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Full text of "The life of trust : being a narrative of the Lord's dealings with George Müller"

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Moulton 





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Mr. & Mrs. Joe Bennett 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

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THE 



Life of Trust-. 



BEING A 



NARRATIVE OF THE LORD'S DEALING* 



WITH 



G-EOBG-E MULLER 

WRITTEN BY HIMSELF. 



Xt\) an Introduction 

By FRANCIS WAYLAND. 



A NEW EDITION, BROUGHT DOWN TO THE PRESENT TIME, 
INCLUDING HIS VISIT TO AMERICA. 



NEW YORK: 
ELBON AND COMPANY, 

1878. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1873, by 

GOULD AND LINCOLN, 
In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



Copyright, 1877, by SHELDON & CO. 



EDITOK'S PREFACE 

TO THE NEW REVISED EDITION, 



* » » 



lb 



££5^' HE first American edition of the Life of Trust was published 
in 1860, under the editorial supervision of Rev. H. L. Way- 
land, D.D. His work was performed with rare judgment 
and skill. From the "Narrative" of Mr. Muller, in four parts, 
the last published in 1856, and from the four " Annual Reports " 
issued in 1857, 1858, 1859, and 1860, he condensed into less than 
one- fourth of the space, a comprehensive view of the life and work 
of Mr. Muller, omitting nothing of essential value. The repetition 
from year to year, of similar events, incidents and illustrations, 
made the reduction an imperative necessity. He divided, also, the 
Narrative into chapters, and prefixed to each chapter a brief state- 
ment of the leading subjects introduced. By such judicious edito- 
rial labor, the American edition was made more attractive than the 
English works from which it was condensed. It was more compact 
for use, involved fewer repetitions, and supplied a Table of Contents, 
by which the reader could be guided. The work has had a large 
and steady sale, and many Christian hearts have been led by it to a 
stronger faith in the Living God. 

The stereotype plates were destroyed in the great fire of Novem- 
ber 9th and 10th, 1872, and the Publishers requested me to 
prepare a new edition of the work. Thirteen years having passed 
since the first edition was published, years rich in labors and in 
fruits to Mr. Muller, it seemed important that some record should 



VI EDITOR' S PREFACE. 

be made of this important period. Since 1860, three new Orjhais 
Houses have been opened, accommodating more than thirteen 
hundred orphans ; and the expenses of the establishment have been 
increased threefold.' But God has proportioned the grace to the 
trial. The barrel of meal has not wasted, nor the cruse of oil 
failed. The supply has been equal to the demand. Several chap- 
ters have been added, giving a brief sketch of the growth and 
prosperity of the institution from 1860 to the present time. It 
exhibits the came daily providential care which marked the earlier 
history of Mr. Muller's labors. To give place to the new matter, 
without swelling the volume to an inconvenient size, paragraphs 
have been dropped here and there frjm the former edition, where it 
seemed possible to omit them, without interrupting the narrative, 
or weakening the force of its lessons. 

With the changes indicated, and the insertion of fine full-page 
wood engravings of each of the five Orphan Houses, the work is 
sent forth anew to encourage Christians to daily faith in a present 
and Living God. Mr. Muller's life is an eloquent sermon on the 
power of faith. If science denies that God can interpose to over- 
rule or guide his laws, an appeal may be made to this testimony of 
personal experience during nearly forty years. If Mr. Galton and 
Prof. Tyndall ask for proofs of the value of prayer in common life, 
they may be directed to the Bristol Orphan Houses, for the 
facts of which they are in search. The facts are numerous, direct, 
and attested by witnesses whose veracity cannot be impeached. 
Mr. Miiller claims that these facts prove the power and willing- 
ness of God to answer prayer. He invites candid men to 
examine them, and pass judgment on his theory. 

HEMAN LINCOLN. 

Newton Centre, May 26, 1873. 



AUTHOR'S PEEFAOE, 



» » ♦ 

ft 



1 1' T was only after the consideration of many months, and after 
much self-examination as to my motives, and after much 
earnest prayer, that I came to the conclusion to write this 
work. I have not taken one single step in the Lord's service con- 
cerning which I have prayed so much. My great dislike to in- 
creasing the number of religious books would, in itself, have been 
sufficient to have kept me forever from it, had I not cherished the 
hope of being instrumental in this way to lead some of my 
brethren to value the Holy Scriptures more, and to judge by the 
standard of the Word of God the principles on which they act. 
But that which weighed more with me than anything, was, that I 
have reason to believe, from what I have seen among the children 
of God, that many of their trials arise either from want of con- 
fidence in the Lord as it regards temporal things, or from car- 
rying on their business in an unscriptural way. On account, 
therefore, of the remarkable way in which the Lord has dealt with 
me as to temporal things, I feel that I am a debtor to the church 
of Christ, and that I ought, for the benefit of my poorer brethren 
especially, to make known the way in which I have been led. In 
addition to this, I know that to many souls the Lord has blessed 
what I have told them about the way in which he has led me, and 
therefore it seemed a duty to use such means, whereby others 
also, with whom I could not possibly converse, might be bene- 
fited. That which induced me finally to determine to write this 

VII 



Vm AUTHOR S PREFACE. 

Narrative was, that if the Lord should permit the book to sell,'l 
might, by the profits arising from the sale, be enabled in a greater 
degree to help the poor brethren and sisters among whom I labor, 
— a matter which, just at that time, weighed much on my mind. I 
therefore began to write. But after three days I was obliged to 
lay the work aside on account of my other pressing engagements. 
Subsequently, I was laid aside on account of an abscess; and 
being unable, for many weeks, to walk about as usual, though able 
to work at home, I had time for writing. When the manuscript 
was nearly completed I gave it to a brother to look over, that I 
might have his judgment ; and the Lord so refreshed his spirit 
through it, that he offered to advance the means for having it 
printed, with the understanding that if the book should not sell 
he would never consider me his debtor. By this offer not a small 
obstacle was removed, as I have no means of my own to defray 
the expense of printing. These last two circumstances, con- 
nected with many other points, confirmed me that I had not been 
mistaken when I had come to the conclusion that it was the will 
of God that I should serve his church in this way. 

The fact of my being a foreigner, and therefore but very imper- 
fectly acquainted with the English language, I judged to be no 
sufficient reason for keeping me from writing. The Christian 
reader, being acquainted with this fact, will candidly excuse any 
inaccuracy of expression. 

For the poor among the brethren this Narrative is especially 
intended, and to their prayers I commend it in particular. 

GEORGE MULLER. 



CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTION . . . xrn 

CHAPTER I. 

BOYHOOD AND YOUTH. 
1805 — 1825. 

BIRTH — EARLY DISHONESTY — INSENSIBILITY — CONFIRMATION IN THE STATE 
CHURCH — DISSOLUTENESS OF LIFE — THE HARD WAY OF TRANSGRESSORS 

— THE GYMNASIUM AT NORDHAUSEN — THE UNIVERSITY AT HALLE — ROV- 
INGS . 47 

CHAPTER II. 

THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN. 

1825 — 1826. 

A TREA SURE FOUND — DAWNING OF THE NEW LIFE — THE PEACE OF GOD — " I AM 
COME TO SET A MAN AT VARIANCE AGAINST HIS FATHER" — "LET HIM 
THAT HEARETH SAY COME " — THE FIRST SERMON — DELIGHT IN THE LORD 

— A COMMON ERROR — THE FOUNTAIN NEGLECTED 54 

CHAPTER III. 

SELF-DEDICA TION. 

1826 — 1829. 

DESIRE FOR MISSIONARY LABOR — PROVIDENTIAL RELEASE FROM MILITARY 
8ERVICE — VISIT AT HOME — LED TO THE LAND OF HIS FUTURE LABORS — 
PROGRESS IN RELIGIOUS KNOWLEDGE — DESIRE FOR IMMEDIATE USEFUL- 
MESS 63 



X CONTENTS . 

CHAPTER IV. 

LEANING ON JESUS. 
1830 — 1832. 

A. DOOR OPENED — TOKENS FOR GOOD — TRUST EXERCISED IN THE STUDY AND 
MINISTRY OP THE WORD — THE SWORD OF THE SPIRIT — TRUSTING IN GOD 
FOR DAILY BREAD — BLESSEDNESS OF WAITING UPON THE LORD — " OWE NO 
MAN" — "ACCORDING TO YOUR FAITH BE IT UNTO YOU " — THE GIFT OF 
FAITH, AND THE GRACE OF FAITH 74 

CHAPTER V. 

MINISTRY AT BRISTOL BEGUN. 
1832 — 1835. 

"HERE HAVE WE NO CONTINUING CTT Y " — CAUTION TO THE CHRISTIAN 
TRAVELLER — NEW TOKENS FOR GOOD — THE WAY MADE CLEAR — MEET- 
INGS FOR INQUIRY — NO RESPECT OF PERSONS WITH GOD— FRANKE, 
"BEING DEAD, YET SPEAKETH" — DAILY BREAD SUPPLIED — A PECULIAR 
PEOPLE . 95 

CHAPTER VI. 

THE SCRIPTURAL KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION. 

1834 — 1835. 

CNSCRIPTURAL CHARACTER OF THE EXISTING RELIGIOUS AND BENEVOLENT 
SOCIETIES — A NEW INSTITUTION PROPOSED — GOD'S WORD THE ONLY RULE, 
AND GOD'S PROMISE THE ONLY DEPENDENCE — " IN EVERYTHING LET YOUR 
REQUEST BE MADE KNOWN UNTO GOD " — EARNEST OF THE DIVINE 
BLESSING ON THE INSTITUTION — BEREAVEMENT — HELPER SEASONABLY 
SENT — REWARD OF SEEKING GOD'S FACE . . . . . ... . . 109 

CHAPTER VII. 

HOME FOR DESTITUTE ORPHANS. 

1835 — 1836. 

FHANKE'S WORKS FOLLOW HIM — A GREAT UNDERTAKING CONCEIVED — REASONS 
FOR ESTABLISHING AN ORPHAN HOUSE — PRAYER FOR GUIDANCE — TREASURE 
LAID UP IN HEAVEN — IN PRAYER AND IN FAITH THE WORK IS BEGUN . . 124 



C O N TE NTS . XI 

CHAPTER VIII. 

THE FIELD WIDENING. 

1836 — 1837. 



AM UNEXPECTED OBSTACLE — IMPLICIT SUBMISSION — A SECOND ORPHAN 
HOUSE PROPOSED — AN ENCOURAGING TEXT — THE NEW ORPHAN HOUSE 
OEENED — COMPLETED ANSWER TO PRAYER — PROGRESS OF TnE LORD'S 
WORK— THE OVERSIGHT OF THE FLOCK:. 136 



CHAPTER IX. 

TRIAL. 

1838. 



THE MINISTRY OF SICKNESS — PEACE OF MIND— JESUS A PRESENT HELP — 
DEEP POVERTY — PLEADING WITH GOD — UNITED PRAYER. . . . 143 



CHAPTEE X. 

DELIVERANCE. 

1838. 

"PERPLEXED BUT NOT IN DESPAIR" — FAITH JUSTIFIED — A LESSON OF OBE- 
DIENCE — BOUNTIFUL SUPPLIES — SPIRITUAL INGATHERING — A DAY OF 
MERCIES — TIMELY AID — A SEASON OF PLENTY — OBEDIENCE REWARDED 158 

CHAPTEE XL 

ASKING AND RECEIVING. 

1839. 

HELP FOR THE POOR SAINTS — THE UNFAILING BANK — MEANS EXHAUSTED — 
LIBERALITY OF A LABORING SISTER — "HE KNOWETH OUR FRAME" — 
REDEEMING THE TIME — GODLINESS PROFITABLE UNTO ALL THINGS . 178 



XII CONTENTS . 

CHAPTEE XII. 

PLENTY AND WANT. 

1840. 

& PURE OFFERING REQUIRED — A JOURNEY PROPOSED — SEASONABLE PRO- 
VISION —LOOKING ONLY TO THE LORD — THE WRATH OF MAN PRAISING 
OOD— A PROMISE FULFILLED — BENEFIT OF TRIAL— NEW SPRINGS 
OPENED — BEFORE THEY CALL I WILL ANSWER — TRUST IN GOD COM- 
MENDED — SPIRITUAL BLESSINGS 184 

CHAPTER XIII. 

FAITH STRENGTHENED BY EXERCISE. 

1841. 

A WANT SUPPLIED — RESOURCES EXCEEDING THE DEMAND — EVIL OF SURETY- 
SHIP—POWER OF CHRISTIAN LOVE — GOD'S WORD THE FOOD OF THE SOUL 

PREPARATION FOR THE HOUR OF TRIAL — POVERTY — DEPENDING ONLY 

OH THE LIVING GOD 199 

CHAPTER XIV. 

WALKING IN DARKNESS. 

1841 — 1842. 

"GOD'S WAY LEADS INTO TRIAL " — GROUNDS OF THANKFULNESS — PKO- 
TRACTED DARKNESS — CAST DOWN, BUT NOT DESTROYED — TRUST IN 
GOD COMMENDED — THE MEANS OF ITS ATTAINMENT — REVIEW OF THE 
WORK . . .212 

CHAPTER XV. 

PROSPERITY. 

1842 — 1843. 

ABUNDANT SUPPLIES — RESTING ON THE WRITTEN WORD — "SEEKING AND 
FINDING" — ERRONEOUS IMPRESSIONS REMOVED — PERSEVERING AND PRE- 
VAILING PRAYER ANSWERED — " LENGTHENING THE CORDS AND STRENGTH- 
ENING THE STAKES" — A FOURTH ORPHAN HOUSE 235 



CONTENTS. XIll 

CHAPTER XVI. 

STEWARDSHIP. 
1844. 

4KTHLY AND HEAVENLY TREASURES — SEEKING THE KINGDOM OF GOD — 
FELLOWSHIP WITH THE FATHER — THE CHRISTIAN MERCHANT — EXAM- 
PLES—MISTAKES 252 

CHAPTER XVII. 

REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 

1845 — 1846. 

AN UNEXPECTED REQUEST — DELIBERATION — A GREAT UNDERTAKING — RE- 
LIANCE ON THE RESOURCES OF THE LIVING GOD — AN ANSWER EXPECTED 
AND RECEIVED— PRATER FOR FAITH AND PATIENCE — FURTHER PROOFS 
OF DIVINE FAVOR— THE BLESSEDNESS OF DEVISING LIBERAL THINGS . 286 

CHAPTER XVIII. 

FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 

1846 — 1848. 

THE SPIRIT OF SUPPLICATION BESTOWED AND PRATEB ANSWERED — TH1 
TIME OF MAN'S NEED AND OF GOD'S BOUNTY — FAITH NOT SHAKEN — 
DEALING ONLY WITH GOD — THE NEEDED AMOUNT FURNISHED — PER- 
PETUAL "NEED" — NOT WEARY IN GOD'S WORK — JOY IN ANSWERED 
PRAYER — FOUR REQUESTS GRANTED — " CONTINUING INSTANT IN 
PRAYER" — THE BUILDING COMMENCED — PERSONAL HISTORY — A MARKED 
DELIVERANCE .....309 

CHAPTER XIX. 

CONTINUED MERCIES. 

1848 — 1850. 

HUMBLE BEGINNINGS — DEVISING LIBERAL THINGS — THE ORPHANS PROVIDED 
FOR — A MEMORABLE DAY — MONEY "AT INTEREST" — MEANS FROM AN 
UNEXPECTED SOURCE — THE PROGRESS OF THE NEW ORPHAN HOUSE — 
MEANS PROVIDED FOR ITS COMPLETION — INEXPRESSIBLE DELIGHT IN 
GOD — REVIEW OF THE TWO YEARS PAST S?T 



XIV CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER XX, 

A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH. 

1850 — 1851. 

PAST MERCIES A ENCOURAGEMENT TO NEW UNDERTAKINGS — A HOUSE FOB 
SEVEN HUNDRED ORPHANS PROPOSED — WALKING BY FAITH — COUNSEL! 
SOUGHT FROM GOD — THE PURPOSE FORMED — DELIGHT IN THE MAGNI- 
TUDE AND DIFFICULTY OF THE DESIGN 348 

CHAPTER XXI. 

UNVARYING PROSPERITY. 

1851 — 1852. 

DESIRES FOR MORE ENLARGED USEFULNESS GRATIFIED — A LARGE DONATION 
ANTICIPATED AND RECEIVED —REVIEW OF 1851 — PERSONAL EXPERIENCE 

— BUILDING FUND FOR THE SECOND NEW ORPHAN HOUSE — DOUBT RESISTED 

— WAITING ON GOD NOT IN VAIN — REVIEW OF 1852 368 

CHAPTER XXII. 

REAPING IN JOY. 

1852 — 1854. 

EXPECTING GREAT THINGS FROM GOD — MUNIFICENT DONATION — INCREASING 
USEFULNESS OF THE SCRIPTURAL KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION — ACCESS 
TO GOD THROUGH FAITH IN CHRIST — A VOICE FROM MOUNT LEB- 
ANON — BENEFIT OF WAITING GOD'S TIME — CAREFUL STEWARDSHIP — 
FAITH, THE ONLY RELIANCE — "THIS POOR WIDOW HATH CAST IN MORE 
THAN THEF ALL" — GREATER ACHIEVEMENTS OF FAITH ANTICIPATED 

— COUNSEL TO TRACT DISTRIBUTORS — A NEW AND SEVERE TRIAL Or 
FAITH 371 

CHAPTER XXIII. 

THREE YEARS F PR SPER 1 T Y. 

1854—1857. 

THE SITE SELECTED — SIX THOUSAND ORPHANS IN PRISON — HOW TO ASK 
FOR DAILY BREAD — REVIEW OF TWENTY-FOUR YEARS — "TAKE NO 
THOUGHT FOR THE MORROW" — INSURANCE AGAINST BAD DEBTS . . 399 



CONTENTS . XV 

CHAPTER XXIV. 

SUMMAR T. 

1857 — 1860. 

5"HE HOUSE FOR FOUR HUNDRED OPENED — PRAYER MORE THAN ANSWERED — 
THE RESORT IN TROUBLE — AN OUTPOURING OF THE SPIRIT ON THE ORPHANS 
— 'LAND FOR A NEW BUILDING PURCHASED — "BUT ONE LIFE TO SPEND FOR 
GOD " — " SCATTERING, YET INCREASING" — A MEMORABLE YEAR — THE GERM 
OF THE IRISH REVIVAL — LETTER FROM AN ORPHAN — THE FRUIT OF SIX 
MONTHS' PBAYEK — THE RESULTS OF THE WORK — REVIVAL AMONG THE 
ORPHANS 218 



CHAPTER XXV. 



1860 — 1868. 

GREAT PROSPERITY — FEWER TRIALS — INFLUENCE — THIRD ORPHAN HOUSE — 
PRAYING FOR HELPERS, AND FOR OTHER NEEDS — REGULAR CONTRIB- 
UTORS—REVIVALS — FOURTH ORPHAN HOUSE 442 



CHAPTER XXVI. 



1868 — 1872. 

DONATIONS — FIFTH ORPHAN HOUSE — nABITS OF BENEVOLENCE — DEATH OF 
MRS. MULLER — MR. WRIGHT AN ASSOCIATE — PLACES FOR THE ORPHANS 
— OBJECTS OF THE INSTITUTION — ORPHANS LEAVING THE INSTITUTION — 
SPECIMEN OF ARTICLES DONATED — NOTE FROM MR. MULLER RESPECTING 
BOOKS AND ACCOUNTS — ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1872 . » 463 



CHAPTER XXVII. 



A VISIT TO THE ORPHAN HOUSES — ATTENDING CHURCH— INTERNAL ARRANGE 
MENTS — FOOD — EDUCATION ~- HEALTH . • , . . . 482 



CHAPTER XXVIII. 

A REVIEW OF FIVE YEARS' WORK — CONTINENTAL TRAVELS, AND VISIT IN 
AMERICA 492 



INTRODUCTION. 




&K°o- 



HAT is meant by the prayer of faith ? is a question which 
is beginning to arrest, in an unusual degree, the attention 
of Christians. What is the significance of the passages 
both in the New Testament and the Old which refer to 
it ? What is the limit within which they may he safely received 
as a ground of practical reliance ? Were these promises limited 
to prophetical or apostolical times ; or have they been left as a 
legacy to all believers until the end shall come ? 

Somehow or other, these questions are seldom discussed either 
from the pulpit or the press. I do not remember to have heard 
any of them distinctly treated of in a sermon. I do not know of 
any work in which this subject is either theoretically explained or 
practically enforced. It really seems as if this portion of Revela- 
tion was, by common consent, ignored in all our public teachings. 
Do not men believe that God means what he appears plainly to 
have asserted ? or, if we believe that he means it, do we fear the 
charge of fanaticism if we openly avow that we take him at his 
word ? 

The public silence on this subject does not, however, prevent a 
very frequent private inquiry in respect to it. The thoughtful 
Christian, when in his daily reading of the Scriptures he meets 
with any of those wonderful promises made to believing prayer, 
often pauses to ask himself, What can these words mean ? Can 
it be that God has made such promises as these to me, and to 
such men as I am ? Have I really permission to commit all my 

little affairs to a God of infinite wisdom, believing that he will 

17 



XVm INTRODUCTION. 

take charge of them and direct them according to the promptings 
of boundless love and absolute omniscience ? Is prayer really a 
power with God, or is it merely an expedient by which our own 
piety may be cultivated ? Is it not merely a power (that is, a 
stated antecedent accompanied by the idea of causation), but is it 
a transcendent power, accomplishing what no other power can, 
overruling all other agencies, and rendering them subservient to 
its own wonderful efficiency ? I think there are few devout 
readers of the Bible to whom these questions are not frequently 
suggested. We ask them, but we do not often wait for an an- 
swer. These promises seem to us to be addressed either to a 
past or to a coming age, but not to us, at the present day. Yet 
with suc> views as these the devout soul is not at all satisfied 
If an invaluable treasure is here reserved for the believer, be 
asks, why should I not receive my portion of it ? He cannot 
doubt that God has, in a remarkable manner, at various times, an- 
swered his prayers ; why should he not always answer them ? 
and why should not the believer always draw near to God in full 
confidence that he will do as he has said ? He may remember 
that the prayer which has been manifestly answered was the off- 
spring of deep humility, of conscious unworthiness, of utter self- 
negation, and of simple and earnest reliance on the promises of 
God through the mediation of Christ. Why should not his 
prayers be always of the same character ? With the apostles of 
old he pours out his soul in the petition, " Lord, increase our 
faith." 

And yet it can scarcely be denied that the will of God has been 
distinctly revealed on this subject. The promises made to be- 
lieving prayer are explicit, numerous, and diversified. If we take 
them in their simple and literal meaning, or if in fact we give to 
them any reasonable interpretation whatever, they seem to be 
easily understood. Our difficulty seems to be this : the promise 
is so " exceeding great " that we cannot conceive God really to 
mean what he clearly appears to have revealed. The blessing 



INTBODUCTION. XIX 

seems too vast for our comprehension ; we " stagger at the prom* 
ises, through unbelief," and thus fail to secure the treasure which 
was purchased for us by Christ Jesus. 

It may be appropriate for us to review some of the passages 
which refer most directly to this subject : — 

"Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall fine; 
knock, and it shall be opened unto you ; for every one that asketh 
receiveth, and he that seeketh findeth, and to him that knocketh 
it shall be opened." " If ye then, being evil, know how to give 
good gifts unto your children, how much more shall your Father 
which is in heaven give good things to them that ask him ? " l 

In the Gospel of Luke the same words are repeated, with a sin- 
gle variation at the close. " If ye, being evil, know how to give 
good gifts unto your children, how much more shall your heav- 
enly Father give the Holy Spirit to them that ask him f"* 

" I say unto you that if two of you shall agree on earth as 
touching anything that they shall ask, it shall be done for them 
of my Father which is in heaven. For where two or three are 
gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them." 3 

" Jesus answered and said unto them, Verily I say unto you, if 
ye have faith, and doubt not, ye shall not only do that which is 
done to the fig-tree, but also ye shall say to this mountain, Be 
thou removed, and be thou cast into the sea, and it shall be done. 
And all things whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye 
shall receive." 4 

The same promise, slightly varied in form, is found in the Gos- 
pel of Mark. " Have faith i7i God. For verily I say unto you 
that whosoever shall say to this mountain, Be thou removed, and 
be thou cast into the sea, and shall not doubt in his heart, but 
shall believe that those things which he hath said shall come to 
pass, he shall have whatever he saith. Therefore I say unto you, 

1 Matthew vii. 7-1 1. 2 Luke xi. 13. 

8 Matthew xviii. 19, 20. i Matthew xxi. 21, 22. 



XX INTRODUCTION. 

Whatsoever things ye desire, when ye pray, believe that ye re- 
ceive them, and ye shall have them." l 

Now I do not pretend that we are obliged to receive these 
words literally. Unless, however, we believe the Saviour to have 
spoken repeatedly on the same subject, at random, and with no 
definite meaning, we must understand him to have asserted that 
things impossible by the ordinary laws of material causation are 
possible by faith in God. I do not perceive, if we allow these 
words to have any meaning whatever, that we can ascribe to them 
any other significance. 

" Verily I say unto you, He that believeth in me, the works 
that I do shall he dp also ; and greater works than these shall he 
do, because I go unto my Father. And whatsoever ye shall ask 
in my name, that I will do, that the Father may be glorified in 
the Son. If ye shall ask anything in my name I will do it." 2 

" Verily I say unto you, Whatsoever ye shall ask the Father in 
my name, he will give it you. Hitherto ye have asked nothing in 
my name. Ask, and ye shall receive, that your joy may be full." 3 

"The effectual, fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth 
much s" A that is, it is a real power, a positive energy. The 
apostle illustrates what he means by availing prayer by the 
example of Elias, a man subject to like passions as we are : " He 
prayed earnestly that it might not rain, and it rained not on the 
earth by the space of three years and six months ; and he prayed 
again, and the heavens gave rain, and the earth brought forth her 
fruit." 5 

The conditions on which prayer will be heard are in various 
places specified, but particularly in John xv. 7 : "If ye abide in me 
and my words abide in you, ye shall ask what ye will, and it 
shall be done unto you." That is, if I understand the passage, 
prevalence in prayer is conditioned by the conformity of our 

1 Mark xi. 22-24. * John xiv. 12-14. * John apvi. 23, 24. 

* James y. 16. ? V. 17, 18. 



INTRODUCTION. XXI 

souls to the will of God ; " if ye abide in me and my words abide 
in you." On this condition, and on this only, may we ask what 
we will, with the assurance that it will be done unto us. Faith, 
in its most simple meaning, is that temper of the mind in the 
creature which responds to every revealed perfection of the 
Creator. Just according to the degree in which this correspond- 
ence exists, is the promise made that we shall have whatsoever 
we ask. 

It is evident, from the eleventh of Hebrews, that the views 
of the Apostle Paul concerning faith were entirely in harmony 
with the passages recited above. He reviews the lives of the 
most eminent saints, for the express purpose of showing that the 
impressive events in their history, whether physical or moral, 
were controlled entirely by faith. He sums up the whole in this 
remarkable language : — 

" And what shall I say more ? For the time would fail me to 
tell of those who through faith subdued kingdoms, wrought 
righteousness, obtained promises, stopped the mouths of lions, 
quenched the violence of fire, escaped the edge of the sword, out 
of weakness were made strong, waxed valiant in fight, turned to 
flight the armies of the aliens ; women received their dead raised 
to life again ; and others were tortured, not accepting deliverance, 
that they might obtain a better resurrection." We are, I think, 
taught by this passage that the apostle believed faith to be a 
power capable of transcending and modifying every other agency, 
by which changes became possible which to every other known 
power were impossible. We see that in this catalogue of the vic- 
tories of faith he includes the subjection of almost every form of 
what we call natural laws. The whole passage seems an illustra- 
tion of the meaning of our Lord, when he says, " If ye have faith 
as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say to this sycamine tree, Be 
thou removed and planted in the midst of the sea, and it shall 
obey you." 

It seems then apparent that the doctrine of the peculiar and 



XXTT INTRODUCTION. 

wonderful power of the prayer of faith is as clearly revealed in the 
Scriptures as any other doctrine. It would seem evident, at any 
rate, from the passages just quoted, that the Apostle Paul under- 
stood the teachings of our Saviour to mean what they say. From 
the general tenor of the Scriptures I think we may learn two im- 
portant truths : First, that there is a certain state of mind in a 
devout soul to which God has promised all that it asks, subject, 
however, as to the manner of the answer, to the dictates of his in- 
finite wisdom and goodness ; and, second, that in granting such 
petitions he does not always limit his action within the ordinary 
or acknowledged laws of matter or of mind. I do not perceive 
how we can interpret the passages above cited, as well as many 
others, without giving them a meaning at least as extensive as this. 
Why is it, then, that this whole range of revealed truth has so 
generally been looked upon as an unknown and unexplored re- 
gion ? Why should we limit either the goodness or the power of 
God by our own knowledge of what we call the laws of nature ? 
Why should we not admit that " there are more things in heaven 
and earth than are dreamed of in our philosophy " ? In a universe 
governed by moral law, why should not moral laws take prece- 
dence of all others ? Why should we deny that there is a power 
in prayer to which we have not commonly attained ? We are 
straitened in ourselves, and suppose that we are straitened in 
God. We interpret the gracious promises of our most loving 
Father in heaven by the rule of our own imperfect and unbeliev- 
ing piety. We ask for light from without, while the light can only 
come from a more elevated piety within. We ask for examples of 
the effects of faith at the present day, corresponding to those 
spoken of in the sacred Scriptures. Thoughtful men acknowl- 
edge that there must be a meaning in these promises, which they 
have not yet understood, and they see plainly that the kingdom of 
God can never come with power until this prevalence in prayer 
shall have become a matter of universal attainment ; and yet they 



m rn o d uc : n )2f. xxiu 

dare hardly believe that God is as good as he has revealed him- 
self to be. 

There have, nevertheless, from time to time, occurred, what 
plainly appear to be, remarkable instances of answers to prayer. 
Many of them have faded from recollection, with the generation 
in which they occurred ; those which are remembered, however, 
seem ta teach us that God is a living God now as truly as in times 
past. The history of persecutions is always filled with remark- 
able answers to prayer. The rescue of Peter from the power of 
the Sanhedrim in one case, and from the power of Herod in an- 
other, has been a thousand times repeated in the history of the 
church of Christ. The answer to prayer for divine direction as to 
the time and manner of performing some Christian service, to which 
an individual has felt himself specially called, has frequently been 
very remarkable. The biographies of the early and of many of 
the later Friends are replete with such instances. Any one who 
will read the edifying memoirs of George Fox, John Woolman, 
William Allen, and Stephen Grellet, will find what I have alluded 
to, abundantly exemplified. The well-authenticated accounts of 
the late revivals in this country and in Ireland teach us that 
most remarkable instances of answers to prayer were of almost 
daily occurrence. In the last century a single instance deserves 
particular remembrance ; it was the founding of Franke's Orphan 
House at Halle. It seemed to him to be a Christian duty to at- 
tempt something for the relief of orphans, and he commenced the 
undertaking. From time to time, as the number of applicants 
increased, the means for their support was provided, in answer, as 
he firmly believed, to fervent and unceasing prayer. Thus an ex- 
tensive establishment was reared, which has continued to the 
present day, providing education and support for thousands of the 
poor and destitute, and it has been for a century and a half one of 
the most honored of the charitable institutions of the continent of 
Europe. 

The most remarkable instance of the efficacy of prayer with 



XXIV INTRODUCTION. 

which I am acquainted, is that recorded in the following pages. 
It seems, in fact, to be a practical illustration of the meaning of 
those passages of Scripture which I have already recited. A 
young German Christian, friendless and unknown, is conscious 
of what he believes to be a call from the Lord to attempt some- 
thing for the benefit of the poor vagabond children of Bristol. 
He is at this time preaching the gospel to a small company of be- 
lievers, from whom, at his own suggestion, he receives no salary, 
being supported day by day by the voluntary offerings of his 
brethren. Without the promise of aid from any being but God, 
he commences his work. In answer to prayer, funds are received 
as they are needed, and the attempt succeeds beyond his expecta- 
tion. After a few years he is led to believe that God has called 
him to establish a house for the maintenance and education of 
orphans. He was impelled to this effort, not only from motives of 
benevolence, but from a desire to convince men that God was a 
living God, as ready now as ever to answer prayer ; and that, in 
the discharge of any duty to which he calls us, we may implicitly 
rely upon his all-sufficient aid in every emergency. 

Mr. Muller was led to undertake this work in such a manner 
that aid could not be expected from any being but God. He did 
not of course expect God to create gold and silver and put them 
into his hands. He knew, however, that God could incline the 
hearts of men to aid him, and he believed, if the thing that he at- 
tempted was of Him, that he would so incline them, in answer to 
prayer, as his necessities should require. Most men in making 
such an attempt would have spread the case before the public, 
employed agents to solicit in its behalf, and undertaken nothing 
until funds adequate to the success of the enterprise had been 
already secured. But Mr. Muller, true to his principles, would 
do no such thing. From the first day to the present moment he 
has neither directly nor indirectly solicited either of the public or 
of an individual a single penny. As necessities arose he simply 



INTRODUCTION. XXV 

iaid his case before God and asked of him all that he needed, and 
the supply has always been seasonable and unfailing. 

The conductors of benevolent enterprises generally consider it 
important to publish the names of donors, appealing thus to what 
is considered an innocent desire in man to let our good deeds be 
known, and thus also to stimulate others to do likewise. Ignor- 
ing every motive of this kind, Mr. Miiller made it his rule to 
publish the name of no contributor. When the name was known 
to him, which, however, was not often the case, he made a private 
acknowledgment ; while in his printed account he only made 
known the sum received, and the date of its reception. In this 
manner, forsaking every other reliance but God, and in childlike 
simplicity looking to him alone for the supply of every want, all 
that he needed was furnished as punctually as if, in possession of 
millions, he had drawn from time to time on his banker. 

Thus has he continued from, I think, the year 1834. By de- 
grees the establishment increased, and it was necessary to leave 
the hired houses in which the children had thus far been accom- 
modated. Land was purchased, and a building was erected in 
the vicinity of Bristol. This was soon filled to overflowing, and 
another building was demanded. This was erected, and it also 
was very soon tilled. These buildings were sufficient to accom- 
modate seven hundred orphans. At the present moment, a third 
building, larger than either, is in the process of erection, and is to 
be finished in the course of the ensuing summer. When this 
shall be completed, accommodations will have been provided for 
eleven hundred and fifty orphans. These expensive buildings 
have been erected ; the land has been purchased on which they 
stand ; this multitude of children has been clothed and fed and 
educated ; support and remuneration have been provided for all 
the necessary teachers and assistants, and all this has been done 
by a man who is not worth a dollar. He has never asked any 
one but God for whatever they needed, and from the beginning 
they have never wanted a meal, nor have they ever allowed then' 



XXVI INTRODUCTION, 

selves to be in debt. There seems in this to be something as re- 
markable as if Mr. Miiller had commanded a sycamine tree to be 
removed and planted in the sea, and it had obeyed him 

But this is not all. Mr. Miiller saw that there was a great de- 
mand for copies of the Holy Scriptures, both in Great Britain and 
on the Continent, and he commenced the work of Bible distribu- 
tion. This so rapidly extended itself that he was soon obliged to 
open in Bristol a large Bible House. He believed that great 
good might be done by the circulation of religious tracts, and he 
has carried out his work extensively. He was moved to make an 
attempt to aid and even to support missionaries among the 
heathen, as well as other good men, of various denominations, 
who, with very inadequate means of living, were preaching the 
gospel to the poor and destitute at home. He began to aid them 
as their necessities came to his knowledge, and now one hundred 
such men are depending on him, wholly or in part, for support. 

Here, then, we certainly behold a remarkable phenomenon. 
A single man, wholly destitute of funds, is supporting and educat- 
ing seven hundred orphans, providing everything needful for 
their education, is in himself an extensive Bible and Tract and 
Missionary Society, the work is daily increasing in magnitude, 
and the means for carrying it on are abundantly supplied, while 
he is connected with no particular denomination, is aided by no 
voluntary association, and he has asked the assistance of not a 
single individual. He has asked no one but God, and all his 
wants have been regularly supplied. In these labors of love he 
has, up to the present time, expended nearly a million of dollars. 
It is thus that he has endeavored to show to an unbelieving 
world that God is a living God, and that he means what he has 
said in every one of his promises. 1 

1 The following brief statistics will show the magnitude of the work already accom- 
plished : — 

The number of pupils hitherto instructed in all the day, evening, and Sunday schools, 
is 13,124. The whole number of orpJians educated within the establishment is 1,153. 
Of the 700 now in the Institution, 260 are hopefully pious. Missionaries aided at the 



INTRODUCTION. XXVII 

I have referred to Mr. Miiller as if he were the sole agent in 
this work. This, however, is by no means true. His co-workers 
in the Institution are all of the same spirit as himself. Mr. 
Craik, a gentleman from Scotland, has been with him from the 
beginning, has shared in all the labors and responsibilities of 
these vast undertakings, and has been specially blessed as a 
preacher of the gospel. The remuneration of all the assistants 
is contingent on the means received in answer to prayer. When 
sacrifices are to be made, they are all prompt to make them, and 
they do not expect an answer to prayer until they have contrib- 
uted, from their own scanty wages, whatever can be spared after 
providing for their actual necessities. 

The last report of Mr. Muller's labors has just been received. 
From this we learn another interesting fact. It seems that the 
late revival in Ireland is indirectly connected with these labors in 



present time, ioo. Since 1834 there have been circulated, — Bibles, 24,768 ; Testaments, 
15,100; Psalms, 719; other portions of Scripture, 1,876; or, total, 42,463 Bibles or por- 
tions of Scripture. Tracts and books (not pages, but separate publications), 11,493,174. 

Two large buildings have been erected, a third is in the process of erection ; the land 
on which they stand has been purchased. The expense of the orphan work alone has 
amounted to ^133,528 sterling, and the expenses are daily increasing. 

The contributions by which these expenditures have been met have been sent from 
every quarter of the globe. The largest amounts have been, as might be expected, from 
England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales ; but to these may be added the Cape of Good 
Hope, Mt. Lebanon, Demerara, Newport, R. I., New York, Philadelphia, California, 
France, Holland, Sardinia, Australia, etc., etc. 

1 Since the above statement by Dr. JVayland, Dec, i860, Mr. Miiller says, i?i his last 
report, 1872 : " The work goes steadily on — we want nothing. Faith is above circum- 
stances. No war, no fire, no water, no mercantile panic, no loss of friends, no death, 
can touch it. It goes on its own steady course. It triumphs over all difficulties." 

Since the commencement more than ,£500,000 ($2,500,000) have been received. 23,- 
000 children or grown-up persons have been taught in the various schools, entirely 
supported by the funds of the Institution, besides the tens of thousands who have been 
benefited in the schools, which were assisted by its funds ; more than 64,000 Bibles, 
85,000 Testaments, and 100,000 smaller portions of the Holy Scriptures, in various 
languages, also thirty-nine millions of tracts and books, in several different languages, 
have been circulated. There have been, from the first, missionaries assisted by its funds, 
and of late years more than 150 in number. On ibis object alone ,£104,000 ($520,000) 
have been expended. 3,575 orphans have been under our care, and five large houses, at 
the expense of ,£115,000 ($575,000), have been erected and fitted up for the accommoda- 
tion of 2,050 orphans. As to the spiritual results, I will here say nothing; indeed. 
eternity alone can unfold them.— Ed. revised edition. 



XXVIII INTRODUCTION. 

Bristol. A pious young Irishman read " The Dealings of the 
Lord with George Miiller," and received from it new views of the 
power of believing prayer. He felt the need of piayer for the 
perishing around him, and determined by prayer and conversation 
to labor for their salvation. First, however, he asked that God 
would give him an associate. This prayer was granted. These 
two then united, in earnest prayer for some additions to their num- 
ber. This prayer was granted. In this manner a small company 
was united in asking for an outpouring of the HoJy Spirit on their 
neighborhood. They devoted themselves to prayer and to labor 
among the people by whom they were surrounded. Their prayers 
were answered. The Spirit was poured out ; twenty-five souls 
were converted. Multitudes united with them in supplication. 
They went from place to place, praying and laboring for the con- 
version of men ; and thus the work extended, until the whole dis- 
trict of Ulster was visited with that remarkable outpouring of 
the Holy Spirit. 

All these we suppose to be indisputable facts. If in any re- 
spect there has been a misstatement, or even an exaggeration, 
the means are abundant for detecting it. The whole work has 
been carried on in the presence and under the inspection of the 
whole city of Bristol. There stand those large and expensive 
buildings. There are seen the seven hundred orphans, who are in 
every respect admirably cared for. Everything has been paid for, 
for Mr. Miiller is never in debt. His poverty is well known, and 
he will not accept of any money as a provision for his future 
necessities. His accounts have been annually audited by a com- 
petent committee. There is not the man living who can contra- 
dict his assertion, " I never asked aid from a single individual." 
Hundreds weekly visit the Institution, and no one has ever found 
in it anything at variance with Mr. Miiller s published statements. 
Last of all, the Rev. Dr. Sawtell, a gentleman known to thou- 
sands in this country, has added his independent testimony to the 



INTRODUCTION. XXIX 

truth of all that is here related. More conclusive evidence to the 
truth of facts cannot be desired. 

To account for a fact is to refer it to some general law whose 
existence is already established. When it is therefore asked, 
How shall these facts be accounted for? we inquire, to what 
known law can they be referred ? They cannot certainly be re- 
ferred to any known law of human action. How would we decide 
if a similar case should occur in physics ? Suppose a series of 
experiments should be made daily for twenty-five years in chem- 
istry or mechanics, with the same invariable result, and this re- 
sult could be referred to no previously established law, — to what 
conclusion should we arrive ? There could be but one conclusion 
in which all men of science would unite. They would all declare 
that a new law had been discovered, and would modify their sys- 
tems accordingly. It seems to me that on all sound philosophical 
principles we are bound to come to the same conclusion in the 
present case. We can refer these facts to no other law than to 
that announced by the Saviour in his promise to answer the 
prayer of faith. There is no reason to suppose that in the case of 
Mr. Miiller and his associates there is anything exceptional or 
peculiar. What God has done for them we cannot doubt that, 
under the same conditions, he will do for every other believing 
disciple of Christ. 

What, then, are the conditions of this remarkable experiment, 
if such we may call it ? They are something like the following. 
A poor, unknown man is convinced that it is his duty, as a ser- 
vant of Christ, to labor in several ways for the relief of the tem- 
poral and spiritual wants of the ignorant and destitute. He 
consecrates himself to the work by dedicating to it his time and 
labor, and whatever pecuniary means should come into hi^ pos- 
session. He resolved that he would neither appeal to any uf the 
ordinary motives which dispose men to humanity, nor even solicit 
aid from any human being, but simply make his wants known to 
God, believing that, if he was doing the work of God, the div^a 



XXX INTRODUCTION. 

promise was pledged in his behalf. Not only did he trust in God 
that all the pecuniary aid which he needed would be furnished, 
but that, in answer to prayer, all needed wisdom would be given 
him in the conduct of his complicated and arduous undertakings. 
The result has met his most sanguine expectations. The institu- 
tion has increased to a most magnificent charity, aside from its 
missionary, Bible, and tract operations ; all its wants have been 
from time to time supplied ; and it is at the present moment 
carried on upon precisely the same principles on which it com- 
menced. We cannot resist the conclusion that if any one will 
undertake any other Christian work in a similar spirit, and on the 
same principles, his labor will be attended with a similar result. 

While we believe this, however, we do not pretend to affirm 
that just such immediate results will always be seen. This would 
be to limit the omniscience of God by the short-sighted ignorance 
of man. It may best suit the purposes of infinite goodness to 
answer the prayer of faith by crosses and disappointments ; but 
these in the end shall be found in the most signal manner to 
promote the object to be accomplished. While the disciples were 
praying and laboring for the extension of the kingdom of Christ 
in Jerusalem, it seemed a strange answer to prayer that they 
should be driven out of the city ; but the meaning of it was evi- 
dent when churches arose in Phenice and Cyprus and Antioch, 
and it became manifest that the gospel was designed not for Jews 
alone, but for the whole family of man. Paul devoted himself 
with unquenchable zeal to the salvation of men, and, with a fer- 
vid eloquence which has given him a place among the noblest 
orators of antiquity, delighted to spend his life in persuading men 
to be reconciled to God. He was a man whose confidence in 
God was as unshaken as any whose history has been recorded 
by the pen of inspiration. It doubtless was to the disciples of 
that age, as well as to himself, a most unaccountable dispensation 
that he should have been impeded in his great work by the ne- 
cessity of composing dissensions and rectifying errors which 



INTRODUCTION. XXXI 

were constantly arising in the churches which he had planted, 
and, most of all, that so many years of his life should have been 
spent in prison. Yet it is to these, at the time untoward circum- 
stances, that we owe the writing of those epistles which occupy so 
large a portion of the volume of inspiration, and without which 
the message of God to man would not have been completed. In 
no other way could his prayer to be useful to the cause of Christ 
have been so fully answered. 

With this understanding of the promise granted to the prayer 
of faith, I do not see why we should not take the case of Mr. 
Miiller as an example for our imitation. Whoever attains to this 
same simple desire in all things to do the will of God, and to the 
same childlike trust in his promises, may, I think, hope for a sim- 
ilar blessing. God is no respecter of persons. "If any man do 
his willy him he heareth." And all the teaching of the Scriptures 
confirms us in this belief. The passages which we have quoted 
at the commencement of this paper, with hundreds of others, all 
lead to the same conclusion. In the Scriptures every form of 
illustration is used to impress upon us the conviction that God is 
indeed our Father, and that he delights to grant our requests for 
anything that is for our benefit, and specially that he pledges 
himself to direct by his counsel, and aid by his providence, every 
one who honestly labors to promote the cause of true benevo- 
lence and real religion. 

If this be so, how important is this subject in its bearing on 
individual effort. No Christian, though the poorest and humblest, 
ever need despair of doing a noble work for God. He need never 
wait until he can obtain the co-operation of the multitude or the 
wealthy. Let him undertake what he believes to be his duty, on 
ever so small a scale, and look directly to God for aid and direc- 
tion. If it be a seed which God has planted, it will take root, 
grow, and bear fruit, " having seed within itself." " It is better 
to trust in God than to put confidence in man ; it is better to trust 
in God than to put confidence in princes." A multitude of cases 



xxxii nrntODUCTioy. 

can be adduced to prove that this course is in harmony with the 
designs of God. It is abundantly shown in the case of Mr. 
Miiller. Take the case of Robert Raikes. Suppose that he had 
established no school until a powerful association, formed from 
ecclesiastical dignitaries, millionaires, and the multitude, had 
united in his support, his effort could hardly have escaped ridicu- 
lous failure. On the contrary, he simply established a school by 
himself. It was a seed which God had planted, and its fruit 
now shakes like Lebanon. 

On the contrast which is seen between the plan of Mr. Miiller 
and the plans by which our missionary and other benevolent 
operations are conducted, it is unnecessary to enlarge. If Mr. 
Miiller is right, I think it is evident that we are all wrong. We 
cannot go into this subject in detail. We may, however, be per- 
mitted to remark, that the means which are frequently employed 
to secure the approbation and pecuniary aid of worldly men, in 
carrying forward the cause of Christ, are intensely humiliating. 
It would seem as though God was the last being to be relied on in 
carrying forward the work which he has given us to do. 

But it is time to bring these remarks to a close. We commend 
this most unpretending of narratives to the thoughtful considera- 
tion of Christians of all denominations. We have greatly over- 
rated the teaching of these facts, if they do not furnish strong 
incentives to A life of holy exertion, and impart an un- 
wonted AND POWERFUL MOTIVE TO EARNEST AND BELIEVING 
PRAYER. F. W. 

Providence, December 17, 1330. 




DB. SAWTELL'S PEEEATORY LETTER 

ooi&io* 

HE following Letter from Rev. Dr. Sawtell, chaplain 
to British and American seamen at Havre, France, 
a gentleman well known in this country, coming 
directly from the scenes to which it refers, and abundantly 
confirming the statements given by Mr. Miiller himself, 
while it bears the impress of a warm and hearty apprecia- 
tion of his work of faith and labor of love, — this outside 
view is a fitting opening to the volume. 

To Eev. Francis Wayland, D.D. 

My dear Sir : Your repeated request that I should furnish a brief 
statement of what I know personally of that extraordinary work of 
faith connected with the Orphan Houses at Ashley Down, near 
Bristol, England, is so in accordance with the expressed wish of 
thousands throughout the land, that, however sorely pressed with 
other duties, I do not feel at liberty to disregard it; and more 
especially as it is to introduce to American Christians " The Lord's 
Dealings with George Muller," — a book the intrinsic merits 
of which, in so far as it exemplifies the power of a living, active 
faith, and its peculiar adaptation to meet the wants of God's people 
in the present age, has, to my mind, no parallel out of the Bible. I 
rejoice in my heart that a new edition is so soon to be issued from 
the American press in a condensed form. 

I shall confine myself to a few simple facts, connected with my 
own personal knowledge, which serve only to confirm all that is 
stated in the Narrative. The facts themselves need no coloring; 

33 



XXXIV DR. SAWTELL'S 

the more simply they are stated, the more eloquently do they speak 
to the head and the heart ; the less they are varnished, the brighter 
they shine. And, as to Mr. Miiller liimself, anything in the shape 
of eulogy would be as foreign to good taste as it would be offensive 
and painful to one whom the Lord delighteth to honor. Indeed, so 
sensitive is he on this point, that, if he hears any one speaking of the 
Orphan Houses as " Mr. Muller's Asylum," he repudiates the thought, 
and exclaims, " No, they are God's Orphan Houses." 

THE FACTS. 

For the last five years my duties have called me frequently to 
England, Scotland, and Ireland, but I do not remember making one 
of these preaching tours without hearing more or less of what many 
called "A standing miracle at Bristol;" — A man sheltering , feed- 
ing, clothing, educating, and making comfortable and happy, 
hundreds of poor orphan children, with no funds of his own, and 
no possible means of sustenance, save that which God sent him in 
answer to prayer. Of course, such facts, coming from undoubted 
authority, and oft-repeated, could not fail to arrest my attention, and 
cause me to ponder deeply these things in my own heart ; and every 
new fact that came to my ears served only to increase an irrepres- 
sible desire to "turn aside and see this great sight." 

I confess, on my first visit, in March, 1860, I had reserved to my- 
self a wide margin for deductions and disappointment; but, after a 
few days of careful investigation, I left Bristol exclaiming, with the 
Queen of Sheba, "The half had not been told me." Here I saw, 
indeed, seven hundred orphan children fed and provided for, by the 
hand of God, in answer to prayer, as literally and truly as Elijah 
was fed by ravens with meat which the Lord provided. And now, 
after an absence of nine months, I am here again, moving about 
among these seven hundred children, examining their writing, and 
the progress they have made in the various branches of study, and 
their different kinds of work, — listening to their sweet voices in 
songs of praise to the God of the orphan, — passing through all 
parts of these vast buildings, that have been erected for their accom- 



PREFATORY LETTER. XXXV 

modation, — conducting their family worship, and addressing four 
hundred of them at one time, and three hundred at another, 
assembled in their respective (lining-halls, the most silent, attentive, 
and earnest listeners I ever addressed; then enjoying hours of sweet 
converse and prayer with Mr. Muller himself, — a privilege for which 
I shall ever thank God. Oh, it is good to be here ! 

But to the Orphan Houses themselves. These are all built of 
stone, in the most complete and thorough manner. No pains have 
been spared in rendering them convenient, comfortable, and safe for 
children, and with special reference to warmth, light, ventilation, and 
cleanliness; and while all is in good taste, and exceedingly chaste 
and neat, it is all plain — nothing for show or ornament. House No. 
1 is fitted up for the accommodation of three hundred orphans, No. 2 
for four hundred ; both completely furnished and completely filled. 
No. 3, now in the course of erection, with its walls up, and partly 
under roof, is planned for the accommodation of four hundred and 
fifty orphans ; and so rapidly are applications coming in that nearly 
four hundred are already registered on their books; so that no 
sooner will it be completed than, with God's blessing, it will be filled 
with helpless orphans. The entire cost of these buildings, and the 
manner of obtaining the funds, I will state in Mr. Miiller's own 
words: "Without any one having been personally applied to for 
anything by me, the sum of £133,528, 14s. has been given to me for 
the orphans, as the result of prayer to God, since the commence- 
ment of the work, which sum includes the amount received for the 
building fund, for the houses already built, and the one now in 
progress." 

But if we would have correct views of the entire work, and under- 
stand what God is willing to do in answer to the prayer of faith, we 
must not confine our eyes or thoughts to the seven hundred orphans. 
There are here in Bristol four day schools for poor children, with 
three hundred and thirty-nine pupils, instructed by believers upon 
scriptural principles, and one Sunday school, such as we call, in the 
United States, "a Mission School," with one hundred and sixty 
children, besides an adult school in which Christian teachers are 



XXXVI DR. SAWTELL S 

employed, two evenings in the week, to teach reading and writing; 
all these schools have been entirely supported out of the funds sent 
in answer to prayer. In reference to this adult school, Mr. Mailer 
says : ' ' Those who teach them take the opportunity of speaking to 
the scholars about the way of salvation, and make remarks on por- 
tions of the word of God which may be read ; and thus many have 
been led to care about their souls, and to go regularly to hear the 
gospel preached." In summing up the results in connection with all 
these various schools, Mr. Muller thus remarks: "Since March, 
1834, there have been 6,945 children in the day schools, 2,952 in the 
adult schools, and 3,227 in the Sunday schools, making a total of 
13,124 souls that have been brought under habitual instruction in the 
things of God, besides the many thousands in the schools in the 
various parts of England, Ireland, Scotland, British Guiana, the 
West Indies, and East Indies, which have been, to a greater or less 
degree, assisted ; " and all, too, let the reader remember, from funds 
sent to Mr. Muller in answer to prayer. 

Nor is this all. During the past year, and out of the same funds 
sent in answer to prayer, there have been expended for the circula- 
tion of the Holy Scriptures the sum of £5,681, 13s. 3^d. ; also, more 
than five thousand pounds, or twenty-five thousand dollars, to aid 
missionary efforts in various parts of the world ; and the total amount 
received since 1834, to aid the blessed work of missions in home and 
foreign fields, is £34,495, 3s. 4d. Added to all this is the sum of 
£8,064, 12s. 6<|d. expended since 1840 for the circulation of religious 
books and tracts, by which -sum 11,493,174 books and tracts have 
been circulated. Thus we see that for these various objects, discon- 
nected with the orphans, there has been sent in to Mr. Muller, since 
March, 1834, the sum of £51,777, 14s. lid., which, added to the sum 
for the orphans, makes a total of £185,306, 8s. lid., — nearly one 
million of dollars, sent to Mr. Muller from various parts of the 
Christian world, and from thousands who never saw him, all in 
answer to prayer, to aid him in carrying forward his benevolent work 
in saving souls and to honor and glorify God. 

Is it any wonder that men of little faith, and slow of heart to 



PREFATORY LETTER. XXXVII 

believe what God says, should look upon all this as a ''standing 
miracle "? But quite otherwise does Mr. Muller regard it. " Think 
not," says he, in his Narrative, "that I have the gift of faith, that 
gift of which we read in 1 Cor. xii. 9, mentioned in connection with 
the 'gifts of healing, the working of miracles,' etc." "It is true," 
he adds, "that the faith I am enabled to exercise is altogether God's 
own gift, but it is the self-same faith found in every believer, the 
growth of which I am most sensible of; for by little and little it has 
been increasing for the last thirty years." 

Now, if it be true that Mr. Muller has received from God no 
extraordinary gift, beyond that which is common to every believer, it 
becomes a solemn and momentous question, and one to be pondered 
deeply and prayerfully, By what means, lias this ordinary faith in 
him attained to such marvellous strength? Whence came he in pos- 
session of that mysterious key by which he is able to unlock the 
store-houses of God's treasures, and, as it were, help himself to 
whatever he needs? Day by day, year after year, does this man of 
God receive the most extraordinary answers to prayer, and by which 
he is able to carry forward the most stupendous and complicated 
works of benevolence, while the like precious faith in others is so 
small and feeble as to be utterly powerless in moving God's loving 
heart in the bestowment of blessings. "Is there not a cause?" 
And ought not such facts and such questions to startle every believer 
into the most thorough searchings of heart to discover the cause of 
his little faith? Let us not attempt, as the manner of some is, to 
evade the issue, by resolving it all into the sovereignty of God. 
True it is, God's sovereignty is all-pervading, and as manifest in the 
Chinese as it is in the British empire ; but were an inquisitive child 
to inquire into the cause of the difference between the well-developed, 
elastic foot of an Englishman, and the little, dwarfish stump of a 
Chinese, no Christian parent would consider it a logical or scriptural 
answer to charge it all upon God's sovereignty. God acts as 
sovereign in giving to the infant a foot, and certain laws of physical 
development, in common with its other members; but when the 
mother, in the pride of her heart, bandages that foot so tight that 



xxxvrn dr. kartell's 

the laws of development become nugatory and powerless, in that 
case the sovereignty of God ceased where the bandaging commenced. 
Just so it is with faith. Being seated with Mr. Muller at his own 
table, a few evenings since, the subject of faith naturally became the 
topic of conversation, when he beautifully remarked, "The first 
germ of faith in the soul is very much like a new-born infant in the 
cradle, very small and very weak, and its future growth and increase 
of strength as much depend on its daily, constant exercise as do the 
physical developments of the child; yes," continued he, "I can now 
as easily trust God for thirty-five thousand pounds as I could at first 
for five thousand." 

Now, may not Mr. Muller's experience on this vital and funda- 
mental principle of our holy religion reveal to us the secret cause of 
our own weak faith? We fold it up, as it were, in a napkin, lay it 
carefully away, and treat it as a tender but foolish mother does her 
offspring : afraid of the open air, it will take cold; it must not walk 
out, it will fall and break its limbs ; it must not take nutritious food, 
it is so delicate. Thus the poor, unfortunate child never rises to the 
full strength and vigor of manhood. So is it with that class of 
believers who do little else than to nurse and sing a kind of lullaby 
over their puny faith ; it must never venture out of sight, or upon a 
stormy sea in a dark night, or, in other words, never trust God. O, 
what a misnomer to call this faith ! and what is it worth, even if it 
can be called faith? Sc far as the wants of this perishing world are 
concerned, it is as worthless as the one talent buried in the earth, 
and if sufficient to save the soul, it can be saved "only as by fire." 
Let us not fail here to mark well the difference between these two 
grains of faith, both small and weak at the beginning, but one, by 
daily vigorous exercise, increases and grows into such mighty 
strength " that as a prince it hath power with God," while the other 
for want of exercise, sinks into imbecility, and becomes powerles 
for good. 

Let us notice, also, the circumstances into which Mr. Muller 
voluntarily threw himself and family, for the very purpose of afford- 
ing opportunity for the exercise of his faith, — giving away all he 



PREFATORY LETTER. XXXIX 

possessed, laying by nothing for the future, — thus placing himself 
and family upon a level with the poorest child, and forcing his faith, 
as it were, into the severest exercise, by looking to God for daily 
bread, no less for himself and family than for the seven hundred 
orphans dependent upon his bounty. Nor can he be persuaded *o 
accept any money, or gifts of any kind, unless with the privilege of 
laying it at once upon God's altar, to advance the cause and kingdom 
of his blessed Redeemer. The following facts and correspondence 
exhibit Mr. Muller's views and real character on this subject. 

In October, 1856, a gentleman, in admiration of the services which 
Mr. Muller had rendered to poor orphans, and to mankind in general, 
sent him one hundred pounds, as the commencement of a fund for 
the future maintenance of himself and family. Mr. Muller's reply 
is so characteristic, and so beautifully exemplifies the simplicity of 
his childlike faith, that I give it in full : — 

" My dear Sir : I hasten to thank you for your kind communi- 
cation, and to inform you that your check for one hundred pounds 
has safely come to hand. 

" I have no property whatever, nor has my dear wife ; nor have I 
had one single shilling regular salary as minister of the Gospel for the 
last twenty-six years, nor as the Director of the Orphan House and 
the other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home 
and Abroad. "When I am in need of anything, I fall on my knees and 
ask God that he would be pleased to give me what I need ; and he 
puts it into the heart of some one or other to help me. Thus all my 
wants have been amply supplied during the last twenty-six years, and 
I can say, to the praise of God, I have lacked nothing. My dear 
wife and my only child — a daughter twenty-four years old — are of 
the same mind with me. Of this blessed way of living none of us are 
tired, but become, day by day, more convinced of its blessedness. 

" I have never thought it right to make provision for myself or my 
dear wife and daughter, except in this way ; that when I saw a case of 
need, such as an aged widow, or a sick person, or a helpless infant, I 
would use my means freely which God had given me, fully believing 
that if either myself, or my dear wife or daughter, at some time or 
other should be in need of anything, God would richly repay what was 
given to the poor, considering it as lent to himself. 

"Under these circumstances, I am unable to accept your kindness 



XL VR. SAWTELLS 

of the gift of one hundred pounds, towards making a provision for 
myself and family; for so I understand your letter. Any gift given 
to me, unasked for, by those who have it in their heart to help me to 
supply my personal and family expenses, I thankfully accept ; or any 
donation given to me for the work of God in which I am engaged, I 
also thankfully accept, as a steward for the orphans, etc. ; but your 
kind gift seems to me especially given to make a provision for myself 
which I think would be displeasing to my heavenly Father, who has 
so bountifully given me my daily bread hitherto. But should I have 
misunderstood the meaning of your letter, be pleased to let me know 
it. I hold the check till I hear again from you. 

" In the mean time, my dear sir, however you meant your letter, I 
am deeply sensible of your kindness, and daily pray that God would 
be pleased richly to recompense you for it, both temporally and 
spiritually. 

"I am, dear sir, 

"Yours very gratefully, 

" George Muller." 

Two days after the above letter was written, Mr. Muller received a 
reply, desiring him to use the one hundred pounds for the orphans, 
and within five days more he received an additional two hundred 
pounds for the benefit of the orphans, from the same individual, who 
up to that time was unknown to Mr. Muller, nor has he ever seen him 
since. 

Here, then, we discover the secret of Mr. Muller's strong faith. 
He will not suffer himself to be placed in a condition where he can- 
not exercise it at all times and in all places. This is the soil, dear 
readers, into which Mr. Muller cast Ms faith, which at the beginning 
was like a grain of mustard-seed, very small, but now, behold, a great 
tree, where I see with my own eyes seven hundred little birds lodg- 
ing in the branches thereof; and so rapidly and vigorously does it 
shoot out new branches, that in a few months four hundred and fifty 
more will be warbling their sweet notes of praise beneath its wide- 
spreading foliage. But this is not all; Mr. Muller not only casts the 
seed into good soil, but he is careful to keep it well watered with the 
dews of heaven; and this he does " by prayer and supplication, with 
thanksgiving, making known his requests unto God/' and by reading 



PREFATORY LETTER. XLI 

and studying the Holy Scriptures ; or, as he modestly expressed him- 
self in conversation, " I am habitually gif en to the reading of the 
word of God, coupled with meditation on the same ; and everything 
connected with myself or my service I turn into prayer." 

Now, most men would consider such a stupendous work as his a 
reasonable excuse for cutting short their closet duties. Not so with 
Mr. Muller. It is in the closet, shut up with God and the Bible, that 
he girds up the loins of his mind, and burnishes his armor for the 
battles of the day. It is very beautiful, also, to notice the confidence 
and childlike simplicity with which he receives everything, and be- 
lieves every word that God has spoken ; and the increased relish and 
zest with which he daily and hourly returns to God's holy word is very 
peculiar ; as though he was in constant communication with heaven, 
and receiving fresh letters of instruction and precious promises daily 
and hourly from his heavenly Father. Hence, he never studies the 
Bible for others, but for himself, to find out what his Father requires 
of him ; and, studying thus, he seems so impregnated with God's 
truth, that when he speaks of God, of Christ, of the Holy Spirit, and 
the great salvation, you are reminded of the words of our Saviour, 
John vii. 38, for from him seem to flow "rivers of living waters." 
And the more strikingly does this appear from his primitive style of 
preaching. Never taking a text, but reading a whole chapter, more 
or less, he literally teaches his hearers out of the Scriptures, pouring 
forth such floods of light upon that given passage that his people very 
soon become mighty in the Scriptures. 

His prayers, also, are as peculiar as his preaching, — great sim- 
plicity in language ; while humbleness, meekness, gentleness, and 
fervency of spirit are so manifest, that he recalls to your mind a very 
dear child, who, having had much forgiven, loves much, and whose 
tender father, before whom it stands, is so rich, so benevolent, so for- 
giving, that it asks and obtains great blessings, while the deep sense 
of its own unworthiness keeps the child's heart very tender and very 
humble. But the most remarkable feature noticeable in his prayers 
is the asking of everything in the name, through the merits, and for 
the sake of the Lord Jesus Christ. I do not mean that the fact itself 
4* 



XLII DR. SAWTELL S 

is peculiar, but the great stress he lays upon the honor and glory due 
to Christ, — Christ's precious blood ; Christ our Teacher, our great 
atoning High Priest ; Christ the Resurrection and the Life ; Christ the 
Exalted, Glorified One ; Christ our Mediator, Intercessor, and Advo- 
cate. To honor and glorify Christ, and magnify his name above 
every name, seems to be the all-pervading theme which fills his heart 
and moves Ms tongue. 

But it is not meet that I keep the reader longer from this remarka- 
ble narrative of the "Lord's Dealings" with the man himself. In 
this he tells Ins own story, and it is marvellous in our eyes. Would 
that it were translated into every language in Christendom, and might 
find its way into every family; for, to my mind, 'it contains the most 
important, the most instructive and impressive lesson to the child of 
God that can be found in any uninspired book, the like of which has 
never appeared since the days of the Apostles. This is no hasty 
opinion, but a solemn conviction, after days and weeks of diligent 
search, and the most thorough investigation, in the very city and on 
the very grounds where these wonderful things have transpired. And 
if God raised up a Luther in the sixteenth century, to scatter the 
clouds and disperse the darkness of that age, and to restore to his 
people that glorious doctrine of " justification by faith," so long 
buried beneath the rubbish of Papal superstition, why should it be 
thought a thing incredible that the same glorious God should, in our 
day, raise up a Muller to rear this " Monument" on Ashley Down, in 
the face of all Christendom, to prove that the God of the Bible, whom 
we serve, is still the "Living God," the hearer and answerer of 
prayer ; and that the faith taught by Luther, and by which alone we 
can be justified before God, is not a dead, but a living, active, prac- 
tical faith, which has in it the power of an endless life, and a power 
that can move the heart and the hand of Him who moves the world? 

MR. MULLER' S PERSONAL APPEARANCE. 
He is tall, rather slender, standing six feet in his boots, and of a 
remarkably fine figure, with a grave, German face, and dark-brownish 
eyes that kindle into a pleasing, benevolent expression in conversa- 



PREFATORY LETTER. XLIII. 

tion. His dress is the very same in cut and color that he wore in the 
German university (his coat a long-tail frock), all in black, except the 
snow-white neck-tie, fastened with a common plain pin in front, the 
ends hid beneath a waistcoat buttoned up so high as to hide everything 
but the cravat ; making his whole general appearance, whether in the 
pulpit or in the street, a perfect model of neatness and order. Hi 
hair is rather coarse, and black as jet. 

HIS SCHOLARSHIP. 

He is master of six languages, — Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, 
French and English, — and reads and understands the Dutch, and two 
or three Oriental languages, but does not profess to be master of them. 
His attainments in Biblical literature are the most thorough, and I 
may say the most extraordinary. 

HIS LIBRARY. 

It consists of a Hebrew Bible, three Greek Testaments, a Green 
Concordance and Lexicon, with some half-dozen different versions of 
the Holy Scriptures, and copies of the best translations into those 
several languages of which he is master. These constitute his entire 
library! 

HIS HABITS AND MANNER OF STUDY AND PREACHING. 

He rises early, enters his closet, shuts the door, opens his Bible, 
offers a short prayer especially to invoke the guidance of God's Spirit 
upon the reading and meditation of his holy word, then reads and 
meditates verse by verse, chapter by chapter, till his whole soul be- 
comes impressed with God's presence and impregnated with God's 
teachings ; then he bows himself, and, like Samson hold of the mid- 
dle pillars, he wrestles with God, till, like Israel, he prevails. His 
habit of reading the Scriptures is to go straight and regularly through 
them, both the Old and New Testaments at the same time ; that is, to 
read in the Old one part of the day, and in the New the other. He 
has strong objections to that hop, skip and jump method that some 



XLIV DR. SAWTELLS 

practise in reading the Bible, or the habit of opening it at random. 
When asked how often he had gone through the Bible in this way, his 
answer was, " I cannot tell, but probably more than a hundred times." 
His preaching is altogether expository, reading a whole chapter, or 
part of one, or parts of two chapters, according to the connection, 
and then drawing out of the passage such rich treasures, so many 
things new and old, that I felt it to be worth crossing the Atlantic to 
hear them. Eor three Sabbaths I sat under his teachings, and heard 
him twice each day. Though he invited me to preach for him, I de- 
clined, for the very reason that I could not afford to lose the precious 
opportunity of hearing him. The happy results of his method of 
preaching are seen in the numbers of men and women connected with 
his churches who have beeome mighty in the Scriptures, and are 
better qualified to expound them, and to guide inquiring souls to 
Christ, than many a young minister who has spent his three years in 
a theological seminary. Let no one imagine that this kind of preach- 
ing becomes dry and heavy. Never have I listened to more burning 
words and touching eloquence than occasionally burst from the lips 
of this man of God, and especially when he turns to the young, and, 
with all the tenderness and pathos of a loving father, pleads with them 
" to seek now the Lord while he may be found, and call upon him 
whilst he is near." 

SELLING JEWELRY SENT IN FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE 
ORPHANS — IS IT SINFUL? 

His answer to me was in substance the following: "If I believed 
it to be sinful, I would smash it all up, though it took ten thousand 
pounds per annum from the orphans' support. I have searched the 
Scriptures and made it a subject of prayer. I do not find a command 
in the Bible against it. I find enough to guide myself in its use ; so 
with my dear wife and daughter. We think a meek, quiet, and hum- 
ble spirit the best of all ornaments, and the only ornament a Chris- 
tian needs. But if we lay down a rule and adopt it as a principle to 
regulate others, consistency would require us not to stop at mere 
jewelry; other rich and costly articles of dress, etc., must be dis- 



PREFATORY LETTER. XLV 

carded , and 'who is wise enough to draw the right line, unless God 
has spoken explicitly on the subject? No ; these things must be regu- 
lated from within. The conscience must be kept quickened, and the 
love of Christ must constrain one in the regulation of these things." 
Mr. Muller's consistent, prayerful, and godly life, connected with his 
wonderful study and knowledge of the Bible, gives weight to his 
opinions on all questions of this kind. 

GENERAL READING, ETC. 

"I have no time," said he, "for that." From his assistants (to 
whom I am indebted for many facts of a personal nature which Mr. 
Muller himself would never have disclosed) I learned that the way 
he kept himself at all posted up with regard to the stirring events of 
the day was by conversation at table with his associates, teachers, 
matrons, etc., who were expected to have a little more time for gen- 
eral reading. His morning hours, after his closet duties are over, are 
spent in his family, opening his letters, packages, etc., marking with 
his pencil and separating them into such divisions or classes that his 
three clerks or assistants can understand their respective duties. He 
reaches the Orphan Houses between ten and eleven o'clock ; there he 
remains till six or seven in the evening, attending to and overseeing 
a great variety of things. The amount of labor he performs is amaz- 
ing, and the almost endless variety would render insane, one would 
think, most other men. Yet he is never rufHed, never looks anxious 
or out of temper, — always calm and placid, and in a prayerful frame 
of mind, casting all his cares upon the Lord, who careth for him. I 
doubt whether I shall ever see his like again this side heaven. If I 
am not a better man in future, possessing more of the spirit of Christ, 
more faith, more of the spirit of prayer and of holy living, for having 
spent three weeks at his feet, surely my case is a very sad one in- 
deed. I have not time to say more on this fertile subject at present. 

Let the dear people of God in America gaze upon this " Monu- 
ment" brought to their view in this narrative, till by prayer and sup- 
plication they shall obtain for themselves more of the " like precious 
faith," — that faith without which it is impossible to please God, — 



XLVI DR. SAWTELZ'S PREFATORY LETTER. 

that faith that worketh by love and purifieth the heart, — that faith 
that removes mountains of obstacles out of our path, — that faith that 
takes hold on God's strength, and is the substance of things hoped 
for, and the evidence of things not seen. O Lord, bless the reading 
of this book to the increase of our faith, and the faith of all thy dear 
children, is the prayer of 

E. N. SAWTELL. 



PUBLISHERS' NOTICE. 

This valuable book has now been brought down five years later 
than the last edition, or from 1872 to 1877. The work has been 
done by Rev. E. P. Thwing, under the personal supervision of Mr. 
Muller, who is now in this country. It gives a full account of Mr. 
Miiller's labors for the past five years. 



THE LIFE OF TRUST. 

CHAPTER I. 

BOYHOOD AND YOUTH. 
1805 — 1825. 

BIRTH — EARLY DISHONESTY — INSENSIBILITY — CONFIRMATION IN THE STATS 
CHURCH — DISSOLUTENESS OF LIFE — THE HARD WAY OF TRANSGRESSORS 
— THE GYMNASIUM AT NORDHAUSEN — THE UNIVERSITY AT HALLE — ROV- 
JNGS. 

QjfL WAS born at Kroppenstaedt, near Halberstadt, in 
the kingdom of Prussia, September 27, 1805. In 
January, 1810, my parents removed to Heimersle- 
ben, about four miles from Kroppenstaedt, where 
my father was appointed collector in the excise. 

My father, who educated his children on worldly prin- 
ciples, 1 gave us much money, considering our age. The 
result was, that it led me and my brother into many sins. 
Before I was ten years old, I repeatedly took of the gov- 
ernment money which was intrusted to my father, and 
which he had to make up ; till one day, as he had repeat- 
edly missed money, he detected my theft, by depositing a 
counted sum in the room where I was, and leaving me to 
myself for a while. Being thus left alone, I took some of 

1 The opinion is often entertained that persons who become eminent for power 
in prayer and nearness of communion with God, owe their attainments to natural 
excellence of character, or to peculiarly favoring circumstances of early education. 
The narrative of the youth of Miiller exhibits the fallaciousness of this view, and 
shows that the attainments which he made are within the reach of any one who 
will " adk of God, tnat giveth to all men liberally and upbraideth not." — Ed. 

47 




48 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. L 

the money, and hid it under my foot in my shoe. When 
my father, after his return, had counted and missed the 
money, I was searched and my theft detected. 

Yf hen I was between ten and eleven years of age I was 
sent to Halberstadt, there to be prepared for the university ; 
for my father's desire was that I should become a clerg}^- 
man ; not, indeed, that thus I might serve God, but that I 
might have a comfortable living. My time was now spent 
in studying, reading novels, and indulging, though so 
young, in sinful practices. Thus it continued till I was 
fourteen years old, when my mother was suddenly removed. 
The night she was dying, I, not knowing of her illness, 
was pla3 r ing at cards till two in the morning, and on the 
next day, being the Lord's day, I went with some of my 
companions in sin to a tavern, and then we went about the 
streets half intoxicated. 

This bereavement made no lasting impression on my 
mind. I grew worse and worse. Three or four days 
before I was confirmed, and thus admitted to partake of 
the Lord's Supper, I was guihy of gross immorality ; and 
the very day before my confirmation, when I was in the 
vestry with the clergyman to confess my sins, after a formal 
manner, I defrauded him ; for I handed over to him only 
the twelfth part of the fee which my father had given me 
for him. In this state of heart, without prayer, without 
true repentance, without faith, without knowledge of the 
plan of salvation, I was confirmed, and took the Lord's 
Supper, on the Sunday after Easter, 1820. Yet I was not 
without some feeling about the solemnity of the thing, and 
stayed at home in the afternoon and evening, whilst the 
other boys and girls, who had been confirmed with me, 
walked about in the fields. 

My time till midsummer, 1821, was spent partly in study, 
but in a great degree in playing the piano-forte and guitar, 
reading novels, frequenting taverns, forming resolutions to 
become different, yet breaking them almost as fast as they 



1821. BOYHOOD AND YOUTH. 49 

were made. My money was often spent on my sinful 
pleasures, through which I was now and then brought into 
trouble, so that once, to satisfy nry hunger, I stole a piece 
of coarse bread, the allowance of a soldier who was quar- 
tered in the house where I lodged. 

At midsummer, 1821, my father obtained an appointment 
at Sehoenebeck, near Magdeburg, and I embraced the 
opportunity of entreating him to remove me to the cathe- 
dral classical school of Magdeburg ; for I thought that if 
I could but leave my companions in sin, and get out of 
certain snares, and be placed under othe v tutors, I should 
then live a different life. My father consented, and I was 
allowed to leave Halberstadt, and to stay at Heiniersleben 
till Michaelmas. Being thus quite my own master, I grew 
still more idle, and lived as much as before in ail sorts of 
sin. When Michaelmas came, I persuaded my father to 
leave me at Heimersleben till Easter, and to let me read the 
classics with a clergyman living in the same place* I was 
now living on the premises belonging to my father, under 
little real control, and intrusted with a considerable sum of 
money, which I had to collect for nry father, from persons 
who owed it to him. My habits soon led me to spend a 
considerable part of this money, giving receipts for different 
sums, yet leaving my father to suppose I had not received 
them. 

In November, I went on a pleasure excursion to Magde- 
burg, where I spent six days in much sin, and though my 
absence from home had been found out by nry father be- 
fore I returned from thence, yet I took all the monej' I 
could obtain, and went to Brunswick, after I had, through 
a number of lies, obtained permission from my tutor. I 
spent a week at Brunswick in an expensive hotel. At the 
end of the week my money was expended. I then went , 
without money, to another hotel, in a village near Bruns- 
wick, where 1 spent another week in an expensive way of • 
living. At last, the owner of the hotel, suspecting that 3 



50 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. I. 

had no money, asked for payment, and I was obliged to 
leave my best clothes as security. I then walked about sis 
miles, to Wolfenbuttel, went to an inn, and began again to 
live as if I had plenty of money. On the second or third 
morning I went quietly out of the yard and then ran off ; 
but being suspected and observed, and therefore seen to go 
off, I was immediately called after, and so had to return. 
I was arrested, and being suspected to be a thief, was ex- 
amined for about three hours, and then sent to jail. I 
now found myself, at the age of sixteen, an inmate of the 
same dwelling with thieves and murderers. I was locked 
up in this place day and night, without permission to leave 
my cell. 

I was in prison from Dec. 18, 1821, to January 12, 1822, 
when the keeper told me to go with him to the police 
office. Here I found that the commissioner before whom I 
had been tried, had acquainted my father with my conduct ; 
and thus I was kept in prison till my father sent the money 
which was needed for my travelling expenses, to pay my 
debt in the inn, and for my maintenance in the prison. So 
ungrateful was I now for certain little kindnesses shown to 
me by a fellow-prisoner, that, although I had promised to 
call on his sister, to deliver a message from him, I omitted 
to do so ; and so little had I be*n benefited by this, my 
chastisement, that, though I was going home to meet an 
angry father, only two hours after I had left the town 
where I had been imprisoned, I chose an avowedly wicked 
person as my travelling companion for a great part of my 
journey. 

My father, who arrived two daj T s after I had reached 
Heimersleben, after having severely beaten me, took me 
home to Schoenebeck, intending, at Easter, to send me to 
a classical school at Halle, that I might be under strict dis- 
cipline and the continual inspection of a tutor. Eastei 
' came, and I easily persuaded him to let me stay at home 
till Michaelmas. But after that period he would not con 



1822. BOYHOOD AND YOUTH. 51 

sent to my remaining any longer with him, and I left home, 
pretending to go to Halle to be examined. But having a 
hearty dislike to the strict discipline of which I had heard, 
I went to Nordhausen, and had myself examined to be re- 
ceived into that school. I then went home, but never told 
my father a word of all this deception till the day before 
my departure, which obliged me to invent a whole chain of 
lies. He was then very angry ; but at last, through my en- 
treaties and persuasion, he gave way and allowed me to 
go. This was in October, 1822. 

I continued at ISTordhausen two years and six months. 
During this time I studied with considerable diligence the 
Latin classics, French, history, my own language, etc. ; but 
did little in Hebrew, Greek, and the mathematics. I lived 
in the house of the director, and got, through my conduct, 
highly into his favor, so much so that I was held up by 
him in the first class as an example to the rest. I used 
now to rise regularly at four, winter and summer, and gen- 
erally studied all the day, with little exception, till ten 
at night. 

But whilst I was thus outwardly gaining the esteem of 
my fellow-creatures, I did not care in the least about God, 
but lived secretly in much sin, in consequence of which I 
was taken ill, and for thirteen weeks confined to my room. 
During my illness I had no real sorrow of heart, }~et, being 
under certain natural impressions of religion, I read through 
Klopstock's works without weariness. I cared nothing 
about the word of God. I had about three hundred books 
of my own, but no Bible. Now and then I felt that I 
ought to become a different person, and I tried to amend 
my conduct, particularly when I went to the Lord's Supper, 
as I used to do twice every year, with the other young meu. 
The day previous to attending that ordinance, I used to 
refrain from certain things ; and on the day itself I was 
serious, and also swore once or twice to God, with the 
emblem of the broken body in ray mouth, to become better, 



52 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. I. 

thinking that for the oath's sake I should be induced to 
reform. But after one or two days were over, all was for- 
gotten, and I was as bad as before. 

At Easter, 1825, I became a member of the University 
of Halle, and that with very honorable testimonials. I thus 
obtained permission to preach in the Lutheran Establish- 
ment ; but I was as truly unhappy and as far from God as 
ever. I had made strong resolutions now at last to 
change my course of life, for two reasons : first, because, 
without it, I thought no parish would choose me as their 
pastor ; and, secondly, that without a considerable knowl- 
edge of divinity, I should never get a good living. But 
the moment I entered Halle, the university town, all my 
resolutions came to nothing. Being now more than ever 
my own master, I renewed my profligate life afresh, though 
now a student of divinity. Yet in the midst of it all I had 
a desire to renounce this wretched life, for I had no enjoy- 
ment in it, and had sense enough left to see the end, one 
day or other, would be miserable. But I had no sorrow 
of heart on account of offending God. 

One day, when I was in a tavern with some of my wild 
fellow-students, I saw among them one of my former 
school-fellows, named Beta, whom I had known four years 
before at Halberstadt, but whom at that time I had 
despised, because he was so quiet and serious. It now 
appeared well to me to choose him as my friend, thinking 
that, if I could but have better companions, I should by 
that means improve my own conduct. " Cursed be the 
man that trusteth in man, and maJceth Jlesh his arm" 

This Beta was a backslider. "When formerly he was so 
quiet at school, I have reason to believe it was because the 
Spirit of God was working on his heart ; but now, having 
departed from the Lord, he tried to put off the ways of God 
more and more, and to enjoy the world of which he had 
known but little before. / sought his friendship, because 
I thought it would lead me to a steady life ; and he gladly 



1822. BOYHOOD AND YOUTH, 53 

formed an acquaintance with me, as he told me afterwards, 
because he thought it would bring him into gay society. 

At the commencement of August, Beta and I, with two 
other students, drove about the country for four days. 
When we returned, instead of being truly sorry on account 
of this sin, we thought of fresh pleasures ; and as my love 
for travelling was stronger than ever, through what I had 
seen on this last journey, I proposed to my friends to set 
off for Switzerland. The obstacles in the way, the want 
of money, and the want of the passports, were removed by 
me. For, through forged letters from our parents, we pro- 
cured passports, and through pledging all we could, partic- 
ularly our books, we obtained as much money as we 
thought would be enough. Forty-three days we were day 
after day travelling, almost always on foot. 

I had now obtained the desire of my heart. I had seen 
Switzerland. But still I was far from being happy. I was 
on this journey like Judas ; for, having the common purse, 
I was a thief. I managed so that the journey cost me but 
two thirds of what it cost my friends. I had, by many lies, 
to satisfy my father concerning the travelling expenses. 
During the three weeks I stayed at home, I determined to 
live differently for the future. I was different for a few 
days ; but when the vacation was over, and fresh students 
came, and, with them, fresh money, all was soon forgotten. 




CHAPTER II. 

THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN. 

1825 — 1826. 

▲ THE A SURE FOUND — DAWNING OF THE NEW LIFE — THE PEACE OF GOD — " I AM 
COME TO SET A MAN AT VARIANCE AGAINST HIS FATHER" — " EET HIM 
THAT HEARETH SAY COME " — THE FIRST SERMON — DEEIGHT IN THE LORD 
— A COMMON ERROR — THE FOUNTAIN NEGLECTED. 

•HE time was now come when God would have 
mercy upon me. At a time when I was as careless 
about him as ever, he sent his Spirit into my heart. 
I had no Bible, and had not read it for years. I 
went to church but seldom ; but, from custom, I took the 
Lord's Supper twice a year. I had never heard the gospel 
preached. I had never met with a person who told me 
that he meant, by the help of God, to live according to the 
Holy Scriptures. In short, I had not the least idea that 
there were any persons really different from myself except 
in degree. 

On Saturday afternoon, about the middle of November, 
1825, I had taken a walk with my friend Beta. On our 
return he said to me that he was in the habit of going on 
Saturday evenings to the house of a Christian, where there 
was a meeting. On further inquiry, he told me that they 
read the Bible, sang, prayed, and read a printed sermon. 
No sooner had I heard this than it was to me as if I had 
found something after which I had been seeking all my 
life long. We went together in the evening. As I did not 
know the manners of believers, and the joy they have in 
seeing poor sinners, even in any measure, caring about the 
things of God, I made an apology for coming. The kind 

54 



1825. THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN. 55 

answer of the dear brother I shall never forget. He said : 
" Come as often as you please ; house and heart are open 
to you." "We sat down and sang a Irymn. Then brother 
Kayser, now a missionary in Africa, fell on his knees and 
asked a blessing on our meeting. This kneeling down 
made a deep impression upon me ; for I had never either 
seen any one on his knees, nor had I ever myself prayed on 
my knees. He then read a chapter and a printed sermon ; 
for no regular meetings for expounding the Scriptures were 
allowed in Prussia, except an ordained clergyman was 
present. At the close we sang another hymn, and then the 
master of the house prayed. Whilst he prayed, my feeling 
was something like this : " I could not pray as well, though 
I am much more learned than this illiterate man." The 
whole made a deep impression on me. I was happy ; 
though, if I had been asked why I was happy, I could not 
have clearly explained it. 

When we walked home, I said to Beta : " All we have 
seen on our journey to Switzerland, and all our former 
pleasures, are as nothing in comparison with this evening." 
Whether I fell on my knees when I returned home, I do 
not remember ; but this I know, that I lay peaceful and 
happy in my bed. This shows that the Lord may begin 
his work in different ways. For I have not the least doubt 
that on that evening he began a work of grace in me, 
though I obtained joy without any deep sorrow of heart, 
and with scarcely any knowledge. But that evening was 
the turning-point in my life. The next day and Monday, 
and once or twice besides, I went again to the house of 
this brother, where I read the Scriptures with him and an- 
other brother ; for it was too long for me to wait till Satur- 
day came again. 

Now my life became very different, though not so that 
all sins were given up at once. My wicked companions 
were given up ; the going to taverns was entirely discontin- 
ued; the habitual practice of telling falsehoods was no 



56 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. IL 

longer indulged in ; but still a few times after this I spoke 
an untruth. I read the Scriptures, prayed often, loved the 
brethren, went to church from right motives, and stood on 
the side of Christ, though laughed at by my fellow-students. 

In January, 1826, I began to read missionary papers, and 
was greatly stirred up to become a missionary myself. I 
prayed frequently concerning this matter, and thus made 
more decided progress for a few weeks. About Easter, 
1826, I saw a devoted j^oung brother, named Hermann 
Ball, a learned man, and of wealthy parents, who, con- 
strained by the love of Christ, preferred laboring in Poland 
among the Jews as a missionaiy to having a comfortable 
living near his relations. His example made a deep impres- 
sion on me. The Lord smiled on me, and I was, for the 
first time in my life, able fully and unreservedly to give 
up myself to him. 

At this time I began truly to enjoy the peace of God 
which passeth all understanding. In my joy I wrote to 
my father and brother, entreating them to seek the Lord, 
and telling them how happy I was ; thinking that, if the 
way to happiness were but set before them, they would 
gladly embrace it. To my great surprise, an angry answer 
was returned. About this period the Lord sent a believer, 
Dr. Tholuck, as professor of divinity to Halle, in conse- 
quence of which a few believing students came from other 
universities. Thus also, through becoming acquainted with 
other brethren, the Lord led me on. 

My former desire to give myself to missionary sendee 
returned, and I went at last to my father to obtain his per- 
mission, without which I could not be received into any of 
the German missionary institutions. My father was greatly 
displeased, and particularly reproached me, saying that he 
had expended so much money on my education, in hope 
that he might comfortably spend his last days with me in a 
parsonage, and that he now saw all these prospects come to 
nothing. He was angry, and told me he would no longel 



1826. THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN. 57 

consider me as his son. But the Lord gave me grace to 
remain steadfast. He then entreated me, and wept before 
me ; yet even this by far harder trial the Lord enabled 
me to bear. After I had left my father, though I wanted 
more money than at any previous period of my life, as I had 
to remain two years longer in the university, I determined 
never to take any more from him ; for it seemed to me 
wrong, so far as I remember, to suffer myself to be sup- 
ported by him, when he had no prospect that I should be- 
come what he would wish me to be, namely, a clergyman 
with a good living. This resolution I was enabled to keep. 

Shortly after this had occurred, several American gen- 
tlemen, three of whom were professors in American col- 
leges, came to Halle for literary purposes, and, as they did 
not understand German, I was recommended by Dr. Tho- 
luck to teach them. These gentlemen, some of whom 
were believers, paid so handsomely for the instruction 
which I gave them, and for the lectures of certain profes- 
sors which I wrote out for them, that I had enough and to 
spare. Thus did the Lord richly make up to me the little 
which I had relinquished for his sake. " fear the Lord, 
ye his saints : for there is no ivant to them that fear him." 

Whitsuntide, and the two days following, I spent in the 
house of a pious clergyman in the country ; for all the min- 
isters at Halle, a town of more than twenty thousand in- 
habitants, were unenlightened men. God greatly refreshed 
me through this visit. Dear Beta was with me. On our 
return we related to two of our former friends, whose so- 
ciety we had not quite given up, though we did not any 
longer live with them in sin, how happy we had been on 
our visit. I then told them how I wished they were as 
happy as ourselves. They answered, We do not feel tha' 
we are sinners. After this I fell on my knees, and asked 
God to show them that they were sinners. Having done 
so, I went into my bedroom, where I continued to pray 
for them. After a little while, I returned to my sitting 



58 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IL 

room and found them both in tears, and both told me that 
they now felt themselves to be sinners. From that time a 
work of grace commenced in their hearts. 

Though very weak and ignorant, yet I had now, by the 
grace of God, some desire to benefit others, and he who so 
faithfully had once served Satan, sought now to win souls 
for Christ. I circulated every month about three hundred 
missionary papers. I also distributed a considerable num- 
ber of tracts, and often took nry pockets full in my walks, 
and distributed them, and spoke to poor people whom I 
met. I also wrote letters to some of my former compan- 
ions in sin. I visited, for thirteen weeks, a sick man, who, 
when I first began to speak to him about the things of God, 
was completely ignorant of his state as a sinner, trusting 
for salvation in his upright and moral life. After some 
weeks, however, the Lord allowed me to see a decided 
change in him, and he afterwards repeatedly expressed his 
gratitude that I had been sent to him by God to be the 
means of opening his blind eyes. 

Having heard that there was a schoolmaster living in a 
village about six miles from Halle, who was in the habit of 
holding a pra}'er meeting at four o'clock every morning, 
with the miners, before they went into the pit, giving them 
also an address, I thought he was a believer ; and as I knew 
so very few brethren, I went to see him, in order, if it 
might be, to strengthen his hands. About two years after- 
wards, he told me that when I came to him first he knew 
not the Lord, but that he had held these prayer meetings 
merely out of kindness to a relative, whose office it was, 
but who had gone on a journey ; and that those addresses 
which he had read were not his own, but copied out of a 
book. He also told me that he was much impressed with 
my kindness, and what he considered condescension on my 
part in coming to see him, and this, together with nry con- 
versation, had been instrumental in leading him to care 



1826. THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN. 59 

about the things of God, and I knew him ever afterwards 
as a true brother. 

This schoolmaster asked me whether I would not preach 
in his parish, as the aged clergyman would be very glad of 
my assistance. Up to this time I had never preached ; yet 
I thought that by taking a sermon, or the greater part 
of one, written by a spiritual man, and committing it to 
memoiy, I might benefit the people. I set about putting 
a printed sermon into a suitable form, and committing it to 
memory. There is no joy in man's own doings and choos- 
Ings. I got through it, but had no enjoyment in the work. 
It was on August 27, 1826, at eight in the morning, in a 
chapel of ease. There was one service more, in the after 
noon, at which I needed not to have done anything ; but 
having a desire to serve the Lord, though I often knew not 
how to do it scripturally, and knowing that this aged and 
unenlightened clergyman had had this living for forty-eight 
years, and having, therefore, reason to believe that the gos- 
pel scarcely ever had been preached in that place, I had it 
in my heart to preach again in the afternoon. It came to 
my mincf to read the fifth chapter of Matthew, and to 
make such remarks as I was able. I did so. Immediately 
upon beginning to expound " Blessed are the poor in spirit," 
etc., I felt myself greatly assisted ; and whereas in the 
morning my sermon had not been simple enough for the 
people to understand it, I now was listened to with the 
greatest attention, and I think was also understood. My 
own peace and joy were great. I felt this a blessed work. 

On my way to Halle I thought, this is the way I should 
like always to preach. But then it came immediately to 
my mind that such sort of preaching might do for illiterate 
country people, but that it never would do before a well- 
educated assembly in town. I thought the truth ought to 
be preached at all hazards, but it ought to be given in a 
different form, suited to the hearers. Thus I remained un- 
settled in my mind as it regards the mode of preaching ; 



60 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. II. 

and it is not surprising that I did not then see the truth 
concerning this matter, for I did not understand the work 
of the Spirit, and therefore saw not the powerlessness of 
human eloquence. Further, I did not keep in mind that if 
the most illiterate persons in the congregation can compre- 
hend the discourse, the most educated will understand it 
too ; but that the reverse does not hold true. 

It was not till three years afterwards that I was led, 
through grace, to see what I now consider the right mode 
of preparation for the public preaching of the word. But 
about this, if God permit, I will say more when I come to 
that period of my life. 

It was about this time that I formed the plan of ex- 
changing the University of Halle for that of Berlin, on 
account of there being a greater number of believing pro- 
fessors and students in the latter place. But the whole 
plan was formed without praj^er, or at least without earnest 
prayer. When, however, the morning came on which I 
had to apply for the university testimonials, the Lord gra- 
ciously stirred me up prayerfully to consider the matter ; 
and finding that I had no sufficient reason for leaving 
Halle, I gave up the plan, and have never had reason to 
regret having done so. 

The public means of grace by which I could be benefited 
were very few. Though I went regularly to church when 
I did not preach myself, yet I scarcely ever heard the 
truth ; for there was no enlightened clergyman in the town. 
And when it so happened that I could hear Dr. Tholuck, 
or any other godly minister, the prospect of it beforehand, 
and the looking back upon it afterwards, served to fill me 
with joy. Now and then I walked ten or fifteen miles to 
enjoy this privilege. 

Another means of grace which I attended, besides the 
Saturday-evening meetings in brother Wagner's house, 
was a meeting every Lord's-day evening with the believing 
students, six or more in number, increased, before I left 



1826. THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN. 61 

Halle, to about twenty. In these meetings, one or two, or 
more, of the brethren prayed, and we read the Scriptures, 
sang hymns, and sometimes also one or another of the 
brethren spoke a little in the way of exhortation, and we 
read also such writings of godly men as were calculated 
for edification. I was often greatly stirred up and re- 
freshed in these meetings ; and twice, being in a backslid- 
ing state, and therefore cold and miserable, I opened my 
heart to the brethren, and was brought out of that state 
through the means of their exhortations and prayers. 

As to the other means of grace, I would say, I fell into 
the snare into which so many young believers fall, the 
reading of rebgious books in preference to the Scriptures. 
I read tracts, missionary papers, sermons, and biographies 
of godly persons. I never had been at any time of my 
life in the habit of reading the Holy Scriptures. When 
under fifteen years of age, I occasionally read a little of 
them at school ; afterwards God's precious book was en- 
tirely laid aside, so that I never read one single chapter of 
it till it pleased God to begin a work of grace in my heart. 
Now the scriptural way of reasoning would have been : 
God himself has consented to be an author, and I am igno- 
rant about that precious book, which his Holy Spirit has 
caused to be written through the instrumentality of his 
servants, and it contains that which I ought to know, the 
knowledge of which will lead me to true happiness ; there- 
fore I ought to read again and again this most precious 
book of books, most earnestly, most prayerfully, and with 
much meditation ; and in this practice I ought to continue 
all the days of my life. But instead of acting thus, my 
difficulty in understanding it, and the little enjoyment I 
had in it, made me careless of reading it ; and thus, liKe 
many believers, I practically preferred, for the first four 
years of my divine life, the works of uninspired men to 
the oracles of the living God. The consequence was, that 
I remained a babe, both in knowledge and grace. 
6 



62 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. II. 

The last and most important means of grace, prayer, 
was comparatively bnt little nsed by me. I prayed, and 
prayed often, and in general, by the grace of God, with 
sincerity ; but had I prayed as earnestly as I have of late 
years, I should have made much more rapid progress. 




CHAPTER III. 

SELF-DEDICA TION. 
1826 — 1829. 

DESIRE FOR MISSIONARY LABOR — PROVIDENTIAL RELEASE FROM MILITARY 
SERVICE — VISIT AT HOME — LED TO THE LAND OF HIS FUTURE LABORS — 
PROGRESS IN RELIGIOUS KNOWLEDGE — DESIRE FOR IMMEDIATE USEFULNESS. 

(?//N August, 1827, 1 heard that the Contiuental Society 
in England intended to send a minister to Bucha- 
rest, the residence of many nominal German Chris- 
tians, to help an aged brother in the work of the 
Lord. After consideration and prayer, I offered myself for 
this work to Professor Tholuck, who was requested to look 
out for a suitable individual ; for with all my weakness I 
had a great desire to live wholly for God. Most unexpect- 
edly my father gave his consent, though Bucharest was 
above a thousand miles from my home, and as completely 
a missionary station as any other. I now prepared with 
earnestness for the work of the Lord. I set before me the 
sufferings which might await me. And he who once so 
fully served Satan was now willing, constrained by the love 
of Christ, rather to suffer affliction for the sake of Jesus 
than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season. I also 
prayed with a degree of earnestness concerning my future 
work. 

One day, at the end of October, the above-mentioned 
brother, Hermann Ball, missionary to the Jews, stated that 
he feared, on account of his health, he should be obliged 
to give up laboring among the Jews. When I heard this, 
I felt a peculiar desire to fill up his place. About this very 
time, also, I became exceedingly fond of the Hebrew lan- 

63 



61 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. III. 

guage, which I had cared about very little up to that time, 
and which I had merely studied now and then, from a sense 
of duty. But now I studied it, for many weeks, with the 
greatest eagerness and delight. Whilst I thus from time 
to time felt a desire to fill up Brother Ball's place, and 
whilst I thus greatly delighted in the study of Hebrew, 1 
called, in the evening of November 17, on Dr. Tholuck. 
In the course of conversation he asked me whether I had 
ever had a desire to be a missionary to the Jews, as I 
might be connected with the London Missionary Society 
for promoting Christianity among them, for which he was 
an agent. I was struck with the question, and told him 
what had passed in my mind, but added that it was not 
proper to think anything about that, as I was going to 
Bucharest ; to which he agreed. 

When I came home, however, these few words were like 
fire within me. The next morning I felt all desire for 
going to Bucharest gone, which appeared to me very wrong 
and fleshly, and I therefore entreated the Lord to restore 
to me the former desire for laboring on that missionary 
station. He graciously did so almost immediately. My 
earnestness in studying Hebrew, and my peculiar love for 
it, however, continued. 

About ten days after, Dr. Tholuck received a letter from 
the Continental Society, stating that, on account of the 
war between the Turks and Russians, it appeared well to 
the committee for the time being to give up the thought 
of sending a minister to Bucharest, as it was the seat of 
war between the two armies. Dr. Tholuck then asked me 
again what I now thought about being a missionary to the 
Jews. My reply was that I could not then give an answer, 
but that I would let him know, after I had praj^erfully con- 
sidered the matter. After prayer and consideration, and 
consulting with experienced brethren, in order that they 
might probe my heart as to my motives, I came to this 
conclusion, that I ought to offer myself to the committee, 



1828. SELF-DEDICATION. 65 

leaving it with the Lord to do with me afterwards as it 
might seem good in his sight. Accordingly, Dr. Tholuck 
wrote, about the beginning of December, 1827, to the com- 
mittee in London. 

It was not before March, 1828, that he received an 
answer from London respecting me, in which the commit- 
tee put a number of questions to me, on the satisfactory 
answers to which my being received by them would depend. 
After replying to this first communication, I waited daily 
for an answer, and was so much the more desirous of hav- 
ing it, as my course in the university was completed. At 
last, on June 13, I received a letter from London, stating 
that the committee had determined to take me as a mis- 
sionary student for six months on probation, provided that 
I would come to London. 

I had now had the matter before me about seven months, 
having supposed not only that it would have been settled 
in a few weeks, but also, that, if I were accepted, I should 
be sent out immediately, as I had passed the university. 
Instead of this, not only seven months passed over before 
the decision came, but I was also expected to come to 
London ; and not only so, but though I had from my 
infancy been more or less studying, and now at last wished 
actively to be engaged, it was required that I should again 
become a student. For a few moments, therefore, I was 
greatly disappointed and tried. But on calmly considering 
the matter, it appeared to me but right that the committee 
should know me personally, and that it was also well for 
me to know them more intimately than merely by corre- 
spondence, as this afterwards would make our connection 
much more comfortable. I determined, therefore, after I 
had seen my father, and found no diinculty on his part, to 
go to London. 

There was, however, an obstacle in the way of my leav- 
ing the country. Every Prussian male subject is under the 
necessity of being for three years a soldier, provided hia 



66 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. Ill 

state of body allows it ; but those who have had a classical 
education up to a certain degree, and especially those who 
have passed the university, need to be only one year in 
the army, but have to equip and maintain themselves din- 
ing that year. I could "not obtain a passport out of the 
country till I had either served my time or had been 
exempted by the king himself. The latter I hoped would 
be the case ; for it was a well-known fact that those who 
had given themselves to missionary service had always been 
exempted. Certain brethren of influence, living in the 
capital, to whom I wrote on the subject, wrote to the king ; 
but he replied that the matter must be referred to the 
ministry and to the law, and no exception was made in my 
favor. 

My chief concern now was how I might obtain a pass- 
port for England, through exemption from military duty. 
But the more certain brethren tried, though they knew how 
to set about the matter, and were also persons of rank, the 
greater difficulty there appeared to be in obtaining my 
object; so that in the middle of January, 1829, it seemed 
as if I must immediately become a soldier. There was 
now but one more way untried, and it was at last resorted 
to. A believing major, who was on good terms with one 
of the chief generals, proposed that I should actually offer 
myself for entering the army, and that then I should be 
examined as to my bodily qualifications, in the hope that, 
as I was still in a very weak state of body, I should be 
found unfit for military service. In that case it would 
belong to the chief general finally to settle the matter ; 
who, being a godly man himself, on the major's recom- 
mendation, would, no doubt, hasten the decision, on 
account of my desire to be a missionary to the Jews. 

Thus far the Lord had allowed things to go, to show me, 
it appears, that all my friends could not procure me a pass- 
port till his time was come. But now it was come. The 
King of kings had intended that I should go to England, 



1829. SELF-DEDICATION. 6? 

because he would bless me there and make me a blessing, 
though I was at that time, and am still, most unworthy of 
it ; and, therefore, though the king of Prussia had not been 
pleased to make an exemption in my favor, yet now all was 
made plain, and that at a time when hope had almost been 
given up, and when the last means had been resorted to. 
I was examined, and was declared to be unfit for military 
service. With a medical certificate to this effect, and a 
letter of recommendation from the major, I went to this 
chief general, who received me very kindly, and who him- 
self wrote instantaneously to a second military physician, 
likewise to examine me at once. This was done, and it was 
by him confirmed that I was unfit. Now, the chief general 
himself, as his adjutants happened to be absent, in order to 
hasten the matter, wrote, with his own hands, the papers 
which were needed, and I got a complete dismissal, and that 
for life, from all military engagements. 

On February 5 I arrived at my father's house ; it was 
the plaee where I had lived as a boy, and the scene of many 
of my sins, my father having now returned to it after his 
retirement from office. There were but three persons in 
the whole town with whom my soul had any fellowship. 
One of them was earning his daily bread by thrashing corn. 
As a boy I had in my heart laughed at him. Now I sought 
him out, having been informed that he was a brother, to 
acknowledge him as such, by having fellowship with him, 
and attending a meeting in his house on the Lord's- day 
evening. My soul was refreshed, and his also. Such a 
spiritual feast as meeting with a brother was a rare thing 
to him. 

I left my father's house on February 10, and about 
February 22 arrived at Rotterdam. My going to England 
by the way of Rotterdam was not the usual way ; but, 
consulting with a brother in Berlin, who had been twice in 
England, I was told that this was the cheapest route. My 
asking this brother, to be profited by his experience, 



68 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. 1IL 

would have been quite right, had I, besides this, like Ezra, 
sought of the Lord the right way. 1 But I sought unto 
men only, and not at all unto the Lord, in this matter. 
When I came to Rotterdam, I found that no vessels went 
at that time from that port to London, on account of the 
ice having just broken up in the river. Thus I had to 
wait nearly a month at Rotterdam, and needed much more 
time than I should have required to go by way of Ham- 
burg, and also much more money. 

On March 19, 1829, I landed in London. Soon after 
my arrival, I heard one of the brethren speak of Mr. 
Groves, a dentist, who, for the Lord's sake, had given up 
his profession, which brought him at least £1,500 2 a year, 
and who intended to go as a missionary to Persia, with his 
wife and children, simply trusting in the Lord for temporal 
supplies. This made such an impression on me, and 
delighted me so, that I not only marked it down in my 
journal, but also wrote about it to my German friends. 

I came to England weak in body, and, in consequence of 
much study, as I suppose, I was taken ill on May 15, and 
was soon, at least in my own estimation, apparently beyond 
recovery. The weaker I became in body, the happier I 
was in spirit. Never in my whole life had I seen myself so 
vile, so guilty, so altogether what I ought not to have been, 
as at this time. It was as if every sin of which I had been 
guilty was brought to my remembrance ; but at the same 
time I could realize that all my sins were completely for- 
given, — that I was washed and made clean, completely 
clean, in the blood of Jesus. The result of this was great 
peace. I longed exceedingly to depart and be with Christ. 

1 Then I proclaimed a fast, to seek of God a right way for us, and for our little 
ones, and for all our substance. — Ezra viii. 21. 

2 To avoid the necessity of reducing the sums named to federal money, it may he 
stated that a pound (j£) is equal to about $4.83, a sovereign to the same, a shilling 
(s.) to about 23 cts. and a penny (d.) to 2 cts. For convenience of computation, 
when exactness is not required, we may call the pound $5.00, and the shilling 25 
eta.— Ed. 



1829. SELF-DEDICATION 69 

When my medical attendant came to see me, my prayei 
was something like this : " Lord, thou knowest that he 
does not know what is for my real welfare, therefore do 
thou direct him." When I took my medicine, my hearty 
prayer each time was something like this: "Lord, thou 
knowest that this medicine is in itself nothing, no more 
than as if I were to take a little water. Now please, O 
Lord, to let it produce the effect which is for my real wel- 
fare, and for tlry glory. Let me either be taken soon to 
thyself, or let me be soon restored ; let me be ill for a 
longer time, and then taken to tlryself, or let me be ill 
for a longer time, and then restored. O Lord, do with me 
as seemeth thee best ! " 

After I had been ill about a fortnight, my medical attend- 
ant unexpectedly pronounced me better. As I recovered 
but slowly, my friends entreated me to go into the country 
for change of air. I thought that it might be the will of 
God that I should do so, and I prayed therefore thus to 
the Lord : " Lord, I will gladly submit myself to thy will, 
and go, if thou wilt have me to go. And now let me know 
thy will by the answer of my medical attendant. If, in 
reply to my question, he says it would be very good for 
me, I will go ; but if he says it is of no great importance, 
then I will stay." When I asked him, he said that it was 
the best thiug I could do. I was then enabled willingly to 
submit, and accordingly went to Teignmouth. 

A few days after my arrival at Teignmouth, the chapel, 
called Ebenezer, Was reopened, and I attended the opening. 
I was much impressed by one of those who preached on 
the occasion. For though I did not like all he said, yet 
I saw a gravity and solemnity in him different from the 
rest. After he had preached, I had a great desire to know 
more of him ; and, being invited hj two brethren of Ex- 
mouth, in whose house he was stajing, to spend some time 
with them, I had an opportunity of living ten days with 
him under the same roof. It was at this time that God 



70 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IIL 

besran to show me that his word alone is our standard of 
judgment in spiritual things ; that it can be explained only 
by the Holy Spirit ; and that in our day, as well as in 
former times, he is the teacher of his people. The office 
of the Holy Spirit I had not experimentally understood 
before that time. Indeed, of the office of each of the 
blessed persons, in what is commonly called the Trinity, I 
had no experimental apprehension. I had not before seen 
from the Scriptures that the Father chose us before the 
foundation of the world ; that in him that wonderful plan 
of our redemption originated, and that he also appointed 
all the means by which it was to be brought about. Fur- 
ther, that the Son, to save us, had fulfilled the law, to sat- 
isfy its demands, and with it also the holiness of God ; 
that he had borne the punishment due to our sins, and had 
thus satisfied the justice of God. And, further, that the 
Holy Spirit alone can teach us about our state by nature, 
show us the need of a Saviour, enable us to believe in 
Christ, explain to us the Scriptures, help us in preaching, 
etc. It was my beginning to understand this latter point 
in particular, which had a great effect on me ; for the Lord 
enabled me to put it to the test of experience, by laying 
aside commentaries, and almost every other book, and 
simply reading the word of God and studying it. The 
result of this was, that the first evening that I shut myself 
into my room, to give myself to prayer and meditation 
over the Scriptures, I learned more in a few hours than I 
had done dmlng a period of several months previously. 
But the particular difference teas, that I received real strength 
for my soul in doing so. I now began to try by the test 
of the Scriptures the things which I had learned and seen, 
and found that only those principles which stood the test 
were really of value. 

My stay in Devonshire was most profitable to my soul. 
My prayer had been, before I left London, that the Lord 
would be pleased to bless niy journey to the benefit of my 



1829. SELF-DEDICATION. 71 

body and soul. In the beginning of September I returned 
to London, much better in body ; and as to my soul, the 
change was so great that it was like a second conversion. 
After my return to London, I sought to benefit nrv brethren 
in the seminary, and the means which I used were these : I 
proposed to them to meet together every morning from six 
to eight for prayer and reading the Scriptures ; and that 
then each of us should give out what he might consider 
the Lord had shown him to be the meaning of the portion 
read. One brother in particular was brought into the same 
state as nryself; and others, I trust, were more or less 
benefited. Several times, when I went to my room after 
family prayer in the evening, I found communion with God 
so sweet that I continued in prayer till after twelve, and 
then, being full of joy, went into the room of the brother 
just referred to ; and finding him also in a similar frame 
of heart, we continued praying until one or two ; and even 
then I was a few times so full of joy that I could scarcely 
sleep, and at six in the morning again called the brethren 
together for pra3 r er. 

After I had been for about ten days in London, and had 
been confined to the house on account of my studies, my 
health began again to decline ; and I saw that it would not 
be well, my poor body being only like a wreck or brand 
brought out of the devil's service, to spend mj 7- little re- 
maining strength in study, but that I now ought to set 
about actual engagement in the Lord's work. I wrote to 
the committee of the Societ}-, requesting them to send me 
out at once ; and, that they might do so more comfortably, 
to send me as a fellow-laborer with an experienced brother. 
However, I received no answer. 

After having waited about five or six weeks, in the 
mean time seeking, in one way or other, to labor for the 
Lord, it struck me that, considering nryself called by the 
Lord to preach the gospel, I ought to begin at once to 
labor among the Jews in London, whether I had the title 



72 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chai\ III. 

of mission aiy or not. In consequence of this, I distributed 
tracts among the Jews, with my name and residence writ- 
ten on them, thus inviting them to conversation about the 
things of God ; preached to them in those places where 
they most numerously collect together ; read the Scriptures 
regularly with about fifty Jewish boys ; and became a 
teacher in a Sunday school. In this work I had much en- 
jo} T ment, and the honor of being reproached and ill-treated 
for the name of Jesus. But the Lord gave me grace, never 
to be kept from the work by any danger, or the prospect 
of any suffering. 

Mr. Miiller was led, toward the close of 1829, to doubt 
the propriety of continuing under the patronage of the 
London Society. It seemed to him unscriptural for a ser- 
vant of Christ to put himself under the control and direc- 
tion of any one but the Lord. A correspondence with the 
Society, evincing on his part, and on their part, entire 
kindness and love, resulted in a dissolution of his relation 
to them. He w r as left free to preach the gospel wherever 
Providence might open the way. 

On December 30, I went to Exmouth, Where I intended 
to spend a fortnight in the house of some Christian friends. 
I arrived at Exmouth on December 31, at six in the even- 
ing, an hour before the commencement of a prayer-meet- 
ing at Ebenezer Chapel. My heart was burning with a 
desire to tell of the Lord's goodness to my soul. Being, 
however, not called on, either to speak or pray, I was 
silent. The next morning, I spoke on the difference 
between being a Christian and a happy Christian, and 
showed whence it generally comes that we rejoice so' little 
in the Lord. This, my first testimony, was blessed to 
many believers, that G6cl, as it appears, might show me 
that he was with me. At the request of several believers, 



1829. SELF-DEDICATION. 73 

I spoke again in the afternoon, and also proposed a meet- 
ing in the chapel every morning at ten, to expound the 
Epistle to the Romans. The second day after nry arrival, 
a brother said to me, " I have been praying for this month 
past that the Lord would do something for Lympstone, a 
large parish where there is little spiritual light. There is a 
Wesleyan chapel, and I doubt not you would be allowed to 
preach there." Being read}' to speak of Jesus whenever 
the Lord might open a door, yet so that I could be faithful 
to the truths which he had been pleased to teach me, I 
went, and easily obtained liberty to preach twice on the 
next day, being the Lord's day. 




CHAPTER IV. 

LEANING ON JESUS. 
1830 — 1832. 

A DOOR OPENED — TOKENS TOR GOOD — TRUST EXERCISED IN THE STUDY AND 
MINISTRY OF THE WORD — THE SWORD OF THE SPIRIT — TRUSTING IN GOD 
FOR DAILY BREAD — BLESSEDNESS OF "WAITING UPON THE EORD — " OWE NO 
MAN " — " ACCORDING TO YOUR FAITH BE IT UNTO YOU " — THE GIFT OF 
FAITH, AND THE GRACE OF FAITH. 

FTER I had preached about three weeks at 
Exmouth and its neighborhood, I went to Teign- 
mouth, with the intention of staying there ten 
^ — ' days, to preach the word among the brethren with 
whom I had become acquainted during the previous sum- 
mer, and to tell them of the Lord's goodness to me. In 
the evening, Monday, I preached for Brother Craik, at 
Shaldon, in the presence of three ministers, none of whom 
liked the sermon ; yet it pleased God, through it, to bring 
to the knowledge of his dear Son a young woman. How 
differently does the Lord judge from man ! Here was a 
particular opportunity for the Lord to get gloiy to himself. 
A foreigner was the preacher, with great natural obstacles 
in the wa} r , for he was not able to speak English with 
fluency ; but he had a desire to serve God, and was by this 
time also brought into such a state of heart as to desire 
that God alone should have the glory, if any good were 
done through his instrumentality. 

On Tuesday evening, I preached at Ebenezer Chapel, 
Teignmouth, the same chapel at the opening of which I 
became acquainted with the brother whom the Lord had 
afterwards used as an instrument of benefiting me so 
much. 

74 



1830. LEANING ON JESUS. 75 

During the week ensuing, Mr. M. preached almost daily 
at the same place, a blessing attending his labors. 

By this time, the request that I might stay at Teign- 
mouth, and be the minister of the above chapel, had been 
repeatedly expressed by an increasing number of the breth- 
ren ; but others were decidedly against my remaining 
there. This opposition was instrumental in settling it in 
my mind that I should stay for a while, at least until I was 
formally rejected. 

I preached again three times on the Lord's day, none 
saying we wish you not to preach, though many of the 
hearers did not hear with enjoyment. Some of them left, 
and never returned ; some left, but returned after a while. 
Others came to the chapel who had not been in the habit 
of attending there previous to my coming. There was a 
great stir, a spirit of inquiry, and a searching of the Scrip- 
tures, whether these things were so. And, what is more 
than all, God set his seal upon the work, in converting sin- 
ners. Twelve weeks I stood in this same position, whilst 
the Lord graciously supplied my temporal wants, through 
two brethren, unasked for. After this time, the whole 
little church, eighteen in number, unanimously gave me an 
invitation to become their pastor. They offered to supply 
my temporal wants by giving me fifty-five pounds a year, 
which sum was afterwards somewhat increased, on account 
of the increase of the church. 

That which I now considered the best mode of prepara- 
tion for the public ministry of the word, no longer adopted 
from necessity, on account of want of time, but from deep 
conviction, and from the experience of God's blessing upoo 
it, both as it regards my own enjoyment, the benefit of the 
saints, and the conversion of sinners, is as follows : First, 
I do not presume to know myself what is best for the hear- 
ers, and I therefore ask the Lord, in the first place, that he 
would graciously be pleased to teach me on what subject I 



78 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IV, 

shall speak, or what portion of his word I shall expound. 
Now, sometimes it happens that, previous to my asking 
him, a subject or passage has been in my mind, on which 
it has appeared well for me to speak. In that case, I ask 
the Lord whether I should speak on this subject or passage. 
If, after prayer, I feel persuaded that I should, I fix upon 
it, yet so that I would desire to leave myself open to the 
Lord to change it if he please. Frequently, however, it 
occurs that I have no text or subject in my mind, before I 
give myself to prayer for the sake of ascertaining the 
Lord's will concerning it. In this case, I wait some time 
on my knees for an answer, trying to listen to the voice of 
the Spirit to direct me. If, then, a passage or subject, 
whilst I am on my knees, or after I have finished praying 
for a text, is brought to my mind, I again ask the Lord, 
and that sometimes repeatedly, especially if, humanly 
speaking, the subject or text should be a peculiar one, 
whether it be his will that I should speak on such a subject 
or passage. If, after prayer, my mind is peaceful about it, 
I take this to be the text, but still desire to leave myself 
open to the Lord for direction, should he please to alter it, 
or should I have been mistaken. Frequently, also, in the 
third place, it happens that I not only have no text nor 
subject on my mind previous to my praying for guidance 
in this matter, but also I do not obtain one after once, or 
twice, or more times praying about it. I used formerly at 
times to be much perplexed when this was the case, but, 
for more than twenty years, it has pleased the Lord, in gen- 
eral at least, to keep me in peace about it. What I do is, 
to go on with my regular reading of the Scriptures, where 
£ left off the last time, praying (whilst I read) for a text, 
now and then also laying aside my Bible for prayer, till I 
get one. Thus it has happened that I have had to read 
five, ten, yea, twenty chapters, before it has pleased the 
Lord to give me a text ; yea, many times I have even had 
fco go to the place of meeting without one, and obtained it, 



1830. LEANING ON JESUS. 77 

perhaps, only a few minutes before I was going to speak ; 
but I have never lacked the Lord's assistance at the time 
of preaching, provided I had earnestly sought it in private. 
The preacher cannot know the particular state of the vari- 
ous individuals who compose the congregation, nor what 
they require, but the Lord knows it ; and if the preacher 
renounces his own wisdom, he will be assisted by the 
Lord ; but if he will choose in his own wisdom, then let 
him not be surprised if he should see little benefit result 
from his labors. 

Before I leave this part of the subject, I would just 
observe one temptatidn concerning the choice of a text. 
We may see a subject to be so very full that it may strike 
us it would do for some other occasion. For instance, 
sometimes a text brought to one's mind for a week-evening 
meeting may appear more suitable for the Lord's day, 
because then there would be a greater number of hearers 
present. Now, in the first place, we do not know whether 
the Lord ever will allow us to preach on another Lord's 
day ; and, in the second place, we know not whether that 
very subject may not be especially suitable for some or 
many individuals present just that week-evening. Thus I was 
once tempted, after I had been a short time at Teignmouth 
to reserve a subject which had been just opened to me for 
the next Lord's day. But being able, by the grace of God, 
to overcome the temptation by the above reasons, and 
preaching about it at once, it pleased the Lord to bless it 
to the conversion of a sinner, and that too an individual 
who meant to come but that once more to the chapel, and 
to whose case the subject was most remarkably suited. 

2. Now, when the text has been obtained in the above 
way, whether it be one, or two, or more verses, or a whole 
chapter or more, I ask the Lord that he would graciously 
be pleased to teach me by his Holy Spirit whilst meditat- 
ing over it. Within the last twenty-five years, I have 
found it the most profitable plan to meditate with my pen 
7* 



78 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IV 

in my hand, writing down the outlines as the word is 
opened to me. This I do, not for the sake of committing 
them to memory, nor as if I meant to say nothing else, but 
for the sake of clearness, as being a help to see how far I 
understand the passage. I also find it useful afterwards to 
refer to what I have thus written. I very seldom use any 
other help besides the little I understand of the original of 
the Scriptures, and some good translations in other lan- 
guages. My chief help is prayer. I have never in my 
life begun to study one single part of divine truth without 
gaining some light about it when I have been able really to 
give myself to prayer and meditation over it. But that I 
have often found a difficult matter, partly on account 
of the weakness of the flesh, and partly, also, on account 
of bodily infirmities and multiplicity of engagements. 
This I most firmly believe, that no one ought to expect to 
see much good resulting from his labors in word and doc- 
trine, if he is not much given to prayer and meditation. 

3. Having prayed and meditated on the subject or text, 
I desire to leave myself entirely in the hands of the Lord. 
I ask him to bring to my mind what I have seen in my 
closet concerning the subject I am going to speak on, 
which he generally most kindly does, and often teaches me 
much additionally whilst I am preaching. 

In connection with the above, I must, however, state 
that it appears to me there is a preparation for the public 
ministry of the word which is even more excellent than the 
one spoken of. It is this ; to live in such constant and real 
communion with the Lord, and to be so habitually and fre- 
quently in meditation over the truth, that without the above 
effort, so to speak, we have obtained food for others, and 
know the mind of the Lord as to the subject or the portion 
of the word on which we should speak. 

That which I have found most beneficial in my experi- 
ence for the last twenty-six years in the public ministry of 
tbe word, is expounding the Scriptures, and especially the 



1830. LEANING ON JESUS. 79 

going now and then through a whole gospel or epistle. 
This may be done in a twofold way, either by entering 
minutely into the bearing of every point occurring in the 
portion, or by giving the general outlines, and thus leading 
the hearers to see the meaning and connection of the 
whole. The benefits which I have seen resulting from 
expounding the Scriptures, are these : 1. The hearers arc 
thus, with God's blessing, led to the Scriptures. They find, 
as it were, a practical use of them in the public meetings. 
This induces them to bring their Bibles, and I have 
observed that those who at first did not bring them, have 
afterwards been induced to do so ; so that, in a short time, 
few (of the believers at least) were in the habit of coming 
without them. This is no small matter ; for everything 
which in our day will lead believers to value the Scriptures 
is of importance. 2. The expounding of the Scriptures is 
in general more beneficial to the hearers than if, on a single 
verse, or half a verse, or two or three words of a verse, 
some remarks are made, so that the portion of Scripture is 
scarcely anything but a motto for the subject ; for few have 
grace to meditate much over the word, and thus exposition 
may not merely be the means of opening to them the Scrip- 
tures, but may also create in them a desire to meditate for 
themselves. 3. The expounding of the Scriptures leaves 
to the hearers a connecting link, so that the reading over 
again the portion of the word which has been expounded 
brings to their remembrance what has been said, and thus, 
with God's blessing, leaves a more lasting impression on 
their minds. This is particularly of importance as it 
regards the illiterate, who sometimes have neither much 
strength of memory nor capacity of comprehension. 4. 
The expounding of large portions of the word, as the whole 
of a gospel or an epistle, besides leading the hearer to see 
the connection of the whole, has also this particular benefit 
for the teacher, that it leads him, with God's blessing, to 
the consideration of portions of the word which otherwise 



80 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IV. 

he might not have considered, and keeps him from speak- 
ing too much on favorite subjects, and leaning too much to 
particular parts of truth, which tendency must surely 
sooner or later injure both himself and his hearers. 
Expounding the word of God brings little honor to the 
preacher from the unenlightened or careless hearer, but it 
tends much to the benefit of the hearers in general. 

Simplicity in expression, whilst the truth is set forth, is, 
in connection with what has been said, of the utmost 
importance. It should be the aim of the teacher to speak 
so that children, servants, and people who cannot read may 
be able to understand him, so far as the natural mind can 
comprehend the things of God. It ought also to be 
remembered that there is, perhaps, not a single congrega- 
tion in which there are not persons of the above classes 
present, and that if they can understand, the well-educated 
or literary persons will understand likewise ; but the 
reverse does not hold good. It ought further to be remem- 
bered that the expounder of the truth of God speaks for 
God, for eternity, and that it is not in the least likely that 
he will benefit the hearers, except he use plainness of 
speech, which nevertheless needs not to be vulgar or rude. 
It should also be considered that if the preacher strive to 
speak according to the rules of this world, he may please 
many, particularly those who have a literary taste ; but, in 
the same proportion, he is less likely to become an instru- 
ment in the hands of God for the conversion of sinners, or 
for the building-up of the saints. For neither eloquence 
nor depth of thought makes the truly great preacher, but 
such a life of prayer and meditation and spirituality as may 
render him a vessel meet for the Master's use, and fit to be 
employed both in the conversion of sinners and in the 
edification of the saints. 

Becoming convinced, after a prayerful examination of 
the Scriptures, that baptism should be administered only by 



1830. LEANING ON JESUS. 81 

immersion, Mr. Miiller was then baptized in the spring of 
1830. 

It was so usual for me to preach with particular assist- 
ance, especially during the first months of this year, that 
once, when it was otherwise, it was much noticed by myself 
and others. The circumstance was this. One day, before- 
preaching at Teignmouth, I had more time than usual, and 
therefore prayed and meditated about six hours in prepara- 
tion for the evening meeting, and I thought I saw many 
precious truths in the passage on which I had meditated. 
It was the first part of the first chapter of the epistle to 
the Ephesians. After I had spoken a little time, I felt that 
I spoke in my own strength, and I, being a foreigner, felt 
particularly the want of words, which had not been the 
case before. I told the brethren that I felt I was left to 
myself, and asked their prayers. But after haying contin- 
ued a little longer, and feeling the same as before, I closed, 
and proposed that we should have a meeting for prayer, that 
the Lord still might be pleased to help me. We did so, and 
I was particularly assisted the next time. 

On October 7, 1830, 1 was united by marriage to Miss 
Mary Groves, sister of the brother whose name has already 
been mentioned. This step was taken after prayer and 
deliberation, from a full conviction that it was better for me 
to be married ; and I have never regretted since either the 
step itself or the choice, but desire to be truly grateful to 
God for having given me such a wife. 

About this time, I began to have conscientious objections 
against any longer receiving a stated salary. My reasons 
against it were these : — 

1. The salary was made up by pew-rents ; but pew-rents 
are, according to James ii. 1-6, against the mind of the 
Lord, as, in general, the poor brother cannot have so good 
a seat as the rich. 2. A brother may gladly do something 
towards my support if left to his own time ; but, when the 



82 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IV. 

quarter is up, lie has perhaps other expenses, and I do not 
know whether he pays his money grudgingly, and of neces- 
sity, or cheerfully ; but God loveth a cheerful giver. Nay, 
I knew it to be a fact that sometimes it had not been con- 
venient to individuals to pay the money when it had been 
asked for by the brethren who collected it. 3. Though the 
Lord had been pleased to give me grace to be faithful, so 
that I had been enabled not to keep back the truth when 
he had shown it to me ; still, I felt that the pew-rents were 
a snare to the servant of Christ. It was a temptation to 
me, at least for a few minutes, at the time when the Lord 
had stirred me up to pray and search the word respecting 
the ordinance of baptism, because thirty pounds of my sal- 
ary was at stake if I should be baptized. 

For these reasons, I stated to the brethren, at the end of 
October, 1830, that I should for the future give up having 
any regular salary. After I had given my reasons for 
doing so, I read Philippians iv., and told the saints that if 
they still had a desire to do something towards my support, by 
voluntary gifts, I had no objection to receive them, though 
ever so small, either in money or provisions. A few days 
after, it appeared to me that there was a better waj' still ; 
for, if I received personally every single gift oifered in 
money, both my own time and that of the donors would be 
much taken up ; and in this way, also, the poor might, 
through temptation, be kept from offering their pence, a 
privilege of which they ought not to be deprived ; and some 
also might in this wa} r give more than if it were not known 
who was the giver, so that it would still be doubtful whether 
the gift were given grudgingly or cheerfully. For these rea- 
sons especially, there was a box put up in the chapel, over 
whi«h was written that whoever had a desire to do something 
towards my support might put his offering into the box. 

At the same time, it appeared to me right that hence- 
forth I should ask no man, not even my beloved brethren 
and sisters, to help me, as I had done a few times, accoj d- 



1830. LEANING ON JESUS. 83 

mg to their own request, as my expenses, on account of 
travelling much in the Lord's service, were too great to be 
met by my usual income. For, unconsciously, I had thus 
again been led, in some measure, to trust in an arm of 
flesh, going to man instead of going to the Lord at once. 
To come to this conclusion before God required more grace 
than to give up my salary. 

About the same time, also, my wife and I had grace 
given to us to take the Lord's commandment, " Sell that ye 
have, and give alms," Luke xii. 33, literalty, and to carry 
it out. Our staff and support in this matter were Matthew 
vi. 19-34, John xiv. 13, 14. We leaned on the arm of the 
Lord Jesus. It is now twenty-five years since we set out 
in this way, and we do not in the least regret the step we then 
took. As I have written down how the Lord has been 
pleased to deal with us since, I shall be able to relate some 
facts concerning this matter, as far as they may tend to 
edification. 

Nov. 18, 1830. Our money was reduced to about eight 
shillings. "When I was pra3 T ing with my wife in the morn- 
ing, the Lord brought to nry mind the state of our purse, 
and I was led to ask him for some money. About four 
hours after, a sister said to me, " Do you want any 
money?" "I told the brethren," said I, "dear sister, 
when I gave up my salary, that I would for the future tell 
the Lord only about my wants." She replied, " But he has 
told me to give }^ou some money. About a fortnight ago, 
I asked him what I should do for him, and he told me to 
give j'ou some money ; and last Saturday it came again 
powerfully to my mind, and has not left me since, and I 
felt it so forcibly last night that I could not help speaking 
of it to brother P." M}^ heart rejoiced, seeing the Lord's 
faithfulness, but I thought it better not to tell her about oui 
circumstances, lest she should be influenced to give accord 
mgly ; and I also was assured that, if it were of the Lord, 
she could not but give. I therefore turned the con\ersa- 



84 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IV. 

tion to other subjects, but when I left she gave me two 
guineas. "We were full of joy on account of the goodness 
of the Lord- I would call upon the reader to admire the 
gentleness of the Lord, that he did not try our faith much 
at the commencement, but allowed us to see his willing- 
ness to help us, before he was pleased to try it more 
fully. 

The next Wednesday I went to Exmouth, our money 
having then again been reduced to about nine shillings. I 
asked the Lord on Thursday, when at Exmouth, to be 
pleased to give me some money. On Friday morning, 
about eight o'clock, whilst in prayer, I was particularly led 
to ask again for money ; and before I rose from my knees 
I had the fullest assurance that we should have the answer 
that very day. About nine o'clock I left the brother with 
whom I was sta3 T ing, and he gave me half a sovereign, say- 
ing, " Take this for the expenses connected with your com- 
ing to us." I did not expect to have my expenses paid, but 
I saw the Lord's fatherly hand in sending me this money 
within one hour after my asking him for some. But even 
then I was so fully assured that the Lord would send more 
that very day, or had done so already, that, when I came 
home about twelve o'clock, I asked my wife whether she had 
received any letters. She told me she had received one the 
da}' before from a brother in Exeter, with three sovereigns. 
Thus even my prayer on the preceding day had been an- 
swered. The next day one of the brethren came and 
brought me four pounds, which was due to me of my former 
salary, but which I could never have expected, as I did not 
even know that this sum was due to me. Thus I received, 
within thirty hours, in answer to prayer, seven pounds ten 
shillings. 

About Christmas, when our money was reduced to a few 
shillings, I asked the Lord for more ; when, a few hours 
after, there was given to us a sovereign by a brother from 
Axminster. This brother had heard much against me, anc* 



1830. LEANING ON JESUS. 85 

was at last determined to hear for himself, and thus came to 
Teignmouth, a distance of forty miles ; and having heard 
about our manner of living, gave us this money. 

With this closes the year 1830. Throughout it the Lord 
richly supplied all my temporal wants, though at the com- 
mencement of it I had no certain human prospect for one 
single shilling : so that, even as it regards temporal things, 
I had not been in the smallest degree a loser in acting ac- 
cording to the dictates of my conscience ; and as it regards 
spiritual things, the Lord had dealt bountifully with me, and 
had condescended to use me as an instrument in doing his 
work. 

On the 6th, 7th, and 8th of Jan. 1831, 1 had repeatedly 
asked the Lord for money, but received none. On the 
evening of January 8, I left my room for a few minutes, 
and was then tempted to distrust the Lord, though he had 
been so gracious to us in that he not only up to that day 
had supplied all our wants, but had given us also those 
answers of prayer which have been in part just mentioned. 
I was so sinful, for about five minutes, as to think it would 
be of no use to trust in the Lord in this way. I also 
began to say to myself, that I had perhaps gone too far in 
living in this way. But, thanks to the Lord ! this trial 
lasted but a few minutes. He enabled me again to trust 
in him, and Satan was immediately confounded ; for when 
I returned to my room the Lord had sent deliverance. A 
sister in the Lord had brought us two pounds four shil- 
lings : so the Lord triumphed, and our faith was 
strengthened. 

Jan. 10. To-day, when we had again but a few shillings, 
five pounds were given to us, which had been taken out of 
the box. I had, once for all, told the brethren who had the 
care of these temporal things, to have the kindness to let 
£ me have the money every week ; but as these beloved 
brethren either forgot to take it out weekly, or were ashamed 
ttf4)ring it in such small sums, it was generally taken out 
8 



** 



36 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IV. 

every three, four, or five weeks. As I had stated to them, 
however, from the commencement, that I desired to look 
neither to man nor the box, but to the living God, I thought 
it not right on my part to remind them of my request to 
have the mone}?- weekly, lest it should hinder the testimony 
which I wished to give, of trusting in the living God alone 
It was on this account that on January 28, when we had 
again but little money, though I had seen the brethren, on 
January 24, open the box and take out the money, I would 
not ask the brother, in whose hands it was, to let me have 
it ; but standing in need of it, as our coals were almost 
gone, I asked the Lord to incline his heart to bring it ; and 
but a little time afterwards it was given to us, even one 
pound eight shillings and sixpence. 

I would here mention, that, since the time I began living 
in this way, I have been kept from speaking, either directly 
or indirectly, about my wants, at the time I was in need. 
The cnly exception is, that in a few instances, twenty years 
or more since, I have, at such times, spoken to very poor 
brethren in the way of encouraging them to trust in the 
Lord, telling them that I had to do the same, being myself 
in similar straits ; or, in a few instances, where it was 
needful to speak about my own want, lest I should appear 
unfeeling, in that I did not help at all, in cases of distress 
or not as much as might have been expected. 

On February 14, we had again very little money, and, 
whilst praying, I was led to ask the Lord graciously to sup- 
ply our wants ; and the instant that I got up from my knees 
a brother gave me one pound, which had been taken out of 
the box. 

On March 7, I was again tempted to disbelieve the faith- 
fulness of the Lord, and though I was not miserable, still, 
I was not so fully resting upon the Lord that I could tri- 
umph with joy. It was but one hour after, when the Lord 
gave me another proof of his faithful love. A Christian 
lady brought five sovereigns for us, with these words written 



1831. LEANING ON JESUS. 87 

in the paper : " I was an hungered, and ye gave me meat ; 
I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink," etc. 

April 16. This morning I found that our money was 
reduced to three shillings ; and I said to my self, I must 
now go and ask the Lord earnestly for fresh supplies. But 
before I had prayed, there was sent from Exeter, two 
pounds, as a proof that the Lord hears before we call. 

I would observe here, by the way, that if any of the 
children of God should think that such a mode of living 
leads away from the Lord, and from caring about spiritual 
things, and has the effect of causing the mind to be taken 
up with the question, What shall I eat? — What shall I 
drink ? — and Wherewithal shall I be clothed ? — I would 
request him prayerfully to consider the following remarks : 
1. I have had experience of both ways, and know that my 
present mode of living, as to temporal things, is connected 
with less care. 2. Confidence in the Lord, to whom alone I 
look for the supply of my temporal wants, keeps me, when 
a case of distress comes before me, or when the Lord's 
work calls for my pecuniary aid, from anxious reckoning 
like this : Will my salary last out ? Shall I have enough 
myself the next month? etc. In this my freedom, I am, 
by the grace of God, generally, at least, able to say to 
myself something like this : My Lord is not limited ; he 
can again supply ; he knows that this present case has been 
sent to me : and thus, this way of living, so far from 
leading to anxiety, is rather the means of keeping from it. 
And truly it was once said to me by an individual, — You 
can do such and such things and need not to lay by, for the 
church in the whole of Devonshire cares about }^our wants. 
My reply was : The Lord can use not merely any of the 
saints throughout Devonshire, but those throughout the 
world, as instruments to supply my temporal wants. 3. 
This way of living has often been the means of reviving 
the work of grace in my heart, when I have been getting 
cold ; and it also has bee & the means of bringing me back 



83 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. IV. 

again to the Lord, after I have been backsliding. For it 
will not do, — it is not possible to live in sin, and at the 
same time, by communion with God, to draw down from 
heaven everything one needs for the life that now is. 4. 
Frequently, too, a fresh answer to prayer* obtained in this 
way, has been the means of quickening my soul, and filling 
me with much joy. 

May 12. A sister has been staying for some time at 
Teignmouth on account of her health ; and when she was 
about to return home to-day, we saw it the Lord's will to 
invite her to stay with us for some time, as we knew that 
she would stay longer if her means allowed it. We were 
persuaded that, as we saw it to be the Lord's will to invite 
her, he himself would pay the expenses connected with her 
stay. About the time when she came to our house, a parcel 
with money was sent from Chumleigh. A few weeks before, 
I had preached at Chumleigh and in the neighborhood. 
The brethren, knowing about my manner of living, after 
my departure collected some money for me, and thus, in 
small offerings (one hundred and seven altogether, as I 
have been told) , two pounds and one penny halfpenny were 
given. Thus the Lord paid for the expenses connected 
with our sister's staying with us. 

June 12. Lord's day. On Thursday last I went with 
brother Craik to Torquay, to preach there. I had only 
about three shillings with me, and left my wife with about 
six shillings at home. I asked the Lord repeatedly for 
money ; but when I came home my wife had only about 
three shillings left, having received nothing. We waited 
still upon the Lord. Yesterday passed away, and no money 
came. We had ninepence left. This morning we were 
still waiting upon the Lord, and looking for deliverance. 
We had only a little butter left for breakfast, sufficient for 
brother E. and a relative living with us, to whom we did 
not mention our circumstances, that they might not be 
made uncomfortable. After the morning meeting, brother Y. 



1831. LEANING ON JESUS. 83 

most unexpectedly opened the box, and, in giving me 
quite as unexpectedly the money at such a time, he told me 
that he and his wife could not sleep last night, on account 
of thinking that we might ivant money. The most striking 
point is, that after I had repeatedly asked the Lord, but 
received nothing, I then prayed yesterday that the Lord 
would be pleased to impress it on brother Y. that we wanted 
money, so that he might open the box. There was in it one 
pound eight shillings and tenpence halfpenny. 

Nov. 16. This morning I proposed united prayer respect- 
ing our temporal wants. Just as we were about to pray, a 
parcel came from Exmouth. In prayer we asked the Lord 
for meat for dinner, having no money to buy any. After 
prayer, on opening the parcel, we found, among other 
things, a ham, sent by a brother at Exmouth, which served 
us for dinner. 

Nov. 19. We had not enough to pay our weekly rent ; 
but the Lord graciously sent us again to-day fourteen 
shillings and sixpence. I would just observe, that we 
never contract debts, which we believe to be unscriptural 
(according to Romans xiii. 8) ; and therefore we have no 
bills with our tailor, shoemaker, grocer, butcher, baker, etc. ; 
but all we buy we pay for in ready money. The Lord 
helping us, we would rather suffer privation than contract 
debts. Thus we always know how much we have, and 
how much we have a right to give away. I am well aware 
that many trials come upon the children of God, on account 
of not acting according to Rom. xiii. 8. 

Nov. 27. Lord's day. Our money had been reduced to 
two pence halfpenny ; our bread was hardly enough for this 
day. I had several times brought our need before the 
Lord. After dinner, when I returned thanks, I asked him 
to give us our daily bread, meaning literally that he would 
send us bread for the evening. Whilst I was praying, 
there was a knock at the door of the room. After J had 
concluded, a poor sister came in, and brought us some of 



90 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IV. 

her dinner, and from another poor sister five shillings. In 
the afternoon she also brought us a large loaf. Thus the 
Lord not only literally gave us bread but also money. 

After we had, on December 31, 1831, looked over the 
Lord's gracious dealings with us during the past year, in 
providing for all our temporal wants, we had about ten 
shillings left. A little while after, the providence of God 
called for that, so that not a single farthing remained. 
Thus we closed the old 3~ear, in which the Lord had been 
so gracious in giving to us, without our asking any one, — 
1. Through the instrumentality of the box, thirty-one 
pounds fourteen shillings. 2. From brethren of the church 
at Teignmouth, in presents of money, six pounds eighteen 
shillings and sixpence. 3. From brethren living at Teign- 
mouth and elsewhere, not connected with the church at 
Teignmouth, ninety-three pounds six shillings and two- 
pence. Altogether, one hundred and thirty-one pounds 
eighteen shillings and eightpence. There had been like- 
wise many articles of provision and some articles of cloth- 
ing given to us, worth at least twenty pounds. I am so 
particular in mentioning these things, to show that we 
are never losers from acting according to the mind of the 
Lord. For had I had my regular salaiy, humanly speak- 
ing, I should not have had nearly as much : but whether 
this would have been the case or not, this is plain, that I 
have not served a hard master, and that is what I delight 
to show. 

Jan. 7, 1832. We had been again repeatedly asking the 
Lord to-day and yesterday to supply our temporal wants, 
having no means to pay our weekly rent, and this even- 
ing, as late as eleven o'clock, a brother gave us nineteen 
shillings and sixpence, — a proof that the Lord is not lim- 
ited to time. 

Jan. 14. This morning we had nothing but dry bread 
with our tea ; only the second time since we have been liv- 
ing by simple faith upon Jesus for temporal supplies. We 



1832. LEANING ON JESUS. 91 

have more than forty pounds of ready money in the house 
for two bills, 1 Tvhich will not be payable for several weeks ; 
but we do not consider this money to be our own, and 
would rather suffer great privation, God helping us, than 
take of it. We were looking to our Father, and he has 
not suffered us to be disappointed. For when now we had 
but threepence left, and only a small piece of bread, we 
received two shillings and five shillings. 

Feb. 18. This afternoon I broke a bloodvessel in my 
stomach, and lost a considerable quantity of blood. I was 
very happy immediately afterwards. February 19. This 
morning, Lord's day, two brethren called on me, to ask me 
what arrangement there should be made to-day, as it 
regarded the four villages, where some of the brethren 
were in the habit of preaching, as, on account of my not 
being able to preach, one of the brethren would need to 
stay at home to take my place. I asked them, kindly, to 
come again in about an hour, when I would give them an 
answer. After they were gone the Lord gave me faith to 
rise. I dressed myself, and determined to go to the chapel. 
I was enabled to do so, though so weak when I went, that 
walking the short distance to the chapel was an exertion 
to me. I was enabled to preach this morning with as loud 
and strong a voice as usual, and for the usual length of 
time. After the morning meeting, a medical friend called 
on me, and entreated me not to preach again in the after- 
noon, as it might greatly injure me. I told him that I 
should indeed consiCte,* it great presumption to do so had 
the Lord not given me faith. I preached again in the after- 
noon, and this medical friend called again, and said the 
same concerning the evening meeting. Nevertheless, hav- 
ing faith, I preached again in the evening. After each 



1 One till I had to meet for a brother, the other was for money which, in the 
form of a bill, I had sent to the Continent; hut in both cases the money was in my 
hands before the bills were given. 



92 THE LIFE OE TRUST. Chap. IV, 

meeting I became stronger, which was a plain proof that 
the hand of God was in the matter. 

Feb. 20. The Lord enabled me to rise early in the morn- 
ing, and to go to our usual prayer meeting, where I read, 
spoke, and prayed. Afterwards I wrote four letters, 
expounded the Scriptures at home, and attended the meet- 
ing again in the evening. February 21. I attended the 
two meetings as usual, preached in the evening, and did 
my other work besides. February 22. To-day I attended 
the meeting in the morning, walked afterwards six miles 
with two brethren, and rode to Plymouth. February 23. 
I am now as well as I was before I broke the bloodvessel. 
In relating the particulars of this circumstance, I would 
earnestly warn every one who may read this not to imitate 
me in such a thing if he has no faith ; but if he has, it will, 
as good coin, most assuredly be honored by God. I could 
not say that if such a thing should happen again I would 
act in the same way ; for when I have been not nearly so 
weak as when I had broken the bloodvessel, having no 
faith, I did not preach ; yet, if it were to please the Lord 
to give me faith, I might be able to do the same, though 
even still weaker than at the time just spoken of. 

About this time I repeatedly prayed with sick believers 
till they were restored. Unconditionally I asked the Lord 
for the blessing of bodily health (a thing which I could not 
do now) , and almost always had the petition granted. In 
some instances, however, the praj^er was not answered. 
In the same way, whilst in London, November, 1829, in 
answer to my prayers, I was immediately restored from a 
bodily infirmity, under which I had been laboring for a long 
time, and which has never returned since. The way in 
which I now account for these facts is as follows. It 
pleased the Lord, I think, to give me in such cases some- 
thing like the gift (not grace) of faith, so that uncondi- 
tionally I could ask and look for an answer. The differ- 
ence between the gift and the grace of faith seems to me 



1832. LEANING ON JESUS. 93 

this. According to the gift of faith, I am able to do a thing, 
or believe that a thing will come to pass, the not doing of 
which, or the not believing of which, would not be sin; 
according to the grace of faith, I am able to do a thing, or 
believe that a thing will come to pass, respecting which I 
have the word of God as the ground to rest upon, and, 
therefore, the not doing it, or the not believing it, would be 
sin. For instance, the gift of faith would be needed to 
believe that a sick person should be restored again, though 
there is no human probability, for there is no promise to 
that effect ; the grace of faith is needed to believe that the 
Lord will give me the necessaries of life, if I first seek 
the kingdom of God and his righteousness, for there is a 
promise to that effect. 1 

March 18. These two days we have not been able to 
purchase meat. The sister in whose house we lodge gave 
us to-day part of her dinner. We are still looking to Jesus 
for deliverance. We want money to pay the weekly rent 
and to buy provisions. March 19. Our landlady sent 
again of her meat for our dinner. We have but a half- 
penny left. I feel myself very cold in asking for money ; 
still, I hope for deliverance, though I do not see whence 
money is to come. We were not able to buy bread to-day 
as usual. March 20. This has been again a day of very 
great mercies. In the morning we met round our break- 
fast which the Lord had provided for us, though we had 
not a single penny left. The last halfpennj^ was spent for 
milk. We were then still looking to Jesus for fresh eup- 
plies. We both had no doubt that the Lord would inter- 
fere. I felt it a trial that I had but little earnestness in 
asking the Lord ; and had this not been the case, perhaps 
we might have had our wants sooner supplied. We have 
about seven pounds in the house ; but considering it no 
longer our own, the Lord kej)t us from taking of it, with 

* Matt. Yi. 



94 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IV, 

the view of replacing what we had taken, as formerly I 
might have clone. The meat which was sent yesterday for 
our dinner was enough also for to-day. Thus the Lord 
had provided another meal. Two sisters called upon us 
about noon, who gave us two pounds of sugar, one pound 
of coffee, and two cakes of chocolate. Whilst they were 
with us, a poor sister came and brought us one shilling 
from herself and two shillings and sixpence from another 
poor sister. Our landlady also sent us again of her din- 
ner, and also a loaf. Our bread would scarcely have been 
enough for tea, had the Lord not thus graciously provided. 
In the afternoon, the same sister who brought the mone} T 
brought us also, from another sister, one pound of butter 
and two shillings, and from another sister five shillings. 




CHAPTER V. 

MINISTRY AT BRISTOL BEGUN. 
1832 — 1835. 

'H2RE HAVE WE NO CONTINUING CITY " — CAUTION TO THE CHRISTIAN 
TRAVELLER — NEW TOKENS TOR GOOD — THE WAY MADE CLEAR — MEET- 
INGS FOR INQUIRY — NO RESPECT OF PERSONS WITH GOD — FRANKE, 
"BEING DEAD, YET SPEAKF.TH " — DAILY BREAD SUPPLIED — A PECULIAR 
PEOPLE. 

PEIL 8. I have felt much this day that Teign- 
mouth is no longer my place, and that I shall 
leave it. I would observe that in August of 1831 
I began greatly to feel as if my work at Teign- 
nioutJ- were done, and that I should go somewliere else. I 
was Lid to consider the matter more maturely, and at last 
had it settled in this way, — that it was not likely to be of 
God, because, for certain reasons, I should naturally have 
Liked to leave Teignmouth. Afterwards, I felt quite com- 
fortable in remaining there. In the commencement of the 
year 1832, I began again much to doubt whether Teign- 
mouth was my place, or whether my gift was not much 
more that of going about from place to place, seeking to 
bring believers back to the Scriptures, than to stay in one 
place and to labor as a pastor. I resolved to try whether 
it were not the will of God that I should still give myself 
to pastoral work among the brethren at Teignmouth ; and 
with more earnestness and faithfulness than ever I was en- 
abled to give nryself to this work, and was certainly much 
refreshed and blessed in it ; and I saw immediately bless- 
ings result from it. This nry experience seemed more 
than ever to settle me at Teignmouth. But notwithstand- 

95 



96 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. V. 

ing this, the impression that my work was done there came 
back after some time, as the remark in my journal of April 
8 shows, and it became stronger and stronger. There was 
one point remarkable in connection with this. Wherever I 
went I preached with much more enjoyment and power than 
at Teignmouth, the very reverse of which had been the case 
on my first going there. Moreover, almost everywhere I 
had many more hearers than at Teignmouth, and found the 
people hungering after food, which, generally speaking, was 
no longer the case at Teignrnouth. 

April 11. Felt again much that Teignmouth will not much 
longer be my residence. April 12. Still feel the impression 
that Teignmouth is no longer my place. April 13. Found 
a letter from brother Craik, from Bristol, on my return 
from Torquay, where I had been to preach. He invites me 
to come and help him. It appears to me, from what he 
writes, that such places as Bristol more suit my gifts. O 
Lord, teach me ! I have felt this day more than ever that I 
shall soon leave Teignmouth. I fear, however, there is much 
connected with it which savors of the flesh, and that makes me 
fearful. It seems to me as if I should shortly go to Bris- 
tol, if the Lord permit. April 14. Wrote a* letter to 
brother Craik, in which I said I should come, if I clearly 
saw it to be the Lord's will. Have felt again very much 
to-day, yea, far more than ever, that I shall soon leave 
Teignmouth. 

April 15. Lord's day. This evening I £>reached, as fully 
as time would permit, on the Lord's second coming. After 
having done so, I told the brethren what effect this doctrine 
had had upon me, on first receiving it, even to determine 
me to leave London, and to preach throughout the king- 
dom ; but that the Lord had kept me chiefly at Teignmouth 
for these two years and three months, and that it seemed 
to me now that the time was near when I should leave 
them. I reminded them of what I told them when they 
requested me to take the oversight of them, that I could 



1832. MINISTRY AT BRISTOL BEGUN. 97 

make no certain engagement, but stay only so loDg with 
them as I should see it to be the Lord's will to do so. 
There was much weeping afterwards. But I am now again 
in peace. 

April 16. This morning I am still in peace. I am glad 
I have spoken to the brethren, that they may be prepared, 
in case the Lord should take me away.. I left to-day for 
Dartmouth, where I preached in the evening. I had five 
answers to prayer to-day. 1. I awoke at live, for which I 
had asked the Lord last evening. 2. The Lord removed 
fiom nry dear wife an indisposition under which she had 
been suffering. It would have been trying to me to have 
had to leave her in that state. 3. The Lord sent us inone}'. 
4. There was a place vacant on the Dartmouth coach, 
which only passes through Teignmouth. 5. This evening 
I was assisted in preaching, and my own soul refreshed. 

April 21. I would offer here a word of warning to 
believers. Often the work of the Lord itself may be a 
temptation to keep us from that communion with him 
which is so essential to the benefit of our own souls. On 
the 19th I had left Dartmouth, conversed a good deal that 
day, preached in the evening, w r alked afterwards eight 
miles, had only about five hours' sleep, travelled again the 
next day twenty-five miles, preached twice, and conversed 
very much besides, went to bed at eleven, and arose before 
five. All this shows that my body and spirit required rest, 
and, therefore, however careless about the Lord's work I 
might haA r e appeared to my brethren, I ought to have had 
a great deal of quiet time for prayer and reading the word, 
especially as I had a long journey before me that day, and 
as I was going to Bristol, which in itself required much 
prayer. Inotead of this, I hurried to the prayer-meeting, 
after a few minutes' private prayer. But let none think 
that public praj'er will make up for closet communion. 
Then again, afterwards, when I ought to have withdrawn 
mj^self, as it were, by force, from the company of beloved 
9 



98 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. V. 

brethren and sisters, and given my testimony for the Lord, 
(and, indeed, it would have been the best testimony I 
could have given them,) by telling them that I needed 
secret communion with the Lord, I did not do so, but spent 
the time, till the coach came, in conversation with them. 
Now, however profitable in some respects it may have been 
made to those with whom I was on that morning, yet my 
own soul needed food ; and not having had it, I was lean, 
and felt the effects of it the whole day ; and hence I believe 
it came that I was dumb on the coach, and did not speak a 
word for Christ, nor give away a single tract, though I had 
my pockets full on purpose. 

April 22. This morning I preached at Gideon Chapel, 
Bristol. In the afternoon I preached at the Pithay Chapel. 
This sermon was a blessing to many, many souls ; and 
many were brought through it to come afterwards to hear 
brother Craik and me. Among others it was the means 
of converting a young man who was a notorious drunkard, 
and who was just again on his way to a public house, when 
an acquaintance of his met him, and asked him to go with 
him to hear a foreigner preach. He did so ; and from that 
moment he was so completely altered, that he never again 
went to a public house, and was so happy in the Lord after- 
wards that he often neglected his supper, from eagerness 
to read the Scriptures, as his wife told me. He died about 
five months afterwards. This evening I was much in- 
structed in hearing brother Craik preach. I am now 
fully persuaded that Bristol is the place where the Lord 
will have me to labor. 

April 27. It seems to brother Craik and myself the 
Lord's will that we should go home next week, in order 
that in quietness, without being influenced by what we see 
here, we may more inquire into the Lord's will concerning 
us. It especially appears to us much more likely that we 
should come to a right conclusion among the brethren and 
sisters in Devonshire, whose tears we shall have to witness, 



1832. MINISTRY AT BRISTOL BEGUN. 99 

and whose entreaties to stay with them we shall have to 
hear, than here in Bristol, where we see only those who 
wish us to stay. 

April 28. It still seems to us the Lord's will that we 
should both leave soon, to have quiet time for prayer con- 
cerning Bristol. April 29. I preached this morning on 
Rev. iii. 14-22. As it afterwards appeared, that testimony 
was blessed to many, though I lacked enjoyment in my 
own soul. This afternoon brother Craik preached in a 
vessel called the Clifton Ark, fitted up for a chapel. In 
the evening I preached in the same vessel. These testi- 
monies also God greatly honored, and made them the 
means of afterward bringing several, who then heard us, 
to our meeting-places. How was God with us, and how 
did he help us, thereby evidently showing that he himself 
had sent us to this city ! 

April 30. It was most affecting to take leave of the 
dear children of God, dozens pressing us to return soon, 
many with tears in their eyes. The blessing which the 
Lord has given to our ministry seems to be very great. 
We both see it fully the Lord's will to come here, though 
we do not see under what circumstances. A brother has 
promised to take Bethesda Chapel for us, and to be answer- 
able for the payment of the rent ; so that thus we should 
have two large chapels. I saw, again, two instances to-day 
in which my preaching has been blessed. 

May 1. Brother Craik and I left this morning for Dev- 
onshire. 

May 3. I saw several of the brethren to-da}^, and felt 
so fully assured that it is the Lord's will that I should go 
to Bristol, that I told them so. This evening I had a 
meeting with the three deacons, when I told them plainly 
about it ; asking them, if they see anything wrong in me 
concerning this matter, to tell me of it. They had nothing 
to say against it ; yea, though much wishing me to stay, 
they were convinced themselves that my going is of God. 



100 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. V. 

May 5. One other striking proof to my mind that my 
leaving Teignmouth is of God, is, that some truly spiritual 
believers, though they much wish me to stay, themselves 
see that I ought to go to Bristol. 

May 7. Having received a letter from Bristol on May 
5, it was answered to-day in such a way that the Lord may 
have another opportunity to prevent our going thither if it 
be not of him. 

May 15. Just when I was in prayer concerning Bristol, 
I was sent for to come to brother Craik. Two letters had 
arrived from Bristol. The brethren assembling at Gideon 
accept our offer to come under the conditions we have 
made, i. e., for the present, to consider us only as minister- 
ing among them, but not in any fixed pastoral relationship, 
so that we may preach as we consider it to be according to 
the mind of God, without reference to any rules among 
them; that (he pew-rents should be done away with; and that 
v:e should go on, respecting the supply of our temporal wants, 
as in Devonshire. We intend, the Lord willing, to leave in 
about a week, though there is nothing settled respecting 
Bethesda Chapel. 

May 21. I began to-da} T to take leave of the brethren at 
Teignmouth, calling on each of them. It has been a try- 
ing day. Much weeping on the part of the saints. Were 
1 not so fully persuaded that it is the will of God we should 
go to Bristol, I should have been hardly able to bear it. 

May 22. The brethren at Teignmouth say that they 
expect us soon back again. As far as I understand the way 
in which God deals with his children, this seems very 
unlikely. Towards the evening, the Lord, after repeated 
pra}*er, gave me Col. i. 21-23 as a text for the last word of 
exhortation. It seemed to me best to speak as little as 
Ible about myself, and as much as possible about 
Christ. I scarcely alluded to our separation, and only 
commended nryself and the brethren, in the concluding 
prajer, to the Lord. The parting scenes are very trying. 



1832. MINISTRY AT BRISTOL BEGUN. 101 

but my full pcrsuasiou is that the separation is of the 
Lord. May 23. My wife, Mr. Groves, my father-in-law, 
and I left this morning for Exeter. Dear brother Craik 
intends to follow us to-morrow. 

We had unexpectedly received, just before we left Teign- 
mouth, about fifteen pounds, else we should not have been 
able to defray all the expenses connected with leaving, 
travelling, etc. By this, also, the Lord showed his mind 
concerning our going to Bristol. 

The following record will now show to the believing 
reader how far what I have said concerning my persuasion 
that it was the will of God that we should go to Bristol 
has been proved by tacts. 

May 25, 1832. This evening we arrived at Bristol. 
May 27. This morning we received a sovereign, sent to 
us by a sister residing in Devonshire, which we take as an 
earnest that the Lord will provide for us here also. May 
28. When we were going to speak to the brethren, who 
manage the temporal affairs of Gideon Chapel, about giv- 
ing up the pew-rents, having all the seats free, and receiv- 
ing the free-will offerings through a box. — a matter which 
was not quite settled on their part, as brother Craik and I 
had thought, — we found that the Lord had so graciously 
ordered this matter for us that there was not the least 
objection on the part of these brethren. 

June 4. For several days we have been looking about 
for lodgings, but finding none plain and cheap enough, we 
were led to make this also a subject of earnest prayer ; 
and now, immediately afterwards, the Lord has given us 
such as are suitable. We pay only eighteen shillings a week 
for two sitting-rooms and three bedrooms, coals, and 
attendance. It was particularly difficult to find cheap fur- 
nished lodgings, having five rooms in the same house, 
which we need, as brother Craik and we live together. 
How good is the Lord to have thus appeared for us, in 
9* 



102 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. V. 

answer to prayer, and what an encouragement to commit 
everything to him in prayer ! 

June 25. To-day it was finally settled to take Bethesda 
Chapel for a twelvemonth, on condition that a brother at 
once paid the rent, with the understanding that, if the Lord 
shall bless oar labors in that place, so that believers are 
gathered together in fellowship, he expects them to help 
him ; but if not, that he will pay all. This was the only 
way in which we could take the chapel ; for we could not 
think it to be of God to have had this chapel, though there 
should be every prospect of usefulness, if it had made us 
in any way debtors. 

July 6. To-day we commenced preaching at Bethesda 
Chapel. It was a good day. July 13. To-day we heard 
of the first cases of cholera in Bristol. July 16. This 
evening, from six to nine o'clock, we had appointed for 
conversing at the vestry, one by one, with individuals who 
wished to speak to us about their souls. There were so 
many that we were engaged from six till twenty minutes 
past ten. 

These meetings we have continued ever since, twice a 
week, or once a week, or once a fortnight, or once a month, 
as our strength and time allowed it, or as they seemed 
needed. We have found them beneficial in the following 
respects : — 

1. Many persons, on account of timidity, would prefer 
coming at an appointed time to the vestry to converse with 
us, to calling on us in our own house. 2. The very fact 
of appointing a time for seeing people, to converse with 
them in private concerning the things of eternity, has 
brought some, who, humanly speaking, never would have 
called upon us under other circumstances ; yea, it has 
brought even those who, though they thought the}^ were 
concerned about the things of God, yet were completely 
ignorant ; and thus we have had an oppor' mity of speak- 
ing to them. 3. These meetings have als\. been a great 



1832. MINISTRY AT BRISTOL BEGUN. 103 

encouragement to ourselves in the work, for often, wheD 
we thought that such and such expositions of the word had 
done no good at all, it was through these meetings found 
to be the reverse ; and likewise, when our hands were hang- 
ing down, we have been afresh encouraged to go forward 
in the work of the Lord, and to continue sowing the seed 
in hope, by seeing at these meetings fresh cases in which 
the Lord has condescended to use us as instruments, par- 
ticularly as in this way instances have sometimes occurred 
in which individuals have spoken to us about the benefit 
which they derived from our ministry, not only a few 
months before, but even as long as two, three, and four 
years before. 

For ' the above reasons I would particularly recommend 
to other servants of Christ, especially to those who live in 
large towns, if they have not already introduced a similar 
plan, to consider whether it may not be well for them also 
to set apart such times for seeing inquirers. Those meet- 
ings, however, require much prayer, to be enabled to speak 
aright to all those who come, according to their different 
need ; and one is led continually to feel that one is not 
sufficient of one's self for these things, but that our 
sufficiency can be alone of God. These meetings also 
have been by far the most wearing-out part of all our work, 
though at the same time the most refreshing. 

July 18. To-day I spent the whole morning in the ves- 
try, to procure a quiet season. This has now for some 
time been the only way, on account of the multiplicity of 
engagements, to make sure of time for prayer, reading the 
word, and meditation. July 19. I spent from half-past 
nine till one in the vestry, and had real communion with 
the Lord. The Lord be praised, who has put it into my 
mind to use the vestry for a place of retirement ! 

Aug. 5. Wlien all our money was gone to-day, the Lord 
again graciously supplied our ivants. Aug. 6. This after- 
noon, from two till after six, brother Craik and I spent in 



104 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. V. 

the vestry, to see the inquirers. We have had again, in 
seeing several instances of .blessing upon our labors, abun- 
dant reason brought before us to praise the Lord for hav- 
ing sent us to Bristol. 

Aug. 13. This evening one brother and four sisters 
united with brother Craik and me in church-fellowship at 
Bethesda, without any rules, desiring only to act as the Lord 
shall be pleased to give us light through his word. 

Sept. 17. This morning the Lord, in addition to all his 
other mercies, has given us a little girl, who, with her 
mother, is doing well. 

Oct. 1. A meeting for inquirers this afternoon from two 
to five. Many more are convinced of sin through brother 
Craik's preaching than my own. This circumstance led 
me to inquire inxo the reasons, which are probably these : 
1. That brother Craik is more spiritually minded than I 
am. 2. That he prays more earnestly for the conversion 
of sinners than I do. 3. That he more frequently addresses 
sinners, as such, in his public ministrations, than I do. 
This led me to more frequent and earnest prayer for the 
conversion of sinners, and to address them more frequently 
as such. The latter had never been intentionally left 
undone, but it had not been so frequently brought to my 
mind as to that of brother Craik. Since then, the cases in 
which it has pleased the Lord to use me as an instrument 
of conversion have been quite as many as those in which 
brother Craik has been used. 

Feb. 9, 1833. I read a part of Franke's life. The Lord 
graciously help me to follow him, as far as he followed 
Christ. Most of the Lord's people whom we know in Bris- 
tol are poor, and if the Lord were to give us grace to live 
more as this dear man of God did, we might draw much 
more than we have as yet done out of our heavenly 
Father's bank for our poor brethren and sisters. March 2. 
A man in the street ran up to brother Craik and put a 
paper containing ten shillings into his hand, saying, " That 



1833. MINISTRY AT BRISTOL BEGUN. 105 

is for you and Mr. Miiller," and went hastily away. May 
28. This morning, whilst sitting in my room, the distress 
of several brethren and sisters was brought to my mind, 
and I said to myself, " O that it might please the Lord to 
give me means to help them ! " About an hour afterwards 
I received sixty pounds from a brother whom up to this day 
I never saw, and who then lived, as he does still, a distance 
of several thousand miles. 

May 29. Eeview of the last twelve months, as it regards 
the fruits of our labors in Bristol : 1 . The total number of 
those added to us within the year has been one hundred 
and nine. 2. There have been converted through our instru- 
mentality, so far as we have heard and can judge respecting 
the individuals, sixty-five. 3. Many backsliders have been 
reclaimed, and many of the children of God have been 
encouraged and strengthened in the way of truth. 

June 12. I felt, this morning, that we might do some- 
thing for the souls of those poor boys and girls, and 
grown-up or aged people, to whom we have daily given 
bread for some time past, in establishing a school for them, 
reading the Scriptures to them, and speaking to them about 
the Lord. This desire was not carried out. The chief 
obstacle in the way was a pressure of work coming upon 
brother Craik and me just about that time. Shortly after, 
the number of the poor who came for bread increased to 
between sixty and eighty a day, whereby our neighbors 
were molested, as the beggars were lying about in troops 
in the street, on account of which we were obliged to tell 
them no longer to come for bread. This thought ulti- 
mately issued in the formation of the Scriptural Knowledge 
Institution, and in the establishment of the Orphan 
Houses. 

Dec. 17. This evening brother Craik and I took tea 
with a family, of whom five had been brought to the 
knowledge of the Lord through our instrumentality. As 
an encouragement to brethren who may desire to preach 



106 THE LIFE OF TRUST, Chap. V. 

the gospel in a language not their own, I would mention 
that the first member of this family who was converted 
came merely out of curiosity to hear my foreign accent, 
some words having been mentioned to her which I did not 
pronounce property. 

Dec. 31. In looking over my journal, I find, — 
1. That at least two hundred and sixty persons (according 
to the number of names we have marked down, but there 
have been many more) have come to converse with us 
about the concerns of their souls. Out of these, one hun- 
dred ^nd fifty-three have been added to us in fellowship 
these last eighteen months, sixty of whom have been 
brought to the knowledge of the Lord through our instru- 
mentality. 

2. In looking over the Lord's dealings with me as to 
temporal things, I find that he has sent me, during the past 
year, — 



1. In freewill offerings through the boxes, as my part 

2. Presents in money given to me 

3. Presents in clothes and provisions, worth, at least . 

4. A brother sent me, from a distance 

5. We live free of rent, which is worth for our part . 



It is just now four years since I first began to trust in 
the Lord alone for the supply of my temporal wants. My 
little all I then had, at most worth one hundred pounds a 
year, I gave up for the Lord, having then nothing left but 
about five pounds. The Lord greatly honored this little 
sacrifice, and he gave me, in return, not only as much as I 
had given up, but considerably more. For during the first 
year, he sent me already, in one way or other, including 
what came to me through family connection, about one 
hundred and thirty pounds. During the second year, one 
hundred and fifty-one pounds eighteen shillings and eight 



£152 


14 5| 


25 


1 3 


20 





60 





10 





£267 


15 81 



1834. MINISTRY AT BRISTOL BEGUN. 107 

pence. During the third year, one hundred and ninety-five 
pounds three shillings. During this year, two hundred and 
sixty-seven pounds fifteen shillings and eight and one 
fourth pence. The following points require particular 
notice : 1. During the last three jxars and three months I 
never have asked any one for anything ; but, by the help 
of the Lord, I have been enabled at all times to bring nry 
wants to him, and he graciously has supplied them all. 2. 
At the close of each of these four } T ears, though my income 
has been comparatively great, I have had onty a few shil- 
lings or nothing at all left ; and thus it is also to-da}-, by 
the help of God. 3. During the last year a considerable 
part of my income has come from a distance of several 
thousand miles from a brother whom I never saw. 
4. Since we have been obliged to discontinue the giving 
away of bread to about fifty poor people every day, on 
account of our neighbors, our income has not been during 
the second part of this year nearly so great, scarcely one 
half as much, as during the first part of it. 

January 9, 1834. Brother Craik and I have preached 
during these eighteen months, once a month, at Brisling- 
ton, a village near Bristol, but have not seen any fruit of 
our labors there. This led me to-day ver} r earnestly to 
pray to the Lord for the conversion of sinners in that 
place. I was also, in the chapel, especiall}- led to pray 
again about this, and asked the Lord in particular that he 
would .be pleased to convert, at least, one soul this evening 
that we might have a little encouragement. I preached 
with much help, and I hope there has been good done this 
evening. The Lord did according to nry request. There 
was a 3 r oung man brought to the knowledge of the truth. 

Jan. 14. I was greatly tried by the difficulty of fixing 
upon a text from which to preach on the morning of Octo- 
ber 20, and at last preached without enjoyment. To-day I 
heard of a ninth instance in which this very sermon has 
been blessed. 



108 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. V. 

Jan. 31. This evening a Dorcas Society was formed 
among the sisters in communion with us, but not according 
to the manner in which we found one when we came to 
Bristol ; for, as we have dismissed all teachers from the 
Sunday School who were not real believers, so now believ- 
ing females only will meet together to make clothes for the 
poor. The being mixed up with unbelievers had not only 
proved a barrier to spiritual conversation among the sisters, 
but must have been also injurious to both parties in several 
respects. One sister, now united to us in fellowship, ac- 
knowledged that the being connected with the Dorcas 
Society, previous to her conversion, had been, in a measure, 
the means of keeping her in security ; as she thought that, 
by helping on such like things, she might gain heaven at 
last. O that the saints, in faithful love, according to the 
word of God (2 Cor. vi. 14-18) , might be more separated 
in all spiritual matters from unbelievers, and not be 
unequally yoked together with them ! 




CHAPTEE VI. 

THE SCRIPTUBAL KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION. 
1834 — 1835. 

TO6CRIPTURAL CHARACTER OF THE EXISTING RELIGIOUS AND BENEVOLENT 
SOCIETIES — A NEW INSTITUTION PROPOSED — GOD'S WORD THE ONLY RULE, 
AND GOD'S PROMISE THE ONLY DEPENDENCE — " IN EVERYTHING LET YOUR 
REQUEST BE MADE KNOWN UNTO GOD" — EARNEST OF THE DIVINE 
BLESSING ON THE INSTITUTION — BEREAVEMENT — HELPER SEASONABLY 
SENT — REWARD OF SEEKING GOD'S FACE. 

'EB. 21. I was led this morning to form a plan 
for establishing, upon scriptural principles, an 
institution for the spread of the gospel at home 
and abroad. I trust this matter is of God. Feb. 
25. I was led again this day to pray about the forming of 
a new Missionary Institution, and felt still more confirmed 
that we should do so. 

[Some readers may ask why we formed a new Institution 
for the spread of the gospel, and why we did not unite with 
some of the religious societies, already in existence, seeing 
that there are several missionary, Bible, tract, and school 
societies. I give, therefore, our reasons, in order to show 
that nothing but the desire to maintain a good conscience 
led us to act as we have done. For as, by the grace of 
God, we acknowledge the word of God as the only rule of 
action for the disciples of the Lord Jesus, we found, in 
comparing the then existing religious societies with the 
word of God, that they departed so far from : t, that we 
could not be united with them, and yet maintain a good 
conscience. I only mention here the following points. 

1. The end which these religious societies propose to 
themselves, and which is constantly put before their mem- 

109 



110 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. VL 

bers, is, that the world will gradually become better and 
better, and that at last the whole world will be converted 
To this end, there is constantly reference made to the 
passage in Habakkuk ii. 14 : " For the earth shall be filled 
with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, as the waters 
cover the sea ; " or the one in Isaiah xi. 9 : " For the earth 
shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters 
cover the sea." But that these passages can have no ref- 
erence to the present dispensation, but to the one which 
will commence with the return of the Lord, — that in the 
present dispensation things will not become spiritually 
better, but rather worse, — and that in the present dispen- 
sation it is not the whole world that will be converted, but 
only a people gathered out from among the Gentiles for 
the Lord, — is clear from many passages of the divine 
testimony, of which I only refer to the following : Matt. 
xiii. 24-30, and verses 36-43, 2 Tim.iii. 1-13, Acts xv. 14. 

A hearty desire for the conversion of sinners, and ear- 
nest prayer for it to the Lord, is quite scriptural; but it is- 
unscriptural to expect the conversion of the whole world. 
Such an end we could not propose to ourselves in the ser- 
vice of the Lord. 

2. But that which is worse, is, the connection of those 
religious societies with the world, which is completely con- 
trary to the word of God (2 Cor. vi. 14-18). In temporal 
things the children of God need, whilst they remain here 
on earth, to make use of the world ; but when the work to 
be done requires that those who attend to it should be 
possessed of spiritual life (of which unbelievers are utterly 
destitute) , the children of God are bound, by their loyalty 
to their Lord, entirely to refrain from association with the 
unregenerate. But, alas ! the connection with the world is 
but too marked in these religious societies ; for every one 
who pays a guinea, or, in some societies, half a guinea, is 
considered as a member. Although such an individual 
may live in sin ; although he may manifest to every one 



1834. THE SCRIPTURAL KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION. Ill 

that he does not know the Lord Jesus ; if only the guinea 
or the half-guinea be paid, he is considered a member and 
has a right as such to vote. Moreover, whoever pays a 
larger sum, for instance, ten pounds or twenty pounds, can 
be, in many societies, a member for life, however openly 
sinful his life should be for the time, or should become 
afterwards. Surely such things ought not to be. 

3. The means which are made use of in these religious 
societies to obtain money for the work of the Lord are 
also in other respects unscriptural ; for it is a most com- 
mon case to ask the unconverted for money, which even 
Abraham would not have done (Genesis xiv. 21-24) ; and 
how much less should we do it, who are not only forbidden 
to have fellowship with unbelievers in all such matters (2 
Cor. vi. 14-18), but who are also in fellowship with the 
Father and the Son, and can therefore obtain everything 
from the Lord which we possibly can need in his service, 
without being obliged to go to the unconverted world ! 
How altogether differently the first disciples acted, in this 
respect, we learn from 3 John 7. 

4. Not merely, however, in these particulars is there a 
connection with the world in these religious societies ; but 
it is not a rare thing for even committee members (the 
individuals who manage the affairs of the societies) to be 
manifestly unconverted persons, if not open enemies to 
the truth ; and this is suffered because they are rich, or of 
influence, as it is called. 

5. It is a most common thing to endeavor to obtain for 
patrons and presidents of these societies and for chair- 
men at the public meetings, persons of rank or wealth, to 
attract the public. Never once have I known a case of a 
poor, but very devoted, wise, and experienced servant of 
Christ being invited to fill the chair at such public meet- 
ings. Surely, the Galilean fishermen, who were apostles, 
or our Lord himself, who was called the carpenter, would 
not have been called to this office, according to these prin- 



112 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. VI. 

ciples. These things ought not so to be among the disciples 
of the Lord Jesus, who should not judge with reference to 
a person's fitness for service in the church of Christ by the 
position he fills in the world, or by the wealth he pos- 
sesses. 

6. Almost all these societies contract debts, so that it is 
a comparatively rare case to read a report of any of them 
without finding that they have expended more than they 
have received, which, however, is contrary both to the 
spirit and to the letter of the New Testament. (Rom. 
xiii. 8.) 

Now, although brother Craik and I were read} r , by the 
grace of God, heartily to acknowledge that there are not 
only many true children of God connected with these relig- 
ious societies, but that the Lord has also blessed their 
efforts in many respects, notwithstanding the existence of 
these and other principles and practices which we judged to 
be unscriptural ; yet it appeared to us to be his will that 
we should be entirely separate from these societies (though 
we should be considered as singular persons, or though it 
should even appear that we despised other persons, or would 
elevate ourselves above them) , in order that, by the bless- 
ing of God, we might direct the attention of the children 
of God in those societies to their unscriptural practices ; 
and we would rather be entirely unconnected with these 
societies than act contrary to the Holy Scriptures. We 
therefore separated entirely from them, although we re- 
mained united in brotherly love with individual believers 
belonging to them, and would by no means judge them for 
remaining in connection with them, if they do not see that 
such things are contrary to Scripture. But seeing them to 
be so ourselves, we could not with a clear conscience re- 
main. After we had thus gone on for some time, we con- 
sidered that it would have an injurious tendency upon the 
brethren among whom we labored, and also be at variance 
with the spirit of the gospel of Christ, if we did nothing at 



1834. THE SCRIPTURAL KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION. 113 

all for missionary objects, the circulation of the Holy 
Scriptures, tracts, etc., and we were therefore led, for these 
and other reasons, to do something for the spread of the 
gospel at home and abroad, however small the beginning 
might be.] 

March 5. This evening, at a public meeting, brother 
Craik and I stated the principles on which we intend to 
carry on the institution which we propose to establish for 
the spread of the gospel at home and abroad. There was 
nothing outwardly^influential either in the number of people 
present or in our speeches. May the Lord graciously be 
pleased to grant his blessing upon the institution, which 
will be called " The Scriptural Knowledge Institution, for 
Home and Abroad." 



I. THE PRINCIPLES OF THE INSTITUTION. 

1. We consider every believer bound, in one way or other, 
to help the cause of Christ, and we have scriptural warrant 
for expecting the Lord's blessing upon our work of faith 
and labor of love ; and although, according to Matt. xiii. 
24-43, 2 Tim. iii. 1-13, and many other passages, the world 
will not be converted before the coming of our Lord Jesus, 
still, while he tarries, all scriptural means ought to be 
employed for the ingathering of the elect of God. 

2. The Lord helping us, we do not mean to seek the 
patronage of the world ; i. e., we never intend to ask uncon- 
verted persons of rank or wealth to countenance this Insti- 
tution, because this, we consider, would be dishonorable to 
the Lord. In the name of our God we set up our banners, 
(Ps. xx. 5) ; he alone shall be our patron, and if he helps us 
we shall prosper, and if he is not on our side we shall not 
succeed. 

3. We do not mean to ask unbelievers for money (2 Cor. 
vi. 12-18) ; though we do not feel ourselves warranted to 



114 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. VI. 

refuse their contributions, if they of their own accord 
should offer them. Acts xxviii. 2-10. 

4. We reject altogether the help of unbelievers in man- 
aging or carrying on the affairs of the Institution. 2 Cor. 
vi. 14-18. 

5. We intend never to enlarge the field of labor by con- 
tracting debts (Rom. xiii. 8), and afterwards appealing to 
the Church of Christ for help, because this we consider to 
be opposed both to the letter and the spirit of the New 
Testament ; but in secret prayer, God helping us, we shall 
carry the wants of the Institution to the Lord, and act 
according to the means that God shall give. 

6. We do not mean to reckon the success of the Insti- 
tution by the amount of money given, or the number of 
Bibles distributed, etc., but by the Lord's blessing upon 
the work (Zech. iv. 6) ; and we expect this in the propor- 
tion in which he shall help us to wait upon him in 
prayer. 

7. While we would avoid aiming after needless singu- 
larity, we desire to go on simply according to Scripture, 
without compromising the truth ; at the same time thank- 
fully receiving any instruction which experienced believers, 
after praj r er, upon scriptural ground, may have to give us 
concerning the Institution. 



H. THE OBJECTS OF THE INSTITUTION. 

1. To assist day schools, Sunday schools, and adult 
schools, in which instruction is given upon scriptural prin- 
ciples, and as far as the Lord may give the means, and 
supply us with suitable teachers, and in other respects 
make our path plain, to establish schools of this kind. 
With this we also combine the putting of poor children to 
such day schools. 

a. By day schools upon scriptural principles, we under- 



1834. THE SCRIPTURAL KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION. 115 

stand day schools in which the teachers are godly persons, 
— in which the way of salvation is scripturally pointed 
out, — and in which no instruction is given opposed to the 
principles of the gospel. 

b. Sunday schools, in which all the teachers are believ- 
ers, and in which the Holy Scriptures are alone the foundation 
of instruction, are such only as the Institution assists with 
the supply of Bibles, Testaments, etc. ; for we consider it 
unscriptural that any persons who do not profess to know 
the Lord themselves should be allowed to give religious 
instruction. 

c. The Institution does not assist any adult school with 
the supply of Bibles, Testaments, spelling-books, etc., 
except the teachers are believers. 

2. To circulate the Holy Scriptures. 

3. The third object of this Institution is to aid mission- 
ary efforts. 

"We desire to assist those missionaries whose proceedings 
appear to be most according to the Scriptures. 

March 7. To-day we have only one shilling left. This 
evening, when we came home from our work, we found a 
brother, our tailor, waiting for us, who brought a new suit 
of clothes both for brother Craik and me, which a brother, 
whose name was not to be mentioned, had ordered for us. 

April 23. Yesterday and to-day I asked the Lord to send 
us twenty pounds, that we might be able to procure a larger 
stock of Bibles and Testaments than our small funds of the 
Scriptural Knowledge Institution would allow us to pur- 
chase ; and this evening a sister, unasked, promised to give 
us that sum, adding that she felt a particular pleasure in 
circulating the Holy Scriptures, as the simple reading of 
them had been the means of bringing her to the knowledge 
of the Lord. 

June 8. Lord's day. I obtained no text yesterday, not- 
withstanding repeated prayer and reading of the word, 



116 TIIE LIFE OF TRUST. Chajp. VL 

This morning I awoke with these words : " My grace is 
sufficient for thee." As soon as I had dressed myself, I 
turned to 2 Cor. xii. to consider this passage ; but in doing 
so, after praj^er, I was led to think that I had not been 
directed to this portion for the sake of speaking on it, as 
I at first thought, and I therefore followed my usual prac- 
tice in such cases, i. e., to read on in the Scriptures where I 
left off last evening. In doing so, when I came to Heb. 
xi. 13-16, I felt that this was the text. Having prayed, I 
was confirmed in it, and the Lord was pleased to open this 
passage to me. I preached on it with great enjoyment. It 
pleased God greatly to bless what I said on that pas- 
sage, and at least one soul was brought through it to the 
Lord. 

June 25. These last three days I have had very little 
i*eal communion with God, and have therefore been very 
weak spiritually, and have several times felt irritability of 
temper. 

June 26. I was enabled, by the grace of God, to rise 
early, and I had nearly two hours in prayer before break- 
fast. I feel now this morning more comfortable. 

July 11. I have prayed much about a master for looys f 
school, to be established in connection with our little Insti- 
tution. Eight have applied for the situation, but none 
seemed to be suitable. Now, at last, the Lord has given us 
a brother who will commence the work. 

Oct. 9. Our little Institution, established in dependence 
upon the Lord, and supplied by him with means, has now 
been seven months in operation, and through it have been 
benefited with instruction, — 1 . In the Sunda} T school, about 
120 children. 2. In the adult school, about 40 adults. 3. 
In the two day schools for boys and the two day schools 
for girls, 209 children, of whom 54 have been entirety free ; 
the others pay about one third of the expense. There have 
been also circulated 482 Bibles, and 520 New Testaments. 
Lastly, fifty-seven pounds have been spent to aid missionary 



1835. THE SCRIPTURAL KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION. Hi 

exertion. The means which the Lord has sent us, as the 
fruit of many prayers, during these seven months, amount 
to one hundred and sixty-seven pounds ten shillings and 
halfpenny. 

Oct. 28. We heard a most affecting account of a poor 
little orphan boy, who for some time attended one of our 
schools, and who seems there, as far as we can judge, to 
have been brought to a real concern about his soul, through 
what I said concerning the torments of hell, and who some 
time ago was taken to the poorhouse, some miles out of 
Bristol. He has expressed great sorrow that he can no 
longer attend our school and ministry. May this, if it be 
the Lord's will, lead me to do something also for the sup- 
ply of the temporal wants of poor children, the pressure of 
which has caused this poor boy to be taken away from our 
school ! 

Nov. 4. I spent the greater part of the morning in read- 
ing the word and in prayer, and asked also for our daily 
bread, for we have scarcely any money left. Nov. 5. I 
spent almost the whole of the day in prayer and reading 
the word. I prayed also again for the supply of our 
temporal wants ; but the Lord has not as yet appeared. 
Nov. 8. Saturday. The Lord has graciously again 
supplied our temporal wants during this week, though at 
the commencement of it we had but little left. I have 
prayed much this week, for money, more than any other 
week, as far as I remember, since we have been in Bris- 
tol. The Lord has supplied us through our selling what 
we did not need, or by our being paid what was owed to 
us. 

Dec. 10. To-clay we found that a departed brother had 
left both to brother Craik and me twelve pounds. 

Dec. 31, 1834. 1. Since brother Craik and I have been 
laboring in Bristol, 227 brethren and sisters have been 
added to us in fellowship. Out of the 227 who have been 
added to us, 103 have been converted through our instru- 



118 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. VI. 

mentality, and many have been brought into the liberty of 
the gospel, or reclaimed from backsliding. Forty-seven 
young converts are at Gideon, and fifty-six at Bethescla. 
2. The income which the Lord has given me during this 
year is : — 

1. My part of the freewill offerings through the boxes £135 13 2| 

2. Money given to me by saints in and out of Bristol 92 7 6 

Altogether * . . £228 8| 

3. Besides this, many articles in provisions, clothing, 

and furniture, worth to us about . . . . 60 

Jan. 1, 1835. We had last evening an especial prayer 
meeting, for the sake of praising the Lord for all his many 
mercies, which we have received during the past year, and 
to ask him to continue to us his favor. Jan. 13. I visited 
from house to house the people living in Orange street, and 
saw in this way the families living in nine houses, to ascei: 
tain whether any individuals wanted Bibles, whether they 
could read, whether they wished their children put to om 
day schools or Sunday school, with the view of helping 
them accordingly. This afforded opportunities to converse 
with them about their souls. 

Jan. 15. This morning I went again from house to house 
in Orange street. I should greatly delight in being fre 
quently engaged in such work, for it is a most important 
one ; but our hands are so full with other work that we can 
do but little in this way. Jan. 21. Received, in answer 
to prayer, from an unexpected quarter, five pounds, for the 
Scriptural Knowledge Institution. The Lord pours in, 
whilst we seek to pour out. For during the past week, 
merely among the poor, in going from house to house, 
fifty-eight copies of the Scriptures were sold at reduced 
prices, the going on with which is most important, but will 
require much means. 

Jan. 2S. I have, for these several days, prayed much 



1835. THE SCRIPTURAL KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION. 119 

to ascertain whether the Lord will have me to go as a mis- 
sionary to the East Indies, and I am most willing to go, if 
he will condescend to use me in this way, Jan. 29. I 
have been greatly stirred up to pray about going to Cal- 
cutta as a missionary. May the Lord guide me in this 
matter ! (After all my repeated and earnest prayer in the 
commencement of 1835, and willingness on my part to go, 
if it were the Lord's will, still, he did not send me.) 

Feb. 25. In the name of the Lord, and in dependence 
upon him alone for support, we have established a fifth day 
school for poor children, which to-day has been opened. 
We have now two boys' schools and three girls' schools. 

Mr. Miiller having determined to visit Germany, 
chiefly on missionary business, reached London Feb- 
ruary 27, and writes: — 

This morning I went to the Alien Office for my passport. 
On entering the office, I saw a printed paper, in which it, 
is stated that every alien neglecting to renew every six 
months his certificate of residence, which he receives on 
depositing his passport, subjects himself to a penalty of 
fifty pounds, or imprisonment. This law I have ignorantly 
broken ever since I left London, in 1829. It appeared to 
me much better to confess at once that I had ignorantly 
done so than now wilfully break it ; trusting in the Lord as 
it regarded the consequences of the step. I did so, and the 
Lord inclined the heart of the officer with whom I had to do 
to pass over my non-compliance with the law, on account of 
my having broken it ignorantly. Having obtained my 
passport, I found an unexpected difficulty in the Prussian 
ambassador refusing to sign it, as it did not contain a 
description of my person, and therefore I needed to prove 
that I was the individual spoken of in the passport. This 
difficulty was not removed for three daj T s, when, after 
earnest prayer, through a paper signed by some citizens of 



120 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. VL 

London, to whom I am known, the ambassador was satis- 
fied. This very difficulty, when once the Lord had removed 
it, afforded me cause for thanksgiving : for I now obtained 
a new passport, worded in a way that, - should I ever need 
it again, will prevent similar difficulties. 

Mr. Miiller was absent for five weeks, during which 
time he experienced many answers to prayer and encour- 
agements to faith. 

April 15. Bristol. Yesterday, at one, we landed in 
London. In answer to praj^er, I soon obtained my things 
from the custom-house, and reached my friends in Chancery 
Lane a little before two. 

June 3. To-day we had a public meeting on account of 
the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad. 
It is now fifteen months since, in dependence upon the 
Lord for the supply of means, we have been enabled to 
provide poor children with schooling, circulate the Holy 
Scriptures, and aid missionary labors. During this time, 
though the field of labor has been continually enlarging, 
and though we have now and then been brought low in 
funds, the Lord has never allowed us to be obliged to stop 
the work. We have been enabled during this time to 
establish three day schools, and to connect with the Insti-. 
tution two other charity clay schools, which, humanly 
speaking, otherwise would have been closed for want of 
means. The number of the children that have been thus 
provided with schooling, in the clay schools only, amounts 
to 439. The number of copies of the Holy Scriptures 
which have been circulated is 795 Bibles and 753 New 
Testaments. We have also sent, in aid of missionary 
labors in Canada, in the East Indies, and on the Continent 
of Europe, one hundred and seventeen pounds, eleven 
shillings. The whole amount of the free-will offerings put 



1835. THE SCRIPTURAL KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION. 121 

into our hands for carrying on this work from March 5, 
1834, to May 19, 1835, is £363 12s. Of d. 

June 22. This morning at two my father-in-law died. 
June 25. Our little boy is so ill that I have no hope of his 
recovery. The Lord's holy will be done concerning the 
dear little one. June 26. My prayer, last evening, was 
that God would be pleased to support my dear wife under 
the trial, should he remove the little one ; and to take him 
soon to himself, thus sparing him from suffering. I did 
not pray for the child's recovery. It was but two hours 
after that the dear little one went home. I am so fully 
enabled to realize that the dear infant is so much better 
off with the Lord Jesus than with us, that I scarcely feel 
the loss at all, and when I weep I weep for joy. 

July 31. To-day brother C r, formerly a minister in 

the establishment, who came to us a few days since, began, 
in connection with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, 
to go from house to house to spread the truth as a city 
missionary. [This was a remarkable interposition of God. 
Brother Craik had before this, for some months, been un- 
able, on account of bodily infirmity, to labor in the work of 
the schools, the circulation of the Scriptures, etc., and my 

own weakness, shortly after brother C r's arrival, 

increased so that I was obliged to give up the work entirely . 
How gracious, therefore, of the Lord to send brother 

C r, that thus the work might go on ! Up to July, 1837 

this beloved brother was enabled to continue in his work, 
and thus this little Institution was in a most important way 
enlarged as it regards the field of labor.] 

Aug. 24. I feel very weak, and suffer more than before 
from the disease. I am in doubt whether to leave Bristol 
entirely for a time. I have no money to go away for a 
change of air. I have had an invitation to stay for a week 
with a sister in the country, and I think of accepting the 
invitation, and going to-morrow. August 26. To-day I 
had five pounds given to me for the express purpose of using 
11 



122 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. VI. 

change of air. August 29. To-day I received another five 
pounds for the same purpose. 

Aug. 30. To-day, for the first Lord's day since our ar- 
rival in Bristol, I have been kept from preaching through 
illness. How mercifully has the Lord dealt in giving me 
so much strength for these years ! I had another five 
pounds sent to aid me in procuring change of air. How 
kind is the Lord in thus providing me with the means for 
leaving Bristol ! Sept. 2. "Went with my family to 
Portishead. 

Sept. 15. As I clearly understood that the person who 
lets me his horse has no license, I saw that, being bound as 
a believer to act according to the laws of the country, I 
could use it no longer ; and as horse exercise seems most 
important, humanly speaking, for my restoration, and as 
this is the only horse which is to be had in the place, we 
came to the conclusion to leave Portishead to-morrow. 
Immediately after, I received a kind letter from a brother 
and two sisters in the Lord, who live in the Isle of Wight, 
which contained a fourth invitation, more pressing than 
ever, to come and stay with them for some time. In addi- 
tion to this, they wrote that they had repeatedly prayed 
about the matter, and were persuaded that I ought to come. 
This matter has been to-day a subject for prayer. 

Sept. 16. We came this morning to the conclusion that 
I should go to the Isle of Wight ; but we saw not how my 
wife and child and our servant could accompany me, as we 
had not sufficient money for travelling expenses ; and yet 
this seemed of importance. The Lord graciously removed 
the difficulty this evening ; for we received most unexpectedly 
and unasked for, five pounds and thirteen shillings, which 
was owed to us, and also, when we had already retired to 
rest, a letter was brought, containing a present of two 
pounds. How very, very kind and tender is the Lord ! 

Sept. 19. This evening we arrived at our friends' in the 
Isle of Wight, by whom we were most kindly received. 



1835. THE SCRIPTURAL KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION. 123 

Oct. 9. I have many times had thoughts of giving in 
print some account of the Lord's goodness to me, for the 
instruction, comfort, and encouragement of the children of 
God. I have considered to-day all the reasons for and 
against, and find that there are scarcely any against, and 
many for it. 

Nov. 15. Bristol. Brother C r and I have been pray- 
ing together, the five last days, that the Lord would be 
pleased to send us means for carrying on the work ol the 
Scriptural Knowledge Institution. This evening, a brother 
gave me six shillings and one penny, being money which 
he formerly used to pay towards the support of a trade 
club, which he has lately given up for the Lord's sake. 
Nov. 18. This evening thirty pounds were, given to 
me ; twenty-five pounds for the Scriptural Knowledge Insti- 
tution, and five pounds for myself. This is a most remark- 
able answer to prayer. Brother C r and I have prayed 

repeatedly together during the last week concerning the 
work, and especially that the Lord would be pleased to 
give us the means to continue, and even enlarge the field. 
In addition to this, I have several times asked for a supply 
for myself, and he has kindly granted both these requests. 
O that I may have grace to trust him more and more ! 




CHAPTEE VII. 

HOME FOR DESTITUTE ORPHANS. 
1835 — 1836. 

FRANKER WORKS FOLLOW HIM — A GREAT UNDERTAKING CONCEIVED — REASONS 
FOR ESTABLISHING AN ORPHAN HOUSE — PRAYER FOR GUIDANCE — TREASURE 
LAID UP IN HEAVEN — IN PRAYER AND IN FAITH, THE WORK IS BEGUN. 

OVEMBER 20. This evening I took tea at a 
sister's house, where I found Franke's life. I 
have frequently, for a long time, thought of 
laboring in a similar way, on a much smaller 
scale ; not to imitate Franke, but in reliance upon the 
Lord. May God make it plain! Nov. 21. To-day 
I have had it very much impressed on my heart, no longer 
merely to think about the establishment of an orphan 
house, but actually to set about it, and I have been very 
much in prayer respecting it, in order to ascertain the 
Lord's mind. Nov. 23. To-day I had ten pounds, sent 
from Ireland, for our Institution. The Lord, in an- 
swer to prayer, has given me, in a few days, about fifty 
pounds. I had asked only for forty pounds. This has 
been a great encouragement to me, and has still more 
stirred me up to think and pray about the establishment of 
an orphan house. Nov. 25. I have been again much in 
prayer 3 r esterday and to-day about the orphan house, 
and am more and more convinced that it is of God. May 
he in mercy guide me ! 

It may be well to enter somewhat minutely upon the 

reasons which led me to establish an orphan house. 

Through my pastoral labors, through my correspondence, 

and through brethren who visited Bristol, I had constantly 

121 



1835. HOME FOR DESTITUTE ORPHANS. 125 

cases brought before me, which proved that one of the 
especial things which the children of God needed in our 
day, was, to have their faith strengthened. I might visit a 
brother who worked fourteen or even sixteen hours a day 
at his trade, the necessary result of which was, that not 
only his body suffered, but his soul was lean, and he had 
no enjoyment in God. I might point out to him that he 
ought to work less, in order that his bodily health might 
not suffer, and that he might gather strength for his inner 
man, by reading the word of God, by meditation over it, 
and by prayer. The reply, however, I generally found to 
be something like this : " But if I work less, I do not earn 
enough for the support of my family. Even now, whilst I 
work so much, I have scarcely enough." There was no 
trust in God, no real belief in the truth of that word, 
" Seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness, 
and all these things shall be added unto you." I might 
reply something like this : " My dear brother, it is not your 
work which supports your family, but the Lord ; and he who 
has fed you and your family when you could not work at 
all, on account of illness, would surely provide for you and 
yours, if, for the sake of obtaining food for your inner man, 
you were to work only for so many hours a day as would 
allow you proper time for retirement. And is it not the 
case now that you begin the work of the day after having 
had only a few hurried moments for prayer ; and when you 
leave off your work in the evening, and mean then to read 
a little of the word of God, are you not too much worn 
out in body and mind to enjoy it, and do you not often 
fall asleep whilst reading the Scriptures, or whilst on your 
knees in prayer ? " The brother would allow it was so ; 
he would allow that my advice was good ; but still I read 
in his countenance, even if he should not have actually 
said so, " How should I get on if I were to carry out your 
advice?" I longed therefore, to have something to point 
the brother to, as a visible proof that our God and Father 
11* 



126 THE LIFE OF 1RUST.. Chap. VII. 

is the same faithful God that he ever was, — as willing as 
ever to prove himself the living God, in our day as for- 
merly, to all who put their trust in him. 

Again ; sometimes I found children of God tried in mind 
by the prospect of old age, when they might be unable to 
work any longer, and therefore were harassed by the fear 
of having to go into the poorhouse. If in such a case I 
pointed out to them how their heavenly Father has always 
helped those who put their trust in him, they might not 
say that times have changed ; but yet it was evident 
enough that God was not looked upon by them as the 
living God. I longed to set something before the children 
of God whereby they might see that he does not forsake, 
even in our day, those who rely upon him. 

Another class of persons were brethren in business, who 
suffered in their souls, and brought guilt on their con- 
sciences, by carrying on their business almost in the same 
way as unconverted persons do. The competition in trade, 
the bad times, the over-peopled country, were given as 
reasons why, if the business were carried on simply accord- 
ing to the word of God, it could not be expected to do well. 
Such a brother, perhaps, would express the wish that he 
might be differently situated, but very rarely did I see 
that there was a stand made for God; that there was the holy 
determination to trust in the living God, and to depend on 
him, in order that a good conscience might be maintained. 
To this class, likewise, I desired to show by a visible proof 
that God is unchangeably the same. 

Then there was another class of persons, individuals who 
were in professions in which they could not continue with 
a good conscience, or persons who were in an unscriptural 
position with reference to spiritual things ; but both classes 
feared, on account of the consequences, to give up the pro- 
fession in which they could not abide with God, or to leave 
their position, lest they should be thrown out of employ 
ment. My spirit longed to be instrumental in strengthen 



1835. HOME FOR DESTITUTE ORPHANS. 127 

mg their faith, by giving them not only instances from the 
word of God of his willingness and ability to help all those 
who rely upon him, but to show them by proofs that he is the 
same in our day. I well knew that the word of God ought to 
be enough ; but I considered that I ought to lend a helping 
hand to my brethren, if by any means, by this visible proof 
to the unchangeable faithfulness of the Lord, I might 
strengthen their hands in God ; for I remembered what a 
great blessing my own soul had received through, the 
Lord's dealings with his servant A. H. Franke, who, in 
dependence upon the living God alone, established an 
immense orphan house, which I had seen many times with 
my own eyes. I therefore judged myself bound to be the 
servant of the church of Christ in the particular point on 
which I had obtained mercy ; namely, in being able to take 
God by his word, and to rely upon it. 

All these exercises of my soul, which resulted from the 
fact that so many believers with whom I became acquainted 
were harassed and distressed in mind, or brought guilt on 
their consciences on account of not trusting in the Lord, 
were used by God to awaken in my heart the desire of 
setting before the church at large, and before the world, a 
proof that he has not in the least changed ; and this seemed 
to me best done by the establishing of an orphan house. 
It needed to be something which could be seen, even b}~ 
the natural eye. Now, if I, a goor man, simply by prayer 
and faith, obtained, without asking any individual, the 
means for establishing and carrying on an orphan house, 
there would be something which, with the ford's blessing, 
might be instrumental in strengthening the faith of the 
children of God, besides being a testimony to the con- 
sciences of the unconverted of the reality of the things of 
God. 

This, then, was the primary reason for establishing the 
orphan house. I certainty did from my heart desire to be 
used by God to benefit the bodies of poor children, bereaved 



128 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. VII. 

of both parents, and seek in other respects, with the help 
of God, to do them good for this life. I also particularly 
longed to be used by God in getting the dear orphans 
trained up in the fear of God ; but still, the first and pri- 
mary object of the work was, and still is, that God might 
be magnified by the fact that the orphans under my care 
are provided with all they need, only by prayer and faith, 
without any one being asked by me or my fellow-laborers, 
whereby it may be seen that God is faithful still, and 
hears prater still. That I was not mistaken, has been 
abundantly proved since November, 1835, both by the con- 
version of many sinners who have read the accounts which 
have been published in connection with this work, and also 
by the abundance of fruit that has followed in the hearts of 
the saints, for which, from my inmost soul, I desire to be 
grateful to God, and the honor and glory of which not only 
is due to him alone, but which I, by his help, am enabled to 
ascribe to him. 

Nov. 28. I have been, every day this week very much in 
prayer concerning the orphan house, chiefly entreating the 
Lord to take away every thought concerning it out of my 
mind if the matter be not of him ; and have also repeat- 
edly examined my heart concerning my motives in the 
matter. But I have been more and more confirmed that it 
is of God. 

Dec. 2. I have again these last days prayed much about 
the orphan house, and have frequently examined my heart, 
that if it were at all my desire to establish it for the sake 
of gratifying myself I might find it out. To that end I 
have also conversed with brother Craik about it, that he 
might be instrumental in showing me any hidden corrup- 
tion of niy heart concerning the matter, or any other scrip* 
tural reason against my engaging in it. The one only 
reason which ever made me at all doubt as to its being of 
God that I should engage in this work, is the multiplicity 
of engagements wh;cli I have already. But if the matte] 



1835. HOME FOR DESTITUTE ORPHANS. 129 

be of God, he will in due time send suitable individuals, so 
that comparatively little of my time will be taken up in 
this service. 

This morning I asked the Lord especially that he would 
be pleased to teach me through the instrumentality of 
brother C. ; and I went to him, that he might have an 
opportunity of probing my heart. For as I desire only 
the Lord's glory, I should be glad to be instructed through 
the instrumentality of any brother, if the matter be not of 
him. But brother C, on the contrary, greatly encouraged 
me in it. Therefore, I have this day taken the first actual 
step in the matter, in having ordered bills to be printed, 
announcing a public meeting on Dec. 9, at which I intend 
to lay before the brethren my thoughts concerning the 
orphan house, as a means of ascertaining more clearly the 
Lord's mind concerning the matter. Dec. 5. This evening 
I was struck, in reading the Scriptures, with these words : 
" Open thy mouth wide, and I will fill it." I was led to 
apply this scripture to the orphan house, and asked the 
Lord for premises, one thousand pounds, and suitable indi- 
viduals to take care of the children. Dec. 7. To-day I 
received the first shilling for the orphan house. 

Dec. 9. This afternoon the first piece of furniture was 
given, — a large wardrobe. This afternoon and evening I 
was low in spirit as it regards the orphan house, but as 
soon as I began to speak at the meeting I received peculiar 
assistance from God. After the meeting, ten shillings were 
given to me. TJiere was purposely no collection, nor did any 
one speak besides myself ; for it was not in the least in- 
tended to work upon the feelings, for I sought to be quite 
sure concerning the mind of God. After the meeting, a 
sister offered herself for the work. I went home, happy in 
the Lord, and full of confidence that the matter will come 
to pass, though but ten shillings have been given. Dec. 
10. I have sent to the press a statement, which contains 
the substance of what I said at the meeting last evening 



130 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. VIL, 

I have received a letter, in which a brother and sister wrote 
thus: "We propose ourselves for the service of the in- 
tended orphan house, if you think us qualified for it ; also 
to give up all the furniture, etc., that the Lord has given us, 
for its use ; and to do this without receiving any salary 
whatever, believing that if it be the will of the Lord to 
employ us, he will supply all our need," etc. In the even- 
ing a brother brought, from several invividuals, three 
dishes, twenty-eight plates, three basins, one jug, four 
mugs, three saltstancls, one grater, four knives, and five 
forks. 

Dec. 12. While I was praying this morning that the 
Lord would give us a fresh token of his favor concerning 
the orphan house, a brother brought three dishes, twelve 
plates, one basin, and one blanket. After this had been 
given, I thanked God, and asked him to give even this 
day another encouragement. Shortly after, fifty pounds 
were given, and that by an individual from whom, for sev- 
eral reasons, I could not have expected this sum. Thus 
the hand of God appeared so much the more clearly. 
Even then I was led to pray that this day the Lord would 
give still more. In the evening, accordingly, there were 
sent, by a sister, twenty-nine yards of print. Also a sister 
offered herself for the work. Dec. 13. A brother was 
influenced this day to give four shillings per week, as 
long as the Lord gives the means ; eight shillings were 
given by him as two weeks* subscription. To-day a brother 
and sister offered themselves, with all their furniture, and 
all their provisions which they have in the house, if they 
can be usefully employed in the concerns of the orphan 
house. 

Dec. 14. To-day a sister offered her services for the 
work. In the evening another sister offered herself for the 
institution. Dec. 15. A sister brought, from several 
friends, ten basins, eight mugs, one plate, five dessert 
spoons, six teaspoons, one skimmer, one toasting-fork, one 



1835. HOME FOR DESTITUTE ORPHANS. 131 

flour-aredge, three knives and forks, one sheet, one pillow- 
case, one table-cloth ; also one pound. In the afternoon 
were sent fifty-five yards of sheeting, and twelve yards of 
calico. Dec. 16. I took out of the box in my room one 
shilling. Dec. 17. I was rather cast down last evening 
and this morning about the matter, questioning whether I 
ought to be engaged in this way, and was led to ask the 
Lord to give me some further encouragement. This even- 
ing a brother brought a quantity of household articles, and 
told me that it had been put into the heart of an individ- 
ual to send to-morrow one hundred pounds. 

Dec. 18. This afternoon the same brother brought the 
hundred pounds above referred to. Since the publication 
of the second edition, it has pleased the Lord to take to 
himself the donor of this hundred pounds, and I therefore 
give, in this present edition, some farther account of the 
donation and the donor. 

A. L. was known to me almost from the beginning of my 
coming to Bristol, in 1832. She earned her bread by 
needle-work, by which she gained from two shillings to 
five shillings per week ; the average, I suppose, was not 
more than three shillings sixpence, as she was weak in 
body. But I do not remember ever to have heard her 
utter a word of complaint on account of earning so little. 
Some time before I had been led to establish an orphan 
house, her father had died, through which event she had 
come in possession of four hundred and eighty pounds, which 
sum had been left to her (and the same amount to her 
brother and two sisters) by her grandmother, but of which 
her father had had the interest during his lifetime. The 
father, who had been much given to drinking, died in debt, 
which debts the children wished to pay ; but the rest, 
besides A. L., did not lilie to pay in full, and offered to the 
creditors twent} T -five per cent., which they gladly accepted, 
as they had not the least legal claim upon the children. 
After the debts had been paid according to this agreement, 



132 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. VII. 

sister A. L. said to herself, " However sinful my father 
may have been, yet he was my father, and as I have the 
means of paying his debts to the full amount, I ought, as 
a believing child, to do so, seeing that my brother and 
sisters will not do it." She then went to all the creditors 
secretly, and paid the full amount of the debts, which took 
forty pounds more of her money, besides her share, which 
she had given before. Her brother and two sisters now 
gave fifty pounds each of their propert} 7 to their mother ; 
but A. L. said to herself, " I am a child of God; surely I 
ought to give my mother twice as much as my brothers and 
sisters." She therefore gave her mother one hundred 
pounds. Shortly after this she sent me the hundred 
pounds towards the orphan house. I was not a little sur- 
prised when I received this money from her, for I had 
alwa} T s known her as a poor girl, and I had never heard 
an} 7 thing about her having come into the possession of this 
money, and her dress had never given me the least indica- 
tion of an alteration in her circumstances. Before, how- 
ever, accepting this money from her, I had a long conver- 
sation with her, in which I sought to probe her as to her 
motives, and in which I sought to ascertain whether, as I 
had feared, she might have given this money in the feeling 
of the moment, without having counted the cost. But I 
had not conversed long with this beloved sister, before I 
found that she was, in this particular, a quiet, calm, con- 
siderate follower of the Lord Jesus, and one who desired, 
in spite of what human reason might say, to act according 
to the words of our Lord, " Lay not up for yourselves 
treasures upon earth." " Sell that ye have, and give 
alms." When I remonstrated with her, in order that I 
might see whether she counted the cost, she said to me, 
" The Lord Jesus has given his last drop of blood for me, 
and should I not give him this hundred pounds ? " She 
would also have me take five pounds for the poor saints in 
communion with us. I mention here particularly that 



1835. HOME FOR DESTITUTE ORPHANS. 133 

this dear sister kept all these things to herself, and did 
them as much as possible in secret ; and during her life- 
time, I suppose, not six brethren and sisters among us 
knew that she had ever possessed four hundred and eighty 
pounds, or that she had given one hundred pounds towards 
the orphan house. 

I relate one instance more. August 4, 1836, seven 
months and a half after she had given the hundred 
pounds, she came one morning to me, and said : " Last 
evening I felt myself particularly stirred up to pray about 
the funds of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution ; but 
whilst praying, I thought, what good is it for me to pray for 
means, if I do not give when I have the means, and I have 
therefore brought you these five pounds." As I had reason 
to believe that, by this time, by far the greater part of her 
money was gone, I again had a good deal of conversation 
with her, to see whether she really did count the cost, and 
whether this donation also was given unto the Lord, or 
from momentary excitement, in which case it was better 
not to give the money. However, she was at this time 
also steadfast, grounded upon the word of God, and evi- 
dently constrained by the love of Christ ; and all the effect 
my conversation had upon her was, that she said, " You 
must take five shillings in addition to the five pounds, as a 
proof that I give the five pounds cheerfully." And thus 
she constrained me to take the five pounds and five shil- 
lings. — Four things are especially to be noticed about this 
beloved sister, with reference to all this period of her 
earthly pilgrimage : 1. She did all these things in secret, 
avoiding to the utmost all show about them, and thus 
proved that she did not desire the praise of man 2. She 
remained, as before, of an humble and lowly mind, and she 
proved thus that she had done what she did unto the Lci*i, 
and not unto man. 3. Her dress remained, during all the 
time that she had this comparative abundance, the same as 
oefore. It was clean, yet as simple and as inexpensive as 



134 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. VII. 

it was at the time when all her income consisted of three 
shillings and sixpence, or at most five shillings per week. 
There was not the least difference as to her lodging, dress, 
manner of life, etc. She remained in every way the poor 
handmaid of the Lord, as to all outward appearance. 4. 
But that which is as lovely as the rest, she continued work- 
ing at her needle all this time. She earned her two shil 
lings-sixpence, or three shillings, or a little more, a week, 
by her work, as before ; whilst she gave away the money in 
sovereigns or five-pound notes. At last all her money was 
gone, and that some } r ears before she fell asleep ; and as 
her bodily health never had been good as long as I had 
known her, and was now much worse, she found herself 
peculiarly dependent upon the Lord, who never forsook 
her, up to the last moments of her earthly course. Her 
body became weaker and weaker, in consequence of which 
she was able to work very little, for many months before 
she died ; but the Lord supplied her with all she needed, 
though she never asked for anything. For instance, a sis- 
ter in communion with us sent her, for many months, all 
the bread she used. Her mouth was full of thanksgiving, 
even in the midst of the greatest bodily sufferings. 

Dec. 31. This evening we had a special meeting for 
prayer and praise. There have been received into the 
church, during the past year, 59. There are men in com- 
munion with us, 95. I have received for my temporal 
wants, in freewill offerings, presents, etc., £285 Is. l£d. 

During January to May of 1836, numerous donations 
were made of furniture, provisions, half-worn clothing, 
and money (varying from one hundred pounds to a 
halfpenny). Encouraged by these unsolicited offerings, 
Mr. Miiller determined to open the Orphan House. 

April. 21. This day was set apart for prayer and 



1836. HOME FOR DESTITUTE ORPHANS. 135 

thanksgiving concerning the Orphan House, as it is now 
opened. In the morning, several brethren prayed, and 
brother Craik spoke on the last verses of Psalm xx. In 
the afternoon, I addressed our day and Sunday school 
children, the orphans, and other children present. .In the 
evening we had another prayer meeting. There are now 
seventeen children in the Orphan House. 

May 6. I have now been for some years, and especially 
these last few months, more or less thinking and praying 
respecting publishing a short account of the Lord's dealings 
with me. To-day I have at last settled to do so, and have 
begun to write. 

May 16. For these several weeks our income has been 
little ; and though I had prayed many times that the Lord 
would enable us to put by the taxes, yet the prayer remained 
unanswered. In the midst of it all, my comfort was, that 
the Lord would send help by the time it would be needed. 
One thing particularly has been a trial to us of late, far 
more than our own temporal circumstances, which is, that 
we have scarcely, in any measure, been able to relieve the 
distress among the poor saints. To-day, the Lord, at last, 
after I had many times prayed to him for these weeks 
past, answered my prayers, there being seven pounds 
twelve shillings and one farthing given to me as nry part 
of the freewill offerings through the boxes, — two five-pound 
notes having been put in yesterda} 7 , one for brother Craik 
and one for me. Thus the Lord has again delivered us, 
and answered our prayers, and that not one single hour too 
late; for the taxes have not as yet been called for. May he 
fill my heart with gratitude for this fresh deliverance, and 
may he be pleased to enable me more and more to trust in 
him, and to wait patiently for his help. 




CHAPTER VIII. 

THE FIELD WIDENING. 

1836 — 1837. 

AN UNEXPECTED OBSTACLE — IMPLICIT SUBMISSION — A SECOND ORPHAN 
HOUSE PROPOSED — AN ENCOURAGING TEXT — THE NEW ORPHAN HOUSE 
OPENED — COMPLETED ANSWER TO PRAYER — PROGRESS OF THE LORD'S 
WORK — THE OVERSIGHT OF THE FLOCK. 

'AY 18, 1836. In the foregoing pages, a state- 
ment has been given of the success with which 
the Lord has been pleased to crown the prayers 
of his servant respecting the establishment of 
an Orphan House in this city. The subject of my prayer 
was that he would graciously provide a house, either as a 
loan or as a gift, or that some one might be led to pay the 
rent for. one ; further, that he would give me one thousand 
pounds for the object, and likewise suitable individuals to 
take care of the children. A day or two after, I was led to 
ask, in addition to the above, that he would put it into the 
hearts of his people to send me articles of furniture, and 
some clothes for the children. In answer to these petitions, 
many articles of furniture, clothing, and food were sent ; a 
conditional offer of a house, as a gift, was made ; individuals 
proposed themselves to take care of the children, and vari- 
ous sums of money were given, varying from one hundred 
pounds to a halfpenny. 

It may be well to state that the above results have fol- 
lowed in answer to prayer, without any one having been 
asked by me for one single thing ; from which I have re- 
frained, not on account of want of confidence in the 
brethren, or because I doubted their love to the Lord, but 
136 



18S6. THE FIELD WIDENING. 137 

that T might see the hand of God so much the more 
clearly. 

So far as I remember, I brought even the most minute 
circumstances concerning the Orphan House before the Lord 
in my petitions, being conscious of my own weakness and 
ignorance. There was, however, one point I never had 
prayed about, namely, that the Lord would send children ; 
for I naturally took it for granted that there would be plenty 
of applications. The appointed time came, and not even 
one application was made. This circumstance now led me 
to lie low before my God in prayer, and to examine my 
heart once more as to all the motives concerning it ; and 
being able, as formerly, to say that his glory was my chief 
aim, L e., that it might be seen that it is not a vain thing 
to trust in the living God, and still continuing in prayer, I 
was at last brought to this state, that I could say from my 
heart that I should rejoice in God being glorified in this 
matter, though it were by bringing the whole to nothing. 
But as still, after all, it seemed to me more tending to the 
glory of God to establish and prosper the Orphan House, I 
could then ask him heartily to send applications. I en- 
joyed now a peaceful state of heart concerning the subject, 
and was also more assured than ever that God would estab- 
lish it. The very next day the first application was made, 
and within a short time forty-three applied. I rented the 
house No. 6, Wilson street, as being, on account of its 
cheapness and largeness, very suitable. 

I have mentioned that we intended to take in the children 
from the seventh to the twelfth year. But after six appli- 
cations had been made for children between four and six 
years of age, it became a subject of solemn prayerful con- 
sideration, whether, as long as there were vacancies, such 
children should not be received, though so young. I came 
at last to the conclusion to take in the little girls under 
seven years of age, for whom application had been made. 
Further, it had been repeatedly brought before me, how 
12* 



.38 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. VIII. 

desirable it would be to establish also, in this city, an 
Orphan House for male children, and there were even arti- 
cles sent for little orphan boys. Partly, then, on account of 
these reasons ; and partly because the Institution already 
opened was quite filled in a few clays ; and partly because 
the Lord has done hitherto far above what I could have 
expected ; I have at last, after repeated prayer, come to 
the conclusion, in the name of the Lord, and in dependence 
upon him alone for support, to propose the establishment 
of an Infant Orphan House. 

June 3. From May 16 up to this day I have been con- 
fined to the house, and a part of the time to my bed, on 
account of a local inflammation, which keeps me from 
walking. Almost every day during this time I have been 
able to continue writing a narrative of the Lord's dealings 
with me, which had been again laid aside after May 7, on 
account of a number of pressing engagements. It is very 
remarkable that the greatest objection against writing it for 
the press was want of time. Now, through this affliction, 
which leaves my mind free, and gives me time, on account 
of confinement to the house, I have been able to write about 
a hundred quarto pages. 

June 14. This morning brother C r and I prayed 

unitedly, chiefly about the schools and the circulation of 
the Scriptures. Besides asking for blessings upon the 
work, we have also asked the Lord for the means which are 
needed ; for on July 1 , seventeen pounds ten shillings will 
be due for the rent of school-rooms, and besides this, we 
want at least forty pounds more to go on with the circu- 
lation of the Scriptures, to pay the salaries of the masters, 
etc. Towards all this we have only about seven pounds. 
I also prayed for the remainder of the thousand pounds for 
the Orphan House. 

June 21. This evening brother C r and I found that 

the Lord had not only been pleased to send us, through the 
offerings which have come in during the last week, in 



1836. THE FIELD WIDENING. 139 

answer to our prayers, the seventeen pounds ten shillings 
which will be due for the rent of two school-roosas on July 
1, but that we have five pounds more than is needed. 
Thus the Lord once more has answered our prayers. 

July 28. For some weeks past we have not been able to 
pay the salary of the masters and governesses a month in 
advance, but have been obliged to pay it weekly. Brother 
C r and I have lately prayed repeatedly together re- 
specting the funds, but we were now brought so low, that 
we should not have been able to pay even this weekly 
salary of the teachers, had not the Lord most remark- 
ably helped us again to-day. For, besides one pound, 
which was given to us, this evening a brother gave eight 
pounds, which sum had been made up by a number of his 
workmen paying weekly one penny each, of their own 
accord, towards our funds. The money had been collecting 
for many months, and, in this our necessity, it had been 
put into the heart of this brother to bring it. 

July 29. This evening, from six to half-past nine, we 
had a meeting for inquirers. There came twelve fresh cases 
before us. 

Oct. 1. To-day, in dependence upon the Lord alone for 
means, we engaged a brother as a master for a sixth day 
school. On account of the many deliverances which we 
have had of late, we have not hesitated to enlarge the field, 
as another boj^s' school was greatly needed. 

Oct. 5. This evening twentj'-five pounds were given to 
me for the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. Thus the 
Lord has already given the means of defraying the expenses 
of the new boys' school for some months to come. 

Oct. 19. To-day, after having many times prayed 
respecting the matter, I have at last engaged a sister as 
matron for the Infant Orphan House, never having been 
able, up to this day, to meet with an individual who seemed 
suitable, though there has been money enough in hand, for 



140 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. VIII. 

some time past, for commencing this work, and there have 
been applications made for several infant orphans. 

Oct. 25. To-day we obtained, without any trouble, 
through the kind hand of God, very suitable premises for 
the Infant Orphan House. 

Nov. 5. There were given b} 7 a brother one hundred 
pounds, fifty pounds of which were previously promised, to 
insure the rent for premises. It is a remarkable fact, 
concerning this donation, that I had, in December of last 
year, repeatedly asked the Lord to incline the heart of this 
brother to give these hundred pounds, and I made a mem- 
orandum of this prayer in my journal of December 12, 
1835. On January 25, 1836, fifty pounds were promised 
by him, and on November 5, fifty pounds besides that sum 
were given ; but it was not till some daj s after, that I 
remembered that the very sum for which I had asked the 
Lord had been given. When it came to my mind that this 
prayer had been noted down in my journal, and I showed 
it to the donor, we rejoiced together ; 7ie, to have been the 
instrument in giving, and i" to have had the request 
granted. 

Nov. 30. On account of many pressing engagements, 
I had not been led, for some time past, to pray respecting 
the funds. But being in great need, I was led, yesterday 
morning, earnestly to ask the Lord ; and in answer to this 
petition a brother gave me, last evening, ten pounds. He 
had had it in his heart, for several months past, to give 
this sum, but had been hitherto kept from it, not having 
the means. Just now, in this our great necessity, the 
Lord furnished him with the means, and we were helped in 
this way. In addition to these ten pounds, I received last 
evening a letter with five pounds, from a sister whom I 
never saw, and who has been several times used by God as 
an instrument to supply our wants. She writes thus : "It 
has been so much on my mind lately to send you some 
money, that I feel as if there must be some need, which 



1837. THE FIELD WIDENING. 141 

the Lord purposes to honor me by making me the instru- 
ment of supplying. I therefore enclose you five pounds, 
all I have in the house at this moment." 

Dec. 9. One pound, with Mark ix. 36-7 : " And taking 
a little child, he set him in the midst of them," etc., a most 
encouraging passage for this work, the force of which I 
had never felt before. 

Dec. 15. This day was set apart for prayer and thanks- 
giving respecting the Infant Orphan House, which was 
opened on Nov. 28. In the morning we had a prayer 
meeting. In the afternoon, besides prayer and thanks- 
giving, I addressed the children of our day schools and 
the orphans, about 350, on Ecclesiastes xii. 1. 

Dec. 31. We had this evening a prayer meeting to 
praise the Lord for his goodness during the past year, and 
to ask him for a continuance of his favors. 

During the past year there have been received into the 
church, 52 ; and the Lord has been pleased to give me, as 
it regards my temporal supplies, £232 lis. 9d. 

REVIEW OF THE YEAR 1836. 

In addition to the items mentioned above, donations 
were received during the year, of money, food, clothes, 
books, boxes, coal-hods, ornaments (to be sold), etc. ; 
also, the offer of gratuitous medical attendance, and med- 
icine. Up to the close of 1836, seven hundred and seventy 
pounds and ninepence halfpenny had been given, and 
forty pounds promised. 

Jan. 2, 1837. This evening the two churches had again 
an especial prayer meeting. 

Jan. 5. To-day a sister called and told me about the 
conversion of her father, who, in his eightieth year, after 
having for many years lived openly in sin, is at last 



142 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. VIII. 

brought to the knowledge of the Lord. This sister had 
long prayed for the conversion of her father, and at last, 
though only after twenty years, the Lord gave her the 
desire of her heart. 

May 18. There are now sixty-four children in the two 
Orphan Houses, and two more are expected, which will fill 
the two houses. 

May 28. The narrative of some of the Lord's dealings 
with me is now near being published, which has led me 
again most earnestly this day week, and repeatedly since, 
to ask the Lord that he would be pleased to give me what 
is wanting of the one thousand pounds, for which sum I 
have asked him on behalf of the orphans ; for though, in 
my own mind, the thing is as good as done, so much so 
that I have repeatedly been able to thank God that he 
will surely give me every shilling of that sum, yet to 
others this will not be enough. As the whole matter, then, 
about the Orphan House had been commenced for the 
glory of God, that in this way before the world and the 
church there might be another visible proof that the Lord 
delights in answering prayer ; and as there was yet a part 
of the thousand pounds wanting ; and as I earnestly desired 
the book might not leave the press before every shilling of 
that sum had been given in answer to prayer, luithout one 
single individual having been asked by me for anything , that 
thus I might have the sweet privilege of bearing my testi- 
mony for God in this book ; — for these reasons, I say, I 
have given myself earnestly to prayer about this matter 
since May 21. On May 22 came in seven pounds and ten 
shillings, and on May 23, three pounds. On May 24, a 
lacly, whom I never saw before, called on me, and gave me 
forty pounds. This circumstance has greatly encouraged 
me ; for the Lord showed me thereby, afresh, his willing- 
ness to continue to send us large sums, and that they cac 
even come from individuals whom we have never seen 
before. 



1837. TIIE FIELD WIDENING. 143 

June !5. To-day I gave myself once more earnestly to 
prayer respecting the remainder of the thousand pounds. 
This evening five pounds were given, so that now the 
whole sum is made up. During eighteen months and ten 
clays this petition has been brought before God almost 
daily. From the moment I asked till the Lord granted it 
full}", I had never been allowed to doubt that he would 
give every shilling of that sum. Often have I praised him 
beforehand, in the assurance that he would grant my 
request* The thing after which we have especially to seek 
in prayer is, that we believe that we receive, according to 
Markxi. 24: "What things soever ye desire, when ye pray <> 
believe that ye receive them, and ye shall have them." 

As the Lord has so greatly condescended to listen to my 
prayers, and as I consider it one of the particular talents 
which he has entrusted to me to exercise faith upon his 
promises, as it regards my own temporal wants and those 
of others ; and as an Orphan House for boys above seven 
years of age seems greatly needed in this city ; and as 
also without it we know not how to provide for the little 
boys in the Infant Orphan House, when they are above 
seven years of age, I purpose to establish an Orphan 
House for about forty boys above seven years of age. 

July 12. The same friend who gave me on May 24, 1837, 
forty pounds for the orphans, and whom, up to that time, 1 
had never seen, gave four hundred and sixty pounds more 
being altogether five hundred pounds. 

It is now three years and four months since brother Craii 
and I began, in dependence upon the Lord for funds, U 
seek to help the spread of the gospel through the instru 
mentality of schools, the circulation of the Holy Scrip- 
tures, and by aiding missionary exertions. Since the# 
there have been circulated, through our instrumentality, 
4,030 copies of the Scriptures; four day schools, for poor 
children, have been established by us ; 1,119 children have 
been instructed in the six day schools, and 353 children are 



144 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. VIII. 

now in those six day schools. Besides this, a Sunday 
school and an adult school have been supplied with all 
they needed, and missionary exertions in the East Indies, 
in Upper Canada, and on the continent of Europe, have 
been aided. In addition to this, the word of God has been 
preached from house to house among the poor, in connec- 
tion with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, by brother 
C r, within the last two years. 

On the fifteenth of August, 1837, the preceding portion 
of this narrative was published. 

Aug. 17. To-day two more children were received into 
the Infant Orphan House, which makes up our full number, 
sixty-six in the Girls' and Infant Orphan Houses. 

Sept. 2. I have been looking about for a house for the 
orphan boys, these last three days. Everything else has 
been provided. The Lord has given suitable individuals to 
take care of the children, money, etc. In his own time he 
will give a house also. 

Sept. 19. It was to-dajr particularly impressed upon my 
heart that I ought to seek for more retirement, though the 
work should apparently suffer ever so much ; and that ar- 
rangements should be made whereby I may be able to visit 
the brethren more, as an unvisited church will sooner or 
later become an unhealthy church. Pastors, as fellow-labor- 
ers, are greatly needed among us. 

Sept. 28. I have for a long time been too much out- 
wardly engaged. Yesterday morning I spent about three 
hours in the vestry at Gideon, to be able to have more time 
for retirement. I meant to do the same in the afternoon, 
but before I could leave the house I was called on, and thus 
one person after the other came, till I had to go out. Thus 
it has been again to-day. 

Oct. 16. For a long time past Brother Craik and I have 
felt the importance of more pastoral visiting, and it has 



1837. THE FIELD WIDENING. 145 

been one of our greatest trials that we have been unable to 
give more time to it. This evening we had purposely a 
meeting of the two churches, at which brother Craik and I, 
and a brother from Devonshire, spoke on : I. The importance 
of pastoral visiting. II. The particular obstacles which 
hindered us in attending to it. III. The question whether 
there was any way of removing some of the obstacles. 

I. As to the importance of pastoral visiting, the follow- 
ing points were mentioned: 1. Watching over the saints, 
by means of visiting them, to prevent coldness, or to re- 
cover them from backsliding. 2. To counsel and advise 
them in family affairs, in their business, and in spiritual 
matters. 3. To keep up that loving and familiar inter- 
course which is so desirable between saints and those who 
have the oversight of them. These visits should be, if 
possible, frequent ; but in our case there have been several 
obstacles in the way. 

II. The particular obstacles in our case are : 1 . The 
largeness of the number who are in communion with us. 
One hundred would be quite as many as we have strength 
to visit regularly, and as often as would be desirable ; but 
there are nearly four hundred in fellowship with us. 2. 
The distance of the houses of the saints from our own 
dwellings, as many live more than two miles off. 3. The 
Lord's blessing upon our labors. Not one }^ear has passed 
awa}^, since we have been in Bristol, without more than 
fifty having been added to our number, each of whom, in 
general, needed several times to be conversed with before 
being admitted into fellowship. 4. That brother Craik and 
I have each of us the care of two churches. At the first 
sight it appears as if the work is thus divided, but the 
double number of meetings, etc., nearly double the work. 
5. The mere ruling, and taking care, in general, of a large 
body of believers, irrespective of the other work, takes 
much more time, and requires much more strength, than 
the taking care of a small body of believers, as we, b} T 

13 



146 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. VII 

grace, desire not to allow known sin among us. 6. The 
position which we have in the church at large brings many 
brethren to us who travel through Bristol, who call on us, 
or lodge with us, and to whom, according to the Lord's 
will, we have to give some time. 7. In my own case, an 
extensive needful correspondence. 8. The weakness of 
body on the part of both of us. When the preaching is 
done, — when strangers who lodge with us are gone, — 
when the calls at our house are over, — when the needful 
letters, however briefly, are written, — when the necessary 
church business is settled, — our minds are often so worn 
out that we are glad to be quiet. 9. But suppose we have 
bodily strength remaining, after the above things have 
been attended to, yet the frame of mind is not always so 
as that one could visit. After having been particularly 
tried by church matters, which in so large a bodj^ doss not 
rarely occur, or being cast down in one's own soul, one 
may be fit for the closet, but not for visiting the saints. 
10. Lastly, in my own case, no small part of my time is 
taken up by attending to the affairs of the Orphan Houses, 
schools, the circulation of the Scriptures, the aiding mis- 
sionary efforts, and other work connected with the Scrip- 
tural Knowledge Institution. 

III. What is to be done under these circumstances? 
1. In the daj^s of the apostles there would have been more 
brethren to take the oversight of so large a body as we are. 
The Lord has not laid upon us a burden which is too heavy 
for us ; he is not a hard Master. It is evident that he does 
not mean us even to attempt to visit all the saints as much 
as is evidently needful, and much less as fiequentty as it 
would be desirable. We mention this, to prevent uncom- 
fortable feelings on the part of the dear saints under our 
pastoral care, who find themselves not as much visited us 
they used to be when we came to Bristol, when the number 
of them was not seventy, and now it is about four hundred, 
and when in many other respects the work in our hands 



#837. THE FIELD WIDENING. 147 

was not half so much as it is now, and when we had much 
more bodily strength. 2. It is therefore evident that there 
are other pastors needed ; not nominal pastors, but such as 
the Lord has called, to whom he has given a pastor's heart 
and pastoral gifts. 3. Such may be raised up by the Lord 
froin our own number, or the Lord may send them from 
elsewhere. 4. But in the mean time we should at least 
see whether there are not helpers among us. 5. As to the 
work itself, in order that time may be saved, it appears 
desirable that the two churches, Bethesda and Gideon, 
should be united into one, that the breaking of bread should 
be alternately, and that the number of weekly meetings 
should be reduced. 

Oct. 21. To-day the Lord has given me a house for the 
Orphan Boys, in the same street in which the other two 
Orphan Houses are. 

Mr. Miiller's health having suffered from his cares, 
money was sent him from unexpected sources, to be 
used in travelling and recreation. 

REVIEW OF THE YEAR 1837. 

1. There are now eighty-one children in the three Orphan Houses, 
and nine brethren and sisters, who have the care of them. Ninety, 
therefore, daily sit down to table. Lord, look on the necessities of 
thy servant ! 

2. The schools require as much help as before ; nay, more, partic- 
ularly the Sunday school, in which there are at present about 320 chil- 
dren, and in the day schools about 350. Lord, thy servant is a poor 
man ; but he has trusted in thee, and made his boast in thee, before 
the sons of men ; therefore let him not be confounded ! Let it not be 
said all this was enthusiasm, and therefore it is come to naught ! 

3. My temporal supplies have been £307 2s. 6^d. 




CHAPTEE IX. 

TRIAL. 

1838. 

THE JoTNISTRY OF SICKNESS — PEACE OF BUND— JESUS A PRESENT HELT — 
DEEP POVERTY — PLEADING WITH GOD — UNITED PRATER. 

ANUARY 6, 1838. I feel little better in my head, 
though my general health seems improved ; but my 
kind physician sa} T s I am much better, and advises 
now change of ah'. This evening a sister, who resides 
about fifty miles from hence, and who is quite unacquainted 
with the medical advice given to me this morning, sent me 
fifteen pounds for the express purpose of change of air ; 
and wrote that she felt assured, from having been similarly 
afflicted, that nothing would do me so much good, humanly 
speaking, as quiet and change of air. 

Jan. 7. This is the ninth Lord's day that I have been 
kept from ministering in the word. My affliction is con- 
nected with a great tendency to irritability of temper ; yea, 
with some satanic feeling, foreign to me even naturally. 

Jan. 10. To-day I went with my family to Trowbridge. 
Jan. 14. Lord's day. I have spent several hours in prayer 
to-day, and read on my knees, and prayed for two hours 
over Psalm lxiii. God has blessed my soul much to-day. 
My soul is now brought into that state that I delight my- 
self in the will of God, as it regards my health. Yea, I can 
now say, from my heart, I would not have this disease 
removed till God, by its means, has bestowed the blessing 
for which it was sent. 
148 



1838. TRIAL. 149 

His health remaining feeble, Mr. M. left England on 
April 6, for Germany, and returned to Bristol, May 7. 
He continues his narrative : — 

May 8. This evening I went to the prayer meeting at 
Gideon. I read Psalm ciii., and was able to thank the 
Lord publicly for my late affliction. This is the first time 
that I have taken any part in the public meetings of the 
brethren since November 6, 1837. 

July 12. The funds, which were this day twelvemonth 
about seven hundred and eighty pounds, are now reduced to 
about twenty pounds ; but, thanks be to the Lord, my faith 
is as strong or stronger, than it was when we had the larger 
sum in hand ; nor has he at any time, from the commence- 
ment of the work, allowed me to distrust him. Neverthe- 
less, as our Lord will be inquired of, and as real faith is 
manifested as such by leading to prr$ T er, I gave myself to 

prayer with brother T , of the Boys' Orphan House, 

who had called on me, and who, besides my wife and 
brother Craik, is the only individual to whom I speak about 
the state of the funds. While we were prajang, an orphan 
child from Frome was brought, and some believers at 
Frome, having collected among them five pounds, sent this 
mone3 T with the child. Thus we received the first answer 
at a time of need. We have given notice for seven children 
to come in, and purpose to give notice for five more, though 
our funds are so low, hoping that God will look on our 
necessities. 

July 17, 18. These two clays we have had two especial 
prayer meetings, from six to nine in the evening, to com- 
mend publicly to the Lord the Boys' Orphan House. Our 
funds are now very low. There are about twenty pounds 
in hand, and in a few days thirty pounds, at least, will be 
needed ; but I purposely avoided sa3~ing anything about our 
present necessities, and spoke on!}' to the praise of God, 
about the abundance with which our gracious Father, " the 
13* 



150 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IX 

Father of the fatherless," has hitherto supplied us. This 
was done in order that the hand of God, in sending help, 
may be so much the more clearly seen. 

July 22. This evening I was walking in our little gar- 
den, meditating on Heb. xiii. 8, "Jesus Christ, the same 
yesterday, and to-day, and forever." Whilst meditating on 
his unchaDgeable love, power, wisdom, etc., and turning all, 
as I went on, into prayer respecting myself; and whilst 
applying likewise his unchangeable love, and power, and 
wisdom, etc., both to my present spiritual and temporal 
circumstances, — all at once the present need of the Orphan 
Houses was brought to my mind. Immediately I was led 
to say to myself, Jesus in his love and power has hitherto 
supplied me with what I have needed for the orphans, and 
in the same unchangeable love and power he will provide 
me with what I may need for the future. A flow of joy 
came into my soul whilst realizing thus the unchangeable- 
ness of our adorable Lord. About one minute after, a letter 
was brought me, enclosing a bill for twenty pounds. 

Aug. 18. I have not one penny in hand for the orphans. 
In a day or two again many pounds will be needed. My 
eyes are to the Lord. Evening. Before this da} 7 is over, 
I have received from a sister live pounds. She had some 
time since put away her trinkets, to be sold for the benefit 
of the orphans. This morning, whilst in prayer, it came 
to her mind, "I have this five pounds, and owe no man 
anything, therefore it would be better to give this money 
at once, as it may be some time before I can dispose of the 
trinkets." She therefore brought it, little knowing that 
there was not a penny in hand. 

Aug. 29. To-day sixteen believers were baptized. 
Among those who were baptized was an aged brother of 
above eighty-four years, and one above seventy. For the 
latter, his believing wife had prayed thirty-eight years, and 
at last the Lord answered her prayers in his conversion. 

Aug. 31. I have been waiting on the Lord for mea^i, 



1838. TRIAL. 151 

as the matron's books from the Girls' Orphan House have 
been brought, and there is no money in hand to advance 
for housekeeping. But. as yet, the Lord has not been 
pleased to send help. As ihe matron called to-day for 
money, one of the laborers gave two pounds of his own, 
for the present necessities. 

Sept. 1. The Lord in his wisdom and love has not yet 
sent help. Whence it is to come, need not be my care. 
But I believe God will, in due time, send help. His hour 
is not yet come. As there was money needed in the Boys' 
Orphan House also, the same brother just alluded to gave 
two pounds for that also. Thus we were delivered at this 
time likewise. But now his means are gone. This is the 
most trying hour that as yet I have had in the work, as it 
regards means ; but I know that I shall yet praise the Lord 
for his help. 

Sept. 5. Our hour of trial continues still. The Lord 
mercifully has given enough to supply our daily necessities ; 
but he gives by the day now, and almost by the hour, as we 
need it. Nothing came in j T esterclay. I have besought the 
Lord again and again, both yesterday and to-day. It is as 
if the Lord said : u Mine hour has not yet come." But I 
have faith in God. I believe that he surely will send help, 
though I know not whence it is to come. Many pounds 
are needed within a few clays, and there is not a penny in 
hand. This morning two pounds were given, for the present 
necessities, by one of the laborers in the work. Evening. 
This very day the Lord sent again some help to encourage 
me to continue to wait on him, and to trust in him. As I 
was praying this afternoon res'pecting the matter, I felt 
fully assured that the Lord would send help, and praised 
him beforehand for his help, and asked him to encourage 
our hearts through it. I have been also led, yesterday and 
to-day, to ask the Lord especially that he would not allow 
my faith to fail. A few minutes after I had prayed? 
brother T came and brought four pounds one shilling 



152 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. IX 

and fivepeiice, which had come in in several small dona- 
tions. He told me, at the same time, that to-morrow the 
books would be brought from the Infant Orphan House, 
when money must be advanced for housekeeping. I 
thought for a moment it might be well to keep three 
pounds of this money for that purpose. But it occurred to 
me immediately, "Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof." 
The Lord can provide by to-morrow much more than I 
need ; and I therefore sent three pounds to one of the 
sisters whose quarterly salary was due, and the remaining 
one pound one shilling and fivepence to the Boys' Orphan 
House for housekeeping. Thus I am still penniless. My 
hope is in God ; he will provide. 

Sept. 6. This morning the books were brought from the 
Infant Orphan House, and the matron sent to ask when 
she should fetch them, implying when they would have 
been looked over, and when money would be advanced for 
housekeeping. I said "to-morrow," though I had not a 

single penny in hand. About an hour after, brother T 

sent me a note, to say that he had received one pound this 
morning, and that last evening a brother had sent twenty- 
nine pounds of salt, forty-four dozen of onions, and twenty- 
six pounds of groats. 1 

Sept. 7. The time had come that I had to send money to 
the Infant Orphan House, but the Lord had not sent any 
more. I gave, therefore, the pound which had come in 3 T es- 
terday, and two shillings and twopence which had been put 
into the box in nry house, trusting to the good Lord to send 
in more. 

Sept. 8. It has not pleased my gracious Lord to send me 
help as yet. Yesterday and to-day I have been pleading 
with God eleven arguments wiry he would be graciously 
pleased to send help. The arguments which I plead with 
God are : — 

1 Groats. Oat9 or other grain, with the hulls removed. — Ed. 



1833. TRIAL. 15^ 

1. That I set about the work for the glory of God, i. e. 5 
that there might be a visible proof, by God supplying, in 
answer to prayer only, the necessities of the orphans, that 
he is the living God, and most willing, even in our day, to 
answer prayer ; and that, therefore, he would be pleased to 
send supplies. 

2. That God is the " Father of the fatherless," and that 
he, therefore, as their father, would be pleased to pro\ide. 
Psalm lxviii. 5. 

3. That I have received the children in the name of 
Jesus, and that therefore he, in these children, has been re- 
ceived, and is fed, and is clothed ; and that therefore he 
would be pleased to consider this. Mark ix. 36, 37. 

4. That the faith of many of the children of God has 
been strengthened by this work hitherto, and that, if God 
were to withhold the means for the future, those who are 
weak in faith would be staggered ; whilst, by a continuance 
of means, their faith might still farther be strengthened. 

5. That many enemies would laugh, were the Lord to 
withhold supplies, and say, Did we not foretell that this 
enthusiasm would come to nothing ? 

6. That many of the children of God who are unin- 
structed, or in a carnal state, would feel themselves justified 
to continue their alliance with the world in the work of 
God, and to go on as heretofore in their unscriptural pro- 
ceedings respecting similar institutions, so far as the 
obtaining of means is concerned, if he were not to help 
me. 

7. That the Lord would remember that I am his child, 
and that he would graciously pity me, and remember that 
I cannot provide for these children, and that therefore he 
would not allow this burden to lie upon me long without 
sending help. 

8. That he would remember likewise my fellow-laborers 
in the work, who trust in him, but who would be tried were 
he to withhold supplies. 



154 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IX. 

9. That he would remember that I should have to dis- 
miss the children from under our scriptural instruction to 
their former companions. 

10. That he would show that those were mistaken who 
said, that, at the first, supplies might be expected, while the 
thing was new, but not afterwards. 

11. That I should not know, were he to withhold means, 
what construction I should put upon all the many most 
remarkable answers to prayer which he had given me here- 
tofore in connection with this work, and which most fully 
have shown to me that it is of God. 

In some small measure I now understand experimentally, 
the meaning of that word " how long" which so frequently 
occurs in the prayers of the Psalms. But even now, by 
the grace of God, my eyes are unto him only, and I believe 
that he will send help. 

Sept. 10. Monday morning. Neither Saturday nor 
yesterday had any money come in. It appeared to me now 
needful to take some steps on account of our need, i. e., to 
go to the Orphan Houses, call the brethren and sisters 

together (who, except brother T , had never been 

informed about the state of the funds) , state the case to 
them, see how much money was needed for the present, tell 
them that amidst all this trial of faith I still believed that 
God would help, and to pray with them. Especially, also, 
I meant to go for the sake of telling them that no more 
articles must be purchased than we have the means to pay 
for, but to let there be nothing lacking in any way to the 
children, as it regards nourishing food and needful cloth- 
ing ; for I would rather at once send them away than that 
they should lack. I meant to go for the sake also of see- 
ing whether there were still articles remaining which had 
been sent for the purpose of being sold, or whether there 
were any articles really needless, that we might turn them 
into money. I felt that the matter was now come to a 
solemn crisis. About half-past nine sixpence came in, 



1838. TRIAL. 155 

which had been put anonymously into the box at Gideon 
Chapel. This money seemed to me like an earnest that 
God would have compassion and send more. About ten, 
after I had returned from brother Craik, to whom I had 
unbosomed my heart again, whilst once more in prayer for 
help, a sister called who gave two sovereigns to my wife 
for the orphans, stating that she had felt herself stirred up 
to come, and that she had delayed coming already too 
long. A few minutes after, when I went into the room 
where she was, she gave me two sovereigns more, and all 
this without knowing the least about our need. Thus the 
Lord most mercifully has sent us a little help, to the great 
encouragement of my faith. A few minutes after I was 
called on for money from the Infant Orphan House, to 
which I sent two pounds, and one pound sixpence to the 
Boys' Orphan House, and one pound to the Girls' Orphan 
House. 

To-day I saw a young brother who, as well as one of his 
sisters, has been brought to the knowledge of the Lord 
through my Narrative. 

Sept. 11. The good Lord, in his wisdom, still sees it 
needful to keep us .very low. But this afternoon brother 

T called, and told me that one of our fellow-laborers 

had sold his metal watch, and two gold pins, for one 
pound one shilling, that nine shillings sixpence had come 
in, and that two of our fellow-laborers had sent two lots of 
books of their own, nineteen and twenty-one in number, to 
be sold for the orphans. 

Sept. 12. Still the trial continues. Only nine shillings 
came in to-day, given by one of the laborers. In the 
midst of this great trial of faith the Lord still mercifully 
keeps me in great peace. He also allows me to see that 
our labor is not in vain ; for yesterday died Leah Culliford, 
one of the orphans, about nine years old, truly converted, 
and brought to the faith some months before her depart- 
ure. 



156 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. IX. 

Sept. 13. No help has come yet. This morning I 
found it was absolutely needful to tell the brethren and 
sisters about the state of the funds, and to give necessary 
directions as to going into debt, etc. We prayed together, 
and had a very happy meeting. They all seemed comfort- 
able. Twelve shillings sixpence was taken out of the 
boxes in the three houses, twelve shillings one of the labor- 
ers gave, and one pound one shilling had come in for 
needlework done by the children. One of the sisters, who 
is engaged in the work, sent a message after me, not to 
trouble myself about her salary, for she should not want 
any for a twelvemonth. 

Sept. 14. I met again this morning with the brethren 
and sisters for prayer, as the Lord has not yet sent help. 
After prayer one of the laborers gave me all the money he 
had, sixteen shillings, saying that it would not be upright 
to pray, if he were not to give what he had. One of the 
sisters told me that in six days she would give me six 
pounds, which she had in the savings-bank for such a time 
of need. Up to this day, the matrons of the three houses 
had been In the habit of paying the bakers and the milk- 
man weekly, because they had preferred to receive the pay- 
merits in this way, and sometimes it had thus been also 
with the butcher and grocer. But now, as the Lord deals 
out to us by the day, we consider it would be wrong to go 
on any longer in this way, as the week's payment might 
become due, and we have no money to meet it ; and thus 
those with whom we deal might be inconvenienced by us, 
and we be found acting against the commandment of the 
Lord, " Owe no man anj-thing." (Eom. xiii. 8.) From this 
day, and henceforward, whilst the Lord gives to us our 
supplies by the day, we purpose, therefore to pay at once 
for every article as it is purchased, and never to buy any- 
thing except we can pay for it at once, however much it 
may seem to be needed, and however much those with 



1838. TRIAL. 157 

whom we deal may wish to be paid only by the week. 
The little which was owed was paid off this day. 

Sept. 15. Saturday. We met again this morning for 
prayer. God comforts our hearts. "We are looking for 
help. I found that there were provisions enough for to-da}*- 
and to-morrow, but there was no money in hand to take in 
bread as usual, in order that the children might not have 
newly baked bread. This afternoon one of the laborers* 
who had been absent for several days from Bristol, returned, 
and gave one pound. This evening we met again for 
prayer, when I found that ten shillings sixpence more had 
come in since the morning. With this one pound ten 
shillings sixpence we were able to buy, even this Saturday 
evening, the usual quantity of bread (as it might be difficult 
to get stale bread on Monday morning) , and have some 
money left. God be praised, who gave us grace to come to 
the decision not to take any bread to-day, as usual, nor to 
buy anything for which we cannot pay at once. We were 
very comfortable, thankfully taking this money out of our 
Father's hands, as a proof that he still cares for us, and that, 
in his own time, he will send us larger sums. 




CHAPTER X. 

DELIVERANCE. 

1838. 

"PERPLEXED BUT NOT IN DESPAIR" — FAITH JUSTIFIED — A LESSON OI OBE- 
DIENCE — BOUNTIFUL SUPPLIES — SPIRITUAL INGATHERING — A DAY OI 
MERCIES — TIMELY AID — A SEASON OF PLENTY — OBEDIENCE REWARDED. 

EPTEMBEE 17. The trial still continues. It is 
now more and more toying, even to faith, as each 
day comes. But I am sure God will send help, if we 
can but wait. One of the laborers had had a little 
money come in, of whichhe gave twelve shillings sixpence ; 
another laborer gave eleven shillings eightpence, being all 
the money she had left ; this, with seventeen shillings six- 
pence, which partly had come in, and partly was in hand, 
enabled us to pay what needed to be paid, and to purchase 
provisions, so that nothing yet, in any waj^, has been lack- 
ing. This evening I was rather tried respecting the long 
clela}^ of larger sums coming ; but being led to go to the 
Scriptures for comfort, my soul was greatly refreshed, and 
my faith again strengthened, by Psalm xxxiv., so that I 
went very cheerfully to meet with my dear fellow-laborers 
for prayer. I read to them the Psalm, and sought to cheer 
their hearts through the precious promises contained in it. 

Sept. 18. Brother T. had twenty-five shillings in hand, 
and I had three shillings. This one pound eight shillings 
enabled us to buy the meat and bread which were needed, a 
little tea for one of the houses, and milk for all ; no more 
than this is needed. Thus the Lord has provided not only 
for this day, but there is bread for two days in hand. Now, 
however, we are come to an extremity. The funds are ex- 
158 



1838. DELIVERANCE. 159 

haustecl. The laborers who had a little money have given 
as long as they had any left. Now observe how the Lord 
helped us ! A lady from the neighborhood of London, who 
brought a parcel with money from her daughter, arrived four 
or five days since in Bristol, and took lodgings next door 
to the Boys' Orphan House. This afternoon she herself 
kindly brought me the money, amounting to three pounds 
two shillings and sixpence. We had been reduced so low 
as to be on the point of selling those things which could be 
spared ; but this morning I had asked the Lord, if it might 
be, to prevent the necessity of our doing so. That the 
money had been so near the Orphan Houses for several 
days without being given, is a plain proof that it was from 
the beginning in the heart of God to help us ; but, because 
he delights in the prayers of his children, he had allowed 
us to pray so long ; also to try our faith, and to make the 
answer much the sweeter. It is indeed a precious deliver- 
ance. I burst out into loud praises and thanks the first 
moment I was alone after I had received the money. I 
met with my fellow-laborers again this evening for prayer 
and praise ; their hearts were not a little cheered. This 
money was this evening divided, and will comfortably pro- 
vide for all that will be needed to-morrow. 1 

Sept. 20. Morning. The Lord has again kindly sent in 
a little. Last evening was given to me one shilling , and 
sixpence, and this morning one pound three shillings. 
Evening. This evening the Lord sent still further sup- 
plies ; eight pounds eleven shillings and twopence halfpenny 
came in, as a further proof that the Lord is not unmindful 
of us. There was in the box of the Girls' Orphan House 



1 In July, 1845, he thus refers to this day: — "I have been only once tried in 
spirit, and that was on Sept. ISth, 1838, when, for the first time, the Lord seemed 
not to regard our prayer. But when he did send help at that time, and I saw that 
it was only for the trial of our faith, and not because he had forsaken the work 
that we were brought so low, my soul was so strengthened and encouraged, that 
I have not only not been allowed to distrust the Lord, but I have not even been cast 
down when in the deepest poverty, since that time." 



160 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. X. 

one pound one shilling, and in that of the Bo3 T s' Orphan 
House one pound seven shillings and twopence halfpenr^. 
One of the laborers, in accordance with her promise this 
day week, gave six pounds three shillings. About eighteen 
months ago she saw it right no longer to have money for 
herself in the savings-bank, and she therefore, in her 
heart, gave the money which she had there to the Orphan 
Houses, intending to draw it in a time of need. Some 
time since (she told me this evening) she drew a part of it 
to buy several useful articles for the Orphan Houses ; now 
the sum was reduced to six pounds. When she found out 
the present need, she went this day week to the savings- 
bank, and gave notice that she wished to draw her money 
to-day. 

Sept. 22. Both yesterday and to-day we have again 
assembled for prayer and praise. We are in no immediate 
want, but on the 29th, nineteen pounds ten shillings will 
be due for the rent of the three Orphan Houses. To-day 
there was only four shillings and sevenpence in hand for 
the other objects of the institution, though it was the pay- 
day for some of the teachers. My comfort was the living 
God. During this week he had helped me so repeatedly 
and in such a remarkable way, as it regards the Orphan 
Houses, that it would have been doubly sinful not to have 
trusted in him for help under this fresh difficulty. No 
money came in this morning. About two, the usual time 
when the teachers are paid, a sovereign was given, with 
which I went immediately to brother T., who attends to 
this part of the work, to pay, at least in part, the weekly 
salaries. I found that he had received a sovereign in the 
morning. By means of this sovereign, together with the 
one which I had received just at the moment when it was 
needed, we were helped through this day. 

Sept. 29. Saturday evening. Prayer has been made 
for several days past respecting the rent, which is due this 
day. I have been looking out for it, though I knew not 



1838. DELIVERANCE. 1G1 

whence a shilling was to come. This morning brother T. 
called on me, and, as no money had come in, we prayed 
together, and continued in supplication from ten till a 
quarter to twelve. Twelve o'clock struck, the time when 
the rent ought to have been paid, but no money had been 
sent. For some days past I have repeatedly had a mis- 
giving, whether the Lord might not disappoint us, in order 
that we might be led to provide by the week, or the day, for 
the rent. This is the second, and only the second, complete 
failure as to answers of prayer in the work, during the past 
four years and six months. The first was about the half- 
yearly rent of Castle-Green school-rooms, due July 1, 1837, 
which had come in only in part by that time. I am now 
fully convinced that the rent ought to be put by daily or 
weekly, as God may prosper us, in order that the work, 
even as to this point, may be a testimony. May the Lord, 
then, help us to act accordingly, and may he now mercifully 
send in the means to pay the rent ! 

Oct. 2. Tuesday evening. The Lord's holy name be 
praised ! He hath dealt most bountifully with us during 
the last three days ! The day before yesterday five pounds 
came in for the orphans. O, how kind is the Lord ! 
Always before there has been actual want he has sent help 
Yesterday came in one pound ten shillings more. Thus 
the expenses of yesterday for housekeeping were defrayed. 
The Lord helped me also to pay yesterday the nineteen 
pounds ten shillings for the rent. The means for it were 
thus obtained : One of the laborers had received through 
his family ten pounds, and five pounds besides from a sister 
in the Lord ; also some other money. Of this he gave six- 
teen pounds, which, with the three pounds ten shillings 
that were left of the above-mentioned five pounds, made up 
nineteen pounds ten shillings, the sum which was needed. 
This day we were again greatly reduced. There was no 
money in hand to take in bread, as usual, for the Bo} t s' and 
Infant Orphan Houses. But again the Lord helped. A 
14* 



162 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. X. 

sister who had arrived this afternoon from Swansea brought 
one pound seven shillings, and one of the laborers sold an 
article, by means of which he was able to give one pound 
thirteen shillings. Thus. we had three pounds, — one pound 
for each house, — and could buy bread before the day was 
over. Hitherto we have lacked nothing ! 

Oct. 9. To-day we were brought lower than ever. The 
provisions would have lasted out only to-day, and the 
money for milk in one of the houses could only be made 
up by one of the laborers selling one of his books. The 
matron in the Boys' Orphan House had this morning two 
shillings left. When in doubt whether to buy bread with 
it, or more meat, to make up the dinner with the meat 
which she had in the house, the baker called, and left three 
quarterns of bread as a present. In this great need, some 
money having been given to one of the laborers, he gave 
two pounds of it, by which we were able to buy meat, 
Dread, and other provisions. 

Oct. 10. The coals in the Infant Orphan House are out, 
and nearly so in the other two houses. Also the treacle 
casks in all the three houses are nearly empty. On this 
account we ask the Lord for fresh supplies. 

Oct. 11. The " Father of the fatherless " has again shown 
his care over us. An orphan from Devonshire arrived last 
evening. "With her were sent two pounds five shillings and 
sixpence. The sister who brought her gave also a silver 
tea-pot, sugar-basin, and cream-jug, of the weight of forty- 
eight ounces, having found true riches in Christ. There 
were also in the boxes nine shillings. One of the laborers 
paid for a ton of coals. We obtained sixteen pounds six- 
teen shillings for the silver articles. Thus we were helped 
through the heavy expenses of the following daj T s. 

Oct. 12. To-day seven brethren and sisters were added 
to us in fellowship, and eight were proposed. May the 
Lord send helpers for the work ! 

Oct. 15. I knew that there would be money needed 



1838. DELIVERANCE. 163 

this morning for many things in the Orphan Houses, and 
my heart was therefore lifted up to the Lord. Just when 
I was going to meet my fellow-laborers for prayer, I 
received from Trowbridge four pounds. There had come 
in also at the Orphan Houses seven shillings and three- 
pence. To this one of the laborers added one pound. 
Thus I was enabled abundantly to supply all that was 
wanted, and to pay for a cask of treacle and a ton of coals. 
We are now, however, cast again on the love of our Lord 
for further supplies, as there is neither airything in hand, 
nor have the laborers any more of their own to give. 

Oct. 16. I was looking up to the Lord for help early this 
morning, when, almost immediately afterwards, brother T. 
came, and brought two silver tablespoons and six tea- 
spoons, which had been left anonymously, yesterday after- 
noon, at the Girls' Orphan House. This afternoon I 
received twelve pounds from Staffordshire. 

Oct. 22. To-day our funds were again quite low. In 
the Infant Orphan House only twopence was left, and very 
little in the other two houses. But the Lord most mani- 
festly again answered prayer, by sending four pounds three 
shillings and one penny. 

Oct. 27. Thanks to our adorable Lord ! this day also we 
have not been confounded ; for there were six shillings in 
the box at the Infant Orphan House, and six shillings came 
in for things which had been given to be sold. To this one 
of the laborers added eighteen shillings. By means of this 
one pound ten shillings we have been able to meet all 
pressing demands, and to procure provisions for to-day and 
to-morrow. 

Oct. 80. This has been again a dajr of peculiar mercies 
in reference to the funds. Whilst I was in prayer respect- 
ing them a brother brought two and a quarter yards of 
cloth. He had bought it for himself, but afterwards, consid- 
ering that he had sufficient clothes, he gave it to be sold 
for the orphans, This evening a sister gave me twenty 



164 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. X. 

pounds, ten of which were for the orphans and ten for the 
other objects. 

Nov. 7. The funds are now again completely exhausted. 

Nov. 13. This morning our want was again great. I 
have twenty pounds in hand, which have been put by for 
rent, but, for the Lord's honor, I would not take of it. Noth- 
ing had come in, and the laborers had scarcely anything to 
give. I went, however, to the Orphan Houses to pray with 
my fellow-laborers, and, if it might be, to comfort them, 
and see what could be done. When I came there I found 
that nineteen shillings and sixpence had come in this morn- 
ing. On inquiry I heard that only two shillings and six- 
pence more were needed to carry us through the day. This 
one of the laborers was able to add of his own. Thus the 
Lord has again helped us out of our difficulty. One of the 
laborers gave some things which he could do without, and 
another gave a workbox to be sold for the orphans. Before 
this day has come to an end, the Lord has sent in one 
pound two shillings and fourpence more, so that we have 
also a little for to-morrow. 

Nov. 21. Never were we so reduced in funds as to-day. 
There was not a single halfpenny in hand between the 
matrons of the three houses. Nevertheless, there was a 
good dinner, and by managing so as to help one another 
with bread, etc., there was a prospect of getting over this 
day also ; but for none of the houses had we the prospect 
of being able to take in bread. When I left the brethren 
and sisters at one o'clock, after praj^er, I told them that we 
must wait for help, and see how the Lord would deliver us 
at this time. I was sure of help, but we were indeed strait- 
ened. When I came to Kingsdown, I felt that I needed 
more exercise, being very cold, wherefore I went not the 
nearest way home, but round by Clarence-place. About 
twenty } T ar<2s from my house I met a brother who walked 
back with me, and after a little conversation gave me ten 
pounds to be handed over to the brethren, the deacons, 



1838. DELIVERANCE. 1G5 

towards providing the poor saints with coals, blankets, and 
warm clothing ; also five pounds for the orphans, and five 
pounds for the other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge 
Institution. The brother had called twice while I was gone 
to the Orphan Houses, and had I now been one half minute 
later I should have missed him. But the Lord knew our 
need, and therefore allowed me to meet him. 

Nov. 24. This again has been a very remarkable day. 
We had as little in hand this morning as at any time, and 
yet several pounds were needed. But God, who is rich in 
merc}^, and whose word so positively declares that none 
who trust in him shall be confounded, has helped us through 
this day also. "While I was in praj^er about ten in the 
morning, respecting the funds, I was informed that a gen- 
tleman had called to see me. He came to inform me that 
a lady had ordered three sacks of potatoes to be sent to the 
Orphan Houses. Never could they have come more season- 
ably. This was an encouragement to me to continue to 
expect help. When I came to the prayer meeting, about 
twelve o'clock, I heard that two shillings had come in, also 
one pound for a guitar, which had been given for sale. The 
payment for this guitar had been expected for many weeks. 
It had been mentioned among us repeatedly that it might 
come just at a time when we most needed it ; and oh, how 
true ! But with all this we could not have put by the rents 
for this week, amounting to thirty shillings. One of the 
laborers therefore gave his watch to the orphan fund, under 
this condition, that should the Lord not enable us before 
Dec. 21 to make up this deficiency, it should be sold, but 
not otherwise, as he needs it in the Lord's service. [A few 
days after the Lord gave the means to put by the thirty 
shillings, and thirty shillings besides for the next week's 
rent.] Thus the Lord helped us through this day, and with 
it brought us to the close of one more week. 

Nov. 28. This is perhaps of all days the most remark- 
able as yet, so far as it regards the funds. When I was in 



166 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. X 

prayer this morning respecting them, I was enabled firmly 
to believe that the Lord would send help, though all seemed 
dark as to natural appearances. At twelve o'clock I met 
as usual with the brethren and sisters for prayer. There 
had come in only one shilling, which was left last evening 
anonymously at the Infant Orphan House, and which, ex- 
cept twopence, had already been spent, on account of the 
great need. I heard also that an individual had gratuit- 
ously cleaned the timepiece in the Infant Orphan House, 
and had offered to keep the timepieces in the three houses 
in repair. Thus the Lord gave even in this a little encour- 
agement, and a proof that he is still mindful of us. On 
inquiry I found that there was everything needful for the 
dinner in all the three houses ; but neither in the Infant nor 
Boys' Orphan Houses was there bread enough for tea, nor 
money to buy milk. Lower we had never been, and per- 
haps never so low. "We gave ourselves now unitedly to 
prayer, laying the case in simplicity before the Lord. 
Whilst in prayer there was a knock at the door, and one of 
the sisters went out. After the two brethren who labor in 
the Orphan Houses and I had prayed aloud, we continued 
for a while silently in prayer. As to myself, I was lifting 
up my heart to the Lord to make a way for our escape, and 
in order to know if there were any other thing which I 
could do with a good conscience, besides waiting on him, 
so that we might have food for the children. At last we 
rose from our knees. I said, " God will surely send help." 
The words had not quite passed over my lips, when I per- 
ceived a letter lying on the table, which had been brought 
whilst we were in prayer. It was from my wife, containing 
another letter from a brother with ten pounds for the 
orphans. The evening before last I was asked by a brother 
whether the balance in hand for the orphans would be as 
great this time, when the accounts would be made up, as 
the last time. My answer was that it would be as great as 
the Lord pleased. The next morning this brother was 



1838. DELIVERANCE. 167 

moved to remember the orphans, and to send to-day ten 
pounds, which arrived after I had left my house, and which, 
on account of our need, was forwarded immediately to me. 
The brother who sent the ten pounds for the orphans sent 
likewise ten pounds to be divided between brother Craik 
and me, with the object of purchasing new clothes for 
ourselves. 

Dec. 6. This afternoon I received one hundred pounds 
from a sister, — fifty for the orphans, and fifty for the 
school, Bible, and missionary fund. This same sister, who 
earns her bread with her own hands, had given, on October 
5, 1837, fifty pounds towards the Boys' Orphan House, and 
gave for the necessities of the poor saints, in August, 
1838, one hundred pounds more ; for she had been made 
willing to act out those precious exhortations : " Having 
food and raiment, let us be therewith content." " Sell 
that ye have, and give alms ; provide yourselves bags 
which wax not old, a treasure in the heavens that faileth 
not,. where no thief approacheth, neither moth corrupteth." 
" Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where 
moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break 
through and steal ; but lay up for yourselves treasures in 
heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and 
where thieves do not break through nor steal." Respect 
ing the fifty pounds which have been given of this sum for 
the school, Bible, and missionary fund, it is worthy of 
remark, that we would not order reference Bibles till we 
had the means. We had repeatedly prayed respecting this 
want of Bibles, and particularly again this morning. It 
had been also much laid on our hearts to-day to request 
that the Lord would enable us to have the Report printed, 
which we could not do unless he first sent the means. 
Lastly, we had also repeatedly asked him to supply us so 
largety, if it were his will, as that at the time of the public 
meetings we might be able to speak again of abundance. 
For though for some months past the time has been fixed 



168 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. X. 

for the public meetings, without any reference to the state 
of the funds, nevertheless, it might Lave had the appear- 
ance that we had convened the brethren for the sake of tell- 
ing them about our poverty, and thus to induce them to 
give. 

Dec. 11, 12, and 13. On the evenings of these three days 
there were public meetings, at which I gave an account of 
the Lord's dealing with us in reference to the Orphan 
Houses and the other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge 
Institution. As the work, and particularly that of the 
Orphan Houses, was begun for the benefit of the church at 
large, it appeared well to us that from time to time it 
should be publicly stated how the Lord had dealt with us 
in reference to it; and as, on Dec. 9, the third year had 
been completed since the commencement of the orphan 
work, this seemed to be a suitable time'for having these 
meetings. 

I notice briefly the following particulars respecting the first three 
objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. 1. There is at pres- 
ent — December, 1838 — a Sunday school supported by it, which con- 
tains four hundred and sixty-three children. This part of the work 
calls for particular thanksgiving; for during these last eighteen 
months the number of the children has been nearly three times as 
great as it used to be. Five of the scholars have been converted 
within the last two years, and are now in fellowship with the church, 
and three of them are teachers in the school. 2. There is in con- 
nection with the Institution an adult school, in which, since the com- 
mencement of the work, above one hundred and twenty adults have 
been instructed, and in which at present twelve are taught to read. 
3. The Institution has entirely supported, since its commencement, 
several day schools for poor children, and within the last two years 
six of such, — three for boys and three for girls. The number of all 
the children that have had schooling in the day schools through the 
medium of the Institution, since its formation, amounts to 1,534; the 
number of those at present in the six days schools is 342. 4. During 
the last two years there have been circulated 1,884 copies of the 
Scriptures in connection with the Institution, and since the beginning 
of the work, March 5, 1834, 5,078 copies. 5. For missionary pur- 
poses have been laid out £74, 18s. 4d. 6. The total of the income 



1838. DELIVERANCE. 169 

for the first three objects, during the last two years, was 
£1,129, 13s. Id.; the total of the expense, £1,111, 13s. 7£d. 

There are, at present 86 orphans in the three houses, i. e., 31 in the 
Girls' Orphan House, 31 in the Infant Orphan House, and 24 in the 
Boys' Orphan House. The whole number of orphans who have been 
under our care from April 11, 1836, to Dec. 9, 1838, amounts to 
110. 

The total of the income for the orphans, from Dec. 9, 1836, to 
Dec. 9, 1838, has amounted to £1,341, 4s. 7d. ; the total of the 
expenses to £1,664, 4s. Old. There was two years ago a balance of 
£373, 4s. 8^d. in hand, and now the balance is £50, 5s. 3d. 

Dec. 16. There was a paper anonymously put into the 
box at Bethesda Chapel containing four pounds ten shillings. 
In the paper was written, " For the rent of the Orphan 
Houses, from Dec 10 to Dec. 31, 1838. ' Oh, taste and see 
that the Lord is good : blessed is the man that trusttfh in 
him I ' " In order that the reader may be able to enter into 
the value of this donation, I would request him to read 
over once more what I wrote under " Sept. 29 " of this 
year. [The individual who gave these four pounds ten 
shillings for the rent of the Orphan Houses for the first 
three weeks after the public meetings, at which the matter 
about the rent, for the instruction of the brethren, was fully 
stated, continued for three years, up to Dec. 10, 1841, to 
give regularly, but anonymously, one pound ten shillings a 
week for the same purpose, which was exactly the sum 
required every week for the rent of those three houses. 
Thus the Lord rewarded our faithfulness in canying out the 
light which he had given us. But the chief blessing 
resulting from this circumstance I. consider to be this, — 
that several brethren, who earn their bread by the labor of 
their hands, have learned through this circumstance that it 
is the will of the Lord they should lay by their rent weekly. 
I beseech those brethren who are not pursuing this course 
to do so, and they will soon prove by experience the benefit 
of acting on scriptural principles even as it regards this 
life.] 



170 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. X 

Deo. 17. Today eleven brethren and sisters were pro- 
posed for fellowship. 

Dec. 20. As the expenses for the orphans have been 
above forty-seven pounds within the last six days, and as 
but little above thirteen pounds have come in, and as the 
money for printing the Report had to be kept back, in order 
that we might not be in debt, we were again to-day very 
low in funds, though it is but six days since the public 
meetings. As I knew that to-morrow several pounds would 
be needed to supply the matrons, I gave myself this morn- 
ing to prayer. About a quarter of an hour afterwards I 
received three pounds, the pajmient of a legacy left by a 
sister, who fell asleep in Jesus several months since, in Ire- 
land. Besides this I received from the brother through 
whom the legacy was paid, two pounds ten shillings for the 
orphan fund. With these five pounds ten shillings I hope to 
be able to meet the expenses of to-morrow. 

Dec. 22. A solemn day. I received to-day the informa- 
tion that my brother died on October 7. " Shall not the 
Judge of all the earth do right?" must be the stay of the 
believer at such a time, and, by grace, it is my stay now. 
I know that the Lord is glorified in nry brother, whatever 
his end has been. May the Lord make this event a lasting 
blessing to me, especially in leading me to earnestness in 
prayer for my father. 



REVIEW OF THE TEAK 1838. 

1. As to the church. There are 405 at present in fellowship with 
us ; 61 having been added last year, of whom 36 have been brought 
among us to the knowledge of the truth. 

2. As to my temporal supplies. The Lord has been pleased to give 
me during the past year £350, 4s. 8d. 

During no period of my life had I such need of means, on account 
of my own long illness and that of my dear wife, and on account of the 
many and particular calls for means, as during the past year; but 



1838. DELIVERANCE. 171 

also during no period of ray life has the Lord so richly supplied me. 
Truly, it must be manifest to all that I have served a most kind Mas- 
ter, during this year also, and that, even for this life, it is by far the 
best thing to seek to act according to the mind of the Lord as to tem- 
poral things ! 



CHAPTER XL 

ASKING AND RECEIVING. 

■ 

1839. 

HELP FOR THE POOR SAINTS — THE UNFAILING BANK — MEANS EXHAUSTED — 
LIBERALITY OF A LABORING SISTER — "HE KNOWETH OUR FRAME" — 
REDEEMING THE TIME — GODLINESS PROFITABLE UNTO ALL THINGS. 

Cty/ANUAKY h 2, and 3, 1839. We have had three 
especial church prayer meetings these three days. 
The year commenced with mercies. In the first 
hour of the j r ear there came in for the orphans 
two pounds seven shillings, which were given after our usual 
prayer meeting on Dec. 31, which this time lasted from 
seven in the evening till after midnight. 

Jan. 20. For some time past it has appeared to me that 
the words, " Ye have the poor with you always, and when- 
soever ye will ye may do them good," which the Lord spoke 
to his disciples, ivho were themselves very poor, imply that 
the children of God, as such, have power with God to bring 
temporal blessings upon poor saints or poor unbelievers 
through the instrumentality of prayer. Accordingly, I 
have been led to ask the Lord for means to assist poor 
saints ; and at different times he has stirred up his children 
to intrust me with sums both large and small, for that 
especial object; or has, by some means or other, put money 
at my disposal, which I might so use. In like manner I 
had been asking again for means, a few days since, to be 
able more extensively to assist the poor saints in commu- 
nion with us, as just now many of them are not merely 
tried by the usual temporal difficulties arising from its 
being winter, but especially from the high price of bread. 
172 



1839 ASKING AND EECEIVING. 173 

And now this evening the Lord has given me the answer to 
my prayer. When I came home from the meeting I found 
a brother at my house who offered to give me ten pounds a 
week, for twelve weeks, towards providing the poor saints 
with coals and needful articles of clothing, but chiefly with 
bread. [Accordingly, this brother sent me, two days after- 
wards, one hundred and twenty pounds, whereby very many, 
especially poor widows, were greatly assisted, chiefly with 
flour and bread. This money just lasted till the price of 
bread was reduced from ninepence halfpenny to sevenpence 
halfpenny.] 

Feb. 7. This day has been one of the most remarkable 
days as it regards the funds. There was no money in hand. 
I was waiting upon God. I had asked him repeatedly, but 
no supplies came. Brother T. called, between eleven and 
twelve o'clock, to tell me that about one pound two shil- 
lings would be needed, to take in bread for the three houses 
and to meet the other expenses ; but we had only two 
shillings ninepence, which j r esterday had been taken out of 
the boxes in the Orphan Houses. He went to Clifton to 
make arrangements for the reception of the three orphans 
of our sister Loader, who fell asleep on the fourth ; for, 
though we have no funds in hand, the work goes on, and 
our confidence is not diminished. I therefore requested 
him to call, on his way back from Clifton, to see whether 
the Lord might have sent any money in the mean time. 
When he came I had received nothing, but one of the 
laborers, having five shillings of his own, gave it. It was 
now four o'clock. I knew not how the sisters had got 
through the day. Toward the close of the day I went to 
the Girls' Orphan House, to meet with the brethren for 
prayer. When I arrived there I found that a box had come 
for me from Barnstable. The carriage was paid, else there 
would have been no money to pay for it. (See how the 
Lord's hand is in the smallest matters !) The box was 
opened, and it contained, in a letter from a sister, ten 
15* 



174 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XI. 

pounds, of which eight pounds was for the orphans, and two 
pounds for the Bible Fund ; from brethren at Barnstable, 
two pounds eleven shillings twopence ; and from another 
brother, five shillings. Besides this, there were in the box 
four yards of merino, three pairs of new shoes, two pairs 
of new socks ; also six books for sale ; likewise a gold pen- 
cil-case, two gold rings, two gold drops of earrings, a neck- 
lace and a silver pencil-case. On inquiry how the sisters 
had been carried through the day, I found it thus : every- 
thing was in the houses which was needed for dinner. 
After dinner a lady from Thornbury came and bought one 
of my Narratives and one of the Reports, and gave three 
shillings besides. About five minutes afterwards the baker 
came to the Boys' Orphan House. The matron of the 
Girls' Orphan House, seeing him, went immediately with 
the six shillings sixpence which she had just received (to 
prevent his being sent away, as there was no money in 
hand at the Boys' Orphan House), and bought bread to the 
amount of four shillings sixpence. The two remaining 
shillings, with the little which was in hand, served to buy 
bread for the Girls' Orphan House. By the donations sent 
in the box I was enabled to give a rich supply to the 
matrons before the close of the day. 

Feb. 13. This evening five pounds were given me, which 
had come in under the following circumstances : A gentle- 
man and lady visited the Orphan Houses, and met at the 
Boys' Orphan House two ladies who were likewise visiting. 
One of the ladies said to the matron of the Boys' Orphan 
House, " Of course you cannot carry on these Institutions 
without a good stock of funds." The gentleman, turning 
to the matron, said, " Have you a good stock?" She re- 
plied, " Our funds are deposited in a bank which cannot 
break." The tears came into the eyes of the inquiring lad}'. 
The gentleman, on leaving, gave to the master of the boys 
five pounds, which came in when Iliad not a penny in hand. 

March 5. To-day, however, I knew that there would be- 



1839. ASKING AND RECEIVING. 175 

ag&in several pounds required, as, besides the daily pro- 
visions, there were coals needed, the treacle casks in two 
houses were empty, and there were but five shillings in hand. 
I gave myself therefore to prayer this morning, "Whilst I 
was in prater Q. Q. sent a check for seven pounds ten 
shillings. 

April 13. I conversed with another of the orphans, who 
seems to have been truly converted, and who has walked 
consistently for many months. To-morrow she will be 
united with the saints in communion. 

April 14. To-day five pounds eightpence came in for 
the orphans, one pound of which is one of the most remark- 
able gifts that we have ever had. A poor brother, with a 
large family and small wages, — there are eight in the fam- 
ily, and he had fifteen shillings wages till lately, when they 
were raised to eighteen shillings, — put by this money bj r 
little and little of what was given him by his master for 
beer. This brother, who- was converted about five years 
ago, was before that time a notorious drunkard. 

July 2. To-day were given to me, ivJien there was not one 
shilling in hand, fifty pounds, for the school, Bible, and 
missionary fund. 

July 15. Monday. To-day two pounds seven shillings 
threepence were needed for the orphans, but we had nothing. 
How to obtain the means for a dinner, and for what else 
was needed, I knew not. My heart was perfectly at peace, 
and unusually sure of help, though I knew not in the least 
whence it was to come. Before brother T. came, I received 
a letter from India, written in May, with an order for fifty 
pounds for the orphans. I had said last Saturday to brother 
T. that it would be desirable to have fifty pounds, as the 
salaries of all my fellow-laborers are due, the three treacle 
casks empty, all the provision stores exhausted, several 
articles of clothing needed, and worsted for the boys to go 
on with their knitting. 

Aug. 22. In my morning walk, when I was reminding 



176 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XL 

the Lord of our need, I felt assured that he would send 
help this day. My assurance sprang from our need ; for 
there seemed no way to get through the day without help 
being sent. After breakfast I considered whether there was 
anjihing which might be- turned into money for the dear 
children. Among other things there came under my hands 
a number of religious pamphlets which had been given for 
the benefit of the orphans ; but all seemed not nearly 
enough to meet the necessities of the day. In this our deep 
poverty, after I had gathered together the few things for 
sale, a sister, ivlio earns her bread by the labor of her hands, 
brought eiglny-two pounds. This sister had seen it to be 
binding upon believers in our Lord Jesus to act out his 
commandments : " Sell that ye have (sell your possessions) 
and give alms," Luke xii. 33 ; and •' Lay not up for j'-our- 
selves treasures upon earth," Matt. vi. 19. Accordingly, 
she had drawn her money out of the bank and stocks, being 
two hundred and fifty pounds, and had brought it to me at 
three different times, for the benefit of the orphans, the 
Bible, missionary, and school fund, and the poor saints. 
About two months ago she brought me one hundred pounds 
more, being the produce of some other possessions which 
she had sold, the half of which was to be used for the 
school, Bible, and missionary fund, and the other half for 
the poor saints. This eighty-two pounds which she has 
brought to-day is the produce of the sale of her last earthly 
possession. [At the time I am preparing this fifth edition 
for the press, more than sixteen years have passed awa} T , 
and this sister has never expressed the least regret as to 
the step she took, but goes on quietly laboring with her 
hands to earn her bread.] 

Sept. 4 I have been led to pray whether it is the Lord's 
will that I should leave Bristol for a season, as I have for 
the last fortnight been suffering from indigestion, by which 
my whole system is weakened, and thus the nerves of my 
head are more than usually affected. There are, however, 



1839. ASKING AND RECEIVING. • 177 

two hindrances in the way, — want of means for the 
orphans, and want of means for my own personal expenses. 
To-day I have received a check from Q. Q. for seven 
pounds ten shillings for the orphans, which came, therefore, 
very seasonably. Also four pounds besides have come in 
since the day before yesterday. 

Sept. 5. To-day a sister sent me five pounds for myself, 
to be used for the benefit of my health. She had heard that 
my health is again failing. I do not lay by money for such 
purposes ; but whenever I really need means, whether for 
myself or others, the Lord sends them, in answer to prayer ; 
for he had in this case again given me prayer respecting 
means for myself, and for the orphans, that my way might 
be made plain as to leaving Bristol for a season. 

Sept. 7. Trowbridge. This has been a very good day. 
1 have had much communion with the Lord. How kind to 
take me from the work in Bristol for a season, to give me 
more communion with himself ! I remembered the Lord's 
especial goodness to me in this place at the commencement 
of last year. How kind has he also been since ! I prayed 
much for myself, for the church at large, for the saints here 
and in Bristol, for my unconverted relatives, for my dear 
wife, and that the Lord would supply my own temporal 
necessities, and those of the orphans ; and I know that he 
has heard me. I am surrounded with kind friends in the dear 
saints, under whose roof I am, and feel quite at home. My 
room is far better than I need ; yet an easy chair in this my 
weak state of body, to kneel before in prayer, would have 
added to my comfort. In the afternoon, without having a 
hint about it, I found an easy chair put into my room. I 
was struck with the kindness, the especial kindness of my 
heavenly Father, in being mindful of the smallest wants 
and comforts of his child. Having had more prayer than 
usual, I found that my intercourse with the saints at tea was 
with unction, and more than usually profitable. 

Sept. 9. I returned to Bristol, to go from hence to 



178 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XI. 

morrow to Exeter, if the Lord permit, on account of my 
health. I had been earnestly asking the Lord, while I was 
staying at Trowbridge that he would be pleased to send in 
supplies for the orphans before I go into Devonshire, and I 
had the fullest assurance that means would come in before 
I left Bristol. I therefore asked my wife, on my return, 
how much had come in, and found that it was only eight 
pounds nine shillings seven and three-fourths pence. This 
was not nearly as much as I had expected, and would not 
answer the end for which I had particularly asked means, 
i. e., that I might be able to leave enough for several days. 
My reply, therefore, was according to the faith given to 
me, and judging from the earnestness and confidence of my 
prayer that the Lord would send more before II eft. About 
an hour after, brother Craik brought me ten pounds, and 
also a letter, in which the arrival of a large box full of 
articles, to be sold for the benefit of the orphans, is 
announced. 

Upon his return from his journey, Mr. M. writes : — 

During my stay at Plymouth, I was stirred up afresh to 
early rising, a blessing, the results of which I have not lost 
since. That which led me to it was the example of the 
brother in whose house I was staying, and a remark which 
he made in speaking on the sacrifices in Leviticus, " that 
as not the refuse of animals was to be offered up, so the 
best part of our time should be especially given to commun- 
ion with the Lord." I had been, on the whole, rather an 
early riser during former years. But since the nerves of 
my head had been so weak, I thought that, as the day was 
long enough for my strength, it would be best for me not 
to rise early, in order that thus the nerves of my head 
might have the longer quiet. On this account I rose only 
between six and seven, and sometimes after seven. For 
the same reason also I brought myself purposely into the 



1838. ASKING AND RECEIVING. 179 

habit of sleeping a quarter of an hour, or half an hour, after 
dinner : as I thought I found benefit from it, in quieting 
the nerves of rny head. In this way, however, my soul had 
suffered more or less every day, and sometimes consider 
ably, as now and then unavoidable work came upon me 
before I had had sufficient time for prayer and reading the 
word. After I had heard the remark to which I have 
alluded, I determined that, whatever my body might suffer, 
I would no longer let the most precious part of the day 
pass away while I was in bed. By the grace of God I was 
enabled to begin the very next day to rise earlier, and have 
continued to rise early since that time. I allow myself 
now about seven hours' sleep, which, though I am far from 
b^ing strong, and have much to tire me mentally, I find is 
quite sufficient to refresh me. In addition to this I gave 
up the sleeping after dinner. The result has been that I 
have thus been able to procure long and precious seasons 
for prayer and meditation before breakfast ; and as to nry 
bod}^ and the state of the nervous system in particular, I 
have been much better since. Indeed, I believe that the 
very worst thing I could have done for my weak nerves 
was to have lain an hour or more longer in bed than I used 
to do before my illness ; for it was the very way to keep 
them weak. As this may fall into the hands of some chil- 
dren of God who are not in the habit of rising early, I make 
a few more remarks on the subject. 

I. It might be asked, how much time shall I allow my- 
self for rest? The answer is, that no rule of universal ap- 
plication can be given, as all persons do not require the 
same measure of sleep, and also the same persons, at differ- 
ent times, according to the strength or weakness of their 
body, may require more or less. Females also, being gen- 
erally weaker in body, require more sleep than males. Yet, 
from what I can learn, it is the opinion of medical persons 
that men in health do not require more than between six 
and seven hours' sleep, and females no more than between 



L80 THE LIFE OF TEUST. Chap. XI. 

seven and eight hours ; so that it would be rather an ex- 
ception for a man to require more than seven and a woman 
more than eight hours. But my decided advice, at the 
same time, is, that children of God would be careful not to. 
allow themselves too little sleep, as there are few men who 
can do with less than six hours' sleep, and yet be well in 
body and mind, and few females who can do with less than 
seven hours. Certain it is that for a long time, as a 3 r oung 
man, before I went to the university, I went to bed regu- 
larly at ten and rose at four, studied hard, and was in good 
health ; and certain also, that since I have allowed myself 
only about seven hours, from the time of my visit at Ply- 
mouth in Oct. 1839, I have been much better in body, and 
in my nerves in particular, than when I was eight or 
ei°:ht hours and a half in bed. 

II. If it be asked, But why should I rise early ? The 
reply is, " To remain too long in bed" is, 1. Waste ofti?ne, 
which is unbecoming a saint, who is bought by the precious 
blood of Jesus, with his time and all he has, to be used for 
the Lord. If we sleep more than is needful for the refresh- 
ment of the body, it is wasting the time with which 
the Lord has intrusted us as a talent, to be used for his 
glory, for our own benefit, and the benefit of the saints 
and the unbelievers around us. 2. To remain too long in 
bed injures the body. Just as when we take too much food, 
we are injured thereby, so as it regards sleep. Medical per- 
sons would readily allow that the lying longer in bed than 
is needful for the strengthening of the body does weaken 
it. 3. It injures the soul. The lying too long in bed 
not merely keeps us from giving the most precious part of 
the day to prayer and meditation, but this sloth leads also 
to many other evils. Any one need but make the experi- 
ment of spending one, two, or three hours in prayer and 
meditation before breakfast, either in his room, or with his 
Bible in his hand in the fields, and he will soon find out the 
beneficial effect which earlv rising has upon the out ware' 



1839. ASKING AND RECEIVING. 181 

and inward man. I beseech all my brethren and sisters 
into whose hands this may fall, and who are not in the 
habit of rising early, to make the trial, and they will praise 
the Lord for having clone so. 

III. It may lastly be said, But how shall I set about ris- 
ing early? My advice is, 1. Commence at once, delay it 
not. To-morrow begin to rise. 2. But do not depend upon 
your own strength. This may be the reason why before 
this you may have begun to rise early, but have given it 
up. As surely as you depend upon your own strength in 
this matter, it will come to nothing. In every good work 
we depend upon the Lord, and in this thing we shall feel 
especially how weak we are. If any one rises, that he may 
give the time which he takes from sleep to prayer and med- 
itation, let him be sure that Satan will try to put obstacles 
into the way. 3. Do trust in the Lord for help. You will 
honor him if you expect help from him in this matter. Give 
yourself to prayer for help, expect help, and you will have 
it. 4. Use, however, in addition to this, the following 
means : a. Go early to bed. If you stay up late, you can- 
not rise early. Let no society and no pressure of engage- 
ments keep you from going habitually early to bed. If you 
fail in this, you neither can nor ought to get up early, as 
your body requires rest. Keep also particularly in mind, 
that neither for the body nor soul is it the same thing 
whether you go to bed late and rise late, or whether you go 
to bed early and rise early. Even medical persons will 
tell } t ou how injurious it is to sit up late, and to spend the 
morning hours in bed ; but how much more important still 
is it to retire early and to rise earty, in order to make sure 
of time for prayer and meditation before the business of the 
day commences, and to devote to those exercises that part 
of our time when the mind and the body are moszjresh, m 
order thus to obtain spiritual strength for the conflict, the 
trials, and the work of the day. h. Let some one call you, 
if possible, at the time which you have determined before 
16 



182 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XI. 

God that you will rise ; or procure, what is still better, an 
alarum, by which you may regulate almost to a minute the 
time when you wish to rise. For about twelve shillings a 
little German clock with an alarum may be bought almost 
in every town. Though I have very many times been 
awakened by the Lord, in answer to prayer, almost to the 
minute when I desired to rise ; yet I thought it well to pro- 
cure an alarum to assist me in my purpose of rising early ; 
not indeed as if it could give the least help, without the 
Lord's blessing, for I should remain in bed notwithstand- 
ing the noise of the alarum, were he not to give me grace 
to rise ; but simply looking upon it as a means, c. Rise 
at once when you are awake. Remain not a minute longer 
in bed, else you are likely to fall asleep, d. Be not dis- 
couraged by feeling drowsy and tired in consequence of 
your rising early. This will soon wear off. You will after 
a few days feel yourself stronger and fresher than when 
you used to lie an hour or two longer than you needed. 
e. Allow yourself always the same hours for sleep. Make 
no change except sickness oblige }^ou. 

On December 10, 11, and 12 we had public meetings, at 
which the account of the Lord's dealings with us in refer- 
ence to the Orphan Houses and the other objects of the 
Scriptural Knowledge Institution was given. It is now — 
December 10, 1839 — five years and nine months since the 
Scriptural Knowledge Institution has been in operation. 

During the last year also, 1. We have been enabled to continue to 
provide all the needful expenses connected with the six day schools, 
three for boys and three for girls. The number of the children who 
are at present in them amounts to 286. The number of all the chil- 
dren that have had schooling in the day schools, through the medium 
of the Institution, since its formation, amounts to 1,795. 2. There are 
at present 226 children in the Sunday school. 3. There are 14 
taught to read in the adult school, and there have been about 130 
adults instructed in that school since the formation of the Institution. 
4. There have been circulated, during the last year, 514 copies of the 
Scriptures, and 5,592 since March 5, 1834. 5. There have been laid 



1839. ASKING AND RECEIVING. 183 

out, during the last year, £91, 6s. for missionary purposes. 6. There 
have been received into the three Orphan Houses, from December 9, 
1838, to December 9, 1839, 16 orphans. There are at present 96 
orphans in the three houses. The number of all the orphans who 
have been under our care from April 11, 1836, to December 9, 1839, 
amounts to 126. 

For the Orphan Houses, without any one having been asked for 
anything by us, the sum of £3,067, 8s. 9^d. has been given, entirely 
as the result of prayer to God, from the commencement of the work 
up to December 9, 1839. 

The total of the expenses connected with the objects of the Institu- 
tion, exclusive of the Orphan Houses, from November 19, 1838, to 
November 19, 1839, is £542, 13s. The balance in hand on November 
19, 1839, was 18s. 5d. 

The total of the expenses connected with the three Orphan Houses, 
from December 9, 1838, to December 9, 1839, is £960, 9s. 2|d. The 
balance in hand on December 9, 1839, was £46, 8s. Id. 

Dec. 31. My health is much better than for years. My mental 
powers also are as good as they have been at any time daring the last 
three years. I ascribe this to God's blessing, through the instrumen- 
tality of early rising, and plunging my head into cold water when I 
rise. 

1. As to the church: During the last year have been added 115; 
of whom 34 have been brought to the knowledge of the Lord among 
us. 

2. As to my temporal supplies, the Lord has been pleased to give 
me, during the past year, £313, 2s. 5d. 



CHAPTER XII. 

PLENTY AND WANT. 

1840. 

A PURE OFFERING REQUIRED — A JOURNEY PROPOSED — SEASONABLE PRO- 
VISION — LOOKING ONLY TO THE LORD — THE WRATH OF MAN PRAISING 
GOD — A PROMISE FULFILLED — BENEFIT OF TRIAL — NEW SPRINGS 
OPENED — BEFORE THEY CALL I WILL ANSWER — TRUST IN GOD COM- 
MENDED — SPIRITUAL BLESSINGS. 

Cty/ ANUARY 1, 1840. This morning, about one hour 
after midnight, I received a paper with some money 
sealed up in it for the orphans. A few minutes 
afterwards, I remembered that the individual who 
gave it was in debt, and I was aware that she had been 
repeatedly asked by her creditors for payment. I resolved, 
therefore, without opening the paper, to return it, as no one 
has a right to give whilst in debt. This was done ivhen 1 
knew there was not enough in hand to meet the expenses of the 
day. About eight this morning, a brother brought five 
pounds, which he had received just then from his mother, 
for the orphans. Observe, the brother is led to bring it at 
once I 

Jan. 25. I have been much in prayer this week about 
going to Germany: 1. To see certain brethren who purpose 
to go as missionaries to the East Indies ; and, 2. To see nry 
father once more. I am led to go just now, instead of de- 
laj^ing it, because my health is again so failing that it seems 
desirable I should leave Bristol at all events ; and thus I 
could continue to serve in the work of the Lord, and yet 
attend to the benefit of my health at the same time. Lord, 
keep me from making a mistake in this matter ! 
184 



1840. PLENTY AND WANT. 185 

Mr. Miiller's absence lasted from Feb. 3 to starch 9. 
Under the latter date he writes : — 

During the whole time of my absence the Lord not only 
supplied all the need of the orphans, but on my return I 
found more in hand than there was when I left. The dona- 
tions, which came in during my absence, amount to between 
eighty and ninety pounds. » 

March 26. On the 17th of this month I received the 
following letter from a brother who several times had been 
used by the Lord as an instrument in supplying our need, 
and who also, two months since, sent thirty pounds. 

" I have received a little money from . Have you 

any present need for the Institution under your care ? I 
know you do not ask, except indeed of Him whose work 
you are doing : but to answer when asked seems another 
thing, and a right thing. I have a reason for desiring to 
know the present state of your means towards the objects 
you are laboring to serve, viz., should you not have need, 
other departments of the Lord's work, or other people of 
the Lord, may have need. Kindly then inform me, and to 
what amount, i. e., what amount you at this present time 
need, or can profitably lay out." 

At the time when this letter came we were indeed in need. 
Nevertheless, I considered that, as I have hitherto acted (i< e., 
telling the Lord alone about our need) , I ought to continue 
to do, as otherwise the principal object of the work, to 
be a help to the saints generally, by seeking to lead them 
to increased dependence upon God alone, through this 
Institution, would be frustrated. I answered therefore the 
letter in substance as follows : — 

"Whilst I thank you for your love, and whilst I agree 
with you, that, in general, there is a difference between 
asking for money and answering when asked, nevertheless 
in our case I feel not at liberty to speak about the state of 
our funds, as the primary object of the work in my hands 
ie* 



186 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XII. 

is to lead those who are weak in faith to see that there is 
reality in dealing with God alone." 

After having sent off the answer, I was again and again 
led to pray to the Lord in this way : " Lord, thou knowest 
that for thy sake I did not tell this brother about our need. 
Now, Lord, show afresh that there is reality in speaking to 
thee only about our need, and speak therefore to this 
brother, so that he may help us," 

To-day, in answer to this my request, this brother sent 
one hundred pounds. Thus I have means for establishing 
the infant school, and for ordering more Bibles. Also the 
orphans are again supplied for a week ; for when the money 
came in, there was not one penny in hand for them. 

April 7. This evening I received information from my 
little half brother that my dear father died on March 30. 
During no period did I pray more frequently or more 
earnestly for the conversion of my dear aged parent than 
daring the last year of his life ; but, at all events, it did not 
please the Lord to let me see the answer to my prayers. 

April 9. We are on the point of sending some money to 
the East Indies for missionary objects. WJdlst I was on 
my knees respecting this object, five pounds was brought 
for it. 

May 3. Last evening a brother was baptized, who on 
the first Lord's day of this j^ear came with his intended 
wife to Bethesda Chapel. Both were in an unconverted 
state. Only since April 1, forty-one persons have come to 
us to speak about their souls. 

May 8. There are four believers staying at my house, 
and to-day we had only a few shillings of our own money 
left. I gave myself, therefore, to prayer for means for oui 
own personal expenses. In answer to my request, I 
received this morning five pounds. 

May 10. To-day five of the orphans were baptized. 
There are now fourteen of them in fellowship. 

May 26. Nothing had come. in. My engagements kept 



1840. PLENTY AND WANT. 187 

me from going to the Orphan House till seven in the 
evening, when the laborers met together for prayer. When 
we met I found that one of them had given seventeen 
shillings, which had been divided between the three houses. 
This, with the little which had been left yesterday, had pro- 
cured all necessary articles. We are now very poor. 

May 27. We met for prayer at eleven this morning. No 
money had come in, but there was enough for dinner in all 
the houses. This morning the last coals were used in the 
Infant Orphan House, and in the Boys' Orphan House there 
were only enough for to-day, and there was no money in 
hand to buy more. In this our need T. P. C. sent a load 
of coals. We purpose to meet again at four this afternoon. 
May the Lord graciously be pleased to send help in the 
mean time ! 

Evening. The Lord has had mercy ! A person bought 
some days since several articles, which had been given to 
be sold for the benefit of the orphans, and owed six pounds 
fifteen shillings. This morning I asked the Lord to incline 
his heart to bring the money, or part of it, as we were in 
such need. Just as I was going to meet for prayer with 
my fellow-laborers this afternoon, he came and brought 
four pounds. But our kind Father showed us still further 
to-day that only for the trial of our faith he had for a season 
withheld supplies ; for there were given this evening, with 
Eccles. ix. 10, five pounds. There came in also nine shil- 
lings for articles which had been put into the hand of a 
sister, who has taken on her the service of disposing of 
articles which are given for sale. Thus the day which had 
began in prayer, ended in praise. But there is one thing 
more to be recorded respecting this day, as precious or more 
so than what has been said : I was to-day informed that the 
Lord had begun to stir up several of the boys to care about 
their souls. 

June 17. For several daj T s past I had been very poor in 
reference to my own temporal necessities, as well as in ref- 



183 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XII. 

erence to the orphans. To-day we were especially poor, in 
both respects ; but our kind Father remembered not merely 
the need of the orphans, but gave me also some money for 
my own personal expenses. The same sister just re- 
ferred to, who brought five pounds ten shillings sixpence 
for the orphans, brought me also seven pounds for myself. 
June 22. To-morrow, the Lord willing, I purpose, with 
my wife, to accompany the three German brethren and the 
five German sisters to Liverpool, who purpose to sail from 
thence. Under these circumstances it is desirable to leave 
at least a little money behind. This desire of my heart the 
Lord has granted ; for this morning D. C. gave me five 
pounds, and there came in by sale of articles ten shillings 
fivepence. In the evening a sister, who has left Bristol 
to-day, sent me by her mother five pounds. 

During the absence of Mr. M., the wants of the orphans 
were supplied in a wonderful manner. To mention but 
one instance, at a time when there was extreme need, a 
poor German missionary, just embarking for a heathen 
land, gave six pounds ten shillings, being his all. 

The following event came to his notice during his 
journey : — 

About Oct., 1837, 1 sent some Bibles and foiiy-six copies 
of my Narrative to a brother in Upper Canada, who, in 
dependence upon the Lord for temporal supplies, is labor- 
ing as a missionary in that country. About eighteen 
months afterwards I heard that this box had not arrived. 
I had reason to think that the broker had never sent off 
the box. My comfort, however, was, that though this poor 
sinner had acted thus, yet the Lord, in his own place and 
way, would use the Bibles and my Narratives. Now, 
almost immediately after my arrival in Liverpool, a brother 
told me that several persons wished to hear me preach who 



1840. PLENTY AND WANT. 189 

had read my Narrative ; and that he knew a considerable 
number had been bought by a brother, a bookseller, from 
pawnbrokers, and sold again ; and that some also had been 
ordered from London when there was no more to be had 
otherwise. It was thus evident that the ship-broker pawned 
these Narratives before he absconded ; but the Lord used 
them as I had hoped. 

Aug. 1. A few days since a brother was staying with me, 
on his way to his father, whom he had not seen for above 
two 3^ears, and who was greatly opposed to him, on account 
of the decided steps which his son had taken for the Lord. 
Before this brother left, that precious promise of our Lord 
was brought to my mind : " If two of you shall agree on 
earth as touching anything that they shall ask, it shall be 
done for them of my Father which is in heaven." (Matt, 
xviii. 19.) Accordingly, I went to the brother's room, and 
having agreed to pray about a kind reception from his 
father, and the conversion of both parents, we prayed 
together. To-day this brother returned. The Lord has 
answered already one part of the prayer. The brother was 
most kindly received, contrary to all natural expectation. 
May the Lord now help us both to look for an answer to 
the other part of our prayer ! There is nothing too hard 
for the Lord ! 

Since the publication of the last edition, the father of 
this brother died. He lived above ten years after Aug. 1, 
1840, until he was about eighty-six years of age, and as he 
continued a life of much sin and opposition to the truth, 
the prospect with reference to his conversion became 
darker and darker. But at last the Lord answered prayer. 
This aged sinner was entirely changed, simply rested on 
the Lord Jesus for the salvation of his soul, and became as 
much attached to his believing son as before he had been 
opposed to him T and wished to have him about him as much 
as possible, that he might read the Holy Scriptures to him 
and pray with him. 



190 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XII. 

Aug. 15. There was to-day the greatest poverty in all 
the three houses ; all the stores were very low, as the income 
throughout the week has been so small. In addition to 
this it was Saturday, when the wants are nearly double in 
comparison with other days. At least three pounds were 
needed to help us comfortably through the day ; but there 
was , nothing towards this in hand. My only hope was in 
God. The very necessity led me to expect help for this 
day ; for if none had come, the Lord's name would have 
been dishonored. Between twelve and one, two sisters in 
the Lord called on me ; and the one gave me two pounds, 
and the other seven shillings sixpence for the orphans. 
With this I went to the Boys' Orphan House about one 
o'clock, where I found the children at dinner. Brother B. 
put the following note into my hand, which he was just 
going to send off : — 

" Dear Brother, — With potatoes from the children's 
garden, and with apples from the tree in the playground 
(which apples were used for apple-dumplings), and four 
shillings sixpence, the price of some articles given by one 
of the laborers, we have a dinner. There is much needed. 
But the Lord has provided and will provide. " 

Aug. 23. Lord's day. As we have often found it to be 
the case, so it is again now. After the Lord has tried our 
faith, he, in the love of his heart, gives us an abundance, 
to show that not in anger, but for the glory of his name, 
and for the trial of our faith, he has allowed us to be poor. 
The Lord has kindly given to-day twelve pounds seventeen 
shillings. 

Sept. 5. Saturday. Because there had come in so little 
during the last days, at least three pounds were requisite to 
supply the need of to-day. There was, however, not one 
penny in hand when the day commenced. Last evening, 
the laborers in the Orphan Houses, together with the 
teachers of the day schools, met for prayer. This morning, 
one of the teachers, who had a little money of his own, 



1840. PLENTY AND WANT. 191 

brought one pound five shillings sixpence. Thus we were 
enabled to provide for the dinner. In the afternoon all of 
us met again for prayer* Another teacher of the day 
schools gave two shillings sixpence, and one shilling came 
in besides. But all this was not enough. There was no 
dinner provided for to-morrow, -nor was there any money to 
take in milk to-morrow, and besides this a number of other 
little things were to be purchased, that there might be no 
real want of anything. Now, observe how our kind Father 
helped us ! Between seven and eight this evening, a sister, 
whose heart the Lord has made willing to take on her the 
service of disposing of the articles which are sent for sal©, 
brought two pounds ten shillings sixpence, for some of the 
things which came a fortnight ago from Worcester, and- last 
Wednesday from Leeds. The sister stated, that though 
she did not feel at all well, she had eome because she had 
it so laid on her heart that shs could not stay away. 

Sept. 8. How kindly has the Lord so ordered it that for 
some time past the income for the school fund should have 
been so little, in order that thus we might be constrained 
to let the laborers in the day schools share our joys and 
our trials of faith, which had been before kept from them ! 
But as above two years ago the Lord ordered it so that it 
became needful to cornmunicate to the laborers in the Or- 
phan Houses the state of the funds, and made it a blessing 
to them, so that I am now able to leave Bristol, and yet 
the work goes on, so, I doubt not, the brethren and sisters 
who are teachers in the day schools will be greatly blessed 
by being thus partakers of our precious secret respecting 
the state of the funds. Our prayer meetings have been 
already a blessing to us, and united us more than ever in 
the work. We have them now every morning at seven, 
and we shall continue them, the Lord helping us, till we 
see his hand stretched forth, not mere'ry in giving us means 
for the teachers, but also for other purposes ; for we need a 
stove in one of the school-rooms, a fresh supply of several 



192 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XII. 

kinds of Bibles and New Testaments, and it is desirable to 
have means to help missionary brethren who labor in 
dependence upon the Lord for the supply of their temporal 
necessities. 

Sept. 21. To-day a brother from the neighborhood of 
London gave me ten pounds, to be laid out as it might be 
most needed. As we have been praying many days for the 
school, Bible and missionary funds, I took it all for them. 
This brother knew nothing about our work, when he came 
three days since to Bristol. Thus the Lord, to show his 
continual care over us, raises up new helpers. They that 
trust in the Lord shall never be confounded. Some who 
helped for a while may fall asleep in Jesus ; others may 
grow cold in the service of the Lord ; others may be as 
desirous as ever to help, but have no longer the means ; 
others may have both a willing heart to help, and have also 
the means, but may see it the Lord's will to lay them out in 
another way ; — and thus, from one cause or another, were 
we to lean upon man, we should surely be confounded ; 
but, in leaning upon the living God alone, we are beyond 
disappointment, and beyond being forsaken because of death, 
or want of means, or want of love, or because of the claims 
of other work. 

Oct. 26. Yesterday morning, when I took my hat from 
the rail, I found in one of my gloves a note containing a 
five-pound note, and the following words : " Two pounds 
for the orphans, the rest for dear brother and sister Miiller," 
There came in still further yesterday two pounds twelve shil- 
lings sixpence. Thus we are again supplied for about three 
days. 

In reference to the note which was put into my hat, con- 
taining five pounds, I just add, that I had repeatedly asked 
the Lord for means for our own personal expenses, previous 
to the reception of it, as we had but very little money for 
ourselves. Indeed, the very moment before I took my hat 
from the rail, I had risen from my knees, having agaio 



1840. PLENTY AND WANT. 103 

asked the Lord for means for ourselves and for the or- 
phans. 

Nov. 8. I purposed to have gone to Trowbridge yester- 
day, and had settled it so on Friday evening with brother 

. But no sooner had I decided to do so, than I felt no 

peace in the prospect of going. After having prayed about 
it on Friday evening and yesterday morning, I determined 
not to go, and I felt sure the Lord had some reason for not 
allowing me to feel happy in the prospect of going. I began 
now to look out for blessings for this day, considering that 
the Lord had kept me here for good to some souls. Tins 
evening I was especially led to press the truth on the con- 
sciences of the unconverted, entreating and beseeching 
them, and telling them also that I felt sure the Lord had, 
in mercy to some of them, kept me from going to Trow- 
bridge. I spoke on Genesis vi. 1-5. Immediately after, 
I saw fruit of the word. An individual fully opened his 
heart tome. I walked about with him till about ten o'clock, 
even as long as I had any strength left. [About ten days 
afterwards, a brother told me of a poor drunkard who heard 
me that evening, and who since then had staid up till about 
twelve o'clock every night to read the Scriptures, and who 
had not been intoxicated since.] 

At the close of these details, with reference to the year 
from December 9, 1839, to December 9, 1840, 1 make a few 
remarks. 

1. Though our trials of faith during this year also have 
been many, and recurring more frequently than daring any 
previous year, and though we have been often reduced to 
the greatest extremity, yet the orphans have lacked nothing ; 
for they alwa} T s have had good nourishing food, and the 
necessary articles of clothing, etc. 

1. Should it be supposed by any one, in reading the 
plain details of our trials of faith during this year, that on 
account of them we have been disappointed in our expecta- 
tions, or are discouraged in the work, my answer is, that 



194 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XII 

the very reverse is the fact. Such clays were expected from 
the commencement of the work ; nay, more than this, the 
chief end for which the Institution was established is, that 
the church of Christ at large might be benefited by seeing 
manifestly the hand of God stretched out on our behalf in 
the hour of need, in answer to prayer. Our desire, there- 
fore, is, not that we may be without trials of faith, but that 
the Lord graciously would be pleased to support us in the 
trial, that we may not dishonor him by distrust. 

3. This way of living brings the Lord remarkably near. 
He is, as it were, morning by morning inspecting our 
stores, that accordingly he may send help. Greater and 
more manifest nearness of the Lord's presence I have never 
had than when after breakfast there were no means for din- 
ner, and then the Lord provided the dinner for more than 
one hundred persons ; or when, after dinner, there were no 
means for the tea, and yet the Lord provided the tea ; and 
all this without one single human being having been in- 
formed about our need. This moreover I add, that although 
we who have been eye-witnesses of these gracious interposi- 
tions of our Father, have not been so benefited by them as 
we might and ought to have been, yet we have in some 
measure derived blessings from them. One thing is certain, 
that we are not tired of doing the Lord's work in this way. 

4. It has been more than once observed, that such a way 
of living must lead the mind continually to think whence 
food, clothes, etc., are to come, and so unfit for spiritual 
exercises. Now, in the first place, I answer that our minds 
are very little tried about the necessaries of life, just be- 
cause the care respecting them is laid upon our Father, who, 
because we are his children, not only allows us to do so, but 
will have us to do so. Secondly, it must be remembered, 
that, even if our minds were much tried about the supplies 
for the children, and the means for the other work, yet, be- 
cause we look to the Lord alone for these things, we should 
only be brought, by our sense of need, into the presence of 



1840. PLENTY AND WANT. 195 

our Father for the supply of it ; and that is a blessing, and 
no injury to the soul. Thirdly, our souls realize that for 
the glory of God, and for the benefit of the church at large 
it is that we have these trials of faith, and that leads again 
to God, to ask him for fresh supplies of grace, to be enabled 
to be faithful in this service. 

5. My heart's desire and prayer to God is, that all believ- 
ers who read this may by these many answers to prayer be 
encouraged to pray, particularly as it regards the con- 
version of their friends and relations, their own state of 
heart, the state of the church at large, and the success of 
the preaching of the gospel. Do not think, dear reader, 
that these things are peculiar to us, and cannot be enjoyed 
by all the saints. Although every child of God is not 
called by the Lord to establish schools and orphan houses, 
and to trust in the Lord for means for them ; yet there is 
nothing on the part of the Lord to hinder, why you may 
not know, by experience, far more abundantly than we do 
now, his willingness to answer the prayers of his children. 
Do but prove the faithfulness of God. Do but carry your 
every want to him. Only maintain an upright heart. But 
if you live in sin ; if you wilfully and habitually do things 
respecting which you know that they are contrary to the 
will of God, then you cannot expect to be heard by him. 
" If I regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear 
me ; but verily God hath heard me ; he hath attended to 
the voice of nry prayer." Psalm lxvi. 18, 19. 

6. As it regards the children of God, who by the labor 
of their hands, or in any business or profession, earn their 
bread, particularly the poorer classes of them, I give my 
affectionate yet solemn advice to carry into practice the 
principles on which this Institution is conducted as it 
regards not going into debt. Are you in debt ? then make 
confession of sin respecting it. Sincerely confess to the 
Lord that you have sinned against Rom. xiii. 8. And if 
you are resolved no more to contract debt, whatever may 



196 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XII. 

be the result, and you are waiting on the Lord and truly 
trust in him, your present debts will soon be paid. Are 
you out of debt ? then, whatever your future want may be, 
be resolved, in the strength of Jesus, rather to suffer the 
greatest privation, whilst waiting upon God for help, than 
to use unscriptural means, such as borrowing, taking goods 
on credit, etc., to deliver yourselves. This way needs but 
to be tried, in order that its excellency may be enjoyed. 

There are few points more which may be of interest to 
the believing reader, which I shall now add. 

1. There have been, during this year, six day schools for poor 
children entirely supported by the funds of our Institution, all of 
which have been established by us. 

The number of all the children that have had schooling in the day 
schools through the medium of the Institution, since its formation, 
amounts to 2,216; the number of those at present in the six day 
schools is 303. 

These day schools have defrayed, by the payments of the children, 
about the sixth part of their own expenses. 

2. There is one Sunday school entirely supported by the funds of 
the Institution. 

3. There has been, since the formation of the Institution, one adult 
school connected with it, in which, on the Lord's day afternoons, 
since that time, about 150 adults have been instructed. 

4. The number of Bibles and Testaments which have been circu- 
lated through the medium of our Institution, during the last year, 
amounts to 452 copies. 

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, 6,044 copies of the 
Scriptures. 

5. There have been laid out, during the last year, of the funds of 
the Institution, £120, 10s. 2d. for missionary purposes. 

6. There are at present ninety-one orphans in the three houses. 
The total number of the orphans who have been under our care from 
April 11, 1836, to Dec. 9, 1810, amounts to 129. 

Without any one having been asked for anything by us, the sum of 
£3,937, Is. Id. has been given to us for the Orphan Houses, as the 
result of prayer to God, since the commencement of the work. 



1840. PLENTY AND WANT. 197 



THE BLESSING OF THE LORD UPON THE WORK IN REF- 
ERENCE TO THE SOULS OF THE CHILDREN. 

1. During the last fourteen months there have been 
meetings purposely for children, at which the Scriptures 
have been expounded to them. At these meetings an 
almost universal attention is manifested by them, which I 
thankfully ascribe to the Lord, and upon which I look as a 
forerunner of greater blessing. 

2. During the last year three of the Sunday-school chil- 
dren have been received into fellowship. 

3. At the end of last year there had been eight or- 
phans received into communion ; during the present year 
fourteen have been received ; in all, twenty-two. 

It was stated in the last year's Report that we were look 
ing for fruit upon our labors as it regards the conversion of 
the children, as the Lord had given to us a measure of 
earnestness in praying for them. The Lord has dealt with 
us according to our expectations. But I expect far more 
than what we have seen. While the chief object of our 
work has been and is still the manifestation of the heart of 
God towards his children, and the reality of power with 
God in prayer, yet, as we hoped, and as it has been our 
prayer, the Lord gives to us also the joy of seeing one 
child after another brought to stand openly on the Lord's 
side. As far as my experience goes, it appears to me that 
believers generally have expected far too little of present 
fruit upon their labors among children. There has been a 
hoping that the Lord some day or other would own the 
instruction which they give to children, and would answer 
at some time or other, though after man}' years only, the 
prayers which they offer up on their ' behalf. Now, while 
such passages as Prov. xxii. 6, Eccl. xi. 1, Gal. vi. 9, 1 
Cor. xv. 58, give unto us assurance not merely respecting 
everything which we do for the Lord, in general, but also 



198 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XII. 

respecting bringing up children in the fear of the Lord, in 
particular, that our labor is not in vain in the Lord ; yet 
we have to guard against abusing such passages, by think- 
ing it a matter of little moment whether we see present 
fruit or not ; but, on the contrary, we should give the Lord 
no rest till we see present fruit, and therefore in persever- 
ing jet submissive prayer we should make known our re- 
quests unto God. I add, as an encouragement to believers 
who labor among children, that during the last two years 
seventeen other young persons or children, from the age of 
eleven and a half to seventeen, have been received into 
fellowship among us, and that I am looking out now for 
many more to be converted, and that not merely of the or- 
phans, but of the Sunday and day school children. As in 
so many respects we live in remarkable times, so in this 
respect also, that the Lord is working greatly among the 
children in many places. 

The total of the expenses connected with the objects of the Institu- 
tion, exclusive of the Orphan Houses, from Nov. 19, 1839, to Nov. 19, 
1840, is £622, 2s. 6|d. The balance in hand on Nov. 19, 1840, was 
£13, 2s. 9ld. 

The total of the expenses connected with the three Orphan Houses, 
from Dec. 9, 1839, to Dec. 9, 1840, is £900, lis. 2.J d. The balance 
in hand on Dec. 9, 1840, was £15, Is. 63d. 

REVIEW OF THE TEAR 1840. 

1. As to church. There are 525 at present in communion; 114 
have been added during the past year, of whom 47 have been brought 

j^to the knowledge of the Lord among us. 

2. As to the supply of my temporal necessities. The Lord has 
be?n pleased to send me, by the freewill offerings of the saints, £242, 
8s. Uhd. 1 

1 It may not be improper to state here that the little patrimony to which Mr. 
Miiller became entitled upon the decease of his father was devoted to the purposes 
of charity and religion, in accordance with the principle of action indicated on 
page 67. This fact is not mentioned by Mr. M., but has come to the knowledge -^ 
the editor through another channel. — Ed. 




CHAPTER XIII. 

FAITH STRENGTHENED BY EXERCISE 

1841. 

A WANT SUPPLIED — RESOURCES EXCEEDING THE DEMAND — EVIL OF SURETY- 
SHIP — POWER OF CHRISTIAN LOVE — GOD'S WORD THE FOOD OF THE SOCIi 
— PREPARATION FOR THE HOUR OF TRIAL — POVERTY — DEPENDING ONLY 
ON THE LIVING GOD. 

ANTJARY 1, 1841. During this week we have 
daily met for prayer, for the especial purpose of 
asking the Lord to give us the means of having th© 
last year's Report printed. It is three weeks since 
it might have been sent to the press. We felt this now to 
be a matter of special importance, as, if the Report were 
not soon printed, it would be known that it arose from 
want of means. By the donations which came in during 
these last days for the orphans, and by ten pounds which 
were given to-day for the other funds, we have the means of 
defraying the expense of about two-thirds of the printing, 
and therefore a part of the manuscript was sent off, trusting 
that the Lord would be pleased to send in more means be- 
fore two sheets are printed off; but, if not, we should then 
stop till we have more. Evening. There came in still fur- 
ther five pounds ; also, ten shillings and three shillings. 

Jan. 11. Monday. During the last week the Lord not 
only supplied us richly with all we needed for the orphans, 
but enabled us to put hj several pounds towards printing 
the Report. On Saturday evening there were only three 
shillings sixpence left. On this account I was looking out 
for answers to my prayers for means, and the Lord did not 
disappoint me. There came in altogether yesterday nine 

109 



200 THE LIFE OE TRUST. Chap. XIII. 

pounds sixteen shillings fourpence. We have now enough 
even for the last part of the Report. 

Jan. 12. To-day I have received a letter from a brother, 
in winch he empowers me to draw upon his bankers, during 
this year, to the amount of one thousand pounds, for any 
brethren who have it in their hearts to give themselves to 
missionary service in the East Indies, and whom I shall 
consider called for this service, as far as I am able to judge. 
[This power lasted only for that 3'ear ; but no brethren who 
seemed to be suitable offered themselves for this service. 
This is another fresh proof how much more easily pecuniary 
means can be obtained than suitable individuals. Indeed, 
in all my experience I have found it thus, that if I could 
only settle thai a certain thing to be done was according to 
the will of God, the means were soon obtained to carry it 
into effect.] 

Jan. 13. This evening I was called to the house of a 
brother and sister who are in the deepest distress. The 
brother had become surety for the debts of his son, not in 
the least expecting that he ever should be called upon for 
the payment of them ; but, as his son has not discharged 
his debts, the father has been called upon to do so ; and ex- 
cept the money is paid within a few days, he will be im- 
prisoned. 

How precious it is, even for this life, to act according to 
the word of God ! This perfect revelation of his mind 
gives us directions for everything, even the most minute 
affairs of this life. It commands us, " Be not thou one of 
them that strike hands, or of them that are sureties for 
debts." Prov. xxii. 26. The way in which Satan ensnares 
persons, to bring them into the net, and to bring trouble 
upon them by becoming sureties, is, that he seeks to repre- 
sent the matter as if there were no danger connected with 
that particular case, and that one might be sure one should 
never be called upon to pay the money ; but the Lord, the 
faithful Friend, tells us in his own word that the only way 



1841. FAITH STRENGTHENED BY EXERCISE. 201 

"to be sure" in such a matter is "to hate suretyship." 
Prov. xi. 15. The following points seem to me of solemn 
moment for consideration, if I were called upon to become 
surety for another: 1. What obliges the person who 
wishes me to become surety for him to need a surety? 
Is it really a good cause in which I am called upon to 
become surety ? I do not remember ever to have met with 
a case in which a plain, and godly, and in all respects 
scriptural matter such a thing occurred. There was gen- 
erally some sin or other connected with it. 2. If I become 
surety, notwithstanding what the Lord has said to me in 
his word, am I in such a position that no one will be in- 
jured by my being called upon to fulfil the engagements 
of the person for whom I am going to become surety ? In 
most instances this alone oaght to keep one from it. 
3. If still I become surety, the amount of money for which 
I become responsible must be so in my power that I am 
able to produce it whenever it is called for, in order that 
the name of the Lord may not be dishonored. 4. But if 
thereTbe the possibility of having to fulfil the engagements 
of the person in whose stead I have to stand, is it the will 
of the Lord that I should spend my means in that way ? 
Is it not rather his will that my means should be spent in 
another way? 5. How can I get over the plain word of 
the Lord, which is to the contrary, even if the first four 
points could be satisfactorily settled? 

March 4. From February 22 up to this day our neces 
sities in the day schools were supplied by thirteen small 
donations, and by a donation of eight pounds from Q. Q. 
To-day I received fifteen pounds. When this arrived 
there was not one penny in hand for the day schools, 
whilst two days after about seven pounds were needed. 
This money came from a considerable distance, and from 
a broker who never had assisted in this work before, 
where ay the Lord afresh shows how easily he ean raise up 
new helpers. 



202 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIII. 

For the encouragement of believers, who are tried by 
having unconverted relatives and friends, I will relate the 
following circumstance, the truth of which I know. 

Baron Von K., who resided in my own country, the king- 
dom of Prussia, had been for many years a disciple of the 
Lord Jesus. Even about the commencement of this century, 
whim there was almost universal darkness or even open 
infidelity spread over the whole continent of Europe, he 
knew the Lord Jesus ; and when, about the year 1806, there 
was the greatest distress in Silesia among many thousands 
of weavers, this blessed man of God took the following 
gracious step for his Lord and Master. As the weavers 
had no employment, the whole continent almost being in an 
unsettled state on account of Napoleon's career, it seemed 
to him the will of the Lord that he should use his very con- 
siderable propert} T to furnish these poor weavers with work, 
in order to save them from the greatest state of destitution, 
though in doing this there was not only no prospect of gain, 
but the certain prospect of immense loss. He therefore 
found employment for about six thousand weavers. But he 
was not content with this. Whilst he gave the bread which 
perishes, he also sought to minister to the souls of these 
weavers. To that end he sought to set believers as over- 
seers over this immense weaving concern, and not only saw 
to it that the weavers were instructed in spiritual things, 
but he himself also set the truth before them. Thus it went 
on for a good while, till at last, on account of the loss of 
the chief part of his property, he was obliged to think about 
giving it up. But by this time this precious act of mercy 
had so commended itself to the government that it was 
taken up by them and carried on till the times altered. 
Baron von K. was, however, appointed director of the whole 
concern as long as it existed. 

This dear man of God was not content with this. He 
travelled through many countries to visit the prisons, for 
the sake of improving the temporal and spiritual condition 



*841. FAITH STRENGTHENED BY EXERCISE. 203 

of the prisoners, and among all the other things which he 
sought to do for the Lord was this also in particular : He 
assisted poor students whilst at the university of Berlin, 
especially those who studied divinity, as it is called, in 
order to get access to them, and to win them for the Lord. 
One day a most talented young man, whose father lived at 
Breslau, where there is likewise a university, heard of the 
aged baron's kindness to students, and he therefore wrote 
to him, requesting him to assist him, as his own father could 
not well afford to support him any longer, having other 
children to provide for. A short time afterwards young T. 
received a most kind reply from the baron, inviting him to 
come to Berlin ; but, before this letter arrived, the 3'oung 
student had heard that Baron von K. was a pietist or mys- 
tic, as true believers are contemptuously called in Germany ; 
and as }~oung T. was of a highly philosophical turn of 
mind, reasoning about everything, questioning the truth of 
revelation, yea, questioning, most sceptically, the existence 
of God, he much disliked the prospect of going to the old 
baronv Still, he thought he could but try, and if he did not 
like it, he was not bound to remain in connection with him. 
He arrived in Berlin on a day when there was a great review 
of the troops, and, being full of this, he began to speak 
about it to the steward of the baron. The steward, how- 
ever, being a believer, turned the conversation, before the 
young student was aware of it, to spiritual things ; and yet 
he could nol say that it had been forced. He began another 
subject, and a third, but still it always came presently again 
to spiritual things. 

At last the baron came, who received young T. in the 
most affectionate and familiar manner, as if he had been 
his equal, and as if young T. bestowed a favor on him, 
rather than that he was favored by the baron. The baron 
offered him a room in his own house, and a place at his 
own table, while he should be studying in Berlin, which 
young T. accepted. He now sought in every way to treat 



204 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XIII. 

the young student in the most kind and affectionate way, 
and as much as possible to serve him, and to show him the 
power of the gospel in his own life, without arguing with 
him, yea, without speaking to him directly about his soul. 
For, discovering in } T oung T. a most reasoning and scepti- 
cal mind, he avoided in every possible way getting into 
any argument with him, while the young student again and 
again said to himself, " I wish I could get into an argument 
with this old fool ; I would show him his folly." But the 
baron avoided it. When the young student used to come 
home in the evening, and the baron heard him come, he 
would himself go to meet him on entering the house, would 
light his candle, would assist and serve him in any way he 
could, even to the fetching the bootjack for him, and help- 
ing him to take off his boots. Thus this lowly aged disci- 
ple went on for some time, whilst the young student still 
sought an opportunity for arguing with him, but wondered 
nevertheless how the baron could thus serve him. One 
evening, on the return of young T. to the baron's house, 
when the baron was making himself the servant as usual, 
he could refrain himself no longer, but burst out thus : 
"Baron, how can you do all this? You see I do not care 
about you, and how are you able to continue to be so kind 
to me, and thus to serve me?" The baron replied, " My 
dear young friend, I have learned it from the Lord Jesus. 
I wish you would read through the Gospel of John. Good 
night." The student now for the first time in* his life sat 
down and read the word of God in a disposition of mind 
to be willing to learn, whilst up to that time he had never 
read the Holy Scriptures but with the view of wishing to 
find out arguments against them. It pleased God to bless 
him. From that time he became himself a follower of the 
Lord Jesus, and has been so ever since. 

May 7. It has recently pleased the Lord to teach me a 
truth, irrespective of human instrumental^ , as far as I 
know, the benefit of which I have not lost, though now 



1841. FAITH STRENGTHENED BY EXERCI3E, 205 

while preparing the fifth edition for the press, more than 
fourteen years have since passed away. The point is this : 
I saw more clearly than ever that the first great and pri- 
mary business to which I ought to attend every day was, to 
have my soul happy in the Lord. The first thing to he con- 
cerned about was not how much I might serve the Lord, 
how I might glorifj 7 the Lord ; but how I might get my soul 
into a happy state, and how my inner man might be nour- 
ished. For I might seek to set the truth before the uncon- 
verted, I might seek to benefit believers, I might seek to 
relieve the distressed, I might in other ways seek to behave 
myself as it becomes a child of God in this world ; and 
yet, not being happy in the Lord, and not being nourished 
and strengthened in my inner man day by da}^, all this 
might not be attended to in a right spirit. Before this 
time my practice had been, at least for ten years previously, 
as an habitual thing to give myself to pra}~er, after having 
dressed myself in the morning. JSfow, I saw that the most 
important thing I had to do was to give myself to the read- 
ing of the word of God, and to meditation on it, that thus 
my heart might be comforted, encouraged, warned, re- 
proved, instructed ; and that thus, by means of the word 
of God, whilst meditating on it, my heart might be brought 
into experimental communion with the Lord. 

I began therefore to meditate on the New Testament 
from the beginning, early in the morning. The first thing 
I did, after having asked in a few words the Lord's blessing 
upon his precious word, was, to begin to meditate on the 
word of God, searching as it were into every verse, to get 
blessing out of it ; not for the sake of the public ministry 
of the word, not for the sake of preaching on what I had 
meditated upon, but for the sake of obtaining food for my 
own soul. The result I have found to be almost invariably 
this, that after a very few minutes my soul has been led to 
confession, or to thanksgiving, or to intercession, or to 
supplication ; so that, though I did not, as it were, gave 
18 



206 THE LIFE OS TRUST. Chap. XIII. 

myself to prayer, but to meditation, yet it turned almost 
immediately more or less into prayer. When thus I have 
been for a while making confession, or intercession, or sup- 
plication, or have given thanks, I go on to the next words 
or verse, turning all, as I go on, into prayer for myself or 
others, as the word may lead to it, but still continually 
keeping before me that food for my own soul is the object 
of my meditation. The result of this is, that there is al- 
ways a good deal of confession, thanksgiving, supplication, 
or intercession mingled with my meditation, and that my 
inner man almost invariably is even sensibly nourished and 
strengthened, and that by breakfast time, with rare excep- 
tions, I am in a peaceful if not happy state of heart. Thus 
also the Lord is pleased to communicate unto me that 
which, either very soon after or at a later time, I have found 
to become food for other believers, though it was not for 
the sake of the public ministry of the word that I gave 
myself to meditation, but for the profit of my own inner 
man. 

With this mode I have likewise combined the being out 
in the open air for an hour, an hour and a half, or two 
hours, before breakfast, walking about in the fields, and in 
the summer sitting for a little on the stiles, if I find it too 
much to walk all the time. I find it very beneficial to my 
health to walk thus for meditation before breakfast, and am 
now so in the habit of using the time for that purpose, that 
when I get into the open air I generally take out a New 
Testament of good-sized type, which I carry with me for 
that purpose, besides my Bible ; and I find that I can 
profitably spend my time in the open air, which formerly 
was not the case, for want of habit. I used to consider the 
time spent in walking a loss, but now I find it very prof- 
itable, not only to my body, but also to my soul. The 
walking out before breakfast is of course not necessarily 
connected with this matter, and every one has to judge 
according to his strength and other circumstances. 



1841. FAITH STRENGTHENED BY EXERCISE. 207 

The difference, then, between my former practice and my 
present one is this : Formerly, when I rose, I began to pray 
as soon as possible, and generally spent all my time tiD 
breakfast in prayer, or almost all the time. At all events 
I almost invariably began with prayer, except when I felt 
my sonl to be more than usually barren, in which case I 
read the word of God for food, or for refreshment, or for a 
revival and renewal of my inner man, before I gave myself 
to prayer. But what was the result ? I often spent a quar- 
ter of an hour, or half an hour, or even an hour, on my 
knees, before being conscious to myself of having derived 
comfort, encouragement, humbling of soul, etc. ; and often, 
after having suffered much from wandering of mind for the 
first ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, or even half an 
hour, I only then began really to pray. I scarcely ever 
suffer now in this way. For my heart being nourished by 
the truth, being brought into experimental fellowship with 
God, I speak to my Father and to my Friend (vile though 
I am, and unworthy of it) about the things that he has 
brought before me in his precious word. It often now as- 
tonishes me that I did not sooner see this point. In no 
book did I ever read about it. No public ministry ever 
brought the matter before me. No private intercourse with 
a brother stirred me up to this matter. And yet now, since 
God has taught me this point, it is as plain to me as any- 
thing, that the first thing the child of God has to do morn- 
ing by morning is, to obtain food for his inner man. As 
the outward man is not fit for work for any length of time 
except we take food, and as this is one of the first things 
we do in the morning, so it should be with the inner man. 
We should take food for that, as every one must allow. 
Now, what is the food for the inner man ? Not prayer, but 
the word of God; and here again, not the simple reading of 
the word of God, so that it only passes through our minds, 
just as water runs through a pipe, but considering what we 
read, pondering over it, and applying it to our hearts. 



208 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIII. 

When we pray, we speak to God. Now, prayer, in order to be 
continued for any length of time in any other than a formal 
manner, requires, generally speaking, a measure of strength 
or godly desire, and the season, therefore, when this exer- 
cise of the soul can be most effectually performed is after 
the inner man has been nourished by meditation on the 
word of God, where we find our Father speaking to us, to 
encourage us, to comfort us, to instruct us, to humble us, 
to reprove us. We may therefore profitably meditate, with 
God's blessing, though we are ever so weak spiritually ; na} T , 
the weaker we are, the more we need meditation for the 
strengthening of our inner man. There is thus far less to 
be feared from wandering of mind than if we give ourselves 
to prayer without having had previously time for medita- 
tion. I dwell so particularly on this point because of the 
immense spiritual profit and refreshment I am conscious of 
having derived from it myself, and I affectionately and 
solemnly beseech all my fellow-believers to ponder this 
matter. By the blessing of God, I ascribe to this mode the 
help and strength which I have had from God to pass in 
peace through deeper trials, in various ways, than I had 
ever had before ; and after having now above fourteen years 
tried this way, I can most fully, in the fear of God, com- 
mend it. In addition to this I generally read, after family 
prayer, larger portions of the word of God, when I still 
pursue my practice of reading regularly onward in the Holy 
Scriptures, sometimes in the New Testament and some- 
times in the Old, and for more than twenty-six years I have 
proved the blessedness of it. I take, also, either then or 
at other parts of the day, time more especially for prayer. 

How different, when the soul is refreshed and made happy 
early in the morning, from what it is when, without spiritual 
preparation, the service, the trials, and the temptations of 
the day come upon one ! 

Oct. 1. When I had again not one penny in hand for 
the necessities of this day, there was brought to me this 



1841. FAITH STRENGTHENED BY EXERCISE. 20U 

morning ten shillings for the orphans, which had been sent 
from Kensington. In the paper which contained the money, 
was written : " Your Heavenly Father knoweth that ye have 
need of these things." " Trust in the Lord." This word 
of our Lord is to me of more value than many bank notes. 
About five minutes later I received from an Irish sister ten 
pounds, through her banker in London. I mention here, 
as a point particularly to be noticed, that after the season 
of comparative abundance had come to an end in Septem- 
ber, the Lord did not at once allow us to be so sharply tried 
as we were afterwards. He dealt in the same gentle way 
with us three years before, when the trials of faith in this 
part of the work first commenced. 

Nov. 2. At a time of the greatest poverty one pound 
was sent by a lady from Birmingham. About half an hour 
afterwards I received ten pounds from a brother who had 
saved up one hundred and fifty pounds, and put it into a 
savings-bank, but who now sees that to devote this money 
to the promotion of the work of God tends more to the 
glory of the name of Jesus than to retain it in the savings- 
bank upon interest for a time of sickness or old age ; for 
he is assured that should such times come, the same Lord, 
who has hitherto cared for him whilst in health and strength 
and able to work, will also care for him then. The same 
brother gave me three pounds a fortnight since. These ten 
pounds came in very seasonably ; for, though we had been 
able to provide for the absolute necessities of to-day, yet 
there was want in many respects, especially as a boy is 
just going out as an apprentice, who needs tools and an 
outfit. 

Nov. 14. When we met again this afternoon for prayer, 
we had reason to praise, for the Lord had sent in means. 
This morning were given to me five pounds, and six shillings 
had come in by sale of articles. 

Nov. 15. Last Friday brother Craik and I had a meeting 
for inquirers and candidates for fellowship. We saw eight, 



210 THE LiFE OF TRUST. Chap. XI1L 

and had to send away *en whom we could not see, our 
strength being quite gone after we had seen the eight, one 
after another. This evening we saw seven, and had to send 
away three. 

Nov. 16. The last four days we have daily met for prayer, 
there being no means to pay the teachers in the day schools. 
Besides this, we need a stove in one of the school-rooms ; 
also some Bibles and tracts. To-day I received two pounds 
from a brother at Exmouth. 

Dec. 9. We are now brought to the close of the sixth 
year of this part of the work, having only in hand the 
money which has been put by for the rent; but during the 
whole of this year we have been supplied with all that was 
needed. 

During the last three years we had closed the accounts 
on this day, and had, a few days after, some public meet- 
ings, at which, for the benefit of the hearers, we stated how 
the Lord had dealt with us during the year, and the sub- 
stance of what had been stated at those meetings was after- 
wards printed for the benefit of the church at large. This 
time, however, it appeared to us better to delay for a while 
both the public meetings and the publishing of the Report. 
Through grace we had learned to lean upon the Lord only, 
being assured that if we never were to speak or write one 
single word more about this work, yet should we be sup- 
plied with means, as long as he should enable us to depend 
on himself alone. But whilst we neither had had those 
public meetings for the purpose of exposing our necessitj^, 
nor had had the account of the Lord's dealings with us 
published for the sake of working thereby upon the feelings 
of the readers, and thus inducing them to give money, but 
only that we might by our experience benefit other saints ; 
yet it might have appeared to some that in making known 
our circumstances we were actuated by some such motives. 
What better proof, therefore, could we give of our depend- 
ing upon the living God alone, and not upon public meet- 



1841. FAITH STRENGTHENED BY EXERCISE. 211 

ings or printed reports, than that, in the midst of our deep 
poverty, instead of being glad for the time to have come 
when we could make known our circumstances, we still 
went on quietly for some time longer, without saying any- 
thing? We therefore determined, as we sought and still 
seek in this work to act for the profit of the saints gen- 
erally, to delay both the public meetings and the Reports 
for a few months. Naturally we should have been, of 
course, as glad as any one to have exposed our poverty at 
that time ; but spiritually we were enabled to delight even 
then in the prospect of the increased benefit that might be 
derived by the church at large from our acting as we did. 




CHAPTEE XIV. 

WALKING IN DARKNESS. 

1841 — 1842. 

u SOD'S WAY JADS INTO TRIAL" — GROUNDS OF THANKFULNESS— PR» 
TRACTED B RKNESS — CAST DOWN, BUT NOT DESTROYED — TRUST IN 
GOD COMMB, DED — THE MEANS OF ITS ATTAINMENT — REVIEW OF THE 
WORK. 

ECElViBER 15, 1841. From Nov. 12 to this day 
my fellow-laborers in the church and I have seen 
thirty inquirers and candidates for fellowship, and 
some of them we have seen repeatedly. How can 
we sufficiently praise the Lord for still continuing to use us 
in his service? 

Dec. 18. Saturday morning. There is now the greatest 
need, and only fourpence in hand, which I found in the box 
at my house ; yet I fully believe the Lord will supply us 
this day also with all that is required. — Pause a few mo- 
ments, dear reader. Observe two things. We acted for 
God in delaying the public meetings and the publishing of 
the Report ; but God's way leads into trial, so far as sight 
and sense are concerned. Nature always will be tried in 
God's ways. The Lord was saying by this poverty, " I will 
now see whether you truly lean upon me and whether you 
truly look to me." Of all the seasons that I had ever 
passed through since I had been living in this way, up to 
that time, I never knew any period in which my faith was 
tried so sharply as during the four months from Dec. 12, 
1841, to April 12, 1842. But observe further: We might 
even now have altered our minds with respect to the public 
meetings and publishing % the Report ; for no one knew our 
212 



1841. WALKING IN DARKNESS. 213 

determination, at this time, concerning this point. Nay, on 
the contrary, we knew with what delight very many chil- 
dren of God were looking forward to receive further ac- 
counts. But the Lord kept us steadfast to the conclusion 
at which we arrived under his guidance. — Now to return 
to Saturday, Dec. 18. Evening. The Lord has been very 
kind to us this day. In the course of the morning six 
shillings came in. We had thus, with what provisions there 
were in hand, all that was needed for the dinner, but no 
means to provide for the next meal in the afternoon. A 
few minutes after the laborers had met together for prayer 
this morning, there was given to one of them a sovereign 
for himself. By means of this all that was needed for tea 
could be procured. When we again met in the evening for 
prajxr, we found that the supplies amounted to two pounds 
eight shillings twopence, — enough for all that was required 
to-day. But one thing more is to be noticed respecting 
this day. I was informed that three more of the orphans 
have been recently brought to the knowledge of the truth. 
We have now been meeting daily for prayer during the 
last five weeks, and thus the Lord has not merely heard 
our prayers respecting the funds, but has also blessed these 
children. 

Dec. 23. This is now the sixth week that the laborers in 
the day schools and Orphan Houses have daily met for 
prayer. Several precious answers we have already received 
since we began to meet, as it regards pecuniary supplies ; 
fresh instances of conversion among the children, etc. 
One of our petitions has been that the Lord would be 
pleased to furnish us with means for a stove at Callowhill 
Street school-room. But, though we had often mentioned 
this matter before the Lord, he seemed not to regard our 
request. Yesterday afternoon, while walking in my little 
garden, and meditating and praying, I had an unusual 
assurance that the time was now come when the Lord would 
answer our request, which arose partly from my being able 



214 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIV, 

to believe that 7ie would send the means, and partly from the 
fact that the answer could no longer be delayed without 
prayer having failed in this matter, as we could not as- 
semble the children again after the Christmas vacation, 
without there being a stove put up. And now, dear 
reader, observe : This morning I received from A. B. twenty 
pounds, and we have thus much more than is required for a 
stove. 

REVIEW OF THE YEAR 1841. 

1. In reading over my journal, I find that the Lord has given me, 
during this year, many precious answers to prayer, in addition to 
those which have been recorded in the previous part of the Narrative. 
I mention the following for the encouragement of the reader: 1. One 
of the orphan boys needed to be apprenticed. I knew of no suitable 
believing master who would take an in-door apprentice. I gave my- 
self to prayer, and brought the matter daily before the Lord. I 
marked it down among the subjects for which I would daily ask the 
Lord; and at last, though from May 21 to September I had to pray 
about the matter, the Lord granted my request ; for in September I 
found a suitable place for him. 2. On May 23 I began to ask the 
Lord that he would be pleased to deliver a certain sister in the Lord 
from the great spiritual depression under which she was suffering ; and 
after three days the Lord granted me my request. 3. On June 15 I 
began to ask the Lord to deliver a brother at a distance, from the 
great spiritual nervousness in which he found himself shut up, which 
not only distressed him exceedingly, and in a great measure hindered 
him in his service towards the world and the church, but which in 
consequence was also a trial to the saints who knew and valued this 
dear brother. This petition I brought many times before the Lord. 
The year passed away, and it was not granted. But yet at last this 
request also has been granted to me and to the many dear saints who 
I know prayed for this dear brother; for though he was for some 
rears in this state, it is now [in 1845] two years and more since he 
has been quite restored. 4. On June 15 I also began to ask the 
',ord daily in his mercy to keep a sister in the Lord from insanity, who 
*^as then apparently on the very border of it; and I have now [in 
.,445] to record to his praise, after nearly four years have passed 
i *ay, that the Lord has kept her from it. 5. During this year I was 
kjjrmed about the conversion of one of the very greatest sinners 



1842. WALKING IN DARKNESS. 215 

that I had ever heard of in all my service for the Lord. Repeatedly 
I fell on my knees with his wife, and asked the Lord for his conver- 
sion, when she came to me in the deepest distress of soul, on account 
of the most barbarous and cruel treatment that she received from him 
in his bitter enmity against her for the Lord's sake, and because he 
could not provoke her to be in a passion, and she would not strike 
him again, and the like. At the time when it was at at its worst I 
pleaded especially on his behalf the promise in Matthew xviii. 10 : 
"Again I say unto you, that if two of you shall agree on earth as 
touching anything that they shall ask, it shall be done for them of my 
Father which is in heaven." And now this awful persecutor is con- 
verted. 6. On May 25 I began to ask the Lord for greater real spir- 
itual prosperity among the saints among whom I labor in Bristol than 
there ever yet had been among them; and now I have to record to 
the praise of the Lord that truly he has answered this request; for, 
considering all tilings, at no period has there been more manifestation 
of grace, and truth, and spiritual power among us, than there is now 
while I am writing this for the press [1845]. 

2. The state of the church with reference to numbers. There are 
572 at present in communion, 88 having been added during the past 
year, of whom 30 have been brought to the knowledge of the Lord 
among us. 

3. The Lord's goodness as to my temporal supplies during this 
year. He has been pleased to give me by freewill offerings of the 
saints, £238, lis. lid. 

Jan. 3, 1842. This evening we had a precious public 
prayer meeting. When the usual time for closing the 
meeting came, it appeared to me that there was a desire 
to continue to wait upon the Lord. I therefore proposed 
to the brethren that those who had bodily strength, time, 
and a desire for waiting still longer upon the Lord, would 
do so. At least thirty remained, and we continued till after 
ten in prayer, whilst several brethren prayed. I never knew 
prayer more really in the Spirit. I experienced for myself 
unusual nearress to the Lord, and was enabled to ask in 
faith, nothing doubting. 

Jan. 4. As we have often found it to be the case, so it 
is now. After a season of more than usual poverty, comes 
a time of more than usual abundance. To-day the same 



216 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIV. 

brother who has been spoken of under Xoverober 3, and 
who has drawn his mone}^ out of the savings-bank to spend 
it for the Lord, sent twenty pounds more of it. There 
came in also from Guernsey one pound, and one pound 
seven shillings besides. I am now able to order oatmeal 
from Scotland, buy materials for the boys' clothes, order 
shoes, etc. Thus the Lord has been pleased to answer all 
our requests with respect to the pecuniary necessities of the 
orphans, which we have brought before him in our prayer 
meetings during the last seven weeks. We have thus had 
of late an abundance, but the expenses have been great 
also ; for within the last twenty-five days I have paid out 
above one hundred pounds. 

Feb. 8. By what came in yesterday and the day before, 
the need of yesterday was supplied, and there is enough in 
all the houses for the meals of to-day ; but in none of the 
houses have we been able to take in any bread ; and as 
yesterday also but little could be taken in, there will not 
remain any for to-morrow ; nor is there money enough to 
take in milk to-morrow morning. There are likewise coals 
needed in two houses. Indeed, so far as I know, these 
three years and seven months, since first the funds were 
exhausted, we were never in greater poverty ; and if the 
Lord were not to send means before nine o'clock to-morrow 
morning, his name would be dishonored. But I am fully 
assured that he will not leave us. — Evening. The Lord 
has not yet been pleased to send us what is needed for to- 
morrow, but he is given us a fresh proof that he is mindful 
of us. Between four and five o'clock this afternoon were 
sent nine plum cakes, which a sister had ordered to be 
baked as a treat for the orphans. These cakes were an 
encouragement to me to continue to look out for futher sup- 
plies. There were also found in the boxes at the Orphan 
Houses two shillings and a penny halfpenny, and one shilling 
fourpence came in for stockings. These little donations 
are most precious, but they are not enough to meet the 



7842. WALKING IN DARKNESS. 217 

need of tomorrow ; yea, before nine o'clock to-morrow 
morning we need more money to be able to take ia the 
miik. Truly, we are poorer than ever ; but through grace 
my eyes look not at the empty stores and the empty purse, 
but to the riches of the Lord oniy. 

Feb. 9. This momins: I went between seven and eight 
o'clock to the Orphan Houses, to see whether the Lord had 
sent in anything. "When I arrived there, he had just two 
or three minutes before sent help. A brother, in going to 
his house of business this morning, had gone already about 
half a mile, .when the Lord was pleased to lay the orphans 
upon his heart. He said, however, to himself, I cannot well 
return now, but will take something this evening ; and thus 
he walked on. Nevertheless, he could not go on an} T further, 
but felt himself constrained to go back, and take to brother 
R. B., at the Boys' Orphan House, three sovereigns. [The 
donor himself stated this to me afterwards.] Thus the 
Lord in his faithfulness helped us. Help was never more 
truly needed, for our poverty was never greater ; nor did 
the help of the Lord ever come more manifestly from him- 
self ; for the brother was gone on a good distance, it was be- 
tween seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and it was so 
short a time before money icould have been needed. Consider 
this, beloved reader, and with us praise the Lord for his 
goodness. Praise him particularly that he enabled us to 
trust in him in this trying hour. There came in besides, 
to-da}-, seven shillings sixpence. 

Feb 12. Saturday. Never since the funds were for the 
first time exhausted had there come in less during any week 
than during this. We were only able to supplv the abso- 
lute necessities ; but this we were enabled to do. TThcn 
the meal-times came, the Lord always provided what was 
needful, and, considering the great distress there is now 
almost everywhere, our dear orphans are very well provided 
for. Now tfais day began not only without there being 
anything in hand, but our stores were greatly reduced, and 
19 



218 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIV. 

we had to procure provisions for two days. One of the 
laborers gave five shillings in the morning, to provide the 
means to take in the milk. I collected together some pam- 
phlets, which had been given for sale, to dispose of them, 
and they were sold about eleven o'clock for four shillings. 
There came in also by sale of stockings three shillings, and 
twelve shillings were paid on behalf of one of the orphans. 
Thus we were provided with means to procure a dinner, and 
had a little towards purchasing bread, but by no means 
enough. All the laborers were together in prayer from 
half-past eleven till one, and we separated comfortably, with 
the purpose of meeting again in the evening. When I came 
home there was given to me an old broken silver pencil-case, 
which, though worth very little, I took as a fresh proof 
that our Father was mindful of our need. When we met 
again this evening, we found that three shillings sixpence 
had come in by sale of stockings, and sixpence for two 
Reports. As all this was not enough, a few old and need- 
less articles were disposed of for four shillings, also the 
broken pencil-case for sixpence. I say needless articles, 
for other articles it did not seem right to us to dis- 
pose of, in order that the Lord's own deliverance might 
be manifest. A laborer was also still further able to 
give seven shillings of his own. To one of the laborers 
two shillings had been owed by a certain individual for 
more than a twelvemonth, which being paid just now, and 
given by him for the orphans, came in most seasonably. 
Thus we had one pound eighteen shillings sixpence, as 
much as was needful to procure provisions till after break- 
fast on Monday morning. However, the Lord helped still 
further. Between eight and nine this evening, after we 
had been together for prayer, and had now separated, some 
money was given to one of the laborers for himself, by 
which means he was able to give nine shillings, so that 
altogether two pounds seven shillings sixpence had come in 
this day. This has been, of all the weeks, during the last 



1842. WALKING IN DARKNESS. 219 

three years and seven months, one of the most trying, so 
far as it regards the trial of faith. Thanks to the Lord who 
has helped us this day also ! Thanks to him for enabling 
us already this morning, when we met for prayer, to praise 
him for the deliverance which we were sure he would work. 
Feb. 16. This morning there was now again only suffi- 
cient money in hand to take in milk at two of the houses ; 
but as a laborer was able to give six shillings sixpence, we 
had sufficient for the milk, and had also enough, with the 
provisions that were in the houses, to provide for the din- 
ner. Nothing more came in in the course of the morning, 
nor was I able to make inquiries how matters stood. In 
the afternoon, between three and four o'clock, having once 
more besought the Lord to send us help, I sat peacefully 
down to give myself to meditation over the word, consider- 
ing that that was now my service, though I knew not 
whether there was a morsel of bread for tea in any one of 
the houses, but being assured that the Lord would provide. 
For, through grace, my mind is so fully assured of the 
faithfulness of the Lord, that, in the midst of the greatest 
need, I am enabled in peace to go about my other work. 
Indeed, did not the Lord give me this, which is the result 
of trusting in him, I should scarcely be able to work at all ; 
for it is now comparatively a rare thing that a day comes 
when I am not in need for one or the other part of the 
work. Scarcely had I sat down to meditate, when a note 
was sent to me from the Orphan Houses, in which brother 
~R. B., master of the Orphan bo} r s, had written thus : " On 
visiting the sisters in the Infant and Girls' Orphan Llouses, 
I found them in the greatest need. There was not bread in 
one of the houses for tea this evening, and the six shillings 
sixpence were scarcely enough to supply what was needed 
for the dinner. I therefore opened the box in the Boys' 
Orphan House, and most unexpectedly found one pound in 
it. Thus, through the kindness of the Lord, we were again 
abundantly supplied as it regards present necessities." In 



220 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Ciiap. XIV. 

the evening the Lord, in his love and faithfulness, stretched 
out his hand still further. I had expounded at the meeting 
a part of John xi. The last words on which I spoke were, 
" Said I not unto thee that if thou wouldest believe thou 
shouldest see the glory of God ? " When the meeting was 
over, as a fresh proof of the truth of this word, a note was 
given to me in which a sick sister sent me five pounds for 
the orphans. 

Feb. 21. Since Saturday evening came in one pound 
eight shillings elevenpence. There were also sent from 
Plymouth a piece of blond, a piece of quilling net, and 
eleven pairs of children's stockings, for sale. Thus we 
were supplied with means for that which was requisite for 
the beginning of this day ; but, as our stores had been so 
reduced at the end of last week, there was not enough for 
tea this afternoon. Four o'clock had now come, one hour 
before the usual tea-time, when a brother from Somerset- 
shire came to see the Orphan Houses, and put a sovereign 
into each of the boxes. Our great need soon brought oii'^ 
the money, and thus we were supplied. [Observe ! The 
brother, as he himself told me a few days after in the 
course of conversation, had but little time, and therefore 
rather hastily went over the houses. Had he stayed long 
and conversed much, as might have been the case, his 
donations would not have been in time for the tea.] 
There came in one shilling besides, by needlework done 
by the children. 

Feb. 25. Greater than now our need had never been. 
Our trials of faith have never been so sharp as during 
this week. Indeed, so much so, that most of the laborers 
felt to-day considerably tried. Yet neither this day has 
the Lord suffered us to be confounded. Through a re- 
markable circumstance one of the laborers obtained some 
money this morning, so that all the need of to-day could 
be amply met. 

Feb. 26. My prayer this morning was in particular 



1842. WALKING IN DARKNESS. 22 

that the Lord would be pleased now to look in pity upt n 
us, and take off his hand. Indeed, for several days my 
prayer has been that he would enable us to continue to 
trust in him, and not lay more upon us than he would 
enable us to bear. This is now again Saturday There 
having been given yesterday a rich supply to the matrons, 
I knew that not so much as usual would be repaired this 
Saturday ; still, I thought that one pound t>,n shillings 
would be needed. Between ten and elever o'clock this 
morning a parcel came from Clapham, cc ^.Gaining two 
pounds two shillings, with two frocks, two petticoats, two 
chemises, two pinafores, and six handke ^Liefs, all new. 
Thus we were richly supplied for to-d ij s for ODly one 
pound ten shillings were needed. 

March 2. This evening were sent, 1 y order of an Irish 
sister, thirty-three and a half pounds f J woollen yarn. Re- 
specting this donation it is to be ren arked that last Satur- 
day we had asked the Lord, in our prayer meeting, that he 
would be pleased to send us me^ns to purchase worsted, 
in order that the boys might go on with their knitting. 

March 9. At a time of the greatest need, both with 
regard to the day schools &nd the orphans, so much so that 
we could not have gone on any longer without help, I 
received this day ten pounds from a brother who lives near 
Dublin. The money was divided between the day schools 
and the Orphan Houses. The following little circumstance 
is to be noticed respecting this donation. As our need was 
so great, and my soul was, through grace, truly waiting 
upon the Lord, I looked out for supplies in the course of 
this morning. The post, however, was out, and no supplies 
had come. This did not in the least discourage me. I 
said to myself, the Lord can send means without the post, 
or even now, though the post is out, by this very delivery 
of letters he may have sent means, though the money is 
not yet in my hands. It was not long after I had thus 
spoken to myself when, according to my hope in God, we 



222 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIV. 

were helped ; for the brother who sent us the ten pounds, 
had this time directed his letter to the Boys' Orphan 
House, whence it was sent to me. 

March 17. From the 12th to the 16th had come in four 
pounds five shillings elevenpence halfpenny for the orphans. 
This morning our poverty, which now has lasted more or 
less for several months, had become exceedingly great. I 
left my house a few minutes after seven to go to the 
Orphan Houses to see whether there was money enough 
to take in the milk, which is brought about eight o'clock. 
On my way it was especially my request that the Lord 
would be pleased to pity us, even as a father pitieth his 
children, and that he would not lay more upon us than he 
would enable us to bear. I especially entreated him that 
he would now be pleased to refresh our hearts by sending 
us help. I likewise reminded him of the consequences 
that would result, both in reference to believers and unbe- 
lievers, if we should have to give up the work because of 
want of means, and that he therefore would not permit its 
coming to nought. I moreover again confessed before the 
Lord that I deserved not that he should continue to use 
me in this work any longer. While I was thus in prayer, 
about two minutes' walk from the Orphan Houses, I met a 
brother who was going at this early hour to his business. 
After having exchanged a few words with him, I went on ; 
but he presently ran after me, and gave me one pound for 
the orphans. Thus the Lord speedily answered my prayer. 
Truly, it is worth being poor and greatly tried in faith for 
nthe sake of having day by day such precious proofs of the 
loving interest which our kind Father takes in everything 
that concerns us. And how should our Father do other- 
wise ! He that has given us the greatest possible proof 
of his love which he could have done, in giving us his own 
Son, surely he will with him also freely give us all things. 
It is worth also being poor and greatly tried in faith, if 
but thereby the hearts of the children of God may be 



1842. WALKING IN DARKNESS. 223 

comforted and their faith strengthened, and if but those 
who do not know God, and who may read or hear of his 
dealings with us, should be led thereby to see that faith in 
God is more than a mere notion, and that there is indeed 
reality in Christianity. In the course of this day there 
came in still further thirteen shillings. 

March 19. Saturday. As it has often been the case on 
Saturdays, so it was this day in particular. "We began the 
day in very great poverty, as only seven shillings had come 
in since the day before yesterday. There was not one ray 
of light as to natural prospects. The heart would be over- 
whelmed at such seasons, were there not an abundance of 
repose to be found by trusting in God. The trial having 
continued so long, and our poverty having now come to 
such a degree that it was necessary we should have help in 
order that the name of the Lord might not be dishonored, 
I had proposed to my fellow-laborers that we should set 
apart this day especially for prayer. We met accordingly 
at half-past ten in the morning. By that time had come in 
four shillings sixpence, seven shillings sixpence, and ten 
shillings. In the afternoon we met again at three, when 
ten shillings came in. In the evening, at seven, we met 
once more, there being yet about three shillings needed to 
procure all that was required. This also we received, and 
even three shillings more than was actually needed came in, 
just when we were about to separate. 

April 12. We were never in greater need than to-da} r , 
perhaps never in so much, when I received this morning one 
hundred pounds from the East Indies. It is impossible to 
describe the real joy in God it gave me. My prayer had 
been again this morning particularly that our Father would 
pity us, and now at last send larger sums. I was not in 
the least surprised or excited when this donation came, for 
I took it as that ivliich came in answer to prayer, and had 
been long looked for. 

May 6. Only three pounds ten shillings twopence half- 



224 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIV. 

penny kaa Deen received since the 2d, on which account 
there would have been only enough means in hand to pro- 
vide for the breakfast to-morrow morning, when in this our 
fresh need we received eighty-six pounds, two pair of gold 
ear-rings, a brooch and two rupees. 

May 10. To-da}^, in closing the accounts, we have left, 
at the end of this period of seventeen months, in which we 
have been so often penniless, the sum of sixteen pounds 
eighteen shillings tenpence halfpenny for the orphans, and 
forty-eight pounds twelve shillings live and one fourth 
pence for the other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge 
Institution. 

The time now seemed to us to have come, when, for the 
profit of the church at large, the Lord's dealings with us, 
with reference to the various objects of the Scriptural 
Knowledge Institution, should be made known by publish- 
ing another Report. For, whilst we, on purpose, had de- 
la}-ed it at this time five months longer than during the 
previous years, and that during a period when we were in 
deeper poverty than during any previous time ; yet, as from 
the commencement it had appeared to me important from 
time to time to make known the Lord's dealings with us, 
so I judged it profitable still to seek to comfort, to encour- 
age, to exhort, to instruct, and to warn the dear children 
of God by the printed accounts of the Lord's goodness to 
us. 

Though our trials of faith during these seventeen 
months lasted longer and were sharper than during any 
previous period, } T et during all this time the orphans had 
everything that was needful in the way of nourishing food, 
the necessary articles of clothing, etc. Indeed, I should 
rather at once send the children back to their relations than 
keep them without sufficient maintenance. 

I desire that all the children of God who may read these 
details may thereby be led to increased and more simple 
confidence in God for everything which they may need 



1842. WALKING IX DARKNESS. 225 

under any circumstances, and that these many answers to 
prayer may encourage tliem to pray, particularly as it re- 
gards the conversion of their friends and relations, their 
own progress in grace and knowledge, the state of the 
saints whom they may know personally, the state of the 
church of Christ at large, and the success of the preaching 
of the gospel. Especially, I affectionately warn them 
against being led away by the device of Satan, to think 
that these things are peculiar to me, and cannot be enjoyed 
by all the children 'of God ; for though, as has been stated 
before, every believer is not called upon to establish orphan 
houses, charity schools, etc., and trust in the Lord for 
means, yet all believers are called upon, in the simple con- 
fidence of faith, to cast all their burdens upon him, to trust 
in him for everything, and not only to make everything a 
subject of prayer, but to expect answers to their petitions 
which they have asked according to his will and in the name 
of the Lord Jesus. Think not, dear reader, that I have 
the gift of faith, that is, that gift of which we read in 1 Cor. 
xii. 9, and which is mentioned along with " the gifts of 
healing," "the working of miracles," " prophecy," and that 
on that account I am able to trust in the Lord. It is true 
that the faith which I am enabled to exercise is altogether 
God's own gift ; it is true that he alone supports it, and 
that he alone can increase it ; it is true that moment by 
moment I depend on him for it, and that if I were only 
one moment left to myself my faith would utterly fail ; but 
it is not true that my faith is that gift of faith which is 
spoken of in 1 Cor. xii. 9. It is the self-same faith which 
is found in every believer, and the growth of which I am 
most sensible of to myself ; for by little and little it has 
been increasing for the last six and twenty years. 

This faith which is exercised respecting the Orphan 
Houses, and my own temporal necessities, shows itself in 
the same measure, for instance, concerning the following 
points : I have never been permitted to doubt during the 



226 THE LIFE OE TRUST. Chap. XIV. 

last twenty-seven 3'ears that my sins are forgiven, that I am 
a child of God, that I am beloved of God, and that I shall 
be finally saved ; because I am enabled by the grace of God 
to exercise faith upon the word of God, and believe what 
God says in those passages which settle these matters (1 
John v. 1 ; Gal. iii. 26 ; Acts x. 43 ; Romans x. 9, 10 ; 
John iii. 16, etc.). Further, at the time when I thought I 
should be insane, though there was not the least ground for 
thinking so, I was in peace ; because my soul believed the 
truth of that word, " We know that all things work together 
for good to them that love God." Rom. viii. 28. Further : 
When my brother in the flesh and my dear aged father died, 
and when concerning both of them I had no evidence what- 
ever that they were saved (though I dare not say that they 
are lost, for I know it not) , yet my soul was at peace, per- 
fectly at peace, under this great trial, this exceedingly great 
trial, this trial which is one of the greatest perhaps which can 
befall a believer. And what was it that gave me peace ? My 
soul laid hold on that word, " Shall not the Judge of all the 
earth do right ? " This word, together with the whole char- 
acter of God, as he has revealed himself in his holy word, 
settled all questionings. I believed what he has said con- 
cerning himself, and I was at peace, and have been at peace 
ever since, concerning this matter. Further : When the 
Lord took from me a beloved infant, my soul was at peace, 
perfectly at peace ; I could only weep tears of joy when I 
did weep. And why ? Because my soul laid hold in faith 
on that word, " Of such is the kingdom of heaven." Mat- 
thew xix. 14. Further : When sometimes all has been 
dark, exceedingly dark, with reference to my service among 
the saints, judging from natural appearances ; yea, when I 
should have been overwhelmed indeed in grief and despair 
had I looked at things after the outward appearance : at 
such times I have sought to encourage nryself in God, by 
laying hold in faith on his almighty power, his unchangea- 
ble love, and his infinite wisdom, and I have said to myself, 



1842. WALKING IN DARKNESS. 227 

God is able and willing to deliver me, if it be good for me ; 
for it is written, "He that spared not his own Son, bnt 
delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also 
freely give us all things ?" Rom. viii. 32. This it was 
which, being believed by me through grace, kept my soul 
in peace. Further : When, in connection with the Orphan 
Houses, day schools, etc., trials have come upon me which 
were far heavier than the want of means ; when lying reports 
were spread that the orphans had not enough to eat, or that 
they were cruelty treated in other respects, and the like ; 
or when other trials, still greater, but which I cannot men- 
tion, have befallen me in connection with this work, and 
that at a time when I was nearly a thousand miles absent 
from Bristol, and had to remain absent week after week ; 
at such times my soul was stayed upon God ; I believed 
his word of promise which was applicable to such cases ; 
I poured out my soul before God, and arose from my knees 
in peace, because the trouble that was in the soul was in 
believing prayer cast upon God, and thus I was kept in 
peace, though I saw it to be the will of God to remain far 
away from the work. Further : When I needed houses, 
fellow-laborers, masters and mistresses for the orphans or 
for the day schools, I have been enabled to look for all to 
the Lord, and trust in him for help. 

Dear reader, I msiy seem to boast ; but, by the grace of 
God, I do not boast in thus speaking. From my inmost 
soul I do ascribe it to God alone that he has enabled me to 
trust in him, and that hitherto he has not suffered my con- 
fidence in him to fail. But I thought it needful to make 
these remarks, lest an}^one should think that my depending 
upon God was a particular gift given to me, which other 
saints have no right to look for ; or lest it should be thought 
that this my depending upon him had only to do with the 
obtaining of money by prayer and faith. By the grace of 
God I desire that my faith in God should extend towards 
everything, the smallest of my own temporal and spiritual 



228 THE LIFE OF TRtST. Chap. XIV. 

concerns, and the smallest of the temporal and spiritual con- 
cerns of my family, towards the saints among whom I 
labor, the church at large, eveiytking that has to clo with 
the temporal and spiritual prosperity of the Scriptural 
Knowledge Institution, etc. Dear reader, do not think that 
I have attained in faith (and how much less in other 
respects !) to that degree to which I might and ought to 
attain ; but thank God for the faith which he has given me, 
and ask him to uphold and increase it. And las|ly, once 
more, let not Satan deceive you in making you think that 
you could not have the same faith, but that it is only for 
persons who are situated as I am. When I lose such a 
thing as a key, I ask the Lord to direct me to it, and I look 
for an answer to my prayer ; when a person with whom I 
have made an appointment does not come, according to the 
fixed time, and I begin to be inconvenienced b}^ it, I ask the 
Lord to be pleased to hasten him to me, and I look for an 
answer ; when I do not understand a passage of the word of 
God, I lift up my heart to the Lord, that he would be 
pleased, by his Holy Spirit, to instruct me, and I expect to 
be taught, though I do not fix the time when, and the man- 
ner how it should be ; when I am going to minister in the 
word, I seek help from the Lord, and while I, in the con- 
sciousness of natural inability as well as utter unworthiness, 
begin this his service, I am not cast down, but of good 
cheer, because I look for his assistance, and believe that he, 
for his dear Son's sake, will help me. And thus in other of 
my temporal and spiritual concerns I pray to the Lord, and 
expect an answer to my requests ; and may not you do the 
same, dear believing reader ? Oh ! I beseech you do not think 
me an extraordinary believer, having privileges above oth- 
er of God's dear children, which they cannot have ; nor 
look on my way of acting as something that would not do 
for other believers. Make but trial ! Do but stand still 
in the hour of trial, and you will see the help of God, if 
you trust in him. But there is so often a forsaking the 



1842. WALKING 03 DARKNESS. 229 

ways of the Lord in the hour of trial, and thus the food for 
faith, the means thereby our faith may be increased, is 
lost. This leads me to the following important point. 
You ask, How may I, a true believer, have nry faith 
streuo-thened? The answer is this : — 

o 

L " Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, 
and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is 
no variableness, neither shadow of turning." James i. 17. 
As the increase of faith is a good gift, it must come 
from God, and therefore he ought to be asked for this 
blessing. 

II. The following means, however, ought to be used: 
1. The careful reading of the ivord of God, combined ivith 
meditation on it. Through reading of the word of God, 
and especially through meditation on the word of God, 
the believer becomes more and more acquainted with the 
nature and character of Gocl, and thus sees more and 
more, besides his holiness and justice, what a kind, loving, 
gracious, merciful, mighty., wise, and faithful being he is, 
and, therefore, in poverty, affliction of body, bereavement 
in his family, difficulty in his service, want of a situation 
or employment, he will repose upon the ability of God to 
help him, because he has not only learned from his word 
that he is of almighty power and infinite wisdom, but he 
has also seen instance upon instance in the Holy Scrip- 
tures in which his almighty power and infinite wisdom 
have been actually exercised in helping and delivering his 
people ; and he will repose upon the willingness of God 
to help him, because he has not only learned from the 
Scriptures what a kind, good, merciful, gracious, and 
faithful being God is, but because he has also seen in the 
word of God how in a great variety of instances he has 
proved himself to be so. And the consideration of this, 
if God has become known to us through prayer and medi- 
tation on his own word, will lead us, in general at least, 
with a measure of confidence to rely upon him; and 
20 



230 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIV. 

thus the reading of the word of God, together with medita- 
tion on it, will be one especial means to strengthen our 
faith. 

2. As, with reference to the growth of every grace of the 
Spirit, it is of the utmost importance that we seek to main- 
tain an upright heart and a good conscience, and, therefore, 
do not knowingly and habitually indulge in those things 
which are contrary to the mind of God, so it is also partic- 
ularly the case with reference to the growth in faith. How 
can I possibly continue to act faith upon God, concerning 
anything, if I am habitually grieving him, and seek to 
detract from the glory and honor of him in whom I pro- 
fess to trust, upon whom I profess to depend? All my 
confidence towards God, all my leaning upon him in the 
hour of trial, will be gone, if I have a guilty conscience, 
and do not seek to put awaj^ this guilty conscience, but 
still continue to do things which are contrary to the mind 
of God. And if, in any particular instance, I cannot trust 
in God, because of the guilty conscience, then my faith is 
weakened by that instance of distrust ; for faith with every 
fresh trial of it either increases by trusting God, and thus 
getting help, or it decreases by not trusting him ; and then 
there is less and less power of looking simply and directly 
to him, and a habit of self-dependence is begotten or en- 
couraged. One or other of these will always be the ease in 
each particular instance. Either we trust in God, and in 
that case we neither trust in ourselves, nor in our fellow- 
men, nor in circumstances, nor in anything besides ; or we 
do trust in one or more of these, and in that case do not 
trust in God. 

3. If we, indeed, desire our faith to be strengthened, we 
should not shrink from opportunities where our faith may 
be tried, and, therefore, through the trial, be strengthened. 
In our natural state we dislike dealing with God alone. 
Through our natural alienation from God we shrink from 
him, and from eternal realities. This cleaves to us more 



1842. WALKING IN DARKEN ESS. 231 

or less, even after our regeneration. Hence it is that, 
more or less, even as believers, we have the same shrinking 
from standing with God alone, from depending upon him 
alone, from looking to him alone ; and yet this is the very 
position in which we ought to be, if we wish our faith to be 
strengthened. The more I am in a position to be tried in 
faith with reference to my body, my family, my service for 
the Lord, my business, etc., the more shall I have oppor- 
tunity of seeing God's help and deliverance ; and every 
fresh instance in which he helps and delivers me will tend 
towards the increase of my faith. On this account, there- 
fore, the believer should not shrink from situations, posi- 
tions, circumstances, in which his faith may be tried, but 
should cheerfully embrace them as opportunities where he 
may see the hand of God stretched out on his behalf, to 
help and deliver him, and whereby he may thus have his 
faith strengthened. 

4. The last important point for the strengthening of our 
faith is^that we let God work for us, when the hour of the 
trial of our faith comes, and do not work a deliverance of 
our own. Wherever God has given faith, it is given, among 
other reasons, for the very purpose of being tried. Yea, how- 
ever weak our faith may be, God will try it ; only with this 
restriction, that as, in every way, he leads us on gently, 
gradually, patiently, so also with reference to the trial of 
our faith. At first our faith will be tried very little in com- 
parison with what it may be afterwards ; for God never 
lays more upon us than he is willing to enable us to bear. 
Now, when the trial of faith comes, we are naturally in- 
clined to distrust God, and to trust rather in ourselves, oi 
in our friends, or in circumstances. We will rather work a 
deliverance of our own, somehow or other, than simply 
look to God and wait for his help. But if we do not pa- 
tiently wait for God's help, if we work a deliverance of our 
own, then at the next trial of our faith it will be thus again, 
we shall be again inclined to deliver ourselves ; and thus, 



232 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIV 

with eveiy fresh instance of that kind, our faith will de 
crease ; whilst, on the contrary, were we to stand still in 
order to see the salvation of God, to see his hand stretched 
out on our behalf, trusting in him alone, then our faith 
would be increased, and in every fresh case in which the 
hand of God is stretched out in our behalf in the hour of 
the trial of our faith, our faith would be increased yet 
more. Would the believer, therefore, have his faith 
strengthened, he must, especially, give time to God, who 
tries his faith in order to prove to his child, in the end, how 
willing he is to help and deliver him, the moment it is good 
for him. 

I now return, dear reader, to the Narrative, giving you 
some further information with reference to the seventeen 
months from Dec. 10, 1840, to May 10, 1842, as it respects 
the Orphan Houses, and other objects of the Scriptural 
Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, besides the 
facts of which mention has been alread} 7 " made. 

During this period, also, 1. Two Sunday schools were 
entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. 2. There 
were two adult schools, one for females, and one for males, 
entirely supported during these seventeen months, in which 
on two evenings of the week the males, and on two even- 
ings the females, were instructed quite gratuitously, in 
reading and writing, and were furnished with books and 
writing materials gratuitously. There were, during these 
seventeen months, 344 adults taught in these two schools, 
and on May 10, 1842, the number under instruction 
amounted to 110. 3. There were, during these seventeen 
months, also six day schools entirely supported by the funds 
of the Institution, three for boys and three for girls. On 
May 10, 1842, the number of children who attended these 
day schools was 363 ; and the total number who, from the 
formation of the Institution, March 5, 1834, up to May 10, 
1842, had been instructed in the day schools, which are 
supported by the funds of the Institution, amounts t" 



1842. WALKING IN DARKNESS. 233 

2,616. 4. During these seventeen months, 798 copies of 
the Uoly Scriptures were circulated, and from the com- 
mencement of the Institution, up to May 10, 1842, 6,842 
copies. 5. During these seventeen months was spent for 
missionary purposes the sum of £126, 15s. 3d. of the funds 
of the Institution, whereb}' assistance was rendered to the 
work of God in Jamaica, in Australia, in Canada, and in 
the East Indies. 6. At the commencement of these seven- 
teen months, i. e., on Dec. 10, 1840, a new object was begun, 
the circulation of such publications as may be beneficial, 
with the blessing of God, to both unbelievers and believ- 
ers. We laid out for this object during these seventeen 
months the sum of £62, 17s. 4d., for which 22,190 such 
little publications were purchased, and of which number 
19,609 were actually given away. 7. There were received 
into the three Orphan Houses 15 orphans, who, together 
with those who were in the houses on Dec. 10, 1840, make 
up 106 in all. Of these, five girls were sent out to service, 
two boys and one girl were apprenticed, one girl was re- 
moved by a lady who had placed her for a time under our 
care, and one was sent back to his relations, as he was 
injurious to the other children. 

There were on May 10, 1842, 96 orphans in the three 
houses, i. e., 30 in the Girls' Orphan House, 37 in the Infant 
Orphan House, and 29 in the Boys' Orphan House. Besides 
this, three apprentices were supported by the funds of the 
Institution ; so that the total number was 99. The number 
of orphans who were under our care from April, 1836, to 
May 10, 1842, amounts to 144. 

I notice further, in connection with the Orphan Houses, 
that, without any one having been asked for anything by me, 
the sum of £5,276, 14s. 8d. was given to me from the 
beginning of the work up to May 10, 1842, as the result oj 
■prayer to God. 

The total of the expenditure for the various objects of the 
Institution, exclusive of the Orphan Houses, during these 
20* 



234 THE LIFE OF TRUST- Chap. XI 7. 

seyejteen months, amounted to £710, lis. 5d. ; the total of 
the income amounted to £746, Is. 0£d. The total of the 
expenditure for the three Orphan Houses, from Dec. 10, 
1840, to May 10, 1842, amounted to £1,333, 15s. 2jd. ; the 
total of the income amounted to £1,339, 13s. 7d. 




CHAPTEE XV. 

PROSPERITY. 

1842 — 1843. 

ABUNDANT SUPPLIES — RESTING ON THE "WRITTEN WORD — "SEEKING AND 
FINDING" — ERRONEOUS IMPRESSIONS REMOVED — PERSEVERING AND PRE- 
VAILING PRAYER ANSWERED — " LENGTHENING THE CORDS AND STRENGTH- 
ENING THE STAKES" — A FOURTH ORPHAN HOUSE. 

(3/jC UNE 3, 1842. For several days past I had not been 
particularly led to pray for means for the orphans. 
Last evening, however, I did so, as we had now 
again no money in hand, there having come in only 

ten pounds two shillings twopence during the last five days ; 

and in answer to nry request two pounds nineteen shillings 

sixpence came in this morning. 

For several months succeeding the last date, means 
continued to flow in, without interruption, as they 
were needed. There was no excess of means, nor 
was there any lack. On Dec. 1, 1842, Mr. Miiller 
writes : — 

Nothing had come in, except five shillings for needle- 
work. The laborers had nothing to give, except one of 
them one shilling sixpence ; yet this little supplied the abso- 
lute need, which was only milk. We were unable to take 
in the usual quantity of bread. Should it be said that the 
not taking in the usual quantity of bread would at once 
prove to the bakers that we are poor, my reply is, that that 
does not follow, because bread has often been sent as a 

235 



236 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XV. 

present, as may be seen in the list of articles, given for the 
orphans, at the end of the printed Reports. But perhaps 
it may be asked, Wiry do you not take the bread on credit ? 
What does it matter whether you pay immediately for it, 
or at the end of the month, or the quarter, or the half }^ear ? 
Seeing that the Orphan Houses are the work of the Lord, 
may you not trust in him that he will supply you with 
means to pay the bills which you contract with the butcher, 
baker, grocer, etc., as the things which you purchase are 
needful? My reply is this: 1. If the work in which we 
are engaged is indeed the work of God, then he whose work 
it is is surely able and willing to provide the means for it. 
2. But not only so, he will also provide the means at the 
time when they are needed. I do not mean that he will pro- 
vide them when ive think that they are needed ; but yet that 
when there is real need, such as the necessaries of life 
being required, he will give them ; and on the same ground 
on which we suppose we do trust in God to help us to pay 
' the debt which we now contract, we may and ought to trust 
in the Lord to suppry us with what we require at present, 
so that there may be no need for going into debt. 3. It is 
true, I might have goods on credit, and to a very consider- 
able amount ; but, then, the result would be, that the next 
time we were again in straits, the mind would involuntarily 
be turned to further credit which I might have, instead of 
being turned to the Lord, and thus faith, which is kept up 
and strengthened only by being exercised, would become 
weaker and weaker, till at last, according to all human 
probability, I should find nryself deeply in debt, and have 
no prospect of getting out of it. 4. Faith has to do with 
the word of God, — rests upon the written word of God ; 
but there is no promise that he will pay our debts. The 
word says rather, " Owe no man anything ; " whilst there 
is the promise given to his children, "I will never leave 
thee nor forsake thee," and, " Whosoever believeth on him 
shall not be confounded." On this account we could not 



1842. PROSPERITY. 237 

say, upon the ground of the Holy Scriptures, Why do you 
not trust in God that he will supply you with means to pay 
your debts which you contract in his service for the neces- 
sities of the orphans ? 5. The last reason why we do not 
take goods on credit is this : The chief and primary object 
of the work was not the temporal welfare of the children, 
nor even their spiritual welfare, blessed and glorious as it 
is, and much as, through grace, we seek after it and pray 
for it ; but the first and primaiy object of the work was, 
to show before the wliole world and the whole church of Christ, 
that even in these last evil days the living God is ready to 
prove himself as the living God, by being ever willing to help, 
succor, comfort, and answer the prayers of those who trust in 
him : so that we need not go away from him to our fellow" 
men, or to the ways of the world, seeing that he is both 
able and willing to supply us with all we can need in his 
service. 

From the beginning, when God put this service into my 
heart, I had anticipated trials and straits ; but knowing, as 
I did, the heart of God, through the experience of several 
years previously, I also knew that he would listen to the 
prayers of his child who trusts in him, and that he would 
not leave him in the hour of need, but listen to his prayers, 
and deliver him out of the difficulty, and that then, this 
being made known in print for the benefit of both believers 
and unbelievers, others would be led to trust in the Lord. 
We discern, therefore, more and more clear ly that it is for 
the church's benefit that we are put into these straits, and 
if therefore in the hour of need we were to take goods on 
credit, the first and primary object of the work would be 
completely frustrated, and no heart would be further 
strengthened to trust in God ; nor would there be any 
longer that manifestation of the special and particular 
providence of God which has hitherto been so abundantly 
shown through this work, even in the eyes of unbelievers, 
whereby they have been led to see that tliere is after ah 



238 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XV. 

reality in the things of God, and many, through these 
printed accounts, have been truly converted. For these 
reasons, then, we consider it our precious privilege, as here- 
tofore, to continue to wait upon the Lord only, instead of 
taking goods on credit, or borrowing money from some 
kind friends when we are in need. Nay, we purpose, as 
God shall give us grace, to look to him only, though morn- 
ing after morning we should have nothing in hand for the 
work, yea, though from meal to meal we should have to 
look to him ; being fully assured that he who is now (1845) 
in the tenth year feeding these many orphans, and who has 
never suffered them to want, and that he who is now (1845) 
in the twelfth j^ear canying on the other parts of the work, 
without any branch of it being stopped for want of means, 
will do so for the future also. And here I do desire, in the 
deep consciousness of my natural helplessness and depend- 
ence upon the Lord, to confess that through the grace of 
God my soul has been in peace, though day after day we 
have had to wait for our daily provisions upon the Lord ; 
yea, though even from meal to meal we have been required 
to do this. 

Dec. 16. Nothing has come in. Three shillings five- 
pence, which one of the laborers was able to give, was all 
we had. At six o'clock this evening, our need being now 
very great, not only with reference to the Orphan Houses, 
but also the da,j schools, etc., I gave myself, with two of 
the laborers, to prayer. There needed some money to 
come in before eight o'clock to-morrow morning, as there 
was none to take in milk for breakfast (the children have 
oatmeal porridge with milk for breakfast) , to say nothing 
about the many other demands of to-morrow, being Satur- 
day. Our hearts were at peace, while asking the Lord, 
and assured that our Father would supply our need. We 
had scarcely eisen from our knees when I received a let- 
ter, containing a sovereign for the orphans, half of which 
was from a young East India officer, and the other half the 



1843 PROSPERITY. 239 

produce of the sale of a piece of work which the sister who 
sent the money had made for the benefit of the orphans. 
She wrote, " I love to send these little gifts. They so often 
come in season." Truly, thus it was at this time. About 
five minutes later I received from a brother the promise of 
fifty pounds for the orphans, to be given during the next 
week ; and a quarter of an hour after that, about seven 
o'clock, a brother gave me a sovereign, which an Irish sis- 
ter in the Lord had left this day, on her departure for Dub- 
lin, for the benefit of the orphans. How sweet and pre- 
cious to see thus so manifestly the willingness of the Lord to 
answer the prayers of his needy children ! 

Dec. 19. Our need, with reference to the school fund, had 
been great during the last three weeks, though we had 
received as much as the teachers absolutely required. IS*ow, 
however, it was very great, as one brother especially needed 
to have several pounds within a day or two, and three other 
teachers also required supplies. It had in addition to this 
been much in my heart to send some money to several 
brethren who labor in foreign lands, in dependence upon 
the Lord only for their pecuniary supplies ; but I had been 
kept from doing so for want of means. On these accounts, 
therefore, I gave myself again especially to prayer this 
morning, when, within a quarter of an hour after I had 
risen from my knees, I received the order for one hundred 
pounds, which I was at liberty to use as need required. 

REVIEW OF THE YEAR 1842. 

1. As to the church. There are 601 at present in communion ; 73 
hare been added during the past year, of whom 27 have been brought 
to the knowledge of the Lord among us. 

2. As to the supply of my temporal necessities, the Lord has been 
pleased to send me £329, 16s. 

Feb. 11, 1843. We had one pound fourteen shillings 
towards the expenses of this day. But as this was not 



240 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XV, 

enough, I asked the Lord still further for help, and, behold, 
this morning's post brought me a post-office order for two 
pounds from Stafford, of which one pound seven shillings 
sixpence are for the orphans-. Thus we have three pounds 
one shilling sixpence, which is quite enough for this day. 

Admire with me, my dear reader, if you know the Lord, 
his seasonable help. Why does this post-office order not 
?ome a few days sooner or later ? Because the Lord would 
help us by means of it, and therefore influences the donor 
just then, and not sooner nor later, to send it. Surely, all 
who know the Lord, and who have no interest in disowning 
it, cannot but see his hand in a remarkable manner in this 
work. Nor will the godly and simple-minded reader say, 
"There is no difference between this Way of proceeding, on 
the one hand, and going from individual to individual, ask- 
ing them for means, on the other hand ; for the writing of 
the Reports is just the same thing." My dear reader, there 
is a great difference. Suppose that we are in need. Suppose 
that our poverty lasts for some weeks, or even some months, 
together. Is there not, in that case, a difference between 
asking the Lord only from day to day, without speaking to 
any human being not connected directly with the work 
about our poverty, on the one hand, and writing letters or 
making personal application to benevolent individuals for 
assistance, on the other hand? Truly, there is a great dif- 
ference between these two modes. I do not mean to sa} r 
that it would be acting against the precepts of the Lord to 
seek for help in his work by personal and individual appli- 
cation to believers (though it would be in direct opposition 
to his will to apply to unbelievers, 2 Cor. vi. 14-18) ; but / 
act in the way in which I do for the benefit of the church 
at large, cheerfully bearing the trials, and sometimes the 
deep trials, connected with this life of faith (which, how- 
ever, brings along with it also its precious joys), if by any 
means a part at least of my fellow-believers might be led 
to see the reality of dealing with God only, and that there 



1843. PROSPERITY. 241 



is such a thing as the child of God having power with God 
by prayer and faith. That the Lord should use for so glo- 
rious a service one so vile, so unfaithful, so altogether un- 
worthy of the least notice as I am, I can only ascribe to 
the riches of his condescending grace, in which he takes up 
the most unlikely instruments, that the honor may be man- 
ifestly his. 

Should Satan seek to whisper into your ears, Perhaps 
the matter is made known, after all, when there is need (as 
it has been once said about me at a public meeting in a 
large town, that when we were in want I pra}^ed publicly 
that the Lord would send help for the orphans, which is 
entirely false) ; I sa} T , should it be said that I took care 
that our wants were made known, I reply : "Whom did I ask 
for anything these many years since the work has been 
going on? To whom did I make known our wants, except 
to those who are closely connected with the work ? Nay, 
so far from wishing to make known our need, for the pur- 
pose of influencing benevolent persons to contribute to the 
necessities of the Institution under my care, I have even 
refused to let our circumstances be known, after having 
been asked about them, when, on simply saying that we 
were in need, I might have had considerable sums. Some 
instances of this have been given in the former part of this 
Narrative. In such cases I refused in order that the hand 
of God only might be manifest ; for that, and not the 
money, nor even the ability of continuing to carry on the 
work, is my especial aim. And such self-possession has the 
Lord given me, that in the times of the deepest povert}-, 
whilst there was nothing at all in hand, tind whilst we had 
even from meal to meal to wait upon the Lord for the 
necessities of more than one hundred persons, when a dona- 
tion of five pounds or ten pounds, or more, has been given 
to me, the donors could not have read in my countenance 
whether we had much or nothing at all in hand. But 
enough of this. I have made these few remarks, beloved 
21 



242 THE LIFE OE TRUST. Chap. XV. 

reader, lest by any means you should lose the blessing 
which might come to your soul through reading the account 
of the Lord's faithfulness and readiness to hear the prayers 
of his children. 

March 8. On Oct. 25, 1842, 1 had a long conversation 
with a sister in the Lord, who opened her heart to me. On 
leaving me I told her that my house and my purse were 
hers, and that I should be glad if she would have one purse 
with me. This I said because I judged that at some future 
time it might prove a comfort to her in an hour of trial, 
having at the same time, to judge from a circumstance 
which had occurred two clays before, every reason to believe 
that she had not five pounds of her own. This sister, after 
I had said so, readily took me at my word, and said, I shall 
be glad of it, adding presently that she had five hundred 
pounds. The moment I heard that, I drew back, and said 
that had I known that she had any money I should not 
have made her this offer, and then gave her my reason wiry 
I supposed she had no property at all. She then assured 
me that she possessed five hundred pounds, and that she 
had never seen it right to give up this money, else she 
would have done so ; but that, as God had put this sum 
into her hands without her seeking, she thought it was a 
provision which the Lord had made for her. I replied 
scarcely an3 r thing to this ; but she asked me to pray for her 
with reference to this matter. This whole conversation 
about the money occupied but very few minutes, and it all 
took place after the sister had risen and was on the point 
of leaving me. After she was gone, I asked the Lord if 
he would be pleased to make this dear sister so happy in 
himself, and enable her so to realize her true riches and 
inheritance in the Lord Jesus, and the reality of her heav- 
enly calling, that she might be constrained, by the love of 
Christ , cheerfully to la}^ clown this five hundred pounds at 
his feet. From that time I repeated this my request before 
the Lord daily ', and often two, three, or four times a day ; 



1843. PROSPERITY. 243 

but not a single word or line passed between me and this sis- 
ter on the subject, nor did I even see her; for I judged that 
it would be far better that she retained this money, than 
that by persuasion she should give it up, and afterwards 
perhaps regret the step she had taken, and thereby more 
dishonor than honor be brought on the name of the Lord. 
After I had thus for twenty-four days daily besought the 
Lord on behalf of this sister, I found her one day, on re- 
turning home, at my house, when she told me that she 
wished to see me alone. She then said to me that from the 
time she had last conversed with me she had sought to as- 
certain the Lord's will with reference to the five hundred 
pounds, and had examined the Scriptures and prayed about 
it, and that she was now assured that it was the will of the 
Lord she should give up this money. After she had told 
me this, I exhorted her to count well the cost, and to do 
nothing rashly, lest she should regret the step she had 
taken, and to wait at least a fortnight longer before she 
carried out her intention. Thus we separated. On the 
eighteenth day after this conversation, I received the fol- 
lowing letter : — 

Dear Brother : — 

I believe the Lord has not permitted you to grow weary of remem- 
bering me, but that he has still enabled you to bear me upon your 
heart in his presence. All is well with me, dear brother. Your 
petitions hare been heard and answered; I am happy and at peace. 
The Lord has indeed manifested his tender care of and his great love 
towards me in Jesus, in inclining my heart cheerfully to lay all I have 
hitherto called my own at his feet. It is a high privilege. 

I write in haste to ask you, as we have now one purse, to receive 
the money at a bank in Bristol. I will direct it to be sent in my name, 
to be delivered into your hands, etc. 

As this whole circumstance is related only for the profit 
of the reader, and as I knew that the sister still had my 
letters on the subject in her possession, I wrote to her, 
requesting her to send them to me, at the time when I pub- 



214 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XV. 

lished the last account about the Orphan Houses, etc., and 
extracts of them were given in the last Report, in so far as 
they might refer to the subject or tend to edification. 
These extracts are here reprinted. My reply to the above 
was this : — 

Bristol, Dec. G, 1842. 
My peak Sister : — 

Your letter found me in peace, and did not in the least surprise me. 
Dealing with God is a reality. Saints have power with him through 
Jesus. It is now forty-two days since you first mentioned this matter 
to me. I cannot but admire the wisdom of God and his love to you 
in allowing me to speak to you as I did [*. e., offering her to have one 
purse with me, when I thought she had no earthly possessions at all], 
that thus this great privilege might be bestowed on you to give up 
this little sum for him. Since that hour I have daily prayed for you, 
and often thrice or more in the course of the day, that the Lord would 
make you so happy in himself and help you with such faith to lay hold 
on all which he has given you in Jesus, that you might be constrained 
by love cheerfully to lay down this little sum at his feet. Thus I 
prayed again at six o'clock this morning for you. Nor have' I had 
the least doubt from the commencement that the Lord did hear my 
prayer; yea, so fully have I been assured that I had the petition, that 
again and again I have thanked him that he had answered my prayer, 
before I saw you eighteen days since, and before your letter came this 
morning. Moreover, I have been fully assured, since you were last 
here, that he was carrying on his work in your soul with reference to 
this matter, and that no subtle suggestions of Satan, nor educational 
prejudices, nor misinterpretations of the Scriptures, were able to pre- 
vail ; for I had asked the Lord by his Spirit to overcome them in you, 
and that, if a brother's word should be needed, he would be pleased 
to incline your heart to write to me ; and as no letter came, I felt 
fully confident you were going forward in this matter in peace. When 
I had seen you this day six weeks, and learned about this little sum, 
I determined never to say or write to you another word on the sub- 
ject, but to leave you in the hands of the Lord. Thus I purposed 
again during the last eighteen days ; for it was not the money given 
up, that I cared for in you, but the money given up unto the Lord, 
and from right motives. On this very account I advised you to wait 
one fortnight longer, though you had come to the conclusion; but 
now, having done so, and seeing that you are fully purposed in the 
Lord to be poor in this world indeed, that the more abundantly you 



1842. PROSPERITY. 245 

may enjoy his riches, his inexhaustible riches, I change my advice. 
My word now, beloved sister, is this : " Whatsoever thy hand findeth 
to do, do it with thy might," and " If ye know these things, happy are 
ye if ye do them." Delay then no longer, even as also you have no 
desire to delay ; and the Lord will bless you abundantly in doing so, 
inasmuch as you do it unto him. As you desire to intrust me with 
this money, I do not refuse it, knowing many ways to lay it out for 
him, etc. [Then only follows the direction how the money is to be 
paid into my banker's hands.] 

On Dec. 18, 1842, I received a reply to my letter, which 
answer was begun to be written on Dec. 8th, but finished 
on the 16th. I give a few extracts of the letter : — 

Since I last saw you, dear brother, I have not had the slightest 
doubt as to what I ought to do. The word of God has been so 
clear to me on this head, that I have been kept resting on it, and, 
in answer to your prayers, no temptation has been allowed to 
prevail, indeed, I think I may add to arise. But I feel that tempta • 
tions may come, and that I may in seasons of trial not always have 
faith to be able to rejoice in this privilege. My heart is so deceit- 
ful, and my faith so weak, that I shall greatly need your prayers 
still. Will you, then, if the Lord enables you, pray that I may 
never offend my Father by regretting in the least measure this act 
of obedience, which he has by his grace inclined me to carry out ? 
Before I ever saw you I had asked the Lord to make me willing to 
give this little sum into your hands, if it were his will I should; 
but his time to make me willing had not then come ; even then I 
had in a measure given it to you, having written a paper, desiring 
in case I should fall asleep in Jesus, that you might get possession 
of it. I had it signed by two witnesses, and I always carried it 
about with me when I travelled, sealed, and directed to you. 
When I wrote this, I little thought what grace the Lord had in 
store for me. You will forgive my being thus tediouo, but I am 
sure you will praise the Lord with me for his gracious dealings 
with me, etc. 

At the end of this letter, which was finished on Dec. 16, 
the sister tells rne that unexpectedly a hindrance had arisen 
to her having possession of the money, so that it was not 
21* 



246 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XV. 

likely it could be paid over to me till about the end of Jan- 
uary, 1843. 

When this letter came, it would have been naturally a 
great disappointment to me, as the sister had told me in a 
previous letter that the money should be paid into my 
hands, and as just at that time in a variety of ways it was 
desirable that I should have considerable sums. The Lord, 
however, enabled me to immediately lay hold on that 
word, " We know that all things work together for good 
to them that love God " (Rom. viii. 28) , and my soul was in 
peace, though we had only enough money in hand to pro- 
vide for one or at the most for two days the necessary 
provisions in the Orphan Houses. It was but the next 
day, Dec. 19, 1842, when I received one hundred pounds 
from A. B., and on Dec. 22, I received fifty pounds from a 
brother in Bristol, besides other donations ; so that within 
one week after I had had grace to delight myself in the will 
of God, he gave me about two hundred pounds, whereby I 
was able to meet all the heavy expenses of replenishing the 
stores, etc., on account of which I should naturally have 
been tried in the payment of the money being delaj^ed. 

In reply to the letter which I received from this sister 
on Deo. 18, I wrote another on Dec. 31, 1842, of which I 
give an extract on this subject : — 

I have continued to pray for you, or rather the Lord has enabled 
me every day once, twice, thrice, or even more, to remember you. 
The burden of my prayer still has been, that he would be pleased 
to mak<2 you very happy in himself, and enable you to enter into 
the inheritance which awaits you; further, that you may not be 
permitted in the least to regret the step which you have taken, v it 
rather consider it a privilege to be permitted to give this little sum 
back to him who gave it to you, and who gave himself for you. 
With reference to the delay, I cannot but rejoice. This gives you 
abundant opportunity to ponder the matter, and afterwards to state 
to any (who, judging as those who know not how rich the saints 
are, might blame you) that you did not do the thing in haste. I 
consider this delay to be for the furtherance of the honor of the 



1843. PROSPERITY. 247 

Lord. You know my advice to you, to wait at least a fortnight. 
That you have seen much of your unfaithfulness, etc., I consider to 
be an especial blessing which the Lord has bestowed upon you, lest 
this step you have taken should become a snare to you. Hum- 
blings last our whole life. Jesus came not to save painted but real 
sinners ; but he has saved us, and will surely make it manifest. 1 
have a passage laid on my heart for you; read the whole of U 
carefully : 2 Cor. viii. 1-9, especially verse 9. 

Day after day now passed away and the money did not 
come. The month of January was come to an end, and 
February also, and the money had not come. Thus more 
than one hundred and twenty days were gone by, whilst 
day by day I brought my petition before the Lord that he 
would bless this sister, keep her steadfast in her purpose, 
and intrust me with this money- for his work in my hands. 
Amidst it all my heart was assured, judging from the ear- 
nestness which he had given me in prayer, and that I had 
only desired this matter to the praise of his name, that in 
his own time he would bring it about. But I never wrote 
one single line to this sister on the subject all this time. At 
last, on the one hundred and thirty-fourth day since I had 
daily besought the Lord about this matter, on March 8, 
1843, 1 received a letter from the sister, informing me that 
the five hundred pounds had been paid into the hands of 
my bankers. 

And now I only give a few lines of a letter which I re- 
ceived on July 3, 1844, from the sister who gave this dona- 
tion, together with my letters for which I had asked her, 
in order that I may show her state of mind on the subject, 
after she had had it more than twenty months before her, 
and after she had for sixteen months actually given up the 
money. She writes thus : "I am thankful to say that I 
have never for one moment had the slightest feeling of re- 
gret, but it is wholly of the Lord's abounding grace. I 
speak it to his praise." 

On March 31, 1843, I called at the Orphan Houses to 



248 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XV. 

make certain arrangements, and one of the sisters told me 
by the way that she had been asked by Miss G., who with 
her father occupied the house No. 4 Wilson Street, to let 
me know that they wished to give up their house, if I 
would like to take it ; but she had replied that it was of no 
use to tell me about it, for she was sure that I had uo 
thought of opening another Orphan House. When I came 
home, this -matter greatly occupied my mind. I could not 
but ask the Lord again and again whether he would have 
me to open another Orphan House, and whether the 
time was now come that I should serve him still more 
extensively in this way. The more I pondered the matter, 
the more it appeared to me that this was the hand of God 
moving me onwards in this service. The following remark- 
able combination of circumstances struck me in particular : 
1. There are more applications made for the admission of 
orphans, especially of late, than we are at all able to meet, 
though we fill the houses as much as the health of the chil- 
dren and of the laborers will possibly admit. 2. If I did 
take another house for orphans, it would be most desirable 
it should be in the same street where the other three are, 
as thus the labor is less, and in times of great need we are 
near together for prayer, the distribution of the money, etc. 
But since the third Orphan House was opened, in Nov. 
1837, there never has been one of the larger houses in the 
street to be let. 3. There are about fifteen children in the 
Infant Orphan House, whom it would have been well some 
time ago to have removed to the house for the older girls, 
had there been room ; but when a vacancy happened to 
occur in that house, there were generally several waiting to 
fill it up, so that unintentionally the female children in the 
Infant Orphan House remained where they were ; but this 
is not well, nor is it according to my original intention ; 
for the infants were intended only to be left till the} T are 
seven years old, and then to be removed to the houses for 
older boys and girls. This my original plan could be exe< 



1843. PROSPERITY. 249 

cuted better for the future, and at once for the present, were 
I to open another Orphan House. 4. I know two sisters 
who seem suitable laborers for this fourth Orphan House, 
and who have a desire thus to be engaged. 5. There are 
three hundred pounds remaining of the five hundred pounds 
which I so lately received. This money may be used for 
the furnishing and fitting up of a new Orphan House. So 
much money I have never had in hand at any one time dur- 
ing the last five years. This seemed to me a remarkable 
thing, in connection with the four other reasons. 6. The 
establishing of a fourth Orphan House, which would in- 
crease our expenses several hundred pounds a year, would 
be, after we have gone for five years almost uninterruptedly 
through trials of faith, a plain proof that I have not re- 
gretted this service, and that I am not tired of this precious 
way of depending upon the Lord from day to day ; and thus 
the faith of other children of God might be strengthened. 

But most important, yea, decidedly conclusive as these 
points were, yet they did not convince me that I ought to 
go forward in this service, if the Spirit's leadings were not 
in connection with them. I therefore gave myself to 
prayer. I prayed day after day, Without saying anything 
to any human being. I prayed two and twenty days with- 
out even mentioning it to my dear wife. On that very da}-, 
when I did mention it to her, and on which I had come to 
the conclusion, after three weeks' prayer and consideration 
in the fear of God, to establish another Orphan House, I 
received from A. B. fifty pounds. What a striking con- 
firmation that the Lord will help, though the necessities 
should increase more and more ! At last, on the twenty- 
fourth claj^, having been now for several days fully assured 
that God would have me go forward in this service, I went 
to inquire whether Mr. and Miss G. still wished to give 
up the house. But here I found an apparent hindrance. 
Having heard no wish expressed on my part to take the 
house, and the sister in the Orphan Houses, with whom Miss 



250 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XV 

G had communicated, not having given her the least reason 
to think that I should do so, Mr. and Miss G. had altered 
their plans, and now purposed to remain in the house. 
However, I was to call again in a week, when I should re- 
ceive an answer. I was not in the least discomforted by 
this obstacle. " Lord, if tJwu hast no need of another 
Orphan House, /have none," was the burden of my prayer. 
I was willing to do God's will, yea, to delight myself in 
his will. And just on this very ground, because I knew I 
sought not my own honor, but the Lord's ; because I knew 
I was not serving myself, but the Lord, in this thing ; and 
because I knew that with so much calm, quiet, prayerful, 
self-questioning consideration I had gone about this busi- 
ness, and had only after many da} r s, during which I had 
been thus waiting upon the Lord, come to the conclusion 
that it was the will of God I should go forward in this 
service. For these reasons I felt sure, notwithstanding 
what Mr. and Miss G. had told me, that I should have 
the house. I also especially judged that thus it would 
be, because I ivas quite in peace when I heard of the obsta- 
cle ; a plain proof that I was not in self-will goiug on in 
this matter, but according to the leading of the Holy 
Ghost ; for if according to my natural mind I had sought 
to enlarge the work, I should have been excited and uncom- 
fortable when I met with this obstacle. After a week I 
called again on Mr. G. And now see how God had wrought ! 
On the same day on which I had seen Mr. G., he went out 
and met with a suitable house, so that when I came the 
second time, he was willing to let me have the one which 
he then occupied in Wilson Street ; and as the owner ac- 
cepted me as a tenant, all the difficulties -were removed, so 
that after the first of June we began fitting up the house, 
and in July the first orphans were received. 

Mr. M. having been invited by several Christians in 
Germany to visit that, his native land, and to labor 



1843. PROSPERITY. 25 i 

there for the promulgation of scriptural truth and the 
advancement of religion, as well as to publish a Ger- 
man translation of his Narrative,: felt that it was his 
duty to accede to the request. It arjswer to prayer, 
he received ample means for his journey, for the sup- 
port of the orphans during his absence, and for the 
publication of the Narrative. He left Bristol on the 
9th of August, 1843. and returned on March 6, 1844. 
During the journey he was greatly aided by Providence 
in the purposes of his mission, and saw much fruit oJ 
his labors.^ 




CHAPTER XVI. 

STEWARDSHIP. 

1844. 

EARTHLY AND HEAVENLY TREASURES — SEEKING THE KINGDOM OP GOD ■■ 

FELLOWSHIP WITH the FATHER— the christian merchant — exam- 
pees — MISTAKES. 

(3^ N concluding this portion of my Narrative, I would 
add some hints on a few passages of the word of 
G od, both because I have so very frequently found 
them little regarded by Christians, and also be- 
cause I have proved their preciousness, in some measure, 
in my own experience ; and therefore wish that all my fel- 
low-saints may share the blessing with me. 

I. In Matt. vi. 19-21, it is written: " Lay not up for 
yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth 
corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal ; but 
lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither 
moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break 
through nor steal : for where your treasure is, there will 
your heart be also." Observe, dear reader, the following 
points concerning this part of the divine testimony : 

1. It is the Lord Jesus, our Lord and Master, who speaks 
this as the lawgiver of his people, — he who has infinite 
wisdom and unfathomable love to us, who therefore both 
knows what is for our real welfare and happiness, and who 
cannot exact from us am 7 requirement inconsistent with 
that love which led him to lay down his life for us. 

2. His counsel, his affectionate entreaty, and his com- 
mandment to us his disciples is, " Lay not up for your- 
selves treasures upon earth/' The meaning obviously is, 

252 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 253 

that the disciples of the Lord Jesus, being strangers and 
pilgrims on earth, i. e., neither belonging to the earth nor 
expecting to remain in it, should not seek to increase .heir 
earthly possessions, in whatever these possessions may con- 
sist. This is a word for poor believers as well as for rich 
believers ; it has as much a reference to putting shillings 
into the savings-bank as to putting thousands of pounds 
into the funds, or purchasing one house or one farm after 
another. It may be said, But does not every prudent and 
provident person seek to increase his means, that he may 
have a goodly portion to leave to his children, or to have 
something for old age, or for the time of sickness, etc. ? 
My reply-is, it is quite true that this is the custom of the 
world. But whilst thus it is in the world, and we have 
every reason to believe ever will be so among those that are 
of the world, and who therefore have their portion on earth, 
Wo disciples of the Lord Jesus, being born again, being the 
children of God, not nominally, but really, being truly par- 
takers of the divine nature, being in felloAvship with the 
Father and the Son, and having in prospect " an inheri- 
tance incorruptible, and undented, and that fadeth not 
away " (1 Peter i. 4) , ought in every respect to act differ- 
ently from the world, and so in this particular also. If we 
disciples of the Lord Jesus seek, like the people of the 
world, aft£r an increase of our possessions, may not tho^e 
who are of the world justly question whether we believe 
what we say, when we speak about our inheritance, our 
heavenly calling, our being the children of God, etc. ? Often 
it must be a sad stumbling-block to the unbeliever to „ee a 
professed believer in the Lord Jesus acting in this paitic- 
ular just like himself. Consider this, dear brethren in the 
Lord, should this remark apply to you. 

3. Our Lord says about the earth that it is a place " where 
moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through 
and steal." All that is of the earth, and in any way con- 
nected with it, is subject to corruption, to change, to disso 
22 



254 TIIE LIFE 01? TEUST. Chap. XVI. 

lution. There is no reality, or substance, in a^thing else 
but in heavenly things. Often the careful amassing of 
earthly possessions ends in losing them in a moment by fire. 
by robbery, by a change of mercantile concerns, by loss of 
work, etc. ; but suppose all this were not the case, still, yet 
a little while, and thy soul shall be required of thee ; or, 
yet a little while, and the Lord Jesus will return ; and what 
profit shalt thou then have, dear reader, if thou hast carefully 
sought to increase thy earthly possessions ? 

4 Our Lord, however, does not merely bid us not to lay 
ill) treasure upon earth ; for if he had said no more, this 
his commandment might be abused, and persons might find 
in it an encouragement for their extravagant habits, for their 
love of pleasure, for their habit of spending everything 
they have, or can obtain, upon themselves. It does not 
mean, then, as is the common phrase, that we should " live 
up to our income ;" for he adds, " But lay up for your- 
selves treasures in heaven." There is such a thing as laj^ing 
up as truly in heaven as there is laying up on earth ; if it 
were not so, our Lord would not have said so. Just as per- 
sons put one sum after another into the bank, and it is put 
down to their credit, and they may use the money after- 
wards : so truly the penny, the shilling, the pound, the 
hundred pounds, the ten thousand pounds, given for the 
Lord's sake, and constrained by the love of Jesus, to poor 
brethren, or in any way spent in the work of God, he marks 
down in the book of remembrance, he considers as laid up 
in "heaven. The money is not lost, it is laid up in the bank 
of heaven; jet so, that whilst an earthly bank may break, 
or through earthly circumstances we may lose our earthly 
possessions, the money which is thus secured in heaven 
cannot be lost. But this is by no means the only difference. 
I notice a few more points : Treasures laid up on earth bring 
along with them many cares ; treasures laid up in heaven 
never give care. Treasures laid up on earth never can afford 
spiritual joy ; treasures laid up in heaven bring along with 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 255 

them peace and joy in the Holy Ghost even now. Treas- 
ures laid up on earth, in a dying hour cannot afford peace 
and comfort, and when life is over they are taken from as ; 
treasures laid up in heaven draw forth thanksgiving that we 
were permitted and counted worthy to serve the Lord with 
the means with which he was pleased to intrust us as stew- 
ards, and when this life is over we are not deprived of what 
was laid up there, but when we go to heaven we go to the 
place where our treasures are, and we shall find them there. 
Often we hear it said, when a person has died, he died worth 
so much. But whatever be the phrases common in the 
world, it is certain that a person may die worth fifty thousand 
pounds sterling, as the world reckons, and yet that individ- 
ual may not possess, in the sight of God, one thousand 
pounds sterling, because he ivas not rich toivards {jfod, he did 
not lay up treasure in heaven. And so, on the other hand, 
we can suppose a man of God falling asleep in Jesus, and 
his surviving widow finding scarcely enough left behind him 
to suffice for the funeral, who was nevertheless rich toivards 
God : in the sight of God he may possess five thousand 
pounds sterling ; he may have laid up that sum in heaven. 
t)ear reader, does your soul long to be rich towards God, 
to lay up treasures in heaven ? The world passes away, and 
the lust thereof. Yet a little while and our stewardship will 
be taken from us. At present we have the opportunity of 
serving the Lord with our time, our talents, our bodily 
strength, our gifts, and also with our property ; but shortly 
this opportunity may cease. Oh, how shortly may it cease I 
Before ever this is read by any one, I may have fallen asleep ; 
and the very next day after you have read this, dear reader, 
you may fall asleep ; and, therefore, whilst we have the 
opportunity, let us serve the Lord. 

5. The Lord lastly adds : " For where your treasure is, 
there will your heart be also." Where should the heart 
of the disciple of the Lord Jesus be, but in heaven ? Our 
calling is a heavenly calling, our inheritance is a heavenly 



256 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

inheritance, and reserved for us in heaven ; our citizenship 
is in heaven ; but if we believers in the Lord Jesus lay up 
treasures on earth, the necessary result of it is, that our 
hearts will be upon earth ; nay, the very fact of our doing 
so proves that they are there ! Nor will it be otherwise^ 
till there be a ceasing to lay up treasures upon earth. The 
believer who lays up treasures upon earth may, at first, not 
live openly in sin, he in a measure may yet bring some 
honor to the Lord in certain things ; but the injurious ten- 
dencies of this habit will show themselves more and more, 
whilst the habit of laying up treasures in heaven would 
draw the heart more and more heavenward ; would be 
continually strengthening his new, his divine nature, his 
spiritual faculties, because it would call his spiritual facul- 
ties into use, and thus they would be strengthened ; and 
he would more and more, whilst yet in the body, have his 
heart in heaven, and set upon heavenly things ; and' thus 
the laj T ing up treasures in heaven would bring along with 
it, even in this life, precious spiritual blessings as a reward 
of obedience to the commandment of our Lord. 

II. The next passage, on which I desire to make a few 
remarks, is Matt. vi. 33 : " But seek ye first the kingdom 
of God and his righteousness ; and all these things shall 
be added unto you." After our Lord, in the previous 
verses, had been pointing his disciples " to the fowls of the 
air," and " the lilies of the field," in order that they should 
be without carefulness about the necessaries of life, he 
adds : " Therefore take no thought (literally, be not 
anxious), saying, What shall we eat? or, What shall we 
drink? or, Wherewithal shall we be clothed? (for after 
all these things do the Gentiles seek ;) for j^our heavenly 
Father knoweth that ye have need of all these things." 
Observe here particularly that vve, the children of God, 
should be different from the nations of the earth, from 
those who have no Father in heaven, and who therefore 
make it their great business, their first anxious concern, 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 257 

what they shall eat, and what they shall drink, and where- 
withal they shall be clothed. We, the children of God, 
should, as in every other respect, so in this particular also, 
be different from the world, and prove to the world that 
we believe that we have a Father in heaven who knoweth 
that we have need of all these things. The fact that our 
Almighty Father, who is full of infinite love to us his chil- 
dren, and who has proved to us his love in the gift of his 
onry-begotten Son, and his almighty power in raising him 
from the dead, knows that we have need of these things, 
should remove all anxiety from out' minds. There is, how- 
ever, one thing that we have to attend to, and w T hich we 
ought to attend to, with reference to our temporal neces- 
sities ; it is mentioned in our verse : " But seek ye first the 
kingdom of God and his righteousness." The great busi- 
ness which the disciple of the Lord Jesus has to be con- 
cerned about (for this word was spoken to disciples, to 
professed believers) is, to seek the kingdom of God, i. e., 
to seek, as I view it, after the external and internal pros- 
perity of the church o£ Christ. If, according to our ability, 
and according to the opportunity which the Lord gives us, 
we seek to win souls for the Lord Jesus, that appears to 
me to be seeking the external prosperity of the kingdom 
of God ; and if we, as members of the body of Christ, seek 
to benefit our fellow-members in the body, helping them 
on in grace and truth, or caring for them in any way to 
their edification, that would be seeking the internal pros- 
perity of the kingdom of God. But in connection with 
this we have also " to seek his righteousness," w T hich means 
(as it was spoken to disciples, to those who have a Father 
in heaven, and not to those who were without) , to seek to 
be more and more like God, to seek to be inwardly con- 
formed to the mind of God. If these two things are 
attended to (and they imply also that we are not slothful 
in business), then do we come upder that precious promise : 
" And all these things (that is, food, raiment, or anything 
2SL* 



258 THE LIFE OE TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

else that is needful for this present life) shall be added 
unto } t ou." It is not for attending to these two things 
that we obtain the blessing, but in attending to them. 

I now ask jt>u, my dear reader, a few questions in all 
love, becauserl do seek your welfare, and I do not wish to 
put these questions to you without putting them first to 
my own heart. Do you make it your primary business, 
your first great concern, to seek the kingdom of God and 
his righteousness ? Are the things of God, the honor of 
his name, the welfare of his church, the conversion of sin- 
ners, and the profit of your own soul, your chief aim ? Or 
does your business, or }'our family, or yovx own temporal 
concerns, in some shape or other primarily occupy your 
attention? If the latter be the case, then, though you 
may have all the necessaries of life, yet could you be sur- 
prised if 3 t ou had them not? Remember that the world 
passeth away, but that the things of God endure forever. 

I never knew a child of God, who acted according to the 
above passage, in whose experience the Lord did not fulfil 
his word of promise, " All these things shall be added 
unto you." 

III. The third portion of the divine testimony on 
which I desire to throw out a few hints, is in 1 John i. 3 : 
"And truly our fellowship is with the Father, and with his 
Son Jesus Christ." Observe, 

1. The words "fellowship," "communion," " copartici- 
pation," and " partnership," mean the same. 

2. The believer in the Lord Jesus does not only obtain 
forgiveness of all his sins, as he does through the shedding 
of the blood of Jesus, b}^ faith in his name ; does not only 
become a righteous one before God, through the righteous- 
ness of the Lord Jesus by faith in his name ; is not only 
begotten again, born of God, and partaker of the divine 
nature, and therefore a child of God and an heir of God ; 
but he is also in fellowship or partnership with God. Now, 
so far as it regards God, and our standing in the Lord 



1814. STEWARDSHIP. 259 

Jesus, we have this blessing once for all ; nor does it allow 
of either an increase or a decrease. Just as God's love to 
us believers, his children, is unalterably the same, what- 
ever may be the manifestations of that love ; and as his 
peace with us is the same, however much our peace may 
be disturbed ; so it is also with regard to our being in fel- 
lowship or partnership with him : it remains unalterably 
the same so far as God is concerned. But then, 

3. There is an experimental fellowship, or partnership, 
with the Father and with his Son, which consists in this : 
that all which we possess in God, as being the partners or 
fellows of God, is brought down into our daily life, is en- 
joj^ed, experienced, and used. This experimental fellow- 
ship, or partnership, allows of an increase or a decrease, in 
the measure in which faith is in exercise, and in which we 
are entering into what we have received in the Lord Jesus. 
The measure in which we enjoy this experimental fellow- 
ship with the Father and with the Son is without limit ; 
for without limit we may make use of our partnership 
with the Father and with the Son, and draw by prayer 
and faith out of the inexhaustible fulness which there is in 
God. 

Let us now take a few instances in order to see the prac- 
tical working of this experimental fellowship, or partnership, 
with the Father and with the Son. Suppose there are two be- 
lieving parents who were not brought to the knowledge of 
the truth until some years after the Lord had given them 
several children. Their children were brought up in sinful, 
evil ways, whilst the parents did not know the Lord. Now 
the parents reap as they sowed. They suffer from having 
set an evil example before their children, for their children 
are unruly and behave most improperly. What is now to 
be done? Need such parents despair? No. The first 
thing they have to do is, to make confession of their sins 
to God, with regard to neglecting their children whilst they 
were themselves living in sin, and then to remember that 



2(30 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

they are in partnership with God. and therefore to be of 
good ::urage, though they are in themselves still utterly 
insufficient for the task of managing their children. They 
have in themselves neither the wisdom, nor the patience, 
nor the long-sutfering. nor the gentleness, nor the meekness. 
nor the love, nor the decision and firmness, nor anything 
else that may be needful 'in dealing with their children 
aright. But their heavenly Father has all this. The Lord 
Jesos possesses all this. And they are in partnership with 
the Father, and with the Son. and therefore they can obtain 
by prayer and faith all they need out of the fulness of C 
I say by prayer an .". . for we have to make known our 

need to God in prayer, ask his help, and then we have to 
:e he will give us what we need. Prayer alone is aot 
enough. TTe may pray never so much. yet. if we do not 
believe that God will give us what we need, we have no 
reason to expect that we shall receive what we have asked 
for. So then these parents would need to ask God to give 
them the needful wisdom, patience, long-suffering, gentle- 
nrss. meekness, love, decision and firmness, and whatever 
else thev mav iudsre thev need. Thev mav in humble bold- 
ness remind their heavenly Father that his word assures 
them that they are in partnership with him, and. as they 
themselves are lacking in these particulars, ask him to be 
pleased to supply their need ; and then they have to bel 
that God will do it. and they shall receive according to their 
need. 

Another instance : Suppose I am so situated in my busi- 
ness that day by day such difficulties arise that I contin- 
ually find that I take wrong steps by reason of these great 
iiiScalties. How may the ease be altered for the better? 
In myself I see no remedy for the difficulties. In looking 
at myself I can expect nothing but to make still further 
mistakes, and, therefore, trial upon trial seems to be before 
me. And yet I need not despair. The living God is my 
partner. I have not sufficient wisdom to meet these difficul- 



\\U. STEWARDSHIP. 201 

ties so as to be aljle to know what steps to take, but he is 
able to direct me. What I have, therefore, to do. is this : 
in simplicity to spread my case before my heavenly Father 
and my Lord Jesus. The Father and the Son are my part- 
ners. I have to tell oat my heart to God. and to ask him, 
that, as he is my partner, and I have no wis Jam in nays :': 
to meet all the many difficulties which continually occur in 
my business, he would be pleased to guide and lii get me, 
and to supply me with the needful wisdom : and then I have 
to believe that God will do so, and go with good courage to 
my business, and expect help from him in the next difficulty 
that may come before me. I have to look out for guidance, 
I have to expect counsel from the Lord: and as assure "ly 
as I do so. I shall have it, I shall find that I am not nomi- 
nally, but really, in partnership with the Father and with 
the Son. 

Another instance : There is a father and mother _ ith 
seven small children. Both parents are believers. TLe 
father works in a manufactory, but cannot earn more tlan 
ten shillings per week. The mother cannot earn anything. 
These ten shillings are too little for the supply of nourish- 
ing and wholesome food for seven growing children and 
their parents, and for providing them with the other ne : - 
saries of life. What is to be done in such a case ? Surely 
not to find fault with the manufacturer, who may not be 
able to afford more wages, and much less to murmur against 
God ; but the parents have in simplicity to tell God. their 
partner, that the wages of ten s hill ings a week are not 
sufficient in England to provide nine persons with all they 
need, so as that their health be not injure: 1 .. They have to 
remind God that he is not a hard master, not an unkind 
being, but a most loving Father who has abundantly pic ~r :". 
the love of his heart in the gift of his only begotten Son. 
And they have in childlike simplicity to ask him thai eitnei 
he would order it so that the manufacturer may be able to 
allow more wages ; or that he ^the Lord) would find them 



262 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

another place, where the father would be able to earn more ; 
or that he would be pleased, somehow or other, as it may 
seem good to him, to supply them with more means. They 
have to ask the Lord, in childlike simplicity, again and 
again for it, if he does not answer their request at once ; 
and they have to believe that God, their Father and partner, 
will give them the desire of their hearts. They have to 
expect an answer to their prayers ; day by day they have to 
look out for it, and to repeat their request till God grants it. 
As assuredly as they believe that God will grant them their 
request, so assuredly it shall be granted. 

Thus, suppose I desired more power over my besetting 
sins ; suppose I desired more power against certain temp- 
tations ; suppose I desired more wisdom, or grace, or any- 
thing else that I may need in my service among the saints, 
or in my service towards the unconverted : what have I to 
do but to make use of my being in fellowship with the 
Father and with the Son? Just as, for instance, an old 
faithful clerk, who is this day taken into partnership by an 
immensely rich firm, though himself altogether without 
property, would not be discouraged by reason of a large 
payment having to be made by the firm within three daj r s, 
though he himself has no money at all of his own, but 
would comfort himself with the immense riches possessed 
by those who so generously have just taken him into part- 
nership : so should we, the children of God and servants 
of Jesus Christ, comfort ourselves by being in fellowship, 
or partnership,' with the Father, and with the Son, though 
we have no power of our own against our besetting sins ; 
though we cannot withstand temptations, which are before 
us, in our own strength ; and though we have neither suffi- 
cient grace nor wisdom for our service among the saints, 
or towards the unconverted. All we nave to do is, to draw 
upon our partner, the living God. By prayer and faith 
we may obtain all needful temporal and spiritual help and 
blessings. In all simplicity have we to tell out our heart 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 263 

before God, and then we have to believe that he will give 
to us according to our need. 

But if ive do not believe that God will help us, could we 
be at peace ? The clerk, taken into the firm as partner, 
believes that the firm will meet the payment, though so 
large, and though in three days it is to be made, and it is 
this that keeps his heart quiet, though altogether poor him- 
self. We have to believe that our infinitely rich partner, 
the living God, will help us in our need, and we shall not 
only be in peace, but we shall actually find that the help 
which we need will be granted to us. Let not the con- 
sciousness o£ your entire unworthiness keep you, dear 
reader, from believing what God has said concerning you. 
If you are indeed a believer in the Lord Jesus, then this 
precious privilege, of being in partnership with the Father 
and the Son, is yours, though you and I are entirely 
unworthy of it. If the consciousness of our unworthiness 
were to keep us from believing what God has said concern- 
ing those who depend upon and trust in the Lord Jesus for 
salvation, then we should find that there is not one single 
blessing, with which we have been blessed in the Lord 
Jesus, from which, on account of our unworthiness, we 
could derive any settled comfort or peace. 

IV. There is one other point, which, in connection with 
several portions of the word of God which bear on the sub- 
ject, I desire to bring before the believing reader, and it 
refers to the " scriptural way of overcoming the difficulties 
with which the believer now meets who is engaged in a busi- 
ness, trade, profession, or any earthly calling whatever, 
which arise from competition in business, too great a num- 
ber of persons being occupied in the same calling, stagna- 
tion of trade, and the like." The children of God, who 
are strangers and pilgrims on earth, have at all times had 
difficulty in the world, for they are not at home, but from 
home ; nor should they, until the return of the Lord Jesus, 
expect it to be otherwise with them. But whilst this is 



2G4 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

true, it is also true that the Lord has provided us in all our 
difficulties with something in his own word to meet them. 
All difficulties may be overcome by acting according to the 
word of God. At this time I more especially desire to 
point out the means whereby the children of God who are 
engaged in any earthly calling may be able to overcome the 
difficulties which arise from competition in business, too 
great a number of persons being occupied hi the same call- 
ing, stagnation of trade, and the like. 

1. The first thing which the believer who is in such 
difficulties has to ask himself is, Am I in a calling in which 
I can abide with God? If our occupation be of that kind 
that we cannot ask God's blessing upon it, or that we 
should be ashamed to be found in it at the appearing of the 
Lord Jesus, or that it of necessity hinders our spiritual 
progress, then we must give it up, and be engaged in some- 
thing else ; but in few cases only this is needful. Far the 
greater part of the occupations in which believers are en- 
gaged are not of such a nature as that they need to give 
them up in order to maintain a good conscience, and in 
order to be able to walk with God, though, perhaps, certain 
alterations may need to be made in the manner of conduct- 
ing their trade, business, or profession. About these parts 
of our calling which may need alteration, we shall receive 
instruction from the Lord if we indeed desire it, and wait 
upon him for it, and expect it from him. 

2. Now suppose the believer is in a calling in which he 
can abide with God, the next point to be settled is, " Wliy 
do I carry on this business, or why am I engaged in this 
trade or profession?" In most instances, so far as my 
experience goes, which I have gathered in my service 
among the saints during the last fifteen years and a half 
\_i. e., in 1845], I believe the answer would be, "I am 
engaged in nry earthly calling that I may earn the means 
of obtaining the necessaries of life for myself and family." 
Here is the chief error from which almost all the rest of 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 265 

the errors which are entertained by children of God, rela- 
tive to their calling, spring. It is no right and scriptural 
motive to be engaged in a trade or business or profession 
merely in order to earn the means for the obtaining of the 
necessaries of life for ourselves and family, but we should 
work because it is the Lord's will concerning us. This is 
plain from the following passages: 1 Thess. iv. 11, 12; 
2 Thess. iii. 10-12 ; Eph. iv. 28. It is quite true that, in 
general, the Lord provides the necessaries of life by means 
of our ordinary calling ; but that that is not the reason 
why we should work, is plain enough from the consideration 
that if our possessing the necessaries of life depended upon 
our ability of working, we could never have freedom from 
anxiety, for we should always have to say to ourselves, And 
what shall I do when I am too old to work, or when by 
reason of sickness I am unable to earn my bread? But if, 
on the other hand, we are .engaged in our earthly calling 
because it is the ivill of the Lord concerning us that we should 
work, and that thus laboring we may provide for our fami- 
lies, and also be able to support the weak, the sick, the 
aged, and the needy, then we have good and scriptural 
reason to .say to ourselves, Should it please the Lord to lay 
me on a 7 -ed of sickness, or keep me otherwise b} r reason of 
infirmity , or old age, or want of employment, from earning 
my bread by means of the labor of my hands, or my busi- 
ness, or my profession, he will yet provide for me. Because 
we who believe are servants of Jesus Christ, who has bought 
us with his own precious blood, and are not our own, and 
because this our precious Lord and Master has commanded 
us to work, therefore we work : and in doing so our Lord 
will provide for us, but whether in this way or any other 
way he is sure to provide for us, for we labor in obedience 
to him ; and if even a just earthly master gives wages to 
his servants, the Lord will surely see to it that we have our 
wages, if, in obedience to him, we are engaged in our call- 
ing, and not for our own sake. 
28 



266 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI 

How great the difference between acting according to the 
word of God and according to our own natural desires, 01 
the customs of the world, will be plain, I trust, by the fol- 
lowing case : Suppose I were engaged in some useful trade. 
Suppose I had the certain human prospect that within the 
next three months my labor would bring me in nothing, for 
certain reasons connected with the state of mercantile 
affairs. As a man of the world I should say, I shall not 
work at all, because my labor will not be paid ; but as a 
Christian, who desired to act according to God's holy word, 
I ought to say, My trade is useful to society, and I will 
work notwithstanding all human prospects, because the 
Lord Jesus has commanded me to labor ; from him, and 
not from my trade, I expect my wages. In addition to 
this, the Christian ought also to say, Idleness is a dread- 
ful snare of the devil ; he has especial opportunity to get 
an advantage over the children of God when they are unoc- 
cupied ; and therefore, I will work though I have no human 
prospect of obtaining pa3^ment for niy labor, but shall get 
only the cost price of the material, and shall have to give 
my work for nothing. Moreover, the Christian ought to 
say, Though, according to human probability, I shall have 
to labor for nothing during the next three months, yet I 
will work, because the Lord may speedily alter the state of 
things, contrary to all human expectation ; but whether 
he be pleased to do so or not, I labor because I am the 
Lord's, bought by his precious blood, and he commands me 
to labor. 

But there are motives still lower than to be engaged in 
our earthly calling merely that we may earn the means of 
obtaining the necessaries of life, why even Christians, true 
children of God, may be engaged in their calling, such as, 
to obtain a certain sum of monej 1 ", and then to retire from 
business and to live upon the interest ; or to provide some- 
thing for old age ; or to obtain a .certain amount of prop- 
erty, without intending to give up business. If it be 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 267 

unscriptural to be engaged in our calling merely even for 
the sake of earning the means for procuring the necessaries 
of life for ourselves and family, how much more unbecom- 
ing that a child of God should be engaged in his calling for 
the sake of any of the last-mentioned reasons. 

This second point, then, Why do I carry on this busi- 
ness? Why am I engaged in this trade or profession? 
ought first to be settled in the fear of God, and according 
to the revealed will of God ; and if we cannot say, in hon- 
esty of heart, I do carry on my business, I am engaged in 
my trade or art, or profession, as a servant of Jesus Christ, 
whose I am, because he has bought me with his precious 
blood, and he has commanded me to work, and therefore I 
work, — I say, if we cannot say this in honest}* of heart, 
but must confess that we work on account of lower motives, 
such as that we may earn our bread, or on account of still 
lower motives, and such as are altogether unbecoming n 
child of God, who is not of the world, but of God, such as 
to obtain a certain sum of money in order to be able to 
live on the interest without having to work or to provide 
something for old age, or to obtain a certain amount of 
property without intending to give up business ; — if these 
are our motives for being engaged in our calling, I say, can 
we be surprised that we meet with great difficulties in our 
business, and that the Lord in his abounding love to us, 
his erring children, does not allow us to succeed? But 
suppose this second point is scrip turally settled, and we 
can honestly say that because we are servants of Jesus 
Christ we are occupied as we are ; we have further to 
consider, — 

3. Whether we carry on our business, or are engaged 
in our trade, art, or profession, as stewards of the Lord. 
To the child of God it ought not to be enough that he is 
in a calling in which he can abide with God, nor that he is 
engaged in his calling because it is the will of his Lord 
and Master that he should work, but he should consider 



268 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

himself in bis trade, business, art, or profession, only as the 
steward of the Lord with reference to his income. The 
child of God has been bought with the precious blood of 
the Lord Jesus, and is altogether his property, with all 
that he possesses, his bodily strength, his mental strength, 
his ability of every kind, his trade, business, art, or profes- 
sion, his property, etc. ; for it is written, " Ye are not 
your own ; for ye are bought with a price." 1 Cor. vi. 
19 5 20. The proceeds of our calling are therefore not 
out own in the sense of using them as our natural heart 
wiches us to do, whether to spend them on the gratifica- 
tion of our pride, or our love of pleasure, or sensual in- 
dulgences, or to lay by the money for ourselves or our 
children, or to use it in any way as we naturally like ; but 
we have to stand before our Lord and Master, whose stew- 
ards we are, to seek to ascertain his will, how he will have 
us use the proceeds of our calling. 

But is this indeed the spirit in which children of God 
generally are engaged in their calling? It is but too well 
known that it is not the case. Can we then wonder at it, 
that even God's own clear children should so often be 
found greatly in difficulty with regard to their calling, and 
be found so often complaining about stagnation or competi- 
tion in trade, or the difficulties of the times, though there 
have been given to them such precious promises as, " Seek 
ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness, and 
all these things shall be added unto you ;" or, " Let your 
conversation (disposition or turn of mind) be without 
covetousness ; and be content with such things as ye have : 
for he hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee." 
Heb. xiii. 2. Is it not obvious enough that when our 
heavenly Father sees that we his children do or would 
use the proceeds of our calling, as our natural mind would 
desire, that he either cannot at all intrust us with means, 
or will be obliged to decrease them ? No wise and really 
affectionate mother will permit her infant to play with a 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 269 

razor, or with fire, however much the child may desire to 
have them ; and so the love and wisdom of our heavenly 
Father will not, cannot, intrust us with pecuniary means, 
except it be in the way of chastisement, or to show us 
anally their utter vanity, if he sees that we do not desire 
to possess them as stewards for him, in order that we may 
spend them as he may point out to us by his Holy Spirit, 
through his word. 

In connection with this subject, I give a few hints to the 
believing reader on three passages of the word of God. 
In 1 Cor. xvi. 2, we find it written to the brethren at Cor- 
inth, " Upon the first day of the week let every one of 
you lay by him in store, as God has prospered him." A 
contribution for the poor saints in Judea was to be made, 
and the brethren at Corinth were exhorted to put by for 
it, every Lord's day, according to the measure of success 
which the Lord had been pleased to grant them in their 
calling during the week. Now, ought not the saints in 
our day also to act according to this word? There is no 
passage in the word of God why we should not do so, and 
it is altogether in accordance with our pilgrim character, 
not only once or twice, or four times a year, to see how 
much we can afford to give to the poor saints, or to the 
work of God in any way, but to seek to settle it weekly. 
If it be said, I cannot ascertain how much I have gained 
in the course of the week by my business, and therefore I 
cannot give accordingly ; my reply is this, Seek, dear 
brethren, as much as possible, to bring your business upon 
such a footing as that you may be able, as nearly as pos- 
sible, to settle how much you have earned in your calling 
in the course of the week. But suppose you should be un- 
able to settle it exactly to the shilling or pound, yet you 
will know pretty well how it has been with you during the 
week, and therefore, according to your best knoivledge, con- 
tribute on the coming Lord's day towards the necessities 



270 THE LIFE OF TEUST. Chap. XVI, 

of the poor saints, and towards the work of God, as he, 
after your having sought his guidance, may lead you. 

Perhaps you say, the weeks are so unlike ; in one week 
I may earn three or even ten times as much as in another 
week, and if I give according to my earnings from my 
calling during a very good week, then how are such weeks, 
when I earn scarcely anything, or how are the bad debts 
to be met? How shall I do when sickness befalls my 
family, or when other trials productive of expense come 
upon me, if I do not make provision for such seasons ? 
My reply is, 1. I do not find in the whole New Testament 
one single passage in which either directly or indirectly 
exhortations are given to provide against deadness in 
business, bad debts, and sickness, by lajang up money. 2. 
Often the Lord is obliged to allow deadness in business, 
or bad debts, or sickness in our family, or other trials 
which increase our expenses, to befall us, because we do 
not, as his stewards, act according to stewardship, but as if 
we were owners of what we have, forgetting that the 
time has not yet come when we shall enter upon our pos- 
sessions ; and he does so in order that, by these losses 
and expenses, our property which we have collected may 
be decreased, lest we should altogether set our hearts 
again upon earthly things, and forget God entirely. His 
love is so great, that he will not let his children quietly 
go their own way when they have forsaken him ; but if 
his loving admonitions by his Holy Spirit are disregarded, 
he is obliged in fatherly love to chastise them. A striking 
illustration of what I have said we have in the case of 
Israel nationally. The commandment to them was, to 
leave their land uncultivated in the seventh 3*ear, in order 
that it might rest, and the Lord promised to make up for 
this deficiency by his abundant blessing resting upon the 
sixth year. However, Israel acted not according to this 
commandment, no doubt saying, in the unbelief of their 
hearts, as the Lord had foretold, " What shall we eat in 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 271 

the seventh year? Behold, we shall not sow, nor gather 
in our increase." Levit. xxv. But what did the Lord do? 
He was determined the land should have rest, and as the 
Israelites did not willingly give it, he sent them for seventy 
years into captivity, in order that thus the land might have 
rest. See Levit. xxvi. 33-35. Beloved brethren in the 
Lord, let us take heed so to walk as that the Lord may not 
be obliged by chastisement to take a part of our earthly 
possessions from us in the way of bad debts, sickness, de- 
crease of business, and the like, because we would not own 
our position as stewards, but act as oivners, and keep for 
ourselves the means with which the Lord had intrusted us, 
not for the gratification of our own carnal mind, but for the 
sake of using them in his service and to his praise. 

It might also be said by a brother whose earnings are 
small, should I also give according to my earnings ? They 
are already so small that my wife can only with the greatest 
difficulty manage to make them sufficient for the family. 
My reply is, Have you ever considered, nry brother, that 
the very reason why the Lord is obliged to let j T our earnings 
remain so small may be the fact of your spending every- 
thing upon yourselves, and that if he were to give you more 
you would only use it to increase your own family comfort 5 
instead of looking about to see who among the brethren 
are sick, or who have no work at all, that 3-ou might helj 
them, or how you might assist the work of God at home 01 
abroad? There is a great temptation for a brother whost 
earnings are small to put off the responsibility of assisting 
the needy and sick saints, or helping on the work of God, 
and to lay it upon the few rich brethren and sisters witl 
whom he is associated in fellowship, and thus rob his owl 
soul ! 

It might be asked, How much shall I give of my income ? 
The tenth part, or the fifth part, or the third part, or one 
half, or more ? My reply is, God lays down no rule con- 
cerning this point. What we do we should do cheerfully 



272 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

and not of necessity. But if even Jacob, with the first 
dawning of spiritual light (Genesis xxviii. 22), promised to 
God the tenth of all he should give to him, how much ought 
we believers in the Lord Jesus to do for him : we, whose 
calling is a heavenly one, and who know distinctly that we 
are children of God, and joint heirs with the Lord Jesus ! 
Yet do all the children of God give even the tenth part of 
what the Lord gives them ? That would be two shillings per 
week for the brother who earns one pound, and four shillings 
to him who earns two pounds, and two pounds per week to 
him whose income is twenty pounds per week. 

In connection with 1 Cor. xvi. 2, I would mention two 
other portions : 1. "He which soweth sparingly shall reap 
also sparingly ; and he that soweth bountifully shall reap 
also bountifully." 2 Cor. ix. 6. It is certain that we chil- 
dren of God are so abundantly blessed in Jesus, by the 
grace of God, that we ought to need no stimulus to good 
works. The forgiveness of our sins, the having been made 
forever the children of God, the having before us the Father's 
house as our home ; — these blessings ought to be sufficient 
motives to constrain us in love and gratitude to serve God 
abundantly all the da} T s of our life, and cheerfully also to 
give up, as he may call for it, that with which he has in- 
trusted us of the things of this world. But whilst this is 
the case, the Lord nevertheless holds out to us in his holy word 
motives why we should serve him, deny ourselves, use our 
property for him, etc., and the last-mentioned passage is 
one of that kind. The verse is true, both with reference to 
the life that is now, and that which is to come. If we have 
been sparingly using our property for him, there will have 
been little treasure laid up in heaven, and therefore a small 
amount of capital will be found in the world to come, so far 
as it regards reaping. Again, we shall reap bountifully if 
we seek to be rich towards God, by abundantly using our 
means for him, whether in ministering to the necessities of 
the poor saints, or using otherwise our pecuniary means for 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 273 

Iris woik. Dear brethren, these things are realities ! 
Shortly, very shortly, will come the reaping-time, and then 
will be the question whether we shall reap sparingly or 
bountifully. 

But while this passage refers to the life hereafter, it also 
refers to the life that now is. Just as now the love of Christ 
constrains us to communicate of that with which the Lord 
intrusts us, so will be the present reaping, both with regard 
to spiritual and temporal things. Should there be found, 
therefore, in a brother, the want of entering into his posi- 
tion as being merely a steward for the Lord in his calling, 
and should he give no heed to the admonitions of the Holy 
Ghost to communicate to those who are in need or to help 
the work of God, then can such a brother be surprised that 
he meets with great difficulties in his calling, and that he 
cannot get on ? This is according to the Lord's word. He 
is sowing sparingly, and he therefore reaps sparingly. But 
should the love of Christ constrain a brother, out of the 
earnings of his calling, to sow bountifully, he will even in 
this life reap bountifully, both with regard to blessings in 
his soul, and with regard to temporal things. Consider in 
connection with this the following passage, which, though 
taken from the Book of Proverbs, is not of a Jewish char- 
acter, but true concerning believers under the present dis- 
pensation also : " There is that scattereth, and yet increas- 
eth ; and there is that withholdeth more than is meet, but 
it tendeth to poverty. The liberal soul shall be made fat ; 
and he that watereth shall be watered also himself." Prov. 
xi. 24, 25. 

In connection with 1 Cor. xvi. 2, I would also direct my 
brethren in the Lord to the promise made in Luke vi. 38 : 
" Give, and it shall be given unto 3^ou ; good measure, 
pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall 
men give into your bosom. For with the same measure 
that ye mete withal it shall be measured to you again." 
This refers evidently to the present dispensation, and evi- 



274 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

dently iu its primary meaning to temporal things. Now 
let an} 7 one, constrained by the love of Jesus, act according 
to this passage ; let him on the first day of the week com- 
municate as the Lord has prospered him, and he will see 
that the Lord will act according to what is contained in this 
verse. If pride constrain us to give, if self-righteousness 
make us liberal, if natural feeling induce us to communicate, 
or if we give whilst we are in a state of insolvency, not pos- 
sessing more perhaps than ten shillings in the pound, were 
our creditors to come upon us ; then we cannot expect to have 
this verse fulfilled in our experience ; nor should we give 
at any time for the sake of receiving again from others, ac- 
cording to this verse ; but if indeed the love of Christ corv- 
strain us to communicate according to the abilit} T which the 
Lord gives us, then we shall have this verse fulfilled in our 
experience, though this was not the motive which induced us 
to give. Somehow or other the Lord will abundantly repay 
us, through the instrumentality of our fellow-men, what we 
are doing to his poor saints, or in any way for his work, 
and we shall find that in the end we are not losers, even with 
reference to temporal things, whilst we communicate liber- 
ally of the things of this life with which the Lord has in- 
trusted us. 

Here it might be remarked, But if it be so that even in 
this life, and with regard to temporal things, it is true that 
a to him that gives shall be given, good measure, pressed 
down, and shaken together, and running over," and that 
a he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully," 
then in the end the most liberal persons would be exceed- 
ingly rich. Concerning this remark we have to keep in 
mind, that the moment persons were to begin to give for 
the sake of receiving more back again from the Lord, 
through the instrumentality of their fellow-men, than they 
have given ; or the moment persons wish to alter their way, 
and no more go on sowing bountifully, but sparingly, in 
order to increase their possessions, whilst God is allowing 



1SU. STEWARDSHIP. 275 

them to reap bountifully, the river of God's bounty toward 
them would no longer continue to flow. God had supplied 
them abundantly with means, because he saw them act as 
stewards for him. He had intrusted them with a little 
which they had used for him, and he therefore intrusted 
them with more ; and if they had continued to use the much 
also for him, he would have still more abundantly used 
them as instruments to scatter abroad his bounties. The 
child of God must be willing to be a channel through which 
God's bounties flow, both with regard to temporal and spir- 
itual things. This channel is narrow and shallow at first, 
it may be ; yet there is room for some of the waters of God's 
bounty to pass through. And if we cheerfuUy yield our- 
selves as channels for this purpose, then the channel becomes 
wider and deeper, and the waters of the bounty of God can 
pass through more abundantly. Without a figure, it is thus : 
At first we may be only instrumental in communicating five 
pounds, or ten pounds, or twenty pounds, or fifty pounds, 
or one hundred pounds, or two hundred pounds per year, 
but afterwards double as much ; and, if we are still more 
faithful in our stewardship, after a year or two four times 
as much, afterwards perhaps eight times as much, at last 
perhaps twenty times or fifty times as much. We cannot 
limit the extent to which God may use us as instruments in 
communicating blessing, both temporal and spiritual, if we 
are willing to yield ourselves as instruments to the living 
God, and are content to be only instruments, and to give 
him all the glory. 

But with regard to temporal things it will be thus, that 
if indeed we walk according to the mind of God in these 
things, whilst more and more we become instruments of 
blessing to others, we shall not seek to enrich ourselves, 
but be content, when the last day of another year finds us 
still in the bod}', to possess no more than on the last day 
of the previous year, or even considerably less, whilst we 
have been, however, in the course of the year, the instru- 



276 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

ments of communicating largely to others, through the 
means with which the Lord had intrusted us. As to my 
own soul, by the grace of God, it would be a burden to me 
that however much my income in the course of the year 
might have been, I were increasing in earthly possession ; 
for it would be a plain proof to me that I had not been 
acting as a steward for God, and had not been yielding my- 
self as a channel for the waters of God's bounty to pass 
through. I also cannot but bear my testimony here, that 
in whatever feeble measure God has enabled me to act 
according to these truths for the last fifteen years [this was 
written in 1845], I have found it to be profitable, most 
profitable to my own soul ; and as to temporal things, 
I never was a loser in doing so, but Thave most abundantly 
found the truth in 2 Cor. ix. 6, and Luke vi. 38, and Prov. 
xi. 24, 25, verified in my own experience. I only have to 
regret that I have acted so little according to what I have 
now been stating ; but my godly purpose is, by the help of 
God, to spend the remainder of my days in practising these 
truths more than ever ; and I am sure that when I am 
brought to the close of my earthly pilgrimage, either in 
death, or by the appearing of our Lord Jesus, I shall not 
have the least regret in having done so ; and I know that, 
should I leave my clear child behind, the Lord will abun- 
dantly provide for her, and prove that there has been a 
better provision made for her than her father could have 
made, if he had sought to insure his life or lay up money 
for her. 

Before leaving this part of the subject, I mention to the 
believing reader, that I know instance upon instance in 
which what I have been saying has been verified, but I will 
only mention the following : I knew many years ago a 
brother as the manager of a large manufactory. Whilst in 
this capacity he was liberal, and giving away considerably 
out of his rather considerable salaiy. The Lord repaid 
this to him ; for the principals of the establishment, well 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 277 

knowing his value to their house of business, gave him now 
and then, whilst he thus was liberally using his means for 
the Lord, very large presents in money. In process of 
time, however, this brother thought it right to begin busi- 
ness on his own account, in a very small way. He still 
continued to be liberal, according to his means, and God 
prospered him, and prospered him so that now, whilst I am 
writing, his manufactory is as large as the one which he 
formerly managed, or even larger, though that was a very 
considerable one. And sure I am that if this brother shall 
be kept by God from setting his heart upon earthly things, 
and from seeking more and more to increase his earthly 
riches, but shall delight himself in being used as a steward 
by God, cheerfully communicating to the needs of God's 
poor children, or to his work in other ways, and doing so 
not sparingly, but bountifully, the Lord will intrust him 
more and more with means ; if otherwise, if he shut up his 
hands, seek his own, wish to obtain sufficient property that 
he may be able to live on his interest, then what he has to 
expect is that God will shut up his hands, he will meet 
with heavy losses, or there will be an alteration in his 
affairs for the worse, or the like. 

I also mention two other cases, to show that the Lord 
increases our ability of communicating temporal blessings 
to others if we distribute according to the means with which 
he has intrusted us, though we should not be in a trade or 
business or profession. I know a brother who many years 
ago saw it right not only to spend his interest for the Lord, 
but also the principal, as the Lord might point out to him 
opportunities. His desire was not, as indeed it ought never 
to be, to get rid of his money as fast as possible, 3-et he 
considered himself a steward for the Lord, and was there 
fore willing, as his Lord and Master might point it out to 
him, to spend his means. When this brother came to this 
determination, he possessed about twenty thousand pounds 
sterling. According to the light and grace which the Lord 
24 



278 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

had been pleased to give, he afterwards acted, spending the 
money for the Lord, in larger or smaller sums, as oppor- 
tunities were pointed out to him by the Lord. Thus the 
sum more and more decreased, whilst the brother steadily 
pursued his course, serving the Lord with his property, and 
spending his time and ability also for the Lord, in service 
of one kind or another among his children. At last, the 
twenty thousand pounds were almost entirely spent, when 
at that very time the father of this very brother died, 
whereby he came into the possession of an income of several 
thousand pounds a j^ear. It gives jo}^ to my heart to be 
able to add, that this brother still pursues his godly course, 
living in the most simple way, and giving away perhaps 
ten times as much as he spends on himself or family. Here 
you see, dear reader, that this brother, using faithfully for 
the Lord what he had been intrusted with at first, was made 
steward over more ; for he has now more than one third as 
much in a year coming in as he at first possessed altogether. 

I mention another instance : I know a brother to whom 
the Lord has given a liberal heart, and who bountifully 
gave of that over which the Lord had set him as steward. 
The Lord, seeing this, intrusted him with still more, for 
through family circumstances he came into the possession 
of many thousand pounds, in addition to the considerable 
property he possessed before. I have the joy of being able 
to add also concerning this brother, that the Lord continues 
to give him grace to use his property as a steward for God, 
and that he has not been permitted to set his heart upon 
his riches, through the very considerable increase of his 
property, but that he continues to live as the steward of 
the Lord, and not as the owner of all this wealth. 

And now, dear reader, when the brethren to whom I have 
been referring are brought to the close of their earthly pil- 
grimage, will they have one moment's regret that they have 
used their property for the Lord? Will it be the least par- 
ticle of uneasiness to their minds, or will their children be 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 279 

the worse for it ? Oh, no ! The only regret they will have 
concerning this matter will be, that the} 7 - did not serve the 
Lord still more abundantly with their property. Dear 
reader, let us each in our measure act in the same spirit. 
Money is really worth no more than as it is used according 
to the mind of the Lord ; and life is worth no more than as 
it is spent in the service of the Lord. 

Whilst the three points mentioned — 1. That our calling 
must be of that nature that we can abide in it with God; 
2. That unto the Lord we should labor in our calling, as 
his servants, because he has bought us with his blood, and 
because he will have us to labor ; 3. That as stewards we 
should labor in our calling, because the earnings of our 
calling are the Lord's and not our own, as he has bought us 
with his blood ; — I say, whilst these three points are par- 
ticularly to be attended to in order that the Lord's blessing 
may rest upon our calling, and we be prospering in it, there 
are, nevertheless, some other points to be attended to, which 
I mention in love to my brethren in the Lord, by whom 
they may be needed. 

4. The next point is, that a believer in the Lord Jesus 
should do nothing in his calling which is purely for the sake 
of attracting the tuorld; such as, for instance, fitting up his 
shop or rooms of business in the most costly manner. I 
do not in the least mean to say that his shop or rooms of 
business should not be clean, orderly, and of such a char- 
acter as that there may be no positive hindrance in persons 
going there. All the needful conveniences that are ex- 
pected may be there, and ought to be there. But if any 
child of God seek to have the front of his shop, or the in- 
terior of his shop, or of his place of business, fitted up in 
a most expensive way, simply for the sake of attracting 
attention, then let him be aware that, just in so far as he 
is trusting in these things, he is not likely to succeed in 
his calling, because he puts the manner of fitting up the 
»hop in the room of trust in the Lord. Such things the 



280 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

i 

Lord may allow to succeed in the case of an unbeliever, 
but they will not prosper in the case of a child of God, 
except it be in the way of chastisement, just as the Lord 
gave to Israel in the wilderness the desire of their hearts, 
but sent leanness into their souls. Should any brother 
have fallen into this error, the first thing he has to do, 
when the Lord has instructed him concerning this point, is 
to make confession of sin, and, as far as it can be done, 
to retrace his steps in this particular. If this cannot be 
done, then to cast himself upon the mercy of God in Christ 
Jesus. 

5. Of the same character is to seek to attract the atten- 
tion of the world by " boasting advertisements," such as 
" no one manufactures so good an article," " no one sella 
this article so cheap," " we sell the best article in the city," 
etc. Suppose these statements were quite correct, yet they 
are unbecoming for a child of God, who has the living God 
to care for him and to provide for him, and therefore needs 
not to make use of such boasting, whereby he may seek to 
insure custom to himself and keep it from others. The 
law of love is, " Whatsoever ye would that men should do 
to 3^ou, do ye even so to them." Matt. vii. 12. Now, what 
do I wish in this particular that others should do to inc. 
but that they should not seek to keep away persons fro:::; 
dealing with me ; but if I use such like expressions in my 
advertisements as have been mentioned, what do they imply 
but that I wish all people should come to me, and deal with 
me ? If, however, already under the old covenant it was 
said, "Thou shalt not covet," how much more sinful. and 
altogether unbecoming is it for us, children of God, who 
are in fellowship with the Father and the Son, to make use 
of such means in order to insure to ourselves pecuniary 
advantages ! But, however much the Lord may allow a man 
of the world to prosper in using such means, they are only 
hindrances to the child of God to getting on in his calling, 
because the Lord sees that they are substituted instead of 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 281, 

trust in himself; and should the Lord for a season allow 
his child apparently to be benefited by them, it will only be 
for his chastisement and connected with leanness in his 
soul. Therefore, my brethren in the Lord, I beseech you 
to put away all these things out of your calling, lest you 
should be hindering instead of furthering your real welfare. 
6. Likewise of a similar character is the following point, 
which God may suffer to be a real hindrance to his children 
in their calling ; it is, To seek the very best, and therefore 
the most expensive, situations which can be had in a town 
or city. Now, I do by no means intend to sslj, that in our 
trade, business, art, or profession, we should seek the most 
obscure, retired, out-of-the-way place possible, and say, 
" God will provide, and I need not mind in what part of 
the town I carry on my calling." There are most assuredly 
certain things to be considered. The persons wiio are 
likely to buy the articles I sell, or employ me, are to be 
considered, and I have not to say, it matters nothing to me 
whether I make them come a mile or two to n^ house, or 
to the most dirty and disagreeable part of the town ; this 
would be the extreme in the other way. But whilst there 
is a certain consideration to be used with reference to those 
who may employ us in our calling, yet if the trust of the 
child of God respecting temporal prosperity is in the fact 
that he lives in the best situation, the Lord will surely dis- 
appoint him. He will have to pay a very high rent for the 
best situation, and yet not succeed, because his trust is in 
the best situation. He is substituting it for dependence 
upon the living God for customers. He is robbing his soul, 
not only in not taking the customers as from the hands of 
the Lord, but he is also obliging Ms heavenly Father, in the 
very love of his heart, to cause him to be disappointed, 
because he is not trusting in him. If the child of God 
were sajing and acting thus : the best situation would cost 
me fifty pounds a year more rent than one which is not 
really inconvenient for my customers, nor in an improper 
24* 



282 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

i 

neighborhood, and the like ; this fifty dollars I dedicate 
unto the Lord, to be paid in instalments for his work or 
his poor saints, whenever the rent-day comes ; such 21 
brother would find himself to be no loser, if this indeed 
were done in dependence upon the Lord, and constrained 
by the love of Jesus. But if the fifty pounds more are paid 
for rent, and yet the living God, in the very love of his 
heart, should be obliged to withhold prosperity from his 
child in his calling, because he sees that he is la3 r ing undue 
stress upon the situation of the house, then not only the 
fifty pounds extra rent per year are lost, but also that 
which the Lord is obliged to withhold from his child be- 
sides, in order to teach him the lesson ; and thus year after 
year, by our own fault, we may have scarcely anything to 
give for the work of God. 

7. The next obstacle to prosperity in our calling which 
I now would mention is, That children of God often use 
such expressions as these with reference to their calling : 
" This is our busy time," or " This is our dead time ; " 
which implies that they do not day after da}>- deal with God 
about their calling, but that they ascribe their having much 
or little to do to circumstances, or to times and seasons. 
That the people of the world should do so is not to be won- 
dered at ; but that the children of God should act thus, 
who in the most minute affairs of life should seek the help 
of God, and deal with God about them, is a matter of sor- 
row to the spiritual mind, and is altogether unbecoming 
saints. But what is the result ? The Lord, according to 
the expectations of his children, allows them to be without 
employment, because they' say, " This is our dead season." 
" He did not many mighty works there because of their un- 
belief," contains a truth which comes in here. But what is 
the right way of looking at the matter ? It is this : the 
child of G-od should say, though generally about this time 
of the year there is little emphyvment to be expected, look- 
ing at it naturally, just as want of employment is neither 



1844 STEWARDSHIP. 283 

good for the outward nor inward man, and as I only desire 
employment to serve God in my business, to have to give 
to those who are in need, or help in other ways the work 
of God, I will now give myself to prayer for employment, 
for I can by prayer and faith as a child of God obtain bless- 
ings from nry heavenly Father, though not in the ordinary 
course of things. If thus the child of God were to say and 
to act, he would soon have employment in his calling, ex- 
cept the Lord meant to use his time otherwise in his work, 
which he would point out to him. 

8. A further reason wiry God may be obliged to resist 
children of .God in their business, may be this, that they 
with the greatest carefulness seek to obtain persons for 
their shop who are considered " good salesmen," i. e., per- 
sons who have such persuasive ways, as that they gain an 
advantage over the customers and induce them not only 
to buy articles for which they ask, whether suitable or not, 
but that they also induce them to buy articles which they 
did not at all intend to buy when they came to the shop. 
Concerning this I notice, in the first place, that if the 
child of God puts his dependence upon the " good sales- 
men," let him not be surprised if his heavenly Father 
should be obliged to disappoint him, because he sees his 
child lean upon the arm of flesh, instead of trusting in the 
living God : and therefore the business does not succeed. 
Further, it is altogether wrong for a child of God to in- 
duce the customers, by means of such men or women who 
have a persuasive tongue, to purchase articles whether 
they suit or not, and whether they are needed or not. 
This is no less than defrauding persons in a subtle way, or 
leading them into the sin of purchasing beyond their means, 
or at least spending their money needlessly. However 
such sinful tricks may be allowed to prosper in the case of 
a man of the world, in the case of a child of God they 
will not prosper, except God allow them to do so in the 
way of chastisement, whilst leanness and wretchedness are 



284 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVI. 

brought into the soul. I knew a case of this kind where 
it was the whole bent of the mind of a professed believer 
to obtain such " good salesmen," and where even a Jew 
was kept outside the shop, walking up and down, to induce 
persons to come in and buy ; and yet that same professed 
believer failed twice in his business. 

9. Another evil with reference to business, and why 
children of God do not get on in their calling, is, that they 
enter upon business often without any capital at all, or 
with too little. If a believer has no capital at all, or only 
a very small capital, in comparison with what his business 
requires, then ought he not to sslj this to himself: "If 
it were my heavenly Father's will that I should enter 
upon business on my own account, then would he not 
somehow or other have intrusted me with the needful 
means? And since he has not, is it not a plain indication 
that for the present I should remain a journeyman (or 
shopman, or clerk, as the case may be) ? " In a variety 
of ways the means might come. For instance, a legacy 
might be left to him, or money might be given to him by 
a brother in the Lord for that very purpose, or a brother 
or sister might propose to the individual to lend him 
money, yet so that if he were unable to pay it again they 
would not consider him their debtor. But if in some 
such way the Lord did not remove the hindrance, and 
the brother would still go into business, he would, through 
the bill system and other things connected with the want 
of capital, not only bring great distress into his mind, and 
subject himself to the possibility of at last being unable to 
pay his creditors, whereby dishonor would be brought 
upon the name of the Lord, but he likewise could not be 
surprised (as he went into business contrary to the will of 
God, since he pointed out to him that he was not to do so 
for want of means) if he should find that he cannot get 
on, and that the blessing of God manifestly is wanting. In 
such a case as this, if it can be done, the retracing our 



1844. STEWARDSHIP. 2Sb 

steps is the Lost thing we can do ; but often this cannot 
be done, as others are involved in the matter, and then we 
have to make acknowledgment of our sin, and seek God's 
merciful help to bring us into a right position. 

10. But suppose all these nine previous points were 
attended to, and we neglected to seek God's blessing upon 
our calling, we need still not be surprised if we met with 
difficulty upon difficult}^ and could not get on at all. It 
is not enough that we seek God's help for that which mani 
festly is of a spiritual character ; but we should seek his 
help and blessing by pra} T er and supplication for all our 
ordinary concerns in life, and if we neglect doing so we 
shall surely suffer for the neglect. " Trust in the Lord with 
all thine heart ; and lean not unto thine own understanding. 
In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy 
paths." Prov. iii. 5, 6. 

Though these few remarks are written by one who never 
was in business himself, jet the truths therein set forth 
have been learned by him in the school of God, and he has 
had them abundantly confirmed through his pastoral labors 
during the last fifteen years and a half. [This was written 
in 1845.] 




CHAPTER XVII. 

REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 

1845 — 1846. 

AH UNEXPECTED REQUEST — DELIBERATION— A GREAT UNDERTAK ING — RE- 
LIANCE ON THE RESOURCES OF THE LIVING GOD —AN ANSWER EXPECTED 
AND RECEIVED— PRAYER FOR FAITH AND PATIENCE — FURTHER PROOFS 
OF DIVINE FAVOR — THE BLESSEDNESS OF DEVISING LIBERAL THINGS. 

(3y/ BEGAN the service of caring for children who are 
bereaved of both parents, by death, born in wedlock, 
and are in destitute circumstances, on Dec. 9, 1835. 
For nearly ten years I had never had any desire to 
hoild an Orphan House. On the contraiy, I decidedly pre- 
ferred spending the means which might come in for present 
aecessities, and desired rather to enlarge the work accord- 
ing to the means which the Lord might be pleased to give. 
Thus it was till the end of October, 1845, when I was led 
to consider this matter in a way in which I had never done 
before. 1 The occasion of my doing so was this : On Oct. 
30, 1845, I received from a gentleman, who lived in the 
street where the four Orphan Houses were, a polite and 
friendly letter, in which he courteously stated to me that 
me inhabitants in the adjoining houses were in various 
fvays inconvenienced by the Orphan Houses being in Wil- 
son Street. He left to myself the judgment of the case. 

This letter I received cm Thursday morning, Oct. 30, 1845. 
Being very much occupied that week, I had scarcely any 
time to consider the matter. On Monday morning, how- 
ever, Nov. 3, I set apart some hours for the prayerful con- 

1 The reader will not fail to remark the striking illustration afforded, in the pres- 
ent chapter, of the truth stated in Chapter xvi., that God rewards the right use 
of means of benevolence by affording the means of enlarged usefulness. - Ed. 
286 



1845. REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 287 

sideratlon of the subject, and after I had besought the Lord 
to guide me to a right decision, I wrote down the reasons 
which appeared to me to make it desirable that the Orphan 
Houses should be removed from Wilson Street, and also the 
reasons against removing. As far as they are suitable for 
being stated in print they were these : — 

I. REASONS FOR REMOVING FROM WILSON STREET. 

1. The neighbors feel themselves inconvenienced by the 
noise of the children in the play-hours. This complaint is 
neither without foundation, nor unjust ; for many persons 
are very much inconvenienced by the noise of children, 
and those living close by the Orphan Houses must be so 
during the play-hours, even though the noise be only of 
that kind that one could not at all find fault with the dear 
children on account of it. I should niyself feel it trying 
to my head to live next door to the Orphan Houses, on 
that account. I therefore ought to do to others as I should 
wish to be done by. This point had never before appeared 
to me in so serious a light. 

2. The greatness of the number of the inmates in the 
houses had several times prevented the drains from acting 
property, and thus has a few times affected the water in 
one or two of the neighbors' houses. With reference to 
these two reasons as it regards those living near the 
Orphan Houses, these words, " Let not your good be evil 
spoken of" (Rom.xiv. 16), and " Let your moderation (i. e., 
yieldingness) be known unto all men" (Philip, iv. 5), seemed 
to me two important portions of the word of God to be 
acted out in this matter. 

But in addition to the reasons for removing the Orphan 
Houses from Wilson Street, on account of the unavoidable 
occasional inconvenience that comes upon the neighbors, 
there appeared now to me, when once I was led to con- 
sider seriously the reasons for removing the Institution 



288 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVII. 

from Wilson Street, other reasons for doing so, in connec- 
tion with the work itself, which had occurred to me before, 
but never in so strong a light as now, when the subject 
was brought more immediately before me by the letter in 
which I was politely requested to remove the Orphan 
Houses from "Wilson Street. These reasons are : — 

1. We have no proper play-grounds in Wilson Street. 
There is one play-ground, which, however, is only large 
enough for the children of one house at a time ; but as 
there are children in four houses who ought to have the 
benefit of it, we cannot arrange so that all the children 
have the full benefit of that plaj^-ground, as the meals 
the school-hours, the weather, and other hindrances inter- 
fere. The dear orphans ought, I know, to be trained in 
habits of industry, but children are children, and need to 
be treated as such ; and they should, on account of their 
health, have the full benefit of a pla} T -ground. But this 
they cannot have in Wilson Street ; and to take them 
out into the fields for the benefit of bodily exercise, as 
we have been in the habit of doing, is often very incon- 
venient. 

2. We have no ground for cultivation near the Orphan 
Houses, and hence there must be more walking for the 
children, on account of using proper means for keeping 
them, with the blessing of God, in health, than is in other 
respects good for them ; because frequent walks easily 
beget in children habits of idleness, which would be espe- 
cially felt when bo} T s are apprenticed. But this difficulty 
cannot be obviated by remaining in Wilson Street, and 
renting a piece of land somewhere else for cultivation ; for 
to get the children ready and conduct them to the piece 
of ground not only takes a good deal of time, but is con- 
nected with other great inconveniences, yea, with insur- 
mountable difficulties, so that we found it needful to give 
up a small piece of ground which we once rented for about 
two years for the orphan boys, at a distance of about half 



1845. REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 289 

a mile from Wilson Street. Thus, by removing from 
"Wilson Street, and obtaining premises surrounded by land 
for cultivation, we should be able to procure a most im- 
portant moral benefit for the children, by having the 
opportunity more fully than we now have of training them 
in habits of industry, besides giving to the boj^s occupation 
which is more suitable for them than knitting, which is 
now the only employment they have, besides making their 
beds, cleaning the house, and attending to the cooking of 
their meals. Moreover, this would be occupation in the 
open air, which not only would bring into exercise the use 
of their limbs, but also make walking for the sake of health 
almost entirely needless. 

3. If we were to remove from Wilson Street, and obtain 
premises in the country, we might have all the washing 
done at home, which now, for want of room, can be only 
done in part. Thus the girls also would have more labori- 
ous work at home : a point of great importance for them, so 
that they would not feel so much the hardships connected 
with going out to service. 

4. The situation of Wilson Street is perhaps scarcely 
bracing enough for strengthening the constitution of the 
orphans, most of whom, being the offspring of very 
diseased parents, require a very invigorating place of 
abode. 

5. The present situation is certainly not desirable for the 
teachers, especially as, when their hours of work are over, 
they have no garden or fields next to the house immedi- 
ately to go into for a little refreshment of their body ; and 
for some of them it is too far to go to fields where they 
might have a bracing air. 

6. In times of sickness we are too confined in the houses 
in Wilson Street. If there were less than thirty children 
in each house, the average expenses of each child would be 
too great, it being desirable, as the arrangements are now, 
that there should not be less than three laborers in each 

25 



290 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XYII. 

house ; and yet, if there are thirty children in each house, 
we are too full in time of sickness, as we have not a single 
spare room in any of the houses. Now, though the Lord 
has during all these years most, mercifully helped us through 
such seasons, yet it has not been without inconvenience, 
and without also, perhaps, having more of the children in 
one room, at such times, than on account of health it is 
desirable. 

7. Even ordinarily, when there is no sickness, it would 
be desirable to have more room. 

There are no premises to be had in Bristol, or in the im- 
mediate neighborhood, where we could have these advan- 
tages ; for I have been looking about in all directions for this 
purpose during the last ten years. But suppose there were 
a large house to be had in one part of the city, and a 
second a mile off, and a third and a fourth in other direc- 
tions, such houses, on account of our peculiar position in 
the work, would not do. For in seasons of need the dis- 
tance of the several houses would render it very inconven- 
ient for the laborers to meet together for prayer, to divide 
the means that may be in hand, etc. Besides, when in 
seasons of other peculiar difficulties, connected with the 
work, I wished to meet all my fellow-laborers, there would 
arise great difficulty by their being divided in different 
parts of the city. It would also thus be very inconvenient 
to persons who wish to see the work, to go from place to 
place, in order to have a view of all the Orphan Houses. 
But this is not all. The more I have considered the mat- 
ter, the more am I now persuaded that no ordinary large 
houses, built for private families, and therefore only calcu- 
lated to accommodate ten or fifteen persons at most for any 
length of time in them, will do for charitable institutions of 
any considerable size, as no ordinary house, except built 
on purpose, furnishes the proper advantages of ventilation, 
a point so needful for the health of the inmates in a charitable 



1845. REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 291 

institution. There seemed to me, therefore, to remain 
nothing but to build premises for the purpose. 

II. REASON'S FOR REMAINING IN WILSON STREET. 

1. God hitherto has pointed out the spot most plainly. 
At the commencement of the work, in 1835, no other 
house was to be had but No. 6 Wilson Street. After- 
wards, when in 1836 the Infant Orphan House was on the 
point of being opened, again I was looking about in all 
directions, and saw many houses, but found none that was 
suitable, till all at once, most unlooked for, the occupiers 
of No. 1 Wilson Street were desirous of immediately 
leaving that house, and I was able thus to rent it. When 
in 1837, I was on the point of opening the Boys' Orphan 
House, I looked about again for a house in all directions ; 
for I knew not at that time, what I have since learned by 
experience, that it was so important that all the houses 
should be near together. After seeking long in vain, I at 
last found a very large house, not far from Wilson Street, 
which I rented ; but when the occupiers of the houses in 
the neighborhood heard that that house had been let for 
a charitable institution, they threatened the owner with an 
action, which led him to request me to give up the agree- 
ment, which, of course, I did immediately. At last, most 
unexpectedly, after having looked about in vain in all 
directions, the occupiers of No. 3 Wilson Street offered it 
to me, and I rented it for the orphan boys. Lastly, in the 
year 1843, when I was led to see it to be the will of God 
to go forward in this work, and to establish the Girls' 
Orphan House No. 2, for older girls, one particular feature 
in the matter was, that the house No. 4 in Wilson Street 
aad been offered to me, without being sought after, when 
\here had not been, for about six years, one single large 
louse to be let in that street. 

[But though hitherto God has pointed out Wilson Street 



292 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVII. 

as being the spot where the work should be carried on, may 
not now the time have come for removing?] 

2. Perhaps we might also rent Nos. 2, 5, and 7, in "Wil- 
son Street, and use two out of those three houses for Or- 
phan Houses, and one of them for an infirmary in the case 
of sickness. 

[But then, I said to myself, would not the objection, 
which the neighbors on the opposite side of the street 
might make, on account of the noise of the children in 
their play-hours, etc., remain? Also the drains would be 
still more unsuitable, not being constructed for so many 
inmates ; and to alter them would be a heavy expense. 
The play-ground would be still less sufficient, if two new 
houses were added. Lastly, there was no reason to think 
that we could rent Nos. 2, 5, and 7.] 

3. There are these three great objections against build- 
ing : The considerable sum which is required, and which 
could be spent for present use upon the orphans. The 
pilgrim character of the Christian seems lost in building. 
The time that it will necessarily take in making arrange- 
ments for it. 

[Do not all these objections only hold good, I said to 
myself, if I were needlessly to set about building? If I 
could rent premises, which are really in every way suitable 
for the work, and 1 preferred building, then those objections 
would apply to the case ; but when one is forced to it, it is 
no more than erecting a large building, because there may 
be eight hundred children of God in fellowship who have 
been hitherto renting a meeting-place, but for certain rea- 
sons are obliged to leave it, and cannot rent another. Such 
could not be accused of needlessly spending money in build- 
ing instead of renting ; nor could it be justly said that they 
have on that account given up the pilgrim character ; nor 
would it be time wasted if some individuals were to make 
arrangements about the building of that meeting-place. 
Therefore these three objections just mentioned, which had 



1845. REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 293 

been for ten years strongly in my own mind, were removed 
when once I saw plainly that nothing remained but to 
build.] 

After I had spent a few hours in prayer and consideration 
over the subject, I began already to see that the Lord would 
lead me to build, and that his intentions were not only the 
benefit of the orphans and the better ordering of the whole 
work, but also the bearing still further testimony that he 
could and would provide large sums for those who need them 
and trust in him for them ; and besides, that he would en- 
large the work, so that, if I once did build a house, it might 
be large enough to accommodate three hundred orphans, 
with their teachers and other overseers and servants needful 
for the work. Concerning this latter point, I think it im- 
portant to remark, that during no period had the number 
of the applications for the admission of orphans been 
greater than just before I was led to think about building, 
so that it was cfuite painful to me not to be able to comply 
with the wishes of all the many persons who applied for the 
admission of orphans. There were many waiting for ad- 
mission, particularly orphan hoys. 

In the afternoon of November 3, 1845, I laid the matter 
before my fellow-laborers in the church (eight in number), 
to get their judgment, whether I ought not to leave Wilson 
Street, and to build. All judged that I ought to leave Wil- 
son Street, and none saw reasons against building. 

On Nov. 4 my dear wife and I began to meet for prayer 
about this matter, and purposed to do so morning by morn- 
ing. We asked God for clearer light concerning the par- 
ticular points connected with the subject ; and being assured 
that it was his will that I should build, I began asking the 
Lord for means. 

On Nov. 7 I judged, having considered the matter more 
fully, that sufficiently large premises to furnish all needful 
accommodation for three hundred children (from their ear- 
liest days up to fifteen or sixteen years old), together with 



294 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVII. 

a sufficiently large piece of ground in the neighborhood of 
Bristol, for building the premises upon, and the remainder 
for cultivation by the spade, would cost at least ten thou- 
sand pounds. I was not discouraged by this, but trusted in 
the living God. 

We continued meeting for prayer morning by morning 
for fifteen days, but not a single donation came in ; yet my 
heart was not discouraged. The more I prayed, the more 
assured I was that the Lord would give the means. Yea, 
as fully assured was I that the Lord would do so, as if I 
had already seen the new premises actually before me. This 
assurance arose not from some vague, enthusiastical feeling, 
the mere excitement of the moment, but, 1. From the rea- 
sons already related, and especially from the commandment 
contained in Philip, iv. 5. For I saw that I should not act 
according to the mind of our Lord Jesus if I did not, as 
soon as I could, remove the orphans from Wilson Street, as 
it had been stated to me, in the letter above referred to, 
that their living there was an anno} r ance to some of the in- 
habitants in that street. 2. This assurance that I should 
build an Orphan Home arose further from the whole way 
in which the Lord had been pleased to lead me in connection 
with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and 
Abroad since its beginning on March 5, 1834, i. e., he has 
been leading me forward as by an unseen hand, and en- 
larging the work more and more from its commencement, 
and, generally, without my seeking after it, and bringing 
things so clearly before me that I could not but see that I 
ought to go forward. 3. Lastly and chiefly, this, my assur- 
ance that I should build unto the Lord this house of mercy, 
arose also particularly from this, that having strictly exam- 
ined my heart as to the motives for doing so, I found that, 
as before God, I could say that my only motives were Ms 
honor and glory, and the welfare of the church of Christ at 
large, the real temporal and spiritual welfare of destitute 
oiphans, and the welfare of all those who might take care 



1845. REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 295 

of them, in the building to be erected. And finding that, 
after praying again and again about the matter, I still re- 
mained in perfect peace, I judged it assuredly to be the will 
of God that I should go forward. 

On Nov. 15 brother R. C. arrived, to labor for a little 
while in Bristol. I communicated to him my position with 
reference to having to remove the orphans from Wilson 
Street, and I had his judgment also as to its being of God 
that I should build. This dear brother's judgment greatly- 
encouraged me. His visit was to me of great help in this 
particular, especially in stirring me up yet more to bring 
everything in connection with this matter before God. He 
also laid it on my heart to seek direction from God with 
reference to the plan of the building. He said, " You must 
ask help of God to show you the plan, so that all may be 
according to the mind of God." 

Up to Dec. 9 thirty-five days had passed away, whilst I 
was day by day waiting upon God for means for this work, 
and not a single penny had been given to me. Neverthe- 
less, this did not in the least discourage me, but my assur- 
ance that God, in his own time and in his own way, would 
give the means, increased more and more. The portion 
which came in course of my meditation on the New Testa- 
ment was the beginning of the epistle of James. More 
than at any period in my life was I struck with these verses : 
" My brethren, count it all J03- when ye fall into divers temp- 
tations (i. e., trials) ; knowing this, that the trying of your 
faith worketh patience. But let patience have her perfect 
work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing." 
James i. 2-4. It was especially the last verse, "But let 
patience have her perfect work," etc., which I found of ex- 
ceeding great importance with reference to the building of 
the Orphan House. It led out my soul in prayer day after 
day, to ask the Lord to increase my faith, and to sustain 
my patience. I had these verses so impressed upon my 
heart that I could not but think that God meant particularly 



296 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVII. 

to bless me by them, with regard to the work before me, 
and that I should especially need patience as well as faith. 

On the thirty-sixth day after having begun to pray, Dec. 
10, 1845, I received one thousand pounds towards the build- 
ing of the Orphan House. This is the largest donation 
that I had received up to that time for the Scriptural 
Knowledge Institution ; but when I received it I was as calm, 
as quiet, as if I had only received one shilling. For my 
heart was looking out for answers. Day by day I was ex- 
pecting to receive answers to my praj'ers. Therefore, hav- 
ing faith concerning the matter, this donation did not in the 
least surprise me. Yea, if five thousand pounds or ten 
thousand pounds had been given to me, instead of one 
thousand pounds, it would not have surprised me. 

Dec. 13. On the thirty-ninth day my sister-in-law, who 
had been for some weeks absent in London, and who had 
now returned to Bristol, told me that she had met a gentle- 
man in London, who, having quite recently read with deep 
interest the Narrative of the Lord's dealings with me, wished 
to know as many particulars about the work in my hands 
as he could. Being told by my sister-in-law that I purposed 
to build an Orphan House, he, an architect, offered to make 
the plan, and superintend the building gratuitously. Unso- 
licited, he pressed this matter upon her with deep and lively 
interest. I hear also that he is a Christian. The fact that 
this offer comes unsolicited, and from a Christiau architect, 
shows especially the hand of God. This is the second proof 
that God will help me in this matter. 

Dec. 23. This is now the fiftieth day since I have come 
to the conclusion to build, and the forty-ninth day since we 
have been daily waiting upon God for help. Nothing more 
has come in since Dec. 10, not even one penn3 r . Tin's 
morning I have been particularly encouraged by the cousid* 
eration that the Lord has sent me the one thousand poi,Lus, 
and the promise from that pious architect, whom I ..lave 
never seen, and of whose name I am as yet in ignon nc<\ 



1845. REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 297 

not to mock me, but as an earnest that he will give all that is 
needed. 

It seems desirable that we should have a large pieoe of 
ground, at least six or seven acres. This piece of ground 
must be in the vicinity of Bristol: 1. In order that the 
Orphan House may be accessible to me, as my place at 
present is fixed by my other work in Bristol. 2. That the 
laborers in the Institution and the orphans may be able to 
attend our meetings, at least on the Lord's day. For if 
meetings were held on purpose in the Orphan House, either 
the laborers or the children would not be benefited by them 
in that measure in which it is desirable. 3. That the in- 
habitants of Bristol may have the benefit of seeing with 
their own eyes this work of God, which is so manifestly 
his, and not mine. 4. That strangers who pass through 
Bristol may have easy access to it, for the same reason. 
But then, such a piece of ground near Bristol, where there 
is just now such an inordinate desire for building, in the 
way of speculation, would cost, in all human probability, 
between two and three thousand pounds. Then the build- 
ing itself, however plain, would not cost less than from six 
to eight thousand pounds, being for three hundred orphans, 
besides all their overseers, teachers, and assistants. In 
addition to this, the fitting up and furnishing the house for 
all these between three and four hundred inmates would not 
cost less than fifteen hundred pounds more. This is indeed 
a large sum of money which I need ; but my hope is in 
God. I have not sought after this thing. It has not begun 
with me. God has altogether unexpectedly, by means of 
the letter before mentioned, led me to it. Only the day 
before I received the letter, I had no more thought about 
building premises for the accommodation of the orphans 
than I had had during the ten previous years. My especial 
praj^er is that God would continue to me faith and patience. 
If he shall be pleased to help me in faith and patience to 
continue to wait on him, help will surely come. 



298 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVII. 

Deo. 24. No further donation yet. But my hope in God 
is unshaken. He most assuredly will help. I have on pur- 
pose not issued any circular in connection with this matter, 
in order that the hand of God may be the more manifest. 
To some persons residing in or out of Bristol I have spoken 
about my intention of building, when conversation led to 
it. Through this, if the Lord please, he can make it known 
tc others, and thus send means for the building fund. Or he 
can send in such an abundance of means for the work 
which is already in existence, that from that abundance 
there might be a rich surplus towards the building fund. 
But howsoever God may help, I do desire to see his hand 
made most manifest. There will be, no doubt, many trials 
connected with this enlargement of the field of labor (for 
if with the one hundred and thirty orphans there has been 
so much trial of faith, what is to be expected when the 
number is three hundred) ; and therefore I desire to see 
as clearly as daylight that God himself is leading me 
onward. 

Dec. 29. This is the fifty-sixth day since I came to the 
conclusion to build, and the fifty-fifth since I have been 
day by day waiting upon God concerning it. Only that 
one donation had come in till this evening, when I received 
fifty pounds. This donation is exceedingly precious to me, 
not only because I am sure it is most cheerfully given, nor 
even because of its largeness, but because it is another 
precious proof that God will bring about the matter, else 
he would not give me these earnests. All my business 
therefore is, to continue in faith and patience to wait upon 
God. My assurance has been more and more increasing 
that God will build for himself a large Orphan House in 
this city, to show to the inhabitants, and to all who may t 
read and hear about it, what a blessed thing it is to trust 
in him. Of late I have seen, by God's grace, more and 
more, how entirely unworthy I am of being used by God 
for this glorious and honorable service, and I can only say • 



1846. REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 299 

u Lord, here is thy servant, if thou art pleased to use such 
a one as I am." 

Dec. 30, 1845. This morning I came, in course of my 
reading, to the commencement of the book of Ezra. I was 
particularly refreshed by the two following points contained 
in the first chapter, in applying them to the building of 
the Orphan House : 1. Cyrus, an idolatrous king, was used 
by God to provide the means for building the temple at 
Jerusalem : how easy therefore for God to provide ten 
thousand pounds for the Orphan House, or even twenty or 
thirty thousand pounds, if needed ! 2. The people were 
stirred up by God to help those who went up to Jerusalem. 
Thus it is a small matter for him to put it into the hearts 
of his children to help me, in desiring to build this house 
of mercy unto his name. This meditation I had before 
breakfast. After f amity prayer in the morning, I had again 
my usual season for prayer about the building, and at this 
time it was particularly coupled with thanksgiving for the 
fifty pounds received last evening, and with entreating 
blessings on the donor. This evening I received one thou- 
sand pounds towards the building fund. When I received 
this donation I was as calm, yea as perfectly calm, as if I 
had received a single penny, because, by God's grace, I 
have faith in him, and therefore I am looking for answers 
to my prayers, and am sure that God will give every shil- 
ling that is needed. 

Jan. 2, 1846. This evening I received from Bideford 
eleven shillings toward the building fund. 

Having asked the Lord to go before me, I went out to- 
day to look for a piece of ground. The armory which is 
to be sold had been several times mentioned to me as a 
suitable place. I did not think so, yet I thought I ought 
at least to look at it. Having seen it and been confirmed 
in my judgment about its unsuitableness, I asked the Lord 
whether I should turn towards the city or towards Staple- 
ton. I felt led to go towards the city, and saw immedi- 



300 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVII. 

ately after some fields near the armory. After having made 
inquiry to whom they belonged, I have been led to write 
this evening to the owner of them, asking him whether he 
is disposed to sell them, etc. I am now quietly waiting the 
Lord's pleasure. If his time has come to answer our re- 
quests as to a suitable piece of land, I shall be glad ; if it 
is not yet come, I desire that " patience may have her per- 
fect work, being perfect and entire, wanting nothing." 

Jan. 8. This evening I received a reply to my letter. 
The owner of those fields writes, that, if he did sell them, 
it would be only for building land, and therefore they will 
be too dear. 

Jan. 9. "Went this morning once more to see those fields, 
which seem very suitable. Met there Mr. L., a land agent, 
who told me that they would be nearly a thousand 
pounds per acre, and therefore too dear. I asked Mr. 
L. to inform me if he should hear of any suitable land for 
sale. 

Jan. 31. It is now eighty-nine days since I have been 
daily waiting upon God about the building of an Orphan 
House. The time seems to me now near when the Lord 
will give us a piece of ground, and I told the brethren and 
sisters so this evening, after our usual Saturday evening 
prayer meeting at the Orphan House. 

Feb. 1. A poor widow sent to-day ten shillings. 

Feb. 2. To-day I heard of suitable and cheap land on 
Ashley Down. 

Feb. 3. Saw the land. It is the most desirable of all I 
have seen. There was anonymously put into an orphan box 
at my house a sovereign, in a piece of paper on which was 
written, " The New Orphan House." 

Feb. 4. This evening I called on the owner of the land 
on Ashley Down, about which I had heard on the 2d, but 
he was not at home. As I, however, had been informed 
that I should find him at his house of business, I went 
there, but did not find him there either, as he had just before 



1846. REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 301 

left. I might have called again at his residence at a later 
hour, having been informed by one of the servants that he 
would be sure to be at home about eight o'clock ; but I did 
not do so, judging that there was the hand of God in my 
not finding him at either place : and I judged it best there- 
fore, not to force the matter, but to " let patience have her 
perfect work." 

Feb. 5. Saw this morning the owner of the land. He 
told me that he awoke at three o'clock this morning and 
could not sleep again till five. While he was thus lying 
awake his mind was all the time occupied about the piece 
of land respecting which inquiry had been made of him for 
the building of an Orphan House, at my request ; and he 
determined with himself that, if I should apply for it, he 
would not only let me have it, but for one hundred and 
twenty pounds per acre, instead of two hundred pounds, 
the price which he had previously asked for it. How good 
is the Lord ! The agreement was made this morning, and 
I purchased a field of nearly seven acres, at one hundred 
and twenty pounds per acre. 

Observe the hand of God in my not finding the owner at 
home last evening ! The Lord meant to speak to his ser- 
vant first about this matter, during a sleepless night, and to 
lead him fully to decide before I had seen him. 

Feb. 8. I wrote the day before yesterday to the archi- 
tect, who has offered his help gratuitously. 

Feb. 11. Received from a sister in the Lord five pounds. 
Received also from the architect the following reply to my 
letter : — 

Mtdeax Sik:-^- 

It will afford me a gratification, beyond what I can communicate by 
letter, to lend you the helping hand in the labor of love you are en- 
gaged in, and I shall esteem it a very great privilege bt.^g allowod 
to exercise my abilities as an architect and surveyor in the erection of 
the building you propose to erect for the orphans. I really do mean 
what I say, and, if all is well, by the blessing of God, I will gratui- 
26 

f 



302 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVII. 

tously furnish you with plans, elevations, and sections, with specifica- 
tion of the work, so that the cost may be accurately estimated. I 
will also make you an estimate and superintend the works for you 
gratuitously, etc. 

The total amount which has been given for the building 
fund, up to June 4, 1846, is two thousand seven hundred 
and ten pounds three shillings five and a half pence. This 
is only a small part of what will be needed ; but, by the 
grace of God, I am in perfect peace, being fully assured 
that God in his own time will send the whole sum which 
is required. Many and great have already been the 
exercises of faith and patience since I first began to give 
myself to prayer about this work, and still greater they may 
be, before it is accomplished ; but God, in the riches of 
his grace, will help me through them all. It is now (June 
4, 1846) two hundred and twelve daj T s since I first began to 
pray about this work, and day after da}', since then, have I 
been enabled to continue to wait upon God, and I am more 
than ever assured that, notwithstanding all my exceeding 
great unworthiness, God will condescend to use me, to 
build this house. Had it been the excitement of the mo- 
ment, the difficulties which have alread3 T come upon me in 
connection with this work (and which are not stated here, 
on account of their occupying too much room) would have 
overwhelmed me ; but as God himself, I trust, led me to 
this work, so he has helped me, and does help me, and I 
doubt not will help me to the end. 

The house is intended to be built so as to accommodate 
one hundred and forty orphan girls above seven years of 
age, eighty orphan boys above seven, and eighty male and 
female orphans from their earliest days, till they are seven 
years old, together with all the overseers and teachers, etc., 
that may be needed. The infants, after having passed the 
age of seven, will be removed into the different depart- 
ments for older boys and girls. 



1846. REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 303 

Before leaving this period, it may be proper to recur to 
the following miscellaneous points, respecting the Scrip- 
tural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, with 
reference to the period from July 14, 1844, to May 26, 
1846. 



1. During the whole of this period four day schools, with 278 children 
in them, were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. 
Three day schools besides were assisted. The number of children 
that were taught in the day schools, entirely supported by the funds 
of the Institution, from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1846, amounts to 
3,983. During the period from July 14, 1844, to May 26, 1846, £628, 
19s. 4|d. was spent on all the schools, which were either entirely or 
in part supported by the funds of the Scriptural Knowledge Institu- 
tion. Further : during this period there were also entirely supported 
a Sunday school with 80 children, and an adult school with 60 persons 
attending it. The total number of the adult scholars who received 
instruction, from the formation of this Institution to May 26, 1846, is 
1,146. 

2. During this period were circulated 269 Bibles and 171 Testa- 
ments ; and 5,079 Bibles and 3,528 Testaments were circulated from 
the commencement of the work up to May 26, 1846. From July 14, 
1844, to May 26, 1846, £40, 7s. lOd. were expended of the funds of 
the Institution on this object. 

3. From July 14, 1844, to May 26, 1846, was laid out for foreign 
and home missions the sum of £595, 7s. 9d. During no period pre- 
viously was so much of the funds of this Institution spent on mis- 
sionary work, which arose from the fact that the more I corresponded 
with brethren who labored in the word and doctrine in foreign lands, 
the more I saw how much they stood in need of assistance, and thus, my 
heart having been led out in prayer to God on their behalf, that he 
would be pleased to send me means, whereby I might be able to assist 
them, he was pleased to do so. This led me to the purpose, as God 
should give me grace, to be still more mindful of them in future, and 
to seek to be able still more to assist them. The same was the case 
with regard to those brethren who labor in England, but who have no 
salary or stipend, but trust in the living God for the supply of their 
daily necessities ; I did long to help such brethren, and had no doubt 
that God would enable me to do so. 

4. There was laid out for the circulation of tracts from July 14, 
1844, to May 26, 1846, the sum of £56, 6s. 9£d., for which 52,003 sucb 



304 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVII- 

little publications were bought, which, with 5,315 in hand on July 11, 
1844, makes 57,318, of which number 40,565 were circulated. The 
total number circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1846, amounts 
to 99,647. 

5. There were received into the four Orphan Houses, from July 14, 
1844, to May 26, 1846, 30 orphans, who, together with those who were 
in the four houses on July 14, 1844, make up 151 in all. 

On May 26, 1846, there were 121 orphans in the four houses. Be- 
sides this, six apprentices were still supported by the funds of the Insti- 
tution, so that the total number was 127. The number of the orphans 
who were under our care from April, 1836, to May 26, 1846, amounts 
to 213. 

I notice further the following points in connection with the Orphan 
Houses : 

1 . Without any one having been personally applied to for anything 
by me, the sum of £13,275, 6s. 9|d. was given to me as the result of 
prayer to God, from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 
1846. This sum includes the £2,710, 3s. 5£d. which, up to June 4, 
1846, were given towards the building fund. (It maybe interesting to 
the reader to know that the total amount which was given as free con- 
tributions, for the other objects, from the commencement of the work 
up to May 26, 1846, amounts to £4,833, 18s. 10id; and that which 
came in by the sale of Bibles and tracts, and by the payments of the 
children in the day schools, amounts to £2,097, 18s. 2£d.) 2. Besides 
this, also a great variety and number of articles of clothing, furniture, 
provisions, etc., were given for the orphans, as has been stated in the 
printed reports. The total expenditure for the orphans from July 14, 
1844, to May 26, 1846, was £2,732, 14s. l£d., and for the other objects, 
£1,325, 7s. 7|d. 

In conclusion, I cannot but mention to the praise of the Lord con- 
cerning this period, that four of the Sunday-school children were 
admitted to communion. Likewise three more of the orphans were 
received into church fellowship ; so that up to that time, altogether, 
thirty-two of the orphans had been admitted. I also mention with 
peculiar joy, and as a matter for thankfulness, that of those who were 
apprenticed or sent out to service, from July 14, 1844, to May 26, 
1846, ten were believers, most of whom had been for several years in 
fellowship before they were sent out to service. But whilst we desire 
to receive these instances as precious encouragements from the Lord 
to continue our service, we cannot but believe, judging from the many 
prayers the Lord gives us for the children and adults under our cars 



1844 REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 305 

and instruction, that that which we see is but an earnest of a far larger 
harvest in the day of Christ's appearing. 

Dec. 31, 1844. Since brother Craik and I came to Bristol, 982 be- 
lievers have been received into communion. During this year 73 
have been received. 

The Lord has been pleased to give me during this year £267, 6s. 9d. 

To this is to be added that for the first two months 
and six days of this year, my expenses, and those of 
my dear wife, during our stay in Germany, were met, as 
also our travelling expenses back, as stated in another 
part of my Narrative. Also during the whole of this } T ear 
a Christian lady gave to our dear child board and schooling 
without any remuneration, — a present worth to us not less 
than fifty pounds. On this point I cannot help making a 
few remarks : I had clearly seen it to be the will of God 
that my daughter should be brought up at school, and not 
at home. My reasons for it were these : 1. My dear wife, 
though well qualified to instruct our daughter, so far as 
knowledge goes, was unable, on account of being engaged 
as my wife in a variety of things connected with the 
Lord's service, to give herself uninterruptedly to this work ; 
and to do it partially we judged to be injurious to our 
daughter. 2. I had seen instances in which a home edu- 
cation for an only child had turned out very badly. 3. I 
judged that the mixing with other children would be bene- 
ficial to our daughter, provided that intercourse was under 
proper oversight ; as thus a child is in early life introduced 
into a little world, and things do not all at once come upon 
a young person, when at last obliged to leave the parental 
roof. 4. But that which most of all led me to this decis- 
ion was, that as in the church of Christ the Lord has quali- 
fied the members of the body for the performance of certain 
work, and all have not the same gift and service, so, in the 
same way, certain believers are called and qualified above 
others for instructing children, and give themselves to this 
particular service, and that, therefore, I ought to make use 
26* 



306 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVII. 

of the qualifications of such, and of their having given theii 
whole time to tins particular service. These reasons led us 
to place our daughter at school, instead of educating her at 
home, and we have never had cause to regret the step we 
took, but, on the contrary, have had abundant reason to 
praise God for it. I have purposely made these remarks, 
as I am fully aware that some believers have different views 
on this subject, and I desire to serve them with the measure 
of light and experience I have obtained. 

After our daughter had been at school for half a year, I 
asked for the account, when it was stated to me by the 
Christian lady in whose establishment she was that she had 
a pleasure in educating her gratuitously. However, as I 
pressed the matter, I obtained the account. It was paid, 
but the exact sum was returned to me anon3 r mousry, which, 
of course, I found out at once to be from the Christian sis- 
ter at whose school my daughter was. From that time I 
could never more obtain the account, though my dear child 
was about six years longer at school. I refer to this point 
for this especial reason : God had laid it on my heart to 
care about poor destitute orphans. To this service I had 
been led to give nryself; he, in return, as a recompense, 
even for this life, took care that my own beloved child 
should have a very good education, free of expense to me. 
I was able and well able to pay for her education, and most 
williug to do so ; but the Lord gave it gratuitously ; thus 
also showing how ready he is abundantly to help me, and 
to supply my wants. 

Having learned that the brethren in German} 7 were led 
away hy false teachers, and having received, in answer to 
prayer, five hundred pounds, for the expenses of his jour- 
ney thither, Mr. M. left Bristol July 19, 1845, and, after 
laboring in word and doctrine in Germany, he returned to 
Bristol Oct. 11, 1845. 



1845. REAPING BOUNTIFULLY. 307 

Perhaps the reader may ask, What has been the result 
of this labor in Germany? My reply is, God only knows 
The d'dy of Christ will declare it. Judging from the con- 
stant labor in pra} r er during eight months before I went 
the second time, and day by day while I was on the Con- 
tinent, and day by day for a long time after my return, I 
am warranted to expect fruit, and I do expect it. I expect 
abundant fruit in the day of Christ's appearing. In the 
mean time my comfort is that two hundred -and twenty 
thousand tracts have been circulated, many of which, 
through the providence of God, found their way not only 
into the darkest places of the continent of Europe, but 
went also to America and Australia. Further : four thousand 
copies of my Narrative, in German, are almost all circu- 
lated. And again, the publishing of my Narrative in 
German led me to do the same in French, which was 
accomplished about three years later. Further : these 
tracts were reprinted at Hamburg and at Cologne, and are 
circulated by other Christians ; in addition to which, my 
having published them in Germany led me to get them 
stereotyped in England, and they continue to be circulated 
in many countries. 

Dec. 31, 1845. There have been received into communion 53 dur- 
ing this year, and 1,055 since the commencement of our coming to 
Bristol. 

During this year the Lord has been pleased to give to me £433, 19s. 
l|d. To this is to be added that my dear child had again during the 
whole of this year her education free at a boarding-school, as stated 
at the close of the last year, whereby I saved about fifty pounds. 
Also, my travelling expenses to and from Germany, and other 
expenses connected with my service in Germany, were paid out of 
the £500 pounds to which reference has been made. Adding these 
two items to £433, I had at least £500. 

April 29, 1846. To-day my beloved wife and myself 
had the inexpressibly great joy of receiving a letter from 
our beloved daughter, while we are staying in the Lord's 



308 THE LIFE OF TRUST. , Chap. XVII 

service at Chippenham, in which she writes that she has 
now found peace in the Lord Jesus. Thus our prayers are 
turned into praises. About eighteen months before this 
I began especially to pray for the conversion of my dear 
child, and the Lord soon after seems to have begun to work 
in her heart. 




CHAPTER XVIII. 

FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 

1846 — 1848- 

1HE SPIRIT OP SUPPLICATION BESTOWED AND PRAYER ANSWERED — THE 
TIME OF MAN'S KFED AND OF GOD'S BOUNTY — FAITH NOT SHAKEN - 
DEALING ONLY WITH GOD — THE NEEDED AMOUNT FURNISHED — PER- 
PETUAL "NEED" — NOT MIAEY IN GOD'S WORK — JOY IN ANSWERED 
PRAYER — FOUR REQUESTS GRANTED — " CONTINUING INSTANT IN 
PR AYER "— THE BUILDING COMMENCED — PERSONAL HISTORY — A MARKED 
DELIVERANCE* 

(3//N the following chapter, Mr. Miiller has grouped 
together, under the appropriate heads, the lead- 
ing events connected with each of the depart- 
ments of the work of the Lord in his hands. 

I. ASSISTANCE TO THE MISSIONARY LABORERS. 

During no former period since undertaking to send aid to 
laborers at home and abroad was I intrusted by the Lord 
with such large sums as during the one to which this chap- 
ter refers. I had never had more need of pecuniary sup- 
plies than during those two 3 T ears, on account of the many 
pressing calls ; but, at the same time, I had the exceeding 
great joy and privilege of being able to respond to them 
in such a way as I had never before been allowed to do. 
These remarks apply to all the various objects of the Insti- 
tution, but especially to the supplies for brethren who labor 
at home and abroad in word and doctrine without being 
connected with any societj' - , or without having any regular 
salary for preaching the word. 

On May 26, 1846, after the accounts had been closed, a 

309 



a 



10 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVIII. 



check for one hundred pounds was given to me, the appli- 
cation of which was left to my disposal. I put half the 
amount to the fund for these objects, and half to the orphan 
fund. When the accounts were closed, there were ninety- 
one pounds four shillings elevenpence three farthings in 
hand for these objects, to which these fifty pounds were 
added ; therefore I began this period with more means 1 han 
I had had in hand at any time previously at the beginning 
of a fresh period ; and as was its beginning, so was the 
continuance. It has often struck me that one especial rea- 
son wiry, on the whoie, I was allowed to have so little trial 
with regard to means for the work during those two j^ears, 
in^eomparison with former times, may have been, that 
thereby the Lord would say that he was willing to give 
what would be needed, when once the new Orphan House 
should be built, though the expenses would be about two 
thousand five hundred pounds a year more than they were 
before. 

June 4, 1846. To-day was given to me, just when Irose 
from my knees, after having asked the Lord for more 
means, especially for missionary purposes, the sum of one 
hundred and fifty pounds, with the request to use of it fifty 
pounds for the orphans, fifty pounds for laborers in Eng- 
land, and fifty pounds for laborers abroad. 

From the commencement of this Institution, on March 
5, 1834, it had been my desire to employ part of the funds, 
with which I might be intrusted, in aiding missionary 
brethren in foreign lands, who are not supported by airy 
regular salary ; and for several years I had likewise had 
the desire to assist brethren, laboring in similar circum- 
stances, in Great Britain and Ireland. The Lord also had 
given me the great privilege to assist such brethren more 
or less during the time that this Institution had been in 
operation ; but especially he began during the two years 
to which this chapter refers to allow me to do so in a far 
greater degree than before. I knew it to be a fact that 



1846. - FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 311 

many brethren who preach the word, without having vaij 
salary for doing so, or property to live upon, were in need. 
Now it might be said that such brethren ought to trust in 
God ; that, if they preach Jesus as the only hope for the 
salvation of sinners, they ought to set them a good ex- 
ample by trusting themselves in God for the supply of their 
temporal necessities, in order that unconverted persons 
thereby might be led to trust in the Lord Jesus alone for 
the salvation of their souls. This is true, quite true. 
Preachers of the precious good news of salvation to every 
sinner who puts his trust in the merits of the Lord Jesus, 
ought indeed themselves to depend upon God, their Lord 
and Father, for the supply of their temporal necessities ; 
but I also felt that I, as their brother, ought to seek to 
help them as far as lay in me. To this I set inyself more 
than ever after the beginning of the year 1846, as I knew, 
that, from particular causes, there was an especial call to 
help such brethren ; and as my own means would go but 
a little way, I gave myself to more earnest prayer than 
ever for such brethren. The result was, that, daring the 
two years of this period, the Lord so answered my daily 
supplications with regard to this particular, that I was 
honored to send nearly three times as much to home and 
foreign laborers as during anj T previous period of the 
same length. One thousand five hundred and fifty-nine 
pounds eleven shillings sixpence were spent in this way, by 
which twentj r -one brethren were assisted who labored in 
foreign lands, and nineteen who labored in Great Britain 
and Ireland. Large as this sum is, in comparison with 
what I had been able to do in this particular in former 
years, yet it is small, very small, in comparison with 
what my heart desired to be able to do for these forty 
brethren. It has frequently, yea almost always, so hap- 
pened, that the assistance which God has allowed me to 
send to such brethren has come to them at a time of great 
need. Sometimes they had no money at all left. Some- 



Q 



1 2 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Ciiap. XVIII. 



times even their last provisions were aimost consumed, 
when I sent them supplies. Some of them are fathers of 
large families, or have sickly wives and children ; some 
were once well off in this world, but for Christ's sake have 
become poor ; and some have had for Christ's sake their 
all taken from them. Is it not an honor to help such 
brethren ? I could fill hundreds of pages by giving ex- 
tracts from the letters of the dear brethren to whom I 
have sent help, and they would be greatly to the edifica- 
tion of the reader ; but I do not feel free to do so. As I 
have not only been laboring for these brethren in praver 
that God would intrust me with means and allow me the 
privilege of helping them, but as I have also asked God to 
direct me especially to send to those who might be in par- 
ticular need, in case I could not help them all ; and as I 
have sought by an encouraging word to strengthen their 
hands in God ; I have great reason to believe that these 
dear brethren have not only been helped by these pecu- 
niary supplies in a temporal point of view, but also that 
the fact of God sending them help in their extremity has 
tended to refresh and strengthen their hearts, and to lead 
them more and more to trust in him. 

March 7, 1847. Often of late had I entreated the Lord 
that he would be pleased to condescend to use me still 
further as a steward, in allowing me to send help to the 
many dear brethren whom I know laboring at home and 
abroad without any salary, the need of many of whom I 
knew. Under these circumstances, I received this morning 
one hundred and fifty pounds with the following lines : — 

Dear Brother : — 

I have great pleasure in sending you one hundred pounds on ac- 
count of laborers in the Lord's vineyard at home and abroad, and fifty 
pounds for other work in your hands. 

Yours very affectionately, 

* • * 



1847. FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 313 

April 5. I have been praying day by clay, ever since I 
was able during the last month to send about one hundred 
and thirty pounds to home and foreign laborers, that the 
Lord would be pleased soon again to give me means for 
them, on account of their great need ; indeed, all our means 
were so exhausted, that I had only just enough for to-mor- 
row evening to meet the weekly expenses connected with 
the six day schools, when this morning I received one hun- 
dred and twenty-five pounds for these objects. Almost 
immediately after this donation had been given to me, I 
received a letter from Demerara about the great need 
among the brethren who labor there, by which intelligence 
the seasonable help just received has become still more 
precious to me. 

May 26, 1848. By the Lord's faithful love I have been 
enabled to meet all the heavy expenses connected with 
these objects during the last two years, amounting to 
nearly two thousand and six hundred pounds, and at the 
same time owe no one anything, and have a balance of 
five pounds nineteen shillings sevenpence halfpenny left in 
hand. 

II. THE SUPPORT OF THE ORPHANS. 

Jan. 20, 1847. For the whole of this period since May 
26, 1846, therefore nearly. eight months, when the accounts 
were closed, we have had always an abundance of means, 
and for the greater part of the time about two hundred 
pounds in hand. The sum of one thousand sixt}^-five 
pounds has come in for the orphans in less than eight 
months, to which is to be added the balance of eighty-five 
pounds four shillings ninepence three farthings in hand 
when the accounts were closed. Invariably I have thus 
been able to give to the matrons of the four Orphan Houses 
the money in advance, which was required for the necessi- 
ties of one week. But now, after having paid away last 
evening forty-five pounds five shillings for the house-keep- 
27 



314 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVITL 

ing of a week in advance and for other expenses, the money 
which remains in hand is needed for rent, and oatmeal, 
which has been ordered from Scotland. This morning 
therefore I gave myself particularly to prayer with regard 
to means for present use for the orphans. How blessed to 
have the living God to go to ! Particularly precious to 
know him in these days of wide-spread distress ! Potatoes 
are too dear for food for the orphans at this time. The 
rice, which we have substituted instead of them, is twice as 
dear as usual ; the oatmeal more than twice as dear, and 
the bread one-half dearer than usual. But the riches of 
God are as great as ever. He knows that our expenses are 
great. He knows that a little will not do in .these days, 
when provisions are so dear, as there are about one hundred 
and fifty persons to be provided for, including teachers and 
apprentices. My soul is at peace. — Evening. About noon 
I received from a pious physician the following note, with 
a check for five pounds : — 

Mr dear Sib : — 

I send you something towards buying bread for the orphans. The 

dearness of food must be felt by many ; but the Lord in judgment is, 

nevertheless, gracious. He will sustain. I am your sincere friend 

and well-wisher, 

* * * * 

March 9. This evening, Tuesday, I find that since last 
Tuesday evening again forty-four pounds one shilling six- 
pence three farthings have come in. How good is the Lord 
in helping me week after week through the heavy expenses, 
especially in this season of deep distress and dearness of 
provisions ! To his praise I can say we have lacked noth- 
ing all this winter. Whilst preparing these extracts from 
my journal for the press, I remember to have heard the fol- 
lowing remarks made with reference to the time about 
which I am just now writing, I mean the season of dearth 
during the winter of 1846-7 : " I wonder how it is now 
with the orohans ? If Mr. Miiller is now able to provide 



1847. FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 315 

for them as he has, we will say nothing." When I heard 
such like remarks I said nothing except this : " We lack 
nothing ; " or, " God helps us." Should this fall into the 
hands of any who have had such thoughts, let them remem- 
ber that it is the very time for faith to work, when sight 
ceases. The greater the difficulties, the easier for faith. 
As long as there remain certain natural prospects, faith 
does not get on even as easily (if I may say so) as when 
all natural prospects fail. It is true that during the time 
of the dearth our expenses were considerably greater than 
usual ; it is also true that many persons, who otherwise 
might have given, were unable to do so, or had their sur- 
plus directed into other channels, such as Ireland, etc. ; but 
the gold and silver are the Lord's. To him we made our 
prayer. In him we put our trust. And he did not forsake 
us. For we went as easily through that winter as through 
any winter since the ivork had been in existence. Nor could 
it be otherwise ; for God had at this very time an especial 
opportunity of showing the blessedness of trusting in him. 
Seek, dear reader, more and more to put your trust in him 
for everything, and you will, even concerning this life, find 
it most precious so to do. 

May 11. This evening I have been able to meet all the 
expenses connected with house-keeping during the coming 
week, through what has come in since May 4, but at the 
same time I have nothing left. Hitherto the children have 
lacked nothing. Never were provisions nearly so dear 
since the commencement of the work as they are now. 
The bread is almost twice as much as eighteen months ago, 
the oatmeal nearly three times as much as formerly, thp 
rice more than double the usual price, and no potatoes can 
be used on account of the exceedingly high price. 

May 30. Lord's-day morning. I have just now received, 
in our great need, when there was not sufficient in hand to 
meet the necessities of to-morrow, six pounds six shillings, 
from a Christian gentleman of title at Zurich in Switzer- 



316 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XVIII, 

land, a distance of about one thousand miles. What a 
most seasonable help ! Thus I am able to send all the remain- 
der of the supplies which are needed till Tuesday evening. 

In these days of straitness the question would naturally 
arise, If, when you have only to care for one hundred and 
thirty orphans, you are so poor, what will you do when 
there are three hundred, for whom you are just on the point 
of building a house ? And, further, Is it not an indication 
not to increase the work, seeing } t ou are now so poor with 
only about one third of the number of orphans which you 
purpose to receive into the new Orphan House ? I am not 
tried, however, with such thoughts ; for I know that, 
1. Only for the trial of my faith, as heretofore, the Lord 
allows me now again to be poor. Never at any time have 
the expenses been so great for the work as from May 26, 
1846, to May 26, 1847 ; but also never has so much come 
in in the same space of time during any other period of 
this work. 2. It is for the profit of the church at large that 
I have now again to pass through these days of poverty. 
3. It is as easy for the Lord to supply me with all the 
means that the work will require when once the new Orphan 
House is opened, as it is for him to give me what I need 
now, though the expenses in all likelihood will then be two 
thousand five hundred pounds a year more than they are at 
present. 

Oct. 19. I left Bristol with my dear wife, partly because 
both of us much needed change of air, and partly because 
I had a great desire to labor in the word for a few weeks 
in Westmoreland and Cumberland. I was not able to 
leave more means than enough for about three days for 
house-keeping expenses. But I could not have stayed in 
Bristol, though there had been nothing at all in hand ; my 
hope was that God would help during my absence. During 
all the time of my stay at Bowness in Westmoreland, from 
Oct. 20 to Nov. 20, there was day by day, with the excep- 
tion of the first three days after my departure, need to wait 



1847. FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 317 

upon God for daily supplies for the orphans. In conse- 
quence of this, every donation, without exception, which was 
received during my absence, came in most seasonably. Partly 
on account of my health, and partly on account of oppor- 
tunities for service in "Westmoreland and elsewhere, I did 
not feel it right to return to Bristol sooner than I did, though 
there was such great poverty ; nor could I have clone any- 
thing in Bristol which I could not do in "Westmoreland, as it 
regards procuring means, since prayer and faith are all the 
means I make use of to obtain supplies when we are in 
need. 

Dec. 23.^ The need of to-day was eleven pounds. This 
sum the Lord gave me thus : Last evening I received one 
pound, together with a pair of trousers and gaiters, and a 
remnant of fustian for the orphans. But as I knew how 
much there would be needed to-day, I waited further upon 
the Lord this morning for help, and, in one minute after I 
had risen from my knees, I received a letter from Liverpool 
with ten pounds for the orphans. The donor writes : "I 
have had the enclosed ten-pound note in my drawer for some 
time, intending to send it to you for the orphans ; but my 
time is so occupied that at a suitable time when at my desk 
I have overlooked it. I now, however, inclose it," etc. 
How seasonable this help ! How exactly to the very shilling 
what is needed to-clay ! How remarkable that just now this 
donor in Liverpool is led to send the ten pounds which had 
been, according to his own words, for some time in his 
drawer for the purpose of sending it ! All this abundantly 
proves the most minute and particular providence of God, 
and his readiness to answer the supplications of his children. 

Dec. 31, 1847. The last day of another year had now 
come. Great and many had been the mercies of God to 
me this year in every way 9 particularly also in connection 
with the orphans ; but now I had again nothing for to-day, 
except two shillings which are in one of the boxes in my 
house. I was, however, by God's grace, able to look out 
27* 



318 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVIII. 

for supplies for this last day of another year also, being 
fully assured that the Lord would not confound me. And 
thus it has been, according to my expectation ; for, before 
I was called on for money, I received one hundred pounds, 
which were left to me to apply to any part of the Lord's 
service where there seemed the most need. 

Feb. 2, 1848. This morning on my walk before break 
fast, I felt myself led out of my usual track into a direction 
in which I had not gone for some months. In stepping 
over a stile I said to myself: " Perhaps God has a reason 
even in this." About five minutes afterwards I met a 
Christian gentleman who gave me two sovereigns for the 
orphans, and then I knew the reason why I had been led 
this way. 

Feb. 3. The readter might say, " You are continually in 
need. No sooner is the one demand met, than another comes. 
Do you not find it a trying life, and are you not tired of 
it ? " My reply is, it is true I am more or less continually 
in need in connection with this work. And if I were to tell 
out all my heart to the reader concerning it, he would have 
still more reason to say that I am continually in need. 
For what I have here written is almost exclusively about 
the way in which God has been pleased to supply me with 
money for carrying on the work ; but I do deliberately 
state that this, much as it might appear to one or the other, 
is by no means the chief thing that I stand in need of from 
day to day. I will just hint at a few other things. Sick- 
ness among the children, very difficult and tedious cases, in 
which, notwithstanding all the means which are used, month 
after month, yea, year after year, the children remain ill. 
Nothing remains but either to keep them, or to send them 
to the Parish Union, to which they belong, as they have no 
relatives able to provide for them. The very fact of hav- 
ing cared for them and watched over them for years only 
endears them the more to us, and would make it the more 
trying to send them back to their osrish. This is a 



1848. FAITH CONFIRMED BT PROSPERITY. 319 

" need " which brings me to God. Here is prayer required, 
not only for means which such sick children call for, but for 
guidance and wisdom from on high. 

Sometimes children are to be placed out as servants or 
apprentices. A suitable place is needed, or else they had 
better remain under our care. The obtaining of this suit- 
able place is a " need" indeed. It is more difficult to be 
obtained than money. Sometimes for many weeks have I 
had to wait upon God to have this " need " supplied ; but 
he has always at last helped. Sometimes great has been 
my " need" of wisdom and guidance in order to know how 
certain children ought to be treated under particular circum 
stances ; and especially how to behave towards certain 
apprentices or servants who were formerly in the Orphan 
Houses. A "need" in this respect is no small thing; 
though I have found that in this and in all other matters, 
concerning which I was in " need," I have been helped, 
provided I was indeed able to wait patiently upon God. 
That word, " Godliness is profitable unto all things, having 
promise of the life that now is and of that which is to 
come " (1 Tim. iv. 8), I have in times almost without num- 
ber found to be true in my own experience. 

Further, when one or the other of the laborers needed to 
leave the work on account of health, or for other reasons, 
I have been at such times in far greater " need " than when 
I required money for the various objects of the Institution. 
I could only have such " need " supplied by waiting upon 
God. I could do nothing but speak to my heavenly Father 
about this matter, and he has alwaj^s helped. One of the 
greatest difficulties connected with this work is to obtain 
suitable godly persons for it ; so many things are to be 
taken into the account. Suitable age, health, gift, experi- 
ence, love for children, true godliness, a ready mind to 
serve God in the work and not themselves, a ready mind to 
bear with the many trials and difficulties connected with it, 
a manifest purpose to labor, not -for the sake of the remn- 



320 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVIII. 

neration, but to serve God in their work ; surely, to obtain 
godly persons, in whom these qualifications even in some 
measure are found combined, is not an easy matter. Not 
that any one will suppose me to mean that I am looking 
out for perfect fellow-laborers. Not that any one will sup- 
pose that my fellow-laborers are referred to by me as if they 
were without weaknesses, deficiencies, and failings. I am 
myself far, very far from being without weaknesses, defi- 
ciencies, and failings. Moreover, I never expect to find 
fellow-laborers for this work who have not their weaknesses ; 
but this I do mean to say, that the work of God in my hands 
is of that character, and, by God's grace, is really carried 
on with such a true purpose to serve God thereby (however 
much I and my fellow-laborers may fail) , that it is with me 
a matter of deep moment to find truly suitable individuals 
for it, in whom, as much as possible, the above qualifica- 
tions should be found united. And, however much there 
may be wanting, this is more and more my aim, that I may 
obtain such helpers ; and hence it can be easily perceived 
how great my " need " must be again and again on this 
very account. I do here especially advise that if any 
should apply in future for situations in connection with this 
work, they would keep these remarks before them ; for, by 
God's grace, it is my purpose never to give to any persons 
a situation in connection with the Institution, if they are 
not suitable for it according to the light which God gives 
me. 

Further, that the laborers work happily together among 
themselves, and that I go on happily in service with them ; 
that I be their servant, on the one hand, and yet, on the 
other, maintain the place which God has given me in this 
work ; surely, if any one carefully looks at this, he will at 
once see that there is a difficulty and a " need" far greater 
than any that is connected with money. Oh, how these 
matters lead one to call upon God ! How they continually 
make one sensible of one's " need ! " Truly, I am in need, 



1848. FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 323 

in continual need. I might refer to many more points, ir 
connection with this work, in which I am more or less con 
tinually in " need ; " but I will only mention one. It i& 
now many years since I have made my boast in the living 
God in so public a manner by my publications. On this 
account Satan unquestionably is waiting for my halting, 
and if I were left to myself I should fall a prey to him. 
Pride, unbelief, or other sins would be my ruin, and lead 
me to bring a most awful disgrace upon the name of Jesus. 
Here is then a u need," a great " need." I do feel myself 
in " need," in great " need," even to be upheld by God ; for 
I cannot stand for a moment if left to myself. Oh that 
none of my dear readers might admire me, and be aston - 
ished at my faith, and think of me as if I were beyond 
unbelief! Oh that none of my dear readers might think 
that I could not be puffed up by pride, or in other respects 
most awfully dishonor God, and thus at last- though God 
has used me in blessing hitherto to so many, become a bea- 
con to the church of Christ ! No, I am as weak as ever. I 
need as much as ever to be upheld as to faith and every other 
grace. I am therefore in " need," in great " need ; " and 
therefore help me, dear Christian reader, with your praj^ers. 
I allow, then, most fully that I am in continual " need." 
This is the case with regard to money matters, because the 
work is now so large. A few hundred pounds go but a lit- 
tle way. There have often been weeks when my demands 
have been several hundred pounds a week, and it can there- 
fore easily be supposed that, even if large donations come 
in, they do not last long. But whilst I allow this, I desire 
that the Christian reader may keep in mind that there are 
other necessities, and even greater ones than those con- 
nected with money. Should, however, the reader say that 
he thinks " I must find this a very trying life, and that 1 
must be tired of it" I beg to state that he is entirely mis- 
taken. I do not find the life in connection with this work 
a trying life, but a very happy one. It is impossible to de- 



322 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVHI 

scribe the abundance of peace and heavenly joy that often 
has flowed into my soul by means of the fresh answers 
which I have obtained from God, after waiting upon him 
for help and blessing ; and the longer I have had to wait 
upon him, or the greater my need was, the greater the en- 
joyment when at last the answer came, which has often 
Deen in a very remarkable way, in order to make the hand 
of God the more manifest. I do therefore solemnly de- 
clare that I do not find this life a trying life, but a very 
happy one, and I am consequently not in the least tired of 
it. Straits and difficulties I expected from the very be- 
ginning. Before I began this service I expected them ; 
nay, the chief object of it was, that the church at large 
might be strengthened in faith, and be led more simply, 
habitually, and unreservedly to trust in the living God, by 
seeing his hand stretched out in my behalf in the hour of 
need. I did, therefore, expect trials, great trials and 
straits ; but cheerfully, for the glory of God, and the profit 
of God's dear children, did I desire to pass through them, 
if only the saints might be benefited by the dealings of God 
with me. The longer I go on in this service, the greater 
the trials of one kind or another become ; but at the same 
time the happier I am in this my service, and the more I am 
assured that I am engaged as the Lord would have me to 
be. How then could I be tired of carrying on the work of 
God on such principles as I do ? 



III. THE NEW ORPHAN HOVSE ON ASHLEY DOWN. 

Up to May 26, 1846, £2,710, 3s. 5^-d. had been received 
toward building the new Orphan House. 

July 4, 1846. For about three months my faith and 
patience have been exceedingly tried about the field 
which I have purchased for the building of the Orphan 
House, as the greatest difficulties arose about my possess- 
ing the land after all ; but, by God's grace, my heart was 



1846. FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 3^3 

kept in peace, being fully assured that if the Lord were to 
take this piece of land from me it would be only for the 
purpose f giving me a still better one; for our heavenly 
Father never takes any earthly thing from his children ex- 
cept he means to give them something better instead. But in 
the midst of all this great trial of faith I could not but 
think, judging from the way in which God so manifestly 
had given me this piece of land, that the difficulties were 
only allowed for the trial of my faith and patience. And 
thus it was. Last evening I received a letter by which all 
the difficulties were removed, and now, with the blessing 
of God, in "a few days the conveyance will be made out. 

July 6. The reason why, for several months, there had 
come in so little for the building fund, appeared to me this, 
that we did not need the money at present ; and that 
when it was needed, and when my faith and patience had 
been sufficiently tried, the Lord would send more means. 
And thus it has proved ; for to-day was given me the sum 
of two thousand and fifty pounds, of which two thousand 
pounds are for the building fund, and fifty pounds for pres- 
ent necessities. 

It is impossible to describe my joy in God when I re- 
ceived this donation. I was neither excited nor surprised ; 
for I look out for answers to my prayers. / believe that 
God hears me. Yet my heart was so full of joj' that I 
could only sit before God, and admire him, like David in 
2 Sam. vii. At last I cast niyself fiat down upon nry face, 
and burst forth in thanksgiving to God, and in surrender- 
ing my heart afresh to him for his blessed service. 

July 21. This morning a gentleman from Devonshire, on 
his way to London, called on me. When he came I was 
just in prayer, having, among other matters, brought also 
before the Lord the following points : 1 . I had been asking 
him for some supplies for my own temporal necessities, 
being in need. 2. I had asked him for more means for the 
building fund, and besought him to hasten the matter, on 



324 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVIII. 

account of the inhabitants in "Wilson Street, on account of 
the welfare of the children and those who have the over- 
sight of them in the Orphan Houses, and lastly that I might 
be able to admit more orphans, the number of applications 
being so great. 3. I had also asked the Lord for means 
for present use for the orphans, as the outgoings are so 
great. 4. I had asked for means for the other objects. 
When I saw this gentleman from Devonshire, he gave me 
twenty pounds, of which ten pounds are to be used for the 
building fund, five pounds for present use of the orphans, 
two pounds for brother Craik and myself, and the remain- 
ing three pounds were left to my disposal, which I applied 
to the other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. 
Thus I received, at the very moment that I had been asking 
God, four answers to my prayers. 

Nov. 19. I am now led more and more to importune 
the Lord to send me the means which are requisite in 
order that I may be able to commence the building. Be- 
cause, 1. It has been for some time past publicly stated in 
print that I consider it is not without ground that some 
of the inhabitants of Wilson Street consider themselves 
inconvenienced by the Orphan Houses being in that street, 
and I long therefore to be able to remove the orphans from 
thence as soon as possible. 2. I become more and more 
convinced that it would be greatly for the benefit of the 
children, both physically and morally, with God's blessing, 
to be in such a position as they are intended to occupy, 
when the new Orphan House is built. And, 3. Because 
the number of very poor and destitute orphans, that are 
waiting for admission, is so great, and there are constantly 
fresh applications made. Now whilst, by God's grace, I 
would not wish the building to be begun one single day 
sooner than it is his will ; and whilst I firmly believe that 
he will give me, in his own time, every shilling which I 
need ; yet I also know that he delights in being earnestly 
entreated, and that he takes pleasure in the continuance in 



1846. FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 325 

prayer, and in the importuning him, which so clearly is to 
be seen from the parable of the widow and the unjust judge. 
Luke xviii. 1-8. For these reasons I gave myself again 
particularly to prayer last evening that the Lord would 
send further means, being also especially led to do so in 
addition to the above reasons, becanse there had come in 
but little comparatively since the 29th of last month. This 
morning between five and six o'clock I praj^ed again, among 
other points, about the building fund, and then had a long- 
season for the reading of the word of God. In the course 
of my reading I came to Markxi. 24 : " What things soever 
ye desire^ when ye pray, believe that ye receive them, and 
ye shall have them." The importance of the truth contained 
in this portion I have often felt and spoken about ; but this 
morning I felt it again most particularly, and, applying it 
to the new Orphan House, said to the Lord : " Lord, I be- 
lieve that thou wilt give me all I need for this work. I rjn 
sure that 1 shall have all, because I believe that I receive 
in answer to my prayer." Thus, with the heart full of pe&tc 
concerning this work, I went on to the other part of l*ie 
chapter, and to the next chapter. After family prayer I 
had again my usual season for prayer with regard to all the 
many parts of the work, and the various necessities thereof, 
asking also blessings upon my fellow-laborers, upon the 
circulation of Bibles and tracts, and upon the precious 
souls in the adult school, the Sunday schools, the six day 
schools, and the four Orphan Houses. Amidst all the 
many things I again made my requests about means for the 
building. And now observe : About five minutes after I 
had risen from my knees, there was given to me a registered 
letter, containing a check for three hundred pounds, of 
which two hundred and eighty pounds are for the building 
fund, ten pounds for my own personal expenses, and ,-.en 
pounds for brother Craik. The Lord's holy name be prated 
for this precious encouragement, by which the building firnrt 
is now increased to more than six thousand pounds. 
28 



326 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVIIT 

Dec. 9, It is now four hundred days since day after day 
I have been waiting upon God for help with regard to the 
building of the Orphan House ; but as yet he keeps me still 
in the trial of faith and patience. Pie is still saying, as it 
were, " Mine hour is not jet come." Yet he does sustain 
me in continuing to wait upon him. By his grace my faith 
is not in the least shaken ; but I am quite sure that he, in 
his own time, will give me everything which I need con- 
cerning this work. Hoiv I shall be supplied with the means 
which are yet requisite, and when, I know not ; but I am 
sure that God will help me in his own time and way. In 
the mean time I have abundant reason to praise God that 
I am not waiting on him in vain ; for since this day twelve- 
month he has given me, in answer to prayer, a most suitable 
piece of ground, and six thousand three hundred and four 
pounds for the building fund, and about two thousand seven 
hundred pounds for present use for the work, so that alto- 
gether I have received, since this da} T twelvemonth, solely 
in answer to prayer, the sum of nine thousand pounds. 
Surely, I am not waiting upon the Lord in vain ! By his 
help, then, I am resolved to continue this course unto the 
end. 

Dec. 22. To-day I have again a precious proof that 
continuing to wait upon the Lord is not in vain. During 
this month comparatively little had come in for the building 
fund ; yet, by God's grace, I had been enabled, as before, 
yea, even with more earnestness perhaps than before, to 
make known my requests unto God, being more and more 
convinced that I ought to seek by earnest prayer soon to 
be able to begin the building. In addition to this I had 
also especial besought the Lord to give me means for 
missionary brethren, and also for brethren who labor in the 
word in various parts of England and Ireland, as all my 
means for them were now gone. I had also been waiting 
upon God for means to order a fresh stock of tracts. I had 
lastly again and again besought the Lord to give me means 



1847. FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 327 

for the poor saints in Bristol, of whom there are many, and 
whose need is now particularly great. Now to-day the 
Lord has granted me precious answers to my requests con- 
cerning these various objects, for I received this morning 
one thousand pounds, with these words : " I send you some 
money, part of which you can apply to the orphans and the 
other objects of your Institution, according to their need, 
and the rest you can put to the building fund. At the 
present price of provisions your expenses must be large for 
the orphans. Please also take twenty-five pounds for your 
own need." 

Jan. 25,^.847. The season is now approaching when 
building may be begun. Therefore with increased earnest- 
ness I have given myself unto prayer, importuning the 
Lord that he would be pleased to appear on our behalf, and 
speedily send the remainder of the amount which is re- 
quired, and I have increasingly, of late, felt that the time 
is drawing near when the Lord will give me all that which 
is requisite for commencing the building. All the various 
arguments which I have often brought before God I brought 
also again this morning before him. It is now fourteen 
months and three weeks since day by da} r I have uttered 
my petitions to God on behalf of this work. I rose from 
my knees this morning in full confidence not only that Gocl 
could, but also would, send the means, and that soon. 
Never, during all these fourteen months and three weeks, 
have I had the least doubt that I should have all that which 
is requisite. And now, dear believing reader, rejoice and 
praise with me. About an hour after I had prayed thus, 
there was given to me the sum of two thousand pounds for 
the building fund. Thus I have received altogether £9,285, 
3s. 9jd. towards this work. I cannot describe the joy I 
had in God when I received this donation. It must be 
known from experience in order to be felt. Four hundred 
and forty seven days I have had to wait upon God before 
the sum reached the above amount. How great is the 



Q 



28 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVIII. 



blessing which the soul obtains by trusting in God, and by 
watting patiently ! Is it not manifest how precious it is to 
cany on God's work in this way, even with regard to the 
obtaining of means ? From Dec. 10, 1845, to Jan. 25, 1847. 
being thirteen months and a half, I have received, solely in 
answer to prayer, nine thousand two hundred and eighty- 
five pounds. Add to this what came in during that time 
for present use for the various objects of the Institution. 
and the total is about twelve thousand and five hundred 
pounds, entirely the fruit of pra3 r er to God. Can it be 
said, therefore, with good ground, that this way of carrying 
on the work of God may do very well in a limited and 
small way, but it would not do on a large scale ? The fact 
brought out here contradicts such statements. 

June 23. This day the Lord in his great goodness, by a 
donation of one thousand pounds for the building fund, hag 
again encouraged my heart abundantly to trust in him for 
all that which I shall yet need to meet the remainder of the 
expenses connected with the fitting up and furnishing the 
new Orphan House, etc. 

April 29, 1848. The total amount which I have received 
for the building fund is £11,062, 4s. lljd. This sum enables 
me to meet all the expenses connected with the purchase 
of a piece of land and with the erection of the house. I 
stated before that I did not mean to commence the building 
until I had all the means requisite for it ; and this intention 
was carried out. It was not until I had a sufficient amount 
of means to meet all the sums required for the various con- 
tractors that a single thing was done ; but when I once had 
as much as was required for them, I did net consider it right 
to delay any longer, though I saw then clearly, and have 
since seen still more clearly, that I should need yet a con- 
siderable sum to complete the work. For whilst in every 
respect the building will be most plain and inexpensive, yet, 
it being intended to be the abode of three hundred oiphans, 
with all their, teachers and overseers, it necessarily must be 



1848. FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 329 

a very large building, and was therefore found to be even 
somewhat more expensive than I had thought, as the whole 
(including fittings and furniture) cannot be accomplished 
for less than fourteen thousand five hundred pounds, towards 
which the Lord has already given me, as stated, eleven thou- 
sand and sixty-two pounds four shillings elevenpence half- 
penny. The sum still needed is required for all the ordinary 
fittings, the heating apparatus, the gas fittings, the furnish- 
ing the whole house, making three large play-grounds, and 
a small road, and for some additional work which could not 
be brought into the contracts. I did not think it needful to 
delay commencing the building, though several thousand 
pounds more would be required, as all these expenses needed 
not to be met till many months after the beginning of the 
building. 

The work of the building commenced on July 5, 1847. 
Six hundred and seven days I sought the help of God day 
by da} r , before we came so far as to be able to commence 
the building ; yet at last he gave me the desire of mv heart. 

IF. MISCELLANEOUS POINTS RESPECTING THE SCRIPTURAL 
KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION FOR HOME AND ABROAD. 

1. During the whole of this period six day schools, with 330 chil- 
dren, were supported by the funds of the Institution ; two Sunday 
schools were entirely supported by it, and a third one was occasionally 
assisted. Again, four from among the Sunday-school children were, 
during these two years, received into church fellowship. The total 
number of the children who received instruction in the day schools 
of the Institution, from its commencement up to May 26, 1848, 
amounted to 4,519. The number of the adult scholars who were in- 
structed during this period in the adult sjchool, which was supported 
by the funds of the Institution, amounted to 292 ; and the total num- 
ber of adults who had instruction from March 5, 1844, to May 26, 1848, 
was 1,438. The total of the expenses connected with all these schools, 
during these two years, amounted to £886, Is. ll^d. 

2. During this period were circulated 649 Bibles and 232 New Tes- 
taments. There were circulated from March 5, 1834, up to May 26, 

28* 



330 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVIII 

1848, 5,746 Bibles and 3,760 New Testaments. During this period, 
£74, 9s. lOd. were expended of the Funds of the Institution on this 
object. 

3. From May 26, 1846, to May 26, 1848, were expended of the funds 
of the Institution on missionary objects, £1,559, lis. 6d., whereby 43 
laborers in the gospel, at home and abroad, were assisted. 

4. During this period 64,021 tracts were circulated, and the sum of 
£63, Is. 5d. was expended on this object of the funds of the Institu- 
tion. The total number of tracts circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to 
May 26, 1848, amounted to 163,668. 

5. There were received into the four Orphan Houses from May 26, 
1846, to May 26, 1848, 51 orphans, who, together with those who were 
in the four houses on May 26, 1846, made up 172 in all. 

On May 26, 1848, there were 122 orphans in the four houses. The 
number of the orphans under our care from April, 1836, to May 26, 
1848, was 264. The total amount of expenditure in connection with 
the support of the orphans from May 26, 1846, to May 26, 1848, was 
£3,225, 5s. lid. 

I notice, in connection with the Orphan Houses, that without any 
one having been pirsonaTly applied to for anything by me, the sum 
of £24,771, 19s. 8qd. was given to me as the result of prayer to God, 
from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 1848. This sum 
includes the £11,062, 4s. Hid., which, up to May 26, 1848, had been 
given towards the building fund. It may be interesting to the reader 
to know that the total amount which was given as free contributions 
for the other objects, from the commencement of the work up to May 
26, 1848, was £7,060, 14s. l|d. ; and that which came in by the sale 
of Bibles and tracts, and by the payment of the children in the day 
schools, amounted to £2,373, 3s. 7£d 

V. PERSONAL HISTORY. 

Dec. 31, 1846. During this year there have been received into fel- 
lowship 66. The Lord has been pleased to give me during this year 
£399, 2s. lid. To this is again to be added, what I have enlarged on 
in a former chapter, that during the whole of this year also my daugh- 
ter was, free of all expenses, at a boarding-school, worth about fifty 
pounds. 

In November, 1847, 1 had a most remarkable deliverance, 
which, to the praise of the Lord, is here recorded, as it is a 
further illustration of how the Lord watches over his children. 



1848. FAITH CONFIRMED BY PROSPERITY. 33\ 

I was laboring for a little while at Bowness and Keswick 
; n the ministry of the word, in October and November. 
When at Keswick, I sta} T ed with my dear wife in a large 
boarding-house, in which, however, we were then alone, ex- 
cept a single gentleman. Just before we left Keswick, on 
the morning of Nov. 24, I heard that the gentleman, lodg- 
mg in the same house, had shot himself during the night, 
out was not quite dead. We had not heard the report of 
the pistol, it being a very stormy night and the house large. 
Two days after, I received from a Christian brother at Kes- 
wick the following information respecting the transaction : 

Keswick, Nov. 25, 1847. 
Deae Me. Mulleb : — 

The tender and Almighty care of our loving Father was never more 
over you, and indeed over all of us, than in your stay at Mrs. 
's. Mr. was quite deranged for two or three days be- 
fore you left. Without any control, he had been walking about his 
room for the last two days and nights, with loaded pistols in his hands. 
Furthermore, he had taken into his head that you were going to kill 
him. How gracious of God that he spread his wings over you and 
over dear Mrs. Muller, so that Satan could not break through the 
fence, to hurt even a hair of your heads ! Speaking after the manner 
of men, there was nothing to have hindered him coming into the 
room, where we were all at tea, 1 and firing- amongst us ; but the Lord 
was our refuge and fortress, and preserved us from danger, which we 
knew not of. lie shot himself in the neck and breast, but is not 
dead. He has a strait-waistcoat on. I assisted in cutting his clothes 
off, and in other little offices needed at such a time, and told him of 
Christ's love in dying for poor sinners. " I know it," he said. He 
shot himself the first time about three o'clock in the morning, and 
again about seven. What a scene his room presented : pistols ly- 
ing in gore; bloody knives, lancets, and razors strewed about the 
floor, etc. 

I add an extract from a second letter, written by the 
same Christian brother, because it shows still further how 

1 The evening before my departure I Lad invited a number of believers to tea, 
to spend some time together in prayer, reading the Holy Scriptures, and in inter- 
course on spiritual subjects. 



332 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XVIII. 

very merciful the Lord was to us at that time, in protecting 
us. 

Mr. is still alive, and has heen removed by his friends into 

Yorkshire. It appears, insanity is in his family, his father being at 
this time in an asylum. It is evident that he had the pistols in his 
pockets, but of this no one knew until after the occurrence took place. 
I do not know what time of night you went to bed, but I judge it was 

about ten. If so, it was at ten o'clock Mr. came down from 

his bedroom, after having been there six hours. It was a mercy 
you did not meet him, as it is plain that he had loaded pistols on his 
person. 

Dec. 31, 1847. There have been received into fellowship, during 
this year, 39 ; and altogether, since Mr. Craik and I began laboring 
in Bristol, 1,157, besides the 68 whom we found in fellowship. Dur- 
ing this year the Lord has been pleased to give me £412, 18s. 8^d. 
To this is again to be added the free education of my dear daughter 
at a boarding-school, worth to us at least fifty pounds. 

In April, 1848, I was enabled, by the help of the Lord, to complete 
all the arrangements for the publication of the Narrative of the Lord's 
dealings with me, in the French language ; and about September of 
the same year, the book appeared, under the following title : " Expose 1 
de quelques-unes des dispensations de Dieu envers Georges Muller. 
Paris, librairie Protestante, Rue Tronchet, 2." 




CHAPTEE XIX. 

CONTINUED MERCIES. 

1848—1850. 

HUMBLE BEGINNINGS — DEVISING LIBERAL THINGS — THE ORFHANS PROVIDED 
FOR — A MEMORABLE DAT — MONEY "AT INTEREST " — MEANS FROM AN 
UNEXPECTED SOURCE — THE PROGRESS OF THE NEW ORPHAN HOUSE — 
MEANS PROVIDED FOR ITS COMPLETION — INEXPRESSIBLE DELIGHT IN 
GOD — REVIEW OF THE TWO YEARS PAST. 

N the 26th of May, 1848, I had on hand for the 
Bible, tract, missionary, and school funds of the 
Scriptural Knowledge Institution, five pounds 
nineteen shillings sevenpence one farthing ; a sum 
so small, that, without the help of God, I could not have 
gone ou even for a few days ; for during this period our 
average expenditure for one single day, merely for this part 
of the work, was as much as the whole balance left in hand. 
Now see how God carried me through, in meeting the ex- 
penditure of the thousands of pounds which were laid out 
for these objects, irrespective of the orphan work, from 
May 26, 1848, to May 26, 1850. 

On the very next day, after the accounts were closed, 
May 27, 1848, I received from. "Westmoreland five pounds, 
being the first donation during this period towards this part 
of the work, of which sum one half was intended by the 
donor for the current expenses of the orphans, and the 
other half for these objects. On the following day, May 
28, were anon3*mously put into the chapel boxes for missions 
one shilling sixpence, and twopence. Now it happened so 
that all the expenses, connected with these objects, during 
the first two days amounted only to about three pounds, 
which I was able to meet by what had come in and the bal- 

333 



334 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIX. 

ance left in hand ; and on May 29 I received one hundred 
pounds. As the application of this sum was left to me, I 
took one-half of it for the orphans, and the other half for 
these objects. Thus I was supplied with means to meet 
the expenses which came on me the following dav. May 30, 
when I had to pay the weekly salaries of the teachers in 
the day schools. 

June 9. Great has been my desire, and many have be«n 
my prayers to God, that he would be pleased to conde 
scend to use me still further, in allowing me the privilege 
of helping brethren who labor in the word and doctrine at 
home and abroad, without any salary, as I have been able 
to do but very little for them comparatively during the last 
four months. Now at last, in answer to my prayers, I 
have received this morning one hundred and sixty pounds 
for home and foreign laborers. The Lord may see it need- 
ful, for the trial of our faith, to seem for a season not to 
regard our supplications ; } T et, if we patiently and believ- 
ingly continue to wait upon him, it will be manifest, in 
his own time and way, that we did not call upon him in 
vain. 

Nov. 9. Only a few shillings were left in my hands o:\ 
Tuesday evening, the 7th instant, towards the weekly sala- 
ries of the teachers, for the coming week. Also, almost 
all the tracts are again gone, and it is nearly four weeks 
since I paid out the last money I had in hand for mission- 
ary objects. As to this latter point, my heart had been 
especially longing to be able to send again help to home 
and foreign laborers, knowing how very great the need of 
many is. Thus I was situated with regard to means, when 
I received to-day one thousand pounds. 

Since March 5, 1834, I have received above forty-four 
thousand pounds altogether [up to May 26, 1850, only] ; 
and so has the Lord enlarged the work and helped me that 
during the last three years I have had the privilege of pay- 
ing away in his service, in connection with this work, about 



1850. CONTINUED MERCIES. 335 

twenty-five thousand pounds ; nor have I had during this 
period, in any one instance, to meet a payment without 
being previously provided by the Lord with means for it. 
If it pleased the Lord to condescend to use me further in 
this wa}^, he could so order it that even a still larger field 
of labor were intrusted to me, which would require still 
greater sums. Truly, it must be manifest to all simple- 
hearted children of God, who will carefully read the ac- 
counts respecting this Institution, that he is most willing 
to attend to the supplications of his children, who in their 
need cry to him ; and to make this manifest is the great 
object I ainuat, through the means of this Institution. 

Jan. 2, 1850. The new year commences, even as to this 
part of the work, with new mercies. There were given to 
me one hundred and sixty pounds, to be used as might be 
most needed. 

Jan. 30. During this month I had been especially led to 
send much assistance to home and foreign laborers. Also 
in other respects the expenses for these objects had been 
considerable. On this account the funds for them had been 
reduced to about eighty pounds when I received this even- 
ing four hundred and fifty pounds, of which the donor 
kindly wished me to take fifty pounds for my own personal 
expenses, to give to brother Craik fifty pounds, and to use 
the other as might be most needed. 

When the accounts were closed, on May 26, 1848, I had 
on hand for the orphans a balance of one pound ten shillings 
three and three-fourths pence. With this amount then we 
began, whilst day by day above one hundred and thirty 
persons were to be provided for in the four Orphan Houses 
in Wilson Street. 

On the very next day, after the accounts were closed, 
May 27, 1848, 1 received from Westmoreland five pounds, 
half of which sum was intended by the donor for the orphans, 
and half for the other objects. This donation I took as an 
earnest out of the hands of the living God, that during the 



336 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIX. 

whole of this period also he would provide for these many 
orphans, as he had done in former years. 

Nov. 9. Up to date the wants of the orphans have been 
supplied as heretofore. Yesterday only five shillings six- 
pence came in. To-morrow more money will be needed for 
house-keeping. In this our poverty I received this morning 
one thousand pounds. The money being left to my disposal 
as it might be most needed, I took of it six hundred pounds 
for the building fund, three hundred pounds for mis- 
sionary purposes and the circulation of Bibles and 
tracts, and one hundred pounds for present use for the 
orphans. I have thus the means which are yet needed for 
this week's house-keeping expenses, besides being able to 
meet other heavy expenses which are before me next week. 
Feb. 20, 1849. For three months and ten da} r s, since 
Nov. 9, 1848, the donations had always come in so that we 
abounded during the whole period, there having been always 
fresh donations received before all the money in hand was 
disbursed. The total amount that came in during this 
period was four hundred and sixty-nine pounds fourteen 
shillings tenpence. Now to-day there was no money in 
hand for advancing the amount needed for the next week's 
house-keeping. All the money in hand was due for rent, 
and therefore unavailable, as I never go into debt for any- 
thing. In this our need there was given to me this after- 
noon the sum of two hundred pounds, which was left to my 
disposal for fitting up the new Orphan House, or for any of 
the objects in connection with the Scriptural Knowledge 
Institution that might be in need. As, however, I have all 
the means for fitting up and furnishing the new Orphan 
House, as far as I know, and as there is no money in hand 
for the present use of the orphans, I took one hundred 
pounds for that object. 

March 9. The new Orphan House is now nearly ready. 
On this account we have to get in large supplies for the 
children's clothes. Within the last few days I have ordered 



1849. CONTINUED MERCIES. 339 

thousands of yards of material for this purpose, and thou- 
sands more will need to be ordered, besides providing a 
stock of many other things. For this large sums are needed. 
Under these circumstances I received to-day a donation of 
three hundred pounds, to be used for the building fund, or 
the current expenses of the various objects, just as it might 
be most required. As I judge that we have all that is 
needed for the fitting up and furnishing of the house, and as 
there is more in hand than usual for the missionary objects, 
the circulation of Bibles and tracts, and for the various 
schools, and^as we have only about sixty pounds for pres- 
ent use for the orphans, towards meeting all the heavy ex- 
penses before us, I took the whole of this donation for the 
orphans, as the donor has kindly left the disposal of the 
money entirely to me. This donation coming in just now 
has been an exceedingly great refreshment to my spirit ; for 
it is at the commencement of the great increase of our ex- 
penses, in connection with the three hundred orphans, in- 
stead of one hundred and twenty, like an earnest from God 
that he will supply us also with means when the demands 
for the three hundred will be more than twice as great as they 
are now. Through this donation I have means to meet all the 
expense which will be incurred in getting in for the new 
establishment the stores of provisions, soap, material foi 
clothes, haberdashery, and of the many other articles of 
which it would be desirable to buy our supplies on whole- 
sale terms. The Lord be praised for his kindness ! 

June 18. To-day, as the fruit of the prayers of three 
years and seven months, the children began to be moved 
from the four Orphan Houses in Wilson Street, Bristol, into 
the new Orphan House. 

June 23. Saturday Evening. This has been indeed a 
week of great and many and peculiar mercies. All the 
orphans with their teachers and overseers have been moved 
into the new Orphan House during Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Thursday ; so that there are now about 



34C THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIX, 

one hundred and forty persons under one roof. The Lord 
has most signally helped. As I had for more than three 
years sought the help of God concerning all matters con- 
nected with the new Orphan House. I did expect his help in 
this particular also ; but he has done beyond my expecta- 
tions. Though only the day before yesterday the last chil- 
dren were moved in, there is already such a measure of or- 
der established in the house, by the help of God, as that 
things can be done by the minute hands of the timepieces. 
His name is to be praised for this, and my soul does mag- 
nify him for his goodness ! Also with regard to temporal 
supplies for the dear orphans, the Lord has been exceedingly 
kind. On the second day of receiving the children, there 
were sent twenty pounds. On the third day, an individual 
who walked with me through part of the house said, u These 
children must consume a great deal of provisions," and, 
whilst saying it, todk out of his pocket a roll of Bank of 
England notes to the amount of one hundred pounds, and 
gave them to me for the orphans. On the very same even- 
ing I had also sent for the orphans a very large cask of 
treacle, and for their teachers and overseers six loaves of 
sugar. Also a cooper made gratuitously two large new 
casks for treacle. On the next day I received information 
that about one thousand pounds of rice had been purchased 
for the orphans, which should be sent. Besides this, several 
small donations have come in. So bountifully has the Lord 
been pleased to help of late, that I have not only been able 
to meet all the extraordinary heavy expenses connected 
with moving the orphans from Wilson Street into the new 
Orphan House, filling the stores of the new Orphan House, 
etc. ; but I have more than five hundred pounds in hand to 
begin house-keeping in the new Orphan House. How true 
that word that those that trust in the Lord shall not be con- 
founded ! After all the many and long-continued seasons 
of great trial of faith within these thirteen years and two 
months, during which the orphans were in Wilson Street, 



1849. CONTINUED MERCIES. 341 

the Lord dismisses us from thence in comparative abun- 
dance. His holy name be praised for it ! 

Aug. 30. Received a fifty-pound note with these words : 
" I send you herewith a fifty-pound note, half for the mis- 
sions, half for the orphans, unless you are in any personal 
need ; if so, take five pounds for yourself. This will be the 
last large sum I shall be able to transmit to you. Almost 
all the rest is already out at interest" I took half of this 
fifty pounds for the orphans, and half for missionaries. 
The writer sold some time since his only earthly possession, 
and sent me at different times sums of one hundred and 
twenty pounds, of one hundred pounds, of fifty-five pounds, 
of fifty pounds, and of twenty pounds for the work of the 
Lord in my hands. When he says, therefore, " the rest is 
already out at interest" he means that he has given it away 
for the Lord, which indeed both for time and eternity is the 
very best way of using the means with which the Lord may 
be pleased to intrust us, in so far as, considering in the fear 
of God all our various claims and duties and relationships, 
we may do so. As this is written for the spiritual profit of 
the reader, I cannot but add to this extract from my jour- 
nal under Aug. 30, 1849, that since that time I have re- 
ceived other donations from the same donor, and much 
larger still. He used for God the means with which he was 
pleased to intrust him, and, contrary to this brother's ex- 
pectation, the above fifty pounds was not the last large 
donation ; for it pleased God soon after to intrust him with 
another considerable sum, which he again used for the 
Lord. This did not at all surprise me ; for it is the Lord's 
order that, in whatever way he is pleased to make us his 
stewards, whether as to temporal or spiritual things, if we 
are indeed acting as stewards, and not as oivners, he will 
make us stewards over more. 

I also cannot help noticing the remarkable coincidence 
that, at the time that God visited this land with the cholera, 
in 1849, 1 had so much room for the reception of orphans, 
29* 



342 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIX 

The Lord was pleased to allow me the joy and sweet priv- 
ilege of receiving altogether twenty-six children, from ten 
months old and upward, who lost their parents in the cholera 
at that time, and many besides, since then, who were bereaved 
of their parents through this fearful malady. 

At the time when I last referred to the progress of the 
new Orphan House, it was being built. A part of it was 
already roofed in, and the remainder was to be roofed not 
many weeks afterwards. But how much did there yet re- 
main to be done in other respects ! A building so consider- 
able as to contain about three hundred large windows would 
require, even after it was finished, an immense amount of 
labor to be fitted up and furnished for three hundred and 
thirty persons. Then, after this was done, the settling in 
of the orphans and their teachers, and other overseers, 
needed still more abundant help. Further, the obtaining 
of suitable helpers for this part of the work was indeed no 
small matter. Lastly, though the Lord had been pleased to 
give me already above eleven thousand pounds for the new 
Orphan House, yet I needed several thousand pounds more, 
in order to bring the whole into such a state as might ren- 
der the building fit for the reception of the orphans. And 
now, in looking back, and finding that I not only was 
helped in all these matters, but also in every one of them far 
beyond my largest expectations, does it not become me to 
say to those who love the Lord Jesus, and into whose hands 
this account may fall : " Oh, magnify the Lord with me, and 
let us exalt his name together ! " Each one of the forego- 
ing difficulties which still existed on the 26th of May, 1848, 
was so great, that if only one of them had remained, and I 
had not been helped, what would have been the result ? But 
while the prospect before me would have been overwhelm- 
ing had I looked at it naturally, I was never, even for once, 
permitted to question what would be the end. For as, from 
the beginning, I was sure that it was the will of God that I 
should go to the work of building for him this large Orphan 



1849. CONTINUED MERCIES. 343 

House, so also, from the beginning, I was as certain that 
the whole would be finished as if the building had been al- 
ready before my natural eyes, and as if the house had been 
already filled with three hundred destitute orphans. I was 
therefore of good courage in the midst of an overwhelming 
pressure of work yet to be done, and very many difficulties 
yet to be overcome, and thousands of pounds yet needed ; 
and I gave myself still further to prayer, and sought still 
further to exercise faith on the promises of God. And now 
the work is done, the difficulties are overcome, all the 
money that was needed has been obtained, and even more 
than I needed ; and, as to helpers in the work, I have ob- 
tained even beyond my expectations and pra}^ers. Nearly 
seven years have passed away (1856) since the new Orphan 
House was opened, and about three hundred and thirty per- 
sons sit down in it day by day to their meals. 

Up to May 26, 1848, I had received altogether towards 
meeting the expenses connected with the building of the 
new Orphan House the sum of eleven thousand and sixty- 
two pounds four shillings elevenpence halfpenny. 

Nov. 9. To-day the Lord has helped still more abun- 
dantly. I have received a donation of one thousand 
pounds, to be used for the building fund and the present 
necessities of the work generally, as the various objects of 
the Institution might require it. 

Jan. 17, 1849. The time is now near when farther steps 
are to be taken to fit up and furnish the house, as more 
than two thirds of the rooms are all but ready. Under 
these circumstances I have prayed the more earnestly, day 
by day, that the Lord would be pleased to give me the 
means which are yet needed ; and as my heart has been 
assured from the beginning, and all through these three 
years and two months, since I first began to pray about 
this subject, that God would in every way help me in this 
work, so I have also been particularly satisfied that he 



344 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIX 

would be pleased to provide the menus which may be re- 
quired to meet all the heavy expenses which yet remain to 
be met. Now, to-day I have had again a precious answer 
to my daily supplications with reference to this work ; foi 
I received this evening six hundred pounds, concerning 
which it were desired that brother Craik and myself should 
each take of it fifty pounds for ourselves ; the remaining 
five hundred pounds was left entirely to my disposal ; yet 
an especial reference was made to the heav} 7 expenses con- 
nected with fitting up and furnishing the new Orphan House, 
towards which I might, either in part or entirely, take this 
sum. 

Feb. 12. The new Orphan House is now almost entirety 
finished. In six weeks, with the help of God, all will be 
completed. On this account I have been during the last 
fortnight much occupied in making the necessary arrange- 
ments for fitting it up and furnishing it ; but the more I 
have been occupied about this, the more I have seen how 
large a sum the whole of the fittings and the furniture will 
require ; and this consideration has led me still more ear- 
nestly of late to entreat the Lord that he would be pleased 
to give me the means which may yet be needed for the com- 
pletion of the whole. Under these circumstances a brother 
in the Lord came to me this morning, and after a few min- 
utes' conversation gave me two thousand pounds, concerning 
which sum he kindly gave me permission to use it for the 
fitting up and furnishing of the new Orphan House, or for 
anything else needed in connection with the orphans. I 
have placed the whole of this sum, at least for the present, 
to the building fund. It is impossible to describe the real 
joy I had in God when I received this sum. I was calm, 
not in the least excited, able to go on immediately with 
other work that came upon me at once after I had received 
the donation ; but inexpressible was the delight which I 
had in God, who had thus given me the full answer to mj 
thousands of pra} T ers. 



1850. CONTINUED MERCIES. 345 

I have thus given a few out of the hundreds of donations, 
varying from one farthing to two thousand pounds, as 
specimens, to show how the Lord was pleased to furnish me 
with the means. The total amount which came in for the 
building fund was fifteen thousand seven hundred and 
eighty-four pounds eighteen shillings tenpence. 

After all the expenses had been met for the purchase of 
the land, the conveyance of the same, the enrolment of the 
trust-deeds in chancery, the building, fitting up, and fur- 
nishing of the New Orphan House, there remained a bal- 
ance of seven hundred and seventy-six pounds fourteen 
shillings threepence three farthings, affording a manifest 
proof that the Lord can not only supply us with all we need 
in his service, simply in answer to prayer, but that he can 
also o-ive us even more than we need. 



During the whole of tne two years ending May 26, 1850, five day 
schools, with 329 children in them, were entirely supported by the 
funds of this Institution; and some pecuniary assistance was rendered 
to four other day schools. Also a Sunday school, with 1G8 children, 
was entirely supported, and another was occasionally assisted. Lastly, 
an adult school, with 106 adult scholars, was supported during this 
period. There were expended on these various schools £851, Is. 5^d , 
during these two years. The number of all the children that were 
taught in the day schools, through the medium of this Institution, from 
March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1850, amounted to 5,114; the number of 
those in the Sunday schools amounted to 2,200, and the number of the 
persons in the adult school to 1 ,737. In all, 9,051. 

From May 26, 1848, to May 26, 1850, were circulated 719 Bibles, 
and 239 New Testaments. There were expended on this object, during 
this period, of the funds of the Institution, £104, 15s. lid. There 
were circulated altogether from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1850, 
6,465 Bibles, and 3,999 New Testaments. 

From May 26, 1848, to May 26, 1850, were spent *£2,574, 16s. 6d. 
of the funds of the Institution for missionary objects, whereby forty 
preachers of the gospel in British Guiana, the East Indies, Switzer- 
land, France, Germany, Canada, Scotland, Ireland, and England, 
were assisted. 

The reader will notice how greatly this object of the Institution was 



346 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XIX. 

increased during the last four years previous to May 26, 1850. This 
arose from the fact that, in the early part of 1846, the need of certain 
brethren who labored in the word and doctrine came before me, and 
God laid them on my heart to labor for them in prayer, in order 
that I might obtain means from him for such brethren to a greater ex- 
tent than I had done before. Ever since then the Lord has been 
pleased increasingly to use me in this way. For from May 26, 1846, 
to May 26, 1848, there was spent for that object nearly three times as 
much as during any former period of the same length; and during the 
period from May 26, 1848, to May 26, 1850, I was not only allowed to 
do as much as before, but to expend even £1,016, 5s. more than dur- 
ing the former period, notwithstanding all the "many heavy additional 
expenses for the various other objects of the Institution. 

It is my sweet privilege to state that the labors of many of these 
forty servants of the Lord, whom I assisted, were especially owned of 
God during these two years. There took place very many conver- 
sions through their instrumentality. 

From May 26, 1848, to May 26, 1850, the sum of £184, 9s. 4£d. 
was expended on the circulation of tracts. There were circulated 
during this period 130,464 tracts. The total number which was circu- 
lated from Nov. 19, 1840, up to May 26, 1850, amounted to 294,128. 

From July 24, 1849, up to May 26, 1850, altogether 170 orphans 
were received, from ten months old and upwards. On May 26, 1850, 
there were, therefore, 275 orphans in the new Orphan House ; and 
with the teachers, overseers, nurses, and in floor and out-door ser- 
vants, etc., the whole number of persons connected with the estab- 
lishment was 308. The total number of orphans who were under our 
care from April, 1836, up to May 26, 1850, Avas 443. 

Without any one having been personally applied to for anything 
by one, the sum of £33,868, lis. l^d. was given to me for the orphans, 
as the result of prayer to God, from the commencement of the work 
up to May 2Q, 1850. It may be also interesting to the reader to know 
that the total amount which was given as free contributions, for the 
other objects, from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 
1850, amounted to £10,531, 3s. 3|d. ; and that which came in by the 
6ale of Bibles and tracts, and by the payments of the children in the 
schools, up to May 26, 1850, amounted to £2,707, 9s. 8^d. 

The total for the current expenses for the orphans from May 26, 
1848, to May 26, 1849, was £1,559, 6s. 9d., and the total of the current 
expenses for them from May 26, 1849, to May 26, 1850, was only 
£2,665, 13s. 2|d., i. e., only about £1,100 more than the previous 
year, 



1850. CONTINUED MERCIES. 347 

As to matters connected with nry own personal affairs, from May 
26, 1848, to May 26, 1850 : — 

Dec. 31, 1848. During this year the Lord was pleased to give me 
£474, 17s. 7d. To this is again to be added, for this year also, as 
before stated, the free education of my daughter at a boarding-school, 
worth at least £50. 

Dec. 31, 1849. The Lord sent me, during the past year, £413, 
2s. id. 




CHAPTER XX. 

A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH. 
1850 — 1851. 

fABT MERCIES AN ENCOURAGEMENT TO NEW UNDERTAKINGS — A HOUSE FOH 
SEVEN HUNDRED ORPHANS PROPOSED — WALKING BY FAITH — ' COUNSEL 
SOUGHT FROM GOD — THE PURPOSE FORMED — DELIGHT IN THE MAGNI- 
TUDE AND DIFFICULTY OF THE DESIGN. 

ECEMBER 5, 1850. It is now sixteen years and 
nine months this evening since I began the Scrip- 
tural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad. 
This Institution was in its beginning exceedingly 
small. Now it is so large that I have not only disbursed, 
since its commencement, about fifty thousand pounds ster- 
ling, but that also the current expenses, after the rate of 
the last months, amount to above six thousand pounds a 
year. I did " open my mouth wi le," this very evening fif- 
teen 3'ears ago, and the Lord has filled it. The new Orphan 
House is now inhabited by three hundred orphans ; and 
there are altogether three hundred and thirty-five persons 
connected with it. My labor is abundant. The separation 
from my dear wife and child is great, on account of my 
being the greater part of the day at the new Orphan House ; 
sometimes also by night. But notwithstanding all this, I 
have again and again thought about laboring more than 
ever in serving poor orphans. Within the last ten days 
this matter has much occupied my mind, and for the last 
five days I have had much prayer about it. It has passed 
through my mind to build another Orphan House, large 
enough for seven hundred orphans, so that I might be able 
to care for one thousand altogether. The points which 
348 



1851. A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH. 349 

have led me to this thought are : 1 . The many distressing 
cases of children bereaved of both parents, who have no 
helper. I have received two hundred and seven orphans 
within the last sixteen months, and have now seventy-eight 
waiting for admission, without having vacancies for any. 
I had about sixty children waiting for admission about six- 
teen months since, so about two hundred and thirty chil- 
dren have been applied for within these sixteen months. 

The thoughts about enlarging the orphan work have not 
arisen on account of an abundance of money having lately 
come in ; for I have had of late to wait for about seven 
weeks upon God, whilst little, very little comparatively, 
came in, i. e., about four times as much was going out as 
came in ; and, had not the Lord previously sent me large 
sums, we should have been distressed indeed. 

Lord, how can thy servant know thy will in this matter 9 
Wilt thou be pleased to teach him ? 

Dec. 26. Twenty-one days have elapsed since I wrote 
the preceding paragraph. Every day since then I have 
continued to pray about this matter, and that with a goodly 
measure of earnestness, by the help of God. There has 
passed awa}- scarcely an hour during these days in which, 
whilst awake, this matter has not been more or less before 
me ; but all without even a shadow of excitement. I con- 
verse with no one about it. Hitherto have I not even done 
so with my dear wife. From this I refrain still, and deal 
with God alone about the matter, in order that no outward 
influence and no outward excitement may keep me from at- 
taining unto a clear discovery of his will. I have the fullest 
and most peaceful assurance that he will clearly show me 
his will. This evening I have had again an especial solemn 
season for prayer, to seek to know the will of God. But 
whilst I continue to entreat and beseech the Lord that he 
would not allow me to be deluded in this business, I may 
say that I have scarcely any doubt remaining on my mind 
as to what will be the issue, even that I should go forward 
80 



350 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XX. 

id this matter. As this, however, is one of the most mo 
mentous steps that I have ever taken, I judge that I cannot 
go about this matter with too much caution, pray erf ulncss, 
and deliberation. I am in no hurry about it. I could wait 
for years, by God's grace, were this his will, before even 
taking one single step towards this thing, or even speaking 
to any one about it ; and, on the other hand, I would set to 
work to-morrow, were the Lord to bid me do so. This 
calmness of mind, this having no will of my own in the 
matter, this only wishing to please my heavenly Father in 
it, this only seeking his and not my honor in it, — this state 
of heart, I sa} r , is the fullest assurance to me that my heart 
is not under a fleshly excitement, and that if I am helped 
thus to go on I shall know the will of God to the full. But, 
while I write thus, I cannot but add, at the same time, that 
I do crave the honor and the glorious privilege to be more 
and more used by the Lord. I have served Satan much in 
my younger 3-ears, and I desire now with all my. might to 
serve God during the remaining days of my earthly pilgrim- 
age. I am forty-five years and three months old. Every 
day decreases the number of days that I have to stay on 
earth. I therefore desire with all my might to work. There 
are vast multitudes of orphans to be provided for. About 
five years ago a brother in the Lord told me that he had 
seen, in an official report, that there were at that time six 
thousand young orphans in the prisons of England. My 
heart longs to be instrumental in preventing such young or- 
phans from having to go to prison. I desire to be used by 
the Lord as an instrument in providing all the necessary 
temporal supplies, not only for the three hundred nowundei 
my care, but for seven hundred more. I desire to alleviate 
jet further the sufferings of poor dying widows, when look- 
ing on their helpless orphans about to be left behind. I 
desire yet further to assist poor persons to whom destitute 
orphans are left, and who are unable to provide for them. 
I desire to be allowed to provide scriptural instruction for 



1851. A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH, 351 

a thousand orphans, instead of doing so for three hundred. 
I desire to expound the Holy Scriptures regularly to a thou- 
sand orphans, instead of doing so to three hundred. I de- 
sire that thus it may be j-et more abundantly manifest that 
God is still the hearer and answerer of prayer, and that he 
is the living God now, as he ever was and ever will be, when 
he shall, simply in answer to prayer, have condescended to 
provide me with a house for seven hundred orphans, and 
with means to support them. This last consideration is the 
most important point in my mind. The Lord's honor is the 
principal point with me in this whole matter ; and just be- 
cause that is "the case, if he would be more glorified by my 
not going forward in this business, I should, by his grace, 
be perfectly content to give up all thoughts about another 
Orphan House. Surely, in such a state of mind, obtained 
by thy Holy Spirit, thou, O my heavenly Father, wilt not 
suffer thy child to be mistaken, much less to be deluded ! 
By the help of God I shall continue further, day by day, to 
wait upon him in prayer concerning this thing till he shall 
bid me act. 

Jan. 2, 1851. A week ago I wrote the preceding para- 
graph. During this week I have still been helped, day by 
by, and more than once every day, to seek the guidance of 
the Lord about another Orphan House. The burden of my 
prayer has still been, that he in his great mercj' - would keep 
me from making a mistake. During the last week the Book 
of Proverbs has come in the course of my Scripture read- 
ing, and my heart has been refreshed, in reference to this 
subject, by the following passages: "Trust in the Lord 
with all thine heart ; and lean not unto thine own under- 
standing. In all thy wa} T s acknowledge him, and he shall 
direct thy paths." Prov. iii. 5, 6. By the grace of God I 
do acknowledge the Lord in my ways, and in this thing in 
particular ; I have therefore the comfortable assurance that 
he will direct my paths concerning this part of my service, 
as to whether I shall be occupied in it or not. Further : 



352 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XX. 

" The integrity of the upright shall preserve them ; but the 
perverseness of fools shall destroy them." Pro v. xi. 3. 
By the grace of God I am upright in this business. My 
honest purpose is to get glory to God. Therefore I expect 
to be guided aright. Further : u Commit thy works unto the 
Lord, and thy thoughts shall be established." Prov. xvi. 3. 
I do commit my works unto the Lord ; I therefore expect 
that my thoughts will be established. My heart is more and 
more coming to a calm, quiet, and settled assurance that 
the end will be that the Lord will condescend to use me } T et 
further in the orphan work. Here, Lord, is thy servant ! 

Jan. 14. Twelve days have passed away since I wrote 
the last paragraph. I have still day by day been enabled 
to wait upon the Lord with reference to my enlarging the 
orphan work. I have been during the whole of this period 
also in perfect peace, which is the result of seeking in this 
thing only the Lord's honor and the temporal and spiritual 
benefit of my fellow-men. "Without an effort could I, by 
his grace, put aside all thoughts about this whole affair, 
could I be only assured that it is the will of God that I 
should do so ; and, on the other hand, at once would I go 
forward, if he would have it to be so. I have still kept 
this matter entirely to myself. Though it is now about 
seven weeks since day by day, more or less, my mind has 
been exercised about it, and since I have dai^y prayed con- 
cerning it, yet not one human being knows of it. As yet 
I have not mentioned it even to my dear wife, in order that 
thus, by quietly waiting upon the Lord, I might not be in- 
fluenced by what might be said to me on the subject. This 
evening I have particularly set apart for prayer, beseeching 
the Lord once more not to allow me to be mistaken in this 
thing, and much less to be deluded by the devil. I have 
also sought to let all the reasons against building another 
Orphan House, and all the reasons for doing so, pass be- 
fore my mind ; and I now, for the sake of clearness and 
denniteness, write them down. 



1851. . A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH. 353 

Reasons against establishing another Orphan House for 
Seven Hundred Orphans. — 1. Would not this be going 
beyond my measure spiritually? according to that word: 
" For I say, through the grace given unto me, to every man 
that is among }~ou, not to think of himself more highly 
than he ought to think ; but to think soberly, according as 
God has dealt to every man the measure of faith." Rom. 
xii. 3. Answer : If the Lord were to leave me to myself, 
the tenth part of the difficulties and trials which befall me 
now in connection with the various objects of the Scrip- 
tural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad would 
be enough to overwhelm me ; but, whilst he is pleased to 
sustain me, I am able day by day to pass on peacefully, 
and am carried through one difficulty after the other : and 
thus, bj- God's help, even with my present measure of faith, 
if continued to me, I should be enabled to bear up under 
other difficulties and trials ; but I look for an increase of 
faith with every fresh difficulty through which the Lord is 
pleased to help me. 

2. Would it not be going beyond iny measure naturally, 
with reference to mental and bodily strength ? Answer : 
Of all the objections against establishing another Orphan 
House, there is none that weighs more with me than this 
one ; I might sky; it is the only real difficulty. This, how- 
ever, too, I am enabled to put aside and to overcome thus : 
~By husbanding my strength, by great order, by regular* 
habits, by lightening the work as much as possible, by 
using every help that I can, I have been enabled to get 
through, a vast quantity of work. My immense correspond- 
ence of about three thousand letters a year I have been ena- 
bled to accomplish without a secretary. The whole man- 
agement and direction and the whole vast correspondence 
of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution has devolved upon 
myself alone these sixteen years and ten months, and I 
have been thinking that, by seeking for an efficient secre- 
tary, and an efficient clerk, and an inspector of the schools, 



354 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XX. 

1 might, with God's help, accomplish yet more, though 
much of what I have been doing hitherto would need to be 
be done by others. There have been several other arrange- 
ments brought before my mind, since I have been exercised 
about this matter, whereby, with the blessing of God, the 
work might be lightened. I should certainly need efficient 
helpers to carry out the plans before me ; but with such, I, 
as director, might be enabled, by God's help, to accomplish 
yet more. 

3. There must be a limit to my work and service. An- 
swer : That is true, and if I were quite sure that the pres- 
ent state of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution were to 
be the limit, I would at once lay aside this thing ; but I am 
not sure that I am come as yet to God's limit. All these 
sixteen } r ears and ten months the work has been constantly 
progressing, and the Lord has helped me continually ; and 
now my mind is just in the same way exercised as when, 
fifteen years ago, I began the orphan work, and as when, 
thirteen } T ears ago, I enlarged the orphan work, and as when, 
seven years and nine months since, I still further enlarged 
the orphan work, and as when, five years and two months 
since, I was led to decide on building the new Orphan 
House. Under these circumstances, having been helped 
through all these difficulties, and seeing such a vast field of 
usefulness before me, and as I have so many applications 
for the admission of very destitute orphans, I long to be 
used still further, and cannot say, that as yet the Lord has 
brought me to his limit. 

4. Is it not like " tempting God," to think of building 
another Orphan House for seven hundred more orphans? 
Answer : " Tempting God" means, according to the Holy 
Scriptures, to limit him in any of his attributes. I, by his 
grace, do not wish to limit his power or his willingness to 
give to me, his poor servant, simply in answer to prayer, 
all the means and every other help and blessing which J 
shall need to build another large Orphan House. 



1851. A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH. 355 

5. You will not get the means for building and fitting up 
so large an Orphan House ; and, even if you did, how will 
you, at the same time, get the means for canying on the 
work which already exists ? Answer : Looking at the mat- 
ter naturally, this is indeed a weighty objection. 

The new Orphan House, with its three hundred orphans 
only, cost about fifteen thousand pounds to build and to 
fit up and furnish ; and still the expenses are not all met 
even now. It will, in all probability, cost several hundred 
pounds yet. And this large sum was needed, though the 
style of the building is most simple, and though the field 
in which it was built was comparatively cheap. After 
this rate, a building to accommodate seven hundred or- 
phans, with the necessary ground attached to it for the 
cultivation of the vegetables used in the Institution, could 
not be less than thuiy-five thousand pounds. Now, looking 
at it naturally, where is this great sum to come from? 
Though I looked at all my friends who have given hitherto, 
and several have done so very liberally, yet I should have 
no natural prospect whatever that I should receive this 
amount ; especially if it be kept in mind that I should need 
six or seven thousand pounds besides, every year, for 
canying on that which is already in existence. I might, 
therefore, well tremble, looking at the matter naturally, and 
say, I shall never have the money for this intended Orphan 
House for seven hundred children ; for where is this large 
sum of thirty-five thousand pounds to come from? And 
even if I were to get the mone}^, will not persons, in giving 
means for such a building fund, take it away from what they 
might have given me for carrying on the work which exists 
already? But whilst thus, naturally, I have no hope of 
succeeding, I am not in the least discouraged spiritually; 
for by faith in the living God I say this : He has the power 
to give me these thirty-five thousand pounds, and much more 
were it needed ; and he has the power, in the mean time, 
to give me also all the large sums required, week after 



356 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XX. 

week, for meeting the current expenses for the present state 
of the work. Moreover, I delight in the greatness of the 
difficulty as it respects the large sum needed for building 
and fitting up such an establishment ; for I desire to be 
most fully assured, from the very outset, that I go forward 
in this matter according to the Lord's bidding. If so, he 
will give me the means ; if not, I shall not have them. 
Nor do I mean to apply to any one personally for pecuni- 
ary help, but purpose to give myself to prayer for means, 
as heretofore. 

6. Suppose, now, you were even to succeed in getting 
this large Orphan House built, how will you be able to 
provide for seven hundred other orphans ? Answer : There 
is much weight in this objection, looking at it naturally. 
I am too much a man of business, and too much a person 
of calm, quiet, cool calculation, not to feel its force. And 
indeed, were I only to look at the thing naturally, I should 
at once be ready to own that I am going too far ; for the 
increase of expenditure for the support of these seven hun- 
dred other orphans could not be less than eight thousand 
pounds a year more, so that the current expenses of the 
Scriptural Knowledge Institution, reckoning its present 
state, and including those eight thousand pounds, would 
be about fifteen thousand pounds a y ear. Now I am free 
to own that I have no human prospect of obtaining such a 
sum year by year. But while matters stand thus, looking 
at them naturally, I see no difficulty at all in them spiritu- 
ally. If according to the will of God I am enabled to go 
about this intended second Orphan House ; and if, under 
his help, I shall be enabled to finish it i he will surely pro- 
vide for those who are gathered together in it as long as he 
shall be pleased to enable me to trust in him for supplies. 
And here I look back upon the way in which the Lord has 
led me and dealt with me. When, about seventeen years 
ago, I took up, in dependence upon the riving God for 
means, two charity schools, with which the Scriptural 



1851. A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH. 357 

Knowledge Institution commenced (and this involved an 
expense of less than one hundred, pounds a year) , I had no 
certain prospect of being able to meet even that small 
sum ; but God so helped me that I had shortly six charity 
schools. He helped me then, also, and enabled me to meet 
all their expenses. When, fifteen years ago, I began the 
orphan work, which was connected with far heavier ex- 
penses, I had still less prospect, according to natural 
reason, of being able to meet them ; but I trusted in God, 
and he helped me, and he not onry enabled me to meet the 
current expenses of thirty orphans in the first house rented 
for them, but enabled me also soon to open another for 
thirty-six more, and I was also enabled to meet all thr>se 
expenses ; for as I had begun in faith in the living God, and 
not in putting my trust in my brethren in Christ, so I was 
not confounded. After I had gone on some time with 
these orphans in the two rented houses, about thirteen 
years ago the Lord was pleased greatly to encourage me 
and to increase my faith by a donation of five hundred 
pounds for the orphans ; for up to that period I had never 
received more than one hundred pounds at once. But this 
kind donor, a stranger to me up to that time, suggested to 
me the propriety of investing this sum and using only the 
interest of it, as I could not ez-ipect to have the orphans 
supported for a continuance in the way they had been till 
then ; for that such institutions must depend upon regular 
subscriptions or funded property, otherwise they could nol 
go on. As, however, this was only a friendly hint, and no 
rendition under which the money was given, I took this live 
hundred pounds towards fitting up a third house, for the 
reception of thirty more orphans. From that time the work 
has been increasing more and more, till it has come to what 
it is at present. Now, suppose I had said, seventeen years 
ago, looking at matters according to natural reason, " The 
two charity schools are enough, I must not go any further ; " 
then the work would have stopped there. Or, if I had had 



358 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XX. 

a little more trust in : my exertions or my friends, I might 
have taken at the utmost one or two steps further. In- 
stead of this, however, I looked in no degree whatever at 
things according to my natural fallen reason, and I trusted 
not in the circle of my Christian friends, but in the living 
God ; and the result has been that there have been since 
1834 ten thousand souls under our instruction in the 
various day schools, Sunday schools, and adult schools ; 
several hundred orphans have been brought up, and many 
of them from their very tenderest infancy ; several hundred 
thousand tracts and many thousand copies of the Word of 
God have been circulated ; about forty preachers of the 
gospel at home and abroad have been, for several years, 
assisted in connection with the Scriptural Knowledge 
Institution ; and a house has been built and fitted up for 
the accommodation of three hundred destitute orphans, 
each of whom has neither father nor mother. How blessed 
therefore is it to trust in God, and in him alone, and not in 
circumstances nor friends ! There' is, however, one thing 
which I must record here, because it has taken place since 
I last wrote in iry journal on this subject, on January 2. 
It is this. During these twelve days I have received' for 
the various object of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, 
in smaller donations, sixty-four pounds fifteen shillings six- 
pence two farthings, also a donation of one hundred and 
fifty pounds, and one of three thousand pounds. Is not 
this a plain proof that God is both able and willing to help 
simply in answer to prayer? Is not human reason con- 
founded by such instances ? When I first began to write 
these exercises of my mind about another Orphan House, 
I knew not that, on January 4, I should receive a donation 
of three thousand pounds ; yet I was fully assured that 
God was able to support one thousand orphans as easily as 
he did the thirty whom I first received in a rented house. 
Does he not, however, tell me by all this, — Go forward* 
my servant, and I will help thee ? 



1851. A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH. 359 

7. But, it might be said, suppose you were able by 
prayer to obtain this large sum for building a house for 
seven hundred other orphans ; and suppose you were able 
to provide for them during your lifetime, — what would be- 
come of this Institution after jour death ? Answer : I am 
quite familiar with this objection. I have heard it many 
times as a reason against the way of obtaining the means 
for the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, simply by trusting 
in God, without any funded property, and without looking 
to regular subscribers ; but my reply is this. My business 
is, with all mysoiight to serve my own generation ; in doing 
so, I shall best serve the next generation, should the Lord 
Jesus tarry. Soon he may come again ; but if he tarry, 
and I have to fall asleep before his return, I shall not have 
been altogether without profit to the generation to come, 
were the Lord only to enable me to serve my own genera- 
tion. Suppose this objection were a sound one, I ought 
never to have commenced the orphan work at all, for fear 
of what might become of it after my death, and thus all 
the hundreds of destitute children without father and 
mother, whom the Lord has allowed me ta*eare for during 
the last fifteen years, would not have been taken up by me. 
The same argument was again and again used to Franke 
my esteemed count^men, who at Halle, in Prussia, com- 
menced, about a. d. 1696, the largest charitable establish- 
ment for poor children that, as far as I know, exists in the 
world. He trusted in God alone. He went on trusting in 
God alone. And God helped him throughout abundantly. 
Simply by trust in the living God, the Institutions, resem- 
bling a large street rather than a house, were erected, and 
about two thousand children instructed in them. Foi 
about thirty years all was going on under his own eye, 
until 1727, when it pleased God to take his servant to him- 
self. At his death these Institutions were directed by his 
truly pious son-in-law. It is true that, at the latter part of 
the last century, and during the first part of the present, 



360 THE LIFE OF TEUST. Chap. XX. 

there was little real vital godliness in these Institutions ; 
still, they were a temporal blessing to many tens of thou- 
sands of young persons even then. So then for several 
tens of years they were carried on in a truly godly way, 
after Franke's death, and when afterwards there was but 
little real vital godliness fouud in these schools, yet tens of 
thousands of children were benefited at least for this life. 
Now these Institutions have existed already one hundred 
and fifty years, and are in existence still ; and, if the Lord 
Jesus tarry, are likely, humanly speaking, to exist here- 
after, as they have existed hitherto. Suppose, then, that 
dear man of God, A. II. Franke, had listened to the sugges- 
tions of unbelief, and said, I must not undertake this work, 
for what will become of it after my death? — then all the 
blessing which spiritually resulted from it to thousands, 
and all temporal benefits which have resulted from it to 
hundreds of thousands, would have been lost. I add, how- 
ever, this. The new Orphan House has been placed in the 
hands of eleven trustees, and has been properly enrolled in 
chancery, and so, also, should God condescend to honor 
me further in building for him this intended house for 
seven hundred orphans, it would likewise be placed in the 
hands of trustees and enrolled in chanceiy. I say one 
word in conclusion on this subject : let eveiy one take heed 
lest, in caring about what will become of the next genera- 
tion, he forget to serve his own generation. The latter, 
each one should seek to do with his might, and thus it 
should be with each succeeding generation ; then, though 
we be dead, yet should we be speaking. A. H. Franke is 
long since gone to his rest, but he spoke to my soul in 
1826, and he is speaking to my soul now ; and to his ex- 
ample I am greatly indebted in having been stirred up to 
care about poor children in general, and about poor orphans 
in particular. 

8. The last objection which has occurred to my own 
mind is, that, by building another Orphan House, I should 



1851. A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH. 361 

be in danger of being lifted up. Answer : I should re in 
danger of it indeed ; and so I am in great danger, even 
were I not in the least degree to go forward. Yea, the 
tenth part of the honor which the Lord has condescended 
to bestow upon me, and the tenth part of service with which 
he has been pleased to intrust me, would be enough, if I 
were left to myself, exceedingly to puff me up. I cannot 
say that hitherto the Lord has kept me humble ; but I can 
say that hitherto he has given me a hearty desire to give to 
him all the glor3 T , and to consider it a great condescension 
on his part that he has been pleased to use me as an in- 
strument in his service. I do not see, therefore, that fear 
of being lifted up ought to keep me from going forward in 
this work : but that I have rather to beseech the Lord that 
he would be pleased to give me a lowl} r mind, and never 
suffer me to rob him of the gloiy which is doe to him alone. 

Reasons for establishing another Orphan House for 
Seven Hundred Orphans. — 1. The man} T applications for 
the admission of destitute orphans which continue to be 
made, I consider as a call from God upon me to do all that 
\s in my power to provide a home and scriptural education 
for a still greater number of orphans. Nothing but positive 
inability to go forward ought to keep me standing still, 
whilst I have almost daily fresh entreaties to receive 
orphans. Since I began writing on this subject in nry jour- 
nal, thirty more orphans have been applied for, from two 
years old and upward. I cannot refuse to help, as long as 
I see a door open, and opened by God, as I consider; to 
help them. 

2. The moral state of the poor-houses greatly influences 
me to go forward. I have heard it again and again, from 
good authority, that children, placed at the Unions, are 
corrupted, on account of the children of vagrants, and 
other very bad young people, who are in such places ; so ' 
that many poor relatives of orphans, though unable to 
provide for them, cannot, hear the idea of then going there, 
3* 



362 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XX. 

lest they should be corrupted. I therefore judge that, 
even for the sake of keeping orphans of poor yet respectable 
people from being obliged to mix with the children of vag- 
abonds, I ought to do, to nry utmost power, all I can to 
help them. For this reason, then, I purpose, in dependence 
upon the living God, to go forward and to establish another 
Orphan House for seven hundred destitute children, who 
are bereaved of both parents. When I write thus about 
the poor-houses, I do not wish to be understood in the way 
of reproof; for I know not how these matters could be 
altered ; but I simply state the fact that thus it is. 

3. In this my purpose I am the more confirmed, since I 
know it to be a fact that the Orphan Houses already in ex- 
istence in the kingdom are b} r no means sufficient to admit 
even the most deserving and distressing cases, and far less 
all that it would be well to provide for. Moreover, there 
is great difficulty connected with the admission of an 
orphan into most of the ordinary orphan establishments, on 
account of the votes which must be obtained, so that really 
needjr persons have neither time nor mone}^ to obtain them. 
Does not the fact that there were six thousand young 
orphans in the prisons of Eugland about five years ago call 
aloud for an extension of orphan institutions ? By God's 
help I will try to do what I can to keep poor orphans from 
prison. 

4. In this purpose I am still further encouraged by the 
great help which the Lord has hitherto given me in this 
blessed service. When I look at the small beginning, and 
consider how the Lord has helped me now for more than 
fifteen j T ears in the orphan work ; and when I consider how 
he has been pleased to help me through one great difficulty 
after another ; and when I consider, especially, how, as 
with an unseen hand, I might say almost against my wilf 

-and former desires and thoughts, he has led me on from 
one step*to another, and has enlarged the work more and 
moie, — I say, when I review all this, and compare with it 



1851. A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH. 363 

my present exercise of mind, I find the great help, the un- 
interrupted help which the Lord has given me for more than 
fifteen years, a great reason for going forward in this work. 
And this, trusting in him, I am resolved to do. 

5. A further reason for going forward in this service 3 
see in the experience which I have had in it. From the 
smallest commencement up to the present state of the 
establishment, with its three hundred orphans, all has gone 
through my own hands. In the work itself I obtained the 
experience. It has grown with the work. I have been the 
sole director of the work, under God, from its smallest 
commencement. Now this is not an every-da} 7 case. No 
committee member of a society, no president or vice-presi- 
dent of an institution, except they had been situated as 
myself, could have this experience. Coupled with this is 
the measure of gift which the Lord has been pleased to 
give me for such work, and for the exercise of which I am 
responsible to him. These things, in connection with the 
former reasons, it appears to me, are a call from God to go 
forward in a greater degree than ever in this work. 

6. The spiritual benefit of still more orphans is another 
especial reason with me why I feel called to go forward. 
The orphans who have been under my care hitherto were 
almost all the children of parents who were naturally weak 
in body, if not consumptive. The very fact of a child being 
deprived of both parents when four, five, six, or seven years 
old, shows that, except the parents lost their lives b} T cas- 
ualty, they were constitutionally weak. On this account, 
young orphans, generally speaking, require particular care 
as to their health. In this respect I desire to care for them ; 
but there is more than that to be attended to. I further 
heartily desire to keep them from the corrupting and de* 
moralizing effect of the lowest sort of children in the 
streets and courts and Unions. But I desire more for them 
than mere decency and morality ; I desire that they should 
be useful members of society, and that the prisons of the 



364 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XX. 

United Kingdom should not be filled with poor, destitute, 
and homeless orphans ; and we bring them up, therefore, 
in habits of industry, and seek to instruct them in those 
things which are useful for the life that now is. But I 
desire more than this for the orphans. I cannot be satis- 
fied with anything concerning them short of this, that their 
souls be won for the Lord. For this reason I long to have 
them from their early days, yea, the younger the better, 
under my care, that thus, under the care of godly nurses 
and teachers, they may be brought up from their ear- 
liest days in the fear of the Lord. Now, as this is the 
chief and primary aim concerning the dear orphans, even 
the salvation of their souls through faith in the Lord Jesus, 
I long to be more extensively used than hitherto, even that 
I may have a thousand of them instead of three hundred 
under my care. 

7. But there is one point which weighs more strongly 
with me than even the last-mentioned one. It is this : 
When I began the orphan work more than fifteen years 
ago, it was for the definite and especial purpose that, by 
means of it, the unconverted might see, through the an- 
swers of praj'er that I received in connection with it, that 
there is verily reality in the things of God ; and that the 
children of God might have their faith strengthened by 
means of it, and might be encouraged, in all simplicit}^, to 
deal with God under every circumstance, and trust in him 
at all times. But if this would be answered in a measure 
by the state in which the orphan work has been in former 
times, and more so by what it has been since the erection 
of the new Orphan House, it would be still more so, by the 
blessing of God, by my going forward in it to a far greater 
degree than before. This point, even the glory of God in 
the manifestation of his readiness to hear prayer, has 
weighed especiauy and supremely with me in purposing to 
enlarge the orphan work. 

8. Lastly, I am peaceful and happy, spiritually, in the 



1851. A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH. 365 

prospect of enlarging the work, as on former occasions 
when I had to do so. This weighs particularly with me as 
a reason for going forward. After all the calm, quiet, pray- 
erful consideration of the subject for about eight weeks, I 
am peaceful and happy, spiritualty, in the purpose of enlarg- 
ing the field. This, after all the heart-searching which I 
have had and the daily praj-er to be kept from delusion and 
mistake in this thing, and the betaking myself to the word 
of God, would not be the case, I judge, had not the Lord 
purposed to condescend to use me more than ever in this 
service. 

I, therefore, on the ground of the objections, answered, 
and these eight reasons for enlarging the work, come to 
the conclusion that it is the will of the blessed God that 
his poor and most unworthy servant should yet more ex- 
tensively serve him in this work, which he is quite willing 
to do. 

Up to this day, Jan. 25, 1851, 1 have not spoken to one 
human being about it. As yet, even my dear wife knows 
not about it. I purpose to keep the matter still for some 
time entirely to m} r self, dealing with God alone about it, in 
order that no outward excitement may be in the least 
degree a stimulus to me. I still pray to be kept from mis- 
take and delusion in this thing ; not that I think I am mis- 
taken or deluded, — quite the reverse, — but yet I would dis- 
trust myself and cling to God, to be kept from mistakes 
and delusions. 

Jan. 31. For several weeks past I have now had no 
doubt that the Lord would have me to serve him in the 
erection and fitting up of another Orphan House for seven 
hundred orphans, and I am quite decided on doing so, under 
his help ; and I am now quiet about it, not because I have 
the least misgiving in my own mind, but because I know 
that it is most suitable that I should still for some time 
continue to deal quietly with God alone about it. 

March 5. Nearly five weeks have passed away since I 
31* 



366 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XX. 

wrote the last paragraph, and my mind has not been once 
during this time, even for a moment, in uncertainty as to 
what I ought to do. It is now about fifteen weeks since I 
have been especially praying about this subject, and three 
months since I began first to write on the subject in my 
journal, and about ten weeks since I have had any doubts 
as to what is the will- of the Lord concerning this service. 
I believe that, altogether unworthy though I am of this 
great honor, he will condescend to use me further and more 
extensively than before in caring for destitute children 
who are bereaved of both parents. And this I purpose to 
do. 

May 24. From the time that I began to write down the 
exercises of my mind on Dec. 5, 1850, till this da}', ninety- 
two more orphans have been applied for, and seventy-eight 
were already waiting for admission before. But this num- 
ber increases rapidly, as the work becomes more and more 
known. 

On the ground of what has been recorded above, I pur- 
pose to go forward in this service, and to seek to build, to 
the praise and honor of the living God, another Orphan 
House, large enough to accommodate seven hundred 
orphans. 

When I published these exercises of my mind, and made 
known my purpose respecting the intended Orphan House 
for seven hundred orphans, in the Twelfth Report of the 
Scriptural Knowledge Institution, the following particulars 
were added to what has been stated : — 

1. All this time, though now six months have elapsed, 
since I first began to be exercised about this matter, I have 
never once been led to ask the Lord for means for this work, 
but have only continued day b}^ day, to seek guidance from 
him as to whether I should undertake it or not. 

2. The means requisite to accomplish the building and 
fitting up of a house which shall be really suitable for my 
intended purposes, though the building be quite simple, can- 



1849. A NEW VICTORY OF FAITH. 367 

not be iess than thirty-five thousand pounds, including fif- 
teen or twenty acres of land round the building for cultiva- 
tion by the spade, in order to obtain out of our own grounds 
all the vegetables which are so important to the health of 
the children. 

3. I do not mean to begin the building until I have the 
means requisite in hand, just as was the case with regard 
to the new Orphan House. If God will condescend to use 
me in building for him another Orphan House (as I judge 
he will) he will give me the means for it. xTow, though 1 
have not on my own mind any doubt left that it is his will 
that I should do so, which has been stated ag.ain and again 
'n the preceding pages ; yet there is one point still wanting 
for confirmation, and that is, that he will also furnish me, 
without personal application to any one, with all the means 
requisite for this new part of my service. I am the more 
needing also to my own soul this last of all the proofs that I 
have not been mistaken (as I firmly believe I have not 
been) , in order to have unquestionable assurance that, what- 
ever trials hereafter might be allowed to befall me in con- 
nection with this work, I did not at my own bidding and 
according to my own natural desire undertake it, but that 
it was under the guidance of God. The greatness of the 
sum required affords me a kind of secret joy ; for the greater 
the difficulty to be overcome, the more will it be seen, to the 
glory of God, how much can be done bj r prayer and faith ; 
and also because, when God himself overcomes our diffi- 
culties for us, we have, in this very fact, the assurance that 
we are engaged in his work, and not in our own. 




CHAPTEK XXI. 

UNVARYING PROSPERIT^T. 

1850 — 1852. 

DESIRES FOR MORE ENLARGED USEFULNESS GRATIFIED — A LARGE DONATION 
ANTICIPATED AND RECEIVED — REVIEW OF 1851 — PERSONAL EXPERDZNOE 

— BUILDING FUND FOR TIIE SECOND NEW ORPHAN HODSE — DOUBT RESISTED 

— WAITING ON GOD NOT IN VAIN — REVIEW OF 1852. 

T the commencement of the year beginning with 
Ma} T , 1850, it was iny purpose to seek help from 
the Lord that I might be able, in a still greater 
degree than before, to assist brethren who labor in 
the gospel at home and abroad, in dependence upon God 
for their temporal supplies, and to labor more than ever in 
the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, and of simple gospel 
tracts. 

June 11. By the sums which came in within the first fif- 
teen days of this period I was able to begin to carry out the 
purpose I had formed ; and as the Lord enabled me, without 
anxious reckoning, to go on giving out as he was pleased 
to intrust me with means, so again he sent further supplies 
before all was gone. It is a point of great importance in 
the divine life not to be anxiously reckoning about the 
morrow, nor dealing out sparingly on account of possible 
future wants which never may come ; but to consider that 
the present moment to serve the Lord only is ours, and that 
the morrow may never come to us. 

April 20, 1851. During the whole of the current year, 

up to this date, the Lord has so abundantly supplied me 

with means that there came not one single case before me 

in which it would have been desirable to help, according to 

868 



1851. UNVARYING PROSPERITY. 369 

the measure of light given to me, or to extend the work, 
without my having at the same time ample means for doing 
so. In the midst of the great depression of the times, 
which was so generally felt, and on account of which, 
humanly speaking, I also might have been exceedingly tried 
for want of means, I, on the contrary, at no period of the 
work for the seventeen }^ears previous had a greater abun- 
dance of means. I do on purpose lay stress upon this be- 
cause I desire that it may become increasingly known that 
there is no easier, no better, and no happier way in the end 
than God's way, and this in particular also with regard to 
the obtaining of means simply in answer to prayer, without 
personal application to any one. 

At the beginning of the year I had more in hand for the 
orphans than for many years before under similar circum- 
stances, the balance for current expenses on May 26, 1850, 
being one hundred and fifty pounds seven shillings ten- 
pence. Yet, much as this was in comparison with what 
the balance had generally been before, how small was the 
amount in reality ! About tlrree hundred persons were 
connected with the new Orphan House, who day by day 
were to be provided with all they needed, besides several 
apprentices who also were still to be supported. On this 
account the one hundred and fifty pounds in hand would 
only furnish that which was needed for about fifteen daj T s, 
as the average expenses of the orphan work alone were 
about ten pounds daily. Place yourself, therefore, dear 
reader, in my position. Three hundred persons daily at 
table, and one hundred and fifty pounds in hand ! Look- 
ing at it naturally, it is enough to make one tremble ; but 
trusting in the living God, as by his grace I was enabled 
to do, I had not the least trial of mind, and was assured 
that God would as certainly help me as he had done four- 
teen years before, when the number of the orphans was 
only the tenth part as large. 

Jan. 4, 1851. This very day the Lord has given me a 



370 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXI. 

most precious proof that he delights in our having large 
expectations from him. I have received this evening the 
sum of three thousand pounds, being the largest donation 
which I have had as yet. I now write again that I expect 
far larger sums still, in order that it may be yet more and 
more manifest that there is no happier, no easier, and no 
better way of obtaining pecuniary means for the work of 
the Lord than the one in which I have been led. How great 
my joy in God is, on account of this donation, cannot be 
described ; but it is not in the least coupled with excite- 
ment. I take this donation out of the hands of the living 
God ; I continually look for his help, and am perfectly as- 
sured that I shall have it, and therefore is my soul calm 
and peaceful, without any excitement, though the donation 
is so large. This donation is, however, like a voice from 
heaven speaking to me concerning a most deeply impor- 
tant matter respecting which I am seeking guidance from 
the Lord, the building of another Orphan House. 

May 26. I am brought to the close of this period. The 
work is more and more enlarging. During the last month 
I have paid out for the orphans more than four hundred 
and fifty pounds, and for the other objects more than five 
hundred pounds, being nearly one thousand pounds during 
one month ; and yet I have a greater balance left in hand, 
through the Lord's kindness, than at the close of any of 
the previous periods. 

From May 26, 1850, to May 26, 1851, there were four day schools 
in Bristol, with 286 children in them, entirely supported by the funds 
of the Institution ; and three others in Devonshire, Gloucestershire, 
and Norfolk, with 180 children in them, were assisted. Further, one 
Sunday school in Bristol, with 184 children, was entirely supported, 
and two others in Devonshire and Gloucestershire, with 213 children, 
were assisted. Lastly, an adult school in Bristol, with 90 persons in 
it, was entirely supported. The expenses connected with all these 
various schools were, during this period, £379, 17s. From the forma- 
tion of the Institution, on March 5, 1834, up to May 26, 1851, there 



1851. UNVARYING PROSPERITY. 371 

were 5,343 children in the various day schools in Bristol alone, 2,379 
in the Sunday school, and 1,896 persons in the adult school, besides 
the thousands in the schools out of Bristol which were assisted. 

There were expended during this period, out of the funds of the In- 
stitution, on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, £150, 16s. 5d. 
There were 345 Bibles sold, and 899 given away; and 30 New Testa- 
ments sold, and 413 given away, during this period. From March 5, 
1834, to May 26, 1851, there were circulated 7,709 Bibles and 4,442 
New Testaments. 

During this year were spent of the funds of the Institution, for mis- 
sionary objects, the sum of £2,000, lis. Id. By this sum forty-five 
laborers in the word and doctrine in various parts of the world were 
to a greater or less degree assisted. The total amount of £2,000 was 
sent to these forty-five servants of the Lord Jesus in 264 different 
sums. 

During this period £358, 7s. 3d. were expended on the circulation 
of tracts, and 303,098 tracts and little books were circulated. I was 
permitted to send out more tracts than during the whole of the previous 
ten years taken together. Nor must it be withheld from the reader, 
as matter for thankfulness, that the Lord was pleased to allow me to 
hear again and again of instances of conversion, by means of the dis- 
tribution of these tracts during this period. 

On May 26, 1850, there were 275 orphans in the new Orphan House 
on Ashley Down, Bristol. On May 26, 1851, there were 300 orphans 
in the new Orphan House. The total number of orphans who were 
under our care from April, 1836, to May 26, 1851, is 488> There 
came in altogether during this year £4,102, 14s. 9|d. for the support 
of the orphans, and £3,640, 9s. If d. for the other objects; and, after 
having met to the full every demand with reference to the orphans, 
the balance of £970, 13s. ll|d. remained in hand. Also, after having 
entered into every door which the Lord was pleased to set before me 
respecting the other objects, and to do far more than during any one 
year previously, the balance of £809, 10s. 6d. remained in hand on 
May 26, 1851. Verily we do not trust in the Lord in vain ! 

Without any one having teen personally applied to for anything 
by one, the sum of £38,018, 4s. 6£d. was given to me for the orphans 
as the result of prayer to God from the commencement of the work 
May 26, 1G51. It may be also interesting to the reader to know that 
the total amount which was given as free contributions for the other 
objects from the commencement of the work to May 26, 1851, 
amounted to £13,988, lis. 9jd. and that which came in by the sale of 



372 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXI. 

Bibles and tracts, and by the payments of the children in the day 
schools, amounted to $2,890, 9s. Hid. 

It pleased the Lord greatly to gladden our hearts by the ■working of 
his Holy Spirit among the orphans during this period. 

Dec. 31, 1850. During this year there have been received into 
fellowship 57, and altogether, from the time that brother Craik and I 
began to labor in Bristol, 1,313. The Lord has been pleased to give 
me, for my personal expenses, £402, 4s. 5d. 

May 26, 1851. The reader will remember that x stated 
in a previous chapter that I purposed, not in dependence 
upon my Christian friends, nor in dependence upon former 
donors, but alone in dependence upon the living God, to 
enlarge the orphan work. Before I brought before the 
public what I purposed to do, I gave the record of the 
exercises of my mind on this subject to a valued Christian 
friend to read, the only one who, besides my family, knew 
anything of this my intention before it came before the 
public. I did this particularly in order that, after I had 
been waiting for several months in secret upon God for 
guidance and direction concerning it, I might also have the 
counsel of a prayerful, judicious, and cautious man of God. 
When v this brother returned the manuscript, he spoke to me 
words of encouragement concerning this purpose, and gave 
me a half sovereign towards the building fund for this house 
for seven hundred destitute orphans. This was the first 
donation, which I received on May 13, 1851, and which, I 
confess, was a "great refreshment and encouragement to me, 
the more so as it came from so cautious a brother, and after 
I had been for several months, through secret prayer, as- 
sured that I should go forward. 

On May 28, 1851, my intention became publicly known, 
and in the evening of May 29 I received from a Christian 
lady a sovereign towards the building fund. 

June 1. A brother in the Lord, who gives his donations 
with the letter "P.," gave me ten shillings. I also received 
a sovereign. This evening I received still further four half 



1851. UNVARYING PROSPERITY. 373 

crowns, with very encouraging words and expressions of 
joy that I have been led to this purpose of building another 
Orphan House for seven hundred more orphans. There 
came to hand, also anonymously, three shillings. Ditto an 
old shilling, a small American coin, and two shillings. 
Also from a Christian servant in Clifton two shillings six- 
pence. 

June 21. Twenty-four days have now passed away since 
I have been enabled, day by day, to wait with a goodly 
measure of earnestness and in faith upon the Lord for 
means ; but as yet only a little above twenty-eight pounds 
has come. But I am not discouraged. The less there 
comes in, the more earnestly I pray, the more I look out 
for answers, and the more assured I am that the Lord, in 
his own time, after he has tried my faith, will send me 
larger sums, and, at last, all I need. 

Aug. 12. Day by day I am waiting upon the Lord for 
means for this object, and generally more than once a day 
am I bowing my knees before God with reference to it. 
Moreover, of late I have been enabled, with increasing ear- 
nestness, to beseech the Lord that he would be pleased to 
send in means for the building fund. My soul has been 
all along at peace, though onl} r so little, as yet, compara- 
tively, has come in (in all, one hundred and twenty seven 
pounds nineteen shillings sixpence) ; and though Satan has 
in the most subtle way sought to shake my confidence, and 
to lead me to question whether, after all, I had not been 
mistaken concerning this whole matter. Yet, though he 
has aimed after this, to the praise of God I have to confess 
that he has not been allowed to triumph. I have especially 
besought the Lord of late that he would be pleased to re- 
fresh my spirit by sending in some large donation for this 
pajt of the work. Under these circumstances I received 
this morning five hundred pounds for the new building. 
I was not in the least excited. I look out for means. Even 
thai very moment , when I received this donation, I was look- 



374 THE L[FE OF TRUST. Chap. XXI. 

ing out for means, for large donations ; and I should not 
have been surprised if five thousand pounds had come in or 
more. The Lord be praised for this precious encourage- 
ment, which has still further quickened me for prayer ! 

March 17, 1852. Day by day I am waiting upon God for 
means. With full confidence, both as to the power of the 
Lord to give me the means, and likewise his willingness, I 
am enabled to continue to wait. But he is pleased to exer- 
cise my faith and patience, and especially has this been the 
case of late. Not more than twentj^-seven pounds eleven 
shillings have come in during the last four weeks for the 
building fund. Yet, amidst it all, b}^ the help of God, my 
heart has been kept looking to the Lord, and expecting help 
from him. Now to-day my heart has been greatly refreshed 
by a donation of nine hundred and ninet3 r -nine pounds thir- 
teen shillings fivepence. I cannot describe to any one how 
refreshing this donation is 'to my spirit. After having been 
for weeks, day b} r day, waiting upon the Lord, and receiving 
so little comparatively, either for current expenses or for the 
building fund, this answer to many prayers is exceedingly 
sweet to my spirit. 

May 20. There remained in hand from the former build- 
ing fund the balance of £776, 14s. 4|d., which I added to 
the present building fund, so that on the evening of May 26, 
1852, I had altogether £3,530, 9s. Ojd. 

Supplies for the School, Bible, Missionary, and Tract Fund, sent 
in answer to prayer from May 26, 1851, to May 26, 1852. — At no 
time during the past eighteen years did I begin a new period with so 
much money in hand as was the case at the commencement of this. 
These was a balance of £809, 10s. 6d. left for these objects. Long 
before this balance was expended, however, the Lord was pleased to 
send in further supplies; so that during all the year there did not 
come before me one single instance in which, according to my judg- 
ment, it would have been desirable to help forward schools or mis- 
sionary objects, or the circulation of the Holy Scriptures and tracts, 
but I had always the means in hand for doing so. 

Supplies for the Support of ths Orphans sent in answer to prayer 



1852. UNVARYING PROSPERITY. 375 

from May2Q, 1351, to May 26, 1852. — When this period commenced 
I had in hand for the current expenses for the orphans £970, 13s. llfd, 
We had never had so large a balance for the other objects at the com- 
mencement of any new period as was the case at the commencement 
of this, and so it was also with regard to the orphan work. But 
though there was this large balance to begin with, dependence upon 
God was still required day by day, as the pecuniary help is only i 
very small part of that which is needed ; and even as to means, this 
sum would not have lasted long, had the Lord not sent in farther sup- 
plies. This, however, he did ; and thus it was that while there were 
other trials, varied and many, yet, as to means, we experienced 
scarcely any difficulty at all. 

During the period from May 26, 1851, to May 26, 1852, there were 
entirely supported by the funds of the Institution four day schools in 
Bristol, with 248 poor children in them, and three others in Devon- 
shire, Monmouthshire, and Norfolk, were assisted. Further, one 
Sunday school in Bristol, with 243 children, was entirely supported, 
and two others in Devonshire and Gloucestershire, with 230 children, 
were assisted. Lastly, one adult school in Bristol, with 120 adult 
scholars, was entirely supported during this period. From March 5, 
1834, up to May 26, 1852, there were 5,525 children in the day schools 
in Bristol, 2,600 in the Sunday school, and 2,033 grown-up persons in 
the adult school. There were expended of the funds of the Institution, 
for these various schools, during this period, £360, Is. 9d. 

During this period, there were expended of the funds of the Institu- 
tion £207, 3s. Id. for the purpose of circulating the Holy Scriptures, 
especially among the very poorest of the poor. There were issued 
during this period 1,101 Bibles and 409 New Testaments. There were 
altogether circulated from March 5, 1834, up to May 26, 1852, 8,810 
Bibles, and 4,851 New Testaments. 

During this year there was spent of the funds of the Institution, for 
missionary objects, the sum of £2,005, 7s. 5d. By this sum fifty-one 
laborers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were 
to a greater or less degree assisted. 

There was laid out for the circulation of tracts, from May 26, 1851, 
to May 26, 1852, the sum of £356, lis. 3id. There were circulated 
during the year 489,136 tracts. 

The total number of tracts which were circulated from the begin- 
ning up to May 26, 1852, was 1,086,366. 

On May 26, 1851, there were 300 orphans in the new Orphan House 
on Ashley Down, Bristol. From that day up to May 26, 1852, there 
were admitted into it 27 orphans. The total of the expenses con- 



o 



7<> THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXI. 



nected with the support of the orphans, from May 26, 1851, to May 26- 
1852, was £3,035, 3s. 4d. The total number of orphans who were 
under our care from April, 1836, to May 26, 1852, was 515. 

Without any one having been personally applied to for anything by 
me, the sum of £42,970, 17s. 6d. was given to me for the orphans as 
the result of prayer to God from the commencement of the work up 
to May 26, 1852. It may be also interesting to the reader to know 
that the total amount which was given as free contributions, for the 
other objects, from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 
1852, amounted to £15,976, 10s. 6|d. ; and that which came in by the 
sale of Bibles and tracts, and by the payments of the children in the 
day schools, amounted to £3,073, Is. 9fd. Besides this, also, a great 
variety and number of articles of clothing, furniture, provisions, etc., 
were given for the use of the orphans. 

Several of the orphans who left the establishment during this year 
went away as believers, having been converted some time before they 
left ; one also who died gave very decided evidence of a true change 
of heart by faith in our Lord Jesus ; several who in former years 
were under our care, as we heard during this year, took their stand 
openly on the Lord's side, and dated their first impressions to the in- 
structions received whilst under our care ; and lastly, of those under 
our care, there were not a few whose spiritual state gave us joy and 
comfort. Thus, amidst many difficulties and trials and some discour- 
agements, we had abundant cause to praise God for his goodness, and 
to go forward in the strength of the Lord. 

Dec. 31, 1851. During this year the Lord was pleased to give me, 
for my personal expenses £465, 13s. l|d. 




CHAPTEE XXII. 

REAPING IN JOT. 

1852 — 1854. 

EXPECTING GREAT THINGS FROM GOD — MUNIFICENT DONATION — INCREASING 
USEFULNESS OF THE SCRIPTURAL KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTION — ACCESS 
TO GOD THROUGH FAITH IN CHRIST — A VOICE FROM MOUNT LEB- 
ANON — BENEFIT OF "WAITING GOD'S TIME — CAREFUL ' STEWARDSHIP — 
FAITH, THE ONLY RELIANCE — " THIS POOR WIDOW HATH CAST IN MORE 
THAN THE? ALL" — GREATER ACHIEVEMENTS OF FAITH ANTICIPATED 
— COUNSEL TO TRACT DISTRIBUTORS — A NEW AND SEVERE TKIAL OF 
FAITH. 

N May 26, 1852, there were in hand toward the 
erection of the second new Orphan House three 
thousand five hundred and thirty pounds nine 
shillings sixpence and one farthing. Donations varying 
in amount from three hundred pounds to fourpence con- 
tinued to be received in answer to prayer. On the 4th of 
Jan. 1853, Mr. M. writes : — 

From London two shillings sixpence. Day by day I 
have now been waiting upon God for means for the build- 
ing fund for more than nineteen months, and almost daily 
I have received something in answer to prayer. These 
donations have been, for the most part, small, in compari- 
son with the amount which will be required for the completion 
of this object ; nevertheless, they have shown that the Lord, 
for the sake of his dear Son, listens to my supplications, 
and to those of my fellow-laborers and helpers in the work ; 
and they have been precious encouragements to me to con- 
tinue to wait upon God. I have been for many months 
assured that the Lord, in his own time, would give larger 
32* 377 



378 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXII, 

sums for this work ; but for this I have been more and more 
earnestly entreating him during the last months. Now at 
last he has abundantty refreshed my spirit, and answered 
my request. I received to-day, the promise that, as the 
joint donation of several Christians, there should be paid 
me a donation of eight thousand and one hundred pounds, 
for the work of the Lord in my hands. 

It is impossible to describe the spiritual refreshment 
which my heart received through this donation. Day by 
day, for nineteen months, I had been looking out for more 
abundant help than I had had. I was fully assured that 
God would help me with larger sums ; }~et the delay was 
long. See how precious it is to wait upon God ! See how 
those who do so are not confounded ! Their faith and pa- 
tience may long and sharply be tried ; but in the end it will 
most assurecll}' be seen that those who honor God he will 
honor, and will not suffer them to be put to shame. The 
largeness of the donation, whilst it exceedingly refreshed 
nry spirit, did not in the least surprise me ; for I expect 
great things from God. Have I been boasting in God in 
vain ? Is it not manifest that it is most precious in every 
way to depend upon God ? Do I serve God for naught ? 
Is it not obvious that the principles on which I labor are 
not only applicable to the work of God on a small scale, but 
also, as I have so many times affirmed during the past nine- 
teen years, for the most extensive operations for God? 

During the year ending May 26, 1853, nine thousand and 
one pounds three shillings were received toward the building 
fund, making the present amount of that fund twelve thou- 
sand five hundred and thirty-one pounds twelve shillings one 
farthing. 

For the various objects of the Scriptural Knowledge In- 
stitution, viz., for school, missionary, Bible, and tract pur- 



1852 REAPING IN JOT. 379 

poses, I had to expend during the year from May, 1852, to 
May, 1853, about six hundred pounds per month, or aboA ; e 
seven thousand pounds in all ; but I had sufficient to meet 
every demand ; and over and above I was helped by the 
Lord to increase the building fund nine thousand pounds. 
The current expenses of the Institution were never so great 
during the previous nineteen years ; but the extent of its 
operations, and the means which the Lord was pleased to 
send in, were also never so great. 

You see, dear reader, that we are richly recompensed for 
our waiting upon God. You perceive the readiness of his 
heart to listen to the supplications of his children who put 
their trust in him. If you have never made trial of it, do 
so now. But in order to have your prayers answered, you 
need to make your requests unto God on the ground of the 
merits and worthiness of the Lord Jesus. You must not 
depend upon your own worthiness and merits, but solely on 
the Lord Jesus, as the ground of acceptance before God, for 
your person, for your praj^ers, for your labors, and for ev- 
erything else. Do you really believe in Jesus ? Do j t ou 
verily depend upon him alone for the salvation of your 
soul ? See to it well that not the least degree of your own 
righteousness is presented unto God as a ground of accept- 
tance. But then, if you believe in the Lord Jesus, it is 
further necessary, in order that your prayers may be an- 
swered, that the things which you ask God should be of 
such a kind that God can give them to you, because they 
are for his honor and your real good. If the obtaining of 
your requests were not for your real good, or were not tend- 
ing to the honor of God, you might pray for a long time 
without obtaining what you desire. The glory of God 
should be always before the children of God, in what they 
desire at his hands ; and their own spiritual profit, being so 
intimately connected with the honor of God, should never 
be lost sight of in their petitions. But now, suppose we 
are believers in the Lord Jesus, and suppose we make our 



380 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXII. 

requests unto God, dependiug alone on the Lord Jesus as 
the ground of having them granted ; suppose also, that, so 
far as we are able honestly, and uprightly to judge, the ob- 
taining of our requests would be for our real spiritual good, 
and for the honor of God ; we yet need, lastly, to continue 
in prayer until the blessing is granted unto us. It is not 
enough to begin to pray, nor to pray aright ; nor is it enough 
to continue for a time to pray ; but we must patiently, be- 
lievingly, continue in prayer until we obtain an answer ; 
and, further, we have not only to continue in prayer unto the 
end, but we have also to believe that God does hear us, and 
will answer our prayers. Most frequently we fail in not con- 
tinuing in praj^er until the blessing is obtained, and in not 
expecting the blessing. As assuredly as in any individual 
these various points are found united together, so assuredly 
will answers be granted to his requests. 

During the year 1852-53, the expense of the support of 
the orphans was fully met by unsolicited donations. Two 
or three particulars only will be given. 

June 29, 1852. To-day I received one of the most 
remarkable donations which I ever had. T give the 
whole account, without the name of the dono 

Lyons, June 24, 1852. 
Dear Brother in Christ : - 

It is now several years that I read with great interest, and I hope 
with some benefit to my soul, the account of your labors and experi- 
ences. Ever since then your work was the object of many thoughts 
and prayers, and I gave many copies of your book to Christian friends. 
One of them has read it in Syria, on Mount Lebanon, where he is 
for commercial business ; and, whilst praying for you and your dear 
orphans, the Lord put it in his heart to send you two pounds, to 
which my husband added two others ; and we beg you to accept that 
small offering in the name of the Lord. If you have published any- 
thing of the Lord's dealings with you since the year 1844, we shall be 
very happy to receive it. You could forward it to Messrs. * * * *, 
London, for * * * * of Lyons. And now, dear brother, may the grace 
and peace of the Lord rest on you and your dear home's inhabitants. 

Affectionately yours in the Lord, 



1852. REAPING IN JOT. 381 

I have had donations from Australia, the East Indies, the 
West Indies, the United States, Canada, from the Cape of 
Good Hope, from France, Switzerland, Germany, Italy, etc. ; 
and now comes also this donation from Mount Lebanon, 
with the prayer of a Christian brother whose name I never 
heard nor know even now. See, dear reader, this is the 
way in which the Lord has helped me in this precious 
service for twenty-two years. "With my fellow-laborers, or 
without them, and they without me, our prayers are offered 
up unto the Lord for help, and he is pleased, for Jesus' 
sake, to listen to our supplications, and to influence the 
hearts of some of his children, known to us or not, to send 
us help. The donors may be rich or poor ; they may live 
near, or at a distance of more than ten thousand miles ; 
they may give much or little ; they may have often given 
before, or never ; they may be well known to us, or not at 
all : in these and many other things there may be constant 
variations ; but God continually helps us ; we are never 
confounded. And why not? Simply because we are 
enabled by the grace of God to put our trust in him for 
what we need. 

Oct. 9. This morning Luke vii. came in the course of 
my reading before breakfast. While reading the account 
about the centurion and the raising from death of the 
widow's son at Nain, I lifted up my heart to the Lord 
Jesus thus : " Lord Jesus, thou hast the same power now. 
Thou canst provide me with means for thy work in my 
hands. Be pleased to do so." About half an hour after- 
wards I received two hundred and thirty pounds fifteen 
shillings ; also one shilling. These two hundred and thirty 
pounds fifteen shillings were left at my disposal, as most 
ueeded. I took one-half for the current expenses for 
the orphans, and the other half for the other objects. I 
am now amply provided for meeting the demands of this 
day. 

The joy which such answers to prayer afford cannot be 



382 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXII. 

described. I was determined to wait upon God only, and 
not to work an unscriptural deliverance for rnyself. I have 
thousands of pounds for the building fund ; but I would 
not take of it because it was once set apart for that object. 
There is also a legacy of one hundred pounds for the or- 
phans two months overdue, in the prospect of the payment 
of which the heart might be naturally inclined to use some 
money from the building fund, to be replaced by the legacy 
money when it comes in ; but I would not thus step out of 
God's way of obtaining help. At the very time when this 
donation arrived, I had packed up one hundred pounds 
which I happened to have in hand, received for the building 
fund, in order to take it to the bank, as I was determined not 
to touch it, but to wait upon God. My soul does magnify 
the Lord for his goodness ! 

This last paragraph is copied out of my journal, written 
down at the time. I add a few words more to the last- 
sentences. 

The natural mind is ever prone to reason, when we ought 
to believe; to be at ivorle, when we ought to be quiet; to go 
our own way when we ought steadily to walk on in God's 
ways, however trjdng to nature. When I was first con- 
verted, I should have said, What harm can there be to take 
some of the money which has been put by for the building 
fund ? God will help me again after some time with means 
for the orphans, and then I can replace it. Or, there is 
this money due for the legacy of one hundred pounds. 
This money is quite sure ; may I not, therefore, on the 
strength of it, take some of the money from the building 
fund, and, when the legacy is paid, replace the money which 
I have taken? From what I have seen of believers, I know 
that many would act thus. But how does it work, when 
we thus anticipate God, b} r going our own way ? We bring, 
in many instances, guilt on our conscience ; but if not, we 
certainly weaken faith instead of increasing it ; and each 
time we work thus a deliverance of our own we find it more 



1852. REAPING IN JOY. 383 

and more difficult to trust in God, till at last we give way 
entirely to our natural fallen reason, and unbelief prevails. 
How different, if one is enabled to wait God's own time, 
and to look alone to him for help and deliverance ! W hen 
at last help comes, after many seasons of prayer it may be, 
and after much exercise of faith and patience it may be, 
how sweet it is, and what a present recompense does the 
soul at once receive for trusting in God, and waiting pa- 
tiently for his deliverance ! Dear Christian reader, if you 
have never walked in this path of obedience before, do so 
now, and you will then know experimentally the sweetness 
of the joy which results from it. 

Oct. 12. By sale of rags and bones twelve shillings six- 
pence. I copy literally from the receipt book. We seek to 
make the best of everything. As a steward of public 
money, I feel it right that even these articles should be 
turned into money ; nor could we expect answers to our 
prayers if knowingly there were any waste allowed in con- 
nection with this work. For just because the money is 
received from God, simply in answer to prayer only, there- 
fore it becomes us the more to be careful in the use of it. 

From Dec. 20, 1852, to Jan. 4, 1853, we had nothing in 
advance of our wants. Means came in only as they were 
required for pressing needs. But on the 4th January, we 
received, as stated under another head, the largest dona- 
tion I ever had, of which I took six hundred pounds for the 
support of the orphans. These facts I state, in order to 
give a practical illustration that those are entirely mistaken 
who suppose that the work is now no longer a work of faith, 
as it used to be in former 3 T ears. It is true, we have now a 
larger income than we used to have in the years 1838, 1839, 
and 1840 ; but it is also true that our expenses are three 
times as great. "We have no regular income now, even as 
we had not then. We ask no human being now for help ; 
even as we did not then. We depend alone upon God, by 
his grace ; even as we did then. Who is there in the whole 



384 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIL 

world who will state that I ever asked him for help in this 
orphan work, from its commencement, on Dec. 9, 1835, up 
till now ? Now, as we have no funds to live upon ; as we 
have no regular subscribers or donors upon whom we could 
depend ; as we never ask help from man, but God alone ; 
and as, finally, we never did go into debt for this work, nor 
do we now : why is it not now a work of faith, as formerly ? 
Will those who say it is not, place themselves in the posi- 
tion in which I was, when, at the close of the year 1852, I 
had not two pounds left, and about three hundred and 
thirty persons were day b} r day to be provided for, with all 
they need, and prove whether it is now anything else than 
a work of faith ? But perhaps I have said too much about 
this. For every one, except those who are determined not 
to see, will have no difficulty in perceiving that now, as 
formerly, one could only be kept from being overwhelmed 
in such a position by looking day by day to the Lord, and 
that not merely for pecuniary supplies, but for help under 
the numberless difficulties which continually are met with 
in such a work. 

How can I sufficiently praise, and adore, and magnify 
the Lord for his love and faithfulness in carrying me thus 
from year to year through this his service, supplying me 
with all I need in the way of means, fellow-laborers, men- 
tal strength, and, above all, spiritual support ! But for his 
help and support I should be completely overpowered in a 
very short time ; yet, by his help I go on, and am very 
happy, spiritually, in my service ; nor am I now generally 
worse in health than I was twent} T yesivs ago, but rather 
better. 

During the year 1852-53, there -were four day schools, with 235 
children in them, entirely supported by the funds of the Institution. 
Further, one Sunday school in Bristol, with 150 children, was entirely 
supported, and three others in Devonshire, Somersetshire, and 
Gloucestershire, with 280 children, were assisted. Lastly, one adult 
school, with 103 adult scholars, was entirely supported by the funds 



1853 REAPING IN JOT. 385 

of the Institution. There were under our care, from March 5, 1834, 
to May 26, 1853, in the various day schools 5,686 children, in the 
Sunday schools 2,673 children, and in the adult school 2,132 persons. 
There were expended of the funds of the Institution during this year, 
for the various schools, £349, 12s. lid. 

During this year there were laid out of the funds of the Institution, 
on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, £431, 5s. l^d., and there 
were circulated 1,666 Bibles and 1,210 New Testaments. There were 
circulated from March 5, 1834, up to May 26, 1853, 10,476 Bibles, and 
6,061 New Testaments. 

For several years past this part of the work has appeared more and 
more important to me on account of the fearful attempts which have 
been made by the powers of darkness to rob the church of Christ of 
the Holy Scriptures. I have on this account sought to embrace every 
opportunity to circulate the Holy Scriptures in England, Ireland, Can- 
ada, British Guiana, the East Indies, China, Australia, etc. Every 
open door which the Lord was pleased to set before me in these or 
other parts of the world, I have joyfully entered ; yea, I have counted 
it a privilege, indeed, to be permitted of God to send forth his Holy 
Word. Many servants of Christ, in various parts of the world, have 
assisted me in this service, through whose instrumentality copies of 
the Holy Scriptures have been circulated. 

During this year there were spent of the funds of the Institution for 
missionary objects £2,234, 2s. 6d. By this sum fifty-four laborers in 
the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a greater 
or less degree assisted. 

There was laid out for the circulation of tracts, from May 26, 1852, 
to May 26, 1853, the sum of £555, 16s. T^d. ; and there were circu- 
lated within this year 733,674 tracts. 

The total number of tracts which were circulated up to May 26, 
1853, was 1,820,040. From Nov. 19, 1840, to May 10, 1842, the first 
period that the circulation of tracts was in operation in connection 
with the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and Abroad, there 
were circulated 19,609 ; from May 26, 1851, to May 26, 1852, 489,136 ; 
and during this period 733,674. 

At the beginning of this period there were 300 orphans in the new 
Orphan House on Ashley Down, Bristol. During the year there were 
admitted into it 13 orphans, making 313 in all. The total number of 
orphans who were under our care from April, 1836, to May 26, 1853, 
was 528. 

Without any one having been personally applied to for anything by 
me, the sum of £55,408, 17s. 53 d. was given to me for the orphans, as 
S3 



386 THE LIFE OF TEUST. Chap. XXII. 

the result of prayer to God, from the commencement of the work up 
to May 26, 1853. It may be also interesting to the reader to know 
that the total amount which was given for the other objects, from the 
commencement of the work up to May 26, 1853, amounted to £19,163, 
14s. Ud. ; and that which came in by the sale of Bibles and tracts, 
and by the payments of the children in the day schools, amounted to 
£3,490, 7s. lid. Besides this, also, a great variety and number of 
articles of clothing, furniture, provisions, etc., were given for the use 
of the orphans. 

The expenses in connection with the support of the 300 orphans and 
the apprentices during this year were £4,453, 15s. l^d. 

Dec. 31, 1852. During this year there have been received into 
fellowship 35 believers. The Lord has been pleased to give unto me 
£445, 8s. 8£d. 

My brother-in-law, Mr. A. N. Groves, of whom mention 
has been made in the first part of this Narrative, as having 
been helpful to me by his example when I began my labors 
in England in 1829, in that he, without any visible support, 
and without being connected with any missionary society, 
went with his wife and children to Bagdad, as a missionary, 
after having given up a lucrative practice of about one 
thousand five hundred pounds per year, returned in autumn 
1852, from the East Indies, a third time, being exceedingly 
ill. He lived, however, till May 20, 1853, when, after a 
most blessed testimony for the Lord, he fell asleep in Jesus 
in my house. 

I have already stated that on May 26, 1853,1 had on hand 
toward building premises large enough for the accommoda- 
tion of 700 children, the sum of £12,531, 12s. OJd. 

A single circumstance will illustrate the widely diverse 
sources from which donations are received, as well as the 
great disparity in amount. 

Jan. 17, 1854. From S. R. and E. R., two poor factory 
girls, near Stroud, Is. 7d. This day I also received the 
promise that there should be paid to me, for the work of 



1854. REAPING IN JOY. 387 

the Lord in nry hands, £5,207, to be disposed of as I might 
consider best. 

The whole amount received for the new Orphan House, 
during the year closing May 26, 1854, was £5,285, 17s. 5d., 
which made the total of £17,816, 19s. 5Jd. in hand on 
May 26, 1854. 

During this year the current expenses for the various 
objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home 
and Abroad amounted to £7,507, 0s. 11^-cl., being £471, 8s. 
lid. more than during any previous year; yet the Lord 
not only enabled me to meet them all, but to add the sum 
of £5,285, 7s. 5d. to the building fund. 

There is yet a large sum required before I shall be enabled 
to build another house for 700 orphans ; nor have I now, any 
more than at the first, any natural prospect of obtaining 
what is yet needed ; but my hope is in the living God. 
When I came to the conclusion that it was the will of God 
that I should build another Orphan House, I had not only 
no natural prospect of obtaining the £35,000 which would 
be needed for this object, but also I had no natural prospect 
of being able to provide for the necessities of the three 
hundred orphans already under my care. Three years 
have elapsed since then, and I have had all I needed for 
them, amounting to about £10,500 ; and £17,816, 19s. 5Jd. 
I have received for the building fund. May I not well 
trust in the Lord for what is yet needed for the building 
fund ? By his grace I will do so, and delight in doing so ; 
for I know that at last all my pra} T ers will be turned into 
praises concerning this part of the service. 

There is one point which is particularly an encourage- 
ment to me to go on waiting upon the Lord for the remain- 
der of the means which are required, viz. : applications for 
the admission of orphans continue to be made. On May 
26, 1853, there were 480 orphans waiting for admission. 
Since then 181 more have been applied for, making in all 



388 THE LIFE OE TRUST. Chap. XXII. 

G61. These children are from three months old and 
upwards, and all bereaved of both parents by death. 

During the year now under review I received the fol- 
lowing donation for the missionary laborers, under circum- 
stances of peculiar interest. 

On Aug. 9, 1853, I received a letter from a Christian 
brother, accompanied with an order for eighty-eight pounds 
two shillings sixpence on his bankers, of which three 
pounds two shillings sixpence were the proceeds of an 
orphan box in a meeting-place of believers, and eighty-five 
pounds from a poor widow who had sold her little house, 
being all her property, and who had put ninety pounds, 
the total amount of what she had received, into that 
orphan box two months before, on June 9, 1853. In this 
box the money had been for some time, without its being 
known, till the orphan box was opened, and the ninet} r 
pounds with a few lines without name were found in it. 
As, however, the fact of her intending to sell the little 
house, and her intention of sending me the money for. the 
Lord's work had been known to the brother who sent me 
the money, he did not feel free to send it to me without 
remonstrating with her through two brethren, whom he 
sent with the money, offering it again to her ; for he knew 
her to be very poor, and feared that this might be an 
act of excitement, and therefore be regretted afterwards. 
These brethren could not prevail on her to receive back 
the money, but they did persuade her to receive back five 
pounds of the amount, and then the brother referred to 
felt no longer free to keep the money from me, and hence 
sent me the eighty-five pounds. 

On the receipt of this, I wrote at once to the poor godly 
widow, offering her the travelling expenses for coming 
to Bristol, that I might have personal intercourse with 
her ; for I feared lest this should be an act of excitement, 
and the more so, as she had received back five pounds of 
the sum. This sister in the Lord, a widow of about sixty 



1853. REAPING IN JOY. 389 

years of age, came to Bristol, and told me in all simplicity 
how that ten years before, in the year 1843, she had pur- 
posed that if ever she should come into the possession of 
the little house in which she lived with her husband, she 
would sell it, and give the proceeds of it to the Lord. 
About five years afterwards her husband died, and she, 
having no children, nor any one having particular claim 
upon her, then sought to dispose of her little property, as 
had been her mind all those years before. However, 
one difficulty after another prevented her being able to 
effect a sale. At last she felt in particular difficulty on ac- 
count of her inability to pay the yearly ground-rent of the 
little house and garden, and she asked the Lord to enable 
her to sell the property, in order that she might be able 
to carry out her desire which she had had for ten years, to 
give to him the proceeds of this her possession. He now 
helped her. The house was sold, the money paid, and she 
put «the whole ninety pounds into the orphan box for me, 
being assured that the Lord would direct me how best 
the money might be used for him. I still questioned her 
again and again, to find out whether it was not excitement 
which had led her to act as she had done ; but I not only 
saw that her mind had been fully decided about this act 
for ten j^ears before, but that she also was able to answer 
from the word of God all the objections which I purposely 
made, in order to probe her, whether she had intelligently 
and from right motives acted in what she had clone. At 
last I was fully satisfied that it was not from impulse, nor 
under excitement, that she had given the money. I next 
stated to her something like this : " You are poor, and you 
are about sixty years old, therefore decreasing in strength, 
and may you not therefore keep this money for yourself? " 
Her reply was, as nearly as I remember, something like 
this : " God has always provided for me, and I have no 
doubt he will do so in future also. I am able to work and 
to earn my bread as well as others, and am willing to work 



390 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXII. 

as a nurse, or in any other way." What could I say 
against this ? This is just what a child of God would sa}^, 
and should say. But the greatest of all the difficulties to 
the accepting of the eighty-five pounds remained in my 
mind, and I state it, as I relate the whole for the profit of 
the reader. It was this. The house had been sold for ninety 
pounds. The whole amount had been put into the box, 
but, on the persuasion of those two brethren who were 
requested to remonstrate with this widow, she had been 
induced to take back five pounds oat of the ninety pounds. 
I therefore said to myself, might she not be willing, after a 
time, to take back the whole ninety pounds ; how, therefore, 
can I feel happy in accepting this money ? On this account 
I particularly laid stress upon this point, and told her that 
I feared she might regret her act altogether after some 
time, as she had taken back these five pounds. I now learned 
the circumstances under which she had been induced to 
take back these five pounds. ■ 

The two brethren who had called on her for the pur- 
pose of pointing out to her the propriety of receiving back 
again the ninety pounds, or part of it, told her that Barna- 
bas sold his land, but afterwards lived with others on that 
which he and others had thrown into the common stock, 
and that, therefore, she might receive at least part of the 
ninety pounds back again, if she would not take the 
whole. She then said to herself that, " as a child of God, 
she might take the children's portion," and, as she had 
given to God these ninety pounds, she might receive five 
pounds back again. She told me that she considered the 
brethren had shown her from the Holy Scriptures what 
she might do, and therefore she had taken these five pounds. 
I did not myself agree with the judgment of those breth- 
ren who had said this (as there is no evidence that Barnabas 
ever was supported out of the common stock, the proceeds 
of the sale of houses and lands, out of which the poor 
were supported) ; but I purposely said nothing to the 



1853. REAPING IN JOY. 391 

widow, lest she should at once be induced to give me 
these five pounds also. She had, however, these five pounds 
untouched, and showed them to me ; and before she left she 
would make me take one pound for the benefit of the 
orphans, which I did not refuse, as I had no intention of 
keeping the eighty-five pounds. She also gave me a six- 
pence for the orphans, which some one had given her for 
herself, a few days before. 

I now asked her, as this matter concerning the retaining 
of the five pounds was satisfactorily explained, as far as it 
respected her own state of heart, what she wished me to do 
with the money, in case I saw it right to keep it. Her 
reply was that she would leave that with me, that God 
would direct me concerning it ; but that, if she said any- 
thing at all about it, she should most like it to be used for 
the support of brethren who labor in the word without any 
salary, and who hazard their lives for the name of Christ. 
She wished me to have a part of the money ; but this I 
flatly refused, lest I should be evil spoken of in this matter. 
I then offered to pay her travelling expenses, as she had 
come to me, which she would not accept, as she did not 
stand in need of it. In conclusion, I told her that I would 
now further pray respecting this matter, and consider what 
to do concerning it. I then prayed with this dear, godly 
woman, commended her to God, separated from her, and 
have not seen her since. 

I waited from Aug. 9, 1853, to March 7, 1854, when I 
wrote to her offering her back again the whole eight} T -five 
pounds, or a part of it. On March 9, 1854, just seven 
months after I received the money,. and just nine months 
after she had actually given it, and ten years and nine 
months after she had made the resolution to give her house 
and garden to God, I heard from her stating that she was 
of the same mind as she had been for years. I therefore dis- 
posed of the money, to aid such foreign missionary brethren 



392 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXII. 

as, according to the best of my knowledge, resembled most 
the class of men whom she wished to assist. 

The reasons why I have so minutely dwelt upon this cir- 
cumstance are : 1. If, as a steward of the bounties of the 
children of God, I should be blamed for receiving from 
a poor widow almost literally her all, it may be seen in 
what manner I did so. To have refused on March 9, 1854, 
also, would be going beyond what I should be warranted to 
do. 2. I desired, also, to give a practical illustration that 
I only desire donations in God's wa}^ It is not the money 
only I desire ; but the money received in answer to prayer, 
in God's order. 3. This circumstance illustrates how God 
helps me often in the most unexpected manner. 4. I have 
also related this instance that there may be a fresh proof 
that even in these last days the love of Christ is of con- 
straining power, and may work mightily, as in the da}'s of 
the apostles. I have witnessed ma?iy such instances as this, 
in the twenty years during which I have been occupied in 
this my service. Let us give thanks to God for such cases, 
and let us seek for grace rather to imitate such godly men 
and women, than think that they are going too far. 

I cannot, however, dismiss this subject, without com- 
mending this poor widow to the prayers of all who love 
our Lord Jesus, that she may be kept humble, lest, think- 
ing highly of herself, on account of what she has been 
able to do, by the grace of God, she should not only lose 
blessing in her own soul,, but this circumstance should be- 
come a snare to her. Pray also, believing reader, that she 
may never be allowed to regret what she has done for the 
Lord. 

After giving in detail the sources and manner of supply 
for the maintenance of the orphans during twenty-four days, 
Mr. M. adds : — 

The particular end wiry I have been so minute, is, to show 



1854. REAPING IN JOY. 393 

that the work is now, as much as ever, a work carried on en- 
tirely in dependence upon the living God, who alone is our 
hope, to whom alone we look for help, and ivho never has for- 
saken us in the hour of need. There is, however, one thing 
different with reference to this year, when compared with 
former years, and that is, that, while our trials of faith dur- 
ing this year were just as great as in previous years, the 
amount needed in former times was never so great as during 
this year, especially as the bread during the greater part of 
this year was about twice as dear as for several years be- 
fore. 

But then, it may be said, If you have had this trial of 
faith, with these three hundred orphans, why do you seek 
to build another Orphan House for seven hundred more, and 
thus have a thousand to care for ? Will vou not have still 
greater trials of faith ? 

My reply is : 1. God has never failed me all the twenty 
years of this my service. 2. I am going on as easily now, 
with three hundred orphans, as with thirt} r , the number with 
which I commenced. Their number is ten times as large 
as it was at the first ; but God has alwa}^s helped me. 3. 
Trials of faith were anticipated, yea, were one chief end of 
the work, for the profit of the church of Christ at large. 
4. I had courage given me to go forward, solely in depend- 
ence upon God, being assured that he would help me ; }^et 
I waited in secret upon him for six months before I made 
this my intention known, in order that I might not take a 
hasty step ; and I have never regretted my having gone for- 
ward. 5. But it needs to be added that the very abundance 
which the Lord gave me at the time, when my mind was 
exercised about this matter, was a great confirmation to me 
that I had not mistaken his mind. And even during this 
year, how great has been his help ; for the income for the 
work altogether has been twelve thousand seven hundred 
and eighty-five pounds fifteen shillings sevenpence half- 
penny. I am, therefore, assured that the Lord will, in his 



394 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXL t 

own time, not only allow me to build another Orphan House, 
but that he will also, when he shall have been pleased to 
fill it, find the means to provide for these children. 

During this year four day schools, with 202 children, were entirely 
supported by the funds of the Institution. Further, one Sunday 
school in Bristol, with 137 children, was entirely supported, and three 
others in Devonshire, Somersetshire, Gloucestershire, with 300 chil- 
dren, were assisted. Lastly, one adult school, with 154 adult scholars, 
was entirely supported. The total amount which was spent during 
this year in connection with these schools was £359, 15s. 10£d. The 
number of all the children who were under our care merely in the 
schools which were entirely supported by this Institution, from March 
5, 1834, to May 26, 1854, was 5,817 in the day schools, 2,748 in the 
Sunday schools, and 2,315 persons in the adult school. 

During thi3 year were expended on the circulation of the Holy Scrip- 
tures, of the funds of the Institution, £433, 2s. 9d. There were cir- 
culated during this year 1,890 Bibles and 1,288 New Testaments ; and 
from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 1854, 12,366 Bi- 
bles and 7,349 Testaments. 

During this year there was spent of the funds of the Institution, 
for missionary objects, the sum of £2,249, 10s. 8id. By this sum fifty- 
six laborers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, 
were to a greater or less degree assisted. 

During this year the Lord was pleased to bless again abundantly 
the labors of many of those servants of Christ who were assisted 
through the funds of this Institution, and this has been the case in 
foreign countries as well as at home. 

There was laid out for the circulation of tracts, from May 26, 1853, 
to May 26, 1854, the sum of £563, 5s. Oid. ; and there were circulated 
869,636 tracts. 

The total number of all the tracts which were circulated from the 
beginning up to May 26, 1854, was 2,689,676. 

We desire to be grateful to the Lord that during no 
period previously we were enabled to circulate more tracts, 
and more copies of the Holy Scriptures, and to aid to a 
greater degree missionary labors, than during this period ; 
yet we would not rest in that. It is the blessing of the 
Lord upon our labors which we need, which we desire, and 
which by his grace we also seek. 



1854. REAPING IN JOY. 395 

If any of the Christian readers are in the habit of circu- 
lating tracts, and yet have never seen fruit, may I suggest 
to them the following hints for their prayerful considera- 
tion. 1. Seek for such a state of heart, through pra}^er and 
meditation on the Holy Scriptures, as that you are willing 
to let God have all the honor, if any good is accomplished 
by your service. If you desire for yourself the honor, yea, 
though it were in part only, you oblige the Lord, so to 
speak, to put you as yet aside as a vessel not meet for the 
Master's use. One of the greatest qualifications for useful- 
ness in the service of the Lord is a heart truly desirous of 
getting honor for him. 2. Precede all your labors with 
earnest, diligent prayer ; go to them in a prayerful spirit ; 
and follow them by prayer. Do not rest on the number of 
tracts you have given. A million of tracts ma}' not be the 
means of converting one single soul ; and yet how great, 
beyond calculation, may be the blessing which results from 
one single tract. Thus it is also with regard to the circula- 
tion of the Holy Scriptures, and the ministry of the word 
itself. Expect, then, everything from the blessing of the 
Lord, and nothing at all from your own exertions. 3. 
And yet, at the same time, labor, press into every open 
door, be instant in season and out of season, as if every- 
thing depended upon your labors. This, as has been 
stated before, is one of the great secrets in connection with 
successful service for the Lord : to work, as if everything 
depended upon our diligence, and yet not to rest in the 
least upon our exertions, but upon the blessing of the Lord. 
4. This blessing of the Lord, however, should not merely 
be sought in prayer, but it should also be expected, looked 
for, continually looked for; and the result will be that we 
shall surely have it. 5. But suppose that, for the trial of 
our faith, this blessing were for a long time withheld from 
our sight ; or suppose, even, that we should have to fall 
asleep before we see much good resulting from our labors ; 
yet will our labors > if carried on in such a way and spirit as 



396 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXII. 

has been stated, be at last abundantly owned, and we shall 
have a rich harvest in the day of Christ. 

At the beginning of this period there were 300 orphans 
in the new Orphan House on Ashley Down, Bristol. Dur- 
ing the year there were admitted into it 30 orphans, making 
330 in all. The total number of orphans who were under 
our care from April, 1836, to May 26, 1854, was 558. 

The expenses during this year for the support of the orphans were 
£3,897, 2s. Q£. 

Without any one having been personally applied to for anything 
by me, the sum of £64,591, 6s. ll^d. was given to me for the orphans, 
as the result of prayer to God, from the commencement of the work 
up to May 26, 1854. It maybe also interesting to the reader to know 
that the total amount which was given for the other objects, from the 
commencement of the work up to May 26. 1854, amounted to 
£22,268, 2s. llgd. ; and that which came in by the sale of Bibles and 
tracts, and by the payments of the children in the day schools, from 
the commencement up to May 26, 1854, amounted to £3,989, 4s. 
Bid. 

Our labors continued to be blessed among the orphans. 
We saw also again fruit of our labors, during this year, 
with regard to orphans who formerly were under our care. 

In July, 1853, it pleased the Lord to try my faith in a 
way in which before it had not been tried. My beloved 
daughter, an only child, and a believer since the com- 
mencement of the year 1846, was taken ill on June 20. 
This illness, at first a low fever, turned to tjnphus. On 
July 3 there seemed no hope of her recovery. Now 
was the trial of faith. But faith triumphed. My beloved 
wife and I were enabled to give her up into the hands of 
the Lord. He sustained us both exceedingly. But I will 
only speak about myself. Though my only and beloved 
child was brought near the grave, yet was 1113' soul in 
perfect peace, satisfied with the will of my heavenly 
Father, being assured that he would only do that for her 
and her parents which in the end would be the best. 



1854 REAPING IN JOY. 397 

She continued very ill till about July 20, when restoration 
began. On Aug. 18 she was so far restored that she could 
be removed to Clevedon, for change of air, though exceed- 
ingly weak. It was then fifty-nine days since she was first 
taken ill. 

TVhile I was in this affliction, this great affliction, be- 
sides being at peace, as far as the Lord's dispensation was 
concerned, I also felt perfectly at peace with regard to the 
cause of the affliction. "When in August, 1831, the hand 
of the Lord was heavily laid on me in my family, as 
related in the first part of this Narrative, I had not the 
least hesitation in knowing that it was the Father's rod, 
applied in infinite wisdom and love for the restoration of 
my soul from a state of lukewarmness. At this time, how- 
ever, I had no such feeling. Conscious as I was of my 
manifold weaknesses, failings, and shortcomings, so that I 
too would be ready to say with the Apostle Paul, " O 
wretched man that I am ! " yet I was assured that this afflic- 
tion was not upon me in the way of the fatherly rod, but 
for the trial of my faith. Persons often have, no doubt, 
the idea respecting me, that all my trials of faith regard- 
matters connected with money, though the reverse has been 
stated by me very frequently ; now, however, the Lord 
would try my faith concerning one of my dearest earthly 
treasures, yea, next to my beloved wife, the dearest of all 
my earthly possessions. Parents know what an only child, 
a beloved child, is, and what to believing parents an only 
child, a believing child, must be. "Well, the Father in 
heaven said, as it were, by this his dispensation, .Art thou 
willing to give up this child to me? My heart responded, 
As it seems good to thee, my heavenly Father. Thy will 
be done. But as our hearts were made willing; to give back 
our beloved child to him who had given her to us, so he was 
ready to leave her to us, and she lived. " Delight tlryself 
also in the Lord ; and he shall give thee the desires of thine 
heart." Psalm xxxvii. 4. The desires of my heart were, 
34 



398 THE LIFJs OF TRUST. Chap. XXII. 

to retain the beloved daughter, if it were the will of God ; 
the means to return her were, to be satisfied with the will 
of the Lord. 

Of all the trials of faith that as yet I have had to pass 
through, this was the greatest ; and, by God's abundant 
mercy, I own it to his praise, I was enabled to delight my 
self in the will of God ; for I felt perfectly sure that if the 
Lord took this beloved daughter, it would be best for hei 
parents, best for herself, and more for the glory of God than 
if she lived : this better part I was satisfied with ; and thus 
my heart had peace, perfect peace, and I had not a moment's 
anxiety. Thus would it be under all circumstances, how- 
ever painful, were the believer exercising faith. 

Dec. 31, 1853. During this year the Lord was pleased to 
give me £638, lis. 8£d 




CHAPTEE XXIII. 

THPEE YEARS OF PROSPERITY, 

1854—1857. 

THE SITE SELECTED — SIX THOUSAND ORPHANS IN PRISON — HOW TO ASK 
FOR DALLY BREAD — REVIEW OF TWENTY-FOUR YEARS — " TAKE NO 
THOUGHT FOR THE MORROW" — INSURANCE AGAINST BAD DEBTS. 

URING the year ending May 26, 1855, Mr. M. 
received toward the erection of the second new 
Orphan House five thousand two hundred and 
forty-two pounds eighteen shillings threepence, 
and the whole sum on hand for this object amounted to 
twenty-three thousand and fifty-nine pounds seventeen 
shillings eightpence one farthing. After recording the 
amount thus obtained, he adds : — 

I judged that, though I had not such an amount of means 
in hand as I considered necessary before being warranted 
to begin to build, yet that I might make inquiries respect- 
ing land. Accordingly, I applied in the beginning of 
February for the purchase of two fields which join the land 
on which the new Orphan House is built. On these two 
fields I had had my eye for years, and had purposed to en- 
deavor to purchase them whenever I might be in such a 
position, as to means for the building fund, that it would 
be suitable to do so. I found, however, that, according to 
the will of the late owner of these fields, they could not be 
sold now. Thus my prospects were blighted. When I ob- 
tained this information, though naturally tried by it and 
disappointed, I said, by God's grace to myself, " The Lord 

399 



400 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIII. 

has something better to give me, instead of these two 
fields ; " and thus my heart was kept in peace. But when 
now the matter was fully decided that I could not obtain 
those fields, which had appeared to me so desirable for the 
object, the question arose, what I was to do for the obtain- 
ing of land. Under these circumstances some of my 
Christian friends again asked, as they had done before, why 
I did not build on the ground which we have around the 
new Orphan House. My reply was, as before, that it could 
not be done : 1. Because it would throw the new Orphan 
House for nearly two years into disorder, on account of the 
building going on round about it. 2. There would not be 
sufficient room without shutting in the present house to a 
great extent. 3. That, as the new Orphan House stands 
in the centre of our ground, there would not be sufficient 
room on any of the sides for the erection of a building so 
large as would be required. I was, however, led to con- 
sider whether there was any way whereby we could accom- 
plish the building on the ground belonging to the new 
Orphan House. In doing so, I found that, — 1. By having 
a high temporary boundary made of old boards, the build- 
ing ground could be entirely distinct from the present 
establishment. 2. By building on an entirely different plan 
from that of the present house, we should not only have 
room enough ; but that, also, 3. The present house would 
not be so inclosed that the health of the inmates of the 
establishment would thereby be injured. 

But there was in connection with this another point 
which now came under consideration in addition to the 
particulars already mentioned : it was this. Though for 
four y ears past I had never had a doubt as to its being the 
will of God that I should build accommodation for se-ven 
hundred more orphans ; jet, at the same time, I had for a 
long time seen the desirableness of having two houses 
instead of one, for the seven hundred orphans. This previ- 
ously formed judgment of having two houses for three 



1855. THREE YEARS OF PROSPERITY. 403 

hundred and fifty orphans in each, or four hundred in the 
one. and three hundred in the other, led me now to see 
whether there could be another house built on each side of 
the present new Orphan House ; and I judged, from meas 
uring the ground, that there was no objection to this plan. 
I then called in the aid of architects, to survey the ground 
and to make a rough plan of two houses, one on each side, 
and it was found that it could be accomplished. Having 
arrived thus far, I soon saw that we should not only save 
expense by this plan in various ways, but especially that 
thus the direction and inspection of the whole establish- 
ment would be much more easy and simple, as the buildings 
would be so near together. This, indeed, on being further 
considered, soon appeared to be a matter of such impor- 
tance, that if even land could be had but a quarter of a 
mile off, the difficulties would be greatly increased thereby. 
At the same time I found that we still should retain so 
much land for cultivation by the spade as would furnish 
some out-door employment for many boys, and would pro- 
duce such kind of vegetables as are the most important for 
young children, to be had fresh out of the ground ; or that 
we could easily rent a piece of ground near for that purpose, 
though it could not be bought. 

The result, then, to which I have arrived at present is 
this : that having seen what could be accomplished on the 
ground which we have already, I decided to build, without 
any further delay than was necessary for preparing the 
plans, at the south side of the new Orphan House, another 
house for four hundred children. The plans are nowread3 r , 
and in a very short time, God willing, i. e., as soon as all 
the necessary preliminaiy arrangements can be made, the 
building will commence, which I think will be in the early 
part of July of the present year (i. e., 1855). 

This house is intended for four hundred female orphans, 
bereaved of both parents, from their earliest days until they 
can be placed out in service. With regard to the other 



404 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIII. 

house for three hundred orphans, to be built at the north 
side of the new Orphan House, nothing definitely can be 
stated at present. There is enough money in hand to build, 
fit up, and furnish the house for four hundred orphans, and 
it is expected that something will be left ; but there is not 
sufficient money in hand, at present, to warrant the com- 
mencement of the building of both. As soon, however, as 
there is, I shall be delighted to take active measures with 
regard to that for three hundred orphans also. I do not 
ask persons to help me with their means. I speak to the 
Lord about my need in prayer, and I do not wait upon him 
in vain. At the same time I feel it right to state that there 
is a loud and an abundant call for caring for destitute or- 
phans. On May 26, 1854, 1 had six hundred and two wait- 
ing for admission, each bereaved of both parents by death. 
Since then, one hundred and ninety-seven more have been 
applied for, making in all, seven hundred and ninety-nine. 
Of these I have been able to receive only thirty-nine during 
the past year, and forty-five who were waiting for admission 
have been otherwise provided for, or have died since appli- 
cation was made for them ; so that still seven hundred and 
fifteen orphans are waiting for admission, from three 
months old and upward. But this number, I state unhesi- 
tatingly, would be much larger, had not very many persons 
refrained from making application because they judged it 
would be of no use, as there are already so many waiting 
for admission. Indeed, there is every reason to believe 
that there are many tens of thousands of destitute orphans 
in this country. And what provision is there in the way of 
orphan establishments, it may be asked. At the last cen- 
sus, in 1851, there were in England and Wales thirty-nine 
orphan establishments, and the total number of orphans, 
provided for through them, amounted only to three thou- 
sand seven hundred and sixty-four ; but at the time the new 
Orphan House was being built there were about six thou- 
sand young orphans in the prisons of England. To pre- 



1855. THREE TEARS OF PROSPERITY. 405 

vent their going to prison, to prevent their being brought 
up in sin and vice, yea, to be the honored instrument to 
win their souls for God, I desire, by his help, to enlarge the 
present establishment so as to be able to receive one thou- 
sand orphans ; and individuals who have purposed not to 
live for time but for eternity, and to look on their means 
as in the light of eternit}^, will thus have an opportunity of 
helping me to care for these children. It is a great honor 
to be allowed to do anything for the Lord ; therefore, I do 
not press this matter. We can only give to him of his 
own ; for all we have is his. When the day of recompense 
comes, the regret will only be that we have done so little 
for him, not that we have done too much. 

During the year from May, 1854, to May, 1855$ 
ample means were provided, in answer to prayer only, 
for the maintenance of the orphans, and for the various 
purposes of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution. The 
following statement exhibits the results of Mr. Muller's 
labors during the year under review : — 

During this year four day schools in Bristol, with 184 children in 
them, were entirely supported by the funds of the Institution ; and 
several other day schools in Devonshire, Cornwall, Suffolk, Ireland, 
and Scotland, were assisted with copies of the Holy Scripture's. Fur- 
iher, one Sunday school in Bristol, with 158 children, was entirely 
supported, and seven others in Cornwall, Devonshire, Somersetshire, 
and Gloucestershire, with about 400 children in them, were assisted. 
Lastly, one adult school, with 133 adults, was entirely supported dur- 
ing this year. The amount expended during this year, on these vari- 
ous schools, was £338, 2s. 5d. 

In connection with all these various schools, I would suggest the 
following important matter for prayer. From March, 1831, to May 
26, 1855, there were 5,956 children in the day schools. In the adult 
schools there were 2,459 persons. The number of the Sunday-school 
children amounted to 2,817. Thus, without reckoning the orphans, 
11,232 souls were brought under habitual instruction in the things of 
God in these various schools ; besides the many thousands in the 



406 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIII. 

schools in various parts of England, Ireland, Scotland, British Guiana, 
the "West Indies, the East Indies, etc., which were to a greater or less 
degree assisted. 

The total sum which was expended during the twenty-one years, 
from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1855, in connection with the schools, 
which were either entirely or in part supported by the funds of this 
Institution, amounted to £7,204, 12s. 8jd. 

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and portions of the Holy 
Scriptures, which were circulated from May 26, 1854, to May 26, 1855, 
is as follows : — 

Bibles sold, 693. Bibles given away, 890. Testaments sold, 950. 
Testaments given away, 748. Copies of the Psalms sold, 82. Other 
small portions of the Holy Scriptures sold, 136. 

There were circulated from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1855, through 
the medium of this Institution, 13,949 Bibles, 9,047 New Testaments, 
188 copies of the Psalms, and 789 other small portions of the Holy 
Scriptures. 

The total amount of the funds of this Institution spent on the cir- 
culation of the Holy Scriptures from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1855, 
is £3,389, 10s. Id. The amount spent during this year, £476, 12s. 3d. 

During this year there was spent of the funds of the Institution, for 
missionary objects, the sum of £2,081, 3s. 2d. By this sum fifty- seven 
laborers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were 
to a greater or less degree assisted. 

The total amount of the funds of the Institution spent on mission- 
ary operations, from March 5, 1834, to May 26, 1855, was £16,115, 
0s. 5id. 

There was laid out for tracts, from May 26, 1854, to May 26, 1855, 
the sum of £624, 8s. 4d. ; and there were circulated within this year 
895,034 tracts and books. . 

The total number of all the tracts and books which were circulated 
from the beginning up to May 26, 1855, was 3,584,710. 

The total amount of means expended on this object, from Nov. 19, 
1840, to May 26, 1855, was £2,868, 15s. 6|d., 

At the commencement of this period there were 298 orphans in the 
new Orphan House on Ashley Down, Bristol. During the year there 
were admitted into it 39 orphans. 

The expenses for the orphans during this year were £4,304, 4s. 7^d. 

Without any one having teen personally applied to for anything hy 
me, the sum of £74,132, 6s. 10:1 d. was given to me for the orphans, 
is the result of prayer to God, from the commencement of the work 
ip to May 26, 1855, which sum includes the £15,055, 3s. 2^d., which 



1855. THREE YEARS OF PROSPERITY. 407 

was the cost of the building, fitting up and furnishing of the present 
new Orphan House, and the £23,059, 17s. 8|d., which was in hand on 
the 26th May, 1855, for the building fund, and the £116, 17s. 8£d., the 
balance for the current expenses. It may also be interesting to the 
reader to know that the total sum which was given for the other ob- 
jects, from the commencement of the work up to May 26, 1855, 
amounted to £25,239, 8s. lO^d. and that which came in by the sale of 
Bibles and tracts, and by the payments of the children in the day 
schools, from the commencement, amounted to £4,531, 12s. lO^d. 
Besides this also a great variety and number of articles of clothing, 
furniture, provisions, etc., were given for the use of the orphans. 

I have the joy of being able to state that we have great cause for 
thankfulness in that in the midst of many difficulties our labors among 
the orphans continue to be blessed, and that especially again and 
again instances now come before us in which those who were formerly 
under our care declare themselves on the Lord's side. 

Besides being able to meet the expenses for the orphans and the 
other objects, amounting altogether to £7,832, 7s. 0£d., during this 
year I was able to add to the building fund £5,242, 18s. 3d. The total 
income during the year was £13,054, 14s. 4d. 

Dec. 31, 1854. During this year there have been received into 
fellowship 61. 

The Lord has been pleased to give me during this year £697, lis. 
5d. 

One or the other of my readers may be ready to exclaim, 
six hundred and ninety-seven pounds eleven shillings five- 
pence ! What a large sum ! Not one out of a hundred 
ministers has such a large salary, nor one out of twenty 
clergymen such a good living ! Should you, esteemed 
reader, say so, my reply is : Indeed, mine is a happy way 
for the obtaining of my temporal supplies ; but if any one 
desires to go this way, he must, — 

1 . Not merely say that he trusts in God, but must really 
do so. Often individuals profess to trust in God, but they 
embrace every opportunity where they may directly or 
indirectly be able to expose their need, and thus seek to 
induce persons to help them. I do not say it is wrong to 
make known our wants ; but I do say it ill agrees with 
trust in God to expose our wants for the sake of inducing 



408 TIIE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIII. 

persons to help us. God will take us at our word. If we 
say we trust in him, he will try whether we really do so, or 
only profess to do so; and if indeed we trust in him, we 
are satisfied to stand with him alone. 

2. The individual who desires to go this way must be 
willing to be rich or poor, as the Lord pleases. He must 
be willing to know what it is to have an abundance or 
scarcely anything. He must be willing to leave this world 
without &ny possessions. 

3. He must be willing to take the money in God's way. 
not merely in large sums, but in small. Again and again 
have I had a single shilling given or sent to me. To have 
refused such tokens of Christian love would have been un- 
gracious. 

4. He must be willing to live as the Lord's steward. If 
any one were to begin this way of living, and did not com- 
municate out of that which the Lord gives to him, but 
hoard it up, or if he would live up to his income, as it is 
called, then the Lord, who influences the hearts of his chil- 
dren to help him with means, would soon cause those chan- 
nels to be dried up. How it came that my already good 
income still more increased so as to come to what it is, I 
have stated in the early part of this volume ; it was when 
I determined that, by God's help, his poor and his work 
should more than ever partake of my means. From that 
time the Lord was pleased more and more to intrust me 
with means for my own purse. 

Various reasons might have kept me from publishing 
these accounts ; but I have for my object in writing the 
gloij of God, and therefore I delight in thus showing 
what a loving Master I serve, and how bountifully he sup- 
plies my necessities ; and I write for the comfort and 
encouragement of my fellow-believers, that they may be led 
to trust in God more and more, and therefore I feel it due 
to them to state how, even with regard to this life, I am 
amply provided for, though that is not what I seek after. 



1856. THREE YEARS OF PROSPERITY. 409 

Up to May 26, 1856, the total income for the building 
fund was £29,297, 18s. ll£d., so that only about £5,700 
more will be required, as far as I am able to see, in order 
to accomplish to the full my purpose respecting the accom- 
modation for 700 more orphans. 

During the year 1855-1856, tne wants of the orphans, as 
well as the demands of the missionar} 7- , Bible, tract, and 
school work, were supplied more amply than ever before, 
and a blessing rested upon all these departments of labor, 
as will appear from the following statement : — 

During this year four day schools, with 203 children, were entirely 
supported by the funds of the Institution ; and nine day schools were 
assisted with copies of the Holy Scriptures. Further, one Sunday 
school, with 158 children, was entirely supported, and eight others 
were assisted. Lastly, one adult school, with 158 adult scholars, was 
entirely supported, and two other adult schools, in Kent and Norfolk, 
were assisted with books. The amount which was spent during tliis 
year, in connection with these schools, was £343, 5s. ll|d. ; and the 
sum total expended during the last twenty-two years, in connection 
with the schools which were either entirely or in part supported by the 
funds of this Institution, amounts to £7,552, 18s. 7£d. The number 
of all the children who were under our care, merely in the schools 
which were entirely supported' by this Institution, from March 5, 1834, 
to May 26, 1856, was 6,104 in the day schools, 2,911 in the Sunday 
schools, and 2,611 persons in the adult school. Thus, without reckon- 
ing the orphans, 1 1,626 have been brought under habitual instruction 
in the things of God in these various schools ; besides the many thou- 
sands in the schools in various parts of England, Ireland, Scotland, 
British Guiana, the East Indies, etc., which have been to a greater or 
less degree assisted. 

During this year were expended on the circulation of the Holy 
Scriptures, of the funds of this Institution, £496, 10s. There were 
circulated during this year 2,175 Bibles, 1,238 New Testaments, 119 
copies of the Psalms, and 155 other small portions of the Iloiy Scrip- 
tures. There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the 
medium of this Institution, 16,124 Bibles, 10,2S0 New Testaments, 
807 copies of the Psalms, and 944 other small portions of the Holy 
35 



410 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIII. 

Scriptures. Tho sum total spent on the circulation of the Holy Scrip- 
tures, since March 5, 1831, is £3,886, 0s. Id. 

During this yearthere were spent, of the funds of the Institution, for 
missionary objects, £2,501, 9s. Id. By this sum sixty-one laborers 
in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were to a 
greater or less degree assisted. 

The sum total which has been expended on missionary operations, 
of the funds of the Institution, since March 5, 1834, is £18,616, 9s. 6|d. 

There was laid out for the circulation of tracts, from May 26, 1855, 
to May 26, 1856, the sum of £791, Is. O^d., and there were circulated 
812,970 tracts and books. The sum total which has been expended on 
this object since Nov. 19, 1840, amounts to £3,659, 16s. 7|d. The 
total number of all the tracts and books which have been circulated 
since Nov. 19, 1840, is 4,397,680. 

At the beginning of this period there were 297 orphans in the new 
Orphan House. During the past year there have been admitted into 
it 25 orphans. The total number of orphans who have been under 
our care since April, 1836, is 622. 

Without anyone having been personally applied to for anything 
by me, the sum of £84,441, 6s. 3|d. has been given to me for the or- 
phans as the result of prayer to God. since the commencement of the 
work, which sum includes the £15,055, 3s. 2^d. which was the cost 
of the building, fitting up, and furnishing of the present new Orphan 
House, and the £29,297, 18s. ll&d. received up to May 26, 1856, for 
the building fund, and the £167, 18s. ll|d., the balance of the current 
expenses. The total sum which has been given for the other objects 
since the commencement of the work amounts to £28,904, lis. 3|d. ; 
and that which has come in by the sale of Bibles and tracts, and by 
the payments of the children in the day schools, from the commence- 
ment up to May 26, 1S56, amounts to £5,145, 17s. 

Dec. 31, 1855. During this year the Lord has been pleased to give 
me £726, 16s. 2£d. 

May 26, 1856. Yesterda} r evening it was twenty-four 
years since I came to iahor in Bristol. In lookiDg back 
upon this period, as it regards the Lord's goodness to my 
family and myself, the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, 
and the saints among whom I seek to serve him, I exclaim, 
What has God wrought! I marvel at his kindness, and 
yet I do not j for such is his manner ; and, if it please him 



1855. THREE YEARS OF PROSPERITY. 411 

that I remain longer on earth, I expect, not fewer manifes- 
tations of his love, but more and more. 

Since my beloved friend and fellow-laborer and I first 
came to Bristol, 1,586 believers have been received into 
fellowship, which number, with the 68 we found in commun- 
ion, makes 1,654. But out of that number 252 have fallen 
asleep, 53 have been separated from fellowship, 145 have 
left us, some, however, merely through circumstances and 
in love, and 510 have left Bristol ; so that there are only 
694 remaining in communion. 

By the contributions received during the year 1856-7, 
the whole amount on hand for the new buildings was 
raised to thirty-one thousand eight hundred seventeen 
pounds one shilling and elevenpence. For the Bible, 
tract, and missionary work, and for schools, Mr. M. 
had the pleasure of receiving and of expending eight 
hundred and twenty-nine pounds more than in the pre- 
vious year. For the support of the orphans all means 
were so abundantly provided that at the end of the 
year there was on hand a balance of one thousand 
four hundred and eighty-nine pounds. 

The following incident illustrates the author's reliance 
upon God for his own future support. 

On Oct. 12, 1856, was sent to me a check for one nun- 
dred pounds, with the request of the donor to receive this 
for myself, as the beginning of raising a fund for my sup- 
port when advanced in years, and for that of my family. 
This very kind and well-intended proposal by the donor, 
who since has died, appeared to me as a subtle temptation 
laid for me, though far from being intended so by him, to 
depart from the principles on which I had been acting 
for twenty-six years previously, both regarding myself 



412 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIII 

and the orphan work. I give the account of this circum- 
stance fully, as it may be profitable to one or other of the 
readers. 

* * * * Oct. 11, 1856. 
Dear Sir : — 

In admiration of the services which you have rendered to poor or- 
phans and mankind in general, I think it right that some provision 
should be made for yourself. I think it right to send you one hun- 
dred pounds, as a beginning to form a fund, which I hope many good 
Christians will add to, * * * * for the maintenance of you and 
your family, if your own labors should be unequal to it, and I hope 
you will lay out this as a beginning accordingly. May God bless you 
and your labors, as he has hitherto done everything connected with 
your Institutions. 

I am, dear sir, 

* * * * 

Ify God's grace I had not a moment's hesitation as to 
what to do. While I most fully appreciated the great 
kindness of the donor, I looked upon this as being per- 
mitted by God as a temptation to put my trust in some- 
thing else than himself, and I therefore sent the following 
letter in reply : — 

Bristol, Oct. 12, 1856. 
My dear Sir : — 

I hasten to thank you for your kind communication, and to inform 
you that your check for one hundred pounds has safely come to 
hand. 

I have no property whatever, nor has my dear wife ; nor have I had 
one single shilling regular salary as minister of the gospel for the last 
twenty-six years, nor as the director of the Orphan House and the 
other objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution for Home and 
Abroad. When I am in need of anything, I fall on my knees, and 
ask God that he would be pleased to give me what I need ; and he 
puts it into the heart of some one or other to help me. Thus all my 
wants have been amply supplied during the last twenty-six years, and 
I can say, to the praise of God, I have lacked nothing. My dear 
wife and my only child, a daughter of twenty-four years, are of the 
same mind with me. Of this blessed way of living none of us are 
tired, but become day by day more convinced of its blessedness. 



1857. THREE YEARS OF PROSPERITY. 413 

I have never thought it right to make provision for myself, or my 
dear wife and daughter, except in this way, that when I saw a case of 
need, such as an aged widow, or a sick person, or a helpless infant, 
I would use my means freely which God had given me, fully believing 
that if either myself, or my dear wife or daughter, at some time or 
other, should be in need of anything, God would richly repay what 
was given to the poor, considering it as lent to himself. 

Under these circumstances I am unable to accept your kindness 
of the gift of one hundred pounds towards 'making a provision for 
myself and family; for so I understand your letter. Any gift given 
to me, unasked for, by those who have it in their heart to help me to 
supply my personal and family expenses, I thankfully accept ; or any 
donation given to me for the work of God in which I am engaged, I 
also thankfully accept, as a steward for the orphans, etc. ; but your 
kind gift seems to me especially given to make a provision for myself, 
which I think would be displeasing to my heavenly Father, who has 
so bountifully given me my daily bread hitherto. But should I have 
misunderstood the meaning of your letter, be pleased to let me know 
it. I hold the check till I hear again from you. 

In the mean time, my dear sir, however you meant your letter, I 
am deeply sensible of your kindness, and daily pray that God would 
be pleased richly to recompense you for it, both temporally and spir- 
itually. 

I am, dear sir, 

Yours very gratefully, 

GEORGE MULLER. 

Two days after I received a reply, in which the donor 
desired me to use the one hundred pounds for the support 
of the orphans, for which object I gladly accepted this sum. 
The day after that I received another one hundred pounds 
from the same donor, and four days after that one hundred 
pounds more, all for the support of the orphans, and all 
from an individual whom I have never seen. 

In the following words is contained a useful lesson to 
persons engaged in business : — 

Feb. 24, 1857. Received five pounds as a thank-offering 
to the Lord for preservation from making bad debts the 
34* 



414 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIII. 

past year. Has it ever occurred to the reader that the 
Lord only can preserve any one engaged in business from 
making bad debts ? Has it also occurred to the reader 
that often the Lord is obliged, because we do not use for 
him, as good stewards, that with which he has been pleased 
to intrust us, to allow bad debts to be made? Consider 
these things, dear Christian reader, j^ou who are engaged 
in business. If you were engaged in mercantile affairs, 
connected with hundreds of thousands of pounds, you may, 
b}^ the help of God, be preserved year after year from mak- 
ing bad debts, though several millions of pounds should be 
turned in the course of a few years, provided you keep 
before you that j t ou are the Lord's steward, and carry on 
business for him ; whilst, on* the other hand, thousands of 
pounds may be lost in one single year, out of only a com- 
paratively small business, because he who carries it on 
" withholds more than is meet, and therefore it tends to 
poverty," the Lord being obliged by bad debts (as they are 
called), which he uses as one of his rods, to deprive his 
servants of that which was not used aright. 

The review of the year ending May, 1857, presents us 
with the following results : — 

There have been during this period four day schools entirely sup- 
ported by the funds of this Institution. There are at present in these 
four day schools 181 children. 

In addition to the entire support of these four day schools, six 
schools were assisted with money, or books, or copies of the Holy 
Scriptures, or both money and books. 

There was one Sunday school, in which there were 175 children, 
entirely supported by the funds of this Institution; and six others 
were assisted. 

There has been, since the formation of the Institution, one adult 
school connocted wiih it, the expenses of which have been entirely 
borne by the Institution, and in which, since March 5, 1834, altogether 
2, 009 adults have been instructed. The number at present on the 
books is 72. i 



1857. THREE YEARS OP PROSPERITY. 4lD 

There were also two other adult schools assisted during the past 
year. 

The total amount of means which has been expended daring the 
last twenty-three years in connection with the schools, which have 
been either entirely or in part supported by the funds of this Institu- 
tion, amounts to £7,938, 18s. 4d. 

The number of Bibles, Testaments, and portions of the Holy 
Scriptures, which have been circulated since May 26, 1856, is as fol- 
lows : — 

Bibles sold, 601. Bibles given away, 1,476. Testaments sold, 
829. Testaments given away, 393. Copies of the Psalms sold, 151. 
Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures sold, 316. 

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through the 
medium of this Institution, 18,201 Bibles, 11,502 Testaments, 458 
copies of the Psalms, and 1,260 other small portions of the Holy 
Scriptures. 

The total amount of the funds of this Institution spent on the cir- 
culation of the Holy Scriptures, since March 5, 1834, is £4,407, 7s. 
2fjd. The amount spent during the past year, £521, 7s. l^d. 

Some time since a brother in the Lord wrote to me that he had it 
in his heart to visit from house to house, in a large manufacturing 
town in Yorkshire, and, if possible, to supply each house with a tract, 
and to seek out persons who were destitute of copies of the Holy 
Scriptures. I supplied him, therefore, with 10,000 gospel tracts and 
30 Bibles, and subsequently with 127 more Bibles, and finally with 
10,000 more tracts and 74 Bibles. 

The tliird object of this Institution is, to aid missionary efforts. 

During the past year has been spent of the funds of the Institution 
for this object, the sum of £3,177, 17s. 11 Ad. By this sum seventy 
four laborers in the word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, 
have been to a greater or less degree assisted. 

The year before last I had been enabled to spend on this part of 
the work more than during any previous year ; but the last year I 
was, by God's help, enabled not only to disburse for this object as 
much as during the previous year, but £676, 8s. lO^d. more. For this 
privilege I feel grateful ; 3-et I long to be permitted by the Lord to do 
much more still. But whilst it has been a source of joy to me to be 
able to assist seventy-four servants of Christ in many parts of the 
world, that which was far more than this a cause of thankfulness, was, 
that almost week by week, and often repeatedly in the same week, 
I had refreshing intelligence from the brethren whom I sought to 
help. 



416 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIII. 

The letters of these brethren exhibit the fact that the 
aid conveyed through Mr. M. was most timely, coming 
often in the hour of sore need. They also give assurance 
that their labors had been singularly blessed to the con- 
version of the heathen, and of the ignorant and deluded 
among whom they preached. 

The total amount of the funds of the Institution which has heen 
spent on missionary operations, since March 5, 1834, is £21,794, 7s. 
6d. 

There has been laid out for tracts, from May 26, 1856, to May 26, 
1857, the, sum of £975, 18s. 7^d. ; and there have been circulated 
within the Inst year 1,313,301 tracts and books. The sum total which 
has been expended on this object, since Nov. 19, 1810, amounts to 
£4,635, 15s. 2*d. 

The total number of all the tracts and books which have been cir- 
culated since Nov. 19, 1840, is 5,710,981. 

Letters from those to whom tracts were sent for distribu- 
tion, convey the intelligence that in very many instances 
the tracts were blessed to the conversion of sinners. 

At the commencement of the last period there were 299 orphans in 
the new Orphan House on Ashley Down, Bristol. During the past 
year there were admitted into it 30 orphans, making 329 in all. When 
the last Report was published, there were 847 orphans waiting for 
admission. Since then 231 more destitute orphans, bereaved of both 
parents by death, and some only a few weeks old, have been applied 
for to be admitted, making 1,078 in all. Of these 1,078 we were only 
able to receive 30, as has been stated, and 58 either died or were 
otherwise provided for, as their relatives or friends have informed us, 
so that there are still 990 waiting for admission. Christian reader, 
think of these 990 destitute orphans, bereaved of both parents ! I 
have now, however, before me the most pleasant prospect, if the Lord 
permit, of being able to receive 400 of them in about three months, 
and also of being permitted to build the third house for 300 more. 

Without any one having been personally applied to for anything 
by me, the sum of £92,175, 4s. 2id. has been given to me for the or- 
phans, as the result of prayer to God, since the commencement of 



1857. THREE YEARS OP PROSPERITY. 417 

the work, which sum includes the £15,055, 3s. 2|d. which was the 
cost of the building, fitting up, and furnishing of the present new 
Orphan House, and the £31,817, Is. lid., which had been received up 
to May 26, 1857, for the building fund, and the £1,489, 7s. 9d., the 
balance of the current expenses. It may also be interesting to the 
reader to know that the total amount which has been given for the 
other objects, since the commencement of the work, amounts to 
£33,293, 9s. 10|d. ; and that which has come in by the sale of Bibles, 
since the commencement, amounts to £2,080, 9s. 10|d. ; by sale of 
tracts, £1,778, 2s. 5d. ; and by the payments of the children in the 
day schools, from the commencement. £2,066, 13s. 4^d. 

The Lord is pleased to continue to allow us to see fruit 
in connection with the orphan work, with reference to 
those who are now under our care, and we hear still again 
and again of cases in which those who were formerly 
under our care have been led to declare themselves 
openly for the Lord, besides those in whom we saw the 
work of grace manifestly begun before they left the Orphan 
House. 




CHAPTER XXIV. 

SUM MAR T. 

1857 — 1860. 

THE HOUSE FOR FOUR HUNDRED OPENED — PRATER MORE THAN ANSWIRED — 
THE RESORT IN TROUBLE — AN OUTPOURING OF THE SPIRIT ON THE ORPHANS 
— LAND FOR A NEW BUILDING PURCHASED — " BUT ONE LIFE TO SPEND FOR 
GOD " — SCATTERING, TET INCREASING " — A MEMORABLE YEAR — THE GERM 
OF THE IRISH REVIVAL — LETTER FROM AN ORPHAN — THE FRUIT OF SIX 
MONTHS' PRAYER — THE RESULTS OF THE WORK — REVIVAL AMONG THE 
ORPHANS. 

OVEMBER 12, 1857. The long looked-for and 
long praj^ed-for day had now arrived when the 
desire of my heart was granted to me, to be able 
to open the house for four hundred additional 
orphans. Much had I labored in prayer and active engage- 
ments to accomplish what was to be done previously ; and 
now things were so far advanced as that the new house 
was ready for use ; and a few days after we began to receive 
the children into it. How precious this was to me, such 
will be able to enter into, who, having day by day prayed 
for a blessing for seven j^ears, and often repeatedly on the 
same day, at last obtain the desire of their heart. Yet this 
blessing came not unexpectedly to me, but had been looked 
for, and had, in the full assurance of faith, been expected 
to be obtained in God's own time. 

Dec. 3. A donor has sent me above fifty £5 notes, one 
every month. Another donor, with an income of only £400 
per annum, has sent me one donation of £10, or £15, or £20, 
after the other, during this year and former j^ears, so that 
from this donor i" have had about £130 during this one year. 
Another donor has sent me £30, £50, or even £100 again 
£18 



1858. A FULL TREASURY. 419 

and again, for several years past. Thus the Lord, by 
smaller or larger amounts, oft repeated, or given only once 
or twice, helps me. Thousands of donors have contributed 
towards this work during the past twenty-four years ; though 
a great part of the income, perhaps one-half or more, has 
come from about one hundred donors only. 

Feb. 17, 1853. As far as I am able to judge, I have now 
all I require in the way of pecuniary means for the third 
ho;i,se also, so that I am able to accomplish the full enlarge- 
ment of the orphan work to one thousand orphans. 

Ity the conclusion of the year under consideration, Mr. 
M. had received, from all sources, thirty-five thousand three 
hundred and thirty-five pounds nine shillings threepence 
toward the new Orphan Houses, " being actually three hun- 
dred and thirty-five pounds nine shillings threepence more 
than I had been from the commencement praying for." 

The following circumstance, connected with the mainten- 
ance and care of the orphans, exhibits the reliance placed 
upon prayer and faith for relief in every exigency : — 

Towards the end of November, 1857, I was most unex- 
pectedly informed that the boiler of our heating apparatus 
at the new Orphan House No. 1, leaked very considerably, 
so that it was impossible to go through the winter with such 
a leak. Our heating apparatus consists of a large cylinder 
boiler, inside of which the fire is kept, and with which boiler 
the water pipes which warm the rooms are connected. Hot 
air is also connected with this apparatus. This now was 
my position. The boiler had been considered suited for the 
work of the winter ; the having had ground to suspect its 
being worn out, and not to have done anything towards its 
being replaced by a new one, and to have said I will trust 
in God regarding it, would be careless presumption, but not 
faith in God. It would be the counterfeit of faith. 



420 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIV. 

The boiler is entirely surrounded by brickwork ; its state, 
therefore, could not be known without taking down the 
brickwork ; this, if needless, would be rather injurious to 
the boiler than otherwise ; and, as, year after 3 T ear, for eight 
winters, we had had no difficulty in this way, we had not an- 
ticipated it now. But suddenly and most unexpectedly, at 
the commencement of the winter, this difficulty occurred. 
What then was to be done? For the children, especially the 
younger infants, I felt deeply concerned that they might 
not surfer through want of warmth. But how were w r e to 
obtain warmth ? The introduction of a neiv boiler would, 
in all probability, take many weeks. The repairing of the 
boiler was a questionable matter, on account of the great- 
ness of the leak ; but, if not, nothing could be said of it, 
till the brick-chamber in which the boiler, with Hazard's 
patent heating apparatus, is inclosed, was, at least in part, 
removed ; but that would, at least as far as we could judge, 
take days, and what was to be done in the meantime to find 
warm rooms for three hundred children ? It naturally oc- 
curred to me to introduce temporary gas stoves, but, on fur- 
ther weighing the matter, it was found that we should be 
unable to heat our very large rooms with gas except we had 
very many stoves, which we could not introduce, as we had 
not a sufficient quantity of gas to spare from our lighting 
apparatus. Moreover, for each of these stoves we needed 
a small chimney, to carry off the impure air. This mode 
of heating, therefore, though applicable to a hall, a staircase, 
or a shop, would not suit our purposes. I also thought of 
the temporary introduction of Arnott's stoves ; but they 
would be unsuitable, as we needed chimne3 T s, long chimneys, 
for them, as they would have been of a temporary kind, and 
therefore must go out of the windows. On this account, 
the uncertainty of its answering in our case, the disfigurement 
of the rooms almost permanently, led me to see it needful 
to give up this plan also. But what was to be done ? Gladly 
would I have paid one hundred pounds if thereby the diffi- 



1858. RESORT IN TROUBLE. 421 

culty could have been overcome, and the children not be 
exposed to suffer for many days from being in cold rooms. 
At last I determined on falling entirely into the hands of 
God, who is very merciful and of tender compassion, and I 
decided on having, at all events, the brick-chamber opened, 
to see the extent of the damage, and to see whether the 
boiler might be repaired, so as to carry us through the win- 
ter. The day was fixed when the workmen were to come, 
and all the necessary arrangements were made. The fire, 
of course, had to be let out while the repairs were going on. 
But now see. After the day was fixed for the repairs, a 
bleak north wind set in. It began to blow either on Thurs- 
day or Friday before the Wednesday afternoon when the 
fire was to be let out. Now came the first really cold 
weather which we had in the beginning of last winter, dur- 
ing the first days of December. What was to be done ? 
The repairs could not be put off. I now asked the Lord for 
two things, viz., that he would be pleased to change the 
north wind into a south wind, and that he would give to the 
workmen " a mind to work ;" for I remembered how much 
Nehemiah accomplished in fifty-two days, whilst building 
the walls of Jerusalem, because " the people had a mind to 
work." Well, the memorable day came. The evening be- 
fore, the bleak north wind blew still ; but on the Wednes- 
day the south wind blew ; exactly as I had prayed. The 
weather was so mild that no fire was needed. The brick- 
work is removed, the leak is found out very soon, the boiler- 
makers begin to repair in good earnest. About half-past 
eight in the evening, when I was going to leave the new Or- 
phan House for my home, I was informed at the lodge lliat 
the acting principal of the firm whence the boiler-makers 
came was arrived, to see how the work was going on, and 
whether he could in any way speed the matter. I went im- 
mediately into the cellar, therefore, to see him with the 
men, to seek to expedite the business. In speaking to the 
principal of this, he said in their hearing, "the men will 
86 



422 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XXIV. 

work late this evening, and come very early again to-mor- 
row." " We would rather, sir," said the leader, " work all 
night." Then remembered I the second part of my pra}^er, 
that God would give the men "a mind to work." Thus it 
was : by the morning the repair of the boiler was accom- 
plished, the leak was stopped, though with great difficulty, 
and within about thirty hours the brickwork was up again 
and the fire in the boiler ; and all the time the south wind 
blew so mildly that there was not the least need of a fire. 

Here, then, is one of our difficulties which was overcome 
by prayer and faith. 

For nearly three months all went on well ; but at the end 
of February another leak appeared, which was worse than 
the previous one. But over this we were helped through 
prayer, so that without any real inconvenience the repairs 
were accomplished within about thirty hours. From that 
time the Lord has not tried us any further in this way. 
While I am writing this it is fine warm weather, and I have 
ordered in both houses the fires to be discontinued in the 
heating apparatuses, and, the Lord willing, a new boiler 
will, of course, be substituted. 

Feb. 2, 1858. " From Newton" one pound. To-day I 
took the first active steps towards the building of the third 
house, when immediately afterwards I was informed by let- 
ter that a lady in London, an entire stranger to me, had or- 
dered her bankers to send me three hundred pounds for the 
support of the orphans. I was also further informed in the 
evening that in two weeks eight hundred pounds shall be 
paid to me for the work of the Lord. The three hundred 
pounds were sent the next day, and the eight hundred pounds 
a fortnight after. See how, with enlargement of the work, 
the Lord keeps pace with the expenses, helping when help 
is really needed, often also giving beforehand. 

During the year 1857-8, twenty-four schools were 
supported or assisted out of the funds of the Institu- 



1858. LETTERS FROM LABORERS. 423 

tion, three thousand nine hundred and sixty-three 
Bibles and portions of Scripture were circulated, and 
three thousand five hundied and thirty-one pounds ex- 
pended for the aid of eighty-two laborers in various 
parts of the world. From these men Mr. Miiller 
received letters containing the delightful intelligence 
that their labors had been blessed of the Lord. After 
giving copious extracts from these letters, Mr. M. 
adds : — 

Such extracts might be greatly multiplied, and, as I said 
before, a large volume might easily be written ; but space 
forbids me giving an}^ more. I feel it, however, due to the 
Christian reader to state that there is good reason to be- 
lieve that many hundreds of souls have been brought to the 
knowledge of the Lord through the instrumentality of these 
brethren within the last year ; and may we not hope that 
even that which is known is not nearly all that the Lord 
has been pleased to accomplish through them ? How sea- 
sonably, often, the help for which I had labored in prayer 
has come to these dear servants of Christ, the following 
extracts from letters may show, though hundreds of simi- 
lar letters have been received by me within the last twenty 
years. 

May 19, 1858. "I gratefully acknowledge the Lord's 
goodness, in the receipt of your check for ten pounds. 
Being brought low, my dear wife and myself, when specially 
waiting on him last evening, pleaded with the Lord that he 
would graciously send a supply this morning ; and again 
we have the proof of his love by your letter and its con- 
tents. Bless the Lord, O my soul ! With many thanks to 
you, in which my dear wife unites, I am," etc. 

Feb. 27, 1858. u Oh, how my heart goes out towards you 
for your affectionate remembrance of us in our low estate i 
Mot a shilling had we in the house, nor any human prospect 



424 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIV. 

of any money, when your remittance of five pounda 
reached us." 

A laborer on the Continent writes on Bee. 17, 1857 : 
" -\^r e received yesterday your kind note inclosing eight 
pounds. The very day you sent your letter to the post- 
office, the 12th instant, was a day set apart for prayer, with 
fasting, to ask the Lord for means." 

There were also circulated during the year 1,334,791 
tracts and books. Letters received from the persons 
who distributed them show that they were greatly 
blessed in awakening and converting souls. 

At the commencement of the last period there were 299 
orphans in the new Orphan House on Ashley Down, Bris- 
tol. During the past } T ear there were admitted into it, and 
into the new house for 400, altogether 219 orphans. The 
total number of orphans who have been under our care 
since April 11, 1836, is 871. 

The opening of the new house for 400 orphans, which is 
not a wing of the house that has been before in existence, 
but an entirely distinct establishment, and larger than the 
former, has made it needful to distinguish between these 
two houses in this way, that the house which was opened on 
June 18, 1849, is now called the new Orphan House No. 1. 
and the one which was opened on Nov. 12, 1857, is called 
the new Orphan House No. 2. The new Orphan House 
No. 1 is fitted up for the accommodation of 140 orphan 
girls above seven years of age, 80 orphan boys above 
seven years, and 80 male and female orphans from their 
earliest da} T s, till they are about seven or eight years of 
age. The infants, after having passed the age of seven or 
eight years, are removed into the different departments for 
older boys and girls. The new Orphan House No. 2 is 
fitted up for 200 female infant orphans, and 200 elder female 
orphans. 



1858. REVIVAL. 425 

Without any one having been personally applied to for any- 
thing by me, the sum of £102,714, 9s. 6d. has been given to 
me for the orphans, as the result of prayer to God, since the 
commencement of the work, which sum includes the amount 
received for the building fund for the houses already built 
and the one to be built. It may also be interesting to the 
reader to know that the total amount which has been given 
for the other objects, since the commencement of the work, 
amounts to £38,297, 12s. ll^d. ; and that which has come 
in by the sale of Bibles since the commencement amounts 
to £2,222, 4s. 3£d. ; by sale of tracts, £2,294, 6s. ll£d., and 
by the payments of children in the day schools, from the 
commencement, £2,138, lis. 4Jd. 

During the past twenty-two years the Spirit of God has 
been again and again working among the orphans who 
were under our care, so that very many of them have been 
brought to the knowledge of the Lord ; but we never had 
so great a work, and at the same time one so satisfactory, 
within so short a time, as during the past year. I will enter 
somewhat into details for the benefit of the reader. There 
are one hundred and forty elder girls in the new Orphan 
House No. 1, of whom, at the beginning of the last period, 
ten were considered to be believers. 

On May 26, 1857, the death of an orphan, Caroline 
Bailey, took place. The death of this beloved girl, who 
had known the Lord several months before she fell asleep, 
seems to have been used by the Lord as a means of 
answering in a goodly measure our daily prayers for the 
conversion of the orphans. It pleased God at the begin- 
ning of the last period mightily to work among the 
orphans, so that all at once, within a few days, without 
any apparent cause, except it be the peaceful end of the 
beloved Caroline Baile} T , more than fifty of these girls 
were brought to be under concern about their souls, and 
some with deep conviction of sin accompanying it, so that 
they were exceedingly distressed. And how is it now? 

' 36* 



426 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XXIV. 

my readers may ask , for young persons are often appar- 
ently much concerned about the things of God, but these 
impressions pass away. True, dear reader, I have seen 
this nryself, having had to do with many thousands of chil- 
dren and young persons within the last thirty years. Had, 
therefore, this work among the orphans begun within the 
last few da3 T s, or even weeks, I should have passed it over 
in silence ; but more than a year has now elapsed since it 
commenced, and it will, therefore, give joy to the godly 
reader to hear that in addition to those ten who were 
previously believers, and of whom one has been sent to 
service, there are tvv T ent3^-three girls respecting whom for 
several months there has been no doubt as to their being 
believers ; two died in the faith within the year ; and there 
are thirty-eight more who are awakened and under con- 
cern about their souls, but respecting whom we cannot 
speak as yet so decidedly. All this regards only one 
branch of the Orphan Establishment, the elder girls of 
the House No. 1. In addition to this, I am glad also to 
be able to state that among the other girls in the New 
House No. 2, and among the boys also, some are interested 
about the things of God ; yea, our labors begin already to 
be blessed to the hearts of some of the new received orphans. 

Continuing the narrative of the progress of the new Or- 
phan Houses, Mr. M. writes under date of Oct. 29 > 1858 : — 

In the last Report, I stated that I was looking out for 
land for the third house. Regarding this, I waited day by 
day upon God. But for many months it pleased him to 
exercise my faith and patience. When, more than once, I 
seemed to have obtained my desire, I again appeared fur- 
ther from it than ever. However, I continued to pray and 
to exercise faith, being fully assured that the Lord's time 
was not yet come, and that, when it was, he would help. 
And so it proved. At last, in September, 1858, 1 obtained 



1858. LAND PURCHASED. 427 

eleven and a half acres of land, quite close to the new Or- 
phan Houses No. 1 and No. 2 and only separated from them 
by the road. On these eleven and a half acres of land a 
house is built. The price for house and land was three thou- 
sand six hundred and thirty-one pounds fifteen shillings, 
being more money than I should have seen it right to expend 
on the site, had it not been that it was of the utmost im- 
portance that the third house should be quite near the other 
two, to facilitate the superintendence and direction of the 
establishment. Thus, at last, this prayer also was answered, 
concerning which I had been waiting upon God for so many 
months, and concerning which the difficulties as to sight 
and reason seemed so great, but respecting which my mind 
was continually at peace ; for I was sure that, as I was do- 
ing God's work, he would, in his own time, help me in this 
particular also. The longer I go on in this service, the more 
1 find that prayer and faith can overcome every difficulty. 

Having now obtained land, and so much, my desire was 
to make the best use of it, and to build for four hundred 
orphans, instead of for three hundred, as I had previously 
purposed to do. After having had several meetings with 
the architects, and finding that it was possible to accommo- 
date, with comparatively little more expense, four hundred 
and fifty orphans, instead of four hundred, I finally deter- 
mined on that number, so as to have eventually one thousand 
one hundred and fifty orphans under my care, instead of one 
thousand, as for several 3~ears previously had been contem- 
plated. The greatuess of the number of destitute children 
bereaved of both parents by death, — together with the 
greatness of the Lord's blessing, which has during all these 
many years rested upon my service in this wa} T , — and the 
greatness of the Lord's help in giving me assistants and 
helpers in the work as well as means, — and, above all, the 
deep realization that I have but one life to spend for God 
on earth, and that that one life is but a brief life ; — these 
were the reasons which led me to this further enlargement. 



428 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XXIV. 

To this determination of a still further enlargement I came 
solely in dependence upon the living God for 7ie?p, though the 
increase of expense for the building fund, on account of the 
purchase of the land, and accommodation to be built for the 
additional one hundred and fifty orphans more than had been 
from the beginning contemplated, would not be less than 
from six thousand to seven thousand five hundred pounds 
more than I had originally expected the total of the prem- 
ises, which we'e to be erected, would cost ; and though, in 
addition to this, the yearly additional expenditure for the 
maintenance of these one hundred and fifty orphans, beyond 
the intended number of one thousand, could not be less 
than one thousand eight hundred pounds a }^ear. But none 
of these difficulties discouraged mo. 

Nov. 27. It is this day a twelvemonth since we began 
to receive fresh children into tl:e new Orphan House No. 2. 
Since then the mercies of the Lord have been very manjr, 
and his help has been very great. There have been received 
from Nov. 27, 1857, to Nov. 27, 1858, altogether three hun- 
dred and eight orphans. Such a year I never spent in this 
service, — one so full of help and blessing in every way. 

Jan. 4, 1859. Received seven thousand pounds, which 
sum was entirety left at my disposal, as the work of God in 
which I am engaged might more especially require it. When 
I decided at the end of October, 1858, to build for four 
hundred and fifty orphans, instead of three hundred, I 
needed several thousand pounds more, and was fully assured 
that God would give me the required means, because in re- 
liance upon him, and for the honor of his name, I had de- 
termined on this enlargement ; and now see, esteemed reader, 
how the Lord honored this my faith in him ! 

Jan. 12. From Westerharu, in eighty-eight small dona- 
tions, £4, 8s. 6cl. Without my knowledge these eighty- 
eight small donations had been contributed, and were sent 
to me. 

May 26. During the year now closing, four thousand 



1859. HELP TO OTHERS. 429 

one hundred and forty-nine pounds seventeen shillings five- 
pence were expended in aid of ninety-one brethren laboring in 
England, Scotland, Ireland, Belgium, France, Switzerland, 
Sardinia, Canada, Nova Scotia, East Indies, China, and 
British Guiana. Also, during the past year 1,885,401 
tracts and books have been circulated. 

At the commencement of the last period there were four 
hundred and ninety-nine orphans in the new Orphan Houses 
No. 1 and No. 2. On May 26, 1859, there were six hun- 
dred and seventjMwo orphans in the two houses, i. e., in 
No. 1, 299, and in No. 2, 373. The total number of orphans 
who have been under our care since April 11, 1836, is 1,083. 

Though during the past year we have not had so great 
and so sudden a work of the Spirit of God going on among 
the orphans as during the previous year, when, within a few 
days, about fifty out of one department of one hundred 
and forty girls were suddenly brought under deep concern 
about their souls ; yet the blessing of the Lord has not 
been withheld even spiritually. There are already many 
caring about the things of God among the four hundred 
and twenty-four orphans who were received within the last 
eighteen months, and who ask it, as a privilege, to be al- 
lowed, in the summer, to take their Bibles with them to bed, 
so that, should they awake in the morning before the bell is 
rung, they may be able to read it. Out of the thirteen girls 
who were sent to service, nine had been believers for some 
time before they left the establishment. 

When I began the orphan work, one of the especial ob- 
jects which I had in view was to benefit the church of Christ 
at large, by the accounts which I might be enabled to write 
in connection with this service ; for I expected, from the 
beginning, to have many answers to prayer granted to me, 
and I confidently anticipated that the recording of them 
would be beneficial to believers, in leading them to look for 
answers to their own prayers, and in encouraging them to 
bring all their own necessities before God in prayer. I 



430 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIV. 

likewise firmly believed that many unconverted persons 
would, by means of such writings, be led to see the reality 
of the things of God. As I expected, so it has been. 
In very many instances the reading of the Reports of this 
Institution, or the " Narrative of the Lord's Dealings," 
with me, has been blessed by God to the conversion of 
those who knew not our Lord Jesus. In thousands of in- 
stances, likewise, believers have been benefited through 
them, being thereby comforted, encouraged, led more sim- 
ply to the Holy Scriptures, led more fully to trust in God 
for everything ; in a word, led, in a greater or less degree, 
to walk in the same path of faith in which the writer, by 
the help of God, is walking. The thousands of instances of 
blessing which have been brought before me during the past 
twenty-four years (for almost daily I have heard of fresh 
cases, and often of several in the same day), have only still 
further led me to earnestness in prayer, that the Lord would 
condescend to use these publications still more, and make 
them a blessing to many tens of thousands of his children, 
and to many tens of thousands cf the unconverted. And 
now the reader will rejoice with me, when he reads what fol- 
lows. I am the more led to relate the following, that the 
godly reader more than ever may be encouraged to prayer, 
and, also, that an accurate statement may be given of this 
fact, which has been already referred to in many public pla- 
ces in connection with revival-meetings, and which likewise 
has been several times stated in print. 

In November, 1856, a young Irishman, Mr. James 
McQuilkin, was brought to the knowledge of the Lord. 
Soon after his conversion he saw my Narrative adver- 
tised. He had a great desire to read it, and procured it 
accordingly, about January, 1857. God blessed it greatly 
to his soul, especially in showing to him what could be 
obtained b}' prayer. He said to himself something like 
this : See what Mr. Miiller obtains simply by prayer. Thus 
I may obtain blessing by prayer. He now set himself to 
prav that the Lord would give him a spiritual companion, 



1859. THE IRISH REVIVAL. 431 

one who knew the Lord. Soon after, he became acquainted 
with a young man who knew the Lord. These two began 
a prayer meeting in one of the Sunday schools in the 
parish of Connor. Having his prayer answered in obtaining 
a spiritual companion, Mr. James McQuillan asked the 
Lord to lead him to become acquainted with some more 
of his hidden ones. Soon after, the Lord gave him two 
more young men, who knew the Lord previously, as far as 
he could judge. In autumn, 1857, Mr. James McQuilkin 
stated to these three young men, given him in answer to 
believing prayer, what blessing he had derived from my 
Narrative, — how it had led him to see the power of believ- 
ing prayer ; and he proposed that they should meet for 
pra}~er, to seek the Lord's blessing upon their various labors 
in the Sunday schools, prayer meetings, and preachings of 
the gospel. Accordingly, in autumn, 1857, these four 
young men met together for prayer in a small school-house 
near the village of Kells in the parish of Connor, every 
Friday evening. On January 1, 1858, the Lord gave them 
the first remarkable answer to prayer in the conversion of 
a farm servant. He was taken into the number, and thus 
there were five who gave themselves to prayer. Shortly 
after another young man, about twenty years old, was 
converted ; there were now six. This greatly encouraged 
the other three who first had met with Mr. James McQuil- 
kin. Others now were converted, who were also taken 
into the number ; but only believers were admitted to 
these fellowship meetings, in which they read, prayed, and 
offered to each other a few thoughts from the Scriptures. 
These meetings, and others for the preaching of the gos- 
pel, were held in the parish of Connor, Antrim, L'eland. 
Up to this time all was going on most quietlv, though 
many souls were converted. There were no physical pros- 
trations, as afterwards. About Christmas, 1858, a young 
man from Ahoghill, who had come to live at Connor, and 
who had been converted through this little company of 



432 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XXIV. 

believers, went to see his friends at Ahoghill, and spoke to 
them about their own souls and the work of God at Con- 
nor. His friends desired to see some of these converts. 
Accordingly, Mr. James McQuillan, with two of the first 
who met for prayer, went, on February 2, 1859, and held a 
meeting at Ahoghill in one of the Presbyterian churches. 
Some believed, some mocked, and others thought there 
was a great deal of presumption in these young converts ; 
yet many wished to have another meeting. This was held 
by the same three young men, on February 16, 1859 ; and 
now the Spirit of God began to work, and to work mightily. 
Souls were converted, and from that time conversions mul- 
tiplied rapidly. Some of these converts went to other 
places, and carried the spiritual fire, so to speak, with them. 
The blessed work of the Spirit of God spread in many 
places. On April 5, 1859, Mr. James McQuilkin went 
to Ballymena, held a meeting there in one of the Pres- 
byterian churches, and on April 11 held another meet- 
ing in another of the Presbyterian churches. Several were 
convinced of sin, and the work of the Spirit of God went 
forward in Ballymena. On May 28, 1859, he went to 
Belfast. During the first week, there were meetings held 
in five different Presb3 T terian churches, and from that time 
the blessed work commenced at Belfast. In all these visits 
he was accompanied and helped by Mr. Jeremiah Meneely, 
one of the three young men who first met with him after 
the reading of my Narrative. From this time the work of 
the Uo\j Ghost spread further and further ; for the young 
converts were used by the Lord to carry the truth from 
one place to another.* 

* Rev. Dr. Sawtell, in a letter to Dr. Wayland, remarks, " So scrupulous was 
Mr. MUller about stating the facts correctly, and so solicitous lest a wrong impres- 
sion should be conveyed, or lest any statement of importance should be made on in- 
sufficient authority, that he sent to Ireland for Mr. McQuilkin, -who, at his request, 
came to Bristol. Mr. Miiller there examined personally into the facts, and only on 
becoming satisfied of its verity, did he insert in his annual Report for 1860 the state- 
ment in regard to the connection between his Narrative and the commencement of 
the Irish revival." 



1859. ENLARGED PROSPERITY. 433 

Such was the beginning of that mighty work of the 
Holy Spirit, which has led to the conversion of many tens 
of thousands, and which is still going on even in Ireland, 
and the blessed results of which are still felt in Scotland, 
England, and other countries. It is almost needless to 
add, that in no degree the honor is due to the instruments, 
but to the Holy Spirit alone ; yet these facts are stated in 
order that it may be seen what delight God has in answer- 
ing abundantly the believing prayers of his children. 

Seeing, then, how greatly he has condescended to own 
these records regarding his willingness to listen to prayer, 
made to him in the name of the Lord Jesus, I am delighted, 
at the close of another year, in connection with this Insti- 
tution, to recount a few of the very many instances in 
which God has been pleased to answer our prayers, and to 
grant blessing to rest upon the various objects of this Insti- 
tution ; yea, blessing greater far than during any part of 
the past twenty-six years, while it has been in operation. 

Up to May 26, 1860, Mr. M. received for the building 
fund the sum of £45,113, 14s. 4£d. 

In May, 1859, I had in hand for the Bible, school, tract, 
and missionary funds, £2,009, lis. 2^-d., a balance far greater 
than I ever had had before. This arose not from the fact 
of unwillingness to spend the means which the Lord had 
been pleased to intrust me with, but chiefly from the fact 
that some large donations had come in during the last part 
of the previous j^ear ; and I had not, as a steward who 
desires to act in the fear of God, had opportunities brought 
before me to spend all. But much as the balance was, all 
the various schools, directly or indirectly connected with 

It is interesting to find that Mr. Miiller's statement of the origin of the revival 
accords with the account of Prof. Gibson, of Queen's College, Belfast, in his admi 
rable work, " The Year of Grace," prepared at the request of Gould and Lin- 
coln, in which he details the events of the recent wonderful work of grace in Ire- 
land. (SeeChap. in.— Vin.)— Ed. 



434 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIV. 

the Institution, required means ; the circulation of the 
Holy Scriptures and tracts, which objects increase more 
and mere, needed much, in order to enter every suitable 
open door ; and lastly, and especially, the ninety-one 
preachers of the gospel in various parts of the world, on 
my list on May 26, 1859, required a large sum to aid them. 
All these various objects, therefore, needed so much, that 
the balance, large as it was, would have lasted but a short 
time, had not the living God, who has been my helper 
from the beginning, and to whom I have looked, and 
looked alone, opened, in answer to our prayers, his boun- 
tiful hands, and sent in more before the balance was 
expended ; so that, though without any human probability 
of meeting even one 5 half of the probable expenses in con- 
nection with these objects, not only have I been able to 
meet the whole, but also, so bountifully has God helped, 
that though the expenses were £1,584, 7s. o^d. more than 
during the preceding 3'ear, I had not only enough, but 
even a larger balance was left than at the end of the 
previous year. 

Jan. 31, 1860. On this day I received a donation of three 
thousand pounds, of which I took for these objects two 
thousand pounds. Day by day, during this period also, I 
had been asking the Lord for means for these objects ; and 
day by day I had been entreating him that he would be 
pleased to enable me to accomplish during this period as 
much as during the former one in the way of circulating 
the Holy Scriptures and tracts, and in aiding missionary 
operations, though I had no natural prospect whatever, of 
being able to do so. My e} T es were alone directed to the 
living God, who }*ear after year, for mairy j^ears past, had 
allowed me to increase the operations of these three objects, 
notwithstanding the continual increase of expense in con- 
nection with the orphan work ; and thus I expected, fully 
expected, though all appearance was against it, that during 
this period also, I should be again helped by God, the liv- 



IS59. LETTERS FROM ORPHANS. 435 

ing God. Think, then, Christian reader, how great my 
spiritual refreshment, when, by this one donation in a great 
measure, I saw these my daily prayers being again an- 
swered. In like manner may you, in your sphere of service, 
in your family affairs, in your business, in your profession, 
in your various temporal or spiritual necessities, have your 
prayers answered. 

Dec. 9, 1859. To-day it is twenty-four years since the 
orphan work commenced. What has God wrought ! There 
have been received since then altogether 1,129 orphans, and 
during the last two years and two months alone 469, so 
greatly has the work increased of late. "We have now 700 
orphans under our care. 

Dec. 10. The following letter was received to-day from 
an apprentice : — 

Most Beloved Sir : — 

With feelings of gratitude and great thankfulness to you for all the 
kindness I experienced whilst under your care, and for now appren- 
ticing me to a suitable trade whereby I can earn my own living, I 
write you these few lines. I arrived at my destined abode in safety, 
and was kindly received by my master and mistress. Dear sir, [ 
thank you for the education, food, clothing, and for every comfort; 
but, above all, for the instruction from God's word which I received 
when in that happy Orphan House ; for it was there I was brought to 
know Jesus as my Saviour ; and I hope to have him as my guide 
through all ray difficulties, temptations and trials in this world; and, 
having him for my guide, I hope to prosper in my trade, and thereby 
show my gratitude to you for all the kindness I have received. 
Please to accept my gratitude and thanks ; and I hope you will be 
spared many more years to care for poor, destitute children like me. 
I am sure I shall often look back with pleasure and regret to the 
time I was in that happy home ; — with pleasure that I lived there, 
and regret that I left it. Begging you to accept my grateful thanks, 
and with my kind love to Mr. L — , Mr. B — , Mr. W — , and Mr. 

S-, 

I am, dear sir, 

Yours gratefully, 

* * * * 



436 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIV. 

The Christian reader, I doubt not, in perusing such let- 
ters, will with us thank God for condescending to give 
such blessing, such abundant blessing, to our labors. 

Feb. 14} 1860. Two pounds ten shillings sixpence, with 
the following letter : — 

My dear Brother in the Lord Jesus Christ : — 

Will you please to accept an order for two pounds ten shillings six- 
pence by the same post, for the dear orphans under your care? The 
history of this small sum is as follows. About seven and a half 
years ago your Narrative was put into my hands, which the_ Lord 
very greatly blessed to my soul. Six years and eleven months ago [ 
was enabled to cast myself, my wife and family, upon the Lord, and 
look to Him, alone for the supply of our temporal necessities while 
laboring in his glorious cause. From that time to the present we 
have had no claims upon any person for a single penny : nor have we 
made known our wants to any, or applied to any person for help, but 
to our heavenly Father alone ; and he has supplied our need and not 
suffered us to be confounded, blessed be his name ! My dear wife, 
as well as myself, from the very first had a strong desire to help you 
? little in your blessed work of love and labor of faith ; but, for a long 
time, owing to the continued ill-health of my wife, and the growing 
expenses of my family, we never seemed to have any money to spare; 
so all we did was to wish, desire, and talk about it, and say how 
happy we should be if the Lord would enable us to do so. At length, 
we both felt that we were acting wrong, and on the eighth of August 
last we solemnly decided we would give the Lord back a tenth of the 
money he was pleased to send us, though at that time we were very 
poor, I may add in deeper poverty than we had ever been before ; 
yet, under those circumstances, we were enabled in the strength of 
the Lord to come to the above decision and act up to it that very 
morning; and the peace and joy we both felt it is in vain for me to 
attempt to describe. The Lord has kept us firm ever since, and in- 
stead of having less for our own use, we have had even more ; so, 
dear sir, this sum is the fruit of six months' prayers. Pardon me for 
troubling you with so long an account of so trifling a sum; but I 
want you to bless our heavenly Father for his goodness to us his 
unworthy servants, and to remember us in your petitions at a throne 
of grace. 

I am, my dear brother, 

Yours very affectionately and respectfully, 

* * * * 



1860. SCHOOLS. 437 

During the year 1859-60 there have been received for the 
orphans 3,542 separate sums. Of these there were 1,494 
under 5s., 560 above 5s. and not exceeding 10s., 614 above 
10s. and not exceeding £1, 288 above £1 and not exceeding 
£2, 411 above £2 and not exceeding £5, 93 above £5 and 
not exceeding £10, 49 above £10 and not exceeding £20, 10 
above £20 and under £50, 11 of £50, 1 of £59, 19s. 9d., 1 
of £62, 17s., 1 of £89, 4s., 1 of £96, 12s., 3d., 5 of £100, 
2 of £500, and 1 of £1,500. Among these donations were 
some from East India, Australia, Cape of Good Hope, 
Saxony, Holland, South America, United States, from ves- 
sels on the ocean, and from missionaries among the 
heathen. 

During the year under consideration twenty-three schools 
in England were supported or aided by the funds of the In- 
stitution. In all of these the teachers are persons of piety, 
and instruction is given not only in secular knowledge, but 
in the way of salvation. "Without reckoning the orphans, 
13,124 souls have been brought under habitual instruction 
in the things of God in these various schools ; besides the 
many thousands in the schools in the various parts of Eng- 
land, Ireland, Scotland, British Guiana, the West Indies, 
the East Indies, etc., which have been to a greater or less 
degree assisted. 

The total amount of means which has been expended during the 
last twenty-six years in connection with the schools, which have been 
either entirely or in part supported by the funds of this Institution, 
amounts to £9,275, 0s. 8^d. 

The number of Bibles, Testaments, and portions of the Holy Scrip- 
tures, which have been circulated since May 26, 1859, is as follows : 
Bibles sold, 579. Bibles given away, 1,120. Testaments sold, 409. 
Testaments given away, 725. Copies of tlie Psalms sold, 63. Other 
small portions of the Holy Scriptures sold, 218. 

There have been circulated since March 5, 1884, through the me- 
dium of this Institution, 24,768 Bibles, 15,100 Testaments, 719 copies 
of the Psalms, and 1,876 other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. 

The amount of the funds of the Institution spent during the past 
37* 



438 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Char XXIV. 

year on the circulation of the Holy Scriptures is £398, 3s. 7d. The 
total amount spent since March 5, 1834, is £5,681, 13s. 3|d. 

During the past year has been spent of the funds of the Institution, 
in aid of missionary efforts at home and abroad, the sum of £5,019, 
6s. Id. By this sum one hundred and one laborers in the word and 
doctrine, in various parts of the world, have been to a greater or less 
degree assisted. It is an interesting fact that these laborers are lo- 
cated in England, Scotland, Ireland, Belgium, France, Switzerland, 
Sardinia, Canada, Nova Scotia, East India, China, and British 
Guiana. 

The laborers aided by the Institution were peculiarly 
blessed during the year 1859-60. While the preaching of 
those laboring in foreign lands was very useful, the breth- 
ren preaching in Ireland and Scotland were signally favored 
with success, and were permitted to see in a wonderful 
measure the fruit of their prayers and toils. A single ex- 
tract only can be given from the letter of a laborer in 
Scotland. 

A devoted servant of Christ has been laboring in a man- 
ufacturing town in Scotland, where, by means of schools, 
Bible classes, visiting from house to house, and preaching 
the gospel among thousands of the most wretched, most 
debased, and most ignorant, he seeks to win souls for the 
Lord. In this service he has been going on j T ear after 
year. In a measure his labors had been blessed up to the 
period of the last Report, but far more abundantly since, 
as the following account, given by himself to me in a letter 
dated Oct. 28, 1859, will show : — 

" This month, through which we have passed, has brought 
me to a point in my history which for years I have contem- 
plated and looked forward to with deeper and more intense 
desire than to any anticipated event in my whole life. 
More than thirty years ago there sprang up in my soul a 
longing and craving for the effusion of the Holy Ghost on 
the church and on the world, such as would extend through- 
out the whole of Scotland. For this I have labored, and^ 



1860 FRUIT IN SCOTLAND. 439 

spoken, and prayed increasingly. As I grew older, the 
craving for this blessing grew stronger. To see it became 
the ruling passion of my soul, and, as years rolled away, 
iny hope of seeing it realized strengthened apace. On this 
season of expected blessing we seem at length to have en- 
tered. The religious movement is creeping steadily along 
the whole of the west of Scotland. It has not acquired a 
sudden or very powerful momentum. "We are, so far as I 
can judge, in the initiatory stage in all the points where the 
work has found a settlement. A sound has gone out as 
from the Lord ; the rumor travels on, and in its course 
awakens the careless, opens the ear, quickens the atten- 
tion, and everywhere is making preparation for something 
coming. This note of preparation is calling the people 
together. Their ear is open to listen. In every place this 
hearing is bringing faith in its train ; men are turning to 
God ; intensity is given to those silent cases of conviction 
where for months or 3-ears there has been concern ebbing 
and flowing with circumstances. Not a few of these have 
come to light through their concern all at once ripening 
into deep distress. Forced out of the old ruts in which 
they have moved, they are forced to venture their all into 
the hands of Jesus, and are set at liberty. Such has been 
the process at work here. I am continually falling in with 
solitary cases, and a number of these have found peace. 
It would take far more time than I can spare to record 
their history, and how they obtained deliverance." 

The total amount of the funds of the Institution which has been 
spent on missionary operations since March 5, 1834, is £34,495, 3s. 
4d. 

There has been laid out for tracts and books, from May 26, 1859, 
to May 26, 1860, the sum of £1,650, lis. 4|d. ; and there have been 
circulated within the last year 2,5G2 ; 001 tracts and books. The sum 
total which has been expended on this object, since K"ov. 19, 1840, 
amounts to £8,064, 12s. 6^d. The total number of all the tracts and 
books which have been circulated since Nov. 19, 1840, is 11,493,174. 



440 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XXIV. 

During the past year there were again circulated 676,600 tracts and 
books more than during the year before. The great number of 
laborers for God who have been raised up for service within the last 
two years in various parts of the world, and the mighty working of 
the Spirit of God, which has created in multitudes a desire gladly to 
receive tracts and books, account for this. Nor is there in these two 
particulars a decrease, but a continual increase. So great has been 
the call for tracts that of late we have sent out repeatedly 100,000 in 
one week, for gratuitous circulation, and sometimes even more than 
this. When the mighty working of the Spirit of God commenced in 
Ireland, I sought from the beginning to send very large supplies of 
tracts to Belfast and elsewhere, in order that thus the holy flame 
might be fanned, as it were, and that in the very outset the simplicity 
of the gospel might be set before the young converts. About two 
millions of the tracts and books circulated during the past year were 
given away gratuitously. Hundreds of believers have been engaged 
in spreading them abroad, not merely in many parts of England, 
Scotland, and Ireland, but in various other parts of the world. 

At the commencement of the last period there were 672 orphans in 
the new Orphan Houses No. 1 and No. 2. During the past year were 
admitted into the two houses 70 orphans. On May 26, 1860, there 
were just 700 orphans under our care, our full number in the two 
houses, i. e., in No. 1, 300, in No, 2, 400. The total number of or- 
phans who have been under our care since April 11, 1836, is 1,153. 

Without any one having been perso?ial!y applied to for anything 
by me, the sum of £133,528, 14s. has been given to me for the orphans, 
as the result of prayer to God, since the commencement of the work, 
which sura includes the amount received for the building fund for the 
houses already built and the one to be built. It may also be interest- 
ing to the reader to know that the total amount which has been given 
for the other objects since the commencement of the work amounts 
to £51,777, 14s. lid. ; and that which has come in by the sale of 
Bibles, since the commencement, amounts to £2,530, 4s. 5^d. ; by 
sale of tracts, £3,546, 19s. l^d. ; and by the payments of the children 
in the day schools, from the commencement £2,304, 18s. 9. Besides 
this, also, a great variety and number of articles of clothing, furniture, 
provisions, etc., have been given for the use of the orphans. 



Day after clay, and year after year, by the help of God, 
we labor in prayer for the spiritual benefit of the orphans 
under our care. These our supplications, which have been 



1860. SPIRITUAL BLESSINGS. 441 

for twenty-four years brought before the Lord concerning 
them, have been abundantly answered in former years in 
the conversion of hundreds from among them. We have 
also had repeated seasons in which, within a short time, or 
even all at once, many of the orphans were converted. 
Such a season we had about three years since, when within 
a few days about sixty were brought to believe in the Lord 
Jesus ; and such seasons we have had again twice during 
the past } T ear. The first was in July, 1859, when the 
Spirit of God wrought so mightily in one school of 120 
girls, as that very many, yea, more than one half, were 
brought under deep concern about the salvation of their 
souls. This work, moreover, was not a mere momentary 
excitement ; but, after more than eleven months have 
elapsed, there are 31 concerning whom there is full confi- 
dence as to their conversion, and 32 concerning whom there 
is likewise a goodly measure of confidence, though not to 
the same amount as regarding the 31. There are there- 
fore 63 out of the 120 orphans in that one school who are 
considered to have been converted in July, 1859. This 
blessed and mighty work of the Holy Spirit cannot be 
traced to any particular cause. It was, however, a most 
precious answer to prayer. As such we look upon it, and 
are encouraged by it to further waiting upon God. The 
second season of the mighty working of the Holy Spirit 
among the orphans, during the past year, was at the end 
of January and the beginning of February, 1860. The 
particulars of it are of the deepest interest. A very profit- 
able pamphlet might be written on the subject. I have 
prayed again and again for guidance how to act, and have 
at last come to the decision not to relate the details, lest 
the dear children, who would recognize themselves in the 
description, should be injured ; for my experience of labor- 
ing twenty-six years among children, and of having had to 
deal with so many very young believers, has led me to the 
full conviction that it is injurious to make them 'prominent. 



442 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXIV. 

If God makes thein prominent by using them as evidently 
he is using children in these days, we have only to admire 
and to praise ; but this is very different from ourselves 
making them prominent. I must therefore content myself 
b} 7- stating that this great work of the Spirit of God, in Jan- 
uary and February, 1860, began among the younger class 
of the children under our care, little girls of about six, 
seven, eight, and nine years old ; then extended to the 
older girls, and then to the boys ; so that within about ten 
da} T s above 200 of the orphans were stirred up to be anxious 
about their souls, and in many instances found peace imme- 
diately, through faith in our Lord Jesus. They at once 
requested to be allowed to hold prayer meetings among 
themselves, and have had these meetings ever since. Many 
of them also manifested a concern about the salvation of 
their companions and relations, and spoke or wrote to them 
about the way to be saved. Should the believing reader 
desire to know how it has been with these children since the 
end of January and the beginning of Februar} T , our reply 
is, we have, in most cases, cause for thankfulness. The 
present state of the 700 orphans, spiritually, is, that there 
are 118 under our care, regarding whose conversion we have 
full confidence ; 89 regarding whom we have also confidence, 
though not to that full degree as concerning the 118 ; and 
53 whom we consider in a hopeful state. To these 260 are 
to be added the 14 who were sent out as believers, and the 
three who died in the faith during the past year. It is to 
be remembered that very man}^ of the children in the Orphan 
Houses are quite young, as we have received them from 
four months old and upward. During no year have we had 
greater cause for thanksgiving on account of the spiritual 
blessing among the children than during the last ; and yet 

WE LOOK FOR FURTHER AND GREATER BLESSING STILL. 




CHAPTER XXV. 

1860 — 1868. 

GREAT PROSPERITY — FEWER TRIALS — INFLUENCE — THIRD ORPHAN HOUSE 
PRAYING FOR HELPERS, AND FOR OTHER NEEDS — REGULAR CONTRTB 
UTORS— REVIVALS — FODRTH ORPHAN HOUSE. 

'ROM this time Mr. Miiller continued to prosper, 
and he met with no severe trials of his faith. 
His needs were greater than ever before, for 
each addition to the number of orphans involved 
a larger expenditure, and the widening operations in all 
departments of the work required a corresponding increase 
of receipts. But he was never brought, as in previous 
years, into great straits. The expenses of single days, 
and often, even, of successive weeks, were larger than the 
receipts ; but the treasury was never empty. A surplus of 
funds accumulated in the banks, more than adequate for 
every emergencj^. The Lord rewarded the faith of his 
servant, which had been proved, like Abraham's, in the 
hours of sore trial. 

He continued to receive testimonies from Christians in 
various parts of the world, that his example had stimulated 
them to a more confident trust in God's promises, and to 
a more systematic benevolence. 

The following letter came from Scotland, in proof that a 
faithful steward has more talents given to his care : — 

Dear Sir : — 

One of your Reports came to my hand aoout toree years since. 
I have embraced the plan, which your Reports recommend, to give to 

443 



444 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXV. 

the Lord as he prospers us. I consider it now my duty to confess, that 
I have found it a real blessing, both temporally aud spiritually. I am 
but a hard-working man, yet I feel it now a pleasure and a luxury to 
keep account of how the Lord prospers my endeavors; and ever 
since I commenced that plan, everything has gone on well with me. 
My earnings have every year been steadily increasing. I may say 
that I have given about seventeen per cent, for the last two years; 
and, though there was not any appearance of prosperity that man 
could see, yet all that I have given awav for the last year came back 
with interest and compound interest. 

Mr. Miiller believed that all Christians should be edu- 
cated in habits of cheerful giving to the Lord, but not by 
urgent entreaty. He says : — 

To ask unbelievers for means is not God's way ; to press 
even believers to give, is not God's way ; but the duty to con- 
tribute, and the privilege of being allowed to contribute to 
the work of God, should be pointed out to believers, and 
this should be followed up with earnest prayer, believing 
prayer, and it will result in the desired end 

On March 12, 1862, the third Orphan House was finished 
and opened, with accommodations for 450 inmates. It was 
begun in July, 1859, and was nearly three years in build- 
ing. On the day of its completion he writes : — 

It was in November, 1850, that my mind became exer- 
cised about enlarging the orphan work from 300 orphans 
ftp 1,000, and subsequently to 1,150 ; and it was in June, 
1851, that this my purpose became known, having kept it 
secret for more than seven months, whilst day by day 
praying about it. From the end of November, 1850, to 
this day, March 12, 1862, not one single day has been 
allowed to pass, without this contemplated enlargement 
being bi ought before God in prajw, and generally more 



1862-1868. REGULAR DONORS, 447 

than once a day. But only now, this day, the New Orphan 
House No. 3 was so far advanced, as that it could be 
opened. Observe then, first, esteemed reader, how long it 
may be, before a full answer to our prayers, even to thou 
sands and tens of thousands of praj^ers, is granted ; yea, 
though those prayers may be believing prayers, earnest 
prayers, and offered up in the name of the Lord Jesus, and 
though we may only for the sake of the honor of our Lord 
desire the answer ; for I did, by the grace of God, without 
the least doubt and wavering, look for more than eleven 
years for the full answer ; I earnestly importuned the Lord ; 
I alone looked for the answer on the ground of the worthi- 
ness of the Lord Jesus, judging myself entirely unworthy 
of an answer ; and I only sought in this matter the glory 
of God. 

Though the expense of building the three Orphan Houses 
had reached nearly £42,000 sterling, yet the fund was not 
exhausted, for more than £11,000 remained to the credit of 
the building fund ; and more than £9,000 to the credit of 
the fund for current expenses. 

Many persons had become so deeply interested in the 
orphan work, that they contributed regularly to its support. 
Their gifts were often small, but the aggregate value was 
large. The report of 1863 alludes to some of these do- 
nors : — 

A Christian, in business in Lincolnshire, has sent me 
week by week 10s. for some time past ; and two donors 
have given for several years past £60 each, annually. A 
waiter at one of the hotels in Manchester has sent me for 
the greater part of the year 5s. every week ; and a donor at 
Nottingham has also sent very many little donations as 
" From Needy." A Christian, in business at Manchester, 
dedicates a little for the orphans for every order he receives, 



448 THE LIFE OF TRUST. CnAp. XXV 

and for every payment which is made, and sends the 
amount, when it has been collected for a while. Another 
Christian brother, in business in London, sends weekly lit- 
tle contributions as God prospers him. A Christian baker 
gives one penny to the orphans for each sack of flour which 
he uses ; and a Christian flour-dealer one penny for each 
sack of flour which he sells. I have already mentioned 
that a widow gives one penny for each pair of shoes she 
sells ; and a certain bonnet-maker one penny for each bon- 
net she makes. We have, also, gratuitously supplied, 
through the kindness of a firm, all the salt which is used at 
the three Orphan Houses. There are two servants of 
Christ, laboring in the gospel in dependence upon the 
Lord for their temporal supplies, one of whom sends the 
tenth part of ail the Lord gives to him, for the benefit of 
the orphans, and the other the fifth part. The latter has 
done so for a number of j^ears, and these amounts have 
been again considerable during the past year. One donor, 
with an income of about £400 a year only, has now for nine 
years past given between £100 and £200 of this income, 
year by year. 

Before the third house was completed, such was the pres- 
sure for larger accommodations to receive the increasing 
number of applicants, and such his confident faith in God 
that all urgent wants would be supplied, that he formed the 
purpose of building two more houses, with capacity for 850 
orphans, making the whole number 2,000. Among other 
reasons he enumerates for this great enlargement of the 
work, is the sense of personal responsibility to improve his 
special talents, for the glory of God, and the good of men. 
He says : — 

In connection with the foregoing reasons stands also the 
fact, that the Lord has been pleased to give me gift for this 



1863-1863. ORPHAN IIOUSE3. 449 

work. I do not take credit to myself for this. There is 
not the least honor due to me on account of it. The germ 
was first implanted by the Lord, and he caused it to grow 
and to increase. The gift which he had been pleased to 
impart, for "such service, was used, at first, while the work 
was small ; for I began with 30 orphans. Afterwards were 
added 36 more, and then after a year again 30 more, and 
finally, after the lapse of several years, 30 more. Thus, for 
above thirteen j^ears, the number of orphans under my 
care never exceeded 126 ; but then it grew to 300 with the 
opening of the New Orphan House No. 1, and with the 
opening of No. 2, to 700 ; and now, with God's blessing, it 
will shortly be 1,150. Thus, with the enlargement of the 
work, the gift, which the Lord had been pleased to give 
to me, was further and further developed, as the whole work 
grew up under my sole and immediate direction. 

Now, while there is not the least honor due to me for all 
this, as God called me for the work, fitted me for it, has 
sustained me in it, and caused my experience to grow with 
the work ; yet, on the other hand, I feel responsibility laid 
on me, still further, to the utmost of my power, to make 
use of this gift and experience, and therefore to enlarge the 
work, as here proposed. 

It was easier to fill the house with orphans, than to ob- 
tain the necessary teachers and helpers. Many who had 
applied for places had, in the mean time, found other posi- 
tions, or proved unsuitable. But Mr. Miiller carried the 
matter to the Lord in prayer, and was not disappointed : — 

Instead of praying once a da}^ with very dear wife about 
this matter, as we had been doing day by day for years, 
we met daily three times, to bring this before God. I also 
brought the matter before the whole staff of my helpers in 
the work, requesting their prayers. Thus I have now con- 
38* 



450 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XXV. 

tinned for about four months longer in praj^er, day by day 
calling upon God three times on account of this need, and 
the result has been, that one helper after the other has 
been given, without the help coming too late, or the work 
getting into confusion ; or the reception of the children 
being hindered ; and I am fully assured that the few who are 
yet needed will also be found, when they are really required. 

Mr. Miiller gave the broadest application to the com- 
mand of the New Testament, " In all things by prayer and 
supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made 
known unto God." He not only looked to God for the 
daily supply of money to meet the wants of the orphans, 
and for teachers and assistants to care for them ; but he felt 
the need of divine help in all the details of his work. He 
was often perplexed by difficulties in finding good places 
for the bo3 r s, when the time came for them to leave the 
Orphan House, and found relief in prayer : — 

In the early part of the summer, 1862, it was found that 
we had several boys ready to be apprenticed ; but there 
were no applications made by masters for apprentices. As 
all our boys are invariably sent out as in-door apprentices, 
this was no small difficulty ; for we not only look for Chris- 
tian masters, but consider their business, and examine into 
their position, to see whether they are suitable ; but, if all 
other difficulties were out of the way, the master must also 
be willing to receive the apprentice into his own family. 
Under these circumstances, we again gave ourselves to 
prayer, as we had done for more than twenty years before, 
concerning this thing, instead of advertising, which, in all 
probability, would only bring before us masters who desire 
an apprentice for the sake of the premium. "We remembered 
how good the Lord had been to us, in having helped ua 



1865-1868. PRAYER. IN SICKNESS. 451 

hundreds of times before, in this very matter. Some weeks 
passed, but the difficulty remained. We continued, how- 
ever, in praj'er, and then one application was made, and 
then another ; and since the time when we first began to 
pra}' about this matter, last summer, we have been able to 
send out altogether eighteen boys ; and the difficulty was 
thus again entirely overcome by prayer, as every one of the 
boys, whom it was desirable to send out, has been sent out. 

When sickness came into the houses, he implored the 
Lord for deliverance, and the prayers were not in vain : — 

During the past year it pleased the Lord to exercise our 
faith greatly with reference to scarlet fever and the hooping- 
cough. In September, 1865, the scarlet fever broke out at 
the New Orphan House No. 2, in which house there are 200 
infant girls and 200 elder girls. It appeared among the 
infants. The cases increased more and more. But we 
betook ourselves to God in prayer. Day by day we called 
upon him regarding this trial, and generally two or three 
times a day. At last, when the infirmary rooms were filled, 
and also some other rooms that could be spared for the 
occasion, to keep the sick children from the rest ; and when 
now we had no other rooms to spare, at least not without 
great inconvenience ; it pleased the Lord to answer our 
pra3^ers, and in merc} T to stay the disease. There were in 
all 36 children ill of the scarlet fever at No. 2, but not one 
died of the disease. The same malady broke out also at 
No. 3. But the Lord dealt there very gently with us ; 
only 3 children were ill of the fever, and all recovered. At 
the end of the } T ear 1865 the hooping-cough appeared among 
the 450 girls of the New Orphan House No. 3. This disease 
was very general in Bristol, and many children died in con- 
sequence. Parents and others, who have an affectionate 
heart, and who feel for the suffering of children, can easily 
suppose how our hearts were affected, when we heard these 



452 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXV. 

dear children laboring under this trying malady. But, 
while we thought it right to take all the necessary precau- 
tions with regard to the spread of the disease, and to use 
the needed remedies, yet our chief and universal remedy, 
prayer and faith, was again resorted to. "We trusted in 
God, and betook ourselves to him, and we were not con- 
founded. When it is considered that we have 1,150 orphans 
in the three houses, and that the hooping-cough was so gen- 
eral in Bristol and the neighborhood, and in many instances 
so fatal, the hand of God, in answer to constant daily 
prayer for several months, regarding this disease, is marked 
enough, in that we had only in all the three houses seventeen 
cases of hooping-cough, and that only one child died in con- 
sequence of the hooping-cough, this dear little girl having 
constitutionally very weak lungs, and a tendency to con- 
sumption, which followed the hooping-cough. 

Similar help was given in the prevalence of small-pox 
in 1872: — 

When the trial had come to its height, and many children 
were laid down in this disease, we proposed that as many 
of the whole staff of teachers, matrons, etc., as could leave 
their post, should, in addition to secret prayer, and our 
regular meeting for prayer, meet day by day for prayer 
regarding this heavy affliction, in order that we might hum- 
ble ourselves under the mighty hand of God, and seek his 
merciful deliverance. From the day we did so, there has 
been a marked and most decided difference. The fresh 
cases have been few comparatively, and the deaths have 
been very rare. The few children who are now ill, are all 
convalescent, with the exception of one. 

The receipts were very unequal. The expense of a single 
day would often exhaust the receipts of the entire week. 



1360-1868. NEED OF FAITH. 453 

There was still need of prayer and faith. In the report of 
1864, Mr. Miiller alludes to this : — 

Let no one take it as a matter of course that means must 
come in, because the work is large, and well known, and 
Reports are issued. For donations might be received, and 
even many, yet the income might be entirely inadequate to 
the outgoings. Take, for instance, the very last day before 
the one on which I am writing this, i. e., May 20, 1864. 
The income of the whole day, in twelve sums, was £6, 14s. 
9d., but the outgoings were £53, 8s. 5d. Take the day be- 
fore that, May 19, 1864. The income was £32, 2s. 3d., in 
again exactly 12 different sums ; but the outgoings were 
£213, 9s. Take this very day on which I am writing, 
May 21, 1864. The income for the orphans has been £2, 
3s. 7d. ; but I have already paid out £25, 4s., yet there is a 
bill of £46, 18s. 5d. more before me to be paid, and I know 
not what other heavy demands may further be made upon 
me this day. Now we did receive on the 19th £6, 14s. 9d. 
in twelve donations, on the 20th £32, 2s. 3d. in twelve dona- 
tions, and to-day £2, 3s. 7d. iu three donations. There were 
therefore many donations received during these three days, 
yet how entirely inadequate to meet the demands ; for the 
total income was only £41, 0s. 7d. during the three days, 
and the outgoings £292, Is. 5d. 

Mr. Miiller was cheered in his work by numerous letters 
from those who had been under his care, and felt that they 
owed their success in life to the training they had received 
in the Orphan Houses. Extracts from their letters are given 
in his annual Reports, and they overflow with gratitude to 
God and to Mr. Miiller. They uniformly remember the 
Orphan House, and send gladly little sums to help forward 
the good work. We give a few extracts : — 



454 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXV. 

Feb. 1, 1866. — From one of the orphans, formerly under 
our care, a believer, and now in service £4 for missions, 
with the following letter : " Dear Mr. Miiller : you will 
be surprised to hear from me again so soon, but I will give 
you my reason in the histoiy of the enclosed sum, which I 
am thankful to be able to offer for the missions. I bad 
saved a nice sum from my earnings, until I was moved in 
reading your Narrative to send you a portion of it. The 
inclination was again renewed, and I put a certain small 
portion by, intending it for a last resource, in case of sick- 
ness, or death, that I might not prove a burden to any one ; 
thinking it presumptuous to leave myself entirely without, 
as I had no one, humanly speaking, to look to for the least 
help. But, dear sir, I have received such benefits, such 
manifestations of God's care and goodness towards me, I 
was constrained to return him the little in my power, to help 
forward the glorious work of spreading the gospel, that 
others thereby may be brought to enjoy the same unspeak- 
able blessings, through the knowledge of that gospel ; and 
I felt I was doing a very ungrateful, neglectful act by keep- 
ing this money lying, when there is much to be done. " 

Feb. 15. — Received 5s. from two orphans, now in service, 
with the following letter : " Beloved and respected Sir : 
will 3~ou please to accept the enclosed trifle towards the 
Building Fund, as we should esteem it a great pleasure to 
contribute one stone towards the erection of another Orphan 
House, that other dear orphans, who are left as we were, 
may be blessed with a similar happy home to that which we 
enjoyed so long. We often think and talk of the happy 
days spent under your fatherly care, and trust that you will 
long be spared to be the orphan's friend. Please to accept 
our heart-felt thanks for all the kindness and care you have 
bestowed upon us. " 

Sept. 27, 1867. — The following letter, with 5s., was re- 
ceived from an orphan who more than ten years since was 
sent out to service, after she had been about ten years un- 



1860-1868. ORPHANS' LETTERS. 457 

der our care : " Dear Sir : may I be permitted to ask your 
acceptance of this small donation as a token of gratitude 
for the great kindness I received whilst under your fatherly 
care ; and may you, dear sir, long be spared to be a father 
to the fatherless, and a friend to the orphan. Often do I 
look back to the period of my childhood spent in the Orphan 
House, and feel grateful that I was one of the number per- 
mitted to find shelter in so good a home. You will, I have 
no doubt, dear sir, be pleased to know that I am still in the 
same situation as when I last wrote to you, where I have 
been now nearly nine years, and am still very comfortable. 
Dear sir, I wish you many happy returns of your birth- 
day, and hope you will long be spared with health and 
strength to see many more,and to carry on the noble work 
you have undertaken." 

July 3, 1871. — " I have been taught by your life, dear sir, 
that there is something truly noble and grand for a man to 
live for ;. there is nought more noble than the cause for 
which you have spent and are still spending your valuable 
life, and for which cause I hope to spend mine, namely, the 
cause of Christ. Will you please accept the most grateful 
thanks of an orphan, for having placed me with a kind mas- 
ter and mistress, with whom I have learnt the trade of dec- 
orating, painter, paper-hanger, etc, 

In March, 1866, the plans for the two new houses were 
ready, and in April tenders were received from contractors 
to build them. Mr. Muller supposed that the building fund 
accumulated, £34,002, 2s., was of ample amount to meet 
all expenses. But the prices of building material and wages 
had so increased since the previous houses were built, that 
it appeared from the estimates of contractors that £7,000 
more would be needed. 

Now, what was to be done under these circumstances ? 
39 



458 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXV. 

My decision was made instantly. My heart longed to build 
two more houses to the honor of the Lord for the benefit of 
poor children, bereaved of both parents by death ; I had 
brought before the Lord many thousands of prayers during 
the past five years ; there were many hundreds of orphans 
waiting for admission, and their number daily increasing 
(for during the past year alone, as stated before, 611 were 
applied for to be admitted) ; but I could not contract debt ; 
I would not sign contracts, which I had not money in hand 
to meet. Should it be said : " But your work is so mani- 
festly the Lord's work, it is surely according to his mind, 
that destitute children, who have lost by death both parents, 
should be cared for, so that } r ou need not be afraid to build, 
though you have not yet all the money in hand, for God 
will surely help you : my reply is this. Just because it is 
the Lord's work, and manifestly his, therefore I can wait, 
patiently wait his time. When his time is come, he will 
give to the last shilling all I need ; but if I commence be- 
fore his time, which I should do were I to begin that for 
which I have not the means, it would be like saying : " God 
has not money enough to pay for his own work ; " and, in- 
stead of acting in faith, I should act presumptuously. I 
therefore did this. As I had ample means to meet the con- 
tract for No. 4 (for separate tenders were given in for the 
two houses), I accepted it, and a written agreement was 
made between the contractor and myself, that on Jan. 1, 
1867, or at any time previously, I may accept his tender for 
No. 5 also, but I shall not be bound to do so. If it shall, 
therefore, please the Lord, by the 1st of Jan., 1867, to give 
me about £7,000 more than I have now in hand, the contract 
for No. 5 will be signed ; but I cannot go in debt. 

It is gratifying to know that the amount needed was re- 
ceived in time to make the tender binding. Jan. 1, 1867, 
he writes : — 



1860-1868. NEW HOUSES. 459 

On the 26th of May, 1866, I needed about £7,000 more 
than I had in hand, to be able to accept the contract for 
No. 5 without going in debt ; but by the 31st of Dec, 1866, 
the Lord had so graciously helped, as that a little more than 
£7,000 had come in by donations and interest, so that a day 
before the 1st of January, 1867, I was able to accept and 
sign the contract for No. 5, the contracts for both houses 
being £41,147. I had now the desire of my heart given 
to me, regarding this point also, and had the precious rec- 
ompense from the Lord, in having received all the money 
from him for this object without going in debt. Thousands 
of times I had asked the Lord for the means needed for 
building these two houses, and now I had, to the full, re- 
ceived the answer. 

It appeared also in the end to be providential that the 
sum needed for both houses was not in hand, when the con- 
tract for house No. 4 was signed. Mr. Miiller writes, at a 
later date : — 

It is necessary here to state, that, if even all the money 
had been in hand on May 3, 1866, to contract at once for 
both houses, yet only one house could have been gone on 
with ; for the houses are so large, that no contractor in 
Bristol nas sufficient scaffolding to begin the two houses at 
once, but there must necessarily intervene between the 
commencement of the one and the other eight or nine 
months. This difficulty could only have been overcome, 
nad there been sufficient money in hand, by having two 
different contractors, which was for many reasons very unde- 
sirable, or by employing one of the great London contract- 
ors ; but if the latter had been done, the two houses would 
aave cost about £7,000 more than they now will cost. 

The year 1866 was memorable for two powerful revivals 
ii ' - Orphan Houses. There had been, in previous years, 



460 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXV 

especially in 1859 and 1860, seasons of marked religious 
interest, in which a number of the orphans gave evidence 
of a genuine change of heart. But each of these revivals 
of 1866 was more powerful than any which had gone before, 
and the latter gave a signal display of divine power. The 
first began at the opening of the year, and, without any 
apparent cause, more than a hundred girls were suddenly 
in earnest about their souls, and, months after, gave evi- 
dence that a new life had begun in them. 

The other revival began in the conversion, on her death- 
bed, of one of the girls. The account, by Mr. Miiller, is full 
of interest : — 

When now this dear girl was convinced of sin, and made 
so unspeakably happy through faith in the Lord Jesus, she 
manifested the deepest concern about the salvation of her 
young friends and companions in the new Orphan House 
No. 3, and sent several messages to them from her dying 
bed, entreating them to seek the Lord. On Sunday, May 
27, 1866, she found peace in the Lord, and on Tuesday 
morning, May 29th, she fell peacefully asleep in Jesus. 
Her thoughtlessness and carelessness regarding the things 
of God had been well known among the orphans, and her 
conversion and her messages were now used by the Lord 
as the instrument of the most extensive and glorious work 
of the Spirit of God that we ever have had among the 
children, during the whole time that the orphan work has 
been in existence. I write after the lapse of five weeks, 
reckoning from the death of Emma Bunn, and about 
350 orphans in the new Orphan House No. 3 alone, have 
since then been led to seek the Lord, and the greater part of 
them have found peace for their souls, through faith in the 
Lord Jesus. These dear children, formerly almost all 
careless and indifferent, and most of them much like what 



1860-1868. REVIVALS. 461 

Emma Bunn had been, have their prayer-meetings among 
themselves, as often as they can, and, in other ways, give 
joy to our hearts. 

Another revival, with even more wonderful results than 
those of 1866, was enjoyed in 1872. The small-pox was 
prevailing at that time in the Orphan Houses, and there 
were a number of deaths, not only among the children, but 
also among the teachers and helpers. God was pleased to 
mingle mercies with affliction, and a profound religious 
interest manifested itself in all the houses. Its good fruits 
were delightful. Mr. Miiller says : — 

I have just received the statements of all the matrons 
and teachers in tK Sve houses, who report to me, that, 
after careful observation, they have good reason to believe 
that 729 of the orphans under our care are believers in the 
Lord Jesus. This number of believing orphans is by far 
greater than ever we had, for which we adore and praise 
the Lord. 

It is worthy of note, as indicating the sovereignty of 
God, in the special gifts of the Holy Spirit, that these revi- 
vals of 1859, 1860, 1866, and 1872, have been the only 
ones of remarkable power, in the history of the Orphan 
Houses. One might suppose that so large a company of 
children, under the best religious influences, and directed 
by a man so mighty in prayer as Mr. Miiller, would be 
visited every year with revival influences. . But while 
prayer was answered daily in providential mercies, and 
food and clothing were never wanting, the spiritual gifts 
were more rarely bestowed. 

In November, 1868, the fourth house was opened, with 



462 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXV. 

accommodations for 450 orphans. The labor involved in 
making preparation to receive this large nnmber of new 
inmates was so great that the opening of the fifth house 
was postponed for more than a year. The correspondence 
alone was immense, involving the writing of several thou- 
sand letters, for Mr. Miiller was very particular in learning 
the history of all the families from which the orphans were 
taken. Of the other work required, he says : — 

It is difficult for those who are not acquainted with the 
practical working of such an Institution to enter into the 
great amount of labor connected therewith ; but were they 
to see all the many thousands of articles of house-linen, and 
all the many thousands of articles of clothing required for 
only one such Orphan House for one hundred and fifty chil- 
dren, they would easily perceive how it comes that I have 
not yet been able to open No. 5. 




CHAPTER XXYI. 

1868 — 1872. 

DONATIONS — FIFTH ORPHAN HODSE — HABITS OF BENEVOLENCE — DEATH OP 
MRS. MULLER— MR. WRIGHT AN ASSOCIATE — PLACES FOR THE ORPHANS 
— OP.Ji.CTS OF THE INSTITUTION —ORPHANS LEAVING THE INSTITUTION — 
SPECIMEN OF ARTICLES DONATED — NOTE FROM MR. MULLER RESPECTING 
BOOKS AND ACCOUNTS — ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1872. 

OME interesting facts in the Reports of 1868 and 
1872 are worthy of record : — 

March 30. — Received also from a laborer in the gos- 
pel, who preaches without any salary, and trusts in the Lord 
for his temporal necessities, 12s., with this statement : "Dear 
Mr. Muller : I desire to enclose 12s. for your work for the 
Lord, and trust he will continue to supply all your need. He 
loveth a cheerful giver ; for he is the most cheerful giver, 
who gave us his dear Son, and with him freely gives us all 
things. The Lord led me five 3 T ears since, to begin with a 
tenth to give to him of all he sent me for my use ; and, by 
his grace, he has helped me to go from a tenth to a seventh, 
then to a fifth, now to a half of all he gives me. As the 
work increases, and helpers come forward to the work, so 
he has enabled me to share with them." 

April 6. — From California £4, with the following letter : 
u Dear Sir : on reading your Narrative I found that, after 
many years of profession, I was onty producing leaves ; for, 
according to 3^0111* remark, I was living up to my means, 
forgetting the command, 'Deny thyself and take up thy cross 
and follow me.' By the help of God I was enabled to 
examine myself, and made an effort to deny a luxury. 
After trial I found that I was better without than with it. 
The produce is twenty dollars, which I transmit to your care 
for the use of the children in your Institution, and will feel 

463 



464 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXVI. 

thankful if the merciful Father accepts this gift from an 
aged sinner, bordering on eighty." 

June 3. — Received to-day £51, 5s., with the following let- 
ter : " My dear Sir : I enclose my check, value £51, 5s., to 
be applied, £20 for missions, £20 for the dear children 
under j^our care, and the balance for yourself £11, 5s. I 
send this in acknowledgment of God's mercies, having had 
great losses in business, and feeling truly thankful that I 
am in a position to bear them, and still to carry on my 
business as usual, with the prayer that God may keep me 
humble at the foot of the cross of Christ." 

Jan. 1, 1872. — " My dear Sir : through the Lord's good- 
ness I am enabled to send you herewith £125 ; £5 for }-our 
own expenses, and £120 in aid of the work under your care. 
It is now ten 3 r ears since I first sent you anything, and 
about the same time since I began to give systematically to 
God's work, through reading of your Narrative. Like 
man}- others I can sa}^, that God has made up to me all 
that I have given and far more. I trust you are in good 
health, and feeling assured that all is going well with you, 
I am, j'ours faithfully, * * * *." — This Christian gentle- 
man has sent me during the last ten years more than 
£5,000 for the work of the Lord; he has sent as God 
has been pleased to prosper him ; and his testimony is, 
" that God has made up to him all that he has given, and 
far more." 

Jan. 29. — Received £2,000 with the following letter: 
ifc Dear Sir : I send you £2,000, the produce of the sale of 
some property, which has given me much trouble of mind, 
and the proceeds of which have been devoted to the Lord's 
service. It is become evident that he saw it not good for 
me to hold so much, and therefore allowed its possession to 
be rather a curse than a blessing. That it may prove a 
blessing by 3 r our appropriation of it, under his guidance, is 
the prayer of, yours truly, * * * *." This letter is full of 
instruction. 1. The Christian gentleman who sent this 



1868-1872. LIBERALITY REWARDED. 465 

money is anything but covetous ; for he had for about 
twenty years sent me much for the Lord's work, and for 
many years about £200 annually ; yet he considered that he 
held too much. So other disciples of the Lord Jesus may 
hold too much. 2. The writer states further, that, because 
the Lord saw it not good for him to hold so much, he al- 
lowed its possession to be rather a curse than a blessing. 
Shall not all of us seek to be profited by the experience of 
this Christian gentleman? Are not all of us, naturally, to 
a greater or less degree, fond of possessions, and therefore 
aiming rather after a curse than a blessing? 3. Posses- 
sions, small or great, are just in so far of value as they are 
used for the Lord. 

In the Report for 1869 is recorded a striking instance of 
the increase which follows liberal giving : — 

This poor cripple began with a very small proportion. 
She gave one penny per week ; but God blessed her plant- 
ing a piece of waste land with potatoes, so, after this, that 
she found she possessed in potatoes, etc., 1858, £10. She 
gave now £d. per day, viz., 3^-d. per week, instead of one 
penny per week, and at the end of 1859 she had in potatoes, 
etc., £15. In 1860 she gave double as much as the year 
before, and had at the end of the year £20. In 1861 she 
gave 2d. daily, or Is. 2d. per week, and her property was, 
by the end of 1861, increased to £30. During the year 
1862 she gave 3d. per da3 r , and found herself possessed, at 
the close of the year, of £45. In 1863 she gave 4d. per 
day, and had at the end of the year £63. During the 
year 1864, this poor cripple was able to give away 6d. per 
day, and yet had at the close of the year more than at the 
beginning ; for she possessed now in pigs, potatoes, etc., 
£75. In 1865 she increased her contributions to 8d. per 
day, and had at the end of the year £86. In 1866 she 
gave after the rate of lOd. per day, and her property 



466 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXVL 

amounted, at the close of the year, to £93. During 1867 
she gave Is. per clay, and this poor cripple possessed now, 
in pigs, etc., property to the amount of £150 at the end of 
the year of 1867. 

The fifth house was opened Jan. 6, 1870, having accom- 
modations, like the third and fourth, for 450 orphans, and, 
with the others, for 2,050 in all. But it was not at once 
filled, though the number of applicants exceeded the ample 
provisions made. The prevalence of measles and scarlet 
fever made it undesirable to receive many new-comers, and 
the death of Mrs. Miiller, in February, who for thirty-four 
years had been his most efficient helper in the orphan work, 
almost paralyzed progress. The grief of the orphans was 
great at the loss of their benefactress, and those who had 
gone out from the Institution in previous years requested 
the privilege of contributing something for a monument 
over her grave. The privilege was granted, and the gifts 
flowed in so freely that a sum fourfold larger than was 
needed soon accumulated. 

In Nov., 1871, Mr. James Wright married the only daugh- 
ter of Mr. Miiller, and was designated as the successor on 
whom the responsibility of the Orphan Houses would rest, 
in case of Mr. Miiller's death. For thirteen j^ears Mr. 
Wright had been one of the most valuable helpers in the 
Institution, and Mr. Miiller and his wife had made it a 
matter of constant prayer, that he might be fitted of God 
for the leadership of the work. In Feb., 1870, Mr. Miiller, 
after the death of his wife, proposed to Mr. Wright to be- 
come his associate with the view of succeeding him at 
death ; but Mr. Wright was not ready to assume so grave a. 
responsibility. Soon after his own wife died, his feelings 



1868-1872 AN ASSOCIATE WORKER. 469 

changed, and he felt it would not be right to shrink from a 
plain duty. This step was a great relief to Mr. Miilier. 
He says : — 

By the Lord's kindness I am able to work as heretofore, 
I may say with little hindrance through illness ; yet, as I 
am sixty-six years of age, I cannot conceal from myself, 
that it is of great importance for the work, that I should 
obtain a measure of relief. This relief, however, can be 
really only given to me by one who stands in a similar 
position to the work, and who, when I am away, or when I 
may feel it desirable to have real rest, could do all I ordi- 
narily do in directing. On this account I have, therefore, 
not only appointed Mr. Wright as my successor, in the 
event of my death, but have, also, associated him at pres- 
ent with me in the direction of the Institution, which year 
by year increases in extent. 

The large increase of expenditure involved in the open- 
ing of the fourth and fifth houses brought no anxiety to 
Mr. Miilier. He knew that the Lord, who had helped him 
hitherto, would support him under the heavier burdens. 
Nor was he disappointed. He writes in 1870 : — 

" Though the current expenses of the Institution were 
far greater during the past year than during any of the 
previous thirty-five years, yet we abounded more than 
ever." 

He rejoiced, also, in the assurance that the end for 

which he commenced the experiment was reached. The 

success of the Orphan Houses during so many years, id 

which no debts were ever incurred, nor were the orphans 

in want even for a single day, was a standing proof of the 
40 



470 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXVI. 

power of prayer. Who, in the face of such facts, could 
deny or doubt that God answers the prayers of his people, 
who trust only in his help ? Mr. Miiller says : — 

The greatest of all the spiritual blessings, however, 
resulting from this work, I judge to be this, that the Re- 
ports "tf hich have been issued in connection therewith, have 
not only been instrumental in the conversion of many sin- 
ners, by leading them to see the reality of the things of 
God, but have, also, in the cases of many thousands of 
Christian persons, as their letters have testified to me, dur- 
ing the past thirty years, been a great spiritual help to 
them, in comforting them, leading them more fully to cast 
their burdens upon the Lord, increasing their faith, showing 
to them practically and experimentally that the Living 
God is still the Living God, and in other respects benefiting 
their souls. This point was the great and chief end of the 
establishment of the orphan work, that thus God might 
be glorified. This end has been answered beyond the 
largest expectations which I had in the } r ear 1835. 

It is one of the aims never lost sight of by Mr. Miiller, 
to train the orphans under his care for the practical work 
of life. He is not content with giving them a pleasant 
home, and a good education. He longs to make them use- 
ful members of society, and skilful workers in the world 
His success has been most gratifying, for the training of 
his institution is one of the best recommendations fox 
-an) r boy or girl. There is a large demand for the orphans, 
who are sent out every year to service or to trades. The 
girls are generally sent to service, and the boys to different 
trades. On this point Mr. Miiller saj^s : — 

We uniformly prefer fitting the girls for service, instead 
of apprenticing them to a business, as being, generally, fai 



1870. ORPHANS LEAVING THE INSTITUTION. 471 

better for their bodies and souls. Only in a few instances 
have female orphans been apprenticed to businesses, when 
their health would not allow them to go to service. If the 
girls give us satisfaction, while under our care, so that we 
can recommend them to a situation, they are fitted out at 
the expense of the establishment. The girls, generally, 
remain under our care till they are about 17 years old. 
They very rarely leave sooner ; and, as we receive children 
from their earliest days, we have often had girls 13, J4, yea, 
above 17 years under our care. They are instructed in 
reading, writing, arithmetic, English grammar, geography, 
English history, a little of universal history, all kinds of 
useful needlework and household work. They make their 
clothes and keep them in repair ; they work in the kitchens, 
sculleries, wash-houses and laundries ; and, in a word, we 
aim after this, that if any of them do not do well temporally 
or spiritually, and do not turn out useful members of society, 
it shall at least not be our fault. The boys are, generally, 
apprenticed when they are between fourteen and fifteen 
years old. But in each case we consider the welfare of the 
individual orphan, without having any fixed rule respecting 
these matters. The boys have a free choice of the trade 
they like to learn ; but, having once chosen, and being 
apprenticed, we do not allow them to alter. The boys, as 
well as the girls, have an outfit provided for them ; and any 
other expenses, that may be connected with their apprentice- 
ship, are also met by the funds of the orphan establishment. 
It may be interesting to the reader to know the kind of 
trades to which we generally apprentice the boys, and I 
therefore say, that, during the last twenty-one years, all the J 
boys who were apprenticed were bound to carpenters, oi 
carpenters and joiners, basket makers, shoe makers, tailors. 
and drapers, plumbers, painters and glaziers, linendrapers, 
printers, bakers, grocers, hair-dressers, ironmongers, tin- 
plate workers, confectioners, hosiers, builders, millers, gas- 
fitters, smiths, outfitters, provision dealers, sail makers, 



472 THE LIFE OF TRUST Chap. XXVI. 

upholsterers, wholesale grocers, chemists, seed merchants, 
umbrella makers, or electro plate manufacturers. The boys 
have the same kind of mental cultivation as the girls, and 
they learn to knit and mend their stockings. They also 
make their beds, clean their shoes, scrub their rooms, go 
errands, and work in the garden ground round the orphan 
establishment, in the way of digging, planting, weeding, 
etc. 

Mr. Miiller is a man of methodical habits, and has a per- 
fect system in the distribution of the orphans in the differ- 
ent houses, in the daily management of the work, and in the 
time for admitting visitors, and conducting them through 
the establishment. He gives a brief statement of the order 
followed in classifying the orphans, and in admitting vis- 
itors : — 

The new Orphan House No. 1 is fitted up for the accom- 
modation of 140 orphan girls above eight years of age, 80 
orphan bo3 T s above eight years, and 80 female orphans 
from their earliest days till they are about eight years of 
age. The infants, after having passed the age of eight 
years, are removed into the department for older girls. 
The new Orphan House No. 2 is fitted up for 200 infant 
female orphans, and for 200 older female orphans. The 
new Orphan House No. 3 is fitted up for 450 older female 
orphans. The new Orphan House No. 4 is fitted up for 
210 boys of eight years old and upwards, 208 infant boys 
under eight years of age, and 32 older girls, to do the 
household work, 450 in all. The new Orphan House No 
5 is fitted up for 210 infant female orphans, and for 240 
older female orphans. 

The new Orphan House No. 1 is open to visitors every 
Wednesday afternoon ; the new Orphan House No. 2, every 
Tuesday afternoon ; the new Orphan House No. 3, every 



1872. OBJECTS OF THE INSTITUTION. 473 

Thursday afternoon ; the new Orphan House No. 4, every 
Friday afternoon ; and the new Orphan House No. 5, every 
Saturday afternoon ; but the arrangements of the establish- 
ments make it needful that they should be shown at those 
times only. No exceptions can be made. The first party 
of visitors will be shown through the houses at half-past 
two o'clock, God permitting ; the second at there o'clock ; 
and, should there be need for it, the third and last party 
at half-past three o'clock. As it takes at least one hour 
and a half to see the whole of each establishment, it is re- 
quested that the visitors will be pleased to make their 
arrangements accordingly before they come, as it would be 
inconvenient should one or the other leave before the 
whole party has seen the house. 

In the report for 1872, Mr. Miiller, in addition to a par- 
ticular review of the year, gives a summary of the work 
accomplished since the foundation of the Scriptural 
Knowledge Institution. It indicates the wonderful growth 
of the work, and the fulness of the divine blessing granted 
to his labors. 

THE OBJECTS OF THE INSTITUTION ARE .' 

1 . To assist day schools , Sunday schools, and adult schools, 
in which instruction is given upon Scriptural principles* and, 
as far as the Lord may give the means, supply us with 
suitable teachers, and in other respects to make our path 
plain, to establish schools of this kind. 

There are altogether sixty-five schools, entirely supported 
by the funds of the Institution (40 day schools, 14 Sunday 
schools, 11 adult schools) ; and that during the past year 
twenty-one schools were assisted, viz., 8 day schools and 13 
Sunday schools. From what has been stated it will like- 
wise be seen, that in the sixty-five schools, entirely sup* 
40* 



474 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXVI 

ported by the funds of the Institution, there were on May 
26, 1872, altogether 4,747 scholars. The total number 
that frequented the schools of the Institution, entirely sup- 
ported by its funds, from the beginning, amounts to twenty- 
seven thousand four hundred and eighty-eight, viz., there 
were 16,455 in all the day schools, 6,275 in all the Sunday 
schools, and 4,758 in all the adult schools. 

2. The second object of this Institution is, to circulate the 
Holy Scriptures. 

The number of Bibles, New Testaments, and Portions of 
the Holy Scriptures, which have been circulated from May 
26, 1871, to May 26, 1872, is as follows : — . 
4,493 Bibles have been sold. 
6,728 Bibles have been given away. 
37,635 New Testaments have been sold. 
16,596 New Testaments have been given away. 
6,826 Copies of the Psalms have been sold. 
4,083 Copies of the Psalms have been given away. 
9,414 Other small portions of the Holy Scriptures have 
been sold. 
25,671 Ditto, given away. 

There have been circulated since March 5, 1834, through 
the medium of this Institution, 75,392 Bibles, 139,218 New 
Testaments, 13,605 copies of the Psalms, and 132,134 
other small portions of the Holy Scriptures. 

3. The third object of the Institution is, to aid mission- 
ary efforts. 

During the past year was expended of the funds of the 
Institution, for this object, the sum of £11,640, 9s. 4^d. 
By this sum one hundred and eighty-seven laborers in the 
Word and doctrine, in various parts of the world, were, 
to a greater or less degree, assisted. 

The total amount of the funds of the Institution, which 
have been spent on missionary operations since March 5, 
1834, is £116,337, 16s. 5£d. 

4. The fourth object of the Institution is, the circulation 



1872. OBJECTS OF THE INSTITUTION. 475 

of such publications as may be calculated, with tho blessing 
of God, to benefit both believers and unbelievers. As it 
respects tracts for unbelievers, we especially aim after the 
diffusion of such as contain the truths of the gospel clearly 
and simply expressed ; and as it respects publications for 
believers, we desire to circulate such as may be instru 
mental in directing their minds to those truths which, in 
these last days, are more especially needed, or which have 
been particularly lost sight of, and may lead believers to 
return to the written Word of God. 

There has been laid out for this object, from May 26, 
1871, to May 26, 1872, the sum of £1,118, lis. 7d. ; and 
there have been circulated within the last year more than 
three million six hundred and eighty-four thousand (ex- 
actly 3,684,842) tracts and books. The sum total which 
has been expended on this object, since Nov. 19, 1840, 
amounts to £20,956, 10s., 4£d. 

The total number of all the tracts and books, which have 
been circulated since Nov. 19, 1840, is above forty-two 
millions and a half (exactly 42,578,554.) 

5. The fifth object of the Institution is, to board, clothe, 
and Scripturally educate destitute children who have lost 
both parents by death. 

At the commencement of the last period there were 1845 
orphans in the new Orphan Houses No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 
4, and No. 5. During the past year 260 orphans were ad- 
mitted into the five houses now in operation ; so that the 
total number on May 26, 1872, would have been 2,105, had 
there been no changes. The total number of orphans who 
have been under our care since April 11, 1836, is 3,835. 

Without any one having been personally applied to for any* 
thing by me, the sum of £370,535, Is. Od. has been given to 
me for the orphans, as the result of prayer to God, since 
the commencement of the work, which sum includes the 
amount received for the building fund for the five houses. 
It may also be interesting to the reader to know that the 



476 THE LIFE OP TRUST. Chap. XXVI. 

total amount, which has been given for the other objects, 
since the commencement of the work, amounts to £154,253, 
2s. 3fd. ; and that which has come in by the sale of Bibles, 
since the commencement, amounts to £5,354, 18s. lOd. ; by 
the sale of tracts, £10,440, 15s. llfd. ; and by the payment 
of the children in the day schools, from the commencement, 
£3,987, 0s. 7£d. Besides this, also, a great variety and 
number of articles of clothing, furniture, provisions, etc., 
have been given for the use of the orphans. 



Mr. Miiller is constantly receiving not only contributions 
in money, but a great variety of useful articles, which are 
regularly sent to a shop provided for their sale. The fol- 
lowing list as a specimen of such articles, given anony- 
mously during the first six months of the year, will not be 
without interest to the reader, as showing by what an end- 
less diversity of means resources are furnished for the 
work in which Mr. M. is engaged : — 

June. A bead bag, a bouquet-holder, 6 gilt brooches, a gilt 
bracelet, a waist-buckle, and an agate heart. — 5 pairs of knitted trav- 
elling shoes, a compass and thermometer, a court-plaster case, a 
guinea piece, 2 half-franc pieces, a copper coin, 4 rings, a brooch, a 
gold pencil-case, a pair of earrings, top of a seal, and a gold vaist- 
buckle. — A silver watch-guard, a small brooch, a breastpin, and a 
ring. — 12 pairs of garters. — A sofa tidy. — A small stereoscopic 
box. — 6 frocks, 6 shirts, 4 pocket-handkerchiefs, 2 pairs of socks, 
2 nightcaps, 12 kettle-holders, 2 pair of wristlets, 4 thimbles, 2 
brooches, steel slides, a bracelet, and waist-buckle. — A bead mat, 2 
bags, a penwiper, 3 book-marks, and a scent bag. — A pencil, 2 pairs of 
spectacles, a smelling-bottle, a pocket-book, some gloves, stockings, 
combs, and various articles of clothing, etc., together with a half- 
sovereign. 

July* An old silver watch, an old metal watch, and an old shil- 
ling. — 2 coats, 1 jacket, 1 waistcoat, 1 pair of trousers, and 1 pair 
of gaiters. — 5 dresses, a body, and two shillings. — 9 pen-wipers, 4 



1872. OBJECTS OF THE INSTITUTION. 477 

babies' shirts, 9 mats, 1 pair of baby's boots, 2 nightcaps, 6 pinafores, 
2 pairs of watch-pockets, 1 ribbon mat, 1 pin-cushion, 2 needle-books, 
and 3 book-markers. — 2 dolls, 2 dolls' hats, a pair of bracelets, a 
pincushion, a needle-book, a shaving-cloth, a sampler, 2 pairs of cuffs, 
a kettle-holder, a penwiper, a pair of baby's shoes, a book-mark, a 
bag, a watch-guard, a pinafore, and a pamphlet. — 2 buckles, a 
smelling-bottle, some mock pearls, 3 hair bracelets, a hair ring, and 
a wig. 

August, Some fancy envelopes. — A ring, 2 shirt-studs, and a 
watch-hook. — A pattern for a collar. — A ring from Stroud. — 12 
new bonnets. — A brooch, a bracelet, a book-marker, some cuffs, a 
pattern for work, and some trimming. — A frame for ladies' work. — 
" From the friend at Devizes," 2 skirts of dresses, a jacket, and a 
shawl. — Some pencil lead for polishing. — Some knitting and sew- 
ing cotton. — 2 old wedding rings. — 3 balls. — 8 book-marks, 4 post 
age-stamp cases, and 6 pin-cushions. 

September. A parcel containing some worsted, some brass thim 
bles, bodkins, and needles. — 4 black ostrich feathers, 1 white ditto, 4 
colored drawings. — 3 pairs of socks, 6 pairs of stockings, and 2 
waistcoats. — A pair of patent renovators (or flesh gloves). — A small 
^ork-bag of silk and straw. — A guinea piece, a lace habit shirt, a 
pair of lace sleeves, and a French cambric handkerchief. — 3 collars, 
1 pocket handkerchief, and 1 pair of sleeves. — 2 flannel petticoats, a 
table-cover, a silver wine-strainer, a silver marrow-spoon, 1 sugar 
spoon, a punch ladle, 6 chemises, and 6 pinafores. — A small hamper 
of books. — 1 alpaca coat, 1 check waistcoat, 1 pair of trousers, 3 
pairs of shoes, 1 travelling cap, 1 pair of spectacles in case, 2 pair ot 
boots, 5 muffetees, 1 pair of gaiters, 1 pair of boots, 8 copper pens, 1 
pair of slippers, 1 black leather bag, 1 pair of new boots, 1 coat, 1 
waistcoat, 5 pairs of gloves, 1 pair of braces, a necktie, a dressing 
box, 2 brushes, 3 razors, a stiletto, a pair of spectacles, and 2 pieces 
of teeth set in gold. — 12 book-covers, 7 small ditto, 1 small box, 4 
ditto in one. — A large box of toys. — A collar. — A large tea-chest, 
containing 160 articles of ladies' dress, etc. — A dress, three bodies, 3 
berthas, a waistband, a pair of cuffs, a feather, an ornament for the 
bair, some artificial flowers, some whalebone, and some pieces of rib- 
bon. — A cloth mantle, a velvet jacket, and a muslin ditto. 

October, 3 pairs of crotchet ladies' slippers, and 1 pair of child's 
ditto. — A pair of gilt bracelets, a collar, a pair of cuffs, and a pair of 
worked sleeves. — 2 paper mats, ahead ditto, a plaister case, 3 nee- 
dle-books, 5 small cushions, 4 pin-cushions, 2 pen-wipers, a book-mark, 



478 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Ch4p. XXVI. 

2 little baskets, a little bag, a doll, a pair of candlestick ornaments, 
and 6 napkin rings. — The parcel also contained 5s. from " Hephzi- 
bah." — An urn-stand, a bag, and a mat. — A collar. — 6 pence 
purses. — 8 dolls' bonnets. — "A Canadian lady's purse." — 9 pairs 
of boots, 3 pairs of shoes, and a single boot, all new. 

November. A box containing 5 bonnets, 2 muslin jackets, 1 silk 
ditto, 1 silk body, 3 muslin dresses, 1 silk ditto, 1 barege skirt, 18 
pairs of fine stockings, 17 pairs of coarse ditto, 3 pairs of boots, 3 
stockings, 10 chemises, 3 pairs of drawers, 5 night-dresses, some pieces 
of ribbon, and a few artificial flowers. — 6 pairs of night-socks. — A 
riding habit, a box, a silk body, some velvet trimming, some satin 
ditto, 2 waistbands, some fringe, some satin ribbon, a feather, a scarf, 
a veil, and a pair of woollen sleeves. — 3 silver coins. — A silver 
tablespoon, some satin trimming, and a frill. — 4 dresses, a skirt, a 
jacket, 3 children's skirts, and 2 frocks. — A small gold pencil-case, 
a gold breastpin, and a pair of small gold earrings. — A collar. — 3 
antimacassars, and a baby's cap. — 2 silver coins, and a pair of silver 
shirt-studs. — 7 boys' shirts. — A jacket and a feather. — A jacket, 
a pair of drawers, 2 chemises, 2 nightcaps, 5 skirts, and 1 body. — 4 
pairs of new boots, and 2 pairs of new shoes. — A crumb-scraper. 

Mr. Miiller, as a faithful steward, renders an annual ac- 
count of all sums received, and how disbursed by him (see 
opposite page) , to which is appended an " Auditor's Report." 
Mr. M. says : — 

The audited accounts, together with the books containing the income 
and expenses, may be inspected by the donors. I particularly state 
this, because I do not publish a list of the donors, nor do I mention 
their names otherwise, in order that there may not he held out the least 
temptation of giving for the sake of worldly applause ; but, at the 
same time, as I do this work in the light, it can bear the light, and 
therefore any donor can satisfy himself, if he please, that his dona- 
tion is accounted for. 

To avoid mistakes, delays, and other difficulties, I would request 
that all letters for me should be directed to my house, No. 21, Paul 
Street, Kingsdown, Beistol. 

GEORGE MULLER. 



5NC0ME AND EXPENSES. 



479 



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CHAPTER XXVII. 

A VISIT TO THE ORPHAN HOUSES — ATTENDING CHURCH — INTERNAL ARRANGE 
MENTS — FOOD — EDUCATION — HEALTH. 

(3//N a brief history of the Orphan Houses, prepared by 
Mr. W. Elfe Taylor, of England, is a chapter devoted 
to an account of a personal visit, with a full sketch 
of the internal arrangements, and of the appear- 
ance and occupation of the orphans. We give the larger 
part of it, as full of interest for American readers : - 

It is a striking sight to watch the orphans passing through 
the streets of Bristol, on their way to attend divine worship, 
Eveiy Sunday morning they may be seen marching, two and 
two, up and down the hilly thoroughfares of that ancient city, 
on their way toBethesda Chapel, where Mr. Miiller ministers, 
there to hear the words of eternal life expounded. Each Or- 
phan House contributes its troop of two or three hundred 
children — the boys and girls being marshalled in separate 
bands, and accompanied by their different masters, matrons, 
and teachers. True indeed isthesa} T ing so often in substance 
heard expressed : " That silent stream of children is the 
most powerful sermon ever preached in the city of Bristol." 

It was on a fine autumnal afternoon in October that we 
paid a long-promised visit to this remarkable Institution. 
As we briskly walked up the hill which separates what is 
called Ashley Down from the city, the woods in the dis- 
tance were alread} 7 clothed in the various hues of autumn, 
affording to the thoughtful mind a striking instance of that 
law by which the beneficent Creator makes even ruin and 
desolation minister to the pleasure and happiness of hia 

480 



1870. A VISIT TO TUB ORPHAN HOUSES. 481 

creatures. Altogether the walk is one of the prettiest 
out of Bristol, the road being studded with neat, elegant 
villas on each side, and though so near a city resounding 
with the din of business, the neighborhood of Ashley Hill 
is as quiet and retired as if situated in the heart of the 
country. 

At length we came within sight of the New Orphan 
Houses, and truly vast erections they are, of almost inter- 
minable length. On entering the grounds in which two of 
the houses stand, we passed the lodge, a neat little cottage 
on the right, and proceeded along the pathway by the side 
of the carriage-drive, which, together with a well-trimmed 
lawn, and some pretty flower-beds, separates No. 1 House 
from No. 2. There are large pieces of ground surrounding 
ea^h of the houses, devoted to the cultivation of vegetables. 
The perfect order and neatness characterizing everything 
outside the establishment gave us a good intimation of 
what we might expect within ; nor were we disappointed. 

On ringing at the entrance, we were admitted by a 
respectable female into a stone hall, and thence up a stair- 
case into the waiting-room, already occupied by several 
visitors seated in groups and chatting together in subdued 
tones. Books and pamphlets were spread out on a table, 
near which sat a well-dressed young person sewing. She 
was placed there to receive the money from any visitors 
who wished to buy Mr. Miiller's Reports, or the Narrative 
of his life ; but none were asked to purchase. 

The Orphan House No. 1, which contains usually 140 
girls above seven years of age, 8C boys of the same age, 
and 80 infants of either sex, was that we first visited ; but 
in describing it we shall follow that order which seems best 
fitted to give a clear understanding of the establishment, 
and not that in which the different parts are — to save 
time — shown to visitors. 

There aie three school-rooms, — boj's', girls', and infants', 
— all large, airy, cheerful-looking apartments. The girls'. 



482 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXVIL 

which is snown first of the three, is very spacious and lofty, 
situated on the ground-floor, and well fitted up with the 
best modern maps and other helps for learning. As our 
party, numbering some sixty or seventy, entered, we beheld 
about one hundred and twenty girls, sitting at work at low 
lesks ; all clothed alike in blue print frocks and neat pina- 
fores, and with their hair cut short behind, but arranged 
with the greatest neatness. On a signal from the principal 
teacher, who was stationed on a small platform, with a desk 
in front, the girls all stood up and placed their hands 
behind them. At another signal one of the orphans struck 
up a cheerful song, which the rest at once joined in, and all 
marched out in single file, with as much precision in theii 
steps as any of our modern volunteer corps would exhibit. 
The effect of this sight was really very striking ; and he 
who can witness unmoved these helpless orphans winding 
their way between the desks, to the music of the touching 
songs which they sang, one after another, must indeed be 
made of very impenetrable materials. As they passed 
round the ends of the desks in front of the visitors, who 
lined the walls on either side, I looked carefully at the 
features of each child, and, although in some cases I saw evi- 
dent traces of disease, inherited, doubtless, from the parents 
whom they had lost,* still there was a general appearance 
of health and of cheerfulness in their happy faces. 

Then we were taken to the girls' " cloak and shoe room," 
where w r e found a vast number of serviceable plaid cloaks 
hanging up around the room, for winter wear. Each girl, 
too, has three pairs of shoes for use, — a mark of sound 
economy on Mr. Miiller's part, as every paterfamilias well 
knows. 

The boys' school-room does not materially differ from 
that of the girls. There were, at our entrance, about 80 



♦From the statistics in Mr. Miiller's possession, it is said that upwards of two- 
thirds of v Jie parents have died of consumption. 



1870. A VISIT TO THE ORPHAN HOUSES. 483 

bo} T s seated at desks, dressed all alike in blue cloth jackets 
and corduroy trousers. Their appearance was certainly 
that of vigorous health. They looked sturdy, good-tem- 
pered fellows. At the word of command they all rose from 
their seats, and marched one after another between the 
desks to the air of some spirited song, just as the girls had 
before. Two separate rooms are appropriated as work- 
rooms also, — one foe the boys, and one for the girls ; the 
former are taught, a few at a time, to knit and mend their 
own stockings, and the girls to make their own garments, 
under the superintendence o'f a teacher who does the cut- 
ting out for them. Then come the play-rooms, one for 
boys and another for girls. These are large, lofty rooms, 
with a few low forms, and nothing else in the shape of fur- 
niture. These are, of course, only intended for use in bad 
weather, at least in the case of the boys. For there is a 
capital court for playing in for each class of orphans, and 
swings and other apparatus for exercise and play. The 
girls' play-room was provided with large cupboards, divided 
into small pigeon-holes, one for each child, well stored with 
dolls, dolls' houses, and a variety of other toys, the gifts, 
sometimes of relatives (who are allowed to visit the orphans 
once a month), sometimes of ladies, who present them to 
the teachers to be used as rewards. 

The infant department in the Orphan House never fails 
to arrest the attention of visitors. Would that we could 
adequately bring before the reader the " infant school," 
with its two hundred little ones, or nearly so — many not 
more than three years of age. A prettier sight we have 
rarely witnessed than that of these destitute children, all 
marshalled in perfect order at a word of command, and 
marching round the room to the sound of their own merry 
voices. Then they proceeded in very soldier-like style to 
fie gallery, and, when seated, sang two or three very pretty 
songs. One was : — 



484 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXVII. 

" The little watch goes tick, tick, tick, 
So many times a minute ; 
And as it goes so quick, quick, quick, 
What can the watch have in it? " 

The words in italics were sung with particular emphasis 
and spirit. 

Another was : — 

" Oh, we're all sawing — saw, saw, sawing — 
Oh, we're all sawing, at our pretty Infant School ! 
The saw goes up and down, with a push, push, push, 
And through the log it cuts, with a whish, whish, whish" 

At the word "push" the little creatures suited the action 
to the word, and so with the corresponding word in the 
other lines of the song. 

We must say a few words about the " infant nursery/' 
Some infants, it should be remembered, are taken in so 
young that they are literally babies, and these are nursed 
in a small comfortable room by a motherly-looking head 
nurse, assisted by two or three of the elder girls. It was a 
touching sight to watch these helpless infants toddling 
about with pretty horses or dolls in their hands, and some 
in the arms of their nurses. Around the room, too, we 
noticed several little basket beds in which these tiny babies 
might be placed, when overcome with sleep, with all the 
fondness of a mother's love. 

Many visitors seem to regard as one of the prettiest 
sights in the whole establishment the "infants' wardrobe." 
It was a room about twenty feet long, and ranged on each 
side of the room stood painted deal presses, divided into 
small pigeon-holes, in each of which were laid by, neatly 
folded up, small duplicates of all the various articles of 
clothing worn by the infants. The one side was set apart for 
the girls' wardrobes, each little pile of clothing being crowned 
by a pretty little straw bonnet, and each garment being 
most carefully and neatly rolled up and pinned together. On 



1870. A VISIT TO THE ORPHAN HOUSES. 485 

the opposite side stood the same number of presses for the 
boys' clothes, and on the top of each tiny wardrobe that 
occupied the pigeon-holes there was placed a littk blue 
cloth cap. It is a fact, that scarcely any part of the house 
affects strangers so much as this infants' wardrobe ; and it 
is a common thing to see tears in the eyes of one and 
another of the visitors, as they gaze on the exquisite order 
and nicety which prevail on every side, and think of the 
tender love which had so wonderfully cared for the smallest 
wants of these helpless little ones. 

Next to the infants' wardrobe room comes the infants' 
dormitory. At the end of the dormitory is a passage on 
each side of which are situated the private rooms of the 
matrons and teachers. These were most comfortably fur- 
nished, and quite in keeping with the station of those who 
occupy such positions in the Orphan Houses. Each indi- 
vidual has a separate apartment. 

The infants' dormitory, to which We have referred, is a 
spacious room, with abundance of air and light — filled with 
little tiny bedsteads. These are all of iron, painted of a 
light yellow color, and many fitted round with railings to 
preserve the younger babes from falling out. The beds are 
ranged in three rows from one end of the room to the other. 
There is no other article of furniture in the room of any 
description. Four larger beds — two at each end of the 
room — are occupied by the elder girls who take charge of 
the forty little orphans who nightly sleep in this cheerful 
room. Forty other infant orphans occupy the correspond- 
ing room to this, which we were afterwards shown. 

There is a third bed-room for girls, in which 140 female 
orphans sleep — two girls occupying one bed. The same 
marvellous cleanliness of floors, and spotless purity of 
quilts and bed-clothes, with which our party was so im- 
pressed in the infants' dormitory, strikes us here. One good 
woman, in the height of her amazement, exclaimed, looking 
at the well-scrubbed boards, " Why, you might eat your din- 
41* 



486 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXVII. 

ner off them ! " Another visitor, of the opposite sex, 
whose face was an index to the benevolence which filled 
his heart, observed, as he gazed at the beds, with the bed- 
clothes folded down with the utmost nicety and precision : 
" Ah, they would never have slept in such beds if their 
parents had lived ! " Great indeed was the admiration 
which this comfortable apartment elicited from our party. 
But it is impossible to describe the effect with pen and ink ; 
it must be seen to be understood. At the end of the room 
there is a small window, opening into a bedroom occupied 
by one of the teachers, who is thus enabled to overlook the 
movements of the children. We afterwards saw the dormi- 
tories for boys, which it is unnecessary to describe, as they 
correspond exactly with the one just mentioned, except 
that only forty children sleep in each. Besides these, there 
is a smaller dormitory with eight beds in it for the elder 
girls, usually called " house-girls," as they are engaged in 
house-work, and are on the point of being sent out to ser- 
vice. Each of these has the privilege of a good strong box 
to hold her clothes in. These girls daily assist the ser- 
vants in the general work of the house. 

After we had seen the infants' wardrobes, we were invited 
to inspect two other wardrobe rooms. The first we came 
to was the boys'. The arrangement of this room exactly 
agreed with that containing the infants' clothes. Each boy 
has a square compartment, in which to keep his clothes, 
with his number marked, in one of the large deal presses 
that line the room. Six bo3^s, we were told, are draughted 
out to take charge of the wardrobes, and see that every- 
thing is kept in proper order. When their term of service 
is expired, their place is supplied by six others, until each 
boy in the house, of a fit age, has taken his" turn. The 
boys have each three suits of clothes. The girls' wardrobe 
room corresponded with that for the boys, except that it is 
much larger. There were the same lofty painted deal 
presses, subdivided into innumerable little pigeon-holes. 



1870. A VISIT TO THE ORPHAN HOUSES. 487 

The girls have five changes of dress. Three blue print 
frocks for ordinary wear in the house, a lilac pattern dress 
for Sundays during the summer months, and a brown merino 
dress for winter wear. The girls make and mend all their 
own clothes. Six girls in rotation take charge of all the 
female wardrobes of the house ; just as in the case of the boys. 

The dining-room where all the orphans take their meals 
is a spacious apartment filled with long narrow tables and 
forms, all as white almost as the paper on which the reader's 
eye is now fixed. "While we were inspecting this room, we 
noticed some of the elder girls employed in spreading the 
snow-white table-cloths for the evening meal. Others at the 
same time entered the room with trays loaded with bread- 
and-butter. Soon afterwards, some hundreds of cups filled 
with milk-and-water were placed upon the tables ; but the 
orphans were not called to tea until after the visitors had 
left. 

It may be interesting here to add a few particulars re- 
specting the other meals of the children, which we obtained 
from our conductor. The food of the orphans at breakfast 
is always oatmeal porridge ; they use milk with it. No 
doubt this wholesome food is one cause of the healthy, 
ruddy appearance of the orphans generally ; for notwith- 
standing a strong prejudice against it in this country, a 
more wholesome, nutritious article of diet certainly does 
not exist. The dinner provided for the children varies 
almost every da}\ Monday there is boiled beef ; Tuesday, 
soup, with a good proportion of meat in it ; Wednesday, 
rice-milk with treacle ; Thursda}^ they have boiled leg of 
mutton ; the following day they have soup again, and on 
Saturday bacon ; on Sundays they always dine on rice with 
treacle, in order that as few as possible may be kept from 
attending public worship. The orphans breakfast at eight 
o'clock, dine at one, and take tea at six. 

The kitchen of the establishment should by no means be 
overlooked. Here we saw the cooking apparatus, one of 



488 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXVII. 

the most improved description, in which one small fire per- 
formed a variety of offices even at distant parts of the 
room. We were particularly struck with three huge up- 
right copper cylinders which we found were used to boil 
the porridge in. A long pipe connects them with the fire- 
place ; they consist of two vessels, the one inside the other. 
The steam is admitted through the pipe into the space be- 
tween the outer and inner vessels ; and a short time is 
sufficient to make the porridge boil. The cooking appara- 
tus altogether is probably the most complete and efficient 
anywhere known. 

We went into the store-rooms also. One was full of 
shoes, caps, haberdashery, etc. Another contained a large 
abundance of sheeting, blankets, calicoes, and such-like 
articles. A third w T as crowded with provisions of various 
descriptions, Scotch oatmeal in barrels, good wheaten flour 
in sacks, large quantities of meat, bread, sugar, etc., etc. 
We saw the bake-house too, and the washhouse. In the 
latter was an American washing machine, where wooden 
balls do the work of human knuckles. There was also a 
singular machine for wringing the clothes, called a Cen- 
trifugal Drying Machine. 

Another apartment is called the u shoes and cloak room." 
Every child in the house has three pairs of shoe:. The 
girls all wear cloaks of a green plaid in winter, and shawls 
in summer. Then there are the " washing-places/' They 
are furnkhed with baths : and all around the walls were 
hung bags containing the brush and comb belonging to each 
child, and the number of the said child painted over each. 
The greatest care seemed to be taken to insure thorough 
cleanliness in the children, and to guard against the spread 
of infectious complaints, should they at anytime exist. 

It may be added that the children all rise about six 
o'clock in the morning. They retire to rest, the elder chil- 
dren about eight or nine, the younger an hour earlier. 
The teachers conduct religious worship eveiy day, at half- 



1870. A VISIT TO THE ORPIIAN HOUSES. 489 

past eight in the morning, and just before tea in the after- 
noon. They have two holidays in the } f ear, at Whitsuntide 
and Christmas. But the orphans never leave the house on 
these occasions, except, as stated before, in company with 
their teachers. The beautiful manner in which the girls dec- 
orate their rooms at these holidays with their own work — 
festoons of artificial flowers, etc. — is one of many signifi- 
cant indications of the healthful, free, and cheerful spirit 
pervading the entire establishment. 

We add a few remarks on the subject of the education of 
the children, and the effects of the system of training 
adopted by Mr. Miiller on the health and bearing of the 
orphans. 

As regards the education of the children, the girls are 
instructed in reading, writing, arithmetic, English gram- 
mar, geography, English history, a little of general history, 
and in all kinds of useful needlework and household work. 
They make their clothes, and keep them in repair ; and 
Mr. Miiller well observes in one of his Reports, "If any of 
them do not do well, temporally or spiritually, and do not 
turn out useful members of society, it shall, at least, not be 
our fault." The boys go through the same course of in- 
struction as the girls, and they learn to knit and mend 
their own stockings. They also make their beds, clean 
their shoes, scrub their rooms, and work a little in the gar- 
den ground around the orphan establishment, in the way 
of digging, planting, weeding, etc. 

There are some points connected with the education of 
these orphan children especially important to notice. For 
instance, there is evidently a more earnest desire to educate 
and discipline the mind, and draw out the kindly affections, 
than to cram the head with a large variety of knowledge, 
which may be, to say the least, of very questionable utility 
to children in their sphere of life. And in proof of the 
success which has attended this S3^stem of education, the 
general admiration expressed by visitors may be referred 



490 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXVII. 

to. We would particularly mention a recent visit of some 
distinguished statesmen and members of Parliament, — 
Lord Stanley, Sir John Pakington, Lord Robert Cecil, Sir 
W. Miles, and others. It would be difficult adequately to 
convey the admiration and surprise which these illustrious 
persons expressed at the general character of the Institu- 
tion, and the principles on which it was conducted. But 
what they especially noticed, whilst in the class-room, was 
the precision and accuracy with which the children were 
able to write from dictation. One of these noblemen ob- 
served, indeed, that the writing from dictation of some of 
the children exceeded those which he had lately inspected 
at one of our large National Institutions. 

As regards the religious teaching imparted to these des- 
titute children, it may be well to state, that the most dili- 
gent efforts are made to render them familiar with their 
Bible. The great doctrines of religion, in which all evan- 
gelical Christians agree, are carefully taught them, without, 
so far as we can learn, the slightest sectarian bias. 

Another point of exceeding importance in any account 
of this noble Institution is, the happy effects of judicious 
care in regard to diet, ventilation, cleanliness, and also the 
encouragement of cheerfulness and invigorating exercise. 

"We are informed by those who are intimately acquainted 
with the Orphan Houses, that these results are strikingly 
observable in the appearance of the children who have been 
longest in the Institution, as compared with those who 
have recently entered. It is even asserted by competent 
judges, that any intelligent person conversant with such 
matters would find no difficulty in pointing out, with con- 
siderable precision, those orphans who have been recently 
received. But the most significant fact that can be men- 
tioned in illustration of the foregoing statement, is the fol- 
lowing. During a period of five years, the average rate 
of mortality has been rather under one per cent. ! When 
this is considered in connection with the circumstance that 



1870. A VISIT TO THE ORPHAN HOUSES. 491 

all the children, having lost both parents, may be presumed 
to inherit from them diseased and weakly constitutions, 
too much importance can hardly be attached to it. It may 
be added, that in many cases where the children on enter- 
ing the Institution have exhibited symptoms of scrofula, 
these have gradually disappeared under the effects of the 
combined influences stated above. 

The Christian philanthropy of Mr. Miiller carries with 
it, therefore, a double blessing. It provides a comfortable 
home for helpless orphans, and trains them to become in 
telligent and useful citizens ; securing for them a happy 
childhood and a useful life. It teaches also that hereditary 
diseases may be checked or eradicated by wise care ; and 
religion adds to length of life no less than to the happi- 
ness of community 



CHAPTER XXYIII. 

A RBVtE"Vr *OY FIVE YEARS' WOEK — CONTINENTAL TRAVELS, AND YISIT IH 

AMERICA. 

1872-1877. 

£^j^T has long been the fervent prayer of Mr. Mliller 
■ that his last days might be made his best days. 
The records of the last five years show how gra- 
ciously God has answered his servant's prayer. 
In the preservation of his physical strength, in the ever 
increasing field of his influence, and in the manifest 
favor of Heaven which attends his work, we see a fulfil- 
ment of the promise, " them that honor me I will honor." 

Reviewing his work for the year ending May 26, 1873, 
Mr. Mtiller notices the special exemption from sickness 
enjoyed at the Orphan houses and the presence of God's 
spirit there ; the increase of schools and of the circulation 
of tracts. One day he wrote, " The income the past five 
days has been so small that it would not cover one-fifth 
of the expenses, but I am expecting again larger, much 
larger sums." The very next day over |4,000 were received. 
The reader will remember, in this connection, that no debt 
is allowed to accrue, and that latterly there always has 
been a surplus from day to day. 

The gifts this year, as always, come from the rich and 
the poor, the aged and the young. One sends a penny 
each on 681 apple trees sold; two children $8, saved in a 
year by giving up sugar; $58 from a commercial traveller, 
a self imposed tax on each chest of tea sold, and $15 from 
an aged man who made bee hives. Thank offerings for the 
birth of children, restoration from sickness and other bless- 
ings, are continually recorded. One is happy in his deliver- 



1872-1877. REYIEW OF FIVE YEARS' WORK. 493 

ance from the curse of tobacco, another has saved money 
to use for the poor by riding in third class cars. A com- 
pany of soldiers, " water drinkers," send their gift. A man 
sends enough to support an orphan a year, saved by giving 
up his pipe and bottle, about $65. Letters from 187 mis- 
sionaries contain items of deep interest. All of these 
laborers are connected with no society and have no regular 
salary, but are in a position of simple dependence on God 
for temporal supplies. Those in China, Spain and Italy 
speak of persecution, but glory in the grace that has made 
them conquerors. 

The balance on hand May 26, 1873, is $26,000. A year 
later, May 26, 1874, we read "My soul doth magnify the 
Lord for his kindness in connection with this Institution ! 
I have just finished writing the history of the last eighteen 
years, completing the history of the forty years of its ex- 
istence. The Lord, as in former years, has met its heavy 
demands. All the requirements He has graciously supplied, 
we owe nothing. When it is considered that above forty 
thousand pounds are required to keep up the work, and 
that we have to look to our Heavenly Father to supply it, 
without being able to reckon upon any certain income, the 
reader will see that the very fact of the existence of the 
Institution is to be reckoned among the special mercies of 
the past year." Eight more day schools and five more 
Sunday schools are added, and the number of orphans cared 
for is set down as 4,408, from the beginning. Twenty-five 
octavo pages are filled with acknowledgments of gifts from 
all parts of the world, in money, in cast-off jewels — the 
folly of wearing which the owners had been brought to see 
— and in articles of merchandise useful in the Orphan 
houses. A christian butcher sends a penny on each sheep 
received ; a house builder a pound for every house erected; 
yeomen send first fruits of harvest, and property holders 
send hundreds of pounds which represent the cost of in- 
surance which they save by trusting ships and houses to 



494 THE LIFE OF TRUST. CHAP. XXVIII. 

God's care. Not every believer can see the propriety of this. 
Some regard the neglect to insure a criminal indifference. 
Let not him that eateth condemn him that eateth not. 

The list of donations is an emphatic argument in favor 
of systematic benevolence and illustrates, from the experi- 
ence of the donors, the pecuniary prosperity which follows 
the habit of generosity in giving regularly, as God gives to 
us. To dispose of articles of expensive table ware, brooches, 
ear rings and other trinkets, a room is used in the Tract 
warehouse for their sale. "We never had bazaars, nor 
intend to have any, but sell the articles in an ordinary 
way." New articles are also made by friends and sold 
here for the benefit of the orphans. The amount spent for 
the year in circulating tracts and books is recorded as 
$5,650, and the number circulated 3,775,771. In the five 
orphan houses there were 1,992 children May 26, 1874. 

For the year ending May, 1875, Mr. Miiller reports 269 
orphans admitted ; 23 deaths ; 3 expelled on account of 
the corrupting influence they exerted ; 56 boys sent out as 
apprentices, and 147 girls as servants; 1,995 remaining. 
He again testifies to the praiseworthy labors of the helpers, 
teachers, nurses and care-takers, and records a balance of 
$42,030 on hand. Twenty-six pages of fine type give ex- 
tracts from the letters of 179 missionaries, which abound 
in facts of marvellous interest. 

The report of 1876 states that the Institution still enjoys 
the uninterrupted smile and help of God, and that it not 
only is kept out of debt, but that the surplus steadily en- 
larges. The 178 missionaries report revivals and spiritual 
increase ; the tract and book department circulates the 
truth in a dozen languages and 9,822 scholars are taught 
in the 110 schools. These latter are in both christian and 
heathen lands. This wonderful success Mr. Miiller at- 
tributes to his humble endeavor to " do the Lord's work 
in the Lord's way," looking alone to Him for guidance 
and aid. 



1872-1877. REVIEW OF FIVE TEARS 5 WORK. 495 



EVANGELISTIC WORK. 

"During the past year, from May 26, 1875, to May 26, 
1876, I have been absent from Bristol by far the greater 
part of the time. For about forty-three years my ministry 
in the Word was almost entirely confined to Bristol and 
Clifton, as I was very rarely preaching in other places. 
Of late years, however, it has been more or less in my 
heart to seek, not only by my publications, but also by the 
living voice to benefit my fellow-believers, especially the 
younger among them, through my experience during 
the past fifty years in which I have known the Lord, 
and through the measure of knowledge I have of the truth. 
This desire I was able to begin to carry out in March, 1875, 
when I left home with my dear wife on a preaching tour ; 
for my dear son-in-law, Mr. James Wright, who has for 
three years assisted me in the direction of the Institution, 
could now be left in charge with the whole work, report- 
ing to me day by day about it, and whom I might assist 
with my judgment in difficult cases. On this first tour I 
preached at Brighton, at Lewes, in London, Sunderland 
and Newcastle, and was abundantly confirmed that God 
would have me further thus to be engaged through the 
great blessing which the Lord condescended to give during 
the fourteen and a half weeks. I saw it His will for me 
to leave Bristol ao-ain after I had been there as long as 
various matters required my presence, and especially also 
to give some time for rest to my dear son-in-law and to my 
dear daughter. After this we set out again, and I preached 
further in London, at Kilmarnock, at Saltcoats, at Dundee, 
in Perth, in Glasgow and the neighborhood, in Dublin, at 
Leamington, Warwick, Coventry, Kenilworth, Rugby, at 
the Victoria Hall in Liverpool and in other halls in Liver- 
pool, at Kendal, Annan, Arbroath, Montrose, Edinburgh, 
Aberdeen, Ballater, Crathie, Braemar, Inverness, Wick, 
Reading, etc. As during my first tour the Lord was 
pleased to bless my labors everywhere among the believers 
and, in not a few instances, also to the unconverted, so it 
was this second time also, only still more abundantly, and 
I became more and more convinced that it is the will of 
the Lord that I should, as much as possible, and as far as 
this Institution permits me to be absent fi om Bristol, spend 
the evening of my life travelling from place to place, to 



496 " THE LIFE OE TRUST. CHAP. XXVIII. 

seek to strengthen the disciples and further to instruct 
young believers by the measure of knowledge and experi- 
ence I have. In this my service I have been in England, 
Scotland and Ireland, most cordially received by many 
hundreds of ministers both in and out of the Establish- 
ment ; and so abundant have been, everywhere, the open- 
ings that, if I had had five or ten times the time and 
strength I had, all could have been employed in entering 
the open doors which the Lord set before me, though I 
have preached hundreds of times. This preaching tour 
had no connection whatever with the Institution." 

He then, as now, declined to narrate his Bristol work, 
lest he be suspected of being out on a collecting tour, 
whereas his sole errand was to help young converts, thou- 
sands of whom, in the United Kingdom, had been awakened 
in connection with the labors of Mr. Moody and others. 

With the exception of Manchester and Birmingham, 
Mr. Muller visited every place in which the American 
Evangelist had been. From these two places urgent solici- 
tations were received, but the call to the Continent seemed 
to be more imperative. Notwithstanding the physical 
strain attending these protracted labors of 1875-6, Mr. 
Muller says, " I state to the praise of the Lord that, with 
scarcely a day's exception, I have been in very good health 
during the whole year, and, though I have been privileged 
to labor more abundantly than ever in the ministry of the 
Word and also in other ways, I am now as well able to 
labor, physically and mentally, as fifty years ago, though I 
have nearly completed my seventy-first year. The Lord 
has, during the past year, again caused abundant spiritual 
blessing to rest upon the various departments of the Insti- 
tution. I record to the praise of the Lord, that during the 
past year, while needing more means than ever, we ali»o 
received more than eyer during one year. Thus the Lord 
showed that He needed not my being in Bristol to supply 
the work with means, but was willing to listen to my 
prayers and those of my dear fellow-laborers in Bristol, 



/ 

1872-1877 EEYIEW OF FIVE YEARS' WORK. 497 

while I was absent. Thus, also, according to my judg- 
ment, the Lord, among other points, in this particular like- 
wise, set His seal of approbation on my absence from Bris- 
tol and on my being engaged as I have been." 

LAST EEPOET, MAY 26, 1877. 

" The faithfulness and the kindness of the Lord are 
great ! We have found it thus, in connection with this 
Institution, more than forty-three years ; and we expect 
that thus it will be in future also. God has proved to us 
His faithfulness year after year, during this long period ; 
and His kindness to us has been beyond all expectation ! 
Our desire was to honor Him when, on March 5, 1834, we 
began this Institution ; and He has ever since shown how 
ready He is to honor those who honor Him. Year after 
year He has been pleased to enlarge this Institution, supply 
its necessities, and cause abundant spiritual blessing to 
rest upon its operations. For all this we adore and praise 
Him ! All the very extensive buildings connected with 
the Orphan Institution and the very many schools, at 
home and abroad, have been mercifully preserved, during 
the past year also, from fire and other calamities. The 
Lord has been pleased to let abundant spiritual blessings 
rest upon the various departments of the Institution. 

If the income of forfcy-one thousand five hun'dred pound^ 
during the past year is added to the income during the 
previous years, it will be seen, that we have received alto- 
gether, simply in answer to prayer and the exercise of 
faith, without applying to anyone for anything, seven 
hundred and fifty thousand pounds sterling (nearly four 
million dollars). Should any of the readers, who are not 
acquainted with the former reports, ask what has been ac- 
complished through these seven hundred and fifty thousand 
pounds, we reply : Sixty thousand children or grown up 
persons have been taught in the various schools, entirely 
supported by the funds of the Institution, besides the tens 



498 THE LIFE OF TRUST. Chap. XXVIII. 

of thousands who have been benefited in the schools which 
were assisted by its funds ; above nine thousand eight hun- 
dred now frequent the schools ; above one hundred and 
thirteen thousand Bibles, above two hundred and ninety- 
five thousand Testaments, and one hundred and ninety- 
eight thousand smaller portions of the Holy Scriptures, in 
various languages, have been circulated since the formation 
of the Institution ; and above sixty millions of tracts and 
books, likewise in several different languages, have been cir- 
culated. There have been likewise, from the earliest days 
of this Institution, Missionaries assisted by its funds, and 
of late years more than one hundred and seventy in number. 
On this object alone one hundred and sixty-three thousand 
pounds have been expended from the beginning. Also 
5,199 orphans have been under our care, and five large 
houses, at an expense of one hundred and fifteen thousand 
pounds, have been erected and fitted up for the accommo- 
dation of 2,050 orphans. As to the spiritual results, I will 
here say nothing ; indeed, eternity alone can unfold them ; 
yet, even in so far as God has been pleased to allow us to 
see already the results, we have reaped abundantly, and do 
so more and more every year." 



1873-1877 REVIEW OF FIVE YEARS' WORK. 



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^ SX 



500 THE LIFE OF TEUST. CHAP. XXVIII, 

"When in the year 1835 I began the Orphan work I 
had, in doing so, particularly in view, through this work to 
prove to the world at large and to the church at large, that 
the Living God is now, as thousands of years since, the 
Living God, and that we may reckon on Him, as those did 
who really knew Him thousands of years ago. That end 
has been particularly answered by this Institution. Tens 
of thousands of souls have indeed been converted through 
the operations of the various objects of the Institution, for 
which I adore and magnify the Lord ; but the greatest 
blessing, which I have reason to believe, which has resulted 
from it, is, that thereby hundreds of thousands of children 
of God, in very many parts of the world, have been en- 
couraged, in all simplicity, to trust in God. While I am 
writing this, at Nimwegen, in Holland, another precious 
proof of this kind has just been brought under my own 
eyes, of which I have had, I might almost say, numberless 
instances : it is this : A Christian evangelist, simply through 
reading about the Orphan work in Bristol, had it laid on 
his heart to care about Orphans, and was encouraged by 
my example, solely in dependence on the Lord, to take 
them up. He began in the year 1863 with three at Nim- 
wegen, in Holland, and he has at present 453." 

Institutions have also been started in America on the 
same plan, which, in their infancy, are reaping their first 
fruits in a prosperity manifestly and peculiarly unlike that 
which results from other methods. As this leaven of faith 
continues to work, there will go on a revolution in the 
whole system of solicitation of funds through salaried 
agents, as well as by means of bazaars, lotteries, suppers 
and other entertainments which pauperize Christianity in 
the eyes of the world, and which, as too often conducted, 
are perilous alike to health and virtue. Although Mr. 
Miiller, in his preaching, abstains from reference to these, 
he enunciates those general principles which, if applied, 
would uproot these evils which exist in this age of ex- 



1873-1877. REVIEW OF FIVE YEARS' WORK. 501 

travagance, of religious sensationalism and high pressure. 
Do GocVs work in QocVs way is his oft repeated admoni- 
tion. He would not unite the church and the world, nor 
act according to worldly maxims of policy in advancing 
the interests of the church. 

The duty and blessedness of systematic giving is 
another axiomatic truth which stands out in all his spoken or 
printed words. On page 24 of the report for 1877, he says: 

"I commend to such of the Christian readers, who are 
not already in the habit of giving to the poor or the Lord's 
work, in proportion as the Lord is pleased to give to them, 
through their business or profession, through presents, 
through legacies, etc., to do so. That is the way of obtain- 
ing blessings to our souls, because we act according to the 
principle laid down in 1 Cor. xvi, 2 : ' Upon the first day 
of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as 
God has prospered him.' In this way we find that double 
if not ten-fold, is the blessing which we receive from God, 
when He prospers us in temporal things ; and it is one of 
the ways in which we honor Him with our temporal 
things ; whilst, if this is not done, and we keep all, or 
almost all, to ourselves, then the very prosperity in tem- 
poral things will be found to be injurious to the inner man. 
It is just this, why Christians should be in such earnestness 
on this point and be habitually returning to the Lord for 
His work or His poor as He may prosper them. Should it, 
however, be said, How much shall I give of that which I 
receive ? The answer is, tlf e Holy Scriptures of the New 
Testament lay down no rule. It is left to the children of 
God to act according to the measure of knowledge and 
grace they have received. The appreciation of what God 
has done for them in Christ should guide them. We have, 
however, not to lose sight of this, that, if the Israelite was 
commanded to give the tenth of all he received, in the 
Lord Jesus, who knows the power of His precious blood, 
shed for the remission of his sins ; who has the whole re- 
vealed will of God in his hands ; and who has received the 
Holy Ghost, and who is partaker of the heavenly calling, 
should certainly not do less than the Israelite. Then the 
Israelite, in addition to this tenth, had many other expenses 
in connection with his being a worshipper of the true and 
Living God, such as the not sowing the seventh year, the 



502 THE LIFE OF TRUST. CHAP. XXVIII. 

going three times a year to the Lord's Tabernacle or 
Temple, etc. [some scholars estimate that half his inco?ne 
went for religious purposes.] We should not say that 
because we are not Jews, and because no commandment 
is given, therefore we may do less than the Jews. Far 
be this from him who knows the power of the precious 
blood of Christ ! My advice is this : If the reader has as 
yet but little knowledge and little grace let him accord- 
ingly, begin with a small per centage, yea, though it were 
ever so small a per centage, only let him be true to God, 
and put aside for Him habitually as He may be pleased to 
prosper him. In this way blessing for the soul will be 
reaped, will be abundantly reaped, and soon will the desire 
spring up in the heart, to increase the proportion of our 
returns to the Lord. This way will more and more lead 
the heart to such a state, to be only a steward for the Lord 
and to be willing to stand with all we have and are before 
the Lord as His stewards. The great spiritual blessing 
which I have received in my own soul, from acting on 
these principles for more than forty-seven years, leads me 
to write as I do. The money thus set apart for the Lord 
should be put aside, and out of that which is thus put- 
aside, when calls come upon us, to give to the poor or to 
the Lord's work, we should then take. How different will 
it be to take from such a store (provided we have not yet 
grace to give all to the Lord if it were necessary) from 
what it would be, if there is the anxious reckoning, whether 
the gift can be afforded or not. We should not give for 
the sake of receiving, but only to please the Lord ; yet this 
is God's way of acting, and according to the plain teaching 
of the New Testament, which states : ' Give, and it shall 
be given unto you ; good measure, pressed down and 
shaken together and running over, shall men give into 
your bosom.' Luke vi. 38." 

From the following condensed statement it mav be 
seen, at a glance, how Mr. Mtiller acts out his own prin- 
ciples. He has no property and no income on which he 
may rely. Trustees hold the Bristol property and he 
never takes out a penny for his temporal need from what 
is sent to the orphans.- But in answer to prayer, God 
has always moved others to send to his servant abundant 
means for his personal support, money which is so de- 
signated at the time by the donors. Now in revealing 



1873-1877. REVIEW OF FIVE YEARS' WORK. 



5Q3 



this chapter of his private history,he says with emphasis, 
" I seek not the praise of men, but the glory of God ; the 
real profit of my fellow disciples, hoping that they may 
act on the same principles, if they have not already. All 
we had was the Lord's and we stood with our all before 
the Lord, for my beloved wife was of one mind with me. 
We lived by the day, looking to the Lord, and kept nothing 
for coming necessities, such as sickness, loss of friends, or 
of income." On his second marriage, November 30, 1871, 
to Miss Susan Grace Sangar, whom he had known more 
than twenty-five years as a consistent believer, he had "joy 
to know that she possessed no property, which fitted her 
the better to be my wife." Only $1000 remained of the 
property once possessed by her, and that was given to the 
Lord's work before their marriage. He also states that 
he always labored without being chargeable to any one, 
and " never received a single fee as a preacher of the 
gospel or for anything I did in connection with the pas- 
toral position. Let none suppose that I do not naturally 
care about money. Left to myself I should even now 
become a lover of money and hold it fast, for I am naturally 
a calculating man. But as long as grace is in exercise, I 
calculate with regard to the eternity that is before me 
and also that, since the Lord Jesus became poor, it becomes 
me to give back to Him in return. Will not my dear 
fellow servants in the gospel consider the Lord's faithful 
dealings with me ? " 

Beginning with 1831, after relinquishing all emolu- 
ment in connection with the pastorate at Teignmouth and 
continuing to the present time, we have the following 
record. Fractions are omitted. 



1831 Rec'd £151 gave away £ 50 



1832 


<i 


195 " 


<< 


70 


1833 


t< 


267 " 


<< 


110 


1834 


it 


288 " 


tc 


120 


1835 


<i 


285 " 


tt 


110 


1836 


u 


232 " 


tt 


80 


1837 


It 


307 " 


tt 


140 



1838 Rec'd £350 gave away £166 

1839 " 313 " " 140 

1840 " 242 " " 80 

1841 " 238 " " 80 

1842 " 329 " " 130 

1843 " 326 " " 140 

1844 " 267 " " 100 



504 






THE LIFE < 


3F TRUST. Chap. XXVIII, 


1845 Rec'd£ 433 


gave away £220 


1860 Rec'd £1054 gave away £ 800 


1846 


<( 


399 


i I i 


180 


1861 ' 


1097 ' 




847 


1847 


<t 


412 


tt I 


180 


1862 * 


1067 " 




876 


1848 


«•• 


474 


tt t 


240 


1863 ' 


' 1172 ' 




961 


1849 


(• 


413 


(f f 


190 


1864 ' 


\ 1230 " 




1024 


1850 


a 


402 


tt t 


180 


1865 ' 


' 1365 " 




1131 


1851 


tt 


465 


tt t 


220 


1866 ' 


' 1602 " 




1362 


1852 


u 


445 


it f 


190 


1867 ' 


1847 " 




1579 


1853 


te 


638 


tl t 


368 


1868 ' 


< 1838 ' 




1577 


1854 


tt 


697 


tl t 


440 


1869 ' 


< 1800 " 




1559 


1855 


tt 


726 


It t 


466 


1870 ' 


« 2067 " 




1713 


1856 


tt 


781 


tt ' t 


500 


1871 < 


' 2171 " 




1570 


1857 


it 


836 


tt f 


566 


1872 ' 


' 2240 ' 




1637 


1858 


ft 


1029 


tt I 


768 


1873 ■ 


« 27?0 << . 


1819 


1859 


u 


1037 


tt i 


776 











The account from which we copy closes with May 1874, 
but we learn from Mr. Muller that the total amount given 
away from his private purse to the present time, November, 
1877, is, in our money, over $180,000. 

He adds, " I have allowed my family the necessities 
and the conveniences of life. I do this still, if not even 
more as I am increasing in years ; but I have ever guarded 
against extravagance in any way, lest my stewardship be 
taken from me. The reader would be mistaken, if he 
supposed, that, as soon as the Lord has sent me means, my 
aim is to get rid of them as fast as possible, as if it were a 
crime to possess a ten pound note. This is not at all my 
way of acting. Whether I have much or little I desire to 
look on it as a steward would and not as an owner. I 
seek grace to give a part, or all, if He would. Often the 
Lord brings before me needy saints besides those sixty- 
eight poor believers whom I seek habitually to help ; or 
some unbelievers or special claims in His work." Thus two 
legacies amounting to $5000 received on January 1, 1874, 
and just before, with an unappropriated balance on hand, 
enabled him to spend a large amount for the Lord's work. 

Mr. Miiller also signalizes the duty of waiting on the 
Lord in humble, active faith. He believes in prayer, as 
perhaps no other man living believes in prayer, but he is 
no less a believer in work. Not only does he spend hours 
in communion with God and His blessed word, but he toils 
as few men can toil. Not only does he preach eight times 



1872-1877. REVIEW OF FIVE YEARS' WORK. 505 

a week with comparatively no fatigue, though seventy-two 
years of age ; travel by day and night to meet appoint- 
ments ; receive uncounted callers, and attend to an over- 
whelming correspondence, but he has the faculty of keep- 
ing other people at work. For example, he has eight sec- 
retaries engaged in answering the 30,000 letters received 
every year. Thousands of his reports are sent by post, to 
applicants in all parts of the world. Mr. M. believes most 
thoroughly in the use of types, and every publication of 
the millions that yearly are issued at Bristol is a vehicle 
of information. When he preaches he wishes the most 
commodious church and desires that the services be widely 
advertised. He has sagacity, keenness, perseverance and 
toilfulness united with his humility and childlike trust. 
He prays as if God was to do all, but labors as though 
success rested on himself. A stranger seeing him as he 
sits silently, even in company, saying little, and with his 
eyes looking downward, as if in constant intercourse with 
the unseen, would perhaps take him for some religious 
mystic, pietist or quietist. But, though not of the world, 
he realizes that he is in the world, and he knows how to 
use it without abusing it. He utilizes every proper aux- 
iliary in doing his work. The success he has had in 
selecting his instruments of service proves that he has been 
endowed with that wisdom which cometh down from 
above. Then he has in his quiet, modest way more real 
magnetism than many who are more eloquent men than he 
is. He is not attractive in speech or gesture. He has no 
" enticing words of man's wisdom," but he talks to the 
people in simple words, " which are thunder, because his 
life is lightning," to borrow Jerome's sententious "figure. 
He talks familiarly in his reports. Having stated that the 
past forty-three years he has spent nearly a million dollars 
in the missionary department of his work, he says : " We 
have reason to believe that there are a thousand millions 
of souls who have never heard the Gospel preached, and 



y 



506 THE LIFE OE TRUST. CHAP. XXVIII. 

that therefore at least nineteen out of every twenty, if not 
forty-nine out of every fifty, are not privileged as we who 
know the Lord Jesus have been. It is an awful considera- 
tion, that the vast majority of our fellow-men have never 
yet had the light of the Gospel ; have never had salvation, 
through faith in the atoning death of the Lord Jesus, 
preached to them. Have we sufficiently pondered this ? 
Has it had a practical effect upon our lives ? And what 
effect has it had ? 1. Has it led us to earnestness in prayer ? 
Day by day should we pray, that God would abundantly 
bless the labors of all His servants who preach the Gospel 
at home and abroad. Every day that we neglect this we 
neglect what, as believers in the Lord Jesus, we ought to 
attend to. But we should also pray for those who are en- 
gaging in preaching the Gospel at home and abroad, that 
they may be upheld and strengthened, both as to their 
outward and inward man. 2. But if we are sincere in our 
prayer we shall do more than this." 

He then shows that prayer without effort and faith 
without works amount to nothing. Some ought to go 
personally to the heathen, trusting in God for support, not 
to any society or human helper. In this Mr. M. speaks 
" not by commandment " or as being a law to others, but 
as Paul, 1 Cor. vii. 7, who said, "I would that all men 
were even as I myself, but every man hath his proper gift 
of God, one after this manner and another after that." A 
second method is to liberally aid those in the field. Mr. 
M. says: " How can we suppose that we love the Lord 
Jesus, if we do not practically show our interest in the 
labors of those who, often with their lives in their hands, 
seek to spread that Gospel, to which we owe our spiritual 
life, peace, joy, yea every thing with reference to eternal 
realities? Now what are we doing to help these Mis- 
sionaries and Evangelists? How much of our time do we 
devote for them ? How much of our money do we give 
for them ? What self-denial in the way of dress, 



1872-1877. REVIEW OF FIVE YEAKS' WORK. 507 

luxury, pleasure and sight seeing do we practice on their 
account ? Do we all spend as much as the twentieth part 
of our income for this object ? What have we been doing 
during the last year, for missions ? Let us examine our- 
selves, let us be honest to our own hearts ! Life will soon 
have come to an end. Our one brief life will soon be over. 
And then, in the retrospect, shall we be able to say that 
we did what we could ? " 

It is a marvel that any who know the activity and 
practical industry of such a life as the Bristol Evangelist 
leads, should ever apply the term " cant' 1 '' to his docility of 
faith and say that " he professes to pray for everything 
and uses no means." 

SUMMARY OF RESULTS. 

Mr. Mtiller, in giving statistics, warns his readers that 
mere numerical magnitudes are of little account in God's 
sight. " We should labor on in this service, prayerfully, 
and believingly labor on, even though for a long time we 
should see little or no fruit ; yea, toe should labor on as if 
everything depended on oar labors, whilst, in reality, we 
ought not to put the least confidence in our exertions, but 
alone in God's ability and willingness to bless, by His 
Holy Spirit, our efforts for the sake of the Lord Jesus. 
And what will be the result of laboring on patiently in 
such a spirit ? We find the answer in the epistle to the 
Galatians, vi. 9 : 'Let us not be weary in well doing; for 
in due season we shall reap, if we faint not.' Observe, in 
due season. The whole of our earthly pilgrimage is a sow- 
ing time, though we may be allowed to see now and then 
already in this life, fruit resulting from our sowing to a 
greater or less degree ; but if it were not thus, or if com- 
paratively but little fruit were now, in this life, reaped, the 
due season is coming. At the appearing of our Lord Jesus 
all will be made manifest ■ our reward of grace will be 
given to us for our patient service then ; and in the pros- 



508 THE LIFE OF TKUST. CHAP. XXVIII. 

pect of that day we have patiently to continue in well 
doing. But this patient continuing in well doing calls for 
much prayer, for much meditation on the Word of God, 
and for much feeding on the work and person of our Lord 
Jesus, in order that thus our spiritual strength may be re- 
newed day by day." This last sentence ought not to be 
forgotten in this age of outward, bustling activities, when 
in keeping other vineyards, one is apt to forget his own. 

Mr. Mtiller's work is in five departments. 

I. Orphans. — During the past year 247 orphans were 
admitted into these five houses, so that on May 26, 1877, 
we should have had altogether 2,242 orphans had there 
been no changes. But of these 2,242 orphans, 40 died 
during the past year. Of those who died, fourteen were 
young infants, and thirteen had been some time decided 
believers before they fell asleep in Jesus. Twenty-four 
out of the 2,242 were delivered up to their relatives who, 
by that time, were in better circumstances than when we 
received the children, and were on that account both able 
therefore to provide for these orphans and also felt it their 
duty so to do. Twenty-four orphans we were obliged to 
return to their relatives, because either on account of their 
physical or mental state they could not be sent to situa- 
tions, or their deportment had been such that we could 
not recommend them to masters and mistresses. Thirty- 
nine of the boys were apprenticed, of whom nineteen were 
sent out as Christian lads. Three girls were sent out as 
pupil teachers, and one hundred and twenty-nine to situa- 
tions, so that on May 26, 1877, we had only 1,983 orphans 
under our care. The total number of orphans who have 
been under our care from April, 1836, to May 26, 1877, is 
5,199. 

The girls who are received into the establishment are 
kept till they are able to go to service. Our aim is to keep 
them till they shall have been sufficiently qualified for a 
situation, and especially, also, till their constitution is suf- 



1873-1877. SUMMARY. 509 

ficiently established, as far as we are able to judge. We 
uniformly prefer fitting the girls for service, instead of ap- 
prenticing them to businesses, as being, generally, far better 
for their bodies and souls. Only in a few instances have 
female orphans been apprenticed to a business, when their 
health would not allow them to go to service. If the girls 
give us satisfaction, while under our care, so that we can 
recommend them to a situation, they are fitted out at the 
expense of the establishment. The girls, generally, remain 
under our care till they are about 17 years old. They rare- 
ly leave sooner; and, as we receive children from their 
earliest days, we have often had girls 13, 14, yea, 17 years 
under our care. They are instructed in reading, writing, 
arithmetic, English grammar, geography, English history, 
a little of universal history, all kinds of useful needle- work, 
and household work. They make their clothes and keep 
them in repair ; they work in the kitchens, sculleries, wash- 
houses and laundries ; and, in a word, we aim after this, 
that, if any of them do not do well temporally or spiritually 
and do not turn out useful members of society, it shall, 
at least, not be our fault. The boys are, generally, ap- 
prenticed when they are between 14 and 15 years old. 
The new orphan house No. 1 is fitted up for the accommo- 
dation of 140 orphan girls above eight years of age, 80 
orphan boys above eight years, and 80 female orphans from 
their earliest days, till they are about eight years of age. 
The infants, after having passed the age of eight years, are 
removed into the department for older girls. The new 
orphan house No. 2 is fitted up for 200 infant female 
orphans and for 200 older female orphans. The new 
orphan house No. 3 is fitted up for 450 older female 
orphans. The new orphan house No. 4 is fitted up for 210 
boys of eight years old and upwards, 208 infant boys under 
eight years of age, and 32 older girls to do the household 
work — 450 in all. The new orphan house No. 5 is fitted up for 
310 infant female orphans and for 240 older female orphans. 



510 THE LIFE OF TRUST. CHAP. XXVIII. 

Without any sectarian distinction whatever and with- 
out favor or partiality, the orphans are received in the 
order in which application is made for them. There is no 
interest whatever required to get a child admitted, nor is 
it expected that any money should be paid with the 
orphans. Three things only are requisite : a, that the 
children should have been lawfully begotten ; b, that they 
should be bereaved of both parents by death ; and c, that 
they should be in needy circumstances. Respecting these 
three points strict investigation is made, and it is expected 
that each of them be proved by proper documents ; but, 
that being done, children may be admitted from any place, 
provided that there is nothing peculiar in the case that 
would make them unsuitable inmates for such establish- 
ments as the new orphan houses. I state here again that 
no sectarian views prompt us, nor even in the least influ- 
ence us in the reception of children. We do not belong 
to any sect, and we are not, therefore, influenced in the 
admission of children. 

The income for the orphans has been kept distinct from 
that for the other objects, and I purpose to keep it so for 
the future. Donors may, therefore, contribute to one or 
other of the objects exclusively, or have their donations 
equally divided among them all, just as it may appear best 
to themselves. If any of the donors would wish to leave 
the application of their donations to my discretion, as the 
work of God in my hands more especially may call for it 
at the time, they are requested kindly to say so when send- 
ing their donations. 

Without any one having been personally applied to for 
anything by me, the sum of £493,048 3s. 8d. has been 
given to me for the orphans, as the result of prayer to God, 
since the commencement of the work, which sum includes 
the amount received for the building fund for the five 
houses. 

II. Books and Tracts.— There has been laid out in 



1872-1877. SUMMAKY. 511 

this department from May 26, 1876, to May 26, 1877, the 
sum of £1,136 14s. 2d.; and there have been circulated 
within the last year 3,466,774 tracts and books. The sum 
total which has been expended on this object, since Nov. 
19, 1840, amounts to £27,336 3s. Of-d., about $136,000. 

The total number of all the tracts and books which has 
been circulated from Nov. 19, 1840, to May 26, 1877, is 
60,408,215. 

Nearly three millions of the tracts and books circulated 
during the past year, were given away gratuitously. 
Hundreds of believers have been engaged in spreading 
them abroad, not merely in many parts of England, Scot- 
land and Ireland, but in various other parts of the world. 

III. Home and Foreign Missions. — This is a third 
object of the " Scriptural Knowledge Institution," During 
the past year was expended of the funds of the Institution 
for this object, the sum of £7,173 12s. lOd. By this sum 
173 laborers in the Word and doctrine, in various parts of 
the world y were, to a greater or less degree, assisted. 

With regard to these 173 laborers in the Gospel in 
various parts of the world, whom we sought to assist 
during the past year, I repeat, that they are not the Mis- 
sionaries of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution, nor do 
we bind ourselves to give them a stated salary, for this 
would lead them out of the position of simple dependence 
upon God for their temporal supplies ; but when we hear 
of any man of God laboring for the Lord in the Word, 
whether in a more public or private way, whether at home 
or abroad, who is not connected with any society, nor in 
the way of receiving a regular salary, and who seems to 
us to stand in need of help, and is working in such a spirit, 
as that, with a good conscience, acting in the fear of God, 
we could help him with the means with which donors in- 
trust us ; we are glad to assist such a one. 

Seventeen pages of fine type are filled with brief ex- 
tracts from missionary letters. 



512 THE LIFE OE TEUST. CHAP. XXVIII. 

A brother writes from Tunghwa, China : — " We had a 
meeting of the native preachers here a week ago. After 
the ordinary business was over, such as giving an account 
of their work at the stations where they labor, their en- 
couragements and discouragements, etc., we had a meet- 
ing in the evening for prayer, praise and exhortation. 
One of the native brethren gave a very precious and stir- 
ring address from Phil. iii. 12-14. We partook of the 
Lord's supper afterwards, and we all enjoyed it very much. 
We seldom have such a treat. Thank God ! we have the 
fountain of blessing to drink at wherever we are. You 
will be glad to hear that the Lord is giving us much en- 
couragement at some of our out-stations. They are not 
satisfied with ordinary Buddhism, and as Christianity holds 
out future happiness, many are inclined to give it a favora- 
ble hearing. Pray, dear brother, that many of them may 
find rest to their weary souls by trusting in the blood of 
Jesus." 

Mr. C. writes again on February 26, 18 77 : — " During 
the year 1876, we received into the church twelve very 
hopeful converts. Since the new year we have received 
other five, and we have still six or seven hopeful inquirers, 
whom we hope to have the joy of receiving soon. Many 
of those who have confessed Christ recently, have heard 
the gospel for years ; some of them for ten years. This 
encourages us to go on sowing the seed, and to believe 
that, in due season, we shall reap if we faint not. I would 
like to mention one good feature in the character of most 
of these new converts, and that is, that they speak of Jesus 
to others, and they do so without any hope of getting 
money from me for doing so." 

One of the Chinese converts, Mr. M., of Mngpo, writes, 
" emphatically a brawler, and such a brawler ! She is 
the landlady of the house in which house I lived for six 
years, hearing and seeing daily almost, such sounds and 
sights, all in connection with this woman, as would A T ex 



1872-1877. SUMMAEY. 513 

the soul of a man less righteous than Lot. She was not 
only { a brawler,' but she was * a Jezebel.' I think I could, 
in an English court of justice, bring home to her the murder 
of one, if not two, poor little wretched daughters-in-law, 
that she had purchased to be wives to her sons. Many a 
time have I myself rescued one of these miserable little 
things out of her cruel hands. Mr. C. once pulled her out 
of a canal into which she had jumped, when in a fit of pas- 
sion, and in which she would probably have perished had 
he not been prompt to deliver her. She has heard the 
gospel for years, and we feared was gospel hardened. "We 
were impelled one day to pray openly for her by name. 
She heard of it and a change at once came over her, more 
and more deep, year by year. Finally she began a prayer- 
ful life, and after two years longer waiting was baptized, 
a brand plucked from the burning." 

A native Chinese preacher, laboring among his country- 
men in British Guiana, writes joyfully of his work and its 
results. 

H. O. writes from New Zealand in a similar strain. 
Mr. G., in Australia, says, " It has pleased the Lord to 
bless my endeavors. For many weeks I rode nearly 100 
miles a week on horseback, distributing tracts, giving 
Bibles where I found a house without one, and preaching 
Christ to all with whom I came in contact. Regular 
preaching was carried on in Echma and Moawa. This 
work was much owned of God. The Lord gave us one 
soul at our first service and subsequently continued to 
bless, so much so, that my colleague remains teaching 
Christ with acceptance and blessing. A church will soon 
be found and steps are already taken for the erection of a 
place of worship." 

From Madrid and other Spanish towns cheering letters 
come. Converts stand firm, having, in the face of difficul- 
ties, resisted the conventionalities of their country, giving 
up work on Lord's day and so being free to join with their 
22* 



514 THE LIFE OF TKUST. Chap. XXVIII 

brethren in worship and service. " At the present time we 
have some eight or nine candidates for baptism and mem- 
bers for the church, some of whom give us especial joy. 
We need heavenly wisdom to discern between real and 
false coin, but for this we count on God, who giveth to all 
men liberally and upbraideth not. One of this number 
was turned out of her employ for confessing Christ, and 
her faith was tried for some little time ; but God heard 
her prayer and others on her behalf, and a place has been 
opened for her in the house of some Christian." 

Mr. G. L. writes from Barcelona : — " We had over a thou- 
sand children and parents up the mountain, and gave them 
a treat after David's fashion, when he dealt to every one 
of Israel, both man and woman, to every one a loaf of 
bread, and a good piece of flesh and a flagon of wine,' with 
the addition of boiled chestnuts and figs. Six omnibuses 
brought up the ' wee ones ' from their various schools, 
while the elder came on foot, accompanied by teachers 
and parents. It was truly a 'children's agape.' The 
teachers told me that it was impossible to control the joy 
of the little ones who came in the coaches, as all along the 
route they would sing some of their favorite hymns. As 
they were returning, and ready for the start, some of them 
said, 'Don George, shall we sing going along?' 'Sing I 
why not ? If you do not the very stones will cry out.' 
In nothing has this government shown more folly, or 
brought down on themselves more ridicule, than in their 
recent orders that our children were not to sing too loud 
in the schools for fear the Roman Catholics should be dis- 
turbed ; caught, they mean, by the golden chains of 
Jesus' love songs. Yesterday I saw a young shepherd 
tending his sheep upon the opposite piece of ground to our 
house. He had just been using ' sling and stone ' to 
frighten a straying sheep from danger, or which was going 
on forbidden ground. Our children observed, and touched 
perhaps with the spirit of the minstrel, who sought his 



1872-1877. SUMMARY. 515 

king by the aid of song, struck up 'The Ninety and Nine,' 
in Spanish. The shepherd stopped and listened, drew 
near and leaned on his staff, a cigarette died out between his 
fingers — his sheep had strayed a long way ere he moved, 
which was not until the children had finished and begun 
another song. I have heard mothers in different parts of 
this land, singing a lullaby of these precious hymns. Yes, 
we will make the people ballads ; the government may put 
many chains, and beat with many stripes, and thrust into 
inner prisons, and make the feet fast in stocks ; but so long 
as the enemy cannot tie our tongues we shall triumph in 
Jesus, ' the name high over all, in heaven or earth or sky.' 
It will be with the gospel in Spain as it was with a poor 
man whose ejaculations in meetings tried a nervous sister, 
who, seeing the man in want of a pair of boots, said to him, 
1 John, if you will suppress your exclamations I will give 
you a new pair of boots.' John being in want accepted 
the offer, and for a Sunday or two kept quiet, but after a 
time the fire burned, and John jumped up saying, ' boots 
or no boots, I must praise the Lord.' Among our visitors 
were the children of the Gypsy school. Some of these 
girls and boys, can now read and write. The tenderness 
the other children showed them formed a fine contrast to 
Roman Catholics, who never mix with other children. 
Last week we held meetings for prayer for Sunday schools; 
a larger number attended than we have yet held. The 
large school room at Barcelona was filled to overflowing; 
several recited portions of the Scriptures ; short addresses 
and pointed prayers followed. Some of our eldest scholars 
have formed a Young Men's Christian Association. Native 
agency is more and more developing itself, in schools, in 
preaching, in prayer meetings and in distribution of the 
Word and tracts. Another gem is about being translated 
from the hospital to shine forever in Jesus' crown. She 
has been now fifteen months under our care, is eighty-nine 
years old, one of nature's nobility ; she came into the 



516 THE LIFE OF TKUST. Chap. XXVIII. 

hospital a poor blind Romanist, with beads, cross and 
rosary ; gradually the light of free salvation, through one 
Mediator, broke in upon her mind ; and for a long time 
past Jesus only has occupied her soul. It is pleasant to 
see her maintain, with a very clear intellect, the assurance 
of her faith in Jesus as her Saviour ; during the past month 
she has counted the days, constantly saying, i end of Octo- 
ber shall finish my days.' On the first of November she 
had a stroke which has left one side dead and her tongue 
speechless, but the eye is not dimmed ; 'tis- sweet to see 
her raise her aged hand, pointing upward, as if to say: 

' Yonder's my house and portion fair, 
My treasure and my heart are there.'" 

Mr. P., laboring in the neighborhood of Cosham, Hamp- 
shire, writes on September 23, 1876: — "I am thankful to 
tell you that the work of the Lord is prospering amongst 
us. Our chapel here and mission room in a neighboring 
village are filled with hearers. Souls are saved. We have 
received several into fellowship lately, and others are can- 
didates. O how gracious the Lord is, to let us see some 
fruit ! " 

Mr. T., laboring at Portsmouth, writes on February 
12, 1877: — "You will, I am sure, be glad to learn that 
since I last wrote to you the Lord has given a continual 
stream of blessing in Gospel testimony. Lord Radstock 
gave his last address in our hall last evening; great num- 
bers had to go away for want of room, and I should think 
that over 250 remained to the after meetings. Not less 
than seven or eight left rejoicing in their new found peace. 
There have been many very striking cases of conversion." 

From the slums of London, Mr. L. writes on April 18, 
1877:— "Adoringly and gratefully I would tell of great 
blessings and ask you to raise a note of thanksgiving. 
Weliave had one continued stream of blessing this year; 
not one meeting but what we have had to rejoice over in 



1872-1877. SUMMARY. 517 

some way. Our prayer meetings have been wondrous 
times, filling my soul with adoring gratitude and unspeak- 
able joy. At some of our meetings twenty-two, twenty- 
four, twenty-eight, and even thirty have led in praise or 
prayer. You will remember that our people are the very 
poorest of the poor, and most of them brought up from the 
deepest depths; many of them not able to read. Their 
utterances are certainly very simple and unpolished ; just 
their every day expressions, but oh, the manifestation of 
confidence, faith, love, peace and rest is very blessed. 
Praise God with me, my brother, for this precious fruit of 
much painful toil." 

IV. Bible Department. — Mt. Mtiller reports as fol- 
lows: 

"We sell Bibles and Testaments to poor persons at re- 
duced prices, or, if the cases be found suitable, give them 
altogether gratuitously. In cases of needy schools, carried 
on in the fear of God, it would be joy in the Lord to us to 
supply them with as many copies of the holy Scriptures as 
they may require. This applies especially to all Missionary 
efforts in forign lands, or to any Scriptural means which 
are used to spread the truth of God in the dark places of 
our land. 

Our particular aim, in circulating the Holy Scriptures, is 
to seek out the very poorest of the poor, through visits from 
house to house, in order to find out the need of the Holy 
Scriptures, and to supply persons either entirely gratis or 
on the payment of a small amount. With this we especial- 
ly combine the furnishing aged persons with copies in large 
type, a point of great moment, as the smallness of type, 
even where a copy of the Bible is possessed, would keep 
many aged persons from reading it; and, also because it 
is well known that Bibles, printed in large type are, up 
to this present day, expensive, considering the means of 
the poor. We have been greatly assisted in these efforts 
of searching out the most needy persons, destitute of the 
Holy Scriptures, by many servants of Christ who, in Eng- 
land, Scotland, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Nova Scotia, Canada, 
British Guiana, the East Indies, Australia, Africa, China* 
&c, have sought to circulate God's Holy Word. 



518 THE LIFE OF TRUST. CHAP. XXVIII. 

7,155 Bibles have been sold the past year, 792 given 
away; 33,406 copies of portions of the Word have been 
sold and 3,074 given away. There are 200 styles of Eng- 
lish Bibles kept in stock, ranging from 12 cts. to $25 ; also 
30 kinds of Testaments and copies of the Scriptures, or por- 
tions of them, in Hebrew, Greek, Russ, Swedish, Spanish, 
Welsh, Danish, Dutch, French, German, Italian and Portu- 
guese. The amount spent the past year on this depart- 
ment is |6,870, and since 1834 $24,000. The report adds, 

During the past year we have continued, by the help 
of an earnest Christian brother, to introduce the Holy 
Scriptures into the factories and mills of Lancashire, York- 
shire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire. Many thousands 
of copies of the New Testament and many Bibles have 
been thus placed again in the hands of men, women, boys 
and girls working in these factories and mills; and this 
work steadily is going on. This colporteur goes from one 
mill to the other, and from one factory to the other, and 
often disposes of hundreds of copies in one place. The 
expense to meet this is considerable ; but the greater the 
efforts which are being made to put aside the Word of 
God, or to do without it, the more it becomes the disciples 
of the Lord Jesus to circulate it with earnest, believing, 
expecting and persevering prayer. 

V. School Work. — The object is to aid day schools, 
Sunday schools and adult schools if taught on Biblical 
principles. 

1. By day schools taught upon Scriptural principles, 
we understand day schools in which the teachers are be- 
lievers, — and in which the way of salvation is scriptural- 
ly pointed out, — and in which no instruction is given which 
is opposed to the principles of the Gospel. During the 
past year seventy -five such day schools were entirely sup- 
ported by the funds of the Institution. Of these seventy- 
five schools there are four in Bristol, one at Callington, in 
Cornwall, one at Kenilworth, in Warwickshire, one at 
Howie Hill, in Herefordshire, two at Walham Green near 
London, three on the Blackdown Hills, in Somersetshire, 



187&-1877. SUMMARY. 519 

four at Barnstaple, three in Exeter, two at Purton, in 
Gloucestershire, one at Cubitt town, London, one at Saul, 
Gloucestershire, one at Yeovil, Somersetshire, one at Bish- 
opswood, Somersetshire, one at North End, near London, 
one at Chittlehamholt, Devon, one at Hopton, Suffolk, five 
at Cardiff, Wales, three at Kilburn, London, one at High 
Bickington, Devon, two at Plymton, Devon, one at Ports- 
mouth, one at Stroud, two at Ludlow, one at East Brent, 
one at Brentford, one at Plympton Underwood, one at 
Bow, one at Shaftesbury, and one at King's Stanley. 
These are the home schools, besides which there are four- 
teen in Spain, four in India, two in Italy, and six in British 
Guiana. Besides these seventy-five day schools, entirely 
supported by the funds of the Institution, eight other day 
schools have been assisted, one in Dorsetshire, one in 
Worcestershire, four in Devon, one in Wiltshire, and one 
in France. 

The number of the pupils in the home day schools, on 
May 26, 1877, was 5,396 ; in the Mission day schools, 1,726, 
in all 7,122. 

The reader cannot but see that the Lord's manifest 
blessing rests upon the schools. I have of late years given 
myself especially to the enlargement of the school depart- 
ment, as in years before that to the increase of the orphan 
work, in order that children, from their early days, may 
be grounded in the Word of God, as the powers of dark- 
ness make every effort to put it aside. 

2. Sunday schools, in which the teachers are believers 
and in which the Holy Scriptures alone are the foundation 
of instruction, are such only as the Institution supports or 
assists ; for we consider it unscriptural that any persons, 
who do not profes# to know the Lord themselves, should 
be engaged in giving religious instruction. 

There are thirty-three Sunday schools connected with 
the Institution, which are entirely supported by its funds. 
In these thirty-three Sunday schools there were, on May 26, 



520 THE LIFE OF TEUST. Chap. XXVIII 

1877, altogether 2,487 scholars. There were likewise, dur- 
ing the past year, thirty-four Sunday schools, to a greater 
or less degree, assisted by the funds of the Institution. 
Of the thirty-three Sunday schools, entirely supported by 
the funds of the Institution, ten are in Spain, seven in 
British Guiana, three in Gloucestershire, two in Somerset- 
shire, three in Devonshire, one in Cornwall, two in Hamp- 
shire, three in Middlesex, one in Suffolk, and one in War- 
wickshire. Of the thirty-three Sunday schools, which 
were only in part supported, two are in Somersetshire, 
three in Devonshire, one in Wiltshire, eight in Middlesex, 
two in Lancashire, one in Warwickshire, one in Suffolk, 
one in Surrey, one in Shropshire, one in Worcestershire, 
one in Staffordshire, one in Cheshire, one in Herefordshire, 
one in Buckinghamshire, two in Hampshire, four in Wales, 
and one in Ireland. 

3. In adult schools, also, all the teachers are believers. 
There are now six adult schools, with 166 scholars con- 
nected with the Institution, which are entirely supported 
by its funds. Of these there are three in Spain, one in 
India, one at Callington, and one at Walham Green. 

From the foregoing statement it will appear that there 
are altogether 114 schools entirely supported by the funds 
of the Institution, (seventy-five day schools, thirty-three 
Sunday schools and six adult schools,) and that, during the 
past year, eight day schools and thirty-four Sunday schools 
were assisted. From what has been stated it will likewise 
be seen, that in these 114 schools, entirely supported by 
the funds of the Institution, there were, on May 26, 1876, 
altogether 9,775 scholars. The total number that fre- 
quented the schools of the Institution, entirely supported 
by its funds, from the beginning, amounts to 60,110, viz., 
there were 39,921 in all the day schools, 13,443 in all the 
Sunday schools, and 6,746 in all the adult schools. 

The amount of means which was expended during the 
past year, in connection with the various schools amounts 



1872-1877. CONTINENTAL TRAVELS. 521 

to £6,653 7s. 9|4. This does not include £1,948 lis. lid. 
expended on the Mission schools alone, which is charged 
to the Mission fund, to which it more properly belongs. 
There has been expended on the home schools from the 
beginning of the Institution £43,802 7s. 3jd., or about 
$220,000. 

CONTINENTAL TRAVELS. 

" During the greater part of the past year, accompanied 
by my dear wife, I have been absent from Bristol on a 
preaching tour on the Continent of Europe, and preached 
repeatedly in Paris. In Switzerland I preached at Berne, 
at Zurich and the neighborhood, at St. Gallen and various 
neighboring places, at Herisau and the neighborhood, at 
Glaris and the neighborhood, at Schaffhausen, at Winter- 
thur and at Basle and various places in the neighborhood. 
In Alsace I preached at Mtilhausen and Strasburg. In the 
Kingdom of Wurtemberg I preached at Stuttgart, Korn- 
thal, Ludwigsburg, Reutlingen, Ober-Urbach and Heil- 
bronni. In the Grand-Duchy of Baden I preached at 
Carlsrube, Constance, Gernsbach, Heidelberg and Mann- 
heim. In the Grand-Duchy of Hesse Darmstadt I preached 
in the Capital Darmstadt. In the Kingdom of Prussia I 
preached at Frankfort on the Maine, Bonn, Cologne, 
Diisseldorf, Dlisselthal, Wesel, Miilheim on the Ruhr, 
Gladbach, Reydt, Vierseu, Crefeld, Duisburg, Essen, 
Elberfeld, Barmen, Cassel, Halle, Berlin, Stettin, Hanover, 
Bieleleld, Soest and Ruhrort. I preached also in the free 
town Lubeck. In the Kingdom of Holland I preached at 
Nimwegen, Arnheim, Utrecht, Amsterdam, Zeist, Haarlem, 
Leyden, the Hague and Rotterdam. Altogether I preached 
three hundred and two times in sixty-eight places, most of 
which were large towns. To every place I had been in- 
vited by letter, as through my labors and writings I have 
been for more than thirty years as well known on the Con- 
tinent as in England. 

" I have referred to this preaching tour in order that the 
Christian friends who read this, may follow my past 
labors on the Continent with their prayers, that the Lord 
would be pleased abundantly to bless them ; for the Con- 
tinent of Europe, as a whole, greatly needs such labors. I 
also do so because I intend, if the Lord will, after some 



522 THE LIFE OF TRUST. CHAP. XXVIII. 

time, to go again to the Continent to labor there further 
in this way, as I have yet sixty-three written invitations 
for various parts of Germany, Switzerland and Holland, 
which I have not been able to accept. Yea, even from 
Vienna and Petersburg I have received letters, to request 
me to go there. 

"The abundant blessing which the Lord has been 
pleased to allow to rest upon these my labors everywhere, 
encourages me to go on with this service, and to spend the 
evening of my life in going from city to city, country to 
country, as long as the Lord gives me health and otherwise 
makes my way plain." 

During his European tour Mr. Milller frequently met 
his former beneficiaries. Their joy and gratitude were 
touching to behold, as after long years they saw their bene- 
factor once more. Letters from them breathe the same 
spirit of thankfulness. One writes : 

"It is with gratitude I look back upon the years 1 
spent in the dear orphan house ; they were happy years. 
And how much there is for which I have cause to be thank- 
ful ! The education I received there, and all the tender 
love and kindness from all around. But most of all I 
rejoice with thankfulness when I remember it was there I 
was taught to know Jesus as mine, and to trust in a lov- 
ing Father, who never forsakes those who trust Him, 
Please accept the enclosed." 

Not only did his orphans, and others among the lowly, 
flock after him, but the rich and titled, barons and princes, 
honored themselves by showing attentions to this venera- 
ble apostle of faith and charity. Among these was the 
Queen of Wtirtemberg, sister of the Emperor of Russia, 
who solicited a private interview with Mr. Milller at 
Stuttgart. A letter sent to the writer from Berlin, early 
in the spring of 1877, speaks of the intense interest and en- 
thusiasm awakened among the people, multitudes of whom 
filled the largest sanctuaries wherever he went. 



1872-1877. mjr. muller's yisit. 523 



VISIT TO AMERICA. 

Mr. Mtlller's " Life of Trust " has had an unprecedented 
circulation in America since 1860. There has been a desire 
to see and hear the author, naturally awakened by its perusal. 
Very many pastors and leading laymen have personally, at 
Bristol, and by letter, solicited a visit, but without avail. 
A united effort, however, among brethren of different 
evangelical bodies has prevailed with the preacher to re- 
consider his plans and to leave the work pressing on him, 
in Germany, for a year's sojourn in the United States and 
Canada. 

Mr. Mtiller and his wife arrived at Quebec Sept. 1, 1877. 
He had an aversion to journeying by the sea, but, provi- 
dentially, was spared any discomfort from sea-sickness. 
On Monday, Sept. 3d, he spoke twice at meetings in Que- 
bec ; on Tuesday he left for Niagara Falls by the way of 
Toronto ; thence direct to New York, arriving at the 
Pierrepont House Saturday morning. Private hospitalities 
had been tendered but were declined, the seclusion of 
hotel quarters having been found to be more restful. 

During these few days about forty written invitations 
were received from American brethren desiring the services 
of Mr. Mtiller, which were regarded by him as indicat- 
ing that he had not mistaken his course in coming to these 
shores. A telegram at Quebec from Rev. Dr. Talmage 
offered Brooklyn Tabernacle for Mr. M. Sept. 9. The 
weather was delightful and this spacious audience room 
was filled with about 4,000 people. The senior professor 
of the Lay College, Rev. J. L. Chapman, offered a prayer 
of invocation, rendering earnest thanks for the long looked 
for presence of this beloved brother. For sixteen years 
Mr M. has received hundreds of written and personal soli- 
citations to come to America, but not till last spring did he 
yield. A letter from representatives from five denomina- 
tions persuaded him that it was God's will that he should 



524 THE LIFE OF TRUST. CHAP. XXVIII. 

come. During the singing of the following original hymn 
to the tune " Webb," Mr. Mtiller was deeply affected : 

Servant of Christ, we greet thee ! 

Beloved of the Lord ! 
Within His courts we meet thee 

With gratitude and praise, 
For what God's grace has taught thee 

Through all these fruitful years, 
And for the marvels wrought thee 

In answer to thy prayers. 

We bless the Hand that led thee 

From youth to green old age : 
Which day by day hath fed thee, 

And thy dear orphan flock ; 
That Hand thy head did pillow, 

When on the ocean's breast, 
And o'er each swelling billow, 

In safety bore thee here. 

Thro' future days, still guiding, 

Thy Master will provide : 
In restful faith abiding, 

Thy wants are all His care. 
And may thy life, Brother ! 

Lead us this path to choose, 
Turning from one another, 

And trusting God alone. 

Smile, Father, on this meeting 

Of these Thy children here : 
O speak Thy loving greeting 

To every heart to-day ! 
And when in heaven, all glorious, 

Thy gathered saints shall stand, 
May each of us, victorious, 

Be welcomed there by Thee ! 

Rev. Prof. E. P. Thwing presided, by request of 
the absent pastor, and read a letter of welcome from 



1872-1877. THE GKEETIKG. 525 

Dr. Talmage. Prof. Thwing spoke in substance as 
follows : 

" This meeting and greeting, my honored brother, is a 
spontaneous expression of gratitude to God, and of affec- 
tion for yourself. This is not the place for any eulogistic 
review of human deeds, but rather for thanksgiving for 
what His power has wrought in answer to the prayer of 
faith and the labor of love. We meet you, brother, with 
no studied phrase and garnished rhetoric, but with brief 
and heartfelt greetings we welcome you and your beloved 
companion to America, to this city of churches, and to 
Brooklyn Tabernacle. I give you this hand in token of 
the ]ove that is felt not only by this people and community, 
but by all Americans who have known your long and 
patient toil for the orjDhan, your work as a minister of 
Christ, and above all, your 'Life of Trust.' The story 
of God's dealings with George Mtiller has been in the hands 
of Americans for seventeen years. It is stranger than 
fiction — and yet, with all its romantic interest, but the sim- 
ple corroboration of the promise, ' Ask and ye shall re- 
ceive.' Christians here have longed to see you. Pastors 
of churches and teachers of sacred learning have felt the 
need of a more practical conception of the cardinal truth, 
that God is and that He is the rewarder of those who dili- 
gently seek Him. We have desired that the members of 
our concrreo-ations and of our seminaries mio'ht? see and 
hear one who has furnished the present age the most con- 
spicuous illustration of the power and willingness of God 
to answer believing prayer. We want to possess Mike 
precious faith,' which, while it does not supersede but 
rather intensifies human exertion, relies utterly on God. 
We can possess it, for ' if any man do His will, him He 
heareth.'' 

" But I will not keep this vast assembly from the feast 
promised them. We invoke upon you and your dear com- 
panion the choicest of benedictions. You have disap- 



526 THE LIFE OE TRUST. Chap. XXVIII 

pointed scores of cities on the Continent to come to 
America, but we feel that you have not mistaken your 
way. You did not solicit an invitation. On the other 
hand, you declined more than one individual request, lest 
you might seem to ' intrude on the churches,' and only 
consented when concerted action convinced you that God 
was calling through these pastors and teachers who formal- 
ly solicited your presence. And now, sir, I do but repeat 
the sentiment which numerous letters and messages author- 
ize me to convey to you, when I say, thrice welcome to 
these shores, to our churches and colleges, our homes and 
our hearts. Tarry in this fair city by the sea, at least till 
after your seventy-second birthday, that September 27 
may be indeed made memorable to you and to us, in grate- 
ful recognition of what God has done through you for 
5,000 destitute orphans, and in recognition of the still 
grander and wider work you are doing in the world as an 
apostle of faith in an age of materialistic unbelief." 

The sermon by Mr. Milller was on the text, "Ask and 
ye shall receive," and exhibited these salient points: that 
our petitions should be purely to advance the glory of 
God ; should be offered in the name of Christ ; with hearty 
faith in His power and willingness to grant them ; with a 
willingness to wait, and without " regarding iniquity." 
Under the last point he said that purity of motive rather 
than absolute sinlessness of life was required. ISTo one 
lived who sinned not. He gave but a few incidents, re- 
serving to Monday and Tuesday evenings following a 
recital of his work in England. He at that time spoke to 
large audiences at Clinton Avenue Church, Rev. Dr. Bud- 
ington, pastor, and on the following Tuesday he preached 
in German at the Church of the Covenant, Prof. Thwing 
pastor. 

Sept. 8, Mr. and Mrs. Mtiller visited the Brooklyn Asy- 
lum and were greeted by over 300 boys and girls, besides 
a large number of the managers and friends. The pulpits 



1872-1877. RECEPTION OF MR. MULLER. 527 

of Brooklyn were offered to Mr. Mullet most heartily and 
he spoke four times in Plymouth Church, at Dr. Wild's, 
at Central Church, Tompkins Avenue Church, Lafayette 
Avenue, at the Methodist, Baptist, Lutheran churches, and 
other places. One object of the American tour being to 
reach the German population of our cities, Mr. M. preached 
repeatedly in Newark and elsewhere in his native tongue 
by request of German Christians. 

Rev. Dr. Cuyler says in the Evangelist : " At first 
sio-ht every one must be struck with his resemblance to the 
late Theodore Frelinghuysen. He is tall, straight as a 
brigadier, and has a countenance of singular benignity. 
His German brogue is rather agreeable. He told us the 
familiar story of his "life of trust," and how wonderfully 
God had answered his prayers. The old story was all the 
more interesting when it came from the lips of the devout 
worker himself. There were two things in his address 
which delighted me exceedingly. The first was, that, in 
founding his Orphan House he had discarded all British 
toadyism for great names, and, instead of appointing a 
Duke or a Lord, he had appointed " his Heavenly Father 
to be its President." This was a very characteristic step. 
But it occurred to me that if it was reverential and wrse 
in Miiller to make the Lord "President of the orphan 
institution," " it was equally wise in the Lord to en- 
trust its practical management to so shrewd a financier 
and sagacious philanthropist as George Miiller. The 
whole success of the enterprise at Bristol is due to a happy 
combination of divine oversight with human energy and 
good sense. There is no miracle in the success of Mr. 
Muller's efforts. He simply believes in God with the filial 
faith of a child. And then he lays hold of God's work 
with all the energy and sagacity of a sensible man, and. 
God prospers his undertakings." 

October 19, he went to Boston and began his work 
there in the vast Tabernacle erected for Mr. Moody. In 



528 THE LIFE OF TRUST. CHAP. XXVIU 

vitations from Providence, Worcester and Newbury port ; 
Amherst and Wellsley Colleges, and many other places in 
New England left little time for the continuous preaching 
in Boston which Brooklyn and New York had enjoyed. 
The winter of 1877-78 Mr. Miiller intends to spend in the 
principal cities south and west going as far as San Fran- 
cisco, and returning to England in June. That an abun- 
dant blessing may crown his work for Christ is the united 
prayer of all believers. 



528 

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1001 






i 


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GAYLORD 






PRINTED IN.U.S A. 



Miiller, George 



923.6 
M887F 
1873 



AUTHOR 



The life of trust 



TITLE 



DATE DUE 



MAY 2 2 m\ /,.?•' / 



BORROWERS NAME 




m. a 



i 






JUL2 



923.6 
M887^ 
1873