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Full text of "Life of Deacon Samuel Chapin, of Springfield"

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929.2 

C365cha 

1832296 



REYNOLDS HfSTORfCAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01206 0957 



GENEALOGY 

929.2 

C365CHA 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/lifeofdeaconsamu01chap 



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CHAPIN FAMILY ASSOCIATION 
PUBLICATIONS. 



LIFE OF 

Deacon^ Samuel jQhapin, 



OF SPRINGFIELD. 



BY 
HOWARD MILLAR CHAPIN. 



PROVIDENCE: 

Snow & Farnham Co., Printers, 

1908. 



1832296 



OFFICERS OF THE ''ASSOCIATION FOR THE YEAR BEGINNING 
MAY 1st, 1908. ARE AS FOLLOWS;— 



« 



Mr. Gilbert W. Chapin, Hartford, Conn., 
Mr. Merrick W. Chapin, Hartford, Conn,, 
Mr. Terry J. Chapin, Suffield, Conn., . 
Hon. Arthur B. Chapin, Holyoke, Mass., 
Dr. Walter H. Chapin, Springfield, Mass., 
Mr. Wm.H. G. Chapin, Parkersburg, W. Va., 
Rev. Charles B. Chapin, Rochester, N. Y., 
Mr. Charles S. Blake, Hartford, Conn., . 
Mr. Frank M. Chapin, Pine Meadow, Conn., 



President. 
Sec- Treasurer. 
Recorder. 



Vice ■ Presidents. 



Executive Committee. 



Mr. Frederick W. Chapin, 
Mr. Henry G. Chapin, 
Mr. William H. Chapin, 



Springfield, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 






The Chapin Family Association was organized at Spring- 
field, Mass., April 2nd, 1904, in response to a desire on the 
part of numerous Chapins scattered tnroughout the country 
that there should be a permanent organization of the Chapin 
family. The object of this Association is to unite in closer 
friendship the descendants of Deacon Samuel Chapin ; to 
honor and perpetuate his memory ; to cultivate a spirit of 
brotherly love ; to compile and preserve the family history ; 
to emulate deeds of patriotism, and to strive for the best and 
noblest things in life. Any descendant of Deacon Samuel 
Chapin may become a member of the Association and entitled 
to the privileges and benefits of such membership. The in- 
itiation fee upon joining the Association is $1.00, and the 
annual dues are $1.00. The larger the membership the 
greater will be the scope and efficiency of the Association. 
The material in this pamphlet has been gathered and compiled 
by Howard Millar Chapin of Providence, R. I., who has 
kindly donated to the Association the results of his labors, 
j^^^ The Association is to be congratulated in being the recipient 
of a work so reliable and thorough. It is issued with the 
approval of a committee of the Association. 

5* Gilbert W. Chapin, 

p President. 

k' August I, 1908. 



^. 



PREFACE. 



A N effort has been made to gather together all the contem- 
'^~*' porary items referring to Samuel Chapin, that could be 
found, and to weave them into a connected narrative that 
they may be better understood. 

I am very much indebted to the works of Francis S. Drake, 
Mason A. Green and Henry Burt, which throw much light on 
the history of Roxbury and Springfield. 

I also wish to thank Dr. Charles V. Chapin of Providence, 
Dr. Walter H. Chapin of Springfield, Mr. William W. Chapin 
of Providence, and Mr. Frank H. Burt of Newton, for their 
assistance. 

Unfortunately the Springfield Church records are not 
extant, so that no information could be derived from that 
source. 

An examination of the Hampshire County deeds with a 
view to discovering which ones were acknowledged before 
Samuel Chapin and to which he was a witness, might give us 
a few new items. The Hampshire wills might also be exam- 
ined in order to see if he witnessed any of them. The Hamp- 
shire Court records also might add a few more items. 

The author will be very glad to receive any additions or 
corrections to this work. 

Howard M. Chapin, 

Providence. 

August I, 1908. 



CONTENTS. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY. 




1 


Chapter I. 


England .... 


9 ' 


II. 


ROXBURY .... 


12 


III. 


Springfield 


15 


IV. 


Selectman 


18 1 


V. 


Commissioner . 


22 


VI. 


Ministry .... 


26 


VII. 


Continued Active Life . 


30 


VIII. 


Death .... 


34 . 


IX. 


Land Records and Wills 


38 ' 


X. 


Writings .... 


48 


XI. 


Pynchon's Store 


52 





Abbreviations. 


R. Ch. 


Roxbury Church Records 


K. L. 


Land 


S. 


Springfield Town " 


M. 


Mass. Col. 


M. A. 


Mass. Archives. 


Pr. 


Printed. 


Pt. 


Part. 



9 

12 
IS 

i8 

22 
26 
30 

34 
38 
48 

52 



LIST OF PLATES. 



I. Statue at Springfield (Frontispiece) 

II. Map of Samuel Chapin's home lot in Spring- 
field 

III. Photo of deed 

IV. Map of Samuel Chapin's lot on end brook 

V. Photo of handwriting 

VI. Facsimiles of Signatures of Samuel Chapin 
and Marks of Cicely Chapin . 



Opp. p 

9 



16 
24 
32 
40 



48 



BIBLIOGRAPHY. 



Town of Roxbury, its memorable persons and places, by F. 

S. Drake, in Boston Rec. Com., Vol. 34. 
Roxbury in the Colonial Period, by F. S. Drake, in Justice 

Winsor's Memorial History of Boston. 
History of Roxbury, by Chas. M. Ellis. 
Roxbury Church Records in Boston Rec. Com., Vol. 1 14. 
Roxbury Land Records in Boston Rec. Com., Vol. 1 14. 
N. E. H. & G. Registor to 1906. 
First Century of the History of Springfield, by Henry Burt, 

including reprint of Springfield Town Records. 
Massachusetts Colonial Records. 
History of Springfield, by Mason A. Green. 
Hampden County Indian Deeds, by Wright, with copies of 

deeds. 
Judge Chapin's Address in the Chapin Gathering, 1862. 
Savage's Genealogical Dictionary. 
Massachusetts State Archives. 
Springfield Vital Records. 
Springfield Proprietors' Records. 
Northampton Probate Records. 
Hami)den County Deeds. 
Hampshire County Probate Records. 
Japhet Chapin's Account l^ook. 
Pynchon Account Books. 




iapirffr"""''-'^"'*''"'" "■■-1 ii,,.. 




Statue by St. (iaudens at Spiingtield, erected in memory of 
Samuel Chapin by Chester W. Chapiii. 



CHAPTER I. 

ENGLAND. 

NOTHING is known with certainty of Samuel Chapin's 
birth and early life. On the statue erected to his 
memory in Springfield by the late Chester W. Chapin, there 
appears the date 1595 which apparently refers to the date of 
his birth. I have never been able to find the authority for 
this date and conclude that it is probably a mere appro.xima- 
tion, which is especially likely as it is in round numbers, 95. 

The only other reference to his birth which has any appear- 
ance of reliability is the following: "My Great, great, grand- 
father, by my mother's side, was Samuel Chapin, Esq. l^orn 
in Dartmouth in Old England. Came over to New England 
about the year 1635, Lived at Ro.xbury awhile, then moved to 
Springfield. Was a deacon of that church. October 29, 1779. 
By me, John Horton." (From the Chapin Gathering, 1862, 
p. 58, note B.) As this was written over a hundred years 
after Samuel's death, it is scarcely more than tradition, yet 
as far as we can verify it, it is true, and so the part we can- 
not verify may have a grain of truth in it. 

Therefore, I hail the records of the church of St. Saviour's, 
Dartmouth, Devon, searched from their beginning in 1582 
till 1635. One Chapin item was the result. " Englishe ye 
daughtr of Robt Chappin christened ye xviith day Deer 
1593." This unfortunately does not prove anything except 
that there were Chapins in Dartmouth in 1593. Since there 
was only one item, we may infer that the Chapins soon moved 
away from St. Saviour's parish, or that they lived in a neigh- 
boring parish and for some reason or other had one child 
christened at St. Saviour's. 



lO 



CHAPIN FAMILY 



Four possibilities are left open to us concerning Samuel 
Chapin's birth, (i) He may have been born in Dartmouth 
and it was not recorded, (2) John Morton may have been 
entirely in error concerning his birth, (3) John Horton may 
have meant some other Dartmouth in England, or (4) Samuel 
Chapin may have been born in a nearby parish, and as Dart- 
mouth was the nearest town, and as perhaps he sailed from 
Dartmouth, the tradition that he came from Dartmouth, grew 
into the tradition that he was born in Dartmouth. This 
fourth possibility I think is by far the most likely. 

One genealogist claims to have discovered the marriage 
record of Samuel and Cicely, and I judge from what he says 
that he found it in Devon. If this is so, it goes to partly 
confirm the fourth possibility above mentioned. 

There can be no doubt that Samuel Chapin came from 
England. If one examines his writings, it will be seen that 
he was a very well educated man for his time. He wrote out 
deeds and agreements in a manner that will convince any one 
that his native language was English, and that he wrote in 
old English characters does not contradict this view. The 
numerous offices which he held, especially that of magistrate, 
would scarcely have been given to any but an Englishman by 
birth and training in those days. Besides also he came to 
New England during a great immigration from England. 
The family names show only that the family was Puritanical. 
The Chapin family as a whole, however, is doubtless of a 
Continental and probably French origin. Still we find a 
Richard Choppyn in England as early as 15 18. 

Undoubtedly the expenditure of a little money and time in 
England would bring to light much valuable Chapin data and 
very likely trace for a few generations the ancestry of Samuel 
Chapin. 

The fact that Henry Burt and Thomas Bliss, both early 
settlers at Springfield, are said to have come from Devon, 
tends to strengthen the probability that Samuel Chapin came 
from that shire, especially when one considers that a Richard 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. II 

Chappin was in Dartmouth in 1593 and an Agnes Chappyn 
in Corn worthy in 1627, 

Samuel Chapin's marriage is not recorded in the records of 
the churches of St. Petrox and St. Barnabas, Dartmouth, 
which I have had searched from 1618 to 1634. 



12 CHAPIN FAMILY 

CHAPTER II. 

ROXBURY. 

SAMUEL CHAPIN came to America in 1635, according I 
to his great-great-grandson, John Horton, whom we have 
before quoted. He probably brought with him his family, 
which consisted of his wife Cicely, three sons, Henry, David, ( 
and Josiah, and two daughters, Catherine and Sarah. He j 
most likely came over in the summer, when the passage was [ 
the mildest, and probably landed at Boston, which was then, f 
as it is now, the chief port of New England. ( 

However he very soon, if not immediately, went to Rox- 
bury to live. Savage gives 1638 as the date of his arrival at ! 
Ro.xbury, but he doubtless based that on the fact that the > 
first record of Samuel Chapin in Roxbury bears the date of | 
1639, and so he deduced 1638 for the date of his arrival •' 
without further authority, which seems especially so since he } 
gives no account of Samuel Chapin for the interval between 
1635 and 1638. Therefore it seems more probable that the t 
Chapins went immediately to Roxbury in 1635, and the ab- ; 
sence of any earlier record in Roxbury is easily accounted for ! 
by the meagreness of the earlier records. ^ 

Roxbury had been founded a few years before, in 1630, by 
William Pynchon. It soon became a small village of trom ^ 
two to threescore families, most of whom came from Nazing, 
London, or the west of England. Possibly it was because he , 
had friends among the latter that determined Samuel to set- 
tle in Roxbury. Its soil was rich though rocky, watered by 
four brooks, and thickly wooded, like the greater part of New j 
England. Probably most of the houses at the time of the I 
Chapin's arrival were small square thatched log cabins with 
one or at best two rooms, and a fireplace. A meeting house 
had been built in the summer of 1632 which was "a rude and 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 



13 



unbeautiful structure with a thatched roof, destitute of shing- 
les or plaster, without gallery, pew or spire." (See Memorial 
History of Boston, edited by Justin Winsor.) It was built 
on meeting house hill, near which the Chapins undoubtedly 
lived, since in 1635 an act was passed that no one should live 
beyond half a mile from the meeting house, in order that the 
inhabitants, by dwelling near each other, would be better pro- 
tected from the Indians. 

He held land in Roxbury as early as 1639, ^s is shown by 
the Roxbury land records. 

" 1639 Samuel Chapin his lot upon which Georg Al cocks 
lot no 6 in the third division is entered " (R. L. *i). 

Three other records, without giving the date, mention his 
land. They are as follows : 

"and in the first and third alotments in the last deuission 
being part of it out of the lot of Samuell Chapin which with 
his (Thomas Ruggles) lyeth betweene John Graues his heires 
and Thomas Griggs the other parte and the lott of the heires 
of John Graue being the seuenth and eight lott therein is 
twenty and eight accres more or lesse " (R. L. [51] *29). 

"And in the first and third allotment in the last diuision 
being the sixt lott lying betweene William Cheiney and 
Samuell Chapen his assignes, sixty four accres one quarter 
and ten rode" George Alcocke's land (R. L. [72] *5i). 

"And in the first and third alottment of the last deuision 
being in the seauenth lott betweene the heires of George 
Alcocke and John Ruggles se. nine accres late Samuell 
Chapin his li)tt " (R. L. [80] *59). On a loose paper prob- 
ably of a date somewhere between 1636 and 1640 entitled 
"A Note of ye Estates and Persons of the Inhabitants of 
Rocksbury," there appears the following item : ^ 

Acres. Persons and estates. 

24. Samuel Chapin. 8 [torn.]. 

(R. L. [7]). It is not clear to what the eight refers, but it 
is probably to the valuation of property. At this time the 
town consisted of sixty-nine families. 



14 CHAPIN FAMILY 

On " I April 1641 Samuell Chapin bought a house and lott 
of James How" (R. L. [80] *59). 

Both Samuel Chapin and Sisly Chapin, wife of Samuel 
Chapin, appear on the church records as members of the 
first church of Roxbury (R. C, Boston Rec. Com. pp. 83 and 
85), which was founded in 1632, and is commonly called John 
Eliot's church. Thomas Weld was its pastor, and John Eliot, 
the Apostle, was its teacher. As in those days a man had to 
be a church member before he could become a freeman, 
Samuel Chapin must have joined the church before 2 June, 
1641, when, 'according to the Mass. Col. Rec. (pr.) i, 378, 
" Samu Chapun " was a freeman (or enfranchised citizen). 

Like most of the early settlers Samuel Chapin must have 
been principally a farmer, although undoubtedly he had to 
turn his hand to many other pursuits as occasion required, 
v-hl:;b vl;^ 11 Li.:r. -■ tr-- :"tn. 1. .-•.^ ^j :.:■:•. -,: ..: 1: j 
.imail i«,M;j.r..-;.'J (community tnc Chapms mas: nave knijvvn v^ry 
well the P^liots, Ruggles, Curtises, Alcotts (then spelt 
Alcock), and the other village families. Samuel Chapin 
doubtless often talked with such men as John Eliot, Thomas 
JJudley, Robert Williams, the elder Heath, William Denni- 
son, and William Pynchon, to whose influence was due the 
emigration of the Chapins to Springfield in 1642. In 1636 
Samuel Chapin, then comparatively a young man, was very 
probably one "of the Roxbury people " who worked on the 
fortifications at Cornhill in Boston. In the fall of that year 
the General Court met at Roxbury, thus giving Samuel 
Chapin a chance to see its workings. During his stay in Rox- 
bury the Pequot War took place, which resulted in making it 
possible to settle with safety in Western New England as at 
Springfield. 

The Chapins lived in Roxbury till the close of the^year 
1642, as on 15 of October of that year "Japhet Chapin, the 
son of Samuel Chapin, was baptized" there (R. C, in B. R. 
C. 1 14). Soon after this, however, they must have moved to 
Springfield, for we find them there in January 1642 (1643). 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 



CHAPTER III. 

SPRINGFIELD. 

TN 1636 William Pynchon, then a resident of Roxbury, hold- 
•'■ ing as a patentee of the Massachusetts Bay Colony cer- 
tain special privileges concerning trading with the Indians, 
and so tempted by the abundance of the beavers in the Con- 
necticut, and possibly also urged on by the prospect of a 
religious controversy with Boston if he stayed at Roxbury, 
led a party of about a dozen families to the Connecticut River, 
where he founded a settlement then called Agawam, but 
which four years later was renamed Springfield, after his 
home in England. Most of the settlers took up farming, as 
there were many fertile meadows along the banks of the Con- 
necticut, while Pynchon for the most part engaged in the fur 
trade. 

The settlement grew slowly at first, but by the time of the 
arrival of the Chapins had become a village of respectable 
size for New England in those days. As we said in the last 
Chapter, the Chapins must have arrived in Springfield during 
the winter of 1642-3. Why Samuel Chapin decided to go 
out into the wilderness of this new settlement we do not 
know, but it was due probably to the influence of its founder, 
William Pynchon, and also to the fact that in a new settle- 
ment like Springfield, the chances of bettering his position in 
life were much greater than in a comparatively old town like 
Roxbury. They very likely went overland on foot from Rox- 
bury to Springfield, although it is not known for certain 
whether they went by land or water. Probably, however, 
they came by the Indian trails through Woodstock in Con- 
necticut, which was a sort of trail centre. 



i6 



CHAPIN FAMILY 



Soon after his arrival Samuel Chapin began to hold public 
offices. On 26 January 1642 (1643), Henry Smith, Elitzure 
Holyoke, Henry Burt, Samuel Chapin, Richard Sikes and 
Thomas Mirack were chosen on a committee of six to lay out 
upland and meadows on the other side of the greate river 
(now the Connecticut), and meadow at Agavvam (S. i. 30). 
On 6 April, 1643, the committee met arid alotted the land. 
(S. I. 32.) 

Of the planting lots that face the great river, Samuel 
Chapin received lot No. 5 of ten and a half acres (S. i. 32). 
This grant according to the records was "disannulled again," 
apparently meaning merely that it was annulled. 

Of the meadow ground on the Agawam side, Sam. Chapin 
received lot No. 18 of one acre (S. i. 33). 

Of the meadow lots on the other side of the great river, \ 
Sam. Chapin received lot No. 21 of half an acre (S. i. 33). . 
Another land grant was soon made as the records show, 23 | 
February, 1643 (1644). "It is ordered yt Samuell Chapin ( 
shall have his 2d lottment toElitzur Holliokes & John Dober 
next to him downward (S. i. 34). 

As he had been at Roxbury, so at Springfield, Samuel 
Chapin was primarily a farmer, but of course here also he had 
to do all sorts of other things besides. He soon became one f 
of the leading men in the government of the town and held r 
many public offices during his life. 

On 6 May, 1644, a tax was levied on all the inhabitants of j 
the town to pay for the Indian purchase. Sam. Chapin was ! 
assessed Ss. lod. (S. i. 35). This tax was to reimburse I\Ir. ' 
Pynchon who in 1636, out of his own pocket, paid the Indians 
for the land on which Springfield was built. This rate, how- 
ever, was never paid, for it was "made voyd " by an order of ,• 
the 26 January, 1646 (1647), (S. i. 35, but January :^g as 
S. I. 50. I consider 26 as more probably correct). Still 6 ; 
March, 1646 (1647), another tax was assessed to reimburse 
Mr Pynchon for the purchase. Sa. Chapen held 43 acres ) 
and was assessed 12s. (S. i. 53). As there was generally a ^ 



ilic 
ire 
arid 
out 

iver 

ro). 

bd. 







Map of Saiiuiel Cliapiirs lioine lot in 
Springticlcl, Mass. 




ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. I/ 

scarcity of coin among the early settlers, taxes could be paid 
in produce, in wheat at 3s. lod. per bushel, in corn at 2s. 6c\. 
and in peas at 3d. 

It is said that in 1643 Samuel Chapin served on a jury in 
Springfield. (See Mss. written by N. G. Chapin and depos. 
ited in the vaults of the N. E. H. & G. Soc. at Boston.) It 
is also said that he was elected deacon immediately on his 
arrival at Springfield. (Springfield Homestead, i June, 1907, 
p. 8.) This may be so, but he is first called deacon in the 
town records in 1649-50. 

Hannah, daughter of Samuell Chapin, was born on the 2 
day of the 10 month (December) 1644 (S. rec") at 10 o'clock 
at night (Judge Chapin's Address, 22). She was baptized on 
December 8 (Judge Chapin's Address, 22). She was the 
youngest of Samuel & Cicely's seven children. 



r 



CHAPIN FAMILY 



CHAPTER IV. 

SELECTMAN. 

ON 26 September, 1644, Samuel Chapin was chosen on a 
committee of five to order the prudential affairs of the 
town (S. I. 36). This prudential committee was in reality the 
first board of Selectmen in Springfield. The Selectmen, or 
Townsmen as they were sometimes called, were generally 
five in number. They were elected by a vote of all the free- 
men of the town at the town meeting, and were to serve for 
one year. They settled disputes, heard complaints, admitted 
inhabitants, regulated highways, bridges, fences, finances, etc., 
and had a general supervision over all the affairs of the town. 

Samuel Chapin held the office of Selectman continuously 
from 26 September, 1644, to 22 November, 1652, when hav- 
ing become a Commissioner, he couJd no longer serve as 
Selectman. 

Samuel Chapin was selectman in 1645, as the old board 
held over, no election taking place. (Burt i. 26.) 

1646, September 23, Samuell Chapin was chosen on the 
committee to order the prudential affairs of the plantation 
(S. 1.48). 

164G, November 2, Lief tenant Smith, Rich. Sykes, Sam. 
Chapen, Tho. Cooper and Henry Burt are discharged from 
the office of looking after the affairs of the town (S. i. 45). 
This was the original board, which had served two years, hav- 
ing been elected 26 Sept. 1644. The new board, chosen Sept^ 
23, immediately went into office. On 3 November, 1646, 
Henry Smith, Elizur Holyoke Sam: Chapen, Henry Burt & 
Ben. Cooley were on the committee to order the prudential 
affairs of the town (S. i. 49). 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. I9 

2 November, 1647, Sam : Chapin was chosen on the com- 
mittee to order the prudential affairs of the town (S. i. 55). 

6 November, 1648, Sam. Chapin was chosen on the com- 
mittee to order the prudential affairs of the town (S. i. 59). 

In 1649 Samuel Chapin was selectman, as the old board 
held over, no election taking place (Burt i. 26). 

5 November, 1650, Samuell Chapin was chosen Townsman 
(S. I. loi). 

4 November, 1651, Samuell Chapin was chosen Townsman 
(S.I. 105). 

Besides the regular routine of the Selectmen, there came 
up many difficult and perplexing problems during the eight 
years that Samuel Chapin was on the board. In the first 
place in 1645, the Selectmen had to arrange for a cemetery, 
meeting-house and training ground. Although the Indians 
had from the first been very well disposed to the settlers, still 
in 1639 ^ '^^v ^^^*^ been passed requiring every man to join 
the militia, or "train band," which was to drill once every 
month. The Meeting House was perhaps the most import- 
ant consideration of the year. It cost eighty pounds (about 
^400) and was a frame building forty feet long by twenty-five 
wide. It had four windows, and two towers, one for the bell 
and the other for a watch tower. It was completed in March, 
1646, and muiit have added greatly to the appearance of the 
village. On the 20 November, 1646, Samuel Chapin's eldest 
daughter, Catherine was married to Nathaniel Bliss. 

In 1646 the town meeting formerly held once a month was 
made an annual affair to bo hold on the first Tuesday in No- 
vember, and if any freeman should be absent therefrom, he 
was to be fined half a bushel of corn. An ordinary or inn 
was established in Springfield and a committee was ap- 
pointed to procure a smith for the town. Thus it may be 
seen that Springfield was growing. The most serious affair 
of the year was the trouble with Hartford. Hartford had 
purchased a fort on the Connecticut at Saybrook, and was en- 
deavoring to levy a tax on all the ships that passed the fort. 



20 CHAPIN FAMILY 

Springfield objected to this tariff and complained to the Gen- 
eral Court of Massachusetts. Trouble ensued between Mas- 
sachusetts and Connecticut, which after many disputes re- 
sulted in the removal of the tariff in 1650. 

On I May, 1645 , according to the town records Samuell 
Chapin was a Constable (S. 1.40). We do not know when 
he was appointed or how long he served. 

7 May, 1645, Samuell Chapin was chosen on a committee of 
five to apportion the planting ground to each house lot (S. 
I. 41). This was the third alotment of land and apparently was 
unsatisfactory as on May 7 the inhabitants agreed to give up 
thealotments of the 3rd division and abide by the results of 
the 4th alotment. 19 May, 1645, Sam. Chapin was chosen on 
a committee of seven to divide the town in equal parts for 
estates and persons (S. i. 42). This committee divided up 
the fourth alotment of land. 

1647 was a hard year. There were floods in the spring, 
caterpillars in the summer and sickness in the fall. Wolves 
were a nuisance so a bounty of los. was offered for every 
dead one. Swine also caused a great deal of trouble and 
damage by running loose through the village. 

10 February, 1647, (1648), Sam: Chapen and 17 others 
agreed to add five pounds more to the minister's salary so it 
will be sixty pounds (S. r. 55), fifty-five pounds havijig been 
appropriated at the town meeting for this purpose. 

In 1648, however a still more troublesome disturbance 
broke out. Hugh Parsons and his wife were accused of witch- 
craft. The excitement was intense and they were brought 
to trial. They were tried in Boston, where they were finally 
convicted in 1650. Mary died in prison and Hugh escaped 
and left the country. But before this trouble was settled a 
worse one had begun. William Pynchon, the mainstay of 
Springfield, was convicted of heresy by the General Court. 
He was immediately deprived of his ofifice and in 1652, with 
his son-in-law Henry Smith, and the minister Mr. Moxon, re- 
turned to England. 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 21 

In April, 1649, Henry Smith & Samuell Chapen were cho- 
sen to seal up our ffreemens votes for magistrates & to send 
them sealed up to John Johnson of Roxbury, who is chosen 
for our deputy to ye General Court (Green 100). 

21 February, 1649 (1650), "There is granted to Deacon 
Chapin a parcel! of land by Agawam falls where he hath i 
acre & halfe already, adjoyninge to mr moxons meadow 
ground, wch acre & halfe is to be made up 6 acres " (S. 
1.62). 

22 January, 165 1 (1652), Sam: Chapen was granted lot 
number 21 of one acre on Mill river "which sayd acar was 
exchanged with the Towne for a parcell of meddow of about 
an acar and halfe lyinge below the lott which was mr moxons 
below (S. I. 107). 

On 14 September, 1652, Sam: Chapen was chosen on the 
committee of four to purchase land for the minister's house 
(S. I. 109). The committee soon purchased the land and on 
November 15 the purchase was approved by the town. 



CHAPIN FAMILY 



CHAPTER V. 

COMMISSIONER. 



AFTER the burning of William Pynchon's book and prac- 
tically his conviction for heresy by the General Court, 
he was deprived of his office as Magistrate of Springfield, and 
his son-in-law, Henry Smith, was commissioned Magistrate in 
his place in 165 1. In the summer of 1652, however, Henry 
Smith accompanied Pynchon to England, thus leaving the 
magistracy vacant. Three men now come to the front in 
Springfield, and taking control of the affairs of the town, gov- 
ern it until their deaths. Two of these men were closely re- 
lated to William Pynchon — his son John and his son-in-law 
Holyoke — the third was the Deacon, Samuel Chapin. 

On 19 October, 1652, John Pinchon, Elitzur Holyoke and 
Samuel Chapin were appointed Commissioners for the town 
of Springfield, and they were given the same commission that 
was granted to Henry Smith in 165 1 (M. 3. 296, pr. 292) 
That is they had full power and authority to govern the inhab- 
itants of Springfield ; to hear and determine all cases and of- 
fences, both civil and criminal, and to inflict all punishments 
not reaching life, limb, or banishment ; to give oaths to con- 
stables ; and to examine witnesses on oath. This appoint- 
ment is again recorded 26 October 1652 (M. 4. loS, pr. pt. r. 
115). 

On 2 November, 1652, Sam : Chapin was chosen a Towns- 
man (S. I. Ill) and served until November 22 when having 
taken the oath as Commissioner, he could no longer serve as 
Selectman. The oath which the Commissioners took on No- 
vember 22 was as follows : • We, John Pinchon, Eliazer 
Holioke, and Samuell Chapin, Commissioners for the town of 
Springfield, by order of the General Court, do here swear by 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 2$ 

the living God that we will truly endeavor to our best ability, 
to demean ourselves in our places according to the laws of 
God and of this jurisdiction, and that we will dispence justice, 
on all occasions proper to our place and cognisance equally 
and impartially, during our abode in this jurisdiction and con- 
tmuance of our commission, as aforesaid. So help us God 
etc. (see M. 4, pr. i. 115) "22 Nov. 1652 Two of these 
townsmen being sworn Commissioners for ye Town of 
Springfield were discharged f r : Townsmen (S. r. in). 
These two men were John Pinchon and Samuel Chapin. 

The new Commissioners soon estabhshed a strong govern- 
ment in Springfield. A vigorous enforcement of the law and 
the prompt prosecution of criminals showed that firm and 
earnest men were directing the affairs of state. Samuel Cha- 
pin apparently held this office until 1661, when he again be- 
came a Selectman. The Commissionership was not enough, 
more work was soon given to him. He was put on a com- 
mittee to divide the land at Naotucke and establish the town 
of Northampton. 

18 May, 1653, In answer to a petition of the Inhabitants of 
Springfield, the General Court appointed a committee consist- 
ing of John Pinchon, Mr. Holyoke and Samuell Chapin to di- 
vide the land at Nonotucke into two plantations (M. 3. 384. 
pr. 308 and M. 4. 123, pr. pt. i. 136). 

14 March, 1653-4, "There is granted to Deacon Chapin on 
ye other side of ye Northerly branch of ye Mill River a litle 
l^sell ol mcddow of about one acre more or less about a cjr of 
a mile his meddow " (S. i. 123). Also Rowland Stebbins is 
granted some meadow " between Benja Munn & Deacon Cha- 
pins meddow" (S. i. 123). 

25 June, 1654, "The commission of Mr. Pinchon, Mr. Mo- 
liocke and Mr. Chapin beinge expired and no other substitu- 
ted in their places, it is therefore hereby ordered that the 
said Mr Joh Pinchon, Mr Elizur Holiocke, & Mr Samuel Cha- 
pin shalbe & hereby are impowered as commissionors to act 
at Springfield, according to the commission formerly graunted 



24 CHAPIN FAMILY 

by this Court to Mr Henry Smyth in May, 165 1, they take- 
inge the oath appoynted formerly by the Court in the yeare 
1652, at some publicke meetinge of (at least) ten of their in- 
habitants of Springfield, afforesaid & this their commission to 
contynue till the Court take further order therein. Dated 2$ 
4. 1654" (M. 3. 428, pr. 351-2). 

Meanwhile the division of land at Naotucke was duly ac- 
comphshed and on 17 October, 1654, a report was submitted 
to the General Court as follows : " We whose names are sub- 
scribed, being appoynted to devide the lands at Naotucke into 
two plantacions, haue accordingly graunted to them that now 
first appeared to remoue thither to plant themselues on the 
west side of the Riuer Conectecott, as they desired, & haue 
layd out their lands, vizt, from the little meddow above their 
plantatio, which meddow is called Capawonke or Mattaomett, 
downe to the head of the ffalls which are below them, reserv- 
ing the lands on the east side of the said riuer for an other 
plantatio 

Yor humble servants 

JOH PiNCHON 

Elizur Holyoke 
Samueix Chapin " 

The report was approved by the Court (M. 3. 437, pr. 360). 
A similar report was presented and approved i November, 
1654, (M. 4. 188, pr. pt. I, 213). This finished for thepresent 
the Naotucke business, but in 1659 he was again put on a 
committee to lay out land there. 

On this same day, i November, 1654, the commission of 
Mr. Pinchon, Mr. Holyoke & Mr. Chapin having again ex- 
pired, it was again renewed as on 25 June, 1654 (M. 4. 188, 
pr. pt. I, 214). 

6 November, 1655, a committee consisting of Sam Chapin, 
John Pynchon and the five Selectmen was given full power 
to carry out the orders of the Court and to grant or dispose 
of land (S. i. 139). 



^ n^Hi 




' V ' ' ' -^^ 



li.&,-' 







► 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 2$ 

15 November, 1655, Mr. Thompson (the new minister) is 
to have the lot lying between Tho Coop : & Deacon Chapin 
(S. I. 140) and on 30 January, 1655 (1656), "Deacon Cha- 
pin is granted lot number 9 of 3 acres of wet meadow and 
lowland (S. i. 138). 

Meanwhile 29 August, 1654, his son David married Lydia 
Cnimp and 31 July, 1655, his daughter Catherine, widow of 
Nathaniel Bliss, married Samuel Marshfield. 



26 CHAPIN FAMILY 



.CHAPTER VI. 

MINISTRY. 

SAMUEL CHAPIN was actively interested in the church 
and appears to have been a deacon as early as 1650. In 
1652 the minister, Mr. Moxon,' went to England with William 
Pynchon, thus leaving the town without a pastor. He was 
succeeded by Mr. Thompson, who left the next year. 

Therefore on 24 March, 1656, Deacon Chapin was chosen 
on a committee of six to obtain a minister in place of Mr. 
Thompson, who had left (S. i. 147). As it was difficult to 
procure a satisfactory minister, it took a long time, during 
which the work of the ministry devolved upon the leading 
men of the town. 

" Att a town meetinge november the fourth, 1656, it was 
agreed by the inhabitants that thease 4 men, vidz Deacon 
Wright, decon chapin mr hollyocke, Henry Burtt, should have 
twelve pounds alowed them by the towne for there labour 
formerly spent amongst us in the lords worke on the Sabothe 
and the sayd twelve pound to be disposed of to each particu- 
lar by the Seleckt men " (S. I. 151). 

"Att a Towne meetinge ffebruary the 16(56) [1657] '^ 
was voted that mr Hollyoke and Henry Burt Should carry 
on the work of the Sabboth in this plase but in case that 
thowrough any providence of god other of them should be 
disenabled that decon chapin should supply that presentt va- 
cantye : more over this Towne voted to allow them jCs^ ^ 
yeare that is to say from the 4th of november last the time 
they begane and to continue till the towne have another 
Suply or shale see cause to alter theyer acts in that particu- 
lar but they would acksept but of £^40 unto which the Towne 
assented. 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 



27 



"it was alsoe voted that they would allow to Decon wright 
dccon chapin mr. Hollyocke Henry Burt £>12 for there la- 
bours the last soomer which they spentt in that worke " (S. 
I. 156). 

9 November, 1657, "Mr. Holyoke is made choise of to 
carry on ye worke of ye Sabbath once every Sabbath day 
wch he accepts of. Mr. Pynchon is made choise of for one 
|)t of ye day once a fortnight wch he will indeavor to attend 
sometimes by reading notes & somet by his owne meditations 
till March next : Deacon chapin & Henry Burt are made 
choise of to carry on ye other pt of ye day once a fortnight 
ffor wch theire Paines they are allowed after forty pounds a 
year" (S. i. 160). 

7 February, 1658 (1659), Deacon Chapin was chosen on 
a committee of three to engage Mr. Hooker to carry on the 
work of the Sabbath for three months (S. i. 172). 

Previously i F^ebruary, 1658, Samuel Chapin was granted 
a house lot of 4 acres, a meadow of 2 and a half acres, a 
wood lot of 4 acres and a lot over the Great river of four 
acres. (Judge Chapin's Address, p 17.) In November, 165S, 
Josiah Chapin, Samuel's son, married Mary King of Wey- 
mouth. 

28 May, 1659, The General Court appointed a committee 
consisting of Capt. Pynchon, Left. Holyoke, Deacon Chapin, 
VVilljam Holton and Richard Lyman, to lay out the bounds 
of the town at Norwottocke (M. 4. orig. 303, pr. pt. i p. 368). 
On the same day and at the General Court meeting also (28 
May, 1659), "There being a commission graunted to Capt 
John Pinchon, Left. Holiocke, & Mr Samuell Chapin, of 
Springfield, for the administration of justice there, allowing 
them the power of a County Court, &c, as by the sajd com- 
mission more fully appeares, it is therefore ordered, that the 
sajd Captaine Pinchon, before he depart, take an oath for the 
faithful dischardge of his sajd commission, & be impowred to 
giue oath to the other two commissioners, the oath to be the 
same wch was appointed by the Court in October, 1652." 
(M. 4 orig. 311, pr. pt. i, p. 379.) 



28 CHAPIN FAMILY 

On 30 September, 1659, The Naotucke Commissioners re- 
turned the following- report : "In obedience to an Order of 
the much Honriored Genii Cortt in May last, appoyntinge us 
whose Names are subscribed to lay out the bounds of the 
New Plantation at Norwottuck on the River Connecticutt, 
for the supply of those people that are to settle there ; Con- 
sideringe what people are. to remoove thither, and thequallity 
of the Lands thereabout. Wee have thought good to lay out 
their bounds on both sides of the said River ; vizt on the East 
side of the River, their Southerly bounds to bee from the 
head of the falls above Springfield ; and Soe to runne East & 
by North the Length of Nine Miles from the Said River ; 
And their Northerly bounds to bee a little brooke called by 
the Indians Nepasoaneage up to a Mountayne called Ouunk- 
wattchu, and Soe runninge Eastward from the River, the 
same Length of Nine Miles : from their southerly bounds to 
the Northerly bounds on the East Side of the River is about 
II or 12 miles. And on the West side of the River, their 
bounds on the South are to joyne or meete with Northamp 
ton bounds, (wch said bounds of Northampton come to a little 
Riveret runing betwixt too peeces of Land called Capawonk 
& Wequittayyogg) And on the North their bounds to bee a 
great Mountayne called Weguomps ; And the North and 
South bounds are to runn West Two miles from the great 
River: And from North to South on that side the River 
about 6 or 7 miles. 

Sept. 30, 1659. By us 

John Pynchon 
Elizuk Holyoke 
Samuell Chapin 
William Holton 
Richard Liman 

A post Script, whereas Its said aboue, that their North & 
South bounds are to run Two miles West from ye great 
River, It is intended, yt the South bounds are the Riueret 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 29 

aboue mentioned upon wt poynt soever it runn and the Two 
miles West respect ye strait line." 
(M. A. V. 112, p. 116) 

In 1659 tl"*^ town granted Homlot P to Mr. Pynchon, "who 
hath sold it to Deacon Chapin, so yt it is now Deacon Cha- 
pin's lot, & ly next that lot wch Symon Beamon sold to Mr. 
Pynchon." (S. i. 131.) 

23 December, 1659, Deacon Chdpin and the selectmen ar- 
ranged the seating in the meeting house (S. i. 270) and 
again on 23 February, 1662 (1663), Deacon Chapin and the 
selectmen arranged the seating in the meeting house (S. i. 
271). This was a very important duty and it was very try- 
ing, too, as the people were to be seated in order of their so- 
cial importance. It is interesting to learn that " Good wife 
chapin is to sitt in the Seate alonge with Mrrs Glover and 
Mrrs Hollyock (S. i. 271). Mrrs Glover being the minister's 
wife, of course took precedence over all other women in theo- 
cratic New P^ngland, while Mrs. Holyoke, was William Pyn- 
chon's daughter, and Pllizur Holyoke's wife. Her father as 
founder, purchaser, chief owner and sole * magistrate ' had 
ruled Springfield from 1636 till his conviction by the General 
Court in 165 i. Her brother-in-law, Henry Smith, as repre- 
sentative and sole magistrate, ruled in 165 i and 1652 until 
his return to Europe. Her brother, Capt. John Pynchon, 
later Major, and her husband, Lieut Holyoke, with Deacon 
Samuel Chapin, as the three Commissioners and Justices of 
the town ruled from 1652 till its destruction in 1675." 



30 CHAPIN FAMILY 



CHAPTER VII. 

CONTINUED ACTIVE LIFE. 



ON 26 March, 1660, Henry Chapin was admitted an inhab- 
itant of Springfield and Deacon Chapin acknowledged 
himself bound to the Town Treasurer in a bond of £20 to 
secure the Town from any charge that might arise on account 
of the said Henry Chapin (S. i. 190). In those days of mu- 
nicipal exclusiveness, a person had to be approved of by the 
selectmen before he could become a citizen of the town, and 
generally also find some one to give a bond, as in the case of 
Henry Chapin. 

In July, 1660, Dea. Samuel Chapin and Mr. Pynchon as 
magistrates, heard the case of Hacklinton vs. Ely (Conn. 
Val. Hist. Soc. papers, 1876-81, p. 127), and on 22 Januaryj 
1660 (166 1), Mr. Chapin, Mr. Pynchon & Mr. Holyoke ad- 
judged John Matthews guilty of drunkenness. (C. V. H. S 
76-81, p. 129.) 

5 February, 1660 (i66r), Deacon Chapin was chosen a 
Selectman (S. i. 195). He had not held this office since 
1652, when he resigned from the board in order to tend to 
his new duties as a Commissioner. 13 March, 1660 (1661), 
Samuell Chapin was granted twenty or thirty acres of land at 
Worronoco (S. i. 206). It was in this year also that Gofte 
and Walley, the regicides, passed through Springfield. 

4 February, 1661 (1662), Deacon Chapin was chosen on a 
committee of three to view the wet meadow on this side of 
Round hill and to report what best be done there (S. i. 
213). On the 29 July, 1662, Goodman Chapin was a credi- 
tor of the estate of Thos. Faxon, jr., of Braintree (N. E. H. 
& G. R. I r, p. 342). This Goodman Chapin may have been 
Samuel, but it is more likely that it was his son Josiah. In 



ASSOCIATION PURLICATIONS. 3 I 

'^ 1662, Hampshire 'County was established with Springfield as 
its capital. Samuel Chapin became Commissioner again in 
1662, for on 14 August, 1662, at a town meeting, Deacon 
Samuell Chapin was chosen for the, Commissioner to join 
with the Selectmen in making the Countrey Rate (i. e. in as- 
sessing the County tax) (S. I. 226), and 16 January, 1662 
(1663), a deed was acknowledged before Elizur Holyoke and 
Samuell Chapin, Commissioners (Hampden Co. Rec. Lib. A. 
folio 15). 

II May, 1663, Deacon Chapin was granted 30 acres of land 
at Worronco on provision that he would buy it of the Indians, 
that he would go there to live for four years, and that he 
would promise not to sell it without the approval of the Se- 
lectmen (S. I, 237). On I August, 1663, Josias Chapin was 
admitted an inhabitant, his father, Samuell, acknowledging a 
a bond of 20 pounds (S. i, 238). 19 November, 1663, a 
deed was acknowledged before Elizur Holyoke and Samll 
Chapin, Commissiors (Hampden A, 11), showing that Samuel 
was still Commissioner. 

8 February, 1663 (1664), Deacon Chapin was chosen on 
a committee of seven to grant and distribute land (S. i, 243), 
this duty having now been taken away from the Selectmen. 
On May 5, 1664, Deacon Chapin attended the meeting of the 
said committee, and several grants of land were made (S. i, 
246). Again on i P'ebruary, 1664 (1665), (S. i, 260), and 
on 6 February 1664 (1665), (S. i, 262), Deacon Chapin at- 
tended similar meetings. On the same day, however, 8 Feb- 
ruary, 1663 (1664), Samuel Chai)in was granted some more 
land at Worronoco. 

22 February, 1663 (1664), (S. i, 246), and 2 March, 
1663 (1664), Deacon Chapin as a Selectman attended the Se- 
lectman's meetings (S. i, 246). He was probably elected 
Selectman earlier in February. On 21 April, 1664, a deed 
was acknowledged before Samuel Chapin, Commissioner 
(Hamp. A. 42). 



32 CHAPIN FAMILY 

" 1 8 May, 1664. In ansr to the peticion of Samuel Cha- 
pin, of Springfield, humbly desiring the favor of this Court to 
grant him some lands in refference to service donne, the 
Court judgeth it meete to grant him two hundred acres of 
land where he cann finde it, not formerly granted to toune or 
person" (M. 4, orig. 437, pr. part 2, p. 103). 

On 24 June, 1668, Samuel Chapin deeded to his son Josiah, 
the two hundred acres granted to him by the General Court 
in 1664 (Mass. Arch. 1"$ B. p. 44). Samuel Chapin acknowl- 
edged the deed 24 August, 1668 (M. A. 15 B. p. 44). 

Finally "1669, May 20, A plat of two hundred acres of 
land, wch was granted to Sam Chapin by the Generall Court 
iBthof May, 1664, returnd as lajd out, about fower miles 
from Mendon, bounded as in ye sajd plat, wch is on file, was 
approoved of by this Court, prouided it exceed not two hun- 
dred acres, as also that it take not in any of the meadows now 
granted to Mendon ; reserving liberty of wayes for toune or 
country, if neede be. Lajd out by Joseph White & Benjamin 
Alby " (M. 4, orig. 641 pr. pt. 2, p. 434). 

On 7 June, 1664, Samuel Chapin and Elizur Holyoke as 
Commissioners, heard the case of state vs. Thompson, Mor- 
ton, and Holyoke, who were accused and convicted of profan- 
ing the Sabbaih. (Burt i, 59.) 

This year, 1664, was a great year for marriages in the 
Chapin family. On the 22 of July, Japhet, Samuel's young- 
est son, married Abelenah Cooley ; on the 15 of December 
Henry, another son, married Bethia Cooley ; and on Decem- 
ber 28, Catherine, Samuel's eldest daughter, now widow of 
Thomas Gilbert, married Samuel Marshfield. 

On 10 January, 1664 (1665), Samuell Chapin as one of a 
committee of eight to oversee highways signed a report of the 
said committee (S. 3, 26). In February, 1664 (1665), Dea- 
con Saml Chapin appears on a list of the inhabitants of 
Springfield (S. 3, 38). On 2 March, 1664 (1665), Deacon 
Ch : received 2 pounds from the town, which the town owed 
him (S. I, 247). 




PLATK IV. 



M;ip of Sanuiel C'hapin's lot (jii lmkI l)rO( 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 33 

II April, 1665, Deacon Chapin did not attend the town 
meeting, and as he did not give a sufficient excuse, he was 
fined 6d. (S. 2, 10). The Springfield Homestead iox i June, 
1907, says that he stayed away probably because of dissatis- 
faction with the way the allotment of lands were managed. 

16 April, 1665, Deacon Chapin hired 100 acres in Chick- 
upy Plaine from John Pynchon. On 16 August, 1665, Dea- 
con Chapin was chosen the Commissioner to join with the 
Selectmen in making the Countrey rate (S. 3, 46). On 10 
November, 1665, Samuell Chapin witnessed a deed from the 
Indians (Hampden A. 68). 



34 CHAPIN FAMILV 



CHAPTER VIII. 

DEATH. 

SAMUEL CHAPIN was now an old man, and having 
borne for over twenty years the burdens of government, 
now in his dedining years withdrew from the centre of politi- 
cal affairs. 

5 February, 1666 (1667), Deacon Chapin, with Pynchon 
and Holyoke was chosen on a committee of eight to care for 
the poor of the town (S. 3, 50), and on 11 February, 1666 
(1667), this committee made its report and Deacon Chapin 
and two others were appointed a committee to distribute 
money to the poor (S. 2, 47). At this meeting, too, i i Feb- 
ruary, 1666 (1667), Deacon Chapin and the Selectmen ex- 
amined the records of the Selectmen for the year previous, 
and found no reason why the arrangement of the seating in 
the meeting house should be altered (S. 2, 43). 

Three times more, according to the records, did Samuel 
Chapin review the minutes of the Selectmen, i February, 
1669 (1670), Deacon Chapin and Lieut. Cooper were chosen 
a committee to examine the accounts of the Selectmen for the 
preceding year, " and ye sd Committee attended ye work" 
(S. 3, 68). 6 February, 167 1 (1672), Deacon Chapin and 
Eli. Holyoke, Senr., were chosen to examine the accounts of 
the Selectmen for the preceding year (S. 3, 75). And again 
3 February, 1673 (1674), Deacon Chapin and Nathaneel Ely 
were chosen to examine the accounts of the Selectmen for the 
year previous (S. 3, 81). 

On 4 March, 1667 (1668), Deacon Chapin was chosen to 
appoint a day on which Mr. Glover's rate (i. e. the minister's 
tax) may be paid, and Deacon Chapin and one of the Select- 
men are to receive the rate (S. 3, 52). 



1832296 

ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 35 

21 May, 1667, Samuell Chapin deeded half his land and 
howsings in Springfield to his son Japhet (Photograph of 
deed in Burt, Vol. II. This deed was never directly recorded, 
but on 19 November, 1667, Japhet Chapin of Springfield, 
deeded to his brother-in-law, John Hitchcock, all the land, 
etc., which he had received of his father, Samuel Chapin, on 
12 October, 1667, it being half of the said Samuel's land in 
Springfield. Both Samuel Chapin and Japhet Chapin signed 
this deed. (Hampden AB, 62 and A, 108). 

4 March, 1667-8, "There is also granted unto Deacon 
Chapin Ten acres of meddow beyond Skipmuck where he can 
fynd it soe much undisposed (S. 3, 164). 

12 April, 1668, Samuel Chapin signed a petition to the 
General Court against imposts (M. A. 60, p. 42). (N. E. H. 
& G. R. 9, 8i).^i) 

On 12 February, 1668 (1669), Deacon Chapin was chosen 
on a committee of nine to decide what highways shall be town 
roads and what ones private roads (S. 3, 23), and this com- 
mittee decided that Deacon Chapin and six others should 
make and repair the highway into the plain above end brook 
(S. 3, 24), and that Deacon Chapin and fourteen others 
should make and repair the way leading to the meadows on 
Mill River, to 16 acres, and to worlds End, beginning at the 
tup of the hill over the ' Causey above Symon Bemons ' (S. 3, 

24). 

23 April, 1669, "There is foure acres of meddow Granted 
to Deacon Chapin, on ye hither branch of fresh water River 
pvidcd it be not already Granted to any other (^S. 2, 72). On 

11 October, 1669, Samuell Chapin and Cicely his wife, deed 
30 acres of land at Worronoco, to John Sackett, of North- 
ampton (Hampton deeds, A. 43), and they both acknowl- 
edged the deed the same day, October 1 1 (Hamp. A. 43). 

12 October, 1670, forty-one men were ordered to get fire 
wood for Mr. Glover, the minister. Deacon Chapin was to 
get two loads (S. 2, 81). 



Arcli. officials read this date, 2 November, i66S. 



36 CHAPIN FAMILY 

From the very first the English at Springfield had treated 
the Indians with honesty and justice, and as a result the Aga- 
wamsand Worronocos had come to live in peace alongside of 
the whites. For forty years the inhabitants of Springfield 
had lived side by side with the Indians in perfect peace and 
tranquility. Therefore on the outbreak of King Philip's war, 
Springfield was not in the least alarmed. As the conflict 
spread westward, Springfield still felt confident that the Indi- 
ans who surrounded it, and who had for more than a genera- 
tion been friendly, would not join Philip in the war. 

On the 4th of October, 1675, Major Pynchon, acting un- 
der the orders of the Commissioners of the United Colonies, 
lead a force from Springfield to Hadley, thus leaving Spring- 
field unprotected. At about this time a number of hostile In- 
dians entered a fort on Long hill in the south part of Spring- 
field, which was occupied by supposedly friendly Indians. An 
Indian named Toto warned the inhabitants of Springfield dur- 
ing the night of October 4, that the town was to be attacked 
and the inhabitants thereupon took refuge in the three forti- 
fied houses of the town. Samuel Chapin was among those in 
Springfield at this time (Burt i, 129 and Green, 162). 

As no attack occurred that night, they began to think that 
the alarm was false, and so in the morning, Lt. Cooper and 
Thomas Miller rode over towards Mill river, where the Indi- 
ans were. They were immediately fired on. Miller was 
killed. Cooper was wounded. But his horse galloped back 
to Springfield, Cooper dropping dead when they reached Pyn- 
chon's house. The Indians now burst forth. Mrs. Matthews 
was captured and killed, and the greater part of the town was 
set on fire. Pynchon and Appleton with 200 men hastened 
over from Hadley as soon as they heard of the attack, but 
found the town in flames when they arrived. About thirty 
houses were burnt, which was almost half the town. The In- 
dians immediately withdrew on the arrival of the soldiers, who 
remained in Springfield until the i6th, when they marched to 
the defence of Northfield. The inhabitants then set to work 
to rebuild the town. 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 3/ 

Samuel Chapin, however, did not live to see the town re- 
built for according to the diary of his son Japhet, " My father 
was taken out of this troublesome world the 1 1 day of No- 
vember about eleven of the clock, 1675 " (Japhet Chapin's 
diary, see N. E. H. & G. Reg. 38, p. 121). 

"Samuell Chapin Deacon of the Church at Springfield died 
II day of November 1675 " (S. vital records, p. 66). 

" Ciseley Chapin the widow of Deacon Samll Chapin was 
sicke and dyed Febr. 8, 1682 " (S. vital, p. 69). 

Of their children, David married Lydia Crump in 1654, 
and lived in Boston ; Henry married Bethia Cooley in 1664, 
and lived in Springfield; Josiah married first in 1658, Mary 
King, living first at Braintree and later at Mendon ; while Ja- 
phet, the youngest son married in 1664 Abelenah Cooley, 
and lived at Springfield ; Catherine married first in 1646 Na- 
thaniel Bliss, secondly Thomas Gilbert, and thirdly Samuel 
Marshfield ; Sarah married in 1647 Rowland Thomas; and 
Hannah married in 1666 John Hitchcock. (See Burt.) 



38 CHAPIN FAMILY 



CHAPTER IX. 

LAND RECORDS AND WILLS. 

<< AT Mr. Glovers Lower Corner, There Deacon Sam 

■**• Chapin is to take in his fence even with it, and to 
Run straite from thence skewing of to N at John Stew- 
arts Corner" (S. 2, 3.) [No date is given.] 

In an undated list of the inhabitants of Springfield who 
have the privilege of voting, appears the name of Deacon 
Chapin (S. 3, 79). 

13 March, 1660, "Theres granted to Samuell Chapin a 
parcell of land at Worronoco beinge between Twenty & 
Thirty acres lyinge on the East side of ye Second Brook yt is 
on this side of Thomas Coopers farme there: & is to be 
bounded by the hills on the North & ye River on the South : 
provided those lands shall be confirmed by ye Corte to be- 
long to this Town & yt he purchase the said peece of land of 
ye Indians : & he is not to hinder passage thorow it to those 
other lands beyond it " (S. i, 206). 

8 February, 1663 (1664), William Branch is granted land, 
"the Northrly bounds to be from the higher side of Deacon 
Chapins Lott in ye playne " (S. i, 244). 

8 February, 1663 (1664), "There is granted to Deacon 
Chapin the land between his low land at Worronoco & the 
top of the hill around the North & Easterly Sides thereof 
Provided it be noe prjudice to any wayes yt may be laid out 
there" (S. i, 241). 

The following records are from the Springfield Book of 
Possessions, p. 4 : 

" Samuell Chapin hath a house lott granted him from the 
plantation contayning 4 acres more or less breadth 8 rod 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 39 

Length 80 rod abutting against the Street East & the greate 
River West Bounded by Mr. Moxon North By Thomas Reive 
South. 

Also in the same hne before his house lott Eastward all ye 
wet meddow containing to the value of about 2 acres more or 
less and at ye end of the wett meddow, by a wood lott of 4 
acres more or less Breadth 8 rod Length 80 rod running in 
the same line Bounded as the home lott is. 

Also over the greate river a lott of 4 acres more or less 
abutting agayn by the greate river East & thence runninge in 
length westward 74 rod the breadth 8 rod Bounded North by 
Mr. Moxon South by Thomas Reive, one acre & halfe of 
this lot at the west end 30 rod long & the whole breadth is 
by Sam Chapin sold to Rich Exsell & his heires for ever febr 
I 1658. 

Alsoe a lott in the plaine of 19 acres more or less Breadth 
26 rod abutting agaynst the great river at the west end & for 
running in length eastward 120 rod liounding North by mr. 
Moxon South by Tho Reive. 

Also [the record is illegible]. This ffiftene acres is by Sam 
Chapin sold & fully passed away to Mr John Pynchon his 
heires & assignes for ever March 20 1656. 

Alsoe a meddow lott over ye greate river i acre J a rod 3 
quters in bredth length 1 14 rod .... the Agawam river to the 
.... bounded by mr. Holyoke e by mr. moxon west. This 
acre pt is to be made up Six acres by ye grant of the planta- 
tion See Town booke feb. 21. 1649 [see Chap. IV]. There 
is of the Southend of this 6 acr lott 5 acr or thereabout Sold 
to Jno Lamb his heires passing for ever viz from ye River to 
ye brow of the hill the west of that meddow lott is Sold to 
Tho Miller his heires & assignes for ever March 14 1660. 

Alsoe a meddow lot over Agawam river i acres with the 
alowa .... Breadth 3 rod length 80 rod Bounded by Menry 
Burt East by Robt Ashly west. 

A parcell of Meddow on the mill river beinge 4 acres more 
or less bounded South by William Warrener North by Ben- 



40 CHAPIN FAMILY 

jamin Munn. This i acr over Agawam is Sold to Jno 
Leonard his heires & assignes forever Jan 31 1662. 

Samuel Chapin hath bought of his son Henry Chapin this 
.... [torn] of August 1652 a parcell of Land in the playne 
over agt Chiccopie river beinge 20 acres more or less breadth 
16 rods length . . .' . the river west 102 rod Bounded North 
by ffrancis Pepper South by Rowland Thomas. This 20 
acres of land is by Samuel Chapin sold & fully parsed away 
to John Scott his heires & assignes for ever Jan. 14th 1661. 

Jan. 1651 There is Given to Sam Chapen by the Planta- 
tion one acre of meddow upon the mill river bounded by 
Jonath Taylor. This single acre is by Japhet Chapin fully 
passed away to Anthony Dorchester & his heires forever. 
Registered Nov. 27, '79. 

December i8th, 1654, Sam Chapin is Possessed by Pur- 
chase from Rich Sikes of a howselot four acres & halfe more 
or less breadth 9 rod length 80 rod the streete to the grt 
River Bounded North by Rich Exsell South by Wm War- 
rina. 

Also in ye same line eastward 2 acres of wet meddow more 
or less 9 rod broad wth a woodlot of four acres & half adjoyn- 
ing bounded as aforsed. 

Also of four acres more or less over the grt river breadth 
8 rod length 80 .... the grt river westward bounded North 
Rich Exsell South Wm Warrinar. 

Also of thirteen acres more or less in the 3rd Devission 
breadth 13 Rod abutting agai the meddow lots south- 
ward & so running North in length 160 rod bounded East by 
Wm Warrinar, west by Rich Exsell. 

Also of Two acres & halfe of meddow on the Mill River 

being the .... at the of the River & runs North Ipounded 

North by Wm Warrinar. All these psells of land are 

Rich Sikes fully passed over to Sam Chapin his heires & as- 
signes for ever recorded this i8th December 165 [4]. 

All these several psells of land viz 4 acres & ^ wet med- 
dow 2 acres wth a woodlot of 4 acres and 4 acres over the 




M ,.a^;^ii^^AJ: 



PLATE V 



Handwriting of Samuel Chapin, in Pynchon Account 15ooks, 
City l,ihrary, Springfield. 



rroiii platu kimlly loaned by Mr. Krank H. I'.uri,.,! Newton, son of Mr. Henry Hurt, aiitli. 
of History of SprinKlield, in wliitli tlic al.ove tut lirst appeared. 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 4I 

grt river And 13 acres in the 3rd devission wth 2 acres & I 
of meddow on the Mill river they are all sold & passed away 
to David Chapin his heires & assignes for ever & by him the 
sd David Chapin they are sold & fully passed away to Tho. 
Noble & James Wariner jointly this 5th July 1656 to them 
theire heires & assignes for ever' (Springf. Bk. of Poss. p. 4). 

For the will of Samuel Chapin see Chapter X. 
"An Inventory of ye Estate of Deacon Sanill Chapin De- 
ceased. 



To I Cow & 2 yearlings at 

To I Hogg at 

To I Gun & sword at 

To Bitle Rings & weges 

To Axes, Chaines, tramls &c 

To an iron Pot & Kettell - 

To a Brass Kettell & Scillit 

To 2 Keelers, 2 payles at 

To I paire sheetes, hood - 



To 2 barls & 2 Dishes at - 
To 4 Pewter Platters at ' - 
To 2 Beds & Pillowes at - 
To I Rugg & Coverlitt at - 
To 2 IManckets at - 
To I Chest & wheele at 
To 2 Cloaks at 
To I Kersey Suite & hatt 
To Debts due to ye estate 



£ 


s 


d 


006 


10 


00 


000 


15 


00 


001 


10 


00 


000 


10 


00 


002 


00 


00 


001 


10 


00 


000 


JO 


00 


000 


10 


00 


001 


00 


00 


014 


15 


00 


000 


06 


00 


000 


16 


00 


002 


10 


00 


003 


00 


00 


000 


10 


00 


000 


10 


00 


002 


10 


00 


002 


10 


00 


018 


07 


00 



030 



The totall Sum of ye abovesaid Inventory is ;^045 -09-00. 
There is due from ye estate to Henry Gilbird ten Pounds 
alsoe to Thomas Gilbird if he stays his time ten Pounds. 



42 CHAPIN FAMILY 

There is likewise due to ye Estate from John Hitchcock 
five Pound a Yeare during ye widdovvs life. And from Ja- 
phet Chapin five Pound a yeare for eight yeares. 

The abovesayd Inventory taken by Jonathan Burt, Samll 
Marshfield." (Hampshire Probate Court.) 

Japhet Chapin of Springfield presented the last will and 
testament of his mother, Cisly Chapin, Widow deceased, to- 
gether with the Inventory of her Estate, which will was ap- 
proved in Court & the Estate in the Invent;ory to be disposed 
according to the will of the deceased. 

A coppy of ye Will & Inventory here follows : 

"The last will & Testament of Cisly Chapin of Springfield 
widdow to Samuel Chapin deceased of the place aforesaid who 
being stricken in years and not well in body yet having the 
use of her understanding and memory as formerly and not 
knowing how it may please God to deal with her doth order 
and dispose of her Estate as followeth Impiimis: I do be- 
queath my body to the ground and my Soule to God that 
gave it. 

2iy I do give and bequeath unto my son henry Chapin of 
Springfield within a twelve month after my decease twenty 
shillings to be paid him by my Executor and also my great 
Bible : 

3«iy I do give and bequeath unto my son Josiah Chapin of 
Braintry in this Colony twenty shillings to be paid to him 
within a twelve month after my decease : 

4iy I do give and bequeath unto my daughter Catharine 
Mashfield wife of Samuell Mashfield of Springfield a sute of 
blackish Searge Cloths of my own wearing clothes after my 
decease and my best Cloake : 

5iy I do give and bequeath unto my daughter Sarah 
Thomas a Cloth wast Coat and Coat of my own wearing 
and my worst Cloak and my best hat : 

6iy I do give and bequeath unto my daughter hannah hitch - 
cock my great iron kittle and two platters she hath now in 
possession and a Chaff bed with a linnon beek and two blan- 
ketts blew ones belonging to the bed : 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 43 

7iy My will is that my Executor shall pay out of my Es- 
tate unto Henry Gilbert now an Aprentice to John Hitch- 
cock of Springfield when the said Henry is twenty-one years 
of age ten pounds to be paid in Corn and Cattle Corn at price 
Currant Cattle as they shall be prized by two Indifferent 
men : 

8'y I do by this my last will and Testament make my Son 
Japhet Chapin of Springfield my sole and absolute Executor 
to pay out all the aforesaid Legac}'es debts dues'" and lawful 
demands due from mee to any person as also to demand and 
receive any such debts as are any wayes Due to me from any 
person or persons whatsoever I say to pay out all the afore- 
said legacies according to this my last will and Testament 
which being done I do give fully and absolutely bequeath all 
the rest of my Estate now in my posession left me by my de- 
ceased husband Samuel Chapin unto my Son Japhet Chapin 
my Executor aforesaid, that this is my last will and Testa- 
ment I do testifie by setting to my hand and Seal This Six- 
teenth day of May Anno: Domini: 1676. 

Signed and Sealed Sicely X Chapin 

in the presence of her Signe 

his mark 
Nathaniel N P Pritchet To y^ above^"^ In- 

Daniel Denton struement was 

a Scale af^xed." 

March: 26: 83 Nath' Tritchcrd made Oath y' he was 
present when Sicely Chapin signed and Sealed this Instru- 
ment as her last will and testament and so declared y" same 
and y' she was then of sound Understanding and hereto made 
Oath : — 

before me John Pynchon Assistant 

Mr. Daniell Denton made oath before y' Court march : 27 : 
1683 y» y^ Testator Signed and Sealed this Instrument as 



44 CHAPIN FAMILY 

her last will and testament and was of sound minde when she 
did it to the best of his knowledge : 

Sam" Partrigg- Clerk. 
(Hampshire Probate Court) ' 

"An Inventory of ye Estate of Cicely Chapin deceased ye 
Wife of Deacon Samll Chapin of Springfd taken March sth, 
1682, taken by us Jonathan Burt Senr and Benjamine Par- 
sons Senr. 

X s d 

One Rugg at 20' One Coverlitt & 

blue blancket 15^ - - 01 15 co 

One pr of Bodyes, a green apron & 

a Wascoate at 10' a Cloak & 

Cloath hood 25^ - . 01 15 00 

One bed at 30^ To 3 pillows & one 

bolster at ro^ - - 02 00 00 

One Cloath Wascoate & one serge 

Wascoate 20^ blue apron, serge 

Neckcloath 5^ - - 01 05 00 

To 4 coats at 3-^ a Cloath hood at 

5^ one pr stockings, 2 Was- 

coats at 6' - - - 03 1 1 00 

To 2 handkerchiefs, one dressing 4^ 

One sheet one slip 2 pillow-. 

beirg 12' - - - 00 16 00 

To I Chest one wheele, 2 Keelers 

12' to 3 platters at 12^ - 01 04 00 

To I pe of tongs, fire shovell, iron 

pots 2 pe pot hooks 2 tramels, 

Crooke - - - 01 00 00 

To I Bedstead 5» one p"" bitle rings, 

3 wedges 10' brass Kettle 5^ 01 00 00 



(1) There is another copy of this will and inventory in tlie Hist. Soc, City Library, Spring- 
field, Mass. 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 45 

£ S d 

To I hooe 2 axes a Whifletree 

chaine a spitt 14 a pot, iron 

Kettell 28* - - - 02 02 00 

To 2 platters at 6" An iron Kettell 

a pr Brass seales & weights 30^ 01 16 00 

To a leather jacket a peas hook a 

frying pan 15^ - - 00 15 00 

A debt of Japhet Chapins at 40-^ 

for Land hire of a cow 40^ , - 42 00, 00 

To a cow hide 8^ By pay of two 

Cows at 6-^ 15^ - - 07 03 00 

To a Steele & a Cow at 6-^ 10^ fan 

& a grindstone at 12^6^^ - 07 02 06 

To a debt of John Hitchcocks at 

25^ - - - - 25 00 00 



Debts due from ye Estate. 



04 06 



To Japhet Chapin 

To 3 qts wine a pint Rhum 2* of 

sugeat - - - 000 08 00 

To his paymt to John Barber for 

makeing Cloaths at - - 000 

To his paymt to Mr. Gilbirt at Hart- 
ford 3* & Nathl Bliss 23s - 001 
To 6' suge at 3^ paymt to Samll 

Ely 12^ 6=^ - - - 000 

To ye Country Rate & Weaveing 

at 17^ 3** Recording 4^ 3'^ - 001 

To makeing a Wascoat & Weaving 

2 yds half Cloath - - 000 

To 2 yd & half of Lining Cloath a 

peck of wheate - - 000 



09 


GO 


06 


00 


15 


06 


01 


06 


03 


09 


08 


06 



001 


00 


03 


001 


14 


06 


015 


16 


09 


OIO 


. ^ 


06 


035 


00 


00 


004 


04 


04 



46 CHAPIN FAMILY 



To a pr of Bodys at 8^ 3"^ a shift 

Cloath 7* 6^ for black serg 4^ 

6^^ - 
To 2 aprons & Lining Cloath i 3^ for 

shoes 21^ 6'^ - 
To Holland & for a capp & for 

stockings 8^ g"^ one yd & hf 

dyet 15= S'^ - 
To payment to Henry Gilbirt lo-^ 

funeral] charges 13^ 6'^ 
To John Hitchcock 
To 3 yeares & a half dyet of his 

ni(jther at - 
To black searge a knife & half a 

bushll wheate 

69 05 07 

Japhet Chapin & John Hitchcock made oath that ye 
abovesd was a true Inventory of their deceased Mother Cicely 
Chapins Estate before Major John Pynchon March 26, 
1683." 

(Hampshire Probate Records.) 

The following is Japhet Chapin's account against his 
mother, Cicely Chapin. 

" my mother Chapin 
debtor 

To a payr of bodies - - - - 083 

To cloth for a shift - - - - oJ-'7 6 

To black Sarge - - - - 046 

To an apron - - - - - 026 

To a shift more - - - - 076 

To a blue apron - - - - 030 



ASSOCIATION PURLICATIONS. 47 

desembe 15 1677 to Jnury 10: 1681 

mother is deptr to mee for 

shoes wich I have had of 

cosen Luk in this tim 

above menshend . . - - 

To hoi end for a hanker 

To a cap . . . . . 

payed to mr Pinchon 

To stokens - - - - - 

by one year and a half 

and sixtin days diet - - - - 

payd to henery Gilbord - - - 

post out of the old book 

for diging the grave - - - - 

(Japhet Chapin's account book/ in Hist. Soc, City Library, 
Springfield, Mass.)" 



2 


01 


06 





3 


6 





I 


6 





12 








3 


9 


15 


08 


00 


10 


00 


"00 


4 


14 


09 





02 


00 



(•) Japhet Cliapin appears to liave had an account book or " diary " previous to this one, but 
I have not succeeded in locating it. See page 37. 



48 CHAPIN FAMILY 



CHAPTER X. 

WRITINGS. 
E existing writings of Samuel Chapin are as follows 

T. 



nrn 



Signature 29 September, 1656, in Pynthon's account book, 
vol. I, p. 238. 

II. 

Signature to report of committee, 30 September, 1659. 
Mass. Arch. 112, p. 116. 

III. 

Signature 16 November, 1663, in Pynch(>n's account book, 
vol. 2, p. 262. 

IV. 

" In consideration of the dept of An hundred & twentie 
one pound eighteen shillings eight pence on the other side 
Captin Pynchion when hee went for Ingland did Agree with 
his brother Holiock to take the mill & Mstr Holioke share of 
the Land belonging thereunto & the saied Mstr Holiokes 
share of pay due from Jeremiah Ik)rton & James Warriner 
for full payment of the saied dcpt & upon deliurie of A deed 
of sale for the Mill & the land to his wife Mstr Pynchion hee 
did giue order his saied wife should Cancel that dept of 121 
18 8d one the other side, Now this first of March 63-64, the 
saied Mstr Holioke did deliuer to Mstres Pynchion A deed of 
sale of the saied Mill & Land, Whereupon the saied Mstrs 
Pynchion Cancelled the saied dept. 

Witnes. Saml'ell Chapin " 



II 







PLATK VI 



"acsimiles of Signatures of Samuel Chapin and of the Marks 
of Cicely Chapin. 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 49 

The words " the other side," in the above refer to the en- 
try showing the indebtedness which was entered on the' op- 
posite page, of the agreement. (Burt.) 



" These Psents testifie that I Samuell Chapin of Spring- 
feild for & in Consideration of fatherly Love & Care which I 
haue & Doe beare Unto my sonne Japheth Chapin haue 
giuen & granted & by these Psents doe giue grant and Con 
firme Unto my saied sonne Japheth Chapin & to his heares 
& assignes for euer all my liowsing & Lands in & about the 
towne of Springfeild euen all that became myne eyter by 
purchas or by Deuidants or gift forme the Toune to haue & 
to hold the aforsaied bowsing & Lande with all the apurte- 
nances thereof To him his heares & asignes foreuer excepting 
the one halfe thereof of all those howsings & Lands for the 
Terme of myne & my wifees Life Unto my saied sonne & to 
his heires & asignes foreuer freely & quietly without any 
manner of Challenge Claim or Demand made or to bee made 
by mee the saied Samuell Chapin or any other Psone or 
Psons whatsoeuer for mee or in my name or in my right or 
by my meanes or Pcurement In Witnesse whereof I haue 
hereunto Sett my hand & scale this 21 of May 1667. 

Samuell Chapin. 

sealed & deliuered in the Psents of " 

John and Hannah Hitchcock the witnesses of course signed 
their names themselves. 

VI. 

Signature to deed, dated 24 June, 1668, in Mass. Arch.- 15 
B p. 44. 

VII. 

Signature to petition 1668 in Mass. Arch. 60, p. 42. 



50 CHAPIN FAMILY 

VIII. 

Although the original will is not on record, I believe that 
Samuel Chapin probably wrote or at any rate composed his 
own will, and so insert it here. 

"In ye yeare 1674: 75 ye 4th of ye first month I Samll 
Chapin of Springfield in the County of Ham})shire doe here 
make & ordaine this my Last will & testement 

Wherein I doe bequeath my self this Body & Spirit into ye 
hands of my most Gracious god & merciful ffather who hath 
magnifyed his mercy & free grace towards me in my Lord 
jesus Christ in whome I have Redemption through his blood 
even ye forgiveness of my Sins through ye worke of ye holy 
ghost workeing regeneration & a new Creation giveing teste- 
mony of Redemption & Adoption through faith in ye Blood 
of my Lord Jesus Christ who dyed for me & Rose againe yt 
I who had deserved Death might injoy Eternal life & by his 
Resurrection assureing me of my Resurrection to Eternll life 
& soe much ye more in yt he hath given me my part in ye first 
Resurrection on whome ye second Death shall have noe 
Power. 

I doe give to my Son Henry Chapin twenty shillings to be 
payd within one yeare after my decease. Also to my Grand- 
son Thomas Gilberd ten Poundes upon this condition yt he 
Serve out his time according to his Indenture yt is to say till 
bee attaine to ye age of one & twenty years. 

All other my goodes & estate within Dores & without I 
give and bequeath to my wife whome I make & Ordaine my 
true & lawfull P>xecutrix in wittness hereoff I have hereuiUo 
sett my hand in ye Presence off 

Sam Chapin." 

Japhet Chapin 

The marke A C of AbeLene Chapin. 

Japhet Chapin & AbeLene his wife testifye yt they being 
Present at ye Date above sd saw Samll Chapin their ffather 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 5 I 

now Deceased set his hand to this writeing abovesd as his 
Last will & testement, declareing it soe & calling ym to wit- 
ness it whereunto they subscribed there handes, & yt at ye 
time of Doeing it he ye sayd Samll Chapin was of sound & 
goode understanding & hereto they made oath ye 24th March 
1676. Before ye WorshipfuU Major Pynchon. Assist. 

(Hampshire Probate records.) 

Cicely Chapin probably could not write. She made her 
mark instead of signing her name. None of the originals are 
extant but there are three documents bearing what is presum- 
ably a facsimile of her 'mark.' 

I. 

Copy of deed. 11 Oct. 1669. Hampden Co. deeds A .43. 

II. 

Copy of her will. 16 May, 1676. Hampshire Probate 
Records. 

III. 

Copy of her will. 16 May, 1676. Hist. Soc, City Li- 
brary, Springfield. 



52 CIIAPIN FAMILY 



CHAPTER XI. 

PYNCHON ACCOUNT BOOKS. 

C AMUEL CHAPIN'S dealings with John Pynchon, throw 
^ much light on his life and on the life of the times in 
general. 

The following extracts (') are from the Pynchon Account 
Books in the City Library, Springfield, Mass, 

(i) (m) has been translated as i,ooo, and yor as you;-. 

Deacon Chapin. 

2 yds scots cloth at 2S 7d 
6 yds f Lockr at 20 d 

2 pr stock at 22d 
1 pr stock i6d. i pr at igd 
I yd -h bleu Linen at lyd 
I yd ^ at 1 9d 

6 yds ^ & nayl of stuft at 5s 3d 
F thrid 2s. 6 laces 5d 
4^ (?) lb thrid Coventry blew 2d 

3 yds gallome gd 
^ yd grene say at 5s lod 
■k m (500) pins 8d. i yd loomeworke 8d 
I bush & ^ of Apples at 4s 
I pr stockens 
Buttons Cot Rib &a Combe to David 

4 yd & ^ of Kersy at 7 s 6d 
4 doz & 4 of Buttons at 5d. 10 sc silke 
I yd & ^ qr of Greene cotton at 3s 2d 

1 yd &; ^ of kersy at 5s 8d 
^ yd flannell 

2 yds of Tawny kersy at 5s 8d 
f yd of Greene Cotton 



00 


05 


G2 


00 


I I 


03 


00 


03 


g8 


00 


G2 


05 


00 


02 


G2 


00 


GI 


iii 


01 


14 


02 


GO 


G2 


05 


GO 


01 


00 


00 


GG 


09 


GG 


02 


I r 


00 


01 


04 


OG 


06 


00 


GO 


02 


06 


GO 


GI 


06 


01 


13 


09 


00 


03 


OG 


OG 


03 


07 


OG 


g8 


06 


GG 


Gl 


03 


00 


I I 


04 


OG 


G2 


04i 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. . 53 

pd your Rate for killing of wolves oo 02 03^ 

Due in my old booke 01 14 07 

(One line crossed out.) 

due for smither)' worke 00 16 10 

(Several lines crossed out.) 

pd your Country Rate, 1652, 5s 3d 
1 yd & ^ of frize at 5s p yd 
I oz. Nutmeggs 8d mace 6d. 
3 Pills 

pd for you to Sam, Marshall of Windsor 
*■ plaine Iron 8d a Gimblet 5d. 2 hooke 

2d sharpning a share and coulter 5d 
Laying a share 

" a Coulter 
Sharp share & coulter 
I qt of vinegar 12 yds Incle 
I pr Pitchforke tines 
Due in my father's booke 
more for oates to be pd in pease 
Due wch you are to pay for your Son Henry 

Chapin 04 05 

26 07 



00 


05 


03 


00 


07 


06 


00 


01 


02 


00 


00 


06 


01 


06 


06 


00 


01 


08 


00 


02 


06 


00 


01 


10 


00 


00 


04 


00 


01 


04 


00 


01 


00 


09 


10 


07 


00 


06 


00 



Reed 67 bush of wheate & 3 bush, all is 70 

bush at 3s lod per bush is 
Reed by a Bill from Goodm. Foord. 
Reed for you of (I. Howell 
Reed in wampam 
Reed by 4 days worke David 
Reed by what I pay David for worke at 

mill 



13 


08 


04 


05 


00 


00 


00 


03 


10 


01 


15 


09 


00 


08 


00 


It 






00 


09 


00 


21 


04 


II 



Lines crossed over and over and almost illegible. 



54 CHAPIN FAMILY 



more 



So Rests due to mee 05 03 00 

you are to pay me for Mr. Moxon. ye 
last halfe of his Rate 14s id & for 
goods you bought of him i8s 01 12 01 





06 


15 


GI 


Reed by Porke & fat 


00 


10 


09 


Reed in wampam 


00 


04 


04 




00 


15 


01 


ly 18 








1653 Acoted & Rests due to mee Just 


06 


00 


OG 


for mending a spade 


CO 


GO 


06 


I bush of Apples 


00 


04 


OG 


I pr stockens 4s 4d i pr Cotton stockens 


2S 






6d 


00 


06 


IC 


3 yds want a litle of wt Cotton at 3s 4d 


GO 


09 


10 


7 yd linnen Cloth at 2s 6d 


00 


17 


06 


5 yds ^ red sh Cotton at 3s 8d 


01 


GG 


02 


pd for you to VVm Brookes 


00 


07 


08^ 


I pr stockens 


GO 


04 


04 


I pr childs stockens 


00 


01 


08 


I Bible 6s 6d i yd i & ^^ of blu linnen 


at 






i8d 


00 


02 


01 


I hat 


00 


09 


00 


a band for a cart to Jno Bliss. 


00 


02 


09 


silke buttons & gallome to David. 


OG 


03 


oCi 


10 yds of kersy at 8s gd p yd 


04 


07 


06 



14 17 05 



(Book I p. 31.) 



G. Chapin. 



2000 pins 2S 8d 3 knives 3s 00 05 08 

3 yds wt Cotton at 3s 4d 00 10 gg 

^ yd ^ qr. wt dimity 13d. i yd | Cot. 2S9d. gg 03 ig 

Needles i2d 3 yds col. dimity at 22 d go 06 g6 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 55 



1 pee Cot Incle. lod \vt tape 5d 


00 


GI 


03 


6 yds Hlet gd 6 yds manchest yd^ 


00 


GI 


o4i 


I pr shooes of ye 7s 


00 


03 


g8 


I pr stockens i4d i pap pins. 6d 


GO 


GI 


08 


I dz ^ wted bro thrid 


00 


GO 


09 


I pint bottle 2s a pint i^ \ Brandy is 


lod^ 00 


03 


loi 


a new socket for a spade 


00 


GO 


I I 


Laying an ax 


GO 


GI 


g6 


I yd & :^ of wt fustian 


OG 


02 


02i 


1 sieth 


00 


04 


08 


4 yds blew Cotton at 3s 8d 


00 


«4 


08 


pd for you to Symon Sacket 


00 


05 


00 


Agust 








9 '54 6 yds red shag cotton at 3s lod 


GI 


03 


00 


I pr stock 


GG 


04 


G2 


2 pr stock at ID d 1 pr 2s 8d 1 pr is 


I id GO 


g6 


03 


I yd blew callico 


00 


02 


04 


^ yd red callico 


00 


GO 


I I 


4 yds ^ red kersy 


01 


04 


04 


5 y^^ i greene kersy at 5s 3d 


01 


08 


loi 


4 yds { kersy at 8s 8d 


01 


•9 


00 


3000 pins 


00 


04 


00 


I yd holland 4s 6d i lace & i pr 


knives 






i5d 


GO 


05 


09 


I yd callico 


OG 


02 


GO 


I yd red callico 


00 


01 


ID 


4 yds wt cotton at 3s 2d 


00 


12 


08 


3 yds of green shagg at 3s 6d 


OG 


IG 


g6 


ilb peper 


OG 


GG 


07 


a comb and cotton rib 


GG 


OG 


.oi 


I lb Copperis i lb Allom 


00 


OG 


10 


I yd -^ kersy at 8s cjd 


GO 


13 


oii 




12 


g8 


08 


Record on ye other side is 


14 


n 


05 



27 g6 01 

Reed by G.Ashley 12s ~) 

by G. Branch 2s 4d j go 14 04 



56 CHAFIN FAMILY 

Reed by G. Cooper oi 03 09 

Reed by worke of his oxen 00 04 06 

Reed by a skin of Bever 00 07 00 

Reed by 3 lb of eandles 00 02 06 

Reed by 192 lb Beife at 4d ' 03 04 00 



Oct. 27 th 
1654 Aeoted & rests due to mee 



05 16 





Reed 60 bush of wheate 
So is resting due to mee 


1 1 


IG 


GG 




10 


GO 


GO 


27 th 


October 1654 










8 se silke 3 yds gallome manchester 


00 


G2 


03 




2000 of hobnayls 


GO 


06 


g8 




i C doble (teas?) 


00 


00 


g6 




I lb pepper 


GO 


02 


04 




I pint vinegar 


00 


GG 


04i 




^ yd F. broad lockra 


GO 


01 


09 




I yd f blew cotton 


OG 


05 


07 




3 lbs sope 


00 


03 


06 




4 lb Allom 2 lbs Copperis 8 sc silke 


00 


03 


g8 




for ye recording of land 2s 
posted to P. 238 


OG 


G2 


00 




1 1 


08 


07 




(Book I p. 32.) 










Deacon Chapin Dr. 










For severall pticulars in p. 32 to ye sum of 


II 


g8 


07 


Feb. 


17th 








165 


4 For a psell of wampam sent to Henry Cha- 








pin 12;^ & IDS more 


12 


10 


GG 




3 lb ^ sope 


00 


04 


GI 




■^ lb powder i4d. 1 lb shot 4d 


GG 


01 


06 




3 lb sugar 


00 


02 


06 




^ a peck of salt 


00 


GG 


10 




2 lb starch 


00 


01 


g6 




16 lb of sugar 


00 


13 


04 




you are to pay for your son David 


IG 


GO 


GO 



35 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. $7 

Reed p Tho Stebbins in wheate i6s | 

Reed p Katherin Bliss 17s 6d j 01 13 06 

Reed 87 bushs. of wheate (at ye Mill in 

June 1655) IS 

Reed a qr of veale 00 
Reed by stringing 247 (fathoms) of wampam 01 

Reed Josias id reaping 00 



^9 


00 


02 


06 


10 


10 


00 


06 





19 


06 


04 


Agust 7th 








165s Acoted & rests due to niee 


15 


14 


06 


I yd ^ of red shag at 3s gd 


00 


OS 


08 


I yd ^ wt cotton at 3s 6d 


00 


OS 


03 


5 yds ^ kersy at 6s 


01 


13 


00 


4 yds ^ wt cotton at 3s 6d 


00 


IS 


09 


I yds f of red kersy 


00 


08 


09 


1500 pins manchest : fillet. Inele. cot 


. rib 00 


03 


07 


6 yds of red cotton at 3s lod 


01 


03 


00 


2 yds ^ of greene say at 5s 


00 


10 


03 


I Bible 


00 


05 


06 


I comb lod I bunch tape i4d 


00 


02 


GO 


1000 pins i6d I knife i2d 


00 


02 


04 


(Page 238) 


2 I 


10 


07 


Oct. I8th 








1655 To 2 yds i kersy at 7s 6d 


00 


16 


04i 


4 doz buttons 2 s. 6sc silke gd 


00 


02 


09 


I line crossed out. 








buttons & 3 sc silke. 


00 


01 


o6i 


1 C of 6d nayles 


00 


01 


00 


3 yds i peniston at 4s 8d 


00 


16 


0+ 


I pr stock 4s 6d 1 pr i8d 


00 


06 


00 


I yd ^ red cotton at 3s lod 


00 


04 


10 


I sickle 


00 


01 


06 




02 


10 


04 


On ye other side is 


21 


10 


07 


You are to pay me for Rowld to 


G. Ed- 






wards 


03 


10 


00 




27 


10 


1 1 



58 CHAPIN FAMILY 

Reed 74 bushs. ^ of wheateat^s 6d p bush. 13 00 09 

Reed in wampam 00 10 00 

Reed 2 bush of oates 00 05 00 

Reed stringing 15 (fathoms) ^ wampam 00 01 11 



Aprill 19th 
1656 Acoted & rests due to mee 13 13 03 

Sept. 25th 
1656 To a hat 00 18 00 

To what you pay me for Josias (as below) 00 09 03 

15 00 06 
Rec'd by stringing of wampam 194 (fathoms) or 04 04 

Acoted Septbr 29th 1656 cS; rests due to Mr. 
Pynchon thirteene pounds, sixteen shil- 
Hng two pence 13 16 02 

(Signed) Samuel Chapin. 

(Book I, p. 237.) 

Deacon Chapin Dr. 

£ s d 

Above ye sum off 13 j 6 02 



Reed by Geo ; Colton 04 05 00 

So he owes mee 09 11 02 
Deacon Chapin 

'lo ye halfe of ye oxen 7;i^ 10s 07 10 00 

1 2 lbs of VVoole 01 00 00 

^ yd J- qr, blew lin 00 01 03 

f yd brd blew linnen 00 01 09 

6 se F thrid 00 00 09 

4 bunches thrid but lod ^ manchest 7d ^ 00 01 06 

^ pee of silk lace 00 00 05 
I lb of thrid 4s 2d fillet i2d. 2 pr sisors i id. 

2 yds ^ gallome 00 06 11 

I Comb 2od Needles 4d 00 02 00 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 



59 



X yd red cotton 

above is 

all is 
posted to N Book p. 20. 



(Book I, p. 238.) 



00 04 00 
09 II 02 

18 19 09 



Deacon Chapin Dr. 
Octobr 28 
1657 To I yd ^ & -|- qr of kersy at 14s 

1 yd ^ kersy at 7s 6d 

, 2 yds of red shag at 4s 

4 yds gallom i4d. 2 so of silke 
2000 of Pins 

2 pr of spectales 

2 yds wt cotton at 3s i id 

1 yd ^ of red shag cot at 4s 

2 C of nayles 6d. smale nayles id 
6 yds of red cotton Goodm. Gun 
Annisseed & buttons 

in my old booke is 



01 


02 


09 


00 


II 


03 


00 


08 


GO 


00 


01 


03 


00 


03 


GO 


CO 


01 


04 


00 


07 


10 


00 


06 


00 


CO 


02 


01 


01 


04 


00 


GO 


01 


08 


18 


19 


09 



!3 09 00 



Reed by 2 bushs of Gates of old 5s. i d 
worke Japhet i8d candles (i)s 8d. a qr. 
of veale 2s 6(d). 2 oxe hides 2£ 02 

Reed by wt. I am to allow you on ye oxen, 
acots being made up cS: I have pd for 
your Ind. corne Hay &c for all I am to 
allow you los 

Reed 14 bushs wheate last yeare 

Reed by making 84 lb candles at 2d p. lb 

Reed by porke & Bacon to ye lead mines 

Reed by your pt of blacks hide 

Reed 40 bushs wheate 

Reed by ye seleetmens order yt I should 
pay you out of ye 40;^ rate (57) 



15 



08 



GO 


10 


00 


G2 


09 


00 


00 


14 


00 


G2 


06 


IG 


00 


09 


06 


07 


GO 


GO 


01 


OG 


OG 


n 


05 


00 



60 CHAPIN FAMILY 

June i8th 
1658 Acoted & rests due to me ye sum o(T 

& for ^ of powder dlrd before ye acot 

not acoted 
resting on buttons 13d. i knife 13d. i 

8d. 
1500 pins 

1 hat 20s. 4 yds wt cotton 14s 8d. 

2 doz button 2s 4d. silke 6d. 
1 yd ^ of red kersy 
pd for you to Sam. Church 
I yd f of red shag cotton 
you are to pay me for Tho. Gilbert 
you are to pay me for ye lot in ye plaine 
nayles 

(In the margin is this statement.) 

Reed 2 bushs of Pease to ye men at ye lead 
mine. Reed for pt of ye oxe at ^jC i8s 
but 1 2d abate for oates and 1 2d I pd. G. 
Fyler for y sons expences so it is but 
3^ 1 6s Resting on red shag you had to 
pay for out of the churches stock 30s 
id. More rests 6s. 3d. 

To a gun 

callico 2S 6d. cotton rib i2d. thrid 3d 

To what you pay for Joseph Parsons 



06 


04 


00 


, but 






GO 


01 


02 


knife 






00 


02 


10 


00 


G2 


03 


01 


14 


08 


GO 


02 


IG 


OG 


08 


03 


00 


03 


GO 


00 


07 


GO 


GI 


10 


GO 


le 02 


GO 


GO 


00 


GO 


06 



GI 


02 


00 


GG 


03 


09 


01 


GO 


GO 



5 02 04 



Reed by 2 bushs Pease 6s. making candles 
33'. 8d. Reed, by ye oxe as above 3;^ 
i6s. Reed 30 bushs of wt. 5;^. 5s. 
All is 09 10 08 

Acoted ye 18. March 16;^, [J & Rests due to 
mee 05 

Jan. ye 7th 1658 sold to Deacon Chapin ye 
homlot wch John Stewart lives on, all 
of it but that pt. next to ye streete for 
II (or 12) rod excepted, So much being 



08 



ASSOCIATION I'UHLICATIONS. 6l 

excepted next to ye streete ye rest to ye 
greate River Deacon Chapin is to have, 
also ye wet meddow before it & also 
ye woodlot belonging to it for wch he 
ingages to pay me in Jan. or Feb. come 
twelve Month ye sum of Thirteen 
Pounds in vvheate at current price in 



Springfeild Hay 


13 


00 


00 


April 30th 








1659 To f yd of wt cotton 


GO 


02 


g6 


I doz of thrid Buttons 


GO 


GG 


05 


I yd of searge 


00 


07 


06 


pd for you to Sam Ball. 


00 


19 


06 


4 yds of wt Cotton at 3s. lod. 


00 


15 


04 


4 yds of red shag cotton & i yd ditto 


01 


OG 


GO 


I b b felt hat 


00 


15 


06 


3 knives 2S 


00 


02 


GO 


3 lb. of Powder 


00 


07 


06 


4 yds ^ of stuft at 4s. 6d. 20s 3d. 3 


doz 






buts 2S 


or 


02 


03 


4 yds of shag cotton 


00 


16 


00 


I C Nay Is 


GO 


GI 


GO 


I yd 1 wt cot at 3s 4d 


00 


05 


GO 


I y -^ & nayl ^ of kersy 19s. silk 2(-^. 


ace 






IS gd. 


01 


01 


GO 


pd for you to John Scot 23s. 6d buttons 


5d 






3d ^ work 4s 8d. 


01 


g8 


07 


^ yd red kersy 


GG 


GO 


09 


for sithe a sieth 


GO 


05 


OG 


2 y red cotton Ss. 4 yds ^ red kersy at 


5s. 






8d. is i£ s^ ^^- ^IJ '=^ 


01 


13 


06 



Reed, by allowing y 20s on exch. of Land, 
candles, worke i£. 13s id. Reed 80 
bush. ^ wt 14. 01. 9 carting stones 8d. 
& I d helping ye brickman 2£ 14s o 
day 4s 02. 18. o il 



62 



CHAPIN FAMILY 



Aug. 23 
1660 Acoted & Rests due to mee 

Posted to p. 262. 

(Book II, p. 20.) 



II 03 00 



Deacon Chapin Dr 



Sept. 3d 
1660 



£ 


s 


d 


To acot made up in p. 20 (August 23, 1660) 11 


03 


OG 


To payment to Deacon Parks for you 30 


00 


GO 


To payment for you to Goodm. Blumfeild 03 


GO 


GO 


To I saddle & fur 02 


GO 


00 


loope lace 00 


GO 


05 


I lb of Powder 00 


G2 


06 


resting on Buttons & silke & the making of 






my candles pd for 00 


02 


IG 


freight of your fardle from England 00 


I 1 


06 


2 yds \ qtr gallome & ^ yd of bl ribban 00 


01 


06 


3 doz of thrid Buttons 6d. i doz 2d \. 6 silk 






Buttons 3d \ 00 


01 


GG 


I lb of Raysons 00 


01 


GO 


Gallome & edge 6d. i C of Nayls 13d 00 


Gl 


07 


20 lb of Cotton woole 01 


01 


08 


To salt 4 bush 00 


18 


00 


To a Lawbooke ' 00 


03 


06 


To my steeres from ye spring to a winter 






los 00 


10 


GO 


^ C of Nayles 00 


00 


07 


2 yds of manchester beys 00 


07 


04 


I Pint of Sack i5d. \ lb of Raysons 6d 00 


01 


09 


Nayls GO 


GO 


04^ 


-^ yd & nayle of striped carpel 3s 5d i awle 






id 00 


03 


06 


2 a sieth you had of old is not acoted 5s 00 


05 


GO 


^ C of Nayls 6d 00 


00 


g6 


kersy &c for Sam. Ball. 00 


16 


06 


2 lb of AUom GO 


01 


02 


lace fillet ..^c 00 


GI 


03 


8 sc silke (for Lyman) og 


01 


00 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 



63 



^ yd of canvas. 

3 yds searge for R. Lyman 

To carying dovvne of 71 bush, of wt 

1000 of Pins 

To Buttons for R Lyman 

2 pr stockens 

I wast Belt 5s. 6d 
I lb Powder 

1 pr stockens 3s. 6d 
1000 Pins i8d 

To Peters keeping your sheepe 1660 

3 yd f blu Linnen at 2od. tape 4d 
To paymt for you for Nath. Pritchard 

2 q Pap 

To paymt for G. Hull for Josias 
Hulls worke. 
I horn comb to Japhet 
To paymt for Goodm. Eggleston 



Reed p. contra 23;^. iis 4d 
rests 36. 13. I 

April! 8th 
1663 Acoted & rests due "> 

To Ballance \ 36 13 

Aprill i6th 1663 sold to Deacon Chapin 100 acres 
of land in Chikkuppy Plaine next above 
Henry Chapins all thorough ye Plaine 
from ye Kiver to ye hill : Cv: also 4 acres 
of muxy meddow for wch he is to allow 
& pay me 16;^ in wheate at 3s. 6d p 
bush. 8;,^ of it next March & ye other 
8£ ye yeare after viz in March next 
come twelve month, all is 16 00 

Let out to Goodm, Chapin ye land of Sack- 
uts at Chikkuppy for wch he is to pay 
me 3 bush I wt. 00 1 2 



00 


01 


05 


01 


02 


g6 


01 


04 


06 


00 


01 


06 


00 


09 


06 


00 


04 


04 


00 


05 


06 


00 


02 


06 


GO 


03 


06 


GO 


01 


06 


00 


01 


o7i 


00 


06 


II 


03 


05 


00 


00 


01 


03 


GO 


OS 


00 


00 


00 


05 


GO 


10 


00 


60 


04 


05 



03 



64 CHAPIN FAMILY 

Let out to G. Chapin ye Plowed ground of 
Sackats at ye Cold Spring for vvch he 



IS to pay me 






00 


ID 


00 


Tape 






GO 


00 


02 


To 6 lb of sugar 






00 


04 


06 


I QPap 






GO 


GO 


07I 


To ye Boate 4 days at 1 6d 






00 


05 


04 


To my cannoe of old 






GO 


04 


00 


To severalls brought from d 


ay 


Booke 


03 


14 


04 




58 


04 


04 



Reed. p. contra i^ 12s go 
Rests 56. 12. 04 

Nov. 16 
1663 Acoted & rests due me from Deacon Chapin 
fifty six Pounds twelve shillings 4d as 
witness his hand. 56 12 04 

(Signed) Samuel Chapin. 
Reed. p. contra 30^ 4s. 3d 
Rests 26. 8. I 

Octobr 29th 
1664 Acoted & Rests due to me ye sum ofif 26 08 01 

posted to N. Booke. 

(Book II, p. 262.) 

Deacon Chapin Cr. 
Nov. 22th 

1660 By one hogg, weight 233 lb. at 3d. p lb. 
June (61) By 20 bushs of wheate 
March 26th or 27th 
1663 Reed by John Scot & G. Francis Pepper 
wheate 
Reed 2 bushs wheate 
By 2 Journys to ye falls wth your Teame 
By ^ d carting & Sam. Balls help 
for an Atachmt 
By 38 lb sugar 
By 3 bushs ^ wheate 



02 


18 


03 


03 


IG 


GO 


1 

06 


12 


00 


GO 


07 


00 


GI 


GO 


GO 


00 


03 


oS 


00 


01 


00 


01 


II 


08 


00 


12 


03 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 6$ 



& By 5 bushs wheate 

By 4 days worke & i qr 

By 2 bolts 

By making 43 lb of candles 1661 

By 12 bushs of Ind. corne in eares 

By 2 fowles & 2 lb Butter 

By carting stones 

By making Candles 1662 

By 20 bushs of wheate 1662 



Acoted p contra 
ye 8th of Aprill 1663. 



00 


17 


06 


00 


08 


06 


00 


00 


06 


00 


07 


02 


00 


15 


00 


00 


02 


06 


00 


06 


00 


00 


08 


04 


03 


10 


00 



23 II 04 



April 20th 1663 Deacon Chapin had some 
blanketting & red shag cotton for to 
(relieve ?) G. exsell, wch he pd me for 
ye greatest pt out out of the churches 
stock : only 5s. is yet behind resting 
due to me : the wch 5 s he is to pay me 
out of ye churches stock. 

Reed it Nov. 16, 1663. 

Deacon Chapin Cr. 
By John Stebbins paying me for you this 

20th June 1663 00 04 00 

By I d. carting to & from ye foote of ye 

falls 
By 3 d. carting stones ^:c 



00 
00 


10 

18 


00 
00 


01 


12 


00 



Discounted this ye i6th 

of Novembr 1663. 
Febr. 9th 

1663 Reed in wampam 01 02 00 

Jan 15 

63 By 22 bush wheat 03 17 00 

March By 16 bu of wheat 02 16 00 



o6 


02 


06 


06 


02 


06 


05 


05 


00 


01 


'5 


00 


sacra- 






00 


01 


09 


02 


08 


00 


00 


14 


06 


30 


04 


03 



66 CHAPIN FAMILY 

June 22 

64 By 35 bu of wheat 

The same day 35 bush more 
June 23 More by Sam: Ely 30 bush more 

By 10 bushs of wheate to Mr. Glover 
By ^ bushs of wheate for ye wine for 

ment 
By 18 bushs of Pease at 2s 8d 
By making candles 14s 6d 

Octobr 29th 1664 

Acoted p contra. 
(Book II, p. 263.) 

Deacon Chapin Dr. 
To severalls brought from day booke wch 

were dlrd July 19, 1664 To ye sum off 05 
To severalls dlrd Sept 7. 64 3^ 9s. id. 
whereoff 40s. set to Mr. Glover as 
day Booke so tis 
To severalls 

2 knives 2s. 4d needles 4d 
To severalls Sept. 21 (64) 
To f yd blew linen, silke, hoocks & eys 
Octobr. 7 

(64) To severalls 00 10 10 

Oct. 29. 

64 To severalls 05 02 04 

Jan 16 

64 To 1 lb of sugar 00 oi 00 

2 fathom of Match 00 00 08 

To paymt you are to make for Mr. Glover 
yt 20s for Geo. Coltons (Bull) behind 
wch yr 2 make good. 00 08 05 

Apr II : 65 To ^ an ell of fine dowlas 00 02 01 

Apr. 18 : 65 To i yd ^. ^ qr. searge at 6s. 6d. 2 sc. 

silke d. 4 y lace at 8 4 (d ?) 00 13 08 

f yd gallome i yd gartering t lb sugar 00 01 06 
To 6 d. on ye wine for ye sacramt wch you 

bid me set to your acot. 00 00 06 



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ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 6/ 

Jun 6 

1665 1 yd nap cotton 3s. 3d. ^ pint sack 00 03 09 
I Dozen elapses 1 d. ^. i Horn-book 4d. 00 00 06 
To Nailes 3s. 4d. i Dozen buttons 8d 00 04 00 
To paymt for you to Doctor Read 00 03 08 

Feb. 26: 

65 To severalls Brought from Day booke 03 07 06 
May 14. 

1666 To an Indian Coate 00 18 00 
To severalls in day Booke to Sept 66 01 18 03 

Oct 29 To severalls 01 00 09 



23 15 09 



Dec. II. 1666 Reed p. contra 23. 15. 06 | 
Rests 00. 00. 03 \ 



Dee. nth 1666 upon this acot above Rests 00 00 03 
But se ye old Booke p. 262 where is due to 

me of old 26. 8. i so yt in all he owes 

me 26^ 8s. 4d. 

Deeeb : 29 : 

66 To rr yd lace at 2s. p yd 00 01 00 
Jun. 14 : 

67 To salt 4s. 6d. I lace 2d. 00 04 08 
Octobr 17 

68 To Steele f lb 00 01 00 
March 9 

69 To a belt 3s. whereoff Goodm. Chapin pd. 

1 2d. to my wife so tis 00 02 00 

To I doz ^ Buttons to Serj. Stebbing 00 01 06 
June 15 

69 To I sieth 00 05 00 
he is to help me 2 d Reaping. 

Resting on spectacles 00 00 03 

To 2 bushs salt 00 12 00 

1 yd f (colored ?) Linnen 3.9. i yd man- 

chester 2 d i yd loop lace 3d 00 04 02 



68 CHAPIN FAMILY 

I sc red silke 2d. 4d thrid gallome 6d 00 or 00 

For Chikkiippy Land as p agreeint on ye 

other side 30 00 00 

To old acot in ye old Booke, now I cross it 

there & so bring it hither 26 08 01 



58 02 00 

Reed p. contra 54. 07. 6 
rests 03. 14 06 

Febr. 3d 
1669 Acoted & rests due To Ballance 03 14 06 

To 2 y ^ kersy dlrd just after ye Reckon- 
ing at 7s. 4d. — i8s. 4d. 2 doz Buttons 
2 s. Thrid 3d. 01 00 07 

More I doz Buttons, i y loop lace 2 d. & 

rests id. 00 01 03 

Febr. 17. 

1669 To ^ yd & Nayle of ye former kersy 00 02 05 
Aug 2Sth 

1670 To I Quire of Pap 00 00 07 



This 25th of Aug. 1670 caryed to ye N. Booke 04 19 06 

(Book III, p. 8.) 

[A page is missing from the account book here so that the ac- 
count to Deacon Chapin's credit is missing.] 
[In the index under letter C is this statement :] 



So rests due to mee from ye church o 03 06 

June I ith 65. To 2 qts i Pynt & ^ of Red 

wine at 22d o 05 01 



1 






Deacon (Miapin hath had of me for ye 
Church, so much Red wine to this i8th 

£ ^ d \ 

of Aprill 1665 as cometh to o 1 1 00 

May 1665 Reed of Deacon Chapin towards 
this 2 bushs of wheate & more 6d on 
acot is 076 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 69 

Agust 13. 65 To 3 qts red wine o 05 06 

Reed 3 bushs ^ of wheate & ^ bushs of 

wheate myself & wife's allowance to 

1666 quits all. 

(Book III, Index, letter C.) 

Deacon Chapin Dr. 

£ s d 
Sept. 66 To 6 yds \ searge at 6s. 6d. i knif gd 02 03 00 

Octob : 24 : 

67 To 2 yds Manchester 00 00 03 



Octob: 16: 68 Acoted wth Goodw. Chapin 
and she engageth to pay to my fathers 
to my fathers Content. 02 03 03 

P Contra Cr. £ s d 

By porke & wheat 02 03 03 



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(Book IV, p. 40.) 

169^ Samll Chapin Dr. 

March 12 To 5 yds serge att 5/ 

I yd ^ ribbin att 8d. 2 yd galoom at 6d. 

3 skains silke 6d. 

To 4 penny worth of Great pins 



To I silke Handkercheifs to your wife 

1 yd J- ribbin at i2d. \ yds. Scotch cloth at 

4/ 4d. I spoon 8d. i lace id. 00 03 08 

Ditto Chapin Cr. 

By r bush wheate 3/8 
By Cash 18s 
I bush wheat 3/6 
By cash in full 3s 

By 6 yds Tear cloth at i8d 



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70 CHAPIN FAMILY 

(Book IV, p. 83) 

Deacon Samll Chapin Dr. 
Aug 25th 

1670 To severall pticulars in ye old Booke 04 19 06 
Dec. 14. 

70 To 2 yds ^ searge at 6s. iod.-i3.s 8d. 2sc 

silk 3d. 00 13 II 

Apr. 4 

167 1 To your paying for clearing Tho. Gilberts 

old acot 01 05 08 

a Comb lod Needles 2d. 00 01 00 

Sept 21 

71 To 4 C of hobnayls 00 01 08 
Jan. 15 

71 To I bunch of thrid Buttons 00 00 10 

To ye Rent of 3 acres of ground this y : 

1 67 1 in 3 corn med. 01 10 00 

July 23th 

1672 To 4 doz of Buttons silk 6d 00 04 06 
Aprill 17 

1673 1<^ 2 C of hobnailes 00 00 10 
Aug 20 

73 To flynt 00 00 06 
Aug 29 

73 To I doz ^ Buttons 00 01 06 

(I line crossed out here.) 

To 3 C 65 p Jo. Artsell in May 73 00 16 06 

Needles 2d 00 00 02 
June 19 

1674 To Paymt for Jos Baldwin 00 03 06 
To ye Rent of 2 acres last 01 00 00 



II 00 01 



Reed p. contra S£ 00s. 07d. 
rests 2. 19. 6 
July 8th 
1674 Acoted & rests due To Ballance 02 19 06 



ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 7 I 

Octob. 3d 

1674 To 6 lb sugar 3s. To i qt Rum lod 00 03 jo 
March 9 

74 To 3 lb sugar 00 01 09 
Aprill 

1675 To 1 qt of Rum 2od 00 01 08 
June 12 

75 'To 3 lb sugar 2s unless she in her pay 00 02 00 
To I pt Rum lod. i qt wine i2d 00 01 10 

Nov 5 

75 1 pt wine 00 01 00 

Dec. 17 

75 To I yd :|^ Packing cloth 00 02 00 



03 13 08 



Reed p. contra 2£ 16. 8. 
rests o. 17. o 
Febr. 21th 
1675 Acoted (with Japhet Chapin & Jo. Hitch- 
cock) & rests due To Ballance 00 17 00 
Reed by making 30 lb. of candles at id. -^ p 
lb & 2d ^ spiuing ye week yarn is 5s. 

So rests due to mee 00 12 00 

wch I2S is set to Japhets acct & is thereby 
pd & Quit all. 

Deacon Chapin Dr. To wine 
for ye sacrament. 
May loth 
1674 To I gallon 1 pt at 5s. 6d 00 06 03 

July 5 

1674 To I gallon i pt of wine at 5s. 6d. 00 06 03 

Sept. To I gallon i pt of wine at 5s. 4d. 00 06 00 

Nov I St 

1674 To I gallon i pt of wine at 5s. 4d. 00 06 00 

Dec. 27 

1674. To I gallon i pt of wine at 5s. 4d. 00 06 00 



72 CHAPIN FAMILY 

Feb. 28 

74 To I gallon i pt wine at 5s. 4d. 00 06 00 

Aprill 18 
1675 To I gallon i pt 00 06 00 



02 02 06 

Discounted p. contra Aprill 28, 1675 <^ Y^ 
rest is made to Decon Chapin as p. 
contra 8s. 
June 2 

1675 To wine 00 06 08 

Aug 15 
1675 To I gallon i qt of wine at 5s. 4d. 00 06 08 

(This account is continued apparently as Deacon Chapin's, 
though it must have been with the church, as Deacon Chapin 
died November 11, 1675). 

(Journal & Day Book p, 85.) 

Deacon Chapin Cr. 
March 
16^^ By 12 bushs. ^ wt p. Sam. Terry 

By Sam. Bliss, Jun. 
Feb. 15 
167 1 By 10 bushs. Jno. C. for rent 

By making 4 lb candles. 

By 7 C of Hay 

By making 34 lb candles 

45 lb candles 

By I d : Nathan A. 

By 100 lb Toe 

By 40 lb ^ candles wickes 

20 lb 

51 lb candles wicked 

By 32 

44 lb i 

Byssi 



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ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS. 73 

Discounted p. contra 
July 8th 1674 
Aprill 

1675 By 1 hide 34 lb 00 08 06 

Dec. 10 
1675 By 168 lb of Pork at 2d. f 01 17 11 

By making 61 lb. ^ candles 00 10 08 

02 16 08 

Discounted p. Contra with Japhet Chapin & 
John Hitchcock. Febr. 21th. 1675. 

Deacon Chapin. 

Acoted with him about ye wine he had of me for ye Sacrament 
& about ye wheate I had of him last year for it : & all ye wine he 
had for ye sacrament being pd for : There is due to Deacon 

Chapin of ye chches acot los. 3d wine at 5s. 6d. I 

intend hereafter to let it goe at 5 (s) 4d. 

Two other items which refer to Deacon Chapin appear on page 

86. 

Apr 28 1675 acoted & rests due to Decon chapin 00 08 00 
(Between 20 Mar. 1674 (1675) & ^^^ '777) ^- Chapin ^ bush : 

Terry ^ : Jo Barber ^ : G. Thomas ^ bush : G. Mirick ^ 

00 06 01^ 

(Journal & Day Book, p. 86.) 



,=^i^^ JAN 7 5 
^^•^ N. MANCHESTER.