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Full text of "Lincoln, the capital city and Lancaster County, Nebraska;"

NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 




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■ TH _ 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

787163 

ASTOT, LEf»OX AND 

TILDfcN FOUNO*itt)f<S 

R 1917 L 



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PUBLIC lis::a:- 



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LINCOLN 

The Capital City 

AND 

LANCASTER COUNTY 

NEBRASKA 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



Chicago, Illinois 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1916 




HON. THOMAS P. KENXAED 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



HON. THOMAS PERKINS KENNARD. 

Hon. Thomas Perkins Kennard, whose residence in Lincohi exceeds in 
duration that of any other citizen now hving here, arrived in this city in 1868 
and it is said that he has had more to do with the city's history than any other 
individual. It was Mr. Kennard who was chiefly responsible for locating the 
state capital in Lincoln and with other events of equal importance his name is 
inseparably associated. He was born in Belmont county, Ohio, near the town 
of Flushing, December 13, 1826, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Perkins) 
Kennard. The father, a farmer by occupation, was born in Virginia and became 
an early settler of Belmont county, Ohio. There was something in the life of 
the frontier, however, that made an appeal to him and as Belmont county became 
more thickly settled he removed with his family to Henry county, Indiana, tak- 
ing up his abode there in 1833. He there purchased a partially improved farm 
and later bought a section of land from the government at a dollar and a quarter 
per acre, he and his wife spending their remaining days upon that place. Their 
family numbered eight sons, one of whom died in infancy, and a daughter. The 
other seven sons, Levi, John, Jacob, Jenkins, Thomas P., Joseph and Marshall, 
reached mature years and the only daughter, Rachel, became the wife of Joseph 
lames. All have now passed away with the exception of Thomas P. Kennard. 

Upon his father's farm in Henry county, Indiana, whither he removed when 
seven years of age, Thomas P. Kennard spent the greater part of his youth. He 
attended school but very Httle. about a year in all. In his youth he spent four 
years as an employe in a woolen mill of Henry county, there learning the busi- 
ness of spinning wool, while his elder brother, Jenkins, also served an appren- 
ticeship in the same establishment. Finally the two brothers purchased the mill 
and operated it for three years, at the end of which time Thomas P. Kennard 
sold his interest to his brother. A year or two before he had decided that such 
a life was not congenial and, moreover, it was his amlntion to study law but up 
to that time he had had no opportunity to do so. He worked in the mill from 
early morning until eight o'clock in the evening and furthermore he had had 
no general education to serve as the foundation upon which to Iniild the super- 
structure of professional learning. He had obtained only a meager knowledge 
of the rudiments of learning from the commonest textbooks, gained in a year's 
attendance at school and through private study. He had no law books and was 
unable to buy them, but so strong was his purpose that he went to Newcastle, 
the county seat of Henry county, and made arrangements with a law firm to 
borrow such textbooks as he would need and which he would study under the 
di.-ection of that firm, to whom he was to report every Saturday afternoon the 
progress that he had made and receive from them further instruction as to how 

5 



6 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

to proceed. Occasionally he would get another law book and this method of 
mastering the principles of jurisprudence was followed for a year. After work- 
ing all day in the woolen mill until eight o'clock in the evening he would then 
study until eleven or sometimes twelve o'clock at night. Upon selling his interest 
in the mill to his brother he removed to the little town of Greensboro, in Henry 
county, Indiana, secured a room to use as an office and hung out his shingle, 
inscribed "T. P. Kennard, Lawyer." He was then about twenty-tive years of 
age and he had previously married. During the two years which he prac- 
ticed there he v/on a reputation as a successful and rising young lawyer and at 
the end of that time sought the broader field offered in the town of Anderson, 
the county seat of Madison county, Indiana. He remained in practice there for 
about three years. Having inherited from his father a love for the frontier, he 
then decided that he would come to Nebraska and just prior to the Civil war, 
accompanied by his oldest brother, Levi, who had decided to engage in merchan- 
dising in the west, he boarded a train at Indianapolis and proceeded to St. Louis. 
Lie there took a boat for Omaha as thfere was no railroad to bring him the 
remainder of the journey. The steamboat trip occupied about two weeks. The 
boat used wood for fuel and proceeded on its run only in the daytime, anchoring 
at some landing place at night. From Omaha the two brothers proceeded to 
Desoto, Washington county, Nebraska, where they took up their abode, Levi 
there engaging in mercantile pursuits, while Thomas P. Kennard entered upon 
the practice of law, in which he was soon well established. His ability soon 
drew to him wide attention and he became not only a leader at the bar but also 
in political circles. 

About that time the people of the state decided to hold a convention with a 
view to perfecting a constitution for statehood. Washington county chose Mr. 
Kennard as its representative in this convention and he accepted the position 
only on condition that he should be allowed to write the platform. He did so 
and its two principal planks were : first, female suffrage, or the right of women 
to vote; and second, that capital punishment should be prohibited in the new 
state. It was left to the people of Nebraska to vote for or against the statehood 
proposition and it was voted down. Soon afterward that element of the voters 
which favored statehood induced the Nebraska delegate in congress to introduce 
a bill for the organization of the state of Nebraska. The bill was enacted, was 
submitted to the people and on this occasion carried by about one hundred 
majority. Accordingly the two leading political parties met in convention at differ- 
ent places and nominated their candidates for state officers. The republicans, who 
favored state organization, met at Plattsniouth and nominated Thomas P. Kennard 
for secretary of state. The democrats, who opposed state organization, met at Ne- 
braska City. The republican convention before it adjourned chose General Thayer 
and Thomas P. Kennard to make a complete canvass of the territory of Nebraska 
in favor of the idea of state organization. General Thayer was then a candidate 
for United States senator from the new state as soon as it should come into being. 
At the ensuing election the republicans and those who favored statehood carried 
the day and the ticket for all state officials won. Mr. Kennard thus became the first 
secretary of state of Nebraska and by re-election served two terms. While in 
that office he was mainly instrumental in selecting Lincoln for the state capital 
as against < hnalia, wificli had been the territorial capital. He led the fight in 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 7 

the state legislature and not only that but he also fathered the movement which 
led to the appointment of a commission of three men who should have the power 
to locate not only the state capital but also important state institutions. This 
commission, which was composed of Governor Butler, State Auditor Gillespie 
and Mr. Kennard, selected Lincoln as the capital and also as the site for the 
State University, the state insane asylum, the penitentiary and other institu- 
tions. Governor Butler left practically all this to Mr. Kennard, who was his 
devoted friend, and therefore Mr. Kennard had more to do with selecting Lin- 
coln than anyone else, for he voted not only his sentiments but also those of 
Governor Butler. He had absolute control of the legislation which made Lin- 
coln the capital, the matter being left to this commission, in which he was the 
dominating spirit, owing to Governor Butler's deference to his ideas. The bill 
which passed the legislature, however, had restricted the commission to Saun- 
ders, Butler, Seward, Saline and Lancaster counties. The commission visited 
all of these counties and Mr. Gillespie favored Ashland, while Governor Butler 
and Mr. Kennanl favored Lancaster county. 

On the expiration of his second term as secretary of state Mr. Kennard re- 
sumed his law practice but soon abandoned it for other business pursuits, first 
engaging in private banking and afterward in merchandising. He was again 
called to public office by appointment of Governor Robert W. Furnas, who made 
him state agent to prosecute certain claims against the federal government grow- 
ing out of conditions arising under the enabling act. Li 1875 he was elected 
to the state senate and before the expiration of his term was appointed by 
General Grant as a member of the board to appraise about seven million acres 
of land in the Indian territory as the basis of the sale of the land to the various 
Indian tribes which the government was settling in that territory. Mr. Kennard 
was elected president of the board. After a few months he resigned and returned 
to Lincoln to become local attorney for the L'nion Pacific Railroad, in which 
capacity he continued for a number of years. He organized the Western Glass 
<& Paint Company in 1S90. becoming its president, and has since continued in 
that oftice. In i8g6 he was delegate at large from Nebraska to the republican 
national convention at St. Louis when McKinley was nominated and served as 
vice president of that body. In 1898 he was appointed by President McKinley 
receiver of ])ul)lic moneys at the LInited States land office at Lincoln and special 
disbursing agent for the government. In recent years because of his advancing 
age he has retired from all active pursuits. The state will ever- owe to him a 
debt of gratitude for his public-spirited devotion to its interests and especially 
is Lincoln indebted to him for the wisdom and foresight which he displayed in 
making this city the capital. 



V. F. HOFMANN. 



^^ F. Hofmann. who figures prominently in financial circles in Havelock, 
was born in Bohemia. March 31, 1859, his parents being Frank and .Anna Alarie 
Hofmann. who spent their entire lives in the old country. \'. F. Hofmann came 
to the United States when a young man of twenty-six years and made his first 



8 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

location in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he accepted any emploj-ment that would 
yield him an honest living. He afterward traveled over South Dakota, making 
the journey on foot across the Indian reservations, and passed through Vermillion. 
In time, however, he decided to go to California, but at Council Blufi's and at 
Oinaha he met some of his own countrymen and obtained employment in connec- 
tion with the construction of the L'nion Pacific railroad bridge at Omaha. Later 
he became an engineer for the same company and while one day leaning out of 
the cab window, when crossing the Missouri river, he was hit on the head by a 
falling sledge and fell into the water. He was taken out some distance below 
the bridge and was conveyed to St. Joseph's Hospital, where he recovered from 
his injuries. During the railroad strike he found employment in the Burlington 
shops at Plattsmoulh and when the shops were removed to Havelock he was one 
of the first workmen sent to this place. For twenty years he was a mechanic in 
the Burlington shops at Havelock. In April, 1907. he became cashier of the 
Farmers & Mechanics Bank, which position he still fills, and he now concentrates 
his energies upon his duties in that connection, proving a popular bank official. 

At Plattsmouth, Nebraska, Mr. Hofmann was joined in wedlock to Miss 
Mary Anna Matous, a nati\-e of Cedar Rapids. Iowa. In everything relating to his 
city's welfare and advancement ]\Ir. Hofmann is deeply and helpfully interested 
and has done much to promote Havelock's growth. He has been a member of 
the city council for two terms and served as mayor for two terms, giving to the 
city a public-spirited and businesslike administration. He belongs to George 
Washington Lodge, No. 250, F. & A. M.. to the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men and the ]\Iodern Woodmen of America. When he arrived in Havelock on 
the 1st of May, 1892, but few houses had been built. He has lived to see many 
changes as the town has grown and developed and in the work of improvement he 
has borne his ])art. He is, moreover, a self-made man, having steadily worked 
his way upward since starting out in life empty handed after coming to the new 
world. Such a record should serve to inspire and encourage others, showing what 
may be accomplished when there is a will to dare and to do. 



HON. BENJAMIN F. GOOD. 

Hon. Benjamin F. Good, lawyer and author, who for twelve years was judge 
of the fifth judicial district of Nebraska and then declined to again become a 
candidate for the office, is now actively engaged in the practice of law in Lincoln 
and is recognized as one of the most distinguished representatives of the bar of 
this state. 

He was born in Bloomfield, Iowa, April 2, i860, and is a son of John and 
Frances (Bothamer) Good, both of whom were natives of County Cork, Ireland, 
but on both sides he comes of English descent. His ancestors were originally 
residents of Somersetshire, England, and were of the Protestant faith. In 
1620, however, branches of both the Good and Bothamer families were planted 
in County Cork, Ireland, and the direct ancestors of Judge Good were therefore 
resideius of County Cork from 1620 until 1849, when his parents came to the 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 9 

United States. While the population of County Cork was largely Catholic the 
Good and Bothamer families held to their Protestant faith and their descendants 
have always ijeen of that belief. Immediately after their marriage in 1849, 
the parents of the Judge crossed the Atlantic and became residents of Dayton, 
Ohio, while later they made their home in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. In 1858, 
however, they removed to Iowa, estalilishing their home upon a farm near 
Bloomfield, where they spent their remaining days, the father passing away in 
1878, while the mother died in 1900. They were the parents of eight children, 
of whom six are yet living, namely: Mrs. Mary Slack, of Holyoke, Colorado; 
lohn R.. of Bloomfield, Iowa ; Benjamin F. ; Mrs. Miriam Russell, of Sewal, 
Iowa: and George W. and William H., both residents of Bloomfield, Iowa. 

Judge Good was reared on the old homestead farm near Bloomfield, Iowa, 
with the usual experiences of the farm bred boy. He attended the common 
schools for about three months each- winter and during the remainder of the 
year was employed in the work of the fields, his time being thus passed until he 
had attained his majority. He was ambitious, however, to enjoy better educational 
opportunities and at that time became a pupil in a normal school at Bloomfield, 
where he devoted two years to study. He afterward took special work in 
history and languages in the Iowa State University and during the winter of 
1883-4 taught a four months' term of school near Pulaski, Iowa, while at the 
same time he devoted every available moment to reading law. In the fall of 
1884 he matriculated in the law department of the University of Iowa, and by 
reason of his previous study and his close application while a student there, he 
was graduated with the class of June, 1885. 

Judge Good immediately afterward located at Wahoo, Nebraska, where he 
entered upon active practice in the month of September as the senior member 
of the firm of Good & Good, his partner being Hon. Edward E. Good who, 
though of the same name, was not a relative. This relationship continued until 
iQOO, when Benjamin F. Good was elected judge of the fifth Nebraska Judicial 
district court and went upon the bench, where he made so excellent a record 
that he was twice reelected for terms of four years each, so that his incumbency 
covered altogether twelve years. He would undoubtedly have been again elected 
to office had he not declined to accept the incumbency in 1912, in which year he 
removed to Lincoln, where he has since engaged in the private practice of law 
with notable success, a large and distinctively representative clientage being 
accorded him. It is characteristic of him that he ever thoroughly prepares his 
cases, and while upon the bench his decisions were marked by a notable grasp 
of everv problem presented for solution and embodied the spirit of absolute 
justice and fairness. He has become widely known as the joint author, with 
Hon. George Corcoran, of a volume entitled Nebraska Instructions to Juries 
and Law Digest, which was published in 1901 and is in general use among the 
representatives of the Nebraska bar. 

On the nth of Tune, i8yo. Judge Good was married to Miss Jennie Jessen, 
of Nebraska City, who died April 2, 1916.' She was a daughter of Mrs. Margaret 
f^Iartin) Jessen, who ere her marriage was the first teacher of white children 
in this state. To Judge and ]\Irs. Good were born two children, Anabel and 
Paul F. The former is a graduate of the State University and is a member of 
the Phi Beta Kappa. The son completed a course in Amherst College of Massa- 



10 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

chusetts at the age of twenty years and is now attending Oxford University of 
England, having been awarded the Rhodes Scholarship for Nebraska. 

judge Good is a Mason and also a member of the Knights of Pythias, fie 
belongs to the Nebraska State Bar Association and was honored with its presi- 
dency in lyii. He is likewise a member of the Lancaster County Bar Associa- 
tion. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party, and he was its 
candidate for congress in 1910. While undoubtedly he is not without that honor- 
able ambition which is so powerful and useful as an incentive to activity in 
public aftairs he regards the pursuits of private life as being in themselves 
abundantly worthy of his best efforts. His is a- notable character — one that 
subordinates personal ambition to public good and seeks rather the welfare of 
others than the aggrandizement of self. Well versed in the learning of his 
profession and with a deep knowledge of human nature and the springs of 
human conduct, possessing also sagacity and extraordinary tact, he is in the courts 
an advocate of great power and influence. 



HON. THOMAS R. BURLING. 

Hon. Thomas R. Burling, deceased, a successful merchant, farmer and 
banker who was the owner of about seven htmdred acres of valuable land in 
Lancaster county, was born in England, March 15, 1846, a son of John and 
Mary (Harry) Burling, the former a native of Cambridge, England, and the 
latter of Wales. The father followed farming about five miles south of Cam- 
bridge until 1854, when he brought his family to the United States, landing 
after a voyage of twenty-eight days. For eighteen months they remained resi- 
dents of New York city, after which Mr. Burling removed to Bureau county, 
Illinois, and purchased a farm near Buda. There his wife passed away in 1862. 
He continued to carry on farming in that locality throughout his remaining days, 
his death occurring in 1876. 

Thomas R. Burling began his education in the schools of England, lieing 
a lad of eight years when the family crossed the ocean. He further studied in 
New York city and in Illinois. His older brother enlisted for service in the 
Civil war and he and a younger Ijrother had to remain at home to care for the 
farm. He resided on the old homestead until he attained his majority and in 
1868 made his way to Lincoln, after which he pre-empted eighty acres of land 
in section 24, Buda precinct. He at once set about improving the place and con- 
tinued its culti\ation until 1887, when he removed to Firth, Lancaster county, 
where he conducted a mercantile establishment for five years, at the end of 
which time his store was destroyed by fire. He next removed to Cortland. Ne- 
braska, where he engaged in the banking business throughout his remaining 
days. He was a very successful farmer, banker and merchant and his property 
possessions in Lancaster county comprised seven hundred acres of rich and 
valuable land. 

On the 22d of October, 1868, Mr. Burling was united in marriage to ]Miss 
Alary A. Streetor, a daughter of Alson J. and Deborah (Boone) Streetor, who 
were natives of Pennsylvania and New York respectively. Removing to Illinois, 




THOMAS R- BUR-LirJG 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

. ASTOR, LFNOK 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 13 

the father engaged in farming in Mercer county throughout the remainder of his 
hfe save for a brief period which he spent on the Pacific coast. Following the 
discovery of gold he spent six months in crossing the plains to California, ac- 
companied by Hiram Boone, his brother-in-law, who worked in the gold mines 
for four years and now makes his home with Mrs. Burling. He served for four 
years during the Civil war as a member of Company D, One Hundred and 
Second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, although he at first enlisted as a veterinary 
surgeon with the Second Illinois Infantry. At the present writing he is eighty- 
six years of age. The city of Streator, Illinois, was named in honor of the 
family of which Mrs. Burling is a representative. Her father was at one time 
a candidate for president of the United States on the union labor ticket soon 
after the Civil war. He died in January, 1903, and his widow sur\-ived for only 
a brief period, passing away in February of the same year. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Burling were born seven children: Harry H., who was 
born December 5, 1869, and passed away in January, 1896: Fanny E., who was 
born November 9, 1871, and is the wife of George H. Dietz, of Lincoln; Frank 
A., who was born October 14, 1874, and is living in Lincoln; G. Worthington, 
who was born August 5, 1880, and died December 7, 188S; Perry R., who was 
born November 6, 1881, and is a farmer living-near Cortland, Nebraska; Blanche 
E,, who was born February ij, 1884, and is the wife of L. L. Kurtz, of Lincoln; 
and Earl Reece, who was born in June, 1886. and died March 8, 1887. 

]\Ir. Burling was cjuite prominent in political circles and in 1878 was elected 
to the state legislature, in which he served for one term, during which period he 
was largely instrumental in securing the passage of some wise and beneficial 
laws. His life was one of intense activity and usefulness and when he died 
after an operation on the nth of May, 1898, at the age of fifty-two years, his 
demise was the occasion of deep and widespread regret. He belonged to the 
Independent Order of r)dd Fellows and his religious faith was that of the 
Presbyterian church, to which he always loyally ahered. In 1909 Mrs. Burling 
removed to Lincoln and purchased a pleasant home at No. 2039 South Twenty- 
third street, where she has since resided. She is well known in the county and 
has the high esteem of all with whom she has been brought in contact. 



RALPH E. I-IARRINGTON. 

Ralph E. Harrington, who with his lirothcr. Harry W., is engaged in the 
real estate and insurance business in Lincoln under the style of the Harrington 
Realty Company, resides at L'niversity Place. He was born in Clinton county, 
Iowa, on the 6th of February, 1881, of the marriage of Ashel and Alice (Walrod) 
Flarrington, the former a native of New York and the latter of Iowa. In 1888 
the familv removed to Nebraska from Clinton County, Iowa, where the father 
had been engaged in the implement business for several years. r)n coming to 
this state he located near Beatrice and gave his attention to farming for a con- 
siderable period. Subsequently he was for four years on the police force of the 
city of Beatrice, after which he engaged in merchandising in Crab Orchard, 
Nebraska, in ]iartnership with our subject ^nd another son. This business was 



14 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

maintained for twelve years, after which removal was made to Pawnee City, 
where he remained for three years. He then retired from active life and took up 
his residence in University Place, where he passed away on the 4th of January, 
1916. His wife, who survives, still makes her home at University Place. 

Ralph E. Harrington was reared under the parental roof and received his 
education in the schools of Beatrice. He was engaged in business with his father 
until the removal of the family to University Place, but in 191 1 he and his 
brother, Harry \\'., formed the Harrington Realty Company and established 
offices in Lincoln. They not only deal in real estate and insurance but are also 
brokers, selling mercantile stocks, and they have built up a good patronage in 
all branches of their business. Harry W. Harrington resides at Florence, a 
suburb of Omaha, and conducts a store there, but he also owns a home in 
University Place. The firm has the state agency for the American Hail Insurance 
Company of Newark, New Jersey, and has the control of the various local 
agents of that concern in Nebraska. The Harrington Realty Company makes 
a specialty of handling eastern Nebraska farm lands and has negotiated the sale 
of much valuable property in that section. Ralph E. Harrington is a stockholder, 
director and the assistant secretary of the Home Savings & Loan Association, 
a local concern which has grown rapidly since its organization. 

On the 6th of May, igo2, occurred the marriage of Mr. Harrington and Miss 
Fosta Roberts, Frank Mills, pastor of the L'nion church at College \'iew and a 
well known business man of Lincoln, officiating. Mr. and Mrs. Harrington 
have beconie the parents of three children : a son, who died in infancy ; Donald P., 
born June 20, 1904: and Roma E., born December 12, lyog. 

Mr. Harrington supports the republican party at the polls but although he 
has never been remiss in any of his duties as a good citizen he has never had the 
time nor inclination to hold public office. He is identified with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America and in religious 
faith is a Methodist. He has gained a gratifying measure of prosperity, which is 
the direct reward of his close attention to business, his enterprise and his integrity, 
and he has also won the sincere respect of all who know him, for his salient quali- 
ties are those that characterize honorable manhood. His residence is at No. 2323 
P street, LIniversity Place. 



ADOLPHUS ROBERT TALBOT. 

Adolphus Robert Talbot is senior member of the law firm of Talbot & Allen, 
of Lincoln, and is also head consul of the Modern Woodmen of America with 
headquarters in Nebraska's capital city. The importance and extent of his 
professional and business activities at once place him among the leading residents 
of the city. He was born upon a farm in Warren County, Illinois, April 11. 1859. 

His father, William Talbot, a fai^mer by occupation, was born in England 
and after arriving at years of maturity married Amy Joan Godfrey, also a native 
of that country. Their marriage was celebrated in England, after which they 
emigrated to ihe United .States and for two years were residents of New York. 
They then removed to Warren county. Illinois, where they spent their remaining 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 15 

da_vs. After iiviiig for many years upon the farm they took up their abode in 
Alexis, a small town three miles distant from their old homestead. There they 
spent their remaining days, the father passing away at the age of eighty-five 
vears. In their family were nine children, seven of whom are living: Mrs. 
Frances .Ann Andrews, of Emporia, Kansas; Edwin H., of La Plata, Missouri; 
George W., of Los Angeles, California ; Mrs. Harriet Ann Vivian, of Schenectady, 
New York; ]\Irs. Hilary Jane Anderson, of Galesburg, Illinois; Adolphus R., of 
this review; and Frederick S., of La Plata, J\Iissouri. 

In religious faith the father, William Talbot, was a devout Methodist and in 
political belief a stanch republican. In i860 he was a candidate for township 
oftice on the ticket on which Abraham Lincoln ran for the presidency and was 
elected. He took a very helpful part in promoting the moral progress of his 
community and was instrumental in securing the erection of several Methodist 
churches in W'arren county. In youth he had been denied all educational oppor- 
tunities but in the school of experience he learned many valuable lessons and, 
moreover, he became a great reader and student of good books, thereby acquir- 
ing extensive learning and de\eIoping his natural talents. His ability made him 
a leader in his home community, and his opinions were listened to with deference. 
Realizing the value of education he provided all his children with collegiate 
training and, moreover, he gave to each one of them a thousand dollars as they 
attained their majority, thus assisting them to start out in life. 

Adolphus Robert Talbot was reared upon his father's farm in Illinois to the 
age of sixteen years, at which time he entered the high school at Alexis, Illinois, 
completing his course there by graduation when eighteen years of age. He then 
became a student in Hedding College, a Methodist school of Abingdon, Knox 
county, Illinois, which he attended for four years and was graduated in 1881, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, becoming valedictorian of his class. 
In the meantime he had determined ujion the practice of law as a life work and 
with that end in view he entered the L'nion College of Law at Chicago, which 
is the law dejjartment of Ijoth the Northwestern LTniversity and the University 
of Chicago. He was graduated therefrom with the class of 1883 with the 
degree of B. L. and in 1886 his alma mater, Hedding College, conferred upon 
him the LL. D. degree. 

On the 1st of May, 1883, ;\Ir. Talbot located in Lincoln, Nebraska, where 
for a period of twenty years he actively engaged in the practice of law, during 
which time he was regarded as one of the eminent and able members of the city 
bar. For a period of ten years, or from 1887 until 1897, he was a member of the 
firm of Talbot & Bryan, his partner having been Hon. William Jennings Bryan, 
thrice democratic nominee for the presidency of the United States. During the 
full period of his law practice, covering twenty years. Mr. Talbot was assistant 
general attorney for Nebraska of the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company. He 
yet remains at the head of the law firm of Talbot & .\llen, his partner being the 
Hon. Thomas S. Allen, who at the present time holds the office of L'nited States 
district attorney. 

In politics ^Ir. Talbot is a republican liut des[)ite this fact has always been 
an ardent friend oi his former law partner. W. J. Bryan. In the fall of 1896 
^Ir. Talipot was elected as state senator on the republican ticket and was reelected 
to the office in 189S, serving as president pro tem of the senate during his second 



16 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

term and by virtue of this ottice became acting governor of the state when 
Nebraska's chief executive was absent. In 1914 Mr. Talbot was appointed by 
President Wilson peace commissioner from the United States to Coiivia and is 
still serving in that capacity. He is ever found in those circles where men of 
intelligence are met in the discussion of vital and significant problems, and his 
labors and influence have been of far-reaching effect. 

Mr. Talbot's official connection with the Alodern Woodmen of America began 
on the 23d of November, 1890, when he was elected a member of the board of 
directors. He was repeatedly elected to that office until 1903, when he was 
elected head consul (or president) of the order,- at which time the office was 
removed from Springfield, Illinois, to Lincoln, Nebraska, where it has since 
remained. Mr. Talbot has since occupied the position, having been reelected 
five times, so that his incumbency covers twelve years, during which he has 
occupied the highest e.xecutive office of the largest fraternal society in the world. 
As head consul he has general supervision over all the work and activities of the 
Older throughout the L'nited States with a field force of more than five thousand 
active men untler him. He is likewise a prominent Mason, having attained the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and the Knights Templar degree of the 
York Rite, while with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine he has crossed the sands 
of the desert. He is likewise an Odd Fellow and a Knight of Pythias, and he is 
a director of the Woodmen's Accident Association of Lincoln. 

On the 15th of May, 1884, Mr. Talbot was married to Miss Addie S. Harris, 
of Abingdon, Illinois, and they have three children : Marie Frances, who is 
now the wife of Charles Stuart, of Lincoln; Robert Harris, a senior in the LTni- 
versity of Nebraska ; and Eleanor Virginia, fourteen years of age, at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Talbot are prominent members of St. Paul's Methodist Episco- 
])al church, in the work of which he takes an active part, while for thirty years 
he has served as one of the church trustees. He is a prominent figure in the 
Nebraska State Bar Association and also a member of the American Bar Associa- 
tion. His professional activities and his official duties in his present connection 
have brought him a wide acquaintance throughout the country and wherever 
known he is held in highest regard, honored for his ability and esteemed for his 
personal worth. 



HON. JOHX B. WRIGHT. 

Hon. John B. Wright, who is one of the oldest and most prominent of 
Lincoln's citizens, established his home here in 1874 and throughout the interven- 
ing period has been actively associated with the material development of the 
city as a lianker and grain merchant and also has been an influencing factor in its 
political affairs through the past forty years. 

He was born in Rochester, New York, DeccnilxT 10, 1845, a son of Thomas 
and Phebe (Brooks) Wright, both of whom were natives of Nottingham, Eng- 
land, where their ancestors had lived for many generations. The marriage of 
Thomas Wrigiit and Phebe Brooks was celebrated in Nottingham and their three 
eldest children were born there ere their emigration to the new world. In 1841, 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 17 

liowever, they crossed the Atlantic to the United States and after residing for a 
short time in Batavia, New York, removed to Rochester. In 1849, when their son 
lohn was a Httle lad of four years, they became residents of Buffalo, New York, 
where for an extended period Thomas Wright was prominently engaged in the 
wholesale millinery business, continuing a leading factor in commercial circles 
of the city almost to the time of his death, which occurred in Monroe, Michigan, 
when he was eighty-one years of age. Mrs. Wright died in Buffalo at the age of 
seventy-seven. There were seven children born to them but only two are now 
living, John B. and Alfred, the latter a resident of Monroe, Michigan. 

The former was reared and educated in Buffalo, New York, and between the 
ages of seventeen and twenty-two years taught several terms of school in 
Monroe county, Michigan. In 1868 he made a trip to Montana, accompanied by 
some young companions. The party of five young adventurers v traveled from 
Siou.x City to Fort Benton, Montana, on a small steamer and were forty-eight 
days in making the trip. Mr. Wright remained for six years in Montana, 
devoting his attention through that period to mining and ranching but in 1874 
disposed of the ranch interests, which he had acquired in that state, and came 
to Lincoln, where he has since remained. For forty years he has continued his 
residence in this city, which was but seven years old at the time he located 
here. He was therefore one of the pioneers of the town, which had just been 
made the capital of Nebraska at the time of his arrival. He has been intimately 
identified with various phases of its development and progress through almost 
the entire period of its history and has been one of the foremost figures in 
business and political affairs of the city. He has stuilied closely its oj)portunities 
and its possibilities and has been a prominent factor in all public movements 
looking to the city's growth and betterment. He has recognized and utilized 
opportunities and has wrought along the lines of modern city building, his 
labors being far-reaching, resultant and beneficial. 

At the same time Mr. Wright has carefully managed his private aft'airs and 
in a strictly businesslike manner, with the result that he has built up a splendid 
competence and is today one of the substantial residents of the capital. Through 
the greater part of this period he has devoted his attention to the grain trade, 
although he has many subsidiary interests, including connection with the banking 
and real estate business of the city. His plans have been carefully formulated, 
his activities intelligently directed and the result has been most gratifying. In 
1890 he was one of the organizers of the Columbia National liank and served 
as its president for seventeen years, or until it was sold. During that period 
he carefully directed its policy and his sound judgment was manifest in its 
success. 

At the same time he has been prominent in a political way and his fellow 
townsmen, appreciative of his worth and ability, have twice elected him mayor 
of Lincoln, in which connection he has given a businesslike and ])rogressive 
administration. He also served in the state legislature for two terms, one in the 
house and one in the senate, and has occupied various minor offices in the city, 
including membership in the city council for two terms. While serving during 
his first term as mayor, in i88r, he was largely instrumental in procuring legisla- 
tion which culminated in building Lincoln's splendid waterworks system, which 
is the pride of all citizens, and he took the lead in the movement which resulted 



18 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

in niuni.ripal ownership of the water plant. It was the city that built the water- 
works and has since continued to own this public utility. It is a worthy monument 
to the untiring labor, foresight and devotion to municipal welfare on the part of 
Mr. Wright. In his political views he has always been a stalwart republican and 
has frequently been solicited to become a candidate for congressman and other 
high offices but has always declined. 

On the 14th of May, 1890, Mr. Wright was married to Miss Jessie Eugenia 
Robinson, of Chicago, and they have one son, John Charles, whose birth 
occurred January 23, 1897, and who is now a student in the University of 
Nebraska. 

Mr. Wright is a Knight Templar !Mason. a member of the ^Mystic Shrine 
and a prominent member of the Knights of Pythias. In the latter organization 
he has held the office of treasurer of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska for twenty- 
four consecutive years and still remains in that position. He is also identified 
•with the Elks. His life work has been of distinct value to his fellowmen. His 
character has stood the test of prosperity. He has never lost his power of self- 
control nor allowed his life to become self-centered but has reached out along lines 
of usefulness and worth to the community for the benefit of his fellowmen and 
the city in which he lives. 



JUDGE ALLEN W.. FIELD. 

Judge Allen W. Field, of Lincoln, was one of the most prominent and most 
public-spirited residents of the city and his demise was widely mourned. For a 
number of years he served upon the bench of the district court of Lancaster 
county, but at the time of his death was a member of the well known law firm of 
I-"ield. Ricketts & Ricketts. A native of Illinois, his birth occurred in La Salle 
on the 20th of November, 1833, and his parents were Wescott R. and Bethia 
(Bates) Field, natives of Vermont. In 1850 they went to Illinois and there 
resided until 1858, when they went to Osage', Iowa. There the father engaged in 
mercantile business for about three years, after which he decided to try his 
fortune in Neljraska, which was then on the western frontier. He located in 
Lancaster county, taking up a homestead in Yankee Hill precinct adjoining 
the present site of the Hospital for the Insane. Later his family joined him 
here and he operated that farm for a long period. At length he removed to 
Colorado, where he passed away in August, 1902. He had long survived his wife 
as her demise occurred in 1875. 

Allen W. Field entered the public schools at Osage, Iowa, which he attended 
until he was ten years of age, and continued his education in the schools of 
Lancaster county. Nebraska. As a boy and youth he also gave much of his time 
to assisting in the development of the home farm. In 1870 he matriculated in 
Tabor College at Tabor, Iowa, but the State University of Nebraska being opened 
the following year, he became a student in that institution, which he attended 
for six years, receiving at the end of that time the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Later the university conferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts. His hich 
scholarship was indicated by the fact that he belonged to Phi Beta Kappa. After 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 19 

completing his college worlc he began the study of law in the office of James E. 
Philpolt and in 1878 was admitted to the bar. During that year he held the office 
of justice of the peace and in January, 1879, he formed a partnership with 
Edwin P. Holmes, who later became judge of the district court. This association 
was maintained with nuUual jileasure and profit until 18S3, and the firm was 
accorded a large share of the public patronage. In 18S2 Mr. Field was elected 
to the lower house of the state legislature and served as a member of that body 
during the eighteenth and uineteenth sessions. He was further honoretl by 
being elected as speaker of the house in the latter session and the impartiality of 
his rulings gained him the commendation of his fellow members. In 1884 he 
formed a law partnership with General J. R. Webster, with whom he was associ- 
ated in practice until 1886, when he was appointed judge of the district court. He 
acquitted himself so admirably in that office that he was elected to that position 
in 1887 and again in 1891, serving upon the bench until 1892, when he resigned 
in order to devote his time to the management of his campaign for election to 
congress, he having received the republican nomination. His opponent was 
William Jennings Bryan, who gained the election by the narrow margin of one 
hundred and forty votes. The e.xcellent showing which Judge Field made was 
evidence of the high esteem in which he was held throughout the district and 
the confidence placed in his ability and integrity. He resumed the practice of 
law at Lincoln and remained an active member of the bar until his demise on 
the 9th of June, 191 5. He was employed as counsel in the greater number of 
the important cases tried in the courts of this district. He realized fully the 
necessity of preparing his cases carefully, and his painstaking investigation of 
every point of the evidence was an important factor in his success. He had a 
comprehensive and exact knowledge of the law, was skillful in applying it to the 
case in hand and was convincing in the presentation of his arguments. 

Judge Field was married on the 20th of December, 1883, to Miss Alay B. 
Fairfield, a daughter of Ediuund I!, and IMary A. (Baldwin) Fairfield, the former 
a native of A'irginia and the latter of \'ermont. Mr. Fairfield devoted his life to 
educational work and in 1849 became president of Hillsdale College at Hills- 
dale, Michigan, a position which he held for twenty-one years. In 1S76 he was 
chosen as chancellor of the State L^niversity of Nebraska and served in that 
capacity for six years, after which he returned to ^Michigan, where he lived 
until bis removal to ( )berlin, Ohio, in itjoo. He passed the remainder of his 
life there, dying in November, 1904. His wife had long preceded him to the 
great beyond, her demise occurring in March, 1881. To Judge and Mrs. Field 
were born four children, namely: Allen W., whose birth occurred on the 6th of 
May. 1885, and who succeeded his father as a member of the firm of Field, 
Ricketts & Ricketts : Georgia B., who is a twin of Allen and is now the wife of 
Fred W. Upson, head of the department of chemistry of the State Agricultural 
College; Kate, who was born on the 8th of June. 18S9, and is at home; and 
Edmund, born July 3, 1892, who is attending the State University. 

Judge Field was one of the leaders of the republican party in Nebraska and 
did much to secure its success in his district although in the last years of his life 
he became somewhat independent in his political views. He attended the First 
Congregational church and fraternally was identified with, the Knights of Pythias, 
the Masons, the Mystic Shrine and the Ancient fjrder of United ^^■orkmen. He 



20 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

erected a beautiful residence at No. 544 South Seventeenth street, and his home was 
always open to his friends, among whom were numbered the men most prominent 
in the intellectual and civic life of Lincoln. Judge Field gave unstintingly of his 
time and energy to the promotion of the public welfare and among the im])ortant 
services which he rendered to his home city was his successful tight before the 
interstate commerce commission in 1895 to remove discriminations in railroad 
rates which were then operating against Lincoln in favor of Omaha and other 
western cities. The Judge was the attorney for the Lincoln Commercial Club 
and showed so clearly the injustice of the discriminations that the commission 
ordered the greater part of tliem abolished and the railroads subsequently did 
away with the others voluntarily. When an etifort was made in 1914 and 191 5 to 
remove the State University from its present location to the state farm Judge 
Field was largely instrumental in securing the necessary financial support to 
make possible the expansion of the university on the present site. At that time 
he was president of the alumni association and vigorously opposed the removal 
of the school as he was convinced that it would work an injury both to the 
university and to the College of .Agriculture. When the question was put to the 
vote of tile i)eopIe in the fall of 1915 the decision was overwhelmingly in favor 
of his position and was in large measure the result of his efforts. His attitude in 
this contest was characteristic of the man as in fighting the removal of the uni- 
versity he was working against his own financial interests since he had real estate 
holdings in the vicinity of the state farm whose value would have Ijeen greatly 
increased if the university had been located there. 

In its issue of the 9th of June, 1915, the day of his death, the Lincoln .Star 
paid the following well deserved tribute to Judge Field. "Death claimed the fore- 
most citizen of Lincoln and pioneer of Nebraska last night when Judge Field 
succumljed to heart trouble, from which he had been a sufferer for more than 
a year. Judge Field was si.xty-one years of age last November, 1914. Coming 
to the state in 1861, Judge Field took an active part in the development of 
Nebraska. He was the type of citizen who placed public service before private 
interests and was an untiring laborer for the best interests of the community. 
His kindly, forceful personality made many warm friends and he enjoyed the love 
ami admiration of thousands of Nebraskans." 



EDWARD FRANKLIN BLACK. 

Among the men in Lancaster county who have jnished forward the wheels 
of progress is numbered Edward Franklin Black, now deceased. He did much 
to raise the standard of live stock in this section of the state and the material 
development of the community was accordingly enhanced. In all of his business 
career he was found thoroughly reliable and progressive and his well directed 
energy and keen insight brought to him very gratifying success. His birth 
occurred at Whitby, near Toronto, Ontario, Canada, February 12, 1846, his 
parents being David and Sarah Black. The father was born near Whitby, 
Ontario, acquired his education in the schools of that locality and afterward 
learned the carpenter's trade. Tn addition to working at his trade he engaged in 



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LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 25 

preaching in Canada and there remained until 1884, when he removed to Ray- 
mond, Nebraska, where he organized a congregation and built the first church. 
He was also instrumental in building a parsonage there and for a considerable 
time engaged in preaching at that place. At length he and his wife removed to 
Council liluffs, Iowa, where both passed away. 

Edward Franklin Black was indebted to the public school system of Canada 
for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed, and when his textbooks were 
put aside he began learning the jeweler's trade. Working his way upward in 
that connection, he at length conducted several jewelry stores and in addition 
he took up as a side interest the imjjortation of fine horses. When his health 
failed he determined to engage in business that would not be so confining as 
the jewelry trade and, disposing of his stores in Canada, he removefl to Ne- 
braska. He had previously engaged in importing pure bred Shire. Clyde and 
I'crchcron stallions from Scotland and other points in Europe and he also made 
many trips to the south, from which point he brought fine horses to Raymond, 
Lancaster county, where he operated an extensive horse barn. There at one 
time he was also engaged in general merchandising but the importation and 
breeding of live stock claimed the greater part of his attention. After removing 
to Lancaster county he purchased seven hundred and twenty acres in Oak town- 
ship and established his home in Raymond, where he continued in the business 
of importing high grade stallions. On account of his popularity in this section 
of the state he was frequently called upon to act as auctioneer in the sale of live 
stock and in that way he became widely known throughout his part of the 
country, being everywhere called Colonel Black. He was an expert horseman 
and he had comprehensive knowledge of the business of importing, breeding and 
selling fine stock. Although he owned more than seven hundred acres of fine 
agricultural land in Oak township, he never cultivated the farm but left its 
development and improvement to his sons and concentrated his efforts along 
other lines, in which he continued up to the time of his death. 

Mr. Black was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Dixon Lees, who was 
born in Roxburyshire, Scotland, March i, 1831, a daughter of George and Mary 
(Montgomery) Lees, who were also nati\es of the land of hills and heather, 
whence they crossed the briny deep to Canada. In early life her father ww, a 
saddler of Scotland and after reaching Canada in 1858 he turned his attention 
to gardening. Both he and his wife dejjarted this life in Canada and were laid 
to rest in the Toronto cemetery. Mrs. Black was taken to Canada by her ])arents 
when but seven years of age and was there educated and married. In 1886 she 
accompanied her husband to Lancaster county and has since made her home in 
Raymond. She has a very attractive residence in this city, which she erected 
after her husband's death. To Mr. and Mrs. Black were born three children: 
Robert J. ; Mabel, who is the wife of J. ]\I. Cameron, a resident farmer of Lan- 
caster county living near Raymond ; and Paul, who follows farming in the same 
county. 

The death of Mr. Black occurred in Raymond. Alarch 2, 1904, and he was 
laid to rest in Oak Creek cemetery. His political allegiance was given to the 
democratic party and he filled his oflice of justice of the {)eace. serving in that 
capacity until his death, and was also a member of the town board and chairman 
of the school board. He belonged to the Presbyterian church, of which his 



26 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

widow is also a member, and his life was ever guided by the teachings of that 
organization, making him a man whom to know was to respect and honor. When 
death called him friends came from all parts of the county to attend his funeral' 
services, for wherever he was known he was held in the highest regard. He 
was very charitable and benevolent, constantly holding out a helping hand where 
aid was needed, and he was also most progressive. He never deviated from a 
course which he believed to be right between himself and his fellowmen. In 
manner he was genial and his unfeigned cordiality won him the respect and 
good will of all with whom he came in contact. His circle of friends was large 
and their high regard came to him as the direct consequence of a well spent life. 



FRANCIS \\'. BROWN. 



Francis W. Brown was prominent in business circles of Lincoln as the presi- 
dent of the F. W. Brown Lumber Company and was also a leader in public affairs, 
having served as mayor of the city and being at the time of his demise post- 
master. A native of Missouri, he was born in Boonville on the i6th of June, 
1854, and was a son of Elisha \V. and Mary (Brent) Brown, the former born 
in Kentuckv and the latter in \'irginia. At an early day in the history of 
Missouri, they took up their residence in that state and the father engaged in 
banking at Sedalia and at Boonville, but during the Civil war he went to Jackson- 
ville, Illinois, where he conducted a bank for several years. Later he returned 
to Sedalia, Missouri, where he passed the remainder of his life. His wife is 
also deceased. 

Francis W. Brown was reared under the parental roof and was given excellent 
educational opportunities. He attended the Kemper Military Institute of Boon- 
ville, Alissouri, and the Illinois College at Jacksonville, thus making thorough 
preparation for assuming the duties and responsibilities of life. On leaving school 
he became connected with the lumber business and remained in Jacksonville until 
1878, when he established a lumberyard on his own account at New Berlin, 
Illinois, which he operated for three years. At the end of that time he accepted 
a position as traveling salesman for S. K. Martin Lumber Company of Chicago, 
which he re])resented on the road for seven years, during which time he made his 
home in Chicago. Subsequently he liecanie vice president of the Henry & Coats- 
man Lumber Company of Kansas City, which concern owned a line of yards in 
Nebraska and Missouri. ]\lr. Brown removed to Omaha, where the purchasing 
office of the company was located, and took over that <le])artment of the business. 
Some time later he was induced to remove his office to Lincoln, where the main 
vard of the company had been established and to assume its management in 
addition to his work as purchasing agent. He removed here in 1891 and when 
the company went out of business two years later he purchased the yard, which 
was subsequently conducted under the style of the F. W. Brown Lumber Com- 
pany, of which he was president and treasurer. He continued to direct its aft'airs 
until his demise and also had many other financial interests of importance. He 
was for a time a director of the Columbia National Bank, and his excellent 
judgment anrl keen business insight were factors in the success of that institu- 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 27 

tion. In 1906 he erected a beautiful lionie at 1521 South Twentieth street and 
there Mrs. Brown still reisdes. 

Mr. Brown was married on the 226 of December, 1880, to Miss Jennie Ben- 
nett, whose parents, Samuel F. and Cornelia (Rogers) Bennett, were born in 
New York. Her father engaged in merchandising in that state until 1876, when 
he removed to Omaha and continued in that line of business until his death. 
Mis wife passed away there in 1891. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Jjrown, namely: Frank W., whose birth occurred on the 18th of August, 1882, 
and who is now editor of the Kearney Morning Times of Kearney, Nebraska; 
and Howard B., who was born on the 8th of July, 1888, and died on the 2d of 
February, 1899. 

Mr. Brown was one of the prominent democrats of the state and was his 
party's candidate for congress and almost secured the election, being defeated 
by E. M. Pollard by only a small majority. He was twice mayor of Lincoln and 
during his term of oftice secured many needed improvements in the city govern- 
ment. It was during his administration that the first of the land now comprised 
in Antelope Park was purchased. He also held a number of other municipal 
offices and in the fall of 1914 was appointed postmaster, in which position he 
was serving at the time of his death, which occurred on the 7th of July, 1915. 
In lyoS Mr. Brown was a delegate to the democratic national convention at 
Denver, which nominated Hon. William Jennings Bryan for the presidency, and 
he served as the member from Nebraska on the resolutious committee. He 
always considered a public office a public trust and discharged his duties with 
an eye vingle to the general welfare. He was a member of the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, and his personality was such that he made and retained 
friends easily. In religious faith he was an Episcopalian. His demise was 
widely regretted and in his death Lincoln sustained a heavy loss. 



ORACLE .MICHAEL SHORE. 

Oracle Michael Shore engaged in farming for many years and won a compe- 
tence that enabled him at length to retire from active life and at the time of his 
death he was living in L'niversity Place, where he was well known and highly 
honored. His birth occurred in Rochester, Indiana, September 8, 1842, and 
his parents were John and Wilhelmina (Cummins) Shore. When but two years 
of age he lost his father and when he was only ten years old his mother passed 
away. He was then taken by an aunt and later by an elder sister, with whom 
he made his home until he enlisted in the L'nion army at the age of nineteen 
years, becoming a member of Company D, Eighty-seventh Indiana A'olunteer 
Infantry. He served with that command for three years and had even more 
exciting experiences than fall to the lot of the average soldier as he was captured 
by the Confederates and succeeded in escaping and rejoining his regiment. He 
and four other prisoners agreed to attem])t to escape when he should give the 
word. He was walking by the side of the guard, who was mounted on horse- 
back, and called his attention to something shining up the road and as soon as 
the Confederate took his eyes oiT the prisoners they ran away. Our subject and 



28 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

' . . 

two others succeeded in escaping and after walking all night and until ten 

o'clock the next morning reached their own regiment. 

\Miilc Mr. Shore was in the army his sister removed to Iroquois, Illinois, and 
after his discharge from military service he joined her there. Not long after- 
ward he was married and after living in Illinois for a time he and his wife went 
to Kansas, wliere they remained for three years. In 1874 they came to Nebraska, 
locating in Cass county, and three years later took up their residence in Lancaster 
county, Mr. Shore purchasing eighty acres of land in Stevens Creek precinct. 
He made many improvements upon the place, kept .everything in excellent repair, 
and in his farm work followed the latest methods and utilized the most up-to-date 
machinery. He was very successful as an agriculturist and in 1906, feeling that 
he was entitled to a period of leisure, he retired and removed to University Place. 
Five years later, on the 27th of April. 191 1, he passed away there, and his demise 
was deeply regretted by his fellow citizens, who held him in warm regard. 

Mr. Shore was married on the 19th of .\pril, 1865. to Miss Ella, Beach, who 
was born in Franklin county, Ohio, September 7, 1848, and who is a sister of 
C. C. Beach, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. She is the 
mother of three children, as follows: Charles, who is a stockholder in and 
salesman for the Buick Automobile Company of Lincoln, married Fannie Hall 
and has three children. Louie. Susie and Charlotte. Oscar resides with his mother 
and is engaged in the jewelry business. Lena is the wife of Sam Latture. of 
University Place, and they have three children, Ethel, Everett and Ada. Mr. and 
Mrs. Shore also reared an adopted daughter, Phena, who is now the wife of Bert 
Gregg, a farmer of Stevens Creek precinct, by whom she has four children. 
Erma. Irene, Gerald and Lynelle. 

]\Ir. Shore was a republican and loyally supported the cantlidates of that 
party at the polls although he never took an active interest in politics. He was 
a memljer of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which his wife still belongs, 
and his influence was always on the side of right and justice. He measured up 
to high standards of manhood and was respected for his integrity and his fair 
dealing. I lis wife still lives in University Place and she is highly esteemed by 
all who have come in contact with her. 



ORLANDO W". WEBSTER. 

C)rIando \Y. \^'cbster. who for a third of a century was engaed in the boot 
and shoe business at Lincoln but who in more recent years has given his attention 
to other matters, has been thus actively connected with the commercial develop- 
ment of the city, and ranks with its foremost business men. lie was born in 
Richland county. Ohio, July 18. 1844. a son of Orrin Webster, who in early 
life engaged in the practice of law. He, too, was a native of Richland county, 
Ohio, born in 1819. and he died there upon his home farm January 6, 1863, when 
forty- four years of age. Me in turn was the son of William W'ebster. who was 
born in Farmington. Hartford county. Connecticut, in 1766 and became one of 
the pioneer residents of Richland county. Ohio, where he later assisted in organ- 
izing the First State Bank of Mansfield. He became also a well-to-do farmer 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 2!) 

of that county and a man of large business affairs, ileing one of the pioneers of 
that section and a man of high character, he was looked upon as one of the 
leaders in his community and left the impress of his individuality upon the 
development of that section of the state. He died in the year 1H38. lie was a 
second cousin of Noah Webster, the famous lexicographer. This branch of 
the Webster family is descended from John Webster, who came from England 
in 1630 and settled in the Massachusetts colony, while later he served as one of 
the early colonial governors of Connecticut. 

The mother of Orlando W. Webster bore the maiden name of Ruth Croninger 
and was born in Richland county, Ohio, in 1820, being just three months younger 
than her husliand, Orrin Webster, to whom she gave her hand in marriage in 
1841. She died in Lincoln, Nebraska, after reaching the advanced age of eighty- 
seven years, and for more than a half century she had lived a widow, true to 
the memory of him to whom she gave her early troth. To them were born eleven 
children, two of whom died yotmg, those reaching adult ages being as follows: 
Daniel S., who died of pneumonia at Brrdstown, Kentucky, in 1862, while serv- 
ing in the Union army in the Twenty-sixth C'hio Regiment ; Orlando Watson, of 
this review ; Alfred Kelley, who became a lawyer and died at Hastings, Nebraska, 
a few years ago ; Eliza M., who gave her hand ni marriage to David Fralich 
and passed away in Lincoln ; \''ernelia, the widow of Scott Depue, whose demise 
occurred in 1874; William W., who died in Lincoln leaving a widow and three 
sons — Dr. Fred, of Lincoln, Dr. Louis, of Ilavelock, and Llomer, of St. Joseph, 
Missouri; Alice Carey, who passed away in 1873; Candace S., who is the wife of 
Hon. J. I'. A. lilack, of Hastings, Nebraska; and Ida E., of Hastings, the widow 
of Lucius J. Capps, who was a well-known attorney of Hastings. The widow 
of Scott Depue, who has made her home in Lincoln since 1875, was for twenty 
years employed in the Lincoln postoffice and is widely known as Nellie Depue. 

Orlando W. Webster was reared to farm life in his native county and attended 
a local academy until he reached the age of seventeen years. He afterward 
taught scdiool for one winter and in 1862 he enlisted as a member of Company D, 
Sixty-fourth C)hio A'olunteer Infantry, serving for a year in the L'nion army. 
He was then mustered out and following his return home devoted his attention 
to teaching school in the winter of 1863-4. Early in 1865 he reenlisted, becoming 
a mem])er of Comjiany D of the fJne Hundred and Ninety-seventh Ohio Regi- 
ment, with which he remained until the close of the war, holding the rank of 
sergeant when finally mustered out at Columbus, Ohio, in August, 1865. 

The war over, Mr. Webster went to Portage, Wisconsin, where he live<l 
with his uncle, the Rev. J. B. Plumstcad, a retired Presbyterian minister, with 
whom he continued for a year, during which time he attended the local high 
school. He afterward taught school for a year in that vicinity and subsequently 
became principal of a ward school at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. In 1869 he arrived 
in Nebraska and in 1870 became a resident of Lincoln, where he has since lived. 
He has seen the city grow from a village of about two thousand inhabitants to 
its present size. He has been closely identified with the city's growth through 
all this period, not only as a business man but as a sujiporter of all those plans 
and projects which have looked to the betterment of municipal conditions. For 
a third of a century he was a successful shoe merchant on O street, being one 
of the pioneers in that line of business in this city. His trade increased with 



30 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

tlie growth of Lincoln and for many years he enjoyed an extensive patronage, 
but in 1903 he withdrew from that hne of trade and has since given his attention 
to other interests, while the fruits of his former toil have supplied him with all 
of the necessities and many of the comforts and luxuries of life. He is now a 
director of the Lincoln Traction Company and he has other investments which 
return to him a good income. 

On the 24th of October, 1876, in Mansfield, Ohio, ]Mr. Webster was married 
to Miss Anna Dull, who died April 3, 1913, leaving three sons, Joseph D., 
Richard ( ). and Calvin. 'i"he eldest is now a farmer of this county. The second 
son is a bacteriologist and chemist who is now in the service of the L^iited 
States government in connection with the bureau of chemistry of the department 
of agriculture, with headquarters in Chicago. He is a graduate of the University 
of Nebraska, wliere Calvin, the youngest son, is now a student. 

The family belong to the Presbyterian church, and Mr. Webster is also identi- 
fied with the Masonic lodge, the Sons of the American Revolution, the Commer- 
cial Club and with the Grand Army of the Republic, thus maintaining jileasant 
relations with his old army comrades with whom he followed the old t^ag as he 
wore the blue uniform an<l marched in defense of the Union. ITis political 
allegiance has always lieen given to the republican party since age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise, and on its ticket he has been elected to a number of 
pubHc offices. It is a well known fact that with him ])atriotic citizenship is above 
I)artisanship. He was for ten years a member of the city council and during 
eight years of that time was chairman of the finance committee, while for two 
years he was president of the council, receiving a unanimous vote for the office 
on both occasions. As chairman of the finance committee he originated the plan 
of requiring the expenditures of the city to be kept within ninety per cent of the 
levy and by strict adherence to this policy the city's credit was such that its four 
per cent bonds brought a premium — a thing that has never happened before or 
since. This is but one of the many tangible evidences that might be cited of his 
devotion to Lincoln's welfare and improvement. He has always stood stalwartly 
for municipal honor and has promoted in every possible way those interests 
which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. 



CHARLES FRANK HARRHAM. 

Charles Frank Ilarphani, vice president and secretary of Harpham I'.rothers 
Company, wholesale saddlers of Lincoln, was born June 10. 1857, in Whiteside 
county. Illinois, his birth occurring on the prairie farm on which his father had 
located a short time before. He was only four years of age when his father 
died, after which he was taken by his mother to Ohio county. Indiana, and there 
his boyhood and youth were passed partly on a farm and partly in the village 
of Hartford in that county. He attended the common schools for about three 
months each winter until he was eighteen years of age, when he returned to 
Whiteside county, Illinois, and took up his residence in Sterling, the countv seat. 
His uncle, John Harpham. had a wliolesale and retail harness store there and 
Charles F. Harpham l)eg;ui working for his uncle as a clerk and general assistant. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 31 

l)cing thus employed from 1876 until 1881, after which he went upon the road 
as a traveling salesman for the wholesale saddlery firm of Gordon Kurtz & 
Company, of Indianapolis, Indiana. In 1885 he resigned that position and 
came to Lincoln, where he entered the employ of the firm of Gustin & Harpham, 
a wholesale harness firm, of which his elder brother, J. C. Harpham, was a 
partner. In 1887 he and his brother purchased the interest of Mr. Gustin and 
the firm of Harpham P.rothers was established and has since been in existence. 
It was incorporated in 1900 under the present style, with Charles F. Harpham 
as the vice pr^ident and secretary. During the early days of the partnership 
he traveled upon the road for the firm but concentrated his efforts upon active 
management at headquarters twenty-five years ago and has since devoted all his 
attention to administrative direction and executive control, bending his efforts 
at all times to constructive work. 

On the 4th of February, 1891, Mr. Harpham was married to Miss Ella Hoddy, 
a native of Mattoon, Illinois, and they have one son, Julius V., now a young 
man of twenty-four years, occupying a responsible position in the First National 
Bank of Lincoln. 

In his jiolitical views Mr. Harpham is a republican, but while he has always 
kept well informed on the questions and issues of the day he has never con- 
sented to become a candidate for office. This does not preclude his active par- 
ticipation in movements for the public good, however, and he has ever stood 
for municipal advancement and for the improvement of the city in every possible 
way. He belongs to the Lincoln Commercial Club and fraternally is connected 
with the Knights of Pythias, the Royal Highlanders and the Modern Woodmen 
of America. The name of Harpham has ever been a synonym for progressiveness 
and reliability in business, the rules of the house measuring up to the highest 
standards of commercial ethics. 



LEVI W. BUTLER. 



Levi W. Butler of LTniversity Place is now living retired save for the 
supervision which he gives to his business interests. He was born in Erie 
county, Pennsylvania, on the 2nd of August, 1841, and was reared and educated 
in that county, remaining upon the home farm until he was about twenty-one 
years of age when he was married and began his independent career, turning his 
attention to farming and dairying. He followed those occupations until 1879 
when he came to Nebraska and purchased a farm in Saunders county. He 
bought his land from the railroad and it was totally unimproved when it came 
into his possession, but as soon as possible he brought it under cultivation and 
erected substantial Iniildings thereon. He resided there until 1890 when he 
removed to University Place as he desired his children to take advantage of the 
excellent educational opportunities here. Not long after taking up his residence 
in the town he erected a livery barn and he continued in the livery business for 
eleven or t\velve years. During part of that time he also operated a hack line 
to Havelock. but on the building of a street car line to that place he discontinued 
his hack service. Later he also disposed of his livery business and he subse- 



32 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

quently turned his attention to dealing in brick, sand and concrete, etc., furnish- 
ing these materials for a great many Iniildings. In 1910 he erected the building 
in which the postoffice is situated and in 1913 built the remainder of the Butler 
building. The entire structure is lifty by ninety feet in dimensions and is two 
stories high. On the tirst floor, in addition to the postoffice, there are a number 
of store.f and also Dr. Walker's of-flce, and Judge Gaylord's ofBce is located on 
the second floor, although the greater part of it is given over to modern 
apartments. Air. Butler gives careful attention to his investments, which yield 
him a good return, and also collects for the gas company. 

On New Year's Day, 1862, occurred the marriage of Mr. Butler and Miss 
Alary Owen, a native of Erie county, Pennsylvania, where she grew to woman- 
hood. She is still living and, like her husband, is vigorous and active. To their 
union have been born four children : Jennie, who married Horace Godden and 
died at the age of thirty-nine years ; Alva E., who is deputy sherifif of Lancaster 
county ; Gary L., who was one of the first students in the Nebraska Wesleyan 
University and who owns a barber shop in his father's building; and Clyde A., 
who is conducting a cleaning and pressing establishment also located in his 
father's block. 

Mr. and Airs. Butler have been members of the Alethodist church since 
they were in their teens and they have taken an active part in the work of that 
organization. Air. Butler aided materially in the erection of the local church 
edifice, has served as trustee, and contributes liberally to the support of the 
church and of the Nebraska Wesleyan University. He was a charter member 
of the Knights of Pythias Lodge of Havelock and in his life exemplifies the 
spirit of fraternity upon which the order is based. He has gained many friends 
since his removal to L'niversity Place and those who are most closely associated 
with him hold him in the highest esteem, which is proof of his genuine worth. 



JOHN O. ROWLAND. 



John O. Rowland, who aided in establishing the Rowland Lumber Company in 
1907, is still connected with that concern and is serving as secretary and treas- 
urer. He has excellent business ability, is energetic and efficient in the manage- 
ment of his affairs, and has gained a competence. He was born in Brighton, 
Washington county, Iowa, on the 27th of January, 1869. His parents, William 
M. and Sarah C. (Shearer) Rowland, were born in Ohio, but before their mar- 
riage they both became residents of Brighton, Iowa, where the father followed 
the carpenter's trade and also engaged in farming to some extent. In 1861 he 
offered his services in defense of the Union and became a member of Company 
K, Thirteenth Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. He was at the front for three years, 
during which time he participated in much hard fighting. On being discharged 
from the army he returned to Brighton, where his marriage occurred and where 
he lived until 1S70, when he removed with his family to Page county, Iowa. For 
ten years he operated land there, which he had purchased, but at the end of that 
time removed to Essex, whence two years later, in 1886, he went to Avoca, 
Nebraska. lie purchased land in that locality and for five years devoted his 




i 



JOUN 0. ROWLAND 



P^jUND-i KIN? 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 35 

time to its culti\ation but at the expiration of that period became a resident of 
Avoca, and engaged in the banking and lumber business there until njoj, wlien 
he sold his interests and came to Bethany, where he is still living. I lis wife 
also survives. 

John C). Kowlaml is indebted for his early education to the puljlic schools 
of Iowa and later attended the Bellevue College at Bellevue, Nebraska, and a 
business college at Lincoln. C)n entering the business world he became asso- 
ciated with his father in business at Avoca, but in 1907 he remo\'ed to Bethany 
and engaged in the lumljer business in partnership with L. L*. Turner. They 
also dealt in coal and hardware, and their association continued for a year, 
after which our subject and his father bought out Air. Turner's interest, remain- 
ing the owners until iQio. In that year A. E. Cutler, a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this book, was admitted to partnership in what is still known as 
the Rowland Lumber Company. The firm conducts two lumberyards and also 
a hardware store, John O. Rowland having charge of one yard and Mr. Cutler 
being manager of the other yard and the hardware business. The company has 
gained an en\iable reputation for reliability and fair dealing and theirs is one 
of the leading enterprises of Bethany. 

Mr. Rowland was imited in marriage on the 2(;th of June, iSyg, to Miss 
Ethelyn Clary, and they are the parents of four children, namely : Gerald C, 
who was born on the 4th of June, 190 1 ; Helen A., born November 29, 1902; 
Ralph S., born May 7, 1905; and Howard, born October 28, 1907. 

The republican party has a stalwart adherent in Air. Rowland, and he has 
served acceptably on the town board and on the school board, doing all in his 
power to promote the public welfare. He holds membership in the Christian 
church, whose teachings govern his life, and he is highly esteemed by all who 
know him because of his abilitv and his many excellent traits of character. 



HERBERT COLLIER PROBASCO. 

Herbert Collier Probasco, who was the efficient and popular assistant cashier 
of the Nebraska State Bank of Lincoln, was born in Geneva. New York, on the 
6th of February, 1870, of the marriage of Charles and Mary (Jackson) Probasco, 
natives respectively of New Jersey and West Virginia. In 1882 the family 
removed to Iowa, but after farming there for a year the father decided to try 
his fortune in Nebraska and accordingly removal was made to Blue Llill. He 
farmed in that vicinity until 1893, when he retired and took up his residence in 
Lincoln, where he passed away on the 2d of November, 1902. His wife survived 
for a number of years, her demise occurring in June, 1915. Their daughter, 
Alice, the wife of C. J. Pope of Red Cloud, Nebraska, is the last of the family 
with the exception of the children of our subject. 

Herbert Collier Probasco was reared in New York, Iowa and Nebraska and 
received his education in the schools of these states. When seventeen years of 
age he began teaching and followed that profession for seven years, having 
charge of schools at Grand Island, Blue Hill and Red Cloud, and during the 
last year of his professional experience teaching in the Prescott school at Lin- 



36 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

coin. He next went to the Black Hills in South Dakota and remained there 
until 1901, hoping that an outdoor life would benefit his health. At the end of 
that time he returned to Lincohi and for a year engaged in the insurance busi- 
ness, after which he became connected with the Farmers & Merchants Hank, 
which had just been organized. He received the first deposit made in the bank. 
Subsequently he became cashier and assisted in directing its [folicy until it was 
sold to the Nebraska State Bank. He became assistant cashier of the latter 
institution and held that position until his death on the 5th of August, 1915. 
He was thoroughly familiar with the minutiae of bank practice and also had that 
grasp of large financial problems essential to the i>ank official and his record was 
highly creditable. 

Mr. Probasco was married on the 15th of August, 1906, to Grace W. W'ill- 
rett. Her parents, Joseph and Elizabeth ( Buerer) W'illrett, were born in De Kalb 
county, Illinois, where the latter farmed during his active life, and is now living 
retired, residing in the city of De Kalb. To Air. and Mrs. Probasco were 
born three children: Herbert W'illrett, born February 26, 1909: Charles Joseph, 
whose birth occurred on the i6th of July, 191 1 ; and Hope Collier, born Novem- 
ber 20, 191 5. 

Mr. Probasco was independent in politics, voting in accordance with his best 
judgment rather than following the commands of a party leader. He gave much 
time to the study of the life of Abraham Lincoln and was an ardent admirer of 
that great American. He held membership in the Methodist church ; for ten years 
was church treasurer : and for twelve years had charge of the choir. Fraternally 
he belonged to the Royal Arcanum and the Fraternal Aid, and the spirit of 
helpfulness was manifested in his daily life. He purchased a comfortable resi- 
dence at 1710 D street and there his family still live. In all relations of life he 
measured up to high standards of manhood, and his death, which occurred when 
he was in the prime of life, was recognized as a loss to his community. 



JULIUS C. HARPHAM. 

Julius C. Harpham, president of the Harpham Brothers Company, wholesale 
saddlers of Lincoln, occupies a position of distinction in trade circles in the 
United States as the president of the Wholesale Saddlery Association. A spirit 
of enterprise and progress has actuated him at every point in his career, and 
step by step he has steadily advanced, his course being marked by an orderly 
progression that has brought him to a ]iosition of leadership. 

He was born upon a farm near Richmond. Wayne county, Indiana, February 
14, 1S55. and in the paternal line is of English and Scotch descent, the Harphams 
originally living in Lincolnshire, England, where many generations of the family 
were represented. The American branch was founded by Stephen Harpham, 
who came to the United States soon after the close of the Revolutionary war, 
accompanied by two of his brothers, James and John. The descendants of t^vo 
of these brothers are now numerous in this country, the other brother never 
having married. Stephen Harjiham took up his abode near Syracuse, New 
'^'ork. The line of descent is traced diiwn to Henrv Harpham. father of Julius 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 37 

C. Harphani, who was born near Syracuse but became a citizen of Wayne 
county, Indiana, in 1854. His entire life was devoted to agricultural pursuits. 
In 1858, when his son Julius was but three years of age, he removed with his 
faniil} to Whiteside county. Illinois, and there transformed the virgin prairie 
soil into a highly developed farm, making it his place of residence until his 
death, which occurred in 1861, when Init thirty-one years of age, resulting 
from an attack of typhoid fever. His widow, whose maiden name was Elsie A. 
Cooper, still survi\c'; at the advanced age of eighty-four years and has lived in 
Lincoln, Nebraska, or vicinity for the past thirty years, her home being now at 
College \'iew, one of the suburbs of Lincoln. She was married to Mr. Harpham 
in Ohio county. Indiana, in 1853 and became the mother of five children, but 
the first born, a daughter, died unnamed. The other four, all sons, are Tubus 
C, Charles Frank, John N. and Henry. The two oldest and the youngest 
reside in Lincoln, Nebraska, while John N. is a resident of Sterling, Illinois. 
The three brothers living in Lincoln compose the wholesale saddlery firm of 
Harpham Brothers Company, Julius C. being the president and treasurer, Charles 
F. vice president and secretary, while Henry is also a partner in the concern. 

Julius C. Harpham was but six years of age at the time of his father's death 
and was largely reared in the home of an uncle in Indianapolis, Indiana, where 
he acquired much of his education. He left school, however, at the age of 
sixteen years and began learning the saddler's trade as an apprentice in Sterling, 
lUinois, serving for a three years' term, during which he was paid twenty-five 
dollars for the first year's work, fifty for the second, and seventy-five for the 
third. When he had completed his trade at the age of nineteen he remained in 
the employ of the man with whom he had learned the business and who was his 
uncle. John Harpham, of Sterling. He continued with him for two years more, 
or five years in all, and then in 1876, when twenty-one years of age, he returned 
to Indianapolis and entered the employ of Gordon Kurtz & Company, wholesale 
saddlers, as a traveling salesman. He occupied that position for six years and 
thus :ic(|uainted himself with every phase of the business. In 18S2 he went to 
Peoria, Illinois, where for two years he conducted a retail harness store on his 
own account. 

In 1884, Mr. Harpham removed his entire stock and tools to Lincoln, 
Nebraska, and here oiiened a retail and wholesale harness business as the 
partner of A. J. Gustin. The firm of Harpham & Gustin continued until 1888, 
when J. C. Harpham and his brother, Charles F., purchased the interest of Mr. 
Gustin and established the firm of Harpham Brothers. This business was con- 
verted into an exclusive wholesale enterprise in 1888 and m 1900 was incorporated 
under the present firm name of the Harpham Brothers Company. The firm has 
now been in existence for twenty-seven years as the exclusive properly of the 
riar[)hams. The wholesale saddlery concern of Harpham Brothers Company is 
today the largest of the kind in the state of Nebraska and is represented on the 
road by seven traveling salesmen. Its ramifying trade interests now cover a 
broad territory, and the house maintains an unassailable reputation for enter- 
prise and business integrity and relial)ility. That he occupies a prominent posi- 
tion as a farsighted. sagacious and progressive man is indicated in the fact that 
he IS now the president of the Wholesalers Saddlery Association of the L'liited 
States, having been first elected at Chicago in 1914 and reelected at tlie annual 



38 - LL\XOLN AND LANXASTER COUNTY 

meeting in San Francisco in 1915. so that he is now serving for the second term 
and presided over the dehberations of the convention at San Francisco. In 
addition to his connection .with the saddlery trade he is a director of the Central 
National ISank of Lincoln. 

( )n the 1st of December, i88o, Mr. Ilarphani was married to JNliss Elizabeth 
Hnbbard, who died September 19, 1882. On the 26th of :\Iarch, 1886, he 
wedded Mrs. Clara B. Cook, nee Giistin, and their children are Edna May, James 
H. and Dorothy Maud, tlie latter now the wife of Phil Southwick. a son of 
L. E. Southwick, of Lincoln, who is well known in banking circles throus;hout 
the state. 

In politics Mr. FLirpham is a republican and for three consecutive terms 
and one other term he served as a member of the Lincoln e.xcise board, which 
had complete control over the police regulations, liquor interests, saloons and 
the health department of the city. In 191 2 he was a delegate to the republican 
national convention at Chicago and as an ardent supporter of Theodore Roosevelt 
was a member of the famous three hundred and six delegates who refused to 
vote for a candidate under the steam roller rules which a majority of the 
national committee had adopted and which virtually eliminated the candidacy of 
Roosevelt. In 1914 Mr. Harpham was a candidate on the progressive ticket 
for the state office of railway commissioner, consenting to make the race solely 
from the standpoint of patriotism. He takes a most active interest in all matters 
for the betterment of Lincoln and stands stanchly in support of those things 
which are a matter of civic virtue and of civic pride. He is a Scottish Rite 
Mason and Alystic Shriner and belongs to the Elks, the Royal Highlanders and 
the Modern Woodmen of America. He was one of the four men who organized 
the Lincoln Commercial Club in 1894 and served as first president in 1897 of the 
Reorganized Club, a consolidation of the Lincoln Commercial Club with the 
Union Club. He was a prominent factor in benevolent work and is now vice 
president of the Lincoln Charity Organization Society. The foregoing will 
indicate that his interests are not self-centered but reach out along the broader 
lines that affect humanity and promote the welfare of his fellowmen. He is 
alert, enterprising and progressive and studies pulilic questions with the same 
thoroughness that has marked his understanding of his private business interests. 
Thus it is that he is actuated by the spirit of true American patriotism which 
recognizes conditions, needs and opportunities and in working toward high ideals 
utilizes practical methods. 



BURTON ARTHUR GEORGE. 

Burton Arthur George, the senior member of the firm of George Brothers, 
composed of Burton A. and Rollin H. George, high class printers, engravers and 
office stationers, has been a resident of Lincoln since 1885, or for more than 
three decades. In that period he has taken an active part in all civic affairs 
and in all movements which have been undertaken for the growth and improve- 
ment of the citv and its environment. His labors have been resultant, far- 
reaching and beneficial. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 39 

\\'isconsin claims Air. George as a native son. his birth having occurred in 
Brookfiekl, that state, October 15, 1871. His father Wilham A. George, a 
newspaper man and pubhsher, was born in New England and during the Civil 
war served for three years with the Union army as a member of Company B, 
Fifth Wisconsin Regiment, commanded by Colonel Amasa Cobb, who later be- 
came a prominent citizen of Lincoln. I\Ir. George, who was a corporal in his 
company, was three times wountled while in service, tvi^ice suftering severe 
injuries. One of the bullets that struck him undoubtedly would have proven 
fatal but for the fact that it hit a small book in his pocket and thus its force was 
somewhat checked and its course deflected. During the greater part of his active 
career William .\. George was a resident of Wisconsin, having removed from 
New England to that state prior to the period of hostilities between the north 
and the south. He had learned the printer's trade in early life and after the 
war lie became a prominent figure in newspaper circles in Wisconsin, being at 
one time a partner in the ownership and conduct of the Milwaukee Sentinel. 
Later he became the foiuider of the Washington County Republican, published 
at Hartford, Wisconsin, remaining its editor and publisher for several years. 
He afterward sold that paper and in 1881 removed to Nebraska, settling at 
Exeter, where he continued until his death in 18S3. He had been married in 
Brookticld. Wisconsin, late in the '60s to ]Mary M. Barnes, and four children, 
three sons and a daughter, were born to them, but Burton A. and his brother 
Rollin H., are the only ones now living. The eldest, a daughter, died in 
infancy, and the youngest, Harry, died of measles at the age of six years. After 
the death of the father ]\lrs. George spent her last years in Lincoln, here passing 
away in 1910. 

The early boyhood of Burton A. George was divided between Hartford, 
Wisconsin, and Exeter, Nebraska, prior to his removal to Lincoln in 1885. All 
his schooling was olnained in those two places before he reached the age of 
twelve years. Upon his arrival in Lincoln, when he was fourteen years of age, 
he entererl the employ of the late Colonel J. D. Calhoun, then editor and owner 
of the Daily State Democrat, and in connection with the mechanical department 
of that paper he served a full apprenticesliip at the printer's trade. He was 
employed by Colonel Calhoun and by his successors, the firm of Cox & Bushnell, 
for eight years and was advanced from the position of office boy to that of 
foreman of the mechanical department. Later he was employed in the office of 
the Nebraska State Journal" for a year as assistant night foreman, after which 
he and his brother, Rollin H., established the present firm of George Brothers in 
June, 1894. Their plant today is one of Lincoln's foremost business institutions, 
turning out printing and engraving of the highest class, indicating expert work- 
manship and capable business management. Their trade has assumed extensive 
pro])ortions and the enterprise is today one of the profitable industries of the 
city. Our subject has served on the board of directors of the Cushman Motor 
Works for six years and is now vice president of this growing manufacturing 
concern. 

On the 15th of October. 1893, Mr. George was married to Miss Lillie Bridges, 
of Cortland, Nebraska. He is identified with several fraternal organizations, 
being a Scottish Rite Mason, a ^.lystic Shriner, a Knight of Pythias and also a 
member of the Alaccabecs and the Royal Highlanders. He is also identified with 



40 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

several local organizations which have to do with the best interests of the city as 
well as with the more important features of its social life. He belongs to the 
Rotary Club, the Counlr_\- Clui), and the Lincoln Commercial Club, and is one of 
the directors of the last named and chairman of its good roads committee. He is 
also a member of the board of directors of the Lincoln Manufacturers Associa- 
tion, one of the directors of the Automobile Club and former president of the 
(_)mal;a-Lincoln-Denver Highway Association and of the Lincoln Automobile 
Llub. He is particularly interested in the subject of improving public highways 
and has done effective work along that line. 

In politics Mr. George is a republican and for seven years served as a member 
of the city council from the seventh ward, after which he declined to again 
become a candidate. He was president of the council for two years and while a 
member thereof he served on the committees which established the city's present 
tine ijark system and was also a meml)er of other important committees, including 
those on gas and traction. He took the initial step in bringing about the legisla- 
tion which built the Tenth street viaduct and also which resulted in the sale of 
six tickets for twenty-five cents on the street cars. He was likewise instrumental 
in helping pass the dollar gas ordinance. He worked effectively and tmtiringly 
to jiromote the welfare and interests of the public and to raise the standards of 
municipal improvement. He has been again and again solicited to accept the 
candidacy for other political honors but would never consent, although since 
leaving the city council he has continued to take an active part in civic affairs 
and the trees, numbering two hundred and five, which adorn West P street, 
were ]ilanted as a result of his individual efforts. He collected over one thousand 
two hundred dollars by private subscription and this stun was used in pavi ■ 
this important boulevard from the west into the city. In all his public serv : 
lie has looked beyond the exigencies of the moment to the needs, possibilities 
and opi)ortunities of the future, laboring for the later as well as for the present 
generation. His plans have ever been well defined and have made such strong 
ap[)eal to the civic pride of his fellow townsmen as to secure hearty indorsement 
and support. His work in this particular has been of great benefit and valtie 
and at the same time he has largely forwarded the material welfare of his city 
throuijh the establishment and successful conduct of his business. 



PHILIP L. WEBSTER. 



Among the Ijusiness enterprises of Havelock which contribute to the material 
development and substantial upbuilding of the city is the jewelry store of Philip 
L. Webster, who began business here in igoi. He was born in Rhode Island, 
February 15, 1869, his parents being John and Martha (Tourgee) Webster, who 
were also natives of that state and there spent their entire lives. 

Philip L. \\^ebster passed his boyhood in his native town of Peace Dale and 
at the age of twenty years turned his attention to the jewelry business. He 
worked at the bench for a time and later embarked in business on his own 
account. In 1892 he came to Nebraska and for a short period was employed 
in Lincoln, hv the jewelry firm of O'Neil & Gardner. Pie then removed to 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 41 

Taiiiora, Seward county, Nebraska, where he conducted business for seven years, 
and in June, 1901, he came to Havelock. Here he opened a store for the sale 
of jewelry and optical goods and has since remained active in the trade, being 
accorded a liberal patronage, so that his business has reached very desirable 
proportions. 

In i8i;0 ^Ir. Webster was united in marriage to ^liss Julia Anna Henderson, 
who was born in Illinois and was taken to Seward county, Nebraska, when two 
years old. She is a daughter of Samuel and Hannah Elizabeth (Mercer) 
Henderson, the former of whom is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Webster have four 
ciiildren: Stanley C, Julia Fern, Philip Neil and Elizabeth IMartha. The last 
named was the prize l>aby in her class at the state fair in 1915. The wife and 
mother is a member of tiu- Congregational church and Mr. Webster belongs to 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Royal Arcanum. Since 1902 
JTC has conducted the Havelock Military Band. His political support is given 
the republican party and he has been called upon to serve in several public offices, 
being for four years city clerk and four years city treasurer, as well as a 
member of the school board. He is unfaltering in his allegiance to all those forces 
which have proven most worth while in the pulilic life of the community and is 
accounted one of the valued citizens of Havelock. 



CHARLES STUART. 



Jharles Stuart is secretary and treasurer of the Nebraska Buick Automobile 
C 'ipany, which was organized in 1909. They are dealers in automobiles and 
accessories and they occupy the Stuart Ijuilding at the southeast corner of 
Thirteenth and P streets in Lincoln, while in Omaha and in Sioux City they have 
branch establishmciits. (3tiier business interests have claimed the attention and 
inohted by the cooperatior. of Mr. Stuart, whose energies and initiative make 
him one of the representative and prominent young business men of the city. 
Nebraska, therefore, is proud to claim him among her native sons. He was 
lifjrn in Madison in 1884, his parents being James and Lillie A. (Eaton) Stuart, 
who were natives of Connecticut and in the year 1878 arrived in Nebraska, 
settling in ^Madison, where the father emljarked in the banking business. He 
gradually extended his efforts over a broad field, becoming the head of banks at 
Madison, Tilden, Norfolk and Elgin. In 1894 he removed to Lincoln, where 
he passed away in T898. His widow, however, still resides in the capital. 

Charles Stuart pursued his education in schools of Nebraska and of Cali- 
fornia, completing his course in the Nebraska State L'niversity. He was a 
young man of twenty-five years when he embarked in his present business as a 
partner in the Nebraska Buick Automobile Company, with H. E. Sidles as presi- 
dent and R. H. Collins, vice president. Mr. Stuart holds the office of secretary 
and treasurer and is active in the management of this business, which is now 
extended over a wide territory and has reached most gratifying proportions. 
Something of the volume of their trade is indicated in the fact that they occupy 
a five-story building in Lincoln and employ seventy-seven people, making theirs 
one of the foremost automobile concerns of the state. Mr. Stuart is also a 



42 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

director of the Lincoln Telephone Company, of the First National Bank, the 
First Savings Bank, the First Trust Company and the Lincoln Traction Com- 
pany. He built and owns the Lyric theater, was one of the organizers and 
developers of Electric I'ark, is the vice president of the Madison National Bank 
at JMadison, Nebraska, and a director of the Tilden National Bank at Tilden, 
Nebraska. In his business life he is a persistent, resolute and energetic worker, 
possessing strong executive powers. He readily recognizes the possibilities of every 
new avenue opened in the natural ramifications of trade. He readily discrimi- 
nates between the essential and the non-essential and he therefore passes over 
the pitfalls into which unrestricted progressiveness is so frequently led and has 
focused his energies in directions where fruition is certain. 

In 1910 Mr. Stuart was married to Miss Marie Talbot, a daughter of A. R. 
Talbot, head consul for the ]\Iodern Woodmen of America, and they have one 
child, Charles, now four years of age. Mr. Stuart is a member of tlie First 
Congregational church, which indicates his interest in those moral forces working 
for the uplift of the community, and he belongs to the Commercial Cluli, a fact 
indicative of his interest in the i)lans and projects for municipal and civic 
jirogress and improvements. His ability and his ambition make him a dynamic 
force in the business world and he stands among those for whom success is a 
certainty because he possesses the qualities which are indispensable thereto. 



GEORGE P. TUCKER. 



Among those who won ])ublic regard through ability and enterprise in busi- 
ness and through the possession of many sterling traits of character was George 
P. Tucker, now deceased. He was regarded as a citizen whom the community 
could ill af¥ord to lose but death claimed him and he passed on. He was born 
in Walworth. Wayne County, New York, Stepember 28, 1834, a son of Luther 
and Elmira (Kent) Tucker, the former a native of Connecticut and the latter 
of Wayne county. New York. The father engaged in merchandising in the 
Empire state throughout the entire ]Deriod of his business career and there passed 
away in 1838. His widow long survived him, dying in 1889. 

George P. Tucker was four years of age when he lost his father. His early- 
schooling was obtained in his native county and later he attended the public 
schools of Walworth. New York, remaining with his mother until he attained 
his majority. He afterward followed farming and stock raising in the east and 
in 1836 he traveled through some of the western states, visiting Nebraska. In 
the fall of that year he returned to New York in time to cast his first presiden- 
tial \ote for John C. Fremont as standard bearer of the newly organized repub- 
lican party. In the spring of 1858 he came west again and settled at Helena, 
Johnson county, Nebraska, where he purchased land and engaged in farming and 
stock raising. He constructed a house entirely of walnut timber, in which he 
lived for a number of years. When the Second Nebraska Cavalry was organ- 
ized his patriotic spirit prompted his enlistment and on the 21st of October, 
1862. he became a memlicr of Company F, of which he was made quartermaster 
sergeant. Fie was promoted to the nmk of orderly sergeant No\ember 13. 



THE ri:w YCr.K 
PUBLIC LiBnARY 

ASTOS, L^NOX 
T'tnr^- POUNOA'IONS 








^<^(TWU cyr^ 




97. 



Oyyft 



y JyCM>ft^C^ 



I ntPf^ "^-"-"^ 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 47 

1862, and was mustered out of the regiment in 1863 with the rank of sergeant 
major. This company was sent to tjie frontier in Dakota to serve against the 
Indians, who, filled with the spirit of unrest, had gone upon the warpath. Mr. 
Tucker rendered valuable aid to his country at that time and returned home 
with a most creditable military record. 

In company with Benjamin F. Lysbaugh and Charles G. Dorsey, Mr. Tucker 
owned the town site of Helena, Johnson county, Nebraska, which they surveyed 
and platted in 1867. In the fall of 1866 Mr. Tucker was elected to the first 
legislature of Nebraska and was one of the men whose vote assisted in moving 
the capital from Omaha to Lincoln. He took an active interest: in all questions 
that came up for consideration and cast the weight of his influence on the side 
of all those measures which he believed to be for the benefit of the new com- 
monwealth. In 1870 he was again elected to represent Johnson county in the 
general assembly and served as senator during the stormy session of 1871. As 
a legislator he was sagacious, farsighted and thoroughly reliable. He was a ready 
debater, clearly presenting his ideas, and the logic and force of his utterances 
carried conviction to the minds of his hearers. He hated wrong in any form 
and his allegiance to the right was incorruptible. No reward of favor, no threat 
nor frown of displeasure could turn him from the course which he believed to 
be for the best interests of the state. He walked firmly in the path of duty and 
his career commanded the respect of even those who opposed him politically. 

Mr. Tucker was appointed receiver of the United States Land Office at 
Lincoln about 1872, during Grant's administration, and in 1873 moved his family 
to Lincoln. During his incumbency in the office it proliably did the greatest 
amount of business as the immigration to the state was the heaviest at that time. 
Subsequently he engaged in the real estate business in connection with John 
McManigal. In this he continued until his death and in his business was very 
successful, wisely and capably directing his interests. He was thoroughly in- 
formed concerning realty values, knew the property upon the market and wisely 
conducted all of his affairs. Again he was called to public office, serving as the 
first water commissioner of Lincoln, and in that capacity he saved to the city 
many thousands of dollars by his rigid inspection of water ]iipe. 

Mr. Tucker was united in marriage March 19, 1864, to Miss Nancy J. Smith, 
who was born November i, 1843, in Republic, Seneca county, Ohio. She had 
come to this state in 1863 and was a daughter of Gaylord G. and Ada Z. (Covey) 
Smith, who were natives of New York, both born in 1803. The father was a 
carpenter and contractor and went to Garden Grove. Iowa, at an early day, 
there spending the remainder of his life. Both he and his wife are now deceased. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Tucker were liorn nine children: Charles A., a jeweler of 
Lincoln: Luther G., who died in 191 1 ; George P.. a veterinary surgeon of Lin- 
coln; Ada. who conducts the St. Oorge photographic studio at the corner of 
Fourteenth and M streets, in Lincoln: Frank H.. a veterinarian of Lincoln; 
William L., also a veterinary surgeon of Lincoln; Laura K., who died in 1878; 
Winifred M., a physician by profession, who became the wife of Dr. A. \V. 
Ward, of Hampton, Nebraska, and died March 6, 1916; and Robert .\.. a veteri- 
nary surgeon of Lincoln, who died February 13, 1910. 

After a short illness, Mr. Tucker passed away July 22, 1892. Since his 
demise Mrs. Tucker has managed the large estate which he left and has edu- 
voi. n— 3 



48 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

cated her children, who have become honorable men and women, occupying a 
prominent position in the different localities in which they reside. Mrs. Tucker 
is a woman of innate culture and refinement, of gentle manner and yet of excel- 
lent business ability. It is well known that she has ever exerted a strong influ- 
ence for good in the community in which she lives and her life has been an 
effective force for right among her many friends and among her children. She 
possesses wide sympathy and love for all mankind and has ever been willing to 
extend a helping hand wherever it is needed. 

In his political faith Mr. Tucker was an earnest republican and fraternally 
was an exemplary member of Lincoln Lodge, No. 54. F. & A. AL, in which he 
held all of the offices, becoming master. He belonged to the Congregational 
church and guided his life according to its teachings. He possessed many 
sterling characteristics but none were stronger than his irreproachable honesty. 
Wherever known he was held in the highest regard and most of all where he 
,was best known. He had a circle of friends coextensive with tlie circle of his 
acquaintances and of him it may well lie said : 

"He was a man. • 
Take him for all in all 
I shall not look upon his like again." 



WILLIAM P. PHILLIPS. 

William P. Phillips, who w'as engaged in the loan and brokerage business at 
Lincoln, also owned a good farm and engaged in raising and selling stock on an 
extensive scale. His birth occurred in Cadiz, Ohio, on the 7th of August, 1842, 
and his parents were John and Eliza (Gilmore) Phillips. The father was a 
native of Chester county, Pennsylvania, but the mother was born in Cadiz, Ohio. 
John Phillips followed the shoemaker's trade for a number of years at Cadiz and 
there both he and his wife passed away, her demise occurring in 1873. He died 
in 1859. They were married in 1828. 

William P. Phillips grew to manhood in his native state. He learned the 
shoemaker's trade and when sixteen years of age began providing for his own 
support. Subsequently he became a clerk and later a partner in a book store 
in Cadiz, ( Jhio. 1iut in 1871 decided to try his fortune in the west and came to 
Lincoln, Nebr.iska. I le secured a position as paying teller in the First National 
ISank and served in that capacity for three years. At the end of that time he 
was compellctl to resign his jiosition on account of ill health, but later he became 
vice [ires'dent of the baid<. Thinking that outdoor work would be beneficial, he 
purchased eleven hundred acres of land in Grant precinct, Lancaster county, and 
made many improvements upon the place. For a time he operated his farm per- 
sonally, but when he had recovered his health he hired others to do the actual 
work, although he continued to give the place his supervision. He fed a large 
number of stock annually and as he watched the market carefully was able to 
sell advantageously. During this time he lived in Lincoln and carried on a large 
loan and brokerage business. His residence was always on the corner of M anil 
Seventeenth streets, and there he passed away on the 20th of May, 1893. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 49 

Mr. Phillips was united in marriage on the 30th of Octohcr, 1867, to Miss 
Mary E. Craig, a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Wallace) Craig, natives 
of Harrison county, Ohio. Her father, who was born March 15, 1S16, removed 
to Fulton county, Illinois, in early manhood and devoted his time and energy to 
farming there until he passed away February 8, 1872. He had long survived his 
wife, who (lied in August, 1847. Mrs. Phillips was born in Lewiston, Illinois, 
on the 17th of February, 1847, and became the mother of five children, namely: 
William C, who was born in Cadiz, Ohio, on the loth of November, 1868, was 
for two terms clerk of the district court at Lincoln and died on the lolh of 
September, 1910; John G., who was born in Cadiz, Ohio, on the 17th of 
November, 1870, became assistant agent at Lincoln for the Chicago, Burlington 
& Ouincy Railroad, and died in September, 1902 ; Lucy E., who was born in 
Lincoln on the 17th of August, 1872, died on the 25th of May, 1895; C. Fred, 
born October 5, 1875, is residing in Lincoln; and b'rank T., born April 5, 1885, 
is a merchant living in San Benito, Texas. 

Mr. Phillips cast his ballot in support of the men and measures of the repub- 
lican party and served as a member of the city council of Lincoln at the same 
time that A. [. Sawyer and J- Z. Briscoe were members of that body. He 
belonged to the Masonic order, and also to the Grand Army of the Republic, 
having enlisted in the Union army wdiile a resident of Ohio and served at the 
front for one humlred days. His religious faith was that of the Presbyterian 
church, and he could be depended upon to further movements looking toward 
the moral growth of his community. He gained a gratifying measure of success 
in his business undertakings and also won the high esteem and warm regard 
of those who were associated with him for his salient characteristics were ad- 
mirable. Mrs. Phillips still owns the residence which he erected in 1871 but 
lives in a smaller house at 1641 M street, which she built. There are few in 
the city who have resided in Lincoln for as long a period and she is widely and 
favorably known here. 



E. W. ROWE, M. D. 



Di. E. W. Rowe. devoting his attention to the practice of medicine and 
surgery in Lincoln, was born in Roberts, Illinois, in 1880. Five years later his 
father, a Methodist niinister, removed with his family to Nebraska, where Dr. 
Row^e attended the public schools in the various towns in which his father held 
pastorates. At the early age of sixteen years he was graduated from the high 
school at Palmyra and later entered the University of Nebraska, which institu- 
tion conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Science at the conclusion of 
his four years' course of study. He then took up the profession of teaching, 
which he followed for a time, and in iqoi he was principal of the Randolph 
(Nebraska) high school. In the meantime he had received a scholarship from 
the Northwestern University of Chicago and with this he entered the medical 
department of that school in the autumn of 1901, being graduated therefrom 
with the class of 1905, at which time tlie M. D. degree was conferred U|)on him. 
Periods of the years 1904 and 1905 were spent as an interne in a Chicago 



50 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

hospital, whereby he gained a broad and vakiable training and experience that 
can be obtained in no other way as readily and as thoroughly as in hospital 
practice. Following his graduation he returned to Nebraska, settling at Wood 
River, where he remained in active practice for three years. In 1908 he removed 
to Lincoln and during the intervening period he has risen steadily until he now 
stands in the front rank of the profession in the capital. He is practicing as a 
member of the firm of Welch, Rowe & Lehnhoft". 

For five years Dr. Rowe served as a councillor of the Nebraska State 
Medical Association and for three years of that time was secretary of the 
council. His high standing in his profession is ftrrther indicated in the fact that 
in 1915 he was elected president of the state organization, being one of, if not 
the youngest, physician ever honored with the presidency of the Nebraska State 
Medical Association, an honor which has been accorded him in recognition not 
only of his marked ability as a member of the profession and the efficiency which 
he has displayed in practice, but also of his sterHng personal qualities and of the 
high principles which actuate him in every relation of life. Dr. Rowe likewise 
belongs to the Lancaster County Medical Society and the Missouri \'alley 
Medical Society, and is a fellow of the American Medical Association. 

In 1905 Dr. Rowe was united in marriage to Miss Belle Harper, of Randolph, 
Nebraska, and they have a daughter, Grace Gertrude. The breadth of his 
interests and activities is indicated by the fact that he is a member of the 
Lincoln Social Service Club, the Open Forum of Lincoln, the Lincoln Commercial 
Club, Wood River Lodge, No. 158, I. O. O. F., the Young Men's Christian 
Association and the Trinity Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is now 
serving on the official board. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party and he is well versed in the vital and significant problems of the age, but 
the honors and emoluments of office have no attraction for him. He has always 
preferred to concentrate his energies upon his professional duties and he is now 
serving as a member of the surgical staff of St. Elizabeth's Hospital in addition 
to caring for a large private practice. 



ROLLIN HARRIS GEORGE. 

Rollin Harris George, the junior partner in the firm of George Brothers, 
printers, engravers and stationers of Lincoln, was born in Pewaukee, Wisconsin, 
June 14, 1873. He is a brother of Burton A. George, in connection with whose 
sketch mention is made of the family history. His early boyhood was spent 
chiefly in Hartford, Wisconsin, and Exeter, Nebraska, and in both states he 
attended the public schools Init was obliged to put aside his textbooks when 
quite young and go to work in order to provide for his own support. His 
residence in Lincoln dates from 1887. At that time he was fourteen years of 
age. Here he at once began learning the printer's trade and when he had mas- 
tered it he worked as a journeyntan until 1894, when he and his brother Burton 
organized the present firm of George Brothers, now one of the best known 
printing and stationery firms in the state. Their total cash capital when they 
began business was five dollars and seventy cents, which they possessed jointly. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 51 

When RoUin George resigned his position to join his brother in partnership he 
was earning only nine and a half dollars a week. I'oth brothers worked 
diligently after launching their own business and in fact until within a few 
years they did practically all of the hard work in connection witli the conduct of 
their business. As time passed on their patronage grew and the excellence of the 
work conmiendcd thcni to further public support. They ever realize that satisfied 
customers are the best advertisement and they put forth their effort to please. 
They are thoroughly acquainted with every phase of the printing business and 
today they have a patronage that is both extensive and important, their business 
having become one of the profitable industries of the city. 

On the 20th of November, 1900, Mr. George was married to Miss I'luma 
McMechan, of Lincoln. Fraternally he is a thirty-second degree Mason and a 
member of the Mystic Shrine. He belongs to East Lincoln Lodge, No. 210,, 
F. & A. M., in which he has filled all the offices, having for the past six years 
occuiiiefl the position of secretary. He also belongs to the Modern Woodmen 
camp at Lincoln, No. 266, of which he is the present clerk, this being the 
largest camp in the state outside of the one at Omaha. He likewise has member- 
ship with the Elks, the Royal Highlanders, the Ancient Order of L'nited Work- 
men, the Odd Fellows, the Royal Neighbors and the Eastern Star. He is a 
supporter and communicant of the Christian Science church and he belongs to 
the Lincoln Commercial Club and the Lincoln Rotary Club. These different 
associations indicate much of the nature of his interests and the rules which 
govern his conduct. In politics Mr. George is a republican and is active in 
support of all those movements which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride 
but would never consent to become a candidate for office. Concentration upon 
business and cooperation in public aft'airs constitute the motto of his life and 
have brought him to an enviable ])osition in the regard of his fellow citizens. 



JUDGE CHARLES L. HALL. 

From 1891 to 1898 Judge Charles L. Hall occupied the bench of the district 
court and his record as a jurist was highly creditable to the thoroughness of his 
legal learning, to his impartiality and to his understanding of the motives of 
human conduct. A native of Ohio, he was born in Jefferson on the 14th of 
December, 1855, a son of Albert S. and Cybelia (St. John) Hall, who were also 
born in that state. The father practiced law in Ohio previous to the Civil war, 
but on the outbreak of the contlict between the north and south he put aside all 
personal ambitions and enlisted in the Hundred and Fifth Ohio \'olunteer In- 
fantry. He was wounded while in action and passed away on the loth of July, 
1863, from the effects of the wound. His wife survived until October, 1881. 

Charles L. Hall grew to manhood in the Liuckeye state and received good 
educational advantages, completing a course at Hiram College in Hiram. Ohio. 
Later he studied law and in January, 1882, was admitted to the bar at Columbus, 
that state. In the same year he removed to Lincoln, Nebraska, and opened an 
office here for the practice of his profession and the real estate business. In 1891 
he was appointed judge of the district court and was later elected to that office, 



52 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

serving in that position until his death on the 24th of August, 1898. In his rulings 
and in his decisions he was notably just, allowing no considerations of privileges or 
favoritism to intiuence him, but determining his course solely on the facts in the 
case and the law applicable thereto. He held the sincere respect of the bar. and 
the people of his district realized that he was a jurist whose sole purpose it was 
to administer the law impartially. 

judge Hall was married on the 6th of May, 1880, to Miss Clara L. Stanhope, 
a daughter of Reddington and Mary E. (Baker) Stanhope. Her father was born 
in Lorain county, Ohio, and was a physician, practicing in Ohio until 1882, when 
he came to Lincoln, Nebraska, where he followed" his profession until 1908. In 
that year he retired and he is still living in Lincoln, enjoying a period of well 
earned leisure. He has reached the advanced age of seventy-nine years. He 
has long survived his wife, whose demise occurred on the 14th of March, 1892. 
Judge and Mrs. Hall had. two children: Burke S., who was born on the i6th of 
September, 1881, at Hiram, Ohio, and died on the 26th of January, 1906; and 
Mary C, born July 19, 1886, who is the wife of EUery L. Davis, an architect 
residing in Lincoln, and has two children, Ellery Hall, born December 23, 1912, 
and Alary Helen, born June 3, 1915. 

Judge Hall was an advocate of republican principles and in 1889 represented 
his district in the state legislature. In religious faith he was a Unitarian and 
fraternally he was connected with the Masons. He was interested in the advance- 
ment of his community along all lines and through his membership in what is 
now the Commercial Club kept in touch with other public-spirited, progressive 
citizens. He was justly held in high honor by all who knew him, and his death 
was the occasion of much sincere grief. 



LOYAL BURTIS HOWEY. 

Loval Burtis Howe\», president of the City National Bank at Lincoln, was 
born in the village of Hannasville, \'enango county, Pennsylvania, November 
20, 1865, son of the Rev. John D. and Angeline (Bowman) Howey. Rev. 
John D. Howey, a Presbyterian minister, devoted his entire life to that calling. 
He was born in Pennsylvania of Scotch-Irish descent. He entered the ministry 
of the Presbyterian church in early manhood and at diflerent intervals in his 
life was pastor of churches in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois and Nebraska. He 
arrived in this state in 1882 and engaged in preaching at both Raymond and 
I'"airmcmt. His last years were spent in Hastings, Nebraska, but his death, 
however, occurred in Lincoln in 1895, his remains being interred in W'yuka 
cemetery, His widow is a resident of Beatrice, Nebraska. They were parents of 
six children, all of whom survive: Willis Clement and Loyal B., of Lincoln, 
Nebraska; Frederick Hamilton, of Beatrice, Nebraska; Clyde Glenn, of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania; Marie Tenena, of Los Angeles, California; and Ivy Belle, 
now the wife of W. C. Black, of Beatrice, Nebraska. 

Lo}-al Pi. Howey in the acquirement of his education attended school in the 
towns of X'ermont, Prairie City, Altoona and Kewanee, Illinois, putting aside 
his textbooks at the age of sixteen, after which he si>ent two years in farm work 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 53 



in Kankakee eountv, Illinois. At the a"e of ei<rhteen he became ; 



&' 



a clerk ni a 



general btore at Knoxville, Illinois, where he spent one year, and in 1XS4, at the 
age of nineteen years, he came to Lincoln, Nebraska, and maintained his residence 
here until 1895. He was first employed as a clerk in Lincoln in the dry goods 
store of Ashley & Millspaugh, then the leading store of the kind in the city. Mis 
ambition during these years was to engage in the banking business, but despite 
all of his ettorts to secure an opening where a knowledge of the business might 
be obtained, none j)resented itself. Finally, however, he was offered the position 
of collector in the State National Lank of Lincoln at a salary of twenty dollars 
lier month. He promptly accepted this, resigning his jjosition with Ashley & 
Millspaugh, which was then ])aying him one thousand dollars per annum. He 
established himself in the confidence of the bank officials and was rapidly pro- 
moted until he was filling the position of bookkeeper. It will be interesting to 
note ill this connection that four of the men then on the force of the State 
National Bank now hold high positions in the banking world. Its assistant 
cashier, Charles G. Waite, is now president of the Drovers National Bank at 
Kansas City, ^Missouri ; the bookkeeper, Daniel G. Wing, is ])resident of the 
First National ESank of Boston, Massachusetts; the teller, H. S. Freeman, is now 
one of the vice presidents of the First National B.ank of Lincoln, while Mr. 
Howey is president of the City National B>ank of Lincoln. 

I\Ir. Howey remained with the State National Bank from 18S8 until 1891, 
when it was consolidated w-ith the American Exchange National Bank, whicii 
then occupied the site of the present City National Bank on the northeast corner 
of ( ) and Eleventh streets. Mr. Howey continued with the American Exchange 
National Bank for two years as bookkeeper and in 1803 ^'^'''* appointed to the 
position of national bank examiner for the state of Neljraska by Lames H. 
Eckels, then comptroller of currency, receiving the apjiointment strictly on his 
merit and fitness for the position, no political influence being used. He served 
for five years and in 1898 resigned to become cashier of the First National Bank 
of Beatrice, Nebraska. He and some of his friends had purchased a controlling 
interest in this bank, the doors of which had been closed ])reviously due to the 
fact that the institution had been one of the victims of the widespread financial 
panic of 1893. It remained for Mr. Howey to revive the bank and again restore 
it to public confidence and public favor — a work which he s])lendidly accom- 
plished during his fourteen years' connection with it as its cashier and president, 
holding the latter position during the last five years of his relation to the bank. 
During this period he took an active part in the work of the Nebraska Bankers 
Association, which organization includes within its memljershij) ])ractically all 
of the banks in Nebraska, serving as president of that organization in 1907. 
In December, 191 1, he sold his interest in the First National Bank at Ileatrice to 
his brother, Frederick H. Howey, who succeeded him as president and so 
continues. Returning to Lincoln, L. B. Howey purchased a controlling interest 
in the City National Bank, becoming its president and assuming control on the 
1st of January, 19 12. This institution under his management has rapidly grown 
in public favor until today it is one of Lincoln's leading financial concerns. Its 
quarters have been more than doubled and the interior of the Ijank has been 
converted into one of the handsomest in the west, being planned along the most 
modern lines of bank interiors. When Mr. Howev took charge the Citv National 



54 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

ranked fourth among Lincoln's banks as to the amount of deposits and today 
ranks second, its growth being unsurpassed by any financial institution in the 
city. He is also president of the Platte Valley State Bank, of Scotts Bluff, 
Nebraska, and of the Nebraska State Bank of Bridgeport, Nebraska, is vice 
president of the Platte \'alley Land & Investment Company of Scotts Bluff, is 
president of the National Accident Insurance Company of Lincoln and has other 
financial interests as a stockholder in other banks. 

On the 6th of March, 1895, Mr. Howey was married to Miss Mary Lightfoot 
Green, of Beatrice, Nebraska, and their three children are: Loyal Green, born 
February 14, 1896; Margaret Lightfoot, May 26,-1901 ; and John Burtis, July 21, 
1907. All were born in Beatrice. 

Mr. Howey is independent in politics and never seeks or desires office. He 
belongs to the First Presbyterian church of Lincoln, in which he is serving as 
trustee, and he is a member of the Young Men's Christian Association and the 
Lincoln Commercial Club. He is a stanch supporter of those interests which 
figure most largely in the improvement and development of the city. 



EDWARD JOHN ANGLE, A. M., M. D. 

Dr. Edward John Angle, physician and surgeon of Lincoln was born on his 
father's farm, near Cedarville, Illinois, on the ist day of April, 1864, the sixth 
and youngest son of John Bouslough and Jane (Bell) Angle, the former a 
native of Washington county, Maryland, and the latter of East Hanover town- 
ship, Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. They were married in Altoona, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1844 and immediately afterward removed to Illinois, becoming 
pioneers of Stephenson county, where they spent their remaining days, the 
father devoting his attention to the occupation of farming. His mother was a 
woman of exceptional character and high ideals, and possessed a very 
clear view of the true values of life. The name was originally spelled Engel and 
the family is of Swiss-French origin. Representatives of the name came to 
America about 1740, settling in northern Maryland. They were members of the 
Mennonite church and in the home country were known as Swiss Quakers. 
In Maryland they early affiliated with the Dunkard church. The mother's peo- 
ple were Scotch and of the Covenanter faith and came to the United States 
soon after the year 1700. They were among those who were persecuted under 
King James and fled to Ulster, Ireland, in the early period of the seventeenth 
century. On the maternal side a score or more members of the family from 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, served in the Revolutionary war. Among this 
number were Private Robert Bell, Lieutenant \\'illiam Young, Captain James 
Wilson, who participated in the campaigns of the Jerseys in 1776 and was at 
Brandy wine and Germantown in 1777, and Captain Lazarus Stewart, the in- 
trepid scout and Indian fighter who fell at the head of his company in the 
Wyoming valley Indian massacre. Richard Swan, who settled in Philadelphia, 
was one of the signers of the Non-Importation Resolutions of 1765. On account 
of religious scruples the father's family were largely non-associators. The 
Mennonites and Dunkards were of unquestioned loyalty and willing to contribute 




DE. EDWARD J. ANGLE 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 57 

to the support and comfort of the soldiers but seriously objected to military 
service. Colonel Andrew Rench and Captain John Rench were members of 
the Committee of Observation of Elizabethtown District, Frederick county Alary- 
land, and were elected delegates to serve in the slate convention, September 12, 
1775. With them patriotism and loyalty to country were stronger bonds than 
church and creed. ( ieneral James Bell, who recently retired from the regular 
army, is a full cousin of Dr. Angle. 

Dr. Angle pursued his early education in the \mh\k schools of his native 
village and later prepared for college at the Madison, Wisconsin, high school. 
He entered the University of Wisconsin in iS.Sj and upon tin- com[)letion of 
the course received the degree of Bachelor of Science. He specialized along 
biological and chemical lines and was the first student to pursue a systematic 
course in vertebrate eiuljryology at the university. This was essentially the pre- 
, medical course demanded by the best medical schools today. The University 
of Wisconsin was scarcely more than a college then and for this fact Dr. .\ngle 
has always been thankful, for it permitted a personal contact with and inspira- 
tion from teachers which is not always possible in these days of large student 
bodies. In the summer of 1885 he began preparation for the practice of medi- 
cine, entering the office of his brother-in-law, Dr. J. C. Corbus, of La Salle, 
Illinois. A year was spent in the medical department of the State University of 
Iowa and in the fall of 1886 he entered the Medical College of Ohio, now the 
medical department of the University of Cincinnati and graduated the following 
year. For a year after his graduation in 1887, Dr. Angle was a country ])rac- 
titioner, then moved to La Salle, Illinois, to take over the practice of iiis brother- 
in-law, who removed to Chicago. Dr. Angle remained for seven years at La Salle 
where he built up a large and successful practice. In the fall of 1894 he entered 
the University of Pennsylvania at F^hiladel])hia. where he was one of the ilrst 
honor men of the class of iSgs. He has since taken postgraduate work in New 
York, Chicago and St. Louis and has continually promoted his efiiciency by 
broad reading as well as by college work. .After locating in Lincoln in i8()5 he 
continued his studies and pursued a special course in the department of zoology 
and embryology under Professor H. C. Ward of the State University. It was 
in recognition of his research work that he was awarded the degree of A. M. 
and a membership in the Sigma Xi, an honorary society whose standard is that of 
research work in science. 

Following his graduation in Philadelphia, and after com])leting jiostgraduate 
work in New York he came in the fall of 1803 to Lincoln, where he has since 
been in continuous [)ractice, possessing marked ability in his s])ecialty, which is 
the treatment of skin and genito-urinary diseases. His knowledge along that 
line is so comprehensive as to make his opinions largely accepted as standard 
among his professional brethern of the city and state. 

In June, 1889, in Freeport, Illinois, Dr. Angle was united in marriage to 
Miss Agnes L. Wolf, a d.iughter of Judge George and .\ngeline (Fleming) Wolf, 
the former of whom was judge of the probate court. His pcojile were from 
Center county, Penn.sylvania, and of so-called "Dutch" descent, while the mother 
came from French-English stock from Jeliferson county, X'irginia. To the 
Doctor and his wife have been born five children, as follows: Sarah Jane, who 
is deceased; Florence Bell, who graduated from the Nebraska State University 



58 LIX'COLX AXL) I.AXCASTER COUNTY 

with the class of njiO. with thi; hunor of nnjnibcr;-liii) in ihe Phi Llcla Kappa 
society ; Edward Everett Dupuytren, a sophomore in the Nebraska State Uni- 
versity, who is preparing for a ineeHcal career : Barbara Josephine, who has 
passed away ; and Agnes Evelyn, who is a student in the graded schools. 

Dr. Angle is well known in Masonic circles, belonging to Lincoln Lodge, 
No. ig, F. & A. M.; to Lincoln Chapter, R. A. M. ; and St. John's Commandery, 
K. T. He is also a member of Alpha Tau Omega, a college fraternity. He is a 
charter mcnil)er of Lincoln Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution 
and he is a member of the Lancaster County ■Medical Society, the Nebraska 
State Medical .Association and the American Medical Association. Lie is like- 
wise a member of the Medical Society of the Missouri X'alley and the American 
Urological Association and is a fellow of the .\merican Association for the 
•Advancement of Science and has recently been informed that his name would 
appear in the forthcoming edition of The Scientists of America, indicating the 
eminent position to which he has attained in scientific circles. He has closely 
applied himself to his profession and served for a period of years as professor 
of skin and urinary diseases in the Nebraska College of Medicine. Several 
attractive j)ositions in medical colleges have been proffered him. He is now 
a member of the staff of St. Elizabeth's Hospital of Lincoln and such is his 
ability that his reputation and his practice extend far beyond the borders of 
Nebraska. 

Dr. Angle is a deep lover of nature, and flowers and trees jjossess for him 
almost human cjualities. Nowhere is he more happy than at their country home, 
Interlachen, near Park Rapids, where the summers are spent among the beauti- 
ful lakes and forests of northern Minnesota. Fishing and hunting are his favorite 
sports. Many record fish have come to his hook. 

By nature of a reserved disposition he has never sought publicity or position, 
finding the greatest pleasure in his profession, his family and groups of selected 
friends. He and his wife are members of the Second Presbyterian church. 
Dr. and Mrs. .\ngle arc well known socially and have a circle of friends almost 
coextensive with the circle of their acquaintance. 



SIMON P. BENADOM. 



Simon P. Benadom. a Lincoln pioneer, arrived in this place in April, 1S67, 
when there was only one small shanty where the city now stands. He purchased 
the small courthouse at Lancaster from Dora Hardenberg. a building thirty-three 
feet square built of hewn cottonwood timber, anil two stories in height, for which 
he jjaid eight bunclrcd dollars, using this as a residence for ten years. Mr. 
Benadom was born near Lancaster, in Lancaster county, Ohio, November 13, 
1826. His father, Ccorge Benadom, was professor of mathematics in Mount 
\'ernon College of ( )hio and was also born in that state, being a son of John 
Benadom, who was of German descent. He was a Methodist preacher and was 
fanied for his elo(|uence. The mother of Simon P. Benadom bore the maiden 
name of Ilann;ih .Myers and was also a native of Lancaster, Ohio. She was a 
very large woman and lived to be about sixty years of age. She was the mother 



LI\'COLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 59 

of six sons and four (laughters, the only survivor hting tlic subject of this 
sketch. 

Simon P. L'.enaduni was reared and educated in (Jhio and at the age of 
seventeen years iiegan learning the blacksmith's trade, serving a three years' 
a])i)renticeship at Winchester, that state. In 1S46, accompanied by his wife and 
one child, he drove a blind horse across the country to Rome, now Olin, in Jones 
county, Iowa, and cast in his lot with the pioneer settlers of that state. When 
they crossed the Mississippi river there were fifty-two people on the ferry boat, 
the largest boat load that had crossed up to that time. He was one of the 
commissioners who located the capital at Des Moines and was otherwise con- 
nected with early events of importance in Iowa. For ten or fifteen years he 
conducted a blacksmith shop and afterward turned his attention to merchandising, 
which he followed for several years, being quite successful in thai undertaking. 
1 le built the first house in Olin, Iowa, owning a tract of land of ten acres where 
the depot now stands. He was postmaster at Olin for six years during the 
Buchanan and Lincoln administrations. He drove across the country in 1859 
to Nebraska City and at the first land sale in Nebraska laid warrants covering 
two claims of three hundred and twenty acres near Nebraska City. He then 
returned to Olin but in 1866 sold out there and removed to Pawnee City, 
Neliraska, where he spent the winter, during which period he bought furs. In 
the spring of 1867 his wife joined him at Neljraska City and with a fine horse 
and buggy they drove over the country to what is now Lincoln. This was the 
first buggy seen in the emljryonic city which is today Nebraska's beautiful capital. 
He also bought and hauled to Lincoln the first chairs and the first furniture 
brought from Nebraska City and this he dis])osed of to his neighbors He 
likewise bought and drove to Lincoln the first cows lirought here and these he 
also sold to the early settlers. In iSt'Cj he burned l)rick where the lU'.rlington 
depot now stands and with many other "first things" lie was prominently and 
actively identified. On one occasion he killed a deer where the Hargreaves store 
now stands and he also killed twenty-one wolves on what is now Second street. 
He built thirty-five mill dams in the state of Nebraska and two in .Missouri, 
lielieving that there might be established a beautiful city at Lincoln, lie |)ut 
forth every efl:'ort to help on the work. He hired a man to go to Plattsmouth to 
get Cottonwood sprouts, which he gave to the ])C(iple. while he himself ])lante(l a 
great many, including all those around the square. It was he who secured the 
passage of the l.)ill to donate the square to the city and in every available way he 
used his aid and his influence to further Lincoln's sulistantial development. 

He has never missed attending the Nebraska state fair since it was estab- 
lishcfl, twice coming from the Pacific coast in order to attend. 

In April, 1844, Mr. P.enadom was married to Miss Fidelia Burous, a native 
of \'ermont, who was reared in Lancaster county, Ohio, where she was a school- 
mate of Mr. Benadom and who died in the lUickeye state. She was the mother 
of the following children: .\lmina E.. the wife of Charles Smith, of Lincoln: 
George W.. now a prominent business man of Morro, California: F.mnia, of 
San Jose, California, who possesses marked literary talent and is well known 
for her poetic gifts; Carrie, the wife of Norman P.. Wilson, of Salome Springs, 
Arkansas; Alice, who passed away in California: and Wilford O.. a prominent 
Methodist Episcopal minister of Seattle, Washington. He is a man of notable 



60 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

physique, Ijcing six feet four inches in height and weighing two hundred and 
twenty pounds. h"or his second wife Simon P. Benadom chose Hannah Jones, 
who passed away in Lancaster county, leaving a daughter, Zella, who was ad- 
mitted to high school when but seven years of age and died a few days after 
entering the high school. 

During the early years of his residence in Lincoln ;\Ir. Benadom purchased 
all of the furs which were sold in this market. He hired trappers for years to 
secure furs and did a hig business in that line. There is no phase of the city's 
development and upbuilding with which he is not f-amiliar and his influence has 
been a most potent force for progress. He called the first democratic meeting 
in Lincoln, has been active and influential as a supporter of the party ever 
since and has served as chairman of the democratic central committee for ten 
years. 



THOMAS R. PREY. 



Thomas R. Prey was one of the earliest settlers of Lancaster county, arriving 
here in 1856, and for over three decades he devoted his time and energy to stock 
raising, but in 1888 removed to Lincoln, where his death occurred. He was 
born in Boston, ^Lassachusetts, the 13th of February, 1826, and his parents, 
John V. and Margaret (Gibson) Prey, were of Scottish ancestry and emigrated 
from Scotland to the L'nited States in early life. They took up their residence in 
Boston but later removed to New York, where the father followed the slater's 
trade. In 183(1, however, he decided to take advantage of the unusual opjior- 
tunities offered by the west and came to Lancaster county, Neljraska, where he 
subsequently took up a homestead. When he first came west the land had not as 
yet been thrown open to settlement under the homestead law, but he purchased 
a farm. lie turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, wdiich he followed 
successfully throughout the remainder of his active life, passing away in Sep- 
tember, 1873. "'s wife was called to her final rest in iS/f). 

Thomas R. Prey remained imder the parental roof during his boyhood and 
youth and received his education in Boston and in the village of Eagle, New York. 
He accompanied the family on their removal to Wisconsin, where they farmed 
until 1831'), when they came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and acquired land. 
Subsequently Mr. Prey homesteaded a good tract and l)rotight all of his holdings 
to a high state of devel()])ment. He gave the greater part of his attention to 
raising stock and his w-ell directed labors returned him a good income. In 1888, 
because of ]wor health, he and his wife took up their residence in Lincoln and 
he passed away here on the 3th fif July, 1004. 

Mr. Prey was married on the 23d of March, 1871, to Miss Martha J. Davis, 
whose birth occurred in .Stockport, Ohio, on the 5th of April, 1843. Her parents. 
Dr. Reuben and .Mary A. (Cieddes) Davis, were natives respectively of Ohio and 
Pennsyhania. In 1853 Dr. Davis removed to Como, Illinois, near Sterling, and 
there he practiced medicine for many years. He gained a high standing pro- 
fession;illy and as he possessed good business ability he also won financial inde- 
pendence, realizing good jirofits on his investments. At his death he held title to 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 



(il 



fifteen hundred acres of inii)roved land. He died on the 7th of Xoveinber, 1887, 
at the age of sixty-eigiit years, but his wife passed away on the i8th of March] 
1848. To Mr. and Mrs. Prey were born three children, namely: Mrs. Minnie 
I'. Kiiotts, who is lil)rarian for the N-ebraska State Historical Society at Lincoln; 
Thomas R., a resident of Ueryl. Utah; and Harry 1".., who lives in San Diego,' 
California. 

Mr. Prey gave his political allegiance to the republican pariv but confined his 
activity in public affairs to the exercise of his right of franchise. He held mem- 
bership in the Christian church but did not belong to any fraternal organizations, 
])referring to spend his leisure time with his family. During the first year of his 
residence in this county, conditions were those of the frontier and there were 
many hardships to be endured that the present generation knows nothing of, 
1)ut he had faith in the future of the county and lived to see his confidence in 
this section more than justified. He had a part in transforming this region of 
ild prairie into one of highly cultivated and well improved farms, and his 
memory is justly held in honor. Mrs. Prey has resided in the county for forty- 
six years and has watched with great interest the rapid change that has taken 
place. Since 1888 she has lived in Lincoln and her circle of friends is almost 
coextensive with that of her acquaintances. She owns property in Salt Lake 
City, is manager of the Brown apartments in Lincoln and several other build- 
ings, and displays unsual executive ability and business acumen. In religious 
faith she is a Presbyterian. 



w 



PIOWARD HAR\'EY. 



Howard Harvey, who is one of the youngest and also one of the leading 
business men of P.ethany. has made an excellent record as cashier of the First 
State Bank. He was born at Ohiowa, Nebraska, December 21, 1892. and he is a 
son of Richard A. and Lillian li. (Clemons) Harvey. The father was born in 
Missouri and the mother was the first white child born in Fillmore county, 
Nebraska. Richard A. Harvey became a resident of this state in early life and 
opened a bank at Ohiowa. wdiich he operated for about twenlv years, after 
which he went to Wymore and conducted a bank there for some lime. Later he 
returned to Ohiowa and managed a lumberyard there mitil 1910, w'hen he took 
up liis residence in Lincoln and organized the I'armers Loan & Investment 
Company, which he has since conducted. He also established the R. A. Harvey 
I^umber Company at College View and later admitted to nartnershij) H. D. 
Enslow, the business being conducted under the name of the 1 larvev-F.nslow 
T-umber Company. His wife also survives. 

Howard Harvey grew to manhood in his native town and attended its schools 
and the high school at Hebron, from which he was graduated in igio. He then 
matriculated in the University of Nebraska and comjiletcd his course there with 
the class of 1914. Following his graduation he worked in the City National I>ank 
at Lincoln as bookkeeper for nine months but in 11)15 was made assistant cashier 
of the First State Bank of Bethany, a controlling interest in whose stock was 
purchased by R. A. Harvey, L. J. Dunn and L. B. Howey in January, 19 15. 



62 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

In the following July our subject was made cashier and purchased stock in the 
institution, lie is also a director and the gratifying increase in the business of 
the bank is due in large measure to his insight into business conditions, his 
enterprise and sound judgment. When he became cashier the deposits amounted 
to fifty thousand dollars and they now total seventy-five thousand dollars. The 
institution is capitalized for ten thousand dollars and earns its stockholders good 
dividends at the same time that it carefully safeguards the interests of its patrons. 
It was established in 1905 by L. S. Hurst and in the eleven years of its existence 
has gained the full confidence of the pulilic. Its afi'airs are in a very prosperous 
condition and plans have been made for erecting a fine modern building in 
the spring. 

Mr. Harvey was united in marriage on the 26th of March, 1916, to Miss 
lulict Proudfit, a daughter of William H. and Frances M. ( Platner) Proudfit, 
who removed to Lincoln from Denver. Ller father is now vice president of the 
R. S. Proudfit Lumber Company but does not take a very active part in the 
management of that concern as he is living practically retired. Her mother also 
survives. 

Mr. Harvey fully indorses the principles of the republican party and is never 
remiss in any of the duties of citizenship although he has not taken an active 
jjart in civic affairs. In all of his dealings he adheres to a high standard of 
ethics. He is well known and his many friends predict for him a successful 
future. 



THOMAS STIX.SON ALLEN. 

Thomas Slinson Allen, United States district attorney for Nebraska and a 
prominent member of the Lincoln bar, was born at Payne's Point, Ogle county, 
Illinois, April 30, 1865. His father, Benjamin Franklin Allen, a retired fanner, 
died in Lincoln, December 20, 1915, at the age of eightv-three years after 
residing in this state from 1869. He was Ijorn in New Hampshire, December 
10, 1832, and was descended from revolutionary stock, which included the 
famous Colonel Lilian Allen, who won distinction as commander of the "Green 
Mountain Hoys." ( )n his removal to Nebraska, llenjamin F. Allen became 
actively connected with its agricultural interests and carried on farming until a 
few years prior to his death, living near \\'abash in Cass countv. He was a 
])rominent leader in the i-'armers Alliance partv of Nebraska, and was instru- 
mental in |)lacing that organization on a firm foundation. He was actively inter- 
ested in ;dl public (|ueslions. lie married Harriet Maria Ely, who was born at 
Hartford. New Yoik. in 1835 and died in Lincoln, lanuarv 25, 11J12, at the age 
of seventy-seven years. In their f.amily were six children of whom five are yet 
living: Esther, now the wife of John T. I'eather of Waverly, Nebraska : Thomas 
S. : Lizzie -A., the wife of Charles .^. .Murfin of Waliash, Nebraska; Grace, of 
Lincoln: and ( )sc;ir II.. of ( )niah;i. A dau.ijhter. .\l)l)ie, the first born, died in 
childhood. 

Thomas S. Allen was about four years of age when brought by his parents 
to Nebraska in 1869. He acijuired his early education in the district schools of 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 6:5 

Cass count}' and at the age of seventeen years entered the ])re])aratory depart- 
ment of the University of Nebraska. He spent six years in all in that institu- 
tion and was graduated in 1889 as valedictorian of his class. He studied law in 
the office of A. R. Talbot, now a prominent member of the Lincoln bar, and the 
present partner of Mr. Allen, and the Hon. William Jennings liryan, Nebraska's 
distinguished statesman. i\Ir. Allen pursued his legal studies in their office for 
two years and at the same time pursued a law course in the old Central Law 
School, which became the law department of the University of Nebraska before 
he finished his course, so that his diploma, dated 1891, came to him from the 
State University. Soon afterward he became a member of the firm of Talbot, 
Bryan & Allen.. Mr. I^ryan withdrew from the firm when he was first nominated 
for the presidency in 1896, since which time the firm name has been Talbot & 
Allen. Since 1892 Mr. Allen has been in the active practice of law and is an 
able member of the bar. He possesses comprehensive knowledge of the principles 
of jurisprudence and is, moreover, a hard worker, careful and systematic in 
preparing his cases. 

Mr. Allen is one of the active members of the democratic party in the state. 
From 1904 until 1909 he was chairman of the democratic state central commit- 
tee, and prior to that time was chairman of the democratic county committee of 
Lancaster county. On the ist of August, 191 5, he was appointed United States 
district attorney for the state of Nebraska by President Woodrow Wilson and 
now holds that office. 

On the 28th of June, 1898, Mr. Allen was married to Miss Mary Elizabeth 
liryan at Salem, Illinois. She is the daughter of Silas L. and Maria Elizabeth 
Lryan and the youngest sister of Hon. William Jennings Bryan. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Allen is a thirty-second degree Mason and a 
member of the Modern ^\'loodmen of America, the Maccabees, the Knights and 
],adies of Security and the Royal Highlanders. He is also a director and the 
treasurer of the \\'oodman Accident Association, which has its head(|uarters in 
Lincoln. He is a member of the Lincoln Commercial Club, the Nebraska Slate 
Bar Association and the Lancaster County liar Association. The breadth of his 
interests and activity is thus indicated, and the city recognizes in him one of its 
]irominent citizens who subordinates personal interest to public welfare and 
partisanship to the general good. 



CAL\'IN A. DT A^KiNn. 

Interested in all those forces which work for the ujjbuilding and development 
of the community, Calvin A. Diamond was for a considerable period a valued and 
representative citizen of Lancaster county, and his death was the occasion of deep 
and wide-spread regret. He was born on a farm in .Shelbyxille township. l!lue 
Earth county, Minnesota, in September, i860, a son of John and Mary (Schutt) 
Diamond, who were natives of Maryland and Pennsylvania resi)ectively. The 
father was a farmer by occupation and on removing westward became one of 
the ]Moneer settlers of Blue Earth county, Minnc'^ota, where he later occuj)ied 
the position of sherilf. He continued to reside in that county throughout his 



64 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

remaining days, his dealli there occurring in 1903. He had for several years 
survived his wife, who died in 1898. 

Calvin A. Diamond was reared and educated in ^lankato and remained 
with his parents until he reached llie age of seventeen years, when he started 
out in business on his own account, becoming a clerk in a store at North Platte, 
Nebraska. Later he went to Rock Springs. Wyoming, where he was employed 
for some time, and afterward he accepted a position as traveling salesman for 
the lirm of Steel & \^'alker. wholesale grocers, of St. Joseph, Missouri, remain- 
ing with that house for a number of years, or until the firm failed. He traveled 
in Nebrask;i in connection with mercantile lines for a quarter of a century. In 
1803 lie came to Lincoln where he continued to reside until called to his final rest 
and where his widow still makes her home. He erected a fine residence at 
No. 2600 Q Street and this Mrs. Diamond now rents, erecting in the spring of 
1915 a residence at No. 1620 C street. 

In June, 1895, Mr. Diamond was united in marriage to Miss Belle Buckworth, 
a daughter of .Alexander D. and Emma ( Sims) Buckworth. who were natives 
of Ohio. The father removed to North Platte, Nebraska, at an early day and 
for nine years held a position in the government land office there. Before this 
time he practiced medicine in Illinois, and after leaving the land office he engaged 
in the Ijanking business, becoming president of the North Platte National Bank. 
He represented his district in the state senate and at the time of the Civil war 
he served with the Union army as assistant surgeon. His life was one of useful- 
ness and he enjoyed the confidence and regard of his fellowiuen in an unusually 
high degree. He passed away in January, 1897, and his wife is also deceased. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Diamond were born three children : Herbert C, who was born 
December 21, 1896, and died January 1 1, 1912 ; Leonard B.. who was born August 
9, 1900, and is now attending high school ; and John A,, who was born March, 28, 
1902, and is also in school. 

Fraternally Mr. Diamond was connected with the Knights of Pythias and the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His political allegiance was given to the 
republican party and his religious faith was that of the Episcopal church. He 
passed away June I, 1909, and thus closed a life which in all respects was 
exemplary. Lie ever lived up to his jjrofessions, was thoroughly reliable in his 
business affairs and straightforward in every relation. His word was as good 
as a bond, and those who knew him entertained for him the highest confidence 
and warmest reeard. 



TOHN FISHER. 



Among those who contributed to the material development and improvement 
of Lancaster county was John F'isher, who for a considerable period was con- 
nected witli agricultural interests here. At the time of his death, March 29, 
1909. he was si.xty-three years of age, his birth having occurred in Carroll 
county, Ohio, March i, 1846. His jmrcnts were Jacob and Gertrude Fisher, 
natives of Germany, who in early life came to the new world, settling in Ohio, 
where Mr. Fisher jnirchascd land, becoming the owner of a good farm in 




MR. AND MRS. .TOIIX Fl.slIKK 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 67 

Carroll county, which he continued to cultivate ami inijirovc initil his life's 
labors were ended in death in 1858. His widow passed away in i8(ji. 

John Fisher spent the days of his boyhood and youth in the county of his 
natixity and is indebted to its public school system for tlie educational privileges 
which he enjoyed. In 1865 he removed westward, settling at I'rairie City, Jasper 
county, Iowa, and there worked at the wagon maker's trade, which he had pre- 
viously learned at his old Ohio home. He was employed for some years at his 
trade in that county, and later he acquired a farm near I'rairie City, which he 
owned and cultivated for nine years. On the expiration of that period he re- 
moved to Audubon county, Iowa, where he bought land and engaged in general 
farming for a similar period. On the ist of March, 1890, he arrived in Lan- 
caster county, Nebraska, and purchased land in Elk precinct, after which he 
carried on the work of the fields there until his demise. 

It was on the 2d of May, 1867, that Mr. Fisher was united in marriage to 
Miss Dianna Beck, a daughter of Michael and Catherine (Houck) Beck, who 
were natives of Pennsyhania. Her father was a farmer by occupation and in 
1855 removed to Jackson county, Iowa, his daughter, Mrs. Fisher, being then 
eleven years of age, her birth having occurred in Pemisylvania, June 22, 1844. 
Mr. Beck continued to engage in farming in Jackson county, Iowa, throughout 
the remainder of his days. He was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, January 31, 1817, and died on the loth of April, 1870, while his wife's 
birth occurred in Westmoreland county, that state, December 9, 1S13. and she 
was called to her final rest August 21, 1877. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. 
Fisher were four children : Catherine W., who was born September 26, 1869, 
and died October 31, 1870: Minnie Mary, who was born February 14, 1871, 
and is now the wife of John Densburger, residing on a farm in Elk precinct, 
Lancaster county; Isaac F., who was born October 25, 1872, and is also engaged 
in farming in Elk precinct: and George A., who was born November 17, 1874, 
and owns and operates the home farm in Elk precinct. 

Following her husband's death Mrs. Fisher removed to Lincoln in October, 
1914, and erected a residence at No. 1325 D street. Mr. Fisher always kept 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day and voted with the demo- 
cratic party. His religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church, in which 
he served as deacon for many years, taking an active part in all branches of 
church work. His life conformed to its teachings, and he was ever honorable 
and upright, meriting the esteen and confidence of all with whom he came in 
contact. 



CHRISTIAN A. THORP. 



Christian A. Thorp, of College View, is a man of much influence in the work 
of the Seventh Day Adventist church as he is editor of the Evangeliets Sendcbud, 
or Gospel Messenger, a Danish-Norwegian paper published by that denomination. 
Fie was born in Farsund, Norway, on the 19th of January, 1864, a son of Knud 
and Katrine (Nielsen) Knudsen Thorp, both natives of Norway. The father, 



68 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER CUCNTY 

who followed agricultural pursuits during his active life, passed away in that 
country in March, 1904, and his wife died there in September, 1912. 

Christian A. Thorp was reared and educated in the land of the midnight sun 
and learned the cabinetmaker's trade, which he followed until 1887, when, at the 
age of twenty-three years, he emigrated to the United States. He followed his 
trade in CTiicago for two years, after which he became a student in the Battle 
Creek College at Battle Creek, Michigan, which is conducted by the Seventh 
Day Advcntist church, and after remaining there for a year he engaged in 
missionary work under the direction of the mission conference of that church 
for one year, lie then entered the office of the Review and Herald at Battle 
Creek, beginning as a typesetter and advancing until in 1896 he was made editor 
of the Evangeliets Sendehud. which was at that time published at Battle Creek. 
In December, 1902. the printing plant was burned and the publication of the 
paper was then transferred to College Mew, Nebraska, where in 1903 the 
International I'uhlishing Association was organized. In the fall of 1914 this 
concern became the international branch of the Pacific Press Publishing Associa- 
tion of Mountain View, Colorado, which issues papers in three lagnuages. Mr. 
Thorp has continued as editor of the paper since he first took charge of it in 1896 
and he has made it an important factor in the development of the Seventh Day 
Adventist church throughout the middle west and northwest. He is in close 
touch with tiie various branches of the work cf the church, is thoroughly 
grounded in the principles for which the church stands, understands clearly the 
function of the denominational press, possesses the power of discrimination and 
the literary taste necessary to the editor and is recognized as a leader in church 
journalistic circles. Beginning in August. 1916, the plant will be located at 
Brookfield. llllinois. to which place Mr. Thorp will remove. 

C)n the 25th of March, 1891. Mr. Thorp was married to Miss Mary Andresen 
and to their union have been born four children : Arthtir C. who graduated 
from Union College with the class of 1914 and is a musician by profession and 
is located at Chicago. Illinois; and Lewis P., Ruth and Esther, all of whom are 
students in Union College. 

Mr. Thorp supports the democratic party at the polls and takes the interest 
of a good citizen in ])ublic affairs although he has never been an office seeker. 
He is chairman of the book committee of the public library and has been very 
efficient in the performance of his duties in that capacity. He has served as an 
elder in the .Seventh Day Adventist church and at all times has its interests 
closelv at heart. 



REV. GEORGE M. GATES. 

Rev. George M. Gates, who has devoted much of his life to the work of the 
ministry and who is also well known as an attorney and also handles real estate 
and loans at University Place and Lincoln, was born in Henderson county, 
Illinois, June 2C\ 1859. a son of David and Edith (Rust) Gates. The father, a 
native of Ohio, was educated and reared to young manhood in Henderson county, 
Illinois, and was there married on the 6tli of May, 1858. Later he removed with 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 69 

his bride to rottawattamie county. Iowa, wIktc he cngaj^ed in farniin<; until 
1878. 'i'hat year witnessed his arrival in Kiehniond county, Nebraska, where he 
carried on general agricultural pursuits for ten years. At the end of that period 
he removed to Nuckolls county, Nebraska, where he made his home with his son 
William. His last days were spent at Table Rock, Nebraska, where he passed 
a\\a\- at the home of his son George. He had long been a member of the 
Christian church and enjoyed the high re.spect and goodwill of all who knew him. 
His wife was born and educated in Henderson county, Illinois, and passed away 
at Big Grove, Iowa, October 19, 1872. She too was a devoted memlier of the 
Christian church and her life displayed many sterling traits which endeared 
her to all. In the family were six children: George "SI.: William \'., a farmer 
of Nuckolls county, Nebraska; Frank, who died at the age of thirty years; 
David, living in Los Angeles, California; Harry, who died at the age of twenty 
years; and Anna, the wife of O. L. Campbell, of Fairfield, Nebraska. 

George JNI. Gates was a lad of eight years when, the family I'emovcd to Iowa, 
H'here he resided until 1876. He then returned to Henderson county, Illinois, 
and worked on a farm for two years. In 1878 he removed to Salem, Nebraska, 
where he was employed at farm labor during the summer months, while in the 
winter seasons he attended school. Suljsequently he went to Cornell Oillegc at 
Mount \'ernon, Iowa, and at odd times worked at the barber's trade, thus earning 
the money that enabled him to meet the expenses of his college course. He next 
took up the study of law with Judge Shoenheit, of Falls City. Nebraska, and 
afterward attended the State University of Kansas at Lawrence, being graduated 
from that institution with the class of June, 1884. He located for practice at 
Stella, Nebraska, where, in addition to following his profession, he edited a 
paper for four years. He next entered the ministry at Brownville, Nebraska, 
and later was in charge of the churches at Crab Orchard, Syracuse, Elk Creek, 
Blue Springs, Peru, Table Uock, Fairmont and Lincoln. In the last named place 
he was pastor of Emanuel church for three years and on account of failing 
health was obliged to retire from the ministry. He then located at University 
Place where he opened a real estate, loan, insurance and law ofTfice, and to that 
business has since devoted his attention. He has secured a good clientage and 
is building up a business of substantial proportions. 

On the ii'ith of August, 1883, yir. Gates was married to Miss Celia A. Clark, 
who was born near Mount \'ernon, Iowa, wdiere she was reared and educated 
by a Methodist Episcopal minister, having been left an orphan in early girlhood. 
She supplemented her public school course by study in Cornell College. By 
her marriage she has Ijecome the mother of seven children. \\'. Edgar, secretary 
and treasurer of the Whitebreast Lumber & Coal Company of Lincoln, married 
Fannie Noyes and has a daughter Lois Celia. Cecil C, who is associated with 
his father in business, married Mary L. Miller of Lincoln and has a son, George 
Lawrence. Bernice E. is the wife of J. M. Showaltcr, principal of the schools 
of Norfolk. Nebraska, and they have two sons, Richard and Eugene. LeRoy M- 
residing on a ranch near Chadron, Nebraska, married Mattie Tavener of Oakdale, 
Nebraska, and they have a daughter, Doris. G. Milton, who is engaged in the 
automobile business in Scribner. Nebraska, married Lois Goodie of Afton, Iowa. 
Lloyd E. is attending high school. Frances Celia, who completes the family, is 
also in school. 



7U LL\C(JL.\ AND l.AXCASTEK COUNTY 

Not content to wholly give up his ministerial work Rev. Gates has been 
engaged in preaching during the past tiiree years at Malcom and Hickman and 
on alternate Sundays during the last year and a half at Stella and \'esta hiving 
these two charges at the present time. In politics he is an earnest republican 
and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day, recognizing the 
duties and obligations as well as the privileges of citizenship. He is a York Rite 
Mason and he also has four sons who are worthy exemplars of the craft. Mr. 
Gates is frequently heard upon the lecture platform, his lectures being the result 
of broad travel and study. His most popular lettures are on the A^ellow- 
stonc, Lincoln and the Battle Flags of the Republic, .Alaska, through which 
country he has traveled quite extensively. Under the Stars and Stripes and Under 
the Mexican l-'lag. He is a tluent and interesting speaker ever commanding the 
attention of his auditors and his teachings and his influence are a potent factor 
for uplift and for good wherever he is known. 



ANDREW ROHRBACH. 

.■\ndrcw Rohrbach was a man whose ujiright life gained him confidence and 
high regard in the various contmunities in which he lived. His widow is now 
a resident of Lincoln and several of their children make their home in Nebraska. 
Mr. Rohrbach was born in Russia, June 26, 1827, a son of W^illiam and Julia 
Rohrbach, who were natives of Germany. The i)arents were farming people in 
the old country and never came to America. 

.Andrew Rohrbach was reared and educated in Russia and about 184S came 
to the new world, settling first at r)Urlington, Iowa, where he worked at the 
hlacksmilli's trade, which he had previously learned in his native country. He 
remained in llurlington for five years and then removed to Border Plains, Iowa, 
where he resided for six years. On the expiration of that period he went to 
Fort Dodge, where he was also in business for thirteen years, and later he removed 
to Sedalia, Missouri, where he spent the succeeding eight years. He next became 
a resident of Kansas City, Kansas, where the remainder of his life was passed, 
his death there occurring December 4, 1890. 

It was on the 28th of October, 1861. that Mr. Rohrbach was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Emma Galer. a daughter of John and Martha (Miller) Galer. 
who were natives of Ohio. .At an early day they removed westward to Illi- 
nois, and in Bureau county, that state, Mrs. Rohrbach was born February 12, 
1844. Ller father there engaged in farming until 1850 when he removed to 
Webster county, Iowa, where he ])urchased land and carried on general agricul- 
tural pursuits throughout his remaining days, his death occurring on the 22d of 
July, i860, when he was fifty-si.x years of age. His wife survived him for a 
number of years and her funeral was on the same day on which President 
Garficld"s funeral occurred. To .Mr. and Mrs. Rohrbach were born eight 
children: John B., now residing in Kansas City; Julia E.. the wife of William 
Booth, residing at Paulette, Nebraska; Etta W., the wife of Edwin. Scoville, 
residing at Clarkson. Nebraska ; William H., living with his mother ; Mildred, 
who died January 4, 1871 ; Florence, the wife of L. ^NI. Gwinn, residing at 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 71 

Jumbo, Arkansas; Nina, the wife of William Murray, a resident of Omaha; and 
Nellie F., the wife of Charles Reardon, whose home is at University i'lacc, 
Nebraska. 

In his political views Mr. Rohrhach was a stalwart republican, always giving 
allegiance to the party. His religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church 
and he guided his life according to its teachings, being ever an upright, honorable 
man, whose word was to be trusted and whose life was characterized by many 
acts of kindliness. In the year 1899 ^Irs. Rohrbach removed to Lincoln, where 
she has since made her home, residing now at No. 2640 O street. In the inter- 
vening period of seventeen years she has made many warm friends and is widely 
known here. 



THEOPHIL PI. BERG. 



Theophil H. Berg, city clerk and auditor at Lincoln and one of the efficient 
men in public service in Lancaster county, was born in St. Charles county, 
Missouri, October 18, 1879, a son of John and Emilie (Beimdick) Berg. The 
father, a native of Germany, was brought to America by his parents during his 
infancy, while the mother was a native of Alissouri, born of German parentage. 
In 1882 they came with their family to Nebraska, arriving in Lancaster county 
on the 3d of September. Mr. Berg soon afterward purchased a farm ten miles 
west of Lincoln and resided thereon until 191 5, when he sold the property and 
is now making his home with his children, his wife having departed this life 
on the loth of October, 1901. 

Theophil H. Berg was educated in the public schools and in the fall of 1900 
came to Lincoln, where he entered the Lincoln Business College, desiring to 
prepare for work other than that of the fields. On the 9th of May, 1901, he 
accepted a clerkship in an architect's office, but had occupied that position for 
only a few months when business became slack and his services were no longer 
needed by his employer. He then went west to Montana and Wyoming, where 
he was engaged in railroad survey work. In April, 1902, he returned to Lincoln, 
where he entered the employ of Leach eS: Plymni, architects, with whom he had 
formerly been connected. That he returned to their service is indicative of the 
fact of their appreciation of his faithfulness and loyalty during the first period 
of his connection with their business. Subseciuently he became associated with 
the firm of H. O. Barber cS: Sons, grain merchants, and was thus connected with 
the grain business until 1905. On the 25th of February of that year he was 
appointed assistant city clerk under Thomas H. Pratt, so continuing until 
March i, 1907, when he was appointed assistant secretary of the Commercial 
Club. He rendered efficient service in that connection until January 9, 1908, 
at which time he resigned to accept the appointment of deputy clerk of the district 
court, remaining in that office until ^lay 15. 191.?, when he was appointed under 
the commission form of government to his present imiiortant ])osition, that of 
city clerk and auditor. It is a matter of record that all of his advancements in 
public and civic life have come to Mr. Berg without solicitation on his part— a 
recognition of his ability and trustworthiness. 



72 LI.XCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

On the 26th of Sqjtcinber, U)0>k .Mr. licrg was married to Miss Clara A. 
Kapke, of Lincoln, whose birth occurred in this county, and their children are 
Helen Ruth and Harold Theophil. In his political views Air. Berg is a repub- 
lican, strong in his advocacy of the party principles yet never bitterly aggressive. 
He is well known in fraternal circles as a meniljer of Lincoln Lodge, No. 54, 
A. F. & A. M., of the Knights of the ALaccabees, the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and the Loyal Order of Moose. He also belongs to the Lincoln 
Commercial Club and cooperates heartily in its well devised plans for the 
upbuilding and benetit of the city. He and his wife are members of the Evan- 
gelical church and he is serving on its official board. In the work of the church 
they take an active and helpful interest and their intluence is always on the side 
of progress and improvement. 



i'HlLIP A. SOMMERLAD. 

Philij) A. Sommerlad is a popular and well known citizen of Lancaster county 
and that his fellow townsmen have confidence in his aliility and integrity in public 
afifairs is indicated in his election to the office of county treasurer, which position 
he is now filling. He is a native son of Nebraska, having been born in the town of 
Arago, Richardson county, August 2'/, i86<S, but from the age of three years 
he has resided continuously in Lincoln, having lieen brought by his parents to 
this city in 1871. His father, the lion. Henry William Sommerlad, was a native 
of Germany and when a youth in his teens came to the new world with a brother 
and sister. He lived for a few years in Buffalo, New York, and was there mar- 
ried. He afterward removed with his wife and three young daughters, who 
had been born in the Empire state, to f\rago, Nebraska. Previous to that time 
he had served as a member of a New "\'ork regiment in the Ci\il war and it 
was soon after this that he journeyed westward. He had been a resident of 
Arago for but a brief period when his wife died, leaving to his care a family of 
three daughters and a son, namely: Helen, now the wife of Will H. Bowen, 
of Jacksonville. Oregon ; b'lizabeth, now the wife of Samuel L Wilson, of 
Talent, Oregon; Caroline, who married George H. Griffis and has since passed 
away, her death occurring at her home in Los Angeles, California, where her 
husband still resides ; and Henry William, now a resident of Livingston, Mon- 
tana. For his second wife the father, Hon. H. W. Sommerlad, married Miss 
Christina Scherrer, also a native of Germany. This marriage was celebrated in 
Buffalo, New York, and to them were born five children, of w^hom the eldest, 
a son, died in infancy. The other four are Sophia, now the wife of Robert D. 
Haney, of Denver, Colorado; Philij) A.; Catharine, who married Frank Simon- 
ton, of Redcliff, Colorado, where she passed away about 1896; and Charles, 
who died at the age of twelve. The family became a prominent one in Richard- 
son county, Nebraska. The father was called u])on to represent his district in 
the state legislature for the term 1869-70. In 1871 he removed to Lincoln and 
at his death in 1873 was serving as receiver in the L^nited States land office. He 
was also the owner of a brewery which he l)iiilt in b'ast Lincoln soon after his 
removal to the capital. • * 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY T.i 

Philip Augustus Sommerlad was reared and educated in Lincoln, where he 
attended the public schools to the age of fourteen years, after which he worked 
for a few years on farms in the vicinity of Lincoln, lie also herded cattle 
and still later was employed by Walter G. liohannan, who conducted a hotel. 
At the age of nineteen years he became fireman at the heating plant of the Lincoln 
postoffice, spending one winter in that way. Lie next secured a position as mail 
carrier on the city force and acted in that capacity for four years. Later he 
pursued a course in bookkeeping in the Lincoln Business College and afterward 
was employed as a bookkeeper by the Wt^tern Newspaper Union of Lincoln 
for eleven years. He spent a year in the office of Miller & Paine in the credit 
department and for five years was the bookkeeper for the L. D. Woodruff 
Printing Company and during the last two years was also secretary and one oi 
the stockholders of that concern. In November, 191 1, he was elected county 
treasurer on the republican ticket and was reelected in 1914, so that he is now 
serving for his second term, which will expire in January, 1917. His reelection 
indicates clearly the confidence and trust reposed in him by his fellow towns- 
men, who appreciated the worth and value of his first term's service. 

On the 14th of October, 1896, Mr. Sommerlad was united in marriage to 
Miss Nellie L. Hyde, youngest daughter of the late Colonel Thomas H. Hyde, 
the founder of the Daily News of Lincoln and its editor and publisher for many 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Sommerlad have one son, Philip Paine Sommerlad, liorn 
March i, 1901. Mr. Sommerlad belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, 
to the Lincoln Commercial Club and the Young Men's Republican Club, of which 
he served as treasurer for two years. That he is not unmindful of the higher, 
holier duties of life is indicated in his membership in St. Paul's Methodist Epis- 
copal church and in the Young ?klen's Christian .\ssociation and of the -fornier 
he is treasurer. His life history is well known to his fellow townsmen, for he 
has practically always lived in Lincoln. Between the ages of eight and twelve 
years he was a newsboy on the streets of the city and thus earned his first money. 
Today he is occupying the responsible and important position of county treas- 
urer, in which connection his record is so excellent that the most malevolent 
could not speak of his service in any disparaging way. He is promj^t, accurate, 
systematic and reliable and he enjoys in full measure the goodwill and high 
regard of all. 



CHARLES W. JESTER, M. D. 

Dr. Charles W. Jester of Bethany has built up a large and representative 
practice, and his ability and conscientiousness are generally recognized. He was 
born in Missouri on the 24th of December. iSf)5. and is a son of Thomas E. and 
Sarah E. (Wilson) Tester, the latter also a native of Missouri. The father, who 
was born in North" Carolina, came to Nebraska in i8fii and here enlisted in 
Companv A, First Nebraska \'olunteer Infantry, with which he served for three 
years and three months. At the close of the Civil war he was mustered out at 
Plattsmouth, Nebraska, after which he went to Missouri, where he farmed 
until 1873. In that vcar he returned to Nebraska and took up a homestead m 



74 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Nuckolls county, which he inii>rovcd and operated until 1900. He then retired 
from active life and removed to Deweese, this state, where he is still living. 
However, he retains the ownership of his farm in Nuckolls cotmty, which has 
been in his possession ever since the patent therefor was given him by the 
United States government under the signature of U. S. Grant. His wife died 
on the 7th of November, 1901. 

Dr. Charles W. Jester was reared at home and as a boy attended the common 
schools of Nuckolls county. Subsequently he became a student in Fairfield Col- 
lege in Clay county and was graduated from that -institution with the class of 
189O. I'or several years he taught school in Clay and Nuckolls counties and later 
served for four years as county superintendent of schools in Clay county, dur- 
ing which time he did much to further the interests of the schools under his 
charge. However, he decided that the medical profession offered greater oppor- 
tunities than that of teaching and at length matriculated in the Lincoln Medical 
College, which conferred upon him the degree of M. D. in 1904. He began 
practice at Eagle, Cass county, and remained there for four years, after which 
he came to Bethany, where he has since resided. He studies his cases carefully, 
taking into consideration the totality of symptoms, has been very successful as 
a diagnostician and also in prescribing the correct treatment. He has gained 
the confidence alike of the general public and his professional colleagues, and his 
practice leaves him little time for outside activities. 

On the iith of February, 1888, Dr. Jester was married to Miss Mary E. 
Keeney, and they have become the parents of four children : Earl, who died in 
i88y; Royal 1^., who is practicing medicine at St. Paul, Nebraska; Pearl M., a 
student in the -State University of Nebraska; and Carl W., who is attending the 
Lincoln Dental College. 

Dr. Jester is a democrat and has taken the interest of a good citizen in public 
afTairs, although he has never sought office. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Royal Neighbors and the Masonic order, and 
his religious faith is that of the Christian church. He is much interested in 
educational matters and is now serving as a member of the school board, and 
along strictly professional lines he is identified with the Missouri Medical 
Association. 



LEWIS GREGORY, D. D. 

The life record of Dr. Lewis Gregory was one of usefulness and honor. 1 \v 
devoted many years to ]ireaching the gospel and in his later life was prominently 
connected with financial interests in Lincoln, being president of the American 
Savings Bank at the time of his demise. He w-as Ijorn in Wilton, Connecticut, 
June 17, 1842, a son of Charles and Harriet (Clark) Gregory, who were also 
natives of that slate. The father followed the occu])ation of farming in Con- 
necticut rmd continued to cultivate his land throughout his entire life, there jiass- 
ing away in 1863, while his wife survived only until 1S67. 

Lewis Gregory was reared and educated in Connecticut and attended the 
\\'illon Academy, in iRCki. when a youth of eighteen years, he entered Yale 




LEWIS GREGORY, U. D. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 77 

University, there pursuing a four years' course, after which he was graduated. 
Still later he entered the Andovcr Theological Seminary at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, and is numbered among its alumni of the class of i868. His first pas- 
torate was at Merrimac, Massachusetts, where he engaged in [)reaching in the 
Congregational church for seven years. In 1882 he came to Lincoln, Nebraska, 
and accepted the pastorate of the First Congregational church, which he filled for 
twenty-three years, doing splendid work for his congregation by strengthening 
the cause in all of its spiritual phases. He was an eloquent and earnest speaker, 
strong in his reasoning and logical in his deductions. He appealed not only to 
the minds but also to the hearts of his hearers, and his earnest purpose brought 
good results, for he was not denied the full harvest nor the aftermath of his 
labors. On the ist of October, 1898, he retired from the ministry and went to 
the east, where he was offered two pastorates, but his interests were all in 
Lincoln, so that he returned after a year or more of travel through the east and 
in Europe. 

On again arriving in Lincoln Dr. Gregory organized the American Savings 
Bank and was also vice president of the American E.xchange Bank, which is now 
the First National Bank. He continued one of the stockholders of the First Na- 
tional until his death and was also president of the American Savings Bank at that 
time. This was the first savings bank in Lincoln to be estaldished after the 
panic of the early 'yos, when several savings banks failed, and his capability in 
its management and control added largely to its success. 

On the I2th of August, 1868, Dr. Gregory was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Buckingham, a daughter of Ebenezer and Laura (Hart) Buckingham. She died 
in Lincoln, July 8, 1876. Three children were born to them: Benjamin, who died 
young; Charles B., who is now president of the American Sa\ings Bank of 
Lincoln; and Helen, who resides in New York City. On the 23th of T'cbruary, 
1897, Dr. Gregory was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Sarah B. 
Ramsdell, a daughter of William H. and Mary (Curtis) Burgess, who were 
natives of Herkimer county, New York. Her father was a farmer by occupa- 
tion and at an early day went to \'irginia, where he purchased land, becoming very 
successful in the conduct of his farm. From time to time he added to his prop- 
erty until he was one of the largest landowners of that locality and he continued 
to reside in Petersburg, Virginia, until called to his final rest. He was a very 
prominent representative of the republican party in his state and at the time of 
his demise held the office of commissioner of revenue. He died in June, 1873, 
at the age of forty-two years, while his wife passed away November 30, 1914, 
at the age of eighty-two years. By her former marriage to Charles 1. Ramsdell 
^Irs. Gregory had three children: Charles 1., who is manager of the .Acme 
Amusement Company of Lincoln; and Lillian and Sarah, bnlh deceased. Their 
father died in 1886. 

Throughout the long years of his residence in Lincoln Dr. Gregory became 
most actively and helpfully interested in everything that pertained to the welfare 
of the city and especially to its upbuilding along educational and moral lines. He 
was a member of the Lincoln school board for a number of years, and he was 
also a member of the board of trustees of Doane College at Crete, Nebraska. 
He died on the 6th of January, 191 1, when sixty-eight years of age. and his death 
was a matter of deep and widespread regret because of the importance and value 



78 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

of his services along many lines. He was a director of the Nebraska Home 
Missionary Society, and in 1895 he was elected a corporate member of the 
American Missionary Board, being the only one from this state. He built a 
palatial residence at No. 1230 L street, adjoining the church which he attended, 
his home being thoroughly modern. The original old church property now 
belongs to Mrs. Gregory, the building still standing on her land. In politics 
he was a republican and never neglectful of the duties of citizenship. He reached 
out along constantly broadening lines for the benefit of his fellowmen and the 
worth of his work was everywhere acknowledged. There came to him "the blest 
accompaniments of age — honor, riches and troops of friends." Mrs. Gregory is 
widely known in those circles in Lincoln which have to do with the upbuilding 
and benefit of the city, having for fourteen years been president of the Civic 
Improvement Society. Theirs was a most happy life because of a congeniality 
of interests and activities. Faultless in honor, fearless in conduct and stainless in 
reputation. Dr. Gregory left a memory that is enshrined in the hearts of all who 
knew him. 



W. R. JOHNSON. 



W. R. Johnson is the owner of one of the leading commercial establishments 
of' Havelock, conducting a hardware, plumbing and heating business. He was 
born in Otoe county, Nebraska, March 12, 1869, a son of William James and 
Theresa (Lender) Johnson. The father was born in Scotland, February 22, 
1840, and when four years of age was taken to Canada. When fifteen years of 
age he became a sailor on the lakes and followed that pursuit several years. 
With the outbreak of the Civil war he responded to the country's call for aid, 
enlisting in the Second Minnesota Regiment of \'olunteer Infantry, with which 
he continued for four years, Ijeing largely engaged in fighting Indians on the 
frontier. After the war he located at Nebraska City and engaged in freighting 
across the plains to Laramie, Wyoming. In 1867 he was united in marriage 
to Theresa Lender, a native of Missouri, and in 1891 they removed to Havelock, 
where Mr. Johnson embarked in merchandising under the firm style of Johnson 
S; Son, opening his stock of goods in a little frame building on the present site 
of the brick store in which the business is still continued. Here Mr. Johnson 
was actively connected with the trade interests of the town until his death, 
which occurred February 8, 1896, and he occupied an enviable position in public 
regard as a business man and citizen. He was always greatly interested in 
attending the Grand Army meetings and he was an exemplary member of the 
Masonic lodge. His wife survived him for about two decades, passing away 
May 29. 1915, at the age of sixty-eight years. To them were born three children, 
namely: W. 1\-. nf this review ;• Mrs. Arthur Belts; and Grace M., of Elberta, 
Utah.' 

\\'. I\. jdhnson was reared in .Xebraska and in early manhood became his 
father's associate and partner in the busness which was conducted under the 
firm name of Johnson & Son until the father's death, when W. R. Johnson suc- 
ceeded to the ownership of the store. He has erected an excellent brick building 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 79 

and he carries a large line of shelf and heavy hardware, in connection with which 
he takes contracts for plumbing and heating work. He is now accorded a 
liberal patronage and his business has reached prolital)le proportions. He was 
also one of the organizers of the Farmers & Mechanics Bank of liavclock but 
has since sold his stock. 

On October 12, 1896, Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Evan- 
geline S. Prescott, a native of Lincoln and a daughter of \V. II. I'rescolt, of 
that city. To them have been born two children, Harry and James. The family 
attend the Methodist church and in politics Mr. Johnson is a republican, but he 
has neither held nor sought political office. He is, however, a member of the 
school board and is interested in all that pertains to educational progress and 
to the improvement of the county along other lines. 



S. WILLIAM GETTIER. 

S. William Gettier is a retired butcher and stockman who now resides at 
No. 1024 J street in Lincoln and is enjoying a well earned rest after long years 
of active connection with business. He was born December 3, 1850, in Adams 
county, Pennsylvania, within five miles of the Gettysburg battleground, and 
remembers the excitement as the troops approached, when the Confederate army 
crossed the Potomac at Harpers Ferry and made their way northward into 
Pennsylvania, while the h'ederal army came from the east and the southeast. 
For days the roads. were crowded with soldiers, first the cavalry and then the 
infantry. His parents lived upon a farm but suffered no hardship or losses 
because of the battle. Those living nearer, however, did, for wheat fields that 
looked fine in the morning appeared like a wagon road at night. The cannon- 
ading could be heard for miles during the three days in which the battle raged, 
terminating in victory for the Union arms on the 4th of July, 1863. 

The parents of Mr. Gettier were Stephen and Eliza (Shrader) Gettier. The 
father was born in Maryland and was of French descent, while the mother was 
born in the state of New York and came of German ancestry. Following their 
manriage they took up their aliode upon the Pennsylvania farm previously men- 
tioned and there continued to reside until called to their final rest. 

S. William Gettier remained at home until nineteen years of age and sjient 
one year in a store at Fredericksburg, Maryland, after which he removed to 
the west. He was employed for a time in Chicago and later his firm sent him 
to Kansas to buy cattle which had been raised in Texas and were brought north 
to fatten on the free ranges of Oklahoma and Kansas. Mr. Gettier made many 
trips across the plains, buying and selling stock, his last trip taking him as far 
as Kearney, Nebraska, from which point he would tra\el east and dispose of 
the cattle in eastern Nebraska. It was these trips that led to the flcvelopment 
of his interest in this state and in the fall of 1872 he settled in Lincoln, where 
in the spring of 1873 '^"^ opened a l)utcher shop on Soutii E!c\enth street. Later 
he was joined by his brother John, and they conducted l)usiness here, establish- 
ing the Gettier Market, which they conducted for many years, hut in i(;o8 sold 
out. They also bought and shipped horses and cattle and S. William (iettier 



80 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

owned a large farm south of Lincoln, dealing extensively in cattle and horses, 
which he pastured upon his place until they were ready for the market. 

Mr. Gettier was married in Seymour, Lidiana, in 1885, to Miss Jessie C. 
Vogle, a native of that place, and they have become parents of two children, 
Vogle and Alillard, both residents of Lincoln. This city was but a small town 
when Mr. Gettier took up his abode within its borders — a western frontier place 
which, however, had entered upon the period of development and progress that 
has continued to the present time. He has been an interested witness of the 
changes which have occurred and the transformation that has been wrought 
and for many years he figured as one of the leading business men of the city 
and is honored as one of its pioneer merchants, although he is not now actively 
connected with business. 



GEORGE EDWARD HAGER. 

George Edward Hager, county attorney of Lancaster county, was bom in 
Appanoose county, Iowa, February' 28, 1874. His father, Jacob Hager, was 
born in Ross county, Ohio, March 17, 1836, and in 1854 removed westward to 
Appanoose county, being then a youth of eighteen years. He accompanied his 
parents and the younger children of the family and became identified with farm- 
ing interests in that locality. .\t the time of the Civil war he responded to the 
country's call for troops and went to the front. After the war he continued 
to engage in farming in Appanoose county until 1875, when he removed to Clay 
county, Nebraska, where he secured a homestead and developed a good farm. 
He died in Clay Center, this state, in November, 1902, and is survived by his 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Margaret Kroft, and who is still living in 
Clay Center, Nebraska. 

George E. Hager spent his boyhood days in Clay county and during summer 
vacations was usually busy in herding the cattle owned by his father. In the 
winter of 18Q1-2 he began teaching, at which time he was a youth of but seven- 
teen years. He taught only that one winter, however, having charge of a three 
months term of school, and for his services he only received thirty-five dollars. 
\\'ith that money as his capital he entered the preparatory department of the 
University of Nebraska. He spent seven years in the university, doing eight 
years school work in that time, and in addition he earned his way all through. 
He was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of .Arts in 1898 and that of 
Bachelor of Law in 1899, and later went to Wyoming, where he spent a few 
weeks looking for a location, after which he returned to Nebraska. From July 
until December, 1899, he was in Plattsmouth, where he practiced his profession 
in a limited way. Jn the latter month he came to Lincoln and has since been 
an active member of the bar of this city. For several years he was a member 
of the firm of Kirkpatrick & Hager and since 1903 has practiced alone. He is 
now holding the office of county attorney, to which he was elected on the repub- 
lican ticket in the fall of 1914. Prior to that time, or from March. 1906. until 
January, 191 1, he was assistant postmaster of Lincoln, serving under Edward 
R. .Sizer. At the latter date he resigned to accejn the jiosition of deputy county 



LINCOLN AND LANXASTER COUNTY 81 

attorney, which position he filled for four years under Judge J. B. Strode. He 
is a gifted speaker, and while a junior in the university won first prize in the 
Center-Lehmer-Quaintance oratorical contest. 

On the 28th of November, 1900, Mr. Hager was united in marriage to Miss 
Jennie Harris, who had been a schoolmate at Clay Center. They have two 
children living: Margaret Reese, born September 22, 1902; and Gloria Gwen- 
dolyn, born July 20, 19 10. 

Fraternally Mr. Hager is a thirty-second degree Mason and a Shriner, and 
he belongs also to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He is a member of the State University .-Vlumni Asso- 
ciation and of the Lincoln Commercial Club. In politics he has always been 
a republican, earnest in his advocacy of the party principles. For four years 
he was president of the Nebraska State Association of County Attorneys, and 
he belongs to the Lancaster County Bar Association and the Nebraska Stale Bar 
Association. His ability has brought him to the front in the practice of law, and 
he is now acceptably filling an important office in connection with his profes- 
sion. 



JOHN STROTSTEFFEN. 

For many years John Strotsteffen was actively connected with railroad work 
in Lincoln acting as section foreman with the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy. 
He was born in Prussia, Germany, Alarch 14, 1828, and is a son of Everhard 
and Mary Strotsteffen, who were also natives of that countr}', where they spent 
their entire lives, the father dying in the '50s, while the mother passed away 
in the succeeding decade. 

John Strotsteffen was reared and educated in Germany and in the '50s came 
to America, making his way at first to Chicago, while later he was located at 
.different periods at Peru and at Aurora, Illinois, being employed during that 
time at railroad work and as a farm hand. About i860 he removed to Iowa, 
settling at West Point, and there on the 13th of September, 1861, he proved his 
loyalty to his adopted land by enlisting for service as a member of Company I, 
Engineers of the West, an Iowa regiment of infantry. Later Companies I 
and C were consolidated and with that command he remained until honorably 
discharged at the close of the war, having served for three years and three 
months. In 1865 he returned to Iowa with a most creditable military record. 
He located on a farm near West Point and cultivated it for a consideral)lc period, 
after which he removed to Jacksonville, Illinois, where he remained for three 
years. He then returned to Iowa, settling at Fort Madison and afterward at 
Burlington, where he was employed as section foreman by the Chicago. Bur- 
lington & Ouincy Railway Company until 1875, when he was transferred to 
Lincoln, Nebraska, continuing to act as section foreman throughout the remainder 
of his active life. 

In January, 1865, Mr. Strotsteffen was married to Miss Theresa Wigginjost, 
a daughter of Bernhard and Elizabeth (Sallan) Wigginjost, both of whom were 
nati\-es of Germany. Mrs. Strotsteft'en was l)orn in Germany, November 23, 



82 LIXXOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

1844, and in 1850 was brought to the new world by her father, w^ho was a farmer 
of Germany and who, on coming to the United States, settled at Fort Madison, 
Iowa, where he spent his remaining days, his death there occurring March 4, 
1854. His wife had died in Germany in 1849. Mr. and Mrs. Strotsteffen had 
no children of their own but they reared a niece, Theresa Slueter, now the wife 
of Joseph Desher, formerly of Lincoln but now a resident of Kansas City. 

As the years passed Mr. Strotsteffen won a gratifying measure of success 
through his energy and persistency in business and, making judicious invest- 
ment, he became the owner of five residence, properties in Lincoln. He lived 
for a number of years at No. 726 \'ine street, but In 1914 removed to another 
property which he owned at No. 658 South Nineteenth street, where his widow 
still resides. He passed away May 30, 191 5, after attaining the very venerable 
age of eighty-seven years. In politics he was a democrat and in religious faith 
a Catholic. He belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic and was ever 
as true and loyal to his country in days of peace as when in days of war he 
followed the nation's starrv banner on the battle fields of the south. 



JOHN E. WINTER. 



John E. Winter, the popular and efficient mayor of College \'iew% is also 
manager of the municipal water and light comjiany, in which capacity he has 
made a highly creditable record. His birth occurred in (Jhio in January, 1876, 
and he is a son of John and Nancy l'>. ( Sabin ) Winter, natives of Michigan. 
The father, who was a merchant, became a resident of Ohio in the early days 
of that state and engaged in business there until the Civil war. He enlisted in 
the Eighty-fourth Ohio \'olunteer Infantry in 1862 and remained with his com- 
mand until 1864, when, on account of disability due to a wound, he was honor- 
ably discharged from the service. He returned to r)hio and continued in 
business there until 1886, when he removed westward to Des Moines, Iowa. He, 
followed mercantile pursuits there until his removal to Redfield, Iowa, where 
he passed away in 1904. He is survived by his wife. 

Tohn E. Winter was educated in the public schools of Des Moines, Iowa, 
and suljsequently learned telegraphy with the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. 
He followed that luisiness for fifteen years and was for some time in the offices 
of the freight and passenger agents of the Chicago Great Western Railroad. In 
1908 he came to College View. Nebraska, and became identified with the Inter- 
national Publishing Association, with which he was connected for three years. 
At the end of that time he became manager of the Nebraska Food Factory 
and held that position for two years but he is now concentrating his energies 
along other lines. He has charge of the municipal water and light company 
and is also mayor. The discharge of the duties pertaining to these offices leaves 
him little time for further interests and his efficient management of the affairs 
intrusted to him has gained him the hearty commendation of his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Winter was married in December, 1896. to. Miss Abigail E. Mack and 
they have become the parents of five children, namely: I\Iack, who was bom 
on the 14th of February, 1899; Wilmuth, born February f). 1901 ; Millison M., 



LLXCULX' AND LANCASTER COUXTY 83 

whose birth occurred in ]\Iarch, 1903; Margaret E., born February 2, 1909; and 
Alyse E., born in February, 19 13. 

Mr. Winter supports the repubhcan party at the polls and does much to pro- 
mote its interests. However, in the performance of his official duties he sub- 
ordinates partisanship to the public welfare and under his administration the 
business of the town has been transacted in a most able manner. I lis religious 
faith is that of the Seventh Day Adventist church. 



HARRY E. WELLS. 



Harry E. Wells first came to Lincoln in 1875 'i''"^l '^''s since been a resident 
of the capital. He removed to this state from La I-'ayette, Indiana, and is now 
one of the best l<nown and most popular men in Lancaster county, where for the 
past six years he has capably and acceptably fdled the office of county clerk. He 
was born in La Fayette. Lidiana, ALarch 30, 1848. The father, James Itdward 
Wells, a contracting carpenter, was born in IVnnsylvania and died in 1861, and 
the mother, who bore the maiden name of Sophia Ford, was also a native of 
Peimsylvania. in which state their marriage was celebrated. They afterward 
removed to La Fayette, Indiana, and there Mrs. Wells passed away in 181)4. 
They had two sons and three daughters. The three sisters are all residing in 
Lincoln, namely: Anna Margaret, now the widow of Colonel Alexander Hoge- 
land, widely known all over the L'nited States as "the newsboys' friend'' ; 
Amanda E., the widow of J. H. ]\IcMurtry ; and Mary E., the wife of F. D. 
Stone, of Lincoln. The brother of our subject is Curtis E. \'\ells, of Oklahoiua 
City, where he is engaged in the real estate business. 

Harry E. Wells was reared and educated in his native city and was graduated 
from the La Fayette high school when a youth of seventeen years. For six 
years thereafter he held a position in the La Fayette postoffice, after which he 
removed to Louisville, Kentucky, and for some years held a responsible position 
with the firm of Fairbanks, Morse & Company, scale manufacturers. He then 
returned to La Fayette, Indiana, but soon afterward came to Lincoln, Nebraska, 
where he arrived forty-one years ago. For several years he was employed in a 
wholesale grocery house. In 1891 he entered the sheriff's office in a clerical 
capacity and a few months later he was appointed deputy county clerk, entering 
upon the duties of that position in 1892. He has since been in the office, covering 
a period of twenty-four years. He continued to act as deputy county clerk for 
eighteen years and in 1909 was elected to the office of county clerk, to which he 
was reelected in 191 1 and 19T3. He is now serving his third term and his 
popularity is such that his fourth election in 1916 is practically assured. The 
law was changed so that now the county clerk is elected on the even years instead 
of the odd, so that when Mr. Wells has finished his third term he will have 
served seven years as county clerk, in addition to eighteen years as deputy. He 
is regarded as one of the leaders of the republican party in Lancaster county and 
is a most untiring worker in its support. His public service has been character- 
ized by efficiency and bv courtecus treatment to all who have come to him with 



84 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

business interests. He is familiar with every detail of the work and in selecting 
assistants has been most careful to secure those well qualified for their duties. 

On the 25th of January, 1882, in Lincoln, Mr. Wells was united in marriage 
to Miss Aimie L. Gillespie, by whom he has three living children, namely : 
Myrtle, now Mrs. G. \V. MacDougall ; Ruth ; and Charles E. All reside in 
Lincoln. Mr. Wells is widely known in Masonic circles as a Royal Arch Mason 
and he also belongs to the Lincoln Commercial Club, cooperating in all of its 
well defined plans for promoting the city's upbuilding and progress. In fact 
he is most public-spirited and his interest in the city's welfare is manifest in 
many tangible and helpful ways. 



CHARLES C. BEACH. 



Charles C. Beach, who is living retired in University Place, was formerly 
engaged in farming but after removing to town turned his attention to car- 
pentering. His birth occurred in Franklin county, Ohio, on the ist of Janu- 
ary, 1846, and he is a son of Newton Beach, also a native of that county. The 
father engaged in farming and also worked in the timber to some extent in the 
days when the custom was to hew logs and shave shingles. He made the lumber 
which was used in the construction of many of the houses and barns in his 
community and was an excellent workman in that line. In 1852 he removed 
westward, settling in Iroquois county, Illinois, three miles from Onarga. He 
cultivated his farm, to which he held title, until 1873 when he went to Kansas 
with his son-in-law, O. M. Shore, and from that state removed to Cass county, 
Nebraska, the following year. He passed his remaining days there, his demise 
occurring in August, 1876. While still a resident of Ohio he was married to 
Miss Elizabeth Holt, who was born in W'rmont, but was taken to the Buckeye 
state when a child. She survived her husband for many years, dying in' Uni- 
versity Place, Nebraska, in April, 1910, when eighty-si.x years old. She was 
the mother of two children, the sister of our subject lieing Ella, who is the wife 
of O. M. Shore and resides at University Place. 

Charles C. Beach grew to manhood in Ohio and Illinois, and as soon as old 
and strong enough began assisting his father with the farm work. He con- 
tinued to reside in Iroquois county, Illinois, for several years following his 
marriage, btit in 1873 went to Cass county, Nebraska, whence four years later 
he came to Lancaster county and ]iurchased eighty acres of railroad land in 
Stevens Creek precinct. At that time this county was undeveloped and the con- 
ditions of life were those of a frontier region. His first home was a frame build- 
ing fourteen by eighteen feet, but shortly after taking up his residence there 
he erected an addition to his house and in i8<jo he built a commodious dwelling. 
As soon as possible he brought his land under cultixation and as time passed 
he made many improvements upon his ])lace until it became one of the most 
valuable farm properties of his locality. He devoted his time and attention to 
its operation until 1900 when he removed to Prairie Home, where he purchased 
two lots and erected a residence. In 1905. however, he disposed of his property 
there and built his present attractive home in University Place. For several 




CHARLES C. BEAOH, HOiVIE AND AUTOMOBILE 



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J u : ^ L. 


"OK 


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0« ' IONS 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 87 

years after giving up farming he engaged in carpentering, and, allhough he is 
practically retired, he still does considerable work in repairing his neighbors' 
houses and in keeping everything about his own place in excellent condition. 
He never served an apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, but being of a 
mechanical turn of mind has developed a high degree of skill in that work. 

On the 26th of March, 1867, in Iroquois county, Illinois, Mr. Beach was 
united in marriage to Miss Susan Hall, who was born in England but became 
a resident of Erie county, Ohio, when a child. To this union have been born 
three children as follows: W. S., who is employed by the Buick Automobile 
Company of Lincoln, married Miss Bertha Griswald and they have four chil- 
dren, Carl, Clifford, Bernice and Gilbert. Ella is the wife of John Hedges, who 
is farming our subject's homestead and she has two children, George and Nellie. 
C. C, the youngest of the family, died when twenty years of age. 

Mr. Beach is a prohibitionist and loyally supports the candidates of that 
party. While living on the farm he served for three years as justice of the 
peace and for one year as assessor and his record in these offices was highly 
creditable, alike to his ability and his public spirit. In religious faith he is a 
Methodist and his daily life attests the sincerity of his belief. He has witnessed 
the greater part of the development of the county and takes great pleasure in 
the knowledge that he has aided in the agricultural progress of his locality. In 
the early years of his residence in the comity prices for grain were very low 
and at times he hauled corn to Lincoln as- Tom Lowry, an old time miller there, 
paid fifteen cents per bushel although the price at Waverly was but twelve cents. 
The first harvesting machine which he used was a McCormick self-rake which 
was considered a wonderful invention at the time, although it was a primitive 
implement compared with the McCormick self-binders which he later owned. 
He has always been willing to adopt new methods which promise to be of value 
and his progressiveness has been one factor in his gratifying success. 



JOHN J. GILLILAN. 



John J. Gillilan, who for about twenty years was an active figure in real 
estate circles in Lincoln, continuing in the business up to the time of his death, 
which occurred August 22, 1901, was at the time forty-seven years of age. He 
was born in Algonquin, Illinois, October 4, 1854, his parents being John and 
Belinda Gillilan, both of whom were natives of Virginia. They removed to 
Illinois, however, at a very early period in the development of that state and 
settled on a farm at Algonquin. In 1881 they became residents of Lincoln, 
Nebraska, where they spent their remaining days. 

Tohn T. GilHlan was accorded liberal educational privileges and after attend- 
ing the public schools entered Oberlin College at Oberlin, Ohio, from which he 
was graduated in due course of time. In 1881 he became connected with busi- 
ness interests in Lincoln, opening a real estate office and conducting his agency 
until his death, which occurred twenty years later. 

On the 6th of Tulv, 1S86, "Sir. Gillilan was married to Miss Susie G. Houtz, 
a daughter of Dr. ^^'illiam G. and Susan Houtz, who were natives of Pennsyl- 
voi. n— 5 



88 LINCOLN AND LA.XCASTER COUNTY 

vania. Her father was born in Daupliin county, that state, October 12, 1830, 
and was graduated from tlie Girard Medical School of Philadelphia. For 
several years he engaged in the practice of medicine in connection with his father, 
Dr. \\'illiam G. Houtz. In 1855 he went to Troy Grove, La Salle county, Illinois, 
and it was there that Mrs. Gillilan was born. For twenty-five years Dr. Iloutz 
engaged in the practice of medicine. He had two brothers who were soldiers 
in the Civil war, and he was among the first physicians to reach the field after 
the battle of Corinth, there rendering great service by caring for the sick and 
wounded. He also gave valuable assistance to his country by rendering pro- 
fessional aid at home to the families of soldiers who were at the front and for 
this service he asked no financial compensation. In 1880 he removed to Lin- 
coln, Nebraska, where he continued to make his home until his death. In this 
city he did not engage in general practice but confined his j)rofessional aid to old 
soldiers and to personal friends, among whom were the late General lohn M. 
Thayer and General \'ictor \'ifquin. Dr. Houtz was married three times, losing 
his first two wives by death. He first wedded Susan Mease, and by that mar- 
riage there were born four children, of whom tw'o died in infancy, while the 
other two, Mrs. Aldridge D. Kitchen and Mrs. John J. Gillilan now survive and 
are residents of Lincoln. The mother passed away in 1862, while the death 
of Dr. Houtz occurred June 30, 1906. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Gillilan were born tw-o children : Lloutz, who died Decem- 
ber 13, 1913; and Ruth, the wife of Dr. Donald B. Steenburg, a resident of 
Aurora, Neljraska. Mr. Gillilan died August 22, 1901, and in his passing the 
community lost a representative and worthy citizen. His political allegiance w-as 
given to the republican party and in November, 1890, he was elected on that 
ticket to the Nebraska State Legislature, serving as a member of the general 
assembly during the twenty-second session. In religious faith he was a Pres- 
byterian, while Mrs. Gillilan is a Congregationalist. She owns the fine home 
which she occupies at No. 1989 Harwood Avenue. Mr. Gillilan was well known 
as a citizen, as a representative business man, and as a loyal friend. He was 
devoted to the welfare of his family and found his greatest happiness when 
promoting their interests. 



' PROFESSOR WILLIAM HENRY GARDNER, A. M. 

The importance of the teaching profession cannot be overestimated. While 
it is necessary for the best interests of a community that all of its officers be 
men capable of discharging their specific duties, it is of the utmost importance 
that the man selected to manage the educational affairs of a county be one cpial- 
ified to the fullest extent for the responsibilities that devolve upon him in shaping 
methods and raising standards that will improve the educational facilities that 
are the foundation of later success for every individual. The citizens of Lan- 
caster county felt that they made wise choice in selecting Professor William 
Henry Gardner for the office which he now occupies. He was born on a farm 
in Lee county, Illinois, July 19, 1855, and comes of a family of intellectual force. 
The Gardners are of English descent but the family was founded in America 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 89 

ill early colonial days by ancestors who settled in New England. Represen- 
tatives of the name served in the Revolutionary war. Members of the family 
removed from New England to New York and it was in the latter state that 
James Gardner, grandfather of Professor Gardner, was born. He married 
Malinda Hammond, a native of \'ermont, and on the (jth of (uly, 1X22, in 
Steuben county, New York, they became the parents of a son whom they called 
Joseph. Removing westward, Joseph Gardner was married in Lee county, 
Illinois, in 1851. to Miss Hannah Maria Shaw, who was born in Erie county, 
New York, August 17, 1831. In 1876, with their four youngest children, they 
removed from Illinois to Del Norte, Colorado. Joseph Gardner was a farmer 
and teacher and he filled the office of justice of the peace in both Illinois and 
Colorado. At Del Norte both he and his wife passed away and were laid 
to rest, her death occurring January 17, 1878, while Air. Gardner died many 
years later, having passed the Psalmist's allotted span of three score years and 
ten. In his earlier manhood he had taught school for many years in Lee 
county, Illinois, and had proven a most capable educator. His wife was also a 
teacher at the time of lier marriage and it seems but a natural sequence that 
Professor Gardner should have turned to the same profession. His father was 
everywhere known as Squire Gardner because of his official service as justice 
of the peace, in which connection he discharged his duties in a most capable 
and faithful manner. 

Professor Gardner is the eldest of five children who grew to maturity, the 
others who survive being: Sadie, the widow of George jMyers and a resident of 
Alonte Vista, Colorado ; and John S. Gardner, living in Denver. Those who 
have passed away were William James, Sarah, Lucy and James M. The first 
two died in infancy. Lucy became the wife of x-Xlbert Myers, a brother of 
George Myers, wdio became the husband of Sadie Gardner, and it was in 1913 
that the death of Mrs. Lucy Myers occurred. James M. Gardner, a civil en- 
gineer, died in Del Norte, Colorado, in 1893. 

\Mlliam IT. Gardner was reared on a farm in Lee county, Illinois, and 
atten.ded school at Lee Center and at Ashton until he was eighteen years of 
age. He then became a teacher in the public schools of Lee county, continuing 
his professional work there through three successive winter seasons while spend- 
ing a portion of the summer vacation periods as a student in the Rock River 
Seminary at ?\lount Morris, Illinois. In 1876, when twenty-one years, of age, 
he became principal of the public schools at Elizabeth, Jo Daviess county, Illinois, 
and after two years there spent became princijial of the schools of Hanover, 
Illinois, where he remained for four years. In 1881 he came to Nebra.ska and 
for four years was superintendent of schools in Pawnee City. He afterward 
spent five years as superintendent of schools at Tecumseh, Nebraska, and two 
years at ^^■ymore, Nebraska, and a similar period at Nebraska City. From 
1893 until 1899 he resided in University Place, near Lincoln, his attention 
being devoted largely to the interests of the Nebraska \\'esleyan University for 
a time, but during the la.st five years he was superintendent of the public schools 
of University Place. From 1899 until 1904 he was superintendent of the schools 
of Auburn, Nebraska, and in the latter year he became superintendent of the 
city schools of Fremont, where he continued until T908, when he returned to 
Lancaster county and again took up his residence in University Place, where he 



90 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

still resides. In May, 191 1, he was appointed to the office of county superin- 
tendent of schools by the board of county commissioners. He has held the 
position ever since, having been thrice elected to the office, his first reelection 
occurring in November, 191 1, and his second in November, 1913. During all of 
the years which he has spent as a teacher and school superintendent he has also 
been a student, constantly broadening his knowledge by reading, investigation 
and study, and in June, 1910, the Nebraska Wesleyan University conferred upon 
him the Bachelor of Arts degree after he had done much work in the school 
and passed the necessary examinations. On the 15th of June, 191 1, the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska conferred upon him the Ma'ster of Arts degree following 
special work which he did there. 

On the 3d of July, 1878, Mr. Gardner was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth Nesbitt, by whom he has four children. Gertrude, a teacher by profes- 
sion, is a graduate of both the Nebraska Wesleyan University and the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska. She was head of the Latin department and is now dean 
of women in the State Normal School at Kearney, Nebraska. Mary is the wife 
of James F. Powell, a newspaper publisher at Ottumwa, Iowa. She is also a 
graduate of the Nebraska Wesleyan University and the University of Nebraska 
and by her marriage has become the mother of three sons, namely: Bobbie; 
and Jack and Billy, who are twins. The third child of Mr. Gardner is John M., 
an architect by profession, residing at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He married Allie 
Furlong. The fourth child is Charles Henry Gardner, a civil engineer, who 
was in the service of the government and the Burlington railroad for four years, 
but is now farming in the irrigated district of Scotts Bluff county. 

Professor Gardner is a republican in politics and since establishing his home 
in University Place he has served as a member of the city council and has also 
been honored with the office of mayor. Fraternally he is a Mason, having 
attained the Knights Templar degree in the York Rite, while with the Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine he has crossed the sands of the desert. He is likewise con- 
nected with the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen. He belongs to the Nebraska Schoolmaster's Club and to the 
Commercial Clubs of both Lincoln and University Place. He is a member and 
steward of the Methodist Episcopal church at University Place and his efforts 
have been an effective force in advancing moral progress as well as promoting 
intellectual development. His standards of life are high anc' he has done much 
to inculcate high principles among those who have come under his teaching, 
many acknowledging his influence for good upon their lives. 



ELLIOTT JOHN CLEMENTS. 

Lincoln has always been distinguished for the high character of her bench 
and bar, and prominent among the distinguished lawyers of the city is Elliott John 
Clements, whom the consensus of opinion places in the front rank of the profes- 
sion. He was born on a farm in Allegan county, Michigan, September 30, 1856, 
and is a son of Cyrus 1). Clements, who was a millwright and mechanic. He 
was born in Trumliull county. Ohio, and was there married to Mary Elizabeth 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 91 

Hughes, a native of rennsylvani;i. In 1853 he removed with his family to 
Allegan county, Michigan, where he and his wife continued to reside for about 
forty years. The father followed contracting and building and did considerable 
millwright work, erecting a number of mills. He was born in 1830 and his wife 
in 1833 and they were but twenty-one and eighteen years of age when mar- 
ried. Li 1893 they came to Nebraska settling in Ord, Valley county, where 
their son Elliott John had located in 1884. There the father passed away in 
1898 while the mother's death occurred in 1913, the remains of both being 
interred in the Ord cemetery. In the family were four sons and three daughters, 
and two brothers and two sisters of Elliott J. Clements are yet living, namely: 
Edwin P., a member of the bar at Ord, Nebraska, where he has resided since 
1888; Nettie L., now the wife of Daniel Burke of Paul, Idaho; Cora E., the 
wife of Homer D. Leggett of Ord; and Arthur A., who was formerly an active 
member of the bar but is now conducting a fruit ranch in Colorado. All three 
sons, who survive, have become lawyers. The brother and sister, who have passed 
away, were Eugene L. Clements of Ord, who was a farmer and blacksmith and 
died in 1900, and ]\Irs. Alice A. Hofifmaster, who died in Greeley, Nebraska, 
in 191 1. 

Elliott John Clements attended a country school in his boyhood and when 
fifteen years of age he began to work with his father at the builder's trade and 
under him mastered carpentering. After leaving the country school he attended 
the high school at Otsego, Michigan, and was also a student in the Pine Grove 
Seminary at Allegan, Michigan. When nineteen years of age he took up the 
profession of teaching, which he followed for six years, and in the summer 
season engaged in carpentering and to some extent in farm work. In 1881 he 
entered the law department of the University of Michigan, pursuing the full 
two years' course at that time and being graduated in 1883, his diploma bearing 
the name of Thomas P.. Cooley, the noted legal author. Mr. Clements was 
admitted lo the bar at Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1883, but spent the summer 
of that year at home assisting his father in building a new residence, the former 
dwelling having been destroyed by fire. During the winter of 1883-4 he taught 
school in Allegan county. He had previously paid his way through the uni- 
versity with money he had made at school teaching and by work at the carpen- 
ter's trade and he again took up the profession in order to obtain a financial 
start ere entering upon active law jiractice. 

In 1884 Mr. Clements removed to Neliraska and was admitted to the bar 
in Wheeler county. He practiced law at Ord, \'alley county, from 1884 until 
1900 and served as the first county attorney there, occuiiying the position for 
four vears. In 1900 he came to Lincoln and has since been one of the city's 
leading attorneys, accorded a large and distinctively representative clientage. He 
is also a director of the Farmers State Bank at York. Nebraska. Though he has 
never held a judicial position, his friends frequently call him "judge" because 
of his service as referee on difl:'erent occasions, appointed as such by the court. 
He stoutly disclaims any claim to the title however. He served as a referee in 
an imjiortant case in Omaha in 1898, to which ])osition he was appointed by the 
state supreme court. 

On the 25th of December, 1885. :\Ir. Clements was married to Miss Ettie 
Rogers, of Ord, and thev have a daughter, Edna \'.. now the wife of Ralph B. 



d2 LLXCULX AND i.A.XCASTER COUNTY 

Sill, of Lincoln, and the mother of a daughter, Virginia Louise, who was born 
May 8, 1914, and who is a great favorite with her grandfather and he is 
with her. 

Jn ])olitics Mr. Clements is a republican but has never held but one office. 
He belongs to the Lancaster County and the State Bar Associations and frater- 
nally is a member of Lancaster Lodge, No. 54, A. F. & A. M., of the Knights 
of Pythias and of the Alodern Woodmen of America. He is likewise a member 
of the Lincoln Commercial Club. Although long a Unitarian in religious belief, 
he is not now actively identified with any church. He is interested in all matters 
that deeply affect his fellow townsmen and the public at large and keeps well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day, being ever ready to support 
his position by intelligent argument. The major part of his time, thought and 
effort, howe\er, are given to his law practice and he is recognized as one of the 
distinguished members of the Nebraska bar. 



WILLIAM E. BARKLEY. 

William E. Barkley, who at the time of his death, which occurred July 13, 
1905. was president of the Lincoln Safe Deposit Company, was for many years 
prominently connected with business interests of this city. He arrived here 
in 1881, removing from his native state of Indiana. His birth occurred January 
24, 1X37, in Kossburg, Indiana, his parents being William E. and America (Ross) 
Barkley, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Indiana. They were 
farming peojMe and William E. Barkley, Sr., removed to Indiana during its terri- 
torial days. There he inirchased raw land which he converted into a rich and 
productive farm, continuing its cultivation until his life's labors were ended 
in de:itb in 183Q. His widow survi\ed him for almost seventy-five years, passing 
awav in 1913 at the notably old age of ninety-seven years. 

William E. Barkley, whose name introduces this review, was educated in the 
schools of Indiana. He was but seventeen months old when his father died 
and he was reared bv bis grandfather. When old enough he went onto the farm 
which his father had left him and for five years he engaged in the cultivation of 
that tract of land. He next turned his attention to mercantile pursuits at New- 
port, Indiana, conducting a store there for twelve years, and during that period 
he was also active in community affairs, serving for four years as township 
trustee, and postmaster during two terms of President Grant's administration. 
He then remo\ed to Morgantown, Morgan county, Indiana, where he conducted 
a general store for six years, coming from there to Nebraska. 

It was in Augu.st, 1881, that Mr. P.arkley arrived in Lincoln, Nebraska, where 
he engaged in merchandising. After two years he joined J. Z. Briscoe in the 
operation of a ranch which they owned, but after four years he returned to 
Lincoln and engaged in the real estate business, remaining active in that lield 
for several years. In 181)4 '•'•'^ ^"" jnirchased the business of what is now 
the Lincoln Safe Deposit Company ami William E. Barkley joined him in a 
partnershi]i, remaining as ]n-esident of the company until his death. 

On the lotb of lulv. 18^1). Mr. I'.arkley was married to Miss Nancy E. Hart. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 93 

a daughter of Aaron and L'^abelle (Pyej Hart, who were natives of Kentueky 
and Colimibus, Ohio, respectively. The father followed the occupation of farm- 
ing in his native state for a numljer of years and afterward removed to Ripley 
county, Indiana, where he turned his attention to farming and later to mer- 
chandising at Pennington, remaining active in that line of business until his 
death, which occurred in August, 11^55. His widow survived him for almost 
two decades, passing away in June, 1874. Mr. and Mrs. Barkley became the 
parents of seven children: \Villiam L., Ijorn in iNf)^, who is now president of 
the Lincoln Safe & Trust Company ; James A., born in 1869, who resided in 
South Africa for fourteen years and now makes his home in Lincoln; John C., 
whose birth occurred in 1873 "'"'^ "^^o follows farming at Gooding, Idaho; Mary 
A., who was born in 18(10 and died in 1864, at the age of four years; Edward, 
whose natal year was 1865 and who passed away in 1S70; Laura E., who was 
born in 1877 and died ten years later; and Robert H., whose birth occurred in 
1880 and who died in 1886, 

At the time of the Civil war ^Ir. liarkley was a member of the home militia 
in Indiana and was on acti\'e duty for ten days during the raid of the Confederate 
general, Alorgan, into that state. In 1859 ^^^ became a member of the Masonic 
fraternity and ever exemjilified in his life its beneficent spirit and purpose. He 
also belonged to the Sons of Temperance and the high principles of his life were 
further indicated in the fact that he held membership in the Christian church. 
llhs political allegiance was given to the repulilican party and he was ever loyal 
and progressive in matters of citizenshijj. His entire life was actuated by high 
princijiles and worthy purposes and those who knew him entertained for him 
the warmest regard. He left to his family not only a comfortable compe- 
tence but also the priceless heritage of an untarnished name. 



ABRAM E. CUTTER. 



Abram E. Cutter, one of the well known business men of Bethany, is pres- 
ident of the Rowland Lumber Company, which operates two lumber yards and 
a hardware store. A native of C)hio, he was born in February, i8'ii. of the 
marriage of Samuel and Christina ( Stucker ) Cutter, both natives of Ohio. The 
father engaged in farming and stock raising in that state and died there in May, 
189S. His wife survived for some time, her demise occurring in January, 
1900. 

Abram E. Cutter received his education in the common schools, remaining 
u])on the home farm until 1883. when he went to Cass county, Nebraska, and 
purcliased a tract of good land, which he cultivated until 11)07. In that year 
he disjiosed of his farm and came to Bethan\', Lancaster county, where he has 
since resided. .\ year or two later he bought an interest in the Rowland Lumber 
Company, of which he is now president and manager, while J. O. Rowland, a 
sicetch of whom appears elsewhere in this work, is secretary and treasurer. The 
company is incorporated and owns two lumber yards and a hardware business. 
Mr. Cutter has charge of one yard and of the hardware store and his ]iartner 
manages the other vard. Their atTairs are wisely managed, and they are ever 



94 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

alert for an opjxjrlunity to increase their business and their patronage has shown 
a steady growth. 

In October, 1887, occurred the marriage of Air. Cutter and Miss Anna L. 
Mosley and they have two children : Mabel E., who was born in March, 1890, 
and is the wife of Dr. J. M. Packer, of Memphis, Saunders county; and Lela, 
who was born in July, 1897, and is attending Cotner University. 

Mr. Cutter gives his political allegiance to the democratic party, believing 
firmly in its principles and is never remiss in any of the duties of a good 
citizen. lie is now serving as a member of the school board and is also filling 
the office of town treasurer. Fraternally he belongs to the Masonic order and 
the Royal Arcanum and holds membership in the Christian church. He is re- 
spected for his ability and enterprise and his personal characteristics are such 
that he has gained the warm friendship of those who have been closely asso- 
ciated with him. 



DR. JAMES FRANKLIN STEVENS. 

Dr. James Franklin Stevens was born in \'an Buren, De Kalb county, Illinois, 
on the 19th of August, 1859, and is the son of Sylvester George and Mary Martha 
(Greene) Stevens. His father was a native of Maine, was reared in New 
Hampshire and received a college education. In 1S54 he was sent to Chicago by 
a Boston firm to establish a branch business house. His work finished he 
traveled by stage as far as Van Buren, then simply a postoffice, where he re- 
mained as tutor and school teacher until his death which occurred in 1861, when 
he was twenty-eight years of age. The mother, Mary M. Greene, a descendant of 
the distinguished Greene family of Rhode Island, was born in western New York, 
the home of her father, James Greene. Her parents were among the early 
pioneers in northern Illinois, to w'hich place she was brought when a little child. 
This continued to be her home until the time of her death in Shabbona, Decem- 
ber 23, 1887. 

Dr. Stevens is an only child and was but two years of age when his father 
died. He was reared by his mother, who notwithstanding limited financial re- 
sources managed to give her son the excellent educational opportunities planned 
by herself and husband prior to the latter's death. His early training was received 
in the district school. This was supplemented by an extensive disciplining in 
field work in nature study and drawing under the immediate supervision of 
Bayard T. Holmes, at that time college student and teacher, and later the 
professor of surgery in the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Chicago, 
Illinois. When sixteen years of age Dr. Stevens was matriculated as a prepara- 
tory student in the Classical Seminary of Paw Paw, Illinois. This institution, 
wOiich years ago voluntarily retired because of lack of endowment, was originally 
chartered by a s])ecial act of legislature of the state of Illinois and for twenty-five 
years was a well known local institution of learning. The required per cent of 
scholarship, namely ninety, before a degree could be granted, would perhaps be 
considered rather severe today. In twenty-five years with an annual attendance 
of several hundred it gr;mled but Ihirtv-four degrees. In 18S1 Dr. Stevens was 



ASTOR, LFN< 
TILRFN POUND" 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 97 

graduated therefrom with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The following autumn 
he entered the medical department of the Northwestern University and upon the 
completion of the course received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in the spring 
of 1S84. Later in life, after becoming a citizen of the new west, he entered the 
University of Nebraska as a graduate student in 1897, and after three years of 
study with Dr. A. Ross Hill, then the head of the department of Philosophy, 
received, in the spring of 1900, the degree of Master of Arts. During the first 
eight years of college life he managed to meet much of the necessary expense by 
his earnings as private tutor, country school teacher during summer vacations, or 
acting in the capacity of assistant to some professor. As he states it "The grind 
was hard but victorious." Immediately after leaving the school of medicine he 
located for practice in Shabbona, Illinois. This town was named after the old 
Indian chief who years before with his tribe lived on his reservation adjoining 
and referred to Mrs. Stevens (the mother, then a child) as "Greene's papoose." 
Here Dr. Stevens came into a full knowledge of what starting in life really means. 
At first he walked, later he purchased a limited means of conveyance and finally 
succeeded in securing a well ordered doctor's equipment. He remained at this 
point for four years, during which time his practice was largely in the surround- 
ing country and nearby towns. He declares that his successful beginning was 
due largely to the influence of his parents' friends supplemented by a warm 
support of his erstwhile pupils and college accjuaintances. 

It was during his stay in Shabbona that Dr. Stevens met Miss Lillian E. 
Carnahan, daughter of S. W. and Celestia Carnahan of Compton, Illinois, who 
was destined in the s\n\ng of 1888 to become his bride. Miss Carnahan was a 
brilliant student and teacher and possessed then as now a large circle of acquaint- 
ances and affectionate friends. The day following their marriage Dr. and 
Mrs. Stevens left the land of their nativity and early life and started for the 
new west with its limitless possibilities. Kansas City was selected as the most 
desirable place in which to locate, and here arrangements were made for a per- 
manent residence. Life in this splendid city, a rapidly enlarging business, and 
most excellent prospects were, however, soon doomed to blight. The peculiarly 
sweltering climate, together with the impure water then furnished unfiltered from 
the ri\er, made such inroads upon the health of his family that it was found 
necessary to first spend many months in travel and recuperation and later to 
remove permanently to the north. Lincoln, Nebraska, was chosen as the objective 
point and in August, 1893, Dr and Mrs. Stevens commenced what has been a 
continuous residence to the present time. In 1894 a daughter, Ruth Mary Stevens, 
was born who after a brief and beautiful life of nine years passed away and now 
rests in Wyuka cemetery. This was the only child. 

Dr. Stevens has practiced continuously in Lincoln since 1893, and has durmg 
this time gained an enviable place in the hearts of the people. He keeps in close 
touch with the advancement which is constantly being made in medical research, 
and his ability and progressiveness have attracted to him a very large clientele, by 
whom he is regarded at once as physician and friend. He emphatically believes 
that the genius of success is the genius of industry and that the practice of 
humanity is more desirable than the practice of commercialism. As a result he 
is an untiring worker and meets the rich and the poor upon the same basis. 
Believing that no individual can develop largely who devotes himself exclusively 



98 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

to one line of thous;lit he is decidedly interested in affairs edueational, social and 
civic. He is a nieniher of the board of education of Lincoln and has been for 
many years one of tlie trustees of Doane College. For several years he was 
lecturer on the principles of medicine in the Lincoln Dental College. For four 
years he was dean and professor of internal medicine in the Nebraska College of 
Medicine which during its existence was first the Patron .School and later the 
affiliated School of Medicine of the Nebraska Wesleyan University. For several 
years he was lecturer on materia medica in the medical department of the Ne- 
braska State Uni\ersity. During the past three years he has been professor of 
introductory meiHcine in the same institution, a position which he still holds. 
He is a member of the Lancaster County Medical Society, The Nebraska State 
Medical Society and The American Medical Association and a Fellow of the 
American Academy of Medicine. He is also a member of tlie Nebraska State 
Pharmaceutical .Association and the Missouri \'al!ey Medical Association. He 
has been a member of the staff' of St. Elizabeth Hospital for twenty years. His 
general interest in scientific research is indicated by the fact that he is a member 
of the Nebraska Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, a member of the American .Academy of Political 
and Social .Science and a founder member of the American .Anthropological 
Association. He also is a nieniljer of the Cooper Ornithological Union and the 
American Ornithological Union. He is connected with the Nebraska Historical 
Association and the Mississippi \'alley Historical Society. He belongs to the Na- 
tional Child Labor Union and several local charities. He is a member of the 
Lincoln Rotary Club, the Lincoln Commercial Club and several fraternal orders. 
In the financial world he is one of the board of directors of the American Sav- 
ings Pank. Llis college fraternities are Sigma Chi and Phi Rho Sigma. Polit- 
ically he has usually been a republican but refuses to vote for any one whom he 
regards unworthy. His church aftiliation is with the Congregationalists. His 
earthly life interests are the promotioti of the welfare of the community in the 
midst of which he lives. 



HON. DON LATHROP LOVE. 

lion. Don I.athro]) Love, a jiromincnt nienil)er of the Lincoln l)ar, has had 
much to do with sha])ing public thought and action in this city, of which he has 
Ijeen mayor. He was horn in Janesville, Wisconsin, March 7, 1863. His father, 
Horace Love, was a farmer throughout his entire life. He was born in western 
New York, being a son of Leonard Love, also a native of the Empire state and a 
farmer by occupation. The early members of the family lived in New England, 
where representatives of the name settled at an early date. The mother of 
Don L. Love bore the maiden name of Gracia A. Ashton, and was born in New 
York in 1824. She was married to Horace Love near Janesville, Wisconsin, 
in 1848, the wedding taking place in the village of Cooksville. In 1864 they 
removed to Marshall county. Iowa, and four years afterward they became resi- 
dents of Calhoun county. Iowa, where the father died in 1882. His wife sur- 
vived him until 1910, reaching the advanced age of eighty-six years, while he 



LINXOLX AND LAX'CASTER COUNTY 9'J 

was but sixty-three years of age at the time of his demise. Both were laid to 
rest in the cemetery at Malvern, Iowa. 

Don L. Love was the youngest of se\en children, live sons and two daugh- 
ters, namely: Horace A., a resident of ]\lanson, Iowa; Addie, the wife of James 
Churchill of Malvern, Iowa; James L., residing at Long Beach, California; 
Jennie, who married Robert Fowder and is now deceased ; Dr. Charles .-\. Love, 
living at Atascadero, California, where he practices medicine; Melvin, who died 
in childhood ; and Don L., of this review. 

The last named spent his boyhood upon a farm in Marshall and Calhoun 
counties, Iowa, and attended the district schools until he reached the age of 
sixteen years when he took up the profession of teaching. He devoted seven 
years to that calling and also attended school during that period, while in vaca- 
tion intervals he worked on a farm. It was during that period that he spent 
about four years in the Iowa State University at Iowa City, being graduated 
from there in i8S6 with the Bachelor of Arts degree. The entire cost of his 
college course he met with money which he earned by teaching school. During 
the season of 18S6-7 he was principal of the school at Garner, Iowa, and at 
the same time he devoted his leisure hours to the study of law. In the spring 
of 1887 he entered a law office in Des Moines and there continued his studies 
through the following summer. In September, 1887, he went to Garden City 
and there entered upon the practice of his profession, but there was little client- 
age to be gotten there for Garden City had been a boom town and the boom 
collapsed. After four months spent there, Mr. Love came to Lincoln, arriving 
here in 1888. Gradually he has worked his way upward in his profession and 
has become a distinctively representative member of the Lincoln bar. In more 
recent years he has devoted much time to official duties and to the conduct of 
private interests, although for about twenty-three years he was one of the active 
members of the Lincoln bar. For a long period he was the partner of W. T. 
Stevens, practicing under the firm name of Stevens & Love, and with the acces- 
sion of Samuel C. Cochran to the firm, the name was changed to Stevens, Love 
& Cochran. For a number of years they maintained a notable place as lead- 
ing lawyers of the capital. At the present time Mr. Love is vice president of the 
Lincoln State Bank and vice president of the Lincoln Trust Company, and thus 
he figures prominently in financial circles of the city. 

On the 20th of .August, 1890, occurred the marriage of Mr. Love and Miss 
Tulia Larrabee, a daughter of late Governor William Larrabee of Iowa. Mr. 
Love is now director of the Nebraska Art .Association, belongs to several literary 
clubs and is a member of the Nebraska Historical Society, all of which indicate 
the nature and I)readth of his interests. In politics he has always been a repub- 
lican, save in 1912 when he supported Roosevelt as a progressive. In 1909 he 
was elected mayor of Lincoln and ser\ed for one term of two years. One of 
the chief planks in his platform was a •■dry" city and the temperance element 
under his leadership won. He was elected and the city was dry for the first time 
in its history, continuing so for two years, or while he lu-ld the office. In 191 T, 
however, the opponents of temperance won and again in 191,^ Prior to .serving 
as mayor, JMr. Love had been appointed acting county judge and for a time was 
upon the bench. In 19 12 he was a delegate at large to the rciniblican national 
convention in Chicago and was one of the Roosevelt men who helped to organ- 

787163 



l(t(» LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

ize the progressive party and nominate the New York statesman. Li religious 
faith he adheres to Unitarian principles, tie is a member of the Lincoln Com- 
mercial Club and of the Lincoln and Nebraska State Bar Associations. He is a 
man of marked ability, exerting a strongly felt influence over public thought and 
action, and standing at all times for those forces which work for the uplift of 
the indi\idiial and the betternient of the district. 



EDWARD G. MAGGI.- 



Edvvard G. Maggi, attorney at law at Lincoln and chairman of the state 
board of pardons, is recognized as one who has been active in shaping public 
thought and action, especially in regard to the j)olitical interests of the state. He 
was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on the ist of February, 1872, a son of Joseph 
and Augustina Maggi, the former a native of Genoa and the latter of Turin, 
Italy. Leaving that sunny land, they came to America in young manhood and 
womanhood and were married in Boston, where they continued to reside until 
called to their final rest. 

Their son, Edward G. Maggi, had the benelit of instruction in the excellent 
schools of Boston, being graduated from the high "school with the class of 1892. 
He afterward attended the Boston University, completing a course in 1896, 
when he won the degree of B. O. In September, 1897, he came west to Lincoln 
to accept the position of principal of oratory in a private school and in 1899 
he was appointed a member of the faculty of the department of oratory of the 
University of Nebraska. While thus engaged he devoted the hours which are 
usually termed leisure to the study of law, which he had previously begun, and 
in 19GI he received the degree of Bachelor of Law from the L^niversity of 
Nebraska. 

Mr. Maggi became an active factor in political circles in early manhood and 
was a prominent worker in the campaign of George L. Sheldon for governor in 
1897. After the election he was one of the first appointees of the new governor, 
being assigned to the position of chief clerk to the executive. He served in that 
position from 1897 until 1899 inclusive and in 1901 he removed to Albion, 
Nebraska, where he remained until 1904. While in the third congressional dis- 
trict he was in 1903 nominated on the independent ticket as a candidate for 
congress and was one of the youngest men ever named in the state for the office. 
However, at th.at time he did not care to make the contest and withdrew from 
the campaign. In IQ04 he returned to Lincoln and resumed the practice of law 
in this city. In 1911 he was again called to public office in his appointment to 
the position of chairman of the board of pardons under Governor Aldrich, who 
reappointed him in 1912, while in 1915 he was again appointed by Governor 
Morehead to serve for another term of three years. In 1916 he was appointed 
a member of the executive committee of the Italian Progressive League, which 
meets in convention in New York city in the present year. This organization 
is formed for the purpose of jiromoling the welfare of Italian emigrants to this 
country and for their material and intellectual uplift. In this connection Mr. 
Maggi is doing im])ortant \vorl<. He has always been an earnest republican 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 101 

in his political views and his efforts for the adoption of republican principles have 
been far-reaching and effective. 

In October, 1905, Mr. Maggi was united in marriage to Miss Grayce Koernor, 
a native daughter of Redwillow county, Nebraska, her birth occurring in a sod 
house. Her father was one of the early homesteaders of that county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Maggi have one child, Ciretchen Victoria. 

Fraternally Mr. Maggi is identified with Albion Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of 
Albion, Nebraska ; Lincoln Chapter, R. A. M. ; Mount Moriah Commandery, No. 
2, K. T. ; and Sesostris Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. He is hkewise a member 
of the Lincoln Commercial Club and of the Phi Gamma Delta, a Greek letter 
fraternity. Mr. Maggi is recognized as one of the most prominent citizens of 
Lincoln. He has closely studied political, sociological and economic questions 
relating to the welfare of the country and is able to speak with authority upon 
many vital problems, while the clearness of his reasoning and the logic of his 
arguments carry conviction to the minds of many. 



CORNELIUS B. KELLER. 

A constantly developing florist Ijusiness is bringing substantial and gratifying 
success to Cornelius B. Keller, who now controls a very substantial trade in 
Lincoln. He was born in Ohio, November 27, 1859, and is a son of Cornelius 
and Johanna Keller, who were natives of Ireland. The mother died in 1S59, six 
weeks after the birth of our subject. The father, who wa-s a farmer and 
])lasterer, came to America about 1S40, landing at New York, where he remained 
for si.\ months. He then went to Ohio, where he settled upon a farm which he 
continued to own and cultivate throughout bis remaining days, his death there 
occurring in August, 1896. 

His son, Cornelius B. Keller, was reared and educated in Ohio and remained 
with his father to the age of nineteen years, when he started out in life on his 
own account. He came to Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1879, to take up nursery work, 
which he had previously followed in Ohio. For two years he was in the employ 
of a nursery man at Lincoln and then secured a position at the state asylum, 
having charge of the greenhouse and garden. He remained in that connection 
for a year but in the meantime had purchased eighty acres of land near Emerald 
on the installment plan. He afterward traded that farm for his present prop- 
erty and greenhouse and since then he has greatly enlarged his equipment until 
he now has six greenhouses. He has also erected a fine modern residence on 
his property at No. 2403 R street. In the development of his business he has 
met with notable success and he now ships all over the state, enjoying a large 
patronage. Mr. Keller also owns other residence property in Lincoln, from 
which he derives a good annual income. He is also a stockholder in the Lincoln 
Telephone & Telegraph Company. His attention, however, is devoted chiefly 
to the cultivation of plants and flowers and there is no phase of the greenhouse 
business with which he is not familiar. He has closely studied the needs of 
flowers and plants and his broad knowledge and experience enable him to win 
substantial success as the years pass on. 



102 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

111 August, 1883, Mr. Keller was united in marriage to I\Iiss Ida Magee, a 
daughter of Ellison Magee. To them were born six children, as follows : ?^Iay, 
at home; Jessie, who is a teacher in the Lincoln schools; Olive, who is engaged 
in teaching school at Fort Smith, Arkansas; Helen, a student in the State Uni- 
versity; Howard, at home; and Ralph, who passed away in April, 1893. The 
wife and mother passed away in .March, 1900, after a week's illness. 

Mr. Keller is prominently known in Masonic circles. He has taken the 
Scottish Rite degrees in Masonry and he is also identified with the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Woodmen of the World and the Royal Neighbors. 
Politically he is a democrat, while his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. Keller is well known in Lincoln and throughout Lancaster county, 
his acquaintance constantly broadening through his social as well as his business 
connections. He is a man whose jnirposes are well defined, whose plans are 
carefidly executed and whose indefatisjable energy and capable management con- 
tinually lead to success. 



FRED PATTRICK. 



Fred Pattrick, who in the field of brick contracting was identified with the 
erection of many of the leading buildings of Lincoln, was born in Boroughbridge, 
England, March 23, 1873, and passed away in Lincoln, March 7, 1916. He was a 
son of William and Hannah (Smith) Pattrick, who were natives of England. 
Tlie father was a brick mason by trade and followed that business in England 
until 1881, when he came to America, establishing his home in Pawnee City, 
Nebraska. He worked at his trade throughout the remainder of his life in 
Pawnee City and in Lincoln. After eight years spent in Pawnee City he removed 
to the capital, where his remaining days were passed, his death occttrring March 
20, 1914. 

l-'rcd Pattrick accompanied his parents to the new world. Llis education, 
begun in the schools of his native country, was continued in Pawnee City, after 
which he learned the brick mason's trade under the direction of his father. He 
always continued in that business and he assisted in the erection of many of the 
largest buildings in this city, his handiwork being seen on every side. He was 
a thorough, systematic and expert workman, always reliable as well as energetic, 
and his success was founded upon laudable ambition and enterprise. 

On the ist of May, 1905, Mr. Pattrick was united in marriage to Miss Lulu M. 
Bool, a daughter of George and Marie (Engelcke) Bool, who were natives of 
Germany but came to America in childhood. Her father was a shoemaker by 
trade, learning the business in Washington, D. C, and for many years he con- 
ducted a shoe shop in Lincoln. He had come to the L'nited States when but 
fifteen years of age and after devoting a long period to shoemaking he turned to 
the occupation of farming, which he followed throtighout the remainder of his 
life. He passed away Jul\- 15, 1914, and is still survived by his widow, who is 
now fifty-nine years of age, while her mother is still living at the very advanced 
age of ninety years, her home being in Washington, D. C. To Mr. and Mrs. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 103 

Pattrick was born a daughter, Annette B., whose birth occurred on the 31st of 
January, 1915, and who died on the 7th of February, 1916. 

j\lr. Pattrick departed this Hfe, after a short ilhiess, March 7, iQif), his deatii 
being deeply regretted by many friends as well as by his immediate family. He 
was a member of the Royal Highlanders and also of the Bricklayers Union. His 
political allegiance was given to the republican i>arty and his religious faith was 
indicated by his membership in the Congregational church, to the teachings of 
which he was ever loyal. 



WILLIAM C. FRAMPTON. ■ 

The bar 01 Lincoln finds a worthy representative in William C. Framiilon, 
who in his practice has demonstrated his ability to carefully analyze his cases 
and correctly ajiply the principles of jurisprudence. He has been connected with 
much important litigation heard in the courts of the district and the records .show 
that he has won many verdicts favorable to his clients. He was born at Chariton, 
Iowa, March 21, 1S64, his birth occurring in a covered wagon in which his 
parents were fleeing from their home at Independence, Missouri, wdiich town 
had been completely sacked and made uninhabitable by Ouantrell's band. The 
family were going to Tama county, Iowa. The father, George V. Frampton, who 
was born January 23, 1S37, became a sawmill owner and operator. At Inde- 
pendence, Missouri, on the 14th of May, 1859, he married Miss Jane Highet, 
who was born at I'arkersburg, West Virginia, April 12, 1843. Her father, James 
Highet, was a native of Ayrshire, Scotland, and came to the United States about 
1S40, accompanied by his wife. He removed westward to Jackson county, 
Missouri, long before Kansas City came into existence and located at Inde- 
])endence. Fie dreamed that a great city would spring up on the bank of the 
xMissouri river in Jackson county and undertook to select the spot for its site, 
missing the present site of Kansas City only a few miles. Later he removed to 
Tama county, Iowa, where he built a gristmill and in that county he spent his 
remaining days. It was his daughter Jane who became the wife of George \'. 
b'rampton. After the birth of their son, William C, the parents continued their 
journey to Tama county, Iowa, where both spent their remaining days, the father 
dying Lanuary 22, 1870, while his wife survived until March, 1912. In their 
family were four children: Alice Janet, who was born November 25, 1S60, and 
died in 1881 : William C, who was born :\Iarch 21, 1864; John \'ernon. who was 
born September 23, i86r), and is a farmer now living at Allerton, Iowa; and 
George Henrv. who was born April 17, i86g, and is living at Lawton, Oklahoma, 
where he is very prominent as a successful business man, being a large breeder 
of cattle and also an extensive landowner. 

William C. Frampton spent his boyhood days at MonticcUo, Iowa, whither 
the mother removed with her children after the death of her husband. William 
C. Frampton was a little lad of luit six years when his father died. The expe- 
riences which came to him in his boyhood and youth were of a strenuous 
character. Fle had little opportunity to attend school, as most of his early boy- 
hood was .spent in herding cattle. By the time he attained his majority he 



104 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

decided lliat lie needed more education. He went to a normal school one year 
and in 1885 he came to Nebraska, after which he engaged in teaching school, 
which profession he followed through two winter seasons in Redwillow county, 
while later he taught school for two winters in Cass county. He matriculated in 
the L'niversity of Nebraska in 1888 and was graduated from its law department 
in 1893, after having spent five years in pursuing studies in diflferent depart- 
ments of the university. Since 1893 he has been a member of the Lincoln bar 
and has risen to prominence in that connection. He has ever recognized the 
necessity for thorough preparation of his cases and he has the analytical mind 
which enables him to correctly dissect a cause and bring out its most significant 
points so as to have the strongest bearing upon the trial of the case. 

On the 13th of June, 1893, in Lincoln, Nebraska, Mr. Frampton was united 
in marriage to Aliss Julia Lenhofif, of Louisville, this state, by whom he has a 
daughter and son, namely : Eleanor, a student in Wpllesley College, of Massa- 
chusetts ; and William Lenhoff, who is a junior in the Lincoln high school. 

Politically Mr. Frampton is a republican but has never sought office save that 
he served for eight years in the city council from the fifth ward and during a 
part of that time acted as mayor pro tem of Lincoln. Fie belongs to the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and to the Lincoln Commercial Club. He assisted 
in organizing the Layman's Club, of which he is a promient member, and he 
belongs to the local and state bar associations. He enjoys the confidence and 
high regard of colleagues and contemporaries and he is spoken of by them as 
one who is most careful to conform his practice to a high standard of profes- 
sional ethics. 



ROBERT S. DILL. 



Among the successful farmers of Panama precinct was Robert S. Dill, whose 
demise in 1901 was the occasion of much sincere regret. A short time before 
his death he had retired from active life and taken up his residence in Bethany, 
where his widow still lives. His birth occurred in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, 
on the 2d of October, 1844, and he was a son of William H. and Mary (Kellogg) 
Dill, natives of Ohio. They removed to Indiana, however, at an early day in 
the history of that state, and the father farmed there for many years but in 
the '80s he came to Nebraska and passed the remainder of his life at Belvidere, 
this state, being called to his final rest on the 19th of June, 1896. 

I^obert S. Dill received his education in the public schools of Indiana and 
remained under the parental roof imtil 1864, when, at the age of twenty years, 
he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry. He served with that regiment until the close of hostilities and then 
returned home and followed agricultural pursuits in Indiana until 1870. As 
early as 1870 he built two houses in Lincoln, Nebraska, which he rented to 
others. On coming to Lancaster county, Nebraska, in that year he took up a 
homestead in Panama precinct, five miles south of Bennet, and at once turned 
his attention to the improvement and o])eration of his place. Later he bought an 
adjoining quarter section and rented his entire farm, removing to Cheney, Ne- 



^1 



''/->'// 




ill;. 



.-!::-. KdUKKT S. DILL 



108 LLXCOLN AND LAN'CASTER COUNTY 

dising at Plainfiekl, Wisconsin, being thus occupied at the time of the outbreak 
of the Civil war. In 1863. however, feeling that his duty to his country was 
paramount to all else, he enlisted for service in the Twenty-seventh \\'isconsin 
Infantry, with which he continued for three years, participating in a number of 
hotly contested engagements and proving his loyalty upon many a southern 
battlefield. 

When the war was over Mr. Bean returned to Plainfield, Wisconsin, where 
he conducted a store until 1876, when he removed to Greeley county, Nebraska, 
and secured a homestead claim. This he successfully conducted for thirty-one 
years, or until 1907, when he retired and removfd to Lincoln, purchasing a nice 
residence at No. 1347 D street. He was then sixty-five years of age. His 
remaining days were spent amid the comforts of life, which he had secured 
through his industry, determination and honorable dealing in former years. 

In March, 1862, ]\Ir. Bean was united in marriage to .Miss Betsey J. \'an 
Allen, who was born in New York city, (3ctober 14, 1842, a daughter of Peter 
C. and Ann ( \ an Buren) \'an Allen, the latter a cousin of President Martin 
\'an Buren. Mr. and Mrs. Bean became the parents of two children. Mary J. 
married Edward Wright, who died December 16. 1896, and she passed away 
August 29, 1914, leaving three children, Earle, Harle and Floyd. William J- 
Bean resides in Moose Jaw, Canada, where he is manager of a large flour mill. 

During his residence in Greeley county, Nebraska, Mr. Bean served as county 
judge for three years. He had prepared for the bar and w-as qualified for law 
practice but never followed the profession in this state. I'raternally he was 
connected with the Grand Army of the Republic and with the Odd Fellows. His 
political allegiance was given to the democratic party, and his religious faith 
was that of the Christian Science church. His was a well spent life, characterized 
by devotion to every public and private duty, and at his passing he left to his 
family the priceless heritage of an untarnished name. Fie had many admirable 
traits of character, not the least of which was his capacity for strong friendships. 



DA\TD J. WEISS. 

David J. Weiss, who has built up a large business as a manufacturer of peanut 
butter, was born in Lancaster, Missouri, on the 19th of October, 1873, of the 
marriage of John and Mary (Fankhouser) ^Veiss, natives respectively of Switzer- 
land and of Chariton county, Missouri. In 1867 the father emigrated to the 
United States and making his way into the interior of the country, located in 
Kentucky. He followed the shoemaker's trade there for some time but at length 
removed to Missouri, where he lived until 1887. In that year he became a resident 
of Frontier county, Nebraska, but after remaining there for five years came to 
College Mew, where he lived until called by death. He died in September, 
1903, but is survived by his wife, who makes her home w'ith our subject. 

David J. Weiss was largely reared and educated in Frontier county. Nebraska, 
but after the family home was established in College \'iew he attended Union 
College, thus su]ii)lementing his earlier schooling. He learned the shoemaker's 
trade from his father and followed that occupation for about fi\'e years, after 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 109 

which he purchased a peanut butter factory here which he has since operated. 
He has gained a large patronage and his trade now covers the State of Nebraska. 
In addition to his factory he owns considerable business property in College 
\ iew, including the two-story building in which the postoffice is located. 

Mr. Weiss supports the democratic party at the polls and for fifteen years he 
has held the office of city clerk, proving very capable and public-spirited in that 
connection. In religious faith he is a Seventh Day Adventist and the teachings 
of that church guide his life. He is well known and his genuine worth has gained 
him the warm friendship of many. 



R. J. TONES. 



For fourteen years R. J. Jones has been engaged in the bakery business in 
Havelock and through this period has enjoyed a good trade that has brought 
to him substantial success. He was born in Wales in 1859 and was a young 
man of twenty-one years when he left that little rock-ribbed country and sailed 
for the new world, settling in 1880 at Utica, New York, where he worked at the 
baker's trade. In 1S87 he became one of the pioneer settlers of Sherman county, 
Kansas, where he engaged in the bakery business and also became a prominent 
and influential factor in the public life of the community. His fellow towns- 
men, appreciative of his worth and ability, twice elected him to the office of 
county treasurer and he was likewise a member of the school board. 

Mr. Jones resided in Fairfield, Nebraska, a short time before going to 
Kansas and was there married to Miss .Anna Williams, who W'a? born in C)neida 
County, New York. They had two sons: Robert C., a barber in Plavelock ; and 
D. Earl, who assists his father in business. The wife and mother passed away 
about four years ago. 

It was in August, 1002, that Air. Jones came to Havelock and opened the 
bakery which he has since conducted w-ith growing success, being now accorded 
a liberal patronage. While in Kansas, Mr. Jones joined the Masonic fraternity 
and is now a member of George Washington Lodge, No. 250, F. & .\. M., of 
Havelock and of the Ancient Order of LInited Workmen. His political indorse- 
ment is given to the re]jublican party and he stands for all those things which 
are most worth while in citizenship. He was nominated for mayor of Havelock 
but was not elected. 



JUDGE EDWARD POWELL HOLMES. 

Judge Edward Powell Holmes, lawyer and ex-judge of the district court, has 
lived in Lincoln continuously since 1870 save from the years 1883 to 1886, when 
he resided at Pierce. Nebraska. He was born in Terre Haute, Indiana. .August 
4, 1857, a son of .Arba Holmes, wdiose birth occurred in Utica, New York, and 
who on removing westward became a resident of Terre Haute, Indiana, where 
he remained for many years, becoming a warm personal friend of the eminent 



110 LIXCOLN AND LANXASTER COUNTY 

silver-tongued orator, Richard W. Thompson, of that place. Arba Hohnes was 
a manufacturer and built the first woolen mill in Terre Haute, where later .he 
erected a foundry. He was married in Pennsylvania, in early manhood, to Miss 
Sarah Powell. Previous to his removal to Terre Haute he had been identified 
with manufacturing interests in Cincinnati, Ohio, for several years. In 1867, 
accompanied by his family, he arrived in Nebraska City, Nebraska, and his 
death occurred in Lincoln about ten years ago, when he was eighty-nine years 
of age. He had for several years survived his wife, who died at the age of 
seventy. Judge Holmes was the youngest of a family of five children, two sons 
and three daughters. His brother, Squire W. Holmes, who served as a soldier 
in the Union army and later became a lawyer of Indiana, died many years ago. 
Persis Holmes, who married Samuel K. Hale, is now deceased. Vashti is the 
widow of William J. La Rue and is living in Kankakee, Illinois. Mary is the 
widow of Guy A. Brown, of Lincoln, Nebraska, who was the first state librarian 
of Nebraska and was clerk of the state supreme court for many years. 

The other member of the family is Judge Edward Powell Holmes, who was 
reared in Terre Haute, Indiana, and in Nebraska City. He completed his educa- 
tion by graduation from the LTniversity of Nebraska in 1878 with the Bachelor 
of Literature degree and he entered upon the study of law in the office of Samuel 
J. Tuttle and Nathan S. Harwood, of Lincoln. For three or four years he 
studied law in their office. He was admitted to the bar, however, at the age of 
twenty-one, soon after he had left the University, for he had been pursuing his 
law studies while attending the University. Since that time he has been actively 
engaged in practice save for the period of his service upon the bench, being a 
member of the Lincoln bar from 1878 until the present time with the exception 
of the three years which he spent in Pierce, where he conducted a bank as well 
as engaged in the ]3ractice of his profession. While there, in 1884, he was elected 
a regent of the State L^niversity and while serving as such and still living at 
Pierce he was elected to the state legislature from Pierce and Cedar counties, 
remaining a member of the iiouse during the session of 1885-6. Since 1886 he 
has made his home in Lincoln and for two years he served as city attorney by 
appointment of the mayor, Robert Graham. He was appointed district judge to 
succeed Judge Jesse B. Strode, who was elected to congress, and he served upon 
the bench for thirteen consecutive years, covering the period of his appointment 
and of his three subsequent elections. .-Xt the end of that time, or in 1907, he 
refused to again become a candidate and has since been very active in law 
practice. Lie is now the senior member of the firm of Holmes & De Lacy, his 
partner being George De Lacy. For many years in his earlier legal career he 
was the partner of the late Judge Allen W. Field under the firm style of Field 
& Holmes. He displays marked ability in his law practice. Along with those 
qualities indispensable to the lawyer — a keen, rapid, logical mind, plus the 
business sense and a ready capacity for hard work, — he brought to the starting 
point of his legal career certain rare gifts — eloquence of language and a strong 
personality. When he went upon the bench he gave evidence of the fact that 
he possessed not only a high order of legal ability but also a rare combination 
of talent, learning, tact, patience and industry. His decisions indicate strong 
mentality, careful analysis, a thorough knowledge of the law and an unbiased 
j udgment. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 111 

On the 24th of July, 1880, Judge Holmes was married to Mrs. Florence 
Farwell, of Lincoln, and they have become parents of a daughter, Ruth, now 
Mrs. Louis Vollentine, of Chicago. Mrs. Holmes was first the wife of William 
P. Farwell, formerly a banker of Lincoln, and they had two children : Florence, 
now the wife of Dr. Charles A. Hull, a surgeon of Omaha ; and John Farwell, 
who graduated from the law department of the University of Nebraska and was 
sent to Mexico by President McKinley as consular agent and later sent by 
McKinley to the Philippines as an interpreter on a Philippine commission. He 
died of cholera in Manila. William Howard Taft was then governor of the 
Philippines and sent Judge Llolmes a cablegram announcing the death of his 
stepson. 

Judge and Mrs. Holmes belong to Holy Trinity Episcopal church. In 
politics he has been a lifelong republican and has served as delegate to many 
county and state conventions of his party. He is a Royal Arch Mason, a Knight 
Templar and a Mystic Shriner and is also identified with the Knights of Pythias. 
He is likewise a member of the Lincoln Commercial Club and the Round Table 
Club, while along strictly professional lines he is connected with the local' and 
state bar associations. He is a man of strong purpose, of marked ability and of 
high principle and has so directed his efforts that they have been of the greatest 
possible value and worth, not only in upholding the political and legal status 
of the community but also in advancing its intellectual and moral standards. 



THOMAS JOHN DOYLE. 

Thomas John Doyle, one of Lincoln's leading attorneys, has been a resident 
of the capital city since 1897 and of the state since 1884. He was born in Greene 
county, Tennessee, May 5, 1858, about ten miles east of Greenville, where was 
the old home of President Andrew Johnson. His father, of whom he was a 
namesake, was born in Path \'alley, Pennsylvania, near the town of Concord, 
April 4, 18 17, and was an inventor and manufacturer. The Doyle fanning mill, 
which in the decade preceding the Civil war was extensively used by the farmers 
of Pennsylvania, Virginia and other states, was his invention and at different 
times he manufactured those mills at Williamsport, Maryland, at Winchester, 
Staunton and Wytheville, Virginia, and at Rheatown and Loudon, Tennessee. 
He had factories at Wytheville, A'irginia, and at Rheatown, Tennessee, at the 
same time. Flis son, Thomas John Doyle, was born at Rheatown and in 1859 
the father removed to Wytheville, \"irginia, where he established a factory. 
\\hen the Civil war began, being a stanch Union man, he returned to cast 
Tennessee, where the Union sentiment was strong, and there he purchased two 
farms, one being in Washington county and the other in Greene. Me lived on 
the former all during the war period and until 1872, at which time he removed 
to a farm in Greene county, where he passed away November 21, 1898, in his 
eighty-second year. He was married in the Catholic Cathedral of Baltimore, 
while living in Winchester, \'irginia, to Miss Ann \'irginia Rougher, who was 
born and reared at that place and was there living at the time of her marriage. 
Her natal day was October 30, 1S30, and she was married in 1854, her death 



112 LLXCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

occurring at Rheatown, Tennessee, January 21, 1895, when she was sixty-four 
years of age. 

Thomas J. Doyle was the eldest son and second child in a family of ten 
children, six sons and four daughters, all of whom reached adult age, namely : 
iVIary \'irginia, now the wife of Dr. Jerome J'. Rankin, of Greeneville, Tennessee; 
Thomas John ; William Jerome, who became a physician and surgeon of promi- 
nence in eastern Tennessee and later of Greeley, Nebraska, where he passed 
away December 26, 1910; Otho H., a farmer of Greene county, Tennessee; 
Magdaline A., also of Greene county; Clara, living in the same county; Phillip 
A., who died at Carnegie, Oklahoma, January I'l,, 1907, at which time he was 
serving as the chairman of the board of county commissioners and was being 
prominently mentioned for the position of the first state treasurer of Oklahoma; 
George W., living in Sioux City, Iowa ; May, who reached womanhood and died 
in Greene county, Teimessee ; and Kdward Doyle, who lives on the old Doyle 
farm in Tennessee which the father purchased in 1861. The founder of the 
Doyle family in America was l-'elix A. Doyle, who reached the United States in 
1743, having come from County Wexford, Ireland. He took up his abode near 
the present town of Doylesburg, named in honor of the family, in Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania. His descendants are now numerous throughout the 
United States, especially in Pennsylvania, Maryland and \'irginia. The family 
' was represented in the Revolutionary war. C)n the maternal side Thomas J. 
Doyle comes of German ancestry. \'arious representatives of the name have 
attained prominence, including Judge Dayton A. Doyle, of Akron, Ohio, and 
William D. Doyle, one of the members of the faculty of Carnegie Institute of 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Thomas J. Doyle was reared on the old Doyle farm in Greene county, Ten- 
n.^ssec, and attended a country school until he reached the age of eighteen years, 
pursuing his studies through the winter months, while in the summer seasons he 
vi'orked in the fields. When eighteen years of age he entered Mount St. Mary's 
College at Emmitsburg, Maryland, which he attended for three years. That is 
the oldest Catholic college in the United States. He afterward took ui) the study 
of law in the office of the late Colonel Henry H. Ingersoll at Greeneville, Ten- 
nessee. Pie was a graduate of Yale and was a first cousin of the distinguished 
orator and thinker, Robert G. Ingersoll. Colonel Henry H. Ingersoll won his 
title by service in the L'nion army during the Civil war and Robert Ingersoll also 
served with distinction during that conflict. Mr. Doyle studied law under Colonel 
Ingersoll until 1882, when he was admitted to the bar at Greeneville, Tennessee. 
He then opened an office and continuetl in practice there until 1884, when he 
came to Xeljraska, entering upon active practice at .Scotia, then the county seat 
of Greeley county, where he remained until 1890. In that year the county seat 
was removed to (Jrceiey and ^Nlr. Doyle went with it, continuing in active prac- 
tice in that town until 1897. Since thai date he has been a prominent member 
of the Lincoln bar and by reason of his ability has worked his way steadily 
upward, being now accorded an extensive clientage that connects him with much 
important litigation. 

On the 8th of July, 1SS3, Mr. Doyle was married in Greeneville, Tennessee, 
to Miss Eliza .\nn Remine. who was born and reared near that place and had 
been an acquaintance of his in boyhood. They have become the parents of six 



LliNCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 113 

children, as follows: Jessica, now the wife of Raymond S. Murray, of Lincoln; 
Kathleen R. ; Thomas John, Jr.; Raymond A.; Elizabeth Ann; and Dorothy. 
Mrs. Doyle is a namesake of her aunt, Mrs. Eliza Ann Brownlow, the wife of 
Larson Brownlow, who was Tennessee's first reconstruction governor following 
tiie close of the- Civil war. His name was William P. Brownlow but he was 
widely known as Parson Brownlow owing to the fact that he had previously been 
a Methodist minister. Mr. Doyle's eldest son, Thomas John, Jr., is a graduate 
of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, where he completed the 
course in 19 14, and he is now an ensign on the United States Battleship Kansas. 
J le is an exceptionally bright young man, being especially proficient in mathe- 
matics, and upon his graduation he stood seventh in a class of one hundred and 
fifty-four. 

In politics a democrat throughout his entire life, Mr. Doyle was the candidate 
of his party in 1895 for judge of the eleventh district, composed of twelve 
counties, and was only defeated by fifty-seven votes, although the counties had a 
large normal republican majority. He had also been the democratic nominee 
for the same judicial office in 1886, vvhen he was not quite old enough to hold a 
position of ])ubiic preferment. He accepted the nonfination in the face of a large 
republican majority merely for the prestige it would give him and the large 
acquaintance it would gain him over the district. He was the democratic nominee 
for congress in the first Nebraska district in 1906 and was defeated l>v only 
twenty-seven hundred votes in a district the normal repul)lican majority of 
which is from four to eight thousand. He has been a leading campaign worker, 
not only in Nebraska but in other states, since 1896. Aside from his political 
service he is active as a director of the L-nion Accident Insurance Company of 
Lincoln. He belongs also to the Lincoln Commercial Club, the Elks Club, the 
Country Clul) and the .Automobile Club, and he is a member of the local and 
state bar associations and also of the American Bar Association. What he 
undertakes he accom])lishes. He is a man of resolute spirit and does not hesitate 
to give that tlKjrough prejjaration which must precede ascendancy in law practice. 
On the loth of January, 1916, he was appointed by Governor John H. Morchead 
a member of the national conference of commissioners on uniform state laws and 
IS now serving as such. Pie belongs to the Candle Light Club and the Knights 
of Columljus and is a devout communicant of the Roman Catholic church. 



EDWIN S. GUNN. 



Edwin S. Gunn, who conducts a wholesale and retail mail order business in 
seeds at Lincoln, has developed a trade of gratifying proportions, making his 
one of the important commercial interests of the city. Pie was born in Illinois. 
August 3, 1867, a son of William and Mary H. ( Rousey) Gunn, who were also 
natives of that state. The father was a real estate dealer and in the fall of 1872 
removed from Macoupin county, Illinois, where his birth occurred, to Edgar. 
Nebraska, where he spent his remaining days, passing away in 1879. He had 
served for three years during the Civil war as a member of Company I, 
Pourtecnth Illinois Infantr\-, and. being captured, was held for nine months in 



lU LLXCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Andersonvillc prison, sufi'cring nil of the hardships incident to southern military 
prison life. His widow long survived him, passing away in 1906. 

Edwin S. Gunn largely spent his youthful days at Edgar, Nebraska, to which 
place his parents removed when he was but live years of age. He supplemented 
his public school studies by a course in the State University, in which he spent 
two years, and later lie took up the furniture business in connection with the 
Lincoln Furniture Company, having become a resident of this city in 1889. He 
was with th;it company for three and a half years, at the end of which time he 
entered the employ of the Griswold Seed Company, with which he continued 
for eighteen years, making steady advance in that connection until he occupied 
ofticiai positions, being vice president of the company when he severed his 
association therewith. He then went to iowa Init after a year returned to 
Lincoln and in March, 1915, engaged in the seed business on his own account 
with store and office at Nos. 219-21 South Tenth street. Here he has since 
conducted business along wholesale and retail lines, having a large mail order 
trade and shi])ping to all parts of the world, his business extending into China 
and the Philippine islands. His interests are carried on under the name of the 
Gunn Seed Company and his patronage is steadily growing. 

C)n the 13th of November, 1895, Mr. Ciunn was united in marriage to Miss 
L Eidora Zediker, a daughter of James F. and Julia (Douglas) Zediker. They 
have become the parents of three chiUlren, Lemar E. N., Zellen W. A. and Ruth 
E. The last named was born March i, 1913. 

Mr. Gunn is a member of the Commercial Club and has membership with 
the Masonic fraternity, being affiliated with Lancaster Lodge, No. 54, F. & A. \l., 
Lincoln Consistory, No. 2, A. & A. S. R., and w'ith the Mystic Shrine. Lie is 
likewise identified with the Royal Aicanum. Li politics he is a republican, 
while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the East Lincoln 
Baptist church, of which he is serving as chairman of the board of trustees. He 
takes an active interest in every plan and project not only for the development 
of his business, which is steadily growing, but also for the development of the 
city along material, intellectual, social and moral lines. 



PETER R. :\IcCOY. 



Peter R. McCoy, who devoted his active life to farming, was living retired 
at Bethany at the time of his demise and was one of the valued citizens of the 
town. He was born in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, on the 29lh of March, 
1838, and was a son of Hugh and Margaret ( Reeder) McCoy, both of whom 
were natives of the Keystone state. The father was a well known educator and 
passed his entire life in Pennsylvania, dying in 1886. He was survived for over 
two decades by his wife, whose demise occurred in 1908. 

Peter R. McCoy attended the public schools in the acquirement of his educa- 
tion and during his boyhood and youth rem;iined under the parental roof. On 
beginning his independent career he turned his attention to farming and followed 
agricultural pursuits until 1862, when he i)Ut aside jjcrsonal interests and enlisted 
in Company I, Eighteenth Penu' dvania Cavalry, with which he served until the 



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THE ; 
PUBLIC Li. 



ASTon, t ■■ KQx 



LIXCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 117 

end of the Ci\il war. After being mustered (int (if the army he returned to 
Pennsylvania and farmed there until 1879, when he came west, locating,' in 
Saunders county, Nebraska. He took up a homestead there and also purchased 
land and devoted his time to the operation of his farm until Kjoo, when he 
retired and removed to Bethany, Lancaster county, lie purchased a good resi- 
dence here and for thirteen years enjoyed a leisure made possible by his former 
well directed labors. On the 24th of June, 1913, he was called from tliis life, 
and his demise was the occasion of much sincere regret. 

Mr. McCoy was united in marriage June 19. 1900, to Sarah E. .Sunderland, a 
daughter of Jacob and Hannah (Maize) Sunderland, both of whom wen- born in 
Pennsylvania, ller father engaged in farming there and died in May, i8i;3, at 
the advanced age of ninety-two years. Her mother had long preceded him in 
death, passing away in March, 1872. L'.y a former marriage Mr. McCoy had 
eleven children, nine of whom survive. In order of birth they are as follows: 
Ida Cora, born March 10, 1868; Maggie May, born May i8, 1869; Harriet, 
born July 17, 1870; Judson K., who was born October 12, 1871, and died No- 
vember 26, 1900; Anna M., born September 16, 1872; Ella V., born October 27, 
1875; Alilton E., born September 21, 1877; Ellis E., born November 9, 1878; 
Rosa May, who was born May 25, 1S80. and is deceased; Garfield, born October 
9, 1881 ; and Walter A., born September 6, 1883. 

The republican party had a stanch supporter in Mr. McCoy, and he served 
acceptably as a member of the town board of Bethany. He held membership in 
the Christian church and through his connection with the Grand Army of the 
Republic kept in touch with his comrades in blue. He was not only interested in 
the civic and moral advancement of his community but he was also identified with 
its business development as vice president of the First State Bank, being one 
of its founders. He was a stanch temperance man. 



ROBERT FREELAXD. 



Robert Frecland, who was a railroad engineer, died as the result of an acci- 
dent in 1904, and his wife suljsecjucntly removed from .-\lliance, where they 
were living at the time, to Bethany and has since been a resident of that town. 
He was born in Freelandville, Lidiana. on the 5th of December. 1862, and is a 
son of Dr. John Thomas and Lydia ( Ford) Freeland. The father was born in 
St. Michaels, Talbot county, Maryland, November 10, 1813, but in the spring of 
181 3. accompanied his fatha- on his removal to Indiana, the family settling near 
Bloomington. He was graduated from the State University of Indiana in 183ft. 
and the following year entered the Louisville Medical School. After his gradua- 
tion from that institution he began the practice of medicine at Edwardsport, 
Indiana, but shortly afterward removed to \Mdner township, Knox county, 
Indiana, wdiere he practiced his profession for nearly fifty years. He was in 
every sense a country doctor of the old school, with an utter disregard for 
personal hardships. He responded to calls day and night that took him far 
from home, over rough country roads, through storm and cold, to answer the 
demands of sufl"ering humanitv- Lie considered it a part of his work to serve, 



118 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

without cost, those patients who were not alile to ]xiy, and as he never refused a 
call he had all of that kind of work to do. At that time there was no provision 
made by the county for medical attention to the poor. In 1850 he was elected to 
the state senate of Indiana and served in all three terms. In 1862 he entered the 
Union army as captain of Company B, Thirty-third Indiana \'olunteer Infantry, 
and remained in the service until the close of the war, when he resumed the 
practice of his profession. He was a charter member of the Tri-State Medical 
Society, consisting of the states of Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky, organized in 
1873, and he was called upon to serve as president of that organization for one 
term. lie was a writer of considerable ability on both scientific and medical 
subjects, and his opinions are still given as authority on some medical subjects 
by the lecturers at Bellevue Hospital School of Medicine, in New York. His 
home in Freclandville was often spoken of as Dr. Freeland's orphan asylum on 
account of the many orphans whom he gave a father's care. He retired from 
the practice of medicine in 1S83. At the time of his death, in 1896, it was said 
of him, that he had done more for the people of his communilv than an\- other 
man who had ever lived there. 

Robert Freeland was reared in the Iloosier state and after completing his 
education engaged in teaching school for some time. His father wished him to 
study medicine and thus follow in his professional footsteps, but he desired to 
try his fortune in the west and m i88_^ came to Lincoln. Nebraska, and entered 
the employ of the liurlington Railroad. After working for a time as engine 
wiper he became connected with the civil engineering department of the road, 
with which he remained for five years. He then worked in the roimdhouse for 
a time and at length was made fireman and soon afterward was promoted to 
engineer, serving in that capacity until his death, which occurred on the Sth of 
June, 11J04, as the result of a railroad accident. In ujoo he took up his residence 
in Alliance, where lie was living at the time of his demise. 

Mr. Freeland was married on the 15th of November, 1891, to Mary A. 
Pierson, a daughter of Richard D. and Nancy E. (Nash) Pierson, natives re- 
spectively of Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. Thev were among the pioneer 
settlers of Indiana, and the father operated a gristmill in Logansport until 1870, 
when he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, which was then largely open 
l)rairie. He took up a homestead fwc miles south of Bennet, in Panama pre- 
cinct, and gave his time to the imjirovement of tliat place until 1886, when he 
rented the farm and removed to Lincoln, lie erected a fine home there and 
remained a resident of that city imlil his ileatli on the i.^th of July, 1887. Flis 
wife survives and lives with her daughter, Airs. Freeland. The latter has 
become the mother of four children, as follows: Fern Lucile, born October 7, 
1892, died October 2, 191 1. Alarie A., born NovemI)er 10, 181)4, 's a graduate in 
music of Cotner LIniversity with the class of 1916 and is now teaching music. 
John Thomas, born April 20, 1899, is attending high school. Dorothy Ellen, born 
April 26, 1903, died March lO, 1907. 

Air. Freeland supported the republican party at the polls but was never a 
candidate for office, preferring to devote his time to his private interests. He 
was affiliated with the .\ncicnt ( )r<ler of United Workmen and the lirotherhood 
of Locomotive Engineers. In all the relations of life he fulfilled the obligations 
resting upon him, and his many excellent equalities gained him a high place in 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 119 

the esteem of those who knew him. In the fall of 1906 Mrs. Frecland removed 
to Bethany in order to educate her children and purchased a nice home at the 
corner of Butler and Fairfield streets, where she still resides. She deserves 
credit for what she has done in rearing her children and affording them good 
educational opportunities, and since removing to Bethany has won many warm 
friends. 



JEFFERSON H. ISROADV. 

Jefferson II. Broady, attorney at law of Lincoln, was born in Brownsville, 
Nebraska, June 2, iSSo, and is the youngest son and namesake of the late Judge 
Jetiferson H. Broady of Lincoln, who served on the bench of the first Nebraska 
district for eight years before removing to Lincoln in 1891. During that period 
he was a resident of Beatrice, Nebraska, whither he had removed from Browns- 
ville. His birth occurred on a farm near Liberty, Illinois, April 21, 1844, and 
there he was reared. He completed his law course in the L^niversity of Michigan 
and received a large share of his legal instruction from the eminent legal writer 
and author, Thomas M. Cooley. He came to Nebraska in 1867, settling at 
Browmsville, and in 1875 he was a member of the state constitutional convention 
which met m Lincoln, representing Nemaha and Richardson counties. He after- 
ward became district attorney of the first Nebraska judicial district, in which 
office he served for tw-o terms and then by jiopular suffrage was placed upon the 
bench, whereupon he served for two full terms or eight years. He declined a 
reelection to the district bench and also declined a nomination to the state 
supreme bench. In i8gi Judge Broady removed to Lincoln, where he repeatedly 
refused to accept nomination for office, preferring to continue in active law 
practice, which he did until his death in 1908, being regarded as one of the 
prominent and distinguished members of the bar of the capital. He was married 
in 1870 to JMiss Nancy Jane McDonald, a native of Peinisylvania ami of pure 
Scotch descent. She still survives him, as do their children : .Anna, who is now 
Mrs. David A. Haggard, of Brainerd, Mimiesota ; Grace, a resident of Lincoln; 
Bracton. who lives in the west and is engaged in mining pursuits ; John Calvin, 
of Auburn, Neliraska ; Jeft'erson H., of this review; and Joyce, now the wife of 
John D. Clark, a lawyer of Cheyenne, Wyoming. Beatrice died in childhood. 

Jefferson H. Broady has lived in Lincoln continuously from the age of eleven 
years or since i8';i. His education was acquired in the puljlic schools of 
Beatrice and Lincoln and in the State I'niversity. and in the latter he ijursued a 
special course embracing both law and journalism. In 1904 he received the 
degree of LL. B. from the State L'niversity and for a year thereafter was in 
St. Paul, Alinnesota, where he engaged in legal editorial work on the statutes of 
Ohio. For three years thereafter he was engaged in legal editori;d work for the 
Lanning Publishing Company, law book publishers of Xorwalk. Ohio, and during 
that period resided in Norwalk and New York city. In 1907 he returned to 
Lincoln and for three years was connected with the Nebraska State Journal 
Company as a law book author and writer, in which period he produced a four 
volume law work entitled the "Nebraska Synoptical Digest'" for the use of 



120 LINXOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Nebraska lawyers, which has since become a standard work in practically every 
law library of the state. In 191 1 he was appointed by the governor and the 
judges of the supreme court as a member of the code commission, the duty of 
which was to revise and codify all the general laws and statutes of Nebraska, his 
colleagues in this commission being A. M. Post of Columbus and E. L. King of 
Osceola. The report of this commission to the legislature, dated 1913, is 
embraced in a volume of over twenty-one hundred pages and was adopted by 
the legislature without change. The entire Nebraska statutes were then revised 
and annotated by this commission in accordance with its report adopted by the 
legislature. It will be seen that Mr. Broady devoted ten years in all to legal 
editorial work and since 1914 he has given his attention to the private practice of 
law with offices in the Bankers Life building in Lincoln. He belongs to the 
Lincoln and Nebraska State Bar Associations and is a member of the American 
Judicature Society, organized to promote the efficient administration of justice. 

On the 24th of November, 1909, Mr. Broady was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaretta Jenkins, of Mifflintown, Pennsylvania. They now have a son and 
two daughters, namely: John H., born September 26, 1910; Margaret, whose 
birth occurred September 30, 1912; and Elizabeth, whose natal day was Sep- 
tember 10, 191 5. 

Fraternally Mr. Broady is a Mason and is a most loyal adherent of the craft. 
He belongs also to the Commercial Club of Lincoln and his religious faith is 
evidenced in his membership in the Presbyterian church. There are few men 
of the west more thoroughly informed concerning the principles of jurisprudence 
and his contributions to law literature are most valuable. He believes in main- 
taining the highest professional standards and his ability has gained for him 
distinction among his colleagues and contemporaries. 



CALVLN G. BEACH. 



Calvin G. Beach passed away in Lincoln in November, 1913. He had lived 
retired during the period of his residence in this city but previously had long 
been connected with farming and stock raising interests and his life was one of 
activity and usefulness. He was born at Painted Post, New York, October 14, 
1839, and was a son of .Mien R. and Amy (Carpenter) Beach. The father 
devoted some years to educational work and later became a minister of the 
Baptist church, devoting a long period to pastoral work in New York. In his 
later years he retired from the ministry and engaged in farming in the Empire 
state, where both he and his wife spent their last days. 

Reared under the parental roof, Calvin G. Beach completed his education in 
a college at Fairfield, New York, and afterward took up the profession of 
teaching, becoming a member of the faculty of Penfield Academy, near Rochester, 
New York. After devoting a few years to that work he went to the oil fields of 
Pennsylvania, where he operated in connection with his brother for a few years. 
In 1872 he removed westward to Blue Rapids, Kansas, purchased land and there 
engaged in raising cattle and other stock, devoting about three decades to that 
business, his efforts being attended with gratifying success, so that he was known 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 121 

as one of the representative agricnlturists and stockmen of the locality. In 1901 
he retired and removed to Lincoln, purchasing three acres of land on Holdregc 
street, where he and his wife long resided. Later they removed to a nice 
residence at No. 645 North Twenty-sixth street, which .Mr. Reach purchased 
and in which he spent his remaining days, passing away in .Vovemher, i<)i3, 
after a long illness. 

It was on the 14th of March, 1872, that Mr. Beach was married to Miss 
Charlotte M. Reed, a daughter of Rev. Edwin D. and Sophia (Redfield) Reed, 
who were natives of Massachusetts and New York respectively, the father re- 
moving to the Empire state with his parents when a lad of seven years. He was 
there educated for the ministry and devoted his entire life to preaching in the 
Baptist church, following his graduation from Madison University at Hamilton, 
New York. His labors wrought for great good in the moral development of the 
localities in which he lived. He passed away April 20. 1888, having for more 
than a decade and a half survived his wife, who died in August, 1871. Their 
daughter, ^Irs. lieach, became the mother of the following children: Allen R., 
chief clerk in the Agricultural College at Lincoln ; Frank \V., a clerk iii the 
Lincoln postoffice ; Anna L., who resides with her mother and is engaged in 
teaching music; E. Carroll, a noted violinist, who taught music in W'ahoo 
Academy, also in Denver, in Stillwater, Oklahoma, and the Nebraska Weslcyan 
University at University Place and passed away December 8, 1914. while a 
professor in Drury College at Springfield, Missouri ; .\nna L., nho was formerly 
a teacher of music in Drury College at Springfield, Missouri; and Calvin C, at 
home. 

The family residence is at No. 2445 O street and Mrs. Beach owns eighty 
acres of land in Kansas and three hundred and twenty acres in Wright county, 
Missouri. In his political views ^Ir. I'.each was an earnest republican and in 
religious faith a Baptist. He took a very active part in the work of the church, 
in which he held various offices, and his efforts were a potent element in pro- 
moting the growth and e.xlending the influence of his denomination and he was 
also a strong temperance worker. His life ever measured uj) high stamlards 
and he left to his family not only a most comfortable competence but also the 
priceless heritage of an untarnished name. 



EARL RAY BIRGE. 



Earl Ray Birge. deputy collector of customs in the ( )niaha district, with 
headquarters at Lincoln, was born at Fargo, North Dakota. May 13, 1885. a .son 
of Richard M. and Emma (Smith) Birge, who now reside in Kansas City. He 
began his education in the schools of Fargo and continued his studies in Omaha 
but when fourteen years of age put aside his textbooks and spent eight years 
thereafter in the service of the Burlington Railroad Comi)any at South Omaha, 
his work being of a clerical character. He afterward s])ent three years in 
Arkansas and Missouri, engaged in niilway work, and in 1910 he entered the 
customs service at Kansas City, Missouri, as a statistical clerk in the office of 
the collector of customs. There he remained until September. 191 3. after which 



122 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

he held a similar position in St. Louis imtil January, 1914, when he was ap- 
pointed deputy collector of customs in the office at Lincoln and is now occupying 
that position. His six years of connection with this line of work indicates his 
ability and fidelity. 

On the 2ist of March, 1909, Mr. LSirge was united in marriage to ^liss 
Alma I'ullcr, a daughter of Hon. George W. Fuller, who is a member of the 
Nebraska legislature and resides at Seward, Nebraska. Our subject and his 
wife have three sons, namely: Richard F., born January 31, 1910; Edmund E., 
whose birth occurred on the ist of November, 191 1 ; and Ervin R., whose natal 
day was December 2, 1914. The parents are members-of the Presbyterian church. 
During their residence in Lincoln they have gained many friends, warm regard 
being entertained for them by all who know them. 



REV. ILDEPHONSE CAST. 

Rev. Ildcpbonse (jast, pastor of St. Francis de Sales Catholic j)arish in 
Lincoln, was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on the 27th of August, 1881, and was 
educated at St. Francis College in Cincinnati, Ohio, with an additional course 
in hcimilectics at St. Bernard, (.)hio, and a course in philosophy at Louisville. 
His theological course was pursued at Oldenburg, Indiana, and he was ordained 
to the priesthood on the 20th of June, 1907. His first charge was as chaplain at 
llic 1 lome of the Good Shepherd, and at the Bartonville Insane Asylum at Peoria, 
Illinois. There he remained for a year and subsequently he was assistant pastor 
of St. Boniface church at La Fayette, Indiana, for three years. In August, 191 1, 
lie was appointed to his present charge, having since been resident priest in the 
parish of St. Francis de Sales in Lincoln. He is doing good work among his 
people, his efforts resulting in the marked upbuilding of the congregation and 
of tlie various departments of church work. 



ARNOTT CHANEY RICKETTS. 

In no profession does advancement de])cnd more entirelv upon individual 
merit than in the law. Xnt ibrough any outside influence or assistance can the 
lawyer attain success. In him must be the ability to untangle complications and 
correctly solve the intricate and complex legal problems due to his knowledge 
of the principles of jurisprudence and his iiljility to correctly analyze and cor- 
relate the points at issue and the legal principles applicable thereto. Among 
those successfully practicing in Lincoln is Arnott Chaney Ricketts, whose indi- 
vidual talents have brought him to the front. He has lived in this city since 1872 
and is a member of the firm of Field, Ricketts & Ricketts. 

He was born on a farm near Findlay, in Hancock county, Ohio, March 18, 
1845, a son of John C. Ricketts, who devoted the greater part of his life to 
agricultural pursuits in Hancock county but afterward spent several years in 
Findlay, Ohio, ami bis last years at the home of his son in Lincoln, Nebraska. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 12:J 

He was born in Fairfield county. < )hio, March 4, 1S15, and i)asscd away in 
Lincoln, June 8, 1894. when in his eightieth year. He was twice married, first 
to Catharine Duncan, by whom he had six children, five sons and a daughter, as 
follows: Andrew Duncan, born January 29, 1843, who is a veteran of the 
L'Uion army and a grain dealer of Champaign, Illinois; Arnott Chaney, of this 
review: Emma J., who was born June i, 1847, and is now Mrs. Louis Scothorn, 
of Lincoln, Nebraska: Charles Kelley, who was born October 14, 1840. and died 
July 9. 1864; James Melville, born November 25, 1852, who passed away at 
Salt Lake City, Utah, May 21, 1901 ; John Milton, twin brother of James M., 
who was a very promising young physician, having studied diligently both in 
America and Europe, and who died at Colorado Springs. Colorado, on the 21st 
of October, 1881. The mother of these children passed away on the 15th of 
August, 1855, and subsequently John C. Ricketts was married a second time. 
The father, mother and three deceased children are all buried in W'yuka cemetery 
of Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Arnott C. Ricketts was reared on his father's farm in Ohio ancl attended the 
country schools through the winter months. In 1864, when eighteen years of 
age, he enlisted and served for four months in the Union army with the "one 
hundred day men," being on duty in \'irginia at the siege of Petersburg. In the 
fall of that year he returned home and resumed his interrupted studies, attend- 
ing the I'indlay ( C)hio ) high school. He also taught a country school near 
Findl.'iv for three years and in 18(17 'i*-' became a student in the Adrian College of 
Adrian, Michigan, where he won his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1871. In the 
meantime he had entered the law department of the University of Michigan and 
was graduated therefrom in 1872. 

Immediately afterward Mr. Ricketts came to Lincoln, then a small town, and 
began practice. He has since continued as an active member of the profession 
here, covering a period of forty-four years, and he is now the senior member 
of the law firm of Field, Ricketts & Ricketts, one of the best known law firms 
of Nebraska. This firm came into existence in 1904, the partners being Judge 
Allen W,. Field, now deceased, A. C. Ricketts and his son, Lowe A. Ricketts. 
Judge Field died June 9, 1915, and was succeeded in the firm by his son .and 
namesake, no change being made in the firm style. 

Mr. Ricketts has been married twice. On the 1st of May, 1873, he wedded 
Miss Louisa M. Lowe, who passed away March 28, 1902, leaving two children, 
as follows: Ena R., born September 26. 1875, who is now the wife of Ernest 
C. Folsom, of Lincoln: and Lowe Arnott. Iiorn December 17. 1877, who is a 
member of the law firm of Field, Ricketts & Ricketts. On the 23d of June, i<)09, 
Mr. Ricketts was again married, his second union being with Miss Sarah Eliza- 
beth Thompson, who was long a teacher in the Omaha schools and was subse- 
quently for several years at the head of the training deiKirtment of the Fremont 
Normal College. 

In politics Mr. Ricketts has alw.iys maintained an independent course, never 
caring to become allied with any party and thus remaining free to support any 
candidate whom he may desire. He always votes for the man whom he thinks 
best fitted for the office. He has filled the position of city attorney for three 
years and for five years was president of the city board of education. He co- 
oijerates in all plans and measures for the general good aiul works earnestly for 



124 LINXOLX AND LAX'CASTER COUNTY 

Lincoln's welfare but has confined his attention principally to his law practice 
and is connected with litigation heard in all the courts of the United States. 
He now belongs to the Lincoln Commercial Club and is an active member of 
the Christian Science church of Lincoln. He early won a notable place at the bar, 
which position he has ever maintained, and there are few if any lawyers of the 
city whose practice exceeds in length the period in which 'Sir. Ricketts has fol- 
lowed his profession in the cajjital. 



HENRY HOLM. 



Henry Holm, proprietor of the Lincoln Tannery, has been in business in this 
city since June, 1895. He was born in Denmark in 1857 '^"'^ when a youth of 
fourteen and a half years he began to learn the tanning trade. For forty-four 
years he has been engaged in the business, every detail of which is familiar to 
him, and undoubtedly one of the most forceful features of his success is that he 
has always continued in the line in which he embarked as a young tradesman. 
After thoroughly acquainting himself with the work he traveled all over Europe, 
visiting nearly every country and working as a journeyman at one time. At 
length he determined to try his fortune in America and came to the United 
States in 1883. He was employed at different periods in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, 
Cincinnati and Louisville, Kentucky, and in the last named city was foreman of a 
tannery for fi\-e years. He later spent a similar period as superintendent of a 
tannery in Chicago, and in 1895 he arrived in Lincoln, where he has since been 
engaged in business, conducting operations at first at the corner of Second and B 
streets, and later just west of the viaduct. In 1908, after experiencing losses 
through the floods of that year, he came to his present location at Nos. 917-19 Q 
street. For several years he tanned hides for leather, but as he could not compete 
with eastern tanneries, he gave up that feature of the business and now tans hides 
and furs for robes, overcoats, caps, mittens, etc., taking care in 1915 of two 
thousand si.x hundred hides for the custom trade. He has the largest establish- 
ment of the kind in Nebraska, employing from sixteen to twenty people. His 
business has grown along substantial lines and his many patrons prove an 
advertisement for him as they are continually speaking in terms of praise con- 
cerning the excellent work which he does. Each year's business has shown a 
gain, resulting from the fact that he is doing work of high quality at a reasonable 
jirice. He has ever based his business upon the principle of actual value in 
service for money received and he pays the highest price for labor of any fur 
tannery in the country, so that he is able to secure the highest class of labor and 
l)ro(luce the best work. The processes used render the skins soft and pliable and 
also wind, water and moth proof. He makes an annual exhibit at the State Fair, 
where he is continually meeting satisfied customers. He manufactures men's, 
women's and children's fur coats of the latest style and design as well as fur 
scarfs and mufi^s, makes rugs and in fact does all kinds of work with all kinds 
of fur. 

At Louisville, Kentucky, Mr. Holm was married to Miss Mary Danielsen, a 
native of Denmark, who was brought to the United States when a year old and 



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LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 127 

was reared in Louisville. They have become the parents of six children : Fred, 
who assists his father in business and who married Helen Winter, of Lincoln, by 
whom he has one child. Pearl ; Elroy, who married Maybelle Hanger, of Lincoln, 
and resides at Billings, Montana, where he is engaged in buying and shipping 
hides and furs; and Helen, ' Loretta, Charles and Henry Jr., all at home. 

The parents are members of the Unitarian church and .Mr. Holm is a socialist 
in his political belief, opposed to monopolies and all those forces which work for 
the interests of the individual at the sacrifice of the interests of the masses. He 
reads broadly and thinks deeply and is well informed on many vital questions and 
interests of the day. Fraternally he is connected with the Royal Highlanders and 
with the Danish Brotherhood. 



LEMUEL J. BONSALL. 

Lemuel T- Bonsall, whose family resides in Lincoln, was for many years 
actively "and prominently connected with the agricultural development of .Xcbraska, 
owning and operating a large tract of land in Greeley county. He was born in 
Illinois, January 7, 1855. and traced his ancestry back to one of the Pilgrims 
who came to the new world on the Mayflower. He was a son of Jesse and 
Margaret (Smith) lionsall. who were natives of the Keystone state, the former 
born in 1817. In their family were thirteen children. In early life Jesse 
Bonsall removed westw:n-(l to Illinois, where he purchased land, devoting the 
greater part of his remaining days to its development and further cultivation. 
Finally he reiired from active business life and removed to Charles City, Iowa, 
where he died in February, 1897, having for more than three years survived his 
wife, who passed away in August, 1893. 

Lemuel ]. Bonsall spent his youthful days in his native state and mastered the 
branches of learning taught in the public schools. With his parents he after- 
ward removed to Iowa and there engaged in farming, purchasing land in Floyd 
county, which he owned and cultivated until 1888. In that year he removed to 
Greeley county, Nebraska, where he bought a farm, giving his attention through- 
out his remaining days to its further improvement, his laliors converting it mto 
one of the valuable farm properties of the district. 

( )n the 7lh of ( Ictober, 1877, in Charles City, Iowa, Lemuel J. Bonsall was 
married to Miss May Rogers, a daughter of Elisha and Fidelia (Hill) Rogers, 
who were natives of New York. The father, who was a merchant, removed to 
Illinois at an early day and thence went to Charles City, Iowa, where he engaged 
in business for several years. Later he became a resident of Scotia, Greeley 
county, Nebraska, where he remained until 1897. when he went to Colorado. 
There his wife died in 1905 and he passed away in I-'owler, C^olorado, m 1914. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Bonsall were born three children, of whom the tirst born 
died in infancv. Delia May, born in January, 1885, is the wife of Fred C. 
\^"rtrees, of Lincoln, to whom she was married October 25. upfi. and they 
have two children : Clift'ord, eight years of age ; and Earl B... in his first year. 
The son, Jesse L. I'.onsall, who is now farming the old homestead in Greeley 
Vni. n— ; 



128 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

county, Nebraska, was born in December, 1888, and on the nth of August, 1909, 
married Jennie P. Burton. 

The death of Lemuel J. Bonsall occurred Sej)temljer 15, 1905, after aliout a 
year's illness. Mrs. Bonsall continued to reside uopn the old home farm until 
1913, when she removed to Lincoln and now resides at No. 2525 O street. 
She still owns the old home property and also considerable real estate in Beatrice, 
Nebraska. In his political views Mr. Bonsall was a republican, always sup- 
porting the men and measures of the party, yet not seeking ofifice. He belonged 
to the Masonic fraternity and was a loyal member of the Presbyterian church. 
His life was active, useful and well sjjent. Me CHdeavored always to follow the 
golden rule and his many good qualities insured him the friendship and kindly 
regard of those with whom he was associated. His business afifairs were care- 
fully managed and brought to him merited and well deserved success, so that he 
left his family in comfortable financial circumstances. 



LEANDO N. MUCK. 



Leando N. Muck is widely known throughout the country in connection with 
his work for the blind. He is the editor and field missionary secretary of the 
Christian Record, a magazine issued under the auspices of the Seventh Day 
Adventist church and sent free to the blind. He has also given many lectures in 
the interests of that publication. His birth occurred in Minburn, Dallas county, 
Iowa, on the 31st of March, 1872, and he is a son of Joseph and Elizabeth J. 
(Kinney) Muck, natives respectively of Kentucky and Indiana. The father 
became a resident of Dallas county, Iowa, in the early days in the history of 
that state and purchased land there which he operated until 1872, when he de- 
cided to try his fortune in Nebraska and homesteaded in Antelope county. For 
a number of years he operated his place there but at length retired and removed 
to Plattsmouth, where he died in 1897. He was survived for six years by his wife. 

Leando N. Muck was reared under the parental roof and received his educa- 
tion in the schools of Nebraska City. Later he learned piano tuning, which 
business he followed for about a year, and then went to Battle Creek, Micingan, 
and took charge of the Christian Record Publishing Company, whose headquar- 
ters were removed to College \ iew, Nebraska, four years later. He is still in 
charge of that enterprise and has lieen very successful in ])uilding u]) the 
circulation of the Christian Record, which is a magazine ])ublished for the blind 
and sent free of charge to those so afflicted throughout the United States. It is 
published by the Seventh Day Advemist church and Mr. Muck gives about half 
of his time to lecturing in the interests of the magazine and securing funds to 
defray the expenses of its publication. When he took charge of the business its 
circulation was only one hundred and seventy-five l)ut it is now thirty-three 
hundred and it has ])roved of great value and interest to the l)lind. The 
company owns its own i)uilding and its jilant is excellently efiuijjped for modem 
and U]i-to-date work. In addition to the other services which he has rendered 
the magazine Mr. Muck invented the press on which the publication is printed. 

On the 1st of December, 1901, occurred the marriage of Mr. Muck and 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 129 

Miss Alice \'. IJaker, and t'ney have a (laughter, Wanda Lane, whose liirlh 
occurred in November, 1903, and who is attending Union College. Mr. Muck is a 
democrat in politics and his religious faith is that of the Seventh Day Adventist 
church. He deserves unusual credit for what he has accomplished, for he 
himself is blind and has therefore had to overcome a handicap that many would 
think precluded their accomplishing anything of importance in the world. Realiz- 
ing both the needs and possibilities of those who are blind, he has thrown himself 
heart and soul into the work of publishing a paper for them and has made a 
record of which he has every right to be proud. 



FRANK A. r.OEHMER. 

I'rank .A. lioehmer is the senior partner in the law firm of I'.oehmer & 
Boehmer, his associates being his two sons, Edwin C. and Rupert .\. lie has 
resided continuously in Lincoln since Novemljer 9. 1884, or for nearly a third 
of a century, removing to this city from Warrenton, Missouri, where he was 
born on the 21st of July. 1855. He was the only child of Dicdrich Iloehmer and 
his wife, wdiose maiden name was Wilhelmina Eorderhase, both of whom were 
born near Hanover, Germany. They Ijecame acquainted and were married, 
however, in the state of Missouri, the father having been brought to the United 
States by his parents in 1837, while the mother crossed the .Atlantic with her 
]5arents in 1835 when a maiden of thirteen years. Diedrich ISoehmer learned 
the carjienter's trade and devoted his attention chiefly to the building of gristmills, 
b'ollowing his marriage he resided in Warrenton, Missouri, and its vicinity until 
1884, when he removed to Lincoln, he and his wife spending their remaining 
days in the home of their son, Erank A. The father died in 1886, at die age 
of seventy-six years, and the mother survived until she reached the age of eighty- 
one years, when she was laid to rest by the side of her husband in Wyuka ceme- 
tery. 

Reared in his native city, Frank A. Boehmer there attended the public scliools 
until he reached the age of fifteen, wdien he entered the Central Wesleyan College 
of Warrenton, which he attended until he finished the scientific and commercial 
courses. He afterward taught school in Warren county for two years and later 
entered the law department of the University of Missouri at Columbia, being 
there graduated in 1880. He was admitted to the bar at Warrenton, where he 
practiced for four years before coming to Lincoln. During that same period 
he edited and published a German weekly newspaper called the Warrenton 
\olksfreund, which he established on the ist of October, 1880, and which is 
still in existence but wdiich he sold in 1884 upon his removal to I,incoln. I'>om 
1880 until 1884 he served as deputy county clerk of Warren county. 

Since his arrival in the capital Mr. ISoehmer has contiimously ])racticed law 
and has also given much attention to real estate matters. His sons, Edwin C. 
and Rupert A. Boehmer, became his i-artners in 19 15 and the firm is accorded a 
liberal and distinctively representative clientage. In 1886 he was instrumental 
in organizing the German National Bank of Lincoln and served as a director 
and as attorney for the bank for several years. In 1907 he assisted in organizing 



130 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

the German Building & Loan Association and was its president for three years. 
In the early part of 1916 he became one of the organizers of the Midwest 
Savings & Loan Association of Lincoln and is now one of its board of directors 
and its legal adviser. 

On the 22d of November, 1881, Mr. Boehmer was united in marriage to 
Miss Alwene Wessel, a native of Warren county, Missouri, by whom he has 
eight children, four sons and four daughters, namely : Olivia, now the wife of 
Albert E. Rische, of Lincoln; Edwin C. and Rupert A., who are associated with 
their father in law practice; and Edna, Frank C, Emil, Marie and Helen, all at 
home. 

In his political views Mr. Boehmer is a republican but aside from four years' 
service as a member of the city council from the fourth ward, from 1887 until 
1891, he has never held nor sought office, though frequently importuned to 
become a candidate. He belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and 
to the German Evangelical St. Paul's church, of which he has served as a trustee 
almost throughout the entire period of his residence in Lincoln, being now 
president of the board, a position which he has held for many years, lie 
speaks and reads both German and English with equal fluency. He is a forcible 
public speaker and his services have been in great demand on the siump in 
political campaigns in both county and state. He has taken an active part 
in several presidential campaigns in the state, being able to address audiences in 
either German or English. He frequently delivers addresses before German 
societies and for several years has been president of the German Men's Society, 
an auxiliary of his church. For two successive years, 1910 and 191 1, he was 
chairman of the day committee in connection with the German Day celebrations, 
on which occasions large parades were held. The great flower parade in Lincoln, 
held on German Day in October, 191 1, when he was chairman of the committee, 
was one of the finest parades ever seen in Lincoln. For several years he was 
president of the Nebraska Saengerbund, an organization of all German singing 
societies of the state, and under his direction the .State Saengerfest was held in 
Lincoln in 1912. It will thus be seen that his interests are broad and varied, 
that he keeps in touch with the trend of modern thought and progress and is 
himself a leader in public thought and action in this city. 



FATHER PETER L. O'LOUGHLIN. 

Father Peter L. O'Loughlin, chancellor of the Catholic diocese of Lincoln, 
was born in Youghal, County Cork, Ireland, on the i8th of August, 1885, a son 
of Martin and Ellen (McDonough) O'Loughlin, both of whom were natives of 
the same county. The father, who was a farmer I'v occupation, has now passed 
away, but the mother still occupies the old home in Ireland. 

Father O'Loughlin was educated in the Christian lirothers College in Youghal 
and subsequently attended Mount Melleray Seminary in County Waterford, 
Ireland, and later continued his education in St. Francis Seminary of Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. He next spent four years in the American College in Rome and on 
the completion of his course there was ordained to the jiriesthood by Cardinal 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY l:il 

Respi,L;hi on the 2ist of December, 1907, thus consuuuiiatiui,' the hcjiie which he 
liad long entertained of taking holy orders. 

Following his ordination Father O'Loughlin spent one year in post graduate 
work in Rome and in 1908 returned to the United States, being appointed 
assistant rector of the cathedral in Lincoln, Nebraska, by Bishop Bonacum. 
Appointment to the chancellorship of the Lincoln diocese came from Bishop 
Tihen in 19 1 2 and he has since acted in that capacity, largely promoting the 
interests of the church through his untiring zeal and consecration to the cause. 
Fie is moderator of the Catholic Students Club of the University of Nebraska. 
He holds the degree of Doctor of Theology and also of Doctor of Philosophy, 
both of which were conferred upon him in Rome. A man of scolarly attain- 
ments and deep human sympathy, the work under his direction is being greatly 
promoted, excellent results following his efforts. 



DANIEL AMERCER BUTLER. 

Daniel Mercer Butler, founder and publisher of the Nebraska Legal News, 
was for about eighteen years a resident of Lincoln. He was born in Springdale, 
Iowa, Tanuary 3, 1S53, a son of Moses Y. and Emily (Schooley) Butler, who 
were natives of Ohio and were adherents of the Society of Friends, or Quakers. 
The father devoted his life to merchandising and in early manhood removed to 
Springdale, Iowa, wdiere his remaining days were passed. He there died in 1886, 
while his wife died in 1907. 

Daniel M. Butler supplemented a public school etlucation by study in the 
State University of Iowa at Iowa City and later he took up the study of law, 
graduating from the Des Moines Law School. He located for practice at 
Northwood, Iowa, where he remained for a short time, but in 1883 removed to 
Osceola, Nebraska, where he turned his attention to newspaper publication, 
becoming the owner and editor of the Osceola Record. Ahev eight years there 
spent he went to David City, Nebraska, where he published the David City 
Tribune until 1892. In that yeai' he arrived in Lincoln and established the 
Nebraska Legal News, which he continued to ]Hil)lish until bis death, which 
occurred January 9, 1910, after a short illness. 

Mr. fjutler had been married in June, 1882, to Miss Mary K. Pershing, a 
daughter of John F. and Mary E. ( Thompson ) Pershing, who were natives of 
Pennsylvania and Tennessee respectively. The father, who engaged in merchan- 
dising, removed to Missouri, settling at Laclede, the county seat of Linn county. 
While there residing he enlisted for service in the Civil war and was engaged in 
military duty for four years, operating a sutler's store during that period. Subse- 
quently he went to Chicago, where he engaged in business throughout his remain- 
ing days. His wife died in 1904. while he passed away in March, 1907. In their 
family were nine children, of whom four are yet living, including C.eneral John J. 
Pershing of the United States Army, who is now ( 1916). the center of interest 
because of his operations upon the Mexican border. 

Their daughter, Mrs. Butler, still makes her home in Lincoln and since the 
death of her husband has continued the pulilication of the .Vebraska Legal News 



132 LINXOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

with office at Eleventh and M streets. She is a member of the Episcopal church 
while Mr. Butler adhered to the Society of Friends. He was also a member of 
the Alasonic fraternity and of the Sons and Daughters of Protection. His 
political allegiance was given to the republican party and he was very active in 
politics and in public affairs, cooperating earnestly in all measures that he 
deemed beneficial to the public and occupying a position of leadership in relation 
to many plans and projects for general improvement and development. As the 
editor of the Legal News he gave to the profession a jnihlication of marked 
value, his previous connection with the bar well qualifying him to understand 
the needs of the profession. TJie publication sets forth the latest decisions of 
widespread interest and many other legal points of worth. 



JOSEPH V. TRAVIS. 



For many years Joseph V. Travis, of Liethany, owned and operated a well 
drilling niaclune but he is now living retired, enjoying a leisure made possible by 
his enterprise in former years. He was bom in Ohio in September, 1846, and 
his parents were Isaac and Matilda (Van Gordon) Travis, natives of the Buck- 
eye state. The father followed the wagon maker's trade in ( )hio and passed 
away there in 1861, while the mother died in 1873. To them were born five 
children, namely: Rev. Gilbert; Agnes, deceased; Joheph \'. ; John F., deceased; 
and Flora J. 

Joseph v. Travis was reared under the parental roof and received his edu- 
cation in the puljlic schools. When eighteen years of age he began his inde- 
pendent career and went to Illinois, where he worked as a farm hand for a 
time, after which he engaged in farming on his own account in Fulton county 
for two years. Subsequently he followed agricultural pursuits in McDonough 
county for three years but in 1874 he removed to Saunders county, Nebraska, 
where he operated rented land for two years. At the expiration of that period 
he returned to Illinois but after remaining there for one season went to Missouri, 
whence in 1878 he came to Nebraska. He lived in Ashland until 1889, when he 
went to Lincoln, Lancaster county, where he engaged in the well drilling business, 
owning a well drilling machine. He was fully equipped for doing rapid and high 
class work and was given many contracts, meeting with gratifying success in 
that business. In April. 1905, feeling that he had accumulated a competence, he 
retired and purchased five acres of land adjoining the town of Bethany, on 
which he has since lived. He has made many improvements upon the place and 
takes justifiable pride in keeping everything in excellent condition. 

Mr. Travis was married on the 26th of September, 1867, to Miss Laura 
Beckelhymer, a daughter of Alexander and Sarah (Brown) Beckelhymer. Her 
parents were natives of Pennsylvania but removed to Illinois and there the father 
farmed until called by death in 1899, when he had reached the advanced age 
of eighty years, as his natal year was 1819. He had long survived his wife, who 
died in 1873. Mr. and Mrs. Travis have three children: Leonidas, who was born 
November 23, 1868; Charles, who was born May 23, 1871, and is living in 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 133 

Bethany; and Clarissa P., who was horn June 12, 1878, and is now the wife of 
W. F. Lintt of University Place. 

Mr. Travis is an adherent of the democratic party and supports its candi- 
dates at the polls. He served as police judge, as justice of the peace and as 
constahle at Ashland, Nehraska, and made an excellent record as an ofiFicial. He 
is identified with the Christian church and can he depended upon to further move- 
ments seeking the moral advancement of his community. He possesses many 
e.xcellent qualities and is held in high esteem wherever known and especially 
where hest known. 



. WILMER BEECHER COMSTOCK. 

Wilmer Beecher Comstock is engaged in the jiractice of law in Lincoln, 
where he has resided since 1887. He was born at White Pigeon, Michigan, 
October 20, 1867, and was therefore a young man of twenty years when he 
came to the capital. His father, Richard Emerson Comstock, also a lawyer 
by profession, was born in Erie, Pennsylvania, February 15, 1830, a son of 
Jonathan and Rhoda (Emerson) Comstock, the latter a member of the Emerson 
family to which Rali)h Waldo Emerson. New England's most distinguished 
philosopher, belonged. One of her brothers became an eminent lawyer of New 
York, and served as United States minister to England during President 
Buchanan's administration. Richard Emerson Comstock was twice married, 
the mother of Wilmer B. Comstock being his second wife. She bore the maiden 
name of Jennie Haviland, and was born near Adrian, Michigan, September i, 
1840. a daughter of Charles Haviland. When their son Wilmer was ten years 
of age the parents removed with their family to Adair county, Iowa, where 
they settled on a farm which ]\Ir. Comstock continued to develop and cultivate 
from 1878 until 1887. In that year he removed to Cheyenne county, Kansas, 
and studied law in the town of St. Francis. He was then admitted to the bar 
and practiced law there for several years, but his last years were passed in 
Lincoln, where he died in 1910. His wife survived him until 1914 and the 
remains of both were interred in the Wyuka cemetery. W. B. Comstock has 
two full brothers ; Allen Wells, now a lawyer of Ponca, Oklahoma ; and Charles 
Emerson, residing in Lincoln. W. B. Comstock is the youngest of the three. 
He has a half sister, Mrs. Idella Jones, formerly of Lincoln, but now of Cali- 
fornia. His mother was a member of the Llaviland family of France, that 
has become famous as manufacturers of the Haviland china. 

From the age of eleven years Wilmer B. Comstock spent his youth upon 
a farm in Adair county, Iowa, and at eighteen took up the profession of teach- 
ing, which he followed for some time in Adair county. He had acquired a good 
common school education and he also attended the high school at Fontanclle, 
Iowa. In 1886 he went to St. Francis, Kansas, where his elder brother, .'\llcn 
W., was then practicing law. For six months he studied law in his brother's 
office, and in October, 1887, came to Lincoln, where he continued his law 
studies until November 22, 1888, being then admitted to the bar. He has 



134 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

since practiced in Lincoln and a liberal clientage is accorded hini, his name 
tiguring in connection with much important litigation. 

On the 4th of March, 1901, Mr. Comstock was united in marriage to Miss 
Jessie Benton Spurck, of Lincoln, the daughter of the late Adam E. Spurck. 
Mrs. Comstock is a graduate of the University of Nebraska and at the time 
of her marriage was a teacher in the Lincoln public schools. By her marriage 
she has become the mother of five children, two sons and three daughters, 
namely : Ruth, John, Edison, Mary and Louise. 

Mr. Comstock has always supported the republican jjarty since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise and for four years he w^as police judge 
and for two years a member of the city council of Lincoln. While in the 
latter office he took the initiative in the investigation of all the city officials 
of Lincoln and served as chairman of the investigating committee which had 
been created according to his resolution. He is a member of the Lincoln 
and State Bar Associations and of the Lincoln Commercial Club. Fraternally 
he is an Elk and in religious faith a Unitarian. In a word, he is a broad-minded 
man and progressive citizen, interested in all that pertains to the welfare of 
the community and the commonwealth. He gives active aid and cooperation 
to many plans for the public good and he stands at all times for those 
things which feature largely in bringing about higher standards of civic con- 
duct and civic progress. 



CHARLES M. KNOWLTON. 

Charles M. Knowlton, of College View, who is one of the best known stock 
dealers in Lancaster county, was born on the 12th of May, 1853. in Connecticut. 
His parents, William J. and Anna (Kinney) Knowlton, were born respectively 
in Maine and in Scotland. In his youth the father sailed before the mast and at 
the time of the Mexican war he served in the army of the United States, proving 
a valiant and loyal soldier. In 1858 he removed westward, settling at Cowper, 
Johnson county, Iowa. He purchased land but after operating it for two years 
had to give it up as the title was not good. He then removed to the vicinity of 
Iowa City and for ten years engaged in farming there but in 1867 decided to try 
his fortune still farther west and drove across the country to Lancaster county, 
Nebraska. He rented a farm, which he operated for a number of years, but at 
length, having accumulated a competence, he put aside the cares of active life and 
removed to Lincoln, where he lived in honorable retirement until his death on 
the 17th of December, 1897, when he was seventy-five years old. His wife sur- 
vived until the 2d of May, 1905, and reached the advanced age of eighty-four 
years. 

Charles M. Knowlton was reared and educated in Johnson county, Iowa, 
and Lancaster county, Nebraska. He remained with his parents, giving them the 
benefit of his labors until he was twenty-five years of age, when he began farming 
on his own account. After renting land for two years he purchased eighty acres 
in Grant township from the Burlington & Missouri Railroad and for three years 
he concentrated his energies upon the development and improvement of that 










t 




PUBLl 



^ j^i 1^ . . 



. ASTO". 
T I L D f N R.J 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 137 

jilace. He then sold to advantage and after renting,' for two years bought eighty 
acres in Lancaster township which was already well improved, l-'or twenty years 
he resided upon that farm and brought the land to a still higher state of culti- 
vation and added various improvements, making his farm one of the most valuable 
in his locality. .At the end of that time he came to College \'ie\v and engaged in the 
livery business, with which he was connected for five years and ten months. Sub- 
sequently he became identified with general merchandising and for a year and 
a half operated a store in College \'iew. He then disposed of that enterprise and 
has since engaged in the buying and shipping of horses, cattle and hogs. He is 
an excellent judge of stock, is widely acquainted throughout the countv and 
understands how to market stock to the best advantage and has found his present 
business very profitable. He owns a fine modern home at the corner of Seventh 
and L streets, holds title to four acres in Burnham's addition to Lincoln and 
also owns a well improved ranch of eight hundred acres in Cherry county, Ne- 
braska. He at one time held title to tv\'enty-five acres of land inside the corpora- 
tion limits of College View but has since disposed of that property. 

Mr. Knowlton was married on the 28th of October, 1880, to Miss .Vnna 
Schenk, a daughter of Fred and Mary A. ( McKeown ) Schenk, the former a 
native of CTermany and the latter of Ireland. The father emigrated to the United 
States many years ago and located at Philadeli)hia, where he passed away in 1865 
at the early age of tw-enty-eight years. His wife survived him for a long period, 
dying on the 17th of February, 1803, when sixty-three years old. Mrs. Knowlton 
was born in Philadelphia on the 27th of December, 1838. By her marriage she 
has become the mother of a daughter, Gertrude, now the wife of Fred R. .Stanley, 
who is engaged in the ])lumbing and heating 1)usiness at Lincoln. On the iith 
of June, 1916, a daughter, Alyse Mildred, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Stanley. 

The republican party has a stalwart supporter in Mr. Knowlton. who does all 
in his power to secure its success at the ])olls. Fraternally he is well known, 
belonging to the Modern Woodmen of .America, the Royal Neighbors, the Masonic 
order and the Eastern Star. He is loyal in friendship, public-s])irited in matters 
of citizenship, and all who have been brought in contact with hiiu hold him in 
high esteem. 



JOHN E. COOK. 



For twenty-two years John E. Cook was a resident of Lincoln. During 
that period he lived retired, although previously he had been active in business 
as both a machinist and farmer. A native son of New England, he was born in 
Roxbury, Massachusetts, Alay 6, 1838, a son of William and Alice Cook, who 
were natives of New York. The father was a team.ster and spent the greater 
part of his life in Boston, where he was also a member of the police force 
for thirty years. He died in 1889, having long survived his w^ife. who passed 
away in 1851. 

John E. Cook was reared and educated in Roxbury, Massachusetts, and at 
the age of twentv-three years enlisted for service as a member of the Thirteenth 
Massachusetts Infantry, with which he remained for three years, or during 



138 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

the war. For three days he was incarcerated in Libby prison and he experi- 
enced all of the different phases of military life, including the long, hard 
marches and hotly contested campaigns. 

With the close of his military service, Mr. Cook returned to T.oston, where 
he worked at the machinist's trade, which he had learned previous to the time 
when he went to the front. He was thus employed in the east until 1S75, when 
he came to Nebraska, settling in Butler county, where he engaged in work as a 
machinist but later secured a homestead in Knox county and was thus identi- 
fied with farming until 1889. In that year he came to Lincoln and retired, 
spending his remaining days in rest from labor, the competence which he had 
acquired in his former business activity supplying him with all the comforts 
of life. 

In December, 1875, ^^^- Cook was united in marriage to Miss Almira M. 
Marsh, a daughter of Edward and Caroline (Beach) Marsh, who were natives 
of Ohio and New^ York respectively. The father removed with his family to 
Illinois and engaged in farming near Freeport until 1874, when he came to 
Neljraska, purchasing land in Butler county. His remaining days were given 
to the cultivation of that tract and thereon he passed away in 1885, while his 
wife died in 1866. Mr. and Mrs. Cook were the parents of three children : 
Winifred, at home; Ralph, residing in Lincoln; and Juanita, who is teaching 
school in \'alley, Nebraska. The death of the husband and father occurred 
January 10, 191 1. He was a loyal member of the Grand Army of the Republic 
and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His political belief was that 
of the republican party and in religious faith he was a Methodist. His life was 
actuated by high and honorable principles and in every relation he was loyal to 
duly and appreciative of the rights of his fellowmen. 



F. E. GILLEN. 



F. E. Gillen is proprietor of the Gillen & Boney Manufacturing Company, 
makers of all kinds of confectionery, in Lincoln, and, moreover, he has the 
distinction of being the only candy manufacturer west of the Mississippi river 
on the executive board of the National Confectioners' Association. He was 
born in South Hend, Indiana, January 18, 1869, and is a son of Edward and 
Ann (Smith) ( iillen, both of whom have passed away. The father was a 
native of New York, while the mother was born in Ireland. They became 
residents, however, of South Bend, Indiana, and it was there that F. E. Gillen 
was born and reared. He spent a year in work as a farm hand in north- 
western Minnesota, but in his native city he learned the candy maker's trade 
and since 1889 has been identified with that line of business in Neliraska. He 
first located at Omaha, where he worked at his trade until i89_^. when he 
came to Lincoln and engaged in the manufacture of candy for two years, and 
then established a factory of his own, organizing the Gillen & Boney Manufac- 
tliring Company, Mr. Boney being associated with him as a partner until 1912, 
since which time Mr. Gillen has been sole proprietor. In 1906 he erected a 
three story brick factory. Something of the substantial growth of his business 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 139 

is indicated in the fact that he now has nine salesmen on the road, while from 
seventy-tive to one hundred people are employed in the factory. The manu- 
factured product finds a ready sale upon the market because of its excellence 
and also by reason of the straightforward business methods and reasonable 
prices of the firm. In addition to his interests along that line Mr. Gillen is 
vice president of the German Building & Loan Association and in all business 
afl'airs he displays sound judgment and unfaltering enterprise. 

In early manhood Mr. Gillen was united in marriage to Miss Emma A. 
Shindel, a native of Indiana, by whom he has three sons, namely : Frank and 
Ronald, who are associated with their father in business ; and Irven, a law 
student in the University of Nebraska. 

Fraternally Mr. Gillen is identified with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Woodmen of the World, and he is also a life member of the 
Commercial Club. For more than twenty years he has been recognized as 
one of Lincoln's leading business men and a most prominent representative of 
its manufacturing interests. He enjoys and merits the esteem and goodwill 
of all with whom he has been brought in contact and his life demonstrates 
what can be accomplished when determination and ambition lead the way. 



THERON A. HOGUE. 



During the last twenty-three years of his life Tlieron A. Hogue was a resident 
of Lincoln, but he had made his home in Nebraska from 1882. He was born in 
Butler Center, Indiana, June 2t„ 1857, a son of Henry and Efta LTogue, the 
former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. The father was a 
farmer by occupation and upon removing westward settled in Dekalb county, 
Indiana, where he purchased a tract of wild land from which he cleared the 
timber and then developed and improved a farm, continuing its cultivation 
throughout his remaining days, his life's labors being ended in 1868. His widow 
still survives and is now living in Auliurn, Indiana, at the advanced age of 
ninety years. 

Theron A. Hogue was reared in his native state and engaged in fanning on 
the old homestead until he went upon the road as a member of an opera com- 
pany, devoting three years to the profession. In 1882 he arrived in Nebraska, 
settling in Kearney, Buffalo county, and there he engaged in the lumber 1)usi- 
ness. conducting a yard at that .point for four years. He next became a resident 
of Edgar, Nebraska, where he carried on a lumber business for two years, 
after which he removed to Dorchester, Nebraska, continuing in the lumber 
business at that place until 1890. Seeking a still broader field of labor, he 
removed to Lincoln, where for a time he continued in the lumber business and 
afterward turned his attention to the milling business. Still later he accepted 
a position with the gas company and was so occupied to the time of his death. 

On the 17th of October, 1883, Mr. Hogue was married to Miss Ella M. 
Shoaft-, a daughter of Peter and Sarah (Tyner) Shoaff, who were natives of 
Indiana. The^ father was a harness maker by trade but afterward turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits and is still operating a farm in Dekalb county. 



140 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Indiana, where his wife passed away in 1867. To Mr. and Mrs. Hogue were 
born four children, as follows : Florence M., whose birth occurred March 30, 
1885, and who is the wife of Orville Young, of Springfield, Missouri; Grace 
J., who was born February 15, 1887, and died on the 20th of November, 1914; 
Mabel C, born November 29, 1888, who is employed as a stenographer by the 
Pioneer Insurance Company at No. 1411 O street in Lincoln; and Earl S., 
who was born April 2, 1891, and is employed as billing clerk by the J. I. Case 
Company of Lincoln. Mr. Hogue erected a nice residence at No. 3220 W 
street, where the family still reside. Mrs. Hogue is agent for the Missouri 
Pacific Railway Company at the Pucks Grove station of Lincoln, having occu- 
pied that position for twenty-three years. 

Mr. Hogue departed this life October 20, 1913. He was a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America and gave his political allegiance to the repub- 
lican party. Plis religious faith was that of the Methodist church and through- 
out his entire life he endeavored to follow the golden rule. He possessed 
notable musical talent and his skill in that direction made him very popular 
in musical circles. He could play any kind of a musical instrument and he 
contributed to the public enjoyment upon many a social occasion. His daughter 
Grace possessed marked artistic talent in another direction, doing fine work 
in oil and china painting. Another daughter, Mabel, was formerly a successful 
school teacher of Lancaster county and is now proving of notable worth in 
business circles, being connected with the Pioneer Insurance Company. 



THEODORE lACOBS. 



Theodore Jacobs, who since 1903 has been one of Havelock's successful 
business men, carrying a complete line of clothing, shoes and men's furnishing 
goods, was born in Chicago, September 9, 1S71, a son of L W. and Josena 
(P>rahren) Jacobs, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father was a 
sailor on the ocean for twenty-five years and later settled in Chicago, while 
subsec|uently he became a resident of Staplehurst, Nebraska, where his death 
occurred. 

Theodore Jacobs had somewhat limited educational opportunities. His youth- 
ful (lavs were spent in Chicago, in Michigan and in Nebraska and when but a 
boy in years he worked around the telcgra]ih office at Staplehurst. It was in 
this knocking up against the world that he obtained much of his knowledge of 
life, learning many valuable lessons in the school of experience. After starting 
out in the business world he clerked in Lincoln for twelve years for the firm of 
I'red Schmidt & P)rother and afterward came to Havelock, where in 1903 he 
purchased a small stock of goods. He has since engaged in business on his own 
account and in 191 i removed to his present location at No. 1422 O street. He 
has gradually increased his stock to meet the growing demands of his trade 
and now carries a large and attractive line of men's clothing, shoes and furnish- 
ings. His reasonable prices, his fair dealing and his progressive methods have 
secured to him a liberal patronage, so that his trade has now reached gratifying 
and profitable proportions. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 141 

On June 9, 1897, Air. Jacobs was united in marriage to Miss Edith L. Morgan, 
a native of Utah, by whom he has four children, namely; Harry ']"., Melvin \V., 
Helen and John 1'. .Mr. Jacobs was reared in tiie Lutheran church hut now 
attends and contributes to the support of the Congregational church, lie belongs 
to the George Washington Lodge, F. & A. M., of Havelock, and to the Knights 
of I^ythias lodge of Havelock, in which he is keeper of the record and seals. 
His political support is given to the democratic party but he does not seek nor 
desire office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs. 



JUDGE JOHN SCOTT McCARTY. ^ 

Judge John Scott McCarty has been a member of the Lancaster County 
bar only since October. 19 13, but for many years previous had ])racticed his 
profession at Auburn, Nebraska, and had become well known throughout the 
state as an able lawyer. He was born at Mason, Illinois, June 10, 1869, and 
since 1878 has lived in Nebraska. His father. Dr. Milburn McCarty, who 
was a practicing physician throughout his entire active career, was born in 
Kentucky, June 5, 1828. He met with an accident which nearly severed the 
right leg. Tendering the foot almost useless. This prevented him from becom- 
ing a soldier in the Civil war, but he was a strong Union man and when (ieneral 
N. 1;. Forrest and his Confederate cavalry started to make a raid up through 
Kentucky, Dr. McCarty, who was practicing medicine in Kentucky, left that 
state and crossed the Ohio River to Illinois, establishing an office in Mason. 
In 1878 he came to Nebraska, settling in Auburn, and in 1890 he removed to 
Granger, Texas, where he died in May, 1907. On May 7, 1853, in Fayette 
county, Illinois, he married Mary A. Wilborn, who survived him a few months, 
dying February, 1908. They traveled life's journey happily together for fifty- 
four years, celebrating their golden wedding in 1903. Two sons survive. John 
S. and Milburn, the latter being a practicing attorney at San Angelo, Texas, and 
now district attorney of that judicial district. 

lustin McCarty was born in Maryland in 1762. teaching school there when 
a young man. He then emigrated to Virginia and from there to Kentucky, 
where he died in 1822, leaving surviving among other children, Milburn, who 
was born in 1798, and who married Katherine Kinnett, whose father and 
mother were both born in New Jersey in 1754, and after their marriage emi- 
grated to Kentucky. Milburn and Katherine were the parents of Dr. McCarty. 

William Burks and wife Frances emigrated from Raleigh Court House, 
North Carolina, to Cumberland county, Kentucky, in 1794- Owing to an upris- 
ing of the Indians they, with other neighbors, took refuge in the fort at Boons- 
boro, where they were compelled to stay for nearly two years. W hde there 
in i7.)7 their daughter Kitty married Willis Wilborn, Sr., and among their 
children was Willis Wilborn, Jr., who married Frances Reese, whose father 
came to Kentucky from Alamance county. North Carolina, in 171^7. Willis 
Wilborn, Jr., and Frances were the parents of Mary A. Williorn. the wife of Dr. 
McCarty. Burksville, the county seat of Cumberland county. Kentucky, was 
founded by and named after William I'.urks. 



142 LINCOLN AND LAXXASTER COUNTY 

Judge John Scott McCarty, when a young man, taught school for four 
years and then took up the study of law. For seventeen years he practiced law 
at Auburn and during that period served for two terms as county judge of 
Nemaha county, and was also for two terms mayor of Auburn. In October, 
1913, he removed to Lincoln and formed a partnership with the Hon. G. W. 
Berge under the firm style of Berge & McCarty, a connection that has since 
been maintained and which has notable rank at the Lincoln bar. Mr. McCarty 
belongs to both the Lancaster County and Nebraska State Bar Associations. 

On the Sth of March, 1893, Mr. McCarty was married to Miss Jeanette Opal 
Harmon, of Nemaha county, Nebraska, a daughter of Henry Harmon, who 
located in that county in 1853 upon land where he resided for forty years, 
when he moved into Auburn. She is a member of the First Christian church 
of Lincoln, of which her brother, the Rev. H. H. Harmon, is pastor. Judge 
McCarty belongs to the Country Club and the Commercial Club of Lincoln, and 
fraternally is a Mason, Elk and Knight of Pythias. His political allegiance is 
given to the democratic party and he keeps well informed on the questions and 
issues of the day. In fact, he is known as a broad-minded man, interested in 
everything tliat has to do with public progress in civic affairs. At the same time 
he is an able lawyer, giving close attention to his practice, and his ability has 
kept him prominently before the public as one of the ablest advocates at the 
Lincoln bar. 



HENRY SHERMAN LOWER. 

Henry Sherman Lower, deiuity county attorney of Lancaster county, was 
born on a farm in Hamilton county. Nebraska, February 29, 1888. His father, 
John T. Lower, who devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, was born near 
Akron, Ohio. January 14, 1854, and having arrived at years of maturity he 
married Josephine Hiatt. who was born near Des Moines, Iowa, June 10, 1863. 
Both are still living and now make their home at Bison, Oklahoma, to which 
state they removed from Hamilton county, Nebraska, in 1900. 

1 Icnry S. Lower was reared on the old farm in Hamilton county to the age 
of twelve years, and during that period attended the puljlic schools of Mar- 
quette. He then accompanied his parents to Oklahoma, where he continued his 
education, being graduated from tiie high school at Hennessey in 1906. In the 
fall of the same year he entered the University of Nebraska, where he studied 
for four years, spending one year in the academic department and three years 
in the law department. He was graduated in igio and since then has Ijeen a 
member of the Lincoln bar. He was appointed deputy county attorney Septem- 
ber I, 191 5, and is now serving in that position under County Attorney George 
E. Hager. He belongs to the Lincoln and to the Nebraska State Bar Asso- 
ciations. 

On the i6lh of ( )ctober, 11J15. Mr. Lower was united in marriage to Miss 
Alice Augusta Fish, of New .Mbin. Iowa. Mr. Lower has an interesting mili- 
tary chapter in his life record, having been for three years a member of Com- 
pany G of the Oklahoma National Guard. He belongs to the Lincoln 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 143 

Commercial Club and cooperates in all of its plans and purposes to promote 
the welfare and advance the interests of the capital city. In Masonry he has 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and is also a member of 
the Mystic Shrine. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and 
he is active in promoting its welfare and successes, but is not a politician in the 
usually accepted sense of office seeking. 



JAMES B. AUSTIN. 

During the later years of his life James B. Austin lived retired in Lincoln, 
■but had previously been identified with the grain trade in that city and had 
become well known as a grain merchant and dealer in live stock in other sections 
of Nebraska. New England claimed him as a native son, for his birth occurred 
in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, May 5, 1854, his parents being James S. and 
Lucy (Allen) Austin, who were also natives of that state. He w-as one of 
eleven children, four sons and seven daughters, ten of whom grew to maturity 
and six of whom survived Mr. Austin. The father was a farmer by occupation 
and on lea\ing the east removed to Crundy county, Illinois, in 1S55. Later" 
he established his home in Livingston county, that state, where he carried on 
farming for many years, but finally retired and removed to Dwight, Illinois, 
where he remained until his death, which occurred in April. 1899, when he 
had reached the venerable age of eighty-four years. For several years he had 
survived his wife, who passed away in September, 1S94. 

James B. Austin was reared and educated in Livingston county. Illinois, 
spending much of his youth in Dwight, and when old enough he began farm- 
ing on his own account in that locality. He afterward returned to Dwight, 
where for five years he engaged in the business of importing horses. In Sep- 
tember, 1 89 1, he came to Nebraska, settling in Furnas county, and for twelve 
years he was engaged in the grain trade at Wil-sonville. He later removed to 
Orleans, where he continued in the grain liusiness for three years, and in 1906 
he came to Lincoln, where he was well known as a grain merchant until 1909, 
when he retired from active business. He passed away December 24, 191 1, 
after a short illness. All through the period of his residence in Lincoln he 
engaged in the real estate business to a greater or less extent. Since his 
demise Mrs. Austin has erected a fine residence at No. 1941 South Twenty- 
third street. 

On the 18th of March, 1879, Mr. Austin was united in marriage to Miss 
Annetta Boyer, who was born in Blair county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of 
George W. and Mary A. (Turnbaugh) Boyer, al.so natives of that .state. In 
1867 the father removed to Illinois. He had previously followed farming in 
the east until after the outbreak of the Civil war, when he enlisted as a mcm- 
lier of Company G, One Hundred and Fourth Pennsylvania \'olunteer Infantry, 
with which he served for about a year. On making his way to the middle west 
he settled in Livingston county, Illinois, where he purchased land and for 
many years carried on farming, after which he removed to Dwight. where he 
spent his remaining days in honorable retirement from labor, his death there 



144 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

occurring June 27, 191 1, when he had reached the advanced age of eighty- 
four. His wife was but seventy-one years of age when she was called to her 
final rest in January, 1899. Mr. and Mrs. .Vustin became the parents of five 
children, as follows: George S., who was born March 31, 1880, and is president 
of the Orleans State Bank at Orleans, Nebraska; Alfred A., who was born 
in January, 1882, and died on the 15th of the following month; Effie M., whose 
birth occurred .Vpril 3, 1883, and who is the wife of Ralph W. Thacker, ath- 
letic director in the college at Lake Forest, Illinois ; Blanche M., who was born 
March 9, 1886, and is at home; and Maude G., born September 27, 1899, "'lo '^ 
attending school. 

Mr. Austin gave his political support to the republican party and he was 
a member of the Lincoln Commercial Club, indorsing and cooperating in all 
the movements which were instituted by that organization. His religious faith 
was that of the Methodist church and he ever endeavored to guide his life by 
its teachings, being straightforward and honorable in all his dealings and rela- 
tions with his fellowmen, so that the genuine worth of his character established 
him firmly in the warm regard of those with wliom he was brought in contact. 



JOHN GETTIER. 



John Gettier was for many years proprietor of one of the leading meat 
markets of Lincoln, although his last days were spent in well earned re- 
tirement from business. He was l.iorn in Gettysburg. Pennsylvania, February 
6, 1853, a decade before the memorable battle there occurred — one of the 
most decisive and most hotly contested of all engagements of the Civil war. 
While spending his youthful days in the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephen Gettier, he pursued his education in the public schools of his native town 
and there resided until 1876, when at the age of twenty-three years he removed 
westward, to Lincoln, Nebraska, and formed a partnership with his brother, 
S. William, in the meat business. For years they conducted the Gettier Market 
and the business is still carried on under that name. They built up a large and 
jjrofitable business which developed witii the growth of the city, remaining ever 
one of the foremost enterprises of this character in Lincoln. .\t length Mr. Gettier 
retired from active business and spent his remaining days in the enjoyment of 
well earned rest, purchasing and occupying a fine residence at No. 1432 R street. 
There he passed away August 9, 1912. 

In January, i(;Oi, Air. Gettier was married to Miss Ella Nutting, a daughter 
of Merrick and Minerva (Metcalf ) Xutting, who were native of Massachusetts 
and Vermont, respectively. Her father engaged in the oil business in the cast and 
in 188=; removed westward to Lincoln. Nebraska, where he engaged in the con- 
tracting and building business until 1897. In that year he removed to Houston, 
Texas, where his remaining days were spent, his death there occurring in March, 
1903. His widow has since returned to Lincoln and now makes her home with Mrs. 
Gettier at the age of seventy-five years. By a former marriage Mr. (iettier had 
one daughter, Gail, now the wife of Jesse Williams, a resident of Lincoln. Since 
her husband's death Mrs. Gettier has sold the residence at No. 1432 R street 




JOHN GETTIER 



.Jbucu^^^'" 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 147 

and has purchased a beautiful home at No. 1926 Cherry street. She is a woman 
of excellent business ability and discernment and carefully manages her prop- 
erty interests. xMr. Gettier was the owner of a considerable amount of real estate 
in Lincoln, together with farm land in Nebraska, and was very successful in all 
he undertook. His political indorsement was given to the republican party, while 
his religious faith was that of the Lutheran church. He hatl a wide acquaintance 
and all who knew him respected him because his life was characterized by 
sterling principles and actuated Ijy high purposes. Mrs. Gettier is also well 
known in Lincoln and is munbered among the members of the Methodist church. 



ROBERT McDEVITT. 



Robert McDevitt, one of the earliest settlers in Lancaster county, is now 
living retired in Havelock. He was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, November 
12, 1842. His father, James McDevitt, also a native of the Emerald isle, died 
when his son Robert was but five years of age, after which his widow, who 
bore the maiden name of Mary Arnold, became the wife of John McClusky, 
and in the year 1854 they came to the United States, landing in New York City 
on the 27th of April of that year. They proceeded thence to Middletown, Con- 
necticut, and in 1858 arrived in Nebraska, settling at Plattsmouth, Cass county. 
In 1865 the mother and son came to Lancaster county, where Robert McDevitt 
homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres, while his mother ])urchased a 
soldier's claim of one hundred and twenty acres, and thus the family became 
identified with agricultural interests in this county. By her first marriage Mrs. 
McClusky had three children, but two had died in infancy in Ireland. By her 
second marriage she had but one child, also deceased. 

Robert McDevitt was a lad of twelve years when the family crossed the 
Atlantic and was a young man of twenty-three years when he came with his 
mother to Lancaster county. His first home in this county was a log house, 
wliich he occupied for thiee years, and in 1868 he erected a frame dwelling 
on his farm. Year after year he carefully tilled the soil, conducting his farm 
along progressive lines, adding many modern improvements thereto and secur- 
ing all the machinery which facilitates the work of the fields. He had charge 
of his mother's as well as his own land, and he cared for his mother until her 
demise, which occurred in 1893, when she had reached the advanced age of 
seventy-five years. Mr. McDevitt continued to engage actively in fanning until 
about nine years ago and was very successful, so that when he retired he was 
the owner of four hundred and forty acres of rich and valuable land in North 
Bluff precinct. He has since sold that property, but still owns five residences 
in Havelock, from which he derives a good rental that provides him with an 
excellent annual income. The Indians were numerous in the county when 
he arrived here, and he had to face all the usual conditions and experiences 
of pioneer life. He frightened and chased away a band of more than five 
hundred Indians who had camped too long near his place. There were few 
experiences of frontier life with which he did not become familiar, and in the 



148 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

conduct of his private interests he promoted the agricultural development of 
the district. 

Mr. McDevitt was united in marriage to Catherine Dailc}', who was born 
in Lafayette, Indiana, December 20, 1852, a daughter of James Dailey, who 
was born in County Cork, Ireland, and who married Ann Scott, a native of 
County Mayo, Ireland. In 1854 they arrived in Nebraska, and Mr. Dailey 
built the second house in Omaha. He also became an early settler of Lincoln, 
while his last days were spent in Wheatland, Wyoming. Mrs. McDevitt has 
ever proved a faithful companion and helpmate to her husband on life's journey. 
She acted as hostess to Governor Butler, T. P. Kennard and Colonel Packard, 
who were commissioners to locate the capital and whom she entertained at many 
a meal. In 1871 when President Grant was touring the country before his 
second election, he and his party were entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
McDevitt, although they did not know who their distinguished visitor was until 
the following morning, when the stage driver told them. It was Mr. McDevitt 
who purchased the first mower and the first reaper ever brought into Lancaster 
county. His wife sometimes assisted him in the work of the fields and on one 
occasion she dropped forty acres of corn in five days, with a horse ahead mak- 
ing the rows and a horse behind to cover the seed. The family is Catholic in 
religious faith and has been most active in promoting the work of the church 
in Havelock. The first mass celebrated in Omaha was held in her father's 
house and the first mass in Lincoln was also held in her father's house. In 
his political views Mr. McDevitt was for many years a republican, but now 
supports the democratic party. For three years he was a member of the county 
board of supervisors and for twenty years served on the school board. For 
fifteen years he traveled for his health, which, however, is now improved. He 
is a pleasant, genial companion, his mind stored with many interesting incidents 
and with reminisences of the early days. He possesses an excellent memory 
and there are few features of Lancaster county's pioneer development with 
which he is not familiar. 



WILLIAM WISEMAN. 



William Wiseman, who formerly engaged in farming, is now living retired in 
College View, enjoying a rest that is well deserved. He was born in Ireland on 
the 14th of April, 1839, a son of John and Charlotte (Nagle) Wiseman, natives 
respectively of Scotland and Ireland. They came to America in 1845 <i"d located 
at St. Louis, Missouri. Although John Wiseman was a pawnbroker in his native 
country he turned his attention to farming after removing to the United States 
and in 1847 settled in Wisconsin, where he purchased a tract of good land. 
He operated that place until his demise in 1896. He had survived his wife for 
two decades as she passed away in 1876. 

William Wiseman was reared and educated in Wisconsin and remained at 
home until he was twenty-four years old, when, early in 1864, he enlisted in 
Company K, Seventh Wisconsin Infantry, with which he served at the front 
until the close of the war. He then went to Iowa and settled in Sac county, 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 149 

where he purchased and improved a farm, concentrating his energies upon its 
cultivation and development until 1904. During that time he saw a great change 
in conditions as when he arrived in that county it was still on the frontier and 
his farm was thirty-tive miles from a railroad. He had a part in the agricultural 
development and advancement of his locality and, moreover, could be depended 
upon to further the civic interests of his commimity. In igcH he retired from 
active life and took up his home in College \'iew, where he purchased a good 
residence. 

Air. Wiseman was married in September, 1866, to Miss Olivia Goodman, a 
daughter of Stephen and I'hoebe (Shuett) Goodman, the former of whom was 
born in X'ermont and the latter in Ohio. In 1840 her father went to Wisconsin 
and there he farmed for many years. Air. and Airs. \\'iseman became the jjarents 
of two children: Charles R., an educator, who is residing in College \ iew ; and 
Maude J., who died in June, 1868. The wife and mother passed away in Alarch, 
1905. and her demise was sincerely regretted ijy her many friends. 

Air. Wiseman is a republican in politics and has served as trustee of College 
Mew and as a member of the school board. In religious faith he is a Alethodist 
and through his connection with the Grand Army of the Republic he continues 
his association with his former comrades in arms. His life has been one of well 
directed activity and of fidelity to duty and he is justly held in high esteem by all 
who know him. 



MARTIN LUTHER EASTERDAY. 

July 26, 1876, Alartin Luther Easterday arrived in Lincoln. He was then 
twenty-seven years of age. He was born on a farm in Harrison county, Ohio, 
February 9, 1849. His father, Daniel Easterday, was born in Jefferson county, 
Ohio, Octobei 19, 1813, and was a son of Christian and Alaria (Stemple) 
Easterday. On the 19th of January. 1837. Daniel Easterday wedded Jane 
Robertson, who was born in Jefierson county, Ohio, August 8, 1816. They 
became the parents of nine children, six sons and three daughters, of whom 
Alartin L. was the sixth in order of birth. All reached adult age and seven are 
now living. In order of birth, the members of the family are: Rev. Thomas 
Robertson Easterday, now of Sault Ste. Alarie. Alichigan, a Presbyterian minister; 
Levi F. M.. who died in Lincoln a few years ago; Annie, who became the wife of 
Benajah Alundy, both now deceased; Amos W., who is deputy city treasurer of 
Lincoln; Hannah AL, the wife of \\'illiam A. Pike, of Pacific Beach, California; 
Martin L. ; Oscar AL. a merchant of Palo Alto, California; David F.. a music 
teacher of Lincoln; and Laura J., living in San Diego, California. In October, 
185 1, the parents moved from Ohio to Alontgomery county, Illinois, and in 1871 
became residents of Carthage, that state. In 1883 they arrived in Lincoln where 
they spent their remaining days happily surrounded by many of their children 
and grandchildren. On the 19th of January, 18S7, they celebrated their golden 
wedding, on which occasion all nine of their children were present. At the time 
of Airs. Easterday's death, December 31, 1895, they had been married nearly 
fiftv-nine vears. Daniel Easterday died June 17. 1901. 



150 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Martin L. Easterday spent his boyhood on a farm in Montgomery county, 
Illinois. He entered the law department of the University of Michigan at Ann 
Arbor and was graduated from there in 1876. Having thus prepared for a 
professional career, he came to Lincoln in July of that same year and has since 
engaged in law practice in this city, being now one of the oldest members of 
the Lincoln bar. The court records bear testimony to many favorable verdicts 
which he has won for his clients. 

On the 22nd of iMay, 1884. Mr. Easterday was married to Miss Nettie Hall, 
of Watertown. \\'isconsin, who was born there November 17, 1858. They became 
the parents of three daughters and one son: Helen .\., who is the assistant 
cashier of the American Savings Bank of this city: Ruth J., who is a graduate of 
the University of Nebraska and is now a teacher in the Lincoln public schools; 
and Donald A. and Irene J., both of whom died in infancy. 

Mr. Easterday is a democrat in his political views but has never been an 
office seeker. He belongs to the Lincoln Bar Association and is an elder in the 
Presbyterian church. His activities outside of his profession have been varied 
and of a helpful character, touching the general interests of society. .\ resident 
of Lincoln for forty years, he is widely known here and the many e.xcellent 
traits of his character have brought to him the warm and enduring regard of 
those with whom he has been brought in contact. 



BERT E. \\ILLL\MS. 



Bert E. Williams, an attorney of Lincoln, was born in Johnstown. Brown 
county, Nebraska, October 18, 1S86, a son of John R. and Mary A. (Stevenson) 
Williams, who were natives of Ohio. In 1878 the father removed from that 
state to Nebraska and for a time engaged in business in Lincoln, but later 
removed to Johnstown, where he conducted business for a few years. He then 
purchased land in Brown county, becoming the owner of twelve hundred acres, 
to the development and improvement of which he devoted his energies until 1902, 
when his wife died and he sold out. He then went to St. Petersburg, Florida, 
where he began the cultivation of oranges, grape fruit and pineapples, giving his 
further attention to his interests in that state until his death, which occurred in 
May, 1915, when he was sixty-seven years of age. 

Bert E. Williams was reared and educated in Brown county and in the 
fall of 1902 went to Florida with his father, remaining there for about three 
years, during which period he completed his high school education. In 1906 
he returned to this state and entered the Grand Island Normal and Business 
College at Grand Island, Nebraska, from which he was graduated with the 
class of 1907. Soon afterward he accepted a position as stenographer and 
assistant in the office of the county attorney at Imperial, Nebraska, serving in 
that capacity until the fall of 1909, when he came to Lincoln and entered the 
State L^niversity as a law student, completing his course by graduation with the 
class of Tune, 1912. Since that time he has been practicing in Lincoln, willi 
offices in the Funke building, and has won at the l)ar a jiosition that many an 
older practitioner might well envy. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 151 

On the 22d of June, 191 1, Mr. Williams was married to Miss Blanche 11. 
Calhoun, a daughter of Thomas and Sarah R. ( Aloler ) Calhoun. They have 
liecome parents of one son, Edward Calhoun, born March 4, 1913. Mr. Williams 
has always voted with the republican party since age conferred upon him the 
right of franchise and is a stanch advocate of its principles. He is prominent 
in Masonic circles, having attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rile, 
while of the Mystic Shrine he is also a member, and he and his wife are 
connected with the Eastern Star. He is likewise identified with the Independent 
Order of C)dd Fellows and attends Trinity Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
his wife is a member. He places correct values upon the opjiortunities of life and 
its obligations and is (juick to utilize and improve the former and with equal 
fidelity meets the latter. , ■ 



WADE H. JORD.AN. 



For twenty-three years Wade II. Jordan was a resident of Lincoln and 
throughout the entire period commanded the respect and enjoyed the warm 
regard of all with whom he came in contact. He was a western man by birth, 
training and preference and the enterprising spirit which dominated this section 
of the country in its upbuilding was manifest in his career. He was born in 
Dubuque, Iowa, April 14, 1844, a son of Bunyan and Elizabeth (Gilbert) Jordan. 
At an early period in the develo])ment of Dubuque the father removed to that 
city, where his father owned and operated the first ferry across the Mississippi 
river, and Bunyan Jordan afterward purchased land near Dubuque and for a 
time engaged in farming but after the Civil war removed to Cass county, Iowa, 
where his remaining days were passed, his death occurring when he was seventy- 
five years of age. His wife passed away in 1S8C, at the age of sixty-five years. 

Wade H. Jordan was reared and educated in Dubuque county, spending his 
youthful days in the usual manner of farm lads. The spirit of patriotism was 
strong within him when Fort Sumter was fired upon and during the opening 
year of the Civil war he watched with interest the progress of events. In August, 
1862, when a youth of but eighteen, he oft'cred his services to the government, 
enlisting as a member of Company H, Twenty-first Iowa Infantry, with which 
he served until July 15, 1865, when he was mustered out. He then accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Cass county, Iowa, where he learned the 
carpenter's trade, which he followed in Atlantic, devoting the greater part of 
his life to work of that character. However, for two or three years he engaged 
in farming in Cass county. In 1892 he removed to Lincoln and carried on 
carpentering in this city until his life's labors were ended in death .April 28, 
1 91 5, after a week's illness, when he had reached the age of seventy-one. 

it was on the loth of March, 1869, that Mr. Jordan was united in marriage to 
Miss Josepha A. Wilcox, a daughter of Wliitman and Elizabeth (Johnson) 
Wilcox, who were natives of New York. The father was a farmer and upon 
removing westward cast in his lot with the pioneer settlers of Lee county. Iowa, 
where he purchased land and engaged in farming for a time. He next removed 
to Audubon county, Iowa, where he carried on general farming for a number of 



152 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

years and later became a farmer of Kansas. Finally he retired from active 
business life and for several years traveled largely for the benefit of his health, 
passing away in Cleveland, Ohio, about 1910. He had long survived his wife, 
who died in 1853. Their daughter, Mrs. Jordan, was born in Chautauqua county. 
New York, December 28, 1849, ''"d by her marriage has become the mother of 
two children: Ida Grace, born December 15, 1870; and Dorothy G., who was 
born January 7, 1873, and is the wife of F. M. Adier, a resident of Chicago. 

For many years Mr. Jordan maintained pleasant relations with his old army 
comrades through his memljership in the Grand Army of the Republic and 
proudly wore the little bronze button that proclaimed him a veteran of the Civil 
war. His political indorsement was given to the republican party and his life 
was guided in its varied relations by hi.s affiliation with the Methodist church. 
He never sought to figure prominently in any pulilic connection but his character- 
istics were of that sterling (juality that gained for him the enduring friendship 
and good will of all who knew him. 



BERNHARD HENRY SCHABERG. 

Bernhard Henry Schaberg, president and manager of the First National Bank 
at LIniversity Place, manifests in his business career certain admirable traits — 
enterprise, fidelity to duty and the tendency at all times to employ constructive 
methods. His plans are always well defined and his course has ever been one 
which would bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. He was bom in St. 
Charles county, Missouri, March 25, 1865, and in 1874, when nine years of age, 
was brought to Nebraska by his mother and stepfather, the family home being 
established u])on a farm in Cuming county. 

There Bernhard H. Schaberg was reared, with the usual experiences that fall 
to the lot of the farm lad. He obtained a public school education, pursuing his 
studies through the winter seasons, while in the summer months he worked in the 
fields. When seventeen years of age, through the influence of a friend, he 
secured the position of bookkeeper in the Elkhorn \'alley liank at West Point, 
Nebraska, spending two years in that position, at the end of which time the 
bank failed and he then entered the West Point National I'ank, with which he 
was connected for four years. In 1888, when a ])rivate bank was established 
at Pilger, he was elected as cashier and manager — a position of large responsi- 
bility for one of his years, as he was then a young man of but twenty-three. 
This institution was afterward reorganized as the Pilger State Bank and in 
1901 became the First National Bank of Pilger with a cai)ital stock of twenty-five 
thotisand dollars. From the beginning his business grew and developed and 
Mr. Schaberg remained as cashier and manager until 1904, when he was 
elected president, which position he has filled continuously since. L'ndcr his 
guidance the business of the bank has grown continuously and the institution 
has become one of the strong financial concerns of that part of the state. In 
1906 the capital stock was increased to fifty thousand ddllars and Mr. Schaberg 
continued to concentrate his energies upon the management of that bank until 
September, 1912, when he came to University Place and purchased an interest 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 153 

in the First National Bank, of which he was elected president and manager, so 
continuing since that time. He is also vice president of the State liank at 
Litchfield, Nebraska^ which was organized in 191 5 and is capitalized for fifteen 
thousand dollars. In addition to his baid-cing interests he owns a nice residence 
at University Place, has farm lands in Knox and Staunton counties, Xebraska, 
and has a half interest in a lumber yard at Englevvood, Colorado, his [lartner in 
that undertaking being his Ijrother-in-law. 

On the 27th of June, 1894, Mr. Schaberg was married to Miss Jessie May 
Abbott, a native of Iowa, who when twelve years of age was taken by her 
parents to Staunton county, Nebraska, where she was educated. By her mar- 
riage she has become the mother of a son, E. Ralph, who was born February 9, 
1897, and is now a junior in the Wesleyan University. 

In politics Mr. Schaberg has always been an earnest republican but not an 
office seeker. Fraternally he is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, 
the Highlanders and the Royal Neighbors. He and his wife and son are all 
members of the Alethodist Episcopal church. They were active in the work of 
the church at Pilger and soon after arriving in University Place, Mr. Schaberg 
was elected a trustee of the church here. While he concentrates much of his 
attention on business he never allows it to so monopolize his time that he has 
no opportunity for other interests and activities. He realizes that he has other 
duties and of these he is in no wise neglectful. His has ever been an honorable 
and U])right career and in marked degree he enjoys the confidence and good will 
of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



SAMUEL BENTON HAMS. 

Samuel Benton liams for thirty-one years a resident of Lincoln, is engaged in 
the practice of law and in a profession where advancement depends entirely upon 
individual merit and ability he has made substantial and gratifying progress. He 
was born upon a farm near New Rumley, Shelby county. Ohio. October 12. i8(K3. 
The village in whicii his birth occurreil has ceased to e.xist. for with the building 
of the railroad through that locality, a new town called •'.\nna" was established 
and the former village passed out of existence. In that locality Richard liams, 
father of Samuel Benton liams, followed the occupation of farming. He too 
is a native of Ohio, but is now residing in Philomath, Oregon. His wife bore 
the maiden name of Martha Ann Hardnock and was born at Hagerstown, Mary- 
land, b'ebruarv (<, 1844, 1)eing five years the junior of her husband, who.se liirth 
occurred August 2^. 1839. In their family were seven sons and three daughters 
and Samuel P.. i^ the second child and oldest son. Nine of the number are still 
living: Mrs. AHce Truell. of Lincoln; Samuel I'..; Mrs. J'.liza .\lbright, resid- 
ing at Salem, Oregon; William M., of Arlington, Nebraska; Mrs. Eliza M. Drum- 
mond, the wife of Dr. C. C. Drummond, a physician of Harda. India; Luther R. 
of Arnold, Nebraska; Arthur C, also of Arnold; and .\ustin H. and Oscar H., 
twins, living at Philomath, (Oregon. 

Samuel Benton liams was rearetl uiion farms in Cass and Lancaster counties 
of Nebraska, having lieen brought by bis parents fo this slate when a child of 



154 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

one and one-half years, at which time the father took up a homestead claim in 
Cass county. In 1876 the family removed to Missouri, but in 1877 returned to 
Cass county and in 1882 established their home on a farm north of Lincoln. 
There they remained until 1885 when the farm was sold and the family Imme 
was established in the capital city. .Samuel 15. liams pursued his law studies 
in the office of a Lincoln attorney and was admitted to the bar November 22, 
1888. He then entered at once upon active jjractice in this city and through 
the intervening years has made a specialty of real estate and probate work, 
together with the pension business. He belongs to the Lincoln Bar .Association. 
In his political views he is a democrat, but has never been an aspirant for public 
office. He holds membership with the Knights of Pythias and is a member of the 
Lincoln Commercial Club. 



OLIVER P. MOULTON. 

Oliver P. Moulton, who is livmg retired in College View, was born in Illinois 
in February, 1848, a son of Reuben L!. and .Susanna ( Ricketts ) Moulton. They 
were both born in Indiana but in an early day removed to Illinois, whence in 
1854 they went to Missouri and in 1855 to Iowa, where the father remained 
until his demise in 1910. He had survived his wife since igoi. 

Oliver P. Moulton grew to manhood and received his education in Illinois 
and Iowa and remained with his parents until he was nineteen years of age. 
He then secured a position in the postoffice at \'andalia, Iowa, where he re- 
mained for four years, but at the end of that time he went to Ringgold county, 
Iowa, and purchased land which he cultivated, together with, a rented tract, until 
1884. In that year he took u\t his residence in Loup county. Nebraska, and 
proved tip on a homestead, which he operated for five years. He next went to 
Valley county, Nebraska, and bought a farm there and also property in the town 
of Ord. For ten years he devoted his time to farming his place in that county 
but subsequently removed to Seward, Nebraska, buying a small tract within 
the town limits. He turned his attention to the raising of fruit and met with 
success in that undertaking as in all of his other enterprises. Since November, 
1912, however, he has resided in College View, where he owns a fine modern 
residence with spacious grounds and an acre tract as well, all within the town. 
In 1907 he bought an eighty-acre farm on section 6, Grant township, which he 
rents. He is living practically retired, enjoying a period of leisure made possible 
by his former labor. 

Mr. Moulton was united in marriage, on the 20th of October, 1874, to Miss 
Sarah A. Lamb, a daughter of Joseph and Ellen (Sylvester) Lamb, natives of 
Kentucky and Indiana. The father, who was for many years engaged in farm- 
ing in Iowa, is still living but the mother died in 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Moulton 
have had two children. \\'alter C. is agent for the Chicago, Burlington &: Ouincy 
Railroad at Anselmo, Nebra.ska. Vera E. is the widow of C. F. Cameron and 
has a son, Wendell, who is attending school in Lincoln. She resides with her 
father. Mrs. Moulton passed away on the 3d of June, 191 2, after a long illness 
and her demise was deeply regretted by all who had come in contact with her. 




OLIVER 1'. MOULTON 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 157 

Mr. Moulton exercises his right of franchise in support of the candidates 
and measures of the repubhcan party but has never been an aspirant for office. 
In rehgious faith he is a Presbyterian and his Ufe has conformed to high stand- 
ards of morahty. He has gained many warm friends in College View since 
removing here and his genuine worth is generally recognized. 



HON. C. PETRUS PETERSON. 

As lawyer and legislator, Hon. C. Petrus Peterson has won a distinguished 
position in public regard. He is now city attorney of Lincoln and his practice 
has long been of an important and distinctively representative character. 
Nebraska is proud to number him among her native sons. He was born on a farm 
in Polk county, March lo, 1880, the eldest son of William and Clara Matilda 
(Landstrom) Peterson, both of whom were natives of Sweden, born in the 
same parish, where the Peterson and Landstrom families were neighbors. The 
former was born September 18, 1849, ^I'lcl came to the United States in 1870. 
The mother was born January 28, 1847, and they were married in Henry, Illi- 
nois, in 1876. In the spring of 1878 they came to Nebraska and purchased 
railroad land in Polk county, the father developing a tract of wild prairie into 
rich and productive fields. The month of March, 1880, was very cold, and 
about the date of the birth of Petrus Peterson, a blizzard so lowered the tem- 
perature that the family had to live in the cellar of the house to keep warm, 
and there his birth occurred. The parents are now residents of Stromsburg, 
Nebraska. 

Petius Peterson was reared on his father's farm and when but four years 
of age began attending school, pursuing his studies to the age of fifteen, 
although after reaching the age of nine years he had the opportunity of attend- 
ing school for only about two months each year as through the remainder of 
the time his services were needed on the home farm. Between the ages of 
fifteen and twenty years he devoted all of his time to the farmwork, but ambitious 
to advance his education, he entered the Luther Academy at Wahoo, Nebraska, 
on attaining his majority, being graduated from that institution on completion 
of the two years' course. He then entered Augustana College at Rock Island, 
Illinois, where he completed four years' work in three years, and was graduated 
with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1906. During the summer seasons he 
engaged in teaching and thus earned most of the money necessary for his college 
expenses. In the fall of 1906 he became a law student in the University of 
Nebraska, where he spent three years, being graduated in 1909. He earned 
his way through the law school as well as through college, and at once began 
practicing in Wahoo, where he remained from June, 1909, until August. 191 1. 
At the latter date he became a resident of Lincoln and has since practiced at 
the bar of this city. He became associated with the late Charles O. W'hedon, 
a prominent lawyer, who was much his senior and who admitted him to a full 
partnership in ii;i2, under the firm style of Whedon & Peterson. This associa- 
tion was continued until Mr. Whedon's death in January. 1913. since which time 
Mr. Peterson has practiced alone. He took over not only the complete law 



158 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

library of Mr. Whedon, which is one of the Ijest in Liiicohi, but also the large 
law business of the firm. He has a suite of rooms on the third floor of the 
Bankers Life Building and his private oftice is one of the handsomest in 
Lincoln. He is a very thorough and earnest lawyer, most carefully preparing 
his cases, his reading covering a wide range. He prepares for defense as well 
as for attack and for the unexpected as well as for the expected ; for the former 
happens in the courts quite as frequently as out of them. 

On the 29th of June, lyio, Mr. Peterson was married to Miss \'era M. Mel- 
quist of Omaha, who was born in that city, but was of Swedish descent, her 
parents having been natives of Sweden. She was graduated from the University 
of Nebraska in 1908 at the age of twenty years, winning the Bachelor of Arts 
degree. She afterward taught in the high school at Benson, Nebraska, until 
1910. She has become the mother of two daughters, Breta Barbara and \'era 
May. 

In politics Mr. Peterson is a republican and was appointed city attorney by 
Mayor Charles W. Bryan, in May, 19 15. He is also a member of the state 
legislature at the present time, having been elected to represent Lancaster county 
in the general assembly in the fall of 1914. He is there giving earnest con- 
sideration to the vital questions which come up for settlement and in the dis- 
charge of his legislative duties ever places the public welfare before personal 
aggrandizement. He belongs to the Lincoln and Nebraska State Bar Associa- 
tions and has been admitted to practice in the federal courts of the United 
States. Fraternally he is a Alason, having attained the eighteenth degree of 
the Scottish Rite, and his religious faith is evidenced by his membership in the 
First Congregational church. His has been a well spent life devoted to every 
public and private duty and his career has at all times measured up to the 
highest standards of manhood and citizenship. 



BURTON H. SHOEMAKER. 

During the years of his residence in Lincoln, where he passed away on the 
15th of May, 1915, Burton H. Shoemaker was largely engaged in carpentering 
and in the line of his chosen occu])ation became well known to his fellow towns- 
men. In his later years he lived retired and he had reached the age of eighty- 
one ere he was called to his final rest. His birth occurred in Pennsylvania, 
March 29, 1834, his parents being David and Anna M. (Taylor) Shoemaker, 
who were natives of the Keystone state. The father followed the occupation 
of farming and throughout his entire life cultivated a tract of land in Penn- 
sylvania. He was born April 16, 1801, and passed away February 8, 1881, 
at the age of seventy-nine years. His wife, whose birth occurred in October, 
1807, died September 3, 1895, ^t the age of eighty-seven years. 

Burton H. Shoemaker was reared and educated in Pennsylvania and from 
that state enlisted for service in the Civil war, although he had been living in 
Iowa for two years prior to the outbreak of hostilities between the north and the 
south. He had returned to Pennsylvania to helj) move his parents to Iowa 
and with the call for volunteers he enlisted, joining the One Hundred and 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 159 

Thirty-second Pennsylvania Infantry, with which he served for nine months. 
During battle he jumped a fence and in so doing sustained injuries from the 
effects of which he suffered throughout his remaining days. 

In 1864 Mr. Shoemaker came to Nebraska and secured a homestead claim in 
Lancaster county. Not a furrow had been turned nor an improvement made 
upon the place, and with characteristic energy he set to work to develop and 
cultivate the land, successfully continuing its operation until 1884, when he 
removed to Lincoln, where he resumed work at the carpenter's trade, which 
he had learned in early manhood. He was a very successful farmer, hiring most 
of the work done, but giving to the development of his farm his personal super- 
vision. His residence in Lincoln covered a period of thirty-one years, during 
which period he devoted considerable time to carpentering, and as he prospered 
he accumulated considerable capital, making judicious investments in real estate. 
His last illness covered but two weeks and on the 15th of May, 191 5. he passed 
away. 

In February, 1856, Mr. Shoemaker was united in marriage to Miss Martha 
|. Brownell, a daughter of Solomon and Susan (Brinkerhoff) Brownell, both 
of whom were natives of New York. The father was a blacksmith and learned, 
his trade in New York City. In the '50s he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, 
from Ohio and conducted a smithy here for a number of years. He afterward 
took up the study of medicine and became a very successful physician. His 
remaining days were spent in Lancaster county, where both he and his wife 
passed away. To Mr. and Mrs. Shoemaker were born five children, as follows: 
Charles A., who is a physician and conducts a hospital at No. 1117 L street in 
Lincoln; Allic, the wife of Jack Hatch, of Lincoln; Grant, living in Montana; 
Sarah, who is deceased; and Alta May. the wife of Albert Spain, who is an 
undertaker at Belleville, Kansas. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Shoemaker was an Odd Fellow and he also 
belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic, thus maintaining pleasant rela- 
tions "with his old comrades of the Civil war. In politics he was a ■ republican, 
strongly indorsing the principles of the party. His religious faith was that of 
the Baptist church and it guided him in all of his relations with his fellowmen. 
No one ever questioned the integrity of his motives or his reliability in Inisiness 
transactions. He regarded his good name and his self-respect as something to 
be most sacredly cherished, and he never deviated from a course which he 
believed to be right between himself and his fellows. 



PETER DONNELLY. 



Peter Donnelly, deceased, was a well known factor in the business circles of 
Havelock, where 'for a long period he engaged in merchandising. He was born 
in Ireland and on attaining his majority came to the United States, after which 
he turned his attention to railroading, and for twenty-eight years was an 
engineer on the Michigan Central, during which period he resided at Michigan 
Citv Indiana At length he met with an accident which forced him to give up 
this work In 1893 he came to Nebraska and settled at Havelock, where he 



160 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

built a store and established a dry goods business. Later he extended the scope 
of his activities by opening a grocery department, and he admitted his son-in- 
law, J. E. Langston, to a partnership in the business. They successfully con- 
ducted the trade, enjoying a liberal and well deserved patronage. Their business 
affairs were ever honorably conducted and their reasonable prices and fair deal- 
ings won for them success, so that Mr. Donnelly left an estate valued at fifty 
thousand dollars when, in September, 1915, he passed away at the age of 
seventy-four years. 

Mr. Donnelly had been married in Indiana to Miss Mary Ann 2^IcCrory, 
a native of that state, and to them was born a -daughter, Mary Angia, who is 
now the wife of J. E. Langston and who is associated with her mother in the 
conduct and ownership of the business left by Mr. Donnelly. In religious 
belief Mr. Donnelly was a Catholic, loyal to the church. He deserved much 
credit for what he accomplished, for he was empty handed when he crossed 
the Atlantic to the new world and it was through perseverence, diligence and 
determination that he worked his way upward and won success. 



JOHN J. LEDW ITH. 



John J. Ledwith, practicing at the bar of Lincoln as the junior partner of 
the firm of Morning & Ledwith, was born in this city on the 20th of March, 
1877, being one of a family of two sons and three daughters, whose father, the 
late James Ledwith, came to Lincoln in 1869 from Freeport, Illinois, here spend- 
ing his remaining days, his death occurring March 30, 1890. He was born 
in Jersey City, New Jersey, September 3, 1841, and following his removal to 
Lincoln engaged in business as a dealer in coal and wootl and as a grocery 
merchant, conducting his business affairs at the northwest corner of Eleventh 
and P streets, where the Savoy Hotel now stands. Mr. Ledwith erected that 
hotel and was yet its owner at the time of his demise. In early manhood he 
wedded Anastasia Maher, who was born in Wisconsin and died in Lincoln, 
Nebraska, May 14, 1884. They became the parents of five children, of whom 
four are living: John J.; Frank E., a resident farmer of Creenwood, Nebraska; 
Agatha, living in Omaha ; and Maude, a resident of Lincoln. 

John J. Ledwith completed his education in the University of Nebraska, 
where he won the Bachelor of Science degree in" 1900 and the LL. R. degree in 
1903. Since that time he has practiced his profession in Lincoln and has been 
continuously associated with W. M. Morning under the firm style of Morning 
& Ledwith, lieing admitted to a full ])artnership in 1908. This is one of the. 
well known and able law firms of the city, accorded an extensive and important 
practice. His father, James Ledwith, had left an estate valued at seventy-five 
thousand dollars, but a financial panic which ensued during the following decade 
brought great losses to the family with the result that John J. Ledwith had to 
earn the money which enabled him to make his way through the State Uni- 
versity. He thus early displayed the elemental strength of his character and the 
same spirit of courage and determination has characterized his later career. In 
addition to his law practice he has since his graduation been an instructor in the 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 161 

law department of the State University, now devoting an hour per day on 
three days of each week to his class in that institution. He is also a member of 
the Nebraska Bar Commission. 

In politics Mr. Ledwith is a democrat and since reaching the age of seven- 
teen years has been an active worker in democratic circles, being much in 
demand as a campaign speaker in Lancaster county for twenty years or more. 
He served for some time as secretary of the democratic county central com- 
mittee and has done much to further the interests in which he so ardently 
believes. He is also active in business lines as a director of the Acme .Amuse- 
ment Company of Lincoln, which controls the Orpheum, Lyric and Wonder- 
land Theaters. 

On the 30th of June, 1909, Mr. Ledwith was married to Miss Alvina IIoppc, 
who was born in Lincoln, August 16, 1885, a daughter of August Hoppe, for- 
merly of this city. Her mother is still living and yet makes her home in Lincoln. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ledwith have two children: Lucile born April iS, 1910; and 
Charles Edward, born August 7, 1914. 

The family are communicants of the Roman Catholic church and Mr. Led- 
with is identified with the Knights of Columbus and also with Lincoln Lodge 
No. 80, B. P. O. E., of which he is the present exalted ruler. He also has 
membership with the Lincoln and Nebraska State Bar Associations and enjoys 
the confidence and goodwill of his colleagues and contemporaries in the pro- 
fession. 



EDWIN S. DOWNES. 



Death claimed Edwin S. Downes on the 24th of September, 1904, at which 
time he had been a resident of Lincoln for a number of years. He was born 
in New Jersey, September 16, i860, a son of Edwin and Margaret fTimmons) 
Downes, who were also natives of the same state. In early life the father took 
up the business of bookkeeping, which he ever afterward followed. .At an early 
dav in the development of Lancaster county be removed to Nebraska and ])ur- 
chased land south of Lincoln, but this was during the period of the grasshopper 
scourge and he was unable to realize any profit from his famiing interests. 
He therefore returned to New Jersey, where he contitiued to make his home 
until his demise, his wife also passing away in that locality. 

Edwin S. Downes was reared and educated in New Jersey and in Iowa. 
He removed west with his parents and after their return to the east he came 
to Lincoln, where he was employed by a cousin who was engaged in the coal 
trade. He afterward removed to Hickman, Lancaster county, where he worked 
in a store for three years and on the expiration of that period he went to Cort- 
land, Nebraska, where he embarked in the grocery business on his own account 
with a partner. On selling out his stock of groceries he established an imple- 
ment store at Princeton and later was engaged in the same line of busmess at 
Sprague for about four years. He afterward went upon the road for 
the Dempster Mill Manufacturing Company of Beatrice, which he repre- 
sented as a traveling salesman in Nebraska for fi\e years, and when they opened 



162 LTXXOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

a branch house in Des Moines he went to that city and remained with the firm 
until his hcahh failed. He afterward came to Lincoln and his remaining days 
were spent here, his, death occurring on the 24th of September, 1904. 

It was on the 29th of November, 1888, that Mr. Downes was married to 
Miss Julia Riley, a daughter of Patrick and Bridget (O'Donnell) Riley, who 
were natives of Ireland and in early life came to America, settling near Alton, 
Illinois, where Mr. Riley purchased land and carried on farming for about a 
quarter of a century. He arrived in Lancaster county in 1879 ^"d invested in 
land sixteen miles south of Lincoln, devoting his remaining days to its further 
cultivation. He died May 19, 1888, and his widow, still surviving, now makes 
her home with Mrs. Downes. To Mr. and Mrs. Downes were born two children : 
Mary lone, who was born September 9, 1889; and Margaret Olive, born Janu- 
ary 31, 1897. Both have taken up the study of stenography and occupy positions 
of that character, the younger daughter being now connected with the firm 
of 11. P. Law & Company. 

Politically Mr. Downes was a republican and his religious belief was that 
of the Catholic church, while fraternally he was connected with the Knights 
of Pythias. He had many admirable characteristics, including marked socia- 
bility, antl his genial nature and affable disposition won him many friends. 



NATHANIEL P. T. SMITH. 

Nathaniel P. T. Smith, who engaged in farming for many years, gained 
financial independence and is now living retired in Bethany. His birth occurred 
in Ohio on the 15th of March, 1844, and he is a son of Madison and Mary 
J. (Whitney) Smith, the former a native of New Jersey and the latter of Ohio. 
The father followed the millwright's trade in New York and in Ohio, but in 
1849 removed with his family to Iowa and purchased land in Monroe county 
which he improved and operated until his death in 1858. Forty years later, in 
1898, his wife passed away. 

Nathaniel P. T. Smith was reared in (Jhio and Iowa and is indebted for 
his education to the district schools. He resided with his mother and worked 
as a farm hand until 1862, when, feeling that his paramount duty was to his 
country, he enlisted in August in Company D. Twenty-second Iowa \'olunteer 
Infantry, and served at the front for eleven months, at the end of which time 
he was honorably discharged on account of sickness. In 1864 he drove across 
country to Plattsmouth, Nebraska, where he resided for some time. At that 
time many mining camps were being opened in Colorado and many new settle-' 
ments started and there was a large trade between that section and ])oints 
farther east, and as there were no railroads, goods were transported by team. 
Mr. Smith engaged in freighting to some extent, making two trips to Denver, 
but in March, 1866, he went to Johnson county, Nebraska, and took uj) a home- 
stead. He resided on that place until 1913 and concentrated his energies upon 
its improvement and operation. He seldom failed to harvest good crops and as 
the years passed his resources grew steadily. In 1914 he retired from active 
life, rented the farm and removed to Bethany, where he purchased a good 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY • 163 

resilience. He also owns one hundred and twenty acres in Montana, and is in 
excellent circumstances. 

On the I2th of February, 1872, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss 
RLartha M. Edwards, a daughter of William and Mary H. (Keeney) Edwards, 
natives of Indiana. The father engaged in farming in that state until his 
demise, which occurred in 1874. Following the death of his first wife, in 1S54 
he remarried. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have become the parents of five children. 
Nora Belle was born March 13, 1S74, and died February 10, 1899, leaving four 
children. Mary E., who was born April 25. 1876, married Hiram Robertson, 
who is operating our subject's farm, and by whom she has eight children. 
Nellie, born October 14, 1880, married R. G. Thompson, a farmer cf Johnson 
county. Edwin E., who was born March 15, 1883, is a graduate of Cotner 
L'niversity, was formerly pastor of the Christian church in El Monte, Cali- 
fornia, and held several pastorates in Nebraska, but is now a professor in Cotner 
University. He is married and has one child, Amarilla C, who was liorn July 
7, 1886, and is a graduate of Cotner LTniversity, married Fred Foote, and they 
reside on a farm in Montana. 

Mr. Smith exercises his right of franchise in support of the candidates and 
measures of the republican party but has never otherwise been active in politics. 
He holds membership in the Christian church and is also identified with the 
Grand Army of the Republic. The success which he has gained is due entirely 
to his thorough knowledge of farming, his enterprise and his good business 
judgment and the j)eriod of leisure which he is now enjoying is well deserved. 
Since coming to Bethany he has gained a wide circle of friends and the respect 
of all who have come in contact with him. 



JOHN J. CLOOS. 



John J. CIoos is serving for the second term as mayor of Havelock and is 
also well known as an enterprising and progressive merchant of the town where 
for the past six years he has been engaged in the hardware trade, as senior 
partner of the firm of Cloos & Anderson, dealers in hardware and also conducting 
a plumbing and heating business. He was born in Southold, Long Island. New 
York, December I, 1861, a son of Gothart and Mary (Nuessle) Cloos, both of 
whom were natives of Germany, the former born in Hesse-Dannstadt and the 
latter in Wurtemberg. Thev were married, however, in the L'nited States and 
the father engaged in the tailoring business in Brooklyn. New York, where his 
last days were spent, his death there occurring when his son John was a youth 
of seventeen years. The mother and her three soiis afterward came to the 
west and resided near Maquoketa, Iowa, for three years. Subsequently she 
spent three years on a rented farm in Butler county, Iowa, and afterward came 
to Fremont. John J. Cloos was later employed in a hardware store for five 
years and spent one year in the Black Hills. For a decade he was employed 
as salesman by dififerent hardware firms of Omaha and St. Louis and sul)se- 
quently was engaged in the hardware trade in Fremont. Nebraska. Later he 
was for several vears a salesman with a wholesale hardware firm of Seattle, 



164 ♦ LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Washington, and afterward was employed for a few years in the Hoppe Hard- 
ware store of Lincohi, but six years ago embarked in business on his own 
account in ilavelock as a partner of E. E. Anderson of Lincohi. For thirty 
years he has been connected in one capacity or another with the hardware trade 
and is faniihar with it in every branch of the business. The firm now carries 
a large and well selected line of shelf and heavy hardware and their success is 
the merited reward of earnest effort, close application and honorable dealing. 

Mr. Cloos was united in marriage to Miss Amanda AL Herre, a native of 
l''rt'niont, Nebraska. Fraternally he is connected with the Odd Fellows of Have- 
lock and with the Masonic fraternity at Fremont. His political allegiance is 
given the deuiocratic party which finds in him a stalwart advocate and he is 
now serving for the second term as mayor of his city. He gave to Havelock a 
businesslike administration during his first term and received indorsement of his 
course in a reelection. He is now putting forth every possible efl:ort to advance 
the welfare of his city and his efforts have been of distinct value to his fellow 
townsmen. 



HENRY H. FREY. 



Henry H. Frey, conducting business in Lincoln as a florist under the firm 
name of Frey & Frey, and the oldest florist in the city, was born in Cumberland 
county, Pennsylvania, September 13, 1841, and he declares that there is nothing 
to the proverbial hoodoo supposed to surround the number 13. for he feels that 
fate has been kind to him in spite of the fact that he was born on the 13th of the 
month. His boyhood was spent in Pennsylvania, where he remained until after 
the Civil war. In 1868 he purchased two hundred and seventy-four acres of land 
in Winchester county, Virginia, where he resided for seven years and then re- 
turned to the Keystone state, where he continued until 1878. On the 8th of 
April of that year he arrived in Lincoln, making the journey by train across the 
country accompanied by his wife and six children. In the party were also two 
other families, there being twenty-five children among them. Mr. Frey immedi- 
ately purchased a home and his first work in the new city was that of assisting 
in building the iron fence around the postoffice. He next entered the employ of 
A. J. Sawyer at gardening and general work, remaining with him for three years. 
Later he spent ten months in Oregon and eighteen months in California, handling 
pig iron in a mill, but the hot iron injured his eyesight and he gave up the work. 
He then, in 1884, returned to Lincoln, purchased ten acres of land at what is now 
Twenty-second and G streets and began gardening. Gradually he converted 
his interests into a greenhouse business which has had a steady growth ever since. 
In connection with his eldest son, C. H. Frey, he carried on the business for 
several years, after which the partnership was dissolved and C. H. Frey estab- 
lished a greenhouse of his own. The father was then joined by his other sons 
and they have since conducted the greenhouse, their plant covering nine acres, 
with one hundred and twenty thousand square feet under glass. Their business 
has reached extensive proportions and they make shipments from the Pacific 
coast to points as far east as the Missouri river and from Canada to the Gulf. 






to C 
> 



r 




. ASTon. 

TfLBEN POUNQft >ON3 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 167 

Their trade has gradually developed and their enterprise is now one* of very 
profitable character. Mr. Frey has also made other investments which have 
brought him good returns and is the owner of two hundred and forty acres of 
land at College View, together with city property in Lincoln. 

In Pennsylvania Mr. Frey was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Jackson, a 
native of that state who passed away March 12, 1910. To them were born nine 
children, as follows : Clarence H., who is engaged in the florist business in 
Lincoln as a member of the firm of C. H. Frey & Company ; Minnie E., who died 
at the age of twenty years ; Joseph B. ; Milton, who died at the age of twenty- 
eight years; Clement E. ; Raymond J.; Bertie, who died at the age of eight 
years ; Ida L., who is the wife of J. W. Spires of Clarks, Nebraska ; and Irwin F. 
Of the above mentioned, Messrs. Joseph B., Clement E., Raymond J. and Irwin 
F. Frey are associated in business with their father. 

In his political views Mr. Frey has been an earnest republican since casting 
his first vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1864, but the honors and emojunieiits of 
office have had no attraction for him. He is interested, however, in everything 
pertaining to the welfare and progress of city and state and has been liberal in his 
donations to many civic projects. In four years he has paid twelve thousand 
dollars for paving alone. He has ever been recognized as a man of earnest pur- 
pose, determined and energetic and has carried forward to successful completion 
whatever he has undertaken. He has made a close study of his w'ork and the 
intelligent direction of his efforts has added to his income year by year until he 
is now at the head of a profitable concern and is accounted one of the substantial 
citizens of Lincoln. 



HON. WILLIAM TOWNSEND THOMPSON. 

The Hon. William Townsend Thompson is a distinguished member of the 
Lincoln bar, who at one time was attorney general of the state, and who has 
also been a member of the Nebraska legislature. In various ways he has left 
the impress of his ability and individuality upon the history of the common- 
wealth, and his course has ever been counted as an asset for progress and 
improvement in connection with his profession and with public affairs. He has 
lived in Lincoln since 1904 and dates his arrival in Nebraska from 1S85. 

Mr. Thompson was born on a farm near Fennimore, Grant county, Wis- 
consin. May 23, i860, his parents being James and Charlotte (Hall) Thomp- 
son. The father, who was a farmer by occupation, was born in London, Eng- 
land, and in 1855 came to the United States. Making his way westward to 
Grant county, Wisconsin, he purchased a farm from the government at a dollar 
and a quarter per acre and upon that tract of wild land built a house. Soon 
afterward he persuaded his brother George, then in England, to come to the 
new world with his family and join him at his new home in Wisconsin. The 
brother acceded to the request, so that soon afterward George Thompson and 
his family were installed in the home of James Thompson. The former, how- 
ever, became ill of pneumonia and passed away. Some time afterward James 
Thompson married the widow of his brother, and of this marriage the Hon. 



168 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

William T. Thompson was the only child. By her first husband Mrs. Thomp- 
son had five children, two of whom are living: Mary A., now the wife of Hiram 
A. Bailey, of Boulder, Colorado ; and George, a resident of Ogden, Iowa. 

William T. Thompson was but five years of age at the time of his father's 
death and was left an orphan by the death of his mother when a little lad of 
eleven years. He then went to live in the home of a Scotchman of the name 
of William Mabin, and in 1873, when thirteen years of age, he made his way 
to the home of his married sister, Mrs. ]\Iary A. Bailey, in Pottawattamie 
county, Iowa, remaining upon her farm there until 1879. Throughout his life 
up to that time he attended the country schools whenever the opportunity 
oflfered, and at nineteen years of age he became a student in Simpson College, 
a Methodist school at Indianola, Iowa, where he spent the succeeding four 
years in study, pursuing the classical course. Ere completing his education, 
however, he taught school at intervals in order to secure the funds necessary 
to continue in college, and while teaching he devoted the hours which are 
usually termed leisure to the study of law. He was admitted to the bar at 
Des Moines, Iowa, in 1884, and for a year practiced at Indianola, that state, 
but in 1885 came to Nebraska and for nineteen years was engaged in law 
practice at Central City. While there he served for two terms as a member of 
the state legislature from Merrick county, being a representative in the house 
from 1899 until 1903. He gave careful consideration to all vital questions 
which came up for settlement, and his course in the legislature marked him as a 
public-spirited citizen who subordinated personal interests to the general good. 
Prior to that time he had served as prosecuting attorney of Merrick county for 
one term. 

In 1904 Mr. Thompson removed to Lincoln and has since been numbered 
among the prominent members of the bar of this city. From 1901 until 1905 he 
was deputy attorney general of Nebraska under Norris Brown, and in 1906 was 
elected to the ofiice of attorney general, entering upon the duties of that 
position in January, 1907. The following year he was reelected and served 
from January, 1907, until October i, 1910, when he resigned to accept the office 
of solicitor for the United States treasury department at Washington, D. C, 
having been appointed to that position by President Taft. Lie thus served 
until January i, 1914, when he resigned. The act of his official career of which 
he is the proudest had to do with his attitude toward the railroads and express 
companies when he was holding the ofiice of attorney general of the state. It 
had long been the custom of the railroads and express companies whenever 
their passenger, freight and express rates had been lowered by legislative enact- 
ment to rush into the federal court and secure an injunction against the enforce- 
ment of the laws. They would thus get the matter into the courts and keep it 
tied up indefinitely, thereby defeating the purpose of legislation. The 
Nebraska state legislature during the session of 1907, while Mr. Thompson 
was attorney general, passed an act reducing the passenger, freight and 
express rates, the last being cut twenty-five per cent. Anticipating that the 
railroads and express companies would hasten to enjoin, in the federal court, 
the enforcement of the new law, as they had frequently done before, Attorney 
General Thompson took time by the forelock and adopted their own tactics by 
going into the state supreme court ahead of them and securing an injunction 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 169 

against the companies, enjoining them from charging any other rates than the 
statutory rates. Jle thus beat them at their own game and with their own 
weapons to the end that the reduced rates became effective accorthng to the 
statute enacted. Since resigning the oflice of soHcitor of the treasury depart- 
ment Mr. Thompson has devoted his attention solely to the practice of law and 
occupies a high place as a member of the Lincoln bar. 

On the 20th of April, 1885, Mr. Thompson was married to Miss Florence 
B. Busselle, of Indianola, Iowa, who was born in Lucas county, that state, and 
is of French and German descent. They have three children : Vivian, now the 
wife of Donald D. Price; Charlotte, the wife of Wilbur M. Jeffreys, of Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; and Norma, at home. 

Mr. Thompson is an ardent temperance man and is doing all he can to 
further the movement to make Nebraska a dry state, being now chairman of 
the executive committee of the Nebraska Dry Federation of Lincoln, which 
organization, it is believed, will carry its dry campaign to victory in the fall of 
1916. As a member of the state legislature, as attorney general of Nebraska, 
and as solicitor of the United States treasury department, he has ever rendered 
a good account of his stewardship, and over the record of his public career there 
falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. He has long been active in the. 
public service and has ever been faultless in honor, fearless in conduct and 
stainless in reputation. 



ALBERT A. CONE. 



Albert A. Cone was for ten years connected with the Security ^lutual Insur- 
ance Company of Lincoln and was recognized as one of the leaders in that line 
of business. His birth occurred in Geneva, Ohio, on the 29th of Deceml)er, 
1865. and he v>-as a son of Oscar and Sally (Citcriy) Cone, the former a native 
of Ohio and the latter of New York. The father was a minister of the United 
Brethren church and held charges in ( )hio and Nebraska, having come to this 
state in 1870. He pas.sed away at Unadilla on the u'li of June, 1885. but is 
survived by his wife. 

Albert A. Cone received his early education in the I'.uckeye stale, as he was 
fourteen vears of age at the time of the removal of the family to Nebraska, but 
supplemented the learning acquired in C)hio by attending the Western College, 
at Toledo. Iowa, which is now known as the Leander Clark College, .\fter leav- 
ing that institution he cultivated land belonging to his father in Otoe county, 
Nebraska, until iSqi but in that year took up his residence in ^■ork, Nebraska, 
and engaged in the grocery business there. Five years later he came to Lincoln 
and for a considerable period of time conducted a grocery and meat market here, 
bu in 1902 went to Auburn, Nebraska, where he managed a grocery store for two 
years. On returning to Lincoln he became connected with the Security Mutual 
Insurance Companv with which he remained for ten years, or until his death 
which occurred on the jth of June, 1914. He possessed sound business judg- 
ment and enterprise and the interests under his charge were most ably managed. 

On the I9lh of November. 1883, Mr. Cone was married to Miss .Anna L. 



170 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Hottel, a daughter of George \V. and Mary C. (Swisher) Hottel, both of whom 
were born in Shenandoah county, Virginia. The father followed agricultural 
pursuits in Virginia, Ohio, Nebraska and Kansas. He came to Nebraska in 1881 
and farmed in Otoe county until 1897, since which time he has lived retired and 
has made his home with Mrs. Cone. He is now nearly eighty-three years of age, 
as he was born October 2, 1833, but is still active. His wife died on the 19th 
of August, 1901. To Mr. and Mrs. Cone were born three children: Oscar R., 
a druggist at I^iberty, Nebraska ; Owen W., who is employed in the Wilson Drug 
Company, at Lincoln ; and Edith M., who is teaching in York College, at York. 
All the children are graduates of the State University of Nebraska. 

Mr. Cone supported the republican party by his ballot but was not otherwise 
active in politics. He was connected w^ith the Modern Woodmen of America 
and was a leading member of the United Brethren church. He gained a gratify- 
ing measure of material prosperity and also won the uncjualified respect of all 
who knew him. His wife owns an attractive residence in Lincoln and is well 
known here. , 



C. W. HOLMES. 



C. W. Holmes, engaged in the real estate and insurance business in Havelock, 
was born in Rock Bluff, Cass county, Nebraska, February 24, 1865, a son of 
Charles M. and Marietta C. (Kauble) Holmes, the former a native of New 
York and the latter of Indiana. The father was a farmer by occupation and in 
the early '50s removed westward to Nebraska, settling in Cass county. His 
remaining days were spent in this state and he passed away in 1889, <^^ the age 
of fifty-five years, after several years' residence in Plattsmouth, Nebraska, where 
he was engaged in dealing in stock, buying, selling and shipping. His wife died 
at the home of their son, C. W. Holmes, in Havelock, at the age of sixty-nine 
years. 

The youthful experiences of C. W. Holmes were those of the farm bred boy. 
He spent his youthful days on the oUl home farm in Cass county, where he 
remained to the age of nine years and then went to Plattsmouth. In 1892 he 
became identified with the business interests of that place as a liveryman and 
later he was engaged in business in Oklahoma City for one year. On the 
expiration of that period he came to H^avelock and for sixteen years was employed 
by the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy Railroad Company in its boiler shops. He 
was then clioscn deputy register of deeds under W. M. Clinton, which position he 
occupied for four and one-half years, and uiion the death of Mr, Clinton he was 
appointed to lill out the unexpired term of si.\ months. On retiring from that 
position he engaged in the insurance and real estate business in Havelock and has 
since concentrated his efforts along tb.at line, being now accorded a liberal 
clientage. 

In early manhood Mr. Holmes was united in marriage to ^liss Lelia Kirk, a 
native of Indiana and a daughter of Samuel W. and Carrie L. (Mathena) Kirk, 
the former born in Indiana and the latter in Kentucky. The family has been 
represented in Lincoln since 1883. and Samuel W. Kirk still resides in that city 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 171 

but his wife passed away in August, 1915. Mrs. Jrlolmcs is a member of the 
Christian Science church. Mr. Hohnes belongs to the Knights of I'ylhias, to the 
Moderi] \\'oo(hiicn of America and to the Tribe of Ben Ilur and in jjohtics is a 
stalwart republican, giving unswerving support to the princijiles of the party. 



MILTON HARKNESS EVERETT, M. D. 

Dr. Milton Harkness Everett, founder of the Lincoln Sanitarium, and one 
of the foremost surgeons of the state, was born in Plattsburg, New York, on 
the 2nd of July, 1847. the son of Oliver and Fanny (Percy) Everett, who were 
also natives of New York. The father followed the occupation of farming there 
until 1850. when he went with the throng of California .\rgonauts to the gold 
fields of the Pacific coast, making his way by the Isthmus route. His death 
there occurred in 185 1 and he was laid to rest in a miners' graveyard near 
Auburn, California. Following the death of her husband Mrs. Everett, in 
1855, went to La Salle county, Illinois, where she afterward became the wife 
of Wallace W. Wallworth, by whom she had two children, one of whom is now 
living, Eva, the wife of A. G. Blake of Terre Haute, Indiana. The mother 
passed away in 1914 at the remarkable age of ninety-one years. 

Dr. Everett, the only living child of his mother's first marriage, was eight 
years of age when the family home was established in La Salle county, Illinois, 
where he pursued his education in the common schools, afterward attending 
Mendota College, which has now passed out of existence. With good literary 
training to serve as the foundation upon which to build professional advance- 
ment, he entered upon the study of medicine at Rush Medical College of Chi- 
cago, and there won his M. D. degree upon graduation with the class of 1870. 
In 1883 he became a student in the New York College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, but four weeks prior to the time when he would have completed his 
course, he was called home on business and did not take the e.xaminations. 
Later he entered the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
from which he received his M. D. degree in 1885. He has repeatedly done post 
graduate work in the dift'erent post graduate schools and polyclinics of New 
York city, and has put forth every possible effort to broaden his knowledge and 
promote his efficiency. He began the practice of his jirofession in La Salle 
countv, Illinois, in 1870, and there during the succeeding seventeen years he gave 
his attention largely to internal medicine. 

In 1887 Dr. Everett came to Lincoln. Nebraska, and five years later began 
the building of the Lincoln Sanitarium, which was designed as a hydro-thera- 
peutics institution, but in the course of years has developed into a hospital for 
surgical work. The original Iniilding contained thirteen rooms, but with the 
growth of patronage, the building has been enlarged on three difterent occa- 
sions and now has a capacity of ninety-five beds and still is not able to accom- 
modate the constantly growing practice, so that in the summer of 1916 another 
story, including forty rooms, will be added to the structure. This institution 
was opened in 1893, at which time Dr. Jerome Everett, a brother of Dr. M. H. 
Everett, became a partner in the Inisiness. The former died in 1909, and in 



172 LlxXCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

recent years Dr. M. H. Everett has practically retired, the sanitarium being 
now conducted by his son, Harry H., and by Dr. Oliver W. Everett, a son of 
Dr. Jerome Everett, Dr. Harry H. Everett acting as the surgeon and Dr. Oliver 
W. Everett as the business manager. 

In 1874 Dr. M. H. Everett was married to Miss -Adelia Harding of Pittston, 
Pennsylvania, and to them were born two children, but Dr. Harry H. Everett is 
the only survivor. The wife and mother passed away in 1908, and Dr. Everett 
afterward wedded Miss Mary S. Shears of Omaha, Nebraska. 

Dr. Everett is a demitted member of the Odd Fellows and he affiliates 
with Lincoln Lodge, No. ly, A. F. iS: .\. M., the Royal Arch chapter, 
the consistory and the Mystic Shrine. In strictly professional relations he is 
connected with the Lancaster County, the Nebraska State and the American 
Medical Associations, and he is also medical director of the Midwest Life 
Insurance Company of Lincoln. He has attained to high professional rank, 
displaying marked skill in his chosen field of labor, as the result of broad study, 
thorough investigation and wide experience. Dr. Everett's studies have always 
been along scientific lines, especially geology, geochemistry, botany and biology. 
Since his retirement from the active practice of his profession he devotes most 
of his time to those studies. His opinions upon medical and surgical practice 
are largely accepted as authority among his professional brethren in Lincoln, 
and, while he is not now engaged in practice to any great extent, his colleagues 
and contemporaries entertain the highest respect for his opinions and attest the 
superior worth of his ideas when they meet him in discussion of professional 
problems. 



FRANK C. GREEN. 



Frank C. Green was for three decades a passenger conductor on tiie Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy railroad and for many years lived at Lincoln. He made 
many warm friends and his demise, which occurred November 4, 1912, was deeply 
regretted. He was born in Plyiuouth, New Hampshire, on the 4th of April, 1844, 
and was a son of Henry C. and Judith (Crosby) Green, natives respectively of 
Cavendish, \'ermont. and Hebron, New Hamjishire. The father conducted a 
blacksmith shop in the latter state for a numlier of years but subsequently went 
to Philadelphia and there engaged in the steam fitting l)usincss. Loth he and 
his wife passed away in the Quaker City. 

Frank C. Green received a good common school education at TM\niriuth, New 
Hampshire, and remained at home until he enlisted for service in the Civil 
war, becoming a memlier of Company .\, Fifteenth New Hampshire \'olunteer 
Lifantrv, when he was not i[uite eighteen years of age. After remaining at the 
front for nine months he returned home and later accompanied his parents to 
Philadelphia where he engaged in steam fitting with his father. He did not 
fuid that occu])ation congenial, however, and entered the employ of the Boston, 
Concord i\: Alontreal, now the Boston & .\Laine railroad, holding the position of 
conductor for about five years. In 1881 he came to Lincoln and became a 
brakeman on the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincv railroad and three months later 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 173 

was promoted to passenger conductor. He served in tlic latter capacity the 
remainder of his. Hfe, or for over thirty years, and his record was highly creditable 
alike to his efficiency and his conscientiousness. During his long connection with 
the Burlington he resided in a number of places, but in iSgi returned to Lincoln 
and remained here until his death on the 4th of November, 1912. lie erected a 
hue home on Harwood avenue, but his widow has sold that place and is now 
boarding with friends in U street. 

On the i6th of December, 1866, Mr. Green and Miss Sarah li. Smith w'cre 
united in marriage. Her parents, Eben K. and Elizabeth (.-Xdams) Smith were 
lioth born in Campton, New Hampshire, and the father engaged in farming in 
that state for many years. After he retired from active life, however, he made 
his home with Mr. and Mrs. Green, passing away in Kansas. The mother died 
in 1Q07. Mr. and Mrs. Green adopted a son, Frank H., who is now a brakeman 
on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad and who married Estella Lawton 
and has two children. Frank Robert and Vivian \'irginia. 

Mr. Cireen was a democrat in politics and in religious faith was a Metb.odist. 
iM-aternally he was a Knight Templar Mason and a Noble of the Mystic 
Shrine and a member of the Order of the Eastern Star and he was likewise 
connected with the (3rder of Railway Conductors. In all relations of life he 
measured up to high standards of manhood and those who were most intimately 
associated with him were his warmest friends. 



WILLIAM THOMAS STEVENS. 

William Thomas Stevens, attorney at law and justice of the ]ieace at Lincoln, 
was born in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, February 8, 1862, a son of Thomas E. and 
Elizabeth (Cox) Stevens, who for many years were residents of this city, where 
the\- arrived in 1886. The father was a brickmaker by trade. He was born at 
McConnelsville, Ohio, May 13, 1831. and his wife's birth occurred in Canada, 
February 2, 1835. They were married in New London. Henry count)', Iowa, and 
after residing for many years in that state came to Lincoln, where the father 
passed away July 2^, 1909, his wife surviving until May 18, nil 2. They are 
survived by two sons : Charles Daniel, now living in Muskogee, Oklahoma ; 
and William Thomas. 

The latter prepared for college in Howe's Academy at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, 
and afterward entered the LTniversity of Des Moines, in which he spent one year, 
later Ijecoming a student in the University of Iowa, where be was graduated 
with the class of 1885. He had also studied law at Clarinda, Iowa, and in 1886 
he was admitted to the bar at Lincoln. Here be has since practiced, being a 
well known representative of the legal jirofession of this cily. In iqo; he was 
elected justice of the peace and has held the office coiuinuously since, having 
been reelected five times. Before entering upon the duties of this position, 
which he discharges in a most prompt and capable ma.nner. he had served tor 
two terms as deputy county attorney. At the April. 191''. primaries he was a 
successful candidate for county judge, receiving the nomination on a non- 
partisan ticket. 



174 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

On the 4th of January, 191 1, Mr. Stevens was united in marriage to Aliss 
Cleona Blanche Russell, by whom he has one son, William Thomas, Jr., born 
October 17, 1914. In politics Mr. Stevens has always been a stalwart republican 
and fraternally he is connected with the Masons, the Odd Fellows and the Elks. 
He is also a member of the Lincoln Commercial Club, the Lancaster County and 
Nebraska State Bar Associations and the Commercial Law League of America. 
He displays marked capability in presiding over the justice court and his deci- 
sions are at all times strictly fair and impartial. 



MAJOR CHARLES WILSON PIERCE. 

Major Charles Wilson Pierce, for many years a resident of Waverly precinct, 
gained ])rominence during his long and active life in diverse fields of activity. 
Enlisting in the Union army for service in the Civil wai he rose to the rank of 
major; as the head of the freedmen's bureau in the south during the early recon- 
struction days, he so gained confidence and good will that he was chosen member 
of congress from Alabama : and as a farmer and stock raiser in Nebraska and- 
land agent for the Burlington Railroad he was an important factor in the develop- 
ment of the eastern part of this state. His birth occurred in New York state, on 
the /th of October, 1823, and his parents were Spooner Reed and Mary (W'ilson) 
Pierce. The father was born in Massachusetts. August 2, 1802, while his parents 
were traveling by wagon to the Geneseo country, in New York, and the mother's 
birth occurred in Yates county. New York, on the 25th of August, 1801. For 
some time Mr. Pierce engaged in farming, but after removing to Ohio turned 
his attention to the milling business and subsequently was a merchant and hotel 
man. He passed his last years at the home of Major Pierce, and died at Havana, 
Mason county, Illinois, on the 6th of September, 1880. He was a member of the 
state militia and was always willing to cooperate in movements seeking the 
general good. His wife died in Lancaster count)', Nebraska, while visiting her 
son on the nth of June, 1874. 

Major Charles Wilson Pierce, who was the oldest of their seven children who 
grew to maturity, received his early education in the public schools of New York 
and later attended an academy at Rochester, that state. When fourteen years old 
he liegan working as a farm hand for si.\ dollars per month, but after being 
employed in that capacity for one summer became connected with a woolen mill 
in Rochester, New York. He remained there for three years and was subse- 
quently em])loycd in various factories in Ohio. After his marriage he began 
working at the painter's trade, which he had learned in his spare time, and he 
took a large contract for painting for the Mad River Railroad Company in Ohio. 
In atldition to working as a house and sign painter he engaged in buying and 
selling land and also in buying and selling stock and in 1853 removed to Havana, 
Illinois. 

In 1862 he entered the Union army and was chosen first lieutenant of Com- 
pany B, Eighty-fifth Illinois \olunteer Infantry, which company was enrolled 
between the i8th of July and the 22d of August. He received his commission 
on the 27th of August, 1862, and went to the front with his command, which 




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AST rj.i. L -' •>. 
TILDE N FOU*^0A K>U^ 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 177 

participated in a number of important engagements. He was slightly wounded 
in the Ijattie of Perryville, Kentucky, during the fir.st year of his service, but 
otherwise escaped injury. In October, 1863, he was transferred to the \'eleran 
Reserve Corps with the rank of first lieutenant and remained with that body 
until the close of hostilities. For meritorious service he was made captain on 
the 29th of Novemljcr, 1865, and for some time he was quartermaster at Camp 
Chase, (Jhio. At the time of Lincoln's assassination he was filling the office of 
cjuartermaster at Washington, D. C, and his regiment was detailed to guard the 
White House. In 1866 his ability and gallantry as an officer was further recog- 
nized and he was promoted to the rank of major. 

When the freedmcn"s bureau was established in .\labama. shorti)- after the 
close of the Civil war. Major Pierce was placed at its head and at once turned 
his attention to organizing its work. He manifested a high order of executive 
ability and through his tact and evident desire to serve the south as well as 
possible, he gained the respect and the warm regard of the southern people, 
although at that time there was a great deal of bitterness toward the north and 
most northerners. Tiie high esteem in which he was held was indicated by the 
fact that he was elected to the fortieth congress from Alnbama, the people assert- 
ing that if they had to be represented by a Yankee they preferred Major Pierce 
to all others. He made an excellent record in that capacity and would have been 
elected for a second term but refused to be a candidate. He was subsequently 
appointed assessor of internal revenue at Mobile, .\Iabama, and held that 
important position until 1871, wdien he resigned and returned to his home in 
Havana, Illinois. Two years previous he had visited Lancaster county, Nebraska, 
and had been much pleased with conditions here, and in .April, 1872, he removed 
to this county from Illinois. He purchased a tract of unimproved land and 
erected thereon a temporary residence, which remained the family home for 
some time, his wife and children having joined him in October, 1872. He formed 
a partnership with General Amasa Cobb and they invested heavily in farm land, 
becoming owners of twelve thousand acres in Lancaster county. At length they 
disposed of the greater part of their holdings but Major Pierce continued to 
devote his time to agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his active life, 
with the exception of three years when he served as register of the United States 
land oifice at Lincoln. He harvested large crops annually and also engaged in 
stock raising extensively and was one of the men of worth of his county. He 
was also land agent for the I'.urlington railroad and sold thousands of acres of 
land for that company in the early period of the settlement of the state. He 
reached the advanced age of eighty-three years, as his death occurred on the 
1 8th of February, 1907, at Federal Point, Florida, where he was spending the 
winter. 

Major Pierce was married on the 5th of November. 1850. to -Miss Isabella 
:\I. Purton, who was born in Norwich, \'ermont, on the i8th of December, 1824, 
and was a daughter of W. S. and Nancy (Russell) Burton, both natives of New 
England. The mother was a representative of a distinguished family, being a 
cousin of Ralph Waldo Emerson. The father engaged in merchandising in 
Norwich, \'ermont, and died there when comparatively a young man. Subse- 
quently the mother removed to .'\urora, Illinois, and there she passed her last 
years. Mrs. Pierce was called to her final rest on the 13th of April. 1903. She 



178 LIXCOLN AND LAX'CASTER COUXTY 

had become the mother of five children, of whom three died in infancy. Florence 
B. resides upon the old homestead of three hundred acres and rents part of the 
land to others, while she personally supervises the operation of the remainder. 
The buildings are large and substantial and the house is .a thoroughly modern 
farm home, being provided with electric light and with an up-to-date water system. 
Charles Albert, who was born on the 8th of December, i860, engaged in banking 
in Tecumseh, Xebraska, for a number of years, but passed away on the 8th of 
May, 1902. He was a prominent Mason, having attained the degrees of the 
Knights Tenivilar Commandery in the York Rite and the thirty-second degree 
in the Scottish Rite, and being also identified with the Mystic Shrine. At the 
time of his death he was serving as commander in the commandery at Tecumseh. 
His widow and two children are li\ing in Lincoln, where the children are attend- 
ing the State University. 

Major Pierce was a stalwart rej)iiblican and was one of the leaders of his 
I)arty in Xebraska. In 1875 he served as a member of the constitutional con- 
vention in this state and he represented his district in the state senate for a 
number of terms. He was known as the father of Mitchell Post, Xo. 38, G. .\. R., 
at Waverly, and was also a member of the ^Military (jrder of the Loyal Legion, 
of which he served as commander for one year. He was made a Master Mason 
in an Ohio lodge in early manhood and from that time until his death took a 
very enthusiastic interest in the activities of the order. He held membership 
in Lincoln Lodge, No. 19, A. F. & A. M., at Lincoln, in ]\It. Aloriah Commandery. 
No. 4, in Consistorv No. 22. in which he had attained the thirty-second 
degree, in Sesostris Temple, Xo. 324, A. A. O. N. M. S. He was a man 
who was incapable of half-hearted endeavor and gave himself unsparingly to 
the accomplishment of any work which he had undertaken. He possessed unusual 
energy and his determination and enthusiasm enabled him to succeed where 
others would have failed. In whatever circumstances jilaced he gained recogni- 
tion as a natural leader, was held in the highest respect and moreover he had the 
faculty of making and retaining the warm friendship of those with whom he was 
intnnately associated. 



HON. JOHN ARTHCR MAGLTRE. 

The history of Hon. John Arthur Maguire is that of one who has never 
subordinated die public good to personal aggrandizement nor ever shadowed 
the general welfare by effort to advance private interests. On the contrary he 
has stood for that which is most worth while to the community and the common- 
wealth, and has made a most creditable record in the halls of national legislation. 
At the present writing he is actively engaged in law practice in Lincoln. He was 
born on a farm in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, November 29, 1870, a son of Francis 
and Margaret (Bough) ]\Iaguire in whose family were eight children — two sons 
and six daughters. The father, now a resident of Mitchell, South Dakota, is a 
man of absolute honesty, of high character — a citizen of sterling worth, interested 
in public affairs. The mother, who died in 1911, was a woman of superior 
accomplishments of heart and mind. She was devoted to home duties and to 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 179 

her famil\- interests and displayed pleasure and devotion in meeting every 
responsibility that devolved upon her. Both were educated in the district and 
high schools of Jo Daviess county, Illinois, and both devoted some time to the 
j)rofession of teaching. Later they took a deep personal interest in the education 
and training of their children, believing that the home and school were the best 
places to prepare for life's activities and for the duties of future citizenship. 
I'.oth were devout Catholics, and the children all adhered to that faith. The 
grandparents were all natives of Ireland, those in the paternal line coming from 
County Fermanagh and in the maternal line from County Cavan. The removal 
of the respective families from Ireland to the new world established the grand- 
parents of lohn A. Alaguire in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, during their period 
of young manhood and womanhood. 

In his youthful days, John A. Maguire accompanied his parents from Illi- 
nois to Dakota territory, the family settling on a government homestead near 
Plankinton, in what is now South Dakota. They were among the first residents 
of that section and suffered many of the hardships and sacrifices of jiioneer life, 
living through the period when drought took the crops, when blizzards swept the 
jirairies and when Indian disturbances were incidents to the settlement of the dis- 
trict. This family of pioneers contributed their part in the development of the 
new west as the immediate ancestral families had contributed their best in the 
settlement of northwestern Illinois. After eight years spent upon the homestead, 
the family removed to Mitchell, South Dakota. In the meantime John .A. Maguire 
had attended the district schools in the winter months, while the summer seasons 
were devoted to farm work. Later he became a student in the South Dakota 
Agricultural College at Brookings, where he studied for three years, meeting his 
expenses by work on the college farm. He was afterward for a year a student in 
the Iowa Agricultural College at Ames and was graduated therefrom with the 
class of 1893. He entered the University of Nebraska in 1895, com])leting a 
course in the academic de])artment in 1S98 and in the law department in 1899, 
and was then admitted to practice. He taught in Ijoth country and city schools 
during the periods of college vacations in order to helji defray the expenses of 
his education. During his college days he took an active part in numerous 
activities of the school where he was a popular and prominent student. 

Following his graduation Mr. Maguire was appointed chief deputy in the 
office of county treasurer William McLaughlin of Lancaster county, and served 
during the years looo and njoi. In 1902 he entered upon the practice of law 
in Lincoln, making steady progress as he demonstrated his ability to successtuUy 
cope with intricate legal problems. In 1905 he was secretary of the democratic 
state committee, having served at different times as chairman and .secretary of 
the citv ccntrrd committee and the county central committee of Lancaster county. 
In 1904 he v.as elected a delegate from the first congressional district to the 
democratic national convention in St. Louis. In 11)1)4 he was president of the 
University of Nebraska Alumni Association and from 1012 to 1913 of the I ni- 
versitv of Nebraska Association in Washington. D. C . 

■ Mr. r^Iaguire was called to otffce in h;o8 when nominated for congress on the 
democratic ticket in the first state wide primary. He was elected to the sixty- 
first congress bv a majoritv of about nine hundred over E. M. Pollard, republican, 
who was at that time rei)rescnting the ilistrict in congress. In ii)io he was 



180 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

reelected to the sixty-second congress over William Hayward, republican, by 
about seven hundred majority and in 1912 was reelected to the sixty-third congress 
over Paul F. Clark, republican and progressive, by about seventeen hundred, 
but in 1914 was defeated by C. F. Reavis, republican, by a majority of about three 
hundred. In his canvass for congress he carried Lincoln and Lancaster counties 
three times. The district had been represented but once l)efore by a democrat 
and for many years had averaged about live thousand republican majority. 
Before each election he made a thorough canvass of his district, except the last 
one in 1914 when congress remained in session until a few days before election 
and he remained at his post in the house until its-adjournment. When a candi- 
date, a congressman or member of political committees, he always insisted on a 
strict adherence to the laws regulating limitations on expenditures of moneys 
for political purposes in elections and strongly supported the passage of laws 
in congress looking toward a purification of elections. He held that political 
campaigns should be conducted along as honest lines as any other business. 

During his service in congress j\Ir. Maguire had the highest record of attend- 
ance and votes of any man in congress and never left Washington while congress 
was in session except on public business. On his election to congress he dismissed 
all business and professional work and devoted all his time and energy to his 
congressional duties, the study of public problems and to the needs of his district. 
In his first campaign for congress he made the campaign generally along lines 
of his party platform and his own promises to the people of the district, and in 
later campaigns he made his canvass principally on his own congressional record 
and that of his party in power. His principal committee work in congress was 
on the committee of agriculture, that committee offering the means of giving the 
best service to his district and most nearly related to the primary industries of 
his district — a committee having charge of legislation and appropriations for 
agricultural colleges and experiment stations, weather bureau, jilant and animal 
investigations, forests, chemistry, soils, markets, rural organization, roads, crop 
rei)orts, quarantine, food and drug acts and other lines. He was looked u])Oii 
in congress as one of the best informed and most effective workers for legisla- 
tion along these lines. He helped to shape and report most of the important 
legislation in congress along these lines during the past few years. He secured 
for his district legislation and appropriations for postoffice buildings whenever 
needed, including the recent extension of the Lincoln building, hog cholera 
elimination, corn improvement investigations, county soil surveys, geological and 
topographical surveys, surveys of overflow and flood streams, engineers for 
public roads, federal rifle range at Plattsmouth and other matters for the 
district. In the sixty-second congress he was also acting chairman of the com- 
mittee on claims. In the sixty-third congress he voted for and supported all 
im[)ortant measures before congress including the L^nderwood tariff' bill and 
income tax, the federal reserve bank act, the Federal Trade Commission and 
other measures regulating the trusts and big business, prohibiting interlocking 
directorates and watered stock in railroad and other corporations. He also 
supported conservation bills regulating charges and control of water power arid 
the leasing of and control of coal and mineral lands, looking toward the develop- 
ment of, but at the same time protecting, the natural resources and the mines and 
forests and coal fields for the public for generations to come. He supported the 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 181 

principles of the workmen's compensation measure and those bills limiting the 
hours of labor of women and children in factories and the enactment of laws for 
the promotiiin of human welfare. He supported President Wilson in his adminis- 
tration and voted for and very generally supported the policies advocated Ijy him 
and those considered by congress. On matters of parliamentary procedure and 
those on which he had made no promises, nor in which lie was guided by plat- 
forms, he was classed as an independent voter. He was recognized as progressive 
in his attitude on legislative matters. During the sixty-second congress he was the 
democratic congressional committeeman for Nebraska. He early advocated and 
held fast for the reformation of house rules looking to more liberal procedure 
and releasing the house from the control of a few men. He refused to be bound 
by caucus action of party when detrimental to the people as a whole or to the 
people of his district. His sympathies are generally regarded as those of the 
people and he looks at all questions from that point of view. He is a member of 
several social, fraternal and political organizations and is active for educational 
and civic improvement. He believes that President Wilson's administration 
means honorable peace with all the world: end of imperialism under the flag; 
diplomacy of honor, justice and wisdom; no government partnership with big 
business ; warfare on lobby, special privilege, corrupt politics ; large individual 
opportunity and for all business ; freedom of business and revival of competition ; 
sound and ])ermanent prosperity for the country ; industrial peace and a fair deal 
for labor; and government of, by and for the people restored, and for all these 
things Mr. Maguire stands. His record has ever been one which bears the 
closest investigation and scrutiny and no one doubts the honesty of his purpose 
nor questions the integrity of his methods. 



ISAAC BALDWIN. 



There is great similarity in the lives of four of Lincoln's respected and 
worthy citizens in that all have been identified with the pioneer history of 
Nebraska and all are veterans of the Civil war, having seen active duty at the 
front as members of the Twentieth Iowa Infantry during the darkest hour in the 
history of our country. Each, therefore, has the right to wear the little bronze 
button which proclaims him a Grand Army man. and the four who, more than 
half a century ago, were "boys in blue" have maintained their friendship uninter- 
rupted to the present time and will remain "comrades until the last ta]) sounds." 

Mr. Baldwin was born in La Salle county, Illinois, December 27, 1S44, his 
parents being Samuel and Nancy (Hall) Baldwin, who were natives of \'cnnont 
and became early settlers in Michigan. It was in the '30s that they removed to 
La Salle county, Illinois, being there at the time of the Black Hawk war which 
occurred in 1832. Their son, Isaac Baldwin, well remembers old Shabbona, the 
Indian chief, who proved himself a friend of the white men. Samuel Baldwin 
was a prosperous farmer and when the Michigan and Illinois canal was built 
he was accorded a contract for building the aqueduct over the Fox river at 
Ottawa. In 1868 he became a resident of Marshalltown. Iowa, where he lived 
retired until called to his final rest and his wile also i)assed away there. 



182 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

A log schoolhouse in La Salle county, Illinois, was the "temple of learning" 
in which Isaac Baldwin pursued his education. In April, 1862, when seventeen 
years of age he ran away from home, visited Dixon, Illinois, and Dubuque and 
Clinton, Iowa, and finally found work at Cedar Rapids. There on the 28th of 
May, 1862, when in his eighteenth year, he enlisted as a member of Company B, 
Twentieth lov.a \"olunteer Infantry, remaining with that command until March 
15, 18G3, when he was discharged on disability through tiie influence of a Bajitist 
preacher who was a brother of General Schofield, and who had married Mr. B:dd- 
win's cousin. Mr. Baldwin had been with his command in Missouri and most of 
the time acted as a nurse in the hospital. At Springfield, Missouri, following the 
encounter with the troops of the rebel general, Marmaduke. he assisted in bury- 
ing forty-Hve Confederate soldiers, but only eleven Union men had been killed 
in that encounter, though several afterward died of wounds and a man standing 
in front of Mr. Balfhvin had his arm shattered during the fight. After being 
discharged Mr. Baldwin rcturnetl to Illinois and in 1864 at (Jttawa assisted in 
raising a company of which Harry llossack became captain with Mr. Baldwin 
lieutenant. They went to Leavenworth, Kansas, and then marched to Topeka 
looking for the rebel general who had liurned Lawrence, Kansas. They pro- 
ceeded to S]M-ingfield, Missouri, and down the Iron Mountain Railroad, captur- 
ing some Ijridge burners. After four months spent in that command, Mr. 
Baldwin returned to Illinois and taught school southwest of Ottawa, where he 
also engaged in farming for a year. He next removed to Tama county, Iowa, 
where for five years he resided upon a cultivated farm, owned by his father, 
while for t>vo years afterward he engaged in lumbering in Minnesota. lie then 
returned to Iowa, settling at Traer and eight years later, or in 1880, established 
his home in Holt county, Nebraska, where he secured a government claim of 
one hundred :'nd sixty acres of raw hind on which not a furrow had been turned 
nor an improvement made. The railroad was then being built through the county 
and crossed his land, he receiving sixty dollars for the right-of-way, a sum which 
was of great assistance to him at the time when he had little ready monev. He 
had secured the tract as a soldier's claim and proved uj) on the pkice. He 
afterward conducted an eating house and hotel at Inman in the same countv, 
antl was there located when the battle of Wounded Knee occurred, furnishing 
thirty gallons of coffee to the United States soldiers when they were returning 
after the engagement, receiving the usual government price of fifty-six cents 
])er gallon for the coffee. He was tlK-re during the terribly cold winter of 1888 
when thousands of cattle met death on the prairies and many human lives were 
lust. A train was held snowbound there for three days and Mr. Baldwin had 
the task of feeding the people, having to bake bread and cook for them. For 
eleven years he remained at Inman and met with good success during that period. 
He was also in business at Leads, a suburb of Sioux City, Iowa, and at Chambers, 
Nebraska, and at length he sold his homestead and in 11)13 removed to Lincoln, 
retiring from active business life, since which time he has lived at No. 1717 
Garfield street. 

]Mr. I'.aldwin was married March 6, 1866, at Ottawa, Illinois, to Susanna 
Bent, who was born in Cambridgeshire, England, January 23, 1847, and is a 
daughter of fohn and Sarah (Graves) Bent, who were also natives of that country. 
The father came to America when Mrs. Baldwin was three and a half years of 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 183 

age and soon afterward the mother and their three children atlempled the trip, 
but were shipwrecked and lost all their possessions. One of the children was 
buried at sea, alter which the mother -with the other two returned to Lngland. 
Later they again started on a voyage to the new world, and this time were 
successful in reaching their destination, joining the husl)aiid and f;ither in New 
York, where they remained for a time and then removed to Ottawa. Illinois, 
where Mr. and Mrs. Bent passed away. To Mr. and Mrs. ISaldwin were Ijorn 
two children. Ella L'. is the wife of ^^'illiam W . Watson of L'niversity Place 
and they have four children. Earl, Ira, \'erna and Neta. The other daughter, 
Cora L., now Mrs. John Crotty, of Fort W'ortli, Te.xas, has two sons. Irwin and 
Clifford. 

Mrs. Baldwin belongs to the Christian Science church. Mr. BaUhvin is iden- 
tified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and gives political allegiance 
to the prohibition party, being a stanch advocate of the temperance cause. His 
entire life has lieen cliaracterized by high i)rinciples and manly conduct, and 
his many good qualities have brought to him the friendship and warm regard of 
all with whom he has been associated. 



LEM MARTIN WILHELM. 

Levi Martin Wilhelm, now living retired at Ilavelock, was for a long period 
actively identified with general agricultural pursuits, making his home in North 
Bluff' precinct. He was born at Belpre, Washington county, Ohio, April 17, 1847, 
a son of George and Elizabeth ( Potter) Wilhelm. The father was born near 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and the mother's birth occurred in Ohio. They re- 
moved to Illinois, settling in Henry county when their son Levi was Init a young 
lad, and afterward they became residents of ^Missouri. Ijut at the time of the 
outbreak of the Civil war returned to Illinois, where their remaining days were 
passed. 

Levi 'SI. Wilhelm sjicnt the greater part of his boyhood in that state, where 
he obtained a puldic school education and was trained to the work of the fields. 
He engaged in farming in Illinois until 1879, when he came to Nebraska and for 
si.x years was engaged in the cultivation of rented land near Lincoln. He after- 
ward purchased one hundred and sixty acres of unimproved land in North Blulf 
precinct and with characteristic energy began its development, transforming the 
tract into arable and productive fields. He afterward extended the boundaries 
of his place by the jiurchase of an additional tract of forty acres and thereon he 
resided until August 14, iqo8, when he retired from active business and estab- 
lished his home in Havelock, where he now resides. 

Ml. Wilhelm was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Ettie Cunningham, who 
was born in Washington county, Ohio, a daughter of Erastus Elijah and Ruth 
(Rouse) Cunningham, who were also natives of the same county. The mother 
died there during the early girlhood of her daughter, Mrs. Wilhelm. and the 
father passed away in Mount \'ernon, Ohio. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilhelm are six children : Lloyd L.. who married Bertha Schmidt and is a 
farmer in Y'ankee Hill precinct; Elizabeth Ruth, the wife of Charles Goslin, a 



18-4 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

resident fanner of Lancaster precinct; Minnie, the wife of A. L. Barber, who 
follows farming near Havelock ; Madge, the wife of George Guthrie, living in 
Omaha; John Luther, a clerk in the Burlington shops; and Mildred, the wife 
of Walter A. Guthrie, who is cultivating her father's farm. Mrs. Wilhelm 
traces her ancestry back to one of the early colonial families, being a descendant 
of Miles Standish. In early womanhood she successfully engaged in teaching 
school for seven years, being a teacher in the country and graded schools of 
Ohio. She has lived on a farm during the greater part of her life and has 
always maintained the deepest interest in educational matters and most liberal 
advantages have been accorded her children, whQ have been imbued with high 
principles and have been taught to judge for themselves. Her home has always 
been the center of social life in the community. She has ever believed in making 
her home so attractive to her children that they would prefer to remain there 
rather than to seek doubtful amusements elsewhere, and her grandchildren, 
four boys and four girls, finds their greatest delight in visiting the home of the 
grandparents. Mrs. Wilhelm is a leader among the women of her neighborhood 
by reason of her progressiveness and broad-mindedness. 

In political faith Mr. Wilhelm is a democrat and while residing on the farm 
served as school director, road supervisor and member of the election board. He 
and his family are members of the Methodist church and he has ever guided 
his life in harmony with the teachings of the church, so that his entire career 
has been an upright, honorable one, winning for him the deserved confidence 
and goodwill of his fellowmen. He is a prominent member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and has the distinction of being the only member of his 
lodge to receive the twenty-five year gold jewel medal in recognition of the 
fact that he has never missed a meeting or failed to pay an assessment during 
that period. He is a charter member of his lodge and his wife. is a member of 
the Eastern Star and of the Rebekahs. She served for three years as secretary 
of both lodges and has been vice president of the district for the Rebekahs. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm are numbered among the prominent and valued 
citizens of the community in which they reside and the circle of their friends is 
almost coextensive with the circle of their acquaintance. 



JOHN H. JOHNSON. 

John H. Johnson, who owns a half interest in four hundred and eighty acres 
of excellent land in Grant precinct, is there engaged in general farming. His 
place is splendidly improved and is one of the most valuable farm properties 
of the county. He was born in New York, on the 23d of September, 1863, and 
is a son of Lacy and Lydia Johnson, natives of England, who, in 1851, crossed 
the Atlantic to America and located in New York where the father farmed 
until 1879, in which year they came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, to live with 
their children. The father died in 1910 and the mother in 1893. 

John H. Johnson began his education in the Empire state and continued it 
after the removal of the family to Lancaster county, Nebraska. He supplemented 
his common school course by study in the Omaha Business College, the Lincoln 




'^^ 98^' 



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M: '^W. 




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MR. AND MRS. JOHN' H. JOHNSON 



TILDi 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 187 

Business College and the Lincoln high school. He remained at home until he 
attained his majority when, in partnership with two hrothers, Henry and James, 
he hegan farming on his own account. They were associated in husiness for 
twenty-five years, engaging in grain and stock raising in Grant precinct. For- 
merly they were heavy cattle feeders, hut our suhject, who is the only one now 
following agricultural pursuits, has largely discontinued that hranch of his work. 
He still raises some high grade shorthorn cattle, however, and also hreeds Poland 
China hogs and Percheron horses. His brother James died in November, 1914, 
and in the spring of 1915 the partnership between Henry and John was dis- 
solved and the former retired and removed to College View where he is still 
residing. He still owns, however, a half interest in the farm which comprises 
four hundred and eighty acres on sections 29, 21 and 28, the residence being on 
section 29. The buildings are model farm structures, provided with all modern 
improvements and representing an outlay of twelve thousand dollars. Mr. John- 
son derives a handsome income from his well directed labors as a farmer and 
stockraiser and is also interested financially in the Farmers Elevator Comjiany at 
Roca, the elevator at Saltillo, and the Farmers Telephone Company. 

Mr. Johnson was married on the 23d of February, 1916, to Miss I^ueiia 
Hawks, a daughter of Austin A. and Lucinda (Case) Hawks, natives respec- 
tively of Massachusetts and of Indiana. The father removed to the latter state 
in early manhood and farmed there for many years but at length went to 
Holdrege, Nebraska, where he died in 18S8, at the age of eighty-seven years. 
The mother survives and is living in Lincoln. 

Mr. Johnson is a republican and keeps well infonued as to the questions 
and issues of the day but is without political aspirations. Mrs. Johnson belongs 
to the Methodist Episcopal church which he attends and he is also connected 
with the Knights of Pythias and the Ancient r)rder of United ^\'orkmen— asso- 
ciations which indicate the principles which govern his conduct. He has not 
only gained material prosperity for himself but has also been a factor in the 
agricultural advancement of his locality. 



JACOB FORSYTH. 



Jacob Forsyth, eighty years of age, but still hale and hearty and enjoying 
excellent health, occupies a comfortable home at No. 1733 Cherry street. For 
almost forty years he was actively engaged in farming in this section of the 
state, but eight years ago put aside the work of the fields and has since enjoyed 
a rest which he' has truly earned and richly deserves. He is entitled to repre- 
sentation in this volume not only as a pioneer settler, but also as a veteran 
of the Civil war, having at the presi.lent's call for troops offered his services 
to the government, going to the front in defense of the stars and stripes. He 
was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, April 23, 1836. His father, John For- 
syth, removed with the family to Iowa in 185 1. settling on a farm in Scott 
countv, and later he operated a sawmill on the Mississipi>i river. He married 
Lucy Hayden, a native of Ohio, who died in Scott county, Iowa, whde his 



Vol. H — 10 



188 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

death occurred at Cordova, Illinois. They were parents of seven sons, all of 
whom reached adult ages and four of whom survive. 

Jacob Forsyth was a youth of fifteen years when the family established 
their home in Scott county, Iowa, and there on the 25th of August, 1862, he 
responded to the country's call for aid, enlisting as a member of Company G, 
Twentieth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He was in the service for thirty-five 
months and was mustered out at Mobile, Alabama, on the 25th of July, 1865. 
While at the front he became a corporal, and he participated in the battle of 
Prairie Grove, Arkansas, the siege of Vicksburg and the siege of Fort Blakely. 
For two months he was ill in a hospital but during the remainder of the time 
was actively engaged in military duty. He was one of five brothers who joined 
the Union army and all of them returned home. These were William, Luther, 
Jasper, John and Jacob, but only Luther and Jacob are now living, the former 
being a resident of Merrill, Wisconsin. The Twentieth Iowa Infantry, to 
which Jacob Forsyth belonged, is represented in Lincoln by four members — 
more than are to be found in the city from any other regiment. These are 
Willram Dififendaffer, Isaac Baldwin. W. Belden Williams and Mr. Forsyth. 
They and their wives hold "reunions" occasionally at each others homes and 
call themselves the "Jolly Eight." 

When the country no longer needed his aid Mr. Forsyth returned to Scott 
county, Iowa, and for two years thereafter operated a threshing outfit and also 
engaged in farming. In 1872 he came to this state, establishing his home upon 
rented land in Cass county. Later he purchased eighty acres of railroad land 
and engaged in farming thereon until eight years ago, when he retired and 
removed to Lincoln, establishing his home at his present place of residence. 
His has been a useful, busy and active life. He brought his fields under a 
high state of cultivation and through the capable management of his business 
interests gained the competence that now supijlies him with all the comforts and 
some of the luxuries of life. 

It was in 1865 in Scott county, Iowa, that Mr. Forsyth wedded Ellen 
Stopher, a native of that county, who died in Cass county, Nebraska, May 7, 
i88y. On lime 8, 1890, he married Mrs. Josiah S. Keefer, who in her maiden- 
hood bore the name of Isabella Snokc. She was born in Schuylkill county, 
Pennsylvania, and in Delaware county, Ohio, became the wife of Josiah S. 
Keefer, who there passed away February 3, 1889, although he and his wife 
had become residents of Lincoln in March, 1879. They built a home at the 
corner of Eleventh and K streets, which was then the outskirts of the city. 
Mrs. Forsyth has vivid recollection of Lincoln in its frontier days and its 
pioneer settlers. She is now seventy-two years of age, but looks many years 
younger. By her former marriage she has three children : Alax L. Keefer, who 
is married and resides in University Place; Mrs. A. C. Adams, living at 1980 C 
street in Lincoln; and l\Irs. John Gamble of Omaha. 

Mr. Forsyth has for fourty-four years lived in this section of the state, and 
there are no experiences connected with the early settlement of the district with 
which he is not familiar. He can remember a time when he hauled the corn 
that he had raised to Lincoln and .sold it for fifteen cents per bushel. His first 
trip to the west was made in 1860, when he crossed the plains to Pike's Peak 
with a yoke of oxen, returning in the same way, and thus he crossed and 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 189 

recrossed Nebraska, which was then called the American Desert. His political 
support has been given to the republican party since its organization and he is 
a member of Kenesaw Post, No. 103, G. A. K., at Elmwood, Nebraska, lioth 
he and his wife are held in the highest esteem. They are numbered among 
the most venerable couples of Lincoln, and in the regard of their friends they 
rank as they do in age — among the first. 



CLAUDE STALEY WILSON. 

Claude Staley \\'ilson, attorney at law and president of the Indiana Associa- 
tion of Lincoln, has, through the years of his connection with the bar, made 
continuous and substantial progress until he now enjoys an enviable reputation 
in all his work in the courts. He was born in South Bend, Indiana, April 12, 
1S77, the onlv son of Emanuel T. and r)llie Mary (Staley) Wilson. The father 
is now a resident of Lincoln, in which city he took up his abode in i(S8i. The 
mother passed away in 1889. Emanuel T. Wilson was born in Canada, May 6, 
1844, and throughout his active life has been a traveling salesman. He resided 
in South Bend, Indiana, for several years, and was there married, September 
22, 1875, to Ollie Mary Staley, who was born at Plymouth, Indiana, January 
22, 1849, a daughter of Alexander C. Staley. who became the founder of the 
A. C. Staley Manufacturing Company a woolen mill concern of South Bend, 
Indiana, which is still in existence under the same name and manufactures one 
of the most popular brands of men's woolen underwear in the United States. 
The founder passed away many years ago, but the firm name is still retained 
as it became a synonym for standard production of that character. In 1881 
Emanuel T. Wilson brought his family to Lincoln, the only daughter being 
Alta Hattie Wilson, now the wife of Julian A. Sutter, a jeweler of Lewistown, 
Montana. The only son, Claude S. Wilson, was Init four years of age when 
brought to Lincoln, and in the pul)lic schools he passed through consecutive 
grades until he had completed the work of the eighth grade. About that time 
his mother died, after which he and his si.ster spent two years at South Bend, 
Indiana, in the home of an aunt, Mrs. Ellen Sapp, their mother's sister. Claude 
S. Wilson attended the South Bend high school during that period and upon 
his return to Lincoln in the fall of 1893 he entered the preparatory department 
of the University of Nebraska in which he spent two years. He was for four 
years a student in the academic department and was graduated therefrom with 
the Bachelor of Arts degree in June, 1899. In the fall of the same year he 
entered the law department and completed a course there in June, icpi, wuh 
the degree of LL. B. He had also studied law in the office of Henry II. Wilson 
of Lincoln during that period, and he was admitted to the bar immediately after 
his graduation, continuing, however, in the office of Mr. Wilson, until July 
I. 1902. During the two years following his graduation from the law depart- 
ment he also took post graduate work in the state university, devoting his atten- 
tion to the study of law under Roscoe Pound an.l the study of American histor)' 
under Howard ^^'. Caldwell. 



190 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

On the 1st of July, 1902, Mr. Wilson, of this review, formed a partnership 
with Fred A. Sutter, under the firm name of Wilson & Sutter, which connection 
continued until December, iyo2, when the junior partner removed to Arizona. 
Since that time Mr. Wilson has been alone in practice and has gained a large 
clientage. He belongs to both the Lincoln and State Bar Associations. He is 
deeply attached to his profession, is systematic and methodical in habit, sober 
and discreet in judgment, diligent in research, courteous and kind in demeanor, 
and these qualities have all combined to add to his success. For several years 
he was treasurer of the Lancaster County Bar Association and has also been 
its vice president. For a number of years he was a lecturer on medical juris- 
prudence of the Nebraska College of Medicine. 

Un the 28th of November, 1907, Mr. Wilson was married to Miss Grace 
Hildebrand of Lincoln and they have a son, William H., who was born May 
18, 191 1. In politics Mr. Wilson is a republican, but has never been candidate 
for political office. He is a prominent Mason, having passed through both rites, 
becoming a Knight Templar and a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason. 
He is likewise a member of the Eastern Star. Many official positions have 
been conferred upon him in the order: he is past master of the blue lodge, 
past eminent commander of the commandery, and past potentate of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is likewise a past great sachem of the Improved Order of Red 
Men of the state of Nebraska. He belongs to the Alpha Tau Omega, the 
Phi Delta Phi and the Acacia, all college fraternities, and for several years 
hold the office of worthy grand scribe in the United States of the Alpha Tau 
Omega and was chairman of the committee which rewrote the constitution of 
that fraternity. He belongs to the Lincoln Commercial Club and for two years 
has been president of the Lidiana Association of Lincoln. During his college 
years he was one of the foremost members of his class, popular and prominent 
in connection with all college functions and the same qualities which won him 
warm friendships in those days have gained him high personal regard during 
the period of his residence in this city. He possesses ability for leadership and 
marked skill in the practice of law. and added to these are a kindly spirit and 
a keen appreciation for the good qualities in others. 



WILLIAM DIFFENDAFFER. 

William Dift'endafi^er, who has led a most active life, has now attained the 
age of eighty-three years, his birth having occurred January 29, 1833, in Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, and he is a son of Henry and .Sarah Diffendaffer. He 
had little opportunity to secure an education for he was bound out when a boy 
and lived among strangers. In 1854 he came west and settled in Muscatine 
county, Iowa, where he was residing at the time of the outbreak of the Civil 
war. He did not immediately respond to the call for troops, hoping that the 
trouble would soon be over, but his patriotic spirit would not long let him be con- 
tent to remain at home and at Davenport, Iowa, on the 15th of .\ugust. 1862, 
he enlisted in Company G. Twentieth Iowa \'olunteer Infantn,-, and went to the 
front, participating in a number of hotly contested engagements, including the 



LIXCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 191 

battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas, the long siege of Vicksburg and the siege 
of Fort Blakely, as well as other encounters with the Confederate forces. He 
ever proved a brave and loyal soldier and returned to his Iowa home with a 
creditable military record. 

For two years after the war Mr. Diffendaffer engaged in farming in Musca- 
tine county, Iowa, and then removed to Monroe county, that state, where he 
remained until 1873, when he settled in Otoe county, Nebraska, becoming a 
prosperous farmer of that locality. He brought his fields under a high state of 
cnltixation, raising the crops best adapted to soil and climate, and annually gath- 
ering good harvests. Year after year he continued to till the soil until 1896, 
when he put aside active farm work and retired to Lincoln, making his home 
at No. 2345 O street. 

Mr. Diffendaffer was married October 17, 1866, in Rock Island, Illinois, to 
Miss America Chambliss, who was born in Hancock county, Indiana, August 
31, 1841, a daughter of Benjamin and Julia Chambliss. Her parents were born 
in \'irginia, becoming residents of Hancock County, Indiana, in 1840 and in 
1850 removed to Muscatine county, Iowa, where through farming and specula- 
tion Mr. Chambliss attained considerable wealth. He made judicious investment 
in real estate, becoming the owner of a large amount of land in Iowa, Nebraska, 
and other sections of the country. Some of this land Mrs. Diffendaffer inher- 
ited, and she is still the owner of considerable property in Otoe and Lancaster 
counties, this state. 

To i\Ir. and Mrs. Diffendaffer have been born three children: Algic, who 
died at the age of eight years; Orpha, who is the wife of Robert H. Reed, a 
farmer living near Lincoln, Nebraska, by whom she has two sons. Earl and 
(denn; and Lillie, the wife of Theodore L. Phillips, a farmer living near Ray- 
mond, by whom she has five children, Fay, Dale, Lloyd, Forrest and Bernard. 
Mr. and Mrs. Diffendaft'er believe in the thorough training of their chihlren 
and taught their girls how to take care of all household duties. 

This worthy couple occupy a comfortable home in Lincoln, in which city they 
are well known. They are worthy Christian people, although holding member- 
ship in no church. They enjoy many a pleasant social occasion with some old- 
time friends — Isaac Baldwin, W. B. Williams and Jacob Forsyth, all three of 
whom were comrades of Mr. Dift'endaft'er in the Twentieth Iowa Infantry, and 
they and their wives constitute a little group known as the "Jolly Eight," meet- 
ing occasionally to recall scenes that occurred on the battlefields of the south, as 
well as to discuss questions of later interest as regards the individual and the 
community. 



ANDREW J. ANGELO. 

Andrew J. Angelo gained a gratifying measure of success as a farmer of 
Lancaster county and at length retired from active life, taking up his residence 
in Bethany, where he died in 1913. A native of Illinois, he was born on the 
2ist of November, 1831, a son of David and ^^lary (Afasters) Angelo. They 
were born in Pennsylvania but became residents of Illinois at an early day in the 



192 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

history of that state, and there the father engaged in farming during his active 
hfe. After retiring he came to Nebraska and made liis home with our subject 
until his death on the 3d of March, 1903. He had survived his wife since 1899. 

Andrew J. Angelo was reared in the Prairie state and was indebted to its 
public schools for his education. He gave his father the benefit of his labor 
until he was twenty-one years of age, when he began farming on his own account, 
so continuing in that state until 1S7S, when he came to Lancaster county, Ne- 
braska, and rented land which he operated for seventeen years. He seldom 
failed to harvest good crops and as he managed his business affairs well his 
resources steadily increased and at length he gave-uj) the work of the farm and 
removed to Bethany, purchasing a nice home at No. 134 Holdredge street. After 
taking up his residence here he did some teaming as he found a life of inactivity 
very distasteful. His death occurred on the 9th of January, 1913. and his 
demise was recognized as a loss to his community. 

Mr. Angelo was married in December, 1876, to Miss Melinda Hobson, a 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Cline) Hobson, who were born in North 
Carolina and Indiana respectively. Her father was a farmer by occupation 
and in early life removed to Illinois, where he followed agricultural pursuits 
until his demise in 1853. His wife was called to her tinal rest in 1857. 

Mr. Angelo cast his ballot in support of the men and measures of the dem- 
ocratic i)arty but was never an aspirant for office. He held membership in the 
Highlanders and the Knights and Ladies of Security, and his religious allegiance 
was gi\en to the Christian church. In all the relations of life he discharged to 
the full the obligations resting u])on him, and those who knew him best were 
his warmest and sinccrest friends. 



'■■, HON. EDWIN JEARY. 

Hon. Edwin Jeary is a member of the state legislature from the thirtieth 
district of Nebraska and not only is his name associated with the political his- 
tory of the state but it is also prominently connected with the material develop- 
ment of Lincoln, where he has resided since 1888, being prominently recognized 
as one of its leading men of affairs. Mr. Jeary is a nati\e of England, his birth 
having occurred at Stalham. in the county of Norfolk, March 6, 1850, his jjar- 
ents being John and Alice (Mack) Jeary, who were also natives of that county 
and there spent their entire lives. Four of their children, however, are now 
residents of the United Slates, namely: \Mlliam. li\ing at Greenwood, Ne- 
braska; Rolieri J., a resident of .Seward, Nebraska; Edwin, of Lincoln; and 
Ehzabeth, now the wife of John Stanton, of Waverly, Nebraska. 

Edwin Jeary acquired a common school education in England and in 1872, 
when twenty-one years of age, came to the United States, making his way at once 
to Lincoln, where he arrived on the i6th of May. He did not tarry at that 
period, however, for at the railroad station he hired out to a farmer who lived 
sixteen miles east of Lincoln, just over the line in Cass county. He had never 
had any experience in farm work, having spent his youthful days in an English 
village, and he did not know the difference between a neck yoke and a double- 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 193 

tree. He was willing, however, to learn and he soon became proficient in all 
the duties that devolved upon him. He says that a well drilled old horse which 
he was given to drive in cultivating the fields taught him how to plow corn. He 
spent the summer of 1872 on farms in Cass county and in the fall of that year 
began teaching school, which profession he followed for about three years. He 
taught his first term in Seward county and the remainder of the time was in 
Cass county. He began the work of instruction in a little sod schoolhouse twelve 
by fourteen feet, receiving the munificent sum of twenty dollars per month and 
boarding around among the parents of the pupils. There were but five children 
enrolled and the average attendance was only three during his first term. While 
teaching school in Cass county he read law and later was admitted to the bar at 
Plattsmouth, Nebraska. He afterward practiced at Greenwood, Cass county, for 
a few years and then, retiring from the field of law, embarked in the banking 
business at Greenwood, having organized the Salt Creek \'alley Bank, of which 
he became the cashier. Later he sokl his interest in that institution and went to 
Staplehurst, Nebraska, where he organized the Kank of Staplehurst, of which 
lie became president. A year afterward he sold out there and founded the 
Bank of Elmwood at Elmwood, Cass county, continuing as its president for a 
quarter of a century. In the meantime, however, the name of the institution 
was changed to the State Bank of I'Tmwood and finally took the name of the 
First National Bank of Elmwood. It was the only banking institution of the 
town. It was not until 191 1 that Mr. Jeary disposed of his interest there. In 
the meantime, however, he had changed his residence to Lincoln, where he 
lias remained continuously since 1888. Since retiring from the banking busi- 
ness he has given his attention to the supervision of private interests. He has 
much valuable residence property in the city of Lincoln and also in Elmwood. 
At the corner of Sixteenth and L streets in Lincoln he has two splendid modern 
frame two story residences, fronting on L street, and a cement block apartment 
house, also modern in every particular, containing four apartments, fronting 
on Sixteenth street,. This is some of the choice property for rental in Lincoln. 
Among his first property interests in Nebraska was a homestead which he 
entered as a claim in 1873. This place was in Seward county but he spent only 
one night upon it, as the wolves frightened him away. A little later he disposed 
of his holdings. 

On the 22(1 of r)ctober, 1876, Mr. Jeary was married to Miss Keturah Samp- 
son, who had formerly been one of his pui)ils in Cass county, to which place she 
had remox'ed from Henry county, Iowa, in 1865, when her parents with their 
family journeyed westward in a covered wagon drawn by two yoke of oxen. 
Mrs. Jeary was then six years of age, having been born in Keokuk county, 
Iowa, in 1859. By her marriage she has become the mother of three children 
who are yet living: May, now the wife of Dr. A. J. Coats, of Fairbury, Ne- 
braska; Lena, a teacher in the Lincoln ]nil>lic schools; and Clark, who is a 
graduate of the law department of the University of Nebraska and is now 
practicing. 

Mr. Jeary has made five trips back to England, his wife accompanying him 
on four of them. They were in that country on a visit when the jtresent war 
broke out August i, 1914. On one of his visits he brought home with him an 
old "grandfather's clock" which has been in the Jear\- family for more than 



194 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

two hundred years, having been purchased directly from the factory in Stalham, 
England, by his great-grandfather, William Jeary. It is hand made and is a 
wonderful piece of mechanism, keeping ]3erfect time despite its two hundred 
years of constant use. Mr. and Mrs. Jeary are members of the First Christian 
church of Lincoln and he is serving on its board of elders. He belongs to the 
Lincoln Commercial Club and is interested in all of its plans and projects for 
the city's development and improvement. Fraternally he is a Mason and a Mod- 
ern Woodman. His political allegiance has always been given to the republican 
party and he is now serving for the third term as a representative in the general 
assembly. He was first elected in 1886 from Casa county and was again elected 
in 1912 and in 1914 from Lancaster county, receiving in 1912 the highest vote 
among the republican legislators of the state. He has given thoughtful and 
earnest consideration to all cjuestions which have come up for settlement and is 
well versed on the vital and significant problems of the day. He has sought to 
further the interests of the state in every possible way, exercising his official 
prerogatives for the public good rather than for self benefit and placing the 
general welfare before partisanship. 



AMOS greena:\iyre. 

Amos Greenamyre, the period of whose residence in Lancaster county covers 
thirty-si.x years, was long and successfully identified with agricultural pursuits 
here but is now living retired in Lincoln at No. 1730 D street. His birth occurred 
in the town of Milton, Mahoning county, Ohio, on the 17th of March, 1840, 
his parents'being Solomon and Mary Ann (Best) Greenamyre, the father born 
in Columbiana county, Ohio, in 1812 and the mother in Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1815. The latter passed away in Uhio in 1845 and in 1856 Solomon 
Greenamyre removed to Bureau county, Illinois, where he devoted his attention 
to farming with success. For his second wife he chose Mrs. Sarah Grimes, whose 
demise occurred in that county in 1882. Solomon Greenamyre was called to his 
final rest in 1887, when a resident of Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Amos Greenamyre was sixteen years of age when his father removed to 
Bureau county, Illinois, and in 1863, when twenty-three years of age, started 
out as an agriculturist on his own account. A younger brother joined the Union 
army but our subject was needed at home. He continued farming in Bureau 
county until 1880, when he came to Lancaster county, purchasing three hundred 
and twenty acres of land in Grant precinct, the farm now known as South Side. 
He made a specialty of horticulture, raising small fruit and peaches, and also 
raised and fed cattle, meeting with much success in both branches of his busi- 
ness. In 1900 he retired and has since made his home in Lincoln. He helped 
organize and for sixteen years was treasurer of the Farmers ]\Iutual Insurance 
Company of Nebraska, now one of the largest in the state, but failing eyesight 
compelled him to give up all work about six years ago. He still owns two hun- 
dred and eighty acres of his old farm, however, and has long been numbered 
among the esteemed, substantial and representative citizens of the community. 

On the 25th of August, 1864, in Bureau county, Illinois, Mr. Greenamyre was 







MR. AND MRS. AMOS GKEEXAMYK'E 
Taken on the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage 



THF 
PUBL 

TILDENFoijWOA ■ lOMS 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 197 

joined in wedlock to Aliss Alargaret S.- Sisler, who was born in thai county June 
II, 1845, her parents being George and Nancy (Perkins) Sisler, the former a 
native of Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, and the latter of Saratoga Springs, 
New York. Mr. Sisler became an early settler of Illinois in 1838 and Ijoth he 
and his wife passed away in Bureau county, that state. Mr. and Mrs. Green- 
amyre are the parents of eleven children, all of whom are li\ing, as follows: 
George W., married Lillian B. Gibson, and they reside on the home farm in 
Grant precinct. ^largaret is the wife of Edson E. Landis, of Kansas City, 
Missouri. Myrtle is the widow of Albert E. Butler, and resides in Lincoln. 
Lloward A. resides in Fort Collins, Colorado. He first wedded Ida Collins, who 
passed away in 1912, and in 1914 he was united in marriage to Mrs. Plelen 
W'illard. Daisy N. has been married twice. She first wedded Walter I'".. Williams 
and after his death became the wife of Benjamin F. Parmley. and they reside at 
La Junta, Colorado. Lillian is the wife of Ira Talbot and they reside near 
Cheney, Lancaster county, Nebraska. Solomon married Susan Gregg and their 
home is in Antelope county, Nebraska. Kalherine married Frank Cummings 
and after his demise became the wife of Arthur Schmitt, their residence being 
in Lewistown, Montana. Rose married Perry Snow and they are residents of 
Independence, Iowa. Sue E. is the wife of Dr. Arthur D. Closson, of Kansas 
City, Missouri. Harold married Marion Franklin and makes his home at Indian 
Head, Saskatchewan, Canada, where he is employed in the Dominion forestry 
service. The parents of these children celebrated their golden wedding August 
25, KJ14, at South Side, and on this occasion nine children and twenty-two grand- 
children were present. 

Mr. Greenamyre is a republican in his political views and while living on the 
farm served as a member of the school board and also in the capacity of assessor. 
His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Church, to 
which his wife also lielongs. He has now passed the seventy-sixth milestone on 
life's journey and has witnessed the progress and development of this district 
during the past third of a century, while his career has ever been such as to win 
the confidence and esteem of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



H. ARCHIE ENSIGN. 



FI. Archie Ensign, engaged in the omnibus and transfer business in Lincoln, 
was born in Wyoming. Iowa, in 1857. a son of Granville Ensign, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. With his parents he removed to Lincoln 
and supplemented his public school education by a course in the State University 
but was taken ill six months before the time of graduation. His business tram- 
ing was received under the direction of his father, in whose omnibus and trans- 
fer business he became interested, inheriting the same upon his father's death. 
This is now incorporated under the name of the Ensign Omnbius & Transfer 
Company and that it is a mammoth concern of the kind is indicated by the fact 
that he employs forty-five men and utilizes thirty teams and four automobiles 
in the conduct of the business. His liberal patronage has been won through close 
application, through indefatigable energy and through earnest effort to please 



198 LIiNCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

his patrons. He is always prompt and reliable and his business methods are 
such as will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. His location is at No. 
221 South Eleventh street, where the business has been carried on for forty-six 
years. He owns his own building and a large number of cabs and omnibuses, 
together with trucks for the transfer of baggage. His interests exceed in volume 
those of any other business of similar character in the city. 

In 1893 Mr. Ensign was united in marriage to Miss Irene James, a native 
of Arkansas, by whom he has two children, Pauline 13. and James \V. In his 
political views Mr. Ensign is a republican and fraternally is connected with 
Lancaster Lodge, No. 54, F. & A. M., and the P/enevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. He is also a member of the Commercial Club and of the Rotary Club and 
in these organizations is popular. He has a large circle of warm friends through- 
out the city in which the greater part of his life has been passed. He is num- 
bered among the early pioneers of Lancaster county, having for many years 
been a witness of the growth and development of this part of the state, so that 
its history is largely familiar to him. 



AMOS H. ADEN. 



Amos H. Aden is at the head of the Aden Grain, Feed & Coal Company at 
Havelock, in which connection he is conducting a business of large and gratify- 
ing proportions that is bringing to him deserved success. He was born in Ger- 
many, May 18, 1863, a son of Habbe L. and Tobke (Frerrich) Aden, who were 
likewise natives of that country, where they remained until 1869 when they 
came to the United States. After a year spent at Bentley, now Golden, Illinois, 
they removed to the vicinity of Carthage, Illinois, and a year later, or in 187 1, 
came to Nebraska, where Mr. Aden homesteaded a claim in Butler county, the 
place being situated about twenty miles from Columbus, wiiich was their nearest 
trading point and to reach which they had to ford the Platte river. Their first 
home was a sod house and they experienced all of the hardships and privations 
incident to settlement upon the frontier. Through his claim Mr. Alden became 
the owner of one hundred and sixty acres and afterward obtained a tree claim 
of eighty acres, while subsequently he purchased a forty acre tract of land. As 
the years passed he carefully developed and improved his farm and became 
one of the prosperous and substantial agriculturists of the district. At length 
he retired to Columbus and his competence was sufficient to enable him to enjoy 
all the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. There both he and his wife 
spent their remaining days. 

Amos H. Aden, who was one of a family of four sons and three daugh- 
ters, was reared on the old homestead farm in P>utler county and shared in the 
hardshij^ of pioneer life. His educational opportunities were limited to the 
advantages offered in the district schools and when twenty-one years of age he 
went to Ouincy, Illinois, where he attended the Gem City Business College. 
Beins thus trained for commercial work he embarked in the hardware business 
at Garrison, Nebraska, having at the time a capital of ten dollars. However, he 
borrowed four hundred dollars from his father and thus secured his stock. For 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 199 

twelve years he remained in business there, during which period he built up a 
good trade. During the succeeding year he traveled for the Osborn Hardware 
Company and then, turning his attention to the grain business, devoted fourteen 
years to buying grain at David City and at Garrison. Later he spent five years 
on a ranch in Greeley county, Nebraska, and then because of failing health 
engaged in no business for a year. Learning that there was an elevator and 
coal business for sale in Havelock, he came to this city and made purchase of 
the same in June, 1912. The property was in a dilapidated condition but he 
rebuilt the elevator and infused into the business his own determination and 
enthusiasm. It was not long before he made his business a market for the 
grain raisers of the district and because of the continued growth of his under- 
taking he admitted his nephew to a partnership on the 1st of March, 1915, under 
the style of Aden Grain, Feed & Coal Company. Their elevator is situated on 
the Rock Island track and they are now controlling an ever growing trade. 

Mr. Aden is happily situated in his home life, He wedded Flora Curry, who 
was born at Postville, Iowa, and they have become .the parents of three children: 
Ruljen, who is married and lives on a farm in Howard county, Nebraska ; and 
Wesley A. and Harold F., both at home. Mr. and Mrs. Aden now reside at 
University Place. She is a member of the Methodist church, while Mr. .Aden 
belongs to the Ancient Order of LTnited Workmen at Garrison. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican ])arty and he keeps well informed on the 
questions and issues of the day, but he does not seek nor desire office, preferring 
to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs which are carefully man- 
aged and are bringing to him gratifying success. He deserves much credit for 
what he has undertaken and accomplished for he had no special chances at the 
outset of his career and through laudable aml:)ition. close application and inde- 
fatigable energy has worked his way steadily upward. 



JOSEPH McKAIN. 



Joseph :\IcKain. residing at No. 417 South Twenty-sixth street in Lincoln, is 
familiarly known as "Kearney Joe." He lived in this section of the state during 
pioneer times — days when mutual hardships and privations and the spirit of 
mutual helpfulness drew men together in strong ties of friendship and led to 
the adoption of such names as that by which Mr. McKain is known to all the 
early settlers. There is no phase of life on the Nebraska frontier with which 
he is not familiar and his stories of the early days are accurate and most inter- 
esting. Mr. McKain was born March 15. 1841, at Pittsburg. Pennsylvania, and 
was there reared in the home of his parents. James and .Adeline (kirwni) 
McKain, who were natives of the Keystone state, where they spent ihcir entire 
lives, the father there engaging in business as a florist. 

It was during the period of Josei)h McKain's early maniiood tiiat the Civil 
war occurred and for nine months he served as a member of Company P.. One 
Hundred and Twenty-third Pennsylvania \'olunteer Infantry, parliciiKiting in 
the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and in the latter part of the 
engagement at Antietam. He was never wounded nor taken prisoner and after 



'&"S^ 



200 LLXCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

his term of service had expired he returned to Pittshiirg, where he engaged in 
market gardening. Still later he became fireman on the old Cleveland, Pittsburg 
iS; Wheeling Railroad in Ohio and subsequently was promoted to the position of 
engineer. 

While still residing in I'ittsburg, Air. McKain was married in 1865 to Miss 
Maggie J. Calhoun, who was there born July 4, 1842, a daughter of Alex and 
Eliza (McCammon) Calhoun. The father, a native of Ireland, came to the 
United States at the age of nine years. His wife was a native of Pennsylvania 
and in 1873 they removed westward to Nebraska, the remains of both being now 
interred at Kearney. Mr. and Mrs. INIcKain -began their domestic life in 
Pittsburg and after the birth of two of their children came to this state, arriving 
in Lincoln on tlie 30th of May, 1872, at which time the city was but a small town. 
The Burlington & Missouri Railroad Company had erected a large shed equipped 
with beds, stoves, etc., where the emigrants could remain for a time, cook their 
food and do necessary washing, and there Mr. McKain and his family remained 
until he could make arrangements for a home of his own. In February, 1873, 
he secured a preemption claim in Buffalo county, south of what is now the city 
of Kearney, then called Kearney Junction. The old Fort Kearney still stood, 
although the soldiers had been withdrawn. Mr. ^McKain lived on this land on 
the bank of the Platte river for three years, his home lieing a sod house, his 
family experiencing all of the hardships brought on through the grasshopper 
scourge and other privations of frontier life. At length he removed to Kearney 
and secured a position with the Burlington & Missouri Railroad Company, soon 
after being promoted to engineer on the run from Kearney to Hastings and 
Aurora. When the Black Hills division was built from Kearney to Callaway 
he assisted in its construction and pulled the throttle of the first engine that 
went over that line. 

When Mr. McKain retired from railroad work in 1900 he came to Lincoln 
and built a beautiful residence at No. 417 South Twenty-sixth street, where he 
has since resided. He is familiar with every phase of Nebraska's pioneer life, 
for he was one of the first settlers of Buffalo county. The representatives of 
the present generation can hardly imagine what the early residents had to endure. 
Conditions that existed brought on hard times. Mr. McKain saw grasshoppers 
completely strip forty acres of coi"n in five hours. He paid twenty dollars per 
month rent for a two-room frame house when he first went to Kearney and began 
railroading there. Corn, corn stalks and buffalo chips were used for fuel, and 
they ate buffalo meat; and when Mrs. McKain's parents arrived one year later 
they were served buffalo steak, her father thinking that it was beef steak and 
saying that it was the finest he had ever eaten. The winters of that period 
were very cold, the snow remaining for months upon the wind-swept prairies. 
While acting as engineer 'Mr. ]\IcKain encountered blizzards so severe that he 
could not see the smokestack of the engine, and in the summer grasshoppers were 
so thick that the trains were stalled. Upon the plains were bands of reckless 
cowboys who were often worse than the Indians and not infrequently murders 
occurred, .^uch were some of the experiences through which the family passed 
and there is no phase of pioneer life with which they are not familiar. 

To Mr. and Mrs. AIcKain were born five children, as follows: Alex C, re- 
siding in Des Moines, Iowa, has a married son, Gay, with one child, Margaret. 



LIXXOLX AXD LA.XCASTER COUNTY 20] 

Adeline is the wife of William Walker, of Boncstccl, South Dakota. Lizzie is 
the wife of Joseph Astley, of Northtield, Minnesota, by whom she has two 
sons. James Kirwin, who resides in Okela, Kansas, is the father of two sons. 
Margaret is the wife of Lloyd Combs, an electrician, who resides at llutte, 
Montana. 

Li politics j\lr. McKain is a stalwart republican, having supported the ])arty 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. l'"raternally he is connected 
with Farragut Post, No. 25, G. A. R., and thus maintains jjleasant relations with 
his old army comrades. He and his wife are a well preserved couple, although 
now seventy-rtve and seventy-four years of age resjjectively. They look much 
younger and keep young in their interests. Air. McKain drives an automobile 
and they take long trips together, having in that way visited .South IXakota in 
the summer of 1915. After long years of active connection with railroad interests 
he is now living retired in the enjoyment of a rest which he has truly earned 
and riclily deserves. 



EDWARD R. SIZER. 



Edward R. .Sizcr is president of the Day & Night Realty Company, con- 
ducting a growing business in real estate, loans and- insurance, handling ranch 
property as a specialty. He is a man of firm purpose and his indefatigable 
industry has been the salient feature in his growing prosperity. He was born 
in Ottawa, Illinois, August 25, 1850, his parents being Randolph and Marinda 
(Root) Sizer. The father, a native of Massachusetts, became a resident of 
Illinois in 1833, casting in his lot with its pioneer settlers, for only the year 
before had the Black Hawk war occurred, terminating Indian supremacy in that 
state. He settled in Ottawa where he engaged in the lumber business, remaining 
for more than two decades a merchant of that city. He there passed away Sep- 
tember 28, 1856, while his wife survived until December ifi, i8'''0. 

Edward R. Sizer was but six years of age at the time of his father's demise. 
He acquired a public school education, passing through consecutive grades to 
his graduation from the high school of Ottawa. He afterward engaged in busi- 
ness in Princeton, Illinois, for a year and in 1874 he arrived in Lincoln where 
he turned his attention to the real estate business. Some time afterward he was 
appointed deputy district clerk under R. M. Vedder and in 1883 he was nomi- 
nated and elected to the position of di.strict clerk with a majority of three thou- 
sand votes. So excellent was the record that he made during his first term in 
the oflice, that he was re-elected in 1887 for a second period of four years. 
Upon the expiration of his services as district clerk in 1891, he joined J. H. Mc- 
Clay in building the Lincoln Normal College. The dormitory of that institution 
is now the Green Gables Sanitarium. From 1809 until 1901 Mr. Sizer was chief 
clerk of customs at Havana, Cuba, and for two years he occupied the position 
of state oil ins])ector in Nebraska. Later he was appointed to the position of 
postmaster in Lincoln under President Roosevelt and continued in that office for 
twelve years under Presidents Roosevelt and Taft, discharging his duties in a 
manner highly satisfactory to the ])ublic. He was always prompt, reliable and 



202 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

faithful, and he retired from office as he entered it — with the confidence and 
good will of all concerned. He then once more resumed active connection with 
the real estate business and is now president of the Day & Night Realty Com- 
pany, with offices in the Lincoln Hotel building at the corner of Ninth and P 
streets. The company handles real estate, makes loans and writes insurance. 
They deal in city and farm jjroperty, making a specialty of ranches in Nebraska 
and adjoining states. The business is incorporated and capitalized for one hun- 
dred thousand dollars and the other officers are: Llenry G. M. Burgess, vice 
president; Charles A. Ranflall, secretary; Fred D. Mason, treasurer; and Harry 
R. Follmer, manager. 

y\t Ottawa, Illinois, on the loth of May, 1871, Mr. Sizer wedded Elizabeth 
C. Atkinson, daughter of David and Mary Id. (Armstrong) Atkinson, who 
were natives of West Virginia. They have become parents of three children : 
Edward R., who resides in East Orange, New Jersey, and is inspector in the 
United States customs service -in New York City; Mrs. Fred E. Hurd, living 
at Council Bluffs; and William A., of the Shedd & Sizer Investment Company 
of r)maha. 

The parents are members of the Holy Trinity church in which Mr. Sizer is a 
vestryman and in the work of the church they take active and heljjful interest. 
That his influence is always on the side of moral progress and uplift is further 
indicated in the fact that he is now serving on the board of directors of 
the Young Men's Christian Association. His political allegiance is given to the 
republican jiarty and fraternally he is connected with the Odd Fellows, the 
United Workmen, the Modern Woodmen, the Knights of Pythias, and the Red 
Men, being in hearty sympathy with the purpose of these dift'erent organizations 
which recognize the obligation of man to his fellows and which teach the prin- 
ci])le of extending a heljiing hanrl wherever assistance is needed. He has made 
a most creditable name in connection with his public service, proving himself 
a loyal and progressive citizen and over the record of both his public career and 
his private life there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. 



ALBERT O. EAIT.KNER. 

Albert ( ). Faulkner is president and general manager of the Woodman Acci- 
dent Company, the oldest accident insurance company of Nebraska. He was 
ffjrmerlv engaged in the ])ractice of medicine, but turned to the insurance business 
and the wise and capable direction of his interests have brought him success 
and prominence in this licld. He was born on a farm in Henry county, Iowa, 
April 4, US59, and is a son of William and Margaret (Johnson) Faulkner. The 
paternal grandfather, James Faulkner, who was a native of \'irginia, was of 
Scotch descent and served with the American army in the War of 1812. In 
Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 17th of November. 7814, he married Rhoda Terry. 
Their son, William Faulkner, was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, November 
20, 1826, and when eleven years of age, or in 1837, was taken by his parents to 
Henrv countv, Iowa, the trip being made from Indiana in a covered wagon, 
drawn by oxen. They were among the pioneers of that state and shared in all 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 203 

ilic liardships and privations incident to settlement upon the frontier. William 
Iviulkncr was married three times, his first wife heing Harriet J. Wilnicth. Mis 
second wife, who Ijore the maiden name of Margaret Johnson, had a family of 
seven children, including Albert O., who was ten years of age at the time of 
h.is mother's demise. Later the father married Permelia A. I'alm, who still 
survives and is now living in Los Angeles, California. William Faulkner devoted 
his life to general farming, but died at the home of his son, .Albert O., in 
Lincoln, December 2(), 1900, his remains being interred in Wyuka cemetery. 
( )f the seven children ijorn of the second marriage, five are yet living: Wesley D., 
a resident of Sheridan. Wyoming; Josephine A., now the wife of John A. 
Campbell, of (jmaha ; .Mbcrt O. ; Elmer E., a resident of Chicago; and Alice E., 
who is now the witlow of Rev. John W. 1 fackley and is living in La .Salle, 
Illinois. The two children who passed away in infancy were -Mary \i. and 
Margaret J. C)n the maternal side, the family comes of Swedi.sh ancestry. 

Dr. Faulkner was reared on a farm in Henry county, Iowa, and supple- 
mented his district school training by study in the schools of Mount Pleasant, 
remaining for a time as a student in the Iowa Wesleyan University of that 
state. \\'hen his university course was completed he went to Seward county, 
Nebraska, where he engaged in teaching for one term, Ijoarding during that time 
with a family who lived in a sod house. At times he had to fight the coyotes 
from the ]3laygrounds surrounding the school house. Desiring to become a 
member of the medical profession, in the fall of 1880 he entered the Hahnemann 
Medical College of Chicago and was graduated therefrom with the class of 1883. 
He then began jiracticing medicine in Fairfield, Iowa, and in 1884 he removed to 
York, Nebraska, where he continued in active practice for six and a half years. 
In 1890 he came to Lincoln and has since devoted his attention to business 
pursuits largely concentrating his efforts upon insurance and real estate. He is 
ilie owner of the Fraternity building on the southeast corner of Thirteenth and 
N streets, which he erected in 1895 in connection with W. E. Sharp and of which 
he is now sole owner with the exception of an eighth interest that is still retained 
by Mr. Sharp. This is one of Lincoln's most popular office buildings. While 
still living in York, Nebraska, in 1890 Dr. Faulkner organized the Woodmen 
Accident Company and removed its headquarters to Lincoln the same year. He 
has since been president and general manager of what is now the oldest accident 
insurance company of Nebraska, its business extending over fourteen .states. 
Dr. Faulkner was also one of the pioneer promoters of the Modern Woodmen of 
America in Nebraska and was for some time its supreme medical examiner. 
He was likewise one of the promoters of the Lincoln Telephone Company and 
for some time was its treasurer. He aided in organizing the Citizen's Railway 
Company of Lincoln, of which he was one of the officers and for several years 
he was a director of the I-irst National I'.ank of Lincoln. .\t the present time 
he is a director of the City National I'.ank. Whatever he undertakes he carries 
through to successful completion. He is a man of marked energy and notable 
business force, who readily recognizes the value of an opportunity. 

On the 13th of December, 1883, in Fairfield, Iowa. Dr. I-'aulkner was united 
in marriage to Miss Jennie \'an Dorn and they have four living children: 
Edwin I., Cora Uny. .Albert E., and Richard W.. all in Lincoln. They also lost 
one son, Robert, who died at the age of ten years. The parents are members 



204 LLXCOLN AND LAXXASTER COUNTY 

of the first Presbyterian church and for many years Dr. Faulkner has been 
chairman of its board of trustees. In pohtics he is a repubhcan but has never 
sought nor desired political office. He belongs to the Commercial Club, the 
Country Club and the Automobile Club and is prominent in Masonic circles. 
His life has been one of continuous activity which has been accorded due 
recognition and today he is numbered among the substantial citizens of the capital. 
His interests are thoroughly identified with those of the state and at all times 
he is ready to lend his aid and co-operation to any movement calculated to benefit 
this section of the country or advance its wonderful development. 



HENRY H. WILSON. 



For thirty-five years a member of the Lincoln bar, Henry H. Wilson has, 
throughout that entire period, made continuous progress and has written his 
name high on the keystone of Nebraska's legal arch. While at all times careful 
to conform his practice to the highest professional ethics he has at the same time 
so guided his course in every relation that his name is honored and respected 
wherever known and most of all where he is best known. The law firm of 
which he is now a member, practicing under the firm style of Burkett, Wilson 
& Brown, is composed of Elmer J. Burkett, formerly United States senator, 
Henry LI. Wilson and Elmer W. Brown, the last named being a nephew of 
Mr. Wilson. 

Upon' a farm near Fremont, Sandusky county, Ohio, on the 1st of January, 
1854, Llenry H. Wilson was born. The father, Nathaniel Wilson, a farmer by 
occupation, was a native of Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, born September 13, 
1813, and was of Scotch-Irish descent. In 1841 he removed to Sandusky county, 
C)hio. He devoted several years of his early manhood to school teaching and 
after his marriage also continued to teach for a time. While engaged in ped- 
agogic work he walked each day three miles to his school and received the 
nuuiificent sum of forty dollars for a three months' term, teaching six days in 
the week. From Sandusky county, Ohio, he removed to Saunders county, Ne- 
braska, in 1 87 1, and in Green precinct secured a homestead claim, which he 
developed into a good farm. Lie died in Valparaiso, Nebraska, October 25, 
1890, when seventy-seven years of age. Nathaniel ^^■ilson was twice married, 
his first union being with Llannah Benscoter, who died in early womanhood and 
in 1 84 1 he wedded Mary Feascl, who was of English and Holland-Dutch descent 
and was born in Franklin county, Ohio, May 23, 1819. In the family were 
nine children. The son Henry H. was the seventh in order of birth and the 
eldest son. Only two are now living, the other being his sister, Mrs. Carolina 
Brown of Lincoln. The mother passed away September 8, 1874, just three and 
a half years after the family came to Nebraska. Mr. Wilson, however, sur- 
vived for a number of years. He was a Dunkard in religious faith and a leader 
in his church. 

Henry H. Wilson spent his boyhood on a farm in Sandusky county, Ohio, 
and attended the nearby district school for about four months each year, one of 
his earlv teachers being the noted educator. Professor H. B. Brown, who 




HEXEY H. WILSON 



f^o 



ivOa 



Tws 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 207 

founded the Valparaiso University of Indiana and who, at the time Mr. Wilson 
was one of his pupils, was a young man less than twenty years of age. When 
a lad of sixteen Henry H. Wilson spent one term as a student in an academy at 
Bryan, Ohio, and he came to Nebraska with his parents when a youth of seven- 
teen years. Being the eldest son he assisted actively in establishing a home for 
the family and in the arduous task of developing the wild land, turning the first 
.furrows in many of the fields. During the winter of 1871-72 he taught school 
in Sarpy county, which adjoins Sandusky county on the east, and in the spring 
of the latter year he attended the Nebraska State Normal school at Peru for 
three months, after which he spent the summer in work upon liis father's farm. 
Later he taught another winter term in Sarpy county and spent another summer 
in the work of the fields. In September, 1873, he matriculated in the University 
of Nebraska, in which he continued his studies for five years, doing six years' 
work in that period and paying his own way all through the university, earning 
the money as an employe of the Marsh Harvester Company, his special work 
being to set up the machines for the farmers and teach them how to operate 
them. He also earned some money as a traveling correspondent for the Omaha 
Bee, devoting the summer months to these activities. In the university he 
became a prominent member of the literary and debating societies and of the 
latter was president. He was also business manager and editor of the Hesperian, 
which was the University periodical of that time, these honors falling to him 
during his junior and senior years. He won the Bachelor of Philosophy degree 
in 1878 and in 1885 the university conferred upon him the Master of Arts 
degree, and in 1895 the degree of Master of Laws. 

Before his graduation in 1878 Mr. Wilson entered into a contract to become 
superintendent of the schools of Seward, Nebraska, and was also principal and 
the only instructor in the high school. He served the Seward schools thus for 
two years and during that period entered upon the 'study of law. On the 2d of 
May, 1880, he became an employe in the law office of Lamb. Billingsley & 
Lambertson of Lincoln, agreeing to take care of the office and library, sweep 
the rooms and do other similar service for which he was to be jjaid twelve dollars 
and a half per month for the first eight months and twenty-five dollars per 
month for the next year. During this period he continued his law studies at 
every available opportunity, his reading lieing directed by his employers and 
on the 2d of February, t88i. lie was admitted to the bar. He continued with 
the same firm, howexer. until November of that year when he entered into 
partnership with Arnott C. Ricketts under the firm style of Ricketts & Wilson. 
In November, 1882, they were joined by Mr. Wilson's former preceptor, Walter 
I. Lamli. under the firm name of Lamb, Ricketts & Wilson, which connection 
continued until November, 1S92, when Mr. Lamb withdrew and the name of 
Ricketts & Wilson was resumed. In 1899 tliey dissolved partnership to enter 
upon other connections, Mr. Ricketts being joined by his son, while Mr. Wilson 
admitted his nephew, Elmer W. Brown, as a partner under the firm name of 
Wilson & Brown. The latter partnership was maintained unchanged until 1908, 
when United States Senator Elmer J. Burkett joined the firm under the firm- 
style of Burkett, \Y\hon & Brown. In his law practice, which has been con- 
stantly growing in volume and importance. Mr. Wilson has been identified with 
five notable cases heard before the United States supreme court, one of the five 
Vol. n— II 



208 LIXXOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

being a celebrated case, that of Anult vs. Griggs. It has become the leading 
case on the power of the state over tlie title to lands lying within its borders. 
Mr. Wilson was admitted to practice before the United States supreme court 
October "ii, 1893. He has been interested as counsel in over three hundred cases 
heard in the supreme court of Nebraska, covering almost every class of litiga- 
tion which has reached that court. He has tried cases in fifty of the counties of 
Nebraska and has practiced in all the adjoining states. In 1889 'le was invited 
to aid in organizing the Central Law School of Lincoln, a private institution, of 
which he became a member of the faculty. In 1891 this school became the law 
department of the University of Nebraska with, its entire faculty as teachers, 
and Mr. Wilson is yet a member of its faculty, remaining as legal instructor in 
the school for twenty-five years. No doubt fully one-third of the lawyers of 
this state have received at least a portion of their professional training from 
him. He was one of the chief counsels in the famous gubernatorial contest of 
1890, appearing for Governor Powers, populist, against Governor Boyd, demo- 
crat. Mr. Wilson argued the constitutional questions involved in that contest 
before the state supreme court. In 1888 he was selected by the university 
alumni and appointed by the board of regents to prosecute before that board the 
charges filed against the chancellor of the university alleging incompetence and 
malfeasance in office which resulted in the board demanding the resignation of 
the chancellor. Mr. Wilson carries a fine gold watch today bearing the date 
July 18, 188S, the day on which he made the closing argument, the watch coming 
to him as a present from the members of the faculty of the university. He is 
recognized as one of the most scholarly lawyers of the state. Besides his mastery 
of our own system of jurisprudence he is broadly read in ancient law and espe- 
cially in the elaborate and finished system of Roman law. 

Mr. Wilson is a most earnest republican and while not a politician in the 
usually accepted sense of the term, he has been most loyal to his party and 
earnest in his efforts to secure the adoption of its principles. In 1902 he was 
the candidate of Lincoln and of Lancaster county for the republican nonn'nation 
for governor of Nebraska but was defeated in the convention although he had 
the support of many of the ablest men of the state — men who desire that the 
office shall be filled not by the professional politician but by the one whose intel- 
lectual force, business ability and public-spirited citizenship eminently qualify 
him for the position. In 1904 Mr. Wilson was a presidential elector for Ne- 
braska on the Roosevelt ticket. In addition to his prominence at the bar and in 
politics. Air. Wilson has become well known in financial circles, being a director 
of the Lincoln State Bank and vice president of the Lincoln Savings & Loan 
Association. 

On the 22d of June, 1882, Mr. Wilson was married to Miss Emma Parks, 
who was graduated from the State University in 1880 and who is a daughter 
of Benjamin D. Parks, captain of Company D of the Twenty-second Iowa In- 
fantry during the Civil war. He was killed in the second battle of ^Vinchcster, 
September 19, 1864. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Ann Famsworth, 
after living a widow for over fifty years, passed away recently at the age of 
eighty-one. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have four living children: Helen, a student 
at the Art Institute of Chicago ; Edith, the wife of Paul T. B^ll of Oakland, 
California ; Ralph P., a lawyer of Lincoln ; and ^^'alter P., a student of archi- 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 209 

tecture in Columbia University. Both parents and all four children arc gradu- 
ates of the academic department of the State University and three of the six 
hold the scholarship degree of Phi Beta Kappa. 

Mr. Wilson has always been deeply interested in every plan and project for 
the betterment of civic and social conditions in Lincoln and for many years he 
was a member of the school board of the city. He is a thirty-third degree Mason 
and a Noble of the ]\Iystic Shrine. He has passed practically all of the chairs 
in the various branches of the order and is a past potentate of Sesostris Temple, 
A. A. O. N. M. S. of Lincoln and is a past master of Kadosh in the consistory. 
He attends and loyally supports the First Congregational church. In the strict 
path of his profession he has connection with the Lancaster County, the Ne- 
braska State and the American Bar Associations and has been honored with 
the presidency of the first two. 

When his friends were urging him strongly to become a candidate for the 
nomination for governor, The Courier of Lincoln said of him: "In all his 
instincts and feelings Mr. Wilson is still a young man. This is traceable to the 
inborn enthusiasm that is so marked a characteristic. For a number of years 
he has been an instructor of the law class of the State University, and this 
intimate association with young men has been the fount from which he has 
renewed his youth. As an instructor he is very popular. In all the years of his 
activities in Lincoln Mr. Wilson has invariably stood for that which is soundest 
morally and best for man. He is an independent thinker, firm in his convictions, 
with the ability to expound his beliefs and defend his principles. Some of these 
qualities bar men from hopes of political preferment, and the possession of them 
has heretofore shut the door of political ambition to H. H. Wilson. That it 
pays even in politics to be honest, sturdy and unflinching is proven by the fact 
that in the present crisis of the party many have turned to Mr. Wilson and 
asked him to stand for governor. Like all men who have the gift of oratory 
Mr. Wilson has a dramatic quality of utterance and a poise that have been mis- 
taken by many indifferent observers for austerity. Professional life with a man 
of studious habits, has a tendency to enwrap one in a mantle of self-concentra- 
tion that can easily be mistaken for aloofness. While in fact Mr. Wilson is a 
man of keen interest in his fellows and an active concern in affairs, he has had 
the misfortune to be misunderstood by some in matters which a closer personal 
friendship soon dispels. That this is true is proven by the high esteem and wide 
popularity he has achieved in those fraternal, professional and social organiza- 
tions'in which he has been most active." 



MICHAEL SCHIRK. 



Abilitv and fidelity to duty have brought Michael Schirk to the prominent 
position which he occupies as foreman in the Burlington shops at HaveIock,.m 
which connection he has the direction of important interests under h.s control 
and is regarded as one of the most trusted employes of the corporation which 
he represents Of German nativity, he was bom in Liblar. near Cologne, in 
the Rhine Province, March 29, 1856, a son of Johan a.ul Maria Anna ( Schmitz) 



210 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Schirk. He pursued his education in the pubHc schools of Germany to the age 
of thirteen years and he had the opportunity to pursue a course preparatory for 
the priesthood or to attend a seminary for teachers, maintained by Count Met- 
ternich, on whose estate his maternal grandfather had spent his entire life as 
a landscape gardener. His father, however, would not consent to his continuing 
in school and in 1869 he became an apprentice in the machine shops of Joseph 
Fritz at Suelz, a suburb of Cologne, to which place his parents had removed in 
1866. His mother died during the war of 1870-71, a victim of smallpox, which 
had been spread throughout the district by the French prisoners of war and 
which became an epidemic in Germany, causing ihe death of many prisoners 
and citizens. In 1872 the father married again, choosing for his second wife 
Sibila Schuetz. Two sons of the family had previously passed away and at his 
father's second marriage Michael Schirk left home, as did his three sisters as 
soon as they were old enough to make a living. 

When his three years' apprenticeship at the machinist's trade had been com- 
pleted Michael Schirk went to Bochum, in the province of Westphalia, and was 
employed in the brass department of the Bochum steel mills. In December, 1874, 
he went to Essen and applied for a position in the mechanical department of 
the Krupp gun works. Because of the accuracy required in that work he had 
quite a time in convincing the foreman that he was qualified, for the man thought 
that a boy of eighteen could not have had sufficient experience. Upon the prom- 
ise that he would do his best he was given a trial and he soon won the confidence 
and friendship of the foreman, In July, 1875, however, he left his position, 
finding the work too monotonous, for during seven months he had worked on 
only three different sorts of work. Deciding to see something of the world, he 
and a friend traveled over Europe, earning their money by securing jobs at the 
various places where they desired to stop. In 1876 Mr. Schirk was sent from 
Vienna as machinist with an exhiljit to the Centennial Exposition in Philadel- 
phia, where he spent four months. Returning to Europe, he and his friend 
finally found themeslves looking for work in France, but such a bitter feeling 
existed in that country after the war of 1871 that no German could secure em- 
ployment. They were about to be sent with the French Legions to Aladagascar 
or Algiers, but they watched their chance to escape and made their way toward 
the Rhine and home. For three days and four nights they were without sleep 
and food except some fruit which they gathered by the wayside. Too proud 
to beg or go home, Mr. Schirk obtained assistance at Cologne from his eldest 
sister to the amount of five marks, or about a dollar and a quarter. This gave 
the young men a chance to enjoy a good meal and soon afterward they secured 
work as machinists. Times were hard in Germany and in fact all over Europe. 
After seeing his partner taken care of Mr. Schirk found employment as a 
machinist on the new fortifications which were being built in a ring around 
Cologne, four miles from the city. He greatly enjoyed that work, for he was 
under the supervision of officers who were fine men and who were looking out 
for the interests of the war department. These included Lieutenants Meyer 
and Kaufman, engineers, and while there Mr. Schirk had private orders through 
Lieutenant Meyer to make models of doors, windows, bridges and all iron con- 
struction used in the fortifications with the offer to receive the contract for 
• that kind of work for fortifications on the right side of the Rhine when the bid- 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 211 

der for the contract should be successful. In 1876 he took the examination for 
military service but was rejected. However, in 1877, he was drawn and after two 
months' service was sent back for disposition in 1878 and ])ut in the reserves. 
His work for the government was in building forts at Niel, Longerich and 
Mnengersdorf and in erecting powder magazines between the forts. Ily Feb- 
ruary, 1878, his work was completed, after which he obtained emi)loynient in a 
country town, Niederempt, in the Rhine Province, where a Mr. Wolf conducted 
a blacksmith and machine shop, employing two men. In that position he had 
to arise at five thirty and begin work in the shop at six. He was allowed twenty 
minutes for breakfast, beginning at seven, worked again until ten and then had 
luncheon. Dinner was served at twelve and at one he was again at work. 
Luncheon was served between four and four twenty and he quit work at eight, 
after which he had supper. He was thus on duty for about fourteen hours out 
of the twenty-four. Here he did all kinds of work, making nails, wagons, farm 
machinery, disk harrows, butter churns, little hand power threshers, and in fact 
making everything from a water pail to a threshing machine and also doing 
horseshoeing and blacksmith repairing. On Sunday morning he would go to 
the shop and work as bookkeeper. His wages were eight marks, or two dollars, 
per week with board and room. He was employed there until the end of the 
year, when he found that he had overdrawn his account exactly a year's wages. 
He gave his employer notice that he would stay another year and pay off his 
debt. The people among whom he lived were sociable, the time passed quickly 
and he enjoyed the work, finding at the end of the year that he had a capital 
of eighty-five pfennigs, or twenty-one cents. Sending his trunk to Cologne with 
a butter and egg dealer who jnade weekly trips to the city with a horse and 
wagon, he then paid forty pfennigs for a ticket and returned to Cologne in 
1880. For two years and four months thereafter he was employed as a ma- 
chinist by the Rhine Railroad at Nikkes. near Cologne, and then he planned to 
start again upon his travels. 

His friend, Henry Klingbeil, who bad an uncle living at Crete, Nebraska, 
had gone on a visit to the new world and promised to let Mr. Schirk know con- 
ditions in this country. He and another friend, Fritz Marx, figured the ex- 
penses of the trip, laid l)y a sum of money each pay day. and at the end of 
twelve months they had everything needed for the journey, including transpor- 
tation to Crete and money for necessary expenses. On the ist of June, 1882, 
they left Cologne for Rotterdam and took passage on the steamer Edam, which 
weighed anchor at Amsterdam on the 3d of June. They arrived in New York 
on the 17th of that month and reached Crete on the 24tb, after an interesting 
experience en route from New York occasioned by a washout at Chariton, Iowa. 
On the i8th of July Mr. Schirk went to Plattsmouth, Nebraska, and the fo^l- 
lowing day entered the em\Aoy of the Burlington Railroad Company. In 1889 
and 1890 he was engaged in mercantile pursuits in Plattsmouth, after which he 
returned to the employ of the railroad company, and in January, 1S94. he came 
to Havelock, where the shops had recently iK-en established. Since that time he 
has been continuously with the comjiany and following the erection of the new 
shops in 191 1 he has acted as foreman. He is an expert in his line, knowmg 
every phase of the machinist's trade, and thus he is able to direct the labors of 
those who serve under him. 



2]2 LLXCUL.X A.XU LA.XCASTEK COUXTV 

In 1883, at Platlsmouth, Mr. Schirk was married to Miss Gertrude Peters, 
who was born in Germany and came to the United States with a girl friend. 
They had been engaged before Mr. Schirk left the fatherland. They have be- 
come the parents of five children : John M., of Alliance, Nebraska, who is mar- 
ried and has five children ; Gertrude, who is the wife of Fred Hug, of Havelock, 
and has three children ; Soj)hia, who married Mark Wiley, of Havelock, and has 
two children ; Otto J., who married and was employed in the office of the super- 
intendent of the Burlington Railroad Company at Omaha, and who was killed 
by an automobile when alighting from a street car four blocks from his home 
the night of April 3, iyi6; and Clara, at home. • 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church and Air. 
Schirk gives his political allegiance to the democratic party. For two years he 
served as a member of the city council and he always stood for that which he 
thought to be best for the welfare of the city. In 1886 he joined the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and was a delegate to Grand Island, Nebraska, where 
the Grand Lodge was organized. He was also a delegate in 1887 and again in 
1889 and for six consecutive years he hold office in the local lodge. In 1893 he 
joined the Modern Woodmen of .America. He is well kown in Havelock and is 
prominent in railway circles, having many friends both among those who serve 
him and those whom he serves. 



SHEPHERD H. KING, D. D. S. 

No history of Lincoln would L)e complete without extended reference to Dr. 
Shepherd H. King, who was the first dentist of the city and for many years 
continued in active practice here but for the past fifteen years has lived retired, 
making his home at No. 1 145 L street. He has now passed the eighty-first mile- 
stone on life's journey, his birth having occurred in Berkshire county, Massa- 
chusetts. June 8, 1833. He was educated at Hoosic Falls and at Cambridge, 
New York, becoming a civil engineer, and soon after his marriage, he removed 
to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he took up his profession, being the first civil 
engineer in that city. He practiced along that line until after the outlireak of 
the Civil war and then enlisted as a member of Company D. Sixth Minnesota 
Infantry, with which he served for three years, being engaged most of the time 
in quelling Indian attacks upon the frontier. He held the rank of fir.st lieuten- 
ant of his company and his duty was often of a most arduous character. He 
took a supply train across the country from Mankato to Fort Thompson and 
his knowledge of engineering proved of great value in that connection. He 
carried his instruments along with him. and on one occasion when the regi- 
ment was making an advance in the wrong direction, he told them of their mis- 
take and set them upon the right path. He was also sent in command of a 
detachment of twelve men to a point in Minnesota and captured and brought 
back some Indian warriors — a feat which was considered quite difficult if not 
impossible with such a small detachment. In recognition of his meritorious 
service he was placed in command of the garrison at Fort Ripley for six months 
or until he was called to his regiment in Helena, Arkansas. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 213 

It was in November, 1871, that Dr. King arrived in Lincoln, where he opened 
an office and began the practice of dentistry, being the first representative of the 
profession in this city, which ;it tliat time was a small village. He purchased lots 
where the Star building now stands and for a time he boarded at the Clifton 
Hotel but later established a home upon the ground which he had purchased. 
His first office was over what is now Harley's drug store and for thirty-one 
years he successfully practiced dentistry, retiring fifteen years ago. In the mean- 
time he had enjoyed a liberal patronage and hat! kept in touch with the advanced 
methods of the profession, doing excellent work for his patrons. 

For more than thirty years Dr. King has made nis home at No. 1145 L street. 
He was married in Troy, New York, June 14, 1858, to Miss Deborah G. Akin, who 
was born in Rensselaer county. New York, March 29, 1839, and is a relative of 
Marquis de Lafayette. She shared with her husband in all the pioneer experi- 
ences in Minnesota and she has lived to witness almost the entire growth of 
Lincoln. In August, 1886, she was elected national inspector of the Woman's 
Relief Corps at the national encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic 
and Woman's Relief Corjis held at Portland, Maine, and later at a national 
encampment held at Miimeapolis. Mrs. King advocated and had adopted in 
spite of strong opposition the measure providing that eligibility to the Woman's 
Relief Corps be broadened to include all loyal women instead of relatives of 
soldiers only, as was then the case. P^or many years she has been a worker 
and organizer in the cause of prohibition and she was the organizer of the 
Woman's Biiiietallic League, a purely political organization for women, formed 
in i8g6 and advocating the silver standard. At the time it disbanded at the close 
of the campaign it had a membership of thirteen hundred and seventy-five. Mrs. 
King was reared in the Methodist church but both she and her husband have 
been members of the Universalist church for years and Dr. King was president 
of the society as long as the organization existed in Lincoln, while she was chair- 
man of the board. Dr. King cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln and 
long supported the principles of the republican party but since 1896 has been an 
admirer and follower of William Jeimings Bryan. He has never aspired to 
public office and has never become identified with secret orders. Dr. and Mrs. 
King have no children of their own but reared five girls. This worthy couple 
are among Lincoln's earliest living settlers and are acquainted with the entire 
history of the city as it has emerged from villagehood and taken on all of the 
fvidences of metropolitan life. Mrs. King has been a most close observer of 
events and recounts many interesting experiences. Their lives are so inter- 
woven with the annals of Lincoln as to become an integral part of its history. 



W. A. SELLECK. 



W. A. Sellcck, manager of the Western Supi)ly Comjiany of Lincoln, whole- 
sale dealers in steam, water and plumbing supjilies. -and also identified with 
other business interests of importance, is numbered among those men of enter- 
prise whose activities contribute to public progress and prosperity as well as to 
individual success. A native of Minnesota, he was born in Owatonna, May 30, 



214 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

1857, his parents being Alson and ]\Iary A. (Kent) Selleck, who were natives 
of New York and in 1856 became residents of Minnesota, where the father 
followed the occupation of farming for many years. He came of a family of 
English lineage, the name apjjearing in old English records, but for many genera- 
tions his ancestry has been distinctively American in its lineal and collateral 
lines. Both he and his wife have now passed away. 

W. A. Selleck was reared upon the old homestead farm in Minnesota and 
attended the country schools, while later he pursued an academic course in 
Carleton College at Northfield, Minnesota. Subsequently he took up the study 
of law in the office of Judge Hickman, now professor of law in the Minnesota 
Law School. In March, 1885, he removed to Lincoln, where he entered upon 
the active practice of his profession, being accorded a liberal clientage. lie was 
senior partner in the firm of Selleck & Lane, which later became Abbott, Selleck 
& Lane, and so continued for several years. He made for himself a creditable 
position at the Lincoln bar and was active in practice until 1898, when he 
severed his professional connections and concentrated his efforts upon the man- 
agement of business affairs. Since then he has been identified with the Western 
Supply Company as its manager and they conduct a substantial business as 
wholesale dealers in steam, water and plumbing supplies. Mr. Selleck is also 
president of the American Building & Loan Company and is vice president of the 
Lincoln Safe Deposit Company. 

Mr. Selleck was married to Miss Nellie H. Horton, a native of Maine and a 
daughter of John B. and Cornelia (Woolworth) Horton. Mr. and ]\Irs. Selleck 
have two children : John K., who is connected with the National N-ray Manu- 
facturing Company; and Marjory, a teacher in the Wayne Normal School. The 
family have a beautiful home at No. 1936 F street and they are members of the 
First Congregational church. 

In politics Mr. Selleck is a republican and has been prominent as a party 
leader, serving in several local offices and for one term as a member of the state 
senate. He has been a member of the city council of Lincoln, has also been city 
attorney and for nine years was a member of the school board. He was at 
one time president of the Lincoln Commercial Club and has been a member 
of the Commercial Building Association since its organization. Fraternally he 
is identified with the Masons, the United Workmen, the Woodmen of the World 
and the Knights of the Maccabees. He stands for progress and improvement 
in every line in which he has been active and is a most helpful and progressive 
member of the Commercial Club, being in hearty sympathy with its plans and 
projects for the development and upbuilding of the city. 



JAMES H. MORRISON. 

James H. Morrison, who is living retired in College View, devoted his active 
life to the work of the ministry of the Seventh Day Adventist church and was 
honored by election to important positions in that denomination. He has always 
been characterized by high purpose, moral fervor and administrative ability 
and has been instrumental in advancing the interests of the chtirch in various 





UK. AND MRS. JAilES H. ilORKlSON 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTLR COUNTY 217 

parts of the country. Lie was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, on (he 
22d of October, 1841, of the marriage of Benjamin J. and Nancy (McGinnis) 
Morrison, both natives of Pennsylvania. The father, who was a farmer, re- 
moved to Lee county, Iowa, in early manhood and there purchased land which 
he operated for twelve years. He then went to Alarion county, Iowa, and 
devoted the remainder of his life to farming there. He passed away in 1884 
and his wife died in 1861. 

James LI. Morrison was reared under the ])arcntal roof and was given excel- 
lent educational advantages, for after completing the course offered in the jniblic 
schools he became a student in Central College at Pella, Iowa. .Although this 
is a Baptist instittttion Mr. Morrison became interested in the doctrines of the 
.Seventh Day Adventist church while attending there and on investigating the 
teachings of that church became convinced of their soundness, .\fter leaving 
school he entered the ministry, proved a very efficient worker in that field and 
for some time served as president of the Iowa conference and later was manager 
of a sanitarium conducted by the Seventh Day Adventists at St. Helena, Cali- 
fornia. ^\dlile living in that state he was made president of district No. 6, which 
includes si.x states, and during the time that he held that office he did much to 
jiromote the advancement of the church in that district. He was subsequently 
transferred to another district, also comprising six states, and still later, in 1893, 
he was sent to College View, Nebraska, and placed in charge of this district, 
which includes six states and a part of Canada. He remained in charge of the 
work of the district until 1902, when he retired from the ministry. Lie has since 
remained in College View and for two years was superintendent of Union Col- 
lege. He is well informed and deeply interested in all of the various phases 
of the activity of the church and although he is now living retired his advice 
is still sought by leaders in church work. He has also been identified with finan- 
cial interests as he was one of the organizers and is still the vice president of 
the Bank of College View. 

Mr. Morrison was married on the 17th of .J^ugust, 1871, to Miss Jennie 
Mitchell, of Whiteside county, Illinois. Her parents, George and Sarah (Little) 
Mitchell, were both born in Connecticut and her father followed shoemaking 
and farming in early life but subsequently became a physician. He removed 
with his family to Whiteside county, Illinois, in an early day in the history of 
that state and later went to Mechanicsville, Iowa, where he purchased land, to 
the operation of which he turned his attention. Both he and his wife died in 
1866. Mr. and Mrs. Morrison have become the parents of seven children. 
Myrtle, who was born August 27, 1872, gave her hand in marriage to E. Spencer 
and died in January, 1907, leaving a son, Gerald, whose birth occurred in August, 
1896. Winnie E. was born in July, 1874, and died on the 21st of October, 1876. 
Estella, who was born on the 20th of February, 1876, died on the 23d of October 
of that year. ^Maude was born July 4. 1877. a"'! died in June, 191 2. H. Archie, 
born December 2, 1879, is now president of Union College and a sketch of^his 
life appears elsewhere in this work. Bertha M. was born February 23, 1883, 
and died on the i8th of November, 1893- R"l'y Charlene, born March 7. 1892. 
is now the wife of V. J. Johns, a minister of the Seventh Day Adventist church 
located at Denver, Colorado. 

Mr. Morrison is an adherent of the democratic party and for four years 



218 LLX'COLN AND LANXASTER CUUXTY 

served acceptably as mayor of College View, giving the nuiiiicipality an upright 
and businesslike administration. During that time light and water plants were 
established and the paving of streets begun. In all the relations of life he has 
measured up to high standards of manhood, is rich in the honor and esteem of 
those who have come in contact with him, and is widely known not only in 
Nebraska Ijut also in other states. 



T. M. CAMP. 



No record of Lincoln's industrial development would be complete without 
extended reference to J. M. Camp, senior partner of the firm of J. M. Camp & 
Son, manufacturers of and dealers in delivery wagons. They also do painting 
and trimming and all kinds of repair work in their line and the business is one 
of the oldest established industries of the city, where Mr. Camj) established his 
home on the 2Sth of February, 1879. He was at that time a man of thirty-one 
years, his birth having occurred in Davenport, Iowa, March 6, 1848. His par- 
ents, J. M. and Mary (Giberson) Cami\ were natives of Zanesville, (_)hio, where 
the father learned and followed the carriage making trade until 1836, when he 
removed westward to Scott county, Iowa, then a frontier district still embraced 
within the borders of the territory of Wisconsin. He entered a claim four miles 
below the present site of the city of Davenport and later removed to a village 
called Rockingham which, it was believed, would develop into a city. The loca- 
tion, however, proved unfavorable and the town was moved up the river, thus 
founding the city of Davenport. After living there for some time J. M. Camp, 
Sr., went to Mount A'ernon, Linn county, Iowa, where he conducted business 
for a number of years, during which time his wife died at the age of sixty. He 
afterward came to Lincoln and spent his remaining days here. He died in De- 
cember, but if he had lived until the following March he would have been 
eighty-five years old. He was a good workman in the line of carriage building 
and was a personal friend of John Deere, for whom he sold plows. He was 
familiar with every phase of Iowa's pioneer development, living there at the 
time of the murder of Colonel Davenport, so that he was familiar with the history 
of that unfortunate episode which aroused all of the early settlers. Mr. Camp 
was a man of large, powerful physique, well formed, and had great strength. 
In his family were six children. William, the eldest, served for three years as 
a member of the Twenty-fourth Iowa Infantry during the Civil war and died 
a year after his return home. Rowena became the wife of Colonel J. Q. Wilds, 
who was a member of the Twenty-fourth Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. He had his 
arm shattered at the battle of Winchester, was operated on but died at Win- 
chester while under the influence of the anaesthetic. He and his elflest daughter 
were buried in the same grave. He and his wife and two daughters all died 
within three months and all of different diseases. The third member of the 
family, D. W. Camp, is a business man of Lincoln. Mary became the wife of 
James A. Bronson and is now deceased. J. M. is the fifth in order of birth. 
George, the youngest, lives at Mount Vernon, Iowa. 

T. M. Camp learned the carriage making trade under the direction of his 



LLXCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 219 

father, beginning work when seventeen years of age. lie supplemented his 
public school education by study at Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa. He 
possessed natural musical talent, having an excellent tenor voice, but when he 
came to Lincoln he decided to leave music alone, as it required much time and 
money and he felt that he had neither to spare. However, he was prevailed 
upon to become a member of the choir of the Presbyterian ciuirch and when 
the people heard him sing his services were in much demand, so that he sang in 
choirs and glee clubs for a number of years. He did not neglect business, how- 
ever, and two hours after he arrived in Lincoln on the 25th of b'cliruary, 1879, 
he was actively engaged in carriage work, painting buggies. He also did repair 
work and built buggies for sale and gradually concentrated his attention more 
and more largely upon his individual business interests. For the past ten years 
he has remained at his present location at Nos. 240 and 242 Soutli Tenth street, 
where under the firm style of J. M. Camp & Son he is engaged in the manu- 
facture and sale of delivery wagons and also does painting and trimming and 
all kinds of repair work. The business represents four distinct trades, namely, 
blacksmithing, painting, trimming and woodwork. He has a contract with 
express companies all over the state to do their repairing and he also repairs 
automobiles, employing six or seven men. He does expert work and among 
his customers are those who have given him their patronage for a quarter of a 
century. 

It was through his activity in musical circles that Mr. Camp met the lady 
who became his wife — Miss Eunice Regnier, who was born in Marietta, Ohio. 
They now have two children : Laurence, who is married and is in Inisiness with 
his father; and Mary, who is a senior in the University of Nebraska. 

Mrs. Camp is a member of the Episcopal church and Mr. Camp belongs to 
the Masonic and Knights of Pythias lodges. His political support is given to 
the republican party but he does not seek nor desire office. He is a home-loving 
man, jovial and genial, enjoying a good story and always looking upon the 
liright side of things. He is today one of Lincoln's oldest and most valued busi- 
ness men, and while he has not become wealthy, he has acquired a comfortable 
comp'fetence and, more than that, he has ever enjoyed the respect and esteem of 
those with whom he has been associated, for his course in business and in 
private life has commended him to the confidence and good will of all with whom 
he has come in contact. 



HON. ALEXANDER H. HUTTON. 

Hon. Alexander H. Hutton, member of the house of reiircsentatives from 
the thirtieth Nebraska district and active in republican circles in Lincoln, is 
perhaps even more widely known in the capitol city as general contractor, in 
which connection he has done most important work, erecting many of the finest 
homes and the most substantial office buildings of Lincoln, He has here resided 
since 1880, arriving in this city when a young man of about thirty-four years. 

Llis birth occurred on a farm near York, Livingston county, New Y'ork, 
July 22, 1846, his parents being Alexander and Jane (Hanna) Hutton, the 



220 LIXCOLX AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

former a farmer by occupation. The parents never came to the west, spending 
their last days in Livingston county. They had eight children, six sons and two 
daughters: JosepW. a retired farmer of Perry county. New York; James S., 
deceased: Mary, the wife of Alexander ]McNelt of Hornellsville, New York; 
Alexander H. ; Thomas and William J., who have passed away; Samuel, residing 
in I'err',-, New York; and Jennie, the widow of Joseph llanna and a resident of 
York, New York. 

Alexander H. Hutton spent his lioyhood days on the home farm and u])on 
attaining his majority served a regular apprenticeship to the carpenter's trade. 
Li fact his training included every branch of the builder's trade, and he not only 
mastered carpentering but also brick and stone work, painting, plastering, etc. 
When his apprenticeship was over he at once took up the business of contracting 
and was thus engaged for five years in his native county. In the meantime he 
had spent the years 1869 and 1870 in Jackson county, Kansas, during which 
period he taught school. He had previously obtained a good academic education, 
supplementing his district school course by a year's study in the Leroy Academy 
of Genesee county. New York, and a year's study in Geneseo Academy of 
Livingston county. New York. After teaching school for two winters in Jackson 
county, Kansas, he returned to New \'ork and resumed the contracting business. 
In 1870 he went to Cleveland, Ohio, where he did general contracting for eight 
years, during which period he erected the Johns Building, which was the first 
seven story structure of that city. In 1880 he came from Cleveland to Lincoln, 
where he has now resided for thirty-six years, all the while engaged in general 
contracting and often employing from forty to fifty men. Scores of Lincoln's 
residences and office blocks have been erected by him, including several of the 
tine business blocks on O street, among them being the Royal Heart, the Kitchen 
block and others. Today he is the pioneer active contractor of Lincoln. In i<p2 
lie built his own home at No. 1435 N street — a large, twenty room, three story 
modern frame residence, now in the business section of the city, so that the 
property is very valuable. One of the linest homes of Lincoln erected by Air. 
Hutton is the residence of the late Judge Allen W. Field, at the corner of 
Seventeenth and J streets, it being completed in July, 1911, after having been 
under construction for a year and a half. He also built the Gere residence on D 
'street, between Eighth and Ninth streets. 

On the loth of September, 1879. Mr. Hutton was married to Miss ]\Iary E. 
Lucas of Hanover, Michigan, who was born in Genesee county. New York, 
and they have four living children: Ralph L.. a civil engineer located at Casper, 
Wyoming, in the service of the Hurlington Railroad Company ; Harriet L., now 
the wife of James E. Edgerton of Fairfield, Idaho; John L., a civil engineer for- 
merly with the Burlington Railroad lint now a resident of Idaho, where he is 
proving up a homestead : and Geraldine. a student in the University of Nebraska. 
The three eldest children are married. One daughter. Elsie Vera, died at the 
age of twenty-one years as a result of a fall in the gymnasium of the State 
University, where she was then a student. 

Mr. Hutton is a Royal Arch Mason, Knight Templar and Mystic Shriner 
and is a past master of his lodge, past high priest of the chapter. i)ast eminent 
commander of the commandery and past potentate of the Alystic Shrine. He is 
also an Elk and Odd Fellow, and his religious faith is indicated by his member- 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 221 

ship in the Presbyterian church. He has been a Hfclong repiibHcan and for 
twelve years served as a member of the city council, during one year of which 
time he was president. In 1914 he was elected to represent the thirtieth Nebraska 
district in the general assembly, of which he is now a member. During his long 
service in the city council he supported and championed many good measures 
which have resulted beneficially to the city, one of these being the ordinance which 
created the present municipal lighting plant. He introduced the ordinance 
which established the plant and voted for its passage against most bitter opposi- 
tion, there being but four of the fourteen councilnien in favor of the project at 
first. He proved to them, however, the wisdom and value of the course, and 
therefore Lincoln does not today pay an exorbitant price for its lighting to some 
private corporation. Many tangible evidences of his public spirit may be cited 
and those who investigate his record will find that his course has always been 
characterized by marked devotion to the general good and that he has ever 
subordinated personal interest to the public welfare. As a business man and 
citizen, therefore, he is entitled to representation among the most prominent 
residents of Lincoln. 



FRANK MILLS. 



Frank Mills, who resides at College \'icw but maintains his business offices 
at Lincoln, is a man of unusual initiative, liusiness acumen and farsightedness 
and is ably managing many important business interests. He is secretary of the 
Nebraska Mutual Insurance Company, the Dwelling House Mutual Insurance 
Company, and Home Savings & Loan Association, the latter of which he organ- 
ized. He is also an important factor in the moral and spiritual life of his 
community. He is pastor of an undenominational church at College Mew, which 
he founded and which has proved, the feasibility of the union of Christians of 
varying creeds for the purpose of working for a common end. His l)irth occurred 
in New York on the 15th of September, i86g, and he is a son of J. H. and Susan 
M. (Baker) Mills, the former born in New York and the latter in \'ennont. 
In early manhood the father followed railroading but in 1S71 he removed to 
Buffalo county, Nebraska, and took U]i land under the honieslead law- l-'rom 
that time until he retired from active life in 1904 he devoted his attention to 
farming, which he found both profitable and congenial. On giving up the work 
of the farm he removed to University Place, Lancaster county, where he passed 
away on the 25th of February, 1908, when sixty-four years of age. He was a 
veteran of the Civil war, having served from the beginning of the conflict until 
1863 with the One Hundred and Twenty-second New ^ork X'olunteer Infantry. 
At the battle of Gettysburg he received a wound which caused him to lose the 
use of his right arm. His wife survives and is living at I'niversity Place at the 
age of seventy-three years. 

Frank Mills grew to manhood in Buffalo county, Nebraska, and received his 
early education in its public schools. Subsequently he entered the Nebraska 
Wesleyan University at University Place and still later iiecame a student^ in 
Denver University of Denver, where he prepared for the ministry. IIis first 



222 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

charge was at Coffey ville, Kansas, and for lifteen years he continued in the 
service of the Methodist Episcopal church, holding a number of pastorates during 
that time in Nebraska. At length, however, he decided to enter the business 
world and accordingly engaged in the insurance business at Lincoln. His ofifices 
are in the Walsh block at No. 141 South Twelfth street. The interests under 
his control are extensive and the business of the various companies has shown a 
steady growth which is attributable largely to his energy and excellent judgment. 
In 1900 he organized a union church at College Mew, the members of which 
represent eleven different denominations, and in 1912 a church edifice costing 
nine thousand dollars was erected. He is pastor of the congregation and under 
his leadership it has accomplished much good in the community. 

Air. Mills was married on the loth of June, 1896, to Miss Maude L. Swan, a 
daughter of W. G. and Rebecca J. (Robb) Swan, natives of Illinois. In 1859 
the family removed to Nemaha county, Nebraska, but subsequently they became 
residents of Johnson county. After farming land which he had taken up under 
the homestead law Mr. Swan turned his attention to the furniture and under- 
taking business, in which he was engaged for twenty-five years, and still later 
he became a lumber dealer. The last years of his life were spent in honorable 
retirement at University Place and there he died in September, 1908. At the 
time of the Civil war he enlisted in the Union army but during the greater part 
of his term of service he was on the Nebraska frontier fighting Indians. He 
was known as Colonel .Swan and was chosen as a member of Governor Holcomb's 
military staff". His wife still survives and is a highly esteemed resident of 
L^niversity Place. Mrs. Mills is the editor of Golden Rod, a mutual insurance 
paper, which she estalilished four months ago and which has already gained 
recognition in its field. She has become the mother of five children: Mildred, 
who was born December 2<), i8g8, and who died in May, 1905; Marie J., born 
March 16, 1900; Paul S., born January 12, 1903: and Maynard \'. and Alerna V., 
twins, born May 16, 1906. 

Mr. Mills is a democrat in politics and is greatly interested in everything that 
concerns the community welfare. He is now secretary of the school board at 
College View and his influence has always been on the side of educational 
advancement. In 1915 he served as chaplain of the house of representatives. 
His religious faith is that of the Alethodist church but he recognizes that all 
denominations are united on the essentials of Christianity and believes that their 
minor differences should be forgotten and that all should cooperate for the 
accomplishment of the great work which is the aim of all. Fraternally he is 
identified with the Masonic order and the Independent (Jrder of Odd Fellows. 



CAPTAIN D.'VMD CROCKETT CRAWFORD. 

Captain David Crockett Crawford, living retired in Lincoln, was born in 
.St. Landries parish, Louisiana, on the 20th of March, 1S40. His father, John 
W. Crawford, a native of Pennsylvania, was of Scotch descent. He became a 
mechanical engineer and in early manhood went to the south, where he engaged 
in installing steam power in cotton and sugar mills, his Jjusiness activity proving 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 223 

an important element along the line of development in Louisiana, where he passed 
away when his son, David Crockett Crawford, was Imt four or five years of age. 
The mother, who bore the maiden name of Susanna De Haven, was a native of 
Louisiana and of French descent and she passed away when her son was a lad 
of but eight years. 

Captain Crawford was reared in the south and in his youthful days found 
employment on the steamboats on the Mississippi river. During the John C. 
Fremont campaign he became a republican and because of his political attitude 
went to Pittsburgh w^hen the war broke out, arriving in that city on the 17th of 
April. 1861. There he enlisted two days later as a member of Company K, 
Fourteenth Pennsylvania Regiment of \'olunteer Infantry, for three months. 
The smoke of Fort Sumter's guns had scarcely cleared away, but he had watched 
the progress of events in the south and resolved that if a blow was struck to 
overthrow the Union he would stand lojally in its defense. He was honorably 
discharged August 10, 1861, at the close of his first term and nine days later he 
re-enlisted, becoming a member of Company I, Sixty-third Regiment of Pennsyl- 
vania Infantry, with which he continued for three years. On the 26th of July, 
1862, he was advanced to the rank of second lieutenant of his company and 
on the 4th of September. 1864, he w-as transferred and was made captain of 
Company E of the One Hundred and Fifth Pennsylvania \'eteran Volunteer 
Infantry. On the morning of April g, 1865, he was in command of a company 
of sharpshooters who were detailed to be present at the surrender of Ceneral 
Lee at Appamattox and he also participatel in the Grand Review at Wash- 
ington, D. C, the most celebrated military pageant ever seen on the western 
hemisphere. He participated in all of the battles of the Army of the Potomac, 
more than forty, excei)t when off duty at the time he was recovering from 
wounds sustained at Chancellorsville on the 3d of May, 1863, on which occasion 
he was struck by a bullet in the right knee and was sent to report to the surgeon 
general at Washington. On the 6th of May, 1864. at the battle of the Wilderness, 
he was shot in the neck, hip and left shoulder, being at that time within one 
hundred yards of where he had been wounded the year before. His injuries ni 
the battle of the Wilderness were very serious and have caused him to be a 
lifelong suft'erer. Six times he sustained wounds, three of which were of a 
serious nature. He had an older brother. \\'illiam. who was a member of the 
southern army and lost his life in the battle of Gettysburg, while his sister was a 
nurse with the Confederate army throughout the war. 

When hostilities were over Captain Crawford returned to his old home in 
Pennsylvania. He had previously learned the trades of painting, trimming and 
steamship building and was employed along those lines in Pennsylvania. For 
eight years he occupied the position of trustee of the Soldiers" Orphans' Home at 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania, his duty being to look after the ori)hans w-ho left 
the home after reaching the age of sixteen years and assist them in findmg 
employment. In 1878 he came to Nebraska and homestended one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in Hall county, whereon he resided for ten years, devoting 
his attention to the development and improvement of that place. On the 4th of 
March, 1887, he came to Lincoln with the newly elected governor, John M. 
Thayer, and for five vears was custodian of the state capitol. Later he spent 
nineteen vears in the emj.lov of the Lincoln board of education as janitor and in 



224 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

repair work on the public schools but for several years has lived retired in the 
enjoyment of a rest to which his years of activity fully entitle him. He never 
liked farming and the wounds which he sustained in the army made it imperative 
that he give up farm work as he was unable to perform the arduous tasks incident 
to the development of the fields. He and his wife, however, were pioneers in 
Hall county, Nebraska, their homestead being situated twelve miles north of 
Grand Island. There they encountered many of the privations and hardships 
incident to settlement on the frontier, their nearest neighbor on the north being 
ten miles distant and on the east two and a half miles. Prairie fires were one 
of the greatest sources of trouble but there were many other hardships to be 
borne. 

On the i8th of March, 1868, Captain Crawford was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna E. Cairns, who was born in England, May 28, 1850. Her parents, 
John and Elizabeth Cairns, emigrated to the United States when she was three 
years old and settled in Pennsylvania in 1854. The father's death occurred 
five days after his arrival in this country and the mother passed away in 
Nebraska in 1881. To Captain and Mrs. Crawford nine children were born: 
Mrs. W. B. Cooper, a resident of Medford, New Jersey ; Bessie, the deceased 
wife of A. D. Caldwell, of Denver, Colorado ; Charles D., superintendent in the 
Gottman & Kretchmar candy factory of Chicago; Frank A., a photographer of 
Norfolk. Nebraska ; Ellen, who died in Grand Island when in her girlhood ; 
Eleanor and Harry R., at home; J. VV.. deceased; and Winnie, the wife of F. P. 
OUiver, of Pocatello, Idaho. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Alethodist church, of which 
Captain Crawford has been a loyal member for many years. In politics he has 
always supported the party which was the defense of the Union during the dark 
days of the Civil war, being an earnest repuljlican. He belongs to Farragut Post, 
No. 25, G. A. R., of Lincoln, and in 1913 he and his wife spent seven days on the 
Gettysburg battlefield in attendance on the ceremonies which were held on the 
fiftieth anniversary of that engagement. A spirit of loyalty has characterized 
him at all times in relation to his country. He did not feel that his duty was 
done when his military service was over -and he has been equally true to the 
best interests of the nation by supporting those ])rojects and measures whicli 
are matters of civic virtue and civic pride. 



FREDERICK M. YOUNG. 

Frederick M. Young was one of the leading contractors of Bethany and 
among other important structures erected the magnificent new Christian church 
here. He not only had a high standing in business but was also po]nilar personally 
and his demise was deeply regretted. A native of ]\Iichigan, his birth occurred 
in Owosso on the 19th of August, 1862. and he was a son of Russell and Mary 
Young, pioneers of Michigan. The father was a machinist and contractor and 
spent his entire life in the Wolverine state, passing away in 1910. His wife died 
forty-six years previously, her demise occurring in 1864. 

Frederick M. Young grew to manhood in ^Michigan and received his educa- 




FREDEKICK M. YUTNG 



\pUBUC L 






LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 227 

tion in the public schools, while under the instruction of his father he learned the 
machinist's and carpenter's trades. His father had specialized in the erection of 
churches and our subject followed his example. In 1896 he removed to Crete, 
Nebraska, and there erected two of the buildings of Doane College, and many 
residences, including the largest one in Crete owned by T. H. Miller, the banker. 
He resided there until H)i2, when he came to Bethany, where he maintained his 
home until called by death. He was accorded a large patronage as a contractor 
and he it was who erected the fine forty thousand dollar Christian church here, 
a structure which is in every way a credit to him. In 1913 he was taken ill and 
for the last two years of his life was unable to work. He passed away on the 
9th of February, 191 5, and his demise was recognized as a loss to the com- 
munity. 

Mr. Young was married in r)ctober. 1882, to Miss Harriet J. Milliken and 
they became the parents of six children : Ralph W., who is residing in Lincoln ; 
and Elizabeth, Merle H., Frederick M., Irwin D. and Alfreda, all at home. 
Mr. Young supported the democratic party and served acceptably as a member 
of the school board. He was identified with the Christian church and in its 
teachings were found the guiding principles of his life. Fle was connected fra- 
ternally with Ben Hur Lodge. He erected a fine residence on his holdings, com- 
prising five acres in the southeastern part of town, and there his widow still lives. 
She has gained many friends since becoming a resident of liethany and all who 
know her respect her highly. 



FRANK A. PETERSON. 

Frank A. Peterson, junior member of the law firm of Mockett & Peterson 
of Lincoln, was born in Omaha, Nebraska, February 22, 1881, and is of Swedish 
descent. His parents, John A. and Caroline C. (Svvanson) Peterson, were both 
natives of Sweden, in which country they became acquainted but were married 
in Chicago in the early part of 1880. Soon afterward they removed to Omaha, 
Nebraska, where they resided until looi in which year they came to Lincoln for 
the purpose of giving their son Frank the opportunity of attending the l^niversity 
of Nebraska. Both passed away here, the father on the i8th of April, 1907, 
and the mother on the i8th of March. 191 5. He was a butcher by trade and 
conducted a meat market in r)niahn from 1886 until 1901, when he retired from 
active business. 

Frank A. Peterson, an only child, was graduated from the high school of 
Omaha with the class of 1901 and in the fall of that year entered the freshman 
class of the University of Nebraska. During his academic course in that insti- 
tution, he specialized in Latin, Greek and German and in 1905 he received the 
Bachelor of Arts degree with Phi Beta Kappa honors. He spent still another 
year in the academic department doing post graduate work, having won a 
fellowship in Greek during the regular course, which fellowship entitled him 
to the extra year. During his post graduate work he was also instructor in Latin 
in the Lincoln Academy. During the winter of 1906-7 he filled the position of 
superintendent of schools at Creighton, Knox county. Nebraska, and in the fall 

Vol. II— 12 



228 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

of tlie latter year he entered the law department of the university, from which 
he was graduated with the LL. B. degree in 1910 with Theta Kappa Nu honors. 

During the first year that he attended law school, Mr. Peterson also taught 
Latin, Greek and debating in the Lincoln high school, devoting the afternoons to 
that work and thus he paid his own way through law school without aid from 
his parents. Since 1910 he has practiced law in Lincoln as the associate of 
Robert S. Mockett, under the firm style of Mockett & Peterson. 

On the 28th of September, 1910, Mr. Peterson was married to Miss Selma E. 
Engstrom. who was born November 20, 1883, and is of Swedish parentage. 
They have two children: Charlotte Christine, born August 3, 191 1 ; and Dorothy 
Frances, liorn July i, 1914. Mr. Peterson is a democrat in his political views. 
He belongs to the Commercial Club and the Polemic Club and has membership 
with the Knights of the jMaccabees and the Congregational church. He also 
belongs to the Lancaster County and to the Nebraska State Bar Associations. 



WILLLAM ALDEN LTNDLY. 

William Alden Lindly, president of the Security Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, is recognized as a man of marked initiative and notable executive 
ability. In all that he undertakes his plans are well defined and promptly executed. 
He has been a resident of Lincoln for thirty years, or since 1886, and throttghout 
the entire period his worth as a citizen as well as a business man has been acknowl- 
edged. He was born in the little town of Lindly's Mills, Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, October 3, 1846. That town was established by his grandfather, 
William Lindly, who was Iiorn in New Jersey but located in Washington county 
at an early day, becoming one of its pioneers. He was a representative of one 
of the early American families founded in Connecticut during colonial days. 
Representatives of the name afterward removed to New Jersey and, as pre- 
viously stated, William Lindly left that state for Pennsylvania. He owned a 
farm which he developed and improved and nearby he built a gristmill which 
became widely known as Lindly's Mill and the postoffice and small town, which 
were established later, also took the same name. In addition to owning his farm 
and his mill, William Lindly was active in the public life of the community and 
served for thirty-nine years as justice of the peace in his county. 

His oldest son. William Davison Lindly, was married in 1844 to Harriet 
Minton, who, like himself, was a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania. 
He died at the early age of twenty-seven years leaving two sons to the care of 
his widow and the younger, Elidor Davison, was not born until after the father's 
demise. He became a resident of New York city where he engaged in the 
brokerage business until his death which occurred in 1892 when he was forty-five 
years of age. Leaving Pennsylvania, the mother removed to Iowa, where she 
passed away in 1872. 

William Alden Lindly was thus left the only survivor of the family. He was 
but three years of age when his father died, after which his boyhood and youth 
were spent in the homes of his jiaternal and maternal grandfathers, both of whom 
lived in Washington county, Pennsylvania. He attended the common schools 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 229 

to the age of fifteen years and then entered Wayneshiu-g College in Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, devoting three years to study in that institution. In 1864, 
when seventeen years of age, he left college to heconie a nicniher of Cieneral 
Buell's personal bodyguard at Nashville, Tennessee. The complete bodyguard 
of the general numbered about two hundred members and had been recruited 
from several Pennsylvania colleges. Mr. Lindly was chosen from Waynesburg 
College and it was his great desire to go, but when the mustering officer learned 
that he was not yet eighteen years of age, he advised the youth to go home to 
his mother. The young man went home and tried to get his mother's consent 
to go, but failed. In a few days, however, she noticed his keen disappointment 
and told him she had decided to give her consent if he still wished to go to the 
front. Within a few days he proceeded to Nashville to join Ceneral I'.ucH's 
bodyguard, but to his astonishment, upon his arrival at Nashville, he found the 
entire bodyguard locked in the penitentiary, having been put there by General 
Thomas, who meanwhile had succeeded General Buell in command at Nashville. 
It had been the latter's plan to surround himself with as fine a bodyguard as he 
could get, hence the two hundred or more of the young Pennsylvania collegians 
had been recruited into the service for that e-xjircss purpose. They had all been 
provided with fine black steeds and special uniforms. However, when General 
Thomas took command he was opposed to all this show and ordered the hand- 
some bodyguard of his predecessor to become a cavalry company and ujion their 
refusal he had thrust them into prison for insubordination. \Mien Mr. Lindly 
arrived and learned what had happened, he found service in the quartermaster's 
department at Nashville, spending one year and three months in that way. He 
then returned to Waynesburg College and resumed his studies, continuing in 
school for a year. 

In 1S66 Mr. Lindly came to the middle west and for a period of twenty 
years was a resident of Oskaloosa, Iowa. For there years he engaged in mer- 
chandising there and afterward served as cashier of the National .State Bank 
from iS(Mj until 1875 and as cashier of the Oskaloosa Bank from 1875 until 1886. 
His younger brother Elidor D. Lindly also lived in Oskaloosa at that time and 
succeeded William A. as cashier of the National State Bank. In 1886 the latter 
concluded his banking interests at Oskaloosa and removed to Lincoln. In 1887 
he became one of the organizers of the Bankers Life Insurance Company of 
Lincoln, now a well known institution of the city, and maintained an official 
connection therewith for twelve years, during five years of which time he was 
its president. Finally in 1899 he withdrew from the P.ankers Life and he and 
others took over the management of the Security Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, which then had its headquarters at Fremont, Nebraska. The business 
was at once removed to Lincoln and reorganized. S. 11. Burnham became 
president at that time and Mr. Lindly secretary. The Security Mutual Life 
Insurance Company practically underwent the process of being born again. It 
was put on a firm basis and was changed from the assessment to the legal reserve 
plan. In 1Q03 Mr. Lindly succeeded to the presidency and still holds that ofifice. 
L'nder his excellent management this has become one of the most prosperous 
of Neliraska's well known life insurance companies and on the northwest corner 
of O and Twelfth streets in Lincoln has just been completed a hand.some, new, 
ten story Ijuilding. of steel and stone construction, which is known as the Security 



230 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Mutual Life Building and is the company's permanent home. They occupy the 
entire tenth flooV of the new building while the other floors are devoted to office 
purposes except the first floor, which is now the home of the Central National 

Bank. 

On the 20th of September, 1870, Mr. Lindly was married at Oskaloosa, Jowa, 
to Eliza Wray, who died January 2, 1909, leaving three children: .Mabel, who 
resides with her father and presides over his home; Henry A., a well known 
business man of Lincoln ; and Wray A., who is assistant secretary of the Security 
Mutual Life Insurance Company. 

In politics Mr. Lindly is a republican and while in Oskaloosa served for six 
years as city treasurer. In Lincoln he has been school director, but is not a 
politician in the sense of ofifice seeking, although deeply interested in the vital 
and significant jjroblems of the day. Fraternally he is a Master and Royal .Arch 
Mason and he belongs also to the Lincoln Commercial Club. He stands for all 
those things which are most worth while in the life of the city and the individual. 
His standards are high, his business integrity is above question, and his ability 
and enterprise have placed him at the head of one of the foremost financial con- 
cerns of the state, making him a central figure in the business circles of Nebraska. 



PERRY EZRA WESTON. 

Perry Ezra Weston, who is living retired in Panama, has gained a competence 
through his well directed labors as an agriculturist in former years. He has 
always manifested a sincere interest in the public welfare, and at the time of 
the Civil war his patriotism led to his enlistment in the Union army with which 
he served for three years. His birth occurred at Manlius, Onondaga county. 
New York, on the 17th of September, 1841, and he is a son of P.ela and Amanda 
(Tobes) Weston. The father was also born in that place, in May, i8ofi, and 
was reared and educated in his native town. He learned the harnessmakers' 
trade and conducted a shop at Manlius until 1845 when, with his wife and 
children, he went to Kendall county, Illinois, renting land near the town of 
Oswego. Later he purchased two hundred and forty acres of partly improved 
land in De Kalb county, that .state, and devoted his time and attention to further 
developing his farm until 1S72 when he sold out and came to Lancaster county. 
He acquired title to an improved place of eighty acres on section 24. Nemaha 
precinct, and for two decades operated that farm. He then retired and removed 
to I'.ennet, Nebraska, where he resided for a time. He later made his home 
with his sons and passed away on our subject's farm in Nemaha precinct on the 
6th of January, 1897. He is buried at Bennet, as is his wife. She was born in 
Manlius, New York, in November, 1805, grew to womanhood there, and her 
demise occurred on the 26th of September, 1900, upon the farm of P. E. \\'e.ston 
in Nemaha township. 

Perry Ezra Weston was but four years of age when he was taken by his 
parents to Illinois and his education was received in the .schools of Kendall and 
De Kalb counties. He early began assisting his father with the farm work, so 
continuing until i860 when he entered the employ of others as a farm hand. In 



LLNXOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 231 

September of the following year he enlisted in Company G, Thirty-ninth Illinois 
\'oluntecr Infantry, and remained with his company until the i6th of September, 
1864. He participated in thirty-four engagements and his record as a soldier is 
one of which he has just cause to be proud. After receiving his honorable 
discharge from the army in 1864, he returned to Illinois and rented land there 
until 1868. In that year he became a resident of Vernon county, Wisconsin, 
where he worked in the sawmills for a time after which he rented a sawmill at 
Trippville, that state, which he operated for six years. In 1878 he arrived in 
Lancaster county, and purchased eighty acres of railroad land on section 35, 
Nemaha precinct. This was raw prairie when it came into his possession but in a 
comparatively short time he had it under cultivation and as the years passed he 
continued to make many improvements thereon. At length he purchased an 
adjoining eighty acres, also on section 35, and his time and energy were taken 
up with the operation of his quarter section until 1904 when he retired from active 
life and removed to Panama, where he [lurchased a good residence. He also 
owns other town property and still holds title to his farm, which he rents. 

Air. Weston was united in marriage at De Kalb, Illinois, on the 28th of 
October, 1865, to Miss Josephine Callson, who was born in Stockholm, .Sweden, 
on the 25th of September, 1845, ^J^'t ''"' 1850 was brought to America bv her 
parents, ]\fr. and Mrs. John Callson, both also natives of Stockholm. They first 
located in De Kalb county, Illinois, I)ut later removed to Chicago, where the 
mother died. The father went to ^Minnesota to buy land when his daughter, 
Airs. Weston, was about thirteen years of age. From that time she worked for 
others until her marriage. She passed away on the 26th of September, 1904, 
on the home farm in Nemaha precinct and is buried at ISennet. She was the 
mother of six children, namely : Eva Belle, the wife, of Arthur Frank Hitchcock, 
a butcher of Panama; Minnie Alice, the wife of Henry R. Frye, a farmer of 
Lancaster county: Irving J., who is farming in Buffalo county, this state; Stella 
May, who married Luther I. Hamilton, principal of schools at York, Nebraska ; 
Addie Nebraska, the wife of James A. DePell, a farmer of Antelope county, 
Nebraska ; and Ella Ethel, who married William G. Bullock, a banker at Cheney. 

On the 25th of September, 1907, Mr. Weston was again married.' Mrs. Mary 
Sophia Stookey Ewing becoming his wife. She was born in Peoria county, Illinois, 
on the 1st of September, 1848, a daughter of David B. and Mary Sophia 
( Rittenhouse) Stookey, the former born in Newark, New Jersey, and the latter 
in the vicinity of that city. Both were reared in their native state, but they sub- 
sequently settled in Peoria county, Illinois, where Mr. Stookey engaged in farm- 
ing. Both passed away on the farm. Their daughter, Mrs. \\'eston. grew to 
womanhood in Peoria county and received her education in the district schools. 
In 1868 she married Johnson Alexander- Ewing, who passed away in Lancaster 
county, Nebraska, in 1894, and is buried at Roca. 

jMr. Weston is a stanch repuljlican in ]iolitics and has been called to a number 
of positions of trust. For three terms, or six years, he was a member of the 
school board of district No. 27 and he has also served on the town board of 
Panama. While living in \'ernon county, Wisconsin, he was township tax 
assessor and he also held the office of member of the town board of Forrest, 
that county. He is a leading member of Elizabeth Upright Post, No. 62, G. A. R., 
at Bennet and has served as commander of that organization. He is no less 



232 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

patriotic now than when he went to the defense of the Union in the '60s and 
he would willingly fight in the army of his country a second time. His many 
excellent qualities have gained him the high esteem and the unqualified respect 
of his fellow citizens and he is recognized as one of the prominent residents of 
Panama. 



ROBERT G. DICKSON. 

Robert G. Dickson is now living retired in Panama but was for many years 
actively engaged in farming and still holds title to his valuable place in Panama 
precinct. He was born near Colesburg, Delaware county, Iowa, on the loth of 
September, 1855, and is a son of Thomas and Hannah (Fleming) Dickson, an 
account of whose lives appears elsewhere in this work. He attended the common 
schools in his native county and as a boy and youth also assisted his father 
with the farm work. In 1873 ^^ accompanied his father to Lancaster county, 
the journey from Iowa to this state having been with team and wagon. In 1875 
he began his independent career, renting land in Panama precinct, which he 
operated until 1878, when he rented another farm. Two years later, or in 1880, 
he purchased one hundred and sixty acres, eighty acres of school land on section 
16, township 7, range 8, and eighty acres of railroad land on section 17. The 
entire quarter section was raw land and it was necessary to break it before it 
could be planted to crops, which he did as soon as possible. He erected a frame 
house, sixteen by twenty-four feet, and put up a straw shed which served as a 
barn until he could build a more substantial structure. He concentrated his 
energies upon the operation of his farm and raised both grain and stock, finding 
that course more profitable than specializing in either. As the years passed his 
resources increased, for he was practical and progressive in his methods and 
careful in the management of his business afl:"airs. In 1S88 he had added to 
his holdings, buying eighty acres of improved land on section 17, adjoining his 
home place, and in that year he built a commodious residence and good barns 
upon his farm. He still holds title to his land, which his sons farm. In 1900 
he removed to Panama, where he purchased lots and built a fine two story home, 
in which he now lives. Although he has lived largely retired since his removal 
to Panama, for five years, or from 1910 to 1915, he was employed in the L. R. 
Conn hardware store. He aided in organizing the Bank of Panama and for a 
number of years owned stock in that institution but has now disposed of his 
interest therein. 

On the 12th of December, 1878, at Panama, Mr. Dickson was united in 
marriage to Miss Clara Elizabeth Clay. Her birth occurred in Shiawassee 
county, Michigan, on the 23d of January, 1857, and her parents were William 
Drakard and Maria (Huson) Clay, both natives of England. Her father was 
born in the parish of Gedney, Lincolnshire, on the loth of July, 1826, and 
after completing his education, which was acquired in the common schools, 
began farming. He was married in December, 1847, and five years later came 
with his family to America, locating at Albion, Orleans county. New York. He 
worked there for three years in the employ of others but at the end of that time 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 233 

emigrated west and purchased a farm in Shiawassee county, Micliigan. After 
operating that place for nine years he went to Mitchell county, Iowa, where he 
engaged in farming for some time and where his wife passed away in 1868. At 
length he removed hy wagon with his family from Iowa to Lancaster county. 
He came with a party which numbered sixteen families and was known as the 
Iowa colony and which was four weeks on the road. Me homesteaded land on 
section 8, Panama precinct, and his first residence was a dugout, which later 
was replaced by a more commodious dwelling. He operated hi.s farm until his 
death, on the loth of September, 1894, and he is buried at Panama. His parents, 
George and Catherine (Drakard) Clay, passed their entire lives in England. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Dickson have been born three children, all natives of 
Lancaster county : Agnes .Ann, who for a time clerked in a store at Panama, 
but is now the wife of Henry C. Johnson, a farmer of this county: Thomas G., 
who is operating the family homestead in Panama precinct : and Ethel May, the 
wife of Percy Ijlasser. a farmer of this county. 

Mr. Dickson is a stanch republican in his political belief and for six years 
he has been a member of the town board of Panama. For eleven years he 
served as school director in district No. 17. He belongs to Panama Lodge, No. 
220, I. O. O. F., in which he has held all of the offices and which he has rep- 
resented as a delegate to the Grand Lodge. He is likewise connected with 
Panama Camp, No. 222-/, M. W. A., to which he has belonged for fourteen 
vears and in which he has served as banker during that entire period. In 1883, 
when the iVesbyterian church was established in Panama, he became identified 
with that organization and for about eighteen years has served as elder. His 
wife is also prominent in the work of the church and is an active member of 
the ladies' society. Although he has always given careful attention to his private 
business altairs and by so doing has gained financial independence, he has never 
forgotten that he has obligations to his community and has always been willing 
to do his part in promoting the public welfare. 



CHARLES ANDREW PERKINS. 

Among the well-to-do residents of Lancaster county who have found fanning 
and stock raising both profitable and congenial is Charles .Andrew Perkins, of 
Centerville precinct. He was born near Bonaparte, \'an Buren county, Iowa, on 
the 24th of October, 1854, and is a son of William and Mary Perkins, the 
former a native of Ohio, in which state his parents settled in early days. Williain 
Perkins was one of the pioneers of \'an Buren county, Iowa, and engaged in 
farming there until his death in 18S9. He is buried in that county. 

Charles A. Perkins was reared under the parental roof and is indebted to the 
public schools of his native county for his education. After putting aside his 
textbooks he farmed with his father for a number of years but in 1874. 
when about twenty years of age, he came to Centerville precinct, Lancaster 
county, Nebraska, where he operated rented land for eleven years. At the end 
of that time he purchased two hundred and forty acres on section 12, Center- 
ville precinct, which was partlv improved when it came into his possession. He 



234 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

has brought the farm to a still higher state of development and has been very 
successful as an agriculturist. He annually harvests good crops and also raises 
shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs, for which he finds a ready sale. In 
addition to his home farm he owns eighty acres, also on section 12. and the 
entire three hundred and twenty acres is under cultivation. 

Air. Perkins was married in Centerville precinct on New Year's day of 1889, 
to Aliss Kitty Ritter, whose birth occurred in Michigan City, Indiana, on the 
2ist of February, 1859. When she was still a child, however, her parents, |o1ti 
;ind Melvina (Cheney) Ritter, reuKn'cd with their family to Wheeler, Indiana. 
Her father passed his entire life in the Hoosier" state and kejH the tollgat<' in 
Alichigan City for some time. He there died in 1881 and his widow siibse- 
quently married John Chapman, a minister, who is still living at the age of 
eighty-two years and is now a resident of Seward county, Nebraska. Mrs. 
Perkins accompanied her mother and stepfather on their removal to Lancaster 
county, Nebraska, in 1869, and for seven years lived in the sod house which 
Rev. Chapman erected upon his homestead in Centerville precinct. She received 
the greater part of her education in this county and remained with her mother 
until her marriage. Air. and Airs. Perkins are the parents of four children, 
namely : Grace Amanda, who was born on the 9th of November, 1890, and is 
now the wife of Henry Johnson, of Lincoln, Nebraska ; Byron Charles, who 
was born March 7, 1892, and is now farming in Lancaster county; Russell 
James, who was born July 21, 1896, and is assisting with the operation of the 
home farm; and Floyd Andrew, born February 18, 1901, now attending school. 

Air. Perkins casts his ballot in support of the candidates and measures of 
li.e democratic party and fraternally is connected with Jamaica Lodge, No. 292, 
A. O. U. W., of which he is a charter member and past recorder. The principles 
which govern his conduct are indicated in the fact that he is a member of the 
Alethodist Episcopal church. He is a man of ability, enterprise and integrity 
and is justly held in high esteem. 



WILLIAM B. KNIGHT. 

William B. Knight, mayor of Bethany, has made an excellent record in that 
office, working effectively for the advancement of the interests of the town, and 
has gained the commendation of all good citizens. He owns a good farm four 
miles east of Bethany and personally supervises its operation. His birth occurred 
in Johnson county, Indiana, August 12, 1861, and he is a son of Isaac and Emily 
(Bryant) Knight, natives of Virginia and Indiana respectively. When two years 
of age the father was taken by his parents to the Hoosier state and there grew 
to manhood. He turned his attention to farming and followed agricultural pur- 
suits in Indiana until some twenty years jjrevious to his demise which occurred 
Alarch 3, 1910. His wife died on the 8th of Jime, 1900. 

William B. Knight was reared in his native state and attended its public schools 
in the acquirement of his education. In the fall of 1883 he went to Platte county, 
Nebraska, but four months later, on the 27th of February, 1884. arrived in 
Lincoln. He, with his father and brothers, purchased three hundred and twenty 




ilK. AND -MKS. WILLIAM B. KNIGHT 



ASTG , . .. 
TiLDfN FrjUNOA IONS 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 237 

acres in Stevens Creek precinct from J. Z. Briscoe and at once turned his atten- 
tion to the operation and further development of that place, residing thereon for 
twenty-five years. In December, 1910, however, he removed to Bethany in order 
to afford his children better educational advantages and still resides there although 
he continues to farm his place. lie has a fine residence at the corner of lloldridge 
and Butler streets, which he erected in 1910, and is one of the most substantial 
citizens of the town. For twelve years he served as a director of the Lancaster 
County Farmers Mutual Insurance Company and his sound judgment was 'a 
factor in the growth of the organization during that period. 

Mr. Knight was married January 14, 1886, to Miss Mary B. Sprague, a 
daughter of James W. and Amanda M. (Patterson) Sprague, the former a native 
of Marietta, C)hio, and the latter of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. In 1802 her father 
enlisted in the Sixty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry and served at the front 
until the close of the war. He held the rank of corporal and made an excellent 
record as a soldier, being prompt and faithful in the discharge of his duties. He 
was in General Grant's army, participated in thirteen engagements, was once 
wounded in the shoulder and at another time was taken prisoner and marched 
seventy-five miles, after which he was incarcerated at Alexandria, Georgia, 
but was later exchanged. After returning from the front he farmed for some 
time and subsequently engaged in merchandising. .After devoting five years to 
that business he purchased land in Morgan county. Indiana, and again concen- 
trated his energies upon agricultural pursuits. At length, having accumulated 
a competence, he retired and removed to Alorgantown, where he resided for 
ten years, or until his demise March u, 1912. He had survived his wife since 
January 30, 1887. 

Mr. and Mrs. Knight have three children. Doris A., who was born Febru- 
ary 18, 1887, is a teacher of viofin and piano in Lincoln and Bethany, i'.lanche 
E., born November 15, 1891, is attending Cotner University and is sjiecializing 
in languages and history. William Alonzo, born on the 12th of September, 1894, 
studied for the ministry in Cotner University and is preaching at Wymore, 
Nebraska. 

Mr. Knight is a stanch democrat in imlitics and has been active in pnlihc 
afl'airs. While living in Stevens Creek precinct he was assessor for i'lvc years, 
was a director of the school board there for ten years and for the last three 
years has served as mayor of Bethany. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen 
and for fifteen vears served as clerk of the camp at Walton. His religious 
faith is that of the Christian church. In all that he has undertaken he has been 
successful, and he* holds to an unusual degree the confidence and respect of his 
fellow citizens. 



S. T. QUANTOCK. 



S. I. Ouantock, who is the cashier of the I!ank of College \-iew. has mani- 
fested" excellent business ability in the management of the affairs of that 
institution and during his adnfinistration its business has doubled m value. His 
advice is often sought on matters of investment and he is recognized as a leader 



238 LLXCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

in local financial circles. His birth occurred in December, -1879, in Livingston 
county, Illinois, where his parents, Henry and Martha ( \'ille ) Uuantock, first 
settled on their removal from England to the United States in 1874. During 
the childhood of our subject the family removed to Howard county, Missouri, 
where the father purchased land which he cultivated until his death, which 
occurred in 1904. He had long survived his wife, who died in 1889. 

S. ]. Ouantock grew to manhood in Fayette, Missouri, and received his 
general education there, graduating from the high school. He then went to 
Battle Creek, Alichigan, where he took a course in the Battle Creek College, 
and subsequently was a student in a business college at Kansas City, Missouri. 
After completing his work there he held a position in Kansas City for a year 
and a half, after which he resigned and went to Springfield. Illinois, where 
he was manager of an office until 1907. He then removed to Scotts Blufif 
county, Nebraska, where he took up a homestead which he improved and oper- 
ated for two years. At the end of that time he sold the property and accepted 
the position of cashier of the Bank of College \'iew, in which capacity he has 
since served. The bank is capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars, and has 
a surplus fund of fifteen hundred dollars and deposits of one hundred and 
twenty thousand dollars. James Schee is the president and J. H. Morrison the 
vice president. The business of the institution has more than doubled since Mr. 
Quantock became cashier, which is evidence of the confidence which is placed 
in his ability and his integrity. He has made it his first care to secure the funds 
of depositors and stockholders against loss Init has also made the bank a factor 
in the legitimate business develo])ment of the town through the judicious exten- 
sion of credit. 

On the 25th of June, igo6, ;\Ir. Quantock was married to ^liss Pearl Blocher, 
of Sedalia, Missouri, and they became the parents of a daughter. Mabel, who 
was born in May, 1908, and died in the same month. Mr. Ouantock supports 
the democratic party by his ballot and keeps well informed as to the c|uestions 
before the public. He has served as a member of the town board for three 
years and for a similar period of time has been a member of the public library 
board and for six years served on the school board. He is a member of the 
Seventh Day Adventist church and is a member of the Christian Record Board. 
He has gained a large measure of financial prosperity, owns a comfortable resi- 
dence here and also holds title to a business block, from the rent of which he 
derives a gratifving addition to his income. He is well and favorably known 
not only in College \'iew but throughout the cour.ty and those who have been 
closely associated with him hold him in warm regard. 



ROBERT A. HUSTON. 

Robert A. Huston, who is successfully engaged in farming on section 36. 
Grant precinct, was born in Ohio on the 25th of May. i860, a son of James and 
Elizabeth Tduston, also natives of C)hio. The father farmed in that state and 
in Missouri until 1876, when he came to I_.ancaster county, where he followed 
agricultural pursuits for many years but in 1901 rehired and is now living in 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 239 

Cheney, at the advanced age of eighty-three years. The mother, who also sur- 
vives, is eighty-six years old. 

Robert A. Huston accompanied his parents to Missouri when ten years 
of age and a few years later came with them to Lancaster county, where he 
grew to manhood. He received a public school education and. assisting his 
father, became familiar with practical agricultural methods, this training well 
fitting him to farm on his own account. When twenty-five years old he left 
home and began operating a tract of land which he had previously purchased 
and which comprises his present home. He also farmed a rented place. He 
was so occupied until 1904, when he removed to his farm of eighty acres which 
is located on section 36, Grant precinct. He has since lived there and has 
brought the place to a high state of development, erecting practically every 
building upon the farm and making many other improvements which have added 
to its value and attractiveness. He raises grain and stock and his well directed 
labors are rewarded by a good return. 

In 1886 Mr. Huston was united in marriage to Miss Mary Johnson, a 
daughter of Lacy and Lydia (Curson) Johnson. Her parents were born in 
England but in 1851 came to America and located in New York, whence in 
1S79 they came to Lancaster county. They lived retired with their children from 
that time until they were called by death, the mother's demise occurring in Eeb- 
ruary, 1893, and the father's in 1910. Mrs. Huston was Ijorn in Orleans county, 
New York, on the 24th of April, 1865, and by her marriage has become the 
mother of four children, namely : l!eulah. the wife of C. E. Cummings, a farmer 
of Grant precinct; Waldo, at. home; Rachel, the wife of A. J. I'eterson, a 
farmer of Grant precinct; and Lucy, at home. 

Mr. Huston exercises his right of franchise in supjiort of the men and 
measures of the republican party and has held local offices, having served for 
six years as precinct assessor, for twelve years as director of the school board, 
and also as constable. He is a member of the Ancient Order of I'nited Work- 
men and his religious faith is that of the United Ilrethren church, lie has won 
a substantial measure of prosjierity and has also gained the untiualilied respect 
of all who have been brought in contact with him, for his life has been guided 
bv the highest moral standards. 



W. BELDEN WILLIAMS. 



Seventy-five years have been added to the cycle of the centuries since W. 
Belden Williams started upon life's journey. He belongs to that class, however, 
who may be said to be not "seventy-live years old" but '•seventy-five years young. ' 
He is a member of a little company known as the '-Jolly Eight," a company com- 
prised of four veterans of the Civil war who were members of the Twentieth 
Iowa Infantrv and their wives, and the name which they have chosen, well 
expresses the' good times which they have at their various "reunions. ' Mr. 
Williams is also numbered among the pioneer settlers of Nebraska. 

His birth occurred in Newark, New Jersey, in 1840, his parents being Glares 
C. and Eliza (Miller) \\'illiams, also natives of that .state, the former of Welsh 



240 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

descent and the latter of German lineage. In 1843 they settled at Davenport, 
Iowa, where the father died during the cholera epidemic of 1852. His wife sur- 
vived for more than a quarter of a century and passed away in Creston, Nebraska, 
in 1878. 

W. Beldcn Williams was taken to Iowa during his early childhood and was 
reared in Scott county, there remaining until August 25, 1S62, when his patriotic 
s])irit was aroused by the continued attempt of the south to overthrow the Union 
and on that date he joined the boys in Ijlue of Company D, Twentieth Iowa \'ol- 
unteer Infantry, with which he served continuously, except from fall of 1S63 to 
fall of 1864, when he was on detached service, until honorably discharged at 
Mobile, Alabama. July 8, 1865. following the close of hostilities. He participated 
in the Ijattle of I'rairie Grove, Arkansas, in the siege of \'icksburg and the charge 
on Fort Blakeley. When the war ended he returned to Iowa. 

In 1872 Mr. Williams came to Nebraska and secured a homestead in Colfax 
county, where he engaged in farming for many years. Later he carried on 
farming in Platte county and afterward in Polk county, and in 1896 he retired 
to Lincoln, since which time he has been variously employed. He was one of 
the pioneer settlers who experienced the hardships wrought liy prairie fires, by 
the grasshopper scourge, by rains and drouths. 

Mr. Williams was married at Creston, Nebraska, in 1879, to Miss Mary 
Steele, who was born at Lewiston, Illinois, and when ten years of age removed 
to Pennsylvania. She homesteaded land in Platte county, Nebraska, as did her 
brother, and her marriage was celebrated in the little sodhouse on her claim, 
which they occupied a few weeks thereafter. Mr. and Mrs. Williams became 
parents of two daughters : Clella, who married Henry Bartels. and Eliza, 
but both now lie buried in \\'yuka cemetery in Lincoln. 

Mr. W'illiams cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln when at 
the front in 1S64 and has always been a stanch advocate of the republican party. 
He and his wife are members of the Second Presbyterian church, and he belongs 
to the Grand Army of the Republic. He looks to be a man of about fifty years 
more than one who has passed the seventy-fifth milestone, for his hair is but 
slightly sprinkled with gray and he is well preserved. He deserves all the honor 
and credit which are due the old soldiers who fought for the supremacy of the 
national government and preserved the LTnion intact. 



SAMUEL HENRY HECKMAN. 

Samuel Henry Heckman. who is living retired in flickman, Saltillo precinct, 
is a representative of one of the earliest pioneer families of the county and has 
witnessed the greater part of the development of this region from a pioneer 
district to the prosperous and highly developed farming section that it is today. 
His birth occurred in I'runswick, Chariton county, Missouri, on the 6th of 
September, 1831, and he is a son of Conrad and Mary ( Dierking) Heckman. 
His father was liorn in Osnabruck. Hanover, Germany, on the 12th of Deccmlier, 
1810, anti after completing his education followed agricultural pursu'ts in his 
native country. After farming for a time he went to Rotterdam, Holland, 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 241 

where he took an academic course, and while there the American ISiblc Society 
sent a call for two German ministers to preach to Germans who had settled in 
Missouri and he came to this country to fill that need. lie had not only acquired 
a thorough education in the schools but he had also traveled extensively over 
Europe, thus gaining much valuable knowledge and broadening his sympathies. 
It was in 1848 that he emigrated to America with his family and settled at 
Brunswick, Missouri. He preached there and at many other jjoints in the state, 
traveling up and down the Missouri river until 1861. lie then removed to 
Nemaha county, Nebraska, where he continued his work as a minister, first 
locating on Big Muddy creek near the site of the town of .Auburn, in 1865 he 
took up his residence at Plattsmouth and later lived at Nebraska City, where 
he remained until the spring of 1867, when he came to Lancaster county on 
account of failing eyesight. Here he purchased a half section of land lying on 
sections ^j, and 34, Saltillo precinct. Although his farm had no imj)rovements 
and had not even been broken he at once set about to bring it to a high state 
of cultivation and as the years passed it increased steadily in value. Later in 
1867 he purchased for six hundred dollars an additional one hundred an sixty 
acres on section 34 from a Mr. Brown, who had homesteaded the place. On 
removing to this county the family had taken up their residence in a little log 
house which stood on land adjoining Mr. Heckman's farm, intending to live 
there only until he could erect a better dwelling. Mr. I'.rown had built- quite 
a comfortable house on his place and after purchasing it Mr. Heckman removed 
with his family to that house. Later he built an addition to his residence, his 
son Samuel H. felling trees and hauling the logs to Lancaster, now Lincoln, 
where they were made into boards, and then hauling the lumber back to the 
farm and aiding in the erection of the addition. Conrad H. Heckman was very 
successful as a farmer and as the result of his careful management and industry 
he gained a substantial competence. In 1880 he erected a fine frame residence 
upon his farm, in which he lived until 1888, when he retired from active life, 
removing to Hickman. He purchased a home in the town and passed his 
remaining days in the enjoyment of well earned leisure, dying in 1892. His 
remains are interred in the cemetery at Hickman. In 1872, when the Atchison 
iS: Nebraska Railroad was building a line through Lancaster county, he gave 
the company forty acres of land for a townsite and the corporation platted this 
tract and developed the town. In return for ^Nlr. Heckman's gift they deeded 
him every other lot and intended to name the place in his honor, but through 
some mistake it was called Hickman instead of Heckman. Mrs. Heckman, who 
bore the maiden name of Mary Dierking. was born in Hanover, Germany, a 
daughter of Henry Dierking, who later emigrated to America. 

Samuel H. Heckman attended the common .schools of Nebraska City in the 
acquirement of his education and after putting aside his textbooks worked on 
his father's farm until he was twenty-one years of age. He then homesteaded 
eighty acres of land on section 32, precinct 7, range 7. in what is now South. Pass 
precinct. Lancaster county. He devoted his time to the improvement of his 
land and later purchased three adjoining eighty acre tracts and also one hundred 
and sixty acres in Gage county, Nebraska, and four hundred and eighty acres 
in Hand county. South Dakota, near W'cssington. I le has made excellent improve- 
ments upon ail of his farms and brought his land under cultivation, deriving 



242 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

therttrom a handsome income. He resided upon his homestead here from 1872 
until the ist of January, 191 5, when he bought a fine modern home in nicj<man, 
where he is now living retired. 

Mr. Heckman was married at Hickman on the loth of ALarch, 1878, to Aliss 
Louisa Augusta Philipsen, a daughter of Aloldt and Henrietta (Henningsen) 
Philipsen, natives of Germany. They resided in that country until 1874, when 
they crossed the Atlantic to America and making their way to the middle west, 
located upon a farm near Hickman, where they still live. Mr. and Mrs. Heckman 
have become the parents of nine children: Conrad Henry, who died in infancy; 
Cecelia, the wife of Alexander Balderson, a farmer of Gage county, Nebraska ; 
George Edward, who is also farming in Gage county ; Marie, the wife of Edward 
Wclirli, a farmer of Lancaster county; Carl, cashier of the First State Bank of 
Hickman; Albert, who is farming in this county; Henry Frederick, who is al^o 
farming in Lancaster county; Edmund Lawrence, a high school student; and 
Lillian, also in school. 

Mr. Heckman is a stanch advocate of republican principles and since attaining 
his majority has supported that party at the polls. For thirty years he served 
as school director of district No. 48. South Pass precinct, and during that time 
worked constantly for educational advancement. He is a consistent member of 
the Lutheran church and his many fine qualities have gained him a high place 
in the esteem of those who know him. As a farmer he was thoroughly practical 
and energetic, and the financial independence which he now enjoys is but the 
luerited reward of his well directed efforts. He is also identified with banking 
circles, being president of the First State Bank of Hickman. 



CHARLES P. ANDERSON. 

Charles P. .Anderson, who owns and manages a shoe store in Waverly, has 
the distinction of being the oldest business man in the town and has secured a 
large and lucrative patronage. His birth occurred in Sweden on the 23d of 
Januarv, 1854, and his parents were Andreas and Christina (Nelson) Peterson, 
who were lifelong residents of that country, where the father engaged in 
farming. 

Charles P. Anderson, who is the second in order of birth in a family of si.x 
children, received his education in the schools of his native land and remained 
at home until he was nineteen years of age, when he began learning the shoe- 
maker's trade. On attaining hi-; majority he entered the Swedish army, where 
he received military training for twc years. After he completed his term of 
service he again turned his attention to shoemaking and conducted quite a large 
business, employing five men. In 188.S, however, when about twentv-nine years 
of age, he emigrated to America and after working for three months in a 
brickyard, engaged in the shoe business at Jacksonville, Illinois, where he 
remained for three years. At the end of that time, he removed to Waverly, 
Nebraska, where he has since remained. He has witnessed practically the entire 
development of the town and has always been found among the leaders in 
movements seeking the public advancement. He owns the property in which 



LINCOLN A.\D LANCASTER COUNTY 243 

his store is located and his business represents a considerable investment as he 
carries a large and up-to-date stock of high class shoes. He has been very suc- 
cessful as a merchant and is in excellent circumstances. .Aside from his business 
property he owns an attractive residence in Wavcrly. 

Mr. .Anderson was united in marria,L;e in ( )ctobcr, i8Si, to Aiiss Christina 
Swanson, who was born in the same section of Sweden as her husband. Her 
father passed his entire life in Sweden and after his demise the mother came 
to .America and spent her last days with her son-in-law. .Alfred Peterson, dying 
at the venerable age of ninety-three years, about igii. Airs. Anderson passed 
away in i8<)4, leaving four children: Ella and Carl, both of whom are at home; 
.Anna, the wife of John Betts, a railroad man living in Lincoln; and Eloff. In 
1890 Air. .Anderson married Miss Anna Louisa Carlson, who was also born in 
Sweden. Five daughters have been born to Mr. .Anderson's second marriage, 
namely: Esther, Ollie, Ruth, Eftie and Helen, all of whom are at home. 

Mr. .Anderson is an adherent of the republican party and loyally supports its 
candidates at the polls but has never sought office as a reward for his fealty. He 
holds membership in the Congregational church and gives his influence to the 
side of righteousness and moral progress. 



R.ALPH M. UEALE. 



Ralph M. Beale, who is president of the Bank of Waverly and is also engaged 
in the insurance business, ranks among the leading citizens of Waverly. Me 
was born at Farmington, Illinois, on the 28th of May. 1883, and is a son of 
Thomas J. and Maggie (Marshall) Beale. His ancestry has been traced back 
to the year 1700 and representatives of the name have been prominent in the 
various localities in which thev have lived. His father's birth occurred in Penn- 
sylvania on the 4th of Alarch, 1851, but in early manhood be removed to Farm- 
ington, Illinois, and there engaged in merchandising. Later he turned his attention 
to the theatrical business, which he followed in various places, InU in 1870 he 
located at Greenwood, Nebraska, and in partnership with a Air. Aleeker estab- 
lished a grain business, which they conducted for two years. .At the end of 
that time he returned to Illinois on account of his father's ill bealtli but following 
the hitter's demise in 1883 Thomas J. Beale again came to Nebraska. Four 
years later he purchased an interest in the Bank of Waverly and was cashier of 
that institution for twenty-four years, or until his death, which occurred in 
November, igii. He was also at one time a stockholder in a number of other 
banks but shortly before his death disposed of his interests therein. Ilis wife 
was born near Farmington. Illinois, and died in Waverly. Nebraska, in 1891. To 
them were born two children, of whom Ral]ih M. is the elder, the other being 
Zella K., the wife of Percy AI. Beach, who is living in Arena, Colorado, and is 
engaged in farming and in installing irrigation systems. 

Ralph M. Beale was reared under the parental roof and received a good 
education. After he had completed the high school course at Waverly he entered 
the State University at Lincoln, where he remamed during the year 1902-3. 
About 1900, however, he had entered the State Bank of Waverly. of which his 



244 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

father was cashier, and after leaving school he turned his entire attention to 
mastering the banking business. He became thoroughly familiar with the routine 
of banking practice and also gained an understanding of the principles of finance 
which underlie the banking system, and subsequent to the death of his father 
in ii;ii he was chosen cashier of the institution. In July. 1913, he was made 
president of the bank and he has since served in that capacity, ably directing its 
policy. The institution has the full confidence of the community and has been 
a factor in the legitimate business expansion of Waverly since it was founded 
in 1885 by Hugh Leal and H. Meeker. Mr. Beale gives much of his time to his 
duties as president of the Iiank but is also engaged in the insurance business 
and has likewise gained success in that connection. He holds title to residence 
property in \\'averly and also owns land in Texas. 

On the 1st of Atigust, 1907, occurred the marriage of Mr. Beale and Miss 
Henrietta Loder, a daughter of William .A. and Margaret (Landon) Loder. 
Her father was born in Coshocton, Ohio, on the 17th of October, 1846, and her 
mother in Liberty, Pennsylvania, on the 28th of June, 1854. For many years 
Mr, Loder followed farming in the vicinity of Ashland, Nebraska, where he 
located about 1870. He passed away on the 14th of March, 1899, but is survived 
by his wife, who resides with her daughter, Mrs. Beale. The latter is the 
youngest of three children, the others being: Ira, who is now residing on a 
farm near Waverlv : and ll;i, the wife of G. C. Pennington. 



THOMAS J. DICKSON. 

Thomas L Dickson of Panama, Lancaster county, was formerly engaged in 
farming and merchandising but is now living retired. He owns land in the 
county and is one of its substantial and leading citizens. He has taken a promi- 
nent part in church work and has also become well known in fraternal circles, 
and in all that he has done has proved capable and public-spirited. 

His birth occurred in Hamilton, Lanarkshire, Scotland, on the 14th of March, 
1847, and his parents were Thomas and Hannah (Fleming) Dickson. The 
father was born in Hamilton on the 2d of February, 1818, and after attending 
the common schools became apprenticed to the stone-cutter's and builder's trades, 
serving a term of seven years. At the end of that time he began following this 
line of work independently and was so employed in various parts of Scotland 
until 1850, when he emigrated to the United States. He landed at New Orleans, 
Louisiana, and made his way up the Mississippi and Ohio rivers to Cannelton, 
Indiana, where he secured work on the construction of a cotton factory. In the 
spring of 185 1 he removed to St. Louis, Missouri, and thence to Dubuque, Iowa, 
from which point he proceeded by wagon to Colony township, Delaware county, 
Iowa, where he purchased three forty-acre tracts of land on section 2, from the 
government, at one dollar and a quarter per acre. He was one of the very first 
settlers of that locality, and it was some time before the homestead law went 
into efifect. He built a small log cabin upon his farm and there all of his chil- 
dren were born with the exception of our subject and his sister, Agnes, both 
natives of Scotland. In 1865 the father juirchased eighty acres of raw prairie 





MR. AND \[RS. THOMAS J. DICKSOX 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 247 

land in Colony township and at once began its cultivation. He made many im- 
provements thereon, erecting a good farm house and substantial barns, and there 
he resided until 1873, when he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, settling on 
section 14, Panama precinct, where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres. 
After the arrival of his father, our subject bought an additional one hundred and 
sixty acres on section 1 5, the same precinct, which became the family homestead. 
The father passed the remainder of his life upon that farm but did not do much 
of the work connected with its operation as he left that to his sons. His death 
occurred on the 2ist of August, 1883, and he was buried in Panama cemetery. 
His wife, who was, in her maidenhood, Miss Hannah Fleming, was also a native 
of Hamilton, Scotland, born on the 15th of June, 1825. Her parents, Edward 
and Agnes Fleming, were also born in that place and passed their entire lives 
there, dying when she was a girl. She received her education in the common 
schools and grew to womanhood in Hamilton, where her marriage occurred. 
She passed away at Panama on the 4th of June, 1913, and was buried there. 
She was the mother of eleven children of whom two died in infancy, tliose who 
survive being: Thomas J., of this review; Mrs. Agnes Hulbert : John H.; 
James ; Robert G. ; \\'illiam F. ; Presley H. ; Andrew L. ; and Frances \\'. 

Thomas J. Dickson was but three years of age when brought by his parents 
to the United States and the greater part of his boyhood and youth was spent 
upon the home farm in Delaware county, Iowa, where he remained until 1870. 
In that year he took up his residence near Vermilion, South Dakota, and home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres of land which he operated for a few months. 
He then went back to Iowa with the intention of returning to South Dakota, but 
in the spring of 1871 he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, to look over the 
country and was so well pleased that he decided to make his home here rather 
than in South Dakota. On the 26th of May, 1871, Mr. Dickson bought one 
hundred and sixty acres of railroad land on section 11, Panama precinct, and 
there he at once erected a small frame house, which remained his residence for 
some time, although it was later replaced by a large and attractive dwelling. He 
, operated that farm successfully until 1899, when he rented the place and removed 
to Panama, where he built a fine home. In January, 1898. he purchased lots in 
Panama, and following the construction of the railroad through the town, he 
erected a store building which he rented, thus securing a gratifying addition 
to his income. \\'hile still on the farm, or in 1895, he bought a third interest in 
a grocery and general store in Panama and was interested in that business until 
1906. During part of the time he was associated with others in the conduct 
of the store, but at length became sole owner of the business, which he gave to 
his son, Clinton D., and his daughter, Mrs. May Elizabeth Steeves, in \()o(\ the 
firm name being Dickson & Steeves. In addition to his home farm he holds 
title to a fine tract of one hundred and sixty acres on section 10, Panama pre- 
cinct, which is a well improved place and is operated by his son Edward. 

Mr. Dickson was united in marriage in Panama township, on the 4th of 
November, 1874, to Miss Agnes Robertson, who was bom in Dubuque county, 
Iowa, on the 7th of September, 1854. a daughter of Douglas and Elizabeth 
(Davison) Robertson, both born near Hamilton. Scotland, the former in 1814 
and the latter on the 17th of June, 1816. Mr. Robertson passed away at Panama, 
Nebraska, on the igth (if l-ebruary, 1891, and was survived by his wife for two 



248 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

years, her demise occurring on the 28th of July, iiS93, at Panama, where both 
are buried. Mr. and Mrs. Dickson have four children, as follows: ^Liy Eliza- 
beth, the wife of Ever M. Steeves, a merchant of Panama; Edward Fleming, 
who is farming in Panama precinct ; Clinton Douglas, of the firm of Dickson & 
Steeves of Panama; and Hazel Mary, a student in the Wesleyan University at 
University Place. 

Mr. Dickson is a republican in jjolitics and for ten years served as a mem- 
ber of the school board of district No. 28, Panama precinct, doing much during 
that time to promote the educational advancement of his district. From 18S0 
to 18S2 he was superintendent of the county poor farm and from January, 1S8S, 
until December, 1894, was county commissioner, holding that office for two terms. 
During his service in this connection the county court house was built, and he 
gave a great deal of time to looking after the details of its construction and is 
proud of the fact that it was so well built that there are as yet no cracks or 
signs of decay in the structure. He was also largely responsible for the beauti- 
fying of the court house lawn, securing the trees planted there at Crete, Ne- 
braska. He has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since 
1869, having been initiated into the fraternity that year as a member of Colony 
Lodge, No. 50, at Colesburg, Iowa. Later he became a charter member of 
Bennet Lodge, No. 32, Bennet, Nebraska, in which "he held all of the chairs, and 
he is now affiliated with Panama Lodge, No. 220, which he aided in organizing 
and in which he has served as treasurer since 1898. He has been a delegate 
to the Grand Lodge of Nebraska several times and is one of the most enthusi- 
astic and prominent members of the organization in his part of the state. He is 
also affiliated with Bennet Lodge, No. 94, A. F. & A. M., with which he has been 
connected since 1S93 and in which he has held all of the chairs. He and his 
family united with the Presbyterian church at Panama when it was organized 
in 1S83 and still hold membership there. He is very active in church work and 
has served as elder since 1883, his record of service in that connection being one 
seldom equalled. His wife is also a leader in various church activities, and they 
have been factors of importance in the moral advancement of their community 
for many years. 



WILLIAM R. GAYLORD. 

William R. Gaylord is an attorney and alistractor of title of L^niversity Place 
and is one of the leading members of the bar of his community. A native of 
Michigan, his birth occurred at Niles, on the nth of September, 1850. a son of 
Sylvanus G. Gaylord, a native of Ohio. The father spent his boyhood and youth 
in the Buckeye state but in his early manhood removed to South Bend, Indiana, 
where he established one of the first hotels in that city, on the site of the present 
Oliver Hotel. In the summer of 1870 he left Indiana and came to Lincoln and 
in the following winter opened the Clifton Hotel, on the corner of Twelfth and 
M streets, one of the pioneer hostelries of the town. Subsequently he engaged in 
the hotel business in Fairmont, Fillmore county, where he resided until 1875, 
when he died at the age of sixty-two years. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 249 

William R. Gaylord was reared at Niles, Michigan, and South l!cnd, Indiana, 
until he was about ten years of age. At that time the family removed to another 
part of the lioosier state and when fifteen years old he began learning the 
tinner's trade at Bourbon, Indiana. Having finished his apprenticeship he 
worked at his trade in Cleveland and elsewhere until 1870 when he removed 
west, spending some time in. Iowa and in Missouri. In January, 1871, he 
removed to Lincoln, Nebraska, and has since been a resident of this state. He 
followed the tinner's trade for some time in the employ of J. L. Caldwell, but 
later went to Fairmont where he read law and was admitted to the bar in 1874. 
He at once began the practice of his chosen profession and also engaged in the 
making of abstracts of title. In addition to his work in these connections he 
published the Nebraska Signal, the first anti-monopoly newspaper, of which he 
was one of the owners for eight or ten years, or until 1898, when he sold out. 
The following year he returned to Lincoln where he resided for about two 
years. At the end of that time he removed to University Place and has since 
conducted a successful title business here and has also been active as a member 
of the bar, confining his attention, however, largely to office practice. He is a 
man of wide legal knowledge and of sound judgment and is further character- 
ised by the accuracy of his work. 

Mr. Gaylord was united in marriage on the 1st of November, 1S75, to Miss 
Margaret B. Brazelton, who was born in Indiana and was a daughter of Dr. 
]ohn B. Brazelton, an early settler of Lancaster county. She passed away on 
the i2th of September, 1915, when fifty-nine years of age. She was the mother 
of eight children as follows: Elizabeth, the wife of H. M. Rathburn, of Lin- 
coln; Nellie, who married L. H. Smutz of St. Louis, Missouri; Lida, who is 
teaching in Wyoming; Mignon, the wife of W. G. Griswold who is engaged in 
the seed business in Lincoln; Alva, who is connected with the Associated Press 
iii Kansas City ; Charles of University Place ; Iva, who is living in Lincoln ; and 
William, who died when twelve years old. 

Mr. Gaylord is a republican and has been especially active in agitation 
against monopolies which he believes are un-American and inimical to the 
prosperity of the country. He has taken a great interest in politics and public 
affairs and is now serving acceptably as police magistrate and justice of the 
peace. In 1872 he was made a ^lason in Fairmont and has ever since been 
a consistent member of the order exemplifying in his life its beneficient teach- 
ings. He belongs to both the blue lodge and chapter. He is also identified with 
the :\Iodern Woodmen of America. He has gained a gratifying measure of 
success in his chosen work and personally he is held in the highest esteem for 
his dominant qualities are such as invariably command respect. 



CHARLES H. ARNOLD. M. D. 

Dr. Charles H. Arnold, possessing all the ciualities requisite to success in 
the practice of medicine, is regarded as one of the eminent physicians and sur- 
geons of Lincoln, enjoying a reputation that many a man of twice his years 
micrht well envy. He was born in Dorchester, Nebraska, on the uSth of October, 



250 • LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

1888, a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Gifford) Arnold, both of whom were 
natives of Indiana. On their removal to Nebraska in 1885, Mr. Arnold pur- 
chased land five miles southwest of Dorchester, Saline county, where he was 
engaged in farming until 1905, carefully and systematically cultivating his land, 
which he converted into an excellent property. He then retired and removed 
to Dorchester, where he has since resided. 

Dr. Arnold is a graduate of the Dorchester high school of the class of 1908 
and prior to that time he attended the Lincoln Business College, although he 
did not complete his course there. In the fall of 1908 he entered Cotner Univer- 
sity at Lincoln, where he entered upon the literary course but afterward took 
up the study of medicine. He continued his preparation for the profession 
until the spring of 1911, when he entered the Chicago College of Medicine and 
Surgery, from which institution he was graduated with the class of 1913. 
During his senior year he served as interne in the Garfield Park Hospital and 
immediately following his graduation he came to Lincoln to enter upon the 
practice of medicine. Here he has since been located and his developing ability 
is bringing him constantly to the front. He has offices in the Terminal building 
and in the period of three years he has built up a remunerative practice, ranking 
very high in his chosen calling. 

On the 20th of January, 1912, Dr. Arnold was united in marriage to Miss 
Irma C. Sears, of Hyannis, Nebraska, by whom he has two children, Hubert 
Andrew and Faith Elizabeth. He is a member of the official board of the First 
Christian church, to which he belongs. Fraternally he is identified with Lan- 
caster Lodge, No. 54, A. F. & A. M. ; Lincoln Chapter, R. A. M. ; Mount Moriah 
Commandery, No. 4, K. T. ; and Sesostris Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Lincoln. 
Nebraska. He is most loyal to the teachings of the craft, exemplifying in his 
life its beneficent spirit. He is also identified with various other beneficial 
orders and he is a member of the Lincoln Commercial Club, heartily indorsing 
all of its plans and projects for tlu* l>enefit and improvement of the city. The 
interest which holds first place in his attention, however, is his profession and 
he keeps in touch with the onward march of thought and progress as a member 
of the Lancaster County Medical Society, the Nebraska State Medical Associa- 
tion and the American Medical Association. He is thorough and systematic in 
all that he does, conscientious in the performance of every professional duty 
and is constantly promoting his knowledge and efficiency through study and 
experience. 



CHARLES VINCENT GROVE SLUSHER. 

Charles Vincent Grove Slusher is operating the family homestead of two 
hundred acres in South Pass precinct and is also one of the administrators of 
his father's estate. A native of Lancaster county, he was horn near Hickman 
on the 3d of August, 1881, and is a son of John Demas and Lydia Ann (Long) 
Slusher. His paternal grandfather, Demas Slusher, was born on the 14th of 
March. 1815, and on the loth of January. 1839, was united in marriage to 
Miss Hannah Burley, whose birth occurred on the 15th of March, 1818. John 



LINCOLN AND LANCy\STER COUNTY 251 

Denias Sliisher was born near jMiltonsburs,^. Monroe county, Ohio, on the 14th of 
December, 1845, and was indebted to the pubhe schools for his education. At 
an early age he began farming his lather's land in Monroe county, Ohio, but in 
1862 he offered his services to his country to aid in putting down the rebellion, 
enlisting in an Ohio regiment. He was at the front throughout the Civil war, 
at the close of which lie was honorably discharged. Returning to Ohio, he con- 
tinued to farm there until 1872, when he located near Blooniingtun, Illinois. 
He followed agricultural pursuits in that locality for seven years but in 1879 
came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and homesteaded one hundred and si.xty 
acres on section 5, South Pass precinct, to which he subsequently added by pur- 
chase forty acres on section 4. He built a small frame house on section 4 and 
at once began placing his land under cultivation, lie was thoroughly practical 
in all that he did and as the years passed his place became known as one of the 
best im])roved farms in the precinct and its value steadily increased. He raised 
both grain and stock and personally operated the farm until 1907, when lie 
retired and removed to Hickman. He had previously purchased two good resi- 
dences there and lived in town during the remainder of his life. He passed 
away on the 17th of April. 191 5, and was buried in the cemetery at Roca. He 
was a charter member of Jerry Sullivan Post, G. A. R., at Hickman and sur- 
vived all of his comrades. His funeral services were attended by practically all 
who knew him, and he was given all ])Ossible honor both Ijecause of his splendid 
(|ualities as a man and because of his connection with the Grand .Army ])ost. 
I'lie flag of ihe post was buried with him. He was married at Miltonsburg, 
( )hio, on the 4th of March, 1867, to Miss Lydia Ann Long, who was born in 
that locality on the 27th of .April, 1845. She passed away on the family 
liomestead in this county on the 1st of November, 1904, and was also buried in 
the Roca cemetery. 

Charles V. G. Slusher was reared in South Pass precinct, this county, and 
at the usual age entered district school No. 59. During his boyhood and youth 
he also learned much concerning farming, as he assisted his father with the 
operation of the homestead, and when the latter retired he took over the entire 
ivork of the farm. He has since concentrated his energies upon the cultivation 
of that tract of land and he is recognized as one of the most practical and suc- 
cessful young agriculturists of the county. He raises both grain and stock 
and derives a good income from all branches of his business. The home farm 
comprises two hundred acres and is splendidly imiiroved and everything al)0ut 
the place is kept in excellent repair. 

Mr. Slusher was united in marriage on the 21st of August. 1907. to Miss 
Minnie Sophie Krueger, who was born near Mrth, in South Pass precinct, on 
the 24th of January, 1885. Her jarents, .\ugust and .Amelia (Graus) Krueger, 
were both natives of Germany but came to America in young manhood and 
womanhood. The father located at once in South Pass precinct, Lancaster 
county, and purchased one hundred and si.xty acres on section 33, which he 
improved and farmed until 191 2, when he took up his residence in Firth, where 
he has since lived retired. His wife first located in Indiana and there their 
marriage occurred. She also survives. .Mr. and Mrs. Slusher have iiad four chil- 
dren : Lulu Lydia .Amelia, who was born in December, 1910, and died on the 
14th of January, 19^; John August, who was born October 5. 191 1, and died 



252 LINCOLN AND LANCASTLK COUNTY 

January 31, 1914: Frank Wilson Frederick, born November 11, 1912: and Carl 
William, born June 3, 1915. 

Mr. Slusher gives careful sludy to the questions and issues before the voters 
and casts his ballot in accordance with the dictates of his best judgment. He 
is ably carrying on the work begun by his father and is characterized by the 
same energy and ability, the same ])ublic spirit and unswerving integrity. 



NICHOLAS BROEKEMA. 

Nicholas Broekenia, who is living retired in Hickman, was born in Aliddle- 
stum, Holland, The Netherlands, on the 25th of January, 1855. His father, 
Thys llroekema, was born in Teuboer, that country, on the 30th of October, 182 1, 
and after comijleting his education in the common schools de\oted his time and 
energy to agricultural ])ursuits. For twenty-eight years he worked for a 
family by the name of Zuidhof, entering the service of the father and continuing 
in the employ of the son. In 1S67, however, he decided to try his fortune in 
the United States and, accompanied by his family, emigrated to this country. 
He first located in Chicago, where he worked as a laborer for a few years and 
later purchased a coalyard, which he conducted for eight years. When seventy 
years old he retired from business and in 1900 came to Hickman to make his 
home with our subject. He passed away here when eighty-three years of age 
and was buried in Chicago. He was a member of the Dutch Reformed church 
and served as elder for twenty-two years in Chicago. For forty-four years he 
was one of the parishioners of the Rev, Debey, who was his pastor for twenty- 
two years in Holland and for a similar period in Chicago. While the Broekema 
family were on a ship on their way from The Netherlands to the United States 
one of the sons was taken ill with smallpox and on reaching New York he and 
the mother, who bore the maiden name of Greatje Rol, were detained in quaran- 
tine, the father and the rest of the family continuing their journey to Chicago. 
The mother died and was buried at the quarantine station on Staten Island. 
She was a daughter of Klaas and i\je Rol, natives of Holland. Her father, who 
was a farm laborer, came to America at the same time as the Broekema family 
and passed away in Chicago when seventy years of age. His wife had died in 
Holland ])revious to his emigration. 

Nicholas Broekema attended school in his native town until he was twelve 
years of age, when he accompanied his parents to the United States. He con- 
tinued his education in Chicago, going to school, however, only when not working, 
as it was necessary for him to provide for his own support at an early age. He 
learned the lather's trade, which he followed in Chicago for eighteen years, but 
in 1892 he entered the employ of Siegel, Cooper & Company, with whom he 
remained for six years. On the 28th of August, 1898. he removed with his 
family to Hickman, Nebraska, where his brother, George Broekema, was con- 
ducting a furniture and undertaking establishment. Our subject worked for his 
brother for a considerable period, but at length retired from active life and his 
son, Thys, bought an interest in the business, the firm name being now George 
Broekema & Company. In 1901 Mr. Broekema of this review erected a sub- 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 25:j 

stantial residence in Hickman, where he still lives, and the leisure which he enjoys 
is well deserved. 

He was married in Chicago on the "th of February, 1884, to Miss Annie 
Punter, a daughter of Simon and Julia Punier, natives of Friesland, Holland. 
Her father worked as a farm laborer in his native country but after his removal 
to the United States in 1881 he engaged in gardening in the \icinity of Chicago. 
He passed away in that city in 191 5, when he had reached the venerable age of 
ninety-one years. His wife also lived to an advanced age as she ])assed away 
in Chicago in 191 1, when eighty-one years old. Their daughter, .Mrs. Hroekema, 
was born in Friesland in i860, and by her marriage has three children: Thys, 
whose birth occurred on the 28th of December, 18S5; Samuel, born June 15, 
1888; and Julia, who was born January 5, 1890, and is the wife of Friend Buel, 
Jr., a well known farmer residing at Sprague, Lancaster county. To this union 
have been born two children, Marion and Blanche Sylvia. 

Mr. Broekema is a republican and discharges to the full all of the duties 
of a good citizen. He has been a member of the town board and of the school 
board of Hickman and has served his community well in those cajjacities. He 
belongs to Damocles Lodge, No. 60, K. P., and has been master of finance. He 
holds membership in the Reformed Church of .America and has conformed his life 
to high ethical principles. 



THYS BROEKEMA. 



Thys Broekema. a member of the firm of George Broekema & Company, furni- 
ture dealers and undertakers of Hickman, is one of the reliable, energetic and 
successful business men of the town. He gives the greater part of his time to 
the management of his business aiifairs. which are in a prosperous condition, as 
George Broekema & Company are accorded a large share of the public patronage 
in their lines. He was married on the 22(1 of August, 1909, at Maysville, Mis- 
souri, to Miss Lois Kline, a daughter of Wei and Mary (Stevens) Kline, natives 
of Ohio. To this union has been born a daughter, Anna Gertrude, whose natal day 
was September 6. 1913. He supports the republican party at the polls and takes 
a commendable interest in the welfare of his community, but is not an office 
seeker. He is vice president of the Southern Lancaster County Old Settlers Asso- 
ciation and is also a prominent member of the Knights of Pythias. 



FRIEDRICH SCHNIEDER. 

Friedrich Schnieder, a large stock dealer, was one of the pioneers of Buda 
precinct, and is now a resident of Hallam. He has led a most active life and his 
indefatigable efYort has been crowned with a substantial measure of success. He 
was born in Germany, July 14, 1854. and is a son of Diedrich and Catherine 
( Saefken) Schnieder, who'came to the United States in IVLny. 1869. establishing 
their home in Clavton county. Iowa. A year later, or in June. 1870. they came 



254 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

to Nebraska, settling in Buda precinct, Lancaster county, the father homesteading 
the north half of the northeast quarter of section 30, while his son, Eilert, home- 
steaded the south half of the same quarter section. Upon that farm Mr. and Mrs. 
Diedrich Schnieder remained until called to their final rest. 

Their son, Friedrich Schnieder, was educated in the public schools and on 
reaching manhood began farming on his own account. In addition to tilling the 
soil he took up the work of raising thoroughbred Poland China hogs and short- 
horn cattle, and became one of the well known stock raisers of his part of the 
state. In 1880 he purchased eighty acres, constituting the north half of the 
northeast quarter of section 31, Buda precinct, and later he bought the southeast 
quarter of section 30. In 1892 the railroad was built through that part of the 
country and the town of Hallam was laid out on his land. Mr. Schnieder still 
owns one hundred and fifty-five acres adjoining the townsite, and in addition his 
property holdings include one hundred and sixty acres in Morris county, Kansas, 
and one hundred and sixty acres in Rusk county, Wisconsin. In 1910 he left 
the farm and removed to Hallam, but is still active in the live stock business, with 
which he has been prominently identified for the past twenty-two years. His 
business interests have been carefully, systematically and wisely managed, and 
he has derived therefrom a substantial measure of success. 

In 1881 Mr. Schnieder was united in marriage to Miss \\'ilhelniina Kclpien 
of Clayton county, Iowa, and to them have been born nine children, seven of whom 
are yet living: Diedrich, a resident of Hallam; Henry, who operates the home 
farm; Lizzie, the wife of Andy Meyer, a resident farmer of Saltillo precinct; 
Friedrich, who carries on farming in Rusk county, Wisconsin ; Dora, who is 
clerking for the firm of Fred Smith & Brother at Lincoln, Nebraska ; Louis, a 
barber of Hallam; and Amelia, the wife of Irvin Lauterbach, a farmer of Buda 
precinct. 

Mr. Schnieder gives his political allegiance to the democratic party, yet does 
not hold himself bound by party ties and votes independently if his judgment so 
dictates. He has ever been interested in the welfare and progress of his com- 
munity, has served as chairman of the town board and for more than thirty years 
has been school treasurer. He is justly counted one of the foremost men of his 
precinct. He likewise belongs to the German Family Club of Hallam and to the 
Modern Woodmen camp, while both he and his wife are members of the Congre- 
gational church. His life has ever been upright and honorable, commending him 
to the confidence and goodwill of his fellowmen, and he enjoys the respect and 
esteem of all with whom business or social relations have brought him in contact. 



JOSEPH Z. BRISCOE. 



Joseph Z. Briscoe, one of the leading and popular citizens of Lancaster county 
and formerly actively identified with merchandising in Lincoln, has been an 
important figure in developing the material, social and religious interests of the 
city. With notable generosity he has devoted a large share of the wealth that 
he has accumulated through patient toil and characteristic energy and enterprise 



^*^ 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 257 

to the educational and moral elevation of the eoninuinity, and his labors in this 
connection have been far-reaching and effective. 

Mr. Briscoe is a representative of one of the old families of Pennsylvania 
and was born in .Somerset county, that state, March i, 1838, his parents being 
Frisljy W. and Eva (Logan) Briscoe. The father, who was of French descent, 
was born in 1809, and the mother's birth occurred in Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1816. Frisby W. Briscoe became a pioneer settler of Nebraska, 
where he arrived in the fall of 1863, taking up his residence in Omaha. He was 
one of the most prominent literary men and educators of his time and taught 
for many years in the academies of Berlin and Somerset, Pennsylvania. The 
latter part of his life was spent on a farm in Sarpy county, Nebraska, where he 
farmed until his death in 1881. In addition to his agricultural labors he also 
engaged in teaching school during the winter months. His widow survived him 
for three decades, passing away in August, 191 1. In their family w^ere six 
children, namely : Mary, the wife of Professor Manoah Eberhardt and a resi- 
dent of Iowa ; Joseph Z. ; Sarah, who married Samuel Cotner, of Omaha, for 
whom Cotner University was named; \\'illiani W., residing in Sarpy county; 
John L. ; and Fred E. 

[oseph Z. Briscoe was reared and educated in Pennsylvania and pursued 
a course of study in Dufif's Merchants College at Pittsburgh, that state, where 
he was thoroughly trained along commercial lines. At the age of sixteen years 
he took up the profession of teaching in the common schools of Oakland, Mary- 
land, and afterward taught a select school at Westville, Indiana. The family 
removed from Pennsylvania to Indiana, where they remained for about six 
years, and on the expiration of that period Mr. Briscoe of this review came to 
Nebraska, settling in Sarpy county, where for a time he was actively and profit- 
ably engaged in farming. He took quite an active interest in politics and public 
affairs and at one time served as county commissioner of that county, which 
office he filled in a most acceptable manner. He also served in the same posi- 
tion in Lancaster county and over the record of his public career there has fallen 
no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. In 1880 he removed to Lincoln, where 
he established a boot and shoe business. He afterward sold out and formed a 
partnership with O. W. Webster in the same line, this connection being main- 
tained under the firm style of Webster & Briscoe at No. 1043 O street. They 
carried a stock valued at thirty thousand dollars and enjoyed a very extensive 
patronage. In 1887 Mr. Briscoe erected a fine modern residence at the corner 
of Seventeenth and Locust streets. In business circles he sustained an^ unassail- 
able reputation for commercial integrity as well as enterprise, and his success 
was the merited reward of close application, persistency of purpose and intelli- 
gentlv directed effort. 

As in Sarpy county, Mr. Briscoe became actively connected with the pubhc 
life of the community following his removal to Lincoln. He was one of the 
members of the city council who disobeyed the restraining order of Judge Brewer 
of the United States district court in regard to ousting from office the police 
judge of Lincoln for dereliction of duty. Judge Brewer regarded their action 
as contempt of court and imposed on the council a fine of five thousand dollars, 
which they refused to pay. Judge Brewer then commended the United States 
marshal to place them in custody until the fine was paid. The case was taken 



258 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

to the supreme court at Washington, D. C, and the decision was that the 
action of Judge Brewer was that of judicial usurpation, so that the council 
was released. It is characteristic of Mr. Briscoe that he stands ever loyally for 
what he believes to be right and neither coercion, fear nor favor can turn him 
from the faithful performance of what he believes to be his duty. 

On the i6th of September, 1858, Mr. Briscoe was united in marriage to Miss 
Eleanora Brandt, who was born in Bloomington, Virginia, April g, 1840, a daugh- 
ter of Elijah P. and Sarah (Kite) Brandt, who were natives of iMaryland, in 
which state they spent their entire lives, the father there devoting his attention 
to the occupation of farming. To Mr. and Mrs. -Brandt were born six children: 
Hettie M., Eleanora, ALirtin, Thomas, Ptolomy and John. Mr. and Mrs. Briscoe 
had one child, Florence V., who was born September 4, 1859. She grew to 
womanhood and was graduated in art from the State University and passed 
away December 17, 1891. 

The parents are members of the Christian church, in which Mr. Briscoe has 
been an ordained elder for thirty-four years, and he has taught in the Sunday 
school for many years and is now a teacher of the Bible class. He was largely in- 
strumental in bringing about the erection of the First Church of Christ in Lincoln 
and was one of the founders of Cotner University at Bethany, generously en- 
dowing the Bible chair of the university with the munificent sum of twenty-five 
thousand dollars. He was the first superintendent of the Sunday school of the 
Christian church in Lincoln and through a period of forty years he has been 
actively engaged in giving Bible instruction in the school, planting many seeds 
that have borne rich fruit in honorable, upright lives. His political allegiance 
has always been given to the democratic party. If there is one more strongly 
marked characteristic in the life of Mr. Briscoe than another it is perhaps his 
unfaltering honesty. He stands loyally for e\ery cause which he believes to be 
right, is steadfast in the support of his opinions and convictions, and his inlUience 
has ever been on the side of truth, reform, progress and improvement. 



GRANVILLE ENSIGN. 

Among those men who have contributed to the business development of 
Lincoln and whose worth as citizens has been widely acknowledged is num- 
bered Granville Ensign, who here passed away in icpf). He was born in the 
state of New York in 1835 and when a young man of eighteen years removed 
westward to Niles, Michigan, but after a short period there passed he established 
his home in Wyoming, Jones county, Iowa, where he owned and operated a 
farm. In 1858 he drove across the country to California, joining a party that 
left Wyoming, Iowa, and made the long trip over the hot stretches of sand and 
through the mountain passes to the Eldorado of the west. He had driven from 
New York to Michigan and from Michigan to Iowa, and thus on reaching Cali- 
fornia he completed an entire journey by wagon across the continent. For three 
years he remained a resident of the Golden state at a period when mail was 
brought across the country by pony express and the cost of sending a letter was 
five dollars. On receiving word that his wife was ill at Wyoming, Iowa, he 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 25!) 

took a boat at San Francisco, sailed around Cape Horn and thence northward 
to Boston and by rail proceeded to his home, where he arrived after three 
months en route to find that his wife had recovered. Following the outbreak 
of the Civil war he responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting at 
Wyoming, Iowa, as a member of Company I, Fifth Iowa X'olunteer Cavalry, 
with which he served for three years. He was on detached duty nearly all of 
the time, being stationed at the commander's headquarters. 

When his military service was ended Air. Ensign returned to Iowa, where 
be conducted a hotel for some time. He then decided to go to Denver, Colorado, 
but on reaching Des Moines found that trains were late and while tiiere waiting 
he heard favorable reports of Lincoln and decided to come to this city, which 
was then scarcely three years old. He arrived on the 24th of March, 1870, and 
embarked in the livery business, for six months having a stand on the north side 
of P street, opposite the present site of the I'ederal building. He then removed 
to 221 South Eleventh street, where he purchased a building which he converted 
into a livery barn. He gradually increased his business until it became the 
largest of the kind in the city and he extended its scope to include the omnibus 
and transfer business, in which he continued actively to the time of his death. 
The business is still continuetl by his son, H. A. Ensign, and is the largest 
undertaking of the kind in Lincoln. Still other business interests occuined the 
time and attention of Cranville Ensign, who in his later years purchased four 
hundred acres of land south of Lincoln and engaged extensively in dairying. In 
all his business career he displayed unfaltering enterprise, keen discernnicnt 
and unabating energy and these qualities brought to him substantial and grati- 
fying success. 

At Wyoming, Iowa, Mr. Ensign was united in marriage to Miss F.lizabeth 
Ann Eastman, born in 1837 in Cleveland, (_)hio, who passed away in Lincoln in 
IQOI. To them were Iiorn two children, H. Archie and Forest W'., the latter 
deceased. 

Mr. Ensign always gave his political allegiance to the repul)lican party and 
in 1880 he was elected sheriff of Lancaster county, in which position he was 
continued by reelection until he had served for four years, discharging his duties 
in a most prompt and fearless maimer. He was also a member of the city . 
council when A. J. Sawyer was mayor and he was long prominent in ])olitical 
circles. He belonged to the Independent Order of C)dd Fellows and he pos- 
sessed all the sterling traits wdiich marked him as a valued citizen, a representa- 
tive and |)rogressive business man and a faithful friend. 



MURRY K. HOLLEY. 



Murry K. Holley, the popular and efficient postmaster of Wavcrly, was 
born in Clarence Center, New York, on the 5th of .April, 1852, a son of John 
and Leonora (Ketcham) Holley, natives respectively of Chestertown, New 
York, and Sudbury, \'ermont. In his early manhood the father drove the 
stage from TUilifalo to F.atavia, New AVirk, over the old plank road which was 
maintained from receiiits at the various tollgates. Subsequently he engaged in 



260 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

merchandising and also served as postmaster of Millgrove, New York. He 
passed away in \'ermont in 1858, and his wife also died in that state. They 
were the parents of seven children, of whom MiuTy K. is the fifth in order of 
birth. 

The last named attended the public schools of Rutland, X'ermont. in his 
early boyhood Ijut ivhen eleven years of age began working as a farm hand, in 
which capacity he continued for six years. He then entered the employ of the 
Central \'ermont Railroad Company and was connected with that corporation 
for twelve years, but in 1881 migrated westward and for a short time lived 
in Indianapolis, Indiana. In January, 1882, however, he came to Waverly, 
Nebraska, where he resided with a brother for three months. At the end of 
that time he went to Kansas and accepted a position with the Burlington Rail- 
road. Not long afterward, however, he entered the employ of the r^Iissouri 
Pacific, with which he was connected for seventeen years, or until January, 
1899, when he took up his residence in Chicago and began w^orking for the 
Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. In April, 1904, he gave up railroad work 
and came to \\'averly, Nebraska, where for three and a half years he was 
employed by the firm of Loder iS: Son. In 1907 he removed to Denver, but 
after engaging in business there for four years returned to Waverly, where 
he has since resided. On the 28th of September, 1913, he received the appoint- 
ment as postmaster, and he is still serving in that capacity and is making a 
highly creditable record. He owns the building in which the postofifice is located 
and also holds title to his attractive residence. 

Mr. Holley was married on the i8th of November, 1874, to Miss Ida Coppins, 
who was born in Rutland, Vermont, and is a daughter of Culmer and Mary 
(Hagar) Coppins, the former of whom was born in England and the latter 
in Vermont. The father became a resident of America in his early manhood 
and engaged in carpentering in the east until the outbreak of the Civil war, 
when he ofifered his services to the L^nion. He took part in much hard fighting 
and died while at the front. His wife is still living and makes her home with 
Mr. and Mrs. Holley at the age ,of eighty-three years. Four children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Holley but all are now^ deceased. 

Mr. Holley votes an independent ticket, supporting the candidates who in 
his judgment will make the best officials. He is a consistent member of the 
i\Iethodist Episcopal church and fraternally is connected w-ith the Masonic 
lodge at Atchison, Kansas. He has been a member of the craft since 1873 
and was made a Master Mason in the lodge at Rutland. \*ermont. During his 
residence in Waverly he has gained a wide acquaintance, and his genuine 
worth is attested by the fact that he is most highly esteemed where best known. 



BYRON CLAY CHARLTON. 

Byron C'^y Charlton, who is a representative of a well known pioneer family 
of Lancaster county, is sticcessfully engaged in farming and stock raising in 
Centerville precinct. He was born in that precinct upon the Charlton homestead, 
on the 25th of September, 1874, a son of William and Mary (Lidolph) Charlton, 



• LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 261 

the former born in Bonaparte, Iowa, on the loth of August, 1845. When a young 
man of eighteen years he went to Cahfornia and there engaged in farming and 
stock-raising for five years. At length he returned to Iowa and thence came to 
Lancaster county, Nebraska, and bought a fine farm on section 26, Centerville 
precinct. He purchased other land from time to time and became one of the 
most extensive land owners of the county. He specialized in feeding cattle for 
market and derived a handsome income from that Iiusiness. In 1906 he retired 
from active life, but still resides upon the home farm. He was married on the 
13th of May, 1872, in Bonaparte, Iowa, to Miss Mary Lidolph, who passed away 
upon the home farm in Centerville precinct, on the 3d of March, 1877, and is 
buried in the Centerville churchyard. 

Byron Clay Charlton received a good education, attending the schools of 
district No. "' and also the city schools of Lincoln and supplementing the 
knowledge thus acquired by study in business college at Lincoln. He also gave 
much of his time during his boyhood and youth to assisting his father and gave 
him the benefit of his services until he was twenty-six years of age, when he 
was married and began farming for himself, taking charge of two hundred acres 
of land in section 25, Centerville precinct, which was given to him by his father. 
He is still operating his place and is meeting with gratifying success as a stock- 
raiser. He annually feeds large numbers of cattle for the market and also breeds 
registered Poland China hogs. He keeps informed as to the results of experi- 
ments in regard to the grade of stock and is a factor in development of stock- 
raising interests in Lancaster county. In. 1914 he erected a fine two-story resi- 
dence which is the handsomest farm house in Centerville precinct, and which is 
provided with steam heat, hot and cold water and gas light from a private gas 
plant, and all of the furnishings are of fine quality and attractive design. The 
barns and other buildings and the general appearance of the place is in keeping 
with the house and his farm demonstrates how attractive country life may be 
made. 

Mr. Charlton was married on Christmas day of 1900, at Roca, to Miss Dora 
Coral Pepple, who was born near Findlay. Ohio, on the 4th of October, 1881, 
and is a daughter of Rufus and Clara Pepple, natives resi)ectively of Michigan 
and Ohio. Her father removed to the Buckeye state and there engaged in farm- 
ing until 1885, when he came to Nebraska and turned his attention to railroading. 
He is now in the mechanical maintenance department of the Union Pacific Rail- 
road and has charge of the water supply for the railroad at Roca. His wife 
grew to womanhood in Ohio and engaged in teaching school there for some time. 
After her removal to Lancaster county with her husl)and and children she taught 
in Centerville and Saltillo townships and followed the teaching profession in all 
for over two decades. She also still survives. Mrs. Charlton was but four years 
of age when she was brought to Lancaster county and was educated in the ])ublic 
schools of Roca and in the Lincoln high school and the State University at Lin- 
coln. She has become the mother of four children : Clay \\'illiam, who was born 
on the 14th of August, 1901, and is now attending .school; Marjory May was 
born on the ist of ]March, 1906, and is attending school; Dorothy Elizabeth, who 
was born February 7, 1912; and Ruth, November 22, 1913. 

Mr. Charhon is a republican in politics and takes the interest of a jniblic- 
spirited citizen in aftairs of local government. Both he and his wife belong to the 



^62 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Methodist Episcopal ciiurch and fraternally he is connected with Damocles Lr -e, 

Knights of J'^thias, at Roca, in which he has sensed as prelate several ns 

and has also held other offices. His interest in the public schools is ind -d 

by the fact that he has served as treasurer of district No. 94 for two rs. 
He believes in progress along all lines of endeavor and can be counted 
to support any movement seeking the advancement of his community. 



■on 



JUDGE LINCOLN FROST. 

High on the legal arch of Nebraska is written the name of Judge Lincoln 
Frost, who for thirteen consecutive years sat upon the bench of the district court 
and for five years presided with marked success over the division having charge 
of the juvenile court. He has ever regarded the law as a force not only for 
checking crime, but a force for the uplift of the individual and a factor in pro- 
moting higher standards of citizenship, and he has ever administered justice 
with that aim in view, believing that there is in each individual seeds of good 
which may be awakened into life. In his law practice he has ever attempted to 
follow constructive methods, administering justice with mercy and calling forth 
the best qualities of the individual. 

Judge Frost was born in Delaware county, Iowa, January 14, 1861, and was 
seven years of age when his father, Lyman Frost, settled in Lancaster precinct, 
Lancaster county, Nebraska, establishing his home on a farm a mile and a half 
east of the present state capitol, becoming one of the pioneer settlers of the 
county. He purchased the eighty acre tract of land on which he took up his 
abode and which had previously been homesteaded. Lyman Frost not only fol- 
lowed farming but also owned and operated a sawmill during much of his active 
career. The frame material out of which he built his first home on that eighty 
acre tract was sawed in his own mill located on Oak creek, a few miles distant 
from his residence, near what is now the town of Raymond. A part of the 
old Frost homestead is now within the corporate limits of Lincoln. Twenty acres 
of the tract remained for a long period in possession of Judge Frost and one of 
his sisters. In 1915 they converted this into a subdivision of the city of Lin- 
coln and named it Lyman Park, in honor of their father. On this have been 
erected many handsome residences, one of which was built at the cost of twenty 
thousand dollars. The entire eighty acre tract, originally in the farm, is known 
as Frost's subdivision to Lincoln, Lyman Frost having first platted this in 1886. 
It will thus be seen that the family name is closely associated with the pioneer 
development and later progress of the city. 

Lyman Frost was born in New Hampshire, February 10, 182 1, a son of Dr. 
E]3hraim K. Frost, who came to Lancaster county with his son Lyman's family 
in 18G8, and here passed away a few years later. His entire life was devoted 
to the practice of medicine and he followed his profession in New Hampshire, 
New York and Iowa. The Frost family, which is of English origin, is represented 
by numerous members in New England, many of whom are jirominent, and annu- 
ally there is held in Massachusetts a Frost family reunion. Lynian Frost was 
married in New York about 1850 to Laura .\ugusta Gray, and to them liave 



LINCOLxN AND LANXASTER COUNTY 263 

bee born six cbildren, four of whom are now living. The family record includes 
Ct ;lia P., the widow of the late Henry D. Blakeslee of Upland, California; 
A' ,\I., the wife of George E. Howard, Ph. D., a member of the faculty of 
th liversity of Nebraska; Charles Sumner, deceased; Flora E., the wife of 
N. " Snell, president of The Midwest Life Insurance Company of Lincoln; 
[u Lincoln Frost, of this review; and John C. Fremont I-"rost, now deceased. 
Tl.c father passed away December i, 1897, his wife July 17, 1S99, and both are 
interred in \\'yuka Cemetery of Lincoln. The father was originally an old line 
whig and became one of the first members of the republican party. Naturally 
he was a great admirer of John C. Fremont, Charles Sumner and Abraham Lin- 
coln and named his three sons for these distinguished American statesmen. How- 
ever, about twenty years ago, Judge Frost dropped the initial A. from in front 
of his name and has since been known as Lincoln Frost. 

He was reared on the old Frost homestead and obtained his early education 
in what was known as the Frost school, which stood neaf the family home. 
About the time he attained his majority he taught two terms of school. Prior 
to this he had spent one year in the Lincoln high school and two years in the 
preparatory department of the State University and was graduated from the 
University of Nebraska with a Bachelor of Arts degree in the class of 1886. 
He spent the school year of 1886-7 doing post graduate work in Johns Hopkins 
University at Baltimore, and while there he was the room mate of the late 
Dr. Amos G. Warner of Lancaster county, a man known to all. In the summer 
of 1887 Judge Frost entered the law office of Sawyer & Snell of Lincoln, com- 
posed of A. J. Sawyer and N. Z. Snell. In 1889 he was admitted to the bar, and 
soon afterward became a partner of his former preceptors, at which time the 
firm style of Sawyer, Snell & Frost was adopted. This relation continued until 
1898, when Mr. Frost was elected judge of the district court of Lancaster county. 
He served on the bench for thirteen years, retiring in 191 1, and during five 
years of that period he also served as judge jof the juvenile court at Lincoln. 
He made a study of the juvenile courts in many di liferent cities, including that 
presided over by Judge Ben B. Lindsay of Denver, and during the period in 
which he sat on the juvenile court bench in Lincoln he built up the local court 
to a high state of efficiency and made it one of the model courts of this character 
in the country. Upon his retirement from the bench he resumed the practice 
of law in Lincoln, and his record is that of a distinguished member at the Itar. 
He has ever been faithful to his clients, fair to his adversaries, and candid to 
the court. In various cases he has exhibited the possession of every faculty of 
which a lawyer may be proud — skill in presentation of evidence, extraordinary 
ability in cross examination, persuasiveness before the jury, strong grasp of every 
feature of the case, ability to secure favorable rulings from the judge, combined 
with unusual familiarity with human nature and with untiring industry. 

On the 19th of November, 1890, Judge Frost was married to Miss Jennie C. 
Connell of Lincoln, who is also a graduate of the University of Nebraska. They 
have three children: Florence, who became the wife of John F. Baird and died a 
few months later; Harold Bonnell, at home; and Lincoln, who was born January 
14, 1907, the anniversary of his father's birth, and is now nine years of age. 

In politics Judge Frost is a republican and has always been a stalwart cham- 
pion of the party, but never an oflice seeker. In fact he has never been a 



264 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

candidate for office save that of judge and on one other occasion when he was 
a candidate for the congressional nomination. Fraternally he is a Mason and 
a Modern Woodman of America. He belongs to the Lancaster County and the 
State Bar Association and to the Commercial Club. He is likewise president of 
the Social Service Club of Lincoln, a position which he has filled for hve years, 
or since its organization, in 191 1. This is Lincoln's leading organization of 
this character and has been addressed by many of the most notable social service 
experts in the United States. The life work of Judge Frost has been of marked 
value to his fellow townsmen. He has been a close student of the great political, 
economic and sociological problems of the day, and has kept abreast with the 
best thinking men of the age. His work for uplift has been productive of 
splendid results, and in all things he is animated by that broad human sympathy 
which is based upon an intelligent understanding of human nature. 



JOHN FREDERICK BRAHMSTADT. 

John Frederick P.rahmstadt was a well known farmer of Olive Branch 
precinct and his demise was the occasion of much sincere regret. A native 
of Germany, he was born in Mecklenburg on the 7th of November, 1838, a 
son of Frederick Brahmstadt, who engaged in blacksmithing in Germany. Our 
subject remained in the fatherland until he was seventeen years old, when, in 
company with his brothers, Henry and William, he came to America and made 
his way to Chicago, Illinois. He worked as a laborer there for a time and 
suljsequently was employed as a farm hand. Following his marriage, which 
occurred in Chicago, he farmed in Cook county for several years and then went 
to Effingham, Illinois, where he established a general store. He engaged in 
business there for a number of yeyrs but at the end of that time lost his store by 
fire and in 1870 he became a resident of York, Nebraska, which was then but a 
tiny hamlet. He built the second house in the town and started a general store, 
which he conducted for eight years. 

In 1878 Mr. ISrahmstadt removed to Cherry county. Nebraska, and became 
the first settler in that county. Previous to his arrival there the only white 
residents of the county were the soldiers in the fort, and he experienced all of 
the hardships and dangers incident to life upon the western frontier. For four- 
teen years he operated a cattle ranch but ilisposed of that place in 1892 and went 
to Blair, Nebraska, where he purchased ten acres of orchrird land. Ius2;ht years 
later, in 1900, he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and began farming three 
hundred and twenty acres of land on section 9, Olive Branch precinct, which 
belonged to his wife. He concentrated h's energies upon the operation of that 
farm during his remaming years, dying there on the 6th of November, 1913. and 
was buried in the Methodist cemetery at Kramer. 

Mr. Brahmstadt and Miss Henrietta Fritz were married in 1857, in Chicago, 
Illinois. She was born in Germany but emigrated to .America in her girlhood 
and located near Effingham, Illinois. -She ]iassed away in Chicago in 1876. leaving 
si.x children: John, who is a horse trainer by occuiiation; Gustave, who is farm- 
nig in Idaho; Edward, deceased, who was a rancher of Cherry county, Nebraska; 



, ^HE fVEW vrRf^ , 
PUBLIC LJ£r.,'v 



ASTQu, L -^^■,x 




MR. AND MR8. JOHN F. BRAHMSTADT 




HEXRY KRAMER 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 269 

Louis, who is operating a sawmill in Arbor, Washington : Emma, the wife of 
Henrv Hollman, a farmer of Olive liranch precinct, Lancaster county Nebraska; 
ami William Henry, who is operating the home jjlace in Lancaster county. Mr. 
Brahmstadt's second marriage occurred on the 2d of May, 1877, on the old 
Kramer farm in Olive Branch precinct, his bride being Mrs. William Hollman, 
nee Sophie Kramer. Her parents, Henry and Margaret (Schaeper) Kramer, 
were born in the province of Westphalia, Germany. The father engaged in 
farming there for some time but in 1S45 came to America and first located in 
St. Louis. .Missouri, whence he went to Clayton county, Iowa. There he bought 
government land which he farmed until his removal to Lancaster county, 
Nebraska, in 1865. He filed on ninety acres of raw land on section 9, Olive 
Branch precinct, and at once began improving his place. For three years he 
lived in a dugout but at the end of that time erected a log house. He resided 
upon the homestead during his remaining days, his death occurring on the Cth 
of lanuary, 11,114, when he had reached the venerable age of ninety-three years. 
He was buried in the Methodist cemetery at Kramer. His wife passed away 
on the 6th of August, 1900, and was also buried at Kramer. He gave the land 
on which tlie town of Kramer is built to the Alissouri Pacific Railroad and the 
town is named in his honor. Mrs. Brahmstadt was born in Clayton county, Iowa, 
on the 2d of .-\pril, 1852, but when thirteen years of age came with her parents by 
wagon to Lancaster county, Nebraska. By her marriage she became the mother 
of eight children, of whom four survive, namely: Benjamin, who is operating 
an elevator in Kramer; Sophie, the wife of Frank Thompson, who is depot 
agent at Kramer; Elsie, who married Edwin Hollman, a farmer of Gage coimty ; 
and Justus Fred, who owns the elevator at Kramer in connection with his 

brother. 

Mr. Brahmstadt was a republican in his political belief and was one of the 
first commissioners of Cherry county, Nebraska, and also served on the school 
board there. His religious faith was that of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and he often filled the pulpit at Kramer when the regular minister was absent. 
His life measured up to high standards of morality, and his genuine worth 
gained him a high place' in the estimation of all who knew him. 



LARS NIELSON. 



Under the management of Lars Nielson the Nebraska Sanitarium, Inc.. at 
College View has been developed from a small institution to one of large pro- 
portions and its equipment has been increased until it is now fully prepared to 
treat successfully various chronic diseases. It was established as a branch of the 
famous Battle Creek Sanitarium, and is conducted along the lines that liave 
made the parent institution so widely known. Mr. Nielson was born m Nor- 
way in February. 18:^8, and is a son of John and Martha (Larson) Nielson, also 
natives of that country. The father followed agricultural pursuits until his death, 
which occurred in 1894, and the mother survived until 1900. Lars Nielson was 
reared in Norway and attended the public schools there in the acquirement of his 
general education. In 1882 he came to America an<l made his way to Minnesota. 



Vol. 11-14 



270 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

where he engaged in farming for a time, but in 1887 went to Battle Creek, Michi- 
gan, and completed his education in the Seventh Day Adventist College. He 
served for a time as steward of that institution and in 1892 accepted a similar 
position in Union College at College View. After serving in that capacity for 
eight years he went to Dakota, where he worked as a minister among the 
Scandinavians for thirteen years, at the end of which time he was asked to 
return to College View. He continued in the work of the ministry here for a 
year, after which he became manager of the Nebraska Sanitarium, which is 
owned by the Seventh Day Adventist church. The institution was opened in 
a two-story frame building, but its patronage grew rapidly and a five-story brick 
building, which was formerly used as a dormitory for Union College, was pur- 
chased and has since been occupied by the .sanitarium. The building has been 
remodeled to meet present needs, and the equipment is complete and modern 
throughout. The institution was organized as a branch of the Battle Creek 
Sanitarium, but this connection has been severed and the Nebraska Sanitarium 
is a separate concern, incorporated under the laws of Nebraska. However, the 
same treatment is given as at Battle Creek, and the local institution is equally 
successful in the cure of diseases. It averages about fifty patients the year 
round and a nurses' training school is maintained at which young women receive 
a thorough professional training, it requiring three years to complete the course. 
The sanitarium declares no dividends, the profits being utilized in improving 
the property and in caring for those who are in need of tretament, but are too 
poor to pay for it. 

In August, 1890, Mr. Nielson was married to Miss Marcia Robinson, by 
whom he has two children : Anna, who was born on the 24th of December, 1893 ; 
and Arthur, whose birth occurred in August, 1895. 

Mr. Nielson gives his political allegiance to the republican party, but has 
confined his activity in public aiTairs to the exercise of the right of franchise. 
As has been indicated, his religious faith is that of the Seventh Day Adventist 
church. He devotes his entire time to the management of the sanitarium and is 
an excellent man for the place, understanding the effects of various diets upon 
the health, knowing the relative value of the diflr'erent therapeutic systems and 
also possessing the requisite administrative ability. 



WILLIAM G. BULLOCK. 

Among the leading business men of Cheney is William G. Bullock, cashier 
of the Bank of Cheney. A native of Nebraska, he was born in Otoe county, on 
the 20th of November, 1876, of the marriage of William E. and Anna (Lehman) 
Bullock, the former of whom was born in Canada and the latter in Wisconsin. 
After fanning in Otoe county. Nebraska, for a number of years, the father 
removed with his family to Lancaster county and followed agricultural pursuits 
here throughout the remainder of his life, dying on the 14th of March, 1916, 
when sixty-two years old. His wife still survives. 

William G. Bullock, who was reared under the parental roof, attended the 
public schools in Lancaster county and supplemented the education so acquired 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 271 

by a course in Weeping Water Academy at Weeping Water, Cass county. Upon 
leaving tliat institution he engaged in the banking Ijusiness at Panama in partner- 
ship with John T. Marshall, but after five years, or in 1910, came to Cheney, 
where, together with Mr. Marshall and seven others, he organized the Bank of 
Cheney, which is capitalized for ten thousand dollars. During the six years 
of its existence it has gained the entire confidence of the community and its 
deposits have constantly increased until they now total forty thousand dollars. 
Mr. Bullock has served as cashier of this institution since it was established and 
its success is attributable largely to his business acumen, his knowledge of 
banking and his unquestioned integrity. The other officers are Charles Marshall, 
]3resident, and John T. ^larshall, vice president. 

William G. Bullock was married, in September, 1909. to Miss Ella Weston, who 
is a daughter of Perry E. and Josephine Weston, natives of Illinois. .At the 
beginning of the Civil war her father enlisted in the Thirty-ninth Illinois \'olun- 
teer Infantry and remained at the front until the close of the war. In 1S71 he 
homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres in Lancaster county, Nebraska, to the 
operation of which he devoted his time and attention until igo8, when he retired 
from active life and is now living at Panama. The mother passed away in 
September, 1905. 

In political belief Mr. Bullock is a republican but he has never taken an active 
part in politics. He holds membership in the United Brethren church, whose 
teachings guide his life, and his dominant characteristics are such as invariably 
win respect and regard. He has gained a high standing in local financial circles 
and personally is popular. 



W. F. ACKER MAN. 



W. F. Ackerman occupies a most important position as superintendent of the 
Burlington shops at Havelock. Gradually he has worked his wav upward, his 
ambition and his energy resulting in his advancement, wliile his life record 
proves what may be accomplished when there is the will to dare and to do. Mr. 
Ackerman is a native son of Iowa, his birth having occurred at Mount Pleasant, 
July 6, 1870. His father, F. G. Ackerman, was born in Germany and at the age 
of fourteen years came to the L'nited States, making his way to Oxford. Ohio, 
where he secured employment in a bakery and confectionery establishment. He 
thus worked until President Lincoln issued his first call for volunteers, when 
he enlisted for service in the Civil war for three months, joining the Forty- 
seventh Ohio X'olunteer Infantry. On the expiration of his first term, during 
which it was proven that the war was to be no mere holiday afi'air but a long 
drawn out contest between the north and south, he re-enlisted and served in all 
for four years and three months, participating in many hotly contested engage- 
ments, and returned to his home with a most creditable military record. M 
Burlington, Iowa, where he located after the war, he married Johanna Fenm'- 
more, a native of Holland. Removing to Mount Pleasant. Iowa, the father 
there worked at his trade and was employed for a time in the State Hospital 
for the Insane at Mount Pleasant. His wife passed away in that city in March, 



272 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

1885, at the age of forty years, while his last days were spent in the home of his 
son, VV. F. Ackernian, in Havelock, where he died at the age of sixty-seven 
years. 

W. F. Ackerman was one of a family of nine children. His hoyhood was 
passed in Mount I'leasant, where he acquired a common school education, sup- 
plemented hy study in the Howe Academy and principally with the Inter- 
national Correspondence Schools, of Scranton, Pennsylvania. In 1888, when 
eighteen years of age, he went to Plattsmouth, Nebraska, where he served an 
apprenticeship as a machinist in the shops of the I'.urlington Railroad, and in 
1894 he went upon the road as a fireman, making his run out of .Alliance, 
Nebraska. From the time of his entrance into the em])loy of the company he has 
made steady progress. In 1897 he became gang foreman and later was made 
erecting foreman at Havelock. In 1899 he was appointed to the position of 
foreman of the shops at Alliance, Nebraska, and in 1900 he became general 
inspector for the Ikirlington Road in Lincoln. In 1901 he was made superin- 
tendent of the shops at Havelock and in 1907 he became assistant superintendent 
of motive power, serving for one year and eight months. On the expiration of 
that period, at which time new shops were opened in Havelock, he was made 
supcrintendem of the shops. He is now serving in that cajjacity and that he is 
one of the most trusted and capable employes of the liurlington is indicated by 
the fact that from the age of eighteen years he has been continuously in the 
service of the corporation. He is a practical railroad man, as his record shows, 
and his ability is demonstrated by his promotions. The shops at Havelock are 
the center of the locomotive industry of the Burlington system and he is in 
charge at this point. His practical experience in the various departments of the 
work well qualifies him to direct the labors of the large force of men who are 
serving under him. 1 le is likewise wxdl known in Ijusiness circles as a director 
of the Havelock Building & Loan .Association and is a stockholder of the First 
National Bank of Havelock. 

In November, 1891, Air. Ackerman was united in marriage at Plattsmouth 
to Aliss Adelia Steimker, who died in June, 1893, since which time he has 
wedded Rosa Prescott, of Havelock. He has two children : William P., who is 
attending the State University: and Eleanor Josephine, at home. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Methodist church and in 
politics Mr. .Ackerman is a republican but not an office seeker, preferring to con- 
centrate his time and energies upon his business interests. He is, hov.'ever, inter- 
ested in all things pertaining to the welfare of Havelock and is co-operating in 
many plans and projects for her improvement and upbuilding. 



ALBERT JAMES HATCHER. 

Albert James Hatcher, who owns two fine farms in this county, is residing 
on section 23, Grant precinct, and has gained a highly gratifying measure of suc- 
cess as a breeder of full blooded shorthorn cattle, and is also engaged in the raising 
of grain. A representative of a well ki;own iMiglish family, his birth occurred near 
Shepton Mallet, Somersetshire, England, on the 4th of April, 1861. His parents. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 273 

George and Elizabeth (Carey) Hatcher, were both natives of that county and 
there the mother passed away. The father was employed in a brewery in Oak 
Hill, England, but following his wife's demise went to Australia, where it is 
supposed that his death occurred, although he was never heard from after leaving 
England. There were five children in the family, those besides the subject being: 
William George, who is a farmer near Kalamazoo, Michigan; John Ed., who 
formerly followed agricultural pursuits in Nance county, Nebraska, but is now 
living in Otoe county ; Lucy, who is still living in England, and Nellie, the wife 
of George Lufif, a farmer of Otoe county, Nebraska. 

Albert James Hatcher was ten years old when he crossed the Atlantic to the 
United States in company with an aunt and his brothers and sister Nellie. They 
went to Allegan county, Michigan, where they joined his mother's brother, 
and later the aunt who had brought the children across the Atlantic, returned to 
England. A. J. Hatcher lived upon his uncle's farm near Kalamazoo and received 
a good common school education. He remained with his uncle until he was fifteen 
years old when he began working as a farm hand. In iS8o he left Michigan and 
went to Otoe county, Nebraska, where he farmed for four years, after which he 
bought one hundred and sixty acres of railroad land in that county, which he 
broke and brought under cultivation. Three years later he sold that place and 
removed to Hitchcock county. Neljraska, where he followed agricultural pur- 
suits, at length concentrating his energies upon the stock business. 1 le owned 
eleven hundred acres of land near McCook and raised large numbers of cattle 
and horses. In 1896 he disposed of his property there and coming to Grant 
precinct, Lancaster county, purchased one hundred and sixty acres on section 
23. He has since resided there and has made many improvements upon his 
place. He also owns one hundred and sixty acres on section 25 and five acres 
on section 26, on which the town of Cheney is located. He does general farming, 
but pays particular attention to raising Poland China hogs, Percheron horses and 
shorthorn cattle, which he sells for breeding purposes. His thorough knowledge 
of stock-raising, and in fact all the phases of farm work, combined with his fine 
business judgment, has enaliled him to gain financial independence. 

Mr. Hatcher was married, on the 12th of September, 1888, to Miss P'lla 
\\'alk-n, who was born in Otoe county, Nebraska, and is a daughter of James 
and Harriet Wallen, natives of England and pioneer settlers of Otoe county, 
Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. Hatcher have become the parents of four children: 
Harry James, who was born in Hitchcock county, on the 9th of March, 1890, and 
is now farming in Lancaster county; Chester, who was born in Hitchcock county 
and is assisting his father ; Flora B.. also a native of that county, and now the 
wife of Claude Laird, a farmer of Lancaster county; and I'.urton. who was born 
in Lancaster county in 1909, and is now attending school. 

Mr. Hatcher is a strong advocate of republican policies and loyally supports 
that party at the polls. For eight years he served on the school board, while living 
in Hitchcock county, and he has held the office of road overseer in Lancaster 
county for four years, keeping the roads in excellent condition during that 
time and making a highly creditable record as an official. He belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church, while his wife is a member of the United Brethren 
church, and fraternally he is a member of the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men, which he joined' at McCook. although he has now transferred his mem- 



274 LL\-COLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

bership to the Cheney lodge. He has inherited the sturdy virtues of his Enghsh 
ancestors and has proved a highly valued citizen of this newer country, with 
whose interests lie has thoroughly identified himself. He has gained prosperity, 
although he began his independent career empty-handed, and his success is irre- 
futable proof of his enterprise, his keenness of insight and his progressiveness. 
During the twenty years of his residence in Lancaster county he has gained a 
large circle of friends and is most esteemed where most intimately known. 



DARWIN DAHARSH. 



Darwin Daharsh, who is conducting a large and profitable general black- 
smithing business in Hickman and is president of the Southern Lancaster 
County Old Settlers Association, was born near Hingham, Sheboygan county, 
Wisconsin, on the 8th of March, 1865, a son of William ISradley and Phoebe 
Louisa (Fyfe) Daharsh. His paternal grandfather, Lsaac Daliarsh, was born 
near Bolivar, New York, and worked in the lumber woods and also engaged in 
farming in that locality. William B. Daharsh was born in Aladison county. 
New York, on the 30th of ALarch, 1830, and received his education in 
the public schools. When still a boy he worked in the lumber woods during 
the winter months and in the summers drove canal boats on the Erie canal. 
He was so employed from the time that he was fourteen years old until he was 
twenty years of age, when he was made captain of a canal boat. In 1853, how- 
ever, he migrated westward to Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, where he bought 
eighty acres of land. Before it could be brought under cultivation it was neces- 
sary to clear it of timber which he did, and he concentrated his energies upon 
the improvement of his farm there until May, 1869, when he came to Lancaster 
county, Nebraska, homesteading eighty acres on section 12, South Pass precinct, 
three-quarters of a mile south of the present site of Holland. He and his wife 
and their five children made the journe)- from Wisconsin to Nebraska overland 
in two covered wagons and the trip required five weeks, as they left their old 
home on the 24th of May and reached Lancaster county on the 26th of June. 
Mr. Daharsh lived u])on his homestead in South Pass precinct until September, 
1877, when he sold that place and rented land near the town of Hickman, where 
he resided until his death on the 19th of January, 1898. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Phoebe Louisa Fyfe. was Ijorn in Salisbury, \'ermont, on the 
28ih of December, 1827, a daughter of James and Electa (Sanford) Fyfe. Her 
father was also a native of Salisbury, and his natal day was the loth of August, 
1704. He was a farmer by occupation. In 1S34 he removed to Orleans county. 
New York, and in 1843 ^o Lockport that state, while in 1847 ^^ took up his 
residence in Lima township, Sheboygan coinUy, Wisconsin, where he passed 
awav on the dth of May, 1863. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. William B. 
Daharsh was celebrated on the i6lh of April, 1856. at Lima, Wisconsin, and 
they became the parents of five children: Emma Elizabeth, the wife of D. J. 
Bryan, a farmer of Askwood, Saskatchewan, Canada; William, who is farming 
in Nemaha township, Lancaster couiUy ; Albert, a farmer of Oklahoma : Darwin ; 
and Elmer H., who owns a garage at Hickman. 

Darwin Daharsh was reared in this countv and is indebted for his education 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 275 

to its public schools. At an early age he began assisting with the work of the 
home farm, but in 1889, when about twenty-four, learned the blacksmith's trade, 
which he tound more congenial than agricultural pursuits and which he has 
since followed with gratifying success. He owns a well equipped shoi) in 
Hickman and is accorded a large share of the public patronage in his Hue, having 
built up an enviable reputation for reliable work and reasonable prices. He also 
owns the ground on which the shop is located and holds title to his commodious 
and modern residence. 

Mr. Daharsh was married in Hickman on the 2yth of November, 1893, to 
Miss Nettie ^lay Shipley, daughter of Enoch Al. and Nancy J. (Swiggart) 
Shipley, the former of whom was born in England. l)ut emigrated to America in 
early manhood and located at Florence, Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. Daharsh are 
the parents of two children: \'erna Ruth, who was born on the 30th of August, 
1895, at Hickman, received her education in the public schools of that town and 
in a commercial school at Lincoln. She is now employed by the Cushman Motor 
Works at Lincoln. Lloyd Ardell, born on the 2d of February, 1901, who is a 
student in the Hickman high school. 

Mr. Daharsh is an active republican and has served in a number of local 
offices. He was a member of the town board for two years, held the office of 
the justice of the peace, and from 190J until 1914 was a member of the board 
of education. He takes a praiseworthy interest in all that pertains to the general 
welfare and is recognized as one of the leading citizens of the town. For four 
years he has been president of the Southern Lancaster County Old Settlers 
Association, his retention in that position indicating the esteem in which he is 
held. His wife belongs to tJie Methodist church, and she also has made many 
warm friends. 



EDMUND L. TEMPLE. 

Edmund L. Temple is now living retired from active agricultural pursuits, 
although still residing on his farm on section 9, Yankee Hill precinct. He was 
born in Winnebago county, Wisconsin, in 1851. His mother died when he was 
but three weeks old. at which time he was taken to the home of an uncle, J. H. 
Fritts, of De Kalb county, Illinois, by whom he was reared to manhood there re- 
ceiving all the love, care and protection that a parent lavishes on a son. His 
father followed the ■■49ers to the California gold fields, where he kept up a regu- 
lar correspondence with his people in the east and after "■making his stake" 
started on the return journey but was never afterward heard from, and it is 
su])posed that he was either killed by the Indians, as he made his way across 
the plains, or was murdered for his money by one of the many bands of high- 
waymen who then infested that section of the country. 

In early manhood Edmund L. Temple was married in De Kalb county, Illinois, 
to Miss Corinthia Brown, a native of La Salle county. Illinois. They began 
their domestic life upon a farm in De Kalb county, where they resided until 
1880, when Mr. Temple and his uncle. I. H. Fritts. removed to Salisburj', Mis- 
souri, where thev remained for three years. In 1883 they came with their 



276 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

respective families to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and Air. i-ritts purchased 
the farm which Mr. Temple now owns. The former did not like this section 
of the country, however, and a month or two later, leaving his nephew on the 
farm, he returned to Illinois. Three years passed, however, and he again came 
to Lancaster county, where he continued to reside until his death. From the 
time of his arrival Edmund L. Temple concentrated his energies upon agricul- 
tural pursuits and was actively engaged in farming until 1909, when he rented 
his land, although he still maintains his residence on the old homestead. 

Fraternally Mr. Temple is connected with Lancaster Lodge. No. 54, I-". &. 
A. M., while his wife belongs to Electa Chapter, No. 8, O. E. S. He is also affili- 
ated with Baird Lodge, No. 54, K. P., of Rokeby, Nebraska, and he and his wife 
are consistent and faithful members of the Congregational church. In politics 
he has always lieen a republican but never an aspirant for office. I le is one of 
the highly esteemed citizens of Lancaster county, his life being well spent, 
characterized by devotion to duty in every relation. He deserves much credit 
for what he has accomplished, as his success has come to him as the reward of 
earnest, persistent and intelligently directed effort. 



LOUIS T. LODER. 



Louis J. Loder, a progressive and prosperous general merchant at W'averly, 
is also engaged in the stock raising business, owning a valuable tract of land 
adjoining the town. He was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, on the 13th of 
February, 1835, of the marriage of William and Margaret (Maston) Loder, the 
former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. The father carried 
on agricultural pursuits in the Buckeye state for many years but about the close 
of the Civil war he came to Nebraska, which state he had previously visited, and 
he spent the last years of his life upon a tract of land which he owned near 
Ashland. 

Louis J. Loder, who is the third in order of birth in a family of twelve 
children, attended one of the pioneer schools of Ohio, the building being con- 
structed of logs. During much of his boyhood and youth, however, he was 
engaged in farm work and thus became familiar with practical methods of 
agriculture. When twenty-one years of age he began his independent career 
and on the 15th of September, 1857, he started for Nebraska, driving a team of 
horses all the way from Ohio to this state. He took up a tract of government 
l.-md on Salt creek in Lancaster county, and there he resided for a number of 
years. At length he traded part of that farm for land adjoining the town of 
Waverly and for three years he concentrated his energies upon the operation 
of that place. In 1896 he became active in the mercantile field, associating 
himself with his son William in the ownership and conduct of a general store. 
They carry a well selected stock of dry goods, shoes, groceries, etc., and their 
patronage is large and representative. He still owns a four hundred-acre farm 
adjoining Waverly and is there engaged in farming and stock raising in connec- 
tion with his son William. They hire help and derive a good profit from the 
sale of their grain and their higli grade stock. 




MR. AND MKS. LOllS .). I.ODKR 



THE I-!^^« 

IpUBLlC Li: 






fA:.u^O^ 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 279 

Mr. Lodcr was married in June, 1866, to Miss Alice Walker, who was born 
in England and is a daughter of Samuel and Christina Walker, who came with 
their family to the United States when Mrs. Loder was a small child. About 
1865 the Walker family located in Waverly, Nebraska, where both parents 
died. Mrs. Loder has also passed away, her demise occurring on the 2d of 
January, 1913. She was the mother of five children, namely: Edward, who is 
a resident of Portland, Oregon, and is vice president of the Gillespie Company, 
wholesale fruit dealers; Edith, the wife of Jeff Yates, who is engaged in the 
piano business in University Place; William, who is his father's partner in the 
store; and two who died in infancy. 

Mr. Loder is a democrat in politics and was the tirst clerk of Lancaster 
county, in which capacity he served for two years. Tie has since refused to 
accept office but takes a commendable interest in public aifairs. In religious 
faith he is a Christian Scientist and holds membership in the mother church at 
Boston. He has thoroughly identified his interests with those of Waverly and 
considers it his permanent home. He is one of the pioneer residents of Lan- 
caster county as he arrived here several years before the Lavender cottage, the 
first house in Lincoln, was erected. He was married in that house and could 
scarcely have thought that within his lifetime a city of metrojjolitan proportions 
would grow up upon that site. During the first years that he engaged in farming 
in this county he was compelled to haul supplies from Plattsmouth and Omaha, 
and settlers wdio came to this region often liecame discouraged because of the 
many hardships to be encountered, feeling that this section was incapable of a 
high state of development. He, however, recognized that it possessed so many 
natural advantages that it was certain to become in time a prosperous agricultural 
ici'ion, and his faith has been more than justified. 



O. OLSON, M. D. 



Dr. O. Olson, who since njon has been eng;iged in the jiractice of medicine and 
surgery in Lincoln, was born in Gardner, Illinois, June 11, 1877, a ^son of 
Matthew and Anna (Thompson) Olson, both of whom are natives of Norway. 
They were married in Gardner, Illinois, in 1871. and in 1878 removed to Lincoln, 
NebVaska, wher-e they remained until 1901. when they returned to Gardner, 
Illinois, where they now reside. 

Dr. Olson was educated in the public schools of Lincoln and in St. Theresa s 
parochial school, and having determined to make the practice of medicnie his 
life work, he entered the medical department of Wesleyan University of Lin- 
coln, where he remained a student from I<P5 'I'ltil his graduation with the 
class of iqoQ. He then entered ui-on the practice of his profession in Lincoln 
on the 1st of June of that year and has since been active along that line. In 
the intervening period of seven years he has built n,) an extensive practice, 
with offices in the First National P.ank building that are well equipped with 
the modern scientific appliances that largely further success in his chosen held. 

In 1903 Dr. Olson was united in marriage to Miss Anna Fuhrmann, of St 
Paul J^Iinnesota. l.v whom he has three clnl.lren. E<lgar L.. Raymond L. and 



280 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Kenneth W. Dr. Olson is an exemplary representative of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, belonging to Lancaster Lodge, No. 54, F. & A. M., while in Lincoln 
Consistory, No. 2, S. P. R. S., he has attained the thirty-second degree of the 
Scottish Rite. He has also crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine and he has membership with the Knights & Ladies of Security. 
His interests are broad and varied and he is found in active connection with 
those cultural forces which work for the uplift of mankind. He is now a 
member of the American Federation of Musicians, having for some years played 
the cornet in the Nebraska State Band. He is a member of the North Star 
Relief Society, of the Lincoln Commercial Club and along strictly professional 
lines his membership is in the Lancaster County Medical Society and the 
Nebraska State Medical Association. His political allegiance is given the 
republican party but he does not seek nor desire political office, preferring to 
concentrate his time and energies upon his professional duties, in which he is 
meeting with "rowing and substantial success. 



HENRY C. BALIS. 



Henry C. Balis, a retired farmer living in Waverly, was born in Benson, 
Rutland county, Vermont, on the 23d of December, 1859. a son of Henry C. and 
IMargaret (Ketcham) Balis. The father was born in Huberton, Rutland county, 
on the 25th of April, 1832, and the mother's birth occurred in Sudbury, that 
county, on the 2d of May, 1832. After farming in his native state for a numlier 
of years the father emigrated with his family to Naperville. Illinois, and pur- 
chased land in that locality. In 1884, however, he removed to \\'averly precinct, 
Lancaster county, Nebraska, -where he became a landowner. He made many 
improvements upon his home farm and also developed another tract of land 
in this precinct. He passed away on the 8th of October, 1910, and his wife died 
February 28, 1908. They were the parents of five children, of whom two sur- 
vive : Henry, and a younger brother, George, a contractor residing in Lincoln. 

Henry C. Balis attended school in \'ermont and supplemented the education 
so acquired by one term of study in the Northwestern College at Naperville, 
Illinois. He assisted his father until he was about twenty-two years of age and 
then took charge of the home farm in Illinois, but in 1885 came to Nebraska and 
located upon land adjoining his father's place. He still owns that farm, which 
he continued to operate until 1914, when he removed to Havelock, whence a 
year later he came to Waverly. He was very successful as an agriculturist and 
the period of leisure which he is now enjoying is richly deserved. He has two 
hundred acres of highly imiiroved land and derives a good income from its 
rental. He has erected a good modern residence in Waverly and also owns an 
interest in a business block here. 

Mr. Balis was married, on the 20th of December. 1882. to Miss Hattie 
Ketcham. a native of Sudbury, A'ermont, and a daughter of b'ranklin and Mary 
(Miller) Ketcham, both of whom passed their entire lives in Rutland county, 
that state. To Mr. and Mrs. Balis have been born five children : Mabel Ella. 
the wife of Charles Bevens, who is operating her father's farm; Dora Ketcham. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 281 

the wife of Robert Beachell, a retired farmer of Waverly precinct; l-annic 
Margaret, who is living in Steinauer, Nebraska; Frank, who is farming near 
Filer, Idaho ; and IMary, the wife of Edward Harrison, a contractor of liavelock. 
Mr. Balis is an advocate of the principles of the republican party but has 
confined his political activity to the exercise of his right of franchise. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America. His many 
admirable qualities have gained him a high place in the regard of all who have 
been intimately associated with him. 



WILHELM FISCHER. 



Wilhelm Fischer is successfully operating a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres on section i, Centerville precinct, and has accumulated more than a com- 
l)etence. A native of Germany, he was born in the grand duchy of Olden- 
l>urg, on the 21st of April, 1854, a son of John Henry and Annie Sophie (Ren- 
kin) Fischer, both of whom were born in the fatherland, where they passed their 
entire lives. The father was a farmer. 

Wilhelm Fischer received a good education in his native land and farmed 
there for a number of years after attaining his majority. In May, 1881, he emi- 
grated to America and landed at Baltimore, whence he came direct to Lincoln, 
Nebraska. He and his wife worked one year for John Dunbar, who resided in 
Centerville precinct, near Roca. Later Mr. Fischer was employed for two 
years in the stone cjuarry at Roca. and in 1884 rented a fifty acre tract of land 
in Centerville precinct. After operating that place for a year he leased eighty 
acres belonging to Adam Heuple, in Saltillo township, north of Hickman. lie 
farmed there until 1888, in which year he rented the southwest quarter of section 
I, Centerville precinct, where he followed agricultural pursuits for si.x years. In 
1894 he invested his savings in forty acres of that place. In 1897 bought another 
forty acres, in 1900 purchased forty acres more, and subsequently bought the 
remaining forty acres, making his holdings one hundred and sixty acres. He 
has remodeled the residence and otherwise improved the place, and derives a good 
income from the cultivation of his land. He not only raises the usual crops, but 
also feeds cattle and Poland China hogs for market, and has found both branches 
of his business profitable. In addition to his home farm he owns one hundred, 
and sixty acres of section 7, Saltillo township, which his son William is ojjerating. 

On the 7th of June, 1881. at Lincoln, Mr. Fischer was married to iliss 
Cathrina Otjenbruns, who was born in Oldenburg, Germany, on the 2d of 
October, 1858. She and her husband were natives of the same place and went to 
school together. Her father, Frederick Otjenbruns, ])assed his entire life in the 
fatherland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fischer have become the parents of eleven children, as follows: 
John, who was born on the 3d of October. 1882, and is farming in Lancaster 
county; Margaret, born December 24, 1884, now the wife of David Berry, also a 
farmer of this county; Kate.who was born March 29, 1886. and is the wife of Ed 
Berry, a farmer of this county; William, whose birth occurred on the 9th of Sep- 
tember, 1888, and who is farming in Lancaster county; Frederick, born on the 



282 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

20th of February, 1891, assisting his father; Annie, whose birth occurred on the 
loth of January, 1893; Lena, who was born on the 15th of December, 1894, and 
is now the wife of George Crabtree; Lizzie, who was born on the 23d of February, 
1897, and married Harvey Werger, at Martell; Johanna, born April 6, 1900, at 
home; Sophie, who was born on the 21st of April, 1902; and Rosie, who was 
born May 27, 1906, both in school. 

Mr. Fischer casts an independent ballot as he refuses to follow the dictates 
of party leaders. He is a communicant of the German Lutheran church and 
seeks to conform his conduct to the teachings of that organization. His life has 
been one of well directed activity and the prosperity which he enjoys is fully 
deserved. 



CAPTAIN JOHN H. WESTCOTT. 

Death often calls from our midst those whom we feel we can ill afford to 
lose. Such was the feeling which was manifested when the news of the demise 
of Captain John H. Westcott, of Lincoln, was received by his many friends, not- 
withstanding the fact that he had almost reached the advanced age of three 
score years and ten. He was born in Brownsville, New York, October 11, 1839, 
a son of Willard and Helen (Putnam) Westcott. The father was a native of 
the beautiful Mohawk valley and tm-ncfl his attention to the occupation of 
farming, purchasing land in New York which he cultivated throughout his 
remaining days, his death there occurring in 7867. His wife was a native of 
Pennsylvania and to them were born three children: John H., Martin II., and 
Minerva J., the last named being now deceased. 

Captain Westcott was reared and educated in Brownsville, New York, and 
supplemented his public school training by study in the academy at Fulton, New 
York, while later he became a student in the high school at W'atertown, New 
York. In the winter of 1861-2 he taught school, but there was a call for men 
to serve the country and protect the Union. He therefore put aside all business 
and personal considerations, resigning his position as teacher, and enlisted on 
the 26th of luly, 1862, as a member of Company H, Tenth New York Heavy 
Artillery. He was mustered in as sergeant and a year later was promoted to the 
rank of second lieutenant, while in August, 1864, his valor, loyalty and al)ility 
won him further promotion to the rank of captain, and thus in command of his 
company he served until April, 1863, when ill health forced him to resign. On 
his recovery he rendered service on detached duty and was sent to Harper's 
Ferry where he was officer of ordnance for two months. His was a most credit- 
able military record, marked by fidelity in every instance and his own bravery 
inspired and encouraged the men who served under him. 

Following the close of the war Captain Westcott purchased a farm which 
he continued to operate until r867. He then left New York and removed west- 
ward to Illinois, in iS^iS, settling in Bureau county where he invested in land 
ten miles northeast of Princeton. He continued to operate that farm until 1878, 
after which he lived in Princeton until tS8o in which year he came to Lancaster 
county, where he had previously purchased four hundred and eighty acres of 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 2m 

land oil section 26, Elk precinct. This he .dcveloijcd ami improved, making it 
one of the best farms in the sttite. In addition to tilling the soil, and cultivating 
the crops best adapted to climatic conditions here, he engaged quite extensively 
in stock raising, becoming a very prominent factor in that business, lie was also 
treasurer of the Sullivan, Westcott & Kelly Company, which for a number of 
years conducted their interests under the firm style of the Lincoln Importing 
Horse Com])any. in the interests of which he made several trips to Europe to 
buy horses. On the farm he made a specialty of breeding and raising Percheron 
horses and roadsters and also engaged in raising Galloway cattle. He continued 
to operate his farm until i8<jo when he removed to Lincoln, having been elected 
to the oflice of county commissioner, in which position he served for six years. 
He was also vice president of the Columbia National Bank until they sold out 
to the First National L!ank. Subsequently he was treasurer of the .American 
Loan Company, which position he occupied to the time of his death on tlie ist 
of April, 1909. 

It was on the 5th of November. 1863, that Captain Westcott was uniled in 
marriage to Miss Augusta H. Middleton, a daughter of .Samuel and Phoebe 
(Ingerson) Middleton, who were natives of Jefferson county. New \'ork. The 
father engaged in farming in New York until 1873 when he removed to Princeton, 
Illinois, and while on a visit in Los Angeles, California, he passed away January 
27, 1887, while his wife died in 1874. Mrs. Westcott was born in Rutland, .\'ew 
York, /August 7, 1841, and by her marriage became the mother of four children: 
Carlton H., who is now private secretary to W. E. Sharpe of Lincoln; Harry 
M., who resides in Lincoln and is in the employ of the International Harvester 
Company; Mabel, at home; and Florence, the wife of E. E. Duncan, who is 
proprietor of a printing office in Lincoln. 

Captain Westcott erected a fine residence at the corner of R and Twenty- 
fifth streets, in igoG, and there his widow still resides. He was a member of 
Lincoln Lodge, No. 19, A. F. & A. M., the Modern Woodmen of .America, and 
the Tribe of Ben Hur. Politically he was a rejmblican and his religious faith 
was indicated by his membership in the Grace Methodist Episcopal church, to 
the teachings of which he was most loyal. His was a well spent life, honorable 
and upright in every particular and the many good c|ualities which he disjilayed 
established him firmly in public regard. He left to liis family an exami)le well 
worthy of emulation and their inheritance was not only a comforalable com- 
petence which he had gained but also the priceless heritage of an untarnished 
name. 



AUGUST BRANDEEN. 



Among those who have contributed in large measure to the commercial expan- 
sion of Waverly is August Rrandeen. the enterprising owner of a well patronized 
general store. A native of Sweden, his birth occurred in JonkojMng Liin, January 
2, 1864, and he is a son of Nicolaus and Katherine (Anderson) Brandecn. who 
passed their entire lives in Sweden, where the father engaged in caqientcring. 

August Brandeen attended countrv school in his native land, but when fifteen 



284 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

years old began working for a fanner. After spending two years in that manner 
he was in the employ of a country merchant for four years and later was coach- 
man for a very aristocratic family. When he had attained his majority he began 
the required military service and was in the army for two years, after which he 
returned home and resided with his parents for a year before emigrating to 
America, in 1888. Me first located in Plattsmouth, Nebraska, and for a year 
was in the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, after which 
he drove a delivery wagon and clerked in various stores, remaining in that city 
for nine years. At the end of that time he came to Waverly and engaged in 
general merchandising with a partner for five ye.^rs, after which he purchased 
his partner's interest, becoming sole owner of the business. He carries a well 
chosen and up-to-date stock, and as his business methods are thoroughly reliable 
he has gained the confidence of the public and is accorded a large patronage. He 
devotes his entire time to the management of his business and is constantly seek- 
ing to improve the service given his customers. He owns a good residence in 
Waverly and is one of the town's most substantial citizens. 

Mr. Brandeen was married on the 25th of April, 1891, to Miss Bertha John- 
son, who was born in northern Sweden, where her parents passed their entire 
lives. To Mr. and Mrs. Brandeen have been born four children : Esther Linea, 
who is a teacher in the commercial department of the Havelock high school ; 
Paul, who died in infancy; Hilton W., who is a student in the high school at 
Havelock; and Mildred Katherine, who is in the ninth grade in the Waverly high 
school. 

Mr. Brandeen is a progressive republican in his political affiliations and has 
served acceptably as a member of the board of education of W^averly. He holds 
membership in the Swedish Congregational church and in all the relations of life 
conforms his conduct to high moral standards. He has never regretted his emi- 
gration to America for here he has found opportunities, the utilization of which 
has enabled him to gain a gratifying measure of success. 



PETER B. ENO. 



Peter B. Eno is living retired in College View in the enjoyment of leisure 
made jwssible by his labor in former years. He was born in the province of 
Quebec on the 9th of November, 1841, of the marriage of Almond P. and Char- 
lotte (Bowen) Eno, the former a native of Connecticut and the latter of New 
Hampshire. The father, who was a cooper by trade and also engaged in farm- 
ing, went to Canada in 1823, when about twenty-two years of age, and squatted 
on land where he operated until 1853. In 1S54 he removed to Clayton county, 
Iowa, and there he passed away on the 2d of January, 1884, when eighty-two 
years of age. His wife died on the 2d of Februan,-. 1883. when she was eighty- 
five years old. 

Peter B. Eno was reared under the parental roof and after completing his 
public school course entered the Upper Iowa University at Fayette. Iowa, and 
on leaving that institution began teaching, which profession he followed during 
the winters for a number of years. He devoted his energies during the sum- 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 285 

nier monllis to farming and at length accunuilatccl suflicicnt capital to enable him 
to buy land in Franklin county, Iowa, which he operated for six years. At the 
end of that time he sold the property and returned to Clayton county, Iowa, 
whence two years later he removed to the vicinity of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 
He bought land there and for thirteen years engaged in both farming and teach- 
ing. He was characterized by great energy and by the ability to so plan his 
work as to secure the greatest results with the least possible effort, and he was 
thus able to successfully follow both occupations. In May, 1892, he came to 
College \'iew, where he has since made his home, and he is today ranked among 
the most highly esteemed citizens of the town. 

On the nth of April. 1868, occurred the marriage of Air. Eno and Miss Ina 
1!. Harriman, a daughter of Joel and Annie (Bailey) Harriman, natives of 
New Hampshire. Mrs. Eno passed away on the 28th of May, 1904, after an 
illness of a year. She was the mother of seven children, namely: Gilbert Ray, 
postmaster of College \'iew ; Fred E., who is engaged in the automobile business 
at Lincoln; Delwin G., also a resident of Lincoln; Mabel D.. the wife of Henry 
R. Groth, who is engaged in the printing business at Lincoln ; and Almond B., 
Peter L. and Florence M., all of whom are deceased. 

Mr. Eno indorses the policies of the democratic party and loyally supports 
its candidates and measures at the polls. He has served for a number of years as 
a member of the town council and has always given his influence to measures 
calculated to promote the general welfare. His genuine worth is attested by the 
fact that those who have been most closely associated with him hold him in the 
highest esteem. 



HENRY McDonald. 



Among the prosperous and up-to-date farmers and stock-raisers of Grant 
precinct is Henry AIcDonald, who also operates three threshing outfits. He was 
born near Eagle, Cass county, on the 15th of January, 1879, a son of Henry 
Harry and Dora ( Weddencamji) McDonald. The father was born, reared and 
educated in Ireland and in early manhood came to the United States. For some 
time he was on the police force in New York City, but decided to try his fortune 
in the west, and located in Cass county. Neliraska, in the early days of that 
section. He took up his homestead in the vicinity of the site of the town of 
Eagle and as soon as possible brought his eighty acres under cultivation. For 
some time he lived in a dugout and he experienced the usual hardships of the 
pioneer, but he had faith in the country and in time prosjierily rewarded his labors. 
He purchased additional land, acquiring title to a large tract, and engaged in 
raising cattle upon an extensive scale. He remained there until his death, which 
occurred in 1891. He is buried at Calvary cemetery, Lincoln, where the remains 
of his wife are also interred. She was bom in Germany, but came to America 
in girlhood and was married in New York City. She passed away in 1898, near 
Walton, Lancaster county. They were the parents of three sons and five daugh- 
ters, nainely: Emma, the wife of Jim Kinny, a farmer of Lancaster county; 
Maggie, who married Ewdell Erskine, a farmer of Lancaster county; Mar>-, the 



286 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

deceased wife of Fred Faulkhaber, a farmer of this county; Dora, who married 
Dovan Kemper, also a farmer; George, who is following agricultural pursuits 
in this county : Henry and L. C, who are farming in Lancaster county ; and Katy, 
who died when two years old. 

Henry McDonald was reared in Cass and Lancaster counties and received 
his education in the district schools. He early became familiar with agricultural 
pursuits and when twenty-one years of age began working as a farm hand. He 
also ran a threshing outfit during the summers and at length secured sufficient 
capital to begin farming on his own account. For eight years he rented land near 
Bennett, but at the end of that time bought two_ hundred and forty acres, one 
hundred and sixty acres on section 14, and eighty acres on section 11, Grant 
precinct. He still owns that property, his home being located on section 14, 
and he brought his land to a high state of development and has erected commo- 
dious and substantial buildings. He does general farming, in addition to grain, 
raising shorthorn cattle, Poland China hogs, mules, horses and sheep. He 
also owns three threshing outfits which he operates in the county during the 
season, and this business yields him a substantial addition to his income. 

Mr. McDonald was married in Stockton, on the 6th of May, 1903, to Miss 
Laura Faulhaber, who was born in Stockton precinct, on the 25th of November, 
1886, and is a daughter of John and Mary (Frank) Fauihaber, who were early 
settlers of that precinct. The mother died in 1888, but the father is living retired 
in Lincoln. To Mr. and Mrs. McDonald have been born four children : Madeline 
Mary, who was born on the 9th of April, 1904; Floyd John, born June 28, 1905; 
Lucile Dora, born January 18, 1907, and Ella May, born May 4, 1909. 

Mr. McDonald is non-partisan in politics, supporting the man rather than the 
party. His religious faith is that of the Roman Catholic church and fraternally 
he is identified with Fitzgerald Council, K. C. He has concentrated his energies 
upon his farm work and has already accumulated a competence. 



MARION KINGSLEY FRYE. 

Marion Kingsley Frye, who is living retired in Panama, formerly engaged 
in agricultural pursuits and met with gratifying success in that connection. He 
was born near Peoria, Illinois, on the 14th of December, 1859, and is a son of 
Henry Abraham and Amy Ellen (Gheen) Frye. The father was born near 
Peoria on the 19th of September, 1836, and after completing the work of the 
common school concentrated his attention upon farming. He resided in the 
Prairie state until the spring of 1881, when he removed to Lancaster county, 
Nebraska, and purchased one hundred and sixty acres on section 25, Panama 
precinct. His farm was slightly improved when it came into his possession, and 
he at once~ began to still further develop it. He owned it, however, for only a 
short time as he disposed of it in 18S2 and bought the northwest quarter of 
section 23 and the northeast quarter of section 22, Panama precinct, which con- 
stituted a well improved and valuable farm. He operated that place until the 
23d of September, 1890, when he there passed away. He is buried in the 
Panama cemetery. He belonged to the Grand Army of the Re]niblic. being 




MARION K. FRVp; 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 289 

entitled to incmbership in that organization because of his service in the Union 
army in 1865. In that year he enhsted in the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry for ninety 
days' service and took part in several skirmishes. His wife was born in Zanes- 
ville, Ohio, on the 12th of August, 1835, and there they were married on the 
17th of April, 1856. She passed away near Peoria, Illinois, on the 20th of 
January, 1873, and is buried in Peoria. 

Marion K. Frye attended the common schools in his native county and also 
assisted his father in his boyhood and youth. In 1880 he came to Lancaster 
county. Nebraska, arriving at the town of Panama on the 21st of May, 1880. 
The following year he was joined by his father, and in 1882 he began working 
for Cooper & Canfield, large cattle dealers of Bennet. After remaining in their 
employ for a year he worked for his father by the month for four years, but at 
the end of that time, or in 1887, he rented a farm in Panama precinct, which 
he operated until 189 1. His father's estate was settled in that year and he 
became the owner of eighty acres of good land on section 22, Panama precinct, 
which he farmed for a decade, selling the place in 1901. He then bought the 
southeast quarter of section 29, Nemaha township, and for fourteen years con- 
centrated his energies upon its cultivation. In December, 191 5, he sold that 
farm and in the following February removed to Panama, where he owns a good 
residence and where he has since made his home. As a farmer he was prac- 
tical, progressive and energetic, and his resources increased from year to year 
as the result of his enterprise and good management. 

Mr. Frye was married, near Panama, On the 6th of Marcli, 1884, to Miss 
Salome Hedges, a daughter of Ira and Elizabeth (Duryea) Hedges, both natives 
of Kcithsburg, Illinois. They came to Lancaster county and the father engaged 
in farming in Panama precinct for many years. Both passed away near Panama. 
Mrs. Frye was also born in Keithsburg, Illinois, in 1866, and became the mother 
of a daughter, Leota, who was born on the 23d of February, 1885, and is now 
the wife of Jacob O. Craig, a farmer of this county. Mr. Frye's second mar- 
riage occurred on the 26th of March, 1887, when Miss Alcy Kathcart became 
his wife. She was born near Wapakoneta, Auglaize county, Ohio, on the 28th of 
October, 1870, and is a daughter of William and Mary (Cochlin) Kathcart, the 
former born on the same farm as his daughter. Mr. Kathcart's natal day was 
the 20th of March. 1848, and he was reared in his native county and farmed 
there until 1880, when he removed to Syracuse, Otoe county, Nebraska, where 
he followed agricultural pursuits until 1883. He then took up his residence near 
Bennet, where he operated a farm for three years, after which he removed to 
the town and conducted a livery barn until 1S87. In that year he went to Saline 
county, Nebraska, where he farmed for a time, but subsequently removed to 
Mahaska, Kansas, where he still lives. His wife was born in Auglaize county, 
Ohio, on the 6th of July, 1849, and passed away in that state on the 12th of 
August. 1871. Mr. and Mrs. Frye have had three children: Nellie Maude, who 
was born January 24, 1888, and died in the following February; Marion Merle, 
who was born October 28, 1892, and is the wife of Claude Gardner, a lumberman 
of Panama; and Ellis Kingsley, born May 26, 1S94. who was educated in the 
Peru State Normal College and since 1914 li<is been principal of the high school 
at Syracuse. 

Mr. Frve believes in the principles of the democratic party but votes inde- 



voi. n— 15 



290 LINCOLxN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

pendcntly whenever he beheves that h"c can best further the pubhc good by so 
doing. He served as a member of the school board of district No. 26 for nine 
years and has never ceased to take a keen interest in educational matters. He 
is a Presbyterian in religious faith and fraternally belongs to Panama Camp, 
No. 2227, M. W. A., in which he has held a number of offices. In all relations 
of life he has proved capable and upright and is highly esteemed by all who 
know him. 



GEORGE W. STROUGH, M. D. 

For a number of years Dr. George W. Strough has engaged in the practice 
of medicine at Hickman, Lancaster county, and he is now the leading represen- 
tative of his profession in the town. His birth occurred in Craig, Holt county, 
Missouri, on the 13th of March, 1870, and his parents were John and Sarah 
Anna (Bowers) Strough. The father was born in the vicinity of .\nderson, 
Indiana, on the 28th of January, 1842, and is indebted for his education to the 
public schools of Anderson. On beginning his independent career he turned his 
attention to farming and in 1869, believing that a new country offered unusu- 
ally good opportunities to the agriculturist, he moved in a covered wagon to 
Holt county, Missouri,, and purchased eighty acres of land in the vicinity of 
Craig. He later added another eighty acre tract to his holdings and in due time 
made his farm one of the best improved places in that county. Pie raised both 
grain and stock and derived a gratifying profit from both branches of his busi- 
ness. In 1892 he disposed of his land in Missouri and located seven miles 
north of Beatrice, Nebraska, buying a quarter section of improved land. He 
brought that farm to a still higher degree of development and engaged in its 
operation until 1908, when he rented it and purchased a home in Beatrice, where 
he is now enjoying a period of leisure. At the time of the Civil war he was 
too young to serve in the army but his patriotism prompted him to enlist in the 
Home Guard of Indiana, which was several times called upon to put down up- 
risings of southern sympathizers. He was married on the 3d of January, 1867, 
at Sulphur Springs, Indiana, to Miss Sarah Anna Bowers, who was born in 
Anderson on the 14th of April, 1848, a daughter of George and Lydia (Queen) 
Bowers, natives of \'irginia. Her education was acquired in the public schools. 

George W. Strough grev\' to manhood in Holt county, Missouri, and as a 
boy and youth gave much of his time to attending the common schools. He 
supplemented the education so acquired by study at the Stanberry Normal .Sclinol 
at Stanberry, Missouri, but left that institution before completing his course 
and for a year engaged in teaching in Holt county. The following year, 1892, 
he taught in Gage county, Nebraska, and during this time began reading medi- 
cine, having decided upon the practice of medicine and surgery as his life work. 
When he had completed his term as a teacher in Gage county he entered the 
Omaha Medical College at Omaha, Nebraska, which is now known as the State 
University Medical College, and in 1896 received the degree of M. D. He 
located at Pickrell, Gage county, and practiced there until September. 1897, 
when he came to Hickman, Lancaster county. In July of the following year 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 291 

he offered his services to his country, which was then involved in war with 
Spain, and enhsted in Company A, Third Nebraska Vokinteer Infantry. He 
remained with that command until August, w^hen the regiment arrived at Jack- 
sonville, Florida, and he was transferred to the hospital corps of the regular 
army. He took a competitive examination for the [losition of acting hospital 
steward and, passing at the head of the list, received the aiipointment the fol- 
lowing day. A month later he was promoted to steward and was ordered to 
Savannah, Georgia. On the 15th of December, i8i;8, he was sent to Havana, 
Cuba, making the trip on the transport Missouri, The hospital corjjs of which 
he was a member were the first troops landed at Ihuaua and at once went into 
camp near Quemadas, later known as Camp Columbia. He remained there until 
he received his discharge from the army on the 2(1 of May, 1S99. He was instru- 
mental in organizing the Volunteer Hospital of the Third Division of the 
Seventh Army Corps and in his work in that connection manifested executive 
ability as well as thorough medical knowledge. 

After leaving the military service Dr. Strough returned to Hickman, Ne- 
braska, by way of New York City and continued in practice here until 1904, 
when he located in Beatrice. He next went to Barnston, Gage county, and prac- 
ticed there for four and a half years. In 1909 he returned to Hickman, where 
he has since remained, and the large and important practice which he is accorded 
is an indication of his high professional standing. He has the full confidence 
of both the general public and of his professional colleagues and is the leading 
physician in the town. 

Dr. Strough was married on the ist of May, 1900, at Craig, Missouri, to 
Aliss Cora \ ictoria Rundle. Her father, Niram Rundle, was born in Indiana 
but resided for a number of years at Hamburg, Iowa, where he owned a woolen 
mill. Later he operated a sawmill in Missouri and in all that he did he met with 
gratifying success. At the time of the Civil war he served as a lieutenant in 
the Union army, thus giving indisputable proof of his loyalty to his country. 
He married Miss Sarah Layton, also a native of the Hoosier stale. Both are 
now deceased. Mrs. Strough was educated in the Craig high school and was 
for five years a teacher in the primary department of the schools at Craig and 
Corning, Missouri. She is active in church work and for the past two years 
has conducted a Bible study class in the Methodist church. She takes a keen 
interest in everything relating to the advancement of the work of the Sunday 
school and church and keeps in touch with the most modern and efficient methods 
of carrying on such activities. She is also a charier member of Rosemary 
Chapter, No. 330, O. E. S., of Hickman, was chosen the first worthy matron 
and was honored by re-election to that office. By her marriage she has become 
the mother of a daughter, Lucile, who was born in Barnston, Gage county, 
Nebraska, December 28, 1905, and is now attending school. 

Dr. Strough is a republican and studies carefully the questions and issues 
of the day but has never been an asjjiranl for political office. However, he has 
served as a member of the board of education of Hickman and was secretary 
of that body when the high school building was erected. He was very active 
in securing the new building and at all times worked for the advancement of 
the schools. He was a charter member of Hickman Lodge, A. F. & A. M., but 
now holds memliership in Beatrice Lodge, No. 26, of lieatrice. He is a charter 



292 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

member of Rosemary Chapter, No. 330, O. E. S., of Hickman, and his fraternal 
relations also include membership in Crawford Lodge, No. 304, L O. O. P., at 
Barnston, Nebraska, in which he has held all the offices. He is a Presbyterian 
in religious faith and practices brotherly kindness, which is the basis of the 
Christian teaching, never refusing to give his professional services when they 
are needed, even if he is certain that he will receive no pay for so doing. He 
owns a handsome home in Hickman and considers himself a permanent resident 
of the town. The success which he has gained is highly creditable in that he is 
a self-educated and self-made man, having depended solely upon his own resources 
for advancement. 



CHARLES V. WARNER. 

Charles V. Warner, a retired farmer and stock raiser residing near Wavcrly, 
holds title to eight hundred and twenty-five acres of excellent land in Lancaster 
county, all of which he has acquired through his own efforts and good manage- 
ment. He is one of the valued citizens whom Sweden has given to Nebraska, 
as his birth occurred in Kisa on the 22d of August, 1848. He is a son of Peter 
Warner and Mary Christina (Anderson) Peterson, also natives of that coun- 
try, where they passed their entire lives. The father devoted his time and 
attention to farming, never aspiring to office or doing military service. In the 
family were nine children, of whom our subject is the seventh in order of birth 
and of whom five survive. Two children are living in Sweden, and Gust and 
John are both farmers in Lancaster county, Nebraska. 

Charles V. Warner received his education in the public schools of his native 
country and early became familiar with farm work as he began assisting his 
father when ten years old. He worked as a farm hand in Sweden for some 
time before his removal to the United States, in 1868, and for a year following 
his arrival in this country he was employed near New Sweden, Iowa, in a 
similar capacity. Subsequently he worked for others in the vicinity of Altona, 
Knox county, Illinois, but in 1871 came with his brothers to Lancaster county, 
Nebraska, and bought land from the Burlington & Missouri Railroad in Rock 
Creek precinct. He farmed there for two years and then removed to Waverly 
precinct, where he rented school land for a time. Later he bought land 
at seven dollars per acre, and he has added to his holdings gradually until 
he now owns eight hundred and twenty-five acres of fine farming land, all of 
which is well improved. He was actively engaged in agricultural pursuits until 
1906, when he retired. He is still residing upon his farm near Waverly, but the 
land is now rented and cultivated by his nephew, C. J. Warner. He was very 
energetic and progressive as a farmer and stock raiser, and the success which 
he gained was the natural result of his industry and good management. He 
installed the first Fairbanks scales in the county and at one time had on hand 
more than 200 head of cattle, although when he began as a stock raiser he had 
only two steers. He was very successful in feeding cattle for the market and 
was for years one of the largest stockmen in the county. 

Mr. Warner was married in 1876 to Miss Matilda G. Gilman, who was born 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 2'.):i 

in Iloston and passed away in 1906. Un the lyth of August, 1908, Mr. Warner 
was again married, Miss Clara Webster becoming his wife. She was born at 
Kewanee, IlHnois, and is a daughter of Owen J. and Margaret Amelia (Clark) 
Webster, the former of whom was born in Harwinton, Connecticut, in 1830, 
and the latter in Milford, that state, in 1835. Mr. Webster became a mason 
contractor when about eighteen years of age and followed that business in 
\arious states, although he never went west of Illinois. He passed away in 
1881. Mrs. Warner and her twin brother Clarence are the youngest in a 
family of six children. 

Mr. Warner is an advocate of republican princiijles and stanchly supports 
the candidates of that party at the polls, but has never sought office. In religious 
faith he is a Swedish Lutheran, and his daily life measures up to high standards 
of morality. Mrs. W^arner is identified with the Woman's Relief Corps at 
\\'averly. They hold the unqualified respect of all who have been brought in 
contact with them and have many warm personal friends. 



NOVIA Z. SNELL. 



Novia Z. Snell, founder and president of The Midwest Life Insurance Com- 
pany of Lincoln, is prominent and active in those circles wherein have originated 
great and splendidly organized insurance interests which have made this city an 
insurance center. He was born on a farm in Harrison county, Missouri, August 
23, i860. His father, James Harrison Snell, was a native of Clay county, Mis- 
souri, born October 2~. 1840, while the grandfather, Noah Snell, was one of the 
early settlers of that state. James H. Snell followed the occupation of farming 
in [Missouri in early manhood and was married in 1859 at the age of nineteen years 
to Analiza Dunkerson, also a native of Clay county. In 1865 he removed with 
his family to Nebraska, settling at Ashland, after which he figured prominently 
in the business life of that community and of Saunders county for nearly half a 
century, as a merchant, as a dealer in livestock and grain and as a miller. He 
finally removed to Lincoln, where his remaining days were spent in retirement 
from business. He was the first village treasurer of Ashland, was many times 
elected to the city council and was also a member of the school board there. In 
1867 he built the first brick house in Saunders county. He died April 3, 1915, 
in his seventy-fifth year, leaving two children, his younger son, Noah David, 
having died in infancy. The others were Novia Z., of this review; and Narcissa, 
who for many years has been connected with her brother, N. Z. Snell, in business 
and is now treasurer of The Midwest Life Insurance Company. The mother 
died in 1866, after which James H. Snell married Susan J. Mailes. who was also 
born in Clay county, Missouri, and was an acquaintance of his boyhood. She still 
makes her home in Lincoln. 

Novia Z. Snell was five years of age when his parents came to Nebraska, 
settling in Ashland. He obtained his early education in the -Vshland public schools, 
and in 1878 he entered the State University, where he completed a four years' 
course by graduation with the Bachelor of Science degree in the class of 1882. 
He spent the summer and fall of that year in his father's hardware store at 



294 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Asliland and on the 1st of January-, 1883, entered the law office of Lamb, Rick- 
etts & Wilson, under whose preceptorship he continued his reading until 1884, 
and in march of that year he was admitted to the bar. 

In September, 1884, Mr. Snell entered the office of Andrew J. Sawyer and 
began the practice of law. On the ist of January, 1885, he was admitted to 
partnership with Mr. Sawyer under the firm name of Sawyer & Snell, which 
connection existed until Lincoln Frost joined them and the firm style of Sawyer, 
Snell & Frost was adopted. This firm became widely known as one of the lead- 
ing law firms of Nebraska. The business relations entered into between 
Mr. Sawyer and Mr. Snell on the ist of January, 1885, have never been dis- 
continued during the intervening period of thirty-one years. They have been 
legal and business associates throughout this entire time, for though the law 
partnership was dissolved in 1903, they- have since been closely associated in 
business affairs. In 1890 ]\Ir. Snell was elected county attorney and served for 
one term. He was not a candidate for re-election. He continued actively in 
the practice of law until 1903 but meanwhile had become much interested in 
life insurance. In 1897 he began first to study the subject with a \ iew to taking 
out a policy on his own life. His interest was awakened and he investigated 
the subject more closely with the result that the more he studied the more it 
appealed to liim, until finally he gave up his law practice entirely in order to 
concentrate his efforts upon the life insurance business. In December, 1898, 
he became a director and the attorney of the Security Mutual Life Insurance 
Company. On the ist of July, 1903, he was made president of this company 
and continued as such until January, igo6. On the 17th of February, of that 
year, he became the organizer and founder of The Midwest Life Insurance 
Company of Lincoln, of which he has since been president, while his former 
law partner, A. J. Sawyer, is the secretary. In 1913 the state legislature of 
Nebraska repealed all of the existing insurance laws and enacted a complete new 
code relating to all insurance companies doing business in the state. Practically 
every insurance company in Nebraska, in fact every old line life insurance com- 
pany with one exception, fought the new code and contested in every legal way 
its constitutionality. The solitary exception was The Midwest Life Insurance 
Company as its president became the champion of the new code and materially 
aided the statute revision commission, composed of Judge A. M. Post of Colum- 
bus, Hon. E. L. King of Osceola and J. H. Broady, Jr., of Lincoln, in its prep- 
aration. Mr. Snell likewise rendered \aluable assistance when the constitutionality 
of the act was tested in the courts. The fact that the insurance code is now in 
favor in Nebraska is due in large measure to Mr. Snell's tireless efforts toward 
that end. 

On the loth of September, 1885, Mr. Snell was married to Miss Flora Frost, 
a member of the pioneer Frost family of Lancaster county and a graduate of 
the University of Nebraska. They have three living children : Hazel Frost, a 
graduate of the University of Nebraska and at present director of social center 
activities in the Lincoln public schools; Eleanor Frost, a junior, and Flora Frost, 
a freshman, in the Lincoln high school. The other child, AHne, died in infancy. 

In politics Mr. Snell is a democrat. He is interested in many things of 
public moment in the city. He is now president of the Lincoln school board, 
was president of the University of Nebraska Alumni Association in lOL^-""'' '^ 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 295 

a riieniber of the Commercial Club ami ijix-sident of the Charily Organization 
Society. His activities are thus broad and varied and touch the general inter- 
ests of the community. His influence and aid are ever given on the side of 
progress and improvement, and his life work has been of benefit and value to 

the city in many ways. 



HENRY JOHN MEYER. 

Henry John Meyer devoted his life to farming and stock raising and at the 
time of his death owned four hundred acres of excellent land on section 19, 
Saltillo precinct. He was born near Syrus, Clayton county, Iowa, on the loth 
of November. 1853, a son of John H. and Eliza (Spellman) Meyer. He re- 
mained in his native county until he was sixteen years of age and attended the 
district schools in the ac(|uirement of his education. On leaxing Iowa he came 
to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and was engaged in farming here with his father 
until 1877, when he was married and took charge of a quarter section of land 
belonging to his father on section 19, Saltillo precinct. He continued to reside 
there until his death and not only acquired title to that farm but also inirchased 
additional land, bringing his holdings up to four hundred acres. He did gen- 
eral farming, raising both grain and stock, and his well directed labors were 
rewarded by a good financial return. He built a good residence upon his home 
farm on section 19, Saltillo precinct, which is just a mile from the town of Roca, 
and he also erected good barns and other buildings. He i)assed away on the 
homestead on the 30th of September, 1901, and is buried in the Stockfeld 
churchyard. 

Mr. Meyer was united in marriage on the 21st of June, 1877, in Saltillo 
township to Miss Sophie Menke, a native of the province of Hanover, Germany 
She was bom on the 18th of March, 1853, her parents being Henry and Lucy 
(Schlomer) Menke, who passed their entire lives in the fatherland, where Mr. 
Menke engaged in farming and stock raising until called by death. Mrs. Meyer 
was reared in Hanover, and in 1873 came to America with her sister and located 
in Saltillo precinct, this county. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer were the parents of seven 
children, all of whom were born on the Meyer homestead, namely: Emma, whose 
birth occurred on the 6th of April, 1878, is now the wife of William H. (lolz, 
a farmer living at M'averly, Lancaster county; Hannah, born on the 26th of 
October, 1879, is the wife of John F. Boesiger, a farmer residing at Firth. 
Lancaster county; Lena, born on the 24th of February, 1881, is the wife of 
Rudolph A. Boesiger, a farmer living near Princeton, Lancaster county; .An- 
drew John was born on the 30th of April, 1883. and is operating the home farm; 
and Amelia, born October 3, 1S87, Lula, born May 18, 1890. and Clare, bom 
October 22. 1892, are all at home. 

Mr. Meyer was an adherent of the reiniblican party and served for many 
years as a member of the school board and also as as.sessor of Saltillo town- 
ship, proving very capable and conscientious in the discharge of his official 
duties. He was also appraiser of the Farmers' Fire c^ Lightning Aid Society. 
which was composed of farmers of Lancaster county. His religious faith was 



296 LLXCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

that of the German Lutheran church and for many years he held the office of 
president of the Stockfeld church in Centerville township, serving in that ca- 
pacity at the time of his death. His abihty, his pubHc spirit and his unswerving 
integrity gained him the unqualified respect of all with whom he came in contact, 
and his friends still honor his memory. 



JACOB ERISMANN. 



Jacob Erismann devoted his active life to farming and as he managed his 
affairs well and was practical and progressive in his methods he accumulated a 
competence which now enables him to enjoy the comforts of life and a period 
of leisure. He resides at Hickman, where he is held in the highest esteem. He 
has reached the advanced age of eighty years, as his birth occurred on the 31st 
of March, 1836. He was born in Hesse-Cassel, Germany, a son of Peter Eris- 
mann, also a native of that country. His natal day was the 22d of January, 
1S04, and he grew to manhood in that country, where he engaged in farming 
until his removal to America in 1852. He made his way to the middle west and 
rented a farm in Putnam county, Illinois, near Peru. Eight years later he took 
up his residence in Bureau county, near Princeton, where he purchased an 
improved quarter section. He operated that farm during the remainder of his 
life, passing away in 1873. His remains are interred at Princeton. He was 
united in marriage in 1832 in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, to Miss Magdalena 
Stably, who was born in that province in 1808. Her demise occurred on the 
family homestead in Illinois in 1891. 

Jacob Erismann received his education in the common schools of Germany 
and remained in that country until he was sixteen years of age, when he accom- 
panied his parents to the United States. He assisted his father in farming and 
after he had reached mature years largely took over the operation of the farm in 
Bureau county, Illinois. In 1868, however, he removed to Livingston county, 
near Forrest, and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of raw land which 
he at once began bringing under cultivation. For a number of years his energy 
was devoted to the improvement of that place but in 1892 he disposed of it and 
in 1893 came to Saltillo precinct, Lancaster county, and bought two hundred 
and forty acres on sections 35 and 36. This place was already well improved 
but he continued its development and as the years passed its value increased. 
He engaged in general farming, meeting with gratifying success in his work, 
and in 1900 retired, purchasing a fine home in the northern part of Hickman, 
where he has since lived, while his son operates the farm. 

In Washington, Tazewell county, Illinois, on the 24th of June, 1869, occurred 
the marriage of Mr. Erismann and Miss Anna Jantzzi, who was born in the 
district of Metz, Lorraine, then French territory, on the 26th of June, 1844. 
Her parents, Michael and Catherine (Naffziger) Jantzzi, were born respectively 
in Lorraine, in 1792, and in Strassburg, Alsace, in 1807. Her paternal grand- 
father was also a native of Lorraine and passed away there when seventy-five 
years of age, and his father was likewise born in that country. Michael Jantzzi 
died in his native land in 1848 and a year later his wife emigrated with her 





MR. AND MR.S. JACOB KRISMANX 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 2'J'J 

family to America, locating first near Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. In 1850, 
however, they came to the States and took up their residence at Peoria, Illinois. 
Mrs. Jantzzi passed away while on a visit at the home of her daughter, at 
Washington, Illinois, in December, 1865, and is buried there. The maternal 
grandparents of Mrs. Erismann were John and Catherine (Gringrich) Naffziger, 
both born near Weisenburg, Lorraine. In 1830 they emigrated to America and 
after living for a time in Canada located in Davis county, Iowa, where the 
father engaged in farming. Later he retired and both spent their last days with 
their eldest son. Christian, a resident of Davis county, Iowa. Both reached the 
advanced age of ninety-one years and lie buried in Davis county. Mrs. Erismann 
accompanied her mother and twelve brothers and sisters to Canada in 1849 ''"^1 
to Peoria, Illinois, in 1S50. She was married at Washington, Illinois, at the 
home of her sister. 

Mr. and Mrs. Erismann have become the parents of si.x children. Alfred J., 
who was born near Forrest, Illinois, on the 22d of May, 1870, came to Nebraska 
in 1892 and for six years made his home with an uncle, who resided near Hick- 
man. In 1898, at the outbreak of the Spanish-American war, he enlisted in 
Company I, First Nebraska Volunteer Infantry, and went with the regiment to 
the Philippine islands. At the time of his enlistment he was a student in a 
commercial college at Lincoln, but his patriotism prompted him to put aside all 
personal interests and offer his services to his country. He took part in a num- 
ber of engagements with the Spanish forces, fought in the trenches before 
Manila, August 2-5, and participated in the assault and capture of that city on 
the 13th of August. He contracted malaria fever and died on the 22d of Oc- 
tober, 1898, some time before the outbreak of the Philippine insurrection. His 
body was brought home in 1899 and he was buried at Hickman with military 
honors. He held membership in the Knights of Pythias lodge at Hickman and 
was a young man of fine character and his demise was deeply regretted by all 
who knew him. Ella, the second child, was born on the 26th of July, 1872, and 
is now the wife of Mitchell Franey, a farmer of Lancaster county. May 
Katherine was born September 18, 1874, and gave her hand in marriage to 
William R. Morrison, a farmer of Idaho. William was born October 30, 1878, 
and died on the 15th of September, 1880. Edgar Eugene was born on the 20th 
of January. 1880, and is now operating his father's farm in Saltillo township. 
Anna Elizabeth was born April 30, 1884, and died on the 7th of January, 1905. 

Mr. Erismann is a democrat in politics and although he has the interest of 
a good citizen in public afifairs he has never been an office seeker. He is one 
of the oldest residents of Hickman and so well has his life been spent that he 
enjoys the unqualified esteem and the sincere respect of all who know him. 



WILLIAM FROHN. 



Among the enterprising and self-reliant men who settled in Lancaster county 
in earlv davs and who laid the foundation for its present prosperity was W dliam 
Frohn,' who became the owner of several hundred acres of land here. He was 
born in Muenchhausen. near Koeln am Rhein. Germany, on the 29th of Xovem- 



300 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

bcr, iXyj. W'lien he was ten years of age lie accompanied his parents. Gottfried 
and Cecelia (Klank) Frohn, to the United States, the voyage being made on a 
sailing vessel, which required forty-six days to cross from Bremen, Germany, 
to New York city. The family located in Clayton county. Iowa, which had been 
thrown open to white settlers only a short time before. The father bought land 
from the government and passed his remaining days upon his farm. 

William Frohn grew to manhood in Clayton county and as a boy and youth 
divided his time between attending the public schools and helping with the 
farm work. In 1869 he came to Lancaster county and purchased two hundred 
and forty acres of wild prairie land in Centervijle precinct which he at once 
began to bring under cultivation. As tlie years passed his resources increased, 
for he was a practical and efficient agriculturist and seldoin failed to harvest 
large crops. He invested his capital from time to time in more land and at 
his death held title to several hundred acres. 

Mr. h'rohn was united in marriage on the 14th of June, i860, in Clayton 
couiUy, Iowa, to Miss Amelia Kreuger, who was born in Westphalia, Germany, 
on the 27th of March, 1841, and was a daughter of Frederick Kreuger. Her 
death occurred in 1878 and later Mr. Frohn was married to Mrs. Elizabeth 
Lcpsey. His living children are as follows: Mary, the wife of William Ober- 
meyer, a resident of Lancaster county ; William, who is living in White City, 
Kansas : Ernestine, the wife of Fred Keiss, of Oklahoma ; Cecelia, now Mrs. 
Hubert Kann and a resident of Oklahoma: Henry and Hubert, both of whom 
are living in Lancaster county; and Amelia, the widow of Edward I'ohl, of 
Lancaster county. By her former marriage Mrs. Frohn had a daughter ^lary, 
and by the second marriage there is a son Gottfried. 

Mr. Frolin cast his ballot in support of the democrat party and was never 
remiss in any of his duties as a citizen. However, he never sought public office 
as his farming interests demanded his undivided time and attention. He gained 
financial independence and in 1896 removed to Lincoln, where he lived in honor- 
able retirement until his demise, which occurred in October, 1915. He was a 
comnumicant of the Roman Catholic church and his many sterling qualities gained 
him the sincere respect of all who came in contact with him. 



JOHN E. ENGLISH. 



Among the well known and sulistantial farmers of Grant precinct is John 
English, whose birth occurred in Ireland, in July, i860. His parents, Thomas 
and Delia (McNulty) English, were also natives of the Emerald isle and there 
the father followed agricultural pursuits throughout his active life. He passed 
away in 1913 and the mother's death occurred two years later. 

lohn E. English grew to manhood in his native country and received his 
education in its public schools. In 1876 he came to America and located in 
Cleveland, Ohio, where he served on the police force for several years. He 
then went to Chicago where he lived for twelve years, but at the end of that 
time came to Lancaster county, and began farming on rented land. Seven years 
later he purchased four hundred and eighty acres on section 24, Grant precinct. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 301 

which he is still operating. He has brought the place to a high state of iiii])rove- 
nient, has carefully conserved the fertility of the soil and in his work uses the 
most up-to-date machinery. He is both progressive and practical and although 
dependent entirely upon his own efforts has gained financial independence. 

In November, 1883, Mr. English was united in marriage to Miss Delia 
McNamara, who was born in Ireland, in August, 1862, a daughter of Patrick 
and Margaret ( Dwyer) McNamara, also natives of that country. The father, 
who was a farmer by occupation, died there in 1872, but the mother subsequently 
came to America and passed away here in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1S92. To Mr. 
and Mrs. English have been born eleven children, as follows: Margaret, Cath- 
erine, Thomas, Michael, Amos. John, Mary, Anna, Sylvester, Edward and 
Charles. 

Mr. English is independent in jjolitics and has confined his activity in ])ublic 
affairs to the exercise of his right of franchise. He is a communicant of the 
Roman Catholic church, to the support of which he contributes. He has never 
regretted his emigration to this country for here he has found opportunity and 
through the exercise of enterprise and good judgment has gained prosperity. 



PETER E. AUCHMUTY. 

Peter E. Auchmuty, manager of the Home Lumber Coni])anv, is successfully 
directing the business of that concern and is considered one of the successful 
men of Waverly. A native of Pennsylvania, he was born in Snyder county, on 
the 5th of December, 1851, and is a son of James and Lucy (Strauser) Auchmuty. 
Tlie father's birth occurred in Pennsylvania, and in early manhood he engaged 
in teaching there, while later he turned his attention to farming. He ])assed away 
in the Keystone state in 1861, and the mother, who was also a native of that state, 
died there when our subject was about two years old. 

Peter E. Auchmuty attended the flistrict schools in Pennsylvania but his 
educational opportunities were limited as he had to begin earning his own liveli- 
hood when he was still a child. When about sixteen years of age he was 
emplojed as a farm hand and worked in that capacity for two years. At the 
end of that time he began learning the plasterer's trade, which he followed until 
1878. He then came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and for a year engaged in 
farm work. Suljsequcntly he resumed work at his trade, which he followed until 
1800, when he turned his attention to the butcher business in Waverly. Ten years 
later he became connected with the Marty & Walker Lumber Com])any in the 
capacity of yard man. When the business passed to the ownershij) of Foster 
(Ji Smith he continued with the new ])roprietors and was promoted to the position 
of manager, which he still holds, although the l)usiness is now owned by the 
Home Lumber Company. He gives the most careful attention to every detail 
of the business and is constantly seeking op|)onunitics to expand the trade of the 
company. He owns valuable city [jroperty in Waverly and is in excellent cir- 
cumstances financially. 

Mr. Auchmuty was married in 1872 to Miss Sarah Catherine HoUenbach, 
who was born in Pennsvlvania of the marriage of Henry and Margaret Eva 



302 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

(ilui'tmanj lloUenbach, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and of Bavaria. 
The father engaged in shoe manufacturing in the Keystone state and passed 
away there. The mother died when Airs. Auchmuty was a small child. Mr. 
and Airs. Auchmuty have had si.\ children. Howard C. married Aliss Ora Reiter 
and is now cashier and bookkeeper for the Clay-Robinson Commission Company 
of St. Joseph, Alissouri. Henry Ruber and Clarence L., the second and third in 
order of birth, are both deceased. William E. is a resident of Omaha and is 
employed by a large commission company as hog salesman. Lettie Alay is the 
wife of F. F. Cooley, a resident of Lincoln, Nebraska, who is in the distributing 
department in the postal service. Martha E. is at home. 

Air. Auchmuty indorses the principles of the republican party but votes inde- 
pendently when he believes that he can best serve the public welfare by so doing. 
He was reared in the Lutheran church but is not now identified with that 
organization. In all relations of life lie has measured up to high standards of 
manhood, and the respect and esteem in which he is held are fully deserved. 



WILLIAAI HENRY KIRTLEY. 

William Henry Kirtley has been very successful as manager of the hardware, 
lumber, coal, implement and elevator business at Cheney, belonging to T. C. 
Wilson, of Walton, and his energy and sound judgment are generally acknowl- 
edged. He was born in Taylor county, Kentucky, on the irth of February, 1865, 
and is a son of B. F. and Ella (Underwood) Kirtley, also natives of that state. 
The father passed away there in 1904, after a busy life devoted to agricultural 
pursuits, and the mother died in 1877. 

William Henry Kirtley was reared under the parental roof and attended the 
common schools in the acquirement of his education. For several years he 
worked as a farm hand, but later engaged in the sawmill business in partnership 
with his brother for three years. In 1866 he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, 
and for three years thereafter he worked on A. H. Wilson's farm. At the end 
of that time he began operating a tract of land near Walton on his own account 
and for sixteen years concentrated his energies upon farming and stock-raising. 
Later he was for two years engaged in the hardware business in Burchard, but 
at the end of that time sold out and formed a partnership with C. AI. Knowlton 
for the conduct of a general store at College \'iew under the name of Kirtlev & 
Knowlton. That association was maintained for two years but on the tst of 
May, 1914, Air. Kirtley came to Cheney and took charge of the hardware, lumber, 
coal, implement and elevator business belonging to his nephew, T. C. Wilson, of 
Walton, Since assuming his duties as manager he has materially increased the 
volume of business and is constantly seeking means of still further extending 
the trade. 

In 1895 occurred the marriage of Air. Kirtley and Aliss Alice Jenkins, who is 
a daughter of Charles William and Ann Jenkins, early settlers of Lancaster 
county. Her mother is still living at the advanced age of eighty-three years. To 
Air. and Airs. Kirtley have been born four children, as follows: Walter D., 
Ellen, Esther and \'iola. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 303 

Mr. Kirtley exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the democratic party but has never sought otifice as a reward for his 
fealty. He is a member of the Baptist church and fraternally is connected with 
the Masons and Modern Woodmen of America. He has a wide acquaintance 
throughout the county and all who have come into close contact witli him hold 
high in the highest esteem. 



GEORGE W. SHAVER. 



George W. Shaver, who is living retired in College View, is well and favor- 
ably known not only in the town but throughout Lancaster county. He was born 
in St. Lawrence county, New York, on the 22d of March, 1845, of the marriage 
of Isaac and Eliza A. (Beswick) Shaver, also natives of the Empire state. 
The father followed agricultural pursuits there until 1858, when with his family 
he removed to Clayton county, Iowa, where he purchased land. After operating 
that place for several years he sold out and went to Kansas, where he farmed 
for ten vears. He then returned to Iowa and located in Franklin county, where 
he bought land which he cultivated during the remainder of liis active life. His 
death occurred in 1903, when he was eighty-six years of age, and his wife 
passed away in 1S97. 

George W". Shaver was rearefl mider the parental root and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of New York and of Clayton county, Iowa. When 
only sixteen years of age he began his independent career and purchased on tilne 
eighty acres of land at ten dollars per acre. For hve years he concentrated his 
energies ujjon the operation of this farm but at the end of that time he sold the 
pljce and bought land in Franklin and Wright comities. He made a number of 
iniproveme-nts upon that farm, which lie operated iov ni;mv years, and as lie was 
practical and progressive in his methods and managed his business affairs well 
liis capital increased steadily. He invested in more and more land until at one 
time he held title to seven hundred acres. In iqoo he sold his interests in Iowa 
and came to College \'iew. He purchased land in this locality and also bought 
town property. Much of his time and attention was given to the raising of fruit 
and he was also active to a considerable extent in the real estate field but for the 
past two years has lived retired. 

Mr. Shaver was united in marriage, in Septemlier, i8i)S, to Miss ]\Iary E. 
Rice, who passed away in September, 1913, after a long illness. To them were 
born eleven children, as follows : Reuben W., w'ho is living in Xashville. Ten- 
nessee : Anion A., who resides in the state of Washington; George, who died in 
November, 1909; I'.elle. the wife of Charles I'eters. of Clary, South Dakota; 
Anna, the wife of Turner Howe, a resident of L'niversity Place: Walter, who is 
living at College Mew; Emil, who died in Septenil)er, 1902; .Albert of Ames, 
Iowa; Clara, the wife of .\rchie Morrow, of I'latte Center. Nebraska: Daisy. 
who gave her haiul in marriage to George Ritlgeway. a contractor, who is engaged 
in business in Lincoln; and Frank, a resident of that city. Of the married 
children Reuben has six children and one grandchild; Anion has five children; 
George has one child and two grandchildren; Belle has six children and one 



304 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

grandchild; Anna has one child; Walter has three children; Albert has three 
children; Clara has three children; and Daisy has two children. There are 
therefore thirty grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. 

Mr. Shaver supports the democratic party at the polls and has served as 
chairman of the town council for seven years and as mayor, as justice of the 
peace and as member of the school board. He has kept in touch with various 
forward movements of the day and is recognized as a man of marked public 
spirit. His life has been one of useful activity and the esteem in which he is 
held is well deserved. 



PHIL R. EASTERDAY. 

Phil R. Easterday, cashier of the First National Bank of Lincoln, was born 
in Carthage, Hancock county, Illinois, January 25, 1877, a son of L. F. M. and 
Abbie Warren (Hunsaker) Easterday. The father was at that time professor 
of mathematics and astronomy in Carthage College, an educational institution 
of the Lutheran church, of which he was one of the organizers and the first 
teacher. In the fall of 1883 he removed with his family, then consisting of wife 
and three sons, to Lincoln. 

Phil R. Easterday, then a little lad of six summers, pursued his entire educa- 
tion in the public schools of this city, continuing his studies until he completed 
the second year of the high school. In the summer of 1893, at the age of six- 
teen, he obtained a position in the American Exchange National Bank, an insti- 
tution controlled and managed by S. H. Burnham. He had previously acquired 
in spare moments some knowledge of shorthand and typewriting and in addi- 
tion to the usual duties which devolve upon the messenger the boy of the bank 
he did stenographic work for Mr. liurnham. This led to the development of a 
very close relationship between Mr. Easterday and Mr. Burnham in various 
successful business operations which have extended over a period exceeding 
twenty-three years. When he entered the bank on the 31st of July, 1893, lie 
did not consider that his school days were over but that he was merely covering 
the vacation period, but the lianking business [iroved so attractive that he decided 
to remain and his life work was therefore begun at a much earlier age tlian 
falls to the lot of most young men. In 1899 Mr. Burnham and his associates 
in the American E.xchange National Bank purchased all the stock of the First 
National Bank of Lincoln and merged the two institutions under tlic name of 
the First National Bank. Soon afterward Mr. Easterday became auditor of 
the institution and later, in 1907, became assistant cashier, which position he 
held until January, 1913, when he was elected cashier of the bank and has since 
continued in that capacity, proving an efficient and popular officer. In addition 
to his duties as cashier he is treasurer of the First Trust Company, one of the 
affiliated institutions of the First National, and he is interested in various other 
business enterprises of the city which contribute to Lincoln's material advance- 
ment and to the individual success of the stockholders. During his continuous 
connection with what has practically been one institution Mr. Easterday has 
seen the liank grow from a small lieginning. with less than seven hundred thou- 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 305 

sand dollars in deposits, to an institution having deposits in its various depart- 
ments aggregating over five million dollars. 

On the 2d of October, 1904, Mr. Easterday was married to Miss Leta Trigg, 
the eldest daughter of ;\Ir. and Mrs. Henry B. Trigg, early residents of Lincohi. 
Mrs. Easterday has been prominent in musical circles, having for two terms 
acted as president of the Matinee Musicale, the oldest musical organization of 
the city and one of the largest in the west. By her marriage she has become the 
mother of three children, two daughters and a son, Phyllis, Marion and Donald 
Philip. The family attend the First Congregational church and they are inter- 
ested in those forces which work for the development and improvement of the 
city along social, intellectual and moral lines. Mr. Easterday's success is attrib- 
utable in large meastire to the fact that he has always continued in that line in 
which he embarked in early manhood, never dissipating his energies over 
diverse fields but concentrating his efl'orts in such a manner that splendid results 
have been achieved. 



PETER H. NISSEN. 



Peter H. Nissen, an efficient and up-to-date farmer of Grant precinct, was 
born in Germany, in June, 1802. His parents, Frederick and Christina (Schmidt) 
Nissen, passed their entire li\es in that country, where the father worked as a 
laborer. He died in 1882 and the mother four years later. Peter H. Nissen 
was reared and educated in his native land but in May, 1884, eimgrated with a 
brother to the United States. They at once made their way to Lincoln, and 
after working at dift'erent jobs secured employment as farm hands. 

Peter H. Nissen worked in that capacity until 1887. when he began farming 
on his own account, renting his present place, which he purchased in 1903. It 
comprises one hundred and sixty acres on section 24. Grant precinct, and is 
thoroughly modern in its improvements. Mr. Nissen has also cultivated rented 
land and for ten years farmed eight hundred acres, raising grain and stock on 
an extensive scale. He has lived ui)on his present place for twenty-nine years 
and has made it one of the most highly developed and most valualile farms in 
his locality. 

In March, 1897, occurred the marriage of Mr. Nis.sen and Miss Mary Willers, 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John \\'illers, who, were born in Germany but came 
to America in 1883 and located in Seward county. Nebraska. The father farmed 
there for many years but is now living retired at the age of eighty-two years. 
The mother has passed away. Mrs. Nissen died on the 2d of January, 1915, 
leaving four children, namely: Christina, who is eighteen years old; and Fred. 
Henrietta and Henry, aged respectively fifteen, thirteen and ten years, all of 
whom are attending school. 

Mr. Nissen votes independently, supporting the candidates whom he deems 
best fitted for office, regardless of party allegiance. He holds membership in 
the Lutheran church and his fraternal connection is with the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, to which he has belonged since 1894. He has never regretted 
emigrating to this countrv for he here found opportunities, the utdizat.on of 



306 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

which has enabled him to gain financial independence, and he has thoroughly 
identified his interests with those of his community, promoting the public wel- 
fare in various ways. 



AUGUST FREDERICK HOFFMAN. 

August Frederick Hoffman, who is living retired upon his farm on section 28, 
Nemaha precinct, has reached the advanced age of eighty-one years and his 
long, active and useful life fully entitles him. to the high place which he holds 
in the estimation of his fellow citizens. He was born in the province of Branden- 
burg, Prussia, on the 30th of January, 1835, a son of August and Christina 
(Gerish) Hoft'man. The father was born in Prussia in 1813 and followed the 
shoemaker's trade at Luckau, where he lived until his death in 1845. H's wife 
was born there in 1814 and died in that town in 1870. 

August F. Hoffman received his education in Luckau and after reaching 
mature years turned his attention to the nursery and seed business and to gar- 
dening and followed those occupations until 1867, when, at the age of thirty- 
two years, he came to the United States, locating in Marshall county, Illinois, 
where he was engaged in the nursery business until 1874. In that year he was 
married and rented a farm in Woodford county, Illinois, where he remained 
until 1880. He then became a resident of Lancaster county, and bought eighty 
acres of improved land on section 28, Nemaha precinct, on which, however, there 
were no buildings when it came into his possession. He erected a frame house, 
fourteen by sixteen feet, which structure remained the family home for a number 
of years. At length he bought another eighty acre tract adjoining his original 
farm and for many years gave his attention entirely to the cultivation of his 
land. He erected new barns and completely remodeled the residence and the 
buildings on his farm compare favorably with those found elsewhere in the 
township. He still resides upon the homestead but since IQCXD has lived retired, 
leaving the active work of the farm to his sons. 

Mr. Hoft'man was married on the 27th of February, 1874, at Minonk, Illinois, 
to Miss Ida Schmidt, who was born in Brandenburg, Prussia, on the gth of 
November, 1856, and is a daughter of Herman and Mary (Schuman) Schmidt, 
both likewise natives of that country. In 1870 they emigrated with their family 
to the United States, landing at New Orleans, and the following year they pro- 
ceeded up the Mississippi river to Woodford county, Illinois, where they located, 
the father renting land near Minonk. Subsequently he purchased a farm, which 
he operated for several years, but in 1880 he came with his family to Lancaster 
county, where he bought one hundred and sixty acres of railroad land on section 
29, Nemaha precinct. He l)rought forty acres under cultivation at once and for 
a number of years lived u])on the farm, which, however, he sold in 1889. He 
then went to Hastings, Nebraska, and became the owner of a valuable farm in 
that locality, residing thereon until his death, which occurred August 13, 1903. 
His wife survived for almost seven years, jiassing away on the 2d of May, 
1910. Both are buried in the cemetery at Blue Hill. Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hoft'man have become the parents of four children, as follows : Emma Marie, 










\ i^"^ 



J" 




AUGUST F. HOFFMAN 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 309 

who was born I'ebruary 25. 1875, at .Miiioiik, Illinois, and is now the wife 
of Charles Richter, a farmer of Nemaha precinct; Alma Augusta, who was 
born December 4, 1878, in Alinonk, and passed away November 2, 1904, her 
remains being interred in the cemetery at Bennet ; Charles Frederick, born in 
Nemaha jjrccinct, February 11, 1884, now operating ihe home farm; and Oscar 
August, who was born in Xemaha precinct. April 10. iS(;o, and is also cn<'a,<'e(l 
in farming the homestead. 

Air. HofYman is a stanch repuljlican in politics but has never desired to hold 
office, lie is identilied with the German Lutheran church and his daily life 
testifies to the sincerity of his religious belief. He was successful as an agricul- 
turist and won a large measure of prosperity, so that he now ranks among the 
substantial men of his community. His sons engage in general farming and are 
progressive, energetic and capable agriculturists. Oscar .\ugust is a member of 
Panama Camp, No. 2227, M. W. A., at Panama. 



L. F. M. EASTERDAY. 



L. F. M. Easterday was one of the prominent real estate dealers of Lincoln 
in its early days and during the later years of his life was connected with sav- 
ings banks of the city. As he was a man of fine education and kept in touch 
W"ith the questions and issues of the day, his opinion on matters of public 
policy was recognized as valuable. His birth occurred on a farm near Steuben- 
ville, Jefferson county. C)hio, on the 21st of October, 1839. He was a son of 
Daniel and Jane (Robertson) Easterday and was a lineal descendant of Martin 
Easterday, who came to the United States from Germany in 1760. 

L. F. M. Easterday was twelve years of age when he accompanied his par- 
ents to Montgomery county, Illinois, and there he assisted his father with the 
farm work for about seven years. When nineteen years old he entered the 
Illinois State University, a Lutheran college, at Springfield, and at the end of 
four years was graduated from that institution. A short time before receiving 
his diploma he was elected professor of mathematics in his alma mater and held 
that position for four years, but in the fall of 1867 he became principal of the 
Hillsboro (111.) Academy. He remained there for two years but at the end of 
that time was obliged to give up school work on account of ill health. He spent 
a year at Topeka, Kansas, and then went to Carthage, Illinois, arriving there on 
the i8th of August, 1870. He at once organized a classical school there, which 
later developed into Carthage College, a Lutheran institution. He devoted 
twelve years to upbuilding the school and gave especial attention to work in 
mathematics and astronomy. In 1883 he removed to Lincoln, Nebraska, where 
he continued to live until his death. For the first two years after arriving in 
Lincoln he was a member of the faculty of the State University, but at the end 
of that time turned his attention to business and for a number of years was one 
of the most prominent real estate men in the city. He had great faith in the 
future of Lincoln and played an important part in its early development. Dur- 
ing the last ten vears of his life he gave jiractically all of his attention to work 
in connection with savings banks. During the greater part of that time he was 



310 LINCOLN AND L-WCASTER COUNTY 

in the service of the American Savings Bank and during the rest of that period 
was an official of the First Savings Bank. He was successful both in profes- 
sional and business life and held a high place in the estimation of his fellow 
citizens. 

Mr. Easterday was married on the i8th of August, 1874, in Carthage, Illi- 
nois, to Abbie Warren Hunsaker and they became the parents of three sons, 
Fred R., Phil R. and Cad R., all natives of Carthage. Mr. Easterday gave his 
political allegiance to the democratic party but was not an aspirant for public 
office. However, he served for a number of years on the city liljrary board 
and was always willing to give of his time and energy to the advancement of 
movements for the general welfare. In i860 he joined the Lutheran church 
at Springfield, Illinois, and held membership in churches of that denomination 
until within the last ten years of his life. He was prominent in the councils 
of his church and took an important part in its work. For a few years before 
his death he belonged to the First Presbyterian church and gave his hearty sup- 
port to its various activities. He passed away in Lincoln, on the 17th of Feb- 
ruary, 1913, at the age of seventy-three years, and was buried in the Wyuka 
cemetery. In all relations of life he measured up to high standards of manhood 
and his demise was recognized as a loss to his community as well as to his 
immediate family. 



MARTIN BURNS. 



Martin Burns, a retired contractor residing in University Place, was born 
in Pekin, Niagara county. New York, on the 14th of October, 1837. and was 
reared in that county, dividing his time during his boyhood and youth between 
assisting his father with the farm work and attending school. After completing 
the course offered in the public schools he entered Genesee College, thus further 
preparing himself for the duties of life. On the 8th of August, 1861, he became 
a member of Company B, Forty-fourth New York Volunteer Infantry, known 
as the Ellsworth Regiment which was a selected body of men, all being of excel- 
lent character, all under twenty-eight years of age and over five feet, eight 
inches in height. While at the front he contracted a severe cold and this proved 
so serious in its effects that he was confined to a hospital at Washington for a 
considerable period and was finally discharged on the igth of April, 1862, at 
Washington on account of ill health. 

Mr. Bums then returned to New York and remained at home until he had 
partly regained his strength and in the fall of 1863 went west, locating in Plain- 
field, Will county, Illinois, where he taught school for several years, serving 
during part of that time as principal. At length he gave up teaching and turned 
his attention to farming, purchasing land near Plainficld. In the spring of 
1878, however, he went to York county, Nebraska, and purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of railroad land, which he brought under cultivation as soon as 
possible. He resided on that place for seven years, at the end of which it was 
a well improved farm, and he sold it and removed to the town of York, where 
he lived until 1888. In that year he took up his residence in I^incoln. Lancaster 



LIXXOLN AND LANCASTER C(3UXTY 311 

county, and purchased a hardware store, which he conducted for about a year. 
At the end of that time he disposed of that business and came to University 
Place and erected a good residence. He moved here in order that his children 
might take advantage of the excellent educational opportunities offered by the 
university. In 1892 he returned to York and for six years served as cashier 
of the Farmers & Merchants Bank of that place but at the end of that time 
sold his interest in the institution and came again to University Place, where 
he has since lived. He turned his attention to contracting and has erected some 
of the best residences in University Place, in Lincoln and in Havelock, having 
gained an enviable reputation for fair dealing and thorough work. In 1915 he 
retired from active business and has since enjoyed a period of well deserved 
leisure. 

Mr. Burns was married on the 15th of March, 1865, to Miss Melvina C. 
Hess, who was born in Madison county, New York, and reared in Will county, 
Illinois. She passed away on the 26th of September, 1908, in the faith of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, of which she was long an active member. She 
was the mother of two children, of whom the elder, Riley H., died in 1890. 
Abbie C. is a graduate of the Wesleyan University and of the State University 
of Nebraska and has also studied foreign languages in Germany and France. 
She has taught German in the Wesleyan University since 1898 and also teaches 
French, being recognized as an unusually fine language teacher. 

Mr. Burns is a stanch republican and in 1881 and 1882 served in the state 
senate, having been elected to that body from the district composed of York 
and Llamilton counties. He was very active in the work of legislation and 
among other things that he accomplished he framed and was largely instru- 
mental in securing the passage of the present school law. He was also an influ- 
ential factor in the securing of the state farm. He belongs to Belknap Post, 
No. 318, G. A. R., of University Place, of which he has been commander, and 
he takes a great interest in the work of that organization, to which he has 
belonged for many years, having joined it while a resident of Illinois. He is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and fraternally is identified with 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He has been successful in all that he 
has undertaken, and his record is doubly creditable in that he is a self-made 
man, having depended solely upon his own efforts and good judgment for bis 
advancement. He is respected for his ability and enterprise and also for his 
integrity, which is above question. 



FRANK H. BERGMAN. 

Frank H. Bergman, who owns and conducts the Sanitary Grocery Company 
at College View, Lancaster county, Nebraska, is one of the most progressive and 
successful merchants of the town. He was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, ii-^ 
September, 1886, and is a son of Henry G.^and Anna M. (Wake) Bergman, 
natives of Ohio and Missouri respectively. The father removed to the latter 
state in earlv manhood and became a member of the firm of H. G. Bergman & 



312 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Brothers, box manufacturers of St. Joseph, where he has Ijeen in business for 
thirty-eight years. His wife is also still living. 

Frank H. Bergman was reared and received his early education in his native 
city and after leaving school went to work for the Brady Carpet Company, with 
whom he remained for five years. He then came to College View, Nebraska, 
and entered Union College, where he took a four years' course. At the 
end of that time he engaged in the manufacture of fireless cookers but sold his 
interests in that connection and engaged in the grocery business in partnership 
with R. H. Bruns. This association was maintained for five months after which 
H. B. Steel bought out Mr. Bruns. At the end of another six months Mr. 
Bergman sold his interest in the business to Mr. Steel, but remained in his 
employ for three and a half years. In February, 191 5, however, he purchased 
the business and has since conducted it under the name of the Sanitary Grocery 
Company. He carries a large stock, takes great pains to meet the demands of 
his customers and as the result of his fair dealing and enterprise has gained a 
large patronage. He is always willing to adopt new methods if they are more 
efficient than the old and this characteristic is manifested in the fact that he 
operates an automobile delivery. 

Mr. Bergman was married on the 7th of July, 1910, to Miss Annie M. Hul- 
lett, a daughter of D. H. and Ellen ( Christenson) Hullett. Her parents, who 
are natives respectively of England and Norway, are now living in North 
Dakota. 

Mr. Bergman gives his political allegiance to the democratic party but has 
never sought nor desired public office. In religious faith he is a Seventh Day 
Adventist and does much to further the work of that organization. He is still 
a young man but he has gained a measure of financial success that many of his 
seniors might well envy and personally he is po]nilar. 



FRANK W. SAMUELSON. 

Frank W. Samuelson. who is engaged in farming in North Bluff precinct, is 
thoroughly up-to-date in his methods and liis place is provided with the most 
modern equijjment. He was born upon his present home farm on the lOth of 
March, 1880, of the marriage of John \l. and Clara (Johnson) Samuelson, who 
were born, reared and married in Sweden, their wedding journey consisting of 
their voyage to the United States. After reaching this country they continued 
their way vv'estward and located in Illinois, whence they came to Nebraska in 
1880. They located upon the farm which their son. Frank W'.. is now operating 
and which was at that time totally unimproved. The father brought the place 
under cultivation, erected suitable buildings and successfully engaged in farming 
until 1007. He then retired and removed to Ccresco. where he passed away 
JMay 5, iQii. The mother died June 25, 1916. 

Frank W. Samuelson, who is the sixth in order of l)irth of a family of seven 
children, attended school in Morth BlufT precinct and under his father's instruc- 
tion early became familiar with farm work. When in his teens he was taken 
into partnership b\- his father and when twenty-one years of age took charge 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY - 313 

of the home farm, which he has since operated. In 1(^13 he purchased the 
interests of the other heirs and is now sole owner of the place, which comprises 
one hundred and sixty acres of highly improved land, lie k'eeps in touch with 
the work of those who are making a scientitic study of agricultural prohlems 
and in his work uses the most u])-to-date machinery, lie lielieves that the best 
is none too good for the twentieth century American farmer and his habit of 
utilizing the most improved machinery on the market and of following pro- 
gressive methods has been an important factor in his success. lie has recently 
purchased a "Jackson 8" automobile and finds it a good investment as well as a 
source of much, pleasure to the entire family. He is not only a landowner but 
also holds stock in the Bank of Waverly and in the I-"armers Cooperative 
Association. 

Mr. Samuelson was married on the 1.2th of June, 1907, to Miss Mabel 
Anderson, a daughter of George A. and Carolina ( Palmquist) Anderson, both 
of whom were born in Sweden. However, they were married in .America 
and the father engaged in farming in Illinois until 1895, when he came to 
Neliraska with his family and located in Mill precinct. There he passed away 
in October, 19TI. Mrs. Samuelson was born in. Cass county, near Jack.sonville, 
Illinois. Ily her marriage she has become the mother of a daughter. Phyllis 
Mayburn A'iola. 

Mr. Samuelson votes for the man rather than the party as he believes that 
the fitness of the candidate for the office in question is a matter of the greatest 
importance. His religious faith is that of the Swedish Mission church and his 
life has meastired up to high standards. He has gained a measure of success 
that many a man his senior might well envy and his enterprise and sound 
judgment insure his continued prosperity. 



RICHARD THURSTON MORRISON. 

Richard Thurston Morrison, a ]irominent and public-spirited citizen, was born 
on the 9th of August, 1856. near Milan, Sullivan county. Missouri. His father 
was William Bailey Morrison, a son of Donald Morrison. The latter was born 
in Alabama Init removed successively to Tennessee and Sullivan county. Missouri, 
passing his last years in the latter state. William Railey Morrison, wdio was a 
native of Tennessee, born in 1835, was reared in that state and acquired his 
education in the public schools. In 1851 he became a resident of Sullivan county, 
Missouri, and after farming there for some time engaged in merchandising at 
Milan, Missouri, continuing active in that line until the .s])ring of 1868. He 
tlxm removed l)y covered wagon to Nebraska. He left Missouri with the intention 
of taking a train to Omaha and going to California, where the railroad had been 
giving employment to many men. but when he reached Omaha he discovered 
that the road had quit sending men to California and accordingly he made his 
way to Nebraska City. Tie resided there for some time and as that was before 
the building of railroads through that section he drove a wagon train from 
Nebraska City to Lincoln. In 1870, however, he rented a farm north of Beatrice 
and later in that vear homesteaded eighty acres of raw land in South Pass 



314 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

precinct. He took up his residence there and concentrated his energies upon the 
improvement of that place until he received a patent to the land in 1875. Me 
then came to Hickman and established a lumber yard, which he conducted, 
together with a grain business, for several years. In 1884 he formed a partner- 
ship with W. P. Larsh under the firm name of Larsh & Alorrison and they 
engaged in general merchandising until 1S88, when Mr. Morrison sold his 
interest in the business to Mr. Larsh and purchased *tock in the Bank of 
Hickman and became its cashier. He served in that capacity until his death, 
which occurred in October, 1901. He was united in marriage in 1855 at Milan, 
Missouri, to Miss Nancy Montgomery, who was born in Ohio in 1836 and is a 
daughter of William Montgomery. Following Mr. Morrison's death she removed 
to Denver, Colorado, and is now living with her youngest daughter, ]\Irs. John 
Stopher, of Loveland, Colorado. 

Richard T. ^Morrison began his education in the schools of Milan. Missouri, 
later attended the schools of Nebraska City for two years, those of Holland, 
Nebraska, for five years and those at Hickman for some time. Upon putting 
aside his textbooks he cultivated his father's land, thus gaining valuable expe- 
rience in the operation of a farm. In 1883 he invested his savings in eighty 
acres on section 24, Saltillo precinct, and for seven years he devoted his time 
and attention to the improvement of that place. At the expiration of that period 
he rented land on section 25 and two years later, or in 1892, he took up his 
residence in Hickman. He then purchased a threshing outfit, which he operated 
until 1898, when he established a dray btisiness. This enterprise proved profitable 
and he devoted his time and attention to its management until 1915, when he sold 
the business. He and his family then took a trip west, visiting his mother in 
Colorado, touring the states of Utah, Idaho, Oregon and California and visiting 
the World's Fair at San FVancisco. On the ist of September, 191 5, he returned 
to Hickman and on the rst of October he engaged in the hardware business. 
He has already built up ;i good patronage, for his integrity and fair dealing are 
well known, and he keeps a large and well selected stock. He still owns his 
farm on section 24, .Saltillo precinct, from the rent of which he derives a 
gratifying addition to his income. 

Mr. ]\Iorrison was married at the Peter Beck homestead, near Hickman, on 
the 13th of October, 1878, to Miss Annie Mary Beck, who was born on the 
22d of February, 1858, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Her father, Peter Beck, 
who was also a native of the Keystone state, removed to Lancaster, \\'isconsin, 
and in 1869 came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and homesteaded land in Sal- 
tillo precinct. He operated his farm many years and is now living retired in 
Hickman. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Sarah Moore, was born in 
Pennsylvania and is still living. I\Ir. and Mrs. Morrison are the parents of four 
children. Louis Guy, who was born on his grandfather's homestead on the 29th 
of July, 1879, is now farming his father's place. He is married and has a son, 
Vernon. Laura Grace was born July 20, 1881, in Hickman and died here in 1893. 
Mamie Laura was born near Hickman on the 22d of July, 1883, and is now the 
wife of Benjamin Walvoord, who is engaged in the automobile business in Hick- 
man, and they have two children. Crystal and Thelma. Coral Sadie was born 
April 27, 1888. near Hickman and is the wife of Dr. Augustine Des Jardins, a 
physician of Hickman. 



LINCOLxX AND LANCASTER COUNTY 315 

Mr. Morrison was school director for district No. 79 in Saltillo township 
for one term and has also served on the board of educatin in Hickman. For 
two terms he was a member of the town board and in up- and 1908 held the 
office of mayor, doing mnch in that time to further the interests of the town, lie 
casts his ballot in favor of the candidates and measures of the democratic party 
and is a lirm believer in the soundness of its policies. He is identilied with 
Hickman Camp, No. 6381, AI. W. A., of which he is a charter memljer and in 
which he has served as secretary for five years, and with Damocles Lodge, No. 
60, K. P., of which he is past chancellor commrmdcr. liis wife belongs to the 
Royal Neighbors and is filling the office of sentinel. 15oth are well known in 
Hickman and their many excellent qualities have gained them a high place in 
the esteem of their fellow townsmen. 



EDMUND S. CUMMLN^GS. 

Edmund S. Cummings owns three hundretl and twenty acres of excellent land 
in Grant precinct but is not now actively engaged in its operation, renting it to 
others. He was born in Carlinville, Macoupin county, Illinois, on the <)th of 
June, 1S57, and is a son of William and IMary ( Alford) Cummings, also natives 
of the Prairie state. The father engaged in farming there until 1872 when he 
purchased land in Missouri, where he followed agricultural i)ursuits during his 
remaining )-ears. His death occurred on the 13th of January. 11J05, and the 
mother's demise took place in iSfe. 

Edmund S. Cummings received his education in Alacoupin county, Illinois, 
and when thirteen years old began working as a farm hand, lie was so em- 
jiloyed for seven years but in 1878 went to Saline county, Nebraska. .\ year 
later he came to Lancaster county and bought land in (irant precinct where he 
has since lived. He now owns a half section of excellent land but at one time 
held title to an entire section. He rents his farm to others as he has retired 
from active life. Through his wise management of his affairs he has gained 
financial indeiiendence and he has also contributed to the .agricultural develop- 
ment of his locality. 

In August, 1878, Mr. Cummings was united in marriage to .Miss Kate Lewis, 
a daughter of John and Julia ( Davis) Lewis, the former born in North Carolina 
and the latter in Kentucky. In an early day the family located in Macoupin 
county, Illinois, and there the father operated one farm for a half century. His 
death occurred, however, at the home of Mr. Cummings on the 18th of April, 
1891. The mother's death occurred in 1856. To Mr. and Airs. Cummings have 
been born five children, namely: Frank, who married Catherine C^reenamyre 
and died December 6, 1905, ■ leaving a widow and a daughter. Doris; Clara, 
the wife of Charles Morton, a rural mail carrier of Lancaster county: Charlie, 
twin brother of Clara, and husband of Beulah Huston, and now a fanner of this 
county: Laura, who married A. L. Magee. a farmer of Grant precinct: and Ruth, 
the wife of Floyd Sturdy, also farming in this precinct. 

Mr. Cummings is a stanch advocate of repulilican ijrinciples and has served 
for several terms as school director and school treasurer. In religious faith lie is 



316 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

a Alethodist and fraternally is identified with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He is hitjhly esteemed by all who know him and most of all by those 
who have been most closely associated with him, wiiich is indicative of his 
genuine worth. 



DANIEL HOY. 



Daniel Hoy, who is farming on section 31, Grant precinct, has never had 
occasion to regret his choice of an occupation for he has found agricultural pur- 
suits both congenial and profitable. He was born in Pennsylvania, in March, 
1843, the son of William and Elizabeth (Cowell) Hoy, natives of Pennsylvania. 
The father, who was a farmer, removed to West Virginia in early manhood and 
located in Wood county, where his death occurred in 1848. The mother sur- 
vived for more than half a century, dying in 1900. 

Daniel Hoy was reared and educated in West Virginia and in 1862, at the 
age of nineteen years, enlisted in Company D, Fourteenth West Virginia \'ol- 
unteer Infantry with which he served for two years and ten months, or until 
the close of the strugle between the north and the south. He then farmed in 
West Virginia until 1872 when he removed to Kansas, whence he went to 
Missouri. After farming in the latter state for nine months he returned to West 
Virginia where he remained until 1883, '™ which year he came to Lancaster 
county, Nebraska. He bought eighty acres of land in Saltillo precinct, which 
he operated for five years, but at the end of that time purchased a similar tract 
on section 31, Grant precinct, to which he later added an adjoining eighty acres. 
He also purchased eighty acres on section 32 and has brought all his land to a 
high state of development, making all of the improvements upon the farm, ivhich 
has become one of the valuable properties of the locality. He is still operating 
his land and derives a good income from the sale of his grain and stock. 

Mr. Hoy was united in marriage on the 30th of January, 1866, to Miss Sarah 
Kincheloe, a daughter of Lawrence and Lettie (Stagg) Kincheloe, natives of 
Virginia. To Mr. and Mrs. Hoy have been born twelve children, naiuely : 
Lawrence B., who is farming in Grant precinct: iMary, the wife of L. E. Renard, 
a resident of Council Blufl's, Iowa; Violet, who married C. E. Butterfiekl, a resi- 
dent of Oregon; \Mlliam, who died on the 24th of February, 1914; Myrtle, tlie 
wife of J. H. Kincheloe, a resident of South Dakota; Gertrude Elizabeth, the 
w'ife of Elmer Jenkins, of Mitchell, Nebraska; Albert, also a resident of that 
town; Ernest W. and James 1!., farmers of this county; Charles Otto and An- 
drew M., wdio are associated with their father in the operation of the honn; 
place; and Mazie L., who died in 1913. 

Mr. Hoy is independent in jjolitics, refusing to follow the dictates of a 
party leader, and he studies carefully the questions and issues of the day so that 
he may cast his ballot intelligently. He served as assessor of Grant precinct for 
one year and made an excellent record in that capacity. For twelve _\'ears he was 
a member of the school board. His religious faith is that of the L'nited Brethren 
church and he is connected with the Knights of Pythias and the Grand Army of 
the Republic. His farming 0])erations demand the greater part of his attention 




MR. AND MK.S. DAMKL HOV 



11 1. 



KU 



TILDE f- K; 



NO-" *r;NS 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 319 



Iju 



t he has also served as agent for the Lancaster County Farmers Mutual In- 
surance Company for twenty years, and has secured many policy holders for 
that organization. He is in excellent circumstances and in addition to his farm 
owns stock in the Bank of Roca. The success which he has gained is doubly 
creditable in that it is the direct result of his own efforts. 



CYRUS BLACK. 



Cyrus Blftck, editor of the Hickman Enterprise, a progressive and reliable 
weekly paper, has gained recognition as one of the leading country journalists 
of the eastern part of Nebraska. He has also re])resented his district in the 
legislature, serving as a member of the house in \<jO>). A native of Illinois, he 
was born near Macomb. McDonough county, of the marriage of James and 
Eliza (Yetter) Black. The founder of the .American branch of the family 
was born in Dublin, Ireland, and was educated for the I'resbyterian ministry 
at Edinburgh. Scotland. In early manhood he emigrated to X'irginia. where he 
engaged in preaching and where he resided until called by death. His son, James 
Black, grandfather of Cyrus lUack, was a native of the Old Dominion and 
devoted his attention to farming and milling. He owned flour mills and oil mills 
and gained a substantial measure of prosperity. He settled in Ohio in the early 
days of the history of that state and passed away there about 1843. His brother, 
Samuel Black, was a captain of the regular army and .served in the lUnck Hawk 
war. lames LUack, father of Cyrus Black, was liorn near Dayton, Ohio, on the 
3d of June. 1828, and received his education in the pul.)lic schools of that locality. 
Upon attaining his majority he liegan farming on his own account and later used 
his spare time in learning the millwright's and carpenter's trades. He later 
engaged in building mills but at length again concentrated his etiforts upon farming 
and in 1849 removed to IMcDonough county, Illinois. There he purchased a 
tract of land which he brought under cultivation and otherwise improved. In 
i8si he returned to Davton, where he was married and lirought his bride to his 
Illinois farm. After operating his place near Macomb for a number of years 
he removed to a farm near Bushnell, also in McDonough county, and cultivated 
that tract of land from 1865 until 1893, retiring in the latter year, although he 
continued to reside upon that place until his demise on the i6th of January. 1909. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Eliza Yetter. was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania and was a representative of a pioneer family of that state, ller parents 
migrated to Miami county, Ohio, and there she grew to womanhood. She passed 
away in Illinois in 1853. 

Cyrus Black, who lost his mother in early infancy, was reared by his father 
and is indebted for his education to the public schools. He was early trained in 
agricultural pursuits and remained upon his father's farm near Bushnell. Illinois, 
until 1876, when he removed to Seward county, Nebraska, and purchased railroad 
land near Utica. He at once began the improvement of thi-s place, which he 
owned until 1883, when he sold it and removed to Thayer county, Nebraska. 
I le took up his residence in Byron and engaged in grain buying and also estab- 
lished a newspaper known as the Byron Gleamer. This was the first newspaper 



320 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

ill the town and he conducted it successfully until 1893, when he disposed of it 
and came to Hickman, arriving here on the 12th of June. He purchased the 
Hickman Enterprise, which he has since edited and published and which receives 
the support of the town and the surrounding country. It has a large circulation, 
is well patronized as an advertising medium and is an important factor in the 
life of the community. It constantly stands for progress and advancement and 
its news columns are dependable and complete. 

Mr. Black has been twice married. At Bushnell, Illinois, on Christmas day of 
1873, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Delia Woodruff, whose parents 
were natives of Marietta, Washington county, OhiOj where they resided for many 
years and where the mother died. The father subsequently removed to the 
vicinity of Kahoka, Clark county, Missouri, where he engaged in farming. Mrs. 
Black was born near Marietta in April, 1847, ^"d became the mother of five 
children. Roy Mason, who was born in Bushnell, Illinois, is a printer and 
resides at Hickman. James Guy, born at Bushnell, is farming in Wapello county, 
Iowa. Anna Elizabeth, who was born near Utica, Nebraska, is now the wife of 
Harry E. McKim, of Chicago. Mary Katharyn was born near Utica and in 
childhood was adopted by Thomas M. Dice, a retired farmer living in Utica. 
She is known by the name of Dice. Mark Whitney, who was born near Utica, 
died at the age of seven years at Shirland, Illinois. The wife and mother passed 
away near Utica on the 15th of February, 1884. On 'the 3d of January, 1886, 
at Byron, Nebraska, Mr. Black married Miss Celia Emma Hayes, a daughter of 
William and Jane (Tyrrell) Hayes. Her father was born in Ohio but in 1869 
took up a homestead in Republic county, Kansas, where he lived until 1894. 
When his farm came into his possession the land was unbroken and it required 
much arduous labor to bring it to a high state of development. He operated that 
j)lace until 1894, when he removed to Superior, Nebraska, where he died in 1904. 
In iSCjO he married Jane Tyrrell, whose birth occurred in Mills county, Iowa, 
and who survives him. She now makes her home v. ith her daughter, Mrs. 
Charles Campbell, of Superior, Nebraska. Mrs. Black was born in Mills county 
in August, ]80i, but was educated in the common schools of Kansas. She, too, 
has passed away, her death occurring March 12, 19 12. To the union ot Mr. 
and Mrs. Black were born three children : George and Jesse, who died in 
infancy; and Susan Beatrice, who was born June 20, 1901, at Byron, and who 
is keeping house for her father. 

Mr. Black supports the republican party at the polls and both through his 
paper and through his individual work has done much to secure its success in 
Lancaster county. He has also held public office, serving for four terms as 
precinct tax assessor of Seward county, Nebraska, and representing Lancaster 
count V in the state legislature in 1909. He served on the public land and 
buildings committee and during his term as a member of the house manifested 
an unusual grasp of i)ublic affairs. However, as the republicans were in the 
minority he did not have an opportunity to do much aggressive work. He has 
always been willing to place the public welfare before his personal interests and 
his support of a measure or movement is evidence that he considers it calculated 
to advance the general good. He is a member of Hickman Lodge, No. 256, 
.\. I'. & .V. Al.. of which he is jiast master and which he has represented several 
times in the grand lodge. He has also attained the eighteenth degree of the 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 



321 



Scottish Rite at Lincoln. He is identified with Koscmary Chapter, No. 240, 
O. E. S., of which he is past patron, and with Hickman Lodge, No. 313', 
A. O. U. W'., in which he has held all of the offices and for nine years has 
served as financier and recorder, lie holds membership in the Methodist Episco- 
pal church and its work profits from his support and hearty co-operation. In 
1904 he erected a fine residence in Hickman, where he has since lived. In all 
fields of activity to which he has turned his attention his ability and power of 
leadership have been recognized and he is justly regarded as one of the leading 
citizens of Hickman. 



THOMAS E. WHEELER. 

Thomas E. Wheeler, register of deeds in Lancaster county, belongs to that 
class of men who in office subordinate personal aggrandizement to the public 
good and count as paramount to all other interests their duty to the public 
manifested in the faithful performance of the tasks incident to the office. i\Ir. 
Wheeler is well known in Lancaster county, where he has lived since June, 1868, 
having been but four years of age when his parents removed from Illinois to 
Nebraska. The family residence was established on a homestead which the 
father had secured on section 26, Stockton precinct. This was in June, 1868, 
and from that date to the present Thomas E. Wheeler has lived in Lancaster 
county. He was born in Butler county, Pennsylvania, September 16, 1863. 

His father, John L. Wheeler, who was a farmer throughout his earlier life 
and later a store keeper in the village of Bennet, Lancaster county, was born 
on a farm near Steubenville, (_)hio, Alarch 11, 1840. He was married in Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, on the ist of December, 1862. to Margaret A. Purvis, 
v.hose l.)irth occurred in Butler county. Pennsylvania, in February. 1841. Their 
l.imily numbered seven children, two sons and five daughters: Thomas E.. who 
was the first born; James A., living in Canadian, Texas; IV-lle, the wite of 
Herljert A. Belt of Omaha; Lizzie, the wife of L. S. Stoner of Bennet, Nebraska: 
Bertha, the wife of H. W. Randall, also of Bennet ; Ida May, the wife of J. D. Poe 
of La Junta, Colorado ; and Alabel, now the wife of Fred Dreeszen of Otoe county, 
Nebraska. As indicated, all of the seven children are yet alive. With his wife 
and three eldest children. John L. Wheeler, removed from Butler county, Penn- 
sylvania, to Illinois in the year 1866. Two years later he brought his family to 
Lancaster county, Nebraska, settling on a homestead in Stockton precinct. \\'ith 
characteristic energy, he began the development and imjirovement of that tract 
of land, which he converted into a good farm, residing thereon until i8<)0, when 
he sold that property and retired from farm life, sjjending his remaining days 
in Bennet, where he conducted a mercantile business for twenty-three years. He 
finally retired, however, and passed away September 13, 1913. having for only 
twenty-one days survived his wife, who died on the 23d of August. Both were 
laid to rest in the Bennet cemetery. 

Thomas E. Wheeler was reared on the old homestead farm and ol)tained his 
early education in the nearest district school, which was a mile and a half from 
his home. For several vears he remained upon tiie farm after attaining his 



322 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

majority, or until it was sold in 1890 and during the latter part of that period 
he and his brother James practically did all of the farm work, although their 
father remained at the head as manager. After removing to Bennet, the two sons 
aided their father in the store, being admitted to a partnership in the business 
under the firm style of J. L. Wheeler & Sons. That connection was continued 
from i8yo until 191 1. On the 9th of January, 1902, however, Thomas E. 
Wheeler had been appointed deputy register of deeds of Lancaster county by 
J. D. Moore, who was then the register. Still retaining his interest in the store 
at Bennet he continued as i\Ir. Aloore's deputy until January, igio, or for 
eight years. Upon the expiration of his term of oflT.ce he gave his entire attention 
to the store in Bennet until January, 1915, when he was called to his present 
position. In the meantime, or in October, igii, he became sole owner of the 
business, which he successfully managed until August. 1914, when he sold out. 
Li November of that year he was elected register of deeds and assumed the duties 
of the office m January, 191 5, for a four years' term, so that lie is now principal 
in the office in which he so long served as deputy. 

On the 13th of August, 1890, Mr. Wheeler was married to Miss Alinnie AL 
Reed, a native of Pennsylvania, and they have four children : Florence E., born 
in December, 1892; Hattie B., born in February, 1894: Robert L., born in 1896; 
and Floyd R., born in October, 1S98. 

In politics Mr. Wheeler is a republican, having long been a stalwart supporter 
and acti\e worker in the party. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, 
to the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and his religious faith finds expression 
in his membership in the Methodist church. There have been no spectacular 
phases in his career, but his has been an active and useful life fraught with good 
deeds and actuated by honorable purpose in both business and official con- 
nections. 



EDWIN LEANDO HEMINGWAY. 

Edwin Leando Hemingw;iy, a well known hardware dealer of Panama, was 
born in Johnson county, Iowa, on the 21st of February, i860. His father, John 
Malsbery Hemingway, was a native of Columbiana county, Ohio, born on the 
4th of March, 1839. He grew to manhood in his native state and received his 
education in its public schools, but in 1857 went to Iowa where he farmed for 
twenty-one years. At the expiration of that time he came to Lancaster county, 
and bought four hundred and forty acres of land in Panama precinct, south- 
west of the town of Panama. His farm was well developed when it came into 
his possession, buf he brought it to a still higher state of cultivation and devoted 
his time to its operation until 1881 when he took up his residence in Hickriian. 
He established a livery business there and sold his farm to advantage. In 1897 
he retired from active life and went to California where he remained for four 
months, after which he spent some time in his old home in Iowa. In 1898 he 
removed to Fort Scott, Kansas, where he passed his remaining days, dying 
there in September, 191 3. He was married March 4, 1838, to Miss Elizabeth 
Huntington X'arney, a daughter of Moses \'arne\-. who was born in the vicinity 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 323 

of Buffalo, New York, and followed tJTe carpenters' trade in Niagara county 
for a number of years, but removed to Cedar county, Iowa, about 1857. lie 
farmed and did carpentering and later became the owner of a stone quarry on 
Cedar river, near Tipton, which he operated until he retired from active life. 
He died in Springdale, Cedar county, in 1882, when sixty-eight years of age. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Charlotte Huntington, was also born 
near ISulialo. She passed away at Springdale, Iowa, about 1889, and is buried by 
the side of her husband in the cemetery at that place. Mrs. Hemingway was 
born in Allegany county. New York, in May, 1841, and attended the common 
schools. In young womanhood she removed to Iowa and there her marriage 
occurred. She now makes her home in Fort Scott, Kansas, although she spends 
a great deal of her time with her children. 

Edwin Leando Hemingway passed his boyhood and youth upon ilie home 
farm in Cedar county, Iowa, and there became familiar with the practical methods 
of agriculture, while his education was acquired in the district schools. On 
reaching mature 3'ears he decided to follow the occupation to which he had been 
reared and farmed in Cedar county until 1888. He then came to Panama 
precinct, Lancaster county, where his father had previously removed, and for 
some time gave his attention to assisting in the operation of his father's farm. 
In 1890 he rented a one hundred and twenty acre tract in Panama precinct and a 
year later removed to the Wagoner farm of one hundred and sixty acres, al-so 
in that precinct. After spending six years there he removed to the j. \'. Goves 
farm of one hundred and fifty acres between Bennet and Cheney. In 1902 he 
took- up his residence on a farm of two hundred and forty acres belonging to 
H. A. Alollin, situated a half mile south of Bennet. In 191 1 he formed a 
partnership with J. O. Genuchi and purchased G. F. Hitchcock's hardware, 
implement and furniture business at Panama which they have since conducted 
under the name of Hemingway & Genuchi. They carry a large and well selected 
stock of goods and their progressiveness and fair dealing have commended them 
to the liberal support of the public. Mr. Hemingway also owns two lots and a 
good residence in the northern part of the town. 

On New Year's Day of 1882, at Centerdale, Iowa, occurred the marriage of 
Mr. Hemingway and Miss Fannie Hetticutt, who was born in Illinois, on the 
i(ith of May. 1863, and was left an orphan when an infant. She was reared by a 
family named Gochee. near Muscatine. Iowa, and attended the common schools 
of that locality. She remained with the Gochee family until she was fifteen 
years old when she began supporting herself, continuing in Iowa until after her 
marriage. She has become the mother of two children. Elfie Loretto was born 
in Panama precinct on the 5th of September, 1890, and after completing the 
course in the district schools entered Bennet high scliool from which she was 
graduated in 1908. She has also given much time to the study of music and is 
now pianist at the Presbyterian church at Panama. John Leando. whose birth 
occurred in Stockton precinct on the 1st of .August, 1900, is now a student in 
the Panama high school. 

Mr. Hemingway is a republican in jiolitics and for five years was a member 
of the school board in district 78, doing much to advance educational interests of 
that district. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian and the uprightness of his 
daily life is evidence of the sincerity of his belief. He has met with success in 



324 Ll.XCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

all that he has undertaken as he is energetic, possesses sound common sense and 
business acumen and is recognized as one of the factors in the business develop- 
ment of Panama. 



WILLIAM SEELENFREUND. 

William Seelenfreund aided in organizing the German-American State Bank 
of Lincoln and has since served efficiently as cashier of that institution. A 
native of Germany, he was born in Prussia in iS6S and received a good educa- 
tion in his nati\c land. When eighteen years of age he emigrated to the United 
States and came at once to Lincoln, Nebraska, where for ten years he was em- 
ployed by George R. Wolfe. During that time he learned the cigar maker's 
trade thoroughly and on severing his connection with Air. Wolfe established 
a cigar factory of his own, employing from twenty-five to fifty people. He con- 
ducted that business successfully until 1908, when he sold out and joined with 
others in organizing the German Building & Loan Association. A year later 
he aided in establishing the German-American State Bank and assumed the 
duties of cashier. He has so directed the policy of the bank as to conserve the 
interests of stockholders and depositors and at the same time promote the busi- 
ness growth of the city through the generous extension of credit. 

Mr. Seelenfreund was married in Lincoln to Miss Anna Bialko, a native of 
Bohemia. In politics he is a republican. His religious faith is that of the Jewish 
church. He is recognized as a man of enterprise and ability and personally has 
many warm friends. 



JEREMY BURGE. 



Jeremy Burge is engaged in breeding full blooded Hereford cattle and has 
contrilnited not a little to the development of the stock raising interests of 
Grant precinct and Lancaster county. He was born in Henry county, Iowa, on 
the 2()th of August, 1S59, of the marriage of J. J. and Mary A. (Lawrence) 
Burge, natives of Ohio and of England respectively. The father removed to 
Llenry county, Iowa, about 1835 with his parents and there grew to mature 
years. He engaged in farming and stock raising in that state until 1 88 1, wlien 
he removed to Butler county, Nebraska. He purchased a farm there, which 
he operated until his death on the 6th of January, 1898. He was survived by 
his wife until April, 191 1. 

Jeremy Burge was educated in the pul)lic schools of Henry county and 
remained ujjon the home farm until he was twenty-three years of age. He then 
purchased three hundred and twenty acres in Butler comity, Nebraska, at seven 
dollars per acre, and took up his residence upon that land, which he operated 
until 1905. On selling it he received seventy-three dollars per acre, the great 
increase in the value of the land indicating the development whicli had taken 
place in the county during the years of his residence there. He then came to 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY :{25 

Lancaster county and l)ou,t;lit fnur hundred and eighty acres on section 13, CJrant 
precinct, from Grant Ensign and in the intervening eleven years he has made a 
great many improvements upon his farm, whicli is now one of the most fully 
equipped and most attractive places of the ])recinct. lie has two sets of buildings 
and everything is kept in excellent repair. He and his son operate the farm in 
partnership and give the greater part of their time and attention to raising full 
blooded Hereford cattle, which business they have found very profitable. 

(_)n the 31st of May. i(S83, Mr. Burge was united in marriage to .Miss Mary 
L Walker, a daughter of George and Eliza ( Mehan) Walker, pioneers of Henry 
county, Iowa. The mother-died on the loth of .April, 1905, but the father survives 
and is now living retired in New London, that county. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Burge have been born four children: George C. ;i farmer of .Sherman county, 
Nebraska; Ralph E., who is associated with his father in farming: Nora M., 
the wife of William Ketelhut, a farmer of this county: and Roy \V.. at home. 

Mr. Burge supports the democratic party at the polls Init has confined his 
political activity to the exercise of his right of franchise. He holds membership 
in the United lirethren church and in all relations of life guides his conduct by 
high standards. He ranks among the leading men of his precinct and personally 
he is popular. 



J. D. SHIVELY, M. D. 



Since 1912 Dr. J. D. Shively has been superintendent of the Nebraska Sani- 
tarium at College \'iew and under his able management the institution has been 
highly prosperous. He has had a great deal of experience in that line of work 
and this, combined with his natural ability, has well fitted him for the discharge 
of his important duties. His birth occurred in Woodburn. Clarke county, Iowa, 
on the I2th of September, 1870, and he is a son of Jacob and Hattie (Gibson) 
Shively, natives of Pennsylvania. The father, who engaged in farming, re- 
moved to Clarke county, Iowa, early in its history and there ])urchased land, 
which he cultivated until 1864 when he enlisted in the Union army with which 
he remained until the close of the Civil war. He then returned home and is 
still operating his farm. His wife also survives. 

J. D. Shively was reared in his native county and is indebted for his early 
education to its public schools. Later he attended Battle Creek College, which 
conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Science. He prepared for the 
practice of medicine at the American Medical and the Rush Medical Colleges 
and was graduated from the former in 1000. He became connected with the 
Battle Creek Sanitarium in a professional capacity and later, for three years, 
was superintendent at the Iowa Sanitarium at Des Moines. He next located 
at Sheldahl, Iowa, where he engaged in the private practice of medicine for 
three years, after which he became identified with the Boulder (Col.) Sani- 
tarium, with which he remained until 19 10, serving as superintendent of that 
institution until he accepted a similar position in the Denver Sanitarium. He 
remained there until July, 1912, when he came to College View to take up his 
duties as superintendent of the Nebraska Sanitarium. He keeps thoroughly 



326 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

informed as to the work that is being done in other progressive institutions of 
the kind in various parts of the country, and has been very successful in main- 
taining a high standard in all departments of the sanitarium. \'arious systems 
of therapeutics are used in treatment of disease and much importance is attached 
to hygienic food, but no fads are exploited as every method of treatment must 
have previously proved its value before it is adopted by the institution, lie 
is connected with the Lancaster County and Nebraska State Societies and with 
the American Medical Association and is at present serving as health officer of 
College \'icw. 

On the i5lh of December, 1897, Mr. Shively. was united in marriage to 
Miss Eva McGee, daughter of John and Drucilla (Nailor) McGee, natives of 
Virginia, but pioneers of Clarke county, Iowa. Mrs. Shively graduated from 
the medical department of Drake University at Des Moines in 1906 and in 
1909 received the degree of Bachelor of Arts on the completion of a course of 
study in the Lini\'ersity of Colorado. She is an experienced and capable physi- 
cian and is her husband's assistant. He is independent politically, preferring 
to vote according to his best judgment rather than follow the dictates of party 
leaders. He holds membership in the Adventist church and its principles have 
guided his conduct in the various relations of life. During the four years that he 
has resided in College \'iew he has gained a wide acquaintance and the warm 
friendship of many. 



JOHN B. LAIRD. 



John B. Laird owns one hundred and sixty acres of good land in Grant 
precinct which is now being operated by his son, and he is living retired in Col- 
lege View. His birth occurred in Wisconsin on the 28th of February, 1856, 
and he is a son of John and Sarah (Brown) Laird, natives of Prince Edward 
Island, England, The father became an early settler of Wisconsin, where he 
farmed until 1870, when he removed to Iowa and purchased land in Montgomery 
county. After following agricultural pursuits there for a long period, he retired 
and went to California, where his death occurred in 1898. He served for two 
years during the Civil war as a member of Company H, Fiftieth Wisconsin 
Infantry, and throughout his life manifested a commendable willingness to sub- 
ordinate personal interests to the general good. His wife preceded him in death 
a number of years as she was called to her final rest in 1882. 

John B. Laird spent his boyhood and youth in Wisconsin and Iowa and is 
indebted to the public schools of those states for his education. On attaining 
his majority he rented the home farm in Iowa and operated that place for three 
years, after which he rented other land, which he farmed until 1885. He then 
came to Lancaster county, and rented land here until 1901. when he purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres on section 11, Grant precinct. He at once began 
the improvement of that farm and devoted his time to raising grain and stock 
until 1913, when he rented the place to his son and removed to College View. 
He purchased a good residence with six and a half acres of land and has since 
made his home here. 



TILO 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 329 

On the sth of October, 1876, occurred the marriage of .Mr. Laird and Miss 
Julia Davis, a daughter of WilHam and Lucy (Maddox) Davis, natives of Vir- 
ginia. They removed to Iowa many years ago and there the father farmed 
until 1883, when he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska. After residing in 
Lincoln for some time he returned to Virginia, where he passed away in 1901. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Laird have been born nine children, namely: Nora, Chester 
Clarence, Ernest, Blanche, Ethel, Claude, Lottie and llazcl. 

Mr. Laird supports the republican party at the polls and promptly discharges 
all of his obligations as a public-spirited citizen. The principles which govern 
his life are found in the teachings of the Methodist church and his genuine worth 
is generally recognized. For many years he worked untiringly and the leisure 
which he now enjoys is well deserved, for it was made possible by his former 
labor. 



JOSEPH T. INGRAM. 



Joseph T. Ingram is living retired in Bethany after years of well directed 
labor as a farmer and is one of the valued citizens of the town. He has not 
confined his activities to agricultural work, however, for he has served as a 
member of the state legislature and in that capacity proved public-spirited, far- 
sighted and progressive. He was born in Flemingsburg, Kentucky, on the 26th 
of July, 1844, and his parents were Joseph and Eleanor (Mershon) Ingram, 
natives respectively of Harpers Ferry, Virginia, and Ohio. The father removed 
with his parents to the Blue Grass state when a child and remained there until 
1844, when he emigrated with his family to Jones county, Iowa. He purchased 
four hundred acres of fine land there and devoted his time to its operation until 
his demise in May, 1864. His wife survived him for less than a year, as she 
passed away in January, 1865. 

Joseph T. Ingram was reared and educated in Jones county, Iowa, and after- 
ward took up the profession of teaching, which he followed at intervals until 
he was forty years of age. In the meantime he engaged in farming and from 
the time that he attained his majority until 1871 he operated rented land but in 
that year he removed to Thayer county, Nebraska, and took up a homestead, 
which he improved and farmed for three years. He then sold that place and 
went to Republic county, Kansas, just across the line, and purchased one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, to the operation of which he devoted the greater part of 
his time for twenty years. In 1891 he was elected to the Kansas state legis- 
lature from Republic county and served in that capacity for one term. Eight 
years later he took up his residence in Franklin county, Nebraska, and bought 
two hundred acres of fine land, which he cultivated until 1905, when he retired 
from active life and removed to Bethany, Lancaster county, where he purchased 
a home and a half block of ground on the corner of Butler and Pitcher streets, 
and there he has since lived in the enjoyment of well deserved leisure. He also 
holds title to five acres on Pennsylvania avenue and he still owns his farm m 
Franklin county. 

Mr. Ingram' was married, in November, 1866, to Miss Alice Kirby and they 

Vol. 11—17 



330 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

became the parents of nine children: Kittie M., Clarence E., Mabel A., Claude 
C, Ethel, Zella, J. Everett, Ruby L. and Carrie. All are married and they re- 
side in Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. There are also eight grandchildren. Mrs. 
Ingram passed away in January, 1910, after a long illness, and in September, 
191 1, Mr. Ingram was again married, Mrs. Effie J. Gillern becoming his wife. 
She has two children, Larue and Maurice F. 

Mr. Ingram is a stanch adherent of the democratic party, believing firmly 
in the soundness of its princi])les, and he has always taken deep interest in 
public affairs. He is identified with the Christian church and has been active in 
its work since he was a youth of sixteen years. Since removing to Bethany he 
has served as elder and he has done much to promote the interests of the church 
in his community. In all that he has undertaken he has gained a gratifying 
measure of success and all who know him respect and esteem him highly. 



BENJAMIN F. SMITH. 

Benjamin F. Smith, living on section 32, Yankee Hill township, was born in 
Blair county, Pennsylvania, in November, 1839, a son of Eli and Eby (Smith) 
Smith, who were natives of Pennsylvania and of English descent. The father 
engaged in woolen manufacturing in his native state for many years, but sub- 
sequently purchased land and devoted his remaining days to farming, his death 
occurring in 1886. For two years he had survived his wife, who died in 1884. 

Benjamin F. Smith was reared and educated in Pennsylvania and remained 
with his parents until 1861 when, aroused by a spirit of patriotism, he enlisted 
as a defender of the Union cause, joining Company D, of the Third Pennsyl- 
vania infantry with which he served for ninety days. Later he served for six 
months in the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry and was afterward connected for 
one year with the Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry. After his final discharge 
he returned home where he remained until 1868 when he came to this county, 
walking from Nebraska City to Lincoln. The work of development and im- 
provement had scarcely been Ijegun at that time. This was a frontier region 
and but few settlers had ventured within the present borders of the county. 
Mr. Smith secured a claim on the 9th of May, 1868, entering eighty acres on 
section 32, Yankee Mill precinct. \\'ith characteristic energy he began to break 
the sod and till the fields, and he also set out many trees and otherwise carried 
on the work of improvement. Subsequently he purchased forty acres more 
and since that time he has li\ed continuously upon the place ^vllich is now his 
home. This covers a period of forty-eight years and there are now few resi- 
dents of Lincoln county who have so long continued upon one place or even 
within the borders of the county. His farm is a nicely improved property and 
its careful management has brought to him gratifying success. In former years 
he was engaged very extensively in raising cattle and hogs but is now largely 
retired. 

On the 25th of December, 1865, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth Harnish, a daughter of Daniel and Su.san ( Schultz) Harnish, both 
of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. The father was a shoemaker by trade 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 381 

and afterward became a farmer. He spent his entire life in Pennsylvania where 
he passed away in 1892. He had long survived his wife, who died in 1856. 
Mrs. Smith was born in the Keystone state October 18, 1845, and by her mar- 
riage became the mother of seven children : Eli Martin, who is engaged in farm- 
ing in Yankee Hill township; Daniel L., who is cultivating his father's farm; 
Ida, the wife of James C. Miller, residing in Virginia; Marion C, the wife of 
Wallace vVngelo, a resident of Idaho; Carrie, the wife of George Williams, a 
farmer of Yankee Hill township; Emma B., the wife of Gordon Angelo, of 
Lincoln; and John O., who died in 1872 at the age of two years. 

In politics Mr. Smith is a republican and for many years served as a dele- 
gate to the conventions of the party. He has occupied the position of road 
supervisor, was school treasurer for four terms and for twenty years one of 
the school directors. He is connected with the Dunkanl or Brethren church 
and he is much interested in all those forces which work for the development 
and upbuilding of the community along moral as well as material lines. His 
life has been well spent and those who know him esteem liini highly because 
of the many sterling traits of character which he has displayed. 



CLINTON J. -MITCHELL. 

Clinton J. Mitchell, of Lincoln, Nebraska, now serving on the board of county 
commissioners from the third district, was born on a farm in Saltillo precinct, 
this county, February 16. 1875, a son of the late Henry F. Mitchell, whose record 
appears elsewhere in this volume. Lie has resided in this county tliroughout his 
entire life. Though born in Saltillo precinct, he has lived in Centerville pre- 
cinct from early infancy and long devoted his time and attention to farming and 
stock raising, becoming one of the largest feeders of beef cattle in Lancaster 
county, a reputation whicli he has enjoyed for twenty years past. His home 
farm of three hundred and sixty acres lies one mile east of tlie town of Sprague. 
He bought the original tract from his father before he was twenty-one years of 
age, l}ecoming owner of eighty acres wholly unimproved, not even a building or a 
fence being upon the place. As the years have passed he has extended the 
boundaries of his farm I)y additicMial purchases of land until the ])lace now com- 
jiriscs three handred and sixty acres and is one of the best im])rovcd farm prop- 
erties in Centerville. Two hundred and forty acres of liis land formerly belonged 
to his f;ithcr-in-Iaw, William Charlton, whose only ilaughter becaiue the wife of 
Mr. Mitchell. In addition to the home place Mr. Mitclu-11 owns one hundred 
and sixty acres in Highland ])recinct and anoiber tract of similar size in i'.utte 
county. North Dakota, both of which he has purchased. 

In politics Mr. Mitchell has always been a stalwart republican, following in 
the footsteps of his father in this particular, lie has never but once been a 
candidate for office and that the jiosition which he is now tilling, lie was elected 
county commissioner from the third district in 1911 and took the office in January, 
IQ12. In 1974 he was re-elected, so thai he is now serving for the second term, 
which is a four years' term, continuing him as the incumbent until January. 1919. 
In order to be nearer the scene of his official activities he removed to Lincoln in 



332 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

the fall of 1915. One of the distinct achievements of his official service was the 
complete redistricting of Lancaster county, having started the movement to 
bring this about. When he became commissioner the third district, which he 
represents, consisted of fifteen precincts of the twenty-four in the county and 
at the same time his district received only one-third of the county funds for 
improvements. He successfully carried through the movement to redistrict with 
the result that his district now has but nine precincts but still gets one-third of 
the improvement funds for roads and culverts. His activity on this line was for 
the general good of the people of his district. When he took office his district 
was carrying an indebtedness of fifty-eight hundred dollars, which has since been 
wiped out, and at the same time he lias bought for the district's use two gasoline 
tractor engines, for which over four thousand dollars was paid. 

On the 2ist of February, 1899, Mr. Mitchell was joined in wedlock to !Miss 
Mary A. Charlton, the only daughter of William Charlton, the largest land- 
owner and wealthiest citizen of Centerville precinct. Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell have 
one son, Charlton F., who was born on the ist of March, 1900. 

Mr. Mitchell is a member of the Lincoln Commercial Club and fraternally is 
connected with the I-Cnights of Pythias, while his religious faith is manifest in his 
membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. His life has been an extremely 
busy and useful one and he is numbered among the foremost agriculturists of 
this part of the state. He is wide-awake, alert and enterprising, ready for any 
emergency in business or in office and actuated at all times by honorable prin- 
ciples and unfaltering loyalty to that which he believes to be right. 



JOHN DICKSON. 

John Dickson, who is living retired in Panama, gained a competence through 
his well directed labors as a farmer and cabinetmaker and is enjoying a well 
deserved period of leisure. His birth occurred on the 6th of January, 1842, in 
Lanarkshire, Scotland, and his parents were John and Isabella (Rogers) Dickson, 
the former born in Hamilton, and the latter in Larkhall, Scotland. The father's 
birth occurred on the 28th of July, 1815, and he received his education in his 
native city, where he subsequently followed the miller's trade until 1871, when 
he came with his family to America and located at Earlville, Delaware county, 
Iowa, where he purchased forty acres of land, and after bringing it under cultiva- 
tion, devoted his time to the raising of grain and stock until his death. His wife 
also passed away upon the home farm. 

John Dickson passed his boyhood and youth under the parental roof and 
after com]3leting his education served an apprenticeship as a cabinetmaker for five 
and a half years. He then followed his trade in Glasgow, Scotland, and Roch- 
dale, Liverpool, Manchester and London, England, remaining in the last named 
city for seven years. In 1871 he accompanied the rest of the family to America 
anil remained for a short time u])on his father's farm in IDelaware county, Iowa. 
Later in that year, however, he went to Chicago where he worked as a cabinet- 
maker for three years, at the end of which time he removed to San Francisco, 
California. There he was emplo\ed in making the furniture for the Palace Hotel, 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY :iXi 

but in 1876 lie left the coast and took up his residence in Lancaster county, 
Nebraska. He purchased an eighty acre tract of raw land on section 11, Panama 
precinct, for which he paid one thousand dollars and which he at once began to 
improve and cultivate. Subsequently he purchased three additional eighty acre 
tracts, bringing his holdings up to three hundred and twenty acres all in Panama 
precinct and all well improved. Lie operated another half section and as the years 
passed his capital increased steadily for he was energetic and practical and man- 
aged his affairs well. In 1910 he retired from active life and built a fine home 
in Panama in which he has since lived. 

Mr. Dickson was married on the 25th of June, 1865, in London. Lngland, to 
Miss Christina Pettigrew, wdio was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, on the 2d of 
April, 1844, a daughter of William and Agnes (Twadell) Pettigrew, also natives 
of that shire. The father was a plasterer by trade and jjassed his active life in 
Scotland, but after retiring came with his wife to America and made liis home 
with Mrs. Dickson. Both Mr. and Mrs. Pettigrew died in this county and are 
buried in Panama cemetery. Nine children have been born to the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Dickson, as follows: Agnes, who was born in London, England, is 
now the wife of Ed Schintall of Panama; John, who was born in Lanarkshire, 
Scotland, and is now engaged in the cofTee business in Lincoln ; William, who 
was born in London and died there in infancy ; Belle, who was born in Chicago 
and passed away in that city in infancy; Maggie, the wife of Louis Gove, a 
farmer of Lancaster county ; Alice, who married Elmer Scott, a farmer of Lan- 
caster county; James, who is farming in Lancaster county; Harry, who is cashier 
of the Turin Bank at Turin, Iowa; and Lizzie, the wife of Selden Ewing, a 
farmer of Manchester, Kansas. 

Mr. Dickson is an advocate of the policies of the republican party and is 
never remiss in any of his duties as a citizen. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Bennet Lodge, No. 94, A. F. & A. M., in which he has served through all of 
the chairs and in religious faith he is a Piesbyterian He is is good circumstances 
financially, receiving a fair income from the rental of liis land and his prosperity 
is doubly creditable in that it is the result of his own industry and good manage- 
ment. He has a wide acquaintance ami his friends are many. 



JOHN JOSEPH MEYER. 

John Joseph Meyer, who is living retired in Ilallam, Buda precinct, has been 
active in a number of fields of endeavor and has met with gratifying success in 
all that he has undertaken. For many years he engaged in farming, subsequently 
conducted a hardware and implement business and still later served as cashier of 
the Hallam Bank. He also assisted in organizing the Cooperative Telephone 
Company of Hallam, in which he is still financially interested. 

Mr. Meyer was born in Clayton county. Iowa, on the 14th of .\pril. 1847, a 
son of John Henry and Eliza (Spellman) Meyer, who were born in Hanover, 
Germany. On removing to Lancaster county Mr. Meyer i)urchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of railroad land on section 21. Buda township, and an eighty 
acre tract on section 28, and later he bought ten hundred and fifteen acres in 



3M LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Saltillo precinct. He devoted his life to agricultural ])ursuits, engaging in 
farming and stock-raising on an extensive scale. 

John J. Meyer was reared in Clayton county and after putting aside his 
textbooks worked for his father until 1868, when he came to Lancaster county, 
Nebraska, to look at some land which his father was thinking of buying. He 
was favorably impressed with conditions here and as the result of his report 
concerning the county and the fertility of the soil the family removed here in 
the spring of 1869. A short time later John J. Meyer took up a homestead of 
eighty acres on section 28, Buda precinct, but continued to reside with his parents 
upon his father's farm. In 1870 he broke forty acres of his own land and in the 
spring of that year purchased a half interest in a threshing machine outfit, which 
he operated during the summer and fall. In the following spring he took up his 
residence upon his farm, he and a neighbor, G. Rippen, keeping "bachelor's 
hall." Following his marriage, which occurred in 1873. he built a frame house, 
fourteen by sixteen feet in dimensions, which was later replaced by a commodious 
residence. He brought his farm to a high state of development and concentrated 
his energies upon its operation until the fall of 1894. He then retired from 
farming and removed to Hallam, P.uda precinct. This town was platted in 1893, 
when the Rock Island Railroad was built through the county, and Mr. Meyer, 
seeing the excellent opportunity to l)uil<l up a prosperous business in the new 
town, formed a partnership with Charles Severin and engaged in the implement 
and hardware business under the name of Meyer & Severin. They were the 
first merchants in Hallam and gained a gratifying patroqage. Subsequently Mr. 
Severin sold his interest in the store to William Elfeldt and the firm name became 
JMeyer & Elfeldt. This association was maintained until .\ugust, 1898, when 
they sold the business to \Villiam Roke. Mr. Meyer then turned his attention 
to banking, aiding in organizing the Bank of Hallam, which opened its doors 
for business on the ist of December of that year. He was its first cashier and 
filled that ])osition continuously for fourteen years, or until the fall of 190S. He 
then sold his interest in the institution and retired from business. He still owns 
his farm, which he rents, and is also interested in the Cooperative Telephone 
Company at Hallam. which he aided in organizing. In 1913 he Intilt a beautiful 
residence in Hallam, in which he has since lived. 

On the 13th of March, 1873. the marriage of Mr. Meyer and Miss Louisa 
Heidecker was celebrated upon his father's homestead near Roca. Mrs. Meyer 
was born in Clayton county, Iowa, on the 1st of July, 1852, and was reared 
within six luiles of the home of her husband, but they never met until both had 
become residents of Lancaster county. Her parents, Christian and Barbara 
(Walter) Heidecker, were both natives of Bavaria, Germany, and on emigrating 
to the United States settled in Clayton county, Iowa, which was then a frontier 
district. The father worked as a day laborer for a number of years but in 1869 
came to Lancaster county, and homesteaded land on section 22, Buda precinct. 
At length, having accumulated a competence, he retired from active life but 
continued to reside on the farm, where he passed away on the 7th of November, 
iQoo. His wife died upon the home place on the 26th of February, 1912, and 
both are buried in the Hallam cemetery. 

Mr. Meyer is a stalwart advocate of democratic principles and loyally sup- 
ports that j)arty at the polls. For ten years he was a member of the school 



LLXCOLN AND LANXASTER COUNTY 3;i5 

board in district No. 114 and he can always be depended upon to take an interest 
in everything that concerns the pubhc welfare. He holds membership in the 
Mallam Congregational church and its work j^rofits l)y his support and coopera- 
tion. He has resided in Lancaster county since pioneer times and has not only 
witnessed its rapid development but has also been a factor in its advancement 
along various lines. Through industry and good judgment he has gained finan- 
cial independence and has also gained an enviable reputation for fair dealing 
and unswerving integrity. 



JOHN M. ada:\is. 



John AI. Adams holds title to eight hundred and fortv acres of excellent 
land and personally super\ises the operation of two hundred acres, but gives 
the greater part of his attention to the conduct of the elevator at Waverly, which 
he owns. His birth occurred in Jonkciping Ian, Sweden, on the 2d of January, 
i860, and he is a son of Jonas and Christina (Magnuson) .\dams. also natives 
of that Ijin. In 1883 the family emigrated to the United States and located ui)on 
a farm seven miles northwest of Waverly, where the mother died in 1885, and 
the father on the 12th of July. 1014. 

John M. Adams, who is the second in order of birth in a family of six chil- 
dren, received the greater part of his education in Sweden but attended school 
for a short time after remo\ing to the United States, thus acquiring a more 
thorough knowledge of the English language. He preceded his parents to this 
country by several years, arriving here in 1876 and locating in Kane county, 
Illinois. For three and a half years he worked as a farm hand there Init at the 
end of that time came to Nebraska and purchased land seven miles northwest 
of Waverly. He concentrated his energies upon the improvement and operation 
of that [ilace until njoo, and as the years passed his resources increased, due to 
his industry and careful management. On removing from the farm to Waverly 
he turned his attention to the grain business, in which he was engaged for nine 
years. He then sold out and purchased another farm, very close to Waverly, 
which he began operating. He farmed that place for a number of years and 
at the same time operated an elevator at Waverly, in which he acquired an 
interest in 1908. In July, 1915, he became sole owner of the elevator and is 
still conducting that business, which has now reached extensive proportions. 
He has invested his capital from time to time in land in this county, and his 
holdings now comprise eight hundred and forty acres, all of which is well 
improved. He operates a farm of two hundred acres in connection with his 
grain business and finds little time for outside interests. 

Mr. Adams w-as married on the 1st of Xovember, 1889, to Miss Hannah S. 
Anderson, a native of Sweden, of which country her jiarents were lifelong 
residents. She too has been called to the home beyond, her death occurring in 
1900. She was the mother of four children, namely: Alvin E., at home: 
Esther A., who is living at home and is teaching in the llavelock schools; and 
Harry W. and Lillian W., both of whom are attending school. On the 17th of 
August. 1904. Mr. Adams was married to Miss Hulda C. Warner, who was born 



336 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

in Lancaster county, a daughter of John and Christina Warner, natives of 
Sweden. On emigrating to the United States they came to Lancaster county, 
Nebrasi<a, where the father purchased land. He is still living and now makes 
his home with his daughter, Mrs. F. E. Peterson, who lives seven miles north- 
west of Waverly. By his second marriage Mr. Adams has three children : 
Emery W., Sylvia Christina and Vernett S. 

Mr. Adams casts his ballot in support of the candidates and measures of 
the democratic party but has never been an aspirant for office. In religious 
faith he is a Congregationalist. His keen business insight, his capacity for hard 
work and his initiative have enabled him to gain financial independence, and at 
the same time he has won an honored name for he has never stooped to dis- 
honest dealings but on the contrary has conducted his business in accordance 
with the highest commercial ethics. 



HENRY G. GALVIN. 



Henry G. Galvin, a resident of North BlufT precinct, has for a quarter of a 
century or more been actively engaged in the breeding of Percheron horses and 
Shetland ponies, in which connection he has become widely known. Gradually, 
however, he is closing out his business along that line but is still the owner of 
one hundred and sixty acres of highly improved land, which he has operated as 
a general stock farm. His business affairs have always been carefully sys- 
tematized and wisely managed, and the success which he has achieved is the 
direct and merited result of his earnest effort. 

Mr. Galvin was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 29, 1856, a son of 
Jarvis and Charlotte (Plumb) George, who were natives of Nottinghamshire, 
England. At an early period in the development of Lancaster county they 
became residents of this locality, and the father died at Saltillo, after which the 
mother became the wife of Edward Galvin, who was born in Ireland and in 
early life came to the new world. Their marriage was celebrated about 1864, 
and Mr. Galvin took up his abode in Saltillo but afterward removed to a farm 
in North BluiT precinct, upon which he continued to reside for about forty-five 
years. He became an extensive landowner, and his agricultural activities were 
an important element in the substantial improvement of the county. He died 
December 13, 1904, and his widow survived until 191 3. 

Henry G. Galvin, who took his stepfather's name, is the only survivor of the 
family of four children born to his mother's first marriage, and there were no 
children of the second union. He attended school in North Bluff precinct but 
his opportunities in that direction were somewhat limited as he early began to 
take an active part in the work of the old home farm, on which he has since 
resided. At about the age of thirty-five years he began operating his business 
interests independently and throughout the intervening period to the present 
has engaged in farming and in the breeding of Percheron horses and Shetland 
ponies. In this connection he has conducted an extensive business, and his 
stock has been shipped over a wide territory. He now has one of the most 
beautiful thoroughbred Arabian stallions in the state, a black and white in color, 




HENRY G. CALVIN 



c 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 33y 

a clear white, with the black covering the body like a blanket, with a mauve 
:olorcd border about one inch in width. The markings are most pronounced 
and most beautiful and the remainder of the animal is pure white. Mr. Galvin 
also has one of the hnest black I'ercherons in this part of the state, an animal 
perfect in every respect, jet black in color and weighing two thousand pounds. 
Air. Galvin is now discontinuing the breeding of stock to some extent, but still 
conducts his place as a general stock farm and devotes his entire attention to 
his agricultural and stock raising interests. However, at tlie present time he 
is leasing a part of his land. 

In politics Mr. Gahin has always followed an independent course, casting 
his ballot for the candidates whom he deems best qualified for office without 
regard to party affiliation. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church, but 
has no loilge or club relations. His has been a busy and useful life, fraught 
with success such as follows close application and indefatigable energy. He 
has always lived in this county, has a wide acquaintance and enjoys the respect 
of his fellow townsmen as a most reliable and progressive business man. 



C. A. HOLDERNESS. 



C. A. Holderness is now living retired at Havelock and the city numbers 
him among the veterans of the Civil war who reside within her borders. One 
by one the old soldiers are passing away and it is meet that the present genera- 
tion should pay respect and honor to those who established the supremacy of 
the Union during the darkest hour of our country's history. Mr. Holderness 
is now nearing the seventy-sixth milestone on life's journey, his birth having 
occurred at Ogdensburg, New York, November ii, 1S40. his parents being 
John and Caroline Holderness, who were natives of England, in which country 
they were reared and married. Crossing the Atlantic to the L'nited States they 
settled at Ogdensburg, where the father followed the occupation of farming 
for a number of years. However, he removed westward with his family to 
Wisconsin, when that state was 'a territory, and there he and his wife passed 
their remaining days. 

C. A. Holderness spent his youth upon the old home farm in Wisconsin amid 
pioneer conditions, which imposed upon the family many of the hardships and 
privations of frontier life. He assisted in the work of the home farm until 
after the outbreak of the Civil war when in response to the country's call for 
troops he enlisted in the First Wisconsin Cavalry at Kenosha and served for 
three years. He participated in m:niy hotly contested engagements and had 
many experiences of military life. At one time he was captured and held as 
a prisoner of war. At another time he became ill with typhoid fever but he 
stuck to his post until he fell out of his saddle. A comrade was paroled to watch 
and care for him, the colonel believing that his end was near. 

After the war Mr. Holderness returned to his Wisconsin home where he 
spent two days in visiting his mother and then joined a friend who was out- 
fitting to go across the plains to Virginia City, Montana. A physician told 
Mr. Holderness that the trip would be most beneficial and he found it a great 



340 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

and enlightening experience. He saw thousands of buiifaloes and many elks 
upon the plains and with a party of eleven he returned by way of the Missouri 
river route. They headed for St. Louis and the trip was fraught with many 
interesting experiences. While making their way in the Big Horn country in 
boats which they had built, they saw what appeared to be the upturned roots of 
numerous cottonwood trees, but as they neared this obstruction in the river they 
discovered that it was a heard of several hmidred elk with their noses on the 
surface of the water and their horns sticking into the air. 

At Omaha Mr. Holderness found work at the carpenter's trade. Some men 
were laying timbers at the edge of the water preparatory to bringing across the - 
river the first locomotive that was ever rolled over Nebraska soil. It was there 
that Mr. Holderness met for the first time a seventeen year old girl with whom 
he has since traveled life's journey. In Omaha he wedded this maiden, Miss 
Emma Lettner, who was born in Des Moines, Iowa, a daughter of John Lettner, 
an early settler of that state. From Omaha they removed to Fillmore county, 
Nebraska, and Mr. Holderness worked at car building and at carpentry most of 
the time. For a while he lived in Nance county, and in 1891 came to Havelock, 
erecting the first house in the new town, while his daughter's marriage was the 
first marriage celebrated in Havelock and her child was the first one born in 
this city. Mr. and Mrs. Holderness became the parents of eight children : Ada. 
the wife of John Bessie living in Sheridan, Wyoming; Nellie, the wife of Lester 
Gleason ; Stella, the wife of Sam Cone ; Herbert, who is married and lives in 
California; Maud, at home; Myrtle, the wife of Walter Helwig; Lulu, the 
deceased wife of Fred Ramsey ; and Sherman, at home. 

For many years the parents have been members of the iMethodist church 
and have guided their lives by its teachings. In politics Mr. Holderness is a 
republican and it is his purpose to join the Grand Army of the Republic, having 
never before had an opportunity to do so because of the fact that he has lived 
where there was no post. He is still the owner of a ranch in Colorado on which 
he lived for five or six years after first coming to Havelock. He is familiar 
with every portion of the history of Havelock and can relate many interesting 
incidents concerning its development. He can also tell inany an interesting tale 
concerning pioneer life in Nebraska, having made his home within its borders 
since it was a frontier state. 



WILLIAM STAHLY. 



William Stahly. who is living retired in Hickman, was born in Hesse Darm- 
stadt, Germany. November 5, 1S46, of the marriage of Peter and Catherine 
(Guengerich) Stahly. His father was born in that province in September, 
1813, and after completing his education turned his attention to farming. In 
1852 he emigrated with his family to the United States and first located at Peru, 
Illinois, where he arrived on the 4th of July. He rented a farm there, but four 
years later went to Bureau county, renting land north of Princeton. After oper- 
ating that farm for nine years, he purchased eighty acres of raw land near 
Forest, Livingston county. He culti\ated that place from 1867 until his death 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTI-.R COUNTY 341 

in June, 1869. His remains were interred in a cemetery near Forest. His wife, 
who was also born in Hesse Darmstadt, continued to reside iiopn the home 
farm in IlHnois until her demise in 1892 and she rests beside her husband. 

William Stahly accompanied his parents to America when six years of age 
and received a good common school education in Bureau and Putnam counties, 
in Illinois. He was early trained to farm work and assisted his father until 
1878 when he came to Lancaster county, and ])urchascd a hundred and si.xty 
acres from the Burlington & Missouri Railroad. A year previous he had visited 
the county and had been so well pleased with conditions here that he decided to 
return and make this his permanent home. His land, which is located on section 
25, Saltillo precinct, was little improved when it came into his possession, there 
being neither house nor barn on the place, and only seventy acres had been 
broken. He soon brought the remainder of the farm under cultivacion and as 
the years passed made many improvements. He harvested large crops of grain 
and also engaged in stock raising, specializing for thirty-five years in Poland 
China hogs. In 18S4 iie purchased an additional eighty acres, also on section 
25, and si.x years later he bought the Larsh farm on section 24, Saltillo precinct, 
which comprises one hundred and sixty acres and was already well improved 
when he purchased it. He erected modern buildings U])()n that farm and in 
other ways increased its value. Still later he accjuired title to eighty acres on 
section 35, Saltillo precinct, which was also an improved property. He ojx-rated 
all of these farms with the aid of hired help and year by year his capital 
increased as he was practical and progressive in his methods and judicious in 
the management of his business affairs. The financial independence which he 
has gained is doubly creditable in that it is the result of his own energy and 
foresight. When he came to Lancaster county, he had only two hundred dollars 
capital and this constituted his first payment upon his original farm. He shipjied 
a team of horses and his farm tools from Illinois, and at once began the improve- 
ment of his place. P^'or a year and a half he made his home with a cousin as 
he was not married at that time. In September, 1915, he retired from active 
life and bought a fine modern residence in the southwestern part of Hickman 
and has since lived there. 

Mr. Stahly was united in marriage, on the 14th of Fcl)ruary, 1882, near 
Peoria, Illinois, to Miss Anna Unzicker, a daughter of Christian and Margaret 
(Schwarzentraub) Unzicker, the former a native of Hesse Nassau, Ciermany. 
He was a land owner in his native country and supervised the work of those 
who cultivated his land and he also owned several Hour mills. In addition to 
looking after his interests he gave considerable time to preaching, being a min- 
ister of the Mennonite church. In 1873 he emigrated with his family to .Xmer- 
ica and for three years lived in Chicago, but at the end of that time removed 
to Putnam county, Illinois. Later he resided consecutively in Tazewell and 
La Salle counties and passed away in Peru on the 19th of March. 1891. As he 
had passed the prime of life before emigrating to America and as he was in 
comfortable financial circumstances, he lived retired during the entire period 
of his residence in this country. His wife died on the ist of August, 1885, ni 
Pen;. Illinois. Mrs. Stablv's paternal grandfather was John Unzicker. who was 
born in Hesse Nassau and'married Barbara Nafl-ziger. His parents were Joseph 
and Katharina ( Guengerich ) Unzicker and his grandfather was George Unzicker. 



342 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

a native of Switzerland, who died in Werth, Germany. Mrs. Stahly was born 
in Hesse Nassau on the 24th of February, 1845, and grew to womanhood in 
that country and received her education in its pubHc schools. Li 1873 she accom- 
panied her parents to the United States and for some time taught school in 
Bureau county, Illinois. She was married in 1882 and became the mother of 
three children: Edgar William, who was born on the ist of July, 1885, near 
Hickman, Nebraska, and died on the ist of August, 1909; Arnold Robert, who 
was born September 28, 1886, near Hickman, and is farming his father's land; 
and Edna Estelle, who was born near Hickman on the nth of June, 1890. 

Mr. Stahly gives his political allegiance to .the republican party and for 
many years was school director of district No. 25. He holds membership in 
the Mennonite church and in his daily life exemplifies the teachings of that 
organization. He has thoroughly identified his interests with those of his 
adopted slate, never failing to support movements seeking the public welfare. 



JOHN H. RAUCH. 



John H. Ranch, a retired agriculturist residing at University Place, has been 
a resident of Lancaster county for almost three decades and still owns an 
excellent farm of one hundred and si.xty acres in Saltillo precinct. His birth 
occurred in South Hanover, twelve miles west of Harrisburg, in Dauphin county, 
Pennsylvania, on the i^th of December, 1847, his jiarcnts being Jacob and Mary 
F. (Felty) Ranch, who were also natives of that county. In 1866 they took 
up their abode near Hennepin, in Putnam county. Illinois, where the father 
passed away in 1876, when seventy-four years old, while the mother died in 
1874, at the age of sixty-eight years. The family is of German descent, its first 
American ancestor having emigrated to the United States in colonial times, while 
the great-grandfather of our subject fought in the Revolutionary war. 

John H. Ranch was reared on the home farm in Pennsylvania and attended 
the common schools in the acquirement of an education. He was a young man of 
nineteen years when in 1866 he accompanied his parents on their removal to 
Putnam county. Illinois, and there turned his attention to general agricultural 
pursuits. In l\Iarch, 1887, he came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, purchasing a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Saltillo precinct, which he operated 
throughout the remainder of his active business career and which is still owned 
by him. This was an improved projierty when it came into his possession, but he 
soon found it necessary to rcl)uil<l the house and erect a new barn and other 
buildings. Success attended his farming operations in gratifying degree, so that 
at length he felt justified in putting aside the active work of the fields and for the 
past seven years has lived retired. He first made his home in pjcthany for a short 
time and then took up his abode in University Place, having a beautiful residence 
at No. 2409 P street. The old home farm in Saltillo ])recinct is now operated by 
his son Merle. 

In 1872, in Putnam county. Illinois, Mr. Ranch was united in marriage to 
Miss Marion J. Stoufter, who was born in Shiremanstown, Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, February 15, 1851, her parents being Henry N. and Susan (Mull) 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 343 

Stouft'er, also natives of that county. They became early settlers of Putnam 
county, Illinois, and spent the remainder of their lives in Hennepin. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Ranch were born ten children, two of whom are deceased. The surviving 
members of the family are as follows: 'Sirs. Anna Hartz, a resident of Scotts 
Bluff county, Nebraska ; Jennie, who is the wife of John E. Mostler, of Saltillo 
township, Lancaster county ; Mina, who gave her hand in marriage to J. E. 
Seacrist, of Saltillo precinct; Madge, the wife of Clarence Dixon, of University 
Place; Alva, who is the wife of Dr. H. PI. Humphrey, living in Daykin, Ne- 
braska; Irene, who is the w-ife of George F. Fatten, of Los Angeles, California; 
Merle A., operating the home farm ; and Robert, farming in Saltillo precinct. 

Mr. Ranch exercises his rigbt of franchise in support of the men and meas- 
ures of the republican party and is an advocate of prohibition principles. Both 
he and his wife are devoted members of the Methodist church, which they joined 
many years ago. His has been an active, useful and honorable career and now 
in the evening of life he can look back upon the past without regret and forward 
to the future without fear. His interest in community affairs is deep and 
sincere and he has been a proud witness of the progress and development of this 
part of the state for nearly three decades. 



LEWIS B. BAKER. 



Lewis C. Baker is a young man but he has already gained a position among 
the most successful farmers of (irant precinct. He was born in Saline county, 
Nebraska, on the 26th of April, 1886, a son of Eugene F. and Rachel Amy 
(Hull) Baker, natives of Illinois and Ohio. The father, who was a farmer by 
occupation, removed to Saline county, Nebraska, aljout 18S3 and followed agri- 
cultural pursuits there until 1903, when he sold his farm and came to Grant 
precinct, Lancaster County, Nebraska, purchasing one hundred and sixty acres 
on section 14. He made a number of improvements upon the ])lace and culti- 
vated the land until igo8, in which year he retired and remo\ed to Bethany, 
where he and his wife are still living. 

Lewis B. Baker was reared in Saline and Lancaster counties, and is a gradu- 
ate of the Lincoln high school and the Lincoln Business College. He liegan 
helping with the farm work as soon as he was old and strong enough and for 
a number of years farmed in partnership with his father, but upon the latter's 
removal to Bethany he took entire charge of the operation of the home place. He 
is both practical and progressive in his methods, watches the markets carefully, 
manages the business phases of farming well, and as a result of his well directed 
industry has already accumulated a competence. 

On the 27th of August, 1913, Mr. Baker was married to Miss Norma Dell 
Magee, a daughter of John and Florence V. (Stewart) Magee. nati\es of Ohio, 
who became early settlers in Lancaster county, Nebraska. The father {pur- 
chased land in Grant precinct and devoted his time to its operation until his 
death in 1900. The mother survives and is living with our subject. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Baker has been born a son. Lowell Fremont, whose natal day was the ist of 
January, 191 5. 



344 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Mr. Baker is a repii])lican in politics, in religious faith is a Baptist, and fra- 
ternally is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America. He concentrates 
his energies largely upon his farm work, hut also finds time to cooperate with 
various movements calculated to ad\-ance the general good. He is energetic and 
thoroughly understands farming and stock raising and his continued success in 
these occupations seems assured. 



WALTER SAMUEL EIS. 

Walter Samuel Eis owns and operate.-; two liundreii and forty acres of fine 
land on section 2, Centerville precinct, and is specializing in raising registered 
Poland China hogs and high grade cattle. He was horn near Fairport, Muscatine 
County, Iowa, on the 24th of January, 1858, a son of Jacob and Mary (Irwin) 
Eis. The father was born in Prussia, on the 21st of November, 1829, and 
remained in that country until he was seventeen years of age, when he emi- 
grated to America. He first located in Ohio, where he worked on the canal, 
but in 1852 he removed to Muscatine, Iowa. He farmed there for many years 
and at the time of his demise, which occurred on the 27th of November, 1906, 
he was one of the substantial men of that county. He is buried in Paris ceme- 
tery, near Pleasant Prairie, Iowa. His wife was born in Alleghany City, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1830, but when fourteen years of age became a resident of Iowa. 
She passed away in Muscatine county, when only thirty years of age and is 
buried in Parr's cemetery. 

Walter Samuel Eis received his education in the district schools of Musca- 
tine county and farmed with his father until he was twenty-three years old. 
He then began his independent career and for a year worked by the month, but 
in 18S2 removed to r)toe county, Nebraska, where his father owned a h;df 
section of lan<l in South Russell precinct. He received eighty acres of that 
place as a gift from his father and as soon as he was able added to his holdings 
by purchasing an additional eighty acres of the same section. He followed 
agricultural pursuits in Otoe county until 1906, when he disposed of his farm 
there and bought two hundred and forty acres on section 2, Centerville precinct, 
Lancaster county, his farm comprising the southeast quarter and the south half 
of the northeast cjuarter of that section. The place was well improved when 
it came into his possession and he has kept everything in excellent repair, so 
that it is one of the attractive and valuable farms of the precinct. He breeds 
registered Poland China hogs and also raises high grade cattle and finds ready 
sale, at good prices, for his stock. 

Mr. Eis was married at Muscatine, Iowa, in 1882, to Miss EtTie Baker, who 
was born in that city on the 2d of June, 1862. She was a daughter of Andrew 
and Mary (Eaton) Baker, both of whom were natives of Indiana, whence they 
removed to Muscatine, Iowa, in the early days of the history of that county. 
The father engaged in farming there and lioth died there. Mrs. Ims passed 
away in Otoe county, Nebraska, on the 12th of October, 1885. and is buried in 
the Plopewell cemetery in that county. She was the mother nl' two children: 
Jacob Hugh, who was born in Otoe cpunty, on the 29th of January. 1883, and 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 345 

is now engaged in the automobile business in Austin, Texas ; and Uoardman, 
wlio was born in Otoe county, Nebraska, on the 4th of May, 1884, and is now 
farming near JMoorcroft, Wyoming. On the loth of November, 1886, Mr. Eis 
was again married. Miss Jennie Palmer becoming his wife. She was born in 
Fowlerville, Alichigan, on the 5th of June, 1863, and remained there until she 
was ten years old when she accompanied her parents to Burlington, Iowa, whence 
she came to Nebraska in 1886, locating in Nebraska City where her marriage 
occurred. Mr. and J\Irs. Eis have five children: Guy Ransom, who was born 
ill Otoe county, on the loth of September, 1887, and is now farming near Daven- 
port, Nebraska; Grace May, who was born in Otoe county on the 23d of Sep- 
tember, 1889, and was married May 17, 19 1 6, to Llewellyn Tate and lives in 
Yankee Hill; Hattie Leona, whose birth occurred on the 28th -of October, 1891, 
and is the wife of George Damrow, a farmer of Grant precinct, Lancaster 
county ; Elary Beryl who was born in Otoe county on the 23d of April, 1896, and 
is assisting his father; and Gleim William, who was born in Otoe county, on the 
2 1st of May, 1898, and is also aiding his father in the operation of the home 
farm. 

Mr. Eis is a stanch republican and does all in his power to further the success 
of that party at the polls. He served for twelve years as a member of the school 
board, while living in Otoe county, and made a highly creditable record in that 
capacity. He belongs to Douglas Camp, No. 735. M. W. A., at Douglas, Otoe 
county, and has served in all of the chairs, and is a member of Lincoln Lodge 
No. 138, I. O. O. F. at Lincoln, having transferred to this lodge from 
Panama lodge at Panama. He was a charter member of Douglas Lodge, 
No. 276, at Douglas, Nebraska, in which he served in all the chairs and which 
was later consolidated with Panama Lodge. He also affiliates with the Royal 
Neighbors at Rokeby, and his wife and daughter Grace are connected with that 
organization. Mrs. Eis was formerly a member of the camp at Douglas, i'l 
which she held the office of oracle, and is a charter member of the Rokeby lodge 
and lias served as oracle therein. Her daughter Grace has held a number of 
minor offices in the camp. i\Irs. Eis belongs to the ^lethodist Episcopal church 
an.d lakes a keen interest in its work. During the ten years in which the family 
have resided in Lancaster county they have become widely known and have 
gained a wide circle of friends. 



WILLIAM B. McCOY. 



Dr. William B. McCoy had engaged in practice at College \'icw for only 
about a year but had already gained recognition as an efficient and successful 
physician and surgeon, when he passed away, his demise, which occurred on the 
2ist of February, 1916, occasioning sincere regret. He was born in Slippery 
Rock, Pennsylvania, on the sth of September, 1878, a son of John E. and Eliza- 
beth M. (Yeager) McCoy. His parents were also natives of Pennsylvania and 
the father devoted his energies to theatrical pursuits. He passed away in 1878 
but was survived l)y the mother until ]\Iay, 191 1. 

William B. ^McCoy was reared in Cleveland, Ohio, to which place his parents 



346 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

removed in his childhood, and obtained his general education in the public schools 
of that city. Later he entered the Case School of Applied Science, which he 
attended for a year and a half and then became a student in Cotner University 
at Bethany, Nebraska, where he remained for one year. Subsequently he 
matriculated in the Chicago College of Medicine and Surgery and received the 
degree of M. D. from that institution in 1914. For five months he practiced at 
Solon, Iowa, but in February, 1915, located in College View where he remained 
until his death on the 21st of February, 1916. It was not long before he gained 
a representative patronage and he held the confidence, not only of the general 
public, but also of his professional colleagues. _ He kept in touch with the 
advancement that is constantly being made in medical science through reading 
and through his membershij) in the Lancaster county and Xeljraska state Medical 
societies. 

Dr. McCoy was married in March, 1912, to Miss Winifred Owen, a daughter 
of Daniel and Lida (Camp) Owen. Her father, who is a traveling salesman, is 
now making his home with his daughter. Dr. McCoy supported the democratic 
party at the poles, believing firmly in its principles, and at the time of his death 
he was filling the position of health officer. Fraternally he was connected with 
the Masonic order, having taken the degrees of the commandery, and he also 
belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was identified with 
Phi Chi, a medical fraternity, and was honored by election to the vice presidency 
of the organization. His religious faith was that of the Christian church and he 
could be counted upon to further the moral advancement of his community in 
every way possible. His salient characteristics were those which invariably 
command respect and regard and those who were most closely associated with 
him were his stanchest friends. 



E. D. EVANS. 



E. D. Evans, of Bethany, is one of the highly esteemed residents of the 
town and is enjoying a period of leisure made possible by his former years of 
well directed labor as an agriculturist. He was born in Henry county, Indiana, 
on the 5th of May, 1838, and is a son of Israel and Eveline W. (.Smith) Evans, 
the former a native of Loudoun county, Virginia, nncl the latter of Belmont 
county, r)hio. The father liecame a resident of Henry county, Indiana, about 
1S33 and ])urchased land there. He farmed in the Hoosier state until 1855, 
when he went to Flarrison county, Icwa. There he bought land, to the cultiva- 
tion of which he devoted his time until his death on the 15th of March, 1883. 
Something over ten years later, or on the 14th of September, 1894, his wife 
also passed away. 

E. D. Evans was largely reared in Putnam county, Indiana, and remained 
under the parental roof until he was twenty years old. He then bought forty 
acres of land in Harrison county. Iowa, and for six years concentrated his 
energies upon its improvement and cultivation. In 1865 he homesteaded land 
in Douglas county, twenty-five miles from Omaha, and resided there until 1872, 
when he sold tlie place and bought a tract of school land which he farmed until 



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a: 

H 
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LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY :i49 

1891. He then rented that place and, coming to Ilethany, erected a fine residence 
at the corner of liutler and Ashgrove streets, where he has since lived. He 
still owns the farm and also holds title to thirty-one lots in P.ethany. Although 
he has reached the seventy-eighth milestone on life's journey he is still active 
and vigorous and is greatly interested in all that is happening in the world at large.. 

Mr. Evans was married on the 12th of September, 1S58, to Miss P'lizabeth L. 
Peckenpaugh, a daughter of Elijah and Caroline (Rowe) Peckenpaugh. In early 
life the father became a resident of Henry county, Illinois, and later removed 
to Warren county, where he farmed until 1855, when he went to Harrison 
county, Iowa, where he bought land. He concentrated his energies upon the 
develo|imcnt and improvement of his place and followed agricultural pursuits 
until his death, which occurred as the result of a runaway on the 2'^th of 
September, 1884. He was survived for many years by his wife, who was called 
to her final rest on the ist of June, 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Evans have become 
the parents of nine children. Pillie C. is the wife of John Reed, a farmer of 
Cheyenne county. Nebraska. William C. is farming in Idaho. Mary L. is the 
wife of T. J. Oliver, a farmer and also a teacher living in Missouri. Martha E. 
has for fourteen years been principal of a ward school at Pocatello, Idaho. Anna 
I. wedded O. W. Portlock, who passed away on the 15th of I-'ebruar)-, 1910. 
Alvin E. is a graduate of Cotner University at P.ethany and of the Nebraska 
State Plniversity and also has the Ph. D. degree from the P'niversity of Michigan 
at Ann Arlior. He took a law course in the State University of Idaho and is now 
taking post-graduate work in law at Harvard. Frank L. is a lumber dealer at 
Hill L'ity, Idaho. Elijah and Ethel are both deceased, the former dying on the 
26th of February, 1861, and the latter on the 17th of March, 1875. 

Mr. Evans is indei)endent politically, voting for the candidates whom he 
deems best qualified to fill the offices in question, rather than obeying the dictates 
of a [larty leader. While living in Douglas county he served as school director 
and as treasurer of the board and did all in his jjower to further the interests 
of the schools. He is an influential member of the Christian church and for 
several years has served as deacon and elder. Plis life has conformed to high 
standards and the respect in which he is held is well deserved. 



EILERT SCHNIEDER. 



Eilert Schnieder is numbered among the pioneer settlers of Buda precinct, 
residing upon the old family homestead on section 30. He was born in the state 
of Oldenburg, Germany, on the 13th of January, 1831, a son of Diedrich and 
Catherine Schnieder, who are mentioned on another page of this work in con- 
nection with the sketch of his brother, Friedrich Schnieder. He began his edu- 
cation in the schools of the fatherland and, following his emigration to the new 
world, continued his studies in public schools of Clayton county, Iowa, and of 
Lancaster county, Nebraska. Pie came to the United States in the spring of 
1868, a year prior to the arrival of his ])arents. He had an uncle who had pre- 
ceded him to this country and was then living in Clayton county, Iowa, whither 
Eilert Schnieder made his way, remaining with his uncle until tiie arrival of his 



350 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

father and mother. Ahout the ist of May, 1870, they started with ox teams for 
Lancaster county, Nebraska, where they arrived on the 4th of June, having been 
four weeks and four days on the journey. The father here secured a homestead 
claim, embracing the north half of the northeast quarter of section 30, and Eilert 
Schnieder homesteaded the south half of the same quarter. The fa,ther died 
about 1878, and after the children had all reached adult age, Eilert Schnieder 
purchased the old homestead on which his father had settled and on which he 
has resided for so many years. His entire life has been devoted to agricultural 
pursuits, and his early training well qualified him to take up the work of this 
character on his own farm. 

Mr. Schnieder completed his arrangements for having a home of his own 
through his marriage in 1882 to Miss Rebecca Prange, a native of Germany, who 
came to this country with her brother Dick Prange in 1880. Mr. and Mrs. 
Schnieder have become the parents of twelve children: William, a resident of 
Buda precinct ; Carrie, the wife of Henry Rippen, who is farming near Kramer, 
Nebraska ; Maggie, living in Lincoln ; Emma, the wife of Diedrich Alahlman of 
Olive Branch precinct ; Anna, Sophia, Mary and Florence, all at home ; Rudolph, 
living in Clayton county, Iowa; Edwin and Alfred, still at home: and George, 
who is yet in school. 

Mr. Schnieder maintains an independent political course, voting according to 
the dictates of his judgment rather than a party. He has served in various 
local offices, including that of assessor, justice of the peace, road overseer and 
school director. He and his family are members of the Congregational church 
and are people of highest respectability. He is numbered among the pioneer 
settlers of the county, having for forty-six years lived within its borders, during 
which period he has witnessed the greater part of its growth and development 
as it has taken on all of the accessories and conveniences known to modern life. 
His efiforts have been an element in the agricultural progress of the county and 
through his close attention to business, his intelligently directed efi'ort and his 
business integrity he has won success. 



HUBERT FROHN. 



Hubert Frohn, who owns and is operating a fine farm of two hundred and 
forty acres on section 22, Centerville precinct, was born upon that place on 
the 9th of February, 1874, a son of William Frohn, a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work. He was reared under the parental roof and in the 
acquirement of his education attended the public schools. .At the time that he 
attained his majority he was an experienced farmer, as he assisted his father 
during his boyhood and youth, and he determined to devote his life to agricul- 
tural pursuits. For five years he and a brother. William Henry Frohn, a 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume, operated the home farm in 
partnership, but Flubert Frohn now owns the place and is farming it alone. 
The buildings are modern and commodious and the land is in a high state of 
cultivation. He raises both grain and stock, finding such a course more profitable 
than specializing in either, and he derives a good income from his well directerl 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 351 

labors. The farm comprises two huiuired and forty acres and is one of tlie 
valuable properties of Centerville precinct. 

Mr. Frohn was united in marriage in lyoi to Miss Lena Krull, a daughter 
of I-'redrich Krull, a farmer of Centerville precinct, and to this union have been 
born four children, namely, Edna, Leona, Hubert, Jr., and Dorothy. Mr. Frohn 
votes independently and is interested in all that pertains to the public welfare 
but has never sought office. His wife is a member of of the Methodist church and 
both conform their lives to high standards of morality. Mr. Frohn has gained 
a competence through his energy and good judgment antl he has also won a 
high place in the estimation of his fellow citizens as his dominant (jualities are 
such as invariably command respect. 



ALPHEUS L. EMERY, M. D. 

Dr. Alpheus L. Emery, a physician and surgeon residing at Waverly, has 
gained a very large practice and also has important business interests. His birth 
occurred at Sutton, Nebraska, on the 14th of April, 1879, and he is a son of 
William Henry and Mary Jeanette (Flansburg) Emery, born respectively in 
Ohio, on the 25th of January, 1849, and in the vicinity of Rochester, New York, 
on the lOth of April, 1832. The father, who is a contractor and builder, came 
to Nebraska about 1S76 and engaged in contracting at Sutton for several years 
but at length removed to Washington, Kansas, where he followed the same Inisi- 
ness until he retired from active life. Both he and his wife are still living in that 
town. 

Alpheus L. Emery, who is the third in the order of birth in a family of eight 
cliildren, was graduated from the Washington high school and subsequently 
entered the medical department of the St. Louis University at St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, from which he was graduated on the ist of May, 1902, with the degree of 
M. D. He opened an office in Waverly, Nebraska, and here he has continuously 
engaged in practice. He keeps in touch with the new discoveries in medical 
science and as he is careful in his diagnosis and conscientious in the care which 
he gives his patients, he has gained an enviable re[)Utation in his profession and 
has built up a practice of extensive proportions. He is frequently called into 
consultation, and his practice makes heavy demands upon his time and strength, 
but he never refuses to answer a call unless it is absolutely necessary to do so. 
He also owns and manages the drug store at Waverly and is a director in the 
H. G. Lincoln Company, which operates five and ten cent stores in Moline, 
Illinois; Aurora, Nebraska; and Columbus, Nebraska. Moreover, he is a stock- 
holder in the M. W. Savage Factories Company at Minneapolis and holds title to 
a quarter section of land in Washington county, Kansas, and eighty acres m 
Lancaster county, near Waverly. 

Dr. Emery was married on Christmas Day, 1904, to Miss Cora Mae Scott, 
a native of Nebraska and a daughter of Hiram and Jennie (Ingram) Scott, 
early settlers of Saunders county, this state, where the father engaged in farming. 
He was a soldier in the Union army during the Civil war and has always been 
characterized by marked public spirit but does not desire office. He and his wife 



352 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

are now living retired in Waverly. Three children have been born to Dr. and 
Mrs. Emery, namely : Angeline Lucile, Cecil Kent and Donald Louis. 

Dr. Emtry is an advocate of democratic principles but has never had time 
to take a very active part in politics. Fraternally he is connected with the j\Iodern 
Woodmen of America and along professional lines is identified with the American 
Medical Association. He has made the interests of the community his interests 
and can be depended upon to cooperate with all movements seeking the general 
good. 



ALBERT LITLE JOHN.SON. 

Albert Litle Johnson, prominent citizen of University Llace, is well known in 
church educational circles as he is president of the board of trustees of the 
Nebraska Wesleyan University and is also a member of the board of education 
of the Methodist Episcopal church of the United States, which has offices in 
New York city. He has been very successful in business as president of the 
Crete Mills, which operates a chain of elevators in Nebraska and Colorado. 

yir. Johnson was born in Albany, Wisconsin, on the 19th of June, 1864, a 
son of Andrew and Mary Ann (Litle) Johnson. The father was Ikumi in Massa- 
chusetts and was educated in that state and in Belfast, Maine, .\fter putting 
aside his textbooks he learned the cabinetmaker's and carpenter's trades. In 18(15 
he became a resident of X'alparaiso, Saunders county, Nebraska, and worked at 
carpentering there for some time. He was employed on the erection of the first 
state University building and also on the capitol building and was regarded as a 
skilled and conscientious workman. At length he removed to Lincoln ;intl had 
the distinction of making the first shingles used in that city. In 1866 he returned 
to the east and later brought his family to this state, the journey being made by 
ox team. They located upon a homestead in Saunders county, which he had 
entered in 18(15. 1 le erected on that place the first frame building in that section 
of the state, hauling part of the lumber from Nebraska City. The house is still 
in good condition and is owned by our subject. Andrew Johnson was highly 
esteemed by his fellow citizens and served as the first postmaster of Valparaiso, 
Nebraska, where he passed away in i8gi at the age of seventy-five years. He 
was a republican in political belief, and was one of the first commissioners of 
Saunders county. His wife was born in New York in iSig and reached an 
advanced age, dying in 1902. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and took an active interest in its work. 

AHiert Litle Johnson is the youngest of a family of ten children, of whom 
two died in childhood. W hen but two years of age he was brought by his par- 
ents to Neljraska and he grew to manhood upon the family homestead, which is 
now the site of \'ali)araiso. Me attended the first district school established in 
the southwestern part of Saunders county, in 1872, when he was eight years of 
age. After leaving the public schools he attended the Nebraska Methodist 
Episcopal Conference Seminary at York, Nebraska, in 1880 and 1881, and in 
the fall of the latter year he became a .student of the State University, where he 
spent a year. Subsequently he took a course in Elliott's Business College at 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 353 

Burlington, Iowa. In 18S3 he became bookkeeper in the mills at Crete, Nebraska, 
and from 1884 until 1888 he was cashier of the bank conducted by his brother, 
R. K. Johnson, at Valparaiso. Later he again became bookkeeper in the Crete 
Mills, and he made such an excellent record there that after a year he was pro- 
moted to the position of assistant manager and in 1S95 was made manager. He 
filled that office capably until 1901, when the company was incorporated and he 
became president. This corporation not only operates the mills at Crete but 
also the Curtis Mills and a line of elevators in Nebraska and Colorado. He is 
still at the head of the company and gives careful attention to the management 
of its affairs. He is also the president and was one of the organizers of the 
First Building and Loan Association, established in University Place. 

Mr. Johnson was married on the 25th of August, 1885, to Miss Hattie E. 
Patmore, who was born in Elora, Canada, but accompanied her parents to the 
United States when a child. To this union have been born four children, namely : 
Rodney K., who is operating a ranch in Wyoming; Porter A., who is with the 
bureau of publicity of the Western Union Telegraph Company and is stationed 
at Denver, Colorado ; Ruth, who was graduated from the Wesleyan University 
v>'ith the class of 1916; and Benjamin Litle, a student in the Wesleyan LIniversity. 

Mr. Johnson is a republican in politics but has never taken an active part in 
affairs of government. He is a member of the Masonic blue lodge and is in 
hearty sympathy with the teachings of tliat organization, lie is one of the 
prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal church in Nebraska and has 
taken an active interest in its educational work. He is now president of the 
board of trustees of the Wesleyan University and is alsd serving on the board 
of education of the Methodist Episcopal church of the United States, having 
been appointed to that position in 1912 to fill the vacancy caused by the death 
of Senator Dolliver of Iowa. The board administers funds which are used to 
assist needy students through college, and it has been the means of educating 
many young people who have become prominent in their respective lines of 
endeavor. Air. Johnson has resided in University Place since 1904 and has 
thorouglily identified his interests with those of the town, cooperating with all 
movements to advance community welfare. He has been a member of the state 
committee of the Young Men's Christian Association for past fifteen years; is 
a trustee of Nebraska Methodist Episcopal Hospital at Omaha; and one of the 
vice presidents for Nebraska of the American Sunday School Union. He is also 
a member of Territorial Pioneer Class A, and is a Son of the American Revo- 
lution. ' 



JAMES DICKSON. 



Among the men who have played an important part in the business and 
agricultural development of Lancaster county is James Dickson of Panama, who 
possesses in unusual degree, the qualities of farsighted enterprise and business 
acumen. He was born near Colesburg, Delaware county, Iowa, on the 20th of 
December, 1853, a son of Thomas and Hannah (Fleming) Dickson. The father 
was born in Hamilton, Lanarkshire, Scotland, on the 2d of February, 1818, and 



354 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

after comjjleting his common school education served an ajjjjrenticeship of seven 
years as stonecutter and stonemason at Hamilton. Subsequently he followed 
liis trades in various places in Scotland until 1850 when he came to the new 
world, landing at New Orleans. He was accompanied by his wife and two chil- 
dren, Thomas and Agnes. They proceeded up the Mississippi and Oliio rivers 
to Cannelton, Indiana, where Air. Dickson secured work at his trades in building 
a cotton factory. He worked there until the sprmg of 1851 when he went to 
St. Louis, Missouri, and thence up the Mississippi river to Dubuque, Iowa, 
where he bought a team and wagon and drove with his family to Delaware county, 
Iowa. This was before the homestead law had. been passed but he purchased 
from the government three forty acre tracts of land in the northeast quarter of 
section 2, Colony township, paying therefor one dollar and twenty-five cents per 
acre. He built a small log cabin which remained the family home for many years 
and in which all of the rest of his children were born. In 1863 the family 
removed to an eighty acre farm also in Colony township which he had purchased. 
This place' was out on the open prairie and there he built a frame house and 
barns. His sons broke the prairie sod and in time the place was converted into 
a well improved farm. In 1873 his eldest son, Thomas, came to Lancaster county, 
Nebraska, to investigate conditions here and was so well pleased that he pur- 
chased a quarter section on section 11. Panama precinct and in the fall of that 
year the family took up their residence upon that farm. Upon arriving in this 
county the father bought an additional one hundred and sixty acres, on section 
15, which w-as partly improved. The farm on section 11, however, was railroad 
land and was totally unimproved when it came into possession of the family. 
Mr. Dickson erected substantial buildings thereon and his sons operated the 
place. He passed aw^ay on the farm on section 15, on the 21st of August, 1883, 
and was buried at I'anama. He married Hannah Fleming, who was born in 
Hamilton. Lanarkshire, Scotland, on the 15th of June, 1825, and was a daughter 
of Edward and Agnes Fleming, also natives of that city. They passed away 
when she was a young girl but she continued to reside in Hamilton and there she 
received her education. She survived her husband for many years, dying on the 
4th of June, 1913. and she too is buried in the Panama cemetery. Mr. and Airs. 
Thomas Dickson were the parents of eleven children of whom nine survive, 
namely: Thomas J., Mrs. Agnes Hulbert, John H., James, kol>"rt G., \\'illiam P.. 
Presley H., Andrew L. and Francis W. 

James Dickson divided his time between attending the pulilic schools and 
assisting his father until i860 wdicn he put aside his textbooks and concentrated 
his attention upon the farm work. Thirteen years later he came by wagon with 
the familv to Lancaster countv, and for a year he gave his father the benefit of 
his labor. In 1874, however, he worked in a grist mill and a lumber yard at 
Palmyra, Nebraska, and in 1873 again turned his attention to farming, purchasing 
a team and renting land in Panama ])recinct, south of the town of that name. He 
operated that place until 1878 when he was married and removed to another farm 
which he rented for a year. He then bought eighty acres of railroad land or. 
section g, Panama precinct, which he brought under cultivation and on which he 
made many improvements, h'roni time to time he added to his holdings until 
he held title to four hundred and forty acres of fine land in Panama precinct, a 
ciuarter section of which he farmed while he rented the remainder. There are 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 355 

four sets of buildings on his farms and all of his land is in a high state of culti- 
vation. In 1895 he bought land in I'anama and erected a tine modern residence 
where he now lives and his home farm is operated by his children. The other 
farms are rented. In 1897 ^^^ ^^'-^^ active in the grain Liusiness, building the West 
Elevator in partnership with Nick Nevine. the iirm being known as Dickson \; 
Nevine. They bought grain extensively and also engaged in buying and shipping 
hogs, so continuing until 1905 when Mr. Dickson sold his interest in tlie business 
l(j Denton Brothers. The business is now being conducted under the name of 
Nevine Elevator. For two years Mr. Dickson was manager of the Panama 
Ilorse Company which was organized by eighteen or twenty farmers of I'anama 
precinct for the purpose of improving the liorses raised in the county. Mr. 
Dickson also aided in organizing the Bank of Panama and is now one of the 
directors of that institution. He has met with success in all he has undertaken 
and is one of the substantial men of the county. 

(Jn the 1st of January, 1878, Air. Dickson was married to Miss Amanda 
Johnston, who was born near llrownville, Richardson county, Nebraska, on the 
20th of May, i860. Her father, Oscar Mitchell Johnston, was a native of 
W'ytheville, Wythe county, X'irginia, and his birth occurred on the 3d of July, 
1832. Pie was reared by an uncle and received his education in the CMd Dominion. 
In 1846, when fourteen years of age, he went to Chicago where he resided for 
a number of years and where he was married in 1856. The following year he 
went to Prownville, Nebraska, where he engaged in the lumber business. Later 
he freighted from Nebraska City and Omaha to Denver, Colorado, transporting 
,snp])!ies and provisions to the gold miners there. In those days the Indians were 
still numerous and troublesome and he had many exciting adventures on the 
r)lains. In i8'i2 he enlisted in Company C of the First Nebraska Volunteer 
Infantry, which was commanded by Captain Pailey. Mr. Johnston served 
through the w^ar, participating in many battles. While at the front he was taken 
ill of fever and returned to Nebraska and was confined for some time in a hos- 
jiilai in Omaha. (3n recovering his health he rejoined his regiment and was in 
active service until the close of hostilities. When peace was restored he returned 
to I'jrownvillc, Xeljraska, and engaged in the lumber business with C. J. Rell, 
as a partner, for a number of years. In 1872, however, he removed to Panama 
l)recinct, where he had taken up a homestead claim. ' 'n his arrival here, how- 
c\cr. he found that someone had jumped his claim and he therefore rented land 
\vhich he operated until igo2, when he retired and purchased a residence in 
Panama, where he lived until called by death on the i8th of December, 1907. He 
is buried at Panama. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Josephine McCord, 
was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on the gth of November, 1838, but when four 
years of age was taken to \\'isconsin, where she -received her education. She 
passed away in Panama, on the 14th of January, 1907, when sixty-eight years 
of age and was buried in the cemetery here. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Dickson have been born four children. Evelyn, who was 
liorn on the home farm on section 9. Panama precinct. August 2, 1S78, is now 
the wife of John Tilton, who is operating that farm. Oscar Charles, born on the 
9th of September, 1883. is now engaged in farming in this county. Josephine 
Grace was born on the 14th of September, 1888 and is the wife of J. E. Chrystal. 
a Presbvterian minister located at Council Bluffs. Iowa. Blanche Ruby, wl'.ose 



356. LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

birth occurred on the 15th of RLirch, i<S96, passed away on the 21st of December, 
Kjio, and is buried at Panama. 

\It. Dickson supports tlie republican party at the polls and for one term 
served on the school board of the town of Panama. He is identified with Panama 
Lodge, No. 2227, M. \V. A., in which he has passed all of the chairs, and Pannma 
Lodge, No. 220, L O. O. ¥., in which he has held all of the offices and which he 
has lepresented as state delegate. He is a member of the Presbyterian church 
and takes a commendable interest in the work of that organization. His wife 
united with the I^resbyterian church in 1S72 and was the organizer of the con- 
gregation at I'anama. IJoth are widely known in Uic county and are held in the 
highest esteem. 



IRA C. SNYDER. 



Ira C. Snyder, who is engaged in farming in Wavcrly precinct, was born 
three miles north of the town of Waverly, on the 22d of December, 1880. and 
is a son of Jeremiah and Mary E. (Hetrick) Snyder. The father was born in 
Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, in 1850, and on beginning his independent 
career turned his attention to agricultural pursuits In 1877 he migrated from 
Pennsylvania to Nebraska and located upon a farm in Waverly precinct, which 
he operated until his death, in 1888, and gained a gratifying income from his 
land. His wife, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1856, survived until |.-uuiary, 
1909. They were the parents of eleven children. 

Ira C. Snyder, the fifth in order of birth, attended the Jordan school in 
Waverly precinct and when eighteen years old began working for others. He 
was thoroughly familiar with agricultural methods for he had operated the 
home farm for five years previously, taking charge of the place when only thir- 
teen years old. After working as a hired hand for two years he farmed the 
homestead for a similar length of time and then resided for a year south of 
Greenwood, in Cass county. On the expiration of that period he removed to his 
present place, which comprises one hundred and seventy-one acres in Waverly 
precinct. This he owns and has brought it to a high state of development and 
also operates an additional two hundred and forty acres. Vie has been very 
successful not only in growing grain but also in stock raising and his resources 
are constantly increasing. He is a member of the Farmers Cooperative .Associa- 
tion at Waverly. 

On the 9th of April, 1902, occurred the marriage of Mr. Snyder and Miss 
Lizzie Beached, who was born in Pennsylvania. Her father, Henry IJeachell, 
engaged in farming and in following the saddler's trade during his early years, 
but later conducted a meat market in Kansas City, Missouri. In 1901 he 
removed to Waverly, where he lived retired for a time but now makes his home 
with a son at Valparaiso. During the Civil war he served for three years in the 
Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry under General Palmer and was entertained at 
the General's mansion at Colorado Springs at the time of the reunion of the 
command. He married Miss Louise Kauffman, a native of Pennsylvania, who 
passed away in 1912. They were the parents of seven children of whom Mrs. 




IRA C. SNYDER AND FAMILY 



\?U'ii^ 






pou' 



JOS' ' 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 359 

Snyder was the fifth in order of Ijirth. By her marriage she has the following 
children: William Claire, who was born in September, 1903; Glenn B., whose 
birth occnrred on the 22d of December, 1905; Vern Eugene, born on tiie 17th 
of Ajiril. 1908: and Lester Ira, born May 17, 1912. 

Mr. Snyder belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church at Waverly and 
fraternally is connected with the Masonic lodge at Greenwood and the Modern 
Woodmen of America at Waverly, in which he has held the office of venerable 
consul and is now serving as one of the board of managers. In political belief 
lie is a republican but has confined his activity in public affairs to the exercise of 
his right of franchise. 



ALLEN ELIZIER CROSBY. 

« 

Allen Elizicr Crosby, vice president of the Baker Hardware Company of 
Lincoln, gives his time to the management of his business interests and is recog- 
nized as a man of enterprise, sound judgment and business insight. He was 
born in Warren county, Pennsylvania, on the 1st of December, 1873, a son of 
Charles and Emily (Stephens) Crosby, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and 
Ohio. The father grew to manhood in the Keystone state and in his youth 
learned the harnessmakers' trade. In 1S77 he became a resident of Lincoln, 
Nebraska, and was connected with the Whitman Harness Company of Lincoln 
for many years. He passed away in \'aIparaiso, Saunders county, Nebraska, in 
1880, and his wife died there in 1887. They were married in Alilford, this state. 

Allen Elizier Crosby accompanied his parents to Lancaster county in 1877 
and received his education in the public schools of \'alparaiso, as the family 
home was maintained there. In 1891, when eighteen years of age, Mr. Crosby 
became connected with the hardware Imsiness in Lincoln and in 1910 became 
a member of the Baker Llardware Company, of which he is now vice president. 
He is actively engaged in the conduct of the business, and his thorough knowl- 
edge of the stock carried and his familiarity with the most efficient methods of 
retail merchandising are important factors in the success of the enterprise. 

Mr. Crosby was married in 1899 at Lincoln to Miss Anna Andra, a native of 
this city. She was born on the 6th of December, 1875, on the site of the Oliver 
theater, and is a daughter of Jacob and Lena (Wittmann) Andra, both natives 
of Germany, whence they came to the L'nited States in 1867. Her father has 
since followed the harnessmakers' trade in Lincoln and is a highly esteemed 
resident of the city. Her mother passed away here in 1914. Mr. and Mrs. 
Crosby have four children, namely : Eldon Charles LIcnry, who was liorn in 
August, 1900, and is attending school : Frances Magdalena, who was born in 
1901 and is also in school; Dorothy Marie, whose birth occurred in 1907; and 
Ruth Leona. born January 9, 19 16. 

Mr. Crosby is a republican in politics and fraternally is connected with the 
Lincoln Camp, No. 916, M. W. A. He has gained a gratifying measure of suc- 
cess in business and his prosperity is the natural result of his energy and good 
management. He takes a great interest in the business expansion of Lincoln and 
can be depended upon to cooperate with all movements which seek the advance- 



360 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

ment of his city along commercial and civic lines. He has resided in Lancaster 
county since early boyhood and the fact that he is held in the highest esteem by 
those who have known him for years is incontestible proof of his genuine worth. 



JOHN VAN BURGH. 



John Van Burgh conducted the first hardware store in Hickman and had 
much to do with the early business development _of the town. He was highly 
esteemed by all who knew him and his demise, which occurred in 1897, was 
deeply regretted. A native of The Netherlands, he was born on tlie 15th of 
November, 1839, a son of Andrew V^an Burgh, who came to America about 
1850, settling at Dunkirk, New York. Later he was joined by his family and 
for some time he worked as a laborer in New York but at length removed to 
Sheboygan covmty, Wisconsin. He passed away at the home of his son John 
at Holland, that state. 

John Van Burgh was a boy at the time of his emigration to the United 
States and completed his education in the public schools at Dunkirk, New York. 
He also learned the shoemaker's trade and followed it for a number of years 
at Cedar Grove, Sheboygan county, Wisconsin. While living there he also 
engaged in farming to some e.xtent and was successful in both occupations. In 
1879 he removed to Buda township, Lancaster county, Nebraska, lioping that 
the change would lienefit his wife's health. He purchased three eighty acre 
tracts of land, buying part of the land from the railroad company and part from 
a private owner. He improved his farm and devoted five years to its cultivation, 
at the end of which time he removed to Hickman and purchased land on which 
he and Herman Leisveld and John J. Trompen built the first grain elevator in 
the town. They were active as grain dealers for four years, but at the end 
of that time Mr. \'an Burgh sold his interest in the business and turned his 
attention to the hardware field. He also purchased a number of city lots and 
bought an old school Ijuilding, the first erected in Hickman, from the school 
board and removing this building to his lots, established a hardware store which 
he conducted until September, 1897. He was the first hardware merchant in 
Hickman and he drew his trade from a wide territory. He carried a good stock 
and his honesty could always be relied upon. As the years passed his resources 
increased and he became recognized as one of the most substantial residents of 
Hickman. He built a fine modern home and there he was living at the time of 
his demise in .September, 1897. 

/\t Holland, Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, on the i6th of October, 1862, Air. 
\'an Burgh was united in marriage to Miss .\nna Stryde, a daughter of .Adrian 
and Nellie (Lcifbroer) Stryde, natives of Molhind. who emigrated to America 
in i8s4 and settled at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where the mother passed away on 
the 5th of .\ugust, 1854. The father subsequently removed to the vicinity of 
Holland. Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, and worked as a day laborer there until, 
he purchased eighty acres of land, which he farmed for some time. In 1879 he 
disi)osed of that place and came to Nebraska with Mr. and ^slrs. \'an Burgh. 
He ac(|uire(l title to eighty acres in Suuth Pass precinct, Lancaster county, liut 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 361 

never operated that farm. He rented it to others and made his home with .Mr. 
and Mrs. \'an Burgh, first in Buda township and later at Hickman. His demise 
occurred on the 27th of September, 1903, and he is buried in the town cemetery. 
Airs. Van Burgh was born at Kartgeen, The Netherlands, on the 24th of August, 
1843. By her marriage she has become the mother of six children : Andrew 
Percy, who is farming in Wyoming ; Adrian Edward, who is conducting the 
hardware business established by his father at Hickman ; William Frank, who is 
in the hardware business at Omaha ; John Martin, a mechanic of Denver, Colo- 
rado ; Nellie Mae, who is a graduate of the School of Music of the Nebraska 
State University and is teaching music in Hickman and Lincoln; and James 
Lloyd, a teacher in a commercial college at Minneapolis, Minnesota. Mrs. Van 
Burgh still resides in her home at H^ickman and has the warm regard of all who 
liave been brought into contact with her. 

Mr. \'an Burgh was an adherent of the rei)ublican party but never had time 
or inclination to hold office. He was characterized by industry, perseverence and 
sound judgment and also had the insight to recognize a good business oppor- 
tunity and the aggressiveness to take advantage thereof. In all of his dealings 
he was straightforward and upright and personally he was popular. 



GEORGE RAYMOND BUCKNER. 

George Raymond Buckner, filling the positon of president of the Lancaster 
county Bank of Waverly. which he established, is one of the most prominent 
young financiers of the county, and his ability and business acumen are generally 
recognized. His birth occurred at Alacedonia, Iowa, on the 2d of September, 
1S82, and he is a son of Perry and Dora (Starts) Buckner, the former born in 
Alissouri on the loth of March, 1832. and the latter in Illinois on the 21st of 
March, 1857. The father became a pioneer settler of Iowa and resided there 
until his death, which occurred in 1884. The mother subsequently married 
W. II. Horn, a resident of University Place, Lincoln, who is also deceased. She, 
however, survives and still lives in University Place. By her first marriage she 
had four children, of whom our subject is the third in order of birth. 

George Raymond Buckner attended the Nebraska Wesleyan University at 
University Place, after completing his high school course, and prepared for a 
business career by taking a commercial course at the Lincoln Business College. 
On beginning his independent career he entered a bank at Havelock. Nebraska, 
where he was employed two years, during which time he gained a thorough 
knowledge of the various phases of Ijnnk procedure, ^\■hen only twenty years 
old he organized the Farmer's State Bank at Davey, Nebraska, in which he held 
the office of cashier for two and a half years. He then became cashier of the 
Farmers and Mechanics Bank at Havelock but after a year came to \\a\-erly and 
in February. 1907, established the Lancaster County Bank. He was chosen the 
(irst cashier of that mstitution and served in "that capacity until 1909, when he 
became president of the bank. He is still the exectitive h.ead of the institution, 
and the steady growth of its business is attributable largely to the careful alien- 



362 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

tion which he gives to the management of its affairs and to his knowledge of 
banking in principle and detail. 

j\lr. Buckner was married on the 14th of June, 1905, to Miss Lola ]\Iay Dan- 
forth, whose birth occurred in Alexandria, Nebraska. Her father, George H. 
Danforth, was born in Boston on the 13th of August, 1844, and in early life 
engaged in merchandising in Massachusetts. At the time of the Civil war he 
served as a private in a Massachusetts regiment, and his military record was one 
of which he had every cause to be proud. After the close of hostilities he came 
to Nebraska and took up his residence in Alexandria, where he lived until about 
1904, when he removed to Lincoln. When he fij-st came to Lancaster county 
he was a member of a party of surveyors but later liomesteaded land and gave 
his attention to the improvement of his farm. At length, however, he established 
a general store at Alexandria, which he conducted for a number of years. He 
is now living retired in Lincoln and is honored as one of the pioneers of the 
county. He experienced all the hardships of frontier life and remembers well 
the days when the Indians were numerous and hostile and the settlers had to be 
constantly on their guard against attack. Llis wife, who was born on the 4th of 
December, 1846, in Surry, Maine, also survives. Mr. and Airs. Buckner have 
three children : Frances Alene, Wilbur Grant and Lorld IJernice. 

Mr. Buckner is a strong republican and in 1913 represented his district in the 
lower house of the state legislature. At the present time he is candidate for 
county treasurer. His religious faith is that of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church, 
and he is not only serving on the official board but has also been honored by 
election as lay delegate from his church to the general conference at Saratoga 
Springs, New York. Fraternally he is connected with the Modern Woodmen of 
America at Waverly, with the Masonic blue lodge at University Place, with the 
Royal .\rcli chapter in Lincoln and with the Consistory, in which he has attained 
the thirty-second degree, in Lincoln. He is a man of great energy and many 
sided interests and has been a factor in the advancement of his community, not 
only along business lines but also along the lines of moral and civic develop- 
ment. 



CLARK HIGHBERGER. 

Clark Highberger, a well known resident of College Mew, who is success- 
fully engaged in raising hogs and cattle upon his farm in Grant precinct^ was 
born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, on the 13th of March. 1861. His 
father, Simon Highberger, was born in Pennsylvania and devoted his entire life 
to farming in that state, dying in 1904. His wife was also born in Pennsylvania 
and her demise occurred in 1900. 

Clark Highberger grew to manhood upon the home farm and remained with 
his parents until he attained his majority. It was not until 1888. however, that 
he came to Lancaster county, and purchased his farm on section 7, Grant pre- 
cinct. He at once took up his residence on that place and for twenty-five years 
actively engaged in agricultural pursuits. He has largely concentrated his 
energies upon the raising of hogs and cattle and has found that occupation 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 86a 

highly profitable. In 1910 he removed to College \'ie\v, where he erected a fine, 
modern home in which he has since lived and he still holds title to two huiulred 
and ten acres in Grant precinct and supervises the operation of that place. 

On the 28th of December, 1887, Mr. Highberger married Miss Ella Zimmer- 
man, a daughter of William and Mary (Yates) Zimmerman. The father enlisted 
in a Pennsylvania volunteer infantry regiment for service in the Civil war and 
saw much active fighting at the front. He returned to civil life at the close of 
hostilities and for many years engaged in farming in Pennsylvania. His death 
occurred in 1900 and his wife passed away in 1877. 

Mr. Highberger is a republican !in his political allegiance but has never desired 
office as a reward for his fealty. He holds membership in the Methodist Epis- 
copal church and his influence is always on the side of righteousness and prog- 
ress. He has gained a competence through his own well directed efforts and is 
highly esteemed by all who come in contact with him. 



GEORGE DANIEL RADER. 

Among the successful and progressive farmers of Centerville precinct is 
George Daniel Rader, who was born in South P)end. Indiana, on the 23d of 
November, 1869. His father, Henry Rader. was born and educated in Germany 
but when nineteen years of age emigrated to the new world and located in New 
York city. He was employed in a slaughter-hotise there and subsequently removed 
to Indiana, where he engaged in farming near South Bend. He decided to try 
his fortune in the middle west, however, and became a pioneer settler of Rich- 
ardson county, Nebraska, but as the Indians were hostile he returned to Indiana, 
where he remained until 1878. He then again went to Richardson county, whence 
in 1S82 he came to Lancaster county and bought one hundred and twenty acres 
of railroad land on section 9, Centerville precinct. He brought his farm under 
cultivation and erected substantial buildings thereon and for many years con- 
centrated his time and energy upon its operation. In 1902 he retired from 
active life but continued to reside upon the farm until his death in 1906. He is 
buried in the Centerville cemetery. He was married in New ^'ork city to Miss 
Elizabeth Landau, who was born in Germany but came to the United States in 
her girlhood. She survives at the age of eighty-two years and still lives upon the 
home place. 

George D. Rader was reared in Richardson and Lancaster counties, and 
received his education in the district schools. He farmed for his father for 
some time and also rented land belonging to others, but in i(p5 went to Colorado 
and located near Fort Collins, Larimer county. After farming there for four 
years he returned to the home place in Lancaster count}- and has since engaged 
in raising stock and grain upon that farm. He thoroughly understands agri- 
cultural work and so manages his business affairs that his resources are con- 
stantly increasing. 

Mr. Rader was married in the Stockfeld church in Lancaster county on the 
3d of February, 1891, to Miss Kate Berkman, a native of Peoria, Illinois, 
who came to Lancaster county with her parents in 1877. To this union have been * 



364 LINCOLN AND Ly\NCASTER COUNTY 

horn I'lve children: Harry and Henry, hoth of whom are farming in Lancaster 
county ; Hukla and Dora, at home ; and Eunice, in school. .Ml of the children 
are natives of Lancaster county save Eunice, who was horn in Fort Collins, 
Colorado. 

Air. Rader supports the democratic party at the polls but otherwise has not 
been active in i)olitics. His religious faith is that of the German Lutheran 
church and in its teachings are found the principles which guide his life. His 
genuine worth is indicated in the fact that those who have known him the longest 
hold him in the highest esteem. 



ROY LUTHER TIGER. 

Roy Luther Tiger occupies the responsible position of cashier of the Lan- 
caster County Bank, in which connection he has made a creditable record, con- 
tributing in large measure to the growth and success of the institution. His 
efforts are intelligently directed and he is now acquainted with every phase of 
the banking business. He was born near Waverly, Nebraska, January 28, 1889, 
a son of John N. and Sarah ( Melick ) Tiger. The father is a native of High 
Bridge, New Jersey, born February 2~ . 1852, and tlie mother's birth occurred 
in Sunburv, Pennsylvania, Ajiril 5, 1847. John N. Tiger always devoted his 
attention to the occupation of farming and upon coming to Nebraska in 1867 
settled near Waverly, where he purchased land and carried on general agri- 
cultural ])ursuits. Year after year he carefully and systematically tilled the soil 
and develo])ed his property up to the time of his retirement in njij;, when he 
removed from his farm and went to make his home with his son, Roy L. His 
has been an active and useful life, crowned by success in business and by the 
regard and esteem of all with whom he has been brought in contact. For about 
five years he was engaged in the grain business in Waverly, begiiming in 1892. 
His wife passed away July 5, 191 1. 

Roy L. Tiger was the third in order of birth in a family of four children. He 
attended the public schools of Waverly, passing through consecutive grades to 
the high school, and for eighteen months he was also a student in the Wesleyan 
College. Through the i>criod of his boyhood and youth he gave his attention to 
agricultural interests but in 1907 embarked in the banking business at Waverly 
in coimection with the ],ancaster County P.ank. A year later he entered the 
Citizens State Bank at University Place in the employ of H. K. Frantz, with 
whom he remained for about a year. Pie was afterwartl connected with the 
Farmers Bank at Prairie Home for about eight months and at the end of that 
time he returned to Waverly, after which he reentered the Lancaster County 
Bank in the capacity of cashier, in which position he has since continued. He 
has thoroughlv acquainted himself with every phase of the banking business. He 
knows that the institution which most carefully safeguards the interests of its 
depositors is the most worthy of credit and support. Pie is ever a courteous and 
obliging official and thoroughly reliable in his business methods, holding to the 
highest standards. He is also a landowner, having a farm property in Lancaster 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 365 

county which he rents, but his entire time and attention arc devoted to the 
banking business. 

On the iJth of June, 1 91 2, Mr. Tiger was married to ^liss Pearl Snyder, 
who was born in Waverly. a daughter of EHas and Catherine (Kauffman) 
Sn}(ler. both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania, born near Reading. About 
18S0 they removed to Nebraska and the father, who became a landowner, engaged 
in farming, residing upon his farm until his death, which occurred in October, 
1888. His widow still resides on the old homestead there. Mrs. Tiger was the 
youngest of their family of seven children and was educated in the schools of this 
county. To ]\lr. and Mrs. Tiger has been born a daughter. Crystal Irene. 

Fraternally Mr. Tiger is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America. 
He belongs to the Lutheran church and he gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party, but he has never been an aspirant for ol¥ice, preferring to con- 
centrate his energies upon his business aflairs. The record of himself and his 
father has made the family name a synonym for business integrity and enterprise 
in the county. R. L. Tiger stands for all that is progressive in citizenship as 
well as in business and cooperates in many well defined plans for the city's 
upbuilding and improvement. 



HEXKV JOHN LUBBERS. 

Henry John Lubbers was one of the pioneer merchants of Holland, Nebraska, 
but is now living retired on his farm in South Pass precinct, enjoying a well 
deserved leisure. Plis birth occurred near Aalten, The Netherlands, on the i6th 
of July, 1839, and he is a son of Gerrit John and Helemina (Reusing) Lubbers, 
also natives of that country. The father, wlio was a farmer, passed away there 
in 1847, '"id the mother died when she had reached the advanced age of eighty- 
two years. 

Henry John Luljbers received his education in the public schools of his native, 
country and on reaching mature years turned his attention to farming. In 1866 
he came to the L'nited States and located near Cedar drove in -Sheboygan covmty, 
Wisconsin, wh.ere he worked by the month as a farm hand for three years. At 
the end of that time, in 1869, he came west to Nebraska, making the trip to 
Nebraska City by railroad and wagon. From that place he proceeded to .South 
Pass precinct, Lancaster county, and took up eighty acres on section 14, under 
the homestead law. He lived for a time in a dugout and devoted his attention 
to farming during that period, but in 1872 removed to the town of Holland, 
where he lived for some time. He finished proving up upon his farm by paying 
the government two hundred and two dollars. On his arrival in Holland he 
entered the employ of a IMr. Brethowwer, who kept a store here and who was 
joined in business in 1873 l^.V W ilhani Walvoord, the firm name being W'alvoord 
& Brethowwer. Later in that year Mr. Lubbers bought out Mr. Brethowwer's 
interest and the firm became Walvoord & Lubbers. He devoted his time to the 
conduct of the business until 1877, when he sold out to -Mr. Walvoord and took 
up his residence upon his homestead, where he lived until 1878. He then removed 
to a forty acre tract on section i, South Pass precinct, which he .had purchased 



366 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

from the railroad in 1S71, and in 1879 he built a commodious residence upon 
that property, where he still lives. ?Ic sold three and a half acres of the original 
forty acres lout subsequently bought additional land, so that the farm now com- 
prises one hundred and sixteen acres. He personally operated the jjlace for 
several years, but it is now rented to his son. In 18S3 he formed a partnership 
\vitli Henry \'an Diest and they established a store in 1 lolland, which they con- 
ducted successfully for a decade, but in 1892 they sold out to Mr. Walvoord. 
Since that date our subject has lived retired, save that he has engaged in cattle 
raising to a small extent. 

Mr. Lubljcrs was married in March, 1874. in Holland, Nebraska, to Miss 
Hattie Brummelstroate, who was born in Wynterswick, The Netherlands, on 
the 3d of February, 1851, of the marriage of Gradus and Harimena Uendina 
(Scholton) Brummelstroate, also natives of that country. They came to America 
in 1867 and in 1870 took up their residence in Lancaster county, Nebraska, 
where the father engaged in farming. He passed away near the town of Holland 
on the 31st of January, 1879, and the mother died in that town in November, 
1908. Both were buried in the cemetery there. Airs. Lubbers accompanied her 
parents to America in 1867, and for three years lived in Sheboygan county, Wis- 
consin, after which the fainily removed to Lancaster county, Nebraska. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lubbers have become the parents of five children: Dillia, the 
wife of James De Boer, a farmer of Panama precinct, this county; Gerrit, a 
merchant in Holland: Gesina, the widow of William H. Walvoord, who farmed 
on section 14, South Pass precinct; Annie, the wife of Gerrit Tan Hulsen, also 
a farmer of Lancaster county; and Henry John, who is operating the home 
place. 

Mr. Lubbers is a stanch adherent of the republican party and has earnestly 
discharged to the full all of the obligations resting upon him as a citizen. He 
served for many years as member of the school board of district No. 12, South 
Pass precinct, and for two years was tax assessor in that precinct. His religious 
faith is that of the Iveformed church, b'or more than four decades he has made 
his home in Lancaster county and he is therefore thoroughly familiar with its 
history, and it is a matter of justifialjle pride to him that he has had a share in 
its development along agricultural, mercantile, civic and moral lines. 



JOHN HOPLEY HARPER. 

John Hoplcv Harper was one of the most successful stock raisers of Nemaha 
precinct and brought his farm of three hundred and twenty acres to a high state 
of development. He gave particular attention to the raising of thorough- 
bred shorthorn cattle but also raised Duroc-Jersey hogs and P.uff Rock chickens. 
A native of London, England, he was born on the 4t]i of April. 1844, a son of 
Allen and Marv (Hopley) Harper. The father's birth occurred in England in 
1810 and he remained in that country until 1847, when he came to the United 
States and located in Woodford county, Illinois. After farming there for a 
number of years he became foreman of a packing house in St. Louis and in 1861 
enlisted for service in the P'nion army, remaining at the front until i8r)4. when 



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LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY :>,&.) 

he became sick with a fever and was sent to a hospital, where he found his 
son John also ill with a fever. Allen Harper participated in many of the most 
important engagements of the war and was twice wounded. On the conclusion 
of hostilities he returned to Woodford county, where he engaged in farming for 
many years. He was of a mechanical turn of mind and patented a number of 
useful devices, such as a revolving dining table and a fire-escape. In 1886 he 
became a resident of Jeti'erson county, Nebraska, and there he passed away a 
few months later. He married Miss Mary Hopley, a native of Woodford county,. 
Illinois, who also died in Jefferson county, Nebraska. 

John H. Harper was brought to the L'nited States when but three years of 
age and received his education in the common schools of Woodford county. 
For a number of years he was employed in a packing house in St. Louis and 
subsequently he farmed in Woodford county, Illinois, until the outbreak of the 
Civil war, when he became master of a mule train in the Union army and was 
with the troops for three years, or until he was taken sick with a fever in a 
southern army camp. He was confined to the army hospital for some time in 
1864, l)Ut later returned to the home farm in Illinois, where he recovered his 
health. He then again turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, cultivating 
land in W'oodford county, until 1879. He was successful and acquired a valuable 
tract of land there. In 1879 he removed to Carroll county, Iowa, where he 
rented a farm for three years, going to Shelby county, Iowa, in 1882. Four 
years later he removed to JeiTerson county, Nebraska, where he farmed until 
181)3. when he came to Nemaha precinct, and purchased the south half of 
section 17. The farm was partly improved when it came into his possession 
but he gave much time and money to its further development. He erected a 
fine modern home provided with all twentieth century conveniences and took 
great pride in keeping everything about the place in excellent condition. He 
engaged in stock raising and was known throughout the west as a breeder of 
thoroughbred shorthorn cattle, shipping to many different states. He also raised 
Duroc-fersey hogs and Buft' Rock chickens, and as he managed his affairs well 
his capital increased steadily as the years passed. He lived lieyond the 
Psalmist's three score years and ten but was still active and vigorous until a 
short time before his death, which occurred upon his farm on the 7th of 
February, 1916. He is buried in Rose Creek cemetery, near Fairbury, Nebraska. 
Mr. Harper was married in 1866 to Miss Sarah Matilda Kunkler, who was 
born on the 4th of January. 1846, in Clark county, Illinois, a daughter of Fred- 
erick and Mary (Keller) Kunkler. Her father was a native of Center county, 
Pennsylvania, and grew to manhood there. In 1845 he took up his residence in 
Clark county, Illinois, whence he subsequently removed to Woodford county. 
He owned land there and followed agricultural pursuits until 1873. when his 
death occurred. His wife was born in Pennsylvania in 1827 and passed away 
near LSloomington, Illinois, in 1870. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Harper, of whom five survive, namely: Alice Gertrude, who was born in 
Bureau county, Illinois, and who is now the wife of James Gregory, a retired 
farmer of Reynolds, Nebraska ; Mary Agnes, who was born in Bureau county 
and is the wife of Elmer \'arney. a merchant of Bennet : Alanson, also a native 
of Bureau county, now farming the homestead in Nemaha township, this county: 
Creighton, who was born in Woodford county, Illinois, and is now farming in 
Vol. n— I'j 



370 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

this county ; and Alpha Maude, who was born in Shelby county, Iowa, and is at 
home. 

Mr. Harper supported the republican i^arty at the polls but never took a 
very active part in politics as his stock raising interests demanded his undivided 
attention. He was highly respected for his enterprise and ability and also for 
his integrity, which was above question, and his personal characteristics were 
such that he gained a high place in the regard of those who were closely associated 
with him. His wife and a son and a daughter still reside upon the home farm in 
Nemaha precinct. 



HERBERT M. CUSHNELL. 

Herbert 'SI. Bushnell, publisher of the Lincoln Trade Review and formerly 
postmaster of Lincoln, Nebraska, was born at Moira, New York, July 20, 1855, 
a son of Martin and Charlotte P. (Clark) Bushnell. The Bushnell and Clark 
families settled in America before 1700 and were among the pioneers of Massa- 
chusetts and Connecticut, and their descendants settled in \'ermont more than a 
century ago. The Bushnells located at Williston, the Gloyds being at Jericho, 
the Clarks at Williston and the Lovejoy family at Royalton, and they were the 
great-grandparents of Herbert M. ISushnell. Two of the great-grandparents 
were soldiers in the Revolutionary army. Paul Clark, of the maternal side, 
served for eight years and live months under Generals Washington and Lafayette, 
and was with the former at Long Island, Trenton, Princeton and Monmouth and 
with the latter at the surrender of Yorktown. 

The early education of Herbert M. Bushnell was received in the school of 
his native village and the public schools of Mitchell county, Iowa, to which place 
his parents removed in 1868. Sulosequently he entered Cedar \'alley Seminary 
at Osage, Iowa, and graduated in 1877 ^^''^^ the honor of being president of his 
class. To defray the expenses of his tuition through the seminary he earned 
money by teaching school. Upon completion of h.is course of study he located 
at Fremont, Nebraska, where he was a schoolmaster for si-\ months, then, 
inclined toward journalism, he began newspaper work at Plattsmouth, Nebraska, 
where for eight years he published the Plattsmouth Enterprise and the Platts- 
mouth Herald. In 1886 he located at Lincoln and assumed charge of the Lincoln 
office of the Omaha Bee. Two years later, in connection with .-\1 G. Fairbrother 
and S. D. Co.x, he established the Daily and Weekly Call, which was conducted 
by them until i8()4. For the three succeeding years Mr. Bushnell was engaged 
in special newspaper work as traveling corresjiondent for the Nebraska State 
Journal. Since he first became a resident of Lincoln he has been active in the 
promotion of ])ublic enterprises and general improvement of the city. He was 
one of the promoters of the Union Commercial Club and served as a member 
of the board of directors. From 1889 to i8gi he was a member of the city 
council. In 1802 he was sent by President Harrison as a special representative 
of the department of state to the United States of Colombia. In politics he 
has always been a republican and for many years was a member of the state 
committee, was for three years chairman of the Lancaster county committee and 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 371 

chairman of the first congressional district committee for four j'cars. Ue was 
appointed postmaster of Lincohi by President McKinley for the four year term 
ending March i, 1902. He has been a member of the city library board and the 
board of education. In 1903 Mr. Bushnell established the Lincoln Trade Review, 
a commercial and financial paper that has become one of the most influential in 
its line in the west. For four years he was president of the State Association 
of Commercial Clubs and in all the years of his residence in Lincoln has been 
an active member of the Lincoln Commercial Club, and in the Rotary Club has 
been e(|ually active, representing the Lincoln Rotary at the international meeting 
in 1914. For the last two years he has been president of the Nebraska Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, in which organization he has been an 
active worker for many years. 

^Ir. Bushnell was married September 4, 1884, to Elsie N. Campbell, a 
daughter of Jesse and Matilda Campbell. They have five children : twin 
daughters, Ora E. and Charlotte M., both of whom are graduates of the Lincoln 
high school, of Monticello .Seminary in Illinois and of the University of Nebraska; 
and three sons, John D., Herbert M., Jr.. and George Dewey. John D. is con- 
nected with the publication of the Trade Review. Herbert M., Jr., a graduate 
of the law department of the University of Nebraska, has entered the legal pro- 
fession. George Dewey graduates the present year from the Lincoln high 
school. 



E. E. HOMRIG. 



E. E. Homrig, who makes his home in Lancaster precinct, was born in Ohio, 
]\Iarch 24, 1849, a son of Lewis and Sarah (Click) Homrig, who were also 
natives of the Buckeye state. The father was a physician and farmer who at an 
early day went to Indiana, where he practiced medicine and carried on general 
agricultural pursuits throughout the remainder of his life. It was in 1856 that 
he removed to that state and there he passed away in January, 1873, when fifty- 
five years of age. His widow long survived him, her death occurring August 
28, 1897. 

E. E. Homrig was a little lad of seven years when his parents removed to 
Indiana, in which state he was reared, remaining at home until he reached the 
age of twenty-seven, when he rented land and began farming on his own account. 
He followed that pursuit in Indiana until 1883, which year witnessed his arrival 
in Lancaster county, Nebraska, at which time he purchased land near Prairie 
Home, in Stevens Creek precinct. After cultivating that tract for four years 
he sold out and removed to Lancaster precinct, where he farmed for two years. 
He next established his home in Yankee Hill precinct and bought eighty acres on 
section 22. Immediately he began the further development of that place and has 
since cultivated it, covering a period of twenty-seven years. He has brought 
his land under a high state of cultivation, the fields annually produce good crops, 
and the neat and thrifty appearance of his place is an indication of his careful 
supervision and practical, progressive management. He is likewise a stockholder 
in the Lancaster Milk Producers' .Association of Lincoln. 



372 ■ LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Mr. Homrig was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Cooper, a daughter 
of Joseph and Ellen (Michaels) Cooper, who were natives of Indiana. The 
father was a minister of the L'nited llrethren church and engaged in teaching 
for forty-four years, most of the time in Indiana. He died in November, 1908, 
while his wife passed away at the age of seventy-eight years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Homrig were married on the 27th of September, 1877, and have become the 
parents of three cliildren; Laura, who was born September 5, 1879, ''"'^ '^ 
employed in the office of W. J. ISryan ; Sybil, who was born October 4, 1882, and 
married W. A. Westcott, of Lincoln; and Sarah E., who was born Eebruary C, 
1887, and died on the 28th of February, 1889. 

Mr. Homrig is the present assessor of his precinct and has filled that office for 
four years. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party ; his religious 
faith is that of the Congregational chtirch ; and his fraternal relations connect 
him with the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America. His 
life has been one of intense activity and throughout the entire period he has 
been identified with agricultural pursuits, winning his success along well defined 
lines of labor. 



ALLISON L. HUSTON. 

Allison L. Huston, who has built up a large business as a general merchant 
at Cheney, is also serving as postmaster of the town. He was born in Ohio, in 
August, 1866, of the marriage of James and Elizabeth (Russell) Huston, natives 
of Ohio. The father engaged in farming in that state until 1874 when he came 
to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and located upon a farm in Grant township, 
where he followed agriculural pursuits successfully for many years, but in 1901 
retired from active life and is now living in Cheney, at the age of eighty-three 
years. His wife has reached the age of eighty-six years. 

Allison L. Huston was reared and educated in this county, as he was but 
eight years of age when the family removed here. After completing his course 
in the business college at Lincoln he began farming on his own account and fol- 
lowed that occupation for fifteen years, but in 1900 came to Cheney and entered 
mercantile circles. He has since conducted a general store and has met with a 
gratifying degree of prosperity. He has erected the building in which his busi- 
ness is located and his patronage is large and representative. He carries a com- 
plete and well selected stock and his policy has always been to give full value 
for money received. 

Mr. Huston was married, on the i8th of March, 1903, to Miss Blanche 
Laird, daughter of J. B. and Julia (Davis) Laird, pioneers of Lancaster county. 
After farming here for many years the father retired and is now living in 
College View. The mother also survives. To Mr. and Mrs. Huston have been 
born two children : Homer B., at school ; and Bernice L. 

Mr. Huston supports the republican party at the polls and keeps well in- 
formed on the questions and issues of the day. Since January, 1901, he has filled 
the office of postmaster and his continuance in that position throughout a num- 
ber of administrations is proof of his ability and conscientiousness. He is iden- 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY '.iT-i 

tifiecl with the Lidependent Order of Odd Fellows and the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen and his religious faith is that of the United Brethren church. 
He has not only gained a large measure of iinancial success but has contributed 
to the commercial growth of Cheney, has supported movements seeking its 
civic advancement and in fact has in all respects proven a public spirited and a 
valuable citizen. For more than four decades he has resided in Lancaster county 
and is therefore familiar with the greater part of its history. 



NELLIE MAE VAN BURGH. 

Nellie Wae \'an Burgh, who was born at Cedar Grove, ITolland township, 
Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, received her early education in the common schools 
of Buda township, Lancaster county. Neliraska, and in the public schools of 
Hickman. Later she attended the Nebraska Wesleyan University at Lincoln 
and the School of Music of the Nebraska State University, from which she 
was graduated in 1906. For three years she was a member of the faculty of the 
Lincoln Musical College but now makes her home at Hickman with her mother. 
She is now teaching music privately in Hickman and Lincoln and has a large 
class as she is not only a hue pianist and organist but is also very capable in her 
work as a teacher. 



JOHN G. ADEN. 

John G. Aden is an enterprising young business man of Havelock, junior 
partner in the Aden Grain, Feed 1^ Coal Com[)any. He was born in Butler 
county, Nebraska, November 28, 1S85, and has always continued his residence 
in this state. Flis father, John IT. Aden, was born in Germany and married 
i'lilen Wisman, a native of Canada. In the year 1871 he came with his parents 
to Nebraska and has since resided in this state. For a long period he was suc- 
cessfully engaged in farming in Butler county, where he developed and improved 
a tract of land, making it one of the valuable farm properties of the district. 
To that occupation he devoted his energies until he put aside all business cares, 
since which time he has lived retired in University Place. 

John G. Aden was reared to farm life, having the usual experiences of the 
farm. Ijroughi up with the advantages of district school education and good home 
training. At length he jomed iiis uncle, Amos H. Aden, in business, entering 
into the present partnership relation on the ist of March, 1915, for the conduct 
of a grain, feed and coal business in Havelock. 

Air. -Aden was united in marriage to Miss Lulu M. Lucas, a native of Shelby, 
Nebraska, and they are well known in Havelock, where they have a large circle 
of warm friends, while the hospitality of the best homes is cordially accorded 
them. They are members of the Alethodist church and Mr. .Aden gives his 
political allegiance to the democratic party, believing that its principles contain 
the best elements of good goverimient. He belongs to the Alasonic lodge and 



374 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

to the Modern Woodmen of America. He stands for progress and improve- 
ment in public affairs and his influence is ever on the side of those interests 
which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. 



ALVm LESLIE iMAGEE. 

Alvin Leslie Magee has resided uiion the family homestead on section 23, 
Grant precinct, for thirty-four years, or during almost his entire life, and is 
now successfully operating that place. He was born in Grant precinct, on the 
27th of May, 1880, a son of John Rrophy and Florence \irginia (Stewart) 
Magee. The father was born near Marietta, Washington county, Ohio, on the 
24th of January, 1849, and there grew to mature years. His parents, Abner and 
Elizabeth Magee, were also natives of the Buckeye state. John Magee farmed 
there until 1874 when he removed to Lancaster county and began cultivating a 
tract of school land east of Lincoln, which he leased. Later he took up a home- 
stead in Edwards county, Kansas, but only remained there a year and a half at 
the end of which time he disposed of his claim and returned to Grant precinct, 
Lancaster county. He rented land for a time but as soon as possible purchased 
eighty acres on section 23, Grant i)recinct, which is still in possession of the 
family. -The place was totally unimproved when he purchased it, but he at once 
erected a small frame house which remained the family home for a considerable 
period, and he l)rought his land to a high state of cultivation. He was actively 
engaged in farming until his death, which occurred on the 4th of October, 180Q. 
and he is buried in Cheney. His wife was born near Marietta, Washington 
county, Ohio, on the 26th of July. 1853, and is a daughter of Joseph and Rebecca 
(Hammond) Stewart, both natives of Virginia. She is descended on both sides 
from the first families of the Old Dominion and is connected by ties of blood 
with many who have gained prominence in that state. Her father became an 
early settler of ( )hio and there slie was born and reared. She is still living and 
makes her home with her son, Alvin Leslie, who is the youngest of her three 
children, the others being: Norma Delia, the wife of Lewis B. Baker, a farmer 
of Grant precinct; and Ida May, the wife of George E. Rice, who is engaged in 
the live stock commission business in Kansas City, Missouri. 

Alvin Leslie Magee has passed his entire life in Lancaster county and received 
his education in the district schools and in a business college at Lincoln. For 
thirty-four years he has resided upon the family homestead and for several 
years has had charge of its operation. He is engaged in general farming, raising, 
not only grain, but also stock, including shorthorn cattle, horses and Poland 
China and Chester White hogs. He also gives some attention to dairying and 
all the branches of his work ;ire well managed and yield him a good financial 
return. ITe keeps in touch with the newest inethods and his progressiveness 
has been an nnportant factor in his success. The house which his father first 
built upon the farm is still standing but is not now in use. His own residence 
is an attractive modern home and everything about the place is kept in excellent 
condition. ITe was the prime mover in the organization of the Home Telephone 
Company, at Cheney, and is still a heav}" stocl<hol(Ier in that concern. 



LIX'COLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 375 

Mr. Magee was married at Omaha. Nebraska, on the 29th of June, 1903, to 
Miss Laura Cummings, who was born in Grant precinct, Lancaster county, on 
the i6th of June, 1886, and was reared and educated in this counly. She is a 
daughter of Edward S. and Katharine (Lewis) Cummings, a sketch of whom 
ajjpears elsewhere in this work. To Mr. and Mrs. Magee have been born four 
children, namely: Edna Louisa, born on tlie Qth of June, 1904; Harry Lee, 
born August 18, 1906; Jac Evans, l)orn October 13, 1910; and Hugh Everett, 
born December 29, 191 1. 

Mr. Magee is independent in politics, voting for the candidate whom he 
deems best fitted for the office, rather than supporting any one party. He served 
for three years as a director of the school board in district No. 83, and is always 
willing to cooperate in movemeiits for the public welfare. In religious faith he 
is a Baptist. In all relations of life he has measured up to high standards and 
his generosity and public spirit have gained him many warm friends. He is 
still a young man but through his industry and enterprise has gained a j)lace 
among the most substantial residents of his precinct. 



HARRY SMITH FREEMAN. 

The business interests of Lincoln find a well known and prominent repre- 
sentative in Harry Smith Freeman, the vice president of the First National Bank, 
whose residence in this city dates from 1882. He was born at the home of his 
maternal grandfather in Taylor county. \ irginia, October 29, 1861, his parents 
being William Howard and Mary Ellen (Smith) Freeman, who resided at 
Grafton, West Virginia. The latter was a daughter of Abraham and Amy 
(Knott) Smith, residents of Pruntytown, Taylor county, \'irginia. William 
Howard Freeman was born in Baltimore, Maryland, and belonged to one of the 
old families of that city. When the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was completed as 
far west as Grafton, West \'irginia, in the '50s he was in the service of that 
company and during the Civil war period he acted as its agent at Grafton. Fol- 
lowing the close of hostilities the Baltimore & Ohio was completed as far west 
as Clarksburg, West \"irginia, at which point he became agent. Soon afterward, 
however, he retired from the service of the railroad company and engaged in the 
banking business at Clarksburg, continuing active as one of the leading financiers 
of that place until the time of his death. For about thirty years prior thereto 
he was cashier of the West Mrginia Bank of Clarksburg and he passed away in 
that city a few years ago at the age of seventy-two. His widow. Mrs. ^lary 
Ellen Freeman, still occupies the old home at Clarksburg and is well preserved 
at the age of eighty-two. There were seven children in their family, three sons 
and four daughters, as follows: Amy, who passed away in 1877 at the age of 
twenty-one years ; MoUie, now Mrs. W. B. Osborn, of Clarksburg, West \'irginia ; 
Harry Smith, of this review; Emma, who resides with her mother at the old 
home: Minnie, also at home; William H., who is also yet at home with his 
mother; and Joseph C, of Columbus, Ohio. 

Harry Smith Freeman was reared in Clarksburg and obtained his early educa- 
tion m the schools of tliat place, while later he had the benefit of instruction in 



376 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

the L'nivcrsity of West Virginia at Morgantown, continuing his studies there 
until he reached the age of nineteen years, when he made his initial step in the 
business world, spending one year as clerk in a shoe store in Clarksburg. In 
1S82, when twenty years of age, he came to Lincoln, Nebraska, where he has 
since maintained his residence, covering a period of more than a third of a cen- 
tury. For two years he was employed as bookkeeper for the grain firm of S. W. 
Little & Company and for a year thereafter he was bookkeeper for the grain 
merchant, T. W. Lowry. In the fall of 1S85 he liccame bookkeeper in the State 
National Bank of Lincoln, which then stood on the southwest corner of Tenth 
and O streets, on the site of the present Terminal building. At that time Erastus 
E. Brown was president and Kent K. Hayden cashier of the bank. Various pro- 
motions came to Mr. Freeman and in 1892 he was made assistant cashier. Late 
in 1892 he accepted the position of assistant cashier in the First National Bank 
and has since been closely connected with the latter institution. In 1897 he was 
advanced to the position of cashier and served as such until 1914, since which 
time he has been the active vice president, aiding largely in shaping the policy 
and directing the interests of the bank, which is one of the substantial institu- 
tions of Lincoln, carefully safeguarding the interests of its depositors and con- 
ducting its business along legitimate and progressive lines. i\Ir. Freeman is also 
vice president of the First Trust Company of Lincoln and of the First Savings 
Bank of Lincoln. 

On the nth of November, 1893, in Lincoln, Mr. Freeman was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Maude Smith, of Lincoln, by whom he has three children, namely: 
William Howard, a young man of twenty-one, who is a graduate of the Culver 
Military Academy of Indiana and is now a bookkeeper in the First National 
Bank ; Margaret, who is now a student in the ]\Iartha Washington -Seminary of 
Washington, D. C. ; and Morton, a youth of thirteen who is a public school student 
in Lincoln. 

Fraternally Mr. Freeman is a Mason and he belongs to the Commercial Club 
and the Country Club. In politics he is a republican well versed on the questions 
and issues of the day, but he has never consented to become a candidate for public 
office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, in which 
he has met with substantial and gratifying success. His advancement is the 
merited reward of ability intelligently directed and a wise use of his time, talents 
and opportunities. 



ZALMON NICOLA. 



Zalmon Nicola, who is living retired in College V'iew, was formerly engaged 
in farming and gained gratifying success in that occupation. His birth occurred 
in West Virginia on the i8th of March, 1836, and he is a son of Jacob and 
Sarah (Cress) Nicola, natives respectively of Peimsylvania and \'irginia. The 
father, who was a farmer and blacksmith, went with his family to Ohio, where 
he remained until 1854, when he removed to Washington county, Iowa, where 
he purchased land which he operated until his death, on the nth of February, 
1876. His wife died in 1872. 









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PUc-i^ 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 379 

ZaIiiKin Nicola received his education in the puhlic schools of Ohio and 
Iowa and remained with his parents until he attained his majority. lie then 
rented land for a year, after which he purchased a farm in Washington county, 
which he cultivated for about twenty-five years. At the end of that time, or 
in 1890, he removed to College View, and was for two years engaged in general 
merchandising. Subsequently he was appointed postmaster, in which capacity 
he served for sixteen years, his long continuance in the office indicating the 
acceptability of his services. He is now living retired, enjoying a leisure made 
possible by his well directed labor in former years. He owns a fine home in 
College \'iew, two blocks east of the Seventh Day Adventist church, and also 
holds title to valuable business property. 

Air. Nicola was united in marriage, in June, 1859, to Miss ]\Iary A. Kinsey, 
a daughter of Samuel and Eliza (Long) Kinsey, both of whom were born in 
Pennsylvania. Her father was a tailor and also engaged in merchandising for 
a time and was likewise identified with agricultural pursuits. In the spring of 
1854 he removed with his family to Washington county, Iowa, and there pur- 
chased land which he operated for eight years. At the end of that time he returned 
to New York and lived there until his demise in March, 1885. He had survived 
his wife for almost six years, her death having occurred on the 8th of April, 
1879. Mr. and Mrs. Nicola have become the parents of four children, namely: 
Amos, who was born on the 12th of October, i860, and lives in Scotts Bluflf 
county, this state; Benjamin, who was born on the 12th of June, 1865, and is 
living in Massachusetts ; Charles C, who was born January 20, 1867, and for 
many years practiced medicine in Attleboro, Massachusetts, where he passed 
away February 6, 191 1 ; and Daniel, who was born on the loth of March, 1874, 
and is now manager of a sanitarium at Attleboro, Massachusetts. 

]\Ir. Nicola has supported the republican party since age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise. He served for some time on the town council and 
was honored by being elected the second mayor of College Mew. He has always 
regarded a public office as a public trust and his record as an official is a highly 
creditable one. For fifty-six years he has been a member of the Seventh Day 
Adventist church and his life has at all times been guided by the highest stand- 
ards of morality. He has done well the duties that lay closest at hand and has 
been recognized as a valued citizen of the communities in which he has lived. 
He has made his home in College View for many years and has won and held 
the friendship of those who have been closely associated with him. 



HENRY N.'XHLEY. 



Henry Nahley, who w^as engaged in farming in Saltillo jjrecinct at the time 
of his demise, was born near Bufifalo, New York, on the 27th of July, 1846, a 
son of Henry and Catherine Nahley. The father was born in Germany and 
remained there for a number of years after reaching maturity but at length 
emigrated to the United States and located near Bufifalo. New York. lie engaged 
in farming there until he decided to try his fortune in the middle west and 
removed to Stanton, Iowa. He devoted his attention to farming in that locality 



380 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

and passed away upon his homestead. His wife, who was also born in the father- 
land, made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Catherine Brown at llickman, 
Nebraska, until her death. 

Henry Nahley grew to manhood in New York and attended the common 
schools in the acquirement of his education. He assisted his father in the work 
of the farm in New York and also ga\e him the benefit of his services for a 
time after the removal of the family to the middle west. In i86g, however, he 
was married and began his independent career. Fifteen years later, in 1884, he 
came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land two miles east of Hickman. The pjace was under cultivation and 
was well improved when it came into his possession, but as the years passed he 
brought it to a still higher degree of development. He carried on general farming, 
raising both grain and stock, and both branches of his business returned him a 
good profit. He also purchased a half section near lilayden, which was a valu- 
able and well improved tract of land. He passed away in a hospital at Lincoln 
ill May, 1903, at the comparatively early age of fifty-si.x years. 

In i86g, at Chenoa, Illinois, occurred the marriage of Mr. Nahley and Miss 
Anna Liesveld. She was born in New York city on the 27th of October, 1850, 
and is a daughter of Richard and Martha (Fandertams) Liesveld. Her father 
was a native of Holland but when a young man of about twenty-five years crossed 
the Atlantic to America and located in New York city, whence he subsequently 
removed to Chicago. Still later he lived in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and on 
leaving that city engaged in farming near Rockville. Grant county, Wisconsin. 
His next removal was to the vicinity of Alalvern, Iowa, where he was overseer 
of a large farm. He passed away there and was buried at ^Malvern, although 
his body was later removed to Holland, Nebraska, and interred by that of his 
wife. She survived him for a number of years and came with her children to 
Lancaster county, Nebraska, locating on land which he had purchased near Hol- 
land several years before his demise. Her sons farm that ])lace and she made her 
home there until iSjq, when she was called to her reward. She was also buried 
at Holland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nahley became the ])areiits of twelve children, as follows : \\i\- 
liani Louis, who is farming in (irant county, Wisconsin: Martha Elizabeth, who 
is at home with her mother; Hattie May, the wife of Ernest Krouse. a black- 
smith of Grant county, Wisconsin ; Lydig., deceased ; Frank Edward, a farmer 
residing at Hickman ; Sarah, the wife of Carl Ewing, of Panama ; Lydia Johanna, 
the v\-ife of August Berkemeyer, a farmer of Blayden ; George Thomas, a car- 
penter residing at Malvern : Henry Andrew, who is farming in the vicinity of 
Hickman: Julia, at home with her mother: Ida Dreka, who married Earl Lock- 
hart, a farmer of Blayden : and Carrie, the wife of B. E. J. Garner, who is fanning 
near Hickman. 

Mr. Nahley supported the republican jiarty and kept well informed as to 
the issues before the people but was not an aspirant for public ofSce. He held 
membership in the German Lutheran church in his early life but later identified 
himself with the Dutch Reformed church. He measured up to the highest 
standards of manhood, and his friends still cherish his memory. He was suc- 
cessful in his chosen occupation, gaining a gratifying measure of prosperity 
through his industry and good management. In 1914 his widow removed to 



LINCOLN AND LANXASTER COUNTY 381 

Hickman and built a commodious two story home with all modern improvements 
in Garner's addition and there she now resides. She has a wide acquaintance 
and is respected by all who know her. 



HENRY CHRISTIAN TIEDEMANN. 

Henry Christian Tiedemann, who engaged in farming on section (>, South 
Pass precinct, was not only respected because of his ability and energy but was 
also held in warm regard because of his many excellent qualities of character. A 
native of Germany, he was born in Schleswig-Holstein, on the 4th of April, 1847, 
and his parents were John Peter and Annie ( Kohrn ) Tiedemann, also natives of 
t'.iat country. The father devoted his life to farming and passed away in Ger- 
many in 1885. He had long survived his wife, whose demise occurred in 1864. 

Hcnr)' C. Tiedemann received his education in the public schools of his native 
land and during his boyhood and youth was trained to agricultural work. In 
1 87 1 he served in the German army, seeing active service throughout the entire 
Franco-Prussian war. In 1873 he emigrated to America, having heard much 
concerning the splendid opportunities offered to the ambitious young men in this 
comparatively new country, and he at once came west locating in Chicago. He 
found employment as teamster for a wholesale feed company and remained with 
that firm for seven years. At the end of that time he determined to again engage 
in farming and accordingly came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and bought 
eighty acres on section 6, South Pass precinct, and forty acres across the road 
in Buda township. His land was partly improved when it came into his posses- 
sion, and he at once began to still further develop the place. In 1889 he remod- 
eled the house, and from time to time he added to the farm buildings. In 1892 
he purchased an additional eighty acres on section 7, and later he acquired title 
to a hundred and sixty acres on section 36. Centerville precinct. In igi2 he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres in Iluda precinct, which is now farmed 
by his son, Edward J. Pie kept all of his land in a high state of cultivation and 
derived a gratifying income from his farming operations. He was practical and 
thorough in all that he did and was also progressive, being willing to discard old 
methods for new when the latter had proved their value. Pie gained a gratifying 
measure of financial success and was recognized as one of the leading agricul- 
turists of his township. 

Mr. Tiedemann was married on the 28th of June, 1874, in Chicago, Illinois, 
to INIiss Magdelena Buhmann, who -sxas l)orn in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, on 
the 15th of October, 1848. She received her education in that country and 
remained there until 1873, when she came to .America and located in Chicago. 
Her paternal grandfather, John Jacob Buhmann, was born in Schleswig-Holstein, 
where he passed his entire life and his wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Matilda Johnsen, died there in 1881. -She too was a native of that country. 
Their son, John Jacob Buhmann, was born there on the 17th of June, 1817, and 
after completing his education engaged in farming. His demise occurred in his 
native land on the 7th of January, 1882. He married ^liss Margaret Schuh- 
macher. who passed away in Schleswig-Holstein on the 22d of October, 1892. 

I 



382 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

Among their children is Mrs. Tiedemann, who has hecome the mother of six 
children, namely : Edward Johannes, who is farming near Princeton, Lancaster 
county; Otto Peter, also a resident of this county: Clara Catherina, the wife of 
Henry H. Schnutte, who is farming in Lancaster county ; Emma ALitilda, the 
wife of Leon Egger, a farmer of this county; Emil Henry, who is farming the 
home place; and Ericda Magdalena, the wife of Llenry Leosing, a farmer of 
this county. 

Mr. Tiedeniimn supported the republican party at the j)olls but was not an 
aspirant for public office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his farm 
work. He held a membership in the Lutheran church and its teachings guided 
his life. He jiassed away August 25, 1915. He measured up to the highest 
standartls of manhood, and his memory is held in honor by all who came in con- 
tact with him. His wife still resides upon the homestead and is a woman of 
many fine qualities, having a host of sincere friends. 



CORNELIUS PORTER BECK. 

Lancaster county is ])rimarily an agricultural county and its rich soil is the 
chief source of its wealth. Among those who are successfully engaged in farming 
is Cornelius Porter Beck of Panama precinct. A native of Pennsylvania, he 
was born near Latrobe, Westmoreland county, on the 6th of August, i860. His 
parents, Peter and Sarah (Moore) Beck, were both born in Allegheny comity, 
Pennsylvania, tlie former on the i6th of November, 1827. After completing his 
common school education, the father worked in the coal mines for a time and 
later farmed for Peter Socksman in \\'estmoreland county. In 1861, however, 
he came west, locating in Grant county, Wisconsin, where he operated rented 
lands until the spring of 1869. He then removed by wagon to Lancaster county, 
Nebraska, and settled on a homestead on Salt Creek in Saltilio township, which 
he had taken up in the fall of the preceding year. His place comprised eighty 
acres on section 27,, Saltilio township, and he at once began to break the prairie 
sod. During the first summer the family lived in a tent, but in the fall he built 
a sod house and in the spring of 1870 erected the first frame house built on a 
hill in Lancaster county, all of the other frame houses having been built in the 
valleys. Lie engaged in farming his homestead until 1893 when he retired and 
took up his residence in Hickman where he built a substantial frame dwelling. 
He still lives there and is highly esteemed by his fellow citizens. In addition 
to his homestead, he owns eighty acres east of that place. 

Cornelius Porter Beck began his education in Grant county, Wisconsin, and 
continued it in the public schools of Lancaster county, as he was but nine years 
of age when the family removed here. As a boy he also assisted his father witli 
the farm work and after obtaining his majority remained at home for a number 
of years, aiding in the operation of the farm. Following his marriage in 1889 
he rented a farm in Saltilio township and for eleven years he cultivated land 
belonging to others. In 1899, however, he bought eighty-three acres in the north- 
east corner of section 4, Panama township. That place was improved when it 
came into his possession, but he has brought it to a still higher state of develop- 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 383 

ment and gives his entire attention to its operation. He raises botli grain and 
stock and derives a good return from both branches of his business. 

Mr. Beck was married on the 13th of March, 1889, at Holland, this county, 
to !Miss Louisa Theade, who was born near Muscoda, Grant county, Wisconsin, 
on the 22d of August, 1870. When she was twelve years of age she came to 
Nebraska with her parents, August and Minnie (Krouse) Theade. Her father 
was born in Germany, on the i8th of Septemljer, 1840, but when still a boy 
emigrated to the United States and located in Grant county, Wisconsin, where 
he farmed for many years. After removing to this county, he followed agricul- 
tural pursuits here for four years, but in 1886 homesteaded land on Yellow 
Stone river, in Custer county, Montana, where he is still living. His wife is a 
native of Wisconsin and her birth occurred in 1850. Mr. and Mrs. Beck have 
four children. Earl Clifton, who was born on the 7th of x\pril, 1891, is a 
graduate of the State University of Nebraska, and is now completing his work 
for the degree of Master of Arts in that institution. Ray Porter was born on 
the loth of March, 1893, and is farming with his father. Hazel Lura was born 
on Christmas day of 1899, was educated in the public schools and is at home. 
Floyd Pierce, the youngest of the family, was born on the 23d of February, 1910. 

Mr. Beck supports the republican party at the polls, but has never been an 
aspirant for political office. He concentrates his energies upon the operation of 
his farm and his well directed labors are rewarded with a gratifying measure 
of success. He is recognized as a progressive and efficient agriculturist and his 
jiersonal characteristics are such that he has gained many warm friends. 



WILIJAM H. BIRDSALL. 

William H. Birdsall was formerly a hardware dealer in \\'averly but is now 
concentrating his energies upon the real estate and insurance business. He was 
born in the province of Ontario, Canada, on the 4th of January, 1863, a son of 
Henry C. and Harriet M. (Park) Birdsall, also natives of the Dominion, the 
former born in 1829 and the latter in 1833. The father came to Lancaster 
county, Nebraska, in 1882 and located uiion a farm, which he at once began to 
develop and improve. In 1884 he was joined by his family and engaged in 
farming in Mill precinct until his death, which occurred in 191 1. His home- 
stead was located on the old }^Iormon trail near the old Graham mill which was 
for many years a landmark in that section of the county. The mother still sur- 
vives and resides upon the home farm. 

William H. Birdsall, who is the second in order of birth in a family of nine 
children, received his education in Canada and remained at home until he was 
twenty-three years of age. He then began farming in Mill precinct, but after 
a mnnber of years devoted to agricultural pursuits removed to \\'averly and 
engaged in the hardware business. He was successful in that connection and in 
1914 and 191 5 erected a modern and substantial business block, in which he con- 
ducted his store until he disposed of the jjroperty in the spring of 1916. He 
is now devoting his entire time to insurance and real estate and is Iniilding up a 
large business along those lines. He is thoroughly informed as to realty values 



384 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

and as to the property upon the market and has negotiated many important sales. 
He has also written a large number of insurance policies and represents only 
thoroughly reliable concerns. He owns city property in University Place and in 
Waverly and also holds title to farm lands in western Nebraska. 

In February, 1897, Mr. Birdsall was married to Miss Minnie S. Hall, who 
was born in McGregor, Clayton county, Iowa, and is a daughter of Cyrus S. and 
Lucina i^Rowenj Hall, natives respectively of New York and New Hampshire. 
The father, who was a farmer by occupation, removed with his family to Red 
Oak, Iowa, and later to Greenwood, Nebraska, where he passed away in 19 12, 
at the age of eighty-one years. His wife died in August, 1915, when seventy- 
eight years old. IMr. Hall was an enthusiastic ]\Iason and was a charter member 
of the lodge at Greenwood, where he served as worthy master. He was also 
identified with the commandery at Red Oak and held the office of eminent com- 
mander. j\Ir. and ]\Irs. Birdsall have two children: Henry C., who was born on 
the 22d of July, 1902; and Adeline E., born on the 19th of December, 1905. 

Mr. Birdsall is a democrat and has held a ntunber of local offices although not 
a politician in the usual sense of the term. He belongs to the Congregational 
church and is well known in fraternal circles, being identified with Unity Lodge, 
No. 163, A. F. & A. M. at Greenwood, the Scottish Rites bodies and the Mystic 
Shrine at Lincoln; the Ancient Order of LTnited Workmen, of which he is past 
master workman ; the Modern U"oodmen of America : and the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, in which he has held all of the chairs. In his dailv life he exem- 
plifies the spirit of fraternity and nuitual helpfulness, upon which those orders 
are founded, and he is popular personally. 



WILLIAM P. AYLSWORTH. 

William P. Ayisworth was one of the founders of Cotner University at 
Bethany and was for many years president of the institution, but has nov.- reached 
an age when he considers himself entitled to a period of leisure and has therefore 
given over the active direction of the school to others and holds the office of 
chancellor emeritus and is also head of the department of Biblical literature and 
ministerial training. He was liorn in Lake county, Illinois, on the 12th of 
December, 1844, and is a son of John and Ann F. (Freeman) Avlsworth, the 
former a native of Rhode Island and the latter of New York. In 1833 th^ 
family removed to Chicago and the father became foreman of the first printing 
office of that place, a position which he tilled for a nuniher of years. Subse- 
quently he purchased land in Lake county and devoted the remainder of his life 
to its oi)eration. He passed away in March, 1902, after having survived his 
wife for many years, as she died in January, 1886. They were the parents of 
two chUdren : John, a minister, who tlied at -\uburn. New York, in 1008: and 
William P. 

The latter was reare<l in his native county and after completing courses 
ofTered in the public schools, attended Chicago L'niversity and was subsequently 
a student in Bethany College in West \'irginia. graduating therefrom with the 
class of 1869. He then began the work of the nu'nistry and was stationed at 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 385 

South Rend. Indiana, and in other towns in that state. He also had cliarge of 
a church at Cokimbus, Ohio, but in 1886 he came to Nebraska and for two years 
was president of l^airliekl College, which later merged with Cotner University. 
In 1889 he located in the town of Bethany and aided in organizing Cotner Univer- 
sity, of which he was vice president until 1896, when he was made chancellor. 
lie dischartjed the duties of that office with marked ability until 1910, when he 
retired from the active management of the institution and was made chancellor 
emeritus and head of the department of Biblical literature and ministerial 
training. He has given many of the best years of his life to the upbuilding of the 
University and the school owes him a debt of gratitude which can never be 
repaid, for it is especially true of an institution of learning that its development 
depends upon the personality of the men at its head. He has the satisfaction 
of knowing that he has done well a work that is worth while and he is held in 
the highest esteem wherever known. He has also gained a gratifying measure 
of material prosperity and was a director and stockholder in the First State 
Bank of Bethany and also owns considerable property which he rents and from 
which he derives a substantial return. His residence is commodious and well 
designed and situated in L'niversity Place. 

!Mr. Aylsworth was married in December, 1872, to Miss Mary D. .Stuzaker 
and to them were born four children, as follows: Raymond G., wdio is in charge 
of the civil engineering work of the Chicago. I'lUrlington & Ouincy Railroad at 
Denver, Colorado; Clara F., the wife of Cleveland Kleihauer, a graduate of 
Cotner L'niversity and pastor of the L'niversity church at Seattle. Washington ; 
and John W. and William S., the former of whom died in 1885 and the latter 
in 1875. 

Mr. Aylsworth is a stanch advocate of the republican principles and supjiorts 
candidates of that party at the polls. While living in Ohio he was chaplain of 
the house of representatives. He belongs fraternally to the ]\Iodern Woodmen of 
America and to Phi Kappa Psi. He is one of the leading members of the 
Christian church in Nebraska and Ijoth as a minister and as an educator has 
done much to further the best interests and increase the influence of that denom- 
ination. He has done considerable writing and is the author of a work upon 
Hebrew prophecy, which is in use as a textbook in his own and other institu- 
tions. 



ALBERT F. STERN. 



Albert F, Stern, who holds title to a good farm in Grant precinct, was born 
in Germany in December. 1862, a son of William and Amelia Stern, also natives 
of tiie fatherland, where the former farmed for many years. .At length, how- 
ever, the family came to America and located in Lancaster county, Nebraska, 
v.-here the father cultivated a tract of good land for six years. He passed away 
in i8cj8 and the mother survived until 1910. 

Albert F. Stern was reared in Germany and received his education in the 
public schools there. When twenty-two years old he came to .America and 
located in Ohio, where he followed the carriagemaker's trade for two years. He 



886 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

then came to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and for fifteen years was in the 
employ of Camp Brothers, carriage makers of Lincohi. At the end of that time 
he removed to Alontana, where he spent three years, but at the expiration of 
that period he returned to Lancaster county and bought eighty acres of land on 
section lo, Grant precinct, which he farmed for a number of years, bringing 
this to a high state of development. The farm is now rented to others and the 
family reside at the corner of Ninth and H streets, in College View. 

JMr. Stern was married, in April, i88g, to ^liss Marie Pump, a daughter of 
Frederick and Dorothy (Eldenburg) Pump, natives of Germany, who came to 
America when children with their respective parents. The father became a 
pioneer of Lancaster county and under the homestead law took up land which 
he is still operating. He served in the Civil war with a regiment of Ohio infantry 
under General Sherman and was with the colors for four years, proving his 
loyalty to his adopted country. The mother died in 1902. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Stern have been born four children : Anna, the wife of T. S. Johnson, of Lincoln ; 
and Carl, Alma and Esther, all at home. The family are Lutherans in religious 
faith. They are well known throughout the county and are held in high esteem. 



MADISON WILLAN. 



Madison W'illan was for many years engaged in farming but is now living 
retired and s])ends part of his time upon the homestead- and ])art with his sons 
in Lincoln. He was born near Lockport, Henry county, Kentucky, on the 5th 
of September. 1847, a son of George and Delphi (Cox) Willan. His father was 
born in Yorkshire, England, on the 21st of February, 1816, and resided there 
until 1845 when he emigrated to the new world, landing in New York on the 
27th of April. On the 5th of April, 1857, he became a resident of Clay county, 
Indiana, and there lived for over forty years, dying on the 5th of August, 1901. 
He was married to Miss Delphi Cox, of Henry county, Kentucky, but sh'^ passed 
away July i, 1856. On the 2d of November, 1862, he was united in marriage to 
Miss Magdalena Retifett, of Clay county, Indiana, who died February 2, 1900. 
From that time until his demise he made his home with his son, A. J. 

Madison Willan was reared near ISrazil, Indiana, and received his education 
in the public schools of that locality. In 1S65, when about eighteen years of 
age, he went to McLean county, Illinois, and rented land near Bloomington. 
In 1883 he came to Lancaster county, arriving here on the nth of March, and 
he bought eighty acres on section 32, Nemaha precinct, which had been taken up 
by John Elrod as a homestead and was well improved. Mr. Willan moved the 
house to a new location, added a second story and also erected barns and out- 
buildings. He fenced the farm and made many other imi)rovements, bringing 
it to a high state of development. He concentrated his energies ujjon the opera- 
tion of his place and as the years passed his capital steadily increased. In 191 1 
he retired from farming and rented his land. He still retains his residence on 
the farm but spends part of his time with his son in Lincoln. In addinon to his 
homestead he holds title to eighty acres of improved land near Pisgah, Harrison 
countv, Iowa, which he rents. While actively engaged in agricultural pursuits 




MADISON WILL AN 



UiiuiL- 



ASTOB, fNOJC 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 389 

he raised grain and also stock, feeding large herds of cattle annually. At one 
time he owned a tine herd of Jersey cattle, hut sold them and turned his attention 
to raising other hreeds. 

On the i8th of January, 1872, Mr. Willan was united in marriage to Miss 
Jane Richardson, at lUoomington, McLean county, Illinois. She was horn in 
Dumfriesshire, Scotland, on the 5th of April, 1850, a daughter of Mathew and 
Christina (Nichol) Richardson, also natives of Scotland. The family came to 
America in 185 1, settling near Bloomington, Illinois, where the father engaged 
in raising cattle on a large scale. He passed away ahout i(jo8 upon the home- 
stead and is buried at Bloomington His wife died about 1904. Mrs. Willan 
was reared in McLean county, THinois, and was indebted for her education to 
the [Aiblic schools of that county. She was called by death on the 22d of March, 
1914, and is buried near Panama. She was the mother of four children, as 
follows: Lafayette was born near Bloomington, Illinois, on the 7th of May, 1875, 
and is now a nioving picture operator of Lincoln. Bessie Leola was born near 
Bloomington, on the 23d of January. 1884, and became the wife of John Everett 
Betzer. a farmer of Lancaster county, on the 23d of August, 1902. She died at 
the Lincoln Hospital on the 22d of November, 1914. Eugene and Geneva, twins, 
born on the home place in Nemaha precinct, October 14, 1890, died on the 17th 
of (October and are buried in the Hickman cemetery. 

Mr. Willan is a stalwart democrat in politics and for two years served as 
school director in McLean county. He holds membership in liennet Lodge, 
No. 94, A. F. & A. yi.. and has been through all the chairs in that order. He 
is also a member of Carnation Chapter, No. 196, O. E. S., of Bennet, of which 
he is past patron. His wife was also identified with that cha])ter. He is a 
member of the Christian church and in all relations of life has sought to conform 
his conduct to high standards of morality. The success which he has gained is a 
direct result of his industry and good judgment, and the leisure which he now 
enjoys is well deserved. 



P. J. BENTZ, D. D. S. 



Dr. P. J. Bentz has lieen successfully engaged in the practice of dentistry in 
Lincoln for the past sixteen years and enjoys an enviable reputation as one of 
the most efficient representatives of the profession here. His birth occurred at 
Mount Top, York county, Pennsylvania, on the 28th of February, 1872, his 
parents being Andrew G. and Catherine (Hershey) Bentz, also natives of that 
county. The family came to Nebraska in 1S83, settling on a farm in Saunders 
county, where the father was actively identified with general agricultural pursuits 
for three decades. He is now living in honorable retirement at Ashland, 
Nebraska. 

P. J. Bentz was reared on the home farms in Pennsylvania and Nebraska 
and in the acc|uirement of an education attended public schools and the \\'esleyan 
University. Having determined upon a professional career, he pre])ared for 
the practice of dentistry as a student in the Kansas City Dental College and 
following his graduation spent a year at Phillipsburg, Kansas. In 1900 he came 



390 LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 

to Lincoln and has since occupied a suite in the First National Bank building 
here. A gratifying and growing practice has been accorded him as he has demon- 
strated his skill and he has long been recognized as one of the foremost represen- 
tatives of his profession in the city. He is a valued member of the Lancaster 
County Dental Society. 

In early manhood Dr. Bentz was united in marriage to Miss Marie Ethel 
Turk, a native of Illinois, who was at that time a resident of L^niversity Place, 
to which town she had accompanied her parents when ten years of age. They 
now have one child, Dorothy Edith, who is in her first year. Their religious 
faith is indicated by their membership in the St. Paul Methodist church. His 
life is exemplary in every respect and his many excellent traits of character have 
won him high regard. 



FRANK ARTHUR PHILLIPS. 

Frank Arthur Phillips has devoted his life to agricultural pursuits and has 
never had occasion to regret his choice of an occupation as he has gained a grati- 
fying measure of success. He resides upon the family homestead on section 2, 
Panama township, to which he holds title. He was born on the loth of February, 
1863, near Grangerberg, Medina county, Ohio, a son of William and Alice 
(Carr) Phillips, the former born in Devonshire, England, on the 27th of IMarch, 
1834. The father attended the public schools of his native country in the 
acquirement of an education and later farmed there until 1S55. In that year he 
emigrated to .America and located in Medina county, Ohio, purchasing land near 
Grangerberg. On the 9th of March, 1885, he came to Lancaster county, and 
purchased a quarter section of land on section 2, Panama township, which was 
at that time partially improved. He brought his farm to a high state of develop- 
ment and until 1894 devoted his time to its operation, but in that year retired 
from active life and built a home in Panama. There he lived for twenty-one 
years but on the 14th of September, 1915, he departed this life. He is buried in 
the Panama cemetery. He was married on the 4th of j\Iay, 1861, in Granger- 
berg, to Aliss .Alice Carr, whose birth occurred in Stark county, Ohio, on the ist 
of May, 1844, and whose parents were Joseph and Lucy ( Whetmore ) Carr. Mrs. 
Phillips was reared and educated in her native state. Following her husband's 
demise she went to Lincoln and is now making her home there with her daughter, 
Mrs. John P. Christopher. 

Frank A. Phillips received a good common school education in ^ledina county, 
Ohio, and as a boy and youth also gained valuable training in farming through 
assisting his father. He accompanied the family to Panama township, Lancaster 
county, and rented his father's farm on section 2, which he purchased in 1894, 
when his father removed to town. He still resides upon that place and the excel- 
• lent condition in which everything is kept testifies to his energy ana carerul 
management. He raises both grain and stock but gives especial attention to 
sheep raising, which he carries on quite extensively. He also owns a two hun- 
dred and forty acre tract of land in Hale county, Texas, a well improved place, 
which is now l)eing operated Ijy his son. 



LINCOLN AND LANCASTER COUNTY 391 

yir. Phillips was married on Christmas day of 1885, at Sharon, Ohio, to Miss 
Eltie Goodwin, who was horn in that town on the 20th of [■"ebruary, 1865, and 
is a daughter of Russell and Jane (Calvert) Goodwin. Her father was also a 
native of Sharon and his natal day was April 14, 1841. He was educated at 
Sharon and engaged in farming in that locality until his death, which occurred 
in i'j04. Llis wife was born in England on the loth of April, 1841, but was 
brought to the United States in 1843 and grew to womanhood in Sharon, where 
hi.-r parents located. She now makes her home with a daughter who lives in that 
town. Mrs. Phillips received a good common school education in Sharon. She 
has one son, Ray Arthur, who was born on the homestead on the 29th of January, 
1894. He attended the schools of Panama township and after putting aside 
his textbooks was associated with his father in farming until 1916, when he 
removed to Plainview, Hale county, Texas, where he is now following agricul- 
tural pursuits. 

Mr. Phillips is an adherent of the democratic party, takes an active part in 
political affairs and his advice is often sought on questions relating to party cam- 
paigns in his section. He has been a member of the school board of district No. 
132, Panama township, for eighteen years and his inliuence has been a factor 
in the advancement of public education there. In his early manhood he taught 
for a year in Medina county, Ohio, and he has never ceased to feel the keenest 
interest in educational affairs. He has also served as justice of the jieace of 
Panama township since 1912. Fraternally he is well known, having belonged 
for twenty-three years to Panama Camp, No. 2227, JNI. W. A., of which he is a 
charter member, and in which he has held several offices ; to Dunaverty Castle, 
No. 31, R. H., of Panama, to which he has belonged for nineteen years, being 
a charter member, and in which he has filled a number of the chairs : and to 
Panama I^odge, I. (J. O. F., at Panama, with which he has been identified for 
three years. His wife is a member of the Bennet Camp of the Royal Neighbors 
ar.d is an oflicer in that organization. Both are members of the Presbyterian 
church and its principles guide them in their daily lives. Mr. Phillips is not 
only a progressive farmer and stock-raiser but is also a good business man and 
manages his affairs so that his capital is constantly increasing. 



ERNEST M. BAIR. 



Ernest M. liair, who is aljly filling the position of cashier of the Citizens 
State Bank of University Place, was born in b^illmore county, Nebraska, on the 
15th of January, 1877, a son of Samuel and Eleanor ( French) Pair. The father 
was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, his father being Samuel Bair, also a 
native of the Keystone state, where he died when about seventy years of age. 
Onr sul)ject"s grandmother, later married Ezekiel Horton. He was a farmer 
by occupation and met with gratifying success. His wife reached seventy-seven 
years of age