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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

United States Life-Saving 
Service 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30 

* 

1907 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1908 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 

Document NQ. 2500. 
Office of the Life-Saving Service. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



ORGANIZATION 5 

STATISTICAL STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 13 

DISASTERS INVOLVING Loss OF LIFE 35 

MEDAL AWARDS DURING YEAR 19 

SERVICES OF LIFE-SAVING CREWS -. 71 

TABLE OF CASUALTIES IN THE FIELD OF LIFE-SAVING OPERATIONS, SEASON 

1907 201 

WOMEN'S NATIONAL RELIEF ASSOCIATION 257 

LETTERS ACKNOWLEDGING SERVICES OF STATION CREWS 261 

APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 281 

LIST OF UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING DISTRICTS AND STATIONS 289 

INSTRUCTIONS TO MARINERS IN CASE OF SHIPWRECK 299 

DIRECTIONS FOR RESTORING THE APPARENTLY DROWNED 309 

MEDAL AWARDS, 1876-1907 315 

ABSTRACT OF RETURNS OF WRECKS, AND OF CASUALTIES TO VESSELS, AT HOME 

AND ABROAD DURING 1907 353 

INDEX . 471 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Page. 

Instructions to mariners in case of shipwreck: 

FIG. 1. Tail block fastened to mast with whip line running through it. . . 303 

FIG. 2. Hawser in position above whip line 304 

FIG. 3. Breeches buoy rigged and hauled off to ship 304 

Directions for restoring the apparently drowned : 

FIG. 4. Expelling water from body 309 

FIG. 5. Movements to produce- inspiration 310 

FIG. 6. Movements to produce expiration 311 

FIG. 7. Movements by one person to produce inspiration 312 

FIG. 8. Movements by one person to produce expiration 313 

4 



ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED STATES LIFE- 
SAVING SERVICE. 



(In conformity with acts of Congress approved June 18, 18 78, and OTay 4, 18 82.) 

SUMNER I. KIMBALL, General Superintendent, Washington, District of Columbia. 

OLIVER M. MAXAM, Assistant General Superintendent, Washington, District of Co- 
lumbia. 

Captain FRANK H. NEWCOMB, United States Revenue-Cutter Service, Inspector of 
Life-Saving Stations, No. 379 Washington street, New York City. 

DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENTS. 

First district SILAS H. HARDING, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 

Second district GEORGE W. BOWLEY, Provincetown, Massachusetts. 

Third district HERBERT M. KNOWLES, Wakefield, Rhode Island. 

Fourth district ARTHUR DOMINY, Bayshore, New York. . 

Fifth district JOHN G. W. HAVENS, Point Pleasant, New Jersey. 

Sixth district WILLIAM E. TUNNELL, Onancock, Virginia. 

Seventh district PATRICK H. MORGAN, Shawboro, North Carolina. 

Eighth district HIRAM B. SHAW, 205 Main street, Jacksonville, Florida. 

Ninth district WILLIAM A. HUTCHINGS, Galveston, Texas. 

Tenth district EDWIN E. CHAPMAN, Buffalo, New York. 

Eleventh district JEROME G. KIAH, Harbor Beach, Michigan. 

Twelfth district CHARLES MORTON, Grand Haven, Michigan. 

Thirteenth district THOMAS J. BLAKENEY, Room 35, New Appraisers' Stores, 

San Francisco, California. 

ASSISTANT INSPECTORS. 

First district 

Second district , Lieutenant F. J. HAAKE, United States Revenue-Cutter 

Service, Room 148, Post-Office Building, or P. O. Box 
1908, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Third district (Lieutenant SAMUEL P. EDMONDS, United States Reve- 

Fourth district I nue-Cutter Service, Patchogue, New York. 

Fifth district Lieutenant CLAUDE S. COCHRAN, United States Revenue- 
Cutter Service, Red Bank, New Jersey. 

Sixth district Captain HORACE B. WEST, United States Revenue-Cutter 

Service, Onancock, Virginia. 

Seventh district Lieutenant COLIN S. CRAIG, United States Revenue-Cutter 

Service, Elizabeth City, North Carolina. 

wirihtit /7Yiw/>/ (Captain OWEN S. WILLEY, United States Revenue-Cutter 

Ninth district "\ Service > Post-Office and Custom-House Building, 

" " 1 Savannah, Georgia. 

7V/% /fr*nW (Lieutenant SAMUEL B. WINRAM, United States Revenue- 

Ekventh Strict " "\ Cutte . r Service > Room 204 > Post-Office Building, Detroit, 

Twelfth district .Lieutenant JAMES G. BALLINGER, United States Revenue- 
Cutter Service, 500 Federal Building, Chicago, Illinois. 

Thirteenth district Coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California, Captain 

DORRF. TOZIER, United States Revenue-Cutter Service, 
Post-Office Building, Portland, Oregon. 

5 



6 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

ASSISTANT INSPECTORS continued. 

Lieutenant AARON L. GAMBLE, United States Revenue-Cutter Service, on special 

duty, Washington, District of Columbia. 
Lieutenant BENJAMIN M. CHISWELL, United States Revenue-Cutter Service-, on special 

duty, Washington, District of Columbia. 

SUPERINTENDENTS OP CONSTRUCTION LIFE-SAVING STATIONS, ATLANTIC AND LAKE 

COASTS. 

Captain FRANK H. NEWCOMB, United States Revenue-Cutter Service, No. 379 Wash- 
ington street, New York, New York. 

Captain F. G. F. WADSWORTH, United States Revenue-Cutter Service, No. 379 Wash- 
ington street, New York, New York. 

SUPERINTENDENTS OF CONSTRUCTION LIFE-SAVING STATIONS, PACIFIC COAST. 

Captain DORR F. TOZIER, United States Revenue-Cutter Service, Post-Office Build- 
ing, Portland, Oregon. 

Captain F. G. F. WADSWORTH, United States Revenue-Cutter Service, No. 379 
Washington Street, New York, New York. 

BOARD ON LIFE-SAVING APPLIANCES. 

OTTO H. TITTMANN, Superintendent United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, President. 

Lieutenant Colonel DAVID A. LYLE, Ordnance Department, United States Army, 
Augusta Arsenal, Augusta, Georgia. 

Lieutenant AARON L. GAMBLE, United States Revenue-Cutter Service, Washington, 
District of Columbia. 

SILAS H. HARDING, Superintendent First Life-Saving District, Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire. 

JEROME G. KIAH, Superintendent Eleventh Life-Saving District, Harbor Beach, 
Michigan. 

HERBERT M. KNOWLES, Superintendent Third Life-Saving District, Wakefield, Rhode 
Island. 

EDWIN E. CHAPMAN, Superintendent Tenth Life-Saving District, Buffalo, New Ycrk. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF TELEPHONE LINES. 

WILLIAM BOLTON, Delawanna, New Jersey. 







LETTEE OF TRANSMITTAL. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 

Washington, November 27, 1907. 

SIR: As required by section 7 of the act of June 18, 1878, 1 have the 
honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Life- 
Saving Service for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1907, and of the 
expenditures of moneys appropriated for the maintenance of the 
Service for that period. 

Respectfully, SUMNER I. KIMBALL, 

General Superintendent. 
Hon. GEO. B. CORTELYOU, 

Secretary oj the Treasury. 

7 



OPERATIONS 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

1907. 



OPERATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES LIFE- 
SAVING SERVICE, 1907. 

CLASSIFICATION OF DISTRICTS AND STATIONS. 

The number of stations in the Life-Saving Service at the close of 
the year was 278 the same as that given in the report for 1906. 
The classification of stations by district and coast is also identical 
with that for last year, namely: 

ATLANTIC AND GULP COASTS. 

First district (coasts of Maine and New Hampshire) 14 

Second district (coast of Massachusetts) 32 

Third district (coasts of Rhode Island and Fishers Island) 9 

Fourth district (coast of Long Island) 33 

Fifth district (coast of New Jersey) 42 

Sixth district (coast from Cape Henlopen to Cape Charles) 18 

Seventh district (coast from Cape Henry to Cape Fear River) 34 

Eighth district (coasts of South Carolina, Georgia, and eastern Florida). : 10 

Ninth district (Gulf coast) 8 

200 

COASTS OF THE GREAT LAKES." 

Tenth district (Lakes Erie and Ontario, including Louisville station) 12 

Eleventh district (Lakes Huron and Superior) 18 

Twelfth district (Lake Michigan) 31 

61 

PACIFIC COA8T.& 

Thirteenth district.. 17 



SUMMARY. 

Atlantic and Gulf coasts 200 

Coasts of the Great Lakes 61 

Pacific coast... 17 



Total 278 

PERIODS OF EMPLOYMENT OF SURFMEN. 

The following statement shows the periods during which the sta- 
tions were manned .(termed the active season) and the number of 
sirrfmen employed at each station. Keepers are on duty at the 
stations throughout the year. 



a Including 1 station at the Falls of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky. 
b Including 1 station at Nome, Alaska. 



11 



12 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Stations. 



Quoddy Head, Cranberry Islands, White 
Head, Hunniwells Beach, Cape Elizabeth, 
Fletchers Neck, Jerrys Point, Wallis Sands, 
Rye Beach, and Hampton Beach. 

Burnt Island and Damiscove Island 



Periods of employment (all dates inclusive). 



Cross Island and Great Wass Island. 



Salisbury Beach, Newburyport, Plum Island, 
Straitsmouth, Gloucester, Nahant, Point 
Allerton, North Scituate, Fourth Cliff, 
Brant Rock, Gurnet, Manomet Point, Wood 
End, Race Point, Peaked Hill Bars, High 
Head, Highland, Pamet River, Cahoons 
Hollow, Nauset, Orleans, Old Harbor, 
Coskata, Surfside, Maddequet, Muskeget, 
Gay Head, and Cuttyhurik. 

Chatham, Monomoy, and Monomoy Point . . . 



City Point 

Brenton Point, Narragansett Pier, Point 
Judith, Quonochontaug, Watch Hill, 
Sandy Point, New Shoreham, and Block 
Island. 

Fishers Island... 



Ditch Plain, Hither Plain, Napeague, Ama- 
gansett, Georgica, Mecox, Southampton, 
Shinnecock, Tiana, Quogue, Potunk, Mo- 
riches, Forge River, Smiths Point, Bell- 
port, Blue Point, Lone Hill, Point of 
Woods, Oak Island, Gilgo, Jones Beach, 
Zachs Inlet, Short Beach, Point Lookout, 
Long Beach, Rockaway, Rockaway Point, 
Batons Neck, and Rocky Point. 

Fire Island... 



Spermaceti Cove, Seabright, Long Branch, 
Deal, Shark River, Spring Lake, Squan 
Beach, Bayhead, Mantoloking, Chadwick, 
Toms River, Island Beach, Cedar Creek, 
Forked River, Barnegat.Loveladies Island, 
Harvey Cedars, Ship Bottom, Long Beach, 
Bonds, Little Egg, Little Beach, Brigan- 
tine, South Brigantine, Atlantic City, Ab- 
secon, Great Egg, Ocean City, Pecks Beach, 
Corson Inlet, Sea Isle City, Townsend Inlet, 
Avalon, Tathams, Hereford Inlet, Holly 
Beach, Two Mile Beach, Cold Spring, and 
Cape May. 

Monmouth Beach 

Sandy Hook 

Cape Henlopen, Rehoboth Beach, Indian 
River Inlet, Fenwick Island, Isle of Wight, 
Ocean City, North Beach, Green Run Inlet, 
Popes Island, Metomkin Inlet, and Parra- 
more Beach. 

Wallops Beach 



Lewes, Wachapreague, Hog Island, Cobb 
Island, and Smith Island. 

Assateague Beach 

Virginia Beach, Dam Neck Mills, Little 
Island, False Cape, Wash Woods, Penneys 
Hill, Currituck Beach, Poyners Hill, Caf- 
feys Inlet, Paul Gamiels Hill, Kitty Hawk, 
Kill Devil Hills, Nags Head, Bodie Island, 
Oregon Inlet, Pea Island, Chicamacomico, 
Gull Shoal, Little Kinnakeet, Big Kinna- 
keet, Durants, Ocracoke, Portsmouth, 
Core Bank, Fort Macon, and Bogue Inlet. 

New Inlet and Hatteras Inlet 

Oak Island... 



Cape Henry, Cape Hatteras, Creeds Hill, 
Cape Lookout, and Cape Fear. 



6 surfmen froin Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 
1907. 

6 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and '2 
additional surfmen from Nov. 1, 1906, t Mar. 31, 
1907. 

7 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 
1907. 

6 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, tp Mar. 31, 
1907. 



7 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 
1907. 

9 surfmen from July 1 to Nov. 15, 1906, and from 
May 1 to June 30, 1907. 

6 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 
1907. 

7 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 
1907. 

6 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 
1907. 



6 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 

additional surfman from Aug. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 

1907. 
6 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 

additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 

1907. 



7 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907. 

8 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907. 

6 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 
1907. 



6 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, to May 31, 
1907. 

7 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907. 

8 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907. 

6 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 
1907. 



7 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907. 

7 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Nov. 1, 1906, to Mar. 31, 
1907. 

8 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



13 



10 



19 



13 



Stations. 



Sullivans Island 

Santa Rosa, Sabine Pass, Galveston, Velasco, 
Saluria, Aransas, and Brazos. 

San Luis 

Big Sandy and Niagara 



Oswego and Charlotte 

Ashtabula and Marblehead . 



Buffalo, Erie, Fairport, and Cleveland . 
Louisville 



Lake View Beach . 



Harbor Beach, Pointe aux Barques, Port 
Austin, Tawas, Sturgeon Point, Thunder 
Bay Island, Middle Island, and Hammond. 

Bois Blanc 



Vermilion, Crisps, Two Heart River, and 

Deer Park. 
Grand Marais... 



Marquette. 
Portage... 
Duluth... 



North Manitou Island. 



Charlevoix, South Manitou Island, Sleeping 
Bear Point, Point Betsie, Frankfort, Man- 
istee, Grande Pointe au Sable, Ludington, 
Pentwater, White River, Muskegon, Hol- 
land, South Haven, Saint Joseph, Michigan 
City, Evanston, Kenosha, Racine, Two 
Rivers, Kewaunee, Sturgeon Bay Canal, 
Baileys Harbor, and Plum Island. 

Grand Haven, South Chicago, Jackson Park, 
Old Chicago, Milwaukee, and Sheboygan. 

Nome, Ilwaco Beach, Yaquina Bay, Coquille 
River, and Point Reyes. 

Grays Harbor, Willapa Bay, Umpqua River, 
Coos Bay, Humboldt Bay, Arena Cove, 
Point Bonita, Fort Point, and Southside. 

Cape Disappointment 



Point Adams . 



Golden Gate. 



Periods of employment (all dates inclusive). 



6 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907. 

6 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907. 

7 surfmen from Aug. 1, 1906, to May 31, 1907. 

7 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 10, 1906, and from Apr. 
10 to June 30, 1907. 

8 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 10, 1906, and from Apr. 
10 to June 30, 1907. 

7 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 15, 1906, and from Apr. 

10 to June 30, 1907. 

8 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 15, 1906, and from Apr. 

10 to June 30, 1907. 

6 surfmen from July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from Apr. 10 to June 30, 1907. 

7 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 12, 1906, and from Apr. 
10 to June 30, 1907. 

8 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 12, 1906, and from Apr. 

10 to June 30, 1907. 

8 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 12, 1906, and from Apr. 
12 to June 30, 1907. 

7 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 15, 1906, and from Apr. 
26 to June 30, 1907. 

8 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 15, 1906, and from Apr. 
26 to June 30, 1907. 

8 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 11, 1906, and^rom Apr. 

28 to June 30, 1907. 
8 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 10, 1906, and from Apr. 

26 to June 30, 1907. 

8 surfmen from July 1 to Dec. 18, 1906, and from Apr. 

27 to June 30, 1907. 

7 surfmen from July 1 to Nov. 30, 1906, and from 

Apr. 2 to June 30, 1907. 

7 iurfmen from July 1 to Nov. 30, 1906, and from 
Apr. 1 to June 30, 1907. 



8 surfmen from July 1 to Nov. 30, 1906, and from 
Apr. 1 to June 30, 1907. 

7 surfmen from July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907. 

8 surfmen from July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907. 



8 surfmen from July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from July 1 to Aug. 25, 1906, 
and from May 1 to June 30, 1907. 

8 surfmen from July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907, and 1 
additional surfman from July 1 to Aug. 25, 1906, 
and from Apr. 20 to June 30, 1907. 

9 surfmen from July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907. 



o Nine of the 10 stations in the Eighth district are maintained only as houses of refuge for the succor 
of the shipwrecked, no crews being employed. 



STATISTICAL STATEMENT. 

During the year 347 documented vessels were involved in disaster 
within the field of operations of the Service. There were on board 
these vessels 3,936 persons, 22 of whom were lost. The estimated 
value of the vessels was $6,478,220, and that of their cargoes $1,824,- 
045, making the total value of imperiled property $8,302,265. The 
estimated value of the property saved was $6,916,400, and of property 
lost $1,385,865. The number "of vessels totally lost was 55. In addi- 
tion to the foregoing there occurred 491 casualties to undocumented 
vessels those under 5 tons' burden, such as sailboats, small launches, 
rowboats, etc. involving 1,176 persons, of whom 23 were lost. The 



14 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



estimated value of the property involved in these disasters was $530,- 
320, of which $516,585 was saved and $13,735 lost. Distressed per- 
sons to the number of 807 were given succor at the stations, a total of 
1,140 days 7 relief being furnished. 

The preceding statement (including both documented and undocu- 
mented vessels) is summarized as follows : 



Total number of disasters 

Vessels totally lost 

Number of persons involved 

Number of persons lost 

Number of persons succored at stations. 
Number of days' succor afforded . 



838 

55 

5, 112 

45 

a 807 

1, 140 

Total value of vessels $7, 002, 000 

Total value of cargoes $1, 830, 585 

Total value of property involved $8, 832, 585 

Total value of property saved & $7, 432, 985 

Total value of property lost $1, 399, 600 

The foregoing figures do not include 111 persons rescued from various 
perilous situations having no connection with vessels. (See p. 16.) 

The apportionment of Service operations to the Atlantic and Gulf, 
Lake, and Pacific coasts, respectively, is shown by districts in the 
following tables: 

ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS. 





First, 
district. 


Second 
district. 


Third 
district. 


Fourth 
district. 


Fifth 
district. 


Number of disasters 


68 


169 


23 


52 


55 


Number of vessels totally lost 


8 


12 




2 


5 


Number of persons involved 


262 


847 


124 


232 


361 


Number of persons lost 


None. 


3 


3 


1 


11 


Number of persons succored at stations 
Number of days' succor afforded 
Value of vessels 


56 
101 
$229, 120 


95 
120 
$913, 665 


22 
46 
$375. 655 


38 
38 

$445, 525 


54 
81 

$747 415 


Value of cargoes 


$93,060 


$238,215 


$32, 400 


$181,850 


$615, 635 


Total value of property involved 


$322, 180 


$1,151,880 


$408, 055 


$627, 375 


$1 363 050 


Value of property saved 


$265,290 


$982, 600 


$312, 750 


$589,960 


$1,227,650 


Value of property lost 


$56,890 


$169, 280 


$95, 305 


$37, 415 


$135, 400 














- 


Sixth 
district. 


Seventh 
district. 


Eighth 
district. 


Ninth 
district. 


Total. 


Number of disasters 


28 


53 


6 


17 


471 


Number of vessels totally lost 


3 


5 


None. 


None. 


38 


Number of persons involved 


107 


321 


16 


41 


2 311 


Number of persons lost 


None. 


None. 


None. 


None. 


18 


Number of persons succored at stations 


71 


59 


12 


3 


410 


Number of days' succor afforded 


110 


171 


17 


3 


687 


Value of vessels 


$63,650 


$586,250 


$18,820 


$11,205 


$3, 391, 305 


Value of cargoes 


$15,905 


$191, 785 


$800 


$425 


$1 370 075 


Total value of property involved 


$79,555 


$778, 035 


$19, 620 


$11,630 


$4, 761, 380 


Value of property saved 


$59,285 


$567, 325 


$19, 610 


$11,520 


$4, 035, 990 


Value of property lost 


$20, 270 


$210, 710 


$10 


$110 


$725 390 















These figures also include persons to whom succor was given who were not on board vessels embraced 
in table of casualties. 

& It should not be understood that the entire amount represented by these figures was saved by the 
Service. A considerable portion was saved by salvage companies, wrecking tugs, and other instru- 
mentalities, often working in conjunction with the surfmen. It is manifestly impossible to apportion 
the relative results accomplished.. It is equally impossible to give even an approximate estimate of 
the number of lives saved by the station crews. It would be preposterous to assume that all those on 
board vessels suffering disaster who escaped would have been lost but for the aid of the life-savers; yet 
the number of persons taken ashore by the lifeboats and other appliances by no means indicates the 
sum total saved by the Service. In many instances where vessels are released from stranding or other 
perilous predicaments by the life-saving crews, both the vessels and those on board are saved, although 

are undoubtedly saved by the warning signals of the patrolmen, while in numerous cases, either where 
vessels suffer actual disaster or where they are only warned from danger, no loss of life would have 
ensued if no aid had been rendered. The number of disasters, the property involved, the amounts saved 
and lost, the number of persons on board, and the number lost are known, and these facts are all that 
can be expressed statistically with reasonable accuracy. The narratives which follow under the caption 
"Loss of life" and the brief statements under the captions "Services of crews" and "Vessels warned 
from danger "convey as adequate an idea of what the life-saving crews actually do in each instance as 
space will allow. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



15 



LAKE COASTS.a 





Tenth 
district. 


Eleventh 
district. 


Twelfth 
district. 


Total. 


Number of disasters 


89 


Ill 


122 


322 


Number of vessels totally lost 


3 


3 


4 


10 


Number of persons involved 


621 


391 


1 103 


2 115 


Number of persons lost 


2 


3 


15 


20 


Number of persons succored at stations 


37 


74 


149 


260 


Number of days' succor afforded 


45 


90 


149 


284 


Value of vessels ' . . ' 


$688.225 


$822 880 


$1 233 420 


|2 744 525 


Value of cargoes 


$64 190 


$129 025 


$140 420 


$333 635 


Total value of property involved 


$752, 415 


$951.905 


$1,373 840 


$3 078 160 


Value of property saved 


$630,900 


$872 650 


$1 263 400 


$2 766 950 


Value of property lost 


$121 515 


$79 255 


$110 440 


$311 210 













Including the river station at Louisville, Kentucky, (Tenth district). 
PACIFIC COAST. 





Thirteenth 
district. 


Number of disasters 


45 


Number of vessels totally lost 


7 


Number of persons involved 


686 


Number of persons lost 


7 


Number of persons succored at stations 


137 


Number of days' succor afforded ^ 


169 


Value of vessels 


$866 170 


Value cf cargoes 


$126 875 


Total value of property involved 


s ( )<n 04") 


Value of property saved 


*(\'W 04") 


Value of property lost 


$363'000 







GENERAL SUMMARY FOR THE YEAR. 





Atlantic 
and Gulf 
coasts. 


Lake 

coasts. 


Pacific 
coast. 


Total. 


Number of disasters 


471 


322 


45 


838 


Number of vessels totally lost 


38 


10 


7 


55 


Number of persons invofved 


2.311 


2,115 


686 


5 112 


Number of persons lost 


18 


20 


7 


45 


Number of persons succored at stations 


410 


260 


137 


807 


Number of days' succor afforded 


687 


284 


169 


1 140 


Value of vessels 


$3 391 305 


$2 744 525 


$866 170 


$7 002 000 


Value of cargoes 


$1,370,075 


$333 635 


Si -(') X7"> 


$1 830 585 


Total value of propertv involved 


$4 761 380 


$3 078 160 


*')<'{ 04") 


$8 832 585 


Value of property sa"ved 


$4 035 990 


|2 766 950 


Si ''{() ().}- 


$7 432 985 


Value of property lost . . 


$725 390 


$311 210 


^W-5 000 


$1 399 600 













o Including the river station at Louisville, Kentucky. 
VESSELS ASSISTED. 

There were 611 vessels, valued with their cargoes at $5,661,235, 
saved under circumstances that would have involved serious 
or total loss but for the assistance given by the life-saving crews. 
In 449 of these instances, in which the property imperiled was 
valued at $1,270,995, the station crews saved property to the 
value of $1,238,935 unassisted, except by the crews of the endangered 
vessels. In the 162 instances remaining, in which the property 
involved was valued at $4,390,240, the life-saving crews worked in 
conjunction with the crews of wrecking vessels, tugs, etc., and the 
value of the property saved was $4,053,230. The station crews also 
afforded assistance of more or less importance to 714 other vessels, 
making a total of 1,325 to which aid was extended. Two hundred 
and four vessels were warned by the signals of the watchmen 
, 2990908 2 



16 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 

and patrolmen of the Service in season to escape disaster. In 182 of 
these instances the warnings were given at night; in 22, during the 
day in thick weather. Of the vessels so warned, 96 were steamers. 



MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES. 

The life-saving crews are frequently called upon to perform services 
in the neighborhood of their stations which are not related to their 
regular duties as salvors of life and property from shipwreck. There 
were rescued during the year: 33 persons who had fallen from docks, 
vessels, etc. ; 22 bathers; 1 insane person ; 2 would-be suicides; 3 per- 
sons endangered in the surf; 2 who had broken through the ice; 1 
from a sewer; 1 from a breakwater; 1, lost in a blizzard; and 45 from 
flood (at Louisville, Kentucky). 

In addition to the above rescues 1 person (a woman) was saved 
from attempted assault; and 10 persons who were ill or had sustained 
more or less serious injury were treated and cared for. Of the num- 
ber last mentioned, 1 had broken a leg and 4 were suffering from gun- 
shot wounds. Seventeen persons in urgent need of medical or surgical 
attention were conveyed to places where such attention could be 
secured. There were recovered from the water the bodies of 86 
drowned persons, and the bodies of 13 persons who had come to their 
death* from various causes were picked up on the beaches and elsewhere 
in the vicinity of the stations. The crews rendered effective service at 
31 neighborhood fires, helped 3 automobiles out of serious difficulty, 
rescued several horse teams from dangerous situations, recovered 14 
fish nets, and on one occasion saved 100,000 feet of saw logs. In one 
instance they helped to take from a burning building 65 horses and 
110 vehicles. 

Besides the foregoing, the year's record shows numerous other 
instances of service, which are too diversified in character for classifi- 
cation, but which, nevertheless, indicate the extended field of humani- 
tarian endeavor that the Life-Saving Establishment has come to 
embrace. (See Services of Crews miscellaneous, p. 170.) 

BOATS AND APPARATUS USED. 

The surfboat was used 997 times, making 1,318 trips; the self- 
righting and self-bailing lifeboat 57 times, mating 75 trips; the power 
lifeboats 132 times, making 157 trips; the power launches 84 times, 
making 87 trips; the smaller boats 776 times, making 898 trips; the 
river life skiffs at the Louisville (Kentucky) station 84 times, making 
92 trips; the breeches buoy 12 times, making 212 trips; the wreck 
gun 17 times, firing 37 shots; the heaving stick 15 times. There were 
landed by the surfboats 1,147 persons, by the lifeboats 89, by the 
power boats 145, by the power launches 176, by the river life skiffs 83, 
by other station boats 518, and by the breeches buoy 198 persons. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 17 

GENERAL SUMMARY 

Of operations since the introduction of the present- life-saving system, lfyi~1907. a 

Total number of disasters 17, 317 

Total number of persons involved , & 121, 627 

Total number of lives lost c 1, 172 

Total number of persons succored at stations d 20, 548 

Total number of days' succor afforded 48, 695 

Total value of vessels $178, 507, 865 

Total value of cargoes $73, 008, 419 

Total value of property involved $251, 516, 284 

Total value of property saved $199, 457, 597 

Total value of property lost $52,058, 687 

NEW STATIONS. 

Contract was made in October, 1906, and June, 1907, respec- 
tively for the building of two new stations one at Bethany Beach, 
Delaware, and the other at Garibaldi, Oregon (at the entrance to 
Tillamook Bay). The station has been completed at the first- 
named place, and that authorized to be established at Garibaldi is 
now under construction. 

STATION SITES. 

Title to a site for a new station, to be located at Neah Bay, Wash- 
ington, as mentioned in last year's report, having been secured, 
advertisement for proposals for the construction of the station was 
issued. The proposals received, however, considerably exceeded the 
limit of expenditure allowed by the act authorizing the establish- 
ment of the station. The plans were therefore modified, and a sec- 
ond advertisement brought a reasonable proposal, which was ac- 
cepted. Contract for the work has been entered into since the close 
of the year. This station was authorized by act of April 19, 1906, 
for seijvice in conjunction with a first-class ocean-going tug (to be 
built and operated by the Revenue-Cutter Service) in saving life and 
property along the North Pacific coast. The necessity for such pro- 
tection was emphasized by the wreck of the steamship Valencia, with 
appalling loss of life, near Cape Beale, coast of British Columbia, 
January 22, 1906. 

The act of March 3, 1903, authorized the establishment of a sta- 
tion at the mouth of Black River, at or near the city of Lorain, 
Ohio. The city undertook to donate a suitable site, but difficulties 
intervened which, until last year, prevented the acquisition of title. 
In the meantime plans and specifications for the buildings were pre- 
pared, leaving their adaptation to the site which should be finally 
determined upon to be made after it was secured. The construction 
of the station is now about to be undertaken. 

a It should be observed that the operations of the Service during this period have been limited as 
follows: Season of 1871-72, to the coasts of Long Island and New Jersey; seasons of 1872-74, to the coasts 
of Cape Cod, Long Island, and New Jersey; season of 1874-75, to the coasts of New England, Long Island, 
New Jersey, and the coast from Cape Henry to Cape Hatteras; season of 1875-76, to the coasts of New 
England, Long Island, New Jersey, the coast from Cape Henlopen to Cape Charles, and the coast from 
Cape Henry to Cape Hatteras; season of 1876-77 and since, all the foregoing with the addition of the 
eastern coast of Florida and portions of the lake coasts. In 1877-78 the Pacific coast was added, and 
in 1880 the coast of Texas. 

<> Including persons rescued not on board vessels. 

c Eighty-five, of these were lost at the disaster to the steamer Metropolis in 1877-78, when service was 
impeded by distance, and 14 others in the same year owing to similar causes. 

d Including castaways not on board vessels embraced in Tables of Casualties. 



18 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

Titles to sites for stations at Fishermans Island and Myrtle Island, 
Virginia, referred to in last year's report, have not yet been secured. 

Three sites for new stations were selected during the year at the 
following points : Isles of Shoals, New Hampshire ; Green Hill (South 
Kingston), Rhode Island, and Cold Spring Inlet, New Jersey. Titles 
to these sites have not yet been obtained, except at the last-men- 
tioned place. The acquisition of the site at Cold Spring Inlet was 
provided for in the river and harbor act of March 2, 1907, which 
required, among other things, that the land necessary for the estab- 
lishment of a station there should be deeded to the Government free 
of cost before any of the funds appropriated thereby for the im- 
provement of the inlet could be expended. This condition has been 
complied with. The site chosen just inside the harbor will form 
an admirable base from which to operate a large self-righting and 
self-bailing power lifeboat, which it is proposed to place there. When 
the station shall have been fully equipped and an auxiliary boat- 
house for the storage of a surfboat placed near the beach a mile or 
more above the inlet (upon land which has been given for the pur- 

SDse by the Cape May Real Estate Company), the old Two Mile 
each life-saying station, built many years ago, can probably be 
abandoned without detriment to the Service. 

In 1887 a station was built at Jerrys Point, at the entrance to 
Portsmouth Harbor, New Hampshire, upon a Government reserva- 
tion under the control of the War Department. After the site had 
been occupied by the Service for more than a quarter of a century, by 
courtesy of that Department, it was last year required for military 
purposes, and a site was therefore selected on Wood Island, Maine, 
on the opposite side of the harbor, permission to occupy the same 
having been given by the Light-House Establishment. A new sta- 
tion is now in process of construction on this site. In the meantime 
station operations have been conducted from rented buildings. 

Since a new harbor, which is largely used by yachts and other 
small craft, has been opened at the southern end of Jackson* Park, 
Chicago, the liability of loss of life and property from marine dis- 
aster has naturally increased in that vicinity. The accidents that 
most frequently occur there the capsizing of small boats are of a 
kind that demand the speediest possible relief; hence the station 
some distance above, erected in 1893 upon the grounds of the Colum- 
bian Exposition, and since occupied by a life-saving crew, is no 
longer a favorable base for life-saving operations. Recognizing this 
fact, the city of Chicago has given the Service a site in an excellent 
location at the entrance to the new harbor, and contract was let 
during the year for the building of a station adapted to the new 
situation. This station is now under construction. 

The devastating hurricane which swept the Gulf coast September 
27, 1906,. entirely destroyed the Santa Rosa life-saving station situ- 
ated on the island of the same name lying off Pensacola, Florida, 
carrying away all the station equipment except a surfboat. In this 
boat the life-saving crew providentially made their escape from the 
inundated island, taking with them such residents of the place as 
they could reach, including 9 women and children. As soon as 
practicable the crew returned to the island and out of pickings from 
the scattered debris of the station constructed a rude shelter. They 
also found and repaired some of the damaged boats and recovered 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 19 

the wreck gun, with which apparatus, and some additional appliances 
afterwards sent them, they have since creditably continued the work 
of the Service. The destroyed station stood upon elevated ground, 
but the storm leveled the site almost to the sea and rendered it useless 
for further occupancy. An available location for rebuilding has been 
selected some distance westward of the old site, near Fort Pickens, 
and, the War Department having given permission to occupy the 
ground, contract has been awarded for the construction of new 
buildings. 

POWER LIFEBOATS. 

At the end of the year there were 17 self-righting and self -bailing 
lifeboats, equipped with power, in use at the stations, several having 
been added to the number mentioned in last year's report. Contract 
has been entered into for the installation of similar equipment in 16 
other boats of the type named. Numerous reports from officers of 
the Service in the field have been received commending these boats 
in enthusiastic terms. Their performances on the several occasions 
when they have been employed during the year have fully justified 
every expectation. In fact, in two or three instances they have 
accomplished rescues under circumstances which would have pre- 
vented success by any other means. 

During the year plans and specifications were prepared for a self- 
righting and self-bailing power lifeboat to be 36 feet in length 2 feet 
longer than any boat now in the Service and equipped with a 
40-horsepower gasoline motor. This boat is now being built. 

AWARDS OF LIFE-SAVING MEDALS. 

It is found impracticable to publish in this report, as has been done 
heretofore under the above caption, narrative accounts of the services 
for which medals were awarded during the fiscal year. Appended 
to the medal-of-honor roll, however, (which see p. 315), are the 
names and addresses of all persons who received medals within the 
period mentioned. There is also shown in each instance the date 
of the award and its character and the nature of the service rendered. 

t 

FLOOD AT LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY, JANUARY 20-30, 1907. 

The Service crew located at Louisville, Kentucky, to afford protection 
to life and property at the Falls of the Ohio River, has made a notable 
record since the station was established in the year 1882, having been 
instrumental in saving hundreds of persons in danger of becoming 
involved in the treacherous river rapids, as well as much property 
from the same peril. The life-saving crew has also several times 
been able to serve the citizens of Louisville in a manner which, 
though well within the line of its duties, nevertheless falls beyond 
the purpose for which life-saving stations are primarily maintained 
namely, upon those occasions when the Ohio Kiver has overflown its 
bounds and deluged the city. 

In January, 1907, following an unusually protracted rainfall, 
Louisville suffered from one of these occasional flood visitations 
with a resulting large property loss. During the period of the inunda- 
tion January 20-30 many lives were also endangered. That no 



20 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

drowning fatalities are recorded was largely due to the vigilance and 
tireless efforts of William M. Devan, in charge of the Louisville 
station, and his crew. The official report of Captain Devan shows 
that he and his men, working in the Service boats, transported to 
and from river craft, inundated buildings, etc., 429 persons (45 of 
which number were actually rescued from situations of peril), besides 
distributing to upward of 2,500 flood sufferers food and fuel furnished 
by the city authorities and donated by private citizens. In the 
prosecution of their relief work they also furnished transportation to 
physicians who were engaged in ministering to the sick and distressed, 
and with their boats performed ambulance duty for the city hospitals, 
whose usual means of conveyance were unable to traverse the flooded 
district. 

The crew rendered equally distinguished service in saving property, 
giving invaluable assistance to owners of vessels whose craft were 
imperiled along the river front. They also did much to keep the 
public utilities in operation, helping to repair the local telegraph and 
telephone lines and to distribute and collect the city's mail, in the 
performance of which last-named service they transported the carriers 
on their rounds. 

Under "Letters of acknowledgment," this volume (see dates 
February 1 to 20), may be found communications from the mayor of 
Louisville, the heads of the several departments of the municipal 
government, and from the representatives of a number of private 
corporations, reflecting the gratitude of the community for the 
work of Keeper Devan and his men. 

LIFE-SAVING EXHIBIT AT THE JAMESTOWN TER-CENTENNIAL EXPO- 
SITION. 

Under the provisions of section 10 of the act of Congress approved 
June 30, 1906, a model life-saving station building was erected upon 
the grounds of the Jamestown Ter-Centennial Exposition, held at 
Norfolk, Virginia, April 26 to November 30, 1907. 

The building was equipped with the. latest appliances and boats 
used by the Service, and was manned by a mixed crew of fresh-water 
and salt-water surfmen veteran members of life-saving crews on 
the Great Lakes and southern Atlantic coast with Captain Henry 
Cleary, keeper of the Marquette (Michigan) station in charge. The 
station, a commodious structure of modified Spanish renaissance 
design, was situated on Bush Creek, a small inlet of Willoughby Bay, 
off Hampton Roads. The creek, after some dredging, afforded an 
admirable place for giving the Service drills and other maneuvers 
illustrative of the operations of the Life-Saving Establishment, the 
site being also advantageously situated with regard to its accessi- 
bility for sight-seers. The drills mentioned were given daily at 2.30 
p. m. from June 8 to the close of the exposition, and, judging by the 
crowds in attendance, the performances furnished one of the leading 
attractions of the fair. 

In his report to the Department, following the closing of the expo- 
sition, Captain Cleary states that the breeches-buoy apparatus drill 
was given 146 times; the rescue from drowning drill 130 times; and 
the capsize drill (in which the self-righting and self-bailing lifeboat 
and the Beebe-McLellan self-bailing surfboat with water ballast and 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 21 

centerboard were used) 562 times; 413 drills having been given with 
the first-named boat and 149 with the latter. The quickest time 
made in capsizing and righting the surf boat, according to the report, 
was fourteen seconds, the time being taken from the command "go," 
with the crew sitting in their places in the boat, to the moment they 
were again in the same position after the boat had gone over. It is 
recalled in this connection that the best time ever made by a life- 
saving crew in going through this maneuver was at the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition at St. Louis, the record being thirteen seconds. 
On that occasion, also, Captain Cleary directed the drill. 

For a generation these drills have been a prominent feature of the 
great expositions held in this country. As they are practically the 
identical maneuvers that the crews of all life-saving stations are 
required to execute at frequent intervals to keep them up to the 
standard of expertness requisite to efficient performance on occa- 
sions of shipwreck, they may be said to afford the general public a 
fairly accurate idea of the serious work of the Service on our sea and 
lake coasts. 

LIFE-SAVING CREWS HONORED BY A FOREIGN GOVERNMENT. 

During the year the King of the Belgians officially recognized the 
services of the crews of the Little Island and Virginia Beach (Seventh 
district) life-saving stations in rescuing 19 men, composing the crew 
of the Belgian steamer Antigoon, of Antwerp, that vessel having 
stranded 2 miles SSE. of the first-named station in the early morning 
of December 15, 1905, during a heavy snowstorm. The recognition, 
which took the form of diplomas, medals, and money, was bestowed 
by royal decree dated May 6, 1907, "as a reward for the exceptional 
courage and devotion displayed by the life-saving crews mentioned." 
Following are the names of the persons so honored, with the character 
of the award in each instance: 

OJ the Little Island station, To Keeper Edgar Chadwick, a diploma 
and civic cross of the first class; and to Surfmen Albert L. Barco, 
John R. O'Neal, Walter N. Capps, Osie Rodgers, Leonard T. Garrison, 
Bennett Malbone, and Leonard E. Eaton, each a diploma and civic 
cross of the second class and 50 francs. 

OJ the False Cape station. To Keeper William O'Neal, a diploma 
and civic cross of the second class; and to Surfmen Thomas H. Delon, 
Harry W. Cason, William J. Stevens, Walter J. Williams, Clayton 
Ewell, Henry N. Holmes and Charles H. Wroton, each a diploma 
and civic medal of the first class and 25 francs. 

A brief account of the services in question is contained in the 
Service report for last year (p. 115). It may be stated here, however, 
that the imperiled men were taken from the stranded steamer by 
means of the breeches-buoy, and that the operation was rendered 
extremely difficult and hazardous by the rapidly rising tide, which 
flooded the beach and apparatus, and the heavy rolling of the vessel 
in the breakers, which required a continual run of tackle work to 
keep clear of the sea the hawser that carried the breeches buoy 
across the 350 yards between ship and shore. Several hours were 
consumed in effecting the rescue. 



22 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

BELIEF FOR LIFE-SAVING CREWS. 

For the last several years appeals have been made through the 
pages of the annual reports for legislation that will enable the Service 
to keep its stations fully manned by competent surfmen. As has 
been previously set forth, the unexampled prosperity of the country 
during the last decade has afforded members 01 the Service crews a 
chance to make better wages in private and less hazardous pursuits, 
which opportunity they have availed themselves of in large numbers. 
Consequently it has been necessary to let 'down the bars, so to speak, 
and take on for temporary employment men who are in too many 
instances unsuited to the Service in both professional qualifications 
and morals, and there has resulted a situation fraught with alarming 
possibilities of disaster to the Life-Saving Establishment. 

An increase in the pay of the life-savers would doubtless improve 
conditions for a time, but, it is feared, would not afford permanent 
relief, owing to the fact that the Service cannot readily adjust itself 
in the matter of wages to the law of supply and demand, as is done 
by the private employer, whose salary list is not regulated by statute. 

Experience has shown that changing a Government pay roll, par- 
ticularly if increases are proposed, is a time-consuming process, in- 
volving much argument and explanation. Meanwhile the condition 
sought to be remedied may have assumed a phase which the advance 
in wages contended for would fail to relieve. The pay of life-saving 
crews, it may be stated in this connection, has actually been changed 
several times in the efforts of Congress to adjust the compensation 
of the surfmen to altered conditions in the industrial world. Such 
legislation has never given satisfactory results, however, or proved 
of lasting benefit to the Service. 

The proposition to increase the pay of the crews would fail of its 
purpose for still another reason. It would leave the incapacitated 
surfman no better off than he is at present. What the rank and file 
want, and what they certainly are entitled to, is some provision 
for disability consequent upon duty in the Service. There is no gain- 
saying the fact that this is the kernel of the situation. Any measure 
that does not embody a pension or a retirement feature will be of 
no more than passing helpfulness to either the Service or its crews. 
The majority of these men enter the vocation of life-saving at the 
most vigorous period of their lives. They know that if they continue 
in the Service and its efficiency depends upon their retention they 
will sooner or later incur disability and be compelled to stand aside. 
Their incapacity may be the result of injury sustained in the perform- 
ance of wreck duty, such as broken bones, sprains, hernia, etc., or it 
may be due to heart trouble, rheumatism, tuberculosis, or a compli- 
cation of these afflictions or several of a dozen other diseases trace- 
able to overstrain or exposure. Every consideration of humanity 
demands that when these men are no longer able to do their work or 
provide for themselves and their families, the Government, which 
they have faithfully served in a dangerous calling, shall help them 
carry to the end the burden of a livelihood. 

Of the several propositions that have been suggested in the way 
of a remedy for existing conditions, retirement pay has been advo- 
cated as the one that will best conserve the interests of the Govern- 
ment in the matter of economy and secure to the surfmen adequate 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 23 

recognition of their rights in the premises. This solution of the 
difficulty is not regarded with entire favor, however, by many who 
think they see in such legislation the entering wedge to a civil-pension 
list. Yet most of those who have stated objections to giving the 
life-savers retirement pay realize that the Service is in sore straits 
and manifest a willingness to do something to bring about a change 
for the better. 

All friends of the Service are at least agreed that remedial action 
by Congress is urgently needed. While those best acquainted with 
the situation are disposed strongly toward retirement, any legislation 
will be welcomed that promises again to place the Service upon an 
efficient footing, and coincidently to do justice to the men who 
have sacrificed health and probably opportunity to the cause of 
humanity, as well as provide for the future welfare of those who now 
bear the brunt of the Service work. 

REMARKABLE CASE OF RESUSCITATION. 

One of several notable cases of resuscitation of the apparently 
drowned in the history of the Service was the restoration or Robert 
Mooney, a blacksmith of Wakefield, Rhode Island, on July 4, 1906. 
Surfman George W. Streeter, and other employees of the Service on 
the Rhode Island coast, performed the resuscitative work under the 
direction of Capt: Herbert M. Knowles, superintendent of the Third 
life-saving district. The period during which the patient was under 
water, the time that intervened before efforts were begun to revive 
him, and the duration of these efforts, where so considerable that it is 
deemed proper to give the particulars of the incident a conspicuous 
place in the text of this report with the view of encouraging protracted 
resuscitative endeavor in similar cases. 

The work of the life-saving crews in restoring the apparently 
drowned under seemingly hopeless conditions has been attended by 
such a degree of success as to justify the assertion that many lives lost 
in drowning accidents are needlessly sacrificed because restorative 
measures are not resorted to at all or are not sufficiently prolonged. 
It is the generally accepted belief that after a body has been under 
water more than six or eight minutes it is too late to do anything 
toward bringing the patient to. Again, it is too often the case that 
those who undertake to resuscitate the apparently drowned become 
discouraged and cease their efforts if no evidence of returning anima- 
tion is noticed after a few minutes' work. The rules for the practice 
of resuscitation according to the method used by the Service (for 
which see p. 307, this report) advise that the attempt to restore life 
be continued as long as four hours, if necessary. In the case of Robert 
Mooney, which follows, it was only after the apparently lifeless body 
had been subjected to vigorous manipulation for an hour and twenty 
minutes that the first sign of life was observed. 

On the afternoon of July 4, 1906, Mooney and two other persons, 
Elisha M. Taylor and James Houghney, were capsized in a flat-bottom 
skiff under sail, off White Hill, upper Point Judith Pond, Rhode Island, 
during the progress of a boat race on the lower pond of the same name 
held under the auspices of the Wakefield Yacnt Club. As the boat 
went over, the swinging boom struck Mooney on the head, rendering 
him unconscious, in which condition he was caught and held under the 



24 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 

prostrate sail. Although neither Taylor nor Houghney could swim, 
they managed to get back to their skiff, but it was some time before 
either became aware of Mooney's predicament, judging from their 
actions, as they were seen after the accident crouching upon the boat's 
side. It appears that Taylor at length began to have some concern for 
their missing companion, and finally undertook to work Mooney out 
from under the sail, in which effort he succeeded. Owing to Mooney 's 
helpless condition, and to the roughness of the water Taylor was 
unable to place him on the boat put of reach of the waves. The best 
he could do was to hold on to his collar with one hand while he sup- 
ported himself by clinging to the boat with the other. Taylor states 
that Mooney had stopped breathing when he extricated him from the 
sail, and that while he held him alongside the boat Mooney's face was 
almost continuously under water. 

Fortunately for Mooney some of the surfmen of the Service were in 
attendance at the boat race, as was also Captain Knowles, whose 
report in the case recites the circumstances of the resuscitation 
practically as here set forth. 

Surfman Streeter sighted the capsized skiff several minutes after 
the accident, at which time he and a man named Thornton were out 
on the pond in a 12-foot sailboat a third of a mile away. In his ac- 
count of his movements Streeter says : 

We sailed around for some little time after seeing the capsize,, when Thornton, after 
seeing the people clinging to the skiff, which was barely awash, suggested that we had 
better run up there, which we did. Before reaching them we took in our sail and 
came along to leeward of them under oars. Taylor was holding Mooney by the collar 
with one hand and supporting himself with his right hand on the boat. About this 
time a small sailboat shot in to leeward of us and picked up Houghney. o We took 
Taylor in the bow of our boat, and I hauled Mooney partly over the stern, face down- 
ward with his legs dragging in the water, and worked the boat to the shore, which was 
between 200 and 300 feet eastward of us. The boat being much overloaded, we had 
to go carefully. I can not give the exact time Mooney was under water, but should 
judge twenty minutes or more must have elapsed from the time we saw the boat cap- 
size until we reached him and got him into our boat. His flesh was so discolored and 
his limbs were so stiff that all who saw him considered his case hopeless. . It was the 
combined efforts of those knowing the method that at last got him to breathing. 

Streeter, assisted by several fellow life-savers, immediately set to 
work to resuscitate Mooney on reaching the beach. The district super- 
intendent, who directed the operation, states that the man was as 
purple as a grape, and that the muscles of his arms were so stiff that 
it required a man at each member, using both hands/ to work them 
while artificial respiration was being practiced. His ja\vs also were 
so firmly clenched that his mouth had to be pried open and kept so 
by a piece of wood inserted between the teeth. Nearly a gallon of 
water was expelled from the patient when first placed upon his 
stomach, and about a pint the second time, accompanied by more 
or less blood. From one-half to three-fourths of a cupful of mucus, 
blood, and water came up when he was turned face downward the 
third and fourth times. 

The first sign of life was observed after an hour and twenty min- 
utes' work when a heated stone was applied to the bare soles. Con- 
stant rubbing, continued artificial respiration with renewed appli- 
cation of heated stones to the extremities, the armpits, and over the 

a It appears that Houghney was washed off the skiff about the time Streeter reached the scene of 
the capsize. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 25 

heart, effected a steady improvement in the patient's condition, and 
some twenty-five minutes after the first indication of returning ani- 
mation was manifest a physican present made an examination and 
reported heart action and a pulse. The bellows movement and rub- 
bing were continued for an hour and forty-eight minutes thereafter, 
and Mooney was then conveyed to his home, where he was attended 
by a physician during the night. He regained consciousness at 1.40 
a. m. July 5, nine hours after the accident. 

Mooney's watch, which it appears, was of good movement and an 
accurate timekeeper, stopped at 4.20 o'clock. It was ascertained 
that the timepiece had been cleaned and regulated only a week pre- 
viously, and, in the opinion of the watchmaker who put it in order, 
must have been very nearly correct with standard time. As the cap- 
size is known to have taken place near the time mentioned (4.20 p.m.) 
the watch in all probability stopped as a result of the accident. Cap- 
tain Knowles remained near the finish line of the race, so he states, 
for two or three minutes after the last boat crossed at 4 o'clock, 47 
minutes 48 seconds. He then started in his motor launch toward 
the upper pond (the scene of the capsize) and landed on the beach 
where the surfmen were working over Mooney at precisely three min- 
utes of 5, calling upon one of the surfmen to note the time of his 
arrival. Streeter had landed with Mooney not over five minutes pre- 
viously. When Captain Knowles came up the surfmen were in the 
act of turning Mooney the second time on his back to begin artificial 
respiration. 

Upon the foregoing the conclusion seems established that thirty- 
two or thirty-three minutes elapsed from the time Mooney was pre- 
cipitated into the water until efforts were begun to restore him. 

A letter written by Mooney to the General Superintendent of the 
Service, in regard to his harrowing experience, appears on page 263 
of this volume. 

THE LARCHMONT DISASTER, FEBRUARY 11, 1907. 

The marine casuality known as the Larchmont disaster, in which the 
passenger steamer Larchmont was sunk on the night of February 11, 
1907, in Block Island Sound in collision with the schooner Harry P. 
Knowlton, occurred outside the field of operations of the Life-Saving 
Service. The case was not, therefore, subject to official investigation 
by this bureau under the requirements of the act of June 18, 1878. 
The services of the life-saving crews on Block Island (upon which up- 
ward of 100 of the victims of the catastrophe drifted ashore aboard 
the Larchmont' s boats and life rafts) in caring for those who were so 
fortunate as to get to land alive, and in recovering from the surf the 
bodies washed up on the island beach, are, however, considered of 
such signal merit as to call for more than incidental notice. 

The names and post-office addresses of those whose lives were saved 
or sacrificed are given in every instance possible in order to amplify 
and complete the record of one of the world's great sea tragedies. 
What follows is compiled from a report made in the case by Captain 
Herbert M. Knowles, superintendent of the Third life-saving district 
(embracing the coast of Rhode Island), and from reports of the em- 
ployees of the Service under whose personal supervision the rescue 
and relief work of the life-saving crews was carried on. Captain 



26 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

Knowles, by whose direction the reports of his subordinates were pre- 
pared, spared no pains to make the record of events that took place on 
the island in connection with the disaster as complete as possible and 
in thorough accord with the facts. 

The Larchmont was a Joy Line, side-wheel, single-deck, two- 
masted steamer, plying between Providence, Rhode Island, and New 
York City. She registered 1,605 tons and was 252 feet long, with 37 
feet beam. She was built in Bath, Maine, in 1885. She left Provi- 
dence on her fatal trip at 6.30 p. m. of February 11, 1907, in command 
of Captain George W. McVey, with Robert Gay, chief engineer, and a 
crew of 30 or 40 men (the actual number is not known). The number 
of passengers on board is also a matter of doubt, but it was probably 
somewhat near 150. Captain McVey, who escaped with his life, 
estimated the number to have been 50 or 75, but the purser of the 
steamer, who also survived the disaster, placed the figures at from 125 
to 150, and most of the ship's crew who reached land alive were in- 
clined to agree with him. While the exact number of fatalities will 
also doubtless ever remain a mystery, the magnitude of the calamity 
may be comprehended by the small number of survivors only 17 out 
of a possible 200 persons on board. 

The schooner Harry P. Knowlton was a vessel of 317 tons, hailing 
from Eastport, Maine. She was commanded by Captain Frank T. 
Haley and carried a crew of 7. When the collision occurred she was 
on her way from South Amboy, New Jersey, to Boston, with a cargo of 
soft coal. She had been ice-bound at the nead of Long Island Sound, 
and had gotten free early in the day of the llth, and in order to make 
up for lost time was carrying considerable canvas. She was built for 
the South African trade, and for this reason, it is stated, was faster 
than the average vessel of her class. As the wind was blowing a 
gale on the night of the llth she was therefore doubtless going along 
at a pretty good clip when she rammed the Larchmont. 

The weather could scarcely have been better calculated to make 
the impending collision of the most terrible consequence. The 
night was clear, but the temperature was only 2 or 3 above zero, 
and the wind, which swept furiously across the Sound from the north- 
west, sent the seas clear over the laboring steamer, the water freezing 
as it fell and leaving a coating of ice upon everything above deck. 
The two vessels came together about 10.45 p. m. 3| miles SSE. of 
Watch Hill light, and almost due west of the northernmost point of 
Block Island, lying 10 miles from the mainland. 

While the stories of the two commanding officers do not agree with 
regard to the movements of their respective vessels just before the 
collision occurred, the recitals' by the survivors from both vessels as 
to what took place afterwards are in substantial accord. The Knowl- 
ton struck the steamer on the port side forward of her paddlebox, 
carrying away all the head gear of the first-named vessel back to her 
knightheads. The speed of the Larchmont, however, carried her 
clear of the schooner, and the latter fell off to leeward. Captain 
Haley says that he signaled the Larchmont for help, but getting no 
response, and finding his vessel rapidly filling, he realized that his 
only hope of safety lay in getting ashore. He therefore hauled up 
to northward for the nearest land, but his vessel was so badly in- 
jured that the crew had to take to the ship's yawl while still a mile 
and a half off the beach and about the same distance from the Quono- 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 27 

chontaug life-saving station. The schooner and her small boat were 
both discovered offshore about 1.30 a. m. by Surf man Charles G. 
Eldridge, of the station named, while making the west patrol. He 
burned a Coston signal, and when the men in the boat struck the 
beach he assisted them to land. They were taken to the station, 
where they were cared for three days. They informed the station 
keeper of the collision, but it appears that they were in ignorance of 
its tragic outcome, having expressed to the keeper the opinion that 
the steamer had gone on her way. The seriousness of the disaster 
was not known on the land until the forenoon of the 12th, when the 
living and dead began to drift ashore on Block Island. After the 
schooner was abandoned it continued to drift shoreward, and took 
bottom on the beach about three-fourths of a mile west of the 
Quonochontaug station, becoming a total loss. 

Following the collision, the Larchmont continued ahead for a, short 
distance with all her lights extinguished by the shock, the water 
pouring in through the gaping hole in her side, and the steam from 
the pipes broken asunder by the schooner's prow filling her super- 
structure. Many of those on board had probably retired, as it 
seems was customary for persons taking passage on this boat to do 
after passing Beaver Tail, where the ocean swell is first encountered. 
Such as had done so were of course totally unprepared to face the 
awful situation with the presence of mind necessary to make the 
most of it, and in the short 12 minutes that ensued before the vessel 
went down had no chance, in the darkness, choking steam and gen- 
eral confusion, to get to that part of the steamer where the crew 
were trying to lower the boats and life rafts. The work of getting 
the boats and rafts over the side and safely afloat was an almost 
impossible undertaking owing to the terrific onslaughts of the seas, 
the fierceness of the gale, and the crowding of the ^terrified passen- 
gers. While the operation was going on a number of the passengers 
jumped, or fell, overboard in their eagerness to leave the ship, and 
were of course drowned. At least half of those on the vessel suc- 
ceeded, however, in getting safely away, and there is little doubt 
that, -but for the rigorous weather, the larger part of them would 
finally have reached land by their own efforts with little discomfort, 
or been picked up by passing vessels. 

Owing to the direction of the wind, the boats and wreckage from 
the steamer were swept toward Block Island, and the majority of 
those, living and dead, that reached the island came ashore near the 
Sandy Point life-saving station, situated near the island's northern- 
most point. Some of the imperiled people missed the island alto- 
gether and were carried on seaward, as was the case with the eight 
survivors picked up by the schooner Elsie several miles northeast 
of the island. The first news received by anyone connected with the 
Life-Saving Service bearing upon the fate of the Larchmont reached 
the Sandy Point station by telephone from the keeper of the Sandy 
Point light about 6 o'clock on the morning of the 12th, the light- 
keeper having informed Surf man Charles A. Mitchell, who was tem- 
porarily in charge of the station during the keeper's absence on 
account of disability, that a boy had come to the light-house nearly 
frozen to death. 

Thinking that a boat might have come ashore, Mitchell sent one of 
the station crew to the beach to investigate, and taking the rest of his 



28 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

men, except one who remained behind to prepare breakfast, went to the 
light-house. The life-savers at once set to work to revive the boy, and 
when he had recovered sufficiently to talk he told them that he was 
one of several persons who had drifted ashore in a boat. 

Leaving a surfman to look after the boy, Mitchell and the rest of his 
men hastened to the beach. In the meantime the surfman who had 
gone to the beach direct from the station had found a boat bearing the 
number 8 broadside on the beach full of water, with the surf breaking 
over it, and a man, barely alive, lashed to a thwart, his form scarcely 
discernable through a covering of ice. This man proved to be Anton 
Razukiewiz, of Central Falls, Rhode Island. The surfman tried to 
get him clear, but was unable to do so until his comrades came to 
his aid. The life-savers carried him to the light-house (which was 
nearer than the life-saving station), where they wrapped him in 
blankets, after which they bore him to their station, and there applied 
the treatment prescribed by the Service for frostbite. They then 
turned him over to the care of Doctor Larrabee, a local physician, for 
w T hom they had telephoned, and went down to the beach to look for the 
other occupants of the boat. Three bodies were picked up, and one 
man was found who showed signs of life. The latter died, however, 
before they could get him to the station. 

While searching for survivors from the first boat that came ashore, 
one of the life-savers, who had gone some distance ahead of his com- 
rades along the beach, observed several persons staggering toward the 
station. The surfman ran to meet them, and, catching hold of two, 
who were in advance of their fellows, helped them as rapidly as possible 
on their way. They proved to be Captain McVey, of the Larchmont, 
and Quartermaster James Staples, of the same vessel. While escort- 
ing these two men to the station the surfman met Surfman Streeter 
leaving the light-house and informed him that there were others com- 
ing along behind. Streeter continued on down the beach in the direc- 
tion indicated, and about 150 yards from the life-saving station dis- 
covered a man prostrate, face down. On turning him over the surf- 
man found signs of life in him, and seeing that the men whom he had 
come to assist would be able to get to the station unaided he took the 
man in his arms and carried him to the light-house. With the help 
of the light-keeper's daughter and others he cut off the man's clothing 
and applied the usual restorative measures, but the man died in their 
hands. 

While efforts were being made to restore the man picked up by 
Streeter another man reached the light-house, who proved to be 
Purser Oscar Young, of the Larchmont. About this time also John 
Tolan and Martis Liebert, firemen from the Larchmont, were found on 
the beach by acting keeper Mitchell and assisted to the life-saving 
station. When these two men were safely under shelter Mitchell again 
went up the beach and found two more nearly frozen men trying to get 
to the station. He secured a team from a resident of the neighbor- 
hood and hauled them in. Their names were James Vann, of Wil- 
mington, North Carolina, and James L. McFarland, of Brooklyn, New 
York. 

Until the arrival of Captain McVey at the Sandy Point station 
the Block Island life-savers had had no definite information of the 
disaster of the previous nio;ht. Upon learning something of the nature 
of the casualty their vigilance was redoubled, and with the spread- 
ing of the terrible news a number of private residents of the island 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 29 

came to the station with proffers of assistance. By mid forenoon 
the mist, which had hung heavily over the water since dawn, began 
to lift, making it possible to get a view offshore, and disclosing a 
boat drifting in. The team that had been previously used in the 
rescue work was brought to the beach, in readiness to carry the 
occupants to the station when they should land. The boat was 
found to be No. 6. It contained one live man and 9 frozen bodies, 
one of those on board having committed suicide while drifting in 
the Sound. Oliver Janvier was the name of the survivor. The 
suicide was identified as John Marcario. Another of the bodies 
proved to *be that of James B. Harrison. 

Soon after the landing of boat No. 6 an empty raft came ashore, 
those it supported having evidently been washed away. Following 
this raft another was sighted, which, on nearing shore, was seen to 
support 6 persons, only one of whom appeared to be living. This 
raft turned over in the surf and all who were on it were swept away, 
but the lone survivor fortunately managed to get hold of the life- 
line attached to it, and was rescued by surfmen Mitchell, Steadman, 
and Northup, who secured him by rushing waist deep into the water. 
This man was named Mohammed Omar. Shortly afterwards a fourth 
raft was seen coming in. Two or three of the surfmen waded out 
to meet it, and found upon it 5 frozen bodies. 

As soon as Acting Keeper Mitchell learned from Captain McVey of 
the seriousness of the disaster, and realized the character of the 
work probably in store for him and his men before the close of the 
day, he telephoned to Keeper A. N. Littlefield, of the New Shoreham 
station, situated near the southeasterly end of the island, to come 
to his assistance. Keeper Littlefield promptly responded, taking 
with him several of his crew and the station cart loaded with cloth- 
ing, blankets, medicines, and other supplies useful in succoring the 
shipwrecked. In his report of the day's work Keeper Littlefield says: 

We reached the Sandy Point station about 10 a. m. and found the life-saving crew 
there busily engaged looking after the survivors, caring for the dead, of which there 
were then 12 at the station, and taking others from the boats and surf. My men at 
once went to work stripping wet and frozen clothing from the survivors and assist- 
ing the physician present in caring for them, while others of my crew went to the 
beach and brought in dead bodies. 

About the time of the arrival of the New Shoreham station crew 
another raft came ashore empty. If was followed by boat No. 5, 
containing one body. A little later boat No. 7 came ashore one- 
third of a mile south of the station with 3 bodies. These were all 
carried to the station by Mr. A. N. Sheffield's ox team, along with 
several other bodies which had washed up on the beach and been 
placed by some of the surfmen out of reach of the surf. 

From noon of February 12 to noon of the 13th 4 men of the 
Sandy Point station, assisted by 2 surfmen from the Block Island 
station, maintained a constant patrol along the beach, while other 
surfmen of the Sandy Point crew were at the station ministering to 
the survivors and caring for the dead. As fast as bodies came 
ashore they were carried to the station and tagged and numbered by 
Doctor John C. Champlin, of the Public Health and Marine-Hospital 
Service, whose station is on the island. Doctor Champlin's work 
was as thorough as possible under the circumstances and greatly 
facilitated the later work of identification at Providence, to which 
place the bodies were taken from the island. 



30 UNITED. STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 

On the morning of the 13th A. N. Sheffield discovered a body in 
the surf about three-fourths of a mile southeast of the Sandy Point 
station. With the assistance of another man Sheffield recovered it 
and laid it on the beach. It was later carried to the station, where 
it was identified as Reverend Philip Manfre, of Providence. 

About noon of the 12th, while the men of the New Shoreham 
station were assisting the Sandy Point crew, word was received that 
the Block Island schooners were bringing survivors and dead from 
the Larchmont into Old Harbor, near the New Shoreham station. 
Thinking that the services of himself and crew might be Deeded at 
Old Harbor, Keeper Littlefield returned with his crew to his sta- 
tion, where they round the citizens at Old Harbor caring for the 8 
survivors and 7 dead picked up by the schooner Elsie. (As pre- 
viously mentioned, this vessel had rescued 8 persons several miles 
at sea, the only survivors picked up offshore by any vessel.) 

The schooner Clara E also brought into Old Harbor 13 bodies; 
the schooner Edward H. Sneed, 3 ; the schooner Wm. Talbot Dodge, 1 ; 
the schooner Little Fred, 6; and the yawl Theresa, 7, making, all told, 
8 survivors and 37 bodies. Four of the survivors and 13 bodies were 
cared for at the life-saving station on the night of the 12th. On the 
13th the living and dead so far brought ashore at Old Harbor, 
numbering 21, were conveyed by team across to New Harbor, on the 
western side of the island, and placed aboard the Joy Line steamer 
Kentucky, which had come to carry them to Providence. The 
Kentucky was then piloted upshore by a surfman from the New 
Shoreham life-saving station, and took from the Sandy Point station 
the survivors and dead being cared for at that place. Later in the 
day 22 more bodies, brought into Old Harbor by the fishing ves- 
sels above referred to, were left at the New Shoreham station, and 
on the following day two more bodies were added to the number. 
The Joy Line sent the tug Roger Williams, to New Harbor to receive 
these, and 23 of them were carried across the island by the life- 
saving crew and placed aboard that vessel. One body, that of 
Harry L. Eckles, a resident of the island, was interred in the Old 
Harbor burying ground. 

On the night of the 25th, two weeks after the disaster, a body was 
found by Acting Keeper Mitchell on the beach a short distance from 
the Sandy Point station. By means of papers found on the clothing 
the dead man was identified as Julian Klimaslewski, of Providence, 
Rhode Island. 

From the foregoing it appears that 20 survivors and 75 corpses 
from the Larchmont came ashore on Block Island, namely: 1 survivor, 
succored at the Sandy Point light station; 11 survivors and 38 bodies, 
cared for at the Sandy Point life-saving station ; and 8 survivors and 
37 bodies, brought into Old Harbor by Block Island schooners. 
These, with 2 bodies that came ashore on No Man's Land, and which 
were recovered by the crew of the Gay Head life-saving station, make 
97 victims accounted for. The bodies last referred to were identified 
as the remains of Joseph P. Gightman, of Lebanon, New York, and 
Frederick H. Mooney, of East Providence, Rhode Island. 

Of the 20 persons who reached land alive, one died on the island 
and two succumbed after reaching Providence, leaving only 17, so far 
as can be ascertained, who survived the terrible exposure of that 
winter's night. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 31 

One fact developed in this case was the failure of both vessels 
involved in the collision to burn rockets or make other distress 
signals. This omission on the part of the Larchmont was doubtless 
due to the great confusion on board and the rapidity with which the 
stricken vessel went to the bottom, leaving no time for concerted or 
effective action of any character by her officers. Moreover, the 
fatally injured Knowlton drifted away after the impact totally 
unaware of the seriousness of the injury she had inflicted on the 
Larchmont. The scene of the collision was not more than 3 or 4 
miles from the mainland, which, the records show, was patrolled by 
members of the Life-Saving Service. As the night was clear and an 
extended view offshore possible, some of them would certainly have 
observed any signals burned by either of the vessels, in which event 
many of those who succeeded in escaping to the boats and life rafts 
might "have been picked up by craft putting out from the shore, 
hours before they began to drift on Block Island. 

The services of the life-saving crews on Block Island, while not 
taking them away from the shore, were extremely heroic and self- 
sacrificing. During the entire day of February 12 several of them 
remained in the open on the beach in a heavy gale of wind, with the 
temperature near zero, their clothing frozen stiff, and their grewsome 
task of recovering bodies frequently taking them shoulder deep into 
the surf. To quote from the report of the district superintendent, 
"they resembled statues of ice more than human beings." Nor was 
their work ended with the close of the day immediately following the 
disaster. Throughout the night of the 12th and until noon of the 
13th they remained on the beach without sleep, and with little 
refreshment, ready to give aid to, or recover any living or dead that 
the turbulent waters might cast upon the shore. Following is a 
letter addressed to the keeper of trie Sandy Point station by the 
president of the Joy Steamship Company, expressing his appreciation 
of the services of these men: 

On behalf of our company I want to thank every man in the life-saving organization 
on Block Island for their efforts in caring for the living and dead from the disaster to 
our steamer Larchmont on the llth instant. From all reports that I have received 
nothing was left undone by the station crews that could have been done. Hoping 
you will convey the thanks of the company to each of the men, and that they may 
know that their work has been, in a small measure at least, appreciated, we remain, 
Very respectfully, 

F. M. DUNBAUGH, President. 

The Service desires here to acknowledge the great assistance 
rendered the life-saving crews on this occasion by private citizens of 
Block Island, as follows: Walter R. Littlefield, Elwin A. Perry, 
Roy Payne, H. Ansel Ball, Thaddeus A. Ball, S. Martin Rose, Samuel 
L. Hayes, Seymour Hayes, Charles Littlefield, Ira II . Littlefield, 
Charles Smith, Arthur N. Sheffield, John G. Sheffield, John Hayes, 
and Oscar H. Willis. Side by side these men worked on the beach 
with the surfmen, picking up bodies and hauling them to the Sandy 
Point station with teams furnished by themselves. 

It is considered proper here to refer to the efficiency of the Service 
telephone system in tnis instance. As the stations on Block Island 
are connected by wire with "half-way" houses, the men on the 
beach and at the stations were able to keep in constant and ready 
communication with each other, thereby greatly facilitating the 
work in hand. 

2990908 3 



DISASTERS 

WITHIN THE FIELD OF OPERATIONS OF THE LIFE- 
SAVING SERVICE INVOLVING LOSS OF LIFE. 



1907. 



33 



DISASTERS INVOLVING LOSS OF LIFE. 



Section 9 of the act of Congress approved June 18, 1878, provides 

That upon the occurrence of any shipwreck within the scope of the operations of 
the Life-Saving Service, attended with loss of life, the general superintendent shall 
cause an investigation of all the circumstances connected with said disaster and loss 
of life to be made, with a view of ascertaining the cause of the disaster, and whether 
any of the officers or employees of the Service have been guilty of neglect or miscon- 
duct in the premises. 

In accordance with the foregoing requirement all disasters attended 
by loss of life occurring during the year within the field of the Service 
were fully investigated, and the circumstances of each case, as gath- 
ered from testimony taken under oath, are set forth below. Brief 
accounts of disasters not attended by fatality may be found under 
" Services of life-saving crews/' (See p. 71.) 

Capsize ofrowboat Blossom, July 1, 1906. 

This disaster occurred about 5 p. m. of July 1, 1906, one-eighth of a 
mile northwest of the Duluth life-saving station and near Osborn's 
sand dock, in Duluth Harbor. The capsize resulted from an attempt 
of two of the three occupants of the boat to exchange seats. Fol- 
lowing the overturn two of the imperiled men struck out for the 
wharf, a short distance away, and were hauled out of the water by 
persons who had witnessed the accident. The third man, however, 
whose name is given as Arthur Haig, was unable to swim, and, after 
a brief struggle, sank. 

A tug and two scows lying at the dock shut out from the station 
a view of the spot where the upset took place, but the attention of 
the man in the lookout was drawn to the mishap by the outcries of the 
survivors when they found themselves overboard. Looking through 
his marine glass he saw a boat drifting, bottom up, out from behind 
the vessels mentioned, and at once associated it with the cries he had 
heard. He hastily sounded the alarm, then left the tower and ran for 
the station dinghy, kept in the water in readiness for such emergen- 
cies, in which with two fellow surfmen he started out to investigate. 

When the alarm was given the keeper and a surfman were in the 
station launch endeavoring to adjust some minor irregularity in the 
working of the machinery. They tried once or twice to start the 
engine with the intention of following after the dinghy, but failed 
to make it go. Thereupon the keeper called the remainder of the 
crew to the power lifeboat, also in the water, in which they gave 
chase to the smaller boat. The two boats reached the scene of the 
accident simultaneously. Upon learning from persons on the dock 
the circumstances of tne capsize and its outcome, the station crew 
set to work dragging for the body, which they recovered in twelve or 

35 



36 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEBVICE. 

fifteen minutes. They carried it to a boat club float near by, and for 
nearly three hours tried to resuscitate the unfortunate man, but 
without success. 

The officer who investigated this case states that the two station 
boats reached the scene of the capsize in two minutes from the time 
the lookout discovered the overturned boat. Their ability to do 
this in the time stated was tested by the officer referred to, who 
required them to go over the same course while the investigation 
was under way. 

But for the presence of the tugboat and scows at the wharf the 
lookout would doubtless earlier have caught sight of the upturned 
rowboat, if he would not actually have witnessed the capsize itself, 
in which event it is likely the station crew would have responded 
in time to save the man's life. The keeper estimated that the man 
had been under water fifteen minutes. 

Capsize of canoe, July 4, 1906. 

Late in the afternoon of July 4, 1906, Mr. Aubrey Sutherland and 
his wife, of Benton Harbor, Michigan, while enjoying Independence 
Day festivities at St. Joseph, Michigan, borrowed a canoe from some 
friends and went out for a sail on the lake. The wind was fresh frpm 
the northwest when they set out, and there was a moderate sea run- 
ning, but the water inside the harbor was quiet and filled with pleas- 
ure craft, and as Mr. Sutherland .(according to the statements of 
witnesses at the investigation) was familiar with sailboats, he and 
his wife left their friends at the pier with entire confidence that their 
outing would be unattended by danger. They went along under 
oars until they were outside the harbor, when sail was hoisted and the 
canoe headed southwest in the open lake. After going offshore for a 
mile or more Mr. Sutherland found the water much rougher than he 
had anticipated and prudently decided to put back to land. He 
thereupon lowered the sail to minimize the possibility of a capsize 
while getting the canoe headed shoreward and undertook to direct 
its movements with an oar. While the canoe was swinging around it 
was caught for a moment in the trough of the sea and before the 
oarsman could again get it under control a wave struck it squarely 
broadside and upset it. The husband was a good swimmer and suc- 
ceeded in getting Mrs. Sutherland to the overturned boat, upon which 
she found a support. Unfortunately the canoe lacked sufficient 
buoyancy to sustain both persons, and the man therefore unselfishly 
abandoned it to his wife, only resting a hand lightly upon it at times 
to conserve his strength, trusting to his expertness as a swimmer to 
keep him afloat until help could reach them. The wife, who was 
ultimately rescued, stated that they felt confident their situation 
would be quickly discovered, as they could distinguish the colors of 
the clothing of persons passing to and fro on shore, and could even 
see moving about the man on duty in the lookout of the life-saving 
station. But the moments passed without bringing the assistance 
hoped for. Shortly after the overturn two launches were seen by 
the Sutherlands going by, some distance away. Both of the imperiled 
persons halloed and waved their hats in a frantic effort to attract 
attention, but the boats kept on their way without noticing them. 
For twenty minutes the self-sacrificing husband paddled about in the 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 87 

water cheering his wife upon the canoe, then with an exclamation of 
despair upon his lips he gave up the struggle and went under. 

A half hour or more after the Sutherland^ left shore the friend who 
had loaned them the canoe, a Mr. Weldon, became apprehensive for 
their safety, and in the hope of being able to get sight of them went 
to the end of the south pier, from which place he picked up a sail far 
out in the lake, which he recognized as belonging to his boat. It 
came down while he stood watching, and later he made out the boat 
itself tossing on the waves. 

After looking from the pier for ten or fifteen minutes Weldon' s 
fears increased to such an extent that he decided to engage a boat 
and go out to investigate. He lost much valuable time in going to 
several boat liveries without success, but finally secured the services 
of the launch Rose Marie. Fifteen minutes later the man operating 
the launch put him upon the scene of the capsize, where he found the 
one survivor sitting on the submerged canoe with only her head and 
shoulders above water. She was able to cooperate with her rescuers 
to the extent of catching a line thrown to her, but lacked the strength to 
hold to it, and it became necessary to run the launch alongside and lift 
her bodily on board. After a hurried search in the locality for Mr. 
Sutherland, the launch started back for the shore, making straight 
for the life-saving station where Mr. Weldon should have gone for 
assistance in the first instance. Mrs. Sutherland collapsed after she 
was taken into the launch, and was unconscious when carried to the 
life-saving station. She was resuscitated, however, by "all the lady 
friends and neighbors 1 ' of the station keeper's family, who worked 
over her for two hours. The body of Mr. Sutherland was recovered 
ten days after the accident. 

It seems safe to conclude from the evidence in this case that if the 
owner of the canoe had gone straight to the life-saving station and 
made known his misgivings Sutherland as well as his wife could have 
been saved. Asked why he did not do so he replied that while he 
had some uneasiness for his friends he knew Mr. Sutherland to be a 
good sailor, that he had been out in the canoe many times before, 
and he felt that he (Sutherland) considered himself safe. Weldon 
states that it was very difficult to keep track of the canoe, it being 
necessary to look for it a minute or two to catch sight of it again, 
once it would disappear in the trough of the sea. 

This fatality occurred on a national holiday, at a time when thou- 
sands of people were along the water front and out on the piers, and 
numerous craft of all kinds launches, sailboats, rowboats, etc. 
were plying the harbor, while a great many bathers were enjoying 
themselves along the beaches. On account of the large crowd and 
the increased liability of accidents the life-saving crew remained the 
entire day within the station grounds ready for instant service. A 
vigilant watch was also kept from the station lookout. There were 
so many boats to be looked after, however, that the man on duty in 
the tower was unable to concentrate his attention on any one craft or 
devote much time to keeping a lookout in any particular direction. 
It developed, moreover, that the canoe containing the Sutherlands 
capsized directly in a strong sun glare, which would have prevented 
anyone at the life-saving station from seeing it, even had its where- 
abouts been approximately known beforehand. 



88 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

Capsize of a dinghy, July 5, 1906. 

About 8 p. m. of July 5, 1906, an 18-foot dinghy belonging to the 
Illinois Naval Reserves put put from the Naval Reserve ooathouse, 
in Chicago Harbor, for rowing drill, in charge of acting coxswain 
Thomas F. Coffey. The boat contained, besides the coxswain, 
Anthony Capodice, Ralph Heeg, Edward M. O'Connell, Joseph 
Pimes, Robert E. Schron, and Frank W. Randall all inexperienced 
recruits. After rowing about the basin for nearly an hour and a half 
the boat's crew pulled up near the old Chicago life-saving station, in 
the lee of the pier, where the mast was stepped and sail made. The 
boat then proceeded southward along the sea wall, or pier, forming 
the eastern boundary of the outer harbor, with the wind on the port 
side. As it neared the gap leading from the harbor into the lake the 
coxswain decided that it would be unsafe to venture outside, and 
ordered his crew to jibe, having previously instructed them how to go 
through that maneuver. When the sail swung over the men they did 
not shift their weight to the weather side quickly enough, and the 
boat shipped considerable water over her lee rail. Instantly the 
recruits were thrown into a panic, and the boat, as one of the survivors 
expressed it, ''settled right straight down." Coffey called to the 
men to jump overboard, but before they could respond to his order 
the dinghy turned over. All of the party except one (who sank 
immediately) succeeded in getting a hold on the dinghy. Four of 
them, however, succumbed to exhaustion and dropped off before the 
arrival of the rescuing boat from the life-saving station. In telling 
what happened after the capsize, Coffey says : 

We all cried for help as loud as we could. The men would let go one by one and 
I would swim around and lift them on again, but they were panic-stricken and would 
fall over each other, pressing one another down. At one time two had hold of me 
one by the arm and one around the neck but I let myself under water and they 
released their hold. When I came up there were four men left, the others having 
sunk. While we four were there I noticed a light outside the light-house on the 
south end of the pier, and a few seconds later another light. After seeing the first 
light the boat turned over and two men went down. 

The man standing watch in the station lookout from 8 to 10 p. m. 
Surfman Curran saw the dinghy hoist sail and move southward near 
the pier. Surfman Preston, returning from the south end of the 
pier on patrol, also observed the boat pmss along. Preston states 
in his testimony that he turned several times to look at the dinghy 
as he walked toward the station, but as the weather was clear, with 
only a moderate wind blowing, he had no thought that there might 
be trouble in store for the boating party. Arriving at the station he 
laid off the signal appliances carried on patrol and went up into the 
lookout to relieve Surfman Curran. The latter thereupon started 
out on patrol, going over the same ground that Preston had covered. 
It may be stated in this connection that it takes at least twenty 
minutes in daylight to make the patrol from the station to the south 
ead of the pier, walking at fairly good speed, and at least twenty-five 
minutes to accomplish the same distance at night, at which time the 
patrolmen have to pick their steps, by the light of a lantern. 

Curran testified at the investigation held in this case, that he felt 
some uneasiness for the occupants of the boat, as he believed them 
to be inexperienced, and that he therefore kept a particularly close 
lookout for them while he tramped out along the pier. He reached 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 39 

the end of the pier, where stands the light-house, about half past 
ten. After looking carefully from the weather side of the light 
structure, he went around to the lee side, and while peering across 
the basin from that position heard faint cries for help. He imme- 
diately burned a Coston signal, followed by two others in rapid 
succession, and then started back to the station. 

Surfman Preston, up in the station lookout, saw the signals and 
at once rang the alarm gong. The testimony of Keeper Charles 
Garland and other members of his crew, which is corroborated 
by D. C. Wickham (assistant to superintendents of construction, 
life-saving Stations, and who was temporarily quartered at the sta- 
tion), shows that the alarm was instantly responded to and that 
inside of a minute the life-savers were on their way to the rescue in 
the Monomoy surfboat. They pulled out along the pier until they 
met Surfman Curran, a hundred yards or more from the light-house, 
who pointed out to them the direction in which he had heard the 
cries. Following the course indicated the boat's crew pulled away 
from the pier in a southwesterly direction, and when they had gone 
nearly a quarter of a mile discovered the dinghy bottom up with two 
men (Coirey and Randall) clinging to it. The life-savers took them 
into the surfboat, and after making a rapid search in the locality in 
the hope of picking up others of the imperiled party pulled rapidly 
back to the station. When the immediate wants of the two survivors 
had been attended to Keeper Garland left them in charge of his 
family and returned to the scene of the capsize to make a more 
thorough search for the missing men. One body was recovered by 
hauling in a line trailing from the dinghy, the outer end of which 
was found entangled around the drowned man's ankle. Members 
of the life-saving crew assisted in the work of dragging for the other 
bodies during the remainder of the night and all the next day, but 
without results. Subsequently, however, the bodies of all but two 
of the victims were recovered. 

This accident took place 1,100 feet west-southwest of the end of 
the pier. As the terminus of the pier is 4,000 feet from the life- 
saying station, the life-savers had to pull approximately a mile in 
going to the rescue. The evidence shows that they responded to 
the alarm without even taking time to dress, and that inside of ten 
minutes after the gong sounded they had the two survivors in their 
boat. 

Capsize of a fish boat, July 23, 1906. 

Among the accounts of casualties given in the annual report of the 
Service from year to year under the caption "Disasters involving 
loss of life" are almost invariably found those of accidents to fish 
boats occurring at the mouth of the Columbia River, Washington. 
The men who engage in fishing in the locality mentioned are a ven- 
turesome class, taking risks in these treacherous waters which fre- 
quently result in a capsize and sometimes terminate fatally. When 
tne sea and weather permit fishing, the grounds, which extend over 
four or five miles, are alive with fishing craft, manned in most cases 
by two men a net tender and a boat puller. On such occasions the 
crew oi the Cape Disappointment life-saving station are usually in 
attendance upon the fishing fleet in a power lifeboat, ready to under- 
take a rescue or to give timely warning of sudden weather changes, 



40 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

the fishermen themselves being PO occupied with their work that 
they frequently disregard signs of approaching danger until too late 
to get safely back to harbor. 

During the present year (1906-7) the crews of the Cape Disap- 
pointment and the Point Adams stations, situated on either side of 
the river's mouth, were upon 12 occasions called to render material 
assistance to fish boats in trouble. The value of the property involved 
in these cases (boats, fishing gear, etc.) was $5,310, of which prop- 
erty to the value of $4,955 was saved. The number of persons imper- 
iled was 23, of whom 5 were lost. 

Only 3 of the 12 accidents resulted fatally. The first capsize 
attended by such unfortunate consequences occurred July 23, 1906, 
on the outside edge of Peacock Spit, a small sand waste a mile to the 
southward of the southernmost point of the cape and the same dis- 
tance west of Sand Island. The boat which got into difficulty was 
a cat-rigged 3-ton craft, manned by Matt Korpela and Walter Nich- 
olsen. When the capsize occurred the Cape Disappointment life- 
savers were in their power boat outside McKenzie Head the western- 
most point of the cape keeping watch upon another fish boat that 
had run into a dangerous position, and did not witness the accident 
three-fourths of a mile away. Their attention was directed to it, 
however, by a wigwag signal from the man on duty in the station 
lookout, ft took them perhaps ten minutes to reach the scene and 
rescue the one survivor, Korpela, whom they found clinging to the 
bottom of the upturned boat. The other fisherman, Nicholsen, was 
nowhere to be seen. Korpela informed his rescuers that Nicholsen 
sank immediately after the overturn and did not again rise to the 
surface, which suggests that he may possibly have been injured by 
the boat when it upset. 

The life-savers cruised about for an hour on the lookout for the 
body of the drowned man, but their quest went unrewarded. They 
recovered the fish boat, however, which they conveyed, with the 
rescued man, to the shore. 

Capsize of a fish boat, July 27, 1906. 

This fatality the second one to occur during the year involving 
loss of life among the Columbia River fishermen took place about 
noon of July 27, 1906, If miles south of the Cape Disappointment 
life-saving station and a mile offshore, the fish boat that met disaster 
having been overturned in the surf in the vicinity of Peacock Spit. 
The two occupants of the boat, both of whom were drowned, were, in 
the judgment of the keeper, strangers on the lower river, otherwise, 
according to his reasoning, they would not have had the hardihood 
to go fishing there in the strong northwest gale and rough sea then 
prevailing. 

Owing to the state of the weather and the tide the fishing grounds 
were practically deserted at the hour of the accident, and no fisher- 
men, it appears, except those who were lost, had risked their lives 
by venturing within the dangerous waters around Peacock Spit. 
The life-saving crew that usually attends the fishing fleet in a power 
lifeboat were on shore when the accident happened, as, to use the 
keeper's words, "no fishing was expected at that stage of the tide." 
A member of the crew was on duty, as usual, however, in the station 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 41 

lookout, keeping an eye on the few boats that dotted the water here 
and there, and he witnessed the capsize. This surfman says in his 
testimony that the fish boat was struck by a breaker and swamped 
while the men in it were picking up their nets. Although the look- 
out was able clearly to distinguish from his post the buoy of the net 
the men were using an object no larger than a man's head he 
could discover no trace of the fishermen after they were thrown into 
the water. The lookout telephoned the news to the station near by, 
and the life-saving crew immediately put out in the power boat. 
They reached the scene of the accident in fifteen minutes, but all 
they could find was the fish boat, which the waves had cast up on 
a sand spit. Two of the surfmen were put off on the spit to watch 
for any signs of the fishermen and the power boat continued on 
toward the main channel, but an hour's search failed to disclose any 
trace of the missing men. Arvid Dahlgren and Carl Smithers were 
the names of the two fishermen. 

Capsize of the gasoline sloop Nora and the gasoline launch Alva B. 

July 29, 19'06. 

On Sunday, July 29, 1906, three days before the life-saving crews 
of the stations on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts had assembled to 
begin the work of a new "active season," there occurred ait Anglesea, 
New Jersey, two fatal boating accidents within two or three hours 
of each other, one of which involved the largest loss of life that took 
place during the year in connection with a single disaster within 
the field of Sfe-saving operations. 

The Nora, the larger of the two vessels, was an 8-ton boat owned 
at Somers Point, New Jersey. The water off Anglesea is one of the 
favorite fishing places along the southern Jersey coast, and on Sun- 
days hundreds of pleasure seekers from Philadelphia come by train 
to this point to spend the day fishing offshore, being carried out to 
the banks in sailboats, launches, etc., by the local fishermen. 

On the day mentioned the Nora, in charge of Captain Herbert M. 
Shivers and a crew of two, left the pier at Anglesea for the fishing 
grounds with 30 excursionists on board. At the time of their de- 
parture the sky was clear, there was little or no sea, and there was 
every indication that the weather would be ideal throughout the 
day. Many other boats, large and small, had also taken advantage 
of the fine weather and gone out, like the Nora, heavily loaded, with 
the prospect of a fine day's sport. 

Early in the afternoon a fight breeze sprang up, and the masters 
of many of the smaller craft, foreseeing the danger of remaining out- 
side in a blow, hoisted sail and started shoreward, the Nora among 
them. Before the Nora could make harbor, however, the wind had 
become almost a gale, and, the tide being at flood, the seas broke 
heavily over Hereford Bar, which the returning boats were com- 
pelled to cross to get in. There is nothing in the evidence to suggest 
that the disaster to the boat was chargeable to poor seamanship on 
the part of her crew, or that anything could have been done under 
the circumstances to avert it. In the words of a survivor describ- 
ing the accident, the sloop while passing over the bar " suddenly 
veered, swung around, wallowed for a moment in the trough of the 
sea, then turned completely over, snapping off her mast like a pipe- 
stem." 



42 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEEVICE. 

In his testimony Captain Shivers states that the water on the bar 
was rough w r hen he attempted to cross, but that he did not anticipate 
getting into trouble. According to his story, when he neared the 
bar he was caught up by a sharp sea and while being swept along 
broached to and went over. When the sea struck the boat the pas- 
sengers became panic-stricken and scrambled to leeward, but whether 
their action precipitated the overturn is not stated. 

A number of the party were caught beneath the Nora following 
the capsize, and it was doubtless due to the heavy seas that so many 
of them thus trapped succeeded in escaping and getting to the sur- 
face, as the boat tossed violently about, thereby uncovering some of 
the victims struggling underneath and enabling them to release 
themselves from the tangle of ropes and fish lines. Several of those 
who wjere not caught under the launch managed to get back to it 
and find a place to hold on, while others, less fortunate, were swept 
clear out of reach of any object that might serve to keep them afloat. 
Three or four who were able to sw^im struck out for the shore as soon 
as they found themselves in the water, but itis doubtful whether 
any of the swimmers would have reached land of their own efforts, 
as they were nearly exhausted when picked up by the rescuing boats. 

Captain Shivers avers that he dived under the launch and hauled 
out 18 life-preservers, but that some of those to whom they were 
passed were too much excited to make use of them. His statement 
in this regard is borne out by the word of one of the rescuers who 
witnessed his conduct following the capsize when everybody else 
involved in the disaster seems to have lost his wits. 

As previously stated, this accident happened within the inactive 
season June and July at a time when no life-saving crews were 
on duty on the Atlantic coast. The keepers, however, of all stations 
are required to remain at their posts throughout the year, primarily 
to protect the station property, but also to keep a lookout for acci- 
dents to vessels within their respective jurisdictions and to assemble, 
if practicable, a boat's crew for rescue or relief work upon the infre- 
quent occasions when that necessity arises within the period named 

It appears that the capsize of the Nora occurred about 1 o'clock 
in the afternoon. Keeper H. S. Ludlam, of the Hereford Inlet 
Station, was apprised of the disaster at 1.15, the news having been 
carried to him by his son while he (the keeper) was in the boat room 
of the station explaining to some visitors the uses of the Service life- 
saving apparatus. He at once left the party and quickly prepared 
to go to the rescue. The celerity with which he made everything 
ready may be judged by the fact that within ten minutes from the 
time he received word of the capsize he had the 26-foot, self-righting 
and self -bailing surf boat in the water and manned by a volunteer 
crew, composed of the following persons: Harry McGinly, Walter 
Ludlam, Harry Frith, John Taylor, George Redding, and Lewis 
Fox, every man of them, as events proved, well fitted for the work 
ahead. On the way out they picked up the men who had undertaken 
to swim ashore. As the surfboat pulled up near the overturned 
launch three of the volunteers McGinly, Redding, and Frith 
jumped overboard and began to assist the imperiled persons to the 
surfboat. While swimming with one of them away from the Nora 
Redding found his progress arrested by something seemingly fast to 
the man he was supporting. On examination he found one of the 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEE VICE. 43 

man's legs entangled in the sloop's rigging, and to release him Red- 
ding had to use a knife, passed to him by his comrades. 

Two other boats reached the Nora about the same time the surf- 
boat arrived the power boat Violet, operated by Captain Lilly, and 
a bank skiff rowed by Captain Johnson. Captain Lilly succeeded in 
picking up 4 men and Captain Johnson 2, and as the power boat was 
considerably larger than the surfboat and capable of greater speed 
those that the surfboat had so far rescued 10 persons were on 
Keeper Ludlam's suggestion transferred to the power boat with 
instructions to Captain Lilly to carry them all as quickly as possible 
to the station for treatment. Referring to what took place after the 
departure of the Violet, Captain Ludlam says : 

Some of those still imperiled were fast in a mass of rope and fish lines, and three of 
our men went overboard with knives to cut them clear, while the others stood by to 
haul them in. As some of them were too weak to help themselves it required the 
united efforts of those in the boat to lift them on board. The difficulty of our work 
was increased by the seas continually breaking over us. When we got close in to the 
Nora I could see one man under water in the hollow of the sea, evidently held down 
by the rigging. Soon he washed clear, and while he was still below the surface one 
of us caught him by the hair and drew him into the boat. We worked over him right 
away, but could not do much for him at the time, as there were so many others in the 
water equally bad off who had to be rescued quickly, or they would soon have expired. 
Some of them were unconscious as soon as we had them in the boat and had to be resus- 
citated on shore. 

On getting back to land Keeper Ludlam found 2 or 3 regular mem- 
bers or his station crew, a number of private citizens, 3 physicians, 
and several nurses caring for those he had sent on ahead by the 
power boat. They had been taken to the local hotels and club 
nouses fronting the beach, Captain Lilly having been unable to put 
them off at the station, as the keeper had directed him to do. 

After seeing that those whom he himself had brought ashore were 
receiving proper attention, Captain Ludlam and his volunteer crew 
again pulled out to the Nora to make doubly sure that no one had 
been left alive on the wreck. They found no more survivors, but 
picked up another body. 

About two hours after the capsize of the Nora,^ and while Keeper 
Ludlam was still looking after trie needs of the victims of that acci- 
dent, word came to the station that another boat had upset on the 
bar. He immediately manned the surfboat and started for the rescue, 
taking with him the same crew, except Harry Frith, whose place was 
filled by Millard F. Ware, a member of the regular station crew. 
Keeper Frank Downs, of the Holly Beach life-saving station, who 
had come to lend Captain Ludlam what assistance he might in con- 
nection with the Nora disaster, also joined the boat's crew, taking his 
place at an oar. They made the best time possible, but reached the 
capsized boat which proved to be the Alva B. too late to be of any 
service. The power boat Israella , coming in a mile astern of the 
Alva B., went to her assistance, as did also the auxiliary sloop Fannie 
E. Mqffat the latter boat having put out from the shore both 
boats reaching the disabled launch considerably ahead of the surf- 
boat crew. The Fannie E. Mqffat had a dory in tow, into which two 
men jumped when alongside the Alva B. and began taking off her 
party from the weather side while the Israella was likewise engaged 
to leeward. 

Many of the survivors left for their homes before their names could 
be taken, and considerable difficulty was therefore experienced in 



44 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 

ascertaining the number and identity of those who perished. At the 
time of the investigation, held two or three days later, however, 7 
bodies had been recovered and identified, and 3 persons who were 
known to have been involved in the disasters were still missing, a 
total of 10 persons 9 from the Nora and 1 from the Alva B. The 
names and addresses of the victims, as furnished by Keeper Ludlam, 
are as follows : From the Nora, Thomas Green, Gloucester City, New 
Jersey; Mathias Ried, Conshohocken, Pennsylvania; Herbert Ham- 
mel, Frederick R. Fisher, Edward Snyder, Samuel Moore, Carl Weaver, 
Griffith Williams, and George Howard, all of Philadelphia. Jeremiah 
Crosson was the name of the man lost from the Alva B. He also was 
a resident of Philadelphia. 

Captain Ludlam highly commends the services of the volunteer 
crew assembled for rescue work in these cases. u They were brave 
men, 7 ' he says, "and worked hard. Had it not been for a crew made 
of such material the loss of life would have been much greater." 

Capsize of canoe, August 18, 1906. 

Shortly after noon of August 18, 1906, a party of 3 persons- 
guests at a summer hotel at Loch Arbor, New Jersey capsized from 
a canoe about 300 yards north of the Deal life-saving station (coast of 
New Jersey) while engaged in the sport of "running the seas," one of 
their number, Howard W. Bell, losing his life. 

Two or 3 members of the life-saving crew, who had witnessed the 
accident from their station, put off to the rescue in a light sea skiff 
and picked up Bell 200 yards from the beach, whom they found 
floating on the surface, " humped up," as one- of them put it, face 
down and apparently lifeless. The 2 other occupants of the canoe 
reached shore unassisted. 

It is stated in the evidence taken in the case that the life-savers 
arrived upon the scene of the capsize inside of five minutes after the 
accident took place, and that three minutes later they had the uncon- 
scious man ashore and undergoing the prescribed treatment for the 
resuscitation of the apparently drowned. One of the surf men who 
went to the rescue states that he had a peculiar color when taken 
into their skiff, and that only about a wineglass full of water was 
expelled from the body in the attempt at resuscitation. There were 
5 physicians in the crowd that the accident had attracted, all of 
whom pronounced him dead shortly after he was laid on the beach, 
it being their unanimous opinion that he had succumbed to heart 
failure while yet in the water. 

Following the upsetting of the canoe 2 of the party, according to 
the story or witnesses, began rolling the canoe over and over toward 
the shore, while the other one was seen swimming about seemingly 
trying to pick up the paddles, as is often done by these canoeists 
when they intentionally upset. The man who lost his life made no 
outcry or otherwise indicated that he was in danger. He simply 
quit swimming and, without sinking, assumed the position in the 
water described by one of the surfmen a circumstance so excep- 
tional as to excite the comment of all who witnessed it. The com- 
panions of the unfortunate man seem to have thought he was all 
right until they saw the life-savers coming. 

It appears that accidents similar to the one here recounted fre- 
quently happen within the limits of the Deal station. "The people 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 45 

go out in their bathing clothes prepared for capsizing/' testified a 
member of the life-saving crew, "and if warned of the danger of 
indulging in such sport tell us it is none of our business." 

Capsize of Car Ferry No. 2, September 29, 1906. 

Car Ferry No. 2, a barge of 1,548 gross tons, owned by the Lake 
Michigan Car Ferry Transportation Company, capsized shortly after 
8 o'clock on the night of September 29, 1906, off the entrance to 
Chicago Harbor, the disaster involving the loss of half her crew of 6 
men, and $69,000 worth of property almost the entire value of the 
vessel and cargo. 

When the casualty happened the ferry had on board 28 cars, dis- 
posed on 4 tracks, half of them loaded with iron ore and half with 
telegraph poles and lumber, the combined weight of the cars and 
their cargo aggregating something over 1,000 tons. 

The barge left Peshtigo, Wisconsin where she received her load 
for Chicago on the afternoon of September 28 in tow of the tug 
J. C. Ames. The vessels were overtaken by a northeast gale when 
they arrived off Milwaukee, but as they had the wind over their port 
quarter, which set the seas after them they nevertheless continued 
to make good progress for some tune after passing that city. When 
they were within two or three hours of their destination, however, 
and headed up for the harbor entrance they found themselves nearly 
in the trough of the sea, in which position the waves broke heavily 
over the weather rail of the barge. A great deal of the water coming 
aboard found its way down into the barge's hold where, as the vessel 
labored, it washed to and fro, seriously disturbing the equilibrium of 
the deck-load and causing the craft to lurch dangerously. The 
situation on the barge, as stated by one of the witnesses at the inves- 
tigation of this case, had not so far been communicated to Captain 
Welcher of the towing vessel. Nevertheless that officer, it seems, 
became apprehensive for the safety of his tow while they were yet some 
distance outside the harbor, and blew a whistle of inquiry to the 
man on the barge, to which came an answering blast signifying that 
everything was O. K. When the 2 vessels came to an anchorage, 
a half mile off shore and under the lee of the outer breakwater, the 
tug signaled to the ferry to shorten the tow line, it being the inten- 
tion of the master of the tug to take the ferry into shoal water, 
where, in case of disaster, the consequences might be less serious. 
Shortly after signaling the barge, Captain Welcher noticed that his 
tow was listing too much to ride safely in the heavy swell beating 
back from the breakwater, and warned the crew of the barge not to 
anchor, but to hold up the line until they could be towed farther 
in. But the master of the barge (Captain O. C. Olson) did not obey 
Captain Welcher's instructions, replying that his crew would pump 
the barge out where she then was. l^fe ^aefror vius; .thereupon let 
go from the barge and the tow line cust> ,if ^ > .,, rA'fM? ' vT/jtvT 

That the Captain of the barge was not without some misgivings 
as to the situation on board" is' evjdenc&$>by the! inquest- that he 
now made for Captain WelcKer'to'siirut u l>y hifo ; jf<?V' ^lf - 'an' hf/ur. 
This the tug did. Seeing that the barge continued to list to port 
after casting anchor, without any indication of recovering herself, 
Captain Welcher whistled for help to get her inside, and the harbor 



46 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

tug Perfection responded. In the meantime the master of the tug 
made several attempts to get the towline again from the barge but 
failed "on account of the wind and the anchor chain being in the 
way" as he states in his testimony. When the Perfection came up 
the tugs together undertook the task of securing the line, and while 
they were maneuvering to get alongside the barge gave a sudden 
lurch, recovered slightly, and then rolled clear over. Both of the 
tugs immediately tooted their whistles vigorously to alarm the life- 
saving crew three-fourths of a mile away and the Ames at once 
turned on her searchlight in an effort to locate any surviving members 
of the imperiled crew. A boat was also lowered from the Ames, 
but the wind and sea prevented its being used. 

The vessel capsized so quickly that her crew had little time to look 
out for themselves, three of their number the master (O. C. Olson), 
William L. Johnsen (wheelman), and Gabriel Henson ("donkey 
man") were not afterwards seen alive, having without doubt been 
caught beneath the vessel and either drowned, or crushed by the 
cars, or the freight stuff with which they were loaded. Two of the 
crew John Dempsy (mate), and William Bunnell (wheelman) 
were taken from the water by the Perfection while one man, Norman 
Kennedy (the cook), was picked up by the life-saving crew from 
some floating telegraph poles. All 3 survivors were taken by the 
life-savers to their station, where they were made comfortable for the 
night. 

The surfman on duty in the lookout of the Old Chicago life-saving 
station first sighted the Ames and its tow at 5.45 p. m., when they 
were about 5 miles to the northeast. It was then growing dark. 
As the barge appeared at that time to be steering somewhat wildly 
the outlook called Keeper Garland's attention to the vessels, and 
that officer directed that they be closely watched. The barge was 
seen from the station to come to anchor under the lee of the break- 
water, but as no distress signal had up to that time been made there 
was no reason for thinking that the tow was in trouble. The call 
for a tug r sounded by the Ames after the barge had dropped her 
anchor, was heard at the station, and the tug Perfection was seen 
going out in response to the signal, neither of which was unusual, 
and therefore not calculated to arouse a suspicion that something 
had gone wrong out at the harbor entrance. A short tiriie after 
the tug went by, says Keeper Garland, there came a crash like a 
vessel smashing into a dock, which was soon followed by another 
one. Then came several blasts of the whistle in rapid succession, 
which the keeper knew to be a portent of disaster. It was apparent 
to him that the time had come for action, and he accordingly launched 
the surfboat and started out with his crew to investigate, getting a 
line on the way from the tug 0. B. Green, which had also answered 
the distress signals. Reaching the scene of the trouble, the keeper 
learned from t the Perfectly what had transpired with respect to the 
capsize anol ,tke ,1'escuk of Iwo 1 -of the sailors. The life-savers there- 
upon circled around the upturned barge looking for other members 
or the, unfortunate- creWj ,arxd picked up the cook, as previously 
staf e$i ,v. V [\] \ \ f n \ *;*:.45r5S-W *\ 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 47 

Wreck of the schooner barge Pasadena, October 8, 1906. 

The Pasadena was a 2,076 'ton vessel, seventeen years old and 
valued at $30,000. She hailed from Cleveland, Ohio. She was 
wrecked 1 mile northeast of the Portage life-saving station, on Lake 
Superior, apout 6 p. m. of October 8, 1906, while on her way with a 
$12,000 cargo of coal from Ashtabula, Ohio, to Superior, Wisconsin, 
in tow of the steamer Gladstone. The disaster resulted in the total 
destruction of the barge and the loss of her cargo, also the loss of 2 of 
her crew of 10 persons. 

All went wen with the 2 vessels until they had accomplished three- 
fourths of their 800 mile voyage, when on the evening of the day 
mentioned they ran into a 60-mile gale of rain and sleet, which com- 
pelled them to seek a shelter. As they were off the Keweenaw 
peninsula when the storm bore down upon them the Gladstone made 
for the Portage ship canal, which bisects the peninsula, in the hope 
of finding a ha~ T en in Lily Pond 1 mile inside the canal entrance. 

The northern end of the Portage ship canal is protected by 2 
breakwaters starting from the land some 3,000 feet apart, extending 
thence into the lake. at right angles to the beach several hundred feet, 
then converging to within 500 feet of each other 2,000 feet from the 
shore. As the Gladstone approached this gap her captain realized 
that it would be impossible to hold the tow up sufficiently to get it 
safely inside, and blew a distress signal, which was repeated by the 
donkey engine on the Pasadena. The last-named vessel also burned 
a flare-up Tight, then cut the towline and threw over her anchors in 
the hope of averting a collision with the east breakwater. Separated 
from the barge, the Gladstone continued on into the canal without 
mishap, but her less fortunate tow was swept with dragging anchors 
helplessly before the gale, and shortly struck the breakwater, staving 
in her bow. Through the hole caused by the collision the water 
rushed, a veritable flood, tearing off the vessel's hatches and making 
a clean sweep of every movable object on her decks, and in an 
incredibly short time she began to break up. Indeed, her crew 
barely had time to put on life-preservers before they found them- 
selves struggling for their lives in the water, surrounded by threshing 
debris. Eight of the seamen reached the shore on pieces of wreckage 
and were dragged from the water by persons who had come to the 
beach with lanterns. Two, however whose names are given as 
Fred Campbell and Oscar Holm lost their lives, whether by drown- 
ing or from injury sustained when the vessel went to pieces will never 
be known. 

The Gladstone and her tow were discovered by the life-saving crew 
while she was standing in for shelter. Keeper McCormick suspected 
they would get into trouble when they should attempt to pass through 
the gap, and accordingly made ready to go out in the station life- 
boat should disaster overtake either of them. He did not have long 
to wait, for soon the blasts of the vessels' whistles and the flare-up 
from the Pasadena told him that his apprehension was well founded. 

The keeper reasoned that the barge would let go her anchors, 
which would, he hoped, hold her long enough for the lifeboat to get 
to her, or that, in the event she should drag, the anchors might 
nevertheless retard her progress to leeward sufficiently to permit 
the lifeboat to overtake her and rescue her crew as the gale carried 

29909- 



48 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE". 

her along. He was also of the opinion that she was deeply loaded, 
which, owing to the flatness of the beach, would keep her from taking 
bottom close enough inshore to render effective the use of the beach 
apparatus. His judgment appears to have been well taken in this 
regard, as it seems highly probable that he could have accomplished 
a rescue in the manner he contemplated had the barge not struck the 
breakwater. 

Having made preparations for the seemingly inevitable, the life- 
saving crew started up the canal under full sail. When near the 
canal entrance the current and sea swept them back almost to their 
starting point, and they were able to regain the lost ground only 
by the assistance of some persons on the west pier, who towed them 
along by the boat's painter. From the canal entrance they started 
for the breakwater gap on tack, which they reached after making 
three legs. As they got into the gap and rose on a high sea they 
caught for an instant a glimmering light off to starboard, which they 
took to belong to the Pasadena. For five minutes the keeper held the 
boat in to the place where the light was seen, when word was passed 
to him that the lookout in the bow had caught a glimpse of a light 
straight ahead. The boat therefore made for the second light, but in 
the darkness it brought up against the breakwater, throwing every 
one of the crew forward, and causing the surfman who was tending the 
main sheet to lose his hold, the sheet unreeving. Out of necessity 
the boat was put before the gale until the sheet could be rerove and 
everything made shipshape. While the crew were employed getting 
things back in place their boat was allowed to drift to leeward 3 or 4 
miles. They managed to work their way back again into the neigh- 
borhood of the east breakwater, but only to meet with another 
serious mishap. This time their tiller was carried away and they 
were forced on the beach, landing within 100 feet of the place where 
the survivors of the Pasadena had drifted in. 

Upon learning from persons on the shore how the disaster to the 
barge had terminated Keeper McCorrnick detailed a part of his crew 
to keep a lookout along the beach for the two men known to be 
missing. He then returned to the station, where he found the 8 sur- 
vivors, who were being cared for by members of the crews of vessels 
that had found refuge from the storm in Lily Pond. 

The failure of the life-saving crew to render assistance in this case 
was due solely to conditions over which they had no control, namely, 
the severity of the storm, the darkness of the night, and the rapidity 
with which the Pasadena broke up. It would seem from the testi- 
mony of the witnesses at the investigation that the barge struck the 
breakwater somewhere near the time the lifeboat passed through the 
gap on its way to the rescue. If this conclusion is correct, the sta- 
tion crew were within a short distance of the doomed ship while it 
still held together, but the night prevented their knowing it. Her 
lights were seen but for one brief moment when the lifeboat was 
tossed up on the crest of a sea while clearing the breakwater. The 
second light seen by the life-savers, and which lured them against 
the breakwater with such disastrous consequences, proved to be the 
storm signal light on the flagstaff near the life-saving station. The 
failure of the boat's crew to identify it was an excusable error in the 
circumstances. However barren of results was their night's work, 
they nevertheless did their full duty at the imminent risk of their 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 49 

lives. The following extract from a letter addressed to the superin- 
tendent of the Twelfth life-saving district by the master of one of the 
vessels that sheltered in Lily Pond is an expression of the opinion 
generally held by the local press and public regarding the conduct of 
the station crew on this occasion: 

I was sheltered in Lily Pond at the time, and with my chief engineer was first on 
the scene, excepting the life-saving crew. I watched their efforts to get out of the 
piers in the face of a 50-mile gale and terrific sea, and can truthfully say that never 
did men work harder or display a better knowledge of their business. Had the barge 
held together ten minutes longer (I do not think she lasted more than half an hour) 
the life-saving crew could, I believe, have taken every man off. My mate and chief 
engineer will bear me out in all I say, as we were all on the beach and helped drag 
those poor fellows out of the surf and get them to the life-sa"ving station. 

- Swamping of a scow, November 12, 1906. 

This accident the first of 2 to occur during the year within the 
scope of the Service in connection with harbor improvements hap- 
pened in the middle afternoon of November 12, 1906. About 2.40 
p. m. of the day mentioned a heavy snowstorm compelled cessation 
of work upon a detached section of the north harbor pier, undergoing 
construction at the entrance to the Chicago River. The laborers 
engaged upon the project had, it appears, been accustomed to go to 
and fro between the scene of their employment and the shore section 
of the pier a 200-foot gap by boat, and, as usual, when the order 
came to stop work on account of the storm an employee of the con- 
struction company sculled a flat-bottom scow about 14 feet long 
across the gap to bring them in. Nine persons besides the man in 
charge of the boat got aboard, the load bearing the scow down until 
her gunwales came to within 4 or 5 inches of the water. As the boat 
pushed from the pier on the way back 2 or 3 of the party on board 
remained standing, refusing to obey the command of the man at the 
oar for them to be seated. When the scow got nearly across the gap 
a small sea that had rolled over the shoal water near the shore 
section of the pier splashed on board. This caused the occupants 
suddenly to shift their positions, which tilted the boat so far to one 
side that it swamped. Finding themselves in the water, several of 
the laborers swam for and reached a row of sheet piling, where, upon 
a submerged crib, 5 of them found refuge; 2 of the imperiled men 
gained the solid pier and reached land unassisted ; 1 remained in the 
scow and was picked up by a fisherman who happened to be near at 
the time; while 2, who were doubtless unable to swim, sank at once 
and were not again seen until their bodies were recovered by the crew 
of the Old Chicago life-saving station. 

The man on watch in the tower of the station named 200 or 300 
yards distant from the scene of the accident saw the occupants of 
the scow tumble overboard, and, with other members of the station 
crew, set out to the rescue as soon as the surf boat could be launched. 
In the meantime Keeper Charles Carland and 1 of his men were on 
the river in a skiff, going from the old station buildings to their new 
quarters. When the skiff cleared the end of the pier near the old 
station the keeper was able to see the men struggling in the water, 
and at once turned to their assistance, reaching them within a few 
seconds after the arrival of the other members of his crew in the 



50 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

surfboat. Upon being informed by someone that a man had gone 
under, Garland took the grappling iron from the surfboat and began 
to drag for the body, recovering it in ten minutes. It was found to 
be the remains of Banks Mako, an Italian. While the keeper was 
at the station working over the body of Mako he received word that 
another member of the boat party had drowned. He at once sent 
members of his crew to search for the missing man, whose body was 
recovered after an hour's quest. Joe Rezetio was the name of the 
second victim (also an Italian) taken from the water. The 5 men 
who had climbed upon the cribwork of the pier were taken off by the 
life-savers who went out in the surfboat. 

Wreck of the Schooner Lugano, November 15, 1906. 

The Lugano was a 174-ton vessel hailing from Port/land, Maine. 
She set sail from Gardiner, Maine, for New York, on what proved to 
be her last voyage, November 13, 1906, with a cargo of laths stored 
in her hold and on deck. There were 5 men in her crew, consisting 
of the master (Edmund Barter), the mate, 2 deck hands and a cook. 
As having an important bearing upon the outcome of the voyage it 
may be stated that the schooner had been in commission nearly 
forty years, having been built in 1867. 

The Lugano had favoring winds and good weather until she reached 
Sow and Pigs lightship, several miles southwest of Cutty hunk Island, 
Massachusetts, about noon of the 15th, when she was overtaken by a 
violent ENE. rain and hail storm, accompanied by a heavy swell. 
Some idea of the force of the gale from the time it bore down upon 
the vessel until she lay in pieces on the rocky shore of Point Judith 
may be had from the report of the Weather Bureau station on Block 
Island. At 12.30 p. m., according to this report, the velocity of the 
wind was 41 miles; at 1.53, 55 miles; at 2.45, 51 miles; and at 3.40 
p. m., 53 miles. 

Shortly after the schooner fell in with bad weather she began to 
leak, so that the cargo in her hold was soon wet up, greatly increasing 
her draft. Her Dumps were started and kept going, but they were 
unable to cope with the flood coming in through the opening seams 
in her hull and finding its way down from her sea-washed decks, 
and had it not been for the character of her load she would undoubt- 
edly have foundered while still a considerable distance offshore. 
The laths served to keep her afloat, however, until she was swept into 
shoal water, where stranding gave wind and sea an opportunity 
quickly to finish their work or destruction. 

The master appears to have had little if any foreboding of disaster 
until about 2 o'clock when it became apparent that the pumps 
were inadequate to their task but as nothing could probably have 
been done aboard ship even sooner that would have saved the 
schooner from the fate that finally befell her an earlier realization of 
her peril on the part of the captain would have been of no conse- 
quence. Captain Barter states in his testimony, given at the official 
investigation of the case, that he at one time considered the prac- 
ticability of anchoring, but gave up the idea, fearing that should he 
attempt thus to stay the vessel s progress she would roll over. 
When he awoke to his danger he decided to seek refuge inside the 
Point Judith breakwater, but the schooner had then become water- 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 51 

logged and would not respond to her wheel, her sails were in tatters, 
and the boarding seas were working havoc to her deck load, making 
it dangerous for her crew to remain on her decks. In fact, the vessel 
was already a wreck and beyond the power of man to save her. She 
struck the beach about 200 yards north of the Point Judith life- 
saving station and 300 yards offshore. As soon as she took bottom 
the seas broke over her with redoubled fury, washing away her house 
and tearing asunder and sending over the side her exposed cargo. 
As the deckload kept going by the board she lightened up somewhat 
and worked farther and farther inshore, the strong littoral current 
and cross sea meantime setting her northward. 

The man on duty in the lookout of the Point Judith station sighted 
the Lugano in distress at 3.30 p. m. only three or four minutes 
before she stranded his attention having Deen previously directed 
to the movements of another disabled vessel trying to get in behind 
the breakwater. The alarm was at once given, and in fifteen minutes 
the life-saving crew had arrived abreast of the schooner and laid a 
No. 4 shot line fairly across the end of her jib-boom. The ship's 
crew secured the line and hauled on board the tail block and whip 
line, making the block fast to the mainmast. The hawser was next 
hauled out and secured, and the apparatus on shore was then set up 
on the beach bluff, more than 20 feet above the water. Considerable 
difficulty was experienced in getting the big line taut, due to the fact 
that the schooner was all the time working her way nearer inshore. 
Finally, however, she stood sufficiently firm to enable the men on 
shore to keep the hawser pretty well clear of the seas, when the 
breeches buoy was started out toward her. 

At this critical juncture occurred one of those unforeseen mishaps 
which, though sometimes trivial in themselves, nevertheless operate 
to render well ordered plans, having every show of success, of no 
avail. The buoy had traveled out along the hawser but a short 
distance when it stopped and refused to go farther. It was soon 
found that the shot line, which the sailors had permitted to drift 
overboard after hauling out the tail block, had become frapped 
around the sagging whip and hawser about 20 feet from the schooner 
too far from either ship or shore to allow of clearing by hand. All 
efforts to free the lines by hauling and working them about from the 
beach were futile. 

Keeper Tefft discussed with his men and others present the advis- 
ability of trying to put a line over the forward part of the schooner. 
The keeper doubted the success of such an attempt, but being resolved 
to leave nothing undone that seemed to offer a chance of getting the 
sailors ashore he decided to make another try with the breeches 
buoy. He accordingly started for the station with 1 or 2 of his crew 
to bring out the reserve apparatus, but had gone only a few steps 
when some one sung out l i The crew is coming ashore ! ' ' All hands 
thereupon turned back and ran down over the bluff to the water's 
edge, that they might be ready to help the seamen out of the surf, 
should the opportunity come. 

The master states that even had another line come aboard it could 
not have been rigged to the foremast, as the torn sails of that mast 
were fouled about their shrouds, and the loose wreckage on that part 
of the ship would have deterred the ship's crew from undertaking the 
task. He would, he said, have tried to fasten a second line to the 



52 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

mainmast, as was done in the first instance. As this mast came 
down at 5 p. m. just at the time the sailors would have been engaged 
in securing the gear the keeper's judgment as to the futility of 
further efforts with the beach apparatus therefore seems to have 
been vindicated. When the master saw that the hawser was fouled, 
and that the buoy could not be worked, he remarked to his crew, 
"I am not going to wait any longer; you will all have to look out for 
yourselves," and seizing a plank leaped into the sea. All the crew 
followed his example except the cook, who, as testified by one of the 
survivors, remained in the rigging. The first sailor to come into 
view through the gathering darkness was seaman Fred Bousher. 
Surfman Max Chamberlain, a powerful man and an expert swimmer, 
dashed into the water up to his chest amidst the debris of the wreck 
and brought him ashore. Meanwhile John Champlin, a local fisher- 
man, who had been assisting the life-savers, discovered another man 
battling with the surf farther up the beach. He and Keeper Tefft 
together plunged into the water and brought the man out. He 
proved to be Captain Barter. Both men were nearly exhausted 
when rescued, and all who witnessed the performance of those who 
saved them agree that they would have shared the fate of their ship- 
mates but for the timely assistance given them. 

The beach was patrolled all night in the forlorn hope of saving 
others of the ship's crew or recovering their bodies. The body of 
seaman John Anderson was found at 7.50 a. m. of the 16th seven- 
eighths of a mile north of the life-saving station, and the bodies of 
mate Joseph Smith and Lewis Black, the cook, were picked up by 
members of the station crew three hours later the same day three- 
fourths of a mile north of the station. Two of the bodies recovered 
were bruised severely about the head, which would suggest the 
possibility of fatal injury from falling spars, or contact with wreckage 
while in the water. The other unfortunate sailor had been handi- 
capped by heavy clothing, which doubtless greatly interfered with 
his efforts to save himself. 

By the morning of the 16th the forward part of the schooner's 
hull had keeled over to the falling tide, and the after portion had 
broken up. The district superintendent a man of wide experience 
in wrecking operations states in an official communication relating 
to the disaster that it was one of the most complete wrecks that ever 
came under his observation. 

On page 269 of this report is printed a letter from Captain Barter 
to the General Superintendent of the Service expressive of his appre- 
ciation of the work of Keeper Tefft and those who assisted him at 
the wreck. The master of the Lugano says that the keeper and his 
crew did all that was possible under the circumstances. 

Storm Disaster near Holland, Michigan, November 21, 1906. 

The storm disaster that occurred near Holland, Michigan, November 
21, 1906, in which 4 men lost their lives while at work upon a break- 
water, affords one of the rare instances in the annals of the Service of 
the failure of a station crew to acquit itself with credit in the prosecu- 
tion of rescue operations. The fault of the Holland crew, whose 
action, or, to put it correctly, inaction, brought down upon their heads 
severe criticism from the local public and press and the condemnation 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 53 

of the Department, consisted in their failure to handle a trying situa- 
tion with judgment, persistence, and courage. 

The breakwater which figures so importantly in this tragedy is in 
plan a four-sided structure. Its 2 ends nearest the shore start at the 
outer ends of what are designated, respectively, the north and south 
piers, which form the sides of a channel about 200 feet wide leading 
from Lake Michigan into Black Lake, a distance of some 1,800 feet. 
From the piers the 2 arms of the breakwater extend 300 feet north- 
westerly and southwesterly, respectively, then change their directions 
and run in converging lines for 800 feet, terminating with the 2 outer ends 
300 feet apart, to afford passage into and out of the harbor of Hol- 
land. At the time of the disaster only a portion of the breakwater 
the outer end of the north arm had been completed. The remain- 
der of that side, however, had been built up nearly to the surface. No 
work had been done upon the short section of the north arm, thus 
leaving an unobstructed gap to the end of the north pier. The work 
was being done by the Bennett & Schnorbach Company, under the 
supervision of Government inspectors. 

The morning of the 21st opened witji a heavy fall of rain, interrupt- 
ing operations on the breakwater, but the contractors were pushing 
the improvement with all possible speed, and when the weather mod- 
erated somewhat about 10 a. m. several men were sent out to the 
structure with a scow load of planks. They had no more than reached 
the scene of their employment, however, and discharged their load 
when it again set in raining heavily, and they returned to the harbor , 
leaving the scow behind. Between 12 and 1 o'clock the weather 
cleared up a little again, and 5 men Alvin H. Nelson, assistant 
United States inpector; Thomas J. Bennett, one of the contractors; 
Edward A. Bennett, a foreman; Martin- Woodard, a carpenter, and 
George Lechaine went out to the breakwater in a gasoline launch, 
which, on their arrival, they moored alongside the scow. 

About 2.30 in the afternoon the wind, which had been blowing off 
the land, shifted to the southward and within a few minutes had be- 
come a driving gale. So quickly did the blow come up that the men 
on the breakwater had little warning of its approach. As the only sur- 
vivor expressed it, the storm broke with the force of a tornado. All 5 
men left their work and made for the launch with the intention of 
running for the harbor. One of their number, Edward Bennett, was 
blown into the water while scrambling off the breakwater. He 
climbed back on the stonework and started again for the launch only 
to be tumbled over a second time by the wind. He managed to save 
himself, however, from going, into the water again and succeeded in 
joining his comrades on the scow. Four of the men jumped from the 
scow into the launch, and one of them, Thomas J. Bennett, remained 
on the scow, holding the line from the launch, ready to shove the smaller 
boat clear when its engine had been started. The engine refused to 
work, however. In the excitement of the moment the man on the 
scow threw the line on the launch and made a leap to join his fellows, 
but slipped and fell between the two violently pitching boats, from 
which dangerous position he was with difficulty extricated. 

At this juncture the scow broke loose from the breakwater and the 
wind sent it bumping along the cribwork with the launch on the out- 
side and slightly astern keeping it company. As the 2 boats swept 
along, the stern of the launch struck heavily against a pile and at the 



54 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



same instant a sea raised its bow and threw it up on the scow. This 
left the stern so low that the smaller boat began to ship considerable 
water, and the men aboard, thinking that it would swamp when it 
came off, all climbed back again on the scow. Three of the men at 
once jumped for and reached the breakwater, and commenced craw- 
ling up on the superstructure, while the 2 others the Bennett broth- 
ers remained on the scow and tried to work the launch back into the 
water. In this they succeeded, and one of them undertook to work it 
up beside the boat they were on, but the other brother, Edward, 
suggested that they abandon the boats and seek safety on the break- 
water, adding the warning that if they remained where they were 
the boats would in all probability be thrown upon the low work of 
the uncompleted portion of the breakwater and pound themselves to 
pieces. 

Thomas Bennett, acting upon his brother's suggestion, jumped to 
the breakwater, but just as Edward was on the point or following 
him the scow struck a pile, which threw it outward. The 3 or 4 feet 
now intervening between the scow and the breakwater caused the 
man to hesitate for an instant, and in the moment of holding back 
the breech became too wide for him to risk clearing it. In telling his 
story of this incident the surviving brother says: 

Tom ran for the longitudinal wall and followed the other men up on the high work. 
He looked back and saw me standing on the scow, and he turned around as if to come 
back. Then he looked at me and I looked at him; we couldn't speak. I said to my- 
self: "The boys up there are safe, and I am the one who is going to be lost." I was 
thinking that the life-saving crew would come out and get them. 

With the lone man on board, the scow was swept along the break- 
water northward, but at no time giving the occupant a chance to 
leave it. His situation seemed for the time much more perilous than 
that of his companions, but, as it turned out, the circumstance 
which prevented his leaving the scow, and seemingly set the death 
sentence upon him, proved his ultimate salvation. After several 
narrow escapes from an overturn, due to contact with the stonework 
of the breakwater, the scow finally rounded the structure and drifted 
through the gap into quieter water, the launch still in attendance. 
The 2 boats continued to drift northward alongshore, and were finally 
blown on the beach a mile and a half north of the channel piers suf- 
ficiently close for Bennett to clamber out and wade to land. Several 
persons met the drenched and nearly frozen man as he emerged from 
the water and assisted him to a hotel in the vicinity, where he was 
given every needed attention. 

Although the storm which sent the 4 men on the breakwater to 
their death broke with little or no immediate warning, it is shown 
by the testimony taken in the case that premonitory notice of ap- 
proaching bad weather had been sent to the life-saving station as 
early as 10 a. m. of November 21, at which hour the keeper, so he 
states, hoisted a storm signal under instructions received from the 
Weather Bureau. 

When the wind shifted to the southward, a short time before the 
heavy blow set in, Keeper Chauncey D. Pool, was with a party of 
men who were at work upon the station launchway, then in process 
of rebuilding. The man at the time on duty in the station lookout 
had been watching the movements of the men on the breakwater, and 
seeing them scurry for their boat called to the keeper to come up into 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 55 

the tower. When the keeper had ascended to the lookout the surf- 
man remarked to him : ' ' I guess the fellows out there are having their 
troubles." The keeper says he looked and saw 4 men on the break- 
water and 1 in the scow, and that the spray was flying clear over 
them, at times hiding them from view. 

Both men descended from the lookout on the run. The keeper at 
once summoned all his crew except 1 man absent on leave and 
proceeded with them to a boat livery on Black Lake, some 200 yards 
from the station, where the service surf bo at was kept while repairs 
were being made to the station launchway . 

That the movements of the station crew while on their way toward 
Lake Michigan may be clearly understood it is deemed necessary to 
state that the north and south piers heretofore mentioned run straight 
toward the east from their outer ends for some 1,200 feet, then turn 
southward at a slight angle and continue the remaining several hun- 
dred feet of their length to Black Lake without further change of 
direction. Under the influence of the gale the water from the great 
lake had already begun to race in between the piers, but that part of 
the south revetment east of the angle afforded somewhat of a lee for 
the surf boat, as the full sweep of the inpouring flood continued on to- 
ward the north pier, and for a time the crew were able to make fair 
headway under oars. On reaching the angle, however, they found 
it much more difficult to get on, as they then had squarely to meet the 
current. When they had worked their way a short distance past the 
turn in the channel several men standing on the south pier took the 
boat's painter at the keeper's request and assisted them along until 
they were nearly to the pier end, then let the painter go. The boat's 
crew thereupon renewed their efforts with the oars, but making no 
appreciable progress they soon abandoned the enterprise and re- 
turned to the station. 

Keeper Pool now decided to attempt a rescue with the beach 
apparatus. Owing to the condition of the pier, which was in bad 
repair and rotten in places, the beach cart could not be used, and it 
was necessary to carry the apparatus in parts out to the place where 
it was proposed to operate it. In the performance of this hazardous 
task the station crew had the willing assistance of several citizens. 
At this time the wind was blowing with such violence that the 
members of the relief party were several times compelled to stop 
and get hold of something to retain their footing. Thus contesting 
every inch of their way with the storm they finally reached the 
light-house at the end of the pier, and placed the Lyle gun in posi- 
tion for firing. The gun was pointed considerably to windward of 
the breakwater to make allowance for the force of the gale, and a 
No. 7 line was sent out with a 5-ounce charge of powder. Owing 
to the thick weather and the clouds of spray that almost continually 
enveloped the breakwater the projectile was lost to view before it 
had finished its flight, but in the opinion of all who witnessed the 
firing it fell several feet short of the mark. As soon as the trailing 
line struck the water the current, which ran obliquely across it, 
swept it toward the north pier in a wide half circle. The keeper set 
his foot upon it to check its running out, but his weight nad no 
apparent effect. Three of the party then took hold of it and pulled 
with might and main, but notwithstanding their combined efforts 
the current tore it from them, almost precipitating them from the 



56 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEBVICE. 

pier. Not until the line had been given a turn around one of the 
supports of the light-house was its progress arrested, and then it 
snapped in two. Here ended the efforts of the station crew to oper- 
ate trie beach apparatus. 

When Keeper Pool and his men came in from the end of the pier 
they found at the station a number of citizens, with whom the situa- 
tion was discussed. One of those present suggested the advisability 
of calling for a tug, and telephone messages were forthwith sent to 
Saugatuck, Grand Haven, and Benton Harbor, but none of the tug 
companies communicated with could be persuaded to venture from 
their harbors under the prevailing weather conditions. About 5 
p. m. the keeper sent a surf man across the channel to patrol the 
north beach, and at midnight 2 other surfmen were sent to relieve 
him. Several citizens also remained on the north beach during the 
night in company with the surfman. The beach to the south was 
also patrolled during the earlier hours of the night, and a constant 
watch was kept from the lookout, the keeper himself performing 
the last-named duty for a part of the time. 

In the exchange of views at the station some of the citizens ex- 
pressed in forcible language their dissatisfaction with the work of 
Keeper Pool and his crew. Some were of the opinion that more 
persistent effort to reach the imperiled men with the surfboat would 
have succeeded, while others were no less certain that a rescue could 
have been effected with the breeches buoy, had a more determined 
effort been made with that apparatus. The failure of the crew 
to accomplish anything in either instance was severely condemned. 
This feeling of bitterness, which was aggravated by the events of 
the next morning, was shared by the entire community and voiced 
by the press. 

It appears to have been the keeper's plan on the night of the 21st 
to again attempt a rescue in the surfboat at daybreak, but as a 
matter of fact it was 8 o'clock or after next morning when he actually 
started. Had he tried to go out at dawn, or as soon as the light 
permitted, perhaps he might have somewhat redeemed himself in 
the eyes of the public, but ne let the opportunity go by unimproved. 
About 6 o'clock he was implored by the rather of one of the imperiled 
men to man the surfboat without delay, but replied that the weather 
was too bad, that it would be useless, that the surfboat had been 
damaged on the previous day and could not be used, and that the 
big boat (the lifeboat), which the father had suggested might be 
available, could not be taken from the station because of the condi- 
tion of the launchway. This man, N. P. Nelson, was very severe on 
the witness stand in his arraignment of the station crew, particularly 
censuring their negligence in not having the surfboat in readiness to 
make another attempt to reach the breakwater at daylight of the 
22d. The surfboat had been injured, it seems, by striking against 
the pier on the afternoon of the 21st. The keeper admittedly knew 
of the injury, but did not take steps to have the damage repaired 
until the next morning, when two hours or more were lost in getting 
the boat in proper condition. 

By the time the surfboat was in readiness the wind had shifted to 
north by west, and the breakwater therefore afforded a lee on the 
inside, which enabled the station crew to get alongside without great 
difficulty. They found the bodies of Nelson, Bennett, and Woodard 



' UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 57 

in a pocket of the cribwork near the inner end of the highest point of 
the structure, but could discover no trace of Lechaine. The body of 
the last-named person was not recovered, so far as the testimony 
shows. He was evidently one who had been seen on the previous 
day standing alone on the cribwork clinging to a pile. He had doubt- 
less been washed from his position by the seas coming over the break- 
water and carried out into the lake. In the judgment of the keeper 
the men whose bodies were recovered had been dead several hours 
when found. Nevertheless, on getting them ashore the station crew 
and the citizens one of whom was a physician made a prolonged 
effort to resuscitate them. 

A searching investigation of this deplorable case was made by Lieu- 
tenant J. G. Ballinger, Revenue-Cutter Service, assistant inspector, 
Twelfth life-saving district, in the course of w T hich 21 witnesses were 
examined and more than 250 typewritten pages of testimony taken. 

In laying before the Secretary of the Treasury the report of the 
investigating officer and accompanying papers, the General Superin- 
tendent of the Service commented as follows: 

I have given the testimony the most careful consideration, and have reached the 
conclusion that while it appears quite probable that none of the men could have been 
saved, owing to the suddenness and fierceness of the tempest, tlie conduct of the life- 
saving crew was not characterized by the energetic, continuous, and persistent en- 
deavor that the attendant circumstances seemed to call for. 

The evidence does not entirely satisfy me that it was impossible for the crew at the 
trial made with the boat to get a little farther beyond the piers and thus enter the 
current sweeping northward and pass through the gap between the end of the pier and 
the breakwater. Whether, having gone through the gap, they could have proceeded 
undertheleeof the breakwater to the imperiled men is, in my judgment, problematical, 
but the alternative of the boat being swept to the northern beach would have satisfied 
the onlookers and the community. The station crew should at least have made a more 
prolonged and vigorous attempt to get beyond the entrance to the piers. 

Furthermore, it seems to me that after the first failure the crew should have made 
another effort with the boat, either repeating their former maneuver or attempting 
a launching from the beacli above the north pier. More than one attempt should also 
have been made with the breeches-buoy apparatus. It appears that but one shot was 
fired with the Lyle gun, using a No. 7 line (^ inch in diameter) and 5 ounces of powder, 
and that the projectile fell at a distance from the men variously estimated at from 2 to 8 
yards. A second trial with 6 ounces of powder the prescribed maximum charge 
would probably have thrown the line over the pier where the men were. If not, there 
was still the reserve line No. 4 ( T \inch in diameter) which, in my judgment would 
have carried the distance. I am at a loss to understand why these attempts were not 
made. The answer given by the crew that even had a line reached the men they 
could not have been saved is not sufficient. It may be correct, but an opinion or a 
theory is not so convincing as a demonstration. 

The crew having made these 2 unsuccessful attempts (with the surfboat and the 
breeches-buoy apparatus) discontinued their efforts and retired to the station. In 
my judgment they should have continued to do something toward effecting a rescue 
until darkness compelled them to stop. Their cessation of activity under the circum- 
stances I regard as unpardonable. The keeper of course is to be held primarily re- 
sponsible, but testimony shows that some talk was made by the crew in the boat after 
it had been towed out to the end of the south pier and the towline, or painter, released. 
The nature of this conversation was not clearly brought out, but I think it may be in- 
ferred that it related to the practicability or wisdom of further efforts to reach the men. 
It is in evidence that at least one of the crow in conversation with outsiders made the 
assertion that he did not have to risk his life, and said other things which gave the 
hearers an unfavorable impression of his courage. His attempt in his testimony to 
explain his Janguage does not appear to me to be satisfactory. 

Upon the recommendation of the General Superintendent, Keeper 
Pool and the surfman who thought his duty did not require him to 
risk his life were dismissed, and instructions were issued that no 
member of the station crew who was on duty at the time of the dis- 



58 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

aster should be permitted again to enlist at the Holland station, 
where, obviously, their further employment was inadvisable. 

Capsize of the canoe Sprite, November 25, 1906. 

A considerable number of the accidents sustained by small craft 
within the field of operations of the Service are due to the venture- 
some spirit of persons more or less skilled in the handling of boats, 
whose expertness prompts them to take risks that those less adept 
on the water would not have the hardihood to incur. The following 
is a case in point: 

About 10 a. m. of November 25, 1906, two young men, Leon K. 
Power and Robert N. Henderson, both of Rochester, New York, 
started down the Genesee River, at Charlotte, New York, in a canoe 
with the intention of taking their boat out through the piers at the 
mouth of the river and around to " West Beach/' on the lake front a 
mile or more westward of the piers, there to store it for the winter. 
Both men, it is stated, were good swimmers and expert canoeists. 
They got safely beyond the piers and headed up along the beach a 
half mile offshore, but while still a considerable distance from their 
destination their canoe capsized, both occupants losing their lives. 

As the canoe passed the life-saving station, situated near the inner 
end of the east pier, the man on duty in the lookout hailed the men 
and motioned to them to turn back, but as they were on the opposite 
side of the river they probably failed to notice his warning. At any 
rate they paid no heed to it. The lookout kept an eye on the canoe 
for a few minutes after it reached the lake, and on being relieved at 
10 a. m. reported it to the man taking his place, who also kept track 
of the men through his glasses. Along toward 11 o'clock the look- 
out noticed that the canoe was not making much headway, and, 
becoming apprehensive for its safety, called Keeper Gray to the 
lookout and expressed his misgivings to him. The keeper was un- 
able at the moment to pick up the canoe through the binocular 
glass, but at once decided that it was a case which called for the ser- 
vices of the power life-boat. He thereupon left the tower with in- 
structions to the surfman to be ready to accompany him as he passed 
by the lookout tower on his way down the river. 

The power boat covered the half mile or so from the station to the 
terminus of the piers in a few minutes, but when it emerged into the 
lake, where an unobstructed view could be had along the west shore, 
the canoe was nowhere in sight. As it could not have made land in 
the time consumed by the life-savers in getting outside the piers, 
Captain Gray was convinced that an accident had occurred, and 
accordingly steered with all speed for the locality in which the boat 
was last seen from the station. 

The canoe was found bottom up. Two oars, a sail, 2 or 3 coats, and 
2 hats, floating on the water nearby, told the story of the tragedy. 
No trace of the canoeists themselves could be found, although the 
life-savers cruised about in the neighborhood of the capsize for an 
hour or more, part of the time dragging for the bodies. 

This accident without doubt occurred while the power boat was 
between the piers on its way to the lake, during which time the life- 
savers were unable to see, the canoe. Keeper Gray expresses the 
opinion that if the young men had hauled their boat over the west 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 59 

pier, launched it again from the west side, and then made their way 
up the beach close inshore, the trip would have been accomplished 
without mishap. 

Wreck of ike schooner Alice T. Boardman, January 4, 1907. 

The Alice T. Boardman was a small two-masted schooner, built in 
Calais, Maine, in 1873, and rebuilt in 1896. She left Calais on Decem- 
ber 3, 1906, for Hyannisport, Massachusetts, with a cargo of lumber 
stored in her hold and on deck, consigned to the H. H. Richards 
Lumber Company, of West Haven, Connecticut, and to J. K. and B. 
Sears, of Hyannis, Massachusetts. The vessel was valued at $12,000 
and her cargo at $4,500. The crew consisted of 5 men the master, 
mate, cook, and 2 seamen. 

She left her last port of call, Portland, Maine, January 3, standing 
off to the southward for Cape Cod. When off Highland Light that 
evening the wind fell calm, and later blew up fresh from the south- 
ward, bringing a heavy rain fall, and making it necessary to beat to 
windward to reach the shoals. When Shovelful Lightship, the last 
aid to navigation made by the schooner, was reached, the weather had 
become so thick that all lights were lost, and the master had to 
depend entirely upon his judgment in running over and clearing the 
numerous small shoals in that locality a very dangerous proceeding, 
because of the strong currents. After beating about and tacking 
several times, and failing to make the fog bell on the Handkerchief 
Shoal lightship, he decided to anchor until the tide should turn and 
the weather clear up. 

Judging himself out of the way of traffic he let go his starboard 
anchor about 11.30 p. m. in 5J fathoms of water and with 30 fathoms 
of chain, and, with all sails furled and the watch set, considered every- 
thing safe and snug for the night. After midnight the weather 
cleared somewhat, and about 4.30 a. m. it was discovered that the 
schooner had anchored off the southeast edge of Handkerchief Shoal 
and that she was dragging northward toward the breakers. Instead 
of making sail and trying to get a better berth the master let go the 
other anchor with 25 fathoms of chain and veered to about 40 fathoms 
on the other chain. Giving her more chain, and a second anchor, 
checked her for a time, but as the holding ground was poor she soon 
started again toward shallow water. The only way in which she 
could possibly have gotten out of her perilous situation at this time 
would have been to make sail and slip her cables, but unfortunately 
she was shipping a great deal of water over her bows, which made it 
very dangerous forner crew to attempt thus to get her free, and she 
finally dragged with both anchors down on a good scope of chain, 
on th*e shoal and into the breakers. When she first took bottom, she 
pounded heavily, but her cargo held secure for some time and she 
did not apparently injure herself, the long lumber in her hold stiffen- 
ing her up considerably and doubtless saving her from going to 
pieces. Meantime she kept working farther and farther up the shoal 
with the seas breaking heavily over her, "to dodge which" the master 
states in his account of the happenings on board, the crew first took 
refuge behind the masts and then in the rigging. 

As the sea steadily increased, the lumber on deck finally began to 
loosen up and go adrift. With the deck practically untenable and 



60 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEBVIOE. 

the imminent possibility of the masts going by the board, if the 
schooner itself did not soon actually break up, the situation of the 
sailors was grave indeed. The one small boat belonging to the 
schooner hung astern, and in the opinion of the master the tune had 
now come when the only chance of saving the lives of himself and 
crew lay in launching it. The entire crew left the rigging and went 
aft to lower it, and succeeded in getting it down and the after tackle 
unhooked, so that the boat swung on its forward tackle and painter. 
One man, Thomas Hen try, jumped into the bow as soon as the boat 
struck the water, but had scarcely done so when a sea knocked it up 
under the schooner's stern and dumped him overboard. The next 
sea righted it full of water, and another sea, following after, threw 
it upside down, in which position it remained. The tide swept 
Hentry away from the schooner so quickly that he had no chance to 
get hold of the boat, nor his shipmates time to throw him a line. He 
was seen to reach some planks floating about in an eddy a rod or 
more to leeward, raise himself partly out of the water and rest his 
elbows upon them, but a moment later the current swept both 
planks and man to the eastward into the breakers and out of sight 
of the vessel. The crew now climbed to the top of the house, from 
which refuge they were intermittently driven into the rigging by 
the boarding seas. 

Up to this tune none of the crew seems to have thought to fly a 
distress signal or otherwise endeavor to attract attention to their 
plight, but following their efforts with the boat 1 of their number 
made his way into the cabin and secured a flag, the national ensign, 
which was placed up in the rigging, union down. 

About 7.15 a. m. of January 4 Substitute Surfman G. P. Smith, 011 
watch in the lookout of the Monomoy Point life-saving station, 
called Keeper Kelley, of the station, up into the tower to look at a 
vessel 2 miles or more to the southwest, apparently dragging her 
anchors and drifting into the breakers. At this time, the keeper 
states, there was a strong SSW. breeze, the weather was misty and 
the sea rough, and the tide was almost at ebb and running to the 
eastward. While the 2 men were watching the vessel she struck. 
The keeper at once assembled his crew and in a few moments from 
the time the vessel was sighted had the surfboat on the way to the 
rescue. As soon as the surfboat got clear of the beach the keeper 
ordered the jib and mainsail set, then hauled up on the port tack, 
standing WSW. By splendid boatmanship the vessel was made on 
the second tack, the life-savers running in on the schooner's lee side 
and taking the survivors off without mishap. 

The shipwrecked men were given every attention at the life-saving 
station, where they remained for forty-eight hours. On January 6, 
the life-savers put them aboard their vessel, which was on the same 
day floated and towed to Hyannis by the revenue steamer Gresham, 
assisted by a tug. The loss of cargo from the schooner amounted to 
$500. So far as can be ascertained the body of the drowned sailor 
was not recovered. 

This shipwreck would doubtless have been unattended by fatality 
had the hapless sailor remained on board. On the other hand, the 
outcome of the attempt to launch the small boat, deterring the 
sailors, as it did, from further efforts to leave ship, in all proba- 
bility prevented the loss of the entire crew, for had they succeeded, 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 61 

even in getting away from the vessel they would not have had one 
chance in a hundred of weathering the heavy seas and getting ashore 
through the surf. 

Foundering of the barges Girard and Alaska, February IS, 1907. 

From the story of the 2 survivors of the Girard it appears that the 
tug Valley Forge, with a string of barges consisting or the Bethayres, 
Alaska, and Girard, left Philadelphia on February 14, 1907, laden 
with coal, consigned to the Consumers Coal Company, of Boston. 
The Girard, the first barge to meet disaster, was a 3-masted, schooner- 
rigged vessel of 824 tons burden. She carried 900 tons of coal in 
her hold, which gave her a draft of 12 feet. Her sails and rigging 
were in good condition, and her- hatches well secured, covered with 
tarpaulins and battened down with wedges and bars. The officer 
who investigated this case states in his report that from the appear- 
ance of the wreckage that came out of her she was in good condition 
and well prepared for heavy weather. 

The Valley Forge and her tow were attended by good weather until 
they arrived off Cape Cod, which they reached on the morning of the 
18th , passing the Pollock Rip light-ship about 3a.m. Here the 4 vessels 
ran into a northeast gale, which r.apidly increased from 35 to 65 miles 
an hour, blowing directly on shore and accompanied by thick snow 
squalls and very cold weather. 

When the tug had forced its way with the barges to a point about 
6 miles north or the Highland life-saving station, the line connecting 
the Bethayres with the Alaska parted, setting the latter vessel and 
the Girard adrift. Separated from their tow, the 2 barges, with a 
line between them, drifted to leeward, their heads to the northwest, 
for half an hour or more, when the hawser was cast off from aboard 
the Alaska, permitting each vessel to look out for herself. As soon 
as the master of the Girard a young Norwegian named Larsen 
saw that he was adrift from the Alaska he set up his forestaysail and 
foresail, hauling the sheets aft to the port side to force her head 
around to the wind. The vessel would not mind her sail, however, 
but fell off to leeward instead, and headed for the shore. While the 
crew were endeavoring thus to get the barge under some degree of 
control the snow thinned a little, disclosing breakers ahead. To 
avoid being driven into the danger that now threatened, sail was quickly 
taken in and both the starboard and the port anchors, weighing 2,000 
and 1,000 pounds, respectively, were let go with 60 fathoms of chain 
on each. The ground tackle did not hold the barge at first and she 
continued to drag toward the breakers on the outer bar, about three- 
fourths of a mile offshore. She finally worked over the bar, after 
Counding on it so hard that, as stated by one of the survivors, her tim- 
ers cracked. While on the bar a sea came aboard and picked up 
seaman Gustaf Johannesen, who was standing near amidships, and 
carried him away. The cook (Martin Berg) , who was aft at the time, 
saw him go, and threw after him a ring life buoy and a life-preserver, 
but both fell short of his reach. The 2 other men on board Captain 
Larsen and seaman Joe Johnson were too busy looking out for their 
own safety and trying to manage the barge to do anything for their 
unfortunate shipmate, who, being heavily clad, must have gone down 
very quickly. 



62 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

After the Girard was hove across the bar she brought up on her 
cables and held on for half an hour. Meantime the seas kept beating 
heavily against her and washing over her, and before long stove in 
her hatches, allowing the water to fill her hold. This brought her 
down so low in the water that she began to pound again, and shortly 
started to drag toward the inner bar, soon going over it and into the 
breakers about 200 yards from the beach, bringing up broadside to 
the sea with her head to the southward. Berg, who had taken the 
wheel, and Johnson were in the pilot house when the barge made her 
last stand, both of them suffering severely from cold. The master, 
who had remained on deck up to this moment, now climbed on top 
of the pilot house, where he might the better take in their desperate 
situation and consider what could be done under the circumstances. 

From the story of the life-savers "who participated in this rescue it 
appears that Surfman A. T. Lucas of the Highland station discovered 
the Girard at 6.30 a. m. of February 18th while making the north 
patrol. The barge was then almost a mile north of the station just 
outside the outer bar, broadside to the sea, and making very bad 
weather of it. As the surf man watched her she hove over the bar, 
heading northeast, and brought up on her anchors, as heretofore 
stated, between the two bars. 

Lucas abandoned his patrol and ran to a watchhouse of the Service 
standing on the beach, from which place he reported his discovery 
by telephone to his keeper. He then retraced his steps to the station, 
and within a few minutes after his arrival his comrades were trudging 
along the beach, helping forward with all possible speed the horse 
attached to the apparatus cart. They arrived abreast of the Girard 
just as she came ashore, w and were soon joined by the High Head 
station crew, to whom Acting Keeper McFayden of the Highland 
station had sent notice. Ten minutes after trie Highland life-savers 
reached the scene a No. 9 shot line, carried by 6 ounces of powder 
(the first and only charge fired) was sent across the 200 yards of surf 
intervening between the shore and the barge, falling so close to the 
captain on top of the pilot house that all he had to do was to reach 
out and lay hold of it. Having caught the line Captain Larsen called 
Berg and Johnson from their shelter to help him haul the tackle on 
board. This work accomplished, the whip-line block was made fast 
around the framework of the house between the 2 forward windows, 
the window sash being kicked out for the purpose. Upon a signal 
from Larsen the men on the beach then hauled off the hawser, which 
was made fast on the barge by hitching it around the pilot house. 
The apparatus having been set up on the shore the breeches buo} T 
was now hauled off. Larsen ordered the cook to get into it, but the 
man was so benumbed by cold that he could no longer do anything 
to help himself, and the captain had to pick him up bodily and place 
him in the buoy. 

When the cook had started shoreward Johnson went back into the 

Eilot house and stripped off his outer clothing, probably to enable 
im the better to cope with the seas when his turn should come to 
get into the buoy. As the weather was bitterly cold, and as he had 
already been drenched while out on the deck, he was soon worse off 
than the cook had been. When the buoy came out the second time 
he did not answer or show himself when Larsen shouted for him to 
come and get in, and when the captain went into the house to see 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 63 

what was the matter he found the man unconscious and hanging to 
the wheel with his arms around the spokes in such a way that he 
could not be pulled loose. Larsen himself was rapidly freezing, and 
realized that if he tarried on the barge he would soon be in the con- 
dition of the man he was trying to save. Moreover, the vessel 
threatened momentarily to break up, in which event his end would 
be no less certain. He therefore reluctantly left the unconscious 
man to his fate and stumbled out of the pilot house and along the 
unstable deck to the waiting buoy, into which he with great difficulty 
managed to place himself and make the signal to haul away. He was 
soon in the hands of the life-savers, but none too soon. Scarcely had 
the breeches buoy passed from over the water when the Girard began 
to break up, and within fifteen or twenty minutes was strewn in 
small bits along the beach. 

The Highland crew hastened to their station with the Girard' s 
cook (who had been taken from the breeches buoy unconscious) in 
the apparatus cart, and Larsen on foot, assisted by a surfman. 
After the clothing of the survivors had been removed they were given 
stimulants and the prescribed treatment for frostbite and put to 
bed. A physician from Provincetown, who had in the meantime 
been sent for, then took charge of them while the life-savers returned 
to the beach with their reserve apparatus cart to look for the Alaska. 
The High Head life-savers had, it appears, while on their way back 
from the Girard, made out that vessel through the snow scurries, at 
anchor outside the outer bar, and on reaching their station had 
reported their discoverv by telephone to the Highland crew. The 
second cart was pullecf 1J miles north from the Highland Station 
and abreast of the Alaska, in readiness when she should strike or come 
close enough to permit shooting a line across her. It could be seen 
from the shore that she was shipping a great deal of water, but she 
was apparently holding on in spite of the weather. At about 1 p. m. 
it was observed that she was dragging to leeward. Suddenly she foun- 
dered and settled in 4 fathoms just outside the outer bar and three- 
fourths of a mile offshore. No signs of life aboard were at any time 
visible from the beach. The theory as to the cause of her sinking, 
accepted by everyone acquainted with the circumstances, is that 
the seas stove in ner hatches and filled her hold. No rescuing boat, 
had there been one at hand, could have reached her under the prevail- 
ing conditions, and, granting that there was anybody alive on the barge 
when she went down, it would have been equally out of the question 
for a boat to get away from her and make the land. The distance 
she lay offshore also prevented the use of the beach apparatus. There 
was, therefore, no way in which connection with the barge could have 
been established by means available to the life-saving crews on the 
beach. As was the case with the Girard, the terrible pounding the 
seas gave her broke her up a very short time after she settled. For 
two or three hours the lire-savers kept a close watch on the beach 
for possible survivors or dead bodies. None came ashore, however, 
and they returned to their station, chilled, hungry, and exhausted 
from their nine hours' work in the winter storm. 

It was afterwards ascertained that the crew of the Alaska con- 
sisted of 4 persons the master, cook, and two deck hands all of 
whom were undoubtedly lost. The tug Valley Forge and the barge 

2990908 5' 



64 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

Beihayres were found 50 miles offshore by a tug sent out to look for 
them. 

In closing his report the investigating officer speaks in high praise 
of the services of the Highland and High Head life-saving crews, 
and specially commends acting Keeper McFayden for his capable 
direction of an arduous and critical day's work. 

Wreck of the steamer Corona, March 1, 1907. 

The Corona was a 1,492 ton steei vessel, owned by the Pacific Coast 
Company, of New York. When she encountered the disaster, the 
account of which is here given, she was on her way from San Fran- 
cisco to Eureka, California, carrying a general cargo valued at 
$50,000, and having on board 95 passengers and a crew of 52. The 
vessel itself was valued at $150,000, and was insured for $115,000. 
The cargo was uninsured. 

The vessel got into difficulty near the entrance to Humboldt Bay 
about 10 a. m. of March 1, 1907. At the time of the accident the 
tide was at flood and the sea rough. She succeeded in getting safely 
over the outer bar, and had reached the vicinity of the north jetty, 
which marks the north side of the channel leading into the bay, when 
suddenly and without warning she sheered and took bottom forward. 
The heavy seas at once swung her about until she lay with her bow 
pointing oceanward. Lying in this position the seas worked her 
around northward and she finally brought up hard and fast in the 
sand about 100 feet outside the jetty and something over 550 yards 
from the shore. The jetty is awash at high water, and when mis- 
fortune befell the Corona it was covered by a seething mass of foam. 

Keeper Hennig, of the Humboldt Bay life - saving station, had 
been watching the Corona's movements from the station situated 
on the bay side of North Spit (a clear view being afforded across 
the half mile stretch of sand intervening between the station and 
the ocean beach), and as soon as he saw that something was wrong 
with the vessel he manned the lifeboat and started out to her 
through the ship channel in tow of a gasoline launch. The launch 
towed the lifeboat as far as the rapidly.increasing seas would permit, 
then cast it off, and the life-savers entered the surf under oars. The 
first breaker that struck the boat pitched one of the oarsmen, Calvin 
C. Wilson, overboard. Fortunately his comrades were able to pick 
him up, and he again took his oar notwithstanding he had sustained 
an injury in going overboard evidently by striking a thole pin of 
sufficient consequence to later incapacitate him for several days. 

After a hard struggle the lifeboat arrived abreast of the steamer, 
which lay on the other side of the jetty. The keeper had grave 
misgivings of his ability to get alongside, but he nevertheless pulled 
straight for the jetty, hoping that the tide might be high enough to 
permit his boat to cross over without striking the rocks. As he was 
about to make the attempt, however, he discovered some rocks be- 
tween the lifeboat and the steamer that the seas had suddenly dis- 
closed, which, together with the warning cry and excited gesticula- 
tions of the Corona's captain (who, with the passengers and crew, had 
been watching the tossing lifeboat from the steamer's rail), caused 
him to abandon the venture. To try to get to the vessel by making 
the arduous pull against sea and tide out and around the end of the 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 65 

jetty seemed a waste of valuable time and strength, and the keeper 
therefore returned to the station with the purpose in mind to take 
his crew across the spit to the boathouse on the ocean beach and 
attempt to reach the steamer in the Monomoy surfboat. 
. It is shown that while the lifeboat was on its way down the ship 
channel on the first trip to the stranded vessel a boat containing 8 
persons was launched from the Corona with the intention of trying to 
make the shore. It had little more than struck the water, however, 
when it was caught up by a sea and hurled with tremendous force 
toward and. over the submerged jetty and capsized. None of the 
party in it succeeded in getting back to the boat, but luckily all had 
on life-preservers, to which fact no doubt those that survived the 
accident owed their lives. Following the capsize the tide, which was 
racing in through the bay entrance, carried both the boat and its 
late occupants swiftly along the south side of the jetty and toward 
the bay, and all but 2 of them finally reached shore, little the worse 
for their experience. Two were saved by a launch, 2 reached the 
rocks of the jetty after drifting into smooth water, and 2 were rescued 
by a son of the light keeper in a small boat. One of their number, 
a man named H. Erickson, was picked up dead by a fisherman and 
brought to the light-house wharf near the life-saving station. This 
accounts for 7 of those involved in the capsize. For a time it was 
thought that this was the entire number aboard the boat when it 
left ship, but several days after the Corona stranded a body was found 
on the rocks of the north jetty within 300 yards of the scene of the 
accident. It w^as badly decomposed, and the features were so torn 
by the rocks as to be scarcely recognizable, but at the coroner's in- 
quest, held at Eureka, several of the Corona's crew swore that the 
body was -that of the ship's quartermaster, J. Anderson, who was 
known to have been one of the unfortunate boat party. 

On getting back to the station with the lifeboat Keeper Hennig 
took his men across the north spit to launch the surfboat Kept at the 
boathouse on the ocean beach. They found near the boathouse the 
second officer of the Corona and some of the steamer's crew. They 
had put off in a second boat to rescue those who had left ship in the 
first, but had not been able to reach or assist them. In fact they 
had barely escaped disaster themselves, reaching the beach with their 
boat in a swamping condition^ 

The life-saving crew started for the steamer in the surfboat as the 
keeper had designed, but the heavy sea and the swift current sweep- 
ing toward the jetty made progress slow. When tne surfboat had 
compassed half the distance to the vessel a man was seen to jump 
overooard from the Corona with a line and strike out for the shore. 
He showed himself to be a fine swimmer, but his expertness availed 
little against the current, and he would have been thrown upon the 
rocks of the jetty had not the station crew, by tremendous exertion, 
overtaken him and picked him up. The line he carried broke before 
he was taken into the surfboat, and when rescued he was entirely at 
the mercy of the sea. The life-savers turned about and put back to 
shore with the rescued man, as it seemed to the keeper impossible to 
get alongside the steamer in the surfboat. 

The keeper next decided to use the beach apparatus, which was 
readily available in the boathouse nearby. The Lyle gun was 



66 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING. SERVICE. 

charged with 12 ounces of powder, and a No. 7 line was sent toward 
the steamer, but it broke in firing. With a like charge a No. 9 line 
was next sent out, but the projectile failed to reach the Corona. 

It having been proven impossible, owing to the distance, to get 
into communication with the steamer by means of the beach appa- 
ratus, the keeper resolved to try again to reach her in the surfboat. 
On this venture the life-savers succeeded in getting near the steamer, 
but found it out of the question to run in alongside because of the 
heavy seas, as there was no lee either to starboard or port, the steam- 
er's starboard side being fully exposed to the beach surf, and against 
her port side beat the heavy surf rolling over the north jetty. 

The captain of the Corona, seeing that there was no chance for 
the surfboat to get to the vessel, threw the life-savers a cork jacket 
with a line attached. This the surfmen secured, and then pulled 
back to the beach, where a hundred willing hands grasped it and 
drew ashore a 3-inch hawser, which the life-savers fastened around 
a tree stump. By means of the hawser the surfboat crew were able 
to go out with greater speed than would have been possible by using 
the oars alone, as the line enabled them to successfully combat the 
current. When the boat neared the steamer, however, the seas were 
still beating so boisterously about her as to make the transfer of 
passengers extremely dangerous. Knowing that the tide, which 
had begun to recede, would soon cause the surf to subside more or 
less, and considering that the vessel stood solid without laboring, 
the keeper called to those on board to remain quiet a little longer, 
assuring them that they were in no danger, and that within an hour 
they could be taken off with comfort and safety. The passengers, 
who crowded the steamer's rail intent upon the movements of the 
life-savers, waved their handkerchiefs and in other ways indicated 
their cheerful acceptance of the situation, and the surfmen pulled 
back to the shore. 

An hour later the life-savers again went to the steamer, and, as the 
keeper had anticipated, were able to get alongside. They first took 
off and brought ashore 4 women, who were let down into the surf- 
boat by a block and chair. By the time the life-savers had landed 
the 4 women and returned to the Corona the tide had fallen below 
the crest of the jetty, which now made a fairly good lee on the 
steamer's port side. This time 9 women were taken into the surf- 
boat. Two of the ship's boats were now lowered and manned, and 
assisted in the work of getting the people ashore. Altogether 60 
persons were landed by the surfboat. 

During the ten days immediately following, the life-savers went 
to the Corona several times, carrying a wrecking crew to and fro and 
performing similar services. The vessel and cargo became a total 
loss, however. 

Capsize of boat belonging to the tug Rescue, March 14, 1907. 

Late in the afternoon of March 14, 1907, the British steamer 
Gowanburn, a vessel of more than 4,000 gross tons, while en route 
from London to New York with a $160,000 cargo of chrome ore and 
wool, stranded on the Long Island coast 12 miles east of Fire Island 
light and 800 yards southwest of the Blue Point life-saving station. 
Through the efforts of tugs and lighters operated by the Merritt & 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 67 

Chapman Wrecking Company she was floated on March 23 and towed 
to New York. The fatality, the circumstances of which are here 
recited, occurred while the salvage fleet was at work on the Gowan- 
burn, the man who lost his life having been one of the wreckers. 
While the steamer was ashore the life-saving crews of the Blue Point, 
Lone Hill, and Bellport stations rendered much valuable assistance to 
the master, Captain Forbes, landing part of his crew in the breeches 
buoy and by boat, carrying messages to and from ship, etc. The 
services of the life-savers in this connection are briefly set forth else- 
where in this volume under "Services of crews" (see p. 142). 

About noon of March 15, while the life-savers, under the direction of 
Keeper Frank Rorke of the Blue Point station, were engaged in 
bringing ashore in the surf boat members of the Gowanbum's crew the 
tug Rescue, the first boat of the wrecking fleet to reach the steamer, 
arrived on the scene. Captain Forbes thereupon decided not to land 
any more of his men, but to cooperate with the wreckers in an attempt 
to float the ship. He asked Keeper Rorke to leave the breeches buoy 
in position, however (communication with the steamer having been 
constantly maintained by that agency), so that those still aboard the 
vessel might be taken on in case of necessity. 

As the wreckers now took charge of the steamer Keeper Rorke and 
his crew pulled back to the shore, loaded their boat on its wagxm, and 
hauled it up on the beach in front of the Blue Point station. Then all 
three life-saving crews went in for dinner. 

The Rescue stood by some distance astern of the Gowanburn, sending 
off to the steamer a boat 30 feet long and 8 feet beam, manned by a crew 
of 7 men. This craft, as stated in the testimony of the captain of the 
tug, was not the regular boat used for wrecking purposes, but had been 
picked up at the company's New York station on emergency for the' 
business in hand. As it proved, the men who operated it were also 
out of place in such a dangerous locality, lacking the knack of boat- 
manship required to cope with the surf. Although the tide was 
nearing flood and the seas were rapidly increasing, the boat's crew 
succeeded in passing twice from the tug to the steamer without mis- 
hap. The third and fatal trip was begun about 2 p. m., at which time 
the Rescue undertook to place a hawser aboard the Gowanbum. 
Everything went well until the boat, with the hawser trailing astern, 
came within about 175 feet of the steamer, when the steering oar was 
struck by a breaking surf wave, knocking the man who held it (Edward 
Johnsen) headlong into the sea. His fellow boatmen were thrown 
into confusion by the accident, but one of them had sufficient presence 
of mind to seize the steering oar, which had fallen inside the boat, and 
direct the others to back oars. When they attempted to do this, 
however, the boat swung around broadside to the seas and shipped 
considerable water. This threw them into a panic, and, forgetting 
the peril of their shipmate, they began pulling for the beach with 
frenzied energy, breaking one oar on the way and losing another. 

Weighted down by heavy rubber boots and thick clothing, the 
man in the water tried to swim for the oar that one of the men in the 
boat had lost, but before he got anywhere near it a shout diverted his 
attention to a ring buoy that had been thrown from the steamer. He 
turned toward it for a moment, then seemed to become confused, and, 
as the seas were breaking over him, soon gave up the struggle and 
went down. His cap remained floating on the water until picked up 



68 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

by the life-savers, and for some time after he had disappeared misled 
the people on shore to think that he was still on the surface. In the 
meantime the boat from which he had been thrown reached the beach, 
having come in as fast as the frightened occupants and the onsetting 
surf could bring it. 

After finishing their meal the Bellport crew went back to l.ieir 
station, and the 2 other crews returned to the beach, Keeper Rorke to 
deliver some messages to Captain Forbes. Surfman Maurice C. 
Baker of the Blue Point crew was intrusted to take them out to the 
steamer, making the trip in the breeches buoy. It was while the 
keeper stood directing the working of the buoy as it carried the surf- 
man out over the water that the accident happened to the wrecker's 
boat. In his report in the case Keeper Rorke says: 

Looking in the direction indicated by a bystander I saw one of the wreckers' boats 
in the water being poorly handled. Surfman Baker, from the rigging of the steamer, 
had noticed that all was not right with the boat and hurried down to the deck and aft, 
from which place he saw a man in the surf. Lieutenant Edmonds [of the Revenue- 
Cutter Service, who was present on the beach, and who afterwards investigated this 
case] came up to me at this time and said: "It looks as if a man was overboard; launch 
your surf boat and try to get him. " We immediately went on the run for the station 
boat. The wreckers' boat came on the beach just as we started, so I ran to her for 
confirmation of the report of the accident. Lieutenant Edmonds stopped at the same 
time and seeing; the wrecking boat afloat said to me: "Rorke, can you take this boat 
off?" I told him I thought I could, and without waiting for orders one of my own 
surfmen and 3 surf men from the Lone Hill station jumped into the boat and seized 
the oars. Then when a favorable opportunity came I gave the command, and the 
crew on the beach shoved us off. Directed by Surfman Baker from the stern of the 
Gowanburn, we carefully searched the locality of the accident. Surfman Edward 
Baker, who was with us in the boat, being an expert swimmer, took off his boots and 
clothing, and prepared to dive if any trace of the man should be seen. We recovered 
his cap, the lost oar and the ring; buoy, but could discover no signs of the man himself. 
The tide was making and the surf increasing rapidly, and one sea we could not dodge 
broke fairly on our heads, partly filling the boat and wetting us to the skin. It did 
no serious harm, however, and we got back to the shore without further mishap. 

Immediately after landing, Keeper Rorke sent some of the surfmen 
out along the beach, thinking the missing man might have drifted 
ashore. Nothing came of the search, however, but on the morning of 
March 20 a fisherman found a body washed up a half mile east of the 
Blue Point station, which was later identified as the remains of the 
lost wrecker. The keeper took charge of it and turned it over to the 
coroner, by whose permission an undertaker buried it in Lakewood 
Cemetery, under the direction of the company in whose employ the 
man's life had been sacrificed. 

It was the opinion to those who witnessed the incidents associated 
with this tragedy that the unfortunate man could have been saved 
only by a boat at the time in the immediate vicinity of the accident. 
The investigating officer states that the response of the life-savers in 
the boat from which the accident occurred was prompt, and charac- 
terized by great daring; that notwithstanding the unwieldiness of 
the craft they worked it energetically and skilfully, and that Keeper 
Rorke's handling of the steering oar and maneuvering of the boat was 
a marvel of surfmanship. * 

Capsize of a fish boat, May 13, 1907. 

The third and last fatal accident of the year in the Columbia River 
fishing fleet occurred May 13, 1907, when 2 men, Carl Juntilla and 
William Jarvis, were capsized and drowned in the breakers while 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 69 

operating their net from a boat belonging to the Columbia Packers' 
Association, of Astoria. 

When the capsize took place the Cape Disappointment life-saving 
crew were in their powder lifeboat 400 or 500 yards away, watching 
some other fishermen who had worked into a position of danger, and 
did not observe the perilous situation of this boat until the instant 
of the overturn. They went to the rescue at full speed, and found 1 
man the only "one visible hanging on to the lee side of his boat 
with only his head showing above water. Owing to the condition 
of the surf the life-savers did not attempt to put the lifeboat along- 
side for fear of crushing the fisherman. They were also deterred from 
running close in by the possible danger of fouling their propeller in 
the fish net trailing from the overturned boat. The keeper climbed 
up on the forward bulkhead of the powerboat, where he could bet- 
ter give directions to the surf man to whom he had relinquished the 
steering oar, and at his command the crew pulled abreast of the fish 
boat and within 20 feet of it. The keeper and a surfman then threw 
lines simultaneously to the imperiled man. Both fell within reach, 
but before he could secure either a breaker bore down upon him and 
carried him away. This was the last seen of him. The life-savers 
righted the fish boat as soon as possible thinking he might be under- 
neath it, but not finding him there they endeavored to pick up the 
net, thinking that perhaps the bodies of both men might be found 
enmeshed in it. In this last undertaking they came very near getting 
into serious trouble themselves. While they were pulling the net on 
board it fouled the propeller, and they were compelled to let their boat 
drift inside the breakers to clear the fclades. Only one fisherman was 
seen at all after the capsize. In the opinion of the keeper this man 
who was found clinging to the boat had become involved in the 
fishing gear or rigging and borne under the moment he lost his hold. 
The keeper says in explanation of this conclusion: "He did not get 
on the bottom of the boat, but remained in, one position. While I was 
on the forward bulkhead of the lifeboat I could see the spars and 
wreckage of the fish boat drifting away, but saw nothing of the other 
man." 

The fish boat was recovered by the station crew and turned over to 
the owners. 



SERVICES OF LIFE-SAVING CREWS. 

1907. 



71 



SERVICES OF LIFE-SAVING CREWS. 



All rescue and salvage work performed by the station crews within 
the year is set forth in abridged form under this caption. Many of 
the cases recorded are of great importance as illustrating the wreck 
operations of the Service and the efficiency of the men who conduct 
them, besides affording suggestions of great value not only to the 
keepers and surf men themselves in the matter of future performance, 
but also to shipmasters and others when overtaken by disaster upon 
the water. For the reason last mentioned it is regretted that this 
branch of the Service operations can not be presented at greater 
length. 

[Abbreviations used in this statement: aux. (auxiliary) , bg. (brig.), bge (barge), bk. (bark), bkn. 
(barkentine) , elec. (electric) , gas. (gasoline), Ich. (launch), nph. (naphtha), sc. (schooner), shp. (ship), 
sip. (sloop), st. (steam), str. (steamer), yt. (yacht), Am. (American), Br. (British), Fr. (French), 
Ger. (German), Hoi. (Hollandish) , . It. (Italian), Mex. (Mexican), Nor. (Norwegian), Port. (Portu- 
guese), Span. (Spanish), Swd. (Swedish), W. N. R. A. (Women's National Relief Association).] 



Date. 



1906. 
July 1 

July 1 



July 1 



July 2 



Station and locality. 



July 3 



July 3 



Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. 
Watch Hill, Rhode Island . 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Sabine Pass, Texas. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



South Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Dinghy, no name... 

Am. sc. Charles H. 
Sprague. 



Gas. Iches. (2) 
Growler, Minx; 
rowboat, Blos- 
som. 



Am. sc. Navigator. 



Gas. Ich., no name; 
Am. str. City of 
Naples. 



Yawl, no name 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Adrift; was recovered by the life-savers 
and turned over to owner. 
Stranded on a reef 2 miles SW. of the sta- 
tion during fresh NE. winds. The life- 
savers found her pounding heavily on the 
rocks and threatening to go to pieces. 
They manned her pumps and kept her 
clear of water until the rising tide, when 
with the aid of her sail they worked her 
over the reef into deep water, after which 
she proceeded to New London for repairs. 

The 2 launches with 29 persons on board 
became disabled and went adrift. The 
life-saving crew in power boat towed 
them to the city dock. The rowboat, 
with 3 men on board, captsized, 1 of the 
occupants sinking immediately. The 
others swam to a dock near by. (For 
detailed account of loss of life from the 
Blossom, see page 35.) 

While lying at anchor capsized during a 
violent squall, 1 mile N. of station, and 
about mile from the shore, where she 
was discovered by the keeper at 5.15 a. m. 
He at once employed a temporary crew 
(inactive season) and proceeded to her 
assistance, but while they were endeavor- 
ing to right her she sank. Anchors were 
then run out, and she was hauled into 
shoal water, bailed out, floated, and 
taken to a proper anchorage. 

The launch, with a party of 3 persons on 
board, while out sailing for pleasure 
broke down, and the life-savers with a 
power boat towed her to the yacht club 
landing. The City of Naples caught fire 
while lying at her dock and for a time was 
threatened with total destruction. The 
life-savers, however, quickly boarded her 
and had the flames under control before 
any great damage was done. 

Broke adrift. Recovered by 2 surfmeu 
who turned it over to owner. 

73 



74 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
July 4 



July 4 

July 4 

July 4 

July 4 

July 4 

July 4 

July 5 

July 5 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Watch Hill, Rhode Island. 



Hereford Inlet, New Jer- 



Erie Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Catboat Memento; 
sip. Alva. 



Am. sip. Alice.... 



Gas. Ich. Elizabeth 
Am. sc. Uncle Sam. 



Gas. Ich. Macbeth. 



Saint Joseph, Michigan, i Canoe, no name 

Lake Michigan. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Gas. Ich. SMdoo... 



Canoe, no name 



July 5 Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



July 5 



July 



July 



Fort Point, California 



Cold Spring, New Jersey. 



Oswego, New York, Lake 
Ontario. 



Yt. Chetopa 

Catboat, no name.. . 

Am. bge. Echo 

Nph. Ich., no name. 



Br. sc. Plunket... 



The Memento carried away her boom dur- 
ing a yacht race and was unable to reach 
her moorings, and the sloop missed stays 
and ran ashore. Surfmen in 28-foot 
launch hauled the sloop afloat, and took 
both boats to a proper mooring. 

Anchored dangerously near shore during 
southerly gale and high sea. The power 
boat containing the life-saving crew went 
to their assistance, brought the 2 occu- 
pants to the station and furnished them 
rood and clothing from the supply of the 
W. N. R. A.; then returned to the sloop, 
made sail on her, and took her into Ston- 
ington Harbor. 

While under way ran ashore. The keeper 
boarded her, ran out an anchor and hove 
her afloat on the rising tide. 

Grounded on old breakwater and unable 
to get afloat. Her occupants, 14 in num- 
ber, were taken int9 the surfboat and 
landed at the station. The stranded 
boat was then hove afloat by the surf- 
men and taken to the station pier. 

Engine disabled and launch, with 2 per- 
sons aboard, and unable to reach the 
shore, went adrift on the lake before a 
fresh north wind. The life-saving crew, 
in surfboat, brought the boat and its oc- 
cupants safely into the harbor. 

During a fresh NW. wind this canoe, con- 
taining a man and a woman, capsized 2 
miles W. of the station and about 2 
miles from the shore. (For detailed 
account of disaster, see page 36.) 

While a party of 18 persons were out in 
this launch the supply of fuel became ex- 
hausted when 2 miles from shore. There 
was a fresh breeze blowing from the 
north at the time and the launch drifted 
away in the trough of the sea. Upon 
sighting her signal of distress the keeper 
went out to her in power boat; towed 
her safely to the shore. 

Drifting helplessly across the harbor, the 
occupant, a man, being inexperienced. 
The life-saving crew went to his assist- 
ance in power boat and towed him to the 
club-house landing. 

Parted her mooring lines and went adrift. 
The station crew towed her back to a 
safe mooring near the station. 

While 7 men of the Illinois Naval Militia 
were out for practice their boat capsized 
during a fresh NE. wind when they had 
reached a point 1 mile S. of the station, 
and i mile from the shore. (For detailed 
account see page 38.) 

This barge, lumber laden, and with no one 
on board parted her moorings and went 
adrift. The life-savers telephoned for 
a tug then boarded the craft. The tug 
Monarch arrived, and after the surfmen 
had run her lines she was towed to a safe 
anchorage in the bay. 

During an easterly gale capsized 500 yards 
from the shore throwing its 2 occupants 
into the high-running surf, but they man- 
aged to reach a place of safety without 
assistance. The keeper found them in an 
exhausted condition, and removed them 
to the station where they were furnished 
stimulants and food, also dry clothing, 
from the supply of the W. N. R. A. and 
put to bed. On the following morning 
the launch was recovered and taken to a 
place of safety in the inlet. 



iprung aleak. At the master's request the 
life-saving crew boarded her, manned the 
pumps, and kept the water down until 
she could be beached. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews Continued. 



75 



Date. Station and locality. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
July 6 Louisville, Kentucky Sailboat, no name. 

Holland, Michigan, Lake i Gas. Ich., no name. 
Michigan. 

City Point, Massachu- j Gas. Ich. Boar 

setts. 



Durants, North Carolina. 



Grand Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Barnegat, New Jersey.. 



Middle Island, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Grande Pointe au Sable, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 
gan. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Little Beach, and Brig- 
antine, New Jersey. 



Am. sc. R. C. Bea- 
man. 



Small boat, no name 



Rowboat, no name. 



Gas. Ich. Bess 



Sip. Petrel 



Gas. Ich. Twilight. 



Sip. yt. Thistle; 
gas. Ich. Lorlile. 



Two gas. Iches., no 
names. 



Am. str. Henry Sills. 



Small boat, no 
name. 



Sip. yt. Izeyl. 



Gas. sip. S. E. 
Smith. 



This boat, Containing 5 men, was discov- 
ered dangerously near the cross dam of 
the falls. The life-savers threw them a 
line, and towed them out of danger. 

Three boys in this launch were unable to 
reach shore, owing to machinery becom- 
ing disabled. The surfmen manned the 
Whitehall 1 boat and towed the launch 
back to the harbor. 

Engine became disabled in Dorchester Bay, 
i mile SW. of the station. Surfmen in 
28-foot launch towed her to the Dorches- 
ter yacht club landing. 

This vessel, lumber laden and with 2 men 
on board, stranded on Oyster Point, 3 
miles N. of the station. She having filled 
with water the keeper, with assistance, 
bailed and pumped her out, then hauled 
her afloat, and took her into Durants 
Bay to a safe anchorage. 

The keeper sent several surfmen to the 
assistance of this water-logged boat, who 
succeeded in getting her up onto the 
beach clear of the breakers. 

At 8 p. m., during thick fog, cries for help 
were heard coming from the breakwater. 
The keeper in a fishing dory pulled out to 
ascertain the trouble, and located the 
boat containing a man fast on the rocks. 
The keeper floated the boat and brought 
it and the man to the station. 

While out with a party of ladies and chil- 
dren on board became disabled and the 
owner requested assistance from the 
life-saving crew. She was taken in tow 
by the launch Relief and landed at the 
yacht club float. 

The master being unacquainted with the 
channel ran his vessel ashore, where she 
began to pound heavily and started to fill. 
The life-savers brought the occupants, 8 
in number, to the shore, and conveyed 
them to a hotel for the night. The sloop 
was floated on the following day and 
taken to a safe place in the bay. 

This launch with a party on board bound 
for Alpena, ran short of fuel and came to 
the station for assistance. As night was 
approaching the keeper afforded them 
shelter until the following morning, when 
upon replenishing their supply of gaso- 
line, they continued on their way. 

Parted her moorings and went adrift in the 
harbor. The keeper, with power boat, 
overtook her and towed her to the yacht 
club landing. The launch, with 1 man 
on board, became disabled and went 
adrift in the lake before an offshore 
wind. Two surfmen took her in tow and 
brought her in to the clubhouse landing. 

At 4.30p.m. during a storm, these launches, 
containing a number of women and chil- 
dren, came to off the station in search of 
a harbor of shelter. The keeper manned 
a skiff and piloted them to a place of 
safety in Hamlin River. 

The life-saving crew, upon discovering this 
vessel on fire, boarded her and extin- 
guished the flames before much damage 
had been wrought. 

This small boat, containing 1 man, cap- 
sized about 1 mile from the station. The 
occupant was rescued by the keeper's 
family. 

Parted her moorings during a heavy squal 
and collided with sloop Veronica. The 
life-saving crew went to her assistance, 
ran a line, and towed her to a safe an- 
chorage. 

Broke down and anchored in the breakers, 
where she was in danger of foundering. 
The station crew went to her assistance, 
ran a line to her, and with the power 
boat, towed her to the station. 



76 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of creivs Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
July 11 

July 11 
July 12 
July 12 

July 14 
July 15 
July 15 



July 15 



July 15 



July 16 



Station and locality. 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Holland. Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 



Point Adams, Oregon. . . 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Grand Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 



Coskata, Massachusetts . . 



July 16 



Gull Shoal, and Little 
Kinnakeet, North Caro- 
lina. 



Skiff, no name 



Skiff, no name 



Fish boat, no name. 



Fish boats (3), no 
names. 



Gas. Ich. Minnie M. 



Gas. Ich. Ahlma.. 



Rowboat No. 25. . . 



Gaa. Ich. Florence M. 



Gas. Ich. Oriole.. . 



Catboat Avilida... 



Am. sc. Matilda D. 
Borda. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



At 7.40 p. m. a boat containing 2 men was in 
danger of going over the falls. The en- 
dangered boat was taken in tow by the 
life-savers and conveyed to a safe place 
in the river. 

At 1.30 p. m. a skiff containing 2 boys cap- 
sized in the lake, the occupants swim- 
ming ashore. The boat was afterwards 
towed in by the station crew and bailed 
out. 

This boat, with 2 fishermen on board, cap- 
sized in the breakers off Peacock Spit 
during a fresh NW. gale. The station 
crew, in power boat, picked up the boat 
and its occupants and took them ashore. 

These boats, while engaged in salmon fish- 
ing in a fog, stranded and filled. The 
life-savers released the boats from their 
seines, bailed them out and floated them. 
The occupants were taken to the station 
and given'dry clothing from the stores of 
the W. N. R. A. 

Broke down with 5 persons on board 2| 
miles W. of station. Life-savers towed 
launch with its occupants into the har- 
bor. 

Grounded on the superstructure of a pier 
while standing down the channel. Two 
surfmen hauled her clear of the obstruc- 
tion. 

At 9.50 a. m. the lookout reported that a 
gasoline launch had run down a rowboat 
containing 2 persons. The life-saving 
crew went out in Monomoy surfboat 
and found a man and a woman clinging 
to the sides of the boat. Before the surf- 
men could reach them, however, the 
woman lost her grasp and disappeared. 
The keeper jumped overboard and recov- 
ered the woman. Both of the rescued 
persons were taken to the station. After 
the woman had recovered they departed 
for their homes. 

Machinery became disabled when launch 
had reached a point 1 mile S W. of the sta- 
tion. The keeper went out to her, took 
her in tow to the harbor, and after mak- 
ing slight repairs she continued on her 
way. 

While 6 persons were sailing on the lake, 
supply of gasoline became exhausted, 
and the party was unable, to reach the 
harbor. The surfmen launched a boat 
and took them in tow to the pier at the 
entrance of the channel, whence the dis- 
abled launch was taken up the river by a 
power boat. 

This boat, with a fishing party on board, 
was dismasted 2J miles NN W. of the sta- 
tion, and beached. The keeper, with a 
team of horses, conveyed the master and 
mate to Nantucket, and then went out to 
the catboat and towed her to town. On 
the following day the other occupants of 
the boat, who had taken refuge in the 
Great Point Light Station, were trans- 
ported to Nantucket in the keeper's dory. 

This vessel, coal laden and bound from 
Port Johnson, N. Y. , to Savannah, Ga. , 
stranded on the North Carolina coast 
during smoky weather, striking the 
beach f mile from the Gull Shoal station 
and 1 mile from the Little Kinnakeet sta- 
tion at 2.30 a. m. The keeper at Gull 
Shoal notified Little Kinnakeet station 
of the wreck, then launched surfboat 
and proceeded to her assistance, arriving 
alongside at 6 a. m. As nothing could be 
done toward floating the schooner, the 
surfmen landed the crew with their per- 
sonal effects. The shipwrecked sailors 
were taken to the station, where they 
remained for 8 days. The vessel proved 
a total loss, 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews Continued. 



77 



Date. 



1906. 
July 17 



July 18 



July 18 

July 18 

July 19 

July 19 

July 20 

July 20 

July 20 

July 20 

July 21 



Station and locality. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Quoddy Head, Maine . . 



July 21 



Race Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Plum Island, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Brant Rock, Massachu- 
setts. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan (service 
by Farragut Yacht 



Plum Island, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Quoddy Head, Maine 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Gas. Ich., no name 



Am. sc. Sarah Ea- 
ton. 



Am. sc. Helen G. 
Wells. 



Slp.yt. Nemadji... 



Gas. Ich. Daisy . . 



Am. str. Bulgaria . . 



Rowboat, no name 



Sip. yt. Valiant... 



Lch., no name 



Sailboat, no name. 



Br. sc. Myra B 



Gas. Ich. Arbutus; 
rowboats (2), no 
names. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



This launch, while on her way from Su- 
perior to Duluth with 1 man on board, 
broke down near the P. V. elevator. A 
surfman went to her assistance in dinghy 
and towed her to the yacht club landing. 

Ran ashore during thick fog at 3 a. m., 
striking on Liberty Point, 4 miles E. of 
station, while attempting to enter 
Quoddy Bay. The crew abandoned 
ship and came to the station. The 
keeper telephoned to Lubec for a tug, then 
manned surfboat and proceeded to the 
schooner and found her rudder gone and 
hull leaking. The life-savers manned the 
pumps and kept her free until the arrival 
of a tug, when she was floated and taken 
to Calais for repairs. 

Ran aground on White Bar. 1 mile W. of 
the station, during thick fog. The life- 
savers boarded her, ran out an anchor, 
and hove her afloat without damage. 

This yacht, while out sailing with 2 per- 
sons on board, carried away her star- 
board shroud during a fresh NE. wind. 
The keeper and 1 surfman went out to 
her in a power boat and towed her to the 
yacht club landing. 

This launch, with 3 persons on board, be- 
came disabled 2 miles from the harbor 
entrance and went adrift on the lake. 
The keeper, in his power boat, towed the 
launch with its occupants to the boat 
club landing. 

Four men, while engaged in floating this 
vessel, were compelled to seek shelter 
from the heavy seas washing her decks. 
The life-savers pulled out to the imper- 
iled men and brought them safely to the 
shore. 

The occupants, 2 small boys and a girl, were 
caught out in a fresh offshore wind and 
unaole to regain the shore. The keeper 
launched surfboat and towed them back 
to the harbor. 

Stranded with 8 persons on board J mile SE. 
of station, its occupants being unable to 
work their vessel into deep water. The 
.surfmen boarded yacht, ran out a kedge 
anchor and, by the combined efforts of 
the capstan and a power boat, succeeded 
in floating her without damage. 

Discovered flying distress signals off 39th 
street; engine disabled. Boat's crew 
from Farragut Yacht Club went to 
launch and remedied difficulty. (The 
club named operates a service lifeboat 
under the supervision of the keeper of the 
Old Chicago Station.) 

Ashore on Lobdells Point, 2 miles N. of 
station, with 2 persons on board. The 
life-savers manned Mackinaw boat and 
went to their assistance, anchoring to 
windward of the sailboat. A surfman 
then jumped on board of her and secured 
a line. She was then taken into deep 
water and the occupants landed on the 
beach. 

During a dense fog ran ashore 2 miles SE. 
of the station at 6 a. m., her crew reaching 
the shore in their own boats. The life- 
saving crew, upon boarding her, found 
that her rudder had pounded off on the 
rocks, and her hull sprung a leak. With 
her sails they worked her clear, but as the 
ebb tide was making could not get her to 
a place of safety. At slack water she was 
taken into Quoddy Bay, where a tug took 
her in tow to Lubec Harbor. 

The launch, while lying alongside a wharf, 
was struck by a squall which parted her 
moorings and cast her up on the shore. 
Two surfmen in station boat hauled her 



78 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



N tnTy a o 1 f d vess t er" Nature of casualty and service rendered . 



1906. 
July 21 



July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 23 

July 23 

July 23 



July 23 
July 23 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



City Point, Massachusetts 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Lake View Beach, Michi- 
gan, Lake Huron. 



Port Austin, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Saint Joseph, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Coquille River, Oregon . . 



City Point, Massachusetts. 



Atlantic City, New Jersey 



Charlotte, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 



South Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Saint Joseph, Michigan 
Lake Michigan. 



Gas. Ich. Arbutus; 
rowboats (2), no 



Gas. Ich. Emma E. 



Flatboat, no name.. 



Rowboat, no name 



Rowboat, no name. 



Gas. Iches. Emilie 
A.. Dixie. 



Gas. Ich. Chicasaw.. 

St. yt. Sea Fox 

% 

Bge., no name 

Sip. Hattie; sail- 
boat Eidelweiss. 

Gas. Ich. Republic.. 
Gas. Ich. Chicota.. 



Am. str. Glenn. 



Yawl Huntress . 



afloat, and brought her to a safe place in 
the harbor. The rowboats, containing 
3 persons in all, were caught out in the 
same squall, and were dashed against 
an obstruction in the harbor. The sta- 
tion crew went to their assistance in the 
power boat, and brought them all, with 
their occupants, safely to the yacht club 
landing. 

Engine of boat disabled while 4 persons 
were on their way in it to Dorchester. 
The station crew went to her in launch 
Relief and towed her to the yacht club 
landing. 

This boat, containing 2 men, went adrift 
in the river and was in danger of going 
over the falls. The station crew brought 
the boat with its occupants safely to the 
station float. 

While off Lake Side Park this boat, con- 
taining a man, capsized during a heavy 
squall about 4 miles from the station. 
The occupant clung to a pound net until 
rescued by the life-savers, who brought 
him and his boat in to the beach. 

This small boat, containing 2 women, was 
unable to reach a landing during heavy 
rain squalls. It was taken in tow by the 
surfboat and brought to the station 
landing. 

These launches, while sailing about the 
harbor, became disabled, and the power 
boat from the life-saving station took 
them in tow to a wharf, where repairs 
were made. 

Engine became disabled and occupants 
were unable to regain the shore. The 
life-saving crew took them in tow with 
the surfboat and brought them back to 
the harbor. 

During a fresh NE. gale dragged her an- 
chor and was in danger of going ashore 
The keeper sent a tug to her assistance 
and she was removed to a safe anchorage. 

Lumber laden, broke adrift, and stranded 
on the bar during fresh NW. wind and 
fog. The keeper recovered the lumber 
which had gone adrift from her deck load, 
then engaged the tug Triumph, which ran 
a line, floated her, and towed her into the 
harbor. 

These boats became unmanageable while 
proceeding up Dorchester Bay, the for- 
mer by stranding, the latter by carrying 
away her boom during fresh SW. winds. 
The station crew, with launch Relief, 
went out to their assistance and towed 
them to a wharf. 

Stranded with 4 persons on board while 
crossing the bar. The ' ife-savers went to 
assistance of launch, ran a line to her, and 
hauled her afloat, when another launch 
took her in tow into a creek. 

Stranded on Nine Mile Point, 10 miles E. of 
the station'. Upon being. notified of the 
casualty the keeper and crew proceeded 
to the place, but all their efforts to float 
the launch were unsuccessful, owing to 
the heavy sea. When the wind and sea 
subsided, the life-savers removed her 
machinery and placed it in the surfboat, 
then hauled the launch into deep water, 
and turned it over to the owner. 

Grounded in the harbor near south pier 
while attempting to pass a dredge. The 
station crew ran a line to her and hove 
her afloat without damage. 

Rigging was carried away by a squall and 
the yawl was forced to come to anchor. 
The station crew observing her distress 
signals went alongside, and, after secur- 
ing a tug, took the disabled craft to a safe 



UNITED STATES LIFK-SAVING SERVICE. 



79 



Services of crews Continued. 



Station and locality. 



Saint Joseph, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 



Louisville, Kentucky. . . 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Grand Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Straitsmouth, Massachu- 
setts. 



Grand Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Cape Disappoin t m e n t , 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Yawl Huntress . . . 



Sip. yt. Nymph.. 



ape 
W 



ashington. 



Point Adams, Oregon ____ 



2990908 6 



Small boats (2) , no 
names. 

Catboat, no name. 



Shanty boat, no 
name. 



Catboat Stroller; 
gas.lch., no name. 



Nph.loh. The Kid 



Gas. Ich. Dutch- 
man. 



Skiff, no name 

Catboat, no name. 

Sip. yt. Madcap . . . 
Gas. Ich., no name. 



Lighter Black Dia- 
mond. 



Fish boat, no name 



Fish boats (4), no 
names. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



anchorage in the harbor. The life-savers 
swept the bottom for the yawl's lost an- 
chor, and recovered it on the following 
day. 

Stranded off Davis Park 18 miles from sta- 
tion, and occupants displayed signals for 
help The keeper was notified by the 
railroad agent, and the station crew with 
a tug proceeded to the place, finding the 
yacht ashore. As it was found impos- 
sible to float the craft by means of the 
tug, a locomotive was employed, which 
hauled her well up on the beach. The 
South Chicago life-saving crew assisted 
in the work with their power boat. 

Adrift on the lake. A surfman in a skiff 
overtook them and restored them to 
owner. 

Capsized in the breakers 2 miles WSW. of 
the station, throwing its occupants, 2 
fishermen, into the surf. (For detailed 
account see page 39.) 

This boat, with 5 persons on board, was 
about to go over the falls. The life- 
saving crew reached the party just in 
time to save them. 

Both of these boats, while sailing for pleas- 
ure, were caught in a heavy squall and 
became unmanageable. The station 
power boat went out to their assistance 
and brought them in to the boathouse 
landing. 

The machinery of this launch broke down 
when she was about 4 miles S. of the sta- 
tion. The keeper was notified of the 
trouble by telephone, and at once 
manned the surfboat and went to her 
assistance in tow of a tug. The life- 
savers took the launch in tow and 
brought her to the station, and after re- 
pairs were made to her engine she con- 
tinued on her way. 

Engine became disabled during brisk SE. 
wind, and boat was in danger of being 
blown ashore. The alarm was given at 
the station and the lifeboat Dauntless 
proceeded to her aid and towed her to 
bo rt. 

This skiff had gone adrift in the river. A 
surfman recovered it and restored it to 
the owner. 

In danger of striking the rocks while at- 
tempting to enter the harbor, and came 
to anchor. The keeper boarded her, and 
after running out an anchor hauled her 
to a safe anchorage. 

At 3.30 p. m. broke her rudderpost when 
1J miles N W . of the station. The keeper 
supposing that something was wrong on 
board, launched surfboat and with his 
crew went to her assistance. Upon ar- 
riving alongside the disabled craft, a line 
was made fast to her, and she was 
brought into the harbor. 

This launch, containing a man and a wo- 
man, ran aground in the breakers and 
was in danger of capsizing. Several surf- 
men in bathing suits succeeded in getting 
the boat into deep water. 

At 6.20 p. m. fire was discovered on board 
this vessel. The life-saving crew in surf- 
boat proceeded to the scene, ran a line of 
hose from a tug near by and extinguished 
the flames before much damage had been 
done. 

Swamped and capsized in the breakers on 
Peacock Spit, 13 miles S. of the station, 
during a fresh NW. gale. (For detailed 
account see page 40.) 

These boats, heavily laden with seines and 
fishing gear, stranded on the jetty sands 
in the Columbia River during thick fog. 



80 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
July 27 

July 28 



July 28 



July 28 



Point Adams, Oregon 

Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Beaver Island, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Fish boats (4), no 
names. 

Am. sc. S. S. Hud- 
son. 



Skiff, no name 



Am. str. Pine Lake. 



July 28 



July 28 



July 29 



Jackson Park, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Kenosha, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Sip. yt. Shenan- 



Sip. yt. Jingo 



Sips. Oregon, Jes- 
sie; catboatNina 
D.; gas. Ich. Inez 



July 29 
July 29 



July 29 



July 29 



Hereford Inlet, New Jer- 
sey. 

Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



..Jo. 



Gas. sc. Nora and 

Ich. Alva B. 
Sailboat, no name. 



Sip. Eagle. 



Br. str. Wyanoke. 



The station crew hove them afloat with- 
out damage. 

Leaking and unmanageable while en route 
to Philadelphia with a cargo of laths. 
The life-savers assisted her crew to heave 
up her anchors, and take her to a safe 
mooring in the harbor. 

This small boat, with 1 person on board, 
went adrift above the cross dam of the 
falls and was in danger of being swept 
over by the swift current. A boat, 
manned by the station crew, towed the 
endangered boat to a place of safety. 

Stranded on the W. side of Beaver Island 
during dense fog at 5 a. m. while under 
way from Green Bay to Cheboygan. The 
keeper proceeded to the scene in a gaso- 
line launch with several volunteers, and 
found the vessel hard and fast. After 
sounding out the deepest waters and 
marking out the channel by buoys, he 
with his men set to work to get her off. 
At 1 p. m. a tug came to their assistance, 
and after running her line, the stranded 
craft was floated. 

At 11.30 a. m. a surfman on station lookout 
saw this yacht capsize 1\ miles SE. of the 
station, and immediately gave the alarm. 
The crew launched surfboat and pulled 
with all possible dispatch to the scene of 
disaster and found that the 2 occupants 
had been picked up by a power boat. 
The surf men ran a line to the yacht, 
towed her into the harbor, and there 
beached her in shallow water. 

During a fresh NE. wind and high sea car- 
ried away her mast when 1 mile SE. of 
the station. The lookout reported the 
yacht to the keeper who at once launched 
surfboat and went out to her assistance, 
They took the disabled yacht in tow with 
the surfboat and brought her to an an- 
chorage in the harbor. 

The Oregon having carried away her mast 
in a fresh breeze, the life-saving crew in a 
power boat took her in tow and se- 
cured her to a safe mooring. The Jessie 
broke her rudder while sailing in a fresh 
breeze and her occupants were unable to 
reach the shore. The station crew in 
launch Relief towed the boat to the Mos- 
quito Yacht Club landing. The Nina 
D., being unable to reach shore, owing to 
a disabled rudder, launch Relief took her 
in tow to Savin Hill. (See letter of ac- 
knowledgment.) 

For detailed account of loss of life in dis- 
asters to these 2 vessels see p. 41. 

While bound to the fishing grounds with 
2 men on board, capsized during a fresh 
breeze f of a mile SE. of station. The 
life-savers picked up the 2 men, and 
landed them, with their capsized boat, 
safely on shore. 

Owing to press of canvas, during fresh 
northerly winds, forestay parted and 
mast carried away at partners. The 
station crew towed sloop into the harbor 
and secured it to a wharf. There were 3 
persons on board. 

Stood in too near shore and struck the bot- 
tom-disabling her wheel and rudder. 
The tug Bob Teed was engaged by the 
keeper, and, with the surfboat in tow, 
picked her up at 2.30 a. m. adrift in the 
lake. Two surfmen were put on board, 
and with a temporary steering gear she 
was taken to the station, where a new 
propeller was put on. Upon completion 
of urgent repairs she left for her destina- 
tion. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



81 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
July 29 



July 29 
July 30 

July 30 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Rocky Point, New York. . 



July 30 i Fort Macon, North Caro- 
lina. 



July 30 



July 31 



Racing shell, no 
name. 



Am. str. Topeka 

Sip. yt. Sanquoit. . 

Scow, no name 

Am.sc. Thelma... 



Ashtabula, Ohio, Lake Gas. Ich., no name. 
Erie. 



Orleans, Massachusetts. . . Gas. Ich., no name 



July 31 Sandy Point, Rhode Is- Am. str. G. W. Dan- 
land, ielson. 



Jul. 31 



Aug. 1 



Aug. 1 



Old Chicago, Illinois, Lake Power catamaran, 
Michigan (service by no name. 
Farragut Yacht Club) . i 



Point Allerton, Massa- i Am. sc. Agnes V. 



chusetts. 



Race Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Gleason. 



Am. sc. Winnebago . 



While out with 2 rowers on board capsized 
near the boathouse. Several surfmen 
pulled out and righted the boat and 
bailed it out, after which the 2 occupants 
returned in it to the boat landing. 

Stranded on North Point during foggy 
weather. The life-saving crew, assisted 
by the tug Meyer, hauled her afloat and 
she proceeded into the harbor. 

Ran ashore during thick fog and be- 
came a total wreck, her 3 occupants 
reaching the shore on an air mattress. 
The keeper furnished them succor at the 
station, and prior to their departure for 
their homes supplied them with dry 
clothing from the stores of the W. N. 
R. A. 

Discovered adrift 1 mile from the station. 
The keeper and crew pulled out to it and 
towed it to the station to await a claim- 
ant. 

While bound for Morehead City became 
water-logged and was in danger of sink- 
ing 1 mile E. of the life-saving station. 
The keeper went out to her in a small 
skiff and, with assistance, manned the 
pumps and kept the water down until a 
steam launch could be procured to tow 
her into smooth water. After her leaks 
were stopped she proceeded on her way. 

While cruising for pleasure with 13 persons 
on board, the machinery of launch be- 
came disabled about 1J miles from the 
station and 1 mile from the shore. The 
life-savers pulled out in surf boat and 
brought the disabled boat, with its occu- 
pants, to a wharf in the harbor. 

Broke away from her moorings and went 
adrift, the men aboard reaching shore in 
a small boat. The keeper of the Orleans 
station, after making diligent but fruit- 
less search for the vessel, was informed 
by telephone from Old Harbor station 
that she had been found ashore by the 
patrol. The Orleans crew, with the as- 
sistance of the surfmen from the Old Har- 
bor station, saved the launch's machinery 
and equipments, and had them shipped 
by rail to the owner at East Hampton. 
The 2 occupants having lost all their 
personal effects, and being drenched and 
chilled, were removed to the station and 
supplied with dry clothing from the 
stores of the W. N. R. A. (See letters of 
acknowledgment . ) 

Machinery became disabled during thick 
fog and steamer blew distress signals. 
The life-savers pulled out and remained 
by her until the arrival of a tug. The 
surfmen then ran her lines and the tug 
towed her to port. 

This boat with 2 men on board was drifting 
into the breakwater at 29th street, with 
aheavyNE. wind and sea running. The 
lifeboat went to their assistance and 
towed them into the harbor. (The club 
named operates a service lifeboat under 
the supervision of the keeper of the Old 
Chicago station.) 

Stranded on Ram Head Bar, 3 miles WNW. 
of the station, during dense fog. The 
life-saving crew boarded her, and after 
considerable effprt succeeded in working 
her afloat and into deep water without 
damage. 

Stranded during dense fog If miles W. of 
the station at 2 a. m. The keeper called 
his crew, manned surfboat, boarded her, 
ran out an anchor, and as the tide came 
up hove her afloat. 



82 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Aug. 1 



Aug. 1 



Station and locality. 



Sandy Point, Rhode Is- 
land. 



New Shoreham, Rhode 
Island. 



Aug. 1 1 Middle Island, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Aug. 1 

Aug. 2 

Aug. 2 

Aug. 2 

Aug. 3 

Aug. 3 

Aug. 4 

Aug. 4 

Aug. 4 

Aug. 4 

Aug. 4 

Aug. 4 



Michigan Citv, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Gurnet, Massachusetts 



Brenton Point, Rhode Is- 
land. 



Fourth Cliff, Massachu- 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Lch. Ailsa. 



U.S. collier Nero.. . 



Short Beach, New York.. 



Point Lookout, New York 



Hereford Inlet, New Jer- 
sey. 

Louisville, Kentucky 



Vermilion, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Br. yt. Wyanoake.. 
Gas. Ich. Alvira 

Gas. Ich. Bertha B . . 

Gas. Ich. Elmira 

Gas. Ich., no name.. 



Am. sc. Laura L. 
Sprague. 



Am. sc. Eliza Jane.. 



Sip. H. H. 



Small boat, no 
name. 



Sip. Watagua.... 



Transportation. . . 



Shanty boat, no 
name. 



Br. str. Glenellah.. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



The patrol at 3 p. m. sighted an abandoned 
launch in the channel, and the keeper with 
surfboat proceeded to her and, after haul- 
ing her up onto the beach, brought her 
tanks, piping, and all movable articles to 
the statio nto await a claimant. 

While en route from Norfolk to Newport 
with a cargo of coal stranded during 
dense fog on the S. side of Block Is- 
land, 2fc miles from life-saving station, 
and 1,800 yards from shore. The life- 
savers aided in carrying out her anchors, 
ran lines, and hove them taut to await 
a rising tide, then returned to the station 
and forwarded messages to the Navy 
Department. The vessel was floated 
later by tugs. 

The master of this vessel was unacquainted 
with the entrance to the harbor. The 
keeper boarded yacht and piloted her to 
a safe anchorage inside. 

Upon hearing signals of distress from this 
launch the surfmen went to her assist- 
ance and found that her supply of fuel 
had become exhausted. After furnish- 
ing her with an ample supply of gasoline 
from the station she proceeded to her 
destination. 

At 8.15 p. m. this launch with 2 persons on 
board became lost in thick fog while sail- 
ing in Dorchester Bay. In response to 
their cries for help the life-savers in 
launch Relief took them in tow to the 
public landing. 

Adrift during strong E. wind and stranded 
on the flats. The keeper boarded her 
and ran out an anchor, and with the ris- 
ing tide she floated without damage. 

Became disabled owing to obstructions 
fouling her propeller. A surfman in sta- 
tion dinghy took her in tow to a boat- 
house. After clearing her wheel she pro- 
ceeded to Superior. 

At sunrise, through a rift in the fog the 
lookout sighted this vessel ashore on 
Browns Island, | of a mile from the sta- 
tion. Upon boarding her it was ascer- 
tained that the master desired a tug. 
The keeper notified a tugboat office and 
a tug was sent to haul her afloat. 

This vessel having anchored in shoal water 
during dense fog was discovered by the 
life-savers who towed her to a safe an- 
chorage with the surfboat. 

Stranded on Humarack Beach while en- 
deavoring to get under way in a light 
wind. The life-savers made sail on her, 
hove on her anchor, and with the rising 
tide worked her over the bar into deep 
water without injury. 

At 4 p. m. a small pleasure boat was sighted 
ashore near Meadow Island. The keeper 
in a launch went to her assistance and 
hauled her afloat without damage. 

At 4 p. m. ran ashore on Meadow Island. 
The life-saving crew ran her anchors and 
hauled her into deep water without dam- 
age. 

The keeper manned surfboat and brought 4 
persons to the shore from the stranded 
gasoline launch Vista. 

This boat, with a man and a woman on 
board, was discovered adrift above the 
falls. The station crew towed them to a 
safe place in the river. 

At midnight during a dense fog the keeper 
was notified by telephone that this vessel 
had grounded near Whitefish Point, 10$ 
miles E . of the station . He summoned a 
tug, which arrived from Sault Ste. Marie 
and floated the steamer without damage. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



83 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



1906. 
Aug. 4 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



. Aug. 5 | Barnegat, New Jersey 

Aug. o j To wnsend Inlet, New Jer- 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



sey. 



Gas. Ich. Jewel . . 



Sip. Kanima. .. 



Gas. 1< h., no name. 



Aug. 5 



Aug. 5 
Aug. 5 
Aug. 5 



Aug. (> 

Aug. 

Aug. 7 

Aug. 7 

Aug. 7 

Aug. 7 



Aug. 7 



Port Austin, Michigan, St. yt. Vita. 
Lake Huron. 



Hammond, Michigan, Skiff, no nume 

Lake Huron. 

Duluth, Minnesota, Lake I Gas. Ich., no name 
Superior. 

Racine, Wisconsin, Lake i Sip. Kinnickinnic.. 
Michigan. 



Gurnet, Massachusetts. ..; Am. so. Rena. 



Xachs Inlet, New York... 



Rye Beach, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Point Allerton, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Manomet Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Monomoy Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Holly Beach, New Jersey. 



Small boat, no 
name. 



Dory, no name 



Gas. Ich. Pilot....'.. 



Dory, no name. 



Am. sc. George V 
Jordan. 



Yt. Glenriddle... 



While sailing for pleasure the machinery of 
launch broke down and the occupant 
was unable to reach shore. A surfman 
in a power boat towed launch to a land- 
ing. 

Stranded on the side of the inlet with 3 per- 
sons on board. The Life-saving crew 
hauled her afloat without seriousdamage. 

Machinery became disabled 1 miles from 
station. Her occupants, 3 men, made 
signals for help. The life-savers towed 
the disabled craft to shore with the surf- 
boat. 

During smoky weather stranded on Cabin 
Point Reef 2 miles ENE. of station and 
sounded distress signals. The Life-sav- 
ing crew boarded her, and upon the re- 
quest of the master, the surfman pulled 
to Pointe aux Barques and notified a 
towboat company, then returned to the 
stranded yacht. A tug floated her and 
the keeper piloted her to an anchorage 
near the dub house. 

This skiff, adrift 5 miles E. of the station, 
was taken in tow by the surfmen and 
brought to the station. 

Engine broke down and launch went adrift 
with 2 persons on board. A surfman 
towed them to a wharf. 

Capsized with 3 persons on board during a 
fresh squall J of a mile from the life-sav- 
ing station. The surfmen pulled out to 
the overturned sloop and found the 3 
men clinging to her bottom. They were 
all taken into the surfboat and safely 
landed. The boat was righted, bailed 
out, and returned to the owner. 

At 8.30 p. m. during thick* fog struck the 
beach near the station, where she was 
made out by the patrol, who, after firing 
a Coston signal, reported her to the 
keeper. The station crew boarded her 
and ran out a kedge, and at flood tide 
hove her afloat and took her to a safe 
anchorage. 

The occupant of this boat came to the sta- 
tion, and the keeper afforded him shelter 
until the following day, when he pro- 
ceeded on his way. 

At 3.30 p. m. while a man and a woman 
were out rowing the boat broached to 
and threw the man into the water. The 
keeper and a surfman rushed out to his 
assistance and brought the dory and the 
other occupant to the beach. 

At 5 a. m. stranded near Boston light- 
house li miles from the station. The 
surfmen boarded her and succeeded in 
launching her over the rocks into deep 
water with but slight damage. 

A dory being sighted adrift with no one in 
it, the station crew took it in tow and 
brought it to the shore. 

Stranded during thick fog on Pollock Rip 
Shoal 4i miles from the station at 4 a. m. 
and was seen by the keeper when the fog 
lifted. The station crew, in power dory, 
found her full of water. The master hav- 
ing decided to abandon her, the entire 
crew of 8 men was brought ashore to the 
life-saving station, where all were fur- 
nished food and shelter until able to de- 
part for their homes. The vessel proved 
a total loss. 

The 3 occupants of this small yacht find- 
ing it impossible to reach their destina- 
tion came to anchor for the night in a 
perilous position near the surf. The life- 
savers seeing their predicament, pulled 
out to the craft and brought the occu- 
pants to the station for the night. They 
were sick and suffering from exposure, 



84 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Aug. 7 



Aug. 7 
Aug. 8 

Aug. 8 

Aug. 8 
Aug. S 
Aug. 8 

Aug. 9 

Aug. 10 
Aug. 10 
Aug. 10 

Aug. 10 
Aug. 11 



Station and locality. 



Holly Beach, New Jersey. 



Portsmouth, North Caro- 
lina. 



Hampton Beach, New 
Hampshire. 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Buffalo, New York, Lake 
Erie. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Fourth Cliff, Massachu- 
setts. 



Point Allerton, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Point Allerton, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Hog Island, Virginia 



Grand Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Cross Island, Maine. 



Yt. Glenriddle , 



Nph. loh. Defiance. . 



Gas. Ich., no name.. 



Sip., no name 



Gas. Ich., no name.. 



Gas. Ich. J. P. Bro- 
gan. 



Am sc. Nellie John- 
son. 



Am. sc. Governor 
Russell. 



Am. sc. George E. 
Lane, jr. 



Am. sc. Arbitrator.. 
Sip. yt. Eclipse 

Nph. Ich., no name . 
Br. bg. James Daly. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



and were supplied* with dry clothing 
from the stores of the W. N. R. A. On 
the following day they embarked and 
continued on their way to Cape May. 

The master being unacquainted with the 
channel stranded on Bush Shoal 2| miles 
W. of the station at 5 p. m. The surf- 
men boarded her, ran out a heavy an- 
chor, and, with the aid of her power, 
hove her afloat and took her to a safe 
anchorage. 

Engine became disabled and boat contain- 
ing 7 people drifted into heavy surf and 
capsized. The station patrol being near- 
by pulled out to them in a dinghy, 
brought them safely through the surf, 
and landed them. The launch was re- 
covered by station crew and bailed out. 

Stranded on NE. end of Horse Shoe Flat 
} mile NE. of station at 7.50 p. m. The 
keeper with a small power boat went out 
to her, ran out an anchor, and with the 
aid of her sails hauled her afloat and 
took her to a safe anchorage. 

Hearing cries for help the station crew 
pulled out and found a launch broken 
down and unable to reach the shore. 
She was taken in tow and secured to a 
yacht-club mooring. 

Engine became disabled when launch was 

5 mile W. of the station. The life-savers 
manned surfboat and towed the launch 
to the station, where repairs were made 
by the keeper. 

Lost her rudder and became unmanageable 

6 miles N. of the station at 4 a. m. The 
life-savers boarded her and, with the 
surfboat towing astern of the schooner, 
by which her master was enabled to steer 
his vessel, finally succeeded in getting her 
into Manitowoc Harbor. 

At 8 a. m. a surfman on watch sighted the 
masts of this vessel through a rift in the 
fog i mile S. of the station. Upon board- 
ing her the life-savers found her hard and 
fast on a sand bar 200 yards from the 
beach. They immediately set to work, 
and ran a kedge, and as it was high tide 
floated her at 11 a. m. without damage. 

Stranded on Georges Island 2 miles NW. 
of station at 6 a. m. The life-savers 
launched the Monomoy surfboat and as- 
sisted in floating the schooner without 
damage. 

Stranded on Georges Island 2J miles NW. 
of station. The life-savers, after float- 
ing the Lane, boarded this vessel, ran out 
her anchors, and hove her into deep 
water uninjured. 

At 9 a. m., while beating out the inlet, 
stranded on a point about 200 yards 
from shore. The life-savers boarded 
her, ran out an anchor to windward, 
and hauled her afloat without damage. 

At 3.30 p. m., while lying alongside the pier, 
broke her moorings and went adrift. A 
surfman on watch launched the patrol 
skiff and towed the launch to the station. 

During a calm and a dense fog the patrol 
while 2 miles from the station heard the 
sound of a fog signal near shore. Upon 
reporting to the keeper the station crew 
manned the surfboat and pulled to her. 
They found her at anchor in a dangerous 
locality, and as it was impossible to get 
her under way owing to calm weather 
the surfmen remained by all night. At 
6.30 a. m. the following day a light breeze 
sprung up and the life-savers made sail 
on her, hove up her anchors, and took her 
to a safe offing, when she continued on 
her way. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



85 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date, i Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Hunniwells Beach, Maine. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Am. sc. William P. 
Hood. 



Gas. Ich. Genevieve. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake Gas. Ich., no name. 
Superior. 

White River, Michigan, | Sip. Owl 

Lake Michigan. 



Plum Island, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Am. str. Nelson; 
bge. Bulgaria. 



Ocracoke, North Caro- Am. sc. Brant. 
Una. 



Erie, Pennsylvania, I^ke Yt. Sunshine. 
Erie. 



Louisville, Kentucky ! Skiff, no name 



Beaver Island, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Hunniwells Beach, Maine. 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 



St. yt. Marcia. 



Skiff, no name 

Gas. Ich., no name. 

Sip., no name 



South Haven, Michigan, Yt. Annie D. C . . . . 
Lake Michigan. 



Point Allerton, Massachu- Am. sc. Nil Desper- 
setts. andum. 



At 2.30 p. m. while being towed into the 
river by the tug Sea King, stranded on 
Sugar Loaf, the tug blowing signals for 
help. The life-savers boarded the ves- 
sel and after running hawsers to several 
of her towboats, the schooner was floated 
into deep water without damage. 

Having become disabled by striking some 
sunken obstruction, the owner of 
launch brought her to the station and re- 
quested the assistance of the surfmen in 
hauling her out on the beach. After get- 
ting her up clear of the water the keeper 
assisted to make repairs, when she was 
launched and taken out into deep water. 

Engine disabled and launch went adrift 1 
mile E. of station. A surfman took her 
in tow to the harbor. 

During a fresh breeze went adrift and cap- 
sized 10 miles from the station. Surfmen 
pulled out to her, righted her, bailed her 
out, and towed her to the shore. 

At 9 p. m. signals for assistance were heard 
on board these vessels. The keeper, 
upon boarding the steamer, found that 
the master wished to be piloted into 
shoal water where his tow barge, which 
was leaking, could be beached. The 
keeper complied with his request. 

Ran aground on a shoal in Pamlico Sound, 
3 J miles from the station. The life-savers 
found her hard aground and unable to 
work off. They ran out her anchors, 
hove her afloat with the windlass, and 
took her to a safe anchorage. 

At 6.15 a. m. was reported ashore in Lake 
Erie, 20 miles from the life-saving sta- 
tion. The keeper immediately sum- 
moned a tug, which towed the surfmen 
to the assistance of the yacht. Upon 
reaching the stranded craft a hawser was- 
run to her from the tug, which quickly 
released her and towed her to Erie. 

This skiff, containing 3 men, was in danger 
of going over the middle chute of the 
falls. The station crew brought the oc- 
cupants and their boat safely to the 
station. 

At 3.30 p. m. ran ashore while attempting 
to enter the harbor. The keeper boarded 
her, ran out her anchor, and with her 
windlass and engine worked her afloat 
without damage. 

A small skiff, having drifted away from 
its moorings, the station crew with the 
Whitehall boat took it in tow and turned 
it over to the owner. 

At 2.30 p. m. collided with a steamer and 
filled, 1 mile N. of the station, the occu- 
pant, a man, saving himself by leaping 
on board the other vessel. The station 
towed the launch ashore, where it was 
bailed out and turned over to the owner. 

This sloop, with 2 men on board, capsized 
during Iresh winds, 3 miles from shore, 
at 10 p. m. The men were taken out of 
the water by a passing fish boat. The 
life-savers righted the boat and brought 
it, with the 2 occupants, to the station, 
where they were furnished stimulants, 
food, and dry clothing from the supply 
of the W. N. R. A. 

At 5 p. m. grounded in the harbor near the 
north pier. The station crew went to 
her assistance, ran a line from her to the 
pier, and hove her into deep water. 

Ran ashore on east side of Georges Island, 
2i miles NW. of station, at 4 p. m. The 
keeper manned the surfboat and assisted 
in running her anchor, heaving her afloat 
without danger. 



86 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Aug. 14 



Aug. 14 
Aug. 14 

Aug. 15 

Aug. 15 
Aug. 15 



Station and locality. 



Big Sandy, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 

Superior. 
North Manitou Island, 

Michigan, Lake Michi- 



Hunni wells Beach, Maine. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Gas. Ich. Rixy 



Sip. yt., no name... 
Yt. Dauntless 

Nph.lch.Wherehere 



Aug. 15 

Aug. 15 

Aug. 15 
Aug. 15 
Aug. 16 

Aug. 16 
Aug. 16 

Aug. 16 
Aug. 16 



Jerrys Point, New Hamp- Br. str. Amethyst, 
shire. 



Watch Hill, Rhode Island. Am. sc. Maggie 
Todd. 



Blue Point, New York. . . . 



Bois Blanc, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Sip. Troubadour... 



Am. str. Sea Fox... 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake Sip. yt., no name... 
Superior. 

I 

Point Adams, Oregon I Am. str. Francis H. 

Leggett. 



City Point, Massachusetts 



Brant Rock, Massachu- 
setts. 



Monomoy Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Cuttyhunk, Massachusetts 



Barnegat, New Jersey 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Sailboat, no name. . 



Am. sc. O. D. With- 
erell. 



Yawl Sibyl. 



Rowboat, no name 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



A night signal of distress being observed 3 
miles from the station, the keeper 
manned a surfboat and pulled out to it, 
finding this launch disabled, with 2 per- 
sons on board. They were taken in tow 
and brought into the harbor, after which 
the launch proceeded to Oswego. 

Adrift in the narbor. A surfman took her 
to the boat club landing. 

This yacht, having arrived off the station 
in a leaky condition, was boarded by 
surfman, who hauled her out and stopped 
her leaks. 

At 9.35 a. m. the engine became disabled 
during a fresh offshore wind, and the 
boat with her 3 occupants drifted to sea. 
The keeper manned the surfboat, 
brought launch and passengers safely to 
shore. 

This vessel arrived off the river and the 
master desiring to enter, the keeper 
boarded her and piloted her to a safe 
anchorage inside. 

Missed stays and was swept to leeward, 
where she stranded on the rocks at 
Watch Hill Point, J mileS. of the station, 
at 9a.m. Upon boarding her the life- 
savers found her full of water. They sum- 
moned a wrecking company, who sent 2 
powerful tugs and a lighter. After her 
cargo was removed the surfmen ran 
hawsers with a power boat, and she was 
floated after 3 hours hard work. 

This vessel with 2 persons on board cap- 
sized fmile E. of the station and 11 miles 
E. of Fire Island. The occupants were 
picked up by a power boat. The surf- 
men righted the sloop and brought it into 
the harbor. A surfman recovered a coat 
containing $200, by diving, and returned 
it to the owner. 

Broke down during smoky weather 6 miles 
from the station at 3.30 p. m. Hearing 
her signals of distress the life-savers put 
out to her, and towed her to Cheboygan 
with the power boat. 

Parted her moorings and went adrift. A 
surfman recovered the sloop and towed 
it back to the yacht club landing. 

Storm bound with a large raft in tow. Was 
assisted by the life-savers to secure her 
raft until the storm abated. 

At 9.50 p. m. engine became disabled in 
Dorchester Bay l\ miles from the station. 
The life-savers, in power boat Relief, 
towed launch to city dock. 

A boy and a girl having gone out for a sail 
found themselves unable to regain the 
shore owing to a fresh offshore wind. 
Several surnnen towed them in with the 
station dory. 

Stranded on Handkerchief Shoal 5 miles 
SW. of station during light winds and 
strong tides. The life-savers boarded 
her, and with her after sails succeeded 
in working her into deep water without 
damage, after which she continued on 
her way. 

Her anchor fouling, yawl dragged ashore 
on Nashawena Island, If miles ENE. of 
the life-saving station. She was discov- 
ered at 4.30 a. m. by a surfman who re- 
ported her condition to the keeper. The 
surfboat was manned, the yawl's anchor 
run out with a long scope of chain, and 
after listing her she was hove afloat at 
high water. 

Capsized on the bar owing to high sea at 
12.30 p. m., the occupants being rescued 
by some persons nearby. The life-savers 
pulled out to the overturned boat, and 
brought the man safely to shore. His 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



87 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 


Nature of casualty and service rendered. 


1906. 
Aug. 16 

Aug. 16 
Aug 16 


Barnegat, New Jersey 
Cape May, New Jersey 

Marquette Michigan Lake 


Rowboat, no name. 
Nph. Ich. Senator . . 

Gas. Ich. Wasp 


boat was afterwards towed in, righted, 
and bailed out. 
While passing out to sea through Cold 
Spring Inlet ran aground 1 miles NW. 
or station. The surfmen found her in a 
leaking condition. After stopping her 
leaks they hove her afloat on the next 
high tide, and she then proceeded into 
Delaware Bay to a safe anchorage. 
Ran short of gasoline and went adrift with 


Aug. 17 
Vug 17 


Michigan. 

Fire Island, New York ... 
Galveston Texas 


Sip. yt. Treasure . . . 
Sip Louise 


3 persons on board during a fresh SE. 
wind, stranding on Presque Isle, 9 miles 
NW. of station. Upon learning that the 
launch was reported missing the life-sav- 
ing crew set out in search of her and upon 
discovering her took her in tow with 
power boat and brought her to Mar- 
quette. 
The owner not being able to launch yacht, 
called on the keeper for assistance. With 
his crew he launched her at high water. 
At 3.30 p. m. during a fresh squall capsized 


Aue. 17 


CJalveston, Texas .. 


Sip. Carrie Beeler 


with 2 men on board at a point 3 miles N. 
of station. The lookout at once gave the 
alarm and 2 surfmen pulled to the rescue. 
Upon arriving alongside the overturned 
boat the occupants were discovered cling- 
ing to its bottom. They were taken out 
of the water and safely landed. The life- 
savers towed the sloop to a safe place, 
righted her, then bailed her out, after 
which she continued on her way. 
At 3 p. m. capsized in harbor channel dur- 


Aug. 17 
Aug. 17 


Marblehead, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 

Holland Michigan Lake 


Am. sc. William A. 
Young. 

Sailboat Pearl 


ing fresh squall J mile W. of station, the 
occupants, 4 men, clinging to her sides. 
The keeper and 3 surfmen picked them 
up, righted their boat, and towed it to 
snore, where the rescued party took 
charge of it. 
Ran ashore on Kelleys Island during 
smoky weather at 4.30 a. m. The life- 
savers boarded, but she was hard 
aground and their efforts to release her 
proved unavailing. The master was 
then taken ashore m the surfboat for the 
purpose of telephoning for a tug. The 
tug floated her without damage and the 
life-savers kept her clear with the pumps 
until she could be taken to a safe anchor- 
age. 
About 3 p in while lying alongside a pier 


Aug. 17 
Aug. 18 


Michigan. 

Jackson Park, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 

Deal, New Jersey 


Gas. Ich. Engle- 
wood. 

Canoe, no name 


with sails hoisted was capsized by a 
squall. The life-savers assisted the own- 
er to right her and bail her out. 
This boat, with 2 men on board, became 
disabled, drifted to the beach and 
grounded at 10.30 p. m., both occupants 
managing to reach shore in safety. The 
life-savers floated the boat, and towed it 
to a safe anchorage in the harbor. 
Capsized on the bar, 1 of the occupants 


Aug. 18 
Aug. 18 
Aug. 18 

Aug. 18 


Barnegat, New Jersey 
Atlantic City, New Jersey. 

Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 

Marquette, Michigan, 
Lake Superior. 


Gas. Ich. Chinchilla . 
Sip. yt. Zena 
Gas. Ich. Edith 

Gas. Ich., no name .. 


losing his life. (For detailed account, 
see page 44.) 
Stranded in Barnegat Inlet with 4 persons 
on board at 5.30 p. m. The life-savers 
boarded her, ran out an anchor, and hove 
her afloat without damage. 
Stranded in the inlet \ mile N. of the station 
at 10 a. m. The life-savers with the aid 
of their power boat succeeded in floating 
her without damage. 
Stranded in Lake Erie about \ mile NE. of 
station at 12.15 a. m. and was at once 
sighted by the life-savers, who dragged 
her into deeper water and took her to a 
place of safety. The 4 men on board 
were removed to the station and fur- 
nished stimulants and dry clothing from 
the stores of the W. N. R. A. 
This launch, with 10 persons on board, 
struck a rock, disabling her propeller, at 
a point \ mile E. of the station. The 



88 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



190fi. 
Aug. 18 



Aug. 19 



Aug. 19 



Aug. 19 



Marquette, Michigan, 
Lake Superior. 

Salisbury Beach, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Gloucester, Massachusetts 



Cleveland,Ohio, Lake Erie 



Gas. Ich., no name. 
Gas. Ich. Sarah . . 



Gas. Ich. May Louise 



Gas. Ich. Ha Ha ... 



Aug. 19 

Aug. 20 
Aug. 21 

Aug. 21 



Aug. 21 



Aug. 22 



Aug. 22 



Aug. 23 



Saint Joseph, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Brant Rock, Massachu- 
setts. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Charlevoix, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 



City Point, Massachusetts 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



City Point, Massachusetts 



Rowboat No. 24. . . 



Sailboat, no name. 



Gas. Ich. Swallow.. 



Am. str. J. N. Par- 
melee. 



Gas. Ich. H. Paul- 
man. 



Sips. Rebel, KittieC 



Sip. Vagabond 



Am. sc. Tempest; 
sip. Vexer. 



life-saving crew with power boat towed 
the launch and its occupants back to the 
harbor. 

Being unacquainted with the entrance to 
the river, this launch, containing 3 per- 
sons, stranded on jetty rocks and made 
signal for assistance. The patrol sighted 
them, burned a Coston signal, and then 
telephoned the keeper, who repaired to 
the scene, and as the boat was found un- 
damaged she was taken to a safe place 
inside. 

At7.45p. m., while endeavoringto enter the 
harbor through a contracted channel, 
struck some submerged piling, and 
turned over and sank 1J miles distant 
from the station. The patrol took the 
men out of the water and landed them on 
a dock. The capsized boat was bailed out 
and hauled out on a launchway near by. 

Engine disabled and launch containing 6 
persons in danger of stranding 12 miles 
W. of station at 8.40 p. m. The keeper 
being notified of the mishap by telephone, 
at once sent for a tug which towed the 
life-savers in their boat to the disabled 
craft. Upon arriving abreast of Eagle 
Cliff the launch was sighted well inshore, 
and the surfmen cast off from the tug and 
pulled to her, took her in tow, and with 
the assistance of the tug brought the 
launch safely to port. 

At 2 p. m. this boat containing 2 men cap- 
sized near the north pier, and upon the 
alarm being sounded a surfman ran to 
the pier, threw them a life buoy and 
landed them safely on the pier. The 

.. boat was righted, bailed out, and turned 
over to the owner. 

At 2.50 p. m. the keeper sent 3 surfmen to 
assist a man and a boy in a sailing dory 
to reach shore against an increasing off- 
shore wind. 

Parted her moorings during a fresh NE. 
wind and drifted across the harbor. She 
was discovered near the P. V. elevator 
in a sinking condition and towed to the 
life-saving station by 2 surfmen. 

At 3.30 a. m. this vessel, with a cargo of 
fish, stranded on north point, 2 miles 
from the station, during a dense fog. 
The patrol sighted her and burned a 
Coston signal to the lookout at the sta- 
tion. The keeper and crew boarded her. 
At the request of the master the keeper 
went ashore and telephoned for a tug, 
which upon its arrival took off a part of 
the cargo of fish. Lines were then run 
to the steamer by the life-savers, who, 
with the assistance of the tug, floated 
her without danger. 

Engine broke down during smoky weather 
and the occupant, a man, was unable to 
reach the harbor. The life-savers took 
him in tow with the surfboat and 
brought him to Chicago. 

These small craft while sailing in Dorches- 
ter Bay became disabled during fresh S. 
wind and their occupants were unable to 
reach the shore. The station crew, in 
launch Relief, took them in tow to safe 
moorings in the harbor. 

Dragged her anchors during a squall and 
stranded 2 miles N. of the station at 
12.15 p. m. The surfmen ran a hawser 
to the tug Starke, which released her 
and towed her to a safe anchorage. 

At 6.30 p. m. the Tempest missed stays and 
ran aground, and set signal of distress. 
The keeper and his crew boarded her, 
and at high water, with heavy NE. wind, 
succeeded in hauling her afloat with 
launch Relief. The Vexer broke adrift 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



89 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Aug. 23 



Aug. 23 



Aug. 23 



City Point, Massachusetts 



Am. sc. Tempest; 



sip. Vexer. 
Wood End, Massachusetts Catboat Davis 



Potunk, New York. 



Cathoat Tris. 



Aug. 23 ! Oak Island, New York Am. sip. Chip. 



Aug. 23 



Aug. 23 



Aug. 24 



Aug. 24 



Oswego, New York, Lake Nph. ich. Elk 
Ontario. 



Charlotte, New York, Gaa. Ich. Majore 
Lake Ontario. 



Straitsmouth, Massachu- Sip. Margaret 
setts. 



Manomet Point, Massa- ; Sip. Modoc. 
chusetts. 



Aug. 24 



Aug. 24 



Aug. 24 



Gay Head, Massachusetts. Am. sc. Eliza Jane 



.do Am. sc. Christopher 

Columbus. 



Cuttyhunk, Massachu- 
setts. 



Blp. Emma Jane. . 



in Dorchester Bay and the station crew, 
in launch Relief, took her in tow to a 
safe mooring. 

At 6.30 p. m. during a fresh breeze from 
SW. this boat, containing 1 man, went 
adrift and collided with a fish trap, and 
was in danger of capsizing. The keeper 
went to the man's assistance and 
brought him safely to the station, where 
he was sheltered for the night. In the 
morning the catboat was towed to town 
by the station power boat. 

With 3 men on board, capsized during a 
fresh SW. wind mile from the station 
at 3.30 p. m., its occupants being picked 
up by a boat near by. The surfmen 
righted the boat, bailed it out, and 
returned it to the owner. 

Lost her tiller and went adrift with 4 per- 
sons on board, finally stranding 1 miles 
NE. of the station at 7.30 p. m. The 
keeper discovered them ashore at 8.30 

&m. He took their boat in tow and 
nded them safely at the station. 

At 4.30 p. m. this boat, containing 4persons, 
stranded 4 miles W. of station. The life- 
savers proceeded to the place in surfboat 
and found the launch well up on the 
beach with steering gear disabled. The 
occupants, with their effects, were safely 
landed, and the launch was floated and 
towed out to a tug, which took it to port. 

At 8.30 p. m. the lookout reported this 
launch going ashore 2 miles NW. of the 
station. Several surfmen went up the 
beach and found that the launch had 
stranded, the occupants, 2 men, having 
managed to reach the shore in safety. 
They were brought to the station and 
supplied with dry clothing from the store 
of the W. N. R. A. The keeper recovered 
the keel, machinery, and other parts of 
the launch and brought them to the sta- 
tion. 

Dragged her anchors and stranded on 
Back Beach at 2 a. m. The surfmen con- 
structed launchways under her and 
hauled her well up onto the beach clear 
of the surf. 

At 7 a. m. this sloop, containing 2 persons, 
l)ecame disabled during a strong NE.wind 
and heavy sea, i mile from the station. 
Seeing her tender capsize and her bow- 
sprit carry away, the keeper manned 
surfboat and went to their assistance. 
The men were taken to the station and 
furnished food and warm drinks, after 
which they departed for Boston. The 
sloop was towed to Plymouth. (See let- 
ter of acknowledgment.) 

Dragged anchors in heavy NE. blow and 
stranded in Menemsha Bight 3 miles E. ol 
station. The life-savers made every at- 
tempt to float her, but without avail. 
They then secured the tug S. C. Hart, and 
with her assistance hauled her afloat. 

Dragged her anchors during NE. gale and 
went adrift, stranding on Dog Bar in 
Menemsha Bight at 2.30a.m. Her sig- 
nals of distress were discovered by the 
patrol, who replied with 2 Coston signals, 
then reporting the vessel to the keeper. 
The station crew went to her in surfboat, 
ran out her anchors, and hove her off the 
bar into deep water, then towed her to a 
safe mooring with power boat. 

While at anchor in Cuttyhunk Harbor 
dragged anchors during fresh NE. wind 
and stranded 300 yards from the shore at 
4.20 a. m. The station crew went to her 
assistance in a dory, ran out her anchor, 
hove her afloat with the windlass, and 
secured her to a safe mooring. 



90 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Aug. 24 



Fishers Island, New York. 



Aug. 24 Rocky Point, New York. . 



Aug. 24 | Spermaceti Cove, New 
Jersey. 



Aug. 24 | Great Egg, New Jersey... 



Aug. 24 

Aug. 24 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 25 
Aug. 2fi 

Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 



Indian River Inlet, Dela- 



White River, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Cuttyhunk, Massachu- 
setts. . 



Oak Island, New York. . . 



Ocracoke, North Caro- 
lina. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 



City Point, Massachusetts, 



Gay Head, Massachusetts 



Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 



Catboat Dinah ..... 



Nph. Ich. Rapture.. 



Gas. Ich. Helen . . 



Catboat, no name.. .' 



Sip. Do Do 



Am. str. Petrel . . 



Sip. Sophie . 



Am. str. Oak Is- 
land. 



Catboat, no name. . 

Rowboat, no name. 
Am. sc. Neptune. .. 

Gas. Ich., no name. . 
Am. sc. Eliza Jane. . 
Catboat, no name . . 



Dragged her anchors during heavy NE. 
wind and stranded near the station at 2 
a. m. The life-saving crew boarded her, 
ran out her anchors, and hove her afloat 
without injury. (See letter of acknowl- 
edgment.) 

Stranded during fresh NE. rain squall and 
heavy sea. The 3 occupants were taken 
off by the surfboat and conveyed to the 
station, where they were furnished food 
and shelter, while their boat was hauled 
up clear of the surf. After the storm 
abated the surfmen launched the boat 
and the party continued on its way. 

Her supply of gasoline became exhausted 
when she had reached a point mile from 
the station. The keeper brought the 
owner ashore, and later put sufficient oil 
on board to enable him to reach his des- 
tination. 

This boat, with 2 persons on board, cap- 
sized i mile NE. of station at 10 a. m. 
during a heavy squall. Two surfmen, 
went to their assistance in a small boat, 
picked the 2 men up, and brought them 
with their boat to the station. 

Broke her centerboard and stranded at 5 
p. m. The life-savers boarded her, took 
off the 7 occupants, and brought them to 
the station, where they were made com- 
fortable until able to return to Rehoboth. 

Parted her anchor chains during fresh E. 
wind and stranded near the life-saving 
station at 7 a. m. The surfmen towed 
her to a pier and made her fast. 

The master not being acquainted with the 
channel, his vessel stranded \ mile NW. 
of the station at 6 p. m. The life-savers, 
in station dory, boarded her and assisted 
the master in heaving her afloat and se- 
curing her to safe moorings. 

Parted her cables during fresh E. winds 
and drifted ashore on a sand bar N. of 
station at 2 a. m. The surfmen boarded, 
ran out lines to a wharf near by, and after 

2 hours' heavy heaving succeeded in get- 
ting her into deep water without damage. 

Became dismantled during bio wing weather 

3 miles S. of station. She was sighted 
flying signals of distress at 5.30 p. m. The 
Monomoy boat was manned, and the 
crew boarded her, and after weighing 
anchor towed her into Ocracoke. 

Found adrift on the lake by a surfman. 
The boat was recovered by the surfmen, 
and brought t'o the station to await a 
claimant. 

While in a water-logged condition set signal 
of distress when 5 miles off the life-saving 
station at 2 p. m. The crew quickly 
boarded her, assisted at the pumps to 
keep her from sinking, then worked her 
into shoal water, where her leaks were 
stopped. 

Engine became disabled while launch was 
standing up Dorchester Bay at about 
8.30 p. m., and its 3 occupants called for 
help. The station power boat Relief 
went to their assistance and towed them 
to the Savin Hill Yacht Club landing. 

At 10.30 a. m. the keeper with his crew pro- 
ceeded in surfboat to Menem sha Bight to 
assist tug S.C.Hart to float this schooner. 
The surfmen ran her lines to the tug, and 
hove up her anchors, after which she was 
hauled into deep water. 

Capsized during fresh winds about 300 
yards from the station at 3.30 p.m., pre- 
cipitating its 3 occupants into the lake. 
The life-savers took 1 of the men from 
the water, while a boat near by rescued 
the other men. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



91 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 


Nature of casualty and service rendered. 


1906. 








Aug. 26 


Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 


Gas. Ich. Fleur de 
lis. 


During a fresh squall of wind and rain this 
launch, with 6 persons on board, became 








disabled and was in danger of sinking. 








The station crew towed her to the station 








with the surfboat, and after the atorm 








subsided the party returned home. 


Aug. 26 


do 


Sc. y t. Mazeppa 


During a fresh squall stranded on Euclid 








Beach 10 miles from the life-saving sta- 








tion at 7.30 p. m. A tug was summoned 








by the keeper, and the life-savers, hi tow 








of the tug, proceeded to the assistance 
of the craft. The surfmen obtained 








soundings near the schooner, then ran a 








hawser from the tug, which hauled her 








afloat and took her into port. 


Aug. 26 


do 


Sip. Flying Scud 


A capsized boat was picked up while drift- 








ing in the lake. A surfman towed it 








to Edgewater Park, bailed it out, and 


.^ 






turned it over to owner. 


Aug. 26 


Thunder Bay Island, 


Am. str. Sea Wing. . 


Stranded on Kenosha Reef 3 miles WNW. 




Michigan, Lake Huron. 




of station at 2 a. m. The life-savers 








boarded her and found her hi a helpless 








condition. They ran out her anchors, 








then shifted her cargo aft, and hauled her 








afloat without damage. 


Aug. 26 


Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 


Racing shell, no 


Shell, with 1 occupant, became water- 




Superior. 


name. 


logged and capsized hi the harbor. A 








surfman, with power boat, picked up the 
man and took him and his boat to the 








landing. 


Aug. 26 


Charlevoix, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 


Am. str. Illinois.... 


At 6.30 p.m. this vessel, while en route 
from Petosky to Chicago with 500 per- 
sons on board, ran ashore while entering 








harbor, striking the beach at a point 400 








yards W. of the life-saving station and 








150 yards from the shore. The station 








lookout sighted the steamer as soon as 








she struck, and the life-savers pulled to 








her assistance in surfboat. The master 








attempted to back his vessel off, but 








fresh winds and high seas only carried 








her higher up on the beach. The station 








crew returned to the shore, set up beach 








apparatus, and fired a line over the for- 








ward end of the steamer, and landed the 








entire ship's company, taking them to 








the life-saving station, where stimulants 








and coffee were served ; also dry clothing 




* 




from the stores of the W. N. R. A. to 








those who had become drenched. (See 








letters of acknowledgment.) 


Aug. 26 


Ludington, Michigan, 


Yt. Lavita 


The crew of this yacht finding it difficult to 




Lake Michigan. 




reach harbor, the keeper sent several 








surfmen on board, who hoisted her sails 








and took her to a wharf. 


Aug. 26 


White River, Michigan, 


Rowboat, no name 


At 3 p.m. the man on pier watch saw this 




Lake Michigan. 




boat adrift on the lake. He recovered 


Aug. 27 


City Point, Massachusetts. 


Am. sc. Myrtle; sip. 
King Philip; gas. 


it and brought it to the station. 
During fresh winds the Myrtle parted her 
mooring and collided with a pier, where 






Ich., no name. 


she was in danger of breaking up. The 








life-savers, with launch Relief, took her 








in tow to a safe anchorage. The sloop 








dragged her anchors and fouled schooner 








Baboon about 1 mile distant from the 








station. The station crew hove up her 








anchors and took her in tow to a safe 








mooring. The gasoline launch became 








disabled while in Dorchester Bay at 10.20 
p. m. Station power boat Relief, in re- 








sponse to signals for help, took her in tow 
to the South Boston Yacht Club. 


Aug. 27 


Brant Rock, Massachu- 


Catboat, no name . . 


Lost her anchor, and being unable to carry 




setts. 




sail on account of heavy blow, drifted out 








to sea. She was sighted by the life-saving 
crew at a point 3 miles from the station. 








They boarded her, ran a line, brought her 








to the station, and hauled her up onto 








the beach above high-water mark. 



92 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. ! Station and locality. 



1906. I 

Aug. 27 Manomet Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Aug. 27 Hereford Inlet, New.Jer- 



Aug. 27 
Aug. 28 



Grand Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Plum Island, Massachu- 
setts. 



Aug. 28 ! Oak Island, New York... 



Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 



Big Sandy, New York, 

Lake Ontario. 
Michigan City, Indiana, 

Lake Michigan. 



Aug. 29 Quonochontaug, Rhode 
Island. 



Aug. 29 Oswego, New York, Lake 
Ontario. 



Aug. 29 Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Aug. 29 Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Aug. 30 Point Judith, Rhode Is- 
land. 



Vug. 30 Potunk, New York 



Aug. 30 Hog Island, Virginia 



Aug. 30 Fort Macon, North Caro- 
lina. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Gas. Ich. Laura 
Sip. yt. Fitzgerald . 

Gas. Ich., no name. . 
Am. sc. Industry . . . 

Am. str. Oak Island. 



Gas. Ich. Take it 

Ezze. 
Gas. Ich. Senator. . . 



Gas. Ich. Annie L... 



Sailboat, no name. 



Gas. Ich., 110 name. . 



Skin*, no name 



Am. sc. Clara E. 
Comee. 



Catboat Iris. 



St. Ich. Eva 



Am. sc. Allison Mil- 
ler. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



This launch, containing 9 persons, broke 
down 6 miles from the station during a 
SW. gale of wind. The keeper, sighting 
her signal of distress, went out to her and 
brought her and the passengers to shore. 

At 4.25 p. m. this vessel, with 3 persons on 
board, stranded on Hereford Bar while 
trying to enter the harbor. The life- 
savers ran her anchor and hove her 
afloat. Two of the occupants were taken 
to the station and sheltered for the night. 

Broke her moorings and went adrift. A 
surfman recovered the launch and towed 
her to the harbor with the station skiff. 

At 3 p. m. word was received by the keeper 
that this vessel had lost her foresail, gaff, 
and foreboom and was drifting toward 
the shore. The life-savers boarded her, 
cleared away the wreckage, manned the 
pumps, and kept the water down until 
she could be taken into port. 

While entering the channel grounded on a 
mud bank J mile from the station. The 
life-saving crew boarded her and light- 
ened her of her cargo, then ran out her 
anchors, hove her afloat, and brought her 
into the harbor. 

Unshipped her propeller, the station crew 
towed her in with surfboat. 

At 5.30 p. m. broke down 2 miles E. of the 
station with 7 men on board. The sta- 
tion crew launched Whitehall boat and 
towed them into the harbor. 

Became disabled owing to a broken rudder. 
The life-saving crew, in surfboat, towed 
her in to a safe place, where repairs could 
be made. 

At 2 p. m. a telephone message was received 
at the station stating that a boat had cap- 
sized in the harbor about 1 miles W. of 
the station. Surfmen pulled alongside 
the overturned boat and found that the 
2 occupants had reached the pier in safety. 
The station crew righted the boat, bailed 
it out, and towed it into the harbor, 
where it was turned over to the owner. 

Engine disabled and launch went adrift 2 
miles SE. of station at 2 p. m. Two surf- 
men with power boat towed her in to a 
safe anchorage. 

Capsized in the surf with 2 men on board. 
The surfmen in station skiff crossed the 
channel, righted the boat, and towed it to 
the beach. One of the men, who had in- 
jured his ankle, was removed to the sta- 
tion, where the keeper applied liniment 
from the medicine chest, after which he 
was taken to his home. 

During thick fog ran ashore about 1 mile 
WNW. of the station at 7 p. m. The life- 
savers boarded her, ran anchors, and at- 
tempted to haul her afloat, but were un- 
successful. The keeper then sent a mes- 
sage to a wrecking company, who floated 
her and towed her to New London. 

Two boys while out sailing in this boat were 
thrown into shoal water. The life-savers 
righted the boat, bailed it out, and as the 
boys were in no danger they continued on 
their way. 

This launch contained 18 persons, sprung a 
leak and was in danger of sinking when 2 
miles off shore at 11 p. m. Upon sighting 
her distress signal, the station crew went 
off in the surf boat and landed the entire 
party. The launch was hauled out on 
the beach and repairs were made, after 
which the party continued on its way. 

Upon attempting to enter the harbor, 
stranded on Quack shoal, 7 miles E. of the 
station at 4 p.m. The life-savers boarded 
her, ran out her anchors, and hove her 
afloat. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



93 



Services of crews Continued. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Aug. 31 City Point, Massachusetts Catboat Mollie; sip. 

Ruth. 



Bulow, Florida. 



Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Nph. Ich., no name. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Newburyport, Massachu- Dory, no name 

setts. 



Sandy Point, Rhode Is- Skiff, no name 

land. 



Atlantic City, New Jersey . Sip. Chalf onte 



Fort Macon, North Caro- Am. str. John F. 

lina. Bell. 

Oswego, New York, Lake j Am. sc. Charles E. 

Ontario. Wyman. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake Gas. Ich. Alberta. 
Erie. 



Duluth, Minnestoa, Lake 
Superior. 



..In. 



Sip. Sylph. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Am. str. Wallula. 
' Lake Michigan. 



Sip. Scud. 



Kewaunee, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



.do. 



Am. sc. City of 
Grand Haven. 

Gas. iches. Scoot, 
no name. 



Gas. Ich., no name; 
sip. Foam. 



The catboat, containing a boy, missed 
stays in a fresh breeze and stranded on 
Thompsons Island, 1 mile from the sta- 
tion at 4.35 p. m. The life-savers, in 
their launch, ran a line to the boat and 
hauled it afloat. The sloop, containing 
3 boys, sailing in Dorchester Bay and 
unable to reach shore during a fresh 
breeze with rough sea, was taken in tow 
by the station launch Relief and towed 
to the boat landing. 

Arrived off the station with motor out of 
order. The keeper put it in working 
order and the boat then proceeded on 
her way. 

This boat, having sunk in Black Lake $ 
mile from the station, the surfmen, in 
Whitehall boat, repaired to the place, 
raised the boat, and brought it to the 
station. 

Adrift with 4 men on board and unable 
to reach the shore. The life-saving crew 
in Monomoy boat, brought them and 
their boat to the station. 

Adrift and full of water and sand. The 
life-saving crew recovered skiff and 
hauled it up on the beach clear of high- 
water mark and notified the owner. 

This sloop with 28 passengers on board 
broke steering gear and ran ashore on 
on Middle Ground on north side of inlet 
at 5 p. m. The life-saving crew landed 14 
of her people, and a launch took off the 
others. She was then worked into deep 
water and taken to a wharf. 

Ran ashore J mile SE. of station. The life- 
savers ran an anchor and hove her afloat. 

Dragged her anchors during fresh NE. 
blow, striking bottom at a point J mile 
W. of the station. The station crew 
boarded her, ran a line to a coal trestle, 
and with her windlass hove her afloat. 

While engaged in fishing ran short of gaso- 
line and made signal for assistance. The 
station crew went out to her in surfboat 
and brought one of her crew ashore, 
where he secured sufficient fuel to carry 
the boat to her destination. 

While sailing in a race with 2 persons on 
board capsized during brisk SW. wind. 
The life-savers took 1 of the occupants 
into the surfboat, while a launch near by 
took the other. The surfmen then 
righted the sloop, bailed her out, and 
towed her ashore. 

Capsized during fresh breeze J mile SE. 
of station. The occupants were picked 
up by a launch. The life-savers righted 
the boat, bailed it out, and towed it to 
the harbor. 

Flying signals of distress 9 miles N. of sta- 
tion at about 7 p. m. The life-savers, 
with surfboat in tow of a tug, went to 
her assistance and ran her hawser to 
the tug, which then towed her into the 
harbor. 

Arrived in port in a water-logged and sink- 
ing condition. The station crew bailed 
her out. 

The machinery of these launches became 
disabled while under way in Dorchester 
Bay. The life-saving crew, with power 
boat, towed them to safe moorings where 
repairs could be made and where an ex- 
tra supply of fuel could be obtained. 

The launch stranded on Tomsons Island, 
while the sloop lost her centerboard 
cruising in Dorchester Bay. The life- 
savers, after landing the 10 occupants 
from the launch, towed the sloop to the 
Mosquito Yacht Club landing. 



94 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Sept. 2 



Sept. 2 

Sept. 2 

Sept. 2 

Sept. 2 

Sept. 2 

Sept. 3 

Sept. 3 

Sept. 3 

Sept. 3 

Sept. 3 

Sept. 3 



Sept. 3 
Sept. 4 

Sept. 4 



Sept. 4 



Station and locality. 



City Point, Massachu- 



North Scituate, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Gurnet, Massachusetts . . . 



Rockaway Point, New 
York. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake Erie 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

Burnt Island, Maine 



City Point, Massachusetts. 



Manomet Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Long Beach, New York. . 



Spermaceti Cove, New 
Jersey. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

Cuttyhunk, Massachu- 
setts. 



Santa Rosa, Florida. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Yt. Thelmall... 



Gas. Ich. Emma E. 



Small boat, no 
name. 



.do. 



Catboat Zip. 



Gas. Ich. Ella. 



Gas. sip. Hattie E. 
Lowry. 



Gas. Iches. Victory, 
Flounder; cat- 
boat Tantrum. 



Small boat, no name 



Gas. Ich. Echo... 



Catboat Cannot 



Sip. Spy. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 
Sip. Eclipse 



Muskegon, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Am. sc. James P. 
Collins. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Capsized off Castle Island with 4 persons 
on board at -7 p. m. The patrol went 
out to her in the tender, found her 4 oc^ 
cupants clinging to her sides, and brought 
them safely ashore. The station crew 
then secured the yacht and towed it in 
to City Point pier with launch Relief. 
After receiving dry clothing from the 
stores of the W. N. R. A. they departed 
for their homes. (See letter of acknowl- 
edgment.) 

Became disabled and hoisted signal of dis- 
tress, when 2J miles NE. of the station 
at 1.40 p. m. The station crew in Mono- 

- moy boat towed her to Cohasset. 

This boat, with 3 children on board, could 
not be located by the owner owing to 
approaching darkness, and the keeper 
sent 2 surfmen in a dory in search of it. 
After pulling about for nearly hour 
they discovered the boat, and brought 
it and the occupants safely to the beach. 

Engine became disabled and boat stranded 
near the station. The life-savers went 
out to her and assisted the occupants 
to land, then saved the engine, but the 
boat broke up, proving a total loss. 

Capsized near breakwater with 4 persons 
on board. They were picked up by a 
boat near by, the life savers righting the 
boat, and towing it to the light-house 
landing. 

Engine became disabled in the harbor, and 
the surfmen took her in tow to the yacht 
club landing. 

Mast carried away and engine disabled. 
The occupants signaled for help. The 
life-savers boarded sloop and took it in 
tow to Friendship, Maine. 

These small craft became disabled while 
carrying passengers for hire in Dorches- 
ter Bay. The life-saving crew, with 
launch Relief, took them in tow to safe 
moorings. 

Three persons in this boat not being able 
to reach shore, the life-savers took them 
in tow with station dory and landed 
them in the harbor. 

Engine broke down and launch stranded 2J 
miles W. of the station at 3 p. m. during 
very fresh winds. The life-saving crew 
boarded her, ran out her anchor, set her 
jib, hove her afloat with the windlass, 
and brought her to the station, after 
which she proceeded to Patchogue. 

Capsized in the East Rockaway Channel 
with 1 man on board. He was picked up 
by a boat near by, the station crew re- 
covered the boat, bailed it out, and re- 
turned it to the owner. 

Stranded near mouth of Shrewsbury River 
with 5 persons on board, the wind blow- 
ing fresh from W. with rough sea. Her 
occupants reached the shore in safety, 
and the surfmen hove her afloat and 
brought her to a safe mooring without 
damage. 

Adrift with 3 persons on board. The surf- 
men towed her to the yacht club landing. 

Stranded 2| miles NE. of station at 10.30 p. 
m. The station crew boarded her, ran 
out her anchor, and at high tide hove her 
afloat and made sail on her. 

Stranded on Monros Point 3 miles NNW. 
of station at 6 p. m. Keeper called crew 
and boarded her with surfboat, ran out 
an anchor and 100 fathoms of cable, and 
after forty minutes hard work hove her 
afloat. 

At 6 p. m. the keeper and a surfman discov- 
ered a launch broken down 8 miles W. of 
station. The station crew boarded her 
and found that she had been drifting 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



95 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of velsse. 



Nature of casualty and Service rendered. 



1906. 

Sept. 4 Muskegon, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Sept. 4 j Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 

Sept. 5 Manomet Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Sept. 5 Brenton Point, Rhode Is- 
land. 



Sept. 5 Narragansett Pier, 
Rhode Island. 



Sept. 5 Point Judith, Rhode Is- 
land. 



Sept. 5 Quonochontaug, Rhode 
Island. 



Sept. o Fire. Island, New York. 



Sept. 5 Hog Island, Virginia . . . 



Sept. o Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Sept. 5 Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

Sept. 5 Grande Pointe au Sable, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 
gan. 

Sept. 5 South Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Sept. 6 Brant Rock, Massachu- 
setts. 

Sept. 6 Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Sept. Louisville, Kentucky 



2990908 7 



Gas. Ich., no name. 

Rowboat, no name. 

Dory, no name 

Sip. Sturgeon 



Sip. Neva. 



Dory, no name . . 
Nph. Ich. Gem... 

Skiff, no name... 



Skiff, no name 



Yawl Lotta 



Nph. Ich. Ninnigret 



Nph. Ich. Countess 



Skiff William 
Brown. 



Am. str. Joseph B. 
Dewey. 



Sip. Whirlwind.. 
Gas. Ich. Sympo. 



helplessly all night with 1 man on board. 
The life-savers towed her to port with 
the surfboat. (See letter of acknowledg- 
ment.) 

Adrift. A surfman secured boat, brought 
it to the station, and the owner took 
charge of it. 

Adrift 3 miles offshore. The station crew 
towed it to the beach and notified the 
owner. 

Capsized in the breakers with 2 fishermen 
on board, 3 miles E. of station. The 2 
men were picked up and brought to the 
station, where they were given stimu- 
lants and dry clothing from the stores of 
the W. N. R. A., and cared for until able 
to proceed to their homes. Their boat 
was recovered and towed to the beach 
and hauled out. 

Capsized while endeavoring to unship the 
mast when J mile NE. of station. The 
surfmen pulled to the man's assistance 
and took him to Whale Rock light-house. 

Broke from her moorings and stranded 1* 
miles WNW. of station at 4 a. m. The 
life-saving crew endeavored to float her 
but, being unsuccessful, hauled her 
higher up on the beach. Upon request of 
the master the surfmen floated her on the 
8th instant. 

While endeavoring to land on the beach 
capsized with 4 men on board. They 
were thrown into the water and clung to 
the sides of the boat. The life-savers 
brought them all safely ashore, and 
hauled their boat up onto the beach clear 
of the surf. 

Because of unfamiliarity with channel 
stranded 4 miles NE. of station at mid- 
night. The surfmen hove her afloat at 
high water and made her fast to a dock. 

Capsized with 2 people on board i mile SE. 
of station. The life-saving crew brought 
them to the station, where they were 
properly care for. They also recovered 
the ooat, bailed it out, and brought it to 
the station, where it was turned over to 
the 2 men. 

Steamer, with 2 barges in tow, stranded on 
Euclid Park beach 10 miles ENE. of the 
station at 2.20 p. m. The life-saving 
crew, in tow of a tug, proceeded to their 
assistance, and after running lines to the 
Dewey and the barges the tug Frank W. 
floated them and towed them into the 
harbor. 

Drifted ashore near boathouse during 
brisk winds. Several surfmen hauled her 
afloat and landed her at the yacht club. 

Machinery disabled when $ mile W. of sta- 
tion. The boat, with her 2 occupants, 
was brought in by the life-saving crew 
where the owner could make repairs. 

Ran aground at entrance to Calumet River 
with 6 persons on board at 8 p. m. The 
station crew boarded her, hoisted her 
sails, and with the assistance of a power 
boat got her afloat and into Calumet 
Harbor. 

Drifting out of the harbor. A surfman re- 
covered dory, towed it to the beach, and 
secured it. 

Machinery broken down and launch adrift 
in trough of sea with 8 persons on board. 
A surfman in a power boat went out and 
towed the boat and its occupants safely 
to shore. 

A skiff containing a man went adrift in the 
strong river current and was in danger of 
going over the falls. The station crew 
brought the boat and the man into safe 
water. 



96 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Sept. 6 



Sept. 8 

Sept. 8 

Sept. 8 

Sept. 8 
Sept. 9 

Sept. 9 
Sept. 9 

Sept. 9 

Sept. 9 

Sept. 10 
Sept. 10 

Sept. 10 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Gay Head, Massachusetts. 



Durants, and Hatteras 
Inlet, North Carolina. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



White River, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

City Point, Massachusetts. 



Seabright, New Jersey. . . 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



.do 



Plum Island, Wisconsin. 
Lake Michigan. 



Charlotte, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 

Charlevoix, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Jackson Park, Illinois, 



Lake Michigan. 



Sept. 10 

Sept. 11 City Point, Massachusetts 



Gas. Iches. (2), no 
names. 

Catboat Maggie i. . . 

Am. sc. Margaret 
and F. Moore. 

Gas. Ich. Siconda. . . 

Rowboat, no name. 
Gas. Ich. High Ball. 

Gas. Ich. Mabel 

Rowboat, no name . 



Gas. laches. (2), no 
names. 



Am. sc. Madonna.., 



Scow, no. name 



Am. str. Falcon. . . 



Am. sc. Oak Leaf. . 



Sailboat, no name.. 



Yt. Hypatia. 



Sept. 11 



Race Point, Massachu- Am. sc. Minnie 
setts. Slauson. 



Sept. 11 ! Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Gas. Iches. (2) A. H. 
B., Lemonseira. 



These launches became disabled owing to 
machinery failing to operate. Several 
surfmen took them in tow and made 
them fast to a wharf where repairs could 
be made. 

At 3 a. m. discovered stranded in the surf 
\ mile E. of the station, having dragged 
her anchors during strong NNE. wind. 
The station crew got out lines and kept 
her from going adrift, until all movable ar- 
ticles were removed, then hauled her above 
high- water mark by a yoke of oxen. 

The master having mistaken Hatteras 
Inlet light for that on Gull Shoal his ves- 
sel ran ashore on Oliver Reef at 4 a. m. 
Both life-saving crews hastened to her 
assistance, ran out anchors, and suc- 
ceeded in getting her out into the sound. 

This launch with 16 persons on board 
struck some wreckage, damaging her 
propeller, 3 miles SE. of the station. A 
surfman with a power boat took launch 
in tow to the yacht club landing. 

Drifting out of the harbor with no one on 
board. A surfman on patrol secured 
boat and restored it to owner. 

While sailing for pleasure in Dorchester 
Bay with 8 persons on board, engine be- 
came disabled and rudder broken. The 
station crew in power boat took them in 
tow to the South Boston Yacht Club. 

Ran short of fuel while off station. A surf- 
man jnanned a boat and furnished them 
sufficient gasoline to reach their destina- 
tion. 

Adrift with 2 boys on board who were un- 
able to get their boat clear of a boom of 
logs against which they had drifted. A 
surfman helped them out of their diffi- 
culty. 

While sailing for pleasure both boats went 
adrift and were in danger of stranding 
when a surfman took them in tow to a 
safe place. 

This vessel having lost her centerboard 
chain, the master requested the life- 
saving crew to help them recover it. 
The surfmen responded and swept for 
the chain, and after bringing it to the 
surface placed it on board the schooner. 

A man and a woman out rowing were un- 
able to reach the shore. Life-savers took 
them into the surfboat and landed them. 

Stranded during smoky weather 6 miles N. 
of the station. The station crew boarded 
her, and after jettisoning a part of her 
cargo the tug J. V. Taylor hauled her 
afloat. 

Sprung a leak when off Ludington, and her 
crew was unable to keep the water down. 
The life-savers boarded with a force 
pump, and kept her cbar until she was 
repaired by a diver. 

At 1 p. m. lookout reported this boat with 
5 persons on board ashore on bar near 
station. The station power boat pulled 
her into deep water without damage- 
Stolen and left on the beach 12 miles from 
the station. The life-savers in power 
boat hauled her afloat, and towed her 
to City Point, where she was turned over 
to owner. 

Stranded during thick fog, but floated be- 
fore the arrival of the life-saving crew. 
At the request of the master the surfmen 
assisted in heaving up her anchor and 
making sail, after which they towed her 
around the cape with the surfboat. 

Engines became disabled and both boats 
went adrift. The station crew towed 
them back to the harbor and secured 
them to a wharf. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



97 



Services of crews Continued. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

City Point, Massachusetts 



Yt. Scud 

Dory, no name 



Gas. Iches. (2) Cas- 
sette, Zenita. 



Gas. Ich. Silver 
Heels. 



Island Beach, New Jersey Sailboat Oakmont . 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Skiff, 110 name 



Grand Marais, Michigan, 
Lake Superior. 



Gas. Ich., no name.. 
Muskeget, Massachusetts. Catboat, no name .. 



Great Egg, New Jersey Bateau, no nme 
City Point, Massachusetts 



Oak Island, North Caro- 
lina. 



Charlotte, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 

Cleveland, Ohio, Lake Erie 



Marblehead, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Ludington, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Old Chicago, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 



Sips. Sea Bright, 
Fanchon. Sally IV. 

Gas. Ich., no name.. 



Am. str. Windsor ... 
Yt. News... 



Am.str.H.B.Tut- 
tle. 



Yt.Zetta. 



Gas. Ich. Idle Hour; 
yt. Diamond. 



Parted her moorings and went adrift. 
Several surfmen in power boat towed her 
back to the yacht club. 

At 6 p. m. lookout reported this boat 
adrift in mouth of river. A surfman in a 
dory recovered it and turned it over to 
owner. 

Machinery of launches became disabled and 
both went adrift during NE. gale. A 
surfman towed them to the boat club 
wharf with power boat. 

Engine disabled and launch went adrift 
with 6 men on board. The station crew 
took them in tow to the Columbia Yacht 
Club landing. 

Capsized with 1 man on board f of a mile 
from the station. Several surfmen 
righted the boat and bailed it out. The 
upset occurred in shoal water. 

Capsized while crossing the river 1 mile S. 
of station with 2 persons on board, both 
of whom were drowned. The station 
crew recovered the bodies and turned 
them over to an undertaker. The skiff 
was towed in and bailed out. 

Collided with a dock during n gale and in 
danger of breaking up. The surfmen 
moved the boat to a place of safety until 
the storm subsided. 

This boat becoming unmanageable in shoal 
water the station crew went to her assist- 
ance in Race Point boat and after reef- 
ing the sail piloted her into smooth 
water. 

Capsized with 1 man on board 300 yards 
NW. of the station. A surfman rescued 
the occupant, righted the boat, bailed it 
out, and towed it ashore. 

These small craft dragged their anchors 
and went adrift during a fresh NE. wind. 
The surfmen in station power boat took 
them in to safe moorings. 

At 11.30 a. m. made signals of distress when 
4 miles SW. of the station. The life- 
savers manned surfboat and upon board- 
ing her found that she had exhausted her 
supply of gasoline, and that her owner 
wished to be towed to Southport. The 
keeper secured a power boat, which took 
the disabled launch to that place. 

Broke her chain and drifted on a yacht. 
The life-saving crew ran lines to her, 
hauled her to a dock and moored her. 

Parted her moorings during fresh NE. 
wind and went adrift, stranding on the 
beach J mile W . of the station . The life- 
savers ran a line to her, hauled her afloat, 
and towed her to the station. 

This vessel sprung a leak and the master 
beached her $ mile E . of the station . The 
life-savers after pulling through the high- 
running surf boarded her and brought 
ashore 6 of the crew, the rest, 7 in num- 
ber, remaining on board. Those taken 
to the station were furnished dry clothing 
from the stores of the W. N. R. A. and 
given shelter until the following day. 
The steamer was finally floated by a tug 
and taken to Sandusky, where she sank 
and proved a total loss. 

Dragged her anchors and in danger of 
stranding. Two surfmen took charge of 
her and secured her to safe moorings. 

Parted their moorings and went adrift 
during SE . gale, the launch colliding with 
another yacht, while the Diamond 
brought up against a sea wall. The sta- 
tion crew with power boat Dauntless 
towed them both to safe moorings. 



98 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Sept. 16 



Sept. 16 



Sept. 17 
Sept. 18 



Sept. 19 



Sept. 19 

Sept. 19 
Sept. 21 
Sept. 21 



Sept. 21 

Sept. 22 
Sept. 22 

Sept. 23 
Sept. 23 

Sept. 23 
Sept. 23 

Sept. 23 



Cuttyhunk, Massachu- 
setts. 

Potunk and Moriches, 
New York. 



Pentwater, Michigan, 

Lake Michigan. 
Grand Haven, Michigan, 

Lake Michigan. 



Sullivans Island, South 
Carolina. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

Wood End, Massachu- 
setts. 

Ocracoke and Ports- 
mouth, North Carolina. 



Old Chicago,Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 

Santa Rosa, Florida 

Saluria, Texas 



Cranberry Islands, Maine. 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Wood End, Massachu- 
setts. 



Yt. Jennie L 

Cat boat Ark... 



Rowboat, no name I 
Small boat, no name 



Skiff, no name 



Am. str. Atlantic 

Lighter, no name. . . 


Gas. Ich., no name. . 



Am. sc. Eva D. 
Rose. 



Sailboat, no name.. 



Rowboat, no name , 



Am. sc. Carrie Bell. 



Gas. Ich. Hattie 
May. 



Am. str. Brunette. 

Gas. Ich. Freddie. . 
Sharpie Carrie 



Atlantic City, New Jersey 

Great Egg, New Jersey . . . Catboat Snapper . . 



The master wishing to enter Cuttyhunk 
Pond for a harbor, the keeper piloted him 
to a safe place inside. 

Capsized in South Bay 2 miles W. of sta- 
tion during a heavy E . wind. The crews 
from the 2 stations repaired to the scene 
and found that the 5 occupants had been 
rescued by a boat near by. The surf men 
righted the boat, bailed it out, brought 
it ashore and delivered it to the sailing 
master. 

Adrift. Picked up by surfmen and turned 
over to owner. 

Unshipped her rudder and became unman- 
ageable when 2i miles S. of the station. 
The surfmen went to her assistance, 
hauled her up on the beach and shipped 
the rudder, after which she proceeded on 
her way. 

Capsized in breakers with 1 man on board 
3 miles E . of station at 11 a. m. The sta- 
tion crew pulled out and found him cling- 
ing to the overturned boat. He was 
taken to the station and supplied with 
stimulants and dry clothing from the 
stores of the W. N. R. A. His boat 
was righted, bailed out, and towed 
ashore. 

Lost her wheel when 8 miles N. of the sta- 
tion. At the master s request the keeper 
notified the tug Bob Teed, which went 
out and brought her into port. 

Adrift and being carried out into the lake 
by a strong current. A surf man with 
power boat towed her to city dock. 

Engine broke down and boat went adrift 
with 3 men in it. Station crew with 
power boat towed them into the harbor. 

The master being unacquainted with the 
locality, vessel stranded on SW. Point 
Shoal 7 miles NW. of station at 1.40 p. m. 
Both life-saving crews went to her 
assistance, ran out her anchors, and 
hove her afloat, then took her in lee of 
Royal Shoal and anchored her. After 
the life-savers had repaired her center- 
board she proceeded to Ocracoke. 

Capsized in heavy squall with 2 men on 
board mile SW. of station at 6 p. m. 
The men took refuge on a yacht near by, 
and the overturned boat was righted by 
the life-savers, bailed out, and towed to 
the Columbia Yacht Club. 

Adrift 2 miles NW. of station with no one 
on board. The station crew in surf boat 
took her in tow to the station to await 
a claimant. 

Missed stays and stranded on Middle 
Ground at entrance of Pass Cavallo f 
mile from station at 9 a. m. The life- 
savers boarded her, ran out anchors, and 
hove her afloat after working on ner for 
two hours. 

Stranded 1J miles from station at low 
tide. The life-savers boarded her, ran 
out her anchors, and at high tide hove 
her afloat without damage. 

Blew out 2 of her boiler tubes while en 
route to Castle Island and set flag for 
assistance. The station crew with 
launch Relief took her in tow to Win- 
throp, where repairs could be made. 

Engine out of order and the occupant 
made signal for assistance. The life- 
savers took her in tow to a wharf. 

Adrift in the surf with 3 persons on board 
and in danger of capsizing. The surf- 
men manned a boat and took them in 
tow to a landing. 

Stranded on the beach 1 mile from station 
with 3 persons on board at 6 p. m. The 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEEVICE. 



99 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Sept. 23 

Sept. 23 



Sept. 23 
Sept. 23 
Sept. 23 



Sept. 24 
Sept. 25 



Great Egg, New Jersey.. 

Oswego, New York, Lake 
Ontario. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



White River, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 



Manomet Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 
Great Wass Island, Maine. 



Catboat Snapper. 
Am. sc. Denver... 



Gas. Iches. (3) 



Yt. Foam 



Sept. 25 



Sept. 25 



Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. 



Brant Rock, Massachu- 
setts. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Dory, no name 

Am. sc. Christie A. 
Cox. 



Am. sc. Newell B. 
Hawes. 



Gas. Ich., no name 



Popes Island, and Assa- i Am. sc. Marion 
teague Beach, Virginia. Grimes. 



Sept. 25 
Sept. 26 

Sept. 26 

Sept. 26 
Sept. 26 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



White Head, Maine. 



Hunniwells Beach, Maine . 



Yt. Sea Gull. 



Nph. Ich., no name . 



Gas. Ich. Minnie 



Point Allerton, Massa- Sip., no name, 
chusetts. 



Louisville, Kentucky Shanty boat, No. 50. 



station crew with surfboat took them 
in tow to Ocean City 

Stranded alongside the pier and began 
striking heavily on the bottom, when 
the life-saving crew, assisted by some of 
the men from the revenue cutter Dallas, 
cast her off and worked her into deep 
water. 

Engines of these launches became disabled 
hi the harbor. The station crew took 
them in tow to yacht landing with a 
power boat. 

Ran on a sandbar during fresh NE. wind 
and could not get afloat. The surfmen 
boarded yacht and in a short time had 
her released. 

While entering the harbor with 3 men on 
board, engine failed to work and launch 
drifted against the pier. The surfmen, 
in surfboat, took them in tow to the 
harbor. 

Adrift. A surfman recovered dory and re- 
turned it to the owner. 

The master being unacquainted with the 
locality, his vessel stranded 4 miles NW. 
of the station at 6.30 a. m. The life- 
savers manned surfboat and pulled to 
the scene of disaster. They ran out her 
large anchor, and 45 fathoms of chain, 
listed her with tackles from the mast- 
head, pumped her dry, and at high water 
hove her afloat and took her to a safe 
mooring. 

Sprung a leak when about to sail with a 
cargo of sand. The life-saving crew 
threw about 60 tons of sand overboard 
then by constant pumping managed to 
keep her afloat until daylight, when they 
beached her on the flats. 

Engine disabled and the occupant, a fisher- 
man, being unable to reach shore, 2 surf- 
men went out to him and towed him to an 
anchorage in Brant Rock Cove. 

At daylight sighted on the beach at a point 
7 miles N. of the Assateague station. The 
ship's crew landed in their own boats and 
came to the station. The keeper took 
them in and gave them dry clothing from 
the stores of the W. N. R. A. The Pope 
Island crew assisted in caring for the 
shipwrecked men. When ready to de- 
part for their homes they were conveyed 
to Chincoteague. The schooner proved 
a total loss. 

Broke away from her moorings and went 
adrift in the harbor. The keeper and a 
surfman took yacht in tow to the yacht 
club landing. 

While being towed by a larger boat, towline 
parted, and launch drifted on the beach 
i mile WSW. of the station. The life- 
saving crew hauled her afloat, towed her 
into a cove, where they delivered her to 
the owner. 

Sprung a leak and in a sinking condition, 
the owner succeeding in getting in the lee 
of an island, where launch was discovered 
by the keeper at 11 a. m. The life-savers 
boarded her and took her in tow to a safe 
place in the river. 

Stranded on SE. bar 1 mile from the station 
at 7 p. m. At high tide the life-savers 
hauled her afloat and took her to Hull, 
where they secured her to safe moorings. 

This boat, with a number of people on 
board, was discovered by the lookout in 
danger above the cross dam of the falls. 
The keeper and his crew, in 2 boats, 
pulled to the rescue and towed the boat 
and its occupants to the life-saving sta- 
tion. 



100 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of creivs Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Sept. 27 



Sept. 27 

Sept. 27 
Sept. 28 

Sept. 28 
Sept. 28 

Sept. 28 
Sept. 29 



Station and locality. 



Straitsmouth, Massachu- 
setts. 



Galveston, Texas. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

North Scituate, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Cape Fear, North Carolina 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Sheboygan, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Hunniwells Beach, Maine. 



Sept. 29 | Gloucester, Massachu- 
setts. 



Sept. 29 

Sept. 29 
Sept. 29 

Sept. 29 
Sept. 29 

Sept. 30 



City Point, Massachusetts 



Oak Island and Gilgo, 
New York. 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Sip., no name. 



Bge. C. W. Bein 

Am. sc. Melitta 

Gas. Ich. Emma K. . 

Yawl, no name 

Catboat Mary M . . . 

Am. sc. Rosebud... 
Bge. Valentine 

Gas. yt. Carrie B . . . 

Gas. Ich., no name. . 

Sailboat, no name.. 
Flatboat, no name. . 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Bge. No. 2. 



Sips. (2), no names 



Gas. Ich. Annie 
Laurie; rowboat, 



The keeper discovered this boat moored in 
an unsafe place during fresh SW. winds, 
and warned the occupants of the danger- 
ous situation. Upon request of the 
owner the keeper took them and the sloop 
into Rockport Harbor. 

Water-logged at pier while loading cargo 
of cotton. Upward 9f 400 bales were 
discharged, and the life-savers assisted 
to secure cargo on the pier. 

Sprung a leak and became water-logged in 
the harbor. Upon the request of the mas- 
ter, surfmen assisted to pump her out. 

Engine failed to operate and launch with 
2 persons on board went adrift 8 miles 
NE. of the station. Upon sighting her 
signals for assistance the keeper manned 
surfboat, pulled out to them, and towed 
them into the harbor. 

Drifted to the beach. The life-saving crew 
hauled the boat well up clear of the surf 
to await a claimant. 

Capsized with 2 men on board J mile SE. 
of station at 3.30 p. m. The life-saving 
crew, in a dingey, picked them up and 
brought them with their boat to the sta- 
tion landing, where the boat was righted 
and bailed out. 

Water-logged and sinking at her wharf in 
the harbor. Upon request of master 
surfmen boarded with pumps and freed 
her of water. 

This barge while being towed out of the 
harbor struck on south end of North 
Sugar Loaf shoal, parting the towline 
and springing a leak. The surfmen ran 
another line to the tug, which succeeded 
in floating her and bringing her in to a 
safe anchorage. 

Missed stays and came to anchor during 
fresh SSW. wind, her cables failing to 
hold, and stranded on Dollivers Neck $ 
mile NE. of station at 2.30 p. m. A tug 
was notified, which, together with the 
life-savers, went to her assistance. Lines 
were run and after considerable effort 
she was floated and towed to Gloucester 
by the tug Eveleth. 

Engine became disabled and boat went 
adrift with 2 persons on board. The 
station crew in power boat towed them 
to Squantum in the lee of the land. The 
life-savers then landed the 2 occupants 
of the launch. 

Went adrift from Fire Island lightship. 
The crews from both life-saving stations 
took charge of boat and hauled it well 
up on the beach clear of the surf. 

This boat, with 5 boys on board, went 
adrift in the Ohio River and was in immi- 
nent danger of going over the middle 
chute. A boat manned by the life-savers 
pulled to the rescue and brought the boat 
with its 5 occupants to the station. 

During a NE. gale this barge containing 
28 loaded cars in tow of the tug J. C. 
Ames, capsized I of a mile from the sta- 
tion at 8 p. m. (For detailed account 
see p. 45.) 

These small craft (1, containing 3 boys, 
unable to reach the harbor, and the other 
having parted her cable and gone adrift) , 
were taken in tow by the keeper and sev- 
eral surfmen, who brought them into the 
harbor. 

The launch, with 2 ladies on board, became 
disabled near Thomsons Island, and the 
rowboat, with 3 boys, went adrift. The 
station crew, in power boat, went to the 
relief of both boats and towed them to 
safe moorings. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 



101 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Sept. 30 



Forked River, New Jersey 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Sept. 30 



Sept. 30 



Sept. 30 



Sept. 30 



Oct. 1 



Oct. 1 



Oct. 1 



Oct. 2 



Oct. 2 



Oct. 2 



Cape May, New Jersey 



Gas. sip. Fannie E. 

MofTat. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 

'Port Austin, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Wood End, Massachu- 
setts. 



Pentwater, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Gfts. Ich., no name. 
Am. sc. Pathfinder. 

l 
Gas. Ich. Surf . . . 



Am. str. Elsie. 



Am. str. Crescent. 



South Haven, Michigan, i Lighter, no name. 
Lake Michigan. 



Oak Island, New York Sharpie, no name 



Point Lookout, New York. 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Gas. Ich. Addle.. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Two men, in this boat, were making pas- 
sage from Atlantic City to New York. 
At a point 8 miles N. of Barnegat they 
were overtaken by a fresh gale and heavy 
sea, which forced them to run for shelter. 
The life-saving crew assisted them to 
land through the surf, and hauled their 
boat up on the beach well clear of the 
undertow. They were then taken to the 
station and given food and dry clothing 
from the stores of the W. N. R. A. On 
resuming their journey their engine 
broke down and they drifted to sea. 
Surfmen launched surfboat and brought 
them into Barnegat Inlet. 

Main boom carried away and engine disa- 
bled when 10 miles offshore. The 11 occu- 
pants headed her off before the fresh NE. 
wind prevailing and anchored abreast of 
the life-saving station at 8. 40 p. m., where 
they signaled for help. The keeper 
boarded her with his crew, bringing the 
passengers and crew safely to the sta- 
tion, where they were furnished food and 
shelter, also dry clothing from the stores 
of the W. N. R. A. On the following 
morning they departed for their homes 
in Philadelphia. 

Sank at her moorings during a fresh NE. 
gale. The station crew hauled launch 
up on the wharf and notified owner. 

Parted her moorings during fresh NE. gale 
and capsized 2$ miles W. of station at 4 
a.m. The life-savers with heavy tackles 
repaired to the place, righted her, hauled 
her in on a sand Dank, bailed her out, and 
secured her to safe moorings, where her 
owner took charge of her. 

Engine disabled and launch containing 6 
persons anchored in surf and in danger 
of colliding with retaining wall during 
fresh NE. gale. The life-savers pulled 
out to them in surfboat and took them 
in tow to the station, where they were 
given dry clothing from the W. N. R. A. 

Engine failed to operate when steamer had 
reached a point 1 mile NW. of station. 
The keeper went out to her in power 
boat and towed her into the harbor. 

While this vessel was standing down the 
channel her keel struck a sunken obstruc- 
tion, bending her shoe. The life-savers 
went to her assistance in a skiff and 
straightened her shoe, after which she 



At 2 a. m. the lookout discovered a lighter 
drifting out into the lake before a fresh 
E. wind. Two surfmen went to her in a 
skiff and towed her to the pier. 

At 3 p. m. the lookout saw a large sharpie 
break adrift from a sloop and drift to the 
beach, where it stranded. The station 
crew hauled it up clear of the surf, and on 
the following morning launched it for the 
owner. 

At 5.30 p. m. launch with 5 men on board 
was sighted making signal for assist- 
ance. The surfmen launched surfboat, 
and upon going alongside found that 
they desired to enter the harbor for the 
night. The life-savers took then in tow 
and brought them in over the bar and to 
a safe anchorage in the inlet. 

At 1.50 p. m. the lookout reported this 
launch with 2 occupants adrift \ mile S. 
of the station making signal for assist- 
ance. The surfboat was manned and 
the crew got a line to the drifting boat in 
time to save her going upon the beach, 
after which she was towed into the har- 
bor, where her machinery was again put 
in running order. 



102 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Oct. 2 



Plum Island, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Am. str. Daniel L. 
Hebard. 



Oct. 2 

Oct. 3 

Oct. 3 

Oct. 3 

Oct. 5 

Oct. 5 

Oct. 5 

Oct. 6 

Oct. 6 



Plum Island, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Point Allerton, Massachu- 
setts. 



Watch Hill, Rhode Island. 



Plum Island, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Wood End, Massachu- 
setts. 



Old Harbor, Massachu- 
setts. 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 



Brenton Point, Rhode 
Island. 



Fort Macon, North Caro- 
lina 



Am. str. Silver King. 



Rowboat, no name 



Gas. Ich. Lizzie A. 



Am. sc. Elva. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Catboat Auk. 



Oct. 6 j Charlotte, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 



Am. str. Peerless. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Skiff, no name 



Bge. Walter A. 
Sherman. 



Ran ashore and stranded on the rocks, 13 
miles W. of station at 7 p. m. Upon 
learning that a steamer was blowing dis- 
tress signals in the vicinity of Whales 
Back reef, the keeper manned Mackinaw 
boat and set out to her assistance. The 
surfmen ran her lines to some obstruc- 
tions near by and, aided by her own mo- 
tive power, attempted to float her, but 
without avail. They then pulled to Elli- 
son Bay for a tug and returned to the 
wreck at 6 a. m. The sea was now mak- 
ing, and after considerable heavy heaving 
she was hauled afloat without damage. 

Stranded on Fish Island, 16 miles NE. of 
the station, at 8 p. m. The station crew 
at once manned Mackinaw boat and went 
to her. Lines were run to the tug Stew- 
art Edwards, which, with the assistance 
of the surfmen, hauled her afloat and 
took her in to Sturgeon Bay. 

At 3.30 p. m. the keeper learned that a row- 
boat had gone adrift with 6 young girls 
in it. He at once went to their assist- 
ance and returned with 2 of the occu- 
pants. The others took passage for 
home on a steamer. 

Engine became disabled 1| miles W. of sta- 
tion at 12.30 p. m. The life-savers board- 
ed launch, repaired her engine, and tied 
her up to a dock at Stonington. 

Stranded on the rocks about mile from 
the station at 2.30 p. m., after the lookout 
had warned her off. The life-savers ran 
a large anchor out into deep water and 
with the aid of the tug Sylvia managed 
to haul her afloat without material dam- 
age. 

Her machinery failing to work, the keeper 
and a surfman took her in tow with a 
powerboat and secured her to her moor- 
ings. 

During calms and strong current drifted 
onto Chatham Bars mile offshore at 4.40 
p. m. Upon observing her signal for as- 
sistance the surfmen boarded her and 
carried out anchors, and at flood tide 
hove her afloat without damage. 

At 7 a. m. this vessel became disabled 5 
miles N. of station and hoisted signal for 
a tug. The keeper procured the tug S. O. 
Dixon, which took her to port. 

At 9.20 p. m. a surfman discovered this 
launch stranded on some rocks \ mile 
from station. The keeper, with his crew, 
hauled her up on the beach clear of the 
undertow, where the owner took charge 
of her. 

At 3.45 p. m. was discovered adrift, and 
later grounded on a shoal i mile N of 
station. The keeper, with crew in a skiff, 
went out to her, bailed her out and 
brought her to the station to await a 
claimant. 

While in tow of the tug Proctor the tow- 
line parted when attempting to enter 
Sodus Bay during fresh W. gale and 
thick rain storm, and barge struck the 
bottom and started to fill. The keeper 
being notified of the disaster set out with 
his crew and appliances by special train 
from Windsor Beach station for Sodus 
Point, arriving at the latter place at 11.30 
p. m. They found the barge lying bow 
in close to the pier, her stern outside in 
the lake. The life-savers boarded her, 
put life preservers on 4 of her crew, then 
placed them all in surfboat and brought 
them ashore. There were 7 all told, a 
woman and 2 small children being among 
the number. They were removed to a 
hotel near by where all were made com- 
fortable. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEBVICE. 



103 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Oct. 6 



Oct. 6 



Oct. 6 



Oct. 7 



Buffalo, New York, Lake 
Erie. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Old C 
Lake M 



hicago, 
Michigan. 



, Illinois, 



Oct. 7 



Oct. 7 



Oct. 7 



Oct. 7 



Oct. 7 



Oct. 7 



Quoddy Head, Maine 



Am. sc. Ada Ma- 
dora. 



Skiff, no name 



Gas. Ich. Lark; yt. 
Wave. 



Br. sc. Bessie 
Parker. 



White Head, Maine. 



Sip., no name. 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



.do. 



.do. 



.do. 



Oct. 7 



Sips. Commodore, 
Bo Peep, Dream. 



Sips. Magic, Vexer, 
Audux. 



Sips. Mistral and 
Paloma. 



Sip. Reliance. 



Point Allerton, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Wood End, Massachu- 
setts. 

Oct. 7 I Batons Neck, New York. . 



Oct. 7 Rocky Point, New York. 



Sip. Jessie A. Pope 
Rowboat, no name 
Gas. Ich., no name.. 



Br. sc. Keewaydin. 



This vessel failing to mind her helm struck 
bottom f mile WNW. of the station at 
8.20 p. m. She lay about 1 mile offshore, 
her crew, 5 in all, managing to reach the 
breakwater wall unassisted. The keeper 
sent tug R. H. Hebard to her assistance 
and then brought the wrecked crew to 
the station in surf boat. The vessel 
proved a total loss, although about one- 
half of her cargo was saved. 

Washed off the beach and went adrift. 
Was picked up by station crew in motor 
boat 2 miles from the station. It was 
held for a claimant. 

The launch became disabled, owing to her 
engine failing to operate, and the yacht 
lost her mast while sailing in a yacht 
race. Both were taken in tow by the 
life-savers in power boat and brought to 
safe moorings. 

During heavy wind and high sea vessel 
missed stays and drifted on the beach 1 
miles SW. of the station at 2.30 a. m. and 
later proved a total loss. The keeper, 
upon learning of the disaster from the 
patrol, manned surfboat and went along- 
side, taking off 2 of her crew and landing 
them. The master decided to abandon 
her, and the life-savers succeeded in sav- 
ing the personal effects of the crew and 
the ship's sails, rigging, and blocks. 
Her entire crew of 6 men was succored at 
the station for four days. 

Adrift with no one on board, $ mile W. of 
the station. The life-savers with surf- 
boat took sloop in tow and brought it 
into the harbor of White Head. 

Broke adrift from their moorings in the 
night during heavy W. blow. The sta- 
tion crew in launch Relief towed them 
in to safe moorings. 

The Magic broke her rudder, the Vexer 
lost her sails in fresh W. wind, and the 
Audux carried away her steering gear 
while sailing in Dorchester Bay. The 
life-saving crew towed them all to safe 
moorings with launch Relief. 

Broke from moorings in fresh W. wind and 
went adrift, stranding on the beach in 
Dorchester Bay. The station crew, 
with launch Relief, hauled them afloat 
and towed them to the yacht club land- 
ing. 

Missed stays and in danger of stranding; 
set signal for assistance. The keeper 
and crew towed her to the lee side of 
Thomsons Island, where 2 surfmen went 
aboard and took her to the station. 

Dragged her anchors and stranded, 1 mile 
SSE. of station. At 1.15 launched surf- 
boat and floated sloop without damage. 

Ashore 1 mile S. of station. The keeper 
and a surfman returned boat to the 
owner. 

Machinery became disabled while crossing 
the sound, and boat stranded on the 
beach \ mile W. of the station at 5 p. m., 
the occupants landing without assist- 
ance. The life-savers hauled the boat 
up on the shore with heavy purchases 
and took the 2 persons to the station, 
where they were cared for until the fol- 
lowing morning. After the life-savers 
had repaired the machinery the party 
continued on its way. 

The wind shifting to a westerly gale schoon- 
er dragged her anchors and struck the 
beach 6 miles W. of the station at 6 a. m. 
The life-saving crew at once proceeded to 
the wreck with surfboat and beach cart. 
A line was successfully sent out to the 
vessel and the breeches buoy run off, and 



104 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Oct. 7 



Oct. 7 

Oct. 7 

Oct. 7 

Oct. 7 

Oct. 7 

Oct. 8 

Oct. 8 

Oct. 8 



Rocky Point, New York. . ' Br. sc. Keewaydin. 



Spermaceti Cove, New Gas. Ich. Skate 

Jersey. 



Forked River, New Jer- 



Gas. Ich., no name. . 



Louisville, Kentucky | Catboat Marie. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake Skiff, no name... 
Superior. 



South Haven, Michigan, Rowboat, no name. 
Lake Michigan. 

Point Allerton, Massa- | Am. sc. Mary A. 
chusetts. Whalen. 



Wood End, Massachu- 
setts. 



Muskeget, Massachusetts. 



%" awl, no name 



Am. sc. Harry 
Knowlton. 



Oct. 8 



Oct. 8 



Oct. 9 



Oct. 9 



Fire Island, New York ... Sip. Nina A. Row- 
land. 



Portage, Michigan, Lake Am. sc. Pasadena.. 
Superior. 



City Point, Massachu- ; Yts. Kittie, Eu- 
setts. genie. 



Wood End, Massachu- 
setts. 



Am. sc. Eugene 
Borda. 



4 of her crew were hauled ashore. The 
fifth man, a cripple, not being able to get 
into the buoy was landed in the schoon- 
er's yawl, which was hauled through the 
breakers by means of a whipline from 
shore. 

Sighted 1 miles from the station flying a 
signal for help. The life-savers found 
her disabled from collision with another 
yacht during the night. Her steering 
gear was damaged and the surfboat took 
her in tow and anchored her in a cove, 
where she was sheltered from the gale 
prevailing. 

Lost rudder, and, engine becomingdisabled, 
launch, with its 1 occupant, went drifting 
to sea. The surfmen went to man's assist- 
ance in surfboat and brought him and his 
launch into the inlet. 

Owing to bad management became water- 
logged and capsized with 2 men on board 
at 1.30 p. m. The station crew at once 
launched 2 boats and started to the res- 
cue. The first boat picked up the 2 men, 
and both boats took the catboat in tow 
and brought all to the station. 

Coal laden with 1 man on board; sank at 
her dock, the man succeeding in getting 
out of her without assistance. The life- 
savers raised the coal, hauled the boat 
out, bailed her, and turned her over to 
owner. 

At 6.50 a. m. the keeper and surfmen, in the 
station skiff, picked up a rowboat adrift 
and landed it at the boathouse. 

Stranded on Georgies Island, 2 miles NW. 
of station at 4 p. m. The station crew in 
surfboat assisted to haul her afloat at 
high tide. 

A schooner's yawl, containing a man, be- 
came disabled by losing her sprit 6 miles 
from the station. The crew went out in 
power boat and took the man on board 
bringing hirn and his boat to land. The 
occupant was nearly exhausted when the 
life-savers picked him up. 

Stranded on the rips close to Skiffs Island 6 
miles W. of the station at 4 a. in. A fresh 
breeze was blowing at the time, making a 
very choppy sea, but the life-savers, 
learning of the disaster, set out with surf- 
boat under sail and boarded her. They 
jettisoned some of her cargo of coal, after 
which, with the aid of her sail and force 
of the current, they worked her over the 
shoal into deep water. Two power boats 
towed her up under Cape Poge. 

The master not being acquainted with the 
channel, vessel stranded on Light-House 
Shoal at 11 a. m. The surfmen boarded 
sloop, ran out an anchor, and attempted 
to heave her afloat, but as the tide was 
falling they were obliged to await the 
next flood tide, when the schooner was 
floated without danger. 

During a NNW. gale, while in tow of 
steamer Gladstone, this vessel was swept 
to leeward of harbor entrance, parting 
towline,andstrandingaboutlmileNE.of 
the station at 6 p. m., losing 3 of her crew. 
(For detailed account see page 47.) 

These yachts parted their moorings in 
Dorchester Bay during a fresh southerly 
wind and were in danger of drifting 
ashore. The station crew in launch 
Relief towed them to safe moorings. 

Anchored in a dangerous locality with 
heavy storm approaching. The master, 
feeling apprehensive for the safety of his 
vessel, set his colors for help, and the life- 
savers went out in Monomoy boat and 
towed schooner into the harbor to a safe 
anchorage. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews Continued. 



105 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Oct. 9 



Oct. 9 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Oct. 10 Burnt Island, Maine 



Oct. 10 



Oct. 10 



Oct. 10 



Oct. 10 



Oct. 11 



Oct. 11 



Oct. 11 



Oct. 11 



Damiscove Island, Maine 



Fletchers Neck, Maine... 



Port Austin, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Baileys Harbor, Wiscon- 
sin, Lake Michigan. 



White Head, Maine. 



Hunni wells Beach, Maine, 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Charlotte, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 



Gas. Ich. Rambler.. Got a painter in her propeller, and went 
adrift with 1 man on board. A surfman 
in motor boat took the disabled launch in 
tow to the yacht club. 

Am. sc. Lilly E ! Sprung a leak off Kewaunee, 90 miles N. of 

station. She managed to reach the har- 
bor of Milwaukee, where the master re- 
quested the life-saving crew to assist in 
keeping his vessel afloat. The surfmen 
boarded her and manned her pumps, 
keeping her from sinking until she could 
be docked. 

Am. sc. J. S. Lam- ! Steering gear disabled and vessel requiring 
prey. assistance, the life-savers boarded her, 

and found her crew somewhat exhausted 
from overwork. The keeper reported 
her to her owners at Port Clyde, and also 
engaged a tug at Rockland. The surfmen 
manned the pumps, rigged a tiller to her 
rudder head, and with the aid of a tackle 
4 men managed to steer her. The tug 
Smith arrived and towed them safely to 
Rockland. 

Am. so. Josie | Discovered by a patrolman at 3 a. m. an- 
chored in a dangerous place near the surf. 
The master requiring assistance, the sta- 
tion crew boarded schooner and got her 
under way, and with the aid of a power 
boat worked her into Booth Bay Harbor. 
Struck the bar while entering Saco Harbor 
at 3 p. m. The life-savers boarded her 
and ran out her anchors with 150 fathoms 
of chain, then ran lines to 3 tugs, which, 
with the aid of the surfmen heaving on 
the windlass, hauled her afloat. 
During heavy northerly wind and high sea 
launch was in danger of pounding to 
pieces against a wharf. She was hauled 
near the shore by the life-savers and an- 
chored behind the breakwater. 
Machinery broke down and launch with 2 
persons on board, went adrift in the lake 
before a fresh NW. wind. Three surfmen 
boarded her and after much effort man- 
aged to get her engine in working order. 
She then steamed back to the harbor. 
During fresh SW. wind and heavy rain 
squalls, vessel got out of her course and 
stranded on Bay Ledge 14 miles ENE. of 
station at 8 p. m., she at the time being 
hidden from the station by interven- 
ing land. Upon being notified of the dis- 
aster by telephone the keeper and his 
crew boarded schooner and found her hull 
stove in and full of water and the crew, 
with the exception of the master and 
mate, having gone ashore in a small boat. 
The master decided to abandon ship, and 
the life-savers landed him and the mate 
and transferred them to a tug bound for 
Rockland. The vessel afterwards proved 
a total loss. 

At 2.45 p. m. the station crew launched 
surfboat, pulled out to sea for a distance 
of 2 miles, and picked up a dory adrift 
containing a valuable fish net. The boat 
and seine were held for a claimant. 

Gas. Ich. Helen M.; : Broke from their moorings in Dorchester 
catboat,noname. Bay during fresh westerly winds and 
went adrift, stranding on Head House 
beach. The life-savers went to them in 
power boat, hauled them afloat, and 
towed them to the public landing, where 
they were secured. 

Am. sc. Bertie Calk- At 6 a. m. a red light was observed on the 
ins. pier. Going out to investigate the station 

crew found a schooner blown some dis- 
tance off the pier, and her master endeav- 
oring to board her. A brisk NE. wind 
was blowing at the time, creating a high 
sea. The master was taken into the surf- 
boat and put on board his vessel. 



Am. sc. William 
Booth. 



Gas. Ich. Venture... 



Gas. Ich. 



Am. sc. Helen B. 
Crosby. 



Sip. Dewet 



106 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Oct. 11 



Oct. 11 



Oct. 11 
Oct. 12 



Oct. 12 



Oct. 13 



Oct. 14 



Oct. 15 



Oct. 15 
Oct. 16 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake Gas. Iches. Lennox, 
Superior. ' no name. 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake Am. s t r . Emma 
Michigan. Bloecker. 



Coos Bay, Oregon ! Sailboat, no name . 



Straitsmouth, Massachu- Yt. Thistle, 
setts. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Gas. Ich. Mascot... 



Oct. 16 

Oct. 16 

Oct. 16 

Oct. 16 



Brant Rock, Massachu- j Gas. Ich. W. and W 
setts. 



Humboldt Bay, California . i Am. strs. Roanoke, 
Scotia. 



Cobb Island, Virginia 



Small boat Annie D 



Creeds Hill, North Caro- Am. sc. Chelton 
Una. Brothers. 

City Point, Massachusetts. Gas. Ich., no name. . 



Wood End, Massachusetts 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Dories (6), no names 



Gas. Ich. No. 73.... 



Gas. Ich., no name. . 



Coquille River, Oregon Fish boat, no name 



The motor of these launches failed to oper- 
ate while under way in the harbor. A 
surfman in a power boat took them in 
tow to a yacht club landing. 

At 7 a. m. became disabled 3 miles SE. of 
the station and hoisted her colors for as- 
sistance. The keeper, in gasoline launch, 
went out to her and found that her engine 
had broken down. She was taken in tow 
and brought into the harbor. 

Capsized with 1 man on board. The sta- 
tion supply boat picked up the man r nd 
bailed the boat out, after which he con- 
tinued on his way. 

While attempting to pass between Gap- 
head and Straitsmouth Island at low tide 
grounded on the bar and was in danger of 
rolling over. The surfmen raised her 
stern, and after heavy heaving worked 
her afloat. 

Engine became disabled and launch went 
adrift i mile from station. The keeper 
went to her assistance with launch and 
towed her back to a wharf for repairs. 

Engine broke down and .launch went adrift 
mile E. of station. The surfmen 
manned Monomoy boat and took the dis- 
abled launch in tow to Green Harbor. 

These steamers grounded on south spit at 
the entrance to the bay during dense fog 
at 6 p. m. The tug Ranger went to their 
assistance with the life-saving crew, and 
after the surfmen had run her Tine to both 
stranded vessels they were hauled 
afloat. They proceeded to Eureka under 
their own steam. 

Sails blown away in heavy NE. gale, and 
boat adrift with 1 man on board. She 
was sighted 2 miles S. of the station, and 
about to enter a line of treacherous 
breakers. Life-savers, in surfboat under 
sail, reached boat and brought it and the 
occupant to the station. The man was 
cared for by the keeper until able to re- 
turn to his home. 

Five surfmen were sent by the keeper to 
assist in floating this vessel, which had 
stranded during a gale. 

Engine became disabled and boat withSper- 
sons on board went adrift and stranded 
on Thomsons Island, 1J miles SE. of the 
station. The life-savers, with launch 
Relief and a 16-foot rowboat, went to 
their assistance, took the passengers off 
with rowboat and placed them in station 
launch, then hauled the stranded boat 
afloat, and towed it to yacht-club float, 
where it was made fast and the 5 people 
landed in safety. 

During a severe easterly gale of this date 
these dories, bound from the fishing 
banks to Provincetown, were caught out 
and could not make any progress to wind- 
ward. The station crew, in power boat, 
towed them to safe moorings. The life- 
savers made 3 trips to this little fleet 
before all were rescued and saved from 
foundering. 

Broke down in the harbor with 2 persons 
on board, and were unable to return to 
their moorings. A surfman in power 
boat went to their assistance and towed 
them to the boat club. 

Engine broke down while on a pleasure 
cruise. The station crew brought the 
launch and its 2 occupants back into the 
harbor. 

Broke from her moorings and drifting to- 
ward a heavy line of breakers i mile SW. 
of station at 5 a. m. Picked up by station 
crew before it entered breakers, towed 
to Bandon and turned over to owner. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



107 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Oct. 18 



Oct. 18 



Oct. 19 



Oct. 19 



Oct. 19 



Oct. 20 



Oct. 20 



Station and locality. 



Cross Island, Maine 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Cape Lookout, North 
Carolina. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



South Muni ton Island, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 
gan. 



Great Egg, New Jersey . 



Cape Henry, Virginia. . . 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Am. sc. Horace G. 

Morse. 



Catboat Stroller.. 



Am. sc. William H. 
- Skinner. 



Fish boat, no name. 



Sailboat, Bessie... 



Nature, of casualty and service rendered. 



Am. str. Wildwood 



Am. str. George 
Farwell. 



Oct. 20 ! Sturgeon Point, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Oct. 20 



Oct. 21 



Sturgeon Bay Canal, Wis- 
consin, Lake Michigan. 



Hereford Inlet, New Jer- 
sey. 



Fish boat, no name. 



Am. sc. Mishicott... 



Am. sc. Atlantic 



Missed stays while attempting to sail out 
of the harbor and stranded on SW. ledge 
off Hog Island, 6 miles N. of station. 
The life-savers, upon boarding her, 
found her in the hands of a wrecking 
company. They landed the personal 
effects of the crew, and carried the mas- 
ter, who was nearly exhausted, to the 
station, where he was cared for until able 
to resume his duties on board. The life- 
saving crew remained by the schooner 
until she was floated on the 21st instant. 

Carried away her halliards and drifting 
helplessly in the harbor with 1 man on 
board. A surfman in power boat towed 
the boat to a wharf. 

At 9 a. m. this schooner, lying at anchor 3 
miles W. of the station, set her flag for 
help. The life-saving crew boarded her 
and found her in a leaky condition. The 
master wanted to get his vessel into 
Beaufort, but owing to dense fog he found 
this impracticable, so the surfmengothr 
under way and sailed her into Lookout 
Bight to a safe anchorage. 

Carried away her mast and unable to re- 
turn to the harbor. The surfmen 
manned motor boat, and towed her to 
her destination. 

At 5.40 a. m. a surfman on watch at station 
reported the mail boat sunk at her moor- 
ings. The keeper quickly aroused his 
crew and ran a strong line from the dock 
to the sunken boat and succeeded in 
hauling her into shoal water, where she 
was bailed out. The cabin of the boat 
having washed off and gone adrift, the 
station crew picked it up and turned it 
over to owner. 

Became jammed in a jetty i mile SW. of 
station. The surfmen, in small boat, 
went to her assistance and ran a line, 
and at high tide hauled her clear without 
damage. 

During dense fog, NE. gale, and high sea 
struck on Cape Henry f of a mile SE. of 
the life-saving station at about 7.15 p. m. 
The lookout reported her to the keeper, 
who burned a Coston signal to let those 
on board know that help was at hand. 
The beach apparatus was run out. and 
the adjoining station notified of the 
wreck by telephone, after which the crew 
hastened down the beach with all possi- 
ble dispatch. When abreast of the ves- 
sel the Lyle gun was placed in position 
and 2 shots fired to her. The first fell 
over her stern, but could not be reached 
by the men on board. The second, how- 
ever, fell over the fore rigging and was 
readily secured by the sailors. The 
breeches buoy was run off, the life-savers 
from the Virginia Beach station assist- 
ing, until the entire crew of 16 men was 
landed on the beach. The vessel proved 
a total loss, but a part of her cargo was 
saved. (See letter of acknowledgment.) 

Stranded on the beach with 2 fishermen on 
board. The station crew aided them in 
hauling their boat up on the beach clear 
of the surf. 

Caught in a heavy sea and drifting toward 
some rocks, where she would have been 
wrecked. The station crew ran a line to 
her and hauled her to a safe place in the 
canal. 

At 6.15 p. m., while getting underway near 
the station, dragged ashore. The life- 
savers in a dory ran a line to her and hove 
her off and took her to a safe place in the 
harbor. 



108 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Oct. 21 



Oct. 21 



Oct. 21 



Oct. 21 



Oct. 22 



Oct. 22 



Oct. 22 



Oct. 22 



Oct. 22 



Oct. 22 



Oct. 23 
Oct. 23 



Oct. 23 



Station and locality. 



Metomkin Inlet, Virginia. 



Charlevoix, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



South Manitou Island, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 
gan. 

Muskegon, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Bge., no name 



Catboat, no name. 



Am. sc. Albion. 



Sip. Angler. 



City Point, Massachusetts.! Yt. Kittie 



Green Run Inlet, Mary- 
land. 



Wallops Beach, Virginia. 



Gas. Ich. Lilian... 



Gas. Ich. Gracy 



Louisville, Kentucky | Flatboat, no name 



Sturgeon Point, Michigan, Fish boat, no name 
Lake Huron. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake Dredge Togo. 
Superior. 



Manomet Point, Massa- Rowboat, no name, 
chusetts. 

Jackson Park, Illinois, | Gas. Ich. Vera 

Lake Michigan. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Sip., no name 

Lake Michigan. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



While being towed by launch Accomac tow- 
line parted and barge went adrift, strand- 
ing on Flounder Point i mile W. of sta- 
tion. The surfmen ran a line from the 
barge to the towing launch, but as the 
tide had fallen and the sea and wind were 
increasing the task of floating her was 
abandoned until the following day, when 
at flood tide she came off without appar- 
ent damage. 

Capsized off North Point with 2 boys on 
board . The life-saving crew picked them 
up and brought them to the station, a 
fish tug bringing their boat. After the 
surfman had righted and bailed the boat 
the boys took charge of it. 

Upon the request of the master of this ves- 
sel the life-savers assisted her crew in 
heaving up her anchor and getting un- 
derway. 

The occupants of this boat not being ac- 
quainted with the locality, set a signal 
for assistance.- As they wished to be 
taken into the harbor the keeper sent a 
surfman on board, who piloted them to 
a safe place inside. 

This yacht having been stolen during the 
night, was abandoned and left at Houghs 
Neck. Upon the request of the owner the 
station crew went and took her in tow 
with launch Relief and returned her to 
her moorings. 

Lost in dense fog and stranded with 3 per- 
sons on board at about 6 p. m. A strong 
NE. breeze was blowing and the occu- 
pants found themselves without food or 
water. The keeper furnished them food 
and offered them shelter at the station, 
then went to the stranded boat with his 
crew and hove her afloat. (See letter of 
acknowledgment .) 

At 2 p. m. this boat, containing a man, 
broke down and went adrift, grounding 
on a marsh near the harbor entrance. 
Her signal for assistance was observed 
by the patrol, and the keeper with 2 surf- 
men went out to her with shovels. After 
digging a passageway for her they hove 
her out into deep water. 

Adrift near the middle chute of the falls 
with 1 man on board. The life-savers 
pulled to the man's assistance as he was 
being set down by the strong current, and 
towed him with his boat to the station. 

The occupant of this boat being unac- 
quainted with the locality and wishing 
to place his boat in a safe place for the 
night, the keeper took charge of it, se- 
cured it for the night, and brought the 
owner to the station, where he was 
afforded shelter until the following 
morning 

While lying at a wharf alongside the tug 
Corona, dredge caught fire and was 
threatened with total destruction. The 
life-saving crew boarded her, and as- 
sisted in extinguishing the flames. 

Picked up and brought in by the keeper 
who assisted 2 fishermen to right and 
bail it, and haul it up on the shore. 

Towline to tender parted and boat went 
adrift and capsized during fresh NE. 
wind and high sea i mile E. of station. 
The station crew pulled out to the drift- 
ing tender, righted it, towed it into the 
harbor, and turned it over to the owner. 

Parted her anchor cable during fresh NE. 
wind and drifted against the breakwater, 
where she was in danger of breaking up. 
She was sighted by the N. patrol, who 
reported her to the keeper. She was 
towed in by the station crew in surfboat. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



- 109 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



1906. 
Oct. 24 i Shinnecock, New York. 



Oct. 24 1 Bethel Creek, Florida.. 



Oct. 24 Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Oct. 24 



Oct. 24 



Oct. 24 



Oct. 24 



Oct. 25 



Oct. 26 
Oct. 25 

Oct. 25 



Sturgeon Point, Michi- 
gan, Lake Huron. 



Middle Island, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Quoddy Head, Maine 



Manomet Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Beaver Island, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Point Adams, Oregon 



Catboat, no name . . 



Gas. Ich., no name.. 



Fish boats (2), no 
names. 



Gas. Ich., Venture.. 



Am. sc. Emma L. 
Nielson. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Sip. Viola.. 



Am. sc. L. M. Mason 



Am. sc. Little David 



Gas. Ich., no name .. 
Am. str . Venezuela. 



Br. shp. Peter Ire- 
dale. 



Capsized with 1 occupant during heavy 
NE. squall, $ mile NW. of station. The 
keeper and a surfman took the man out 
of the water, and righted and bailed the 
boat. 

This launch requiring repairs, the owner 
came to the station and requested aid 
from the keeper. He responded, and in 
a short time the launch was overhauled 
and rendered seaworthy. 

During a heavy SE. gale and high sea 
dragged anchors and went adrift; 1 boat 
becoming water-logged, and sinking. 
The other was picked up by the station 
crew and towed to a safe mooring. The 
sunken craft was hauled into shoal water 
by the surfmen, and when the gale 
abated they succeeded in getting it well 
up on the shore. 

During a SE. gale and high sea filled and 
sank at her dock. The station crew 
dragged her into shoal water, and on the 
following morning discharged her cargo 
and took out her machinery, and pro- 
peller, after which the master abandoned 
her. 

During SE. gale dragged anchors and 
stranded on a sandbar 6 miles NW. of the 
station. The station crew, with their 
surfboat under sail, beat down to 
schooner and boarded her, and after jet- 
tisoning her cargo, floated her without 
damage. 

Parted her anchor chain 3 miles N. of sta- 
tion at 4 a. m., a fresh gale prevailing. 
The owner, thinking his vessel greatly 
damaged, decided to abandon her, but the 
life-savers engaged a tug and went to her 
assistance. A line was passed around 
the sloop below the water line, and the 
tug then floated her and brought her into 
the harbor, where the owner took charge 
of her. 

While bound to Milwaukee with a load of 
railroad ties lost her sails in fresh E. gale 
and high sea, and when in the vicinity of 
the life-saving station set her colors 
union down. The keeper sighted her at 
9a.m., and inferring that the master de- 
sired a tug called up the towboat office 
by telephone, but was informed that 
they did not consider it safe to send a tug 
to her. She struck the pierhead and 
damaged her bulwarks and cabin, at the 
same time losing some of her deck load. 
The life-savers boarded her, ran her lines 
to the pier, and hauled her in to a safe 
place. They also manned the pumps and 
pumped her dry . The keeper then recov- 
ered 150 ties, which had been washed over- 
board, and returned them to the 
schooner. 

Grounded in Quoddy Bay 2 miles NE. of 
the station at 1 a. m. She failed to rise 
with the incoming tide, and her deck load 
of laths washed overboard. The lookout 
reported her to the keeper, who manned 
a boat, and went to her assistance. The 
surfmen jettisoned her cargo, pumped 
her out, and with the aid of some sail 
worked her over the reef, then took her to 
safe moorings in Quoddy Bay. She sus- 
tained no damage. 

B roke from her moorings . Recovered by a 
surfman and turned over to owner. 

The master being unacquainted with chan- 
nel and wishing to enter the harbor, the 
keeper piloted his vessel in to a safe berth. 

Ran out of her course during thick rainy 
weather and struck on Clatsop Spit 3 
miles SW. of the station at 7.30 a. m. 
The patrol reported her to the keeper. 



110 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Oct. 25 



Point Adams, Oregon 



Br. shp. Peter Ire- 
dale. 



Oct. 26 
Oct. 20 



Manomet Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Race Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Dory, no name 

Am. so. E. C. Hus- 



Oct. 26 



Oct. 20 



Oct. 26 



Oct. 2? 



Oct. 27 



Oct. 27 



Monomoy Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Louisville, Kentucky 



South Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



.dor. 



Gas. Ich., no name.. 
Gas. Ich. Harry 

Am. so. Augustus . . 
Am. sc. AlidaHearn. 



Yt. Lucy B. 



.'In. 



Am. sc. Maurice B. 
G rover. 



Am. str. Lacka- 
wanna. 



The surfboat was hauled to the wreck by 
2 double teams, a third team bringing up 
the beach apparatus cart . The surfboat 
went alongside and brought the entire 
crew of 27 men ashore. Four of them, 
being entirely destitute, were furnished 
dry clothing from the stores of the 
W . N . B . A . Assistance was rendered the 
master and crew during the days which 
followed. All of the personal effects of 
the sailors were brought ashore, and 5 of 
the shipwrecked men were quartered 
at the life-saving station for five days. 

Adrift. Picked up by a surfman and 
landed on the beach. 

At about 2.30 a. m. surfman on watch re- 
ported a schooner on the bar 1 miles W. 
of the station. The life-savers went 
aboard and found schooner heading 
directly on the beach, with anchor under 
foot and in danger of overriding it. The 
life-savers hove up the anchor, trans- 
ported it aft, crotched the main boom, 
and hauled the anchor out to the end of 
it, when it was let go with cable hove 
taut. This stopped schooner from going 
on the beach. When the tide rose the 
vessel swung to her anchor and floated. 
She was then warped out to a safe offing, 
where sails were set, and she proceeded 
on her voyage undamaged. 

Engine broke down and launch adrift with 
2 men on board near Shovelful lightship 
at 10 a. m. The life-saving crew with 
power boat towed them into Chatham 
Harbor. 

Adrift in the river above the falls with 4 
men on board. The station crew manned 
a boat and caught them in time to avert 
disaster, and towed their boat to a safe 
place in the river, the 4 occupants being 
brought to the station landing. (See 
letter of acknowledgment.) 

Vessel desiring to enter the harbor, the 
keeper sent 2 surfmen on board, who 
helped bring her in to safe anchorage. 

Stranded on SW. point of middle ground 
i mile NW. of the station at 6 a. m. The 
life-savers boarded her, ran out an an- 
chor, and after heavy heaving on the 
windlass got her off without damage. 

Parted her moorings and went adrift 1 mile 
N. of the life-saving station at 4 p. m. 
The surfmen manned a boat, and after 
securing a towline to her foremast towed 
the yacht clear of the breakwater and to 
a safe anchorage. 

At 8.15 p. m. the lookout reported vessel at 
anchor near the breakwater on fire. The 
keeper, after reporting her to the fire de- 
partment, boarded her, ran out a line of 
hose, and in a brief time had the flames 
under control. 

At 2.20 p. m. the lookout reported a steamer 
that, in trying to enter the harbor, had 
drifted to leeward and struck the con- 
crete pier about f mile N. of the stati9n. 
The keeper with his crew went alongside 
of the vessel, which had stranded on the 
riprap stone of the new breakwater, but 
master stated that assistance was not 
required. The surfmen returned to 
shore and notified owners and agents. 
At 5 p. m. the seas began to break over 
the vessel, and her crew signaled for help. 
The keeper procured tug Frank W. to 
tow surfboat and crew out to her. The 
vessel had broken open and filled. The 
entire crew of 22 men were taken off and 
landed at the life-saving station. They 
were cared for, and then left for the city. 
The vessel proved a total loss. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews Continued. 



lit 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


ality of vessel. 


Nature of casualty and service rendered. 


1906. 








Oct. 27 


Louisville Kentucky 


Sailboat Swallow. . . 


Capsized in the strong current of the river 








with 3 persons on board. The endan- 








gered people \vere picked up above the 








falls and brought to the station in safety. 








Their boat was righted, bailed out, 








taken in tow by 2 of the station boats, 








and secured in the canal. 


Oct. 27 


Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 


Sips. Margrete, 


Both these vessels broke from their moor- 




Superior. 


Spray. 


ings during a fresh N W. gale, went adrift, 








and stranded 3 miles SE. of station. 








When the gale moderated the surfmen 








went out and towed them back to moor- 








ings with power boat. 


Oct. 27 


Jackson Park, Illinois, 


Fish boat, no name. 


Swamped and went adrift in the lake with 




Lake Michigan. 




1 man on board. The wind was fresh 








from NW. with high sea. The station 








crew picked him up and brought him 








and his boat to the station. After fur- 








nishing him stimulants the keeper sent 








him to his home. 


Oct. 27 


Old Chicago, Illinois, Lake 


Skiff, no name 


Adrift; picked up by a surfman, and held 




Michigan. 




at the station lor a claimant. 


Oct. 28 


City Pomt.Massachusetts. 


Cat boat Fleet Wing. 


Carried away her sails during strong W. 
wind and unable to reach shore. The 








station crew in launch Relief towed her 








back to the Savin Hill Yacht Club. 


Oct. 28 


Short Beach, New York.. 


Sharpie, no name. . . 


Capsized and sank fc mile NE. of station 








with 1 man on board. Two surfmen 








brought him and his boat to the station, 
where he was supplied with dry clothing 
from the stores of the W. N. R. A. The 








keeper afforded him shelter until the fol- 








lowing day. 


Oct. 28 


Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 


Am. str. Pathfinder. 


Her course carrying her too close to shore, 
this vessel stranded during a NW. gale 








and high sea at 3.30 a. m. The-life-savers 








went to her, a distance of 9 miles, and 








brought the master to Harbor Beach for 
the "Duroose of enfrafirin&r a wrecking? out- 








fit. Later the wind increased and the 








master, after scuttling the ship, aban- 








doned her, and the entire crew of 22 men 








was brought ashore by the life-savers 








and conveyed to the station, where they 








were furnished stimulants and dry cloth- 








ing from the stores of the W. N. R. A. 








The life-savers continued to help float 








this vessel when the gale subsided, and 








after aiding in stopping her leaks and 








pumping her out she was released by the 
tugs Favorite and Jones on the 2d prox- 








imo. 


Oct. 28 


Port Austin, Michigan, 


Fish boat Path- 


Parted her mooring and went adrift dur- 




Lake Huron. 


finder. 


ing NW. rain storm. The life-savers got 
a line to her stern and hauled her back 








to her wharf and secured her. 


Oct. 28 


Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 


Am. sc. Ford River.. 


During a NNW. gale and high sea sprung 
her rudderpost and carried away her 








chain plates and sails when 4 miles off 








Jackson Park at 8 a. m. She was sighted 








at anchor flying a signal for assistance, 








and owing to smoky weather and the 








great distance offshore the life-saving 








crew did not discover her earlier. The 








keeper notified a towboat company, then 
manned power boat and went out to her. 








The surfmen boarded her and upon the 








arrival of the tug Spencer worked her 








into port, the life-savers from the South 


Oct. 29 


Frankfort, Michigan 


Am. sc. Carrier 


Chicago station aiding with apower boat. 
Schooner had difficulty in making harbor 








in strong gale and snowstorm. Life- 








savers took her line and towed her to a 








safe berth. 


Oct. 29 


Muskegon, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 


Am. sc. Emily and 
Eliza. 


During a heavy southerly blow with high- 
running sea tried to enter harbor, but 








was swept to leeward and struck the 








pierhead, and was unable to get clear. 








The station crew boarded her, ran lines 








to the opposite pier, and hauled her in- 








side into smooth water. The tug Gun- 








derson then took her to a good anchor- 



2990908-^ 8 



112 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Oct. 29 



Oct. 30 



Oct. 31 



Oct. 31 



Muskegon, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Port Austin, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Fire Island, New York. . . . 



Rocky Point, New York. . 



Am. sc. Emily and 
Eliza. 



Am. sc. Thomas H. 
Gaboon. 



Scow, no name... 



Am. sc. Elizabeth. 



Oct. 31 



Portage, Michigan, Lake 
Superior. 



Gas. Ich. Nokomis. 



Oct. 31 

Nov. 1 
Nov. 1 



Umpqua River, Oregon. . . 

Cranberry Island, Maine. . 
Cape Elizabeth, Maine. . . . 



Am. str. Juno 



Am. sc. Hattie Lor- 
Ing. 

Sip., no name 



Nov. 1 



Nov. 1 



Nov. 1 



Nov. 1 



Nov. 1 



Monomoy Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Fire Island, New York.. . . 

Barnegat, New Jersey 

Holly Beach, New Jersey . 

Thunder Bay Island, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 



Gas. Ich., no name. 
Scow, no name 

Sip. Lolita 

Bge. Pacific 

Sip. Dutch Girl.... 



age. Had It not been for the timely held 
of the life-savers this vessel would have 
been thrown upon the beach and lost. 
(See letter of acknowledgment.) 

During a fresh NE. wind and high sea was 
reported drifting in the lake. The life- 
savers upon boarding her were informed 
by the master that he desired a tug. The 
surfmen returned to the shore and sent a 
tug to her. 

Anchored off station in fresh NE. wind 
and moderate sea. The master fearing 
that he would come ashore, borro*wed an 
anchor and cable from keeper. Life- 
savers assisted in securing same. 

Parted her anchor chains in fresh NE. gale 
and went adrift. The station crew 
manned a boat and after a hard pull 
against wind and sea succeeded in reach- 
ing her. Her crew was taken off and 
brought to the station, where they were 
afforded shelter for the night. The ves- 
sel drifted to the beach and struck at a 
point 2 miles E. of the station, where she 
was completely submerged by the surf. 

Went adrift during fresh NW. wind and 
struck the breakwater and sank. The 
surfmen found her on the bottom, with 
the seas breaking over her. They got a 
stout line to her, hauled her up clear of 
the surf, and bailed her out, then towed 
her to the station and hauled her out on 
the launching ways. She had several 
holes stove in her. After the surfmen 
had made repairs she was taken to a 
mooring and turned over to the owner. 

Struck a sunken ledge 1 miles above sta- 
tion at 3.30 p. m. The life-savers went to 
her in 2 skins and attempted to float her, 
but all their efforts proved futile. Two 
scows were then procured, and with their 
assistance the steamer was floated and 
towed to Gardiner by the tug Hunter. 

Lost 1 of her anchors. Life-savers went 
out to her and laid out another, and 
afterwards swept for the lost one. 

Discovered by patrol adrift 4 miles SSE. 
of station; wind blowing heavy from 
NW. and sea rough. Life-savers put out 
In surfboat and found no one on board. 
Cable being chafed through, she had 
evidently gone adrift from her moor- 
ings. After five hours beating against 
head seas, she was brought to anchor off 
the station and was afterwards turned 
over to owner. 

Parted mooring in strong N. wind and 
high sea and came ashore 1 mile NE. of 
station. Life-savers hauled boat out of 
surf, and she was afterwards repaired. 

During a gale with a moderate sea, an- 
chored off station and rolled her mast 
out. Life-savers went to her in surfboat, 
cleared away the wreckage, and hauled 
mast up on deck. 

Discovered ashore ha Barnegat Inlet, li 
miles NNE. of station. Owner declined 
assistance, but watch was kept on sloop 
until she was floated by high tide Nov. 4. 

Discovered by lookout S. 4 miles from 
station, apparently water-logged and fly- 
ing signals of distress, hi company with 
2 other barges being towed. Life-savers 
went out in surfboat, but met Two Mile 
Beach life-saving station's crew and were 
informed that the Pacific's crew had 
been transferred to the other barges. 

Received a telephone message that a fish 
boat was ashore on North Point 5' 
miles from station; fresh S. wind and 
heavy surf. Life-savers went to her in 
surfboat and at 10 p. m. had her hauled 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



113 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Nov. 1 



Nov. 2 



Thunder Bay Island, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 
gan. 

Quoddy Head, Maine 



Sip. Dutch Girl 

Br. sc. Fauna 



Nov. 2 
Nor. 2 



Nor 2 



Nov. 2 



Nov. 3 



Nov. 3 



Cranberry Island, Maine. 
Shark River, New Jersey . 



Great Egg, New Jersey. 



South Manitou Island, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 
gan. 



Louisvult, Kentucky.... 



Michigan City, Indiana. 
Lake Michigan. 



Sip. no name 

Gas. Ich. Harold... 



Gas. sc. Alberta . . . 



Gas. Ich. Sneak 



Rowboat, no name . 



Gas. Ich. Bradweli. 



Nov. 4 



Nauset, Massachusetts.. 



Br. sc. G. M. Coch- 
rane. 



up on the beach. She had been stove in 
and was leaking badly. Crew reached 
shore before the arrival of life-savers. 

Entered Quoddy Bay and set a distress 
signal, anchoring 2 miles NE. of station. 
Life-savers went aboard and found her 
leaking badly. They left a watch on 
board and telephoned for a tug, but it 
was unable to come until weather abated. 
As schooner was pounding heavily by 
night, part of her crew were taken off 
and cared for at the station. The next 
morning tug arrived and, assisted by 
station crew, schoone.r was towed to a 
safe berth. 

Life-savers went out to a small sloop that 
had nearly filled and was in danger of 
sinking and bailed it out and secured it. 

Struck on bar off Shark River in trying to 
enter; discovered immediately by look- 
out. Fresh NW. breeze and moderate 
surf. Surfboat was launched and went 
to assistance. Life-savers took out 
launch's ballast, ran out anchor, and 
worked her into deep water, saving the 
boat and the lives of the 2 men composing 
her crew. 

Discovered by lookout on sandbar 1J miles 
SW. of station. Life savers went to her 
assistance but found her fast aground. 
She floated off at high tide, but ran 
aground again. She was finally hauled 
on Nov. 4 by the assistance of the station 
crew. Vessel suffered no damage. 

Discovered by lookout, 4 miles SE. of sta- 
tion, wind blowing fresh from the SW. 
and a moderate sea. Machinery broke 
down and launch set a distress signal. 
Life-savers went out to her and towed 
her back to station. 

Discovered by lookout, 2 boys in a boat in 
danger, just above cross dam of the falls. 
Life-savers towed them to the station. 
Keeper gave them proper directions for 
proceeding safely back to Jeffersonville, 

Left for fishing grounds Nov. 3, not haying 
returned the 5th, fishermen notified 
keeper. A tug was hired and life-savers 
went to fishing grounds 10 miles NNW. 
i W. of station, found nets but no boat. 
Searched for six hours and then returned 
to station. Received telephone message 
3 a. m., morning of 6th, that the steamer 
Glen of Chicago had picked up launch, 
her crew unconscious from hunger and 
cold. The Bradweli had neither sail nor 
anchor. 

Vessel discovered by patrol at 5.25 a. m. 3 
miles south of station. He burned Coston 
signal and notified station by telephone. 
It was blowing strong NE. and a high 
surf running. In the darkness she had 
mistaken the back land for the beach. 
The seas breaking over the schooner were 
too heavy for any boat to withstand, so 
the beach apparatus from Nauset Sta- 
tion was hauled 3 miles to abreast of the 
stranded schooner. The life-savers from 
the Orleans Station arrived soon after 
and assisted in all operations, having 
driven 2i miles along the beach, launched 
their boat and crossed the inlet. The 
wreck was lying 125 yards offshore and 
was reached by the first shot, the line 
falling across the fore topmast stay. The 
whip and hawser were hauled off in turn 
and eet up at the masthead. The crew 
of 6 men were hauled ashore in the 
breeches buoy, the last man being landed 



114 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Nov. 4 



Nov. 4 



Nauset, Massachusetts... 



Br. sc. G. M. Coch- 
ranc. 



South Chicago, Illinois, Gas. Ich. Chester . . 
Lake Michigan. 



Nov. 5 Frankfort, Michigan, Lakb 
Michigan. 

Nov. 6 White Head, Maine... 



Nov. 6 



Nov. 7 



Nov. 9 



Nov. 10 



Coquille River, Oregon 



Gay Head, Massachusetts. 



Quoddy Head, Maine 



Small boats, no 
names. 



Am. sc. Forest Belle. 



Fish boat, no name 



Am. sc. Mopang. . . 



Br. sc. Ethel... 



Atlantic City, New Jersey.! Gas. Ich. Naiad. 



at 7.30 a. m., twenty-five minutes after 
the buoy was first sent ofl. The crew 
were furnished dry clothes from the 
W. N. R. A. supplies, and were housed 
and fed for two days at the station. (See 
letter of acknowledgement.) 

Engine broke down 1 mile NE. of station, 
and drifting ashore. Discovered by pier 
lookout. There were 6 persons on board. 
Life-savers went to their assistance in 
surfboat and towed them into Calumet 
River, where repairs could be made. 

Life-savers picked up 2 rowboats that were 
adrift and afterwards turned them over 
to their owners. 

Discovered by lookout at anchor in danger- 
ous position i mile offshore, 1\ miles 
ENE. of station. Strong NNW. breeze 
and moderate sea. She had missed stays 
and let go both anchors, but they failed 
to hold. When station crew in surfboat 
reached her she had dragged down until 
the rocks were only a ship's length under 
her stern. Her sails were hoisted, her 
anchors hove up, and she was worked 
into Seal Harbor to a safe anchorage. 
Without the assistance of the life-savers 
she would have gone on the rocks. 

Discovered by lookout mile SW. of sta- 
tion. Two fishermen had hauled in their 
net and were standing back, but strong 
SE. wind and ebb tide carried them into 
the breakers on the North Spit near the 
bar. Life-savers in surfboat went to 
their assistance and found boat half full 
of wa ter . D uring the smooth spell ma n- 
aged to get a line to the fishermen and 
towed them clear of the breakers. 

The master applied at the station for as- 
sistance in getting the schooner under- 
way from an anchorage dangerously 
near the rocks, \ mile east of station. 
Life-savers launched surfboat and went 
to his assistance. Anchors were hove up, 
windlass working badly. With 5 fath- 
oms of chain out schooner missed stays, 
so both anchors were again let go, fetch- 
ing up still closer to the rocks. The 
master made a second attempt and 
again missed stays. Both anchors were 
let go, but too late to keep her off the 
rocks. Owing to the rough sea she be- 
gan to fill. Took the crew of 3 men ashore 
in surfboat, housed and fed them three 
days. Boarded schooner the next day 
to obtain personal effects of her crew. 
She was a total loss, and the under- 
writers began to strip her the next day. 

Patrol saw schooner strike on ledge m 
Quoddy Bay 1 miles NNE. of station, 
her master having mistaken the channel. 
He notified station and life-savers went 
to her assistance. She had gone ashore 
at high water, so it was necessary to 
await the following flood. Planks were 
placed under bilge to fend her off and 
barrels slung to help lift her. The mas- 
ter was taken ashore in station boat to 
telephone for tug. The life-savers re- 
turned to the Ethel at 4 the next morn- 
ing, discharged her deck load and boated 
two-thirds of her cargo to the tug, this 
being necessary to float her. She came 
off without damage to her hull. 

Discovered by patrol east \ mile from sta- 
tion. Boat had lost its bearings in the 
dark and was standing into danger. She 
was warned off by patrol burning Coston 
signal; he then reported to station. 
Surfboat put out and placed 1 or life- 
savers on launch, who piloted her safely 
into inlet. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEEVTCE. 



115 



Services of creics Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 


Nature of casualty and service rendered. 


1906. 








Nov. 11 


Charlotte, New York 


Br. Bge. Quebec 


Disco vered by lookout at 8.30 p.m. stranded 
4 mile NE. of station, f mile offshore; 






g 


NE. gale, rain, and heavy sea. Barge 








was in tow of the tug Proctor. They 








had left Charlotte early in the afternoon, 








but weather had become such that they 








were obliged to turn back for port. 








Proctor blew distress signal for life- 


- 






saving station, and 34-foot power boat 








started to assistance, meeting the Proc- 








tor coming in, the towline having parted 
and the barge having stranded. A heavy 








sea boarded the lifeboat in the jaw of the 








piers and signal lights were put out. 








Barge's crew of 8 were taken off. A line 








fouled the boat's propeller and surfmen 








had to take to their oars. Were unable 








to make the life-saving station, so 
dropped down to last pier, anchored boat 








off, got 2 surfmen ashore with lines, and 








barge's crew were hauled ashore on pier. 
The lifeboat itself afterwards dragged its 








anchor and went ashore. On the 13th, the 








sea having subsided, she was hauled off 








by the harbor tug. 


Nov. 11 


Old Chicago, Illinois 


Gas. Ich. Surf 


Manned by 3 men. Stood out into the 








lake, contrary to warning given by 
keeper. Blowing a gale from the north, 
high sea. A mile out their engine broke 








down. Keeper and surfmen who were 








watching them immediately launched 








station power boat and went to their 








assistance; towed launch back to harbor. 


Nov. 11 


Old Chicago, Illinois. 


Gas. Jch. Lucki 


Keeper noticed launch steering for the 








open lake. Wind blowing a gale from 








the north and a high sea. When f mile 








off shore engine became disabled and she 
was in danger of swamping. Life-savers 








went to her in surfboat and towed her 








to safety. 


Nov. 11 


Racine, Wisconsin 


Am. sc. Ottawa. ... 


Sea increased so that schooner could not 








lay in safety at her berth. No crew on 








board. At master's request keeper sent 








2 surfmen to assist in bringing vessel to 








a safe berth. 


Nov. 12 


Cross Island, Maine 


Sip. Edalith. 


Parted her moorings in strong east gale 








and stranded 100 yds offshore, J mile 








west of station in Northeast harbor. 








Life-savers proceeded to the scene by 








land and found sloop well up on the 








rocks. Placed heavy lifting bars under 








her bilge and got her far enough up to 








place a crab under her bottom, saving 








her from further damage. Ran out an- 








chor and at high tide hauled her off. 








Took her around to head of harbor and 








hauled her up on the beach. The station 








crew were engaged in this work from 8 


Nov. 12 


City Point, Massachusetts 


Gas. Ich. Queen 


a. m. to 7 p. m. 
Engine disabled, boat unmanageable, crew 








made distress signals which were an- 








swered by lookout. Life-savers went 








out in launch and towed her to the 








nearest shipyard, where repairs could be 
made. 


Nov. 12 


Old Chicago, Illinois 


Scow, no name 


Scow was overcrowded and swamped 850 








feet north of station. There were 10 men 








on board, 2 of whom were lost. (For 


Nov. 13 


Fletchers Neck, Maine. . . . 


Am. sc. John I. 


detailed account see page 49.) 
Dragged anchors in strong WNW. wind 






Snow. 


and stranded 1 miles from station, 500 








yards offshore. Life-savers went to her 








in surfboat and ran out anchor and 100 








fathoms of hawser. At high tide set all 








sail and hove her off. Stowed anchor and 


'..'.*' 






hawser and piloted her out of harbor. 








She was very shorthanded. 


Nov. 13 

Nov. 13 


South Hampton, New 
York. 
Shinnecock, New York 


Small boat, no name 
Am. sc. bge. M. P. 


Keeper assists a fisherman to save his dory 
bottom up in the surf. 
Discovered by patrol dangerously near 






Grace. 


shore. He burned Coston signal to warn 








her off, Vessel stranded 400 yards off- 



116 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Nov. 13 



Nov. 13 



Shinnecock, New York . 



Oswego, New York. 



Am. sc. bge. M. P. 
Grace. 



Am. ac. Menominee. 



Nov. 13 

Nov. 14 
Nov. 15 

Nov. 15 
Nov. 15 

Nov. 15 
Nov. 15 



Point Adams, Oregon .. 



Santa Rosa, Florida, 



Point AUerton, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Hampton Beach, New 
Hampshire. 

Brant Rock, Massachu- 
setts. 



Wood End, Massachu- 



Br.bk. Galena 



Yawl, no name. 



Am. sc. Mary L. 
Newton. 



Small boats, no 



Chatham, Massachusetts. 



Eight small boats, 
no names. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Catboat? Comfort.. 



Nov. 15 



Nov. 15 



Chatham, Massachusetts. 



Monomoy, Massachusetts 



Catboat, no name. . 



Catboat Sylvia . . . 



shore, f mile ESE. from station. The 
Grace with 2 other barfes, all coal laden, 
had been in tow of the tug Edward Luck- 
enbach, and had been lost the night of the 
12th. Life-savers went out in surfboat 
and assisted in running lines, the crew 
having already been taken off by the tug. 
Vessel and cargo were a total loss. 

Discovered by lookout at 1 p. m. at time of 
outbreak of fire. She was lying at dock 
i mile west of station; surfmen arrived 
at fire in surfboat ten minutes after it had 
broken out. Her forecastle was burning 
and smoke pouring up through her deck 
and around stem. Two tugs arrived at 
the same time. The life-savers cut away 
the deckand thetugs played threestreams 
of water inside. The fire was soon ex- 
tinguished. 

Went ashore 11 miles south of station at 
6.30 p. m.; strong SW. wind, rain, fog, 
and nigh sea. Owing to thick weather 
and no telephone connection it was not 
reported until 1.30 p. m. Galena's crew 
had landed with much difficulty in their 
own boats. Keeper detailed a watch to 
be kept on her. 

Discovered by lookout, capsized 2 miles 
north of station. M9derate SW. gale, 
rough sea, and raining. Life-savers 
went to her assistance in surfboat, rescu- 
ing 3 men clinging to her bottom. 
Righted, bailed out, and towed yawl to 
safe berth. 

Stranded at 8 p. m. on False Spit, If miles 
NN E. of station, mile off shore. Blow- 
ing strong ESE., high surf, raining and 
very thick. Discovered from lookout at 
daybreak. Her crew had gotten ashore 
on Great Brewster Island in their own 
boat. Life-savers took them off, trans- 
ferred them to tug, and gave them trans- 
portation to Boston. 

Life-savers hauled up on the beach 5 fishing 
boats in danger of being smashed in the 
surf. 

Blowing fresh and a high sea. Life-savers 
hauled out 8 gunning dories that were in 
a dangerous position below the break- 
water. 

In getting underway, engine became dis- 
abled and launch drifted into the surf, 
mile SE. from station. Wind blowing 
strong SE. Life-savers laid out anchor, 
ran out 100 fathoms of line and hauled 
her out into deep water. 

Discovered by lookout towing a small boat. 
She carried away her sail and stranded 
J mile west of station on bar entering 
Stage Harbor. Strong east gale and 
choppy sea. Life-savers launched surf- 
boat and went to her assistance. At 
high tide boat was hauled off and an- 
chored in safe berth. As master and 
mate were wet and cold they were taken 
to their homes. 

This boat, in tow of the Comfort, had 
stranded and was picked up by the life- 
savers at the same time. While trying 
to beat out her sail had been blown away 
and her main boom broken. 

Discovered by lookout, ashore 1 mile from 
station. Strong east wind and rough 
sea. Surfmen went to her assistance in 
dory. Her engine had been disabled and 
she had no sail. Laid out 2 anchors'and 
hauled her into deep water. Took her 
crew (2 fishermen) to the station; housed 
them for the night and fed them; fur- 
nished dry clothing for themselves and a 
new sail for the boat. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



117 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 


Nature of casualty and service rendered. 


1906. 








Nov. 15 


Point Judith, Rhode Is- 


Am. Sc. Lugano 


At 3.30 p. m. vessel was discovered by look- 




land. 




out mile off shore, water-logged and un- 
manageable, and heading for the beach. 








Wind was blowing a strong gale from the 
NE., rain and hail, and a high sea. She 








struck 200 yards north of station and 300 








yards offshore. Three of her crew were 








lost. (For detailed account see p. 50.) 


Nov. 15 


Fire Island, New York 


Catboat, no name. . . 


Capsized J mile offshore, 1 mile north of 








station, blowing a gale from NE. and a 
high sea running. Reported by lookout. 
Life-savers went out in surfboat, picked 








up owner, righted and bailed out boat. 


Nov. 15 


Fire Island, New York 


Lighter, no name... 


Reported adrift by one of the surfmen. 








Blowing strong from the NE. Life- 




1 




savers ran a line to her and made her fast . 








Notified owners at wireless station. 


Nov. 15 


Long Branch, New Jersey. 


Am. sc. James M. 


Blowing fresh NE., raining, and high sea. 


- . . 




Hall. 


Lookout reported schooner 3 miles SE. 








of station m distress, flag in rigging 
union down. She had been heading 









south, but now stood in for the beach. 








She stranded 100 yards out i mile south 








of station. Life-savers proceeded with 








beach apparatus to scene of wreck. The 
first shot from Lyle gun was successful, 








and her crew of master and 3 seamen 








were safely landed. They were cared for 








at the station for three days. The Life- 








Saving Service crew from Deal station 








had been called, but the distance to come 








was such that the last man had been 








landed by the time of their arrival. The 
distress signal had been sighted at 10.45 








a. m. At 12 m. the life-savers had com- 








pleted the rescue, and apparatus was 








ready for a second schooner heading for 








the beach to the southward. 


Nov. 15 


Long Branch and Deal, 


Am. sc. Sam. C. 


Stranded 1,500 yards south of the James M. 




New Jersey. 


Holmes. 


Hall at 12 m. Fresh NE. wind, raining, 








and high seas. She was water-logged 








and was stranded to save crew. The 








life-savers from Long Branch and Deal 








used the same apparatus employed at the 








wreck of the Hall. The first shot from 








the Lyle gun was successful, and the 








crew of 4 men were safely landed in the 








breeches buoy. The life-savers returned 








their apparatus to the station at 1.20 








p. m., naving rescued the crews of 2 








schooners in two hours. Some of the 








crew were kept at the station for three 








days, and were outfitted with clothing 








from the W. N. R. A. supplies. 


Nov. 15 


Cape Lookout, North 


Sc. yt. Iris 


Mistook the color of Beacon Light and 




Carolina. 




stranded 1J miles NW. of station at 9 








p. m. Moderate NW. gale and rough 
sea. Those on board Bred guns and 








showed a light, which was seenby patrol 
and answered with a Coston. Station 








was notified and surfboat went to assist- 








ance. She was well up on the beach. 








The personal effects 01 the crew were 








boated ashore. The sailors were taken 








to the station and supplied with food and 
dry clothes from the supplies of the W. N. 
R. A. On the 16th the life-savers visited 








the yacht and found her chime opened up 








for a length of 12 feet. Repaired same 








with canvas and planking, and removed 








ballast. She was floated at high water 
the 17th and towed by gasoline launch to 








Morehead City. 


NOT. 15 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin. . . . 


Sip. Viola 


Life-savers went to stranded sloop and 








after a half day's work released her and 


Nov. 15 


Duluth, Minnesota. 


Lighter, no name. 


brought her into harbor. 
Tjirht6r in tow of st6&m6r N6W York w&s 








water-logged 1$ miles from the sta- 








tion. Discovered by lookout. Life-savers 








started immediately with launch and 








surfboat. Upon arrival found that her 2 








men had been taken off by ferryboat. 








Surfmen towed lighter to dock, 



118 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Nov. 16 



Nov. 16 



White Head, Maine.... 



Fletchers Neck, Maine. 



Rowboat, no name 



Am. sc. Marshall 
Perrin. 



Nov. 16 



Nov. 16 



Nov. Li 



Nov. 16 



Nov. 18 



Nov. 20 



Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Spermaceti Cove, New 
Jersey. 



South Manitou Island. 
Michigan/ 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin. . . 



Salisbury Beach, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Straitsmouth, New 
Hampshire. 



Sip. Gracie. 



Dredge. 



Am. sc. Margaret 
Dall. 



Am. str. Orion... 



Am. sc. Wm. F. 
Green. 



Br. sc. Erne May . . 



Sunk at moorings at 1.30 a. m., 3 miles NE. 
of station. ENE. gale, raining, and 
heavy sea. The next morning when gale 
had abated, life-savers went to her m 
surfboat and swept her with grapnels. 
She was raised, taken ashore, bailed out, 
and delivered to her owner. 

Parted her chains and came ashore at 1 
a. m. in NE. gale of snow, hail, and rain. 
High sea. Could not be seen from sta- 
tion as she lay on other side of island 1^ 
miles distant. Notification received by 
signal from light keeper on Wood Island, 
that she had gone to pieces in five min- 
utes after she had struck. After a long 
search the body of her master was re- 
covered. One of her 2 seamen was 
washed ashore unhurt. He was cared 
for at the station for two days and given 
an outfit of clothing. The body of the 
other seaman was never found. 

The keeper being informed that a sloop w&s 
in distress 6 miles to the ENE., a point 
not visible from station, went to her 
assistance in surfboat. The wind was 
blowing strong ESE. and there was a 
heavy sea to pull against. The Gracie 
was picked up flying distress signal. 
Her sails had been blown away. Surf- 
men repaired sails, set storm sail, got in 
her anchor, and headed her back to port. 

Sunk in channel of Shrewsberry River 1 
mile SW. from station; the upper story 
of her house above water and her crew 
safely therein. All hands on dredge had 
been asleep throughout night, wind had 
shifted, making up a rough sea, and she 
had filled. Life-savers went out to her 
in surfboat, but found that she was in 
need of no assistance. 

Discovered by lookout. Dragged anchor 
and stranded 1 mile north of station. 
SE. gale; raining and rough sea. She 
went ashore at 11.30 p. m. and was 
boarded thirty minutes later by life- 
savers in surfboat. She was well up on 
the beach, and her crew had gotten 
ashore. 

Stranded on North Point 5 miles north of 
station; atmosphere smoky. Station 
notified by telephone. Life-savers in 
surfboat in tow of tug Welcome pro- 
ceeded to the wreck, and were joined by 2 
other tugs. Life-savers assisted in run- 
ning hawsers. After working three 
hours steamer was released. 

Lost rudder, having struck a derelict; 
leaking; anchored in a dangerous place. 
She was sighted by the lookout when she 
anchored at 5 a. m. f mile NE. of station 
and 300 yards offshore. Set a signal of 
distress and at 5.15 the surfboat put out 
to her. Keeper came ashore and tele- 
phoned for a tug, then returned. Assist- 
ed in getting anchor up, getting under- 
way, and working her into deep water. 
She was soon picked up by the tug and 
towed to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
life-savers staying by her at master's 
request to help at the pumps. Tug 
towed station crew back at 4 p. m. 

At 1 a.m., in trying to pass between Sandy 
Bay breakwater and Little Salvages, 
struck on the latter and knocked off her 
rudder. She came off and let go both 
anchors, If miles from station. Her 
master came in and reported to keeper of 
station. Surfboat was launched, and 
life-savers went to assistance. Engaged 
a power boat to tow her; got up her 
anchors, hoisted her rudder on deck, and 
turned her over to power boat, which 
towed her into Rockport Harbor. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



119 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Nov. 20 



Race Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Nov. 20 



Nov. 20 



Nov. 21 



Nov. 21 



Nov. 21 



Nov. 21 
Nov. 21 

Nov. 21 
Nov. 21 



Nov. 21 



Lone Hill, New York.. 
Louisville, Kentucky. 



.do. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan. 



Tawas, Michigan. 



Frankfort, Michigan. 
Ludington, Michigan . 



Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 



'Id Chicago, 
Lake Michigan. 



Willapa Bay, Washing- 
ton. 



Am. sc. Francis W. 
Whalen. 



Small boat, no name 



Gas. Ich., no name, I 
and shanty boat, j 



Flatboat Harry 



Am. sc. Jennie 
Weaver. 



Barge No. 1 



Am. sc. Wanderer. . 



Small boat no 
name. 



Gas. Ich., no name, 
scow, no name. 



Small boat, no name; 



Am. sc. Bangor 



At 10 p. m. discovered by lookout and 
reported immediately after stranding, 
11 miles west of station, 450 yards on- 
shore. Launched surfboat, carried out 
anchor and helped heave her off. Helped 
make sail. Keeper gave master direc- 
tions as to steering out, then went 
ashore. When schooner passed out 
abreast of station, being dangerously 
near the bar, she was warned off by Cos- 
ton signal. As the sea made up very 
choppy immediately after getting off, 
schooner would probably have filled, 
except for the warning. 

Discovered adrift by surfman 4 miles SE. 
of station, half full of water. He bailed 
it out, towed it ashore and hauled it up 
on the beach. 

Shanty boat in tow of gasoline launch dis- 
covered by lookout dangerously near the 
Kentucky chute of the falls. Life-savers 
went out in boat and towed them in to 
station. The gasoline launch had broken 
down and the 2 boats with their 2 occu- 
pants were drifting into the strong cur- 
rent of the falls. They were allowed to 
proceed after they had been instructed 
now to get through the canal. 

Discovered adrift oy lookout, 5 men on 
board, 100 yards north of station. In 
two minutes the lifeboat was alongside* 
and a line fast to the flatboat. She was 
towed in to the steamer City of Cincin- 
nati, which she was trying to make, when 
she went adrift. 

Blowing south gale, high sea; breast line 
parted and allowed schooner to pound 
on windward side of dock. Her master 
requested assistance of life-savers, who 
in surfboat ran out a line and hauled 
schooner clear of the dock. 

At 10.45 p. m. lookout reported a light 2 
miles to the westward and keeper made 
out a torch flare up. The surfboat was 
launched at 11 p. m. There was a heavy 
gale from the SW. and a high sea. 
Reached barge after a desperate pull of 
two hours. It was the lumber-laden 
barge No. 1 in tow of the steamer John 
McKerchey. Barge had a heavy list and 
had just lost her deck load; had 6 feet of 
water in her hold. Life-savers stood by 
her until 3 a. m. when wind and sea had 
gone down. On the 23d life-savers pulled 
ashore 50,000 feet of lumber and turned 
it over to the underwriters. 

Schooner made port in fresh east breeze. 
Life-savers took her line and towed her 
to a safe berth. 

Wind took a sudden shift and blew a 
strong gale from the south. A skiff be- 
longing to the Point Au Sable light-house 
and a scow were pounding against the 
dock. The life-savers towed them to a 
safe berth and secured them for the night. 

Five men took these vessels out to break- 
water under construction. While the 
men were at work a cyclone came up, 
and 4 of them were drowned. (For de- 
tailed account see page 52.) 

Assistant light-house keeper was return- 
ing from attending lights when high 
sea and heavy gale drove him against the 
weather side of the pier. His distress 
was witnessed at the station, and life- 
savers in surfboat went to his assistance. 
The weather was such that the life-savers 
had to secure a tug to tow them back to 
the station. (See letter of acknowledg- 
ment.) 

Discovered by lookout, dismasted, an- 
chored, and helpless near breakers, 7 



120 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Nov. 21 



Nov. 22 



Nov. 22 



Willapa Bay, Washing- 
ton. 



Erie, Pennsylvania. 



Fairport, Ohio. . 



Am. sc. Bangor. 



Rowboat, no name . 



Am. str. Chas. B. 
Hill. 



Nov. 22 



Nov. 23 



Cleveland, Ohio. 



Ashtabula, Ohio 



Am. sc. Penobscot. . 



Am. sc. bge. Com- 
modore. 



Nov.- 23 



White Head, Maine. 



Am. sc. Penobscot. 



Nov. 23 



Cape May, New Jersey 



Gas. Ich. Thelma 



Nov. 23 



Marblehead, Ohio 



Am. sc. Guido... 



miles WSW. of station and 5 miles oft- 
shore. Distress signal showing. A high 
sea was running. Lifeboat was launched 
and surfmen went out to her assistance. 
Tug arrived at the same time and towed 
schooner into the bay. 

Discovered by lookout adrift mile south 
of station. Launched surfboat, towed 
boat in to station, and cared for it until 
the 23d, when it was claimed by owner. 
As it was blowing strong with a rough 
sea at the time, the boat would certainly 
have been smashed against the break- 
water but for the timely assistance of the 
life-savers. 

At 9.50 a. m. keeper received a telegram 
that a vessel was ashore 12 miles ENE. 
of station. Lifeboat was launched and 
taken in tow by the harbor tug Annie. 
She had sprung a bad leak and had to be 
beached. Her 21 men were taken off 
and transferred to the tug. Owing to a 
moderate gale and high sea this was 
accomplished with considerable diffi- 
culty, it oeing necessary to make 3 trips 
between the tug and wreck. The life- 
boat was considerably damaged. 

Lookout sighted a torch on a vessel 1J 
miles west of station. Life savers went 
to her in surfboat. She wanted a tow 
into port. Returned to station and 
telephoned for a tug. 

The morning of the 23d the keeper of the 
station was notified by telephone that 
the harbor tug company were sending a 
steamer to the wreck of the Chas. B. Hill, 
15 miles west south from the station. 
Tug Fabian took life-savers in surfboat 
in tow and proceeded to wreck. Soon 
after arrival a party signaled from ashore. 
Surfboat went in and picked them up. 
They were members of the Chas. B. Hill's 
crew. They informed keeper that the 
vessel just in sight about 5 miles NNE. 
was the barge Commodore, and that they 
had cast her adrift the night before when 
she was laboring in the heavy seas. 
Tug towed surfboat out to Commodore, 
found her flying signal of distress, her 
foresail and staysail carried away, her 
hawsepipe pulled out, and her bow in 
danger of being cut down by the 90 fath- 
oms of chain out. Life-savers boarded 
barge, assisted to heave in chain and an 
anchor, and clear up wreckage. Barge 
was towed into harbor for repairs. 

Loaded with lumber, bound from Bangor 
for New York, anchored in Seal Harbor 
in strong west gale, dragged anchors and 
stranded on rocks 1 miles NE. of station. 
Life-savers went to her assistance in surf- 
boat, ran out a kedge, hove her clear of 
the rocks, and landed her captain at 
Sprucehead to telephone for a tug. When 
tug arrived life-savers ran a hawser, 
assisted in heaving up anchor, hoisting 
sails, and working her out past White 
Head. 

Machinery disabled, anchored off Priscilla 
Beach 4 miles NNW. of station. Wind 
came out strong NW. and boat had to be 
beached. Her crew applied at station 
for assistance. Keeper and 1 surfman 
went to her and found her full of water 
and sand. Procured a team of 4 horses 
and the next morning the life-savers 
assisted in hauling boat up on the beach, 
loaded it on a wagon, and hauled it to 
Schellingers Landing, a distance of 6 
miles. 

Anchored 3 miles NE. of station, and dis- 
covered flying distress signal. Life- 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



121 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Nov. 23 



Nov. 23 



Marblehead, Ohio 



Portage, Michigan. 



Am. sc. Guido. 



Be. bge. Matanzas . 



Nov. 24 



Nov. 25 



Chatham, Massachusetts . 



Wood End, Massachusetts 



Am. sc. L. A. Plum- 
mer. 



Gas. Ich., DO name. 



Nov. 25 



Charlotte, New York .... 



Canoe Sprite. . 



Nov. 26 i Muskeget, Massachusetts 



Nov. 26 New Shoreham, Rhode 
Island. 



Nov. 26 



Duluth, Minnesota. 



Nov. 26 Duluth, Minnesota... 



Am. sc. Thos. A. 
Cromwell. 



Am. sc. John Feeney 



Gas. leh. Lennox . . . 



Scow, No. 36. . 



Nov. 27 



Marblehead, Maine 



Am. sc. Jennie G. 
Pillsbury. 



savers responded in surfboat and found 
her unable to heave her anchors. They 
assisted in raising them, and then ran 
lines to a tug, which towed schooner to a 
safe berth in lee of Kellys Island. 

Patrol burnt Coston in answer to distress 
signal of vessel at entrance of break- 
water. Surfmen launched surfboat and 
pulled out to barge in tow of the fish tug 
Tramp. Owing to fresh west wind and 
high sea the tug was unable to handle the 
barge, as she had swung around onto the 
breakwater and stranded. At master's 
request life-savers got another tug, and 
were employed three hours running lines 
to tugs. The barge had been in tow of 
the steamer Panama, which had lost her 
rudder and dropped the tow. (See letter 
of acknowledgment.) 

At 6.45 a. m. set signal of distress. having 
been in collision with unknown schooner. 
She was badly cut in on her starboard 
quarter and ner mainsail and spanker 
badly torn. Surfmen assisted in patch- 
ing hole, and then came ashore and sent 
for tug, which towed vessel info port. 

Discovered by lookout J mile from station 
and 75 yards offshore; blowing fresh from 
N W . and a high sea . Surfmen went out to 
her and found her stranded in the surf, 
laid out her anchor and hauled her into 
deep water; bailed her out; left 1 surf- 
man aboard, and took the 2 men belong- 
ing to her to station; supplied them with 
dry clothing from W. N. R. A. stores. 
Surfmen went out in power boat and 
towed launch to Provincetown. 

Capsized 1 mile N.by W. of station and dis- 
covered by lookout. Station power boat 
put out to the rescue, and picked up 
canoe, but the 2 men had sunk. (For de- 
tailed account see page 58.) 

Stranded 5J miles NW. of station. Dis- 
covered by lookout as she went ashore at 
7 a. m. Life-savers went immediately to 
her in surfboat and stayed by her until 
arrival of tug. 

Stranded on sandbar i mile east of station; 
discovered by lookout. Life - savers 
launched surfboat and went to her assist- 
ance; carried out her anchor, and at 
high tide assisted in heaving her into 
deep water. 

Went adrift in heavy NE. gale i mile south 
of station; reported by lookout. Life- 
savers went to her assistance in surfboat 
and towed her into dock. There was a 
man in the launch, but he was unable to 
handle it. 

Broke moorings in NE. gale; drifted away 
from dredge and stranded 1 mile SW. of 
station. Application for assistance was 
made at station. Life-savers went out 
in surfboat and ran line from scow to 
dredge and she was pulled off when wind 
moderated. 

Discovered at 6 a. m. flying distress signal; 
stranded 4 miles east of station; fresh 
NE. wind; moderate sea. She had 
missed stays and went ashore 400 yards 
off Twobush Island. Life-savers went 
out in surfboat, but just before arrival ' 
schooner floated off and dropped her 
anchor and crew took to their boat. 
Life-savers boarded her and found her 
hold half full of water and filling fast. 
They got out and landed on the island 
her spare sails, spars, and rigging. Ves- 
sel soon rolled over on her beam ends. 
Took crew ashore and got them trans- 
portation to Rockland. Vessel parted 
chains and drifted out to sea. She was 



122 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEBVTCE. 
Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Nov. 27 



Nov. 27 



Nov. 27 



Nov. 27 



Nov. 28 



Nov. 28 



Nov. 29 



Station and locality. 



Marblehead, Maine. 



Marblehead, Ohio. . 



. Grand Marais, Michigan. 



Point Adams, Oregon 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Am. str. Aurelia. . . , 



Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. 



Atlantic City, New Jersey 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Am. sc. Jennie G. discovered If miles SE. of the Burnt 
Pillsbury. Island station and was boarded by life- 

savers from latter station at 7 a. m. 
There being no service that they could 
render the derelict they went ashore and 
notified the collector of customs and the 
revenue cutter at Portland. They also 
notified her owner and underwriters. 

Br. str. Tecumseh..! Struck and sunk on Mouse Island Reef 
11 p. m. in strong west wind and high 
sea, 8 miles NW. of station. Discovered 
by lookout, flying distress signal next 
morning. Keeper telephoned for a tug. 
Life-savers went out to her in surfboat 
and brought master and purser ashore 
to arrange for wrecking outfit. The next 
day wind had freshened and sea had in- 
creased. Keeper hired tug to tow life- 
savers, ship's officers, and supplies back to 
wreck. Station crew assisted in running 
lines and placing pumps; vessel was leak- 
ing badly. Stood by the 28th and 29th 
until wind and sea had gone down. Their 
attendance being no longer required they 
returned to the station. 

Br. str. Turret Went ashore west of harbor piers in NW. 
Crown. gale of snow and a high sea, at 8.45 p. m. 

and was reported immediately by look- 
out. Keeper burnt Coston, and went to 
her in surf boat. The master informed the 
keeper that his vessel was resting easy 
and that they would not leave her. 
Surfboatwas beached abreast of steamer, 
and watch was kept during night. 
Boarded steamer the next morning and 
brought messages ashore for owners. 
On the 29th the surfmen sounded and 
located best water for hauling off and 
ran lines to two wrecking tugs. 
Discovered by patrol at daybreak, strand- 
ed 2 miles north of station. It was blow- 
ing strong from the eastward and there 
was a choppy sea. She had touched on 
the bar two hours before and her deck 
load of lumber had shifted; this starting 
her to leak badly; she had been headed in 
for Astoria. The water was soon knee 
deep in the engine room, so the master 
ran her aground to save her. As she was 
showing no lights, she was not seen until 
half an hour later. The life-savers 
launched their surfboat and went aboard. 
The master was landed to communicate 
with owners and the life-savers returned 
to the steamer to stand by her during 
the night, the seas washing over her 
constantly. Later a tug took all ex- 
cept 3 of the crew off. Surfmen arranged 
with those left on board to signal if as- 
sistance was needed; returned to station. 
The next morning the vessel was hauled 
off and towed to Astoria. 

Gas. Ich., no name.. Discovered by lookout, 1 mile NNE. of 
station. While fishing off north jetty 
she got a rope in her propeller and drifted 
into the surf before she let go her anchor. 
Another fish boat took off her crew. Life- 
savers went to her in surfboat and towed 
her into smooth water, cleared her wheel, 
and turned her over to her owner. 

Sip. Commander. . . Stranded on North Bar half a mile east of 
station. Discovered by lookout. Surf- 
men went out to her, ran out anchor, 
hoisted sail, and worked her into deep 
water, then anchored her to wait until 
the wind served, and returned to station. 
At flood tide she entered the inlet with- 
out further help. 

Flatboat Tom Discovered adrift above the falls. Life- 
savers towed boat and her crew of 7 men 
safe in to shore. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



123 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Nov. 30 



Quoddy Head, Maine. 



Br. sc. Alice Maud. 



Oregon Inlet, North Car- 
olina. 

Grand Marais, Michigan. . 
Portage, Michigan 



Nov. 30 
Nov. 30 

Nov. 30 

Nov. 30 
Dec. 2 

Dec. 2 

Dec. 3 Daraiscove Island, Maine. Small boat, no 

name. 

Dec. 3 i Blue Point, New York do... 



Fort Point, California 



Bogue Inlet, North Caro- 



White River, Michigan. . . 



Yacht Ritta.. 
Gas. sc. Mary. 



Am. str. A. E. 
Stewart. 



Fish boat, no name. 



Am. sc. Benj. Rus- 
sell. 



Am. str. Petrel... 



Dec. 4 



Fletchers Neck, Maine. ... Am. sc. J. W. Brad- 
ley. 



Dec. 4 Manomet Point, Massa- i Gas Ich., no name . 

chusetts. 
Dec. 4 Core Bank, North Caro- Am. str. Albemarle. 

Una. 



While beating into Quoddy Bay the night 
of the 29th, against strong NNE. breeze, 
missed stays and had to anchor in shal- 
low water. At 3 a. m., in trying to get 
out, she lost 1 anchor and dragged the 
other, causing her to strand and pound 
heavily, which started her leaking badly. 
Schooner made no distress signal, but 
was discovered by the patrol at day- 
light, lying H miles from the station. 
Life-savers boarded her and found leak 
such that pumps were imable to free her. 
At flood tide she came off and was an- 
chored in channel. Brought master 
ashore to telegraph for a tug; returned 
to vessel in afternoon, finding her full of 
water; brought crew in to station for 
the night, giving them shelter and meals. 
Returned to schooner the next morning, 
and the tug arriving soon after, the life- 
savers assisted in heaving up her anchor 
and secured the 1 that had been lost the 
day before. The master having sprained 
his ankle, was treated at the station and 
supplied with liniment from medicine 
chest. 

Came into Inlet and asked to be piloted 
through the inside passage. Keeper sent 
surfman on board who gave desired aid. 

While crew from station were exercising 
in surfboat, a power launch was observed 
drifting across bay. Her owner stated 
that engine was broken down. He was 
given a line and launch was towed to 
dock. 

In a westerly gale and high sea, this steam- 
er, bound from Duluth for Cleveland with 
iron ore, stranded 1 mile NW. of station. 
Life-savers in surfboat went immediately 
to her assistance, but before any aid could 
be given the seas lifted steamer clear. 

Three fishermen trying to weather a north 
gale were driven broadside on the beach. 
Life-savers hauled boat up on beach out 
of danger. 

Set ensign union down. Life-savers went 
put and masterasked to be shown the wa 1 "" 
into the inlet, the pilot being absent 
The keeper showed him the way in over 
the bar. 

At 9.50 p.m. the keeper was notified by tel- 
ephone that this steamer was afire. The 
season having closed, he was alone at the 
station. He launched the skiff and went 
to the assistance of the vessel's master, 
who was also alone . Together they made 
every effort to save her, but she was to- 
tally destroyed, and sunk in 40 feet of 
water. 

At 8 p. m. a surfman discovered a small 
boat adrift on the west side of the island. 
Life-savers hauled it up and notified the 
owner. 

Discovered adrift in the bay. Life-savers 
brought boat ashore and hauled it up on 
the beach. 

Blowing fresh from the north; schoone 
parted chains and stranded 1 mile north 
of station. Life-savers went to her, and 
as it was low tide 2 men were placed on 
board as a watch, the others returning 
to the station to await high water. At 
6p.m. hawser was run ashore and tackles 
led to masthead, and she was righted. 
Tug arriving soon after, she was towed 
off and into the wharf. Life-savers 
pumped schooner out. 

Hauled launch put of surf to safety on the 
beach to await a claimant. 

Ran aground 14 miles NE. of station, 4 
miles offshore. Reported to keeper by 
signals from mail boat. Life-savers 



124 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEBVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station .and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Dec. 4 



Dec. 4 



Dec. 4 



Dec. 4 



Dec. 5 



Dec. 6 



Core Bank, North Caro- 
lina. 



Sullivans Island, South 
Carolina. 



Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 



Tawas, Michigan. . 



Assateague Beach and 
Wallops Beach,Virginia. 



Assateague Beach and 
Wallops Beach, Virginia. 



Am. str. Albemarle 



Small boat, no 
name. 



Two launches, 2 
lighters; no 
names. 



Fish boat, no name. 



Am. sc. Wm. H. 
Bailey. 



Am. sc. Florence I. 
Lockwood. 



Dec. 6 



Ocracoke, North Carolina. 



Dec. 6 



Dec. 6 



Dec. G 



Buffalo, New York. 



Erie, Pennsylvania. 



Am. sc. C. R. Ben- 
nett. 



Scow, no name . 



.do 



Tawas and Sturgeon 
Point, Michigan. 



Br. sc. Wawanosh. 



went to her assistance in surf boat. 
There were 13 passengers on board, she 
was resting easy, but fearing that it 
might blow strong from the north the 
surfmen remained by her. At midnight 
the steamer Nuse and a tug arrived. 
Life-savers then ran hawsers and the 
steamer was released without damage. 
(See letter of acknowledgment.) 

Owner of small boat applied at station for 
assistance in hauling it out of surf where 
it bad been since the preceding day. 
Surfmen assisted owner in securing the 
boat. 

Launches (low power) and lighters 
(heavily laden. with stone) in danger of 
being carried out to sea by strong ebb. 
They had dropped their anchors but were 
dragging. Keeper got a line to them, 
making shore end fast to tree. 

Keeper was notified by telephone that boat 
had sunk off Tawas City 4 miles NW. of 
station. Proceeded to scene of accident 
in surfboat, and hauled nets ashore, then 



got a purchase to boat and hauled it up 
into slip. 



on beach. Bailed it out and towed 



Stranded on Turners Lump 4 miles S. by 
E. of Assateague and 7 miles SE. by E. 
of Wallops Beach stations. The life- 
savers from both stations went immedi- 
ately to her assistance, sounded out deep- 
est water, and succeeded in floating her. 
They then instructed the master how to 
clear the shoal. 

Stranded and sunk on Williams Shoal 2 
miles SW. by W. of Assateague station 
and 1J miles offshore, while running for 
harbor before a strong wind. No dis- 
tress signals were made and vessel was 
not discovered till daybreak. The crew 
from Assateague reached schooner first 
and took off her crew of 6 a difficult 
task, as she was lying in the breakers and 
much lumber was floating about. The 
Wallops Beach station crew came up and 
took the Assateague crew and the res- 
cued persons in tow for the shore. The 
schooner's crew were succored at the sta- 
tion four days and given clothing from 
the supply of the W. N. R. A. (See let- 
ter of acknowledgment.) 

Discovered by lookout ashore on 9-foot 
shoal 3 miles NW. of station with signal 
of distress flying. Surfboat was launched 
and life-savers went to her assistance. 
Carried out anchor and laid out cable; 
worked for three hours. She came off at 
high water. She dragged her anchors 
and went ashore a second time the 8th; 
life-savers assisted in lightering her cargo 
and she was floated off the 9th. 

A scow broke adrift in creek full of running 
Ice. Life-savers got a line to her, but she 
parted it. Launched surfboat and towed 
her into deep water, where tug picked 
her up. 

Broke adrift from moorings in strong gale 
and rough sea. Was sighted by lookout 
| mile SE. from station. She would 
nave gone to pieces shortly on the rocks 
had not the life-savers in surfboat picked 
her up. They towed her to a sandy 
beach and hauled her out and secured 
her. 

In tow of steamer Lake Michigan, broke 
her tow line in SE. gale and heavy sea 
and stranded 17 miles NE. of Tawas and 
19 miles S. of the Sturgeon Point stations 
at 2 a. m. The 2 stations were notified 
of the disaster by telephone. The Stur- 
geon Point life-savers went to schooner 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews Continued. 



125 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service remdered . 



1906. 
Dec. 6 



Tawas and Sturgeon 
Point, Michigan. 



Br. sc. Wawanosh. 



Dec. 6 



Dec. 7 



Portage, Michigan. 



White Head, Maine. 



Am. str. John Har- 
per. 



Am. sc. Ellen M. 
Mitchell and Br. 
so. Prudent. 



Dec. 7 



Dec. 7 



Point Allerton, Massachu- 
setts. 



Forge River, New York. 



Dredge, no name . 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Dec. 7 



Dec. 8 



Atlantic City, New Jer- 
sey. 



White Head, Maine. 



Am. str. Seven 
Brothers. 



Am. BC. Lulu W. 
Eppes. 



Dec. 8 



Plum Island and Glou- 
cester, Massachusetts. 



Am. sch. Bessie C. 
Beach. 



in surfboat under sail, and found that 
the crew had been taken off by the fish 
tug J. H. Spencer. The tng towed the 
surfboat back to its station. The keeper 
of the Tawas station hauled his surfboat 
and beach gear 2 miles over rough roads 
and chartered a train, which took the 
outfit and crew to Au Sable. They ar- 
rived at that place, however, after the 
tug mentioned had set out to the scene 
of the stranding. Both life-saving crews 
had traveled long distances to assist this 
vessel, the Sturgeon Point crew 20 miles 
and the Tawas crew 28 miles, without 
having been able to take a hand in the 
rescue, the tug having rendered that 
service. 

Keeper received message from steamer's 
master asking aid. She had been stove 
in by ice in two places while steaming 
through the canal 1 mile south of station. 
Life-savers went to her in surfboat, 
shifted cargo to port, and patched hole 
in starboard bow. The next day cargo 
was again shifted and the hole in the 
port bow patched. 

These vessels collided while beating into 
Seal Harbor. The Mitchell carried away 
her jib boom and head gear. The Pru- 
dent had her head sails badly torn and a 
hole stove in on her water line. Life- 
savers went out in surfboat, cleared the 
wreckage, and made temporary repairs 
on the Mitchell and then boarded the 
Prudent. They assisted the crew in 
listing over, guying out booms, and re- 
moving everything movable about decks. 
Got holo well above water and repaired 
rigging. 

Blowing s 
surfman, 

notified and surfboat was launched. It 
was thought that a crew might be on 
board. When life-savers were 2 miles 
ESE. of station they spoke pilot boat 
and learned that there was no one on 
board. They then returned to station. 

Discovered by lookout, broken down, and 
drifting before gale; high sea running. 
Launch was then 1 mile offshore and 1J 
miles NE. of station. Surfmen went out 
to her. There was a big sea and the ice 
was making, so it was impossible to get 
her anchor. The owner was brought 
ashore, and the next day the surfmen 
helped in breaking the launch out from 
the ice and taking her into the mainland. 

Stranded 1 mile north of station. She had 
come out to tow fishing smack into creek 
but had been unable to hold up against 
the strong wind. A line was run to the 
smack anchored near by and the tug was 
soon released. 

In strong NW. gale, heavy vapor over the 
water, zero temperature. Having lost 
reckoning, anchored in Musselridge chan- 
nel. When vapor cleared was sighted by 
patrol, flying signal of distress. Life- 
savers went to her in surfboat and found 
her anchored in dangerous position near 
a sunken ledge. Was so badly iced up 
that pumps and windlass could not be 
worked; 3 feet of water in hold. Crew 
too exhausted to work. Life-savers 



strong and rough sea; sighted by 
i, drifting out to sea. Keeper was 



cut ice away from windlass; hove up an- 
chors; hoisted sail and worked her in to 
a safe anchorage in Seal harbor. 
Stranded 1\ miles SSE. from Plum Island 
station and 7 miles overland from Glou- 
cester station. There was a heavy vapor 
over the water and wreck was not visible 



126 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Dec. 8 



Plum Island and Glou- 
cester, Massachusetts. 



Am. sch. Bessie C. 
Beach. 



Dec. 8 



Dec. 



Dec. 8 



Fire Island, New York . . . 



North Beach, Maryland. . 



Biscayne Bay, Florida. . . 



Gas. sc. A. M. Low 



Gas. Ich. S. I. Kim- 
ball. 



Gas. Ich. Asbury 
Park. 



Dec. 8 



Dec. 8 



Louisville, Kentucky. 



Coos Bay, Oregon 



Barge, no name .. 



Am. sc. Esther 
Buhne. 



Dec. 



Dec. 9 
Dec. 9 



Fletchers Neck, Maine 



Fire Island, New York.... 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Am. sc. Herman F. 
Kimball. 

Sip. Minion 

Gas. Ich. no name. 



from either. Keepers were notified by 
telegram and telephone. The keeper of 
Gloucester station obtained a team of 
horses and their surfboat was hauled 7 
miles overland. On arrival at the wreck, 
sails, rigging, and some of the spars were 
found carried away, and the crew frost- 
bitten. A telephone message was sent 
for a tug and the crew were treated for 
frostbite. The crew from Plum Island 
arrived soon after, and the life-savers 
cleared up the wreckage. The Plum 
Island crew stayetl by the schooner that 
night, working the pumps. The next 
day tug arrived with lighter; life-savers 
lightered cargo and ran hawser. They 
stayed by schooner, working the pumps, 
until she was safely docked in harbor. 

Keeper was called up by master of the Low 
and was asked for aid. The boat had an- 
chored near the shore and was in great 
danger of running ice. Keeper instructed 
1 of surfmen as to precautions to be ob- 
served in keeping boat off shoals. Surf- 
man piloted boat safely up the channel 
to her destination. 

Discovered aground 2i miles W. by N. from 
station. Life-savers went out to her 
having to break the ice nearly all the way. 
After hauling her off, they returned to 
the station. 

Owner came to station for assistance, his 
boat having broken down and driven 
ashore. It was lying in the surf in dan- 
ger of being pounded to pieces on the 
beach. Keeper accompanied owner to 
scene of disaster 10 miles north of station 
With tackles and rollers succeeded in. 
getting boat up on beach where the ma- 
chinery was repaired. When weather 
moderated boat was launched and she 
proceeded on her way. 

Lookout gave alarm that empty coal barge 
was adrift about J of a mile west of sta- 
tion. Two station boats were launched 
and went to its assistance. They were 
unable to handle it on account of the 
strong wind so it was landed on the rocks. 



over the falls. The harbor boat Transit 
soon after took barge in to the wharf. 

Stranded on Middle Ground just inside 
outer end of jetty. The keeper had the 
life-savers standing by the surfboat be- 
fore the schooner struck; there was a 
rough sea and breaking on the bar. A 
sudden shift of wind, coming out ahead 
forced her to anchor to avoid being 
wrecked on the jetty. She immediately 
hoisted her flag union down. Life-savers 
boarded her in surfboat. Keeper pro- 
ceeded to Empire City and procured a 
tug, returning in tow of the same. Life- 
savers ran lines and assisted in getting 
up anchor. She was towed into deep 
water undamaged. 

Discovered by patrol when she set signal 
for assistance. Life-savers went out to 
her in dory. The weather was threaten- 
ing and vessel was anchored on lee shore. 
Surfmen assisted in getting underway 
and piloted her into the harbor. A week 
later they assisted in getting vessel un- 
der way and piloted her out. 

Frozen in at her moorings. Crew broke 
sloop out and hauled her ashore and up 
on the beach out of danger. 

A watchman asked keeper for aid in getting 
his power boat out of the ice, where it 
had been frozen in about a quarter of a 
mile from the station. Life-savers went 
out to her in small boats, broke away 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



127 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Dec. 9 



Dec. 9 

Dec. 10 

Dec. 10 

Dec. 10 

Dec. 11 



Dec. 11 



Dec. 11 

Dec. 11 

Dec. 12 

Dec. 13 

Dec. 13 

Dec. 14 



Station and locality. 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Fire Island, Now York. . . 



Long Beach, New Jersey. 



Sullivans Island, South 
Carolina. 

Louisville, Kentucky 



Highland, Massachusetts 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Little Island and False 
Cape, Virginia. 



Chicamacomico, North 
Carolina. 



Fort Macon, North Caro- 
lina. 



Erie, Pennsylvania. 



Fire Island, New York . . 



Assateague Beach, Vir- 
ginia. 



Mantoloking and Chad- 
wick, New Jersey. 



Gas. Ich. no name.. 
Gas. Ich. no name . . 

Ger. str. Peruvia . . . 

Small boat, no name 
Small boat, no name 



Am. sc. William 
Marshall. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Am. sc. Ralph M. 
Hay ward. 



Gas. sc. Mabel Hor- 
ton. 



Small boats, no 
name. 



Catboat, no name . 

Sharpie, no name.. 
Sip. Three Sisters. 

Austrian str. Clara . 



the ice around it; towed it in and hauled 
it up on the beach. As heavy ice was 
moving the boat would surely nave been 
crushed. 

Sunk during the night at her moorings in 
a NW. gale. Weather turning colder she 
was frozen under. Life-savers broke ice 
out to her, made a hawser fast to her, led 
it ashore and hauled herup on the beach. 

Grounded f mile south of station, } mile 
offshore. She was discovered by the pa- 
trol who burned a Coston and hurried 
back to the station. The life-savers went 
out to her in surfboat. As the weather 
was fine no aid was needed, and steamer 
floated off at high water. 

Unable to launch boat owner came to sta- 
tion for aid. Life-savers placed boat in 
water for him. 

Two boys in a small boat tried to cross 
ahead of tug towing mud scows. Look- 
out heard tug's signal and station crew 
went out to them. The boy's boat had 
been run under, and they had been haul- 
ed up on tug, from which they were 
taken by life-savers. The boys were 
landed and the boat was recovered and 
turned over to owner. 

Patrol sighted her coming ashore at day- 
break, blowing strong from the NE. Sea 
rough. Life-savers recognized her as the 
derelict William Marshall, which had 
been abandoned the 8th instant in a 
water-logged condition. She stranded 
75 yards offshore near the station. As 
her cargo was from Saint Johns, the 
keeper took charge of all that could be 
saved and notified the collector of cus- 
toms at Provincetown. The vessel went 
to pieces in a storm later in the month. 

Discovered when she stranded by patrol J 
mile SE. of station. It was blowing 
fresh, rough sea, and a thick haze. The 
Little Island life-savers arrived at the 
scene at 8.45 p. m., those from False Cape 
an hour later, having been called over by 
telephone. A line was shot aboard and 
the master was landed in the breeches 
buoy. He telegraphed for a tug. The 
next evening the tug pulled schooner off 
the beach and took her to Norfolk. 

Mail boat grounded 3 miles west of station. 
Life-savers went out and took off mail 
and passengers. Later delivered mail 
and passengers to her. 

Two sharpies driven in on lee shore 1 mile 
NW. 01 station. Life-savers got them 
off, carrying out anchor and hauling 
them into deep water. 

Running before the wind she got so far into 
the ice, could not get out. Life-savers 
went out in surfboat and towed her clear 
of ice and to the station. 

Found adrift by life-savers; hauled up on 
the beach and later turned it over to 
owner. 

Loaded with lumber; no one on board; 
dragged her anchor and sank. Life- 
savers boarded her and unloaded lumber; 
freed the sloop of water; turned vessel 
and cargo over to owner. 

Stranded 1 mile south of station at 5 a. m.; 
high sea at the time . O wing to the dark- 
ness it was necessary to fire 4 shots from 
the Lyle gun before reaching the vessel. 
Life-savers from Chadwick station ar- 
rived in time to assist in setting up the 
beach apparatus. As the weather im- 
proved it was not necessary to land any 
of the crew, but a close watch was kept 
on vessel until floated. 



2990908 9 



128 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Dec. 15 



Dec. 15 
Dec. 16 
Dec. 16 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Fort Point, California. 
Fire Island, New York. 
Cape Henry, Virginia. . 



Gas.lch., no name.. 

Naval tug Umdilla. 
Sharpie, no name. . . 
Am. sc. Edgar C. 



Dec. 16 



Dee. 17 



Beaver Island, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Hunniwell* Beach, Maine. 



Dec. 17 



Dec. 18 



Race Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Fire Island, New York... 



Dec. 18 South Manitou Island, 
Michigan. 



Dec. 19 



Dec. 21 



Dec. 21 



Dec. 22 



Galveston, Texas. 



Squan Beach, New Jersey 



Durants, North Carolina. 



Avalon, New Jersey 



Am. str. L. C. 
Waldo. 



Am. sc. Clare E. 
Comes. 



Am. sc. Jos. W. 
Lufkins. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Am. str. Pottawat- 
tomie. 



Am. sc. Susie 



Small boat, no 
name. 



Am. sc. Chelton 
Brothers. 



Am. sc. Eugene H 
Cathrell. 



Adrift in ice 2i miles N W . of station. Life - 
savers went to her and towed her clear 
of heavy running ice, which would surely 
have crushed her. Started engine and 
turned boat over to owner. 

Unable to get line to scow on account of 
its having drifted into shallow water. 
Life-savers ran a line for them. 

Adrift in ice; picked up by life-savers and 
turned over to Western Union Telegraph 
Co. 

Stranded J mile ESE. of station, 3.30 a. m.; 
discovered by patrol. Weather hazy. 
Keeper notified the Virginia Beach sta- 
tion and then proceeded to the scene. 
Life-savers earned out a kedge and led 
a line to the windlass, but could not 
move her. At sunrise a tug arrived with 
the Virginia Beach surfmen and they 
ran a hawser to her. The tug pulled 
until ebb tide and then postponed opera- 
tions. At high water 4 tugs had lines 
to the schooner and she was floated, hav- 
ing suffered no damage. 

Thick weather, heavy sea, blowing fresh; 
steamer stranded 10 \ miles NW. of sta- 
tion. There was much ice in large fields, 
and the surfmen had considerable diffi- 
culty in getting out to her. Keeper 
came ashore and telegraphed for assist- 
ance. Vessel was released the 18th, but 
slightly damaged. 

Anchored in dangerous berth \\ miles S. 
by E. of station, in mouth of river, not 
having wind enough to get into the har- 
bor. Signs of an approaching gale led 
the crew to abandon the schooner and 
come ashore to the station seeking shel- 
ter. They had made no distress signals. 
Life-savers secured tug, got up anchor, 
ran lines and remained by schooner until 
towed to safe berth. 

Stranded at 8.45 p. m., 1 mile west of 
station. Discovered by lookout. Life- 
savers went to her in surfboat, laid out 
an anchor and warp and at high water 
warped her off; assisted in making sail. 
Schooner left apparently undamaged. 

Broke down and stranded \ mile NE. of 
station. Blowing strong from the north 
and a moderate sea. Life-savers went 
to her in surfboat and laid out an anchor 
and warp. Took her supplies ashore 
and stored them. It being low water 
it was necessary to await flood tide, 
when she came off without damage. 

Stranded near station, blowing strong 
from the SW. Life-savers went to her 
in surfboat. Carried out anchor and 
warp to hold her head offshore. Keeper 
went ashore and telegraphed for tug. 
Came back and located best water by 
soundings. The tug soon after worked 
herself off and the life-savers returned to 
the station. 

Grounded 1 mile NNE. of station. Keeper 
and crew pulled to scene in surfboat, ran 
out an anchor and hauled her into deep 
water. 

Patrol found a clinker-built yawl, white 
painted, in the undertow. Life-savers 
hauled it out on the beach; it looked like a 
pilot's boat. Reported find to Maritime 
Exchange, New York. 

Stranded 3 miles NW. of station, 2J miles 
offshore. Life-savers went to her in 
skiff, carried out an anchor, and ran a 
warp; took out some of her cargo and 
soon floated her off. 

Grounded on the bar at half tide, Jmile SE. 
from station. Life-savers assisted in 
floating her and piloted her into safe an- 
chorage. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews Continued. 



129 



Date. 



1906. 
Dec. 24 



Dec. 24 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Point Allerton, 
chusetts. 



High Head, Massachu- 
setts. 



Dec. 26 Shark River, New Jersey 



Dec. 



Dee. 26 



Dec. 27 



Dec. 27 



Dec. 27 



Dec. 29 



Little Island, Virginia. 



False Cape, Virginia... 



Cross Island, Maine 



Fourth Cliff ,Massachusetts 



Wood End, Massachusetts 



Point Adams, Cape Dis- 
appointment, Oregon. 



Am. sc. Manhassett. 



Am. sc. Fortuna. . . 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Barge John Hag- 
gerty. 



Barge, no name 



Br. gc. Wandrian. 



Gas. Ich. Pearl.... 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Am. sc. Alice Mc- 
Donald. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Lookout reported vessel ashore on Rain 
Head Bar 2f miles NNW. from station. 
Life-savers went to her in surfboat and 
assisted in pumping, as she was leaking 
badly, and running hawsers to tugboats. 
Remained by schooner until floated. 

At 5 a. m. patrol reported at station that 
a schooner apparently abandoned was 
drifting ashore 1 \ miles SE. from station. 
Upon the arrival of the life-savers at the 
scene it was identified as the derelict 
Fortuna. She was a total wreck. 

While off shore 3 miles, fishing, engine 
broke down. Boat 3i miles east of sta- 
tion. Their signal of distress was seen 
by lookout. It was blowing strong from 
the NW. and they were being carried out 
to sea, the waves breaking over them at 
times. Two of the life-savers went out 
in a power boat and towed disabled boat 
to landing. 

Anchored 6 miles SE. of station; made 
signal. Life-savers went out to her in 
surfboat and found that they wished to 
be reported and wanted a tug. Keeper 
did as desired. 

Lookout reported flag flying in rigging; 
could not make it out. Life-savers 
hitched up team and hauled boat abreast 
of barge and went out and found that she 
wanted to be reported to owners. Keeper 
did as desired. 

Missed stays and stranded on Little River 
Island 6 miles NE. of station. Discov- 
ered by 1 of the surfmen. Life-savers 
proceeded to scene In surfboat. As she 
was high on the rocks and it was low 
water, it was necessary to await high 
water. The keeper telegraphed fo the 
U. S. R. C. Woodbury for assistance. 
Returned and ran out an anchor to 
heave her off. At high water an attempt 
was made, but was unsuccessful. 
Schooner was leaking badly, so deck 
load was discharged. The Woodbury 
arrived the 29th and worked on schooner 
the 29th and 30th, the life-savers running 
lines between the cutter and tho 
schooner. Tho Wandrian was floated 
the latter day and was taken to a safe 
berth at the head of the harbor. (See 
letter of acknowledgement.) 

Shipped a sea, capsized and sunk f milo 
NNE. of station. Discovered by look- 
out. Surfboat immediately went to res- 
cue. Found owner clinging to the bow, 
only part of boat above water. He was in 
an exhausted condition and could have 
held on only for a short time; was taken 
to the station, given stimulants and an 
outfit of clothing from the W. N. R. A. 
supplies. Life-savers returned and an 
attempt was made to raise boat, but un- 
successful. The next day keeper secured 
a power boat and with it and the efforts 
of the surfmen she was gotten inshore 
and beached, the surfboat keeping the 
stern clear of the bottom while the power 
boat towed her in. 

Engine broke down and stranded 100 yards 
off station. It was so rough that she 
came ashore before her anchor could 
fetch her up. Life-savers took out her 
fish and laid out an anchor to windward- 
Hauled launch out into deep water and 
placed fish on board. Furnished fisher- 
man supplies from the W. N. R. A. 
Stranded on Jetty Sands 4 miles WNW. of 
station. She had been observed before, 
but as the weather was thick and squally, 
it was not thought that she would cross 



130 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Dec. 29 



Point Adams, Cape Dis- 
appointment, Oregon. 



Am. sc. Alice Mc- 
Donald. 



1907. 
Jan. 3 



Great Wass Island, Maine. 



Sip. Maggie Beal... 



Jan. 3 



Cape Henry, Virginia 



Am. sc. R.W.Hop- 
kins. 



Jan. 3 

Jan. 4 
Jan. 4 



Nome, Alaska. 



Monomoy Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Cobb Island, Virginia.... 



Am. sc. Mabel A... 



Am. sc. Alice T. 
Boardman. 

Bateau, G.P.Moore 



in over the bar until the next morning. 
The captain headed in at 6 p. m. and 
struck on Clatsop spit, came off and 
drifted farther inshore. At 10.30 p. m. 
she showed a distress signal, burning a 
tar barrel. Keeper telephoned to the 
Cape Disappointment life-saving station 
and was informed that she was ashore on 
the Jetty Sands and that he was launch- 
ing the power lifeboat to go to her assist- 
ance. The Point Adams life - savers 
placed the beach apparatus in their life- 
boat and, in tow of the tug Wallula, pro- 
ceeded to the scene of the wreck. The 
Cape Disappointment crew were met, 
and from them it was learned that the 
crew of the schooner were in no danger. 
The tide being low and the sea rough the 
master of the tug decided to postpone 
operations, and the life-savers returned 
to their stations. Weather was unfa- 
vorable the next two weeks, though ef- 
forts were made Dec. 31; life-savers tried 
running line to the tug Tatoosh, but the 
tides were found too strong. On Jan. 10, 
the life-savers assisted in laying out 
mushroom anchor and ran hawsers to 
shore and to a scowanchored near, placing 
blocks and other gear where needed. On 
the 14th they ran lines to the tugs, and at 
high water the schooner was floated and 
taken to Astoria. Owing to the severe 
cold the life-savers' boat, oars, and gear 
were incased in ice. (See letter of ac- 
knowledgment . ) 

Stranded on Hat; Cove Ledges, 3 miles N. 
from the station, at 3 p. m. The life- 
savers immediately went on board, as- 
sisted the crew to fihrow over her ballast 
and made all preparations for hauling 
her off at the next high water. The wind 
was freshening, with rain and snow and 
the sea making up fast. At 11 p. m. the 
sea lifted her off the ledge and she swung 
to her anchor. The life-savers then 
hauled her clear, made sail and took her 
to a safe anchorage. 

At 9 p. m. the station watch heard distress 
signals about 1 mile N. of the station and, 
not being able to tell whether the vessel 
was ashore or not, he was sent up abreast 
of her to burn a Coston signal, which was 
answered by distress signals from the 
schooner. The surfboat was launched 
and the life-savers went aboard. They 
found her to be ashore about 1,200 yards 
from the beach and pounding consider- 
ably. She had no hawser on board and 
for that reason her kedge could not be 
used, so all her headsails were set, and 
with a fresh SW. breeze she soon began 
to swing head offshore and about 12.20 
a. m. floated without any apparent dam- 
age, and proceeded on her voyage. 

At 8.30 p. m. the keeper and 3 surfmen 
hauled the schooner Mabel A. clear of the 
Snake River bridge, where she had 
drifted during the high water. 

Stranded on Handkerchief Shoal 1\ miles 
SW. of station, losing 1 man of her crew. 
(For detailed account see page 59.) 

About 3 p. m., while 1 of the surfmen was 
out gunning in a small boat, the wind 
having increased to a gale from the west, 
he observed a bateau capsized about 1 j 
miles N. of the station and 14 miles off- 
shore, with one man clinging to her 
bottom. He immediately went to his 
rescue , took him to the station and the 
keeper and a crew went in the launch, 
righted the bateau and towed it into the 
station. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



131 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1907. 
Jan. 4 



Station and locality. 



Oak Island, North Caro- 
lina. 



Jan. 5 Smith Island, Virginia... 



Jan. f> South Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Jan. 6 j] Barnegat and Forked 
Jan. 7 River, New Jersey. 



Jan. 9 



Jan. 7 



Jan. 9 



Jan. 9 



Santa Rosa, Florida . . 



Quoddy Head, Maine . 



Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Gas. Ich., no name 



Am. sc. Harry C. 
Brown. 



Lighter, no name . , 
as. sc. Sheila.. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Nph. Ich. Privateer 



Am. sc. C. W. Dex- 
ter. 



Fishing dory, no 
name. 



Stranded at 2 p. m., 2J miles SE. of the sta- 
tion, on Cape Fear bar. The surfboat 
was launched and went to her assistance. 
Found that she was hard aground, and 
as the tide was ebbing, her anchors were 
planted and when the tide turned, she 
was hauled afloat and taken to a safe 
place by the life-savers. 

9 a. m., this vessel while standing out 
through Fishermans Inlet grounded 4 
miles SW. by W. from the station. The 
life-savers went to her assistance in the 
small boat, lightered part of her cargo, 
and worked on her until high water, with- 
out success, when they returned to the 
station. At 6 p. m. they went back to 
the schooner and remained all night, try- 
ing to float her on the flood tide out fail- 
ing. On the morning of the 6th they 
lightered more cargo and at 1 p. m. floated 
her, returned her cargo, and piloted her 
out through the inlet. 

10.30 a. m. a water logged lighter adrift in 
the harbor was recovered and made fast 
to the dock by the keeper. 

While attempting to enter Barnegat Inlet, 
the Sheila went aground li miles NE. of 
the Barnegat station at 3 p. m. The 
crews from both stations boarded her in 
their surfboats, but the master declined 
assistance at the time, saying that he 
would signal if they were needed. At 11 

E. m. he set signals and was again boarded 
y both crews. He had floated off the 
shoal at high water but had slipped his 
anchor. The life-savors took him in to a 
safe place, anchored him, and in the 
morning recovered his anchor and cable 
and delivered them to him. At 10 a. m. 
of the 7th, while attempting to leave the 
harbor, he ran ashore again. The crews 
from both stations succeeded in kedging 
him afloat and anchored him in a safe 
berth. Going out on the morning of the 
9th he ran ashore the third time. Again 
the life-savers from the 2 stations boarded 
him and succeeded in hauling him afloat 
and placed him in a safe anchorage. He 
succeeded in getting out on the morning 
of the 10th without further mishap and 
apparently undamaged. 

3 p. m. this launch broke her eccentric rod 
} mile N E. of station and signaled for 
assistance. The surfboat was launched 
and the life-savers went to her aid, tow- 
ing her in to a safe anchorage near the 
station. One of the station boats was 
loaned to the owner to take his passen- 
gers to Pensacola and obtain necessary 
parts to repair his broken machinery. 

Anchored 4 miles ENE.of station; set dis- 
tress signals at G p. m. The surfboat was 
launched and went to her assistance. In 
beating into Quoddy Bay against a 
strong NW. wind the schooner's jibs had 
carried away and she had come to anchor. 
Fearing she would drag her anchors, her 
captain set signals for assistance. The 
surfboat arrived alongside at 8 p.m. On 
account of the gale and the Iced-up con- 
dition of the boat, the keeper decided it 
best not to return to shore until morning. 
At 8 a. m. of the 10th they started back 
and reached the station at 11.15. The 
keeper telephoned for a tug, which came 
that evening and towed the schooner in- 
to Calais. 

At 10.45 a. m. the lookout discovered a 
fishing dory 2 miles NNE. of station with 
a coat on an oar. The surfboat was 
launched, but before they reached the 
dory it was picked up by a gasoline 



182 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality.. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Jan. 9 



Jan. 9 



Jan. 9 



Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. 



Peaked Hill Bars, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Cuttyhunk, Massachu- 
setts. 



Fishing dory, no 
name. 



Gas. Ich., no name.. 



Sc. bge. Woodbury 



Jan. 9 



Jan. 9 



Fishers Island, New York. 



...do 



Am. sc. Ellen M. 
Mitchell. 



Br. se. Emily An- 
derson. 



Jan. 10 



Wood End, Massachu- 
setts. 



Gas. Ich. Charles A. 
Foster. 



Jan. 10 



.do 



Ga. Ich., no name. 



launch. Returning another dory with 
an old man and boy in it requested to be 
towed in. As it was blowing a gale with 
snow squalls they were brought ashore. 

12.15 p. m. this dory landed on the beach 
near the station. The heavy sea and 
spray had saturated the clotning of the 
2 men of her crew. The boat was hauled 
upon the beach to safety and the men 
furnished with a warm drink of whisky 
and one suit of dry clothing each, from 
the stores of the W. N. R. A. 

At 4 p. m. the keeper received a telephone 
message that a barge was ashore on the 
western end of Pasque Island. At 4.10 
the surfboat got away under reefed sail 
and arrived off the stranded barge at 
4.45. A strong NW. gale was blowing 
and it was impracticable to hold the 
boat alongside during the night. The 
captain and crew refused to leave the 
barge. It was impossible to get back to 
the station that night, and after two and 
one-half hours of hard pulling they ar- 
rived at the nearest practicable landing 
on Nashawena Island. The revenue- 
cutter Dexter was telephoned for at 
Wood's Hole and the boat's crew were 
given supper and night's lodging at a Mr. 
Manley's. Early on the morning of the 
10th the surfboat returned to the wreck 
and sounded out the best water around. 
The tug arrived at 8 a. m. but had no 
running line to run her hawser, and the 
surfboat was taken back to the station 
in tow of the tug and an old spare whip 
procured. Arriving back at the wreck, 
the tug's hawser was run by the life 
savers and at 3.30 p. m. the revenue cut- 
ter Dexter and the tug floated the barge. 
The Dexter then towed the surfboat back 
to the station. 

Went ashore in a fog at 8 a. m. \ mile SE. of 
station. The life-savers arrived along- 
side in the surfboat at 8.20. The master 
requested the keeper to telephone for a* 
revenue cutter and tugs, which was done. 
In the afternoon a tug arrived from New 
London and the surfboat again went to 
the stranded vessel. She was floated at 
2.30 p. m. 

Keeper received a telephone message from 
Fort H. G. Wright at 8.15 a. m., inform- 
ing him there was a vessel ashore on Race 
Rock Point, Fishers Island, 7* miles W. 
from the station. At 10.45 the life-savers 
arrived alongside the stranded vessel in 
the surfboat. Her master declined as- 
sistance. Arrangements were made for 
notifying the station through the com- 
manding officer of Fort Wright if help of 
any kind was needed. 

This boat ran out of gasoline and came to 
anchor at 7 p. m. of the 9th, 4 miles SE. 
of the station and 2 miles offshore. They 
had nothing with which to make a night 
distress signal but at daylight, 7 a. m., 
an oilskin coat was hoisted on an oar. 
This was seen as soon as hoisted and the 
keeper and a crew went to their assist- 
'ance in the power boat. A strong NW. 
gale had been blowing all night and the 
sea was rough. When the life-savers 
reached them they were wet and cold, 
helpless, and about used up. They were 
towed into the'nearest harbor. 

While in the harbor, after towing in the 
launch Charles A. Foster, the keeper was 
informed that 3 boats were missing. He 
immediately went out in the power boat 
to look for them, going first to Barnsta- 
ple and then to Billingsgate Island where 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



188 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Jan. 10 



Wood End, Massachu- 
setts. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Jan. 10 



Watch Hill, Rhode Island 



Bges. Marvin, 
Honesdale, and 
Delaware. 



Jan. 10 



Jan. 11 



Jan. 11 



Point Adams, Oregon 



White Head, Maine. 



Oak Island and Cape 
Fear, North Carolina. 



Am. sc. Alice Mc- 
Donald. 



Am. BC. Mansfield. 



Am. sc. John J. 
Hanson. 



Jan. 11 



Jan. 13 



Jan. 13 



Sabine Pass, Texas. 



Point Allerton, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Old Harbor, Massachu- 
setts. 



Yawl, no name 



Am. sc. Margaret 
Dillon. 



Am. str. Onondaga . 



one of the missing boats was found, out 
of gasoline and unable to get any. Of- 
fered to tow him home, but he was afraid 
to risk his boat out in the heavy sea, so 
the keeper went to Wellfleet, procured 
10 gallons of gasoline, brought it back 
to him and left him there until the 
weather should moderate. Another of 
the missing boats was found at Well- 
fleet all right and the third one was lost. 
The power boat was away from the sta- 
tion over fourteen hours on very ardu- 
ous duty. 

While the tug Constance was going 
through Watch Hill Race in the after- 
noon in a SW. gale with 6 barges in tow, 
the tug was unable to keep the barges 
far enough up to windward and at 4.30 
p. m. the last 3 stranded on Napatree 
Point, U miles WNW. from the station. 
The small boat was launched immediate- 
ly and went to the assistance of the 
barges, which were pounding heavily and 
leaking. The crews of the Honesdale and 
Marvin 4 in all were taken off by the 
life-savers, but when the Delaware was 
reached her crew had already abandoned 
her in the barge's dory. Upon arrival 
at the station at 6.45 the 2 men from the 
Delaware were there. The 6 were given 
food and shelter for the night and the 
following morning were put aboard a 
wrecking tug and taken to New London. 

The surf boat assisted in laying out a heavy 
mushroom anchor, ran lines, and assisted 

Cerally in making preparations to 
t this vessel. Employed from 11.30 
a. m. until 4.30 p. m. 

At 3 a. m. anchored in a dangerous berth, 
blowing strong from the SW., snowing 
and a rough sea. Discovered by lookout 
at daybreak. She hoisted a signal of 
distress, the life-savers went out in surf- 
boat, found her riding heavily to both 
anchors. The wind had become fair so 
life-savers assisted crew in getting up 
anchors and making sail. 

Stranded 3 miles SSE. of station, blowing 
fresh, weather smoky. She was discov- 
ered by lookout and life-savers went out 
to her in surfboat and found her ground- 
ed near the outer bar, Cape Fear River. 
The life-savers from the Cape Fear sta- 
tion came off, but as there was nothing 
more for them to do, they returned to 
their station. With a rising tide the 
life-savers secured a tug and ran the 
schooner's lines to her. At high water 
she floated off without damage. 

Lookout discovered a small boat capsized 
about 2 miles NNW. of station. Life- 
savers proceeded to scene in dingey and 
found that occupant had been rescued by 
light-house keeper. They righted boat, 
bailed it out, cleared sails and gear, and 
gave boatman a tow back to Sabine Pass. 

Stranded in snow squall 2 miles NW. of 
station. Life-savers went to her in surf- 
boat and ran line from schooner to tug. 
Assisted in handling same until schooner 



Stranded at 1.30 a. m. 1 miles NNE. of 
station. Thick, misty weather, a high 
sea running. Warning was given imme- 
diately by lookout and life-savers pro- 
ceeded to a point abreast of vessel. The 
The first shot from the Lyle gun landed 
the line on her deck and the breeches 
buoy was sent out to her. As she was in 
no immediate danger none of her crew 
were landed. The weather moderated 
and life-savers carried out underwriter 



184 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Jan. 13 



Jan. 14 



Old Harbor, Massachu- 



Portsmouth, North Caro- 
lina. 



Am. str. Onondaga 



Am. sc. John I. 
Snow. 



Jan. 14 



Jan. 14 



Point Adams, Oregon.. 



Humbolt Bay, California 



Am. sc. Alice Mc- 
Donald. 



Am. str. Sequoia . . 



Jan. 16 



Quoddy Head, Maine 



Am. sc. Emily F. 
Northam, and Br. 
sc. Ida May. 



Jan. 16 



Jan. 16 



Lewes, Delaware. 



Point Adams, Oregon 



Am. sc. Joel Cook. 



Catboat, no name. 



and brought dispatches ashore. With 
the assistance of towboats, the steamer 
was floated March 14. 

Foggy weather, could not see light, went 
ashore 3 miles S. of station at 3 a. m. 
She was sighted at sunrise and the life- 
savers went to her in surfboat. Furled 
her sails, got up anchor, took crew in to 
the station and the keeper telegraphed 
for the revenue cutters Seminole and 
Boutwell. Before they arrived the 
schooner had filled and sunk. Later the 
underwriters discharged the cargo and 
stripped her. (See letter of acknowl- 
edgment.) 

At request of master, life-savers went in 
tow of tug to stranded vessel, ran a haw- 
ser to her from tug. At high water she 
was hauled off. As schooner was leaking 
badly and steam pump in poor order, 
life-savers accompanied her to Astoria. 
Owing to the extreme cold weather the 
boat, oars, and all other gear were cov- 
ered with ice upon return to station. 

Tiller rope broke and she stranded on N. 
side of North Jetty, 1 mile west of station, 
6.15 p. m. There was a moderate sea and, 
in answer to her distress signal, the life- 
savers hastened to the beach and set up 
beach apparatus. Owing to extreme 
distance offshore it took 6 shots before 
reaching the steamer. The strong tide 
swept the line down on the rocks and it 
was impossible to send the whip off. 
The beach cart from the station was 
brought up at daylight and 3 more shots 
were fired, none of which reached the 
steamer. The surfboat was now 
launched and in 2 trips 15 men were 
brought into the station. Vessel was 
abandoned and was later stripped by 
wrecking company. 

NNE. gale and a rough sea. The first-named 
trying to beat into Quoddy Bay had to 
anchor to keep off the rocks, her head- 
sails having been blown away. Lying 
in a dangerous berth, she set distress 
signals. Crew badly frostbitten and in 
an exhausted condition. Keeper tele* 
phoned for a tug and the life-savers went 
out to her in surfboat. Found her wind- 
lass broken down; surfmen worked on it 
all night and at 6 p. m. the next day got 
up the anchors, when schooner was taken 
in tow by tug and taken into harbor. 
While working on the windlass a British 
schooner anchored near by, set distress 
signals and part of the life-saving crew 
went to her and assisted in getting up 
her anchors. Tug towed her also in to 
Quoddy Bay. The extreme temperature 
of 17 below zero made this work espe- 
cially trying. All the surfmen were frost- 
bitten, one so badly that he had to be 
laid off duty. 

Anchored near the bar 500 yds. ESE. of 
station, blowing fresh from the NE. and 
a moderate sea. Life-savers saw dis- 
tress signal when vessel dragged down 
on the bar and took bottom. Went 
out and spoke her, and at master's re- 
quest secured a tug, which hauled vessel 
into deep water, undamaged. 

Catboat belonging to the U. S. Light- 
House Service sailed into the ice 500 yds. 
NW. of station and stuck there. Strong 
E. wind and a choppy sea. The life-sav- 
ers went out in a surfboat and after a 
hard pull found the asst. keeper of the 
Desdemona Light Station stuck fast. 
The life-savers took the catboat in tow 
and worked their way to the Quarter- 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



135 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Jan. 16 



Jan. 19 



Jan. 19 



Jan. 20 



Jan. 21 



Point Adams, Oregon 



Catboat, no name 



Galveston, Texas Br. str. Industry. . 



Grays Harbor, Washing- Am. sc. Endeavor, 
ton. 



Bodie Island, and Oregon Am. sc. Dewey. .. 
Inlet, North Carolina. 



Jan. 23 



Jan. 24 



Jan. 24 



Jan. 25 



Block Island, Rhode Is- 
land. 



Core Bank, North Caro- 
lina. 



Point AUerton, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Am. sc. Montana. 



Am. sc. Coaster.. 



Am. sc. Catherine 
G. Howard. 



Durants, North Carolina.. Sip. Silver Spray. . 



Cape May, New Jersey. . . . Am. sc. Samuel H. 
Sharp. 



master's wharf, where the boats were 



light- 
keeper was kept at the station until the 
next day. 

Hazy weather, moderate sea, mistook har- 
bor lights and stranded 2 miles E. of sta- 
tion. To reach steamer it was necessary 
to row 14 miles against wind and tide or 
to transport boat across jetty and over 
a low flat for half a mile; the latter was 
undertaken. Upon arrival vessel was 
found in no danger and after discharging 
water ballast vessel backed off into deep 
water. 

Blowing fresh, raining, and moderate sea. 
In tow of tug, struck on bar 7 miles W. 
of station. She let go both anchors but 
showed no signals ofdistress. The next 
day the master of the tug Printer re- 
quested assistance of the life-savers. 
They went out in surfboat and found 
that schooner was waterlogged; suc- 
ceeded in slipping chains and ran haws- 
ers to tugs. She was towed back to har- 
bor. 

Mistook light and run ashore 5 miles S. by 
W. from station, on Oregon Inlet shoals. 
At 1.30 a. m. master applied at the sta- 
tion for assistance. Life-savers pro- 
ceeded to the scene in powerboat and. 
assisted by life-savers from Oregon Inlet 
station, soon got her into deep water. 

ashore 3 miles N. of station. Life-savers 
proceeded to scene with surfboat and 
beach apparatus. She was 1$ miles off- 
shore, a heavy sea running, and wind 
blowing a NW. gale. No signs of life 
were seen upon her; nevertheless the 
keeper decided to try to reach her. After 
a futile attempt he only gave up after 
the vessel had sunk and his crew were 
exhausted. Watch was kept on the 
beach until all chance of anyone coming 
ashore from the wreck was hopeless. It 
was afterwards learned that schooner's 
crew had been taken oft by the towing 
tug. 

Discovered by lookout at daybreak, drag- 
ging ashore in Core Sound, 3 miles SW. 
from station. Blowing fresh NW. gale 
and a high sea. Life-savers went to her 
in power boat; vessel had fouled her an- 
chor and had stranded before arrival of 
surfmen. They ran out a line and soon 
hauled her into deep water. Schooner's 
crew arrived soon after and she was 
turned over to them. 

Discovered by lookout, stranded 2 miles 
NW. of station. A thick vapor hanging 
over the water. Life-savers found her 
in an easy position. Returned to sta- 
tion and telephoned for a tug. Schooner 
was floated undamaged same evening. 

Stranded at high water on Oyster Point, 
3 miles N. of station. She made a dis- 
tress signal and the life-savers went out 
to her and laid out an anchor and line, 
but could not float her. Took the 2 men 
sailing her to the station and cared for 
them until the next day when the tide 
had risen. The surfmen then hauled her 
off and she went on her way undamaged. 

Struck on Cape May Spit, blowing fresh 
and sea breaking heavily on shoals, 2J 
miles from station. Discovered at the 
time by the lookout, and the suf rmen in 
surfboat set out immediately for her, 
arriving after a hard pull of two hours. 



136 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 


Nature of casualty and service rendered. 


1907. 








Jan. 25 


Cape May, New Jersey 


Am. sc. Samuel H. 
Sharp. 


She was breaking up and her crew had 
launched their boat, but owing to the 








high sea had not dared to leave her. 








They were taken to the station and cared 








for until the 28th, when, through the 








courtesy of the Pennsylvania Railroad, 








they were given transportation to Phila- 






* 


delphia. 


Jan. 26 


Holly Beach and Two- 
Mile Beach, New Jersey. 


Dredge Big Four... 


While steaming to Atlantic City, stranded 
on Turtle Gut Bar, 2 miles S. of Holly 








Beach and 1 mile N. of Two-Mile Beach 








stations. She was reported immediately 








by 1 of the surfmen at Holly Beach and 








the surfboat was carted across to Turtle 








Gut Inlet, boarding the dredge one hour 








after it had struck. The Two-Mile Beach 








crew arrived soon afterwards. The sea 








was at the time too high for any efforts 
at floating the dredge. The next morn- 








ing the station crews carried out their 








hawsers and laid out 3 anchors. The 








sea during the night had torn away 6 of 
dredge's windows and had bilged her. 








The dredge's steam pumps cleared her 








and the life-savers boarded up the win- 








dows and hove her 200 yards nearer to 








deep water, postponing work with the 








ebbing tide until the next day. On the 








28th the dredge was floated, but in trying 
to cross the bar she again grounded. 








During the preceding operations the 
work was performed under the most un- 








favorable conditions; 1 surfboat was 








badly damaged by being smashed by the 








sea against the side of the dredge, 1 of 








the surfmen severely injured, and 1 of 








their large hawsers parted. A tug ar- 








rived the early morning of the 29th and 








the surfmen ran lines to the dredge 








which was floated at high water and was 








taken safely over the bar. 


Jan. 27 


Saluria, Texas 


Sip., no name 


Three gentlemen came to the station from 








a small sloop, which was weather-bound 








in the stiff norther, for shelter for the 








night, as their boat had no sleeping 








quarters. They put up for the night at 
tne station and left at daybreak next 








morning on their boat. 


Jan. 28 


Durants, North Carolina. . 


Gas. Ich. Dutcher... 


Engine disabled, drifted on reef 3 miles N. 








of station. Discovered by lookout, and 








life-savers went immediately to her as- 








sistance. She had stranded on Oyster 








Point at flood tide and was in no danger. 
The life-savers took off her passengers 








and landed them at Frisco. The launch 


Jan. 28 


Core Bank, North Caro- 


Am. sc. Francis 


floated off the next day at high water. 
At midnight the 27th, anchored back of 




lina. 




Harbor Island bar to await high water 








to cross over. At 3 a. m. the wind sud- 








denly shifted from west to north, parted 
both chains, and vessel was driven ashore 








10 miles NNE. of station. She was there 








discovered by the keeper while out in a 








power boat. With the N. and W. winds 








that had prevailed the tides were so low 








no effort was made to float her. On Feb. 








2 the wind came out from the NE. Life- 


, 






savers planted anchors and ran lines, as- 








sisted by power boat and vessel's power, 
she was floated. Life-savers directed her 


Jan. 28 


Fort Macon, North Caro- 
lina. 


Naph. Ich., no name. 


safely out of the sound. 
At 5 p. m. a naphtha launch broke down 1 
mile NW. from the station and set sig- 








nals for assistance. A skiff and 3 men 








were sent to her and 2 of the party on 








board taken off and transported to More- 








head City. 


Jan. 28 


Brazos, Texas 


Catboat , no name. . . 


Parted cable and drifting to sea before 








NW. gale. Discovered by patrol at 4.60 








a. m. He secured the boat and notified 








keeper. The life-savers proceeded to her 
and hauled her up on the beach. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of cr&ux Continued. 



137 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 



ality of vessel. Nature of casualtv and *** rendered. 



1907. 
Jan. 29 



Jan. 30 



Jan. 31 



Feb. 1 



Feb. 2 



Feb. 3 



Feb. 3 



Portsmouth, North Caro- 
lina. 



Fort Point, California 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 



TTV/ AHV^ID, f T J 

Lake Michigan. 



Cap* Lookout, North 
Carolina. 



Race Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



New Inlet, North Caro- 
lina. 



Cape Fear and Oak Island, 
North Carolina. 



Am. sc. J. I. Snow. 



Gas. Ich. Sprig 



Gas. Ich. Hugo 



Br. str. Sheppy 
Allison. 



Am. sc. Alice M. 
Guthrie. 



Small boat, no 



Am. sc. Sallie I'On 



Feb. 4 



Ocean City, Maryland.... 



Am. sc. Tena A. 
Cotton. 



Feb. 4 



Umpqua River, Oregon. . . 



Am. sc. Alpha . 



The keeper and crew went to the wreck of 
the J. I. Snow this date in the surfboat 
and recovered a case of goods which was 
turned over to the underwriter's agent. 

Machinery disabled, drifting out to sea 
with ebb tide. Discovered by lookout 
at 5.15 p. m. when about 1 mile NW. of 
station. There were 2 men on board. 
Life-savers went out and towed her hi 
to station. As there was a rough sea 
on outside and darkness fast coming on 
they were undoubtedly saved from de- 
struction. 

At 7.45 p. m. keeper sighted a torch on 1 
of fishing fleet, out in the ice 7 miles E. of 
station. As it was during the inactive 
season he was alone at the station. He 
burned a Coston in answer and sum- 
moned the fishing tug Julia Hammel, 
which went out and brought the launch 
to safety in the harbor. 

Stranded on Lookout Shoals in thick 
weather. First discovered by the S. 
patrol at 2.30 a. m. as the fog lifted. The 
life-savers went alongside in the surfboat 
and offered assistance, which was de- 
clined. Upon their return one of the 
surfmen was sent to Beaufort to tele- 
phone for the revenue cutter which ar- 
rived on the 3d and floated the Allison. 

Stranded on the inner bar, 650 yards N. of 
the station, in a thick fog, at 7.55 p. m. 
The life-savers went on board in the surf- 
boat, kedged her around head offshore 
and set all sail. As the wind was blow- 
ing stiff and sea rough, she would go 
ahead a little each time she lifted on a 
sea, and at 9.30 she floated clear. 

Capsized in a squall, 4 miles W. of the sta- 
tion, with 1 man, a surfman from Chica- 
macomico, clinging to her keel. The 
station crew went to his assistance in 2 
sailing skiffs. His boat was righted and 
bailed out, and he was furnished with 
dry clothing and sent back to his station 
in charge of 1 of the surfmen. 

Stranded 6 miles S. by E. from Cape Fear 
station. Oak Island was notified. The 
Cape Fear crew arrived in their surfboat 
at 4.30 and Oak Island in the lifeboat at 
5.30. The life-savers assisted to run lines, 
with her sails, and at the pumps. When 
she was floated at 9.15 p. m. she was 
leaking so badly her master requested 
them to remain on board and help with 
the pumps until she was anchored off 
Soutnport, which they did. 

Stranded 4 miles S. of the station at 1 a. m. 
The. station crew went to her assistance 
in the surfboat. No immediate assist- 
ance being required, the keeper returned 
to the station, telephoned for a tug, and 
informed the owners of the mishap. In 
the afternoon the sea making up, the 
schooner's crew and their baggage were 
landed by the life-savers in the surfboat. 
They were given dry clothing from the 
stores of the W. N. R. A. and succor at 
the station from the afternoon of the 4th 
until the morning of the 6th. (See letter 
of acknowledgment.) 

Stranded 9 miles N. by W. of station. 
Crew got ashore at low tide. Upon re- 
ceiving notification, life-savers proceeded 
to scene In surfboat, cleared up the deck 
and furled sails. The vessel was high 
and dry, having taken the beach at high 
water. During May and June the life- 
savers, together with the wrecking tugs, 
made many attempts to get schooner 
afloat. The underwriters finally decided 
the vessel would not be worth the ex- 
penditure necessary to save her. 



138 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 



ality of vessel j Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Feb. 5 



Pamet River, Massachu- 
setts. 



Bge. Woodbury.. 



Feb. 5 

Feb. 5 

Feb. 6 

Feb. 6 

Feb. 6 

Feb. 6 



Santa Rosa, Florida 



Ilwaco Beach, Washing- 
ton. 



Cape Hatteras and Creeds 
Hill. North Carolina. 



Ocracoke, North Carolina . 



Ludington, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Point Bonita and Fort 
Point, California. 



Skiff, no name 



Am. sc. Solano... 



Am. sc. Hilda. 



Gas. Ich. Georgia. 



Skiff, no name 



Am. sc. Wm. F. 
Witzemann. 



Feb. 7 



Fletchers Neck, Maine... 



Br. sc. Maple Leaf. 



In tow of the tug Paoli, bound from Boston 
to South Amboy, parted her hawser in 
a NE. gale and snowstorm while off 
Highland Light in the afternoon of this 
date. Both anchors were let go, but in 
the heavy sea 1 chain parted and the 
other anchor dragged. The life-savers 
saw her, and when she struck mile S. 
of the station the beach apparatus was 
in place and ready for use. As soon as 
she struck a line was shot over her and 
the whip run out and made fast, but as 
she continued to drag a little, the whip 
parted before the crew could be landed. 
The keeper then directed the men on 
board to float a heaving line in through 
the surf, which they finally succeeded in 
doing. The life-savers bent on a larger 
line, which was hauled on board, and the 
4 men of her crew slid down this line to 
safety, bringing some of their baggage. 
Her master and 1 man remained on the 
scene of the stranding until she broke up 
on the 19th, being cared for at the station. 

Washed up on the beach J mile W. from 
the station. Launched and brought to 
the station by the surfmen, where it was 
held for a claimant. 

Ashore 6 miles N. of station, crew safe. 
Arrrangements were made for rendering 
assistance if needed, and the owner was 
notified by the keeper. 

Grounded on-Inner Diamond Shoals 5 miles 
offshore in a heavy gale about 4 a. m. 
A heroic effort was made by the crews 
from both stations to save those on 
board, but all perished. 

Stranded 2J miles SW. from the station. 
The life-savers went to her in the surf- 
boat, planted kedges, and worked four 
hours trying to haul her off. She was 
floated the following high water. 

Drifting out with the ice and current. The 
keeper worked his way to this skiff 
through the ice in the small boat, took it 
in tow, and brought it to the pier, where 
it was turned over to owner. 

Stranded 3 miles up the coast from Dux- 
bury Point and 10J miles W. by N. from 
Point Bonita station. The Point Bonita 
crew in their surfboat and the Fort Point 
crew in their lifeboat set out for the scene 
of the stranding in tow of the tug Daunt- 
less. While they were on their way the 
weather shut in thick, and when off 
Duxbury Reef Vhistling buoy the life- 
savers landed through the surf and ascer- 
tained from persons on shore the location 
of the vessel. Then they returned to the 
Dauntless, and together the tug and the 
station boats felt their way up to the 
schooner. They ran the tug's hawser, 
and rigged up a whip and breeches buoy 
from the vessel to the beach for the use of 
the master and mates, who proposed to 
remain on board. As nothing further 
could be done by the life-savers they then 
returned to their stations under oars, 
taking with them the 5 men composing 
the ship's crew. 

Struck on Sharps Rocks, 2 miles NNW. 
from the station at 6.20 a. m. The life- 
savers went to her assistance in the surf- 
boat, but it being ebb tide, after telephon- 
ing for a tug, they returned to the station, 
going back to the wreck at the beginning 
of flood. They set sails, ran hawsers 
for the tug, and helped at the pumps. 
The tug was unable to float her, and 3 
of the surfmen remained on board for 
the nighli to help with the pumps. At 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



139 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Feb. 7 



Feb. 7 
Feb. 7 



Feb. 7 



Feb. 8 



Feb. 8 



Feb. 9 



Feb. 11 



Feb. 12 

Feb. 13 

Feb. 14 

Feb. 18 

Feb. 19 



Feb. 12 



Feb. 13 



reb. 13 
i'eb. 14 



Feb. 14 



Fletchers Neck, Maine. . . 



Race Point, Massachu- 
setts. 
Popes Island, Virginia 



MosquitoLa-goon, Florida . 



0?uraet, Massachusetts . . . 



Brenton Point, Rhode 
Island. 



Ship Bottom and Long 
Beach, New Jersey. 



Cuttyhunk, Massachu 
setts. 



Gay Head, Massachu- 
setts; Sandy Point, New 
Shoreham, and Block 
Island, Rhode Island. 



Quonochontaug, Rhode 



Gurnet, Massachusetts. 



IRace Point, Massachu- 
f setts. 



Monomoy Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Br. sc. Maple Leaf. 



Dories (o), no names. 

House boat, no 
name. 

Aux. sip. Dolphin... 



Am. sc.Valentinna. . 
Str. Richmond . . 



Am. sc . Helen J. 

Seitz. 



Gas sip. Louise 



Am. str. Larch- 
mont. 



Am. sc. Harry 
Knowlton. 



Sip. Two Sisters... 



Dories (3), no 
names. 



sc. Greta. 



high water in the morning she floated off, 
the life-savers set sail and piloted her 
to a safe anchorage. Three of them re- 
mained on board until she was taken into 
port, as she was leaking badly. 

Picked up by the station crew on different 
patrols and hauled up on the beach. 

Frozen in, 3 miles SW. of the station, and 
out of wood. The keeper and 2 surfmen 
assisted in replenishing the supply. 

Lost their way coming through the la- 
goon. The keeper showed them a chart 
and gave them full directions as to the 
channel. 

Out of coal and no convenient way to get 
any. Furnished with 4 bags from the 
station supply. 

Stranded on Pine Tree Point, 3 miles 
WNW. from the station, about 10 p. m. 
The crew got ashore a few minutes 
later, 3 of them losing most of their 
clothing. They were given dry clothing 
belonging to the W. N. R. A. The 
life-savers assisted the wreckers with the 
pumps, lines, etc., until she was floated, 
Mar 5. 

Struck 1 mile N. of Long Beach station in 
thick, hazy weather, at 12.40 a. m. The 
life-savers from both stations went to her 
assistance in their surfboats. The crew 
were in no immediate danger, and the 
boat's crew stood by, carrying messages 
to and from the shore and helping 
generally, until the wrecking tug arrived 
and took charge. 

Ashore on the eastern end of Nashawena 
Island, 3J miles E. from the station. The 
life-savers went to her assistance in the 
surfboat. Owing to the prevailing gale 
nothing could be done, and the boat 
could not return to the station on ac- 
count of the ice. Remained on Nasha- 
wena for the night and in the morning 
went aboard the stranded vessel, kedged 
her afloat, and took her to a safe an- 
chorage. 

In collision with the schooner Harry 
Knowlton and sunk NW. of Block Is- 
land about 11 p. m. A NW. gale was 
blowing and it was very cold. Twenty 
survivors were assisted in landing, given 
medical attention and dry clothing from 
the stores of the W. N. R. A. 76 bodies 
were recovered and cared for at the 
stations until claimed. (For detailed 
account see p. 25.) (See also letter of 
acknowledgment, p. 275.) 

In collision with the steamer Larchmont 
NW. of Block Island and abandoned in 
a sinking condition about 1J miles off- 
shore. She drifted in and sank f mile 
W. of the station. Her crew of 7 men 
came ashore in their yawl boat, being 
assisted to land by the patrolman on the 
W. beat. They were brought to the sta- 
tion and given dry clothing from the 
stores of the W. N. R. A. They were 
given food and shelter at the station 
until the 14th. 

The life-savers in the Jersey boat located 
and recovered an anchor and cable lost 
by this vessel, and turned it over to her 
owners. 

One with 3 men and 2 with 2 men in each, 

surf, were landed and hauled up clear of 
the water by the life-savers and 4 of the 
rescued men given supper at the station. 
Struck on Shovelful Shoals, 1 J miles SSW. 
from the station. The life-savers went 
to her in the surfboat. The keeper was 



140 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Feb. 14 



Feb. 14 



Monomoy Point, 
chusetts. 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Br. sc. Greta. 



Ice scooter (skiff), 
no name. 



Feb. 15 



Feb. 16 



Feb. 16 



Feb. 16 



Feb. 18 



Feb. 18 



Assateague Beach, Vir- 
ginia. 



Barnegat, New Jersey . . . 



Cape Disappointment, 
on. 



Coquille River, Oregon . . . 



Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Sip. Sally. 



Eleo. sip. Barbara . 



Skiff, no name 



U. S. revenue cutter 
Thetis. 



Br. str. Ixia. . 



Nph. Ich., no name. 



Feb. 18 



High Head and Highland, 
Massachusetts. 



Bges. (2) Girard 
and Alaska. 



Feb. 19 



Brazos, Texas.. 



Sip. Uno. . . . 



given full charge by her master, hauled 
down her headsails, trimmed her after- 
sails and backed her off. The headsails 
were then set and she proceeded on her 
voyage. 

Frozen in the ice in the middle of the bay, 
its occupant having crawled ashore on 
East Island, where he had to walk all 
night to keep from freezing. It was re- 
ported at the station at 6.30 p. m. and a 
search instituted, which continued until 
after midnight, but was not successful. 
At daylight the life-savers procured some 
scooters,foundtheman Arthur Ream- 
on East Island, towed him to the sta- 
tion, gave him warm food and a change 
of clothing from the W. N. R. A. stores. 
In the afternoon he was taken to his des- 
tination by the station team. 

Missed stays 1 J miles S. by E. from the sta- 
tion and was in danger of fouling the 
boathouse and doing damage both to 
herself and the house. The station crew 
went on board in the surfboat, ran a line, 
and hauled her out clear. 

Being a stranger, anchored in a bad place 
on account of running ice. The keeper 
and 2 surfmen went on board in a small 
boat, warned him, and assisted to shift 
anchorage to a safer berth. 

Drifting put over the bar in a strong ebb 
tide, with 2 men in it. The power boat 
went out from the station and towed 
them in to safety. 

Blowing 4 long blasts on her steam whistle 
in a thick fog, while off the station. The 
life-savers went out in the surfboat to in- 
vestigate. Were informed that she was 
searching for the missing gas. sc. Rita 
Newman and her commanding officer 
wanted the latest news concerning her. 
This was furnished him. 

Off the harbor entrance with signal set for 
a pilot. As no pilot went to her the keep- 
er went out in the surfboat. Found that 
she barely had coal enough to reach the 
inner harbor. She was piloted in and 
her master taken to Portsmouth to make 
arrangements for coaling his vessel. 

Adrift thirty-six hours in a gale of wind 
and snow storm, with 3 men on board. 
Their engine was broken down and they 
could make no headway with oars in the 
heavy sea. Finally they drifted in near 
the beach, but were afraid to land through 
the surf. Seeing the patrolman's lan- 
tern they .hailed him, and he directed 
them where to land and assisted them 
through the surf. They were taken to 
the station, given dry clothing from the 
W. N. R. A. supply, and food and shelter 
for the night. 

Broke adrift from their tow during a heavy 
NE. gale and snowstorm, on the early 
morning of the ISth. The Girard strand- 
ed 1 mile north of Highland station, about 
200 yards offshore. Two of her crew 
were drowned and 2 saved by the life- 
savers. The Alaska went down J mile 
offshore and her crew of 4 were lost. 
The 2 men saved were given dry clothing 
from the supply of the W. N. R. A. and 
food and shelter at the station two days. 
Four bodies were later recovered and 
turned over to the coroner. (For de- 
tailed report see page 61.) 

Grounded on an uncharted shoal, 1 mile 
NW. from the station. The life-savers 
went to her assistance in the surfboat 
and after an hour's work succeeded in 
getting her afloat and anchored her in a 
safe berth. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



141 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1907. 
Feb. 23 



Station and locality. 



Mosquito Lagoon 
Florida. 



Feb. 24 Damiscove Island, Maine 

i 
Feb. 24 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 



Feb. 25 



Feb. 26 



Feb. 25 



Feb. 26 
Feb. 26 



Mar. 1 



Mar. 3 



Mar. 3 



Nahant, Massachusetts. . 



Townsend Inlet, andAva- 
lon, New Jersey. 



Cape Lookout, North 
Carolina. 



Ocean City, Maryland .... 



Cape Lookout, North 
Carolina. 



Humboldt Bay, California. 



Durants, North Carolina . 



Saluria, Texas... 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Houseboat Wol- 
verine. 



Fishing boats.... 
Am. sc. Anna F. 



Nph. lch.,noname. 



St. yt. Nada 



Am. sc. William 
Neely. 



Knockabout Helen. 



Am. sc. Levi S. An- 
drews. 



Am. str. Corona ... 



Am. sc. Lorena 



Gas. Ich. Mabel.... 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Ashore mile NW. from the station. The 
keeper went to her assistance in the 
launch. She got afloat and he piloted 
her into deep water. Soon she was 
ashore again. He returned, helped pole 
her off, showed her master the chart, and 
gave him full directions as to the best 
water. * 

The life-savers, with 2 dories and a skjff, 
broke the ice in the harbor and saved 
several fishermen's boats from dragging. 

Sprung a leak and was beached 2 miles S. 
of Hillsboro Light. Captain Frutsche, 
the only one on board, came to the sta- 
tion, was given food and shelter twenty- 
six hours, furnished a week's provisions, 
tools to repair his boat, and the keeper 
took him back to his vessel and assisted 
in every way possible to get her repaired. 

Engine disabled, drifted up on Dread 
Ledge 2| miles ENE. from the station. 
Her 2 occupants got out on the ledge and 
attracted the lookout's attention by 
waving handkerchiefs. The life-savers 
went to their aid in the surfboat, took 
the two men to Swampscott, returned 
and recovered the boat, which they 
towed to the station. 

At anchor 3 miles ESE. of Avalon station 
at 7.40p. m v with her shaft broken. The 
attention of the life-savers was attracted 
by a torch that she burned. The crews 
from both stations went out in their 
surfboats, her master was brought 
ashore and assistance telephoned for. 

Anchored 8 miles SW. from the station 
with 6 feet of water in her hold and in a 
sinking condition. They set their colors 
union down and the station crew went to 
their assistance In the lifeboat. All prep- 
arations had been made to abandon ship, 
but the keeper persuaded the master t j 
get up anchor and he then piloted her up 
into Lookout Bight and brought her to 
anchor in smooth water. On the 26th, 
finding that she was sinking, her master 
set signal for the life-savers. They came 
off and the keeper directed him as to the 
best place to beach her. 

Grounded on a ridge near the station. 
Three of the surfmen went to her aid in 
a skiff and helped float her. 

About 3 miles off the station, set her ensign 
union down. The life-savers boarded 
her and found she was leaking over a foot 
an hour. The keeper piloted her into 
Lookout Bight and anchored her in 
smooth water. 

Grounded at the outer end of north jetty 
li miles W. from the station, while at- 
tempting to cross the bar. She had on 
board 95 passengers and a crew of 52. 
Two men of her crew were lost. (For 
detailed account see page 64.) 

Capsized in thick, squally weather, at 9.30 
a. m. of the 2d, 10 miles N. of the sta- 
tion. The keeper was informed on the 
morning of the 3d and the life-savers 
went to her assistance in the supply skiff, 
righted her, bailed and pumped her out, 
and turned her over to her owner. 

Anchored in Bayou Saluria, 3 miles from 
the station, set signals for assistance. 
The station team was taken up abreast, 
her master came ashore and reported 
that he was out of gasoline. Not having 
any at the station the keeper directed 
him to the nearest source of supply, and 
on the following morning set ranges on 
the beach to enable him to cross the bar. 



142 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Coiitiuued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Mar. 4 



Mar. 4 



Msr. 6 



Mar. 9 



Durants, North Carolina . 



Bogue Inlet, North Caro- 
lina. 



Lewes, Delaware . 



Cape Fear, North Caro- 
lina. 



Yawl boat, no name 
Am. sc. John Rus- 



Am. sc. John J. 
Ward. 



Am. sc. Stanley H. 
Minor. 



Mar. 9 Bulow, Florida 



Mar. 10 
Mar. 11 

Mar. 13 



Saluria, Texas 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Gas. Ich. Tude. . . 



Sip. White Wing . . 



Sip. Ella. 



Bellport, Blue Point, and Br. str. Gowanburn 
Lone Hill, New York. 



Picked up a yawl boat adrift in Pamlico 
Sound, towed it to the station, and held 
it for its owner. 

Grounded on a shoal 1 mile west from the 
station. The life-savers went to her as- 
sistance in the power boat, helped with 
the windlass, ran lines and helped vari- 
ously from 5.30 p. m. until midnight, 
when she was floated and taken to a safe 
anchorage. 

In a heavy squafl and snowstorm dragged 
her anchor and struck the new break- 
water 3 miles NE. of the station at 1 a. m. 
She soon filled and sank. Her crew got 
out on the breakwater with their bag- 
gage and were cared for at the light- 
house. They were brought to the sta- 
tion by the pilot boat Philadelphia and 
given food and shelter for the day. 

Stranded on Frying Pan Shoals about 12 
miles S. by E. from the station at 3 a. m. 
of the.Sth in thick weather. Her lifeboat 
was lost, and 2 of her crew came to the 
station in her small boat, arriving at 6.15 
a. m. of the 9th. They were wet and cold 
and were given dry clothing from the 
stores of the W. N. R. A., and the life- 
savers proceeded to the scene of the wreck 
in the surfboat. They arrived at 10 and 
found her decks awash and the remainder 
of her crew 6 men and the master's 
wife huddled up on top of the cabin, 
cold and wet, and none of their personal 
effects saved. They were taken in the 
surfboat, rowed to Cape Fear bar, and 
there the Government dredge took them 
in tow and towed them to Southport, 
where they arrived at 2.15 p. m. (See 
card of thanks.) 

Bent her propeller shaft and was poled to 
the station dock where, with the assist- 
ance of the keeper, she was hauled out, 
her shaft straightened, and put in work- 
ing shape. 

Water supply had become salty. Was fur- 
nished with fresh water from the station 
cistern. 

Stuck in the slush ice and unable to reach 
her pier. The keeper threw a heaving 
line to her, got her line, and, with a tackle, 
warped her in to the pier. 

Stranded 800 yards SW. of Blue Point sta- 
tion, in a dense fog at 4.30 p. m. Bellport 
and Lone Hill stations were notified and 
their crews assisted in subsequent opera- 
tions. The beach apparatus was run 
down, and, guided solely by her whistle, 
it being too thick to see the steamer, a 
shot was fired and landed fair, the whip 
was run out and set up, and the breeches 
buoy run out with a message that the 
life-savers were ready to land the crew, 
but advising them to wait for low water 
if there was no danger of the vessel break- 
ing up. At 11.45 p. m. a surfman was 
sent on board in the breeches buoy to ar- 
range a system of signals. The appa- 
ratus was kept ready for instant use and 
the life-savers stood by all night. At 
9.45 a. m. a signal was received and 1 
white man and 5 Chinamen were landed 
in the breeches buoy. The surfboat then 
went out and brought ashore 2 white men 
and 8 Chinamen. The wrecking tug Res- 
cue arrived and took charge in the early 
afternoon. The surfboat from the Res- 
cue while running a line to the stranded 
vessel became unmanageable in the 
breakers, the man who was steering was 
knocked overboard, and the boat came 
through the breakers and up on the 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



143 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Mar. 13 



Bellport, Blue Point, and 
Lone Hill, New York. 



Mar. 13 



Mar. 13 



Mar. 14 



Mar. 14 



Atlantic City, New Jer- 
sey. 



Portsmouth, North Car- 
olina. 



Wood End, Massachu- 
setts. 



Br. st. Gowanburn 



Am. str. Queen 
City. 



Yawl boat. no 
name. 



Sip. Albert Drum- 
mond. 



Aransas, Texas i Sip. Lady Gay 



Mar. 16 Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Mar. 16 



Power boat, no 
name. 



Atlantic City, New Jersey.! Sip. Commander.. . 



Mar. 16 I Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 
Mar. 17 Ilunniwells Beach, Maine. 

Mar. 18 Core Bank, North Caro- 
lina. 



2990908 10 



U. S. coast survey 
steamer. 

Sip. James M 



Am. sc. Carrie 
Grannis. 



beach. The life-savers quickly launched 
the boat and made a systematic search 
for the man who had fallen overboard, 
but he had gone under and could not be 
found. The 13 Chinamen were put 
aboard the revenue-cutter Mohawk and 
taken to the Ellis Island Immigration 
station for detention and the 3 white men 
put back on the Gowanburn. Several 
trips were made back and forth to the 
stranded vessel in the surfboat on subse- 
quent days, carrying messages, and the 
wreckers were posted as to time of high 
water by signals from the station. On 
the 23rd the Gowanburn was floated, 
very little damaged. The body of the 
drowned man was found on the 20th 
and turned over to the coroner. (See 
letter of acknowledgment.) (For ac- 
count of loss of life see page 66.) 

Stranded on Absecon Inlet outer bar, J 
mile SE. from the station. The life-sav- 
ers were alongside in their surfboat 
within twenty minutes after she struck. 
They planted her anchor in the channel 
and succeeded in kedging her afloat. 

At the request of the underwriter's agent, 
hitched the station team to a yawl boat, 
belonging to the wreck of the schooner 
John I. Snow, and hauled it over the land 
to the Sound. 

Caught in the ice while trying to get into 
the harbor, and in danger of being 
carried out to sea by the ebb tide. 
The beach apparatus was sent down and 
a line shot on board. When the tide 
turned she was pulled into the harbor 
through the ice, bv means of this line. 

Stranded on Mustang Island, J mile NE. 
from the station. The station crew went 
to her assistance in the surfboat, planted 
an anchor, two of them got overboard on 
her lee side and, after heaving for a half 
hour, they succeeded in floating her with- 
out any apparent damage. They then 
assisted to get her underway. 

Broken down 2 miles NNW. from the sta- 
tion, with 3 boys in it. Two of them 
came to the station and told the keeper 
they had left 1 boy in the boat and she 
was in danger of being caught in the drift 
ice. The life-savers went in the surfboat 
and towed the launch back to the station, 
where she was made secure. The 3 boys 
were given food and shelter for the night 
and the following day, and their parents 
notified that they were safe. 

Stranded on Absecon Inlet outer bar, J 
mile SE. from the station at 3:10 p. m. 
The life-savers went off to her in the surf- 
boat and by working her headsails soon 
succeeded in getting her afloat and into 
deep water. 

At the request of her commanding officer, 
the keeper piloted this vessel into Bis- 
cayne Bay. 

Blown ashore in Sagadahoc Bay, 2 miles 
ENE. from the station at 8 a. m. The 
keeper was notified by telephone,launched 
the surfboat, and .arrived alongside at 9 
a. m. The life-savers planted anchors, 
hove her off, and took her to a place of 
safety. 

Carried away her foremast in a stiff north- 
easter, 2 miles NW. of the station, in 
Core Sound at 2 p. m. The power boat 
went to her assistance, towed her into 
smooth water, the life-savers transferred 
her cargo to another boat and rigged a 
jury mast, with which he succeeded in 
getting into North River, where a new 
mast could be obtained. 



144 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



1907. I 
Mar. 19 | Atlantic City, New Jersey. 



Mar. 19 



Mar. 20 



Fort Lauderdale, Florida . 



Hereford Inlet, New Jer- 



Mar. 20 j Galveston, Texas. 



Mar. 22 
Mar. 23 



Mar. 24 



Mar. 24 
Mar. 24 



Mar. 24 



Fort Lauderdale, Florida 

Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Straitsmouth, Massachu- 
setts. 

Nahant, Massachusetts. . . 
Gurnet, Massachusetts... 



Assateague Beach, Vir- 
ginia. 



Mar. 24 



Mar. 25 



Mar. 27 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Sip. Pittsburg 



Lch. GHV. 



Small boat, no name 



St. Ich. Olivia . 



Gas. Ich. Lida... 



Am. sc. Annie E. 
Edwards. 



Dories (2) , no names 

Dory, no name 

Am. sc. Tecumseh. . 



Am. sc. J. F. Whit- 
comb. 



Galveston, Texas Gas. Ich. Skidoo. 



Cape Henry and Virginia Car float No. 68.. 
Beach, Virginia. 



Potunk, New York. 



Sip. Rambler. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Stranded on the bar, } mile NE. from the 
station at 5 a. m., and pounding. The 
life-savers went to her assistance in the 
small boat and hove her off into a deep 
basin, where she lay at anchor until flood 
tide, when she got underway and got 
across the bar without any further 
trouble. 

Stranded on the inner bar at 8 a. m. The 
keeper went to her assistance in the small 
boat, took a line from her stern and suc- 
ceeded in pulling her out into deep water. 
She was then taken to the station dock, 
examined, and found all right. The 
keeper gave her master directions con- 
cerning the channel and she proceeded on 
her way. 

Dragged her anchor and went ashore on the 
lee side of the channel. The life-savers 
went to her assistance in a small boat, 
ran her anchor and planted it in deep 
water and on the flood tide she was 
hauled afloat. 

Grounded on the edge of the channel, 100 
yards E. of the station. The small boat 
went to her assistance, planted an anchor, 
and helped haul her afloat. 

At the request of the master of this boat 
the keeper piloted him out of New River. 

Aground 1 mile NNW. from the station. 
The life-savers went to her in the surf- , 
boat, planted her anchor, and succeeded 
in heaving her afloat. 

Two dories adrift at sea, picked up by the 
station dory and turned over to their 
owners. 

Picked up by the east patrol and held at 
the station for the owner. 

Stranded on Browns Island Shoal, f mile 
SSW. from the station, strong E'ly wind 
and high surf. The life-savers went to 
her assistance in the surfboat and re- 
mained alongside until the seas began to 
sweep over her, when 6 of the crew were 
taken in the surfboat to the station, the 
remaining 4 coming in the Tecumseh's 
boat. Her master was later put on 
board a tug and the remaining 9 were 
given food and shelter for the night. 

Stranded in a fog at 4 a. m., 7 miles N. and 
E. of the station. As she was sinking, 
the crew abandoned her in their own boat 
at daylight and arrived at the station at 
9.45 a. m., where they landed. Five were 
furnished food and shelter one day and 
1 three days. Her master was taken to 
town to make report and arrangements 
with wreckers and brought back to the 
station. (See letter of acknowledgment.) 

Broke her rudder chain while near the sta- 
tion, was poled in to the landing and fur- 
nished, by the keeper, with some 12- 
thread manila with which to make tem- 
porary repairs. 

Observed by the Virginia Beach lookout 
at 7 a. m. drifting in toward the beach. 
Cape Henry station was notified by tele- 
phone and, when she struck, both crews 
were on hand with beach apparatus 
ready. The sea drove her so high up on 
the beach it was not necessary to use the 
apparatus, the 1 man on board being 
helped to get ashore by the life-savers. 
No. 68 was floated by the Merritt-Chap- 
man Co. on the 27th. 

Ashore \\ miles E. of the station, in the 
bay. The keeper and 5 surfmen, with 
lines and tackles, went to her assistance 
at 7.20 a. m., hauled her afloat and re- 
turned to the station at 9 a. m. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



145 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



1907. 

Mar. 28 Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Lighter, no name.. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Mar. 30 I Batons Neck, New York. ' Am. sc. Hamlet 



Mar. 30 Louisville, Kentucky Shanty boat, no 

name. 



Mar. 31 
Mar. 31 



Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 



Apr. 2 

Apr. 2 

Apr. 2 

Apr. 2 

Apr. 2 

Apr. 3 

Apr. 3 

Apr. 3 



Santa Rosa, Florida. 
Galveston, Texas 



Santa Rosa, Florida 

Plum Island, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Dory, no name. 
Sc. Harry 



Skiff, no name 

Am. str. Southern 
Cross. 



Poyners Hill, North Caro- Dory, no name . 
Una. 

Core Bank, North Caro- Gas. Ich. Minnie, 
lina. 



Fort Macon, North Caro- Nph. Ich. Lorraine, 
lina. 



Fort Lauderdale, Florida . Gas.lch.EleanorlV 



San Luis, Texas. 



Cape Lookout, North. 
Carolina. 



Fort Lauderdale, Florida . 



Coos Bay, Oregon 



Skiff, no name 



Am. sc. Pearl Cul- 
len. 



Gas.lch.Nedoline .. 



Gas. Ich. Telephone. 



Parted her moorings in a heavy squall at 
10 p. m. The keeper and caretaker went 
on board and made her secure. Lines 
were procured from the station, with 
which she was securely moored to south 
pier. 

Stranded E. f mile from the station in a 
thick fog at 6 a. m. The small boat went 
to her assistance and the life-savers suc- 
ceeded in kedging her afloat without 
damage. 

Adrift and in danger above the falls, with 
a man and woman on board, about 7.15 
a. m. One of the station boats went to 
their assistance, took them in tow and 
towed them into a safe place at the head 
of the canal. 

Picked up adrift in the bay by the station 
crew and held for a claimant. 

Stranded and abandoned on Bolivar pen- 
insula 10 miles NNE. of the station dur- 
ing a gale on the night of the 30th. The 
lookout saw her rft daybreak and the 
surfboat went out under sail to investi- 
gate. The life-savers, after working on 
her nearly all day with kedges and using 
her sails, floated her and brought her 
into port, where she was turned over to 
her owner. 

Picked up on the beach, f mile east of sta- 
tion, by the patrol and held for claimant. 

Adrift in the slush ice, between Plum and 
Washington islands, i mile N. of station. 
The life-savers went to her in the ice 
boat and ran a line across the drift ice to 
another tug, which succeeded in pulling 
her out without damage. 

Found on the beach near station by patrol, 
hauled up clear of surf and held for 
claimant. 

Floated off the ways at the Carteret Club, 
5 miles SW. from the station, by high 
water, pounding against the wharf and 
nearly full of water. The life-savers 
hauled her clear of wharf, pumped and 
bailed her out, and moored her in a safe 
berth. 

Stranded at the mouth of Cowpen Creek. 
The life-savers planted an anchor, hauled 
her afloat, and took her to a safe anchor- 
age. 

At anchor inside, with a heavy NW. wind 
and strong ebb tide dragging her out 

through the inlet. The keeper went on 
board in the dory, cleared the anchors, 
and worked the launch in to a safe berth. 

Adrift in the bay; picked up by the life- 
savers, taken to the station, and held 
for claimant. 

Broke her main boom coming out over 
Beaufort bar, and applied to the keeper 
for assistance in repairing it. The sta- 
tion crew furnished material, scarped 
the boom, shipped it and set sail, the 
schooner proceeding to her destination. 

Ran on the inside bar and, in getting off, 
disabled machinery. The keeper went 
out in the small boat, towed them to 
the station dock, and put her machinery 
in working shape. 

Stranded on a sandbar \ mile E. of station. 
The life-savers went aboard in the life- 
boat and attempted to float her. Being 
unsuccessful, they returned to the sta- 
tion, bringing the 1 man on board with 
them. He was furnished with dry cloth- 
ing belonging to the W. N. R. A. and 
cared for at the station for the night. 
On the 4th the life-savers returned in 
their lifeboat and floated the Telephone, 
which then proceeded on her way. 



146 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Apr. 4 



Apr. 4 



Apr. 5 



Little Kinnakeet, North Sc., no name 

Carolina. 

Sabine Pass, Texas j Nph. Ich., no name. 



Core Bank, North Caro- 
lina. 



Apr. 5 

Apr. 6 

Apr. 6 

Apr. 6 



Humboldt Bay, California 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Point of Woods and Fire 
Island, New York. 



Hog Island, Virginia . . . 



Apr. 6 Ludington, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Apr. 6 



Apr. 7 



Apr. 7 



Apr. 8 

Apr. 8 
Apr. 10 



South Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Plum Island, Massachu- 
setts. 



Nags Head and Bodie 
Island, North Carolina. 



Plum Island, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Point Adams, Oregon 

White Head, Maine... 



Am. sc. Laura L. 
Sprague. 



Gas. Ich. Elgin 



Am. sc. Annie E 
Edwards. 



Am. Sc. Sallie M. 
Russell. 



Sip. Two Brothers. 



Gas. Ich. Hooligan. 



Am. Str. William B. 
Kerr. 



Am. sc. F. A. Smith. 



Am. sc. Louis Bos- 
sert. 



Gas. Ich. Viking... 

Skiff Bessie K 

Rowboat, no name. 



Three surfmen employed five hours assist- 
ing owner to get this boat ready for 
launching. 

Engine disabled, drifting out with the tide, 
with 3 men on board, about \ mile SI']. 
from the station. Life-savers went to 
their aid in the small boat, landed 1 man, 
and towed the launch to Sabine. She w as 
the quarantine launch belonging to the 
State board of health. 

Flying distress signals 3 miles ENE. from 
the station. The life-savers launched 
the surfboat through heavy surf and 
went alongside. She was leaking and 
had 9 feet of water in her hold, and 
the crew were exhausted. The keeper 
brought her to anchor, furled sail and 
returned to shore to telephone for assist- 
ance. At daylight of the 6th the station 
crew returned and pumped her put. On 
the 8th the revenue cutter arrived and 
took her in tow. (See letter of acknowl- 
edgment, p. 277.) 

Aground in the bay. The station crew 
went on board in the small boat, ran out 
anchor and hove her afloat. 
Aground on the north point of Tobys flats 
3 miles W. from the station. The life- 
savers went to her assistance in the surf- 
boat, planted her anchor and hove her 
afloat. They then hoisted sail and pi- 
loted her out into deep water. 

Aground on Tobys Flats, 3 miles west of 
Point of Woods station. The crew from 
this station went to her assistance in 
their small boat and the Fire Island crew 
in the surfboat. Together by means of 
anchors and sails they soon had her 
afloat and piloted her out into the chan- 
nel. 

Dragged her anchors in a NE. gale, and 
stranded 1| miles S. of station. The life- 
savers went to her assistance in the surf- 
boat, hauled her afloat, and took her into 
a safe harbor. 

Adrift in the lake, mile WNW. of the sta- 
tion, engine disabled, no oars and no 
anchor, with a fresh E. breeze. The 
station crew went out in the surfboat and 
towed her in to the pier. 

Hove to off the station and signaled for a 
boat. The power lifeboat went along- 

to land some men who were on board to 
witness her trial trip. Seven men were 
landed at the station. 

Stranded in Ipswich Harbor, 3 miles S. of 
station. The station crew went to her 
assistance in the small boat, ran anchors 
and hove her afloat, set sail and piloted 
her up the harbor to a safe berth. 

Stranded at midnight, in thick weather, 
400 yards S. of the Nags Head station. 
Her crew of 8 men and 2 lady passengers 
were landed by the life-savers in the 
breeches buoy, the Nags Head crew being 
assisted by the Bodie Island crew. The 
8 men were sheltered at the station three 
days and the two ladies five days. They 
were eventually put back aboard the 
Bossert and she was floated on the 12th. 

Ashore on the east end of Detroit Island 
3 miles E. of station. The life-savers 
took a heavy anchor and some tackles 
in the surfboat and, after putting some 
skids under her, they pulled her afloat. 

Found on the beach, hauled up clear of the 
tide and held for claimant. 

Sunk at its moorings in an E. gale. The 
life-savers swept for it with grapnels, 
recovered it, and turned it over to owner. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



147 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



1907. 

Apr. 10 Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Apr. 10 



Apr. 10 
Apr. 11 

Apr. 11 



Apr. 11 
Apr. 11 

Apr. 12 



Apr. 12 



Apr. 13 



Apr. 13 



Apr. 13 



Assateague Beach, Vir- 
ginia. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 

Lake Michigan. 
Atlantic City, New Jersey. 



Beaver Island, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Ludington, Michigan, 

Lake Michigan. 
South Haven, Michigan, 

Lake Michigan. 



Am. Sc. Alice. 



Sip. Lizzie M. Jones 



Skiff, no name 

Am. Sc. R. B. Leeds. 

Am. str. John 
Schroeder. 



Scs. (2) D. A. Wells 

and Minnehaha. 
Gas. str. Flora V... 



Ocracoke and Portsmouth; Am. Sc. Benjamin 
North Carolina. Russell. 



Coos Bay, Oregon. 



Metomkin Inlet, Virginia . 



Saluria, Texas . 



Baileys Harbor, Wiscon- Sip., no name 

sin, Lake Michigan. 



Sc. bge. Chinook 



Sip. Ethel 



Sc., name unknown. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Parted her cable and stranded in a NE. 
gale, 1J miles N. of station, punching a 
big hole in her bottom. The life-savers 
covered the hole with canvas and lashed 
cork under the bottom to keep her afloat. 
On the 13th the station dory assisted by 
naphtha launches hauled her off and she 
was towed to Portsmouth. 

Sighted 2 miles SSW. from station, with 
distress signal flying. The life-savers 
boarded her in the surfboat and found 
her sails blown away, main boom broken 
and crew exhausted. The keeper worked 
her up in the inner harbor and anchored 
her in a safe place. Her master was then 
furnished transportation to town and 
back. 

Adrift in the river. Recovered by 1 of the 
surfmen and restored to owner. 

Stranded on the bar J mile N. of station. 
The life-savers went on board in the surf- 
boat, ran put anchors, and hauled her 
afloat, taking her to a safe anchorage. 

Got stuck in the ice, about 400 yards off the 
station, and her master requested the 
keeper to land him, so that he could tele- 
graph for assistance. The small boat 
was used and he was landed and taken 
aboard again. 

Towed out through the piers by the keeper 
and crew. 

Adrift 200 yards SW. of end of south pier, 
with piston rod broken. Surfmen went 
to her assistance in the small boat and 
towed her into the harbor. 

Stranded in Ocracoke Inlet, 3 miles E. of 
Portsmouth station. The crews from 
both stations went to her assistance in 
their surfboats, ran her anchor out into 
deep water, and hove her afloat on the 
flood tide. She was then taken up into 
Ocracoke harbor to a safe anchorage. 

In tow of the tug Columbia, parted her 
hawser crossing the bar, about 3J miles 
SSW. from the station. When the life- 
savers arrived alongside in the lifeboat 
she had drifted in among the breakers on 
South Spit and anchored. The 6 men of 
her crew were gotten into the boat with 
difficulty, landed at the station, provided 
with dry clothing belonging to the 
W. N. R. A. and given shelter until the 
15th. On the 13th the Chinook parted 
her chains, drifted ashore and began to 
break up. On the 15th the life-savers 
rigged up beach apparatus and by this 
means saved about $1,000 worth of prop- 
erty. (See letter of acknowledgment, 
page 277.) 

Stranded in the inlet, 1 mile SE. from sta- 
tion. The life-savers went to her assist- 
ance in the surfboat, succeeded in floating 
her on the flood tide, and she proceeded 
to her destination. 

Standing onand off the bar under shortened 
sail ina NE. gale, with signal set forpilot. 
The keeper set ranges for the bar and she 
steered by them across, and made a har- 
bor up the Pass. 

Capsized 1 mile SW. of station, with 3 men 
clinging to her bottom. Fifteen minutes 
after she capsized the life-savers reached 
the men, rescued them from the ice-cold 
water, took them to the station, gave 
them medical attention and dry clothing 
belonging to the W. N. R. A. They then 
picked up the sloop and towed it in. The 
surfboat was used. 



148 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 


Nature of casualty and service rendered. 


1907. 








Apr. 14 


Fletchers Neck, Maine 


Sc. bge. Pocopson. . . 


In tow of tug, parted her hawser and 








stranded at the mouth of Saco River, 3 








miles NNE. from station, at midnight. 








The life-savers went to her assistance in 








surfboat, helped tug to plant her anchor, 








ran the tug's hawser, assisted with lines 








and at the windlass. At high water she 








was floated and the surfmen accompanied 








her to a safe anchorage. (See letter of 








acknowledgment, p. 277.) 


Apr. 14 


Point of Woods, New 


Am. sc. P. E.Whar- 


Stranded 2 miles north of station. Surf- 




York. 


ton. 


men went to her assistance in the surf- 








boat, planted her anchor, and with help 








of sails got her afloat and took her into 








deep water. 


Apr. 15 


Hunniwells Beach, Maine . 


Am. str. Seguin 


Ashore on the edge of the bank, on Parkers 








Head Flats. 1 mile north of station, and 








lying over on her side. Life-savers went 








to her in surfboat and assisted a tug to 








right her, by running hawsers under bow 
and stern and heaving them taught on a 








vessel which was lying alongside. She 


Apr. 15 


Wachapreague, Virginia. . 


Am. sc. John Russell 


righted and floated off when the tide rose. 
Stranded on Dawson shoals, 2 miles ESE. 








of station, at 4 a. m. The life-savers 








went alongside in the lifeboat, set all sail 








and, it being quite rough, anchored their 








boat near by to await the high tide. 








With sail set and the wind blowing a 








gale she soon went off and proceeded, 








undamaged. 


Apr. 15 


Cobb Island, Virginia 


Sip. Jordan 


Ashore on Hog Island bar, 5 miles NE. of 








station, with rudder broken. The life- 








savers went to her assistance in the surf- 








boat, worked her afloat, and anchored 








her in Loon Channel until high water, 








when they worked her up the channel, 








beached her, repaired the rudder and 








floated her again, when she proceeded 








to her destination. 


Apr. 15 


Buffalo, New York, Lake 


Gas. Ich., no name. . 


At anchor near Bird Island pier, out of 




Erie. 




gasoline. The power surfboat went to 








her assistance and towed her in to the 








station, where gasoline was procured 


Apr. 15 


Sturgeon Bay Canal, Wis- 


Am. str. Louis Pah- 


and she proceeded on her way. 
Stranded on Clay Banks, 9 miles S. of sta- 




consin, Lake Michigan. 


low and sc. Delta. 


tion, in a SE. gale and snowstorm. The 








keeper procured a tug and lighter and 








transported the beach apparatus, boat 








wagon, and surfboat to Sawyer, where 6 








teams were procured to take them on to 








the scene of the wreck. The surfboat 








was manned by the life-savers and the 13 








members of the Pahlow's crew landed in 








2 trips. An attempt was then made to 








shoot a line over the Delta, but[it was not 








successful, and the surfboat was again 








launched and went alongside, but her 








crew would not come ashore. The life- 








saving crew remained on the scene of the 








wreck until the 18th, taking soundings, 








assisting tugboats, running lines, and 
transporting crews of the wrecks to and 








from the beach. The Delta was floated 








on the 16th and the Pahlow on the 18th. 


Apr. 16 


Monomoy Point, Massa- 


Am. sc. William 


Anchored on Stone Horse shoal, 3 miles SE. 




chusetts. 


Rice 


from station, with ensign union down. 








The life-savers went alongside in the 








power lifeboat, and found her leaking 








badly, with crew exhausted from contin- 








uous pumping. Surfmen manned the 
pumps, got the vessel under way, and 








took her to Gloucester, arriving at mid- 








night. They remained on board, keeping 








pumps going until 6 a. m., when help was 








procured from shore. 


Apr. 16 


Coskata, Massachusetts . . 


Catboat Ramona.. . 


Stranded 4 miles S. of station, at 1 a. m. 








The station crew went to her assistance 








in the surfboat, dug a channel in the sand 
and hauled her afloat through this canal. 








Employed from 9 a. m. to 4.30 p. m. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



149 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Apr. 16 



Apr. 16 
Apr. 17 



Saluria, Texas 



IHarbor Beach, Pointe 
f aux Barques, and Port 

Austin, Michigan, Lake 

Huron. 



Sc., name unknown. 



Am. str. Ogdens- 
burg. 



Apr. 17 



Apr. 17 
Apr. 19 
Apr. 20 



Charlevoix, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Sleeping Bear Point, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 
\ gan. 



Apr. 18 
Apr. 18 

Apr. 18 

Apr. 18 
Apr. 18 

Apr. 19 

Apr. 19 
Apr. 20 



Great Wass Island, Maine 



White Head and Burnt 
Island, Maine. 



Chad wick, New Jersey 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Hunniwells Beach, Maine 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 

Michigan. 
Point of Woods, New 

York. 



Gas. Ich. Prince 
Olaf. 



Am. sc. Eliza Day. 



Sip. Infanta. 



Am. sc. Sardinian.. 



Am. sc. William 
Booth. 



Flat Harry. 



Am. sc. J. L. Green. 



Motor boat, no 
name. 



Yawl, no name 

Sip. Nettie 



The keeper set bar ranges for an unknown 
schooner that wanted to leave the bay. 
She crossed the bar safely and proceeded 
on her voyage. 

Stranded on the reefs, 1 miles NNE. from 
Pointe aux Barques station. Crews 
from the 3 stations mentioned, going to 
her assistance, using, in the order named, 
the power lifeboat, the English model 
lifeboat, and the surf boat. The life- 
savers took soundings, threw overboard 
part of the cargo, and carried messages 
between the beach and the wreck. The 
Harbor Beach crew returned to their sta- 
tion on the 16th. A wrecking tug ar- 
rived at 7 a. m. of the 17th and the life- 
savers assisted by running lines, throw- 
ing over cargo, carrying messages, and, 
variously. At 11 a. m. she was floated 
by the tug and proceeded down the lake. 

Caught in the ice 200 yards from the end of 
the pier, and unable to move. The life- 
savers shot a line to her with the beach 
appartaus and, with the line, hauled her 
through the ice and into the harbor. 

Filled with water and capsized 5 miles NE. 
of station, at 3 a. m., afterwards drifted 
in and stranded on Pyramid Point. Dis- 
covered by lookout at daylight and the 
life-savers started at once in surfboat. 
When 2 miles from the station the 
schooner's crew of 4 were met coming 
along the beach. They were taken to 



On the 19th the life-savers went to tl 
wreck in the surfboat and succeeded, 
after nine hours' work, in righting her. 
On the 20th, after ten hours' work, she 
was pumped out and taken out to a safe 
anchorage. (See letter of acknowledg- 
ment, p. 277.) 

Ashore on Brownies Island Ledge, 1 mile 
W. of station. The life-savers went to 
her in the small boat, run out an anchor, 
hauled her off the ledges, made sail, and 



Stranded on the S. end of Metinic Island, 
6J miles S. of White Head station, sprung 
a leak and sunk, the crew making shore 
in their own boat. The life-savers from 
both stations went to her assistance in 
their surfboats, but as nothing could be 
done, they returned to their stations and 
notified the owner of the wreck. 

Stranded 1 mile N. of station, at 4 a. m. 
The life-savers arrived alongside in surf- 
boat at 4.30. Her master requested 
keeper to notify owners. She got off in 
about two hours and proceeded on her 
voyage. 

Loaded with coal and adrift in the river 
above the falls, with 2 men on board. 
The life-savers went to their assistance 
in the river boat and towed them in to 
the dock. 

Entered the harbor at 4.10 a. m., leaking 
badly and crew exhausted. Life-savers 
boarded her in the small boat at 4.30 a. m. 
and kept her pumped out until 4.30 p. m., 
while her crew rested. 

Engine disabled, outside the harbor, with 

2 men on board. Life-savers went out in 
the small boat and towed them into the 
harbor. 

Adrift in the lake, picked up by the surf- 
boat, towed in, and delivered to owner. 

Ashore on W. side of East Island Flats, 2 
miles NW. from station, with 1 man and 

3 children on board. The life-savers went 
to their assistance in the power boat. 
Her anchor was planted and an effort 
made to haul her afloat, but it was not 



150 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Apr. 20 



Apr. 20 
Apr. 20 

Apr. 21 



Station and locality. 



Apr. 21 

Apr. 21 
Apr. 22 



Apr. 23 
Apr. 24 



Apr. 23 



Apr. 23 



Apr. 24 
Apr. 24 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 



South Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Damiscoye Island and 
Hunniwells Beach, 
Maine. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Frankfort, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Barnegat, New Jersey 

Atlantic City, New Jersey. 



Buffalo, New York, Lake 
Erie. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Sip. Nettie. 



Str. John Schroeder. 



Am. str. Empire 
State. 



Am. sc. Catherine 
G. Howard. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Gas. Ich. Fannie A. 



Sc. Petrel. 



Sip. Rajah. 



Am. sc. Charles W. 
Parker. 



Str. Frank L. Bapst 



Str. Search Light. . . 



Hunniwells Beach, Maine . 

High Head, Massachu- 
setts. 



Rowboat, no name. 
Br. sc. Stanley 



successful. The man and children were 
then brought ashore. She floated at 
high water the 21st and was recovered by 
her owner. 

Ashore in the harbor, at 3 a. m. Two surf- 
men ran lines for her, using the station 
skiff, and she soon worked herself afloat. 

Parted her moorings and went adrift in the 
inner harbor, with no one on board. The 
life-savers boarded her in the surfboat 
before any damage had been done, and 
let go her anchor. The owners were then 
notified. 

! Struck on Bantam Rocks, 1 miles SSW. 
from Damiscove Island station, at 2:30 
a. m. The life-savers from that station 
went aboard in the surfboat and brought 
5 of vessel's crew ashore, the other 15 
landing in a private boat. They were all 
cared for at the station until 2 p. m. of the 
22d. Numerous trips were made between 
the wreck and shore and her sails, run- 
ning rigging, masts, gaffs, booms, com- 
pass, clock, anchors and chains, 10 dories 
and 100 fathoms of hawser were saved by 
the Damiscove Island crew and 2 dories 
by the Hunniwells Beach crew, who went 
to the scene in their surfboat. 

Moored to the dock near the station, and 
discovered by the lookout to be afire 
about 11 p. m. He went aboard and put 
it out before much damage had been done. 
Two men were asleep in the hold. 

Becalmed just outside the piers, and drift- 
ing in on the beach. The life-savers pro- 
cured a tug and towed her well out into 
the lake. 

Stranded in Barnegat Inlet, Imile N. of sta- 
tion. The life-savers went to help her in 
2 small boats, planted her anchor in deep 
water and hauled her afloat, 
nk on Absecon Inlet bar, mile SE. of sta- 
tion. The life-savers went to her assist- 
ance in the surfboat on the 23d, but could 
not find her on account of the dense fog. 
Her crew landed at the station in their 
own boat and were given dry clothing 
belonging to the W. N. R. A. dn the 
24th the station crew went out and picked 
up a dory loaded with the schooner's rig- 
ging, which had sunk the day before, and 
towed it ashore. The Parker was strip- 
ped by her owners and abandoned. 

Caught in heavy flow of ice and stranded 
on Horseshoe Reef. The life-savers went 
to the scene in the power surfboat and 
ran lines for the tugs, which finally suc- 
ceeded in hauling her afloat. 

Last seen about ENE. 2 miles from the 
station, headed in for the harbor. When 
sufficient time for her to reach port had 
elapsed and she had not arrived, the life- 
savers went out to search for her in the 
surfboat. The search was kept up from 
7.50 p. m. until 1.45 a. m., but nothing 
was found. On subsequent days the 
power lifeboat made 15 trips, the surf- 
boat 1 other trip, and the small boat 4 
trips, searching for the tug, for wreckage, 
and for bodies, and dragging the bottom. 
There were 6 men in the crew of the 
Search Light, all lost. (See letter of 
acknowledgment, p. 279.) 

Drifting out to sea, picked up by surfboat, 
taken to station, and held: for claimant. 

Stranded on Peaked Hill bar, J mile N. of 
station, at 12.30 a. m. The life-savers at 
once went to her assistance in the surf- 
boat, planted her kedge in deep water 
and, about high tide, set sail and hove 
her off, after jettisoning about one-fifth 
of her cargo. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



151 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1906. 
Apr. 24 
Apr. 25 



lAssateague Beach, Vir- 
/ ginia. 



Sips. (2) Edith Lou- 
ise and Lizzie M. 
Jones. 



Apr. 24 



Apr. 24 



Apr. 24 

Apr. 24 
Apr. 25 

Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 



Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Port Austin, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Frankfort, Michigan 
Lake Michigan. 



North Scituate, 
chusetts. 



Ashtabula, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Marblehead, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Gas. Ich. Ida. 



Gas. yt., no name. . . 



Gas. Ich. Wanderer. 



Scs. (2) Joses and 
John Mee. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Gas. Ich. Hiram. 



Scow, no name. 



Apr. 27 



Burnt Island, Maine. 



Apr. 27 do 



Br. sc. Frances A. 
Rice. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Dragged ashore 1 miles S. of station, in 
strong NW. wind, the Jones parting her 
cable and losing an anchor. The life- 
savers went to their assistance in surf- 
boat but, owing to strong wind and high 
sea, could accomplish nothing. In the 
afternoon at high water, the wind and 
sea having gone down, the surfboat re- 
turned and hauled the Edith Louise 
afloat. At 3 a. m. of the 25th, the life- 
savers went aboard the Jones and with 
the help of sails and anchor floated her at 
5.45 a. m. The keeper borrowed an an- 
chor for her, in place of the one lost, and 
she proceeded on her way. 

Engine broken down, 1 miles NE. of sta- 
tion, in Lake Erie. The station crew 
went out in the power lifeboat and towed 
her in to the dock at Erie. (See letter of 
acknowledgment, p. 277.) 

At anchor inside the breakers, at Forest 
Bay reef, 5 miles NNW. from the sta- 
tion, with rudder disabled. The power 
lifeboat went to her assistance, but found 
her crew landed and, as it was too rough 
to take her in tow, returned to station. 
When the weather moderated, returned, 
and towed her to station, hauled her out 
on lifeboat car and repaired the disabled 
steering gear. 

Engine and steering gear disabled, 1 mile 
N. of station. The life-savers towed her 
in with their surfboat, and furnished 1 of 
the crew shelter at the station for one 
day. 

The life-savers took their lines on the pier 
and hauled them to a place of safety. 
It was blowing a gale with blinding snow- 
storm. 

Engine broken down li miles E. of station. 
The life-savers towed her in with the 
surfboat and landed the 3 men of her 
crew . The morning following they towed 
her to Scituate and turned her over to 
the owners. 

Engine disabled and drifting toward a 
rocky beach west of harbor entrance. 
The life-savers went to her hi surfboat 
and towed her into the harbor. 

Stranded and sunk 5 miles S. of Cedar 
Point light-house and about 12 miles 
from the station. The keeper was noti- 
fied by telephone at midnight and went 
to the wreck in the power surfboat. Not 
being able to locate the scow in the dark, 
the life-savers landed at Cedar Point 
dock and walked down the beach. At 
daylight the wreck was located with 3 
men in the fore peak. A fisherman's 
skiff was procured and, although the sea 
was high, the skiff was successfully 
launched and the 3 men landed. They 
were then taken to Sandusky in the 
power boat where dry clothing was pro- 
cured for them. On the 27th the life- 
savers returned to the wreck in the power 
boat and assisted the wreckers by run- 
ning lines, throwing over cargo, and vari- 
ously. The scow was floated about noon . 

Anchored in a dangerous and exposed 
place at the SE. end of Aliens Island, but 
on account of set of tide and light breeze, 
unable to shift. The life-savers went on 
board in the power boat, assisted to get 
anchor, and towed her to a safe anchor- 
age. 

Engine disabled J mile S W . of station. The 
power boat went to her assistance, towed 
her into the station, the life-savers over- 
hauled the engine and got it working 
again, and she proceeded to her destina- 
tion. 



152 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Apr. 27 

Apr. 27 



Apr. 27 



Apr. 28 



Apr. 28 



Apr. 29 



Apr. 29 



Apr. 29 



Apr. 30 



Apr. 30 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Humboldt Bay, California. 



White Head, Maine 



Poyners Hill and Caffeys 
Inlet, North Carolina, 



Flat, no name 



Am. str. R. J. Gor- 
don. 



Gas. Ich., no name. . 



Am. sc. Lena White. 



Port. Bk. Oriente . . 



Quoddy Head, Maine. 



Am. sc. Anna 



Lake View Beach, Michi- 
gan, Lake Huron. 



Monomoy, Massachusetts. 



Jerrys Point, and Wallis 
Sands, New Hampshire. 



Am. Str. Pilgrim . . . 



Catboat Fardyce 



Dory, no name 



Gay Head, Massachusetts. 



Bge. Lewis Thomp- 
son. 



Adrift above the falls, with 2 men on board. 
The life-savers went alongside, took 
them in tow, and brought them to shore. 

Adrift 3 miles S. of station, with machin- 
ery disabled and blowing distress sig- 
nals. The keeper telephoned for a tug 
and the life-savers went alongside in the 
surfboat, remaining by her until the tug 
arrived, when a line was run for the tug 
and she proceeded down the lake with the 
steamer in tow. 

Life-savers go out in surfboat and grapple 
for sunken launch. Brought it to the 
surface, but lost it again upon change of 
tide. At slack water it was raised and 
towed ashore. 

Stranded on a sunken ledge near Sleepers 
Point, 7 miles NE. of station in a thick 
fog. The life-savers boarded her in the 
surfboat and manned the pumps until 
the arrival of a tug. They ran lines for 
the tug and, in a short time, she was 
hauled afloat. 

Stranded 2 miles SE. of Poyners Hill sta- 
tion, and discovered at 3.15 a. m. The 
life-savers from both stations went to 
the wreck with their beach gear and flred 
4 shots from the Lyle gun, the last one 
landing on her deck, but there was no 
sign of life on board. It was afterwards 
learned that her crew had abandoned her 
and were picked up by a fishing schooner 
and landed in Norfolk. A wrecking tug 
arrived and took charge at 3 p. m. 

Stranded on Nancy Ledge, Quoddy Bay, 
3i miles E . of station, in thick fog. W hen 
the tide rose she began to break up and 
her crew of 7 came to the station, where 
they were cared for two days. The life- 
savers made 2 trips to the wreck in the 
surfboat, and saved all the sails and rig- 
ging they could get. These were turned 
over to the owner. The vessel became a 
total wreck 

Sprung a leak and beached 4 miles S. of sta- 
tion, strong NE. wind and high sea. The 
life-savers were notified by telephone and 
transported their surfboat to the scene 
on a wagon. Three trips were made to 
the stranded vessel and 31 people all on 
board were safely landed. On subse- 
quent days 2 other trips were made in 
the surfboat, assisting the wreckers. 
(See letter of acknowledgement, p. 278.) 

Stranded on a bar, \ mile W. of station. 
Keeper and surfmen went to her in dory 
but, owing to falling tide, failed to float 
her. Took occupant ashore and sup- 
plied him with provisions. At high wa- 
ter the life-savers took him off and floated 
his boat. 

This boat with 1 occupant capsized in the 
surf 1| miles NE. of Wallis Sands station. 
They were called by messenger and pro- 
ceeded immediately to the scene, calling 
up the Jerrys Point station by telephone. 
The latter crew went in their surfboat; 
upon their arrival they found that the 
liie-savers from Wallis Sands had recov- 
ered the body from the water and had 
hauled the dory up on the beach. The 
victim had died of heart failure and had 
slipped off the boat's bottom when the 
life-savers were within 40 feet of him. 

In tow of a tug, stranded near Gay Head 
Light, f mile S. of station, in a thick fog. 
The life-savers went on board in the surf- 
boat and transported her crew of 3 to the 
tug. On May 1, took the crew back to 
the barge. On the 2d, assisted the tug 
by running hawser to barge, at high wa- 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



153 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1907. 
Apr. 30 



Apr. 30 



May 1 
May 1 



May 1 
May 2 



May 2 

May 3 

May 3 

May 3 

May 3 

May 3 



May 3 
May 3 



Station and locality. 



Gay Head, Massachusetts 
Smith Island, Virginia. . . . 



Salisbury Beach, 

chusetts. 
Point of Woods, New 

York. 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Cape Henry, Virginia. . . . 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Bge. Lewis Thomp- 
son. 



Am. sc. Sterling Sis- 
ters. 



Dory, no name 

Am. sc. Cozy 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Marblehead, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Charlevoix, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Frankfort, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Grand Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Evanston, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 



Holland, Michigan, Lake 

Michigan. 
Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 

Michigan. 



Bge. Alex Anderson . 



Am. sc Glendy 
Stewart. 



Am. str. Chas. A. 
Street; Am. sc. 
Jeremiah God- 
frey. 

Am. sc. Louise A. 
Benton. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 

Gas. loh., no name. 
Gas. Ich. Fox... 



Am. str. Jas. H. 
Reed. 



Small boat, no 

name. 
Skiff, no name 



ter in the morning and again in the after- 
noon, using the surfboat on both occa- 
sions. The barge was floated on the 
afternoon high water. 

Dragged her anchors and stranded on Cape 
Charles Point, 4 miles WSW. from sta- 
tion, at 9 p. m. of the 29th. Being thick 
weather, was not discovered until the 
30th. At high water of the 30th, the sta- 
tion crew went on board in the small boat 
and tried to float her, but were not suc- 
cessful. May 1 they returned, took out 
part of her cargo, ran an anchor and hove 
her afloat. The cargo was then put back 
on board and she proceeded. 

Surfman finds a fisherman's dory adrift, 
secures it, and returns it to owner. 

Lookout reported a schooner stranded 1 
miles N. of station. Life-savers pro- 
ceeded to the scene in power boat and laid 
out an anchor and hawser. Vessel was 
hauled off at high water, May 2, and pro- 
ceeded up the bay. 

Stranded at the outer end of the harbor 
piers. Life-savers assisted in running 
lines on the pier and in warping barge 
into harbor. 

Keeper was notified by master that his 
schooner had sunk during the night in 
Lynnhaven Bay. Life-savers took trol- 
ley to boathouse, launched surfboat, 
boarded schooner, and proceeded to 
work pumps, lay out anchors, and 
lighten her cargo. At high water they 
hauled schooner into deep water and 
dropped anchor in a good berth. The 
surfmen were absent irom the station 
from 7 a. m. until 8 p. m. 

Lookout reported a steamer and schooner 
stranded on Mouse Island reef. Life- 
savers proceeded to the scene in the 
power surfboat and assisted steamer in 
releasing schooner. 

Head rigging had been carried away in 
collision with steamer, which towed her 
to a point off the port and left her at 
anchor. Life-savers went to her in surf- 
boat, returned ashore and secured tug, 
and later went out and assisted in heav- 
ing up anchor. 

At 4 a. m. surfman discovered the Culver 
gasoline ferryboat drifting out in the 
lake. He secured it and turned it over 
to owner. 

Broke down 1J miles W. of station. Life- 
savers went out in surfboat and towed 
launch in to pier. 

Broke down and anchored 5 miles E. of 
station. Life-savers secured a tug, went 
out to disabled craft, and ran lines be- 
tween her and tug. 

At 9 p. m. lookout reported steamer's lights 
nearer shore than usual course. Surf- 
boat was hauled abreast of steamer; 
owing to high surf it took an hour for 
life-savers to reach her It was blowing 
NE gale and vessel had stranded in 
snow squall Life-savers telephoned for 
tug and took soundings the 4th and 5th 
to determine nature of bottom and lo- 
cate best water. The steamer was re- 
leased the forenoon of the 5th, after 
throwing overboard one-third of her 
cargo of iron ore. 

Surfmen went ont in skiff and picked up 
small boat adrift. Restored it to owners. 

Capsized in surf 1 mile S. of station while 
trying to land; crew of 2 men got safely 
ashore. Accident was immediately re- 
ported by lookout. Life-savers pro- 
ceeded to scene in surfboat, righted and 
bailed out skiff, hauled it up on beach 
and recovered ftshing gear. 



154 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
May 3 



May 4 



May 4 



May 4 

May 4 
May 5 



May 5 

May 5 

May 5 

May 5 

May 5 

May 5 

May 5 

May 5 

May 6 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Burnt Island, Maine... 



False Cape, Virginia: 
Wash Woods, North 
Carolina. 



Skiff, no name 

Am. sc. Illinois . . . 



Br. str. Doar. 



Thunder Bay Island, 
Michigan, Lake Huron. 

White River, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Plum Island, Massachu- 
setts. 



City Point,Massachusetts. 



Gas. Ich. Fannie A 



Scs. Tillie E and 
Kate Howard. 

Am. sc. James and 
Ella. 



Sip. Cypress. 



Dory, no name 



Gurnet, Massachusetts Sip., no name , 

Short Beach, New York. . . Am. str. Reliance . . . 
Durants, North Carolina.' Am. sc. Marblehead . 



Sullivans Island, South 
Carolina. 



Lake View Beach, Michi- 
gan, Lake Huron. 

Grand Marais, Michigan, 
Lake Superior. 



Jackson Park, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Small boat, no name 



Am. str. Pilgrim.. 
Am. str. Sanilac. . . 



Gas.lch. D. E.Coye. 



Surfmen went out in small boat and picked 
up a skiff adrift in the river. Restored 
it to its owner. 

Stranded on S. side of Martins Point. Life- 
savers took master ashore to telephone 
for tug. Returned to schooner and then 
went to Franklin Light to pilot tug. 
Owing to dense fog tug did not find 
schooner. Life-savers assisted crew in 
setting sail to list schooner, and at high 
tide she came off. 

Stranded 2J miles SE. of station, hazy 
weather, and a moderate sea. Discov- 
ered by lookout at 1.15 a.m. Vessel was 
discovered at the same time by the patrol 
of the Wash Woods station. He burned 
a red light to let them know that help was 
at hand. The False Cape crew, assisted 
by the keeper and 2 life-savers from the 
Wash Woods crew, launched the surfboat 
and hoarded the steamer. Returned 
ashore and telephoned for tug, which 
arrived at 10 a, m., pulled vessel off, and 
took her in tow. 

Engine broke down 1 mile SE. of station. 
Life-savers went out to her in surfboat 
and gave her a tow to North Point. 

Life-savers towed them clear of the pier 
heads so they could stand out. 

Discovered by patrol when she stranded at 
5.15 a. m., 7 miles SSE. of station. Life- 
savers proceeded to scene in surfboat, 
found vessel leaking badly. Assisted at 
pumps and threw overboard 100 tons of 
sand. Tug arrived at 3.30 p. m., and life- 
savers ran hawser from tug to schooner. 
She was floated at high tide, crew return- 
ing to station at 6.50 p. m. 

Stranded J mile N. of station. Discovered 
by patrol. Life-savers went to her, but, 
on account of falling tide, had to wait for 
high water. Laid out an anchor and ran 
line to her masthead to right her and keep 
her from filling at high water. Sloop 
was hauled off at 2 a. m. 

Three men, under the influence of liquor, 
capsized dory \ mile SE of station. Life- 
savers went to their assistance in launch. 
Rescued the men, righted and bailed out 
boat, and took them in to station. 

Carried away mast; life-savers went out 
in dory and towed boat in to station. 
Supplied owner with rigging and mast, 
and assisted him in setting up same. 
He proceeded to Plymouth. 

Went ashore in entering Jones Inlet. Life- 
savers went to her assistance and after 
tug was floated at high water piloted her 
into inlet. 

Dragged her anchor and stranded 1 mile N. 
of station. Fresh NE. wind and rough 
sea. Life-savers assisted in getting ves- 
sel into deep water. 

Surfman discovered small boat capsized 3 
miles from station. Life-savers pro- 
ceeded to scene in surfboat. The occu- 
pants, 3 soldiers, had already righted 
their boat. They were towed to their 
destination. 

Life-savers assist in getting lighter off to 
steamer and to load heavy machinery. 

With barge in tow, fouled tow line while 
entering harbor. Life-savers went to 
her in surfboat and, at master's request, 
sent a tug out to her. She was towed in 
to dock and line was cleared from wheel. 

At 7.30 p. m. lookout reported a launch 
disabled } mile NE. of station. Life- 
savers went to her in surfboat and towed 
her into harbor. A party of 5 were on 
board. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



155 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
May 7 

May 7 
May 7 

May 9 

May 9 

May 9 

May 9 
May 10 
May 10 

May 10 

May 10 
May 10 
May 10 

May 11 
May 11 

May 11 
May 11 



Fenwick Island, Delaware 



Smith Island, Virginia. . . . 



Southside, California 



Saluria, Texas. 



Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Grand Marais, Michigan, 
Lake Superior. 



Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 

Hunni wells Beach, Maine. 
Fletchers Neck, Maine .. 



Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. 



Nahant, Massachusetts. . 



City Point, Massachusetts. 



Block Island, Rhode Is- 
land. 



Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Point Allerton, Massachu- 
setts. 



Blue Point, New York. . . . 



Oregon Inlet, North Caro- 
lina. 



Fish boat, no name 

Am. sc. Wm. Grif- 
fith. 

Gas. Ich., no name. 

Skiff, no name 

Yawl, no name 

...do... 



Gas. Ich., no name. 
Two lighters 



Am. sc. Maggie Mil- 
ler. 



Sailboat, no name . 

Sip. Maud 

Rowboat, no name 
Gas. Ich., no name. 

...do... 



Dory, no name.. 



Sip. Tidal Wave.... 



Gas Ich., no name.. . 



Lookout discovered a boat with several 
fishermen capsized in the surf. Life- 
savers went to their assistance. Fisher- 
men had gotten ashore. Life-savers as- 
sisted in hauling boat up on .the beach. 

Stranded 3 miles WSW. of station on en- 
tering channel. Life-savers went out in 
small boat, ran out an anchor and, at 
high water, hove schooner into deep 
water. 

Lookout reported a launch broken down, 
i mile N. of station, and drifting into the 
breakers. Life-savers proceeded to 
scene in surfboat, gave her a line and 
towed launch to safety. 

Surfman found a skiff that had gone adrift 
from the sloop Bessie in a norther. Hauled 
boat up on beach and later delivered it 
to owner. 

On weather side of breakwater, 2 occupants 
could not keep it clear, in perilous posi- 
tion. Life-savers in surfboat got grap- 
nel to yawl and towed it to lee side of 
breakwater. 

Blowing fresh and choppy, cook of the tug 
Meyer got adrift in yawl. Life-savers in 
surfboat pulled out in harbor and towed 
the yawl back to the dock. 

At 5a. m. surfman launched skiff and towed 
launch to the shore. It was adrift on 
Black Lake. 

At 2 a. m. the watch discovered 2 lighters 
drifting out to sea. He got a line to them 
and secured them at wharf. 

Stranded 1J miles N. of station. Imme- 
diately reported by lookout. Life-savers 
went out in surfboat, pumped out 
schooner and hove up anchor. Floated 
at high tide and was piloted by life-saver 
out of harbor. 

Boat anchored in shoal place. Had been 
trying to beat against a head tide, blow- 
ing a gale, Helpless and in a dangerous 
position. Life-savers went out in surf- 
boat, towed the boat ashore and hauled 
it up on the beach. Attended to the 
occupant who was suffering from sea- 
sickness. 

Dragged her anchor and was picked up by 
station dory 1J miles from station. She 
was towed to safe anchorage and later 
turned over to owner. 

Tender of the sloop Gulinearhad parted her 
painter and gone adrift in strong breeze. 
It was picked up by life-savers and re- 
turned to sloop. 

Owner applied at station at 7.50 p. m. for 
assistance to save his boat, which had 
broken down and drifted ashore in fresh 
W. wind. Life-savers hauled boat up out 
of danger. 

Lookout discovered a boat in distress 
drifting to sea, 1 mile SE. of station. 
Station dory went out and towed launch 
to Little Harbor and there anchored her. 

Discovered by surfman driftirfg toward 
bar, which was breaking. Life-savers 
went out in station dory and towed the 
boat to the station. The occupant, a 
soldier, had been unable to manage it 
under sail. 

Discovered by lookout dragging her anchor 
and drifting before fresh north wind 
toward the beach. Surfmen went out to 
her, cleared her anchor, and let go an- 
other, fetching sloop up. 

Left inlet for Manteo. When 2 miles 
from station, dropped anchor. Life- 
savers went to her, found engine broken 
down, towed launch back to station. 



156 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
Mav 11 



May 11 
May 12 

May 12 

May 12 

May 12 
May 12 
May 12 

May 12 

May 12 
May 13 

May 13 

May 13 
May 13 

May 13 



Durants, North Carolina.. 



Charlotte, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 



Hunniwells Beach, Maine. 



City Point. Massachu- 
setts. 



Race Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Potunk, New York 



Am. sc. Georgia A. 
Gaskins. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Am. sc. Alma . 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

Holland Michigan. Lake 
Michigan. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 



.do. 



Gas. Ich. Edith 

Gas. Ich. A. Brown. 

Gas. Ich. Oyster 
Transport. 

Gas. Ich., no name. . 
Sip. Budweiser 

Yawl, no name 

Gas. Ich., no name. . 



City Point, Massachusetts 



Sip. yt. Thelma 11 



Spermaceti Cove, New Jer- Sc. yt. Mayflower . 
sey. 



Saluria, Texas. 



Thunder Bay Island, 
Michigan, Lake Huron. 



Jackson Park and Old 
Chicago, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 



Am. sc. Cazadero... 



Gas. Ich. Fannie A. . 



Sip. yt. Huntress. 



Reported by lookout at anchor, 4 miles W. 
of station, with signal of distress flying. 
Surfmen boarded her and found windlass 
broken down. They got her underway, 
anchoring in a safe berth. 

Keeper was notified by telephone that 
launch was ashore, at 9.30 p. m., 4 miles 
SE. of station. Life-savers in power 
boat, w'th surf boat in tow, proceeded to 
the scene. The next day she was hauled 
off, towed to station, hauled out on 
incline and put in good condition. 

Stranded 2 miles S. by W., of station. Life- 
savers launched surfboat and proceeded 
to scene; vessel leaking badly, manned 
pumps and set sail to list her over. Life- 
savers had nearly floated schooner when 
tug came up and hauled her off. Surf- 
men accompanying them to Bath, man- 
ning the pumps. 

Disabled, master called out to station for 
assistance. Life-savers went out in 
launch and towed boat in to yacht club 
landing. 

Engine disabled and launch drifted ashore 
2 miles SSW. of station. Life-savers re- 
moved ballast and got boat up on beach; 
the next day they returned to the scene 
and boat was safely launched. 

Ran aground J mile NE. of station. Life- 
savers went out to her, succeeded in heav- 
ing her off and anchored her in deep water. 

Broke down in harbor channel and was 
drifting ashore. Keeper went out and 
towed it in to landing. 

Capsized i mile E. of station. Lookout re- 
ported it and life-savers immediately went 
to the assistance of the 2 men thrown into 
the water. They were rescued, and the 
boat righted, bailed out and turned over 
to owner. 

Two occupants intoxicated, collided with 
submerged pier. Wind blowing a S. gale 
and the sea rough. Accident was reported 
by lookout and life-savers immediately 
went to the rescue in surfboat, saving the 
inebriates from a watery grave. 

Blowing a SW. gale, sea rough, engine be- 
came disabled 4 miles E. of station. Dis- 
covered by lookout. Surfmen in power 
lifeboat proceeded to the scene and towed 
disabled boat to Jackson Park. 

At 1.20 a. m. surfmanon patrol discovered 
the yacht pounding against the iron pier, 
where she had fetched up after dragging 
her anchor. Alarm was given and life- 
savers in power launch soon arrived on 
scene. The yacht was towed out to a 
safe anchorage and given a long scope of 
chain. 

Reported by lookout when she grounded 
on Hogs Back Shoal. Station crew went 
out in surfboat, carried out anchor and 
hove her into deeper water. Yacht was 
floated at high tide. 

In distress, wished to seek shelter from 
stormy weather. Schooner set signal 
and the surfmen put up ranges. She 
crossed in over the bar in safety. 

Engine broke down 12 miles E. of station. 
Discovered by patrol at 7 p. m. Life- 
savers went to her in surfboat and, after 
a long pull, brought her in to North 
Point. After repairing, the launch again 
broke down the 17th, and the life-savers 
again towed her in with the surfboat. 

Keepers of both stations received notifica- 
tion that a gasoline launch, towing a 
sloop showing distress signal, had been 
seen off 50th street. The Jackson Park 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



157 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
May 13 



May 13 



May 13 
May 14 

May 14 
May 15 

May 15 
May 15 
May 16 

May 16 
May 16 

May 16 
May 18 

May 18 



Jackson Park and Old 
Chicago, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 



Point Adams, Oregon 



Sip. yt. Huntress . . 



Am. shp. Emily 
Reed. 



Cape , Disappointment, 
Washington. 



Gurnet, Massachusetts 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Monomoy Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Manistee, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Great Wass Island, Maine. 



Old Harbor, Massachu- 
setts. 



Lewes and Cape Henlopen, 
Delaware. 



Little Kinnakeet, North 
Carolina. 

Gurnet, Massachusetts . . 



Short Beach, New York . . 



Fish boat, no name . 



Sip. yt. Penelope 



Small boat, no name 



Am. sc. W. H. 
Moody. 



Gas. bge. Night 
Hawk. 



Am. str. David Rust 



Am. sc. Ellen M. 
Mitchell. 



St. yt. Verona 

Sip. yt. Wabun 

Am. scs. Hobson 
and Little Bettie. 

Small boat, no name 
Small boat, no name 



surfboat proceeded to scene with all 
speed, the launch was able to take care 
of herself so the surfboat took the 
sloop in tow. The Old Chicago power 
lifeboat soon came up and assisted 
in taking the Huntress in to a safe berth. 

Stranded on Desdemona Sands, 1 mile N. 
of station. Was reported by lookout 
and surfboat put out to her assistance, 
life-savers laying out a kedge anchor and 
wire cable and running a line to the tug 
Wallula, which arrived soon after. Ef- 
forts at floating the ship were unsuccess- 
ful. On May 14, the life-savers assisted 
in carrying out 1 of the ship's anchors and 
80 fathoms of chain. At 12.45 a. m. May 
15 the life-savers went off and assisted in 
heaving vessel into deep water. She was 
undamaged and the tug towed her to 
Astoria. 

While life-savers were patrolling off Pea- 
cock Spit in power lifeboat, a fish boat 
with 2 occupants capsized 400 yards in- 
shore, both men losing their lives. (For 
detailed account see page .) 

The master having lost his tender and not 
knowing the channel signaled for assist- 
ance. Life-savers went out in dory, re- 
covered tender and piloted the sloop into 
port. 

Surfman discovered a skiff adrift in the 
river, towed it to the station and later 
restored it to owner. 

Discovered by lookout at 5.15 a. m., 
stranded 4J miles W. by S. of station. 
Life-savers went to her in power lifeboat. 
Sail was set and, at high water, the 
schooner was driven over the shoal. 

Heavily laden with gravel, broke down off 
harbor entrance. Sea choppy, she would 
have filled and sunk if life-savers had not 
gotten a line to scow and towed her 
inside. 

Grounded off pierhead and blew signal 
for assistance. Life-savers boarded the 
steamer and the keeper directed the mas- 
ter where to work vessel into channel and 
piloted her in. 

\t 3.45 a. m. discovered ashore by patrol, 
3 miles W. of station. Life-savers in 
surfboat immediately boarded her and 
found vessel fast on the rocks, badly 
strained and nearly full of water. No 
chance of saving her. Keeper tele- 
graphed to owners and life-savers landed 
crew and baggage. 

Stranded 1 mile SSW. of station, on Roar- 
ing Bull shoal, while trying to enter Chat- 
ham. In dangerous position. Wind 
blowing fresh and choppy sea. Life- 
savers went out to her in surfboat. Car- 
ried out anchor and cable and, at mid- 
night, she was hauled off into deep water. 

At 5.45 light-house keeper notified the 
Lewes station the sloop was aground, 19 
miles N. of station. Keeper notified the 
station at Cape Henlopen. Both crews 
proceeded to the scene, buried sand an- 
chor, clapped on tackles and hauled yacht 
out on the beach. 

Surfmen are called upon to assist in block- 
ing up vessels for repairs. Request com- 
plied with. 

Surfmen in power boat discover 2 men in 
small boat making ineffectual effort to 
head up against strong tide and wind. 
They were taken in tow to the wharf. 

Surfman in small boat tows a broken-down 
launch, with 1 occupant, to the shore. 



158 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
May 18 



May 19 
May 19 

May 19 
May 19 

May 19 
May 19 

May 20 

May 20 
May 20 

May 20 

May 20 



May 20 
May 21 



Durants, North Carolina. 



Burnt Island, Maine 



Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 



Ludington, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

South Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Evanston, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. (Service by 
Rogers Park Boat Club.) 

Jackson Park, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



White Head, Maino 



Gurnet, Massachusetts.. 



Fire Island, New York . . 



Two Mile Beach, New Jer- 



Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 



Marblehead, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Damiscove Island, Maine. 



Am. sc. Tennyson . 



Am. sc. Temper- 
ance Belle. 



Small boat, no name 

Small boat, no name 
Am. sc. Maryette. . . 

Rowboat, no name. 



Gas. Ich. Bon Ami 
and sail boat Eta. 



Am. sc. Jonathan 
Cone. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Sip., no name 



Gas. Ich. Fannie E. 
Moffatt. 



Am. str. Bertha 
Wallace. 



Gas. Ich. Gest. 



Sip. Vigilant. 



Discovered by lookout at 5.30 a. m., 
stranded 3 miles N. of station. Surf- 
men went to her, ran out an anchor, and 
discharged part of cargo. Gas. Ich. 
Dutcher came along and with her assist- 
ance the schooner was hove off into deep 
water. 

At 12.30 a. m. is warned off from coming 
ashore by patrol. Is soclose to the shore 
that he directs her how to steer into safe 
anchorage. 

Two men fishing from small boat outside 
of piers. Wind freshened, boat was 
driven against pier and capsized. Life- 
savers went out, righted and bailed out 
boat and picked up boat and fishing gear. 
The occupants had climbed up on pier. 

Lookout discovered a skiff, drifting out 
through the channel; he went out in sta- 
tion boat and towed skiff to the dock. 

Discovered by lookout at 10 p. m. , heading 
onto pier; he warned heT in time to pre- 
vent striking head on. Surf men take 
vessel's lines, and haul her to a safe berth 
abreast of station. 

Volunteer life-savers go out in surfboat to 
3 occupants of sinking boat and tow 
them ashore. 

Reported by lookout as in distress. Life- 
savers went out in surfboat and found 
their engine broken down. They were 
towed in to their moorings. 

Swept out of her course by strong current, 
in thick fog. Anchored in dangerous 
position among sunken ledges, 400 yards 
S. of station. Life-savers boarded her 
in surfboat, hoisted sails, hove up anchor 
and piloted her out clear of ledge. The 
schooner proceeded on her way. 

Night patrol discovers a launch disabled 
3 miles N. of station. Notifies station 
by burning coston. Life-savers come 
out in power boat and pilot launch in 
to the station. 

With a crew of 3 men, caught out in a fresh 
blow, sail blown away and boat driven 
ashore, discovered by lookout. Surfmen 
went to their assistance, got boat off the 
beach, and anchored it in a safe harbor. 
Took the 3 men to the station, gave them 
supper and shelter for the night, and sup- 
plied them with dry clothes from the 
W.N.R. A. supplies. 

Owner needed launch after it had left port. 
He telephoned station to recall it. Life- 
savers rowed 1J miles offshore and de- 
livered message. 

Keeper notified by telephone that she had 
broken down 18 miles WSW. of station. 
Blowing fresh and a high sea. Surfmen 
proceeded to the scene in power lifeboat 
and found her anchored on lee shore. One 
man, 2 women, and a child, without 
provisions on board, the man ill. The 
owner had landed in tender to call for aid, 
but owing to the stormy weather, had 
been unable to return. Surfmen got up 
her anchor and towed her back to Erie. 

Broke down 7 miles SE. of station. Dis- 
covered by life-savers while out cruising 
in power lifeboat, they were towed to a 
place of shelter. 

Caught out in squall, mast carried away, 2 
miles W . of station. Discovered by look- 
out. Life-savers went to their assist- 
ance in surfboat, but found that they had 
secured their mast and sail and were 
safely anchored. Surfmen returned to 
the station. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-HAVING SERVICE. 



159 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1907. 
May 21 



May 21 
May 21 

May 21 
May 21 

May 22 
May 22 
May 24 

May 24 



May 25 
May 25 



May 25 
May 25 

May 25 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Narragansett Pier, Rhode Sailboat, no name. 
Island. 



Oak Island, New York Am. sc. Anna 

Brown. 



Grand Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Sheboygan, Wisconsin, 
LakeMichigan. 



Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake Small boat, no 
Erie. name. 



Small boats of str. 
Naomi. 



Gas. lens. Pinta 
and Florence. 



Am. sc. Carrier 



Marblehead, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Little Kinnakeet, North 

Carolina. 
Niagara, New York, 

Lake Ontario. 



Ludington, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Old Chicago, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. (Service by 
Farragut Yacht Club) . 

Ilwaco Beach, Washing- 
ton. 



Gas. Ich. Beatrice. . . 



Sip. yt. Totem 



Raft, no name 



Am. sc. N. J. Mer- 
cedes. 
Rowboat, no name 



Am. sc. Minnie 

Johnston. 
Canoe Restless . . . 



Am. sc. Solano 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



Capsized in a fresh breeze, 1 mile NE. of 
station. Discovered by lookout. The 
occupant would have drowned had it not 
been for the timely assistance of the surf- 
men. They righted and bailed out boat 
and took occupant, who proved to be the 
assistant keeper of the Whale Rock light, 
to his station. 

Stranded 1J miles S. of station, while enter- 
ing Fire Island inlet. Discovered by 
lookout. Life-savers boarded her in surf- 
boat. Assisted in working schooner off 
and piloted her into inlet. 

The steamer Kansas, with the survivors of 
the burned steamer Naomi on board, 
hailed the station and asked the keeper 
to look out for the Naomi's lifeboats, 
which she had in tow. Surfboat went 
out and picked them up and towed them 
to the Crosby dock. 

At 12.54 a. m. the lookout gave alarm, hav- 
ing discovered 2 boats afire on the beach, 
$ mile SE. of station. Life-savers pro- 
ceeded immediately to the scene; in a few 
minutes the Florence was saved. She 
was only slightly damaged. The Pinta 
was a total loss. 

Master, in yawl, applied at station for tow 
out to his vessel, hove to out in the Lake; 
it was too rough for him to pull out. The 
surfboat took him in tow. As he wished 
to enter harbor, the surfmen went on 
board and helped handle sails and run 
lines. 

When assistant light keeper was pulling 
out to his station he lost his oars. He 
signaled to the lookout and a surfman 
went out and towed him to the station. 

When 2 miles N. of station broke down and 
made dL tress signals. The power surf- 
boat went to their assistance and towed 
them to a dock. 

Weather unfavorable. Had anchored off 
Tompkins Island. Two occupants, fear- 
ing that she would drag ashore, came to 
station for assistance. Life-savers went 
out in launch and towed her to a safe an- 
chorage. 

Wind freshened and the 2 men in charge 
found raft unmanageable. They came to 
the station at 10.20 p. m. for assistance. 
Life-savers got up steam in the Relief, 
and towed raft to public landing, thus 
preventing damage to the many yachts 
anchored in the neighborhood. 

Surfmen assisted in launching vessel from 
ways after repairing. 

Three soldiers from Fort Niagara tried to 
cross the river, were carried out in the 
lake, where a high sea was running. The 
alarm was given by the lookout and the 
life-savers went to their rescue in surf- 
boat. The rowboat was fast filling and 
but for the timely arrival of the surfmen 
the 3 soldiers would have been probably 
lost. The rowboat was taken in tow to 
the station. (See letter of acknowledg- 
ment, p. 278.) 

The vessel, unable to beat in against head 
wind, life-savers towed her into harbor. 

With 2 occupants capsized near the club- 
house. Volunteer life-savers went out to 
them in surfboat and brought them 
ashore. 

At request of underwriters, the life-savers 
launched surfboat and started out for 
stranded schooner. After pulling about 
5 miles the steamer Acme took them in 
tow. The surfmen ran a line to the So- 
lano, and brought ashore a dispatch from 
the master. 



29909 OS 11 



160 



UNITED STATES -LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
May 26 



May 26 



May 26 



May 26 



May 26 



May 26 



Point Allerton, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



.do. 



May 26 



May 26 



May 27 



May 27 
May 27 
May 27 



Bois Blanc, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Mich 



Old Chicago. Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 



Evanston, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 

Port Austin, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Sip. Evelyn 

Rowboat No. 33 . . 



Catboat, no name . 



Am. sc. Mary Greg- 
ory. 



Small boat, no 
name. 



Sip. Alice Hartman. 



Gas. Ich. Sacajawea. 



Gas. Ich., no name. . 



Am. str. C. F. Biel- 
man and tow sc. 
Mary E. McLach- 
lan. 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

Hammond, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Rowboat, no name 
Gas. Ich., no name. 
St. yt. CelaS 



Discovered by lookout ashore 2 miles 
NNW. of station. Life-savers boarded 
the sloop and hauled her off undamaged. 

Capsized 4 miles ENE. of station. Keeper 
received notification by telephone at 1.10 

&m. Life-savers proceeded to the scene 
power lifeboat. The occupants had 
been picked up by another boat. The 
surfmen recovered the boat equipments 
and articles of clothing, which were re- 
turned to the owners. 

Capsized f mile W. of station. Discov- 
ered by lookout. Life-savers proceeded 
to the scene in the power lifeboat. Res- 
cued man from the water, righted the 
boat, and took them to the station. 

Stranded 3 miles W. of station. Life- 
savers go to Sheboygan and secure 
pumps and try to pump her out, but find 
her so badly stove in that the attempt is 
given up. 

Discovered by surfman, adrift 1 mile W. of 
station, 3 small boys in her. Wind blow- 
ing strong. Life-savers went out in 
launch and towed them to dock. 

Left the harbor in the forenoon, manned by 
3 inexperienced men. Life-savers kept 
close watch on her and in the evening she 
was sighted trying to beat back, but 
making little headway. The weather 
was threatening, so power lifeboat was 
launched, and surfmen went out and 
towed them back to harbor. Just miss- 
ing a heavy squall that developed into a 
gale. 

Blowing a N. gale, raining, and a high sea. 
Parted moorings and was drifting out in 
the lake when surfman, at 9.20 p. m., dis- 
covered it. He burned a Coston signal 
and the surfboat went out and secured 
the launch. 

Life-savers hauled out a small launch 
lying on the beach. Otherwise it would 
have been dashed to pieces. 

Stranded in fog 1 mile N. of station. Dis- 
covered by lookout at 2 a. m. Life- 
savers boarded her in surfboat. Keeper 
landed master and took him in buggy to 
Port Austin, where he telephoned for a 
tug. It was now blowing strong, so the 
surfmen returned the master in the life- 
boat . Took off 3 men and 1 woman, went 
over to the schooner, which was also 
ashore, and took off her entire crew of 8 
men. These people were sheltered and 
fed at t he station until the 28th, when the 
wind had abated; also 14 other men that 
were taken from the steamer later in the 
day, when the wind had increased to a 
strong gale. The tug Favorite arrived 
from Duluth at 5 a. m. the next morning. 
The surfmen put the diver and owner of 
steamer on board, assisted in placing 
pumps, throwing out cargo of iron ore 
and worked the small pumps on the 
barge. The steamer was hauled off the 
29th and the schooner the night of the 
30th, the life-savers standing by and as- 
sisting at all times. 

Patrol discovers a small skiff drifting out 
of harbor. He secures boat to the dock 
and later turned it over to owner. 

Engine disabled, adrift mile SW. of sta- 
tion. Life-savers towed launch to boat- 
house, where repairs were made. 

Sinks at moorings, 6 miles NW. of station, 
N W. gale and heavy sea. Life-savers no- 
tified by telephone at 9 p. m. The next 
morning, the wind and sea having 
abated, the life-savers proceeded to the 
wreck in surfboat. Found her with 
decks awash . They succeeded in fl oating 
her in an undamaged condition. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



161 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
May 27 



North Manitou Island, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 
gan. 



Am. sc. Oneida.. 



May 28 
May 28 
May 28 



May 29 



May 29 
May 29 



May 29 



May 29 



May 29 



Damiscove Island, Maine . 
City Point, Massachusetts. 
Cape May, New Jersey 



Small boat, no name. 
Gas. Ich. Onaway... 



Gas. Ich. Louie S. 
Allen. 



White Head, Maine. 



Am. sc. Rosa E . . . 



Quogue, New York . 



Lewes and Cape Henlo- 
pen, Delaware. 



Catboat, no name 
Gas. yt. Geisha 



Hog Island, Virginia 



Galveston, Texas. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Gas. Ich. Snail 



Gas. Ich. Ella... 



Rowboat, no name 



Strong NW. wind, snow and high sea. 
Trying to find shelter under the island, 
is stranded 2f miles S. of station. Dis- 
covered and reported by lookout. Life- 
savers boarded ner in surfboat. Manned 
pumps and tried to free her, but were un- 
able to gain on leak. On the 29th a tug 
attempted to haul her off, but was un- 
successful. On the 31st another attempt 
was made and she was floated. Schooner 
was leaking so badly that surfmen as- 
sisted at the pumps until she was docked. 

At 6 a. m. discovered a skiff, adrift, 1$ miles 
NW. of station. Life-savers towed it to 
the station. 

Dragging her anchor. Surfmen went out 
and hauled launch in to good berth and 
safely anchored it. 

A party of 6 men bound for the Jamestown 
Exposition head out into Delaware Bay, 
strong NW. wind and heavy sea. Wrecks 
machinery and carries away gasoline 
tank. They fire distress signals and the 
life-savers go to her assistance in surf- 
boat. Keeper boarded her and found a 

. man apparently dead from gasoline 
fumes. He resuscitated him by means of 
artificial respiration. The sufferer was 
hurried ashore and put under the care of 
a physician. The surfmen towed the 
launch to Cold Springs, where it was re- 
paired. 

Stranded on Southern Island, 3 miles W. 
of station. Trying to beat into harbor, 
strong NW. wind and moderate sea. 
Discovered at the time by life-savers who 
went to her in surfboat. They ran out 
an anchor, but were unable to haul her 
off, as the tide was falling; discharged 
the cargo of lumber, pumped her out, and 
at the flood schooner was floated. 
Life-savers working at pumps until the 
vessel reached Tennants Harbor. 

Strong NW. wind, capsized 1 miles ENE. 
of station. Life-savers went to her, 
righted and bailed out boat, and assisted 
occupant in getting up sail. 

MistooK range and stranded 2 miles E. of 
Lewes and 2 miles N. of Cape Henlopen, 
at 9 p. m. Life-savers were notified over 
telephone and they boarded the yacht 
in their surfboats. They ran out a line 
and anchor, hove it taut, and ran another 
line to the United States engineer's 
steamer Zizania. Tide was falling, so 
vessel did not come off at first attempt. 
At high water a hawser was run to the 
light-house tender Sunflower, and the 
yacht was floated. Surfmen cleared 
hawser which had fouled yacht's pro- 
peller. The Sunflower towed her into the 
harbor. 

Stranded 5 miles S. of station. Word was 
brought to station and life-savers im- 
mediately proceeded to the scene. After 
in digging a ditch, the 



life-savers succeeded in floating the 
launch, and at 11 p. m. they arrived with 
her at the station. 

In heavy squall, parted chain and stranded 
on jetty rocks, near the station. Life- 
savers proceeded to her assistance, car- 
rying out anchor and hawser, and hove 
launch off the rocks. 

Parted mooring and went adrift in fresh 
NE. wind, discovered by lookout. Surf- 
men towed it back to the yacht club. 



162 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
May 29 



Coos Bay, Oregon. 



May 30 

May 30 
May 30 

May 30 

May 30 

May 31 
June 2 
June 2 



Hunniwells Beach, Maine. 



City Point, Massachu- 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Gas. Ich. Mayflow- 
er and raft. 



Gas. Ich., no name.. 



Sailboat Dorothea. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 



Lake Michigan 



li,L r : 



Fishers Island, New York. Gas. Ich., no name. 



Sip. yt., no name. .. 



Harbor Beach, Michi- 
gan, Lake Huron. 



Am str. Search- 
light. 



June 3 
June 3 



June 3 



June 3 do 



Cape Disappointment, Am. str. Daisy 



Washington. 



Freeman. 



Salisbury Beach, Massa- Fish dory, no name 
chusetts. 

City Point,Massachusetts Gas. yt. Tidy Adly 



.do... Sailboat, no name . 



June 3 do. 



June 3 do. 



Sip. Varuna 



Sc. yt. Christine. 



Catboat Angora. 



Stranded at 5.30 a. m., 3 miles SSW. of sta- 
tion. Discovered by lookout, and the 
life-savers immediately proceeded to the 
scene in surfboat. The raft that the 
launch had been towing was drifting 
out over the bar when the life-savers got 
a line to it and warped it in to the beach. 
After six hours continual work the May- 
flower was floated undamaged and the 
crew returned to their station. 

Assistant light keeper coming ashore, his 
launch engine became disabled and boat 
started drifting to sea. Wind blowing 
fresh offshore. Discovered and reported 
by lookout, launch 2 miles SSW. of sta- 
tion. Keeper secured a power boat and 
towed the launch to the station. 

Capsized while rounding turning buoy in 
race. Life-savers in tug Relief went out 
and picked up occupants and towed the 
boat to Dorchester. 

At 9 a. m., when mile SW. of station, 
engine broke down and the launch went 
adrift. Life-savers went out and towed 
her to repair shop. 

At 4 p. m. broke down near the station, life- 
savers towed it to the yacht club dock. 

Capsized 1 miles S. of station. Discov- 
ered by lookout, who sounded the alarm; 
life-savers proceeded to the scene in surf- 
boat. Yacht's crew had been picked up 
by another boat. Life-savers bailed out 
and righted the yacht. 

Keeper discovered a power boat broken 
down about 3 miles W. of station. 
Went out in power lifeboat and towed it 
to the station. 

Life-savers in power lifeboat assist tugs in 
sweeping for the sunken steamer. They 
renew their efforts the 8th, but are unsuc- 
cessful. 

Struck on the bar 5 miles SSW. of station. 
Strong NW. wind and a moderate sea. 
Started leaking badly; set a distress sig- 
nal. Was discovered by keeper, and life- 
savers proceeded to her in power lifeboat. 
They found steamer in a water-logged 
condition, took off her crew and stood by 
her until arrival of tug. The life-savers 
then transferred crew to tug, which 
towed steamer back to Astoria. 

Keeper found a fisherman's dory adrift in 
the surf. He hitched station horse to it 
and hauled it up on the beach. 

Strong NE. wind and rough sea, dragged 
anchor and fouled the yacht Oriole. 
Life-savers laid out a large anchor and 
hauled the Tidy Adly out to it and clear 
of the yacht. 

Parted her moorings during the night and 
stranded on Tompsons Island, 1 mile SE. 
of station. Life-savers floated and 
towed boat to the station, turning it 
over the next day to the owner. 

Strong NE. wind and rough sea, dragged 
anchor and stranded 1 mile NE. of sta- 
tion. Discovered by the life-savers out 
in the launch Relief, which was anchored 
to windward. A line was run to her and 
the boat was hauled off and taken to a 
safe mooring. 

Was discovered dragging anchor and in 
danger of going on the rocks. The surf- 
men in the launch Relief anchored to 
windward, put a line on board, hove up 
yacht's anchors, and towed her to a safe 
berth. 

Parted moorings and stranded 1 mile NE. 
of station. Blowing strong and a rough 
sea. She was hauled afloat by the surf- 
men in the launch Relief and towed over 
to Castle Island wharf, there making 
her fast, as she had no anchors on board. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



163 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
June 3 



June 3 



June 3 



City Point, Massachusetts 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Plum Island, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Sip. Sintram.. 



Am. sc. N. Ransom . 



Am. str. Veronica. . . 



June 3 

June 4 

June 4 

June 4 

June 4 

June 4 

June 4 

June 5 

June 5 

June 6 

June 6 

June 8 



Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 



Cape May, New Jersey . . . 
Louisville, Kentucky 



North Manitou Island, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 
gan. 

Grand Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Sturgeon Bay Canal, Wis- 
consin, Lake Michigan. 



Gurnet, Massachusetts . . 



Fairport, Ohio, Lake Erie. 



Niagara, New York, Lake 
Ontario. 



SabinePass, Texas 



Atlantic City, New Jersey. 



Fish boat, no name 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Gas. yt. Omega 
Taylor. 



Am. sc. Oneida... 



Gas. Ich. Hellen 
Temple. 



Gas. Ich. Olga 

Gas. Ich. Sea Gull II. 

Dory, no name 

Scow, no name 

Rowboat, no name. 

Skiff, no name 

Gas. Ich. Harriet... 



Parted her moorings during the night and 
went adrift. Owner applied to keeper 
for aid. When weather cleared, the 
sloop was discovered 3 miles SW. of 
station. Surfmen hauled her off and 
towed her to the Columbia Yacht Club. 

While being towed out of the harbor by 
gasoline launch, drifted against pier and 
launch could not get her clear. Life- 
savers ran lines to her, and the schooner 
was warped to a dock and there made 
fast. 

While towing barge Tessett in dense fog, 
towline fouled steamer's wheel and she 
drifted ashore, 13 miles S. by W. of 
station. Word was brought to keeper 
by passing schooner. Life-savers went 
to her in Mackinaw boat, arriving at the 
scene at 12.45 a. m. After working five 
hours on the towline, the life-savers suc- 
ceeded in clearing it, they then landed 
the master so he might telephone for a 
tug. The tug hauled the steamer off 
and she and her consort proceeded to 
Escanaba. 

Life-savers while patrolling in power life- 
boat near Peacock spit, found 2 fisher- 
men in danger. They were towed out 
to safety. 

Badly leaking, life-savers beach launch to 
prevent her sinking, and assist the 
owner to repair leak. 

Lookout discovers yacht broken down and 
drifting in river. Three men on board. 
Life-savers go out and tow them in to 
landing. 

Surfmen pump out schooner, which had 
stranded May 27. 

Machinery disabled 2 miles NW. Gestation, 
her distress signal discovered by lookout. 
Life-savers proceeded to the scene and 
towed launch to its dock. 

Exhausted supply of gasoline, when out in 
lake 3 miles N. of station. Made distress 
signals which were discovered by the 
lookout. Life-savers in power boat 
towed it back to port. 

Broke down 5 miles SE. of station, foggy 
weather prevented its being seen from 
station. Keeper was notified by tele- 
phone, he telephoned for Government 
tug and then proceeded in surfboat to 
disabled launch. The tug soon came out 
and took launch in to the dock. 

Two fishermen, trying to row out to their 
vessel, were cut off by strong head tide. 
Life-savers picked them up in power boat 
and towed them out to their vessel. 

Cast off from tug and anchored 2 miles NE. 
of station. During the night parted her 
anchor chain and drifted down the lake. 
Life-savers in surfboat notified tug, were 
taken in tow and started for scow. It 
was overtaken 12 miles from Fairport, 
and but for the timely arrival of the res- 
cuers would have soon been on the beach. 

At 11 p. m. lookout heard cries for help, J 
mile S W. of station. He turned in alarm 
and surfboat was launched. Life-savers 
picked up soldier in small boat; it had 
nearly swamped in the rough water, and 
but for the timely assistance would have 
been lost. 

Keeper went out and recovered a skiff 
drifting down the river. It was turned 
over to the harbor master, who proved 
to be the owner of it. 

Stranded on sand bar, 1J miles N. of sta- 
tion. Life-savers proceeded to the scene, 
carried out an anchor and succeeded in 
hauling launch into deep water. 



164 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
June 8 



June 8 



June 8 



June 8 



June 



June 9 



June 9 



June 9 



June 9 

June 9 

June 9 

June 9 



Cape May, New Jersey. . . 



Tawas, Michigan, Lake 
Huron. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Frankfort, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. (Serv- 
ice by Farragut Yacht 
Club.) 



Great Wass Island, Maine 



Gas. Ich. Katherine. 



Gas. Ich. Edith G. . . 



hs., (2) 
names; skiff, no 



Gas. Ichs., (2) no 
names 
name. 



Gas. Ich. Grace W . . 



Sip. Soubrette 



Am. sc. John S. 
Presson. 



Salisbury Beach, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Hereford Inlet, New Jer- 
sey. 



Biscayne Bay, Florida..:. 

Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Gas. Ich. Fannie E. 
Moffat. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 
...do... 



June 10 Oswego, New York, Lake 



Ontario. 



...do. 



RowboatNo.12.... 



Small boat, no name. 



Broke down and anchored on Pressy 
Weeks Shoal. Life-savers went out to 
her and towed boat into bay, where it 
was hauled out on the beach and repaired. 

Engine became disabled 3 miles SW. of 
station; was discovered by lookout and 
'life-savers proceeded to scene in surfboat. 
They towed the launch back to East 
Tawas. 

Two launches with pleasure parties aboard 
broke down. They were discovered by 
the surfmen, who went out in station 
launch and towed disabled boats to the 
dock. A skiff drifting in the harbor chan- 
nel was picked up by the keeper and 
towed to the dock. 

Went adrift from dock about J mile from 
station. Surfman went out in small 
boat and towed it back and delivered it 
to owner. 

With 3 yachtsmen on board, capsized 4 
miles S. of station. Blowing fresh, sea 
rough. Discovered by lookout. Surf- 
men proceeded to the scene in the power 
lifeboat. Upon arrival it was found that 
the volunteer life-saving crew of the Far- 
ragut Yacht Club had already rescued 
the 3 men from the water. The life- 
savers joined with the volunteer crew in 
towing the sloop in to the wharf. 

Stranded 8 miles NE. of station. Discov- 
ered by keeper while on trip in power 
boat. It being inactive season, he mus- 
tered a volunteer crew and proceeded to 
scene of disaster. Found schooner in a 
dangerous position. Life-savers carried 
anchors ahead, astern, and off weather 
quarter, to prevent her from driying far- 
ther up on ledge at flood tide. - Lightered 
cargo and at high water the vessel was 
hauled off. It being dark and stormy 
she was anchored for the night. The next 
morning in trying to get out, the anchor 
dragged and schooner fetched up in dan- 
gerous position between two ledges. She 
showed distress signal and life-savers 
again proceeded to her assistance. They 
carried out a kedge anchor and a long line, 
and by smart handling of the sails worked 
her clear of the ledges into the channel. 
(See letter of acknowledgment.) 

Made distress signals off station. Keeper 
went out in dory and found that they 
were out of gasoline. He took a supply 
out to them, the surf being too high for 
the launch to effect a landing. 

While bound out on a fishing trip, engine 
became disabled and launch stranded. 
Keeper went out in small boat and trans- 
ported her 4 passengers to the shore. He 
then carried out a small anchor and as- 
sisted the owner in hauling the launch 
into deep water. 

Ran out of gasoline, keeper gave owner 
supply to carry him to Miami. 

Engine disabled, went adrift near station. 
Life-savers in launch towed her to yacht 
club dock. 

Engine disabled and with 3 men on board 
was drifting offshore; no oars on board. 
Surfmen went out and towed them back 
to the harbor. 

With 2 drunken men on board, capsized 
near the station. The boat was a metal 
one, incapable of giving support; and 
had the life-savers not promptly gone out 
to their assistance they would have prob- 
ably drowned. 

Adrift in the lake, 3 miles NE. of station. 
Life-savers towed it back to station, 
where it was later claimed by owner. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



165 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
June 10 



June 10 

June 10 
June 11 
June 11 

June 11 

June 11 
June 11 

June 12 
June 12 
June 12 
June 13 

June 13 
June 14 
June 15 

June 15 

June 15 
June 16 

June lf> 
June 17 



Michigan City, Indiana, Gas. Ich., no name.. 
Lake Michigan. 



Old Chicago, Illinois. Lake 
Michigan. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Point of Woods, New 
York. 

Jackson Park. Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Plum Island, Wiscon- 
sin, Lake Michigan. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 

Nome, Alaska 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



.do. 



Sip. yt. Dragoon 



Small boats (5), no 
names. 

Gas. Ich. Mildred... 
Gas. Ich. Vim. . . 



Sip. yt. Thetis 

Small boat, noname. 
Gas. Ich. The H. W 



Racing s h e 1 1 , no 
name. 

Fish boat, no name . 
Small boat.no name. 
Gas. Ich., noname.. 

...do... 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, ...do 
Lake Michigan. 



Niagara, New York, Lake 
Ontario. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Michigan. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 

Lake Michigan. 
City Point, Massachusetts 



Br. str. Turbinia... 



Gas. Ich. Molly.... 



Columbia Yacht 

Club yachts. 
Rowboat, no name 



Michigan City, Indiana, Columbia Yacht 
Lake Michigan. Club Yachts. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Gas . Ich . Arro wanna 



Engine broke down 2 miles NW. of station, 
blowing strong offshore and boat had no 
anchor. They were being carried out in 
the lake when they made a distress signal 
which was seen by lookout. Life-savers 
went out in surfboat and towed launch 
in to safety. 

Noticing that she seemed to be handled by 
an inexperienced crew, life-savers went 
out in power lifeboat and offered assist- 
ance. The occupants were very much 
exhausted from hunger and cold. The 
sloop was given a line and was towed in 
to port. 

Found by surfman, adrift and pounding 
against breakwater. They were recov 
ered and restored to owner. 

Broke down 1 mile NE. of station, 12 lady 
passengers on board. Keeper assisted in 
making repairs. 

Engine disabled, and drifting offshore 
when discovered by patrol, shortly after 
midnight. Life-savers proceeded to the 
scene, 1 mile SE. of station, and towed 
the launch with its 2 occupants back to 
its moorings. 

While assisting the Vim, a yacht lying 
to the eastward made distress signal, 
her bowsprit was broken, and rigging 
damaged. She was taken in to Jackson 
Park harbor. 

Surfman recovered a skiff adrift in the 
river. It was restored to its owner. 

At 2.30 a. m. keeper was notified that 
launch was missing. Surfmen went out 
and found her anchored 8 miles WNW. 
of station; as the wind was ahead for the 
return trip, a tug was secured to tow 
the launch back to port. 

With 2 men on board, became water-logged. 
Life-savers towed them back to club- 
house. 

Was drifting out over the bar, when life- 
savers went out and towed it back to 
station. 

Drifting offshore with 2 boys in it. 
Picked up by the station launch and 
towed in to the beach. 

Engine disabled 1 mile S. of station, dis- 
covered by lookout. Keeper assisted 
with launch and towed her back to boat- 
house. 

Engine disabled, and adrift 1 mile W. of 
station. Surfman assisted with launch 
and towed boat in to the dock. 

Unable to get back to harbor, having run 
out of gasoline. Surfmen go out and 
tow it in. 

Ran aground \ mile SE. of station, life- 
cavers pulled off to her in surfboat. They 
carried out the station kedge anchor and 
tried to pull steamer off; anchor was too 
light. They then went to Niagara and 
secured a heavy anchor. This time the 
life-savers were successful and the 
steamer was hove into deep water. 

While out on trip, lost her propeller and 
went adrift \ mile SW. of station. 
Surfmen towed her back to yacht club 
dock. 

Surfmen in small boats run lines and 
assist racing yachts to their berths. 

Two men out rowing in a choppy sea lost 
their oarlocks. They were drifting rap- 
idly away when their distress was discov- 
ered by lookout. Life-savers went out 
in launch and towed them to landing. 

Surfmen engaged during the day in hand- 
ling and running lines of racing yachts 
from Chicago. 

Broke down near the station. Surfman 
went out in launch and towed her to her 
dock. 



166 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 


Nature of casualty and service rendered. 


1907. 
June 17 

June 17 


Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

Old Chicago, Illinois, 


Gas. Ich., no name . . 
Sip. Naniwa 


Engine disabled mile W. of station. 
Keeper went out in launch and towed it 
to the dock. 
Steering gear disabled, tied up 12 p m 


June 17 
June 18 

June 18 


Lake Michigan. 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 
Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 

do 


Small boat, no name 
Canoe, no name .... 

Catboat Oneota 


at breakwater, discovered by patrol. 
Keeper was notified and life-savers 
pulled to scene in surfboat; found sloop 
too large for surfboat to tow, so keeper 
landed the 3 women passengers. Re- 
turned with power lifeboat and towed 
sloop to Columbia Yacht Club dock. 
Adrift in river, recovered by life-saver and 
restored to owner. 
Caught in wind squall, occupant in great 
danger of capsizing. Keeper went out 
in launch, took man aboard, and towed 
the canoe in to the yacht club. 
Carrying too much sail caught in squall 


June 18 

June 19 
June 19 


Hither Plain, New York.. 

Charlotte, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 
Louisville, Kentucky 


Fish boat, no name. 

Gas. Ich., no name . . 
Gas. Ich. Lorelei 


becomes unmanageable. Life-savers 
went out in launch and towed boat back 
to yacht club. 
Fishermen go out to their nets in dense fog 
After their departure heavy surf makes 
up. Upon their return keeper warns 
them against landing, directing them to 
the shelter behind Montauk Point. 
Keeper went out in gasoline launch from 
Fort Pond Bay and brought them in. 
At the request of owner, life-savers go in 
surfboat and float launch. 
Lookout gave alarm that this boat loaded 


June 19 
June 19 


Yaquina Bay, Oregon 
Point Bonita and Fort 


Sailboat, no name . . 
Am sc Louis 


with passengers, was in danger above the 
falls. Life-savers proceeded to the scene 
in one of the station boats and found 
launch's engine disabled. They towed 
it back to the station, where repairs were 
made. 
Life-savers receive notice by telephone that 
a sailboat was in distress off Alsea Bay, 
21 miles S. of station. The wind was 
blowing strong from the NW., and it was 
too rough on the bar for the sailboat to 
enter the bay. Life-savers proceeded to 
the scene in surfboat, and found the sail- 
boat and her crew of 3 men in a dangerous 
position. They had also run short of 
provisions and water. Surfboat was un- 
able to beat back on account of head wind 
and current. The 3 men were taken 
aboard, their boat left at anchor, and the 
surfmen took to their oars. They were 
afterwards picked up by a tug and towed 
to the station. Sailboat was towed in by 
gasoline launch two days later. 
Stranded at 2 30 a m in dense fog about 30 


June 20 


Point, California. 
Squan Beach, New Jersey. 


Fishboat, no name . 


miles WSW. of stations. Moderately 
rough sea. Reported by Merchants' 
Exchange and by Weather Bureau. 
Both crews were immediately mustered 
for service, and upon the arrival of the 
tug Sea Queen they were taken in tow for 
the Farralone Islands, where the wreck 
had occurred. The schooner was found 
fast ashore, full of water, and in danger 
of going to pieces at any moment. The 
master refused to leave her, so the life- 
savers rigged up a breeches buoy be- 
tween her and the island. By evening 
the sea had made up so that the master 
was pursuaded to leave; 5 were taken 
ashore in the breeches buoy and 5 in the 
ship's boat. The surfboat crews were 
then towed back to port. The schooner 
went to pieces that night. 
Capsized in shallow water near the beach, 
2 of its 7 occupants being caught under 
the gunwale. Keeper hurried to the 
scene, and assisted in righting boat and 
in extricating the 2 fishermen. They 
were very badly bruised. Keeper ap- 
plied liniment and hot-water bags, and 
did all that was possible to add to their 
comfort. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



167 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 


Nature of casualty and service rendered. 


1907. 








June 20 


Aransas, Texas 


U.S. R.C.Windom. 


Wishing to cross in over the bar, hoisted a 








signal for a pilot. Keeper went out and 








piloted her in. 


June 20 


White River, Michigan, 


Gas. Ich., no name, 


Engine disabled 4J miles S. of station. Life- 




Lake Michigan. 


towing wood scow. 


savers notified by telephone. They pro- 
ceeded to the scene and towed wood scow 








to a safe anchorage. The launch was 








brought back to the station for repairs. 


June 20 


Jackson Park, Illinois, 


Gas. Ich. Vanadis. . . 


Engine disabled 1 mile NE. of station, sig- 




Lake Michigan. 




nal of distress was discovered by lookout. 








Life-savers towed her into the harbor 








back of the station, where repairs might 








be made. 


June 20 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 


Skiff no name 


Adrift in th.6 river rBCOvcrcd by surfmftn 




Lake Michigan. 




and returned to owner. 


June 21 


City Point, Massachusetts. 


Rowboat, no name . 


Three men, fishing from small boat, capsize 








it. Surf men hasten to the scene in launch. 








rescue men from the water, right and bail 
out boat and take them ashore. 


June 21 


Grand Marais, Michigan, 


Bge. Galatea 


At the request of the tugs' masters, life- 




Lake Michigan. 




savers took soundings around the barge 








and ran lines to her. They laid out buoys 








marking the deepest water for the tugs. 


June 21 


Old Chicago, Illinois, Lake 


Rowboat, no name . 


With 4 inexperienced occupants, collided 




Michigan. 




with a submerged pier. The sea threw 3 








of them on top of the pier, from which 








they were rescued by the life-savers. The 
fourth drifted off in the boat and was res- 








cued by a gasoline launch. 


June 22 


Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 


Gas. Ich., no name. . 


Ran out of gasoline and went adrift near 




Superior. 




station. Blew distress signals, and life- 








savers went out in launch and towed it 






1 


back to boat club. 


June 22 


Jackson Park, Illinois, 


Sip. Sporting Extra. 


Capsized in a sudden squall, f mile SE. of 




Lake Michigan. 




station. Accident was witnessed by 








lookout, who immediately rang the 








alarm. Life-savers proceeded to the 








scene, but found that a gasoline launch 








cruising near by had picked up the crew. 








Life-savers righted and bailed out sloop 








and towed it to its moorings. 


June 22 


Old Chicago, Illinois, Lake 


Gas. Ich. Iris 


Engine disabled and boat drifting out into 




Michigan. (Service by 




the lake, when discovered by one of the 




Farragut Yacht Club.) 




crew. Surfboat, manned by volunteer 








crew, went out and took it in tow. After 








the engine was repaired, the launch's 








crew were warned to go to their dock, as 








a storm was making up. 


June 22 


do 


Gas. Ich., no name. . 


On their wav back from the Iris volunteer 








life-savers sight another launch broken 








down, heavy squall struck them and the 








launch was in danger of going ashore. 
Life-savers get a line to them and tow 








them back to the harbor. 


June 23 


Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 


do 


Engine became disabled when 5J miles 




Erie. 




WNW. of station. Choppy sea and 
launch drifting out into the lake. Look- 








out discovered the predicament of the 3 
occupants and gave the alarm. Surfmen 








in power lifeboat hastened to their rescue 








and towed them back to port. They 


June 23 


South Haven, Michigan, 


Canoe, no name .... 


were in danger of sinking. 
Containing 2 young men, capsized at a 




Lake Michigan. 




point in the river not visible from the sta- 








tion. One of the occupants was drowned; 








word was brought to the station and life- 








savers started immediately to the scene. 








They recovered the body, and for over an 








hour attempted resuscitation. Efforts 








unsuccessful. 


June 23 


Golden Gate and South- 
side, California. 


Am. sc. Sausalito. . . 


Missed stays and anchored near the beach 
at a point 3 miles south of station. 








South side life-savers went out to her in 








surfboat and advised master to call for a 








tug, the schooner tailing almost in on the 








beach. A message was signaled to the 








station and from there a tug was called. 








Tug's demands were exorbitant, so the 








master declined its services. At 11 p. m. 








schooner dragged her anchors and 








stranded, she burned a flare-up. Keeper 



168 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



1907. 
June 23 



June 24 



June 24 



Golden Gate and South- 
side, California. 



Newburyport, Massachu- 
setts. 



Oak Island, New York . . . 



Am. sc. Sausalito . 



Catboat Strideway 



Am. str. Oak Island 



June 24 



Holland, Michigan, Lake Canoe, no name ... 
Michigan. 



June 25 



Aransas, Texas. 



June 25 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



U. S. R. C. str. Win- 
dom. 

Catboat Oneota... 



June 25 Old Chicago, Illinois, Lake Gas. Ich. Anthon . . 
Michigan. 



June 25 

June 26 
June 26 

June 26 
June 26 

June 26 
June 27 

June 27 



Point Bonita, California.. 

Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 

Muskeget, Massachusetts . 
Blue Point, New York. . . . 

Hereford Inlet, New Jer- 
sey. 



Gas. Ich. John A. 
Britton. 

Am. sc. Smith Tut- 
tle. 

Dory, no name 

Sharpie, no name. . 
Gas. Ich. Barbara.. 



Sullivans Island, South Catboat, no name 
Carolina. 



City Point, Massachu- Gas. Ich. Independ- 
setts. ence. 



Sip. Ada 



called up a tug and the Golden Gate sta- 
tion, and then went off t9 the schooner. 
The two crews assisted in running the 
hawser and stood by the schooner until 
she was floated. 

Stranded on sunken wreck, 1 mile N. by W. 
of station. Keeper and son hastened to 
the scene, finding numerous holes 
punched in her bottom by wreckage. At 
low water they bailed out the boat, 
stuffed the holes with oakum, and 
patched them over with canvas. Laid 
out an anchor and at high water hauled 
her off; set sail and took her into New- 
buryport. 

Stranded in thick fog, | mile NE. of sta- 
tion. Master applied at station for as- 
sistance. Keeper employed crew, car- 
ried out steamer's anchors, and towed 2 
scows out to the wreck. The cargo was 
loaded on the scows, and they were then 
placed one under each quarter. At high 
water they floated the steamer off. Life- 
savers restowed cargo and towed scows 
back to dock. 

At 7.30 p. m., a canoe containing 2 young 
men, capsized J mile E. of station. Life- 
savers started to their assistance, but the 
men had gotten ashore. The canoe was 
righted, bailed out, and the keeper re- 
stored it to the owner. 

Anchored 2 miles N. of station. At 4.30 a. m.. 
Keeper went on board and piloted her 
out. 

Two inexperienced occupants, caught out 
in squall, becomes unmanageable. Life- 
savers hasten to her in launch and tow 
the Oneota to yacht club. 

With party of 4 on board, broke down near 
the station. Life-savers went out in 
launch and towed them back to port. 

At 6 a. m. stranded near the station, thick 
fog. Patrol discovered her predicament 
and gave alarm at station. Life-savers 
went out in surf boat, towed launch off 
the rocks, and to the station wharf. 

Stranded on point near the station, thick 
fog. Keeper went off and assisted mas- 
ter in working her off at high tide. 

While keeper was making trip for mail, he 
sighted a small boy, in drifting dory, cry- 
ing for help. Keeper gave him a line and 
towed dory to the wharf. 

Picked up adrift near the station. It was 
secured to the dock and keeper adver- 
tised the find. It was afterwards 
claimed by owner. 

With 13 passengers on board, stranded 
near the station. Keeper employed boat- 
men (inactive season) and went out and 
brought in some of the passengers. The 
Barbara, thus lightened, was towed off 
by another launch. 

Capsized mile off shore; occupants, 2 sol- 
diers, thrown into the water. Keeper 
and surfman hastened to their assistance, 
arriving just as their boat sunk. 

Strong W. wind and rough sea, lookout 
discovered launch dragging her anchor 
down toward iron pier. Surfmen went 
to her, hove up and cleared anchor, and 
towed her to a safe berth, where anchor 
was let go again. But for such timely 
assistance the launch would have been 
broken up against the pier. 

Dragged her anchor in the blow mentioned 
above. Was discovered by lookout 
drifting down on other yachts. Surf- 
men boarded her, hove up and cleared 
anchor, and let go again after towing her 
to a safe berth. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



169 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 


Nature of casualty and service rendered. 


1907. 








June 27 


Louisville, Kentucky 


Skiff, no name 


Lookout discovered a man in a skiff in dan- 








ger of going over the falls, he gave the 








alarm and life-savers hastened to the 








rescue. The skiff was caught in time 








and towed back to the station. 


June 27 


Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 


Gas. Ich. Jane M.... 


Got an anchor chain fouled in her wheel. 




Superior. 




Word was sent to keeper, who went out 








in launch and towed disabled boat to the 








dock, where her wheel was cleared. 


June 27 


Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 


Fishboat, no name. . 


With 2 fishermen in her, capsized 3 miles 
WSW. of station. Surfmeh in power 








lifeboat proceeded to the scene. Tne oc- 
cupants had been picked up by other 








fishermen close by. The life-savers took 








them into the power boat, righted and 








bailed out their boat, and took them to 








the station. They were furnished with 








dry clothing from the supplies of the 








W. N. R. A. 


June 28 


Grand Marais, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 


Rowboat, no name. . 


Discovered drifting out in the lake. Look- 
out sounds alarm and life-savers go out 








and tow it in. The occupants were 3 








young women, inexperienced in handling 
a boat, and were unable to make head- 








way against the fresh off shore wind. 


June 28 


Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 


Gas. Ich., no name; 


These launches were out for pleasure and 




Superior. 


gas. Ich. Zurich. 


became disabled near the station. Wind 








blowing fresh SW. Life-savers went out 








in station boats and towed them to their 








docks. 


June 28 


Michigan City, Indiana, 


Small boats (21), no 


Loaded with small children of excursion 




Lake Michigan. 


names. 


Cy, rowing inside of breakwater. As 
were very careless, the station boat 








was manned and patroled among them. 


June 29 


City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 


Small boat, no 
name. 


Had capsized with owner, who was picked 
up by life-savers in launch. They oailed 








out and righted boat, and took it and its 








owner to tne station. 


June 29 


Hatteras Inlet, North 


Am. sc. Georgia 


Thick and raining, strong SSE. wind, 




Carolina. 


'iaskins. 


stranded at 4 a. m., 5 miles WNW. of 








station. Keeper discovered her at day- 




' 




break, with distress signal flying. It 
being* inactive season, he had difficulty 








in mustering a crew. With those that 








he could get, he went off and assisted in 


June 29 


Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 


Racing shell, no 


heaving schooner into deep water. 
With 2 occupants, collides with a boat at 




Superior. 


name. 


anchor. Life-savers proceed to the 
scene in launch, and find shell leaking and 








in a water-logged condition. The 2 men 








with their shell were landed at boat- 








house. 


June 29 


Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 


Small boat, no name 


Got adrift from breakwater and was being 
blown out in the lake, when it was dis- 








covered by a surfman, who went out and 








secured it. It was restored to its owner. 


June 29 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 


Gas. Ich. Ideal 


Capsized in Milwaukee River, in swell of 




Lake Michigan. 




steamer. Ten occupants, most of whom 








were women and children. Only by the 








quick action of the life-savers were their 








lives saved; only one of the men could 








swim. The life-saving crew hastened to 








the scene in the surfboat and took the 








unfortunates from the water. Some 








were going down for the second time. 








They were taken to the station, given 








stimulants and were outfitted from the 








W. N. R. A. stores. 


June 29 


Point Adams, Oregon. . . . 


Catboat, no name . . 


Sailing too close to the breakers, stranded 








4 miles W. of the station. Surfman re- 








- ported to station by telephone and the 








surfboat proceeded to the scene. Upon 








arriving, the surfmen found that the 








crew of fishermen had gotten ashore, and 








that the boat was too old and too badly 








broken up to attempt saving. The surf- 








men secured 100 fathoms of fish net. 


June 30 


Fletchers Neck, Maine 


Am. sc. Game Cock. 


SE. gale, high sea, and raining; schooner 








with deck load of lumber, sprung a leak 








and came into harbor to anchorage. 








Life-savers boarded her, hove her down, 








drained her through holes bored in bilge, 



170 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews Continued. 



Date. 



1907. 
June 30 



June 30 



June 30 



June 30 



June 30 
June 30 



Station and locality. 



Name and nation- 
ality of vessel. 



Fletchers Neck, Maine. . . . 



City Point, Massachusetts 



.do 



.do. 



Saluria, Texas. 



Charlotte, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 



June 30 Louisville, Kentucky 



June 30 



June 



June 30 



June 30 
June 30 



.do. 



Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 



Duluth, Minnesota, Lake 
Superior. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 

Lake Michigan. 
Nome, Alaska 



Am. sc. Game Cock. 



Gas. Ich. Beatrice . 



Gas. Ich., no name.. 



Sip. Marion. 



Am. sc. Kate M... 
Gas. Ich. Bay View. 



Skiff, no name 



Shanty boat, no 
name. 



Gas. Ich., no name. 



Catboat Pokeginia. 



Skin 1 , no name . . 
Am. sc. Mabel A . 



Nature of casualty and service rendered. 



and calked hull. They were employed a 
week at this work, assisting in diocharg- 
ing and restowing deck load of lumber. 

Engine became disabled and launch 
stranded near the station. Surfmen 
went to her in power boat, floated and 
towed launch to station. 

Engine became disabled and launch 
stranded 4 miles SE. of station. The 
life-savers in the launch Relief floated 
and towed her to the station. 

Fresh wind and rough sea, broke her boom 
when 1 J miles NE . of station. Her signal 
of distress was seen by keeper, who sent 
the launch to tow sloop to mooring. 
After it was secured, the life-savers 
landed the occupants ashore. 

Life-savers set up ranges to mark channel 
over the shifting bar and enable this 
schooner to cross in safety. 

Machinery disabled, stranded 8 miles E. of 
station. Keeper notified by telephone 
message, proceeded to the scene in power 
lifeboat, towing surfboat. By the time 
of arrival at the wreck, the wind had 
shifted to NW. and kicked up a heavy 
sea. Life-savers hauled launch up on 
the beach clear of the surf. When the 
sea had gone down, they made another 
trip to the Bay View, jacked it up, and 
launched it. 

Lookout discovered 2 boys in skiff, in dan- 
ger of going over the Indiana chute of the 
falls. Life-savers go out in boat and tow 
them back to the station. 

Lookout discovered this boat with man on 
board, in danger at the head of the mid- 
dle chute of the falls. Life-savers towed 
him in to safe water and gave directions 
for proceeding through the canal. 

Keeper was notified by telephone that a 
launch, with a pleasure party of 7 on 
board, had broken down, at 6.45 p. m., at 
a point 9 miles WSW. of station. Life- 
savers in power lifeboat proceeded to the 
scene and towed the disabled boat back 
to Erie. 

Blowing fresh, stranded mile SE. of sta- 
tion. Surfman in launch hastened to her 
assistance and, after hauling the boat 
afloat, towed it, with the 3 occupants, to 
the yacht club. 

Adrift in the river, is recovered by surfman 
and restored to its owner. 

Stranded on bar, while trying to get out of 
Snake River. Life-savers ran line from 
schooner to tug and boated her cargo 
ashore. After repeated attempts, tug 
gave it up for the day. The next morn- 
ing the life-savers laid out a kedge and 
hauled the schooner into deep water. 



MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES OF LIFE-SAVING CREWS. 



Under this caption are briefly set forth the services performed by 
life-saving crews in casualties not relating to vessels, such as rescues 
of persons who had fallen from docks, floats, etc., recovery of the 
bodies of the drowned, aid in extinguishing neighborhood fires, suc- 
cor to persons in distress in the vicinity of stations, resuscitation of 
the apparently drowned, saving property exposed to loss in various 
ways, etc. In many of these cases the rescued persons owe their lives 
to the promptness and intelligent action of the surfmen. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



171 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Service rendered. 


Nature of casualty. 


1906. 








July 1 


White River, Michigan, 


Rescue from drown- 


John Mahoney, a cook, fell from a dredge 




Lake Michigan. 


ing. 


into the lake, and was rescued by the life- 








saving crew and put safely on board the 








dredge. 


July 1 


O 1 d Chicago, Illinois, 


Clothing furnished. . 


Frank Sahaskey fell from a pier and was 




Lake Michigan. 




rescued by several fishermen. The keeper 








supplied the man with dry clothing from 








the stores of the W. N. R. A. 


July 2 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 


Recovery of body . . . 


The body of an unknown man was brought 




Lake Michigan. 




to the surface in the Kinnickinnic River 








by the surfmen with grapnels, and was 








sent to the morgue. 


July 4 


Quonochontaug, Rhode 


Resuscitation. 


A catboat containing Robert Mooney and 




Island, Fishers Island, 




2 other men, while following the boat 




New York, and Sandy 




races in upper Point Judith Pond, cap- 




Point, Rhode Island. 




sized, and Mooney was thrown out and 








caught under the sail. From the time 








Mooney was thrown into the water until 








efforts to resuscitate him were begun 








more than thirty minutes elapsed. (For 








detailed account see page 23.) 


July 4 


Ludington, M ic h i g a n , 
Lake Michigan. 


Rescue from danger. 


An aeronaut in a parachute fell into the 
lake and the life-saving crew, in surfboat, 








picked him up and landed him and his 








balloon safely at Pere Marquette pier. 


July 5 


Narragansett Pier, Rhode 


Assistance at fire... 


At 3.30 p. m. an automobile caught fire 




Island. 




while passing the station. The life-sav- 








ing crew put out the flames with fire- 








extinguishers and saved the car. 


July 5 


Charlotte, New York, 


Recovery of body . . . 


The life-savers recovered the body of a 




Lake Ontario. 




man who had fallen from a bridge and 








drowned. 


July 5 


Harbor Beach, Michigan, 


Assistance at fire . . . 


Fire being discovered in a dwelling, the oc- 




Lake Erie. 




cupants were notified by the patrol, who, 








with a fire hose, succeeded in extinguish- 








ing the flames before they had gained 








much headway. 


July 7 


Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 


Recovery of body . . . 


At 10 a. m. a message was received by the 
keeper that a boy had drowned in the 








river 4 miles from the station. Two surf- 








men recovered the body by dragging, and 








turned it over to the undertaker. 


July 7 


Louisville, Kentucky 


Rescue from drown- 


A boy while swimming in the river was 






ing. 


caught in the strong current and swept 








down near the falls. The life-saving 








crew, seeing his predicament, manned a 








boat, picked the drowning boy up, and 


July 7 


Ludington, Michigan, 


Recovery of body . . 


brought him safely to the river's bank. 
A boy having fallen into the lake 2 miles 




Lake Michigan. 




from the life-saving station, a surfman 








proceeded to the place and after dragging 








the bottom with grappling irons brought 








the remains to the surface. The Service 








method of resuscitation was applied for 








one hour without success. 


July 7 


Saint Joseph, Michigan, 


Body found 


The life-savers recovered the body of an un- 




Lake Michigan. 




known man floating on the lake, and noti- 
fied the police authorities, who turned it 








over to an undertaker. 


July 8 


Pecks Beach, New Jersey. 


Succor 


Six young men who had been searching for 








a lost companion came to the station late 








in the night and were sheltered until 


July 8 


Sheboygan, Wisconsin, 


Aid to injured.. 


morning. 
A boy having run a large sliver of wood into 




Lake Michigan. 




his foot, was carried to the station, where 








the keeper gave him stimulants, after 








which he was sent to his home for med- 








ical treatment. 


July 9 


Ship Bottom, New Jersey. 


Body found. 


Keeper recovered the body of an unknown 








man floating in the water, and turned it 








over to the coroner. 


July 9 


Thunder Bay Island, 
Michigan, Lake Huron. 


Transportation 


Upon hearing the emergency signal sound- 
ed on a steamer whistle, the station crew 








pulled out into the lake and brought 








ashore a fireman who had refused duty 








on board his vessel. 


July 11 


Galveston, Texas 


Rescue from drown- 


Viola Nelson, a young girl, finding herself 






ing. 


adrift in a small boat, jumped overboard, 








but as she was unable to wade ashore 








clung to the side of the boat to keep from 
sinking. The keeper, seeing her perilous 



172 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



1906. 
July 11 



July 11 



July 12 



July 12 

July 12 

July 12 
July 13 

July 14 

July 14 

July 14 
July 15 

July 16 
July 17 

July 17 
July 17 



Galveston, Texas 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Buffalo, New York. Lake 
Erie. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake Erie 



South Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Evanston, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Galveston, Texas 



Saint Joseph, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



.do- 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Lake Michigan. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Cleveland,Ohio,Lake Erie. 



South Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Rescue from drown 
ing. 



Recovery of body . . 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Body found. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Aid to injured. . . . 
Recovery of body . 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Recovery of body. . 

Rescue from danger. 
Clothing furnished . 

Recovery of body . . 
...do... 



.do. 



.do. 



Nature of casualty. 



situation, shouted to her to hold on, then 
ran to the pier, jumped into the water, 
swam to her rescue, and brought her and 
the boat to the shore. 

John Hyrcyek, 13 years old, was drowned 
at the foot of Indiana street, 1 mile dis- 
tant from the station. Two surfmen 
with grappling irons recovered the bcdy 
and turned it over to the city authorities. 

At 1.45 p. m. a small boy while wading in 
shallow water walked into a hole where 
the water was 12 feet deep, and was sink- 
ing for the last time when a surfman, who 
was on the pier at the time, plunged in 
and by diving brought the boy to the sur- 
face. The Service method of resuscita- 
tion was applied until the boy showed 
signs of reviving, when he was removed 
to the station and furnished with stimu- 
lants and food, also dry clothing from 
the stores of the W. N. R. A. 

A body of a man was found floating on the 
lake by the life-saving crew, who turned 
it over to the undertaker. It was iden- 
tified as the remains of Captain M. Elven, 
who was drowned when the schooner Al- 
geria, foundered off the harbor on M&y 9 
last. 

Charles Little while attempting to swim 
across the harbor became exhausted and 
called loudly for help. The lookout, 
hearing the cries, threw him a life-pre- 
server and hauled him safely to the shore. 

A young boy having cut his leg while in 
bathing, the keeper stopped the flow of 
blood, dressed the wound, and sent him 
to his home. 

William Mulligan, a boy 7 years of age, fell 
into the lake and was drowned. The life- 
savers, with grapnels, repaired to the 
place, and after dragging the bottom for 
one hour succeeded in bringing the re- 
mains to the surface. 

A runaway horse plunged into the harbor 
channel, and the keeper manned a skiff, 
pulled out to the animal, brought it back 
to the shore, and turned it over to the 
owner. 

The body of Aubrey Sutherland, who was 
drowned several days previous, was re- 
covered li miles S W. of the station by the 
life-saving crew. The remains were 
turned over to the undertaker. 

James Greenwald got beyond his depth 
while in bathing and called loudly for 
help. The station crew reached him in 
time to prevent drowning. 

John Wilky fell into the river from south 
pier while fishing, and after being taken 
from the water was conveyed to the life- 
saving station, where he was furnished 
dry clothing from the stores of the \V. N. 

The body of Arthur Dalton, who was 
drowned, was brought to the surface by 
several surfmen with grappling irons and 
turned over to the city authorities. 

Michael Chinchilia, a boy 11 years of age, 
fell into the river and was drowned. Two 
surfmen repaired to the scene and after 
grappling for the body for some time 
succeeded in bringing it to the surface, 
when the undertaker took charge cf it. 

A boy having fallen into the lake was 
brought to the surface by the station 
crew, and after attempting to revive him 
without success, his remains were sent 
to his home. 

The body of Frank Glish, who had been 
missing from his home for several days, 
was rec9vered from the bottom of the 
Kinriickinnick River by several surfmen 
with grappling irons. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



173 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Service rendered. 


Nature of casualty. 


1906. 
July 18 

July 21 

July 21 
July 22 


Evanston, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 

Cape May, New Jersey 

Ashtabula, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 

Erie Pennsylvania, Lake 


Recovery of body. . . 

Rescue from drown- 
ing. 

Transportation 

' do 


The body of Conrad Maple wood, who was 
drowned in Lake Michigan, was recov- 
ered by several surfmen and turned over 
to the city authorities. Attempts were 
made at resuscitation, but as the man 
had been hi the water for nearly an hour 
all efforts proved futile. 
Darthy Stokely while bathing became ex- 
hausted and was unable to reach the 
shore. The life-saving crew went to his 
rescue and brought him safely to the 
beach. 
The body of a man having been recovered 
from the bottom of the lake, the surfmen 
transported the remains in surfboat to 
an undertaker. 
Mr. E. Dagget and family while attempt- 


July 22 
July 26 

July 28 
July 29 


Erie. 
Point Adams, Oregon 
Gurnet, Massachusetts 

Manistee, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 

Louisville, Kentucky.. 


Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Succor; clothing 
furnished. 

Recovery of body. . . 
.do 


ing to cross the bay at night were in dan- 
ger of capsizing, and were landed on the 
opposite shore by a surfman in a power 
boat. 
Two large fishing nets having fouled a buoy 
on Clatsop Spit the life-savers recovered 
them without damage and restored them 
to the owners. 
Running out of gasoline and storm bound, 
the occupant of a launch came to the sta- 
tion and requested shelter. The keeper 
took him in and furnished him food and 
lodging, also dry clothing from the stores 
of the W. N. R. A. 
The station crew upon learning that a boy 
had drowned while swimming, manned 
the surfboat, and with grappling irons 
recovered his body. After practicing 
the Service methods of resuscitation 
without signs of returning animation the 
remains were turned over to his parents. 
(See letter of acknowledgment.) 
Conrad Reisser having fallen into the Ohio 


July 29 

July 29 
July 30 


South Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 

Erie. Pennsylvania. Lake 


Rescue from drown- 
ing. 

Recovery of body. .. 
do 


River and drowned, the station crew re- 
paired to the place with grappling irons 
and in a short time brought the remains 
to the surface and turned them over to 
the city authorities. 
While William Gee and A. A. Luch, both 
of Chicago, were in bathing, the former 
became exhausted in his efforts to swim 
to south pier. The lu'e-savers went to 
his rescue, and with the assistance of his 
companion succeeded in getting him out 
of the water to a safe place. He was 
then removed to the station, given stim- 
ulants and restoratives from the medi- 
cine chest, and put to bed until he recov- 
ered his normal conditions. (See letter 
of acknowledgment.) 
Upon learning that a man had drowned 
while in bathing, the life-saving crew 
launched, surfboat, and after dragging 
the bottom for about one hour succeeded 
in bringing the remains to the surface. 
Clarence Calvert fell into the lake from the 


July 30 


Erie. 
Marblehead, Ohio, Lake 


do 


Anchor Line dock and was drowned. 
The keeper and 2 surfmen pulled to the 
spot in a dinghy, and after dragging the 
bottom for two hours brought the body 
to the surface and turned it over to an 
undertaker. 
John Bence, of Oak Harbor, having fallen 


July 30 


Erie. 
Nome, Alaska 


Rescue from drown- 


from a dock into the lake and drowned, 
the keeper and a surfman with grappling 
irons went to the place, and after drag- 
ging the bottom brought the remains to 
the surface. 
A man under the influence of liquor made 






ing. 


a bet with some companions that he 
could swim off to a vessel at anchor 
about 2 miles offshore. After swimming 
about a mile and a half he started back. 
About this time his companions notified 
the keeper, who immediately went to his 
assistance in a gasoline launch. He was 



174 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



Nature of casualty. 



1906. 
July 30 



July 30 
July 31 



Aug. 1 
Aug. 2 



Aug. 2 

Aug. 2 

Aug. 3 

Aug. 3 



Nome, Alaska. 



Point Adams, Oregon. . . 
Golden Gate, California. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Manomet Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Ship Bottom, New Jer- 
sey. 

Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Sandy Hook, New Jersey. 



Cleveland, Ohio. Lake 
Erie. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Recovery of body. . 
Resuscitation . . 



Body found. . 
Resuscitation. 



Aug. 4 Charlevoix, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Aug. 5 



Aug. 4 



Aug. 5 



Aug. 5 



Point Judith, Rhode Is- 
land. 



Muskegon, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Rocky Point, New York. . 



Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 



Body found 



Recovery of bodies 
(2). . 



Aid to injured 



Recovery of body . . 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Recovery of bodies 

(2). 



found face down in the water holding on 
to a piece of driftwood. He was taken in 
the boat and artificial respiration prac- 
ticed on him for about a half hour. 
Landing him on the beach, he was taken 
to the life-saving station, given treat- 
ment, and a physician sent for. Later he 
was removed to the hospital and a few 
days later was fully recovered. 

The life-saving crew recovered two nets 
valued at $200, which had gone adrift, 
and restored them to the owners. 

At 6 p. m. a demented woman threw her- 
self into the water opposite the life-sav- 
ing station and was rescued from drown- 
ing by the timely arrival of a surfman, 
who took her out of the water and 
brought her to the station, where she 
was furnished with dry clothing from 
the stores of the W. N. R. A. 

The body of Wesley Martin, who was 
drowned on the day previous, was re- 
covered by several surfmen, who turned 
it over to the city authorities. 

Miss Bessie Sanger, while in bathing, got 
beyond her depth and sank, but a man 
nearby brought her to the surface and 
to shore, where the life-savers at once 
practiced the Service method of resus- 
citation until she revived. She was 
then taken to her home, given dry cloth- 
ing and stimulants, after which she was 
put to bed. 

The keeper found the mutilated body of 
an unknown man on the beach, and 
turned it over to an undertaker. 

William Peters, a boy 6 years old, having 
been rescued from drowning, was resus- 
citated by the life-saving crew and sent 
to his home. 

The life-savers found the body of an un- 
known man on the beach and turned it 
over to the coroner. 

Russell Hurd and James Butler having 
fallen into the river and drowned, sev- 
eral surfmen with grappling irons pro- 
ceeded to the place, and after dragging 
the bottom for some time recovered the 
bodies and delivered them to the under- 
taker. 

At 4.30 p. m. Lawrence McKinnon, 14 years 
of age, while in bathing fell on a nail on 
the pier and received two cuts in the leg. 
Two surfmen dressed the wound and 
took the boy to a physician. 

Miss Blanche Colston, while in bathing, 
got beyond her depth and was drowned. 
Her body was recovered and brought to 
the shore, where the Service method of 
resuscitation was practiced for some 
time by the district superintendent and 
assistant, but without avail. 

At 7.30 a. m. Mrs. B. Plant fell into the 
river about 200 feet W. of the station, 
and a surfman ran to her assistance, 
took her to shore, and brought her to 
the station, where she was furnished dry 
clothing from the stores of the W. N. 
R. A. 

A bather being discovered J mile from 
shore clinging to a log was picked up out 
of the water by the life-saving crew and 
brought to the station in an exhausted 
condition. The keeper furnished him 
stimulant and dry clothing, and, after 
he had recovered, sent him to his home. 

Two boys while attending a picnic fell into 
the water and were drowned. The sta- 
tion crew upon learning of the casualty 
pulled to the place, and with grappling 
irons soon brought the bodies to the sur- 
face. The coroner arrived upon the scene 
and took charge of the remains. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



175 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



Nature of casualty. 



1906. 
Aug. 5 



Aug. 5 



Aug. 5 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Pointe aux Barques, Mich- 
igan, Lake Huron. 



Saint Joseph, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Recovery of body 



Transportation. . . 



Recovery of body 



Aug. 5 

Aug. 5 

Aug. 7 

Aug. 7 

Aug. 7 

Aug. 8 

Aug. 8 

Aug. 8 



Aug. 9 d 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 



Michi; 



gan. 



Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 

Monmouth Beach, New 
Jersey. 



Paul Gamiels Hills, North 
Carolina. 



Saluria, Texas. 



Point Allerton, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Fairport, Ohio, Lake Erie. 



Assistance at fire .. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Recovery of body . 



Aid to injured 



Fresh water fur- 
nished. 



Body found. 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 



Aug. 10 Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



2990908 12 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Recovery of body. 



.do. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



At 6 p. m. the keeper was informed by tele- 
phone of the drowning of Herman Schell, 
a resident of Louisville. The keeper with 
boat crew went to the place, and after 
dragging the river's bottom brought the 
remains to the surface, transferred them 
to shore, and turned them over to the 
city authorities. 

Two men from the tug Bob Teed, who were 
desirous of reaching their yacht, were 
landed on shore and conveyed to Pointe 
aux Barques by a team provided by the 
keeper. 

At 5.50 p. m. a man fell into the river while 
attempting to board a steamer and was 
drowned. The life-savers hearing dis- 
tress signals from the vessel, at once re- 
paired to the place, and after dragging 
the bottom for forty minutes managed 
to bring the body of the unfortunate man 
to the surface. After applying the Serv- 
ice method of resuscitation for one hour 
without avail a physician pronounced the 
man dead and the coroner took charge of 
the remains. 

At 4 p. m. the surfmen were notified that 
the Government pier on the opposite side 
of the river was on fire. They crossed in 
a skiff and with fire buckets extinguished 
the flames before much damage had been 
done. 

A gill net valued at $300 went adrift, but 
was picked up by the life-saving crew 
and restored to the owner. 

At 4.15 a. m. word reached the keeper that 
William McGrath had fallen into the wa- 
ter at a point } mile N. of the station and 
was drowned. The keeper with several 
surfmen proceeded to the place in a skiff 
and after fifteen minutes search recov- 
ered the body. Attempts were made to 
resuscitate him, but without avail. 

A man having been injured in a sawmill, 
surfman No. 1 transported him to the 
mainland, where he received medical 
attention. 

The fishing sloop Dunbar having run short 
of fresh water, her master came to the 
station and requested assistance. An 
ample supply of water was put on board 
the sloop from the station cistern. 

The body of an unknown man was found 
on the beach U miles from the station by 
a surfman, who turned it over to the 
medical examiner. 

A woman walking on a pier accidently slip- 
ped and fell into the river. Her husband 
plunged in and succeeded in dragging her 
to a pile, where both were rescued by the 
life-savers, who had pulled out to them 
in a boat. (See letter of acknowledg- 
ment.) 

Matthew Hansen, aged 44 years, fell from a 
pier into the lake and was drowned. The 
keeper learning of the accident repaired 
to the place and endeavored to secure the 
body by diving, but owing to great depth 
of water his efforts were unavailing. 
Surfmen finally brought it to the surface 
with an extension pole. 

Benjamin Albright, a boy 14 years of age, 
fell into the Root River and was drowned. 
Two surfmen in a station skiff went to 
the place and brought the body to the 
surface. It had been in the water one- 
half hour and all efforts at resuscitation 
proved futile. 

At 11.45 a. m. a boy capsized in a canoe and 
clung to some piling until the arrival of 
a surfman in a skiff, who rescued him 
from his perilous situation and landed 
him 'iafely on shore. 



176 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Aug. 10 



Aug. 11 

Aug. 11 
Aug. 12 

Aug. 13 

Aug. 13 
Aug. 14 

Aug. 14 
Aug. 14 



Aug. 14 
Aug. 14 

Aug. 16 
Aug. 16 
Aug. 17 



Station and locality. 



Saint Joseph, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Rye Beach, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Kewaunee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Point Lookout, New 
York. 



Harvey Cedars, New Jer- 
sey. 



Sturgeon Point, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Monomoy Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Pecks Beach, New Jersey. 



South Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Saint Joseph, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 



Salisbury Beach, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Manomet Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Service rendered. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Recovery of body. 



.do. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Clothing furnished. 
Rescue from danger. 

Clothing furnished . 
Body found 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



.do. 



Assistance to the 
sick- 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Assistance at fire.. 



Nature of casualty. 



At 3 p. m., while in bathing, a young boy 
got beyond his depth and called loudly 
for help. A surfman, who was crossing 
the river in a skiff, located the boy and 
hastily pulled to the rescue. He was 
taken out of the water and landed safely 
on shore. 

Mr. Charles Trafton, while in bathing got 
out beyond his depth, became exhausted, 
and called loudly for help. A surfman 
near by plunged in and brought the 
drowning man to a floating stage. He 
was then taken to shore in a dinghy and 
sent to his home. 

At 8 a. m. the keeper and his crew dragged 
the river's bottom in search of the body 
of a boy who was drowned on the pre- 
ceding day. His remains were brought 
to the surface and sent to his parents. 

The body of R. Heilman, a bather, was 
picked up in the surf and brought to the 
shore by the life-saving crew, who imme- 
diately practiced the Service method of 
resuscitation without signs of returning 
animation. A physician pronouncing 
life extinct, the remains were turned over 
to the coroner. 

At 11.30 a. m. a small boat containing a 
boy capsized 100 yards offshore. The 
station crew pulled out to the rescue, 
took the boy out of the water, righted 
the skiff, and returned to the shore, 
where the occupant was landed. 

A woman in landing from a boat became 
drenched, and the keeper furnished her 
with dry clothing from the stores of the 
W. N. R. A. 

A sailing party from Harwick called at the 
station with a seasick companion in an 
unconscious condition, and the keeper 
applied restoratives from the medicine 
chest, and in a short time restored her to 
normal conditions. 

An unknown man in a destitute condition 
came to the station and requested assist- 
ance. The keeper took him in and fur- 
nished him clothing from the stores of 
the W. N. R. A. 

At 3.30 p. m. word was sent to the keeper 
that Stephen Kostka, of Chicago, was 
drowned near Virginia Beach, 1 miles 
from the station. The body was discov- 
ered on the bar, taken into the surf boat, 
and landed on the beach, where the Serv- 
ice methods of resuscitation were applied 
without any signs of returning anima- 
tion. The remains were turned over to 
an undertaker. 

At 7.15 p. m. a young man while in bathing 
got beyond his depth and called loudly 
for help. A surfman in the station skiff 
picked him up out of the water and 
landed him safely on shore. 

At 3 p. m. an unknown man while attempt- 
ing to swim to the N. pier became ex- 
hausted and called for help. Two surf- 
men who were on the pier plunged into 
the water, swam to his rescue, and 
brought the man safely to shore. 

A woman having become seriously ill in a 
cottage on the beach the keeper and sev- 
eral surfmen carried her to an ambulance, 
which removed her to her home. 

An automobile having run down an em- 
bankment near the station, several surf- 
men assisted the owner in getting it back 
on the road. 

At 6.30 a. m. a fire broke out in a livery sta- 
ble and the life-savers at once repaired 
to the scene. After assisting to rescue 65 
horses and save 110 vehicles they sot to 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



177 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



Nature of casualty. 



1906. 
Aug. 17 



Aug. 18 



Aug. 19 



Aug. 19 



Aug. 19 



Aug. 20 

Aug. 20 
Aug. 20 



Aug. 20 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Ocean City, Maryland 



Gay Head, Massachusetts. 



Fort Macon, North Caro- 
lina. 



Sheboygan, Wisconsin, 
LakeMichigan. 



Isle of Wight, Maryland. 



Saluria, Florida. 



Assistance at fire . . 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Aid to injured 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



.do. 



Succor. 



South Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Fresh water fur- 
nished. 

Rescue from drown 
ing. 



Aug. 20 



Jackson Park, Illinois. 
Lake Michigan. 



.do. 



Aug. 20 



Evanston, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 



Recovery of body . 



work with a fire hose and apparatus, and 
in a short time the flames were under 
control. The fire department then ar- 
rived and, with the assistance of the surf- 
men, succeeded in extinguishing the 
flames at a late hour. 

Cries for help being heard over the water a 
surfman set out to the place and found 
two bathers out beyond their depths and 
unable to reach the beach. They were 
brought to the shore in safety. 

A man having fallen down a steep embank- 
ment near the station the keeper and crew 
went to his assistance and found that he 
had broken his right leg. A horse and 
wagon were hastily procured by which 
the man was conveyed to a physician, who 
set the leg and sent the man to his home. 

A man while bathing in the surf got out 
beyond his depth and was in danger of 
drowning, when a surfman plunged in, 
grasped the man, and swam with him to 
shore. 

At 2.10 p. m. a boat containing a man cap- 
sized m the harbor. Upon hearing the 
alarm the surfmen launched a boat and 
pulled out to the overturned boat. The 
occupant who was found clinging to the 
sides of the boat was taken out of the 
water and brought to the station. The 
capsized boat was also landed, righted, 
and bailed out, after which it was re- 
turned to the owner. 

A man while fishing, having become storm 
bound, came to the station for shelter. 
The keeper took him in and cared for him 
until the following morning. 

The fishing sloop Hilda having run short of 
fresh water her supply was replenished 
from the station cistern. 

Paul Vitze while bathing in the surf became 
exhausted and was in danger of drown- 
ing. A companion near by held him up 
until the arrival of the life-saving crew 
from the station J mile distant, when he 
was taken to the pier and furnished stim- 
ulants. A physician was summoned who 
sent the man to his home. 

Miss Gertrude Price jumped off a dock and 
thecompany's agent plunged in after her, 
but failed to reach her. Surfman Marsh- 
all who was returning from liberty ran to 
the place, dived down through 24 feet of 
water, recovered the woman and brought 
her to the surface. Marshall at once set 
to work, applying the Service methods of 
resuscitation until she showed signs of 
reviving. She was then conveyed to a 
hospital, where she was restored to her 
normal condition. 

At 4 p. m. the lookout hearing cries for 
help, gave the alarm, whereupon the surf- 
boat was launched and the crew pulled 
out to a man and a boy struggling in the 
water. The boy had fallen into the 
water, and the man having gone to his 
assistance became exhausted, and both 
would have drowned had it not been for 
the timely arrival of the life-saving crew, 
who removed both to a near by pier. The 
man quickly recovered, but it was nec- 
essary to convey the boy to the sta- 
tion, where he was restored. After the 
keeper had furnished him dry clothing 
from the stores of the W. N. R. A. he was 
taken to his home. 

About 4 p. m. the police department tele- 
phoned the station, informing the keeper 
that a boy had drowned in a pond near 
Gross Point. The keeper with grappling 
irons recovered the body and sent it to 
his parents. 



178 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Aug. 21 



Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 23 

Aug. 24 



Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



South Haven, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Chatham, Massachusetts 



Cuttyhunk, Massachu- 
setts. 



Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Kewaunee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Manistee, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



New Shoreham, Rhode 
Island. 



Aug. 24 Atlantic City, New Jersey 



Aug. 24 
Aug. 24 

Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 26 



Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Hampton Beach, New 
Hampshire. 



Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 
Erie. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Aid to sick. 



Recovery of body. 



.do. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Aid to injured 



Body found. 



.do. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Rescue from danger 



Assistance at fire.. 



Body found . 



Nature of casualty. 



Mr. C. D. Wilson while walking near the 
edge of a pier accidentally fell into the 
water, and after struggling to reach the 
shore managed to gain some spiling, by 
which he kept his head above water. The 
life-saving crew seeing the man fall, at 
once launched surfboat and pulled to the 
rescue. Upon approaching the man he 
let go his hold and fell back into the 
water, but was rescued by the surfmen, 
who conveyed him to the station, where 
he was furnished stimulants and dry 
clothing from the supply of the W.N.R. A. 

A horse having strayed away was found by 
several surfmen, who brought the animal 
to the station and turned it over to the 
owner on the following morning. 

Sumner Irish, while on a fishing trip, was 
taken suddenly ill, and the keeper in his 
dory carried him to the village for medi- 
cal assistance, after which he was put on 
board a steamer and sent to his home in 
New Bedford. 

At 10.20 p. m. the keeper was notified by 
telephone that a young man had jumped 
off of Macatawa dock and was drowned. 
The station crew at once pulled to the 
place and, after grappling for the body 
for \\ hours, succeeded in bringing it to 
the surface. The remains were turned 
over to the coroner. 

At 10.30 p. m. the life-saving crew learning 
that a man had fallen overboard hastened 
to the spot and recovered the body. The 
Service methods of resuscitation were 
practiced for 2 hours without avail. 

While a number of the crew of the tug 
Mann were in swimming two of the men 
became somewhat exhausted in the 
strong undertow and were in danger of 
being swept into the lake. The alarm 
was at once given at the station, the 
crew hurried to the place, threw them a 
line, and hauled them safely to the beach. 

At 2.20 p. m. the S. patrol discovered a 
woman lying on the beach in an uncon- 
scious condition. She had fallen on the 
rocks and sprained her ankle. A carriage 
was procured and she was sent to her 
home. 

At 9.20 a. m. the station was informed of 
the drowning of Louis Simkins near Rum 
Point. The crew launched a small surf- 
boat and pulled to the place, practiced 
the Service methods of resuscitation, but 
without avail. The remains were turned 
over to the coroner. 

The body of a man having been discovered 
on the beach the keeper brought it to the 
station and turned it over to an under- 
taker. 

The life-savers manned a boat and pulled 
out to a man who was being swept out 
over the bar by the strong undertow. A 
surfman jumped overboard from the 
bow and landed him in the surfboat, 
after which he was conveyed to the 
shore and turned over to his friends. 

A man and a woman while in bathing were 
unable to reach shore owing to heavy 
seaweed. A surfman went out to their 
assistance and brought them both safely 
to the land. 

At 9 p. m. fire was discovered on the* penin- 
sula by the patrol. As it was rapidly 
spreading, owing to strong winds, the 
keeper sent 4 surfmen to the place and in 
three-fourths of an hour they had the 
flames under subjection. 

At 2.30 p. m. word having reached the 
station that a body was floating on the 
lake, keeper sent one of his crew to the 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



179 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



Nature of casualty. 



1906 

Aug. 26 Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Aug. 26 Fort Point, California.... 



Aug. 27 Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Aug. 28 Island Beach, New Jersey 



Aug. 28 Santa Rosa, Florida 



Aug. 28 Pointe Aux Barques, Mich- 
igan, Lake Michigan. 



Aug. 29 Sullivans Island, South 
Carolina. 



Aug. 30 Buffalo, New York. Lake 
Erie. 



Aug. 31 Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Sept. 1 Chatham, Massachusetts. 



Sept. 2 Thunder Bay Island, 
Michigan, Lake Huron. 



Sept. 3 Wood End, Massachusetts 



Sept. 4 Harbor Beach, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 



Sept. 4 Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 



Sept. 5 Old Chicago, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 



Body found 

Rescue from danger 

Recovery of body.. 

Transportation 

Assistance to sick.. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Resuscitation. 



Recovery of body . 



.do 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Succor. 



Transportation . . 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Transportation. . . 
Recovery of body.. 



place and the body was secured and 
turned pver to the city authorities. It 
was identified as that of Paul Vetter, 
who was drowned on the 24th instant. 

At 3.45 p. m. the lookout discovered 2 
men on a rock J mile S. of the station 
making signals for assistance. The surf- 
boat was launched and the crew pulled 
out and brought the 2 men to the station. 
They had gone out to fish, but were later 
cut off from the shore by the rising tide. 

A man having fallen from a dock and 
drowned, the station crew proceeded to 
the place in a skiff, and after grappling 
for the b9dy for fifteen minutes succeeded 
in bringing it to the surface. It was 
identified as that of Rudolph Shaw, and 
it was turned over to the city authorities. 

At 8.30 a. m. in response to a signal of dis- 
tress on board the schooner Benjamin M. 
Wallace the life-saving crew pulled out 
to her and brought ashore a member of 
her crew in order to enable him to obtain 
medical assistance. 

A man having been taken seriously ill the 
keeper transported him to Fort Bar- 
rancas for medical attention. 

A large boom of logs belonging to the Ried 
Wrecking Company, of Sarnia, having 
gone adrift the keeper with a gasoline 
launch took them in charge to await the 
arrival of the owners. 

A woman having been seized with cramps 
while in bathing was brought ashore in 
an unconscious condition. The surfmen 
practiced the Service method of resus- 
citation until she revived. She was fur- 
nished stimulants from the station med- 
icine chest and sent to her home. 

At 7.15 p. m. the keeper received word over 
the telephone that a man had drowned J 
mile from the station, and immediately 
sent several surfmen to -the place in a 
dinghy, and after grappling for the body 
for fifteen minutes managed to bring it to 
the surface. 

A bather named Clarence Hicks drowned 
1J miles W. of the station. The life- 
savers dragged for his body in surfboat, 
recovered it, and attempted resusci- 
tation, but without success. 

At 4 p. m. a horse attached to a cart dashed 
into the water near the station, and the 
keeper and day watch waded in and 
brought the animal and cart safely to the 
beach. 



uring dense fog came to the station and 
the keeper gave them shelter and food. 
They departed on the following day. 

Two persons wishing to reach Boston and 
there being no means of conveyance the 
keeper with a power boat took them to 
the steamboat landing. 

A large chain belonging to the Dunbar 
Dredge Company was recovered by 
several surfmen while in bathing. The 
owners were notified, and the chain was 
forwarded to them by the keeper. 

The keeper in a power boat took the light- 
house inspector ashore from tender 
Heather, and later put him on board 
prior to her sailing. 

At 3.30 a. m. the keeper received word that 
a man had fallen from a dock and was 
drowned 1 mile NW. of station. The 
keeper sent several surfmen to the place, 
who, after one hour's search, succeeded 
in bringing the remains to the surface 
with grappling irons. 



180 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Service rendered. 


Nature of casualty. 


1906. 








Sept. 6 


Gurnet Massachusetts. 


Succor 


Three persons finding their boat hard 








aground were unable to return to their 








homes, and the keeper gave them shelter 








for the night. 


Sept. 6 


Frankfort, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 


Assistance at fire... 


At 11 a. m. word was received by the keeper 
that a large quantity of coal belonging to 
the Ann Arbor Railroad Company was 








on fire, and the keeper with his crew 








equipped with fire pump and hose quickly 
repaired to the scene and in a short time 








extinguished the flames before much of 








the coal had been destroyed. 


Sept. 7 


Atlantic City, New Jersey . 


Rescue from drown- 
ing. 


A surfman while in bathing heard cries for 
help, and upon seeing a small boy out be- 
yond his depth swam to him and brought 


Sept. 9 


Pentwater, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 


Recovery of body . . . 


him safely to the beach. 
Florence Depeel, 16 years old, fell into the 
lake from the pier at about 9 p. m. The 
station crew hastened to the scene of dis- 








aster, recovered the body, and practiced 






' 


the Service method of resuscitation, but 








without success, as life was extinct. 


Sept. 9 


Plum Island, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 


Transportation 


The distress signal being observed flying 
on Pilot Island, the keeper manned surf- 








boat and responded to the signal. Upon 
arrival he found that the light keeper's 








wife wished to be conveyed to Detroit 








Harbor, in order to obtain medical at- 








tendance for her sick child. The keeper 








complied with the request. 


Sept. 12 


Ditch Plain, New York. . . . 


Assistance at fire... 


A cottage having caught on fire, the station 
crew repaired to the scene with fire appa- 
ratus and extinguished the flames before 








much damage had been wrought. 


Sept. 12 


Louisville, Kentucky 


Recovery of body. . . 


An aged colored man was taken from the 
water by life-savers; after two hours of 








fruitless efforts at resuscitation, the body 








was turned over to the coroner. 


Sept. 13 


Brenton Point, Rhode 


Assistance at fire... 


At 3.30 a. m. a barn having been struck 




Island. 




by lightning and in danger of being de- 








stroyed by fire the station crew, after 








notifying the fire department, hastened 








to the place and assisted in rescuing a 








number of horses and getting the flames 








under control. 


Sept. 13 


Louisville, Kentucky 


Recovery of body. . . 


Word having reached the station inform- 
ing the keeper that a man had fallen into 








the river and drowned, surfmen manned 








a boat and pulled to the place, grappled 








for the body, and in a short time suc- 
ceeded in bringing it to the surface. At- 
tempts were then made to revive it, but 








without avail, as the man was dead. The 








coroner took charge of the remains. 


Sept. 14 


Point Judith, Rhode 
Island. 


Body found 


At 2.30 a.m. a body was found floating on 
the water and a surfman hauled it out to 








high-water mark, where the coroner took 








charge of it. 


Sept. 15 


Brenton Point, Rhode 


Assistance to sick. 


At 1 p. m. a sick man was discovered lying 




Island. 




in the road, and the patrol removed him 








to the station, where the keeper furnished 
him with stimulants and cared for him 








until he was able to return to his home. 


Sept. 16 


City Point, Massachusetts. 


Recovery of body. . 


At 1.50 p. m. the keeper was notified that a 








man had fallen from a boat and was 








drowned off Sculpin Ledge. The station 








crew manned a boat and pulled to the 








place, and after grappling for the body 
for a short time brought it to the surface 








and turned it over to an undertaker. 








(See letter of acknowledgment.) 


Sept. 17 


Long Branch, New Jersey. 


Body found 


A body having washed ashore f mile S. of 








the station was turned over to an under- 








taker for interment. 


Sept. 18 


Gloucester, Massachu- 
setts. 


Clothing furnished. 


Edward Munroe fell off the dock near 
the station and the keeper furnished 








him dry clothing from the stores of the 
W. N. R. A. 


Sept. 13 


Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 


Recovery of body. . 


Joseph Johnson while in swimming in the 




Erie. 




lake got beyond his depth and was 
drowned. The keeper sent 2 surfmen, 








who brought the remains to the surface 








with grappling irons. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



181 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Service rendered. 


Nature of casualty. 


1906. 
Sept. 19 

Sept. 19 

Sept. 20 

Sept. 21 
Sept 21 


Core Bank, North Caro- 
lina. 

South Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 

Gloucester, Massachusetts 

Oak Island, New York.,.. 
Evanston Illinois, Lake 


Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Assistance at fire. . . 

Assistance to sick. . 

Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Body found 


The life-saving crew picked up 2 air-tight 
copper tanks which had washed up onto 
the oeach and held them until the arrival 
of a claimant 
At 10.30 p. m. the lookout reported to keep- 
er that the breakwater at Calumet River 
was on fire, and the station crew imme- 
diately pulled to the scene and found the 
pier, with a freight car belonging to the 
Illinois Steel Company, threatened with 
destruction. The alarm having been 
sent in to the fire department the surf- 
men set to work and succeeded in getting 
the fire under control by the time the fire 
department arrived. 
A workman employed on the launchway of 
the station was taken ill with hemor- 
rhage of the stomach, and the keeper pro- 
cured a conveyance and took him to his 
home. After supplying him with some 
clothing from the stores of the W. N. R. 
A. he was removed to a hospital for med- 
ical attendance. 
A large quantity of lumber having been 
washed up onto the beach, several surf- 
men recovered it and held the same until 
the arrival of a claimant. 
A body which had evidently been in the 


Sept. 21 

Sept. 22 
Sept. 23 

Sept 25 


Michigan. 

Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Metomkin Inlet, Virginia . 

Old Chicago, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 

Saluria Texas 


Assistance at fire . . . 

Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Recovery of body.. . 
Assistance to sick . 


water for a long time was taken out of 
the water by the keeper and turned over 
to the police authorities. 
At 3.40 a. m. the dredge Martin having 
caught on fire, the station crew with fire 
apparatus repaired to the place and, after 
running a line of hose, extinguished the 
flames before much damage had been 
wrought. 
A bar buoy having gone adrift, the same 
was recoverd by the life-saving crew and 
the inspector notified. 
William Herzog having fallen from a 
steamer and drowned, the life-saving 
crew repaired to the place, recovered the 
body, and turned it over to the city au- 
thorities. 
The master of the schooner Kate M. having 


Sept. 26 


j-Santa Rosa, Florida 


Rescue from danger. 


been taken ill on board his vessel, the 
keeper furnished him stimulants and 
medicine from the station medicine chest. 
On the night of the 26th the wind increased 


Sept. 27 

Sept. 26 
Sept. 27 


Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 


Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 


Recovery of body. . . 
. do 


to a hurricane and by 10 p. m.'the seas 
were breaking entirely across the island. 
By 1 a. m. the life-savers had gotten 
everybody on the island, including 4 
women and 5 children, in the surfboat 
which they had previously anchored near 
the station. At daylight the anchor was 
tripped and with a drogue astern the bay 
was safely crossed and a landing made 
near Woolsey. The station and all build- 
ings on the island were demolished by the 
sea. 
George Winters having committed suicide 
by jumping into the river, surfmen recov- 
ered his body with a grapnel after one 
hour's work and sent it to his home. 
At 9.30 p. m. a telephone message was sent 


Spt. 29 


Erie. 
Saluria, Texas 


Aid to sick 


to the keeper notifying him that William 
Monkmon, a fireman, had fallen over- 
board from tug Peerless, 400 feet E. of 
station and was drowned . Two surfmen 
pulled to the tug, and, after grappling for 
the body, brought it to the surface and 
turned it over to an undertaker. 
A young man having been taken ill while 


Sept. 29 


Grande Pointe au Sable, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 
gan. 


Recovery of prop- 
erty. 


working on a ranch was brought to the 
station, cared for by the keeper, who 
afterwards took him in a dinghy to a phy- 
sician. 
At 11.30 a. m. a boom of logs having broken 
adrift, the station crew assisted to repair 
the break and recover the logs, which had 
washed away. 



182 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEEVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



Nature of casualty. 



1906. 
Oct. 1 



Lewes, Delaware. 



Saluria, Texas. 



Oct. 4 



Oct. 5 
Oct. 5 



Oct. 7 



Oct. 



Oct. 9 



Oct. 10 



Oct. 10 



Oct. 17 



Oct. 18 



Oct. 21 



Oct. 24 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



New Shoreham, Rhode 
Island. 



Niagara, New York, Lake 
Ontario. 



Old Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Jackson Park, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 

Southampton, New York, 



Sandy Point, Rhode 
Island. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Hereford Inlet, New Jer- 
sey. 



.4o. 



Green Run Inlet, Mary- 
land. 



Marblehead, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Assistance at fire. . 



Fresh water fur- 
nished. 



Recovery of body .. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Assistance at fire. . . 



Recovery of body . . 



Body found 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



.do. 



Assistance to light 
keeper. 



Succor. 



.do. 



Clothing furnished. 



Rescue from danger. 



At 8.15 p. m. the keeper was notified by tele- 
phone that a fire had broken out on a 
pier, and with his crew hastened to the 
place and extinguished the flames before 
any material damage had been done. 

The master of the sloop Hilda came to the 
station and reported to the keeper that 
his supply of fresh water was exhausted. 
His vessel was furnished with water from 
the station cistern. 

At 6.30 a. m. the keeper received word that 
a sailor had fallen overboard from the 
steamer Western Star and was drowned. 
He, with a surfman, at once went to the 
place, and after dragging the river for 
some time succeeded in recovering the 
body, which proved to be that of Patrick 
Sheehan. It was turned over to an un- 
dertaker. 

The keeper recovered a barrel of New Eng- 
land rum, which had washed up in the 
surf, and held it at the station until the 
arrival of a claimant. 
A fire .having been reported in Youngs- 
town, 1 mile distant, the keeper and his 
crew, equipped with fire apparatus, 
hastened to the place and aided in ex- 
tinguishing the flames and saving the 
adjoining buildings from total destruc- 
tion. 

At 8 a. m. the keeper was notified by a, 
boatman that a sailor from the U. S. S. 
Tuscarora had drowned a short distance 
below the life-saving station the night 
previous. The keeper and his crew with 
grapnels recovered the body which 
proved to be that of John B. Halste. 
It was turned over to the commanding 
officer of his vessel. 

The body of an unknown man was found 
lying on a park bench, and the keeper 
turned it over to the city authorities. 

A fisherman who was assisting to launch 
was carried out into the high-running 
surf and was in danger of drowning. A 
surfman near by rushed in, grasped the 
the man, and brought him safely to shore. 

George Payne, a fisherman, while attempt- 
ing to land through the surf in a dory 
suffered a capsize and was in danger of 
drowning in the strong undertow. The 
keeper and his crew rushed into the 
water and brought the man safely to 
the shore. 

The elevated walk leading to the light- 
house having been carried away for a 
distance of 400 feet by a heavy storm, the 
keeper went out in surf boat and con- 
veyed the light keeper to shore. 

At 11 p. m. John Foster, a sailor, came to 
the station and requested shelter for the 
night, a storm which was prevailing at 
the time making it impossible for him to 
get on board his vessel. The keeper 
afforded him the necessary shelter and in 
the morning put him <i i board with the 
station boat. 

At 8 p. m. Richard Sender came to the 
station and informed the keeper that it 
was impossible for him to reach his ves- 
sel, owing to heavy winds and high sea. 
The keeper took him in and afforded him 
succor until the following day. 

About 3 p. m. a man drenched and suffering 
from exposure came to the station and 
requested aid. The keeper supplied him 
with dry clothing from the stores of the 
W. N. R. A. 

At 5 p. m., as the steamer Lakeside was 
making her landing, Jay Lynch, a pas- 
senger, fell overboard and was in danger 
of drowning. Several surfmen who wit- 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



183 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



Nature of casualty. 



1906. 
Oct. 24 



Oct. 25 

Oct. 27 
Oct. 27 
Oct. 28 

Oct. 28 
Oct. 29 

Oct. 29 

Oct. 31 
Oct. 31 
Oct. 31 

Nov. 1 
Nov. 1 
Nov. 2 

Nov. 2 
Nov. 5 



Marblehead, Ohio, Lake j Rescue from danger. 
Erie. 



Sturgeon Bay Canal, Wis- 
consin. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 

Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Assistance to 
Light-H ouse 
Establishment. 

Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Cape Henry, Virginia Transportation 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Saluria, Texas 



Point Bonita, California.. 



Brant Rock, Massachu- 
setts. 



Old Harbor, Massachu- 
setts. 



Lake View Beach, Michi- 
gan, Lake Huron. 



Pointeaux Barques, Mich- 
igan, Lake Michigan. 

Point Adams, Washing- 
ton. 

Monomoy Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Lone Hill, New York 



Thunder Bay Island, 
Michigan, Lake Mich- 
igan. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Medical assistance. . 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



.do. 



Assistance at fire.. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Assistance to Immi- 
gration Service. 

Aid to disabled tug . 



Succor. 



Succor and trans- 
portation. 



nessed the affair launched a boat and in 
14 minutes had the man in the boat. 
He was taken ashore and sent to his 
home. 

The master of the schooner Katie E. How- 
ard came to the station and notified the 
keeper that he had lost one of his anchors. 
The keeper sent 2 surfmen with grappling 
irons to the spot and after dragging for 
some time succeeded in raising it. 

During a heavy gale and a high running 
sea launched surfboat and assisted light 
keeper to light his lamps. 

A fish net valued at $800 went adrift and 
the surfmen recovered it and turned it 
over to its owner. 

While supervising the wrecking operations 
on the Geo. Farrwell, the agent of the 
Merritt & Chapman Wrecking Co. fell 
dead. Upon request the life-savers re- 
moved the body to the station. 

Delivered to the schooner S. M. Mason a 
log which she had lost in gale while mak- 
ing harbor. Also assisted her in loading. 

While loading schooner Lille Bird, 1 of the 
deck hands fell from the deck into the 
hold injuring his back. Keeper assisted 
in getting man to his home, applied lini- 
ment and hot applications, to the great 
relief of the sufferer. 

A laborer while repairing Government 
wharf was knocked into the water by 
falling timbers, when Surfman Harrison 
M. Averill leaped into the water and 
swam him to safety. Only a powerful 
swimmer could have rescued him. 

NNE. breeze increasing to a gale toward 
sunset, high sea, 10 gunning dories lying 
at the breakwater threatened with de- 
struction. Life-savers haul them up on 
breakwater and secure them. 

A dory moored 4. mile SW. from station 
capsized in high sea, strong NNE. breeze. 
Life-savers went to boat in surfboat, 
righted it and bailed it out, and took it to 
a safe anchorage. 

Cottage occupied by one of the surfmen 
caught fire. Life-savers responded to call, 
but too late to save the building. Saved 
household effects. It' broke out at la.m. 
and only the most strenuous efforts pra- 
vented its spreading to the other station 
buildings. 

Surfman discovered a newly broken ship's 
spar, 42 feet long, towed it to station to 
await claim of owner. 

Went out in surfboat and landed watch- 
men from outgoing steamers the 1st and 
2d inst. 

Tug International with 3 barges in tow an- 
chored in the slue of Pollock Rip. She 
signaled ' ' steering gear disabled. Life- 
savers telephoned to her owners and they 
sent back word that another tug would 
come to her assistance. 

Three small boys blown across the bay in a 
small boat the day before with nothing 
to eat. Keeper furnished them with food 
and shelter. The next day sent them to 
Patchogue in a sloop and furnished them 
with money to pay their way back to 
Lay vi lie. 

Keeper received a telephone message that 
Surfman Brown, hunting on North Point, 
4 miles distant from the station, had been 
shot. Keeper manned surfboat, taking 
mattress, blankets, whisky, and medi- 
cine chest. The 4 miles were rowed in 
twenty-five minutes. Brown was found 
nearly dead from loss of blood and expo- 
sure. First aid and stimulants were 
given to him and he was taken to the hos- 
pital at Alpena. 



184 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Nov. l 



Nov. 7 

Nov. 8 

Nov. 10 

Nov. 11 

Nov. 11 
Nov. 15 
Nov. 16 

Nov. 16 
Nov. 16 

Nov. 16 

Nov. 17 
Nov. 17 

Nov. 18 



Nov. 21 

Nov. 22 

Nov. 24 
Nov. 24 



Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



Nature of casualty. 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 



Nome, Alaska. 



.do. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



Nome, Alaska 



Ilwaco Beach, Washing- 
ton. 

Point Judith, Rhode 
Island. 



Cold Spring, New Jersey . 



Nags Head, North Caro- 
lina. 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 



Recovery of body.. . 



Water and trans- 
portation. 



Transportation 



Rescue from danger. 



Transportation 



Assistance at fire.. 



| Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Recovery of bodies 
(3). 



Aid to schooner.... 



Provisions fur- 
nished. 



Assistance at fire... 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Recovery of prop- 
Lake Michigan. erty. 

Two Rivers, Wisconsin,.' do , 

Lake Michigan. 



Forked River, New Jersey. Medical assistance . 



Kewanee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Louisville, Kentucky. 



Mosquito Lagoon, Flor- 
ida. 

Louisville, Kentucky 



Assistance to 
Light-House Es- 
tablishment. 



Search for body... 



Fresh water fur- 
nished. 

Search for body . . . 



Keeper sent 3 surfmen in station dinghy to 
grapple for the body of a sailor who had 
fallen overboard from the steamer Ama- 
zonas. Body was found and keeper 
turned it over to the coroner. 

Master of La Gloria complained to keeper 
of mutinous crew. Keeper went on 
board to protect master and persuaded 
ringleader to take his discharge. Keeper 
took him ashore and brought off another 
man to fill vacancy. Supplied vessel with 
fresh water. 

Keeper was notified that the gasoline 
schooner Hazel was returning to Nome 
with the engineer badly burned. When 
schooner was sighted, life-savers went 
out in surfboat and transferred victim of 
gasoline explosion to Marine Hospital. 

Keeper noticed distress signal on lighter of 
two men adrift 2 miles south of station. 
Blowing strong north gale. Life-savers 
went out in surfboat and took them 
ashore. 

Sea washing around fog-signal station so 
high that light keeper could not get 
ashore. Life-savers went out in surfboat 
and brought him in. 

Life-savers went to assistance of fire de 
partment in extinguishing fire in small 
dwelling. 

A white and black striped whistling buoy 
found on the beach by life-savers. Light- 
House inspector at Portland was notified 

Surfmen found the bodies of James Smith, 
mate, Seaman Bousher, and Cook Lewis 
Black. These men had been lost in the 
wreck of the schooner Lugano. 

Three-masted schooner flying signal of dis- 
tress. Keeper telegraphed to revenue- 
cutter at Lewes, Delaware. 

Two men in a gasoline launch towing a 
small sloop landed at station. Life- 
savers hauled up boats and furnished 
men with meals and lodgings. 

Lookout discovered that a fire had broken 
out among the tar barrels at the Racine 
Gas Co.'s plant across the river. He tele- 
phoned to the fire department and the 
blaze was soon extinguished. 

Surfman picked up a skiff adrift in the river 
and turned it over to its owner. 

Strong east gale with a high sea, a pile of 
lumber belonging to the Nelson Lumber 
Co. in danger of washing away. Life- 
savers assisted in taking care of it. 

Man living in houseboat near by was 
taken seriously ill with cramps. His 
brother applied at the station for aid. 
Medicine was furnished and he was in- 
structed how to use it. Keeper visited 
sick man at 10 p m. and found him much 
improved. The next night at midnight 
the keeper was again called upon for aid. 
Sufferer was in such condition that keep- 
er assisted in getting him to the railroad, 
where he could be taken to his home. 

Life-savers were called out to fog-signal 
station to assist in securing a coal shed 
that was being carried off the pier. Seas 
breaking over continually, the light 
keeper was taken ashore in'surfboat. 

Man fell from flatboat 3^ miles west of sta- 
tion. Two surfmen went with drags to 
scene of drowning; after working all night 
were unable to locate body. 

Two men in sloop visit station; at their re- 
quest they were furnished with fresh 
water. 

Night watchman gave the alarm that man 
had gone overboard from wharf -boat. 
Life-savers went in boat and dragged for 
body. Search unsuccessful. Recovered 
body Nov. 25. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



185 



Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 






1906. 
Nov. 25 



Nov. 25 



Nov. 26 
Nov. 28 



Nov. 30 

Dec. 5 

Dec. 7 

Dec. 7 

Dec. 9 

Dec. 10 

Dec. 13 

Dec. 15 

Dec. 16 

Dec. 16 

Dec. 17 

Dec. 26 



Dec. 27 



Station and locality. 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Point Adams, Oregon 



Frankfort, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Oak Island, North Caro- 
lina. 



Kewaunee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Chadwick, New Jersey 



Straitsmouth, New Jer- 
sey. 



Nauset, Massachusetts. 



Nome, Alaska 

Brenton Point, Rhode Is- 
land. 



Maddequet, Massachu- 
setts. 



Old Harbor, Massachu- 
setts. 



Point of Woods, New I Recovery of prop- 



Service rendered. 



Assistance at fire.. 



Assistance to Immi- 
gration Service. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Succor; medical as- 
si stance and 
clothing. 



Assistance at fire.. 



Transportation and 
succor. 



Trarsportation... 



.do: 



Assistance at fire... 
do 

Transportation 

...do... 



York. 
Wallops Beach,Virginia. . . 



South side, California. .. . Aid to automobile. . 



erty. 

Succor; clothing 
furnished. 



Jackson Park, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



Rescue from danger 



Charlevoix and Sleeping Rescue from drown- 
Bear Point, Michigan, ing. 
Lake Michigan. 



Nature of casualty. 



Patrol discovered a barn on fire. With the 
assistance of some boys he extinguished 
the fire, saving the barn and in all proba- 
bility the adjoining farm buildings. 

Life-savers went out in surf boat and landed 
a watchman of the Immigration Service. 
Made trips in the performance of the same 
service the 29th and 30th. 

Life-savers hauled 100,000 feet of saw-logs 
from water, drifting out into lake. 

Surfmen in a small boat took a destitute 
sailor from a rock in salt meadows 3 miles 
from station. He had been on the rock 
twenty hours; took him to the station, 
gave him shelter, food, medical treat- 
ment, and an outfit of clothing from the 
W. N. R. A. 

Fire broke out hi a pile of cord wood, started 
by sparks from steam engine which was 
sawing near by. Life-savers proceeded 
to fire with buckets and soon put it out. 

While out gunning about 1 mile NW. of sta- 
tion, man shot himself. Life-savers car- 
ried him to station and later to train. 
Did all that was possible to relieve his 
sufferings. 

Two fishermen in sloop could not make 
Rockport against strong NW. wind. 
Anchored near station but started drag- 
ging out to sea. Life-savers went out 
ancT secured boat and took men ashore. 

Blowing fresh with a high sea, life-savers 
assisted wreckers in going to and from 
the wreck of the schooner G. M. Coch- 
rane. Sea was so high that this was the 
only means of communicating with the 
beach. 

Rendered aid to the city fire department in 
extinguishing blaze in small dwelling. 

Discovered close by, fire extinguished by 
life-savers, who, after calling up fire de- 
partment, proceeded to the scene with 
nre extinguishers. 

Two overseers of the Humane Society re- 
quested, and were given passage to Tuck- 
ernuck Island. Life-savers took them 
over hi dory. 

Boatman in skiff capsized in squall and lost 
his oars; towed him to his home in North 
Chatham. 

Life-savers picked up 2 spiles drifting in bay 
2 miles NW. of station. Notified owner 
of recovery of same. 

Patrol met 2 men from weather-bound 
sloop. They were drenched and suffer- 
ing from exposure. They were taken to 
station and supplied with food and dry 
clothing from the supplies of the W. N. 
R. A. 

A large automobile with 2 women passen- 
gers got stuck in quicksand 2 miles south 
of the station. In danger of destruction 
by the rising tide. Life-savers were 
called and succeeded in extricating the 
machine. 

Keeper hearing man crying for help ran out 
in direction of cries. Found man stand- 
ing with feet in mouth of sewer, support- 
ing himself by clinging to the edge of the 
ice. His clothes were frozen and he was 
unable to move. Keeper lowered him- 
self down and passed a line around the 
unfortunate man and assisted by an- 
other hauled him up on the dock. Sup- 
plied him with hot food and dry clothing 
and accompanied him to his house. 

Surfmen Ward W. Bennett, of Charlevoix, 
and Frank C. Bennett, of Sleeping Bear 
Point life-saving stations, brothers, 
spending Christmas at Glen Lake, Mich, 
(inactive season), effected a daring res- 



186 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 



1906. 
Dec. 27 



1907. 
Jan. 1 



Jan. 3 



Jan. 5 



Jan. 6 



Jan. 6 

Jan. 9 
Jan. 9 

Jan. 10 
Jan. 12 

Jan. 13 



Station and locality. 



Charlevoix and Sleeping 
Bear Point, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Southside, California. 



Nome, Alaska. 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Point Adams, Oregon 



Peaked Hill Bars, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Point Adams, Oregon. . . 



Louisville, Kentucky 

Louisville, Kentucky 

Orleans, Massachusetts.. 



Service rendered. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Rescue from danger. 



.do. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Transportation 



Clothing furnished 
Transportation 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 
Recovery of body. 



Transportation. . 



Nature of casualty. 



cue of a drowning boy named Harry 
Tobin on Christmas day. They were 
watching the skaters when they heard a, 
scream and saw a boy struggling in the 
water and broken ice about 50 rods away. 
Without hesitating a moment Surfman 
Ward W. Bennett, calling to his brother 
to follow with a pole or rope, rushed to 
where the boy had gone down the third 
time and, throwing off his coat, dived 
after the drowning boy. The water was 
about 12 feet deep and, after groping 
around for some time on the bottom, 
Surfman Bennett located him, caught 
him by the shoulders and brought him 
to the surface. His brother meanwhile, 
having cut a rope from a sled near by, 
was waiting for him and, with the assist- 
ance of bystanders, soon got the 2 out of 
the water. The 2 life-savers then ap- 
plied the resuscitation of the apparently 
drowned treatment and in about ten 
minutes the lad had sufficiently recov- 
ered to be removed to a near-by house 
and a little later to his home. In three 
days he had completely recovered. 

At 7.15 p. m., when Surfman Knudsen was 
returning from beach patrol, he heard a 
woman's loud cries for assistance and 
hurrying up he found a young woman 
struggling with a man, who was trying 
to assault her. The man fled upon his 
approach and Knudsen escorted her to 
the nearest car. 

At 9 a. m. R. H. Marshall, a teamster, re- 
ported to the keeper that his team and 
driver were lost on the tundra about 8 
miles east of the station in the blizzard. 
Patrolman No. 4 and dog team was sent 
to search for them. He met them and 
piloted them Dack to town. 

At 7.55 p. m. the station watchman gave 
the alarm that a man had fallen over- 
board near the station. One of the sta- 
tion boats was launched and manned, 
the man was picked up, brought to the 
station, his wet clothing removed, dry 
underwear supplied; he was put to bed 
wrapped in blankets and his wet cloth- 
ing dried out. He left the station at 6 
the next morning. 

7.50 a. m. the steam tug Gettysburg, while 
trying to get. a hawser to a barge, went 
aground on an uncharted shoal, 1 mile 
NNE. from the station. The small boat 
was launched and went to her assistance. 
The master requested to be taken ashore 
to a telephone, which was done, and the 
Gettysburg was afloat before he got 
back. 

At 7 p. m. lowered the surfboat and trans- 
ported a U. S. immigration inspector to 
a German steamer anchored near the 
station. 

Dry clothing from the W. N. R. A. supply 
was furnished 2 men, who landed through 
the surf in a dory and got wet and chilled. 

6 a. m. pulled out in the surfboat to an out- 
going steamer and brought a U. S. immi- 
gration inspector ashore. 

At 11.40 launched the boat and brought to 
shore a calf that had fallen overboard. 

About 12.40 p. m. one of the station boats 
dragged for and recovered the body of a 
colored man named Joseph Hicks, who 
had fallen from a barge and was drow ned 
about three blocks east of the station. 

Life-savers go out to the stranded steamer 
Onondaga and carry dispatch ashore for 
master. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



187 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



Nature of casualty. 



1907. 
Jan. 14 



Jan. 14 



Jan. 16 



Jan. 



Jan. 19 



Jan. 20 



Jan. 20 

to 
Jan. 30 

Jan. 22 



Jan. 25 
Jan. 25 

Jan. 26 
Jan. 27 



Jan. 27 



Feb. 2 
Feb. 3 



Feb. 4 



Louisville, Kentucky ..... 



Plum Island, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 



Wood End,Massachusette 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Santa Rosa, Florida 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Sullivans Island, South 
Carolina. 



White Head, Maine 

Golden Gate, California. 



Orleans, Massachusetts. 



Maddequet, Massachu- 
setts. 



Galveston, Texas 



Sandy Hook, New York 



Old Harbor, Massachu- 
setts. 



Point Adams, Oregon 



Recovery of body. . 



Transportation, as- 
sistance to Light- 
House Depart 
ment. 



Medical assistance. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Succor; provisions 
furnished. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty, transporta- 
tion, rescues from 
drowning, etc. 

Assistance at fire. .. 



Assis t a n c e to 
schooner. 



Succor. 



.do. 
.do 



Recovery of body . 

Body found 

Transportation . . . 

Fire extinguished . 



Body of man who was drowned the night 
of the 14th recovered by life-savers, after 
dragging the greater part of the night. 
The place where man was drowned was 
not visible from station at time of acci- 
dent on account of dense fog. 

Assistant keeper at Plum Island light- 
house taken seriously ill. Life-saver 
with assistant go out in ice boat and 
brought sick man ashore. Owing to 
slush ice it took five hours to make the 
trip. 

Man in dory landed at New Castle badly 
frostbitten, and applied for assistance. 
Liie-savers gave him every attention 
issible and afterwards removed him to 



A power boat broke her engine and had an- 
chored under lee of Long Point. It came 
on to blow strong, endangering boat. 
Life-savers went out in power boat and 
towed it to wharf. 

Lookout discovered and reported a man in 
a wagon driving 2 horses was in danger 
in the river opposite side. Life-savers 
went to their assistance in boat. Saved 
man, horses, wagon, and gear. The 
driver had been intoxicated. 

Man left ashore at station, too rough for 
his launch to take him off. Life-savers 
furnish him with provisions and shelter 
until the next day. 

Services of station crew during overflow 
of Ohio River January 20-30, 1907. (For 
detailed account see p. 19.) 

At 3.15 a. m. lookout discovered a building 
on fire J mile NE. of station. All life- 
savers not on patrol proceeded to the 
scene, and though unable to save the 
building, prevented fire from spreading 
to other buildings. 

Life-savers in surfboat notified the reve- 
nue cutter Woodbury that the Am. sc. 
Addie was ashore at Turtle Island. 

Beach patrol finds a man with gunshot 
wound in his head. Keeper called up 
police authorities, and an ambulance 
conveyed him to hospital. 

Horse slipped and fell on ice, injuring hind 
legs. Life-savers covered it with blank- 
ets and later loaded it into farm wagon. 

At 9 a. m. the keeper received a telephone 
message from Tuckernuck Island that a 
Mr. Dunham had fallen and broken his 
shoulder blade and requested him to 
bring a doctor. The surfboat was 
launched at 9:15, the doctor taken to the 
island, returning at 1:30 p. m. Mr. Dun- 
ham expressed his gratitude for the 
service. 

At 8:30 a. m. the quarantine tug Hygeia 
reported that 1 of her men had fallen 
overboard during the night and was 
drowned. The keeper at once sent 3 men 
in the dinghy to drag for and recover the 
body, which they did. It was turned 
over to the coroner. 

The body of an unidentified man was found 
on the beach by the life-savers and 
turned over to the coroner. 

The surfboat was launched and 3 men who 
had come over to look at the wrecked 
steamer Onondaga were taken back to 
North Chatham. The wind having 
freshened they were unable to get back, 
and applied to the life-saving crew for 
assistance. 

A dwelling a short distance west of the sta- 
tion caught on fire. The station crew 
put it out before any material damage 
had been done. 



188 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Service rendered. 


Nature of casualty. 


1907. 








Feb. 8 


Orleans, Massachusetts 


Aid to injured 


Surfman Shiverick assisted a lady 72 years 








old, who fell on the ice and broke her 








wrist. He procured a doctor and other- 








wise assisted. 


Feb. 9 


Point Adams, Oregon 


Transportation .... 


The surfboat was launched at 6:30 a. m., 
went to an outgoing steamer and brought 
a watchman of the Immigration Service 








ashore. 


Feb. 10 


Green Run Inlet, Mary- 


....do 


Mr. and Mrs. Follow were taken to North 




land. 




Beach by the station team this day, as 
the bay was frozen over and they had no 








other way of reaching there. 


Feb. 23 


Dam Neck Mills, Virginia. 


Clothing furnished 


A sick and destitute man was furnished 








with clothing and a number of sheets and 








a blanket from the station. 


Feb. 25 


Sandy Point, Rhode 


Body found 


Surfman found the body of a dead man on 




Island. 




the beach. It was later identified and 


Feb. 25 


Point Adams, Oregon... . 


Transportation 


turned over to the proper authorities. 
At the request of the master of the Br. str. 
Gyneric her pilot was taken ashore in the 








surfboat. 


Feb. 25 


Golden Gate, California. . . 


Recovery of body . . 


Surfmen recovered a body lying at the foot 
of a cliff about 1 mile east of Point Lobos 








and turned it over to the coroner. 


Feb. 27 


Point Adams, Oregon 


Transportation 


Landed a watchman of the U. S. Immigra- 








tion Service from an outgoing steamer, 








in the surfboat. 


Feb. 28 


Burnt Island, Maine 


do 


Transported a man who had shot himself 








in the arm, to Port Clyde for medical at- 








tention. 


Mar. 3 


Atlantic City, New Jer- 


Recovery of prop- 


Surfmen went out in a small boat and re- 




sey. 


erty. 


covered a lady's fur muff that she had 








lost overboard and returned it to her. 


Mar. 3 


Michigan City, Indiana, 


Rescue from drown- 


One of the surfmen heard a man's cries for 




Lake Michigan. 


ing. 


assistance and found an intoxicated man 








in the river about 300 yards from the sta- 








tion. He pulled him out. 


Mar. 7 


Fishers Island, New York. 


Succor and trans- 
portation. 


The assistant keeper of Latimer Reef light- 
house was given shelter at the station for 
the night and taken to the light-house in 
the power boat in the morning. 


Mar. 9 


Galveston, Texas 


Recovery of body 


Keeper and 3 surfmen went to Texas City 








in the dinghy, grappled for and recov- 








ered the body of a drowned man. 


Mar. 13 


Sandy Hook, New Jersey . 


Succor 


Three men from the fishing smack Hattie 








Douglass, which sank in the ice field off 








Romer Beacon, were given food and shel- 








ter for the night. 


Mar. 14 


Wood End, Massachu- 


Medical assistance 


The crews of 7 gasoline boats who were wet 




setts. 


and transporta- 


and cold from landing through the ice, 






tion. 


were given medical attention at the sta- 








tion and 1 man who was hurt was trans- 








ported in a dory to the nearest doctor. 


Mar. 18 


Short Beach, New York. . 


Assistance to Light- 


At the request of the master of the buoy 






House Establish- 


tender, assisted him to plant some buoys. 






ment. 




Mar. 18 


North Beach, Maryland. . 


Succor and trans- 


Two gunners arrived at nightfall very 






portation. 


much fatigued. They were given food 


Mar. 19 


Hunniwells Beach, Maine. 


Transportation 


and shelter for the night and transporta- 
tion to Ocean City in the morning. 
Took a physician in the surfboat to Seguin 


Mar. 19 


Louisville, Kentucky 


do 


Light station, the assistant keeper hav- 
ing sickness in his family. 
The keeper and crew in 1 of the station 








boats ran some lines for a steamer in dan- 








ger of going adrift, took 4 colored people 
to their home in the flooded district and 








moved about $250 worth of household 








effects out of the flooded district. 


Mar. 19 


Vennilion,Michigan, Lake 
Superior. 


Medicines furnished 


A man who was suffering great pain was 
furnished mustard plasters from the sta- 


Mar. 20 


Hampton Beach, New 


Rescue of property . 


tion supply. 
A small building on the sea wall was in 




Hampshire. 




danger of being blown into the sea. It 








was secured by the station crew. 


Mar. 20 


Blue Point, New York.... 


Body found 


The body of a man supposed to have 








drowned from the wrecking tug Rescue 








was recovered, and by direction of the 
coroner turned over to the undertaker. 


Mar. 20 


Currituck Beach, North 


Succor 


An itinerant peddler came to the station 




Carolina. 




in a heavy rainstorm and was given shel- 








ter for the night. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



189 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Service rendered. 


Nature of casualty. 


1907. 
Mar. 21 

Mar. 24 
Mar. 25 


Oak Island, New York. .. 

Core Bank, North Caro- 
lina. 

Quonochontaug, Rhode 


Assistance to Light- 
House Establish- 
ment. 
Medicines furnished. 

Body found 


At the request of the master of the tender 
Gardenia, he was assisted in placing 
buoys in Fire Island Inlet. 
A child quite sick with a fever was fur- 
nished with medicines from the station 
supply, there being no doctor near. 
Two surfmen found the body of a drowned 


Mar. 25 


Island. 
Louisville, Kentucky. .. 


Rescue from drown- 


man about 2J miles from the station and 
turned it over to relatives. 
A man named James Perkins fell into the 


Mar. 26 


Sandy Point, Rhode Is- 


ing. 
Body found 


river about 150 feet west of the station. 
He was rescued by the life-savers, 
brought to the station in the station 
boat, rubbed down, given dry clothing, 
and sent to his home. 
Surfman on watch discovered a human foot 


Mar. 26 
Mar. 28 
Mar. 29 
Mar. 30 
Apr. 3 


land. 

Louisville, Kentucky 
Fletchers Neck, Maine 

Manomet Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Amagansett, New York. . . 
Santa Rosa, Florida 


Rescue from drown- 
ing. 

Transportation 

Assistance to Light- 
House Establish- 
ment. 
Fire extinguished . . 

Body found 


in a bunch of seaweed. Investigation 
brought to light 2 human legs. On the 
28th an arm and backbone were found. 
Identification was impossible and they 
were buried by the life-savers. 
A man who had fallen in near the foot of 
the levee was rescued by a boat's crew 
from the station and sent to his home. 
The agent of the wrecked schooner Mar- 
shall Perrin was taken to the wreck in the 
surfboat. 
At the request of the master of the tender 
Mayflower, assisted him to locate Mary 
Ann Rocks, where he set a spar buoy. 
Three of the surfmen put out a fire J mile 
west of the station, which threatened to 
destroy some buildings. 
Surfmen in the supply ooat recovered the 


Apr. 3 


Fort Point, California 


Succor 


body of a drowned boy on the beach 3 
miles east of station, took it to Pensacola 
and turned it over to the coroner. 
A horse and wagon mired in the mud near 


Apr. 6 


Saluria, Texas 


Assistance to Hy- 


the station were extricated by the sta- 
tion crew. 
A surfman found on the beach a bottle with 


Apr. 7 
Apr. 9 

Apr. 10 


Sheboygan, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Point Adams, Oregon 
Michigan City, Indiana, 


drographic Office. 
Rescue from danger. 
Transportation 

do 


a paper containing hydrographic infor- 
mation thrown over from some vessel at 
sea. It was forwarded to the Hydro- 
graphic Office. 
A drunken man on the end of the pier w'as 
in danger of falling overboard. A surf- 
man brought him ashore and put him on 
the road to the city. 
The station crew went out in the surfboat 
and brought ashore from an outgoing 
steamer 2 watchmen of the U. S. Immi- 
gration Service. Later the steamer hav- 
ing returned on account of rough bar, the 
watchmen were put on board again. 
The life - savers rescued the lightkeeper 


Apr. 10 


Lake Michigan. 
Point Adams, Oregon 


. . do 


using the surfboat. The seas were bury- 
ing the piers, the elevated walk had been 
carried away, and there was no other way 
for him to get ashore. 
The life-savers puV-ed out in the surfboat 


Apr. 12 
Apr. 16 


Sheboygan, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan . 

Sabine Pass, Texas 


Assistance to U. S. 
Army engineers. 


and brought ashore 3 inspectors of the 
U..S. Immigration Service, from outgo- 
ing steamers. 
Surfmen in the small boat assisted to take 
soundings outside of harbor piers. Em- 
ployed all day. 


Apr. 16 
Apr. 18 


Big Sandy, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 
Galveston, Texas 


Recovery of prop- 
erty. 
Recovery of body 


surfboat and assisted the local fire de- 
partment to fight a big fire. 
The station crew recovered 43 bales of hay 
from the lake and held them for claimant. 


Apr. 18 


Cape Disappoint m e n t, 
Washington. 


Recovery of prop- 
erty. 


the body of Mike Mitchell, a stevedore, 
who had been knocked overboard and 
drowned. 
Life-savers in the surfboat recovered 100 
fathoms of gill net, lost by a fisherman, 
and turned it over to owner. 



190 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Service rendered. 


Nature of casualty. 


1907. 
Apr 19 


Deal, New Jersey 


Rescue from drown- 


Surfman No. 6 rescued a drowning boy and 


Apr 20 


do 


ing. 
Fire extinguished 


brought him to the station, where he was 
successfully given the treatment for re- 
storing the apparently drowned. 
The station watch at 7 45 p m discovered 


Apr. 20 
Apr. 21 


Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 
Biscayne Bay, Florida 


Assistance at fire . . . 
Succor 


a fire in a dwelling about 200 yards from 
the station. The station crew called the 
occupants and in a little while succeeded 
in putting out the fire. 
Surfmen assisted the local fire department 
at a big fire in a livery stable. 
A party of 6, traveling in an open boat 


Apr. 21 


Brazos, Texas 


do 


were overtaken by night and were given 
shelter at the station until the next day. 
A fisherman who was unable to get to town 


Apr. 22 
Apr 22 


Hunniwells Beach, Maine . 
San Luis Texas 


Transportation .... 
Succor 


on account of rough weather, was fur- 
nished some groceries by the keeper. 
An old lady who had sustained painful in- 
juries, was taken from Seguin light-house 
to shore by the life-savers in the surfboat. 
Five men in a weather bound launch short 


Apr. 24 
Apr. 24 

Apr. 26 


Manistee, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 

Ludington, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Nome, Alaska ... 


Assistance to U. S. 
Army engineers. 

Body found 
Rescue from dan- 


of provisions, were supplied with enough 
to last them several days, by the keeper. 
Surfmen assisted engineer officer to locate 
a large stone in the channel of Manistee 
River. 
Life-savers in the surfboat found the body 
of a drowned woman about 3 miles out in 
the lake. It was brought ashore and 
turned over to the coroner. 
Five children who were fishing around a 


Apr. 27 


Grande Pointe au Sable, 


ger; succor. 
Body found 


hole in the ice, were sent ashore by the 
keeper as the ice was getting rotten. A 
team of 4 horses that had broken through 
the ice was rescued by the surfmen. 
Found on the beach 8 miles north of station 


Apr. 28 
Apr. 28 

Apr. 28 
Apr. 30 

Apr. 30 
May 1 


Michigan, Lake Michi- 
gan. 
Plum Island, Massachu- 
setts. 

Charlotte, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 

Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 
Saint Joseph Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Cape D isappointment, 
Washington. 

Fairport, Ohio, Lake Erie. 


Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Recovery of body.. . 

Assistance at fire . . . 
Search for body 

Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Succor 


and brought to the station in the surf- 
boat and turned over to the coroner. 
Eight stray cows rounded up by life-savers 
near station. Owner, who was notified 
by telephone, came and took charge of 
them. 
Keeper received telephone message that a 
man's body had washed ashore 1 miles 
NW. from station. Life-savers pro- 
ceeded to scene in power lifeboat and 
dinghy. Secured body and turned it over 
to coroner. 
Crew responded to fire alarm in house on 
west beach. 
Steamer City of Chicago reported a floating 
body in the river. Life-savers went out 
in skiff and made diligent search for 
same, but were unsuccessful. 
Life-savers, patrolling outside of Peacock 
spit, picked up 300 fathoms of gill net, 
lost by fisherman. Restored it to owner. 
Two men, crew of the beached tug L. B. 


May 1 
May 1 

May 2 


Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 

Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 

Cape May, New Jersey 


Assistance to U. S. 
H y d r o g r aphic 
Office. 

Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

do 


Johnson, came to the station for relief. 
They were supplied with dry clothes 
from the W. N. R. A.; also with supper, 
lodging, and breakfast. 
Surfmen took soundings to ascertain ex- 
tent of shoal and the depth of water on 
same. Forwarded results to U. S. Hy- 
drographic Office at Chicago. 
Life-savers patrolling outside of Peacock 
spit in power lifeboat. Fisherman ap- 
plied for assistance in search for lost net. 
Life-savers discovered same and turned 
it over to owner. 
Life-savers sighted and saved a fish net, 


May 2 


Saluria, Texas 


Fresh water and 


abandoned and adrift, about 1 mile off- 
shore. 
Master of fisning sloop Bessie came to sta- 






provisions fur- 
nished. 


tion and applied for assistance. He had 
lost his water barrel and provisions in 
heavy weather. Keeper supplied him 
with both. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



191 



Date. 



1907. 
May 2 



May 3 

May 4 

May 4 

May 5 

May 6 

May 6 

May 6 

May 7 

May 8 

May 9 



May 9 



Station and locality. 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 



Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 

Ashtabula, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Fort Point, California 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Michigan Citv, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Burnt Island, Maine... 



Barnegat, New Jersey 



Frankfort, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



South Chicago, Illinois, 
Lake Michigan. 



May 11 Thunder Bay Island, 
Michigan, Lake Michi- 
gan. 

May 12 i Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 



May 12 



Service rendered. 



May 13 



Nome, Alaska. 



City Point, Massachusetts. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Transportation 



Aid to Light-House 
Establishment. 



Rescue from danger 

Recovery of body.. . 

Succor 

Recovery of body.. 



Succor. 



May 13 | Oregon Inlet, North Car- 
olina. 



May 13 Galveston, Texas. . 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Assistance at fire.. 



Recovery of body. 

Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Rescue from danger 
Assistance at fire . . 



Rescue from drown- 
ing. 



Succor. 



Recovery of body 



Nature of casualty. 



One barrel of oil and a truck lost overboard 
from the Goodrich Transportation Co.'s 
dock. Life-savers proceed to the scene, 
grapple for, and restore truck and oil to 
owner. 

Surfman pulled man out of Black Lake. 
He had fallen off dock. The weather was 
very cold. He was furnished with dry 
clothing from the supplies of the W. N. 
R. A. 

Two men on anchored sloop could not get 
ashore. Surfmen launched boat and 
landed them. 

Light keeper and assistant unable to get 
out on crib to test fog signal apparatus 
on account of high sea. Life-savers in 
surfboat landed them and later went out 
and brought them in. 

At 8 p. m. lookout reported seeing a light 
on the rocks south of the station. Life- 
savers went out in surfboat and found 
three fishermen calling for help. They 
were brought in to the station. 

Keeper learning that a body was in the 
river near one of the wharf boats, he sent 
a boat to pick it up. Turned body over 
to the coroner. 

At 2 a. m. patrol found a man lost in the 
hills. Had been in the woods all night. 
He was taken to the station. 

Keeper was requested to drag for body of 
man; police had been unable to find. 
After a search, life-savers recovered body 
and turned it over to coroner. 

Fishing party in small sailboat was be- 
calmed near the station. There being no 
accommodations on board, they were 
allowed to sleep in the station. 

Ring buoy marked Aloha was picked up by 
surfman. Reported find to New York 
maritime and signal towers. 

Fire broke out in Woodward's warehouse, 
400 yards from station. Life-savers pro- 
ceeded to scene with force pump. Found 
the tug E. D. Holton moored: to wharf 
near by, no one on board. Life-savers 
hauled tug away from dock and then 
played stream on fire, until it was extin- 
guished. 

Station crew in small boat found body 
afloat in Calumet River. Towed it into 
bank and turned it over to the city au- 
thorities. 

Surfman picked up a patent fish net that 
had washed ashore. It was returned to 
the owners. 

Two men fell into river near the station and 
were hauled from the water by one of the 
surfmen. 

A surfman assisted some workmen to ex- 
tinguish flames in a burning tent 2 J miles 
SE. of station. 

Intoxicated man fell off landing, 11.20 p. m. 
The patrol heard the splash and he was 
taken out of the water as he was going 
down the last time. He was taken to the 
station, given a rubbing and hot stimu- 
lants. The next day he was sent to his 
home fully recovered. 

A man in want was given shelter at the sta- 
tion. He had lost his shoes, so a pair 
from the W. N. R. A. supplies was given 
to him. 

A sailor from the steamship Skipton Castle 
was drowned while swimming from the 
ship's side. Life-savers were called ,body 
was secured, and resuscitation was at- 
tempted. The body had been under 
water two hours and all attempts were 
unsuccessful. 



29909 



192 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEEVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Service rendered. 


Nature of casualty. 


1907. 








May 13 


Fort Point, California 


Recovery of prop- 


Automobile with 2 occupants got mired 






erty. 


near the station. Surfmen are called 








and succeed in extricating machine. 


May 14 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 


Recovery of body.. 


Life-savers took charge of body found 
floating in river and notified the coroner. 


May 16 


Kenosha, W isconsin.Lake 


Rescue from drown- 


A small boy fell from scow and would have 




Michigan. 


ing. 


surely drowned had he not been picked 








up by surfman. 


May 17 


Evanston, Illinois, Lake 


do 


An intoxicated man waded out in the lake, 




Michigan. 




trying to drown himself. Surfmen take 








him out and turn him over to the police. 


May 19 


Nahant, Massachusetts... 


Succor 


Three men, fishing from small boat, cap- 








sized 2 miles SE. of station. Life-savers 








are notified by and carried to the scene 








by driver of automobile. Efforts to re- 








suscitate 1 proved unsuccessful. The 








other 2 are taken to the station and given 








treatment, food, and clothing. 


May 19 


Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 


do 


Patrol finds man, seriously ruptured, ly- 




Erie. 




ing on floor at key post. He was re- 








moved to the station and there provided 








with a meal and bed for the night. 


May 20 


Point Adams, Washing- 


Transportation 


Life-savers went out in the suriboat and 




ton. 




brought ashore a watchman of the Im- 








migration Service, sea very rough on the 








bar. Later in the day he was returned 








to the steamer. 


May 21 


do 


do 


Life-savers went out to an outgoing steam- 








er and brought ashore the immigration 








inspector and the master's wife. 


May 23 


Point Bonita, California. . 


Search for body 


Three soldiers come to the station and ask 








aid in recovering body of drowned com- 








rade. Life-savers place dory on station 








wagon and at 9 p. m. start for the scene. 








They dragged for it that night and sev- 








eral succeeding days, finally recovering 








it. 


May 25 


Charlevoix, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 


Clothing furnished.. 


A young woman that had fallen into the 
water near the station was given clothes 








from the W. N. R. A. supplies. 


May 25 


Manistee, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 


Recovery of prop- 
erty. 


Steamer loading lumber at the wharf has 
her lines carried away by passing steamer, 








losing overboard 1,000 feet. It was re- 








covered by surf men. 


May 26 


North Scituate, Massa- 


Aid to patriotic so- 


Life-savers assist the Woman's Relief 




chusetts. 


cieties. 


Corps, G. A. R., and the Sons of Veterans, 


May 27 


Point of Woods, New 


Transportation 


in decorating the graves of soldiers. 
Man with sick wife asks for transportation 




York. 




to doctor. Life-savers convey them to 








the mainland in sailboat. 


May 27 


Corson Inlet, New Jer- 


Recovery of prop- 


Patrol found sneak box and 7 decoy ducks 




sey. 


erty. 


in the surf. They were taken to the sta- 








tion to be held until claimed by owner. 


May. 27 


Isle of Wight, Maryland . . . 


Succor 


Cripple caught in wind and rain storm, 








given a bed and meals at the life-saving 








station. 


May 27 


Grand Marais Michigan 


Assistance at fire . . . 


Lookout discovers the roof of the light- 




Lake Superior. 




house keeper's dwelling on fire. By the 








timely assistance rendered by the life- 








savers the building is saved. Wind 


May 27 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 


Recovery of body.. . 


blowing a strong gale at the time. 
Surfmen in dinghy bring ashore the body of 
man floating in river; notified coroner. 


May 27 


Yaquina Bay, Oregon 


Rescue from danger. 


Insane man takes 5-year-old sister out in 








sailboat, wind blowing strong. Surf- 








men go out and bring them ashore. 


May 28 


Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 


Recovery of prop- 
erty. 


Life-savers went out in surfboat and 
picked up a gill net that had been lost 








in the breakers. 


May 29 


South Manitou Island, 


Transportation 


The schooner Josephine Dresden burned a 




Michigan, Lake Michi- 




Coston signal. Life-savers went out to 




gan. 




her and brought passenger ashore. 


May 29 


Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 


Recovery of prop- 
erty. 


Life-savers went out in surfboat and re- 
covered a gill net that had been lost in 








the breakers. 


May 30 


Biscayne Bay, Florida 


Succor 


Three turtle hunters afforded shelter for 








the night. 


May 30 


Erie, Pennsylvania, Lake 


Clothing furnished.. 


An intoxicated man, who had fallen into 




Erie. 




the water, was brought to the station 








and furnished with dry clothing from 








the W. N. R. A. supplies. 


May 30 


Holland, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 


Rescue from danger 


Surfman on pier watch pulled a man from 
the water. He was taken to the station 








and furnished with a dry suit of clothing. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



193 



Date. Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



Nature of casualty. 



1907. 
May 30 



Sheboygan, Michigan, 



May 30 

June 1 
June 1 

June 2 



June 3 

June 3 

June 4 

June 4 

June 5 

June 6 

June 6 

June 7 

June 8 

June 8 

June 8 



heboygan, Mic 
Lake Michigan. 



Recovery of body 
and rescue from 
drowning. 



Yaquina Bay, Oregon 



Bunalo, New York, Lake 

Erie. 
Harbor Beach, Michigan, 

Lake Huron. 



Galveston, Texas. 



Transportation. . . . 



Rescue from danger 

Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Recovery of body . . 



Milwaukee Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 

Nome, Alaska 



City Point, Massachu- 
setts. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Assistance at fire . . . 



Rescue from drown- 
ing and recovery 
of property. 



Wood End,Massachusetts Succor; clothing fur- 
nished. 



Nome, Alaska. 



Manistee, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Yaquina Bay, Oregon Transportation 

.do... 



Thunder Bay Island, 
Michigan, Lake Huron. 



Gurnet, Massachusetts 



.do. 



Pecks Beach, New Jersey. . j Clothing furnished. . 



Saluria, Texas Fresh water fur- 
nished. 



Laborer fell from coal hoist onto dock, 
body rolling into the water. Life-savers, 
while dragging for body from the surf- 
boat, were called to a dock across the 
river 100 yards away, where a 5-year old 
boy had fallen in. Lines were dropped 
and surfboat proceeded to the scene, 
rescuing the boy. Dragging was then 
resumed and the body was soon recov- 
ered. But for the prompt action of 
the life-savers the child would have been 
surely lost. The laborer had been killed 
by the fall, his skull having been frac- 
tured. 

The agents of steamer Francis H. Leggett 
ask to be taken aboard with pilot. 
Steamer lying off the Bay. Surfboat 
was lowered and they were put onboard. 

Life-savers in dinghy take man from the 
bottom of an overturned scow. 

Life-savers in power lifeboat picked up COO 
feet of lumber. Took it to station to 
await claim of owner. 

Two young men, who had been fishing, 
came to station and reported to keeper 
that their companion had been drowned 
while swimming. Surfmen proceeded to 
scene of casualty 3 miles away, and, after 
dragging one-half hour, secured the 
body. 

Surfmen in dinghy recover body floating 
in Kinnif.kinnick River. It was deliv- 
ered to the coroner. 

A team of mules used in transporting 
freight over the ice from the steamer Cor- 
win broke through J mile offshore. The 
life-saving crew after 1 hours' work suc- 
ceeded in getting them ashore. 

At 10.05 p. m. a fire was discovered on Gov- 
ernors Island. Life-savers proceeded to 
scene and prevented flame from spread- 
ing to other buildings. 

A teamster conveying 16 mail sacks from 
the S. S. Corwin, in the ice 3 miles out, 
breaks through. The man, mules and 
mail would have been lost had not the 
life-savers hastened to the scene with 
planks and extricated them from their 
perilous predicament. 

Two men, from the wrecked sloop Gracie, 
were brought to the station in great dis- 
tress. They were fed, sheltered, and 
clothed from the supplies of the W. N. R. 
A. On the 7th the keeper took them to 
the railway station and secured their 
transportation to their homes. 

A team of horses, used in hauling gravel 
from a pit, fell into a narrow ravine 18 
feet deep. Life-savers after strenuous 
efforts succeed in extricating wagon and 
team. 

Life-savers went out in surfboat to the 
steamer Francis H. Leggett, bound out, 
and brought ashore the pilot. 

Keeper was notified by telephone that 1 of 
repair party at the light-house had been 
severely injured. Keeper took him in 
stearr yacht to surgeon in Alpena. 

Owing to serious illness, the light-house 
keeper required the presence of his wife, 
who was visiting in Duxbury. Life- 
saver made trip in power boat and 
brought wife to sick husband. 

A boatman, wet, footsore and poorly 
clothed, called at station for aid. He 
was given an outfit of clothing from the 
supplies of the W. N. R. A. 

Agreeably to master's request, the fisihing 
schooner Elizabeth was supplied with 
fresh water. 



194 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 



Station and locality. 



Service rendered. 



Nature of casualty. 



1907. 
June 10 



June 10 



June 10 
June 12 

June 12 
June 12 

June 12 
June 12 

June 12 

June 15 
June 16 

June 16 
June 16 

June 17 

June 17 
June 18 



June 19 
June 19 

June 20 
June 20 

June 20 



Cape Henry, Virginia 



Dam Neck Mills, Virginia. 



Assistance at fire. . . 



.do. 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake j Recovery of prop- 
Michigan, erty. 



Point of Woods, New 
York. 



Transportation 



Chester Shoal Florida ' Fresh water fur- 
nished. 
Saluria, Texas Transportation. . . : 



Charlotte, New York, Rescue from drown- 

Lake Ontario. ing. 

| 
Racine, Wisconsin, Lake j Aid to navigation. 

Michigan. 



Lake Michigan. 



Michigan City, Indiana, 

Lake Michigan. 
Grand Haven, Michigan, 

Lake Michigan. 

Michigan City, Indiana, 

Lake Michigan. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 

Lake Michigan. 

City Point, Massachusetts 



Two Rivers, Wisconsin, Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Rescue from drown- 
ing. 
Clothing furnished.. 

Transportation 

Recovery of body. . . 

Clothing furnished.. 



Evanston, Illinois, Lake 
Michigan. 

Sturgeon Bay Canal, Wis- 
consin, Lake Michigan. 



Chicamacomico, North 
Carolina. 

Hammond, Michigan, 
Lake Huron. 

Burnt Island, Maine ! Succor . . . 



Assist at North- 
western Univer- 
sity encampment. 

Assistance at fire... 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 

Clothing supplied... 



Saluria, Texas. 



Manistee, Michigan, Lake 
Michigan. 



Fresh water and 
provisions sup- 
plied. 

Aid to navigation. . 



Keeper was called by telephone to assist at 
fire. Life-savers proceeded to the scene 
and found, the Princess Anne Hotel and 
other buildings on fire. After assisting 
at the fire for four hours, it was finally 
gotten under control. 

At 4.30 a. m. the keeper was notified that 
the Princess Anne Hotel was on fire. 
It being inactive season, he at once em- 
ployed a crew and they proceeded at 
once to the scene on horses. With their 
fire extinguishers they rendered assist- 
ance in preventing the spread of the 
flames. (See letter of acknowledg- 
ment, p. 279.) 

Life-savers in surfboat went out and se- 
cured a net that was in danger of being 
lost. 

Resident of Fire Island asked keeper for 
aid in getting demented man to main- 
land. Keeper took patient in rowboat 
over to a fish boat that was to sail over 
to mainland. 

A party of 3 men camping near the" station 
were given a supply of fresh water. 

Man and woman were given transporta- 
tion from the sloop Estelle to Mata- 
gorda light station. 

Man leaped into lake from wreck pole, 
breaking ankle. He was rescued by life- 
savers in small boat. 

Life-savers in surfboat drag and locate an 
obstruction, upon which the steamers of 
the Goodrich line had struck on several 
occasions. 

Two boys in skiff, boating a load of boxes 
across the river, lost their cargo over- 
board. Life-savers assisted them in 
recovering the boxes. 

Man falls from dock into lake, is hauled out 
by life-saver. 

Two men in skiff, capsized. They were 
taken to the station and supplied with 
dry clothing. 

At 3.30 a. m., life-savers took officer of the 
U. S. R. C. Tuscarora out to his ship. 

Surfmen in station boat recover body of 
man floating in the river. It was de- 
livered to the coroner. 

Two men who had capsized in skiff were 
brought to the station in gasoline launch. 
They were outfitted with supplies from 
the W. N. R. A. 

Life-savers assist in putting up tents for 
the faculty and students. 

Fire broke out on Government derrick 
scow, station was notified by light-keeper. 
Life-savers put pump in small boat and 
proceeded to the scene. The deck be- 
neath the boiler was afire and had burned 
through in several places. The pump 
was started and the fire was soon extin- 
guished. Fires were drawn from the 
boiler. 

Keeper secured a number of railroad ties 
on the beach. Delivered them to the 
railroad wreck master. 

An outfit was issued to the family of J. A. 
Jarvis, their home and belongings having 
been destroyed by fire. The clothing 
was supplied by the W. N. R. A. 

Three fishermen, in small boat, were de- 
layed in sailing by dense fog. Keeper 
gave them a room and beds for the night. 

Fishing sloop White Wing, having run out 
of fresh water and provisions, master 
sends 1 of crew to station, seeking relief. 
Keeper issues quantity sufficient to tide 
them over until arrival of supply boat. 

Surfmen assist in taking soundings in har- 
bor. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



195 



Date. Station and locality. 



1907. 
June 21 



June 21 
June 22 



June 22 



Michigan City, Indiana, 
Lake Michigan. 

Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 



Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 



Sturgeon Bay Canal, Wis- 
consin, Lake Michigan. 



Service rendered. 



Rescue from danger. 



Recovery of prop- 
erty. 



Resuscitation; 
clothing fur- 
nished. 



June 23 Saluria, Texas . 



June 23 Charlotte, New York, 
Lake Ontario. 



June 23 

June 23 
June 23 



June 23 
June 24 
June 24 

June 24 
June 24 

June 25 
June 26 



Ashtabula, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Charlevoix, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 

Racine, Wisconsin, Lake 
Michigan. 



Kewaunee Wisconsin, 
Lake Michigan. 



Brenton Point, Rhode 
Island. 



Short Beach, New York . 



Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 



White River, Michigan, 
Lake Michigan. 



Pamet River, Massachu- 
setts. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Lake 
Erie. 



Transportation 

Assist at burial 

Recovery of body . 



Aid to Light-House 
Establishment. 



Rescue from danger 
Recovery of body. . . 



Assistance at fire . . 
Recovery of body. . 
Transportation 



Fresh water fur- 
nished. 

Aid to injured 



Provisions fur- 
nished. 



Recovery of body. . 



Naturo of casualty. 



Heavy squall coming up, life-savers go out 
to detached breakwater and bring in a 
small boy, who had been left there to fish. 

Life-savers in surf boat pick up large gill net 
that had been lost in the breakers on 
Peacock spit. It was restored to the 
owner. 

Man fell from pier into lake, several hun- 
dred yards from station . Lookout gave 
alarm and life-savers in surf boat immedi- 
ately started for the scene. Keeper and 
surf man dove down to locate the body. 
They brought body to the surface after it 
had been under water for five minutes. 
After a half hour's resuscitation signs of 
life appeared. He was removed to a bed 
at the station, given stimulants; and, 
after he had fully recovered, was given, 
an outfit of clothing from the W . N . R . A . 
and was sent to his home. 

Coal passer, scalded by the breaking of 
steam pipe on the barge I. N. Foster, was 
transferred from the barge into the surf- 
boat at a point 2J miles SE. of station. 
He was taken ashore and placed under a 
doctor's care. 

.Keeper assisted at burial of man, who had 
died on the island. Made coffin, dug 
grave, and read burial service. 

Intoxicated man fell from steamer as she 
was backing out from dock. Accident 
was seen by lookout, who sounded the 
alarm. Surfmen proceeded to the scene 
and recovered the body after it had been 
under the water about twenty minutes. 
Efforts at resuscitation proved fruitless 
and the body was turned over to the 
coroner. 

Keeper of light-house asked for assistance 
in repairing fog-signal engine. Surfmen 
complied with request and in one hour 
the apparatus was in working order. 

A small lad while playing on the pier fell 
into one of the pockets . A surf man , who 
happened to be near, hauled him out. 

Keeper was notified by telephone that a 
boy had drowned in Root River, 2J miles 
from the station. Life-savers proceeded 
to the scene in surfboat and secured the 
body, after it had been under the water 
one hour. Attempt at resuscitation 
was unsuccessful and the body was de- 
livered to the coroner. 

Light-keeper sounded fire signal. Life-sav 
ers placed pump in surfboat and pro- 
ceeded to the scene. The fire was soon 
extinguished. Little damage done. 

Keeper received word that a body was 
afloat 1 mile from station. He went out 
in skiff and secured it, towed it ashore, 
and delivered it to coroner. 

Keeper hearing that a body had been 
washed up by the tide, he notified the 
coroner and conveyed that official to the 
scene. 

The sloop Ada called in at the station. As 
she was out of fresh water she was given 
the needed supply. 

In answer to signal, life-savers went out to 
steamer and learned that a fireman had 
broken his leg. They sent word to the 
Muskegon crew to meet the steamer at 
the dock with doctor and ambulance. 

The crew of the schooner Robert and Ar- 
thur, stranded near the station, were 
supplied with hot coffee and lunch by the 
keeper. 

Keeper notified by telephone that a boy 
had drowned in the Cuyahoga River, 3 
miles from the station. Life-savers pro- 
ceeded to the scene and, after dragging 
about one hour, secured the body. It 
was turned over to the police authorities. 



196 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 
Services of crews (miscellaneous) Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Service rendered. 


Nature of casualty. 


1907. 








June 26 


Sleeping Bear Point,Mich- 


Assistance at fire . . . 


Fire broke out in shop near the station. 




igan, Lake Michigan. 




Surfmen responded quickly with force 








pump and fire extinguishers, and it was 








soon^pul out. 


June 28 


Old Chicago, Michigan, 


Recovery of body. .. 


The body of a man was found by surfmen 




Lake Michigan. 




in the power lifeboat. It was turned 








over to the city authorities. 


June 28 


Muskegon,Michigan, Lake 


Rescue from drown- 


Girl fell into the river and was hauled out 


June 28 


Michigan. 
Coquille River, Oregon. . . 


ing. 
Aid to Engineers, 


by one of the surfmen. 
On 28th and 29th, the life-savers in surf- 






U. S. A. 


boat ran lines of soundings for engineer's 








force. These were needed for Govern- 








ment survey. 


June 29 


Golden Gate, California... 


Assistance at fire. . . 


At 7.20 p. m. house mile from station was 








observed to be on fire. Surfmen at- 








tended with axes and buckets and pre- 








vented the spread of the flames. 


June 30 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 


Recovery of prop- 


While a teamster was washing horse and 




Lake Michigan. 


erty. 


wagon on the beach, the horse rolled 
over and would have drowned had not 








the life-savers hastened to the scene in 








their surfboat. They rescued the outfit. 


June 30 


Nome, Alaska. 


Transportation 


The engineer of the gasoline boat Eagle met 








with an accident while the boat was lying 
at the mouth of Snake River and was 








taken ashore, where medical attention 









could be procured. 



VESSELS WARNED FROM DANGER. 

Under the regulations of the Service the station crews are required 
to patrol the beach every night during the active season from sunset 
to sunrise, and also during the daytime in thick weather, the main 
purpose of the patrol being to obtain speedy knowledge of disaster 
and insure prompt assistance to those imperiled. An additional 
object of importance is the discovery of vessels standing into dan- 
ger. During the year 204 vessels (96 of which were steamers) were 
saved from disaster by the timely warnings of the patrolmen. In 
182 instances the warnings were given during the night, in 22 during 
the daytime. Many lives and much property were undoubtedly 
thus saved; but it is manifestly impossible to estimate in figures the 
services of the station crews in this regard. Only those instances of 
warning are given in the following table in which the signals were 
effective. The table does not include warnings that failed to pre- 
vent strandings, or those made only to let stranded vessels know that 
their situation had been discovered. 

Services of crews (vessels warned from danger). 



Date. 


Station. 


Warned by night. 


Warned by 
day. 


Kind of signal. 


Danger 
threatened. 


1906. 
Aug. 1 


Brant Rock Mass 




Schooner 


Shout 


Stranding. 


Aug. 1 


Chester Shoal, Fla . . 




Steamer 


International 


Approach ing 


Aug. 3 


Pamet River, Mass 


Launch 




code. 
Coston light 


shoal. 
Stranding. 


Aug. 3 


Point Lookout, 


Schooner 




do 


Do. 


Aug. 5 


N. Y. 
Nahant Mass 


Steamer 




do 


Stranding in fog. 


Aug. 7 


Wood End, Mass... 


Schooner 




do 


Stranding. 


Aug. 11 


Gurnet, Mass 


Vessel, unknown 




do 


Do. 


Aug. 11 


Peaked Hill Bars 


do 




do 


Do. 




Mass. 











UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



197 



Services of crews 



warned from danger] Continued. 



Date. 


Station. 


Warned by night. 


Warned by 
day. 


Kind of signal. 


Danger 

threatened. 


1906. 
Aug 12 


Wood End Mass 


Schooner 




Coston light.. 


Stranding. 


An? 12 




Sloop 




do 


Do. 


AI-ICT 10 


North. Beach. Md 






do 


Do 


ATJCT 14 


Newburyport Mass 


Vessel unknown 




do 


Do. 


An? 1 'i 


Wood End Mass 






do 


Do 


Aug. 16 
Aug 17 


Crisps, Mich., Lake 
Superior. 
Fort Macon N C 


do 

do . . 




do 
...do... 


Do. 
Do. 


Aug 18 


North Beach Md 


Schooner 




...do... 


Do. 


Ane 1 18 








. ..do.. . 


Do 


Aug 19 


Va. 
Two Rivers, Wis., 




Steamer with 


Bell on pier. . . 


Unable to enter 


Aug 20 


Lake Michigan. 


Steamer 


tow. 


Coston light . . 


harbor in fog. 
Stranding in fog 


A IICT 22 


Mich., Lake Su- 
perior. 






. ..do 


Do. 


A ne 24 


Mich., Lake Mich- 
igan. 




Launch 


International 


Warned of danger- 


Aug 26 




. 


Ship 


code. 
do 


ous bar. 
Stranding 


Aug 30 


N.J; 


Vessel unknown 




Coston light . . 


Do. 


Sept. 1 
Sept 5 


N.J. 

Cuttyhunk, Mass . . . 

Little Beach N J 


Sloop 

Schooner 




do 
...do... 


About to anchor 
on rocky ledge. 
Stranding. 


Sept 6 


False Cape Va 


Steamer 




do 


Do. 


Sept 12 








.do. 


Stranding in fog 




Wis., Lake Michi- 
gan 










Sept 13 


Batons Neck N Y 


Steamer 




...do... 


Stranding 


Sept 14 


Pecks Beach N J 


Vessel unknown 




. ..do 


Do 


Sept 16 


Wood End Mass 


Schooner 




do 


Warned of being 


Sept 16 




Vessel unknown 




do 


anchored in dan- 
gerous position. 
Stranding. 


Sept 16 




Vessels (2) un- 




Coston lights 




Sept 17 




known. 




(2)- 
do 


Do 


Sept 22 


Mass. 


barge. 




Coston light 


Do 


Sept 22 


Me. 






do 


Do 


Sept 24 


Lake Superior. 
Peaked Hill Bars, 


schooner hi tow. 
Schooner 




do 


Do. 


Sept 28 


Mass. 
Metomkin Inlet, Va 


Vessel unknown. 




...do... 


Do. 


Sept 29 


do 


do 




. . .do 


Do. 


Oct 3 


Little Beach, N. J 


Steamer 




...do... 


Do. 


Oct 5 


New Inlet N C 


do 




.do 


Do. 


Oct 5 


Gull Shoal N. C 


do 




...do... 


Do. 


Oct 5 


Fort Macon, N. C 


do 




do 


Do. 


Oct 7 


North Beach Md 






do 


Do. 


Oct 9 


Deer Park, Mich., 


Steamer 




Coston lights 


Do. 


Oct 14 


Lake Superior. 
Big Kinnakeet N C 


Vessel unknown 




(2). 
Coston light . . 


Do. 


Oct 14 


Velasco Tex 




Steamer 


International 


Do. 


Oct 16 


Bogue Inlet N C 


Steamer 




code. 
Coston light 


Do. 


Oct 16 


Chester Shoal Fla 




Steamer 


International 


Do. 


Oct 17 


Virginia Beach Va 


Schooner 




code. 
Coston light.. 


Do. 


Oct 18 


Dam Neck Mills Va 


do 




do 


Do. 


Oct 20 


Long Beach N Y 


do 




...do... 


Do. 


Oct 22 


Virginia Beach Va 


do 




do.. . 


Do. 


Oct 22 


Dam Neck Mills Va 


do 




Coston lights 


Do. 


Oct 23 


Virginia Beach Va 


do 




(3). 
Coston lights 


Do. 


Oct 23 


Dam Neck Mills Va 


do 




(2) 
do 


Do. 


Oct 24 


Oak Island N Y 


do 




Coston light . . 


Do. 


Oct 24 


False Cape Va 


Steamers (2) 




do 


Do. 


Oct 31 




Schooner 




...do 


Do. 


Oct 31 




do 




do 


Do. 


Oct 31 


Del. 


Vessel unknown 




do 


Do. 


Nov 1 


False Cape Va 




Vessel, sail . . . 


International 


Do. 


Nov. 1 


Core Bank, N. C . . . 


Steamer 




code. 
Coston light.. 


Do. 



198 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews (vessels warned from danger} Continued. 



Date. 


Station. 


Warned by night. 


Warned by 
day. 


Kind of signal. 


Danger 
threatened. 


1906. 
Nov. 10 


Atlantic City N. J 


Launch 




Coston light.. 


Shown way in 


Nov. 12 


Cuttyhunk, Mass 


Steamer . . ! 




...do... 


over the bar. 
Stranding. 


Nov. 13 


Hog Island, Va 


Vessel, sail 




...do... 


Do. 


Nov 13 


Point Reyes Cal 


Steamer 




do 


Stranding in fog. 


Nov. 17 


Surf side, Mass 


...do... 




...do... 


Stranding. 


Nov. 17 


Long Beach, N. J 


. do 




do.... . . 


Do. 


Nov 25 


South Brierantine, 


do 




do 


Do. 


Dec 6 


N.J. 
Biscayne Bay, Fla 




Steamer 


International 


Do. 


Dec. 7 


Race Point, Mass 


Schooner 




code. 
Coston light . . 


Do. 


Dec. 12 
Dec 16 


Core Bank, N. C 
Zachs Inlet N. Y 


do 

Vessel unknown 





do 
do. 


Do. 
Do. 


Dec. 20 


Core Bank, N. C . . 


Steamer . . 




Coston light 


Stranding in thick 


Dec. 21 


Santa Rosa, Fla 


Vessel, unknown . 




(4 signals). 
Coston light 


weather. 
Stranding. 


Dec 22 


Wood End, Mass 


Schooner 




(2 signals). 
Coston light 


Do. 


Dec 22 


Spermaceti Cove 


Steamer 




do 


Do. 


Dec 23 


Race Point Mass 


Schooner 


. 


do 


Do. 


Dec 24 


Pecks Beach N J 


Steamer 




do 


Do. 


Dec. 24 


Avalon, N. J 


Schooner 




Coston lights 


Do. 


Dec. 26 


Wash Woods, N. C 


....do 




(2). 
Coston light . . 


Do. 


1907. 
Jan. 3 


Newburyport, Mass 


Vessel, unknown 




Waving lan- 


Do. 


Jan. 4 


Oak Island, N. C 


Yacht 




tern. 
Coston light . . 


Do. 


Jan. 12 


Point Allerton, Mass 


Schooner 




. ..do 


Do. 


Jan. 12 


Isle of Wight Md 


do 




do 


Do. 


Jan. 14 


North S c i t u a t e, 


Steamer . 




do 


Do. 


Jan. 15 


Mass. 
False Cape Va 


do 




do 


Do. 


Jan. 16 


Oregon Inlet, N. C 


do 




....do 


Do. 


Jan. 19 


Wallops Beach Va 


Vessel unknown 




do 


Do. 


Jan. 23 


North Beach Md 


Schooner 




...do... 


Do. 


Jan. 25 


Hatteras Inlet N C 


Steamer 




.do ... . 


Do. 


Jan. 27 


Gilgo, N. Y 




Barkentine 


International 


Do. 


Jan. 27 


Jones Beach N. Y 




Bark 


code, 
do 


Do. 


Jan. 27 


Cape Henry, Va 


Steamer 




Coston lights 


Do. 


Feb. 1 


Race Point, Mass... 


Schooner 




(2). 
Coston light . . 


Do. 


Feb. 1 


Cape Henry, Va 


Tug with 2 barges. 




do.. ..... 


Do. 


Feb. 1 


False Cape, Va 


Steamer 




Coston lights 


Dp. 


Feb. 2 


Orleans, Mass 


Schooner 




Coston light 


Stranding in fog. 


Feb. 2 


Ditch Plain N Y 


Steamer 




do 


Stranding. 


Feb. 3 


Nauset, Mass 


Tug with 4 barges 




...do... 


Do. 


Feb. 4 


Dam Neck Mills Va 


Steamer 




do 


Do. 


Feb. 5 


Lone Hill N Y 


do 




do 


Stranding in snow- 


Feb. 5 


Cape Henry, Va . . . 




Steamer, Ger- 


International 


storm. 
Stranding. 


Feb. 7 


Newburyport Mass 


Vessel, unknown 


man. 


code. 
Coston light 


Do. 


Feb. 9 


Fort Macon N C 


Steamer 




do 


Do. 


Feb. 9 


Chester Shoal, Fla 




Steamer 


International 


Do. 


Feb. 15 


Race Point, Mass 


Schooner 




code. 
Coston light. . 


Do. 


Feb. 16 


Sandy Point, R. I 


Steamer 




do 


Do. 


Feb 16 


San Luis, Tex 


do 




Fired Lyle 


Do. 


Feb. 19 


Southside, Cal 


do 




gun (2). 
Coston light 


Do. 


Feb. 21 


Point Allerton, 


Schooner 




do 


Stranding in snow- 


Feb. 21 


Mass. 
Point Lookout 


Steamer 




do 


storm. 
Stranding. 


Feb. 21 


N. Y. 

Cape Henlopen, Del 


Schooner 


' 


do 


Do. 


Mar. 1 


Harvey Cedars, N J 


Steamer 




do 


Do. 


Mar. 5 


False Cape, Va. 


do 




...do... 


Do. 


Mar. 6 


Long Beach, N. Y 


do 




..do 


Do 


Mar. 10 


Orleans, Mass 


Tug with 3 barges 




do 


Stranding in snow- 


Mar. 14 


Race Point, Mass 


Steamer 




do 


storm. 
Stranding in fog. 


Mar. 14 


Nauset, Mass 


Tug with 2 barges 




do 


Stranding. 


Mar. 14 


Shark River, N. J 


Steamer 




do 


Stranding in fog. 


Mar. 14 


Isle of Wight, Md 


Schooner 




..do 


Stranding. 


Mar. 14 


Wallops Beach, Va.. 


Vessel, unknown . 




do... 


Do. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



199 



Services of crews (vessels warned from danger} Continued. 



Date, 


Station. 


Warned by night. 


Warned by 
day. 


Kind of signal. 


Danger 
threatened. 


1907. 
Mar. 15 

Mar. 16 
Mar. 17 
Mar. 18 
Mar. 18 
Mar. 20 
Mar. 20 

Mar. 21 
Mar. 24 

Mar. 25 
Mar. 27 

Mar. 28 

Mar. 29 
Mar. 30 

Apr. 2 
Apr. 5 

Apr. 6 

Apr. 7 
Apr. 7 
Apr. 9 

Apr. 10 
Apr. 12 
Apr. 14 

Apr. 15 
Apr. 18 

Apr. 19 
Apr. 20 
Apr. 21 
Apr. 22 
Apr. 23 
Apr. 23 
Apr. 28 

Apr. 28 
Apr. 30 

May 2 
May 3 
May 4 
May 5 
May 6 

May 10 

May 10 

May 10 
May 18 

May 19 
May 21 
May 22 
May 22 

May 26 
May 26 

May 27 
May 28 
May 30 

June 1 
June 3 


Salisbury Beach, 
Mass. 
Jones Beach, N. Y 
Fire Island, N. Y. 
Metomkin Inlet, Va 
Cape Henry, Va... 
High Head, Mass. 
Oak Island, N. Y. 

Isle of Wight, Md... 
Southside, Cal 


Schooner 




Coston light., 
do 


Stranding. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Standing into dan- 
ger. 
Stranding. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Too near bar for 
safety. 
Heading for beach. 
Stranding. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
About to run on 
the bar. 
Stranding. 
Do. 
Standing into 
danger. 
Too close to shore. 

Too near the point. 

Too near the bar. 
Stranding. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Standing in near 
rocks. 
Heading in for the 
point. 
Heading into the 
breakers. 
Stranding. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Heading for the 
beach. 
Stranding. 
Heading for 
shoals. 
Dragged anchor. 

Stranding. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Stranding in fog. 

Heading for 
shoals. 
Stranding in fog. 

Stranding. 
Do. 
Heading for shore. 

Do. 
Heading for reef. 


Tug with 1 barge. 
Steamer 






do 


Vessel, unknown. . 




do 


Steamers (2) 




do 


Tug with barges.. 




do 


Vessels, unknown 
(2). 
Schooner 




do. .. 




do 




Tug w i t h 1 
barge. 


International 
code. 
Coston light.. 
Coston lights 
(2). 
Coston light.. 

do 


Wash Woods, N.C.. 
Ocean City, Md... 


Steamer 


.do 




Assateague Beach, 
Va. 
Cobb Island, Va.... 
Peaked Hill Bars, 
Mass. 
Nauset, Mass 


Schooner 




Vessel, unknown 




Schooner 




do 


Vessel, unknown. . 
Steamer 




do 


South Brigantine, 
N. J. 
Cape Henry, Va. 




do 


do 




do 


Long Beach N. J 


do 




do 


Little Island, Va 


do 




do 


Hog Island, Va 

Fire Island, N. Y.:. 
Brazos, Tex 


Vessel unknown 




do 


Schooner 




do 


do 




do 


Little Beach, N. J... 




Schooner 


International 
code. 
Coston lights 
(2). 
Coston light . . 

do 


Erie, Pa.,Lake Erie. 

South M a n i t o u 
Island, Mich., 
Lake Michigan. 
Wood End, Mass... 
San Luis, Tex. . 


Steamer 




Schooner 




Steamer 




Vessel unknown ' 


do 


Hog Island, Va 


do 


do 


Point Reyes, Cal 
Newburyport, Mass. 
Dam Neck Mills, Va. 
Gurnet, Mass 

Cape Henlopen, Del. 
Newburyport, Mass. 

Hereford Inlet, N. J. 
Point Judith, R. I.. 
False Cape, Va 
Wash Woods ,N. C.. 


Steamer . 


do 


Vessel, unknown.. 


Shout 


Steamer 


Coston light.. 
do 

do 


Sloop 
Steamer 


Small boat, sail... 


: 


do.. 


Steamer 




Hn 


Schooner 1 do 


Steamer i Hn 


do 


do 


Nauset, Mass 


Schooner 


do 


Fire Island, N.Y... 
South Brigantine, 
N.J. 
Cape Disappoint- 
ment, Wash. 
Green Run Inlet, 
Md. 
Burnt Island, Me. . . 
Popes Island, Va . . . 
Cobb Island, Va 


Steamer. ... ' 


do 


Steamer 


do 


Vessel, unknown 




.do 


Sloop . 


do 


Schooner 




do 


Vessel unknown 




.do.. 


do > 


do 


North Manitou 
Island, Mich., 
Lake Michigan. 
Wash Woods, N. C 




Steamer 


Lookout bell.. 

International 
code. 
Shout 




Charlevoix, Mich., 
Lake Michigan. 
North Beach, Md... 
Point Reyes, Cal 
Sleeping Bear Point 
Mich., Lake 
Michigan. 
Aransas, Tex 


! .clo. 


Schooner 


Coston light . . 
do 


Steamer 


Schooner H n 


do 




do 


Biscayne Bay, Fla. . 




Steamer 


International 
code. 







200 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Services of crews (vessels warned from danger} Continued. 



Date. 


Station. 


Warned by night. 


Warned by 
day. 


Kind of signal. 


Danger 
threatened. 


1907. 
June 4 


South Manitou 




Steamer 


Loud noise 


Stranding in fog 


June 10 


Island, Mich., 
Lake Michigan. 
Point Reyes, Cal 


Steamer 




Coston light 


Too close to 


June 13 


Chicamacomico, N . C. 


.do... 




.do . 


breakers. 
Stranding. 


June 14 


Portage, Mich., 


do 




do 


Do. 


June 24 


Lake Superior. 
Sleeping Bear 


.do 




Coston lights 


Heading for shore. 


June 24 


Point, Mich., 
Lake Michigan. 
Point Reyes, Cal 


.do 




(3). 
Coston light 


Too close to 


June 25 


Sheboygan, Wis., 




Schooner 


Shout 


breakers. 
Too close to beach. 




Lake Michigan. 











TABLE OF CASUALTIES 

WITHIN THE FIELD OF OPERATIONS OF THE 
LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



1907, 



201 



202 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



Table of casualties, 

DISTRICT NO. 1. EMBRACING COASTS OF 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
July 8 


One-quarter mile south- 


Jerrys Point 


Rowboat, no name 






July 18 
July 21 


southwest of station. 
Four miles east of station. 

Two miles southeast of 


Quoddy Head 
do 


Sc. Sarah Eaton. Calais, 
Me. 
Sc. Myra B., St. John, 


Hodgins... 


199 


July 30 


station. 
One-quarter mile south 


Jerrys Point 


New Brunswick. 
Sip. yt. Sanquoit, Bos- 






Aug 7 


of station. 
One hundred and fifty 


Rye Beach 


ton, Mass. 
Small boat, no name ; . 






Aug 8 


yards south of station. 
Two and one-half miles 


Hampton Beach. . 


Gas. Ich., no name, 






Aug. 11 
Aug. 11 
Aug. 13 


southwest of station. 
Two miles south-south- 
west of station. 
One-half mile east by 
south of station. 
One mile north of station. 


Cross Island 
II unni wells Beach, 
do 


Amesbury, Mass. 
Bge. James Daily, Yar- 
mouth, Nova Scotia. 
Sc. William P. Hood, 
Fall River, Mass. 
Gas.lch.,noname,Phips- 


Comers 
Smith 


170 

G65 


Aug. 15 


Three-quartersmile south- 


do 


burg, Me. 
Nph. Ich. Wherehere, 






Aug 26 


southeast of station. 
Abreast of station 


Jerrys Point 


Bath, Me. 
Sc Neptune, Machias, 


Johnson 


109 


Sept. 3 
Sept. 23 


Oneand one-quartermiles 
north by east of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Burnt Island 
Cranberry Islands 


Me. 
Sip. Hattie E. Lawry, 
Waldoboro, Me. 
Gas. s. Hattie May, 


Lawry 
Jarvis 


12 
5 


Sept. 25 
Sept. 26 


west-northwest of sta- 
tion. 
Four miles northwest of 
station. 
One-half mile west-south- 


Great Wass Is- 
land. 
White Head 


Southwest Harbor,Me. 

Sc. Christie A. Cox, 
Rockland, Me. 
Nph. Ich., no name, Bris- 


Simmons . . 


35 


Sept. 26 


west of station. 
Two miles south-south- 


Hunniwells Beach . 


tol, Me. 
Gas. Ich. Minnie, Bath, 






Sept. 29 
Oct. 7 

Oct. 7 


west of station. 
One-half mile east by 
south of station. 
One and one-half miles 
southwest by west of 
station. 
One-half mile west of sta- 


do 

Quoddy Head 

White Head. 


Me. 
Bge. Valentine, New 
London, Conn. 
Sc. Bessie Parker, St. 
John, New Brunswick. 

Sip., no name, Tenants 


Pendleton . 
Brinton 


305 
240 


Oct. 10 
Oct. 10 


tion. 
Two and one-quarter 
miles southeast of sta- 
tion. 
Two miles northwest of 


Burnt Island 
Damiscove Island 


Harbor, Me. 
Sc. J. S. Lamprey, Thom- 
aston, Me. 

Sc. Josie, Machias, Me. 


Thomas . . . 
Chase 


306 

83 


Oct. 10 
Oct. 18 


station. 
One and one-half miles 
north-northwest of sta- 
tion. 
Six miles north by west 


Fletchers Neck . . . 
Cross Island 


Sc. William Booth, New 
London, Conn. 

Sc. Horace G. Morse, 


Emmons... 
Kearney. 


545 
437 


Oct. 25 


of station. 
Two and one-half miles 


Quoddy Head 


Somers Point, N. J. 
Sc. Little David, East- 


Ross 


15 


Nov. 1 


northeast of station. 
Four miles south-south- 


Cape Elizabeth . . . 


port, Me. 
Sip., no name, Portland, 






Nov. 2 
Nov. 6 


east of station. 
Two miles northeast of 
station. 
Two and one-half miles 


Quoddy Head 
White Head 


Me. 

Sc. Fauna, Lunenberg, 
Nova Scotia. 
Sc. Forest Belle, Machias, 


McDonald . 
Griffin 


161 
81 


Nov. 9 
Nov. 12 


east-northeast of sta- 
tion. 
One and one-half miles 
north-northeast of sta- 
tion. 
One-quarter mile west of 


Quoddy Head 
Cross Island 


Me. 

Sc. Ethel, Grand Manan, 
New Brunswick. 

Sip. 'Edalith, Machias, 


Wilson.... 


30 


Nov. 13 

Nov. 16 
Nov. 16 

Nov. 23 


station. 
One and one-quarter miles 
north of station. 
Near White Head Island. . 
Six miles east-northeast 
of station. 
One and one-half miles 
northeast of station. 


Fletchers Neck . . . 

White Head 
Jerrys Point 

White Head 


Me. 
Sc. John I. Snow, Rock- 
land, Me. 
Rowboat, no name 
Sip. Grace, Gloucester, 

Sc. Penobscot, Belfast, 

Me. 


Tuttle 

Turner 
Pendleton . 


196 
... 

358 



UNITED STATES -LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



203 



season of 1906-7. 

MAINE AND NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


1 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


Persons on board. 


Persons saved. 


Persons lost. 


1 Persons succored at 
station. 


A 

oj 

1* 
S | 

"m 

I 


Adrift 




$50 




$50 


$50 




1 


1 








New York City to 




4 000 




4 000 


4 000 




6 


fi 








Calais, Me. 


Wood 


800 


$600 


1,400 


765 


$635 


1 


3 








wick, to Boston, 
Mass. 
Portland Me to Bos- 




4,000 




4,000 




4, COO 


g 


8 




3 


3 


ton, Mass. 
Pleasure trip 




'10 




10 


10 




2 


?, 








do 




250 




250 


250 




7 


1 








Porto Rico West In- 


Molasses 


6 000 


3 000 


9,000 


9,000 




7 


1 








dies, to St. John. 


Coal 


14 000' 


4 000 


18 000 


17 800 


20) 


3 


H 








to Gardiner, Me. 




150 




150 


145 


5 


1 


1 








er. 
Adrift 




2,000 




2,000 


2,000 




3 


3 












700 


2 500 


3 200 


3 200 




5 


5 








ham, Mass. 


Lobsters 


1 200 


600 


1 800 


1 785 


15 


9 


9 








Friendship, Me. 




' 600 




600 


600 




1 


1 








Seal Harbor, Me. 
Jonesport to Rock- 




3,500 




3,500 


3,475 


25 


2 


?, 








land. Me. 




200 




200 


200 














Spruce Head, Me. 
Bath to Phippsburg, 




250 




250 


245 


5 


2 


?, 




?, 


2 


Me. 
Pittston Me to New 


Ice 


5 000 


2 800 


7 800 


7 300 


500 


9 


9 








York City. 
St. John, New Bruns- 
wick, to New York 
Citv. 
Adrift 


Laths 


8,000 
75 


5,000 


13,000 
75 


2,500 
75 


10,500 


6 


6 


.... 


6 


24 


New York City to 


Coal 


5 500 


2 500 


8 000 


7 850 


150 


6 


fi 








Rockland, Me. 
Providence, R. I., to 




2,500 




2,500 


2,500 




8 


3 








Machias, Me. 
Philadelphia Pa to 


Coal 


15 000 


6 000 


21 000 


21 000 




6 


6 








Saco, Me. 

Savannah, Ga., to Ha- 
merest, Nova Scotia. 
Lubec to Eastport Me 


Lumber . . 
Laths 


14,000 
500 


8,600 
200 


22,600 
700 


18, 450 
550 


4,150 
150 


7 

9 


7 

9 




1 


1 


Adrift 




400 




400 


400 














Windsor, Nova Scotia, 


Lumber . . 


5,000 


2,500 


7,500 


7,500 




6 


6 




2 


2 


to New York City. 
New York City to Blue 


Coal 


700 


900 


1,600 


1,600 




3 


3 








Hill, Me. 


Fish 


800 


2 000 


2 800 


2 790 


10 


9 


9 








Brunswick, to East- 
port, Me. 
Broke from moorings 




400 




400 


395 


5 


1 


1 








Dragged anchors and 




6,000 




6,000 


6,000 




a 


8 








stranded. 




40 




40 


40 




i 


1 








Fishing trip 


Fish 


500 


15 


515 


465 


50 


3 


3 








Bangor Me., to New 


Lumber 


8,000 


9,020 


17,020 


16, 920 


100 


5* 


5 








York City. 

























204 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 1. EMBRACING COAST OF 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 

. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 

Nov 27 


Four miles east of station 


White Head 


Sc. Jennie G. Pillsbury, 


Gray 


154 


Nov. 30 


One and one-half miles 


Quoddy Head . . 


Rockland, Me. 
Sc. Alice Maud, St. John, 


Gale 


136 


Dec. 4 
Dec. 7 

Dec. 7 


north-northeast of sta- 
tion. 
One mile north of station . 

One and one-quartermiles 
east-northeast of sta- 
tion. 
do 


Fletchers Neck . . . 
White Head 

do 


New Brunswick. 

Sc. J. W. Bradley, Glou- 
cester, Mass. 
Sc. Ellen M. Mitchell, 
New York City. 

Sc. Prudent, St. John, 


Foley 
Wry 

Priest . 


48 
379 

117 


Dec. 8 


Two and one-half miles 


. .do 


New Brunswick. 
Sc. Lulu W. Eppes, Ells- 


Ray 


81 


Dec. 27 


east of station. 
Six miles northeast of sta- 


Cross Island.. . 


worth, Me. 
Sc. Wandrian, Parrs- 


Card. 


349 


1907. 
Jan. 3 


tion. 
Three miles north of sta- 


Great Wass Is- 


boro, Nova Scotia. 
Sip. Maggie Beal, Beals, 






Jan. 16 
Jan. 19 
Feb. 7 

Mar. 17 
Apr. 10 
Apr. 10 
Apr. 14 
Apr. 15 


tion. 
Three miles southeast of 
station. 
Three miles north-north- 
east of station. 
Two miles north-north- 
west of station. 

Two miles east-northeast 
of station. 
One-third mile northeast 
of station. 
One and one-half miles 
north of station. 
Three miles north-north- 
east of station. 
One mile north of station 


land. 
Quoddy Head.... 

Cranberry Is- 
lands. 
Fletchers Neck... 

IIunniwelJsBeach. 
White Head 
Jerrys Point 
Fletchers Neck . . . 
Hunni wells Beach 


Me. 
Sc. Emily F. Northam,a 
New York City. 
Sc. Maud Malloch, Cal- 
ais, Me. 
Sc. Maple Leaf, Parrs- 
boro, Nova Scotia. 

Sip. James M., Bath, Me.. 

Rowboat, no name, St. 
George, Me. 
Sc. Alice, Portsmouth, 
N. H. 
Sc. bge. Pocopson. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 
Str. Seguin, Bath, Me 


McLean 
Forward. . . 
Smith 

Tibbetts. . . 

Littlefleld. . 
Eastvand.. 
Call 


332 
116 
112 

31 

5 
721 
96 


Apr. 18 


One mile west of station. 


Great Wass Is- 


Sip. Infanta, Jonesport, 






Apr. 18 


Metinic Reef 


land. 
White Head and 


Me. 
Sc. Sardinian Rockland, 


Ilutchings 


124 


Apr. 21 
Apr. 27 
Apr. 27 


One and one-half miles 
south-southwest of sta- 
tion. 
One and three-eighths 
miles southwest of sta- 
tion. 
Five-eighths mile south- 


Burnt Island. 
Damiscove Island. 

Burnt Island 
do 


Me. 
Sc. Catherine G. How- 
ard, Boston, Mass. 

Sc. Frances A. Rice, 
Weymouth, Nova 
Scotia.& 
Gas. Ich., no name, Mon- 


Decker 
Stuart 


122 
131 


Apr. 28 


west of station. 
Seven miles northeast of 


White Head.. 


hegan, Me. 
Sc. Lena White, Rock- 


Patterson 


126 


Apr. 29 
May 10 


station. 
Three and one-half miles 
east of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Quoddy Head.... 
Fletchers Neck 


land, Me. 
Sc. Anna, Boston, Mass. 

Sc Maggie Miller Parrs- 


Kerrigan... 
Haws 


488 
93 


May 11 


north of station. 
One mile southeast of sta- 


Jerrys Point . 


boro, Nova Scotia. 
Nph. Ich., no name, Bos- 






May 12 
May 16 

May 20 
May 28 


tion. 
Two miles south by west 
of station. 
Three miles west of sta- 
tion. 

Four hundred yards 
southwest of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Ilunni wells Beach. 

Great Wass Is- 
land. 

White Head 
Damiscove Is- 


ton, Mass. 
Sc. Alma, Machias, Me... 

Sc. Ellen M. Mitchell, 
New York City. 

Sc. Jonathan Cone, New- 
buryport, Mass. b 
Skiff, no name 


Kelly 
Rankin 

Walls .. 


173 
379 

122 


May 29 


from station. 
Three miles west of sta- 
tion. 


land. 
White Head 


Sc. Rosa E., Bangor, Me. 


Dooly 


40 



a Disabled, requiring the assistance of the life-saving crew. 

P In dangerous position, from which life-saving crew extricated her. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



205 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

MAINE AND NEW HAMPSHIRE Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


H 


Estimated amount 
saved. - 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


Persons on board. 


Persons saved. 


Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. 


"5 

!i 

a" 


Boston, Mass., to 




$3,000 




$3,000 




$3,000 


4 


4 








Rockland, Me. 
St John New Bruns- 


Lumber 


3,000 


$2,500 


5,500 


$5,500 




5 


5 




r> 


5 


wick, to Boston, 

Mass. 




1 500 




1 500 


1,500 




3 


3 








stranded. 
Rockland to Bath,Me 




5,000 




5,000 


4,800 


200 


7 


7 








New York City to St 


Coal 


4 500 


1 500 


6 000 


5 650 


350 


5 


5 








John, New Bruns- 
wick. 
.Boston Mass to Ells- 




2,500 




2,500 


2,500 




3 


3 








worth, Me. 




18 000 


5 000 


23 000 


22 000 


1 000 


7 


7 








to New York City. 
Fishin ' trip 




300 




300 


285 


15 


? 


9 








New York City to 


Coal 


7 000 


2 500 


9 500 


9 500 




7 


7 








Eastport, Me. 
Calais Me to Boston 


Lumber 


2,000 


1,800 


3,800 




3,800 


3 


3 








Mass. 
New York City to St 


Coal 


4,500 


2,000 


6,500 


5,700 


800 


4 


4 








Andrews, New 
Brunswick. 
From Bath Me 




1 200 




1 200 


1 200 




3 


3 








Sunk at moorings 




40 




40 


40 




1 


1 








Portsmouth N H to 




300 




300 


275 


25 


? 


? 








Isles of Shoals. 
Philadelphia Pa to 


Coal 


3,500 


5,000 


8,500 


8,500 




4 


4 








Saco, Me. 
Towing a vessel 




14,000 




14,000 


14,000 




7 


7 








Fishing trip 




300 




300 


300 




? 


? 








New York City 4o 


Coal 


2 000 


1 200 


3 200 




3,200 


5 


r> 








Rockland, Me. 
Gloucester Mass to 




12 500 




12,500 


2,000 


10,500 


?0 


20 




?0 


40 


Boothbay Harbor, 
Me. 


Piling 


2 000 


1 200 


3 200 


3 200 







6 








Scotia, to Somerset, 
Mass. 
Pleasure trip 




250 




250 


250 




? 


?, 








South Amboy N *J 


Coal 


6 500 


1 500 


8 000 


7 925 


75 


5 


5 








to Rockland, Me. 
Philadelphia, Pa., to 
Calais, Me. 
Hantsport Nova Sco- 


do.... 
Lumber 


4,000 
1 200 


2,000 
2 000 


6,000 
3 200 


3 200 


6,000 


7 
4 


7 
4 


.... 


7 


14 


tia, to Boston, Mass. 
Adrift 




800 




800 


800 




9 


9 




9 


? 


Jersey City, N. J to 


Cement 


3,000 


4,000 


7,000 


6,700 


300 


4 


4 








Bangor, Me. 
St. John, New Bruns- 
wick, to New York 
City. 
South Amboy N J 


Lumber . . 
Coal 


5,000 
2 500 


6,000 
1 000 


11,000 
3 500 


4,000 
3 500 


7,000 


7 
4 


7 
4 


.... 




.... 


to Vinalhaven, Me. 
Adrift 




5 




5 


5 














Bangor to Tenants 


Lumber.. 


700 


850 


1,550 


1,500 


50 


2 


?, 








Harbor. Me. 

























206 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 1. EMBRACING COAST OF 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1907. 
May 30 


Two and one-half miles 


Hunni wells Beach . 


Gas. Ich., no name, Se- 






June 9 
June 9 


south-southwest of sta- 
tion. 
Eight miles northeast of 
station, 
do 


Great Wass Is- 
land, 
do 


guin Island, Me. 

Sc. John S. Presson, 
Gloucester, Mass.o 
Sc. John S. Presson, 


Ramus 


92 


June 26 


One-quarter mile south- 


Jerrys Point 


Gloucester, Mass. 
Sc. Smith Tuttle, Booth- 


Barton 


89 


June 30 


southwest of station. 
In Biddeford Pool Har- 


Fletchers Neck 


bay, Me. 
Sc. Game Cock, Machias, 


Gates 


67 




bor. 
Total 




Me. 



















DISTRICT NO. 2. EMBRACING COAST 



1906. 
July 3 


Pollock Rip 


Monomoy Point 


Str. Kanawha Mar- 


Johnson. . 


2,182 


July 4 


One and one-quarter 


City Point 


quette, Mich. 
Catboat Memento, Bos- 






July 4 


miles southeast of sta- 
tion. 
One-half mile north by 


. .do 


ton, Mass. 
Sip. Alva, Boston Mass 






July 10 


west of station. 
One-half mile northwest 


do 


Sip. yt. Izeyl, Boston, 






July 18 


of station. 
One mile west of station 


Race Point 


Mass. 
Sc Helen G Wells 


Firth 


95 


July 22 


One-quarter mile south 


City Point 


Gloucester, Mass. 
Gas Ich. Emma E Bos- 






July 23 
July 23 


of station. 
One-half mile north of 
station. 
One-half mile southeast 


do 
do 


ton, Mass. 
Sip. Hattie, Boston, 
Mass. 
Sailboat Edelweiss, Bos- 


McNamara 


12 


July 29 


of station. 
One-half mile northeast 


do 


ton, Mass. 
Catboat Nina D., Bos- 






July 29 


of station. 
One mile southeast of 


do 


ton, Mass. 
Sip Jessie Boston Mass 






July 29 


station. 
Two miles east of station 


do . 


Sip Oregon, Boston 






July 29 


One-half mile northwest 


do 


Mass. 
Gas. Ich. Inez, Boston, 






July 31 


of station. 
Three and one-half miles 


Orleans 


Mass. 
Gas. Ich., no name, 






Air?. 1 
All"' 1 


south east of station. 
Three miles north-north- 
west of station. 
One and three-quarters 


Point Allerton 
Race Point 


Greenport, N. Y. 
Sc. Agnes V. Gleason, 
Gloucester, Mass. 
Sc y Winnebago Bos- 


Forbes 
Olson 


70 

17 


AUK 1 


miles west of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Old Harbor 


ton, Mass. 
Gas. Ich., no name 






Aug. 3 
Aug 4 


north-northeast of sta- 
tion. 
Three-quarters mile 
south-southwest of 
station. 
One and three-quarters 


Gurnet 

Fourth Cliff 


Sc. Laura L. Sprague, 
Marblehead, Mass. 

Sip. II. II., Gloucester, 


\Vixon 


594 


Aug. 6 
Aug. 7 

Aug. 7 


miles south of station. 
Two hundred- yards 
southwest of station. 
Four and one-half miles 
east-southeast of sta- 
tion. 
One and one-half miles 


Gurnet 

Monomoy Point.. 

Point Allerton. . . 


Mass. 
Sc. Rena, Boston, Mass.. 

Sc. George V. Jordan, 
New York City. 

Gas. Ich. Pilot, Boston, 


Lavangia . . 
Mitchell . . . 


41- 

616 


Aug. 9 
Aug. 10 
Aug. 10 


northeast of station. 
One-quarter mile south 
of station. 
Two and one-half miles 
northwest of station, 
.do 


Fourth Cliff 
Point Allerton 
do 


Mass. 
Sc. Gov. Russell, Prov r 
incetown, Mass. 
Sc. George E. Lane, jr., 
Boston, Mass. 
Sc. Arbitrator, Glouces- 


Bragg 
Kendrick.. 

Silva. 


135 
73 

106 








ter. Mass 







Vessel stranded again in same locality. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



207 



of 1906-7 Continued. - 

MAINE AND NEW HAMPSHIRE Continued. 







o 


s 




| 


| 


7? 






T3 


i 


Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


ll 


it 

go 




i! 

Cj CO 


< o 


ns on boa 


ns saved. 


I 

OQ 


ns succore 
station. 


1| 






00 


5 

i 


1 


1 


00 


E 


I 




E 


1 


00 

1 






w 


w 


frj 


H 


w 


PH 


PH 


PH 


PH 




Adrift 




$200 




$200 


$200 




2 


2 








Machias to Portland, 


Gravel 


3,000 


$300 


3,300 


3,275 


$25 


4 


4 








Me. 
























Dragged anchors 


do 


3 000 


275 


3 275 


3 275 




4 


4 








Kennebec River, Me., 


Lumber... 


1,200 


400 


1,600 


1,600 




3 


3 








to Boston, Mass. 
























Lying at moorings 


do 


500 


1 800 


2 300 


2 250 


50 


3 


3 




































229,120 


93,060 


322 180 


265 290 


56 890 


62 


262 




48 


93 



























OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



Norfolk, Va., to Bos- 


Coal 


$200,000 


$10,000 


$210,000 


$210, 000 




14 


14 








ton, Mass. 
Pleasure trip 




400 




400 


395 


$5 


4 


4 








do 




250 




250 


250 




10 


10 








Parted moorings 


' 


500 




500 


500 














Fishing trip 


Fish 


7,000 


500 


7 500 


7 500 




19 


19 








Pleasure trip 




1,000 




1 000 


1 000 




4 


4 








Dragged anchor and 




3,000 




3,000 


3 000 




1 


1 








stranded. 
Pleasure trip 




100 




100 


95 


5 


5 


5 








.do 




50 




50 


45 


5 


4 


4 








do 




300 




300 


290 


10 


g 


6 








do 




200 




200 


150 


50 


4 


4 








do 




275 




275 


275 




3 


3 








York, Me., to Gardi- 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




2 




9 


9 


ners Island, N. Y. 
Fishing trip 




10,000 




10 000 


10 000 




18 


18 








New York City to 




3,500 




3 500 


3 500 




5 


5 








Gloucester, Mass. 
Adrift 




1 000 




1 000 


400 


600 












New York City to 


Coal 


14,000 


2,400 


16,400 


16,400 




7 


7 








Plymouth, Mass. 
Gloucester, Mass., to 




200 




200 


200 






1 








Newport News, Va. 
Boston to Plymouth, 




900 




900 


900 




2 


2 








Mass. 
New York City to 


Coal 


12,000 


3,000 


15,000 




15,000 


8 


8 




8 


8 


Gardner, Me. 
Employed in harbor. . . 




500 




500 


500 




3 


3 








Fishing trip 


Fish 


10,000 


500 


10,500 


10,500 




94 


04 








do 


...do 


10,000 


7,000 


17 000 


17 000 




18 


IS 








Boston to Province- 




10,000 




10,000 


10,000 




>n 


^0 








town, Mass. 

























2990908 14 



208 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT NO. 2. EMBRACING COAST 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Aug 14 


Georges Island 


Point Allerton 


Sc Nil Desperandum 


Randlett 


79 


Aug. 16 


One and one - quarter 


City Point 


Bangor, Me. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Bos- 






Aug. 16 


miles northeast of sta- 
tion. 
Handkerchief Shoal 


Monomoy Point 


ton, Mass. 
Sc O D Witherell Bos- 




631 


Aug. 16 


Nashawena Island . 


Cuttyhunk 


ton, Mass. 
Ywl v. Sibvl New York 


Hoffman 


14 


Aug. 19 


Three miles south of sta- 


Salisbury Beach.. 


City. 
Gas. Ich. Sarah, Glouces- 






Aug. 19 


tion. 
One and one-half miles 


Gloucester ... 


ter, Mass. 
Gas. Ich. May Louise 






Aug. 22 


northeast of station. 
One and one-half miles 


City Point 


Boston, Mass. 
Sip. Rebel, Boston, Mass 






Aug. 22 


east-southeast of sta- 
tion. 
Two miles east-southeast 


do .... . 


Sip. Kittie C., Boston, 






Aug. 23 
Aug. 23 


of station. 
Two-thirds mile north- 
northeast of station. 
One-quarter mile north 


do 

do 


Mass. 
Sc. yt. Tempest, Boston, 
Mass. 
Sip. Vexer, Boston Mass 


Otsen 


35 


Aug. 23 


of station. 
Two miles east of station. 


Wood End . 


Catboat Doris, Prov- 






Aug. 24 


One and one - quarter 


Straitsmouth 


incetown, Mass. 
Sip. Margaret, Rockport, 






Aug. 24 


miles west-northwest 
of station. 
One-half mile northeast 


Manomet Point . . 


Mass. 
Sip. y. Modoc, Boston, 






Aug. 24 


of station. 
Three miles east of sta- 


Gay Head 


Mass. 
Sc. Eliza Jane, New Bed- 


Connor 


29 


Aug. 24 


tion. 
Two miles east of station 


do 


ford, Mass. 
Sc. Christopher Colum- 


Peck 


7 


Aug. 24 


One-half mile northwest 


Cuttyhunk 


bus, Providence, Mass. 
Sip. y. Emily Jane, New 


Allen 


16 


Aug. 25 


of station, 
.do 


do 


Bedford, Mass. 






Aug. 26 


One-quarter mile south- 


City Point 


Conn. 
Gas. Ich., no name Bos- 






Aug. 27 


west of station. 
The Salvages 


Straitsmouth 


ton, Mass. 
Sc M H Perkins 


Carrol 


76 


Aug. 27 


One-half mile east of sta- 


City Point 


Gloucester, Mass. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Bos- 






Aug. 27 


tion. 
Two-thirds mile north- 


.do 


ton, Mass. 
Sip. yt. King Philip 




14 


Aug. 27 


northeast of station. 
One-half mile north by 


do 


Boston, Mass. 
Sc. Myrtle, Boston, Mass 






Aug. 27 


east of station. 
Three miles northeast of 


Brant Rock 


Catboat, Green Harbor, 






Aug. 27 


station. 
Six miles northeast of 


Manomet Point.. . 


Mass. 
Gas. Ich. Laura, Mano- 






Aug. 31 


station. 
One mile south by west 


City Point 


met, Mass. 
Catboat Mollie Boston 






Sept. 1 


of station. 
One mile east-southeast 


Newburyport. 


Mass. 
Small boat, no name 






Sept. 2 


of station. 
One mile south-south- 


City Point 


Plum Island Point, 
Mass. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Bos- 






Sept. 2 


west of station. 
do 


do 


ton, Mass. 
Rowboat no name 






Sept. 2 


One-half mile south of 


.do. 


Boston, Mass. 
Gas. Ich. no name Bos- 






Sept. 2 


station. 
Two miles northeast of 


do 


ton, Mass. 
Sip. Thelma II Boston 






Sept. 2 


station. 
Two and one-half miles 


North Scituate... 


Mass. 
Gas. Ich. Emma E., Bos- 






Sept. 3 


northeast of station. 
Three miles east-south- 


City Point 


ton, Mass. 
Gas Ich Flounder Bos- 






Sept. 3 


east of station. 
One-half mile north of 


do 


ton. Mass. 
Gas. Ich. Victory, Bos- 






Sept. 3 


station. 
One-half mile southeast 


.do.. 


ton, Mass. 
Catboat Tantrum Bos- 








of station. 




ton, Mass. 







UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEBVICE. 

of 1906-7 Continued. 

OF MASSACHUSETTS-Continued. 



209 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


j 


t 

P 

I 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


Persons on board. 


1 




Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. 


"3 

M 

<n 2 

I" 


Bangor, Me., to Bos- 


Lumber . 


$2,200 




$2,400 


$2,400 














ton, Mass. 
Pleasure trip 




550 




550 


550 




2 


2 








Baltimore, Md., to 


Coal... . 


8,000 


2,500 


10,500 


10,500 




8 


8 








Boston, Mass. 
Cottage City to New 




1,300 




1,300 


1,300 














Bedford, Mass. 
Pleasure trip 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




3 


3 








Portland Me., to Bos- 




450 




450 


440 


$10 


3 


3 








ton, Mass. 
Pleasure trip 




150 




150 


150 




5 


5 








do 




250 




250 


250 




2 


2 








do 




2,000 




2,000 


2,000 




7 


7 








Broke from moorings . 




300 




300 


300 














Fishing trip 




400 




400 


400 




J 


1 




1 


l 


Dragged anchor and 




200 




200 


175 


25 












stranded. 
Boston to Manomet, 




200 




200 


150 


50 


2 


2 




2 


2 


Mass. 
New Bedford to Gay 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




9 










Head, Mass. 
Dragged anchors and 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




9 


? 








stranded. 
do 




12,000 




12 000 


12 000 




13 


13 








Bridgeport, Conn., to 




1,500 




1 500 


1 500 




g 










Cuttyhunk, Mass. 
Pleasure trip 




500 




500 


500 




3 










Fishing trip 


Fish 


2,200 


200 


2,400 




2,400 


14 


14 








Pleasure trip 




800 




800 


800 




4 


4 








Dragged anchors and 




1,200 




1,200 


1,190 


10 












collided. 
do 




450 




450 


450 














Adrift 




25 




25 


25 




1 


1 








Fishing trip 




200 




200 


200 




q 


q 








Pleasure trip 




100 




100 


100 




1 










Adrift 




15 




15 


15 




1 










Fishing trip 




150 




150 


150 




4 


4 








do 




15 




15 


15 




g 


g 








Pleasure trip 




125 




125 


125 




1 


1 








Capsized... 




175 




175 


150 


25 


g 


g 




2 




Pleasure trip 




900 




900 


900 




2 


9 








do 




1,200 




1,200 


1,190 


10 


8 


H 








do 




1,500 




1 500 


1 500 




2 


2 








do 




1,000 




1 000 


965 


35 


5 


5 

































210 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 2. EMBRACING COAST 



Date. 


Place. 
* 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Sept. 4 


Two and one-Quarter 


Cuttyhunk 


Sip. Eclipse Edgartown' 




10 


Sept 8 


miles northeast of sta- 
tion. 
One-half mile east of sta- 


Gay Head 


Mass. 
Catboat Maggie R Hy- 


Gocknett 


5 


Sept. 9 


tion. 
One mile east of station . . 


City Point 


annis, Mass. 
Gas. Ich. High Ball, 






Sept. 11 


Twelve miles south- 


.do 


Boston, Mass. 
Sip. yt. Hvpatia Bos- 




12 


Sept. 11 


southwest of station. 
One and one - quarter 


Race Point 


ton, Mass. 
Sc. Minnie Slauson Ban- 




317 


Sept. 13 


miles west of station. 
One mile east of station. . 


City Point 


gor, Me. 
Gas Ich. Silver Heels, 






Sept. 15 


One and one-half miles 


do 


Boston, Mass. 
Sip. Sea Bright, Boston, 






Sept. 15 


west-southwest of sta- 
tion. 
One mile west-southwest 


do 


Mass. 
Sip. Fanchon, Boston, 






Sept. 15 


of station. 
One-quarter mile north- 


do 


Mass. 
Sip. Sally IV, Boston, 






Sept. 21 


west of station. 
Two miles southwest of 


Wood End 


Mass. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Prov- 






Sept. 23 


station. 
One-half mile north of 


City Point 


incetown, Mass. 
Str. Brunette, Marble- 


Fuller 


10 


Sept. 25 
Sept. 26 


station. 
One mile northwest of 
station. 
One mile east-southeast 


Newburyport 
Point Allerton. . 


head, Mass. 
Sc. Newell B. Hawes, 
Boston, Mass. 
Sip., no name, South 


Hassen 


89 


Sept. 28 


of station. 
Eight miles northeast of 


North Scituate... 


Boston, Mass. 
Gas. Ich. Emma K., Co- 






Sept. 29 


station. 
One-third mile northeast 


Gloucester 


hasset, Mass. 
Gas. yt. Carrie B., Bos- 


Powell 


27 


Sept. 29 


of station. 
Two hundred yards 


City Point 


ton, Mass. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Bos- 






Sept. 30 


southwest of station. 
One-half mile southeast 


.do.. 


ton, Mass. 
Rowboat, no name, Bos- 






Sept. 30 


of station. 
do 


do 


ton, Mass. 
Gas Ich Annie Laurie 




> 


Oct. 5 


Two miles south of sta- 


Old Harbor. 


Boston, Mass. 
Catboat Auk, Hyannis, 


Cahoon. . 


6 


Oct. 7 


tion. 
Two-thirds mile north- 


City Point 


Mass. 
Sip. Commodore, Bos- 






Oct. 7 


east of station. 
One-quarter mile north 


do 


ton, Mass. 
Sip. Bo Peep, Boston 






Oct. 7 


of station. 
One-half mile southeast 


.. ..do 


Mass. 
Sip. Magic, Boston, Mass 






Oct. 7 


of station. 
.. .do.. . 


do 


Sip Mistral Boston 






Oct. 7 


One-half mile north of 


do 


Mass. 
Sip. Paloma Boston 






Oct. 7 


station. 
Two miles east-southeast 


do 


Mass. 
Sip Dream, Boston 






Oct. 7 


of station. 
One mile south-southeast 


Point Allerton .... 


Mass. 
Sip. Jessie A. Pope, Bos- 


Pope 


10 


Oct. 8 


of station. 
Two miles northwest of 


do 


ton, Mass. 
Sc. Mary A. Whalen 


Brophy 


134 


Oct. 8 


station. 
Six milQs southeast of 


Wood End 


Boston, Mass. 
Ywl., no name, Rock- 






Oct. 8 


station. 
Six miles west of station . 


Muskeget 


land, Me. 
Sc. Harry Knowlton, 


Haley 


317 


Oct. 9 


One-half mile north of 


City Point 


Eastport, Me. 
Sip. Eugenie, Boston, 






Oct. 9 


station. 
One-half mile northwest 


. ..do 


Mass. 
Sc. yt. Kittie, Boston, 




6 


Oct. 11 


of station. 
One-half mile north of 


do 


Mass. 
Catboat no name Bos- 






Oct. 11 


station. 
do.. 


.do 


ton, Mass. 
Gas. Ich. Helen M., Bos- 






Oct. 16 


One and one-q u a r t e r 


do 


ton, Mass. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Bos- 








miles southeast of sta,- 
tion. 




ton, Mass. 







UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



211 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

OF MASSACHUSETTS Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


p 

t3 
g 

H 


"o 

ji 



w 


1 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


1 


fl 
PH 


Persons saved. 


i 

03 

G 
PH 


Persons succored at 
station. 


*H 

03 
t-t 

m g 

I 


Pleasure trip 


Fish 


$800 




$800 


$800 




q 


q 








Dragged anchors and 




300 




300 


100 


$200 


S 


3 








stranded. 
Cruising 




1,200 




1,200 


1,200 




8 


8 








Stolen from moorings 




1,000 




1,000 


775 


225 












New York City to 




6,000 




& 000 


6,000 




7 


7 








Bangor, Me. 
Pleasure trip 




1,800 




1,800 


1,800 




6 


fi 








Dragged anchor 




200 




200 


200 














Broke from moorings 




500 




500 


500 














Dragged anchor 




1,500 




1,500 


1,500 














Fishing trip 


Fish 


500 


$50 


550 


550 




3 


1 








Employed in harbor 




1,000 




1,000 


850 


150 


? 


9 








Plum Island to Bos- 


Sand 


2,000 


100 


2,100 


2,060 


40 


4 


4 








ton, Mass. 
Pleasure trip 




200 




200 


200 




? 


9 








Adrift.. .. 




700 




700 


700 




? 


9 








Parted chains and 




6,000 




6,000 


5,900 


100 


7 


7 








stranded. 
Pleasure trip 




1,800 




1,800 


1,800 




i 


? 








do 




15 




15 


15 




1 


3 








do 




200 




200 


200 




1 


T 








Fishing trip 


Fish 


400 


10 


410 


410 







9 








Broke from moorings 




500 




500 


500 














.do... . 




175 




175 


175 














Fishing trip 




800 




800 


790 


10 


8 


8 








Broke from moorings 




650 




650 


645 


5 












and stranded, 
do 




1 000 




1 000 


1 000 














do 




175 




175 


175 














Dragged anchor and 




500 




500 


500 




s 


1 








stranded. 
Fishing trip 




15 000 




15 000 


15,000 




99 


99 








Stonington, Me., to 




50 




50 


50 




1 


1 








New York City. 
Philadelphia, Pa., to 


Coal. 


7,000 


1,395 


8,395 


8,365 


30 


fi 


fi 








Eastport, Me. 
Broke from moorings 




250 




250 


250 














and stranded. 
Dragged anchor 




700 




700 


700 














Broke from moorings 




125 




125 


125 














and stranded. 
do 




150 




150 


150 














Fishing trip 




250 




250 


250 




5 


5 

































212 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT No. 2. EMBRACING COAST 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Oct. 26 

Oct. 26 
Oct. 28 

Nov. 1 
Nov. 4 

Nov. 7 
Nov. 15 

Nov. 15 
Nov. 15 
Nov. 15 
Nov. 15 
Nov. 18 
Nov. 20 

Nov. 20 
Nov. 24 
Nov. 25 
Nov. 26 
Nov. 28 
Dec. 8 
Dec. 11 

Dec. 17 
Dec. 24 

Dec. 24 
Dec. 27 

Dec. 27 

1907. 
Jan. 4 

Jan. 9 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 


One and one-half miles 
west of station. 
One mile southeast of 
station. 
One and one-q u a r t e r 
miles east-southeast of 
station. 
One mile northeast by 
north of station. 
Three miles south of Nau- 
set station. 

One-quarter mile east of 
station. 
One and three-quarters 
miles north-northeast 
of station. 
One-half mile southeast 
of station. 
One mile west of station . 

do 


Race Point 


Sc. E. C. Hussey, Salem, 
Mass. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Chat- 
ham, Mass 
Catboat Fleet Wing, 
Boston, Mass. 

Gas. Ich., no name, Chat- 
ham, Mass. 
Sc. G. M. Cochrane, 
Parrsboro, Nova Sco- 
tia. 
Sc. Mopang, Boston, 
Mass. 
Sc. Mary L. Newton, 
Lubec, Me. 

Gas. Ich., no name, Prov- 
incetown, Mass. 
Catboat, no name, Chat- 
ham, Mass. 
Catboat Comfort, Chat- 
ham, Mass. 
Catboat Sylvia, Matta- 
poisett, Mass. 
Sc. Wm. F. Greeny Bos- 
ton, Mass. 
Sc. Effle May, St. John, 
New Brunswick. 

Sc. Francis Whalen, 
Boston, Mass. 
Sc. L. A. Plummer, New 
Bedford, Mass. 
Gas. Ich., no name,Prov- 
incetown, Mass. 
Sc. Thomas A. Crom- 
well, Boston, Mass. 
Gas. Ich., no name, New- 
buryport, Mass. 
Sc. Bessie C. Beach, New 
Haven, Conn. 
Sc. William Marshall,** 
Boston, Mass. 

Sc. Joseph W. Lufkin, 
Gloucester, Mass. 
Sc. Manhasset, Boston, 
Mass. 

Sc. Fortuna, Machias, 
Me. 

Gas. Ich. Pearl, Marsh- 


Hopkins... 


81 


Monomoy Point . . 
City Point 






Monomoy Point . . 

Nauset and Or- 
leans. 

Gay Head 






Tower 
Miller 


257 

77 
112 


Point Allerton.... 
Wood End 


Aylward . . . 


Chatham 






do 






One mile northwest of 
station. 
Three-quarters mile 
northeast of station. 
One and three-eighths 
miles northeast by east 
of station. 
One and one-quarter 
miles west of station. 
Three and one-half miles 
southeast of station. 
One-eighth mile north- 
west of station. 
Five and one-half miles 
northwest of station. 
One mile north-north- 
east of station. 
Entrance to Essex River. 

One-half mile north of 
station. 

One mile west of station. . 

Two and three-quarters 
miles north-northwest 
of station. 
One and one-quarter 
miles southeast of sta- 
tion. 
Three-quarters mile 
north-northeast of sta- 
tion. 
One hundred yards south 
of station. 

Two and one-quarter 
miles southwest of sta- 
tion. 
East end of Pasque Island 

Georges Island 


Monomoy 






Salisbury Beach.. 
Straitsmouth 

Race Point 
Chatham 


Smith 


267 
55 

137 
394 


Gale 


Norris 
Peck 


Wood End 




Muskeget 


Williamson 


128 


Newburyport 

Gloucester and 
Plum Island. 
Highland 


McKeague . 
Gayton 

Crowell 
Doyle 

Tower 


341 
305 

112 
112 

25 


Race Point 


Point Allerton 
High Head 


Fourth Cliff 


Wood End 


field, Mass. 

Gas. Ich., no name, Prov- 
incetown, Mass. 

Sc. Alice T. Boardman, 
Calais, Me. 

Sc. bge. Woodbury, Fall 
River, Mass. 
Sc. Margaret Dillon, 
Boston, Mass. 
Str. Onondaga, New 
York City. 






Monomoy Point.. 
Cuttyhunk 


Robertson. 

Carlson 
Tobin 
Bunnell 


123 

735 
77 
2 ? 696 


Point Allerton 
Old Harbor 


One and one-half miles 
northeast of station. 





o In dangerous position requiring assistance. 

*> Vessel waterlogged and was abandoned 25 miles east of Highland Light on December 8. She 
drifted ashore on December 10, 1906. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



213 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

OF MASSACHUSETTS Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


1 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


Persons on board. 


-d 

1 

PH 


Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. 


i 

o 

83 
1 

'1 


Fishing trip 




6,000 




$6 000 


$6 000 




18 


18 








.. .do 




425 




425 


425 




9 


2 








do 




300 




300 


280 


$20 


9 


9 








Broke from moorings 




125 




125 


25 


100 












and stranded. 
River Hebert, Nova 
Scotia, to New Ha- 
ven, Conn. 
Fall River to Gay 


Lumber . . 


12,000 
1,800 


$3,500 


15,500 
1,800 


2,500 


13,000 
1,800 


6 
3 


6 
3 


.... 


6 
3 


23 
3 


Head, Mass. 
New York City to 


Coal 


2,000 


900 


2,900 




2 900 


4 


4 








Eastport, Me. 
Fishing trip . . 




200 




200 


200 




1 


1 








do 




150 




150 


140 


10 


1 


1 








do 


Fish 


500 


15 


515 


505 


10 


? 


? 








do 




600 




600 


600 




2 


2 




2 


2 


New York City to 


Coal 


5,000 


2,000 


7,000 


6,300 


700 


ft 


ft 








Portland, Me. 
Boston, Mass., to St. 




1,500 




1,500 


1, 475 


25 


3 


3 








John, New Bruns- 
wick. 
Fishing trip 




10,000 




10,000 


10,000 




?'> 


99 








Stockton, Me., to New 


Potatoes. . 


8,000 


3,500 


11,500 


9,000 


2,500 


7 


7 








York City. 
Fishing trip . 




300 




300 


295 


5 


2 


2 




2 


2 


do 


Fish 


14,000 


100 


14,'100 


14,100 




?3 


?3 








do 




200 




200 


200 




1 


1 








Stonington, Me., to 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
St. John, New Bruns- 


Stone 
Lumber . . 


6,000 
3,000 


2,000 
3,000 


8,000 
6,000 


7,500 
1,000 


500 
5,000 


6 


6 


..... 


.... 




wick to New York 
City. 
Fishing trip 




7,500, 




7,500 


7 500 




99 


22 








do . 


Fish 


10 000 


625 


10 625 


8 325 


2 300 


23 


23 








Jonesport, Me., to 


do 


650 


5,550 


6,200 




6 200 












Gloucester, Mass. 
Fishing trip 

do 


do.... 
.. do 


1,500 
400 


10 
50 


1,510 
450 


1,490 
450 


20 


1 

2 


1 

2 




1 


1 


Calais, Me., to Hyan- 
nis, Mass. 

Boston, Mass., to 


Lumber . . 


4,000 
25,000 


2,910 


6,910 
25,000 


3,910 

25,000 


3,000 


5 
3 


4 

s 


1 


4 


8 


South Amboy, N. J. 
Fishing trip 


Fish 


12,000 


800 


12,800 


12,800 




16 


16 








Boston, Mass., to 
Jacksonville, Fla. 


General. . . 


250,000 


160,000 


410,000 


341,095 


68,905 


28 


28 


.... 







214 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT NO 2. EMBRACING COAST 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1907. 
Jan. 24 


Georges Island. . . . 


Point Allerton. 


Sc. Catherine G. How- 


Dicker 


122 


Feb. 2 


Six hundred and fifty 


Race Point.. 


ard, Boston, Mass. 
Sc. Alice M. Guthrie, 


Guthrie.. 


88 


Feb. 4 
Feb. 5 
Feb. 11 


yards north of station. 
Two miles west-north- 
west of station. 
Three-quarters mile south 
by east of station. 
Three and one-half miles 


Point Allerton . . . 
Pamet River 
Cuttyhunk 


Boston, Mass. 
Sc. Juno.o Boston, Mass. 

Sc. bge. Woodbury, Fall 
River, Mass. 
Nph. s. Louise, New Bed- 


Daggett . . . 
McVay 
Edwards . . 


119 
735 
9 


Feb 14 


east of station. 
One and one-quarter 


Monomoy Point 


ford, Mass. 
Sc. Greta, Dorchester, 


Walsh 


161 


Feb. 18 
Feb. 25 


miles south-southwest 
of station. 
One mile north of High- 
land station. 
Two and three-eighths 


Highland and 
High Head. 
Nab ant. 


New Brunswick. 

Sc. Girard, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 
Nph. Ich., no name, 


Larson 


841 


Mar. 7 
Mar. 14 


miles east-northeast of 
station. 
Two and one-half miles 
north-northwest of sta- 
tion. 
Two miles east of station 


Point Allerton . . . 
Wood End 


Swampscott, Mass. 

Sc. Fillmore, Machias, 
Me. 

Gas. Ich., no name, 


Mitchell . . . 


50 


Mar. 14 


Off Long Point 


do 


Provincetown, Mass. 
Sip. Albert Drummond, 


Williams 


7 


Mar. 24 


T h r e e-quarters mile 


Gurnet . 


Provincetown, Mass. 
Sc. Tecumseh, Duxbury, 


Tallgreen . . 


41 


Apr. 7 


s o u t h-southwest of 
station. 
Three miles south of sta- 


Plum Island 


Mass. 
Sc. F. A. Smith, Boston, 


Perkins.... 


77 


Apr. 16 
Apr. 16 


tion. 
Three miles southeast of 
station. 
Four miles south of sta- 


Monomoy Point.. 
Coskata . 


Mass. 
Sc. William Rice, Thom- 
aston, Me. 
Catboat Ramona, Nan- 


Maloney... 


133 


Apr. 24 


tion. 
T h r e e-quarters mile 


High Head 


tucket, Mass. 
Sc. Stanley, Lunenberg, 


Conrad 


99 


Apr. 25 


north of station. 
One and one-half miles 


North Scituate . . 


Nova Scotia. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Win- 






Apr. 30 

May 4 


east of station. 
T h r e e-quarters mile 
south of station. 
One-half mile north of 


Gay Head 
City Point 


throp, Mass. 
Sc. bge. Lewis Thomp- 
son, Boston, Mass. 
Sip. Cypress, Boston, 


Santos .... 


730 


May 5 


station. 
One-half mile southeast 


do 


Mass. 
Small boat, no name, 






May 5 


of station. 
Seven miles south-south- 


Plum Island , 


Boston, Mass. 
Sc James and Ella Bos- 


Barns 


90 


May 10 


east of station. 
One-half mile north- 


Newburyport 


ton, Mass. 
Skiff, no name, New- 






May 10 


northeast of station. 
One and three-quarters 


Nahant 


buryport, Mass. 
Sip. Maud, Revere, Mass. 






May 12 


miles southwest of sta- 
tion. 
One-quarter mile north- 


City Point 


Gas. Ich. Edith, Boston 






May 12 


west of station. 
Two miles south-south- 


Race Point 


Mass. 
Gas Ich A Brown Prov- 






May 13 


west of station. 
One-half mile north by 


Citv Point 


incetown, Mass. 
Sip. yt. Thelma 11, Bos- 






May 15 
May 16 


east of station. 
Four and one-half miles 
west by south J south 
of station. 
One mile south-south- 


Monomoy Point.. 
Old Harbor 


ton, Mass. 
Sc. W. H. Moody, Glou- 
cester, Mass. 

St. yt. Verona, Boston, 


G r o n v e- 
rean. 


75 


May 24 


west of station. 
One mile east of station 


City Point 


Mass. 
Raft no name 






May 24 


One-half mile southwest 


do 


Sip. Totem, Boston, 






May 26 
May 28 


of station. 
Two miles north-north- 
west of station. 
One-half mile west of sta- 


Point Allerton . . . 
City Point 


Mass. 
Ywl. yt. Evelyn, Boston, 
Mass. 
Gas. Ich. Onaway, Bos- 


Chase 


8 




tion. 




ton, Mass. 







No assistance required of life-saving crew. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



215 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

OF MASSACHUSETTS-Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


1 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


Persons on board. 


Persons saved. 


Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. 


* 

IH 

O-O 

3 S 

8| 

>> 


Fishing trip 


Fish 


$ 12, 000 


$1,500 


813,500 


$13,500 




22 


22 








do 




9,000 




9,000 


9,000 




10 


19 








do 


Fish 


14,000 


1,500 


15,500 


15,500 




21 


?1 








Gloucester, Mass., to 




25,000 




25,000 




$25,000 


4 


4 








South Amboy, N.J. 
Fishing trip 




1,500 




1 500 


1 500 




3 


3 








Salt Cay West Indies 


Salt 


9,000 


1,500 


10 500 


10, 450 


50 


5 


6 








to Dorchester, New 
Brunswick. 
Philadelphia Pa to 


Coal 


10,000 


4,000 


14 000 




14,000 


4 


2 


2 


9 


4 


Boston, Mass. 
Fishing trip 


Fish and 


500 


25 


525 


475 


50 


9 


2 








Abandoned 


gear. 
Lumber . . 


700 


1,200 


1,900 


900 


1,000 


? 


? 








Fishing trip 


Fish ... 


400 


75 


475 


475 




? 


? 








Fast in ice 


.do 


500 


100 


600 


600 




3 


3 








Fishing trip 


do 


8,000 


3,500 


11,500 


11,000 


500 


10 


10 




q 


<> 


Fouled anchor and 


Sand . . 


1,000 


200 


1,200 


1,200 




4 


4 








stranded. 
South Amboy, N. J., 


Coal 


2,200 


1,000 


3,200 


2,700 


500 


4 


4 








to Thomaston, Me. 
Nantucket to Coskata, 




200 




200 


200 




1 


1 








Mass. 
Bridgewater, N o v a 
Scotia, to New York 
City. 
\Vinthrop to Srituate, 


Lumber . . 


5,000 
500 


2,150 


7,150 
500 


6,720 
500 


430 


5 
3 


5 
3 






.... 


Mass. 
South Amboy, N. J., 


Coal 


12,000 


7,000 


19,000 


18,700 


300 


3 


3 




? 


?, 


to Portland, Me. 
Sailing in harbor 




700 




700 


700 




3 


3 








Capsized 




50 




50 


50 




1 


} 








Essex to Boston Mass 


Sand 


2,500 


150 


2 650 


2 300 


350 


5 


5 








Fishing trip 




15 




15 


15 




1 


1 




1 


1 


Adrift 




200 




200 


200 














Pleasure trip 




500 




500 


500 




9 


9 








Fishing trip . . 




' 800 




800 


795 


5 


> 


<> 








Dragged anchors.. 




175 




175 


175 














Fishing trip 


Fish 


8,000 


500 


8,500 


8,500 




14 


14 








Boston, Mass., to 




3,000 




3,000 


3,000 




? 


?, 


. 






Jamestown, Va. 
Adrift 




200 




200 


200 




4 


4 








Dorchester to Bay 




400 




400 


400 




? 


| 








View, Mass. 
Provincetown to Bos- 




500 




500 


500 




10 


10 








ton, Mass. 
Dragged anchors 




800 




800 


800 







































216 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT NO. 2. EMBRACING COAST 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1907. 
May 30 


One-half mile west of 


City Point... . 


Sailboat Dorothea, Bos- 






June 3 


station. 
One-third mile northwest 


do 


ton, Mass. 
Gas. yt. Tidy Adly,New 




13 


June 3 


of station. 
Three miles southwest of 


do 


Bedford, Mass. 
Sip. Sintram. Boston, 






June 3 


station. 
Two-thirds mile north by 


do 


Mass. 
Sip. Varuna. Boston, 






June 3 


east of station. 
One mile southeast of 


...do 


Mass. 
Sailboat, no name, Bos- 






June 3 


station. 
Two-thirds mile north of 


do 


ton. Mass. 
Catboat Angora, Boston, 






June 3 


station. 
One-half mile west-south- 


do 


Mass. 
Sc. yt. Christine, Boston, 




11 


June 16 


west oi station. 
One-ha'fmilesouth-south- 


.do 


Mass. 
Rowboat, no name, Bos- 






June 21 


west of station. 
One-quarter mile south 


do 


ton, Mass. 
Rowboat, no name, Bos- 






June 24 


of station. 
One mile north by west 


Newburyport .... 


ton, Mass. 
Catboat Strideaway, 






June 24 


of station. 
One-quarter mile south- 


Pamet River 


Lynn, Mass. 
Sc. Robert and Arthur, 


Anderson 


110 


June 27 


east of station. 
One-quarter mile north 


City Point 


Boston, Mass. 
Gas. Ich. Independence, 






June 27 


of station. 
Five hundredyards north- 


do 


Boston, Mass. 
Sip. Ada, Boston, Mass. . 






June 30 


west of station. 
One and one-quarter miles 


do 


Sip. Marion, Bos ton, Mass 






June 30 


northeast of station. 
Four miles southeast of 


.do 


Gas. Ich., no name, Bos- 






June 30 


station. 
One-half mile north of 


do 


ton, Mass. 
Gas. Ich. Beatrice, Bos- 








station. 
Total 




ton, Mass. 



















DISTRICT NO. 3. EMBRACING COASTS OF 



1906. 
July 1 

July 4 


Two miles southwest of 
station. 
One and one-half miles 


Watch Hill 
do 


Sc. Charles II. Sprague, 
Providence, R. I. 
Sip. Alice, Onset, Mass 


Colbeth.... 


318 


Aug. 1 


northwest of station. 
Two and one-half miles 


Sandy Point 


St. Ich. Ailsa, New York 






Aug. 1 
Aug. 3 
Aug. 15 


southwest of station. 
Two and one-half miles 
south of station. 
One-half mile west of sta- 
tion. 
Watch Hill Point 


New Shoreham . . . 
Brenton Point 
Watch Hill 


City. 
Str. Nero, U. S. Govern- 
ment. 
Sc. Eliza Jane, New Bed- 
ford, Mass. 
Sc. Maggie Todd, Calais, 


Shurtleff. . . 
Crowley . . . 
French 


1,900 

29 
136 


Aug. 24 


Three hundred yards 


Fishers Island 


Me. 
Catboat Dinah, Noank, 






Aug. 30 
Sept. 5 


northwest of station. 
One-eighth mile west- 
northwest of station. 
Three miles east by south 


Point Judith 
Brenton Point 


Conn. 
Sc. Clara E. Comee, 
Bath, Me. 
Sip. Sturgeon, Newport, 


Barter 


138 


Sept. 5 


of station. 
One-third mile northeast 


Narragansett 


R. I. 

Rowboat no name 






Sept. 5 
Sept. 5 


of station. 
One and one-half miles 
west-northwest of sta- 
tion. 
Three hundred yards 


Pier. 
Point Judith 

Quonochontaug 


El. s. Lotta, New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

Nph. Ich. Ninigret, 


Clark 


8 


Oct. 6 


southeast of station. 
One-quarter mile west- 


Brenton Point 


Weekapang, R. I. 
Gas Ich., no name, New- 






Nov. 15 


northwest of station. 
Point Judith 


Point Judith 


port, R. I. 
Sc. Lugano. Portland, 


Barter 


174 


Nov. 26 


One-quarter mile east of 
station. 


New Shoreham... 


Me. 
Sc. John Feeney, New 
York City. 


Mosier 


47 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



217 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

OF MASSACHUSETTS-Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


"8 
H 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


1 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


1 
1 

GO 

a 
1 

3 


1 

fl 
( 

3 


1 Persons lost. 


1 Persons succored at 
1 station. 


Days' succor af- 
forded. 


Capsized . . ... 




$100 
2,000 
1,000 




$100 
2,000 
1,000 
500 
60 
150 
2,500 
20 
25 
600 
11,000 
600 
250 
75 
150 
475 


$95 
2,000 
1,000 
500 
60 
150 
2,500 
20 
25 
525 
11,000 
600 
250 
65 
140 
475 


$5 




Dragged anchors 












Parted moorings and 
stranded. 
Dragged anchors and 
stranded. 
Parted moorings and 
stranded. 
do 




















500 
60 
150 
2,500 
20 
25 
600 
10,000 
600 
250 
75 
150 
475 
















































Dragged" anchors 


















Adrift 









2 
3 
2 
23 


2 
3 
2 
23 








Capsized 












Lynn to Newburyport, 
Fishing trip 






75 








Fish 


$1, 000 


.... 


15 


15 


Dragged anchors 






do 


















Pleasure trip 






10 
10 


6 
3 
6 


6 
3 
6 








Fishing trip 







Pleasure trip. 
















913,665 


238,215 


1,151,880 


982,600 169,280 


847 


844 


3 


62 


85 








KHODE ISLAND AND FISHERS ISLAND. 



Stonington, Conn., to 




$8,000 




$8,000 


$7,900 


$100 


7 


7 








Georgetown, S. C. 
Onset, Mass., to New 




800 




800 


800 




? 


2 




g 


2 


London, Conn. 
New York City to 




1,500 




1,500 




1,500 


1 


1 








Block Island, R. I. 
Norfolk, Va., to New- 
port, R. I. 
New Bedford to Taun- 


Coal 


250,000 
1,000 


$10,000 


260,000 
1,000 


205,000 
1,000 


55,000 


38 
? 


38 

9, 








ton, Mass. 
Calais, Me., to Bridge- 


Lumber . . 


1,500 


4,000 


5,500 


4,500 


1,000 


B 


5 








port, Conn. 
Dragged anchor and 




300 




300 


300 




4 


4 




1 


1 


stranded. 
Perth Amboy, N. J., to 


Paving 


2,500 


3,000 


5,500 


5,500 




4 


4 








Boston, Mass. 
Capsized and sunk. . 


blocks. 


300 




300 


100 


200 


? 


? 








Capsized 




50 




50 


50 




1 


1 








Broke from moorings 




1,200 




1,200 


1,150 


50 


3 


3 








and stranded. 
Capsized 




300 




300 


295 


5 


4 


4 








Adrift 




1,200 




1,200 


1,150 


50 












South Gardiner, Me., 
to New York City. 
Fishing trip 


Laths 
Fish and 


2,500 
3,000 


3,300 
1,000 


5,800 
4,000 


100 
4,000 


5,700 


5 

8 


2 

8 


3 


2 


12 




tackle. 























218 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT NO. 3. EMBRACING COAST OF 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1907. 
Jan. 9 


One-quarter mile south- 


Fishers Island 


Sc. Ellen M. Mitchell, 


Wry 


379 


Jan. 10 


east of station. 
Napatree Point 


Watch Hill 


New York City. 
Bge. Honesdale, New 


Groninger 


277 


Jan. 10 


do 


...do 


York City. 
Bge. Delaware, New 


Buddenha- 


294 


Jan. 10 


do 


do 


York City. 
Bge. Marvin New York 


gen. 
Sutton 


274 


Feb. 8 


Three miles west-north- 


Brenton Point 


City. 
Str. Richmond New 


Snow 


401 


Feb. 12 


west of station. 
One and one-q u a r t e r 


Quonochontaug . 


York City. 
Yawl belonging to Sc. 






May 21 


miles west of station. 
One mile east-northeast 


Narragansett 


Harry Knowlton. 
Rowboat, no name. . 






May 31 


of station. 
Three miles west of sta- 


Pier. 
Fishers Island 


Gas Ich., no name 








tion. 
Total 























DISTRICT NO. 4. EMBRACING 



1906. 
Aug. 2 


Two miles northeast of 


Point of Woods 


Gas Ich Elmira New 






Aug. 8 


station. 
One-half mile northeast 


do 


York City. 
Sip no name Bay- 






Aug. 13 


of station. 
Three miles north-north- 


do 


shore, N. Y. 
Sip., no name. Sayville, 






Aug. 15 


west of station. 
Three-quarters mile 


Blue Point 


N. Y. 
Sip. Troubadour, Blue 






Aug. 17 


northwest of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Fire Island 


Point, N. Y. 
Sip y Treasure Bay- 






Aug. 23 


west of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Oak Island 


shore, N. Y. 
Sip Chip Oak Island 






Aug. 23 


northeast of station. 
Three-quarters mile 


Potunk 


N. Y. 
Catboat Iris, West 






Aug. 24 


northwest of station. 
One-quarter mi IP, west 


Rocky Point 


Hampton, N. Y. 
Nph Ich R a p t u r e 






Aug. 25 


of station. 
One hundred and ten 


Oak Island 


Lyme, Conn. 
Str Oak Island Pat- 


Rich 


19 


Aug. 28 


yards north of station. 
One mile northeast of 


do 


chogue, N. Y. 
Str Oak Island, Pat- 


Rich. 


19 


Aug. 30 


station. 
One-quarter mile north 


Potunk. 


chogue, N. Y. 
Catboat Iris, West 






Sept. 2 
Sept. 3 
Sept. 3 


of station. 
One-eighth mile south- 
west of station. 
Two and one-half miles 
west of station. 
One-half mile west of sta- 


Rockaway Point . 
Point of Woods.. . 
Long Beach 


Hampton, N. Y. 
Gas. s. Gipsy, New York 
City. 
Gas. yt. Echo, Pat- 
chogue, N. Y. 
Catboat Can Not 


R o w 1 e n- 
son. 
Becken- 
ridge. 


11 
24 


Sept. 5 


tion. 
Four miles northeast "of 


Fire Island . 


Nph. Ich. Countess, New 






Sept. 6 


station. 
One - half mile north- 


Point of Woods 


York City. 
Nph Ich Gem Bay- 






Sept. 16 


northwest of station. 
Two miles northeast of 


Moriches and Po- 


shore, N. Y. 
Catboat Ark, Speonk, 






Sept. 23 


Moriches station. 
Two miles northeast of 


tunk. 
Moriches 


N. Y. 
Catboat, no name, 






Oct. 2 


station. 
One mile west of station 


Oak Island 


Speonk, N. Y. 
Sharpie no name Bay- 






Oct. 7 


One-quarter mile west of 


Batons Neck 


shore N. Y. 
Gas. Ich., no name, 






Oct. 7 

Oct. 8 
Oct. 24 


station. 
Six miles west of station. . 

One mile northwest of 
station. 
One-third mile northwest 


Rocky Point 

Fire Island 
Shinnecock 


Stamford, Conn. 
Sc. Keewaydin, Parrs- 
boro, Nova Scotia. 

Sip. Nena A. Rowland, 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Catboat, no name 


Salter 
Rowland . . 


200 
38 




of station. 











UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



219 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

RHODE ISLAND AND FISHERS ISLAND Continued. 







w 
























O 







rt 


pj 

















1 












d 


. 




1 




Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


L 


?o 




|j 


03 . 


1 


2 
1 


I 


So 

o o 


|| 






03 > 


oj 




oj <n 


oj 


| 


d 


a 


-2> 
6 


2 









1 


1 

i 


3 


1 






PH 




I 


Bath, Me., to New 


Lumber . 


$8,000 


$7.500 


$15,500 


$14, 700 


$800 


7 


7 








York City. 
























New York City to 


Coal 


1,000 


1,200 


2,200 




2,200 


2 


2 




2 


2 


Providence, R. I. 
























do 


do 


1,000 


1,200 


2,200 




2,200 


9 


9 




9 


2 


do 


do 


1,000 


1,200 


2,200 


700 


1,500 




9 






si 


Providence, R. I., to 




90,000 




90,000 


65,000 


25,000 


16 


16 








New York City. 
From wrecked vessel. 




30 




30 


30 




7 


7 




7 


?i 


Capsized 




75 




75 


75 






1 








Adrift 




400 




400 


400 






1 




































375,655 


32,400 


408,055 


312, 750 


95,305 


124 


121 


3 


18 


42 



























COAST OF LONG ISLAND. 



Pleasure trip 




$10,000 




$10,000 


$10,000 




8 


8 








do 




200 




200 


200 




4 


4 








Capsized 




200 




200 


200 




9 


9 




9 


9 


do 




200 




200 


200 




9 


? 








Pleasure trip 




500 




500 


500 




9 


9 








.do 




100 




100 


100 




4 


4 








. .do.. . 




250 




250 


250 




3 


3 








do 




500 




500 


500 




3 


3 




3 


3 


Broke from moorings 




4,000 




4,000 


4,000 




8 


3 








and stranded. 
Babylon to Oak 


P r o vi- 


4,000 


$50 


4,050 


4,050 




43 


43 








Island, N. Y. 
Capsized 


sions. 


250 




250 


250 




? 


? 









Pleasure trip 




2,000 




2,000 




$2,000 


14 


14 








do 




4,000 




4 000 


4 000 




2 


9 








Capsized 




100 




100 


100 




1 


1 








Bayshore to Fire 




2,000 




2,000 


2 000 




4 


4 








Island, N. Y. 
Adrift 




200 




200 


200 




g 


8 








Capsized 




300 




300 


300 




5 


5 








do 




200 




200 


200 




9 


9 








Broke from moorings 




30 




30 


30 














Oyster Bay, N. Y., to 




250 




250 


250 




4 


4 




4 


4 


Stamford, Conn. 
New York City to 


Coal 


6,000 


1,800 


7,800 


5,000 


2,800 


5 


5 








WolfvUle, Nova 
Scotia. 
Bridgeport, Conn., to 


Oysters. . . 


3,000 


1,500 


4,500 


4,500 




3 


3 








Fire Island, N. Y. 
Capsized .. 




40 




40 


40 




1 


1 


































220 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTICT NO. 4. EMBRACING 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Oct. 27 

Oct 28 


One-half mile northwest 
of station. 
One-half mile northeast 


Point of Woods . . 
Short Beach 


Sip. Alida Hearn, Pat- 
. chogue, N. Y. 
Sharpie, no name, Free- 


Mosher.... 


28 


Oct. 31 
Nov. 13 


of station. 
Two miles east of station. 

Three-quarters mile east- 


Rocky Point 
Shinnecock 


port, N. J. 
Sc. yt. Elizabeth, New 
York City. 
Shp. M. P. Grace, New 


Stockfern.. 
Schmidt . 


16 
1,928 


Nov 15 


southeast of station. 
One mile north of station 


Fire Island 


York City. 
Catboat, no name, Fire 






Nov. 15 


Off station 


.. do 


Island, N. Y. 
Scow, no name 






Dec 7 


One and one-half miles 


Forge River 


Nph. Ich., no name, Cen- 






Dec 8 


northeast of station. 
Off station 


Fire Island 


tre Moriches, N. Y. 
Gas. s. A. M. Low, 


Pauch 


18 


Dec. 9 


Four hundred yards 


Point of Woods 


Bridgeport, Conn. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Pat- 






Dec. 9 


north of station. 
Off station 


Fire Island . . . 


chogue, N. Y. 
Gas. Ich., no name. Fire 






Dec. 9 


....do 


do 


Island, N. Y. 
Sip. Minion, Fire Island, 






Dec 15 


Two and one-half miles 


Point of Woods 


N. Y. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Bay- 






1907. 
Feb 14 


northwest of station. 
One mile northwest of 


do 


shore, N. Y. 
Small boat, no name, 






Mar. 13 
Mar 14 


station. 
Eight hundred yards 
southwest of Blue Point 
station, 
do 


Blue Point, Lone 
Hill and Bellport. 

do 


Bayshore, N. Y. 
Str. Gowanburn, Gree- 
nock, Scotland. 

Boat belonging to sc. 


Forbes 


4,315 


Mar. 16 


Two miles north-north- 


Point of Woods 


Rescue, New York City 
Gas. Ich., no name, Bay- 






Mar. 26 


west of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Potunk. 


shore, N. Y. 
Sip. Rambler, Pat- 


Biggs 


5 


Mar. 30 
Apr. 6 
Apr. 6 
Apr. 14 
Apr 20 


east of station. 

Three-eighths mile east 
of station. 
Three miles west of sta- 
tion. 
Three miles west of Point 
of Woods station. 
Two miles north of sta- 
tion. 
Two miles northwest of 


Batons Neck 
Point of Woods... 

Point of Woods 
and Fire Island. 
Point of Woods... 

do 


chogue, N. Y. 

Sc. Hamlet, Baltimore, 
Md. 
Sc. Annie E. Edwards, 
Patchogue, N. Y. 
Sc. Sallie M. Russell, 
Patchogue, N. Y. 
Sc. P. E. Wharton, Chin- 
coteague, Va. 
Sip Nettie Islip N Y 


Benjamin. . 
Hubbard . . 
Rogers 
Brasher . . . 


13 

61 
41 
76 


May 1 


station. 
One and one-half miles 


do 


Sc. Cozy, Patchogue. 


Rogers .... 


39 


May 12 


north of station. 
One-quarter mile north- 


Potunk 


N. Y. 
Gas. Ich. Oyster Trans- 






May 20 


east of station. 
One mile northwest of 


Fire Island 


port, Greenport, N. Y. 
Sip., no name, Linden- 






May 21 


station. 
Fire Island bar 


Oak Island 


hurst, N. Y. 
Sc. Anna Brown, Pat- 


Hendrick- 


48 


May 29 


One and one-half miles 


Quogue 


chogue, N. Y. 
Catboat, no name, 


son. 




June 11 
June 24 


east-northeast of sta- 
tion. 
One mile northeast of sta- 
tion. 
Three-qu arters mile 


Point of Woods... 
Oak Island 


Quogue, N. Y. 

Gas. Ich. Mildred, Pat- 
chogue, N. Y. 
Str. Oak Island, Pat- 


Smith 
Rich 


14 
19 




northeast of station. 
Total 




chogue, N. Y. 



















In dangerous position from which life-saving crew extricated her. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

of 1906-7 Continued. 

COAST OF LONG ISLAND Continued. 



221 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


*o 

i 

Is 


& 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


"g 

1 
ti 
o 

W 

f 



2 

3 
4 
1 


1 
3 


fc 


Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. 


1 Days' succor af- 
forded. 


Bridgeport, Conn., to 
Patchogue, N. Y. 
Capsized 


Oysters... 


$800 
10 
3,500 


$800 


$1,600 
10 
3,500 
32,500 
70 

500 
300 

2,500 
300 
70 
75 
1,000 

30 
510,000 

150 
1,200 
300 

2,450 
4,500 
1,800 
5,000 
250 
3,500 
1,800 
200 
4,300 
600 

3,200 

4,000 


$1,600 
10 
3,400 




2 
1 
3 
4 
1 










1 


1 


New York City to 
Greenport, N. Y. 
Newport News, Va., 
to Providence, R. I. 
Capsized 






$100 
32,500 


Coal . ... 


25,000 
70 

500 
300 

2,500 
300 
70 
75 
1,000 


7,500 










70 

500 
295 

2,500 
300 
60 
75 
1,000 

30 
510,000 

150 
1,200 
300 

2,450 
4,500 
1,800 
5,000 
250 
3,500 
1,800 
200 
4,300 
600 

3,200 
4,000 








Adrift 














Centre Moriches to 
Smith Point, N. Y. 
Bridgeport, Conn., to 
Bay shore, N. Y. 
Fast in ice 






5 


1 
2 


1 
2 


.... 


1 


1 
















Sunk at moorings 






10 












Fast in ice . ... 
















Adrift 


















Fast in ice. 




30 
350,000 

150 
1,200 
300 

1,450 
2,500 
800 
3,000 
150 
2,000 
1,200 
200 
2,500 
600 

3,000 
4,000 






1 
36 

> 


1 
36 

4 


1 


2 
16 


2 
16 


Hull, England, to New 
York City. 

To wrecked vessel 


Chrome 
ore and 
wool. 


160,000 




Fire Island to Bay- 
shore, N. Y. 
West Hampton t o 
Shinnecock Bay, 
N. Y. 
Greenport to Princes 
Bay, N. Y. 
Greenport to Sayville, 

do.' 
do 

Islip to Point of 
Woods, N. Y. 
Northport to Sayville, 
N. Y. 
Greenport to Sayville, 

Fishing trip 








3 

2 

2 
3 
2 
4 


3 
2 

2 
3 
2 
4 




3 


3 








Oysters. . . 
do.... 
do.... 
do.... 
Furniture. 
Oysters... 
. .do 


1,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
100 
1,500 
600 




































4 


4 










2 

2 
3 

3 

2 

14 
5 


2 
2 
3 
3 

2 

14 
5 




















.... 


3 


a 


Greenport to Oakdale, 
N. f. 
Capsized 


Oysters... 


1,800 












Patchogue to Point of 
Woods, N. Y. 
Babylon to Oak Is- 
land, N. Y. 


General... 


200 
































445,525 


181,850 


627,375 


589,960 


37,415 


232 


231 


1 


35 


35 







222 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEEVICE. 

Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 5. EMBRACING 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
July 6 


Two miles east of station.. 


Cold Spring 


Nph. Ich., no' name, 






July 8 


One and one-half miles 


Barnegat 


Longport, N. J. 
Sip. Petrel, Perth Am- 


Evenham 


8 


July 11 
July 23 


north-northeast of sta- 
tion. 
Two and one-half miles 
south of Little Beach 
station. 
One and one-quarter 


Little Beach and 
Brigantine. 

Atlantic City 


boy, N. J. 

Gas. s. S. E. Smith, Stam- 
ford, Conn. 

Gas. Ich. Republic, At- 


Deakyne. . . 


7 


July 29 
July 29 


miles north of station. 
One-half mile southeast 
of station. 
Three-quarters mile east- 


Hereford Inlet. . . , 
.do 


lantic City, N.J. 
Gas. s. Nora, Somers 
Point, N. J. 
Gas. Ich. Alva B., Grassy 


Shivers 


8 


Aug. 4 


southeast of station. 
One-eighth mile south- 


....do .. 


Sound, N. J. 
Gas. Ich. Victor, New 


Fountin . 


14 


Aug. 5 


east of station. 
One mile northeast of sta- 


Barnegat 


York City. 
Sip. yt. Kanima, New 


Hall 


10 


Aug 5 


tion. 
One and one-half miles 


Townsend Inlet 


York City. 
Gas. Ich. no name, 






Aug 16 


south of station. 
One and one-quarter 


Barnegat 


Townsend Inlet, N. J. 
Rowboat, no name, Bar- 






Aug 16 


miles northeast of sta- 
tion. 
One and one-half miles 


Cape May 


negat, N. J. 
Nph Ich Senator, Phila- 






Aug. 18 


northwest of station. 
Three hundred yards 


Deal.. 


delphia, Pa. 
Canoe, no name, Loch 






Aug. 18 


north of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Barnegat 


Arbor, N. J. 
Gas. Ich. Chinchilla, New 






Aug 18 


north of station. 
One-half mile north of 


Atlantic City 


York City. 
Sip yt Zena, Essington, 






Aug 24 


station. ' 
One-quarter mile north- 


Great Egg 


Pa. 
Catboat no name, Long- 






Aug. 27 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 3 


west of station. 
One-third mile southeast 
of station. 
Three-q uarters mile 
north of station. 
One mile west southwest 


Hereford Inlet.... 
Atlantic City 
Spermaceti Cove._ 


port, N. J. 
Sip. yt. Fitzgerald, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sip. TheChalfonte, Som- 
ers Point, N. J. 
Sip. y. Spry, Newark, 


Keller 
Adams 


10 
15 


Sept 13 


of station. 
One mile north-north- 


Island Beach 


N.J. 
Catboat Oakmont, Sea- 






Sept. 23 


west of station. 
One mile east of station 


Atlantic City 


side Park, N. J. 
Sharpie Carrie, Atlantic 






Sept. 23 


One mile south of station . 


Great Egg.. 


City, N. J. 
Catboat Snapper, Ocean 






Sept 30 


Five hundred yards 


Forked River 


City, N. J. 
Gas Ich no name, At- 






Sept. 30 
Oct. 7 


southeast of station. 
One-quarter mile south- 
west of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Cape May 

Spermaceti Cove 


lantic City, N. J. 
Gas. s. Fannie E. Moffat, 
Camden, N. J. 
Gas. Ich. Skate, Newark, 


Peterson. . . 


14 


Nov. 1 


west of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Barnegat 


N.J. 
Sip. Lolita,o Island 






Nov 2 


north-northeast of sta- 
tion. 
One-half mile south 


Shark River 


Heights, N. J. 
Gas Ich Harold Bel- 






Nov. 3 


southwest of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Great Egg 


mar, N. J. 
Gas. s. Alberta, Somers 


Casto 


19 


Nov. 15 
Nov 15 


southwest of station. 
One-half mile south of 
Long Branch station. 
do. 


Long Branch and 
Deal. 
..do 


Point, N. J. 
Sc. James M. Hall, 
Somers Point, N. J. 
Sc. Samuel C. Holmes, 


York 
Evans 


87 
79 


Nov. 16 


One mile south-south- 


Spermaceti Cove 


Wilmington, Del. 
Dredge No. 1 Camden, 






Nov. 23 


west of station. 
Four miles north-north- 


Pp.pe Mav 


Nph. Ich. Thelma, Phila- 






Nov. 28 


west of station. 
One-half mile east of sta- 


Atlantic City 


delphia Pa. 
Sip. Commander, Atlan- 






Dec. 7 


tion. 
One mile north of station. 


. ..do 


tic City, N. J. 
Str. Seven Brothers, 


Mathis 


40 








Greenport, N. Y. 







No assistance required of life-saving crew. 



UNITED STATES -LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



223 



of 1906-7 Continued. 
COAST OF NEW JERSEY. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


3 
I 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


1 


Persons on board. 


Persons saved. 


Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. 


Days' succor af- 
forded. 






$350 




$350 


$325 


$25 


9 


9 






4 


port, N. J. 
Toms River to Barne- 




1,500 




1 500 


1,450 


50 


8 


8 








gat Inlet, N. J. 
Bound Brook to Bar- 




4 000 




4 000 


4,000 






4 




1 


1 


negat, N. J. 
Pleasure trip 




400 




400 


400 




4 


4 








Fishing trip 




1 500 




1 500 


1,200 


300 


33 




q 


6 


6 


do 




400 




400 


300 


100 


11 


10 


1 






do 




3,000 




3 000 


3,000 




7 


7 








New York City to 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




ft 


6 








Barnegat, N. J. 
Fishing trip 




300 




300 


300 




5 


5 








Capsized 




25 




25 


25 




1 


1 








Cape May, N. J., to 




1,000 




1,000 


900 


100 


4 


4 








Philadelphia, Pa. 
Capsized 




25 




25 


25 




3 


2 


1 






New York City to 




2 500 




2 500 


2 500 




4 


4 








Barnegat Inlet, N. J. 
Pleasure trip 




2 000 




2 000 


2,000 














Capsized. 




40 




40 


40 




9 


9 








Philadelphia Pa. to 




2,500 




2,500 


2,500 




6 


6 




o 


? 


Atlantic City, N. J. 
Pleasure trip 


f 


3,500 




3,500 


3,490 


10 


31 


31 








do 




1,200 




1,200 


1,200 




5 


5 








do 




200 




200 


200 




1 


1 








do 




50 




50 


50 














Fishing trip 




75 




75 


75 




8 


j 








Atlantic City N. J. to 




300 




300 


300 






9 




? 


' 


New York City. 
Fishing trip 




2,700 




2,700 


2,650 


50 


11 


11 




11 


11 


Newark to Highlands 




900 




900 


890 


10 


2 


9 








Island Heights to 




5 000 




5 000 


5 000 














Barnegat Inlet, N. J. 
Cruising 




550 




550 


550 














Bridgeport Conn to 


Oysters 


2 000 


$.500 


2 500 


2 500 




2 


9 








Pleasantville, N.'j. 
Indian Creek, Va., to 
New York City. 
Virginia to New York 
City. 
Sunk at moorings 


Oil 

Wood 


2,000 
2,000 
60,000 


5,500 
225 


7,500 
2,225 
60,000 


1,500 
100 
60,000 


6,000 
2,125 


4 
4 
5 


4 
4 

R 


.... 


4 
4 


6 
3 


Philadelphia, Pa., to 




400 




400 


250 


150 








9, 


5 


Great Egg Harbor, 
Philadelphia, Pa , to 




2,500 




2,500 


2,500 




9 


9 








Atlantic City, N. J. 
Fishing trip 




3 000 




3 000 


3 000 




4 


4 

































2990908 15 



224 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT NO. 5. EMBRACING 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Dec. 10 


Three miles north of 


Bonds and Long 


Str. Peruvia, Stettin, 


Dresse 




Dec. 14 


Bonds station. 
One mile south of Man- 


Beach. 
Mantoloking and 


Germany. 
Str. Clara, Trieste, 


Zar.. 


3,932 


Dec. 22 


toloking station. 
One-quarter mile south- 


Chadwick. 
Avalon 


Austria. 
Sc. Eugene H Cathrall 


Smith 


42 


Dec. 26 


east of station. 
Three and one-half miles 


Shark River 


Bridgeton, N. J. 
Gas. Ich., no name, 






1907. 
Jan. 6 


east of station. 
One and one-quarter 


Barnegat and 


Bradley Beach, N. J. 
Gas. s. Sheila, New 


Hixon 


39 


Jan. 25 


miles northeast of Bar- 
negat station. 
Two and one-half miles 


Forked River. 
Cape May 


Haven, Conn. 
Sc. Samuel H. Sharp, 


Stroveland 


236 


Jan. 26 


south-southeast of sta- 
tion. 
One mile northeast by 


Two Mile Beach 


New York City. 
Dredge Big Four Atlan- 






Feb. 9 
Mar. 13 


east of Two Mile Beach 
station. 
One mile northeast of 
Long Beach station. 
Three-quarters mile 


and Holly Beach. 

Long Beach and 
Ship Bottom. 
Atlantic City 


tic City, N. J. 

Sc. Helen J. Seitz, 
Boston, Mass. 
Str. Queen City, Somers 


Carter 
Buck 


2,547 
42 


Mar. 16 


southeast of station, 
do 


do ... 


Point, N. J. 
Sip. Commander, Som- 


Smith . . . 


8 


Mar. 19 


One-quarter mile north- 


do 


ers Point, N. J. 
Sip. Pittsburg, Somers 


Jeffries 


23 


Mar. 27 


east of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Little Beach 


Point, N. J. 
Gas. s. Rupert II, Som- 


Mathis 


10 


Apr 11 


south of station. 
One-half mile north of 


Atlantic City 


ers Point, N. J. 
Sc R B Leeds, Chinco- 


Price 


34 


Apr. 22 


station. 
One mile north of station. 


Barnegat 


teague, Va. 
Sip. Rajah, New York 






Apr. 23 
May 13 


One-half mile southeast 
of station. 
One mile west of station. . 


Atlantic City..... 
Spermaceti Cove.. 


City. 
Sc. Charles W. Parker," 
Kennebuuk, Me. 
Sc. yt. May Flower, 


Larsen 


57 
84 


May 28 


One-half mile northwest 


Cape May 


New York City. 
Nph. Ich. Louie S. Allen, 


Summers . . 


8 


June 4 


of station. 
One-half mile east of sta- 


do 


Somers Point, N. J . 
Nph Ich , no name, Go- 






June 8 


tion. 
One and one-half miles 


Atlantic City. 


shen, N. J. 
Gas. Ich. Harriet, Atlan- 






June 8 


north of station. 
One-half mile west of sta- 


Cape May 


tic City, N. J. 
Nph. Ich. Katherine, 






June 20 


tion. 
Two hundred and fifty 


Squan Beach 


Camden, N. J. 
Fishboat noname,Man- 






June 26 


yards east-southeast of 
station. 
One-eighth mile east- 
southeast of station. 

Total 


Hereford Inlet.... 


asquan, N. J. 

Elec. s. Barbara, Som- 
ers Point, N. J. 


Campbell . . 


11 















DISTRICT NO 6. EMBRACING COAST BETWEEN 



1906. 

Aug. 10 


One mile south of station 


Hog Island 


Sip yt. Eclipse Phila- 


Pemberton. 


25 


Aug. 24 


Two miles west-south- 


Indian River In- 


delphia, Pa. 
Sip. Ho Do, Rehoboth, 






Aug 30 


west of station. 


let. 


Del. 
St Ich Eva Thomas 






Sept. 5 


station. 
One-quarter mile south- 


do 


Wharf, Va. 
Skiff William Brown 






Sept. 25 
Oct 15 


east of station. 
Four and one-half miles 
south-southwest of 
Popes Island station. 


Popes Island and 
Assateague 
Beach. 
Cobb Island 


Willis Wharf, Va. 
Sc. Marion Grimes, New 
York City. 


Osborn 


72 




tion. 











Crew landed in their own boat. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



225 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

COAST OF NEW JERSEY Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


"o 



!i 

" 

W 





Estimated amount 
saved. 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


Persons on board. 


Persons saved. 


s 


{ 


Persons succored at 
station. 


* 

l i 

oa 
| 


Dantzic, Germany, to 


Sugar 


$240,000 


$236,210 


$476, 210 


$476, 210 




?8 


?8 








Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mediterranean Sea to 


General 


150,000 


350,000 


500,000 


500,000 




W 


99 








New York City. 
Philadelphia Pa to 


Shells 


1 000 


900 


1,900 


1 900 




} 


3 








Sea Isle City, N.J. 
Fishing trip 




250 




250 


250 




3 


3 








New York City to 




8,000 




8 000 


8 000 




4 


4 








Miami, Fla. 
Bermuda Hundred, 


Wood . 


3,000 


1,000 


4,000 




$4,000 


6 


ft 




R 


18 


Va., to New York 
City. 
Wildwood Crest to 




100,000 




100,000 


99,700 


300 


11 


11 








Egg Harbor, N. J. 
Baltimore Md to 


Coal 


100 000 


20,000 


120 000 




120,000 


12 


12 








Boston, Mass. 
Fishing trip 


Fish 


12,000 


300 


12,300 


12, 175 


125 


1? 


1? 








do 


do 


2,500 


25 


2 525 


2 525 




3 


^ 








do 




2,500 




2,500 


2,500 




7 


7 








i 
Delaware Bay to Brig- 


Oysters 


2,000 


200 


2,200 


2,200 




T 


} 








antine, N. J 
Hampton, Va., to At- 


.do. 


1,200 


750 


1,950 


1,950 




3 


s 








lantic City, N. J. 
Bayhead N J to New 




500 




500 


500 




1 










York City. 
Atlantic City, N. J., to 




2,000 




2,000 




2,000 


11 


11 








Cape Hatteras, N. C. 
Perth Amboy to High- 




10,000 




10,000 


10,000 




^ 


5 








lands, N. J. 
Atlantic City N J to 




1,200 




1,200 


1,175 


25 


6 











Norfolk, Va. 
Cold Spring to Goshen, 




200 




200 


195 


5 


9 


9 








Pleasure trip 




1,500 




1,500 


1,500 




? 


9 








Camden to Longport, 




500 




500 


500 




? 


? 








Capsized 


Fish 


350 


25 


375 


350 


25 


7 


7 








Fishing trip 




1,800 




1,800 


1,800 




15 


15 




6 


R 






























747,415 


615,635 


1,363,050 


1,227,650 


135,400 


?61 


S50 


11 


46 


73 



























CAPE HENLOPEN AND CAPE CHARLES. 


Hog Island to Nor- 
folk, Va. 
Fishing trip 




$3,000 
200 
1,000 
75 
3,600 

50 




$3,000 
200 
1,000 
75 
3,850 

50 


$3,000 
190 
1,000 
75 
380 

50 


$10 


5 
7 
18 
2 
15 

1 


5 

7 
18 
2 
15 

1 












.... 


7 
17 
2 

7 
1 


7 
17 
2 
15 

1 


Thomas Wharf to Hog 
Island, Va. 
Capsized and sunk 












Fishing trip 
Adrift 


Fish 


$250 


3,470 











226 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT NO. 6. EMBRACING COAST BETWEEN 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 
/ 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Oct 21 






Bge no name Green- 






Oct 22 


tion. 
Three miles west of sta- 


Green Run Inlet 


backville, Va. 
Gas. Ich. Lilian 






Oct 22 


tion. 
One and one-half miles 


Wallops Beach 


Gas. Ich. Gracy, Chinco- 






Dec 5 


north-northwest of sta- 
tion. 
Seven miles southeast by 


Wallops Beach 


teagne, Va. 
Sc. William H. Bailey, 


Ellis 


489 


Dec. 7 
Dec 8 


south of Wallops Beach 
station. 
Two and one-half miles 
east of Wallops Beach 
station. 
Three miles west one-half 


and Assateague 
Beach. 
do.. 

North Beach 


Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sc. Florence I. Lock- 
wood, Norfolk, Va. 

Gas Ich. S. I. Kimball, 


Taylor 


290 


Dec 13 


north of station. 


Assateague Beach 


Chincoteague, Va. 
Sip Three Sisters, Chin- 






Dec 16 


southeast of station. 
Six miles southwest of 


Wallops Beach 


coteague, Va. 
Sip. Conkey, Chinco- 






1907. 
Jan 4 


station. 


Cobb Island 


teague, Va. 
Bateau G P Moore, Red 






Jan 5 


north of station. 
Isaac shoals 


Smith Island 


Bank, Va. 
Sc. Harry C. Brown, 


Evans. 


11 


Feb. 4 


Four miles south of sta- 


Ocean City 


Cape Charles, Va. 
Sc. Tena A. Cotton, 


Primrose . . 


377 


Feb. 15 
Apr 6 


tion. 
One and one-quarter 
miles south by east of 
station. 


Assateague Beach. 


Bridge ton, N. J. 
Sip. Sally, Norfolk, Va.. 

Sip Two Brothers 


Hill 


29 


Apr 13 


south of station. 


Metomkin Inlet 


Broad water, Va. 
Sip Ethel Oyster Va 






Apr 15 


station. 
Five miles northeast of 


Cobb Island 


Sip Jordan Norfolk Va 


Leeds 


25 


Apr. 24 
Apr. 24 


station. 
One and one-half miles 
south by east of station, 
do 


Assateague Beach, 
do 


Sip. Lizzie M. Jones, 
Chincoteague, Va. 
Sip. Edith Louise, Chin- 


Boston 
Jeffries 


21 
15 


Apr. 29 

May 7 


Four and one-half miles 
west-southwest of sta- 
tion. 
Three miles west-south- 


Smith Island 
do 


coteague, Va. 
Sc. Sterling Sisters, New- 
port News, Va. 

Sc. William J. Griffith, 


Mesick 
Simpson . . . 


23 

17 


May 16 


west of station. 
One and one-half miles 


Cape Henlopen 


Cape Charles, Va. 
Sip yt Wabun New 






Mav 28 


north of Cape Henlopen 
station. 
Five miles south of sta- 


and Lewes. 
Hog Island 


York City. 
Gas Ich Snail Norfolk 






May 29 


tion. 
Two miles north of Cape 
Henlopen station. 

Total 


Cape Henlopen 
and Lewes. 


Va. 
Gas. yt. Geisha, Albany, 
N.V. 


Abbot 


65 















DISTRICT NO. 7. EMBRACING COAST BETWEEN 



1906. 
July 7 


Three miles north of sta- 


Durants . 


Sc. R. C. Beaman, Eliza- 


Ballance . . . 


12 


July 16 


tion. 
Three - quarters mile 


Gull Shoal and 


beth City. N. C. 
Sc Matilda D Borda 


Peck 


827 


July 30 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 12 


southeast of Gull Shoal 
station. 
One mile east of station . . 

Two and one-half miles 
west of station. 
Three and one-half miles 


Little Kinna- 
keet. 
Fort Macon 

Portsmouth 
Ocracoke 


Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sc. Thelma, Beaufort, 
N.C. 
Nph. str. Defiance. Beau- 
fort, N. C. 
Sc. Brant, Newbern, 


Willis 
Bryant 
Gaskill 


9 
6 
29 




northwest of station. 




N.C. 







UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



227 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

CAPE HENLOPEN AND CAPE CHARLES Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 





Estimated value of 
cargo. 


j 


jl 
i 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


Persons on board. 


Persons saved. 


Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. 


Days' succor af- 
forded. 


Adrift 




$400 




$400 


$400 


















1 000 




1 000 


1,000 






* 




3 


3 






800 




800 


800 




1 


1 








lops Beach, Va. 
Charleston S C to 




8 000 


$7 000 


15 000 


15 000 




7 


7 








New York City. 

Norfolk, Va., to New 
York City. 

From Chincoteagud 


do 


2,500 
1,000 


4,000 


6,500 
1 000 


2,000 
1,000 


$4,500 


6 

1 


6 
1 




6 


24 


Va. 
Dragged anchor and 




75 


100 


175 


165 


10 


9 


9 








stranded. 
Wachapreague to Chin- 
coteague, Va. 

Capsized.. 


Clams 
Oysters . 


150 
50 


140 
20 


290 
70 


130 
70 


160 


2 
1 


2 
1 




2 


2 
1 


Cobb Island to Nor- 


.do 


2,000 


500 


2,500 


2,500 




2 










folk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va., to New 


Piling 


10,000 


1,800 


11,800 




11,800 


7 


7 




7 


14 


York City. 
North Carolina to 


Oysters. . . 


2,000 


500 


2,500 


2,500 




8 


3 








Chincoteague, Va. 
Dragged anchors and 


do 


500 


200 


700 


690 


10 


1 


1 








stranded. 
Oyster to Chinco- 


. .do 


150 


100 


250 


250 














teague, Va. 
Atlantic City, N. J., to 




1,500 




1,500 


1,475 


25 


3 


3 








Norfolk, Va. 
Hampton, Va., to At- 


. .do 


800 


350 


1,150 


1,105 


45 




9 








lantic City, N. J. 
Cobbs Island to Chin- 


do... 


1,800 


270 


2,070 


1,995 


75 












coteague, Va. 
Dragged anchors and 


.....do 


2,000 


600 


2,600 


2,600 




? 


a 








stranded. 
Norfolk to Hog Island, 


Shells . 


1,000 


75 


1,075 


1,075 




1 


1 








New York City to Sand 




4,000 




4,000 


3,835 


165 








9 




Shoals Inlet, Va. 
Norfolk to Hog Island, 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




9 


9 




9 


9 


Tampa, Fla., to New 




15,000 




15,000 


15,000 




6 


6 








York City. 




























63,650 


15,905 


79,555 


59,285 


20,270 


107 


107 




57 


00 



























CAPE HENRY AND CAPE FEAR. 



Scranton to Hatteras, 


Lumber . . 


$200 


$25 


$225 


$225 




?, 


?, 




' 




N. C. 
New York City to Sa- 


Coal .... 


15,000 


6,000 


21,000 




$21,000 


8 


8 




8 


64 


vannah, Ga. 
Fishing trip . . . 


Fish. 


500 


60 


560 


560 




S 


s 








Morehead City to 




500 




500 


500 




1 


1 








Portsmouth, N. C. 
Washington to Ocra- 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




T> 


1? 








coke, N. C. 

























UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT No. 7, EMBRACING COAST BETWEEN 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Aug 25 


Three miles south of sta- 


Ocracoke 


Catboat, no name 






Aug 30 


tion. 
Seven miles east of sta- 


Fort Macon 


Sc. Alison Miller, Wash- 






Sept 1 


tion. 
One-half mile southeast 


do 


ington, N. C. 
Str. John F. Bell, Beau- 


Willis 


12 


Sept. 8 
Sept. 21 
Sept 21 


of station. 
Olivers Reef, Pamlico 
Sound. 
One mile west of O era- 
coke station. 
Frying Pan Shoals 


Durants and Hat- 
teras Inlet. 
Ocracoke and 
Portsmouth. 
Cape Fear . . 


fort, N. C. 
Sc. Margaret and F. 
Moore, Annapolis, Md. 
Sc. Eva D. Rose, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 
Bk. Launberga, Lillie- 


Larkey .... 
Warren.... 
Johnson . . . 


42 
104 
1,302 


Oct 15 


Three and one-half miles 


Creeds Hill . 


sand, Norway. 
Sc. Chelton Brothers, 


Barnett . . . 


10 


Oct. 19 
Oct. 20 


west of station. 
Three miles west of sta- 
tion. 
Three - quarters mile 


Cape Lookout 
Cape Henry 


Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Sc. Wm. H. Skinner, 
Baltimore, Md. 
Str. George Farwell, 


Griffith.... 
Chisholm . . 


262 

977 


Nov. 15 
Dec 4 


southeast of station. 
One and one-eighth miles 
northwest of station. 
Fourteen miles northeast 


Cape Lookout 
Core Bank 


New York City. 
Sc. yt. Iris, New Bed- 
ford, Mass. 
Str. Albemarle, New 


Bigelow . . . 
Wallace . . . 


10 
509 


Dec 6 


by north of station. 
Three miles northwest of 


Ocracoke 


York City. 
Sc. C. R. Bennett, Chin- 


Merritt .... 


32 


Dec 8 


station, 
do 


do 


coteague, Va. 
Sc C R. Bennett, Chin- 


do 


32 


Dec. 11 

Dec 11 


One-third mile southeast 
of Little Island station. 
Three miles west by 


Little Island and 
False Cape. 
Chicamacomico 


coteague, Va. 
Sc. Ralph W. Hayward, 
Fall River, Mass. 
Gas. Ich. Mabel E. Hor- 


Lawry... .. 
Ward.. . . 


604 
8 


Dec 11 


north of station. 
One mile northwest of 


Fort Macon 


ton, Elizabeth City, 
N.C. 
Sharpie, no name, North 






Dec. 16 
Dec. 2.1 


station. 
One-half mile east-south- 
east of station. 
Three miles northwest of 


Cape Henry 
Durants 


River, N. C. 
Sc. Edgar C. Ross, Sea- 
ford, Del. 
Sc. Chelton Brothers, 


Quillin 
Poyner 


399 
10 


Dec. 26 

1907. 
Jan 3 


station. 
Six miles southeast of 
Little Island station. 

One mile north of station 


Little Island and 
False Cape. 

Cape Henry 


Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Sc. John Hagerty, New 
York City. 

Sc R. W. Hopkins, 


Hodges 
Clark 


235 
935 


Jan 4 


Two and one-half miles 


Oak Island 


Thomaston, Me. 
Gas, Ich., no name, Little 






Jan 11 


southeast of station. 




River, S. C. 
Sc John J Hanson, 


Wood 


628 


Jan. 14 


west of Cape Fear sta- 
tion. 
Three miles south of sta- 


Oak Island. 
Portsmouth 


Portsmouth, N. H. 
Sc. John I. Snow, Rock- 


Tuttle..... 


J96 


Jan 20 


tion. 




land, Me. 
Sc Dewcy Beaufort, 


Scott 


20 


Jan 23 


of Bodie Island station. 
Three miles southwest of 


Oregon Inlet. 
Core Bank 


N.C. 
Sc Coaster, Beaufort, 


Hill 


5 


Jan 24 


station. 
Three miles north of sta- 


Durants 


N.C. 
Sip. Silver Spray, Eliza- 


Williams . . 


6 


Jan. 28 


tion, 
do 


do 


beth City, N. C. 
Gas. Ich. Dutcher 






Jan. 28 


Ten miles north-north- 


Core Bank 


Sc. Francis, Annapolis, 


Mersereau . 


20 


Feb. 3 


east of station. 
Frying Pan Shoals 


Cape Fear and 


Md. 
Sc. Sallie I'on, Philadel- 


Ayres 


550 


Feb 6 




Oak Island. 


phia, Pa. 
Gas Ich Georgia, Beau- 






Feb. 26 
Mar. 2 


southwest of station. 
One mile north of station 

Ten miles north of station 


Cape Lookout 
Durants 


fort, N. C. 
Sc. William Neely, New 
Haven, Conn. 
Sc. Lorena, Elizabeth 


Smith 
Quidley.... 


897 
16 


Mar. 4 


One mile west of station. . 


Bogue Inlet 


City, N. C. 
Sc. John Russell, Bridge- 
ton, N. J. 


James. ... 


156 



a Vessel stranded again in same locality. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



229 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

CAPE HENRY AND CAPE FEAR Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


"o 

1 

H 


_: 



\ 

i 


f 
9 


1 

rt 
o 

1 
PH 


s 

1 

i 

Pn 


Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. | 


Days' succor af- 1 
forded. 






$150 




$150 


$125 


$25 


4 


4 








Beaufort to Hatteras, 




600 




600 


600 




7 


7 








N. C. 

Out for a tow 




1,800 




1,800 


1,800 




3 


3 








Washington to Mur- 




2,000 




2,000 


2,000 




4 


4 








freesboro, N. C. 
Bay River N C to 


General 


5,000 


$2,000 


7,000 


7,000 




7 


7 








Baltimore, Md. 
Pensacola Fla to Rio 


Lumber 


40,000 


23,560 


63,560 


21,000 


42,560 


17 


17 








de Janeiro, South 
America. 




500 




500 


500 




2 


2 








stranded. 
Georgetown S C to 


Lumber 


8,000 


10,000 


18,000 


18,000 




6 


f. 








New York City. 
Jacksonville, Fla., to 
New Haven, Conn. 
Boston Mass., to Mi- 


do.... 


20,000 
1,200 


25,000 


45,000 
1,200 


10,000 
1,050 


35,000 
150 


16 
^ 


16 

S 




16 
S 


26 

6 


ami, Fla. 
Belhaven to Newbern, 


General. 


25,000 


2,000 


27,000 


27,000 




?8 


?8 








N. C. 
Ocracoke, N. C., to 


Oysters 


2,000 


500 


2,500 


2,500 




3 


3 








Norfolk, Va. 
.do. 


do.. . 


2,000 


500 


2,500 


2,500 




3 


3 








Mystic Conn to Nor- 




12,000 




12 000 


12,000 




9 


g 




I 


1 


folk, Va. 
Ma nteo to Hatteras 


Merchan- 


3,000 


300 


3,300 


3,300 




7 


7 




9 


? 


N. C. 
North River to More- 


dise. 
General 


500 


200 


700 


700 




o 


? 








head City, N. C. 
Georgetown, S. C., to 


Lumber 


15,000 


6,000 


21,000 


20,550 


450 


6 


6 








Baltimore, Md. 
Swanquarterto Frisco, 


Corn 


200 


40 


240 


240 




? 


? 








N.d 
Cape May, N. J., to 




18,000 




18,000 


18,00 




10 


10 








Norfolk, Va. 
Gulfport, Miss., to Bal- 


Lumber t 


30,000 


21,720 


51,720 


51,720 




q 


q 








timore, Md. 
Little River, S. C., to 




800 




800 


800 




3 


3 








Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C., to 


Lumber . . 


20,000 


8,480 


28,480 


28,480 




7 


7 








New York City. 
New York City to 


General 


7,500 


10,000 


17,500 




17,500 


fi 


6 




6 


?4 


Miami, Fla. 
Beaufort to Elizabeth 
City, N. C. 
Adrift 


Oysters. . . 


1,500 
500 


25 


1,525 
500 


1,025 
500 


500 


2 


2 


.... 


2 


2 


Washington to Bux- 


General... 


500 


700 


1,200 


1,200 




2 


? 




?, 


?, 


ton, N. C. 
Englehard to Buxton, 




800 




800 


800 




\ 


4 








N. C. 
Baltimore, Md., to 




3,500 




3,500 


3,500 




9 


9 








Daytona, Fla. 
Jacksonville, Fla., to 


Lumber . . 


12,000 


8,000 


20,000 


16,000 


4,000 


8 


8 








Philadelphia, Pa. 
Beaufort to Ocracoke, 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




4 


4 








N.C. 

New York City to 


Cement... 


18,000 


13,000 


31,000 


20,900 


10,100 


8 


8 








Charleston, S. C 
Hatteras to Elizabeth 




1,000 




1,000 


800 


200 


2 


? 








City, N. C. 
Swansboro, N. C., to 


Lumber . . 


9,000 


2,000 


11,000 


11,000 




B 


B 








New York City. 

























230 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT NO. 7. EMBRACING COAST BETWEEN 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1907. 
Mar. 8 


Frying Pan Shoals 


Cape Fear 


Sc Stanley H Minor 




696 


Mar. 18 


Two miles northwest of 


Core Bank 


Boston, Mass. 
Sc. Carrie Grannis, 


Giliken 


H 


Mar. 25 


station. 
Two miles north of Vir- 


Virginia Beach 


Beaufort, N. C. 
Car float No. 68, New 






Apr. 2 
Apr. 5 


ginia Beach station. 
Six miles northeast of 
Creeds Hill station. 

Three miles east-north- 


andCapeHenry. 
Creeds Hill, Cape 
Hatteras, and 
Big Kinnakeet. 
Core Bank 


York City. 
Sc. Bivalve, Elizabeth 
City, N. C. 

Sc. Laura L. Sprague 


Ketchum... 
Barter 


17 
594 


Apr. 7 
Apr. 12 
Apr. 28 


east of station. 
One-quarter mile east by 
south of station. 
Three miles south of 
Ocracoke station. 
Two miles southeast of 


Nags Head 

Ocracoke and 
Portsmouth. 
Poyners Hill and 


Marblehead, Mass. 
Sc. Louis Bossert, New 
York City. 
Sc. Benjamin Russell, 
Bridgeton, N. J. 
Bk Oriente Oporto 


Fletcher... 
James 


605 
154 
554 


May 2 


Poyners Hill station. 
Six miles west of station. . . 


Caffeys Inlet. 
Cape Henry 


Portugal. 
Sc. Glendy Stewart, Nor- 


Bradshaw 


9 


May 4 
May 5 


Two and one-quarter 
miles southeast of 
False Cape station. 
One mile north of station . 


False Cape and 
Wash Woods. 

Durants 


folk, Va. 
Str. Dora, Whitby, Eng- 
land. 

Sc. Marblehead, New- 


Randall 
Ballance 


2,290 
15 


May 11 


Four miles west of sta- 


do 


bern, N. C. 
Sc. Georgia A Gaskins 


do 


13 


May 18 


tion. 
Three miles north of sta- 


do 


Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Sc. Tennyson Avon N.C 






June 26 


tion. 
Five miles north by east 


Cape Fear 


Sip. Harry and Ralph, 


Johnson 


H 


June 29 


of station. 
Five miles west-north- 
west of station. 

Total 


Hatteras Inlet. . . . 


Camden, N. J. 
Sc. Georgia A. Gaskins, 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 


Ballance... 


13 















DISTRICT NO. 8. EMBRACING COASTS OF SOUTH 



1906. 
Sept. 19 


Three miles east by south 


Sullivans Island . . 


Skiff, no name, Mount 






Dec. 4 


of station. 
One hundred and thirty- 


Fort Lauderdale . 


Pleasant, S. C. 
Launches (2) , lighters 






Dec. 8 


five yards west of sta- 
tion. 
Ten miles north of sta- 


Biscayne Bay 


(2), no names, Fort 
Lauderdale, Fla. 
Gas. Ich., Asbury Park, 






1907. 
Apr. 2 

Apr. 3 


tion. 

Seventy-five yards north- 
west of station. 
Two hundred and twenty 


Fort Lauderdale . 
do 


Asbury Park, N. J. 

Gas. s. Eleanor IV, New 
York City. 
Gas. s. Nedoline, Day- 


Lay ton 


27 


June 26 


yards west of station. 
One mile south by east of 


Sullivans Island. . 


tona, Fla. 
Catboat, no name, Sulli- 








station. 
Total 




vans Island, S. C. 



















DISTRICT NO. 9. EMBRACING GULF 



1906. 
July 2 


One mile north of station. 


Sabine Pass 


Sc. Navigator, Sabine 






Aug. 17 


One-quarter mile west of 


Galveston 


Pass, Tex. 
Sip. Carrie Beeler Gal- 






Aug. 17 


station. 
Three miles north of sta- 


do 


veston, Tex. 
Sip. Louise, Galveston, 








tion. 




Tex. 







UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 

of 1906-7 Continued . 

CAPE HENRY AND CAPE FEAR Continued. 



231 







"o 







| 


| 


. 






tj 


i 


Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


9 
f- 


It 




t 
IS 


i. 
si 


o 

CO 


! 

GO 


1 

CD 


s succore* 
bation. 


succor 
orded. 
















PI 




a 


fl K> 








i 


| 


1 




l 




s 


1 




1 






H 


9 


EH 


N 


H 


PH 


h 


PH 


PH 


q 


Brunswick, Ga., to 


Lumber... 


$35,000 


$28,500 


?63,500 


$26,500 


$37,000 


9 


9 




2 


2 


Philadelphia, Pa. 
























North River to New- 


Oysters 


600 


75 


675 


650 


25 


o 











bern, N. C. 


and po- 
























tatoes. 






















Newport News, Va., 




90,000 




90,000 


90,000 




1 


'1 








to New York City. 
























Dragged anchors and 




1,200 




1,200 


1,200 




4 


4 








stranded. 
























Jacksonville, Fla., to 


Lumber.. . 


16,000 


9,000 


25,000 


18,000 


7,000 


8 


8 








Elizabethport,N.J. 
























New York City to 




35,000 




35,000 


21,000 


14,000 


10 


10 




10 


34 


Wiggins, S. C. 
New York City to 




8,000 




8,000 


8,000 




6 


6 








Bogue Inlet, N. C. 
Conetable Island to 


Phosphate 


16,500 


4,200 


20,700 




20 700 


16 


16 








New York City. 


rock. 






















Hampton Bar to 


Oysters. . . 


1,000 


500 


1,500 


1,450 


50 


2 


2 








Lynnhaven River, Va 
























Trinidad, West Indies, 


Asphalt.. . 


100,000 


9,000 


109,000 


109,000 




25 


?5 








to Baltimore, Md. 
























Dragged anchors and 




500 




500 


500 




2 


2 








stranded. 
























Hatteras to Washing- 


Fish 


500 


100 


600 


550 


50 


4 


4 








ton, N. C. 
























Washington to Bux- 


General... 


300 


200 


500 


500 




9 


9 








ton, N. C. 
























Parted cable and 




400 




400 




400 


1 


1 








stranded. 
























Washington to Hat- 


Ice 


1,000 


Aw 


1,100 


1,100 




9 


9 








teras, N. C. 




























586,250 


191,785 


778,035 


567,325 


210 710 


321 


TM 




52 


163 






























CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND EASTERN FLORIDA. 



Capsized . 




$10 




$10 


$10 




1 


1 




I 


I 


Palm Beach to Fort 


Lumber, 


2,500 


$800 


3,300 


3,300 




6 


6 








Lauderdale, Fla. 
Disabled and stranded. 


stone, 
and ce- 
ment. 


300 




300 


300 




(a) 


(a) 




I 


5 


Miami, Fla., to New 





15,000 




15 000 


15 000 




5 


5 








York City. 
Miami to Daytona, Fla. 




1,000 




1,000 


1 000 




9 


9 








Capsized 




10 




10 




$10 


9 


9 




































18 820 


800 


19 620 


19 610 


10 


16 


16 




2 


g 



























COAST OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Capsized 




$200 




$200 


$200 




1 


1 








do 




50 




50' 


50 




4 


4 








do 




300 




300 


290 


$10 


2 


2 

































a No one on board at time of disaster. 



232 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 9. EMBRACING GULF 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Sept 4 


Three miles north-north- 


Santa Rosa . 


Sc. Jas. P. Collins, Pen- 


Scott 


13 


Sept. 22 


west of station. 
Four and one-half miles 


Saluria 


sacoia, Fla. 
Sc. Carrie Bell, Port La- 


Ericson 


7 


Nov 14 


north by east one-half 
east of station. 
Two iniles north of sta- 


Santa Rosa 


vaca, Tex. 
Ywl., no name, Warring- 






Dec. 19 


tion. 
One mile north-northeast 


Galveston 


ton, Fla. 
Sc. Susie, Galveston, 


Watson. 


21 


1907. 
Jan 7 


of station. 
Three-quarters mile 


Santa Rosa 


Tex. 
Nph. Ich. Privateer, San- 






Jan. 11 


northeast of station. 
Two miles north-north-' 


Sabine Pass 


ta Rosa Island, Fla. 
Ywl., no name, Galves- 






Jan. 28 


west of station. 
One-half mile north of 


Brazos 


ton, Tex. 
Catboat, no name, Isa- 


' 




Feb 19 


station. 
One mile northwest of 


do 


bel, Tex. 
Sip. Una, Galveston, 






Mar 14 


station. 
One-third mile northeast 


Aransas 


Tex. 
Sip. yt. Lady Gay, Cor- 






Mar. 20 


of station. 
One hundred yards east 


Galveston 


pus Christi, Tex. 
St. Ich. Olivia, Galves- 






Mar. 30 


of station. 
Ten miles north-north- 


do 


ton, Tex. 
Sc. Harry, Galveston, 


Hooper 


19 


Apr. 4 


east of station. 
One-quarter mile south- 


Sabine Pass 


Tex. 
Nph. Ich., no name, Sa- 






May 29 


east of station, 
do 


Galveston 


bine, Tex. 
Gas Ich. Ella, Galves- 






June 4 


Five miles northeast of 


do 


ton, Tex. 
Sip. Simon, Galveston, 








station. 
Total 




Tex. 




















DISTRICT NO. 10 EMBRACING 



1906. 
July 4 


One-half mile south- 


Erie 


Sc. Uncle Sam, Erie, Pa.. 






July 4 


southwest of station. 
Two and one-half miles 


Cleveland 


Gas. Ich. Macbeth.Cleve- 






July 6 


west of station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


land, Ohio. 
Sailboat no name, 






July 11 


do 


do 


Louisville, Ky. 
Skiff, no name, Louis- 






July 15 


Four hundred yards east 


Erie 


ville, Ky. 
Lch. Ahlma, Erie, Pa ... 






July 15 


by south of station. 


Cleveland 


Rowboat No *25 Cleve- 







July 22 


yards west of station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


land, Ohio. 
Flat, no name, Louis- 






July 23 


Ten miles east of station 


Charlotte 


ville, Ky. 
Gas. Ich. Chicota, Char- 






July 25 


Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


lotte, N. Y. 
Shanty boat no name 




' 


July 26 


Two and one-half miles 


Cleveland 


Wilmington, W. Va. 
Str. C. W. Elphicke, 


Dobson 


; 

2,406 


July 27 


northeast by east of 
station. 
Three - quarters mile 


do 


Cleveland, Ohio. 
Lighter Black Diamond, 




552 


July 28 


southwest of station. 
Falls of the Ohio . 


Louisville 


Cleveland, Ohio. 
Skiff, no name, Louis- 






July 29 


Three - quarters mile 


Erie 


ville, Ky. 
Sailboat no name, terie, 






Aue 4 


southeast by south of 
station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


Pa. 

Shanty boat no name, 






AUK. 12 


Twenty miles east-north- 


Erie 


Jeffersonville, Ind. 
Ywl. yt. Sunshine, Chi- 






Aug 12 


east of station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


cago, 111. 
Skin no name, Louis- 












ville, Ky.. 







UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



233 



of 1 906-7 Continued. 

COA'ST OF THE UNITED STATES Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


j 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


iL 

w 


Persons on board. 


! 

fi 
PH 


CO 

= 
S 




Persons succored at 
station. 


Days' succor af- 
forded. 




Fish 


$1 400 


$$225 


$1 625 


$1 625 




4 


4 








Espiritu Santo Bay to 


Oysters 


600 


200 


800 


800 




4 


4 








Port Lavaca, Tex. 
Capsized 




30 




30 


30 




3 


3 




3 


3 






1 200 




1 200 


1 200 




4 


4 








Bayou, Tex. 
Pensacola to Santa 




400 




400 


400 




5 


5 








Rosa Island, Fla. 
Capsized 




50 




50 


50 




1 










Adrift 




75 




75 


75 














Isabel Tex to Tam- 




900 




900 


900 




2 


9 








pico, Mexico. 




2 500 




2 500 


2,500 




9 


9 








Tex. 




1 000 




1 000 


1,000 






4 








Galveston, Tex. 




800 




800 


800 




9 


9 








Adrift 




800 




800 


800 














Parted chains and 




700 




700 


700 














stranded. 
Dragged anchors and 




200 




200 


100 


$100 












stranded. 




























11,205 


425 


11,630 


11, 520 


110 


41 


41 




3 


3 



























LAKES ERIE AND ONTARIO. 



Pleasure trip 




$125 




$125 


$125 




17 


17 








do 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




? 


? 








do 




125 




125 


125 




B 


B 








.do 




15 




15 


15 




?, 


?, 








do 




500 




500 


500 




1 


1 








do 




50 




50 


50 




9 


9 








Fishing trip 




5 




5 


5 




? 


9 








Charlotte to Sodus, 




200 




200 


100 


$100 


?, 


? 








N. Y. 
Wilmington,W.Va., to 




150 




150 


150 




B 


5 








Bloomfield, Ind. 
Ashtabula, Ohio, to 


Coal 


65,000 


$9,600 


74,600 


56,600 


18,000 


18 


18 








Ashland, Wis. 
On fire in harbor 


Sand and 


5,000 


500 


5,500 


4,500 


1,000 












Employed in harbor 


gravel. 


10 




10 


10 




1 


1 








Capsized 




30 




30 


30 




9 


9 








Jeffersonville, Ind., to 




150 




150 


150 




2 


9 








Cairo, 111. 
Dragged anchors and 




2,500 




2,500 


2,490 


10 


3 


3 








stranded. 
Pleasure trip 




15 




15 


15 




3 


3 

































234 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 10. EMBRACING 
I 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Aug. 14 


Three miles north of sta- 


Big Sandy 


Gas. Ich. Rixy, Oswego, 






Aug. 17 


tion. 
Kelleys Island 


Marblehead 


N. Y. 

Sc. Wm. A. Young, Port 


Armstrong 


434 


Aug. 18 


One-quarter mile north- 


Erie 


Huron, Mich. 
Gas. Ich. Edith, Buffalo, 






Aug 23 


east by north of station. 
Three and one-half miles 


Oswego 


N. Y. 

Nph Ich Elk Osweeo 






Aug 23 


west of station. 
Two miles northwest of 


Charlotte 


N. Y. 

Gas. Ich. Majorie, Lock- 






Aug. 26 


station. 
Three hundred yards 


Erie 


port, N. Y. 
Catboat, no name, Erie, 






Aug. 26 


southeast by south of 
station. 
Two miles southwest of 


Cleveland. 


Pa. 
Sip. Flying Scud, Cleve- 






Aug. 26 


station. 
One-quarter mile west of 


do 


land, Ohio. 
Gas. Ich. Fleur de Lis, 






Aug. 26 


station. 
Ten miles east-northeast 


.....do 


Cleveland, Ohio. 
Sc. yt. Mazeppa, Cleve- 






Sept 1 


of station. 
One-half mile west of sta- 


Oswego 


land, Ohio. 
Sc. Charles E. Wyman, 


Mullen 


234 


Sept. 2 


tion. 
One-quarter mile north- 


Cleveland. 


Milwaukee, Wis. 
Catboat Zip, Cleveland, 






Sept. 4 


west of station. 
One and three-quarters 


Erie 


Ohio. 
Rowboat Eldred, Erie, 






Sept. 5 
Sept 5 


miles northwest of sta- 
tion. 
Ten miles east-northeast 
of station, 
do 


Cleveland. 
do 


Pa. 

Str. Jos. B. Dewey, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Lighter No 7, Cleveland 


Whiting... 


22 


Sept 5 


do 


do 


Ohio. 
Lighter No. S.Cleveland, 






Sept. 6 


Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville. 


Ohio. 
Skiff, no name, Louis- 






Sept. 15 


One hundred yards north- 


Charlotte 


ville, Ky. 
Str. Windsor, Rochester, 


Andrews. 


193 


Sept. 15 


west of station. 
One-quarter mile west of 


Cleveland 


N. Y. 

Sip. yt. News, Cleveland, 






Sept 15 


station. 
One-half mile east of sta- 


Marblehead 


Ohio: 
Str. H. B Tuttle, Cleve- 


Dayton 


744 


Sept. 23 


tion. 
One-half mile west of sta- 


Oswego. 


land, Ohio. 
Sc. Denver, Cape Vin- 


Rector 


33 


Sept. 26 


tion. 
Falls of the Ohio . 


Louisville 


cent, N. Y. 
Shanty boat No. 50, 






Sept. 28 


One-quarter mile south- 


Cleveland 


Louisville, Ky. 
Catboat Mary M., Cleve- 






Sept 29 


east of station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


land, Ohio. 
Flat, no name, Louis- 






Oct. 6 


Thirty-two miles east of 


Charlotte 


ville, Ky. 
Bge. "Walter A. Sherman, 


Hourigan 


519 


Oct. 6 


station. 
Three-quarters mile west- 


Buffalo 


Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Sc. Ada Medora, Grand 


Abraham- 


290 


Oct. 7 


northwest of station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


Haven, Mich. 
Catboat Marie, Louis- 


son. 




Oct 22 


do 


do 


ville, Ky. 
Flat, no name, Louis- 






Oct. 26 


do. . 


do 


ville, Ky. 
Gas. Ich. Harry, Louis- 






Oct. 27 


Three-quarters mile 


Cleveland 


ville, Ky. 
Str. Lackawanna, Du- 


Gray son... 


2,015 


Oct 27 


north of station. 
Three-quarters mile east- 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Sc. Maurice B. Grover, 




2,213 


Oct. 27 


northeast of station. 
One mile north of station 


do 


Cleveland, Ohio. 
Yht. Lucy B., Cleveland, 






Oct. 27 


Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


Ohio. 
Sailboat Swallow, Louis- 






Nov 3 


do 


do 


ville, Ky. 
Skiff, no name, Louis- 






Nov. 11 


One-half mile northeast 


Charlotte 


ville, Ky. 
Bge. Quebec, Montreal, 


Seuvie 


989 


Nov. 13 


of station. 
One-half mile west of sta- 


Oswego 


Canada. 
Sc. Menominee, Ogdens- 


Newhouse . 


455 




tion. 




burg, N. Y. 







UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



235 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

LAKES ERIE AND ONTARIO Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


1 


4* 

|| 


a 

1 

o3 . 

4^ 
CJ O 


1 

g 

I 
1 

2 


Persons saved. 


I 

OD 
Pi 

PH 


Persons succored at 
station. 


i 

|H 

i| 
1 


Clayton to Oswego, 




$1,200 




$1,200 


$1,200 














N. Y. 
Cleveland to Kelleys 




12,000 




12 000 


11 500 


$500 


7 


7 








Island, Ohio. 
Buffalo N. Y., to Port 




500 




500 


500 




4 


4 




4 


4 


Burwell, Canada. 
Pleasure trip 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




4 


4 












750 




750 


250 


500 


2 


2 




2 


2 


N. Y. 
Capsized 




20 




20 


20 




9 











do 




100 




100 


100 




3 


3 








Pleasure trip 




600 




600 


600 




g 


(j 








do 




2,000 




2,000 


1,700 


300 


4 


4 








Dragged anchors and 




3,500 




3,500 


3 500 




3 


3 








stranded. 
Pleasure trip 




100 




100 


100 




4 


4 








Adrift 




40 




40 


40 














Employed in harbor 




3,000 




3,000 


3 000 




4 


4 








do 




5,000 




5,000 


5,000 




g 


3 








do 


Stone 


1,000 


$200 


1,200 


1,200 




2 


2 








Fishing trip 




5 




5 


5 




1 


1 








Parted moorings 




6,000 




6,000 


6,000 




IT 


n 








do . 




300 




300 


300 














Cleveland, Ohio, to 


Coal 


6,000 


1,500 


7 500 


1 500 


6 000 


13 


13 




6 


g 


Sarnia, Canada. 
Point Peninsula to 


Hay 


500 


325 


825 


825 




4 


4 








Oswego, N. Y. 
Louisville to Owens- 


Household 


250 


200 


450 


450 




8 


8 








boro, Ky. 
Pleasure trip 


goods. 


100 




100 


100 




2 


2 








do 




5 




5 


5 




5 


5 








Charlotte, N. Y., to 


Coal...... 


8,000 


2,500 


10,500 


8,500 


2,000 


7 


7 








Brookville, Ontario. 
Petosky, Mich., to 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Capsized and sunk . 


Lumber .. 


3,000 
200 


6,000 


9,000 
200 


3,000 
200 


6,000 


7 
2 


7 
2 




7 


7 


Fishing trip 




10 




10 


10 




1 


1 








Pleasure trip 




1,500 




1 500 


1 500 




4 


4 








Buffalo, N. Y., to 


Sugar 


110,000 


4,200 


114,200 


75,000 


39,200 


??, 


?? 








Cleveland, Ohio. 
Lying at moorings 


Coal 


20 000 


6 000 


26 000 


25 000 


1 000 


10 


10 








Adrift 




200 




200 


200 














Capsized 




400 




400 


360 


40 


4 


4 








Pleasure trip 




10 




10 


10 




2 


2 








Charlotte, N. Y., to 
Brookville, Ontario. 
On fire in harbor 


Coal.... T . 
do.... 


55,000 
4,000 


5,000 
5,000 


60,000 
9,000 


60,000 
8,800 


200 


8 
5 


8 
5 


.... 


8 


16 



























236 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 10. EMBRACING 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Nov 20 


Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


Gas. Ich. and shanty 






Nov 21 


do 


.. .do 


boat, no names, Ris- 
ing Sun, Ind. 
Flat Harry. Louisville, 






Nov 22 


One-quarter mile south 


Erie 


Ky. 
Rowboat No. 6, Erie, 






Nov 22 


of station. 
Twelve miles east-north- 


Fairport. 


Pa. 
Str. Charles B. Hill, De- 


Coleman 


1 731 


Nov. 23 
Nov 25 


east of station. 
Ten miles west by north 
of station. 
One mile north by west of 


Ashtabula 
Charlotte 


troit, Mich. 
Sc. Commodore, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 
Canoe Sprite, Charlotte, 


Desot 


550 


Nov 27 


station. 
Eight miles northwest of 


Marblehead 


N.Y. 

Str. Tecumseh, Sarnia, 


Beaupre 


1 000 


Nov 29 


station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


Ontario. 
Flat Tom, Louisville, 






Dec 6 


Three-q u a r t e r s mile 


Erie 


Ky. 

Scow, no name, Erie, Pa. 






Dec 8 


southeast of station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


Bge., no name, Pitts- 






Dec 10 


do 


do 


burg, Pa. 
Flat, no name, Louis- 






Dec 12 


One-quarter mile west of 


Erie 


ville, Ky. 
Skiff, no name, Erie, Pa. 






1907. 
Mar 30 


station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville. 


Shanty boat, no name, 






Apr 18 


do 


do 


Louisville, Ky. 
Flat Harry, Louisville, 






Apr 24 


One and one-half miles 


Erie 


Ky. 
Gas. s. Ida, Cleveland, 


Picket 


9 


Apr 26 


northeast by north of 
station. 
One-half m ile north- 


Ashtabula 


Ohio. 
Gas. Ich. Hiram, Ashta- 






Apr 26 


northeast of station. 
Twelve miles from station 


Marblehead. 


bula, Ohio. 
Scow, no name, Lorain, 






Apr 27 


Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville. 


Ohio. 
Flat, no name, Louis- 






Mav 2 


Eight miles northwest of 


Marblehead 


ville, Ky. 
Sc Jeremiah Godfrey 


Moore 


653 


May 11 


station. 
Four miles southeast of 


Charlotte 


Detroit, Mich. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Char- 






May 19 


station. 
One-quarter mile east of 


Erie.. 


lotte, N. Y. 
Rowboat No. 3, Erie, Pa 






May 20 


station. 
Eighteen miles west- 


.do 


Str. Bertha Wallace, San- 


Schau. . 


8 


May 20 


southwest of station. 
Seven miles southeast of 


Marblehead 


dusky, Ohio. 
Gas. Ich Gist, Marble- 






May 22 


station. 
One-half mile east-south- 


Erie. 


head, Ohio. 
Rowboat, no name, Erie 






May 22 


east of station. 
Two miles north of sta- 


Marblehead. . 


Pa. 
Gas. Ich. Beatrice, Kel- 






May 25 


tion. 
One and one-half miles 


Niagara 


leys Island, Ohio. 
Rowboat, no name, Fort 






May 26 


west of station. 
Three-quarters mile west 


Cleveland 


Niagara, N. Y. 
Catboat, no name, Cleve- 






May 26 


of station. 
Four miles east-northeast 


do 


land, Ohio. 
Rowboat No. 33, Cleve- 






June 4 


of station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville. 


land, Ohio. 
Gas. yt. Omega Taylor, 






June 6 




Niagara 


Louisville, Ky. 
Rowboat no name 






June 15 


west of station. 
One-half mile southeast 


do 


Str. Turbinia, Hamil- 


Anleraw- 




June 19 


of station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


ton, Ontario. 
Gas. Ich. Lorelei, Cin- 


ford. 




June 23 


Five and one-half miles 


Cleveland 


cinnati, Ohio. 
Gas. Ich. , no name, Cleve- 






June 27 


west-northwest of sta- 
tion. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


land, Ohio. 
Skiff no name. Louis- 












ville, Ky. 







UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



237 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

LAKES ERIE AND ONTARIO Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


*o 

| 
1* 

11 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


*-; 
H 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


"S 

1 

n 
o 

GO 

s 
fc 


t3 

<B 
1 

m 

i 


s 


Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. 


Days' succor af- 
forded. 






$260 




$260 


$260 




2 


a 








Adrift 


Coal 


250 


$50 


300 


300 




B 


5 








do 




75 




75 


75 














Buffalo N Y to To- 


Coal 


35 000 


11 000 


46 000 




$46,000 


21 


21 








ledo, Ohio, 
do 


.do 


3,000 


4,500 


7,500 


7,250 


250 


7 


7 








Capsized 




50 




50 


50 




9 




? 






Huron Ohio to Wind- 


Coal 


8,000 


6,000 


14,000 


14,000 




1? 


1? 




? 


?, 


sor, Ontario. 
Adrift 




225 




225 


225 




7 


7 








do 




25 




25 


25 














do 




1,600 




1,600 


1,600 


















5 




5 


5 




9 


9 








Fast in ice 




15 




15 


15 




4 


4 








Louisville to Branden- 
berg, Ky. 
Adrift 


Household 
goods. 
Coal 


125 
250 


150 
70 


275 
320 


275 
320 




2 
2 


2 
2 




.... 


.... 


Lake Erie to Erie Pa 


Fish cans 


2,000 


95 


2 095 


2,095 


- 


2 


2 








Adrift 




700 




700 


700 




9 


9 








Parted line and strand- 


Stone. ... 


5,000 


1,000 


6,000 


5,700 


300 


3 


3 








ed. 
Jeffersonville Ind., to 




5 




5 


5 




? 


9 








Louisville, Ky. 
Kelleys Island Ohio 


Stone 


3,000 


300 


3,300 


3,300 




7 


7 








to Detroit, Mich. 
Charlotte to Sea 




450 




450 


450 




1 


} 








.Breeze, N. Y. 
Capsized 




40 




40 


40 




9 


9 








Lorain Ohio to Erie 




1,500 




1 500 


1 485 


15 


5 


5 








Pa. 




505 




505 


505 




3 


3 








head, Ohio. 
Adrift 




60 




60 


60 




1 


1 








do 




800 




800 


800 




2 


2 








do 




10 




10 


10 




3 


s 








Capsized 




150 




150 


150 




1 


1 








do 




75 




75 


75 




2 


2 






j . 


Pleasure trip 




400 




400 


400 




} 


3 








Adrift 




10 




10 


10 




1 


1 








Lewiston, N. Y., to 




300,000 




300 000 


300,000 




950 


9<iO 








Toronto, Ontario. 
Pleasure trip 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




5 


5 








Adrift 




400 




400 


400 




4 


4 








Pleasure trip 




15 




15 


15 




1 


1 

































238 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT No. 10. EMBRACING 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1907. 
June 30 


Eight miles east of sta- 


Charlotte 


Gas. Ich. Bay View, 






June 30 


tion. 
Nine miles west-south- 


Erie 


Rochester, N. Y. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Erie, 






June 30 


west of station. 
Falls of the Ohio 


Louisville 


Pa. 

Shanty boat, no name, 






June 30 


do 


do 


Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Skiff, no name, Louis- 








Total 




ville, Ky. 



















DISTRICT NO. 11. EMBRACING 



1906. 
July 1 


One -eighth mile north- 


Duluth . 


Rowboat Blossom, Du- 






July 3 


west of station. 
One mile west of station 


.do 


luth, Minn. 
Str. City of Naples, 


Caughill 


2,340 


July 9 
July 19 


One-quarter mile south- 
east of station. 
Two miles southeast of 


do 

do 


Cleveland, Ohio. 
Sip. yt. Thistle, Duluth, 
Minn. 
Gas Ich Daisy Duluth 






July 20 
July 21 


station. 
Three-quarters mile 
southeast of station. 
Three miles southeast of 


Harbor Beach 
Duluth 


Minn. 
Sip. yt. Valiant, St. 
Louis, Mo. 
Gas. Ich. Arbutus, Du- 


Goodwin . . 


9 


July 21 


station. 
One-quarter mile south- 


.do 


luth, Minn. 
Rowboat, no name, Du- 






July 21 


east of station. 
do 


.do 


luth, Minn. 
Rowboat, no name, Du- 






July 22 


Four miles south by west 


Lake View Beach. 


luth, Minn. 
Rowboat, no name, Port 






July 22 


of station. 
One-half mile northeast 


Port Austin 


Huron, Mich. 
Rowboat no name 






July 25 


of station. 
One mile southeast of sta- 


Duluth 


Gas. Ich no name Du- 






July 25 


tion. 
One-quarter mile south- 


.do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Du- 






July 29 


east of station. 
Eight miles south of sta- 


Harbor Beach 


luth, Minn. 
St. yt. Wyanoke, Kings- 






July 29 


tion. 


do 


ton, Ontario. 
Sip Eagle Harbor 







July 29 


southeast of station. . 
Two-sevenths mile north- 


Duluth 


Beach, Mich. 
Shell no name Duluth 






Aug. 5 
Aug 14 


west of station. 
Two and one-half miles 
east-northeast of sta- 
tion. 
One-quarter mile south- 


Port Austin 
Duluth 


Minn. 
St. yt. Vita, Detroit, 
Mich. 

Sip. yt , no name, Du- 


Sydney 


69 


Aug 15 


east of station. 
Six miles east-southeast 


Bois Blanc 


luth, Minn. 
Str. Sea Fox, Cleveland, 


Laird 


15 


Aug 16 


of station. 
Nine miles northwest of 


Marquette 


Ohio. 
Gas Ich Wasp Mar- 






Aug 18 


station. 
One-half mile east of sta- 


do 


quette, Mich. 
Gas Ich no name, Mar- 






Aug 21 


tion. 


Duluth 


quette, Mich. 
Gas Ich Swallow Du- 




1 


Aug. 26 
Aug 26 


station. 
Three miles west-north- 
west of station. 
Two-thirds mile west of 


Thunder Bay Is- 
land. 
Duluth 


luth, Minn. 
Str. Sea Wing, San- 
dusky, Ohio. 
Shell no name, Duluth, 


Purdy 


39 


Aug 29 


station. 
Two miles southeast of 


do 


Minn. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Du- 






Sept 1 


station. 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Sip yt Scud Duluth 






Sept 1 


east of station. 


do 


Minn. 
Sip yt Sylph Duluth, 






Sept 2 


station. 
One mile south of station 


do 


Minn. 
Gas yt. Ella, Duluth, 












Minn. 







UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



289 



0/1906-7 Continued. 

LAKES ERIE AND ONTARIO Continued. 







"3 


"3 

<D 




S 


i 


. 






T3 


*H 


I 




a 

a . 


1 




g 


| 





d 




S 


M 


Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


!>-j 


> 6 




1! 


Si 





1 


1 


0_0 


11 






03 r* 


($ O 








pi 


ri 


n 


pH ^ 


*H 


j 




Q 


S 


d 


S 







d 





o 


"cQ 






H 


H 


1 


1 


1 


i 

& 


S 


i 
1 


I 


I 


Pultneyville to Sea 




$1,600 




$1,600 


$1,500 


$100 


6 


8 








Breeze, N. Y. 
























Adrift 




400 




400 


400 




7 


7 








Cincinnati Ohio to 




40 




40 


40 




1 


1 








Cairo, 111. 
























Pleasure trip 




20 




20 


20 




9 


9 




































688,225 


$64,190 


752,415 


630,900 


121,515 




619 


2 


29 


37 



























LAKES HURON AND SUPERIOR. 







$40 




$40 


$40 




^ 


? 


1 






% 
On fire at dock 


Coal 


60,000 


$13, 000 


73,000 


73,000 




18 


18 








Adrift 




185 




185 


185 














do. 




400 




400 


400 




3 


3 












3 000 




3 000 


3 000 




g 


g 








do 




1 500 




1 500 


1 495 


$5 


2 


9 








do 




40 




40 


40 




1 


1 








do 




40 




40 


40 




9 


9 








do 




15 




15 


15 




1 


1 








do 




20 




20 


20 




9 


? 








..do 




250 




250 


250 




1 


1 








do 




100 




100 


100 




2 


2 








Kingston to Sault Ste. 




1 000 




1 000 


965 


35 


2 


2 








Marie, Ontario. 
Pleasure trip 




300 




300 


275 


25 


3 


3 








i 
do 




200 




200 


200 




9 


9 








Detroit to Tawas, 




10,000 




10 000 


10 000 




7 


7 








Mich. 
Adrift 




300 




300 


300 














Fishing trip... 


Fish . 


2,000 


50 


2 050 


2 045 


5 


6 


fi 








Whitmores Landing 




500 




500 


500 




S 


3 








to Marquette, Mich. 
Marquette to Presque 




900 




900 


890 


10 


10 


10 








Isle, Mich. 
Broke from moorings . 




300 




300 


225 


75 












Fishing trip 


Fish and 


4,000 


300 


4 300 


4 300 




9 


9 








Pleasure trip 


nets. 


75 




75 


75 




1 


I 








do 




500 




500 


500 




9 


2 


! 






do 




300 




300 


300 




1 


S 








do 




150 




150 


150 




2 


2 








Fond du Lac, Wis., 




1,200 




1,200 


1,200 




9 


? 








to Minnesota Point, 
Minn. 

























2990908 16 



240 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 11. EMBRACING 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Sept 3 




Duluth 


Gas. Ich., no name, Du- 






Sept 5 


east of station. 
One hundred and sixty- 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Sip. yt. Whirlwind, Du- 






Sept 6 


five yards southeast of 
station. 
One mile southwest of 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Du- 






Sept 8 


station. 
Three miles southeast of 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich. Siconda, Du- 






Sept 9 


station. 
Two-thirds mi IP. south- 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Du- 






Sept 11 


west of station. 
One-half mile northwest 


do . 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich. Lemonseira, 






Sept 11 


of station. 


do 


Duluth, Minn. 
Sip yt Scud Duluth 






Sept 12 


station. 


do 


Minn. 
Gas. Ich. Zenita Du- 






Sept. 12 


of station, 
do 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich. Cossette, Du- 






Sept 13 


One-half mi IP. southeast 


Grand Marais 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. yt., no name, 






Sept 19 


of station. 
One hundred and sixty- 


Duluth 


Grand Marais, Mich. 
Lighter, no name, Du- 






Sept 23 


five yards north of sta- 
tion. 
One-half mi IP. southwest 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich. Zenita, Duluth, 






Sept 23 


of station, 
do 


do 


Minn. 
Gas. Ich. Happy Day, 






Sept 23 


One-half mile west of sta- 


do 


Duluth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich. Lorlile, Du- 






Sept 25 


tion. 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Sip yt Sea Gull Du- 






Sept 30 


east of station. 


Harbor Beach 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich. no name Har- 






Sept 30 


yards east of station. 


Port Austin 


bor Beach, Mich. 
Sc. Pathfinder. Port Aus- 






Oct 6 


southwest of station. 


Harbor Beach 


tin, Mich. 
Skiff, no name. Harbor 






Oct 7 


One-quarter mile north- 


Duluth 


Beach, Mich. 
Skiff, no name, Duluth 






Oct 8 


west of station. 
One mile northeast of sta- 


Portage 


Minn. 
Sc. Pasadena, Cleveland, 


Sullivan . . . 


2,076 


Oct 9 


tion. 


Duluth 


Ohio. 
Gas Ich Rambler Du- 






Oct 10 


station. 


Port Austin 


luth, Minn. 
Gas Ich. Venture Al- 






Oct 11 


southwest of station. 


Duluth 


pena, Mich. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Du- 






Oct 11 


station. 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas Ich Lennox Du- 






Oct 12 


tion. 
One mile south of station 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich. Mascot, Supe- 






Oct 16 


do 


do 


rior, Wis. 
Gas. Ich. No. 73, Duluth, 






Oct 18 




do 


Minn.- 
Catboat Stroller Du- 






Oct. 22 


One-quarter mile north- 


Duluth 


luth, Minn. 
Str. Togo, Duluth, Minn. 


Jones 


33 


Oct 24 


west of station. 




Fishboat no name Har- 






Oct 24 


of station. 


do 


bor Beach, Mich. 
Gas Ich no name Har- 






Oct 24 


five yards southeast of 
station. 




bor Beach, Mich. 
Gas Ich Venture Al- 






Oct. 24 
Oct 27 


tion. 
Six miles northwest of 
station. 
Three miles southeast of 


Middle Island 
Duluth 


pena, Mich. 
Sc. Emma L. Nielson, 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Sip yt. Spray, Duluth, 


Ferris 


90 


Oct 27 


station, 
do 


do 


Minn. 
Sip. yt. Margrete, Du- 












luth, Minn, 







UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

of 1906-7 Continued. 

LAKES HURON AND SUPERIOR Continued. 



241 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


I 


| 

V 



H 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


s 

1 


00 

& 


! 
I 

& 


Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. | 


* 

h 

i| 
I 


Pleasure trip 




$300 




$300 


$300 




3 


3 








Broke from moorings. 




300 




300 


300 














Pleasure trip 




200 




200 


200 




3 


3 








.do 




1,800 




1,800 


1,780 


$20 


16 


16 








...do 




500 




500 


500 




1 


1 








...do 




125 




125 


125 




? 


? 








Adrift 




300 




300 


300 














Pleasure trip 




125 




125 


125 




1 


1 








do 




250 




250 


250 




1 


1 








Lying at dock 




300 




300 


295 


5 












Adrift 




700 




700 


700 














Pleasure trip 




125 




125 


125 




4 


4 








do 




600 




600 


600 




1 


1 








do 




350 




350 


350 




1 


1 








Broke from moorings 




50 




50 


50 














Sunk at moorings 




75 




75 


65 


10 












Broke from moorings . . 




350 




350 


350 














Adrift 




15 




15 


15 














Sunk at dock 


Coal 


10 


$20 


30 


30 




1 


1 








Ashtabula, Ohio, to 


....do 


30,000 


12,000 


42,000 




42,000 


10 


8 


9 


8 


16 


Superior, Wis. 
Pleasure trip 




500 




500 


500 




1 


1 








Lying at dock 


Fruit 


400 


15 


415 


415 




3 


3 








Pleasure trip 




500 




500 


500 




I 


1 








do 




400 




400 


400 






1 








Adrift 




500 




500 


500 




I 


1 








Pleasure trip 




300 




300 


300 




I 


1 








do .' 




100 




100 


100 




1 


1 








On fire at dock 




2,500 




2 500 


2 200 


300 


3 


T 








Sunk at moorings 




50 




50 


50 














Dragged anchors 




450 




450 


450 














Sunk at dock 


Fruit 


300 


150 


450 


50 


400 


2 


2 








Dragged anchor and 


Cedar 


2,000 


400 


2,400 


2,400 




4 


4 








stranded. 
Parted moorings and 




185 




185 


175 


10 












stranded. 
Broke from moorings . . 




200 




200 


200 







































242 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT NO. ll.-EMBRACING 



Date. 


i 1 i ' 
i i & ' \ 
i " ! 
Place. 


1 
Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Oct. 28 

Oct 28 


Nine miles south of sta- 
tion. 


Harbor Beach 
Port Austin 


Str. Pathfinder, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 
Sc. Pathfinder, Port 


Peterson... 


2,424 


Ort 31 


tion. 




Austin, Mich. 
Gas Ich Nokomis Han- 






Nov 1 


station. 


Thunder Bay 


cock, Mich. 
Fish boat Dutch Girl, 






Nov 15 




Island. 
Duluth 


Alpena, Mich. 
Lighter no name, Du- 


. 




Nov. 23 


south of station. 
One-quarter mile north- 


Portage 


luth, Minn. 
Sc. Matanzas, Duluth, 


Murphy . . . 


2,600 


Nov 26 


west of station. 


Duluth 


Minn. 
Gas Ich Lennox Du- 






Nov 26 


of station. 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Scow No 36 Duluth, 




89 


Nov. 27 
Nov 30 


station. 
One-quarter mile north 
of station. 


Grand Marais 
do 


Minn. 
Str. Turret Crown, To- 
ronto, Ontario. 
Gas. Ich. Mary, Grand 


Cavanagh . 


1,141 


Dec 4 


west of station. 
Tawas City 


Tawas 


Marais, Mich. 
Fish boat, no name, 






Dec 6 






Tawas City, Mich. 
Str John Harper, Cleve- 


Jones 


1,951 


1907. 
Apr. 16 

Apr 21 


One and one-half miles 
north-northeast 
of Pointe aux Barques 
station. 
One-quarter mile east of 


Pointe aux 
Barques and 
Port Austin. 

Harbor Beach 


land, Ohio. 

Str. Ogdensburg, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Gas. sc. Fannie A., To- 


Hough .... 


2,329 


Apr 24 


station. 
One mile north of station 


Port Austin 


ledo, Ohio. 
Gas. Ich. Wanderer, 






Apr. 29 
May 9 


Four miles south by east 
of station. 

One mile east of station 


Lake View Beach . 
Harbor Beach 


Grindstone City, Mich. 
Str. Pilgrim, St. Clair, 
Mich. 

Yawl, no name 


Cotton 


299 


May 9 




Grand Marais 


Yawl, no name, Milwau- 






May 12 


station. 
One mile southwest of 


Duluth 


kee, Wis. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Du- 






May 13 
May 17 


station. 
Six miles southeast of 
station. 


Thunder Bay 
Island, 
do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich. Fannie A., Al- 
pena, Mich. 
Gas Ich Fannie A., Al- 


- - 





May 25 


tion. 
Three miles west of sta- 


Bois Blanc 


pena, Mich. 
Sc. Mary A. Gregory, 


Ludwigs... 


87 


May 26 


tion. 
One mi IP west ol station 


Duluth 


Grand Haven, Mich. 
Skiff, no name, Duluth, 






May 27 
May 27 


One mile north of station, 
do 


Port Austin 
.do.... 


Minn. 
Str. C. F. Bielman, Port 
Huron, Mich. 
Sc. Mary E. McLachlan, 


Hanson . . . 
Leisk 


2,056 
1,762 


May 27 




Hammond 


Port Huron, Mich. 
St yt. Cela S., Grace, 






May 27 




Duluth 


Mich. 
Gas Ich no name Du- 






May 29 


of station. 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Rowboat no name Du- 






Mav 30 


east of station, 
do 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas Ich , no name, Du- 






May 30 
June 8 


Three-quarters mile 
southwest of station. 
Three miles southwest of 


......do 

Tawas 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Du- 
luth, Minn. 
Nph. Ich. Edith G., East 









station. 


Duluth 


Tawas, Mich. 






June 8 


west of station. 
Two hundred yards south 


do 


Minn. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Du- 








of station. 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas Ich no name, Du- 












luth, Minn. 


".. 





UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



243 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

LAKES HURON AND SUPERIOR Continued. 



Where from and 
^here bounds 


Cargo. 


?.."" 
Estimated value of 
vessel. 


9 



a 

?d 

rl tuD 

*" 
W 


i 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


| 
o 

li 

to 

w 


1 
1 

03 

a 
1 

iS 


Persons saved. 


_ ' 

PH ' 


1 Persons succored at 
station. 


i 



M <2 

K. 






$130,000 




$130,000 


$115,000 


$15,000 


9 1 


>1 




?1 


?i 


Duluth, Minn. : 
Broke from moorings 




350 




350 


350 














Sunk in harbor 


Coal 


500 


$20 


520 


410 


110 


4 


4 








Disabled and stranded 




100 




100 


95 


5 


1 


1 








Duluth Minn to Su- 




50 




50 


50 














perior, Wis. ' 
Cleveland Ohio to 


Coal 


GO 000 


12 000 


72 000 


71 950 


50 


10 


10 








Duluth, Minn. 
Adrift 




400 




400 


400 




1 


1 












10 000 




10 000 


10,000 














and stranded. 
Goderich Ontario to 




100 000 




100,000 


99,000 


1,000 


19 


19 








Duluth, Minn. 
Adrift 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




1 


1 








Sunk at dock 




400 




400 


400 














Ashland Wis to 


Iron ore 


">0,000 


12,320 


62,320 


61,820 


500 


Ifi 


16 








Ashtabula, Ohio. 
Chicago 111 to Og- 


Grain and 


185 000 


50 000 


235 000 


235 000 




21 


21 








densburg, N. Y. 
On fire at dock. . 


flour.- 


2,000 




2,000 


i 2* 000 




2 


? 








Fishing trip 




325 




325 


325 




9 


9 




1 


j 


Alpena to Detroit 


Prod uce 


10 000 


2 700 


12 700 


2 350 


10 350 


si 


SI 








Mich. 
Lying at pier 


and lum- 
ber. 


50 




50 


50 




9 


9 








Adrift 




40 




40 


40 




1 


1 








do 




200 




200 


200 




1 


1 








Fishing trip 




2,500 




2,500 


2,500 




<> 


r , 








do 


Fish and 


2,500 


250 


2,750 


2,400 


350 


5 


5 




5 


6 


Bois Blanc Island to 


nets. 
Cedar 


1,200 


800 


2,000 


1,900 


100 


s 


T 








Cheboygan, Mich. 
Adrift 


posts. 


5 




5 


5 




s 


3 








Escanaba, Mich., to 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Escanaba, Mich., to 


Iron ore . . 
do 


95,000 
30,000 


13,000 
12,000 


108,000 
42,000 


104,200 
37,000 


3,800 
5,000 


18 

8 


18 
8 




18 

8 


18 
16 


Erie, Pa- 
Sunk at moorings 




800 




800 


750 


50 


3 


3 








Adrift 




200 




200 


200 




9 


9 








do 




30 




cO 


30 














do 




200 




200 


200 




9 


9 








do 




300 




300 


300 




2 


2 








Pointe aux Barq ues to 




600 




600 


600 




4 


4 








East Tawas, Mich. ' 
Adrift 




5 




5 


5 














do 




100 




100 


100 




9 


9 








do 




800 




800 


800 




6 


6 

































244 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 11 EMBRACING 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1907. 




Duluth 


Gas Ich , no name, Du- 






June 12 


station. 
One-quarter mile south- 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Shell, no name, Duluth, 






June 13 


east of station. 
One mi IP. west of station 


do 


Minn. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Port 






June 13 


One mile south, of station. 


.do 


Wing, Wis. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Du- 






June 15 




do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich Molly, Duluth. 






June 17 


of station. 
One-half mile west of sta- 


do 


Minn. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Du- 






June 17 


tion. 
One-quarter mile south- 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich. Arrawanna, 






June 18 


east of station. 
One-half mile south of sta- 


do 


Duluth, Minn. 
Catboat Oneota, D u- 






June 18 


tion. 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Canoe no name Du- 






June 25 


station. 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Catboat Oneota, Du- 






June 27 


of station. 
One-quarter mile south- 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas. Ich. Jane M., Du- 






June 28 


east of station. 
One-quarter mile north 


Grand Marais . 


luth, Minn. 
Rowboat, no name, 






June 28 


of station. 


Duluth 


Grand Marais, Mich. 
Gas Ich no name Du- 






June 28 


of station. 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Gas Ich Zurich, Du- 






June 29 


east of station, 
do 


do 


luth, Minn. 
Shell, no name, Duluth, 






June 30 


One-half mile southeast 


do 


Minn. . 
Catboat Pokegima, Du- 








of station. 
Total 




luth, Minn. 



















DISTRICT No. 12. EMBRAC 



1906. 
July 4 


Two miles west of station 


St. Joseph 


Canoe, no name, Benton 






July 5 




Old Chicago 


Harbor, Mich. 
Sailboat no name Chi- 






July 9 
July 9 


Two hundred yards south 
of station. 


Michigan City 


cago, 111. 
Str. Henry S. Sill, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Small boat no name 


Tonkin 


35 


July 15 


One mile southwest of 


Grand Haven 


Sheboygan, Wis. 
Gas. Ich. Florence M., 






July 15 


station. 
Two miles south of 


Racine 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Gas yt Oriole, Racine, 






July 23 
July 25 


station. 
Eighteen miles west- 
southwest of station. 


Michigan City 


Wis. 

Sip. yt.Nymph, Chicago, 

Nph Ich The Kid Dav- 


McCreary. . 


6 


July 26 


tion. 


do 


enport, Iowa. 
Sip yt Madcap Macat- 






July 28 
July 28 


northwest of station. 
Six miles west by south 
of station. 


Beaver Island 


awa, Mich. 
Str. Pine Lake, Grand 
Haven, Mich. 
Sip yt Shenando Chi- 


Jacobson... 


388 


July 28 


southeast of station. 


Kenosha 


cago, 111. 
Sip yt Jingo, Kenosha, 






July 29 


tion. 
North Point 


Milwaukee 


Wis. 
Str. Topeka, Milwaukee, 


Rees 


1,376 


Aug 5 




Racine 


Wis. 
Sip yt Kinnicinnick 






Aug 11 


Two miles east-southeast 


White River 


Milwaukee, Wis. 
Sip Owl White Lake, 






Aug. 11 


of station. 
Thirteen miles north of 
station. 


Two Rivers 


Mich. 
Sc. Petrel, Milwaukee, 
Wis. 


Nelson 


78 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



245 



of 1906-7 Continued. 

LAKES HURON AND SUPERIOR Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


*o 

0) 

a 

\i 

i 

H 


I 


J! 

I 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


Persons on board. 


Persons saved. 


1 

03 

1 


Persons succored at 
station. 


Days' succor af- 
forded. 


Adrift 




$1,200 




$1,200 


$1,200 




9 


9 








Pleasure trip 




75 




75 


75 




9 


9 








Adrift 




500 




500 


500 




4 


4 








do 




800 




800 


800 




5 


5 








do 




500 




500 


485 


$15 


1 


1 








do 




500 




500 


500 




1 


1 








do 




500 




500 


500 




9 


9 








Pleasure trip 




75 




75 


75 




? 


? 








.do 





30 




30 


30 






1 








do 




75 




75 


75 




9 


2 








do 




750 




750 


750 




^ 


5 








Adrift 




20 




20 


20 




3 


^ 








do 




200 




200 


200 




1 


1 








Pleasure trip . . 




500 




500 


500 




? 


9 








.do 




250 




250 


225 


25 


? 


9 








do 




75 




75 


75 




3 


3 




































822,880 


$129,025 


951,905 


872,650 


79,255 


391 


388 


s 


61 


77 



























ING LAKE MICHIGAN. 



Capsized 




$40 




$40 


$40 




? 


1 


1 


1 


1 


do 




45 




45 


45 




7 


9 


<i 


o 


9 


On fire at dock 




2 000 




2 000 


2 000 




4 


4 








Adjift 




20 




20 


20 














Holland to Whitehall, 




900 




900 


900 




1 


1 








Mich. 
Pleasure trip 




250 




250 


250 




6 


6 








do... 




800 




800 


400 


$400 


4 


4 








St. Joseph to Macki- 




1,500 




1,500 


1,495 


5 


4 


4 








nac. Mich. 
Cruising 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




5 


5 








Green Bay, Wis., to 




16,000 




16,000 


16,000 




14 


14 








Cheboygan, Mich. 
Capsized 




200 




200 


200 




2 


2 








Pleasure trip 




50 




50 


45 


5 


5 


5 








South Haven, Mich., to 




50,000 




50,000 


50,000 




T> 


T> 








Milwaukee, Wis. 
Capsized 




500 




500 


500 




3 


3 








do 




200 




200 


200 




2 


?, 








Pounding against pier 


Hay 


1,500 


$400 


1,900 


1,900 




5 


5 

































246 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVIN<i SEKVICE: 



Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 12. EMBRACING 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. ; 
Aug. 17 


One-half mile south of 


Jackson Park 


Gas. Ich. Englewood, 






Aug. 19 


station. 
Two hundred and sixty- 


St. Joseph 


Chicago, 111. 
Rowboat No. 24, St. 






Aug. 19 


five yards west-north- 
west of station. 
Five hundred yards east 


Sheboygan 


Joseph, Mo. 
Rowboat Ousel, Sheboy- 






Aug. 21 


of station. 
Two and one-half miles 


Charlevoix 


gan, Wis. 
Str. J N. Parmelee, 




;0 


Aug. 21 


north of station. 
Five miles northeast of 


Old Chicago 


Grand Haven, Mich. 
Gas. Ich. H. Paulman. 






Aug. 22 


station. 
Two and one-quarter 


Milwaukee 


Chicago, 111. 
Sip. Vagabond, Milwau- 






Aug. 24 


miles north of station. 
Five hundred and twenty- 


White River 


kee. Wis. 
Str. Petrel, White lake, 






Aug. 26 


five feet east of station. 
Four hundred yards west 


Charlevoix 


Mich. 
Str. Illinois, . Duluth, 


Richard- 


2 427 


Aug. 28 


of station. 
Three miles west-south- 


Plum Island 


Minn. 
Sc. Industry, Milwau- 


son. 
Morris 


55 


Sept. 4 


west of station. 
Eight miles west of sta- 


Muskegon 


kee, Wis. 
Lch.. no name. Chicago, 






Sept. 5 
Sept. 5 
Sept. 10. 
Sept. 15, 


tion. 
One-half mile west of 
station. 
One-half mile southeast 
of station. 
Six miles north of station. 

One mile southwest of 


Grande Pointe au 
Sable. 
South Chicago 

Charlevoix 
Old Chicago 


111. 
Gas. Ich. Sympo, Luding- 
ton, Mich. 
Sip. yt. Neva, Chicago, 

Str. Falcon, Marquette, 
Mich. 
Sip. yt. Diamond, Chi- 


Thompson. 
Gaskin 


17 
865 


Sept. 15 


station. 
...-.do 


do 


cago, 111. 
Gas. Ich. Idle Hour, Chi- 






Sept. 15 


One hundred yards west 


Sheboygan 


cago, 111. 
Sc. Clara, Grand Haven, 


Olsen 


24 


Sept. 17 


of station. 
Fourteen miles north of 


Racine .. 


Mich. 
Gas. Ich. Diamond B., 






Sept. 21 


station. 
One-half mile southwest 


"Old Chicago 


South Chicago, 111. 
Sip. yt., no name, Chi- 






Sept. 23 


of station. 
Two hundred and thirty- 


White River 


cago, 111. 
Sc. yt. Foam, Chicago, 




10 


Sept 27 


five yards east of sta- 
tion. 
Milwaukee Harbor 


Milwaukee 


Sc Melitta Milwaukee 




83 


Sept. 28 


Two hundred yards west 


Sheboygan ... 


Wis. 
Sc. Rosebud, Marquette, 


Cody 


44 


Sept. 29 


of station. 
Three hundred yards 


Milwaukee 


Mich. 
Sip., no name, Milwau- 






Sept. 29 


north of station. 
Five hundred yards east- 


do 


kee, Wis. 
Sip., no name, Milwau- 






Sept. 29 


southeast of station. 
Three-quarters mile 


Old Chicago 


kee, Wis. 
Bge. No. 2, Milwaukee, 


Olsen ' 


1 548 


Sept. 30 


north-northeast of sta- 
tion. 
Three miles north of sta- 


Chicago 


Hvis. 
Gas. Ich. Surf, Chicago, 






Oct. 2 


tion. 
One-half mile south of 


Two Rivers 


Gas. Ich., no name, Two 






Oct. 2 
Oct. 2 


station. 
Thirteen miles west of 
station. 
Sixteen miles northeast 


Plum Island 
do 


Rivers, Wis. 
Str. Daniel L. Hebard, 
Marquette, Mich. 
Str. Silver King, Buf- 


Nilsen 
Carr 


159 
48 


Oct. 3 


of station. 
Seven hundred yards east 


do 


falo, N. Y. 
Sc. Elva Milwaukee 




09 


Oct. 6 


of station. 
Four miles northeast of 


Old Chicago 


Wis. 
Sip. yt. Wave, Chicago 






Oct. 6 


station. 
One and one-half miles 


do 


Gas. Ich. The Lark, Chi- 






Oct. 9 


southeast of station. 
Milwaukee Harbor 


Milwaukee 


cago, 111. 
Sc Lilly E Milwaukee 




191 


Oct. 10 


One mile from station 


Baileys Harbor. . . 


Wis. 
Gas. Ich. Lena, Baileys 






Oct. 19 


Two hundred yards 


North Manitou 


Harbor, Mich. 
Gas. Ich. Bessie, North 






Oct. 20 


northeast of station. 
One hundred yards 
southwest of station. 


Island. 
Sturgeon Bay 
Canal. 


Manitou Island, Mich. 
Sc. Mishicott, Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 


Everson 


73 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SA 



SERVICE. 



247 



of 1906-7 Continued. 
LAKE MICHIGAN Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


"o 

ij 

In 

H 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


1 


E s'timated amount 
saved. 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


Persons on board. 


Persons saved. 


Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. 


Days' succor af- 
forded. 


Cruising 




$600 




$600 


$575 


$25 


2 


2 








Capsized '. . . 




40 




40 


40 




2 


2 








do 




35 




35 


35 












1 


Fishing trip 


Nets and 


3,000 


$600 


3 600 


3 500 


100 


6 


6 








Pleasure trip 


fish. 


400 




400 


400 














Dragged anchor and 




2,400 




2,400 


2,400 














stranded. 
Broke from moorings 




600 




600 


600 














and stranded. 
Petoskey to Charle- 
voix, Mich. 
Hedge Hog Harbor to 


M erchan- 
dise. 
Wood . . 


200,000 
500 


1,200 
150 


201,200 
650 


200,000 
550 


1,200 
100 


600 

9 


600. 
2 


.... 


100 


100 


Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Adrift 




225 




225 


225 










" 


1 


Coopers Creek to Lud- 




500 




500 


500 




9 


2 




9 




ington, Mich. 
Pleasure trip 




5,000 




5,000 


5,000 




6 


6 








Escanaba to Boyne 


Iron ore.. 


35,000 


4,000 


39,000 


38,400 


600 


13 


13 








City, Mich. 
Parted moorings 




3,800 




3,800 


3,800 














Dragged anchor and 




900 




900 


900 














collided. 
Pentwater, Mich., to 


Fruit 


500 


300 


800 


775 


25 


4 


4 








Sheboygan, Wis. 
Milwaukee, Wis., to 




700 




700 


685 


15 


2 


2 








South Chicago, 111. 
Pleasure trip 




180 




180 


180 




2 


2 








Georgian Bay to Chi- 




3,000 




3,000 


3 000 




2 


2 








cago, 111. 
Manistee, Mich., to 


Lumber . . 


500 


425 


925 


925 






3 








Milwaukee, Wis. 
Marinette to Milwau- 


....do 


900 


1,800 


2,700 


2,700 




^ 










kee, Wis. 
Parted moorings and 




75 




75 


60 


15 












stranded. 
Pleasure trip 




35 




35 


35 




3 


3 








Peshtigo, Wis., to Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Pleasure trip 


Iron ore 
and ce- 
dar poles. 


50,000 
380 


26,000 


76,000 
380 


7,000 
380 


69,000 


6 
6 


3 

6 


3 


3 


3 

Q 


Adrift 




600 




600 


600 




2 


2 








Pequaming, Mich., to 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Buffalo, N. Y., co Chi- 




15,000 
3,500 





15,000 
3,500 


15,000 
3,375 


125 


12 
5 


12 
5 






.... 


cago, III. 
Little Harbor, Mich., 


Lumber . . 


800 


1,500 


2,300 


2,300 




5 










to Two Rivers. Wis. 
Pleasure trip 




480 




480 


420 


60 


3 


3 








do 




500 




500 


500 




1 










Manistee Mich., to 


Bark 


700 


425 


1,125 


1,125 




5 


5 








Milwaukee, Wis. 
Adrift 




450 




450 


450 




9 


9 








Sunk at moorings 




600 




600 


590 


10 












Employed in harbor. . . 




500 




500 


500 




2 


2 

































248 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 12. EMBRACING 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned. 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
Oct. 21 

Oct. 23 
Oct. 23 
Oct. 24 
Oct. 24 

Oct. 27 
Oct. 28 
Oct. 29 
Nov. 2 

Nov. 4 
Nov. 11 
Nov. 11 
Nov. 12 
Nov. 16 
Nov. 16 
Nov. 21 

Nov. 21 
Dec. 2 

Dec. 16 
Dec. 18 

1907. 
Jan. 31 

Feb. 6 
Mar. 28 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 6 
Apr. 8 

Apr. 11 
Apr. 13 
Apr. 15 

Apr. 15 
Apr. 17 

Apr. 17 
Apr. 20 
Apr. 27 


Two and one-half miles 
northwest of station. 
One-half mile east of sta- 
tion. . 
One-half mile north of 
station. 
Three miles north of sta- 
tion. 
Four hundred yards 
south-southeast of sta- 
tion. 
One mile southeast of 
station. 
Ten miles southeast by 
east J east of station. 
One-half mile west of sta- 
tion. 
Four miles southeast of 
station. 

One mile northeast of 
station. 
One quarter mile east- 
southeast of station. 
One-half mile southeast 
of station. 
One-sixth mile north of 
station. 
One mile north of station . 

Five miles north of station 

Eight hundred yards west 
of station. 

One-sixth mile northeast 
of station. 
One hundred and seventy- 
five yards east of sta- 
tion. 
Ten and one-half miles 
northwest of station. 
One-quarter mile east of 
station- 
Seven miles east of station 

Seventy-five yards south 
of station. 
Thirty-five yards north- 
northwest of station. 
One-half mile north by 
west of s ation. 
One-half mile west-north- 
west of station. 
Three miles east of sta- 
tion. 

One-third mile from sta- 
tion. 
One mile southwest of sta- 
tion. 
Nine miles south of sta- 
tion. 
do 
One-eighth mile west of 
station 
Five miles northeast of 
station. 
One-quarter mile south- 
west of station. 
Three miles south of sta- 
tion. 


Charlevoix . . 


Catboat, no name, Char- 
levoix, Mich. 
Gas. Ich. Vera, Chicago, 
IU. 
Sip. no name, Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 
Sip. Viola, Milwaukee, 
Wis. 
Sc. L. M. Mason, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 

Fishboat, no name, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Sc. Ford River, Grand 
Haven, Mich. 
Sc. Emily and Eliza, 
Chicago, 111. 
Gas Ich. Sneak, Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 

Gas. s. Chester, Chicago 
111. 
Gas. Ich. Lucki, Chicago 
111. 
Gas. Ich. Surf, Chicago, 
111. 
Scow, no name, Chicago, 

Sc. Margaret Dall, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Str. Orion, Milwaukee, 
Wis. 
Gas. Ich. and scow, no 
names, Muskegon, 
Mich. 
Rowboat, no name, U. S 
Government. 
Str. Petrel, White Lake, 
Mich. 

Str. L. C. Waldo, Detroit 
Mich. 
Str. Pottawattomie, 
Grand Haven, Mich. 

Gas. Ich. Hugo, Two 
Rivers, Wis. 
Skiff, no name, Luding- 
ton; Mich. 
Lighter, no name, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Str. Southern Cross, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 
Gas. Ich. Hooligan, Lud- 
ington, Mich. 
Gas. Ich. Viking, Wash- 
ington Harbor, Wis. 

Gas. s. Flora B., Grand 
Haven, Mich. 
Sip., no name, Baileys 
Harbor, Wis. 
Str. Louis Pahlow, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Sc. Delta, Chicago, 111 
Gas. Ich. Prince Olaf, 
Charlevoix, Mich. 
Sc. Eliza Day, Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 
Str. Empire State, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 
Str. R. J. Gordon, Grand 
Haven, Mich. 






Jackson Park 
Milwaukee 










do 






Two Rivers 


Balsta 


249 


Jackson Park 
Old Chicago 


Hansen 
Ludwig 


299 
63 


Muskegon 


South Manitou 
Island. 

South Chicago 
Old Chicago 
do 


Ritcheler . . 


8 






do 






South Manitou 
Island. 
Milwaukee 


Clark 


149 
2,283 


Scott 


Holland 




Old Chicago 






White River 






Beaver Island 

South Manitou 
Island. 

Two Rivers. 


Duddleson. 
Rudick .... 


4,466 
18 


Ludington 
Old Chicago 










Plum Island 


Pooler 


25 


Ludington 
Plum Island 






South Haven 
Baileys Harbor. . . 

Sturgeon Bay 
Canal. 
do 

Charlevoix 


Randal 


6 


Carr 
Bates 


366 
269 


Sleeping Bear 
Point. 
Old Chicago 

Two Rivers 


Christian- 
son. 


139 
1,116 
280 


Kase 







UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



249 



of 1 906-7 Continued. 
LAKE MICHIGAN Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


I 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


d 
o 

I 


1 

PH 


Persons lost. 


Persons succored at 
station. 


I 


Capsized 




$150 




$150 


$150 






9 




2 




do 




100 




100 


95 


$5 












Adrift 




75 




75 


75 


















450 




450 


450 














stranded. 




1 000 


$4 320 


5 320 


5 120 


200 


* 










ada, to Milwaukee 
Wis. 
Fishing trip 


ties. 


25 




25 


25 




1 


1 








Chicago 111 to Che- 




3 600 




3 600 


3,320 


280 


7 


7 








boygan, Mich. 
South Haven to Mus- 




1,000 




1 000 


990 


10 












kegon, Mich. 
Glen Arbor to South 




800 




800 


800 




4 


4 








Manitou Island, 
Mich. 
Disabled and drifting 




1,500 




1,500 


1,500 




6 


fi 








Pleasure trip 




275 




275 


275 




1 


1 








do 




380 




380 


380 




3 










Overloaded and 




20 




20 


20 




10 


8 


. 






swamped. 
Chicago 111 to Stur- 




2 000 




2 000 




2 000 


5 


5 








geon Bay, Wis. 
Toledo Onio to Mil- 


Coal 


60 000 


18 000 


78 000 


73 000 


5 000 


14 


14 








waukee, Wis. 
Lying at moorings 




1,600 




1 600 


800 


800 


5 


1 


4 






Employed in harbor 




60 




60 


60 




1 


1 












600 




600 




600 












Ashtabula Ohio to 


Coal 


250,000 


30,000 


280,000 


267,000 


13,000 












Milwaukee, Wis. 
Frankfort to South 


Fish 


2,000 


75 


2,075 


2,075 




fi 


,. 








Manitou Island 
Mich. 
Fishing trip 


Fish and 


1,000 


800 


1 800 


1,800 




4 


4 








Adrift 


nets. 


15 




15 


15 














do 




8,600 




8 600 


8,600 


















800 




800 


800 




4 


4 








ington Island, Wis. 
Adrift 




350 




350 


350 




8 


8 








Detroit Harbor t o 




700 




700 


700 




3 


3 








Washington Harbor 
Wis. 
Fishing trip 




1,000 




1,000 


1,000 




3 


3 








Capsized. 




25 




25 


25 




3 


3 




3 


3 


Chicago, 111., to Nah- 




15,000 




15,000 


12,500 


2,500 


13 


13 








ma, Mich, 
do 




4 000 




4 000 


3,300 


700 


7 


7 








Fishing trip 




1 000 


200 


1 200 


1 200 




2 


2 








Elk Rapids, Mich., to 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Adrift 


nets. 
Lumber . . 


1,600 
25 000 


1,800 


3,400 
25 000 


2,700 

25 000 


700 


4 


4 




4 


4 


Manitowoc Wis to 




12 000 




12 000 


12 000 




^ 


11 








Boyne City, Mich. 

























250 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT NO. 12. EMBRACING 



Date. 


Place. 

,' i 

- !. . | i v! 

'" ' s I i 


Name of station. 

| 


Name; of vessel and 
where owned. 

i 

L i 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1907. 
May 2 

May 3 j 
May 3 i 

May 12 
May 12 
May 12' 
May 13 
May 15 
May 19 
May 19 

May 19 
May 19 
May 21 

May 21 
May 25 
May 26 
May 26 
May 27 
May 30 
June 3 
June 4 
June 4 
June 8 
June 9 

June 10 
June 10 
June 11 
June 11 
June 14 
June 17 
June 20 
June 20 
June 22 
June 22 
June 25 
June 29 


Off station 


Charlevoi^ 


; 

Sc. Loitie A. Burton, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Str. James H. Reed, Du- 
luth, Minn. 
Skiff, Racine, Wis 


Hansen 
Houghton . 


203 
5,598 


One and one-half miles 
northeast of station. 
On,e mile south of station. 
One-half mile northeast 
of station. 


Evanston j 


Racine... \ 
Jackson Park 

Holland j. 


Gas. Ich. D. E. Coye, 
Chicago, 111. 
Sip. Budweiser, Macat- 
awa, Mich. 
Ywl., ncjj name, Chicago, 

Gas. lch>, no name, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Sip. ytJ Huntress, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Scow Night Hawk, Man- 
istee, Mich. 
Gas. s. Maryette, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Gas. Ich. Bon Ami, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Sailboat Eda.Chicago.Ill . 
Rowboat, no name 










Two hundred yards north 
of station. 


Old Chicago 










Three miles north, of Jack- 
son Park station. 


Jackson Park and 
Old Chicago. 






Two-sevenths mile west 
of station. 
One-half mile southeast 
of station, 
do 


Scuth Haven 
Jackson Park 
do 


Campbell . . 


44 






Off station 


Evanston 






One-half mile southeast 
of station, 
do 


Holland 


Gas. Ich. Florence, Ma- 
catawa, Mich. 
Gas. Ich. Pinta, St. 
Augustine, Fla. 
Canoe Restless, Chicago, 
111. 
Gas. Ich. Sacajawea, 
Chicago, 111. 
Sip. Alice Hartman, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Sc. Oneida, Milwaukee, 
Wis. 
Sip. yt.,no name, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Str. Veronica, Niagara 
Falls, N. Y. 
Nph. Ich. Helen Temple, 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Gas. Ich. Sea Gull II, 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Sip. Soubrette, Chicago, 

Rowboat No. 12, Michi- 
gan City, Ind. 

Gas. Ich., no name, Mich- 
igan City, Ind. 
Sip. yt. Dragoon, Racine, 

Sip. yt. Thetis, Chicago, 

Gas. Ich. Vim, Chicago, 
111. 
Gas. Ich., no name, Two 
Rivers, Wis. 
Sip. yt. Naniwe, Chicago, 
111. 
Gas. Ich. Vanadis, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Gas. Ich. and tow, no 
names, Whitehall, Mich 
Sip. yt. Sporting Extra, 
Chicago, 111. 
Gas. Ich. , no name, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Gas. Ich. Author, Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Lch. Ideal, Milwaukee, 
Wis. 






do 


Colby 


9 


One-quarter mile north- 
east of station. 
Three-quarters mile south 
of station. 
Three and one-half miles 
northeast of station. 
Two and three-quarters 
miles south of station. 
One and one-half mile 
south of station. 
Thirteen miles south by 
west of station. 
Two miles northwest of 
station. 
Five miles southeast of 
station. 
Four miles south of sta- 
tion. 
One hundred and fifty 
yards northeast of sta- 
tion. 
Two miles northwest of 
station. 
Two miles north-north- 
east of station 
One mile southeast of sta- 
tion, 
do 


Jackson Park 
Old Chicago 








do 






North Manitou 
Island. , 
Old Chicago 


Kristiansen 


201 


Plum Island 


Keischgens 


1,093 


Grand Haven 

Sturgeon Bay Ca- 
nal. 
Old Chicago 










Michigan City 
do 










Old Chicago 
Jackson Park 
do 














One-quarter mile south- 
east of station. 
One and one-quarter 
miles south of station. 
One mile northeast of sta- 
tion. 
Four and one-half miles 
south of station. 
Three - quarters mile 
southeast of station. 
One-half mile north of 
station. 
One-fifth mile east of sta- 
tion. 
Two hundred yards 
northwest of station. 
Total 


Two Rivers 
Old Chicago 
Jackson Park 
White River 














Jackson Park 
Old Chicago 










do 


Milwaukee 























UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



251 



of 1906-7 Continued. 
LAKE MICHIGAN Continued. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


"o 

8 

jt 

1 


| 

1 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


Estimated amount 
lost. 


g 
1 

a 
1 
I 


1 

1 

GQ 
! 


i Persons lost. 




Persons succored at 
station. 


i 

t-t 

cj >rt 

O Q) 

o 

I 


Washington Harbor to 
Charlevoix, Mich. 
D ulu th, Minn., to 
South Chicago, 111. 
Capsized 


Grain... 
Iron ore 


$4,500 
335,000 

5 
3,000 

50 
35 
1,400 
1,000 


$3,000 
27,300 


$7,500 
362,300 

5 
3,000 

50 
35 
1,400 
1,000 
425 
1,100 
1,500 

500 
5 
400 

2,200 
50 
3,000 
35 
20,500 
150 
65,000 
600 
800 
150 
35 

400 
350 
600 

600 
600 
300 
300 
725 
300 
600 
900 
300 


$7,000 
353,200 

5 
3,000 

50 
35 
1,400 
1,000 
425 
1,075 
1,500 

500 
5 
375 


$500 
9,100 


6 
24 

2 
5 

2 
2 
3 
1 
5 
3 
3 

4 
4 


6 

24 

2 
5 

2 
2 
3 
1 
5 
3 
3 

4 
4 












On fire in harbor 
Pleasure trip 













do ' 










do 














Adrift 














do 


Gravel.. 
Wood... 


400 
1,000 
1,500 

500 
5 
400 

2,200 
50 
3,000 


25 
100 










Muskegon, Mich., to 
Chicago, 111. 
Adrift 


25 














do 




Pleasure trip 






On fire in harbor 






25 

2 200 








do 
Capsized 


















50 
3,000 
35 
20,225 
150 
64,200 
600 
800 
150 
35 

400 
350 
575 
600 
600 
300 
300 
725 
290 
600 
900 
300 




2 


2 








Parted moorings 












Adrift... 




35 
2,500 
150 
65,000 
600 
800 
150 
35 

400 
350 
600 
600 
600 
300 
300 
725 
300 
600 
900 
300 




275 


3 
6 
3 
15 
8 
3 
3 
2 

2 
2 
3 
2 
4 
15 
2 
4 
(a) 

9 
4 


3 
6 
3 
15 
8 
3 
3 
2 

2 
2 
3 
2 
4 
15 
2 
4 
(oV 
9 
4 








Cecil Bay, Mich., to 
Chicago, 111. 
Capsized 


Lumber. 


18,000 














Waukegan, 111., to Es- 
canaba, Mich. 
Pleasure trip 






800 


:: 










Fishing trip 







Capsized 




.....do 








2 


2 


Pleasure trip. . 








Adrift 














Pleasure trip 






25 








do 












do 














Michigan City, Ind., to 






Chicago, 111. 
Pleasure trip 














From Whitehall, Mich. 
Capsized 


















10 








Adrift 






.... 






Pleasure trip 








Capsized 








10 


10 


15 


10 

137 


10 










1,233,420 


140,420 


1,373,840 


1,263,400 


110, 440 


1,103 


1,088 


137 







a Crew rescued by launch near by. 



252 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 

DISTRICT NO. 13. EMBRAC 



Date. 


Place. 


Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
where owned.- 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1906. 
July 5 


Two miles northwest of 


Fort Point 


Bge.Echo.San Francisco. 




468 


July 12 


station. 
Four miles west-south- 


Cape Disappoint- 


Cal.o 
Fish boat, no name, 






July 12 


west of station. 
Four miles west of station 


ment. 
Point Adams 


Astoria, Oreg. 
Fish boat, no name, 






July 12 


do 


do 


Astoria, Oreg. 
Fish boat, no name, 






July 12 


do 


do 


Astoria, Oreg. 
Fish boat, no name, 






July 20 




Fort Point 


Astoria, Oreg. 
Fish boat, no name San 






July 22 


southwest of station, 
do 


Coquille River 


Francisco, Cal. 
Bge., no name, Bandon, 






July 23 


Peacock Spit 


Cape Disappoint- 


Greg. 
Fish boat, no name, 






July 27 


do 


ment, 
do 


Astoria, Oreg. 
Fish boat, no name 






July 27 


Four miles west of station 


Point Adams 


Fish boat, no name 






July 27 


do 


do 


Astoria, Oreg. 
Fish boat, no name, 






July 27 


do 


do 


Astoria, Oreg. 
Fish boat, no name, 






July 27 


do 


.do 


Astoria, Oreg. 
Fish boat, no name, 






Oct. 14 
Oct. 14 


One mile south of station . 
do 


Humboldt Bay... 
do 


Astoria, Oreg. 
Str. Scotia, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
Str. Roanoke, San Fran- 


Carlson.... 
Dunham .. 


181 
2,354 


Oct 16 




Coquille River 


cisco, Cal. 
Fish boat, no name Ban- 






Oct. 25 
Oct. 31 

Nov 6 


west of station. 
Three miles southwest of 
station. 
One and one-half miles 
northeast of station. 
One-half mile southwest 


Point Adams 
Umpqua River .. 
Coquille River 


don, Oreg. 
Sp. Peter Iredale, Liver- 
pool, England. 
Str. Juno, Coos Bay, 
Oreg. 
Fish boat, Bandon, Oreg. 


Lawrence. . 
Graham . . . 


2,075 
22 


Nov 10 


of station. 
Two miles south of station 


Nome . 


Lighter, no name, Nome, 






Nov. 27 
Dec. 8 


Two miles north of sta- 
tion. 
Three miles south-south- 


Point Adams 
Coos Bay. 


Alaska. 
Str. Aurelia, San Fran- 
cisco', Cal. 
Sc. Esther Buhne, Eu- 


Johnson... 
Olsen 


440 
290 


Dec. 29 

1907. 
Jan 4 


west of station. 
Four miles west-north- 
west of station. 


Point Adams 
Nome 


reka, Cal.o 
Sc. Alice McDonald, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Gas. s. Greyhound, 


Bender 
Quinn 


656 
9 


Jan. 14 
Jan 16 


One mile west by south 
of station. 


Humboldt Bay... 


Nome, Alaska. 
Str. Sequoia, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
Catboat no name U S 


Lunstedt . . 


411 


Jan. 19 
Jan 30 


northwest of station. 
Seven miles west of sta- 
tion. 


Grays Harbor 
Fort Point 


Government. 
Sc. Endeavor, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
Gas. Ich. Sprig San 


McCallip... 


565 


Feb. 3 
Feb. 5 

Feb 16 


station. 
Nine miles north by west 
of station. 
Ten and one-half miles 
west by north of Point 
Bonita station. 


Umpqua River... 

Point Bonita and 
Fort Point. 


Francisco, Cal. 
Sc. Alpha, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
Sc. Wm. F. Witzermann, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Skiff no name Sand 


Trudgett . . 
Lindquist . 


300 
473 


Mar. 1 


west of station. 
North jetty 


ment. 
Humboldt Bay 


Island, Wash. 
Str. Corona, New York 


Boyd 


1,492 


Apr 1 




Coos Bay 


City. 
Gas. Ich. Telephone, 






Apr. 12 


tion. 
Three and one-half miles 
south-southwest of sta- 
tion. 


do 


Marshfleld, Oreg. 
Sc. bge. Chinook, Ta- 
coma, Wash. 


Lowell 


785 



ln dangerous position, from which life-saving crew assisted to extricate her. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



253 



of 1906-7 Continued. 
ING PACIFIC COAST. 



Where from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


Estimated value of 
vessel. 


Estimated value of 
cargo. 


I 


Estimated amount 
saved. 


4* 
O 
03 . 


Persons on board. 


Persons saved. 


I 
I 


Persons succored at 
station. 


Days' succor af- 
forded. 


Adrift 




$10 000 


$3 000 


$13,000 


$13,000 














Capsized 




500 




500 


350 


$150 


? 


? 




? 


? 


Fishing trip 




285 




285 


260 


25 


? 


? 




a 


2 


do 




275 




275 


205 


70 


a 


a 








do 




450 




450 


430 


20 


2 


2 








do 




250 




250 


250 




1 


1 




1 


1 


Broke from moorings 


Lumber 


600 


375 


975 


875 


100 












and stranded. 
Capsized 




500 




500 


500 






1 


1 






do 




400 




400 


325 


75 


? 










Fishing trip 




400 




400 


390 


10 


2 


2 








do 




500 




500 


495 


5 




? 








do 




450 




450 


450 




? 


? 








do 




450 




450 


450 




? 


9 








Eureka to San Fran- 


Lumber 


20 000 


6 000 


26,000 


23,000 


3,000 


16 


16 








cisco, Cal. 
do 


General 


250,000 


10,000 


260,000 


260,000 














Adrift 




125 




125 


125 














Salina Cruz, Mexico 




50,000 




50,000 


35,000 


15,000 


?7 


?7 




5 


?5 


to Portland, Oreg. 
Umpqua River to Gar- 




2,000 




2,000 


1,850 


150 


3 


3 








diner, Oreg. 
Fishing trip 




130 




130 


130 






2 








Lying at moorings 




4 000 




4 000 


4 000 






9 








Linnton, Oreg., to San 
Francisco, Cal. 
San Francisco, Cal., to 


Lumber . . 


80,000 
15,000 


18,000 


98,000 
15,000 


97,985 
15,000 


15 


20 

8 


20 

8 




1 


1 


Marshfield, Oreg. 
San Francisco, Cal., to 




30,000 




30,000 


28,000 


2,000 


10 


10 








Vancouver, Wash. 
Crushed in ice 




5 000 




5 000 




5 000 












San Francisco to Eu- 




36 000 




36 000 




36 000 


94 


?4 








reka, Cal. 
Fast in ice 




140 




140 


140 




1 


1 





1 


1 


Grays Harbor Wash 


Lumber 


20 000 


12 000 


32 000 


23 500 


8 500 


q 


q 








to San Pedro, Cal. ' 
Adrift . 




600 




600 


600 










2 


2 


San Francisco, Cal. to 




20 000 




20,000 




20,000 


8 


8 








Coos Bay, Oreg. 
San Francisco, Cal., to 




15,000 




15,000 




15,000 


8 


8 








Grays Harbor, Wash. 
Adrift 




15 




15 


15 






2 








San Francisco to Eu- 


General 


150,000 


50,000 


200,000 




200,000 


147 


145 


2 


100 


100 


reka, Cal. 
South Inlet to Marsh- 




2,000 




2,000 


2,000 




1 


1 




1 


1 


field, Oreg. 
San Francisco Cal to 


Dynamite 


20 000 


5 000 


25 000 




25 000 


fi 


6 




6 


18 


Bandon, Oreg. 


and mer- 
chandise. 























254 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



Table of casualties, season 
DISTRICT No. 13. EMBRACING 



Date. | 


Place. 


; i 
j ! 
Name of station. 


Name of vessel and 
. where owned. ' 


Master. 


Ton- 
nage. 


1907. 
Apr 27 


One mile southwest by 


Humboldt Bay 


Gas. Ich., no name, Eu- 






May 12 
May 13 


west of station. 
One mile north of station. 


Point Adams 
Cape Disappoint- 


reka, Cal. 
Sip. Emily Reed, San 
Francisco, Cal. 
Fish boat, no name, As- 


.Davidson.. 


1,564 


May 29 


miles south of station. 
Three miles south-south- 


ment. ; 
Coos Bay 


toria, Oreg. 
Gas. Ich. Mayflower and 


Wasson. .. 


8 


June 2 
June 18 


west of station. 
Five miles south-south- 
west of station. 


Cape Disappoint- 
ment. 
Yaquina Bay 


tow, Coos Bay, Oreg. 
Str. Daisy Freeman, San 
Francisco, Cal. 
Sailboat no name, New- 


Johnson 


436 


June 19 
June 23 


of station. 
Twenty-seven miles 
southwest by west of 
Point Bonita. 
Three miles south of sta- 


Point Bonita and 
Fort Point. 

Southside 


port, Oreg. 
Sc. Louis, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Sc. Sausalito, San Fran- 


Dayer 
Bressem . . . 


831 

3G7 


June 25 


tion. 


Point Bonita 


cisco, Cal. 
Gas Ich John A Brit- 






June 27 


station. 




ton, San Francisco, 
Cal. 
Fish boat no name As- 






June 30 


west of station. 
Three-quarters mile west 


ment. 
Nome 


toria, Oreg. 
Sc. Mabel A., Nome, 


Webb 


10 




of station. 
Total 




Alaska. 



















RECAPIT 



Districts. 


Total 
number 
of disas- 
ters. 


Total value 
of vessels. 


Total value 
of cargoes. 


District No 1 


68 


$229, 120 


$93, 060 


District No. 2 . 


169 


913, 665 


238, 215 


District No 3 


23 


375, 655 


32,400 


District No 4 


52 


445, 525 


181,850 


District No. 5 


55 


747, 415 


615, 635 


District No 6 


28 


63,650 


15,905 


District No 7 


53 


586,250 


191, 785 


District No., 8 


6 


18,820 


800 


District No 9 


17 


11,205 


425 


District No. 10 


89 


688.225 


64,190 


District No 11 


111 


822,880 


129,025 


District No 12 


122 


1,233,420 


140,420 


District No. 13 


45 


866, 170 


126,875 












838 


7,002,000 


1,830,585 











In dangerous position, from which life-saving crew assisted to extricate her. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



255 



of 1906-7 Continued. 
PACIFIC COAST Continued. 










5 




g 











c3 


J, 


















I 


% 


. 




I 





























Whore from and 
where bound. 


Cargo. 


-51 


it 




1! 


otS 







3 


1 


o o 


11 






"S > 


i 




a 


I"" 


8 


0) 

a 


a 


1 


2 






n 


8 


"3 


q 


_9 





o 


o 





<n 






i 














1 





fi 


fi 


& 


Fishing trip 




$600 




$600 


$600 




1 


i 








San Pedro, Cal., to 




25,000 




25.000 


25,000 




18 


is 








Portland, Oreg. 
























Fishing trip 




550 




550 


550 




9 




9 






Dragged anchors 




3,300 




3,300 


3,270 


$30 


5 


5 








Portland, Oreg., to 


Lumber. . . 


40,000 


$3,500 


43,500 


43,000 


500 


21 


2] 








San Pedro, Cal. 
























Newport to Alsea Bay, 




100 




100 


100 




o 


7 








Oreg. 
























Grays Harbor, Wash., 


Railroad 


15,000 


16,000 


31,000 




31,000 


10 


10 








to San Francisco, 


ties. 






















Cal. 
























San Francisco, Cal., to 




40,000 




40 000 


39 000 


1 000 


s 


g 








Coos Bay, Oreg. 
























Pleasure trip 




4,000 




4,000 


4,000 




4 


4 




4 


4 


Capsized 




550 




550 


550 




9 


9 




9 


9 


Nome, Alaska, to Si- 


Tobacc o , 


2,000 


3,000 


5,000 


4,650 


350 


8 


3 








beria. 


sugar, 
























etc. 


























866,170 


126,875 


993,045 


630,045 


363,000 


6S6 


670 


7 


129 


161 



























ULATION. 



















Number 








Total 


Total 


Total 


Number 


Total 


of disas- 


Total amount 


Total amount 


Total amount 


number 


number 


number 


of per- 


number 


ters in- 


of property 
Involved. 


of property 
saved. 


of property 
lost. 


of per- 
sons on 


of per- 
sons 


of per- 
sons 


sons suc- 
cored at 


of days' 
succor 


volving 
total loss 








board. 


saved. 


lost. 


stations. 


afforded. 


to ves- 


















sels. 


$322, 180 


$265,290 


$56,890 


262 


262 




56 


101 


8 


1,151,880 


982,600 


169, 280 


847 


844 


3 


95 


120 


12 


408,0,55 


312, 750 


95,305 


124 


121 


3 


22 


46 


3 


627,375 


589.960 


37, 415 


232 


231 


1 


38 


38 


2 


1,363,050 


1,227,650 


135,400 


361 


350 


11 


54 


81 


5 


79,555 


59,285 


20,270 


107 


107 




71 


110 


3 


778,035 


567, 325 


210, 710 


321 


321 




59 


171 


5 


19,620 


19,610 


10 


16 


16 




12 


17 




11,630 


11,520 


110 


41 


41 




3 


3 




752, 415 


630,900 


121,515 


621 


619 


2 


37 


45 


3 


951,905 


872, 650 


79,255 


391 


388 


3 


74 


90 


3 


1,373,840 


1, 263, 400 


110, 440 


1,103 


1,088 


15 


149 


149 


4 


993, 045 


630,045 


363,000 


686 


679 


7 


137 


169 


7 


8,832,585; 7,432,985 


1,399,600 


5,112 


5,067 


45 


807 


o 1, 140 


55 



a These figures include 128 persons to whom succor was given who were not on the vessels embraced 
in the tables, and 138 days of such succor, as follows: 



District No. 1 . 
District No. 2 . 
District No. 3. 
District No. 4. 
District No. 5. 
District No. 6 . 



2990908- 



8 persons, 8 days. 
33 persons, 35 days. 

4 persons, 4 days. 

3 persons, 3 days. 

8 persons, 8 days. 
14 persons, 20 days. 



-17 



District No. 
District No. 
District No. 
District No. 
District No. 
District No. 



10 . . 
11.. 

12 . . 

13 . . 



7 persons, 8 days. 
10 persons, 11 days. 

8 persons, 8 days. 
13 persons, 13 days. 
12 persons, 12 days. 

8 persons, 8 days. 



Total 128 



138 



WOMEN'S NATIONAL RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 



257 



WOMEN'S NATIONAL RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 



Contributions of clothing, restoratives, etc., for the use of needy, 
sick, and injured persons rescued from shipwreck and other situa- 
tions of distress or danger, were made by the Women's National 
Relief Association during the year, as usual, to a considerable number 
of life-saving stations. The following table shows the stations at 
which these supplies were used, the number of beneficiaries, and the 
circumstance that in each instance gave rise to the need sought to be 
relieved. 

Beneficiaries of the Women's National Relief Association. 



Date. 



1906. 

July 1 

4 

4 

5 

6 

12 

12 

15 

26 

29 

30 

31 

31 

Aug. 2 

4 
13 
13 
14 
18 
19 
20 
21 
23 
26 

Sept. 2 

15 
18 
19 

20 
25 
29 
30 
30 
30 

Oct. 8 
21 
25 
28 
28 

Nov. 4 
15 



Station and locality. 



Beneficiaries. 



Old Chicago, Illinois 

Watch Hill, Rhode Island. . 

Saint Joseph, Michigan 

Old Chicago, Illinois 

Cold Spring, New Jersey 

Buffalo, New York 

Point Adams, Oregon 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Gurnet, Massachusetts 

Hereford Inlet, New Jersey. 

Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 

Orleans, Massachusetts 

Golden Gate, California 

Manomet Point, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Muskegon, Michigan 

Point of Woods, New York. 

Sturgeon Point, Michigan.. 

Pecks Beach, New Jersey 

Erie, Pennsylvania 

Sheboygan, Michigan 

Jackson Park, Illinois... 

South Haven, Michigan. 

Charlotte, New York. . . . 

Charlevoix, Michigan 



City Point, Massachusetts.. 
Brenton Point, Rhode 

Island. 

Marblehead, Ohio 

Gloucester, Massachusetts.. 
Sullivans Island, South 

Carolina. 

Gloucester, Massachusetts.. 
Assateague Beach, Virginia. 

Old Chicago, Illinois 

Forked River, New Jersey . 

Cape May, New Jersey 

Old Chicago, Illinois 

Portage, Michigan 

Green Run Inlet, Maryland . 

Point Adams, Oregon 

Short Beach, New York 

Harbor Beach, Michigan . . . 

Nauset, Massachusetts 

Point Judith, Rhode Island. 



A man who had fallen from a pier. 

Two men from the sloop Alice. 

A woman rescued from a capsized canoe. 

Two men rescued from a capsized catboat. 

Two men rescued from a capsized naphtha launch. 

A boy taken from the water and resuscitated by a surfman. 

Two men rescued from a foundered fish boat. ' I 

A man who had fallen from a pier while fishing. 

A man in a gasoline launch, storm-bound near the station. 

Six survivors from gasoline schooner Nora and launch Alva B, 

capsized on Hereford Bar. 
Three persons frm wrecked sloop yacht Sanquoit. 

Two persons from wrecked gasoline launch. 

A demented woman who had attempted suicide by drowning. 

A woman rescued from drowning. 

A woman rescued from drowning. 
Two men rescued from a capsized sloop. 
A woman drenched while landing from a boat. 
A destitute man. 

Four men from the stranded gasoline schooner Edith. 
A man rescued from a gisoline rowboat. 
A man and a boy rescued from drowning. 
A man who had fallen into the water from a pier. 
Two men from the stranded gasoline launch Marjorir. 
Two passengers and crew of American steamer Illinois (4 per- 
sons). 

Four persons from capsized yacht Thelma II. 
Two fishermen from capsized sloop Sturgeon. 

Six of crew of steamer H. B. Tuttle. 

A man who had fallen into the water from a dock. 

A man rescued from a capsized skiff. 

A workman taken sick near the station. 

Crew of wrecked American schooner Marion Grimes (15 persons). 
Three men, survivors of the lost car barge No. 2. 
Two persons from a disabled gasoline launch. 
Eleven persons from disabled gasoline sloop Fanny Moffat 
Six persons from gasoline launch Surf. 
Eight of crew of wrecked schooner Pasadena. 
A man suffering from exposure. 

Four destitute seamen from wrecked British ship Peter Iredale. 
A man from sunken sharpie. 

Twenty-two men, crew of stranded American steamer Path- 
finder. 

Crew of 6 men landed from the British schooner G. M. Cochrane. 
Two of crew of stranded American schooner Lugano. 

259 



260 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

Beneficiaries of the Women's National Relief Association Continued. 



Date. 


Station and locality. 


Beneficiaries. 


1906. 






Nov. 15 


Long Branch, New Jersey. . 


Eight men from the crews of the schooners James M. Hall and 






Sam. C. Holmes. 


15 


Cape Lookout, North Caro- 
lina. 


Crew of 3 from the schooner yacht Iris. 


25 
28 


Wood End, Massachusetts. 
Oak Island, North Carolina. 


Two men from a stranded gasoline launch. 
Destitute sailor rescued from a rock in a salt marsh. 


Dec. 6 


Assateague Beach, Virginia. 


Crew of 6 from wrecked schooner Florence I. Lockwood. 


16 


Wallops Beach, Virginia 


Two men from a weather-bound sloop. 


27 


Fourth Cliff, Massachusetts 


Fisherman from a stranded gasoline launch. 


27 


Wood End, Massachusetts. 


Fisherman from disabled gasoline launch. 


1907. 






Jan. 9 


Peaked Hill Bars, Massa- 


Two men from a dory that had landed through the surf. 




chusetts. 




Feb. 4 


Ocean City, Maryland 


Crew of 7 from wrecked schooner Tena A. Cotton. 


9 


Brentons Point, Rhode 


Three firemen from the tug Richmond. 




Island. 




12 


Quonochontaug, Rhode 


Crew of 7 from the schooner Harry P. Knowlton. 




Island. 




12 


Sandy Point and New Shore- 


Nineteen survivors from the steamer Larchmont. 




ham, Rhode Island. 




14 


Point of Woods, New York. 


A man who had been out all night on the frozen bay. 


18 


Jerrys Point, New Hamp- 
shire. 


Three men who had been adrift in an open boat for 36 hours. 


18 


Highland, Massachusetts... 


Two men from the wrecked barge Girard. 


23 


Dam Neck Mills, Virginia. . . 


A sick and destitute man. 


Mar. 9 


Cape Fear, North Carolina. 


Two sailors from the wrecked schooner Stanley H. Minor. 


14 


Wood End, Massachusetts. 


Five fishermen who had been caught in an ice field. 


25 


Louisville, Kentucky 


A man who had fallen into the water. 


Apr. 3 


Coos Bay, Oregon 


A man from the stranded gasoline launch Telephone. 


12 


Coos Bay, Oregon 


Six men from the wrecked barge Chinook. 


13 


Baileys Harbor, Wisconsin. 


Two men from an overturned sailboat, 


23 


Atlantic City, New Jersey . . 


Six men from the sunken schooner Charles W. Parker. 


May 1 


Fairport, Ohio 


Two men of crew of tug L. B. Johnson. 


y 3 


Holland Michigan 


Man who had fallen into the water from dock. 


13 


Oregon Inlet, North Caro- 


A man in distress. 




lina. 




20 


Fire Island, New York 


Three men from a stranded sloop. 


25 


Charlevoix Michigan 


A young man who had fallen into the water from a pier. 


June 17 
19 


City Point, Massachusetts.. 
Hammond, Michigan. 


Two men who had capsized in a skiff. 
A family who had lost their belongings in a fire. 


22 


Racine, Wisconsin 


A man resuscitated from drowning. 


27 


Cape Disappointment, 
Washington. 


Two men rescued from a capsized fish boat. 


29 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Ten persons capsized from gasoline launch Ideal. 



LETTERS OF ACKNOWLEDGMENT. 



261 



LETTERS ACKNOWLEDGING THE SERVICES OF LIFE-SAVING 

CREWS. 



The following special acknowledgments of services rendered by the 
life-saving crews during the year have been received at the office of 
the General Superintendent. Numerous similar expressions of grati- 
tude, tendered personally to the members of the life-saving corps, 
are noted in the wreck reports and transcripts of station journals 
which the keepers are required to forward to headquarters. 

WAKEFIELD, RHODE ISLAND, July 8, 1906. 

MY DEAR SIR: I take this opportunity to thank you as chief of the Life-Saving 
Service for the timely and valuable service rendered me on the 4th instant by Super- 
intendent H. M. Knowles, surfmen Geo. N. Streeter, James H. Moore, and Charles H. 
Whaley, ex-Surfmen Whaley, Gardiner, and friends in restoring me to life on that date. 
Three of us were in a flat-bottom sailboat, owned and sailed by Elisha Taylor of this 
place, when she was capsized by jibing in a brisk southwest wind. I was hit by the 
boom on the left side of my head, rendering me unconscious and pitching me headlong 
under the sail, as the boat was upset and I sank below the surface. Elisha Taylor, 17 
years of age, jumped in after me. He could not swim. He found me struggling in the 
water, but he could not get me out of the sails of the boat. He had to come up to get 
air. He took off his clothes and jumped in the second time. He got me by the hair 
of my head and brought me to the surface. From the time I was hit I remembered 
nothing that transpired until about 2 a. m. the next day, when I regained conscious- 
ness. My narrow escape from death, as related by my friends, is more miraculous 
than I can describe by pen or words, and I am satisfied that it is due to the valuable 
services rendered by your men and Elisha Taylor that I am here to relate this much. 

The fact that my watch stopped at 4.20 p. m. is conclusive that more than half an 
hour must have elapsed from the time the ooat upset until I was dragged ashore in a 
lifeless condition. 

Very truly, yours, ROBERT MOONEY. 

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT, UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



SAVIN HILL, MASSACHUSETTS, July 30, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: Both my son and myself appreciate very much your kindness in towing 
us home after losing our rudder off Castle Island yesterday. I would have been glad 
to pay the boys who came over with us, but they refused it, and I learned afterwards 
that it was against the rules to receive any pay. I hope some time to be able to return 
the kindness. 

Yours, truly, WILLIAM B. ROLFE, 

Owner Catboat Nina D. 
Captain FRANKLIN E. HAMILTON, 

Keeper, City Point Life-Saving Station, South Boston, Boston, Massachusetts. 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, August 1, 1906. 

GENTLEMEN: My husband and I wish to extend to you our heartfelt thanks for the 
rescue of our only son on Sunday afternoon, July 29. We had been over 'the day 
before on an excursion given by the Improved Order of Red Men, and as my daugh- 

263 



264 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 

ter was spending her vacation at River View resort with Mrs. J. A. Matheson, and 
was not to return until Sunday night, we left William there to accompany his sister 
home. I really feel that but for your timely efforts in rescuing him we might to-day 
be in tears. So kindly accept our heartfelt thanks and deepest gratitude for what 
you have done. 

Sincerely and gratefully, yours, Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE J. GEE. 

To the LIFE-SAVERS, LIFE-SAVING STATION, 

South Haven, Michigan. 



GARDINERS ISLAND, SUFFOLK COUNTY, NEW YORK, 

August 5, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: Accept from Mr. and Mrs. John Lyon Gardiner their sincere thanks 
for the valuable assistance which you and your crew extended to their son Winthrop 
Gardiner the night of July 31. 

Mr. Winthrop Gardiner has repeated his story of your untiring efforts to save his 
boat, and of the many courtesies extended to himself and friend. With feelings of 
deepest gratitude to your crew, believe me, 

Sincerely, ygurs, E. C. GARDINER. 

Captain JAMES H. CHARLES, 

Keeper Orleans Life-Saving Station. 



GARDINERS ISLAND, SUFFOLK COUNTY, NEW YORK, 

August 5, 1906. 

MY DEAR CAPTAIN: My friend J. L. d'Este and I wish to thank you sincerely for 
the services and kind hospitality you showed us the night of July 31 last. We reached 
home safely. 

Sincerely, yours, W. GARDINER. 

Captain JAMES H. CHARLES, 

Keeper Orleans Life-Saving Station, East Orleans, Massachusetts. 



HAWKINS BROTHERS COMPANY, 

Painesville, Ohio, August 13, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: I wish to sincerely thank you and the Fairport life-saving crew for the 
prompt services rendered in assisting me in saving my wife from being drowned in 
Grand River on August 8, 1906. 

We both also express our sincere thanks to the Women's National Relief Associa- 
tion, and to yourself and wife for your most kmd personal hospitality. 

Very truly, yours, S. M. HAWKINS. 

Captain N. M. RASMUSSEN, 

Keeper Fairport Life-Saving Station, Fairport Harbor, Ohio. 



OCRACOKE, NORTH CAROLINA, August 15, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: I want to express to you and your crew our thanks for the prompt assist- 
ance rendered us on Sunday afternoon. Our entire party is enthusiastic over the man- 
ner in which you came to our relief while we were in distress. With best wishes for 
you and your crew, I remain, 

Cordially, yours, WALTER GASKILL, 

Master, Schooner Brant. 
Captain DAVID WILLIAMS, 

Keeper Ocracoke Life-Saving Station, Ocracoke, North Carolina. 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, August 21, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: I most sincerely and gratefully wish to convey to you my commendation 
of the prompt and wise conduct of your life-saving crew at Jackson Park Station yester- 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 265 

day afternoon in rescuing my boy from what appeared to be sure death from drowning. 
I can not adequately extend my thanks for such work as that. But for their timely 
and skillful attendance, a little coffin with my best treasure on this earth would be now 
in this room. 

I wish to especially name Mr. Henry Sinnigen and Edward Schonsett for their 
daring and bravery and subsequent scientific treatment of the unconscious form, which 
led to restoration nothing short of miraculous. May the Lord bless such people engaged 
in such heroic work. 

Most earnestly, yours, AUGUST PAARSEN, Jr., 

5749 Lowe Avenue. 

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 

Washington, District of Columbia. 



NOANK, CONNECTICUT, August 25, 1906. 

MY DEAR MR. KIMBALL: I beg to call your attention to the assistance rendered myself 
and boys, in a cat boat on the night of the 23d instant, by Keeper Ed. P. Sisson and the 
crew oi the Fishers Island station (East Harbor). 

There was of course no especial danger to anyone. But the running of the lines and 
laying out of kedges was, in my opinion, very cleverly done. 

I also would call to your attention the good discipline of the men, as I saw them 
about the station and afloat. 

But what impressed me was the genuine desire to give any assistance possible under 
any circumstances whatever. 

I am most grateful to Captain Sisson and his men, and take this method of expressing 
my appreciation, and I hope you will bear it in mind to their credit. 

******* 

FRANCIS WINSLOW, 
Lieut. U. S. N. (Retired). 
S. I. KIMBALL, Esq., 

General Superintendent U. S. Life-Saving Service, 

Treasury Department, Washington, D. C. 



CITY OF CHARLEVOIX. 
CHARLEVOIX, MICHIGAN. 

Resolved, That the city council of the city of Charlevoix in session Wednesday even- 
ing August 29, 1906, do hereby express their unqualified admiration and appreciation 
for the splendid efforts of Captain Fountain and the Charlevoix life-saving crew of the 
Charlevoix station in aiding the distressed steamer Illinois, aground on the Charlevoix 
south beach Sunday evening and night, August 26 (during which time the wind 
reached a velocity of 30 miles an hour and the sea was running very high), in removing 
the passengers, women, children, and men (many of whom were citizens of Charlevoix), 
nearly 400 in all, by means of the breeches buoy and by the surf boat. 

Resolved, That the skill, endurance, and brave effort of the captain and his crew are 
entitled to the highest commendation and praise, and this council is proud of the 
efficiency and capability of the United States Life-Saving Service, and of the Charle- 
voix station in particular. 

The city council desires also to express their appreciation and the grateful thanks 
of the city and its officers for the well directed and gallant efforts of many citizens and 
summer visitors in supplementing and promoting the efforts of the captain and crew 
of the life-saving station. 

Resolved, That this resolution be spread upon the records and that a suitably en- 
graved and framed copy be presented to Captain Fountain and his crew, and also 
that a copy be forwarded to the proper governmental department. 

The above resolution was unanimously adopted at a meeting of the city council 
held at the city council chambers August 29, A. D. 1906. 

HARVEY L. IDDINGS, Mayor. 
H. S. HARSHA, City Clerk. 



266 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

NEW ENGLAND INSURANCE EXCHANGE, 

Boston, Massachusetts, August 31, 1906. 

MY DEAR CAPTAIN: It is very hard to put on paper just how grateful Captain 
Stockbridge and myself feel toward you and your able crew for the timely assistance 
rendered on the morning of August 24. The sloop Modoc was towed to Plymouth 
and hauled out for the winter at Seaside. The sail and the tender caused us some 
trouble when we started, as you doubtless observed. We found that the hull suffered 
no injury and with all of the pounding not a seam opened. The step split and let 
the mast go forward, but it did not give away entirely. 

Thanking you heartily and with kindest regards to the cook and the crew, I remain, 
Very truly, yours, 

HENRY B. SEARS, Owner, Sloop Modoc. 
Captain GEORGE W. HOLMES, 

Keeper Manomet Point Life-Saving Station, Manomet, Massachusetts. 



BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA, September 1, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: I highly appreciate the services rendered by Keeper Pugh and his 
crew of the Fort Macon life-saving station in assisting me in heaving my vessel off 
Quack Shoal, North Carolina. I also wish to express my gratitude for the aid the 
Life-Saving Service has rendered my vessel in the past. 

Very respectfully, J. G. BALLANCE, 

Master, Schooner Allison Miller. 

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 

Washington, District of Columbia. 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, September 4, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: I feel it my duty to express my heartfelt thanks to you and your crew 
for the prompt assistance you gave me on Sunday, the 2d instant, when my yacht 
Thelma //foundered and capsized off Castle Island; and for the kindness and hospi- 
tality shown us at the station. 
Believe me to be, 

Yours, sincerely, 

W. P. WORDEN. 

Captain FRANKLIN E. HAMILTON, 

Keeper City Point Life-Saving Station, South Boston, Boston, Massachusetts. 



PEORIA, ILLINOIS, September 5, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: Being one of the passengers, with my wife and son, on the steamer 
Illinois, stranded at Charlevoix, Michigan, August 26 last, I wish to call your atten- 
tion to the grand work of the life-saving crew of that station. They were unceasing 
in their efforts to do everything in their power for the stranded passengers, many of 
whom were sick, and, granting that they were only doing their duty, they deserve 
great credit for their patient and tender care of the women and children. I am only 
one of many who voiced their appreciation of the heroic work, especially that of the 
keeper, Mr. Frank Fountain. 

I assure you that if there is any way of a promotion or a credit mark that can be 
given to Keeper Fountain, I trust that you will take this into consideration. I beg 
to remain, 

Yours, truly, M. SCHRADZKI. 

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 

Washington, District of Columbia. 



MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN, September 5, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: I wish to again most heartily thank you for the assistance you and your 
crew rendered me yesterday in rescuing me from the lake. At sunrise I was so far out 
that I had practically given up any hope of being seen from the life-saving station, and 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 267 

was trying to keep in the path of some passing vessel, which seemed more difficult as 
the launch was drifting out to sea all of the time. I can not too heartily praise your 
vigilance, as it seems now a marvel that you were able to locate me and pick me up so 
promptly. 

Most sincerely, yours, R. E. JANNEY. 

Captain JOHN A. NELSON, 

Keeper Muskegon Life-Saving Station, Muskeg on, Michigan. 



TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA, September 13, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: Doubtless you have heard from many who were on board the steamer 
Illinois when she went aground August 26 last at Cnarlevoix the praises of the keeper 
and men of the life-saving station at that point. But if so, the praise that is due them 
can not be too 'of ten repeated or too much emphasized. 

I have never had stronger feelings of gratitude and a greater pride in my country, 
and I served four years as an officer in the war for the Union, than when I and my 
family were safely taken from the stranded vessel, and I witnessed the untiring and 
intelligent work of that little band of heroes. All honor to them. I wish I had a list 
of their names. 

Respectfully, yours, A. C. FORD. 



SOUTH BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, October 7, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: We wish to extend our thanks to you all for the manner in which you 
tried to rescue Elliott R. Greenfell. Words can not express the appreciation and 
gratitude which we feel toward you all, which we assure you we will never forget. 

MRS. GREENFELL AND FAMILY. 
Captain HAMILTON AND CREW, 

City Point Life-Saving Station, South Boston, Boston, Mass. 



NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT, October 8, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: I desire to express my thanks to the crew of the Hunniwells Beach 
life-saving station for the services rendered in connection with the barge Valentine, 
which struck on North Sugar Loaf, entrance to Kennebec River, on the 29th of Sep- 
tember last, in tow of the tug Harold. 

The crew of that station ran out a hawser to the barge Valentine after we had pulled 
her off, and 6 men went abroad the barge and kept her free of water until she arrived 
at Bath. Their help was most timely, and saved the barge from filling full of water, 
and also prevented serious damage to her cargo of ice. 

I want to express my thanks for the prompt manner in which they performed their 
duty. 

Yours, very truly, AMASA LEANE, 

Master, Tug Harold. 
GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 

Washington, District of Columbia. 



PORTAGE LIFE-SAVING STATION, MICHIGAN, October 9, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: At 6.15 last night the steamer Gladstone towing the barge Pasadena 
entered the canal, but the Pasadena struck the shore outside of the east breakwater. 
Captain T. H. McCormick, of the Portage life-saving station, at once started out in 
the face of a 60-mile gale to rescue the crew, but the vessel broke up before he was 
able to reach her. Eight of the crew reached shore and were well taken care of at 
the station. Two of her crew were lost. This morning the vessel is completely 
broken up, showing the fierceness of the storm. I consider it a very brave act for 
Captain McCormick to have gone out as he did. 
Yours, respectfully, 

J. A. HOLMES, Master, Steamer Gladstone. 
Captain J. G. KIAH, 

Superintendent Eleventh Life-Saving District, Harbor Beach, Michigan. 



268 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

WASHBURN, WISCONSIN, October 14, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: Since my arrival here and at Duluth have heard several marine men 
giving their opinions as to the manner of handling the wreck of the barge Pasadena, 
which occured at Portage Canal, October 8th. Now, as a matter of fact, I have great 
respect for the Life-Saving Service, for I consider it is about as near perfect as it is 
possible to get it and, if not presuming too much on your time, would like to state to 
you just what I think of the action of Captain McCormick and his able crew, I being 
an eye-witness to their efforts to reach the unfortunate sailors. I was sheltered in 
Lilly Pond at the time and, along with my chief engineer, was the first on the scene 
of the wreck outside of the life-saving crew, and watched their several efforts to get 
out of the piers in the face of a 50-mile northwest wind and terrific sea, and can truth- 
fully say there never were men worked harder and displayed better knowledge of 
their business than did that crew on the night in question. 

The barge broke up very quickly; don't think she lasted over half an hour, if that. 
Had she held together ten minutes longer the crew would, I believe, r^ave got every 
man aboard off in safety. Unfortunately the men were in the surf just as the boat 
passed out of the gap. The only reason I have in making this statement to you is 
this: I don't like to hear anyone censured when they were doing everything that 
human beings could do. I am not acquainted with Captain McCormick, but would 
be just as ready, if he had been lax in his duty, to find fault as I am to praise his 
efforts in behalf of that crew. 

It would seem to me from the brave efforts of those life-savers to reach that wreck 
that there was a stronger motive urging them on than the mere question of dollars 
and cents. My mate, chief engineer as well, and barge captain and crew, will, I 
think, bear me out in all I say, as we were all on the beach and, am pleased to say, 
helped to drag those poor fellows out of the surf and get them to the station. 

Trusting that I have not trespassed too much on your valuable time, I have the 
honor to remain, 

Yours, respectfully, JOHN Y. HANSON, 

Master, Steamer Charles A. Street. 

Captain J. G. KIAH, 

Superintendent Eleventh Life-Saving District, Harbor Beach, Michigan. 



CAPE HENRY, VIRGINIA, October 24, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: We hereby wish to express our gratitude and appreciation for the serv- 
ices rendered by Keeper Nelson Holmes and crew of the Cape Henry life-saving 
station, and Keeper J. W. Partridge and crew of the Virginia Beach life-saving station 
on Saturday night, October 20, when they rescued our crew in the breeches buoy and 
remained by us all night taking us and our effects ashore at daylight. We also desire 
to compliment them upon the splendid way in which they handled their equipment 
in the face of a heavy NE. gale and thick weather. They fired two lines. The first 
crossed us aft, but on account of the seas going over the after end we were unable to 
reach it. The second line landed in our fore rigging, and then we had no difficulty 
in carrying out the instructions from shore. We thank them for the kind treatment 
and hospitality extended to us while at the station. 
Respectfully, yours, 

J. D. CHISHOLM, Master, 
FERDINAND McKEiGE, Jr., First Mate, 
ALBERT SWIM, Chief Engineer, 
SAMUEL HAMPTON, Assistant Engineer, 

Steamer George Farwell. 
GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, October 27 , 1906. 

DEAR SIR: I am at a loss to find words to express my appreciation and gratitude 
to you and your able men for your most obliging and heroic work in saving us from 
our most sorry plight in the bay last Monday morning, October 22, after being 
ashore on that little desolate island all night. I have seen a number of boats handled, 
but the way you and your men managed that sailboat in the gale, and at the same 
time rowing us off that shore, is surely deserving of far more than I can ever say or do 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEKVICE. 269 

for you. The dry clothing you were kind enough to supply me with I left at the 
hotel at Snow Hill. Accept my sincere thanks. 

Yours, very truly, NAT. F. CROW. 

Captain B. S. POWELL, 

Keeper Green Run Inlet Life-Saving Station, Ocean City, Maryland. 



LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY, October 30, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: I wish to thank you and your crew for the noble work in preserving 
the lives of myself and companions who came so near being dashed over the falls 
on the night of the 26th instant. Being a northerner, and accustomed to being out 
in rough water on the lakes, I did not realize our danger until I heard that awful 
roar of the falls. I owe my life to the heroic work of your men who struggled with our 
launch for more than an hour before we were safely landed. Again allow me to extend 
to you my heartfelt thanks and best wishes. 

Yours, very truly, W. C. BAKER, Jr. 

Captain WILLIAM M. DEVAN, 

Keeper Louisville Life-Saving Station, Louisville, Kentucky. 



MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN, November 2, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: I want to congratulate you on the good work of the life-saving crew 
and keeper of the Muskegon station here for the assistance they rendered in saving 
my schooner Emily and Eliza on Monday, October 29. I feel under obligations to 
them for the good they did me. 

Very truly, yours, L. C. LUDWIG, 

Master, Schooner Emily and Eliza. 
Captain CHARLES MORTON, 

Superintendent Twelfth Life-Saving District, Grand Haven, Michigan. 



POINT JUDITH, RHODE ISLAND, November 19, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: We desire to express to you, as chief of the Life-Saving Service, our 
grateful appreciation of the valuable service rendered by the Point Judith life-saving 
crew, under command of Captain Tefft, and also to those assisting him in saving our 
lives on the 15th instant. The fouling of the shot line with other ropes in the wreck- 
age was most unfortunate, through no fault of the life-savers. They did for us all 
that was possible for anyone to do under the circumstances. 

Captain EDMUND BARTER, 

Master, late Schooner Lugano. 
FRED. BOUSHER, Seaman. 
Hon. S. I. KIMBALL, 

General Superintendent United States Life-Saving Service, 

Washington, District of Columbia. 



POINT JUDITH, RHODE ISLAND, November 19, 1906. 

We take this opportunity to express through the columns of your valuable paper our 
sincere gratitude for the timely service rendered by the Point Judith life-saving crew, 
and their assistance in saving our lives, and for the kind treatment received while at 
the station. My vessel, the schooner Lugano, of Portland, Maine, on November 15 
had become water-logged and Unmanageable, and was driven on the rocks during 
the prevalence of a terrific northeast gale and dashed to pieces by the heavy seas. 
Those lost were unquestionably stunned or killed by being struck by wreckage, as 
marks about their heads bore evidence to that effect. The life-saving crew and those 
assisting them did all that was possible for men to do to save us. 

EDMUND BARTER, Master. 
FRED. BOUSHER, Seaman. 
To the EDITOR OF THE NEW YORK HERALD. 



270 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

DULUTH, MINNESOTA, November 27, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: I take the liberty of writing you a few lines in regard to the life-saving 
crew of Portage station. On the morning of the 23d instant, at 4 o'clock, the barge 
Matanzas arrived at Portage in tow of the small fish tug Tramp. In trying to take the 
barge in, the tug did not have the necessary power to hold her up to the westward 
against the heavy sea and she took the bottom with her anchor down. We were 
immediately boarded by Keeper McCormick and his crew of surf men. They turned 
to and rendered all the assistance possible. All that I have to say is that I found 
the whole crew, from Keeper McCormick down, experts at the business and I cheer- 
fully and without solicitation commend the Portage life-savers as worthy of any con- 
sideration the Government or the superintendent of the eleventh district may see fit 
to offer. 

Yours, truly, S. M. MURPHY, Master, barge Matanzas. 

Captain JEROME G. KIAH, 

Superintendent Eleventh Life-Saving District, Harbor Beach, Michigan. 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, December 1, 1906. 

DEAR SIR : I beg leave to express the thanks of myself and crew to the Life-Saving 
Service and especially to the crew of life-savers of the Nauset station who, with the 
assistance of Keeper Charles and the crew of the Orleans life-saying station, succeeded 
in rescuing us from the wreck of the schooner G. M. Cochrane, which stranded on Nauset 
Beach, November 4, 1906. The crew and myself had to stay at the station for a few 
days and were treated with the greatest kindness by Keeper Walker and his gallant 
crew. This we shall always keep in grateful remembrance. 
Very respectfully, 

BEDFORD TOWER, Master. 
Hon. S. I. KIMBALL, 

General Superintendent United States Life-Saving Service. 



ASSATEAGUE, VIRGINIA, December 8, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: We, the captain and mate of the schooner Florence I. Lockwood, wish to 
express our sincere thanks to the keeper and crew of this station for the prompt man- 
ner in which they came to our assistance without any signals when our vessel was 
stranded and sunk, the wind and sea being strong. Also for the kind treatment 
received from them while at the station with my crew. 
Respectfully, 

WILLIAM A. TAYLOR, Master. 
H. M. BERRY, Mate. 

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 

Washington, District of Columbia. 



NORFOLK AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, 

Norfolk, Virginia, December 18, 1906. 

DEAR SIR: Referring to the steamer Albemarle, which went ashore on Hogis Reef, 
Pamlico Sound, on the morning of the 4th instant, I wish to thank you and your 
men, and also the General Superintendent of the Life-Saving Service, for the prompt 
manner in which you responded to the call, your crew making the 14 miles in very 
quick time. 

Yours, truly, M. W. MAGUIRE, 

General Superintendent. 

Captain W. T. WILLIS, 

Keeper, Core Bank Life-Saving Station, Atlantic, North Carolina. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 271 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND LABOR, 
LIGHT-HOUSE ESTABLISHMENT, MUTUAL SAVINGS 

BANK BUILDING, 704 MARKET STREET, 
OFFICE OF INSPECTOR, TWELFTH DISTRICT, 

San Francisco, California, December 24, 1906. 

SIR: I desire to express to you and to the captain and crew of the life-saving station, 
Humboldt Bay, California, my thanks for the service rendered by them to the light- 
house tender Madrono on December 22, 1906. 

In attempting to place Humboldt Bay Buoy No. 1 on December 18, 1906, the 
Madrono was struck by 3 breakers coming over the stern and was swept inshore. 
She was obliged to let go the spar buoy at a point about 150 feet inshore of its proper 
position. 

On December 22d, Captain Hennig went with his lifeboat to the buoy, which was 

in a position not safe for the Madrono to approach, and secured a line to it, by which 

the Madrono was able to haul the buoy out and then to place it in proper position. 

This could not have been done without the kind assistance of the life-saving crew. 

Respectfully, 

H. T. MAYO, 

Commander, U. S. N., Inspector. 
Major T. J. BLAKENEY, 

Superintendent Thirteenth Life-Saving District, San Francisco, California. 



UNITED STATES REVENUE-CUTTER SERVICE, 

STEAMER GRESHAM, 

Provincetown, Massachusetts, January 6, 1907. 

SIR: I wish to express my appreciation of your promptness, and that of the crew at 
Wood End life-saving station, in informing me of the disaster to the schooner Alice T. 
Boardman, on Handkerchief shoal, on the 4th instant. Much credit is also due to the 
crew of the life-saving station at Monomoy Point,* as they took off the crew of the 
stranded schooner under very adverse circumstances. 

The crew of the Gresham succeeded in getting the schooner off the shoal yesterday, 
and she was safely towed into Hyannis Harbor last night. 

Respectfully, yours, K. W. PERRY, 

Captain, Commanding. 
Captain GEO. W. BOWLEY, 

Superintendent Second Life-Saving District, Provincetown, Massachusetts. 



OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C., Januarys, 1907. 

SIR: The following is an extract of a letter received from Captain J. H. Brown, U. S. 
Revenue-Cutter Service, commanding the revenue-cutter Woodbury, stationed at 
Portland, Maine, in relation to the services of the keeper and crew of the Cross Island 
life-saving station, in connection with the stranded schooner Wandrian: 

"It gives me pleasure to highly commend Keeper Fred. E. Small and the crew of 
the Cross Island station for the valuable assistance rendered to the Woodbury in run- 
ning and handling lines, and for the hearty, cheerful, and intelligent manner in which 
the work was done." 

Respectfully, WORTH G. Ross, 

Captain U. S. R. C. S., Chief of Division. 
GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



PORTSMOUTH, NORTH CAROLINA, January 15, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: We, the undersigned, wish to express our appreciation of the assistance 
that Keeper McWilliams and crew of the Portsmouth station have rendered us. On 
January 14, 1907, at 8.10 a. m., the above-named crew boarded the schooner John I. 
Snow, of Rockland, Maine, on her way to Miami, Florida, which had gone ashore on 

* For detailed account of services of Monomoy Point life-saving crew see p. 59. 
2990908 18 



272 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

Portsmouth Beach. All of us were taken off and carried to the life-saving station. 
We must say that we never met a more gentlemanly crew in our life. We also found 
the crew ready to give assistance in any way they could. _ We appreciated the good 
work done for us; also the genial manner in which they did it. We wish to congrat- 
ulate you in having such a good man as Keeper McWilliams. 
Yours, very respectfully, 

H. S. TUTTLE, Captain. 

G. H. BROWN, Mate. 

C. F. STREAM, Cook. 

VICTOR NEWMAN. 

J. B. DERDLEY. 

EDWARD KLEMENSEN. 
Of Schooner John I. Snow. 

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



ASTORIA, OREGON, January 15, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: The schooner Alice McDonald, ashore on Clatsop Spit, mouth of the 
Columbia River, for the last fourteen days, was floated yesterday. During that time 
the Point Adams life-saving crew rendered me the very best service possible was ready 
night and day, and ran lines through the surf several times when quite rough and very- 
cold. I am unable to adequately express my obligation for the assistance rendered. 
Yours truly, 

JOSEPH BENDER, Master. 

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 

Washington, District of Columbia. 



CITY OF LOUISVILLE, BOARD OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

Louisville, Kentucky, February 1, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: Since normal conditions are beginning to prevail in the extensive dis- 
trict lately visited by the flood, I take occasion in behalf of the board of public safety, 
tcvtender you and the men under your command sincerest thanks and grateful acknowl- 
edgments for the heroic conduct exhibited at a time of great peril. Yourself and men 
not only entered cheerfully in the trying work of rescue, but the work of assisting the 
rescued was rendered doubly effective by your vigilance and willingness to ameliorate 
suffering wherever found. The board of public safety feel that yourself and crew 
have, by your self-possession, energy, and intelligence, been of material aid and assist- 
ance to the city authorities, and that there is due you and the men under your com- 
mand public acknowledgment of your devotion to duty. 
Very sincerely, yours, 

JAS. B. SMITH, Chairman. 
Captain WILLIAM M. DEVAN, 

Keeper Louisville Life-Saving Station, Louisville, Kentucky. 



NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. 

SIR: I wish to thank you, the keeper and crew of Ocean City (Maryland) station for 
their prompt rescue, and care afterwards, of me and my crew when I was stranded in 
that vicinity on the schooner Tena A. Cotton, on February 4, 1907. 

Respectfully, ELIAS PRIMROSE. 

Hon. S. I. KIMBALL, 

General Superintendent United States Life-Saving Service, 

Washington, District of Columbia. 



UNITED STATES POST-OFFICE, 
Louisville, Kentucky, February 4, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: My attention has just been called to the splendid service rendered by 
you to Mr. John Watson, carrier No. 41, during the recent flood. In some way the 
articles which appeared in the papers escaped my attention and it was only to-day 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 273 

that I heard of the matter. I wish to thank you personally very much and assure 
vou of the high appreciation in which I hold you along with Mr. Watson. It is just 
such whole-hearted service as this that marks the real, conscientious public servant. 
I trust that it may be my pleasure to know you and thank you in person, as I have 
done Mr. Watson. 

Respectfully, ROBT. E. WOODS, 

Postmaster. 
Captain W. M. DEVAN, 

Keeper, Louisville Life-Saving Station, 

Louisville, Kentucky. 



EXECUTIVE OFFICE, 
City of Louisville, February 5, 1907. 

MY DEAR SIR: As mayor of the city of Louisville, and personally, it affords me 
more than usual pleasure to extend you, on behalf of our citizens, thanks for the excel- 
lent work done oy you and the Louisville life-saving crew during the recent flood, 
which wrought so much damage in Louisville. It would be a difficult matter to 
estimate in money the services rendered to the destitute and homeless by your crew* 
In naming you at the outset as one to have charge of the distribution of provisions, 
coal, etc., I felt that no mistake was made, by reason of your wide acquaintance along 
the river front with citizens whose homes were ruined on account of the flooded con- 
ditions. 

It is not my custom to write such letters of commendation, but I feel in this instance 
that it is due you, and I wish that I might explain the valuable work rendered by 
you and your crew to your superiors in Washington. If you see fit you have my per- 
mission to forward this letter with any report you may make to the U . S. Government. 
Again thanking you for the valuable assistance rendered in behalf of suffering 
humanity, I have the honor to remain, 

Yours, very truly, OWEN TYLER, 

Mayor. 
Captain WM. M. DEVAN, 

Keeper, Louisville Life-Saving Station, 

Louisville, Kentucky. 



CITY OF LOUISVILLE, 

DEPARTMENT OF POLICE, 
Louisville, Kentucky, February 5, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: I wish to express my thanks to you and the members of your station 
for the valuable assistance rendered this department from the beginning to the ending 
of the flood of 1907. 

I am satisfied that through the efforts of you and your men, numerous lives were 
saved, and large property interests protected from loss by the high water which 
inundated a large portion of this city. 

I also wish to thank you in behalf of myself and the citizens in general for the 
invaluable assistance rendered the flood sufferers during this period. I am, 
Very respectfully, 

SEBASTIAN GUNTHER, 

Chief of Police. 
Captain WM. M. DEVAN, 

Keeper, Louisville Life-Saving Station, 

Louisville, Kentucky. 



CITY OF LOUISVILLE, 
BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS, 
Louisville, Kentucky, February 6, 1907. 

GENTLEMEN: I have been instructed by this board to thank you for the valuable 
assistance rendered by you to the city of Louisville and her people in the flooded 
districts during the latter part of January last past. 

Very truly, ROGER G. McGRATH, 

Secretary, Board of Public Works. 
Captain WM. DEVAN AND CREW, 

Louisville Life-Saving Station, 

Louisville, Kentucky. 



274 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

LOUISVILLE AND EVANSVILLE PACKET COMPANY, 

Louisville, Kentucky, February 7, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: I wish to thank you and your crew for the prompt and efficient services 
rendered this company from the beginning to the end of the high water during January, 
1907. Your men at all times were eager and willing to carry members of our crew 
who were on the steamers Tarascon and Tell City lying alongside of our wharf boat 
from the boat to the landing and back again, also in laying lines and anchors in order 
to keep the wharf boat and steamboats in position, the fastenings to which they were 
tied having been pulled out during a severe storm on the night of the 19th of January. 
Had it not been for the prompt service rendered by your crew at this particular time, 
we would have suffered considerable damage to our floating property. 
Again thanking both you and your crew, I remain, 

Yours, truly, GEO. H. WILSON, 

Superintendent. 
Captain WM. M. DEVAN, 

Keeper, Louisville Life-Saving Station. 

Louisville, Kentucky. 



THE LOUISVILLE HOME TELEPHONE COMPANY, 

Louisville, Kentucky, February 7, .7907. 

DEAR SIR: We write this letter to extend our thanks and appreciation of your 
valuable service rendered our company during the recent flood. 

Having subscribers scattered all along the river front, and the construction of tele- 
phone instruments being such that contact with water means total ruin, it was neces- 
sary for us to handle a great deal of our property. 

We found on account of the great demand for boats that it was impossible to hire 
them, and we, with many others, had to depend entirely upon your service. 

Your men were always ready and willing to extend help to us, and the manner in 
which your men answered the many calls made at this time of distress demonstrated 
.the fact that you have a very efficient organization. 
Again thanking you and your men, we remain, 

Yours, very truly, P. S. POGUE, 

Superintendent. 
Captain WM. M. DEVAN, 

Keeper, Louisville Life-Saving Station, 

Louisville, Kentucky. 



POSTAL TELEGRAPH-CABLE COMPANY, 

SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, 
Louisville, Kentucky, February 9, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: On behalf of the Postal Telegraph-Cable Company and personally I 
desire to express our appreciation of your courteous treatment of us during the recent 
flood at Louisville. 

Our main lines to Cincinnati were in a very serious condition and we were unable 
to obtain a boat to get to our poles, when you kindly not only furnished us with a 
boat but with a crew to handle it. Had our line gone down it would have meant 
a very considerable loss to us, and also great inconvenience to the business men of 
Louisville, and also citizens. 

I have called the attention of our executive office to the matter, with a request that 
they send a letter to the Life- Saving Bureau in Washington expressing our appre- 
ciation and thanks. 

Yours, truly, W. J. SLATER, 

Superintendent. 
Captain WM. M. DEVAN, 

Keeper, Louisville Life-Saving Station, 

Louisville, Kentucky. 



CITY OF LOUISVILLE, FIRE DEPARTMENT, 

Office of Chief Engineer, February 10, 1907. 

MY DEAR CAPTAIN: I desire to thank you and your corps for the valuable services 
rendered my department during the recent high water. It would have been impos- 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 275 

sible to remove our fire-alarm boxes and maintain our service in the flooded district 
without your assistance, for all of which I feel most grateful, and any time myself or 
the fire department can serve you command us. 

Yours, very respectfully, FILLMORE TYSON, 

Chief, Fire Department. 
Captain WM. M. DEVAN, 

Keeper Louisville Life-Saving Station, Louisville, Ky. 



LOUISVILLE AND CINCINNATI PACKET COMPANY, 

Louisville, Kentucky, February 11, 1907 . 

MY DEAR CAPTAIN: The high water during the month of January, 1907, was quite 
disastrous in many ways, but this company escaped any serious loss or damage to our 
property, and I feel that we are under many obligations to you and your gallant crew 
for assistance rendered us in many ways, and so often. I want to make special 
mention of services rendered during the storm of January 19 and 20 which, was one of 
the most severe on record in this locality. Had it not been for services rendered by 
yourself and crew during that period the loss would have been far greater than it was. 
As you are, of course, aware, we were entirely dependent upon your crew in taking 
our wharf boat and steamboat crew to and from shore, for which I also want to thank 
you over and over again. 

Wishing you and your gallant "boys" much success, I beg to remain, 
Yours, respectfully, 

C. C. FULLER, Superintendent. 
Captain WILLIAM M. DEVAN, 

Louisville Life-Saving Station, Louisville, Kentucky. 



POSTAL TELEGRAPH-CABLE COMPANY, 
OFFICE OF THE THIRD VICE-PRESIDENT, 

New York, February 20, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: On account of the high water which prevailed at Louisville during the 
month of January, our lines were seriously interrupted. 

I am advised that on account of this high water it was extremely difficult to make 
repairs to our lines, and that it was almost impossible to obtain boats with which to 
reach our lines. 

Through the courtesy of the life-saving station at Louisville, who furnished us with 
a boat and 2 men to inspect our lines which were submerged, we were able to restore 
communication much more rapidly than we could otherwise have done. 

It has occurred to us that it is only proper that this courtesy should be brought to 
your attention, and to assure you that it was greatly appreciated. 
Yours, very truly, 

C. C. ADAMS, Vice-President. 
Mr. S. I. KIMBALL, 

General Superintendent United States Life-Saving Service, 

Washington, I). C. 



JOY STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

New York, February 22, 1907. 

MY DEAR CAPTAIN: On behalf of our company I want to thank yourself and every 
man in the life-saving organization on Block Island for their efforts in attending to the 
living and the dead from the disaster that occurred to our steamer Larchmont on the 
llth instant. From all of the reports that I received there was nothing left undone at 
their hands or at your own that could have been done. I had been in hopes of meeting 
you personally while I was in Providence, feeling that I could better express myself 
to you in person than in a letter. I still hope that at some time in the near future I 
may have the pleasure of meeting you. 

Hoping that you in turn will convey the thanks of this company to each of your men, 
that they may know that thei* work has in a small measure at least been appreciated 
we remain, 

Very respectfully, yours, JOY STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

By F. M. DUNBAUGH, President. 
Captain S. R. SANDS, 

Keeper Sandy Point Life-Saving Station, 

Block Island, Rhode Island. 



276 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

CARD OF THANKS. 
[From the Southport Herald, March 21, 1907.] 

We, the undersigned members of the crew of wrecked schooner Stanley H. Minor, 
wish to thank Captain J. L. Watts and crew of Cape Fear life-saving station for their 
prompt and timely assistance and kind treatment, and also Captain Crawford, of 
steamer Cape Fear, for assisting us into Southport. 

Captain E. L. FULLERTON, WIFE, AND CREW, 

Wrecked schooner Stanley H. Minor. 



ASSATEAGUE BEACH LlFE-SAVING STATION, 

Chincoteague Island , Virginia, March 25, 1907. 

Sir: We, the undersigned, wish to express our sincere thanks to the captain and 
crew of Assateague Beach life-saving station, our appreciation of the service rendered 
to us while in distress from shipwreck, 1\ miles N. by E. of the station named. Their 
prompt and humane treatment merits our warmest thanks. 

JEFFERSON S. SMITH, Captain. 
HERMAN DE ECHENAGUCIA, Mate. 
AUSTIN C. RILEY, Cook. 
DAVID BROWN. 

Of Schooner J. F. Whitcomb. 

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



JOHN C. SEAGER COMPANY, 
STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND LOADING BROKERS, 

Produce 'Exchange, New York, April 4, 1907. 

SIR: On behalf of the master of S. S. Gowanburn, recently ashore at Fire Island 
near the Blue Point life-saving station, we beg to take this opportunity of expressing 
to your Department the appreciation felt by himself and the members of his crew by 
reason of the very generous and excellent assistance rendered by the life-savers, es- 
pecially Keeper Frank Rorke and his men from the Blue Point station, at the time of 
the unfortunate accident, and also during the period he (the master) continued on 
the beach. 

He requests us to say that he found them at all times courteous, obliging, and willing 
to render any service in their power. 

Yours, faithfully, JOHN C. SEAGER COMPANY, 

JOHN C. SEAGER, President. 
GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 

Washington, District of Columbia. 



U. S. STEAMER SEMINOLE, 
Wilmington, N. C., April 12, 1907. 

SIR: I wish to acknowledge the hearty cooperation of the keepers of the Life-Saving 
Service on this coast the past winter with the revenue-cutter Seminole, in giving 
prompt information of vessels in distress. 

Especial acknowledgments are due Keepers Wm. H. Gaskill, Wm. T. Willis, Chas. 
S. McWilliams, and Patrick H. Etheridge, of Cape Lookout, Core Bank, Portsmouth, 
and Cape Hatteras life-saving stations, respectively. 

Respectfully, J. H. QUINAN, 

Captain, U. S. R. C. S., Commanding. 

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 

Washington, District of Columbia. 



UNITEP STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 277 

W. E. CROCKETT & Co., 
SHIP BROKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

2-4 Stone street, New York, April 22, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: Through you I wish to express my sincere thanks to Captain W. T. Wil- 
lis and crew of the Core Bank life-saving station for their valuable assistance on the 5th 
in freeing my vessel, which was water-logged in a hurricane of April 3 and 12. We 
came opposite their station under sail displaying a signal of distress. The same was 
answered by the code signals G.T.E. (Heave to, I will send a boat). The surf was 
very high at the time, but they made the launch nicely, and looked out ashore for 
messages. It being dark and surf headed high, they did not come back that night, but 
came at sunrise the next morning, and stayed with me until assistance arrived. I 
also wish to thank you, the General Superintendent, for having such a good Service. 
Very respectfully, yours, 

F. B. BAXTER, 

Master Schooner Laura L. Sprague. 
GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SREVICE. 



ERIE FISH COMPANY, 
Erie, Pennsylvania, April 25, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: We beg to thank you for the assistance rendered to our disabled tug 
Ida. Your new gasoline launch is a splendid addition to the Life-Saving Service, 
and in this case saved our men much suffering. 

Yours, very truly, ERIE FISH COMPANY, 

T. B. WALKER, Manager. 
Captain A. P. JANSEN, 

Erie Life-Saving Station, Erie, Pennsylvania. 



KELLEY LUMBER AND SHINGLE COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS, 

Traverse City, Michigan, April 28, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: I wish to thank you for the assistance rendered me by the captain and 
crew on Sleeping Bear Point in raising and pumping out the schooner Eliza Day. 
Yours, very truly, 

H. CHRISTINSON, Captain. 
Captain CHARLES MORTON, 

Superintendent Twelfth Life-Saving District, Grand Haven, Michigan. 



THE PHILADELPHIA AND READING TRANSPORTATION LINE, 

Port Richmond, Philadelphia, April 30, 1907. 

MY DEAR SIR: I have before me report of the captain of our sea barge Pocopson, 
in advice of valuable aid and assistance given to our vessel in the work of floating 
her off the bar at the entrance to Saco River, Maine, 14th instant, by your good self 
and the crew under your command. 

On behalf of this company, I desire to convey to you personally, and, through you, 
to each member of your crew, our sincere thanks and high appreciation of the services 
rendered in this instance. 

Very truly, yours, Q. H. KAGERMAN, 

Shipping and Freight Agent. 
Captain L. C. TOTMAN, 

Keeper Fletchers Neck Life-Saving Station, Biddeford Pool, Maine. 



RIVERTON LUMBER COMPANY, 
San Francisco, California, April 30, 1907. 

MY DEAR SIR: On the 12th day of April while the tug Columbia was towing our 
barge Chinook across Coos Bay bar the tug's hawser parted and left our barge on the 
bar at the mercy of the breakers, on a very rough bar, too. The tug blew distress 



278 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

signals and in a very few moments Captain Nelson and his crew were on the scene 
and- at the risk of their lives succeeded in taking .our captain and the entire crew 
ashore in safety. He took them to his home, entertained and cared for them, and 
made them comfortable. In fact, he and his good wife and the entire crew did every- 
thing it was possible for them to do. We feel it would be very ungrateful indeed 
on our part if we did not in some way express our gratitude to you in their behalf, 
and if you are fortunate enough to have such splendid men at all the stations in your 
district, you are surely to be congratulated. Our Mr. Jones has just returned from 
the wreck and reports that Captain Nelson and his wife treated him with the greatest 
consideration and kindness, and on behalf of the Riverton Lumber Company and 
Mr. Jones we wish to thank you for the splendid service. 

Yours, very truly, 

RIVERTON LUMBER COMPANY, 
W. H. SMITH, President. 
Major T. J. BLAKENEY, 

Superintendent Thirteenth Life-Saring District, San Francisco, California. 



PORT HURON, MICHIGAN, May 10, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: In behalf of the passengers, crew, and myself of the steamer Pilgrim, 
we wish to extend to yourself and crew a vote of thanks for the kindness shown to us 
on the night of April 29, 1907, when we were wrecked on Huronia Beach; also for 
the haste you made in reaching us. Yourself and crew are to be congratulated on 
the manner in which you handle your boat in such cases. 
Once more thanking you, I remain, 

Yours, respectfully, A. J. COTTON, 

Master, Steamer Pilgrim. 
Captain PLOUGH and CREW, 

Lake View Beach Life-Saving Station, Port Huron, Michigan. 



FORT NIAGARA, NEW YORK, May 26, 1907. 

DEAR SIR: I now take the pleasure of thanking you and your gallant crew for the 
heroic rescue of myself and 2 comrades, privates Will Joplin and William T. Kelly, 
which occurred on Lake Ontario, May 25, 1907. 

I honestly believe that but for the prompt assistance of yourself and crew, we cer- 
tainly would have perished, as the waves were very high and filled the boat in such 
a very short time as to render it impossible to bail to any advantage. 

My 2 comrades unite in thanking you most heartily and would like very much to 
have this letter submitted with your official report. 
Again thanking you most heartily, 

I remain, yours respectfully, GEORGE S. SELLAIRS, 

Corporal, Company C, Twelfth Infantry. 
Captain M. E. CLEMONS, 

Keeper, Niagara Life-Saving Station, Youngstown, New York. 



STURGEON BAY, WISCONSIN, May 31, 1907. 
To whom it may concern: 

I hereby express my thanks to the U. S. Life-Saving Service, the North Manitou 
Island life-saving station crew, and to Surf men Edward Fisher and Fred. Bordeaux, 
for services rendered to me when stranded on North Manitou Island in the schooner 
Oneida, and afterwards in keeping her afloat when in a leaking condition. 

JOHN KRISTIANSEN, Master. 



JONESPORT, MAINE, June 10, 1907. 
To whom it may concern: 

This is to certify that Captain O. B. Hall and crew of Great Wass Island station 
rendered me very valuable service in floating my vessel and cargo from the breakwater 
in Mooseabec Reach on the night of January 9, 1907; also, again the morning of Janu- 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 279 

ary 10, after I had made an unsuccessful attempt to get under way from the anchorage, 
where they had put me the night before. The anchor dragged and we came near going 
ashore again. I set my flag of distress and it was soon answered by Captain Hall and 
crew, who succeeded in getting my vessel clear and anchored her in Sawyers Cove. 
I greatly appreciate this valuable service. 

MANUEL B. RAMUS, 
Master of Schooner John S. Presson. 



HARBOR BEACH, MICHIGAN, June 12, 1907. 

Know all men by these presents, that I, George Brown, a brother of the captain 
and mate of the ill-fated Search Light, being in the tower or lookout at the time of the 
wreck of the Search Light, do hereby certify that the life-saving crew at Harbor Beach 
did all in their power to save the crew of said Search Light, and are still doing all they 
can to find the bodies. 

GEORGE L. BROWN. 



RAILWAY MAIL SERVICE, 

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF CLERK, 

Nome, Alaska, June 13, 1907. 

SIRS: With great pleasure in behalf of the Post-Office Department, I desire to 
express to yourself and crew of the United States life-saving station at Nome, Alaska, 
my hearty appreciation for the good work performed in saving the United States 
mail from damage, and the probable loss of life, while the mail was being transferred 
over the ice on June 4, 1907, from the steamer Corwin, lying 4 miles from the shore. 
A mule team with 16 sacks of second-class mail went through the ice, and had it 
not been for the assistance rendered by the life-saving crew, the driver, mules, and 
mail might have been lost. 

Very respectfully, WM. McMANiis, 

Chief Clerk. 
Captain THOMAS A. Ross AND CREW, 

Nome Life-Saving Station, Nome, Alaska. 



O'KEEFE'S INN, 

Virginia Beach, Virginia, June 15, 1907 . 

DEAR SIR: Kindly accept my sincere thanks to yourself and men for your timely 
assistance in helping me to save our building on the morning of the 10th instant. 
Sincerely yours, 

W. J. O'KEEFE, 

of O'Keefe Brothers. 
Captain J. E. WOODHOUSE, 

Keeper Dam Neck Mills Life-Saving Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES, 

1907. 



281 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDI- 
TURES FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF THE LIFE-SAVING SERV- 
ICE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1907. 



APPROPRIATION LIFE-SAVING SERVICE, 1907. 

For salaries of superintendents of the life-saving and lifeboat sta- 
tions and houses of refuge in the several districts on the sea and lake 
coasts of the United States, as follows: 

Maine and New Hampshire, district No. 1 $2, 000. 00 

Massachusetts, district No. 2 2, 000. 00 

Rhode Island and Fishers Island, district No. 3 1, 800. 00 

Long Island, district No. 4 2, 000. 00 

New Jersey, district No. 5 2, 000. 00 

Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, district No. G 2, 000.' 00 

Virginia and North Carolina, district No. 7 2, 000. 00 

South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, district No. 8 1, 700. 00 

Gulf of Mexico, district No. 9 1, 800. 00 

Lakes Ontario and Erie, district No. 10 2, 000. 00 

Lakes Huron and Superior, district No. 11 2, 000. 00 

Lake Michigan, district No. 12. 2, 000. 00 

Washington, Oregon, and California, district No. 13 2, 000. 00 

$25, 300. 00 
For salaries of 287 keepers of life-saving and lifeboat stations and of 

houses of refuge 246, 900. 00 

For pay of crews of surfmen employed at the life-saving and lifeboat 
stations, including the old Chicago station, at the uniform rate of $65 
per month each during the period of actual employment, and $3 per 
iday for each occasion of service at other times; compensation of vol- 
unteers at life-saving and lifeboat stations for actual and deserving 
service rendered upon any occasion of disaster, or in any effort to save 
persons from drowning, at such rate, not to exceed $10 for each volun- 
teer, as the Secretary of the Treasury may determine; pay of volunteer 
crews for drill and exercise; fuel for stations and houses of refuge; 
repairs and outfits for same; rebuilding and improvement of same, 
including use of additional land where necessary; supplies and pro- 
visions for houses of refuge and for shipwrecked persons succored at 
stations; traveling expenses of officers under orders from the Treasury 
Department; commutation of quarters and purchase of fuel in kind 
for officers of the Revenue-Cutter Service detailed for duty in the 
Life-Saving Service; for carrying out the provisions of sections 7 and 8 
of the act approved May 4, 1882; for draft animals and their mainte- 
nance; for telephone lines and care of same, and contingent expenses, 
including freight, storage, rent, repairs to apparatus, labor, medals, 
stationery, newspapers for statistical purposes, advertising, and all 
other necessary expenses, not included under any other head of life- 
saving stations on the coasts of the United States 1, 602, 850. 00 

Total 1, 875, 050. 00 

283 



284 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SEBVICE. 

EXPENDITURES. 

For salaries of superintendents of life-saving and lifeboat stations 
and houses of refuge in the several districts, as follows : 

District No. 1, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 $2, 000. 00 

District No. 2, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 '. . 2, 000. 00 

District No. 3, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 1, 800. 00 

District No. 4, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 2, 000. 00 

District No. 5, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 2, 000. 00 

District No. 6, July 1 to December 6, 1906, and March 13 to 

June 30, 1907 1, 466. 66 

District No. 7, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 "... ' 2, 000. 00 

District No. 8, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 1, 700. 00 

District No. 9, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 1, 800. 00 

District No. 10, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 2, 000. 00 

District No. 11, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 2, 000. 00 

District No. 12, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 2, 000. 00 

District No. 13, July 1, 1906, to June 30, 1907 2, 000. 00 

$24, 766. 66 

Salaries of 271 keepers, districts Nos. 1 to 13, inclusive, 

quarter ending September 30, 1906 60, 375. 00 

Salaries of 271 keepers, districts Nos. 1 to 13, inclusive, 

quarter ending December 31, 1906 59, 975. 00 

Salaries of 271 keepers, districts Nos. 1 to 13, inclusive, 

quarter ending March 31, 1907 60, 262. 50 

Salaries of 271 keepers, districts Nos. 1 to 13, inclusive, 

quarter ending June 30, 1907 59, 950. 00 

- 240, 562. 50 
Pay of surfmen in district No. 1, from August 1, 1906, to 

May 31, 1907 61, 149. 83 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 2, from July 1, 1906, to June 

30, 1907 136, 695. 02 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 3, from August 1, 1906, to 

May 31, 1907 38,668.50 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 4, from August 1, 1906, to 

May 31, 1907 126,938.48 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 5, from August 1, 1906, to 

May 31, 1907 174, 529. 09 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 6, from August 1, 1906, to 

May 31, 1907 79, 096. 84 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 7, from August 1, 1906, to 

May 31, 1907 149, 807. 65 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 8, from August 1, 1906, to 

May 31, 1907 3, 895. 67 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 9, from August 1, 1906, to 

May 31, 1907 31, 776. 30 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 10, from July 1, 1906, to June 

30, 19.07 44, 962. 77 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 11, from July 1 to December 

18, 1906, and from April 10 to June 30, 1907 73, 101. 41 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 12, from July 1 to November 

30, 1906, and from April 1 to June 30, 1907 112, 233. 31 

Pay of surfmen in district No. 13, from July 1, 1906, to June 

30, 1907 104, 182. 36 

Pay of volunteer surfmen for assistance to the 

keepers and crews of certain stations at wrecks 

which occurred during the active season: 

District No. 1 $3. 00 

District No. 2 9. 00 

District No. 5 5. 00 

District No. 7 15. 00 

District No. 10 18. 00 

District No. 11 2. 00 

District No. 12 105. 00 

District No. 13 10. 00 

167.00 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 285 

Pay of surfmen for services at wrecks which occurred 
at periods when crews were not required to reside 
at the stations: 

District No. 1 $63. 00 

District No. 2 33. 00 

District No. 3 : 39. 00 

District No. 5 64. 00 

District No. 7 33. 00 

District No. 9 18. 00 

District No. 11 11. 00 

DistrictNo. 12 27.00 

$288. 00 

- $1,137,492.23 
Pay of disabled keepers under the provisions of section 7 of 

the act approved May 4, 1882 3, 469. 18 

Pay of disabled surfmen under the provisions of section 7 of 

the act approved May 4, 1882 16, 241. 36 

Pay of widows and others under the provisions of section 8 of 

the act approved May 4, 1882 5, 402. 34 

25, 112. 88 

Apparatus 17, 666. 89 

Books, charts, stationery, advertising, etc 1, 882. 20 

Care of stations pending appointment of keepers 699. 67 

Commutation of quarters and fuel in kind for officers of the 
Revenue-Cutter Service detailed for duty in the Life-Sav- 
ing Service 7, 499. 14 

Compensation for special services, labor, etc 46, 626. 09 

Draft animals . . . '. 12, 617. 95 

Equipments 8, 063. 13 

Freight, packing, storage, telegraphing, etc 5, 735. 79 

Fuel and water for stations 29, 266. 89 

Furniture 10, 638. 84 

Medals 735. 67 

Protection of stations 700. 00 

Rebuilding, repair, and improvement of stations 34, 880. 96 

Removal of stations 2, 250. 42 

Rents 7, 558. 00 

Repairs to apparatus, equipments, and furniture 28, 030. 83 

Sites for stations 1, 197. 74 

Subsistence of persons rescued from wrecked vessels 81. 40 

Supplies 28, 067. 07 

Telephones, telephone lines, and their maintenance 19, 245. 29 

Transporting apparatus to and from wrecks, at stations where 

horses are not kept 547. 20 

Traveling expenses of officers 12, 683. 50 

276, 674. 67 



Total expenditures from appropriation " Life-Saving Service, 1907 " 1, 704, 608. 94 

Balance of available funds, June 30, 1907 , 170, 441. 06 

1, 875, 050. 00 

At the beginning of the fiscal year there remained on hand avail- 
able from the appropriation of the preceding year, the following: 

Unexpended balance, July 1, 1906 $116, 994. 67 

To which repayments have been made amounting to 294. 40 

Total available funds 117, 289. 07 

The expenditures from this sum during the last year, made in pay- 
ment of indebtedness standing over from the preceding year, were as 
follows : 

"Life-Saving Service, 1906," available as above $117, 289. 07 



286 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

Pay of volunteer surfmen for assistance to the keepers and 
crews of certain stations at wrecks which occurred during 
the active season: 

District No. 6 $5. 00 

Pay of surfmen for services at wrecks which occurred at 
periods when crews were not required to reside at the 
stations: 

District No. 1 $84. 00 

District No. 2 75. 00 

District No. 4 102. 00 

District No. -5 45. 00 

District No. 7 22. 50 

District No. 9 3. 00 

District No. 10 3. 00 

334. 50 

$339.50 
Pay of disabled keepers under the provisions of section 7 of 

the act approved May 4, 1882 4, 056. 50 

Pay of disabled surfmen under the provisions of section 7 of 

the act approved May 4, 1882 16, 349. 64 

Pay of widows and others under the provisions of section 8 of 

the act approved May 4, 1882 4, 215. 34 

24, 621. 48 

Apparatus 22, 219. 82 

Books, charts, stationery, advertising, etc 175. 44 

Commutation of quarters and fuel in kind for officers of the . 
Revenue-Cutter Service detailed for duty in the Life-Sav- 
ing Service 612. 75 

Compensation for special services, labor, etc 3, 726. 63 

Draft animals 716. 68 

Equipments 847. 50 

Freight, packing, storage, telegraphing, etc 1, 853. 37 

Fuel and water for stations 1, 329. 53 

Furniture 405. 60 

Protection of stations from enroachment of the sea 34. 85 

Rebuilding, repair, and improvement of stations 13, 151. 35 

Rents 2, 053. 66 

Repairs to apparatus, equipments, and furniture 5, 668. 09 

Sites for stations 247. 50 

Subsistence of persons rescued from wrecked vessels 8. 60 

Supplies . 861. 14 

Telephones, telephone lines, and their maintenance 4, 265. 06 

Transporting apparatus to and from wrecks, at stations where 

horses are not kept 46. 50 

Traveling expenses of officers 1, 142. 78 

59, 366. 85 



Total expenditures from appropriation "Life-Saving Service, 

1906 " 84, 327. 83 

Balance of available funds, June 30, 1907 32, 961. 24 



v 117,289.07 

There also remains unexpended at the beginning of the fiscal year, 
from appropriation of 1905. the following: 
"Life-Saving Service, 1905 " $39, 437. 88 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 287 

The expenditures from this balance during the year, made in pay- 
ment of indebtedness standing over from the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1905, were as follows: 

"Life-Saving Service, 1905, " available as above. $39, 437. 88 

Pay of disabled surfmen under the provisions of section 7 of the 

act approved May 4, 1882 .- : $1, 661. 83 

Books, charts, stationery, advertising, etc $3. 00 

Freight, packing, storage, telegraphing, etc 7. 52 

Fuel and water for stations 9. 00 

Rebuilding, repair, and improvement of stations 200. 00 

Repairs to apparatus, equipments, and furniture 6. 25 

225. 77 



Total expenditures from appropriation "Life-Saving Service, 1905" 1, 887. 60 
Balance unexpended June 30, 1907 37, 550. 28 

This unexpended balance of $37,550.28 was carried to the surplus 
fund June 30, 1907. 

Other appropriations for the maintenance of the Life-Saving Ser- 
vice were as follows : 

" Life-Saving telephone, cable, or telegraph lines Green Bay to Rock 
Island, Wis., 1904:" 
I Balance available July 1, 1906 $3, 208. 46 

There were no expenditures during the year from this appropria- 
tion, and the balance of $3,208.46 was carried to the surplus fund 
June 30, 1907. 

" Rebuilding and improving life-saving stations (proceeds of sales): " 

Balance available July 1, 1906 $18, 885-. 99 

This sum has been increased by amounts realized from sales of 
public property belonging to the Life-Saving Service con- 
demned and sold in conformity with provisions of law $2, 018. 00 

Less amount expended during the year 1, 687. 00 

331. 00 



Total available funds June 30, 1907 19, 216. 99 

There was collected during the year and covered into the Treasury 
as miscellaneous receipts, and carried to the account of " Receipts 
from United States telephone lines, Life-Saving Service," the sum of 
$88.40, being tolls for the transmission of messages. 

The total net expenditures for the maintenance of the Life-Saving 
Service during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1907, were therefore as 
follows : 

"Life-Saving Service, 1907 " $1, 704, 608. 94 

"Life-Saving Service, 1906 " 84, 327. 83 

"Life-Saving Service, 1905 " 1, 887. 60 

"Rebuilding and improving life-saving stations (proceeds of sales) "... 1, 687. 00 



] , 792, 511. 37 
Less the following: 
Repayments to appropriations: 

"Life-Saving Service, 1906 " $294. 40 

"Rebuilding and improving life-saving stations (pro- 
ceeds of sales) " 2, 018. 00 

2, 312. 40 



Total net expenditures of the Service 1, 790, 198. 97 

2990908 19 



288 UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

There remained standing to the credit of the respective appropria- 
tions at the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1907, available as 
heretofore stated, the following balances: 

"Life-Saving Service, 1907" $170,441.06 

"Life-Saving Service, 1906 " 32, 961. 24 

"Rebuilding and improving life-saving stations (proceeds of sales)" . . 19, 216. 99 

The foregoing statement for the net expenditures for the mainte- 
nance of the Life-Saving Service for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1907, differs from the expenditures by warrants in the following 
particulars : 

Net expenditure by warrants $1, 792, 441. 96 

To which should be added the following amount, as shown on page 284 
of the report for 1906: 

In hands of W. S. Richards, disbursing clerk, June 30 ; 1906 

" Life-Saving Service, 1906 " 9, 614. 41 

1, 802, 056. 37 

Less the following amounts: 
In hands of W. S. Richards, disbursing clerk, June 30, 1907- 

' 'Life-Saving Service, 1907 " $11, 308. 64 

Amounts reappropriated and expended by warrants not 

included in the foregoing statement 548. 76 

11, 857. 40 



Net expenditures from appropriations for the year 1, 790, 198. 97 

To the foregoing statement of expenditures for the maintenance of 
the Life-Saving Service may be added the following: 

APPROPRIATION . 

"Salaries, office Life-Saving Service, 1907" $46,100.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Compensation of officers and employees in office of Life-Saving 

Service $45, 838. 32 

Amount unexpended 261. 68 

46,100.00 



LIST OF UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING 
DISTRICTS AND STATIONS. 



289 



LIFE-SAVING DISTRICTS AND STATIONS IN THE UNITED 

STATES. 



FIRST mSTRICT. 

COASTS OF MAINE AND NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



Name of station. 


i 
State. 


Locality. 


Approximate 
positions 


Lati- 
tude, 
north. 


Longi- 
tude, 
west. 


Quoddy Head 
Cross Island 
Great Wass Island 
Cranberry Islands 


Me 
Me 
Me 
Me 


Carrying Point Cove 


t // 

44 48 40 
44 36 45 
44 28 00 
44 15 30 
43 58 40 
43 52 20 
43 45 20 
43 4500 
43 33 58 
43 2630 
43 03 30 

43 01 15 
42 59 30 
42 56 20 


/ // 

66 58 50 
67 16 30 
67 3530 
68 12 40 
69 08 00 
69 17 40 
69 37 00 
69 46 55 
70 12 00 
70 20 30 
70 42 45 

70 44 00 
70 45 20 

70 47 40 


Off Machiasport 


Off Jonesport 


Little Cranberry Island, off Mount Desert 
On southwest end White Head Island v . . . 
Off mouth St. Georges River 


White Head 
Burnt Island 
Damiscove Island 


Me 
Me 
Me 


On the west shore of Damiscove Harbor 
On west side 'mouth Kennebec River 


Hunniwells Beach 
Cape Elizabeth 
Fletchers Neck 


Me 
Me 
Me 


Near the Lights 


Biddeford Pool Fletchers Neck 


Jerrys Point.: 
Wallis Sands 


N. II.... 
N. II.. 


Southeast point Great Island, Portsmouth 
Harbor. 
1J miles south of Odiornes Point 


Rye Beach 
Hampton Beach. 


N. H.... 

N. H 


North end of Rye Beach 


1J miles north of Great Boars Head 









SECOXI> DISTRICT. 

COAST OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



Salisbury Beach 
Newburyport . . 



Plum Island.. 
Straitsmouth i 



Mass.. 
Mass.. 



Mass... 
Mass... 



Gloucester... .i Mass. 



Nahant 

City Point 



Mass... 
Mass... 



Mass.. 



Point Allerton 

North Scituate 

Fourth Cliff j Mass... 

Brant Rock Mass. . . 

Gurnet ! Mass... 

Manomet Point ; Mass. . . 

Wood End Mass... 

Race Point Mass... 

Peaked Hill Bars... 



3 mile south of State line j 42 51 40 

North end of Plum Island, mouth of Merrimac I 42 48 30 

River. 

On Plum Island, 2J miles from south end 

mile west of Straitsmouth light 

Old House cove, westerly side of harbor, 1 

miles from town. 

On the neck, close to Nahant 

Floating station in Dorchester Bay, Boston 

Harbor. 

1 mile west of Point Allerton 

2J miles south of Minots Ledge light 

South end of Fourth Cliff, Scituate 

On Green Harbor Point 

4 miles northeast of Plymouth 

6J miles southeast of Plymouth 

| mile east of light 

If miles northeast of Race Point light 

1\ miles northeast of Provincetown ' 42 04 40 

Obtained from latest Coast Survey charts. & Formerly Davis Neck. 

291 



42 4400 
42 39 30 
42 35 30 

42 25 45 



42 18 20 
42 1400 
42 09 30 
42 05 30 
42 00 10 

41 55 30 

42 01 15 
42 04 45 



70 49 00 
70 49 00 

70 47 15 
70 3600 
70 41 10 

70 56 00 



70 54 00 
70 45 30 
70 42 10 
70 38 40 
70 36 10 
70 32 40 
70 11 30 
70 13 15 
70 09 50 



292 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



SECOND DISTRICT Continued. 
COAST OF MASSACHUSETTS Continued. 



Name of station. 


State. 


Locality. 


Approximate 
position.0 


Lati- 
tude, 
north. 


Longi- 
tude, 
west. 


High Head 


Mass.... 
Mass.... 

Mass 


3% miles northwest of Cape Cod light 


/ // 

42 03 55 
4202 55 
42 00 00 
41 56 45 
41 50 40 
41 45 35 
41 41 45 
41 39 10 
41 35 25 
41 33 10 
41 22 00 
41 14 30 
41 16 05 
41 20 20 
41 21 04 
41 25 25 


70 06 50 
70 04 20 
70 01 15 
69 59 05 
69 56 45 
69 55 55 
69 56 00 
69 57 10 
69 59 10 
70 00 20 
70 01 15 
700600 
70 12 30 
70 18 50 
70 50 08 
70 54 45 


Highland 


1 mile northwest of Cape Cod light 


Pamet River 


3 miles south of Cape Cod light 


Cahoons Hollow 
Nauset 


Mass.... 

Mass 


2} miles east of Wellfleet , 


1 miles south of Nauset lights 


Orleans 


Mass.... 
Mass.... 
Mass. 


Abreast of Ponchet Island 


Old Harbor 

Chatham 


J mile north of Chatham Inlet 


1J miles south-southwest of Chatham lights . . . 
2J miles north of Monomoy light 


Monomoy 


Mass.... 

Mass 
Mass.... 
Mass 


Monomoy Point 


| mile southwest of Monomoy light . . 


Coskata 


2i miles south of Nantucket (Great Point) light. 
2J miles south of the town of Nantucket . . . 


Surfside 


Maddequet 
Muskeget 


Mass.... 
Mass 
Mass-. . . 
Mass.... 


6 miles west of Surfside 


Near west end of Muskeget Island 


Gay head 

Cuttyhunk 


Near light 


Near east end Cuttyhunk Island 







THIRD DISTRICT. 

COASTS OF RHODE ISLAND AND FISHERS ISLAND. 



Brenton Point 


R. 


On Prices Neck 


41 26 58 


71 20 10 


Narragansett Pier 


R 


Northern part of the town 


41 25 45 


71 27 20 


Point Judith 


R 


Near light 


41 21 40 


71 29 00 


Quonochontaug 


R. 


1\ miles ast of Watch Hill light 


41 19 50 


71 43 10 


Watch Hill 


R 


Near light 


41 18 20 


71 51 30 


Fishers Island 


N Y 


West shore of East Harbor 


41 17 00 


71 56 40 


Sandy Point . 


R 


Block Island, north side, near light 


41 13 40 


71 34 40 


New Shoreham 


R 


Block Island, east side, near landing 


41 10 20 


71 33 30 


Block Island 


R 


Block Island, west side, near Dickens Point. . . . 


41 09 40 


71 36 40 



FOURTH DISTRICT. 

COAST OF LONG ISLAND. 



Montauk Point b 


N. Y 


At the light 


41 04 00 


71 51 30 


Ditch Plain 


N.Y.. . 


3i miles southwest of Montauk light 


41 02 10 


71 54 30 


Hither Plain 


N Y 


i mile southwest of Fort Pond 


41 01 30 


71 57 50 


Napeague 


N.Y.. 


Abreast of Napeague Harbor 


40 59 45 


72 02 40 


Amagansett 


N Y 


Abreast of the village 


40 58 00 


72 08 20 


Georgica 


N.Y.. 


1 mile south of village of East Hampton 


40 56 40 


72 11 40 


Menmr 


N Y 


2 miles south of the village of Bridgehampton 


40 54 10 


72 18 00 


Southampton 


N.Y. 


f mile south of the village 


40 52 10 


72 23 40 


Shinnecock 


N Y 


2 miles east-southeast of Shinnecock light 


40 50 40 


72 27 50 


Tiana 


N.Y.. 


2 miles southwest of Shinnecock light 


40 49 40 


72 31 30 


Quogue 


N Y 


J mile south of the village 


40 48 20 


72 36 00 


Potnnk 


N.Y 


1 \ miles southwest of Potunk village 


40 47 30 


72 39 00 


Moriches 


N Y 


2 miles southwest of Speonk village 


40 46 30 


72 43 10 


Forge River 


N.Y. 


3 miles south of Moriches 


40 44 30 


72 49 00 


Smiths Point... 


N.Y... 


Abreast of the point. . 


40 44 00 


72 52 20 



a Obtained from latest Coast Survey charts. 

b In charge of keeper of Ditch Plain station. No crew employed. 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 



293 



FOURTH DISTRICT Continued. 
COAST OF LONG ISLAND Continued. 



Name of station. 


State. 


Locality. 


Approximate 
position.o 


Lati- 
tude, 
north. 


Longi- 
tude, 
west. 


Bellport 


N. Y.. 


4 miles south of the village 


o r /r 

40 42 40 
40 40 40 
40 39 40 
40 38 50 
40 37 40 
40 38 10 
40 37 20 
40 36 40 
40 36 10 
40 35 30 
40 35 10 
40 35 10 


72 55 50 
73 01 20 
73 04 20 
73 08 10 
73 13 20 
73 17 40 
73 22 20 
73 26 20 
73 28 50 
73 31 20 
73 3540 
73 40 45 


Blue Point 


N Y 


4J miles south of Patch ogue 


Lone Hill 


N. Y. 


8 miles east of Fire Island light 


Point of Woods 


N Y 


4 miles east of Fire Island light 




N. Y 


\ mile west of Fire Island light 


Oak Island 


N Y 


East end of Oak Island 


Gilgo 


N Y 


West end of Oak Island . 




N Y 


East end of Jones Beach 


Zachs Inlet 


N Y 


West end of Jones Beach 


Short Beach 
Point Lookout 


N.Y.... 

N Y 


^ mile east of Jones Inlet 


2 miles west of New Inlet 




N Y 


Near west end of Long Beach . 




N. Y 






N Y 


Near the village of Rockaway . 


40 35 30 
40 34 10 
40 34 20 
40 57 10 

41 08 20 


73 47 30 
73 51 50 
73 55 30 
732400 

72 21 10 


Rockaway Point 


N. Y.... 

N Y 


West end of Rockaway Beach 


Manhattan Beach 


K; i Ions Neck 


N. Y 


East side entrance to Huntington Bay, Long 
Island Sound. 
Near Rocky Point, Long Island Sound, about 
4 miles northerly from Greenport. 


Rocky Point 


N. Y.. 







FIFTH DISTRICT. 

COAST OF NEW JERSEY. 



Sandy Hook 


N. J 


On Bay side, J mile south of point of Hook 


40 27 51 


74 00 2 


Spermaceti Cove 


N J 


2J miles south of Sandy Hook light 


40 25 40 


73 59 01 


Seabright 


N. J 


About a mile south of Navesink light 


40 22 50 


73 58 31 




N J 


About a mile south of Seabright 


40 20 30 


73 58 3( 




N J 


Greens Pond 


40 16 40 


73 59 (X 


Deal 


N. J 


Asbury Park .. 


40 13 50 


73 59 S 


Sharp River 


N. J 


Near the mouth of Shark River 


40 11 30 


74 00 41 


Spring Lake 


N J 


2J miles south of Shark River 


40 09 20 


74 01 2( 


Squan Beach 


N. J 


1 mile southeast of Squan village 


40 07 00 


74 02 01 


Bay head 


N. J 


At the head of Barnegat Bay 


40 04 00 


7402 4( 


Mant oloking 


N J 


2^ miles south of head of Barnegat Bay. 


40 01 40 


74 03 K 


Chadwick 


N. J 


5 miles south of head of Barnegat Bay 


39 59 10 


74 04 0( 


Toms River 


N.J ... 


On the beach abreast mouth Toms River 


39 56 10 


74043( 


Island Beach 


N J 


1J miles south of Seaside Park . . .... 


39 53 40 


74 05 (X 


Cedar Creek 


N.J 


5f miles north of Barnegat Inlet 


39 51 10 


74 05 K 


Forked River 


N J 


2 miles north of Barnegat Inlet 


39 48 10 


74 05 4( 


Barnegat 


N J 


South side of Barnegat Inlet 


39 45 30 


74 06 K 




N J 


2i miles south of Barnegat Inlet 


39 43 50 


7407 2( 




N J 


5J miles south of Barnegat Inlet 


39 41 20 


74 08 3( 


Ship Bottom 


N. J 


Midway of Long Beach 


39 38 10 


74 11 (X 




N J 


If miles north of Beach Haven 


39 35 00 


74 13 2( 




N J 


2J miles south of Beach Haven . . 


39 32 00 


74 15 2( 


Little Eire... 


N. J.. 


Near the light north of Inlet. . . 


39 30 10 


74 17 



a Obtained from latest Coast Survey charts. 

b Station destroyed by sudden gale while being moved across the water to new site. 

c Not in operation. 



294 



UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

FIFTH DISTRICT Continued. 
COAST OF NEW JERSEY Continued. 



Name of station. 


State. 


Locality. 


Approximate 
position.a 


Lati- 
tude, 
north. 


Longi- 
tude, 
west. 


Little Beach 


N. J 


South side of Little Egg Inlet 


/ // 

39 27 30 
39 25 30 
39 2400 
39 22 00 
39 20 50 
39 19 00 
39 1700 
39 14 50 
39 13 10 
39 09 40 
39 07 30 
39 05 50 
3902 30 
39 00 20 
38 58 40 
38 57 10 
38 56 00 
38 55 40 
38 56 40 


74 19 30 
74 20 30 
74 22 30 
74 24 50 
74 27 40 
74 31 10 
74 3400 
74 36 50 
74 38 20 
74 41 05 
74 42 45 
74 43 10 
74 45 50 
74 47 20 
74 49 50 
74 51 10 
74 54 30 
74 57