and has been a 
frequent delej>ate to State 

Conventions. In 1808 ilayor Van Wyck appointed liim a Justice of 
the Court of Special Sessions. The son of Thomas W. Fitzii'erald and 
Susan, daujihter of Danic] Howard, he was born in tliis city, Se])tem- 
ber 1, 1854, and educated in tlie jniblic scliools and tlie Colleuc of the 
Citv of New York. 




THOM.VS \V. HT/.ciKHAI.n 



328 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

fc^EABUKY, EOBEKT, was (Hhicated at the Hempstead Institute 
aud Uniou Hill Academy of Jamaica, studied law with Alden J. 
Spoouer, of Brooklyn, and Judge William H. Onderdonk, of Queens 
County, aud was admitted to the bar in December, 18G6. For 
two years he practiced with John W. C. Leveiidge, of New York 
City, subsequently fonued a partnership with Alden J. Spooner, of 
Brooklyn, and since 1870 has practiced at Hempstead, L. I. For 
thirteen years he has been a member of the Hempstead Board of 
Education. Since April, 1876, he has been Clerk to the Queens 
County Board of Supervisors. He is a director of tlie Hempstead 
Bank and its counsel. He is a member of the Keform Club of Xew 
York, and is Past Master of Morton Lodge, No. 63, Free and Accepted 
Masons. He was born in Hempstead, L. I., December 10, 1841, and 
is the son of Kobert S. Seabury, merchant, and Sarah Elizabeth 
Hunt. He descends from John Seabury, who came to Massachusetts 
during the early colonial period, and whose grandson, John Seabury, 
in 1G73, married a daughter of John Alden and Priscilla Mullins. 
Rev. Samuel Seabiiry, D.D., who was born in 1706, was the father 
of Samuel and .Vdam Seabury, who settled in Hempstead. Mr. Sea- 
bury married, first, Amelia Hendrickson, in May, 1870, and, second, 
Mary Hendrickson, a sister of his first wife, in July, 18S4. He has a 
son, Albert Hewlett Seabury, who was graduated as a civil engineer 
from Cornell University in 1895. 

BOWMAN, HENRY HOPPER, studied at Cornell University for 
one year, at the University of New York for one year, and two 
years later was graduated ft'om the Columbia College Law School. 
This was in 1875. While studying law he lectured on commercial 
law and the theory of accounts in Packard's Businci^s College in 
this city. He began law practice in this city in 1877, and three years 
later entered the firm of Smith & Bowman. For many years he 
has been President and Treasurer of the Peter Adams Company and 
the Adams & Bisliop Company, manufacturers of high-grade paper, 
and has held the same offices in the Passaic Quari-y Company. He 
is a member of the Aldine Club of Manhattan Borough and the Mon- 
tauk Club of Brooklyn. He was born in Paterson, N. J., May 9, 1851, 
and is the son of John Harkness Bowman and Eliza Jane Hopper. 
He is of Scotch, English, Dutch, and French ancestry. His father, 
a civil engineer, was born in (Jlasgow, Scotland. 

VAN NAME, CAL^'IN DECKER, has been engaged in the prac- 
tice of law in New York City since 1877. He has maintained his resi- 
dence on Staten Ishiiid. liowever, Avhere he was born, and has taken 
an interest in all local public improvements. He served a number of 
years as a member of the I>oard of Sewer Commissioners of the village 
of Port Richmond. S. L, luiw a i)nrt of the City of New York, and was 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



329 



York. The hou of 
(laiitiliter of Ben- 
sides alike he de- 



also its Corporation Counsel. He is a menibei of the Holland Society 
and the Democratic ('lub of New York City, and of New York Com- 
niaudery, Knights Templars, and Mecca Temple of the Order of 
Nobles of the jMystic Shriue. He was born at Mariner's Harbor, S. I., 
January' 3, 1857; was educated in the New York City public schools, 
prepared for the University Law School, and in ^May. 1877, was gradu- 
ated from that institiition with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, 
and at once was admitted to the bar of New 
William Henry Van Name and Elizabeth A., 
janiin Decker, on the paternal anil maleinal 
scends from old Dutch fam- 
ilies of New Amsterdam. 
Tlirough his mother lie lin- 
eally descends from Lieu- 
tenant Decker, who was the 
first Sheriff of New Nether- 
lands. On the paternal side 
lie descends — through Will- 
iam Henry ^"an Name, Co!-- 
nelius Van Name, Aaron 
Van Name, Charles Van 
Name, Simon A'an Name, 
and Evert Van Name — 
from Joachem A'an Name, 
Avho ai-rived at New York 
City in the ship Hope, wliieli 
sailed from Amsterdam, 
April S, 16G2. He lived for 
some time in Harlem (see 
Biker's " History of Har- 
lem," p. 33!) ) . Subsecjuently 
lie settled at Kingston, 
T'lster County, N. Y'., and 
there married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Evert Pell. calvis delker van naml. 

One of their sons. Evert. 

the ancestcn- of Mr. Van Name, married Wintje Beuleani. and settled 
on Staten Island, where descendants have continued to the present 
time (see Clnte's " History of Staten Island " ). Joacliem \'an Name 
was a son of Engelbert Van Name, of Ileusden, on the I'viver :Meuse, 
in Holland. From this place Joachem Van Name went to Amster- 
dam, and thence took slup for New Amsterdam. 




HOTTENBOTH, ADOLPH CHBISTIAN, attended the New York 
jHiblic schools, in 1888 was graduated from tlie College of the City 
of New York in the scientific course, and in 1890 was graduated 



330 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



from the Lnw Srliool oi tli*^ Xcw York University. He praetieeJ 
alone for a time after liis admission to tlie bar, and tlien became a 
member of tlie present firm of Gnmbleton & Hottenrotli. Tie is 
counsel to the Taxpayers" Alliance, while his firm are attorneys to 
the I'eople's (Inaranty and Indt'innity Company. ITe was a deleiiate 
to the Constitutional Conxention of LS94, and secui-ed the adoption 
of canal imi)rovenu^nts in tiiat body. As counsel of the property 
ownei-s of the Twenty-third Ward he was active in securing through 
trains on the INranhattau Elevated Kailway and a uniform fare of five 
cent.s. He is a mcnilicr of the New York City Council for the term 
from 189S to 1!)02. The son of Christian C. Hottenrotli and Catherine 
Sandrock, he was born in New York Citv, INIav 9, 1S69. 



MoKOON, DENNIS DANIEL, began the practice of law in Oswego 
County, New York, in 1854, served two terms as Judge of the 

County Cour-t of that county, and 
was just entering upon the third 
term, for wliich he had been (dected, 
^ ,., , flM^^ when the Civil War was inaugu- 

W ' * AAv^^ vntea. He resigned from the bench 

and enlisted in Company D of the 
One Hundred and Tenth New 
York A'olunteers. He soon rose to 
the rank of First Lieiitenant, and 
acted as Adjutant of the regi- 
ment. A subsequent attack of 
typhoid fever incapacitated him for 
furthei' military service, as well as 
for business activity of any kind, 
for a term of three years. In 1867 
he again liegan the practice of 
law in ]\riddIetown, Orange Coun- 
ty, N. Y., whither he had removed, 
as a member of the firm of 
Foote, McKoou & Stoddard. In 
1874 he also opened an office in New York City, while in 1877 that at 
.Middletown was completely abandoned. At present he is head of 
the New York law firm of McKoon & Luckey, his son, D. Gilbert 
McKoon, having been received into partnership in 1889, and David B. 
Luckey in 1892. Judge :McKoon is President of the Mannahasset Park 
Association, of ^Monmouth County, New Jersey, is A'ice-President of 
the Frontier I>ank (d' Niagara, N. Y., of which he has been a director 
since its organization, and is Treasurer of the Kichmoud Homestead 
Association, of New York City. He married, in 1852, Mary, daugh- 
ter of Andrus (lilbert, a wealthy citizen of Oswego County. New 
York, where he served many terms as Supervisor, and for more than 




DKNKIS D.\NIEL McKOON. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 331 

forty years was a civil magistrate. Mrs. McKoou died, lejiviug oue 
cliild, the present D. Gilbert McKoou. Judge McKoon was himself 
boru in Ilion, Herkimer County, y. Y., October 17, 1827, the son of 
Martin McKoon and Margaret, daughter of Colonel Clapsaddle. the 
latter an officer in the War of 1S12, and a prominent and wealthy 
citizen of Herkimer County. Judge ^McKuon is lineally descended 
from Martin Luther, of Germany, and Koger Williams, of Rhode 
Island. His ancestor, James McKoou, son of Jonathan McKoon. of 
Scotland, settled in Herkimer County, Xew York, in the middle of the 
eighteenth century. While the family was of Norman origin, Kichard 
le Machun and Kobert le Machun were established among the Scotch 
nobility as early as 12(U A.D. and 1290 A.D., respectively. The late 
Judge McKoon, Vice-Chancellor of the State of New York, was Mr. 
McKoon's uncle. 

LOEl), DANIEL, founder of the well-known law lirni of Lord, Day 
& Lord, was born in Stonington, Conn., September 2, 1795, and died 
in New York City, IMarcli 4, 1808. He was graduated from Yale Col- 
lege in 181-4, attended the Law S<-h()(d at Litrliticld. Conn., and in 1817 
was admitted to the New York bar. During the last forty years of 
his life he was counsel on one side or the other in most of the noted 
civil suits in the New York State courts. He appeared in the cases 
growing out of the fire in New York in 1836, those growing out of the 
panic in 1837, the litigations between the ^letlKxlist and iMitch Re- 
formed churches, and the Mason and Phelits and the Leake will con- 
tests. He also won in the United States Supreme Court in the case of 
the prize ship Hiawatha. 

L'AMOREAUX, JESSE SEYMOUR, attended the coiiinion schools 
of Saratoga County, New York, and subse(|uently was graduated 
from the Fort Edward Collegiate Institute. lie studied law in Schuy- 
lerville, N. Y., and was admitted to the bar. May 8, 1861. He enjoys 
an extensive practice, having offices in Ballston Spa, N. Y., and in 
New York City. During the last ten years he has mainly devoted 
himself to corporation work. He is a director and Vice-President 
of the First National Bank of Ballston Spa, as well as its attorney. 
He served a term of six years as County Judge of Saratoga County, 
having been elected in 1882. He is a member of the Lotos Club of 
New York City and the Albany and Saratoga clubs. He has been 
a Royal Arch 3Iason for twenty-five years. He is a member of tlie 
First Presbyterian Chnrcli of Ballston Spa. He was bora in Wilton, 
Saratoga County, N. Y'., December 11, 1837, and is the son of Jesse 
L'Amoreaux and Charity Esmond. 

CA:\rPBELL, THO:^IAS C, lawyer, was born in Rochester, N. Y"., 
April 27, 1845, and, at the age of sixteen, enlisted in the Union Army, 



332 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



bciiiti' nuistercd out in October, 1S65. In 1807 he wai^ elected Qnarter- 
nuister-General on the staff of Comniander-iu-Chief John A. Logan of 
the Grand Arniv of tlie Republic, and was appointed editor of the 
JxijiiihUr, organ of this society. This position he held until March, 1870, 
when he was graduated from the Cincinnati Law School and began 
the practice of law in Cincinnati, Oliio. In 1868 he had been elected a 
lueniber of the City Council of Cincinnati, while in ISG'J he had been 
appointed Assistant Kevenue Collector. Elected Prosecuting Attorney 
of Cincinnati in 1871, he held the office for two tenns. For ten years 
he was couns<'l of the Cincinnati Ga.:rtlc. He prosecuted election 
frauds for the Republican Committee in 1876. In behalf of Judge Cox- 
he successfully contested before the Ohio Senate and Supreme Court 
the elt^cti(ui of Judson TTai-inon, late Attorney-General of the United 

States. He was counsel for Hon. 
Stanley Matthews, subsequently 
a Justice of the Supreme Court of 
the United States, in his contest 
with tieneral Banning, and was 
counsel for Governor Camjibell in 
las Congressional contest. He suc- 
cessfully defended Chief of Police 
Shellbaker and Ccnnptroller Hoff- 
man, both of Cincinnati. In 188-1 
he founded the Cincinnati Eveniixj 
Trh'iinini, and for three years con- 
ducted it. Since 1888 he has been 
engaged in practice in New York 
City. For four years he was Pres- 
ident of the Hamilton Republican 
Club of this city. He is a mem- 
ber of the Ohio Society, and is a 
Scottish Rite Mason. He is a 
member of the Reorganization 
Committee of the Columbus Central Railway Comjiauy. He has tAvice 
been nominated for Congress, both times declining to accept. 




A.Ml'liKI.L. 



SHELDON, EDWARD WinCHT, was graduatcl fiom Princeton 
College in 1S79, subseciueutly receiving the degree of Master of Arts; 
studied law A\ith William A. W. Stewart, of New York City, and 
in 1881 was graduated from the Columbia College Law School. He 
lias since iiracticiMl in New York. He has been counsel for the 
National Park J'.ank and the T'nited States Trust Company in impor- 
tant litigations, and has rondurted a large number of foreclosure 
and mortgage ]i]'ocecdings against railroad corjiorations. He was 
born in Plainficld, N. J., December 17, IS.'iS. and is the son of Rev. 
George Sheldon, I),D., and ]\Lirtha LA^nian. lie lineallv descends from 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF XEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



333 



Isaac Slii'ldnii, who sailed from IMyinoutli, Euglaiid, aud was at Dor- 
chester, Mass., in 1634; at ^yindsor, ('oiin., in 1040, aud eventually 
settled at Northampton, Mass. 



CKUMWELL, CtEOKCII':. lawyer, and first Tresident of the Boroujih 
of Richmond under the present charter of the < 'ity of New York, was 
graduated in 187S from the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, in 1883 
was graduated from Yale University, and subse(|iiently was giaduated 
from the Columbia College Law School. He entered the laAV ottice of 
Elihu IJoot, afterward forming his present connection with the lirm 
of Butler, Stillman & Hubbard. In 1887 he was elected to the New 
York Assembly as a Republican from Kichmond County, receiving 
a majority of 1,229, the largest ever received by a Kcpublican in tlie 
county. In 1888 he was the unsuc- 
cessful Ilepiiblican candidate for 
Congress from the First New Y^ork 
District. During 1888 aud 1889 he 
was a member of the Republican 
State Committee. In 1897, Gover- 
nor Black appointed him a member 
of the Board of Park Commission- 
ers for IMchmond County, Avhile by 
Ills colleagues he was elected Presi- 
dent of tiie Board. Elected Presi 
dent of the Borough of Richmond 
in 1897, he was seated in ofjtice after 
a contest in the courts. He is a 
director of the Walker Chemical 
Company, and a member of the 
Union League, Century, and Uni- 
versity clubs, and the Downtown 

Association, of Manhattan Bor- 
ough; the Hamilton Club, of 

Brooklyn, aud various clubs and societies of Staten Island and else- 
where. He breeds hackney horses on his estate. Far View Farm, on 
Staten Island. Born in Brooklyn, N. Y.. July 3, I860, he is the son 
of the late Henry B. Cromwell, New York merchant, and founder of 
the Cromwell Steamship Lines. He descends from Thomas Cromwell. 
Earl of Essex, head of the family of which the famous Lord Protector 
of England was a member. 




J 



GEOKCK CROMWKI,!.. 



CULLEN, EDGAR MONTGO^MERY, Justice of the Supreme Court, 
attended the Kinderhook, N. Y., Academy, in 1860 was graduated 
from Columbia College, and entered the Troy Polytechnic Institute. 
Wlien the Civil War occurred he became Second Lieutenant in the 
First United States Infantry. He participated in the battles of Cor- 



334 HISTORY OF THE GREATER XEW YORK. 

iiitli and Fariuiiigton. Coiiimissioiied by Govemor [Morgan in 1SG2, 
when nineteen years of age, Colonel of the Xinety-sixtli New York 
Volunteers, be served in this capacity in the ^'irgiuia operations 
leading to the downfall of Lee. Upon his return he followed the 
profession of civil engineer, and in 1S75 became Engineer-in-chief on 
the staff of Governor Tilden, with the rank of Brigadier-General. 
He had also begun the stiuly of law with his uncle, Judge Alexander 
Mc<Jue, soon after his return from the arm}', and, in May, 1SG7, was 
admitted to the bar. He became a member of the Brooklyn law firm 
of McCue, Hall ,S: Cullen, which, in 1870, was reorganized as Hall & 
CuUeu. He served several years as Assistant District Attorney, hav- 
ing been appointed in 1872. In 1880 he was elected on the Demo- 
cratic ticket a Justice of the Supreme Court for the Second Judicial 
District of the State of Xew York. He distinguished himself by his 
judicial integrity and impartiality in the famous Dutchess County 
election case, which led to the defeat of Isaac H. Maynard for the 
Court of Appeals in the State election of 1892. The Democratic 
politicians proposed to discipline Judge Cullen by refusing him a re- 
nomination for the Supreme Court bench in 1891. The Brooklyn 
Bar Association took action, however, public sentiment became 
strong on the subject, and Judge Cxilleu was finallj- nominated by 
the Eepublican Convention and by both wings of the Democracy. He 
was elected by a phenomenal majority. He was born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., December 1, 1813, and is the son of the late Dr. Henry James 
Cullen and Eliza McCue. His father was one of the most prominent 
physicians of Brooklyn. 

FIELD, DAVID DUDLEY, a brother of Cyrus W. Field and of 
Hon. Stephen J. Field, of the United States Supreme Court bench, 
was tutored by his father; in 1825 was graduated from ^Mlliams 
College; read law with Harmanus Bleecker, of Albany, and was 
licensed as an attorney at New Y'ork City in 1828, and admitted as 
a counselor in 1830. He was counsel for James Fisk in the Erie liti- 
gation, and for A\'illiam M. Tweed at the time of the ovei'throw of 
the Tweed ring. He was counsel for Samuel J. Tilden in the Tilden- 
Ha,yes Presidential contest. He was elected to Congress in 1877 to 
till the unexpired term of Smith Ely. But his fame rests upon his 
work in codifying the laws. He advocated codification as early as 
1839, and in 1811 submitted to the Legislature several bills on the 
subject, which failed of passage. The Constitutional Convention of 
1816 recommended codification, and in 1817 Mr. Field was appointed 
one of the commissioners to draft codes. Tlie New York code of civil 
procedure was tlius drafted and was enacted into law by the Legis- 
lature in 1817. Held also drafted the code of criminal procedure 
adopted by the Legislature in 1881, and the penal code adopted in 
1882. His gTeatest effort, the civil code, has so far failed of adoption, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 335 

priinipally on account of the hostile attitude of the Association of 
the Bar of the City of XeAV Yorlv. His civil code has been enacted 
in the two Dakotas and California, however, while his code of crimi- 
nal procedure is the basis of that adopted in nearly thirty States and 
several Territories. Before the British Association for the Promotion 
of Social Science he advocated in 1SG6 the adoption of international 
codes looking to the abolition of war and the substitution of judicial 
arbitration. He was the first President of the Association for the 
Reform and Codification of the Laws of Nations. His " Outlines of 
an International Code " has been translated into French, Italian, and 
Chinese. He was born in Haddam, Conn., February 13, ISOo, and 
died in Xew York City, April 13, 1894. He was the eldest of the dis- 
tinguished sons of IJev. David Dudley Field and Submit Dickinson. 

TKACY, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, attended the commcm schools 
and the Owego ( N. Y.) Academy, studied huv with Davis & Warner, 
of Owego, and in May, 1851, was admitted to the bar. He practiced 
law for ten years in Owego. In November, 1853, he was elected Dis- 
trict Attorney of Tioga County, New Yorlc, on the ^Vhig ticket, and 
A\as re-elected for a second term of three years. 
In the organization of the Republican party he 
became one of its local leaders. Elected to the 
New York Assembly in 1801, he was active in 
securing the election of Henry J. Raynn;)nd as 
its Speaker, and was Chairman of several im- 
portant committees. He also assisted in effect- 
ing an alliance between the War Democrats 
and the Republicans. In 1862 he raised a regi- 
ment in his district, and was apiniinted its 
Colonel. Having been assigned to tlio defense 
of Washington, and to duty in Northern Mr- 
ginia, his regiment became a part of the Ninth HKN.rAMix f. tracy. 

Corps, and was engaged in the Wilderness 

campaign of 1804. A portion of the Union line having given way on 
the extreme right in the battle of the Wilderness, Colonel Tracy seized 
the colors and carried his men forward with a charge, the capture of 
the works following. For this he was awarded a medal. He was sub- 
sequently prostrated by sickness and sent home. He resigned, but 
when he had recovered, re-entered the service, and was assigned to 
the command at Eluiira, N. Y.. where there was a camp and drafr 
rendezvous, as well as a large number of Confederate prisoners. At 
tlie close of the war he resigned, having been commissioned Brigadier- 
( Jeneral. He became a member of the New York law tirm of Benedict, 
Burr & Benedict in July, 1S(;5. lie soon made Brooklyn his residence. 
In 1800 he was appointed United States Attorney for tin- Eastern 
District of New York, and did much to stamp out illicit distilling. 




3'Mi HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

caiTifd on tlirou,i;li official conuivance. lie was one of the counsel of 
lleui y Ward Ueechei- in tlie defense of the famous suit brought against 
the preacher by Theodore Tilton. He argued a number of important 
cases in the Court of Appeals, the Federal courts, and the fc<upreme 
Court of the United States. By appointment of Governor Cornell he 
was a Judge of the Court of Appeals from December 8, 1881, until suc- 
ceded through the election of Chief Judge linger, January 1, 1883. A 
delegate to the Kepnblican National Convention of ISSO, he was one of 
the " Ir^talwarts " who voted for General Grant to the end. He was 
IJepublican candidate for Mayor of Brooklyn in 1881, but resigned 
in favor of Beth Low, who was elected. In 1882 he was caudidat(^ for 
Justice of the Supreme Court, received 23,000 more votes than the rest 
of the ticket, but was defeated, Cleveland carrying the State that year 
by i;t2.000 majority. He was Secretary of the Navy in the Cabinet of 
President Benjamin Harrison, and was enthusiastic in the work of 
building up the new navy. At the end of tlie administration he re- 
sumed the practice of law in New York ('ity, and is head of the tirm of 
Tracy, Boardiuan & I'latt. lie and ex-President Harrison were counsel 
for "\'enezuela in the boundary dispute between that country and Eng- 
land. By Governor Morton he was appointed one of the nine commis- 
sioners to draft the char-ter of the present City of New York. In the first 
municipal election of the consolidated city under this cliarter, in the 
fall of 18!l7, General Tracy was the IJepublican candidate for Mayor, 
the other candidates being Seth Low, Robert Van Wyck, and Henry 
George. Born in Owego, Tioga County, N. Y., April 20, 1830, General 
Tracy is the son of Benjamin Tracy. His ancestors, originally- from 
Ireland, were long established in Vermont. 

O'CONOE, CHABLES, for many years conceded to be the most 
eminent legal practitioner in New York City and the nation, was 
born in New York City, Januain- 22, 1801:, and died in Nantucket, 
Mass., May 12, 188L His father, of an old family of Connaught, 
Ireland, came to New York City in 1801. When thirteen years of 
age, Charles O'Conor entered a lawyer's office. He was admitted 
to the bar as an attorney in 1824, and as a counselor in 1827. He 
was counsel in the Lispenard will contest, the Slave Jack and the 
Lemon slave cases, appearing for the slaveholders; the Forrest divorce 
case, the Parish and Jumel will cases, the Tweed prosecution, and 
the Tilden-Hayes Presidential contest. He was counsel for Jefferson 
Davis when the latter was indicted for treason. Under President 
Pierce he was for a time United States District Attorney for the 
Southern District of New York. He was the Presidential candidate 
of that faction of the Democratic party which rejected the nomination 
of Horace Greeley, but failed to carry a State. He left books and a 
considerable sum of money to the New York Law Institute Library. 
He recovered |G1,000 for Mrs. Forrest after nineteen years' litigation. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



337 



The impresaon had gone abroad, ^vliicli ]\Ir. o'Coiior bad unfortu- 
nately left uucoutradicted, that be bad uiidertakeu Mrs. Forrest's 
case in pure pbilantbropv. His cbivah y liad, in fact, called out a gift 
of silver plate from tbe ladies of !N"ew York, which he had accepted. 
Hence charges were made when be acceided as his fee a large pro- 
portion of tbe sum recovered for Mrs. Forrf^st. 'Sir. O'Conor at once 
demanded an investigation at the liands of the Association of tbe 
Bar of tbe Cit^- of New York, and by a committee appointed from 
that body be was exonerated from tbe charge of unprofessional 
conduct. 



EVARTS, WILLIAM MAXAYELL, succeeded Charles O'Conor as 
tlie acknowledged bead of tbe Xew York bar. He attended the Boston 
Latin School, in 1837 was graduated from Yale College, having 
founded, while at college, the Tnlr LUcnirn Macju-'uie, and studied law 
at the Harvard Law School and with 
Daniel Lord, of New York. He was 
admitted to tbe bar in 1841, and al- 
most at once attracted attention. 
From 1819 to 1852 he was Assistant 
District Attorney of New York City. 
In 1851 be prosecuted the Cuban lili- 
busters in tbe case of the Cleopatra. 
As counsel for the State of New York 
he argued tbe Lemmon Slave case in 
the Supreme Court in 1857, and in tlie 
Court of Appeals in LSfJO. In 1802 he 
maintained in the United States Su- 
preme Court the right of tbe Govern- 
ment to treat ca](tured vessels as 
prizes. In tbe same tribunal he dem- 
onstrated in 1865 and 1800 tbe uncon- 
stitutionality of State laws whicli, 

without Congressional sanction, sought to tax National bank stock and 
Government bonds. He was chief counsel fen- tbe President in the 
Johnson impeachment proceedings in the I'nite<l States Senate. Ap- 
pointed United States Atorney-General in tlie Cabiiu^ of Jolmson, July 
15, 1868, he served until the close of the adnnnistration. He was cliief 
counsel for the Ignited States in the successful ])rosecution of the Ala- 
bama claims before the Arbitiation Tribunal at Geneva, Switzerland, 
in 1872. He was chief counsel for Henry ^A'ard Beecher in the sensa- 
tional Tilton suit of 1875. Two years later he was chief counsel for 
the Republican National ( 'ommittee in the Tihlen-Hayes Presidential 
contest. He was counsel in the Parish and Ganlner will contests. 
Still the nominal bead of tbe notable law firm of Evarts, Choate & 
Beaman, for some vears be has been in retirement. He was Chairman 




WIII.IA.M MAXWKLl. KVAKTS. 



338 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

of the New York delcnatinii in the Ikeimblicaii Natioii.-il ( 'oiivention 
in 1N(JU, and in that body nonunated William II. Seward for the Presi- 
dency. In ISCl he and Horace Greeley were rival candidates for the 
United States Senate before the Xew York Legislatnre. Evai*ts 
withdrew in favor of Ira Harris, who was elected. Tlironi^hont the 
administration of Pre.sident Hayes, Mr. Evarts was Secretary of State. 
At the close of his term he was ai)pointed the deleiiate from the United 
States to the Hiternational Monetary Conference at Paris in 1S81. He 
was United States Senator from Xew Y'ork from .March 4, 1885, to 
March 3, 1891, and was the leader of the Kepnblican ]»aity in the Sen- 
ate. He has delivered many notable orations on inipmtant public 
occasions. He was born in Boston, Mass., Febrnaiw <1, 1818, and is 
the son of the late Jereniiali lOvarts. well known as a jdiilanthropist. 

CAKTER, JA]MES COOLIDGE, was graduated from Harvard Col- 
lego in IS.'iO, from the Harvard Law School in 1853. and the same year 
was admitted to the bar at New Y'ork, where he has since f-dlowed 
his profession. He stands at the head of his profession in this city. 
He is senior member of the tirm of Carter & Ledyard, has been Presi- 
dent of the Bar Association of the City of Xew Y'ork, and since its 
organization in 1892 has been President of the City Club, founded 
Avith a view to reform in municipal government. He is also a mem- 
ber (d' the Metropolitan, Union League, Century, University, and 
Alpha Delta Phi clubs. He was a factor in the overthrow of the 
Tweed ring, was one of the founders of the Bar Association, organ- 
ized at that time, and was counsel for the people in the suit to recover 
|;0,00(),000 from Tweed. In 1S75. Governor Tildeu appointed him 
a member of the commission to recommend a form of municii)al gOA 
ernment for the cities of the State of Xew York. He has been counsel 
for the City of New Y'ork in many of its most imi)ortant cases in the 
Court of Appeals. As an authority on international law his repu- 
tation is more than national. He repi'esented the United States Gov- 
ernment before the Tribunal of Arbitration at Pai'is in 1893 on the 
seal fishery question. He was counsel of the Federal Government in 
the notable income tax cases in the United States Supreme Court. 
In the same court he was counsel in the case of the Scotia, in cases 
to recover from A. T. Stewart & Co.; in the Madame Jumel will liti- 
gations, in the Bate Befrigerator litigation, in the test case to deter- 
mine the con.stitutionality of the law excluding Chinese laborers, in 
cases testing the Ignited States land grants to transcontinental rail- 
roads, in the Counsehnan case, the Louisiana lottery cases, and many 
others. He has published " The Proposed Codification of our Com- 
mon Law," " The Provinces of the Written and the Unwntten Law," 
and '■ The Ideal and the Actual in the Law." He Avas born in Lancas- 
ter, Mass., October 14, 1827, and is the son of Major Solonn)n Carter 
and Elizabeth Wliite. He lineally descends from Rev. Thomas Carter, 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 339 

who was educated at St. John's </ollei;c^, Cambrid,n-e, Eniilaud, came 
to America in 1635, and was minister of the church at Wohurn, Mass., 
for fortv-two years. 



CURTIS, GEOIJGE WILLIAM, was one of tlie most distinguished 
citizens of New York, and wielded a powerful national influence in 
inculcating high ideals in the administration (d' public affairs. (For 
portrait, see A'olume I., page 484, of this work.) While he was a 
popular lyceum lecturer and delivered orations on many notable pub- 
lic occasions, the (ddef medium of the propagation of his vicnvs was 
Hfuixrs Waklji, of which he was political editor from 18(i4 until his 
death, August 31, 1892. In early days he was a member of the famous 
Brook Farm Colony, and subse(]uenlly spent eighteen months at Con- 
cord as the companion of Emerson and Hawthorne; but while most of 
these iduloso]dMcal spirits were mere tlii-orists, Curtis ajiplied him- 
self to ])ractical affairs, and seeking only to im])ose what was feasible, 
had the satisfaction of seeing many of the principles for which he 
contended practically a]»]died in public administration. Civil-service 
reform alfords a notable instance. Our local Idstory in recent years 
has also emphasized the wisdom (d' his contention that patriotism 
should so triumph over jiartisanslii]) that party aftiliations are freely 
repudiated whenever macdiine pt)liticians dominate to the extent of 
imposing unflt candidates who can not be trusted not to turn gov- 
ernment into a public scandal. Born in Providence, February 24, 
1824, he removed with his ]jarents to Xew York at the age of flfteeu, 
and w-as a merchant's clerk prior to his connection with Brook Farm. 
Subsequent to that episode lie traveled for four years in Europe, 
Egy]»t, and Syria, and in 1850 published his " Nile Notes of a How- 
adji." The same year he joined the editorial staff of the New Yoi'k 
Trihiiiir, while a series of letters contributed to that journal were re- 
published under the title of " Lotus Eating." Fiitiiaiii's Moiiihli/ hav- 
ing been established in 1852, he soon became its editor, and when the 
enterprise failed "with unexampled generosity and nicety of honor, 
sacrificed his private fortune and mortgaged his future earnings to 
save the creditors of the periodical from loss." " Potiphar Papers " 
and " Prue and I " were republications from this magazine. His first 
novel, '• Trumps," a satii-ical exposure of fashionable life, appeared 
as a serial in Tlarixr's Wivl-h/ in 1858-9, while the "Lounger" series 
ai»])eared in the same in 1858. For six years ])rior to 1873 lie contrib- 
uted to I[arp(r\s Fxizar the series, " Manners on the Boad, by an 
Old Bachelor." In addition to his notable seiwice as political editor 
of the Wcel-li/, lie also long contributed the " Easy Chair," a dejiart- 
ment in Ilnrpri's Month! n M(i<i(i:iii( . Always an ojiponent of slav- 
ery, he supported Fremont in the campaign of 1856, and was a dele- 
gate to the Be])ublican National Conventions winch nominated 
Lincoln, in 18(10 and 1804. He refused tlie post of (V)nsul-Gen- 



340 



HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 



crnl to Eiiypt offered him by Lincoln in 1S62. Congressional cau- 
<lidate in the First District of this city in 1864, he was defeated 
with the rest of the local Keptiblican ticket. The same year he 
became a Eegent of the State University. He was a member of 
the Constitntioual Convention of 1867 and Chairman of its Committee 
ou Education. In 1868 he was a Presidential elector. Appointed by 
President Grant in 1871 one of the commission to draught regtilations 
for the Federal civil service, he was elected President of the commis- 
sion, as also of the Advisory Board which succeeded it. His early and 
constant love for tlie Rei)ublican ]>arty deeply emphasized the signifi- 
cance of his reptidiatiou of the nomination of James (J. Blaine for the 
Presidency in 1881, and his advocacy of the candidacy of Grover Cleve- 
land, who had just made his splendid record as Mayor of Btiffalo and 
Governor of Xew York. 



DANA, CHAELES AXDERSOX, editor and principal proprietor of 
the New York Sini from 1867 until his death in October, 1897. occu- 

])ied a. conspictious place in the history of 
American journalism. He was freqtient- 
ly styled the " dean '' and the " Nestor " 
among- journalists of the United States; 
but his great professional merit lay in the 
remarkable degree in which lie intro- 
ducetl literary workmanship of a high 
grade into journalism without sacrificing 
— but rather promoting — tlie character 
of his organ as a newspai)er. He was 
born in Hinsdale, N. H., August 8. 1819, 
spent two years at Harvard, althotigh 
failing eyesight did not ]iermit him to 
graduate, and subsequently joined the 
Brook Farm community. He was an 
active contributor to tlie periodical of the 
coinnninity, the Harbiufin; and later 
joined the stafl" of the Boston CJinninfi/pc. 
In 1817 he became connected with the 
New York Trihniir, and during 1848 served that and several other 
journals as European correspondent. He was managing editor of the 
Trihinir from 1849 to 1862, resigning in tlie latter year because of his 
disagreement with Horace Greeley's- war policy. He was then ap- 
]>ointed Assistant Secretary of War. and was subsequently the con- 
fidential representative of Lincoln and his Cabinet ou the field. His 
own accotmt of this service was completed shortly before his death, 
and has been published in serial form in one of the magazines. After 
the war and pi-ior to his connection with the New York l^itu, he was 
for a time on the staff of the Chicaii-o Trihunc. He had a remarkable 




1.11AKLKS AXDKRSdX DA.NA. 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 341 

command of auoient aud inodiTii languages, traveled much abroad, 
was au art connoisseur, an expert on porcelains, and an authority on 
horticulture. With (jieorge liipley he planned aud edited Appleton's 
" New American Cyclopa'dia "; in collaboration with General James 
II. Wilson wrote a " Life of General Grant," and compiled the 
" Household Book of I'oetry," and " Fifty Perfect I'oems." He mar- 
ried, in 1S4(), Eunice McDaniel, of Maryland, who survives him, and 
had one sou — Paul Dana — and three daughters — Mrs. William H. 
Draper, Mrs. John W. Brannan, and Mrs. Walter M. Underhill. He 
was the son of Anderson Dana and Ann Denisou. grandson of Daniel 
Dana and Dollie Kibbee, great-grandson of Anderson Dana, who per- 
ished in the Wyoming massacre, in which he was volunteer Aid to 
Colonel Zebulon Butler, and was descended from liichard Dana, who 
settled in Cambridge. Mass., in 1040. 

DANA, PAUL, succeeded his father, the late distinguished Charles 
Anderson Dana, as Editor of the New Yoi-k »S'»//, and President of the 
Sun I'rintiug and Publishing .Vssociation. He liad previously been 
for many years a Park Connnissioner of New Ycn-k City, and was 
President of the Board of Park Commissioners. He was also long 
an editorial writer on the aS'hh. He was born in this city in 1852. aud 
was educated at Harvard. He married Mary Duncan. He is a mem- 
ber of the 8ons of the American IJevolutioii, and of the Kacipiet, Uni- 
versity, Harvard, TJockaway Hunting, and Westminster Kennel clubs. 

GILDEE, BICHAED WATSON, poet, and editor of the Ccii/nni 
Ma</a.ziiic, has been actively connected with many ]>ul)lic interests. 
He was Secretary of the Art and Exhibition Committee of the New 
York Centennial celebration in 1SS!»; Secretary of the Washington 
Memorial Arch Committee; a mend>er of the New York General Com- 
mittee on the World's Fair; the tirst President of the Kindergarten 
Association of this city, and is a member of the General Committee 
of the Peo]de's ^Municipal League of New York. He has long main- 
tained a dei)artment in the ('ciifttri/ in which public questions are 
discussed, his position being similar to that sustained editorially in 
Tfarper's Wcclli/ and the New York EnniiKj I'osL A member of many 
clubs, he has been President of the l<\'llowcraft Club, and assisted 
in founding the Society of American Artists, the American Copyright 
League, the Free Art League, and the Authors" Club. He has pub- 
lished three volumes of poems, which apjieared in a new edition in 
1887 under the titles, " The New Day,"' " The Celestial Passion," and 
" Lyrics."" Born at Bordentown, N. J., February 8, 1844, he is the 
son of Rev. W. H. Gilder, a ilethodist clergyman, who also edited 
the Philadelphia Repositorf/ aud the Litcrarii Nef/isfcr, and grandson 
of John Gilder, a well-known Philadelpliinn who served in the Penn- 
sylvania Legislature and as Chairman of the Building Committee of 



342 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Girai'd College. From the age of twelve Mr. Gilder dabbled in news- 
paper work. In 18(33 he participated in the eniergencv campaign to 
repel the Confederate invaders of Pennsylvania. Having entered 
the study of laAv in Philadelphia, his father's death, iu 1864, led 
him to accept the position of Paymaster on the Camden and Amboy 
Eailroad. Later he engaged Avith the Newark Adrertincr, and rose 
from Keporter to ilanaging Editor. He subsequently attempted to 
launch the Newark Moniiiif/ I'lfiist) r, a daily, which eventually came 
to grief. But he had meanwhile taken on as a side issue the editor- 
shi]) of Hours at Ihiiiir, a little monthly published by the Scribuers, and 
with such success that when tliis magazine was displaced by the 
original ^Scribiirr'.s Monthli/, with the late Dr. J. G. Holland as Editor- 
in-chief, Mr. Gilder was associated with him as Managing Editor. 
Upon the death of Dr. Holland, in 1881, eleven years later, he became 
his successor, and has continued under the change of ownership and 
change of name to the Ventunj. 

WAEKER, CHAKLES DUDLEY, the well-known author, since 
1884: has been one of the editors of Harper's Magazine. He was born 
in Plainfield, Mass., 8eptember 12, 1829, and was graduated from 
Hamilton College in 1851. In 1853 he was a member of a surveying 
party on the Missouri frontier. He was graduated from the law 
dei)artmeut of the University of Pennsylvania, in 1850, and for four 
years thereafter practiced law iu Chicago. He became assistant edi- 
tor of the Hartford (Conn.) Press in 1800, was editor from 1801 to 
18(17. when it was consolidated with the Coiirant, when he became co- 
editor. He has traveled extensively. He has written and lectured 
on prison reform, university extension, and other social topics, 
while his more purely literary works include " My Summer in a Gar- 
den " (1870). " Backlog Studies " (1872), " My Winter on the Nile " 
(1870), " Being a Boy " (1877), " Captain John"Smith " (1881). " Wash- 
ington Irving" (1881). "Their Pilgrimage" (1880), "Studies in the 
South and West " (1889), " A Little Journey in the W'orld " (1890), 
and " Our Italy " (1891). " The Gilded Age " (1873) was written in 
collaboration with Samuel L. Clemens. He has received honorary 
degrees from Harvard and Dartmouth. 

WHITE, RICHABD GRANT, is best known for his annotated edi- 
tion of Shakespeare's plays, which m.aj be pronounced a classic of 
its kind. He also published volumes on foreign travel, on the Eng- 
lish langiuige, and presenting an anthology of the poetiw of the Civil 
War. Born in New York City May 22, 1821, and graduated from the 
University of the City of New York, he was intended for the church, 
but eventually studied medicine, then studied law, and having been 
admitted to the bar in 1845, finally turned to literature. In 1845 he 
became art critic on the staff of the New York Courier. He was one 



F.NCYCLOPF.DIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



343 



of the fouuders of the New York World in ISdd. Chief of the United 
States Keveuue Maiine Bureau for tiie District of New York from 1S5S 
to 1878, lie ali^o ]Mirsue(l liis literary avocations during this jteriod, 
especially devoting himself to his edition of tlie ji'reat poet. Under 
the pen-name of " A Yankee,' he also contributed weekly letters toi 
the London ^prctcifor durin*;' the Civil War. Stanford \Yhite, w<dl- 
known architect of this city, is his son. He was himself the son of 
Kichard Mansfield White, sliii)i)ini; merchant, id" New Y'ork City; was 
the liiandson of Rev. Calvin Wldte, Ikcctoi- of Sr. -Tames' Parish ( Epis- 
copal), of Derby, Conn., and descended from .Tohn White, who came 
over in the shiji Lion in 1632, settled at Canibiidiic, Mass., and in 1630 
became one of the founders of TTartford, Conn., uiidi^r l{ev. Thomas 
Hooker. 



WHITE, STANFOriD, one of the most prominent architects of 
NeAV Y'orlc City, is also an oflicer of a number of corporations. He 
is President of the United Indusfrial Company, N'ice-President of the 
Madison Square Garden Comi)any, 
Vice-President of the IJoanoke Kapi<ls 
Power Company, Treasurer of the Self- 
threadinji' Sewini;- Machine Company, 
and a director of the (Jarden City 
Company. Since 1881 he has been a 
member of the notable architectural 
firm of 3IcKim, ilead & White, of this 
city. He was the architect of ^ladison 
Square Garden, Washinjiton Memorial 
Arch, and the buildiniis of the Metro- 
politan and Century clubs, the Uni- 
Tersitj^ of New Y'ork, and the Univer- 
sity of Virjiinia, together with the 
Villard house on ]\Iadison Avenue, 
now owned by Whitelaw lieid. He is 
also an artistic interior decorator, 
the Metropolitan and Players' clubs. 




fTANFUKll WIIITK. 



the Yillard house, the Church of 

the Ascension and the altars of the Church of the Paulist Fathers 
affordiuii- examples of his work. He desii^iied the anddtectural fea- 
tures for such sculptures by Augustus St. Gaudens as the Adams 
tomb in Washin.inton and the pedestals of the I'arraiiut statue in 
New Y'ork, the Chapin statue at Sprinjitield, Mass., and the Lin- 
coln and Logan statues at Chicago. The son of the late Richard 
Grant White, the distinguished Shakespearian editor, critic, and au- 
thor, :\rr. White was born in this city November 9, 1853, was in- 
structed in private schools and under tutors, was graduated from 
the Universitv of New York, studied architecture under Charles D. 



344 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

Gambrill and H. II. Ivleliardson, being chief assistant in tlie constrnc- 
tion of Trinity Cluu'ch, Boston, Kichardson's greatest worlc, and stud- 
ied and traveled in Europe from 1S7S to ISSO. He is a member of the 
Union, Metropolitan, Century, City, University, Eiding, Grolier, 
Racquet, Players', Lambs, Kismet, Meadowbrook, Adirondack League, 
and New York Yacht clubs, and the Institute of Architects. Ho 
married in 1884 Bessie Smitli, a descendant of Colonel Eichard 
Smith, original patentee of vSmithtown, L. I., and of General Xathaniel 
Woodhull, of the Eevolution, and has a sou — Lawrence Grant AVhite. 

SCEIBXEE, CHAELES, present head of the notable publishing 
house of Charles Scribner's Sons, was born in this city, and in 1875 
was graduated from Princeton College. He is a trustee of the Bowery 
Savings Bank and the State Trust Company, and is a director of the 
National Park Bank. He is a member of the Union, Union League, 
Centurj', University, Princeton, Aldine, and Morristown clubs. He 
married Louise Flagg. 

APPLETON, ^VILLIAM IIENEY, the venerable head of D. Apple- 
ton & Company, although long since retired from active pai-ticipation 
in its management, is a director of the Central Trust Company, and 
a trustee of the New York Life Insurance Company and the New 
York Security and Trust Company. He founded the Apploton Church 
Home at Macon, Ga., for the orphans of the South. The eldest son of 
Daniel Appletou, founder of the publishing house, he was actively as- 
sociated with his father from the inception of the enteiiirise. The ex- 
periment of importing English books in connection with his drygoods 
business was first made by his father in 1825, and in 1830 he was 
placed in charge of the modest book department. In 1835, when the 
book trade was followed exclusively, he visited London and made 
advantageous arrangements with the publishing houses of Long- 
mans and John !Murra3^ He also studied the book trade for three 
months in Germany. In 1836 he visited London again and established 
a permanent agency, publishing several religious books while there. 
In 1838 he became his father's partner. From his father's retirement 
in 1818 to his own retirement in 1891 he remained the active head 
of the great establishment. Some of the more important enterprises 
of the house during this period were the establishment of its printing 
office and bindery on Franklin Street in 1853, and its removal to 
Brooklyn in 1853; the publication of the "American CyclopiTedia" from 
1857 to 1863, and of tlie revised edition from 1873 to 1876; the " An- 
nual Cyclopanlia," with its yearly volume, since 1861, and the estab- 
lishment of Popular Science Monthly. 

APPLETON, DANIEL, Colonel of the Seventh Eegiment, N. G. 
N. Y., is a prominent member of the well-known publishing firm of 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 345 

D. Appletoii & Coiupauy, aud is a director of the Americau Boole Com- 
pany and A. J. Jolinson Company. He is a member of the Union, 
Century, liidiuii-, Aldine, New Yorli Yacht, and other clubs. Born 
in this city, February 24, 1S52, he is the son of the late John A. Apple- 
ton, who was long a member of the famous publishing house, being 
the second son of its founder, the original Daniel Appleton. He 
attended the public schools and completed his education in Germany, 
returning at the age of nineteen to enter the employ- of the firm. 
Since 1S71 he has been a member of the firm, and has long been man- 
ager of its tinances. Three of his great-graudfathers were Kevolution- 
ary soldiers, and his two grandfathers commissioned officers in the 
^A'ar of 1812. In his school days he was a member of the Boston Cadet 
Corps, and went into camp with it for live seasons. The Urauge Kiot 
of 1871 led him to join the militia. Entering the Seventh Regiment, 
he rose from the ranks through the grades of Corporal, Sergeant, and 
First Sergeant, becoming Second Lieutenant May 23, 1870, Captain 
January 13, 1879, when he recruited Company F from thirty- five to 
one hundred and three men, aud Colonel of the regiment to succeed 
(ieneral Emmons Clark, July 19, 1889. He helped to garrison the old 
armory over Tompkins Market duiiug the railroad riots of 1877, and 
led his regiment during the more recent street-car strike riot in 
Brooklyn. He is unmarried. 

AVn^LIAMS, LEWIS ALFBED, is President and Treasurer of the 
New York History Companj', is President and Treasurer of the 
L. A. Williams Publishing and Engraving Company, is President 
of the Century History Company, and is Manager of the American 
Bailway I'ublishing Company. He is a member of the Ohio So- 
ciety of the City of New Y'ork. He was born in Bellevue, Ohio, 
January 22, 1849, and is the son of David Williams and Rebecca, 
daugliter of Daniel Elliott. His paternal grandfather was David 
AN'illiams, while his great-grandfather, also David Williams, was a 
R(Wolutionary soldier. The latter immigrated to America from 
^Vales. Mr. AVilliams attended the public schools, and at the age of 
seventeen taugiit school in Iowa. He returned to Ohio to take charge 
of the books of a large milling and grain elevator company. He was 
subsequently cashier and bookkeeper in a banking and milling com- 
pany. In 1878 he engaged in the publication of county aud city his- 
t(iries, bringing out histories of Cleveland, Ohio; Seattle, Wash.; Ash- 
tabula County, Ohio; Cincinnati, Ohio; Ashland County, Ohio; Colum- 
bus. Oliio; ciiillicothe, Ohio; Louisville, Ky., and Geauga and Lake 
counties, Ohio. In 1887 he established at Cleveland, in connection 
with his brother, the Manazinc of M'c^iicni Historij, an historical month- 
ly. He removed to New Y^ork City and there continued its publi- 
cation, in 1891 changing the title to the Nalional Maffazhic. After the 
doatli of :\rrs. iMartha J. Lamb, the Mafjn-hir of American Historif was 



346 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

acMiuired and coiisdlidated with I lie \(iH<imil M<iii<i:iiH: A little later 
the ]»i'()])ertv was sold to Saimici N'ietoi- (Atiistaiit. Mr. Williams 
believed that wortliy works on local history could be iirotitalily 
published, witli ihe elimiuatiou of the " coinnun'cial " feature which 
had hitherto been characteiistic of such works. The feasibility 
of these ideas was vindicated when he successfully projected and 
l)ublished General James Grant Wilson's " Memorial History of 
the City of New V(U'k,"' John IJussell Young's " ^lemorial His- 
tory of Philadelphia, ■' a "History of the Hcnch and I'ar of New 
York." edited by Judges Bischoff and McAdam; "Leslie's History 
of the Greater New York," Seilliamer's " flistory of the Republican 
Party," and other similar works. He married, in 1870, Jessie, daugh- 
ter of H. M. t^inclair, of Bellevue, Ohio, b^' whom he had a daughter — 
Grace. Mrs. Williams died in 1872. He married, in 1870. Elizabeth, 
daughter of fc^tephen Boalt, of Xorwalk, Ohio, In' wlnun he has two 
sons — Lewis Alfred, Jr., and Gurth. 

ARKELL, WILLTA]\I J., well-known publisher, Avas born in 
( "anaj(diarie, Jlontgomery Goinity, X. Y., in lS.")(i, and is the son of 
ex-Senator James ArJcell, A\id('l.\' known as the inventor and success- 
ful manufacturer of paper tlour sacks. After receiving an academic 
education, ^Mr. Arkell entered the service of his father in the exten- 
sive mills at Canajoharie. At the age of nineteen lie nearly lost his 
life through an explosion, followed by a disastrous fire, in his father's 
mill. Afer his recovery, in connection with the late Joseph W. 
Drexel, he purchased the Albany Krviiiiii/ Jdiuiml, one of the most 
inflneiilial Republican newspapers in the State at the tinu', and con- 
ducted it with ability ami succ-ss. In 1888 he b<M-anH' the pro))rietor 
of Jiidfir, the well-known Reiiublican cartoon publication, which was 
then struggling to secure recognition. By attaching to his staff the 
noted cartoonists, Bernard Gillam and Eugene Zimmerman, of Puck, 
and retaining the services of (Jrant Hamilton, the leading artist then 
and now of Judge, he brought about him a staff which commanded 
recognition for .JikJijc as tlic leading colored cartoon paper in the 
Avorld. In 188!) lie ])urchased LvkI'k'h Wccl-Ii/ from Mrs. Frank Leslie 
for .^300,000, and gave this pa]K'r a higher reputation tlian it had 
enjoyed before. More recentlA' Ins company became the oAvner of the 
old and well-established fannly ])nblication, D(iiii>n:sf>i Mouthlji Min/n- 
.c///('. Mr. Arkell has retained his residence in Canajoharie, thougli 
living for the greater part of evei"y week in New York. On the death 
of Joseph W. Dri'xel. he was selected as executor of Mr. DrexeFs large 
estate, which he administered with fidelity and success. He has been 
connected, as a director, with tli(^ Canajoharie Bank and with several 
banks in New York, with the American Bank Note Company, and 



ENCYCLOPEOrA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



347 



various other corporations. He is a ineiiiber of the riiiou Leaj^ue 
Lotos, the New York Athletic, aucl Press clubs. 



BENNETT, .TAME8 (ioiJDoX, JK., succeeded his father as pro- 
prietor and nianayei" of tlie New York Hera hi in 1S72, having- been 
carefully educated and trained in journalism. In 1883 he joined witli 
John W. Mackay iu the or;j,'anizatiou of tlie Onuuiercial Cable Com- 
pany, and the laying" of new cables across the Atlantic to England and 
France. This service has greatly deci-eased the cost of ocean telegTa- 
phy. An enthusiastic yachtsman, in 18tjtj he raced from Sandy Llook 
to the Needles, Isle of Wight, his schooner-ya(dit, Henrietta, winning in 
13 days, 21 hours, 5.5 minutes. In a similar 
race, from (^ueenstown to New York, in 
1870, the English yacht, Cambria, defeated 
his yacht. Dauntless, by the short lead of 
two hours. He is a member of the Union, 
Metroi)olitan, and many other clubs, but 
for years has had his principal residence 
in Paris, where he superintends tlie col- 
lection of foreign news, a feature of his 
paper. He has established Londiui and 
Paris editions of the Hcrahl, and attracted 
attention by the publication in the English 
edition of warnings of stonns telegraphed 
from the United States. Two of his nota- 
ble journalistic feats were the sending of 
Henry M. Stanley to search for Dr. Living- 
stone in Africa, at the expense of the 

Herald, and the fitting up and dispatch of the Jeannette Polar Explor- 
ing Expedition. Mr. Bennett was boin in tliis city. M:i\ 10, 1841. 

BENNETT, JAMES GORDON, founder of the New York IhnihJ 
in 1835, and its Managing Editor as well as proprietor until his 
death, June 2, 1872, was born at New-mills, Banffshire, Scotland, 
about 1800. He was educated for the Koman Catholic priesthood at 
Aberdeen, but a perusal of Franklin's " Autobiography" turned his 
thoughts toward America. Peaching Halifax in 1811), he gave lessons 
in French, Si)anish, and bookkeeping for a time, and then removed 
to Boston, where he worked in a juinting office. In 1822 he reached 
New i^ork, and for some years worked as reporter and assistant editor 
on New York newspapers, interspersed with various futile attempts to 
launch a journal of his own. A series of letters as Washington corre- 
spondent of the Courier and Enquirer attracted attention, and in 1830 
he became associate editor of this paper. In 1833 he became City Edi- 
tor of the Peuusj/lvaniaii at Philadeli)hia. He presently returned to 
New York, however, and on May 11, 1835, sent forth the first number 




.TAMES GORIlOX BEXNF.TT, JR. 



348 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

of the Xew York HcrahU a one-cent daily, from its ori^iinal ottioe in a 
cellar. Refiisinii a political complexion for his sheet, and denyinji' 
that he had any hobby to promulgate, he filled the paper with news 
and gossii) dished up in a si^rightly style. The paper at once became 
a success, while his enterprise in getting news ahead of his competi- 
tors enabled the Herald to lead all rivals for many years in point 
of circulation. He married Henrietta Agnes Crean, in her early days 
an accomi^lished music teacher, and had two sons and a daughter. 
One son is his namesake and successor; the other died in early youth. 
The daughter married Isaac Bell, Jr., and is now a widoAV living 
abroad with her three children — one son and two daughters. Mrs. 
Bennett died in Italy, in March, 1873, not quite a year after her hus- 
band's decease. 

CARLETON, GEORGE W., long a prominent publisher of this city, 
although since ISSG he has been in retirement from the active manage- 
ment of the house founded by him, is now an active executive officer 
of a number of important corporations. lie is President of the ^V'ilcox 
and Gibbs Sewing Machine Company, and a director of the Equitable 
Life Assurance Society, and the Fifth Avenue Safe Deposit Company. 
He is a member of the T'nion League and Lotos clubs, and the Sons 
of the Revolution. He was born in New York City, January 16, 1S32, 
and educated at Dr. Hawk's classical seminary at Flushing, L. I. He 
married Elizabeth H., daughter of Moses G. Baldwin and Elizabeth 
Bolles, of Newark, N. J., and has two daughters. He is himself the 
son of Cyrus Carleton, of Alma, Me., and Maria Leonard Arms, of 
Dceitield, Mass., and is descended from Edward Carleton, of London, 
who came over in 1639 and settled at Rowley, Mass., which he repre- 
sented in the General Court. This Edward was lineally descended 
from one of the Norman invaders of England, Carleton-Baldwin de 
Carleton, of Cai"leton Hall, near Penrith, Cumberland, England. Mr. 
Carleton's paternal great-grandfather, Moses Carleton, during the 
Revolution was a private in the Lexington Alarm Comj^any of minute 
men, of which his maternal great-grandfather, Noadiah Leonard, was 
Captain. 

PUTNAM, GEORGE PALMER, in 1810 established in this city the 
publishing firm of Wiley & Putnam, in 1848 continued the business 
under his own name. Avhile from I860, when his sons became asso- 
ciated with him, until his death in 1872, he was head of the firm of 
G. P. Putnam & Sons. In 1852 he established Pidiiaiu's Macjazlne, 
which was eventually discontinued through lack of support at that 
time for a purely literary periodical. He was appointed by President 
Lincoln, in 1862, Collector of Internal Revenue. In 1837 he had been 
the organizer of the first copyright association, and subsequently he 
was one of the earliest advocates of international copyright. He was 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 349 

one of the foimders of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The devel- 
opment of wood-engravin;;' was largely due to his encouragement. He 
published several volumes of which he was the author. In 1840 he 
nuirried Victorine, daughter of Joseph Haven, a Boston merchant, 
and granddaughter of Colonel Francis ^lason, who was in command of 
the ordnance in \Vashingtou's army in 177(1. George Haven, J. IJish- 
op. and Irving Putnam are their sons. Mr. Putnam was himself the 
son of Henry Putnam, a lawyer of P>oston. and Catherine Hunt, 
daughter of General Joseph Palmer, of the litnolution, and descended 
from John Putnam, who came from England to Salem, Mass.. in IG.Sl. 
General Israel Putnam, of tlie Ike^'ohition, ^\as a member of the same 
family. 

PUTNAM. GEORGE HA^'EN, in 1872 succeeded his father, the 
late George Palmer Putnam, as head of the publishing house of G. P. 
Putnam's Sons, and since the incorporation of the business, has been 
its president. He was born in London, England, April 2, 1811, and 
attended Columbia College and the University of Gottingen, leaving 
the latter in 18()2 to enlist in the One Hundred and Sixty-seventh 
New York Volunteers. He served until the close of the war, attaining 
the rank of Major. In 1866 he was appointed Deputy Collector of In- 
ternal Eevenue. He has been active in securing international copy- 
right, and is Secretary of the Publishers' Copyright League. He has 
also been a prominent champion of Civil-service reform and of Free 
Trade, and more recently has participated in the work in favor of 
sound flnance done by the Chamber of Commerce as a member of one 
of its sub-committees. He is the author of many encyclo])edic and 
magazine articles, and has published volumes on the copyright ques- 
tion and aspects of the publishing business. He was oue of the found- 
ers of the City Club, as he was also of the Reform Club. He is likewise 
a member of the Century and Authors" clubs, the Savile Club of Lon- 
don, and the Military Order of the Loyal Legion. 

GREELEY, HORACE, the most famous newspaper editor in the 
history of the United States (see frontispiece of this volume), was 
born in Amherst, N. H., February 3, 1811, and died in New York, No- 
vember 29, 1872. When he was ten years of age his father, Zaccheus 
Greeley, a small farmer, became bankrupt, and left New Hampshire 
to escape imprisonment for debt. He settled at Poultney, "S't., where 
Horace was ai^i^renticed to learn the printer's trade. The latter came 
to New York City in 1830, and worked for eighteen months as a jour- 
neyman printer. He then obtained an editorial position on the Morn in;/ 
Post, a penny sheet, which soon expired. As editor of the Neir Yorker, 
he saw that journal develop into a success. He next edited the Log- 
Cahiii, in advocacy of the Presidential canvass of General Harrison. 
He had carefully hoarded his savings, and, on April 10, 1841, he issued 



350 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

the first number uf the New York Tribune. This venture was success- 
ful from the start, while Greeley eventually made his journal the fore- 
most in the United States in power to influence public opinion. 
Elected to Congress in 18-18 to serve three months of an unexpired 
term, this short term enabled (Ireeley to expose the mileage abuse. 
lu 1851 he visited Europe, and while at London was Chairman of one 
of the juries of award at the World's Fair. In 1859 he made an over- 
laud trip to California, lie deprecated the Civil War, but urj^ed its 
vigorous prosecution when inaugurated. In May, 18t>7, in the face 
of threats of personal violence, he signed the bail bond of Jefferson 
Davis. He opposed the reconstrurtion policy. In 1S72 he was nom- 
inated for the Presidency by a faction of the Republican party, and 
was indorsed by the regular Di'UKKi-atic organization, but failed of 
election. It is believed that this disappoiutiuent liastcued his death. 
His history of the Civil War, " The American Conflict," is one of the 
standard authoiities on the subject. He published other works, on 
slavery, political economy, various reforms, farming, and on his trav- 
<']s in Europe, together with an autobiographical naiTative. 

ItOBI^s'SOX, SAMUEL ADAMS, after a long career as a successful 
physician, has distinguished himself in recent years by his practical 
work in advocacy of sound economics in the United States. He had 
long been an active Eepublican and a prominent member of the Amer- 
ican Protective Tariff League, being Chairman oi the Committee on 
Literature in the latter organization. He had also been a frequent 
delegate to the American Rankers' Association, and had made a 
.study of economics, accumulating a large library on the subject. But 
after the Presidential election of 18!»2, believing a financial crisis to be 
at hand in the nation, he aliandoned a plan of travel abroad in order 
to devote his energies to popular educational work in economics. He 
was active in Washington in 18!)3 in the fight to secure the repeal of 
tlie bullion clause of the Sherman silver bill. He was also instru- 
mental in obtaining important amendments to the Wilson tariff bill. 
In 1894, on the urgent appeal of the Executive Committee of the 
American Protective Tariff League, he visited, as the representative 
of this organization, various States and Territories in the West where 
campaigns were in progress. His efforts in LTtah, where he made many 
addresses, are believed to have secured the small Republican majority 
in the convention which framed its constitution as a State. Being 
present at the National Convention of the League of Republican 
Clubs at Denver, in June, 1891, he was made a delegate from New 
York, placed on the Committee on Resolutions, and led the successful 
fight for a sound money resolution. He subsequently received a vote 
of thanks from the Protective Tariff League, which was presented to 
him engraved on silver. He visited twenty-seven States and Territo- 
ries, informing himself as to the ]iro])aganda in advocacy of Die un- 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF XEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



■A51 



limited coinage of silver at the ratio of sixteen to out. In the sjiring 
of 1805 he was ursied to pnrsne his work in connection with the New 
York Chamber of Commerce. lie was elected a member of this bo<ly, 
made a member of its ir^jiecial Committee ou Sound Financial Legis- 
lation, and made a member and Corresponding Secretary of this com- 
mittee's E.xecntive Committee of nine members. In this capacity he 
visited a large percentage of the imi)ortant cities of the Union, and in 
every one, with a single exception, succeeded in inaugurating system- 
atic work in the interest of sound finances. He ^\■as made a delegate 
from New York to the National Convention of the League of Repub- 
lican Chilis at Cleveland, Ohio, in 1805; was again a menilier of tlie 
Committee on l\es(dutions; was a niemlier of its Snli-Conimittee of 
Nine, and was a member of its Sub-( "(ininiitte<^ of Thn^e. Dniing the 
two weeks of the debate with Har- 
vey, author of " Coin's Financial 
School," which occurred at Chicago 
in Jnly, 1895, Dr. IJobinson fur- 
nished arguments to Mr. Ilorr, the 
sound-money champion, also writ- 
ing a considerable part of the large 
volume which subsequently aje 
peared. From about this time until 
the close of the Presidential cam- 
paign of 1896, he concentrated his 
efforts in educational work in eight 
States, which he considered there 
was a bare possibility of carrying 
for sound money, namely : Califor- 
nia, Oregon, North Dakota, Indi- 
ana, Kentucky, West Virginia, 
Michigan, South Dakota, Ohio, and 
Nebraska. When IMcKinley and 
Bryan had been nominated, Ohio 

and Nebraska were dropjied troni tins list, i>\\ the sn]»]>osition tl:at the 
nominees would carry their respective States. Literature was sent 
to the editors, doctors, jiostmasters, teachers and olticers of labor or- 
ganizations, granges, and farmers' alliances in all these States, this 
educational work being accomplisjied, so far as possible, before the 
heat of a political camjiaign had set it. When the precinct poll-lists 
could be obtained, literature was sent to the voters. The commercial 
lists of Rradstreet and Dun, for towns of 5,000 or less, were utilized in a 
similar way. McKinley carried seven of the eight States thus can- 
vassed. His entire plurality in six of them was but 38,921, however, 
and since the carrying of these States by Bryan would have elected 
the latter, and, since each vote changed would have c(ninted as two, 
a change of 19,467 votes in the States thus canvassed might have 




S.^.MLkl. Al>AMS KCllilNSOX. 



352 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

elected Bryau. Dr. IJubiiisou has contiuueil educational work aloug 
these lines since the caiiipaii;n of 1896 as Chairman of the Committee 
ou Finance of the New York Board of Trade and Transportation. As 
a delegate from this body to the National Monetary Convention, in 
January, 1898, he read a notable paper on " The True Source of the 
Demand for a Gold Standard and a Sound CuiTency.'' A delegate to 
the last convention of the Xatif)nal Board of Trade, he was appointed 
for the cuiTent year Chairman of its Committee on Public Health and 
n. member of the committees on Finance and on Merchant Marine. In 
the last-mentioned committee he defeated the attempt to secure an in- 
dorsement of tht^Hanna-Payne ship subsidy bill. His subsequent scath- 
ing criticisms of this measure, published in the organ of the American 
Protective Tariff League, and in the Congressional Record, as incoiijo- 
rated in the speech of a member, are credited with having defeated this 
bill in the last Congress. Dr. Bobinson was born in Franklin, Pa., and 
is the son of Rev. John Robinson, D.D.. and Hannah Walker Adams 
Plumer. His grandparents, Jolin and Rosanna Robinson, of Scotch 
antecedents, removed from Ulster, Ireland, to Virginia. Dr. Robin- 
son also descends from Henry .Vdams, of Braintree, Mass., in 1636, 
the common ancesttir of Samuel Adams of the Revolution, President 
John Adams, and President John Quincy Adams. Through his grand- 
father. Major Samuel Plumer, and his great-grandfather. Captain 
Nathaniel I'himer, a Revolutionary officer, he also descends from 
Francis Plumer, who came to New England from England in 1633. 
Educated by his father, at sixteen years of age Dr. Robinson began 
the study of medicine, and was graduated at Cleveland, Ohio, at the 
end of a four years' course. For six years he pursued professional 
studies in New York, London, Paris, Berlin, and ^'ienna. Residing 
on Staten Island, his practice extended to New Y'ork and Brooklyn, 
while he received patients from all parts of the Union. Trustee of a 
banking institution and Chairman of its Finance Committee, for many 
years he was a director of one of the largest insurance companies of 
New Y'ork, and Chairman of its Investment Committee. One of the 
founders and original trustees of St. Austin's School, Staten Island, 
he was also its Prcsidt-nt until he recently resigned. He is President 
of the Kill von Kull Workingmen's Club and Institute, of West New 
Brighton, S. I., his predecessor in this office having been the late Hon. 
Erastus Brooks. He is a director of the Staten Island Chamber of 
Commerce, and was one of the founders of the Civic Federation of 
America, of Avhich he is Treasurer. He is a member of the New Y''ork 
Chamber of Commerce, the New York Board of Trade and Transporta- 
tion, the American Economic Association, the American Protective 
Tariff League, the Republican and Pal Ha clubs of New York, the Na- 
tional Municipal League and I'lanklin Institute of Philadelphia, and 
the Home Market Club of PxisTon. As a Mason he is a life member of 



ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 353 

Crescent Lo(l<j,e, Palestine Comuiauden"; is a lueiiiber of the four Scot- 
tisli Rite bodies, and of Tvriaii ( 'hajilcr and Merea Temple, New York 
City. 

TILDEX, SAMUEL JONES, attended Yale College and the Univer- 
sity of the City of New York, and iu 1841 \\as admitted to the New 
Y'ork bar. For thirty years he was engaged in the active practice of 
his profession, and was one of the recognized leaders of the bar. He 
was a specialist in municipal law, and was i)roticient iu conveyancing, 
r'rom 1S5S to 1875 he was counsel for many railroad corporations. For 
a time he was corporation attorney for the City of New Y(U-k. He was 
a member of the New York Assembly in 1845 and 184(1, and was a mem- 
ber of the Constitutional Convention of 184G. During the Civil War 
he was fre(iuently consulted by Secretary of ^^'ar Stanton and Gover- 
nor Horatio Seymour. He was one of the founders of the Association 
of the Bar of the City of New Y'ork in 1870 to clear the legal profession 
from the imputation of indifference in the presence of the corruption 
of the judiciary under the Tweed influences. His is by far the most 
prominent tigure in the movement resulting in the overthrow of the 
Tweed ring, the successful issue being principally due to his remark- 
able genius for political organization. In 1871 he accepted election 
to the New Y'ork Assembly for the purpose of caiTying through the 
impeachment of Judges Barnard, Cardozo, and ^IcCunn. He became 
Chairman of the State Democratic Committee. In 1874 he was elected 
Governor of New Y'ork, defeating John A. Dix by a majority of 50,000. 
As Governor he overthrew the Canal ring, exjiosing the scandals con- 
nected witli canal management, and directing the prosecution of 
guilty parties. He was the Democratic nominee for President in 1870, 
and received a large popular majority over Rutherford B. Hayes. 
Both sides claimed a majority of the electoral vote, and the election 
was long in doubt. The extra-constitutional electoral commission, 
which finally decided the matter, gave Mr. Hayes 185 electoral votes 
and Mr. Tildeu 184. By his will, Mr. Tilden left several million dollars 
for tlie establishment of a public library in New Y'ork City, but this 
project was defeated, as originally intended, by a successful contest 
of the will. Through the generosity of one of the heirs, however, about 
a nullion d<dlars was released for the pur]>ose intended. This has been 
united with the Astor and Lenox endowments to establish the new 
Public Librai-y of the City of New Y'ork. Mr. Tilden was born in New 
Lebanon, N. Y'., February 9, 1814, and died at his country residence, 
Oreystone, ^^'estcbester County, N. Y'., August 4, 1886. His father, 
Elam Tilden, was a farmer. He descended from Nathaniel Tilden, 
who settled in Scituate, Mass., in 1G34. 

CORNELL, ALONZO B., Governor of New York from January 1, 
1880, to January 1, 1883, has been actively connected with the develop- 



354 HISTORY OU THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

inciit (if telegraphic eorjioi-atioiis iu tliis country. He is now a director 
of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and N'ice-Pre.sident of the 
American Kailwav Electric Light Company. He was formerly Presi- 
dent of the ^Vestern Union Telesirajdi Company, in the service of 
which he rose through the grades of operator, superintendent, director, 
and vice-president. Born in Ithaca, N. Y., January 22, 1832, the son 
of the late Ezra Cornell, founder of Cornell University, having re- 
ceived an academic education, he learned telegraphy at Troy, X. Y., 
and assisted the late Professor Morse in biiilding the first telegraph 
line. In 1854 he became active in forming the Western Union, being 
a director of the original companies which were consolidated in its 
organization. He lias been a directoi" of the Westei'n Union con- 
tinuously to tlie present time, as well as its Vice-President and Presi- 
dent tor terms of years. He was appointed by President Crant in 
1869 Surveyor of Customs for the port of Xew York, and declined his 
nomination by the same the next year as First Assistant Treasurer at 
New York, preferring to retain the other position. Elected to the Xew 
York Assembly of 1872, he was unanimously made Speaker by the 
Pepublicans, who controlled tlie lIous<'. Declining re-election, he re- 
sumed as an ohicer of the Western Union. In 187G President Grant 
ai)pointed him Xaval Otttcer of Customs at this port, and this office 
he held until duly, 1878, when he was suspended by President Hayes, 
as was Chester A. .Vrtliur as Collector of the Port, in the factional 
tight then in progress. 'Sir. Cornell received his vindication in his 
nomination and election as Governor of New York in the fall of 1879, 
as did Mr. Arthur in his nomination and election as Vice-President 
the following year. Mr. ( 'ornell was one of the best governors in the 
history of the State, but his renomination in 1882 was prevented by 
the politicians of his party, whose ire he had aroused by the resolute 
exercise of the veto of obnoxious legislation. The people approved, 
however, and elected as his successor (irover Cleveland, who had dis- 
tinguished himself as the " veto " Mayor of Buffalo. The amendment 
to the usury laws brought about by Governor Cornell in 1882 " has 
proved to be a financial measure of the highest importance, and one 
which has gone further towai-d making New York City one of the 
chief monetary centers of the world than any other legislative act." 

:\IILLER. WAKNEK. United States Senator fnmi New York in 
lS,s2 and several years following, and the pioneer in the manufacture 
of paper from wood ])ul]), is interested in various corporations. He is 
President of tlie llerkiniei- Paper Com])any. Secretary of the Hudson 
Piver I'ulp and Pajier Comi»any. and a director of the Standard Na- 
tional Bank. I lie Traders' ITre Insurance Company, and the luterna- 
rioiial North and South American Transportation and Express Com- 
]iany. He actively interested liimself in the ]iroject of a shi]i canal 
across the Isiliniiis of Panama, ami for some vears was President of 



EXCYCLOPKDI A OF XEW YORK BIOGRAPHY. 



355 



The Nic:u;i,mia ("iiiinl ('oiistruclion ('(iiiiiiMii.v. Tlie inventor of ma- 
chines to maniifactnre wood pulp, these were not at first reiiai-(h'(l 
with favor by pa]»erniakers. but eventually became indispensable. As 
a result of this invi^ntion the paper used by newspapers lias ])eeu re- 
duced in cost from fifteen to three and a half cents a pound. From 
his own mills at Ilerkiuier he rapidly accumulated a fortune. He 
was born in ()swei;() Couuty. Xew York, August 12. 1S:>S. of (ier- 
man descent, his grandfather having been a colonel in the Kevolution. 
In 1860 he was graduated from Union College, and when the war be- 
gan enlisted in the Mfth X(^w York Cavalry. He was ])romoted To 
Lieutenant, and having been cai^tTired in the Battle of Winchester, 
and paroled on the field, was honorably discharged. He was a Mem- 
ber of the Assendjiy of l.'^"."). and was elected to the itlTli and 4TTh 
Congresses. Upon The resignaTion nt' SenaTors Itoscoe Conkling and 
Thomas C. I'laTt to embarrass I'residenT Carrteld, he was elecTed To 
the UniTed STaTes ^?enaTe in place of .Mr. I'laTT. He was The Kepublican 
candidate for (Jovernor of New Y(U'k in ISSS. and was defcaTcd h\ 
lioliTical enemies in his own jiaiiy. 



BLIS8, COKNKLI US Ni:\VT()X, SecreTary of The Interioi 



n The 
id of The di-vgdods connnissiou 



f <<*. 



Cabinet of Presidi^uT ]McKinley, is 
firm of Bliss, Uabyan c^ (^"ompany, 
of This city, and has been promi- 
nently connected with many finan- 
cial and other institutions. He is 
a trTistee of the Central Trust Com- 
liany, a dir(^ctor of the I'ourth Na- 
tional Bank, The EquiTable Life As- 
surance Company, and the Home 
Lisurance ( 'om])any, and a governoi 
of Tile New York HospiTal. AT The 
Time of bis acceptance of the portfo- 
lio of the Interior in LSflT. he was 
also Treasurer of the New Yoik 
Hos)iital, Vice-President of the 
Fourth XaTional Bank. Vice-I'resi- 
deuT (d' The Chandler of Commerce, 
and Chairman of iTs Executive 
ConnniTTee. Vice-I*residenT of The 

Union League Club, and rreshlenT of The New Fnglan<l Society. 
He was Treasurer of the Eepublican National Committee in 1S1>2, 
and again in 1890. In addition to the organizations named, he is like- 
wise a member of the I^nion, iletropoliTan, lliding. Players', Lotos, 
MerchauTs', Lawyers', and Bepublican clubs, and the Dunlap Society. 
He married, in i8r>9, ElizabeTh, daughTer of Hon. Avery Plumer, of 
BosTou, and has livim; a daughTer and a. son, Cornelius Bliss, Jr. Born 




COKNELIUS NEWTON BLI.SS. 



356 HISTORY OF THE GREATER NEW YORK. 

in Fall Kiver, Mass., Jamiarj 20, 1833, Mr. Bliss is the son of Asaliel 
N. Bliss and Irene B. Luther, and descends from Thomas Bliss, who 
came fmm Devonshire, lOnyland, about 1(!35 and resided at Braintree, 
Mass., and Hartford, Conn. His father having died when he was an 
infant, Mr. Bliss removed to New Orleans with his mother and step- 
father, Edward i^. Keep, attended the New Orleans High School, 
spent a \ear in the counting-room of his stepfather, and then entered 
the employ of James M. Beebe & Company, drygoods commission 
meichanis of Boston. In lS(J(i he became a member of the Boston 
firm of John S. and Eben Wright & Company, and soon after removed 
to New York to establish a branch house. The style of this firm even- 
timlly became Wriglit, Bliss & Fabyan, and subsequently, as at pres- 
ent, Bliss, Fabyan & Company. 

JESUP, MORRIS KETCHUM, philauthropisr and public-spirited 
citizen of New York City, was long engaged in mercantile life in 
this city. Between the ages of thirteen and twenty-three he was in 
the sen'ice of the mercantile firm of Rogers, Ketchnm cS: (irosvenor; 
from 1852 to 1856 was a member of the firm of ( "lark & Jesiip, and in 
the latter year organized the firm of il. K. Jesup e^- ( 'ompany, which in 
1883 was changed to Jesup, Baton & Com])any. This firm was subse- 
i|U('iitly succeeded by Cuyler, Morgan 6c Company, of which Mr. C. C. 
Cuyler, ^fr. Jesup's nephew, is the head. Mr. Jesup is a director of 
the Central Railroad of South Carolina. He was one of the founders 
of the Young jNIen's ( 'liristian Association of this city, for many years 
was its Ti-esident, and liberally contributed toward the erection of 
the building of tiie Twenty-third Street Branch. For many years he 
has been Bresident of the I'ive Points House of Industry. He is also 
President of the New York City Mission and Tract Society, and is 
Vice-President of the Evangelical Alliance. He is a director of the 
Deaf and Dumb Asylum, as he is also of the Hospital Saturday 
and Sunday Association. In 1881 he built and donated to the City 
.Alission and Tract Society the De Witt Memorial Churcli. He is a 
trustee of tlie Union Theological Seminary, and provided for the 
erection of one of its buildings at the tinu^ of the removal of the insti- 
tution to its present site. He is Treasurer of the J. F. Slater Fund, 
for the elevation of the negro race. During the Civil War he was one 
of the founders of the United States Christian Commission, of which 
he became Treasurer. For many years lie has been President of the 
American Museum of Natural History in New York City, of which 
he was also one of the incori)orators and original trustees. To this 
institution he presented the Jesup collection of tlie woods of the 
United St