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Full text of "Lighted Pathway"




LEE COLLEGE LIBRARY 

PRESENTED BY 
DR. CHARLES W. CONN 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



ME IQ BE IAKEN OUT 



Lee College udi 

iessee 



http://archiv|.^<^tails/HghtecJ|^way1966chur 

from the desk of the editor 



LIGHTED 



JANUARY, 1966 




thway 




r?£r° 






The New Year 



Hustle, bustle, hustle, bustle — 
They rush the livelong day, 
Each one doing all he can 
To find a better way. 

No one tarries, no one plays, 

They all work hard and fast. 

The New Year brings new hopes in hearts, 

The Old Year now is past. 

— Edna Hamilton 



vg^O 



Old And New 



Old Calendar, you must come down; 

Your usefulness is o'er. 

We've looked at you a lot of times 

But will do so no more. 

Old Year departing, good-bye now, 

We hate to see you go, 

For you were with us quite awhile; 

We're fond of you. you know. 

New Calendar, you must go up. 
To take the other's place; 
We'll look at you a lot of times 
And write upon your face. 
New Year beginning, welcome now! 
What will you bring our way? 
Many golden opportunities — 
Each one a bright new day! 



-Roy J. Wilkin:: 



^^O 



Published monthly at the Church of God Publishing House. 
Cleveland, Tenn. All materials intended for publication in The 
LIGHTED PATHWAY should be addressed to Clyne W. Buxton, 
Editor. All inquiries concerning subscriptions should be addressed 
to Bookkeeping Department, Church of God Publishing House, 
Cleveland, Tennessee. 



P. O. Box 



LIGHTED 



Pathway 

DEDICATED TO THE CHURCH OF GOD VOL': . . •^ 



JANUARY 


1966 


Vol. 


37, 


No. 1 


CONTENTS 




Paid With Blood 


3 


Clyne W. Buxton 


On the Road 


4 


Raymond John Flory 


How to Earn Friendship 


5 


Evelyn Witter 


A Song for You, Joe 


6 


Donald B. Gibson, MD 


National Youth Week 


7 


Paul F. Henson 


Talking About God 


9 


Lon Woodrum 


Corrosion is Costly 


9 


Normand J. Thompson 


Don't Sell Your Church 






Short 


10 


Eileen M. Hasse 


Footsteps of Apostle Paul 


1 1 


Belle Chapman Morrill 


His Honor Preferred 


12 


LeRoy Brown 


Guest Lecturers at the 






National Convention 


13 


Lamar Vesr 


A Letter Frcm Joan 


u 


Grace V. Watkins 


Mote Hunting 


16 


Katheri.ne Bevis 


The Most Talked About 






Lunch Ever! 


18 


Betty Spence 


Pen Pals 


19 




Franz Joseph Haydn 


20 


Chloe S. Stewart 


Lee College Fall Revival 


22 


Denzell Teague 


Remember the Bible's 






Remarkable Remarks? 


23 


Vincent Edwards 


Ilinois Conduces Teen Day 


24 


Reporter 


Young People's Endeavor 






Statistics 


24 




Variety 


26 




Cover 




Eastern Photo Service 


STAFF 




Clyne W. Buxton 


Editor 


Lewis J. Willis 


Editor in Chief 


Chloe Stewart 


Artist 


Helen McMu 


len 


Research 


H. Bernard Di 


• c n 


Circulation Director 


E. C. Thomas 


Publisher 


CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 




Donald S. Aultman 


Paul F. Henson 


Margie M. Kelley 


Avis Swiger 


Denzell Teague 


Hollis L. Green 


FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS 




Bobbie May Lauster 


France 


Margaret Ga 


nes 


Jordan 


L. E. 


Hell 


Japan 


Ruth Craw 


Ord 


Brazil 


Martha Ann Smith 


China 


NATIONAL YOUTH BOARD 




L. W. Mclntyre 


Thomas Grassano 


Cecil R. Gu 


iles 


Haskel C. Jenkins 


Paul L. Wa 


ker 




SUBSCRIPTION RATE 




Single Subscript 


Cl\ 




per year 


$1.50 


Rolls of 15 


$1.50 


Single copy 


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c3 



PAID WITH BUOOD 



POLICEMAN STEPPED in 
front of my car and mo- 
tioned me to a halt. "The 
speed limit on this boulevard is 
thirty miles per hour," he stated 
brusquely. "According to our elec- 
tronic timer you were traveling 
forty miles per hour. I will have to 
give you a ticket for seventeen dol- 
lars and fifty cents, which you can 
pay in cash at the City Hall, or 
you can pay with blood." Pay with 
blood? The statement stunned me. 
"Yes," he explained, "you can pay 
by giving a pint of blood to the 
American Red Cross." 

When the Red Cross had drawn 
the blood, I was given a slip of 
paper showing that I had given 
plasma and was told to take the 
slip and the ticket to the City 
Hall. At the proper window I pre- 
sented the papers. Without any 
questions the clerk wrote with red 
ink across the ticket: Paid with 
blood. 

Here my heart could not help 
but reminisce of Calvary. I remem- 
bered how Christ had suffered for 
my sins; how He had been crowned 
with cruel thorns; how He had been 
beaten; how he had labored up 
Golgotha with His cross; and how 
He had been nailed to that cross 
for me. I had been "speeding" to- 
ward destruction, and had been 
"fined" with eternal death, but 
Christ had paid my fine with His 
blood. 

As the clerk blotted the wet, red 
ink, I thought further: I looked 
forward to the Day of Judgment. I 
saw myself standing tremblingly 
before the majestic, dreadful 
court of heaven, guilt of many 
sins, and knew that these sins 



were punishable by death. I could 
offer no defense; I had done all 
of which I was accused. 

Then Christ, my Mediator, 
stepped forward and proclaimed 
unwaveringly to that heavenly 
court, "It is all right. I paid for his 
sins at Calvary with My blood. The 
account was fully settled long ago." 
The account is settled because I 
have repented of my sins and 
Christ has forgiven me. This brings 
me to think about you. 

As you read these words I wonder 
if your sins have been forgiven. 
If not, you should ask Christ to 
forgive you now. Though He died 
on the cross for your sins, you 
must repent in order for His death 
to be effective for you. Do you know 
how to get your sins forgiven? Let 
me tell you. 

First you must realize that you 
are a sinner, for the Bible says, 
"All have sinned, and come short 
of the glory of God" (Romans 3: 
23). Then you must realize that 
the wages of sin is death (Romans 
6:23), and that you cannot save 
yourself (Jeremiah 13:23). Next, 
know that Jesus can and will save 
you (Luke 19:10). 

Then, tell Christ that you are 
truly sorry for your transgressions 
(Luke 13:3) and that you believe 
He can and will save you (Acts 
16:31). Believe on Christ as these 
scriptures reveal and you will be 
saved (John 1:21)! 

This formula for finding Christ 
is timeworn, yet ever new; it is 
God's way for you to come to Him. 
Ask the Lord Jesus Christ to for- 
give you this moment. He not only 
gave His life at Calvary for me, but 
He shed His blood there for you 
also. • 



By CLYNE W. BUXTON 




This article is available in tract form 
and may be secured without charge by 
writing: Church of God, Department of 
Evangelism, 1080 Montgomery Avenue, 
Cleveland, Tennessee. 



By RAYMOND JOHN FLORY 

ON THE 
ROAD 




'/] 



EN REDEN WAS return- 
A\ ing from a church con- 
J u vention and was wait- 
ing for a stoplight in Rolla, Mis- 
souri, when suddenly his car door 
opened. Ken turned quickly and 
saw a huge, burly man sitting be- 
side him! The stranger grunted, 
"How 'bout a lift?" 

Ken eyed him suspiciously. He 
needed a shave, or worse, he need- 
ed a bath. When the light changed, 
the car drove off. The miles rolled 



by before the passenger said anoth- 
er word. 

Finally, Ken suggested, "How 
about some food?" He thought per- 
haps he could get rid of his un- 
welcome rider. Rubbing his thick 
whiskers, he replied, "Yeah — I sure 
could use some food all right." 

They stopped at the next diner. 
It was almost empty, except for two 
truck drivers who were eating rolls 
and drinking coffee. The waiter 
eyed both of them as they came 
toward the counter. "What'll it be?" 

Ken's passenger seated himself. 
"I'll take ham and eggs." 

"Anything to drink?" 

"Make it coffee — and black." 

The waiter nodded as he wrote 
on the check. He turned to Ken, 
and asked, "What's yours?" 

"Make mine the same, only cof- 
fee with cream." 

In the background blared jazz 
records, mixed with the speech of 
the truck drivers who were at the 
end of the bar. 

Ken turned to his rider. "What's 
your name?" 

"Just call me Max," came the 
answer from a raspy voice. 

"Where are you headed?" Ken in- 
quired. 

"Nowhere in particular — Wherev- 
er you are." Max' eyes took on a 
sinister glow. 

"Have you ever met the Lord 
Jesus?" Ken asked. "Look, Bud, 
none of that church stuff," Max 
said coldly. Silence followed. 

"I'm going to Saint Louis," Ken 
finally said. "That's as far as I'm 
going." He wondered if he would 
even get to the next town. He 
watched Max smile in a self-satis- 
fied way. After that it seemed an 
eternity before the waiter appeared 
with the food. Max dug into the 
ham and eggs like he had not eaten 
in a year. 

Ken looked out the window. When 
he glanced at Max' plate, it was 
almost empty. Max was really de- 
vouring his meal, reaching every 
which way for the bread, butter, 
salt and pepper. He reminded Ken 
of a human steam shovel. All of a 
sudden, Ken's appetite was gone 
when he thought about what was 
ahead of him on his journey to 



Saint Louis. Ken ate slowly while 
Max watched with caution, as if 
Ken might suddenly make a break 
for the door. 

Max wiped his mouth with a 
napkin, for some food remained on 
his whiskers. Ken paid the check 
with no argument from his fellow 
traveler. While Ken waited for his 
change, Max blurted, "They sure 
don't feed ya this good at the 
pen — " 

The last hope of ditching Max 
came when, as they left the diner, 
Ken dropped his keys. Max picked 
them up, and said, "You'll never 
get to Saint Louis that way." They 
got into the car. Max chuckled 
as he tossed the keys to Ken. 

Ken's fingers shook as he turned 
the key .... Maybe if he flooded 
the motor .... 

"Cut out the cuties, mister. Let's 
get goin'!" It was no use trying to 
pull anything funny, so Ken started 
the car. Would Saint Louis ever 
come? Ken wondered as the miles 
crawled by. It was getting dark 
when Max spoke. "Okay, buddy — 
you kin pull over to the side of the 
road." 

Ken eased up on the gas, and 
the car slowed to a stop. Would 
this be the end? What now? Ken's 
face twitched and his heart pound- 
ed wildly. He felt stiff and unable 
to move as he watched Max reach 
into his coat pocket and bring forth 
a .45 revolver! 

"Ya didn't think I just came 
along for the ride, did ya?" Ken 
edged toward the door. Max 
laughed. He toyed with the gun. 
"When I hopped in, I was gonna 
rifle ya— push ya outta the cor 
and take off. But now, after the 
swell meal— I was really starved — 
I feel better. Ya know, it kinda 
tasted like the ham my mother 
used to fix . . . ." 

He poked the gun. "Ya know — 
you're a right nice guy. Thanks 
for the chow, buddy." Max slowly 
opened the door and climbed out. 
He started walking down a narrow 
path. Shaking, Ken watched him 
fade from view. In front of the 
car, he noticed a sign, which read: 
"Where Will You Spend Eternity?" 



By EVELYN WITTER 




few I Earn Frenl 



ONE DAY AFTER I read aloud a theme in my 
English class on "What Qualities I Like Best 
in Other People," one of the girls whom I 
knew only casually came up to me and said: 

"Evelyn, I would like very much for us to be friends." 

"That would be nice, Nona," I said, noncommittally. 

As I walked toward my next class I asked myself the 
question, "Can friendship be just for the asking?" 

"No," I answered myself. "Desiring friendship is a 
good beginning, but desire alone does not make a 
true friendship. Friendship is the result of understand- 
ing between two people, and understanding takes time 
and experience. Understanding is not always easy, 
either, because no two people are alike." 

As time went by I saw more and more of Nona. 
Her eyes sparkled; her voice lilted; she had a ready 
smile. Her whole personality generated warmth when 
we were together. It was a sure sign that she was 
enjoying my company. As love begets love, so did 
Nona's warmth bring forth a responsive warmth from 
me. 

Nona often gave me compliments when she thought 
I deserved them. She would say, "I think you con- 
ducted the meeting very expertly today," or "Your 
ideas for the class party showed a lot of good plan- 
ning." 

I appreciated these compliments because they gave 
my morale a big boost. I tried in return to give Nona 
honest compliments too. I found there were many 
ways that I could do so. She was exceptionally good 
at basketball, a sincere worker in charitable drives, 
and she took on responsibilities at home that most 
girls would not attempt. My admiration and respect 
for Nona grew. 




Then Nona began to consult me about important 
decisions that she had to make. One of these de- 
cisions was whether to go to camp or to visit her 
Aunt Harriet during her vacation. This made me feel 
as if I were really important to her and that my 
previous camp experiences were worthy of respect. 

In return I asked her advice in fields where she 
was more experienced than I, such as in physical 
education courses and the packing of baskets for the 
needy. The sharing of our problems drew us closer 
and closer together. I learned that when you know 
about another's problems and you have thoroughly 
discussed them with that person, you will feel a close- 
ness with that person and want to keep his confidences 
just as if they were your own. 

When we had differences of opinion, Nona never 
battled to get her own way. She gave her views 
quietly and calmly, showing a willingness to com- 
promise. I wanted her to be happy when she was 
with me, and this desire downed any inclination that 
I might have had to "boss" her. No plans that in- 
cluded the two of us were ever made without the 
approval and agreement of both of us. 

Now we can say that we are really friends, Nona 
and I. Our friendship did not come merely because 
one of us asked for it. Rather, it came because both 
of us worked toward friendship. We really earned 
friendship by feeling love for one another, by being 
big enough to pay honest compliments, by sharing 
and profiting from each other's previous experiences 
when making important decisions, and by settling our 
differences through considering each other's wishes. 

Both Nona and I agree that true friendship is worth 
working for. It is one of the happiest relationships 
that two people can have! • 



By DONALD B. GIBSON, MD 




Dr. Donald B. Gibson, 

an ordahied minister of the 

Church of God, is a 

medical doctor and resides 

in Chattanooga, Tennessee. 



REMEMBER VIVIDLY an 
occasion when as a teen- 
J ager and young Christian I 
talked to a minister about a "call" 
to Christian service. I had had no 
call, I thought, and with a keen 
desire to launch on some specific 
mission, I was naturally quite anx- 
ious to get the go-ahead signal 
first. 

The minister assured me that 
looking for a call was not the im- 
portant thing. Instead, he told me 
what is important and it is some- 
thing I shall never forget: "God 
always calls busy people." 

As the years went by I found this 
to be true again and again as I 
read the Bible. Take Samuel's call, 
for example. It was very early in 
life, while he was busy as an altar 
boy in Shiloh, that his call came. 
Or look at David, who became the 
hero of a nation while he was still 
a very young man. 

But perhaps even more impor- 
tant than his heroism is the fact 
that David was in proper position 
for responsibility — he was busy do- 
ing the little things. He never 
would have had the chance to slay 
a giant if he had not been out 
at the Israelite camp one day bring- 
ing lunch to his brothers. 

God chose Amos, the prophet, 
not because he was a fluent or- 
ator; in fact, he was surprised 
that God would want him and he 
said, "Why, I'm no prophet. I'm 
not even a prophet's son." No, he 



was not a celebrity, but he was the 
best shepherd and picker of syca- 
more fruit on the hills of Tekoa. 

If you follow the search, you will 
find that the minister's statement 
holds true, even in the New Tes- 
tament. The shepherds to whom 
angels appeared when Christ was 
born were busy keeping watch over 
their flock the night the good news 
came. Jesus chose a busy tax col- 
lector, and a busy fisherman. Even 
Saul of Tarsus, destined to become 
the illustrious Paul, was busy 
prior to his conversion, even if his 
energy was misdirected against 
the Christians. 

When I was in my mid-twenties 
I met a fine young man in Des 
Moines who was a jazz enthusiast. 
One day Joe and I were discussing 
the Christian life and he said, "I 
think you have to give up too 
much to become a Christian. Take 
me: I like to sing. I love jazz. I 
couldn't give up music." 

"But, Joe," I said, "God doesn't 
ask you to give up anything un- 
less He gives you something better 
in its place. Besides, God wants 
you just as you are — with your 
love for music." God only wanted 
Joe to love the right kind of music. 

Now let me write to all the Joes 
across America, who have hopes, 
dreams, and desires and who have 
never been told by anyone that 
God is not a divestor but is, after 
all, a developer of talent. God does 



not take away your sparkle and 
make some drab and lifeless man- 
nequin out of you. 

It is no mere coincidence that 
the Bible says, "Remember now 
thy Creator in the days of thy 
youth." Youth is the time when 
energy is spontaneous, enthusiasm 
is brimming, and faith is natural. 
It is a time long before prejudices 
arrive and harden the emotions. 
When you are young, you are flex- 
ible and impressionable. 

You are eager for now. Now is 
better than later. Now is when you 
want to make your decisions, to 
state your position, to stand your 
ground and to make your move. 
So, you, Joe, are a natural for the 
immediacy of the divine call which 
says. "Behold, now is the day of 
salvation." The church needs new 
life, and that is why I say it needs 
you. 

If you are like the Joes I know, 
you can find a dozen or more 
places to go besides church. You 
have a dozen things to do because 
that is the way you are and no- 
body would change that. 

Sure, Joe, you have a song to 
sing. But be sure you sing your 
biggest and best song. Be sure you 
go the way that will make you 
happiest in the long run. And that 
way is God's way. 

There is a song for you, Joe. 
And you can sing it, And you 
will like it, if you learn it, for 
God wrote it especially for you. • 



Air n w 



YOUTH WEEK 



// ODAY'S YOUNG PEOPLE need to understand 
// that Jesus Christ is the way to all that is 
U meaningful and worthwhile. Therefore, the ob- 
jective of National Youth Week for 1966 is to show 
today's youth that Christ is the way to 

Supreme love — for God and for our fellowman 
Enduring faith that never fails 
Abidmg hope for today and the future 
Unspeakable joy, regardless of life's circumstances 
Unceasing satisfaction in Christian living 
Unending peace, even in a world filled with turmoil 
Eternal life through His redeeming grace. 

These wonderful truths which will be used as daily 
emphasis during Youth Week point up the important 
fact that only in Christ can we receive those in- 
gredients that really make life meaningful. If only 
we could get this truth across to all the youth of 
America! Or even to all the youth who attend the 
Church of God! 

The thousands upon thousands of American youth 
who have never been introduced personally to Jesus 
Christ and the scores of youth who drop out of our 
own churches during their teen years should serve as 
a challenge to every church to make an all-out ef- 
fort during this important week to reach as many 
of these young people as possible, to win them to 
Christ, and to challenge them to an unreserved con- 
secration to Him. 

A Youth Week Packet will be mailed to each pastor 
by December 1. This packet will contain an attractive 
poster announcing the Youth Week theme and a 
brochure featuring illustrated materials which can 
be ordered from the National Sunday School Associa- 
tion to implement the program. 

The National Youth Department urges every pastor 
to proclaim January 30-February 6 as Youth Week in 
his church. A youth pastor, Sunday school super- 
intendent, Sunday school teachers and officers could 
be appointed to serve the church on Youth Sunday, 
February 6. A youth evangelistic campaign could be 
conducted during this week — or maybe a weekend 
revival. Having a special week of Bible study and dis- 
cussion group activities would be very beneficial. 
Many other ideas for planning Youth Week may be 
found in the Youth Week idea book listed among the 
materials mentioned above. 

As we plan our Youth Week for 1966 let us keep 
in mind: "What the church will be tomorrow, it is 
becoming today in the lives of its youth." • 




By PAUL F. HENSON 



Assistant National Sunday School and Youth Director 

January 30-February 6 is National Youth Week in the 
Church of God. The theme is: 
Christ Is the Way 



FEBRUARY 

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT 

30 31 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 




!y LON WOODRUM 



TALKING ABOUT GOD 












ODAY THERE appears to be 
a kind of universal distress 
among church leaders over 
the Christian's inability to com- 
municate the gospel to unbelievers. 
All sorts of suggestions have been 
put forth: Some Christians attempt 
to speak to men only on the level 
of the secular, because they un- 
derstand this far better than they 
do religious terminology. 

Some even have gone so far as 
to suggest that we drop the name 
of God from our vocabulary al- 
together. This, of course, is poor 
advice, for we cannot witness of 
Christ and yet leave His name from 
our witness. 

However, it may well be that one 
of the most difficult arts for a 
Christian to master is to witness 
correctly for Christ. Communica- 
tion between men has never been 
easy; and this is especially true 
when one is a believer and the 
other is not. No doubt you have 
seen many a would-be witness 
whose passion overshadowed his 
prudence, whose zeal was far 
superior to his tact. 

You probably have heard of the 
newly converted barber who, while 
stropping his razor, said to the 
man in his chair, "Brother, are 
you ready to meet your Maker?" 

In many cases the New Testa- 
ment might assist us in learning 
how to talk with men about reli- 
gion. The gospels report a number 
of instances in which Jesus spoke 
person-to-person about the King- 
dom: Nicodemus, and the woman 
at Jacob's well are two examples. 
Jesus evidently found true delight 
in talking to men about His Father. 

It must be noted that when Jesus 



discussed religion with persons, He 
never drew back from bringing 
God into the discussion and making 
plain what man's relationship to 
God should be. 

Jesus' disciples followed in His 
footsteps after His departure from 
them. Philip talked to the Ethio- 
pian eunuch; Ananias to Saul; 
Aquila and Priscilla to Apollos; and 
Paul to the ship's captain during 
his famous ocean voyage. 

Talking comes easily for many 
persons; but talking about God re- 
quires grace, an understanding of 
the truth, common sense, discipline, 
and above all — the inspiration of 
the Spirit. Without affectation in 
any manner, one's conversation 
must come from a sincere heart. 
The effectiveness of one's speech 
is based on his inner assurance of 
his relationship to Christ, and his 
awareness of human nature. Re- 
cently someone said that we need 
men in the church who can talk 
Christ even more than we need 
those who can preach Him. 

John said, "Every one that loveth 
is born of God." It is far easier to 
discuss things that are nearest our 
heart than anything else. Any per- 
son who loves God not only has a 
right to discuss the things of God. 
but he is bound to do it! He wit- 
nesses from an inner urgency of 
the Spirit. We are not told if the 
disciples had ever studied the tech- 
nique of soul winning; but they did 
say, "We cannot but speak the 
things which we have seen and 
heard" (Acts 4:20>. Indwelling love 
must find expression. "Out of the 
abundance of the heart the mouth 
speaketh" (Matthew 12:34 1. • 



m\ SPOKESMAN FOR a 
/ __ \ prominent denomination 

U U recently announced that 
local revival meetings will soon be 
a thing of the past. He sadly re- 
marked, "People — even church 
members — are too busy with golf, 
bowling, boating, and television to 
attend religious meetings during 
the week." 

Recently a high school student 
with a flippant smile said to his 
minister, "The story of Noah and 
the ark is just a fable." 

The minister looked at the young 
man with shocked concern. "Bob, 
I'm truly sorry to hear you say 
that. Our Lord Jesus believed that 
Noah was a real person and that 
the Flood was a real deluge." 

"Well, my teacher said that No- 
ah was a myth, and that Jonah 
was too," Bob insisted. 

The minister shook his head 
sadly. He was disturbed that such 
spiritual corrosion was at work in 
the schoolroom as well as in the 
church. What could he do to halt 
the insidious worldliness, unbelief, 
and declension of morals that were 
gnawing holes in the Christian 
armor? 

What can you and I do about 
this situation? 

Well, the Bible says, "Let a man 
examine himself" (1 Corinthians 
11:28). We can take a long look 
at those telltale holes, and remem- 
ber that corrosion can be very 
costly — it can cost us our immor- 
tal souls! We can ask God to apply 
a protective coating of God's grace 
and power to our corrupt and cor- 
roded lives. 

Charles Whitefield, the great 
evangelist, had a brother who was 
an earnest Christian. But the 
pursuit of worldly pleasures began 
to pit and corrupt his shining ar- 
mor. Finally one day he went to 
hear his famous brother preach. 
As he listened, he realized that his 
Christian life was dangerously cor- 
roded. 

The next afternoon as he sat at 
tea with the Countess of Hunting- 
don, an ardent supporter of Charles 
Whitefield, she asked, "Why are 
you so solemn and silent?" 



CORROSION 

IS COSTLY 



By NORMAND J. THOMPSON 




He pushed his plate aside. "I 
cannot eat. I am the most miser- 
able of all men. I — I am a lost 
man," he groaned. 

"I'm glad of that," she said. "I 
am very glad of it." 

"My lady, how can you say 
that?" protested Whitefield. "It is 
cruel to say you are glad that I 
am a lost man." 

"I am glad," smiled the countess, 
"because it is written, 'The Son of 
man is come to seek and to save 
that which was lost.' " 

Tears rolled down his cheeks. 
"Oh, madam, I bless God for that 
scripture! He ivill save me! He ivill 
forgive me. Thank God!" 

In spite of the ugly corrosion 
that rusts and damages our lives, 
God will forgive and save you and 



me. Christ loved us, and gave Him- 
self for us, that He might sanctify 
and cleanse us, and present "to 
himself a glorious church, not hav- 
ing spot or wrinkle, or any such 
thing; but that it should be holy 
and without blemish" (Ephesians 
5:27). 

When we come to Him, He will 
cover our spots of corrosion with 
the spotless robe of His righteous- 
ness. 

Then we can exclaim exultantly: 
"I will greatly rejoice in the Lord 
. . . for he hath clothed me with 
the garments of salvation, he hath 
covered me with the robe of righ- 
teousness, as a bridegroom deck- 
eth himself with ornaments, and 
as a bride adorneth herself with 
her jewels" (Isaiah 61:10). • 



!> 




By EILEEN M. HASSE 



DON'T SELL 
YOUR 



It would be better to concentrate on a few special 
interests." 

Perhaps no part of the church is open for greater 
criticism than the people, themselves. 

"Some church member he is!" 

"If that's the church, I'll have no part of it!" 

"Looks like religion didn't do much for her!" 

While church members may try to do the right 
thing, the fact remains that they are human. Try 
as they might, some members do wrong. By doing so, 
they often hurt the church in their dealings with 
others. 

Putting the best construction on everything goes 
a long way toward making up for the failures of some 
church people. By repeating and enlarging upon mis- 
deeds of church members the church is sold terribly 
short. By concentrating on the great Christian truths 
to be found in the church we will draw the attention 
of outsiders to the real meaning of religion. 

Because a member does something wrong, that does 
not mean that the church sanctions him in his wrong- 
doing. Just how penitent or how sincere the wrong- 
doer may be, no one may judge. God alone can see the 
heart. There is no need to sell the church short be- 
cause a few people have fallen short of expectations! 

Church leaders are naturally in the limelight. They 
are wide open for criticism. When church leaders are 
not revered in public, the church is hurt. 

"Him? A church leader?" 

"Look at his past!" 

Did Jesus not call Matthew to be His disciple? Did 
Jesus hold his past against him? Indeed, who is to 
say that some church leaders may be called because 
of their past? 

"Because I did not always have a church home, I 
feel I can teach the children in my Sunday school 
class to value their church," one teacher said. 

"I didn't learn the books of the Bible until lately," 



CHURCH SHORT 



THE CHURCH HAS a definite job to do socially. 
Gone are the days in many churches when 
people gathered on Sunday morning, then 
locked the church door for the coming week. Chris- 
tian fellowship is a necessary part of any church 
program. 

"It's something every night!" one mother com- 
plained. 

"I just couldn't take it — financially or physically," 
an outsider thinks. That mother sold the church ac- 
tivities short. Perhaps she lost a future church mem- 
ber by giving the church functions a black eye. 

The busy mother meant: "My children have spread 
themselves too thinly over too many outside activities. 



another teacher said, "I believe many children do 
not realize the importance of the memory work." 

So a faulty past can mean that the church leader 
will be more dedicated. Such leaders are often more 
understanding of what goes on in the minds of the 
unchurched and the erring. Knowing these things can 
be a great help in reaching the lost. 

Keeping the value high on church leaders places 
a high value on church opinion among the out- 
siders. It is from the outsiders that our new members 
come. The outsiders are the home mission field. We 
owe it to them to keep the value of our church high. 

My church! What a responsibility! I must not 
cheapen myself by selling my church short! • 



10 





By BELLE CHAPMAN MORRILL 



FOOTSTEPS 

OF APOSTLE PAUL 












\V OME INTERESTING EXCAVATIONS have been 
^CNmade in cities which Paul visited on his mis- 

V^ysionary journeys, and in Tarsus, his birthplace. 

Tarsus had a great university and a famous ath- 
letic arena. The arches of some of these old buildings 
were found a few years ago when the ground was 
being excavated for one of the buildings of the present 
Tarsus College, a missionary college for boys. The 
ruins of a factory have also been found where sou- 
venirs in the shape of images of famous athletes 
were made. Paul's description of the Christian life 
as a race course in 1 Corinthians 9:24-27 shows his 
knowledge of the athlete's training. 

In Antioch of Syria, where the name Christian was 
first given to the followers of Jesus, much excavation 
has been possible because the present town, Antikia, 
is some distance from the site of the old city. In 
Paul's day there was a two-mile paved street from 
the seaport to the city itself. Some of the marble 
columns which protected the sidewalk from the 
chariots in the street, still remain. The most important 
discovery here is the famous "Chalice of Antioch," 
which is now housed in a safety vault in New York 
City. 

This cup is of silver filigree covered with gold leaf. 
On one side is a picture of Jesus as a boy, on the 
other Jesus as a man, with his feet on the Roman 
eagle. Was that to show the craftsman's belief that 
Jesus would conquer proud Rome? Inside this or- 
namental cup is an old, plain cup, which may have 
been the actual one used by Jesus and the disciples 
at the Last Supper. 



Like Antioch, Ephesus was also located on a river. 
In Paul's day this was dredged so that ships could 
sail all the way to the city itself. Ephesus had a 
famous temple to Diana, which was called one of the 
Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Paul's preaching 
here for two and a half years so affected the sale of 
images and good luck souvenirs of the goddess that 
the silversmiths stirred up a mob against Paul. Read 
the whole exciting story in Acts 19. 

Today, although some of the pillars of the temple 
are still standing, the surrounding land is a swamp; 
and instead of hearing "Great is Diana," the old cry, 
a visitor hears only the croaking of frogs! 

In Athens one can still see the marketplace where 
Paul talked with other teachers (Acts 17:17). and 
Mars Hill, where he delivered his sermon. Scientists 
hope to find here the altar to an unknown god. 
which Paul mentioned. Though it has not been found, 
a similar one has been found in another city. 

Many of the ruins in Rome bear testimony to the 
martyrdom of the early Christians. The Colosseum 
ruins show the great arena, the pits where the lions 
were kept, and the benches where the bloodthirsty 
spectators sat. The Mamertine Prison, a dungeon cut 
out of the rock is probably the prison where Peter 
was confined. 

Guides take visitors through the winding passages 
of the underground catacombs, where the persecuted 
Christians met for worship and also buried their dead. 
If one enters Rome by the Appian Way, that marvel 
of Roman road building he can literally walk in the 
footsteps of Paul. • 



11 



By LeROY BROWN 



HIS HONOR PREFERRED 



/M ARON HOLMES and his 
rZ\ wife, modern missionaries 

L/U in Liberia, saw a young na- 
tive girl with her hands tied se- 
curely to a post. A load of dry 
straw had been piled on her hands, 
and a local law official was ready 
to touch a match to it! 

The missionary rushed forward, 
saying, "Stand back!" He untied 
the girl, then insisted that his wife 
tie his hands to the post. "Now, set 
fire to me!" he said. 

The lawman watched in amaze- 
ment. "But you didn't steal any- 
thing," he said. "We were going to 
punish this child for stealing." 

Then Missionary Holmes, with 
his hands still tied to the post 
preached about how Jesus, the sin- 
less, died for the sins of the world. 
What a graphic analogy it was, and 
how that sermon struck home! In- 
cidentally, the child was not re- 
tied to the post. 

For forty-four years Aaron 
James Holmes was one of the few 
Negro American Missionaries in 
Africa. In 1910, with his wife and 
two small children, he moved from 
Florida to Liberia mainly because 
the government over there gave 
him twenty-five acres of land and 
he had become weary of being a 
sharecropper in Florida. After the 
death of his American wife, Holmes 
met a beautiful Liberian girl who 



was a teacher in an African mis- 
sion school. After they were mar- 
ried, he was converted through her 
efforts and became deeply interest- 
ed in missionary work. 

His interest in helping needy 
people was especially stimulated 
once when a collection was being 
taken in a native church. He was 
not impressed with the amount of 
money that was given, or by the 
products such as rice, palm oil, 
or cackling chickens that were put 
into one of the large wood collec- 
tion bowls, but his heart was 
touched when Boymah, a leper, 
came forward, put one of the big 
bowls on the mud floor, and got 
into it himself! The poor man had 
nothing but himself to give. And 
Holmes concluded, Can I do less? 

His days and evenings were spent 
in Christian service — preaching, 
personal evangelism, instructing, 
and helping native people live bet- 
ter lives in various ways. He partic- 
ularly liked to work with the soil, 
and he was especially adept at 
getting products to grow! Further- 
more, he shared his knowledge and 
helped others get more from the 
land. He also taught the natives 
how to make molasses from sugar 
beets, and his wife taught the 
women how to prepare new dishes 
from sweet potatoes and other 
products. 



Missionary Holmes and his iamily 
believed firmly in God and in His 
protecting care. Once, for instance, 
their young daughter was seriously 
ill from mushroom poisoning. Per- 
haps she had eaten a few toad- 
stools. The only doctor was forty 
miles away, and he was a dentist 
rather than a medical doctor. But 
they sent for him. In the mean- 
time, they anointed the child with 
oil and prayed for her. 

Sixteen hours later when the 
dentist arrived, he found the little 
girl up and gleefully playing with 
her pet monkey. 

Through sunshine and rain the 
Holmeses labored. The going was 
sometimes difficult, especially when 
drought or plague struck the com- 
munity. When a plague of locusts 
came, destroying the crops, for in- 
stance, the Holmeses simply dined 
on roasted locusts until they could 
get a more choice supply of food 
again. 

In 1958 Missionary Holmes died 
suddenly from a heart attack while 
he was in the United States to 
raise money for his mission. He 
was even then planning to return 
to Africa. But his almost half cen- 
tury of devoted service there spoke 
for itself. Never seeking honor for 
himself, he spent the greater part 
of his lifetime in what most people 
would consider comparative seclu- 
sion, to honor his beloved Saviour.* 



12 



HOUGH THE National Sun- 
day School convention has 
been covered by our publi- 
cations, I just must tell you some- 
thing about the guest lecturers of 
that great gathering. The conclave, 
convening in Cincinnati in Sep- 
tember, was a genuine boost to 
the program of Christian educa- 
tion in the Church of God. 

Sunday school leaders from 
across the nation were greatly in- 
spired and challenged as Dr. Roy 
B. Zuck, executive director of Scrip- 
ture Press Foundation, Wheaton, 
Illinois, masterfully directed work- 
shops entitled, "Planning Effective 
Youth Meetings," "The Work of 
the Board of Christian Education," 
"The Work of the Junior High De- 
partment," and "Standards of Sun- 
day School Success." 

Dr. Zuck's unique manner of 
conducting these workshops 
brought many favorable comments 
from his pupils and, without doubt, 
made lasting impressions. So many 
wonderful ideas were explicated 
by Dr. Zuck that one's knowledge 
of the work of the Sunday school 
was bound to grow richer by simply 
being exposed to his lectures. 

A second guest lecturer, Miss 
Winona Walworth, executive assis- 
tant of the Christian Education Ex- 
tension of Scripture Press Publi- 
cations also did a superb job in 
expanding the theme of the con- 
vention. Her audiences were profi- 
ciently directed in workshops en- 
titled, "Vacation Bible School," 
"The Work of the Primary De- 
partment," "The Work of the Chris- 
tian Education Director," "Plan- 
ning the Year's Program," and 
"Children's Church." Miss Wal- 
worth's remarkable knowledge of 
the work of Christian education in 
the local church and her enthusi- 
astic manner of lecturing made 
her workshops most enjoyable as 
well as highly informative. 

"The Pastor and the Sunday 
School," a workshop conducted by 
Dr. Charles Blair, pastor of the 
three thousand-member Calvary 
Temple of Denver, Colorado, was 
both interesting and instructive. 
Dr. Blair's lecture was spiced with 



practical experiences as well as 
practical instructions. 

A highlight of the entire con- 
vention was Pastor Blair's sermon 
on "The Charge of the Church — 
Christian Service" which was deliv- 
ered in one of the general sessions. 
According to Dr. Blair, if we are 
to be effective in "the King's busi- 
ness" we must possess a convic- 
tion that what we have to offer 
is second to none and is the 
greatest need of humanity. He al- 
so pointed out that we must "main- 
tain contact with our home of- 
fice," and be prepared to "face our 
competition" if we are to be greatly 
effective in the charge of the 
church. 

Dr. Blair remarked that there 
are other commodities which are 
sold on the market at a much 
cheaper price; however, if we are 
convinced that what we have to 
offer is the greatest need of hu- 
manity, we must go about our 
task with a feeling of urgency for 
"our King is soon coming, and the 
markets are fastly closing." The 
fervent manner in which this great 
message was delivered sparked a 
pledge of dedication in the hearts 
of the thousands who heard our 
guest from Denver. 

The Reverend George S. McNeill, 
executive director of the National 
Sunday School Association added 
much to the success of the con- 
vention. In his workshop concern- 
ing "Recruiting and Training 
Workers, the Reverend McNeill re- 
vealed that "the greatest weakness 
in the local Sunday school is to 
be found in the staff of workers 
which is responsible for its opera- 
tion." One of the most inspired 
addresses of the entire convention 
was given by the Reverend McNeill 
at a 7:00 a.m. breakfast for state 
Sunday school and youth directors 
and state overseers at the Shera- 
ton-Gibson Hotel. 

His subject, "John Did No Mira- 
cles," made his early morning au- 
dience aware that the greatest as- 
pect of a man's life is not in the 
miracles he performs, but in the 
fact that "what he says about 
Christ is true." • 



GUEST 

LECTURERS 

AT 

THE 

NATIONAL 

CONVENTION 




By LAMAR VEST, State Director 
of Oklahoma 



13 




while we 

were still juniors at college. 
Rick and I decided— well, you know 
what we decided. 



A LETTER 
FROM JOAN 



ml EAR BOB, 
//// My favorite brother 



By GRACE V. WATKINS 



probably sitting on the 
edge of his chair waiting to hear 
what happened this weekend, the 
most exciting weekend of my life. 

So many things happened just 
as I slipped away from the cam- 
pus with my overnight case to 
meet Rick at the edge of the high- 
way, until . . . 

But let's get everything in prop- 
er order. When I finished packing 
and signed out for Greenwood City 
(you remember I told you Rick's 
sister lives there and we were go- 



ing to her house first i, I left Bal- 
lard Hall and the campus. I was 
trembling with excitement, happi- 
ness, and anticipation, and a little 
fright, too. In an hour, I told my- 
self. I would be Mrs. Richard Con- 
way. I wondered what Mom and 
Dad would think, what they would 
say when I phoned them long dis- 
tance after the ceremony. 

I felt a little shaky. Bob, way 
down inside, because Rick and I 
had decided to slip off by our- 
selves and be married in Green- 
wood City with just Rick's sister 
and her husband for company. All 



11 



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my life I had planned on a wed- 
ding in my home church, with 
Mom and Dad and the family 
there, with the sanctuary filled 
with friends and relatives, my 
teachers and the church folks. I 
had planned for the sanctuary to 
be beautifully decorated with flow- 
ers, and afterward have the cut- 
ting of the big white wedding cake. 

But when Mom and Dad were so 
opposed to our being married while 
we were still juniors at college, 
Rick and I decided — well, you know 
what we decided. It was good to 
share the secret with you, Bob, you 
and Rick's sister. 

After I left the campus in the 
rain and walked over to the high- 
way, I kept thinking about home 
and wondering what the folks were 
doing. But then Rick came and 
picked me up in the car and it 
was so wonderful to be with him 
that I forgot everything else. 

The rain kept coming down, but 
we were happy because we were 
together. We drove through Stan- 
port and Beechville and my heart 
kept beating faster and faster. An- 
other five miles and we would 
reach Greenwood City! 

Then two miles out of Beech- 
ville, something went wrong with 
the car. It came to a dead stop 
and nothing Rick did made any 
difference. It just would not go. 
Finally he suggested that we walk 
down the road to a little house, 
where lights were shining from the 
windows. There he would phone 
the garage in Beechville. 

So that was what we did. The 
house was a sort of lonely little 
place, but it looked good to us. A 
young woman came to the door 
and soon we were taking off our 
wet wraps and Rick was phoning 
the garage. 

The repairman came in a hurry 
and he and Rick went back to the 
car. They were gone a long time; 
and, Bob, that was when the 
strange thing happened. I found 
that the young woman living in the 
little house was Donna Jean Sla- 
ter! You remember when you were 
in college, Donna Jean was the 
prettiest girl on the campus! 

I remembered the May Day pic- 



nic when I was visiting you, and 
Donna Jean announced her en- 
gagement to Phil Barlow. I thought 
she was the luckiest girl in the 
world. Then the next Christmas 
they eloped, the year they were 
juniors. 

And now I was in Donna Jean 
and Phil's house. It must have 
been planned that way by the good 
Lord. In minutes I was telling her 
that Rick and I were on our way 
to be married secretly. 

"Oh, Joan," she said, "don't do 
it. You'll be sorry as long as you 
live. Phil and I have always re- 
gretted we did it. We didn't tell 
our parents, just drove to the near- 
est county seat and hunted up a 
minister and were married in the 
parsonage parlor. The memory of 
my parents' faces, when Phil and 
I visited them two weeks later and 
told them, will haunt me the rest 
of my life. 

"Phil and I just didn't think, I 
guess. We didn't consider our folks, 
the way they had loved us and 
sacrificed for us and dreamed 
wonderful dreams for us." 

"Were they opposed to your get- 
ting married?" I asked. 

"They liked Phil and wanted us 
to marry," Donna Jean said, "but 
not then and not that way." Tears 
came into her eyes, then she ;aid, 
"When two people marry on the 
sly, comments are always made, 
comments that aren't complimen- 
tary. People wonder why the sud- 
den and secret marriage, even if 
there isn't actually any reason." 

Then Donna Jean told me, Bob, 
how their plans hadn't worked out. 
She and Phil had planned that 
they would stay in college, get their 
degrees, both teach a couple of 
years, then Phil would go on for 
his master's degree. 

"But Judy was born the next 
October," she told me, "and Jill a 
year later. Phil doesn't have his 
bachelor's degree yet, even though 
we've been married four years. He's 
going to night school in Green- 
wood City after working each day 
at the supermarket." 

Donna Jean talked about bud- 
gets, insurance, hospital bills, gro- 
cery bills, rent, car repairs and a 



lot of other things that didn't 
sound rosy at all. 

And, as Donna Jean talked, 
things shifted into a new perspec- 
tive. It had seemed so wonderfully 
thrilling — our slipping off and be- 
ing married secretly, then phoning 
our parents with the announce- 
ment, coming back to college with 
the big news, and having everyone 
"oh" and "ah" at my being a mar- 
ried woman. But suddenly, there in 
Donna Jean's little living room, it 
didn't seem glamorous any more 
— it seemed selfish and risky and 
foolish. 

Rick and the repairman came 
back after a while and said the 
car would have to be towed into 
Greenwood City. Rick must have 
seen something in my face, because 
when I walked to the door with 
him, he put his hand on my shoul- 
der, and said, "You've changed 
your mind, haven't you?" 

"Yes, Rick," I whispered. "Don- 
na Jean and Phil did what we 
were going to do. As they look 
back, it doesn't seem very smart. 
Maybe we're not as smart as we 
thought we were. I guess we don't 
know very much about life." 

I could see the repairman at the 
edge of the highway waiting for 
Rick. Rick sighed. "Yeah, I've been 
thinking the same thing, while I 
was standing there watching that 
fellow check the car." 

"Maybe the good Lord sent the 
breakdown to bring us to our 
senses. I — I guess we needed Don- 
na Jean, and—" I broke off. 

Rick nodded. And in that mo- 
ment. Bob, I prayed a prayer of 
thanks, and I'm sure Rick did the 
same. His sister was awfully re- 
lieved. 

So, you see, Bob. I'm not Mrs. 
Richard Conway. I'm still Miss Joan 
Everett. I love Rick as much as 
ever, maybe more. But we're wait- 
ing for the wedding until the day 
when Dean Orringer makes his 
speech about degrees at the end 
of our senior year, and Rick and 
I are possessors of little black- 
covered books that say we're alum- 
ni of Bainbury College. 

Love. 

Joan • 



15 



By KATHERINE BEVIS 




MOTE HUNTING 



E LIVE IN a world of seasons. Even the days 
of our years are divided into seasons with 
multi-activities abounding in our schedule. 
One season opens while another comes to a close. 

Let us consider the hunting season. The hunter sets 
out during the limited time allowed with the in- 
tention of getting the maximum game. He makes the 
most of his time and opportunity in bagging the game 
and enjoying the sport. But he is cautious not to go 
beyond his limit lest he be penalized for doing so. A 
hunter must try to make the best of this limited 
season. 

However, there is a hunter who has open season all 
the time in which to do his hunting. He does not 
need a gun and shells, nor does he have to watch 
out for the game warden. Who is this hunter? 
The mote hunter! Instead of a gun, he has a vo- 
cabulary made up for the most part of just a few 
selected words but these words have smeared the good 
name of many persons. 

These mote hunters, with beams in their own eyes, 
take an attitude toward another that is like "scream- 
ing over a mouse to divert attention from the lion." 
Such words as "Yes, she is good, but — " "Of course 
he is smart, but — " "He did get the votes, but have 
you heard — ?" 



Now this open-season hunter does not necessarily 
lie: he just suggests and intimates. Then if he is 
cornered, he can quickly say, "Oh, I didn't mean that!" 
The open-season hunter's main authority is "They say 
. . ." or "I have heard. . . ." He makes use of this 
tool — gossip — to lower his listener's opinion about those 
who are the subject of his unguarded talk. 

If you happen to be one of these open-season hunt- 
ers, why not try to fill your mind with healthy and 
positive attitudes. Do this by reading the Bible, by 
thinking on spiritual things, and by clearing the chan- 
nels of your mind. Mote hunting is like a vise be- 
cause it holds the hunter in its clutches and he him- 
self receives the greater injury. 

The story is told of a small-town newspaper editor 
who became impressed by the Bible passage. "He that 
is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone 
at her" (John 8:7). He actually placed a stone on 
his desk; and when anyone annoyed him, the stone 
would remind him of wrongs which he had done. He 
could then feel that the mote in the other person's 
eye was not so large after all. May we be very care- 
ful how we make use of this open-season — this sea- 
son of the mote hunter! • 



1G 



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Application to Buckingham Life Insurance Company 
Executive Offices, Libertyville, Illinois 



AMERICAN TEMPERANCE HOSPITALIZATION POLICY 

NameCPIFASF PRINT) 


Street nr RD * 






County 


State 


2,D 


Age Date of Birth 




Month Day 

Height 




Beneficiary 






1 also apply for coverage for the me 

NAME AGE 


mbers of my family listed below: 

HEIGHT WEIGHT BENEFICIARY 


BIRTH DATE 


1. 


2. 


3. 


4. 



To the best of your knowledge and belief, are you and all members listed above in good health 
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written answers to the above questions. 
Date: Signed :X . ____.^ 

AT-IAT 



Mail this application with your tint premium to 



isi ; 



S AMERICAN TEMPERANCE ASSOCIATES, Inc., Box 131, Libertyville, Illinois 



THE 

MOST TALKED ABOUT 

LUNCH EVER ! 




THE BEDCLOTHES landed in 
a crumpled heap as Jeremy 
sprang out of bed and 
reached for his brown and yellow 
tunic. Today was the day he had 
dreamed of. And he did not want 
to waste a single minute of it. His 
birthday had come at last and now 
that he was twelve he was going to 
hike — alone — to his uncle's house 
five miles away, near a little town 
called Bethsaida. 

As he awoke, Jeremy smelled the 
freshly baked barley bread. After 
a hearty breakfast of warm bread, 
figs, and goats' milk he was on his 
way to Uncle Laban's house. 

Soon the boy's tan leather thongs 
were stained a dark brown by the 
moist dew that lay on the grassy 
fields. Jeremy carried a pigskin 
shoulder bag which contained his 
favorite slingshot and the small 
lunch his mother had prepared. 
The bag swung back and forth at 
his side as he trooped along pre- 
tending to be a rich merchantman 
traveling into a far country to buy 
spices and perfumes. 



The hike was every bit as excit- 
ing as Jeremy had dreamed it would 
be. But after several hours he had 
to admit he was travelweary. He 
was about to stop and rest when 
he spotted a crowd of people in 
the field up ahead. This unexpected 
sight gave Jeremy a new spurt of 
energy. He forgot how tired ho had 
been only moments ago and hur- 
ried on toward the crowd. When he 
reached the edge of the company 
some children about his age called 
to him to join in a game of tag. 
But the boy was bent upon learn- 
ing what had brought so many 
people to such a lonely spot. 

While Jeremy was nudging his 
way through the dusty host, a wo- 
man with a gruff sounding voice 
ordered him to get still and listen 
to Jesus. Jeremy could not be still! 
He squeezed his way slowly to the 
center of the throng. And then he 
saw the Man whom they called Je- 
sus. He did not look unusual. He 
was not doing anything unusual. 
He was not even speaking to the 



people but was looking toward a 
small group of men. 

Jeremy quickly concluded that 
nothing spectacular was taking 
place after all and that he had 
better bo on his way. As he turned 
away he overheard a bearded man 
among Jesus' companions saying, 
"What shall we do? These people 
have nothing to eat." Jeremy 
scanned the people who had con- 
gregated around Jesus. They were 
not carrying any provisions. The 
lad could imagine that they were 
getting hungry for they looked 
faint. He clutched the skin bag 
and thought how clever his moth- 
er had been to prepare him a 
lunch. 

Before long Jeremy became very 
hungry. He sprawled out on a 
patch of cool grass and took his 
lunch from the bag. He peeled 
away the linen cloth to see what 
was inside. Then he spread the food 
out on the linen napkin. There 
were five barley cakes and two 
smoked fish. Jeremy bowed his 
head to give thanks. When he lift- 



18 



ed his eyes, he was met with what 
seemed like a thousand wistful 
glances. 

His heart pounded so hard that 
he felt sure the people could see it 
thumping beneath his tunic. As he 
stuffed the lunch back into the bag, 
an idea struck him. Without wait- 
ing to think how it might turn out, 
he drew near and touched the 
bearded man on the shoulder. 

The man turned. His forehead 
wrinkled with worry as he spoke 
to Jeremy. "If you are lost, Lad, 
just stand still. I will help you 
presently." And with that he turned 
back to the others. 

"Oh well," mumbled Jeremy, "I 
don't reckon my lunch would have 
helped anyhow." 

But when the boy heard some 
little babes crying, he was deter- 
mined to share his lunch. Once 
more he tried to get the man's at- 
tention. With one hand he held 
his lunch; with the other he pulled 
at the man's coat sleeve. Someone 
standing nearby noticed and said, 
"Andrew, that lad wishes to speak 
to you." The one called Andrew 
wheeled around. "Look, Son," he 
began. 

"But Sir," interrupted Jeremy. 
"I have here a small lunch. Give 
it to Jesus." 

Andrew knelt by the boy. "Why 
Laddie, this lunch would not go 
very far," he exclaimed. 

"I know," admitted Jeremy, "but 
I want to share it." Then Andrew 
took Jeremy by the hand and led 
him to Jesus. "Master," he said, 
"there is a lad here with a small 
lunch of five barley loaves and 
two small fish." 

Jesus smiled and took the lunch. 
The Master raised His hands. Si- 
lence fell over the crowd as He 
gave thanks. Jeremy stood watch- 
ing intently to see what Jesus 
would do with the lunch. To his 
surprise Jesus began giving His 
companions instructions about 
seating the people on the grass. 
Then when everyone was settled 
He began breaking the lunch into 
pieces and the men began distri- 
buting the food. 

Jesus continued to break the 
bread and fish, but they did not 



seem to be getting any smaller. 
Jeremy blinked his eyes and shook 
his head to see if he could be 
dreaming. When one of the men 
handed him a piece of fish and 
bread he wondered at the miracle. 
When he was in the open field 
again, Jeremy ran like a deer- 
hound, still clutching the frag- 
ments of his lunch. There was no 
time now to kick stones or exam- 
ine field plants. When he reached 
his uncle's house he was speech- 
less. Later the moisture returned 
to his parched throat and he be- 
gan telling his relatives the strange 
story about his lunch. • 



ANSWERS TO "REMEMBER THE 

BIBLE'S REMARKABLE 

REMARKS?" 

(See page 23) 

1. (a) Delilah (Judges 16:9). 

2. (c) Saul (Acts 9:5). 

3. (c) Nathan (2 Samuel 12:7). 

4. (b) Isaac (Genesis 27:24). 

5. (a) Ahab (1 Kings 21:20). 

6. (b) Pilate (John 19:5). 

7. (b) Ahasuerus (Esther 6:6). 

8. (a) Jacob's sons (Genesis 37: 

19.) 

9. (b) Moses (Exodus 10:29). 

10. (c) Goliath (1 Samuel 17:43). 



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Many artists live their lives in relative obscurity and die paupers 



FRANZ 
JOSEPH HAYDN 




By CHLOE S. STEWART 



NE DOES NOT ordinarily 
think of Franz Joseph Hay- 
dn as a composer of hymns. 
We usually associate him with sym- 
phonic music since he is sometimes 
called the Father of the Symphony, 
yet this eighteenth century com- 
poser created several outstanding 
religious compositions. 

One of the choice blessings which 
God has given man is the ability 
to compose and play good music. 
Even without the talent necessary 
to create our own songs, or the 
ability to play an instrument, we 
can derive immeasurable benefit by 
listening to good music. 

Haydn, or little Sepperl, as he 
was called in his boyhood days, 
was born in Rohrau, Austria, in 
1732, the second of a family of 
twelve children. Sepperl's talent for 
music began to show up at a very 
early age, but he was by no means 
a wunderkind as was Mozart. In 



fact if a premature death had tak- 
en Haydn from the world as early 
as it did Mozart and Schubert, he 
would not have written a single 
work capable of insuring him last- 
ing fame. 

He was nearly sixty when he 
wrote his first London Symphony 
and over seventy when he pro- 
duced his two great oratorios. 
Young Sepperl at the age of five 
and a half was sent away from 
home to study music in Hainburg. 
His mother wanted her son to be- 
come a Catholic priest, but due to 
his musical inclination and the in- 
fluence of a cousin who was the 
principal and precentor of the 
church of St. Philip and St. James, 
he never followed her wishes. This 
cousin, J. M. Franck, became his 
first teacher. 

Karl G. Reutter the younger, 
court composer and choirmaster at 
the cathedral of St. Stephens in 




Vienna found out about young 
Sepperl and persuaded him to join 
his choristers and thus became his 
second teacher. He remained for 
nine years at this magnificant and 
imposing cathedral. When Haydn 
became seventeen years old, he got 
into a little trouble with his prac- 
tical jokes and was expelled. 

For employment after his explu- 
sion from Reutter's service at St. 
Stephens, young Haydn began to 
take part in serenades and gave 
music lessons to a few youngsters 
for a modest fee. Through one of 
his students, he became acquainted 
with a then famous Italian com- 
poser and teacher, Nicolo Porpora. 
This led to more acquaintances 
and influences which helped mold 
young Haydn into the great musi- 
cal genius he was to become. 

Haydn married Maria Anna 
Keller when he was twenty-eight 
years old, although he was really 



20 



in love with her sister who became 
a nun. As Haydn began to develop, 
he became the assistant conductor, 
then later the conductor to the 
court at Eisenstadt (Hungary) for 
Prince Paul Anton Esterhazy. While 
at the Esterhazy court he was ob- 
ligated to compose exclusively for 
the prince; he was bought, mind, 
soul, and body. He found a way, 
however, to circumvent this dilem- 
ma and soon his works began to ap- 
pear outside the court of Eisen- 
stadt. 

Franz Joseph Haydn was a part 
of the same period to which Mo- 
zart and Beethoven belonged. 

The Sturm and Drang (storm 
and stress) period of the time en- 
gulfed Haydn as well as the other 
artists and writers of his time. This 
period played a valuable part in 
his development and served as a 
sobering ingredient to the frivolity 
of the rococo style. 

It is difficult, due to disagree- 
ment among the authorities, to say 
just how many compositions this 
great musician made. Several at- 
tempts have been made to produce 
definitive editions of his works, 
the best of which is estimated to 
comprise eighty volumes when 
completed. He wrote over a hun- 
dred symphonies, around eighty- 
three quartets, about twenty-one 
trios, many hymns and oratorios, 
several operas, and many other 
works. 

At the age of fifty-eight (1790), 
he took his first trip to England. 
Mozart exclaimed "Oh, papa, you 
have had no education for the wide 
world, and you speak so few lan- 
guages." Haydn answered, "But 
my language is understood all over 
the world." His stay in England 
stimulated his creative powers to 
the utmost and resulted in an un- 
folding of the twelve brilliant Lon- 
don Symphonies. 

Many artists live their lives in 
relative obscurity and die paupers 
but not Haydn. He was well-known 
and well-to-do throughout his adult 
lifetime. 

Haydn had the unusual experi- 
ence of reading his own obituary 
notices. The rumor was spread 
throughout Europe in 1805 that he 



had died. Cherubini, a composer, 
wrote a cantata on his death, and 
Kreutzer composed a violin con- 
certo based on themes from Hay- 
dn's works. These works and Mo- 
zart's requiem was scheduled to 
be performed in Paris in February 
1805. Haydn's sense of humor was 
as active as usual and he wrote a 
letter explaining that if he had 
known about this in time, he would 
have made a trip to Paris and 
conducted the Requiem himself. 

In the opinion of the author, the 
best composition of all Haydn's 
works, and Haydn's own favorite, 
is a national hymn contained in 
one of his string quartets called 
The Kaiserquartett in C major. It 
is the second movement, Poco 
Adagio Cantabile, which contains 
variations of his famous hymn, 
Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser. This 
immortal hymn was composed in 
1797 as the Austrian national An- 
them, and for more than a century 
it was used with at least a dozen 
different lyrics as the anthem of 
the Austro-Hungarian monarchy. 

This hymn became the Third 
Reich's infamous song, "Deutsch- 
land, Deutschland Uber Alles," and 
is still considered a national hymn 
by the Federal Republic of Ger- 
many. John Newton gave this melo- 
dy new lyrics and it has been sung 
for years, in English-speaking 
churches, under the title, "Glorious 
Things of Thee Are Spoken." 

This was the last song to be 
sung by Haydn before he died in 
1809. Vienna had capitulated to 
Napoleon's Army, Haydn's nerves 
had become shattered by witness- 
ing hours of bombardment and 
too, he was then seventy-seven 
years old. • 



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S I A I I.. 



By DENZELL TEAGUE 




LEE COLLEGE FALL REVIVAL mM 




OTAL COMMITMENT t o 
Christ was the theme of the 
Lee College fall revival, con- 
vening October 17-24. Speakers 
were the Reverend Messrs. J. Frank 
Spivey of Atlanta, Georgia, and 
Frank W. Lemons of Alexandria, 
Virginia. Both of these men are 
respected in the church as men of 
spiritual stature and are much 
sought after as camp meeting 
speakers. 

Leading the congregation each 
day into new discoveries of old 
truths, the Reverend Mr. Lemons 
garnered from his years of experi- 
ence in Pentecost, thrilled our 
hearts, in simple, straightforward 
terms, as he heralded the heroes 
of the Pentecostal heritage of the 
Church of God. 

Quick-witted and eloquent, the 
Reverend Mr. Spivey graphically 
and colorfully explained in vivid 
detail the professing Christian's 
personal obligation to the heri- 
tage, declaring the cost of disciple- 
ship, lauding the joys and satisfac- 
tions of the consecrated heart, and 
extolling the benefits of a life com- 
mitted to Jesus Christ. 

Lives were changed as an Unseen 
Power moved across the congrega- 
tion, bringing help to the helpless 
and hope to the hopeless. God was 
recognized in His Omnipresence in 
the early morning prayer meetings 
as well as in the all-night prayer 



sessions in which He toucned and 
changed many lives. Many re- 
ceived the baptism of the Holy 
Ghost both inside and outside the 
services. One young lady literally 
received the baptism outside the 
services: out on the street, amid 
the joyous shouts of classmates. 

This writer was thrilled during 
the altar services as he witnessed 
Holy Ghost-filled teachers weeping 
and praying with earnest seekers 
whose unflagging concern resulted 
in total commitment and ultimate 
baptism of the Holy Ghost. 

Surely this revival was an ectype 
of that great revival that swept 
Cleveland in 1907, which, in itself, 
was a latter day fulfillment of the 
prophecy of Joel, "In the last days, 
... I will pour out of my Spirit . . ." 
In the intervening years the whole 
world has felt the impact of that 
revival. Gone are the sawdust trails, 
the tent poles, and the binding 
ropes, but still present in this re- 
vival was the same Pentecostal 
power, sent from the same God by 
the same Spirit, and manifested 
in the same way. 

Doubtlessly the Church of God 
will feel the impact of this revival 
for years to come; and growth and 
life and strength for the church 
will be the fruition of those who, 
dissatisfied with token contribu- 
tions, met Christ face-to-face in 
total commitment. • 



2L> 



REMEMBER THE 

BIBLE'S REMARKABLE REMARKS ? 



By VINCENT EDWARDS 



In case you have never consid- 
ered how packed the Bible is with 
stirring incident and eventful ac- 
tion, here is a quiz on ten sayings 
that were each made at a time of 
crisis. Three names are given with 
each saying, and it is your job 
as an up-and-coming Scriptural 
expert to tell who was the speak- 
er. You may write your selections 
in the blanks provided. 

Count 10 for each name you 
choose correctly. A total score of 
70 is an average mark; 80 shows 
real biblical knowledge, while 90 
will mark you as a genuine pundit 
in this field. The correct answers 
are on page 19. 



1. "The Philistines are 
upon thee." 

(a) Delilah 

(b) Jezebel 

(c) Miriam 



2. "Who art thou. Lord? 1 

(a) Peter 

(b) Stephen 

(c) Saul 



3. "Thou art the man. 

(a) Samuel 

(b) Elijah 
<c) Nathan 

4. "Art thou my very 
son . . .?" 



(a) Jacob 

(b) Isaac 

(c) Abraham 



5. "Hast thou found me, 
O mine enemy?" 

(a) Ahab 

(b) Pharaoh 

(c) Haman 

6. "Behold the man!" 

(a) Herod 

(b) Pilate 

(c) Caiaphas 

7. "What shall be done 
unto the man whom 
the king delighteth 
to honor?" 

(a) Darius 

(b) Ahasuerus 

(c) Nebuchadnezzar 



8. "Behold, this dreamer 
cometh." 

(a) Jacob's sons 

(b) The men of Athens 

(c) Job's three friends 

9. "I will see thy face 
again no more." 

(a) Paul 

(b) Moses 

(c) Jonathan 

10. "Am I a dog, that thou 
comest to me with 
staves?" 

(a) Sennacherib 

(b) Belshazzar 

(c) Goliath 



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ILLINOIS CONDUCTS TEEN DAY 




The State Sunday School and 
Youth Department of Illinois con- 
ducted its first Statewide Teen Day 
October 9, 1965, at Mackinaw Dells, 
near Bloomington. The program 
was packed with interesting and 
informative ideas. It all began at 
9:30 a.m. as our teens worshiped 
together. The "Teen Witness 
Clinic," led by Norman Jones of 
Bloomington, taught our youth 
techniques of witnessing. With in- 
formative teaching and filmstrip, 
this class was geared to train and 
give the know-how in witnessing 
with an actual demonstration of 
house-to-house witnessing. 

From 11:00 a.m. till noon, three 
classes were in session during 
"Teen Discussion Time." A class 
for the young teens, ages thirteen 
through fifteen, on "Spiritual 
Guidance for Early Teens" was 
taught by Dale Brown of East 
St. Louis. He dealt with problems 
which early teens will encounter. 
Betty Madison of Decatur taught 
a class for teen girls, ages sixteen 
through nineteen, on "How to Pick 
a Husband." She dealt with such 
points as what qualities to look 
for, courtship, engagement, mar- 
riage, the new morals, and the sa- 
credness of sex. James Guynn of 
Lawrenceville treated the same 
subjects in his class for teen boys, 
ages sixteen through nineteen, as 
he told them "How to Pick a Wife." 

"Teen Feed Time" was at 12:00 
noon. Basket lunches were opened 
to appease hungry appetites. "Teen 



Recreation" was thoroughly en- 
joyed from 1:00-4:00 p.m. with 
games of horseshoe, Ping-Pong, 
Softball, volleyball and skating. 
During "Teen Singspiration Time" 
our hearts were blessed by the in- 
spired singing of the Evangels, a 
teen trio from Peoria. 

This wonderful day was climaxed 
by "Teen Worship" with a mes- 
sage by Eugene Maddox of Clin- 
ton. The Holy Spirit used Brother 
Maddox to reach and challenge 
the youthful hearts as was evi- 
denced by the results of "Teen 
Dedication Time." The two hun- 
dred and fifty-seven registered 
delegates can testify to the suc- 
cess and effectiveness of this great 
day that will long be remembered 
by those present. Even before the 
day ended, many were asking, 
"When are we going to have an- 
other one?" 

Linda McCoy of Bloomington and 
David Steele of Peoria were elected 
by the group as "Miss Illinois Teen- 
ager" and "Mr. Illinois Teen-ager" 
respectively. 

Our theme for the day was 
"Christ for Teens — Teens for 
Christ. State Youth Director Jim 
Madison challenged the teens as 
they left to be "Teens for Christ." 
He instructed them to live for 
Christ, to work for Him, to walk 
with Him, to talk with Him, and to 
die in Him that they might be per- 
mitted to live and reign with Him. 
—Reporter 



I 

)R 



YOUNG 
PEOPLE' 
ENDEAVO 

ATTENDANCE FOR OCTOBER 

By Donald S. Aultman 
National Director 



This report represents only those 
YPE's that had an average atten- 
dance of more than 50 weekly and 
reported their attendance to the 
office of the National Sunday 
School and Youth Director. By no 
means does it reflect all the Fam- 
ily Training Hour (YPEi groups 
of the Church of God. Each church 
is invited to participate in this 
column. Attendance averages 
should be mailed on a postal card 
on the day following the last YPE 
service in the month and should 
be addressed to Donald S. Ault- 
man, national director, 1080 Mont- 
gomery Avenue, Cleveland, Tennes- 
see 37312. 

Daisy, Tennessee 303 

Goldsboro (Clingman Street I, 

North Carolina 251 

Middletown (Clayton Street), 

Ohio .... 236 

Lakeland (Lake Wire), 

Florida .... 203 

Canton (Temple), Ohio 194 

Greenville (Tremont Avenue i. 

South Carolina 188 

Atlanta (Hemphill Avenue). 

Georgia 177 

Dillon, South Carolina 177 

Wyandotte, Michigan 171 

Dayton (Philadelphia), Ohio ... 149 

Flint (West), Michigan 144 

Tampa (Buffalo Avenue), 

Florida _ .... ... 143 

Phoenix (44th Street), 

Arizona _ 135 

Birmingham (North), 

Alabama __ .... __ __ __ 134 

Lenoir City (Sixth Avenue), 

Tennessee : 124 

Kannapolis (Elm Street), 

North Carolina ... . . .... _.. 122 



24 



Chattanooga (North), 




Odessa, Texas .... _ 


. 68 


Tennessee .... ... . — . __ 


120 


Rochester, Michigan .... .... 


68 


Birmingham (South Park), 




North, South Carolina 


67 


Alabama .... _ - — 


118 


Hixson, Tennessee .... .. 


66 


Fresno (Temple), California __ 


116 


Lemmon, South Dakota .... .. 


. 66 


Indian Springs, Alabama .... .... 


116 


Covington (Shepherds 




Samoset, Florida 


111 


Fold), Louisiana _. .. 


. 65 


Brunswick (Norwich 




Hartwell, Georgia ._ — . ~ 


65 


Street), Georgia ... . _. ... . 


110 


East Point, Georgia 


. 64 


Monroe, Michigan .... .... .... 


110 


Lake Worth, Florida .... 


. 64 


Paris, Texas _ ... 


108 


Oregonia, Ohio ... .... a... .... .. 


. 62 


Middlesex, North Carolina .... 


107 


Santa Ana (Center 




Norfolk (Azalea Garden), 




Street), California .... .... _ 


62 


Virginia ~ ... . ... . __ 


105 


Abbs Valley, Virginia .... .... _ 


. 61 


Jesup, Georgia .... .... .— .... 


104 


Loxley, Alabama .... .— __ .. 


. 61 


Decatur (Sherman 




Cleveland (East), Tennessee _ 


60 


Street), Alabama .... .... .... 


103 


North Woodville, Michigan .. 


. 59 


Poplar, California .... ... . .... .... 


101 


Adrian, Michigan .... -... _ .. 


. 58 


Manns Choice, Pennsylvania 


97 


Lincoln (52nd Street), 




Lawton (Ninth and Lee), 




Nebraska ... 


58 


Oklahoma .... .... .... .... .... .— 


96 


Circleville, Ohio .... .. 


57 


Vanceburg, Kentucky .... .... .... 


95 


Jackson (Leavell Woods), 




Miami (North), Florida .... .... 


94 


Mississippi .... _ - 


. 57 


Portland (Powell Boulevard), 




Valdosta, Georgia .... ... 


. 57 


Oregon .._ ._ .... 


93 


Bonne Terre, Missouri .... .. 


56 


Columbus (Frebis Avenue), 




Thomasville, Alabama .. 


56 


Ohio 


91 


Sale Creek, Tennessee 


. 55 


Salisbury, Maryland .... .... 


91 


Aurora (Lincoln Street), 




Talladega, Alabama .... .... .... 


86 


Illinois ... ... . .... ... . — . .... - 


. 52 


Charlottesville, Virginia ..._ .... 


85 


Charleston (Davis Creek), 




LaFayette, Georgia 


85 


West Virginia .... .... ... . .. 


. 52 


Brownfield, Texas .... .... 


84 


Jason ville (Park and 




Fort Worth (Northside), Texas 


84 


McKinley), Indiana 


. 52 


Sanford, Florida ... .... __._ .... 


84 


Savannah, Louisiana .... .... .. 


50 



Adamsville, Alabama .... .. 

Louisville (Faith Temple), 

Kentucky ... .... .... 

Fort Worth (White 

Settlement), Texas .... .... 

Lawrenceville, Illinois .... .... 

Iowa Park, Texas .... .... 

Isola, Mississippi .... .... .... 

Chase, Maryland .... .... .... 

Dearborn, Michigan 

Harrison, Arkansas _ .... 
Thomasville, North Carolina 
Amarillo (West), Texas .... 

Lancaster, Ohio 

Wayne, Michigan .... .... .... 

Princeton, West Virginia .... 

St. Louis (Webster Groves), 

Missouri .... .. . .... .... .... 

Griffin, Georgia 

Crab Orchard, Tennessee ... 
Donalds, South Carolina .. 
Phoenix (East), Arizona .... 

Royston, Georgia .... .... 

Springfield ( Northside ) , 

Missouri .... .... .... 

Elyria, Ohio .... ... ... .... 



81 



81 



a^^ 



Enigma, Georgia, Sunday School 

We should like for the readers of 
the Lighted Pathroay to know of 
the excellent progress we are mak- 
ing here at Enigma. The Lord is 
especially blessing our Sunday 
school. For example, during the 
month of September we averaged 
thirteen per Sunday over the week- 
ly average attendance of August. 
Our church is growing in every de- 
partment, and we are joyously 
thankful to God for His many 
many blessings to us. 

— Curtis Fountain, pastor 




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CAROL LORONDEAU 
WINDSOR, ONTARIO 

Our YPE had a special program 
recently entitled "This Is Your 
Night" in honor of our president, 
Carol Lorondeau. 

Carol is eighteen years of age 
and has served as a YPE president 
for five years. She is a real example 
of an outstanding Christian in her 
faith and devotion to God. The 
Lord and the church always comes 
first in her life. 

Carol graduated from high school 
this year and has entered the uni- 
versity in Windsor. She is already 
making plans to go to Lee College 
next year. Her desire for the 
future is to teach in one of our 
bible colleges. 

We feel very proud of Carol here 
in Windsor. 

— G. F. Kirby, pastor 



KNOXVILLE, IOWA 
SUNDAY SCHOOL 

The Church of God Sunday 
school in Knoxville, Iowa, had a 
most successful Promotion Day on 
September 26, 1965. Being well at- 
tended, the program was under the 
direction of Mrs. Neva Williams, 
wife of the pastor. 

The program featuring the chil- 
dren, consisted of songs, prayer, a 
poem and a pantomime. After the 
promotion certificates were pre- 
sented, the pastor talked to the 
children on how to live for Jesus. 
Later, the children were served 
cake, ice cream and a drink. 

— Mrs. Leslie Williams, reporter 




Mary Sherman with some pupils 
and the bus 



WARREN, OHIO 
SUNDAY SCHOOL 

For the past five years, Mary 
Sherman and her class of inter- 
mediates have vigorously collected 
coupons for the Church of God 
Home for Children. They send ap- 
proximately two thousand per 
month. Mrs. Sherman works all 
night at the hospital each Satur- 
day night then brings eleven to 
thirteen children to Sunday school 
the next morning. Besides this, 
she provides a nice Bible for each 
student entering her class. 

We appreciate her work so very 
much. 

— R. E. Caraway, pastor 



BLACK MOUNTAIN 
NORTH CAROLINA 

The YPE at Black Mountain, 
North Carolina, raised $256.46 in 
a five-week contest with the chil- 
dren. Did they hustle! Never have 
our children worked so faithfully 
and eagerly. The night of Septem- 
ber 22, 1965, was a highlight that 
will not be forgotten. The seven 
boys and girls working to be 
crowned Prince and Princess were 
excited. However, they were not 
alone; the parents and all others 
were, too. 

The picture is of the entire Court. 
Each child was crowned according 




to the amount of money turned 
in and each child was a winner. 
The Prince was Allan Marler and 
the Princess was Debbie Smith. In 
the Court was Theresa Chambers. 
Allan Whitson, Linda Kilpatrick, 
Valerie Vance and Michael Con- 
nor. 

We thank the Lord for a job well 
done. Black Mountain is moving for 
Christ. —Reporter 



NOW IS THE TIME! 

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God Will Keep 



When I'm in bed, and lights are out. 
My ears just seem to roam about. 
I hear the cars that roll along; 
Sometimes I hear a happy song. 
The cricket sounds so glad and free, 
Then night birds call with frequent glee. 
A frog will croak three times or more; 
He lives beneath my bedroom floor. 
And then I know that God's great hand 
Has made all things in all our land. 
I know He loves the nighttime things 
That crawl or hop or fly with wings. 
And soon I close my eyes to sleep 
While trusting God my way to keep. 

—Wallace A. Ely 




Winter Patterns 



Needlelike ice hangs motionless, 
Crystal artistry has begun — 
Shimmering silver, covers the ground, 
And soft puffy clouds are spun. 

Frosty patterns are on the fence, 
Earth is sprinkled with clinging white, 
Sparkling enchantment is complete . . . 
All wrapped in beauty for the night. 

— Edna Hamilton 




In Fellowship with God 



Each day you should slip silently 

Into some secret hiding place 
And leave resentments, cares, and fears 

Outside the door. To know His grace, 
To satisfy your inner need, 

Pray God be with you in that space. 

In penance and on bended knee, 
Let God's love flow about you there. 

Pray for His guidance, let His will 
Become your will, and ask to share 

A greater burden of His task, 
A larger, greater load to bear. 

In humble service of our Lord, 

A blessed peace is always found; 
A joy the world can never give 

Will fill your soul, your heart abound. 
To live in fellowship with God— 

You cannot walk on higher ground! 

— Roy Z. Kemp 



Consolation 



Somewhere there is a heart that aches; 
Somewhere there is someone in pain, 
But He who rules the universe 
Shall see that joy will come again. 
For it is certain Someone cares, 
And it is certain Someone knows 
About our joys and happiness, 
About our griefs and cares and woes. 

If we but place our trust in Him 
And put our burdens on His breast. 
We soon shall know the peacefulness 
And quietness that comes with rest. 
Our worried hearts shall soon be calmed; 
Our minds completely filled with ease; 
Our God and Father understands; 
He knows and feels, He hears and sees. 



-Roy Z. Kemp 




ST8M TH8 SVIL TID8 



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REGULAR A. UNDER WHOSE WINGS by Ze- 
nobio Bird. (Retail price, S2.50) B. NO MORE A 
STRANGER by Orville Steggerda. (Retoil price, 
$2.50) C. UNINTERRUPTED SKY by Paul 
Hutchens. (Retail price, $2.95) D. DEVOTIONAL 
READINGS FOR USE IN SCHOOLS. (Retail price, 
$2.50) E. STOKE OF BRIER HILL by Zenobio 
Bird. (Retail price, $2.00) F. MYSTERY OF THE 
MARSH by Poul Hutchens. (Retail price, $2.95) 
G. SOUTH AMERICAN ROMANCE by Mary Orr. 
(Retail price, $2.50) H. BEYOND THE TANGLED 
MOUNTAIN by Percy. (Retail price, $2 5C 
MINISTERIAL I. PREACHING FROM ECCLESI- 
ASTES by G. Avery Lee. (Retail price, $2 75) 
J. AND JESUS IN THE MIDST by Herman Hoek- 
sema. (Retail price, $1.50) K. EFFECTIVE PUB- 
LIC PRAYER by Robert L. Williamson. (Retail 
price, $2.95) L. MESSIANIC PROPHECY IN THE 
OLD TESTAMENT by Aaron J. Kligerman. (Retail 
price, $2.95) M. KINGS ON PARADE by Lee 
Roberson. (Retail price, $1.50) N. OPERATION 
EVANGELISM by Horace F. Dean. (Retail orice, 
$2.95) O. MOSES' MIGHTY MEN by H. Hobbs. 
(Retail price, $2.50) P. YOU AND THE HOLY 
SPIRIT by Oglesby. (Retail price, $1.50) 
JUNIOR Q. MAN-EATERS AND MASAI SPEARS 
by Charles Ludwig. (Retail price, $1.25) R. WITH- 
OUT A SWORD by Margaret Rondolph Cate. 
(Retail price, $2.25) S. STORY OF MARTIN 
LUTHER by Morion Shoeland. (Retail price, $1.25) 
T ROGUE ELEPHANT by Charles Ludwig. (Retail 
price, $1.25) u. THE BOY FROM NORTHFIELD 
by Harry Albus. (Retail price, $1.25) V. MAN- 
EATERS DON'T LAUGH by Charles Ludwig. (Re- 
tail price, $1.25) W. KEN, SOUTH OF THE BOR- 
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MAN-EATERS CLAW by Charles Ludwig. (Retail 
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LIGHTED 




Pathway 



FEBRUARY, 1966 




■A, 




*w 



II 



^...^v 



V 



% Jitim 



GocPs L 



aw 



LIGHTED 



A new morality swept the land — 
God's laws had simmered down 
To meet the needs of modern man 
In country, city, town. 
This new law, from whence it came, 
They did not seem to care; 
But the license — ah, the license! 
And demarcation started there. 

God's law must be written down, 

In letters black and white; 

It must spell out the facts, 

It must be wholly right. 

Haphazard law the Illustrious Judge 

Such risk would never dare. 

So when they spoke of a new morality, 

Demarcation started there. 

— Grace Cash 



vQ^TD 



Whispering, shouting, murmuring voices 
Telling the stories of life today; 
How many, how many of these different voices 
Are showing lost people the Way? 

Voices singing and voices complaining 
Telling every secret known unto man. 
But how many Christian voices are speaking 
Of the Secret that only a Christian can? 

Oh, Christian friends let's raise our voices 
Above the noisy hue and cry; 
Let's tell the lost ones the Story of Life 
Before they wither and die. 

— Marjorie Clifton 



Published monthly at the Church of God Publishing House. 
Cleveland, Tenn. All materials intended for publication in The 
LIGHTED PATHWAY should be addressed to Clyne W. Buxton. 
Editor. All inquiries concerning subscriptions should be addressed 
to Bookkeeping Department, Church of God Publishing House, 
Cleveland, Tennessee. 

ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER AT 
POST OFFICE, CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 
Postmaster send Form 3579 to LIGHTED PATHWAY, P. O. Box 
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Pathway 



FEBRUARY 


, 1966 


Vol. 


37, No. 2 


CONTENTS 




Editorial 


3 


Clyne W. Buxton 


The Bible Is Enough! 


4 


Kalherine Bevis 


When Lincoln Asked Men 
to Pray 


5 


Vincent Edwards 


Home for Children 


6 


Clyne W. Buxton 


Snow Dreams 


8 


Grace V. Schi 1 linger 


The Search Continues 


9 


Paul F. Henson 


More Power to You! 


10 


Normand J. Thompsor 


The Miracle of Sunnyside 
Mission 


1 1 


Walter R. Pettitt 


Criticizing the Pastor 


2 


William Glenwood 


Can You Classify These 
Classifieds? 


13 


Erma Reynolds 


Everybody's Business 


14 


James E. Adams 


Testifying With a 
Typewriter 


6 


Evelyn P. Johnson 


Strengthening Winds 


8 


Ruth Crawford 


The Wayside Chapel 


20 


Frederick Norman Joy 


February Brings a 
Challenge 


22 


Mono Gay 


Young People's Endeavor 
Statistics 


24 




Variety 


26 




Only One Life 


27 


W. L. Hopper 


Cover 




Luoma Photos 


STAFF 




Clyne W. Buxton 

Lewis J. Willis 

Chloe Stewart 

Helen McMullen 

H. Bernard Dixon 

E. C. Thomas 


Editor 

Editor in Chief 

Artist 

Research 

Circulation Director 

Publisher 



CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Donald S. Aultman Paul F. Henson 

Margie M. Kelley Avis Swiger 

Denzell Teague Hollis L. Green 

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS 

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Margaret Gaines Jordan 

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Ruth Crawford Brozil 

Martha Ann Smith China 

NATIONAL YOUTH BOARD 

L. W. Mclntyre Thomas Grassano 

Cecil R. Guiles Haskel C. Jenkins 
Paul L. Walker 

SUBSCRIPTION RATE 

Single Subscription, 

per year $ 1 .50 

Rolls of 15 $1.50 
Single copy . 15 



^}Q0 S<2953®G?8£l/7 



What Happens After Death ? 



HEN DEATH OVERTAKES a loved one, it is a sad and lonely time for the relatives. 
Recently on a five-hundred-mile trip, I saw four funeral processions. As the family car of one pro- 
cession crept by, the sober, expressionless countenance of a mourner, dressed in black, struck so- 
lemnity to my mind as I reminisced over the passing of some of my loved ones. One has to live 
with the fact that Death stalks the earth, and at unannounced hours he takes one person here 
and another there, leaving loved ones stunned, perplexed and confused. The Bible says that it is ap- 
pointed unto men once to die; therefore, a time will come, ere the Rapture transpires, when one 
will pull the cold shroud of death about him and lie down to sleep. Man has always pondered the 
mystery of death. Ancient Job asked "If a man die, shall he live again?" The atheist thinks he will 
not; the agnostic is not sure; but the Christian knows that he will. The follower of Christ knows 
that all men, good and bad, live beyond the grave. He knows that to die in Christ is to be witli 
Jesus and the heavenly host in glory. He also knows that when one dies without Christ he must 
live in eternity apart from Him. The major reason the Christian works tirelesslv to convert the 
sinner is to try to save him from eternal punishment after death. 

THE APOSTLE PAUL EXPLORED the subject of life after death in his first letter to the 
church at Corinth. As he taught that new church, composed mostly of persons who had been recentlv 
converted from heathenism, he said, "I tell you this, my brothers: an earthly body made of flesh 
and blood cannot get into God's kingdom. These perishable bodies of ours are not the right kind to 
live forever. But I am telling you this strange anil wonderful secret: We shall not all die, but we 
shall all be given new bodies! It will all happen in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, when the 
last trumpet calls. For there will be a trumpet call from the skv and all the Christians who have 
died will suddenly become alive with new bodies that will never, never die; and then we who are still 
alive shall suddenly have new bodies, too. For our earthly bodies, the ones we have now that can 
die, must be exchanged for our heavenly bodies that cannot perish but will live forever" (1 Co- 
rinthians 15:50-53, living letters). 

THANK GOD, WE WILL have new bodies beyond the grave! A friend of mine, a Christian 
brother, has been afflicted with an arthritic condition for years. The other day poison set up in 
his leg and it had to be amputated in order to save bis life. When this friend slips away home to 
he with the Lord, he will be given a body like Christ's. There will be no fevered joints or drawn 
limbs. He will have a new body! Will we live beyond the grave? Praise God, we will! Our finite 
minds cannot imagine all that awaits beyond the veil. The Bible savs. "I've hath not seen, nor ear 
heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things which Coil hath prepared for them 
that love him." When a loved one dies, we are grieved because of his passing and his absence is 
felt acutely. Nonetheless, if that loved one knows Christ, death is not the end for him it is just the 
beginning. May each reader prepare himself to live with Christ beyond the grave. 





By KATHERINE BEVIS 




FOR TIMES LIKE these— when the world's hori- 
zons are darkening — the Word of God is the 
light that is sorely needed. 
It is said that when Dwight D. Eisenhower was 
president, he kept in the left-hand drawer of his 
White House desk a well-thumbed Bible to which he 
frequently turned. The first words in that Bible are 
the same as those in your Bible, with one exception: 
they are underscored with a pencil. During his first 
campaign when a reporter asked him about his re- 



ligious faith, he reached for his Bible and drew a line 
under the words, "In the beginning, God. . . ." 

"That's where our Nation started," said he; "that's 
where my parents and forefathers started." 

All of us must start there. Our attitude toward God 
and His Holy Word determines far more in our life 
than most of us may realize. 

A noted professor of English literature, William Lyon 
Phelps, found his Bible so rewarding that he made 
this statement: "A knowledge of the Bible without a 
college course is more valuable than a college course 
without a knowledge of the Bible." 

Several years ago the London War Cry carried a 
series of articles in which well-known Army leaders 
were asked, "If you were marooned on an island, 
what five books would you choose?" In every an- 
swer, the Bible was first. 

It would be a trying experience to be marooned, 
but such a plight would be even worse if one could 
not have a Bible. Yet, this was the experience of 
Sir Ernest Shackelton, who found himself shipwrecked 
in the Arctic region in a small boat with several 
others. Later, he testified that their constant repeti- 
tion of the Bible from memory was what kept up 
their spirits. 

There is no book quite like the Bible. In order to 
read God's Book as we should, we need to have a 
regular time and place for this reading. And we need 
to also remember that a hurried, harried spirit robs our 
soul of the food we need from this precious Book. We 
need this quiet time in this day in which we live. 
Bible reading needs the soil of a quiet, receptive 
spirit if our life is to be "Scripture-saturated." 

Christians subscribe heartily to the statement that 
"The Bible is the sole rule and guide for our faith." 
Of course every now and again there have been 
those who put the Bible under the microscope of high- 
er criticism. But the Bible still stands. As the poet 
said, "The hammers don't wear the anvil out." It 
is the other way around — the anvil stands, but the 
hammers clutter up the ground. 

The resurgence of critical examination of the 
Scriptures should cause us no real concern. These 
present day critics come up with no new approach. 
They spin their wheels in restatements of the heresies 
of the ages and despite their frantic preachments 
the Word still stands. "Heaven and earth shall pass 
away, but my words shall not pass away" (Matthew 
24:35). 

Yes, the Bible stands as the sole rule and guide for 
faith. 

The Bible is enough! • 



By VINCENT EDWARDS 



WTIhdim ILiim(B@Ilia 



Mloim 



WE HAVE BEEN the recipients of the choicest 
bounties of heaven. We have been preserved 
these many years in peace and prosperity. 
We have grown in numbers, wealth and power as no 
nation has ever grown. But we have forgotten God." 
If the average American were asked to tell who wrote 
these words, the last person he would probably think 
of would be the nation's former president — Abraham 
Lincoln. 

Yet, anyone who will take time to examine Lin- 
coln's various state papers is due for a surprise. In 
proclamation after proclamation, he turned to the 
Supreme Being in time of crisis. 

This phraseology, which sounds not unlike that of a 
modern evangelist, was characteristic of Lincoln. The 
passage quoted above came from one of many public 
appeals which he issued during the long struggle with 
the South. When he set aside days in which he. would 
call for "national thanksgiving, praise and prayer," 
he would herald the date with such a proclama- 
tion. 

Of all the public leaders who have served in Wash- 
ington, probably none showed a deeper sense of hu- 
mility. Even when victory crowned the North's ban- 
ners, his joy was toned down. If he had not been 
struck down by an assassin's bullet, he would have 
been the first to seek reconciliation and to try to heal 
the bitter feeling between those who supported the 
Union and those who favored the Confederacy. 

Many of Lincoln's contemporaries apparently did not 
sense the strong religious faith which inspired the 
president. But research has brought out how tireless 
was his search for divine guidance. 

Here is a striking passage from another one of his 




proclamations in calling for a day of national hu- 
miliation, fasting, and prayer: 

"It is the duty of nations as well as of men to own 
their dependence upon the overruling power of God, 
to confess their sins and transgressions in humble 
sorrow, yet with assured hope that genuine repentance 
will lead to mercy and pardon, and to recognize the 
sublime truth, announced in the Holy Scriptures and 
proven by all history, that those nations only are 
blessed whose God is the Lord." 

Abraham Lincoln, more than any other president 
of the United States, asked the people to join in 
prayer. He sought their prayers again and again. If 
ever words seemed designed for a nation's guidance, 
they are those which he wrote when the country 
was torn by conflict and uncertainty: "It is fit and 
becoming in all people at all times to acknowledge and 
revere the supreme government of God, to bow in 
humble submission to His chastisement, to confess 
and deplore their sins and transgressions in the full 
conviction that the fear of the Lord is the be- 
ginning of wisdom, and to pray with all fervency 
and contrition for the pardon of their past offenses 
and for a blessing upon their present and prospective 
action." 

To a later generation of Americans, the meaning 
of Lincoln's public expressions seem only too clear. 
In time of war, the great president had a pretty 
sound idea as to how the country could anchor itself 
to the bedrock of the Eternal. Above all, Abraham 
Lincoln seemed to have had a deep conviction of the 
necessity of prayer and repentance on the part of 
individuals as well as the nation. • 



5 9 6^0 



Doyle Stnnfield, chairman of the hoard, 
emcees the Christmas party 



THERE IS A new look on the 
grounds of the Church of 
God Home for Children. The 
long dreamed-of buildings, ar- 
ranged to house only twelve chil- 
dren each, have been started; in 
fact, the first two are practically 
finished. In the new buildings the 
children will have cottage or 
home-type accommodations as op- 
posed to the present dormitory plan. 
As finances come in, the man- 
agement of the home plans to de- 
molish the older buildings and re- 
place them with the smaller homes. 
These new buildings are excellent- 
ly planned, being spacious, com- 
fortable, and home-like. Each room 
is large, well furnished, has ad- 
joining bath, and will accommodate 
two children. The building includes 
bedrooms, living room, kitchen, 
dining room, a special room for 
those who become ill, and quarters 
for a man and wife who will care 
for the children. 

A very fine spirit prevails at the 
Home for Children among both the 
personnel and the children. Mrs. 
A. A. Shrader of Pine Bluff, Ar- 
kansas, has been a matron at the 
Home for a total of four and one- 
half years. She said of her work: 
"We will give account to God for 
what we do with our lives. If 
anything is God's work, this is it. 
I am glad I am here." 

Mr. Shrader is also employed by 
the Home, working as a night 
watchman and - doing other tasks. 
They have no children of their 
own. Mrs. Shrader is matron of 
about twelve boys, ages eleven and 
twelve. When asked her opinion of 
the new buildings, she commented, 
"They are most needed. It just 
isn't practical to live in a dormitory 
and keep twelve to fourteen chil- 
dren." 

The Home, located in Sevierville, 
Tennessee, has 165 children and 
forty employees. It is capabably di- 



rected by P. H. McCarn, super- 
intendent; E. K. Waldrop, assis- 
tant superintendent; and Paul Dun- 
can, social service director. The ad- 
ministration is answerable to a 
board of directors. Presently there 
are sixteen children in foster care, 
three adopted, and seven in Lee 
College. 

One marvels at the excellent 
training the children possess. This 
writer attended the annual 1965 
Christmas party of the Home, and 
in the crowded hall several chil- 
dren unavoidably bumped into him. 
Without exception an "excuse me" 
was immediately voiced by the 
child. 

The Church of God Home for 
Children has produced many fine 
citizens over the years. Children 
who grew up there have become 
businessmen, housewives, and min- 
isters. For example, one owns a 
printing business in Dallas; an- 
other is the wife of a well-known 
Tennessee minister; another is an 
executive with a stove-making com- 
pany, and still another is program 
director of a nationwide radio 
broadcast. 

Year after year young men and 
women leave the home to find their 
places in the world. We must con- 
tinue to help the Home for Chil- 
dren. The new buildings are need- 
ed desperately. Besides this, the 
regular maintenance must be fi- 
nanced. 

Would you like to do something 
to help the children of this home? 
Here is what you can do: (1) pray 
regularly for them; (2) save all 
your trading stamps and coupons 
from merchandise and send them 
to the home; (3) never fail to give 
your birthday and anniversary of- 
ferings at your local church; (4) 
each Sunday give in the Home for 
Children offering; (5) give liberal- 
ly in the Fall Festival when spon- 
sored by your state. • 




The Reverend and Mrs. R. Leonard Carroll. 

Dr. Carroll, third 

itant general overseer of the church of God, 

sits with the board 

when it is in session. 

He gave an inspiring address 

at the party. 




By CLYNE W. BUXTON 



6 




17; is directory 

stands in the lobby 

of the administration building 



This photograph, 

though taken on a foggy day and therefore not very clear, 

depicts one of the new cottage-type 

homes in the foreground 





Santa Clans 

ed his traditional sack 

for a Cherrios box. 

did not seem to mind 



Slioivn here is the board of directors 

of the Home for Children. 

Heading left to right, they are: 

). H. Hear, 

Garland Griffis, Charles Tillcy, 

Sylvia Norman, 

Doyle Stanfield, Lucille Walker, 

11. Leonard Carroll, and Earl Causey. 

Seated are E. K. Waldrop, 

assistant superintendent (left) and P. H. McCarn. 

superintendent 



A larger boy 

helps smaller children locate 

Christmas presents 




Jk 




ALTHOUGH SPRING is a 
long way from being just 
around the corner, I found 
much to inspire me in the last 
big snowstorm. Because the stretch 
that the mailman would have to 
travel from the main road to our 
place along the river was drifted 
over with the deep wet snow, I 
walked up our cleared narrow path 
to the main-road mailbox to mail 
my letters. I have found so many 
times that on a walk, even a short 
one, I find inspiration which I 
would never have known if I had 
been riding in a car. 

As I was coming back, down in 
the hollow between two big hills 



I seemed to be compelled to stop 
and look all around me — up on the 
pasture hillsides where the snow 
and blue sky met, up at the morn- 
ing sun that was so bright it made 
me squint, at the roadbanks with 
their weedy grass all neatly round- 
ed off with snowcaps. 

Every single one of these things 
seemed alive. They were alive! Not 
the hurrying aliveness of summer 
when everything in nature rushes 
to finish its yearly life-span be- 
fore frost touches it, but a sort 
of sleeping, d o r m a t aliveness 
that waits for the sun to get around 
to shining in longer days. 

And surely the snow itself lives, 



I thought. It has the life and vi- 
tality of every kind of moisture we 
know about. As soon as it is under 
the sun long enough it will change 
its form, flow down the steep hill- 
sides into creeks, and on and on 
until many days from now it will 
rise again, beckoned back into the 
sky by the sun where it will stay 
until it falls again as rain or sleet 
or snow. 

What about those spindly-look- 
ing bushes along the fence row? 
Of course, they are alive! Their 
life is deep down beneath the 
ground in their roots, sleeping, too, 
until the sun tells their branches 
it is time to send out new green 
leaves. Then the sap will flow up- 
ward until it reaches every little 
twig and branch with its new- 
life power and the little leaves be- 
gin to unfold. 

How true even today are the Bi- 
ble verses about Moses blessing the 
land and its creations. How much 
the messages in the Bible can mean 
to us if we will just look for and 
try to understand their meanings. 

Read Deuteronomy 33:13-16. 
What a beautiful prayer! 

"And of Joseph he said, Blessed 
of the Lord be his land, for the 
precious things of heaven, for the 
dew, and for the deep that couch- 
eth beneath, And for the precious 
fruits brought forth by the sun, 
and for the precious things put 
forth by the moon, And for the 
chief things of the ancient moun- 
tains, and for the precious things 
of the lasting hills, And for the 
precious things of the earth and 
fulness thereof, and for the 
good will of him that dwelt in the 
bush: let the blessing come upon 
the head of Joseph." 

Because the beauty of the snow, 
and the wisdom in the Bible, and 
the joy I felt that day were all 
mingled together somehow, I whis- 
pered a humble prayer as I hur- 
ried on to our house on the river- 
bank: "Give me the wisdom, the 
grace, and the faith to always ap- 
preciate the wonder of all nature. 
And thank You, God, for making 
me stop and really see things to- 
day. Amen." • 



By PAUL F. HENSON 
Assistant National Sunday School and Youth Director 




THE THOUSANDS ATTENDING the great Youth 
Night services of the last General Assembly 
seemed to express by their reaction their ap- 
proval of the decisions reached by the board of 
judges in selecting the winners for the Teen Talent 
Parade. But when Philip Cook, Rita Coleman, Johnny 
Miller, the Joy Belles Trio and the South Cleveland 
Youth Choir were proclaimed national winners in the 
instrumental, vocal solo, song leading, vocal group, and 
choir divisions, the search for teen-age talent in the 
Church of God was not over. 

In fact we are just getting started. We are sure 
there are many more wonderful musicians, many 
other beautiful voices, other fine choir directors, and 
other great youth choirs like these mentioned above. 
And it is the objective of the Teen Talent Parade 
program to discover and develop this talent for 
Christ. 



The Teen Talent program has brought into being 
many special musical and singing arrangements that 
have been a great blessing to the churches and this is 
its true purpose. Not just to provide a person or group 
to compete in a talent contest, but to discover and 
develop young talent to be used in local church ser- 
vices as well as other special meetings. 

We urge every church where possible to sponsor a 
contestant in the '66 Talent Parade. The state di- 
rector of each state will arrange district or regional 
competition to determine who will participate in the 
state competition. The state winners will be eligible 
to compete for national honors. 

As in the past the finals in the competition will be 
held during the General Assembly, August 10-15, 1966. 
The announcement of winners will be made during 
the youth service. Rules governing the contest will be 
furnished each church by the state director. • 





By NORMAND J. THOMPSON 



THE NATION'S worst power 
failure in history last fall 
brought trouble and anxiety 
to thirty million people living in 
eight states and Canada. It blacked 
out eighty thousand square miles 



and rendered useless millions of 
electrically operated machines and 
appliances. It graphically demon- 
strated how dependent we are on 
electricity for light and power. 

Our daily lives are more power- 
driven than we realize. Count the 
electrical gadgets used in your 
home. Add to them industrial ma- 
chinery, cars and trucks, great 
ocean liners, jet planes, atom 
bombs, and so forth. The total of 
power-driven machines is stagger- 
ing. But the greatest need in Amer- 
ica today is for the power of God. 
Satan is everywhere trying to un- 
dermine God's power in our lives. 
How well he is succeeding in mak- 
ing lives shoddy and dishonest can 
be seen from bankruptcy figures. 
In 1945 there were only 11,051 
personal bankruptcy petitions filed 
in America. In 1963, a year of un- 
precedented prosperity when no- 
body should have gone bankrupt, 
the figure skyrocketed to 157,000! 

Satan's attacks resemble the foul 
shipworms that keep gnawing at 
the hulls of wooden ships. He is 
our hidden enemy, secretly sapping 
our spiritual strength, and de- 
stroying our usefulness for God. 
Ugly demons of spite, anger, ha- 
tred, jealousy, and lying can worm 
their way into our souls. These 
pests are most active when our 
spiritual tide is at a low ebb. 

The ancient Greek and Roman 
shipbuilders wisely protected their 
vessels, using a device called 
"scupper nailing." Large-headed 
nails were driven into a ship's hull, 
so close together they overlapped. 
This provided an effective armor 
which the shipworms could not 
penetrate. 

Is there a protective armor you 
and I can wear? Yes. The Bible 
urges, "Put on the whole armour 
of God, that ye may be able to 
stand against the wiles of the devil" 
(Ephesians 6:11). We must arm 
ourselves with truth, righteousness, 
faith, salvation, and the Word of 
God. 

"Power belongeth unto God," de- 
clares the psalmist. Amid the mad 
whirl of man's mechanical power, 
we are apt to miss hearing the 
psalmist's message. 



Nineteen hundred years ago, Pi- 
late heard the message; but he re- 
fused to believe it. He threatened 
his prisoner Jesus with the proud 
boast: "Knowest thou not that I 
have power to crucify thee, and 
have power to release thee?" Jesus 
answered quietly, "Thou couldest 
have no power at all . . . except 
it were given thee from above" 
(John 19:10, 11). 

Pilate would have been complete- 
ly forgotten centuries ago, except 
for his name's being linked with 
Jesus Christ, who had power to 
rise from the dead and who, twen- 
ty centuries later, still rules mil- 
lions of lives by His power. 

We need Christ's power in our 
daily lives. We need it more than 
we need powerful cars and ships, 
jet planes, and atom bombs. No 
other power under heaven can save 
us from self, sin, and Satan, and 
"present you faultless before the 
presence of his glory with exceed- 
ing joy" (Jude 24). 

Jesus told His disciples, "I am the 
light of the world" (John 8: 12 1 . 
Thus, like modern electricity, He 
can enrich our lives with both 
power and light. 

There is no need for anyone to 
grope about in a spiritual black- 
out, feeling futilely for a Christ 
afar off. He is not far from any 
one of us. He is just a prayer 
away. And He is still reiterating 
His biblical promise, "Ye shall re- 
ceive power, after that the Holy 
Ghost is come upon you" (Aets 
1:8). 

If our lives are fruitless, even 
shoddy, we have short-circuited 
God's power; He has not short- 
circuited us. The first century 
church did not go around groan- 
ing, "What's the world coming to?" 
Instead, they shouted ecstatically, 
"Look what's come to the world!" 

One hundred and twenty ordi- 
nary people sought God's power in 
an upper room. The power fell, and 
they became extraordinary people. 
They shook Jerusalem with their 
exploits. You, too, can transcend 
the ordinary, endued with the Holy 
Spirit's power. You, too, can shake 
your city with great exploits for 
God. • 



10 



The Reverend junus Fulbright 




By WALTER R. PETTITT 



MLHIR£i<DIL.IE 
(SrfF 



^WEfM^f^Ein)!^ 



mih 





JUNUS FULBRIGHT was in 
the 1965 graduating class of 
Lee College. One week after 
graduation he married Barbara 
Gayle Harvey and together they 
became a part of "the Miracle of 
Sunnyside Mission." 

The knowledge and experiences 
acquired at Lee, along with the 
many preaching opportunities, were 
of untold benefit, related Junus. 
He further stated that Lee had 
taught him certain values: that 
popularity, riches, honor and 
recognition, although not wrong, 
should not be one's ultimate aim. 

The Reverend J. E. Steele and 
his congregation of the North 
Chicago Church of God provided 
inspiration and assistance for the 
street services that were started 
on the corner of Sunnyside and 
Clifton. It was here a converted 
bartender, Danny Nelson, preached 
his first sermon. The laymen gave 
out tracts and enthusiastically gave 
their personal testimonies. 

The services were moved from 
the street to a yard that was 
fronted on several sides by apart- 
ment buildings. The crowds would 
sometimes total two-hundred and 
fifty. Many children attended, so a 
youth choir was formed. One man 
looked as though he would fall 
from the window as his interest 



drew him to listen to the services 
nightly, conducted in the yard be- 
neath him. 

Conviction Seized Hearts 

A drunkard, listening through 
an opened window lifted his hand 
for prayer. Some workers went to 
his apartment, where he and his 
wife were led to Christ. 

A backslidden preacher was re- 
claimed and in his testimony 
promised to continue in his calling. 
A young boy climbed from a tree 
and said, "Brother Fulbright, God 
has saved me. Is it wrong to 
smoke?" He indicated he would stop 
smoking, but felt he would have a 
battle because he had already be- 
come addicted to tobacco. 

The Strange Truth 

Many of the people in Chicago 
needing to be reached have mi- 
grated from other sections of the 
country, especially the South. At 
home they were known and re- 
spected. They had attended church 
and complied with the moral and 
cultural standards of their society. 
But here in Chicago there were no 
guidelines, restraints or acquain- 
tances. Economically, they had to 
live where rent was cheap. This 
meant living in crowded condi- 
tions, loitering on the streets, and 
the possibility of having question- 



able morals. Such conditions are 
a hotbed for breeding delinquents, 
addicts and lawlessness. It is diffi- 
cult to believe that people, good 
people, can change so much under 
these circumstances, but they 
sometimes do. 

The Miracle Happens 

About one hundred persons have 
been saved at Sunnyside. The Rev- 
erend H. L. Rose, state overseer, 
has provided rent for the present 
location. A Vacation Bible School 
was conducted. Joe McCoy and Lee 
Baxter from Lee College organized 
a Boys Club while they were there 
during the summer. Like a Mighty 
Army, a history of the Church of 
God, is being studied on Family 
Night. 

Among the Catholics, Buddhists 
and atheists, the Church of God 
sign shines out brightly on Sunny- 
side Avenue in Chicago. The mira- 
cle shall continue and increase as 
Junus Fulbright enthusiastically 
carries on his daily pastoral re- 
sponsibilities, for the communi- 
ty is becoming increasingly con- 
scious of his ministry. By God's 
grace we believe this mission soon 
will be a thriving church and will 
be spawning other missions in 
Chicago. This is "the Miracle of 
Sunnyside Mission." • 



11 




Criticizing the Pastor 




THE VERY THOUGHT of 
criticizing the pastor makes 
some people shudder. Others 
sparkle with glee at the sugges- 
tion. Somewhere between these 
two positions is the attitude which 
should be maintained by the aver- 
age pew-sitter. 

Some pastors promote pew-sitter 
shuddering. They maintain a "you 
can't touch God's anointed" im- 
pression of themselves and preach 
this constantly. This is an unfair 
practice stemming either from an 
inferiority complex, an incorrect 
view of God's calling, a desire to 
overlord others or a lack of knowl- 
edge of both God and men. 

Once a pastor realizes that he is 
a man like all other men and is 
totally honest with his people on 
this score he will not be afraid of 
criticism. This honesty will also dis- 
arm many of his critics. People will 
always take potshots at the self- 
imposed pedestal percher. Who 
really blames them? 

Respect for your pastor does not 



mean shuddering at any thought 
that he is not perfect. Nor can the 
less critical conclude that those 
who analyze their pastor's pulpit 
performance or pastoral ministry 
are less spiritual than they. A lack 
of analysis might indicate 
a swallow-everything-hook-1 i n e- 
and-sinker spirituality. 

The hypercritical are usually 
bound by picayunish items. The 
pastor's tie has a spot on it; he 
pronounces biblical names with 
peculiar syllabication; he does not 
pray at every household visit. Such 
people usually strain at the gnat— 
and miss the joys of the Christian 
faith. 

How should you criticize, or shall 
we use the better word — evaluate 
— your pastor's ministry? First of 
all, what is his ministry to you 
personally? Does he reach into your 
soul with his messages, offering 
you soul - searching to recognize 
your sins and weaknesses? Then 
does he give the remedy through 
practical counsel? Does he make 
you feel happy you are a Chris- 



12 



tian? Does he challenge you to 
labor, pray and give? 

If all these questions can be an- 
swered affirmatively, be happy God 
has directed your pastor to your 
church. He is accomplishing much 
for which he is called. Surely you 
will not agree with all his preach- 
ing or programming. Only the 
jellyfish personality, which is prac- 
tically useless in the Kingdom of 
God, would agree 100 percent of 
the time. 

But what do you do when you 
disagree with the pastor? The 
easiest reaction is to criticize him 
over the back fence to some Chris- 
tian neighbor or over the dinner 
table to a blood kin. This is often 
the most detrimental to your pas- 
tor's ministry. 

When you are in disagreement 
with your pastor's preaching you 
can take the problem two places 
— the parsonage or the throne of 
grace. Both your pastor and the 
Lord should hear about your dis- 
agreement with the sermon ma- 
terials. Often prayer will eliminate 
criticism. It brings you into right 
harmony with the Lord and some- 
times shows you how right your 
pastor was. 

But there are honest disagree- 
ments on doctrinal issues as well 
as ways of expressing these. A chat 
in the pastor's study might bring 
you closer to your pastor and also 
broaden his concept of some truth. 
If he is rather opinionated on 
some issue, your discussion might 
at least inspire him to mention 
there are other views. Possibly he 
will give the issue new treatment 
from your point of view. Happy 
is the church member who can 
thus counsel his pastor. Lord give 
us more of them. 

Likewise, when you disagree on 
the pastor's programming. Take the 
matter to the Lord, then to the 
pastor. But you have a third re- 
course. The programming of a 
church involves the lay leaders al- 
so. You can discuss your program- 
ming point of view with the ap- 
propriate church leader. This will 
help the church leaders determine 
a balanced program for the church 
fellowship. 



When you hear others criticizing 
your pastor, take note of what they 
say. Rather than defending him 
just tell them what his ministry 
has meant in your experience. Tell 
them what has happened in your 
life since he came to your town. 
But do not forget what they are 
saying about him. Perchance he 
has not visited some sick person 
or prospect. Possibly you could call 
him and inform him that the per- 
son is sick or that there is a pros- 
pect at 102 Maple Street. You 
turn criticism into profitable co- 
operation. He will be glad some- 
one told him about these needy 
persons. 

Perchance the criticism is some- 
thing the pastor refuses to do any- 
thing about, you and the fellow 
critic should go to the church 
leaders. Possibly they will arrange 
a meeting with him to discuss the 
issues. 

Face-to-face criticism of your 
pastor is the most profitable for 
him, for you, for your church. Feel 
free to go to him with your prob- 
lems. Through this interexchange 
of ideas he will grow in grace and 
in effectiveness in his ministry. 

Your pastor will never be above 
criticism. So as long as it is his 
portion, you have the privilege and 
responsibility to help him main- 
tain a joyous relationship to all 
those in the congregation. The very 
method you use may determine 
his ability to reach out and help 
another needy soul. 

Remember always that you your- 
self are not beyond the reaches 
of the critic. And if you would 
like gracious treatment at the 
hands of your critics show con- 
siderable grace toward the spiritual 
shepherd of your church. The very 
love and grace you show toward 
him will multiply unto you many 
fold. 

Evaluate your pastor's ministry 
— of course. You must do it for your 
own soul's eternal good and present 
outreach. And as you honestly 
evaluate his ministry you will come 
to realize the greatness of God's 
call to the men and women who 
have accepted the ministry as their 
life's work. • 



CAN YOU CLASSIFY THESE 
CLASSIFIEDS? 

By Erma Reynolds 

If classified advertising had been 
used in biblical times can you tell 
which Bible person would have 
been responsible for placing the 
following advertisements? Nine or 
more correct answers is excellent; 
seven or eight good; five or six 
average. Less than three correct; — 
better not advertise the fact. 

1. For Sale: Houseboat, three hun- 
dred cubits long, fifty cubits 
wide, thirty cubits high. Sturdy 
construction. Many extras. 
Contact owner at Mt. Ararat. 

2. Be the first in your crowd to 
play the new harp or organ. 
Very latest in stringed instru- 
ments. Call inventor for de- 
tails. 

3. Moving, must sell at once, mat- 
tress and coverings, water jars, 
earthen vessels, clothing, mis- 
cellaneous items, all in excel- 
lent condition. Can be seen at 
Ur. 

4. Wanted: Experienced stable 
hands to care for large string 
of horses. Apply at the Castle, 
Jerusalem. 

5. For Sale: Orchard. Many va- 
rieties of fruit. Well irrigated. 
Must sell immediately. Reason- 
able. 

6. Tabernacle architect wants 
work. Experienced in stone- 
cutting, metalwork and timber 
carving. 

7. Have harp and other items, will 
swap for slingshot and smooth 
stones. 

8. Private party wants sun dial. 
Must be in good condition. 

9. Bethlehem barley farmer now 
hiring reapers. Good pay and 
fine working conditions. Call at 
farm for details. 

10. For Sale: Iron bedstead over 
thirteen feet long. In perfect 
condition. Splendid buy for tall 
men. Write owner, King of 
Bashan. 

Answers to "CAN YOU CLASSIFY 

THESE CLASSIFIEDS?" ON PAGE 

14. 



13 



Sverybody's 
Business 

By JAMES E. ADAMS 




I WALKED INTO the barber 
shop one day as a customer 
remarked, "People will gam- 
ble, you know. So why not legalize 
gambling and let the government 
get some taxes out of it?" 

The barber and I had discussed 
this on a previous occasion; he 
knew my convictions about gam- 
bling and seemingly agreed. But as I 
sat down to await my turn, I no- 
ticed him winking slyly at the 



speaker. The barber wanted to have 
some fun, so he asked, "Jim, what 
do you say about that?" 

I was perfectly willing to be 
drawn into the discussion. The 
man in the chair works for the 
same company I do. We are friend- 
ly. 

"That is the line of reasoning 
people used in and prior to 1933 
when they repealed the Prohibi- 
tion Amendment to the Constitu- 
tion," I said. "But alcohol-relat- 
ed costs greatly exceed liquor reve- 
nue. For instance, a recent study 
of the State of Massachusetts 
showed that for every dollar of 
beer and liquor tax received, the 
state spent more than three dollars 
for known and measurable alco- 
hol-related costs. 

The man in the barber chair 
said shortly, "Okay! But the fellow 
who gambles a little would not af- 
fect others like the drinker does." 

"I think he would and does," I 
replied. "No one can beat the hors- 
es and the wheels of chance. The 
family man deprives his family in 
order to gamble." 

My fellow employee then said, 
"But why not give the fellow who 
can afford to gamble a chance?" 

"No one can afford to gamble," 
I replied. 

"Come on, Jim. You don't know 
what I can afford to lose." 

"It isn't what you can or cannot 
afford personally. You still affect 
others. By gambling you support 
men who will stoop to some pretty 
mean things to attain their ends." 

"Who and what, for instance?" 

"The xoho is professional gam- 
blers and criminals. Specifically — 
some children were selling 'Jesus 
Saves' decals along Highway 60 
near Lake Tahoe in Nevada. Gam- 
bling interests reported them to 
the authorities and demanded that 
the police do their duty. The charge 
was 'peddling without a license.' 
The children were actually jailed 
lest they hurt business." 

"Isolated incident," my fellow 
employee said laconically. 

"Nevada would hardly be called 
an isolated incident," I retorted. 
"According to FBI statistics the 
crime rate in Nevada is almost 



double that of neighboring states 
which do not have legalized gam- 
bling. Gambling draws the criminal 
element and has been known to 
make criminals of others trying to 
recoup their losses or pay their 
debts." 

By this time I was in the barber 
chair, and the gambling supporter 
was ready to leave. His parting 
shot was, "I still think if a fellow 
wants to gamble and can afford 
it, it is strictly his business. He 
should be allowed to gamble." 

"When a man's activities affect 
others, it is never 'strictly his busi- 
ness,' " I stated as he walked out. 

In England, which legalized gam- 
bling several years ago, the ma- 
jority of the gambling shops are 
in poorer neighborhoods. People 
do not have enough money left 
after gambling to pay their debts. 
Consequently, there has been an 
increase from ten to twenty per- 
cent in bad debts. 

To legalize gambling under the 
guise of lightening the tax load 
is to place a greater burden on 
those who can least afford it — and 
upon their dependents. No one who 
is concerned about his child's, his 
neighbor's, and his own well-being 
can afford to gamble. No one who 
is concerned about the spirituality, 
morality, and stability of his 
country will raise his voice in sup- 
port of gambling. Quite the oppo- 
site! • 



ANSWERS TO "CAN YOU CLASSI- 
FY THESE CLASSIFIEDS?" ON 
PAGE 13 

1. NOAH (Genesis 6:14-16) 

2. JUBAL (Genesis 4:21) 

3. ABRAHAM (Genesis 12:1) 

4. SOLOMON (2 Chronicles 9:25) 

5. ADAM (Genesis 2:9, 10) 

6. BEZALEEL (Exodus 31:1-6) 

7. DAVID (1 Samuel 16:16, 23; 
1 Samuel 17:40) 

8. HEZEKIAH (2 Kings 20:8-11) 

9. BOAZ (Ruth 2) 

10. OG (Deuteronomy 3:11) 



14 



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AMERICAN TEMPERANCE HOSPITALIZATION POLICY 



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To^tifydng 



SOME OF MY most vivid rec- 
ollections are the old-fash- 
ioned prayer meetings 
which I attended in my early years. 
Members of the congregation 
would stand up and testify. One 
elderly lady, so uneducated as to be 



With a Ty~po^v^:rite:r 




By EVELYN P. JOHNSON 



almost illiterate, never failed to rise 
to her feet and tell how she loved 
her "God Almighty." 

Such testimonial meetings are 
rare now; but we, as Christians, 
should not let this prevent us from 
testifying of our love for God and 
of His wondrous works. 

A few years ago I found a way 
to witness for the Lord which 
brings me much happiness and 
spiritual satisfaction. I testify with 
my typewriter and, sometimes 
while doing so, I find myself shed- 
ding tears of joy as did those 
Christian acquaintances of my 
childhood. 

As a Christian free-lance writer, 
I submit articles, stories, poems, 
and short items to editors of var- 
ious religious magazines for con- 
sideration for publication. Some 
material is accepted for publica- 
tion by the first editor to whom I 
submit it, but some is not. When 
a manuscript is rejected and re- 
turned to me by an editor, I simply 
mail it to another magazine which 
I feel might be able to use it. By 
following this procedure, I even- 
tually sell most of the material I 
write. 

"Courage in a Delta Shack" 
told a story of my personal ob- 
servation of a poverty-stricken 
sharecropper's wife who praised 
God while giving birth to her fifth 
child in a squalid hut. This story 
was printed in Guideposts and lat- 
er reprinted in nearly one hun- 
dred newspapers. 

This manuscript brought more 
response than any I have written. 



One reader wrote, "Your story 
helped me to realize my blessings 
and to minimize my few difficul- 
ties when I thought of the true 
faith in God this woman had." 

"Knock, and It Shall Be Opened" 
was published in These Times mag- 
azine. This was the story of how I, 
as a young widow, found peace and 
happiness through serving others 
and how God provided the oppor- 
tunity for the service. 

Many lesser incidents — all from 
real life — woven into stories, ar- 
ticles, and fillers have been pub- 
lished in dozens of religious mag- 
azines. 

In each manuscript I try to 
point out some spiritual truth in 
relation to the story— a truth 
which has enlightened or inspired 
me. My aim is to enlighten and 
inspire my readers. 

By injecting spiritual truths into 
my secular writing, I am able to 
broaden the scope of my Christian 
witnessing. I sold a poem that told 
of "finding God among the birds" 
to a leading farm and home mag- 
azine. Another, comparing the tele- 
scopic view from the top of a fire 
tower to our vague vision of the 
world to come, was printed in a 
widely circulated newspaper. 

These stories and articles provide 
me with a substantial part of my 
livelihood, but more rewarding 
than the money are the letters 
from people who have found new 
hope, encouragement, and inspira- 
tion through reading my material. 
Most important of all, writing 
these stories gives me the oppor- 
tunity to stand up (and speak) for 
my Lord who has blessed me be- 
yond measure. 

There is a tremendous responsi- 
bility involved in writing for Chris- 
tian publications. Realizing this re- 
sponsibility, I try to increase my 
knowledge of the mechanics of 
writing by studying various text- 
books, and my knowledge of spir- 
itual things by studying the Bible, 
Bible commentaries and diction- 
aries. I also pray earnestly that 
God will direct me in my efforts 
to write. The more I pray and 
study God's Word, the more I come 
to know and love God, and the 



1G 



more I am enabled to testify 
through my writing. 

Writing for Christian publications 
is a competitive endeavor, but 
there is always room in this min- 
istry for a dedicated Christian who 
is talented and has something 
worthwhile to say. Age need not be 
a barrier, nor are most physical 
handicaps. The free-lance writer 
can set his own working hours and 
can usually work in his own home. 
He can usually work at writing 
long after he has reached the age 
at which many workers are forced 
to retire. Too, the Christian free- 
lance writer can reach more peo- 
ple in witnessing for Christ than 
is possible in almost any other min- 
istry. 

If you feel an urge to witness 
for Christ by writing, I hope you 
will seriously consider free-lance 
writing, either as a career or as a 
part-time hobby. The field is wide 
open, and the opportunities for 
serving Christ in this manner are 
truly great. More religious books 
and magazines are being published 
today than ever before. This trou- 
bled world needs good Christian 
reading material which will crowd 
the smut and indecent literature 
off the newsstands. Perhaps you 
are one of the Christians who can 
fill this need. 

You are not required to have a 
college education before you enter 
into the ministry of free-lance 
writing, but such an education 
can, of course, be very helpful. 
What you must have is a deep 
and abiding faith in our Lord Je- 
sus Christ, a reasonably compre- 
hensive understanding of the Eng- 
lish language, an alert and in- 
quisitive imagination, a typewriter, 
a sincere desire to write, and a 
determination to succeed. 

Your local librarian can supply 
you with various textbooks on cre- 
ative writing, and your pastor can 
also advise you on how to prepare 
yourself for this challenging and 
exciting ministry. By carefully 
studying the types of material pub- 
lished in the magazines for which 
you wish to write, you can gain 
insight into the requirements and 
needs of the editors. 



Many colleges, universities, and 
correspondence schools teach 
courses in creative writing. These 
courses can teach you various 
shortcuts to successful writing, 
techniques, and tricks of the trade, 
but no course can make a writer 
of you. The only way to learn to 
write well is by writing. Study the 
types of publications for which 
you wish to write, and practice 
constantly. It is only through con- 
stant study and practice that you 
can gain skill in the use of words, 
and it is the degree of skill you 
acquire in the use of words which 
will help to determine your suc- 
cess as a writer. 

Manuscripts intended for sub- 
mission to editors should be typed 
in professional format. This means 
they should be typed on good 
quality, white bond typing paper, 
size 8V 2 inches by 11 inches. All 
manuscripts should be typed on 
one side of page only. Type your 
name and full mailing address in 
the upper left-hand corner of the 
title page of the manuscript. 
In the upper right-hand corner of 
the title page, type in the approxi- 
mate number of words your manu- 
script contains. 

Enclose a self-addressed envelope 
with sufficient postage affixed to 
it for the return of each manu- 
script you mail out. Short items, 
such as quizzes, poetry, anecdotes, 
etcetera, may be mailed out 
in groups of about five, but longer 
manuscripts such as stories and 
articles should be mailed singly. 
Allow at least six weeks for an 
editor to report on your manu- 
script before querying him about 
it. 

In times of discouragement, re- 
member that the chief difference 
between the successful Christian 
writer and the failure is that the 
successful writer refused to give 
up. Instead of quitting because his 
first efforts were rejected, he 
sought God's guidance and help. 
Do likewise. 

Remember, also: "Thou shalt be 
his witness unto all men of what 
thou hast seen and heard" (Acts 
22:15). • 



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them were faced with the decision 
of whether to give up their good- 
paying secular jobs in order to de- 
vote their full time in studying 
God's Word and doing Christian 
service. It was their decision to 
make. 



STRENGTHENING WINDS 




llhoda Watson gi 



Nilza Vradigue 
explaining the way of salvation to a boy 





Getting back from a weekend trip 



Tt FTER THE LONG dry sea- 
ZJ son, it had finally begun 
to rain. Six-year-old Pe- 
dro rushed into the house, soak- 
ing wet, clutching in his little 
hands some flower bulbs that had 
been planted a couple of days be- 
fore. Wide-eyed, the words tum- 
bled from his lips as he told his 
mother: "If I hadn't gotten them 
up when I did, they would have 
drowned!" He was wanting to pro- 
tect them from the storm, not 
realizing that without the rains, 
they would never amount to any- 
thing. 

As I thought about his concern 
for the bulbs, it seemed amazing- 
ly similar to some of our inclina- 
tions — if not actions — to protect 
the Bible school students from the 
storms of life. The group is small, 
just eleven students, but they are 
all God-called young people. From 
different towns and varied family 
backgrounds they came. A couple of 



When they announced, however, 
that they had really burned the 
bridges behind them and had 
joined the ranks of those who 
trust the Lord to supply all their 
needs, we had mixed feelings. 
Would they be able to hold out? 
Would they miss the things they 
had been accustomed to having 
while earning good wages? Were 
they certain of the step they were 
taking? These were unvoiced ques- 
tions in our minds. Others had 
other bridges to burn. We waited — 
and watched— and prayed — and 
saw God work. 

We are in the second term of 
Bible school now. The students 
have learned a lot outside of class- 
es. Some of them have been 
through trials from which we 
would have liked to shield them. 
For instance, Nilza became deathly 
ill one day and was rushed to the 
hospital. While she hung between 
life and death for two days, a 
chain of prayers went before God 
the Father pleading for her de- 
liverance. Nilza underwent surgery 
for bleeding ulcers and had more 
than half her stomach removed. 
It was only by the mercies of God 
that her life was spared. 

The mother of another student 
passed away suddenly in a remote 
town in the interior, leaving Maria 
Amelia an orphan. The lady was 
buried the same day. There was 
no way to get word to Maria 
Amelia until two days later. Can 
you imagine the shock? Once again 
the student body went to its knees. 
The Holy Ghost has been present 
to comfort Maria Amelia's heart. 
Instead of becoming weaker spir- 
itually because of her loss, this 



18 




David Rodriques preaching 
open-air service at the marketplace 



young lady has learned from ex- 
perience that God's grace is suf- 
ficient. 

One student faces a probable call 
into military service; the mother 
of another has been seriously ill. 
Maria do Carmo does not under- 
stand how the Lord is supplying 
her family's needs without her 
working to help support them, but 
He is! Francisco Aleixo pastors a 
church five miles away and pedals 
back and forth every day on his 
bicycle. The odds are against his 
being in school, what with his fam- 
ily obligations plus caring for the 
church and two or three missions. 
But when God calls, He makes a 
way! 

One day recently in chapel, the 
fellows and girls were telling how 
God had definitely and unmis- 
takably supplied some particular 
need in their lives. Their testi- 
monies were heartwarming. A girl 
said that while doing Christian 
service during vacation, her low- 
heeled shoes tore up. The only 
other shoes she had were a pair 
of heels. 

Though not comfortable and def- 
initely not practical for walking, 
she began wearing them to do 
house-to-house evangelism and the 
other work she was engaged in. 
Shortly, they, too, tore up. She was 



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literally without shoes. She had a 
Friend, however, and to Him she 
told her need. Right away she re- 
ceived as a gift a new pair of 
shoes from a local shoemaker. He 
even repaired her others! Another 
confessed her timidity in doing 
personal witnessing, but she had 
an intense desire to win souls to 
Christ. 

God helped her to overcome her 
backwardness, and during the past 
vacation period, she and her co- 
worker won seventy-one souls to 
Christ, mainly through personal 
work. Other testimonies were just 
as thrilling, as one after an- 
other related how God always 
supplied their needs — varied as they 
were — and they knew He would 
keep on doing it. 

Bring them in out of the rain? 
Shield them from the storms? No, 
the trees are much stronger that 
have been rocked back and forth 
by the wind. Their roots go down 
deeper; they are of stronger fiber. 
Is it not also true that Christians 
exposed to trials — rocked back and 
forth by the tempter — and who 
come through without yielding, are 
all the stronger? 

"My God shall supply all your 
need according to his riches in 
glory by Christ Jesus" (Philippians 
4:19). • 




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lie 
Wayside Chapel 

By FREDERICK NORMAN JOY 



OUR PLANS DID not include 
an overnight camp at the 
roadside park near Plank- 
inton, South Dakota. But like many 
plans, something happens to cause 
one to change his mind. In our 
case the change was well reward- 
ing. We were nearing the end of 
an almost nine thousand mile tent- 
camping trip. In addition to several 
northern states, we had camped 
in Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon 
Territory and Alaska. As with most 
homeward bound travelers, the lure 
of home was very strong. 

The miles on the highway slipped 
by like the minute hand on a clock 
until we reached the roadside 
campground on U.S. Highway 16 
just east of Plankinton. The 
campground was no different from 
the others but for one thing: 
standing out against the green 
grass and a few trees was what 
looked like a model of a typical, 
white-painted, tall-spired church 
so common along the highways of 
New England. Two words in black, 
old English lettering identified the 
building: Wayside Chapel. 



A few years ago when camping 
began to be popular, many thought 
the fad would soon pass. The head- 
shakers were wrong. Each year 
brings an increase in the number 
of campers. Each camper has his 
own preference for travel: auto, 
trailer, camping unit mounted on 
a light truck, or backpacking with 
tent and sleeping bag. With thou- 
sands of campers on the highways 
and in the forests, the sale of camp 
equipment and accessories is big 
business. 

The Alaska Department of Travel 
estimates that over half of those 
traveling the Alaska Highway last 
year were campers. With new gad- 
gets and products appearing on 
the market each season the num- 
ber of campers will increase. To- 
day's camper and tourist is well 
supplied with material needs. There 
is, however, one aspect of camp- 
ing which has been neglected. 

While talking with the many 
campers I met on our long trip, 
I found that the thing which they 
missed most was not the conven- 
iences of our modern push-button 



environment, but the need for quiet 
communion and meditation when 
the occasion arose. Although non- 
denominational services are held in 
most of our national parks, it is 
not always possible for the traveler 
to be near a national park on Sun- 
day; also, not all of today's camp- 
ers visit national parks. It must be 
remembered too, that on a camp- 
ing trip most of us travel light. 

The tourist making nightly mo- 
tel stops may have his Sunday-go- 
to-meeting clothes with him, but 
it is not so with the camper. His 
wearing apparel is for camp, not 
appearance. So if he arrives at a 
suitable campground on Saturday 
he may think about church for 
the next day — Sunday. But he is 
among strangers, there is a strange 
church in a strange town and he 
is in camp clothes. What should 
he do? He hesitates and decides to 
skip church, even though it might 
be one of his own denomination. 

We found an answer to this dif- 
ficulty in Wayside Chapel. It was 
an invitation to pause and rest — 
an invitation for a few minutes 



20 



quiet contemplation and commu- 
nion. It should not be thought that 
the Wayside Chapel is for campers 
only. It offers a warm welcome to 
all who travel the highways. The 
touring vacationist, the traveling 
salesman, the truck driver, and 
all who travel the highway can 
each in his own way satisfy his 
spiritual needs in the Wayside 
Chapel. 

The chapel door was unlocked, 
so we walked in. It was quite small, 
being only ten by fourteen feet 
with a ceiling height about the 
same as that found in the average 
home. Inside to the right was the 
guest register. On the left was a 
small bench with several Bibles 
and New Testaments — these were 
free to those who desired one. 
Above the bench was a dedication 
tablet. There was seating capacity 
for six. Beyond the pews was a 
reading desk with an open Bible. 

Although the Wayside Chapel is 
sponsored by a denominational 
group, there is nothing to indicate 
any given persuasion. It is strictly 
nonsectarian with nothing to stress 
any particular belief other than 
Christianity. It offers a welcome 
to people of all faiths. 

The group responsible for the 
Wayside Chapel was the Mr. and 
Mrs. Club of the Christian Re- 
formed Church of Corsica, South 
Dakota. The chapel was designed 
by an architect and built largely 
by volunteer labor. Construction 



took place in Corsica, then the 
building was moved to the present 
location. No matter how idealistic 
our plans might be, figures prove 
the ultimate success or failure of 
any undertaking. The figures giv- 
en to me by the Reverend John 
Ebbs, pastor of the sponsoring 
church, prove that the Wayside 
Chapel has been a great success 
in catering to the spiritual needs 
of the camper and tourist. 

The chapel was opened in the 
early summer of 1964. Within four 
months, twelve thousand people 
had signed the guest book. Almost 
every state in the Union is rep- 
resented together with visitors 
from Canada, Great Britain, 
France and Australia. The Rev- 
erend Mr. Ebbs also informed me 
that there are three other similar 
Wayside Chapels: one in the State 
of Washington, one in Minnesota 
and another in Iowa. 

An interesting point is that the 
chapel is built on state property, 
the campground being under the 
jurisdiction of the South Dakota 
Department of Game, Fish and 
Parks. This department extended 
all possible cooperation in granting 
permission for the chapel to be 
placed in a state roadside park. 
As a matter of fact, a representa- 
tive of the department took part 
in the dedication services. The idea 
behind the Wayside Chapel to- 
gether with state participation 
should induce other denominations 
to erect other wayside chapels. • 




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UPMELi 



BY MONA GAY 



j-j MERICA'S GREATNESS is 
/£\ due to her founding fa- 
thers-men who sincerely 
and unselfishly dedicated their 
lives, their fortunes, and their sa- 
cred honor to the cause of inde- 
pendence and civil and religious 
liberty, and to the establishment 
of a government with a Constitu- 
tion and Bill of Rights that would 
guarantee these blessings to the 
people of our great country. These 
men were men of God. It can truly 
be said that our country's founda- 
tion was quarried from the Holy 
Bible, which is the bedrock. 

Our democracy rests upon the 
biblical doctrines of the sacred 
worth of human personality, the 
equality of individual rights, broth- 
erhood as interpreted by the Gold- 
en Rule, and service as a stan- 
dard of greatness. Realizing this as 
the month of February comes to 
us another time, our hearts are 
filled with pride, patriotism, and 
gratitude; for it is in this month 
that we celebrate the birthdays of 
two men who helped to give to us 
our great America — George Wash- 
ington and Abraham Lincoln. 
These two American patriots were 
men who loved God and who knew 
how to talk with Him. Their lives 
present a challenge to us in these 
days when prayer is so needed, and 
when faith in God is a must if 
we are to survive the storm blow- 
ing in upon us. George Washing- 
ton, the father of our country, 
found help and guidance through 
prayer. Those days at Valley Forge 
were trying and discouraging for 
the men of the Continental Army. 
These soldiers, poorly clad and 
with no prospect of relief, fought 
in the bitter cold. One incident 
from that battle has indelibly im- 
pressed itself upon American peo- 



a (Slhalllcsim/ 



pie and endeared General Wash- 
ington to people of every genera- 
tion since. 

Abraham Lincoln, the emanci- 
pator of four million slaves and 
the savior of the American Union, 
also had an unshakable faith in 
God and in His overruling provi- 
dence. If ever anyone fulfilled 
Browning's dictum that a "man's 
reach could exceed his grasp," it 
was Abraham Lincoln. It was a 
long reach from the backwoods 
cabin in Kentucky where he was 
born to the White House in Wash- 
ington, where he died. 

It was a long reach from the boy 
who lay upon the puncheon floor 
of a frontier cabin, writing with 
a piece of charcoal on the back 
of a wooden shovel by the flicker- 
ing light of a pine knot, to the 
man who wrote the Gettysburg 
Address and the second inaugural 
speech. The scriptural cadences of 
his speeches were freighted with 
moral intensity. "The Almighty 
has His own purposes," he de- 
clared in his second inaugural ad- 
dress, affirming and reaffirming 
his faith in the justice of his 
cause and in the righteousness of 
God. 

As we commemorate the birth- 
days of these great Americans — 
great in faith, and great in sac- 
rifice — may we realize that our 
hope for the tomorrows converges 
in the certainty that we have the 
same God who heard and an- 
swered the prayers of these men. 

May we meet the challenge this 
month of February throws out to 
us by walking in the footprints of 
these two great American patriots. 
May we turn, in this time of need, 
to that Book from which the 
foundation of our great America 
was quarried— the Holy Bible. • 



963 



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in one month 




HENRY RODSTROM does it . . . 
and has for years . . . with the 
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At. the same time, Mr. Rodstrom serves as a gospel 
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Subscribe to the LIGHTED PATHWAY, 

one of America's leading evangelical 
magazines. The cost is negligible — just 
$1.50 per year. Address: 

LIGHTED PATHWAY 
922 Montgomery Avenue 
Cleveland, Tennessee 37311 



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ATTENDANCE FOR NOVEMBER 

By Donald S. Aultman 
National Director 

This report represents only those 
SfPE's that had an average atten- 
dance of more than 50 weekly and 
reported their attendance to the 
office of the National Sunday 
School and Youth Director. By no 
means does it reflect all the Fam- 
ily Training Hour (YPE) groups 
of the Church of God. Each church 
is invited to participate in this 
column. Attendance averages 
should be mailed on a postal card 
on the day following the last YPE 
service in the month and should 
be addressed to Donald S. Aultman, 
national director, 1080 Montgom- 
ery Avenue, Cleveland, Tennessee 
37311. 



Canton (Temple), Ohio 

Greenville (Tremont Avenue) 

South Carolina _ _ .... _ 
Middletown (Clayton Street), 

Ohio - _ 

Dillon, South Carolina 

Lakeland (Lake Wire), 

Florida .... ... . ... . .... ... . 

Jacksonville (Springfield), 

Florida 

Flint (West), Michigan 

Wyandotte, Michigan .... .... .. 

Chattanooga ( North ) , 

Tennessee .... .... _ _ _ .. 

Tampa (Buffalo Avenue), 

Florida .... .... .... _ 

Brunswick, Georgia 

Birmingham (South Park), 

Alabama .... ... . .... .... 

Kannapolis (Elm Street), 

North Carolina .... .... _ .. 

Roanoke Rapids, 

North Carolina .... _ 

Thorn, Mississippi 

Manns Choice, Pennsylvania 
Paris, Texas .... .... .... _ _ 

Jackson (Bailey Avenue), 

Mississippi .— 

Iowa Park, Texas .... .... .... 

Wilson, North Carolina .... _ 

Morganton, North Carolina .. 



318 

318 

243 
208 

'201 

169 
146 
143 



136 
133 

131 

130 

118 
118 
114 
112 

110 
109 
109 
107 



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Graphically depicting the origin and progress of 
this great magazine, 



This beautiful filmstrip, available without charge, 
colorfully illustrates how the Lighted Pathway is 
compiled. 



For showing in your church, write: Lighted Path- 
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24 



Colquitt (South Mt. Zion), 

Georgia _ .... _.. 106 

Fresno (Temple), 

California 106 

Norfolk (Azalea Garden Road), 

Virginia 103 

Vanceburg, Kentucky 103 

Woodruff, South Carolina 101 

Portland (Powell Boulevard), 

Oregon _ ____ 100 

Lemraon, South Dakota .... 99 

Lawton (Ninth and Lee), 

Oklahoma _ .- .— .... 97 

Eight Mile, Alabama .... 93 

East Point, Georgia 92 

Middle Valley, Tennessee 90 

Brownfield, Texas 89 

Columbus (Frebis Avenue), 

Ohio 88 

Monroe, Michigan _ .... 88 

Salisbury, Maryland _ 88 

South Lebanon, Ohio _ 88 

LaFayette, Georgia .... ..__ .... 87 

St. Louis (Gravois Avenue), 

Missouri _ 85 

West Frankfort, Illinois 84 

North, South Carolina .... 83 

Sanford, North Carolina 83 

Princeton, West Virginia 82 

Chase, Maryland 81 

Adamsville, Alabama 78 

Jackson (Leavell Woods), 

Mississippi 78 

Isola, Mississippi .__ ._. 76 

Santa Ana (Center Street), 

California 76 

Talladega, Alabama .... .... .._. 76 

Phoenix, Arizona _ 75 

Phoenix (East), Arizona 72 

Cleveland (Detroit Avenue), 

Ohio 71 

Cahokia, Illinois _ 70 

Hixson, Tennessee ___. 70 

Louisville (Faith Temple), 

Kentucky ____ 70 

St. Louis (Webster Groves), 

Missouri 70 

Elyria, Ohio 69 

Lancaster, Ohio 68 

Jasonville (Park and McKinley), 

Indiana _ 67 

Griffin, Georgia 65 

Hartwell, Georgia _ .... 65 

Fort Worth (North), Texas .... 64 

Amarillo (West), Texas 63 

Oregonia, Ohio _ _ ._ .... 63 

Donalds, South Carolina 62 

Sale Creek, Tennessee 62 

Royal Oak, Michigan „ 60 

Adrian, Michigan 59 

Rochester, Michigan .... 58 

Covington (Shepherd's Fold), 

Louisiana ._ 57 

Hamilton (Kenworth), 

Ohio _. .... .... 57 

Cleveland (East), 

Tennessee _ 56 

Royston, Georgia _ .... .... 56 

Flint (Kearsley Park), 

Michigan _ 55 

Charlottesville, Virginia 54 

Lawrenceville, Illinois _ 53 

Leesburg, Florida 52 

Gastonia (East), 

North Carolina .... .... .... .... 50 



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ANNA WADE, Dept 430CB, Lynchburg, Virginia 



I NAME 

I 

ADDRESS. 



I CITY 

I NAME OF 

ORGANIZATION . 




CORBIN, KENTUCKY, SUNDAY SCHOOL 



The Church of God has once 
again walked off with the citywide 
Sunday school contest for the 
third time in a row. 

The Church of God in 1963 was 
winner four out of five Sundays 
in the month of September with a 
160 percent increase. The second 
place for 1963 went to the First 
Methodist with a 14 percent gain. In 
September 1964 the Church of God 
won again three out of four Sun- 
days with a 61 percent gain. The 
First Baptist took second place. 

For the third year in a row, and 
four out of the five Sundays in 



October of 1965, the Church of God 
once again excelled with an in- 
crease of 134 percent and a total 
attendance of 342. The old atten- 
dance record was broken with 
an increase of 109 above the pre- 
vious record. 

The Church of God in Corbin is 
highly esteemed among the other 
churches and townspeople. Having 
had pastors who have taken an 
active part in the ministerial as- 
sociation and other community 
projects, the church holds a place 
of honor in the hearts of the city 
in general. The present pastor, the 
Reverend R. E. Worley, is now serv- 



ing as vice-president of the Min- 
isterial Association and was se- 
lected as the speaker for the com- 
munity-wide thanksgiving service 
this year. The church sponsors a 
weekly broadcast, "Waves of Re- 
deeming Grace Gospel Broadcast," 
which has become one of the most 
popular religious broadcasts in 
eastern Kentucky and is aired on 
the 5,000 watt radio station, WYGO, 
each Sunday from 8:30-9:00 a.m. 
"Forward in Faith," the national 
radio voice of the Church of God, 
is also heard on this same station 
each Sunday from 7:30-8:00 a.m. 
— Reporter 




I'OKT IIUIION 



PORT HURON SUNDAY SCHOOL 

The beautiful St. Clair Room of 
the YMCA was the scene of the 
1965 Fall Sunday school kickoff 
banquet for the Port Huron, Michi- 
gan, Church of God. A beautifully 
decorated room, a lovely dinner, 
good Christian fellowship, and 
above all an inspiring challenge 
from God's Word made this an 
evening that will long be remem- 
bered by the people of our church. 

Three of our teachers were hon- 
ored as "Teachers of the Year: 
Miss Dorothy Stickler, Nursery De- 



partment; Miss Lyndal Tiller, 
Youth Department; Mr. Tom 
Glenn, Adult Department. The 
awards were presented by Superin- 
tendent Charles Perkins, and his 
assistant, Don Wilton. 

The highlight of the evening, 
however, was an inspiring chal- 
lenge from the Word of God pre- 
sented by the Reverend O. W. Polen, 
pastor of the West Flint, Michi- 
gan, Church. Special musical pres- 
entations were given by the West 
Flint Christian Education Director, 
Joe Muncy. 

— Herman L. Sjnith, pastor 



2ti 



KJnii 



y 



KJne 



By W. L. (BILL) HOPPER 



"I only regret that I have but 
one life to lose for my coun- 
try." These were reported to have 
been the last words of Nathan 
Hale, a twenty-one-year-old x- 
school teacher, turned soldier, who 
was hanged for spying on the 
British Army, September 22, 1776. 

To die for one's country is ad- 
mirable; but to die for one's God 
is faith in action. The apostle 
Paul said, "For to me to live is 
Christ, and to die is gain" (Philip- 
pians 1:21). 

Jimmy Doyle Bruce was born in 
1937 in a little country town in 
Texas. At the age of twelve he 
learned that he had diabetes, a dis- 
ease which he had for the rest of 
his life and finally consumed him 
at the age of twenty-eight. 

I went to pastor the church in 
the little town of his birth in 1953, 
and Jimmy became one of my Sun- 
day school pupils. About the time 
of my arrival he was playing with 
friends at the old "swimming hole" 
and broke one of his legs, which, 
because of his diabetic condition, 
never completely healed; he suf- 
fered with it from then on. In 
spite of his physical difficulties, he 
felt the call to enter the ministry, 
and at the age of eighteen he pas- 
tored his first church. 

He became affiliated with the 
Church of God and served as an 
evangelist, pastor, and district 
youth director in the short time 
allotted to him. While pastoring 
the church in Seymour, Texas, in 



(JLlfe 



1964, his doctor told him that he 
had less than a year to live. Dur- 
ing his long illness he talked al- 
most constantly about his minis- 
try, and how he would like to be 
able to preach just one more ser- 
mon before going home. 

The Reverend Jimmy Bruce 
closed his eyes on earth on Oc- 
tober 25, 1965, at eight-thirty in 
the morning and opened them in 
heaven. The huge crowds that 
filled the Elam Road Church in 
Dallas and crowded around the 
grave at his hometown where he 
was buried, gave testimony to his 
success as a minister in the Church 
of God. As he lay with his Bible in 
his hands — his last request — and 
surrounded by over fifty-five beau- 
tiful floral tributes, his many 
friends said good-bye. They walked 
away, vowing in their hearts to 
carry on the good fight of faith 
that he had started and to be bet- 
ter servants of the Christ for whom 
he gave his life. Faithful until 
death, Jimmy Bruce has now re- 
ceived his crown of life. 

Jimmy left his wife, Bobbie Jean, 
and two sons: Gary Doyle, and 
David Lynn. The song used in the 
funeral service, "I'll Be Waiting at 
the River for You," was taken as 
a promise by his family who are 
anxiously looking forward to that 
meeting. The boys, who happen to 
be my grandsons, are planning to 
follow in their father's footsteps 
and become ministers of the gos- 
pel; perhaps they can finish the 
work which their dad started. • 



PEN PALS 

Naomi Gibson (15) 

Davln, 

West Virginia 

Connie White (15) 

Crown, 

West Virginia 

Deborah Simons (14) 

Crown, 

West Virginia 

Connie Bailey (13) 
Post Office Box 4 
Crown. West Virginia 

Alice Pennington (13) 
Post Office Box 12 
Crown, West Virginia 

Margie Willoughby (19) 
704 East Independence 
Shawnee, Oklahoma 74801 

Karen Willoughby (24) 
704 East Independence 
Shawnee, Oklahoma 74801 

Patricia Kay Hardee (18) 

Route 2 

Hillsboro, North Carolina 27278 

Elaine McDaniel (16) 

Route 2. Box 397 

China Grove, North Carolina 



WINTER DAY 

Elms are weaving black tracery 
Against a sky of pewter-gray; 
And snowflakes, fragile as old lace. 
Are falling on this winter day. 

Silver birches stand gracefully; 
A bluejay, like a sapphire dart 
Flashes through the crystalline air 
And warms the cackles of my heart. 

Lord, the beauty that is unfolding 
On this winter day everywhere, — 
Evidence of Your grace and love — 
Is almost more than I can bear. 

Grant that some of the purity 
That infiltrates this frosted day 
May enter the unworthy soul of me 
And, from this day forward, stay! 

—Earle J. Grant 



in n re 

Evangi 




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LIGHTED 



Pathway 



MARCH, 1966 



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i 



We see them there, row on row. 
Forgotten by their kin, 
Stripped of the gaieties of life, 
These brave, forgotten men. 

Some might go home if they could still 
Bombs bursting in the night. 
They cannot see past battlegrounds 
Their wards of dreary white. 

Here as we stand, the sun streams down 
And shines from door to door 
And silent shadows of a cross 
Appear upon the floor. 

God grant you, brave, forgotten men. 
When taps shall sound on high, 
A heaven where there are no wars 
And men don't have to die! 

— Wilma Caudle 















With gentle hands and kindly eyes, 

Our Saviour brought relief 
From pain, from darkness, and from sin 

To those who had belief. 
Beneath His kind and gentle touch. 

All pain and anguish fled; 
A radiance replaced the dark, 

And hope replaced the dread. 

His touch made sick ones well again, 

Gave sight to blinded eyes; 
His touch made lame ones jump with joy 

And shout in glad surprise; 
His touch brought healing; yet, He said 

To each poor tortured soul: 
"Thy sins be forgiven. Be made well. 

Thy faith hath made thee whole." 

— Roy Z. Kemp 



Editorial 

How Will Peace Come? 

Grandpa Barton's 

Conversion 

A Praying Friend 

Idolatry Thrives 

My Home Is Over Jordan 

Sugar or Salvation? 

God Needs Youth 

Why Witness? 

Textbooks Come Alive 

at Oconaluftee 

Faith Versus Feeling 

It Is Changed Lives 

That Count 

The Joy of Living 

Only Two Cans of 

Tomato Juice 

Here's How We Did It 

Who Sits With Your 

Child's Mind? 

Young People's Endeavor 

Statistics 

A Big Friend for Little Joe 

Poetry 

Cover 



Clyne W. Buxton 

Lewis J. Willis 

Chloe Stewart 

Kathy Woodard 

H. Bernard Dixon 

E. C. Thomas 



Donald S. Aultman 

Margie M. Kelley 

Denzell Teague 



Bobbie May Lauster 

Margaret Gaines 

L. E. Heil 

Ruth Crawford 

Martha Ann Smith 



Clyne W. Buxton 
Grace V. Schillinger 

Pauline Bone 
Grace V. Schillinger 
Mont Hurst 
William J. Krutza 
Evelyn P. Johnson 
C. Milton Parsons 
Paul F. Henson 

Grover Brinkman 
John H. Whittington 

Hollis L. Green 
Katherine Bevis 

Matilda Nordtvedt 
John E. Black 



22 Marjorie Clifton 



Donald S. Aultman 
James E. Adams 



Eastern Photo Service 



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An Editorial 



By Clyne W. Buxton 



Oh, the joy of looking forward 
To the day when Christ shall i 
To the glorious resurrection 
Of the saints who've 



To the raptures of the Rapture, 
Going up to be with Him 
Through the ages of the ages 
His sweet face will ne'er grow di 



Yes, the world may scatter pleasures 
That would thrill a human heart, 
But the joy of seeing ]esus 
Has no earthly counterpart. 

It may take a little ivaiting 
Till God's time is truly right, 
But to know that He is coming 
Fills the soul with pure delight. 

— Gladys M. Gearhart 



HE WILL RETURN 



N THE MIDST of these godless days when a 
so-called theological professor is spouting the 
nonsense that God is dead, the heavenly Father 
may well turn to His Son and command Him to come 
to the earth to rapture His church. The reason some 
believe that God is dead is that their sins have pushed 
them far from God. Consequently, they have no faith 
to trust Him nor to believe His Word. That kind of 
person does not know the Father or the Son. If 
Christ should come, such persons, no doubt, would go 
blandly on their way and would never be aware that 
Jesus had returned. 

The coming of the Lord Jesus will be secret, for the 
world will not see Him when He comes to rapture every 
born-again person. While writing about this imminent 
event, Louis T. Talbot said: "There will doubtless be a 
great stir for a time. Families will be separated from 
loved ones. Unsaved husbands will wonder where their 
Christian wives have gone. Unsaved wives will wonder 
about their Christian husbands. Parents will miss 
their Christian boys and girls; and all children who 
have not reached the age of accountability will be 
taken to be 'with the Lord.' 'As a thief in the night,' 
He will come; and only the ears of the redeemed will 
be tuned to hear 'the voice of the archangel' and 
'the trump of God.' " 

The simple fact prevails that Christ will come back 
to this world. We know that the Bible prophesied of 
His first coming in detail. The prophets foretold His 
birth and birthplace, His incarnation and rejection. 
His suffering and death, His resurrection and triumph. 
All of these prophecies were fulfilled to the letter. The 
New Testament is replete with prophecies of His second 
coming. Just as certain as He came to Bethlehem, He 



will come again to this world, according to numerous 
scriptures, to take those who know Him to heaven. 
It has been said that Christ's second coming is men- 
tioned 120 times in the New Testament, that four per- 
cent of all the words of the New Testament relate 
to the subject, and that one verse of every twenty-six 
in the entire Bible refers to the event. 

Just as the first coming of our Lord into the world 
covered a period of time — thirty-three years — so will 
His second coming span several years. This Second 
Coming will be in two phases. The first phase, which 
is the subject of this discussion, we call the Rapture. 
At the Rapture all who know Christ will slip away 
instantly with Him to heaven and will be there about 
seven years. During this time the Tribulation, foretold 
with clarity in the Scriptures, will transpire here on 
earth. At the end of this short period Christ will come 
back from heaven, accompanied by His saints. This is 
the second phase of His second coming. He, the "Son 
of righteousness," returning with His saints, will de- 
stroy His enemies with the brightness of His coming, 
and thus culminate the battle of Armageddon. Christ 
will remain upon the earth and will rule the world for 
a thousand years. This period will be the Millennium. 

The Apostle John, in writing about the Rapture, 
stated. "Every man that hath this hope . . . purifieth 
himself" (1 John 3:3). The hope of the return of 
Christ is a sanctifying truth. It searches the soul and 
converts idle Christians into zealous workers for God. 
The prevalent fact that at any moment the long- 
awaited Christ may suddenly appear, keeps the fol- 
lower of God constantly on the alert. Christ is coming! 
He is coming soon! Would you go in the Rapture if 
Christ Jesus should return today? 







By GRACE V. SCHILLINGER 



HOW WILL 
PEACE COME ? 



HE LAST LETTER from our 
son in service lay in my lap. 
Where would they send him 
next? Would he be safe? What is 
he doing now? Is he lonely? 
Thoughts like these wandered 
through my mind, keeping time 
with the dragging rhythm of my 
own loneliness. 

Our farmhouse was quiet. The 
rest of the family — the four re- 
maining children and my husband 
—were sleeping. One dim light on 
the television set kept the room 
from total darkness. 

Folks keep telling us we should 
not miss John so. We have four 
others at home — with so many, 
they say, just one gone should not 
make much difference. Perhaps 
they have never read about the 
shepherd who went out to look for 
the one lost sheep when there were 
ninety-nine safe in the fold. 

How wonderful it will be, I 
thought, when all wars come to an 



end, when every man can return 
to his home and live his life as the 
Good Shepherd planned it to be. 
When there will be no more good- 
byes at railroad stations and air- 
ports and army camps. 

Because I think better in dark- 
ness I turned off the one light in 
the room. How will peace come? 
Will fighting end it? Will govern- 
ment laws stop it? Questions . . . 
questions . . . questions. 

But who can tell me? Who can 
give me an answer? — an answer 
that will satisfy every parent whose 
thoughts are with their sons away 
from home. For a long time I sat 
there in the quiet country dark- 
ness with no noise, except now and 
then the sleepy talk of our chick- 
ens roosting near the fence north 
of the house. And the sighing wind 
as it passed through the pine trees. 

With each question, a greater 
yearning surged inside me. And a 



greater love for all sons who leave 
home to be soldiers. Why can I not 
know? Why can I not be shown 
so I can tell others? 

Suddenly it seemed like the room 
was not dark any more. A Light 
such as I have never seen came 
before me. It seemed I was not even 
in our old farmhouse living room, 
facing east. All I knew was a 
strong yearning — begging to 
know! 

Then the Light shone downward 
and I saw the map shapes of the 
Americas. Then of Britain. Of Ire- 
land and Scotland and many oth- 
ers. On these shapes were many 
people, all with their arms and 
faces lifted up. And the Light shone 
down on them. To the right of 
these people were the dim shapes of 
the other countries of the world. 
There was no Light on them and 
the people looked dark and as if 
they were milling around, hunt- 
ing . . . hunting . . . hunting for 
something they could never find. 

What does this mean? Am I be- 
ing shown? What is the way? Then 
suddenly the Light shone brighter 
on the people who knew the way. 
No words were spoken but I sensed 
or felt the word love. At that mo- 
ment the Light changed and flowed 
toward the milling people in the 
dark countries. They stopped when 
the Light struck them. One by one 
they seemed to understand, to 
know, and lifted up their arms and 
faces. 

As if a heavy velvet curtain had 
fallen, I realized I was sitting in 
our farmhouse living room. The 
homey sound of chickens on the 
roost and of the wind in the trees 
came through the window. 

It was not a dream. Nothing like 
this had ever happened to me be- 
fore, but it told me that America 
is on the right road. When we send 
gifts of clothing, food, and money 
to other lands — this is love. When 
we send literature — Bibles, good 
magazines and letters of hope — 
this is love. When we strive to learn 
peaceful ways to use our atomic 
knowledge — this is love. 

The Light is love. So we must 
not stop. We cannot stop, if we 
want true lasting peace. • 



Grandpa Barton's 

Conversion 



MlM AND CAROLYN had been 
Iff saved for only three weeks 
■ff when they called their pas- 
tor, the Reverend Mr. Cooper, to 
come to their home and pray for 
Carolyn's father. Many people af- 
fectionately called him Grandpa 
Barton. He was now ninety years 
old and critically ill. If the lights 
were turned off or he was left 
alone, he became hysterical and 
started talking about his sins. 

Grandpa Barton's face lit up with 
a warm, friendly welcome as Pas- 
tor Cooper entered the sickroom. 

"How are you today, Grandpa?" 
the minister inquired. 

"Not so well," he answered as 
tears again streamed down his 
wrinkled cheeks. "Can you help 
me? My sins haunt me daily. Why 
is this, Preacher? I joined a church 
when I was ten years old and I 
have been around the church ever 
since. Yet, I do not have peace. 
What is the matter with me, 
Preacher? Since Carolyn and Jim 
started attending your church they 
seem to have a joy and happiness 
that I do not possess." 

"Do you really know Jesus as your 
Saviour, Friend?" the pastor asked 
kindly. 

"I'm not sure what you mean, 
Preacher. No one ever asked me 
that before," he replied. 




By PAULINE BONE 



As clearly as he knew how the 
Reverend Mr. Cooper explained to 
Grandpa Barton the A.B.C.'s of 
salvation, telling him that if he 
would confess his sins that Jesus 
would forgive him. Then he asked, 
"Would you like for me to pray for 
you?" 

"Yes, please do," came the heart- 
ening reply. 

Kneeling with his arms on the 
side of the bed, Pastor Cooper 
prayed earnestly that Grandpa 
Barton would be born again. It was 
not long before he felt Grandpa 
tugging at his coat sleeve to let 
him know that his prayer had been 
answered. On each side of his pil- 
low, tears of repentance and joy 
had left their mark. Grandpa Bart- 
on's face began to beam and ra- 
diate glory. 

"It's all right! It's all right! It's 
all right!" he kept repeating joy- 
ously. "All these years I've gone to 
church and have never known un- 
til now that salvation is real." 

Grasping the minister's hand, 
Grandpa Barton said, "Thank you, 
and God bless you for showing me 
the plan of salvation." 

Later, when Carolyn returned to 
Grandpa's room after a short visit 
with a neighbor, he said reassur- 
ingly, "It's all right, Honey. I'm not 



afraid now. I am not alone at all. 
Jesus is with me." He continued to 
give a radiant testimony to every- 
one who came in. 

Today in some churches, there 
are those like Grandpa Barton who 
do not know what it means to be 
born again. 

The same was true when Jesus 
was on earth. Nicodemus, a promi- 
nent ruler of the Jews, came to Je- 
sus inquiring about spiritual things. 
To Jesus' admonition, "Ye must be 
born again," Nicodemus asked won- 
deringly, "How can a man be born 
when he is old?" 

Jesus answered, "Art thou a mas- 
ter of Israel, and knowest not these 
things?" Then he continued to ex- 
plain to Nicodemus the way of sal- 
vation, saying, "For God so loved 
the world, that he gave his only 
begotten Son, that whosoever be- 
lieveth in him should not perish, 
but have everlasting life." 

Have you been born again? Look 
to Jesus! Be assured: "That if thou 
shalt confess with thy mouth the 
Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in 
thine heart that God hath raised 
him from the dead, thou shalt be 
saved. For with the heart man be- 
lieveth unto righteousness; and 
with the mouth confession is made 
unto salvation" (Romans 10:9, 10). 




By GRACE V. SCHILLINGER 



A PRAYING 
FRIEND 



T WAS A little odd, the way I found my pray- 
ing friend. She is not a woman whom I have 
known all my life. But in this time of my life, 
being the mother of little children, I know what a 
blessing it was that I came to know her. 

We became corresponding friends first, through a 
women's household column in a newspaper. For sev- 
eral years we wrote back and forth from Nebraska 
to Illinois and then one summer Ilene came by train 
to visit our farm. We learned much about her ranch 
life in northwestern Nebraska and became acquainted 
with her husband and three sons, just through our 
visiting. 

When she went back to her sandhill ranch coun- 
try, our letters flew faster than ever. Two years later 
my husband and I drove out to see their place. A 
close bond was forged on that trip, and after re- 
turning home, I found it easy to write Ilene about all 
my hopes, dreams, my frustrations, ideas and my deep 
concerns. 

We have three little daughters. So our children, 
and how we were raising them, became a topic of 
constant conversation in our letters. She became a 
friend so understanding that I could talk over my 
most personal problems with her— a friend who really 
cared for me, who loved me in spite of my faults, 
and to whom I could tell all about my prayers. 

My letters to Ilene helped me each time I wrote one. 
When I told her about my troubles and asked for 
her prayers, my own burden seemed lighter. We both 
knew about God's promise that "where two or three 



are gathered together" in His name, there He would 
be. 

When we learned that our three-year-old daughter 
Sharon had contracted undulant fever, my praying 
friend meant so much to me. Before the report came 
back from the state office that her case was positive, 
my letters were anxious, pleading ones. 

"Please, Ilene," I wrote, "pray that whatever Sharon 
has isn't too serious." I forgot to ask her to pray 
with me that I would be given the needed strength 
to take and bear whatever burden was given me. 

Her letter came back over the six hundred miles 
between us: "Maybe you've been trying too hard. Why 
not just relax and let God take over?" Then she went 
on to tell how she does when she's worried: "I lie 
down on my bed, just quietly thinking, and I seem 
to see the figure of Jesus, holding out His hands in 
an expression of benediction. There is such a light 
shining from His face, such a look of kindness and 
compassion on His face, and such a look of His want- 
ing to help me. After that I know I will be blessed 
and shown the way." Then at the end of her letter 
is the phrase that has meant so much during our 
friendship: "I will be praying for you." 

As I visualize Ilene saying a prayer or two for me 
and my family, I think about Jesus with His under- 
standing, His love, His wonderful compassion, and I 
am most thankful that we have Him. 

Find a praying friend for yourself. It will help 
when the going gets rough. I know. My praying friend 
has helped me, and God has helped us both. • 



6 



IDOLATRY THRIVES 



By MONT HURST 



EVER BEFORE IN the 
world's history has idolatry 
taken on so many enticing 
forms and lured so many people 
away from God's plan and purpose 
for their lives. The forms of mo- 
dern idolatry are innumerable and 
ever increasing. Modern civilization 
has these false idols; and carefree, 
careless - thinking people are 
brought under the influence of 
these false fancies. Idolatry slips 
into the lives of many who believe 
that they are steadfast Christians 
and who are active members of 
churches. 

Idolatry in its truest sense is the 
worship of a false image of di- 
vinity or a symbol of deity. It is 
recognized in the frivolities of oth- 
erwise staid and solid citizens who 
profess to be followers of Christ. 
What a pity it is that most of 
them are sincere in their mistaken 
belief that they are loyal to Christ 
and His church. The very atmos- 
phere of our times is filled with 
idolatrous practices, habits, and 
love of self. Material wealth only 
satisfies temporarily the desire for 
self-gratification. 

When an individual sincerely 
strives to serve God there will be no 
place in his life or thinking for 
idolatry. Idol worship is not some- 
thing which only heathen people 
in benighted lands practice. It is at 
its worst in our present-day civili- 
zation. It may be seen as one pur- 
sues educational and artistic at- 
tainments and in the love of 
fashion and personal vanity in ap- 



pearance. It can be recognized 
when a person must have the 
latest model automobile, a color 
TV and stereo. It appears, also, 
when social success, business ad- 
vancement, politics, an elegant 
home and a myriad of other things 
become the most important goals in 
a person's life. 

We are admonished in God's 
Word to keep ourselves from idols. 
This order is not stressed in its 
simplicity to a great extent, but the 
Bible is filled with vivid illustra- 
tions of people whose sorrow and 
downfall came because of idolatry 
in some form. Samuel said "to obey 
[God] is better than sacrifice." 
Those who do not hear and heed 
the voice of God are, in fact, ido- 
lators of the worst type. This means 
that God's voice is unheeded be- 
cause of other interests or in- 
fluence. 

We read of priests, monks, and 
others who daily devise new means 
of worshiping God, but God has not 
commanded these in His Word, and 
they become idolatrous. Yet, these 
men are sincere and live within 
Christian boundaries. They prac- 
tice idolatry without really know- 
ing it. It is very easy for idol 
worship to enter and become es- 
tablished unless the true Christian 
is alert and has his faith firmly 
planted in the Word of God. 

What could be more profitable in 
determining our personal standing 
with God than in making an occa- 
sional appraisal of our lives to see 
if anything has become an idol to 




us without our knowing it. God ex- 
pects us to be on guard and to 
quickly recognize any attempt of 
the evil forces to trap us. We live 
in an age of change when the ar- 
ray of idols is constantly being pre- 
sented to us in an ever-increasing 
number. 

May we guard against falling in- 
to any trap of idolatry and seek a 
fresh anointing of God's power 
daily. Satan is ever on the alert to 
try to warp the soul and hinder 
the power of one's testimony. Our 
loyalty belongs to God. Idolatry has 
no place in a Christian's life. • 




MY HOME 

IS 

OVER 



JORDAN 



By WILLIAM J. KRUTZA 



N LENGTH, DEPTH, width or capacity the Jor- 
dan River is insignificant. It meanders snakelike 
for 120 miles — from high in the Mount Hermon 
area to the Dead Sea which is twelve hundred feet 
below sea level and twenty-seven hundred feet below 
its source. Its fast moving, shallow waters pass 
through no large cities. Its capacity is about 1 percent 
of the flow of the Nile. 

The Jordan's significance is not material; it is spiri- 
tual. The place of Jesus' baptism — the Ford of the 
Partridge — has immeasurable spiritual significance to 
millions of Christians. Thousands make a pilgrimage 
to this spot yearly. Many take or buy a bottle of 
Jordanian water. Some even desire baptism by its 
waters. Roman Catholics make holy water from this 
river. 

Like the course of the river, the name Jordan flows 
through the Bible from Genesis through the Gospels. 
Lot found its plains good grazing land for his cattle. 
Moses looked over it into the Promised Land. Joshua 
crossed it on dry ground. John the Baptist used it as 
a baptistry. It has become the symbol of the entrance 
into the blessings of the Lord and even into heaven 
itself. 

The Negro spiritual vividly and dramatically por- 
trays the spiritual significance of this river, "Deep 
river, my home is over Jordan." Another hymn writer 
has said, "On Jordan's stormy banks I stand and cast 
a wistful eye." Another invites us to "cross Jordan 
today, today; The waves will divide, they'll stand at 
your side; Cross Jordan today!" 

The Arabs aptly name the Jordan "Al-Urdun" or 
"Descender." This is especially true at the northern 
end where it descends fifteen hundred feet in the first 



ten miles. Five miles later where it enters the Sea 
of Galilee, the Jordan is six hundred feet below sea 
level. It then passes through country that looks some- 
what like the surface of the moon. It empties itself 
into the lowest spot on the earth — the Dead Sea. 

Jericho, to the north of the Dead Sea, is the most 
significant city on the Jordan River. Archaeologists 
have uncovered ruins at Jericho that date back over 
eight thousand years. Some believe this to be the 
oldest inhabited city in the world. It is not situated 
alongside of the Jordan, but on an oasis nourished 
by springs. Yet, the Jordan probably played an im- 
portant part in the life of the city. 

Although one would not cherish bathing in the 
muddy waters, Elisha told the Syrian General Naa- 
man to dip seven times in its water to be cleansed 
from leprosy. Naaman rebelled. Were not the waters 
in the rivers around Damascus much cleaner? But 
when Naaman obeyed the prophet, God performed a 
miracle. 

Today the Jordan River is a controversial stream. 
Both the state of Israel and the kingdom of Jordan 
want to use its waters. Neither looks upon it from the 
spiritual point of view. Until they do, they'll continue 
to have crises about its use and significance. It is only 
as people come to know the God who, for some reason 
known only to Himself, made this muddy river sig- 
nificant in the spiritual sense will they ever come to 
know the abiding peace of "living beyond Jordan." 

The Christian, who possesses the vast amount of 
Scriptural background and who sees the spiritual sym- 
bolism in the Jordan, can invite others to "cross Jor- 
dan today" — to come over into the Promised Land 
where God blesses His people with peace. • 



8 



T WAS A frosty morning in 
mid-November. The icy air 
was uncomfortable as I hur- 
ried along the street toward the 
dentist's office for an early ap- 
pointment. Turning the corner, I 
saw a number of people standing 
in line at the door of a department 
store. 

Some of the people frowned im- 
patiently; others jostled their 
neighbors in an effort to shorten 
the line. An acquaintance of mine 
stood near the back of the line and 
I stopped to ask what the attrac- 
tion was. 

"The first twenty-five customers 
at this sale will get a five-pound 
bag of sugar free!" she exclaimed. 
"I hope I'm one of the number," 
she added with a note of urgency 
in her voice. 

It was shortly after the end of 
World War II. Sugar was expen- 
sive and hard to get at any price. 
I could sympathize with these peo- 
ple who sought a needed commod- 
ity for their family larders. But 
their anxiety made this seem a 
matter of life or death, and I was 
sure none of them would suffer 
any real hardship if they failed to 
get the bag of sugar. Was it 
worth the pushing and shoving to 
get in line and to the cold wait? 

This merchant had led the public 
to believe that he was giving away 
something, and it is the nature of 
human beings to grab at the pro- 
verbial "something for nothing." 
We will drive out of our way to 
shop with merchants who give trad- 
ing stamps, because we have been 
conditioned to believe that we get 
free gifts with the stamps. 

Too often we follow the path of 
greed and selfishness, seeking what 
we consider the sweets of this 
world to gratify our mortal minds 
and bodies, yet ignoring a more 
vital product so necessary for the 
edification and preservation of our 
immortal souls. 

This product is offered free to 
all mankind. We do not have to 
wait in line nor save trading stamps 
to obtain it. It will save us from a 
hereafter of fire and brimstone, 



and it will add much to the hap- 
piness we experience in this world. 
It is the gift of eternal salvation. 

This free gift was provided for 
us by a loving Saviour who "took 
on him the seed of Abraham. . . . 
That he might be a merciful and 
faithful high priest in things per- 
taining to God, to make reconcilia- 
tion for the sins of the people" 
(Hebrews 2:16, 17). 

Salvation is obtainable by all hu- 
manity, and the only condition is 
that a person have faith in Christ 
and repent of his sin. The gift 
comes from the love of God toward 
man through the sacrifice of His 
Son who died to atone for sin. (See 
John 3:16.) Because of Christ's 
sacrificial offering, God gives di- 
vine forgiveness to all who be- 
lieve and repent. 

To know God is to love Him, and 
if we love Him we must repent. Re- 
pentance merely means that we feel 
sincerely sorry for our sins of com- 
mission and omission. When we are 
genuinely repentant, we experience 
a spiritual rebirth, or regenera- 
tion; and we long to get right with 
God, to walk in His paths, and to 
consecrate our lives for His pur- 
poses. 

Being weak in the flesh, we are 
prone to stray away from God and 
to let temptation lead us to join 
the long lines of people who jostle 
and shove in their greed to gain 
the "sugar" that is offered by the 
world. But in this same Christ who 
so lovingly provided for our eternal 
haDoiness we can find strength to 
resist that temptation. We should 
"seek the Lord and his strength, 
seek his face continually" (1 
Chronicles 16:11). 

This means to "pray without 
ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) for 
"he is able to succour them that 
are tempted" (Hebrews 2:18). If 
we stock our spiritual larder with 
this gift, we can drink freely from 
the fountain of life and never 
thirst or hunger. 

"How shall we escape, if we neg- 
lect so great salvation?" (Hebrews 
2:3). • 




Sugar 

Or 
Salvation 



By EVELYN P. JOHNSON 



i 




GOD 



YOU 



n 



By C. MILTON PARSONS 




C. Milton Parsons, B.S., 

s Sunday School and Youth 

Director of the Church 

jf Cod in Tennessee. Being 

an enthusiastic and 

imaginative person, he is 

a capable and popular 

leader of youth. 



FVERY ENTERPRISE NEEDS the vast energies, 
alert minds, daring faith and limitless potential 
r inbred in youth. The Creator is no exception. If 
"the Lord hath need of them" could be said of two 
lowly animals, how much more so could this be said 
of the vibrant youth of our day. 

God has, in every age, sought out from among youth 
those who would perform His will. Classic examples 
include Isaac, Joseph, Moses, Ezekiel and Daniel. Yet, 
another less-cited example is Jeremiah, who was se- 
lected before his birth and notified of his work at the 



probable age of twenty. God needs a host of young 
Jeremiah's today who will live obedient lives through 
faith in Christ. 

God needs youth to be an example: Jeremiah's ex- 
ample of godly faithfulness provoked his own towns- 
men and brethren to threaten his life. As example 
goes, his life was quite similar to that of our Lord's: 
his mission was ordained before birth, he was perse- 
cuted by his own townsmen, he denounced the cor- 
rupt priesthood, he foretold the destruction of Jeru- 
salem and the Temple, and he was exalted above his 
fellowmen. 

Paul declares to youth, "Be thou an example of the 
believers." The masses have heard a lot of talk about 
Christianity, but they are looking for changed lives. 
Youth at home or school and on the campus or the 
job can startle the world with a life "dead to sin and 
alive unto righteousness." God needs youth who will 
live godly — there is no substitute that will satisfy Him. 

God needs youth to witness for Him: Jeremiah bold- 
ly prophesied all that was given him even though two 
thirds of his prophecy was about destruction. His 
words jeopardized his life many times. He faced in- 
ternal strife and international woe every day with 
Assyria, Babylon, and Egypt fighting for world supre- 
macy. In times like these, God needs youth to witness 
for Him. 

God has hundreds of young Jeremiah's in these 
present times who are witnessing to the saving grace of 
Christ in every place. The need, however, is for every 
saved young person to confess Christ before men, 
which in itself is essential to divine inheritance (Luke 
12:8). 

God needs youth to live for Him: What a pitiful 
mite the repentant thief had to offer — a few minutes 
of Christian testimony. While still a youth, Jeremiah 
surrendered to the claims of God. With this early 
start he was able to serve God for over forty years! 
God needs youth today who will give a full life. Too 
many candles of life are burned away selfishly only to 
blow the smoke in God's face in a penitential prayer. 

Will you not join the ever-increasing throng of 
youth who are revealing to others the majesty of the 
Lord our Righteousness, who Jeremiah declared would 
reign and prosper as King on the earth in the last 
days (Jeremiah 23:5, 6). God needs YOUth. • 



10 



RFC. . WITNESS 





Why Witness? 



By PAUL F. HENSON 
Assistant National Sunday School and Youth Director 



WHY WITNESS? Because personal witnessing 
is commanded by our Lord Jesus Christ. In 
the familiar scripture, Acts 1:8, He has com- 
manded it in no uncertain terms: "Ye shall receive 
power, after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you: 
and ye shall be witnesses unto me . . . ." If you think 
you can become a Christian and forget it, you 
may as well forget it. One writer expressed it this 
way: "There are only two things you can do with 
the Christian faith— give it away, or give it up." As 
Spirit-filled children of God we must become givers of 
our faith. We must share with the world the glorious 
truths which we have learned and experienced in 
Christ. 

Jesus went about doing good — saving, helping, and 
healing. As our example, He has pointed the way for 
all Christians. In every Christian's life, there should 
be a continuation of that ministry today. Jesus re- 
vealed Himself as the light of the world; and yet 
He very emphatically said to His followers, "Ye are 
the light of the world." If the compassion and love 
that compelled Christ to lead men out of their sin 
and darkness is reflected in us, we too will be glowing 
lights that will lead men to Him. Yes, our very faith 
demands that we be His witnesses. 

Also, the needs of those about us demand that we 
be personal witnesses for Christ. Whether we realize 
it or not, our lives are constantly affecting others. 
Our influence may be as injurious as an infectious 
disease or as healthy and refreshing as a summer 
evening's breeze. It is up to us. Christ has asked us 
to pattern our lives after His life that others may 
be influenced for right. The spiritual needs of those 



within our own communities testify to the need for a 
vigorous program of personal evangelism on the part 
of every Christian. 

People are not seeking churches, therefore the 
church must be seeking people. We cannot put a 
sign up on the church that says "Here is God, come 
and find Him." But we must go from door to door, 
from person to person, and take God to them. It is 
estimated that there are only about thirteen million 
Americans who attend church, and about one hun- 
dred and fifty million who do not. Witnessing to these 
millions is the responsibility of every Christian. 

This is the aim of the Pioneers for Christ Club: 
To witness to as many people as possible and to win 
them for Christ. This dynamic youth evangelism or- 
ganization has grown in the past eight years from a 
small club functioning only on the Lee College campus 
to a mighty evangelistic arm of the Church of God 
functioning today in every state in the United States 
and also in foreign countries. The ministry of (PFO 
Clubs centers primarily in door-to-door witnessing, 
street services, jail services, services in detention 
homes, tract distribution, pioneering new churches, 
prayer groups, and altar workers. Through these ef- 
forts, hundreds of souls are led to Christ, as well as 
the church being awakened to the great need of per- 
sonal witnessing. 

In the months to come this page in the Lighted 
Pathway will be dedicated to the promotion of the 
PFC. Our goal is to have an active PFC Club in every 
church and every Church of God member become a 
personal witness for Christ. • 



11 



By GROVER BRINKMAN 



Textbooks 
Come Alive At 

OCOHUOfTEE 




T IS GOOD to read history, 
especially the history of the 
United States. But it is even 
better to see it come alive. 

Have you not often wondered 
about the mode of life here, espe- 
cially the life of our native Ameri- 
cans, the Indian, say two centuries 
ago? In western North Carolina, at 
Oconaluftee, history comes alive for 
you and me — all the glory, pathos, 
tragedy, and culture that was the 
Cherokee Nation. 

Daily, sixty-odd members of 
the eastern band of the Cherokee 
Nation leave their homes on the 
Qualla Reservation in the Great 
Smoky Mountains to take up cen- 
tury-old tribal tasks at Oconaluftee. 
The dress worn, the skills em- 
ployed, even the dwellings are 
exactly the same as the ancient 
Cherokees used. Oconaluftee was 
designed by anthropologists from 
three universities: North Carolina, 
Tennessee, and Georgia. 

Why is Oconaluftee so important 
to you and me in this age of the 
bomb? If for no other reason, for 
comparison. Here is the story of 
great Americans and their culture. 
Here too is the story of a black 
page in our history — the trail of 
tears. Oconaluftee has thousands 
of visitors each year, and none go 
away disappointed. 

For many visitors, the Cherokees 
here are the first real Indians they 
have ever seen. As one walks 
through the village, many miscon- 
ceptions are erased. There are no 
spangles, feathered headdresses, 
tom-toms, or bows and arrows. The 
Cherokee, remember, fought and 
hunted with spear and blowgun. 

At Oconaluftee, you see meat 
cooked at the open fire, beads 
strung, rugs woven, pottery made. 
A woman shapes soft clay into "low 
fire" vessels of great beauty; an- 
other makes baskets out of river 
rushes. A girl pounds a wooden 
mallet into a hollowed-out stump 
to grind corn. Another girl shows 
how a snare works to catch small 
animals along the trail. 



12 



It has been nearly three hun- 
dred years since the first white 
settlers pushed through Cherokee 
country on the westward trek. 
Their influence is still evident in 
the buildings and implements used 
by these native Americans. The 
Cherokee lived in a cabin, not a 
wigwam; he mixed the white man's 
skills with his own; he exchanged 
furs for a bolt of cloth; he traded 
for iron kettles and metal knives. 

The visitor, seated today in the 
seven-sided council house at Oco- 
naluftee, learns much of the tragic 
history of the Cherokee. He learns 
how the main body of the tribe was 
herded westward in Andrew Jack- 
son's time in an exodus that even 
today is remembered as a trail of 
horror and death. 

The original band of three hun- 
dred Cherokees, who hid out in 
the hills over a century ago to es- 
cape the exodus, have today multi- 
plied to nearly five thousand. They 
live within the boundaries of the 
Qualla Reservation: fifty-seven 
thousand acres of some of the most 
rugged mountain country in 
North America. Their homes are 
tiny cabins and small farms in se- 
cluded valleys and coves. 

The Cherokee did not have it easy 
in his struggle to become a good 
American. But today they are good 
Americans — viewed with respect. 
Many of them are Christians. 
There are churches of many de- 
nominations hidden in the coves. 
They are intelligent, self-support- 
ing Americans who are proud of 
their birthright. Their future looks 
bright. 

Last year more than five million 
people visited the Qualla Reserva- 
tion. Industry has invaded the 
Great Smokies and the Cherokees 
now have jobs — many of them 
skilled and rewarding. 

At Oconaluftee, one gets a thumb- 
nail sketch of the Cherokee that 
gives him new insight into the 
pasts of these great Americans. It 
instills within the visitor an ap- 
preciation of the fact that it is not 
the color of a man's skin that 
qualifies him as a man — or a 
Christian. • 





John H. Whittington 



UTH VERSUS 
FEELING 



By John H. Whittington 
Layman, Parkwood Avenue 
Church of God 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



"Now faith is the substance of 
things hoped for, the evidence of 
things not seen" Hebrews 11:1. 

Vertigo — a dizzy, confused condi- 
tion of the mind — simply means 
one cannot tell which way is up. 
This condition is common to pilots 
flying on instruments. It has re- 
sulted in the death of many good 
pilots. The only way out of this 
situation is to disregard all feeling 
and put complete faith in the in- 
dication of the instruments. 

High in an overcast sky one dark 
hazy night, a student pilot was fly- 
ing with his instructor. The stu- 
dent had lost outside reference as 
to the attitude of the aircraft. Sud- 
denly he spoke to his flight instruc- 



tor, "This aircraft is not level." 
Hastily the instructor glanced at 
the panel and assured him that the 
aircraft was indeed flying level and 
admonished him to hold his course. 

The student still insisted that the 
aircraft was not level and handed 
control over to the instructor. What 
the student did not know, was that 
the instructor did not feel level 
either, but experience had taught 
him that he had to rely upon the 
instruments instead of his feeling. 
For to rely upon feeling would 
mean a spiral right onto the sur- 
face. 

Spiritual vertigo can develop 
when we doubt God's Word — the Bi- 
ble — for one moment: Faith in His 
Word assures us which way is up. • 



13 



IT IS CHANGED 
LIVES 
THAT COUNT 



By Hollis L. Green 

Administrative Assistant .■/;*.'> ...» 
Sunday School and ','"/.['"•'.' '*y-"u:' 

Youth Department • < -&' : Vi: '.,;•?[ .\'y:. 




The Reverend Hollis L. 

Green is president of the 

National Sunday School 

Association (NSSA) 

Camp Commission and 

represents the camping 

ministry on the Board of 

Directors of NSSA. 




Camping Association standards of 
one acre per camper, we have one 
hundred campers per acre." In 
spite of these adverse circum- 
stances, summer camps are mak- 
ing a tremendous contribution to 
the church. During the Church of 
God camping season of 1965 there 
were 2,672 campers saved, 1,698 
sanctified, 1,509 filled with the 
Holy Ghost, 2,474 baptized in wa- 
ter, and 778 added to the church. 

In view of this contribution, we 
need to think seriously about the 
programming for the coming 
camping season. Previously, the 
major anticipation for the camp- 
ing season was to expect the un- 
expected. While this remains a nec- 
essary element in camp planning, 
much has been learned about 
young people that influences the 
planning of the camp program. 

Careful consideration of current 
research — concerning the needs, 
desires, and "normal" action of 
young people — and the practical 
experience of camp leadership spell 
success for any summer camping 
experience. Christian camping 
helps young people in their quest 
for understanding, achievement, 
self-government, fellowship, and 
occasional solitude. These spiritual 
and practical results are sound 
reasons for vigorously supporting 
the camping program. 



HOW DO WE help young 
people put Christ first in 
their lives? The answer is 
found in two key words: activity 
and interest. There must be ac- 
tivity to interest young people. 
They cannot be satisfied doing the 
same things that please the older 
or more settled adults. They are 
young and energetic, searching for 
something to do. Christian leaders 
must supply that "something." But 
activity alone is not sufficient, it is 
changed lives that count. This is 
the purpose of having summer 
camp. 

Christian camping is a fusion of 
recreation, education and inspira- 
tion, consummated in the great 
out-of-doors. The blending of these 
forces gives Christian camping a 
most significant and far-reaching 



influence in Christian education. 
Camping must be considered in the 
context of Christian education and 
must be made a part of the total 
program of the local church. 

The scope of Christian camping 
becomes apparent when one real- 
izes that almost a half million 
acres of United States timberland 
is devoted to camping and camp- 
related conferences with an evan- 
gelical emphasis. The fact that the 
Church of God has a growing stake 
in the camping ministry is chal- 
lenging. Crowded into seventy- 
three Church of God camps last 
summer were 15,579 campers, and 
capacity preregistration caused 
many young people to miss camp. 
Commenting on the crowded con- 
ditions, one director recently stated, 
"Instead of meeting the American 



CAMPERS FIND 
UNDERSTANDING 

Much of the restless searching 
of young people can be explained 
in their quest for understanding. 
This emphasis on the persistent 
searching of young people has dy- 
namic implications for summer 
camp. There is a uniqueness about 
Christian camping that creates 
community out of chaos and de- 
velops a concern for others. 
Through the ministry of the sum- 
mer camp, young people become 
aware that the church wants to 
understand and assist them. The 
availability of better trained coun- 
selors is helping many camps to 
have more effective counselor- 
camper relationships. 



14 



This in turn brings about better 
understanding. The overwhelming 
advantage of the camp situation 
is the fact that spiritual truth can 
be a natural part of every activity. 
Thus, camp embraces the total life 
experience of the camper; conse- 
quently, it affects a camper's 
whole life and personality. Camp- 
ing then becomes an important 
milestone in the young person's 
quest for understanding. 



CAMPERS MAKE 
ACHIEVEMENTS 

Young people are possessed by 
an inner motivation that causes 
them to continually strive for 
achievement. To become a useful 
and needed member of the group 
seems to be a primary objective. 
Regardless of age there is an al- 
most universal desire to be con- 
sidered worthy of respect by one's 
associates. Therefore, one of the 
major challenges of camp pro- 
gramming is to assist young peo- 
ple in achieving the fullest possible 
stature in all aspects of life: phys- 
ical, mental, spiritual and social. 
Camp offers Christian young peo- 
ple opportunities for achievement 
in classroom studies, for competi- 
tion in the camp recreation pro- 
gram, for developing musical tal- 
ents and for spiritual growth. Of 
course, many campers find Chris- 
tian companionship that lasts "till 
death." In these days of mixed 
marriages and divided homes this 
is a worthy achievement. 



CAMPERS EXPERIENCE 
SELF-GOVERNMENT 

Young people want to help make 
the rules by which they live. This 
aspiration is manifested in their 
search for self-government. Teen- 
agers are not opposed to rules, but 
they want to have a part in es- 
tablishing the behavior code by 
which they are expected to live. 
The motivation behind this desire 
for self-government is the need of 



being trusted. Most young people 
want to conform— in fact, they fear 
embarrassment if they do not con- 
form. The rules young people make 
for themselves are usually more 
strict than those made by adults; 
and they religiously obey the code 
of conduct they establish for them- 
selves. 

Camp leaders are inventing and 
testing new forms of communica- 
tion to widen the participation in 
the decision-making process. Re- 
cent developments in this area are 
encouraging. Camps are using the 
senior campers as assistants; the 
student council system is being em- 
ployed; and campers are being 
placed on the camp discipline and 
advisory committees. Educating 
young people to share in the de- 
cisions that must be made on im- 
portant issues results in a new kind 
of laboratory for studying and test- 
ing the implications of discipleship 
and leadership among young Chris- 
tians. This involvement in the to- 
tal operation of summer camp 
helps young people to become prop- 
erly related to the central objec- 
tive of church camping and en- 
ables them to experience a degree 
of self-discipline that is inherent 
in the Christian way of life. 



^\ 



CAMPERS ENJOY FELLOWSHIP 

Young people are seeking to have 
meaningful association with oth- 
ers their own age; they are search- 
ing for fellowship that helps them 
to be comfortable in the presence 
of others, even when they may 
make a mistake. Summer camp of- 
fers a kind of social relationship 
where campers are not afraid that 
their association with others will 
be curtailed or terminated because 
of what one says or thinks in good 
conscience. 

In the close relationships found 
at camp young people often dis- 
cover their limitations as well as 
their areas of strength. They be- 
come aware of human fallibility 
and recognize their need for fur- 
ther learning. Communication with 
and fellowship of other young peo- 
ple teach them that they may 



learn from their associates. Camp- 
ing then becomes a vital experience 
in the social development of young 
people. 



CAMPERS BENEFIT FROM 
OCCASIONAL SOLITUDE 

Even though the basic concept of 
Christian camping has a social fo- 
cus and its objective is to impel 
campers toward others in a proper 
relationship, young people still need 
occasional solitude. An often-neg- 
lected aspect of normal develop- 
ment is the almost unconscious de- 
sire to withdraw occasionally from 
the crowd and its intensive over- 
dose of stimulation. Most young 
people are bored with the thought 
of being alone, but it is the obliga- 
tion of Christian educators to en- 
courage the life-restoring use of 
meditation, prayer, Bible reading, 
and simple introspection. 

Christian camps are giving se- 
rious thought to their responsibility 
for guiding young people in a con- 
structive use of their free time. 
This rhythmic withdrawal from the 
social demands of camp life is ex- 
pressed in the camp "quiet time" 
for personal devotions. Young peo- 
ple need this time to view life in 
its proper perspective which will 
enable them to find meaning for 
their existence. Bonaro W. Over- 
street in his book. How to Think 
About Ourselves, has a few sug- 
gestions for building a wholesome, 
personal philosophy of life: (1) fit 
yourself into the human race, (2) 
fit the passing moment into the 
longer time span, (3) fit the known 
into the unknown, (4) fit one's 
own culture into other human cul- 
tures, (5) fit the human race into 
the universe, and (6) fit actions 
into principles of action. Chris- 
tian camping is geared to assist 
young people in understanding 
where their lives fit into God's plan. 

The spiritual and social implica- 
tions of Christian camping make 
camping worthy of the earnest and 
prayerful support of every adult 
Christian. Camping changes the 
lives of young people and this 
counts with God. • 



15 




By KATHERINE BEVIS 






THE JOY 
OF LIVING 



IGNS PLASTERED NEW England a few years 

ago which showed a picture of a big dish of 

steaming, hot baked beans. The vapor of this 

appetizing portion formed the words, "The joy of 

living." 

At other places we have seen the same sign applied 
to a brand of beer or cigarettes. Many people feel 
that they have found the good life and freedom if 
they have plenty of appetizing food to eat, and stimu- 
lating beer to drink, and the best filter cigarettes to 
smoke. 

But these people are not free. They are slaves to 
their baser selves. 

The joy of living is growth — Christian growth. Our 
task as Christians is very significant. We must de- 
sire to grow — to increase "in wisdom and stature, and 
in favour with God and man" (Luke 2:52). 

How do we create conditions for growth that will 
help us to know "the joy of living?" The key that 
opens this door is submission: "Thy will be done." 

A little boy saying his nightly prayers was heard to 
plead: "Please God, make Boulder the capital of Colo- 
rado." 

His mother asked, "Mike, dear, why do you ask 
that?" 

"Because," the lad explained, "that's what I put 
down on my exam paper today." 

The child's request may seem amusing. But some of 
us are often just as ridiculous in asking things from 
God. 

Joy in living is found in doing God's will. We are 
taught to pray: "Thy will be done in earth, as it is in 
heaven." 



The trouble is that we put ourselves at the center 
of things and look on the world and other people from 
a personal point of view. God must be put in the 
center. We must give Him first place or we find that 
everything is out of focus. 

A teacher once asked her pupils what they consid- 
ered the greatest thing in life. The best answer was 
given by a little girl who said: "To grow and grow 
forever and ever." 

Gutzon Borglum, the distinguished American sculp- 
tor who carved the giants of American history on the 
face of Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills of South 
Dakota, has a stimulating philosophy: "I cannot tell 
you how to be a giant any more than I can tell you 
how to grow to be eight feet tall," he said. "I can mere- 
ly say, 'grow!'" 

Nature takes care of our physical growth if sun- 
shine and food are provided. God takes care of our 
Spiritual growth when we put Him in the center of 
our lives — when we do His will. 

The material world is taking fast strides and man 
himself must become a giant in order to master its 
tremendous forces — he must grow in his spirit, mind 
and soul, if he is to know the joy of living. He must 
grow in these inner qualities or be swallowed in the 
sea of lost opportunity. 

Happiness does not come from obeying the im- 
pulse to run away from the demands and experiences 
of life, but it is an everlasting joy related to everlast- 
ing well being and divine security because we are liv- 
ing in His will. We must grow "in wisdom and stature, 
and in favour with God and man" if we are to know 
true joy. • 



16 



NEW AMERICAN TEMPERANCE PLAN 



PAYS 



WEEKLY.. 



even for life to Non-drinkers and Non-Smokers ! 

At last — a new kind of hospitalization plan for you thousands who realize drinking and 
smoking are harmful. Rates are fantastically low because "poor risk" drinkers and smok- 
ers are excluded. Since your health is superior there is no age limit, no physical exami- 
nation, no waiting period. Only you can cancel your policy. No salesman will ever call. 
Starting the first day you enter any hospital, you will be paid $14.28 a'day. 



Vo 



Every day in your newspaper you see 
more evidence that drinking and smoking 
shorten life. They're now one of America's 
leading health problems— a prime cause 
of the high premium rates most hospitali- 
zation policies charge. 



as a non-drinker and non-smoker. The 
new American Temperance Hospitaliza- 
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rates because we do not accept drinkers 
and smokers, who cause high rates. Also, 
your premiums can never be raised be- 
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claims. Only a general rate adjustment 
up or down could affect your low rates. 
And only you can cancel your policy. We 
cannot. 



1. You receive $100 cash weekly — 
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you collect. 

2. Sickness and accidents are 
covered 

except pregnancy, any act of war or mili- 
tary service, pre-existing accidents or 

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LOOK AT THESE 
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(as described in policy). We pay $2000 
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for loss of one hand, one foot, or sight of 
one eye. Or $6000 cash for loss of both 
eyes, both hands, or both feet. 



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Application to Buckingham Life Insurance Company 
Executive Offices, Libertyville, Illinois 



Name (PLEASE PRINT) 




Street nr RD * city 


Cnunty statu 




Age Date nf Birth 


Month Day 


Year 






1 also apply for coverage tor the members of my family listed below: 

NAME AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT BENEFICIARY 


BIRTH DATE 


1. 


2. 




3. 


4. 



To the best of your knowledge and belief, are you and all members listed above in good health 
and free from any physical impairment, or disease? Yes □ No Q 
To the best of your knowledge, have you or any member above listed had medical advice or 
treatment, or have you or they been advised to have a surgical operation in the last five years? 
Yes □ No D If so, please give details stating person affected, cause, date, name and address 
of attending physician, and whether fully recovered. 



Neither I nor any person listed above uses tobacco or alcoholic beverages, and I hereby apply 
for a policy based on the understanding that the policy does not cover conditions originating 
prior to its effective date, and that the policy is issued solely and entirely in reliance upon the 
written answers to the above questions. 
Date : Signed : X 

ATIAT 



Mail this application with your first premium to 



Inc., Box 131, Libertyville, Illinois 






By MATILDA NORDTVEDT 







T*S ONLY TWO cans of to- 
mato juice, Lord. Must I make 
it right?" 

I need not have asked, because 
the still small Voice in my heart 
had already told me I must. 

It had all started that morning 
when one of the nurses in surgery 
sent me down to the storeroom to 
get some fruit juice. The doctors 
would need a refreshing drink af- 
ter the operation they were per- 
forming. 

Louise, a nurse's aide like my- 
self, stopped me on my way. "Get 
me two cans of tomato juice while 
you're down there," she hissed in 
my ear. 

I hesitated. 

"Go ahead. I always do it," she 
assured me. 

Frankly, I was a little afraid of 
Louise. I had been wanting to wit- 
ness to her, but she seemed way 
beyond me. She was a teen-ager 
like myself, but so sophisticated. 
She smoked and swore, and had 
left home to live in an apartment 
by herself. Evidently she was ac- 
customed to sneaking cans of juice 
out of the hospital for her break- 
fasts — or for her boyfriends. 

"Okay," I agreed meekly as I 
hurried down to the elevator. 



Unlocking the storeroom door I 
walked in and found the cans of 
juice. Dr. Boyer liked pineapple and 
Dr. Meyer, tomato. Guiltily I piled 
two extra cans of tomato juice for 
Louise on top of the others and 
turned to go. 

One of the nuns had followed me 
into the storeroom. I must have 
looked guilty because she eyed me 
quizzically, pointed to my armload 
and asked, "What are you doing 
with those?" 

"They are for the doctors in sur- 
gery," I answered quickly. 

The sister nodded and let me pass 
out into the hall. My heart was 
pounding furiously. I felt like a 
liar and a thief — and I was. 

When I saw Louise I hastily gave 
her the two cans of tomato juice 
hoping that getting them out of 
my hands would make me feel bet- 
ter. But it did not. 

"Thanks, Pal," she said with a 
wink. 

I was miserable. How had I, a 
Christian, become involved in a 
mess like this? I should not have 
agreed to get juice for Louise in 
the first place. To make matters 
worse, I had lied to the sister to 
protect Louise. 



18 






How could I make it right? I hated 
to tell on Louise. I knew Christians 
should not be tattlers either. Sud- 
denly I had an idea. I had told 
the sister that the juice was for the 
doctors. I would go to Louise, de- 
mand the tomato juice back, put 
it in the refrigerator in the tiny 
kitchen off surgery, and the doctors 
would drink it as I had said. The 
lie would be taken care of; I would 
not have to tell on Louise, and I 
would not be helping her steal 
either. 

I took a deep breath. This was 
not going to be easy— little, in- 
significant me telling high and 
mighty Louise what to do. But hard 
as it might be, I knew I must do it. 
Yes, it was much better to endure 
Louise's scorn and fury than to 
keep this sin between God and me. 

With a prayer in my heart for 
courage I walked up to Louise when 
I found her alone. 

"Louise, I'm a Christian," I be- 
gan breathlessly. "I can't take to- 
mato juice for you. I feel awful 
about doing it. You give it back to 
me and I'll put it in the refrigera- 
tor for the doctors, or—" I hated 
to say it. "I'll— I'll have to tell the 
sister," I finished. 

I felt like somebody else was do- 
ing the talking. Where did I get the 
nerve? 

Louise shrugged. "Oh, all right, 
if that's the way you feel about it." 
I could not be sure, but I imag- 
ined I saw just a tiny glimmer of 
respect in Louise's eye. 

With the tomato juice safely in 
the refrigerator, I breathed a sigh 
of relief and hurried back to wash- 
ing the surgical instruments. 
Strange how it had all worked out. 
Louise had not become angry after 
all; I had made a start at wit- 
nessing to her; and best of all, I 
had peace in my heart again. 

Besides all this, I had learned a 
valuable lesson. Whatever my mis- 
take or sin the only thing to do was 
to straighten it out right away! It 
was not nearly so hard to humiliate 
myself before a friend as it was to 
have something come between me 
and my Lord — even if it was only 
two cans of tomato juice! • 



"This work fulfills my desire for __. fT' J 
full-time Christian service. It JaMk ? ilfvV •' 
gives me a deep satisfaction Jjl ^ iAl'fflM^ft J Mbk i 
helping parents to train P-f .gBI IJS islfli 
their children . . . iff^t J?P IMwH ^S^"w- 

m m -wlm m^m 




has opened the door to a 
richer, fuller life for my family 
and myself." 



"the financial rewards exceed my dreams! 

I'm living better than ever before in my life and doing something I truly 
enjoy. After only six months I was promoted to area manager and a year 
later to my present job as district manager." 



EARN 



A YEAR AND UP 
$75 to $100 A WEEK PART-TIME 

NO INVESTMENT • NOTHING TO BUY • START AT HOME IN YOUR SPARE TIME 

This is your open door to financial independence. Dignified work with 
a 42-year-old company highly respected by evangelical leaders in practi- 
cally every evangelical church group. 

HERE'S WHAT SOME OF OUR MEN AND WOMEN ARE EARNING 

• Mr. R. S., Tennessee, earned $220 per week his first 21 weeks. • Mr. J. I., New 
Jersey, averaged $1,057 each of the last 3 months. • Mrs. M. M., Western Canada, 
averaged $167 per week part time her first 3 months in this service. • Ninety-three 
hours invested by Rev. I. W., Alabama, during his first 5 months part time earned 
him $2,295. 



act now \ 

Immediate openings 
for Christian men and 
women, laymen, 
housewives, teachers, 
church workers and 
ministers. No investment 
or oblfgation. Start ,- 
now if you qualify. 
MAIL THE COUPON 



John Rudin & Co. Inc. 

22 West Madison St., Dept. LP36 
Chicago, III. 60602 

Please send complete information 
without cost or obligation. 

Name 



Address^ 
City 



State or Province. 



GOSPEL TENTS 

For Sale 

Nashville Tent & Awning Co. 
615 20th Ave., N. 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Write for Price 




Little Giant Hotomatic 
Gas Water Heater No. 3 
Will supply all the hot water 
needed for Baptistries, Church 
Kitchens, Rest Rooms. Heats 
450 GPH, 20" rise in tempera- 
ture. Write for free folders on 
water heaters. Fiberglass Bap- 
tistries, spires and crosses. 
LITTLE GIANT MFG. CO. 
907 7th Street, Orange. Texas 



Does Your Church 

Need Money? 

Sell beautiful hand woven nylon 
handbags. No money invested. 
Write for free fund raising plan. 

Eugene D. Roberts 
Hand Woven Handbags 
1554 N. Concord Rd. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 



100% PROFIT 
NO INVESTMENT 

560.00 CASH every time !0 members of your 
?roup each sell 12 cans of Old-Fashioned Pea- 
Brittle at $1.00 per can. 
100% PROFIT! The quart size cans cost your 
group only 50c each — sell for $1.00! 
NO INVESTMENT! NOT EVEN lc! Order 120 
to 1200 cans today. Take up to 30 days to send 
payment. Give your name, title, phone number 
and complete address, 'he name, address, etc. 
of 2nd officer, name of group, quantity of each 
desired, and nearest Freight Office (no parcel 
post). Extras sent FREE to cover shipping cost 
east of Rockies. OFFER OPEN TO GROUPS 
ONLY! WRITE TODAY! 





Attendance for Easter 1964 — 1521 
Attendance for Easter 1965 — 1550 




This is the Middletown (Clayton Street), Ohio, Church of God. The Reverend 
Haskel C. Jenkins, pastor, is shown at left. Associate Pastor, John E. Black, is 
also pictured. 



W73 l£)0{£) QVQ 



By John E. Black, 
Associate pastor 



HE LORD HAS blessed the 
Clayton St. Church in Mid- 
L dletown, Ohio, in leading the 
nation in Sunday school attendance 
on Easter Sunday for the last two 
years. We are very thankful for 
this and want to pay tribute to 
whom tribute is due. Many have 
inquired about our program and 
want to know what we do here at 
Clayton Street. 

A standing policy has been in 
operation in Ohio for several years. 



Each spring we have a statewide 
Sunday School Enlargement 
Campaign which begins six or seven 
weeks prior to Easter Sunday. We 
then climax the drive on Easter, 
when we go all out to give our 
Sunday school the big spring 
thrust. Much planning goes into 
the campaign in the local church. 
The program, prepared by the 
pastors in conjunction with the 
Christian Education Board, is then 
presented to the entire staff of 



900 North 19th Street 
BIRMINGHAM 3, ALABAMA 



Sunday school workers. Target 
dates are set; goals are set; the re- 
porting procedures are set — then we 
are off! On the very first day of the 
drive, we are ready to go! 

At the present time, Mrs. Bobbie 
Day and Miss Louise Lawson head 
up our visitation program. These 
ladies keep records up to date, keep 
prospects channeled into the pro- 
per areas, see that needy families 
have help, and knock on doors. 
Our Sunday school teachers are 
requested to contact every absen- 
tee every week. This is one of the 
strong points of our Sunday school 
operation. On Thursday night we 
have the "Great Commission Ser- 
vice" based on Mark 16:15, Acts 
1:4, and Acts 1:8. We also have 
visitation on Saturday for the ben- 
efit of those who did not get to go 
during the earlier part of the week. 
After visiting and contacting sev- 
eral hundred homes every week, 
we have found there is nothing 
that will take the place of this con- 
tact between the church and the 
home. 

We have found another phase of 
visitation to be very helpful. The 
week prior to Easter is set aside for 
"Operation: Manhunt." Monday 
through Friday of this week is set 
aside as visitation time for every- 
one. We encourage and insist that 
all church members, board mem- 
bers, Sunday school workers and 
everyone whom we can enlist to 
join us in this effort. 

To promote the campaign, the 
church gives each one, who does 
outstanding work, certain awards 
of recognition. We have business- 
men who donate a used car, a 
bicycle, a transistor radio, or things 
of this nature. The church awards 
youth camp trips to those of youth 
camp age. Our teachers and offi- 
cers are presented books. The 
grand award is an expense-paid 
trip to LTC at Lee College, or 
something of this nature. We feel 
the money is well invested. 

Each year thousands of homes 
are contacted. For example, three 
classes of the Junior Girl's Depart- 
ment will visit almost two hun- 
dred homes in one hour and a half. 
This visitation is repeated many 



times during the course of a cam- 
paign. 

We have been blessed with a 
staff of workers who are very co- 
operative in taking the training 
courses. Last year alone we award- 
ed about 175 Teacher Training 
Certificates. Over fifty of our full- 
time workers have the Master Di- 
ploma. When a new person is first 
added to the staff, he is given the 
training courses and brought up to 
date on them. This spirit of pro- 
gressiveness possesses the whole 
Church. Every available space has 
been filled for some time now, but 
we are making plans to eliminate 
this problem. Right now, two class- 
es of kindergarten boys meet in 
the basement hallway of the 
church. At the rear of the annex, 
a converted garage provides four 
classrooms for junior boys. An in- 
effective bus, heated by an oil 
burner, is used for a junior boy's 
class which averages twenty-five 
per Sunday. Our four church buses 
and a chartered city bus brings in 
about 250 people per Sunday under 
ordinary circumstances. 

After all is said and done, we 
have over fifteen hundred in Sun- 
day school because of the coopera- 
tion of a number of great people 
and their hard work! Each Easter 
the Jefferson School gymnasium is 
rented for the junior boys, junior 
girls and junior hi boys to have 
classes there. Their regular rooms 
are used for expansion here at the 
Church. 

Because of the many things we 
would like to put into our pro- 
gram we do not feel that we are 
"the example." But, it is an honor 
to have a group of workers such as 
we have here. Pastor H. C. Jenkins 
is a Sunday school-minded man. 
He humbly accepts his heavy re- 
sponsibilities. I have enjoyed work- 
ing with him these five years. The 
Church Council is an aggressive 
group of men who never dictate 
policy or try in the least to run 
things. They cooperate 100 per- 
cent. They are also very progres- 
sive minded. The other boards and 
committees are "labourers togeth- 
er with God." It is a thrill to work 
with such a group as this. • 



NEED*180 
TO $2,500 

FOR YOUR 
ORGANI- 
ZATION? 

Mason 
Candy 
can help 
you! 




•ALMOND 
COCOANUT 

•ASSORTED 
JELLIES 

•CHOCOLATE 
CHIFFON 

NO MONEY IN ADVANCE . . . NO RISK . . . 
NO OBLIGATION. Mason supplies your 
group with a choice of beautifully boxed, 
top-quality Mason Candies and tells you 
how your organization can make 40< on 
every $1.00 box sold. At no extra charge 
each package is wrapped with your or- 
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AFTER you have sold the candy. RETURN 
WHAT YOU DON'T SELL. For complete 
information, fill in and mail this coupon. 



• MRS. MARY 

• BOX 549. M 


TAYLOR. 
NEOLA, tv 


DEPT. 783 


4ASON. • 


| . PLEASE SE 
- • INF0RMAT 
• PLAN 


>ID ME. WITHOUT OBLIGATION, , 
ON ON YOUR FUND-RAISING • 


. NAMF 








• 

• AGE (IF UN 


DER 21) 






) . nor,4Ni7ATii"iN 
















* COUNTY 




. .. STATE 


• 


• HOW MANY 






















By MARJORIE CLIFTON 




WHO SITS WITH 
YOUR CHILD'S MIND ? 



WORKING MOTHER will 

take great precautions to 

choose a baby-sitter who 

will take proper care of her child, 

feed him well balanced meals and 

keep him clean. 

She must make sure that the sit- 
ter does not drink, or use the wrong 
kind of language in front of her 
child, and that she is a responsible 
person who will not let the child 
play with poison or otherwise dan- 
gerous objects. 

The sitter must also be someone 
who will see that a smaller child 
naps, eats, and plays on a healthy 
schedule. She must be someone who 
will watch a child closely when he 
is small so that he will not wander 
off and become lost, or form the 
wrong kind of companionship af- 
ter he is older. 

You cannot blame a mother for 
being so particular about the phys- 
ical welfare of her child. 

If it is necessary for a mother 
to work she must, for the benefit 
of her child and for her own peace 
of mind, be sure that the one who 
assumes the responsibility of caring 
for her child be the one best fitted 
for it. 

But how many mothers— and fa- 
thers—fail to realize that there is 
another facet which is just as im- 
portant to their child's well being? 

How many mothers, even those 
full-time mothers who do not work 
outside the home, realize what kind 
of material is being used to "baby- 
sit" the average child's mind? 



Parents have latched on to tele- 
vision as a wonderful opportunity 
to keep their children's minds oc- 
cupied from the time they can tod- 
dle until they are old enough to be- 
gin spending their evenings else- 
where than in the home. 

Authorities and parents seem to 
be baffled at the increasing num- 
ber of teen-age criminals; yet, 
they need not be. 

Children now learn their first 
words while watching all-out gun- 
fights, hand-to-hand combat, per- 
sonal killings, and other major 
crimes on TV. Minor incidents 
which are poured into their open 
receptive minds range all the way 
from the praise of cigarettes and 
smoking as a "pastime and re- 
laxation," to the glamour of seeing 
the so-called sophisticated set 
drink their beer, wine, and whiskey. 

As for the hardhearted children 
on the streets — the ones who have 
not progressed far enough to ac- 
tually take part in the many crimes 
being committed by juveniles; the 
ones who simply watch, laugh, 
and walk away — why should they 
not be thick-skinned, so far as the 
acts of violence affecting them? 

Is it not pounded into them day 
by day that everybody is doing it 
on TV? Does TV not teach them 
several times a day that telling on 
the guilty ones just is not done? 

When are we as parents going to 
wake up to the fact that — while 
our children may be the healthiest 



in many generations, while they 
may have more privileges and a 
higher standard of living than 
those anywhere else in the world — 
their minds are being totally cor- 
rupted? 

Why? Because we spend more of 
our time trying to pay for the 
privileges and the high standards 
and less time in deciding what kind 
of recreation our children should 
have, or what kind of programs 
our children may watch, and how 
many! 

Until parents and educators, as 
well as television producers, begin 
urging upon children the story of 
the miracle birth instead of un- 
adulterated sex; until the Sermon 
on the Mount and the cross of 
Calvary replace the smuggler's 
code and the crime of passion; un- 
til the minds of our youth are 
turned from the unfailing private 
detective to the Resurrection of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, the crime rates 
will continue to rise. The kids are 
seeking the thrills they see others 
enjoying on TV. 

When they find this is not 
enough, they will turn to liquor to 
drown their disappointments, and 
so the alcoholic list will be longer. 

We as parents and Christians 
must not neglect the care and 
feeding of our children's mental 
faculties. We must promote a dras- 
tic change in the material offered 
for consumption in our homes to- 
day. • 



22 



ATTENDANCE FOR DECEMBER 

By Donald S. Aultman 
National Director 

This report represents only those 
SfPE's that had an average atten- 
dance of more than 50 weekly and 
reported their attendance to the 
office of the National Sunday 
School and Youth Director. By no 
means does it reflect all the Fam- 
ily Training Hour (YPE) groups 
of the Church of God. Each church 
is invited to participate in this 
column. Attendance averages 
should be mailed on a postal card 
on the day following the last YPE 
service in the month and should 
be addressed to Donald S. Aultman, 
national director, 1080 Montgom- 
ery Avenue, Cleveland, Tennessee 
37311. 



Goldsboro (Clingman Street), 

North Carolina 223 

Lakeland (Lake Wire), 

Florida .... 218 

Greenville (Tremont Avenue), 

South Carolina 195 

Flint (West), Michigan _ 169 

Atlanta (Hemphill), Georgia .... 165 
Tampa (East Buffalo), 

Florida _ 161 

Vanceburg, Kentucky 160 

Jesup, Georgia 158 

Wyandotte, Michigan 152 

Lenoir City (Sixth Avenue), 

Tennessee 144 

Austin, Indiana .... 141 

Monroe, Michigan 135 

Kannapolis (Elm Street), 

North Carolina .... 131 

St. Louis (Gravois Avenue), 

Missouri __ 130 

Morganton, North Carolina .... 128 
Phoenix (44th Street), 

Arizona ._ 127 

Roanoke Rapids, 

North Carolina _. .... 123 

Woodruff, South Carolina 119 

Middle Valley, Tennessee 117 

Dillon, South Carolina .... .... 115 



Chattanooga (North), 

Tennessee 114 

St. Louis (Webster Groves), 

Missouri .... .... .... .... .... .... 109 

Lawton (Ninth and Lee), 

Oklahoma 104 

Middlesex, North Carolina .... 104 
Norfolk (Azalea Garden), 

Virginia .... 104 

Salisbury, Maryland .... .... .... 104 

South Lebanon, Ohio .... .... 102 

Columbus (Frebis Avenue), 

Ohio .... 101 

Lemmon, South Dakota .... .... 101 

Manns Choice, Pennsylvania .... 101 

Miamisburg, Ohio .... .... 101 

Fort Worth (Riverside), Texas 100 

Lorain, Ohio 100 

Paris, Texas .__ .... .... — . __.. .... 94 

Sanford, Florida .... 94 

Jackson (Leavell Woods), 

Mississippi .... .... .... .... .... .... 92 

Decatur, Alabama .... .... 91 

Cleveland (Detroit Avenue), 

Ohio 88 

Pompano Beach, Florida .... .... 88 

Wilson, North Carolina .... .... 88 

Houston (No. 2), Texas .... ... 87 

Isola, Mississippi .... .... .... ... 84 

Princeton, West Virginia .... .... 84 

Augusta (Crawford Avenue), 

Georgia .... .... .... .... .... 82 

North, South Carolina 82 

Booneville, Mississippi 81 

Chase, Maryland 81 

Talladega, Alabama 78 

Elyria, Ohio 75 

Lancaster, Ohio 73 

East Point, Georgia 72 

Oregonia, Ohio .... .... .... 71 

Iowa Park, Texas 70 

Jackson, Ohio .... .... .... .... .... 70 

Gastonia (East), 

North Carolina .... 68 

Wayne, Michigan .._ .... .... .... 68 

Danville (North), Virginia .... 66 

Cleveland (Northeast), Ohio .... 65 

Rochester, Michigan .... .... .... 64 

Sale Creek, Tennessee .... „ 64 

Lake Orion, Michigan 62 

Covington (Shepherds Fold), 

Louisiana _ 61 

Royston, Georgia 61 

Cahokia, Illinois __ 60 

Donalds, South Carolina .... .... 60 

Rockford (Ken Rock), Illinois 60 



Santa Ana (Center Street), 

California 60 

Adrian, Michigan 58 

Phoenix (East), Arizona .... 

Charlottesville, Virginia .... 

Detroit (Palmer Park), 
Michigan .... .... .... .... .... 

Phoenix (South), Arizona ... 

Thomasville, Alabama 

Davis Creek, West Virginia 

Odessa, Texas 

Flint (Kearsley Park), 

Michigan 51 

Cleveland (East), Tennessee .... 50 
Troy, Michigan 50 




WINDOWPHANIE 
TRANSPARENCIES 

THE 

ONLY SUBSTITUTE 

FOR 

STAINED GLASS 



Transforms plain church windows into 
windows of sacred beauty at small 
cost. Windowphanie is similar in rich 
colors, artistry and reverential effect 
to stained glass. Easy to apply and 
will last for years. Write for free sam- 
ples and details today. 

WINDOWPHANIE CO., Dept. LP 
Box 127 Collinsville, Va. 24078 




NOW— an easy way to raise funds for your organ- 
ization's treasury. Popular, fast-selling candies are 
proven money-makers for thousands of groups. Large 
assortment— filled chocolates, mints, hard candies. 
You clear a substantial profit on every box. No in- 
vestment or down payment— your club spends not a 
penny. No risk— you pay only for candies sold. 
Write today for additional information. NO OBLI- 
GATION! 

. .......M1IL COUPON TODAY— — — — — — — 

REHOBOTH PRODUCTS CO. 

Dept. JC Rehoboth Beach, Delaware 
RUSH COMPLETE DETAILS ON EASY WAY 
TO RAISE FUNDS WITH FAST-SELLING 
CANDIES! NO OBLIGATION! 

Name 

Address 

Cily 



.State. 



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Organization. 



RAISE MONEY 

FOR ANY WORTHY PURPOSE 

Candy — Flavoring 
Cards — Novelties 
Write for Free Information 
LOVEJOY PUBLISHING HOUSE 
P. O. Box 8 — Madison, Tenn. 



ISTRIES- SPIRES 

Unit-Molded 
Fibergla 
Accessories f • JE i 

Wiedemann .^ni/uihle^. ,&nr. 

Box 672 Dept. J5, Muscatine, Iowa 




CHOIR- PULPIT 

HANGINGS 
AITAR BRASS WARE 



JL 



T H E C E . W A R D C O 
i London. Ohit 



Rnnn christian 

UUUU WORKERS 



WANTED 



... to sell Bibles, good books, Scripture 
Greeting Cards, Stationery, Napkins, Scrip- 
ture Novelties. Liberal profits. Send for 
free catalog and price list. 
GEORGE W. NOBLE, The Christian Co. 
Dept L, Pontiac Bldg., Chicago 5, 111. 



FREE! SUCCESS-PROVEN FUND 
RAISING PLANS 

for all departments of the Church of 
God. Gifts, flavors, household neces- 
sities, candies with special Church of 
God labels. Profits to 100% plus beau- 
tiful premiums and TV stamps. Also 
free dining and kitchen equipment. 
No money needed. Write for free cata- 
log and details. SHELBY SPECIALTY 
CO., Elyria 2, Ohio 



WOLFE BROS. & CO. 

PINEY FLATS, TENN. 



i 



Manufacturers of DISTINCTIVE 



- CHURCH FURNITURE 



Since 1888. Write for free estimate. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL MEMORY 
COURSE CERTIFICATES AWARDED 




Pastor Doyle Stanfield awards the certificates 



NORTH CLEVELAND, TENN., SUNDAY SCHOOL 



A red-letter day for the North 
Cleveland Church of God was De- 
cember 12, 1965. Pictured above are 
some of the girls who received their 
first year certificate for having 
done all the Bible reading and re- 
quired work for the Memory 
Course. The Reverend W. Doyle 
Stanfield, pastor, awarded certifi- 
cates to eleven girls. No class ever 
demonstrated more interest in do- 
ing the specified work. No doubt 
many of the girls will complete the 
three-year course in 1966! A cer- 
tificate will be awarded for com- 
pletion of each year's work of the 
three-year Memory Course. When 
one has completed the entire 
course, a special Sunday school pin 
will be awarded. 



Teachers, have you challenged 
your group in learning this special 
memory work? I recommended it 
for both junior and teen-ager. In 
these days of crises, we need to 
train our boys and girls in the 
knowledge of the Scriptures. What 
better way can you prepare them 
to face the future? 

If your group has completed the 
first year's work, please send us 
the information and a picture of 
the group. Complete instructions 
for the teacher is given in each 
quarter of the Junior Teacher 
Sunday school quarterly. The Ju- 
nior Challenge also supplies infor- 
mation for the boys and girls. 

— Geneva Carroll 



24 




GOOD NEWS FROM ADRAIN, 
MICHIGAN 

God is blessing in many ways in 
Adrian. The Young People's En- 
deavor record attendance and rec- 
ord offering were broken during 
October. Four young people gave 
their hearts to God during this 
time, for which we give God all 
the praise. 

The Sunday school collected over 
twenty-seven thousand coupons 
and stamps for our Home for Chil- 
dren and also gave nineteen dol- 
lars to help buy paint for the Home. 

As you can see, God is blessing 
the Adrian Church of God. 

— G. W. Bearden, pastor 



Bediee, La., YPE 





Vicki Beauchamp 



Dale Lavigne 



The Junior Young People's En- 
deavor of the Bediee Church of God 
has a zeal for God and missions. 
Recently they conducted a drive to 
collect greeting cards to be sent 
to the mission field. A grand total 
of over six thousand cards was col- 
lected by the boys and girls. Win- 
ner in the girls' division was Vicki 
Beauchamp, age 9; runner-up was 
Edith Blow, age 7. Boys' winner 
was Dale Lavigne, age 6; and run- 
ner-up was Michael Bennett, age 
7. Others participating were: Cin- 
dy Arnold, Nancy Bennett, Dianne 
Jordan, Sherry Pritchard, Susan 
Arnold, Mary Bell, Timmy Blow, 
and Bruce Jarrell. 

The boys and girls have also col- 
lected Sunday school literature, Bi- 
bles, and New Testaments to be 
sent to our missionaries. 

— Reporter 



SERVICEMAN 
ABROAD? 



If you have a relative or friend 
in the armed services in Europe 
and should like for him to be con- 
tacted by the Church of God, send 
his name and address to the fol- 
lowing address: 

The Reverend G. A. Swanson 
European Servicemen's 

Representative 
675 Kaiserslaurern, 

Pirmasenerstr 31 
Deutschland, Germany 



FOR SALE: GOSPEL TENTS. Spe- 
cial prices to ministers. For com- 
plete information write VALDOS- 
TA TENT AND AWNING CO., 
Box 248, Valdosta, Georgia. Day 
Phone: CHerry 2-0730. Night 
Phone: CHerry 2-5118. 




RAISE s 40 CASH 

OR MORE FOR YOUR CHURCH OR GROUP 

easily, quickly, at no risk with this 

beautiful Last Supper Picture Plate 

MAIL COUPON FOR DETAILS 

Raise $40 . . . $200 . . . even $400 for your Treasury with 
inspiring and beautifully designed wall or mantlepiece 
plates, depicting the beautiful scene of Our Lord's Last' 
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By JAMES E. ADAMS 




tie Joe 



EN- YEAR-OLD Joe had never walked; his 

legs were practically paralyzed. The only time 

he ever had playmates was on rainy days 

when children could not be outdoors. So the little 

fellow was lonely. 

But he always looked forward to 2:30 in the after- 
noon when a small locomotive, the "yard engine," 
came down the tracks by his home. The engineer 
always rang the bell and waved. He was Joe's hero. 

One day the engine came in the morning and 
stopped in front of Joe's house. The engineer came 
into the boy's yard. "Is your mother home?" he asked, 
smiling. Little Joe sat there in his wheelchair speech- 
less. The big man looked so strong and kind. "Is 
your mother home?" the engineer repeated. 

"Oh, I — I'm sorry. Yes — yes. I — I'll call her," Joe 
stammered. 

"No, don't bother. I'll just knock." 

Joe could not hear what his big friend and his 
mother were saying. But several minutes later they 
came toward him. "Joe, would you like to take a 
train ride with me this afternoon?" the engineer 
asked. 

"Oh — oh, boy!" I sure would. Can I, Mother?" 

"Yes, Joe. You may," his mother replied. 

"I have only one car on today," the engineer ex- 
plained. "And it goes twenty miles down the line. So 
I'll have plenty of time to show you the ropes." 

Little Joe had a wonderful day. He rang the bell 
and blew the whistle for the crossings. He handled the 
throttle. He even shared the lunch in the engineer's 
huge bucket. 



He was a tired but happy boy as the engineer lifted 
him from the train that evening. As he carried the 
young cripple home, he said, "Joe, you don't have to 
be carried. You can walk — if you'll try real hard." 
Joe looked into the kind face so close to his. His 
friend surely would not spoof him, he thought. But 
he could not — he just could not walk. 

"I know it's hard to believe, Joe," the big man con- 
tinued quietly, "but you try. I know you can walk if 
you will just try real hard." 

That was the turning point for Joe. Everytime he 
waved to his friend he could almost hear the words: 
"I know you can walk if you will try real hard." 

Joe walks today, and that fact is ample reward 
for his big friend. 

The engineer had a trait which seems to be fast 
disappearing from the hearts of men today — com- 
passion. Compassion comes from root words which 
mean "to suffer with." It distressed the man to see 
Joe so small, so helpless, so alone. The compassion he 
showed encouraged and inspired the .lad. 

Nowadays we are so busy — so taken up with our 
own problems. But if we just catch the vision of Je- 
sus, who was frequently moved with compassion: if 
we will take time to sit where others sit, to weep 
with them that weep, to help the helpless— then we, 
too, can give the word of encouragement and de- 
liverance that is so sorely needed. 

The Bible admonishes us to "be ye all of one mind, 
having compassion one of another, love as brethren. 
. . . knowing that ye are thereunto called, that ye 
should inherit a blessing" (1 Peter 3:8, 9). • 






Springtime is here — we live again; 
All life awakes anew. 
Fair nature hums that sweet refrain, 
"Arise — there's work to do!" 

Then every living thing is thrilled 
And every heart inspired. 
The grass is green, the brook is filled — 
What more could be desired? 

Fine, as are the other seasons 
And all the joys they bring, 
But first, for many happy reasons, 
In my heart I love the spring! 

— Neal Curtis 









Oh, what joy in singing praises 
To the Father's Holy name; 
How much sweeter is this glory 
Than pursuit of wealth or fame. 

Voices raised in sincere gladness 

Are the echoes of the soul; 

Hymns of love, though tongues may stumble, 

Will revive and make us whole. 



Sing, oh sing, the praise of Jesus; 
He who died to set us free 
Will send blessings to the singer, 
And will hear the harmony. 



Let our voices ring to heaven, 
Keep our faith from growing dim; 
He has done so much for sinners, 
Let us sing our thanks to Him! 

— Evelyn P. Johnson 



Dolores Booth (16) 
119 Lewis Street 
Chlncoteague, Virginia 23336 






Joyce Booth (14) 
119 Lewis Street 
Chincoteague, Virginia 23336 

Lonnie McCalister (10) 

3433 S.W. Twenty-First Street 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

Rayna Scott (13) 

Route 2 

Eubanks, Kentucky 

Brenda Plrkle (14) 
P.O. Box 63 

Mallory, West Virginia 

Elverta Guffey (10) 
900 Frankin Street 
Moberly, Missouri 



Springtime had crept upon the scene 

The landscape was soft with its summer green. 

Young Jimmy ran and asked his dad, 

"Do you know how to make me glad?" 

"Now, Son, what do you want?" queried he. 

Jimmy replied, "You — to go fishing with me." 

"I'd like to go with you," his dad said, 

But other interests were lying ahead. 

He wondered if these he should delay, 

Then said they could wait another day. 

Looking into his son's starry eyes, 

Oh, he was glad to sacrifice. 

As, hand in hand they went fishing that day, 

Seemingly a bit of heaven had come their way! 

— Earle J. Grant 



READERS CAN OBTAIN. AT A CONSIDERABLE SAVING 
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it will come AUTOMATICALLY. If he docs not want the 
selection, he simply mails a properly checked slip indicating 
the choice of one or more of three alternate selections or a 
rejection of all records that month. 



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record for that month. The "Record Guide" will also list three 
alternate records each month. 



'Includes all records under following Labels: SING, SKYLITE, 
MAJESTIC, HEARTWARMING, ZONDERVA.N, FESTIVAL, 
and other major labels. 



PEACE — The Johnson Sisters — MFLP 404 
Side one: Above All Else; When The Morning Comes; My 
Truest Friend; Oh Sinner; Peace; Jesus Is The Way-Maker. 
Side two: Do Lord; Closer Home; I'm Not Alone; Somewhere 
Listening; Jesus, I Love Him (More Than Silver); Look For Him. 

FAITH IN FOCUS — G. W. Lane 

Side one: Till The Storm Passes By; Where No One Stands 
Alone; I Will Pilot Thee; A Little Talk With Jesus; When He 
Reached Down His Hand; Take My Hand, Precious Lord. 
Side two: Just A Closer Walk With Thee; Master, The Tempest 
Is Raging; The Fountain That Will Never Run Dry; Ship Ahoy; 
We'll Soon Be Done With Troubles And Trials; Room At The 
Cross. 

CONTEMPORARILY YOURS — S-7020 

The Vanguards — MFLP 7020 

Side one: He Will Make A Way; It Shall Come To Pass; The 

Wonder; The Oldtime Gospel; The Family Bible; Lovcst Thou 

Me. Side two: Thanks Be To Calvary; I See A Bridge; Rain, 

Rain, Rain; Kneeling At The Feet Of Jesus; Love And Grace. 



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THE BEST OF THE GOODMAN FAMILY — Sims 117 
The Happy Goodman Family 

Side one: I Wouldn't Take Nothing for My Journey; The 
Goodman Familv Storv; Will the Lord Be With Me; Child of 
the King; Touch the Hand of the Lord. Side two: I'm In A 
New World; Lord I Need You Again Today; When the Roll 
Is Called Up Yonder; The Old Gospel Ship; Nearer To Thee; 
Without Him. 

I WOULDN'T TAKE NOTHING FOR MY JOURNEY NOW — 

SRLP 6030 

The Oak Ridge Boys — SSLP 6030 

Side one: I Wouldn't Take Nothing For My Journey Now; 

Victory; I Shall Be At Home With Jesus; I Asked The Lord; 

Walk With Mc; Live A Little More. Side two: The Christian 

Way; Hide Thou Me; One Of These Mornings; What Love; 

At The Altar; Little Is Much When God Is In It. 

WON'T WE BE HAPPY — SRLP 6027 

The Spcer Family — S-6027 

Side one: I'm Looking For Jesus; Time Has Made A Change; 

Won't We Be Happy; I Want To Sec Jesus First Of All; 

Greater Love; My Home Sweet Home. Side two: I'll Live In 

Glory; How Big Is God; Palms Of Victory; Born To Serve 

The Lord; Little Is Much; Our Troubles Will Be Over. 



PATHWAY RECORD CLUB 

922 MONTGOMERY AVENUE 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



ADDRESS 
CITY 



LIGHTED 



Pathway 




W! r~ou Tlu 



Why sit you there in Judas' place, 
Bereaved of hope, despaired of grace? 

Why sit you there in Peter's gloom? 
Lift the latch of your mind's room. 

See Magdalene lilies growing. 

Her repentance showing. 
Drink the Sabbath's golden air; 

Let your heart live Easter's Prayer. 

— Mary Ann Put man 



Morning is bright with many faces 

Scrubbed and shining, home from church. 
The hour has lost the greying traces 

Of Friday's grief; even the birch 
Tree in our yard seems whiter, 

It's pale green shadows thin and lighter. 
Luminous dreams on children's faces 

Are in secret, quiet places, 
Searching for colored, oval eggs 

With reaching arms and bouncing legs, 
With sudden laughter and happy sighs 

Against the leaves. We, adult-wise 
Come following the children after 

Looking for something dropped in snow 
And find the hidden Faith 

We lost so long ago. 

— Mary Ann Putman 



Vol. 37, Nc 



Editorial 


3 


Clyne W. Buxton 


April's Message 


4 


Grace V. Schillinger 


When It Was Yet Dark 


5 


Hoi 1 is L. Green 


A Living Witness 


6 


Carl H. Richardson 


Christ — Alive and Relevant 


8 


Daniel L. Black 


1 Saw Easter Dawn 


9 


Clay Cooper 


Scouting Within the Church 


10 


Lonzo T. Kirkland 


Why 1 Believe in the 
Pioneers for Christ 


1 1 


Wade H. Horton 


Sufficient Sacrifice 


12 


Dorothy C. Haskin 


The Man Who Sang 
Himself Out of Prison 


13 


Matilda Nordtvedt 


Jim's Confession 


14 


Pauline Bone 


The Moving Spirit 


16 


Lon Woodrum 


Life's Pendulum Swings 


18 


Grover Brinkman 


Dying Condition 


19 


Mont Hurst 


It Happened in 1 864 


20 


Katherine Bevis 


Date Culture 


21 


B. Stovall 


Descent From the Cross 


22 


Homer Hathoway 


Young People's Endeavor 


24 


Donald S. Aultman 


Go Quickly and Tell 


26 


Vivian Hackney 


Poetry 


27 


Mary Ann Putman 


Cover 




Luoma Photos 


Clyne W. Buxton 

Lewis J. Willis 

Chloe Stewart 

Kathy Woodard 

H. Bernard Dixon 

E. C. Thomas 


Editor 

Editor in Chief 

Artist 

Research 

Circulation Director 

Publisher 



Published monthly at the Church of God Publishing House. 
Cleveland. Term. All materials intended for publication in The 
LIGHTED PATHWAY should be addressed to Clyne W. Buxton. 
Editor. All inquiries concerning subscriptions should be addressed 
to Bookkeeping Department, Church of God Publishing House, 
Cleveland, Tennessee. 

ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER AT 
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Postmaster send Form 3579 to LIGHTED PATHWAY. P. O. Box 
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By CLYNE W. BUXTON 



A ROAD REACHED from Jerusalem to Eramaus, a distance of 
about seven miles, upon which two disciples walked. It was the 
afternoon of the first Easter; and as the two men plodded along, 
they were engrossed in conversation about the ignominious death of their 
Master, Christ Jesus. Unenlightened about the Resurrection of their Lord, 
they lamented what appeared to be the eternal loss of their great Leader. 
Two days earlier He had been snatched from them by ruthless men and 
nailed to a rugged cross. Now these two disciples trudged to Emmaus 
with sad hearts and perplexed minds. They were not two of the Twelve, 
but were, nonetheless, devoted followers of the Nazarene. One was Cleopas, 
the other, anonymous. 

A Stranger overtook them presently, dropped 
into step with them, and joined in the conversa- 
tion by asking, simply, "What are you talking 
about and why are you sad?" Surprised that 
anyone in the area would not know of the cruci- 
fixion, the disciples concluded that He was from some other place. Then 
this Stranger, who was the resurrected Christ, began to preach to them. 
I can never read the account of the Emmaus discourse without wishing 
that I could have walked the road that day with the Master and could 
have heard Him talk. For reasons known to the Holy Spirit, the conversa- 
tion was not recorded. We do know, however, what the Lord talked about, 
for Luke says, "Beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded 
unto them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself" (Luke 
24:27). In all the scriptures! Jesus took all Old Testament references 
about Himself and, one by one, showed these two men how, for a surety, 
He was the Messiah. What a great sermon for such a small audience! 

As we recall certain Old Testament scripture today, we can almost hear 
the Lord as He explained the deeper truths of Moses to these men. Their 
ears "burned" as He traced the Messianic notes in the music of the 
Psalmist, showing Himself to be David's King, or the One "altogether 
lovely" in the Songs of Solomon. In studying the Bible we find that in 
Isaiah He is a Sovereign Ruler, bearing the government upon His 
shoulders, and in Jeremiah He is the Branch of Righteousness. With 
shade and sweet fragrance, He is Ezekiel's Plant of renown, and in 
Daniel He is the Stone cut without hands. In Hosea He is the ideal 
Israel and in Joel He is the Hope of the people, while in Amos, He is 
the Fruition of a vision. He is Obadiah's Deliverance upon Mount Zion, and 
Jonah's Sign. He is a Revivalist in Micah, a Publisher of Peace in Nahum, 
the Anointed in Habakkuk, the Pure Language in Zephaniah, the True 
Zerubbabel in Haggai, the Bringer of Peace in Zechariah, and the Sun 
of Righteousness in Malachi. The two disciples must have been awestrick- 
en as the Stranger opened up the Scripture to them. 

Then they reached Emmaus. That long, sad road was no longer sad or 
long after Jesus joined the two men, for He had stirred and challenged 
them to the depth of their souls. They would not allow Him to go further, 
but insisted that He stay with them. He stayed, He broke and blessed 
bread, He revealed Himself to them, and then He vanished. Miracle of 
all miracles, Christ had risen from the dead and was alive. They had 
seen Him! That first Easter brought joy, faith, and contentment to 
Cleopas and his friend. They soon left their house, rushed back along 
Emmaus Road to Jerusalem, and told the Twelve that they had seen the 
Lord. This Easter we may not see Christ visibly, but we can see Him 
anew by seeking Him in the Scriptures and in prayer. By searching 
for Him thus, the Holy Ghost can cause our hearts to burn within us. 
He will reaffirm the truth that Christ is alive! • 



ROAD TO EMMAUS 













By GRACE V. SCHILLINGER 





OW DO YOU feel these early spring days 
* when you hear a meadowlark singing on a 
telephone wire as you drive down the road? 
Or when you hear a toad telling you he is glad he 
happened to find such a fine big pond to live near? 
Or when you see the dandelions growing bigger and 
greener on the roadbanks? 

Does it make you hurry around in your house, hunt 
up all your cleaning gadgets, run hot water in a pail, 
and get busy with spring cleaning? That is one thing 
they tell me to do. 

But there is a lovelier message that I receive. And 
I am not a bit reluctant about obeying it because 
April makes her commands in such beautiful ways. 

April makes me want to walk leisurely through the 
fields to see what I can see. The meadowlark and 
the toad and the dandelions lead me on to other 
things. I like to see how clear the water is in our 
little creek, to see the stones in the bottom of it. Each 
one is as clean and polished as winter ice can make 



it. A pair of killdeers run on the bank close by, telling 
me in shrill calls that they wish folks would stay 
away from their resting place. 

I climb up on the steep bank, and peep under the 
hedge thicket. Sure enough! The hepaticas are out! 
Their blossoms are mostly white but sometimes I find 
one or two with a pink or lavender cast. The blooms 
stand well above the decayed leaves and twigs from 
which they grew. Each little flower stem wears a 
covering of downy hairs. 

No matter how low my spirits were when I left our 
farmhouse, after a long walk my worries always leave. 

When I return from such a walk, I prop open both 
of the henhouse doors so that all the chickens can get 
out. All winter long they have been cooped up and 
I know just how they feel — like getting outdoors, and 
scratching around, and looking for things. 

"Dear heavenly Father, teach us to obey April's 
message and get outdoors so we may learn of the 
beauties of nature. Amen." • 



AN EVENING OF darkness 
hovered about Gethsemane. 
Evil spread over the world 
like a drapery of shadows and the 
disciples slept. Farther in the gar- 
den, we see Jesus on His face, in the 
agony of prayer. Then comes the 
darkest deed of all human history 
— the kiss of betrayal! immediately 
the scene fades into the night. 

The secrecy of this darkness con- 
ceals many cowardly and wicked 
deeds. We see the mockery at Pi- 
late's Judgment Hall and the deny- 
ing disciple. We witness the suffer- 
ing of the Saviour, the crusade to 
Calvary and the crucifixion of 
Christ. We hear the scoffing of the 
soldiers and the ruthless ridicule of 
rattling rebels. The sun refuses to 
shine, the earth trembles and the 
rocks break. It is dark. 

Resounding from the shadowy 
knoll of Calvary, a tender voice 
asks, "My God, my God, why hast 
thou forsaken me?" Jesus was bear- 
ing the sins of the whole world 
and God could not look upon sin. 

Fleeing from skull-shaped Gol- 
gotha, the followers of the cruci- 
fied Christ seem to have forgotten 
The Way as they disappear into 
the darkness. The prolonged dark- 
ness seemingly causes all hope 
to disappear. Clouds of doubt stag- 
ger their faith and veil the true 
meaning of the Scriptures. Over- 
whelmed with sorrow, these de- 
spondent disciples journey along 
an unknown trail. 

While it was yet dark, the sol- 



WHEN IT WAS 

YET 
DARK 



diers came to Joseph of Arima- 
thea's tomb to guard the body of 
Christ. Following Pilate's orders to 
"make it as sure as ye can," they 
sealed the stone that was over the 
door and took their places. Sturdy, 
stiff, and stalwart they stood to 
defy any approaching disciple of 
the Nazarene. It was yet dark! 

The hearts of the fatigued dis- 
ciples were still filled with despair. 
It was yet dark and the memory 
of that nightmare haunted them. 
They groped in the darkness as 
blind men. While the darkness lin- 
gered, on the morning of the third 
day the angel of the Lord came 
and rolled away the stone. His 
countenance which shown like 
lightning was such a contrast to 
the night that the astounded keep- 
ers fell as dead men. While it was 
yet dark, death lost its sting, and 
the grave was robbed of its victory. 

As the women approached the 
vicinity of the tomb, it seemed that 
all the light of dawn radiated from 
the tomb. Stepping from the twi- 
light into this heavenly light, they 
were amazed and astonished. "He 
is not here: for he is risen, as he 
said," declared the angel. The night 
was ended. The Sun of Righteous- 
ness appeared above the horizon. 
A new day had dawned, and the 
dark shadows of Satan's everlast- 
ing night were chased away. The 
glorious rays of the Light of the 
World illuminated every darkened 
crevice of the earth. The mist was 
rolled away. Our Redeemer was 
resurrected! • 




By HOLLIS L GREEN 
5 



I, BILL, Take thee, Edie, to 
be my wedded wife. To have 
and to hold, from this day- 
forward, 'til death us do part." 

It seemed incredible that only 
six weeks before, I had performed 
the marriage ceremony in the 
Church of God in Mansfield, Ohio, 
of twenty-year-old Bill Bielawski 



!!ll HIEM! 



and his nineteen-year-old bride, 
Edie, and had heard these young 
Christians repeat their marriage 
vows. How suddenly, and with such 
grave devastation, had tragedy in- 
terrupted their lives. 

It was a dismal Thursday night, 
October 15, 1964, that Bill's bride 
of six weeks was preparing supper 
for her apprentice plumber hus- 
band, who that evening was 
working late with an acetaline 
torch in a rigidly narrow incase- 
ment. Suddenly the white hot 
flames burst over Bill's slender 
body! 

Five horrifying minutes passed as 
his partner tried frantically to re- 
move Bill's burning body from its 
fiery entombment. Water was 
poured down the shaft. Finally the 
flames were quieted and Bill's body 
was smoldering, as his partner, 
Raymond Wolf, lifted him to floor 
level. Raymond Wolf is an out- 
standing Christian man who de- 
scribes this dramatic episode often 
as a testimony to the power of the 
Holy Spirit in the believer's life. 

"Bill was still alive," Raymond 
said. "It's almost unbelievable but 
as I was lifting Bill's smoldering 
body from the shaft he was speak- 
ing in other tongues as the Holy 
Spirit gave him the utterance! The 




A LIVING WITNESS 



Comforter was praying to the Fa- 
ther for Bill's life!" Raymond ex- 
plained. 

The sirens screamed on that 
chilly October evening toward the 
site of this harrowing disaster. 
Across town, fourteen-year-old 
Carolyn Wolf, suddenly felt a great 
burden to pray. Not realizing the 
tragedy that had befallen her mu- 
tual friends and her father's ap- 
prentice plumber, she fell to her 
knees and prayed "in the Spirit," 
on Bill's behalf. 

Mansfield's hospital was ill 
equipped to handle patients as bad- 
ly burned as Bill was. Therefore, 
the ambulance then raced the sev- 
enty miles to the Ohio State Uni- 
versity Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. 
Miraculously, Bill never lost con- 
sciousness. 

Keith Kemper, twenty-five-year- 
old plumber who worked with Bill, 
and for whom Bill and Edie had 
prayed for several months, accom- 
panied Bill in the ambulance to 
Columbus along with Edie and Ray- 
mond Wolf. While his body was in 
almost unbearable torment, Bill be- 
gan witnessing to his unsaved 
friend, Keith. 

"While I was on fire down in that 
shaft, Keith, that five minutes 
seemed like an eternity!" Bill 



pleaded painfully. "Hell will be ten 
million times hotter than that. You 
saw what happened, Keith, and 
you heard me speak in tongues 
while they lifted me from that 
shaft. You know salvation is real," 
Bill earnestly entreated his friend. 

Keith could take it no longer. His 
voice was choked with emotion as 
he said, "Bill, I want what you 
have in your heart." While the am- 
bulance raced toward the hospital, 
Keith surrendered his life to Christ. 

Arriving at the university hos- 
pital's emergency room, the med- 
ical experts determined that Bill 
had suffered second and third de- 
gree burns over 72 percent of his 
body. The fatality rate for such 
cases is almost 100 percent. The 
team of somber-faced doctors told 
his young wife that if he lived, it 
would be a miracle. 

Shock, pneumonia, and infection 
are three deadly enemies of burn 
patients. Miraculously, Bill never 
went into shock nor did he lose 



The author of this article, 
the Rev. Carl H. Richardson, 
is presently the pastor of the 
Lakeland (Lake Wire Drive), 
Florida, Church of God. 




6 



By CARL H. RICHARDSON 



hospital nurse said 
Bill is the 

remarkable and consistent Christian she 
ever seen. 



consciousness at all. Amazingly, he 
never suffered pneumonia, but he 
did have scattered infection in va- 
rious sections of his charred body. 

In the hospital elevator on the 
way to the operating room that 
night in Columbus, Bill grimaced 
to Edie, "Honey, it's really bad." 
Choking back the tears, she sobbed, 
"Don't worry, Bill, the Lord will 
take care of you." 

Edie's words proved to be pro- 
phetic. The Lord did take care of 
Bill. Now, nearly a year and a half 
after this tragic accident, Bill is 
convalescing in the Canton, Ohio, 
hospital. Although he has been hos- 
pitalized for an agonizingly long 
period of time, and although he 
has suffered a countless score of 
painful skin graft operations and 
untold suffering, Bill is a living 
witness for Jesus Christ! 

Regularly he witnesses for Christ 
to the nurses, the doctors, the hos- 
pital orderlies, and virtually every- 
one with whom he talks. His pas- 
tor, the Reverend T. L. Copeland, 
and a Columbus pastor, the Rev- 
erend William Winters, visited Bill 
and both stand firm in their con- 
viction that he is the most remark- 
able person they have ever seen. 
In many ways his young wife, Edie, 
is equally remarkable. 



Of this tragic experience Edie 
has remarked: 
About two days after the acci- 
dent, I felt impressed to read 
the powerful ninety-first 
psalm, which really strength- 
ened my faith. I knelt to pray 
with a boldness which I had 
never had before. Suddenly, I 
felt the load lift and a great 
calmness came over me that 
I had never experienced in all 
my Christian life. From then 
on, I knew Bill would live. I 
now feel much closer to God 
and I know that Bill and I 
will always want God on our 
side to lead our lives as we 
try our best to live 100 percent 
for Christ. 

University hospital Nurse Hack- 
man told me: 
When I first saw Bill in Oc- 
tober (1964) and noted the ex- 
tent of his burns, I immediate- 
ly realized it was a miracle 
that he was alive. He was the 
worst burn case I have ever 
seen. In the months to follow, 
I would wonder every day on 
the way to the hospital what 
condition he would be in. Each 
day I would see a little im- 
provement. 

I realized that the pain Bill 
was being subjected to was 
more than most people can 
even begin to comprehend. Yet, 
Bill must live with this terrible 
pain moment by moment, hour 
by hour, day by day, week by 
week, and month by month. 
He is a most remarkable young 
man. In the past month, I have 
come to know Bill very well 
and I know that he will not 
give up until he is completely 
healed. 



His doctors say that he has the 
best attitude of any patient they 
have ever seen. The Word of God 
says, "Ye are my witnesses, saith 
the Lord, and my servant whom 
I have chosen" (Isaiah 43:10). 

Bill Bielawski is living today by 
the grace of God, but he is not a 
liability on the ledger— he is a liv- 
ing witness to the saving, trans- 
forming grace of Jesus Christ. • 




"Brother Richardson, I love the Lord more 
than I have ever loved Him in my whole 
life." 




Bill and Edie have regular family dei 
yns which, they say, "strengthens and si 




Gospel recordings and Bible reading help 
fill the long, painful hours with purpose. 



'The Reverend Daniel L. Black, a native of 
South Carolina, pastors the Church of God 
in Meadow, South Dakota. 



By DANIEL L. BLACK* 




ei "» sr MWE mn 



% H 




THE ROMAN WORLD of two millennia ago may 
seem remote and archaic to the average 
modern man. Nevertheless, it was in many 
ways similar to our world. With pride, many of its 
citizens might have called it "the modern world." The 
Romans had amalgamated Greek culture and intellect, 
and Roman power and initiative to found a golden 
empire. 

So great was that Mediterranean civilization that 
it has left an indelible story in the pages of history, 
and its influence is still felt. Over against this, Paul 
of Tarsus, one of its citizens, declared that the glorious 
world he lived in did not know God or Christ. That 
world could boast of its high mentality but was so in 
error as to be blind to the presence of God's Son in 
the world. 

The terms Christians and Nazarenes were not titles 
of respect in the Roman empire. Those titles were 
pinned to a group of people who worshiped a man 
named Jesus as if He were God. The despised Chris- 
tians insisted that Jesus the Christ had been crucified 
and buried but had arisen from the dead to become 
the Saviour of the whole world. That modern world 
insisted that Jesus was dead and the Christians were 
fanatical daydreamers. 

Jesus did rise from the dead. Though the fact re- 



main, there are many to whom Christ is virtually 
dead. They have never been able to realize that there 
is a definite relationship between the here and now 
and the Resurrection of Jesus the Christ. 

The problem is not that Christ is dead but that men 
have dug a wide chasm of doubt between themselves 
and Christ. It is a ditch which many men have fallen 
into and have been destroyed. It is the chasm of 
worldly wisdom that crucified the best Man who ever 
lived. It is the same conceit that painted ancient 
civilization against the backdrop of a sordid crime: 
the crucifixion of Christ. It is the same pseudo- 
intellectualism that denied His Resurrection from the 
tomb. 

Christian theology is no poor science, but arguments 
will not necessarily make Christ living and vital to 
one's mind. Christ arose from the dead and now 
reaches to two sides of the grave, the here and the 
hereafter. Faith will make Him very much alive in 
both spheres when arguments have failed. Christ is 
more than an idea, or an example, or an influence. 
He is a living personality and becomes very personal 
to those who believe in Him. He is alive; He is God. 
If you are acquainted with Him, there will be no 
questions about His being alive, or relevant. You will 
know for sure! • 



8 



By CLAY COOPER 1 



: ERUSALEM . . . Easter Morning, 33 A.D. This 
morning before daybreak Mary Magdalene wak- 
ened Jerusalem with the exultant cry, "I have 
seen the Lord." The electrifying news followed by 
three days the demands of Jewish leaders that Jesus 
of Nazareth be put to death. Yielding to their clamor, 
the governor, Pontius Pilate, ordered the execution. 
Christ was crucified on a nearby hill, Golgotha. Joseph 
of Arimathea, prominent member of the local San- 
hedrin, entombed the body in his own garden. 

Christ's death, witnessed by many, was accompanied 
with strange phenomena. The sun eclipsed at midday; 
an eerie three-hour darkness prevailed; the earth 
quaked and from sundered graves the dead sprang to 
life and even now are going about in the city. 

At this moment the whereabouts of Jesus is unknown 
except to some of His closest disciples who have been 
in touch with Him. But, Jerusalem is agog. The re- 
port is spreading like wildfire. Hope leaps high. At 
last, death has been conquered. The human family 
which for milleniums has marched in one unbroken 
column into the shadows may henceforth walk in 
this kindled light. To the once skeptical, Christ's pre- 
crucifixion assertions, "I am the resurrection and the 
life ... he that followeth me shall not walk in dark- 
ness but shall have the light of life," now ring with 
credibility. 

It is reasoned that what has occurred here this 
first Easter Sunday is heaven's seal of approval upon 
the events of Good Friday — the Father's confirmation 
of the Son's atoning death for errant man. Assuredly 
the Resurrection provides impetus for Christ's fol- 
lowers to enforce His title as mankind's only Saviour 
throughout the hostile earth. Their leverage over 
opposition will be considerable since Christianity 
emerges as the world's only religion basing its claim 
to acceptance upon the proven Resurrection of its 
Founder from the grave. 

Easter becomes more than an extraordinary occur- 
rence of the first century. It belongs to the ages. 
Forevermore it will challenge the philosopher, "Ex- 
plain me"; and the historian, "Reproduce me." Per- 
petually it will defy time, "Erase me." To faith it will 
constantly say, "Receive me." As long as time lasts 
the lately crucified One, now living, and the Church 
He has founded will tower above all systems of faith 
and worship. A Risen Saviour promising everlasting 
life to all who believe in Him can never become 
ancient history. 

Unquestionably, because of what has just transpired, 
the "first day of the week" will henceforth be cele- 
brated as "The Lord's Day." The last secular Sunday 
in history came and went seven days ago. • 



hikr Jaum 




*Clay Cooper is president of Vision. Inc. 



By LONZO T. KIRKLAND, Speciol Activities Supervisor, Notional 

Sunday School and Youth Department 




The Church of God participates in the 
program of the Boy Scouts of 
America. In this article Lonzo 
Kirkland discusses the im- 
portance of scouting. 



Scouting 

Within 
The Church 



Lonzo T. Kirkland, 
a native of Florida, 
is an unusually creative 
person. Being an excel- 
lent artist, he contributes 
a great deal to the 
effectiveness of the 
National Sunday School 
and Youth Department 
of the Church of God, 




WHY SHOULD A church 
sponsor a scout unit? A 
frequent answer given to 
this question is that scouting serves 
as a community service in keeping 
youth busy and off the street. 
While these ideas are true, they 
nevertheless should not be the real 
purpose in sponsoring a scout unit. 
The church should recognize the 
benefits and values which the 
scouting program can contribute to 
the total program of Christian ed- 
ucation in the local church. 

In its effort to win, conserve, 
and develop youth, churches are 
finding scouting an ideal resource 
with which to complement or ex- 
pand its youth program. At many 
points the objectives of scouting 
coincide with the goals of Christian 
education. Both are concerned with 
the elements of character and citi- 
zenship development. Both have 
mutual interests in providing 
wholesome activities that aid in 
Christian growth. 

Since the Boy Scouts of America 
is nonsectarian, it does not teach 
religion but it recognizes this as 
the responsibility of the church and 
home. However, it is religious in its 
principles and purposes. One of the 
fundamentals upon which scouting 
is founded is that no boy can be- 
come the best citizen without first 
recognizing his obligation to God. 
The scout promise puts primary 
emphasis on "duty to God" and 
the scout law is a paraphrase of 
the decalogue in a boy's language. 
Tne twelfth scout law is, "A scout is 
reverent." "He is reverent toward 
God. He is faithful in his religious 
duties, and respects the convictions 
of others in the matters of cus- 
tom and religion." This spiritual 
quality of the scouting program 
makes it a unique concept in Chris- 
tian education. 

The Boy Scouts of America does 
not own or operate scout units. 
The church owns and controls its 
unit as defined in the charter it 
receives annually. This means that 
the church selects the unit leaders 
and supervises its program. Scout- 
ing has a pattern for organization 



and operation of scout units but it 
depends on the church to gear this 
pattern into its own program of 
Christian education. Boy scouting 
and girl scouting units fit neatly 
into the age group programs of 
the local church. Under proper 
planning and leadership, scouting 
can contribute much to the reli- 
gious experience of youth. 

The God and Country Program 
is a plan for the spiritual growth 
of scouts. The Church of God pro- 
gram was patterned by the National 
Sunday School and Youth Depart- 
ment. A scout in the God and 
Country Program is engaged in 
five areas of study, experience, and 
service: (1) Christian faith, (2) 
Christian witness, (3) Christian 
outreach, (4) Christian citizenship, 
and (5) Christian fellowship. The 
boy's own minister guides the 
scout through this program which 
offers an excellent opportunity to 
the minister for personal guidance 
which will have far-reaching ef- 
fects on the boy's life. 

Scouting, when offered by the 
church to the community, becomes 
a missionary outreach. What a 
natural way to attract youth! It 
offers boys and girls adventure ex- 
periences in the out-of-doors, op- 
portunities to learn skills and 
handicrafts, vocational exploration, 
and association with other young 
people. This appeal draws in youth 
who may not have a good home 
environment or godly parents to 
guide them to the source of spiri- 
tual power, knowledge, and grace. 
Through scouting in the church, 
many unchurched boys and girls 
have brought their families into 
the sphere of Christian influence. 
This is evangelism at work. 

Scouting can be a true adventure 
in Christian education or a mean- 
ingless jumble of roughhouse 
games, depending upon the leader- 
ship provided and the way your 
church views scouting. Is there a 
troop in your church? Make it an 
integral part of your Christian edu- 
cation program and reap the bene- 
fits scouting can give your church. 



10 



RFC. . WITNESS 




The Reverend Wade H. Horton, general overseer 

of the Church of God, has a genuine interest in 

evangelization. The LIGHTED PATHWAY is honored 

to print this excellent article by our highest official. 



By WADE H. HORTON 



pi 



"•"■'■"'"■PIONEERS FOR CHRIST 



Y FIRST acquaintance 
with the Pioneers for Christ 
J was during my term as 
Overseer of Mississippi. Brother 
Charles R. Beach, the man who 
has done more than any other to 
make this a strong evangelistic arm 
of the church, came with several 
of the young men and women to 
one of the districts for a weekend 
of meetings. 

They not only made an indelible 
mark on the entire district but 
upon the state overseer as well. 
The strong impression made upon 
me during those services has been 
lasting and, in fact, has become 
more deeply embedded in my spiri- 
tual nature as I have continued to 
watch these precious dedicated 
young people in action. 

I believe in the Pioneers for 
Christ first, because its members 
follow the New Testament pattern 
of gospel proclamation. The Scrip- 
tures declare that the disciples 
"went forth, and preached every- 
where" (Mark 16:20). Again it is 
written they "went every where 
preaching the word" (Acts 8:4). 
And Acts 5:42 gives even a clear- 
er picture, "And daily in the tem- 
ple, and in every house, they ceased 
not to teach and preach Jesus 
Christ." 

It is unmistakably plain from 
these scriptures that they preached 
everywhere and went on a house- 
to-house and door-to-door evange- 
listic invasion. This is exactly what 
the Pioneers for Christ movement 



is doing. They have chosen, or 
should I say, they have been chosen 
to revive and revitalize this method 
of evangelism. It has proved to be 
an effective means of building up 
the churches and of reaching the 
lost in these last and closing days. 
Not only are they practicing this 
means of promulgating the gospel, 
but they are training others to do 
the same. 

Second, this means of evangeliza- 
tion is an avenue of service for our 
youth. There is a deep-seated de- 
sire in the heart of every Christian 
to do some sort of service for his 
Lord and for lost humanity. Isaiah 
cried out, "Here am I, Lord, send 
me." Paul on the Damascus road 
passionately inquired, "Lord, what 
wilt thou have me to do?" This is 
the cry from the heart of every 
born-again believer. 

It is no less true of our youth. 
They want something to do. It is 
not necessary for them to be pam- 
pered and coddled, as some seem 
to think. They want to be treated as 
mature Christians and to be as- 
signed a task comparable to their 
elder contemporaries. This can be 
done through Pioneers for Christ 
enlistment and evangelistic en- 
deavors. Every pastor and every 
parent should encourage the con- 
secrated young people to enter this 
kind of Christian service. It is an 
avenue of service that will pay tre- 
mendous dividends and will help 
strengthen our youth in the faith 
and in their church evangelistic 
program. 



Third, as a result of this sacrifi- 
cial ministry strong Christian char- 
acter is built. Witnessing is not 
an easy task. If you think it is, why 
not try it sometime. Oh yes, it is 
easy to get up in a spiritual ser- 
vice and testify to the saints, but it 
is an entirely different matter to 
present the gospel from house-to- 
house and to witness in face-to- 
face evangelism. No, it is not easy 
work, but it is rewarding work. It 
is rewarding in that souls are won 
to Jesus Christ. It is rewarding in 
that one receives joy in seeing the 
results and in knowing that he is 
doing the work of his Lord and 
Master. 

It is also rewarding in that each 
participant grows stronger and 
stronger in the Lord as he works 
in His vineyard. Make no mistake 
on this point — a lazy Christian will 
always be, at the best, a weak 
Christian. But the sacrificial, wit- 
nessing Christian will continue to 
mature and to be strengthened in 
the Lord. The working, witnessing 
child of God will find that his total 
Christian character will be improv- 
ing and that he is more and more 
conformed to the image of Christ, 
as he seeks through sacrifice to 
do His will and His work. 

I believe in the Pioneers for 
Christ movement because it has a 
strong basis. I believe in the plan 
and in the persons participating 
in it. God grant an accelerated con- 
tinuance of this effort until the 
coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. 



11 



ummn. 




tnnm 



By DOROTHY C. HASKIN 




HOME OP DAVID LIVINGSTONE 
When David Livingstone lived in this house, his family occupied 
only one room. Now the entire house is used as a museum in 
his memory. 



BUT FOR ME, perish the thought that I should 
boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, through whom the world has been cru- 
cified to me and I to the world" (Galatians 6:14, 
The Berkeley Version). 
Any Christian who visits Scotland naturally wants 



to go to Blantyre to visit the David Livingstone Memo- 
rial. We hear more about this missionary than most 
and rightly so, for he performed outstanding work 
for the cause of Christ. 

The children of the Sunday schools of Scotland 
contributed offerings which were used to buy the house 
in which David Livingstone spent his boyhood and 
turned it into a memorial. It is a fairlv large house 
of between twenty to thirty rooms. Each room is 
arranged to exhibit different times in Livingstone's 
life. In one room is a cotton loom. Perhaps the one 
which Livingstone himself used, but at least it came 
from the factory in which he was employed from 
the time he was ten until he was nineteen. The 
building is a homely but fitting memorial for this 
man who for all his greatness of deeds and character 
was a simple man. 

Yet, interestingly enough, of the many rooms, Living- 
stone, one of seven children, lived with his family in 
only one room. They could not afford more than 
that. Surely the sparseness of his childhood fitted him 
for the sacrifices of his life. 

For sacrifice he did, so much so that one cannot 
view his memorial or consider his life without asking 
himself, have I, too, made sufficient sacrifice for 
Christ? 

When he lived at Blantyre, he walked four miles 
each day to and from Glasgow in order to attend 
medical college. 

When he went to Africa as a missionary, he 
stayed sixteen years before taking his first furlough. 

He spent over thirty years crisscrossing Africa. 

On one missionary journey he and his carriers 
covered eleven hundred miles on foot. 

He traveled a grand total of enough miles to measure 
the distance from New York to San Francisco seven 
times over. 

He added one million square miles to the map of the 
world. 

During his journeys in the interior, food became so 
scarce that roots, moles, and mice were considered 
luxuries. 

Once he went more than two years without hear- 
ing a word from his family. The news of the birth of 
his youngest child did not reach him until the child 
was over two years old. 

When H. M. Stanley of the New York Herald was 
sent to find him, Livingstone had been lost for three 
years in the heart of Africa. It took Stanley another 
year to find him, making it four years during which 
the outside world did not hear from him or of him. 

On most of his travels he preached at least once 
each day, always on Sunday, and carried lantern 
slides of Old Testament characters. 

Yet for all of this, he said, "I have never made a 
sacrifice." • 



12 



WE MAM mS 



SANS HIMSELF 






By MATILDA NORDTVEDT 



001 



OF PRISON 



HANS NIELSON HAUGE had been thrown into 
jail many times for preaching the gospel. In 
Norway during the late 1700's when this fear- 
less young man lived, only trained ministers were al- 
lowed to preach. But most of the ministers in Norway 
at that time were ungodly men. They told the people 
in their sermons how to plant crops and how to raise 
cattle and such things, instead of telling them how 
to be saved and live godly lives. 

A rabble of loafers hung about the prison where 
Hauge was kept, hoping to get a look at the prisoner 
and to make fun of him whenever the guard opened 
the door. 

The sheriff, coming to the prison, noticed the motley 
crowd, but instead of scattering them he smiled and 
said with a twinkle in his eye, "Now we will have a 
dance." 

"And Hauge will be the fiddler," said one. 

"No, he doesn't know how to fiddle, but we will 
make him dance," promised the sheriff. The crowd 
broke into cheers. What fun it would be to see the 
serious lay preacher dance, he who preached against 
such worldliness. 

The sheriff permitted the laughing, jesting crowd to 
follow him into the prison. The fiddler tuned his 
violin and began to play. First the sheriff danced with 
his wife and then giving her hand to Hauge said, 
"Now it's your turn to dance." 

Hauge took her by the hand saying, "All right, if the 
fiddler will play the tune I want." 

"Which one?" asked the fiddler. 

"This one," said Hauge, and began to sing in a 
strong, powerful voice. 







"What comfort will it give you 

That Christ from death arose 
If you in sin continue 

And rush to endless woes 
All steeped in filth and sin, 

In wicked crafty highways 
In lewd and wanton byways 

With morals mired within." 

Hauge sang four verses of the hymn. By the time 
he had finished everyone was quiet and sober. He 
began to speak to them of the One who had died for 
their sins whom they were scorning. He told them of 
the coming judgment upon those who refused His 
salvation. 

One by one the people slipped out of the jail. The 
sheriff, cut to the heart, could not sleep that night. 
In the middle of the night he ordered the prisoner 
taken to a judge nearly thirty miles away where 
the case was dismissed and Hauge was given his free- 
dom. • 



Christ told of an impetuous young man, the Prodigal Son, who demanded 
his portion of the family's wealth so he could get out and see the world. 
Do not miss this article concerning a modern prodigal. 



By PAULINE BONE 



A Modern Paraphrase of the 
Parable of the Prodigal Son 





IIM IS MY name. I am a teen- 
ager. Once I thought people 
did not understand me. It 
seemed someone was always say- 
ing: "Don't do this; don't do that!" 
I got fed up with it all and de- 
cided to quit school. I even decided 



my own father was an old fogy. I 
craved more and more spending 
money, and longed for a car of my 
own — the latest model. 

My father tried to reason with 
me, telling me how he and my 
mother had saved for years for my 



future education; but I screamed: 
"I wish you would give me my 
money now and let me do as I 
please." Finally, against his better 
judgment, my father said, "All 
right, Son." A short time later he 
handed me my money. 

The first thing I did was to go 
to the nearest car dealer. There 
I purchased a brand new sports 
car. Just for show, I drove to high 
school during the noon hour. 
Soon the boys and girls crowded 
around and chorused enviously, 
"Say, Jim, this is neat!" 

But no small town for me. I 
headed for the big city where I 
checked in at a hotel. Later, I went 
shopping for new clothes — the lat- 
est fashions: That night I met Joe 
in the hotel dining room and soon 
we were conversing freely. "How's 
night life around here," I ques- 
tioned. "Come with me and 111 
show you the town," Joe invited. 

Joe took me to the swankiest 
night club in town. The lights were 
dazzling, the music electrifying, the 
girls glamorous and exciting. 
While we were sitting at a table 
with several other young people, 
Joe ordered intoxicating drinks. 
When Joe saw me toying with my 
glass, he teased, "What's the mat- 
ter, Jim? Don't be chicken. One 
drink won't hurt anybody." 

As I continued to associate with 
this fast crowd, one thing led to 
another. I became a chain smoker, 
and even used some of the crowd's 
foul language as my convictions of 
right and wrong dimmed. As I 
drank again and again, my mor- 
al standards also began to slip. It 
wasn't long until I discovered that 
immoral girls were demanding 
more and more of my time and 
money. 

Late one morning, after a hor- 
rible hangover from the night be- 
fore, it suddenly dawned on my 
numbed senses that my money was 
almost gone. What to do now? I 
went to the hotel lobby and bought 
a newspaper. Hastening to my 
room, I searched the want ads and 
clipped the ones that seemed the 
most promising and started out to 
find a job. 



14 



While applying for a job, I would 
seem to be making a favorable im- 
pression until the question was 
asked: "And what are your quali- 
fications?" With slumped shoul- 
ders, downcast eyes, and shameful 
remorse, I would answer: "I didn't 
finish high school." 

It is tough finding work without 
a high school education. One night 
after I had had a particularly hard 
day — tramping the streets for hours 
— Joe called. "I'm going out tonight. 
Do you want to come along?" 

"Sure thing. I'll pick you up at 
seven," I offered. 

Later, as we were descending 
some basement steps, I questioned, 
"Where are we going, Pal?" 

"You'll see. Deal the cards right 
and you can make big money here." 
I never meant to gamble. But since 
my funds were so low, I reasoned, 
"I'll play just once. Maybe I'll win." 

I did win, and this only spurred 
me on. But soon I began to lose 
heavily. Before I realized it, I was 
deeply in debt. When I mentioned 
that I could not pay, one of the 
fellows drew a knife and I dashed 
for the nearest exit. I jumped into 
my sports car and raced through 
town. I heard a shrill siren. Think- 
ing the police were after me, I 
drove faster and faster and soon 
reached the countryside. After 
many frightful miles of breaking 
the speed limit, I hit a bridge 
abutment, and was thrown from 
my car. 

After a night of unconsciousness, 
I awoke with a painful headache, 
wondering, "Where am I?" Stum- 
bling to my feet, I found my car 
was demolished. There I was broke, 
sick, lonely, hungry, and stranded 
on a strange country road. I walked 
to the nearest farmhouse and 
knocked on the door and a kind 
old gentleman answered. "I'm visit- 
ing my uncle," I lied, "and I won- 
dered if you could use an extra 
farmhand for a few days." 

"I believe I could, Son," he an- 
swered. "My wife has been quite 
ill and I have to spend extra hours 
taking care of her." I was too 
proud to reveal my unfortunate cir- 
cumstances to the farmer. There- 
fore, I ate the best scraps that I 



could find in the garbage I took 
to the hogs, and slept in an old 
abandoned shed about a mile 
away. 

Oh, what a heavy load of guilt 
I carried as I thought of the un- 
necessary worry and heartaches 
that I had caused my dear par- 
ents. I remembered how tenderly 
they had cared for me during my 
childhood days, supplying all my 
needs. I recalled the songs we used 
to sing together and the family 
prayers. I had felt so secure then. 

I remembered the times I had 
done little things that displeased 
my kind father. Always when I 
would say, "I'm sorry"; he would 
say, "Son, I forgive you." How my 
weary heart ached when I thought 
of Father and home! I knew I 
was not worthy of such love. But 
how I longed for another chance 
to make things right. 

To my wishful mind came the 
tender words of a song we used to 
sing at revival meetings: "Come 
home, come home. Ye who are 
weary, come home." I pondered 
these words. "Can it possibly mean 
me?" I said aloud. Then a ray of 
hope began to pierce the deep 
gloom in my heart. Perhaps my 
father would forgive me one more 
time if he saw how truly sorry I 
was for my sins. Oh, how I would 
try to make good if he would only 
forgive me. Right then and there 
I made up my mind that when I 
got my first pay check I would 
board the first bus for home, and 
this I did. 

Before I got up the lane to the 
front gate, I saw my dear father 
running to meet me with out- 
stretched arms. How I hastened 
into those loving arms, crying, 
"Father, forgive me!" Not once did 
he scold, but called joyfully, "My 
precious son was dead and is 
alive again; he was lost and is 
found. Praise the Lord!" 

Now I'm dwelling at my father's 
house, listening to his prayers of 
thanksgiving, feasting at his table, 
wearing the best clothes. When 
school opens in the fall, I will glad- 
ly be one of the first students to 
enroll. I guess I am the luckiest 
boy alive! • 



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WHO IS GOD? WHAT DOES HE DO? HOW DOES HE WORK? 




By LON WOODRUM 



iryOR AGES MAN has been 
hi asking, "What is God like?" 
-*- The question, of course, is 
difficult, because we have nothing 
with which to compare Him. Many 
perhaps have cried out with Eli- 
hu, "God is great, and we know 
Him not!" Yet, with John others 
have testified, "We know that we 
know Him." However, who is capa- 
ble of saying what He is like? 

Still, we have the word Jesus gave 
the woman on a Samarian well 
curb, who was trying to locate God 
and to discover who worshiped 
Him aright: "God is Spirit." 

This, to be sure, does not dis- 
solve the old mystery as to what 
God is like; for who can fully 
understand a spirit? Who has ever 
seen a spirit? The word, in old 
English, is "ghost"; and if we back- 
track the word far enough, we come 
to the word wind. Who knows about 
ghosts — or who has held the wind 
in his hand? "The wind," Jesus told 
Nicodemus, "blows where it likes. 
You can hear the sound of it but 
you have no idea where it comes 
from and where it goes. Nor can 
you tell how a man is born by the 
wind of the Spirit" (John 3:8, 9, 
Phillips). 

But God is Spirit — whether we 
can fully comprehend this fact or 
not. And if God is Spirit, man is 
spirit; for man is made in His 
image. Therefore the only com- 
munication we can have with Him 
is in the realm of the spiritual. 
Who ever saw Him on television, 
or ever heard Him on radio? God 
cannot be contacted by our auto- 



mation or our gadgets. "The Spirit 
Himself bears witness with our 
spirit" (Romans 8:16, Phillips). The 
Spirit contacts spirits! 

Man's flesh is his earthy trap- 
pings. Physically there is small dif- 
ference between an animal and 
a human being. It is not odd that 
through the ages man has been 
likened to beasts. It is said that 
man "works like a horse," that he 
is "sly as a fox" and is as "brave 
as a lion." An animal is born in 
pain, seeks sustenance after birth, 
rests when he is tired, mates with 
his own kind, and dies when he 
gets old. So it is with man. 

But Isaiah insists that man is 
something other than a beast. "The 
Egyptians are men, and not God; 
and their horses flesh, and not 
spirit" (Isaiah 31:3). This same 
prophet also says he did not seek 
God in the flesh— "With my spirit 
... I seek thee" (Isaiah 26:9). The 
physical man may be God's tem- 
ple; but "the spirit of man is the 
candle of the Lord" (Proverbs 
20:27). James writes, "The body 
without the spirit is dead" (James 
2:26). 

The total man, to be sure, is 
important; but the spirit is that 
particular element through which 
God contacts man. A dog is a liv- 
ing being, but he does not worship 
the Almighty. When the Creator 
wants to bring His human creature 
into a marvelous experience with 
Himself, He must work a spiritual 
wonder. "That which is born of the 
Spirit is spirit" (John 3:6). In re- 
birth a man's physical, mental, and 
emotional makeup might not be 



vastly altered; but a strange, in- 
definiable operation takes place in 
his mysterious spirit. 

This eternal, indescribable Spir- 
it, which is God, breaks on the 
creational scene in the opening of 
the Bible. "The earth was with- 
out form, and void; and darkness 
was upon the face of the deep" 
(Genesis 1:2). The earth was emp- 
ty, untenanted— "And the Spirit of 
God moved." The Spirit acted. The 
Bible is the story of the action of 
the Spirit in human personality 
and in human history. 

Incidents of this action are dra- 
matically depicted in God's Word. 
"The Spirit of the Lord came upon 
Gideon; and he blew a trumpet" 
(Judges 6:34). Samson confronts 
an angry lion and "the Spirit of 
the Lord came mightily upon him" 
(Judges 14:6). The Spirit so dom- 
inated a slave until an emperor 
could recognize Him and feel His 
presence. Pharaoh said of Joseph, 
"Can we find such a one as this 
is, a man in whom the Spirit of 
God is?" (Genesis 41:38). 

In the Bible the Spirit has more 
than twenty titles, most of them 
denote His action on human life. 
He is the Spirit of counsel, grace, 
holiness, knowledge, life, truth 
and judgment. 

This eternal Spirit is not only 
creative, but it is redemptive. 
Through His action a Saviour ap- 
peared on the scene of sinful hu- 
manity. Prior to His ministry Christ 
was led of the Spirit into the des- 
ert to be tempted. In His actual 
ministry He said, "The Spirit of the 



16 



Lord is upon me" (Luke 4:18). 
Moreover, after His ministry was 
finished, we find in the report: 
"Christ . . . being put to death in 
the flesh, but quickened by the 
Spirit" (1 Peter 3:18). And, follow- 
ing His Resurrection and Ascen- 
sion the same Spirit filled the Early 
Church and sent it on an un- 
paralleled mission with a redemp- 
tive gospel for mankind. 

Here, too, we come upon one of 
the most astounding stories ever 
told. All through that stirring, and 
often disturbing, journal — the Acts 
of the Apostles — we see the Spirit's 
incredible performance in human 
life. Surely no one would have giv- 
en those first believers an outside 
chance of winning against the in- 
superable odds ! Publicity was 
against them. Their organization 
and their administration were woe- 
fully inadequate. They had no ed- 
ucational institutions. They were 
scattered about, somewhat like ants 
when someone steps on their ant- 
hill! Yet, beneath all appearances, 
there was a unifying force beyond 
description. Without the dynamic of 
the Spirit, those first Christians 
would not have been able to prop- 
agate the gospel outside of Jeru- 
salem. As it was, they penetrated 
the Roman world, even before the 
New Testament was finished, until 
there were "saints in Caesar's 
household." 

Obviously, a mighty moving of 
that Spirit in the Church is our 
deepest current need. We need to 
be like Zerubabel. When confront- 
ed by the Herculean task of build- 
ing the temple of God, he heard 
the message from heaven: "Not by 
might, nor by power, but by my 
spirit, saith the Lord of hosts" 
(Zechariah 4:6). 

We need this creative, judicious, 
compassionate, and redemptive 
Spirit to move the Church again 
as He has moved it in ages past. 
Before there can flow from our 
innermost beings rivers of living 
water, our hearts must be emptied 
of earthly idols and opened to the 
Spirit's purifying fire. Only by the 
thrust of the Holy Spirit, can we 
move out to accomplish our mis- 
sion in the world. • 



$ 



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in one month 




HENRY RODSTROM does it . . . 
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own boss and sets his own 
hours. In one recent 10-week 
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were $235.00 a week. He loves 
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At the same time, Mr. Rodstrom serves as a gospel 
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YOU Can make mOney like tlliS: R. A., Tennessee, earned $5,375.00 
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Please send complete information on your program with- 
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Address | 


City 


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(This offer for 


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People move to the city, from the city, 

and from city to city. There is a great need 

for preaching Christ in the cities. 




By GROVER BRINKMAN 




EN GRADUALLY built the 
first city, building by build- 
ing. Then they built a wall 
around their habitat for protection. 
But later, they found that a mere 
crowding together would not as- 
sure them of finding happiness or 
peace. Along with the increasing 
population, crime came to the city 
and flourished in the dark alleys. 
Man became frightened and moved 
out to the countryside in order to 
escape himself. For thousands of 
years now the pendulum has swung 
back and forth — with men moving 
to the city, and then to the wide 
open spaces. 

Today the move is to the city. 
Sixty-three percent of the entire 
United States population lives in 
the 212 metropolitan areas with 
populations of fifty thousand or 
more — rather amazing statistics, 
any way you view it! 

New York City, of course, is the 
greatest human beehive — 7,891,957 
in 1960. Combined with Jersey City 
and Newark, it makes up the world's 
largest metropolitan census area 



with nearly fifteen million people 
more or less frustrated at their 
own population explosion. 

On the west coast, Los Angeles 
has spread over 450 square miles. 
Many of these people, of course, 
would like to live away from the 
throngs, but they can not make a 
living except in the city with its 
many opportunities. Such is the way 
of life. 

Our population centers are not 
the biggest in the world. Tokyo, 
for instance, was the first city to 
officially pass the ten-million mark 
in 1962. And Shanghai unofficially 
claims to be in the same category. 

People, by their own number, 
blend into anonymity. This fact, 
then, applies more to the city dwell- 
er than the rural resident. 

The pace of life itself seems to 
be accelerated in the city, and de- 
celerated in the wide open spaces. 
Man can walk the quiet country- 
side and talk with his God much 
easier than he can in the din 
and congestion of the metropolis, 
the editorialists tell us. 



But even so, the city has its 
charm. Some cities have their own 
particular charm, atmosphere, and 
culture. Who can say that walking 
the streets of Jericho, now called 
Eriha, in Jordan — the oldest known 
walled city — has not its own par- 
ticular charm? 

Who can not feel the hand of 
age and history in the world's oldest 
capital city, Damascus, Syria — 
a stronghold inhabited since 2000 
B.C.? 

Our own Washington, D.C., the 
City of Magnificent Distances, has 
its own charm. Montreal, the capi- 
tal of Quebec, is often called the 
City of Saints; and Cologne, Ger- 
many, the "City of the Three 
Kings," reportedly is the burial 
place of the Magi. 

The pendulum keeps swinging — 
the movement to the city and the 
moving from the city. Possibly it 
will be thus throughout all time. 
The city, the barren desert, the 
thinly populated plain, the hamlet, 
and the farm are all part of the 
plan of living. But each generation 
seems to change the barometer. • 



18 



By MONT HURST 



ALL OF US are in a dying condition. We 
started dying the minute we were born and 
the process has been under way ever since. 
As surely as life comes, death is close on its heels. 
To live and to die is inevitable in the supreme will 
of Almighty God. 

We are on probation from the moment we are born. 
And, when we reach the age of accountability, we 
should be on temporary leave from our natural home 
as provided by our Lord above. During this proba- 
tionary period we face every kind of danger, hazard, 
and evil influence. But God has provided us with the 
necessary protective devices and power to move 
through every one of them with the song of victory 
on our lips. Each day should add to the sacred luster 
of that crown of victory. 

Many of us know the impact of a doctor's words 
when he has done everything he can to relieve the 
suffering of a loved one and to prolong his life. He 
says, "I'm sorry. I've done everything I can do. There 
is no hope." But, how glorious is the contrast in 
our spiritual lives when Jesus says to us, "I have done 
all I can. There is hope!" The Great Physician has 
never lost a case that was completely turned over 
to Him and His prescription was followed to the letter. 
We begin dying physically the minute we are born. 
But, more important, we have the opportunity of living 
more and more abundantly as we grow in stature and 
knowledge. Someone has aptly said that divine healing 
is simply divine life. How true this is! Such healing is 
not alone in its reality. Divine life means having 
Christ within. And, if He is within us, we have divine 
life for He said that He was the way, the truth, and 
the life. The Grim Reaper can only harvest human 
bones and flesh. It is wholly impossible for him to 
gather human souls into his barns when they dwell 
in bodies only as places of temporary abode. 

Hell is separation from God. And there are countless 
numbers of people today who will quickly tell you 
they are living in a hell on earth. But such a life is 
only a tiny foretaste of what the region of Satan 
will be like. Despite his garnering of teeming millions 
of souls into his domain, he can never point to one 
born of divine life! Satan causes each individual to 
face every possible thing that will cause human death. 
He is eminently successful in this Satanic project. But 





EMitta 



God makes sure that each soul born into this world 
has every possible advantage in avoiding citizenship 
in hell. 

There is no more dependable warning signal than 
for each of us to never forget for a moment that 
physically we are in a dying condition. This awareness 
will cause us to intensify our obedience to God, our 
fellowship with Jesus, and our baptism with the Holy 
Ghost. Dying to the world, we live for Him. • 



19 



By KATHERINE BEVIS 






THE MAN OF GOD sat at his desk in his study 
watching the rain as it fell in torrents— large 
drops beat hard against his windowpane. The 
Reverend Mr. Wakinson, a minister of a small church 
in Pennsylvania, sat in deep thought, occasionally 
glancing at a coin that lay on his desk. 

"It just isn't right," he spoke aloud, although there 
was no one near enough to hear his voice. "It just 
isn't right that Almighty God is not recognized in 
some form on the coins of our nation." 

Arising from his desk, the minister walked back 
and forth in his small study. With each step, he 
became more concerned about this matter. He paused 
for a moment in his anxious walking and an idea 
came to him. He would write a letter to the Secretary 
of the United States Treasury, asking his help in doing 
something that would help to take the shame away — 
the shame of our nation's not recognizing God on its 
coins. 

As a result, Treasury Secretary Salmon Chase, re- 
ceived a letter soon after this night. Brief and to the 
point, it read, "One fact touching our currency has 
been seriously overlooked. I mean the recognition of 
Almighty God in some form on our coins. What if 
our Republic were now shattered beyond reconstruc- 
tion? Would not peoples of succeeding centuries rightly 
reason from our past that we were a heathen nation?" 

In conclusion, he proposed a motto on the theme 



of God, Liberty, and Law. He closed the letter with 
these words, "This would relieve us from the ignominy 
of heathenism. This would place us openly under the 
divine protection we personally claim. From my heart 
I have felt our national shame in disowning God as 
not the least of our present national disasters." 

Needless to say this letter impressed Treasury Secre- 
tary Chase deeply. He immediately posted a letter to 
James Pollock, who at that time was director of the 
mint in Philadelphia. Inspired by the plea of this 
minister, Salmon Chase, wrote: "No nation can be 
strong except in the strength of God, or can it be 
safe except in His defense. The trust of our people in 
God should be declared on our coins." 

After two other mottoes were proposed — the first, 
"God Our Trust" then, "God and Our Country"— the 
motto we know today was chosen. Now over a century 
old, "In God We Trust" first appeared on a United 
States two-cent piece, in 1864. Then the motto began 
appearing on many of our nation's coins. It was not 
until 1938, when the Jefferson nickle was minted, that 
all of our coins were minted with this inscription. 
And in 1955 President Eisenhower proposed that our 
currency carry this inscription as well. Though the 
one-dollar certificates were the first to bear the in- 
scription, "In God We Trust," the day will soon arrive 
when all our currency will officially bear these words 
recognizing Almighty God. • 



20 



IN BIBLICAL times dates were 
an important part of the 
diet. Dates are still cultivated 
for food. Coachella Valley, in south- 
ern California, about 140 miles 
southeast of Los Angeles, is the 
home of the date garden shown in 
the picture. There are a number 
of other date gardens in the vicini- 
ty. 

Date culture requires a warm, 
dry climate. However, the roots .of 
the date palm go down into the 
ground several feet and must have 
a good supply of water at all times. 
Irrigation supplies that need. Date 
growers of the old world say, "A 
date palm must have its feet in the 
water and its head in the fires of 
heaven." 

Dates grow in bunches. Even 
though much water is needed by 
the roots, rain is an enemy of the 
ripening dates. As a protection, 
heavy treated paper is tied over 
the bunches in order to shield them 
if it rains. (See picture.) These cov- 
ers are put on when the dates begin 
to color and are left on till harvest- 
time. 

The same type of date may be 
propagated by selecting an offshoot 
or sucker of a young date of the 
variety desired. When it develops 
roots of its own, it is set out and 
will eventually produce fruit. 

Pollenization consists of taking 
pollen from the male flower and 
dusting it on the female flower. 
Doing this by hand eliminates 
waste and gives better results than 
leaving pollenization to chance. 

At harvesttime, a number of date 
growers no longer use ladders to 
reach the high date bunches. They 
have worked out a system requiring 
six men for its operation that saves 
both time and expense. A tower 
is driven between two rows of 
palms. Two men are hoisted up to 
the date bunches in open-top cages. 
Twin arms extend from the tower 
so that the men in the cages can 
work on two rows of trees at the 
same time. 

Dates are cut off in bunches and 
deposited in the cages. When the 
men harvesting the dates finish 
their work, they signal the opera- 
tors below to lower the cages over 




This magnificent date grove is located near Los Angeles. Note 
the paper over the ripening dates to protect them from rain. 



DATE CULTURE 



By B. STOVALL 



a shaker on the platform below. A 
trapdoor of the cage is then opened 
and the dates fall into the shaker. 
The swift vibration removes all the 
dates from the bunches and the 
loose dates fall into bins. Fork 
lifts pick up these bins, load them 



on trucks, and take them to pack- 
ing houses where they are cleaned 
and sorted and made ready for 
market. Some choice dates sell for 
a dollar or more per pound, while 
those of cheaper quality sell for 
much less. • 



5000 SSSSSS WANTED 



... to sell Bibles, good books, Scripture 
Greeting Cards, Stationery, Napkins, Scrip- 
ture Novelties. Liberal profits. Send for 
free catalog and price list. 
GEORGE W. NOBLE, The Christian Co. 
Dept L, Pontiac Bldg., Chicago 5, 111. 




Wiedemann tfnduafodet, 

Box 672 Dept. J5, Muscatine, 'Iowa 



CHOIR-PULPIT 

HANGINGS 
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J. 



WARD CO 
London. Ohit 



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No money needed. Write for free cata- 
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Does Your Church 

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Sell beautiful hand woven nylon 
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Hand Woven Handbags 
1554 N. Concord Rd. 
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SOUTHEASTERN EQUIPMENT CO. 




Chairs and tables in com- 
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S LER CITY. NORTH CAROLINA 



Descent 

From The Cross 



By HOMER HATHAWAY 



JOSEPH OF Arimathea, an 
honorable counsellor, which 
also waited for the kingdom 
of God, came, and went in boldly 
unto Pilate, and craved the body of 
Jesus. And Pilate marvelled if he 
were already dead: and calling un- 
to him the centurion, he asked him 
whether he had been any while 
dead. And when he knew it of the 
centurion, he gave the body to 
Joseph. And he bought fine linen, 
and took him down, and wrapped 
him in the linen, and laid him in 
a sepulchre which was hewn out 
of a rock, and rolled a stone unto 
the door of the sepulchre. And 
Mary Magdalene and Mary the 
mother of Joses beheld where he 
was laid" (Mark 15:43-47). 

There is something of the evan- 
gelist in him. 

A famous artist, Vincent Van 
Gogh, wrote the above words when 
speaking ?bout the almost mira- 
culous talents of Rembrandt van 
Rijn, whose paintings on Scriptural 
subjects are ami ng the most mag- 
nificent of the old masters. 

Although Rembrar.dt was not a 
member of any specified religious 
faith, he had devoted friends from 
practically every established reli- 
gion. Such men as Madasseh Ben 
Israel, Sylvius, Anslo, and Ephraim 



Bonus exerted a tremendous in- 
fluence on him. This influence, 
coupled with his own troubles and 
suffering, gave him an insight into 
the Scriptures and their message 
which few artists ever gained. 

Claude Roger Marx, in his bio- 
graphy of Rembrandt, says that 
"a more intense visual communion 
with the figure of Christ has never 
been established by any artist. 
Christ, from the manger to the 
grave: the child Christ questioned 
by the doctors; Christ driving the 
changers from the Temple or 
talking with his disciples; Christ 
preaching, performing miracles, 
betrayed and put to death." 

Rembrandt, as a youth, appears 
to have discerned this peculiar af- 
finity of being able to transpose 
his deeply religious feelings onto 
canvas. As he matured, he in- 
creased in knowledge as well as 
talent; and his paintings became 
even more dramatic. However, he 
never sacrificed simplicity for dra- 
ma. Many painters of his time de- 
voted themselves to opulent rendi- 
tions of biblical subjects, but Rem- 
brandt painted his pictures as if 
he had literally been an eyewitness 
to them. He elevated poverty to a 
sublimity unmatched by any of his 
contemporaries. 

The magnificence of his work is 



Photograph courtesy of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. 




In this famous painting "Descent From the Cross," Rembrandt displayed his unique skill 
in highlighting Christ and His mother, while keeping all else in semidarhness. 



doubly amazing when one studies 
his life. There is probably no ar- 
tist's life which so closely parallels 
that of Job; yet who, in spite of all 
his misfortunes, remained the eter- 
nal Good Samaritan. In spite of the 
deaths of his father and mother, 
several of his own children, his 
first and second wives, his battle 
with authorities over a commission, 
his eventual bankruptcy, and the 
sale of his remaining collection, 
Rembrandt continued to demon- 
strate his faith by devoting himself 
to further painting of the Bible 
and its people. 

When he died in 1669, he left an 
unfinished painting on his easel: 



"Simeon in the Temple." His death 
went unnoticed outside of his own 
country, but his paintings have be- 
come collector's items — eagerly 
sought. 

In "The Descent From the Cross" 
Rembrandt has effectively used 
light, as he often did, by highlight- 
ing the figure of Christ and the 
figure of his mother in the lower 
right, while all else remains in 
semidarkness. It is as if he were 
saying that even in death, the inner 
light of man's salvation pushes 
aside the darkness of despair, that 
hope of life everlasting shines forth 
through the spirit, even though the 
body may die. • 



FOR SALE: GOSPEL TENTS. Spe- 
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Box 248, Valdosto, Georgia. Day 
Phone: CHerry 2-0730. Night 
Phone: CHerry 2-5118. 



RAISE $ 50, MOO 
even $ S00 

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I ship you on credit 200 
assorted packages of 
inspiring Prayer Grace 
Napkins. Have 10 
members sell 20 50^ 
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$50 CASH, send me 
$50. Get free samples, 
details. No obligation. 



ANNA WADE DepUsocE Lynchburg, Va. 24505 
Rush FREE Samples and details of your plan 
for us to raise $50, $100, even $500, without 
spending 1<. No obligation. 



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23 




Daisy, Tennessee, Young People's Endeavor 



The crowning exercises of the 
Mr. and Miss Daisy Church of God 
were recently held. This fine group 
of young people worked for four 
weeks raising money toward the 
building fund of their new church. 
The climax of this event will be on 
Easter Sunday, when we hope to 
have reached our goal of ten thou- 
sand dollars. A total of $467.00 was 
raised during the contest and will 
be turned in at this time. 

Pictured at the crowning are 
(left to right) Mr. Johnny Curtis 
and Miss Geneva Phillips, the 1965 
reigning couple; Mr. Bud Jones and 



Miss Karen Privett, Mr. Jerry Park- 
er and Miss Paulette Watts, first 
runners-up, who raised $128.00; Mr. 
Donny Smith and Miss Alma 
Phillips, 1966 Mr. and Miss Daisy 
Church of God, who raised $157.00; 
Treva Connor and Tracy Reno, 
crownbearers; Mr. Harold Beavers, 
Miss Sherri Lovelady, Mr. Billy 
Lane, Miss Delores Wright, and De- 
lores Jenkins, sponsor. 

The Reverend Warren Beavers is 
the pastor of these fine young peo- 
ple. Please pray that our goal will 
be reached. 



PEN PALS 



Linda Wright (18) 

Route 1 

Huntersville, North Carolina 

Diana Lovese (14) 

4526 Chaparral Philview 

Borger, Texas 

Sandra Dianne Jones (14) 
104 Cliff Street 
E. Rockingham, North Caro- 
lina 

Nancy Stubbs (8) 
2008 Pine Street 
Rockingham, North Carolina 



Lida Mason (14) 
Box 276 
Temperanceville, Virginia 

Mary Stubbs (14) 
2008 Pine Street 
Rockingham, North Carolina 

Hilda Wiley (19) 
Post Office Box 86 
Lebanon, South Dakota 57455 

Jewell Worm (14) 
Post Office Box 86 
Lebanon, South Dakota 57455 

William H. Morgan, Jr. (16) 
Post Office Box 41 
Vanceburg, Kentucky 41179 



YOUNG 

PEOPLES 

ENDEAVOR 

JANUARY YPE ATTENDANCES 

By Donald S. Aultman 
National Director 

This report represents only those 
YPE's that had an average atten- 
dance of more than 50 weekly and 
reported their attendance to the 
office of the National Sunday 
School and Youth Director. By no 
means does it reflect all the Fam- 
ily Training Hour (YPE) groups 
of the Church of God. Each church 
is invited to participate in this 
column. Attendance averages 
should be mailed on a postal card 
on the day following the last YPE 
service in the month and should 
be addressed to Donald S. Aultman, 
National Director, 1080 Montgom- 
ery Avenue, Cleveland, Tennessee 
37311. 

Lakeland (Lake Wire), 

Florida 336 

Goldsboro (Clingman Street), 

North Carolina 252 

Middletown (Clayton Street), 

Ohio __. 243 

Hamilton, Ohio 229 

Newport News, Virginia 213 

Jacksonville ( Springfield ) , 

Florida .... 207 

Canton (Temple), Ohio 195 

Kannapolis (Elm Street), 

North Carolina 190 

Greenville (Tremont Avenue), 

South Carolina 185 

Cincinnati (Central Parkway), 

Ohio 182 



Griffin, Georgia .__. 175 

Wyandotte, Michigan .... .... 158 

Flint (West), Michigan 157 

Vanceburg, Kentucky .... 155 

Salisbury, Maryland .... 143 

Garden City, Florida 142 

Miamisburg, Ohio __ 118 

Middle Valley, Tennessee 114 



24 



Tampa (Buffalo Avenue), 

Florida _ _ - - 

Newport, Tennessee .... 

Chattanooga (North), 

Tennessee 

Poplar, California _ ... 

Paris, Texas _ 

North Ridgeville, Ohio 

Brunswick (Norwich Street), 

Georgia 

Lorain, Ohio __ 

Manns Choice, Pennsylvania _. 

Willow Run, Michigan 

Wilson, North Carolina .... 

Lawton (Ninth and Lee), 

Oklahoma .._ 

Morganton, North Carolina _ 

Thorn, Mississippi — _ _ 

Monroe (Ninth Street), 

Michigan _._ _ _ 

Santa Ana (Center Street), 

California — _ 

Norfolk (Azalea Garden), 

Virginia 

Talladega, Alabama 

Columbus (Frebis Avenue), 

Ohio - 

Pompano Beach, Florida _ _. 
Roanoke Rapids, 

North Carolina 

Elyria, Ohio _ __ _.. _ 

Johnson City, Tennessee .... .. 

Lancaster, Ohio 

Fort Worth (North), Texas _ 

Cumberland, Maryland 

St. Louis (Webster Groves), 

Missouri .... 

Adamsville, Alabama .... __ ... 
Augusta (Crawford Avenue), 

Georgia 

Isola, Mississippi 

Sanford, Florida .... .... 

Chase, Maryland ... 

Dalton (East Morris Street), 

Georgia 

Miami (North), Florida _.. .. 
Columbia (West), 

South Carolina .. 

Lenoir City (Sixth Avenue), 

Tennessee 

Dayton, Tennessee _ .. 

South Lebanon, Ohio 

Wayne, Michigan 

Adrian, Michigan „ .. 

West Frankfort, Illinois 

Decatur, Alabama .... .... .... 

Cleveland (Detroit Avenue), 

Ohio .... _ _ 

Flint (Kearsley Park), 

Michigan .... __ 



112 
111 

110 
106 
104 
103 

101 
101 
101 
100 
100 



82 



65 



Lagrange, Ohio ~ 64 

Phoenix (East), 

Arizona 64 

Valdosta, Georgia - 63 

Charlottesville, Virginia .... .... 62 

Amarillo (West), Texas 61 

Oregonia, Ohio .... _ — 61 

Phoenix (South), Arizona .... 61 

Davie, Florida _ _ _ .... 59 

East Point, Georgia .... ... ... 58 

Jackson (Crest Park), 

Mississippi 1 57 

Jackson (Leavell Woods), 

Mississippi ... . _ _ 57 

Regina, Saskatchewan 57 

Royal Oak, Michigan .... 56 

Cleveland (East), Tennessee .. 54 

Holland, Michigan __ _ 54 

Wooster, Ohio „ — . . 54 

Midwest City, Oklahoma 53 

Granite City, Illinois .... - 51 

Jackson, Ohio 51 

Jason ville (Park and McKinley), 

Indiana _ 51 

Donalds, South Carolina .... .... 50 

Miami, Florida _ 50 



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SORROW AND A deep sense 
of loss engulfed "Mary Mag- 
dalene and the other Mary" 
as they hastened to the tomb. The 
sweet spices they carried seemed 



to be a small offering to make. But 
now that Jesus, their beloved 
friend and teacher was dead, 
anointing His body with spices was 
the last service they could render 
Him. 

As they hurried along the dark 
path, the thought of Jesus in the 
grave was almost more than they 
could bear. Yet, love impelled them 
to make the pilgrimage while they 
still could enter the tomb. Being 
practical they wondered about the 
huge stone which sealed the en- 
trance. How could they move it? 

Then they reached the garden. 
But the tomb was not as they ex- 
pected it to be. The stone had been 
rolled from the entrance — and an 
angel sat on the stone! Awestruck, 
the two women gazed at the angel, 
whose "countenance was like light- 
ning, and his raiment white as 
snow" (Matthew 28:3). His mes- 
sage intensified their sense of awe: 

"Do not be alarmed and fright- 
ened. ... He is not here; He is 
risen . . . Come see the place where 
the Lord lay. Then go quickly and 
tell His disciples" (Matthew 28:5-7, 
The Amplified New Testament). 

The story of these two women 
on the first Easter morn reminds 
us of various moods, feelings, and 
happenings familiar to us: 

Sorrow — Lost persons, realizing 
the darkness of their lost condi- 
tion, feel sorrow weighing heavily 
on them. Christians, too, feel the 
weight of sorrow when they realize 
their way is dark because their 
problems, frustrations, or routine 
busyness prevent a close fellowship 
with Jesus. 

They have failed to seek His 
guidance in making decisions; and 
they have betrayed Him by 
thoughtless speech, careless and in- 
different actions; or they have 
failed to love as he loves. 

Fear — Without Jesus to encour- 
age, strengthen, and enlighten 
them, people fear many things: the 
unknown, the unfriendliness of as- 
sociates, the sting of gossip, the 
uncertainty of earning a living, the 
thought that perhaps life has no 
meaning after all, et cetera. 

Unexpectedness — The one sure 
thing about life is that it changes. 



Plans may not work out according 
to the original "blueprint." Hard 
work does not always bring suc- 
cess. Improvement goals seem un- 
attainable. Then, on the good side, 
sorrow may lead to unexpected joy. 
Illness may lead to greater under- 
standing and faith. Rebuffs may 
strengthen the desire to succeed. 

Encounter — Messengers in almost 
every nation proclaim, "The Lord is 
risen!" Lost persons need to en- 
counter these messengers so that 
they may turn to the Lord for sal- 
vation. Christians need to encount- 
er them that they may be reminded 
to break away from stifling self- 
centeredness. 

Command — Messengers not only 
proclaim, "The Lord is risen," but 
they command hearers to become 
messengers, also. Hearers must go 
quickly and tell what they have 
heard. 

Joy — Belief is joy: joy that Jesus 
conquered death; joy that he 
makes" life new — abundant in all 
goodness; joy that he prepares a 
place in heaven, where we will en- 
joy face-to-face fellowship with 
Him throughout eternity. 

Obedience — Each person who 
hears and accepts the Lord's mes- 
sage, accepts the responsibility of 
working in the Lord's mission field 
— the world. He accepts the world 
and all people in it as created by 
the same heavenly Father. He cul- 
tivates compassion for wayward 
humanity — compassion such a s 
God had when he spoke of the 
people whom he created in his 
image: "O that there were such an 
heart in them, that they would 
fear me, and keep all my com- 
mandments always, that it might 
be well with them, and with their 
children for ever!" (Deuteronomy 
5:29). 

THE STORY of the women who 
saw the empty tomb that first 
Easter morn does more than re- 
mind us of familiar moods, feel- 
ings, and happenings. It stirs our 
hearts to make love-impelled pil- 
grimages because we serve a living 
Christ. What journey of service 
shall we take first? To whom shall 
we go quickly today and tell of the 
risen Lord? • 



26 



Poetry of Mary Ann Putman 

poetry, writh 
she had the 



D 

rv 



U 



±. V-JLJL/l 



The day was dark when Judas stood 

Despairing in a darker wood; 
The day was black as ebony 

When Christ was hanging on a tree. 

Grace, the whispering of hope 
Came unto Him, an angel spoke; 

Judas could not lift his head 
To him it seemed that hope had fled. 

He could have been in Paradise 
Seeing Love with his own eyes; 

To lift his head up from his hands 
Seemed too hard and Judas said, 

"There's nothing left for me." 

And he went out 
And hung himself . . . 

Upon an olive tree. 

This day in woods as dark as this 
Christ is betrayed by one false kiss; 

Christ speaks with love, longingly 
"To find peace, come unto Me." 

Hearts in dark despairing woods 
What worth is your silver goods? 

Would you give up the same as He 
Unto a dark Eternity? 

— Mary Ann Putman 



There is a scene and you are in it, 
Real as sunlight, golden, warm. 

We're beyond our minds' confusion; 
We are past our souls' storm. 

We are walking past blue heather, 

While the warm content 
That comes with Easter weather 

Teaches us what His Words meant. 

We've emerged from dream's illusion 

Coming to reality. 
You and I kneel near the One 

Who once kneeled in Gethsemane. 
— Mary Ann Putman 



TR 



n 



I walk the bitter stones of time 
Toward midnight's thunder 

I hold the ragged child of Faith 
Hate has torn asunder. 

I trudge mountains tall with fear 

Each crevasse branching 
From sharp overhanging cliffs 

Dark is avalanching. 

I grasp the shivering child of Faith 

The ground beneath us quaking- 
Love becomes a havened cave 
Hope's warm sunlight breaking. 

— Mary Ann Putman 



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Order From: CHURCH OF GOD PUBLISHING HOUSE, 922 Montgomery Avenue, Cleveland, Tennessee 

Pathway Book Store Pathway Book Store Pathway Book Store Pathway Book Store Pathway Book Store 

231 S. Church St. 75 S. Broadway Greenbrier Shopping Center 615 Market St. 1108 Florida Avenue 

Charlotte, N. C. Akron, Ohio Atlanta, Georgia 30044 Chattanooga, Tenn. Tampa, Florida 




.*jr 



WH© 




They announced today that God is dead. 

And quite with jubilation; 

Word went by teletype and air, 

Darting throughout the nation: 

God is dead! God is dead! 

Repeated in consternation, 

And some accepted it as true, 

And some with reservation. 

They announced today that God is dead. 

They hammered with bold gyration; 

No whispered awe, no lowered tone, 

No funeral notification. 

If these do not believe God is, 

Then why announce His cessation? 

And if they never believed He was. 

They foolishly disturbed the nation. 



— Grace Cash 




©ran 



Deep as silent oceans flow 

Tall as mountains white with snow. 
The height and depth of her years 

Are boundaried by love and tears. 

Mother's love goes heartache deep 

Sacrificing cherished sleep 
With hope she conquers growing fears 

Through the crosses of her years. 

For her child lost in woods unknown 
She climbs each mountain, turns each stone. 

Through midnight's blue unknown 

She tells her child, "You're not alone." 



-Mary Ann Putman 



Published iimnilih ;ii Ihe Clum-h nl Cud Publishing Hue. 
Cleveland. Tenn. All materials Intended for publication in The 
LIGHTED PATHWAY should be addressed to Ciyne W. Buxton, 
Editor. All inquiries concerning subscriptions should be addressed 
to Bookkeeping Department. Church of God Publishing House. 
Cleveland, Tennessee. 

ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER AT 
POST OFFICE, CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 
Postmaster send Form 3579 to LIGHTED PATHWAY. P. O. Box 
880. Cleveland. Tennessee 37311. 



LIGHTED 




DCDfCATED TO T>€ CHURCH OF 000 YOU 


■^ 


May, 1966 


Vol. 37, 


•Ao. 5 


CONTENTS 


Editorial 3 


Clyne W. Buxton 


Why Not Keep a Prayer 




Journal? 4 


Vaughn Taylor 


Motherhood: Land of 




Wonder — And 




Responsibility! 5 


Marjorie Clifton 


What The Cigarette 




Advertisements Do 




Not Tell 6 


L. C. Lemons 


How to Win Your Loved 




Ones to Christ 8 


Grace V. Watkins 


Winning By Witnessing 9 


Walter R. Pettitt 


Sharon's Declamation 




Speech 1 


Grace V. Schillinger 


The Troubled Heart 12 


Raymond John Flory 


Tasting or Feasting? 13 


Pauline Bone 


Breath of Life 14 


Grover Brinkman 


How to Listen to Your 




Pastor's Sermons 16 


William J. Krutza 


The Spirit of Life 18 


Lon Woodrum 


When It Is Bedtime 




In the Wild 20 


David Gunston 


The Floodlands of Neglect! 22 


Katherine Bevis 


West Columbia, S. C, 




Pioneers for Christ 23 


Arlene Spencer 


Young People's Endeavor 24 


Donald S. Aultman 


National Youth Week a 




Success in Tucson! 25 


Mrs. Robert L. Glenn 


The Hardworking 




Wright Brothers 26 


Alfred K. Allan 


Poetry 27 




Cover 


Luoma Photos 


STAFF 




Clyne W. Buxton 


Editor 


Lewis J. Willis 


Editor in Chief 


Chloe Stewart 


Artist 


Kathy Woodard 


Research 


H. Bernard Dixon 


Circulation Director 


E. C. Thomas 


Publisher 


CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 




Donald S. Aultman 


Paul F. Henson 


Margie M. Kelley 


Avis Swiger 


Denzell Teague 


Hoi 1 is L. Green 


FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS 




Bobbie May Lauster 


France 


Margaret Gaines 


Jordan 


L. E. Heil 


Japan 


Ruth Crawford 


Brazil 


Martha Ann Smith 


China 


NATIONAL YOUTH BOARD 




L. W. Mclntyre 


Thomas Grassano 


Cecil R. Guiles 


Haskel C. Jenkins 


Paul L. Walker 




SUBSCRIPTION RATE 




Single Subscription, 




per year 


$1.50 


Rolls of 15 


$1.50 


Single copy 


.15 



By Clyne W. Buxton 




I YEARN 

FOR YOUR CONVERSION 



I HAVE BEEN thinking a great deal about you 
lately. I know that you grew up in a Christian 
home and attended church regularly. I know 
that you have been surrounded by godliness, but have 
never experienced the joy, the contentment, and the 
assurance of sins forgiven. This disturbs me. You 
have been with, or near, Christians all your life, 
yet you have never been saved. You have had godly 
parents, who have trusted God, prayed, and possessed 
a glowing testimony. You have admired them, believed 
in them, and have known their experience was genuine. 

Yet, you have never known the joy of your own 
sins' being forgiven. You have not repented of sins 
committed years and years ago, and now they weigh 
heavily upon you. Some of your .relatives and friends 
have turned to Christ; in fact, they came home years 
ago. But you are still out in the cold. Farther and 
farther you have roamed, and year after year you 
have spurned the call of the Holy Spirit. Even while 
you read these words Christ is tugging at your heart, 
assuring you that He wants to be your Lord. 

Oh, how I yearn for your conversion. My heart 
literally throbs for % you to be saved. You have an 
idea of what you are missing, for at times your mind 
wants to have a God to pray to; your heart hungers 
for the peace and joy that only Christ can give; 
your soul reaches out for eternal life with the eternal 
God. You ought to turn to Jesus; you can turn to 
Christ now. Your shameful past and your sinful habits 
can be forgiven in a moment. You can simply tell 
God that you want to be saved, that you are sorry of 
all your sins, and that you want Christ to come into 



your heart. He never turns a deaf ear to such a re- 
quest. He will save you. 

Otherwise, you will die without Christ. Then we will 
take you to the church where good songs will be 
sung, and the preacher will say kind things about 
you. However, he will never say whether or not you 
ever knew Christ, and perhaps some people in the 
congregation will never know. But I will know. As we 
follow you to the cemetery, I will know that years 
ago in a revival meeting you refused Christ. I will 
know that down through the years the compassion- 
ate Saviour returned often to you, wanting to save you, 
but you would not listen. I will not tell them, but I 
will know that you never did possess the joy of salva- 
tion. While they lower you into the ground, I will 
remember that you stumbled through a whole lifetime 
in darkness, and I will walk away from the cemetery 
deeply saddened. 

Actually, you are near the parting of the way, and 
you will either turn to the Lord, claiming your un- 
merited salvation from Christ, or you will soon slip 
into eternity without Him. You see, your time is run- 
ning out. You will either turn to Christ, or soon 
you will pass on without ever having known Him, 
and this grieves me. It really disturbs me that you 
will have lived your life on earth, meeting all of its 
trials, its disappointments, and even its joys, without 
the comforting, abiding influence of Christ. You are 
too fine for this, and it just should not happen to 
you. Bow in prayer now and admit Christ into your 
heart. Then you will know the joy of salvation here 
and the bliss of Heaven throughout eternity. • 



By VAUGHN TAYLOR 





Not Keep a Prayer Journal? 



UR CHRISTIAN EXPERIENCES may become 
more interesting if we keep a prayer journal. 
/ When we come to a severe temptation or trial, 
sometimes it is easy to forget the many times that 
God has answered prayer for us. But by keeping a 
prayer journal, a Christian will be able to look back 
and read about the miraculous answers to prayer 
which he has received. This will strengthen his faith 
so that he can believe God for greater blessings. 

Christians of every age should keep a prayer journal. 
Children sometimes receive their requests from God 
right away because of their simple faith. Teen-agers 
will find that a prayer journal can make a great 
difference as to which path they may choose to take 
when they are faced with important decisions. If 
they will read about God's previous blessings, it will 
strengthen their faith and cause them to want to 
continue serving Him. Mothers and fathers many 
times share unusual experiences in receiving answers 
from God to problems that only married people face. 
A prayer journal will strengthen their relationship 
with God as they reread about the many times He 
has helped them and has answered their prayers. 

Some older persons need a boost in faith some- 
times, because they feel neglected. A prayer journal 
will help to turn their interests toward others. It is 
plain to see that a prayer journal can be a wonderful 



blessing and the best time to start one is right now. 

An ordinary diary purchased at the stationery coun- 
ter of a department store will serve very well for 
your prayer journal. Write down what you are praying 
about. Leave space opposite the request to write in the 
date that you received assurance in your heart that 
God had answered the prayer. Below each entry, 
leave a space to be filled in with the date and cir- 
cumstances of the final answer to your prayer. 

An entry in your prayer journal may resemble this: 
125P. May 18, 1965. Today God gave me the assurance 
in my heart for the salvation of my nephew, 
Mark. Praise the Lord! 
125A. April 20, 1966. The Lord is merciful, bless His 
name! Mark accepted the Lord as his Saviour to- 
night in revival services. It is so wonderful to 
know that God hears and answers prayer. 

Before long your prayer journal will begin to re- 
semble the book of The Acts of the Apostles. Just as 
the book of Acts proclaims many answers to prayer in 
the days of the apostles, so a prayer journal helps 
the Christian of today see that God has not changed 
and that He still hears and answers prayer. 

Many have received great blessings by keeping a 
prayer journal. Why not try this method yourself? 
After several years it will probably become one of your 
most valuable treasures. • 



MOTHERHOODS^ OF bonder- 



RESPONSIBILITY 



\JJ LUE EYES GAZE up at me, a tiny mouth 
rv\ twists into its first smile and my heart melts. 
il/ Something wonderful has happened, and I can 
not wait to share it with you! 

I am a mother! 

What is so extraordinary about that, you ask. Most 
women become mothers at one time or another in 
their lives. It is far from being a biological rarity. 
That is true. But this time it happened to me, and 
that makes it unique. 

The beautiful little girl that has become our daugh- 
ter has certainly changed our lives. What an awesome 
responsibility I have now. This little bundle of life 
depends entirely on me to keep the spark of life 
burning. As she grows, she will depend on me for 
other things, such as guiding her feet in the way they 
should walk, teaching her words that she should 
speak, and directing her mind into the channels of 
knowledge which will be most desirable for her. 

The character of this little life will be built upon 
the foundation which I help her to construct. I feel 
very humble that God has entrusted me with such a 
sacred task. There are many physical changes also. 
There will be no more peaceful nights for awhile 
that I will be able to sleep all night long, because of 
the two o'clock feedings. 

My full attention is never centered upon any one 
thing so much that my ears are not tuned to hear 
that first small cry when she awakens. Instead of 
that extra cup of coffee after breakfast, I now make 
up the formula. Instead of a relaxing chat on the 
telephone after lunch, I now wash diapers! I have to 
test my skill at burping her after giving her a bottle 
and at soothing a small aching tummy at midnight. 

These are only a few of the many changes I have 
made gladly. I accept them with profound thankfulness 
that I have been allowed the privilege of making 
them,. What other thing in this world could I hold 
in my possession that would bring this joy, this ex- 
citement, this humility, this sense of living at last? 

Many passages in the Bible mean so much more now. 
Any mention of parent and child I immediately 
apply to my own experience. I can feel in my heart 
the mortal pain that our heavenly Father must have 
felt, when He offered up His only begotten Son on the 
cross. How great His love must be for His earthly 
children that He should pay such a price for our 
salvation. 




By MARJORIE CLIFTON 



When a person becomes a parent for the first time, 
real values begin to come into view. Of what value is 
money? It would not buy a hair on her head. Of 
what value is riches? They have nothing to do with 
the smile in her eyes. Of what value are earthly 
possessions? These will not buy her eternal life. 

True, the price of parenthood is great: — in dollars 
and cents and in toil and tears. I have learned from 
my brief experiences that I have many problems 
before me. I pray that I may be worthy to meet them. 



What The 

Cigarette Advertisements 

Do Not Tell! 



IT ALL STARTED with cig- 
arettes!" was the plaintive 
cry I heard from this stranger 
on the hospital bed next to mine 
in a semiprivate room. For sev- 
eral days he had been suffering 
intense pain which no amount of 
medication could entirely alleviate. 
Now in the after-midnight hours 
several nurses were working over 
him trying to make him comfort- 
able. 

I learned that for five straight 
days a needle had been in his arm 
through which an expensive med- 
icine was being injected. All the 
while he was receiving oxygen 
through a tube in his nose. Having 
to be there and listen to him suf- 
fer was a disturbing experience. 
It would be mighty hard, I con- 
cluded, for any thinking person to 
hear and witness such a scene and 
ever light another cigarette. 

His pain-filled words, "It all 
started with cigarettes," kept 
haunting me. I thought of the more 
than three hundred million dol- 
lars spent annually to impress peo- 
ple, especially young people, with 
the "joys" of smoking. My mind 
visualized the television and mag- 
azine advertisements which picture 
a healthy, happy young man and 
a beautiful young lady skipping 
along lightly, pausing to light a 
cigarette and remark how won- 
derful this particular brand tastes. 
But of course, the advertisements 
would not dare show the delayed, 
tragic, and deadly painful effects 
of smoking, or few would buy their 
product. 

Forty-six thousand, nine hundred 
and seventy-three persons died of 



lung cancer in the United States in 
1963— an average of 129 deaths a 
day. This was nineteen times as 
many as the 2,500 deaths from lun 
cancer in 1930. And statistical 
studies indicate that ten 
times as many smokers 
as nonsmokers die 
of lung cancer. The 
heavy smoker is 
sixty-four times 
more likely to die 
of lung cancer than 
the nonsmoker. 
Yet, all we hear 
about it is when 
some nationally known 
personality dies. The 
average "little guy" 
suffers and dies in compara 
tive obscurity in scenes like I had 
witnessed which are being reenact- 
ed hourly in thousands of hospitals 
and homes all over the land. That 
is what the cigarette advertise- 
ments do not tell! 

We view with alarm the fatal- 
ities from automobiles on Ameri- 
can streets and highways which in 
1963 killed an average of eighty- 
one passengers and an additional 
thirty-eight pedestrians each day. 
But do we realize that the com- 
bined total is still ten less per day 
than the daily deaths from lung 
cancer? And in comparing these 
figures it is important to remember 
that nearly 100 percent of the pop- 
ulation will ride in a car or walk 
across a street during the year to 
help account for those 119 deaths 
per day, while less than 38 percent 
of the total population are smok- 
ers. 

At the time this is being writ- 
ten, total United States deaths to 




By L. C. LEMONS 

date in the war in Vietnam are 
less than three thousand. Lung 
cancer kills that many in only 
twenty-four days! 

The tobacco companies are work- 
ing desperately to discover new 
gimmicks, invent new and "better" 
filters, while if we would only read 
"between the lines," each effort is 
an admission of the harmful ef- 
fects of smoking. Vested interests 
now are spending vast sums of 
money trying to convince the public 
that air pollution from car ex- 
hausts, factories, chemical plants, 
and the like are the real cul- 
prits — and many will believe them. 



But whatever they come up with 
cannot change the facts, because 
smokers and nonsmokers alike 
breathe the polluted air, but only 
the smokers become the victims of 
cigarettes ten to one over the non- 
smokers. 

Later, when the miracle of med- 
icine and expert professional care 
had eased his pain, Walt told me 
his story. He had lived with the 
usual hacking cough common to 
smokers, but the first real warn- 
ing came when his vocal chords 
had to be scraped in an attempt 
to eliminate the smoke-seared ef- 
fects. At that time his doctor had 
said he should "let up" on smok- 
ing, which he interpreted to mean 
"smoke less." But when he re- 
turned for a checkup the doctor 
made it clear he had meant "stop 
smoking." 

His reluctance to give up such a 
pleasurable habit brought this 
sharp warning from the doctor, 
"All right, if you want to be stub- 
born about it, go ahead and smoke. 
Or you can put a gun to your head 
and pull the trigger. Either one 
will accomplish the same results." 

"That was enough for me," said 
Walt. "I threw my cigarettes in the 
doctor's waste basket and haven't 
smoked since." 

But it was too late! A malignancy 
already was at work in one lung, 
requiring its removal a year ago. 
When Walt left the hospital that 
time it was with the high hopes 
that he was done with the effects 
of smoking. But it was not that 
easy. Three times since then he has 
been back in the hospital with com- 
plications, a part of which I was 
witnessing. The "pleasures" of 
smoking long since have been 
stripped of their disguise and the 
real effects are being painfully felt 
in the life of this man. 

"Walt, when and why did you 
start smoking?" I asked him. 

"About the age of sixteen," he 
replied. "I did it to be like the rest 
— you know, 'a big shot.* That was 
ridiculous! I kept on smoking. No 
one enjoyed it more than I. How- 
ever, several years during Lent I 
did stop. I realized that I felt 



better and my food tasted better. 
But when someone offered me a 
cigarette after Lent, like a fool I 
would take it and was hooked 
again. It is really just a matter of 
nerves. You come to feel you must 
have something in your hand and 
something in your mouth. The 
easiest way is never to start!" 

"May I pass on your testimony 
as a warning to others, especially 
young people?" I asked Walt. "If it 
will help to keep even one person 
from having to go through what I 
have, it will be worth it," he re- 
plied. "I don't hesitate to tell peo- 
ple who smoke, 'Look at me! You 
don't enjoy smoking any more than 
I did. But if you want to be stub- 
born, go ahead. Maybe you'll live 
through it, maybe you won't!'" 

Even after I had returned home, 
the memories of his intense suffer- 
ing seemed like a nightmare. I 
looked up a January 1964 state- 
ment of the United States Surgeon 
General who had definitely con- 
cluded: "Cigarette smoking is cas- 
ually related to lung cancer in men. 
. . . The data for women, though 
less extensive, points in the same 
direction." The report went on to 
point out that the mortality rate 
of cigarette smokers over non- 
smokers is particularly high for 
bronchitis and emphysema, cancer 
of the larynx, oral cancer, cancer 
of the esophagus, and peptic ulcer. 

Smoking cigarettes was also cited 
as a factor in heart and circulatory 
diseases. The American Cancer So- 
ciety tells us the "death rates for 
cancer of the oral cavity, larynx, 
pharynx, and esophagus are five 
times as high for the cigarette 
smoker as for nonsmokers." 

While searching for further in- 
formation on the effects of smok- 
ing, other alarming facts came to 
light: 

1. Cigarette smokers who inhale 
retain in their lungs 90 percent of 
the tar and other substances con- 
tained in the smoke. There is no 
evidence that filters can or can- 
not prevent lung cancer. 

2. If taken in a single dose, sev- 
enty milligrams of nicotine, one of 
the most powerful of all poisons, 
is sufficient to kill an average per- 



son. For some brands known to 
contain 2.5 milligrams of nicotine 
per cigarette, the smoke from 28 
cigarettes taken at one time would 
form a lethal dose. But when 
smoked over a period of time, for- 
tunately the healthy body is able 
gradually to dispose of much of 
the poison. 

3. Cigarette smoke contains car- 
bon monoxide gas. This is the 
deadly odorless gas found in auto- 
mobile exhaust fumes which if in- 
haled direct would kill in ninety 
seconds! 

4. The linings of the bronchial 
tubes of most heavy cigarette 
smokers who died of causes other 
than cancer, closely resembles the 
linings of persons who died of lung 
cancer. Few, if any such cells are 
found in the bronchial tubes of 
nonsmokers. 

5. The American Public Health 
Association says that one million 
of today's school-age pupils are ex- 
pected to die of lung cancer be- 
fore they reach seventy! 

"It all started ivith cigarettes!" 
The supposed pleasures of smoking 
all seem like hollow mockery now 
to Walt who has endured such 
agonizing pain these past few 
years. And the end is not yet! 
Right now he still is fighting to be 
one of the 5 percent who survive 
lung cancer. In addition to his own 
suffering, one must not overlook 
the long hours of worry and anx- 
iety brought to his wife and loved 
ones by what he considered his own 
"personal pleasure." No one is an 
island unto himself. 

What are the symptoms of lung 
cancer? A persistent cough, short- 
ness of breath, a chronic tired 
feeling, blood in the sputum, a lin- 
gering infection of the lung or 
pain in the chest. However, by the 
time these appear the disease us- 
ually has progressed too far to be 
cured. 

But is it necessary for each of 
us to learn life's lessons the hard 
and painful way? Not if we heed 
the warnings coming to us from 
modern medical research and the 
counsel of men like Walt who al- 
ready have suffered much: "The 
easiest toay is never to start!" • 



HOW TO WIN YOUR 



LOVED 
ONES 



By GRACE V. WATKINS 

DO YOU HAVE a loved one 
who is an unbeliever? 
If your answer is Yes, per- 
haps winning that person to Jesus 
Christ is one of your deepest de- 
sires. But what can you do spe- 
cifically, you may ask. 

First, give careful thought to 
your attitude and approach. Just 
what is the overall winning ap- 
proach? Let us consider the car 
salesman. When he is talking with 
a prospective buyer, he gears his 
sales talk in such a way to show 
the customer that buying that par- 
ticular car will make his life 
happier and more successful. The 
salesman ties in the purchase of the 
car with the things the buyer 
wants most in life. 

An approach somewhat the same 
may be used when you try to win 
a loved one. As an illustration, let 
us say that your Uncle Jim, who 



lives in your home, has never re- 
ceived Jesus Christ. 

Are heavy arguments and verbal 
battles part of your program? They 
should not be. Toss them in the 
ash can, along with trying to make 
him feel ashamed, or by trying to 
make him feel "left out," or by 
showing with your remarks and at- 
titudes that you think he is a dark 
and benighted sinner! 

The car salesman shows admira- 
tion for the potential customer's 
good qualities and accomplish- 
ments. The same technique on your 
part will win Uncle Jim's increased 
affection. If you show sincere love 
and faith in his good qualities, and 
belief in his potential, he will warm 
to what you say on other subjects. 

Here are other specifics you can 
carry out, too: Daily, or many 
times a day, pray for Uncle Jim. 
Ask your Christian friends to do the 
same. Should you let Uncle Jim 
know that you pray for him? Yes. 
But it would probably be better not 
to tell him about the prayers of 
your friends. Ask them not to men- 
tion the project to anyone. People 
often resent the feeling of a 
group "ganging up on them." Even 
with your own prayers, they may 
be more effective if you do not 
make daily references to them in 
Uncle Jim's presence. 

Does Uncle Jim attend your fam- 
ily worship? If he does, fine. If 
he does not and will not, then be 
careful never to berate or use heavy 
pressure. If he will listen to your 
reading from the Bible, select pas- 
sages that glow with peace, joy, 
the love of God, and the victorious 
life — rather than those packed with 
doctrine or punishment. Does your 
own day-by-day living reflect 
peace, love, and joy? If it does, this 
is probably your greatest witness. 



If Uncle Jim should make sar- 
castic remarks about your faith, 
remain calm, polite, and kind. 
This can be a powerful witness at 
such times. 

The way you react to dark and 
trying experiences will also be a 
dynamic witness to him. Try to 
maintain a peaceful serenity and 
an unconquerable faith. If Uncle 
Jim sees these things apparent in 
your life, it will have a great in- 
fluence upon him. And a much 
greater one, if he sees this for him- 
self, rather than having you point 
it out to him. 

If you or your parents will en- 
tertain in your home once in 
awhile by inviting especially pleas- 
ant and friendly Christians, par- 
ticularly those in Uncle Jim's age 
bracket, this will be compelling. 
Heavy doses of talk about church 
may boomerang and be detected 
as "bait," but casual references 
are fine. If there are several Chris- 
tians in your community with the 
same hobby interest as Uncle 
Jim's, try to get him acquainted 
with them. Mutual interests are a 
good wedge. 

Place Christian books and mag- 
azines on the living room table. 
This can be very effective if it is 
not overdone. You may be able to 
find a book or an article about 
some outstanding man in the same 
professional field as Uncle Jim's. 

Perhaps your loved one, who is 
an unbeliever, does not live in your 
home; however, many of these 
techniques may be used by ad- 
justing them accordingly. 

Patience, appreciation, prayer, 
and the help of Christian friends 
have won hundreds of persons to 
Christ. They can win your loved 
one, too. • 



s 




What are Christians put into the world for except 
to do the impossible in the strength of God. — General 
S. C. Armstrong 





By WALTER R. PETTITT, 

Director, Evangelism and Home Missions 



BY WITNESSING 



MY HEART CONTINUES to rejoice in deep 
gratitude for the interest being shown in the 
pioneers for Christ efforts. It is my prayer 
and hope that the aim of the Evangelism Department 
will be realized in having a Pioneers for Christ Club 
in every church. 

Other countries are promoting the Pioneers for 
Christ. Ephraim Rivera, evangelism director of Puerto 
Rico, recently requested materials and tracts so that 
he could organize Pioneers for Christ Clubs among 
the churches in Puerto Rico. Antonino Bonilla, over- 
seer of Northwest Mexico, reported that several Pio- 
neers for Christ Clubs were active in his district and 
that he needed more materials so that instructions 
could be given to all of his churches. 

Furthermore, the work of the Pioneers for Christ 
moves forward in the United States. W. C. Lambert, 
evangelism director in North Carolina, informed me 
that over fifty Pioneers for Christ Clubs have been 
organized. He taught a personal witnessing course in 
every region of the state. Interest is high. Some pas- 
tors attribute the increased attendance and success- 
ful revivals to the activities of these witnessing 
groups. 

A report from the Parkway Church in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, revealed that because of their witnessing over 
one hundred persons have received Christ. They meet 
regularly to carry out the Great Commission. We 
have provided them with about ten thousand tracts. 
A young businessman from Cincinnati recently wrote 
to me requesting more information regarding the 
doctrine of the Church of God. He said that someone 



from the Parkway Church had witnessed to him and 
had left a tract for him to read. 

The Pioneers for Christ Club, although primarily a 
youth-centered endeavor, is not exclusively so. "Every 
member a witness" is our goal. Canton, Ohio, under 
the direction of David Horton. has an active witness- 
ing group of all ages. The Evangelism Department 
provides a Pioneers for Christ Packet for one dollar. 
Included in it are instructions on how to organize a 
Pioneers for Christ Club, and also there is a supply 
of tracts. Free tracts are available also for the future 
witnessing program. 

Clifford Mullins, pastor in Gary, Indiana, has a 
local Pioneers for Christ Club and also a district club. 
Their witness teams have witnessed faithfully and 
they have greatly assisted in organizing two churches 
and one mission. 

The New Testament Christians witnessed every- 
where until all Asia heard the message (Acts 2:46, 
5:42, 8:4, 19:10). Our Early Church fathers were wit- 
nesses of the Lord's saving power, sanctifying power, 
and healing power. They made no attempt to preach. 
But they shared this newfound joy with their friends 
and neighbors. When the Holy Ghost fell on them, 
they had an urgent desire to witness to others. 

So this method of evangelism is not something new. 
It is as old as the Church. Whether it is door-to- 
door witnessing, or on the street, or among friends, 
we must witness if we fulfill Christ's commission to 
"go ye therefore, and teach all nations . . . observe 
all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo 
I am with you alway" (Matthew 28:19, 20). • 



?*m/jF 



Shoron turned her face away. As she did so, her eyes 
met her mother's. The other women in the room 
were chatting and laughing, but her mother sat 
( <*4&M si l ent| y- There was not a trace of a smile on her face. 

1 73* 




ONLY ONE MORE week to 
practice for the declama- 
tion contest! "Are you ner- 
vous?" Sharon wanted to know. 

"A little," Lois admitted as she 
turned down the volume on the 
radio. "Just do our best . . . that's 
all we can do. Do you know yours?" 

"I ought to. I've practiced enough. 
I'll be glad when it's all over, 
though." 

"By the way, I wonder what the 
teacher meant when she said they 
would have something different at 
the parent-teachers' program. I 
wonder why she wanted all the 
girls in our class to come?" 

"I can't imagine. It will probably 



be some dull old speaker as usual." 
The girls were now at the school 
auditorium, and Sharon pulled the 
big door open. The room was be- 
ginning to fill with girls and their 
mothers who had come to attend 
the parent-teachers' meeting. 

After a short business meeting, 
one of the teachers announced, 
"We are going to do something a 
bit out of the ordinary tonight. 
Three ladies have said they will be 
judges for a contest that we've 
planned. If these three will please 
come forward, we will begin." 

Sharon watched the three wom- 
en go to the front and sit down 
at a little table. Then one of the 



women stood up and said, "We're 
going to have a reading contest to- 
night. We judges have picked out 
the selections to be read. We have 
in this hat all the names of the 
first-year junior high girls, and 
we're going to pick out six names. 
These students will leave the room, 
and then one at a time each will 
come back in to take his turn in 
the contest. The idea is to read the 
selection, which none of the con- 
testants know, with as much ex- 
pression as possible. We will award 
three prizes." 

"This is different!" Sharon whis- 
pered to Lois. "Isn't it exciting?" 
The judges called out four names. 



10 






By GRACE V. SCHILLINGER 



The fifth name was Lois' and the 
last was Sharon's. 

The six girls filed out into the 
hall. Lois was called in first to 
read. The girls out in the hall could 
not hear a word she said. The 
heavy door prevented any sound 
coming out to them. Then another 
girl was called in. 

Sharon's knees began to shake. 
Her mouth felt dry. "What if I 
can't say a word when I get out 
there?" she thought. "This is the 
way it will be next week at the 
declamation contest. I hope I'm not 
this nervous." 

The door opened and the lady 
judge said, "Sharon Stevens next." 

Quaking inwardly, Sharon 
walked to the front. A book was 
handed to her. "Read the passage 
that is marked, Sharon," the judge 
instructed. "I've got it marked 
where to begin and stop." 

Sharon glanced at the page. Why, 
the first paragraph was — No, it 
couldn't be! She fidgeted and 
looked at her mother sitting in the 
front row of seats. 

"You may begin now," the judge 
said kindly. 

Sharon looked at the page again. 
"What shall I do?" she thought. 



The selection marked for her to 
read was part of her declamation 
piece! She knew it by heart. She 
could say it in her sleep almost. 
Well, she might as well read it. 
There was nothing else to do. 

She lost her self-consciousness as 
she read. She put in all the ex- 
pression she had practiced during 
the past weeks. When the story was 
sad, she put in sadness. When it 
was gay, she put in laughter. When 
she finished, she smiled at the au- 
dience, handed the book to the 
judge, and took her seat. 

"The other girls won't have a 
chance," she thought to herself. 
"The prize is mine." Her heart felt 
like singing. Maybe the prize would 
be something she could give her 
mother for Mother's Day. Maybe it 
would be a lovely hanky or a pret- 
ty box of stationery. The three 
judges went out into the hall. 

"Wonder who'll get first," Lois 
whispered to Sharon. "Did you 
think the piece was hard to read?" 

"Well," Sharon said slowly, "not 
too hard." 

"At least it was fair," Lois add- 
ed. "We all had the same chance." 

Sharon turned her face away. 
As she did so, her eyes met her 



mother's. The other women in the 
room were chatting and laughing, 
but her mother sat silently. There 
was not a trace of a smile on her 
face. 

At that moment the judges came 
back, each smiling broadly. The 
speaker for the three said, "Third 
prize goes to Naomi Winters. Sec- 
ond prize goes to Lois Douglas. The 
speaker paused and looked straight 
at Sharon. The first prize wasn't 
hard to decide. First prize goes 
to . . ." 

Sharon sprang to her feet. 
"Stop!" she interrupted. "I know 
you're going to say my name, and 
it isn't fair. I don't deserve first 
prize ! " 

"My dear," the woman said, 
"what do you mean?" 

"That reading you gave me was 
part of my declamation piece. That 
is why I read it better than the 
others. I don't want the prize." 
Sharon sank down in her chair. 
She felt her face getting red— and 
hot. Above the awful ringing in 
her ears she heard the whisperings 
around the room. 

"The judges will retire to the hall 
for a moment," the speaker said. 

Sharon covered her face with 
her hands. 

Soon the judges were back. 
"We've changed things a bit," the 
speaker said with a smile. "The 
girl receiving second prize will get 
first. The one with third prize will 
get second. Sharon's prize will not 
be for reading the selection best, 
but it will be for her honesty." She 
handed Sharon a snow-white rib- 
bon. 

Later when Sharon was walking 
home with her mother, she burst 
out, "I'm so terribly ashamed!" 

"Never mind, dear," her mother 
said, "we all make mistakes. As 
long as you did tell them, you 
weren't cheating completely. Next 
time you'll know at first sight what 
is right to do. Anyway, I'm very 
proud of you." 

"Proud? How could you be?" 

"Yes, Sharon. I'm proud of your 
courage. Would you give me your 
white ribbon for a Mother's Day 
gift? I would like to keep it al- 
ways." • 



11 



The 
TROUBLED 

HEART 



By RAYMOND JOHN FLORY 



JACOB LISTENED intently as the Master spoke: 
"Which of these three, in your opinion, proved 
himself neighbor to him who fell among the 
robbers?" 

The lawyer, standing in front of Jacob, said, "He 
who took pity on him." 

The Master nodded. "Go and do as he did." 

Jacob frowned as he thought about his own selfish- 
ness. He had hoarded money throughout his life- 
time as an innkeeper. Now he was old and lived 
alone. His wife was dead; he had no children to keep 
him company. He wanted more than anything to ask 
the Master into his home for supper. It was so lonely 
eating all alone. All of his life he had hated the Jews, 
but the Master was different. He did not feel worthy 
to ask the Master to have supper with him. 

Jacob mounted his donkey and slowly proceeded to 
his small, but nicely furnished home. 

Upon his arrival, he put the donkey in the stable. 
His thoughts drifted back to the Master. Here was a 
man who was humble but strong, who spoke kindly 
but firmly. He truly was a man among men. Looking 
into His eyes was like gazing upon the face of God. 
The story of the Good Samaritan had beauty and 
truth. 

He realized that he had lived a relatively simple 
life — although he had accumulated vast sums of 
money. And he knew that someday when he was no 
longer on earth he would have to surrender his money. 
He would have to figure out a plan to see that his 
money was distributed to the poor when he was no 
longer alive. But that was not really the answer. If he 
wanted to be a true follower of the Master, he would 
have to act now. Tomorrow was not the time. It was 




today — right now! If only he had asked the Master to 
have supper with him — but lifelong hatred for Jews 
made him remorseful. Today, he had met the Master, 
only to see Him no more. 

Inside his home, he lit the fireplace. He prepared 
the broth and bread. Even with all his money, he 
thought, he could not buy back his wife. With all his 
money, he could not buy happiness. His wrinkled face 
wore a solemn expression. He wanted to cry, but there 
were no tears. 

There was a knock on the door. Slowly, he pushed 
back his chair and went to the door. When he opened 
it, to his astonishment, there stood the Master! 

"May I have some water for my donkey?" 

"Sure — sure you — you may. Jacob's heart raced. 

"I have a long journey ahead." 

"Please — please come in." 

"Thank you, my friend." 

No one had ever called him friend before. Jacob 
searched for the right words. "Would — would you be so 
kind as to have supper with me . . .?" 

The Master smiled and nodded slowly, his eyes 
searching Jacob's face. "Yes, thank you. I'll stay for 
supper." 

"Please — please be seated." He was smiling now as 
he went to the cupboard to get the dishes. 

Handing the cup and bowl to the Master, Jacob's 
thoughts went back to a night in Bethlehem where 
he had been an innkeeper. 

A young man had knocked on his door, asking for a 
room for his wife who was with child. He had refused 
them entrance. . . . 

"I — I have something to confess." 

The Master smiled. "I know, my friend — But let 
not your heart be troubled." • 



12 



BUTTER TASTERS" serve an 
important purpose for man- 
ufacturing companies. As 
the butter comes through a tube 
into the taster's mouth, he tastes 
it and passes it on to another tube 
that empties it into a waste con- 
tainer. But we can clearly see that 
manufacturers must have consu- 
mers — or those who feast on their 
product — if they are to conduct a 
successful, thriving business. 

The same principle applies to the 
church of the living God. The 
psalmist exclaimed, "O taste and 
see that the Lord is good." Another 
time he rejoiced: "How sweet are 
thy words unto my taste! yea, 
sweeter than honey to my mouth!" 
We can say a hearty Amen to the 
psalmist's testimony. But we must 
not be satisfied just to taste the 
good things of God. Peter advised 
his Christian brethren that if they 
had "tasted that the Lord is gra- 
cious," then they should desire the 
sincere milk of the word, that they 
might grow thereby. 

If we are to grow in the grace 
and knowledge of the Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ, we must have 
a continual feast on the Word of 
God. Those who feast on God's 
Word are able to withstand the 
storms of life and, in so doing, can 
help to win others to the kingdom 
of God. 

Notice Bible examples. Job, who 
lost all his material possessions and 
a family of ten children in one day, 
cried, "I have esteemed the words 
of his mouth more than my neces- 
sary food." For this reason, also, 
Job could stand the further test of 
his wife's scoffing. He could still 
retain his integrity after being af- 
flicted "with sore boils from the 
sole of his foot unto his crown." 

Jeremiah, the weeping prophet, 
who endured so many hard trials 
testified: "Thy words were found, 
and I did eat them; and thy word 
was unto me the joy and rejoicing 
of mine heart: for I am called 
by thy name, O Lord God of hosts" 
(Jeremiah 15:16). 

The Bereans received the com- 
mendation of being more noble 
than those in Thessalonica because 
they "received the word with all 



readiness of mind, and searched 
the scriptures daily" (Acts 17:11). 
As a result of their daily feast, 
many honorable men and women 
were won to a saving knowledge of 
the Lord Jesus Christ (verse 12). 
Because Jesus had feasted on 
God's holy Word, He was able to 
overcome all of Satan's temptations 
in the wilderness, declaring: "Man 
shall not live by bread alone, but 



By PAULINE BONE 



TASTING OR FEASTING 



by every word that proceedeth out 
of the mouth of God" (Matthew 
4:4). 

As long as I can remember, my 
Christian mother fed me on the 
Word of God. Although she did 
not come from a Christian back- 
ground, she got a taste of God's 
mercy and forgiveness. She was so 
delighted that her heart craved 
more and more of His spiritual 
blessings. As she feasted on God's 
Word daily, she nourished her 
family with the same spiritual food 
that satisfied her. That is why I 
love to feast on His Word today. 

We cannot survive as individual 
Christians if we do not feast on 
God's Word. Paul exhorted young 
Timothy: "Study to shew thyself 
approved unto God, a workman 
that needeth not to be ashamed, 
rightly dividing the word of truth" 
(2 Timothy 2:15). In other words, 
"Timothy, make God's Word your 
daily menu." Why? "All scripture 
is given by inspiration of God, and 
is profitable for doctrine, for re- 
proof, for correction, for instruc- 
tion in righteousness: That the 
man of God may be perfect, 
throughly furnished unto all good 
works" (2 Timothy 3:16, 17). Since 
this is true — if we are to be vic- 
torious Christians and if the church 
is to go forward to constant vic- 
tory — we must become more than 
mere tasters of the Word. One hour 
in Sunday school on Sunday morn- 
ing may be enough to taste the 
Word; but we need the Sunday 
morning and Sunday evening 
preaching services, the mid-week 




prayer services, the revival services, 
and the daily devotional services in 
our own homes to properly feast 
on God's Word. 

Tasting or feasting — which will it 
be? Defeat or victory depends on 
our answer. • 



V\ 



Breath of Life 





ONCE THE BATTERED jeep 
splashed through the ribbon 
of water covering the bed- 
rock of the ford, the narrow trail 
led upward, twisting and turning 
through the slash pines. The baby 
was quieter now — its eyes closed, 
its hands motionless under the 
wooly blanket. This was the quiet- 
est it had been since becoming ill 
after prayer service last evening. 
For a moment Myrna thought there 
might be some miraculous change 
for the better. Then noting the 
blue, deepening under its eyes, she 
realized that she was wrong. She 
turned off the motor, so she could 
better listen to the child's labored 
breathing. 

"O Lord, she's chokin' worse than 
ever!" she said, her voice tight. Her 
reference to the Deity was an en- 



treaty, not blasphemy, for Myrna 
served God, and knew He was all- 
powerful. Her work-roughened 
hands opened the blanket a bit 
more, despite the chill in the air. 
She sat there awkwardly with her 
big frame hunched over the tiny 
form. Myrna knew that some mo- 
mentous decision must be made 
immediately. 

"If Tody dies, I'm blamin' that 
doctor!" she mumbled, her young- 
old eyes never leaving the tiny face. 
"He was too busy to come out to the 
cove, his secretary said. Bosh! He 
was just scared that the brush 
might scratch his shiny new car! 
'Bring the baby in to the clinic, 
Mrs. Halliday,' the girl had said 
— as if it was as simple as that. 
Milt was gone, an' with drivin' 
forty miles in this beat-up jeep, 
and Tody being so sick — " 



By GROVER BRINKMAN 



She kept talking, as if each 
cyclonic word was a relief valve, 
draining off her built-up tension. 

"I told that girl 'bout my old 
Granny Beckett, what she did in 
an emergency like this. But she 
'lowed the baby might die, and iffen 
it did, I'd be held responsible." She 
paused, to wipe a bit of sputum 
off the purplish lips of the child. 
"Tody's growin' worse by the min- 
ute! She'll choke long 'fore I get to 
that clinic!" 

She hugged the baby to her 
bosom; her eyes were wild with 
sudden terror. "I reckon Granny 
Beckett's saved more kids in the 
hills than that new doctor. She 
didn't have no hospital — just a lot 
of faith in the Lord's mercy, an' 
a willow tube or a wild turkey 
feather. I seen her do it, an' I can 
do it, too, even to my own flesh 
and blood. But I've got to have 
someone to help me, an' this city 
doctor's got me all aflutter — " 

She turned the key, pressed the 
starter. But the hot motor failed 
to respond. Finally it coughed and 
died. She thought of the gas tank 
at last, pushed a reed down into 
the tank. It came up bone dry. 

Terror tightened her eyes now, 
beating at her sanity. 

She snatched up the baby and 
ran up the road on foot. The slash 
pines thinned out as she climbed. 
Above the next hairpin turn, she 
saw the blacktopped highway. 

"I've got to get help!" she told 
the emptiness — "Got to get help 
right now!" 

Old Sam Darby was cutting slash 
pine for the sawmill on the hill- 
slope to her left, but she disregarded 
him as a possible means of aid. 



14 



She waded through the ditch and 
out on the blacktop. 

But minutes later, with no sound 
of an approaching car or truck, 
she realized that this secondary 
roadway might be empty for min- 
utes to come. And little Tody would 
be past all mortal aid if she wait- 
ed much longer. 

She stood there — a pathetic fig- 
ure, young in years but with an 
earthy wisdom about her face that 
was undeniable. She looked up and 
down the empty roadway, her lips 
trembling. The baby started to 
whimper now and terror built up 
in her face, distending her eyes. 

She gave one more look at the 
roadway, searching its twisting ex- 
panse where it dropped down to 
the valley. Suddenly she seemed to 
make a decision. She ran back to 
the cutover hill and shouted at old 
Sam Darby. 

He was old. He was feeble. And 
his hands shook, as she well knew. 
But he was the only hope she 
had. 

"My baby's chokin' something 
awful!" Myrna told him. "Milt's 
away, and the jeep's out of gas. 
It's more'n forty miles to the hos- 
pital. You've got to help me, Sam!" 

There was a sudden desperation 
in his seamed face. 

"Myrna, what kin I do?" 

She looked at his hands, at the 
tremor in them, at his faded, 
rheumy eyes and work-bent frame. 

"You've got to hold Tody for me 
—to help me for just a few mo- 
ments — " 

He didn't answer at once. Per- 
haps he was even afraid to an- 
swer. 

"What're you gonna do, Myrna?" 

"I've watched my Granny Beck- 
ett several times, Sam. It's the only 
hope left — " 

"But my hands—" 

"Sam, Tody's dyin' right this 
minute! Are you gonna stand there 
an' not help me?" 

She pushed the blanketed baby 
into Sam's reluctant arms. 

Her eyes scanned the roadside, 
evidently seeking some familiar 
growth. Finally they focused and 
she ran down the slope where a 
tiny stream trickled. 



There was a skinning knife in 
her hand now, and she slashed 
quickly at the yellow willows that 
grew near the stream. 

She was rolling something in the 
palm of her hand, much as a child 
molds a mud pie, as she ap- 
proached old Sam. Finally she had 
the bark loosened on the pliable 
willow twig and she slipped it off, 
making a hollow tube about two 
inches long. She held up the tiny 
tube for inspection. It resembled 
an oversized soda straw — a hollow 
pencil of bark. Very carefully she 
trimmed both ends and then placed 
it between her lips. She pulled air 
through it and was apparently sat- 
isfied with her handiwork. 

"Sam, we'll make a bed on this 
flat sandstone right here — " 

"Myrna, look at my hands!" 

He wiped his sweating forehead 
on the sleeve of his flannel shirt. 

"Myrna — " 

She peeled off her jacket and 
spread it on the flat rock. Taking 
the baby from Sam's arms, she laid 
it gently on the improvised bed. 
Then she unbuttoned its clothing. 

"Sam, you've got to hold Tody's 
head — hold her rock still!" 

"I can't do it — " 

"Sam, if you don't — if the baby 
dies — " She left the sentence hang- 
ing in mid-air. 

He was desperate now, protesting. 

"Myrna, even if I hold her rock- 
still, how do you know — " 

"I don't!" she said through tight 
lips. "I'm only hopin' and prayin'. 
It's the last thing I can do. You'd 
better pray, too. Another minute or 
two and she'll be gone — " 

The color of the baby's face was 
darkening; the wheeze of its la- 
bored breathing was more pro- 
nounced than ever. 

Her eyes sought old Sam's now. 
The entreaty in them was the des- 
perate plea of a distracted mother 
making one last desperate effort 
to save the little life which only 
a few months before she had giv- 
en birth. 

"You hold her hands, Sam, like 
this! And her head with the other 
hand! She must not move, Sam — 
not a quiver!" 



A tremor shook his lanky form, 
as if he had a sudden chill. 

"I'll hold her still — or die," he 
said. 

Myrna nodded, clamping her lips. 
From a pocket she produced a 
clean handkerchief and laid it on 
the baby's chest. She placed the 
willow tube between her own lips 
and moistened it with saliva. 

She said something indistinctly, 
perhaps a prayer. Then her hands 
worked fast — 

Old Sam clamped his teeth hard 
and closed his rheumy eyes. He 
was not a praying man, but at that 
instant he prayed. 

The woman sighed at last and 
winked back the tears. Her hands 
were still busy; her lips were a 
tight, stern line in her oval face. 

When old Sam looked up, he saw 
the willow tube. One end was pro- 
truding from the baby's throat. He 
heard its sudden long, shuddering 
breathing as its starved lungs in- 
haled life-giving oxygen. 

Myrna rebuttoned its clothes and 
pulled up the wooly blanket, be- 
ing careful not to disturb the wil- 
low tube. She glanced at old Sam's 
leathery face. It was strangely pale 
and drawn. But his eyes were bright 
in admiration. 

"Thanks, Sam!" she said. "I'll 

Please turn to page 24 




\ 



She held up the tiny tube 
for inspection. It resembled an over- 
sized soda straw — a hollow pencil 
of bark. 



15 




By WILLIAM J. KRUTZA 



HOW 

TO LISTEN 

TO YOUR 
PASTOR'S SERMON 



EVERY PREACHER masters a 
special technique for present- 
ing pulpit utterances. Mr. 
Peter Pew-Sitter has to recognize 
these techniques whenever a new 
pastor comes to his church. If 
Peter fails to grasp the pastor's 
technique, he will probably miss the 
punch line of most sermons. 

A few basic principles will help 
you get the central theme of every 
sermon you hear, both from your 
pastor and from special occasion 
speakers. These principles can be 
applied to every prepared speech 
you hear. 

But before we spell out principles 
on how to listen to a sermon, let 
us see how not to listen to a ser- 
mon. Picayunish Pew-Sitter notices 
every mistake of grammar, every 
mispronounced syllable. She listens 
for every possible mistake. Others 
listen for pastoral pet phrases. 
They only hear the number of pas- 
toral cliches he injects weekly. 
Others listen for illustrations — an 
illustration being like a window to 
allow light to brighten up a sub- 
ject. 

But these illustration-listeners 
fail to realize that a building can- 
not be made 100 percent of glass. 
Gazer Pew-Sitter looks upon the 
preacher's gestures, trying to ana- 



lyze his hand and arm movements. 
He goes away frustrated. 

Back to basics. All sermons have 
some type of an introduction. Of- 
ten this is presented in illustrative 
form to get your attention. Do not 
get lost in the imaginative details 
of an introduction. Watch for the 
transition from the attention-get- 
ter into the theme and then into 
the body of the sermon. Occasion- 
ally, the preacher will give his 
theme in the early moments of his 
sermon. Watch for it: it's the 
punch line that you cannot afford 
to miss. 

Probably the most important part 
of the sermon is its central theme. 
This, even more than the title, tells 
what your pastor is preaching. It 
is the central truth he aims to im- 
part to not only the Pew-Sitters but 
even to the Pew-Sleepers. Quite of- 
ten it comes as the punch line 
toward the end of the introduc- 
tion. Some preachers will restate 
their themes so the Pew-Sitters get 
the point. 

Watch for transitional words, 
phrases, and sentences. These con- 
nect the thoughts of the sermon 
and lead you into the development 
of them. Watch for phrases such 
as reasons lohy, times when, places 
where, suggestions or methods how, 
ways in which. 



Get the points. These often ap- 
pear as the skeleton of a sermon. 
Some pastors over-emphasize the 
outline in order for you to get the 
points. And this may become a bit 
boring. Of course, in a more staid 
teaching situation, where the pre- 
sentation is more a lecture than a 
sermon, the speaker will probably 
emphasize the outline on purpose. 
A handy notebook and pencil are 
helpful to retain the points of the 
sermon. Some people even make 
notes in the margins of their Bi- 
bles next to the text under con- 
sideration. You can purchase a 
wide margin Bible for this purpose. 

Evaluate the illustrations 
supporting evidence. Notice what 
support your pastor gives to his 
arguments in favor of or against 
each point he makes. Remember 
always that illustrations — picto- 
rial expressions to portray truth — 
are not the truth itself; they only 
illuminate, amplify, or clarify 
truth. Vivid illustrations may ad- 
here in your mind, but make sure 
you remember what they illustrate. 
Evaluation of supporting evidence 
is equally important. Take note 
whom your pastor is quoting, where 
he gets his support. This will help 
you as you rethink the sermon at 
the dinner table on Tuesday or 
Thursday evening. 



16 



Check the conclusion. Why is my 
pastor preaching this sermon? De- 
termine this for yourself. The why 
might be different for you than it is 
for the person next to you. The 
conclusion usually contains some 
challenge: Here is something to do 
about what I have preached. Of- 
ten, it is an open invitation to pro- 
cure or administer what has been 
preached. Sometimes, in the case 
of a Bible-study sermon, the con- 
clusion will be a restatement of the 
theme or of the doctrine. 

Now you have received some of 
the basic principles whereby you 
can analyze sermons in order to 
gain an intellectual grasp of what 
is said. This is beneficial in the de- 
velopment of your spiritual per- 
sonality. 

But there is another way to lis- 
ten to a sermon. It runs concur- 
rent with all that has been said, 
and is probably more important to 
your spiritual development. Unless 
you listen with your heart, what 
your head gains will be somewhat 
useless or even spiritually deaden- 
ing. Of every sermon you must ask, 
"What does this mean to me?" You 
must listen with a soul intent on 
reacting positively to the truth. 

Your pastor might not specifical- 
ly state the above question. It was 
in his soul the first time the theme 
entered his mind. This is why he 
preaches. He, in behalf of Christ, 
is hoping for your positive ac- 
ceptance of truth and your definite 
commitment to the Christ about 
whom he earnestly and diligently 
preaches. 

Lest you overwork this question 
by asking it too many times 
throughout the sermon, save it for 
the last. Sometimes it would be 
dangerous to apply it to the open- 
ing illustration. 

Whisper this prayer before your 
pastor begins: "O God, open my 
eyes to see, my ears to hear, my 
mind to comprehend, and my heart 
to apply." Thus, you will know how 
to listen to a sermon. You will be 
able to say, "That was a good ser- 
mon," because it did something 
for you personally. • 






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i 




By LON WOODRUM 



T 

HE DIVINE SPIRIT, which 
fired the primitive believ- 
ers into action and sus- 
tained them in their hard march 
over the world, brought down one 
of the church's mightiest enemies 
— Paul of Tarsus. And he, engirded 
by the same Spirit, became such 
a champion for the church that 
literally hundreds of volumes have 
been written about him. 

Paul emphasized the work of the 
Spirit as few men ever have. In 
one chapter of a letter to Christians 
at Rome, he catalogs many of the 
operations of the Spirit in human 
personality. It is something of an 
adventure to mark the major roles 



of the Spirit in the eighth chap- 
ter of Romans. 

First, there is the Spirit of libera- 
tion. "The law of the Spirit of life 
. . . hath made me free from the 
law of sin and death" (Romans 
8:2). 

The apostle had struggled long 
and hard with the law. In the Ro- 
man letter he refers to the law 
sixty-eight times. He underscores 
the futility of the law to change a 
man. "The Law can produce no 
promise, only the threat of wrath 
to come" (Romans 4:15, Phillips). 
The law saved no one; it could op- 
erate only after it had been violat- 
ed. The law demanded so much and 



offered no help at all. Yet, it kept 
hammering away at the guilty soul. 
And the man involved in trying to 
keep the law, apart from God's 
grace and Spirit, became a hope- 
less legalist. Legalism was the ul- 
timate maladjustment. "O wretch- 
ed man that I am! who shall de- 
liver me from the body of this 
death?" (Romans 7:24). 

But Paul found a way out of his 
agonizing predicament. "I thank 
God through Jesus Christ our Lord 
. . . There is therefore now no con- 
demnation to them which are in 
Christ Jesus. . . . For the law of the 
Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath 
made me free from the law of sin 
and death" (Romans 7:25-8:2 1 . 

But the legal freedom from the 
position of an imprisoned alien is 
not enough! Paul discovers also the 
Spirit of endorsement. Not only is 
the outlaw pardoned; he is adopted 
by a King! "The Spirit itself bear- 
eth witness with our spirit, that 
we are the children of God" (Ro- 
mans 8:16). 

Paul expresses the same idea to 
the Galatians. "It is because you 
really are his sons that God has 
sent the Spirit of his Son into your 
hearts to cry, 'Father, dear Fa- 
ther!' You, my brother, are not a 
servant any longer; you are a 
son" (Galatians 4:6, Phillips). 

How vastly different is a ser- 
vant from a son! The son has a 
name to protect, an heritage to 
honor, a discipline to maintain! 
Some have criticized believers for 
singing the gospel song, "I'm a 
Child of the King," saying it makes 
the singers appear egotistic; but it 
is rather difficult for one to be 
aware of his sonship with the Al- 
mighty without feeling a bit jubi- 
lant! 

Further, once we have been 
adopted into the heavenly family, 
we have the Spirit of guidance. 
We have a tutor. "As many as are 
led by the Spirit of God, they are 
the sons of God" (Romans 8:14). 

The Acts of the Apostles tells of 
an Ethiopian official sitting on a 
coach seat reading from Isaiah; 
and, approaching him, an evange- 



18 



list asked if he knew what he was 
reading. The official replied, "How 
can I possibly understand it . . . 
unless someone puts me on the 
right track?" (Romans 8:31, Mof- 
fatt). We can be grateful that even 
in such a frustrated and con- 
fused world as ours, there is Some- 
one to put us on the right track. 
The Spirit of God can show us the 
way, for He always knows the way. 
Except for Him, who can keep us 
from going astray in a disturbed 
time like ours? 

But the believer, pardoned, 
adopted, and tutored through the 
Spirit, has a further need: the 
Spirit of Mortification. "If ye live 
after the flesh, ye shall die; but 
if ye through the Spirit do mortify 
the deeds of the body, ye shall live" 
(Romans 8:13). 

Even though we are no longer 
condemned by a violated law and 
are God's children, guided by His 
Spirit, still we need special help to 
be what we should be. Paul writes 
often of the sarx, the flesh, the 
deadly enemy that may trouble be- 
lievers. This is an enemy that we 
cannot manage alone. The control 
of our fallen nature requires more 
power than we possess. Only the 
Spirit can execute these foes with- 
in and give us victory. 

Again, we possess the Spirit of 
communication. "The Spirit ... it- 
self maketh intercession for us with 
groanings which cannot be ut- 
tered" (Romans 8:26). Living Let- 
ters paraphrases this message 
thus: "The Holy Spirit helps us 
with our daily problems and in our 
praying. For we don't even know 
what we should pray for, nor how 
to pray as we should; but the Holy 
Spirit prays for us with such feel- 
ing that it cannot be expressed in 
words. And the Father Who knows 
all hearts knows of course what the 
Spirit is saying as He pleads for us 
in harmony with God's own will" 
(Romans 8:26, 27). 

Our prayers need not be literary. 
When we run out of words, when 
we scarcely know what it is that 
we really need, the Spirit, praying 
in a "language beyond language," 
takes our case before God. He al- 
ways prays according to God's 



will, and God answers according 
to our actual needs. He knows the 
heart and how it is ever over- 
burdened with its secrets. 

Finally, the Spirit that indwells 
the believer is the Spirit of Im- 
mortality. "We who have a fore- 
taste of the Spirit are in a state of 
painful tension, while we wait for 
the redemption of our bodies which 
will mean that at last we have 
realized our full sonship in him 
... let us remember that hope 
always means waiting for some- 
thing that we haven't yet got. . . . 
The Spirit of God not only main- 
tains this type within us, but helps 
us in our present limitations" (Ro- 
mans 8:19-26, Phillips). 

Immortality, to a Spirit-filled be- 
liever, is not just a doctrine; it is 
hope kept alive in him by the Spir- 
it of life. It is no idle song we sing 
when we sing of a "foretaste of 
glory divine." The fact of eternal 
life has been made real to us by 
the forever-living Spirit of God. As 
mortals, we carry our immortality 
with us! Nor is ours the old Greek 
idea of a general "immortality"; 
our hope is based on Christ's Res- 
urrection from the grave. Be- 
cause He lives we shall live also. 

And we know the Spirit's work 
will not be finished in us when we 
breathe our last breath. He who 
brought Christ triumphantly from 
the tomb has also pledged to 
"quicken your mortal bodies by his 
Spirit that dwelleth in you" (Ro- 
mans 8:11). In the end the whole 
of created life will be rescued from 
the tyranny of change and decay 
and will have its share in that 
magnificent liberty which can on- 
ly belong to the children of God. 

"Ye are ... in the Spirit," says 
Paul, "if so be that the Spirit of 
God dwell in you" (Romans 8:9). 
This is the Spirit that liberates us 
from a condemning law, adopts us 
into the family of God, gives us 
spiritual guidance in life, mortifies 
our inner enemies, communicates 
in prayer, and gives us a foretaste 
of future glory. 

All who are outside the Spirit 
are dead. In Him we share the 
eternal aliveness of God, for He is 
the Spirit of life. • 



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19 



WHEN IT 
IS BEDTIME 



THE WILD 



By DAVID GUNSTON 




GOD MADE ALL creation, 
including domesticated ani- 
mals and those of the forest. 
How the all-wise God places the 
instinctive desire in these crea- 
tures to secure required rest for 
their bodies is an interesting study 
indeed. Sleeping habits among wild 
creatures vary far more than those 
of human beings. There may be a 
few eccentric folk who sleep in 
queer positions and in queer places, 



but very few of them have to 
sleep standing upright. 

Yet, that is what many birds do. 
Small perching birds roosting at 
night in trees and bushes have 
their claws automatically locked by 
a reflex action as they clasp a 
perch. This prevents the bird from 
falling off its roost when it is 
asleep. 

Orangutans have the same device 
which prevents them from falling 
out of their tree-top nests as they 
sleep; they cling to a strong branch 
with one or more hands. Australian 
frogmouths sleep so soundly that 
you can pick them up and put 
them down again on their nightly 
perch without waking them. 

On the other hand, some birds, 
particularly geese and waders, sel- 
dom go into a deep sleep at all. 
They are restless all night and at 
the first suspicion of danger will 
start flying around. Gulls and 
plover are also very light sleepers 
and frequently wake at night to 
fly around and call at intervals. 

Sometimes gulls sleep on the wa- 
ter, as do ducks, swans and alba- 
trosses. Such birds are of course 
endowed by God with waterproof 
plumage which keeps them dry, al- 
though they may sleep soundly on 
the waves. 

Whales are said to be the only 
animals which get along with lit- 
tle or no real sleep. We cannot be 
sure of this since whales have nev- 
er been fully studied, but small 
specimens kept in very large 
aquariums have been observed to 
swim around constantly all the 
hours of the clock, while whales at 
sea are known to be active by night 
and day. It has been suggested that 
whales must keep on the move to 
keep their bodies warm in the icy 
seas where they live. Even so, it 
seems strange that they can exist 
without ever completely resting. 

There are many ways of keeping 
warm at night in the wild. A bird 
will puff out its feathers to pre- 
vent its natural heat from escaping. 
Small animals will curl right up 
around themselves. Wild swine will 
sleep in a circle — all touching one 
another, with their heads inward. 



Gorillas make a deep warm bed of 
mosses, sticks, and leaves. Although 
birds seldom make much of a bed, 
certain species like tits and wrens 
do crowd together a dozen or more 
at a time in disused nests in the 
winter, ostensibly to keep warm. 

Even ants smooth down a small 
surface to sleep on. Their night's 
rest lasts for about three hours; 
after which they get up, literally 
stretch themselves, and perform a 
slow opening of the jaws, which 
must be the nearest thing to a 
yawn in the insect world. Many 
animals perform thus on waking: 
watch a cat stretch its muscles after 
a nap. Farmers know that a cow 
is ailing if it rises from rest or 
sleep wearily without stretching it- 
self. 

Solitary insects like wasps and 
butterflies choose warm snug 
places in which to sleep, perhaps 
in holes in trees, in walls, or in 
flowers. Elephants like to sleep on 
a mound which makes it easier for 
them to rise in the morning. Some- 
times an elephant will sleep stand- 
ing up— like horses do on occasion. 
Elephants, dogs, cats, apes, horses 
and many other mammals obvious- 
ly dream and have nightmares. 
Elephants may bellow and trumpet 
in anguish during such a dream. 

Many birds roost in trees — but 
some prefer the ground, facing the 
wind and occasionally choosing ex- 
posed sites in an open field. Most 
mammals go to some kind of shel- 
ter, but hares sleep above ground 
on the grass with no overhead cov- 
ering at all. 

Birds like geese, gulls, and starl- 
ings may travel many miles each 
evening to pack in their thousands 
in favorite roosting spots, especial- 
ly in winter. Plantations, reed- 
beds, mud flats and sandbanks are 
popular sleeping sites. But starlings 
in their noisy thousands often con- 
gregate on buildings in towns in 
large numbers to roose on stone- 
work and roofs. 

The various sleeping habits 
among wild creatures provide in- 
teresting and informative reading 
material. How great is God's pro- 
tective care for that which He has 
created! • 



20 



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PAYS »100 WEEKLY... 

even for life to Non-drinkers and Non-Smokers ! 

At last — a new kind of hospitalization plan for you thousands who realize drinking and 
smoking are harmful. Rates are fantastically low because "poor risk" drinkers and smok- 
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nation, no waiting period. Only you can cancel your policy. No salesman will ever call. 
Starting the first day you enter any hospital, you will be paid $14.28 a day. 



You do not smoke or drink — 

so why pay premiums for 

those who do? 

Every day in your newspaper you see 
more evidence that drinking and smoking 
shorten life. They're now one of America's 
leading health problems — a prime cause 
of the high premium rates most hospitali- 
zation policies charge. 

Our rates are based on your 
superior health, 

as a non-drinker and non-smoker. The 
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And only you can cancel your policy. We 
cannot. 

READ YOUR AMERICAN 
TEMPERANCE PLAN BENEFITS 

1. You receive $100 cash weekly— 
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except pregnancy, any act of war or mili- 
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Actually, no other is like ours. But com- 
pare rates. See what you save. 



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hospitals. So get your protection now. 



MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

Read over your policy carefully. Ask your min- 
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days and we will immediately refund your en- 
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gain thousands of dollars .. .you risk nothing. 



IMPORTANT: include your first premium with application. 

LOOK AT THESE 
AMERICAN TEMPERANCE LOW RATES 

Pay Monthly Pay Yearly 


swi | $ 3 80 | $ 38 


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TEAR OUT AND MAIL TODAY BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE 



Application to Buckingham Life Insurance Company 

Executive Offices, Liberty ville, Illinois at.ioo 

AMERICAN TEMPERANCE HOSPITALIZATION POLICY 

Name (PLEASE PRINT) 

Street or RD » city 

County state Zip 

Age Date of Birth. . 



Occupation Height Weight 

Beneficiary Relationship 

I also apply for coverage for the members of my family listed below: 

NAME AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT BENEFICIARY BIRTH DATE 



_4. 

To the best of your knowledge and belief, are you and all members listed above in good health 
and free from any physical impairment, or disease? Yes □ No Q 
To the best of your knowledge, have you or any member above listed had medical advice or 
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Yes □ No n I' so, please give details stating person affected, cause, date, name and address 
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Neither I nor any person listed above uses tobacco or alcoholic beverages, and I hereby apply 
for a policy based on the understanding that the policy does not cover conditions originating 
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written answers to the above questions. 
Date : Signed : X 

ATIAT 

Mail this application with your firtt premium to 5613 

CAN TEMPERANCE ASSOCIATES, Inc., Box 131, Libertyville, 



By KATHERINE BEVIS 




THE FLOODLANDS 

OF 

NEGLECT ! 



WIRLING AND ROARING, the gray waters of 
■ Canada's Humber River moved downstream, 

™" urged on by heavy rains. Along the flats, rows 
of houses lurched from their foundations and ca- 
reened down the river. 

Later, when the waters had receded, the bewildered 
refugees walked back and stood where their homes 
had once rested. Unable to comprehend the tragedy, 
they began to rebuild, carrying wood and stone down 
from higher ground. Civic leaders protested in vain. 

Finally, in the absence of the law, the authorities 
ruled that the flats belonged to the river, and al- 
though there might not be a flood for years, the river 
could "reclaim" its property at any time. 

How like so many lives! Lives that are being built 
in the same sordid areas where a million previous 
lives have perished! 

Like this flat river area, there is a territory where 
lives instead of homes are careening in swift destruc- 
tion. These lives built on the devil's territory are being 
swept from their foundation. He can bring this de- 
struction down on them whenever he chooses. 

Paul tells us in Hebrews 2:2, 3, "For if the word 
spoken by angels was steadfast, and every trans- 
gression and disobedience received a just recompense 
of reward; How shall we escape, if we neglect so 
great salvation; which at the first began to be spoken 
by the Lord, and was confirmed unto us by them 
that heard him . . .?" 

These are challenging words! 

Notice that Paul uses the word neglect not reject. 
He was speaking to people who were Christians, but 
who had been neglectful. 

Webster defines the word neglect thus, "To treat 
with little or no attention or respect: to consider or 
deal with as of little or no consequence; to fail to 
attend to with due care or attention; to slight, dis- 
regard, or treat with indifference, as to treat a guest 
with neglect." 

As Christians, how guilty are we of neglect? 

Let us take our everyday lives for example. How 
many of us neglect those things upon which our 



lives and character are built: prayer, Bible reading, 
and meditation. 

Neglect is a common fault of human beings. Often 
it is labeled "procrastination." How easy it is to put off 
doing things which at the moment do not seem urgent. 
The small, everyday happenings demand our time and 
energy so much that we "neglect" to consider the 
thing which is most important to our lives — our eter- 
nity! 

If we could only catch a glimpse of eternity and 
what it means to us we would more likely consider 
our soul's condition. We treat with indifference and 
take for granted the privileges that are ours— pray- 
ing, reading God's Word, attending church. We may 
neglect making an eternal decision for God until we 
face death, but we will not die without making some 
decision. 

The story is told of Charles H. Spurgeon, the famous 
London preacher, who was walking along the street 
and heard a young robust workman swearing. 

As he approached the workman, Spurgeon asked, 
"Can you pray as well as you swear?" 

The young man laughed with a superior air, de- 
claring that he never indulged in anything so useless. 

"Well, I'll give you this," said Mr. Spurgeon, offering 
him a coin, "if you will promise me never to pray." 

The young man pocketed the coin with a chuckle. 
By and by, however, as the day wore on he felt uneasy. 
Never to pray! Never! Maybe he would want to pray 
someday. Maybe he had sold something very precious. 

When he returned home in the evening, he told his 
wife about the incident. She was horrified. 

"We don't pray now," she said, "but some day we 
may need to pray." 

The couple made inquiries and learned who it was 
that had given them the coin. Mr. Spurgeon was 
able to lead them both to Christ. 

"How shall we escape if we neglect so great salva- 
tion?" How? We shall not escape. The path of neglect 
is broad. There are many traveling on it. They are 
building their lives upon the devil's territory. • 



22 



WEST COLUMBIA 



PIONEERS 
FOR CHRIST 



"But ye shall receive power, after 
that the Holy Ghost is come up- 
on you: and ye shall be witnesses 
unto me both in Jerusalem, and in 
all Judaea, and in Samaria, and 
unto the uttermost part of the 
earth" (Acts 1:8). 

It is true that we can never 
force men and women to accept 
salvation. But, we, as Spirit-filled 
Christians armed with the Word of 
God, are not powerless. Conse- 
crated young people, who pray ear- 
nestly, go in sincerity, and believe 
God for guidance, will always have 
the Holy Spirit by their side. 

Approximately three months ago, 
under the direction of our Young 
Peoples Endeavor President, Anna- 
belle Breedlove, the young people 
of the church organized a Pioneers 
for Christ Club which meets on 
Wednesday night during the reg- 
ular prayer service. 

James E. Carter has taught 
courses on various topics, such as 
the Bible, church teachings, and 
career preparations. 

Quizzes on each topic have been 
given so that the students will have 
a more thorough understanding of 
the material. The young people, in 
turn, learn to respond and discuss 
freely each topic or item as it is 
taught each week. 

Once a month the Pioneers for 
Christ Club visits the South Car- 
olina State Industrial School for 
Girls. The club has had and is 
still having a tremendous outpour- 
ing of God's blessings upon their 
efforts as they witness to these girls. 

Thus far, twenty-one girls have 
come to know the Lord. Each girl 
seems to be deeply moved by God's 
Spirit every time a service is held. 
The girls of the school now have 
access to the Lighted Pathioay 
each month — another effort of the 
club to help the girls to go on 
with the Lord. 



We know that if it was not for 
God's guidance, we would have no 
success in witnessing for Him. 

Under the supervision of the 
Young Peoples Endeavor president 
and teacher, we have been able to 
witness from door to door, and to 
give out tracts, Evangels, and 
Lighted Pathways. Visits have been 
made to the Veteran's Hospital 
where literature has been dis- 
tributed. 

Recently we visited a church 
member who is now shut-in. Our 
service with her was simple as far 
as arrangement and programming 
is concerned. But as the young 
people sang "Amazing Grace" and 
"I Feel Like Traveling On" the 
Lord blessed. Our shut-in member. 
Granny Birchmore, is now ninety- 
four years old and is very ill. As 
the Lord blessed her, she clapped 
her hands and praised the Lord. 
The Holy Spirit was very evident 
in the service. 

The Pioneers for Christ Club at 
the West Columbia Church of God 
may be small in number, but we 
want to go on for Christ and wit- 
ness and win many more souls for 
Him. Our faith is in God and we 
cannot fail. "Ask, and it shall be 
given you; seek, and ye shall find; 
knock, and it shall be opened unto 
you: for every one that asketh re- 
ceive th; and he that seeketh find- 
eth; and to him that knocketh it 
shall be opened" (Matthew 7:7, 8). 

Faith and complete commitment 
to God in the lives of Pioneers for 
Christ Club members will inspire 
others to make the same kind of 
dedication. There is a feeling of 
satisfaction and joy in the heart 
of one who is being used and led 
by the Holy Spirit to declare the 
gospel of Christ. We are saved to 
serve. • 

— Arlene Spencer, Reporter 




MRS. RUTH UNDERWOOD 

Mrs. Ruth Underwood of Rock 
Hill, South Carolina, is a young 
lady of the Church of God who 
has done well in the business world. 
The staff of the Lighted Pathioay 
is pleased to feature her in this 
column. 

Recently Ruth was presented the 
Outstanding Graduate Award by 
The College of Commerce of Rock 
Hill, where she also received the 
Stenographic Certificate in 1952. 
During those days as a student. 
Ruth made all "A's" in her sub- 
jects. 

Mrs. Underwood has been secre- 
tary for the past nine years to Mr. 
William H. Grier, president of the 
Rock Hill Printing and Finishing 
Company, a subsidiary of M. Low- 
enstein and Sons, Incorporated. Mr. 
Grier stated: "In whatever position 
she has served, she has performed 
her work very efficiently and her 
Christian life has had a profound 
effect on her associates." 

Ruth attended Lee College before 
entering business college. She mar- 
ried Granvil C. Underwood of Jef- 
ferson City, Tennessee; and they 
have two children. Donna and 
Larry. The Underwoods reside in 
Rock Hill, where they all are active 
members of the Cedar Street 
Church of God. • 

23 



Young Peoples Endeavor 



Breath of Life 
from page 1 5 

never forget you. Your hands were 
steady as a rock." 

"What — what are you gonna do 
now?" he asked, wiping his brow. 
The shakes came back to his fin- 
gers now, worse than ever. 

"I'll wait for someone to come 
along — " 

She stopped at the sudden noise 
of screeching brakes. Then she saw 
the shiny new, expensive car. It 
had topped the brow of the hill, 
unnoticed. A man got out and ap- 
proached them. He seemed to be 
in a hurry. 

"I'm looking for Clingman's 
Cove," he said. "A mountain wom- 
an by the name of Myrna Halli- 
day— " 

Myrna walked closer. "You've 
found her." 

"I'm Dr. Saunders," he explained. 
"Your call came in late last night 
while I was in surgery. The new girl 
at the clinic — " 

"I reckon she didn't understand 
how serious it was — " 

"Is this the baby?" 

She pulled back the wooly blan- 
ket. He could not conceal his sur- 
prise. Then his eyes raised as ad- 
miration chased away his disbelief. 

"I've heard of things like this 
happening in the hills," he said, 
checking with his fingertips. 
"Hmm! Willow tube! It was dan- 
gerous, Mrs. Halliday. You could 
have missed its windpipe. But evi- 
denly you saved the baby's life." 
He opened the car door. "Let's get 
started." 

His hand descended on old Sam's 
shoulder; his smile was warm and 
friendly. "I suppose you helped out, 
too. Old-timer?" 

"He held the baby steady as a 
rock, and God helped us, too," 
Myrna said simply. 

Old Sam did not answer. He was 
all choked up. He merely stood 
there clenching and unclenching 
his quivering hands. 

But Myrna saw his eyes, and 
something in them was too price- 
less for words. • 



ATTENDANCE FOR FEBRUARY 

By Donald S. Aultman 
National Director 

This report represents only those 
iTPE's that had an average atten- 
dance of more than 50 weekly and 
reported their attendance to the 
office of the National Sunday 
School and Youth Director. By no 
means does it reflect all the Fam- 
ily Training Hour (YPE) groups 
of the Church of God. Each church 
is invited to participate in this 
column. Attendance averages 
should be mailed on a postal card 
on the day following the last YPE 
service in the month and should 
be addressed to Donald S. Aultman. 
National Director, 1080 Montgom- 
ery Avenue, Cleveland. Tennessee 
37311. 



FEBRUARY YPE ATTENDANCE 

Cleveland (South), Tennessee.. 353 
Lakeland (Lake Wire), 

Florida 240 

Middletown (Clayton Street), 

Ohio 217 

Cincinnati (Central Parkway), 

Ohio ... .... ____ 208 

Greenville (Tremont Avenue), 

South Carolina ... .... .... 190 

Flint (West), Michigan 172 

Tampa (Sulphur Springs), 

Florida 166 

Jacksonville (Springfield), 

Florida 158 

Atlanta (Hemphill), 

Georgia .... .... .... 145 

Wyandotte, Michigan .... .... .... 144 

Vanceburg, Kentucky .... .... .... 142 

Garden City, Florida ... 140 

Pompano Beach, Florida 137 

Radford, Virginia 129 

Hamilton (7th and Chestnut), 

Ohio .... 126 

Kannapolis (Elm Street), 

North Carolina .... .... 124 

Tampa (Buffalo Avenue),- 

Florida .... 124 

Chattanooga (East), 

Tennessee .... 119 

Chattanooga ( North ) , 

Tennessee 119 



Jackson (Bailey Avenue), 

Mississippi 116 

Lorain, Ohio .... 113 

Paris, Texas 113 

Flint (Kearsley Parki, 

Michigan .... 110 

Monroe (4th Street), 

Michigan 107 

North Ridgeville, Ohio 106 

Fort Worth (Riverside), 

Texas ... 105 

Fresno, California ... ... .... .... 104 

Fort Pierce, Florida 101 

Thorn, Mississippi 101 

Poplar, California .... .... .... ... 100 

South Lebanon, Ohio ... 100 

Pasco, Washington .... .... .... ... 98 

Wilson, North Carolina 98 

Middle Valley, Tennessee 97 

Tulare, California .... .... 94 

Danville (West), 

Virginia 90 

Talladega, Alabama 89 

Santa Ana (Center Street), 

California ... .... .... 87 

Swift Current, 

Saskatchewan 87 

Decatur, Alabama 86 

Manns Choice, Pennsylvania .... 86 

Maimisburg, Ohio .... __ 86 

Johnson City, Tennessee 83 

Middlesex, North Carolina .... 83 

Valdosta, Georgia .... .... .... ..._ 83 

Huntsville (Virginia Boulevard), 

Alabama .... .... .... .... 82 

St. Louis (Webster Groves), 

Missouri .... .... 81 

Isola, Mississippi 80 

Dayton, Tennessee .... 79 

Princeton, West Virginia .... .... 79 

Lawton (9th and Lee), 

Oklahoma 78 

Adamsville, Alabama 76 

Lancaster, Ohio ... .... .... .... 76 

Lawrenceville, Illinois 76 

Morganton, North Carolina ... 76 

Salisbury, Maryland 74 

Sanford, Florida 73 

Cahokia, Illinois ... — . 72 

Wichita (South), Kansas 71 

Wayne, Michigan .... .... 70 

Sale Creek, Tennessee 68 

West Frankfort, Illinois 68 

Phoenix (East), 

Arizona 67 

Cleveland (Detroit Avenue), 

Ohio - 66 

Odessa, Texas 66 



24 



North, South Carolina 65 

Amarillo (West), Texas .... .... 64 

Chase, Maryland 63 

Jackson (Crest Park), 

Mississippi ... . 63 

Booneville, Mississippi .... .... .... 62 

Lubbock, Texas 62 

Phoenix (44th Street), 

Arizona .... .... 62 

Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan .... 60 

Lake Worth, Florida 59 

Omaha (Parkway), 

Nebraska ._ — . .... 59 

Griffin, Georgia ._. _. .... __. 58 

LaGrange, Ohio 58 

Holland, Michigan .... 56 

Charlottesville, Virginia 54 

Circleville, Ohio 52 

Loxley, Alabama 52 

Lucedale, Mississippi 51 

Rochester, Michigan 51 

Donalds, South Carolina 50 

East Point, Georgia .... .... .... 50 

NATIONAL YOUTH WEEK 
A SUCCESS IN TUCSON! 

For weeks prior to January 31 
things had been buzzing. Meetings 
were held, plans were made, ar- 
rangements were taken care of, 
and much prayer was sent to 
heaven. Our local youth board, con- 
sisting of four members, was ex- 
cited about the plans being made. 
They were anticipating the pros- 
pect of winning other young peo- 
ple to the Lord Jesus Christ. 

On February 1, the first night of 
worship services, God was there to 
bless us. Our program was entitled, 
"Signs of the Times." Comparing 
our life with Christ and our road 
signs of today, this program was 
very effective. As a result, there 
was deep spirit of consecration in 
the altar service. 

"Youth Wants to Know" was our 
theme on Wednesday evening. 
About two weeks prior to our meet- 
ing, we placed a decorated question 
box in the back of the church. Our 
pastor, the Reverend Robert L. 
Glenn, made announcements con- 
cerning it at every service and 
quite a number of questions were 
put in it. To answer these ques- 
tions, we invited three young min- 
isters to participate in a panel dis- 
cussion. They were the Reverend 



Messrs. Robert L. Glenn, Fred 
Behrs, and Bennie Burton. These 
discussions were very informative 
and challenging. Again we en- 
joyed a good season of prayer in 
our altar services. 

Friday evening was delightful! 
Pastor Glenn showed a film en- 
titled, "Son of Man." The film 
helped to bring a good response in 
the altar service. Afterwards re- 
freshments were served, and we 
had a good time of fellowship. 

National Youth Week culminated 
on Sunday with a great day of ser- 
vices. The youth served in every 
office of the church and Sunday 
school. 

Every young person, selected to 
fill a position, had prepared himself 
for his particular assignment. The 
classes were an inspiration to each 
one attending them. The reports 
were all made out correctly by the 
secretaries. The song leader led our 
hymns with much enthusiasm, 
causing everyone to respond and 
rejoice. Then the youth pastor, Tom 
Wood, stepped to the pulpit and 
presented a most challenging mes- 
sage. 

Sunday evening closed our Na- 
tional Youth Week with two being 
saved and one receiving the bap- 
tism of the Holy Spirit. What a 
lovely sight to see the youth of our 
church praying and rededicating 
their lives to Christ. We have a 
capable group and only Christ can 

be given credit for this. • 

— Mrs. Robert L. Glenn 



GOSPEL TENTS FOR SALE 

10% discount to Evangelists and 
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write: 

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AWNING CO. 

P. O. Box 18314 Phone: 363-6511 

Memphis, Tennessee 38118 



Our latest LP record- 
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postpaid. Order from: 



Henson Family 

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Dept. LP 56 

160 - 15th St., N.E. 

Cleveland, Tenn. 




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FOR ANY WORTHY PURPOSE 

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Write for Free Information 

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P. O. Box 8 — Madison, Tenn. 



FOR SALE: GOSPEL TENTS. Spe- 
cial price* to ministers. For com- 
plete information write VALDOS- 
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Box 248, Valdosta, Georgia. Day 
Phone: CHerry 2-0730. Night 
Phone: CHerry 2-5118. 




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Box 672 Dept. J5, Muscati 



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Manufacturers of DISTINCTIVE 



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ce 1888. Write for 




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2H 



By ALFRED K. ALLAN 




THE HARDWORKING 
-^i_- WRIGHT 

3HT BROTHERS 



THE FAMOUS WRIGHT Brothers, Wilbur and 
Orville, were reared in a parsonage, the sons 
of the Reverend and Mrs. Milton Wright. These 
two young men, who successfully flew the first self- 
powered airplane, were two very self-reliant men. 
They did not wait for others to do things for them, 
instead they went out and earned their own way. 

Wilbur was the older of the two. He was born in 1867 
on the small Wright farm in Millvale, Indiana. Soon 
afterwards the family moved to Dayton, Ohio, where 
Orville was born in 1871. Their father early taught 
his children the value of honest hard work. 

The Wright Brothers liked to tinker about and 
experiment on new ideas in the little workshop 
which they had built for themselves on the farm. The 
boys decided that they themselves would pay for all 
of the costs of their experiments. So they earned 
money by taking little jobs — folding papers, running 
errands, and collecting and selling scrap. 

In 1889 the brothers, then in their early twenties, 
started publishing a little four-page weekly newspaper, 
which they called The West Side News. They printed 
the paper on a large press which they themselves had 
built. 

They saved up enough money to buy two bicycles — 
one for each of them. With these two handsome 
vehicles and their savings, the brothers opened up 
their own bicycle shop where they repaired bikes and 
sold new ones. The business boomed and in 1895 they 
invented their own kind of bike, the Van Cleve. 

Then they became interested in airplanes. They read 
everything they could find that had been written 
about flying, including the experiments of other pio- 
neers in the field. 

In 1899 they saved up fifteen dollars, bought a bi- 



plane kit and started experimenting with their own 
ideas on how they thought a plane could be lifted off 
the ground and flown through the air. They learned 
about an open field in North Carolina, which was 
called Kitty Hawk. They chose this place as an ideal 
site for their glider tryouts. 

During the next two years they made many visits to 
Kitty Hawk, and their many attempts to fly only 
ended in failure. Either the weather stopped them, or 
they had accidents, or their data proved to be in 
error. But the courageous brothers continued to try. 
All this experimenting cost money but the Wrights 
earned it all by themselves — by working for it at 
honest labor. 

Finally in 1902 they built their first power ma- 
chine, equipped with an engine. The brothers hoped 
that it would work. But only by further experiment 
would they be able to prove if their years of persis- 
tent effort would end in success. 

The wind howled on the afternoon of December 
17, 1903, as the Wright Brothers pushed their crude, 
makeshift air machine onto the field at Kitty Hawk. 
Orville lay prone behind the controls of the plane 
which had been set on a rail. He moved the machine 
forward. It skipped roughly along the rail. The wind 
sprayed Orville's face. Suddenly the plane began to 
slowly rise from the ground and into the air. It stayed 
up for twelve seconds, then Orville settled it down 
again on the ground. The Wright brothers had proven 
that a heavier-than-air flying machine was possible. 

This was the beginning. The hardworking, self-re- 
liant Wright Brothers had charted a course that others 
would follow and that would eventually lead to our 
having the safe and speedy airplanes of this modern 
day. • 



'26 



ANNOUNCING 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY ACTIVITIE 

Special Banquets 

Teen 

College and Career 

Awards Banquet for State Directors 

Guest Banquet Speaker: Dave Wilkerson 
of Teen Challenge, New York City 

Mass Youth Rally 

Speaker: Cecil B. Knight 

Natioral Teen Talent Runoffs 



PEN PALS 



Cynthia (Cindy) McNeese (16) 
Route 2. Box 545 
Perry, Florida 32347 

Linda Williams (14) 
Cedar Street Ext. Box 19 
Pocomoke City, Maryland 
21851 

Paulette Durham (14) 
4 Laurel Street 
Pocomoke City, Maryland 
21851 

Mary Smith (18) 
P. O. Box 9714 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 74107 

Juanelle Conrad (15) 

R. F. D. 2 

Clark, Missouri 65243 

Kenny Conrad (9) 

R. F. D. 2 

Clark, Missouri 65243 

Linda Rich (19) 
2956 Carleon Road 
Jacksonville, Florida 32218 

Paul Rich (12) 
2956 Carleon Road 
Jacksonville, Florida 32218 



Lynette Rich (10) 
2956 Carleon Road 
Jacksonville, Florida 32218 

Elaine Elliott (16) 
Route 1 Box 407 
Candler, N.C. 

Joann Elliott (11) 
Route 1 Box 407 
Candler, N.C. 

Steve Elliott (12) 
Route 1 Box 407 
Candler, N.C. 

Judy King (13) 

439 Pemberton Drive 

Jackson, Mississippi 39208 

Yvonne Pack (18) 

Bradley, 

West Virginia 25818 

Linda Pack (16) 

Bradley, 

West Virginia 25818 

Linda Thomas (14) 
Box 141 

Beckley, West Virginia 25801 

Cora Burgess (16) 
Piney View, 
West Virginia 



Judy Reid (17) 

Bradley, 

West Virginia 25818 



A LITTLE BOY'S PRAYER 

Dear God, 

I wonder if Mommy found the way, 
I wondered and wondered all the day. 
I asked you God in last night's prayer 
To watch for her . . . did she get there? 
You see, dear God, I loved her so 
And that was far for her to go 
Alone. 

Please God, tell her that I'll be good 
And always do the things I should. 
We all missed her so much last night, 
But Jean and Baby Jill can't write 
Because God . . . they are so very small. 
So I am writing this for all. 
And we won't let the baby fret, 
Tell Mom that, God . . . please don't forget. 
Be good to Mom, too, please . . . will you? 
I'm so lonesome and feel so blue . . . 
Last night I cried and cried and cried. 
I am sorry, God that Mommy died. 
I miss Mom's kiss upon my head, 
O, I wish my Mommy wasn't dead. 

— Edna Hamilton 

MOTHER'S GUIDING PRAYER 

Walk on, young ones, out into life. 

There awaiteth a path to choose. 
Go on very slowly, my sons and watch 

That pathway is easy to lose. 

There are burdens and hardships to bear, 
my boys. 

And many an error you will make. 
Sometimes the strain on your body and mind 

Will cause your soul to shake. 

For life on this earth is not easy today. 

Evils and sins are not few. 
What you make of yourself, dear ones 

Depends entirely upon you. 

But always remember to pray, humbly 

Whenever you start to fall. 
Our God will not fail to answer 

He's watching over all. 

Go now into life with my prayers, and please 
When the sun of your time sinks low. 

May the God who gave you to me, my sons 
Take your hand, show the way to go. 

Across the dark waters of death He will lead, 

Banishing fears and strife. 
If you have made yourself worthy, dear ones 

And followed Him all through your life. 

— Sarah Longo 



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Order From: CHURCH OF GOD PUBLISHING HOUSE, 922 Montgomery Avenue, Cleveland, Tennessee 

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LIGHTED 



JUNE. 1966 






Give Your Heart 



Have you idols in your closet, 
On your shelves, or in your heart? 
Have you something treasued highly 
That has strewn your thoughts apart? 

Do you dwell upon your pleasures? 
Are they captors of your heart? 
Or do you, by storing trifles. 
Make your soul a merchant's mart? 

God is waiting, pleading for you — 
For a life that's set apart; 
Why not cast aside your idols — 
Give to God all of your heart! 

— Grace Cash 



LIGHTED 



^^O 



Stranger 



He does not know the love of Christ — 
The love we Christians share; 
He is a stranger — lost in sin, 
He has no faith in prayer; 

To him the Saviour is no friend. 
Although he's heard of Him; 
His knowledge of the Risen Lord 
Is very vague and dim. 

"Oh, Open up his eyes, dear Lord, 
That, somehow, he may see 
That he'll be lost in darkness 'til 
He comes in faith to Thee!" 

— Roy J. Wilkins 



^Q^O 



Pathway 



Published monthly at the Church of God Publishing House. 
Cleveland, Tenn. All materials intended for publication in The 
LIGHTED PATHWAY should be addressed to Clyne W. Buxton. 
Editor. All inquiries concerning subscriptions should be addressed 
to Bookkeeping Department. Church of God Publishing House. 
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ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER AT 
POST OFFICE, CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 
Pcstmaster send Form 3579 to LIGHTED PATHWAY, P. O. Box 
880, Cleveland, Tennessee 37311. 



KncATOToncowiCHa 




•^ 


JUNE, 


1966 


Vol. 


37, 


No. 6 


CONTENTS 




Editorial 


3 


Clyne W. Buxton 


Stars and Stripss 


4 


Katherine Bevis 


Father's Day 


c j 


Enola Chamberlin 


Tribute to Dad 


6 


Grace Schillinger 


Bible Names 

You and Your Child's 

Exams 


7 
8 


Matilda Nordrvedt 
Eileen M. Hosse 


1 Found My Boy 


9 


Betty Spence 


Needed: Personal 
Witnesses 


10 


Pauline Bone 


Report of PFC Work 
in North Carolina 


1 1 


Paul F. Henson 


A Miraculous Cure! 


12 


Evelyn P. Johnson 


Don't Forget to Remember 


13 


Margie M. Kelley 


Calling Youth to 
Christian Commitment 


14 


Donald S. Aultman 


Seconds Tick Away 


16 


Grover Brinkman 


Void If Detached 
Two Faces of Okinawa 


18 
20 


Ho! lis L. Green 
Dorothy C. Haskin 


National Youth Week, 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 


22 


Russell L. Miller 


National Award Winning 
Troop 


23 


Lonzo T. Kirkland 


Young People's Endeavor 


24 


Donald S. Aultman 


Variety 


2 6 




Poetry 






Cover 




A. Devaney, Inc. 


STAFF 




Clyne W. Buxton 

Lewis J. Willis 

Chloe Stewart 

Kathy Woodard 

H. Bernard Dixon 

E. C. Thomas 


Editor 

Editor in Chief 

Artist 

Research 

Circulation Directo 

Publisher 


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Avis Swiger 
Hoi lis L. Green 


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i^ m? n it <s> ss n ^ il, 



C/*/«0 WC Buxton 



SENATOR EVERETT DIRKSON has said he will lead a fight in Congress 
to restore Bible reading and prayer to public schools. This is a most 
plausible project for the Senator and many persons have written 
their congressmen asking them to support him. However, while we put up a 
national howl about the Supreme Court ruling against prayer and Bible read- 
ing, it is alarming that so many of us Christians do practically no Bible 
reading or praying in our homes. Living by a certain philosophy, or creed, or 
by good intentions, we appear "Christian" to the outsider, yet have little of 
Christ within us, for He dwells constantly only with those who commune with 
Him regularly. Too many Christians have not set up some sort of a system 
of regularly seeking their God. If a survey should be taken among us, as- 
certaining those who have a daily quiet time— a constant habit of getting 
alone for Bible reading and prayer — the results would probably show that 
the vast majority do not have regular private devotions. This fact must 
surely grieve the heart of God. 

There are two requisites for having day in and day out quiet times: one, 
an insatiable desire to have them; the other, a reasonable system to follow. 
The Christian should make up his mind that every day before he closes his 
eyes in sleep, he will "enter into his closet" for prayer and Bible study. A 
good plan of Bible study is to carefully read from twenty verses to three 
chapters each day; or, one may desire to study by subject, referring to dif- 
ferent scriptures. Ideally, prayer should immediately follow Bible study; none- 
theless, if time will not permit this, then pray at a later hour. This writer 
advocates praying by a wrist watch — thus making oneself stay in prayer at 
least for the time decided upon. And a definite minimum length of time 
should be used in prayer each day: fifteen, thirty, or sixty minutes. Praying 
is hard work, requiring concentration, determination, and perseverance. One's 
self rebels against this, and nothing short of strict self-discipline will result 
in a successful prayer life. 

The devotional life of biblical Daniel is exemplary. Though he was bur- 
dened with vast responsibilities of a high government office, the Bible 
says of him: "He went into his house; and his windows being open in 
his chamber toward Jerusalem, he kneeled upon his knees three 
times a day, and prayed, and gave thanks before his God" (Daniel 
6:10). Note Daniel's system — he prayed three times a day. The 
ninth chapter of Daniel relates that he read God's Word and 
then prayed, and God gave him a vision foretelling events 
hundreds of years in the future. Being alone with God does 
pay rich dividends. In fact, some persons believe that one's 
effectiveness for God is commensurate with the time one 
spends with Him privately. It takes time for a person 
to pray until he really prays. As much as fifteen 
minutes may be required just to pray past mental 
distractions to the heart of God — then he is 
ready to pray. Such prayer time may require 
foregoing a television program, or even a 
visit with a friend, but it is worth the sac- 
rifice. The Christian moves hito a new 
dimension with the Lord Jesus Christ 
when he starts maintaining con- 
stant, consistent, private devo- 
tions. Have you tried it? • 



Private Devotions 

Key 

To 

Victory 




By KATHERINE BEVIS 




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THE CONGRESS OF the United States on June 
14, 1777, adopted the Stars and Stripes as our 
national standard. This year we celebrate the 
one hundred and ninetieth anniversary of the birth 
of our flag. It is not so much to the flag itself that 
we pay homage, but to the principle for which it 
stands: the principle of justice and freedom for all 
men. 

Since those early days we have found the Stars 
and Stripes carrying out the mission for which it was 
born. Even in the colors we find the silent but potent 
message of a free nation — purity of motive, strength 
of character, and loyalty to principle. For 190 years 
our flag has stood as the symbol of liberty to all 
those within our borders. 

Today as again our men are carrying the flag into 
new fields in the name of freedom and liberty, it 
perhaps has a deeper meaning for all of us than ever 
before. Down through the years men have followed 
and died for that flag — not only because it is the flag 
of their country, but also because of the qualities of 
liberty, justice, and freedom for which it stands. 

The entire world today looks with hope to the symbol 
of a nation which stands firmly against tyranny of 
every kind, wherever it may be found. With that hope 
must come the realization that only by unselfishly 
guarding freedom can tyranny and greed be avoided. 



Today we pay homage to our flag, our own red, 
white, and blue, and silently pray that in all the future 
years, as in the past, this banner will ever be held 
aloft in the march for life, liberty, and the pursuit 
of happiness for all men. 

Let us pause for a moment to rededicate ourselves 
to the principle as bequeathed to us in our own Stars 
and Stripes. May we pledge anew our stedfast faith 
to the heritage the founders of our nation have given 
to us — this silent messenger as a Magna Charta for 
future generations to follow in their dealings with 
mankind. 

In the early days of our struggle for liberty there 
was conceived in the minds of our forefathers a de- 
sire for a symbol which would herald to the world 
the things for which they were fighting — truth, lib- 
erty, and equality of man. Thus to our flag, on this 
day we pay tribute, and also to all those who have 
held aloft this symbol of truth and freedom. In pay- 
ing this tribute we know that it is only as God is 
at the center of our being, continually urging us to be 
free, that we are really free and can cast off 
all fear and bondage. 

God's will for all men is freedom: freedom to ex- 
press that which is deep within the heart of all, free- 
dom for which our flag is a symbol to all — the Stars 
and Stripes forever! • 



FATHER'S DAY IS most ap- 
propriately celebrated be- 
cause of the love a little girl 
had for a man who was both father 
and mother to her and her broth- 
ers and sisters. Although its public 
observance was long in coming, the 
little girl was determined that 
something be done for this father 
through all the years. 

Many years ago Sonora Louise 
Smart told her adored father that 
when she grew up she was going 
to do something special for him. Of 
course she did not wait until she 
grew up. She was always doing 
something special for him. She con- 
tinued doing special things for him 
even after she married and became 
Mrs. Bruce Dodd, of Spokane, 
Washington. 

On Mother's Day, 1909, the spark 
she had been carrying burst forth 
into a torch. She was listening to 
Dr. Henry Rasmus speak about 
mothers and what they mean to 
the world. She knew that fathers 
meant a great deal, too. Then why 
not have a Father's Day? They de- 
served to be honored right along 
with mothers. Surely her own fa- 
ther, who was still living, deserved 
all the honor which could be given 
to him. She approached Dr. Ras- 
mus with her idea. 

"Splendid," he cried. "You work 
on it and I'll help you in any way 
possible." 

Mrs. Dodd admits she was taken 
aback. How could she work out a 
plan for such a stupendous thing? 
Then came another thought, How 
could she not do it? She had wait- 
ed long for such a chance. But she 
must have a little time. 

It was not until the next spring 
that she knew what she wanted to 
do. Her father's birthday was in 
June. Why not ask all the ministers 
in Spokane to preach on father- 
hood one Sunday in June? 

The response to her request was 
gratifying indeed. Members of the 
Ministerial Alliance went with her 
to the City Council. The mayor is- 
sued a Father's Day proclamation. 



He was glad for the chance and 
was grateful to the woman who 
had brought the subject to him. 

But Spokane could not hold such 
a big thing. M. E. Hay, governor 
of the State of Washington, de- 
clared the third Sunday in June 
to be Father's Day. John Matthie- 
son, a merchant, made a window 
display. In it he featured George 
Washington as the father of his 
country. He put up a poster with the 
words, "Remember Father." He 
graced everything with the Ameri- 
can flag. All of this gave the day 
a national turn. Papers from all 
across the country picked up the 
story. The State of Washington had 
a new holiday. 

It was a great holiday for Mrs. 
Dodd. She took her father to 
church to hear the Reverend Con- 
rad Bluhm speak on "The Knight- 
hood Which Never Retreats." It was 
a Father's Day sermon to start 
other Father's Day sermons across 
the land. 

And there were many more, but 
for years there was no national 
observance of the day. Mrs. Dodd 
did not stop her crusading for a 
national day. When her own fa- 
ther died in 1919, she struck out 
anew on her project for a country- 
wide observance of the day. 

Even though she was not alone — 
many others were now fighting 
with her — it was the year of 1936 
before the National Father's Day 
Committee was formed in New 
York. Its intention was "to spread 
the sentimental and spiritual ob- 
servance of the day." At long last 
it was adopted by all America. 

And how glad we are! Father, 
no less than Mother, deserves rec- 
ognition and appreciation for what 
he does for his family. He deserves 
to be told of the love they have 
for him on a special day that has 
been set aside for this purpose. We 
owe a great deal to Mrs. Dodd. She 
feels that in some measure she had 
paid off the debt she owed her own 
wonderful father. • 



fathers 
6ay 



h€? 



By ENOLA CHA^pERlJlM 



r 



By GRACE SCHILLINGER 




Tribute 
lb Dad 



DURING THE DAYS when I 
was trying to think up a 
suitable quotation to use in 
my tribute to you, Dad, a friend 
said to me, "But your father is still 
living." 

And I answered, "Sure. Why not 
pay him tribute now while he's here 
to know?" So I thought some more 
— all the time remembering how 
you always loved the outdoors so 
much. Birds, flowers and all kinds 
of trees — from fruit trees to the 
kind that give only beauty, like 
the redbud. You always said, "Fruit 
is fine, but I like to plant some 
trees just because they look pretty. 
And a redbud tree is a mighty 
pretty sight in the springtime." 

But I still had not found a good 
quotation to work into my tribute. 
Then I thought of a few words I 
had heard once: "He who plants a 
tree lives not for himself alone." 

These words describe you and 
your life perfectly, Dad. In all the 
places you have lived and moved 
away from, you and Mom have left 
behind a trail of trees for others 
to remember you by. Not only have 
you left trees, but also shrubs, 
flowers, lovely lawns, and bird- 
houses galore. 



"Why do you bother?" the neigh- 
bors would ask. "You'll probably not 
live here long enough to eat the 
fruit." 

"Someone else will," you would 
say. "It costs so little to plant a 
tree. Just a few cents and a bit of 
work." Sure, it did take a little 
money, a little time, and work — 
but what else? It took a good deal of 
love for other folks and being an 
unselfish person who thought of 
others. 

I can recall that you taught me 
a great deal of life's lessons while 
talking to me about trees. That big 
walnut tree in our front yard — re- 
member how its trunk was divided 
about three feet from the ground 
and it looked almost like two sep- 
arate trees from there on up? That 
crotch made a fine place to sit and 
read. 

"See how this walnut tree holds 
up its branches?" you asked me 
once. 

"Yes, I see." 

"Well . . ." you went on in that 
slow, quiet voice of yours, "Don't 
ever do anything that'll keep you 
from holding your head up just like 
that; — very proud." 



You always liked to work with 
trees. You learned the right way to 
trim and prune them so that they 
would not break in a hard wind. 
You taught yourself from a book 
how to graft branches of a better 
kind onto an inferior strain. And 
when I watched, you had a lesson 
to tell and I knew it applied to lit- 
tle girls as well as trees. 

"This little tree here," you said, 
pointing to the apple tree that was 
not a heavy bearing variety, "if I 
let it grow up just as it is, it would 
have little wizened apples on it." 
You went on working with the 
grafting wax and making the 
proper cuts on the tree. "But when 
I graft this branch on right," you 
continued, "and sort of tell it I 
expect it to grow up to be a better 
tree, then all the branches from it 
will grow fine, big red apples." 

I thought it was a special kind 
of magic that only you knew. Other 
girls' dads worked in offices, or 
owned stores or big farms, or were 
even rich enough that they did not 
need to work at all. But my dad — 
you — knew how to make old trees 
over into wonderful new ones. To 
this day I believe that it was a 
kind of magic — the magic of having 
faith and working with God and 



nature. But unlike most magic, it 
lasted. 

Then there is the big oak tree in 
our backyard that had been struck 
by lightning years before we moved 
there. In my heart I have always 
likened you to that tree — strong 
through any storm, dependable year 
after year. Now in your later 
Grandpa years since your heart has 
been acting up, you are even more 
like it. Your heart trouble is your 
own bolt of lightning. And like that 
oak you did not give up. 

When folks ask how you are 
after you have spent another long 
night in your big chair because you 
cannot breathe lying down, you al- 
ways say, "Fine! Pretty good! 
Things will all be better someday." 
Then you change the subject sud- 
denly to the weather, or the birds 
that are building in your bird- 
houses, or to the pie Mom made 
for dinner. Like the oak tree, you 
are going on, making the most of 
your days. 

When I got married the first 
thing you gave us was a bunch of 
fruit trees — apples, peaches, and 
plums — and a redbud, just because 
it is pretty. 

"A man and his wife should start 
their marriage by planting some 
trees," you said. It is a good begin- 
ning and each year since we have 
been planting some. 

Because you have always been 
close to growing things, it has af- 
fected your personality and habits. 
It has made you love all children, 
even though they belong to 
strangers. Your voice is soft and 
low to match a pine tree's sigh 
or the creek's ripple. Your heart 
is tender so that you are always 
touched by sad stories. For the 
rest of my life, Dad, each time I 
look at my most beloved tree — the 
oak — I'll think of your hope and 
faith. 

* * * 

My father read this tribute and 
of course, he sniffled. I am so glad 
I gave it to him when I did. A 
short time later he died. Now, in 
these days so filled with uncertain- 
ty and fear I am remembering his 
words, "Things will all be better 
someday." • 



BiBle names 



By MATILDA NORDTVEDT 






(Give yourself ten points for 
each name you get from the first 
clue, five points for the second 
clue, one point for the third.) 

1. The last syllable of his three 
syllable name is a kind of 
meat. 

He left his country to obey God. 
He is the father of the Jewish 
nation. Genesis 17:5, 6 

2. The last syllable of his four 
syllable name is the sound a 
cat makes. 

His name is usually linked with 

Phillip's. 

He was one of Jesus' disciples. 

Matthew 10:3 

3. The last syllable of her three 
syllable name is a note on the 
scale. 

She and her husband went to 
Italy because of persecution in 
Rome. 

She made tents with her hus- 
band. Acts 18:1-3 

4. The last syllable of his two syl- 
lable name means a stick. 

He was a king. 

He tried to kill the baby Jesus. 

Matthew 2:13 

5. The last syllable of his two 
syllable name means a false- 
hood. 

He was a priest in the temple. 
Samuel helped him in the tem- 
ple as a boy. 1 Samuel 3:1 




mm' ^i 

4f m&fe '- 



The last syllable of his two syl- 
lable name has something to 
do with corn. 
He had twelve sons. 
He wrestled with an angel. Gen- 
esis 32:24 

7. The last syllable of her three 
syllable name has a ring to it. 
She was a queen. 

She was eaten by dogs. 2 Kings 
9:36 

8. The last syllable of her three 
syllable name is an exclama- 
tion. 

She went to battle with Barak. 
She was a prophetess of Israel. 
Judges 4:4 

9. The last syllable of his three 
syllable name means father. 
He fought against Israel in the 
days of Elisha. 

He was a king of Syria. 1 Kings 
15:18 
10. The last syllable of her two 
syllable name is a cheer. 
She laughed at God's promise. 
She had a son in her old age. 
Genesis 21:2 



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YOU AND 



tion to the topic sentences and the chapter headings. 
When an examination is announced, encourage your 
child to ask the teacher how far back she will go 
for the test. Then see that he begins his review 
systematically, well in advance of the test. 



YOUR CHILD'S EXAMS 




By EILEEN M. HASSE 



OULD YOU LIKE to help your child avoid 
those missteps that often become cata- 
strophic during final examinations? The 
ability to take tests in his stride depends upon your 
child's learning how to study and how to write a 
test. You, as a parent play a vital part in teaching 
him what is expected of him on tests. Your attitudes 
are often responsible for his success or failure. 

Every parent is familiar with the terrific last- 
minute struggle of a child trying to stuff facts into 
his head, hoping that he will pass the test. Too often 
other homework is piled up for the same evening of 
the nerveracking cramming. But parents can head off 
these problems by making their attitude known from 
the beginning of the school term. 

Encourage your child to study along the way, to 
pay attention to important points, and to keep his 
quizzes and notes for later reference. Help him to 
select the important points by paying special atten- 



Teachers are fair. Never lead your child to believe 
the teacher is "out to get him" with a test. Teachers 
are merely checking to see how many students have 
retained the knowledge they should have. 

Provide a quiet place for study. See that it is 
equipped with a study table and chair, and that it is 
well lighted and has proper study materials. The time 
to equip the study corner is at the beginning of the 
school year. However, as test time rolls around, if 
you have failed to do this, you may still reserve a 
quiet corner of the kitchen for homework and review. 

Encourage your child to keep notebooks for each 
course, whether or not they are required by the 
teacher. These notebooks will prove valuable as he 
prepares for examinations. Ask to see his outlines or 
notes once or twice to be sure he is recognizing the 
important points. Your interest will do more to spur 
him on to better grades than anything else. Some- 
times poor students ask themselves, "Who cares?" Be 
sure your child has an answer to that question. 

A child's physical condition is highly important at 
the time of trying tests. If a child is sleepy or hungry, 
he cannot do his best. In order to keep your child 
at his best physically, you may have to forgo some 
social activities yourself. Since your child is with you 
but a few years before he goes out on his own, it is 
well worth the sacrifice to help him become self- 
sufficient. Usually it is the mother's job to see that 
her child is awake in plenty of time to eat a good 
breakfast on the day of examinations. Parents must 
insist that the child get plenty of rest in order that 
his mind will be refreshed and that he can think 
more clearly for tests. Children must be told and re- 
told, and then reminded again. So, wise parents will 
remind a child to read the directions twice and listen 
to the teacher's directions with both ears. 

Finally, a parent can help his child pass his tests 
by seeing him off to school in plenty of time. Do not 
send him on his way too early, or he may try to do 
a lot of last-minute studying that might lead to panic. 
Neither should he be slightly tardy or he might de- 
velop a feeling of feverish rush. 

The teacher's job ends when your child leaves the 
classroom. But parents must take up where the 
teacher leaves off. Whether parents realize it or not, 
they are largely responsible for their child's success 
during examination week. Systematic studying must 
start early in the course but last-minute details are 
also vitally important. • 



8 



By BETTY SPENCE 



I Found My Boy 



I 



T WAS AN exciting day when 
the fragile Dapper Dan tagged 
"Spence baby" was dressed in 
his pale green going-home outfit. 
For me, however, it was nervous 
excitement. Suddenly going home 
meant having no more trained 
nurses to bathe, feed, and tend the 
new baby. 

A sweet-faced nurse, who helped 
me dress the baby, sensed my new- 
mother qualms and relieved my 
fears somewhat by assuring me 
that everything would turn out all 
right as long as Chuck was given 
plenty to eat and plenty of love. 
Two frantic days and two dozen 
diapers later, I discovered a few 
details that the nurse had failed 
to point out in her advice about 
"bringing up Junior." 

But in spite of my infantphobia 
young Chuckie responded delight- 
fully to his Gerbers, Carnation, and 
tender-loving care. He responded 
so well, in fact, that he was big 
enough to start school at age five. 
The art of being a good mother, so 
I thought, had at last become less 
arduous and time-consuming. 

What to do while Chuck was 
away at school posed no problem, 
for I had several surpressed am- 
bitions and set right in unearthing 
them. For a while I was able to 
keep my outside-the-home activi- 
ties confined to school hours, but 
by the time Chuck was a fourth- 
grader my newly accumulated du- 
ties spilled over into family time. 

It is amazing how the parental 
silhouette can become distorted 
and unbalanced without one know- 
ing it. Christianity has lifted wo- 
man to higher heights. She has 
reached for and has attained equa- 



lity in practically every field. These 
accomplishments have not, howev- 
er, been without sacrifice. In order 
to achieve a higher status, she has 
had to forego some of her identity 
with the home. The children may 
have gone unattended. King Solo- 
mon observed that a child left to 
himself bringeth his mother shame. 

I overheard a parent-child con- 
versation at a restaurant one day 
which points out how preoccupied 
we as parents must sometimes 
seem to be when our children are 
trying to tell us something. A 
young father was concentrating 
upon what to order for his family 
and was not aware of his little 
girl's unabated request. "Daddy," 
she whined, "I want a coke, I want 
a coke Daddy. Da-a-a-ddy . . . 
Da-a-a-ddy, can I have a coke?" 
Is it any wonder that by the time 
some children are teenagers they 
feel as if there is a soundproof 
wall between them and their par- 
ents! 

With so many ideas these days 
of where a woman's place is, it is 
easy to be found guilty of doing too 
much for one's family and not 
enough "with them." G. Campbell 
Morgan wrote about a friend who 
especially enjoyed being with his 
child. There came a time, however, 
when the little girl seemed to shun 
him for something she had to do 
at home. Weeks went by with 
the man grieving the absence of 
her company. 

On the father's birthday he was 
presented a gift from his little girl. 
Upon opening the package, he 
found a pair of handmade slippers 
and exclaimed, "Darling, it was 
good of you to buy these for me." 



"Oh! Father, I didn't buy them. 
I made them for you." Suddenly 
the parent realized why the child 
had not had the usual amount of 
time for him. "Next time," he said, 
"buy the slippers. I would rather 
have my child all my days than 
anything she could make for me." 

It took a chat with Chuck's fifth 
grade teacher to convince me that 
I had too many missiles in orbit 
and was not giving enough of my- 
self to my child. 

"If only you could spend thirty 
minutes a day helping Chuck with 
his arithmatic," she had said. These 
words were like acid penetrating 
my already too-full schedule as 
piano teacher, church worker, wo- 
man's auxiliary leader, and Chris- 
tian writer. The idea that I had 
been "too busy" was not exactly a 
new one. 

My husband had hinted, in no 
uncertain terms, at that truth 
many times but I had refused to 
believe that anyone else could fill 
my shoes. But sitting there in 
Chuck's empty classroom with his 
teacher, I suddenly knew that I 
could never enjoy the success of 
any accomplishment if I failed as a 
mother. 

God has endowed woman with 
many distinguishing qualities 
which are constantly sought on 
every hand. The social whirl cla- 
mors for her hospitality, the in- 
dustrialist seeks her efficiency, the 
cultural realm welcomes her crea- 
tivity, the male invokes her fideli- 
ty, the child . . . craves her time and 
attention. It is surprising how close 
I can get to Chuck by simply giving 
him my undivided attention. I feel 
that I have rediscovered my boy. • 



9 




Needed: 



personal 
Witnesses 




By PAULINE BONE 



\ TO DOUBT YOU have told others about your 
J\! pastor, Sunday school teacher, mother, father, 
-*- * or some other dear friend. But have you told 
anyone about your best friend, Jesus? Andrew, of the 
New Testament, did. "He first findeth his own brother 
Simon, and saith unto him, We have found the Messias, 



which is, being interpreted, the Christ. And he 
brought him to Jesus" (John 1:41, 42). 

Philip, another follower of Jesus, told Nathanael: 
"We have found him, of whom Moses in the law, and 
the prophets, did write, Jesus of Nazareth" (John 
1:45). As is customary, Nathanael began to question 
Philip about his new Friend. Philip invited Nathanael 
to "come and see" Him. When Jesus saw them ap- 
proaching, He did not wait for a proper introduction, 
but cried out, "Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom 
is no guile. . . . Before that Philip called thee . . . 
I saw thee" (vv. 47, 48). Nathanael exclaimed joy- 
ously, "Thou art the Son of God" (v. 49). 
• Jesus also saw us and loved us dearly before we 
ever knew Him. And today He sees and knows our 
friends, neighbors, and loved ones. He is anxiously 
waiting with a tender, compassionate heart, and his 
loving hands are extended in welcome to each one. It 
is in God's plan to use Christians as personal wit- 
nesses to introduce these people to Jesus. We need not 
make flowery speeches of introduction. We need only 
to have a personal acquaintance with Jesus, to read 
the Bible, pray, be filled with the Holy Spirit, and go 
forth to witness to others about the wonderful things 
that Jesus has done for us. 

Sometime ago I heard a Christian Jew, Irene, give 
her thrilling personal testimony. Due to the witness 
and personal visitation of a Christian school teacher, 
Irene became deeply convicted of her sins. At home, 
Irene prayed desperately to God: "If Jesus is your 
Son, help me to believe it." God heard her earnest 
prayer and wonderfully revealed to her that Jesus is 
truly His Son and that He died on the cross to save 
her from her sins. Immediately she cried to God for 
forgiveness and received a glorious experience of sal- 
vation as peace flooded her soul. 

Irene reasoned that her neighbors did not know 
Jesus or they would have told her about Him. Al- 
though she had known Jesus such a short time, He 
was so very real and precious to her that she was 
sure others would want to know Him, too. The same 
day that she was converted, she got the New Testa- 
ment that her Christian school teacher had given 
her and searched until she found John 3:16. With 
her Testament in her hand, a glow on her face, and 
wondrous joy in her heart, Irene went forth to tell 
others of her new Friend. 

She went from house to house, knocking on doors. 
When one of her neighbors came to the door, Irene 
would read John 3:16: "For God so loved the world, 
that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever 
believeth in him should not perish, but have ever- 
lasting life." She would tell her neighbor what Jesus 
had done for her personally, have prayer with her, 
then go to the next house. God honored Irene's simple, 
humble faith, and seventeen of her neighbors were 
saved that day. 

Do your friends and neighbors know Jesus? Tell 
them about Him today. You will be glad you did! • 



10 



By PAUL F. HENSON Assistant National Sunday School 
and Youth Director 

Information supplied by the Rev- 
erend Bill Sheeks, State Director 



Report of PFC Work 
NORTH CAROLINA 



in 




THE PIONEER-FOR-CHRIST 
approach to soulwinning is 
■ the most practical and re- 
warding of all methods of evange- 
lism. My reason for believing this 
is not simply that it sounds ex- 
citing, nor that it can produce 
good-sounding statistics. But, we 
have tried this simple approach 
and it has worked. It has worked 
in churches large and small and it 
can work in any church, if given 
the proper leadership and partici- 
pation. 

North Carolina now has seventy- 
three local church Pioneer for 
Christ Clubs and six district clubs — 
a total of seventy-nine. These are 
distributed across the state from 
the rugged mountains to the At- 
lantic and are producing notable 
results in all areas where they are 
operating. 

These seventy-nine clubs have 
been organized with soulwinning as 
their ultimate goal. In most cases, 
it is the youth of the church who 
are carrying the message through 
witnessing. We are finding that 
this kind of witness challenge for 
our youth not only saves many who 
are desperately lost, but it also 
strengthens the witnesses. Nothing 
is more thrilling to a teen-ager 
than to return from a PFC visita- 
tion with a feeling of worthiness 
in God's church and the knowledge 
that he has been an instrument in 
soul-saving. By initiating and 
maintaining an active PFC, many 
churches have seen a total change 
in outlook for the future — progres- 
siveness, enthusiasm, and opti- 
mism has taken the place of dull, 



uneventful routine. God's church 
must have this change for spiritual 
and numerical growth. 

The one goal of PFC work is 
soul salvation. Our Pioneers for 
Christ bear witness of their own 
change of life and hope to bring 
the listening sinner to repentance. 
Many times this is possible by 
merely relating the story of salva- 
tion. Sometimes this story is not 
accepted on the initial contact. 
Therefore, many of the clubs have 
involved themselves in activities 
and projects other than the door- 
to-door witnessing with the expres- 
sion of eventually reaching sinners 
with the gospel. 

The South Rocky Mount Church 
of God recently conducted a PFC 
revival. The results proved to be 
more successful than any revival 
conducted in the church in several 
years. The district youth director 
simply taught the youth the why 
and hoiv of personal witnessing the 
first week, and the group put this 
knowledge into action the second 
week. Many were saved and Pas- 
tor B. E. Ellis reports that many 
of these were Sunday school mem- 
bers who had never been reached 
for Christ through the Sunday 
school or pulpit ministries of the 
church. 

North Carolina has eleven Indian 
churches, nine of which make up 
the Pembroke District. District 
Youth Director Mary Lee Jacobs 
and District Pastor Millard May- 
nard have organized a PFC in five 
of these churches. The clubs meet 
monthly. These clubs include older 
members— as well as young— and 
have strengthened the Church of 



God considerably not only by their 
witnessing but by financial contri- 
butions for the Indian tabernacle. 

The West Durham PFC has re- 
cently been holding witness rallies 
in Pittsboro, where a Church of 
God is now organized. This small 
work has been strengthened by 
PFC members canvassing the town 
and distributing information about 
the Church of God. Also, the group 
of young people saw the immediate 
need and contributed financially to 
the new work. 

The Goldsboro Church has had a 
50 percent increase in Sunday 
school attendance in the last four 
years and is now averaging over 
three hundred per Sunday. This 
has largely been accomplished by 
PFC members' constant work as a 
visitation committee for the Sun- 
day school. 

South Gastonia, one of our lar- 
gest churches, has a very active 
PFC. This group uses one night per 
week for witnessing and also meets 
for an hour on Sunday afternoon 
for prayer in the church. This 
prayer session has not only given 
these young people direction in 
visiting, but has brought a revival 
every Sunday night to the church. 
I visited the South Gastonia Church 
one Sunday night and the altar was 
filled with young people seeking ex- 
periences with God. Also, the PFC 
at this church accepted Youth 
World Evangelism Appeal as a club 
project and liberally contributed to 
this youth mission cause. 

Wilson, another growing church, 

has found that PFC has put new 

life into the entire church program. 

Please turn to page 24 



11 



M^ 



A 
Miraculous 
Cure! 



By EVELYN P. JOHNSON 



FTEN WE CONSIDER cer- 
tain drugs a magic cure for 
every illness — just as in the 
early days of penicillin a few doc- 
tors used it as a cure-all. A fam- 
ily joke at our house is, "Mama 
thinks Vicks is a cure-all." When 
my children were small, every snif- 
fle brought on a chest rub with 
that ointment, and every scratch 
and bruise received an application 
of it. 

Qualified doctors assert that there 
is no one drug which is a cure for 
all illnesses. Each physical ailment 
requires a different treatment. Yet, 
there is one cure-all, not only for 
our physical disabilities, but for our 
spiritual weaknesses and our men- 
tal frustrations also. This all-heal- 
ing prescription is the power of 
Jesus Christ! "For I will restore 
health unto thee, and I will heal 
thee of thy wounds, saith the Lord" 
(Jeremiah 30:17). 

This does not mean that all ail- 
ments will be miraculously cured, 
nor all wounds healed uncondition- 
ally. I recall an incident from my 
childhood. My aunt was ill, and a 
doctor was called. He left a box of 
pills for her. After a week she had 
not improved and the doctor came 
again, leaving more medicine. 

Later in the day, as my uncle 
was walking across the yard, he 
noticed a small white object laying 
near the door. Curious, he stooped 
to examine it, and found the grass 
was sprinkled with similar pellets. 
Instead of taking her medicine my 
aunt was throwing it out the door. 

Similarly, in order for us to re- 
ceive the healing power of Jesus 
Christ, we must do more than 
merely call upon Him. In Exodus 
15:26 we are told to "hearken to 
the voice of the Lord thy God," to 
"do that which is right in his 
sight," to "give ear to his com- 
mandments, and keep his statutes." 
If we do these things, we are prom- 
ised freedom from diseases, for He 
is the "Lord that healeth." 

Proper medical treatment was 
practically unknown in Hebrew 
history. Throughout the Old Testa- 
ment there is scarcely a mention 
of the science of medicine. People 
believed in spiritual healing. 



Many are skeptical of spiritual 
healing in our present century. Yet, 
the Scriptures tell us that with 
God, all things are possible, and 
surely He still heals. We hear of 
instances in which an Unseen Hand 
has brought about the recovery of 
a patient who had been pronounced 
incurable. Doctors admit they held 
no hope for the patient. Can we 
doubt that Christ was the cure? 

Just as the Lord sent forth His 
twelve disciples to "Heal the sick, 
cleanse the lepers," and "raise the 
dead" (Matthew 10:8), He sends 
today's physicians with a great deal 
of power. We should use these tal- 
ented men, but we should not for- 
get to ask God's assistance, too. 

We have an example in 2 Chroni- 
cles 16:12. Asa was greatly diseased 
in his feet but "he sought not the 
Lord," going instead to physicians 
and relying upon their power alone. 
He was not healed, because in verse 
13 we are told that he died two 
years later. 

Again in Mark 5:26 we read of a 
woman who, for twelve years, had 
depended on physicians to cure 
her of a disease. She had spent all 
her money, going to many doctors 
and receiving prolonged treatment. 
Yet, her condition grew continually 
worse. Then she heard of the mi- 
raculous power of Jesus and sought 
Him out. She had heard so much 
of this Great Healer that she be- 
lieved only a touch of His garment 
would make her well again. Her 
faith was justified, for Christ told 
her, "Thy faith hath made thee 
whole" (Mark 5:34). 

Jesus can heal our physical ail- 
ments when it pleases Him to do 
so. But He can do more. "He heal- 
eth the broken in heart, and bind- 
eth up their wounds" (Psalm 147: 
3i. And He can give us relief from 
mental strain. In Psalm 103:3 we 
are promised that He "healeth all 
thy diseases." This covers the dis- 
eases of the mind, body, heart, and 
soul. There is nothing that cannot 
be healed by the power of a loving 
Christ if that cure is according to 
God's purpose. 

Jesus Christ is, indeed, a cure-all! 



12 




I sit beside my lonely fire 
And pray for wisdom yet: 

For calmness to remember 
Or courage to forget. 

Charles H. Aide 

Don't 
Forget to 
Remember 



By MARGIE M. KELLEY 



^ NE IS WISE to remember, even though to do 
IcyfllJ so mav bring sadness. Scripturally we are ad- 
IK^ffl monished to remember. 

We are told to remember Lot's wife. Why? Because 
she looked back to evil Sodom and all it represented, 
thus disobeying God and was turned into a pillar of 
salt. God desires that each of His children maintain 
a look toward the pure and holy things of life, in- 
stead of the evil and sinful. 

Solomon had good reason for admonishing young 
people to "remember now thy Creator in the days 
of thy youth," for he knew that when one is young, his 
mind is tender and easily trained. Jesus also asserted, 
"Suffer little children ... to come unto me." 

Science reveals that lasting impressions are made 
during youth, that indelible impressions are regis- 
tered in the minds of youth that neither time nor 
experience can erase. It also teaches that lifelong 
habits are developed then — that important decisions 
are reached which will influence life greatly. Science 
has shown, too, how character is formed in youth 
and how bodily habits are established. Science also 
reminds us that during one's youth is the best time 
to specialize in memorizing, and learning to do some- 
thing well. 



Because of these determined facts, it seems then 
that youth is the great time of opportunity. How can 
any young person afford to forget his Creator at 
such an important time of his life. 

Paul admonishes us to "remember them which have 
the rule over you, who have spoken unto you the word 
of God: whose faith follow, considering the end of 
their conversation" (Hebrews 13:7). The shepherd of 
the flock — God's minister — usually has the best in- 
terest of his followers at heart. Remember and heed 
his instructions in order to have a more fully de- 
veloped Christian life. 

But there are those individuals who do not always 
remember at the right time. Joseph in his dungeon 
cell in Egypt had asked the chief butler to remember 
him after he gave proper interpretation to his dream. 
Did he remember? Genesis 40:23 says, "Yet did not 
the chief butler remember Joseph, but forgat him." 

When Christ healed the ten lepers, only one re- 
membered to return to give thanks. What a sad in- 
dictment against mankind for such ungratefulness 
shown in these two biblical incidents. 

"The wicked shall be turned into hell, and all the 
nations that forget God" (Psalm 9:17). Thus we see 
that if one forgets God, it will cost him his soul. • 



13 




CALLING YOUTH TO CHRISTI/ 




Dare Will;cr\u>i 



UJGUST 9 Teen Talent Parade 

6:00 p.m. ■ 10:00 p.m. 
Balinese Room, Claridge Hotel 

LUGUST 10-12 Teen Talent Parade 

(Scheduled between General Assembly services) 

LUGUST 13 College-Career Banquet (ages 18-24) 

10:00 p.m., Claridge Hotel ($3 per person) 
Speaker: Dave Wilkerson 

Teen Banquet (ages 13-17) 

2:00 p.m., Claridge Hotel ($3 per person) 

Speaker: Dave Wilkerson 

5.00 p.m. Coliseum Parade of Champions 
Announcing Teen Talent National Champions 



AUGUST 14 



AUGUST 14 



6.00 p.m. Colise 
Mass Choir 
Dave Wilkerson 



n Youth Serv 
Lee Singers 
Message: Ce 




f P' 


ople attend th 


e b 


en 


nial 


Get 


eral 


Assembly. 


the 


vast 


is 


ilways re 


span 


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to 


the 


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listry 


of 


youth, 


whe 


her 


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through 


sing 


Hg 


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sical 


instrument 






The Lee Singers, the foremost choir of the Church of God, will sing 
this year during the General Assembly, convening in Memphis, 
August 10-15. These highly trained young people are well known 
for their excellent singing. 



The crucial challenge of total commitment will be 
pressed upon our young people perhaps more forcibly 
than ever in the 1966 Church of God General Assem- 
bly. Never before in the world's history has the Chris- 
tian church stood in such need of consecrated young 
people who will stand up for Christian values in the 
face of secularism and materialism. No longer can we 
afford the luxury of waiting for all-out dedication — 
the time is now! Each of the youth activities will 
keep this theme of commitment before our youth. 

TEEN TALENT PARADE 

This musical extravaganza featuring state cham- 
pions competing for national honors will begin on 
Tuesday, August 9 at 6:00 p.m. in the Balinese Room 
of Hotel Claridge. This exciting competition will con- 
tinue throughout the week as hundreds of teen-agers 
sing and perform representing their states in vocal 
solo, vocal ensemble, instrumental solo, instrumental 
ensemble, and choir competition. As the young people 
meet for fellowship in the tension of national com- 
petition a commitment to excellence in the perfor- 
mance of sacred music to the glory of God will be 
kept to the fore. 



COLLEGE-CAREER BANQUET 
A later evening College-Career Buffet for 



iges 



eighteen through twenty-four will continue the week- 
end of youth activities. Beginning 10:00 p.m. Saturday, 
August 13, the banquet will be in Hotel Claridge. 
Featured speaker of this banquet will be Dave Wilker- 
son of Teen Challenge in New York City. His best- 
selling book, The Cross and the Switchblade, has sig- 
naled a new era in youth evangelism, while giving 



14 



By Donald S. Aultman, National Sunday School and Youth Director 



COMMITMENT 




eloquent evidence to the religious world that Pente- 
cost is going to the people and confronting the prob- 
lem of our society at every level. 

TEEN BANQUET 

Sunday, August 14 at 2:00 p.m. in the Hotel Claridge, 
Dave Wilkerson will once again speak to our young 
people at the Teen Banquet. Designed for ages thir- 
teen through seventeen this Sunday afternoon will 
offer a time of Christian challenge as Wilkerson's 
message centers around the theme, "Why in the 
World." 

COLISEUM TEEN TALENT 
PARADE OF CHAMPIONS 

At 5:00 p.m. Sunday, August 14, all the state cham- 
pions who have competed for honors during the week 
will be on "parade" for one hour in the giant mid- 
South Coliseum. The General Assembly will move to the 
Coliseum on Sunday morning and there will be no 
Sunday afternoon service. This meeting place will pro- 
vide a tremendous setting for these young musicians. 
At 5:30 p.m. the national champions will be an- 
nounced and will perform. 



COLISEUM YOUTH SERVICE 
"Calling Youth to Christian Commitment" 

At 6:00 p.m. the spiritual emphasis of this great 
week will climax around the theme, "Calling Youth 
to Christian Commitment." Thousands of youth and 
their elders will gather at this late afternoon hour to 
be challenged by the dynamic ministry of Cecil B. 
Knight. A former National Director, Cecil Knight has 
a burden for youth and the touch of God on his life 
that reaches young people. A special feature of the 
youth rally will be the challenging testimony of Dave 
Wilkerson, who will give his vibrant testimony of how 
God has enabled him to be an effective witness for 
Christ to New York City's teen drug addicts, gangs, 
and beatniks. His life and testimony are a miracle 
of the grace of God and illustrate forcibly how God 
yet calls men to work for Him in a specific way. The 
music will be highlighted by a huge mass choir and 
the thrilling Lee Singers, under the direction of Dr. 
Delton L. Alford. 

All Church of God young people are invited to at- 
tend the 1966 General Assembly. Come expecting an 
exciting time of fellowship and spiritual challenge. 



15 



By GROVER BRINKMAN 




Here is man's oldest calendar — the land itself. Once the Grand Canyon was a level 
plain; now it is a mile in depth, and eighteen miles across. How many centuries 
did it take to cut this gigantic gorge? Only God Himself knows. 

seconds tick away 

an example of time 



ROWING UP ON an Illinois 
farm, I distinctly remember 
my father's admonition, 
something to the effect that idle 
time was the workshop of the devil. 
At the time, I was quite sure that 
he never intended we even ap- 
proach this workshop's door. But 
now I know that he was merely 
trying to impress his sons with the 
value of time. 

As I write this, the old clock in 
the hall keeps ticking away. It is 
a very old clock, and what stories 



it could tell. Perhaps it bounced 
westward in a Conestoga wagon. It 
has seen the advent of many 
things: the telephone, electricity, 
the automobile, and airplane. It 
has seen birth and death, happi- 
ness and tragedy, the declaration 
of wars and subsequent peace. Yet, 
it ticks on and on, proving that 
time stops for nothing, that it is 
strictly a one-way street. There is 
no turning back, no retracing, no 
recovery of precious minutes lost 
in idleness. 



The old clock tells us that what- 
ever life brings tomorrow will de- 
pend to a great extent on what we 
do with our time today. It might 
tell us, too, that the wisdom of 
age depends upon the mental and 
spiritual energy that we acquire in 
our youth. 

Perhaps one of the greatest les- 
sons in time can be acquired sim- 
ply by standing on the rim of the 
Grand Canyon, contemplating the 
thing we see. Once this was a level 
plain. Now it is a mile-deep gorge 
in spots, and over twenty miles 
from rim to rim. It took not 
thousands but millions of years 
for water to cut that terrific can- 
yon. Here is a visual lesson in time 
far greater than the spoken or 
written word. 

If you're still unimpressed, go 
into the redwoods forest and con- 
template the giant trees. Here, too, 
time built the giants, day by day, 
over centuries of time. Each day, 
remember, was usable time in the 
tree's growth, not wasted in idle- 
ness. 

Jesus himself realized that the 
time of His ministry was short. He 
exhorted this fact to his friends on 
many occasions. Jesus was trying 
to impress the fact that time is 
daily, hourly. If we take up His 
cross, we must do it daily. 

We may state wistfully with the 
poet, "Turn backward, turn back- 
ward, O time in thy flight; make 
me a child again just for tonight," 
but we know it is an impossibility. 
Time, the one-way street, moves 
its traffic in a single direction. 

Someone has said that the mo- 
ment we are born, we start to die. 
It is a long process, to be sure. 
But after a century of time, more 
or less, time always accomplishes 
that end. 

People use time in different ways. 
Some of us squander it, some of us 
invest it wisely. Do not forget that 
Jesus invested his short life for the 
benefit of others; each minute of 
that short life has brought divi- 
dends to all who would do like- 
wise. Remember, there are no red 
lights on time's one-way street. 
The traffic is kept in continual 
motion. • 



16 



NEW AMERICAN TEMPERANCE PLAN 

PAYS '100 WEEKLY.. 

even for life to Non-drinkers and Non-Smokers ! 

At last — a new kind of hospitalization plan for you thousands who realize drinking and 
smoking are harmful. Rates are fantastically low because "poor risk" drinkers and smok- 
ers are excluded. Since your health is superior there is no age limit, no physical exami- 
nation, no waiting period. Only you can cancel your policy. No salesman will ever call. 
Starting the first day you enter any hospital, you will be paid $14.28 a day. 



You do not smoke or drink — 

so why pay premiums for 

those who do? 

Every day in your newspaper you see 
more evidence that drinking and smoking 
shorten life. They're now one of America's 
leading health problems — a prime cause 
of the high premium rates most hospitali- 
zation policies charge. 

Our rates are based on your 

as a non-drinker and non-smoker. The 
new American Temperance Hospitaliza- 
tion Plan can offer you unbelievably low 
rates because we do not accept drinkers 
and smokers, who cause high rates. Also, 
your premiums can never be raised be- 
cause you grow older or have too many 
claims. Only a general rate adjustment 
up or down could affect your low rates. 
And only you can cancel your policy. We 
cannot. 

READ YOUR AMERICAN 
TEMPERANCE PLAN BENEFITS 
1. You receive $100 cash weekly — 

TAX FREE-even for life, 

from the first day you enter a hospital. 
Good in any hospital in the world. We pay 
in addition to any other insurance you 
carry. We send you our payments Air 
Mail Special Delivery so you have cash 
on hand fast. No limit on number of times 
you collect. 

2. Sickness and accidents are 
covered 

except pregnancy, any act of war or mili- 
tary service, pre-existing accidents or 



sickness, hospitalization caused by use of 
liquor or narcotics. On everything else 
you're fully protected — at amazingly low 
rates! 

3. Other benefits for loss 
within 90 days of accident 

(as described in policy). We pay $2000 
cash for accidental death. Or $2000 cash 
for loss of one hand, one foot, or sight of 
one eye. Or $6000 cash for loss of both 
eyes, both hands, or both feet. 

We invite close comparison 

Actually, no other is like ours. But com- 
pare rates. See what you save. 



DO THIS TODAY! 

Fill out application below and mail right 
away. Upon approval, your policy will be 
promptly mailed. Coverage begins at noon 
on effective date of your policy. Don't de- 
lay. Every day almost 50,000 people enter 
hospitals. So get your protection now. 



MONEY- BACK GUARANTEE 

Read over your policy carefully. Ask your min- 
ister, lawyer and doctor to examine it. Be sure 
it provides exactly what we say it does. Then, 
if for any reason at all you are not 100' ', satis- 
fied, just mail your policy back to us within 30 
days and we will immediately refund your en- 
tire premium. No questions asked. You can 
gain thousands of dollars . . .you risk nothing. 



IMPORTANT: include your first premium with application. 

LOOK AT THESE 
AMERICAN TEMPERANCE LOW RATES 

Pay Monthly Pay Yearly 


Each adult 
19-59 pay. 


$ 3 80 


$ 38 


Each adult 
60-69 pays 


$ 5 90 | $59 


Each adult 
70-100 pays 


$790 


$79 


Each child 18 $980 $00 

and under poyt * *0 

SAVE TWO MONTHS PREMIUM Br PAYING YEARLY! 



TEAR OUT AND MAIL TODAY BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE 



Application to Buckingham Life Insurance Company 
Executive Offices, Libertyville, Illinois 



RANCE HOSPITALIZATION POLICY 



Name (PLEASE PRINT) 




Street or RD 1 otv 


Cniinty state 


ZlD 




Month Day 


Weight 83 ' 


Beneficiary Relationship 




1 also apply for coverage for the members of my family listed below: 

NAME AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT BENEFICIARY 


BIRTH DATE 


1. 


2. 




3. 


4. 



To the best of your knowledge and belief, are you and all members listed above in good health 
and free from any physical impairment, or disease? Yes Q No Q 
To the best of your knowledge, have you or any member above listed had medical advice or 
treatment, or have you or they been advised to have a surgical operation in the last five years? 
Yes □ No □ If so, please give details stating person affected, cause, date, name and address 
of attending physician, and whether fully recovered. 



Neither I nor any person listed above uses tobacco or alcoholic beverages, and I hereby apply 
for a policy based on the understanding that the policy does not cover conditions originating 
prior to its effective date, and that the policy is issued solely and entirely in reliance upon the 
written answers to the above questions. 
Date: Signed:X 

ATIAT 



Mail Mv* application with your first premium to 



5813 



AMERICAN TEMPERANCE ASSOCIATES, Inc., Box 131, Libertyville, Illinois 



cle the /ft 



id Hollis L. (. 



pot) 



up the 



ipurla 



church membership. Mr. Green, a lucid writer, is well experienced as c 

ister, having served the Church of Cod as a pastor, an evangelist, and as a stati 

Sunday school and youth director. Presently he is administrate 

assistant in the National Sunday School and Youth Department of his church 




VOID IF DETACHED 



By HOLLIS L. GREEN 



^» 




*p VERYTHING dear to the 
heart of Jesus Christ is tied 
— ^ up in the church and its work 
in the world. The New Testament 
knew nothing of "free lance" Chris- 
tianity. The believers were united 
for personal edification and Chris- 
tian witness. The church was a 
"fellowship" of all who found union 
with God, who would bring the 
reality of Jesus Christ into all 
their living. A holy love bound 
them together as a resolute band 
f^//X^ of believers determined to change 
% the world for Christ. 

The church ministered to the 
various needs of the individual for 
personal edification and each be- 
liever contributed to the effective- 
ness of the total Christian witness. 
Exerting Christian influence was 
the result of the united effort of 
all believers to live for Jesus Christ 
in the world. To accomplish this 
influence, each believer had to 
maintain his personal experience 
with Christ. 

The purpose of the church is to 
maintain Christian ideals, to edify 
believers, to reach the lost, and to 
be a Christian influence in the 
world. The church is weak today 
despite numerical strength, be- 
cause men often expect the cor- 
porate image of the church to have 
sufficient Christian influence on 
the world. But the church cannot 
do the task that has been assigned 
to the individual Christian. Noth- 
ing effectively can be done so long 
as the church is thought of as a 
whole. Practical thinking is a per- 
sonal matter. The church is only 



the aggregate of all its members 
and cannot be better than the 
spiritual experience of those who 
compose it. 

It is a fallacy of division to 
reason that what is true of the 
whole is true of the part. The 
church with all its purity and pow- 
er can never, by published stan- 
dards alone, influence the world. 
The faith and the Christian stan- 
dards of the church must be 
exemplified in the lives of indi- 
viduals. Discipleship is an indi- 
vidual matter just as salvation is 
a personal experience. Christ is the 
builder of the church, and it is 
true that the church contributes 
to the Christian life of man, but 
the world is influenced by the 
personal experience and testimony 
of believers. The individual Chris- 
tian is a vital part of the church, 
but the Christian witness of the 
church is determined by how the 
individual members conduct them- 
selves in their affairs with men. 

The Christian must seek to un- 
derstand the ministry of the 
church, its place, and its purpose in 
his life, and to attach himself to it 
with intelligence and loyalty as 
an earnest member. The duty of 
the Christian to belong to the 
church is involved in his duty to 
Christ, himself, his fellow Chris- 
tians, and to the world. Member- 
ship in the church enlightens the 
believer of his Christian obligation 
and gives him strength to fulfill 
this duty. 

The believer must not only be 
attached to Christ, there must also 



18 



be a union with other believers. 
The abiding influence of the 
church is essential to maintain the 
proper relationship with God. The 
Bible clearly teaches that the 
Christian experience is strength- 
ened by Christian fellowship and 
weakened by the lack of it. An 
alliance with other believers in 
the worship and work of the church 
assures continued fellowship with 
Christ. 

Church membership is limited to 
those who meet certain require- 
ments set forth in the Word of 
God. Anyone who does not meet 
the qualifications of personal sal- 
vation and a willingness to walk in 
the light of the Scriptures cannot 
become a member of God's church. 
Church membership, however, is a 
logical step for the converted per- 
son. His love and devotion to Jesus 
Christ will naturally cause him to 
associate with others who share 
the same attachment. The church 
is that divine institution that Je- 
sus loved and sacrificed Himself to 
establish. It has a holy mission and 
a sacred message. It is natural 
for the followers of Christ to love 
the church and to desire its fellow- 
ship. 

There is no security for the be- 
liever outside the protection and 
influence of the Christian fellow- 
ship. God's plan did not leave the 
convert to face the "wiles of the 
devil" alone. The church was es- 
tablished to provide a place of di- 
vine refuge and is the believer's 
God-given home. Membership in 
this chosen institution is important. 

Through the Word of God and 
constant Christian companionship, 
the believer gains strength and 
courage to meet life's most trying 
times. Every convert to the Chris- 
tian faith belongs within this 
great company of believers. The 
spiritual life is impaired when fel- 
lowship with the church is lacking. 
Our Christian experience could not 
long exist in these last days with- 
out our participation in this vital 
part of God's plan. The effective 
witness is void if detached from 
the fellowship and life of the 
church. • 




"My 15 years with John Rudin Company 
have been deeply rewarding both spirit- 
ually and financially. Earnings were sub- 
stantial from the very beginning with 
rapid advancement." 



"THIS IS A MINISTRY..." says Walter Bischoff. "It seeks to recapture 
the home as a center of Christian training and influence. It's fascin- 
ating work that blesses one's own life as well as others." 

EARN $ 10,000 

A YEAR AND UP 

$75 to *100 A WEEK PART-TIME 



NO INVESTMENT • NOTHING TO BUY • START AT HOME IN YOUR SPARE TIME 

This is your open door to financial independence. Dignified work 
with a 42-year-old company highly respected by evangelical leaders 
in practically every church group. 

HERE'S WHAT SOME OF OUR MEN AND WOMEN 
ARE EARNING FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME 

Mrs. H. M. earned $3,290 in three months. Mr. R. C. of Canada 
earned over $1,000 a month in the past six months. Mrs. M. W. 
averaged $101 per week part-time last year. Rev. J. H. made $622 
part-time his first month. 

Act now and gain financial independence 



Immediate openings for Christian 
men and women — laymen, house- 
wives, teachers, church workers and 
ministers. No investment or obliga- 
tion. 



INVESTIGATE TODAY! 

start immediately if you qualify 



MAIL THE COUPON NOW 



John Rudin & Co., Inc. 

Dept. LP-66 22 West Madison St. 
Chicago, Illinois 60602 



Please send 



:omplete infor- 



mation on your program 
cost or obligation. 



State or Province 



By DOROTHY C. HASKIN 





c 

OMETIMES BONNIE does 
not know if she is living in 
the United States or in the 

Orient. That is because she lives 

in Naha, Okinawa. 
Okinawa is an island of two 

faces ... a group of Americans 

bathing in the surf ... an ornate 



Okinawan tomb . . . often a sign in 
both Japanese and English. 

Continually the island shows its 
two faces to Bonnie. She is a mis- 
sionary's daughter, a member of 
the one percent who are Christians, 
and she is aware of the two reli- 
gious faces of Okinawa. She knows 
the sixty-four church buildings on 
the island and the work of the 
twenty denominations or boards, 
varying from Baptist to Jehovah's 
Witness. Also, she has been in many 
homes with a god shelf, where the 
family bows low before the ances- 
tral tablets. Daily, she walks by the 
large homes with the fierce stone 
dog at the entrance that is sup- 
posed to frighten away the evil 
spirits. 

It is all fascinating to Bonnie, but 
inasmuch as she lives among so 
much superstition, she is thankful 
that her father is a missionary. 
How proud she was when the 
United States High Commissioner, 
Lieutenant General Paul W. Cara- 
way said to the missionaries, "I 



thank you for your selfless service 
to the people of Ryukyu Islands. 
They need many things — spiritual, 
intellectual, and material. They de- 
sire these things and I am con- 
vinced that they possess the basic 
qualities that make the bulk of 
them willing to work for the ful- 
fillment of their desires. They need 
help; and you are doing your full 
share in supplying this need." 

It has been a satisfaction to have 
her father's work so appreciated. 
Bonnie and her family used to live 
in Manila, where her father worked 
for a Christian radio organization, 
FEBC, that broadcasts news, music, 
and the Christian message in 
thirty-six languages over seventeen 
transmitters. They have a total of 
107 program hours each day. 

From Manila, her father was 
transferred to Okinawa. She went 
with him to Oyama, at the north 
end of the island where the 
transmitters and antennas were lo- 
cated. She crawled out over the 
rocks to the place where the guy 



20 



7vvo Fatc&s of Okinawa 



wire was fastened in a rock lapped 
by the China Sea. It was with awe 
in her heart that she stood there 
and tried to visualize Chinese men 
and women, and maybe girls like 
herself on Mainland China, listen- 
ing to the wonderful story of Jesus 
Christ. She knew that their com- 
munist leaders try to keep them 
from knowing about God, but noth- 
ing can stop the radio from going 
over the airways. 

She turned and walked across 
the grass toward the building 
where the transmitter was located, 
thinking how carefully the pro- 
grams were taped. Always the 
voices were Chinese, the music 
European classical. No mention 
was made of denominations, for 
that was western, and only illus- 
trations from the Bible were used. 
There was nothing to offend the 
regime, only to encourage the 
Christians. 

Bonnie knew the people listened, 
for letters written on rice paper 
in Chinese characters came to the 
station. She remembered one spe- 
cial one which said, "It will be a 
surprise to you when you receive 
my letter. I returned to the Main- 
land of China last year from Ban- 
dung, Indonesia. When I was in 
Indonesia I could go to church with 
my family every Sunday. Luckily 
we have a radio so that we can 
listen to the gospel broadcasting 
in Cantonese, Amoy, and Indo- 
nesian. Before and after working, 
we listen to the radio and we do 
feel better and comforted." 

Bonnie only lived a few months 
in Oyama. Then her family moved 
to Naha, where the broadcasting 
studios are located. Their pro- 



grams are taped to broadcast over 
KSDX, the Japanese-language sta- 
tion and KSAB, an English-lan- 
guage station. Talk about its being 
one world! Bonnie has the best of 
either hemisphere right in Okinawa. 
Most exciting of all is her school. 
It is strictly different! She had 
heard of the problem of mission- 
aries' children getting the right 
kind of schooling and that some- 
times the mother teaches them. 
But Bonnie's mother had not 
taught her. Where the family was 
first stationed in Manila, she had 
attended Faith Academy for mis- 
sionary children. But since she had 
come to live in the Ryukyus she 
attended Okinawa Christian 
School. While some of the students 
had missionary parents, there 
were more students whose fathers 
were businessmen. 

How many times had she heard 
her father explain to a touring 
minister from the United States 
about the school. She knew the 
speech by heart. In his easy voice, 
that carried a deep undercurrent 
of conviction, he always said: 

"In Okinawa it is a problem to 
know where to send one's children 
to school. Because the United States 
government has located a large 
section of military personnel in 
Okinawa and business is flourish- 
ing, many Oriental businessmen 
have come here from the Philip- 
pines or Hong Kong. Their chil- 
dren do not speak Japanese suffi- 
ciently to go to the Japanese 
schools. The military government 
won't let them attend the school 
for military personnel. Therefore, 
we realize that it is a ministry 
to open Okinawa Christian School, 



not only for our own boys and 
girls but also for the children of 
businessmen." 

Bonnie counted and decided that 
out of the over one hundred at- 
tending the school, only eight or 
ten had missionaries for parents. 

Bonnie sighed! Her classes were 
mostly small because there were 
fewer teen-agers but many of the 
classes were crowded. Teachers 
were the problem. Some were mis- 
sionary's wives, others servicemen's 
wives, including wives of three 
Negroes. But . . . Bonnie fretted, 
why does everyone who wants to 
be a missionary, think he has to 
be an evangelist? or a doctor? or 
teach in a Bible school? Why can 
not someone see that it is just as 
important to teach children? Or 
teen-agers who have to live in a 
foreign country? 

All sorts of thoughts jumbled 
over in Bonnie's mind as she 
walked home. She passed a moth- 
er, carrying a toddler on her back, 
a woman washing rice at the well, 
an old man in a kimono, carrying 
a cane. Several children stared at 
her, but she went on her way, 
away from the people, toward the 
shore. 

There under a pine tree twisted 
by the wind, she stood facing the 
ocean. A light spray flickered 
across her face, as she prayed: 
"Lord, it's a wonderful world, and 
full of all sorts of interesting 
things. I don't really know what I 
want to do when I graduate. Some- 
times I think I must go to those 
who live on the other islands and 
tell them about Jesus. Other times, 
I see the need of coming back here 
as a teacher. Whatever I do, Lord, 
I want it to be for Thee. Araen."» 



21 




in fiiw mil 



BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA 



"Christ Is Our Need" was the 
theme used in the opening services 
of National Youth Week on Mon- 
day, January 31. Tuesday evening 
the theme was "Christ Is Our All'; 
and "Christ Is the Way" was the 
subject for Wednesday night. Three 
young persons spoke at each service. 
The youth were in complete charge 
of the program. 

On Sunday, February 6, the 
young people of the church pre- 
sented one of the most successful 
and wonderful Youth Day pro- 
grams ever. Sixty young persons 
served in every official capacity of 
the church. The junior-highs and 
senior-highs served as Christian 
education director, general Sunday 
school superintendents, departmen- 
tal superintendents, and choir di- 
rector. Youth from the young peo- 
ple's class and the senior-high class 
served as Sunday school teachers 
for the Adult Department. The 
junior-highs and juniors served as 
Sunday school teacher for the 
Youth, and Junior Departments, 
and as the Sunday school secretary. 
The Beginner Department was the 
youth choir for the day. 



The ushers and offering boys 
were from the Junior and Junior- 
high Departments. The youth pas- 
tor gave a most challenging and 
inspiring message before the reg- 
ular pastoral sermon. 

All youth workers for Youth Day 
assembled in their regular classes 
for the record and then reported to 
their assignment in the various de- 
partments. The regular officers 
and teachers were present to as- 
sist if needed. This Youth Day 
served as on-the-job training for 
the young people of our church. 

The youth performed with such 
dignity, poise, and sincere worship 
that the adults of the church re- 
quested the Youth Day be held 
more frequently than once a year. 
This is the fifth year that Youth 
Day has been observed in this man- 
ner. 

The training of our young peo- 
ple became a reality before the 
church. It was a rewarding experi- 
ence to see the church of tomor- 
row in action today. 

— Russell L. Miller, Director 
Christian Education 




PRAYER DAY 

We are calling on all Christians 
everywhere to pray for gospel 
broadcasting on June 12, 1966. Each 
year the International Christian 
Broadcasters sponsor this Annual 
Day of Prayer for Gospel Broad- 
casting around the world. 

There are currently fifty-three 

missionary radio and television 

stations on the air, scattered across 

j the world. In addition, hundreds of 

i programs are produced and re- 

I leased over commercial stations. 

I Presently there are over four hun- 

i dred million radio receivers, or an 

I average of thirteen sets for every 

one hundred people. Some 12,600 

| transmitters are in use throughout 

the world, and the transistor — 

pocket radio — has brought millions 

I of people within the reach of the 

| gospel. 

Television is expanding with fan- 
| tastic speed, and color television is 
j actively developed in many coun- 
tries. About 2,500 television trans- 
| mitters are now in use, and the 
j opportunities for the Church of 
God are unlimited. 

Pray especially on June 12 for 
effective communication. Pray for 
the Forward in Faith broadcast 
sponsored by the Church of God, 
and for gospel broadcasting every- 
where. 



22 







M 




NATIONAL AWARD WINNING TROOP 



Boy Scout Troop 90 of the Park 
Avenue Church of God in Charlotte, 
North Carolina, was recently hon- 
ored with the National Camping 
Award of the Boy Scouts of Ameri- 
ca for 1965. In demonstrating its 
excellent camping skills, Troop 90 
also competed with fifteen troops 
to win the first place award at the 
annual Boy Scout Camporee in the 
Blue Ridge Mountains. In June, 
1965, Troop 90 again took first 
place honors for having kept the 
neatest campsite during a seven- 
day camp period at Camp Steere 
on the Catawba River. 

At the 1965 Boy Scout Exposition 
held in the Charlotte Coliseum 
the national award winning troop, 
along with thirty-three other 
troops, were presented first place 
awards for their exhibition of Boy 
Scout skills while competing with 
some seventy troops. The Park 
Avenue troop presented a booth 
demonstrating the techniques and 
procedures of the merit badge, 
Pigeon Raising, which featured live 
pigeons. The Charlotte Observer 
also gave the Park Avenue troop 
honorable mention in its report of 
the exhibition. 



The Eagle Scout Award has been 
recently awarded to two members 
of Troop 90: John Risley, Jr., and 
Calvin Fink. Of the twenty-five 
members of the troop, nine have 
completed the Junior Leader's 
Training Course and three have 
become members of the Order of 
the Arrow, a brotherhood organi- 
zation for honor scout campers. 

Scoutmaster John Risley, Sr., 
has been awarded the Scoutmas- 
ter's Key Award after having com- 
pleted three consecutive years as 
scoutmaster and having twice led 
his troop to earn recognition 
awards in national programs. As- 
sistant Scoutmaster Dave Fink has 
been awarded the Scouter's Train- 
ing Award after having completed 
similar requirements. 

The Park Avenue Church of God 
has discovered Scouting to be a 
true adventure in Christian educa- 
tion. By making it an integral part 
of its Christian education program, 
it is reaping the valuable benefits 
which Scouting provides for the 
boy, church, and community. 

— Lonzo T. Kirkland 

Special Activities Supervisor 

Sunday School and 

Youth Department 



GOSPEL TENTS FOR SALE 
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REPORT OF PFC WORK 
From Page 1 1 



Since the youth have organized a 
PFC, spiritual interest is continual- 
ly on the increase churchwide. On 
one particular Saturday, the PFC 
president led the way by visiting 
forty homes in one day. Realizing 
the need of total church involve- 
ment, a youth chorus has been or- 
ganized from this group. Recently 
at a district youth convention, the 
large choir at the Wilson Church 
was packed with these young peo- 
ple. 

The Charlotte District PFC, led 
by Bobby Sustar, concentrates in 
one local church area every month. 
This is a combination door-to-door 
invasion and visitation for the lo- 
cal Church of God. 

The Elm Street Church in Kan- 
napolis has "Meet Human Needs" 
Night each Thursday in which 
young and old are invited to go out 
from the church to meet whatever 
need is prevalent — salvation, Holy 
Ghost, healing, comfort, prayer, et- 
cetera. As a result, we have had an 
increase in attendance, with re- 
vival-spirited services. 

Hayesville, a small district in 
Western North Carolina, has a dis- 
trict PFC that travels forty miles 
on Sunday afternoons to the small 
town of Robbinsville to witness. A 
new Church of God averaging 
thirty-eight in Sunday school is the 
result of these efforts. This is the 
sole holiness church in the county. 

These are reports from only a 
few, but they are typical of the 
wonderful efforts of PFC Clubs 
across North Carolina. PFC work 
is doubtlessly one of the reasons 
God is blessing the Church of God 
in churches large and small, old 
and young. For the last six months, 
North Carolina Sunday schools 
have averaged over twenty-five 
thousand persons in attendance 
per Sunday. Much credit for re- 
cruiting and enlisting must be giv- 
en to our fine youth who are doing 
a marvelous job of propagating a 
gospel that changes lives. • 



Young Peoples Endeavor 



MARCH YPE ATTENDANCE 

By Donald S. Aultman 
National Director 

This report represents only those 
iTPE's that had an average atten- 
dance of more than 50 weekly and 
reported their attendance to the 
office of the National Sunday 
School and Youth Director. By no 
means does it reflect all the Fam- 
ily Training Hour (YPE) groups 
of the Church of God. Each church 
is invited to participate in this 
column. Attendance averages 
should be mailed on a postal card 
on the day following the last YPE 
service in the month and should 
be addressed to Donald S. Aultman, 
National Director, 1080 Montgom- 
ery Avenue, Cleveland, Tennessee 
37311. 

Middletown, Ohio .... .... 244 

Atlanta (Hemphill), Georgia . 201 
Lakeland (Lake Wire), 

Florida 199 

Cincinnati (Central Parkway), 

Ohio - .... 192 

Goldsboro, North Carolina 189 

Flint (West), Michigan 172 

Gastonia (Ranlo), 

North Carolina 167 

Ecorse, Michigan 166 

Greenville (Tremont Avenue), 

South Carolina _ .... 166 

Jacksonville ( Springfield ) , 

Florida .... 156 

Wilson, North Carolina 150 

Garden City, Florida 148 

Tampa (Buffalo Avenue), 

Florida .... 148 

Wyandotte, Michigan ... . 142 

Paris, Texas ._. . __. ._. . ._. 141 

Hamilton (7th and Chestnut), 

Ohio 134 

Miamisburg, Ohio ._. 130 

Greenwood, (South), 

South Carolina .... .... 127 

Kannapolis (Elm Street), 

North Carolina 125 

Chattanooga (East), 

Tennessee .... 114 

Elyria, Ohio 113 

North Ridgeville, Ohio 113 

Vanceburg, Ohio .... .... .... .... Ill 

Lorain, Ohio .... 110 



Waycross (Genoa Street), 

Georgia .... .... 

Brownfield, Texas 

Swift Current, 

Saskatchewan 

Augusta (Crawford Avenue), 

Georgia .... 

Pompano Beach, Florida 

Bartow, Florida _ . 

Middle Valley, Tennessee 

Chattanooga (North), 

Tennessee .... _ 

Danville (West), Virginia . 

Salisbury, Maryland ... 

Morganton, North Carolina 

Dallas (Oak Cliff), Texas 

Kingsport (Chestnut Street), 

Tennessee _ 

Isola, Mississippi . 

Monroe (4th Street), 

Michigan .... _ _ 

Dayton, Tennessee .... 

Norfolk (Azalea Garden), 

Virginia .... . 

St. Paul, North Carolina .... . 

Dillon, South Carolina 

Jesup, Georgia _ _ . 

Lawton (9th and Lee), 

Oklahoma . 

Vero Beach, Florida 

Amarillo (West), Texas .... . 

Joppa, Maryland 

Lawrenceville, Illinois 

Manns Choice, Pennsylvania . 
Johnson City, Tennessee .... . 
Roanoke Rapids, 

North Carolina .... . 

Fremont, Ohio 

Decatur, Alabama .... 

Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan ... 

Sale Creek, Tennessee 

Raleigh (Georgetown Road), 

North Carolina ... . „ .... . 

Talladega, Alabama 

Kokomo (Central), 

Indiana .... .... .... 

Phoenix (South), Arizona .... 
Jackson (Crest Park), 

Mississippi . 

Modesto, California .... __ 
Santa Ana (Center Street), 

California 

South Lebanon, Ohio . 

Wayne, Michigan 

Willow Run, Michigan .... ._. 

Belle Glade, Florida .... .... . 

Clayton, Georgia .... 



109 

107 



106 

106 

103 
102 

101 
100 
100 



37 



85 



24 



Columbus (Frebis Avenue), 

Ohio - _ 74 

Cleveland (Detroit Avenue), 

Ohio 73 

Lake Placid, Florida ... 70 

North, South Carolina .... 70 

Phoenix (44th Street), 

Arizona 70 

St. Stephen, South Carolina __ 70 

Loxley, Alabama .... __ 69 

Valdosta, Georgia 69 

Lake Worth, Florida .... 68 

Reeds Chapel, Tennessee 67 

West Columbia, South Carolina 67 

Portsmouth, Virginia .... 64 

Jasonville (Park and McKinley), 

Indiana __ — — 62 

Holland, Michigan _ 61 

Odessa, Texas .... _ __ _ 60 

Sanford, Florida .... _ ._ 59 

Circleville, Ohio 58 

Davie, Florida _ 58 

Bessemer City, North Carolina. 57 

Gardendale, Alabama 57 

Mobile (Lott Road), 

Alabama __ __ __ _ 56 

Cleveland (East), 

Tennessee ... ... - — 55 

Hickory (East), 

North Carolina .- — 55 

Logan, West Virginia 55 

Newport, Tennessee .... _ ._ 55 
Gastonia (East), 

North Carolina 54 

Monroe, Louisiana __ 54 

Bonne Terre, Missouri 53 

East Point, Georgia 53 

Lagrange, Ohio - 53 

Lake Orion, Michigan : 53 

Norton, Virginia 53 

Portland (Powell Boulevard), 

Oregon .... - 53 

Royston, Georgia — . .- 53 

Tyler, Missouri _ 53 

Gainesville, Georgia .... .... ... . 52 

Charlottesville, Virginia .... _ 51 

Pine Bluff, Arkansas .... .... .... 51 

Royal Oak, Michigan .... _ .... 50 



tPOGQ UPQt]& 



Miss Judith Rimar (17) 
10940 Ravenna Road 
Twinsburg, Ohio 44087 

Miss Cecilia Mason (16) 
Box 276 
Temperanceville, Virginia 



Buddy Wycuff (15) 
P. O. Box 3005 A 
Crab Orchard, Tennessee 

37723 

Miss Sandra Yelvington (14) 

Box 562 

Winter Haven, Florida 33880 

Victor Smith (15) 

32 Hampton Green Avenue 

Spanish Town, Jamaica, W.I. 

Miss Peggy Sue Howe (14) 

Route 1 

Sarah, Mississippi 38665 

Miss Mary F. Hanks (19) 
General Delivery 
Galax, Virginia 

Miss Mary E. Thomas (21) 
Route 2, Box 46 
Clyde, N. C. 

Miss Mary E. Lee (18) 
Route 4, Box 475 
Mount Olive, N. C. 

Miss Charlotte Y. Starcher 

(20) 
Haws Hill Road 
Franklin, West Virginia 

Mr. Charles R. Shacklett (22) 
P. O. Box 171 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Mr. W. Edward Hunt (23) 
108 Randolph Street 
Enfield, N. C. 



SERVICEMAN 
ABROAD? 









If you have a relative or friend 
in the armed service-s in Europe 
and should like for him to be con- 
tacted by the Church of God, send 
his name and address to the fol- 
lowing address: 

The Reverend G. A. Swanson 
European Servicemen's 

Representative 
675 Kaiserslautern, 

Pirmasenerstr 31 
Deutchland, Germany 




Hoiomalic Gas Water 
Heater #3 
Will supply all the hot water needed 
for Baptistries, Church Kitchens, 
Rest Rooms. Heats 450 GPH, 20° 
rise in temperature. Write for free 
folders on water heaters, Fiberglass 
Baptistries, spires and crosses. Also 
Electric Water Heaters. 

LITTLE GIANT MFG. CO. 

907 7th Street, Orange, Texas 



ISTRIES- SPIRES 

Unit-Molded 

Fibergl 

Accessories f^'jE! ' -y- 

Box 672 Dept. J5, Muscatine, Iowa j 




RAISE MONEY 

FOR ANY WORTHY PURPOSE 



Write for Free Information 

LOVEJOY PUBLISHING HOUSE 

P. O. Box 8 — Madison, Tenn. 



FOR SALE: GOSPEL TENTS. Spe- 
cial prices to minister*. For com- 
plete information write VALDOS- 
TA TENT AND AWNING CO., 
Box 248, Valdosta, Georgia. Day 
Phone: CHerry 2-0730. Night 
Phone: CHerry 2-5118. 



WOLFE BROS. & CO. 

PINEY FLATS, TENN. 

Manufacturers of DISTINCTIVE 




Since 1888. Write for free estimate. 



GOSPEL TENTS 

For Sole 

Nashville Tent & Awning Co. 

615 20th Ave., N. 

Nashville, Tennessee 

Write for Price 



SOUTHEASTERN EQUIPMENT CO. 




Chairs and tables in com- 
plete range of sizes for every 
Church need. Steel and wood 
folding chairs, folding ban- 
quet tables, speakers' stands. 
Also office desks and 
chairs. Write for in for- _- 



SIIFR CITY. NORTH CAROL 



25 




LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, DISTRICT QUEEN 



Miss Darlene Fulford, from the 
Happyville Church of God, was 
crowned "queen" for 1966 at the 
annual banquet for the Lake City, 
Florida, District. The banquet is 
sponsored by the District Youth 
Department and was held Satur- 
day night, February 12, at the 
Blanche Hotel, under the direction 
of the Reverend Glen R. Barrs, 
district youth director. 

The program was opened with 
the invocation by Mrs. Mary Ben- 
ton and a welcome by Miss Dar- 
lene Roschester. Everyone joined in 
singing, after which everyone en- 
joyed a very lovely dinner. 

The highlight of the evening was 
a talent contest to select the dis- 
trict queen for 1966. Contestants 



included Miss Darlene Fulford from 
Happyville, Miss Sue Barton from 
Olustee, Miss Mary Carr from Lake 
City, Mr. Johnny Larramore from 
Macclenny, and Miss Sue Blount 
from Lake City. 

The winner was selected on the 
basis of the number of banquet 
tickets sold, the number of Evangel 
subscriptions sold, and the perfor- 
mance in the talent contest. 

The crowning of the 1966 queen 
was conducted by Mrs. Donald K. 
Koon, followed by remarks from 
Glen Barrs, youth director; Albert 
J. King, master of ceremonies; and 
Donald K. Koon, district pastor. 
The benediction was given by W. C. 
Cobb. 

— Gene Rowell, reporter 




FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 

Donna Jo Sarvis, a member of 
the Fourth Avenue Church of God, 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, was pre- 
sented the Certificate of Merit 
Award recently. The award was 
given for outstanding activities and 
leadership in the home, the school, 
and the community. Her school 
principal said of her: "Donna is 
an only child, but she has re- 
mained very unselfish, kind, gra- 
cious, and entirely unspoiled." 

Donna, a twelve-year-old sixth 
grader, has adjusted well to her 
home, though her mother cannot 
speak to her. When Donna was an 
infant, her mother lost her voice 
and is a permanent tracheotomy 
patient. It was necessary that Don- 
na learn lipreading before she ever 
learned to read written notes. She 
responds to the tinkling of a bell 
when her mother needs her. This 
young lady accepted Christ at an 
early age and joined the church 
last year. 



Subscribe to the LIGHTED PATHWAY, 
one of America's leading evangelical 
magazines. The cost is negligible — just 
$1.50 per year. Address: 

LIGHTED PATHWAY 
922 Montgomery Avenue 
Cleveland, Tennessee 37311 



2fi 



ANIMAL FRIENDS OF THE BIBLE 



LIFE 

Twixt life and death, there is a role. 

And each must act his own. 
Time now to feed the living soul — 

Our tenets be made known. 
Some think that only poets dream 

Of love and life hereafter, 
Not so! for every soul that breathes 

Must have some love and laughter. 
— Wilma Caudle 



Since time began, a horse has run 
With hoofs of flashing black, 
Obediently responding to 
The one upon his back. 

Food ravens brought to Elijah 
Long years ago, sufficed: 
A donkey at Jerusalem 
Triumphant, carried Christ. 

The dove with olive in its mouth 

From drier habitat 

Led Noah safely in the ark 

To cleft of Ararat. 



WOODLAND REFUGE 

My little woodland road 
Could lead to anywhere. 
Welcome peace and quietude 
Enfold me when I'm there. 

My worries slip away 
Amid its rustic charms, 
As they did long ago. 
When I lay in mother's arms. 

— Mildred Rapp 



A lamb was carried in the arms 

Of One who loved mankind: 

The cock that crowed in warning was 

Not far from Palestine. 

A fatling and a little child, 

A leopard and a bear 

Were prophesied to live in peace 

With cockatrice and hare. 

And when a little sparrow falls, 
All frozen on the sod, 
The nestling, though frail and small, 
Is known and loved by God! 

—Stella Craft Tremble 



LOOKING WESTWARD 



I saw the prairies on an autumn day — 
Vast, rolling ruggedness of brush and sage. 
Raw, naked buttes, by wind worn away, 
Mute symbols of the ravages of age. 



SORROW IS A TESTING 



Brown grassland graduates to purple hills 
That meet a sky, so big! so azure bright! 
These boundless miles my soul with rapture fills; 
I feel contentment and a sweet delight. 



The darkest night will have an end 
And morning, bright and fresh, will dawn; 
If we have patience, trust, and hope, 
Our dark despair will soon be gone. 



Against a backdrop of such awesome size. 
My own, trifling cares just disappear. 
I cannot hear those petty, selfish cries, 
While God's great silent music fills my ear. 
—Thelma M. Williamson 



Look up with faith; believe His Word. 
God soon will wipe away our tears. 
The pricks of sorrow which we feel 
Are ways He tests us down the years. 



-Roy Z. Kemp 




ST8M TH8 SVIL TID8 



in literature by 

stimulating interest in good books. 
Help win the battle for die 
minds and hearts of youth by 
creating a market for wholesome 
Christian literature. 
You can start now by joining the 
1 *i ill 1WI iv I it H)\< Clt 
Our club helps drive out bad books 
by making good books available 
monthly . . . and you 
get a BONUS book with each 
4 that you receive. 

Add your strength to our efforts today. Simply fill out the application form and mail today. 



HOW THE CLUB OPERATES 

Each month the Pathway Book Club reviewers will make a se- 
lection for each division from the very best Christian books 
available. A copy of the Book Path containing reviews of these 
selections will be sent to each member. The member will 
decide whether or not he desires the book for his division. 
If so, he does NOTHING, it will come automatically. If he 
does NOT want the selection, he simply mails a properly 
check rejection slip which is included in each Book Path. 



CHOOSE YOUR DIVISION 

The Pathway Book Club offers books in three separate and 
distinct divisions: 

1. THE MINISTERIAL DIVISION offers sermonic helps and 
study books for ministers and Bible students. 

2. THE REGULAR DIVISION offers Christian fiction, bio- 
graphical, and devotional books for laymen, teen-agers, and 
adults. 

3. THE JUNIOR DIVISION offers inexpensive Christian books 
for children under 12 years of age. 





PATHWAY BOOK CLUB 






922 MONTGOMERY AVENUE 


A 




CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE J[_ J\jU JU • 


^wmm. 




PLEASE ENROLL ME AS A MEMBER OF THE PATHWAY BOOK CLUB. 
SEND ME YOUR INTRODUCTORY OFFER OF FIVE BOOKS, THE LETTERS 
OF WHICH 1 HAVE ENCIRCLED, PLUS A COPY OF THE LIVING LETTERS 
FOR ONLY 99C PLUS POSTAGE. 1 AGREE TO TAKE 4 ADDITIONAL 
DIVIDEND-CREDIT MONTHLY SELECTIONS WITHIN ONE YEAR. WITH 
EACH FOURTH SELECTION 1 DO ACCEPT, 1 MAY CHOOSE A FREE BONUS 
BOOK FROM A SPECIAL LIST PROVIDED. 1 PROMISE TO PAY WITHIN 
30 DAYS. 


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SELECT 5 BOOKS AND CIRCLE THE CORRESPONDING LETTERS HERE: 


your : 




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REGULAR A. UNDER WHOSE WINGS 
Zenobia Bird. I Retail price. $2.50) B. NO 
MORE A STRANGER bv Orville Steggerda. 
(Retail price, $2.50 1 C. BLAZE STAR bv Paul 
Hutchens. (Retail price. $2.95) D. THROUGH 
WINDING WAYS bv Zenobia Bird. (Retai 
price. $2.00) E. ECLIPSE bv Paul Hutchens 
(Retail price. $2.95 1 F. MYSTERY OF THE 
MARSH bv Paul Hutchens. (Retail price. 
$2.95) G. UPRIGHT LOVE bv Phvllis Speshock. 
I Retail price. $2.95) H. THE QUEST by Bauer. 
(Retail price, $2.50) 

MINISTERIAL I. PREACHING FROM ECCLE- 
SIASTES bv G. Averv Lee. I Retail price. $2.75 1 
J. AND JESUS IN THE MIDST by Herman 
Hoeksema. (Retail price. $1.50) K. EFFECTIVE 
PUBLIC PRAYER bv Robert L. Williams 
(Retail price. $2.95) L. MESSIANIC PROPHECY 
IN THE OLD TESTAMENT bv Aaron J. Klige 
man. (Retail price, $2.95) M. KINGS ON 
PARADE bv Lee Roberson. (Retail price. $1.50 
N. OPERATION EVANGELISM bv Horace F. 
Dean. (Retail price, $2.95) O. MOSES' MIGHTY 
MEN bv H. Hobbs. (Retail price, $2.50) P. YOU 
AND THE HOLY SPIRIT by Oglesby. (Retail 
price. $1.50) 

JUNIOR Q. MAN-EATERS AND MASAI 
SPEARS bv Charles Ludwig. (Retail price. 
$1.25) R. WITHOUT A SWORD by Mar-alvi 
Randolph Cate. (Retail price. $2.25) S. STORY 
OF MARTIN LUTHER bv Marion Shoeland. 
(Retail price, $1.25) T. ROGUE ELEPHANT 
bv Charles Ludwig. (Retail price. $1.25 1 U. 
THE BOY FROM NORTHFIELD by Harry 
Albus. (Retail price. $1.25) V. MAN-EATERS 
DON'T LAUGH bv Charles Ludwig. (Retail 
price. $1.25 1 W. KEN. SOUTH OF THE BOR- 
DER bv Basil Miller, i Retail price, $1.00 1 
X. MAN-EATERS CLAW by Charles Ludwig. 
(Retail price, $1.25) 



LIGHTED 



JULY, 1966 



fill 



m 



1 1 1 1 1 1 



I 



«• § i 



LUll; 



Mill 



Hf*j 









i 






IIIH4 



THE 

LEE COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

announces the first 

BIENNIAL ALUMNI BANQUET 

at the 

CHURCH OF GOD GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

in 

Memphis, Tennessee 

on 

Saturday, August 13, 1966 

from 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. 

Theme: "Be Thou An Example" 



Speaker 

Master of Ceremonies 

Alumni President 

Program Committee 
Donald Aultman 



Ray H. Hughes 

J. H. Walker, Jr. 

Paul L. Walker 

Delton Alford 
Bennie Triplett 



Address Inquiries to: 

Philip C. Morris, Secretary 

LEE COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Cleveland, Tennessee 37311 



Published monthly at the Church of God Publishing House. 
Cleveland, Term. All materials intended for publication in The 
LIGHTED PATHWAY should be addressed to Clyne W. Buxton, 
Editor. All inquiries concerning subscriptions should be addressed 
to Bookkeeping Department, Church of God Publishing House, 
Cleveland, Tennessee. 

ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER AT 
POST OFFICE, CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 
Postmaster send Form 3579 to LIGHTED PATHWAY. P. O. Box 
880. Cleveland, Tennessee 37311. 



LIGHTED 



Pathway 

DEDICATED TO THE CHURCH OF GOD VOUNG PEDP. ' "^ 



Ju 


ly 1966 


Vol. 


37, 


No. 7 


CONTENTS 




Editorial 


3 


Clyne W. Buxton 


Liberty Bell Is Not 






America's Oldest! 


4 


Grover Brinkman 


Flag At Half-Mast 


5 


Roy Bernard Jussell 


Unequal Yoke 


6 


James E. Adams 


Time — And the Kitchen 






Blackboard 


7 


Grace V. Schi 1 linger 


Who Can Be Against Us? 


8 


Neal C. Neitzel 


Evangelism and Home 






Missions 


9 


Walter R. Pettitt 


Be An Example of 






Independence 


10 


Denzell Teague 


Courage Unexcelled 


11 


Violetta Gammon 


Our Flag 


12 


Nancy M. Armstrong 


I've Got the Car Tonight! 


13 


Charles Van Ness 


Dedicated to the Glory 






of God 


14 


Paul F. Henson 


What Is Your Score? 


15 


Irene Belyeu 


God Beside You 


16 


Clare Miseles 


Word From Heaven 


18 


Matilda Nordtvedt 


Mac's Victory 


20 


Norman Carroll Mohn, Ph.D 


A Gem From Tragedy 


21 


Geneva Carroll 


Young People's Endeavor 


22 


Donald S. Aultman 


Kings of the Ocean 


26 


David Gunston 


Poetry 






Cover 




Eastern Photo 


STAFF 




Clyne W. Buxton 


Editor 


Lewis J. W 


Mis 


Editor in Chief 


Chloe Stewart 


Artist 


Kathy Woodard 


Research 


H. Bernard Di 


<on 


Circulation Director 


E. C. Thomas 


Publisher 


CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 




Donald S. Aultman 


Paul F. Henson 


Margie M. Ke 


ley 


Avis Swiger 


Denzell Teague 




FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS 




Bobbie May Lauster 


France 


Margaret Ga' 


nes 


Jordan 


L. E, Heil 


Japan 


Ruth Crawford 


Brazil 


Martha Ann Srr 


ith 


China 


NATIONAL YOUTH BOA 


RD 




L W. Mclntyre 


Thomas Grassano 


Cecil R. Gu 


les 


Haskel C. Jenkins 


Paul L. Walker 




SUBSCRIPTION RATE 




Single Subscript 


on, 




per year 


$1.50 


Rolls of 


15 


$1.50 


Single copy 


.15 



Clvx^eV</. EJuxton 



PRICE OF FREEDOM 



m. 



Y WIFE, OUR thirteen-year-old daughter, and 
I quietly closed the door to our home, slipped 
into the family car, and pulled slowly out of 
our driveway. If we were fortunate, we could glide 
through our hometown and into the countryside un- 
noticed. Then we might be able to escape. An enemy 
had overrun our country and our freedom had been 
destroyed. The radio and television was blaring forth 
the announcement that all firearms and Bibles were 
to be taken to the city hall and every person was to 
go down and register, regardless of age. All churches 
were closed. No longer could we worship as we desired, 
work where we wanted to, or read or speak as we 
pleased. 

My family and I got through the town and fled 
into the countryside. Miles away there was a little- 
used, ungraded road, which we knew about, winding 
through a large wooded area. We reached the road, 
followed it for awhile, and finally pulled the car into 
deep woods, covering the tracks behind us. With a 
shovel we dug a pit beneath the car for extra space, 
being careful to dispose of the dirt from our digging. 
After storing what supplies we had brought, we settled 
down for a long period of hiding. Our family devotions 
were held quietly with no singing, lest we attract 
someone and our hiding place would be discovered. 
Deeply we yearned for the normal life — to walk down 
a street unmolested, to go to a well-stocked grocery 
store, to read the newspaper. Fondly we remembered 
Sunday school, worship services, and good literature. 
However, we knew that the churches had been nailed 
shut and the presses had been taken over by the oc- 
cupational forces. Our country had been overrun by 
an enemy, and we were stunned. Freedoms, which we 
had taken for granted all of our lives, were now so 
precious and so far from us. We sat in the woods 
dejectedly. 

About that time an alarm clock went off. I heard 
pans rattling in the kitchen and smelled bacon fry- 
ing. Faintly I heard the newsman on the television 
in the den telling of the proposed launching of two 



astronauts. We were not a captive nation! We were 
still free! I had been dreaming! I breathed a prayer 
of thanks for freedom and bounced out of bed. 

This month, July 4, we commemorate the beginning 
of our freedom — the beginning of our independence. 
How we thank God for the courage of our forefathers! 
Recounting the grievances of the colonies against the 
English crown and declaring the colonies to be free 
and independent states, the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence marked the culmination of a political process. 
The colonies were now releasing themselves from the 
crown and were founding their own government. 
This historic Declaration, the original draft being 
penned by Thomas Jefferson, using "neither book 
nor pamphlet," as he later said, is a model document. 
Its principles have been incorporated into various gov- 
ernments in Europe and Latin America. 

Of course, the resounding note throughout the Decla- 
ration is freedom, and the last sentence reads, "And 
for the support of this Declaration, with a firm re- 
liance on the protection of Divine Providence, we 
mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes 
and our sacred honor." Fifty-six men, representing 
the thirteen states, solemnly affixed their signatures 
to the document. Thus a free nation began to take 
shape. Note that these founders of our country pledged 
their fortunes, their honor, and even their lives to 
freedom. 

A few months ago I stood in the very room where 
these men, bent on freedom, signed the Declaration 
of Independence 190 years ago. Surveying the rustic 
chairs, the simple tables, and the other common 
surroundings, mentally I reconstructed the signing of 
the document and visualized the sincerity that must 
have transpired there. Surely these men knew that 
their actions would bring down the wrath of the 
mother country on their heads. Yet, by their actions, 
they were saying that they would rather be dead free 
men — if it came to dying — than to be live bondmen. 
Such is the price of freedom! 






LIBERTY 
BELL 

Is not America's o&ftf! 



a 



By GROVER BRINKMAN 



HE USE OF BELLS for service, in the Chris- 
tian church is usually ascribed to Paulinus, 
Bishop of Nola, in Campania, Italy (353-431). 
But their extensive use for church purposes seems to 
be credited to Pope Sabinianus (604-606) who or- 
dained that every hour should be announced by the 
sound of a bell. 

The Anglo-Saxon historian, Bede, mentions that 
Benedict, Abbot of Wearmouth, England, brought a 
bell from Italy for his church about 680. Church 
bells came into use in the East during the ninth 
century. Two centuries later their use is recorded in 
both Germany and Switzerland. 

Most of the bells first used in Western Europe 
were apparently hand bells. Several examples, some 
of them, believed to have been made as early as the 
sixth century, still exist in Ireland, Scotland, and 
Wales. One bell, which is said to have belonged to 
Saint Patrick, may still be seen at Belfast. 

With this brief summary of bell history fresh in 
your mind, what would you say if some acquaint- 
ance stopped you on the street today and asked you, 
point-blank: "Where is the oldest church bell in the 
United States?" What would your answer be? 

Perhaps you would answer: "The Liberty Bell, of 
course!" or name some ancient bell in our oldest city, 
Saint Augustine, Florida. In either case you would be 
in error. The oldest bell in the United States still 
is hale and hearty today, enshrined at McKendree 
College, at the little midwestern town of Lebanon, 
Illinois. 

This fact is authenticated by historical data, much 
of which is in the college's own files, as members of 
the faculty have traced the origin of the ancient bell. 
Recorded history of the bell dates back for cen- 
turies. Although the bell has been at its present site 
only since 1858, its sonorous tones were heard in 
Europe back in the eighth century. It was cast in 
Spain, later recast there, and brought to Florida in 
the sixteenth century. 

There are many unfilled gaps in the history of the 
bell. From Florida it found its way to the Southwest 
during the era when the West was our last frontier. 
In the 1850's a band of Santa Fe traders found the 




The McKendree Bell is called the patriarch of all chapel 
bells in the United States, and was presumably cast in 
Spain in the eighth century. Somehow it found its way 
to the United States, was lost, found, recast, and today 
is an heirloom at a small Methodist college at Lebanon, 
IUinois. 

bell in a deserted Indian Mission in New Mexico terri- 
tory and started treking East with it. 

The bell next was reported to be at Saint Louis — 
then the gateway city to the West — where it was re- 
cast and repaired. Next data on the bell was in 1858, 
when it was exhibited at Centralia, Illinois, where the 
Illinois State Fair was then held. Here it was pur- 
chased for McKendree College. The bell was taken to 
Lebanon and hoisted into the bell tower of the chapel 
building which was then under construction. 

Just how the ancient bell served its first century 
in America is unknown. McKendree College, founded 
in 1828, is one of the oldest colleges in the Mississippi 
Valley. One of the buildings, "Old Main," is the oldest 
assembly hall west of the Alleghenies. 

Surely it is a pigmy in comparison to one of the 
largest bells in the world: the "Czar Kolokol" in 
Moscow, cast in 1733, weighs 180 tons. The tone of 
the old bell at McKendree is superb, showing that 
even at this early ninth century date, the bellmakers 
were artisans, tuning their brass, antimony, and tin 
to any desired pitch. 

Very few people have seen the McKendree Bell, for 
until a few years ago it reposed in the clock tower 
of the chapel building. In order to reach it, one had 
to climb a series of rickety ladders. Now, however, 
the bell has been taken out of the tower and placed 
in the college library where it can be viewed by the 
public. • 



By ROY BERNARD JUSSELL 




MS GROUP OF American men sat long in con- 

JUference. Adjourning, they went into the city 

"■ street and saw, to their great surprise, that 

the American flag on staffs along the sidewalk stood 

at half-mast. 

Their astonishment was short-lived, however, when 
they learned that a distinguished general, perilously 
stricken, whose death was a momentary expectancy, 
had passed on. A member of the group remarked, 
"Pray God that this glorious symbol of American 
freedom may never fly at half-mast in mourning the 
death of our republic." 

Even the suggestion of such an evil possibility must 
rouse within God-fearing, liberty-loving American 
patriots a determination that no such tragedy shall 
befall the nation. 

On Independence Day, July 4, may we rededicate 
our lives to insure that our Star-Spangled Banner, 
this proud symbol guaranteeing to each and every 
American "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness," 
may ever wave. 

It was the Continental Congress, meeting in Phila- 
delphia in 1777, which adopted a resolution making 
the Stars and Stripes the flag of the United States. 
However, it was not until our recent Eighty-first 
Congress passed a National Flag Day Bill that Flag 
Day became officially recognized, thus culminating 
long years of work by individuals and organizations. 

It is by presidential proclamation that Flag Day 
is celebrated, Old Glory is displayed on public 
buildings, and patriotic programs are given. In public 
schools the pledge of allegiance to the flag is spoken: 
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States 
of America and to the Republic for which it stands, 



one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and 
justice for all." 

Mrs. Betsy Ross is credited with designing our pres- 
ent flag, yet the design, adopted by the Continental 
Congress, Philadelphia, June 14, 1777, by resolution 
stated: "Resolved: That the flag of the united states 
(sic) be 13 stripes alternate red and white, that the 
union be 13 stars white in a blue field representing 
a new constellation." Thus, Mrs. Ross was given the 
prescribed design. There are fifty stars in our be- 
loved flag today. 

If one should chance to be at a military post when 
at dawn the Stars and Stripes are raised to ripple 
on a lofty flagpole, he would notice that the man in 
uniform takes care that the flag does not scrape the 
earth. And when at sunset Old Glory is lowered, she 
is gathered into arms respectfully and carefully 
folded and put away, her mission for the day ac- 
complished. 

Our flag, wherever she flies upon land and sea, 
proclaims to the world American freedom and the 
Christlike attributes of justice, courage, mercy, gen- 
erosity and brotherhood. Freedom is inherent with 
God. This truth in the hearts of our Pilgrim fa- 
thers motivated them to move to a wilderness Ameri- 
ca that they might enjoy the blessings of liberty and 
worship their sovereign Creator. 

A grateful American people respectfully, lovingly, 
set out the Stars and Stripes, which represent what 
we are as a nation, carrying valiantly still the heritage 
of liberty conceived in the godly minds of our found- 
ing fathers. 

Let us say along with the poet — 

"A day, an hour, of virtuous liberty is worth 
a whole eternity of bondage." • 




UNEQUAL 
YOKE 




A PASTOR KEPT a jealous, loving watch over 
twenty-seven of his young people between the 
ages of thirteen and eighteen. He coveted 
God's best for them. They all made a confession of 
faith and regularly attended church services. They 
all heard sermons on separation from the world, espe- 
cially regarding marriage. In spite of all this, only 
six married Christians. 



By JAMES E. ADAMS 



Sad as this is, can it be possible that even some 
of these six are unequally yoked together? Implied 
in the scriptural admonition to be "not unequally 
yoked together with unbelievers" is the positive in- 
vitation to be equally yoked together in and with 
Christ. (See 2 Corinthians 6:14; Matthew 11:29, 30.) 

One of the most beautiful examples of being equally 
yoked together and doing the work of the Lord is 
Priscilla and Aquila. In the six times the Bible speaks 
of them, one is never mentioned without the other. 

When the Apostle Paul left Corinth and went to 
Ephesus, Priscilla and Aquila accompanied him. When 
this couple heard Apollos speaking boldly in the syna- 
gogue, "knowing only the baptism of John. . . . they 
took him unto them, and expounded unto him the 
way of God more perfectly" (Acts 18:25, 26). When 
a place was needed in which to hold church ser- 
vices, they opened their home. When anything was 
to be done, they did it together. Marriage had not 
only made them one flesh— they were one in zeal 
and service to God. 

I know a modern counterpart. A young married 
couple both work and they tithe consistently. He is 
president of his church's youth group and assistant 
teacher of primary boys. She teaches beginners. To- 
gether, they attend four services on Sundays, Wed- 
nesday evening prayer meeting, and the biweekly ser- 
vice for aged people in an institution. They are one 
of the happiest and most ideally matched couples I 
know — equally yoked in the work of the Lord. 

On the other hand, another couple was converted 
after they were married. The wife felt they should 
tithe, but her husband was unconvinced. He did go 
along, but for only two weeks. They are unequally 
yoked in this matter. He is satisfied but she believes 
they are not carrying their fair share of the burden. 
She helps in church ministries. He attends — period! 

Another Christian couple is very happy together. 
They dress in good taste and buy a new car fre- 
quently. They attend Sunday morning services reg- 
ularly. It is a distinct pleasure to meet and talk with 
them, for they are so cheery. But they are equally 
yoked in refusing to assume any responsibility in the 
church. They have not yet taken the yoke of Christ 
upon them. 

Courtship days should be days of dedication to one 
another and to Christ. It is the time for mutual agree- 
ment concerning dedication to Christ and His 
church. 

Talk it over. If your fiance believes he should tithe, 
you should pray for this grace also. If your finace is 
a worker, you must decide to quit being a shirker. 
If you do not face, decide, and agree upon these 
issues before marriage, you may be unequally yoked 
together in dedication to the demands of the gospel 
even though you have grown up (and still hold 
membership) in the same church. • 



By GRACE V. SCHILLINGER 



TIME AND 



THE 



KITCHEN BLACKBOARD 




WHILE MY SMALLEST son held the back door 
open, I lugged in the big box of groceries 
and set it down. I glanced at the black- 
board on the west kitchen wall. A message was writ- 
ten on it: "Bring the family to our barbecue down 
in the timber pasture tonight. Bring anything you 
have that would taste good roasted over an open 
fire.— Betty." 

While the family was being rounded up and I was 
gathering food for the picnic basket, I was remem- 
bering some of the things that had been written on 
the blackboard as the years went by. Telephone mes- 
sages to my husband were recorded — "Bill wants to 
use the old tractor to grind corn after dinner." — 
and the exact time when I popped a cake into the 
oven of the old range. 

When our first baby was on the way, we used 
the blackboard to write down favorite names: David 
. . . Kathleen . . . John. Five times after our first 
boy was born, we listed favorite baby names on the 
blackboard. 

Through the years, six children — three sons and 
three daughters: — have used it to study on . . . and 



to fight over. When a child was sick, I would write 
down the time for the next medicine: "John — fever 
medicine, midnight." 

Later, when most of them could read, I wrote fam- 
ous sayings, proverbs and Bible verses. 

Once I left a note for the school children: "Gone to 
the dentist. Fresh cookies in the cookie jar. — Mom." 
I might as well let them know it is all right to go 
ahead and eat the cookies, I thought, because they 
will anyway. 

Upon returning I found a note from my aunt — 
whom I had not seen in years — and my mother and 
my two sisters: "So nice to have visited in your home. 
Lovely lunch (we fixed it ourselves)." 

I stopped remembering the years and packed the 
bigr picnic basket . . . ripe red tomatoes, a jar of 
homemade dill pickles, the fresh-baked chocolate cake. 
The rest of the rambunctious bunch was waiting out 
in the car, and someone was blowing the horn. I 
left a note on the board in case someone should 
come while we were away: 

"We're down at Betty's for a barbecue. Be back 
around nine." • 



By NEAL C. NEITZEL 



Who 

Cm Be 
Against Us ? 



THE MOST DIFFICULT phase of any conflict 
we encounter during our lives on earth is 
fought in savage, silent intensity within our 
own minds. 

If we could but conquer ourselves, worldly problems 
and worries would be forever vanquished. Unfortun- 
ately, this inner battle is seldom won. Human minds 
are beseiged by a multitude of distractions and tem- 
tations while self-doubt and fear ally themselves with 
our lack of faith. 

Is it any wonder, then, that mental illness ravages 
our land? that the pressures and challenges found 
in everyday living have exacted such a terrifying toll 
among us? 



The tempo of our times continues to gather speed. 
We find ourselves spinning about frantically, trying 
to keep pace. "Slow down and live" is a fine safety 
slogan. We might elaborate on this by explaining 
that before we can really live, we must think; we 
must use the powers of reasoning and intellect which 
God has given us. 

There was a time when I spun like a whirling 
dervish, scrambling hither and yon, buffeted about 
like a fragile straw in the wild wind. There was a 
time when words like happiness, pride, success, and 
love of others were only words. 

I was traveling at breakneck velocity in the general 
direction of nowhere — frustrated, unhappy, and 
confused. I was not exactly a failure, nor yet a mental 
and physical washout, but without question, that was 
my destination. 

Why? Who was there to condemn? to accuse? All 
around me, I saw men and women of similar cir- 
cumstance. I saw other faces haggard and unsmiling, 
reflecting the grim lines I knew were etching them- 
selves on my countenance. 

But I saw other faces, too. The serene, pleasant 
features of women and men who appeared to have 
won their battle with life. "Who are these people?" 
I inquired of myself. "What makes them different? 
What magic formula have they found? If I can learn 
their secret, perhaps I can use their methods to climb 
up out of this depressed rut I seem to be trapped in." 

With deliberate casualness I managed to become ac- 
quainted with these men and women whom I envied. 
All of them were successful in their chosen fields of 
endeavor and all were friendly, genuinely eager to 
help and to serve others. It was not difficult to ex- 
tract their secret. Actually, it was not a secret at 
all, and it was not some strange mystic power or a 
magic formula. 

Every happy and successful person I spoke with 
was glad to explain the reasons and causes for 
their individual triumphs. Those explanations directed 
me toward the one and only path there is which 
will guide us to the objectives we desire to arrive 
at during our years on earth. That path is the high- 
way to the Kingdom of our Eternal Father. The 
church and the Bible are the road maps we must 
follow; and our religious faith is the driving force 
that will get us there. 

An amazing series of events occurred when I began 
to renew my faith in God. My faith in myself was 
not only restored, it was greatly strengthened. Grad- 
ually at first, then rapidly, my problems, frustra- 
tions, and unhappiness were routed in permanent de- 
feat. My life now is filled with purpose and under- 
standing. 

This is not to say that life's conflicts are ended. 
There will always be problems to solve and obstacles 
to surmount. But we do not have to fight alone. 
By joining forces with God the mightiest of powers 
are bestowed upon us. If God be for us, who can 
be against us? • 



8 



Witnessing 
Conference and 



By WALTER R. PETTITT 

Director, Evangelism and Home Missions 




Revival- 



WEST COAST BIBLE COLLEGE 





Milton Hay 

Director of 

Christian Service 

Dept. 



Walter R. Pettitt 
Evening 
Speaker 



I DON'T BELIEVE in God" was 
the curt answer from a moth- 
er standing at the door. A 
young Christian witness had just 
asked her the question, "Are you a 
Christian?" An eight - year - old 
daughter delightfully exclaimed, "I 
do." But after a stern stare from 
her mother, she modified her state- 
ment with a faltering, "I . . . think." 

This scene epitomizes the Ameri- 
can society. Fresh, impressionable 
young people are brainwashed, mis- 
led by false standards, and disillu- 
sioned by trusted civic and religious 
leaders. They start out eager to be- 
lieve in God. But — something hap- 
pens. 

The West Coast Bible College con- 
ducted their second witnessing con- 
ference May 9-13 in order to train 
and inspire workers to reach lost 
souls. 

Milton Hay, instructor and di- 
rector of the Christian Service De- 
partment, had a well-planned and 
efficiently executed program. Lec- 



turers included Paul Henson, Law- 
rence Walston, David Bishop, Char- 
lotte Coder, Milton Hay, and Walter 
Pettitt. 

Field work, under the inspiring 
guidance of Dowain Geesey, result- 
ed in four hundred home visits, 
tract distribution, and fifteen con- 
versions. 

The West Coast Bible College 
Pioneers for Christ Club has car- 
ried on an energetic visitation pro- 
gram which was initiated in the 
first conference in March of 1964. 
They have conducted conferences 
in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Ne- 
vada, Arizona, Mexico, and in many 
churches in California. 

State Overseer Floyd Timmerman 
and Youth Director B. L. Kelley 
were present and contributed 
greatly to the success of the ser- 
vices. Paul Henson's lectures, ser- 
mons, and singing were used of the 
Lord to bless all of us. 

The witnessing conference and 



revival climaxed with Teen Day. 
Several hundred young people vis- 
ited the West Coast Bible College 
campus where Paul Henson min- 
istered to them. 

The campus spring revival con- 
vened each night in conjunction 
with the witnessing conference. It 
was not only a challenge but a 
thrilling experience to minister to 
the students, faculty, and visitors. 
My life was enriched by the fresh, 
warm, and sincere fellowship of- 
fered by the young folks as well as 
the faculty. 

Spiritual convenants were re- 
newed, talents were rededicated, 
lives were offered for the Lord's 
service, and sins were forgiven. The 
Holy Ghost prevailed upon the 
hearts, and revival fires fell. 

Superintendent Lawrence Wals- 
ton led the devotions nightly. One 
evening he gave a thrilling testi- 
mony of his experiences in witness- 
ing to me on skid row in Fresno.* 



By DENZELL TEAGUE 



Be An 

Example 

Of Independence 



Denzell league was salutatorian of 

the graduating clan of Let < Olh . • 

Bible ( ollege Division, in \l.n of this 

\car. Printed here is the speech 

given before the student hody on 

Honors and Awards Night. 

is summer Denzell, his wife Elizabeth, 

and their daughters, Teresa and Nina, 

will ™ to Ci, 




D) ECENTLY I WAS asked to 
[\( make an impromptu state - 

UU ment as to "Why I Thank 
God I Am an American." This ex- 
perience caused me to begin to 
think along the lines of patriotism 
and its attendant demands and 
privileges, so far as American pa- 
triotism is concerned. 

Many persons think positively in 
connection with patriotism, yet for 
some reason my thoughts took on a 
negativistic turn. I could not think 
at that moment about the freedom 
of the press, or freedom of reli- 
gion, or freedom to pursue an 
ethereal happiness. Freedom has be- 
come a catch-all word today, ap- 
propriated by any who would like 
to act contrarily to the mores of 
acceptable society or contrarily to 
the laws of God. 

Even the term "acceptable so- 
ciety" is used as a tool to brow- 
beat the susceptible soul into sub- 
mission, to force the fickle into the 
mold of mediocrity which spews 
forth with assembly-line precision 
thousands of young men and boys 
(and sometimes women and girls), 
who all peer out from under iden- 
tical shaggy beatle-bang haircuts, 
and thousands of women and girls 
with the same green eyelids and 
bubble hairdos. The billboards blare 
out "A Million Mustangs Can't Be 
Wrong," "Who's Drinking All That 
Diet-Rite Cola?" 

Conformity, conformity, CON- 
FORMITY screams at us on every 
hand. And the beatniks of a few 
years ago cried out for conformity 
to nonconformity. 

I, personally, cannot thank God 
for this kind of freedom — the free- 
dom to conform by being pressed 



into the mold of the "Pepsi Gen- 
eration." Quite the contrary, I 
thank God for revolution. The 
world would be a sorrier place to 
live were it not for the revolu- 
tionaries of history. 

In the eighteenth century Ed- 
ward Jenner became tired of stand- 
ing by as people died of smallpox 
which had turned cities into char- 
nel houses and villages into ghost 
towns. With popular opinion 
against him, he experimented with 
sick cows and well human beings 
until he perfected the method of 
prevention called vaccination, 
which has since saved untold mil- 
lions of lives. This was revolution 
in medicine. 

Wilbur and Orville Wright in 
1903 were not content to ride bicy- 
cles, regardless of how ornate they 
might have been. One could paint 
them bright colors, attach all sorts 
of wrought iron and filigree work, 
but one still had only a bike. They 
harnessed their brain power, drove 
their bodies, directed their efforts, 
and developed the flying machine 
—a revolt in transportation. 

I believe in revolution. By revo- 
lution I do not mean "movement, 
either real or apparent, in a circle 
around some point," that is to say, 
"going in circles." By this term I 
mean complete change. 

Patrick Henry, governor of Vir- 
ginia, was tired of British tyranny. 
His impassioned cry, "Give me li- 
berty or give me death," was a 
stimulus which helped to bring 
about the War of Independence 
and the Spirit of '76. Patrick 
Henry was a revolutionary, foster- 
ing revolution in a nation. 



When men's souls were being 
vexed, if not stolen, by the existing 
religious order, and when the meri- 
torious works of men were being 
extolled above simple faith in Jesus 
Christ, one man stood firm and 
spoke loudly and clearly against 
religious sham in his own church. 
Martin Luther was a revolution- 
ary and brought about revolt in 
the church. 

The greatest revolutionary of all 
time was Jesus Christ. "Think not 
that I am come to send peace on 
earth: I came not to send peace, 
but a sword. For I am come to set 
a man at variance against his 
father, and the daughter against 
her mother" (Matthew 10:34, 35). 
The Apostle Paul speaks of the 
inner turmoil of a soul in the throes 
of conviction in Romans 7:15, "For 
that which I do I allow not: for 
what I would, that do I not; but 
what I hate, that do I." This revo- 
lution continues today when one 
accepts Jesus Christ. "If any man 
be in Christ, he is a new creature" 
(2 Corinthians 5:17). This is revo- 
lution in the soul. 

And today the Church of God 
finds itself in a particularly critical 
position. With renewed emphasis on 
the doctrine of the baptism of the 
Holy Ghost in certain old-line de- 
nominations, we are on the thres- 
hold of general acceptance by the 
church world. This is almost un- 
heard of so far as the history of 
our church is concerned, for we 
were organized in 1886 as a sect, 
which is defined by Thorndike- 
Barnhart Dictionary as "a reli- 
gious group separated from an es- 
tablished church." Not only is this 

PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 22 



10 



THE LATE PRESIDENT Kennedy once stated 
when discussing courage: "In whatever arena 
of life one may meet the challenge of cour- 
age, whatever may be the sacrifices he faces if he 
follows his conscience — the loss of his friends, his 
fortune, his contentment, even the esteem of his 
fellowmen — each man must decide for himself the 
course he will follow." 

I have a little brunette pen pal in Oklahoma who 
has looked into her soul and found courage — cour- 
age from a Source beyond the limits of man. Seven 
years ago, Lynn was vacationing with her aunt. It 
was the summer preceding her senior year in high 
school. She became very ill; and before she could 
reach a hospital, she was paralyzed from the waist 
down. By the time spinal and bulbar polio had run 
their course, this ^attractive teen-ager could not move 
a muscle below her neck. 

She graduated from high school at the Research 
Institute in Houston, Texas, in her iron lung. Her 
fellow classmates were in iron lungs or wheelchairs. 

At first Lynn was bitter. "How could this happen 
to me?" she asked. What a typical question. We ask 
questions like this for such minor things in our own 
lives. But this was a very major circumstance. 

Lynn never gave up, and with the aid of a strange 
brush which she gripped between her teeth, she be- 
gan trying to paint as therapy. In a short time her 
skill was remarkable. One autumn, her oil paintings 
won the Best of Show Award in one division at the 
Oklahoma State Fair. 

This young lady spends her hours in the extremely 
limited environment of an iron lung with the ex- 
ception of about six hours a day in the portable 
lung. She does her painting during these "free" hours, 
with the easel only twelve to eighteen inches from her 
face. After one year in a hospital, the remaining 
six have been lived in her living room with her at- 
tentive mother ever at her side. 

I have so often wished to travel the thousand miles 
to meet my pen pal in person and watch her paint 
the beautiful scenes with her odd brush. But most of 
all, I would like to just chat with a young lady 
who is a pattern of perfection in bravery. 

So many teen-agers grow bitter over trivial dis- 
agreements with their parents, or complain of physi- 
cal blemishes, or despair over minor love affairs. 
Could you face and fight and win a battle like Lynn? 
It is worth thinking about. 

With all her physical limitations she still has a sense 
of humor. She watches television by looking at a 
mirror placed above her face. The images are of 
course reversed for her. "I'm getting good at reading 
commercials backwards," she laughs. 

I think God is especially proud of His children who 
face life fearlessly, and that surely includes Lynn. • 



By VIOLETTA GAMMON 



COURAGE 
UN- 
EXCELLED 




Holding her brush with her teeth, Lynn 
paints a beautiful outdoor scene. 



11 



By NANCY M. ARMSTRONG 








UR FLAG, AS it waves today, is the beautiful 
result of many designs created during the his- 
tory of the United States. The early colonists 
naturally used the flag of the Mother Country. Then 
some individual colonies created their own designs to 
represent them. 

In 1776 the first national ensign came into being. 
It was designed by a committee from the Continental 
Congress. Benjamin Franklin was a member of this 
committee. This flag had thirteen stripes, alter- 
nating red and white, and in the corner on a field 
of blue the royal ensign of Great Britain. The stripes 
represented the colonies and the royal ensign indi- 
cated that they still belonged to Great Britain. 

The Declaration of Independence dissolved the 
union with Great Britain and on June 14, 1777, Con- 
gress resolved: "That the flag of the thirteen United 
States be thirteen stripes, alternating red and white, 
and that the union be thirteen stars, white in a 
field of blue, representing a new constellation." 



When the states of Vermont and Kentucky were 
admitted to the Union, the number of stripes and 
stars was increased to fifteen. This was the flag 
that waved over Fort McHenry when it was attacked 
by the British in the War of 1812. At this battle the 
flag inspired Francis Scott Key to write "The Star- 
Spangled Banner," which later became our national 
anthem. 

It was soon realized that the flag would become too 
large if a new stripe was added for each state ad- 
mitted to the Union. On April 4, 1818, Congress 
passed a resolution reducing the stripes to thirteen 
to represent the original colonies. Only a new star 
was added for each new state. The star is officially 
added on the Fourth of July following the admis- 
sion of the state. At the time the resolution was 
passed there were twenty states. Today, with the ad- 
ditions of Alaska and Hawaii, our flag waves proudly 
with fifty stars in its field of blue. • 



12 



H'VE GOT THE car tonight!" 
These words have been the 
prelude to an evening of trag- 
edy for hundreds of teen-age young 
people. 

They have introduced an evening 
when healthy, vibrant young peo- 
ple have started out with the 
whole world ahead of them, only to 
end in a horrible traffic accident 
that claimed life and limb. 

This year a young man died in 
a hospital. He had lain in the hos- 
pital, a patient, for ten years as 
a result of an automobile accident 
which occurred when he was a 
teen-ager. Ten years of pain, end- 
ing in death, is a terrible price to 
pay for carelessness! 

A carload of teen-agers, starting 
out for a neighboring city to see a 
high school basketball game, nev- 
er completed the trip. A major 
highway accident, which took the 
life of the young driver and in- 
jured his passengers, thrust its 
chilling hand of death into the eve- 
ning of fun. 

Why do so many teen-agers have 
accidents? Why is it so hard for 
young people to obtain insurance? 
What is the cause of these tragic 
accidents? Is it because a teen-ager 
is a poor driver? Is it due to lack 
of driving judgment? Can a teen- 
age driver not know and obey traf- 
fic laws? 

If what safety experts say is 
true, the real cause behind most 
traffic accidents is Satan! Accord- 
ing to B. L. Corbett, managing di- 
rector of the Milwaukee Safety 
Commission, the basic causes of 
traffic accidents are greed, selfish- 
ness, and disregard for the rights 
of others. 

In other words, traffic accidents 
are caused by an attitude of 
heart. An attitude that reveals 
qualities which Satan has planted 
in the life. It is the spirit of Satan, 
not Christ, that makes the driver 
greedy, selfish, and thoughtless of 
others. 

Speaking further about accident 
causes, Corbett said a me-first at- 
titude on the part of motorists is 
responsible for much of the trouble 
on the highway. When a teen-ager 
slips behind the wheel of the fam- 
ily car, whom is he going to please, 




Christ or Satan? The real answer 
to this question will be expressed 
in the way he handles the car when 
his best girl is by his side and his 
friends are in the back seat. 

Technical advances have been 
made in the automobiles of our day. 
Not only is more horsepower and 
comfort at our disposal when we 
drive a modern car, but built into 
the automobile is a longer life- 
span. Since 1925, the average life 
of an automobile has doubled. Six 
and a half years was once the 
average age of vehicles. Today the 
usual age of worn-out cars is 
twelve years or more. 

Yet, any of us can drive to the 
nearest junkyard and see the 
twisted body and shattered glass of 
a 1961 automobile that has ended 
its life of service at the scene of 
an accident; — an accident that 
might also have taken the life of 
the driver. Is it not time for Chris- 
tian young people to come to the 
forefront for Christ in the matter 
of traffic safety? 

Cannot young people feel that 
the born-again driver who waits 
courteously for the car who does 
not have the right-of-way is the 
hero, rather than the hot rodder 
who cuts in front of a speeding 
car? Cannot Christian teen-agers 
respond to the impulses that Christ 
puts in the heart to be generous 
and thoughtful, rather than the 
attitudes of Satan to be greedy, 
selfish, and disrespectful? 

The next time you take the car, 
why not show off in front of the 
crowd? But show off for Christ. 
Do it by burying the me-first at- 
titude, and drive with an others- 
first frame of mind. 

You will please Christ if you do. 
And you will probably find that 
you are able to say more often: 
"I've got the car tonight!" • 



By CHARLES VAN NESS 



I've 
Got 
The 
Car 
Toni 



ght! 



13 



DEDIO 

TO TJ 




By PAUL F. HENSON 
Assistant National Sunday School 
and Youth Director 



I WELL REMEMBER when the 
idea was first projected to 
"build in Brasilia." It was in 
a meeting of the state Sunday 
school and youth directors follow- 
ing the close of the 1960 General 
Assembly. The Reverend C. Ray- 
mond Spain, then serving as field 
representative in the Foreign Mis- 
sions Department, met with the 
state directors to discuss ways of 
involving more young people in the 
work of missions. 

He explained how the govern- 
ment of Brazil would provide a nice 
lot in the beautiful new city of 
Brasilia if the church would con- 
struct a building. As Brother Spain 
told us how, with a united effort, 
the young people of the Church of 



God could raise the money to build 
this church, the idea really caught 
fire. I am sure it was a move of 
God. 

At that time I was serving as 
state director of Mississippi, and 
I remember how we directors left 
that meeting eager to challenge our 
youth to raise twenty thousand dol- 
lars for the Brasilia project. I think 
the photos here will illustrate how 
wonderfully the youth responded 
to the challenge. That ensuing year 
they raised about twenty thousand 
dollars. 

As our faithful missionary, the 
Reverend Bill Watson, began the 
construction of the building, many 
delays and setbacks were encount- 
ered — but Brother Watson worked 



litis beautiful lir.isilia ( hurch, tin In 
project of the Youth H arid I i«(>/^< list 
Appeal (YWEA), was paid (or 
with money raised by ( kurch of (.«</ 
youth, and supplemented by the 
World Missions Department of the ch\ 



on. Today we have in Brasilia one 
of the most beautiful and lovely 
churches in our entire movement. 

There are no words to describe 
the thrill I experienced when I 
arrived in the city of Brasilia and 
saw the building for the first time. 
As a state director I had led the 
youth in my state in raising a 
rather large sum to be applied on 
this project. The thought never oc- 
curred to me that I would be per- 
mitted to be present for the dedica- 
tion. It was a marvelous sight to see 
the hundreds gathered in front of 
the church ready for the cutting of 
the ribbon at the door. 

A hush fell over the crowd as I 
took the pair of scissors in my 
hand and said, "On behalf of the 
Church of God National Youth Di- 
rector, the young people of the 
United States, and the Foreign Mis- 
sions Board — that is also represent- 
ed at this dedication by its field 
representative, the Reverend James 
L. Slay — I take great pleasure in 
cutting this ribbon that will offi- 
cially open the doors of this beau- 
tiful church. This building stands 
as a testimony to the faithfulness 
in giving of the Church of God 
youth in the United States. It is 
also a testimony of the labors of 
love of our wonderful missionary 
overseer, the Reverend Bill Watson, 
and those who have worked so 
hard with him." 

As the snipped ribbon floated to 
the floor, the crowd spontaneously 
burst into singing a hymn as they 
marched into the building. 



14 




,-% "*"BH 



-i 






The Reverend I'aul F. Henson greeted the 
congregation. 




A large crowd attended the dedication. 







Missionary Bill Watson prayed the he 
diction in the Portuguese language. 



The Reverend James L. Slay de- 
livered a most timely dedicatorial 
message. The people rejoiced as he 
reminded them that God had seen 
their needs and put it on the hearts 
of the Church of God youth in the 
United States to help them estab- 
lish a strong witness for His name 
in this city. After the message the 
prayer of dedication was prayed 
in three languages. The Reverend 
Bill Watson prayed in Portuguese; 
Dr. James Beaty, superintendent of 
South America, prayed in Spanish; 
and I prayed in English. Brother 
Watson arranged and conducted a 
beautiful and impressive dedication 
service. 

After a short recess, we reassem- 
bled for an evening evangelistic 
service. I was honored to be the 
speaker for this service. The build- 
ing was filled to capacity, with 
many standing. God's presence was 
very evident. In spite of the fact 
that the people were very tired, 
they really worshiped God. When 
the altar invitation was given sev- 
eral came forward. A number re- 
ceived a definite experience in the 
Lord. 

As I was leaving the church after 
almost all of the people had left, 
I paused again in the vestibule to 
read the bronze plaque which 
states, "This temple was construct- 
ed by the Young People's Endeavor 
of the United States and the For- 
eign Missions Board. Dedicated to 
the glory of God on the 27th of 
March, 1966." • 



THE C 



MI38I01 

litis 



by Floyd D. Carey, Jr. 

1. I realize the pressing importance 
of understanding, believing in, 
and promoting God's world-mis- 
sion plan. This plan is designed 
to reach the lost of every conti- 
nent, village, and hamlet with 
the story of eternal life through 
faith in Jesus Christ. I will en- 
deavor to do my part in the ful- 
fillment of this God-command- 
ed ministry. 

2. I will commit myself to the com- 
mission: "Ye shall be witnesses 
unto me . . . unto the uttermost 
part of the earth" (Acts 1:8), 
in such a manner that my life 
will influence others to believe 
and obey Christ's mission charge. 
I will witness by giving, foster- 
ing, and influencing others to 
participate in mission activities. 

3. I am in partnership with Christ. 
This close connection will be re- 
flected in my personal giving for 
the upkeep and the extension of 
my church's campaign to rescue 
the perishing in foreign fields. 

4. I will yield my life to Christ and 
obey His command, "Follow me." 
If the Spirit sets me apart for 
foreign service I will say, "Here 
am I, send me." If I am assigned 
to home duty I will faithfully 
remember the ones who received 
orders to go. 

5. I will apply myself as an inter- 
cessory foreign missionary and 
will consider this sacred privilege 
as an appointment and binding 
duty. I will also remember the 
missionaries by writing letters 
and sending needed supplies. God 
has marvelously implanted His 
love in my heart. I cannot do 
less than tell others that He 
can do the same for them. 



15 



CLARE MISELES 



GOD 



VOU 



























FRANK BREATHED A deep 
sigh of relief as he eyed his 
chemistry quiz mark. "B+! 
Oh, thank God!" he exclaimed 
gratefully. 

"Thank God?" answered Tony. 
Amusement veiled his brown eyes. 
"Why the thanks? Didn't you do 
it all yourself?" 

For a second, Frank was stunned 
and caught off guard. Tony was his 
friend, but he was not close enough 
to him to know what was really 
in his heart. Strange about some 
things, but he had just naturally 
assumed that Tony believed — and 
he had let it go at that! 

At last, he looked up and said, 
"Do you really think I did it all 
myself?" Tony let out a loud laugh. 
"Now, I've heard everything! Or — " 
He gave Frank a mental going- 
over. "Are you putting me on?" 

Frank shook his head. He was 
dead serious. "That's the last thing 
I would do about the Word of 
God. . . ." 

"You really mean it, don't you?" 
He stopped laughing and opened 
his mouth wide letting his lip hang 
in amazement. "I don't get it — a 
sharp guy like you being brain- 
washed!" 

"I am not brainwashed, God is 
actually beside me." 



"God beside you — " mocked Tony. 
His mouth curled sardonically. 
"Where is He? Point Him out! I 
would like to see Him!" More mock- 
ery rolled out of his throat. "Do 
you see Him?" 

Frank did not answer. He knew 
that even trying to answer such 
questions was useless. But he did 
say, "Are you so sure God is not 
here? If you are, tell me how and 
why you are." Tony shook his head 
with annoyance. 

"Then God could be here — " went 
on Frank. 

"All right, so maybe — mind you, 
I say maybe — maybe there is a Su- 
preme Being. But to say that He is 
beside you — I don't know. And be- 
sides, what is He?" 

"'God is a Spirit' (John 4:24); 
'God is light' (1 John 1:5); 'God 
is love' (1 John 4:8)," answered 
Frank quietly. He watched his 
friend closely. "Have you ever read 
the Bible?" he asked. "I mean 
really read the Bible — " 

"Who reads the Bible?" 

"I do—" 

"And to think you are a sharp 
guy — " muttered Tony. 

"Maybe that's why I am — " 
There was nothing boastful about 
his tone. "And because you are 



plenty sharp yourself, maybe you 
should start reading the Bible. If 
anyone can read and judge you 
can. Why don't you try and see for 
yourself!" 

"I don't have one—" said Tony, 
looking for an excuse. 

"Well, I have. There's more than 
one Bible in our house." So Tony 
accepted Frank's Bible reluctantly. 
"I don't know when I can get 
around to it — " he explained, hold- 
ing the book loosely. 

"You will—" insisted Frank. "You 
will. . . ." And Tony did. He resid 
and read some more. 

For weeks, Frank patiently wait- 
ed for Tony to come forward for a 
talk. Not once did he question his 
friend about his reading. At last, 
Tony talked, and his first comment 
was, "No wonder the Bible's the 
best seller. You know, it is quite 
a book! If nothing else, it's like — 
like reading poetry, or real good lit- 
erature." 

Frank smiled, but said nothing. 
There was nothing he had to say, 
at the moment. At the present, he 
was satisfied. Tony was reading the 
Bible . . . and Tony was plenty 
sharp. He could — and would judge. 



16 



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Is the Bible a vibrant force in your home, solving daily problems for the members of the family? 
In this article the author shares some rich experiences concerning the effectiveness of the Word in 
daily life. 



Word from Heaven 



5y MATILDA NORDTVEDT 



THE BIBLE IS a very vi- 
brant force in our house, 
helping each member of the 
family through many difficulties'. 
For example, our fourteen-year- 
old son, Tim, was staying alone 
with his two brothers overnight. It 
had seemed like a lark when my 
husband and I had left that morn- 
ing. But now that it was dark and 
his brothers were asleep, Tim was 
scared. He rechecked the doors to 
make sure they were locked. Re- 
luctantly he turned out the lights 
in the living room and walked 
slowly to his room. Accustomed to 
reading a few verses of Scripture 
before going to bed, he reached for 
his Bible, turning to the Psalms. 

He read the fourth Psalm. When 
he reached the last verse a smile 
spread across his face: "I will both 
lay me down in peace, and sleep: 
for thou, Lord, only makest me 
dwell in safety" (Psalm 4:8). 

Wonderingly Tim read the verse 
again, amazed that God had spo- 
ken to him so directly. He thanked 
Him for the wonderful promise; 
then no longer uneasy, he turned 
out the light and fell soundly 
asleep. 

Thirteen-year-old Joel came 
home from school with a problem. 
Richard Duffy, one of the "hoods" 
at junior high, had demanded a 
dime from him, and this was the 
second time it had happened. 

"Why did you give it to him?" 
asked Dad. 



"At first I told him I wouldn't," 
answered Joe, "but he said he would 
advise me to. And besides, there 
was another guy with him and 
they were both bigger than me." 

"Next time just punch him in 
the nose," suggested twelve-year- 
old Mark. 

"Or grab his head and throw 
him down," offered Tim. "Get him 
down and push back his legs." 

"Like this!" Mark jumped up 
from the table to demonstrate on 
the kitchen floor. 

Joel sighed and shook his head. 
"It's not as easy as you make it 
sound," he insisted dejectedly. 

It was time for our family de- 
votions. We had used the "Trust 
and Obey" box of Bible verses that 
evening. 

A slow grin passed over Joel's 
troubled face when I read my verse. 
"I exhort therefore, that, first of 
all, supplications, prayers, interces- 
sions, and giving of thanks, be 
made for all men. . . . that we 
may lead a quiet and peaceable life 
in all godliness and honesty." 

"Let's try praying for Richard," 
I suggested as I turned the card 
over to Isaiah 50:7: "For the Lord 
God will help me; therefore shall 
I not be confounded." 

Joel's grin spread a little wider 
when the next card was read: 
"Follow after . . . meekness" 
(1 Timothy 6:11). 



18 




We were all listening eagerly now 
to see what else God would say to 
Joel. "Forbearing one another, and 
forgiving one another" (Colossians 
3:13) came next. 

Joel could not help chuckling be- 
fore he read his card, because it 
was so appropriate. "Walk in love" 
(Ephesians 5:2) and "with God all 
things are possible" (Matthew 
19:26). 

As we bowed our heads to thank 
God for speaking to us, Joel was 
no longer troubled about Richard 
Duffy. Let him keep the dimes — it 
did not really matter. He would 
pray for him and try to love him. 
If Richard ever accosted h i m 
again, the Lord would help him. 

I was annoyed with Luella. Just 
because we had not been able to 
go to her Tupperware party out 
in the country on a blizzardy night, 
she was offended and declared 
that she was giving up the Sunday 
school class which she taught. She 
knew that this would be the best 
way to punish us all, because we 
were so short of teachers — and Lu- 
ella was an excellent one. 

I was furious. "What she needs 
is to be told off once and for all!" 
I declared hotly to my husband. 
"She's acting like a baby! What if 
we all quit our jobs as soon as 
our feelings were hurt? I'm going 
to telephone her the first thing to- 
morrow and let her know how I 
feel!" 



Stomping upstairs I prepared for 
bed. I did not feel much like read- 
ing my Bible, but I reached for it 
anyway. My marker was in James. 
I swallowed hard when the words 
on the page seemed to leap up at 
me. 

"Wherefore, my beloved brethren, 
let every man be swift to hear, 
slow to speak, slow to wrath: for 
the wrath of man worketh not the 
righteousness of God" (James 1:19, 
20). 

Immediately I was filled with re- 
morse and cried out to God for 
forgiveness for my unkind feelings 
against Luella. I remembered that 
she had physical ailments that I 
did not have, that she still carried 
emotional scars from being reared 
in a broken home. I remembered 
1 Peter 4:8, "Above all things have 
fervent charity among yourselves: 
for charity shall cover the multi- 
tude of sins." 

How I thanked God that night 
for showing me through His Word 
that I was wrong. He kept me from 
losing my temper with Luella, that 
perhaps would have had disastrous 
results. He enabled me to pray for 
her instead, and to love her. 

Sherry was such a problem in 
release time class. Never in my life 
had I encountered such a sassy, 
rebellious child. Discipline did not 
seem to help. She disturbed the en- 
tire class and I was at my wits' 
end. 



"There is only one thing to do," 
I decided. "I must tell her she can- 
not come any more. If she mis- 
behaves once more, that is what I 
will do. She is absolutely impossi- 
ble!" 

With a heavy heart I left the 
church and went home. Taking my 
Bible I sat down to have my de- 
votions. I was not really expecting 
to hear God's voice that morning, 
but I did. He said to me from the 
book of Jeremiah where I was read- 
ing consecutively, "Behold, I am 
the Lord, the God of all flesh: is 
there any thing too hard for me?" 
(Jeremiah 32:27). "Call unto me, 
and I will answer thee, and shew 
thee great and mighty things, 
which thou knowest not" (Jere- 
miah 33:3). 

Tears came to my eyes as God 
spoke to my heart. No, I would not 
send Sherry away from my class. 
God had sent her to me, and noth- 
ing was too hard for Him — not 
even Sherry. Dropping on my knees 
I called to Him to show me great 
and mighty things in behalf of this 
poor, mixed-up girl. 

Do you wonder that the Bible has 
an important place in our home? 
Do you wonder that we want to 
read it every day, when God gives 
us so much help and direction from 
it? The everlasting God speaks to 
us in practical, everyday situations. 
And He will speak to you, too, if 
you will open your Bible and give 
Him a chance, e 



19 



a children's story 



Macs Victory 



By NORMAN CARROLL MOHN, Ph.D. 



THEY CALLED HIM Mac be- 
cause he was obviously of 
Irish stock — red hair, sprite- 
ly, and possessed of optimism and 
devilishly good humor. He was only 
twelve years old, but very respon- 
sible and dependable. Being the 
eldest of six children, he naturally 
had many duties not ordinarily 
delegated to a boy his age. As a 
result, he soon developed a leader- 
ship among his playmates that was 
of high regard and of long dura- 
tion. 

Mac's family knew very little 
about the Word of God and the 
teachings of Jesus. Not only that, 
his family was one of very mea- 
ger circumstances, making him 
more than a little bit responsible 
for his other two brothers and their 
sisters. He would do odd jobs to 
help supply his mother with money 
to buy food, especially whenever 
his father would go away for weeks 
at a time or get sick. 

Mac would care for his brothers 
and sisters by organizing them in- 
to teams for playing games or do- 
ing needed chores about the house. 
This is why Mac became a leader 
among the boys of his age around 
the neighborhood. He always 
seemed to have just the right idea 
at the right time. And he knew just 




how to handle every difficult sit- 
uation. 

One day, while he was helping a 
man tear down an old barn, Mac 
fell from the hayloft and broke his 
leg and three ribs. But he never 
complained about the hurt or the 
loss of activity. Even while he was 
in the hospital, wrapped in a cast 
for his leg and tight bandages for 
his ribs, he never once gave him- 
self time to be resentful of his mis- 
fortune. 

The doctors issued warnings that 
no improvements were sure and 
certain for Mac. He would stand 
a good chance of being crippled for 
a long time. In fact, he could con- 
tract a disease which might be 
fatal. Instead of being sad and ill- 
tempered, Mac tried to occupy his 
time with useful thinking. 

There was one other trait about 
Mac that was outstanding. He was 
curious about things. He would have 
a knack for tearing things apart 
and putting them together again 
—such as clocks, and gas-powered 
motors, and radios. That was how 
he helped earn some of the money 
he needed to help his. mother. So it 
was not any surprise that now he 
had asked for the old discarded 
table radio he had found in the 
city dump several weeks ago. 

Every day Mac would work with 



his new project — to make the radio 
play again. When the family came 
to see him once, they brought him 
an aerial wire and a radio tube at 
his request. Some of his friends 
came by and supplied him with a 
couple of resistors. Finally, one day 
he surprised his doctor, his nurse, 
his whole family, and some of his 
friends. He had the radio working 
again. 

What a wonderful inspiration the 
radio was to Mac. He was proud 
of his accomplishment, not only 
because of his ability to fix broken 
things, but because the programs 
were so helpful to him during the 
long hours of lying still in a cast. 
He would listen to the newscast 
and would also hear the Word of 
God preached during the quiet of 
the evenings. 

Now Mac had never gone to 
church before. Other than attend- 
ing a Christmas play when he was 
about seven and hearing a church 
chorale once when he was eleven, 
he never knew much about the 
teachings of Jesus. But the radio 
changed all this. It took him to 
church every day and caused him 
to think, deeply and seriously. After 
hearing the gospel songs for a time 
or two, he began to sing along with 
the music. He even taught them 
to his brothers and sisters, and to 
his friends, when they came for a 
visit. He listened to the sermons 
and tried to retell them, even 
though he did not understand 
everything that was said. 

Gradually, but surely, God saw to 
it that Mac understood enough 
about His Word to want to become 
a Christian. One day he announced 
to his family and friends, "I love 
my Jesus, and I want to work for 
Him now." He was saved, at last. 

Mac's life was a wonderful in- 
spiration to all who knew him from 
that time on. He led his brothers 
and sisters to Christ. He helped 
many of his friends along the way 
toward being saved and living for 
Jesus. Even his mother and father 
were impressed. They said that this 
was all well and good for Mac, but 
that things had gone wrong too 
long for them to see the light, just 
yet. 

PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 24 



20 



A GEM FWM 



By GENEVA CARROLL 




Vv~ AVED ALONE," was the 
Yl message cabled from Car- 

^J diff, Wales, by Mrs. H. G. 
Spafford to her husband in Chi- 
cago. 

The tragic death of his four little 
girls: Maggie, Tanetta, Annie and 
Bessie, caused Mr. Spafford to write 
the hymn of resignation, "It Is Well 
With My Soul." 

Horatio G. Spafford was born on 
October 30, 1828, in the State of 
New York. He went to Chicago, 
Illinois, where he became professor 
of medical jurisprudence in an in- 
stitution in Chicago. In 1871 Mr. 
Spafford lost a greater part of 
his fortune in the disastrous fire 
which ravaged the city. Two years 
later the family decided to visit 
Europe and in order to be re- 
moved for a time from the scene 
of their financial ruin. Mr. Spaf- 



ford found that his business com- 
mitments would not permit his go- 
ing at the time, but he arranged 
for four of his five daughters to 
sail with their mother and he 
promised to join them later. 

Mrs. Spafford and the girls took 
passage on one of the most luxuri- 
ous ships then afloat, the French 
liner S. S. Ville du Harve. The 
story of that voyage is most 
heartbreaking. On a black Novem- 
ber night, the steamer collided with 
a larger vessel, causing the S. S. 
Ville du Harve to sink within half 
an hour. Nearly all on board the 
ship were lost. Mrs. Spafford took 
her children from their berths 
and went up on the deck. When she 
learned that the vessel was sinking 
fast, the mother knelt with her 
girls in prayer, and asked God to 
save them, if possible; but if it 

PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 24 



21 



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BE AN EXAMPLE OF INDEPENCENCE 
from page 1 

imminent acceptance unheard of, 
but it is also dangerous. 

Robert E. Park and Ernest W. 
Burgess say that "a sect is a re- 
ligious organization that is at war 
with the existing mores. It seeks to 
cultivate a state of mind and es- 
tablish a code of morals different 
from that of the world about it; 
and for this, it claims divine au- 
thority." 

Christ came and built a church 
which could be termed a sect of 
Judaism. Surely within the context 
of this definition the Church of 
God is also termed a sect — it is at 
war with a society which seeks 
general conformity to its code of 
trial marriage and quickie divorce, 
the new morality and easy abor- 
tion, the topless swimsuit and legal- 
ized homosexuality, and accessible 
alcohol and lots of LSD. With these 
and other things of a similar na- 
ture the church must continue to 
war. The Church of God must hold 
high the standard not only of Pen- 
tecost, but of holiness; for before 
we were a Pentecostal church, we 
were a Holiness church. 

"Beware when all men speak well 
of you." Beware of ecumenicism, 
the "coming of age" of the church. 
Robert L. Sutherland, professor of 
sociology at the University of 
Texas, states that a sect becomes 
a denomination "when the groups 
which opposed the sect cease their 
persecution and give it a recog- 
nized place in the society." God 
grant that we should never cease 
to be a sect if this means that we 
must conform to the ideas and 
mores of a sin-sick world. 

The words of Missionary Paul are 
most applicable here, for he wrote: 
"Be not conformed to this world: 
but be ye transformed by the re- 
newing of your mind" (Romans 12: 
2). But God needs followers who 
will dare to be revolutionary; who 
will dare to endeavor to bring about 
change for the betterment of the 
church, the nation, and the world. 

We have within our grasp the 
potentiality to change the world 
for Christ, if first we let Him revo- 
lutionize our own lives. • 



A 



ATTENDANCE FOR APRIL 

By Donald S. Aultman 
National Director 

This report represents only those 
YPE's that had an average atten- 
dance of more than 50 weekly and 
reported their attendance to the 
office of the National Sunday 
School and Youth Director. By no 
means does it reflect all the Family 
Training Hour (YPE) groups of the 
Church of God. Each church is in- 
vited to participate in this column. 
Attendance averages should be 
mailed on a postal card on the day 
following the last YPE service in 
the month and should be addressed 
to: Donald S. Aultman, National 
Director, 1080 Montgomery Avenue, 
Cleveland, Tennessee 37311 



Middletown (Clayton Street i, 

Ohio ... ... -- ... 219 

Jacksonville (Springfield), 

Florida _ 206 

Cincinnati (Central Parkway), 

Ohio .... 201 

Goldsboro (Clingman Street), 

North Carolina 200 

Greenville (Tremont Avenue), 

South Carolina 198 

Canton (Temple), Ohio .... .... 193 

Flint (West), Michigan 176 

Garden City, Florida .... 174 

Lakeland (Lake Wire), 

Florida 158 

Atlanta (Hemphill), Georgia . 151 
Tampa (Buffalo Avenue), 

Florida 147 



22 



Wyandotte, Michigan 144 

Hamilton (7th and Chestnut), 

Ohio 141 

Pompano Beach, Florida ._. 141 
Conway (North), 

South Carolina _ ._. _. 135 

Brunswick (Norwich Street), 

Georgia... .... .... .... .... 134 

Augusta (Crawford Avenue), 

Georgia ... __._ .... 130 

Lenoir City (Sixth Avenue), 

Tennessee ... 130 

Kannapolis, North Carolina .... 126 

North Ridgeville, Ohio .... .... 125 

Tampa (Sulphur Springs), 

Florida 115 

Paris, Texas... Ill 

Colquitt (South Mt. Zion), 

Georgia .... 110 

Pacoima (San Fernando Valley), 

California 110 

Chattanooga (East), 

Tennessee .... 109 

Ecorse, Michigan .... .... .... .... 109 

Flint (Kearsley Park), 

Michigan .... .... .... .... 107 

Vanceburg, Kentucky 106 

Morganton, North Carolina .... 105 
Dallas (Oak Cliff), Texas... 104 
Norfolk (Azalea Garden), 

Virginia .... 102 

St. Louis (Gravois Avenue), 

Missouri .... .... 102 

Danville (West), Virginia _ .... 100 

Ferndale, Michigan .... 100 

Roanoke Rapids, 

North Carolina .... .... 98 

Elyria, Ohio .... _ .... 97 

Jesup, Georgia .... .... .... 95 

Thorn, Mississippi 95 

Markleysburg, Pennsylvania ._ 92 

Lake Worth, Florida .... .... 90 

Lancaster, Ohio .... .... 88 

Manns Choice, Pennsylvania ... 88 

Oregonia, Ohio .... __ .... 84 

St. Louis (Webster Groves), 

Missouri .... .... .... .... .... .... 83 

Wayne, Michigan .._ .... 83 

Wilson, North Carolina .... .... . 83 

Salisbury, Maryland 81 

Jackson (Crest Park), 

Mississippi 80 

Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan .... 80 

Isola, Mississippi .... .... _ 79 

Lawrenceville, Illinois .... 79 

Miamisburg, Ohio .... .... _ .... 78 

Garden City, Georgia .... 77 

Jacksonville (Southside Estates), 

Florida _ 77 



West Columbia, 

South Carolina .... ___. ___ 77 

Columbus (Frebis Avenue), 

Ohio - 76 

Lawton (Ninth and Lee), 

Oklahoma 76 

Sale Creek, Tennessee 76 

Clayton, Georgia .... .... 75 

Decatur (Sherman Street), 

Alabama .... __ ... . 75 

Sanford, Florida 74 

Sidney, Ohio /. .... 74 

Talladega, Alabama __ .... — _ 74 

Johnson City, Tennessee 73 

Vero Beach, Florida .... _ ._. 73 

Cahokia, Illinois .... .... 72 

Cleveland (Detroit Avenue), 

Ohio ... 72 

Hamilton (Kenworth), Ohio .... 71 

Dayton, Tennessee _. __ ... . __ 69 

Valdosta, Georgia 68 

West Monroe, Louisiana 68 

Jackson (Leavell Woods), 

Mississippi 67 

Clover, South Carolina _ ._ 66 

Royal Oak, Michigan .... .... .... 66 

Loxley, Alabama .... _ ... . _ 64 

Parsons, West Virginia .... _ 64 

Adrian, Michigan ... .... .... ... . 63 

Brownfield, Texas .... ..__ .... .... 63 

Davie, Florida .... _ 63 

Boynton, Pennsylvania __ 62 

Chase, Maryland .... .... __._ — _ 61 

Holland, Michigan .... .... .... 61 

Monroe, Louisiana .... .... .... .... 60 

Vancouver, Washington 58 

Charlottesville, Virginia .... __ 57 
Covington (Shepherds Fold), 

Louisiana ... .... .... _ 57 

Odessa, Texas _ 56 

Gastonia (East), 

North Carolina .... .... ..... .... 55 

Bush (Sharps Chapel), 

Louisiana 54 

Donalds, South Carolina 54 

Rochester, Michigan .... .... .... 54 

East Point, Georgia .... ... . ... . 52 

Gainesville, Georgia .... .... .... 51 

West Green, Georgia .... .... .... 51 

Cumberland, Maryland.. .... 50 

Lagrange, Ohio .... .... .... .... 50 

Thomasville, Alabama .... .... 50 



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MAC'S VICTORY 
from page 20 

The mother and father did final- 
ly see the light too. It was exactly 
one week after Mac had accepted 
Jesus in his heart that he died of 
bone deterioration and virus com- 
plications. But, his love and trust 
in Christ enveloped all of his friends 
and all of his family. 

It was quite obvious that he had 
many true and lasting friends. 
They formed a prayer vigil which 
stationed one person by his casket 
every hour of the day. If a mem- 
ber looked as though he might 
break down and cry, the others 
would remind him, "Mac told us 
not to cry. We should rejoice in 
Jesus', and sing." And so, they 
would break out into the gospel 
hymns which he had taught them 
while he was still in the hospital. 

Just before they took Mac out of 
the house to the burial place, little 
brother Joey remembered some- 
thing Mac had told him. "You 
know," he said, "I forgot to get 
the poem he wrote for us all to 
read — if he should have to go." 

So saying, little Joey ran upstairs 
to the bedroom and reached in the 
dresser drawer for Mac's familiar 
cigar box full of personal effects 
and treasures. He reached in and 
withdrew a neatly folded piece of 
paper containing the one and only 
poem Mac ever wrote. Returning to 
the group downstairs, Joey put 
the paper into his mother's hand 
with, "Please, Momma, read it to 
all of us." 

Some were perfectly quiet, while 
others were sobbing softly as she 
read these words: 

Every time I'm bad, and sin, 
Or find my heart all shrunk and 

thin, 
I try to tear my soul apart, 
And look for Jesus in my heart. 

He will help me, this I know, 
Guide my feet where they should 

go, 
And if I do a goodly deed, 
You will know its' Him I heed. 

When I die, I pray His love 
Will take me to my God above. 
Amen. • 



A GEM FROM TRAGEDY 
from poge 21 

was His will to take them, she 
asked for divine strength for that 
hour. In a very few moments the 
ship sank and the children were 
lost. 

Mrs. Spafford sank with the ves- 
sel but later was rescued by one 
of the sailors on the ship. Ten days 
later she landed with the other 
survivors at Cardiff, Wales, where 
she cabled her husband immediate- 
ly. This was the first news Mr. 
Spafford had had from his loved 
ones since they had sailed from 
New York. As soon as possible, he 
booked passage for England, where 
he joined his wife. 

When Mr. Spafford's ship 
reached the place where the S. S. 
Ville du Harve had gone down, the 
captain called the father to his 
cabin and pointed out the spot 
where his children were buried in 
the sea. 

That night Mr. Spafford went 
through a second Gethsemane. 
When he had first received the 
heartrending message from his 
wife, he went to God in prayer 
and asked strength and courage. 
And in spite of such tragedy, his 
faith in God had won out. 

D. L. Moody and Ira D. Sankey, 
who were in a meeting in Edin- 
burgh at the time, went imme- 
diately to Liverpool to comfort the 
bereaved parents. These ministers 
were pleased to find that the Spaf- 
fords were able to say, "It is well; 
the will of God be done." The 
mother said, "We have not lost our 
children. We are only separated 
for a little time." 

Just before they had sailed for 
Europe, the girls had been won- 
derfully saved in one of Moody's 
meetings. In 1876 Moody and San- 
key returned to Chicago to con- 
tinue their evangelistic work. Mr. 
Sankey was royally entertained in 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Spaf- 
ford for a number of weeks. During 
that time, Spafford wrote the hymn, 
"It Is Well With My Soul," in 
memory of the death of his four 
girls. Philip P. Bliss composed the 
music and sang it first at Moody's 
meeting in Farwell Hall. 



24 



A gentleman, who had suffered 
great financial reverses in the 
panic of 1899, was deeply despon- 
dent. When he heard the beautiful 
hymn and learned the tragic story 
behind it, he said to a friend, "If 
Mr. Spafford can write such a 
heart-searching hymn from trage- 
dy, I will never complain again." 

At a gathering of a thousand 
ministers in Farwell Hall, Philip P. 
Bliss sang the solo, "It Is Well 
With My Soul." Just a month later 
he and his wife were on their way 
to Chicago for a series of meetings. 
When a bridge collapsed, the train 
on which they were traveling went 
into a ravine and was destroyed 
by fire. More than a hundred of 
the passengers were burned to 
death, including Mr. Bliss and his 
wife. Thus the hymn is linked with 
tragedy by water and fire. 

While living in Chicago, Mr. and 
Mrs. Spafford became greatly in- 
terested in the Second Coming of 
Christ. They became so zealous that 
they decided to go to Jerusalem 
and there await the coming of the 
Lord, taking with them the daugh- 
ter who was spared from the trage- 
dy. Shortly afterwards, Mr. Spafford 
died. Mrs. Spafford and her daugh- 
ter remained in the Holy City. She 
became the head of a society whose 
headquarters were in a building 
outside of Jerusalem. A number of 
people lived there, having all things 
in common. The daughter became 
very popular among the natives 
and taught a large group of chil- 
dren, instructing them in English 
literature and in American ways. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sankey visited Jeru- 
salem some years later, and visited 
with Mrs. Spafford and her daugh- 
ter. 

H. G. Spafford's hymn of trust 
and resignation has encircled the 
globe many times and people have 
been blessed with these wonderful 
words: 

When peace, like a river, attendeth 
my way, 
When sorrows like sea billows 
roll; 
Whatever my lot, Thou hast taught 
me to say, 
It is well, it is well with my soul. 



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KINGS of 

the OCEAN 



By DAVID GUNSTON 



THE BOOK OF Genesis states 
that God created the fouls 
of the air. One of these 
creations, the albatross, is a most 
interesting bird, staying at sea all 
the time, except when nesting or 
when driven ashore by high winds. 
Few sailors do not know the al- 
batross. Ever since man first sailed 
across the seas, he has held this 
great bird of the world's oceans in 
awe and respect, creating all kinds 
of legends and stories about it. For 
many centuries it was held to be 
fatally unlucky to kill any alba- 
tross — and it will be remembered 
that it was this very crime which 
brought Coleridge's Ancient Mari- 
ner all his trouble. 



Albatrosses are by far the largest 
and, generally speaking, the most 
numerous of all the truly oceanic 
birds of the world. They are essen- 
tially creatures of the southern 
oceans, but so great is their range 
of flight that they may be en- 
countered anywhere well out of 
sight of land. 

Incidentally, they are among 
the few birds completely unknown 
to the landlubber in the civilized 
world. To study them properly, man 
must spend lengthy periods at sea, 
for these birds live all their lives 
on the ocean, only touching land 
for a few months each year to 
breed. 

An albatross on land, apart from 
the desolate, unhabitated islands of 
the far south where they nest, is a 
great rarity and is only caused by a 
bird's being driven ashore against 
its will in a strong gale. 

With their curious tubular nos- 
trils, enormous span of their nar- 
row wings, their huge size and un- 
mistakable habit of gliding and 
sailing tirelessly over the waves, 
albatrosses are easy to recognize. 
They are indeed the gulls of the 
wide oceans, often becoming ex- 
ceedingly tame and intelligent 
when they follow ships, which they 
do regularly. 

Many a ship's crew of both an- 
cient or modern times have felt the 
seven seas less lonely because of the 
friendly presence of a following al- 
batross'. Perhaps that is why the 
mariners of old hesitated to kill 
one, even though food might have 
been short. 

This trailing of ships is one of 
the most characteristic features 
of the albatross which can actual- 
ly remain in the air for days on 
end, only paddling on the surface 
to pick up cuttlefish, squids, and 
offal, upon which they live. 

Dr. William Beebe, the well- 
known American marine biologist 
tells of one specimen which fol- 
lowed a ship for three thousand 
miles, while another bird tailed a 
ship for six consecutive days with- 
out any observed break at all. As 
far as was known it never once left 
the air during that time for more 
than a few moments at a time — 
then only to feed on the surface. 



Indeed, it was in sight all the time 
during daylight, and the ship was 
steaming without a break. 

The name albatross comes from 
the Portuguese alcatraz, a peli- 
can, but that was a mistake on 
the part of our forefathers. Alba- 
trosses are quite different from 
pelicans and possess this great 
mastery of the air which is un- 
known outside their own species. 

The largest of them — the wan- 
dering albatross — has a wingspan 
of some twelve feet; and with its 
short tail, legs set far back, and 
streamlined body, it looks all wings. 

That, of course, is its secret. By 
means of its immense wingspread 
it can take full advantage of every 
breath of wind, even on the calmest 
day, gliding and soaring effortless- 
ly at no great height over the 
water. An albatross rarely flies 
high into the air, preferring to hov- 
er a few feet over the waves, 
ballancing itself on various air cur- 
rents and eddies. 

On land it is ungainly and well- 
nigh helpless, waddling awkwardly 
to and from its rough nest. On 
board ship on deck it is absolutely 
helpless; and a captured albatross, 
hooked on a stout line with a piece 
of meat, will become violently sea- 
sick on a rolling vessel, being quite 
out of its own element. 

There are many kinds of alba- 
trosses, but they all have these 
characteristics, although individual 
species have strange and some- 
times beautiful courtship dances 
and posturings of their own. Their 
constant flying makes them always 
hungry and they need endless 
supplies of food to maintain the 
energy needed to remain airborne 
for days on end. A storm-driven 
albatross, kept without adequate 
food for a day or so owing to the 
rough sea, may perish from starva- 
tion. 

We still know surprisingly little 
about these true spirits of the sea. 
Perhaps one day some intrepid 
traveller will be able to devote the 
several necessary years to a pro- 
longed study of their ways through- 
out the world. In any event, they 
will always remain kings of the 
ocean, lone, but mighty wanderers 
of the seven seas.» 



26 



WISDOM FOR FATHERS 

A man with legs set wide apart — 
Who looms a giant in the eyes 
Of his small son who, fear in heart, 
Stands cowering, filled with painful cries- 
Is ogre-like: a fearful man. 
A punishment should fit the crime. 
And any angered father can, 
With understanding, take the time 
To discipline with kindly word. 
A father's love should always rule, 
His anger not be seen or heard. 
A father should not be a fool! 



THAT ONE ABOUT THE SHOE 

From certain oft quoted bits, 
The logic's plainly gone. 
How can you tell if the shoe fits, 
Until you put it on? 

— Grace V. Watkins 



-Roy Z. Kemp 



DOES IT MATTER WHOM I DATE? 

Short or tall, 

It doesn't matter at all — 

Quiet or lively, laughing or shy, 

Brown or hazel or blue of eye. 

But oh, it matters very much, 

Whether your date has known the touch 

Of Christ, and whether your date has trod 

The path of comradeship with God! 

— Grace V. Watkins 



I SHALL REACH THAT HOME ABOVE 



Holy Spirit, faithful Guide, 
Thou art ever near my side; 
Thou wilt never let me fall 
If upon Thy Name I call. 



Thou dost set my spirit free, 
Give me life and liberty; 
In the fullness of Thy love 
I shall reach that home above. 

Where there's health and wealth and joy 
And no earthly cares annoy; 
Where the streets are paved with gold, 
There Thy face I shall behold. 

And I will dwell forever more 

On that blissful, happy shore, 
Where with the angels I shall sing 
Praises to my Lord and king. 

— Evangelist Danny Capps 



TO A MATERIALISTIC WORLD 

What have you done to my Sundays, 

These orbed and golden hours 

When air seems fresh, birdsongs more lyrical, 

The pause when I rest and turn my thoughts 

To all things, pure and holy, 

And draw, from the deep reservoir of faith, 

A store of strength to last me through the week? 

Why do you dull them to cheap ugliness, 

Begrimed and horrible, and try to shove me 

From the paradise I so much loved 

Into a gloom of outer emptiness? 

— Alice Mackenzie Swain 



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Side one: Above All Else; When The Morning Comes; My 
Truest Friend; Oh Sinner; Peace; Jesus Is The Way-Maker. 
Side two: Do Lord; Closer Home; I'm Not Alone; Somewhere 
Listening; Jesus, I Love Him (More Than Silver); Look For Him. 

FAITH IN FOCUS — G. W. Lane 

Side one: Till The Storm Passes By; Where No One Stands 
Alone; I Will Pilot Thee; A Little Talk With Jesus; When He 
Reached Down His Hand; Take My Hand, Precious Lord. 
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Cross. 

CONTEMPORARILY YOURS — S 7020 

The Vanguards — MFLP 7020 

Side one: He Will Make A Way; It Shall Come To Pass; The 

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THE BEST OF THE GOODMAN FAMILY 
The Happy Goodman Familv 

Side one: I Wouldn't Take Nothing for My Journey; The 
Goodman Family Story; Will the Lord Be With Me; Child of 
the King; Touch the Hand of the Lord. Side two: I'm In A 
New World; Lord I Need You Again Today; When the Roll 
Is Called Up Yonder; The Old Gospel Ship; Nearer To Thee; 
Without Him. 

I WOULDN'T TAKE NOTHING FOR MY JOURNEY NOW — 

SRLP 6030 

The Oak Ridge Boys — SSLP 6030 

Side one: I Wouldn't Take Nothing For My Journey Now; 

Victory; I Shall Be At Home With Jesus; I Asked The Lord; 

Walk With Me; Live A Little More. Side two: The Christian 

Way; Hide Thou Me; One Of These Mornings; What Love; 

At The Altar; Little Is Much When God Is In It. 

WON'T WE BE HAPPY — SRLP 6027 

The Speer Family — S-6027 

Side one: I'm Looking For Jesus; Time Has Made A Change; 

Won't We Be Happy; I Want To Sec Jesus First Of All; 

Greater Love; My Home Sweet Home. Side two: I'll Live In 

Glory; How Big Is God; Palms Of Victory; Born To Serve 

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LIGHTED 



Pathway 

ai in ICT 1 OZ Z 



AUGUST, 1966' 





Folks slump and snooze 

In cushioned pews, 

While souls are bound by sin; 

Do they not care 

That everywhere 

Are souls they need to win? 

So satisfied! 

They're in "The Bride!" 

Why get upset? Excited? 

The church is there — 

Folks "just don't care!" 

Why should they be invited? 

Their sins are gone, 

They slumber on 

And wait the call to glory; 

Lord, can't they see 

That, while they're free, 

Lost souls must hear the story? 

— Roy J. Wilkins 



LIGHTED 




LEE COLLEGE (BTS) CLASS OF 



This class will celebrate its twenty- 
fifth anniversary during the General As- 
sembly. All 1941 students are urged to 
be present. The reunion will be part of 
the Lee College Alumni Association Bi- 
ennial Banquet which convenes on Satur- 
day, August 13, from five to seven p.m., 
in Hotel Peabody. 



MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND THE 
LEE COLLEGE ALUMNI BANQUET 

Saturday, August 13, 1966 

5:00-7:00 p.m. 

Peabody Hotel 

Price: $3.00 per person 

Tickets may be obtained at the Lee 

College booth during the Assembly 

— J. Herbert Walker, Jr. 

Alumni President 



Published monthly at the Church of God Publishing House, 
Cleveland. Tenn. All materials intended for publication in The 
LIGHTED PATHWAY should be addressed to Clyne W. Buxton, 
Editor. All inquiries concerning subscriptions should be addressed 
to Bookkeeping Department, Church of God Publishing House, 
Cleveland, Tennessee. 

ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER AT 
POST OFFICE, CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 
Postmaster send Form 3579 to LIGHTED PATHWAY, P. O. Box 
880. Cleveland, Tennessee 37311. 




August 1966 
Vol. 37, No. 8 



Editorial 


3 


Clyne W. Buxton 


A Deadly Mistake 


4 


Matilda Nordtvedt 


When God Spoke 






Through a Flower 


5 


Margaret Gaines 


Four Million Mistakes 


6 


Grover Brinkman 


From Caterpillar to 






Butterfly 


7 


James H. Jauncey 


All Aboard for College 


8 


Grace V. Watkins 


Personal Evangelism 


9 


Carl H. Richardson 


1 Wish 1 Did Not 






Have To . . . 


10 


Charles Van Ness 


Needed: Prayer Partners 


1 1 


Pauline Bone 


Four Reasons Why We 






Need the Bible! 


12 


Clay Cooper 


A Man's Job 


14 


Evelyn P. Johnson 


Variety 


16 




Throw a Word Overboard! 


16 


Vincent Edwards 


The Silent Gods 


18 


Lon Woodrum 


Variety 


20 




Arizona Statewide 






Teen Day 


22 


W. A. Davis 


Young People's Endeavor 


2 4 


Donald S. Aultman 


Trip Winners Announced 






at Home for Children's 






Spring Banquet 


26 


Mary R. Mitchell 


Poetry 






Cover 


Eastern Photo Service 


STAFF 




Clyne W. Buxton 


Editor 


Lewis J. Willis 


Editor in Chief 


Chloe Stewart 


Artist 


Kathy Wood 


ard 


Research 


H. Bernard Di 


on 


Circulation Director 


E. C. Thomas 


Publisher 


CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 




Donald S. Aultman 


Paul F. Henson 


Margie M. Ke 


<:-., 


Avis Swiger 



Denzell Teague 

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS 

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Single copy . 1 5 




By Clyne W. Buxton 



FORE 
WINTER ! 



THE AGED PAUL sat in a lonely prison in 
Rome and scribbled a letter to a close friend. 
Writing to Timothy, a young preacher who 
pastored a congregation at Ephesus, Paul made a 
plaintive request which is recorded in the fourth chap- 
ter of Second Timothy. "Come to see me soon," he 
pleaded; "And come before winter." The old saint 
knew that the distance by sea and land between 
Ephesus and Rome was great; and he was cognizant 
that the trip could not be made successfully in winter. 
Moreover, this grand old soldier of the cross lay in a 
cold dungeon waiting to be executed. He was quite 
sure that he would not see another spring. So if 
Timothy did not come soon, there would be no need 
for him to come at all. It would be too late! 

The apostle asked Timothy to bring his coat, his 
books, and his parchments. In the confusion of his 
arrest, he must have been denied even his personal 
possessions. So the old preacher was cold, and he was 
longing to have something to read. One can imagine 
that he especially desired to have his Old Testament 
scrolls. Furthermore, he yearned for his parchments, 
or writing materials. In a sense, these were meager 
things to request. He did not ask for food, sympathy, 
or fine clothes. If only he had his old coat from Troas, 
his books, and writing materials, he could be content. 
How he must have yearned for God's Word! 

In his book entitled / Was a Communist Prisoner, 
Haralan Popoff, a Pentecostal preacher, tells how 
deeply he desired to have a Bible to read. One day a 
cell mate produced a New Testament which he had 
found. From it he tore out a leaf to use in rolling a 
cigarette. Popoff was so thrilled and excited at just 
the sight of the Testament that he begged the prison- 



er to let him have it, which he did. This preacher, not 
having seen a Bible for years, studied the Testament 
on the sly every opportune moment he had. Within a 
few days he had memorized forty-seven chapters, for 
he knew that as soon as the guard discovered that 
he had a Testament, it would be taken and destroyed. 
And just as he feared, the book was taken from him. 
Nonetheless, he feasted for months upon the chapters 
which he had memorized. 

"Come before winter," Paul had pled. Surely Timothy 
must have gotten there. One can imagine that Timo- 
thy immediately turned his pastoral responsibilities 
over to another person and struck out for Rome. Paul 
loved Timothy dearly, and he must have been greatly 
encouraged by the presence of the young pastor during 
his last hours. As the aged apostle hobbled away 
to the guillotine, he must have leaned heavily on the 
understanding arm of Timothy. The support of a kind, 
encouraging Christian brother at such an hour is of 
inestimable value — more than words can express. 

"Come before winter," Paul had said. Such a state- 
ment can be made relevant to our turning to Christ. 
We are not to wait until the summer is past, and the 
harvest is ended before coming to Him — that may be 
too late. Sometimes it is difficult for one to come to 
Christ when his soul is in the grip of a spiritual 
winter. But the sinner should not put off seeking the 
Lord until he faces the cold, clammy clutches of 
Death. Rather, he should surrender to the Lord while 
he is in good health and respond to the beckoning of 
the fervent Holy Spirit when all is well. Likewise, the 
Christian must fully commit himself to the Lord Jesus 
now and not wait until some unusual trial or circum- 
stance overshadows him. May we all come to the Lord 
Jesus "before winter." • 



3 



A 
DEADLY 




MISTAKE 



By MATILDA NORDTVEDT 



THE WORDS SOUNDED congenial and unprej- 
udiced, "I am as thou art, and my people as 
thy people; and we will be with thee in the 
war" (2 Chronicles 18:3). But Jehoshaphat, a godly 
king, had joined affinity with wicked King Ahab, who 
had forsaken the Lord for idol worship. 

King Jehoshaphat almost lost his life in that battle. 
When they compassed him about, he cried out, "And 
the Lord helped him; and God moved them to depart 
from him" (2 Chronicles 18:31). 

When Jehoshaphat returned from the battle and his 
close brush with death, Jehu the son of Hanani the 
seer met him with these words, "Shouldest thou help 
the ungodly, and love them that hate the Lord? there- 
fore is wrath upon thee from before the Lord" 
(2 Chronicles 19:2). 

Jehoshaphat did not get angry with the prophet as 
his father had before him, neither did he pay atten- 
tion to the words from the mouth of God. After all, 
one must be broadminded and unprejudiced! Grad- 
ually his friendship with the house of Ahab ripened 
into a marriage alliance between Jehoshaphat's son 
and Ahab's daughter. 

Jehoshaphat experienced a marvelous deliverance 
from the Moabites and Ammonites who far out- 
numbered the army of Judah. He diligently promoted 
the worship of God and the teaching of God's law 
to his people. But he made a drastic mistake when 
he joined himself with the enemies of God. All the 
good he had been able to accomplish for Judah dur- 
ing his lifetime was swept away by this deadly 
compromise. 

We read that Jehoram, Jehoshaphat's son, "walked 
in the way of the kings of Israel, like as did the 



house of Ahab: for he had the daughter of Ahab to 
wife: and he wrought that which was evil in the eyes 
of the Lord" (2 Chronicles 21:6). He even murdered 
his brothers to make sure his position as king. 

But the damage did not end there. Jehoshaphat's 
grandson, Ahaziah, who succeeded the wicked Jehoram 
to the throne, "also walked in the ways of the house 
of Ahab: for his mother was his counsellor to do 
ivickedly" (2 Chronicles 22:3). 

After the death of Ahaziah, this wicked woman, 
Athaliah, killed all the royal seed except one who 
escaped and made herself the ruler of the land. For 
fifteen years after the death of Jehoshaphat, God 
was shut out of Judah by wicked rulers. 

Jehoshaphat trusted in God and wanted to serve 
Him. He was kind and good, but he did not realize 
that "the friendship of the world is enmity with God" 
(James 4:4). He did not realize that his generosity 
toward Ahab was a deadly mistake which would lead 
his nation to ruin. 

Did Jehoshaphat come to his senses at last? Per- 
haps so. Toward the end of his life, he joined Ahab's 
son in a business venture. Again God spoke to him 
through a prophet. "Because thou hast joined thy- 
self with Ahaziah, the Lord hath broken thy works. 
And the ships were broken, that they were not able 
to go to Tarshish" (2 Chronicles 20:37). 

At last Jehoshaphat was ready to listen. "Then said 
Ahaziah the son of Ahab unto Jehoshaphat. Let my 
servants go with thy servants in the ships. But Je- 
hoshaphat would not" (1 Kings 22:49). 

These "things . . . were written for our learning" 
(Romans 15:4). "He that hath an ear, let him hear" 
(Revelation 3:6). • 



T 



HE SUMMIT OF Mount 
Barbara commands a splen- 
did view of rolling hills and 
the Mediterranean Sea below at 
Jaffa. The spectacular scenery 
and the light, pure air of the 
heights is ample reward for the 
difficult climb upwards. 

Long ago a dear child of God 
called Barbara had to flee to this 
mountain and live in a cave in 
order to escape her persecutors. 
Some of them even followed her 
there and tormented her in many 
wicked ways. Still she trusted God 
and He delivered her and provided 
all her needs. Today, as is often the 
case, the churches reverence her 
memory far more than they follow 
her example. They have built a 
little shrine and commemorate her 
life annually with a feast. 

One beautiful sunny day a few 
of my friends and I climbed to the 
summit of Mount Barbara. Al- 
though I wanted to see the shrine 
and view the land from the top, I 
was more conscious of the Master 
than I was of Barbara. As I 
climbed, my heart prayed, "Lord, 
teach me some truth today as I 
walk this way with Thee." 

There exists no path up the 
mountain. The slopes are almost 
solid stone. In places the stones 
are smooth and slippery; in other 
places they are sharp and pointed. 
Briers and thorns grow thickly be- 
tween the stones, making the path 
hard and hostile. 

Before I had climbed a third of 
the way, I felt exhausted with the 
heat and the obstacles. The all-too- 
distant summit did not seem to be 
worth the effort from such a van- 
tage point. Although struggling 
with an overwhelming desire to go 
back, I plodded on. Suddenly, my 
foot slipped and I grabbed for a 
stone to prevent my falling. Re- 
covering from my fear and sur- 
prise, I felt something moist and 
soft under my hand. To my aston- 
ishment there was a most beauti- 
ful, delicately colored and per- 
fumed cyclamen. Yes, there it was, 
growing in less than a cup full of 
earth in the crevice of the rock. 
And blooming too, mind you, and 
that out of season. 



By MARGARET GAINES 



Miss Margaret Gaines, 
sionary to Jordan. 



Immediately I knew that God 
was speaking to me, and I waited a 
moment to listen. "What are you 
doing here, beautiful Flower, in 
such a dreadfully lonely, desolate, 
and hostile place? Are you not 
wasting your beauty and perfume? 
How do you thrive in the crevice 
of the grey rocks?" Silently I ques- 
tioned the flower. Just as silently 
it answered, "I was placed here on 
a special mission by a wise Mas- 
ter — first, to spend my beauty and 
perfume for Him alone; second, to 
encourage weary travelers who 
strive for the heights. He who 
placed me here also nourishes and 
sustains me, and His smile fulfills 
all my longings." So spoke the love- 
ly little preacher. What theology! 
What a subject for songs and 
books! What sublime truth spoken 
in the silent language of a flower 
in the world's most unlikely pulpit? 

In an effort to preserve the ex- 
perience, I picked the flower 
(which willing accepted martyr- 
dom as a part of its calling) and 
continued my climb with new 
strength and determination, elabo- 
rating the flower's message in my 
heart all the way. 

From the summit of Mount Bar- 
bara greater vision came to me. 
Not only of rolling hills and distant 
blue seas. But with eyes a little 
wider open, I beheld greater rea- 
sons for being, wider fields of 
service, and purer devotion to God. 
"Thank you for the new truth, 
Lord," I prayed, "And, Lord, I 
would rather be a cyclamen in 
some lonely, hostile place — giving 
courage to travelers and living for 
Thee alone — than to share the 
passing glory and honor of hot- 
house orchids, roses, and gardenias, 
which proudly decorate banquet 
halls or weddings. If in Thy wisdom 
Thou seest it can be, make me 
just such a plant, O Lord." • 



Church of God Mis- 



When God 
Spoke 

Through a 
Flower 




FOUR MILLION 




7P 




MISTAKES! 



RECENTLY IN A small town in Illinois, two little 
girls were playing hide-and-go-seek. They 
chose an old refrigerator in an old barn as 
their hiding place. Hours later when the girls were 
found, they both had smothered to death. 

Add to this Illinoisan tragedy, more than four mil- 
lion accidents that happened last year at home. 
Luckily, some of them were nonfatal. 

But think of the toll: millions of people are injured 
at home, which is supposed to be the safest spot in 
our lives. There were far less auto accidents during 
the same period! 

In every room, on every staircase, in each back- 
yard, there are potential dangers, especially to small 
children. 

What are we doing to correct them? 

There is only one thing to do with a discarded 
refrigerator that has been placed on the junk heap: 
knock off the door-locking mechanism so that it can- 
not prove a deathtrap. Better still, strip off the entire 
door! 

What about the plastic bag? Do not leave one ly- 
ing around for some innocent child to pull over its 
head. 

Americans have been oversold on special weeks that 
are dedicated to some cause. But as you read this, 
go over to the calendar and circle the next seven- 
day period. Make this your own personal "Emergencies 
Do Not Wait Week!" It might save the life of some- 
one you love. 

You change the oil in your car at regular in- 
tervals, so why not inspect your home this week and 
do a bit of accident-proofing? 

How long has it been since you checked your med- 
icine cabinet? 

A good place to start is the kitchen. If your baby 
is like most babies, he does not let Mommy make a 
move without following at her heels. This means he 
spends lots of time crawling around the kitchen, ex- 
ploring the wonders of the cabinet bins and drawers. 



5y GROVER BRINKMAN 



Make sure that your poisonous products, including 
some of the most ordinary cleaning materials, are 
out of reach. Store sharp knives in a container, turn 
the handles of your pots and pans inward on the 
stove when cooking — and keep matches in an un- 
attainable place. 

Above all, never underestimate the resourcefulness 
of your youngster. He can manage to get himself into 
the strangest situations! 

Every bathroom should have a door that can be 
opened from the outside. There should be a grab 
bar on the tub or shower. Electrical appliances 
should be kept out of reach of bathtub and sink, 
so that wet hands will never get to them. 

The biggest backyard menaces are broken glass, 
protruding nails in boards, holes in the ground, and 
neglected play equipment. You can make short work 
of these. 

What about the power tools — are they padlocked? 
And the guns? Even unloaded guns are a hazard, 
unless the shells or bullets are out of reach. 

The power mower is dangerous, so is the family car. 
Even the poison ivy in the backyard is a potential 
enemy unless you grub it up. And what about those 
insecticides out in the garage? 

Give all of these things a common denominator, 
and they spell accidents are about to happen. 

One of the greatest home hazards is the possibility 
of being burned by an overturned pan or utensil on 
the stove, or by scalding water. Regardless of whether 
or not you believe in "ancient remedies," never use 
butter, grease, tannic acid jelly, or boric acid in any 
form on burns. 

Accident potentials are in every home, on every 
farm, in the city, or wherever you live. Spot them, 
eliminate them. Do not wait until tragedy strikes. 

The two little girls who hid in the old refrigerator 
are gone. But do not let it happen in your own 
family! • 



REN WAS ALWAYS espe- 
cially close to Grandma. 
She was eighty-three, yet 
she seemed to understand just 
what was going on in his mind. 
She was so proud of him that she 
made him feel like a million dol- 
lars. She was so good, too, that 
Ken felt a little guilty in com- 
parison. Then suddenly she was not 
there any more. 

It had happened without warn- 
ing. Grandma had died in her 
sleep. 

The funeral was a new experi- 
ence for Ken, and a terrifying 
one. The minister said kind and 
wonderful things about Grandma, 
but Ken could not keep his eyes 
off that casket. Something wonder- 
ful had dropped out of his life, and 
it gave him a sinking feeling in- 
side. He told his father about it. 

"Yes, Ken. I think I know how 
you feel. It hits us all the same way 
when we first experience the loss of 
a loved one in death." 

"But, Dad, why do we have to 
die? Why can't we live forever?" 

"We can. But not here. Remem- 
ber how frail Grandma was? Her 
body was just worn out. The same 
thing happens with all living 
things. She liked life, but she was 
ready to move on." 

"I just can't see how Grandma 
can move on when she is dead. I 
know this is faith, but I just don't 
get it." 

"That's because you look upon 
death as the finish. The Bible says 
it is only a transition." 

"All I know is that Grandma isn't 
here any more." 

"I miss her, too. But it helps me 
to know that she is still alive in 
another world. Paul says, 'Sorrow 
not, even as others which have no 
hope' (1 Thessalonians 4:13). By 
this he means that when a loved 
one dies we feel grief at the part- 
ing; but if the loved one was a 
Christian, there is a difference. We 
have the hope of seeing him again." 

"The trouble is, Dad, we have to 
take this for granted. If we could 
only see Grandma up there now, it 
would make it easier." 



"Too easy. Faith isn't that sim- 
ple. But we still can be sure. We 
can trust the Word of God. It 
teaches that death is something 
like the change from caterpillar to 
butterfly. When the caterpillar 
comes to the end of its phase, it 
looks like a dead thing stuck to 
the twig of the tree. But something 
is going on inside. Soon it sheds its 
caterpillar body and emerges as a 
butterfly. In so doing, it changes a 
very limited existence for a much 
more wonderful one." 

"You mean that Grandma has 
gone through a kind of chrysalis?" 

"Yes, Ken. Paul taught in the Bi- 
ble that there are two kinds of 
bodies: the earthly one and the 
heavenly one. He called these 
'tents' because they are the homes 
of the person, within which lives 
the soul or spirit or personality. 
This is indestructible. While we 
live in this world we have a 
worldly body. When the body is no 
longer useful, we shed it and pass 
through into the other world to get 
the other heavenly body." 

"So Grandma won't be frail any 
more?" 

"No. She has a new body without 
any of the earthly limitations. She 
has started a whole new existence." 

"But how can we be sure this 
will happen to us?" 

"God guarantees it, Ken. When 
we give our hearts to Him in con- 
version, He enters our inner spirit 
and unites it to Himself. This 
means that our continued existence 
beyond death is as sure as the life 
of God. Nothing can be more cer- 
tain than that." 

"But, Dad, if this is true, why 
don't we want to die?" 

"Because God has given us life 
to enjoy to the fullest. We should 
think about life, not death. But 
knowing the Christian teaching 
about death helps us to live, be- 
cause we are not afraid about it 
anymore." 

"I still feel sad about Grandma's 
dying, Dad. But the funny sinking 
feeling inside has gone." 

"That was your own fear of 
death, Ken. Now that it's gone, you 
can go on living the way Grand- 
ma would like for you to do." • 



From 
Caterpillar 

to Butterfly 



By JAMES H. JAUNCEY 




By GRACE V. WATKINS 




f 




W 

1 A / ILL YOUR FIRST day on 

1/1/ campus be thrilling? 

frightening? confusing? 

fun? or very different from high 

school days? 

The first day at college can be 
any of these. If you, know just 
what differences to expect, your 
initiation into college life will be 
easier. 

First of all, there is greater free- 
dom in the day's schedule. Lessons 
do not have to be taught only in 
classrooms or study halls from nine 
to three. Except for classes and 
labs, daily schedules are largely of 
the instructors' own arranging. 

But do not throw your beanie in- 
to the air and whoop at this news! 
College courses are tough, and you 
will have to S-T-U-D-Y. Competi- 
tion for admission to college is 
stiffer every year. 



Will classes be more formal or 
less formal? At a large university, 
they will probably be more formal; 
at a smaller, church-related col- 
lege, they will likely be less for- 
mal, probably pleasantly informal. 
You will not find juvenile cutups 
or teacher baiters in college class- 
rooms! 

At college you will be more "on 
your own," too. Does that mean 
parentwise, as well as teacherwise? 
Yes! Even if you live at home and 
attend college in your hometown, 
less emotional dependence on Mom 
and Dad is as it should be. (If you 
possibly can, try to have the last 
two years of college away from 
home.) 

Do try to attend a college with 
a beautiful campus. Melodramatic 
as it sounds, memories of a lovely 
campus will be a joy all your life. 
You will find the group of build- 
ings, rather than just one build- 
ing, exciting, thrilling. 

Clothes? There is great variation, 
of course — not so much in type as 
in variety. In most colleges and 
universities, the sweater-and-skirt 
outfit is the standard for girls. For 
fellows, modified sports clothes are 
the style. Add a few dress-ups for 
social evenings, and you are all set. 

Dates at college? Of course! 
There is the fun of having dates 
for campus events, there is the pos- 
sibility that you will find your one 
and only. Conversational ease with 
the opposite sex is a foundation 
stone of the happy adult life. 



As for your one and only, sociol- 
ogists say couples who meet in 
college have eight times as much 
chance for happiness as those who 
meet otherwise. 

If you possibly can, attend a 
church-related college. College 
friendships are among the deepest 
and most precious of a lifetime. 
Glorious friendships will be yours 
at a church-related college — with 
girls and fellows who, like you, have 
known the faith-lighted path, have 
thrilled to working in church, 
youth fellowship, Sunday school, 
and youth choir. You will have un- 
forgettable memories of chapel, 
vespers, courses in religion, and 
long, shared talks about the basics 
of life. 

For your first days on campus, 
here are a few suggestions in a 
nutshell: 

Remember there will be a period 
of adjustment. There may be times 
when you will feel "lost" and "un- 
anchored." 

Try to keep your thoughts and 
interests ahead, rather than look- 
ing back. 

Be warm and friendly. Seek out 
girls and fellows with the same 
interests as yours. 

Fill your heart with a desire to 
grow — to develop. 

Do not write weepy letters home. 
Instead, tell the folks how won- 
derful college is and what glorious 
paths lie before you. 

Get into religious activities as 
soon as possible. 

Develop a strong interest in the 
campus, in the new town. Learn 
all you can about them. 

Develop a feeling of loyalty to 
the college and become a booster 
for it. 

Start out with regular Bible 
reading and prayer each day, and 
thank God for your wonderful new 
opportunities. 

If you, Marilyn, are startled, 
when your professor calls you 
"Miss Smith"; if you, Rodney, feel 
"uncomfortable" when he address- 
es you as "Mr. Jones" — sit up 
straight and learn to love it! It is 
a badge of really growing up! • 



8 



WALTER R. PETTITT 

Director, Evangelism and Home Missions 



personal EVAN6ELISM 



By CARL H. RICHARDSON 





The Rev. Carl H. Richardson 



AY NOT YE, There are yet 
four months, and then com- 
eth harvest? behold, I say 
unto you, Lift up your eyes, and 
look on the fields; for they are 
white already to harvest" (John 
4:35). 

"The gospel," said Vance Havner, 
"is not something to come to 
church to hear, but something to 
go from the church to tell." 

William Temple said, "We can 
give the world Christ; we cannot 
give it more, we dare not give it 
less!" 

"Give me ten men," thundered 
John Wesley, "only ten, who fear 
nothing but God, hate nothing but 
sin, and love nothing but souls, 
and I'll shake the foundations of 
hell and set up the kingdom of God 
in this present world!" 

Every Christian, whether he be 
minister, teacher, youth worker, 
administrator, writer, or layman is 
to be a productive, fruit-bearing 
soulwinner. We were "born to re- 
produce." 

A large baby food company has 
as its slogan: "Babies are our busi- 
ness—our only business." It should 
be said of every church "Souls are 
our business — our only business." 
In 1794 John Wesley gave this mes- 
sage to a group of preachers, "You 
have nothing to do but win souls." 
Evangelism, therefore, is not a 
"sideline" of the church but is its 
primary reason for existence. 

Barren altars, cold Christians, 
fruitless ministries, and stagnate 



churches lend undeniable evidence 
to one of two things: unctionless 
intellectualism and fleshly fanati- 
cism. 

Several steps are important for 
us to remember if we are to be ef- 
fective and productive workers in 
personal evangelism. 

PLANNING 

Winning a soul to Jesus Christ 
will not happen by accident. A 
definite chief aim should be kept 
firmly in mind by the soulwinner 
as he sets out to work for Christ. 
"My job," said saintly William 
Carey, "is to extend the kingdom of 
God. I only cobble shoes to pay my 
expenses." 

"He that winneth souls is wise." 
The wise soulwinner will plan his 
strategy prayerfully before he at- 
tempts to witness to an eternal 
soul, carefully steering his conver- 
sation to introduce Jesus Christ to 
those with whom he deals. 

PREPARATION 

It is obvious that one cannot win 
others to Christ unless he himself 
is thoroughly prepared for the task. 
Soul-searching prayer should be 
made to be sure that the "channel" 
is clear between himself and his 
God. If "newborn babes" are to 
be born into the family of God, 
there must be some soul travail. 

Martin Luther spoke of Chris- 
tians of his generation as being so 
unconcerned about souls in prayer 
that they "failed to get sweat upon 
their souls." John Henry Jowett 



once remarked, "We cease to bless 
when we cease to bleed." John Knox 
must have known this same burden 
for lost souls when he uttered to 
God, "Give me Scotland, or I die!" 
When the church stops seeking 
the lost, it is lost. 

PROCEDURE 
Evangelism puts the "go" in gos- 
pel. Christ has never told us to 
wait until sinners come to us, but 
rather he tells the Christian to go 
to the sinner! "The Son of Man is 
come to seek and to save that which 
was lost," are the compelling words 
of Jesus. 

A. Amid the grand surroundings 
that were hostile to her faith 
in God, Naaman's serving maid 
witnessed to her leprous master 
until he responded and sought 
further help from the prophet 
of the Lord. 

B. For thirty-eight years a crip- 
pled beggar sat outside the Tem- 
ple gate, until Peter and John 
carried the good news of the gos- 
pel which transformed his entire 
life and caused five thousand 
souls to be added to the church 
in one day! Personal evangelism 
avalanched into mass evangelism 
on that day. 

C. It was in the chariot of the 
Ethiopian that Philip witnessed 
to and won a soul as a result of 
personal evangelism. 

D. What else was it but personal 
evangelism that was exemplified 

Please turn to page 23 



9 



Ill 



I liiit fere 




By CHARLES VAN NESS 



ABOUT THE TIME you 
bring your date to the car 
—both of you are absolute- 
ly dazzling in your finest clothes — 
and find the two front tires nuz- 
zling the pavement without decent 
distance between the rim and the 
blacktop (they are flat!), you may 
be tempted to groan, "I wish I 
didn't have to put up with trou- 
ble like this." 

Or, when your best friend (up 
to now) casually remarks he is 
taking your girl to the church pic- 
nic and you are welcome to come 



along for the ride provided you sit 
in the back seat with the potato 
salad, and your hand tightens slow- 
ly around the salad bowl and you 
are strongly considering the sug- 
gestion to let him have the potato 
salad right now — in the face — a 
better part of you might whisper, 
"I wish I didn't have to overcome 
temptations like this." 

Or, while the rest of the class 
have already turned in their pa- 
pers, have gone outside where you 
can hear them whooping it up be- 
cause it was such a simple exam, 
and you are still struggling with 
question number 8 (out of 20), 
you might comment, "I wish I 
didn't have to take tests." 

Troubles, temptations, tests. How 
wonderful it would be if you did 
not have to contend with any of 
these things? 

Maybe; but then again, maybe it 
would not be so great. As long as 
you are in this world, you are going 
to have these three T's. 

Perhaps an item about something 
out of this world will help us think 
about the place that troubles, 
temptations, and tests have in our 
lives. 

"How do you find out about 
things 'out of this world'?" you 
might ask. "Are you talking about 
what the Bible says?" 

No, we are not. We are talking 
about something the Russians said. 
And it is "out of this world" be- 
cause it concerns space travel. 

Assuming that we can believe the 
Russians' findings, their news item 
is extremely interesting. They re- 
port that experiments with animals 
in a weightless environment show 
that astronauts could not survive 
more than fourteen days without 
gravity's pull. The heart and blood 
vessels cannot adapt properly dur- 
ing weightlessness. 

In other words, the body needs 
the weight of gravity — the heavy, 
constant drag upon it — to func- 
tion at top capacity. 

Incidentally, an American doc- 
tor was the one who brought the 
news back to this country, so prob- 
ably the findings are valid. 

What will space technicians do 
to keep astronauts alive for flights 



of more than fourteen days? The 
answer is simple: they must pro- 
vide aritificial gravity — something 
that will remove the weightlessness 
and restore the normal pull upon 
the bones, muscles, and organs. 
One easy way to do this is to cause 
the space capsule or vessel to spin 
like a bullet does when it leaves 
the barrel of a gun. 

Then the edge of the vessel be- 
comes "down" because the centri- 
fugal force pushes everything in 
that direction. Or, another way to 
provide articifial gravity would be 
to connect the space vehicle by 
chain or pipe to a sort of heavy 
ball around which the vehicle re- 
volves. This works something like 
the pail of water that you swing 
over your head. Again, centrifugal 
force pushes against everything to 
take away the curse of weightless- 
ness. 

Notice the expression, "curse of 
weightlessness." 

We said that because weightless- 
ness is not a blessing to our bod- 
ies, for they work better when they 
have something pulling them down. 
Our bodies develop better in the 
presence of gravity's force. 

Is it possible that our spiritual 
lives work better when they have 
things pulling them down? Things 
like troubles, temptations, and tests 
— all kinds, not just those we take 
at school — may be the very down- 
ward pull we need to develop strong 
Christian characters. 

Come to think of it, I believe the 
Bible says something about that. 
1 Peter 1:6 and 7 talks about temp- 
tation and trial doing something 
for the Christian's faith. They re- 
fine and purify it. 

Or, to say it another way, the 
downward pull of trouble results 
in an upward growth of faith. 

So, when you face that next 
trouble, temptation, or test, do not 
try to escape it by saying, "I wish 
I didn't have to. . . ." This is just 
another way of shirking moral and 
spiritual responsibility. 

Meet the problem head on. Ask 
Christ to help you solve it, and 
watch yourself develop into a ma- 
ture Christian. • 



10 



By PAULINE BONE 



tefel: 




j 



EFFERY AND his little friend 
had had a fight over a bird 
nest, because they both had 
wanted it. Jeffery's mother coun- 
seled kindly with him, helping him 
to see the need of asking forgive- 
ness. Jeffery said, "Mamma, I'm 
going in and say my prayer and 
you better go along, because it is 
going to be a hard one." 

People down through the ages 
have needed someone to share their 
burdens in prayer. 

A certain disciple at Damascus, 
named Ananias, was directed to 
"arise, and go into the street which 
is called Straight, and enquire in 
the house of Judas for one called 
Saul, of Tarsus: for, behold, he 
prayeth" (Acts 9:11). Here was one 
that needed a prayer partner that 
he might receive his sight, and be 
filled with the Holy Ghost. Accord- 
ing to Romans 15:30, "Now I be- 
seech you, brethren, for the Lord 
Jesus Christ's sake, and for the love 
of the Spirit, that ye strive together 
with me in your prayers to God 
for me," Saul, who was now the 
great Apostle Paul, continued to 
need prayer partners that the full- 



PRAYER 
PARTNERS 



ness of Christ might rest upon his 
life daily. 

One day when God's people were 
in a battle with their enemies, 
Moses took Aaron and Hur with 
him to the top of a hill to pray 
for victory. It was a hard prayer. 
As long as Moses held up his hands 
toward heaven Israel prevailed. 
But Moses became so weak that he 
could hardly hold up his hands. 
Then Aaron and Hur stayed up his 
hands until victory was in sight. 
Missionaries especially need prayer 
partners like Aaron and Hur who 
will hold them up before God. One 
missionary writes from the field: 
"We are the only Christian wit- 
nesses in our area. We have great 
opportunities to win souls for 
Christ. Pray that the Holy Spirit 
will work in hearts and bring 
them to repentance and salvation." 
Will it be an easy task to win these 
souls for Christ? Not according to 
the words of a missionary speaker 
from Africa that I heard recently. 
He said, "God works in the souls 
of men the same way around the 
world." He told us that the hearts 
in Africa are just as hard as they 



are here. They have to be dug out 
of the miry pits of sin one by one. 
It takes much earnest and fervent 
prayer to do this. Will you be a 
missionary's prayer partner, help- 
ing to win souls for Christ? 

Often those persisting in prayer 
need someone with them for en- 
couragement. This was true of Eli- 
jah when he was praying for rain 
on the top of Mount Carmel. As 
Elijah continued in fervent prayer, 
his servant looked again and again 
for signs of rain. Finally the ser- 
vant cried, "Behold, there ariseth 
a little cloud out of the sea, like 
a man's hand" (1 Kings 18:44). 
This was just the encouragement 
Elijah needed. 

A Christian lady counseled with 
a friend at the altar, urging her 
to pray until victory came, assur- 
ing her she would stay with her. 
Prayer partners like this are a 
great blessing. 

A decree had been signed in Shu- 
shan the palace to destroy all 
Jews — God's chosen people — b o t h 
young and old, little children and 
women included. This sad news 

PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 25 



11 



WE 

HEEB THE BIBLE ! 



By CLAY COOPER 

President, Vision Incorporated 



TWO ATTORNEYS, both 
equally aware of our grow- 
ing moral decadence, sharp- 
ly, disagreed on how to reverse the 
trend. One proposed widespread 
application of the Ten Command- 
ments. The other mocked, "They're 
just a set of worn-out customs." 

After being challenged to reread 
them (Exodus 20:1-17) and to pick 
out any that could be discarded 
without endangering human rights, 
homes, schools, institutions, and 
basic freedoms, the skeptic later 
conceded, "I've been racking my 
brains to find just one of those 
commandments that we could do 
without and still keep things going. 
But there's not one you can drop 
and still expect men to act like 
human beings." 

What is true of the Decalogue 
is true with the whole Bible. It 
is relevant. "All Scripture is given 
by inspiration of God, and is 
profitable for doctrine, for reproof, 
for correction, for instruction in 
righteousness: That the man of 
God may be perfect, throughly 
furnished unto all good works" (2 
Timothy 3:16, 17). 

If we are going to put a soul back 
under the ribs of the present 
civilization, we are going to have 



to readopt the zeal for the Bible 
expressed in the Methodist Hymnal 
(1880): 

"The B-I-B-L-E, 

That's the Book for me; 

The B-I-B, oh, the B-I-B, 

Oh, the B-I-B-L-E." 

REASON ONE 

THE BIBLE— PROFITABLE 

FOR INSTRUCTION 

Deuteronomy 11:19; 

2 Chronicles 17:9; Isaiah 34:16; 
John 5:39; Romans 15:4 

John Quincy Adams did not hesi- 
tate to affirm, "The first and al- 
most only book deserving of uni- 
versal attention is the Bible. I 
speak as a man of the world . . . 
and I say to you, 'Search the 
Scriptures.' " In his diary (Sep- 
tember 26, 1810) the sixth President 
of the United States made this 
entry: "I have made it a practice 
for several years to read the Bi- 
ble through in the course of every 
year. I usually devote to this read- 
ing the first hour after I rise ev- 
ery morning." 

Read it to be wise, believe it to 
be safe, practice it to be holy, is 
a triad loaded with meaning. 

"Read it to be wise . . ." Presi- 
dent Herbert Hoover paid the Bi- 



ble a tribute on this point, "There 
is no other book so various as the 
Bible, nor one so full of con- 
centrated wisdom." It instructs the 
mind. 

"Believe it to be safe . . ." The 
Apostle Paul taught, "The holy 
Scriptures . . . are able to make 
thee wise unto salvation through 
faith which is in Jesus Christ" 
(2 Timothy 3:15). It teaches the 
soul. 

"Live it to be holy . . ." Abra- 
ham Lincoln found the Bible 
something to live by. "I am prof- 
itably engaged in reading the Bi- 
ble," he wrote. "Take all of this 
Book upon reason that you can, 
and the balance by faith and you 
will live and die a better man." 
It relates time and eternity. 

"I am a Bible-bigot," wrote John 
Wesley in his journal (June 2, 
1766). "I follow it in all things, 
both great and small." Do we? If 
not, why not? 

REASON TWO 

THE BIBLE— POWERFUL 

IN INFLUENCE 

Jeremiah 5:14, 23:29; 

Romans 1:16; Ephesians 6:17; 

Hebrews 4:12 

William Lyon Phelphs, the early 
American educator, felt that ev- 
ery copy of the Scriptures ought 
to have written on its cover these 
words, "Highly explosive! Handle 
with care." 

The Bible is not static. It con- 
dones or it condemns. It illuminates 
or incinerates. It is never unpro- 
ductive. Sin may keep a man from 
this Book, but when applied, this 
Book will keep a man from sin. 

As with a man, so with a na- 
tion. Here the weight of the open 
Bible is incalculable by the very 
judgment of men in high places, 
present and past. Federal Judge 
Luther W. Youngdahl contends, 
"If we are to win the cold war, 
we must get back to God; and to 
get back to God, we must get back 
to the Bible." It can save us from 
catastrophe. 

It is sheer tragedy that a na- 
tion, such as ours, molded into 
greatness by this instrument 
should now find itself making 
nearly every official judgment 



12 



against it. We could learn much 
from emerging Africa. The gov- 
ernment of Ghana recently placed 
an order in London for five hun- 
dred thousand Bibles to be used 
as textbooks in every public school 
in the republic of seven million 
people. 

So much a part of the warp and 
woof of developing America was 
the Bible that Andrew Jackson af- 
firmed, "That Book, Sir, is the rock 
upon which our republic rests." 
For what it could mean now, on 
this end of our shaky existence, a 
Christian patriot has said, "If I 
were to have my way, I would take 
the torch out of the hand of the 
Statue of Liberty, and in its stead 
place the open Bible." 

REASON THREE 

THE BIBLE— PURIFIER 

OF THE LIFE 

Psalm 119:9; 

John 15:3, 17:17; Ephesians 5:26; 
1 Peter 1:22 

"Now are ye clean through the 
word" (John 15:3). Dr. Carl G. 
Morlock, professor of clinical med- 
icine in the Mayo Foundation and 
consultant in internal medicine at 
the world-famed clinic, testifies: "I 
try to set aside some portion of 
each day for Bible reading and 
prayer. When, however, the press 
of work crowds out time that 
should be given to these matters, I 
find that my personal life suffers. 
The Bible is a secure guide for 
living in a world which seems to be 
evermore uncertain of what is best 
in human conduct." 

It is not only the Book of God, 
but the God of books when we seek 
for light on spiritual regeneration. 
Here we learn how "old things 
are passed away; and behold all 
things are become new" (2 Corin- 
thians 5:17). Greek mythology 
may tell us how Circe, with her 
magic wand, turned men into 
swine, but the Bible is the only 
authority on how swine are turned 
into men. "I don't want to read 
the Bible, that is not yet," said an 
inebriate still in love with his 
darling sin, "for I know what it 
will do to me." 

Let's quote presidents again: "I 
have always said, and will always 



say, that the studious perusal of 
the sacred Volume will make bet- 
ter citizens, better fathers, better 
husbands" (Thomas Jefferson). 
"When you have read the Bible, 
you will know it is the Word of 
God, because you will have found 
it the key to your own heart, your 
own happiness, and your own 
duty" (Woodrow Wilson). "Its 
words constantly influence my 
thoughts, words, and deeds . . . 
in all areas of life. I memorize 
and repeat it daily" (Herbert Tay- 
lor, past president of Rotary In- 
ternational). 

REASON FOUR 
THE BIBLE— PROVISIONS 

FOR THE SOUL 

Job 23:12; Psalm 119:103; 

Jeremiah 15:16; Matthew 4:4; 

1 Peter 2:2 

"Man shall not live by bread 
alone" (Matthew 4:4). It is said 
that Alexander slept with Homer's 
Iliad under his pillow, for even 
the great conqueror needed some- 
thing more than swords and sol- 
diers. When will we learn, in this 
age of affluence and militaristic 
might, that our destiny is not 
wrapped up in guns or butter, even 
guns and butter. 

". . . but by every word ... of 
God." Billy Graham says, "Through 
the years of experience I have 
learned that it is far better to miss 
breakfast than to forego a session 
with His Word. Not that the Bible is 
some kind of a religious fetish 
which brings good fortune, but that 
I, myself lack decisiveness and pur- 
pose and guidance when I 
neglect what is more important 
than my necessary food." "Brown 
Bread and the Gospels is good 
fare," goes the English Puritan 
saying. 

When one is born again and be- 
comes spiritually alive, he discov- 
ers his need of spiritual groceries. 
Suddenly "that old Book" is no 
longer a manual, it is meat and 
drink. The testimony of those who 
receive strength and stamina 
from it is universal. Even the most 
saintly must feed upon it. 

Paul, now a prisoner in a dank 
Roman dungeon, wrote his friend 



Timothy, "The cloke that I left at 
Troas with Carpus, when thou 
comest, bring with thee, and the 
books, but especially the parch- 
ments" (2 Timothy 4:13). The 
cloak he needed for the body; the 
books for the mind and the parch- 
ments (Scriptures) for the spirit. 
"Especially the parchments." Do 
we put this emphasis on the soul 
food? We should. 

SUMMARY 

"The Bible reveals the mind of 
God, the state of man, the way of 
salvation, the doom of sinners, the 
happiness of believers. Its doc- 
trines are holy, its precepts bind- 
ing, its histories true, its decisions 
immutable. 

"It contains light to direct you, 
food to support you, comfort to 
cheer you. It should fill the mem- 
ory, rule the heart, guide the feet. 
It is a mine of wealth, a paradise 
of glory, a river of pleasure. 

"Here paradise is restored, heav- 
en is opened, hell is disclosed. 
Christ is its grand object, our good 
its design, the glory of God its end. 

"It is given you in life, will be 
opened in judgment and remem- 
bered forever. It rebukes the 
slightest sin, woos the greatest sin- 
ner, wins the hardest heart. 

"It offers protection in infancy, 
happiness in childhood, inspiration 
in youth, strength for maturity, 
assurance for old age, comfort in 
death, salvation and riches, and 
glory and reward for all eternity" 
(A. F. Miller). 

This Holy Book I'd rather own 
than all the gold and gems 
That e'er in monarch's coffers 
shone, than all their dia- 
dems. 

Nay, were the seas one chrysolite, 

the earth one golden ball, 

And diamonds all the stars of 

night, this Book were 

worth them all; 

For here a blessed balm appears 
to heal the deepest woe 
And those who read this Book in 
tears, their tears shall 
cease to flow. 

Thanks be unto God for His un- 
speakable gift — The Bible! • 



13 




A MAN'S JOB 



By EVELYN P. JOHNSON 



MOVED THE comic section 

of the Sunday paper out of 

the chair and sat down. 

"Come here, Beth," I called. 

"Let's get your hair brushed." 

My five-year-old pixie placed her 
doll carefully on the couch. Then 
she sat on the ottoman at my feet. 

As I struggled with the silken 
snarls of her blonde curls, she 
asked, "Mommy, why doesn't 
Daddy come to church with us?" 

I glanced across the room where 
Joe sat in the big reclining chair, 
completely engrossed in the morn- 
ing paper. Why did he not go? I 
asked myself, trying to think of an 
answer. He used to attend church 
regularly, but for several months 
he had been "too tired" or "too 
busy," but I could not give her 
that excuse. 

"Hey, Dad, can I get the car 
out?" Beth's brother spared me 
further worry on the first problem, 
at the moment, by bringing up 
another. He stood in the doorway, 
still pulling on his coat. Robin was 
large for his age, but that did not 
make him any more mature and I 
was against his driving the car. 

I had long ago ceased voicing 
my objections, however. Every time 



I did, Joe said, "Aw, don't be a 
fuddy-duddy," or "He's got to learn 
sometime — better he should learn 
at home." 

But I still felt twelve was far too 
young — under the watchful eye of 
his father, it might not be really 
dangerous. But suppose he tried 
to show his young friends what he 
had learned — when there was no 
adult around? 

"Dad?" Robin persisted. When Joe 
reads the paper, he seems to shut 
out everything else. 

"Huh?" He finally looked up. 
"Oh. Yeah, son. Go ahead and back 
it out of the shed. Save your 
mother that much time." He looked 
toward me, as if expecting an ar- 
gument. I kept brushing hair. 

Robin picked up the car keys 
from the table by the door and 
hurried out of the house. I went 
into the bedroom to get my hat 
and bag. 

I heard the sputter of a cold 
motor outside the window. Then, 
a quiet hum, and I knew Robin was 
easing the car out of the shed. I 
reached into the closet for my hat 
and pushed the door shut. As I 
did, I heard a dull thud. The front 
door slammed and Joe's angry 
voice boomed out across the yard. 



14 



This is it, I thought, and 
breathed a quick prayer for Robin's 
safety. I forced myself to go ahead 
with my dressing. 

"Any nut could beat that!" I 
heard Joe yell. "Why did you cut 
so soon?" Robin sobbed. He may be 
old enough to drive the car, but he 
is young enough to hurt easily, I 
thought. He tried to interrupt. 
"But, Daddy, I—" 

"But, nothing," his father 
snapped. "Go tell your mother to 
come here." 

I opened the door and asked Joe 
if I could help. "Yes," he said, 
without looking at me. "Get under 
the wheel and try to drive out of 
the ditch while we push." 

It looked hopeless to me. The 
gutter was rather deep and one 
tire rested against the concrete 
curb. Without any comment I did 
as he asked. The wheels spun and 
the odor of hot rubber permeated 
the early morning air. After sev- 
eral minutes and no success, I 
turned off the switch and got out 
of the car. 

"Joe, I'm going to walk on to 
church with the children. Other- 
wise, we'll be late for Sunday 
school. If you'll wait, I'll help you 
get the car out after church." 

"Go on, you're no help anyway! 
I'll get the thing out by myself," 
my husband stormed. 

As we walked the few blocks to 
church, Robin talked. 

"Mommy, I should have listened 
to you. I'm not such a hot driver, 
after all. But Mom," he caught 
back a sob. "Why did Dad get so 
angry at me? He told me I could 
drive." 

" 'Cause he doesn't study 'bout 
God," Beth put in, trying to com- 
fort her big brother. 

"Sh-h dear," I said. "Perhaps 
your father will open his heart to 
the Holy Spirit soon. We must be 
patient and loving." 

"And Robin, dear," I turned to 
my son. "You've learned a lesson — 
in time, I hope. Just be thankful 
this was not a serious accident and 
that no one was injured. Some of 
us learn early — some late. And 
someday your father will learn 
self-control and reasoning. Mean- 




while, we must be patient and ask 
God to help him." 

We reached the church just in 
time for assembly and, afterwards, 
we each went to our class. I found 
it difficult to pay attention to the 
lesson that morning as my mind 
kept wandering back to the car 
incident. And I kept praying in- 
wardly that Joe would wake up — 
that he would see how wrong he 
had been in expecting a boy to do 
a man's job. He was a good pro- 
vider and, actually, he was a kind 
husband and father — when he took 
time to remember that he had a 
family. Being away from home six 
days a week as a traveling sales- 
man had made things difficult for 
him, too, and lately he had not 
been living like a Christian should 
live. 

The bell rang and I automati- 
cally followed the group out of 
the Sunday school room toward the 
sanctuary. I took my usual seat, 
halfway toward the front, so the 
children could find me easily when 
they came out of class. I was 
watching for them and did not 
notice a figure come to the end of 
the pew and stop. Suddenly I felt a 
hand on my shoulder and turned 
to see who it was. 

As I looked up, Joe whispered, 
"Is this seat reserved?" And before 
I could reply, he sat down and 
unobtrusively reached for my hand. 



"I would like to join you and the 
children in worship this morning, 
honey," he said. "And I would like 
to start off on the right foot. I've 
already asked God to forgive me 
and I hope my family can forgive 
my unjust action, too." 

He went on, "After you left I got 
to thinking about how I've acted 
lately. Somehow I've lost touch — 
and now this thing with the car. 
I was the one who encouraged 
Robin to drive, then when he made 
a mistake — as we all do now and 
then — I scolded him too harshly — " 

He stopped talking and smiled 
as he looked toward the front of 
the sanctuary. I glanced that way 
and saw our children coming down 
the aisle. Robin's eyes filled with 
tears when he saw his father — but 
this time they were not tears of 
fear or hurt. A sparkle of joy 
shone through the dampness, and 
he quickened his step. Beth, in the 
innocence of childhood, was not 
content to walk faster. She ran 
down the aisle and into the pew. 

"Daddy, Daddy, you did come!" 
She threw her arms around Joe's 
neck and the people around us 
smiled in Christian understanding 
at her display of love. 

I felt like expressing my own joy 
in the same manner, but I merely 
returned the pressure of Joe's hand 
and whispered to my little family, 
"God be praised!" • 



15 



J 

I j 






fcB^___~ 


■« 




J 



ROSWELL, NEW MEXICO 



The Church of God Sunday 
School Junior Department at Ros- 
well, New Mexico, has just ended 
an eight-week contest in which the 
boys and girls competed against 
each other in a drive to obtain 
money for missions. 

Anna Ruth Lee, director of the 
Junior Department and Jackie 
Simeone, assistant director, were 
responsible for the enthusiastic 



way the boys and girls responded. 

There was a total of $58.24 
raised. The girls brought in $31.65; 
the boys $26.59. As was planned, 
the boys on the losing side will 
serve the girls an ice cream sup- 
per. 

The church at Roswell is very 
proud of their juniors and the will- 
ing way they are working for the 
Lord. 



Kearsley Park, Flint, Michigan 




Recently at the end of a six-week 
period, the Young People's En- 
deavor at Kearsley Park, Flint, 
Michigan, closed a Mr. and Miss 
YPE contest. During the contest, 
trading stamps and coupons were 
collected for the Home for Chil- 
dren. Subscriptions were taken for 
the Evangel and Lighted Pathway 
and also points were given, based 
on the attendance. 

Our attendance increased from 
an average of 55 to 94 the first 
month and 107 the second month. 

Mr. YPE, Jeff Layne, and Miss 
YPE, Beverly Hammon, worked 
very hard, as did everyone who 
participated. 

The Reverend A. V. Holdman is 
the pastor of these fine young peo- 
ple. Pray for us that our YPE will 
continue to grow and that many 
souls will be saved. 

— Carolyn Music 
Secretary -treasurer 



Throw a Word Overboard! 



A "Brain-Teaser" for Bible Experts 
By Vincent Edwards 



Here is a new kind of Bible "quiz- 
zer." Below are ten well-known pas- 
sages from Scripture, but in each 
one a word has been added that 
does not appear in the original 
context. 

Can you throw out the word that 
simply does not "belong"? Allow 
yourself 10 points whenever you 
spot it. Your standing as a Bible 
pundit will be determined by your 
final score: 90 is excellent, 80 is 
good, and 70 is fair. 

1. "Surely goodness and mercy 
shall follow me all the days of 
my life: and I will dwell safely 
in the house of the Lord for 
ever." 

2. "Remember now thy Creator in 
all the days of thy youth." 

3. "I have fought a good fight, I 
have finished my course, I have 
always kept the faith." 

4. "It is much more blessed to give 
than to receive." 

5. "If God be for us, who then can 
be against us?" 

6. "T h o u g h I speak with the 
tongues of men and of angels, 
and have not any charity, I am 
become as sounding brass, or 
a tinkling cymbal." 

7. "Glory to our God in the high- 
est, and on earth peace, good 
will toward men." 

8. "God is our sure refuge and 
strength, a very present help 
in trouble." 

9. "Verily I say unto you, Inas- 
much as ye have done it unto 
one of the very least of these 
my brethren, ye have done it 
unto me." 

10. "For what is a man profited, 
if he shall gain the whole world, 
and thereby lose his own soul?" 



16 



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The Silent Ms 



By LON WOODRUM 




AN OLD TESTAMENT 
prophet addresses idols, de- 
manding an authentic her- 
meneutical and eschatological mes- 
sage from them. "Bring your case 
forward . . . state your proofs. Let 
us hear what has happened in the 
past, that we may ponder it, or 
show me what is yet to be, that we 
may watch how it turns out; yes, 
let us hear what is coming, that 
we may be sure you are gods; come, 
do something or other that we 
may marvel at the sight! — why, 
you are things of naught, you can 
do nothing at all" (Isaiah 41:21- 
24, Moffatt). 

Isaiah continues: Cyrus has ris- 
en in the north and is crushing 
kings in his path; and this con- 
queror will restore shattered Israel. 
Which of the man-made gods knew 
about this? what idol predicted it? 
So many little gods — and not one 
promises Israel's coming deliverer! 
Yet God's prophets had been pro- 
claiming this thing right along. "I 



see no one, not a prophet in the 
midst, to answer my inquiries! 
They are all an empty nothing, all 
they do is utterly inane" (Isaiah 
41:28, 29 Moffatt). 

In these times, when civilization 
seems cracking at all its seams, 
perhaps we could do with a proph- 
et to harangue our idols! We ap- 
pear to be building up for global 
ruin. The far-out existentialists of- 
fer us a futureless future. Sad 
theologians with sadder theologies 
assault the bastions of orthodoxy. 
And see what has happened to our 
philosophers! Donald Kalish, chair- 
man of the philosophy department 
of UCLA, says, "There are no 
ethical truths, there are just clarifi- 
cations of ethical problems. Take 
advantage of these clarifications, 
and work out your own existence. 
You are mistaken to think that 
anyone ever had the answers. There 
are no answers. Be brave and face 
up to it" {Time, January 7, 1966, 
p. 24). 



Sometimes, nagged by dark po- 
etic mood, it almost seems to us 
that a giant has stepped on the 
human anthill, and the ants are 
going wild. One recalls how Jesus 
warned that there would be "dis- 
tress of nations, with perplexity; 
. . . Men's hearts failing them for 
fear, and for looking after those 
things which are coming on the 
earth" (Luke 21:25, 26). 

The savants of politics and the 
oracles of religion talk of great so- 
cieties, world brotherhood, ecumen- 
ical faith and global freedom; but 
at times their talk begins to sound 
like television commercials — their 
dream seems as unreal as the TV 
huckster's spiel about the goo that 
can make the homely girl pretty! 

Yet, there resides in an old Book 
the promise of dawn. Isaiah, hav- 
ing vent his irony on the idols, 
speaks of One who will bring ful- 
fillment to man's finest hopes. 
"See! my Servant, whom I uphold; 
my chosen one, in whom I delight. 



18 



I have put my Spirit upon him, 
he shall bring forth justice to the 
nations. . . . Faithfully shall he 
bring forth justice; he shall not 
flicker or bend, till he establish 
justice in the earth" (Isaiah 42:1, 
4, Smith-Goodspeed) . 

But at that point where we 
should be hearing, as a million 
trumpets, this promise of hope we 
are flogged with a vast silence. An 
"empty nothing" stands in the holy 
place. Nihilism slaps us across the 
face. "All they do is utterly inane." 
Multitudinous gimmicks and gad- 
gets are employed to shore up our 
sagging world; while that radiant 
future pledged by the unparalled 
Word is ignored. 

Deliverance is promised to the 
church as it was promised to Is- 
rael through Cyrus; yet as the or- 
acles of Isaiah's time knew noth- 
ing of the approaching event, the 
oracles of our day have no mes- 
sage on the great promise. Science 
is silent as to the beyond. Philoso- 
phy has only questions without an- 
swers. Ontologists, on the whole, of- 
fer no daybreak. Many educational 
chiefs would rather you came ex- 
pounding Communism than 
preaching on the Parousia of the 
Prince of Peace. Even theologians 
wince when we talk of that 
"blessed hope" which is referred to 
more than three hundred times in 
the New Testament. 

The prophet's plea is sharp. 
"Shew me what is yet to be . . . 
yes, let us hear what is coming!" 
Eschatology is still valid for the 
evangelical! The past and the pres- 
ent, with all their myriad happen- 
ings, are small compared to that 
future foretold by the Word. All the 
New Testament message bends to- 
ward that day when the rule shall 
be taken from sinful and senseless 
men and given to the Son of man. 

In this hour of "empty nothing," 
when today's despair confronts to- 
morrow's nihilism, we need to hear 
prophetic voices waking from the 
meaningless babble. "Produce your 
cause, saith the Lord; bring forth 
your strong reasons, saith the King 
of Jacob" (Isaiah 41:21). The Word 
needs to be spoken even when it 



stirs "hatred in the house of . . . 
God" (Hosea 9:8), and when the 
cry is made, "The prophet is a fool, 
the spiritual man is mad" (Hosea 
9:7, 8). 

The cry will come. For, strange 
though it be, the heaviest reproach 
sometimes falls on him who utters 
mankind's highest hope — the hope 
the Book called "blessed" — the com- 
ing of Christ to make a world 
wherein dwells righteousness. Man, 
somehow, does not want God in his 
history — past, present or future. He 
prefers to go it alone, groping, 
stumbling, exisentially displaced, 
lost; overburdened with self- 
strength, self-wisdom and self- 
goodness. 

Still, like Isaiah challenging the 
silent gods, the genuine prophet en- 
visions the day of deliverance. 
"Sing unto the Lord a new song, 
and his praise from the end of the 
earth, ye that go down to the sea, 
. . . the isles, and the inhabitants 
thereof. ... let the inhabitants 
of the rock sing, let them shout 
from the top of the mountains. Let 
them give glory unto the Lord, and 
declare his praise in the islands. 
And I will bring the blind by a 
way they knew not; I will lead 
them in paths that they have not 
known: I will make darkness light 
before them, and crooked things 
straight. These things will I do un- 
to them, and not forsake them" 
(Isaiah 42:10-12, 16). 

Although the dumb oracles re- 
main unspeaking, the Author who 
began the human story shall write 
its denouement. The prophetic 
trumpet does not stumble. Its note 
is positive, authentic, authoritative. 

It said the Messiah would come; 
and He came. It was right about 
the Palestinian Event, and the 
Scriptures will be right about the 
cosmic epiphany. "My former pre- 
dictions have now come to pass. 
And now I foretell you new things; 
ere ever they spring up, I tell you 
of them" (Isaiah 42:9, Moffatt). 
Let the little gods be silent; the 
Lord, most high, has spoken. For 
him in any tense — past, present or 
future — a lie is impossible. H i s 
worlds will fall, but his Word will 
not fall. • 




Box 672 Dept. J5, Muscatine, Iowa 



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Dept. DEPT. 4-28 
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19 



Cocoa, Florida 



Newport News, Virginia 




The first Sunday in February, 
the Church of God of Cocoa 
crowned Tommy Fike and Cindy 
McRae as king and queen of the 
Sunday school. It was the climax 
of a rewarding Sunday school ef- 
fort in which our attendance and 
offerings were boosted greatly. Al- 
so during the contest the boys and 
girls brought in thousands of 
stamps and coupons. When the fi- 
nal count was made, we had 112 
books of stamps and 13,217 coupons 
to send to our Home for Children 
in Sevierville, Tennessee. We praise 
God for our opportunity to serve 
in His Kingdom. 

— Robert Culpepper 



The Briarfield Road Church of 
God in Newport News, Virginia, 
honored our high school graduates 
with a Junior-Senior Banquet on 
Friday, June 3, 1966, at 8:30 p.m. 
The fellowship hall was decorated 
for this special occasion and fifty- 
six guests were present for the 
program geared to the youth of 
our church. The theme, "The Fab- 
ulous Forties," was in connection 
with the year of their birth; and 
the pastor, as master of ceremon- 
ies, brought humor and serious- 
ness in his introduction of each 
of the twelve participants. 

The young people changed to 
informal dress and were taken to 
a supervised recreational area be- 
fore going home. This is only one 
of many projects sponsored by the 
local church for the benefit of its 
youth and young adults to try to 
maintain wholesome fellowship 
that will supplement their Chris- 
tian experience. A number of 
youth have recently accepted the 
Lord and united with the church 
as a result of the church's in- 
terest in their social and recre- 
ational activity as well as their 
spiritual needs. The local church 
was responsible in forming a soft- 



ball league that is now in its third 
summer. With the Assemblies of 
God, the Pentecostal Holiness 
Church and the Church of God 
of Prophecy, they share in times 
of Christian activity and fellow- 
ship. 

A "Young Couples Club" has 
been formed by the local church. 
They meet each month at the 
various members' homes for lawn 
croquet, volleyball, hamburger and 
hot dog cookouts. They strive to 
bring in new couples into their 
fellowship as a means of influ- 
encing them to come to church. 
Then God's Spirit has a chance 
to reach them for Christ and His 
Kingdom. 

A continual revival spirit is felt 
in the regular services. Each Sun- 
day the youth gather around the 
altars praying, crying, rejoicing, 
and leading others to Christ. Our 
church has adopted as its motto 
the descriptive words from Luke's 
Gospel: "And Jesus increased in 
wisdom [intellect] and stature 
[physically], and in favour with 
God [spiritual] and man [social]" 
(Luke 2:52). 

— Reporter 



MOOSE JAW, SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA 







The Moose Jaw Church of God 
Sunday School has just completed 
a contest for the memorization of 
Bible verses. The junior winners 
were Brian Roset, memorizing a 
total of 110 verses; and Linda 
Bridal, 95 verses. In the picture, 
the pastor, the Reverend Mr. Hay 
is presenting Brian and Linda 
with their checks to be used for 
youth camp while the Reverend 
Mr. Bridal, Sunday school super- 
intendent, looks on. 



20 



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31ATEBIK TEIN 



By W. A. Davis, State Sunday School 
and Youth Director of Arizona 



The State Youth Department of 
Arizona recently sponsored the 
second annual statewide Teen Day 
in Phoenix, Arizona. 

Some of the highlights of the 
program included a color guard 
from a local explorer troop which 
led the entire group in the alle- 
giance to the American and Chris- 
tian Flags, and Teen Testimony 
Time which proved very exciting 
as several young men gave their 
testimonies. Next came the discus- 
sion groups led by Dr. Paul F. 
Strickland, Christian psychologist, 
and the Reverend Roger P. Jones, 
executive secretary of Arizona Al- 
cohol and Narcotic Information 
and Education Bureau. 

Dr. Strickland, who was on a re- 
turn visit to our Teen Day, gave an 
informative lecture on "Youth 
Problems" and also conducted a 
question and answer period. 

The Reverend Mr. Jones, a native 
of North Carolina, described the 
days he spent working in tobacco. 
He told the group what cigarette 
advertisers really meant when they 
said, "It's what's up front that 
counts." During his lecture, he de- 
scribed the awful effect alcohol has 
upon the vital body organs. He also 
gave some case histories of alcoho- 
lics. 

At noon each one made his way 
to the lovely downtown YMCA's 
special activities room for a youth 
banquet. The Reverend H. L. Diffie 



22 




Dr. Paul Strickland 



vcrend Roger Jones 



served as Master of Ceremonies 
and Dr. E. C. Christenbury brought 
a challenging after-dinner speech. 

The afternoon was divided be- 
tween recreation and Teen Talent 
time. 

At 5:30 the group viewed a film 
entitled "Verdict at 1:32." In the 
film a medical doctor dissects the 
brain of an elderly alcoholic and 
the brain of a young lady who had 
only a few drinks. He then com- 
pared the two, pointing out the 
devastating effect of alcohol on 
the brain. 



The day's activities were crowned 
with an evening youth rally. The 
counted attendance reached 310. 

The Reverend Rick Painter, a 
California evangelist, spoke with a 
mighty anointing. A pastor com- 
mented that this was one of the 
finest messages he had ever heard. 
God used the message to His glory. 
The altar was filled with young 
people who wanted more of God in 
their lives. 

Many left the Arizona statewide 
Teen Day with a keen desire to 
serve the Lord in a greater way. 




Rev. E. C. Christenbury 



Rev. Rich Pair 



PERSONAL EVANGELISM 
( From page 9) 

by our Lord in meeting and sav- 
ing the adulterous woman at the 
well? 

Dr. Charles W. Conn outlines four 
procedural steps that are splendidly 
basic to personal evangelism: 

1. Want them 

2. Approach them 

3. Win them 

4. Keep them 

The Christians of the Early 
Church were all personal evange- 
lists. They went from house to 
house sharing their faith in Christ 
and "God added to the church 
daily." These personal soulwinners 
were spoken of as "those who 
turned the world upside down!" 
POWER 

Machinery does not create pow- 
er; it consumes it. There must be 
power behind the plan; Power be- 
hind the preparation; Power be- 
hind the procedure; Power behind 
the patterns; And most important- 
ly, there must be power behind the 
person! 

We are instruments in God's 
hands, but we cannot do the work 
of the Holy Spirit. His work is in- 
dispensable in personal evangelism. 
Only by His unction can we be 
truly successful. 

Unction cannot be learned, only 
earned. It is desirable that we get 
acquainted with better techniques, 
organization, and methods. But 
with all of our getting, let us get 
unction. 

"Not by might, nor by power, but 
by my spirit, saith the Lord of 
hosts" (Zechariah 4:6). 



Answers to Throw a Word Overboard! 

From page 16 

1. safely (Psalm 23:6) 
I. all (Ecclesiastes 12:1) 
?. always (2 Timothy 4:7) 
I. much (Acts 20:35) 
5. then (Romans 8:31) 
5. any (1 Corinthians 13:1) 
1. our (Luke 2:14) 
5. sure (Psalm 46:1) 
). very (Matthew 25:40) 
). thereby (Matthew 16:26) 



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MAY YPE ATTENDANCE 

By Donald S. Aultman 
National Director 

This report represents only those 
YPE's that had an average atten- 
dance of more than 50 weekly and 
reported their attendance to the 
office of the National Sunday 
School and Youth Director. By no 
means does it reflect all the Fam- 
ily Training Hour (YPE) groups 
of the Church of God. Each church 
is invited to participate in this 
column. Attendance averages 
should be mailed on a postal card 
on the day following the last YPE 
service in the month and should 
be addressed to Donald S. Aultman, 
National Director, 1080 Montgomery 
Avenue, Cleveland, Tennessee 37311. 



Middletown (Clayton Street), 

Ohio __..214 

Greenville (Tremont Avenue), 

South Carolina ... .... 201 

Lakeland (Lake Wire), 

Florida 184 

Bristol, Tennessee 182 

Hamilton (7th and Chestnut), 

Ohio .... 177 

Garden City, Florida _. 176 

Tampa (Buffalo Avenue), 

Florida ._ 171 

Flint (West), Michigan ... .... 163 

Jacksonville (Springfield), 

Florida .... 159 

Canton (Temple), Ohio _ 151 

Kannapolis (Elm Street), 

North Carolina ... .... .... .... 149 

Atlanta (Hemphill), 

Georgia 147 

Cincinnati (Central Parkway), 

Ohio 140 

Vanceburg, Kentucky ._. .... .... 127 

Wyandotte, Michigan _.. 120 

Winchester, Kentucky 118 

Elyria, Ohio 116 



Morgan ton, North Carolina __ 116 

Wilson, North Carolina __ .... 116 
Lexington (Seventh Avenue), 

North Carolina ... .... .... _ 110 

Clan ton (Zion Ridge), 

Alabama .... .... .... 109 

Miamisburg, Ohio .... _. .... 108 

Brunswick (Norwich Street), 

Georgia 107 

North Ridgeville, Ohio .. 107 
Norfolk (Azalea Garden), 

Virginia __ 103 

Chattanooga (East), 

Tennessee _ __ — . — 101 

Conway (North), 

South Carolina .... .... .... .... 101 

Roanoke Rapids, North 

Carolina .... .... .— . _ 101 

Johnson City, Tennessee ._ 97 

North, South Carolina 95 

Thorn, Mississippi .... _ .... .... 94 

Daytona Beach (McLeod 

Street), Florida .... .... 91 

Paris, Texas .... .... .... .... 91 

Chase, Maryland ... .... .... .... 88 

Jacksonville (Southside 

Estates), Florida 88 

Valdosta, Georgia 85 

Manns Choice, Pennsylvania 84 

Edgemere, Maryland .... . 83 

Princeton, West Virginia .... .... 83 

Hurst, Texas ... .... ... ... 82 

Isola, Mississippi . .... 81 

Avon Park, Florida .. 80 

Pompano Beach, Florida .... .... 80 

Portland (Powell Boulevard), 

Oregon 80 

Lawton (Ninth and Lee). 

Oklahoma 79 

West Columbia, South 

Carolina .... .... .... .... .... .... 79 

Brownfield, Texas .... ... .... 78 

Pacoima (San Fernando 

Valley), California .... 78 

Arcadia, Florida _.. .... .... .... 77 



Cahokia, Illinois 75 

Lancaster, Ohio _ 75 

Ecorse iWestside), Michigan 74 
Marion (Cross Mill » , 

North Carolina 74 

Talladega, Alabama ... 73 

Cleveland (Mt. View), Ohio .... 71 
Jackson (Crest Park), 

Mississippi .. . _ 71 

Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 

Canada . 71 

Oregonia, Ohio .... _ - 71 

Clover, South Carolina .... 69 

Holland, Michigan 69 

Swift Current, Saskatchewan, 

Canada _ _ __ _ 69 

Jackson (Leavell Woods), 

Mississippi .... .... 68 

Modesto, California _ 66 

Wayne, Michigan .... .... 66 

Kingsport (Chestnut Street i, 

Tennessee ... .... __ .... — . — 64 

Royal Oak, Michigan .... .... ..-. 64 

Sanford, Florida .... __ 64 

Cumberland, Maryland .... .... 63 

Flint (Kearsley Park), 

Michigan ... .... _._. __ 63 

Amarillo (Westside), Texas .... 62 
Cleveland (Detroit Avenue), 

Ohio 62 

Pinetops, North Carolina 62 

Tulare, California __ ... 62 

Loxley, Alabama — 59 

Monroe, Louisiana .... _ 59 

Spartanburg ( North I , 

South Carolina .... .... .... __ 59 

Fremont, Ohio .... _ __ .... 58 

Santa Ana (Center Street), 

California ... . — . 58 

Covington (Shepherds Fold), 

Louisiana .... .. . ... . _ 57 

Lawrenceville, Illinois ... .... _ 57 

Booneville, Mississippi _ 56 

Charlottesville, Virginia 56 

Lagrange. Ohio .... __ _. 56 

Miami, Florida _ _ 55 

West Monroe, Louisiana .... .... 55 

Conneross, South Carolina .... 54 

Lake Worth, Florida .... 54 

Sale Creek, Tennessee .... .... ._ 53 

Davie, Florida ... 52 

Leicester, New York .... .... .... 52 

Brooklyn (Bay Ridge), 

New York .... _ 51 

Cleveland (East), Tennessee .... 51 

Donalds, South Carolina .... ... . 51 

Omaha (Parkway), Nebraska 51 

Circleville, Ohio .... .... — . _ 50 

East Point, Georgia ._ 50 

Phoenix (East), Arizona .... .... 50 



24 



Needed: Prayer Partners 
(From Page 11) 

reached the ears of good Queen 
Esther who was in a position to 
help her people. Although it would 
take some hard praying, she knew 
her God was able to help and de- 
liver. Therefore, she called for 
prayer partners, sending this mes- 
sage to her cousin, Mordecai: "Go, 
gather together all the Jews that 
are present in Shushan, and fast 
ye for me, and neither eat nor 
drink three days, night or day: I 
also and my maidens will fast like- 
wise; and so will I go in unto the 
king, which is not according to the 
law: and if I perish, I perish" 
(Esther 4:16). You know the re- 
sult. God spared His humble, pray- 
ing people. 

Because you and I were under 
the death penalty, Jesus, the pre- 
cious Son of God, went into the 
Garden of Gethsemane to pray. It 
was going to be such a hard prayer 
that He needed the help and en- 
couragement of those He loved. 
Taking with Him Peter, James, 
and John, He cried: "My soul is 
exceeding sorrowful, even unto 
death: tarry ye here, and watch 
with me" (Matthew 26:38). It was 
your sins and my sins that took 
Jesus there to pray the same 
agonizing prayer the third time 
(verse 44). It was our sins that 
caused Him to pray so earnestly 
that His sweat became as though it 
were great drops of blood falling 
to the ground. But are you not 
glad that Jesus received strength 
and victory through prayer and 
was able to go to Calvary to com- 
plete the plan of salvation, dying 
on the old rugged cross that we 
might be free from sin? 

No matter how big your prob- 
lems seem to be, how heavy your 
burdens are, how hard or long you 
have been persisting in prayer, 
take courage. Jesus understands. 
He will meet you at the place of 
prayer. Remember His kind words 
to Peter: "I have prayed for thee, 
that thy faith fail not" (Luke 
22:32). Jesus has the same loving 
concern for His people today. Hear 
these comforting words: "Likewise 
the Spirit also helpeth our infirmi- 



ties: for we know not what we 
should pray for as we ought: but 
the Spirit itself maketh interces- 
sion for us with groanings which 
cannot be uttered. And he that 
searcheth the hearts knoweth what 
is the mind of the Spirit, because 
he maketh intercession for the 



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saints according to the will of God" 
(Romans 8:26, 27). While the Spirit 
makes intercession for us, we also 
need to pray for and with each 
other, strengthening each other in 
bonds of love. 

It is a great privilege to be a 
prayer partner! • 




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25 



TRIP WINNERS 

Announced at 
Home for ChMrcn Spring 

Banquet 




ANTICIPATION RAN high 
as the annual banquet for 
the Church of God Home 
for Children drew to its climax. 

Boys and girls, handsomely at- 
tired in their very best dresses and 
suits, had filled the banquet room 
of the Green Valley Restaurant in 
Pigeon Forge to its capacity. Every 
youngster from the Home who 
would be eleven years old or more 
this year was privileged to attend. 
Also present were the staff of the 
Home, the Home's Board of Di- 
rectors, and distinguished friends 
of the Home. 

The Reverend Garland Griffis, a 
member of the Home's Board of 
Directors, served as master of cere- 
monies and delighted everyone 
with his ready wit and humor. 

The Reverend E. C. Thomas, pub- 
lisher of the Church of God Pub- 
lishing House, was the banquet 
speaker. He challenged the young 
people to fully dedicate themselves 
to Christ and live for Him, despite 
the pressures of the jet-age society 
in which they must live. 

Then the moment eagerly await- 
ed by the youth in attendance fi- 
nally arrived. The Reverend E. K. 
Waldrop, assistant superintendent 
of the Home, rose to announce the 
names of the lucky boys and girls 
who had won the coveted trips for 
this year. 

A few weeks earlier, the winners 
had been selected through the use 
of secret ballots by the boys and 
girls of their age groups who live 
in the Home. The names of the 



By MARY R. MITCHELL 



winners of this popularity contest 
and also the places of interest the 
older group will visit, are kept "top 
secret" until the spring banquet. 
The younger winners (eleven 
through thirteen) know they will 
get to visit Washington, D.C., for a 
weekend. But the winners from the 
older group (fourteen and older) 
must wait until just before their 
names are called at the banquet 
before they learn where they will 
be going. In past years, winners 
have gone to such places as the 
New York World's Fair, Califor- 
nia's Disneyland, Texas, and Wis- 
consin. 

Suspense in the banquet room 
had reached the point of a final 
countdown for blast-off when 
Brother Waldrop, after making re- 
marks designed to add to the tor- 
tuous waiting, finally began to 
read the names. 

Everyone warmly applauded the 
winners of the Washington, D. C, 
trip when their names were called. 



Nan and Helen shoiv Pete and Jerry 
what size fish they plan to catch 
in Florida. Helen plans to catch 
one just about equal to her petite 
size. (Left to right: Jerry, Helen, 
Nan and Pete) 

David, Janie, Patricia and Lynn 
look over a map of Washington, 
B.C., in preparation for their week- 
end trip there. 

(Left to right: David, Janie, Pa- 
tricia and Lynn) 



These fortunate youngsters are Pa- 
tricia Aldridge, David Oliver, Janie 
Harper, and Lynn Fowler. 

Suspense mounted again as 
Brother Waldrop continued, "The 
bus is now loading for Orlando, 
Cocoa Beach, Cape Kennedy, and 
all points west!" The teen-agers 
screamed with delight, then wait- 
ed hopefully for their names to be 
called as the winners of this won- 
derful trip. Four of them were well 
rewarded for their friendly, pleas- 
ant personalities and their pop- 
ularity among their peers, for they 
were the chosen ones. These de- 
serving young people are Pete Cecil, 
Nan Myers, Jerry Beasley, and 
Helen Johnson. 

The entire cost of the annual 
banquet and the financing of these 
yearly trips are paid for through 
the gifts of generous individuals 
who are vitally interested in the 
children who live in the Home. To 
them we wish to express our most 
sincere thanks. • 



26 



WHAT IS SUMMER? 

Summer is a happy child, 
Free from school and books, 
Roaming over hills and dale. 
Watching traveling brooks, 
Listening to an ocean breeze, 
Walking through the corn, 
Thanking God for all the fun. 
And autumn who is born. 

— Clare Miseles 



SMU ES, PLEASE! 

Choir singers who look doleful 
Seem somewhat out of place. 
Of course they should be soulful, 
But doesn't a happy face 
Let holy love shine through? 
I'm sure God likes it, too! 

—Grace V. Watkins 





OCCASIONAL CHAIR 

My mom informs me I am not 
To sit in that upholstered spot. 
Her orders lead me to declare 
That it's a never-never chair! 

—Grace V. Watkr, 




CONCERNING A CHRONIC 
SIT-BY-THE-AISLER 

On viewing one who won't move over, 
I'm often in emotional clover, 
Considering how ducky it 
Would be to tilt the pew a bit, 
And watch the hapless victim slide 
And take an unintended ride! 

— Grace V. Watkins 



JOHNNY THE A LI II 111 

The following poem contains seven references to 
verses in the Bible. Some are direct quotes, some use 
the idea. Can you spot the seven? 

He's as light of foot as a wild roe. 
At shooting arrows out of a bow 
He's a wonder to many, and never will fall 
If he should decide to leap over a wall. 
Stronger than lions, he and his brother, 
Like hilltop cedars. There isn't another 
Can equal his prowess if he should take 
A swim to the other side of the lake. 
As lithe as a porpoise is this young man. 
With right hand or left he dexterously can 
Hurl stones and hit poles twenty paces away. 
Oh, Johnny's the stellar athlete of the day. 

— Grace V. Watkins 

KEY: 

Light of foot as a wild roe (2 Samuel 2:18); shoot- 
ing arrows out of a bow (1 Chronicles 12:2); a wonder 
to many (Psalm 71:7); leap over a wall (2 Samuel 
22:30); stronger than lions (2 Samuel 1:23); to the 
other side of the lake (Luke 8:22); with right hand 
or left . . . hurl stones (1 Chronicles 12: 



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LIGHTED 

Path 



SEPTEMBEI 



Bmmwnr 



On your birthday, do you not like 

To reminisce a bit? 

To stand upon the crest of life. 

And have a look at it? 

Those years are just a stairway 

Rising up to where you are. 

You started at the bottom, 

With your eyes upon a star. 

Oh, that step was a rough one! 
That next, you managed badly; 
Those you danced through blithely, 
But the next you crept up sadly. 
There is one you may be proud of, for 
You helped along the way, 
Some others, who were upward bound. 
And knelt with them to pray 

But now your memory's brought you back 

To where you are standing, here. 

So face the future, leave the past, 

Begin another year. 

Your eyes are clear, your step is firm. 

You are strong and unafraid! 

Because God walks before you. 

You may tread the path He has made. 



-Thelma Williamson 



Published monthly at the Church of God Publishing Hi use, 
Cleveland. Term. All materials intended tor publication in the 
LIGHTED PATHWAY should be addressed to Clyne W. Buxton. 
Editor. All inquiries concerning subscriptions should be addressed 
to Bookkeeping Department, Church of God Publishing House. 
Cleveland. Tennessee. 

ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER AT 

POST OFFICE. CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 

Postmaster send Form 3579 to LIGHTED PATHWAY. P. O. Box 

HHC. Cleveland. Tennessee HTISll 



LIGHTED 



Pathway 



SEPTEMBER, 1966 
Vol. 37, No. 9 



CONTENTS 




Editorial 3 


Clyne W. Buxton 


September Soliloquy 4 


Grace V. Schillinger 


Finished! 5 


Ruth Crawford 


Easily Influenced 6 


Matilda Nordtvedt 


Is Your Bible a Snack Bar? 7 


Evelyn P. Johnson 


A Portrait of Apathy 8 


Denzell Teague 


Prayer — The Foundation 

of Life! 10 


Katherine Bevis 


Why a College Education? 1 1 


Hoi lis L. Green 


Why Believe in God? 12 


Charles Van Ness 


Pioneers for Christ Overseas 14 


Esdras Betancourt 


Laughter the Best Medicine 16 


David Gunston 


We Asked For a Miracle 

and Got It 18 


James Kilby 


Do Animals Have Fun? 20 


Grace V. Watkms 


Three Steps to Greatness 22 


Raymond L. Cox 


Young People's Endeavor 24 


Donald S. Aultman 


Variety 26 




Poetry 




Cover 


A. Devaney, Inc. 


STAFF 




Clyne W. Buxton 

Lewis J. Willis 

Chloe Stewart 

Kathy Woodard 

H. Bernard Dixon 

E. C. Thomas 


Editor 

Editor in Chief 

Artist 

Research 

Circulation Director 

Publisher 


CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 




Donald S. Aultman 

Margie M. Kelley 

Denzell Teague 


Paul F. Henson 
Avis Swiger 


FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS 




Bobbie May Lauster 

Margaret Gaines 

L. E. Heil 

Ruth Crawford 

Martha Ann Smith 


France 
Jordan 
Japan 
Brazil 
China 


NATIONAL YOUTH BOARD 




L. W. Mclntyre 
Cecil R. Guiles 
Paul L. Walker 


Thomas Grassano 
Haskel C. Jenkins 


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im m> n it <n> us h m± jl, 



Clyne W. Buxton 



NO WORDS ARE spoken more joyously than 
when a student exclaims, "School is out!" The 
very thought of laying textbooks aside and for- 
getting assignments and tests for three or four months 
enthralls him. One who has been in the classroom 
for nine months is due a change of pace; he should 
have a vacation from the school routine. Nonetheless, 
a vacation cannot last forever, for one must return 
to learning, to mental development, to preparation 
for life. He must return to school to be educated. 

The reasons for training are myriad. Someone has 
said, "Everyone should learn all he can and should 
can all he learns." A sage by the name of Addison 
stated: "I consider a human soul without education 
like marble in the quarry, which shows none of its 
inherent beauties till the skill of the polisher fetches 
out the colors, makes the surface shine, and dis- 
covers every ornamental cloud, spot and vein that 
runs through the body of it." The road from the 
first grade to the twelfth may get rocky, rough and 
winding; the going may become slow, but still this 
road must be traveled. To take a side road anywhere 
along the way is a wrong turn of the worst kind. 
There is never a shortcut to a full life. 

Nor should one terminate his studies upon receiving 
a high school diploma, but he should diligently strive 
to attain a college degree. Some high school seniors 
plead that they just cannot use four more years of 
their lives in training. "Why, I would be twenty-one 
by the time I received a degree," one may reason. 
And this is true! However, the question is, How old will 
he be four years from now, whether or not he goes 
on to college? Now I did not take modern math, but 
according to my ancient mode of calculating, he will 
still be twenty-one — and I had rather be twenty-one 
with a college diploma, than without one! 

A student may not stand at the head of his class, 
but he ought to be studious. Winston Churchill 
facetiously spoke of his school days when he wrote in 
Roving Commission: My Early Life, "By being so long 
in the lowest form I gained an immense advantage 
over the clever boys ... I got into my bones the 
essential structure of the ordinary British sentence 
— which is a noble thing. Naturally I am biased in 
favor of boys learning English; and then I would let 
the clever ones learn Latin as an honor, and Greek 
as a treat." Churchill did learn English well, and he 
left numerous books as a monument to his studious- 
ness. 

It is difficult to imagine a good Christian being a 
poor student; for like oil and water, those two con- 



cepts just do not mix. One owes it to his Christian 
testimony to be thorough and conscientious. Most 
students are not brains, so-called; for there are not 
many geniuses. Students who make good grades are 
those who have good study habits and constantly 
forge ahead, seeking out new truths. Mel Larson 
makes the ten following suggestions for being a good 
Christian student in his book, For Teen -agers Only: 
(1) "Set Yourself a Schedule." (2) "Make Some Solid 
Friends." (3) "Keep Yourself Healthy." (4) "Do Your 
Home Work." (5) "Get Into at Least Two Extracurricu- 
lar Activities." (6) "Make the most of Your Dates." 
(Make them constructive) (7) "Take Part in Your 
Class Activities." (8) "Plan Now for Tomorrow." (Mis- 
sionary work? Take languages. Science? Hit the math 
subjects hard. . . .") (9) "Keep Up With Your 
Church Activities." (10) "Remember Christ in All 
You Do." 

The high school and college student can be a dy- 
namic force for Christ on campus. In the midst of 
profanity, vulgarity, and even denials of God's exis- 
tence, the dedicated Christian will be a glowing light 
for God with words fitly spoken and with a life 
consistently lived. Unsaved students, bobbing in the 
sea of sin, desperately need the lifeline of Christian 
hope — they must not be failed. The- cross of Christ, 
lifted up on campus through tracts, personal witness- 
ing, and godly living, will make the erring ones cogni- 
zant of the living, vibrant Saviour, and will attract 
some to Him. 

Therefore, as the student returns to the classroom 
this month, his purpose for being there will be two- 
fold. First, he will go back to further his training: 
learning more about persons, places, and things. 
Even in this, his ultimate goal will be to serve Christ. 
I overheard a twelve-year-old praying this prayer: 
"Lord, help me to be a good student now, so that I 
may grow up to be a well-trained worker for you." 
The other reason for returning to school this fall 
should be to let Christ's light shine forth, to let 
others know by one's attitude and testimony that 
he is following the Lord. A youth who is a good 
student and a good Christian is a mighty important 
and rare person these days. 



September Sottfomiy 



BY GRACE V. SCHILLINGER 





HAT DOES SEPTEMBER mean to you? 
To all school children from the first grade 
up, it means hurrying to reach school on 
time each day; the clean smell of new tablets, books, 
and pencils; meeting old friends and making new 
ones; trying to make good grades. 

To all mothers, it means saying a thankful prayer 
each night when the children come home safely; try- 
ing to keep enough food cooked for the always-hun- 
gry youngsters; breathing a sigh of relief that the 
season's garden work is almost finished; and, at 
nights', gazing at the age-old wonder of the harvest 
moon. 

To the fathers, it means wondering how he will 
keep the children in clothes this school year, digging 
some late potatoes, picking peaches from the last 
late tree so Mother may can them, and hoping the 
world tension will lessen soon. 

September also means big black and yellow spiders 
in the tomato patch; pears turning yellow; apple 
butter cooking down to a deep brown deliciousness in 
a big kettle; chili sauce — if one finds time to make it; 
and everyone looking forward to the time when he 



can spend some time with his hobby or reading good 
literature. 

Sometimes there comes a day of dampness with 
harsh winds and stinging rain. Then maybe the very 
next one will be sunshiny and warm — a golden day 
with blue skies and birds singing, a day that Summer 
forgot to gather up and take along when she went 
away. 

A feeling of nostalgia sweeps over you — the feeling 
everyone experiences in September. Summer is gone 
and you begin to wonder if you have accomplished 
very much. With the sweet smell of burning leaves 
floating in an open window, a lump rises in your 
throat. 

Yes, September is a month of almost-feeling-sad. 
Then you begin to think that maybe God's outdoors 
is tired too, just like you are, and that it will wel- 
come a few months' rest. You notice again how 
bright the autumn leaves look, how extra glowing the 
late red roses in the garden are, how unbelievably 
blue the sky is — you take a tip from all of nature. 

You put on a cheerful smile yourself. September is 
the beginning of the yearly resting-time — for nature 
and for us. Let us be thankful for it. • 




-o» 



BY RUTH CRAWFORD 



Finished 



N 1957, BERNARDO SAYAO, a dynamic Brazilian 
who was not afraid of work, set out to open a 
JL. road between Brasilia, the new federal capital, 
and Belem, a thriving seaport one thousand miles 
away on the northern coast. About three hundred and 
fifty miles of this road would have to be cut through 
the dense Amazon forest. 

The heat was almost unbearable. Hordes of poison- 
ous insects swarmed around the workers and got in- 
side their clothes, while snakes crawled over their 
feet. Men died. But Sayao was a pusher and work con- 
tinued; approximately one thousand meters of road 
were opened a day. One group worked southward 
from Belem, while another crew pushed northward 
from Brasilia. 

Two years later, when the road lacked less than 
thirty miles' being completed, Sayao went inside his 
tent to write out an order. Suddenly there was a 
loud crash. Quite mysteriously, a large branch fell 
from a nearby tree, crushing Sayao's head and caus- 
ing death. He had worked hard and tirelessly, but he 
did not live to see his task finished nor his goal 
reached. 

There was another Man whose life had a purpose. 
He was from Nazareth. His aim in life was to satisfy 
the justice of God and to offer redemption to a 
fallen race. He could only do this by dying Himself — 
and this He did. The justice of God and the sin- 
fulness of man met when Christ was crucified. When 
He said, "It is finished," the veil of the Temple 
was rent in twain from top to bottom, giving us free 
access to the throne of grace. Since Jesus Christ paid 
the price of redemption with His own precious blood, 
God can now receive the repenting, returning sinner 
both as a loving Father and a just God. 

Anything short of termination would not have suf- 
ficed. But Christ did not leave any gap between 
sinful man and our Righteous Father. The road was 
opened all the way. It is finished! • 








Ruth Crawford is a Church 
of God Missionary to 
Brazil. 



EASILY 
INFLUENCED 




BY MATILDA NORDTVEDT 



DMAGINE HAVING A grandmother who wanted 
to kill you! That was the lot of Joash, young 
prince of Judah. But when all his brothers were 
killed by the wicked woman, an aunt rescued Joash. 
For six years he was hidden while his evil grand- 
mother, Athaliah, reigned over Judah. 

During these early years Joash must have been 

taught the things of God by Jehoiada, the priest. 

His Aunt Jehosheba, who was caring for him, was the 

priest's wife. 

At last the great day arrived to conspire against 



Queen Athaliah and make the boy, Joash, king. He 
was only seven years old when his wicked grandmother 
was put to death and he was crowned as ruler of 
God's people. 

Joash started out well. He listened to godly Je- 
hoiada's counsel, doing what was right in the sight 
of the Lord. The house of God had fallen into ruin 
during the reign of Athaliah. Joash decided to repair 
it. Under his leadership, once again the priests of- 
fered sacrifices to God and the people worshiped 
in the Temple. 

As long as Jehoiada lived to counsel him, Joash fol- 
lowed the Lord. But one day Jehoiada died. Joash 
was now on his own. 

Others' came to influence him. The young princes 
of Judah did obeisance to the king. They persuaded 
him to forget about God and to serve idols instead. 
Why this sudden turnabout? 

Evidently Joash had never come to a personal 
decision to follow the Lord. He followed him because 
Jehoiada influenced him to do so. When the good 
influence was removed and replaced by evil influence, 
he swung completely around and began to walk in the 
opposite direction. He went so far as to refuse to hear 
God's Word spoken to him by Jehoiada's son, Zecha- 
riah, even commanding that this godly man be stoned 
to death. 

Joash went downhill quickly after that and came 
to a sorry end. He not only was soundly defeated in 
battle by the Syrians, but was killed in his own bed by 
his servants who conspired against him. 

There is a modern-day parallel to this sad story. 
Many young people live supposedly "Christian" lives 
while they are at home with their parents. They 
profess to be saved, take part in youth meetings, and 
attend Bible camp. They appear to be genuine Chris- 
tians. But let these same young people get away from 
home into an ungodly environment, and we see them 
falling victim to the influences of the world and the 
devil. Just as Joash did, they turn an about-face 
and begin to walk in the opposite direction. Why? 

These young people have been influenced by their 
godly parents and by the gospel of Jesus Christ, 
but they have evidently never received Christ as their 
own personal Saviour and Lord. They perhaps have 
believed in Him with their head, but not with their 
heart. Paul says, "With the heart man believeth unto 
righteousness" (Romans 10:10). 

Paul says, "Examine yourselves, whether ye be in 
the faith; prove your own selves" (1 Corinthians 13:5). 
Becoming a true Christian involves more than mental 
assent to a truth. It involves you eternally with Jesus 
Christ as your Saviour and Master. By faith yield 
yourself completely to Him. Then you can go out into 
the world unafraid of being "bowled over" by its evil 
influences. You can say with Paul, "I know whom I 
have believed, and am persuaded that He is able to 
keep that which I have committed unto Him against 
that day" (2 Timothy 1:12). And with David you can 
say, "O God, my heart is fixed; I will sing and give 
praise, even with my glory" (Psalm 108:1). • 



6 



IS YOUR BIBLE A 



BY EVELYN P. JOHNSON 



SNACK BAR ? 



T THE FOOT of the hill near the end of Main 
Street in my hometown is a place we call the 
Snack Bar. It is a popular spot — especially 
with the teen-age crowd. They stop by at all hours of 
the day for a bite to eat, but this establishment 
does no serve full meals. Growing boys and girls order 
hot dogs, and cokes, which fill the hollow in their 
stomachs but do not provide a balanced diet. 

Many of us use our Bibles like the teen-agers use 
this eating place— just for snacks. But this is not the 
proper way to read the Word of God. We cannot select 
a Scripture verse at random and always get its full 
meaning. 

I once knew a woman who boasted that she read a 
Bible verse every morning before she began her day's 
work. This is a commendable habit, but her method 
of selection was rather haphazard. She merely opened 
her Bible and read whatever verse she happened to 
see first. 

Suppose this verse caught her glance: "I have 
planted, Apollos watered; but God gave the increase" 
(1 Corinthians 3:6). Her good habit would be un- 
broken, but would this one verse really teach her any- 
thing? Would it comfort or inspire her? If she read 
the preceding verses, and those following, she would 
learn that we "are labourers together with God," that 
it is the minister who plants the seed (of faith) and 
waters it, but that only God can actually save the 
lost sinner. 

Perhaps her Book opened at this verse: "And the 
peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall 
keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus" 
(Philippians 4:7). This Scripture contains comfort and 
reassurance — but only on certain conditions. The 
peace of God is not for all men. It is only for those 
who "stand fast in the Lord" (verse 1), those who 



"by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving" let 
their requests be known to God (verse 6), and those 
brethren who think on things that are true, honest, 
just, pure, lovely, and of good report (verse 8). 

If her Bible should fall open at the book of Timo- 
thy, my friend might read: "This is a faithful saying 
and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came 
into the world to save sinners; of whom I am chief" 
(1:15). 

Taken by itself, one might say that this verse 
proves that all sinners will be saved; therefore, we 
need not worry. But we know here, too, there is a 
condition to be met. We must read more to learn 
how Christ came into the world, what He did to save 
sinners, and what the sinner must do. 

"And if any man obey not our word by this epistle, 
note that man, and have no company with him, that 
he may be ashamed." This verse from 2 Thessalonians 
3:14 would seem to justify our "washing our hands" 
of one who does not live according to God's Word — 
that is if we read no further. But the next verse tells 
us to "count him not as an enemy, but admonish 
him as a brother." 

True, there are many Scripture verses, when read 
singly, that offer instruction and edification. These 
verses, like hot dogs and cokes, fill the void tempo- 
rarily; but how much more satisfying the "meal" 
would be if we really studied the Bible as we read it, 
thus learning more about the God who loved us so 
much that He sacrificed His only begotten Son that 
we might share heaven with Him. Why settle for 
snacks when a feast awaits us if we will only search 
the Scriptures diligently and prayerfully? 

In John 21:12 Jesus did not tell His disciples to 
come and snack. His words were, "Come and dine." • 



HE LAST thirty-five min- 
utes of the young life of 
Miss Catherine Genovese be- 
came ... a shock in the life of the 
city. But at the time she died — 
stabbed again and again by a 
marauder — her quiet, dark, but en- 
tirely respectable, street in Kew 
Gardens, New York, hardly took 
note. 

"It was not until two weeks later 
that Catherine Genovese, known as 
Kitty, returned in death to cry the 
city awake. Even then it was not 
her life or her dying that froze 
the city, but the witnessing of her 
murder — the choking fact that 
thirty-eight of her neighbors had 
seen her stabbed or heard her 
cries, and that not one of them 
during that hideous half hour had 
lifted the telephone from the safe- 
ty of his own apartment to call the 
police and try to save her life. 
When it was over and Miss Gen- 
ovese was dead and the murderer 
gone, one man did call — not from 
his own apartment but from a 
neighbor's and only after he had 
called a friend and asked her what 
to do." 1 

What, exactly, is the problem? 
Why would these thirty-eight per- 
sons, the majority of whom are 
perfectly normal, relatively law- 
abiding citizens of a typical urban 
community, simply close their eyes 
to this frightful murder? The so- 
ciologist and the psychiatrist would 
endeavor to define this type of be- 
havior in such terms as "aliena- 
tion of the individual from the 
group," "megalopolitan societies," 
and "the disaster syndrome." Ac- 
tually all this professional jargon 
can be summed up in one word — 
apathy. 

Laymen live in the particular, 
says Charles D. Kean. He further 
states that this applies in both a 
political and an economic sense. 
Their political and economic con- 
cerns are generally confined to the 
relation between political and ec- 
onomic factors and their own fam- 
ilies, their neighborhoods, and their 
jobs. 3 It appears that little thought 
is given to the other fellow except 
as an instrument to obtain the de- 
sires of one's own. And as an in- 



A PORTRAIT 
OF 
APATHY 



BY DENZELL TEAGUE 



strument, who needed Catherine 
Genovese? 

When questioned as to why no 
aid was given to this poor unfor- 
tunate, these were typical answers: 
"I was too tired," "I don't know." 
One man responded that he got out 
of bed and started to go to Miss 
Genovese's aid but was dissuaded 
by his wife, whose excuse was that 
she did not want her husband "to 
get involved." How else could this 
be classified if not as "alienation 
from the world"? 

Robert Lynn writes concerning 
the layman: "His growing sense of 
alienation from the world (and 
therefore his flight into . . . 
apathy) is not overcome by asking 
him to study the latest and 'best' 
guide to national and international 
social issues. He will not be able to 
act or respond until he understands 
himself." 4 He must find answers to 
these searching questions: "Who 
am I? What am I going to do about 
it?" 

In agreement with this is David 
J. Ernsberger, who says, "The lay- 
man will only become deeply con- 
cerned over broader national and 
international issues as he is led to 
comprehend their relationships to 
more localized and personal con- 
cerns." 5 
Either consciously or unconscious- 
ly, many persons are seeking to 
comprehend and to surmount the 
problems of the day. It appears 
that church membership is contin- 



ually increasing. Helen Khoobyar, 
in her book, Facing Adult Prob- 
lems in Christian Education, says 
that there are presently fifteen mil- 
lion adults who attend church 
study groups. The question is, 
"Why?" Some recognize the fact 
that their knowledge is limited, and 
that there is confusion regarding 
every church doctrine. Some come 
to find an answer to the questions 
which their friends or family ask. 
Some desire knowledge for knowl- 
edge's sake. Some come to "con- 
firm their piety and moralism." 
Some are eager to learn how to 
solve life's problems and to be hap- 
py. Then there are those who are 
the unbelievers, heretics, and reb- 
els who simply use the group as a 
captive audience to air their own 
uncertainty and unbelief. fi 

In spite of the varied stated rea- 
sons for seeking, the basic reason 
is a desire for some kind of knowl- 
edge, but what is knowledge? "It 
is not," says Helen Khoobyar, "sy- 
nonymous with intellectual 
achievement; it is not merely the 
outcome of intuition, or acquaint- 
ance with Christian tradition. It 
connotes, in addition to these, a 
deeper level of understanding be- 
yond the individual's thought and 
will, engaging his total existence — 
emotion, will, action." 7 

We live in a civilized nation — a 
nation of advanced technology and 
intellectual achievement — but one 
must recognize the fact that in in- 



8 




stances such as cited at the be- 
ginning of this article, although 
education and literacy are wide- 
spread, something is lacking. Many 
are absorbing great amounts of 
factual material concerning the- 
ology, the Bible, ethics, morality, 
and religion; but more is required 
than the mere formation of ver- 
balized concepts or the experi- 
encing of a classroom emotional 
catharsis. These concepts must be 
carried over into the everyday lives 
of each individual student. 

Evidently this is not being done 
in the public schools; therefore, 
left to the church is the tremen- 
dous task of motivating its pupils 
to a life of altruism and practical 
Christianity, which in actual prac- 
tice would have eliminated the 
Catherine Genovese murder. 

It has been said, and it must be 
reemphasized, "Good society does 
not make Christians, but Christians 
make a good society." In his book, 
Teaching for Results, Findley B. 
Edge said, "We believe that a con- 
version experience — a personal ex- 
perience in which the individual 
accepts Jesus as Saviour and Lord — 
is the means by which an individ- 
ual enters the Christian life and 
is the only adequate foundation 
and sufficient motivation for Chris- 
tian growth." 8 

It is only when man receives the 
new nature at conversion (2 Co- 
rinthians 5:17) that the "broader 
national and international issues" 



of which Mr. Ernsberger speaks, 
will become more localized and 
personal. When man can see him- 
self as part of the Body of Christ, 
he will then recognize that every 
other Christian — regardless of race 
or social standing — is a member of 
the Body also and that every hu- 
man being is a potential member. 
At that point his apathy will give 
way not to mere sympathy but to 
compassion, brotherly love, and 
even to empathy. 

"Christian Education is the at- 
tempt, ordinarily by members of 
the Christian community, to par- 
ticipate in and to guide the changes 
which take place in persons in 
their relationship with God, with 
the church, with other persons, 
with the physical world, and with 
oneself." 9 One of the accepted 
tenets of psychology is that this 
changing of the "self-image" — that 
is, the finding of the self — is aided 
by reciprocal communication, and 
the church can be of real service 
by taking part in this two-way 
communication, not as a "paid" 
listener like a psychiatrist, but by 
providing discussion groups within 
its membership. 

This should be done on the in- 
timate, personal level of the small 
Sunday school class or other study 
group in which one may really be 
afforded the opportunity of sharing 
himself with others to bring about 
mutual understanding. Into this 
congenial atmosphere, theology, the 



Bible, ethics, morality, and religion 
can be combined to bring about a 
satisfactory conclusion to the ques- 
tions which perplex men and cause 
them to wander aimlessly searching 
for the answers. 

When men are confused and dis- 
illusioned about their faith, they 
tend to question the existence of 
God, the validity of our claims of 
divinity for Jesus Christ, the pur- 
pose of life, and the life after 
death. When these answers con- 
cerning the invisible are not forth- 
coming, man's faith vacillates, and 
he develops a materialistic outlook. 

The real solution to the problem 
of apathy, then, is to provide oppor- 
tunity for instruction. "Man can- 
not receive an answer to a ques- 
tion he has not asked." 10 But sim- 
ply answering questions about cer- 
tain doctrines is also insufficient. 
"Faith is not the holding of cor- 
rect doctrines, but personal fellow- 
ship with the living God." 11 

A personal encounter with God 
will result in the changing of 
apathy to empathy, for Jesus said, 
"By this shall all men know that 
ye are my disciples, if ye have 
love one to another" (John 13:35). 



FOOTNOTES 

1 A. M. Rosenthal, "Study of the Sick- 
ness Called Apathy," New York Times 
Magazine (May 3. 1964), p. 24. 

2 Webster's New International Dictionary 
of the English Language, Second Edition 
(Springfield: G. and C. Merrlam Company, 
1942). p. 122. 

3 Charles D. Kean, The Christian Gospel 
and the Parish Church (New York: The 
Seabury Press, Inc., 1953), p. 37. 

4 Robert Lynn, "Experiment In Suburbia," 
Christianity and Society, XVIII (Spring, 
1953), p. 21. 

•") David J. Ernsberger, A Philosophy of 
Adult Christian Education (Philadelphia: 
Westminster Press, 1959), p. 77. 

6 Helen Khoobyar, Facing Adult Prob- 
lems in Christian Education (Philadelphia: 
Westminster Press. 1963). p. 14. 

7 Ibid. 

8 Findley B. Edge, Teaching for Results 
(Nashville: Broadman Press, 1956), p. 22. 

Lewis J. Sherrill, The Gift of Power 
New York: The Macmlllan Company, 1959). 
p. 82. 

10 Khoobyar, op. cit., p. 50, citing Paul 
Tlllich. 

11 Ibid., p. 65, citing William Temple. 



PRAYER 

THE 

FOUNDATION OF LIFE 



BY KATHERINE BEVIS 




IN SPITE OF the rapid changes taking place in 
our world today, one great eternal truth re- 
mains the same: God answers prayer. He is 
"the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever" (He- 
brews 13:8). 

Nowhere in the Bible is there a restriction placed 
on what we may ask and receive from the Father. 
"All things that the Father hath are mine . . ." 
(John 16:15). Too many times we stumble blindly 
along, groping for help, because we have lost the 
precious key that opens the door of heaven — faith! 

Paul said that by our faith we can move mountains 
and without faith we can do nothing. With it, we 
can conquer the world! 

Prayer is the mark of discipleship! 

If you took prayer out of the teachings of Jesus, 
there would be little or nothing left, for the very basis 



upon which Christianity rests is that God loves 
His children, He desires that they come into His 
presence and commune with Him. He sent His Son 
that mankind might find the way back to Him 
through humble prayer and faith. 

Men of the past knew the need of prayer! 

John Knox prayed; and Mary, Queen of Scots, said 
that she feared the prayers of John Knox more than 
she feared all the armies of England. John Wesley 
prayed, and revival came to England, sparing her the 
horrors of the French Revolution. Jonathan Edwards 
prayed, and revival came to Northampton where 
more than fifty thousand people joined the churches. 

George Washington Carver, who called his labora- 
tory "God's little workshop," knew the need of prayer. 
Arising at four in the morning, he would go out into 
the woods alone and there, among the things he loved, 
he communed with his Maker. Listen to his words: 
"In the woods each morning, while most people are 
yet asleep, I can hear God's voice and understand 
His plan for me. And listening to Him, I am able 
to gather specimens and study the great lessons that 
Nature is so eager to teach me." 

Today as never before in the history of Christen- 
dom, people need to acquire and build a faith that is 
inflexible in the face of the whole world — a faith 
that has no doubt in our God who is able. 

What we cultivate grows, what we neglect dies; 
this is disturbingly true also in our prayer life. 

Events today seem far beyond our control, and any 
effort to better them seems useless. "How can any one 
person do anything about the world situation?" you 
ask. 

It is true! You are just one person! But you are an 
individual who can pray. And if you have read much 
history, you know that men of the past have prayed 
and that God has answered their prayers. 

Elijah prayed, and God sent fire from heaven to 
consume the offering on the crude altar which he 
had built in the presence of God's enemies. Daniel 
prayed, and the secret of God was made known to 
him through the saving of his companions. Paul 
prayed, and hundreds of churches were born in Asia 
Minor and Europe. 

"The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man 
availeth much" (James 5:16). 

The prayer of faith is the foundation of life! • 



10 



BY HOLLIS L GREEN 



WHY A 
COLLEGE 

EDUCATION ? 



Assist our campus ministry by 
forwarding the names and address- 
es of college students to CAMPUS 
CALL, 10 8 Montgomery Avenue, 
Cleveland, Tennessee 37311. These 
collegians will be informed about 
our campus ministry and the work 
of KAPPA EPSILON. They will also 
receive a FREE subscription to 
CAMPUS CALL, a sixteen-page 
publication for collegians. 

Interested in initiating a KAPPA 
EPSILON fellowship group on your 
campus? For full particulars write 
to CAMPUS CALL, 1080 Montgom- 
ery Avenue, Cleveland, Tennessee 
37311. KAPPA EPSILON is spon- 
sored by the Church of God to pro- 
mote campus fellowship and an 
academic inquiry into the Chris- 
tian faith. 



HY DO YOUNG people go to college? Colle- 
\f\f gians have reached the age when Ameri- 
cans normally assume adult responsibili- 
ties, and in the American tradition the first adult 
responsibility is work. Collegians are workers with 
leisure. These two aspects of college life are often 
misunderstood. 

Learning is work; it is hard work. Learning re- 
quires just as much resolution and regularity as any 
other kind of work. Students who cannot muster the 
self-discipline to meet the day-by-day demands of 
learning will fail as surely as they would at any 
other job. Socializing and playing must be placed in 
their proper perspective. If these receive precedence, 
the student will come to his desk with dragging feet 
and drooping eyelids, his energies spent. There can be 
no effective study or learning. A collegian finds diffi- 
culty in maintaining a proper pattern of activity be- 
cause the initiative must be his own. He is in a sense 
self-employed. 

Why labor the point? Because, the compulsory sys- 
tem of American education is not the best preparation 
for the kind of adult responsibility collegians must 
assume. American education is an excellent system 
to provide basic learning skills, but compulsory edu- 
cation trains one to be dependent rather than inde- 
pendent. This is not the most adequate preparation 
for academic excellence. Collegians no longer have 
the coaxing and prodding of parent and teacher. 
They are on their own and must accept responsibility 
for their own success or failure. 



Education is guided learning; but in college, study 
is not compulsory. A college education is designed to 
wean students from their dependence on teachers 
and to help them achieve a degree of intellectual in- 
dependence. The basic role of the teacher is to guide 
and direct the self-activity of the student and, as a 
rule, tell him nothing he can learn for himself. How- 
ever, this does not discard the fact that collegians 
have paid for professional assistance and should avail 
themselves of instruction, advice, and guidance com- 
mensurate with this investment. 

What is the true meaning of leisure? It is not 
synonymous with idleness— freedom to do nothing, to 
take it easy, or to loaf. The value and meaning of 
leisure is clear only when collegians understand 
they are not free from work, but have been given 
freedom to work — freedom to do the kind of work they 
want to do. This does not mean they have freedom 
to demand an A for C work, freedom to oversleep, to 
cut classes, or to stay up all night. A poor concept of 
freedom could be transferred to all of one's life and 
lay the foundation for continuing difficulties. 

Collegians must learn how to learn. The guidance 
ends in a few years, but the learning goes on through- 
out life. It is impossible to store away enough knowl- 
edge during the college years to last a lifetime. Colle- 
gians must prepare themselves to meet the challenge 
of change by constantly acquiring new knowledge, 
new interests, new skills, new ideas, and new attitudes. 
College not only points one in the right direction, but 
higher education assists the collegian in developing 
a capacity for recharging his own intellectual battery. 



11 



HY BELIEVE IN God?" a 
young man asked his 
high school friend. "You 
pray, 'Thy will be done,' and then 
no matter how things turn out, you 
claim it is God's will. I can get 
just as good results by going out- 
side and praying to that lamp 
post." 

Have you ever been asked a ques- 
tion like that? or perhaps asked it 
yourself? 

Often young people have similar 
questions and many Christians do 
not have an answer that will sat- 
isfy them. To point to your per- 
sonal experience with Christ may 
not be the answer that satisfies 
the young person who wants to 
"think for himself." 

But God has given us the an- 
swer to these questions. It is found 
in the creation about us. You can 
easily discover it — and show others 
the answer — by following four sim- 



ple steps. Take each of these steps 
with an open mind and you'll know 
why you should believe in God. 

Step 1 — Something Caused Things 

Little Johnny's mother took him 
by the ear and marched him 
through the kitchen into the front 
room where the wallpaper was 
smeared with childish writing. 

"Why did you write on the wall?" 
she scolded. 

"I didn't write that," Johnny an- 
swered. "It wrote itself." 

In spite of his explanation, John- 
ny was spanked. 

Why? Because Johnny's mother 
knew the words had not written 
themselves on the wall. She knew 
that things do not just happen. 
There is a cause. 

A few years ago I took a trip to 
one of the largest structures ever 
built by man — the Grand Coulee 
Dam in Washington State. The 
dam is immense. But while I was 
studying it, I suddenly glanced at 



the hills into whose sides the dam 
is built. Compared to those hills the 
dam looked small. Yet those hills 
are only small mounds compared 
to a range of mountains like the 
Rockies. Still the Rockies are noth- 
ing when you compare them to the 
great stretches of the earth's sur- 
face. The earth is gigantic. It 
dwarfs our greatest achievements, 
in spite of our boasts of "shrink- 
ing" the earth through jet travel. 

Who, or what, caused this earth? 
Whatever it was, it was much 
greater than man. 

Step 2 — An Intelligent Cause 

The second step is to determine 
whether or not this cause is in- 
telligent. 

Johnny's mother knew her son 
had written on the living room wall 
because he had written words. She 
knew the dog or cat had not made 
the marks. The pets did not have 
enough intelligence to write words. 



Why Bcficvc in 



BY CHARLES VAN NESS 




12 



In fact, you can detect intelli- 
gence by the things which it alone 
can do. Intelligence leaves its mark 
upon its work. So to determine 
whether or not our cause is intel- 
ligent, we must look at the uni- 
verse it created. 

When we look only at the earth, 
the result is an overwhelming ar- 
gument for intelligence. The so- 
called laws of nature are fixed. 
Gravity constantly and endlessly 
attracts in an exact mathematical 
proportion. Chemistry, physics, 
mathematic s — a 1 1 our exact 
sciences — are based upon natural 
laws of the universe and reveal or- 
der, order, order. These sciences ex- 
pose a creation of precision and 
order, not chance. 

A study of the universe strength- 
ens our argument. Stars and plan- 
ets obey laws. All matter we have 
discovered is composed of the or- 
derly arrangement of atoms. 

Everywhere we look we find law 
and order. 

You would think your friend was 
crazy if he tried to tell you your 
car was created by chance. Espe- 
cially if you had just overhauled 
the engine. You know those parts 
had to be carefully and intelligent- 
ly placed in their correct order. 
They did not just fall into place. 

Step 3 — A Cause Interested in Us 

Our next step is to find out 
whether this intelligent cause" is in- 
terested in us personally. 

Many astronomers who scan the 
skies believe in a God. The orderly 
operation of the universe brings 
them to this conclusion. But many 
think that a God who created such 
infinite spaces could not be in- 
terested in such insignificant be- 
ings as men. They say, "Man is too 
small to warrant the notice of 
God." 

Perhaps the astronomer should 
study physiology. Here we find the 
intelligent cause so interested in 
man that thousands of tiny white 
corpuscles were placed into his 
bloodstream just to fight disease 
germs and keep him alive. This 
cause placed scar cells in our skin 
that might never be used. Yet if the 
cells are ever needed they are right 



on hand to heal a wound. The in- 
telligent cause folded the mem- 
branes of our lungs intricately to 
make our lung surface equal to an 
area the size of four basketball 
courts. Without this huge area, our 
lungs would not properly take oxy- 
gen from the air. The intelligent 
cause created such a complicated, 
compact system for hearing we still 
do not know how it works. We have 
eyes made so delicately that we 
have only theories on how we see. 

Such care and intelligence was 
used in constructing us that the 
greatest minds of men are baffled, 
merely trying to understand and 
follow the things this intelligent 
cause has already done. 

What is the greatest thing the 
intelligent cause could have given 
us? Would it be the ability to run 
like an antelope, move heavy 
weights like an elephant, or to pos- 
sess the eyesight of an eagle? 

The greatest ability is intelligence 
— intelligence that enables us to 
construct vehicles that carry us 
faster than the antelope, machines 
that move loads greater than any 
elephant can handle, and telescopes 
that probe far beyond the capac- 
ity of the eagle. 

How did man receive these out- 
standing qualities which fix this 
gulf? They were given to him. Giv- 
en by the intelligent cause, God, 
who created heaven and earth. 

We have seen by three steps how 
there is a cause, an intelligent 
cause, an interested intelligent 
cause who created heaven and 
earth. We call this cause God. 

Step 4 — A Cause Has Revealed 
Himself 

Our last step is to discover 
whether the intelligent cause, God, 
has revealed Himself to man. 

In Christianity we find a Bible 
which begins the story of redemp- 
tion simply, and progresses grad- 
ually, educating each succeeding 
generation, preparing mankind for 
future happenings. 

The Bible contains an entirely 
unique feature, fulfilled prophecies. 
It contains hundreds of predictions 
so detailed and definite that no 
man could have guessed or antici- 



pated them. These prophecies have 
been fulfilled by history, storms, 
drought, sinners, godly men, rebels 
against God, and by persons who 
never knew of the prophecies' 
existence. 

Men, alone, could never have 
brought these prophecies to pass 
exactly as the Bible foretells. 

The Bible was written over a pe- 
riod of sixteen hundred years; yet 
compare the finished product with 
the confusion of Hinduism. The Bi- 
ble is an orderly account of God's 
dealings with man and his sin. 

Compare Christianity with Islam 
and Buddhism which are merely 
revelations to one — let me repeat — 
one man. When only one man 
comes to you and says, "I have 
talked with God and He told me 
this," you can do nothing to dis- 
prove his claim. But you can, and 
would, doubt. 

That is what these religions 
leave in our minds — doubt. 

Compare them with Christianity 
and the biblical account of many 
men who have had many revela- 
tions. Each revelation builds upon 
the other like a carefully engi- 
neered building until they form a 
clear picture pointing to the Lord 
Jesus Christ. 

Of the major world religions, 
only Christianity offers the intelli- 
gent, gradual revelation which an 
intelligent cause, God, would pre- 
plan and present. 

Only Christianity contains the 
hallmark of the supernatural, ful- 
filled prophecies. Only Christianity 
can claim to be the revelation of 
God to mankind. 

By taking four simple steps we 
have an answer for the young man 
who said, "I can pray to the lamp 
post and get the same results." 

We know there is an intelligent 
cause who is interested in us and 
has revealed Himself to us. As 
Christians, our prayer is more than 
a mental exercise or a psychologi- 
cal crutch. It is contact with the 
living God. 

We know this with our minds, 
and we know it inwardly by the 
witness of the Spirit. 

This is why we believe in God. 



13 




WALTER R. PETTITT 

Director, Evangelism and Home Missions 






AFTER holding our second 
invasion in France, we 
reached the German bor- 
der as the sun was beginning to 
set. The border guard looked at the 
international plate on my car, and 
then proceeded to inspect our 
passports. Looking at the pass- 
ports, he read, "Madge Thomp- 
son, Jamaica; Edith Waidhas, 
Germany; Daniel Kempf, France; 
Esdras Betancourt, Puerto Rico; 
Mary Betancourt, Alabama." He 
handed the passports to me and 
remarked, "This is really an inter- 
national car." He did not realize 
how much those words meant to 
many who have labored to make 
Pioneers for Christ an interna- 
tional movement, a dream come 
true, and a vision realized. 

The Church of God Bible Semi- 
nary in Switzerland is the ideal 
place for an international witness- 



by Esdras Betancourt 



ing team, since our students come 
from the different countries of 
Europe. In the last year and a half 
our students have traveled many 
miles visiting from house to house 
and preaching on the streets. Most 
of our work has been done in the 
following countries: 

GERMANY: The majority of our 
invasions have been held here. 
"The Way of Salvation" tract was 
translated to German. A copy of 
the book, P.F.C. International, was 
translated in outline form and 
distributed in a ministers' meeting. 
In our last youth conference, lec- 
tures were taught on "How to Lead 
a Soul to Christ" and "How to Do 
Personal Work in the Altar." The 
German brethren have received us 
well and they share with us the 
desire to bring the gospel to every 
individual. 



FRANCE: Charlie Hermann, up- 
on graduating from the Bible 
school, chose France as his place 
of labor. While there, he organized 
the first Pioneers for Christ group 
with ten members. When we ar- 
rived there for our first inva- 
sion, we found everything in order. 
The city where they wanted to be- 
gin a new work had been mapped 
out and all the material necessary 
was neatly arranged. After two in- 
vasions they now have a small mis- 
sion in the city of Celestial. In 
France we found that many peo- 
ple have lost their faith in a per- 
sonal God, but we keep on search- 
ing for that lost coin. 



HOLLAND: With great expecta- 
tion we awaited the day for our 
first trip to Holland — the country 
of tulips and windmills. Upon our 
arrival, we were very warmly 
greeted by the Boelen family. Dur- 
ing the day scattered showers pre- 
vented us from holding a service 
in the local park. Late in the after- 
noon we decided to hold it anyway, 
even though we knew few people 
would attend. When we arrived in 
the park, our suspicions were con- 
firmed; we found no one within 
sight. We decided to set up the 
speakers and preach in spite of our 
circumstances. As we sang and 
testified, a crowd began to gather. 
Before long six countries were 
represented in the crowd — Portu- 
gal, Spain, Turkey, Jordan, Moroc- 
co, and some of the local people. 
Through interpreters and in their 
own native tongue, we told them 
the story of Jesus. The next day 
four of them came to Sunday wor- 
ship and two young boys gave their 
hearts to the Lord. 

We know that the gospel of 
Christ, presented by the methods 
He used, is still the cure for the ills 
of the world. We will work until 
Jesus comes. Then we will be gath- 
ered in from the four corners of 
the earth to live forever in Heaven. 



14 



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LAUGHTER 



THE BEST 
MEDICINE 



BY DAVID GUNSTON 




WIT ONCE called it "the 
sensation of feeling good 
all over and showing it 
principally in one spot." 

Laughter — and it is still the best 
medicine of all. 

Recent medical and psychologi- 
cal research has proved beyond all 
doubt what wise folk have always 
known instinctively: that laugh 
and be well is no mere catchphrase. 
Indeed, to be unable — for what- 
ever reason — to explode spontane- 
ously into rich laughter may well 
be a serious disability. Medical men 
are increasingly supporting the 
view, too, that the laughless person 
rarely makes a good member of the 
community. 

According to Dr. Pierre Vachet, 
of the Paris Institute of Psycho- 
logy: "Laughter releases tonic emo- 
tions which, through the medium 
of the sympathetic nervous system, 
cause a sudden nervous discharge 
and change the bodily reactions 
of the individual." 

It is said that human beings are 
the only creatures on earth who 
can laugh — or who need to laugh. 
Even on the purely physical level, 
a good laugh wonderfully relaxes 
muscular tensions in the whole 
body, but especially in the chest 
and abdomen. By relaxing our 
diaphragms during the heavy 
breathing-out that accompanies all 



sound laughter, we speedily relieve 
inner tensions without realizing it! 
This allows a deeper rhythm in our 
breathing, our blood takes in more 
oxygen and so, from our vocal 
cords to the soles of our feet, we 
are first stimulated, and then 
wonderfully relaxed. 

Wise old Rabelais, also a doctor, 
said long ago: "Burst with laugh- 
ter and get well." He added what 
might equally apply to our own 
times: "This age has a bad stom- 
ach. Purge it with laughter." 

But as well as making us. feel 
physically better, any old laugh 
tones us up emotionally and men- 
tally. We laugh because we enjoy 
ourselves, but equally we also en- 
joy ourselves because we laugh. 

At a recent experiment held at 
New York University two groups 
of students were formed and placed 
on exactly the same daily food. 
Group A had to occupy itself im- 
mediately after every meal with 
serious scientific discussions led by 
a tutor, while Group B was regu- 
larly entertained after eating by a 
good light comedian. 

After only a fortnight it was 
found that the general health and 
spirits of Group B were far better 
than their less fortunate fellows in 
Group A. Group B's appetites, di- 
gestions and "overall emotional 
tone" were greatly improved over 



those of the less happily engaged 
students. 

Perhaps this only proved in scien- 
tific fashion what most of us know 
already — that good food, enjoyed in 
pleasant company, soon generates 
laughter with all its attendant 
benefits, not the least of them be- 
ing good appetites and digestions! 

But strangely enough, the medi- 
cal world has still to get these truths 
across — in this country, at least — 
in the face of age-old restraints 
and antipathy towards both the 
guffaw and the giggle. There is 
still far too much pomposity abroad 
in the world, still awaiting defla- 
tion by great gales of gusty laugh- 
ter. 

There are still too many other- 
wise sensible folk who believe that 
loud laughter in children — surely 
the most glorious sound in all 
creation — is ill-bred and impolite if 
adults can hear it. There are still 
too many men who think that be- 
cause a naturally gay woman is 
heard constantly to laugh, then 
she must automatically be a shal- 
low-minded, silly giggler. 

Laughter is life's pleasantest in- 
fection, so to do any real good it 
must be audible to others. The 
solitary secret snickerer may well 
be maladjusted towards his or her 
fellows. 

Dr. G. W. Valentine, a psycholo- 
gist who has made a study of 



16 



laughter in children, bears this out 
by telling us that secret laughers 
are extremely rare in normal 
healthy children. 

He also discovered that an in- 
fant's first smile is its, first true 
expression of well-being and pleas- 
ure, though real laughter appears 
only at about the age of twelve 
weeks. 

The older baby laughs not be- 
cause he is physically better able 
to do so than the newborn child, 
but because he is psychologically 
better equipped to do so. He laughs 
because he understands, in . some 
obscure instinctive way, that the 
general meaning of some uttered 
human sounds is contented happi- 
ness. 

Also, we now know that the de- 
velopment of laughter from the 
earliest age is closely connected 
with the development of speech. 
This suggests that like ordinary 
speech, laughter is a fundamental 
means of human communication. 

So, if an adult finds it hard to 
laugh day by day, he or she may 
well be as immature as a toddler 
unable to talk. It took a humorist 
(Mark Twain) to tell us that 
"against the assault of laughter 
nothing can stand," though the 
belly laugh's "sudden glory" must 
have been known to cavemen. 

If there are stupid people who 
spoil (for themselves) the very real 
value of live laughter by laughing 
superficially at everything and 
everyone all the time, for the rest 
of us it is the happiest convulsion 
of them all. And it can be sum- 
moned back again and again with- 
out ever seeming stale. 

Recent study has also shown that 
if a person's laughter is spontane- 
ous and not just an affectation, 
the chances are that he or she 
maintains a sense of perspective 
about life that is to be envied. 

For laughers generally are more 
sensitive and sympathetic than 
those unfortunates who show only 
stiff, sad unsmiling faces to the 
world and its woes. 

There's an old French proverb 
whose profound wisdom is always 
worth remembering: The day is 
lost on which one has not laughed. 



satisfaction 
plus security— 

says Richard Ooi 




"This is a ministry that God has given me 
and I find joy in helping families to a better 
understanding of the Bible. Working for 
John Rudin and Company has given me 
real satisfaction, plus financial 
security for my family." 

Richard Oostra came to Canada from the 

Netherlands in 1952 and later enrolled at 

Prairie Bible Institute. His Christian concern 

brought him to the John Rudin Company 

in 1964 and in only six months he was 

promoted to provincial manager. 



EARN *10,000 

A YEAR AND UP 
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1. Rev. J. H. averaged 11 hours a week 



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2. Mr. H. M. working extra hard, full time, 
the last 4 months earned $6,040.00. 

3. Mrs. J. V., a housewife, earned $4.02 
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$1,921.00 his first 3 months investing 
less than 10 hours per week. 



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John Rudin & Co., Inc. • Dept. LP 96 
22 W. Madison St., Chicago, III. 60602 



Please send me complete information on this 
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Address- 
City 



State or Province- 



WE 

ASKED 
FOR A MIRACLE 

AND GOT IT 



BY JAMES KILBY 



A 



RE YOU THROUGH in the 
kitchen, Marcella?" I called 
out. "Let the rest go and 
come on in here." Then as an after- 
thought I said, "Make some coffee, 
will you?" 

"I already have it plugged in," 
she said. We were so proud of our 
new electric percolator. "Lola and 
Ben said they might drop in after 
a while. I had better make a full 
pot," I heard her say. 

The commercial came on. I 
walked out to the kitchen. Mar- 
cella was coming into the house. 
She had been outside feeding the 
dog. 

Our little crawler scooted along 
the kitchen wall, and before either 
of us could catch her, she had 
reached up and grabbed the cord 
of the coffeepot. 

Eight cups of scalding coffee 
spilled down over her! 

Marcella screamed. I imagine I 
did too. I picked Dawn up. She had 
not even cried yet, just that aw- 
ful pained and shocked look on her 



baby face. Quickly we took off her 
dress, shirt, socks, and finally her 
diaper. Blisters were everywhere al- 
ready. The burns looked worse 
where the diaper had held the cof- 
fee in. 

"Dear God, don't let it be bad!" 
I prayed as I worked with her. But 
I knew it was very bad. She was 
so terribly burned she still had not 
cried. I always thought anyone 
would cry when they were hurt 
that much. 

The television was blaring out a 
new musical show — gay, light mu- 
sic. 

"Judy!" I yelled. "Bring out a 
quilt right away! A doctor . . . got 
to get to the doctor." Marcella was 
moaning, almost hysterical. "And 
shut that thing off in there!" 

Somehow the girls heard me and 
came running. Judy ran to the bed- 
room for a quilt. We wrapped the 
baby in it as easily as we could. 

"Get out to the car!" I yelled at 
Marcella this time. "The rest of 
you girls stay here!" 



But the other four daughters fol- 
lowed us to the car. 

"What happened? What's wrong 
with Dawn?" Virginia asked. 
"Where are you . . .?" 

The rest of the questions we did 
not hear. We were driving out the 
lane. 

"I don't think she's hurt bad, not 
real bad," I mumbled. I realized 
then that I should have said these 
words to the ones we had left at 
home. "I hope they don't wait up 
for us. No telling how long. . . ." 

I glanced at my wife, holding the 
baby on her lap. Dawn was crying 
a little now, a deep-down, hurting 
kind of cry that I had never heard 
before. 

"What's that? Oh, I don't know 
what you're talking about!" Mar- 
cella said. "Can't you hurry? I'm so 
scared." Her voice didn't sound 
natural either. 

"Now, don't get excited, honey," 
I tried to soothe her as I avoided 
the rocks in the road. "I am hur- 
rying. But the car will only stand 
so much over these rocks. Go fast- 
er when we get to the highway." 

"Oh, Jim, look at the big blister 
on her thumb!" Dawn was trying 
to get the thumb in her mouth. I 
was getting more worried each 
time that awful hurting cry came 
from her; but to keep Marcella 
from knowing, I talked about how 
poorly the car was running. 

"Missing or something," I mut- 
tered as we pulled out onto the 
highway. "I'll have to take it to the 
garage tomorrow. There is always 
something to take a man's mon- 
ey." 

Inside I was praying that a tire 
would not blow out and that the 
lights would be green when we got 
to town. Evidently God heard, be- 
cause there was little traffic, and 
the lights were with us. 

"Stop at the Professional Build- 
ing, Jim. There are several doctors 
there and maybe one of them will 
be in." Marcella was crying softly, 
numb with fear. 

The doctor took one look, cov- 
ered Dawn up, and said, "Take this 
baby to the hospital as fast as you 
can. I'll have a doctor waiting." 

"Those tires . . . bad," I said to 
Marcella. "We'll drive to the police 



18 



station and have someone take us 
to the hospital." 

At the station the officer was 
wary. I talked excitedly and my 
old work clothes were dirty and I 
needed a shave. Finally we made 
him realize it was an emergency. 
He made a call to the ambulance 
which was at a football game and 
we started out. After a few blocks 
we met the ambulance and trans- 
ferred to it. 

When we got to the hospital, the 
doctor had not arrived and the 
nurse could not even give her a 
sedative until he came. 

"What will we do? What will we 
do?" Marcella was beside herself. 
Dawn was screaming with pain and 
there was nothing we could do for 
her. "If it was only me that was 
burned. If it was only me," Mar- 
cella kept saying. "Why doesn't the 
doctor hurry?" 

When the skin specialist arrived, 
he took one look. "Take her to the 
operating room for a transfusion." 
As the nurses left with Dawn, he 
turned to Marcella and me. "We'll 
do all we can, but don't expect a 
miracle. It doesn't look very prom- 
ising, but we'll do everything we 
can to ease her pain." 
"Oh, Jim!" my wife sobbed. "What 
will we do?" 

"Why, we will expect a miracle," 
I answered in a low voice. "We will 
pray for one." I put my arm around 
her shoulders. "If you have ever 
prayed before for anything, ask 
God now to save our little girl!" 

We stood there together, our 
heads bowed. In a moment Mar- 
cella took my hand, and we walked 
out to the waiting room. 

Strangely, an inner peace came 
to me. As I looked at my wife, I 
knew she felt it too. 

"There's Someone else in that 
operating room with Dawn besides 
the doctor and the nurses," I said. 
"He's directing the doctor's hands." 

"Let's phone our pastor,' Mar- 
cella suggested. "He would want to 
know." 

It was some time before I could 
find a neighbor at home who could 
tell the minister. Soon after I got 
the neighbor on the phone, friends 
began coming to the waiting room 
to pray and reassure us. 



What a blessing friends are, I 
thought. We all visited quietly, 
praying aloud occasionally, and 
waiting for the nurse to give us 
some word. 

Waiting. Waiting. Waiting. 

Finally a nurse came down. 
"She's sleeping now. I suggest that 
you all go home and get some 
sleep." 

"Sleep! After this? I don't believe 
I'll ever sleep again," Marcella 
cried. 

The nurse handed me a packet 
of pills. "These will help your wife 
sleep. She's worn out. Take her 
home and put her to bed. The baby 
won't wake up until morning. We 
will let you know." 

The minister took Marcella's arm 
and gently urged her to the door. 
"Let's leave her in God's hands," 
he said. "He will take care of her." 
Before we stepped into the car, he 
held each of us by the arm; and 
with tears, flowing, he prayed. 

The other four girls met us at 
the door when we got home, even 
though it was late. 

"Dawn is going to be all right," 
I told them. I believed it too. 

The next morning at the hospital 
we met the doctor coming from 
Dawn's room. "She looks much bet- 
ter this morning, folks. Of course, 
she's still in pretty bad shape. But 
it looks like a miracle has hap- 
pened. If she doesn't catch cold, I 
believe she will make it. I'm really 
amazed!" 

"Of course she will make it!" I 
was squeezing my wife. Maybe I 
even squeezed the doctor, too. My 
knees felt wobbly and I sat down. 

"You know, doctor, we knew last 
night that she would make it! We 
had faith in you; but just to make 
sure, we left Dawn in God's hands. 
All our friends prayed, and our 
pastor." I hugged Marcella close 
again. "How could God help but let 
our miracle happen?" 

"Your baby will have to stay here 
in the hospital a long time. She 
will suffer. It won't be easy. But 
. . . yes, . . . yes, I actually be- 
lieve I've seen a miracle." The doc- 
tor's face shone with satisfaction. 

Back home . . . there are no 
sweeter words to a husband who 
has been wounded in war, or to a 



father to whom hope has been giv- 
en for an injured child. Dawn 
would go back home — up that 
bumpy, rocky lane to our old house. 
And we would teach her to love 
every inch of it, every flower, ev- 
ery tree, and every bush. • 




mm 

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COLLEGIATE CAP & GOWN CO 




RAISE MONEY 

FOR ANY WORTHY PURPOSE 



Write for Free Information 

LOVEJOY PUBLISHING HOUSE 

P. O. Box 8 — Madison, Tenn. 




Your organization can sell our top 
quality pecans and candy to raise need- 
ed funds. We grow, pack and ship our 
own pecan meats, attractively packaged 
in cellophane bags. Whole halves or 
broken pieces available. 

And now! Boost your sales and profits 
with our complete line of homemade, 
individually gift boxed pecan candies: 
Pecan Brittle, Pecan Glace', and Pecan 
Log Rolls. 

For complete details and wholesale 
price lists, write: 

Dept. 4 
MASCOT PECAN COMPANY 

Glennvijle, Georgia 



19 



BY GRACE V. WATKINS 




DO ANIMALS HAVE FUN ? 



DO YOU HAVE the notion that only human 
beings "have fun"? "Pet animals join in fun," 
you may be thinking, "because they live with 
people, but it is not so with wild creatures." 

Are you sure? If you hunted up a biologist who had 
tramped miles in brush and jungle, he would tell you 
that many wild creatures have as much fun as you 
do with baseball, hiking, tobogganing, and volleyball. 

Let us suppose that you could be whisked off to a 
hiding place in a jungle near a broad pool that is a 
favorite haunt of elephants. Listen! Elephants are 
coming! With a noisy splash several of the biggest ones 
wade into the water. In a minute they are drawing 
water into their trunks and squirting it on one 
another. The water fight is on! Squirting water, dash- 
ing it on their neighbors, and making sounds that 
certainly mean, "Hey, stop that or I'll squirt twice as 
much on you!" 

But otters have even more fun in the water than 
elephants do. In spring and summer, otters often make 
mud slides into the water, then they zip down them 
into the ripples with a splash. In winter they make 
snow slides and whiz down them at high speeds. 

Young California sea lions are sliders, too. A slip- 
pery rock is their favorite. Up on the rock! Get set! 
Go! In seconds' they zoom into the water, then clamber 
up for another try. Young sea lions often shake sea- 
weed just for fun, too, throwing it about; or they toss 
pebbles. 

High on the list of animlas that have fun is the 
chimpanzee. These big fellows do not have sliding 



parties. But they love to grab up a stout stick, find 
a hollow log, and beat out a series of booms and 
bangs. 

If a chimp wants still more action, he rears up 
and stamps around in a solo dance with an amazing 
variety of steps, working up to a big climax. 

But South American red howling monkeys take the 
prize. One of the most exciting sights and colorful 
sights in all animal land is the pageant of these little 
fellows linking hands and tails and making a living 
bridge among the treetops. Dangerous? Not for red 
howling monkeys! Just FUN, in capital letters. 

But it is not necessary to travel a thousand miles to 
see animals have fun. Rabbits have their recreation 
times, too. When they feel especially frisky, they play 
leapfrog! Foxes often amuse themselves for a long 
time by tossing sticks or small stones into the air, 
then dashing to capure the object as if it were a 
valuable find! 

Is "having fun" part of the normal pattern for 
human beings — and animals? Of course! When God 
created living creatures, and gave them certain basic 
drives. He implanted in them the drive to enjoy 
recreation! Actually, having fun — if it is wholesome, 
renewing fun— helps a person be a better Christian. 
It stimulates him and makes him feel refreshed for 
the challenge of service that is such a glorious thing! 

How can a person decide which types of "fun" are 
Christian? What better test is there than to ask one- 
self, "Would I be glad to have Jesus Christ join in this 
fun time?" • 



20 




People may resist a smile... But never a slice of 

Benson's Old Home Fruit Cake 



THAT'S WHY IT'S BEST FOR FUND RAISING! 

Why does Benson's Old Home Fruit Cake go to the expense of sending free selling 
slices with every order? It's simple. People can't resist them. Once they taste a sample, 
they want to buy a cake. Club groups make a dollar clear profit each time they sell 
a 3-pound cake. This profit combination can't be beat. Last year, club groups earned 
from $50 to $4500 with Benson's proven plan. Your group can do it, too. Get the com- 
plete story. Mail the coupon today for a brochure and 10 sample slices. But be care- 
ful, you may not be able to resist them either. 



YOU ALWAYS WIN WITH BENSON'S PLAN 

• BEST FRUIT CAKE BAKED 

• UNCONDITIONALLY GUARANTEED 

• SELLING SLICES FURNISHED FREE 

• NO INVESTMENT REQUIRED 

• FREIGHT PREPAID 

• INITIAL SHIPMENT BONUS PLAN 



BENSON'S OLD HOME FRUIT CAKE 

245 N. Thomas Street, P. 0. Box 1432 — M2 

Athens, Georgia 30601 

Please rush color brochure and ten free selling 

slices of Benson's Sliced Old Home Fruit Cake. 

NAME. 



..-^ 



ADDRESS 


CITY 

ZIP CODE 
ORGANIZATION 


STATE 
PHONE 



POSITION IN ORGANIZATION. 



(We can honor only those inquiries that list organization names, 
since we sell only through civic, church, community and school 
groups.) 



THREE 
STEPS TO 
GREATNESS 



BY RAYMOND L. COX 



HO IS THE greatest? 
Cassius Clay has changed 
his tune — temporarily, at 
least! 

One night after winning the 
boxing crown, he rebuked reporters 
for having underestimated his fistic 
prowess. Defiantly he challenged 
them, "Who's the greatest?" He de- 
manded that they eat crow and 
concede, "You are." Already, in the 
ring he had made the claim, "I am 
the greatest! I am the king! I 
shook up the world! I am the 
greatest!" 

However, since espousing the 
Black Muslim cult, Cassius Clay 
has changed his. tune. A recent 
press release quotes the champion 
as exclaiming, "Allah is the great- 
est!" 

Actually there can be no com- 
parison between God and men so 
far as greatness is concerned. God's 
magnitude exceeds man's far more 
massively than mighty Mount Ev- 
erest dwarfs a grain of sand. But 
relative greatness among men is 
possible for even the lowliest to at- 
tain, according to the Bible. 

Aspirations for greatness have 
fired Christ's followers from the 



beginning — sometimes, to be sure, 
actuated by unworthy motives. 

One day Jesus convoyed his dis- 
ciples back to Capernaum. Surrepti- 
tiously the Twelve conducted a 
minor quarrel on the journey. Je- 
sus waited until all were comfort- 
ably settled in the lodgings for the 
night before inquiring, "What was 
it that ye disputed among your- 
selves by the way?" (Mark 9:33). 
The evangelist relates this reac- 
tion: "But they held their peace: 
for by the way they had disputed 
among themselves, who should be 
the greatest" (Mark 9:34). 

This was not the only time the 
disciples broached the subject. And 
Jesus utilized other occasions for 
pointing out dramatically the true 
path toward greatness. 

What is the first step? 

When in Matthew 18:1 the dis- 
ciples asked, "Who is the greatest 
in the kingdom of heaven?" Jesus 
"called a little child unto him, and 
set him in the midst of them, And 
said, Verily I say unto you, Except 
ye be converted, and become as 
little children, ye shall not enter 
into the kingdom of heaven" (vers- 
es 2, 3). 



Salvation is the first step toward 
greatness! No one can claim to 
have commenced to walk the road 
to greatness until he has been con- 
verted. By combining the concept 
of conversion with becoming "as 
little children" Jesus reiterates the 
principle he enunciated when he 
warned Nicodemus, "Except a man 
be born again, he cannot see the 
kingdom of God" (John 3:3). A 
man may be fifty years old, but if 
he is born again, then he becomes 
a "babe in Christ." No matter how 
celebrated or renowned a person 
may be on earth, God refuses to 
recognize any greatness on his part 
until he is converted. Salvation is 
the indispensible first step toward 
greatness. 

But there follows inevitably 
another, if a Christian is to grow 
toward greatness with God! Jesus 
continued, after insisting on con- 
version, "Whosoever therefore shall 
humble himself as this little child, 
the same is greatest in the kingdom 
of heaven" (Matthew 18:4). Hu- 
mility is the second step toward 
greatness! 

If anyone had asked Jesus what 
man was the greatest ever to live 
up to His own time, we know whom 
He would have indicated. Christ 
singled out a contemporary and 
declared, "Verily I say unto you, 
Among them that are born of 
women there hath not risen a 
greater than John the Baptist" 
(Matthew 11:11). He was the 
greatest, said Christ. But then Je- 
sus proceeded, "Notwithstanding he 
that is least in the kingdom of 
heaven is greater than he!" (Mat- 
thew 11:11). 

Note that Jesus did not desig- 
nate him that is greatest in the 
kingdom, but him that is least — 
the man who is willing to take the 
lowest place. He is greater than 
John the Baptist. He who exalts 
himself shall be abased. But he who 
humbles himself, God will exalt. 
Humility is a necessary step to 
true greatness. Solomon counselled, 
"Let another man praise thee, and 
not thine own mouth" (Proverbs 
27:2). And Paul declared, "For not 
he that commendeth himself is ap- 
proved, but whom the Lord com- 
mendeth" (2 Corinthians 10:18). A 



22 



person who is genuinely great will 
never tell you so! God resists the 
proud — even those whose pride 
consists in exulting in their own 
humility! But he gives grace to the 
humble. The man who humbles 
himself, rather than letting cir- 
cumstances humble him or even 
God humble him, has taken long 
strides along the road to greatness. 
The first step is salvation. The 
second is humility. 

The third step toward greatness 
is service. 

Jesus distinguished dramatically 
between greatness in the world and 
in the church. He advised his dis- 
ciples, "Ye know that they which 
are accounted to rule over the Gen- 
tiles exercise lordship over them; 
and their great ones exercise au- 
thority upon them. . . . But so shall 
it not be among you: but whosoev- 
er will be great among you, shall be 
your minister" (Mark 10:42, 43). 
Some have misunderstood 
Christ's meaning of the word min- 
ister. Today the term "minister" 
suggests respect and prestige, as a 
synonym of pastor or clergyman. 
Centuries of faithful service have 
distinguished the term in our cur- 
rent vocabulary. But the word Je- 
sus used had no distinguished sig- 
nificance during this time. It sim- 
ply meant a waiter, usually a wait- 
er of tables, or an ordinary house- 
hold servant such as washed the 
feet of newly arrived guests in the 
home where he was employed. 

Jesus magnified ministry, not 
hierarchy. To "whosoever will be 
great among you, shall be your 
minister" he added the additional 
qualification, "And whosoever of 
you will be the chiefest, shall be 
servant of all" (Mark 10:44). Then 
he alluded to his own example, "For 
even the Son of man came not to 
be ministered unto, but to min- 
ister, and to give his life a ransom 
for many" (verse 45). Emphasis is 
on the even. If anyone deserved 
to be served, it was Jesus. If any- 
one merited ministry from others, 
it was Christ. But even heaven 
crown prince Emmanuel came not 
to be served, but to serve! Ser- 
vice, however humble and unrecog- 
nized, qualifies the humble believer 
for God's recognition of greatness! 



The Scriptures therefore put 
greatness squarely within the grasp 
of every man. Every man may be 
converted, born again, and saved. 
Every man may humble himself. 
Every man may serve. Jesus guar- 
anteed a reward for such seeming- 
ly insignificant ministry as the 
offering of a cup of cold water in 
His name! He insisted that the 
Christian who feeds the hungry, 
feeds Himself. The believer who 
takes in the stranger, affords shel- 
ter to Jesus; he who visits the sick 
or the prisoner, visits Christ! "In- 
asmuch as ye have done it unto 
one of the least of these my breth- 
ren, ye have done it unto me" 
(Matthew 25:40). • 



BIBLES and BOOKS 

Repaired and Rebound 
Reasonably 

write for free information to: 

McKINLEY BINDING SERVICE 

206 Rock Cut Road 

Forest Park, Georgia 30050 



NEW SOUND'' ELECTRONIC 




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Executive 
Closet 





By Evelyn Witter 

An important executive, I know, 
was dubbed by his intimates as 
"the ulcer type." 

Then this nervous, short temp- 
ered, desperate, tired-looking man 
gradually became a smiling, self- 
composed man with energy to 
spare. 

One of our friends finally had 
enough courage to ask the execu- 
tive what had caused the mirac- 
ulous change. 

The executive led him into the 
filing room. It was as small as a 
closet; but in addition to the filing- 
cabinets, which lined the walls, 
there was a table. A small shag 
rug lay on the floor in front of the 
table on which was an open Bible. 

This verse of Scripture is the ex- 
planation given by the executive: 
"When thou prayest, enter into thy 
closet, and when thou hast shut thy 
door, pray to thy Father which is 
in secret" (Matthew 6:6). 



FOR SALE: GOSPEL TENTS. Spe- 
cial prices to minister*. For com- 
plete information write VALDOS- 
TA TENT AND AWNING CO., 
Box 248, Valdosta, Georgia. Day 
Phone: CHerry 2-0730. Night 
Phone: CHerry 2-5118. 



5000 



CHRISTIAN 
WORKERS 



WANTED 



... to sell Bibles, good books, Scripture 
Greeting Cards, Stationery, Napkins, Scrip- 
ture Novelties. Liberal profits. Send for 
fre« catalog and price list. 
GEORGE W. NOBLE, The Christian Co. 
Dept L, Pontiac Bldg., Chicago 5, 111. 



EARN MONEY FOR YOUR CHURCH 

Sell the finest quality pecans, walnuts, 
mixed nuts or salted peanuts. Make up to 
$150 selling 200 packages at competitive 
prices. Packaged in one pound see- through 
bags. Write for infor- 
mation. DEPT. 209 
ACE PECAN CO. 
2055 Lunt Ave. 
Elk Grove Village, III. 







100% PROFIT 
NO INVESTMENT 

$60.00 CASH every time 10 members of your 
group each sell 12 cans of Kitchen-Fresh Choc 
olettes or Coconettes at $1.00 per can. 
100% PROFIT! The one-lb. size canisters cost 
your group only 50c each — sell for $1.00! 
NO INVESTMENT! NOT EVEN lc! Order 120 
to 1200 cans today. Take up to 30 days to send 
payment. Give your riame, title, phone number 
and complete address, the name, address, etc. 
of 2nd officer, name of group, quantity of each 
desired, and nearest Freight office (no parcel 
post). Extras sent FREE to cover shipping cost 
east of Rockies. OFFER OPEN TO GROUPS 
ONLY! WRITE TODAY! 



VERNE COLLIER 



r. 

I BIR/v 



Dept. 4-29 

900 North 19th Street 
BIRMINGHAM 3, ALABAMA 



" s kfc>xjjn L g 

People© Kndeavor 



JUNE YPE ATTENDANCE 

By Donald S. Aultman 

National Director 

Middletown (Clayton Street), 

Ohio .... .... 248 

Jacksonville (Springfield), 

Florida 243 

Canton (Temple), Ohio 239 

Garden City, Florida 188 

Cincinnati (Central Parkway), 

Ohio 180 

Lakeland (Lake Wire), Florida 174 
Tampa (Buffalo Avenue), 

Florida .... 162 

Pulaski, Virginia 160 

Atlanta (Hemphill), Georgia .... 153 
Gastonia (Ranlo), North 

Carolina 150 

Bristol, Tennessee 139 

Jackson (Bailey Avenue), 

Mississippi .... 135 

Flint (West), Michigan . 130 

Kannapolis (Elm Street), 

North Carolina ... .... 130 

Hamilton (7th and Chestnut), 

Ohio 128 

Wyandotte, Michigan .... 125 

Lancaster, Ohio 122 

Dalton, Georgia 119 

Chattanooga (East), Tennessee 113 
Morganton, North Carolina 108 

Miamisburg, Ohio .... .... 107 

North Ridgeville, Ohio 105 

Cumberland, Maryland 102 

Colquitt (South Mount Zion), 

Georgia 100 

Clarksville, Tennessee 98 

Elyria, Ohio _ . 98 

Santa Ana (Center Street), 

California .._ .... .... 98 

Norfolk (Azalea Garden), 

Virginia .... .... 96 

Manns Choice, Pennsylvania . 93 
Wilson, North Carolina _.. .... 93 

Paris, Texas .... ... 91 

Conway (North), 

South Carolina .... .... .... .... 90 

Sanford, Florida ... .... .... .... 86 

Princeton, West Virginia 85 

Vanceburg, Kentucky .... .... .... 85 

Johnson City, Tennessee 83 



Lawton (Ninth and Lee), 

Oklahoma 

Pacoima (San Fernando 

Valley), California .... .... 

Thorn, Mississippi 

Cahokia, Illinois _ 

Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 

Canada 
Avon Park, Florida 
Portland (Powell Boulevard) 



Oregon .... .... .... .... .. 


. 77 


Pompano Beach, Florida .... .. 


75 


Isola, Mississippi 


73 


Hurst, Texas .. 


. 72 


South Lebanon, Ohio . 


72 


Wayne, Michigan .... .... .... _ 


69 


Jackson (Crest Park), 




Mississippi _ .... .. 


. 68 


Logan (West), West Virginia .. 


. 68 


Royal Oak, Michigan .... 


68 


Birmingham (Pratt City), 




Alabama .... 


67 



North, South Carolina 

Sale Creek, Tennessee 
Ecorse (Westside), 

Michigan __ .... 

Cleveland (East), Tennessee 
Dayton, Tennessee 

Valdosta, Georgia ... . 

Cleveland (Detroit Avenue), 

Ohio ... 

Tulare, California 

West Monroe, Louisiana 

Willow Run, Michigan 

Flint (Kearsley Park), 

Michigan 

Covington (Shepherds Fold), 

Louisiana .... 

Jackson (Leavell Woods), 

Mississippi 

Charlottesville, Virginia „ 
Daytona Beach (McLeod Street), 

Florida 54 

Donalds, South Carolina 54 

Fairfield, Illinois _. 54 

Lawrenceville, Illinois . .... .... 54 

Bessemer City, North Carolina 53 
Hartsville (Middendorf), 

South Carolina .... .... _ 53 

East Point, Georgia 52 

Phoenix (East), Arizona .... .... 52 

Lagrange, Ohio .... .... .... .... .... 51 

Brewton (East), Alabama .... 50 

Circleville, Ohio .... 50 



24 




BAPTISTRIES -SPIRES 1 



• Unit-Molded 
Fiberglass 

• Accessories 



WOLFE BROS. & CO. 

PINEY FLATS, TENN 



Wiedemann tfttcUtAJudeb, .tftts. 
Box 672 Dept. J5, Muscatine, Iowa 



Does Your Church 



Need Money? 



Sell beautiful hand woven nylon 
handbags. No money invested. 
Write for free fund raising plan. 

Eugene D. Roberts 
Hand Woven Handbags 
1554 N. Concord Rd. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 37421 



Chillicorhe, Ohio 

Recently we closed a Young Peo- 
ple's Endeavor contest at the 
Church of God in Chillicothe, Ohio, 
in which a YPE King and Queen 
were chosen. Points were given for 
attendance, offering, orphanage 
coupons, and Royal Crown bottle 
caps. Wenda Hixon was chosen as 
the queen, and Robert Wood as the 
king. 

— Mary Cox, YPE -president; 
Ralph Woods, pastor 





RAISE *50... 
*100..?500 




Shirley Sanders (14) 
1104 East Avenue B 
Sweetwater, Texas 

Alice Jenkins (14) 
Route 6, Box 13 
Roanoke. Virginia 



Sherry Ladd ( 

Box 324 

Bowman, North Dakota 

Rhonda Ladd (10) 

Box 324 

Bowman. North Dakota 

Linda Joyce Gunter (21) 

Route 2. Box 149 

Crab Orchard, Tennessee 37723 



'^£*£2£~\ior your Church or Group before 
Christmas this Quick, Easy Way! 

When you mail the coupon below, I'll send 
you full facts on my easy Plan to put $50 
and more ,in your group's treasury, plus 
free samples of these and other napkins. 

Here are the highlights of my no-risk, 
money-making plan. I ship you 200 assorted 
packages of inspiring Christmas Napkins on 
credit. You risk nothing. You simply have 10 
members each sell twenty 50<?-packages! 
(Many families buy 4,5,6 packages on sight!) 
Send me $50 of the proceeds and KEEP $50 
CASH FOR YOUR TREASURY! Then or- 
der more on credit — and make $100, $200, 
even $500 for your church or group! 

Join more than 100,000 Church Groups, 
Clubs, PTA's, Veterans' Auxiliaries and 
other groups who have used this plan suc- 
cessfully — without risking a penny! Mail cou- 
pon now for complete facts. No obligation. 

Anna Wade Dept430CTLynchburg . Va. 

■E30EEIH E'l'L'Kl<' f MM 

•Anna Wade, Dept.430CT Lynchburg, Va. 24505 ' 

(Send me FREE samples of Christmas Napkins. I 
Also include details for our Group to raise $50 to| 
I $500 without spending K. 



"...ENJOYED SELLING YOUR NAPKINS..." 

"Enjoyed selling your Napkins . . . used 
part of our profit to buy 10 new Church 
Hymnals . . ." 

-Mrs. V.C.H.. Washington, D.C. 
"The Club (hanks you for helping us swell 
our treasury by $50.00, and for all the 
cooperation you pave us." 

-Mrs. I.W.C.. N. Miami Beach, Florida 



iNamc 

I Address. 
(City 



: of Organization. 




Jacksonville, Springfield, Florida 



From, left to right: Doralyn Dan- 
iels, Gail Rainey, Jean Batten, 
Sonia Lane (Miss Sunday School of 
1965), Margaret Brock, Shirley Wil- 
liams and Iris Newman. 

Pictured above are the six con- 
testants who competed in the an- 
nual "Miss Sunday School" contest, 
along with Miss Sunday School of 
1965. This banquet is sponsored by 
the Senior High Department of the 
Springfield Church of God for the 
purpose of establishing a college 
fund. 

The banquet speaker this year 
was the Reverend C. Raymond 
Spain, who also served as judge 
along with the Reverend Messrs. 
J. T. Roberts, and Cecil Hayes. The 



contestants were judged on ticket 
sales, Bible chapter category, mon- 
ey raised, and Sunday school at- 
tendance. 

The banquet was held in the Sig- 
nal Terrace Room of the Atlantic 
Coast Line Building. Second run- 
ner-up was Miss Iris Newman; 
first runner-up was Miss Jean 
Batten; and "Miss Sunday School 
for 1966" was Miss Shirley Williams 
who gave a puppet portrayal of 
Ruth and Boaz. Saint Folino, su- 
perintendent of the Senior High 
Department was the master of 
ceremonies. 

— Jerry Folino, secretary of 
the Senior High Department 



Davie, Florida 



Two Davie, Florida, young peo- 
ple are fine examples of what 
youth can do to promote the cause 
of Jesus Christ. 

Ten of our young people were 
given a talent dollar and awards 
were to be given to the Junior and 
the Senior who could raise the 
greatest amount of money in five 
weeks. Through their initiative and 
hard work the Young People's En- 
deavor raised $237.94. 
Miss Lou Conn sold luscious apple 



pies to raise money and capture 
the junior trophy. 

Charles McDade engaged the 
help of his grandmother to fill his 
orders for German chocolate cakes 
and adorable doll-fashioned pillows. 
He brought in a grand total of 
$92.00 and received the senior 
trophy. 

We praise God for all of our 
young people who are devoting 
their lives to Christ. 

— N. Powell, pastor 



South Carolina Teen Day 

What a beautiful sight it was to 
see the twelve hundred to fourteen 
hundred teen-agers, along with 
their pastors and youth leaders, 
stand to sing "Amazing Grace." 
Being held in the Township Audi- 
torium in Columbia, South Caroli- 
na, on April 30, 1966, it was the an- 
nual South Carolina "Teen Day." 

Shortly after arriving, one could 
sense an air of expectancy for a 
great and eventful day. Its activi- 
ties were planned and directed by 
State Sunday School and Youth Di- 
rector John E. Lemons. 

The Honorable Governor Robert 
McNair began the day's program 
with an address at 9:00 a.m. Fol- 
lowing the governor, the voices of 
the "Ministers' Trio" (Donald Ault- 
man, Bennie Triplett, and Roose- 
velt Miller) thrilled and charged 
this great audience with their songs 
of inspiration. Roosevelt Miller 
added to the enjoyment of this out- 
standing program with the song 
"Only a Boy Named David." This 
selection has captivated Church of 
God youth throughout the nation. 

National Sunday School and 
Youth Director Donald S. Aultman, 
concluded the morning service with 
a dynamic message entitled, "Youth 
Ought to Know." 

The afternoon session began with 
the "Teen Talent Parade." There 
were fifty-seven participants in 
five categories who competed for 
championship honors. The winners 
were Mike Baker, Simpsonville, vo- 
cal solo; Joy Thompson, Greenville, 
(piano) instrumental solo; The 
Moore Sisters, Pacolet Mills, vocal 
ensemble; McDuffie Street Brass 
Quartet, Anderson, instrumental 
ensemble; South Greenwood Choir, 
Greenwood, choir. 

The day was climaxed with a 
banquet, at which time the above 
winners were announced. State 
Overseer D. A. Biggs then gave a 
challenging message to the teen- 
agers. 

This day, the greatest ever to be 
experienced by the South Carolina 
Teens, will long be remembered in 
the hearts of all who attended. 

— Youth Board Reporter 



26 



A NEW DAY 

There's something almost sacred 
About the dewy, early morn; 
It somehow makes me feel as if 
My very soul had been reborn. 

Dew-wet grass beneath my feet; 
A gentle breeze upon my brow; 
Mistakes and cares of yesterday 
No longer seem a worry now. 

I lift my eyes to One who wants 

To daily guide me, if I would; 

This day that God has made is perfect. 

It's only me who isn't good! 

— Lena Sprague 




IF CHRIST HAD NOT COME 

If Christ had not come to walk among men, 

To offer lost souls redemption from sin. 

If He had not died that all men might live 

And promised each penitent one to forgive. 

If Christ had not come in His unbounded love 

To bring us the story of that great home above — 

There'd be no gospel, no fellowship sweet, 

No laying our burdens at His Cross-scarred feet. 

The world would be lost in Stygian gloom 

And sinners consigned to a self-wrought doom. 

If Christ had not come — a petrifying thought. 

He came — He died — our souls are blood-bought! 

— Evelyn P. Johnson 




THE SEARCH 




I saw You in a baby's cry 
In fur and feather, sea and sky, 
Somewhere in time, I passed You by 
I searched for You. 



MAKE THE MOST 



I reeled into hell's darkened den, 
The hunting place for troubled men. 
Who seek for things that might have been- 
If only they would search for You. 



Make the most of every moment. 
Unused time is treasure lost; 
In each unemployed minute 
Thoughts decay — how great the cost! 



In stillness of an alleyway, 
I tasted the dregs of life's decay 
And fell on trembling knees to pray. 
To search for You. 



Paints and brushes that are scattered 
Could begin a masterpiece; 
Slabs of stone and sharpened chisel 
Bestowed glory upon Greece. 



I saw the thorns, still dripping red, 
The nail holes where, Dear One, You bled 
For multitudes which You had fed, 
Who would not search for You. 



Pen and paper on the table 
Wait to hold great poetry; 
Moments' put to use have given 
Thought-filled lines nativity. 



Oh God, Dear God, look down on me. 
Open my eyes that I might see. 
You bore that crown and bled for me 
So I might seek and find You. 

— Wilma Caudle 



Make the most of every moment, 
Be up and doing — dream and dare, 
There are many worlds to conquer, 
You may win one in an hour! 

— O. J. Robertson 



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LIGHTED 



Pathway 



OCTOBER. 1966 



m m 





PF 



*vm 



mm www^ m ^ m m 




GIRL BEING NICE PLUS TO MY BROTHER 

It does not take a shrewd detective 
To sense her ultimate objective. 
It is lucid, plain, and clear as honey: 
She hopes to make her future Sonny! 

— Grace V. Watkins 




CONCERNING CONVERSATION 

A chronic "me, myself, and I-er" 
Will rate a D and seldom higher; 
But sprinkle "yous" along the way, 
And talkwise, you will rate an A! 

— Grace V. Watkins 




MAN IN CHURCH ASLEEP WITH 
HIS MOUTH OPEN 

The chasm's depth I would not know. 
But suddenly I am all aglow. 
To seize a clothespin strong and bright 
And close the opening firm and tight! 
— Grace V. Watkins 




LIGHTED 



Pathway 

DEDICATED TO THE CHURCH Of 000 VOUTIG PEOPLES ENCCWOR "^ 



OCTOBER, 1966 
Vol. 37, No. 10 



CONTENTS 

Editorial 3 

Youth in Focus at the 

General Assembly 4 

Spreading the Flame 6 

Compromise Never! 10 

The Gentle Art of 

Restoration 1 1 
Now That You Are in 

College 12 

Pioneers for Christ 1 3 

Christian in a Voting Booth 1 4 

Sunday Best 1 6 

Youth Camp: 

Brazilian Style 1 8 

The Speaking Blood 20 

Will You Be the Victim 

of a Criminal? 22 

Variety 24 

Young People's Endeavor 27 
Cover: United Nations' 
Building 



STAFF 

Clyne W. Buxton 

Lewis J. Willis 

Chloe Stewart 

Kathy Woodard 

H. Bernard Dixon 

E. C. Thomas 



Clyne W. Buxton 

Floyd D. Carey 
Carl H. Richardson 
J. E. De Vore 

William E. Winters 

Harold Bare 
Walter R. Pettitt 
Roy Bernard Jussell 
James E. Adams 

Ruth Crawford 
Raymond L. Cox 

Grace V. Watkins 

Donald S. Aultman 

Eastern Photo Service 



Editor 

Editor in Chief 

Artist 

Research 

Circulation Director 

Publisher 



CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Donald S. Aultman Paul F. Henson 
Margie M. Kelley Avis Swiger 
Denzell Teague 



Published monthly at the Church of God Publishing House. 
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The 
Church 
IVIo\/es Forward 



Editorial 

Clyne W. Buxton 



T HIS ISSUE OF the Lighted Pathway is dedi- 
cated to the Fifty-first General Assembly of the 
Church of God. The Assembly, convening in 
the Ellis Auditorium in Memphis, August 10-15, at- 
tracted delegates from all over this nation and nu- 
merous foreign countries. As this writer sat high in 
the third balcony during one of the services and ob- 
served the mammoth crowd which filled both the large 
and the small auditoriums— the stage being located 
between the two — he could not help but reminisce 
over the first Assembly of the church. Church his- 
tory reveals the meager beginning of the embryonic 
movement. 

Though the Church of God began in 1886, its prog- 
ress was at a snail's pace in those early years. The 
First General Assembly convened during the wintry 
month of January in Camp Creek, North Carolina, 
in 1906. That year the delegates met in a farmhouse 
and got there by wagon and buggies; this year they 
met in a spacious, air-conditioned auditorium, arriving 
in shiny new cars and by plane. That year twenty-one 
delegates attended; this year there were approximate- 
ly 12,000. That year the church membership stood at 
a handful; this year it was nearly 450,000. That year 
the real estate holdings of the church was only a 
few hundred dollars; this year it was more than 130 
million. The church has come a long way since that 
first Assembly at Camp Creek. 

Not only has the movement made good progress 
since 1906, but its strides forward for the last two 
years have been remarkable also. The audience lis- 
tened with rapt attention as the general secretary- 
treasurer reported that during the biennium thou- 
sands had been saved and added to the church, and 
that the property value had increased more than 
twenty million dollars. Too, the increase in the num- 
ber of ordained ministers was obvious. When the 
Assembly met in Memphis four years ago, the main 
floor of the large auditorium, the meeting place of the 
Ordained Ministers' Council, was not so crowded as 
it was this year. 

The delegates from foreign lands were especially 
impressive. Dr. Robert O'Bannon, superintendent of 
the church in the Middle East, was there with his 
wife Nancy. This highly trained young man reflects 
some of the best qualities of the Church of God. From 
faraway India the Pospisils had come, being home on 



leave after spending many fruitful years in that land. 
Dr. James Beaty, overseer of South America, was pres- 
ent with his wife Virginia. Also attending were L. E. 
and Letha Heil, along with their family, who have 
spent many profitable years in Japan; and Samuel 
Peterson of Haiti, Luke and Lois Summers of Jamaica, 
and Lambert DeLong from Germany. Of course there 
were many more missionaries from various countries. 

The business sessions of this Assembly were chal- 
lenging, and some of the measures passed were far- 
reaching. For example, the delegates passed that the 
pastoral appointments would be for four years in- 
stead of the traditional two. Some persons felt that 
this was the most progressive step taken at the con- 
clave, while others had mixed emotions about it. Dur- 
ing the convention the retired minister was given an 
increase in salary, and plans were laid to increase 
the receipts of the Home for Children. Listed here 
are some of the other measures approved: (1) To 
revise the requirements for the Armed Forces chap- 
lains so that more young, qualified ministers may en- 
ter that field; (2) To strike the word colored from 
the church book of Minutes, wherever the word ap- 
pears; and (3) To formulate a National Laymen's 
Board, which among other duties, will serve as a 
liaison between the laymen and the ministry. 

A few years ago the Church of God had the largest 
percentage of increase in membership of any Protes- 
tant church in America for that year. The movement 
is still enjoying unusually good progress. At this writ- 
ing construction of a spacious General Offices build- 
ing is underway in Cleveland, Tennessee. The four- 
story structure will cost one and one-half million dol- 
lars. Congregations are building large sanctuaries and 
Sunday school plants throughout the nation. Besides 
this material progress, the ministry is upgrading itself 
by further training. Each year ministers are receiving 
graduate degrees, including the doctoral degree. 

The Church of God has grown from a mountain 
cabin in North Carolina where the first Assembly was 
held to a potent movement reaching seventy-two 
countries. It is founded on the Bible and has a min- 
istry and membership that is both godly and zeal- 
ous. The movement has manpower, finances, and the 
blessings of God. The church is moving forward; and 
with God's guidance, it is ready to do great exploits 
for Christ. • 



3 



JESUS CHRIST was the great- 
est rebel who ever lived" pro- 
claimed Cecil Knight, youth 
night speaker at the General As- 
sembly. "He rebelled against hy- 
procrisy, make-believe dedication, 
and conformity to the patterns of 
the world." It is believed that this 
same distinguishing virtue is re- 
flected in the attitude and actions 
of Church of God youth today. 

They are rebels with a cause. 
They rebel against such claims as 
was made by John Lennon of the 



Beatles, "We are more popular 
than Jesus." They rebel against the 
current trends of sexual promiscui- 
ty and immorality. They rebel 
against the teaching of an in- 
tellectualist who tries to reduce 
the deity of Christ. They rebel 
against shallow spirituality and un- 
scriptural practices. 

They are rebels with a cause, 
with a purpose, with a goal; they 
are motivated by high standards, 
divine eagerness, and holy concern. 
I think that the gripping remark 
by Cecil Knight, "Jesus Christ was 
the greatest rebel who ever lived," 
reveals the spiritual image and fi- 
ber of Christian youth who attend- 
ed the 1966 General Assembly. 

Young people have been included 



in the events of the biennial Gen- 
eral Assembly for years. While it is 
true that the major portion of the 
functions are designed for minis- 
ters and adult laymen, there are, 
however, some activities designed 
exclusively for youth. Included in 
these special events are the Teen 
Talent Parade, youth banquets, and 
youth night attractions. 

The Teen Talent Parade was 
conducted at set intervals during a 
four-day period to determine na- 
tional winners. State champions, 
representing five different catego- 
ries, provided a wide variety of 
musical talent, spiritual entertain- 
ment, and youth identification. 
Competing champions, because of 
their skill and devotion, presented 



^fffflH TO 





A^P ^ 



YOUTH 



By FLOYD D. CAREY, JR. 



IN FOCUS AT THE 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



a compelling challenge to teens in 
the audience for total surrender 
and dependable service. 

It is only natural that the atti- 
tudes and philosophy of today's 
youth will set the trend and pace 
for our church tomorrow. The for- 
ward look of youth at the General 
Assembly — heart-anchored happi- 
ness and evangelistic fervor — are 
indications of future church en- 
largement and doctrinal stability. 
In all worship gatherings the youth 
joined in; they could be seen pray- 
ing, singing, and rejoicing. 

The Reverend Dave Wilkerson, 
director and founder of Teen Chal- 
lenge in New York, was guest 
speaker at the youth banquets. 
During the youth night program, 
he also gave a sober challenge to 
adults to help win and guide teen- 
agers. 

The presentation of the teen 
talent winners, state YPE and 
Sunday school awards, the Lee 
College Singers and the Sunday 
school superintendent and the YPE 
president of the year were addi- 
tional highlights of this service. 
God moved during the youth ser- 
vice in a commanding and glori- 
ous way. 

When the invitation was given, 
hundreds of young people came 
forward. As they stood in front of 
the platform some of them were 
weeping, others were rejoicing, and 
still others were pledging them- 
selves for full-time Christian ser- 
vice. There is no reason to doubt 
that from among this group there 
will come missionaries, Sunday 
school teachers, pastors, local 
church leaders, and strong laymen. 

The spiritual impetus of the 
General Assembly is a creating and 
developing force for our youth. May 
the spirit among our youth at this 
gathering spread throughout our 
churches, and may God give us a 
great spiritual move among Church 
of God youth everywhere. • 



M^pk<V"!e**i&Aefy Aigait/ 10-15 



The Fort Myers (Florida) Trio placed first in 
the vocal group competition. The Reverend 
C. Raymond Spain, assistant general overseer, 
presents the trophy. 




The first place winner in the brass ensemble 
category was the Fort Myers (Florida) Trom- 
bone quartet. 



Sharon Abbot, Milford, 
Delaware, won the in- 
strumental solo trophy. 




Randy Weeks of Prichard The North Cleveland (Tennessee) Youth Choir 
(Mobile), Alabama, was placed first among choirs, 
the top vocal soloist. 







SRRE/MDING 



ET ON FIRE, and people 
will come to watch you 
burn," thundered John Wes- 
ley. 

John the Baptist said, "I indeed 
baptize you with water; but one 
mightier than I cometh, the latchet 
of whose shoes I am not worthy 
to unloose: he shall baptize you 
with the Holy Ghost and with fire" 
(Luke 3:16). Men came dripping 
from the hands of John, but came 
blazing from the hands of Jesus! 

Uncounted thousands of people, 
old and young alike, experienced a 
rekindling of fire in their heart 
during the Fifty-first General As- 
sembly of the Church of God in 
Memphis, Tennessee, August 10-15. 

Having now returned to their re- 
spective areas of service for Christ, 
they are perpetually "spreading the 
flame" around the world! 

ITS PURPOSES 

The purposes of the General As- 
sembly are diverse, but in this par- 
ticular meeting there was little 
doubt that the primary purpose 
was to assist the ministry and laity 
in "spreading the flame" of the 
gospel of Jesus Christ. 

Keynofing this biennial conclave 



with a stirring address was the 
Reverend Wade H. Horton. It is 
likely that he will be long remem- 
bered and honored as one of the 
most evangelistic and progressive 
leaders the Church of God has ever 
had in its illustrious history! This 
man of God unburdened his heart 
and thrilled the opening night au- 
dience estimated at approximate- 
ly 11,500 as he exclaimed: "As God 
continues to supply the manpower 
and the money, we are yet deter- 
mined to turn the world upside 
down!" 

He went on to point out that by 
continually spreading the flame of 
evangelism where we are serving, 
and through the unction of the 
Holy Ghost, we can turn our part of 
the world "upside down" for Christ. 
Furthermore, we can accomplish 
this task in this generation should 
Jesus tarry His coming! 

ITS PEOPLE 

Fellowship is always an impor- 
tant part of any General Assembly. 
The maze of humanity inching 
their way about in the crowded 
corridors at various intervals dur- 
ing the day was often halted by 
friends who stopped to chat for a 



BY CARL H. RICHARDSON, Pastor, Lakeland, Florida 



GENERAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Reverend C. Raymond Reverend Ralph E. Reverend Vessie D. 

Dr. R. Leonard Carroll Spain Dr. Ray H. Hughes Williams Hargrove 




THE FLAME... 



Reverend Walter R. 

Pettitt, Director of Evangelism 

and Home Missions; 

elow: (left) Donald S. 
Aultman, National Sunday 
School and Youth Director. 




The Reverend Ralph E. Williams, General Secretary-Treasurer, conducted a memorial service honoring those ministers who 
passed away during the last two years. The chart at left reflects part of the combined results of those ministers' work during 
their lifetime. 







moment with each other. Fortu- 
nately, most folks just "happened" 
to have the latest photograph of 
their children to show to their 
friends, or a picture of their new 
church building. Cliches abound at 
a meeting like this one. Such 
phrases as these were most often 
repeated: "Hey! How're you do- 
ing?" 

"You've picked up a little weight 
since I saw you last, haven't you? 
"Say, if you see my wife, would 
you tell her I'm looking for her?" 
"Where are you living now?" 
"My feet are killing me!" 
"Who do you think will be our 
next state overseer?" 
"Really?" 

"Good to see you. See you later!" 
Although these phrases were re- 
peated, it seems, a hundred times 
a day, no one seemed to mind, be- 
cause this was the General Assem- 
bly! And the fellowship at a 
Church of God meeting is always 
wonderful. 

One humorous (to some) aspect 
of the meeting was the report that 
a professional pickpocket had tak- 
en advantage of the milling 
throngs in the auditorium area. 
One of the mayor's assistants 
quipped in his welcoming remarks, 
"Memphis is a city of churches, 
culture, 620,000 friendly people— 
and one pickpocket." 



This writer was walking from 
the hotel to the auditorium one 
afternoon and happened to over- 
hear two teen-age boys talking. As 
they walked along on that hot Au- 
gust afternoon, one said in his 
Memphian teen-age lingo; "Man! 
Have you seen all these girls and 
women walking around town in 
those big, crazy hats? They don't 
even wear any makeup! Kind of 
nice, huh?" 

The other shaggy-haired teen- 
ager replied dryly, "Yeah! Crazy 
man — Crazy!" 

Memphis knew we were there! 

From across the nation and 
around the world they had come, 
thirteen thousand strong! Some of 
God's best people anywhere in the 
world had converged upon one city. 
Quality and quantity were both in 
abundant supply. 

ITS POWER 

Machinery does not create power. 
It consumes it. Some of the greatest 
preachers' and musicians in the 
world were there. The program 
was skillfully organized, but the 
machinery would have bogged 
down without the power of God! 

In the midst of one magnificent 
spiritual deluge of God's power, the 
newly elected general overseer, Dr. 
Charles W. Conn, stated: "Many 
are saying that this is the greatest 
General Assembly that they have 




ever attended." It was obvious to 
even the person seated in the most 
remote section of the vast audi- 
torium, that God had especially 
charged the very atmosphere with 
His mighty power! 

The guidance of the Holy Ghost 
was perceptible in the Ordained 
Minister's Council as some one 
thousand and four hundred men of 
God elected such Spirit-filled and 
capable executives as Dr. Charles 
W. Conn, general overseer; Dr. R. 
Leonard Carroll, C. Raymond 
Spain, and Dr. Ray H. Hughes as 
assistants to the general overseer; 
Ralph E. Williams as the general 
secretary-treasurer; and Vessie D. 
Hargrave as world missions direc- 
tor. Then too, the various depart- 
ment heads are each one, in his 
own right, known to be real men of 
God who are consumed with the 
burden of "spreading the flame" 
through the various arms of their 
important departments. 

One of the most popular songs 
at the Assembly was, "Lord, Lift 
Me Up to Higher Ground." It 
seemed to catch fire in a multitude 
of hearts and became a prayer by 
many that was almost immediately 
answered. The music, and especial- 
ly the singing of the various choirs, 
at the Assembly was among the 
most outstanding this writer has 
ever heard! 



8 



Dave Wilkerson spoke to 
several youth groups and 
once to the General As- 
sembly. 



Powerful preaching, in keeping 
with the Spirit-directed theme, 
"Spreading the Flame," was done 
by the Reverend Wade H. Horton, 
former general overseer and now 
state overseer of South Carolina; 
F. L. K. Howard Browne, general 
overseer of the Church of God in 
South Africa; Dr. George F. Barnes, 
college president from England; 
Dr. Laud O. Vaught, president of 
Northwest Bible College in Minot, 
North Dakota; Roy Burroughs, a 
minister from South Carolina; F. 
Douglas Morgan, national evange- 
list from South Carolina; Dave 
Wilkerson, gangland evangelist and 
author from New York City; and 
Cecil B. Knight, state overseer of 
Indiana. 

Beloved pioneer ministers, R. P. 
Johnson, Mrs. M. P. Cross, J. L. 
Goins, and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph 
Koshewitz were leaders in the 
prayer services and in the impres- 
sive pioneer day service respective- 
ly. George W. Alford was the speak- 
er in the unforgettable missions 
service in which our honored mis- 
sionaries paraded beneath the flag 
of the nation where God has so 
graciously blessed their labors of 
-love. This "parade of nations" is a 
sight this writer shall never forget. 
Dr. Delton Alford directed the 
Lee Singers in the climactic service 
of this convocation with God on 
youth night as the glory of the 
Lord came down! Donald S. Ault- 
man, Paul F. Henson, and their 
fine board can always be counted 
on to deliver a well-planned and 
power-packed service. 

In summation, the crowds were 
large; the preaching was tremen- 
dous; the music was incomparable; 
the fellowship was wonderful; the 
services were powerful; the sche- 
dule was strenuous; but heaven 
bent low to touch the lives of those 
whose hearts were set Godward to 
help the Church of God to continue 
"spreading the flame!" • 



Cecil Guiles (left), state 
director of Alabama, took 
first place in three differ- 
ent categories. 




(extreme left) Bill Watson, 
Brazil, presented an album 
| to Don Aultman showing the 
new Brasilia church built 
with YWEA and mission 
funds, (left) Tannis Duncan 
showed one of the new 
homes at the Home for 
Children. 





COMPROMISE 
NEVER 



"Samuel hewed Agag in pieces 
before the Lord in Gilgal" (2 
Samuel 15:33). 



By J. E. DEVORE 



HE HISTORY OF Saul is 
one of the most interesting 
of all Old Testament sketch- 
es. From those days when he went 
searching for lost stock, until he 
was anointed by Samuel and be- 
gan to prophesy, interest in him 
increases. At last he is king. 

He was a magnificent man in 
appearance, standing head and 
shoulders above others. Physical 
perfection, however, is not as im- 
portant as moral and spiritual in- 
tegrity. It is always better to obey 
than to sacrifice. 

God ordered Saul, "Smite 
Amalek, and utterly destroy all 
that they have, and spare them 
not" (1 Samuel 15:3). The 
Amalekites were a source of con- 
stant grief to Israel. Vexed by their 
wickedness, God called for their 
complete extermination. He gave 
Saul the strategy for success and 
future victory. 

But Saul spared the best sheep. 
Samuel said to him, "Why didn't 
you destroy them?" Saul answered, 
"I wanted to present a sacrifice." 
The wise and faithful old prophet 



declared in effect, "You have 
missed the mark and failed miser- 
ably in disobeying the command of 
God." 

When Samuel saw Agag who had 
been brought back as a prisoner of 
war, he drew his sword and hewed 
this evil one in pieces before the 
Lord. Thus he destroyed a chief 
source of trouble and removed a 
great enemy of God's people. 

This typifies the command of 
our Lord which is given to all His 
disciples: "Take up your cross and 
follow me." It means death to sin, 
death to carnal-mindedness, death 
to the old nature, death to compro- 
mise and cowardice. It means the 
determined crucifixion of confor- 
mity, when the side of the ma- 
jority is a refuge for a cowardly 
soul. Saul said, "I would have 
obeyed, but I feared the people." 
He should have remembered that 
the fear of the Lord, not the fear 
of people, is the beginning of wis- 
dom. 

The Apostle Paul commanded, 
"Quit you like men, be strong." 
Phillips Brooks declared, "Do not 



pray for easy lives. Pray to be 
strong men. Do not pray for tasks 
equal to your powers. Pray for 
powers equal to your tasks. Then 
the doing of your work shall be no 
miracle, but you shall be a 
miracle." 

A little lad offered an exasperat- 
ing prayer one night: "Please, God, 
get Daddy to give me that electric 
train for Christmas, and have my 
teacher notice how much better I 
read now, and make the big kids 
take me into their game, and 
With that his father interrupted 
him and said, "Son, don't take it on 
yourself to give orders to your 
Commander. Just report for duty." 

Will you report for duty? Will 
you obey your Commander? Will 
you hew Agag (your old life of 
selfishness) in pieces? Have you 
the courage? Have you the man- 
hood or the womanhood to take 
such a stand? Have you willed to 
do the will of God? Then, compro- 
mise never! Christ is the Captain 
of our salvation; the fight is on; 
contact with Him will result in a 
courageous life and will produce the 
fruits of holiness. • 



10 



"Brethren, if any man be overtaken in a fault, ye 
which are spiritual, restore such an one in the spirit 
of meekness; considering thyself, lest thou also be 
tempted" (Galatians 6:1). 



BY WILLIAM E. WINTERS 



ANY PEOPLE, EVEN so-called Christians, 
become angry when reproving anger; they 
become sinful in reproving sin, mean in re- 
proving meanness, and hateful in reproving hate. 
They try to settle one devil while they raise another 
one. They try to put one devil to sleep while they 
alarm another one. 

The word restore signifies "to set in joint again," 
"to put in place again" — like setting a broken bone. 
The art of restoration requires gentleness as well as 
skillfulness. This applies to the Christian as well as 
the surgeon. A butcher could amputate an arm or a 
leg, but one would prefer having a surgeon. Restora- 
tion is not an act of butchery or of mutilating men 
and women in their character and influence, but it 
is an act of surgery to restore one to spiritual health. 

Paul the Apostle tells us the reason we should be 
gentle and skillful in dealing with our erring brother: 
"Considering ourselves." Oh yes! if a bone is out of 
joint, be gentle, please; be careful please; be skillful, 
please! And too, fellow Christian, if a soul is in an 
unhealthy condition and his faults have crippled his 
testimony, and if his faith is limping, please be skill- 
ful and gentle in your acts of restoration. 

Paul seems to say, "Give mercy to your erring 
brother today, because you may wish to borrow some 
mercy tomorrow." The object of our reproof is to re- 
store and to heal our brother's actions, not to make 
a scar on his Christian life. The best surgeons leave 
the smallest scar. A real friend will hide our faults 
from others, while he is exposing them to us. A real 
Christian friend will reprove in private rather than 
spread a rumor in public. 

The Good Shepherd was a wonderful example in 
practicing the gentle art of restoration. He went out 
after the runaway sheep. Remember, it was an old 
sheep — not a lamb. When he found it, he did not throw 
rocks at it; he did not run or chase it back; he did 
not whip it back, or even lead it back — but he car- 
ried it back. This is real restoration. 

Restoration must always be the object of our re- 
proof. There are many hard heads and many hard 
hearts that need to be restored, and kindness is the 
key that opens the hardest hearts. Please God, give us 
Christian brothers who are skilled in the gentle art 
of restoration. • 



The Gentle 
Art Of 
Restoration 







*'.% -~- 



11 



NOW THAT 
YOV ARE IN 




XCITED ABOUT IT, are you 
not? You have been buying 
collegiate clothes and saving 
money. This is your first extended 
absence from home. The freedom 
will be great. You have even for- 
gotten that some high school 
teacher said you were mentally in- 
capable of college, or that every- 
body flunks two or three subjects 
each year. 

That is all to come. Right now, 
you are thinking of how you are 
finally on your own — a man or 
woman of the world. Just think — 
you will have several dollars to 
spend every week with no lawn to 
mow, car or dishes to wash, or all 
those other little chores which had 
to be done at home. 



COLLEGE 



BY HAROLD BARE 



Well, those things are all behind. 
Ahead lies four wonderful years to 
be climaxed by your receiving a 
guarantee of twenty thousand dol- 
lars a year for the rest of your life. 
It is all planned so beautifully and, 
of course, it will transpire just as 
planned. 

The following statement you will 
probably judge to contradict the 
purpose of this article. Neverthe- 
less, it is valid. 

Your first disillusionment with 
college and frustration of personal 
ambitions will likely be the result 
of upperclassmen and authorities 
imposing upon you their ideas and 
plans for your college career and 
future. They will also inform you of 
the many emotional stages you are 
to experience and the effect these 
traumatic incidents will have in 
changing your personality. 

But there is no need to speak of 
these things. Too soon you will 
learn them firsthand. Besides, the 
purpose of this article is not to 
embellish the tales of horror you 
have already heard. 

As stated previously, "It is all 
planned so beautifully" in your 
mind. You may even know when 
you are going to get married and 
where you will work after college. 

You should have plans. You 
should have ambitions. You should 
have dreams. If you fail to strive 
for some goal in the future, it is 
doubtful if your life has purpose 
today. Your idealism is not a false 
approach r to college life. You would 



be wrong to anticipate a college 
career jammed with every conceiv- 
able problem. Too much money is 
one problem — not enough is anoth- 
er! You cannot have both. Face the 
situation realistically. Your college 
career will be entirely different 
than all others. You owe it to your- 
self to remain an individual in a 
society geared to stereotype. 

Keep your dreams. Keep your 
plans. Keep your ambitions. Even 
color them! But do yourself the 
favor of learning to earn the re- 
wards of achieved goals. In your 
idealism it is to your advantage to 
remember there is no immuniza- 
tion against problems. 

On the contrary, statisticians 
have already estimated the number 
of deaths, suicides, nervous break- 
downs, dropouts, and failures 
which can be expected during the 
course of the coming school year. 
If they are right, somebody is going 
to have problems. 

The point of this article? First, 
consider a very simple analogy. 
The squirrel stores food for the 
winter. He does not know that on 
the first of February snow will fall 
and three days later the tempera- 
ture will be sub-zero. He does know 
that winter is coming and there 
will be dangerous weather. The 
weather is of no consequence, how- 
ever, if he has sufficient shelter 
and food. He will see another 
summer. 

You cannot know exactly what 
will happen during your college ca- 
reer. It is safe to assume there will 
be problems. Foreknowledge would 
be of little help. Sufficient to the 
need is the knowledgeable assur- 
ance that every problem will be 
transcended. 

Is this possible? It is. But there 
is only one way. Place Christ first. 
Give Him complete control of your 
life. Submit your plans to Him and 
accept His master plan, and He can 
direct you to success in spite of 
problems. 

Go with the Master of every 
problem, for tests, finances, social 
conflict, mental anguish, physical 
fatigue, and spiritual retardedness 
can be overcome with His help. He 
is sufficient. Go with God. • 



12 



Is your Pioneers for Christ 
club chartered? If not, write 
for a permanent charter; 
there Is no charge. Send 
the following Information: 

(1) Name of church 

(2) Name and address of 
the sponsor 

(4) Name and address of 

the president 
(4) Whether the club is 

presently active 
By all means, your club 
should be chartered. The 
national office has colorful 
crests for sewing onto jack- 
ets, symbolizing PFC activi- 
ties. The price of the crests 
Is only fifty cents each. To 
secure the crests or a char- 
ter, write: 
EVANGELISM AND HOME 

MISSIONS 
1080 MONTGOMERY AVE- 
NUE 
CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 
37311 




WALTER R. PETTITT 

Director, Evangelism and Home Missions 



Pioneers for Christ 




National I *?ri 



The Reverend Aubrey D. Ma 



By Walter K. Pettitt 

Aubrey D. Maye has received the high honor of be- 
ing selected as the first full-time National Director of 
Pioneers for Christ. He will also have other responsi- 
bilities related to the Evangelism Department. 

The Reverend Mr. Maye, a native of Georgia, grad- 
uated from Fitzgerald High School and received his 
B.A. degree from Lee College. He comes to this office 
from New Mexico where he has served as pastor and 
state Sunday school and youth director. In 1962 he 
married Marian Childers of Gadsden, Alabama. They 
have one son twenty months old. 

Pioneers for Christ (PFC) had been an intimate part 
of the Reverend Mr. Maye's life. He was president of 
the PFC Club in Lee College, where he directed their 
diverse activities and scores of weekend invasions. 

An international interest will continue in his work 
since he led a summer witnessing team in Europe and 
spoke during the servicemen's retreat in Germany. One 
summer he spent working with a team in New York 
City, where he assisted Dave Wilkerson in teen-age 
evangelism. 

The Evangelism and Youth Departments will assist 
Brother Maye in facilitating his program. 



CHRISTIAN In A 



BY ROY BERNARD JUSSELL 



HILE THE AMERICAN Christian accepts 
first of all the sovereignty of the living God 
over his life, he respects and desires to ad- 
vance the sovereignty of his free Christian republic 
when he casts his ballot on election day. 

Therefore, no patriot-Christian should enter a vot- 
ing booth uninformed on issues and candidates, and 
certainly a Christian should vote for a Christian. His 
political party affiliation, per se, should not govern 
how he shall vote — not in this day when agnostics 
and atheists feel little or no allegiance to constitu- 
tional Americanism and may be found in our major 
political parties. 

No voter should therefore say, as one said, "I am 
going to vote for candidates of X Party because my 
family has for generations voted for X Party candi- 
dates." 

Our United States of America was founded as a 
Christian republic and is still a Christian nation. Be- 
cause it has been Christian, it has given to its citizens 
such bounty, individual freedom, and human progress 
as has not been equaled by any nation in recorded 
history. 

With so lofty a record, should we not — when we 
stand alone before God as we vote — make certain that 
the candidate we vote for believes wholeheartedly in 
our American way of life? Let us remember well 
that when our elected officials take office, they de- 




clare under oath to preserve, protect, and defend the 
Constitution of the United States of America under 
God. 

If an incumbent legislator has consistently voted 
for legislation which is patently contrary to our Con- 
stitution, is he protecting, defending, and preserving 
that Constitution? If he has not adhered to the oath 
which he took, is he entitled to your vote as a 
Christian? 

The Constitution of the United States consists of 
seven articles and twenty-two amendments and has 
been the supreme law of the Federal government since 
its adoption in 1789. We had in May, 1787, at Phila- 
delphia, the Constitutional Convention which drew up 
this matchless document. The session was attended 
by all states but Rhode Island. 

It would seem that all Christians — and we assume 
that they are literate — should have in their possession 
for ready reference the Constitution of the United 
States; it is the guide to intelligent, Christian voting. 

There is also available the voting record of mem- 
bers of our Congress, compiled by at least one body of 
watchful Constitutionalists sitting in our nation's 
Capitol. This information can be subscribed to at a 
minimal cost. 

May it not be said of Christian voters that they 
were lax in informing themselves on issues and candi- 
dates, and that therefore the battle for a free nation 
under God was lost. • 



14 



NEW AMERICAN TEMPERANCE PLAN 

PAYS WEEKLY... 

even for life to Non-drinkers and Non-Smokers ! 

At last — a new kind of hospitalization plan for you thousands who realize drinking and 
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nation, no waiting period. Only you can cancel your policy. No salesman will ever call. 
Starting the first day you enter any hospital, you will be paid $14.28 a day. 



You do not smoke or drink- 
so why pay premiums for 
those who do? 

Every day in your newspaper you see 
more evidence that drinking and smoking 
shorten life. They're now one of America's 
leading health problems — a prime cause 
of the high premium rates most hospitali- 
zation policies charge. 



as a non-drinker and non-smoker. The 
new American Temperance Hospitaliza- 
tion Plan can offer you unbelievably low 
rates because we do not accept drinkers 
and smokers, who cause high rates. Also, 
your premiums can never be raised be- 
cause you grow older or have too many 
claims. Only a general rate adjustment 
up or down could affect your low rates. 
And only you can cancel your policy. We 
cannot. 

READ YOUR AMERICAN 
TEMPERANCE PLAN BENEFITS 

1. You receive $100 cash weekly— 
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you collect. 

2. Sickness and accidents are 
covered 

except pregnancy, any act of war or mili- 
tary service, pre-existing accidents or 



sickness, hospitalization caused by use of 
liquor or narcotics. On everything else 
you're fully protected — at amazingly low 
rates! 

3. Other benefits for loss 
within 90 days of accident 

(as described in policy). We pay $2000 
cash for accidental death. Or $2000 cash 
for loss of one hand, one foot, or sight of 
one eye. Or $6000 cash for loss of both 
eyes, both hands, or both feet. 



Actually, no other is like ours. But com- 
pare rates. See what you save. 



Fill out application below and mail right 
away. Upon approval, your policy will be 
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hospitals. So get your protection now. 



MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

Read over your policy carefully. Ask your min- 
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it prmtdes exactly what we say it does. Then, 
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days and we will immediately refund your en- 
tire premium. No questions asked. You can 
gain thousands of dollars .. .you risk nothing. 



TEAR OUT AND MAIL TODAY BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE 





IMPORTANT: include your first premium with application 

LOOK AT THESE 
AMERICAN TEMPERANCE LOW RATES 

Pay Monthly Pay Yearly 


Each adult 
19-59 pays 


$380 


$ 38 


Each adult 
60-69 pays 


$590 | $59 


Each odult 
70-100 pays 


$790 | $79 


Each child 18 $980 $90 

and under pays » *0 

SAVE TWO MONTHS PREMIUM BY PAYING YEARLY! 







Application to Buckingham Life Insurance Company 
Executive Offices, Libertyville, Illinois 

IN TEMPERANCE HOSPITALIZATION PI 



Name rPLEASE PRINT) 




Street nr RD » citv 


County state 


ZlD 


Afle Date nf Birth 


Month Day 


Year 


Beneficiary Relationship 




1 also apply (or coverage for the members of my family listed below: 

NAME AGE HEIGHT WEIGHT BENEFICIARY 


BIRTH DATE 


1. 


2. 




3. 


4. 



To the best of your knowledge and belief, are you and all members listed above in good health 
and free from any physical impairment, or disease? Yes Q No Q 
To the best of your knowledge, have you or any member above listed had medical advice or 
treatment, or have you or they been advised to have a surgical operation in the last five years? 
Yes □ No D II so, please give details stating person affected, cause, date, name and address 
of attending physician, and whether fully recovered. 



Neither I nor any person listed above uses tobacco or alcoholic beverages, and I hereby apply 
for a policy based on the understanding that the policy does not cover conditions originating 
prior to its effective date, and that the policy is issued solely and entirely in reliance upon the 
written answers to the above questions. 
Date: Signed: X 

ATIAT 

Moi7 this application with your first premium to 6613 

CIATES, Inc., Box 131, Libertyville, Illinois 



BY JAMES E. ADAMS 






















wfCi. 






S±unjdjou^l$eAt 



UNDAY IS LIKE a stile be- 
tween the fields of toil, 
where we can kneel and 
pray, sit and meditate." Many peo- 
ple believe the first part of this 
observation by Longfellow, but miss 
the blessedness of the latter. Some 
men conclude the statement with: 
"Where we can kneel and pull 
weeds, or sit behind the steering 
wheel of the car." And many 
women think: "Where we can 
kneel and dust the furniture, or sit 
and watch television." 

Many parents still remember the 
good old days when they took a 



bath on Saturday night and 
spruced up the next day in their 
Sunday best — but their children do 
not. One four-year-old girl knew 
that weekends were her daddy's 
time to be the home handyman. 
And she was used to seeing him 
wearing an old flannel shirt — 
which had seen better days— while 
doing his odd jobs. One evening 
she spotted the old shirt and cried, 
"Look! There's Daddy's Sunday 
shirt." 

Mothers who have jobs in in- 
dustry use Sunday to tidy up their 
homes. Others who have several 



children feel that Sunday is their 
day to sleep late and enjoy the 
relaxation which they had little 
time for during the week. In too 
few cases do church attendance 
and worship constitute their en- 
joyment. 

Perhaps because of many labor- 
saving devices and the five-day 
workweek, people think they do not 
need to use this "stile between the 
fields of toil" to rest and worship 
God. And it is true that few people 
are being hospitalized from over- 
work. But better than half the na- 
tion's hospital beds are filled by 
people who have collapsed from 
nervous strain. 

The heavy traffic to and from 
work, the dull monotony fyet split 
second timing) of the assembly 
line, the unending effort to please 
the unpleasant customer, the rush 
to get Johnny off to school while 
the baby is crying and the phone 
is ringing, put a strain on people's 
nervous systems these days. Then 
when they can relax, they turn on 
the television with its reports of 
war, and its exciting programs and 
suspense dramas. 

As never before, men and women 
need Sunday and God. It is balm to 
the soul to kneel in prayer, espe- 
cially on Saturday night, and con- 
fess to God the omissions and fail- 
ures of the past week. Then to 
arise on Sunday morning, attend 
church, and worship God — this 
brings joy and peace. By faith we 
know God is near, and we rejoice 
in His presence. 

Preston J. Moore, past national 
commander of the American 
Legion, said, "Americans are begin- 
ning to find out that there is more 
human dignity in kneeling before 
God than in lying on a couch be- 
fore a psychiatrist." 



16 



And Dr. L. Nelson Bell, a retired 
surgeon, executive editor of Chris- 
tianity Today and father-in-law of 
Evangelist Billy Graham, said, 
"Psychologists and psychiatrists 
are discovering that humanity 
must be reconciled to God." Ad- 
dressing a group on "Religion and 
Psychiatry," he affirmed his re- 
spect for current psychiatric meth- 
ods, but said, "There are thousands 
of people in America who are look- 
ing for help whose problem is pri- 
marily spiritual, not physical or 
mental. In their hearts is a spiri- 
tual hunger which can never be 
satisfied by anything or any person 
other than Jesus Christ." 

But it is difficult to convince 
some people that they have a spiri- 
tual need and that God is the great 
Supplier. 

A Christian was concerned about 
Howard, a fine, cleanliving young 
fellow who never attended church. 
This man knew he would have a 
hard time proving to the youth 
that he was a sinner in need of a 
Saviour. So one day he said, 
"Howard, if you will attend Sunday 
school, you will find you have much 
in common with other fellows of 
your age. You will enjoy it." 

After receiving quite a few well- 
spaced bits of advice somewhat like 
this, Howard began to go to Sunday 
school. Six months later he said, 
"I'm sure glad I started attending 
church. Now I have found my 
Saviour, and the week is not com- 
plete without my having times of 
worship in the house of God." 

God rested on the seventh day 
of creation's week and sanctified 
it. He decreed — for the good of 
man — that one day in seven be set 
aside for rest. Jesus also said, "The 
sabbath was made for man, and 
not man for the sabbath." 

In commemoration of the Resur- 
rection of Christ on Sunday, the 
Early Church came together upon 
the first day of the week. Sunday, 
the "stile between the fields of toil, 
where we can kneel and pray, sit 
and meditate," can bring to a sat- 
isfying completion the old week and 
can strengthen our physical, men- 
tal, and spiritual reserves for the 
new. • 



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$622 his first month part-time. Mrs. M. W. averaged $101.00 per week 
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State or Prov 




Brazilian Style 




Miss Ruth Crawford, a Church of Cod 
missionary to Brazil, has been in 
that country for six years. As this article 
evidences, she possesses a genuine 
interest in youth. 



S THE SPARKS from the 
bonfire jumped crazily 
about and then drifted off 
into space, a large group of 
Brazilian young people were sing- 
ing hymns and giving their testi- 
monies. It was the final night of 
senior youth camp, and feelings 
were mixed. They were happy, for 
the Lord had bountifully blessed 
them. Yet, they were sad because 
on the following morning they 
would have to part, leaving camp 
and returning to their homes. 

This made the sixth consecutive 
year that youth camps have been 
held in Brazil, and a lot of things 
have changed since the first one 
was conducted in July of 1960. Only 
seventeen were enrolled that first 
year; but under the circumstances, 
that was as many as we could 
handle. The campsite was the then 
unfinished Bible school building. 
Boxes, crates, and scaffolding 
planks supplied tables and benches 
needed for the dining room and 
classrooms. We made a worktable 
for handcraft class from an old 
refrigerator crate. Some mattress- 
es were borrowed, but most of us 



slept on the floor. No panes in the 
windows made for perfect visibility 
and first-class ventilation (espe- 
cially since July is the coldest 
month of the year in Brazil!). 

In that first camp, our days' ac- 
tivities began before sunrise, and 
continued through the evangelistic 
services at night. They included 
devotions, Bible classes, practical 
studies on the Christian life, music, 
handcraft, and recreation. Each 
night we had good evangelistic ser- 
vices; six souls were saved. Most of 
the churches, parents, and pas- 
tors, as well as the kids who came, 
did not understand too well what a 
youth camp was all about. But en- 
thusiasm grew as the days passed. 
When Saturday came, none of the 
young people wanted to leave! Such 
was the beginning of Church of 
God youth camps in Brazil. 

Each year the enrollment has in- 
creased. By 1964, there were fifty 
campers who came. Our facilities 
being limited, we decided that it 
was time to divide the camp. So 
beginning with 1965, there were 
two camps: one for ages fifteen 
and up, and one for ages ten 



through fourteen. And so it was 
that this year the enrollment was 
at an all-time high, with forty- 
nine registered in the first camp 
and thirty-five in the second. I 
found it interesting that nine of 
the seventeen who attended the 
first youth camp were also at camp 
this year. Some of these have not 
missed a single camp since the 
first one! 

The evangelist was one of our 
Bible school students who, three 
years ago, came to youth camp as 
a backslidden young fellow set on 
causing trouble. When prayer time 
came, he would not pray, and he 
hindered his friends who en- 
deavored to seek the Lord. He was 
a nuisance! But one evening as we 
gathered to pray in behalf of the 
evangelistic service that was soon 
to follow, the Lord convicted David 
of his waywardness. Falling to his 
knees, he cried out for mercy. That 
night he prayed through to a glori- 
ous experience with God. Before 
camp was over, he had received 
the Holy Ghost baptism and a call 
to the ministry. The following 
January, he enrolled in the first 



18 



The campers presented a skit they prepared 
during the week. 



term of Bible school and will be 
graduating in December of this 
year. God has blessed his ministry 
and has given him many souls. His 
messages to the campers revealed 
his compassion for their souls and 
his earnest desire to see them all 
at peace with God and completely 
yielded to Him. The Lord blessed in 
a precious way! There were a 
number of definite experiences, in- 
cluding several who received the 
baptism of the Holy Ghost. 



BY RUTH CRAWFORD 



As one after another of the 
young people testified on the last 
night of camp that year, I became 
even more impressed with the 
necessity (and rewards) of youth 
work. Among the number who en- 
circled the bonfire were several who 
had accepted Christ in vacation 
Bible schools conducted in local 
churches the past few years. There 
were others who had found Him 
in youth camps, and still others 
who had been saved in special 
youth services which the Bible 
school students and others had di- 
rected. During the week they had 
shared experiences one with anoth- 
er; they had prayed over problems 
together and had seen God answer 
needs in their own lives as well as 
in the lives of others. For five days, 
their hearts and minds had been 
channeled into thinking about their 
"time and talents" (which was the 
theme for the week), and a num- 
ber had discovered that they were 
not completely yielded to the Lord. 

As that final service reached its 
climax, the very presence of God 
seemed to permeate the entire area. 
While a consecration hymn was 
being sung, more than a score of 
young people stepped forward, stat- 
ing their willingness to follow the 
Lord wherever He might lead them. 
Was this a play on their emotions? 
No, it was God speaking with His 
children, and they recognized His 
voice. A lot of things have changed 
since our first youth camp, but 
He never changes! • 




RAISE MONEV 

FOR ANY WORTHY PURPOSE 

Candy — Flavoring 
Cards — Novelties 

Write for Free Information 

LOVEJOY PUBLISHING HOUSE 

P. O. Box 8 — Madison, Tenn. 



New Way for Your Church or Group 

to Raise $40-CASH-fa»7y, Quickly! 



MAIL COUPON TODAY-Send No Money 
I Send Your Organization— 
ON CREDIT- Everything 
You Need to Raise $40.00! 

Let me send you at once the facts about my re- 
markable Plan which gives your group $40.00 
CASH almost like magic. Just fill out the coupon 
below and mail it to me now. At once I'll send you 
— absolutely FREE and without obligation — com- 
plete details of my nationally famous Plan which adds 
$40.00 to $300.00 and more CASH to your Treasury . . . 
all without spending a single penny of your own money. 

YOU NEVER SPEND OR PAY if OF YOUR OWN M0NEY-N0 RISK! 




Set a festive 
Holiday table 
with gay Metvy 
Christmas TaVIe 
Covers in red, green 
and gold. No iron never- 
launder polyethylene 
wipes clean with damp 
cloth. Big 54" x 72" size. 



No room here to give you all the facts, but here 
are the highlights of my famous Plan. I ship 
you 100 of my cheery Merry Christmas Table 
Covers. They're so gay and colorful that many 
homes will order several on sight. I send the 
Table Covers to you entirely ON CREDIT. 

My Famous Plan Followed Successfully 
By More Than 50,000 Organizations! 

Join more than 50,000 clubs, PTA's, schools, 
veterans' auxiliaries and other groups who raise 
large sums of money without lc cost, thanks to 
my famous Anna Wade Fund- Raising Plan. 

FDEE COMPLETE DETAILS... 
REE Mall Coupon Now! 

Just mail the coupon to me today for complete de- 
tails of this easy-to-follow rewarding Plan. Every- 
thing comes to you free ... no obligation whatsoever. 
So fill out and mail coupon now! 

ANNA WADE, Dept/130 CW Lynchburg, Va. 



I trust you! Then you simply have 10 mem- 
bers each sell only 10 Table Covers at $1 eacii, 
and send $60.00 of the proceeds to me when 
the Table Covers are sold. AND YOU KEEP 
$40.00 OF THE PROCEEDS FOR YOUR 
TREASURY ! Take up to 60 days. 

I ANNA WADE, Dept. 430 CW 
| Lynchburg, Virginia 

I Please rush complete details. FREE and without obliga- 
I tion. of your plan for our group to raise $40 00 and mor,- I 
Merry Chri=' 



I without spe 
■ Covers and r 



many other products 



M| 



| NAME , 

1 ADDRESS I 

1 i 

| CITY ZONE STATE j 

I Name of 

. Organization ; 

I If Church I 

I Give Name............ „_„ j 

19 




The 

SREAKING Blood 



BY RAYMOND L COX 



BLOODSHED CRIES aloud 
for revenge! 
God himself attested this 
fact at the time of the first human 
slaying. Present proclivities toward 
crime cannot be considered too 
shocking when it is remembered 
that the first man born in this 
world became a murderer! 

Cain was provoked at his brother 
Abel. Vexed at his own inability to 
achieve acceptance with God 
through a bloodless sacrifice and 
jealous of Abel's successful ap- 
proach to God with the firstlings of 
his flock, Cain committed the first 
homicide of human history by 
clobbering Abel to death in the 
fields. The murderer may have 
concealed the corpse by covering it 
in a shallow grave. But there was a 
witness to the crime. God beheld 
the deed perpetrated and inquired 
of Cain concerning his brother's 
whereabouts. Eve's firstborn replied 
lamely, "I know not: Am I my 
brother's keeper?" (Genesis 4:9). 
Cain could not bluff his way out 
of the charge. God accused, "The 
voice of thy brother's blood crieth 
unto me from the ground" (Genesis 
4:10). Abel, although dead, yet 
spoke. The voice of his blood could 
not be silenced. Abel's blood cried 



for justice! And justice for wrong- 
doesrs involves judgment and ret- 
ribution. Cain was cursed for life 
on account of his crime. The speak- 
ing blood called for vengeance. 

Thus it was in Israel's history 
following the conquest of Canaan 
that persons appointed to bring to 
justice slayers guilty of man- 
slaughter were called the avengers 
of blood. They were permitted to 
pursue their prey all over Palestine. 
The only hope for the fleeing slayer 
was to resort to one of the six 
cities of refuge where they could 
be protected — as long as they re- 
mained within. Thereby justice was 
tempered with mercy. The blood 
which cried for vengeance was 
muffled on certain occasions. 

Only accidental, unpremeditated 
manslaughter was grounds for se- 
curity and protection within the 
cities of refuge. Other capital 
crimes could not be escaped by flee- 
ing. 

Now in the sight of the infallible 
divine Judge, all sins constitute 
capital offenses. Not only crimes 
are adjudged worthy of death, all 
iniquity is so regarded. "The soul 
that sinneth, it shall die" (Ezekiel 
18:4). "The wages of sin is death" 
(Romans 6:23). These are not the 



arbitrary decrees of damnation- 
dealing preachers. They are the 
pronouncements of the just and 
righteous God. All sin cries for 
judgment. 

However, justice is tempered with 
mercy in God's dealings with his 
creatures concerning sin. Abel's 
blood cried aloud for vengeance, 
but Christ's blood speaks louder. 
The blood of Jesus Christ, God's 
Son, drowns out the call for judg- 
ment. "Jesus the mediator of the 
new covenant, and . . . the blood 
of sprinkling, that speaketh better 
things than that of Abel" (He- 
brews 12:24 ) . The apostle who 
wrote these words had experienced 
the truths memorialized in the 
hymn by Phoebe Palmer long be- 
fore they had been written. 

"I see the new creation rise, 
I hear the speaking blood; 

It speaks, polluted nature dies! 
Sinks neath the cleansing flood." 

Jesus Christ is the fulfillment of 
the cities of refuge. On the cross 
when he offered to God "the one 
sacrifice for sin forever" which 
assured acceptance with God to 
every believer, Jesus prayed, "Fath- 
er, forgive them; for they know not 
what they do" (Luke 23:34). His 



20 



blood still speaks louder than the 
rantings and ravings of the accuser 
of the brethren! Christ provides 
immunity to retribution not only 
for one crime but for all transgres- 
sions. "The blood of Jesus Christ 
his Son cleanseth us from all sin" 
(1 John 1:7). Men and demons may 
shriek and shout about the ini- 
quities of a believer, but God can- 
not entertain the charges, for that 
person is under the blood. He lis- 
tens only to "the blood of 
sprinkling, that speaketh better 
things." "Though your sins be as 
scarlet, they shall be as white as 
snow" (Isaiah 1:18). 

Christians can face the future 
with confidence, recognizing that 
their guilt is forgiven and forgot- 
ten. They sing the chorus of testi- 
mony: 

"When the blood's applied to your 
heart, 
When the blood's applied. 
Someday you'll stand at the great 
judgment bar, 
I know that Jesus will not be far. 
When the blood's applied to your 
heart 
When the blood's applied. 
There'll be nothing to say; 

There'll be nothing to pay; 
When the blood's applied!" 

How wonderfully true! "There'll 
be nothing to pay," for Jesus paid 
it all on Calvary. And there will 
be nothing to say for the Saviour's 
speaking blood will effectively be 
heard. The bloodshed of man cries 
aloud for revenge; but the blood- 
shed of God's Son cries aloud for 
release! Abel's blood called for jus- 
tice. Christ's blood calls for mercy 
because the shedding of His blood 
satisfied divine justice forever and 
furnished the remission of sins. 

Christ's speaking blood will make 
itself heard for the benefit of be- 
lievers. The redeemed receive in- 
stead of sin's salary of death God's 
gift of life through Jesus Christ 
(Romans 6:23). Jesus promised, 
"Verily, verily, I say unto you, He 
that heareth my word, and be- 
lieveth on him that sent me, hath 
everlasting life, and shall not come 
into condemnation; but is passed 
from death unto life" (John 5:24). 



REPLACE THAT OLD COFFEE MAKER 

with a NEW Automatic 

80-CUP URN 



RAISE FUNDS FOR YOUR 

CHURCH, CLUB OR CIVIC 

GROUP 





80 CUP 

URN 
FREE 



For selling only $48 of M-K SPICES 

Write today for details and special 

order form. Money raising offers, too. 



MARION-KAY 



Dept.l 62-A Brownstown. Ind 47220 



Your organization can sell our top 
quality pecans and candy to raise need- 
ed funds. We grow, pack and ship our 
own pecan meats, attractively packaged 
in cellophane bags. Whole halves or 
broken pieces available. 

And now! Boost your sales and profits 

_ with our complete line of homemade, 

individually gift boxed pecan candies: 

Pecan Brittle, Pecan Glace', and Pecan 

Log Rolls. 

For complete details and wholesale 
price lists, write: 

Depr. 4 

MASCOT PECAN COMPANY 

Glennville, Georgia 



Raise $ 72 
to $ 2,000 selling 
DuPont Family-Pak 
toothbrushes 
Make 100% profit 






Keep 504 of every $1 .00 pak sold 




NO RISK. NO INVESTMENT. PAY ONLY 
FOR WHAT YOU SELL.When your group 
needs money. .. remember ... PEOPLE 
NEED TOOTHBRUSHES! Dentists rec- 
ommend toothbrushes be changed 
every 3 months. It's EASY selling this 
DuPont Family-Pak of 3 nylon tooth- 
brushes. You promote good dental 
health — a community service. DuPont 
toothbrushes are offered on a GUAR- 
ANTEED NO RISK basis; you PAY 
ONLY FOR THOSE YOU SELL, RETURN 
UNSOLD PORTION. We pay all mail- 
ing charges (minimum order, 72 Paks). 
FREE KODAK & WESTINGHOUSE 
PRIZES ARE AWARDED TOP SALES- 



MEN! Last year The Home for Children, 
in Lincoln, Nebraska, needed to raise 
money. Mr. Robert Rudell, Superintend- 
ent, ordered 2016 DuPont Family-Paks 
on Sept. 1st. By Oct. 20th all DuPont 
Paks were sold. THE HOME MADE 
$1,008.00 AND WON 14 KODAK FLASH 
CAMERAS. 

This year Mr. Rudell wrote to us say- 
ing, "We had a successful drive last 
year. I would like to know if it would 
be possible to sell another thousand 
toothbrushes during June and July to 
raise $500.00." To ORDER or get FREE 
SAMPLE and information, clip and mail 
this coupon today! 



"~l 



is 72 Paks. Order in multiples 
of 72. Return unopened Paks 
for FULLCREDIT.) 
; — i Send me a FREE Family- 
1 — I Pak of 3 DuPont nylon 
toothbrushes and also full 
details on the Fuller Fund 

















ORGANIZATION 




ADDRESS 


CI 


Y 




STATE 


ZIP 



21 



Will You 

Be The Victim Of 

A Criminal? 



BY GRACE V. WATKINS 




GIRL FOUND unconscious by 
Roadside, Assailant Sought." 
"Youth Found Knifed, Beat- 
en, in Lonely Woods." 

When you read such headlines in 
the paper, do you tell yourself with 
a shrug, "What a dumb person! 
That would never happen to me"? 
Do not be too sure! The girl by the 
roadside and the fellow found in 
the lonely woods probably thought 
the same thing. 

Yet, if they had practiced pre- 
cautions that crime experts rate as 
A plus, the tragedies would not 
have come. If you keep these pre- 
cautions in mind, chances are you 
will avoid such happenings. 

First, a teen-ager, who is alone 
in the house, is smart never to let 
anyone in unless it is somebody 
well known. True, the sweater 
salesman who looks like a nice 
college boy and who flashes bright 
samples seems innocent enough — 



but that is just it. He may be the 
most dangerous criminal in seven 
states, or a decoy for a criminal. 
Recently three young holdup men 
entered a large bank and easily 
robbed it. How? They were dressed 
as painters! 

Dates with a girl or a fellow you 
hardly know are another never- 
never rule. That stunning blonde 
girl you meet at the drugstore 
fountain may be a lure for crimi- 
nals. The same goes for the tall, 
dark, and handsome young man 
who offers to drive you to the 
beach and let you out at the front 
door of your friends' cabin. Even a 
girl or a fellow you have seen here 
and there several times, even one 
who has appeared at church or 
youth fellowship once or twice, is 
not necessarily "safe and sound." 

A double date can be dangerous, 
too. Unless the proposed date is 
someone you know well or has been 



recommended by someone you 
know well, danger may be only 
yards away. Equally risky is the 
person who claims to be a pal of 
someone you know or once knew. 

Are you a nature lover? Do you 
"simply love" green woods and 
quiet, secluded valleys? Yes, they 
are delightful. But remember that 
sometimes isolated nature spots are 
a choice locale for crime perpetra- 
tors. If your youth fellowship has 
a picnic at Greenside Park, do not 
wander off by yourself to a woodsy 
glen — it could mean black tragedy. 
And having your date with you in 
that remote spot does not insure 
safety. 

Have you ever taken a bus trip, 
struck up an acquaintance with 
someone on the bus, and during a 
fifteen-minute stop, been invited to 
have a coke at a quiet place on a 
side street? Crime experts give one 
word of advice: Don't! You may 
never get back on the bus. Any 
invitation from a stranger— to eat, 
to go strolling, to investigate a li- 
brary, or to feed the pigeons — is a 
hazard. 

Another pet approach of crimi- 
nals is the opener, "May I sit at 
your table?" What to do? Finish 
your refreshments as soon as possi- 
ble. With no conversation, get up 
quickly, depart as quickly. 

You would never pick up a hitch- 
hiker? never stop to see what is 
wrong with the "poor old lady in 
the ditch"? Good! There have been 
cases where the poor old lady 
turned out to be a thug with a gun. 
(Of course the thug was dressed in 
women's clothes, and was wearing 
a white wig!) 

Improper suggestions or advanc- 
es, indecent remarks, a display of 
any pornographic booklet from 
anyone, should be reported at once 
— to parents, teachers, or youth 
counselor. You may be thought a 
square? Just the opposite! You may 
save your life and the lives of oth- 
ers as well. 

Of course Christian girls and fel- 
lows should be "kind," "friendly," 
"helpful," "democratic." But where 
danger lurks, being kind, friendly, 
helpful and democratic just do not 
apply! • 




Hoiomalic Gas Water 
Heater #3 
Will supply all the hot water needed 
for Baptistries. Church Kitchens, 
Rest Rooms. Heats 450 GPH. 20° 
rise in temperature. Write for free 
folders on water heaters, Fiberglass 
Baptistries, spires and crosses. Also 
Electric Water Heaters. 

LITTLE GIANT MFG. CO. 

907 7th Street, Orange, Texas 



iOUTHEASTERN EQUIPMENT CO. 



Chain and tablet in com- 
plete range of sues for every 
Church need. Steel and wood 
folding chain, folding ban- 
quet tablet, ipeakera' itandi. 
Alio office desks and 
chairs. Write for in for- 



WASTRIES- SPIRES I 

• Unit-Molded 
Fiberglass > ^\\ 

• Accessories ^IbN,—* 





„ Box 672 Oept. J5, Muscatine, Iowa 

Does Your Church 

Need Money? 

Sell beautiful hand woven nylon 
handbags. No money invested. 
Write for free fund raising plan. 

Eugene D. Roberts 
Hand Woven Handbags 
1554 N. Concord Rd. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 37421 



a Free 
dollar box 
of candy 
worth $ 1200 7 



How accepting a free box of Mason Candy netted 

Mrs. Koubek's Band Parents group $1200 profit in just seventeen days! 




As chairman of the drive to raise money 
for needed band equipment, Mrs. Arthur 
Koubek of Lyons, Illinois, was faced with 
the problem: how to raise funds quickly, 
without risk or investment. She found the 
solution in the Mason representative's of- 
fer of a free box of candy. When the Mason 
man delivered it, he explained Mason's 
famous protected fund-raising plan. 

Mason supplies your group— complete- 
ly without risk or investment — a choice 
of beautifully boxed, top-quality Mason 
Candies. At no charge, each box has an 
attractively printed band, bearing your 
organization's name, picture, and slogan. 
Mason even pre-pays shipping charges. 
Your group makes a big NET PROFIT of 
66%% (40C on every dollar box that costs 
you only 60C) and you pay nothing till 
after your drive is over. Anything remain- 
ing unsold can be returned for full credit I 
No risk, no investment — you pay only af- 
ter you have collected your profit! Many 



community, school and religious groups 
have raised from $300 to $2500 in four 
to twenty days. So can you. 

For details and your 'ree box of Mason 
Candy: fill in coupon below. 



MRS. PAT N" 
BOX 549. M 


ASON, DEPT 723 
NEOLA. N. Y. 


. MASON. 


GENTLEMEN: PLEASE SEND f» 
OUT OBLIGATION, INFORMATION 
FUND RAISING PLAN. 


E. WITH- 
ON YOUR 


| NAME 


AGF Mfunrfp 


r2l) 


1 ORGANIZATION 




' ADDRESS 






| CITY 






1 HOW MANY 


MEMBERS 












— ~ 





23 



'athway — 
per year 



FOR SALE: GOSPEL TENTS. Spe- 
cial prices to ministers. For com- 
plete information write VALDOS- 
TA TENT AND AWNING CO., 
Box 248, Valdoita, Georgia. Day 
Phone: CHerry 2-0730. Night 
Phone: CHerry 2-5118. 



CHOIR-PULPIT 

HANGINGS 
ALTAR BRASS WARE 

Catalog on request 



J^ 



WARD CO. 
London. Ohio 



BIBLES and BOOKS 

Repaired and Rebound 
Reasonably 

write for free information to: 

McKINLEY BINDING SERVICE 

206 Rock Cut Road 

Forest Park, Georgia 30050 



5000 



CHRISTIAN 
WORKERS 



WANTED 



. . . to sell Bibles, good books, Scripture 
Greeting Cards, Stationery, Napkins, Scrip- 
ture Novelties. Liberal profits. Send for 
free catalog and price list. 
GEORGE W. NOBLE, The Christian Co. 
Dept L, Pontiac Bldg., Chicago 5, 111. 



NEW! 

Golden PRAYING HANDS PEN 

FUND RAISING 

PROGRAM 

• NO Risk! 
• NO Investment! 

55c PROFIT on each 
$1-00 S aie! 

An "easy to sell" item, that everyone can use! 
Sent to you. postpaid — with no investment on 
your part. Pay only after sold ! Full credit for 
unsold items ! Have 10 members sell 25 items, 
and your organization makes $137.50! — 25 
members — $343.75! 

A completely packaged plan ! 



COLLINGWOOD 

FUND-RAISING 

Dept. LP 44 Warren Street, 
Providence, Rhode Island 02901 




MMM I 



Nebraska Youth Camp 



Nebraska held its first state 
youth camp in 1963 with thirty-one 
campers. Steady progress in this 
field has been made under the 
leadership of our state youth di- 
rector, George C. Davis. Despite the 
fact that Brother Davis has been 
pastoring a church and working in 
an office part time, he has done a 
good job. For this we are grateful. 

Our 1966 camp was held at the 
Polk Bible Camp, near Polk, Ne- 
braska, about ninety miles north- 
west of Lincoln. The number of 
campers this year was sixty-eight. 
Shown in the picture here are the 
campers and workers — a total of 
ninety-seven. 

This camp was under the super- 
vision of S. G. Brown, Omaha 



Christiansburg, Virginia 
Youth Activities 




(Parkway) pastor. Brother Brown 
and his fine staff, are to be com- 
mended for the wonderful work 
they have done. 

Brother Brown is standing on the 
extreme right in the picture. Next 
to him is Charles Sustar, Kansas 
state director, who was the night 
speaker. It was a real pleasure to 
have this fine young man and his 
wife in our camp. Each year wher- 
ever I am working, I always look 
forward to youth camp. 

Please pray for Nebraska and its 
growth. Our newest church, Ash- 
land Park, Omaha, R. B. Ingersoll 
pastor, had eighteen campers. This 
was second only to Omaha, Park- 
way. 

—W. L. Edgar, overseer 



Praise goes to the Young 
Peoples Endeavor and the Lamp- 
lighters at the Auburn Church of 
God in Christiansburg, Virginia, for 
the fine work they have done in 
raising money to remodel the front 
of the church with brick. New 
double doors, an awning over the 
porch, and aluminum awning win- 
dows have been added. Shrubbery 
has been set out on each side of 
the porch. The total amount of 
coupons raised was 1,938,349. 

Mrs. Katheren Estes was selected 
"YPE President of the Year" in the 
State of Virginia. She has held 
this office in our local church for 
four and one-half years. Our YPE 
has a Silver Shield rating. These 
accomplishments, and many more 
which space will not permit to 
mention, have been possible be- 
cause of God's blessings upon us. 
—Elbert L. Cox, pastor 



24 



Pen Ms 



WOLFE BROS. & CO. 

PINEY FLATS, TENN 



Mary Ellen Bozeman (14) 

P.O. Box 32 

Loxley, Alabama 36551 

PFC Terry L. McDaniel 2214989 (19) 
H&S Co. 5th Serv. B.N. 5th Mar. Dir. 
Camp Pendleton, California 92055 

Sue C. Bowers (16) 

Haws Hill Road 

Franklin, West Virginia 26807 

Eugenia Mae Starcher (14) 
143 Locust Avenue 
Spencer, West Virginia 25276 

Shirley Sanders (14) 
1104 East Avenue B 
Sweetwater, Texas 

Alice Jenkins (14) 
Route 6, Box 13 
Roanoke, Virginia 



For that TRIP OF A LIFETIMl 

WHEATON 
TOURS 



TO... -"*- Experienced, tour planning, 

1. Spring Holy Land Retails handled by tour 

2. Summer Holy Land leader lectures en route, 
3 Europe outstanding sights, places 

4. South America of special interest to 

5. Scenic America Christians, fine fellowship, 

6. Fall Holy Land new friends, annual tour 
reunion, happy memories 
for a lifetime. 





Write for free estimate. 



^IUL 



ML High qualit 


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16 02 


HI packages a 


id bulk. Just 


try ou 


W tasty pecan 


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W *Sr customers o 


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WRITE NOW: H. M. THAMES PECAN CO. 
P. O. Box IS88. Mobile. Ala. 




If you have a relative or friend 
in the armed services in Europe 
and should like for him to be con- 
tacted by the Church of God, send 
his name and address to the fol- 
lowing address: 




$60.00 CASH every time 10 members of your 
group each sell 12 cans of Kitchen-Fresh Choc- 
olettes or Coconettes at $1.00 per can. 
100% PROFIT! The one-lb. size canisters cost 
your group only 50c each— sell for $1.00! 
NO INVESTMENT! NOT EVEN lc! Order 120 
today. Take up to 30 days to send 
payment. Give your name, title, phone number 
and complete address, the name, address, etc. 
of 2nd officer, name of group, quantity of each 
desired, and nearest Freight office (no parcel 
post). Extras sent FREE to cover shipping cost 
of Rockies. OFFER OPEN TO GROUPS 
ONLY! WRITE TODAY! 



SPSS 

MONEY BACK 
G UARANT EE 

FREE 

COLOR CWMOfiS 



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NO-" " 

GUARANTEED FOR LIFE I 

RUSH COUPON TODAYI 



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ACCORDION CORPORATION 
OF AMERICA, Dept LP 106 

5535 W Belmont »ve., Chicago. III. 60641 




OF AMERICA, Deot. LP 106 

5535W.Belmont»ve., Chicago, 111.60641 

Send KREE COLOR CATALOGS. LOW 
DISCOUNT PRICE LIST. 



25 




SING LP 6000 
Max Morris at the 
Piano 




SRLP 5998 Big 
Chief's Golden 
Stairs Choir 




SING LP 9051 How 
Green Is Your Val 
Gary McSpadden 





SING LP 458 Rose 
Covered Lane — Blue 
Ridge Quartet 




Sing LP 302 Music 
for Meditation — 
David Reece 




SRLP 6013 Garden 
of Melody— Speer 
Family 




SRLP 6000 Singing 
Time in Dixie — 
Statesmen Quartet 
STATES'" '■ AS 

WOOD 





SING LP 3212 Sing 
the Gospel — 
The LeFevres 



m 



BAGWELL 

SING LP 4042 
Wendy Bagwell and 
the Sunlighters 




SING LP 905 
TV Request — 
Harvesters Quartet 




SING LP 2081 The 
Ministers — Forward 
in Faith Trio 



a 



I 



Jtt&s 



SRLP 5987 

The Lee College 

Choir 





SRLP 5995 At Home 
With the Blackwood 
Brothers 




SING LP 558 The 
Gospel Singing 



SING LP 3005 
Gospel Rhythm — 
Prophets Quartet 




SING LP 403 
Sing Harmony — 
Johnson Sisters 

GOSS ■ 




SING LP 7002 The 
Big Gospel Sound — 
Goss Brothers 

ME OAK RIDGE BOYSZZ 



w 



2Ti mi 

SRLP 6020 Sing for 
You— Oak Ridge 
Boys 




SRLP 6015 From the 
Land of the Sky — 
The Kingsmen 



XIV 



4 



When you join the PATHWAY 
RECORD CLUB and agree to 
purchase six additional records 
within the period of one year 



FOR ONLY 



t 



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Pathv 



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Blackwood Brothers, Statesmen, LeFevres, Specr Family, Wills Family, 
Oak Ridge Quartet, Blue Ridge Quartet, Rebels, Harvesters, Prophets, 
Goss Brothers, Florida Boys, Wcatherford Quartet, plus scores of 
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you get to join Pathway Record Club. 

You will receive a copy of "Record Guide" each month indicat- 
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HOW THE CLUB OPERATES 

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These selections are described in the "Record Guide" which you 
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YOUNG PEOPLES 



By Donald S. Aultman, 
National Director 



JULY YPE ATTENDANCE: 

Goldsboro (Clingman Street), 

North Carolina .... 208 

Middletown (Clayton Street), 

Ohio 191 

Jacksonville (Springfield), 

Florida .... ... _ .... 177 

Jacksonville (Garden City), 

Florida .... 174 

Atlanta (Hemphill), Georgia ... 173 
Lakeland (Lake Wire), Florida 172 
Wyandotte, Michigan .... .... .... 164 

Cincinnati (Central Parkway), 

Ohio 154 

Gastonia (Ranlo), 

North Carolina ... .___ .... .... 152 

Tampa (Buffalo Avenue), 

Florida 146 

Pulaski, Virginia .... .... .... 140 

Hamilton (Princeton Pike), 

Ohio 139 

Avon Park, Florida ... 129 

Jackson (Bailey Avenue), 

Mississippi .... 128 

Canton (Temple), Ohio 120 

Morganton, North Carolina .... 116 

Lorain, Ohio .... .... .... ... . ... _ .... 112 

Pompano Beach, Florida .... .... 110 

Arcadia, Florida .... .... 100 

Thorn, Mississippi .... .... .... .... 98 

Lexington, North Carolina .... 93 

Rossville, Georgia 93 

Johnson City, Tennessee .... .... 92 

Daytona Beach (McLeod Street), 

Florida 91 

South Lebanon, Ohio .... _.. 86 
Baton Rouge (Acadian Through- 
way), Louisiana _.. 85 



Chattanooga (East), 

Tennessee — . 85 

Florence, South Carolina .... 85 

Addison, Alabama .. . ... . 83 

Conway (North), South 

Carolina ... .. 83 

Princeton, West Virginia .... .... 83 

Amarillo (West Side), Texas .... 81 

Pacoima (San Fernando Valley), 

California ... .... .... .„.. ... . _.. 81 

Thomaston, Georgia .... .... .... 79 

Dayton, Tennessee .... ... 78 

Royal Oak, Michigan .... .... .... 78 

Logan, West Virginia .... .... .... 77 

Elyria, Ohio 75 

Columbus (Frebis Avenue), 

Ohio .. 74 

Vanceburg, Kentucky .. 74 

Loxley, Alabama .. 73 

Lawrenceville (8th and Collins), 

Illinois .... .... ... .. 71 

Callahan, Florida ... .... .... .... 70 

Hurst, Texas .... 70 

Jackson (Crest Park), 

Mississippi .... .... 70 

Jackson (Leavell Woods), 

Mississippi ... 70 

Jacksonville (Southside Estates), 

Florida ... .... .... 70 

Sanford, Florida 70 

West Columbia, South 

Carolina ... 69 

Ecorse (Westside), Michigan .... 68 
Tampa (Temple Terrace), 

Florida ... .... .... .... 68 

West Monroe, Louisiana .... .... 68 

Dalton, Georgia .... 66 

Cahokia, Illinois .... .... .... .... 65 

North, South Carolina .... ._. 64 

Lawton (Ninth and Lee), 

Oklahoma .... .... 61 

Flint (Kearsley Park), 

Michigan ... .... 60 

Salem, Virginia .... .... .... ____ 60 

Clarks Chapel, Texas 59 

Clover, South Carolina .... ... 59 

Monroe (Fourth Street), 

Michigan .... .... 59 

Corbin (Center Street), 

Kentucky .... 56 

East Point, Georgia .... .... .... 55 

Saraland, Alabama .... 55 

Sale Creek, Tennessee .... .... 54 

Charlottesville, Virginia .... .... 53 

Peoria, Illinois .... .... .... .... .... 52 

Circleville, Ohio .... 51 

Cleveland (Detroit Avenue), 

Ohio ____ ... .... .... .... 50 

Kellysville, West Virginia .... 50 



j¥¥¥¥¥\lW\lJ^ 



TWO MEN BUILT A WALL 

Two men lived in houses nestled 

side by side 
They never spoke, no not a word, 

but from each other shied. 
They built a wall between them 

many, many years ago 
It was not seen by others but the 

two knew it was so. 

They could have planted flowers 

on their common border line 
But each was feared his flowers 

toward the other side might 

climb. 
And so there was an empty space 

where flowers could have 

grown 
And in each spring's own spading 

time, no flower seeds were 

sown. 

But years rolled by, and not just 

rolled, but fastly, fastly flew, 
Now on the hill two miles away — 

side by side lie two. 
The roses on the one man's grave 

have rambled to the other, 
The ivy from the other has too 

blanketed his brother. 

It is very sad how unseen walls 

have separated men 
But roses have no eyes for lines, no 

hearts to hate a friend. 
They spread their scent throughout 

the air, though ugly be their 

bower, 
Oh, that simple men were schooled 

and as wise as just a flower. 

— Violetta Gammon 

pmkmkMkMkMkMk 




ST8M THS SVIL II D 8 



in literature by 

stimulating interest in good books. 

Help win the battle for the 

minds and hearts of youth by 

creating a market for wholesome 

Christian literature. 

You can start now by joining the 

I *i ill vwi iv I >< >< >1< CIi il 

Our club helps drive out bad books 
by making good books available 
monthly . . . and you 
get a BONUS book with each 
4 that you receive. 

Add your strength to our efforts today. Simply fill out the application form and mail today. 



HOW THE CLUB OPERATES 

Each month the Pathway Book Club reviewers will make a se- 
lection for each division from the very best Christian books 
available, A copy of the Book Path containing reviews of these 
selections will be sent to each member. The member will 
decide whether or not he desires the book for his division. 
If so, he does NOTHING, it will come automatically. If he 
does NOT want the selection, he simply mails a properly 
check rejection slip which is included in each Book Path. 



CHOOSE YOUR DIVISION 

The Pathway Book Club offers books in three separate and 
distinct divisions: 

1. THE MINISTERIAL DIVISION offers sermonic helps and 
study books for ministers and Bible students. 

2. THE REGULAR DIVISION offers Christian fiction, bio- 
graphical, and devotional books for laymen, teen-agers, and 
adults. 

3. THE JUNIOR DIVISION offers inexpensive Christian books 
for children under 12 years of age. 





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1 



REGULAR A. UNDER WHOSE WINGS 
Zenobia Bird. (Retail price, $2.50) B. NO 
MORE A STRANGER bv Orville Steggerda. 
(Retail price, $2.50) C. BLAZE STAR bv Paul 
Hutchens. (Retail price, $2.95) D. THROUGH 
WINDING WAYS by Zenobia Bird. (Retail 
price. $2.00) E. ECLIPSE bv Paul Hutchens. 
(Retail price. $2.95) F. MYSTERY OF THE 
MARSH bv Paul Hutchens. (Retail price, 
$2.95) G. UPRIGHT LOVE bv Phyllis Speshock. 
(Retail price, $2.95) H. THE QUEST by Bauer. 
(Retail price, $2.50) 

MINISTERIAL I. PREACHING FROM ECCLE- 
SIASTES bv G. Averv Lee. (Retail price, $2.75) 
J. AND JESUS IN THE MIDST by Herman 
Hoeksema. (Retail price, $1.50) K. EFFECTIVE 
PUBLIC PRAYER by Robert L. Williams 
(Retail price. $2.95) L. MESSIANIC PROPHECY 
IN THE OLD TESTAMENT bv Aaron J. Klig 
man. (Retail price. $2.95) M. KINGS ON 
PARADE bv Lee Roberson. (Retail price, $1.50) 
N. OPERATION EVANGELISM by Horace F. 
Dean. (Retail price. $2.95) O. MOSES' MIGHTY 
MEN bv H. Hobbs. (Retail price, $2.50) P. YOU 
AND THE HOLY SPIRIT by Oglesby. (Reta 
price, $1.50) 

JUNIOR Q. MAN-EATERS AND MASAI 
SPEARS bv Charles Ludwig. (Retail price, 
$1.25) R. WITHOUT A SWORD by Margaret 
Randolph Cate. (Retail price. $2.25) S. STORY 
OF MARTIN LUTHER by Marion Shoeland. 
(Retail price, $1.25) T. ROGUE ELEPHANT 
bv Charles Ludwig. (Retail price, $1.25) U. 
THE BOY FROM NORTHFIELD by Harn 
Albus. (Retail price, $1.25) V. MAN-EATERJ 
DON'T LAUGH bv Charles Ludwig. (Retail 
price, $1.25) W. KEN. SOUTH OF THE BOR- 
DER bv Basil Miller. (Retail price, $1.00) 
X. MAN-EATERS CLAW by Charles Ludwig. 
(Retail price, $1.25) 



Creatures 



We want something; so we pretend to purchase it 
for the children. 

We feel bad about something we did or did not do 
and so we take our frustrations out on our children, 
other people, or the church. 

We speak of the power of pictures which leave such 
deep impressions because they combine the ear and 
eye gate for learning. Then we seek to persuade 
ourselves that savagery, killing, and immodesty on the 
television has no harmful effect on our children. 

We drive an expensive "heavier" car because, "we 
travel a great deal and cannot stand the vibrations." 
But after we pull the car into the garage, we climb 
on a luxurious vibrating chair or mattress. 

We are desirous of buying a new appliance or car. 
In order to justify the purchase, we seek to find some 
flaw to get rid of our present model. But when we 
sell the old model, we imply that it is in perfect 
shape. 

We speak of the sin of taking the Bible and prayer 
out of our public schools but seldom take our Bibles 
to church and easily skip prayer meeting. 

We wax eloquent on the corruption of Communism 
because, we say, it compels people to cease attending 
church, reading the Bible, and giving open testimony 
for Christ. But what the Communists do by force, we 
do by choice. 

We are quick to tell people that we belong to the 
church. But when there is work to do, we say, ''Let 
them do it." Or when something goes wrong, we say, 
"They are responsible." We even blame "the church" 
for not taking a stand or failing in its task. But who 
is the church? 

We deplore juvenile delinquency and lawlessness in 
our society. Then we take our children into our cars 
and exceed the speed limit; we do not stop at stop 
signs. At the dinner table we boast how we were 
caught for breaking the law but cleverly escaped a 
fine. 

Yes, we are strange creatures — and contradictory! • 
— John M. Drescher 



Published monthly at the Church of God Publishing House. 
rid, Tenn. All materials intended for publication in The 
LIGHTED PATHWAY should be addressed to Clyne W. Buxton. 
Editor. All inquiries concerning subscriptions should be addressed 
to Bookkeeping Department, Church of God Publishing House. 
Cleveland, Tennessee. 

ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER AT 
POST OFFICE. CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 
Postmaster send Form 3579 to LIGHTED PATHWAY. P. O. Box 
880. Cleveland. Tennessee 37311. 



LIGHTED 



Pathway 



NOVEMBER, 1966 
Vol. 37, No. 1 1 



Editorial 

My Thanksgiving Log 

Sand Writing 

It Is Not Death to Die! 

She Fought for 
Thanksgiving Day 

Pioneers for Christ 
Who Is Playing Church? 

Sunset in Amazonas 

Not Good Enough 

Youth Camps 

Storm 

When the Christian Fears 

Do the Task Now 

Variety 

Young People's Endeavor 

Poetry 
Cover 



STAFF 

Clyne W. Buxton 

Lewis J. Willis 

Chloe Stewart 

Kathy Woodard 

H. Bernard Dixon 

E. C. Thomas 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Donald S. Aultman 

Margie M. Kelley 

Denzell Teague 

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS 

Bobbie May Lauster 

Margaret Gaines 

L. E. Heil 

Ruth Crawford 

Martha Ann Smith 

NATIONAL YOUTH BOARD 

L. W. Mclntyre 
Cecil R. Guiles 
Paul L Walker 

SUBSCRIPTION RATE 

Single Subscription, 

per year 

Rolls of 15 

Single copy 



Clyne W. Buxton 
Margie M. Kelley 
William E. Winters 
Raymond L. Cox 



8 Enola Chamber 



Mrs. William D. Wooten 
Hugh Don Johnson 
James E. Adams 
C. Milton Parsons 
Charles Van Ness 
William J. Krutza 
Clare Miseles 

Donald S. Aultman 
Religious News 



Editor 

Editor in Chief 

Artist 

Research 

Circulation Director 

Publisher 



Paul F. Henson 
Avis Swiger 



France 
Jordan 
Japan 
Brazil 
China 



Thomas Grassano 
Haskel C. Jenkins 




EDITORIAL 

By Clyne W. Buxton 




A RECENT NEWSPAPER article stated that the 
// average American family owes nine hundred 
_/\l dollars, excluding personal loans and charge 
accounts. The writer hastened to add, however, that 
the families can afford the debts. We are not finan- 
cially overloaded, he assured us. That same paper 
carried an article stating that more and more jobs 
are being created, causing our unemployment figures 
to drop to a new low. How thankful America ought 
to be for God's multitudinous and totally unmerited 
blessings! We are the richest nation on the earth, and 
our great prosperity has lasted for years. Though all of 
us may not agree with the newspaperman when he 
states that we are not overloaded, for we may feel that 
we know more about that subject than he does (!), we | 
should be thankful for God's financial blessings. 

November is Thanksgiving month, for each year the 
President proclaims that in this month a particular 
day be set aside for Americans to thank God for His 
blessings. If we are so enveloped with our blessings 
that we are unaware of them, we ought to pray that 
God will endow us with a spirit of thankfulness. 
Shakespeare said : 

O Lord! that lends me life, 

Lend me a heart replete with thankfulness. 

Ever since our Pilgrim Fathers first met together 
for a time of fellowship with each other and for a 
time of thankfulness to the Lord for His blessings, 
Americans have celebrated such times at intervals. 
However, Thanksgiving became a nationwide obser- 
vance in 1864 when President Lincoln made the first 
presidential proclamation concerning the day. 

Thanksgiving Day should be a time when families 
and friends come together. It should be a time when 
the laborer lays aside his tools and relaxes with his 
family. Yet, it should be more. Observance of the day 
should go beyond a big dinner, a ball game, or a time 
of sight-seeing. We should show God how thankful 
we are by speaking of Him, reading His Word, and 
spending some time in a prayer of thanksgiving. Too, 
whether we play or relax during the day, we can 
exemplify thankfulness by our attitude. 

When Nehemiah and those with him began to re- 
build the wall of Jerusalem, they came against 
staggering difficulties. Yet, the builders persevered, 
not even removing their clothes or weapons to sleep. 
When they finally finished the walls and the people 
were settled in their homes, they had a day of thanks- 



giving. The eighth chapter of Nehemiah relates what 
took place on that thanksgiving day. Ezra, the scribe, 
stood at a pulpit and read the Law from early morning 
to midday; and both the men and the women stood 
listening attentively, the Bible is careful to tell us. 
Nehemiah says that at noon he, himself, dismissed 
the people, telling them, "Go your way, eat the fat, 
and drink the sweet, and send portions unto them for 
whom nothing is prepared: for this day is holy unto 
our Lord: neither be ye sorry; for the joy of the Lord 
is your strength" (Nehemiah 8:10). Note that the 
Israelites gave to the needy on a thanksgiving day. 
Ann Robinson, the poet, said: 

On a Thanksgiving Day 

If you want a good time, 
Then give something away. 

Thanksgiving necessarily involves God. "The very 
fact that a man is thankful implies Someone to be 
thankful to," said Eliot Porter. A devoted follower of 
God is thankful throughout the year, yet en Thanks- 
giving Day the Christian focuses on thankfulness. 

John Wildman tells of a Christian woman in a 
southern town whose husband died rather suddenly. 
His funeral was scheduled at ten in the morning on 
Thanksgiving Day. The church had planned a Sun- 
rise Service before the death occurred, so they went 
ahead with it. The early morning congregation was 
surprised to see present the wife of the deceased, for 
her husband's funeral was to be conducted in that 
same sanctuary just a few hours later. 

Various members of the congregation gave testi- 
monies of thanksgiving. Finally, the widow stood and 
in measured tones said: "A few hours from now we 
will meet in this same auditorium for my husband's 
funeral. You are probably wondering how. under 
such circumstances, that I can come to this Thanks- 
giving service and take part in it. But I am glad to be 
here today and offer my gratitude to the Lord for 
His abundant grace. I want to say of the Lord Jesus 
Christ in this hour — He is adequate." This is a great 
testimony of thankfulness to Christ for His closeness 
during bereavement. 

As we follow God, giving thanks to Him in times of 
sorrow and in times of joy. He will dwell with us. 
and will give us His peace. Paul's admonition to the 
church at Colosse is applicable to us today: "And let 
the peace of God rule in your hearts, to the which 
also ye are called in one body; and be ye thankful" 
(Colossians 3:15). • 



3 



Praise God from ivhom all blessings flow; 
Praise Him, all creatures here below; 
Praise Him above, ye heav'nly host; 
Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. 



MY THAHKSBIVIKS 
LOB 




BY MARGIE M. KELLEY 



Thanksgiving Day. Even though thankfulness 
should flow from our lives each day, the special 
day is an event looked forward to by most of us. V 
Thanks be to God for our American Thanksgiv- 
ing Day which reminds us of a group of people 
who found time to be thankful and passed the 
tradition on to us. ' 

Home. "Be it ever so humble, there's no place 
like home." When the business world gets weary 
and the cold winds blow, how refreshing to re- 
turn to the quietness and warmth of home. The 
bark of the dog to welcome us, the aroma of 
good food, and the glance of someone loved all 
help to make us thankful for a good home. 

America. How great to have been born an Ameri- 
can. This land of fertile fields, lovely cities, and N 
manifold opportunities for all is indeed an at- 
tractive homeland. Thank God I am an Ameri- 
can. 

Neighbors. If only to be able to borrow a cup of G 
sugar, how encouraging a neighbor can be. A 
good neighbor makes life more worthwhile. 
Emerson once said, "The ornaments of our house 
are the friends that frequent it." 



- Kindness. Coleridge said, "The happiness of life 
is made up of minute fractions — the little soon- 
forgotten charities of a kiss or smile, a kind 
look, a heartfelt compliment, and the countless 
infinitesimals of pleasurable and genial feeling." 

Salvation. For the saving grace of Christ I am 
truly thankful. Salvation has met the deepest 
need of my life, has brought peace, joy, and 
unending love. 

- Guidance. To have had splendid guidance by 
parents, teachers, and ministers is an unsur- 
passed blessing. 

Integrity. Even though integrity may have been 
missing on numerous occasions, it is good to 
know the virtue still exists. Thanks be to God for 
men and women who are honest and let integrity 
shine forth from their lives. 

Victory. "But thanks be to God, which giveth us 
the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ" (1 
Corinthians 15:57). 

Influence. "I would be true, for there are those 
who trust me; 

I would be pure, for there are those who care; 
I would be strong, for there is much to suffer; 
I would be brave, for there is much to dare. 
I would be friend of all — the foe, the friendless; 
I would be giving, and forget the gift, 
I would be humble, for I know my weakness; 
I would look up, and laugh, and love, and lift." 
— Howard A. Walter 

Nourishment. We are told that half the world's 
population goes to bed hungry each night. Good 
food is a blessing most of us take for granted. 
Thanks to our Creator for nourishing food. 

Godliness. The Scriptures tell us that righteous- 
ness exalteth a nation. Even though America's 
godliness has grown dim, it is good to contem- 
plate on Christianity's influence yet apparent 
in our nation. • 



•'Jesus stooped down, and with his finger wrote on the 
ground, as though he heard them not" (John 8:6). 




Sand Minting 



BY WILLIAM E. WINTERS 



The Reverend William E. Winters 

r gifted writer and will be contributing, 

regularly to the "Lighted Pathway." He 

pastors the Philadelphia Road Church of 

God, Dayton, Ohio. Being a lucid, effective 

speaker, he often is invited to preach 

to congregations outside his pastorate. 




m. 



ANY BOOKS HAVE been written about Jesus; 
however. He never wrote a book or a letter. The 
Scripture text tells us that Jesus was writing 
on the ground. Jesus was often seen talking with His 
disciples, giving admonition and instruction; He 
preached many sermons. But few times did anyone 
ever see Him writing anything. But before others 
could see it and before historians could copy it, His 
writing was gone. His writing was on the ground and 
God washed Mother Nature's sandy slate with the 
rain and wiped it dry with the wind. Jesus' writing 
was forever erased. 

When Almighty God wants permanent records and 
lasting laws, He does not write in the sand. God wrote 
His first written law with His finger in tablets of 
stone. When God wrote the sins of Judah, He wrote 
with a pen of iron which had a diamond point. This 
iron-diamond-pointed pen would never wear out and 
would write legibly and permanently. No w'nd or 
rain would ever wash away this kind of writing. 

Note that when Jesus wrote, He wrote in the sand. 



It is best to write some things in the sand. Christians 
would do well to practice sand writing. Write the 
faults of others in the sand. Write your own failures 
in the sand. Write your catalog of criticism in the 
sand. Write your agendas of accusation in the sand. 
Write all your hurts and bitterness in the sands of 
forgetfulness. Sand writings are easy to forget; for. 
while we are busy writing, Mother Nature is busy 
erasing the sandy slate. 

One may write his name in the ocean sand, but 
Mother Nature with her continuous waves will erase 
the sandy slate. This is sand writing. 

Wendel Holmes says, "Memory is a crazy witch: she 
treasures bits of rags and straw and throws her 
jewels out the window." We must not let our memory 
do this to us; we must forget the rags and straw 
and cherish the jewels. 

Our Prayer Should Ever Be: "Lord help me to 
write those things I ought to remember in the 'ledger 
of memory' and to write the things I ought to forget 
in Mother Nature's sandy tablet." • 



IT IS NOT 
DEATH TO 

DIE! 



BY RAYMOND L. COX 




Entrance to Catacomb 

of St. Sebastian, Rome, 

ancient underground 

cemetery 

of Christians 



Shelf tombs hewn into 

the sides of the corridor \ 

were for Christian 

who did not die a. 

martyrs. Catacomb 

of St. Sebastian 




TOURISTS FLOCK to a par- 
ticular museum in Rome to 
behold one of its feature 
attractions, an arrangement of two 
rows of ancient tombstones placed 
opposite each other. Guides conduct 
the visitors down the lane between 
the exhibition and translate the 
Latin inscriptions. One memorial 
stone reads, "Farewell, farewell, 
farewell forever." Another epitaph 
stoically announces, "I was not, I 
became, I am not, and I care not." 
The tombstone of a child com- 
plains, "I, Procope, lift up my 
hands against the cruel god who 
snatched me away, being innocent." 
Another proclaims hopelessly, "Af- 
ter death, no reviving; after the 
grave, no meeting." Additional de- 
spondent inscriptions greet the 
tourist before he reaches the end 
of the row on that side. 

But when the visitor turns and 
surveys the epitaphs on the oppo- 
site row the melancholy mood sud- 
denly brightens. Inscriptions like 
these appear: "He sleeps, but 
lives!" "Weep not, my child, death 
is not eternal." "He went to God." 
"Alexander is not dead, but lives 
above the stars." 

These contradictory epitaphs 
stand close together in space but 
they range worlds apart in senti- 
ment. What is responsible for the 
amazing variances of attitude? 
How can we reconcile this proxim- 
ity of an epitaph like "After 
death, no reviving" to an inscrip- 
tion encouraging, "Weep not, death 
is not eternal"? 

Whence came these particular 
tombstones? 

The ancient epitaphs displayed in 
this Roman museum represent arti- 
facts from the catacombs. They 
came from two different ceme- 
teries, one pagan, the other Chris- 
tian. The hopelessness on the one 
hand and confidence on the other 
reflect the different answers 
heathenism and Christianity offer 
to a question as old as death yet 
as new as the most recent grave. 
"If a man die, shall he live again?" 
(Job 14:14). Paganism is pessimis- 
tic, but Christianity knows the an- 
swer for sure since "our Saviour 




Tourists down in the catacombs of St. 
Sebastian, Home 




Jesus Christ . . . hath abolished 
death, and hath brought life and 
immortality to light through the 
gospel" (2 Timothy 1:10). 

Ever since the first Easter 
dawned with a reveille of light, 
Christians have been able to chorus, 
"It is not death to die!" This is not 
an evangelistic exaggeration but a 
blessed fact. As discerning a man 
as the Apostle Paul was, he actually 
preferred death to continued life 
on earth. He declared, "To die is 
gain" (Philippians 1:21). He voiced 
"a desire to depart, and to be with 
Christ; which is far better" (Philip- 
pians 1:23). 

No wonder the enraptured bards 
exult, "There is no death!" 

We see but dimly through the mists 
and vapors 
Amid these earthly damps. 
What are to us but sad funeral 
tapers 
May be heaven's distant lamps. 
There is no death — what seems so is 
transition. 
This life of mortal breath is but 
a suburb of the Life Elysian 
Whose portal men call death. 



Jesus proclaimed, "I am he that 
liveth, and was dead; and, behold, 
I am alive for evermore . . . and 
have the keys of hell and of death" 
(Revelation 1:18). And he also 
said, "Because I live, ye shall live 
also" (John 14:19). "I am the 
resurrection, and the life: he that 
believeth in me, though he were 
dead, yet shall he live: And whoso- 
ever liveth and believeth in me 
shall never die" (John 11:25, 26). 

Jesus Christ has brought life and 
immortality to light through the 
gospel. No longer must the tomb be 
feared as the period at the end of 
the sentence of life. Instead it is 
the conjunction connecting Chris- 
tians with the life to come. Homer 
Rodeheaver wired a bereaved fami- 
ly, "God has made of death but a 
narrow starlit strip between the 
communion of yesterday and the 
reunion of tomorrow." 

That is why martyrs, daubed 
with pitch at the stake, have been 
able to hold out their arms to em- 
brace the flames commencing to 
curl about them! 

During the reign of England's 
"bloody" Queen Mary, two Chris- 
tians were sentenced to burn at 
Stratford-on-Bow. One man was 



lame, the other blind. As the fire 
licked around them the lame man 
tossed away his staff and cried to 
his colleague, "Courage, brother, 
this flame will soon cure us both!" 

It is not death to die! For the 
believer "to die is gain." To depart 
and be at home with the Lord Je- 
sus Christ is "far better." 

But only a Christian can cherish 
such expectation with confidence. 
No sinner dare say, "It is not death 
to die." For the unsaved to die 
seals eternal doom. Physical death 
initiates the unbeliever into the 
second death which is eternal con- 
finement in the "lake which burn- 
etii with fire and brimstone" (Reve- 
lation 21:8). 

A man's life expectancy on earth 
may be rated long, but no one is 
really ready to live until he is 
ready to die; and the only ones 
who are ready to die are believers 
in Christ for whom death has been 
robbed of its sting of sin. For them, 
and for them alone, Jesus promised 
of their day of decease, "To day 
shalt thou be with me in para- 
dise" (Luke 23:43). Of them, and 
of them alone is it blessedly true, 
it is not death to die. • 



li Fug tat 
Fir 

Thanksgiving 
Day 




BY ENOLA CHAMBERLIN 



ARAH HALE LIVED when 
women were not supposed 
to take part in any activity 
outside of the home. But being left 
a penniless widow, she had to pro- 
vide for her five children. She sup- 
ported them by her own efforts, 
even though her friends arid rela- 
tives objected. She taught when 
teaching was strictly a man's job. 
She gave us the much-loved poem 
"Mary Had a Little Lamb." And 
she crusaded for over a score of 
years for a day of thanksgiving. 
It was not that we had not had a 
Thanksgiving Day prior to Mrs. 
Hale's efforts. The Pilgrims had 
started that for us. In 1779 George 
Washington set aside a day for the 
giving of thanks — but that was for 
one year only. If our country was 
to have such a day in future years, 
other presidents would have to issue 
a proclamation declaring it. Some 
presidents did. Some states ob- 



served the day. But there was noth- 
ing permanent, nothing of a na- 
tional character about it. 

Mrs. Hale was deeply religious; 
she thanked God constantly for all 
of her blessings. This was all right 
for her, but she felt that the people 
of the country should all do the 
same and do it concertedly on one 
specified day of each year. So she 
set out to try to bring this about; 
but many years passed before this 
was accomplished. In the mean- 
time this inspired and inspiring 
woman did not sit with folded 
hands. 

When her husband and his sup- 
port were taken from her she 
started making hats for women. 
Business was poor. Besides, the 
sewing on of feathers and bows of 
ribbon did not keep her mind oc- 
cupied. So, with pencil and paper 
at hand, she began to write. 

Her first book, Northward, 
spoke out for a national Thanks- 
giving Day. This brought her to 
the attention of the publisher of 
Ladies Magazine of Boston. Before 
long she became its editor, which 
position she kept after Louis A. 
Godey took it over. It then became 
known as Godey's Ladies Book. 

This book had a national circu- 
lation. Through its pages, Sarah 
Hale expounded the causes which 
were dear to her heart. She found- 
ed the Seamen's Aid Society, and 
the Ladies' Missionary Society of 
Philadelphia. She worked untiring- 
ly to raise money to complete the 
Bunker Hill Memorial. One such 
effort included an American fair 
where handmade quilts, spreads, 
doilies, pickles, and perserves were 
sold. This fair amazingly netted 
thirty thousand dollars for her 
project. 

But through all of this she did 
not forget Thanksgiving Day. To 
her it was a religious symbol which 
must not be allowed to fall into 
disuse. Each year she wrote edi- 
torially, congratulating states 
which had observed the day. She 
wrote letters to governors, con- 
gressmen, and presidents. She 
asked for their support in the cru- 
sade. 
Other things demanded her at- 



tention. She fought for equal edu- 
cation for woman. She insisted that 
women be not barred from any pro- 
fession, and that they be allowed 
to become teachers, nurses, and 
even doctors, if they wanted to. 
That others stormed at her and 
ridiculed her did not ruffle her 
ladylike composure one bit. She let 
such revilement pass over her, as a 
wind passes over a strong tree, and 
went on to other projects. 

With all this work as an editor 
and a crusader, she still found 
time to write two more books. One 
of these was a book of poetry for 
children. But remembering how she 
had had to strive for her own chil- 
dren's welfare, she thought of 
practical things for others. 

Through her efforts, day nurs- 
eries and public playgrounds came 
into existence. Still remembering 
her own struggles, she persuaded 
manufacturers of sewing machines 
to put out a model for the home. 
But through it all, the big dream 
of her life was a nationally ob- 
served Thanksgiving Day. 

With war brewing between the 
states, Mrs. Hale felt that this day 
was needed more than ever. She 
felt that maybe something of na- 
tional significance, since it was also 
of religious significance, would 
have a unifying effect. So, she re- 
doubled her efforts. But the people 
were too caught up in their own 
discord to consider anything which 
they might share in harmony. And 
so the war came. 

Mrs. Hale was deeply saddened. 
She felt the country would need 
everything possible to unite it when 
the struggle was over. So on she 
went with her crusade. 

High with hope, she took her 
plans directly to President Lin- 
coln. The President, on October 3, 
1863, issued a proclamation. This 
set aside the fourth Thursday in 
November as a national holiday, 
a day for Thanksgiving. 

Mrs. Hale lived on to see the 
North and the South once more 
united. She lived to see people from 
all sections of our country celebrat- 
ing and giving thanks on the day 
for which she had campaigned for 
so many years. • 



8 



Who ii ¥ 




BY MRS. WILLIAM D. WOOTEN 



There is a real ministry for the very little layman 
-here's proof! 





0\ O YOU KNOW how to tell that you are saved? 
_/ j This question was asked by a seven-year-old 

^—^ children's church attendant of a neighborhood 
playmate. The look of surprise on the face of the young 
friend revealed the negative answer even before she 
spoke. Young Lynn — this seven-year-old lay member 
of the Church of God — then began to quote to his 
friend the scriptures which he had learned in the 
children's church of the National Church of God: Acts 
16:31; Romans 10:9; Luke 13:3; and 1 John 1:9. In 
witnessing to his young friend, little layman Lynn used 
the method which he had seen demonstrated and 
which he had had the opportunity to participate in 
during a training session in children's church. The 
young lay witness also invited his friend to attend his 
church Bible school. Through the efforts of Lynn and 
his family the playmate did attend the Bible school. 

Lynn has been trained early in life to witness for 
Christ. And, in the weekly training sessions of the 
children's church of his church, he is constantly re- 



minded that there are four things that every Christian 
layman should do— including the little laymen: Pray, 
read the Bible, tell others about Jesus, and come to 
church. 

Notice that Lynn knows scripturally how to tell 
that he is saved. He did not tell his friend that she 
must "feel" saved or that she must just join the 
church. His witness was based soundly on the Word of 
God. 

How many adult lay members in our church could 
answer this question scripturally? Let us go a little 
further! If the lay adults can answer this question, 
how many of them dare to ask it of their daily 
associates and companions? 

Often we think of children's church only as an op- 
portunity to get the "kids" out of the way. We should 
make this a time of planting seeds of salvation in the 
minds of little laymen. 

Who do you think has been playing church? • 




raslor )uiin\tm, picturca 

uith u young Brazilian lad at Me 
•■lunch neat the ton of the >(■ tps 
where the merchants unload thei 
at the " ater'i edge. 



SUNSET IN AMAZONAS 



Pastor Johnson 

?ws the harbor at Manaus 

from his hired canoe. 

Many opportunities 

ifforded to witness during 

one afternoon. 



I WAS STANDING by the old 
river docks alongside the Rio 
Negro River, a tributary to 
the great Amazon, in Manaus, 
Amazonas, Brazil, where the mer- 
chants and farmers were unloading 
their produce. A long flight of 
wooden stairs reached from the 
water's edge to the dock where the 
produce was stacked in huge piles. 
The place was crowded. Boatmen 
were hollering out to each other. 
A carnival-like spirit was in the 
air. 

Men in shabby shorts carried 
large loads of bananas on wooden 
frames strapped on their shoulders. 
One well-fed, young man sat at the 
top of the steps, leaning back 
against the old stone, market wall. 
As these slave-looking burden bear- 
ers passed by with heaped stacks 
of bananas on their backs (some 
of the bananas were as large as 
ears of corn), the man would reach 




out and pluck one or two of the 
finest bananas, peel it, eat a bite 
or two of it, and then cast the re- 
mainder away or throw it at one 
of the young men standing at the 
water's edge. 

Manaus, a city of 250,000 popu- 
lation, located in the heart of the 
jungle one thousand miles up the 
Amazon and accessible only by boat 
or plane, was on the last leg of my 
more-than-15, 000-mile tour of the 
missions fields of Brazil. 

We visited in Rio de Janeiro, with 
its teeming unreached thousands, 
for two days of the trip. Overseer 
Jack Pope was my host and took 
me on a tour of the city. 

While stopping over in one of the 
world's fastest growing cities, Sao 
Paulo, I was convinced that there 
are multitudes in Brazil, yet un- 
reached by the gospel of Jesus 
Christ. 

For more than six weeks I 




traveled with Bill Watson, overseer 
of the Central Region, to many 
far-flung mission stations, church- 
es, and preaching points. Going 
from Goiania, Goias — headquarters 
of the Watson family, Ruth Craw- 
ford (missionary supported by the 
Whitehaven Church of which I pas- 
tor), Millie Crosswhite, and Janet 
Carter — we visited the work and 
saw souls saved, healed, and filled 
with the Spirit of God. 

It was early morning, June 7, 
that I boarded a plane at Goiania, 
left the team of missionaries, and 
headed deep into the jungle-land 
towards Manaus, the old rubber 
plantation of bygone days. There 
I was to spend three memorable 
days viewing the Lord's harvest 
field in one of the remote places of 
the world. One of the citizens re- 
marked that "Manaus is at the 
end of the world." 

It will be hard to forget the trip 
over the vast jungle. After leaving 
Brasilia, the ultramodern capital 
of Brazil, we were five hours in the 
air nonstop on our way to Manaus. 
Almost four of those five hours 
were spent over nothing but vast 
primeval junele-land. We saw only 
five or six little huts during that 
four-hour flight. The landscape be- 
low turned a dark green, with the 
only breaks being those of the 
many streams which looked like 
numerous veins feeding a much 
larger unseen channel. Beautiful 
rainbows decorated the expansion 
below us. 

In this part of the world few 
white men have ventured. And 
there are yet vast territories un- 
mapped. If a man should get lost 
in this jungle-hell, it is doubtful 
that he would ever be found by an 
army of men in a lifetime. And 
yet as my eyes searched for 
civilized objects below, I knew that 
there were thousands of human 
beings — Indian tribes, souls for 
whom the Saviour died— mingling 
in this jungle area. 



to 



These souls — whose schoolroom 
consists of learning the "ways of 
the wild" for survival, whose medi- 
cine comes from plants and bark 
of the trees, whose religion is hand- 
ed down by ancestors, and whose 
practices of religion are those of 
superstitious fanaticism — are the 
ones yet unreached by the Saviour's 
commission. It was with somewhat 
of an emotional disturbance that 
my eyes were focused for four 
hours on this desolate harvest field. 

The jungle treetops crowded both 
sides of the river as the plane let 
down at the airport of the 
strangest city I have ever visited. 
The streets were crowded with 
young people. This was the result 
of two factors: (1) The only schools 
in the area are in Manaus, (2) 
Life expectancy along the Amazon 
is only thirty-eight years. Mer- 
chants lined their produce and 
wares on the downtown sidewalks. 
Children of all ages hollered out 
their sales pitches. Beggars roamed 
the streets. 

The open marketplace was in- 
fested with vultures walking the 
floor gleaning the scrap meat. Side- 
walk bars were doing a flourishing 
business. Ships from all over the 
world were busy unloading and 
loading cargo. Fishermen were 
bringing in their catch for the day. 

I was told by the missionaries 
that there is yet an Indian tribe, 
only one hour's travel time out of 
Manaus, that will kill any white 
man who comes near. 

Dr. David Stowell, director of the 
Baptist Seminary of Amazonas, in- 
vited me to speak to the students. 
I found an enthusiastic group of 
young people preparing for the 
Lord's work. 

We spent an afternoon in the 
harbor, witnessing wherever oppor- 
tunity afforded itself and passing 
in and out among the traffic in 
the little boats and canoes. Even 
though the language was a great 
barrier, the printed word was al- 
ways accepted; and the message 
we had was made clear in the lan- 
guage of the people. 

Dr. Stowell and his fifteen-year- 
old daughter, Pat, awoke me early, 
around 4 a.m. in my hotel room on 
my third day in Manaus. Pat was to 



BY HUGH DON JOHNSON 




Pastor Johnson stands on the old floating 
of Dr. and Mrs. David Stowell at sunset. 

serve as my guide and interpreter 
on a day's journey on a milk boat 
down the Amazon. 

We paid our fare — a little more 
than thirty cents for the both of us. 
The little tiled-roof boat, with some 
thirty people aboard, set out long 
before sunrise down the wide dark 
river. Distant lights flickered along 
the banks. The air was cool and 
pleasant. By lantern light we could 
make out the different faces of the 
passengers aboard. Small children 
played freely, with little attention 
from their parents, on and around 
the small rails that were the only 
barriers between them and the big 
river. 

I was busy taking notes and 
scanning the scenery as opportu- 
nity allowed. I was told dreary 
stories about life among these poor 
people who live along the banks of 
the river. There are no doctors ex- 
cept in Manaus. Poisonous snakes 
abound in the area. When bitten, 
the people have to have medical 
attention within two hours — if not, 
they die. It is next to impossible 
for a boat to get them into the city, 
even if one were at hand, in such a 
short time. 

The crewmen handled the milk 
that was to be picked up with 
amazing rapidity. They were experts 
at their job. At some places where 
it was impossible to get the boat 
alongside the banks, a small canoe 
came out to meet us. In addition 
to collecting milk, there was such 
business as the picking up of hides 
of animals, cheese, butter, and oth- 



dock at Manaus with Danny Stowell. 



er farm produce, and so went the 
day's business. 

A mother came aboard with her 
little girl who had been having a 
temperature for three days. She 
had to get the daughter to a doc- 
tor right away. Then a family came 
aboard. That this was a long-await- 
ed trip into the city to visit rela- 
tives was evident by the excitement 
on their faces. The crew members 
and passengers were curious about 
the little camera in my hand that 
produced pictures on the spot. 
Everyone wanted his picture taken. 
The captain wanted a picture of 
the crew. It was my chance to try 
my hand at piloting a boat, so I 
exchanged a picture for an oppor- 
tunity to steer the milk boat. 

Over near one of the banks a 
group was swimming in the river. 
A couple of young ladies jumped 
into the water fully clothed. 
Here and there adults could be seen 
bathing at the edge of the water. 
A dead calf floated downstream 
with a vulture perched on top 
getting a free ride and a meal. 

As the boat came alongside the 
bank, the people lined up, excited 
about doing their business for the 
day, or exchanging news, or just 
passing the time away. It was a 
good opportunity for Pat and me to 
pass out some tracts. Not one was 
refused. As the boat pulled away 
from the bank, we looked over our 
shoulders and saw that the people 
had already begun to read the lit- 
erature. 

Please turn to page 23 



11 



BY JAMES E. ADAMS 




£""7 HE WORDS "NOT good 

/ enough" have stopped many 
•— ' an individual and group 
short of their goal. But the Uni- 
versity of Arkansas Mixed Chorus 
would not be stopped. They were 
turned down by a State Department 
screening agency as "not good 
enough" to warrant federal assis- 
tance in traveling to Europe. The 
singers went anyhow and won 
first place in international compe- 
tition. 

After its rebuff by governmen- 
tal officials, the chorus embarked 
on a statewide fund-raising drive, 
giving concerts and seeking alumni 
assistance. As a result, the Arkan- 
sas group financed its trip to 
Europe on a "do-it-yourself" basis. 

The forty-voice chorus competed 
in Italy and won the prize, sur- 
passing twenty-six other groups to 
do so. To make the victory sweet- 
er, on its return to the States, the 
schola cantorum was publicly con- 
gratulated by President Kennedy 
in his news conference. And, a week 



later, the "not good enough" chorus 
sang for him in the White House 
Rose Garden. 

However, other seemingly not- 
good-e n o u g h individuals and 
groups have brightened their 
sphere — and beyond — with music. 

This writer was asked to lead 
the Saturday evening street meet- 
ing our church held. Considering 
the lack of musical ability, this 
was nonsensical. But since no one 
else would do it, he did. It seemed 
at times that the open-air services 
received scant appreciation. But, 
unknown to us, we had an audience 
in a darkened apartment across the 
street. 

A shut-in liked our singing! As 
soon as the opening song service 
was over, he would push his wheel- 
chair away from the window. Then 
he became aware we were singing 
choruses between testimonies. So he 
began to stay at the window till 
it was time for the concluding ser- 
monette. Finally, the invalid was 
listening in to the entire service. 

One evening after we had gone, 



he remained there by the window, 
his face buried in his hands. His 
wife walked over to him. He was 
praying as tears trickled between 
his fingers. He was converted that 
night. 

His wife told one of our members 
about it several years later. "He 
died, looking forward with joy to 
meeting his Saviour," she said. 

As individuals and as a group, 
we would have won no prizes with 
our singing. But we were "good 
enough" to be used of the Lord to 
lead a wandering, lost sheep into 
the fold. 

While not all of us can excel in 
music, speaking, or teaching, there 
are other ways to make music un- 
to the Lord. It is music to the 
heart of God to find a yielded life 
through whom He can bless others. 
Rather than look at our inabili- 
ties, let us cooperate with God; let 
us allow Him to take our "not 
good enoughs" and by His divine 
power and Spirit produce through 
us results in the- lives of others 
which will last through eternity. • 



12 



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AMERICAN TEMPERANCE HOSPITALIZATION POLICY 

Name (PLEASE PRINT) 

Street or RD » city 

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BIRTH DATE 


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Mail this application with your first premium to 

AMERICAN TEMPERANCE ASSOCIATES, Inc., Box 131, Libertyville, Illinois 




YOUTH CAMPS 



BY C. MILTON PARSONS 



O 

AIL 



C. Milton Parsons, an ordained minister 

of the Church of God, is administrative 

assistant in the Sunday School and 

Youth Department. Having served as a 

state director in both Ohio and 

Tennessee, Milton is a highly experienced 

and very capable youth leader. 

14 



/O ACH YEAR THE camping 
f program in the Church of 
God increases in size and ef- 
fectiveness. New records are con- 
stantly being set in attendance 
and spiritual results. 

A distinguishing factor in 1966 is 
that, for the first time in our 
church's history, all fifty states 
were represented in the camping 
program! A total of seventy-eight 
camps was conducted and regis- 
tration was an all-time high of 
16,506. 

From its inception, God has chos- 
en to honor Church of God youth 
camps with His presence and pow- 



er. In these seventy-eight revivals, 
there were 2,751 converted, 1.731 
sanctified, 1,456 filled with the 
Holy Ghost, 2,312 baptized in water. 
and 735 who joined the Church of 
God. Thousands of campers, who 
were Christians when they came, 
were greatly edified and strength- 
ened in the Lord. 

The impact of youth camps on 
the lives of today's youth is im- 
measurable. During camp the total 
personality of the individual is af- 
fected — physically, mentally, social- 
ly, financially, emotionally, and. 
most importantly, spiritually. There 
is a marvelous mixture of fun, 




LISTED HERE IS THE 1966 REGISTRATION BY STATES: 



Alabama _. 


.... 825 


Mississippi 


... 331 


Alaska .... 


39 


Missouri _ 


... 228 


Arizona 


.... 220 


Montana-Wyoming 


. 208 


Arkansas 


.... 226 


Nebraska _ _ 


89 


California-Nevada ... 


.... 247 


New England States .... 


... 100 


Canada (Western) ... 


... 130 


New Jersey .... 


._ 117 


Colorado-Utah 


.... 100 


New Mexico _ 


... 135 


Florida _ _ .... 


.... 904 


New York _. . 


95 


Georgia :... 


.... 1,223 


North Carolina 


... 1,665 


Hawaii .... .... n 


29 


North and South Dakota 


92 


Idaho ■ ... 


96 


Ohio _ 


812 


Illinois _.. 


510 


Oklahoma .... 


... 302 


Indiana _ 


... 397 


Oregon _ _. 


... 233 


Iowa .... .... 


... 126 


Pennsylvania _ 


... 350 


Kansas .... .... .... .... .... 


.... 124 


South Carolina 


_ 1,127 


Kentucky __ ... 


.... 635 


Tennessee _ 


... 1,516 


Louisiana 


— 168 


Texas 


... 606 


Maryland, Delaware, 




Virginia _ 


_ 682 


D. C _ 


.... 527 


Washington 


... 274 


Michigan-Canada 




Wisconsin-Minnesota .... 


... 112 


(Central) ._ 


__ 550 


West Virginia .... .... .... 


... 356 



Home Run King 



faith, and fellowship. According to 
recent surveys, young people ex- 
press more love for youth camp 
than any other area of church 
activity. 

From the parents' standpoint, 
youth camp is the best single in- 
vestment available. Youth camp is 
an ideal place to experience being 
away from home for the first time. 
The administration sees to it that 
each camper receives individual 
care and prevenient protection in 
the absence of parents. They re- 
turn home with more enthusiasm, 
a brighter outlook, and a greater 
love for parents and family. 



From the church's point of view, 
campers returning home have of- 
ten ignited revivals in the local 
churches. Individuals who had 
seemed to be hopelessly out of 
reach came to know Christ at 
camp. As a young person loses his 
shyness and receives greater love 
for God, the best in him comes to 
light in camp — talent, personality, 
leadership, consecration, and spiri- 
tuality. 

The scope of Church of God 
camping is destined to enlarge as 
more young people become interest- 
ed and more parents and pastors 
learn of its dynamic potential 
for good. 



Although Tennessee led the na- 
tion three years in youth camp 
registration, North Carolina and 
State Director Bill Sheeks took the 
lead this year with a total of 1,665. 
Tennessee came in second register- 
ing 1,516 and Georgia came in third 
with 1,223. 

We do thank God for making 
the 1966 camping program all that 
the glowing reports and beaming 
state directors said it was. May ev- 
eryone concerned be led by God's 
Spirit to even greater effectiveness 
for Christ in the camps of 1967, if 
Christ should delay His Second 
Coming. • 



An entire camp poses for a picture — Jl 



~: 







y «y.. f.\ ,- 







15 




BY CHARLES VAN NESS 



R-R-R-R-ACK Bo-0-o-o-o- 

om! 

A long, forked tongue of 
high voltage electricity frantical- 
ly reaches out to discharge its en- 
ergy. 

The brilliance of its flash lights 
up the sky. The booming of its 
thunder dwarfs other sounds. Dogs 
whimper and slink away. 

One of the most awesome spec- 
tacles man can witness is the fury 
and force of an electrical storm. 
As God displays raw energy on the 
loose, people's reactions range from 



disguised fear to sincere apprecia- 
tion. 

Lightning, regardless of your own 
personal reaction to it, is extremely 
interesting. An average lightning 
bolt is four thousand feet long and 
carries a wallop of one million kilo- 
watts! With that much energy 
packed into the narrow channel of 
electricity, the bolt hits so hard 
that the person hit probably does 
not feel a thing. Cheer up! You 
won't feel anything! 

Incidentally, if you hear the loud 
thunder, you are safe. The one you 



L6 



hear has already done its work. If 
you want to know how close light- 
ning is, here is a rule-of-thumb 
guide. Thunder that you hear five 
seconds after the flash comes from 
lightning one mile away. Even 
when you hear the thunder and see 
the lightning at the same instant 
the lightning may be an eighth of 
a mile away. Your retina retains 
the image of the flash after it has 
disappeared. 

Authorities think lightning is 
caused by the friction of wind- 
driven mist as it is blown across 
the earth's surface. Since rain con- 
ducts electrical charges to the 
earth, thunderstorms arise during 
dry periods when the accumula- 
tion of charges can take place. 
Since the electrical charges cannot 
escape, the cloud becomes heavily 
charged. When the cloud approach- 
es another cloud with low charge, 
or the earth, the sudden discharge 
of high voltage electricity produces 
the typical lightning flash. This is 
called a lightning stroke. 

Because a cloud is a poor con- 
ductor of electricity, it gradually 
discharges its store of energy. This 
is why several strokes of lightning 
occur during a storm. It is a good 
thmg clouds are poor conductors. 
Think of the damage that would be 
caused by one super-bolt of all the 
energy in the cloud! 

Some people think there is only 
one type of lightning. Actually 
there are several. One is "flash" or 
"stroke" lightning. This is the nor- 
mal type that usually accompanies 
electrical storms. Another is "sheet" 
lightning. Scientists believe this is 
merely the reflection of distant 
stroke lightning. 

"Ball" lightning is an unusual 
type. No known pictures of ball 
lightning exist, but several people 
have seen it. It resembles a ball of 
brilliant light which seems to float 
slowly a short distance above the 
surface of the earth. Witnesses re- 
port that it has drifted through an 
open door or window into a house. 
It generally explodes but does little 
damage. 

Then there is a type of light- 
ning called "Saint Elmo's fire." It 
resembles streaks or jets of lights 



coming from the tips of projecting 
objects such as masts of a ship. The 
hissing tongues of fire are several 
inches long. When the electrical 
discharge of the lightning stroke 
takes place, it produces heat which 
causes a sudden expansion of air 
particles. This is followed by a 
sharp compression of those parti- 
cles beyond. This process goes out 
like ripples from a stone thrown 
into a pool of water. The expansion 
and contraction of air particles 
causes the rolling noise of thunder. 
Despite all its fireworks and thun- 
derous noise, lightning greatly 
benefits mankind. 

"How can lightning help us?" 
someone asks. "I thought it caused 
damage." 

We only hear about the damage 
lightning causes, but there is an 
immense, unseen blessing that 
comes from lightning. When the 
bolt releases its energy, the light- 
ning produces a reaction between 
the oxygen and nitrogen in the 
atmosphere which produces a wa 
ter-soluble nitrogen compound. 

The compound is brought to 
earth, . perhaps weeks or months 
later, by rain or snow. This nitro- 
gen compound is food for crops and 
vegetation. Scientists estimate that 
the three billion strokes of light- 
ning each year manufacture one 
million tons of nitrogen fertilizer. 
This is more than the entire ferti- 
lizer industry of the world pro- 
duces. 

So the next time you see light- 
ning and hear its thundering 
crashes, remember that God is re- 
leasing nitrogen which will mean 
life to crops and, ultimately, to 
you. Remember something else. Our 
Christian life seems to have light- 
ning storms. Some great disap- 
pointment or discouragement may 
crash around us like a bolt of 
lightning. 

But like lightning these spiritual 
testings may bring blessings to us 
Maybe months — even years — will 
pass before we see the value of the 
storm. But if we trust the Lord 
and refuse to let the storm defeat 
us, we will find our lives have 
grown spiritually because of the 
storm. • 




LIVING LETTERS 

the New Testament epistles 

LIVING PROPHECIES 

the Minor Prophets, Daniel and Revelation 

LIVING GOSPELS 

all four Gospels and Acts 

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WHEN THE 
CHRISTIAN 

FEMS 



BY WILLIAM J. KRUTZA 



< *' } VEN CHRISTIANS have 
S fears! And although the Bi- 
C_-^ ble contains many injunc- 
tions about the removal of one's 
fears through his faith, in every- 
day living in our rushed society 
anxieties develop. Thus it becomes 
imperative that the Christian first 
learn how to analyze what causes 
anxieties before he can apply any 
beneficial scriptural cures. 

In our competitive business 
world, even the Christian business- 
man can become concerned about 
the success of any venture. The 
top rung Christian businessman 
faces some of the same frustra- 
tions that his unbelieving counter- 
parts face. 

One of the greatest fears which 
plagues our society is the fear of 
failure. One would look far and 
wide to find a person who could or 
would accept defeat and failure as 




readily as acclaim or success. Even 
the Christian fears failure — in fact, 
some seem to build up a greater 
mechanism against failure than 
their counterparts. They build up an 
unreal facade of spirituality to 
cover their fears or failures. 

Unfortunately, the pattern soon 
becomes an energy and nerve con- 
suming cycle — fear of failure, re- 
doubled effort, fear of failure. . . . 
The cycle also has an adverse ef- 
fect upon the person's satisfaction 
with his work. And the Christian 
person is prone to begin question- 
ing the will of God as far as his 
personal positioning is concerned. 
The expectation of failure always 
robs an individual of the normal 
amount of satisfaction which 
should accompany a job well done. 

Many Christians seem resigned 
to the lot of continuous failure. 
They expect to fail in the business 



world because they predetermine 
that the world is against them be- 
fore they start. 

The person who begins to anti- 
cipate failure even before there is 
any indication that it will come 
engages in a self-destroying pro- 
cess. The risks become greater as 
the person advances up the exe- 
cutive ladder. 

Fear of failure usually springs 
from the individual's own distort- 
ed concept of success. And even 
the Christian is not exempt from 
this fear because materialism has 
so dominated much of our Chris- 
tian thinking that success has be- 
come mandatory, even for the fol- 
lowers of Jesus Christ. 

To reverse this situation, to 
change our fears, to calm our 
hearts, to find true success even 
in the midst of a seeming financial 
loss— all these require more than 
the quoting of some catchy phras- 
es about success or the quoting of 
Bible verses that use the word fear. 
One can quote Bible verses and 
still face fearful situations. A self- 
appraisal is mandatory if we are 
to overcome fear. And this ap- 
praisal must not neglect any area 
of our lives. 

Men, Christians included, rarely 
want to take a critical view of 
themselves. Rarely do they practice 
personal honesty when looking in- 
side their own personalities. It 
seems all too devastating to take 
a close personal analytical view of 
oneself. But, if we are to be victors 
over fears, we must see ourselves 
as we really are, see God as He is, 
and relate ourselves and our ex- 
periences with Jesns Chrst to our 
relationships with the situations of 
life. 

To make this analysis we ought 
to ask ourselves some pointed ques- 
tions: 

Do we fear being found in the 
wrong? 

Do our fears simply cover some 
other spiritual, emotional, or psy- 
chological need? 

Do we expect to fail even before 
we begin a project? 

Are we fearful because we do not 
want others to know of some lack 
of education or ability? 



18 



Are we afraid that some more 
capable person will get our job or 
position? 

Do our fears simply cover up for 
a lack of preparation or enthusi- 
asm? 

Once we discover the source of 
our fears, we will be able to apply 
the scriptural truths. And even the 
recognition of our fears is but a 
partial answer to our problem. The 
Scriptures do not condone glossing 
over causes of fear. Examples of 
fear, either from business life or 
from the Bible, are closely tied to 
interpersonal relations. And once 
we recognize that this is true, we 
are well on the way to the Chris- 
tian solution of fears. 

But an analysis of fears without 
any constructive activity about a 
remedy is both fruitless and fear- 
some. One must translate his 
analysis into action — he must put 
into motion those activities which 
will remove the fears. For example, 
if a man fears swimming in deep 
water, he must first master all 
the techniques of swimming while 
in shallow water. Then he can 
venture out into the deep. If a 
man is afraid to drive an automo- 
bile, he will only overcome this 
fear as he takes driving lessons 
and then goes down the freeway 
in solo fashion. 

Even the Christian, simply be- 
cause he has accepted the Saviour, 
is not guaranteed an immediate 
cure for all fear. Rather, it is a 
gradual process. As he comes to 
understand the fuller meanings of 
his salvation, he can draw upon 
those resources which eliminate 
fear. 

The fear of failure, the fear of a 
lack of respect, the fear of perse- 
cution — these can only be overcome 
as the Christian recognizes higher 
goals, as he sees beyond himself 
and his job. He need not continue 
in his fears once they develop. And 
whereas the man of the world can 
only draw upon his own ingenuity, 
the Christian can draw upon the 
wonderful power of God. 

Fears will come, even to the 
Christian. But the dominating pow- 
er of these fears can be appre- 
ciably diminished as the Christian 
learns to lean upon the Lord. • 






OUT OF 



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BY CLARE MISELES 



DO THE TASK NOW 




m 



IKE LOOKED at the rum- 
ble-bumble in his closet 
and shook his red head. "I 
know it's a mess," he apologized. 
"But can't it wait until tomor- 
row — " His mother gave him a 
"I've heard-that-one-before" look 
and shook her head in disgust. 

"I know — " grinned Mike, sheep- 
ishly. "Someone once said, 'In two 
more days, tomorrow will be yes- 
terday.' " 

"You said it," replied his mother. 
"I didn't." 

"Someone else also said some- 
thing else," added his grandma 
coming into the room. She con- 
tinued quietly, " 'There is ... a 
time to every purpose.' " 



"I don't know if that was 
Matthew or Mark — " interrupted 
Mike. 

"It was neither," said Grandma, 
still quietly. "Ecclesiastes 3:1, to be 
exact." 

"All right, Ecclesiastes!" piped 
Mike. "But I promise to get to my 
closet one of these days." 

Whether it is a closet that needs 
cleaning, or waiting homework, or 
some job that requires attention, 
Mike's quotation is true. More im- 
portantly so is his grandma's quote 
from the Bible. There really is a 
time to every purpose — and for 
every purpose. 

Putting off a purpose can put 
you into the worst possible habit. 



In no time at all you can be hooked 
and very definitely conditioned to 
never getting anything done. Worst 
of all, you will be defeating the 
most important purpose of your 
life — the one God gave you. 

As Mike said later, "I really don't 
know why I don't get to it." He 
shook his head and looked to his 
mother and grandma for a possi- 
ble answer. 

"Easy — " explained his grandma. 
"Most of the time you just don't 
think you have what it takes to do 
it!" 

"You mean I think I can't clean 
a closet?" he laughed. 

"It's not just the closet: — just 
everything in general," she began. 
"Cleaning your room or whatever 



20 



you should do is only part of the 
category. It just fits into the pat- 
tern, that's all." 

Actually, she is right. It is a 
pattern — and one, that you, your- 
self, build. It works this way: What 
you like to do, you usually jump to 
in a hurry. What you do not like, 
you slack off, until you put it off 
altogether. Before you know it, you 
have talked yourself into another 
habit, another conditioning, one 
that strongly tells you that you 
cannot do this, and you cannot 
do that! In no time, you have la- 
beled yourself — the one without 
this or that ability. 

This is as far from the truth as 
the earth is from the sun. Matthew 
25:15 tells us that God has created 
everyone with gifts: "To every man 
according to his several ability." 
You are no exception. He has 
granted you blessings, too, so that 
you can do many, many things. In 
fact, as is true with most of us, 
you will never fully unbury and 
cultivate all the gifts He has given 
you. 

But one thing is certain: You will 
never even make a dent if you 
continue to put off chores, respon- 
sibilities, or whatever it is that 
must be done. Get to your duties 
without delay. Usually things turn 
out better than you expected, any- 
way. Accomplishment is, in itself, 
a great feeling. You feel good when 
you know you have done some- 
thing worthwhile. But the richer 
reward comes with the enlighten- 
ment and understanding gained 
from a new experience. No matter 
what, there is something to be 
learned from even the smallest 
task. What does this mean? Simply 
that whatever you do usually has 
a chain reaction and leads to your 
doing something else. Thus you un- 
cover one after another the trea- 
sures which the Lord as in store 
for you. 

So, forget that "I'll do it tomor- 
row" idea. Get busy today so that 
you can fulfill the words of the 
Gospel of Matthew, "To every man 
according to his . . . ability." By 
so doing, you will be able to de- 
velop the potentialities which God 
has given you. • 




BIBLE DISCUSSION: WATER AND SPIRIT BAPTISM 

Albert Batts and Harold Sain 
A Bible discussion. A book that is different — sixteen 30-minute 
speeches as debated before more than 5,000 people by Albert 
Batts and Harold Sain on water baptism and spirit baptism. 
Mr. Sain affirmed that water baptism is the last act in re- 
mission of sins. Albert Batts denied. Albert Batts affirmed 
that the Holy Spirit Baptism is for believers today as in the 
days of the apostles. 

Price, $2.00 
Order from: Albert Batts 

712 Lee Highway 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 37421 



WOLFE BROS. & CO. 



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NO INVESTMENT! NOT EVEN lc! Order 120 
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and complete address, the name, address, etc. 
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ORGANIZATION. 



21 



GREENVILLE (TREMONT), SOUTH CAROLINA 




The "Lighted Pathway" congratulates Mrs. Margaret Pressley and Mr. 
E. C. Trammel upon their selection for this honor. Since the pictures 
were taken Pastor Johnson has assumed the pastorate of the Sulphur 
Springs (Tampa), Florida Church of God. The Reverend Louis Cross now 
pastors Tremont. 



Tremont Mother of the Year 

After five weeks of voting, the 
day finally arrived for the an- 
nouncement of the "Mother of the 
Year" at the Tremont Avenue 
Church of God in Greenville, South 
Carolina, for 1966. In order to vote 
for the "Mother of the Year," each 
voter had to be present in his Sun- 
day school class. After the final 
tabulation was made, Margaret 
Elizabeth Pressley was announced 
the winner. 

She is shown here receiving a 
large, white, family Bible as one of 
her gifts. The presentation is being 
made by Pastor W. E. Johnson. 

Sister Margaret Pressley has been 
a member of the Tremont Avenue 
Church of God for twenty-one 
years. At the present time, she has 
four children and four grandchil- 
dren who attend the Tremont 
Avenue Church. She has six chil- 
dren, fifteen grandchildren, and 
eight great-grandchUdren. 

— Church reporter 



Tremont Father of the Year 

We had five weeks of voting for 
the "Father of the Year" of the 
Tremont Avenue Church of God in 
Greenville, South Carolina. In or- 
der to vote for the Father of the 
Year, each voter had to be present 
in his Sunday school class. On 
Father's Day, after all the votes 
were counted, E. C. Trammell was 
announced the winner. 

Here Pastor W. E. Johnson is 
presenting him the Father of the 
Year Plaque upon which his name 
has been placed as the "Father of 
the Year" for 1966. 

Brother E. C. Trammell has been 
a member of the Tremont Avenue 
Church for thirty years. At the 
present time, his wife, four chil- 
dren, and four grandchildren at- 
tend this church. 

He has seven children and eleven 
grandchildren. 

May the Lord continue to bless 
Brother Trammell and all the 
fathers in the Church of God. 

— Church reporter 



Use the PILOT in your youth meetings. 
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Narragansett (Chicago) YPE 

The Narragansett Church of God 
Young People's Endeavor sponsored 
a contest for twelve weeks that 
was geared to the times. Red and 
blue teams were chosen and were 
represented by a rocket. Their goal 
was the moon. The purpose of the 
contest was to raise money for the 
purchase of a new church organ. 
Points were earned by receiving of- 
ferings, reading Bibles, and bring- 
ing visitors to YPE. 

Rex Allen served as captain of 
the blue team, and Nancy Jenkins 
was captain of the red team. Both 
teams worked hard in raising 
money. They took turns in serving 
refreshments after YPE each week 
in order to gain their goal. 

Winning the contest by five 
points, the blue team was served 
by the red team at a banquet held 
in honor of the winning team. At 
this time a check for the organ in 
the amount of $350.00 was pre- 
sented by Captains Rex Allen and 
Nancy Jenkins to Pastor James E. 
Allen. 

—Bob J. Pack 




Rex Allen and Nancy Jenkins pre- 
sent check to Pastor James E. 
Allen. Present also are the YPE 
President and Vice-president, Mr. 
Bob J. Pack and Mrs. A. Jenkins. 



22 



Sunset in Amazonas 

From Page 11 

The little mud-thatched houses 
along the river were surrounded by 
tall weeds and trees. There were 
small clearings for farming. Us- 
ually, large families lived in these 
huts shaping their living quarters 
with homemade furniture, and 
their diet from the soil. 

Such was life as I saw it from a 
milk boat on the Amazon. After 
eight hours we arrived again at the 
busy city. It had been a full day — 
and one that I shall never forget. 

I watched the sun set, red and 
lowering, over the Amazon. As I 
watched there on the floating dock 
in the State of Amazonas, I fully 
realized that the laborers who were 
working for forty dollars a month, 
the twenty-five percent who had 
leprosy, and the rabble of the street 
— all would soon be havm? their 
own personal sunset. And the ques- 
tion of questions in my mind was 
this: "Will they hear before the 
sunset?" And if so, what will they 
hear? 

A young man stood at the gate 
where I was to board the plane to 
leave Manaus (I planned to fly 
another thousand miles down the 
Amazon River to Belem before re- 
turning home). In his broken Eng- 
lish, he spoke to me about the 
needs of the youth of Brazil and 
of his desire for success in life. I 
gave him a three-point formula to 
help him obtain this success: 

1. Let God be your supreme direc- 
tor in all areas of life. 

2. Shun the diseases of the land 
and keep a healthy body as an 
investment to obtain this suc- 
cess. 

3. Be prepared and ready; be 
standing near God's door of op- 
portunity when it opens. 

Our conversation was brief, but 
what he said was equivalent to God 
speaking to me. I was aware of 
the millions of young people — not 
only in Brazil, but all over the 
world — who need guidance and di- 
rection in times like these. There 
are millions of young people who 
need to hear and experience the 
message, which we possess before 
the sunset. • 



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Arcadia, Fla., Junior Choir 



The Arcadia, Florida, Church of 
God junior choir ended their con- 
test on Sunday, July 24. Under the 
leadership of Miss Shirley Hill, the 
juniors raised $101.16 for the Home 
for Children in a contest which 
lasted for three weeks. 

For raising the most money in 
the contest, two of the juniors were 
crowned King David and Queen 
Esther on Sunday morning during 
the Sunday school hour. Bobby 



Jones, with over twenty-five dollars, 
won the kingship. Christine Kipp, 
with twenty dollars, won the 
queenship. Runners-up were Lynn 
Griffin and Cheryl Woodley. 

The choir is made up of children, 
ages ten to thirteen, who also 
raised a payment of $203.00 for 
the church in June. These "Little 
Lights for Jesus" are doing a fine 
job in letting their lights shine, as 
they work for Jesus and His church. 



Members of the choir are (L. to 
R., back row) Larry Hill, Christine 
Kipp (Queen Esther), Bobby Jones 
(King David), Cheryl Woodley, and 
Terry Hill. (L. to R., front row) 
Miss Shirley Hill (director), Ronald 
Jones, Lynn Griffin, Karen West- 
berry, Sharon Dyess, and Miss 
Dorothy Culver, pianist for choir. 

— Horace Hill, 
Sunday school superintendent 



Columbus, Ohio, VBS 

During our vacation Bible school 
this summer a touching incident 
occurred. Each of the children had 
been asked to bring a pair of new 
socks to be sent to the Home for 
Children. As the children marched 
forward, bringing the socks, one 
little girl began to cry and said, 
"I don't have any socks to give." 
She could hardly be quieted. 

Later, she sat down, removed 
her shoes, pulled off the socks she 
was wearing, came forward bare- 



footed, and deposited the socks with 
the new ones. Then the child re- 
turned to her seat and put on her 
shoes and ceased to cry. The inci- 
dent was reminiscent of B ; ble days 
when the woman anointed Christ. 
and He said, "She hath done what 
she could." 

The socks have been photo- 
graphed and are shown here. 

-—Mrs. T. A. Perkins 
director of school 




24 




Pompano Beach, Florida, 
Youth Earns High Honors 

The Church of God in Pompano 
Beach, Florida, is proud to present 
Ricky Dotson as one of its most 
outstanding youthful members. 
Ricky was recently honored with 
the American Legion School "For 
God and Country" Award, which, 
in part, reads: "This certificate of 
distinguished achievement is 
awarded Richard Dotson of Tedder 
Elementary School in recognition 
of attainment acquired as winner 
of the American Legion School 
Award, and in further recognition 
of the possession of those high 
qualities of courage, honor, leader- 
ship, patriotism, scholarship, and 
service, which are necessary to the 
preservation and protection of the 
fundamental institutions of our 
government and the advancement 
of society." 

This summer at Florida State 
Youth Camp, Ricky was chosen as 
"Mr. Junior Youth Camp." 

Ricky leads a very active life for 
a twelve-year-old as a member of 
the "Teachers of Tomorrow," the 
church's Boy Scout troop, the 
school band, the chorus, and as a 
student of private piano lessons. 

As his pastor, I feel he does his 
best to subscribe to the apostle's 
admonition to "be ... an example 
of the believers" (1 Timothy 4:12). 

— Leon H. Ellis, pastor 




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25 



Young Peoples Endeavor p„^ p.f. 



This report represents only thos 
ifPE's that had an average atten- 
dance of more than 50 weekly and 
reported their attendance to the 
office of the National Sunday 
School and Youth Director. By no 
means does it reflect all the Fam- 
ily Training Hour (YPE) groups 
of the Church of God. Each church 
is invited to participate in this 
column. Attendance averages 
should be mailed on a postal card 
on the day following the last YPE 
service in the month and should 
be addressed to Donald S. Aultman, 
National Director, 1080 Montgom- 
ery Avenue, Cleveland, Tennessee 
37311. 

AUGUST YPE ATTENDANCE 

Garden City, Florida ... 202 

Lakeland, Florida .... .... . .... 192 

Greenville (Tremont), 

South Carolina .... .... .... 185 

Cincinnati (Central Parkway), 

Ohio ... 185 

Middletown, Ohio ... 178 

Canton (Temple), Ohio .... .... 171 

Pulaski (East Main Street), 

Virginia .... 167 

Gastonia (Ranlo), 

North Carolina 158 

Hamilton (Princeton Pike) 

Ohio .... ... 147 

Paris, Texas ._ _ .... .... .... 145 

Jacksonville ( Springfield ) , 

Florida .... .... .... .... .... 145 

Royal Oak, Michigan 136 

Wyandotte, Michigan .... 133 

Flint (West), Michigan .... .... 13C 

Tampa (East Buffalo), 

Florida . ... 125 

Vanceburg, Kentucky .... 115 

Chattanooga (East), 

Tennessee 108 

Fort Worth (Riverside), 

Texas .... 104 

Wilson, North Carolina 103 

Conway (North), 

South Carolina 99 

Thorn, Mississippi .... .... .... .... 98 

South Lebanon, Ohio 98 

Thorn, Missouri 94 

Flint (Kearsley Park), 

Michigan .... .... .... 93 

Brunswick (Norwich Street), 

Georgia .... 93 

Corbin (Center Street), 

Kentucky .... 92 

Manns Choice, Pennsylvania __ 87 



By Donald S. Aultman 
Natio?ial Director 



Jesup, Georgia ._ .... 87 

Pacoima (San Fernando Valley), 

California 86 

Jackson (Crestpark), 

Mississippi __ .... .... 86 

Austin, Indiana 84 

Decatur (Sherman Street), 

Alabama 80 

Camden, Ohio .... .... .... . 80 

Hurst, Texas .... .... .... .. . 79 

Elyria, Ohio .... 79 

Dayton, Tennessee .... 79 

Clover, South Carolina 79 

Oregonia, Ohio .... ... . .... .... .... 78 

West Amarillo, Texas .... 77 

Ports (Westhaven Park), 

Virginia _. 76 

Loveland, Ohio .... ... .. 76 

Loxley, Alabama .... ... 74 

Wayne, Michigan .... .... .... .... 71 

Shawnee, Oklahoma .... .... .... 71 

Lawrenceville, Illinois _.. .... .... 71 

Isola, Mississippi __ .... 71 

Johnson City, Tennessee .... .... 71 

Lancaster, Ohio ... 70 

Cahokia, Illinois _. .... .... 68 

West Monroe, Louisiana 67 

Atlanta (East Point l, 

Georgia ... .... .... .... .... .. . 67 

Columbus (Frebis Avenue), 

Ohio .... . 66 
Portland (Powell Boulevard), 

Oregon .... . 62 

Valdosta, Georgia .... .... .... .... 61 

Miami, Florida 61 

Evansville (East Side), 

Indiana .... .... .... .... .... .... 61 

Davtona Beach (McLeod Street), 

Florida .... 61 

Princeton, West Virginia .... .... 60 

Holland (Zeeland), 

Michigan .... .... 60 

Pine Bluff, Arkansas .... 59 

Thomaston, Georgia .... .... .... 58 

Portage, Indiana 58 

Peoria, Illinois .... .... .... .... .... 58 

Chase, Maryland 58 

Logan, West Virginia .... .... 56 

Charlottesville, Virginia .... .... 55 

Washington Park, Illinois .... 52 

Spartanburg (North), 

South Carolina .... — _ 52 

Salem, Virginia .... 52 

Palmetto, Florida .... _. .... 52 

Kokomo (East Jefferson), 

Indiana ... 50 



Sarah Grimes (23) 

6610 17G Apt. Grelg Street 

Seat Pleasant, Maryland 20027 

Lydla Kohanlk (20) 
114 Second Avenue S. 
Weyburn, Sask., Canada 

William O. Lloyd (20) 
50 W. Penning Avenue 
Wood River, Illinois 62095 

Linda Franklin (16) 
706 W. Sixth Street 
Sweetwater, Texas 

Glenda Franklin (16) 
706 W. Sixth Street 
Sweetwater, Texas 

Eddie Lee Lazenby (12) 
Route 3, Box 307 
Pensacola, Florida 32503 

Deborah Cunningham (14) 

2916 Rancho Road 

El Sobrante, California 

Barbara Cunningham (9) 

2916 Rancho Road 

El Sobrante, California 

Ellen Cousineau (15) 

Route 2 

Bitely, Michigan 49309 

Richard W. Saunders (14) 

Box 2AA 

Chapmanville, West Virginia 

Brenda Lee Cooper (18) 
Job, 

West Virginia 

David Ralph Pugh (15) 
1209 Cleona Drive 
Chesapeake, Virginia 23506 

Kirby Lynn Johnson (17) 
2988 Welcome Road 
Chesapeake. Virginia 23506 



Assist our campus ministry by 
forwarding the names and address- 
es of college students to CAMPUS 
CALL, 10 8 Montgomery Avenue, 
Cleveland, Tennessee 37311. These 
collegians will be informed about 
our campus ministry and the work 
of KAPPA EPSILON. They will also 
receive A FREE subscription to 
CAMPUS CALL, a sixteen-page 
publication for collegians. 

Interested in initiating a KAPPA 
EPSILON fellowship group on your 
campus? For full particulars write 
to CAMPUS CALL, 1080 Montgom- 
ery Avenue, Cleveland, Tennessee 
37311. KAPPA EPSILON is spon- 
sored by the Church of God to pro- 
mote campus fellowship and an 
acadamic inquiry into the Chris- 
tian faith. 

— C. Milton Parsoiis 

Editor, CAMPUS CALL 



26 



We Give Thanks 



We pause to think on this Thanksgiving Day 

Of Pilgrim Fathers and those pioneers 

Who braved the seas and left their homes behind 

them, 
Sowing in hardships, through those bitter years. 
Today, we reap the heritage of freedom, 
Enjoy the plains and prairies, rich with corn, 
While Peace smiles on wood and fertile valley, 
In our land, where luckily, we were born. 
Though centuries have passed, we are aware 
Of the present power of our forefather's prayer 
For blessings they fought for and nobly planned 
That millions now can share in this good land. 
We have supreme responsibility, 
As on our knees today we humbly ask 
For courage and faith of founding fathers — 
For wisdom to fulfill the further task. 
Our country's freedom will admit no bars 
Beneath a banner, flecked with fifty stars. 
On this Thanksgiving Day, from sea to sea, 
We lift our praises in humility! 

—Stella Craft Tremble 



the Lord It Grows 



A child is like a little seed, that's placed into the 

ground, 
It nneeds a lot of loving care, to make it firm and 

sound: 
The tears we shed on it's behalf will water it like rain, 
The word of God will nurture it and help it sustain; 
And should the storms of life beat 'round with all its 

crushing blows, 
With arms outstretched toward the sky, unto the 

Lord it grows. 

— Nancy Thompson 





\ Forget the Old Folks 



Corrupt Advice From the Clergy! 



A certain denominational pastor in an eastern state 
recently caused quite a commotion because he ad- 
vocated that teen-agers live together (as man and 
wife) before being actually married! He declared that 
it was perfectly proper — if they had the consent of 
their parents! Imagine that! 

Certainly, an uproar of verbal and written fire- 
works should have been aimed at him! Such trashy 
teaching is bad enough when it appears between 
the lurid covers of a cheap paperback novel; how 
much more vile is that kind of advice when it comes 
from the lips of a man who is supposed to be a servant 
of God — by reason of his office — and an example of 
purity and holiness to his congregation and the com- 
munity he serves! 

The Bible insists on sexual purity — both outside and 
inside of the marriage relationship — and anybody who 
disregards it and sows to the flesh is sooner or later 
to find these words to be all too true: "Be not de- 
ceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man 
soweth, that shall he also reap" (Galatians 6:7). 

— Roy J. Wilkins 



Oh, do not forget your folks at home 

As up and down the land you roam. 

Remember father and mother dear, 

To whom you owe a lot of cheer 

For what they have done in bygone days 

To care for you in many ways, 

To rear and train and make you strong 

To stand for right against the wrong! 

Take time to write them now and then 
By type or pencil or by pen, 
And maybe send a check or bill 
To let them know you love them still. 
Show them as their years grow few 
That they are precious yet to you, 
That in your heart they have a place 
That time and distance can not erase. 

Yes, do not forget the old folks, please 

And pray for them down on your knees, 

For they have weathered many storms 

And time and age has changed their forms; 

But love and kindness is a trait 

That is never, never out of date. 

If you will give them this and more, 

You will reap it again on heaven's shore. 

— Walter E. Isenhour 




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