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Full text of "Liberty's victorious conflict : a photographic history of the World War"

LIBERTY'S 
VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 



A Plioto^raphic Histor\[ of the World War 




Published h\\ 

The Magazine Circulation Ccinc. 

Publishers of WomanTsWeekKj 

CHICAGO 



IhAlL 



[ 3 1833 01955 9506 

Oc 940.410 AaIL 



(CTDRIOUS 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/libertysvictorioOOchic 




LIBERTYS 
VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 

A Photographic History of the World Ws^r 



Fo 



o r d 



IN years to come, when studying Tlie Great War, the most 
authentic records will be found in photographs. Men may 
disagree in their recollections, opinions may be colored by 
personal bias, but photographs cannot but show facts without 
any modification. Wherefore carefully selected pictures, such 
as appear in this collection, will form the most valuable data 
concerning the history of this period. Therefore, to all this book 
hcis an appeal: for its value today in showing what our boys 
went through; for its value in the many tomorrows as an 
historical document which the children will love, because it 
pictures what brother or father did in the great days. 

Woman's Weekly ■ 




LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 



AMERICA'S WAR AIMS 



As slated by President Wilson in his mes- 
sage to Congress, April 2, IQ17, recommend- 
ing a declaration of war on Germany. 



WE are accepting this challenge of hostile purpose because 
we know that in such a Government, following such 
methods, we can never have a friend; and that in the 
presence of its organized power, always lying in wait to accom- 
plish we know not what purpose, there can be no assured secur- 
ity for the democratic Governments of the world. We are 
now about to accept the gage of battle with this natural foe to 
liberty, and shall, if necessary, spend the whole force of the Nation 
to check and nullify its pretensions and its power. We are glad 
now that we see the facts with no veil of false pretense about them, 
to fight thus for the ultimate peace of the world and for the libera- 
tion of its peoples, the German peoples included; for the rights of 
nations great and small, and the privilege of men everywhere to 
choose their way of life and of obedience. The world must be made 
safe for democracy. Its peace must be planted upon the tested foun- 
dations of political liberty. We have no selfish ends to serve. 
We desire no conquests, no dominion. We seek no indemnities 
for ourselves, no material compensation for the sacrifices we shall 
freely make. We are but one of the champions of the rights of 
mankind. We shall be satisfied when those rights have been made 
as secure as the faith and the freedom of nations can make them. 
. . . But the right is more precious than peace, and we shall fight 
for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts — 
for democracy, for the right of those who submit to authority to 
have a voice in their own Governments, for the rights and liber- 
ties of small nations, for a universal dominion of right by such a 
concert of free people as shall bring peace and safety to all 
nations and make the world itself at last free. 




CHRONOLOGY 



Principal Events of the War 

1914 1916 



Murder at Serajevo of the Archduke Francis Ferdinand. 

i: Liege occupied (Aug. 9); Brussels (Aug. 



Aug. 16. British expeditionary force 
Aug. 18. Russia completes mobilizat 



ded in France, 
and invades East Pruss 
Dogged retreat of Freri 



Aug. 23. Tsingtau bombarded by Japanese. 

Aug. 25-Dec. 15. Russians overrun Galicia. Lemberg taken (Sept. 2); 

Przemysl first attacked (Sept. 16); siege broken (Oct. 12-Nov. 12). 

Fall of Przemysl (Mar. 17, 1915). Dec. 4, Russians Z'A miles from 

Cracow. 



Aug. 26. Germans destroy Louvain. 
Aug. 26. Russians severely defeated 



Battle 



Tannenberg, 



Eas 



Sept. 6-10. Battle of the Marne. Germans reach the extreme point of 
their advance; driven back by the French from the Marne to the 
River Aisne. The battle line then remained practically stationary 
for three years (front of 300 miles). 

Oct. 9. Germans occupy Antwerp. 

Oct. 16-28. Battle of the Yser, in Flanders. Belgians and French halt 
German advance. 

Oct. 17-Nov. 17 French, Belgians and British repulse German drive 
in first battle of Ypres, saving Channel ports (decisive day of bat- 
tle, Oct. 31). 

Oct. 28. De Wet's Rebellion in South Africa. ^ 

Nov. 7. Fall of Tsingtau to the Japanese. 

Nov. 10-Dec. 14. Austrian invasion of Serbia (Belgrade taken Dec. 2. 
recaptured by Serbians Dec. 14). 

Nov. 10. German cruiser "Emden" caught and destroyed at Cocos 
Island. 

Dec. 8. British naval victory ofif the Falkland Islands. 

Dec. 17. Egypt proclaimed a British Protectorate, and a new ruler ap- 
pointed with title of sultan. 

Dec. 2-4. First German air raid on England. 



1915 



Jan. 8. Complet 

Feb. 10. Germany sends memorandum to neutral powers that armed 

merchant ships will be treated as warships and will be sunk without 

warning. 
Feb. 16. Kamerun (Africa) conquered. 
Feb. 21-July. Battle of Verdun. Germans take Ft. Douaumont (Feb. 

25). Great losses of Germans, with little results. Practically all the 

ground lost was slowly regained by the French in the autumn. 
Mar. 8. Germany declares war on Portugal. 
Mar. 24. French steamer "Susse 

80 passengers, including An 
Apr. 17. Russians capture Trebizond. 
Apr. 24-May 1. Insurrection in Ireland. 
Apr. 29. Gen. Townshend surrendered to the Turks before Kut-i 

Amara. 



May 31. Naval battle off Jutland. 



Aug. 27-Jan. 15, 1917. Roumania en 
and is crushed. (Fall of Bucha 
Jan. 2; Focsani captured, Jan. 8), 



1917 



Jan. 22. President Wilson addresses the Sena 
steps necessary for world peace. 

Jan. 31. Germany announced unrestricted subn 
tied zones. 



; his ideas of 
rfare in speci- 
ith Germany; 



Jan. 1-Feb. 15. Russians attempt to cross the Carpathians. 

Jan. 24. British naval victory in North Sea off Dogger Bank. 

Feb. 4. Germany's proclamation of "war zone" around the British Isles 
after Feb. 18. 

Feb. 18. German official "blockade" of Great Britain commenced. Ger- 
man submarines begin campaign of "piracy and pillage." 

Feb. 19. Anglo-French squadron bombards Dardanelles. 

Mar. 17. Russians captured Przemysl and strengthened their hold 
on the greater part of Galicia. 

Apr. 17-May-17. Second Battle of Ypres. British captured Hill 60 (April 
19); April 23, Germans advanced toward Yser Canal. Asphyxiating 
gas employed by the Germans. Failure of Germany to break through 
the British lines. 

Apr. 26. Allied troops land on the Gallipoli Peninsula. 

Apr. 30. Germans invade the Baltic Provinces of Russia. 

May 7. Cunard line steamship "Lusitania" sunk by German submarine 
(1,154 lives lost, 114 being Americans). 

May 23. Italy declared war on Austria-Hungary. 

June 3. Przemysl retaken by Germans and Austrians. 

June 22. The Austro-Germans recapture Lemberg. 

July 15. Conquest of German Southwest Africa completed. 

July 12-Sept. 18. German conquest of Russian Poland. Germans cap- 
ture Lublin (July 31); Warsaw (Aug. 4); Ivangorod (Aug. 5); Kovno 
(Aug. 17); Novogeorgievsk (Aug. 19); Brest-Litovsk (Aug. 25); 
Vilna (Sept. 18). 

Aug. 4. Capture of Warsaw by Germans. 

Aug. 19. White Star liner "Arabic" sunk by submarine; 16 victims, 2 
Americans. 

Oct. 5. Allied forces land at Salonika, at the invitation of the Greek 



gov 



of Serbia. Fall of 
stir (Dec. 2). 
and Sulva Bay (Gal- 



Feb. 24. Kut-el-Amara taken by British under Gen. Maude (campaign 
begun Dec. 13). 

Feb. 26. President Wilson asks authority to arm merchant ships. 

Mar. 11. Bagdad captured by British under Gen. Maude. 

Mar. 11-15. Revolution in Russia, leading to abdication of Czar Nicholas 
II. (Mar. 13). Provisional government formed by Constitutional 
Democrats under Prince Lvov and M. Milyukov. 

Mar. 17-19. Retirement of Germans to "Hindenburg line." Evacuation 
of 1,300 square miles of French territory, on front of 100 miles, from 
Arras to Soissons. 

Apr. 6. United States declares war on Germany. 

Apr. 9-May 14. British successes in Battle of Arras (Vimy Ridge taken 
Apr. 9). 

Apr. 16-May 6. French successes in Battle of the Aisne between Sois- 
sons and Rheims. 

May 15-Sept. 15. Great Italian offensive on Isonzo front (Carso Pla- 
teau). Capture of Gorizia (Aug. 9). Monte Santo taken (Aug. 24). 
Monte San Gabrielle (Sept. 14). 



June 7. British blow up Messines Ridge, south of Ypres 

7,500 German prisoners. 
June 10. Italian offensive on Trentino. 
June 12. King Constantine of Greece forced to abdicate. 
June 26. First American troops reach France. 
June 29. Greece enters war with Germany and her allies. 



chancellor. Dr. 

July 20. Drawing at Washington of names for first army under selective 
July 20. Kerensky becomes premier on resignation of Prince Lvov. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 



July ao. Mutiny in German fleet at Wilhelmshaven and Kiel. Second 
mutiny Sept. 8. 

July .31-Nov. Battle of Flanders (Passchendacle Ridge); British suc- 
cesses. 

Aug. 15. Canadians capture Hill "0, dominating Lens. 

Aug. 19. New Italian drive on the Isonzo front (Carso Plateau). Monte 
Santo captured (Aug. 24). 

Sept. 3. Riga captured by Germans. 

Sept. 15. Russia proclaimed a republic. 

Oct. 24-Dec. Great German-Austrian counterdrive into Italy. Italian 
line shifted to Piave River, Asiago Plateau, and Brenta River. 

Oct. 23-26. French drive north of the Aisne wins important positions, 
including Malmaison Fort. 

Oct. 26. Brazil declares war on Germany. 

Oct. 27. Second Liberty Loan closed ($3,000,000,000 offered; $4,017.5;i2,- 
300 subscribed). 

.N'ov. 2. Germans retreat from the Chemin des Dames, north of the 

Nov. 3. First clash of Americans with German soldiers. 

Nov. 7. Overthrow of Kerensky and provisional government of Russia 
by the Bolsheviki. 

Nov. 18. British forces in Palestine take Jaffa. 

Nov. 22-Dec. 13. Battle of Cambrai. Successful surprise attack near Cam- 
brai by British under Gen. Byng on Nov. 22 (employs "tanks" to 
break down wire entanglements in place of the usual artillery prep- 
arations). Bourlon Wood, dominating Cambrai, taken Nov. 26. Sur- 
prise counterattack by Germans. Dec. 2, compels British to give up 
fourth of ground gained. German attacks on Dec. 13 partly suc- 

Nov. 29. First plenary session of the Inter-Allied Conference in Paris. 
Si.xteen nations represented. Col. E. M. House, chairman of Ameri- 
can delegation. 

Dec. 6. U. S, destroyer "Jacob Jones" sunk by submarine, with loss 
of over 40 American men. 

Dec. 6. Explosion of munitions vessel wrecks Halifax. 

Dec. 6-9. Armed revolt overthrows pro-Ally administration in Portugal. 

Dec. 9. Jerusalem captured by British force advancing from Egypt. 

Dec. 15. Armistice signed between Germany and the Bolsheviki gov- 

Dec. 2;i. Peace negotiations opened at Brcst-Litovsk between Bolshe- 
viki government and Central Powers, under presidency of the 
German foreign minister. 



1918 






Jan. 5. Premier Lloyd George outli 

Jan. 20. Naval battle at entrance to Dardanelles. 

Jan. 21. Americans placed in charge of sector on French frot 

Jan. 24. Chancellor von Hertling speaks on German war aim 

Jan. 30. Peace strikes occur in Germany. 

Feb. 5. U. S. Transport Tuscania is torpedoed. 

Feb. 6. Ukraine-Teuton peace treaty signed. 

Feb. 19. Gen. Sir Henry H. Wilson made British chief of st; 

Feb. 21. German troops occupy Rovno and Reval, in Russia 

Feb. 22. British capture Jerico. 

Feb. 28. Allied ambassadors leave Petrograd. 

Mar. 2. Russia accepts German peace terms. 

Mar. 4. Roumania accepts German armistice conditions. 

Mar. 5. Bolshevik government flees from Petrograd to Mos 

Mar. 7. Finland and Germany sign peace treaty. 

Mar. 14. Russian congress of Soviets ratifies peace treaty 

Litovsk. 
Mar. 20. United States and Britain requisition Dutch ships. 
Mar. 21. Germans begin big offensive on wester 
Mar. 23. Paris bombarded by gun seventy mile: 
Mar. 27. Premier Lloyd George asks United St; 

Mar. 28. Allies placed under supreme command of Gen. Foch. 

Mar. 29. Gen. Pershing places American forces at Gen. Foch's disposal. 

Mar. 30. American troops march to front. 

Apr. 5. Japanese force lands in Vladivostok. 

Apr. 9. Germans begin Flanders offensive. 

Apr. 15. Secretary Baker returns from Europe. 

.\pr. 16. Bolo Pasha executed for treason. 

Apr. 20. Americans win battle of Seicheprey. 

Apr. 23. Ports of Zeebrugge and Ostend blocked by sinking old British 



dies 



St. Que 



troops 



.\pr. 30. Gavrio Prinzip, assassin of Franz Ferdinand, 

May 8. Germans meet defeat near Ypres. 

May 10. Additional vessels sunk at Zeebrugge and O: 

May 17. Sinn Fein leaders arrested in Ireland 

May 27. Germans begin another phase of great offens 



May 38. .Americans take village of Cantigny. 

May 31. U. S. Transport President Lincoln sunk, returning from France. 

May 31. Germans reach Chateau Thierry, on the Marne, but are 

stopped by French and American Marines 
June 3. German submarine raid off the American coast. 
June 6 .American marines gain two miles in battle near Veuilly. 
June 7. .\mericans win second battle northwest of Chateau Thierry. 
June 9. Germans begin offensive between Montdidier and the Oise. 
June 11. Americans capture Belleau wood. 

June 15. Austrians begin offensive against Italians and cross the Piave. 
June 18-22. Austrian offensive ends in disastrous failure. 
June 26. Americans win battle north of Belleau wood. 
July 1. U. S. transport Covington sunk. 
July 1. Americans capture village of Vaux. 
July 6. President Wilson and cabinet decide to take joint action with 

allies in Russia. 
July 9. Richard von Kuehlmann resigns as German foreign secretary. 
July 9. Italian and French troops begin successful advance in .Albania. 
July 13. Three American army corps formed in France. 
July 15. Germans cross the Marne and threaten Chalons and Epernav. 
July 15. British and American troops occupy the Murman coast of 

Russia. 
July 18. French, Americans and British begin great counter-attack on 

German right flank and win important victory. 
July 19. United States cruiser San Diego sunk. 
July 20. Germans hurriedly retreat across the Marne. 
July 20. Liner Justicia torpedoed and sunk. 
July 21. .Americans and French capture Chateau Thierry. 
July 30. German Crown Prince flees from the Marne and withdraws 

.Aug. 2. Soissons recaptured by Foch. 

.Aug. 4. .Americans take Fismes. 

Aug. 5. American troops landed at .Archangel. 

-Aug. 7.S .Americans cross the Vesle. 

•Aug. 16. Bapaume recaptured. 

.Aug. 38. French recross the Somme. 

Sept. 1. Foch retakes Peronne. 

Sept. 12. Americans launch successful attack m St. Mihiel sahent. 

Sept. 28. Allies win on 250-mile line, from North Sea to X'erdun. 

Sept. 29. Allies cross Hindenburg line. 

Sept. 30. Bulgaria surrenders, after successful allied campaign in Bal- 
kans. 

Oct. 1. French take St. Quentin. 

Oct. 4. Austria asks Holland to mediate with allies for peace. 

Oct. 5. Germans start abandonment of Lille and burn Douai. 

Oct. 6. Germany asks President Wilson for armistice. 

Oct. 7. Americans capture hills around Argonne. 

Oct. 8. President Wilson refuses armistice. 

Oct. 9. Allies capture Cambrai. 

Oct. 10. Allies capture Le Cateau. 

Oct. 11. -American transport Otranto torpedoed and sunk; 500 lost. 

Oct. 13. Foch's troops take Laon and La Fere. 

Oct. 14. British and Belgians take Roulers; President Wilson demands 
surrender by Germany. 

Oct. 15. British and Belgians cross Lys river, take 13.000 prisoners 
and 100 guns. 

Oct. 16. Allies enter Lille outskirts. 

Oct. 17. -Allies capture Lille, Bruges, Zeebrugge, Ostend and Douai. 

Oct. 18. Czecho-Slovaks issue declaration of independence; Czechs 
rebel and seize Prague, capital of Bohemia; French take Thielt. 

Oct. 19. President Wilson refuses Austrian peace plea and says Czecho- 
slovak state must be considered. 

Oct. 21. Allies cross the Oise and threaten Valenciennes. 

Oct. 22. Haig's forces cross the Scheldt. 

Oct. 23. President Wilson refuses latest German peace plea. 

Oct. 27. German government asks President Wilson to state terms. 

Oct. 38. Austria begs for separate peace. 

Oct. 29. .Austria opens direct negotiations with Secretary Lansing. 

Oct. 30. Italians inflict great defeat on .Austria; capture 33,000; Aus- 



Itahi 



ter 



Oct. :il. Turkey surrenders; Austrians utterly routed by Italians; losi 

50,000; -Austrian envoys, under white flag, enter Italian lines. 
Nov. 1. Italians pursue beaten .Austrians across Tagliamento river 

allied conference at Versailles fi.xes peace terms for Germany. 
-Nov. 3. .Austria signs armistice amounting virtually to unconditiona 

surrender. 
Nov. 4. .Allied terms are sent to Germany. 
Nov. 7. Germany's envoys enter allied lines by arrangement. 
Nov. 9. Kaiser Wilhelm abdicates 
Nov. 10. Former Kaiser Wilhelm and his eldest son, Friedrich Wilhelm 

flee to Holland to escape widespread revolution throughout Ger 



sow. 



the 



HOW THE WAR BEGAN 




Archduke Franz Ferdinand, His Wife and Children 

e was the nephew and heir of the aged Emperor Francis Joseph. His 
lination caused an ultimatum to be addressed by Austria to Serbia, where 
claimed the plot had been hatched. 





Charles 


1, 


Empc 


ror 


of Au 


stria, 


andE. 


Tipress Zita 






Born 
became Er 
throne wa 
throne in 


n 1887, upon the 
nperor. Zita is o 
cleared by the 
November. 1918. 


death 
the 


of his 
Bourbo 
sination 


grand uncle, Francis Joseph, Charles 

n House of Parma. Their way to the 

at Serajevo. Charles abdicated his 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




The Austrians seemed de 
tricts of Serbia. Not satisfie- 
the entire civilian population, 
is a typical scene with innoc 



Austrian Atrocities in Serbia 

termined to wipe out entirely the inhabitants of the conquered dis- 
d with wreaking their vengeance on soldiers and practically starving 
on the flimsiest of excuses, they hung many non-combatants. This 
ent civilians hanging on roadside gibbets. 



Peter I, of Sertia 

A member of the Karageorgevitch family, h« 
ascended the throne June 15, 1903, as the reiult of 
a palace revolution. Owing to his feeble health. 

Crown Prince .Alexander became regent. 




Fleeing before the Ger 



King Peter in the Serbian Retreat 

hosts the aged Serbian monarch is escaping from his country riding on an artillery limber drawn 



THE SERBIANS FIGHT ON 








/ 






^^^^Es^u^F^* 



From V. & TJ. Official Italian Photogr«)h 



To the left is Gen. Vassitch, who commanded the Serbi 
Serbian supply depot situated behind the Serb trenches in ( 



Serbians, Though Dri\ 

To the right, 



from Their Country, Fought On 

iew of mountain fighting, showing a line of 



at their posts. Below, a 




LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




British Use Double Litter to Carry Wounded in Balkans 

donkeys were used by the British hospital men to bring in wounded during the Balkan fighting. This photograph was taken about SO 




The American Red Cross in the Balkans 

acrosv the tents and the motors of the An 



British Observer Uses Parachute 

Red Cros-, Attacked by a hostile airplane, he is descending: 

from his balloon by means of a parachute. 



THE GUILTY LORDS OF WAR 




Mohammed V, Sultan of Turkey, 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Frederick William, former German Crown Pi 



German Personages Prominent in tKe War 



BELGIUM'S HEROIC FIGURES 




Editli Cavell, Martyr 
An English nurse in Brussels; she was condemned in secret by a military 
1 won a lasting place in history by his court for assisting Belgian youths to escape across the border. She was shot 

until war was declared by our country. at 8 a. m., Oct. 13, 1915. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Bridge Wrecked by Belgians and German Pontoon at Liege 




German Troops Passing Through Louvain 



ompletelyguiled 



THE GERMAN ATROCITIES 




elgian refugees sleeping 



Homeless Belgian War Victims 

on the floor and covered with blankets. Men, women 
suffer almost beyond description as they fled from the 



d children deprived of every belonging and 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 






mj^ 


ms:T:^m 


\ MH^S 



The Belgian Retreat from Antwerp 
Nearly all the Belgian army and their British allies were able to escape from 



Antwerp when the Ge: 



broke down the defe 



Belgian Militia Attacking Uhlans Near Ypres 

Hastily called from civil pursuits, the Belgians fought heroically against 
A-hclming odds of the German regul 




Belgian Trenches in Overflowed Land 

The old device of opening the dikes and letting the sea flow ove 
adopted successfully in the defense of Flanders. 



Belgians Leaving Bruges in Retreat 
It was a pathetic time for the people left behind when the Belgian army 
boarded trains, fleeing before the Hun horde, to join the allied armies. 




Field Guns in the Battle of Hofstade 



fought with skill and bravery. 



Marching in Defense of Antwerp 

Artillery was moved to the entrenchments surrounding Antwerp and fought 
bravely until the giant German siege guns began firing from miles away. 



BRITISH STATESMEN 




Herbert Asquith, who was Prime Minister when the war began. The Prince of Wale 

BritisL Leaders in tte War 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Commander of British third army, who led th 
attack on Cambrai Nov. 20, 1917, where tanks brok 
the German line. 



Field Marsha 

Commander of the British Expeditionary Corps in 
France, 1914-15, being replaced by Sir Douglas Haig. 



Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig 

Commander-in-chief of the British forces in Fra 
and Flanders, succeeding Viscount French in 191fi 



THE SINN FEIN V 1' 11 I S I .\ ( 




Interior ol Dublin Post Office Where Si 



Made Their Stand, Easter 1916 

completely wrecked during the fight between 



Roger Casement 

A German ship attempted to land troops on the 
Irish coast: Sir Roger Casement who was on the 
vessel was taken off and made a prisoner and the 
boat was sunk. Casement was shot in the Tower 
of London. 




LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Carrying out the customs of the Crusaders who centuries befo 
British forces, entered Jerusalem on foot, after he had succeeded 
city. The British commander made his triumphal entry ihrough th 
Italian forces who co-operated with the British in the drive in Pa 



delivered the Holy City 
1 wresting it from the sway of the 
Jaffa gate. .Accompanying Gen. Al 



infidels, Gen. Allenby, commander of the victorious 
rurk. The Turks and their Teuton allies evacuated the 
nby are his staff and the commanders of the French and 



THE BRITISH IN PALESTINE 




Beersheba, WKen the BritisK Entered It 



BritisK "Camelry; Ammunition Train 





Allied Leaders'^in Jerusalem 

Commander of the British forces, is saluting, behind him is a French ol^cer and behind the latter an Itali: 



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Reading tlie Britisk Proclamation 

to the people of the Holy 
1 was standing when Christ 
n front. 

Brilisli Official 



BritisK "Tommies" Visit Solomon's Pools 



A priest is reading the British proclams 
City from the steps of the Tower of David. ' 
was in Jernsalem. An honor guard of troop; 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




The City of the Arabian Nights 

British troops are shown marching in the streets of Bagdad, which looks the same toda 
the time of Haroun-al-Raschid. 




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Marching Turkish Prisoners Through Bagdad 

sh soldiers are escorting their Turkish prisoners through New Street ir 



Turkish Observation "Nest" 
British troops captured a pole where the Turks 
had placed an observation post. The top was well 
covered, shieldine the observ 




British Official Photographs. ® r, & U 



Lavir 



Telephone Wires Over Desert in Mesopotamia 

are laying a telephone ca ble in Mesopotamia. A British offic 



id. The British laid the first 



THE BRITISH I N MESOPOTAMIA 




British Official Photographs © U & U 

A Macliine Gun AmbusK 

Hidden in shrubbery, this Lewis gun crew is 
working its deadly weapon with the enemy only 
100 yards away. 



Marcking in the Desert 

These husky British troopers are marching on the sands of Mesopotan 



earing the uniform 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 



J^i^MN^ttUO 



i > 




th the heliograph. This signaler is working at the 



THE ARMENIAN MASSACRES 




It Takes More Than a River to Stop BritisK Armored Motor Cars 



campaign. In tht 




Armenian Refugees Camp at Port Said 

an refugees encamped on the sand at Port Said, The Armenians suffered terribly fr^ 



the hands of the 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Several thousand Armenian refuge 



Armenian Refugees Escape to Egypt 

!s succeeded in escaping and with the aid of a Fre 



ade their way to Egj'pt. 







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r^:: 


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Where tKe Turk Has Passed 



Safe from the Murderers 



PhotonTttpha from U. & U. 



LONDON AIR RAIDS 




Uflicial Photographs © U & U 

Homes Wrecked by Raiders 
In these suburban cottages two schoolboys were killed by Huns seeking 
to spread "Kultur." 



Mother and Son Inspecting the Rums 
A mother and her little son have returned from a visit and this mass of 
debris greets their eyes, where they had left their home. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Dirigible "Hansa Arriving at Potsdam Harbor 

The "Hansa" was one of many smaller diriniM,.. „si.l \,x \W German 



The body of its dead commander is seen lying on a stretcher 
front of the tumbled mass of steel and aluminum that was once tl 

h„<rf .„ner-7enne1in L-44. 



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The first new Gem 
ndon. The German 
h a rifle. The phntn 



A New Zeppelin Made Prisoner 

Zeppelin to be captured with practically a "whole skin," was downed by French 

imander attempted to destroy his machine, but a Frenchman who happened to espy hi 
■)ws the huge gasbag lying helpless in a field near Bourbonne-les-Bains. 



WAR BALLOONS 




The Observers Parachute Leap 

"Sausages" are captive balloons used at the front to direct the artillery fire and for observation An observation balloon is falling in flames, and 

rk. They played a prominent part in the observation work of the various armies afield. over it is a parachute, containing the 



"Sausages" Used in Observation Work 




New Type of "Sausage" Used by French 

It flew over the enemy lines and wired information as to ranges of batterii 
1 the like to the post with which it was connected. 



Public Information 



n t'ublic intormation. 

The "Sausage" Going Up 



The lines connecting ,...., 

tinguished. Sometimes telegraph and teleph 



this balloon with the apparatus below can be dis- 
' ' ■ ' ' ■ ■ ?d it with the post. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




This remarkable phot 



Remarkable Pnoto of tne Germans Burning Rheims 

made from an aeroplane shows the City of Rheims ablaze from the shells dropped into the city by the Teutons. 



AERIAL ADVENTURES 




Dropping a Bomb from the Air 

An actual photograph of a raider letting go a bomb, taken from an accom- good fortune 




Wreckage of Big German Plane Brought Down Near the Marne 

The giant bimotor that propelled the latest type of German Gotha plane can be plainly seen amidst this tumbled mass of wreckage. 



fell at Chateau Thierry, on 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




How We Got Our Aerial Pnotograpns from the Front 

A British flier ready to make a picture over the enemy lines. The camera is fastened to the side of the plane and so arranged that a simple finger pressure operates 
shutter and makes the photograph. 




British Official I'l,.,(, v, ,|.l,. .1 \ r 

British Air Scouts Bringf In Reports on Germans Making Drive in Randers 

This pair of British aviators is making a report on the ohservations they took in a flight over the lines of the Germans. This photograph shows unusually well how 
twm-machme guns were arranged so that their fire converged on the target. With the use of tracer bullets leaving a trail of smoke deadly marksmanship was made easy. 



WARRIORS OF THE AIR 






Navigating the Air 

Pilot and observer in a British airplane are 
suiting a map. 



Giant Dirigibles Guarding British Coast 

airships of this type kept ; 




Fixing the Bombs to a Big British Plane 

fastening bombs to the bottom of one of the big bombing planes ready to 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




, U. & U. © Committee on Fufillc -Inrortnat.on 

Sixteen American Planes in Battle Formation 

This photograph was taken at Rockwell Field. San Diego. Ca 



© U. X U. BntisTi Officfal Photograph. 

British Flying Over German Lines 

A duo of airplanes making a flight for purposes of observation. 




J. & U. French Official Photograph. 

Bulldogs of tke Ai 

One of the British giant bombing planes just 



ing on a bombing raid 



© U. S U. French Official PholoRraph. 

Loading Up witli Aerial Torpedoes 

Making preparations for the departure of a Handley-Page 
English aviation camp on the Aisne front. 




© Western New; 



A Pioneer of the Proposed Trans-Atlantic Bombing Fleet 

' i <:'ose view of the Handley-Page aeroplane Langley. being prepared for launching at Elizabeth. N. J. This is the type of machine which was proposed 
Trans-.\tlantic bombing fleet. 



AMERICAN AVIATION 




From U. ,1- U. © Comi 



was taken in the 



American Air Squadron in Flight 

from an aeroplane, thousands of feet above the ground and sho 



squadron of Ar 




-^-- ^^fcYNi^-^ ''^- 


Ah-. 


i^ 1 ) 



U. A U. © Committee on Public Information. 

U. S. Searchlight Keeps Watch for Enemy Aircraft 



aft Section of the 



From U. & U. 

Latest U. S. Dirigible Just Before Her Maiden Flight 

Dirigible D U-I is the latest type tried out by Uncle Sam. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Famous AirFigLters ^^-^^ ^ - "^ " ^ ^ ^ 

A Capt. Georges Guynemer, greatest of French aces, 

if l.r»Tnl-iat<; who. before his death, destroyed fifty-two enemy 

Ma). Kaou. i^utoerry, /.mer.can av.ator a.^, wyu - - - 1 T \^ O ITl D a t S ^j^p,,^,^ 
met his death in the air after destroying many Ger- 




An F. B. A. seaplane in distress, the pilot"; being rescued b> a sister plane 



ATTLES IN THE CLOUDS 




The German is sho 



Guynemer's Forty-fiftK Victory 

inning nose dive by the violence of which the pilot and observer have been 




In 1916 a French F. B. A. 



Destruction of a Submarine 

aplane destroyed an enemy submarine in the North Sea. dropping bombs fron 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




'■'/" 


.^i- mm 


i 


Ip 


j^l^Sfl^^M 


1 


'^'""Jl 



Wreckage of Halifax Disaster 

A few of the wrecked homes in Halifax and a number of Cana 
3 were of considerable assistance in digging for bodies and 



:learing the 



Thirteen Miles from the xlalifax Explosion 



JM^^^^k 


*r'-, ,-*. 


^ 


W^ 






^^m^'" --; 






Bodies of victi 
which is rapidly be 


Some of the Dead 

ms of the great Halifax disaster are lying on 
ng covered by snow. 


the ground 




Collision of This Vessel, S. S. Imo 

Reli 



with Mont Blanc, Caused Great Halifax Disaster 

with the munition-laden French vessel. Mont Blanc, and caused th 
1 be seen in the background. The explosion occurred Dec. 6, 1917. 



ROU M AN I A 




LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Ex-King Constantine, Ex-Queen Sophie, and their Children, in Exile 

Constantine and Sophie, sister of the German Emperor, taken at their Swiss residence, the Villa "Wehrli" 




Villages Wrecked by SheU Fire 

Official photograph taken on the Salonika front. A sample of the desota- 
and waste caused by the 



THE BALKAN FRONT 




Greek Rebels, FigKting King, Adv 

Greek rebels, dressed in French uniforms and carrying French guns, marched through the 
forces before Constantine's abdication. 



battle to the King's 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




The Two Italian Army LeaJc- 
To the right is a portrait of the present Commander-in-Chief, Gen. Diaz, who replaced him after the Isonzo 



ON THE ITALIAN FRONT 




® U. ft U. OScill Italian Photograph. 



Where the Italians Fought 

most rugged mountain country in the world, the Italians faced the An 



The terrific mountain battles were fought 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Bringing Up the Guns 

A monster Italian gun being carried across a deep valley in the Tn 
a cable swung from opposite heights. 





Traveling Via tlie A 



Italian First Aid Station 
This photograph was taken near the first line between the 
protection afforded by the sand bags. 



nd Piave. Note the 



One of the ae) 
opposite high peaks 
in a roundabout wa 



trolleys the Italians swung across from 
The passage through air saved a journey 
over the jagged rugged country. 




Photographs. © U. & U. 
The greatest difficult 



Aerial Ferry Transports Food and Wine 

fighting is transportation. The Italians overcame this difficulty through the u.^ 



WARFARE IN THE ALPS 





In the Front Line 

Communication trenches on Mt. Asolone overlooking the Brenta River 



BeKind Nature's Barriers 
Barracks on the back slopes of Mt. Asolone 




LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 





Conquered Dugouts 

A newly taken Austrian trench on Col del Rosso 



Getting a Good View 

An Italian outlook on Col del Rosso 




Where Snows Never Melt 

Juilding roads of approach to Mt. Tonale Pass, the scene of a great Italian victory 



TRENCHES IN THE ALPS 




Reserve troops waiting in the second lii 



Ready to Enter the Fight 

trenches on the Montello line, one of the vital points in the victorious defen 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




A Mountain AmbusK 

outpost and barbed wire entanglements en the Uppe 




Waiting Their Chance to Fight 

rve troops just brought up behind Mt. Tonale F'ass. 



ITALIAN GUNS 




Hauling the Big Guns Up Mount Grappa 

are shown hauling their big guns up the slope of Mount Grappa, where most sanguinary fighting occurred in the last disastrous 



attempt of Austr 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Gregory Rasputin, the famous Russian monk, who 
Tsarsky Selo. Rasputin was murdered by Russian no 



iblem 



izarina's Favorite 

the power behind the Russian thro 



ded by a group of admirers at the Imperial Palace at 



THE EASTERN FRONT 



psr ^) 








'dj/j 


S ^ /^ jmL^ ^ 


1 '■ -''."^^\r*^'''''^' I" 


-BHi 


M 



Russian Infantry 

aldier that composed the first Ku 



C..'7'^i&.--^"*¥'^ 




® u. & u. 

Pouring into Hungary 

Part of the Russian forces that carried the fight to enemy 




Siberian Infantrymen Arrive in Warsaw 

Siheriaii troops arrived in Warsaw in 1914 just in time to save the cit 
from the Germans, when the Kaiser's forces first began to attack the city. 




Russians Advancing 

Marching along a railway on the great plains of Poland. 



From U. & U. 
Servii 



Austrian Prisoners 

D some of the thousands of pr 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




c) Brown & Daw 



The span can be 
Iter spout 
of the e 



Blowing Up a Bridge 

buckling under the strain 
planted in 



A Przemysl Ruin 

Galician city compelled I 



boats over the Sar 



the effect of the i 
the Russian rei 



the river. Thi: 




fl^^V^|!9^i 






I^^HiSii^^. 9^ < 


,;1 


'M% 


„^S3 


iSBrS 


T^:;'-?--j!i» 



Russians Blow Up Villag 




Russian Infantry and Cossack Prisoners 



Ten thousand Russiai 
the road in the distance. 



Notice the line along 



les in Galicia. 



© Brown fit Dawson, Stamford, Conn. 

The Great German Drive Througli Galicia 

By some brilliant infantry charge, and masterful maneuver 
Germans came out victorious in the battle of Stuckoff. They captur 
of prisoners, guns and supplies. 



THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION 




u. & u. 

Street Fight 

Soldiers and students are seen firin 
in the houses on the opposite 



/ 


i 




HHIM 


i%^ 


f ^^^^t 




ilHMi 


l^^^l 



n Petrograd 

across the Moikia 



Revolutionists in Raid 

d flags to their bayonets and taken 




From U. & U. 

MacLtne Guns Mow Down People 
The scene of this fight is the Nevsky Prospect. On the roof of the Public Library, the large b 
[uns the result of whose fire can be seen in the numbers lying dead and wounded in the stree 
n a vehicle. Near the foreground a woman can be seen protecting her child. 



ationed the machine 
are being sent aiway 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Sharpshooters of the Legion of Death 



BOLSHEVIK REVOLUTION 




© u. * n. 



Kerensky and His Cabinet 



Alexander F. Kerensk3 

Kerensky escaped from Russia. Most of the cabinet have been imprisoned by the Bolsheviki. Number 1 is Kerenskv ■ -Xs nremier hp maHp th^ ' ■ ■ 

2, Nekrasow; 3, Orenm ; 4. Kokoshkin ; 5, Pesheehonow ; 6. Aukscutiew ; 7, Chernow ; 8, Nikitin; 9, Kartashew 10 Old- ' " P'^^™'?'^ ^^ '"^1<= Pe. 

enleure; 11, Zarudney; 13, Efremou; 13, Sarenkow; 14, Skolelew; 15, Prskojovitz. 




Council of Soldiers' Deputies in Session in the Duma, Petrograd 

This revolutionary body was the incubator that hatched the Bolsheviki. 



LI BERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 





A Prison Wrecked 

Litovski Prison, Petrograd, was attacked, the prisoners freed, and the 



.^Ay|^|Hy HmhI ■■^^^Kj 


1 


i 


m 


mhkShU^ 


i 


f 







Kremlin 


in 


Moscow 


Wrecked 


by Bolsheviki 


The 


Tl'ouTthr 


rgho'ut 


irrepai 
the wo 


ably 
Id, s 


uff" 


eked. The whole beautiful 
ed considerably. 



The German Curse in Ri; 
A Petrograd police barracks after the revoh 
until they were overwhelmed by the mobs. Some c 
a slaughter house after the mobs got through. 




Burning Royal Symbols 

Imperial Eagles and royal arms torn from governme 



buildings serve for a bonfire. 



OLSHEVIK LEADERS 




Signing the Armistice at Brest-Litovsk 

•est-Litovsk on December 15, 1917, when the Russians and Teutons signed the armistice that started the peace negotiations, 
shown on the left signing the armistice for the Central Powers. The Bolshevi!<i representatives are seated opposite. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




General Petain Decorates Wounded Nurse 
One of the nurses who by her individual bravery saved the lives of 



Recent Photograph of General Foch 

Under Ferdinand Foch was unified the command of the allied 
hat the attack would be much more effective. 



MARSHAL JOFFRE 




M. Rene Viviani, foreign minister ai 
escort walking into the City Hall of Nev 
New York's skyscrapers. The insert is It 



Marshal Joffre's First View of New York's Skyscrapers 

ex-premier and head of the French Commission, on arm of Joseph H. Choate, followed by Marshal Joffre and 
fork where Mayor Mitchell officially received them. Marshal Joffre is lookmg upward, getting his first real view ot 
shal Joffre. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




German Raider "Seeadler Wrecked 



Camouflaged Teuton U-Boat 



The "Seeadler" (Sea Eagle) is held fast in the sands near Tahiti. She This boat is painted a solid sea green with a long wave length of fo 

was wrecked October 8, 1917. color superimposed on the hull and the conning tower. 




German Submarine Mine-Layer 

The German submarine mine-layer U-C 5, h-ing in the Thames off Temple 
Pier, Lond..n. The vessel was a prize of the British Xavy 



The Emden 

This German cruiser ran a spectacular course as a commerce raider 
from August 11 to Nov. 10, 1914, under Capt. von Muller. It was destroyed by 

the Australian cruiser Sydney. 




Submarine kitops Spanish Liner Off Cadiz 



THE U-BOAT MURDERS 




Torpedoed Liner Sinking in Mediterranean 

eked without warning by a German submarine and sank in a few 



passengers and 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




covered with tht 



F RIGHTFU LN ESS AT SEA 




Hospital Ship Torpedoed 



British hospital ship "Gloucester Castle" sinking in the British Channel after 
being torpedoed by a German U-boat despite the plainly visible Red Cross signs. 




The Final Plunge 



seen 


rhe sinking 
close by. 


of a ship torpedoed by a German U-boat. .'\ 


rescue ship is 


V^»' 


ki^ill!'-- 






^^- 


Eny^Kfi^irK. ^ 


*,^^ 


t 


%^ 


^^- v?^^ t^^ ^-^r^- 


fe^ 


m 


_ ^^^^ 


^^^""^"^^^ ^'^''- -' 


> 


t'v 


1 







1 OfBdaT Phologi'apT© U. SV. 

British Destroyer Rescues Su 

Surviviors ol a torpedoed vessel landing from a British destroyer at 




British Official Photograph © U. & U. 

The Wake of a Torpedo 

The dreaded silver trail left by the engine of death fired by a lurking submarine. 




Victims of the Submarine 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




A schooner is on fir. 



Sutmarine Victim in Flames 

lilt of the explosion of a German torpedo. A graphic illustratic 



of German frightfulness. 




Britisk Transport Torpedoed 



This vessel, torpedoed in the Eastern Medit 
ran on the rocks in an effort to beach her. Men can be seen 
sliding down the ropes. At the stern is a lifeboat hanging by 
the painter. 





Torpedoed French Transport Sinking 

The big French transport Medie, torpedoed in the Mediter- 
ean, went down in two minutes after the munitions on board 



From U. S U. 

Pose While Facing Death 

Soldiers on the transport Ivernia, sunk in the Mediterranean Ja 
tograph before getting into lifeboats. 



1917, posed for this pho- 



Jit/ J^m^l. 



®"»"- Taking Its Final Plunge 



Troopship That Struck a Mi 



The P. and O. liner Arabia was torpedoed by a German sub- When the British troopship "Tyndareus" struck a mine off Cape Agulhas, the Tommies on 

marine in the Mediterranean. There were one hundred and board lined up and went through the "Birkenhead Drill" and sang. Two rescue ships made their 

seventy persons on board. appearance in time. 



SUBMARINES 




"'"■"U.su. Fitting Finisli for Giant U-Boat 

One of the big German U-boats lying a total wreck on the coasts of Wissant, near Calais, France. The submarine was captured by the French and the crew taken 
prisoners by Belgian calvary. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




An American Torpedo 

One of the giant torpedoes destined for use by America's big battleships in process of assembly. The torpedoes are shipped in parts from the factory at which they 
are made to a barge moored in a little port somewhere along the coast. Here they are assembled and then tested. 




United States Submarines 

These are the Kl, K2, K5 and K6, lying in an American harbor. They are of the smaller type used for coast defense. 



'A BATTLES 




Battered Deck of the "Vindictive," Martyr Ship 



This remarkable picture shows deck and bridge of the British Cruis 
carried a landing force to the mole at Zebrugge, while other vessels were 
German shells. On May 9, the "Vindictive," filled with cement, was sui 



• "Vindictive," with sand bags used to reinforce the armored stations. On April 23, 1918, it 
link to block the harbor. The photograph was taken after this raid and shows the work of 
c to block the harbor at Ostend. 



LI BERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Wkat British SKell Did 
This is a close view of the deck of the German destroyer V-69, after a battle with British light sea forces in the North Sea. 




German Destroyer V-69 After a Battle 



The destroyer was damaged in a battle between German and British light sea forces and was taken into the harbor of Ymuiden, Holland, by her crew. One of 
funnels was tilted at a dangerous angle, and her deck was covered with wreckage and debris, havoc wrought by British shell fire. 



SMOKE SCREENS 




"Smoke Screens'" 

making smoke screens to hide them from the submarines and other enemy craft. The smoke screen perfectly disguises the vessel. 




"Smoke Screen Protects a Convoy 

Allied merchant ships, under convoy, are hidden from Teuton submarines by the screens of dense smoke 



by the guard of war ships. 




Photo bj N. G. Moser. From U. t V. 



'Sn-.oke Screen" on a Battleship 



This smoke screen, developed by the U. S. S. Arkansas, entirely envelops the ship in a few minutes, making it indistinguishable to tie enemy. A division ; 
; iaa5«er in Ae f wTg i iw d. — ^ — 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CO\FLICT 




Sweeping Vermin Off tne Seas 

This British official photograph shows one of the British drift fleets that are making their worth felt in service in the North Sea and the waters about the British Islet 




Putting Finisliing Touches on French Sutmarine Mi 



BRITISH SUBMARINES 




A Britisli Submarine 

The B2 is one of tiie smaller type of submarines in the service of the British 



then the war bega 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 



MJ^ 1./ ^^^^ 




.^:'4-4. 


•f.^ 

^ 


Iff 




) C. Si 1 



Sails with G 

On the first trip after unrestr 
S. S. Rochambeau sailed wi 
cancelled their reservations. 



Mounted on Deck 



gun mounted on he 



Gun That Sank a Submarine 

e American steamship Mongolia sank the f 
an American shell. 




the Nehraskan, 



the Irish Sea. Thirteen 



Last Plunge of the "Gulflight" 

Torpendoing of the .American steamer "Gulflight," ofT Scilly Islands, May 
i. The Gulflight is settling by the head. 



AMERICA DECLARES WAR 





<Si G. V. Buck. 

William G. McAdoo 

Appointed Secretary of the Treasury at the 
beginning of President Wilson's first term, 
Mr. McAdoo assumed after war was de- 
clared the important duties of General Di- 
rector of the United States Railroad 
Administration. He directed the financing 
of the war with conspicuous success. 



Washinston, D. C. 



President of the Unit< 
for the democracies of thi 
leadership, declared war c 



Woodrow Wilson 

Sta 



Robert Landing 

He succeeded William Jennings Bryan as 
Secretary of State and filled that office with 
distinction in the trying days that preceded the 
declaration of war with Germany. He was 
trained hy years of experience in the school 
of American diplomacy, which places honesty 
above intrigue, and frankness above evasion 
and deceit. 




President Wilson, and His War Cabinet 



On the extreme left is the President. Back of the table, left to right, are William G. \ 
Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy; D. F. Houston, Secretary of Agriculture, and W. 
Lansing, Secretary of State; Newton D. Baker, Secretary of War; A. S. Burleson, Postmas 
tary of Commerce. 



Adoo, Secretary of the Treasury; Thomas W. Gregory, Attorney General; 
Wilson, Secretary of Labor. In front of the table, left to right, are Robert 
General; Franklin Lane, Secretary of the Interior; W. C. Redfield, Secre- 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




lOin.-.liT,!., Washinstc.n, 



President Wilson Calls for War on Austria in Address to Congress 
An impressive moment during President Wilson's stirring address to the joint session of the reconvened Sixty-fifth Congress. Speaker Champ Clark, of the House, 
right, presided jointly with Vice-President Marshall, president of the Senate, on the left, while President Wilson made his address. 




Duncan U.F/etchep FpedepJck Hhle <slamesIfiimi7(on. Lewis @/oAn B.KendpIc/c Ifiles Poindextep e/o/inff.BdJiMead Phpk Ihamme// 



i 




Wilhun N.CeJdep F.N.Simmoiid BeMlf.Fejvtald Hoke SmUk Hem^jr L-Kyer-ts (SAqpIss (Suph's WllJi'am S.TTenyo. 

United States Senators Who Have Led in Supporting tKe President 



J 



AMERICAN STATESMEN 







^ay A'/fj^mn Jhomns SierJin^ ^ ffeed ^moof eldines A.Seed 



(S/ia-3. B. HendePrSon 



^1^ 




^JW^.I^ 



-op,r.gM-Ha.r.,C 



A. J Gj-'onn a e^" W. W&.d<swo2'th,rJp, qJoJiji F. cSh'a/poth 





Ho. ppi/ S.Ifew Ffsai c/s F. W&rpsn (oMsF. To0O7se/zd (j. W.NorpJs F/?om&s F Oore 



i-Sf^ph L Fph 77 cs OJFe N. e/mr/e^- G. S.P&^e 



Fj'dJik F.Bi'&ncle^ee Atlee Pome/^e/ie 








Wm. H.Thompson a'cxmesFFV^t-soR FIopj'>u rS77P.ppi.7=d W.Z.sTones 



Some of the most 



Leaders in the Senate 

nbers of tlie greatest deliberative body in the world who hclred wage the 



LI li ERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 



Hi 





IS 





mi 



71jU£.W/MSKW AISFRTF.POIK HAWLD KNUTSON ALV4N T.FUllES m.4KP GLAPK £DmPDW.G/MY ^..¥..;\Tl 




M-AI/dfJElD ^VfD/ll .'•rffoa^/c 



Vry ^PTtCuxJ^ liNeOLNDIXON 








m 





Members of tlie War Congress 



and Austria-Hungary, 



WAR ADMINISTRATORS 




i TO/1 COJfNALir W.P.:STEV£JfSON R.W.PAffK£K H.L. CANDY ;- £DaA!f K./l'/irSS CKI-FARTHUJi ^.W.DEMPSEY erAINr r. IE W-rM^ 

J.BAGHARACH W.W.W/lSO/f J.W. ALEXANDER C.'f.CURRY f.E.BROWNE -J.C.CATfTRlLL F.S.PUSIfELL '/^."p. GAMPElElL 

iiiiiR 





PM. it Clmd.nn 



H.T.RAINEY CLjEF&lD IRELAND £.E.DEJ/fSON o/.ET.'LAUGHLLN 6.E.FULLER W.R.GREEET E^.ElOlLJ/KSlYOSm-F. S./fERSEE 



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e.H. ROWLAND ALB£RTE.,JOHmON e/.ff.^LULZ ^./?Ur71FLL /J A.-'EADjOFN r- 'APr/VCr / LEA D.KDRU/fKFR eJOHN M CA'^EfFR 



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^^^..CeeJe SfoARTKlSE l^TT^l J^.e.KELLY .Jomf BAFR .jdifl^^.B^Cif 

Memters of the 65th Congress, Which Declared War on Germany 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




The Council of National Defe 



The Council of National Defense and the Advisory Commission in joint session in the office of the Secretary of Wa., „„.., _. _. .. 

Secretary of Agriculture David F. Houston; Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels; Secretary of War Newton D. Baker; Secretary of the Interior Franklin 
and Secretary of Labor William B. Wilson. Standing, left to right: Julius Rosenwald, Chairman of the Committee on Supplies; Bernard M. Baruch, in charge of raw 
materials; Daniel Willard, transportation; Dr. F. H. Martin, medicine and sanitation; Dr. Mollis Godfrey, science and research; Howard Coffin, munitions, and W. S. 
Gifford, director of the council. 



AMERICAN GENERALS 




e G. V. Buck 

Maj. Gen. Peyton C. MarcL 
This photograph was taken in Washington i 
mediately after he took possession of the Chief 
Staff's office in the War Department. 



[ 


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1 


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®u-*"- Newton D. Baker, Secretary of War 

Though accused of being a pacifist, this former mayor of 
Cleveland, O., directed the activities which placed an Ameri- 
can army of 1,900,000 men in France in 1918, and defeated 
Germany. 



® Clmcdm«t, Wuhmiton. D C. 

Maj. Gen. Tasker H. Bliss 

Gen. Bliss was Chief of Staff of the American 
armies in France and a member of the Inter-Allied 
Military Conference. 




• Clincdinit, w««hingtoii, D. c. The American War Council 

The War Council aided Secretary Baker in keeping the machinery of the Army smoothly. It w 
Department From left to right: Charles Day. civilian member; Major General William Crozier,Majc jV- , ii c r- 

W^N?wton D. Baker, Assisfant Secretary of War Benedict Crowell, Major General E. H. Crowder. Col. Palmer E. P.erce, and Col. U. S. Gr; 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Generals Focn and Pershing 



The smile of confidence and 
which these two "men of the hour" ■ 
the spirit of the leaders and of thi 
great battle for freedom. 



as typical of 
fighting the 



Perslimg the Man 

;imate photograph of the American gen- 



eral who commanded 



Persting and Joffre 

The hero of the Marne and the leader of the Ameri- 
[1 Expeditionary Forces exchange views. 




General PersKing and Staff on Arrival in England 

af American troops abroad, surrounded by members of his staff, photographed 



ival in England. General Pershing 



AMERICA IN ARMS 




From left to right: Prival 
the same company. The photo 
'1917, five months later at Cam] 



Tobe White, Company K, First North Carolina Infantry, who comes from Buncombe county of that state, and Private W. C. Bryson of 
in the left was taken at Camp Glenn, Morehead City, N. C., August, 1916, while the one at the right shows the same two men January 20, 
Stewart, Texas, showing White a gainer by 30 pounds and Bryson, heavier by 50 pounds. 




From U. & U. © Comm 



Americans 
Lsual design. 



Public Information. 

Aerial View of a Charge Over the Enemy's Trenches 
ishing over a perfect network of trenches at a training camp somewhere in this country. These trenches 



LIBERTY'S VICroniOLS COXFI.ICT 




Cowtoys and Cattlemen Make Good Soldiers 

few months ago these National Army men were totally unfamiliar with soldiering and the handling of military 




Wash Day in Camp 

The soldiers of the 56th U. S. Infantry, stationed at Camp McArthur. Texas, 
are shown washing their own clothes. 



© U. & U. 

A Bayonet Duel 

Two men at the Princeton Officers' Training Camp are using the Canadian 
equipment, consisting of steel helmets, wire masks and padded canvas jackets. They 
were instructed by Canadian officers. 




Teaching Boxing to Our Soldiers 

Willie Ritchie, former lightweight champion, who changed his uniform as boxing instructor to that of a private in the National Army, is showr. here 
teaching the soldiers of Camp Lewis to box. 




ARMY SIGNALERS 




Signal Corps Men in Training 

They must know how to operate motorcycles as well as how to 
re of other things. 



elephone wires and 



•^m^^^^im 



n Newspaper Union. 

An Army Wi 

Members of the U. S. Signal 
ith a wireless and signal I 



Outfit 



red automobile 



Field Generator and Tractor with Se 

This apparatus was designed by Sergeant Lowmuller of tl 
1 great success at night for signaling, discovering bodies oi 



irchlight Trailer 

: Marine, Corps. It was 
troops and Iridge-buildii 




® Western Newspaper Union 

American Army Wireless Operators 
This picture shows wireless operators of the U. S. Army sending practice military messages to San 



Barbed Wire Entanglements 
The latest forms of barbed wire entanglements, at Camp 
Dix, N. J. The soldiers in training learned to get through 
this wire at the greatest possible speed. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




This 
deceive when he' 
he tooks its twin fcrother. 



Learning the Art of Camounage 

earing the costume for rock-camouflage. Of course, it does 



the open, but if he gets into position alongside a rock 



ERICANS IN TRAINING 




The 102Bd Engineers putting on their gas 
that the gas attack had begun. 



Putting on Gas Masks at Top Speed 

nediately after the explosion of a real gas shell, the trained French dogs i 



down the line to herald 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Speeding Up Production of Munitions 

?fore lieing Inaded ind cipped with time Here, lying in bins, are tons and tons of 




Rifle Manufacture 



From U. & U. 

Forging Our Weapons 

Pounding a big gun into shape with one of the largest hammers; a 
the plant of the Bethlehem Steel works. 



OVR MERCHANT MARINE 





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A Wooden Dreadnaught 

The launching of the Coyote, first wooden ship constructed by the Emergency Fleet Corporatii 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




A submarine and seaplane, the 



Our Navy of the Air and Undersea 

submarine on the left being partly submerged with its 



ng tower above 



AMERICAN WAR SHIPS 




Cape May Naval Reserves Get First Boat Drill 

These blue-jackets, though they appear amateurish, will soon be first class oarsmen. This is the first time tlicy liave be 




From U. «: U. © N. G, 

Signaling from tlie Bridge of tke Pennsyl 



A 3-Incli Gun Cr 



Many methods of visual signaling are employed in our navy. Here the sig- A gun crew of the auxiliary supply ship Celtic, loading and standing by for 

nalers are usmg flags and wig-wag alphabet. probable emergency . ' 





kk % A^i 






>^.. 
'— ^ 



I U. S U. & N. G. Mo 




Making Ready the Big 14-Inch Guns 

er complement of over twelve hundred men than any other ship of 



This group IS haul- 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




From U. & U. © N. G. MoKr. 



A Broadside 

Tons of steel are being hurled at enormous speed from the guns of the U. S. S. New Hampshir 



AMERICAN DREADNAVGBT 




Fire on the U. S. S. Wyoming at Sea 
The blaie was quickly put out by the crew. Every man on a battleship has a certain duty in case of fire. The wonderful system and the rrectaon with which 
h man does his task mean that a fire has small chance aboard a U. S. battleship. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




U. S. S. Texas Off to Join Atlantic Fleet 

leaving the New York Navy Yard .tq.,jginj_)iie,,^5in<jc Fleet at Hampton Roads 



taken just as the big sea fighter was 



'fU AMERICAN TRANSPORTS 



m 


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A Convoy Scattering 

An authentic photograph of a convoy maneuvering after a submarine has been 



) U. & U. 

An American Convoy 

Transports conveying American troops, photographed in foreign waters. 





U. S. Marine Transport 



I U. St u. 

Snip That Dared SuDmarines 

The S. S. Rochester was one of the first ships to sail from New York unarmed 
after the German declaration of a barred zone. Crowds greeted her arrival at 
Bordeaux. 




U. S. Transport "Neptune 
On this ship the first American troops of the E.xpeditionary Forces sailed to Europe. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Blue and Gray in a New Meeting 

The "Blue Devils" of France and their commanders are reviewing the West Point Cadets. The "Blue Devils 
Academy and see Uncle Sam's gray-coated cadets on dress parade. 



West Point to inspect the Milit»ry 



OUR EXPEDITIONARY FORCE 




The Flags of the American Legion 
ceremony. Dr. Walter Hines Page, th 
Anthem. 









feiiiyi 




American Troops in London 

National Army men passing a detachment of Horse Guards at Whiteha 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




) Committee on Public Information. From Underwood 4 Underwood. 

Canteen Always Ready During Army Hikes 

The canteen is the first tent to be pitched when the men are on a hike, for ice cream bricks are always 



AMERICAN ARTILLERY 





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Americans Charge Through Gerinan Entanglements 

Under the protection of a perfect barrage these American fighters have gone over the top and are chari- 
ng through the German barbed wire enta--' '- 



Marines with New Model Anti-Aircraft 
Machine Gun 

The German Taube and other air machines served 




American Artillery in France 

ven much of the credit for the successful French 
Field Artillery Battalion lined up for final inspection 



counter-oflensi 




Hidden in a quiet wo 



Our Troops Encamped on the Aisne 

near the front Is the camp of the American troops who were fighting 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




From U. & U. © Committee on Public Ini 




Mess Time in Trenches 

Lunch hour is always observed even at the front. 



om U, & U. © Committee on Public Information. 

.Americans Win French Decorations 

General Gaucher of the French army is decorating 
1 American officer and an American soldier for 
avery in a recent bombardment. 







2.t^ ^r-'r- r 



f? Tt h U, BritiBh Official Photograph. 

American Machine Gun in Action in France 

"Somewhere in France" this machine gun it in action. These Ameriaan figtiters have received an intensive training in the use of «ht fun. 



IN THE FRONT LINE 




Tins entire brigade in heavy marching order is stan 


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Brigade Ready for the March 

ding with stacked guns waiting the word of command. Tliis picture gii 



client idea of the 




© U. & U. British Official Photograph. 

American Troops Digging In 

While the soldiers are digging a trench on the French A group of American soldiers in shell holes on the Western front are throwing hand grenades into th« 

front, a Y. M. C. A. man is serving crackers and fruits German lines. 

to them. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




m U. & U. © Committee on Public Information. 

U. S. Marines Wearing Gas Masks in France 

These Marines are equipped with the latest gas masks and steel 




(S U. & U. British Offic al PI otograph 

Tropliies Captured by Americans at Battle of Seiclieprey 

These doughboys are wearing German hats and displaying other 
souvenirs ; a Boche gun, gas mask, wire-cutter and canteen. 



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From U. & U. © Committee on Public Information. 

Botli Men and Horses Wear Ga 



Masks at the Front 




From U. & U. © Commit! 



American Engineers in France 

American engineers of the • Division marching to the front lines. 



OVER THE TOP 




Barrage Covers Grenade Attack on tlie Marne 

French troops are leaving their trenches to make a grenade attack on the German lines. The way has been prepared for them by barrage fire. 




From Western Newspaper Union © Committee on Public Information. 

Yankees Going Through the German Wire 




From Western Newspaper Union © Committee on Pi 

American Firing Anti-Aircraft Gun 

An officer, on second line of defense, firing an anti-aircraft machine gun 
several German airplanes who are trying to spot American positions. 




Depth Bombs on American Patrol Boats 

A scene on the Harvard, a transformed yacht. The deadly depth bombs are 
the things like oil cans on the rack. 




From U.'& U. © Committee on Public Information. 

Americans Grooming Their Horses 

Before starting out on the way to the front these members 
artillery are washing their horses in a stream in France. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




iish Official Photograph 



Convalescing in the open 



American Soldiers Forget Wounds 

I the beautiful grounds of American Red Cross Hospital No, 21. the gift of an Englishv 




© U. 4 U. British Official Photograph. 

"WKen a Man's Down" Then Enmity Ends 

The German wounded who fall into the hands of the British receive perhaps 
the best of treatment from the hands of the British doctors and ambulance men. 



© Western Newspaper Union — Canadian Official Photograph. 

Questioning a Wounded "Fritzie' 

A Canadian medical officer is examining a wounded Ger 
clasps his big steel helmet to his breast. 



SOCIAL SIDE OF WAR 




American Hospital Tr; 

One wounded soldier is being lifted into a hospit 
5 others lie on stretchers waiting to be put aboard. 



Newspaper Union 

Convalescing in London 

Two smiling Sammies, who tasted some of the heavy fighting on the Westen 
front in France, recuperating from their wounds in a London hospital. 




Hospital Car Provides Every Comfort 

linistering to soldiers who are playing sick for the occasion in the hospital car designed 



ndardized by the Erie Railroad Mechanical 




Decorated witK Croix de Guerre 

Privates Dewev S. Smith and George A. Hopkins, and two Red Cross i 
o were awarded the Croix de Guerre, France. 



American Officers Convalesce 

Hon. Mrs, Spender Clay reading to Americans at her estate in Lingfield 
Surrey which was American Red Cross Convalescent Home No. 1. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




J Committee on Public Inforn.alioli. 

Brave Bullets to Bake Pies 

As heroic as the American soldiers 
•ation Army girls who braved enemy fi 
luts for our fighting men. 



the trenches were the courageous Sal- 
day and night to bake pies and dough- 



Welcome in Many Languages 

The hand of goodfellowship was spread broadcast by the V. 



ngling of troops of different 



M. C. A., and 
the huts gave them a chance 




• O 



Army Checkerboard Strategist 
In a Y. M. C. A. hut just behind the lines, one soldier is executing a flank 
attack on the checkerboard front, while his opponent is calmly bringing up his 
mental reserves. 



The Postofiice at the Front 



BEHIND THE FRONT LINES 




© Committee on Public Informal 



Taking Cover 



ish Official Photograph ® U. & U. 

Little French Refugees 

Just like their daddy, these little French refugees have donned steel helmets. 




© U. iU. 



ritish Official Photograph ® U. & U. 

German Ammunition Wagons Destroyed Cliateau-Tliierry Liberated 

The remains of what was once a train of German ammunition wagons which Taken after the battle of Chateau-Thierry, where Americans defeated the 

were destroyed hy the effective fire of British gunners. 



Germans in their drive on Par 




Wasted Powder 

A German ammunition dump blown up by the Huns before 



LI BERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




British Official Photograph — Courtesy of Pathe Company. 



BritisK Tanks in Action 

tanks continue one of the chief weapons of the Allies in resisting the German onrush. In open fighting their terrorizing aspect and 
able aids to the infantry. In the lower picture one is shown moving through a shell swept village to the front. 




BRITISH FIGHTERS 




© U. & U. British Official Photograph, 



Companions in Combat 

sli troops and tanks going up to check the Germans in Flander, 




@ U. & U. British Official Photograr.li. 

BritisK Guns Work Overtime 

The photograph shows a heavy gun the instant it has fired at the Germans. 



irks. Officii British War Pictures. Released by.Pathe. 

A Good Haul 

Prisoners taken by British in 1918 battle of Flanders. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 





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B U. & U. French Official Photograph. 

Frenck Cantonment in the Oise District 



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Real Dogs of War on Duty 

Real war dogs in the trenches were not ferocious fighters, but succored those who had falle 




U. & U. French Official Photograph. 

Frencli Mosquito Tanks 

These swift tanks are the latest model. 




Photo from U. & U. 

Neiv Heavy French Artillery 

The gun crew of one of the 280 mms. at work, sheltered from the 
eye of the air scout. 




1 C. » U. 

The Gas Attack Gong SoundeJ 




French Drive Back Raiders with Hand Grenade 



THE 1918 GERMAN DRIVE 




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enough Dynamite to Blow Up an Army 

arge number of 66 millimeter bombs, Ausalde type. Although 



Newspaper Union © Committee on Public Information. 

American Troops Repairing Motorcycles 

epair shop in a ruined French village back of 




mSibM^M/"^ 



wssm 






) WeBteni Newspaper Union— Canadian Official Photograph. 



A Canadian anti- 



Hun Planes Disturb Ca'nadians' Game of Poker 

aft gun crew, who a few seconds before were enjoying a friendly game of poker, is rushing 



Boche airman reception. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




k V British Official Photo»r«pt 

British Send Shells into German Lines 

Tommies are shown ramming a shell into a large calibre English gun 



OPEN FIGHTING 




© U & U. British Official PhotosraDh 



British Troops Barricade Village 

erman drive. British troops are hurriedly erecting a bar 



the streets of a French village to 




© U. & U. British Official Photograph. 

German Scout Plane Brought Down 

Happy British flyers are wheeling the fusilage of a German scout plane along a road behind the lines. The 
flyers caught it scouting over their lines during the Flanders battle. 



the craft were shot to pieces when the British 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




A Doughtoy's Prisoner 

Paul Meier, 259th German Reserves, taken prisoner by U. S. Infantry 



& U. British Official Photojraph. 

Brothers in Arms 

British and French infantry in open fighting in Picardy. 



CHECKING THE HUNS 




® U. & U. British Official Pholograpl 



Tommies Reat After a Battle 

Worn out but happy despite the strenuous fighting, these Tommies are i 




LI BERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




The Cavalry Comes Back 

French cavalry with British Tommies waiting for the Boches in a small village behind a bar 




Official War Pictures. Released by Pathe 



A Wrecked German Observation Post 

This photograph was taken after the first battle of Messines Ridge. 



ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUNS 




This is one of the highly mobile 



An Anti-Air Automobile Gun 

te anti-aircraft guns which the French used so effe ctively in the Picardy fighi 




Range Finding for Anti-Air Gun 

Officers of a French automobile battery are shown in the Picardy offensive giving the range of enemy airplanes to the guns 



LI BERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




1 Official Photograph. 



Waiting for Customers in SKell Shattered SKop 

Shop and house are almost totally destroyed by the fierce enemy shell fire, yet tl e aged storekeeper pathetically keeps his post, waiting for chance customers to pur- 
chase the shght stock of goods that has escaped the general destruction. t- j f y , e, v 



FRENCH INFANTRY 




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French sold: 
alley below. 



Fighting with Stones 

the Vosges mountains hurling ; 



V. i U. 

Storming Monkey Mountain 

French troops are shown in a charge which carried the strong position north 




( U. & U. 

Making a Charge in the 

A photograph taken while the action was the hottest during the battle of Chemin des Dame 
ot to advance too rapidly. 



Open 

;. An officer can be 



fith his hand upraised cautioning his men 



LI BERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




I Photograph © U. & 

The gun has just been 



Britiskf Artillery Battery Going into Action 

limbered and swung into position while the ammunition limber has been drawn 




Britiah Officill Photoeniph. 

Pulling British Anti-Aircraft Gun into New Position 

Gunners like these do wonderful work warding off the prying eyes of the 
enemy. Anti-aircraft field pieces are usually placed a short distance behind the 
front lines. 



Britiah Official Photograph © U. & U. 

Into Action on tLe Gallop 

Royal Horse Artillery approaching a battery position. The R. H. A. are the 
and generally co-operate particularly with the 



obile branch of the 




French Official Photograph © U. » U. 



Guns Like This Won the War 
Taken in the Oise district, this photograph show a French Filloux gun being pulled by a caterpillar 



THE GREAT COUNTER DRIVE 




Pursuing the Hun 

troop^ ha^iW're'Sn/bTdgerg^o'dt^oulMrpe^Tt "m'^n^'to cro'ss:'"' '"'"''' '""' """^ °' transportation to impede the progress of the oncoming foe. The pursuing 




The French Small Tanks 



Official Photograph ® U. 



Captured German Tank 

a>fL^^^^e^tur°^,^s^tit^i^fL^^frir;^^5r"^-'-'^^^^ .oJl^^^^-^T'^^^^r^f^^rTi^;:^^'--'^ 




French "Whippet" Tanks Going Into Actic 



sses like rows of shrubbery in the 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Explosion of Ammunition in Trenc. 

A large house in a French village where the Gei 

quantity of ammunition, was burned before their retr 

Lirred onlv a few seconds before the British arrived. 



Redoubt 30 Feet Underground Blown Up 

After three and a half days of tunneling the Canadians reached a German 
redoubt 3n feet under ground. It was constructed of concrete and beams. The 
photograph was taken from a parapet 100 yards away. 




I U. & U. 

Liquid Fire Attack 

Tommies give a demonstration of the liquid fire attack for the Queen of England's benefit. It ' 



1 on the first visit Queen Mary paid to the fighting line in France. 



THE GERMAN RETREAT 



l^^S^^^^^^^^^^^ 



itish Official Photograph © U. & U. 

A Shell Swept Road 

British troops going up to the French line along a shell-swept road. Dead hor; 





Where the Wave Receded 



Bringing in the Wounded 

A light military railway close to the Western front is being put to a use for 
which it was not originally intended. 




German Made Trenches Occupied ty French 

ade trenches were captured, and the French directed their fire from them. 



Note the bodies of the Germans killed in the 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Concrete Gun Pits 

Captured by the Canadians, they resisted the shell fired by theii 




British Official Photograph © U. & U. 

They Feel at Home 








A German Headquarters 



Built to Last Forever 



Entrance to a deep dugout used by the commanding officers Now that the Germans have been driven from this concrete gun pit, Canadian gunners find 



protection in it from Hun fire. 



THE GERMANS WEAKEN 




1 Official Photograph. From 



An American Haul of Prisoners 

A lone U. S. Infantryman is guarding this long line of German prisoners captured in the 



offensive on the Ma 




Prisoners Counted as They File By 

British soldiers counting the endless stream of German prisoners as they file 
by. They were captured in a terrific battle near Beaumont Hamel. 



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Military Police Bring in Prisoners 

These military police attached to the first division of the U. S. 
leading to the rear a batch of German soldiers. 




British OtScial Photograph © U 



Glad to Be Out of I 



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Waiting to Be Questioned 

German prisoners taken in the Teuton drive of March, lois, by the Br 




The happy look on these German faces is typical of prisoners captured in the 
1 offensive of 1918. 



French Official Photograph. 

French Prison Camp Near the Oise 
They cried, "Kamerad !" That's why they're now in this French prison camp. 
near the Oise river. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




An Attack ty Grenadiers 

^perts ill grenade throwing are leading an advance upon the German trenches preceded by a bar 




The surviving members of a British outpost 



Holding to tlie Last Man 

ded by Huns, are displaying the courage : 



common in this war, fighting to the last. 



THE LAST BATTLE 




1 Official riiotogiapli i 



BntisK Cavalry in Peronne 

vhich the Germans were forced to evacuate after disiilaying stubborn resistance. British cavalry marched 




From Western Newspaper Union. 

Patrols on the Belgian Front 

A raft on the Yser river serves for a reconnaisance of the enemy hi 



-itish Official Photograph. ® Western Newspaper Union. 

The Advance on Bapaume 

British infantry and a tank in the last great offensive of the 




British Official Photograph. From I. F. S. 

The Cavalry in Waiting 

A British horseman waits under shell fire for the signal to advance. 



The Historic Marne 

Here the Americans and French stopped the last German offei 
had stopped the first. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




American Artillery in Action 

A battery of 6-inch guns being placed in an advanced position. 



'4lLL^^ 




Yanks Going into Action 

In combat formation, they are going forward toward the Rhine in a wood in Als 



PRISONERS 







All Packed Up for Prison 

These Germans carried bags of clothing which they had prepared in advam 



Huns Carry Canadian Wounded 

Their guard is a wounded man whom they are assisting to a hospital. 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




Americans Build Telephone 

Corps men are running a cable through a French town. 



Clearing Away Debris 

an soldiers begin reconstruction work in Montdic 




) Western Newspaper Ui 



Rebuilding a Bridge 

Canadian engineers are at work replacing a bridge which the Germans destroyed. 



REP A TRI A TES 




French Peasants Return Home 

Walking back to the villages which the American advance had liberated from the Hu 




Giving Thanks for Deliverance 

Abbe Thuilliez of Cambrai conducting in the Cathedral of 
brai, October 13, 1918, a service of thanksfiving. 



© Western 

French Reclaim Buried Valuables 

After the allied forces had recaptured the town of Hombleux, the inhabit 
the valuables they had buried to keep them from the thieving Huns 



LIBERTY'S VICTORIOUS CONFLICT 




N^ 



-ii