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Full text of "Lion, The"

THE LION 




^Wkajt HVes %mmw& 



memoue& 



jay 

toue/ ptiends/ 

experience/ 

good leadens/ 

wisdom/ 

loAte/ 

imdeastomliitq/ 

family/ 

opportunity/ 

matu/tiAAj/ 

tifa 

sAating/ 

lewuMMcy 

hope/ 

paixioUsm/ 

happiness/ 






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What We Treasure 



2 




Ch erish ed A lem ories 

1 2 

Value Your Goals 

44 



'tomtoms/ 

Wealth ot Knowledge 

5 6 

Going lor the Prize 

9 8 

Our Pride and Joy 

1 36 



1 80 

EAST MISS. COMM. COLLEGE 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lionthe2002east 







EAST MISSISSIPPI 

EMCC 



COMMUNITY COLLEGE 



Scoobr Campus 

Highway 16 West 
Scooba, MS 39358 
662-476-8442 



Golden Triangle 

8731 S. Frontage Road 

Mayhew, MS 39753 

662-243-1900 





Meridian Nruhl Air Station 

1155 Rosenbaum Avenue 
NAS Meridian, MS 39309 
601-679-3570 



Columbus Rir Force Brse 

14 MSSQ/MSE 

Columbus, MS 39710 

662-434-2660 





Macon Extension 

Highway 45 
Macon, MS 39305 
662-726-4225 



EAST MISS. COMM. COLLEGE LIBRARY 



9LJ2, 



•ton 



^I/olume 68 



QOOQ 



"The faculty and 
staff are treasures 
that you do not 
realize when you 
first arrive at 
EMCC," said Kati 



Opening 



Fleming, a student 
on the Scooba 
Campus. "But 
after just a couple 
of weeks of 
attending classes, 
you begin to see 
that these people 
really care about 
you - they want to 
help, and they 
want you to learn. 
Most of the teach- 
ers treasure their 
students, realizing 
that, for the most 
part, they have 
wonderful young 
adults entrusted to 
their guidance. " 



Above right, 
Casey Abrams, 
Hayley 
Ballard, Jana 
Moss, Krystal 
King, Marcella 
Jones, Austyn 
Gordon, Alexis 
Hutchinson, 
and Katie 
Richards rest 
after a hard 
day at soccer 
practice. 

Right, Michael 
Oliver, 
Chandra 
Foard, and 
Mario Thomas 
enjoy the 
afternoon in 
front of the 
Student Center 
on the Scooba 
Campus. 



Here at East Mississippi Community 
College, there are several things that we 
treasure. From special times spent with 
friends, to caring, devoted teachers, every- 
where you turn there are hidden treasures. 
Every day at EMCC you encounter something 
new that would be considered a treasure in 
someone's eyes. 

Our president, Dr. Tommy Davis, is some- 
one we all should treasure. He is entirely 
devoted to our school, having graduated 
from EMCC himself back in 1 954. It was he 
and our board of trustees that turned the col- 
lege around twelve years ago, saving the col- 
lege and increasing the enrollment over two 
hundred percent. The administration should 
also be treasured for the leadership they pro- 
vide and for achieving the goals they set for 
our college. Whether financial, educational, 
or emotional support is needed, students are 
given an opportunity for success. 

Adding to the list of treasures is not hard, 
especially when you think about the five dif- 
ferent locations EMCC offers its students. 
The Scooba campus - the main campus - is a 
special place where students get a taste of 
history by attending classes in some of the 
same buildings their parents did. 

Then there is the Golden Triangle campus 
at Mayhew, located in the Lowndes County 
prairie. Here the students get to choose 
among a wide variety of academic, technical, 
and career courses. The Columbus Air Force 
Base extension caters to military personnel, 
but also serves hundreds of civilians from the 
surrounding area. The fourth location, the 
Meridian Naval Air Station Extension, serves 
primarily military personnel, but has civilian 
students as well. An academic night exten- 
sion is also located in Macon. 

Treasures are found everywhere one might 
turn at EMCC. Some students might not 
treasure the same things that their friends 
do, but all in all, the days spent at EMCC 
should be a treasured time in life. 

- Linda Sciple 




Opening 

■ 2 " 




MM 



Top, resting 
between classes, 
Maranda Latham 
and Tyler Lofton 
talk about the foot- 
ball game. 

Middle, Alisha 
Acker and Lauren 
Hester talk to Mr. 
Salter about their 
tests. 

Immediatly above, 
Constance Logan 
and Eric Jones 
enjoy a game of 
pool. 



Opening 

" 3 " 



Right, before class starts, Kenvetta Moore, llii ia 
lliil'iiiir. Chris l!ii\hiii!>. ami Itrn liimd inert behind 
the Administration Building to talk about the 
igweek. 

Below, iliirm students llirhelle Guadagno anil kuri 
herd discuss plans for the evening. 




Opening 
" 4 " 



lll'lllH . Ullilr |lil\\JII!J 

mill liiliiiiiii Dili i\ lii 



iniMiillie library. Jiin lei 
at the latest trends in a 





cooba 




1 J*** 


«* ■ 








p^pv mHr /^i^fl 


li 


f 


m 


:■ 


. if 


I 1 I 

1 I 

1 s 



bove, Lauren Hester, krvstel Indersnii, lliislin 
(Hinders, llreu Smith, illisnii Power and Jiilm 
lilrliell are walking through HCCs historical lai 
lark, (lie arrliuav, it hit It lias slimil since HI:'/. 



Left, kimanet Junes and llarpila lll'iird are retu 
iiii! to the diirin alter a hard dav al rheerlrariino 



What do you treasure? On the 
Scooba Campus, we treasure many 
things, such as the special bond 
between teachers and students. You 
can always depend on the teachers to 
do their very best to make your col- 
lege experience one you will never tor- 
get. We also treasure the close friend- 
ships students develop as they start 
school in a new place. 

Of course, the different sports are 
also treasures, both to the athletes 
that are involved in them and their 
fans. These athletes have usually 
played "their" sport all their lives, 
becoming 
experts in their 
game of choice, 
treasuring every 
small accom- 
plishment along 
the way. From football, soccer, and 
basketball in the fall to baseball, soft- 
ball, and golf in the spring, fans can 
always take some time off and enjoy 
these sports. 

With all these treasures found on 
the Scooba Campus, we sometimes 
forget the recently completed and 
newest additions. The girls' honors 
dorm wing has been added recently, as 
has the men's honors dorm. A com- 
plete interior renovation of the 
Business offices and Financial Aid 
offices of Wallace Hall has given much 
needed space for the business of the 
college. Work is underway on the 
newest treasure, the addition to the 
science building. And last, but not 
least, we are in the process of 
raising money for the Chapel in the 
Pines, which will provide space for 
religious activities for students. 

We hope that your experiences at 
EMCC's Scooba Campus will be some- 
thing you'll always treasure. 

- Jennifer Hester 
and Linda Sciple 



0pe n "7s> 

■ S " 




Ili'lim . Larnipr Lunsfuril takes notes durino lecture 
in ilrs. 11 iiiiliiiu'inih llmiiiin lleielnpitieiil lliirriiiiie & 
Fiimilv class. 



One of EMCC's greatest treasures is its 
extension located at the Columbus Air Force 
Base, which otters classes to over 200 mili- 
tary personnel and civilians each year. 

The instructors at the base have found 
that the college extension is a special treas- 
ure for them for many reasons. "EMCC's 
CAFB extension is a special place for both 
instructors and students," said Dudley 
Shurlds, history instructor. "This site is very 
informal or 'laid back.' which makes one feel 
very comfortable. Mrs. Newton and Renee 
Sanders know their jobs, which facilitates 
faculty members' duties. There is no other 
place I'd rather be." 

The fact that the faculty have given their 
time and talents to educate and prepare the 
students in a positive setting is something 
that is very treasurable. The students, in 
return, meet instructor expectations and feel 
comfortable approaching their teachers 
when they have questions, which is why 
there is always a good student-faculty rela- 
tionship. It is also why EMCC-CAFB 
Extension Director Jacqueline B. Newton has 
a place in her heart for these relationships. 
"What I treasure about EMCC-CAFB is the 
students' relationship with the faculty and 
staff, and I also value knowing that 
Columbus Air Force Base has reached the 
best quality of improved education. The staff 
consists of six full-time personnel, with some 
assistance of part-time help. The office han- 
dles all areas for the students, from being 
successfully admitted to the College, to com- 
pleting the courses required for an Associate 
Degree and University transfer. To know 
that we have gone above and beyond the 
call of duty to help students meet their goals 
is what I treasure the most." 

Whether it's the educational opportunity 
the base extension represents, the instructor- 
student relationships, or the positive, helpful 
attitudes of the staff, the Columbus Air 
Force Base extension is clearly a treasure of 
EMCC. 

- Monica Davis 

Opening 



urn bus 



Air 

Force 
Base 





Above, Tiim iii Fields iiml Prim illii lleiuiey keep up 
with I lie timing of the musical notes given by llnsn 
for Children instructor Jerome Key. 



Iia I'ale finishes her Imsol't (Mire 
assignment before the end of class. The I 111! boasts a 
large computer lali lor student use. 




it'll, computer instructor Mrs. Lou lloliiml listens to 
■losliiiii II ii Imiiiii niiliiin a imililciii in llicroi onipiilcr 
Efice class. 




Above, College Alorbra instructor llonna 
Ullrich explains a formula to her class. 
The CAFB also offers Calculus, 
Trigonometry, and Finite Hath, all taught 
by Mrs. Ullrich. 



Openi n& 

" 7 " 




Opening 
" 8 - 



Below, Uremia lli'iinl iiml Linda Ileum share a In 
between classes. 






Above, Fred Tate, Crystal Sizemore, Kerstii Sims, 
and llirliiirllii Shrill discuss I lie lecture assign- 
ment they were given in their class. 

Lett. Iiiiih h run prepares fur his next class in the 
Student (enter. The center has piml tallies, vend- 
ing machines, a television viewing area, tables and 
chairs, and a smoking area. 



olden 
Triangle 

True to its name, the Golden Triangle Campus 
continues to be a treasure to the many people who 
take advantage of the golden educational opportu- 
nities offered. 

Those opportunities are not only in education 
but in life itself. "The response to offerings on this 
campus has been so great that all efforts to 
increase the classrooms and parking have been 
quickly overcome by more new students and addi- 
tional services," said Dr. Rick Young, Executive 
Officer of the Golden Triangle Campus. 
"Convenient location, flexible year-round class 
schedules, and quality education for a reasonable 
cost are just some of the many reasons that the 
Golden Triangle Campus has been so successful." 

The highly dedicated staff and personnel are the 
true treasures that make everything possible. The 
legacy of the faculty and staff who have worked so 
tediously for so many years is now and always will 
be the graduates as well as the others served by 
the Golden Triangle Campus, and their contribu- 
tions as leaders and the economic prosperity of our 
region will not be soon forgotten. 

The Golden Triangle Campus's growth continues 
on. The campus has plans that include new build- 
ings, parking, and program offerings, which should 
result in a contribution of the high level of services 
that are required to meet the demands of the 1 1 st 
Century. With these possibilities and the continued 
support of local board and county supervisors, 
many new golden educational opportunities will be 
discovered and treasured by all. 



- George Spinks 



Opening 

" 9 " 




Below, la\liii l'uniiin«rtiiini is taking notes during Mr. 
Hark Si'lindrr's lecture in Western Civilization I class. 



For the students that attend the 
Meridian Naval Air Station EMCC 
Extension, there are numerous things on 
campus to treasure. There are things like 
the shortened and flexibility of the semes- 
ters, dedicated staff and students, class- 
room availability and experienced and 
qualified faculty. 

The student body at MNAS extension is 
composed mostly of military personnel, 
for whom the classes were designed. The 
EMCC extension offers intensive eight- to 
twelve-week semesters with classes taught 
in the afternoon and evenings. Students 
can receive an Associate's degree in less 
than a year by taking short-term classes. 
This is a true treasure for military stu- 
dents who need to take classes quickly 
before moving on to another base. 

"Students like the mobility and flexibili- 
ty of the classes at MNAS because the 
classes are brought to them," said Mr. 
Mark Schroeder, Director of the Meridian 
Naval Air Station EMCC Extension. 

"Receiving a college education is very 
important for your future," Schroeder 
said. "From the neck down, you can 
make $5 per hour all day, but from the 
neck up, the sky's the limit!" 

Schroeder also said that the instructors 
at the base treasure the opportunity for 
the exchange of ideas between students 
and instructors. It is because of these 
exchanges that dreams are fulfilled and 
students of the MNAS extension receive 
an Associate's degree, one of the many 
treasures of a valuable education. 

- Monica Davis 



end/an 

tfavai 

Air 

Station 





Above, during Western Civilization class, student 
Teresa llaxkin puts her education to the test as she 
instructs the class lor the evening. 

Right, Mien Lester and Carol Inn Quart mini use 
their text hooks In keep up with Legal Environment i 
Business instructor U Welch's lecture. 



Opening 

" 10 " 




Lett, student Jerry Blue and EMtC HAS Director 
Hail Schroeiler listen In Teresa llaskin's led lire. 




Above, Joseph Nl mlian pays close atten- 
tion In llr. Lit tun's lecture in American 
National Government class. 



Opening 
" 11 ~ 



"Attending East 
Mississippi 
Community 
College has 
blessed me 



CheRished CDemoiues 



with the opportu- 
nity to make so 
many fond mem - 
ories/'said 
Morgan McPhail, a 
sophomore on the 
Scooba Campus. 
"Some of those 
memories include 
playing in the 
water on campus 
with my suite- 
mates when it 
flooded, partici- 
pating in the 
Beauty and Beau 
Pageant, and 
going to Mr. 
Salter's house to 
hang out. The Lord 
has placed so 
many wonderful 
people in my life 
during these short 
two years. I have 
formed a family 
on this campus 
among the faculty 
and the students 
that I will never 
forget. I am so 
glad that I chose to 
attend EMCC." 



Above right, 
Lauren Hester 
and Allison 
Power enjoy 
their dorm life 
experience by 
talking on the 
phone with 
friends. 

Right, Shannon 
Brown, Natalie 
Garton, and 
Randi Little 
enjoy a fun day 
playing in the 
rain after a 
rainstorm hit 
Scooba. 



Campus life is a treasure to the stu- 
dents of East Mississippi Community 
College. Whether enjoying dorm life, 
or attending all the extracurricular 
activities on campus, such as athletics, 
homecoming, beauty and beau pag- 
eant, and club meetings, students are 
always developing new friendships. 
Students spend their extra time play- 
ing volleyball, playing cards in the 
Student Center, and just hanging out 
with old and new friends. During the 
fall semester, students enjoy the 
Christmas play, inflatable fun day, 
concerts, pep rallies, and sports 
events. The Spring semester is filled 
with an art exhibit, Pine Grove 
Festival, concerts, and more sports 
activities, all of which make campus 
life an experience one will never for- 
get. 

"Campus life is very different, and it 
gives you the chance to experience life 
on your own," said Kelly Johnson, a 
freshman majoring in psychology. 
"Living here is about give and take, 
cooperation and participation, basical- 
ly. It is about having fun learning 
about life." 

Whether living on campus or com- 
muting, students will always find 
something to do, people to meet, and 
memories to treasure at EMCC. 

- Jennifer Hester 



CatHpHs Aife 




c®' 



12 ' 





Top, Jon Detrick 
Grissom and 
Herbert Handy are 
showing their true 
singing talent at 
Fun Flicks. 

Middle, Shannon 
Brown, Jennifer 
Hester, Natalie 
Garton and Randi 
Little are looking to 
see who can make 
the biggest splash. 

Immediatly above, 
Kristin McClelland, 
Keely Rutledge, 
and Morgan 
McPhail are gath- 
ering items for a 
scavenger hunt. 



— 13 ™ 



Right, Tameka Pippin, Robert Peoples, Terrone 
Hopson. Reshard Alonza, and Iracey Wallace 
sing to the audience at Jan Jlicks while making a 
mask video. 

l$elow. Aaron l%udlove and Dominique Nay lor 
chat about what is going on after class today. 



tfelow, Kristin McClelland. Shannon thrown, 
and James Sanford are on an adventure to 
win the scavenger hunt held by the SCJ. 




Above, many students con- 
verse on the back steps of 
the Administration 
building between classes. 




"When all else fails, 
leave it to me and my 
crazy friends to find 
something to do, even 
if it's getting down 
and dirty on a rainy 
day." 

Randi Cittle 



"Jun Jlicks was most 

enjoyable. £7t was fun 

acting like my favorite 

artist and making a 

video. S7 had a lot of 

fun." 

Crystal Hogan 





^ 



<*P US I, 

14 ' 






V 



tf 






^ 



% 




No matter what the season 
in Scooba, Miss., there are 
numerous events and activities 
to get involved in. 

In plaee ol our annua 
Back-T o-Sehool dance this 
year. Fun Flicks came to the 
campus in August. It was a new 
activity that gave the Scooba stu- 
dents the opportunity to dress up 
and make a music video ol them- 
selves lip synching to their lavorite 
music. "I liked how everyone came 
together and participated. The trib- 
ute to Aaliyah, by Crystal Hogan. 
was great! said Sophomore 
Terronne Hopson. 

Each spring EMCC holds a 
crawl ish boil in the Caleteria. 
Cajun music is played in the 
background while students line up 
to lill their plates with crawiish. 
"It is big lun every year. said 
Caleteria Manager Steve Sharp. 
As they say in New Orleans. "Let 



Rashard Alonza 

sings to Dowki Low 

by R. Kelly in a video 

made by Jun Jlicks. 

Students lip synched 

in front of a blue 
screen, and a back- 
ground of their 
choice was added 
later. Alonza wore a 
Hawaiian hat to go 
with a beach back- 
ground. 



the good times roll! 

I here are also numerous 
activities sponsored by the 
Student C hristian Fellowship 
and the Fellowship ol 
Christian Athletes. The SCF 
and the rCA oiler students 
several activities each year, 
including Christian rock bands, 
such as Purification through 
Bloodshed, a Meridian band that 
played in August ol this year. 
"It was very spiritually uplifting, 
said a student alter the program 
was over. 

When there isn t something 
planned lor students, they find 
their own entertainment, lrom a 
game ol night volleyball to play- 
ing in the mud. 

Despite the dillerent interests 
ol students, there is always some- 
thing positive and lun available 
lor them to do. 

— Monica Davis 




Above, students fill their trays full of crawfish and play with 
their food during the annual crawfish bowl. 



Above, Derrick Wallace, Nakesha Vassar, and rjobbu Johnson 
put on a show for the Scooba students during Jun Jlicks. 



C,s»' 



mP us C 
15' 




tfelow, Tim Penry and Susan Cherry 
work on their clay sculptures in prepara- 
tion for the Pine Qrove festival. 



% 



Each year. EN 1C C s Scooba 
C ampus holds its cherished Pine 
Grove Festival. 

The leslival. which allows stu 
dents, instructors and the public 
an opportunity to celebrate the line 
arts with music, art exhibits, litera- 
ture, theatre and guest performers, 
olliciallv begins with the annual pres- 
entation ol Syzygy, the college s liter- 
ary magazine. I he presentation was 
part ol the EMCC Scooba 
C ampus s Awards Day, held April 
19. Following tradition, the 2001 Syzygy editor. 
Angel Williams, presented the lirsl copy ol the lit- 
erary magazine to District Academic Dean Randall 
E. Lee. 

1 bat night, the drama class perlormed A 
Night of Shits and Sketches." EMCC faculty and 
stall starred in two skits: A Big Round Guy Falls 
OH a High \\ all and C auscs Quite a Ruckus in 
the town, and I he Doctors Office. Student skits 
included The Really. Really. Really True Stoiy of 
C mderella. 7 \ s Johnny I 'rbane - Intellectual 



Katie Richards and 

^ana Moss sketch a pic 

tare to display at the 

Pine Qrove festival. 



Detective, and I rouble is haling 
A/v Pants. 

The art students held an art 
exhibit and sale in the Stenins 
I lall loyer. which began with a 
pottery demonstration by art 
instructor I errv C herry. 

On April 26. guest speaker 
Elizabeth Sareone presented a lec- 
ture. Myths and Fairy 1 ales: i\ot 
Just lor Children in the Stennis 
Auditorium. 

On the evening ol May 1, the 
EMCC choral students perlormed. The concert, 
under the direction ol Mrs. Brenda DiMichele and 
perlormed by members ol EN [C C s All State 
1 lonor Choir. Rellections and C oncert Choir, lea- 
lured songs such as Just a Single \ oiee. Sing lor 
Joy I his Festive Day, and A/ivm/ji ol Lile. 

Earlier in the leslival. the band presented a 
Spring lime Melodies concert. I he concert lea- 
lured such melodies as ;\ll Glory I old. Emblem ol 
L nity. and Amazing Grace. 

— Jenniler Hester 




Above, Toccara Coleman and 
Christina White are rehearsing 
songs for the choral concert held in 
May of each year. 




Above, Dean Randall fc. Lee is presented with the first copy of the literary maga- 
zine Syzygy by the magazine's editor, Angel Williams. 

Right. Mandy Wells is painting one of her many masterpieces to be displayed in 

the student art exhibit. 




a ' 



16 ' 



Left, science instructor Andrea ^judd mentally rehearses her 
lines before performing in the all faculty skit. rf gig Round 
Quy... 



tSelow. quest speaker Elizabeth barcone 
talks to the audience about f air u tales. 

^ar below. Mr. Herru Cherru holds a 
potteru demonstration in the Stennis 
fouer as part of the pine Qrove festival. 




'V look forward to 
I pine Qrove every 
year because you 
get to see a lot of 
different artwork 
and hear different 
types of music." 
art teacher jVlr- 
V$ill Lauderdale 



c^ pus ^ 



17 



Right. Elizabeth Thomas plays the part of 
Cinderella in the Really. Really. Really True 
Story of Cinderella. 

Below, Qabe McCann plays the prince who tries 
to talk to Cinderella, played by Elizabeth 
Thomas. 



^elow. "Jason Moody plays the mayor and 
Jeremy Jarvis plays the detective in 
Trouble 9s Eating My Pants. 







<\^^L 


iff v^i 


r« 




- : i ; ^ Hi w 




-■ m 







Above, several of Mrs. 
Qordon's Drama babies 
play the audience to Jason 
Moody's televangelist in 
Trouble 9s Eating My 
Pants. 




"Watching the play 
inspired me to partici- 
pate in drama this 
year, and 9 feel lucky 
to be part of such a 
talented group." 

Tiffany Jones 



"9 love acting and 
making people laugh. 
Cast year at EjVlGC, 9 
played the leading 
role in Lady in Qreen. " 
Summer Wooten 





— 18 ™ 



«c 



tfA**-^ 





I he drama students per- 
lormed A Night ol Skits and 
Sketches during EMCC s annu- 
rine drove Festival activities. 

Skits included the Really, 
Really, Really True Story ol 
Cinderella, TVs Johnny Urbane - 
Intellectual Detective, and Trouble is 
Eating My Pants. EMCC faculty 
and stall starred in two skits: A Big 
Round Guy Tails Off a High Wall 
and Causes Quite a Ruckus in the 
Town, and The Doctors Ollice. 

Students in the play were 
Jeremy Jarvis, Elizabeth Thomas. 
Crystal Hogan, Gabe McCann, Josh 
Goodwin, Summer Wooten, Lois 
Morris. Jason Moody, Shanna 
Beasley, Deanna Smith, Derrick 
Conner, Frankie Doss. Star 
Stephenson, and Matthew Terrell. 
Instructors and stall included Sean 
McDonnall, Janet Brings, Bill 



English instructor 

garnet Griggs plays 
the receptionist 

and former soccer 
coach Sean 

McDonnall plays a 
vera susceptible 
patient in the all 
faculty and staff 
member sketch, 

The Doctor's Office. 



Lauderdale, Michele Staley, 
Andrea Judd, and Martha 
Taylor. 

This was the lirst year at 
EMCC and lirst production lor 
new drama instructor Marie 
Cordon. I he Drama Babies, as 
Mrs. Gordon allectionately calls 
her students, helped with set 
design, costumes, props, play pro- 
gram and publicity. 

"I extend my heartlelt thanks 
to the Drama Babies lor giving 
me the time ol my lile, said 
Mrs. Gordon. "My thanks also to 
the entire EMCC student body, 
faculty, stall, and administration 
lor their well 'wishes and support. 

Also assisting the production 
were Melanie Key, Donnie Stokes, 
Bobbie Gibson, Lucy Hull and 
Irene Nichols. 

— Jennifer Hester 




Above, Crystal Hogan, playing one of the ugly stepsisters, 
argues with Cinderella's Elizabeth Thomas. 



Above, Jeremy jarvis and Summer Wooten play the classic 
gumshoe detective and tempting "dame" in Trouble. 



™ is — 



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& ^fei/Hutva^, Williatu/UlcAael "Brown, J>auC *BaU*ti (/host 
I -Hanbscme), tftabe tfthitaket, a»7> ^atrtck 7>i/klcheU 





<r t*f> *Zen 'Beauties: 

Standing: 7tachelflewe.il, flmanba ~Haiff>eU, Qennifce* fcntx, Lauren 

"Heslet, Qettnifce* 'Hester, £*Ua TZay ^eaiti: T>estinti D?ish, Helena 

t>aois, fCfistel /4nde*son, an) dassie /ktfUns. 




D really enjoyed being In the 

pageant. Ot toas exciting getting tc 

knew ail ofi the contestants. -Dt mas 

an hone* tc be chosen /Host 'Beautiful 

at d/HCC. " Y}ennifa* Knox 



■ 2o'm 



IflQSb 











Helena Daols, Cassle /liklns, Qennlfe* ICnex '(/Hest ^Beauii^ul), 
ICrtste.1 /4n?e?st>n, an) fZachcl /MaioM. 




£tan)ing: < JtMl) /kaMay, Ck*lslef>he* Kiatscn, /Halcelut Thrown, ^paul 

Halt**), tQaie. tOhUakey, T>aWek 7>i/Huh&l,e; Kneeling: tOilUe 
/l&eHen, /Canny /Hasen, /}e?h £te.elk, Omar Heat) an) Tto)e.iHek ~Ol*aqes 



PATIl BAtLARB 



■§Mm 



-s&^mi?- 



' D hob a really fiun time In the 
c/H(Z(Z ^Beauty anh^Beau pageant, 
/ill the. guys get tc play cards In the 
back while the girts to&te en stage. 
'"Paul Mallard •■ *?„ ' '- , 



* 21 m 



a^tyue 



rjelow, Angela White sings Patsy Gline 
songs for the audience while the judges 
make their decision. 




Jennifer Campbell-Knox of 
Scooba was chosen as the top 
beauty and Paul Mallard of 
Starkville was chosen as top 

in the annual beauty 
and \3eau Pageant held on the 
Scooba Campus November 6. 

The top five beauties includ- 
ed Jennifer Campbell-Knox of 
Scooba, Kristel Anderson of 
Macon, Rachel Nowell of 
Columbus, Selena Davis of 
Clarksdale, and Cassie Atkins 
of Columbus. 

The top five beaus included 
Jred Murray ofAmory; Patrick DiMichele and 
William fSrown of Scooba; Paul Mallard of 
Starkville; and. Wade Whitaker of DeKalb. 

The top ten beauties included Davis, 
Atkins, Nowell, Campbell, and Anderson; 
Lauren Hester and Jennifer Hester of New 
Hope; Destiny Drish of Columbus; Amanda 
Harpole of Scooba; and Erica Ray of West 
Point. 



Above, in the annual 

beauty and \3eau 

pageant, the selected 

top ten return on stage 

for additional 

competition. 



En tertainmen t for the 
evening was provided by the 
EMCC Reflections and Miss 
Angela White, a performer 
with the Meridian Little 
Theater. 

Paul Miller, assistant acade- 
mic director of the Qolden 
Triangle campus, was the 
master of ceremonies for the 
pageant. Mrs. 9rene Nichols 
and Mrs. Robin Julton were 
co-head chairpersons for this 
year's event, instructors who 
helped included Patricia 
Calloway, Wynelia Cherry, %renda DiMichele, 
Rachel Ezelle, Marie Qordon, Lucy Hull, IS'ill 
Lauderdale, Susan Sleppy, Mary Margaret 
Smith, and Martha Taylor. Many staff and 
students also helped behind the scenes, 
because of the hard work of all involved, the 
pageant will hold cherished memories for 
many students. 

- Jennifer Hester 




Above, Shannon thrown adds the fin 
ishing touches to Kristin 
McClelland's hair before the show 
begins. 



Above, the tMGG singing group, Reflections, performs for the audience during an 
intermission of the beauty and fteau Pageant. 

Right, beauty contestants Amanda Harpole, Gassie Atkins, and Randi Little pose 
for the camera during one of the pageant breaks. 





C ftt*f»« Ujr^ 



Left, Kristel Anderson freshens up her face while she waits 
for her turn on stage. 

tfelow. 2001 l%eau contestants Josh Steele and Kenny 
Mason enjoy a funny conversation while waiting for the pre- 
sentation of tfeaus. 



tfelow, beauty contestants Marshetta 
Little, "Jackie Elder, and Selena Davis 
talk about how pretty all the girls look 
in their dresses. 

Vmmediatly below, the people that 
made the pageant possible are co- 
chairman Robin Julton, emcee Paul 
Miller and co-chairman Srene Nichols. 




■ 23 ■ 



Right. Lauren Hester, Allison Power, and Keely 
Rutledge enjoy the quiet study time they have 
in their dorm room, 

l^elow, Kristin McClelland prepares herself for 
the rest of the week by ironing her clothes for 
each day. 



tSelow. ^josh McCarty and l^en Masoi / sat i 
that the socks they're wearing on their 
hands make them'go taster" as they play 
one of their favorite a, m 




Above, after a long day in 
class, Kelly Johnson down- 
loads songs off her com- 
puter and burns a CD. 




"Dorm life is good 
because you always 
have someone to talk 
to, and you make a lot 
of new friends." 

Kristin McClelland 



"Living in the dorm is a 
good transition be- 
tween leaving home and 
living on your own be- 
cause you have your 
roommate and suite- 
mates to help you deal 
with your problems. " 
Devin Davis 





0* 



tnP us L, 

24 " 




J* 



\Xithe 



Dorm life at EMCC is a 
treasured experience that will be 
remembered lor a Ide time and 
an interesting aspect ol what 
college lile really is all about. 

While meeting many new peo- 
ple and learning to cooperate with 
them on a daily basis, a student 
develops a sense ol independence. 
Whether watching movies, playing 
games with suitemates. talking on 
the phone to Inends, or most 
importantly, sleeping alter a long 
night out, dorm lile can be a 
new and exciting experience lor 
students. 

"Dorm lile at Scooba is better 
than anywhere else because you 
gel to talk to your teammates 
and you get to meet new people, 
said Ben Mason, a member ol 
the baseball team. 



tyVTCe Dorms: 

Qilbert Anderson 

Long Hall 

Honors Dorm 

Noxubee Hall 

Lauderdale Hall 
Sullivan Hall 



-a 



% 




Students learn many les- 
sons ol lile when they deal 
with their roommates and 
suitemates. Living in the 
dorm also gives students the 
opportunity lo socialize with dil- 
rerent types ol people Irom 
many walks ol lile. Living on 
campus gives the students a 
chance to get away Irom home, 
as well as lo sec -what lile is 
all about. Students learn many 
responsibilities, such as waking 
up on time lor classes, doing 
laundry, and remembering obli- 
gations. 

Overall, the experience dorm 
students obtain on the Scooba 
campus will be one they will 
continue lo cherish lor years to 
come. 

— Jennifer Hester 




Above, while in their dorm room, Niko tdwards and Renaldo 
Deans enjoy watching Monday night football. 



Above, urew Powell, tSill Cotton, Todd Harcrow, and Matt Michew 
do the usual in the bogs dorm: talk on the phone and hang out. 



C* 



25' 



tSelow. EMGG cheerleader Cassie Atkins 
throws miniature footballs and bags of 
candy Into the stands. 



e&nufig 




EMCC's Homecoming 
game, held October 20, 
was a bittersweet ending 
to a full week of activities. 

The week began with 
students following the 
cheerleaders' dress up list. 
Each day, students were 
asked to show their support 
for the dons by dressing a 
certain way. The last dag 
was Hush day, where the 
cheerleaders couldn't speak 
all dau. During the week, a 
Homecoming dance was 
held, inflatable Jun came to 
the campus, and the students enjoyed 
a pep rally. Anyone who caught a 
cheerleader talking on Hush day got a 
chance to hit that cheerleader with a pie 
during the pep rally. 

On Homecoming dag, an alumni lun- 
cheon was held in the Keyes Currie 
Coliseum with entertainment by the 



EMCG Reflections. 

Honored at the luncheon 

were Mark D. McPhail, the 

2001 Distinguished 

Service Award recipient, 

and A.L Courtney, Jr., the 

\a zr^- *sf , 2001 Alumnus of the Mear 

Qandy, tddieMoss, and redpient ' J 

EMCC played Holmes at 
2 p.m. The final score was 
3-17. The Lions may have 
lost, but they played a 
good game. 

Half-time events included 
the presentation of the 
2001 Homecoming court 
and the crowning of the queen. Morgan 
McPhail was crowned queen. 

following the game, a reception for 
students and alumni was held at the 
president's home. Whether good or bad, 
the memories made during 
Homecoming will be cherished by many. 

- Jennifer Hester 



Above, Roderick 



Jonathan West, mem- 
bers of the football 
team, enjoy the pep 
rally, which was 
held on Friday in front 
of the cafeteria. 




Above, Dean Lee eats at the "kiddie 
table" daring open house at the 
Davis home. 



.3mh 



Above, the EMCG football team runs onto the field ready to play Holmes. 

Right, the 2001 EMCG Homecoming Court includes Roshunda Evans, Gamillia 
Joote, Jennifer Knox, Sheena Jordan, Queen Morgan McPhail, Lauren Hester, 
Kimanet ^ones, Tenisha $land, and Gora McDuffy. 






*i 




■ 26* 



Left, cheerleaders Kimanet Tories and Elise Mallette try to 
clean their faces after the pie throwing event was over. 

ISelow, the EMCC Reflections provided entertainment during 
the Alumni luncheon. Accompanying them on piano is choral 
instructor fijrenda DiMichele. 



Below. Mark McPhail stands ready to 
receive the Distinguished Service 
Award from Alumni President Donnie 
Qrayson. 

Smmediatly below, EMCC mascot Leo 
the Lion shows his true colors as he 
fights off the Holmes bulldog with the 
American flag. 




■ 27 M 









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i 




Sjdeena faidan QxtmilUa &xwte fonmfy&i JCn&x 

FRESHMAN MAID FRESHMAN MAID FRESHMAN MAID 




fZenitAa Sitand Jlawten Meatex, JUmanet foned, 



SOPHOMORE MAID 



FRESHMAN MAID 



SOPHOMORE MAID 




StoAJfumda &jto#td Qxma Mc3)xiffy 

SOPHOMORE MAID SOPHOMORE MAID 



■ 28 m 










3tatnecamiiig< dueen 

J/La^an J\/ic3thait 



■ 







u It was an honor to have been chosen East Mississippi Community Coieeges 
homecoming queen. 1 eeee blessed to be abie to represent such a wonderful 

SCHOOL AND SUCH WONDERFUL PEOPLE."- ~ M.ORGAN McPhAIL 



m 29* 



Right, receiver Detrick l^arnetthas an open 
path to take the ball down the field during 
the Homecoming game. 






Below, Homecoming Queen Morgan McPhail is 
joined bg EMCC President Dr. Tommy Davis 
and Qolden Triangle GEO Dr. Rick Ljoung. 



Below. A.L. Courtney receives the Alumnus 
of the Ujear Award from Alumni President 
Donnie Qrayson during halftime cere- 
monies. 




Above, the inaugural 
inductees to EMCC's Sports 
Hall ofjame are introduced 
on the field before the 
game begins. 




"9 had two of my suite 
mates in the homecoming 
court this year. 9 enjoyed 
watching the whole court 
walk out on the football 
field in their dresses. 
Everything was very nice. " 
Kayla Murphy 



"9 enjoyed all of the home- 
coming activities. The pep 
rally was fun to watch and 
the pie throwing was an 
experience to watch. EMCC's 
homecoming was fun." 
Adam Parker 





■ 30 m 



I 









9n addition to the traditional 
festivities, this years 
Homecoming celebration includ- 
ed a Korean War memorial ded- 
ication and a Sports Hall of 
fame induction ceremony. 

The Korean War memorial 
dedication honored those EM^C stu- 
dents who served our country in the 
Korean War. The dedication was a 
project of the 1 23rd Medical Collection 
Company (SEP), National Quard, 
which has a special bond with EMCC 
because the members were EMCC 
students when they were called to 
active duty. When theu were called to 
train for active duty, theu first used 
the EMCC campus as their tempo- 
rary barracks. The ceremonu was 
headed by Sergeant Carl Hildreth of 
Columbus, a former EMfC student and mem- 
ber of the companu. The dedication ceremonu 
took place at the new memorial erected between 



Al Sports Hall of 

~jawie inductee 

meets Mrs. Davis 

and President 

Davis during a 

reception in their 

home after the 

game. 



Administration building 
and old gum. Quest speaker 
was brigadier Qeneral fames R. 
McKell. "Taps" was performed 
bu EMCC student Bobby 
Tolliver. 

Later that morning, twenty for- 
mer athletes and coaches were 
inducted during the inaugural 
Sports Hall of fame ceremony. This 
year's inductees included fred 
Adams, ferry ^oatner, Betty 
Spears Boyette, Randall 
Bradberry, fesse Brown, Bill 
ISuckner, Roger Duncan, Don 
Edwards, 9kie Ethridge, Henry 
faulkner, fack Manley, Richard 
Math is, Clyde Pierce, Qerald Poole, 
Malcolm Robinson, Thomas 
Scarborough, Warren Swoope, and 
fames Walker. Also Included are two former 
EMCC coaches who are now deceased, Robert 
Victor Sullivan, and Keyes Currie. 




Above, during the pep rally, Mr. Thrash, Crystal Hogan. and Mr. 
Cherry give the student body some nice entertainment. 



Above, at the pep rally, Jennifer Hester smacks cheerleader Jennifer 
Campbell-Knox in the face with a pie for talking on "Hash day. " 



■ 31 m 



Scooba Campus"'" 




KD/h/W&Z /}Q/*££ 



TZOVZIZDOC tf/VWty 



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u 



In my experience at EMCG I have overcome 



my obstacles that will help me later in my 
on-going college career. God has really 



^w, 



"EMCC has taught me that no matter what 
happens to you, there are always friends to 
- , push you on." '\-, : * 









■ in 



)lessed me." 






■ 32 m 



' 




Co-head cheer- 
leader Kimanet 
Jones shows her 

spirit during 
EMCC's homecom- 
ing week by dress- 
ing as a tiger on 
costume day. Her 
costume was 
Grrrreat!!!! 



Sophomore maid 
Kimanet Jones and 
her escort walk on 

the field during 
the presentation of 

the Homecoming 
; court at half time 
ceremonies on 

Homeconling Day. 





Roderick takes a 

much-deserved 

break on the 

sidelines during a 

football game this 

season. 



Roderick Gandy 

tackles a 
Coahoma oppo- 
nent, preventing 
him from scor- 
ing during the 
Homecoming 
game. 




Kimanet Denise Jones was 
samed Miss MM.CC and Roderick 
Gandy was named Mr. EMCC by 
the student body in november. 
Kimanet, a Secondary Education 
major from columbus, is the 

DAUGHTER OF EtHEL JoNES. She IS 

iN EMCC cheerleader, a member 
df the Choir, Gospel Choir, 



Drama Ciub, FCA, and a member 
of Jesus Christ Church of 
Columbus. She is a member of the 
national honor Society, ' Who's 
Who Among College Students, a 
sophomore maid in the emcc 
Homecoming Court, and co-head 

CHEERLEADER. RODERICK GaNDY, A 
pRE'IfAW MAJOR FROM CdUMBUS, IS 




the son of royand dorothy 
Gandy. He is a member of the 
Football team, Fellowship of 
Christian Athletes^ and*a member 
of the Church of God In Chrisi 
in-Columbus. 

Congratulations to Kimanet 
and Roderick. We hope your time 
at 1 emcc has been a treasured one. ,'i 




■:>:•■■ tj: 






^Jfrcs/iMan 



Patrick DiMichszb, a Wildlife Eaw Enforcement major 

FROM SCOOBA, IS THE SON OF CoNRAD AND BrENDA 

DiMichele. He is a member of FCA, $CF, Music 
Theatre Workshop, the Football team, and the 
Collegian. He was also chosen as one of the top five 
beaus in this year's Beauty and Beau pageant. T chose 
EMCC because I've lived here all my life and I knew 

THIS WAS A GREAT PLACE BEFORE I ENROLLED HERE. Now I 
AM GETTING A GREAT EDUCATION AND MEETING A LOT OF 
NEW PEOPLE. " a 




Rodney Outlaw, a Eiberal Arts major from 

$TARKVILLE, IS THE SON OF RoSlE OUTLAW. He IS A 
MEMBER OF THE FoOTBALL TEAM, REFLECTIONS, AND 

Music Theatre Workshop. u EMCC has made me a 

BETTER PERSON. EMCC HAS HELPED ME MATURE RAPID- 
LY, AND I APPRECIATE IT GREATLY. ATTENDING COLLEGE 
HERE HAS TAUGHT ME TO BE A GREAT PERSON AT ALL 
TIMES. " 



c(V mp"« £j^ 







::■ :3V$S«* 



Courtney Pom, a Business Technolgy major from 
West Point, is the daughter of William and 
Golden Jefferson. She is a member of the EMCC 
Gospel Choir and Phi Beta Eambda. T chose 
EM.CC because it is a wonderful school to prepare 

YOU FOR A MAJOR UNIVERSITY. " 




34 




1 ^cccba & 



Pansy Brown, a Hotel and Restaurant major from 
Starkville, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Whlie D. Wilson. A Golden Triangle student, 
she is the Vice-President of DECA. "Since it had 

BEEN A NUMBER OF YEARS SINCE I ATTENDED SCHOOL, I 
CHOSE EMCC TO prepare MYSELF TO GO BACK TO 

m$u to get my b.$. degree in business and 
Industry. " 



Ben Cooper, a Hotel and Restaurant major from 
Starkville, is the son of Debbie and Robert 
Cooper. A Golden Triangle student, he is the 

DECA FUNDRAISER COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN/ SOCIAL PLAN- 
NER, an Eagle scout, and a member of EVA. u The 

PROGRAMS AND THE TEACHERS ARE FUN. I CHOSE 

EMCC because it is not too far to drive and just 

ABOUT ALL OF MY FRIENDS ARE OUT HERE. * 





Camelua Foots, a Pre~Eaw major from Columbus, 

IS THE DAUGHTER OF GlENDA BuCKHALTER AND $AMMIE 
BuCKHALTER. $HE IS A MEMBER OF THE EMCC BAND, 

Choir and Drama Club. u I chose EMCC because I 

NEEDED TO START AT A JUNIOR COLLEGE. CoLLEGE HAS 
TAUGHT ME TO WORK HARD AND STUDY TO MAINTAIN A 
GOOD GRADE POINT AVERAGE. " 



■ 35 H 



/tit. anb/Hlss 6/HCC 

Golden Triangle Campus 




/4A/W7><£7Z /V<S/U 



Kww ^ii/ty 



Attending EMCC has been a very knowledge- 
expanding experience. Attending this great 
school has taught me that hard work and 
determination is truly the key to reaching 
one's goals." 



"I chose EMCC because they give you a head 

start on your goals. College has taught me to 

be responsible." 



■ 36 ■ 












Alander Neal does 

research in the 
library for a class 
assignment. A biol- 
ogy major, Neal 
will be spending a 
great deal of col- 
lege time doing 
research. 



"I've really 
enjoyed attending 
here, and I'm real- 
ly looking forward 

to more experi- 
ences and meeting 
more people at 

EMCC." 
- Kenya Petty 



sfo ( 





"I've really 

enjoyed attending 

EMCC, because it 

gave me the 

chance to meet 

new people and 

earn new 

friends . " 

- Alander Neal 



Kenya Petty 

works on a floral 

arrangement 

during a Hotel 

and Restaurant 

assignment on 

arranging a 

table. 




Alander Neal and Kenya Petty 
were chosen by the crolden 
Triangle Campus student body as 
Mr. and Miss EMCC. 

Alander, a Biology major from 

StaRKVILLE, IS THE SON OF l,OVEY AND 

Alice Neai. He is a member of 
Who s Who Among American 
College Students, the Kappa 



Aepha Theta Honors Society, and 
the Honors Society. He is also 
on the Deans L,ist. 

Kenya Petty, a Hotel and 
Restaurant major from Blackjack, 
is the daughter of wlllie and 
Connie Petty. She is a member of 
DJECA. 

Mr. and Miss EMCC are two 



students chosen by the campus 
student body to best represent the 
college. These students must have 
excellent grade point averages, be 
involved in campus activities, and 
be positive, friendly representatives 
of the college. 

Congratulations, Alander and 
Kenya, on your accomplishments. 



■ 37 U 



£eph 



6MC1HL 



Morgan McPhah,, a Poutical Science major from 

CoLLINSVILLE, IS THE DAUGHTER OF Mr. AND Mrs. Mark 

McPhail. She is a member of FCA, SCF, PTK, SGA, and the 

SoFTBAll TEAM. $HE IS PRESIDENT OF SGA, A USA AlL'AcADEMIC 
NOMINEE, A MEMBER OF THE PRESIDENTS 1,IST AND NaTIONAI 

Dean's List, a HEADWAE recipient, Homecoming Queen, 
and Top Academic Freshman Female Athiete. "I chose FMCC 

BECAUSE OF ITS SMALL ENVIRONMENT AND WONDERFUL REPUTATION. I 
HAVE FORMED SO MANY WONDERFUL RELATIONSHIPS AND GREAT MEM- 
ORIES THAT I WILL CHERISH FOREVER. FMCC HAS HELPED PREPARE 
ME FOR THE NEXT STEP IN MY LIFE. " » 











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Crystal Qctzntgva Hogan, an art major from Starkville, 

IS THE DAUGHTER OF HERMAN AND Tl,OUISE ASHFORD. $HE IS A 
MEMBER OF MuSIC ThEATRE WORKSHOP, REFLECTIONS, AND 

the Student Government Association. She has been hon- 
ored by Reflections for her work. "EMCC has made me 
more open, and it makes me more confident about myself. 
i have made more friends here than in starkville hlgh 
School. I will surely miss this school, the students, and 

THE WONDERFUL TEACHERS WHEN I GRADUATE. " 



c ftT»P>« *£r 




IfiON Tsrreii, Ash, a Biochemistry/Pre-Medicine major from 
DeKalb, is the son of Forena and Jerry Grady. He is a member 
of the EMCC Lions Band, Choir, FMCC Gospel Choir, and 

IS THE HEAD MUSICIAN OF MeRCY AND PEACE ChURCH. He IS A 
RECIPIENT OF THE NATIONAL BaND AwARD, A MEMBER OF THE 

National Honor Society, Who's Who Among American 
College Students, Dean's List, and is the Drum Captain. "I 

CHOSE EMCC BECAUSE OF THE FAMILY ATMOSPHERE. The FRIENDS I 
HAVE MADE ARE INNUMBERABLE. GoD HAS TRULY BLESSED ME HERE AT 
EMCC. I WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER MY TWO YEARS HERE." 




38 




Josette Brown, a Hotei and Restaurant major from 
Starkville, is a member of DECA, the Student 
Government Association, and is the Hotel and 
Restaurant DECA President. A Golden Triangle stu- 
dent, SHE IS CERTIFIED BY THE STATE IN $ERVeSaFE, HAS BEEN A 

Girl Scout leader for five years, and is a Who's Who 
recipient. t chose to attend emcc because of the out- 
STANDING Hotel & Restaurant program that is offered. 
This program has helped me utilize my skills and secure a 
bright career for my future. " 







Aiandsr Nbai, a Biology major from Starkville, is the 
son of eovey and alice neal. a golden triangle stu- 
DENT, HE IS A MEMBER OF Who's Who AmONG AMERICAN 

College Students, the Kappa Alpha Theta Honors 
Society, and the Honors Society. He is also on the 
Dean's Eist. u Attending EMCC has been a very knowl- 
edge-expanding EXPERIENCE. ATTENDING THIS GREAT SCHOOL 
HAS TAUGHT ME THAT HARD WORK AND DETERMINATION IS 
TRULY THE KEY TO REACHING ONE'S GOALS." 







Ryan Waudrop, a Pre-Pharmacy major from Columbus, 
is the son of Dennis and Brenda Waldrop. He is a 
member of the emcc football team, and a member of 
Eighthouse Baptist Church in Columbus. He was 
named Defensive Player of the Week three times, in 
Itawamba, Co~Ein and Coahoma. T have matured 

GREATLY SINCE I STARTED AT EMCC. I HAVE MET A LOT OF 
FRIENDS AND HAVE HAD MANY MEMORABLE EXPERIENCES. " 



■ 39 ■ 






rjelow, choral director Mrs. f3renda 
DiMichele speaks to the visiting children 
before the performance begins. 




The week following 
Thanksgiving, 60 EMCC Choir 
students donned costumes and 
took to the stage to bring 
Christmas cheer to the Scooba 
campus. 

frosty Jollies Holiday Revue, a 
combination of two of choral direc- 
tor Mrs. Brenda DiMichele's prior 
Christmas productions, hosted 
Santa Claus, his reindeer, Rudolph 
Rudy's Cuties, Jrosty the 
Snowman, Marshmallow Qirls, 
clowns, carolers, Suzy Snowflake, a ballerina, a 
Spanish duo, EMCC" cheerleaders, and the EMCC 
lion mascot. Hundreds of elementary school chil- 
dren and pre-schoolers attended the several 
performances scheduled throughout the week, 
ending with a 7 p.m. performance on Wednesday 
night for members of the community, before the 
evening's performance, some of the characters 
performed for children of single parent EMCC 
students, an annual Special Populations event. 

Jrosty Jollies Revue members this year were 
Scotty Elliott, Crystal Miller, Annette Creel, Qino 
Perry, Eric Robinson, Cora McDuffy, Pamela 
Smith, Terrell Ash, Kjrandy R,al\, Patressa 



Cast members of Jrosty 

Jollies Holiday Revue 

dance to The Merra 

Christmas Polka. 



fester, Steve gutter, Shannon 
pfrown, Jennifer Knox Campbell, 
Ton Carroll. Cheryl Clark, 
Toccara Coleman, Seth 
Cumberland, Patrick DiMichele, 
Demorns Dlsmuke, Destiny 
Drish, Jennifer Dujour, 
Jacqueline Elder, Kati Jleming, 
Chandra Joard, Camillia Joote, 
Jelicia Qeorge, Albert Qoodwin, 
Qarthia Halbert, Amanda 
Harpole, Rick Hill, Crystal Hogan, 
Airon Holliday, Natasha Hopson, 
Shundra Jenkins, Kelly Johnson, Kimanet 
Jones, Jason Latham, Marshetta Little, Lamont 
Long, Chastley Louis, Rob Mc Arthur, Qabe 
McCann, Melissa Minor, Tiffany Moore, Kim 
Mowry, Rodney Outlaw, Ljulonda Reed, Patricia 
Robertson, James Rush Jeanisha Rush, Linda 
Sciple, Piper Sharp, Dusty Smith, Marion Smoot. 
Qeorge Spinks, Jernadas Taylor, Holly Ward, 
Chris Watson, Devron WAtson, Linda White, 
Kelly Wilkins, Angel Williams, Lyndall Wood, 
Summer Wooten, Andre Wright, and Kathryn 
Zalme. 

- Jennifer Hester 







Above, reindeer Rodney Outlaw and 
elf Crystal Hogan sing a duet for the 
children. 



Above, Marshetta Little, Katie 2alme, Cora McUuffu, Crystal Hogan, Jennifer 
Knox, and Kimanet Jones perform the Marshmallow Qirls song. 

Right, the cast and crew of this year's Jrosty Jollies Holiday Revue. 




c<v mp"s Ci^ 

■ 40 ■ 



Left, Kati Fleming. Andre Wright, Rodney Outlaw and Dusty 
Smith carry Suzy Snowflake, Crystal Miller, daring Suzy's 
introduction song. 



IQelow, Patrick DiMichele, who plays 
Rudolph, and Jennifer Knox, who plays 
a Rudy's Cutie, dance and sing. 



immediately below, Tori Carroll signs 
the words to the Christmas song. 




■ 41 ■ 



Right, Dennis Uupree and Rashard Alonza race 
to the end of the obstacle course. 

tfelow, Mandi Wells takes a break after a long 
bat fan time at the "velcro pit.'' 



fSelow, an EMCC student goes flipping 
through the air as he enjoys the exciting 
dag of inflatable fan on the Scooba campus 




Above, Caseg Abrams and 
Steven piatt compete with 
one another to see who is 
faster and stronger. ..looks 
like Caseg got the best of 
Steven! 




"'It was fun. 9 really 
1 enjoyed the one where 
4 you had to run as fast as 

you could before the cord 

pulled you back. That 

was right!" 

Dennis Dupree 



"The chance of acting like 
a kid again is a chance 
every adult looks forward 
to. inflatable ~jun made 
that opportunity possi- 
ble." Adam l^urke, Men's 
Soccer Coach. 





™ 42 — 



V 



<J< 



yfr 



oJbieSu 






M* 



College is supposed to be 
about hard work, concentra- 
tion and dedication to learn- 
ing. $ut sometimes, all that 
serious thought gets 
monotonous, and students I 
find themselves tired, run down, 
and bored. How do you get out 
of the doldrums? Do something 
fun and unique 1 . EMCC's student 
activities director, Kelbu 
Bowman, made sure students 
had fun mid-semester by bring- 
ing In inflatable fun activities. 

"9 thought it was an activity 
that every student could partici- 
pant in," said Bowman. "9 think 
the students really enjoyed it 
because 9 saw everybody participating on 
every station they had set up. " 

inflatable fun has several different sta- 
tions, and four came to the campus this 



^ 



f 



During inflatable 
Jun, students 

played on: 

Bouncy Boxing 

Velcro Wall 

Bangee Run 

Obstacle Course 



year. Bouncy boxing allows 
students to get in an inflat- 
able ring and box with huge 
blow-up gloves. The obsta- 
cle course gives students a 
challenge as they race 
through tunnels, climb walls 
and slide to the finish line. The 
bungee run allows two stu- 
dents to race each other, with 
the winner reaching the flag 
before the bungee cords pulls 
them back to the starting line. 
The velcro wall is self explana- 
tory: it lets students leap into 
the air and plaster themselves 
against a giant velcro wall. 
"As soon as they set up the 
stations, everybody just ran to the activi- 
ties and started playing, "said Bowman, 
"inflatable fun brought back the kid in a 
lot of students." Thank you, Mr. Bowman! 




Above, %en Stiller, John Juller. long Sutler and Tg Harbour 
wrestle to see who is "King of the Hill. " 



Above, Jennifer Campbell-Knox and Alexis Hutchinson give all they 
have while competing to see who is the better woman. 

™ 43 ~ 



"EMCC's organi- 
zations are 
great," said 



V&lue (Jour Codls 



freshman 
Matthew 
Darnell. "No 
matter what you 
want, there is a 
club or organi- 
zation for you 
here. The 
organizations 
are one of the 
most important 
resources on 
campus. Not 
only do they 
provide all of us 
with a way of 
communicating 
with each other, 
but they allow 
every student to 
get involved 
with campus life 
in some way." 



Above right, 
Matthew Darnell 
enjoys some 
cake during the 
annual Back to 
School festivi- 
ties, which are 
sponsored by 
many of EMCC's 
clubs. Hey, who 
needs a fork 
when you have 
Cassie Chance's 
help? 

Right, students 
gather for the 
annual See You 
at the Pole rally. 
The event is 
sponsored by 
SCF, but all stu- 
dents, faculty 
and staff are 
welcome to par- 
ticipate. 



Whether looking for fun, friendship, or 
hoping to further one's educational experi- 
ence, there is a club or organization for 
everyone at EMCC. 

Students have the opportunity to join 
clubs based upon their major, likes, tal- 
ents, goals, and educational backgrounds. 
EMCC's organizations not only provide 
students with extracurricular activities, 
they also help to bring the whole campus 
together. 

The clubs and organizations provide stu- 
dents and faculty members with many 
valuable life lessons. Students learn how to 
be responsible for themselves as well as 
others. "It is important to become involved 
with as many activities as possible," said 
Mrs. Brenda DiMichele, a sponsor of many 
musical organizations on the Scooba 
Campus. "Not only do they prepare you 
for your life to follow, they also give you a 
chance to make a difference here and 
now." Not only do the students learn 
about life, but also the sponsors learn 
about their students: how they look at life 
and how they think. 

Above all, EMCC's organizations provide 
all students with the chance to interact 
with each other. One never knows when he 
or she may meet a new best friend, and 
there is not a lesson of more value in life. 

The common goals and interests that 
bring students on a campus together is 
something of great value, and something 
we can all treasure. 

- George Spinks 



O. 



M 






™ 44 "* 




Top, Hope Holly, Ardra 
Morgan, Gennice 
Morgan, and Phi Beta 
Lambda sponsor Marilyn 
Doolittle count money 
raised by the GT Chapter 
of Phi Beta Lambda to be 
donated to the Red Cross 
for the Sept. 1 1 disaster 
relief fund. 

Middle, members of the 
Association of 
Information Technology 
Professionals sell pizzas 
as part of their fund rais- 
ng efforts. 

Immediately above, Phi 
Theta Kappa sponsor Jim 
Huerkampand GT 
Academic Dean Jerry 
Davis welcome GT stu- 
dents into the Eta Upsilon 
Chapter of the interna- 
tional community college 
honor society. 






Srudem Chmsnan Fellowship 

Golden Tmangle Campus 

The Student Christian Fellowship was a new addition to the 
Golden Triangle's organizations this year. The Student Christian 
Fellowship is a non-denominational organization designed to help 
strengthen and develop college students as disciples of Christ. SCF 
meets each week for fellowship, and thev plan to hold manv 
extracurricular activities including praver groups, Bihle Study, fun 
nights out in neighboring towns, and special events like See You at 
the Pole. 

Standing: Clark McCullv, Aaron Brooks, Marcus Moslev, Kimberly 
Rice, Roxanne Liddell, Chip Wells, Levorn Daniels, Willie Clav, 
Dontrell Quinn. 





Vbi Thera Kappa 



Golden Tmangle Campus 

The purpose of Phi Theta Kappa is to recognize and encourage 
scholarship among associate degree students. To achieve this pur- 
pose, PTK provides opportunity for the development of leadership 
and service, for an intellectual climate to exchange ideas and ideals, 
for lively fellowship for scholars, and for stimulation of interest in 
continuing academic excellence. This club's primary goal is to 
encourage membership and to strive for academic excellence in 
order to qualify for scholarship opportunities at senior institutions. 
Members must be full-time students with a 3.5 GPA or better. 
Seated: (left to right) Angela Huffman-Rep, Rodnev Busbv-Pres., 
Amy Arlington, Julie Boerger, Brian Mead. 



A/1 Siaie CboiR 
Scooba Caaipus 

All State Choir is an organization that can be grouped with East 
Mississippi Community College's variety of organizations that cater 
to the musicallv inclined portion of the student body. All State 
Choir consists of a select group of talented singers. Each year this 
group is selected to join the Mississippi Community/Junior College 
All State Honor Choir held in Jackson, Mississippi. During this con- 
ference, the club members participate in a group singing of songs 
that have been pre-selected each year. All throughout the school 
vear, the club members practice one on one with Brenda DiMichele, 
the club advisor. Mrs. DiMichele also advises Reflections, Music 
Theatre Workshop, and the EMCC choir. 

Standing: Seth Cumberland, Piper Sharp, Crystal Hogan, Jennifer 
Knox, Rodnev Outlaw. 





Gospel CboiR 



Scooba Caoipus 

The Gospel Choir is an organization that seeks to enhance stu- 
dents' singing abilities. The club helps to achieve spiritual education 
through music. 

Front Row: (left to right) Cora McDuffv, Venetta Wraggs, Shay 
Hopson. Second Row: Eric Robinson, Niecv Pusha, Kimberly 
Wilson. Thrid Row: Rick Hill, Kimanet Jones, James Rush. Fourth 
Row: Ciystal Bridges, Monica Davis, Joe White. Fifth Row: April 
Williams, Jason Latham, Gino Pern'. Back Row: Matt Downing, 
Demorris Dismuke, Aspen Cannon. Not Pictured: Mr. Stennis 
(Director), Undre White, Andre Stewart, Chasley Lewis, Crystal 
Hogan, Matthew Terrell, Tewisha Cotton, Keva Calhoun, Minteci 
Williams, Toni Jackson, Ursula Conley, Denitta Quinn, Chandra 
Foard. 



™ 46 ■* 




Srudem Chmsnan Fellowship 

Scooha Campus 

Front Row: (left to right) SCF sponsors Mary M. Smith, Rev. John 
Wood, Irene Nichols. Second Row: Holly Ward, Matthew Barrett, 
Steve Butler, Monica Davis, Crystal Bridges, Deborah Stewart, 
Chasley Lewis, Cassie Chance, Niecy Pushae, Destiny Drish, 
Crystal Miller. Third Row: Alicia Dufour, Will Pillard, fennisha 
Rush, Tasha Hopson, Tiffany Moore, Melanie Key, Summer 
Wooten, Christina White, Kristin McClelland, Felicia George, 
Lyndall Wood, Nancy Skelton, Keelv Rutledge, Jennifer Knox, 
Morgan McPhail, Marion Smoot, Shannon Brown. Back Row: 
David Smith, Patrick DiMichele, Andre Stewart, Andre Wright, 
Dusty Smith, Morris Bell, Josh Steele, John Alan Darnell, Matthew 
Terrell, Andrew Pilgrim, Rob Mc Arthur, Kennv Mason. 



Cneawe Arts Club 
Scooha Campus 

The Creative Arts Club is an organization created this year for stu- 
dents interested in the arts, whether it be visual art, music, drama 
or writing. Its purpose is to provide opportunities for the enjovment 
of creative expression in the arts. Students do not have to be an 
artist to be a member. The club is open to all students interested in 
expressing their creativity and enjoving the creativity of others. 
Some of the activities the club plans to do are enjov literary read- 
ings, art exhibits, and field trips to cultural events. The club meets 
weeklv in Aust Hall. Front Row: (left to right) Jeri Walton, Jana 
Moss, Gabe McCann, Donnie Stokes. Back Row: Mandy Wells, 
Kristina Garrison, Jennifer Hester, sponsor Terry Cherry, Jennifer 
Lewis, Russ Farris, Yvonne Parr, Raymond Gibson. 





Dnaooa Cluh 

Scooha Caaipus 

The Drama Club is an organization that promotes the art of the 
theatre. This club gives all students interested in theatre a chance to 
experience comedy and tragedy to the fullest. Members of the 
Drama Club, advised bv Marie Gordon, build the Beauty and Beau 
set, as well as the Christmas production sets. In the spring of each 
year, the club produces a play for the annual Pine Grove Festival. 
This plav is performed for all EMCC students and families to enjoy. 
Front Row: (left to right): Gene Perry, Gabe McCann, Mrs. Gordon, 
Otis Bumpers, Josh Steele. Second Row: Nakesha Vasser, Angel 
Williams, Elizabeth Thomas, Selena Davis, Tiffany R. Jones, 
Minted Williams. Back Row: Summer Wooten, Kimanet Jones, 
Tiffany S. Jones. 



Phi Theia Kappa 



Scooha Campus 

Phi Theta Kappa-Eta Upsilon Chapter is an international com- 
munity college honor societv that promotes hallmarks of scholar- 
ship, leadership, service, and fellowship. Members of PTK must be 
invited into the club based on academic achievements. Lucy Hull 
advises the club with the help of Janet Briggs. 
Front Row: (left to right) Cheryl Senate, Michele Guadango, 
Morgan McPhail, Weslev Clav, Kristina Garrison, Melanie Kev, 
Ashley Knight, Jamie Cherry. Second Row: Michele Preslev, Kellv 
Peoples, Erica Ray, Jennifer Hester, Kavla Murphy, Cora McDuffy, 
Mrs. Janet Briggs, Marion Smoot. Back Row: Mrs. Lucv Hull, 
Joshua Hailev, Ben Earnest, David Smith, Josh Perry, Shawntez 
Williams. 




o«j 3n,za V 

™ 47 ■* 



scuoepc RecRuteeRs 

SCOOBA CAMPUS 

The Student Recruiters are an organization that helps to bring new 
students to EMCC. The student recruiters visit the high schools in 
the district and work on campus with the recruiter to encourage 
prospective students to attend EMCC. Each vear, EMCC also has 
davs where local high schools are invited to tour the school. 
Students who wish to become a recruiter must fill out an application 
and interview with the campus recruiter. Their job is to influence 
high school students to consider the programs and opportunities at 
our college and help them understand what EMCC is all about. 
Front Row: Elise Malette, Bailev Patterson, Jennifer Knox. Second 
Row: Chandra Foard, Marquita Alford, Amber Lunsford, Jackie 
Elder, Piper Sharp, Jennifer Hester. Back Row: Kimanet Jones, 
Monica Davis, Cassie Atkins, Kellv Johnson, Lauren Hester. 





Cl)OtR 



SCOOBA CAXDPUS 

The choir is an organization which was created to enhance the 
voices of EMCC students. This club is open to all students inter- 
ested in singing. Each vear, club members produce a Christmas 
musical for countv schools. 

Front Row: Mrs. Brenda DiMichele, Yulonda Reed, Airon Hollidav, 
Piper Sharp, Crystal Miller, Annette Creel, Shundra Jenkins, 
Amanda Harpole, Jackie Elder, Chaslev Lewis. Second Row: 
Jeanisha Rush, Melissa Minor, Felecia George, Camillia Foote, 
Marshetta Little, Cora McDuffv, Kimanet Jones, Tiffanv Moore, 
Lyndall Wood, Jennifer Knox. Back Row: Jason Latham, Seth 
Cumberland, Rick Hill, Fernandez Tavlor, Albert Goodwin Jr. 



music tteAceR ojorks1x)p 

SCOOBA CAlWUS 

The Music Theatre Workshop is an organization that works with 
the EMCC Choir to produce a Christmas musical for area elemen- 
tary school students. The musical is full of bright costumes, happy 
faces, and not to mention, Jollv OF Saint Nick and his fleet of rein- 
deer, headed up by Rudolph's shiny red nose. 
Front Row: (left to right) Mrs. Brenda DiMichele, Patrick 
DiMichele, Kim Mowrv, Crvstal Hogan, Jason Letham, Chandra 
Foard, Destinv Drish, Kellv Johnson. Second Row: Devron Watson, 
Tasha Hopson, Rob McArthur, Holly Ward, Alicia Dufour, Kate 
Fleming, Andre Wright. Back Row: Summer Wooten, Marion 
Smoot, Shannon Brown, Jennifer Fleming, Dustv Smith. Not 
Pictured: Tori Carroll, Seth Cumberland, Scottv Elliot, Chastlev 
Louis, Gino Perry, Linda Sciple, Pam Smith, Chris Watson, Katie 
Zalme, Albert Goodwin Jr., George Spinks. 





Reflections 

SCOOBA CAMPUS 

The Reflections is an organization that consists of a select 
vocal/instrumental ensemble. This group provides music for audi- 
ences of all ages and musical tastes with a repertoire ranging from 
pop to country, as well as contemporary classics and rock-n-roll. 
The ensemble provides music for the sporting events, Homecoming 
events, Beautv and Beau, the Pine Grove Festival, the Mississippi 
Communitv/Junior College Choral Festival, as well as the graduation 
commencement exercises. Front Row: (left to right) Rob McArthur, 
Seth Cumberland, Demorris Dismuke. Second Row: Piper Sharp, 
Jennifer Knox, Jennifer Fleming, Crvstal Hogan, Mrs. Brenda 
DiMichele. Back Row: Al Goodwin Jr., Dustv Smith, Rodnev 
Outlaw. 



™ 48 -* 



\. \ 




cbe syzyqg scaff 

SCOOBA CAmPUS 

Svzvgv is an organization that promotes creative writing and aims 
to improve students' writing abilities. Members of the Svzvgv staff 
must have an interest in writing, have reasonably good English skills 
and an interest in literature. The staff produces a yearly literary 
magazine that is unveiled during the annual Pine Grove Festival. 
The first copy is presented to the Academic Dean by the magazine's 
editor. This year the magazine is headed by Kenneth Turner with 
assistance from Martha Taylor and Janet Briggs. 
Front Row: (left to right) Kelly Johnson, Melanie Key, Jennifer 
Lewis, Angel Williams. Back Row: Shawntez Williams, Martha 
Taylor, Kenneth Turner, Janet Briggs, Fred Murray. 



che colleqfAT) scaff 

SCOOBA CAMPUS 

The Collegian staff is an organization that produces the campus 
newspaper. Anyone interested in journalism, public relations, or 
simply has a love for writing is invited to join the club. The onlv 
requirement is that one must have fairly good writing skills. The 
Collegian is produced six times per year, three times per semester. 
The paper is the official newspaper of East Mississippi Community 
College. It is distributed throughout the Scooba and Golden 
Triangle campuses, and the Columbus Air Force Base, Meridian 
Naval Air Station, and the Macon extensions of EMCC. 
Front Row: (left to right) Tiffany Moore, Melanie Key, Kelly 
Johnson, Cassie Chance, Shannon Brown, Dr. Conrad DiMichele. 
Back Row: Andrew Pilgrim, Matthew Darnell, Patrick DiMichele, 
George Spinks. 





che Uop's pRfoe bapo 

SCOOBA CACrtPUS 

The EMCC Lion's Pride Band is an organization that provides 
music for many campus activities such as home football games, bas- 
ketball games, and pep rallies. Members of the band also divide into 
smaller groups to form the Jazz Band and the Symphonic Band. 
These two bands perform Christmas and Spring concerts each year. 
The members of this year's band are: Alisha Acker, Terrell Ash, 
Chervl Beatv, Amario Bovd, Aspen Cannon, Naquietta Conner, 
Annette Creel, Alicia Dufour, Orlando Ellerby, Belinda Forest, Jon 
Detrick Grissom, Demorris Dismuke, Garthia Halbert, Toureen 
Hendricks, Hansel Jackson, Crystal Miller, Melissa Minor, Lonell 
Richey, James Rush, Andre Stewart, Fernando Tavlor, Elizabeth 
Thomas, Derrick Wallace, ICeith Webb, Roger White, Lyndall 
Wood. This vear's Drum Major is Garthia Halbert. 



che Uop SCAFF 

SCOOBA CACrtPUS 

The Lion Staff is an organization intended for students interested 
in journalism, advertising, and public relations. Each vear the staff 
creates an original edition of the EMCC vearbook, The Lion. The 
goal of each vear's staff is to create a unique edition of the EMCC 
vearbook for students and faculty to enjoy for years to come. This 
club follows every activity on campus and records them for all to 
witness again and again. At the end of the vear, the yearbooks are 
distributed throughout the campus for all to admire. 
Front Row: (left to right) Cassie Chance, Chandra Foard, Jennifer 
Hester, Lauren Hester. Back Row: George Spinks, Monica Davis, 
Shannon Brown, Kelly Johnson. 




Bv** nizat S 
™ 49 ■* 



Delia Epsilon Chi-Mankeiing 

Golden Tmangle Campus 

The Marketing Chapter of Delta Epsilon Chi is a student-cen- 
tered organization providing leadership and personal development 
designed specifically for students preparing for marketing related 
careers. The chapter provides numerous opportunities to develop 
professional skills hv attending state, regional and national confer- 
ences and competitons. 

First Row: (left to right) fohn Massev, Malika Watkins, Tara 
Deason, Melva Clark, Balke Hanson, Eunice Shelton, Rashell 
Hopkins, Patricia Wilson, Chip Wells, Pan Phillips, Kattie Wilson, 
Kim Rice, and Melanie Sander-Advisor. Second row: Caroline 
Bass, Kim Hovle, Brant Johnson, Rob Mclntvre, Levorn Daniels, 
Joev Ingram, Shae Jones, Angel Stovall, JoLee Clark. 





Deha Epsilon Ch- 
Banhnq and Finance 
Golden TRiaiiQle Campus 

The Banking and Finance Chapter of Delta Epsilon Chi serves stu- 
dents preparing for careers in the finance and business world 
through the banking curriculum. Pictured: (left to right) Janet 
Cullett-Advisor, Tarha Sharp, Latasha Poe, Doris Pavne, Bavonca 
Collins, Anita Lindsev, Tomeka Ivory, Mitzi Clav, Shay Glenn, 
Carolvn Brewer, Tata Vaughn, Jovce Davis, Kim Hill, Cynthia 
Ridenson, Erica Edwards, Tasha Crawford, Marquetta Spenser, 
Catrina McBride, Weslev Duncan, Tangiel Harris, Latonya Gray, 
Lakisha Emerson, Candv Bradlev, Shemeka Frazier, Sharon Harris, 
Tiran Devers, Debra Tuggle, Jennifer King, Kim Earvin, Pamela 
Jones, Linda Butler. 



Deha Epsilon Chi- 
Hoiel and ResTaimam 

Golden Tmanqle duvpus 

Students enrolled in Hotel and Restaurant Management, 
Marketing Management, and Fashion Management who are plan- 
ning careers in the food service and hospitality industries participate 
in the Hotel and Restaurant Management Chapter of Delta Epsilon 
Chi. 

Seated: (left to right) Pansv Brown, Sheena Jordan, Kenva Pettv, 
Phyllis Brewer. Standing: Linda Farrar-Advisor, Nicole Brown, 
Josette Brown, David Hoskins, Brandv Washington, Clark McCullv, 
Josetta Jefferson, Rasheda Washington, Fredrick Turner, Laurie 
Porter. 





Vocanonal Indusimal 
Cluhs op Amemca 

Golden TmanQle Caaipus 

The Vocational Industrial Clubs of America is an organization con- 
sisting of students majoring in trade, technical and occupational 
fields. 

Pictured: (left to right) Derica Howard, Crag Johnson, Marcus 
Johnson, Kelon Midcalf, Damarie Smoot, Detrick Doss, Maurice 
Dean, Larrv Willis, monica Williams, Gary Burtlett, Jakob Baird, 
John Winters, Teri Henson, Lakeisha Clav, Jennifer Kev, Montreso 
Jackson, Darren Macon, Rohnda Galberth, Brooks Swink, 
Christopher Norrell, Dale Morrow, Lee Autrev, Rvan Kimbrough, 
David Beall, Jason Cannon, John Hamlin. 



<y<P niz *% 

— 50-* 




euLft 



U ; 07 




Associcmon oj: InponmaTion 

Technology Vnopessionais 

Golden Tmangle Campus 

Participation in AITP develops a better understanding of the 
nature and functions of data processing, promotes sound general 
principles in data processing and examines technical methods with 
a view toward their improvement. Club membership is available to 
any full-time student majoring in the field of data processing. 
Seated: (left to right) Jean Greg, Christina Faulkner, Sara Hanson, 
Myisha Cole, Dot Lane, Sandra Coleman. Standing: Allen Ming, 
Christopher Youngblood, Daniel Powell, Brian Mead, Brad 
Courtney, David Ellis. 



Realrh OccupanonaL 
Srudems of Awenica 
Golden Tmangle Campus 



First Row: (left to right) Belinda Mead, Margaret Scrock, Jennifer Croing, 
Diana Johas, Catherine Gibson, Shiketa Barry, Tracy Savage, Shelia Brown, 
Judv Wolanek, Moniqe Stevenson, Rikki Donald. Second row: Michael 
Melcha, Veronica Ealon, Ebonv Tenia, Amanda Woodham, Hettie Sellers, 
Shylanda Wimmons, Jamonica Swaniga, Carmen White, Rebecca Jones, Love 
Hemming, Stephanie Hill, Melissa Rhodes, Evondia Roseburg, Tameka 
McCloud. Third Row: Sandra Edmonds, Jodie Vaughn, Richellette Hones, 
Many Patterson-Davis, Jaren Paisone, Ashlev White, Susan Martin, Carmen 
Anderson, Julie Gillis, Bridget McGregor, Tamma Terrell, Angela Ivy, 
Kvmberlv Lebbetter, Paula Jones. 





Siubem Govemcnem Associcmon 

Golden Tmangle Campus 
The Student Government Association serves as a liaison between 
the student bodv and the administration. It is composed of class rep- 
resentatives who are nominated from each academic, career, and 
technical program and elected through a general election. The organ- 
ization acts as the voice of the student bodv in presenting informa- 
tion and ideas to the EMCC administration. 

Seated: (left to right) Josette Brown, Lorie Flemings, Sulata Young, 
Vernitta Mosley, Jean Greggs, Amanda Avcock. Standing: Chris 
Erby, John Massey, Craig Johnson, Greg Myers, Hollv Ohs. 



Vhi Beia laoohda 
Golden Tmangle Campus 

Phi Beta Lambda is a non-profit educational association of student 
members preparing for careers in business. The purpose of Phi Beta 
Lambda is to develop competent, aggressive, business leadership, to 
increase interest in the intelligent choice of business occupation and 
to encourage improvement in scholarship. 

Seated: (left to right) Trim Dendy-Advisor, Zelma Fulgham- 
Advisor, Marilyn Doolittle-Advisor, Mechelle Blair, Ardra Morgan, 
Katrina Andrews, and Gennice Moore. Standing: Lakita Bush, 
Vanessa Hickman, Robert Bessey, Hope Holley, Bernice Brandon, 
Sherman Butler, Jennifer Peeples, Alfreda Walker, Livia Yarbrough, 
Odie Macon, Carolyn Pointer. 




— 51^ 



l)eAlcl) CARe asstscapc 

ORQAPfZACfOP 

SCOOBA CAMPUS 

This is a new organization on the Scooba campus, designed this 
year for students in the Health Care Assistant program. Students in 
this organization participate in fund raisers for charities and organ- 
izations such as Relav for Life and United Wav. The organization 
plans to promote health care in the community. 
Front Row: Tameka Jamison, Amie Jackson, Shatina Simpson. 
Second Row: Shekelia Tisdale, Shartisa Stewart, Sharonda Hopson, 
Yalonda Glass, Deandra Lockett. Back Row: Pamela Smoot, Avesha 
Stewart, Alicia Williams, Alexis Jamison, Tina Moslev, Larina 
Gradv, Tisha Bourrage. 





Fonesotg cLub 

SCOOBA CAIDPUS 

The Forestry Club provides students with the opportunity to get 
involved in an organization that promotes forestrv and land man- 
agement practices. Members of this club work together to organize 
fund-raisers and field trips. These trips help to promote a better 
understanding of our natural resources and soil. This club is also a 
member of the Mississippi Adopt-A- High wav program and has 
established a recvcling program for the Scooba campus of EMCC. 
Front Row: (left to right) T.J. Prisock, Bass Smith, Dustv Ezelle, 
Kurt Shepard, Ben Smith, Eric Jones, Addv Clark, Patrick 
DiMichele. Back Row: Mr. Andrew Couch, Luke Holeman, Ben 
Shelton, Ward McGee, David Dees, Orlando Ellerbv, Devron 
Watson, Kelvin Gordon, Josh Thompson, Ira Ben, Mr. Bob Walker. 



OPCfCAL ClUB 



SCOOBA CACrtPUS 

The Optical Club is an organization for Optical Technology majors. 
All freshmen and sophomores enrolled in Optical Technology are 
encouraged to become members of the club. Each year, the club 
takes various field trips around the state and learns more about the 
human eve and how to care for it. 

Front Row: (left to right) Jennifer Evans, Rosalvn Dismuke, 
Marshetta Little, Colleen Wells. Second Row: Christy Conner, 
Deidra Lewis, Dallas Jones, Tameka Gladuev, Cheiyl Clark. Third 
Row: Mattie Madison, Sandra Lucas, Hope Lincoln, Debbie Stuart, 
Monique Edwards, Jackie Gradv, Yolanda Price. Back Row: Darlene 
Spencer, Km Grace, Yolanda Reed, Casey Fox, Eddie Sciple. 





sfqcryv pW sfqoiA 

SCOOBA CAMPUS 

Sigma Phi Sigma is an organization for Funeral Service Technology 
majors. Club members are given a chance at hands-on training in 
their chosen profession. The club members are taught ethics, pro- 
fessionalism, and moral character. This organization gives students 
a way to learn more about the funeral service business and a way to 
meet business contacts. 

Front Row, Sitting: (left to right) Chris Coleman, Cecelia Sellers, 
Bryant Mitchell, Mollv King, Stephanie McCune. First Row, 
Standing: Demorris Dismuke, Debra Sanders, Andv Reffett, Delina 
Henderson, Mona Robinson, Miracle Crump, Joyelle Lathan, 
Rodnev Garmon, Back Row, Standing: Mark Smith, Tviese Brown, 
Mike Atwood, Katrina Custer, Koney Thompson, Hal Smith. 



~ $2 "* 




VOCACfOPAl fpOUSCltf Al ClUBS Of 
A^eRfCA 

SCOOBA CAMPUS 

The Vocational Industrial Clubs of America is an organization 
that consists of students majoring in trade, technical and occupa- 
tional fields. VICA on the Scooba Campus consists of Automotive 
majors. This organization has been reinstated on the Scooba 
Campus this vear. 

Front Row: (left to right) Russell Rivers, David Outlaw, Antonio 
Anthonv, Don McCov, Marcus Smith, Angel Polanco, Back Row: 
Demetrica Outlaw, Tommy Gandy, Quinton Williams, Timothy 
Mills, Chris Coleman, Tonv Robinson, Matthew Johnson, Joe 
Jones, Matthew Barrett. 



Fellcxusbfp op cl)Rf scfAD ACl)Leces 

SCOOBA CA01PUS 

Fellowship of Christian Athletes is an organization designed for 
Christian students to fellowship and unite in the love of Jesus. FCA 
gives athletes and coaches a chance to come together with other 
Christians and worship Jesus Christ. 

Front Row: Dustin Pounders, Destiny Drish, Lvndall Wood, 
Melanie ICev, Cassie Chance, Morgan McPhail, Natalie Williams. 
Second Row: Drew Powell, Clint Richards, Josh Perry, Josh Snider, 
Allison Power, Lauren Hester, Jackie Elder, ICavla Murphv, Kelly 
Peoples, Margaret McClure, Michael Johnson. Third Row: Ivennv 
Mason, Chase Spencer, Joel Patrick, Jennifer Hester, Keelv 
Rutledge, ICimanet Jones, Kati Fleming, Josli Steele. Back Row: Rob 
McArthur, Patrick DiMichele, Chris Watson, Josh McCartv, Lee 
Bovd, Chad Carlson, Wade Whitaker, Robert Curry. 





Pl)f BeCA lAMBA 

SCOOBA CAmPUS 

Phi Beta Lamba is a nonprofit educational association of student 
members preparing for careers in business. PBL provides support for 
business students and enhances and increases their knowledge about 
business. Front Row: (left to right) Rick Hill, Steve Butler, Derrick 
Minor, James Rush, Elizabeth McNutt, Adrienne Cole, Monique 
Bester, Lora McCullough, Patricia Robertson. Back Row: Alma 
Wren, Rosemary Parson, Christina Brashee, Patricia Triplett, 
Charlesha Stewart, Courtney Poe, Cledeen Dotson, Tenisha Bland, 
Chassitv Rush, Dorothv Odom, Chassitv Rush, Takisha Neal. 



scuOeDC qoveRpmepc ASSOCtACfoi) 

SCOOBA CAMPUS 

The Student Government Association is an organization that is 
made up of class representatives chosen to best serve the interests of 
the student bodv. These representatives gather ideas, suggestions 
and opinions from other members to be discussed at their meetings. 
SGA makes recommendations to the administration, who then con- 
siders the request. Not onlv does SGA work hard, but it gives them 
the opportunity to communicate with people that share in the same 
interests. These students are considered the voice of the student 
bodv on the Scooba campus of EMCC. Each year, new officers are 
chosen for SGA. This vear the officers are Crystal Hogan, Morgan 
McPhail, Geno Perry, and Dusty Smith. 




- S3 "* 



UODS PRf D€ BAPO 



Below: Alisha Acker and Cheryl Beaty - Saxaphones 



The EMCC Lions' Pride 
Band was reinstated in 1994. 
In their first year of dutv, the 
band had twelve members but 
has grown considerably ever 
since. It is now one of the 
most well known organiza- 
tions on campus. It is hard 
not to take notice of the band. 

The EMCC "Pride" Band 
continues to perform faithful- 
ly under the direction of first 
vear director Mr. Ron Posev, 
who came to EMCC after a 
stellar career as band director 
for several educational institu- 
tions. This vear the "Pride" 
filled the nights with their 
special hits. The band also 
showed their pride by attend- 
ing home football games 
faithfully. During the vear, 
the band also wowed the 
EMCC students and staff 
with several concerts. 

It is half time during a foot- 
ball game. Hundreds of 
EMCC football fans are sit- 
ting on the edges of their seats 



in the Sullivan-Windham 
Stadium. What are thev wait- 
ing so anxiouslv for? To hear 
the red, black, and white 
cloaked figures, the EMCC's 
Lions Pride Band, share their 
spirit with their rousing 
music. Wherever thev go, the 
band alwavs carries them- 
selves with spirit, jov, and 
Lions "Pride." 

The members of this year's 
band are: Alisha Acker, 
Terrell Ash, Cheryl Beatv, 
Amario Bovd, Aspen Cannon, 
Naquietta Conner, Annette 
Creel, Alicia Dufour, Orlando 
Ellerbv, Belinda Forest, Jon 
Detrick Grissom, Toureen 
Hendricks, Hansel Jackson, 
Crystal Miller, Melissa Minor, 
Lonell Richev, James Rush, 
Andre Stewart, Fernando 
Taylor, Elizabeth Thomas, 
Derrick Wallace, Keith Webb, 
Roger White, and Lvndall 
Wood. This vear's Drum 
Major is Garthia Halbert. 

- GS 



Above right: Lyndall Wood and Elizabeth Thomas - Flute 



Center: Melissa Minor, Naquietta Conner, and Annette Creel 

Clarinet 




Above: EMCC's Color Guard: Crystal Miller - Flag Captain, 
Garthia Halbert - Drum Major, and Belinda Forest - Saxaphone 



Right: Amario Boyd, Samoria Conner, and Camillia Foote - Trumpet 






o^ an,za V 
- 54 "* 



Below, From Top, Back Row: (left to right) Matthew Downing, Taureen Hendrix. Second Row: Jason Latham, Roderick White, Rod Porter. 

Third Row: Aspen Cannon, Terrell Ash, Jon Derrick Grissom, James Rush, Derrick Wallace, Fernando Taylor. Fourth Row: Hansel Jackson, 

Amario Boyd, Camillia Foote, Samoria Conner, Cheryl Beaty, Alisha Acker, Lonell Richey. Fifth Row: Belinda Forest, Elizabeth Thomas, 

Naquietta Conner, Lyndall Wood, Melissa Minor, Annette Creel, Crystal Miller. Front-Center: Garthia Halbert 




"Band is great. It 
is a lot of fun and 
creates opportuni- 
ties that I would 
not be able to 
experience." 
Lyndall Wood 
Freshman 




"I am glad that I 

got involved in 

band. It has 

allowed me to 

meet many new 

people and make 

friends." 
Garthia Halbert 

Freshman 

~* 



Above: Front Row: (left to right) Aspen Cannon, Derrick 

Wallace, Lonell Richey, Terrel Ash, Jason Latham. Back 

Row: Roderick White, James Rush, Jon Derrick Grissom, 

Fernandos Taylor, Rod Porter, and Hansel Jackson - 

Percussion 



Left: Taureen Hendrix and Matthew Downing - Tuba 



c* nte «V 

- 55 ■* 



"I chose EMCC 
because it was 
close to home 
and because I 



ana Decause i ^h 

wanted to ^^^ 

UleAtth Op Kjiouiledge 

attend a junior J ^^J 



college before 
attending a 
senior college. 
I like attending 
classes at EMCC 
because of the 
small student/ 
teacher ratio 
and because 
they are willing 
to help students 
one on one," 
said Shereka 
Bush. "At EMCC 
you are known 
by your name, 
where at a sen- 
ior college you 
are known by a 
number. EMCC 
is a wonderful 
school and I 
have enjoyed 
my past two 
years here. I 
will truly miss 
this place. I will 
highly recom- 
mend students 
attend EMCC." 



Above right, 
Krystal King, 
Jana Moss, and 
Austyn Gordon 
pay attention in 
Mrs. Gordon's 
speech class. 

Right, Kelly 
Peoples, Danita 
Richardson, 
Jessica Vaughn, 
Shalandria 
Darden, Minteci 
Wiliams and 
Natalie 

Williams, mem- 
bers of Mrs. 
Judd's Botony 
class, go out- 
side to identify 
types of grass. 



EMCC allows its students a wealth 
of academic, career, and technical 
education. 

Academic programs give students 
the opportunity to transfer courses to 
a university, while technical or career 
programs allow students to obtain an 
associate of applied science degree or 
certification. 

The career-technical programs offer 
students the opportunity to get real 
life experiences and abilities needed to 
survive in today's fast-paced job mar- 
ket. Students obtain the valuable skills 
of responsibility, punctuality, leader- 
ship, teamwork, problem solving, and 
professionalism, and they exercise 
their minds by learning information 
that pertains to their field of studies. 

Tech-Prep, Work Based Learning, 
Job Placement, Special Populations, 
Adult Basic Education, and Continuing 
Education are unique services offered 
by EMCC. All of these programs give 
students the knowledge needed to 
prepare students for their futures. 

EMCC treasures every academic, 
technical and vocational program on 
its campuses. The classes and pro- 
grams offer a wealth of knowledge for 
any student who treasures the future 
and wants to improve his or her way 
of life. 

- Lauren Hester 





program 

" 56 " 




Left, Marques 
Sykes works on his 
masterpiece in Mr. 
Cherry's ceramics 
class. 

Above, health care 
assistant majors 
Sharonda Hopson 
and Shatina 
Simpson practice 
using a blood pres- 
sure cuff on each 
other. 

Middle, Tony 
Robinson and 
Marcus Smith 
examine what's 
under the hood in 
automotives class. 

Immediately 
above, Ben Smith 
and Dusty Ezelle 
take a test in 
forestry class on 
the identification of 
leaves. 



progra/^ 

" 57 " 



Creativity in 
the Making 



Fine Arts 



Scooba Campus 



I he line arts department provides educa- 
tion tor Lnglish. Art, Speech, Drama, and 
Foreign Language majors. Anv student thai 
has interest in any ol these majors is com- 
pelled lo use their wealth ol talent and 
imagination lo their lull potential. I he 
Fine drove Festival is a great example ol 
what these creative minds have accom- 
plished. "LAIC C has a really good pro- 
gram. It is a good place lor an art stu- 
dent lo develop his hidden talents, says 

I erry C herry, line arts chairman and art 
instructor. Many students that arc enrolled 
in this program have had their knowledge 
ol art expanded lor the heller. As in the 
case ol C rystal 1 logan. she says, ' have 
always enjoyed art. since I was a little girl 

I his program will hopeiully help me to 
become a heller artist. Doing art makes 
me leel good. — C hanara roara 

Right, Mrs. Briggs helps Kim Warren with a class 
assignment. 



Right, Krystal King paints a future masterpiece in Mr. 
Lauderdale's painting class. 

Below, chorus tunes up their voices before they sing 
for Mrs. DiMichele. 






Above, Lonell Richey sketches his 
picture before he starts painting. 

Far right, Courtney Tannerbriel 
shows her artistic ability with 
one of her famous paintings. 



program 

~ 58 " 




Above, Annie Penick concentrates very hard to mold the clay just right in 
Mr. Cherry's ceramics class. 






Left, Trey Gibson and Ryan Gibson help each other 
with a class assignment in English Literature I. 

Below, Matt Lewis, Natalie Garton, Henry Barnett, 
and Peter Malone listen to lecture in speech class. 



Below, Crystal Hogan and Mr. Cherry 
prepare for art class. 




\bove, English instructor/softball Coach Pain Moore helps Hayes Rector with an assignment, while Allison Power and Keeley Rutledge work hard on their 
inglish papers. Mrs. Moore's English class always works on their writing skills. 

" 59 " 



Expanding 
the Mind 



Science 



Scooba Campus 



The EMC C science department includes 
all .science, mathematics, and compute 
courses. A wealth ol knowledge can be 
attained trom the many dilierent classes 
that are offered. 

II one is interested in science, the cours 
es ollered include anatomy and physiology, 
biology, chemistry, microbiology, organic 
chemistry, physical science, physics, and 
zoology. In main, one could 6ain consider- 
able Knowledge trom the choices ol algebra, 
trigonometry, calculus, math lor teachers, 
Unite math, statistics, or developmenta 
main. II one is interested in obtaining 
computer skills, one can choose between 
computer concepts, computer programming, 
and microcomputer applications. As one can 
see. the LlMC C science department has a 
variety ol courses, no matter what a stu- 
dent s major may be. — Linda Ijciple 

Right, Mrs. Judd explains a point to David Yeates and 
Marques Sykes in Bilogy I Lab. 




Right, Danita Richards, Kelly Peoples, and Natalie 
Williams gather information for their lab assignment. 



Below, Mrs. Sleppy's Computer class is working on a 
lab assignment in Microsoft Word. 



Above, Shawanda Readus takes 
notes in Physical Science class. 

Far right, Craig Reeves works on 
a computer assignment. 




Above, Mrs. Fulton's college algebra class listens and takes notes as she 
explains a new formula. 



" 60 " 



Left, Mr. Gibson helps Terrell Ash with his homework 
in Algebra class. 

Below. Morgan McPhail listens to a lecture in Mr. 
Skipper's chemistry class. 



Below, Mrs. Sleppy assists Chimere 
E wings with a computer problem. 




ibove, Mr. Skipper's class pays attention and tries to keep up with their note taking as he lectures about periodic tables and formulas. Chemistry has always 
een considered a hard subject by students, but Mr. Skipper explains the subject very well. 

— 61 " 



Past, Present, 
and Future 



Social Science 



Scooba Campus 



I he Social Sciences department lias 
always been a mainstay on EMC C s 
Scooba Campus. No mailer what the 
major, every student must have basic 
knowledge in at leasl one ol ihe many 
Social Sciences. 

I he Social Sciences locus on our hie 
with other people in group situations. 
I hey include anthropology) economics, histo- 
ry, political science, sociology, criminology, 
and the science ol law. Such subject areas 
as education, ethics, philosophy, psychology, 
biology, geography, medicine, art. and lin- 
guistics are also considered lo be part ol 
the Social Sciences. 

In the words ol the Social Sciences 
department director Or. Conrad \j'\S Iichele. 
"One ol the most important things in 
today s society is making a dillerence in 
any way you can. The Social Sciences 
allow and prepare students lo do just 
that. — George Spinhs 

Right, Cassie Atkins. Bo Blackledge. David Smith. Todd 
Harcrow, and Phillip Culpepper listen to Mrs. Hull's lecture. 



Right, Kurt Shepherd is concentrating on Mr. Salter's 
lecture in psychology. 

Below, Dennis Dupree is intensely listening to his pro- 
fessor's lecture for the day. 





Above, Nick Dimino listens care 
fully to his instructor. 

Far right, Mr. Salter gives a 
detailed lecture to his class. 



Above, Mr. Salter's class pays close attention to his lecture on the study 
of the mind and the founders of psychology. 



" 62 " 



Lett, Mr. Reeves talks with Chris Issac and helps him 
with a U.S. History question. 

Below, Chris Watson, John Allen Darnell, Trent Myers, 
Candice Spires, and Tori Carroll work hard in Western 
Civilization. 



Below, Niecy Pushae takes notes in 
U.S. History class. 




Above, the students of Mrs. Hull's Economics class pay close attention, listen extremely hard, and take careful notes on the topic of the day. This class is 
always full of interesting topics, and there is never a dull moment. 

\?rograo, s 

™ 63 " 



Foresters In 
The Making 



Forestry 



Scooba Campus 



The Forest I eelmology program is a 
two year technical program that produces 
highly motivated individuals to meet the 
need ol the growing lorest industry. Forest 
management through proper production, pro- 
tection and management ol limberlands and 
oilier forestry related crops is emphasized in 
this program. 

A variety ol learning experiences related 
to tree identification, soils, land and lorest 
measurement, limber and lorest products 
harvesting, growth processes ol timber 
stands, lorest protection, timber stand man- 
agement, and lorest products utilization arc 
ollered lor the students to participate in. 
I lie program combines lecture-based activities 
with laboratory Held experiences, tberelore 
giving the students valuable hands-on experi- 
ence. Many lab hours are spent collecting, 
researching, and elassdymg data Irom diller- 
ent lorests in the outlying area. With all 
this knowledge under their bells, the slu- 
dents are ready to meet the demands ol the 
job market in the loresl industry. — LS 

Right, the forestry dendrology class visits the Noxubee 
Refuge for a day of identifying trees and examining leaves. 



*K 




Right, Mr. Couch explains how to use the Global 
Positioning System to Ben Smith, Ward McGee, and 
Ira Ben. 

Below, the forestry class takes a trip to the Red Hills Mine in 
Ackerman, AL. This truck can haul 1 56 tons of dirt at one time. 





^S? 4 



Above, Devin Snowden takes a 
test on identifying different types 
of leaves. 

Far right, Orlando Ellerby and 
Ben Smith use the Global 
Positioning System for forest 
mapping. 



" 64 " 




Above, the foresty class visits the Lindon Lumber Company in Alabama. 
They watch closely as the guide demonstrates scaling hardwood. 



Injunes Mum 

Be Reports 

Ti- Too 



Left, Roderick Dale observes as Marshetta Little looks 
through the lensometer. 

Below, Roderick Dale looks through the lensometer to 
verify the power of the lens. 



Above, during class, Mr. Sciple advises Marshetta Little and Kim Grace on how to help a customer choose 
flattering frames for his or her face. 



: 




Below, Rosalyn Dismuke prepares 
materials for her lab assignment. 




Look Into 
My Eyes 



Ophthalmics 



Scooba Campus 



Ophthalmic I echnologv is a two- 
year technical program oltered on the 
Scooba campus. 1 o receive the train- 
ing the students need, the program 
lias top-ol-the-line equipment, even 
ollering a room resembling I lie Ironl 
ol an optician s store. I his room is 
complete with walls ol eyeglass 
Irames and stations where students 
learn to help customers lind the best 
lilting Irames. 

Hands-on experience in making 
lenses, dispensing glasses, selling 
Irames. and adjusting and repairing 
eyeglasses is acquired in the 
ophthalmics program. A ten-week 
internship with an optical lab or 
optical dispensary is required ol the 
students, giving them real-world 
experience. \\ lien the students gradu- 
ate, they can work lor an eye doctor, 
an optical lab. an independent opti- 
cian, or as a salesman lor a Irame 
or lens company. 

— Lilian Sciple 



program 

" 65 ~ 



Revving up 
for the future 



Automotives 



Scooba Campus 



The Automotive I echnology program on 
the Scooba campus is committed to keeping 
up with tne ever-changing automotive indus- 
try. \\ iln ears becoming more computerized 
eaeli year, it is essential to try to beep up 
to date willi repair technology. 

Between labs, lectures, and demonstra- 
tions, tne students are given an opportunity 
to learn every aspect ol automotive repair. 
Mr. Earl Oliver, instructor lor the 
Automotive I echnology program, oilers sever- 
al years experience and a wealth ol knowl- 
edge to bis students on the Scooba campus. 

The automotive students are given a 
choice between two programs: (l) a nine 
month curriculum that leads to a vocational 
certificate in Automotive Mechanics or, \~2) a 
two year curriculum that leads to an 
Associate ol Applied Science degree in 
Automotive I echnology. In either option, the 
graduates learn the basic skills and the tech- 
nical knowledge to properly diagnose and 
repair late model vehicles. — US 

Right, Russell Rivers, Timothy Mills, Allen Hopkins, 
and Matthew Barrett work on an engine in lab. 



Right, Allen Hopkins and Ricky Benamon work 
together on a project. 

Below, Tony Robinson helps his classmate check the 
oil of a car during automotive class. 




;.:,; ;■:■;, ■ 


pr§ m 






.... ■ ■ 


' / \ 






; ; .-;;;f : ' 


1 

/ i i 






^J 




* ; 




^w 


^^. ■:.%. 




s 




Above, Matthew Barrett gets his 
hands dirty while working under 
the car. 

Far right, Mr. Oliver explains a 
procedure to Angel Polanco and 
Don McCoy. 








Above, the front row of Mr. Oliver's Automotive Class, Matthew 
Johnson, Joe Odom and Don McCoy, listen to lecture. 



program 

' 66" 




Left, Tameka Jamison learns how to wash dentures 
during her lab class. 

Below, Latina Mosley and Tisha Bourrage are learning 
how to check temperature. 



Below, Shekelia Tisdale and Sharonda 
Hopson learn how to provide dental 
care for patients. 





Above, Mrs. Jennifer Hull teaches Shekelia Tisdale how to accurately read a scale and how to record the 
weight during class time in the Health Care Assistant program. 



Lending a 
helping hand 



Health Care 
Assistant 



Scooba Campus 



To become a Health Care 
Assistant, one must have a wealth ol 
dedication and caring, plus a working 
knowledge ol the health care held. 

The Heath Care /Assistant pro- 
gram at EMC C is a one semester 
course. Six classroom hours are put 
in each day until clinical training 
begins. 

I here are many occupations lor 
Health Care Assistants. I hey include 
working lor hospitals, home health, 
long term health, hospice, and mental 
health agencies. 

Not only does this class provide 
training, it provides the students with 
good work ethics and specilic charac- 
teristics needed lor the job. Instructor 
Jenniler Hull said that most people 
enter the Held ol Health Care 
Assistant to "provide quality care lor 
the basic need lor the patient. This 
job is a very satisfying occupation 
that provides tender loving care. 

— Lauren Hester 



program 

~ 67~ 



Windows of 
Opportunities 



Business Computers 



Scooba Campus 



kiMC.C. oilers two degrees in the 
Business I echnology program: Oiiice 

Systems I echnology and Microcomputer 
I echnology. An Oiiice Assistant Certificate 
is also available by completing the lirst 
vciir ol ibe Oiiice Systems Technology cur- 



Right, Sonya Brooks works hard on her assignment in 
Microsoft Word. 

Below, Kay Ratcliff, Latasha Jones, and LaKeshia 
McDade pay close attention to their spreadsheet proj- 
ect. 




riculum. 



Desktop publishing, database manage- 
ment, spreadsheet applications, word pro- 
cessing, oral and written communications, 
and ellective human relations are some ol 
the areas that are locnsed on in the 
Business 

I echnology program. Alter successfully com- 
pleting the required courses, a student is 
prepared lor employment in business, indus- 
try, and government organizations that use 
microcomputers. \\ ilb the world becoming 
more and more computerized, there is sure 
to be a big demand in the luture lor those 
individuals who possess this valuable know! 
edge. 

— Luton Sciple 

Right, Mrs. Calloway helps Chastity Rush with an 
assignment in Business Computers. 




Above, Tenisha Bland and James 
Rush follow the instructions in 
the book. 

Far right, Dorothy Odom follows 
directions to complete her class- 
work. 



" 68 " 




Above, Christina Brasher works on her typing skills as she tries to finish 
an assignment before class is over. 



Left, Matthew Terrell smiles for the camera while on 
his way to a convention. 

Below, members of the funeral service class pose for a 
picture at a convention in New Orleans. 




Below, Shavona Gandy, Hal Smith, 
and Bryant Mitchell listen to a speak- 
er at a convention in New Orleans. 



400 






Above, Danny Shumaker and Mike Atwood pay close attention to a lecture about the embalming process 
in a funeral services class taught by David Mullins. 



State of the 
Art Education 



Funeral 
Services 



Scooba Campus 



I he Funeral Services Technology 
program at LMCC is nationally 
accredited by the American Hoard ol 
FuneraJ Service Education. I lie goal 
ol the program is to provide training 
to prepare students lor entry level 
positions lollowing graduation and 
licensure. 

I lie classroom facilities include a 
lab equipped with up-to-date embalm- 
ing equipment and a new devotional 
chapel/display room used lor mock 
lunerals. I o put into practice the 
information learned in Restorative 
Art/C olor and C osmetics class, a new 
restorative art lab lias been added. 
The Funeral Services 1 echnology 
program is lortunate to have two 
experienced teachers: Mr. Don Webb 
and Mr. David Mullins. I bese two 
men oiler a wealth ol knowledge to 
the their students, preparing them to 
be efficient workers in the luneral 
home and other luneral service 
fields. - LS 



" 69 " 



Preparing for 
the Future 



Related Studies/ 
GED/Special Pops 



Scooba Campus 



I he Related Studies class assists slu- 
dents in eliminating academic dilliciencies 
relating to llicir vocational or technical pro- 
grams. Students arc helped in related stud- 
ies by Mrs. Irene Nichols on the Scooba 
campus. 

"It is not only a joy, but very reward- 
ing to see students reach their potential in 
learning, said Nichols. 

Mrs. Mary Smith serves students in 
special populations by counseling and 
recruiting, and she provides relerrals to 
helplul resources. 

1 be CiLlJ program is run by Mrs. 
Marion Sams. She instructs students in 
Adult Basic Education so they can prepare 
lor the CjEL) test. I bese ladies are some 
ol the college s pride and joy- 
Right, the Parenting Skills class receives valentines from Mrs. 
Smith. Their motto was "Put your heart into parenting." 




Above, Robert Cherry completes an 
assignment during the GED class. 

Far right, Mrs. Nichols advises Joe Joe 
Jones with a question in related studies 
class. 



programs 



Right, Morris Bill of Shuqualak speaks to the the Stress 
Management class in Special Populations. 

Below, Mrs. Marion Sams assists Euginia Boykins with a GED 
assignment on the computer. 




i 






1 !< 



~i 




Above, Carolyn Moore, an employee of the MS employment service, interviews Laura 
Shelton during related studies class. 



70 



Left, Related Studies instructor Gina Thompson checks a stu- 
dent's assignment. 



Below, Related Studies instructor Cindy Johnson and Omari 
Welles review his grades. 




Below, instructor Melissa Wilson and District 
ABE/GEP Director Andra Brown prepare to 
broadcast training over the Community 
College Network (CCN). 




Above, Special Populations Coordinator Brenda Wilson reviews her files on her students and their classes. 



Lending a 
Helping Hand 



Related Studies 
§ ABE/GED 



Golden Triangle Campus 



the Golden Triangle Campus oilers 
three programs to help students with 
their academic endeavors. 

The Related Studies program assists 
students in eliminating academic defi- 
ciencies relating to their vocational or 
career programs. Mrs. Cindy Johnson. 
Mrs. Gina I hompson and Mrs. lam 
Gox are instructors lor the Related 
Studies program. 

ABE/GED prepares students lor the 
GEO lest. Andra Brown is the district 
ABE/GED director lor the college, and 
Melissa Wilson is an instructor lor the 
Golden I riangle campus. 

The Special Populations Coordinator 
lor the Golden I riangle campus is 
Brenda Wilson, and the Basic Skills 
Specialist is Chrystal Newman. 

These helplul programs and the 
ladies who instruct them are the pride 
ol many at EMCC. 



* 71* 



Imaginative 
Perspective 



Fine Arts 



Golden Triangle Campus 



I he Division ol rine Arts provides 
students on the Golden I riangle 
Campus a liberal education thai eneour 
ages intellectual development and stimu- 
lates a hlc-long pursuit ol knowledge. 
"A strong background in the arts 
helps develop an imaginative, well-rounc 
ed student, says Jerry Davis. Cj I 
Academic Dean. 1 his background 
allows students to develop their analyti- 
cal abilities and to look at problems 
with a unique perspective. 

1 he division oilers a wide variety o 
classes designed to introduce students to 
the basic methods ol inquiry in diverse 
disciplines. Students improve their skills 
in writing and speaking, and broaden 
their perspectives on humanity and cul- 
ture in the natural and leehnologica 
world. 

— A/iWi/ie/ O/imi 



Right, Raven McGee and Emily Moore search the GT 
Library for information for their Comp. II papers. 

Below, Tracy Hampton gathers her notes and her 
thoughts before heading into speech class. 



Right, Jamie Johnson and Laura Black discuss their 
artistic perspectives. 




Above, Anna Horn tries to put 
the visual into words. 

Far right, Mrs. Elam describes 
the finer aspects of the art 
world to her Art Appreciation 
class. 



" 72 " 




Above, Field Johnson reviews his assignment before beginning research 
during an English Composition II project. 



Left, Ashley Cummings goes online to search for infor- 
mation for her English Composition II research paper. 

Below, Brian Cocke puts on his tie before making his 
biographical speech. 



Below, Jennifer Robinson adds to the 
pressure in speech class by videotap- 
ing speakers as they give their 
speeches. 




Above, Mrs. Grych gets a laugh as students present their source materials for their speeches. 



frogra^ 

" 73 " 



Understanding 
Our World 



Science 



Golden Triangle Campus 



I he Oolden I riangle C ampus 
Division ol Science complements the 
classes ollcrccl at lliMC C s other cam- 
puses. The division encompasses a sci- 
ence curriculum as well as math ant 
computer-based curricula. C lasses I'ange 
Irom biology lo college algebra and 
microcomputer applications. 

I he Science and I echnology pro- 
gram is designed to provide students 
with (undamental knowledge ol science 
and technology and how lo apply it by 
solving problems in a technological con- 
text, says instructor Jim I luerhamp. 

I he program is unique in that its 
locus is to provide students with basic 
technical knowledge lor a variety ol top- 
ics and lo expose students lo basic 
career inlormation within these areas. 
I his leaves the student with a variety 
ol options lollowing community college. 

- MG 

Right, Antonio Sudduth and Michael Jones test a 
laser beam. 



Right, Nathan Taylor checks the answers to his 
trigonometry homework before class starts. 

Below, Mrs. Jordan shows Shealyn Tullos how to use 
a microscope in her Biology I lab. 




Above, Kristi Gonzales memorizes 
elements off of the periodic table. 

Right, Joanna Sproggins makes 
sure her anatomy and physiology 
lab report corresponds with the 
evidence that she has found. 



" 74 " 




Above. Benny Gates and Jessica Hill use an automated milling machine 
during their science and technology assignment. 



Left, Edanil Neal and Pamela Wilson work to assemble 
the parts of a computer. 

Below, Catrina Kirk and Matt Haskins make models of 
different kinds of molecules in their Biology I lab. 



Below, John Williams carefully 
conducts a DNA test. 




Above, JoAnna Spraggins, Ziffie Mosley, Daisy Broome, and Robin Sowers examine human tissue under a microscope in their anatomy and physiology lab. 



" 7S " 



Analytical 
Thinking 



Social Science 



Golden Triangle Campus 



1 lie Social Science Division on 
tne Golden l rianqle C ampus serves 
a variety ol diiierent majors, includ- 
ing elemenlary education, special edu- 
cation, business, accounting, social 
work, liealtn and physical education, 
social sciences, political sciences, pre- 
benavioral law. and criminal justice. 

I o understand today s volatile 
political environment, tne study ol 
social science is imperative to today s 
college student. says Dr. Raj 
Shaunak, Economics Instructor on 
tne Golden I riangle C ampus. 
"Classes in political science. 
American government, and economics 
are designed to provide students with 
an in-deptn view ol now not only tne 
United Slates, but tne world oper- 
ates. 

- MG 

Right, a group of psychology students listen for their 
instructions. 



Right. Jessie Carter listens intently to a lecture on the 
Battle of Waterloo in his Western Civilization II class. 



Below, a group of Human Growth and Development 
students listen as the instructor gives each group 
their learning issue. 





. im5 m &• ik*™*** 



Above, William Ward and Adam 
Bardwick communicate with their 
instructor. 

Right, Heather Emory lectures 
to her Human Growth and 
Development class. 



program 

" 76 " 



Above, Brad Cox and Lauren Strickland take down lecture notes. 




Left, Shicconer Williams checks over her sociology 
notes before taking her first test. 

Below, Eileen Thompson, Pat Robinson, and Kevin 
Coggins listen to a lecture on Freud's psychosexual 
theories in psychology. 



Below, Wade Jones makes sure he is 
fully prepared for his psychology 
class. 




Above, a group of students work on their group learning assignments in Heather Emory's Human Growth and Development class. 



" 77 " 



On-The-Job 
Training 



Work Based Learnin 



Golden Triangle Campus 



\\ ork-Based Learning is a teaching 
strategy that blends classroom instruction 
and on-the-job experience lor community 
college students enrolled in a career/tech- 
nical program. I lie program prepares 
tliem lor careers in a Inynly leclinical 
workplace. \ Ins strategy bridges tlie yap 
between high scbool and post secondary 
education through an articulated program. 

According to \\ ork-Based Learning 
Coordinator Linda Gates, llie goal is to 
create clear pathways between school and 
the worklorce. 1 lopelully, students will 
become motivated, employers will be 
inclined to support educational goals, and 
teachers will be able to visualize and 
adopt a business perspective. Ultimately, 
a better prepared citizen and worker will 
be produced. 

-MG 



Right, Chief Schnell supervises David Hoskins at Old 
Waverly Golf Club. 



Right, Benjamin Turnipseed and Buddy Hudson work 
on an electrical project. 

Below, Lee Gillis and Greg Vanderburg team up to 
bend a conduit. 



Above, Linda Beam Smith works 
on a new design for her class. 



Far right, Cory Flye and 
instructor Steve Malone work 
on machine tool operations 
skills. 



" 78 " 




Above, John Jackson supervises Estella Payne at the Social Security 
Office. 




Left, hotel and restaurant management major Andrea 
Pool makes sure her table setting is placed just perfectly. 

Below, Daniel Huffman and Derek Ryland use a lab 
volt tester in their electrical technology class. 




.— ^ 








Below, Shylanda Simmons takes 
Hettie Sellat's blood pressure. 





Technical 
Preparation 



Tech Prep 



Golden Triangle Campus 



Students at EMCC prepare lor a wide 
range ol technical careers by engaging in 
active learning and skill preparation. 

In a world where rapid change is 
the rule, the goal ol lech Prep is lor 
all students to become proiicient learn- 
ers, competitive workers and responsi- 
ble citizens, lech Prep connects stu- 
dents to lile and ellectively blends aca- 
demic and career/technical education 
into a challenging, purposeful course ol 
study that can lead to a rewarding 
career or prepare students to turther 
their education. 

With technology at the lore- 
Iront ol our economy, it is impera- 
tive that EMCC graduates have the 
knowledge and skills to meet the 
demands ol the workplace, says 
Coordinator Ellen Shaw. 



Above, Victor Barnett operates a lathe in the machine tool operations lab area. 



- MG 



program 

" 79 ~ 



Preparing for 
the Unexpected 



Emergency Med Tech 



Golden Triangle Campus 



I lie September 1 1 tragedy in New 
i ork really gave the public an in-depth 
view ol this proiession, says Sanclv 
IVlapp, LM I instructor. "As uniortunate 
as that tragedy was. it gave people the 
opportunity to see the dedicated, special 
type ol person it lakes to train lor. and 
become an EMT. 

I he Lmer^ency Medical I echnician 
program prepares students to respond to 
medical emergency calls and evaluate the 
nature ol the emergency, take prompt 
action to reduce medical hazards, trans- 
port to receiving stations and serve as a 
technical assistant to the hospital emer- 
gency room stall. Specihc course content 
is based upon the National Department 
ol I ransporlation and the National 
Standards Curriculum. 

- MG 



Right, instructor Sandy IVlapp explains the day's exercise 



Right, Shanita McGee holds Olean Pittman's head to stabilize 
her neck and spine. 



Below, Heather Shaw, Olean Pittman, and Shanita McGee lis 
ten to the description of their emergency scenario. 




Above, instructor Sandy IVlapp shows 
how to adjust a neck brace. 

Far right, Heather Shaw breaks out the 
emergency gear and prepares to put a 
support vest on her "patient." 



program 

" 80 " 




Above, Stacy Manigo, Joseph Whittington, and Cvester Brand turn a patient, unfortu- 
nately, breaking his leg. 



Left, David Hood and Austin Reed select the tools they're going 
to need for the next job. 

Below, Nathaniel Peterson gets to the bottom of things while 




Below, Gus Riley secures a spark plug while 
looking at the work in front of him. 




Mwe, instructor Grady Graham waits patiently for an answer after posing a question to his freshman class. 



Running 
Smoothly 



Automotive* 



Golden Triangle Campus 



I he Automotive Services I cch- 
nology department oilers two pro- 
grams: a nine-month curriculum leacl- 
ng to a career certiiicate in auto- 
motive mechanics and, a two-year 
curriculum leading to an Associate of 
Applied Science degree in automotive 
technology. 

"Career opportunities are certainly 
out there. says instructor Grady 
Graham. " We ve never had problems 
placing students in good jobs: how- 
ever, there are more great opportu- 
nities lor graduates today than ever 
he I ore. 

The automotive programs provide 
students with the skills and knowl- 
edge to properly diagnose and repair 
late model vehicles, along with prob- 
lem solving techniques as well as 
computer and electronics diagnostics. 

- MG 



" 81" 



Critical 
Caring 



Nursing 



Golden Triangle Campus 



I his one-year program is a course ol 
study designed to prepare qualilied men 
and women to become practical nurses. 
Upon successfully completing the program, 
the graduate is eligible to take the 
National Council Licensure Examination 
lor Practical Nurses. 

I he nursing program oilers students 
classroom and laboratory instruction in 
areas such as vocational adjustments, basic 
nursing skills, nutrition, anatomy, human 
growth and development, pharmacology, 
maternal/child nursing, and emotional and 
mental illness. 

"1 work at Oktibbeha County 
Hospital, so I see instructors and students 
in the clinical setting. says student. Mary 
Patterson Davis. I wanted to be a part 
ol the class, and I m ihanldul lor the 
opportunity to train at EMCC . 

- MG 

Right, Shikeeta Barry, Angela Ivy, Shelia Brown and Jamonica 
Swanigan discuss moving patient, Jennifer Coring. 



Right, Mellisa Rhodes is all smiles after completing the infec 



tious waste removal training. 




Below, Catherine Gibson can hardly contain her happiness as 
she and other nursing students wash up for the next exercise. 



Above, Hettie Sellers takes a quiet 
moment to study in the lab. 

Far right, Rikki Donald uses the com- 
puter lab to begin reviewing for her 
state board examination. 



" 82 ™ 




Above, Nursing District Director Belinda Mead addresses students during one of their 
classes. 



Left, instructor Marilyn Doolittle assists Beulah Sherrod with a 
computer exercise. 

Below, instructor Trina Dendy shows Michelle Blair the finer 
points of hooking up a monitor. 



Below, Hope Holley awaits instructions on 
the next step to hooking up a computer. 





The Business 
of Learning 



Business 
Technology 



Golden Triangle Campus 



The Business I ecbiiology pro- 
gram prepares sjrjulual.es lor employ- 
ment in business, industry antl gov- 
ernment organizations lliat use 
microcomputers lo process and man- 
age information. I lie program oilers 
two degrees in the computer lield: 
Oiiice Systems I ecbiiology and 
Microcomputer I ecbiiology. 

Ollice Systems oilers a broad 
overview ol the ollice Junction with 
primary concentration on ollice skills. 
Microcomputer I ecbiiology includes 
software conbguralion. network 
administration and systems operation. 

I bis is a new start lor me. 
says student Carolyn Pointer. "My 
teachers are great, and learning 
more about computer operating sys- 
tems should belp me start a reward- 
ing career. 



Above, Rosie Bush, Connie Coleman and Livia Yarbrough concentrate on completing a business technology exam. 



MG 



~ 83" 



Must Be The 
Money 



Banking S Finance 



Golden Triangle Campus 



The Banking and Finance I echnology 
program provides an introduction and 
overview ol the financial services industry. 
It also provides opportunities lor students 
to develop basic linancial knowledge and 
abilities, along with the the required com- 
petencies and soeial skills necessary lor 
employment and advancement in the held 
ol linance. 

C ourses in tinance, computers and 
academics are included. I he program is 
designed to help students lake advantage 
ol the varied career opportunities available 
in North Mississippi in the lield ol 
linance. 

1 his program gives students the 
basic skills they need to acquire entry 
level positions in the lield ol linance serv- 
ices, says instructor Janet Ciullclt. 

Many ol the students in the program 
are currently working in the lield. 

- MG 

Right, Tamesha Brooks, Mrs. Janet Gullett, Tomeka Ivory, 
Contessa Ewing and Takeita Jackson sell candy for PBL. 




Right, Linda Butler follows along in the text while listening to 
the lecture. 

Below, Carolyn Brewer, Missy Clay and Wesley Duncan try to 
keep up while taking notes. 




§H mmk « y| |M 



Above, Jennifer King goes over her 
notes before tackling an exam. 



Far right, Erica Evers, Tosha Crawford 
and Frances Devers listen intently. 




Above, instructor Janet Gullett gives out assignments to the 10 a.m. Banking and 
Finance class. 



" 84 " 



Left, Brad Gary takes a second to look up some terminology in 
the text. 

Below, Trivena Johnson, Byron Hampton, Jessica O'Neal, and 
Shirley Richey work together developing a weh site. 




Below, Christopher Youngblood gets a kick 
out of Sandra Coleman's assignment. 



Above, Maurico Clark and Michael Crawford plan how to tackle the next obstacle in their group project. 



A New Way 
to Network 



Local Area 
Network 



Golden Triangle Campus 



Students entering the Local Area 
Network I eelmology program will be 
given the opportunity lo train in a 
hands-on environment in the held ol 
information technology. 

EMCC s L/\N curriculum is a 
Cisco Local Academy. Students lake 
a lour semester program as part of 
the LAN curriculum which will teach 
the principles ol designing, hudding 
and maintaining networks. Upon com- 
pletion ol the program, students will 
quality lo register lor the certification 
examination lor the Cisco Certilicd 
Network Associate (CCNA). 

I really like the hands-on experi- 
ence added to the lectures. says 
Dot Lane. LAN student. "I was 
really drawn lo the Cisco affiliation 
and the courses in networking and 
UNIX systems." 

- MG 



~ 85" 



Creating a 

New You 



Cosmetology 



Golden Triangle Campus 



"I ve always dreamed ol a career in 
which 1 could make other people led 
good about themselves, says cosmetology 
student Jessica I lumps. "1 love doing 
hair and makeup lor events, and 1 enjoy 
the interaction within the program. 

The Cosmetology program at the 
Golden I riangle Campus oilers students 
the training needed in order to acquire a 
license. Students receive a career cerlili- 
cate and qualify to take the state hoard 
examinations, allowing them to work as 
cosmetologists, eslhelicians, or nail/colo 
technicians. Students receive 230 hours o 
theory and 1.270 hours ol supervised 
skills training and clinical work over the 
ten-month program ol study. I he ratio o 
lab hours to lecture is 3 to 1 providing 
rewarding, hands-on experience. 

- MG 



Right, Shameka Brooks and Kayse Gayliss work on perm 
wraps. 




Above, Lashuna Tillman creates some 
marvelous finger waves. 

Far right, Kelly Atkinson gives a client 
a pedicure. 



Right, Melissa Shackelford does a roller set on one of her 
future customers. 

Below, Tasha Vaughn practices her finger wave technique 




Above, Niki Bates and Jennifer Eiland carry on a conversation while Niki works on a 
perm wrap and Jennifer completes her roller set. 



" 86 " 




Left, Ryan Powe and Jerry Roberts work on the drawings they 
developed in the computer aide drafting (CAD) class. 



Below, Buddy Wyers uses the new Center for Manufacturing 
Technology Excellence lab, 

I 

ft/:-' 



Below, Mary J. Smith holds the marker dur- 
ing surveying exercises. 





Above, Jason Cannon surveys the area around the Golden Triangle Campus pond. 



Drawing Up 
New Ideas 



Drafting and 
Design 



Golden Triangle Campus 



The Dralting and Design 
I echnology curriculum prepares stu- 
dents lor employment in the Held ol 
technical graphical representation. 
Dralters may seek employment in 
steel production, architecture, civil 
service, general drafting and engi- 
neering. 

My lather is in this line ol 
work, and I ve always lound dralting 
interesting. says student Rhonda 
Oalbertn. "I really enjoy the sense 
ol accomplishment alter completing a 
drawing or project. 

Classroom training provides a 
sound loundalion in the basics ol 
dralting practices and is closely 
related to industry standards. The 
subjects taught include architectural 
dralting. computer aided dralting 
(CAD) and others developed to meet 
industry needs. — A/O 



" 87 ™ 



What Makes 
Things Tick? 



Right, Brian Smith checks the fine tuning on a VHF transmit- 
ter. 

Below, Russell Stallings conducts tests on linear integrated cir- 
cuits. 




3p ^%**«^ 






Golden Triangle Campus 



I his program provides an opportunity 
to not only Unci out what makes things 
tick, but oilers students a broad electron- 
ics base and is designed to prepare I be 
graduate tor employment in all areas ol 
electronics. I be program oilers a coverage 
ol electronics studies including analog 
electronics, digital electronics, communica- 
tions, microcomputers and industrial elec- 
tronics. 

1 be tilings tbal impress me most 
about tbe program are the instructors 
and the high-tech lab equipment, says 
Bradley Barton. "After EMCC, I hope to 
land a job and turther mv education. 

I be labs are equipped with modern 
test equipment, components and training 
devices which enhance the development ol 
technical skills and competence in the use 
ol testing equipment. 

- MG 

Right, Ronald Anthony makes the final adjustments while 
installing a VHF transmitter. 




Above, Thomas Oden solders a circuit 
board. 

Far right, Jennifer O'Brian and Stuart 
Adams work on circuit board assembly. 




Above, instructor Bob Lovelace, Chip Sorrels and Rob Martin conduct the final tests on 
the VHF transmitter assembled by the class. 



" 88' 



Left, Marcus Johnson wires a breaker box on a residential panel. 



Below, Kevin Burrus wires a start-stop motor control system. 




Below, Angela Ebenthal tackles soldering a 
circuit board. 




Above, Derek Ryland puts the finishing touches on a residential electrical outlet. 



A Shocking 
Career Move 



Electrical 
Technology 



Golden Triangle Campus 



The Electrical I echnology depart- 
ment oners a one year, career cerlih- 
eate program or a two-year. Associate 
oi Applied Science degree program. 

1 he one-year program prepares grad- 
uates lor employment in residential, 
commercial, and industrial electricity 
settings. 

I he two-year program provides stu- 
dents with more in-depth training in 
all aspects ol the electrical lield. 
Additional instruction is provided in 
the areas ol instrumentation, solid- 
state motor control, and digital elec- 
tronics. 

We have excellent lab lacilities 
which give students a chance to worh 

n simulated residential and industrial 
sellings. That experience builds conli- 
dencc lor graduates when they prepare 
to take that lirsl job. says instructor 
Mike Stringer. - MG 



" 89" 



The Best 
Service 



Hotel and 
Restaurant 



Golden Triangle Campus 



I he Hotel and Restaurant Management 
program is designed to provide specialized 
instruction in all phases ol hotel and 
restaurant management and to prepare stu- 
dents lor careers as managers/supervisors in 
the hospitality and tourism industry. 

"Our students henelit irom actual expe- 
rience, says instructor Linda rarrar. 
I he students actually develop and cater 
most ol the major events on campus. 
I hey handle groups Irom lour to 400. 
\\ hen they enter the work lorce, they know 
what to expect and now to tackle it. 

Courses cover phases ol iood salely. 
selection, production and handling, as we 
as management principles ol the hospitali- 
ty industry. 

- mg 

Right, Surina Young, Theneshia Neal, Pansy Brown, Phyllis 
Brewer, Kimberly Brock and Ben Cooper prepare desserts. 



Right, Phyllis Brewer gets ready to prepare desserts from the 
cake she has pulled from the oven. 

Below, Ben Cooper serves tea during the EMCC-GT Steering 
Committee Conference. 




Above, Lyles Freez puts his training to 
work at the Hampton Inn in Starkville. 

Far right, Kimberly Brock uses a tooth- 
pick to check bread as it comes out of 
the oven. 



" 90 " 




Above, Sheena Jordan and Kenya Petty man the drink cart 



Left, Thomas Oden gets some individual instruction from Mr. 
Emmett Farrar. 

Below, David Self and Del Faulkner get a close-up view of the 
workings of a robotic arm. 



Below, Sigrid Luna records the measure- 





Above, John Hunt runs the switchboard for a production line. 



The Measure 
of a Career 



Instrumentation 



Golden Triangle Campus 



Instruments used to measure 
and control speciiic processes are 
essential to producing quality prod- 
ucts in industry today. The technol- 
ogy required to use these instru- 
ments is called instrumentation. 
I he program prepares graduates to 
work with professionals in many 
diiierent helds that require accurate 
measurements lor analysis and lor 
process control maintenance. 

I oday s instrumentation stu- 
dents benelit Irom training in var- 
ied helds, says instructor Emmett 
Farrar. "Industries are looking lor 
employees who can perlorm a num- 
ber ol diiierent skills at a very 
high level." 

Classroom and hands-on lab 
studies are used to teach basic 
electronics, pneumatics and 
hydraulics. 

- MG 



" 91 " 



Grinding Out 
a Future 



Machine Tools 



Golden Triangle Campus 



I lie Machine I ool Operations pro- 
gram oilers a one or two-year option. 
The lirsl year consists ol hands-on opera- 
tion ol machine shop equipment and 
classroom theory covering such areas as 
saiety, blueprint reading, lathe and 
milling machine operation and shop main. 

I here arc certainly plenty ol oppor- 
tunities lor machinists out there. says 
instructor Steve iMalone. "Willi Industries 
like Nissan and others moving into t lie 
state, the job opportunities are going to 
keep gelling better. 

I he second year ol study oilers theo- 
ry and operation ol computer numerical 
control (C NC ) equipment, metallurgy, 
and production methods along with the 
development ol more hands-on training. 

- MG 



Right, Clarence Wyman and Chad Malone are milling out a 
pocket. 



Right, Terrell Jones changes a tool on a 



Below, Charlie Allen attempts to be very precise when working 
on the lathe. 








Above, Major Lee sets the dimensions 
on a saw. 

Far right, Chris Godfrey cranks down a 
press. 



Above, Jonathan Stokes turns the diameter on a lathe. 



program 

" 92 " 




Left, Angel Stovall is all smiles alter presenting her marketing 
ideas to the class 

Below, Chip Wells and Caroline Bass team up to develop a writ- 
ten marketing strategy. 




Below, Rob Mclntyre and Kim Hoyle plan 
the best way to market their product. 




vbove, John Massey (front) ponders how to draw more customers while Laurie Montgomery and Bruff Sanders man the DEX 
Marketing booth at homecoming, 



Getting the 
Word Out 



Marketing 



Golden Triangle Campus 



I lie primary objective ol any 
11. agency or business is to mar- 
ket its products or services proi- 
itably. Marketing Management 

I echnology prepares graduates lor 
careers in marketing, research, 
sales, advertising, management, pub- 
lic relations, merchandising and 
buying. 

"I recently moved into the area 
and have learned a lot in a short 
time in the marketing program, 
says student Kiniberly 1 loyle. 

lope to obtain a position in the 
marketing lield and eventually own 
my own business or lirm. 

Marketing research determines 
the demand tor products and servic- 
es. Students learn to develop this 
research and plan prohlable sales 
forecasts. 

- MG 



" 93 " 



Looking for 
Success 



Supervision 
Management 



Golden Triangle Campus 



Supervision and Management 
I ecnnology is a two-year curriculu 
ollcrecl at the Oolden I riangle Campus as 
part ol the EMCC evening hours pro- 
gram. 

1 he program leads to an Associate ol 
Applied Science degree. The sixty-six credit 
hours required are designed lor adults 
wishing to qualify or become heller quah- 
lied lor management and supervisory pos 
tions in business, industry, and govern- 
ment. 

All ol the students in the program 
are looking to move to the next level pro- 
lessionally, says instructor Ben Murphy. 

This program is exciting because the stu- 
dents are locused on improvement, which 
makes my job easy. 

- MG 

Right, Jeffery Collins and his classmates take a quick look at 
their notes before a test. 




Right, Jay Mordecai buries his nose in the Supervision 
Management text book. 



Below, Jennifer Overstreet can't conceal her excitement over 
another chance to take notes. 



Above, Katie Perry cracks a smile as 
she prepares to turn in an assignment. 

Far right, instructor Ben Murphy perch- 
es atop his classroom throne. 




Above, Billy Wilson (front) and other members of the Supervision Management class 
follow Mr. Murphy's lecture in their texts. 



" 94 " 



GO 




Left, Chris Henry gets ready to board the EMCC trainer and hit 
the highway. 



Below, Ricky Hollis decides to close his eyes and point to his 
next practice driving destination. 



Below, Kareim Bellamy and instructor Louis 
Nabors share a laugh before class. 





vbove, Patricia Sturdivant has her eyes and her dreams on the open road. 



On Time and 
In One Piece 



Truck Driving 



Golden Triangle Campus 



I he Commercial [ruck Driving 
program is an eight week course ol 
study which prepares the graduate to 
enter the commercial truck driving 
industry as an over-the-road driver. 
1 he program covers such areas 
as Department ol I transportation 
rules and regulations, safety, proper 
shilling techniques, pre-trip inspec- 
tions, map reading, log hooks, and 
cargo handling. 

"Our number one concern is 
salety, ol course. says instructor 
Louis Nabors. "Our priority is to 
train students to become sale, elli- 
cienl, confident drivers. Our reputa- 
tion rides with every graduate. 

Students are trained to drive 
conventional and cab-over tractors 
pulling loaded and empty (lathed 
trailers. 

-MG 



" 95" 



One Hot 
Career Move 






Golden Triangle Campus 



Recent growth in development and man- 
ufacturing in North IVlississippi has created 
increasing, stable career opportunities tor 
welders. I lie program prepares graduates to 
enter the job market in many dillcrenl 
areas including manufacturing, structural 
construction, pipeline construction, and cus- 
tom jobs. 

I he job-market is really good lor 
welders right now, says instructor Ricky 
Collier. "( )ur program is expanding to meet 
the needs ol employers in our area. We 
simply can I supply graduates last enough. 

1 he program trains students about safe- 
ty in all aspeets ol welding and fabrication. 
Students are taught the correct methods ol 
welding, are welding, tig welding, brazing 
and the use ol an aeelyline torch. 

- MG 

Right, instructor Ricky Collier explains to Christopher Norell 
what he wants done for class. 




Right, Larry Willis sets up to begin welding on a bicycle rack 
for the Sally Kate Winters Children's Home, a program project. 

Below, Gary Bartlett welds together pieces for the base of the 
bicycle rack. 



Above, Dale Morrow and Maurice 
Smoot look for good welding rods. 

Far right, Marcus Johnson takes one 
more look at his project before cutting 
out a pattern. 




Above, Monica Williams gets everything in her station set up before she fires up her 
torch for the next project. 



program 

" 96 " 



Left, Larry Mobley and Raymond Bonner put a new door up in 
the Industrial Maintenance lab. 

Below, Marco Baker and Chris Higgenbothan check the voltage 
on an electrical pane. 




Below, Jeffery Coleman and Shirley Williams 
pressure wash some equipment. 




\bove, Justin Mason and Nathan Blake go head-to-head in order to assemble a conveyor system for the IMT lab. 



New Career 
Opportunity 



Industrial 
Maintenance 



Golden Triangle Campus 



New to EMCC, Industrial 
Maintenance I echnology is a two- 
year program designed to provide 
students the opportunity to develop 
technical and interpersonal skills. 
Students in the IM 1 program 
receive an introduction to communi- 
cation, mathematics, science and 
computers, and study electrical, 
mechanical and environmental lun da- 
mentals. 

I his program was developed 
based on industry need. says 
instructor Mike MeC ullough. 'Our 
students receive training in a wide 
variety ol academic and technical 
subjects. I oday, industries are hiring 
individuals who are qualified to ban- 
die a large, varied number ol tasks. 
The program goal is to provide that 
type ol technician. 

- MG 



" 97 " 



"/ decided to 
cheer for EMCC 
because it is a 



Qoing pent the Jhazt 



great school, 
said Kimanet 
Jones, a sopho- 
more, who is a 
co- head cheer- 
leader. "It is an 
honor to have 
been chosen as 
co-head cheer- 
leader of an out- 
going and friendly 
squad. I know 
that the communi- 
cation skills I have 
learned will help 
me later on in life. 
I also believe that 
coming to EMCC 
has helped me 
with my future 
education. I have 
enjoyed my two 
years in school 
here." 



Top right, to 
get the ball 
around the 
defense, Brian 
Kelly sends a 
header into the 
air. 

Right, Detrick 
Barnett tries 
to avoid the 
Holmes 
defender in an 
attempt to gain 
yardage. 



Throughout high school, many ath- 
letes strive to excel. Some athletes 
choose to spend long hours in the 
weight room, while some spend more 
time on the basketball court working 
on a jump shot or on the golf course 
improving drive distances. Sometimes 
their hard work pays off in the form 
of a college scholarship. 

Athletics plays such an important 
role in student life at EMCC. Many 
students attend athletic events to 
cheer the Lions and Lady Lions to vic- 
tory. For every person, there's a sport 
of interest. 

Those who do participate in 
athletics provide spectators with joy, 
excitement, suspense, and happiness. 
Sports also provides athletes a way of 
staying physically and mentally fit. 
Each athlete strives to be the best he 
or she can be. Together with 
determination and will, every student 
athlete can win a prize of his or her 
own. 

When student athletes combine 
their talent to form a team, a bond is 
made. This team must now prepare for 
the upcoming season, which will bring 
stress, happiness, heartache, and 
relief. When put together, talented 
athletes produce a talented team. 
With that, these athletes strive to win 
the prize. 
- all sports stories by Cassie Chance 





Sports 

' 98 ' 




eft, after leaving 
he competition 
ehind, Ryan 
odriguez goes up 
for two. 

Top, student train- 
rs Alan Lewis and 
Ashley Knight pack 
ce bags into a 
ooler for later 
se. 

Middle, Lady Lion 
ope Sanders hus- 
les to get the ball 
own field. 

mmediately 
bove, Kristin 
McClelland makes 
great catch dur- 
ng a game. 



Sp or ts 

' 99 ' 



^^T he 2001 Lions are, First Rom (1- r): Kenneth Hollis, Michael Johnson, Detrick 

* Barnett, Marques Sykes, Rashod Gandy, Henry Barnett, Brian Thompson, Coach Tom 
Goode, Terion Reynolds, Gerrad Williams, Joe White, Eddie Moss, Scotty Elliott, and 
Roderick Gandy; Second Row ll-r): Patrick DiMichele, Tamar Sherrod, Fines Tate, Nick 
Dimino, Dauid Vates, Maruin Sommeruille, Galen Hendricks, Pete Malone, Otis Bumpers, 
Kendrick Harris, Maurice Cunninyham, Marcus Latham, and Ryan Waldrop; Third Row (l-r): 
Matt Uauyhn, Jessie Snowden, Terrance Coyyins, Jamar Richardson, Ueron Wriyht, Mario 
Euans, Johnathan West, Clarence Jones, Dustin Jones, Rl Cumminys, T.C. Hudson, Chris 
Issac, and Robert Curry; Fourth Rouj (l-r): Robert Miskel, Frank Edwards, Deshune 
Howells, Joe Knox, Will Gillard, Rocky Rockette, Dashon Sillimon, Kristian Peoples, Gene 
Perry, Braz Coleman, Niko Edwards, Eli Lasky, Patrick Bell, and Tyler Richardson; Fifth 
Row (l-r): Sean Gerald, Michael Williams, Jonathan Brandy, Tyler Lofton, and Jeremy 
Foster. 




FOOTBALL 








The 2001 season brought ups and downs 
to the Lion football team. Head coach 
Tom Goode entered his tenth season as 
the headman. First year assistant Kelby 
Bowman joined S.E. Sullins, Tommy 
Moore, and Trac Baughn on staff this year. 

With just 19 sophomores on this year's 
squad, the Lions expected the talented 
freshman class to step up and become an 
important factor. 

Freshman Fines Tate was a big factor on 
defense this year for the Lions, as was 
freshman Joe White. Sophomore Ryan 
Waldrop, who ranked nationally for tack- 



les made, was also an important factor 
this past year. 

Sophomore Gene Perry was named to 
the Pre-Season All-Academic team. 
Running back David Yeates, wide receiver 
Michael Johnson, and wide receiver Matt 
Vaughn were key targets this year for 
sophomore quarterbacks Terion Reynolds 
and Scotty Elliott. 

The Lions made a good showing in the 
last game of the season. EMCC faced 
North Division champion Delta in Scooba. 
Delta won the game 24-14. 






^rnmediately aboue, in hopes of stopping 
mLm the offensiue aduance, Kendrick Harris 
makes a tackle in the backfield. 



Sp or ts 

' 100 ' 



y/eft, after get- 
^ ting an inter- 
ception, Joe 
White attempts 
to get up field 
th the ball. 



immediately 
■*■ belouj, Coach 
Trac Baughn 
explains a play 
to Marcus 
Latham. 





Veft, Coach Tom 
^ Goode and Coach 
Tommy Moore 
obserue the Lion 
offense during the 
Homecoming game. 



twiddle, sopho- 
*r more quarter- 
back Scottu Elliot 
brings the Lion 
offense to the line. 



immediately 
Um aboue, in hopes 
of gaining yardage, 
Detrick Barnett cuts 
back to auoid the 
defenders. 



' 101 ' 



IN THE 
ZONE 



" I came here 

because of the rich 
tradi- 
tion 
and 

because 
I can 
receiue 
a good 
educa- 
tion. 

-Fines Tate 
Freshman 



"EMCC is a uery per- 
sonable school, and 
I am 
proud 
to be a 
part of 
the tra- 
dition.' 





-Matt Uaughn 
Sophomore 



"I came here 

because the faculty 
pushes 
you to 
excel in 
acade- 
mics 
and 

athlet- 
ics. " 



-Patrick DiMichele 
Freshman 



Sp or ts 

' 102 ' 




Jp igh t, Coach Tom Goode and 
^ Coach Tommy Moore talk ujith 
the offense. 

J? elouj, in hopes of scoring, 
J& Kendrick Harris fights for 
yardage. 





1LA iddle, freshman Maurice 
'r Cunningham comes in to 
defend on an ouerthroujn pass. 



immediately aboue, making his 

may into the backfield, Ryan 
UJaldrop goes after the quarter- 
back. 




FOOTBALL 



2001 EMCC LION FOOTBALL 



Date Opponent Location Score 



Sept. 6 Souhwest Summit 



Sept. 13 Co-Lin Scooba 



Sept. 27 Northeast Scooba 



Oct. 6 Itawamba Fulton 



Oct. 11 Jones 



Scooba 



Oct. 20 Holmes (HC) Scooba 



Nov. 3 Delta 



Scooba 



W 10-7 



LO-22 



Sept. 20 Coahoma Clarksdale W 23-8 



L 14-41 



L 17-18 



L6-30 



L3-17 



Oct. 27 Northwest Senatobia L 0-42 



L 12-24 




immediately aboue, wide receiuer Matt 
m ^ m Uaughn waits to get water after coming 
off the field. 



sports 

'103 ' 



yions Cheerleaders are, First Row (l-r): Rmber 
~ Lunsford, Marquita Rlford (co-captain), Bailey 
Patterson, Jackie Elder, and Elise Mallette; Second 
Rouj (l-r): Piper Sharp, Jennifer Knox, Cassie 
Rtkins, and Kimanet Jones (co-captain). 











S-P-l-R-l-T! Spirit! Spirit! Let's hear it! 
The cheers and chants of the cheerleaders 
cannot be mistaken. Cheerleaders have 
quite an important job. They have the task 
of leading cheers on the sidelines and 
encouraging the crowd to participate. The 
co-captains for this year's squad are 
Marquita Alford and Kimanet Jones. 
Michele White is the sponsor. Cheerleaders 
cheer at football and home basketball 
games. 

"Cheering provides people a way to 
express their outgoing side," Mrs. White 



said. "A cheerleader needs good coordina- 
tion, to be outgoing, energetic, patient, 
and willing to work." This year's squad is 
very peppy and well coordinated. They 
have also begun a new tradition of cheer- 
ing towards the Lion football team on the 
sidelines. The cheerleaders believe that 
this will motivate the team better. 

Thanks to the cheerleaders, Lion fans 
can proudly support and yell for EMCC. 
These cheerleaders help encourage ath- 
letes to keep going and not to give up in 
order to obtain their goal. 





y*mmediatelu aboue, Jackie Elder, Rmber 
Lunsford, Kimanet Jones, Cassie Rtkins, 
and Marquita Rlford shout it out at the 
first home game of the year. 




Sports 

'104 ' 




Veft, these 
^ ladies perform 
an exciting cheer 
to get the Lion 
crowd pumped 
up. 



y^elouj, making 
*^ sure the 
croujd can hear 
them, Elise 
Mallette and 
Baileg Patterson 
cheer loud and 
proud. 





JV "<c ^1 






"3- ^M 






n 






$»yf 






tw# 


*- / * ' nfl 


B * 


<&!■) 











•:fe 



y/eft, co-captains 
^ Marquita Rlford 
and Kimanet Jones 
discuss some new 
cheers. 



A^iddle, a few of 
' the cheerlead- 
ers make a dance 
moue at the foot- 
ball game. 



^"mmediatelg 
•*" aboue, these 
ladies practice long 
hours to keep the " 
football and basket 
ball teams' spirits 
up. 



Sports 

'105' 



IN THE 
ZONE 



"I came to EMCC 
because they haue a 
great 
soccer 
team, 
and I 
wanted 
to be a 




I part of 
I that." 




-Casey Rbrams 
Defender 



"I came here 

because I just want- 
ed to 
play 
soccer. 
Coming 
here 
has 

allowed 
me to 
do 
that." 



-Hayley Ballard 
Midfield 



"I came here to plau 
soccer and returnea 

SmmmammwA because 
fflB ' felt 
EH we 
could go 
to the 
playoffs 
again." 




-Tiffany McKay 
Fullback 



*Oight, in hopes that the ball will 
f\ hit off the opponent, Emily 
Gable takes a shot. 

<y mmediately below, Marcy Jones 
m ^ m takes the ball upfield. 



w<W 




M^iddle, Michelle Guadagno goes 
^Vup to try to get the ball 
around Holmes' defenders. 



^■"mmediatelg aboue, in a defen- 
■^" siue struggle, Alexis 
Hutchinson fights for the ball. 



i 








Sports 

' 106' 




WOMEN'S 
SOCCER 

2001 EMCC LADY LIONS SOCCER 



Date 



Opponent Location 



Aug. 29 Shelton 

Sept. 1 Jones 

Sept. 8 Co-Lin 

Sept. 15 Hinds 

Sept. 22 Holmes 



Ellisville 
Wesson 
Scooba 
Scooba 



Sept. 25 Gulf Coast Scooba 

Sept. 29 Pearl River Perkinston 

Oct. 3 Hinds Raymond 

Oct. 6 Pearl River Scooba 

Oct. 13 Gulf Coast Gulfport 

Oct. 17 Holmes Goodman 



Oct. 23 Co-Lin 



Scooba 



Oct. 27 Gulf Coast* Raymond 

* denotes MACJC playoffs 



Score 



Tuscaloosa W 3-0 



W 2-1 
W4-0 
L 0-1 
W 12-0 

LO-6 
W4-0 
L 1-4 
W4-1 
L0-3 
W 8-0 
TO-O 
L0-3 




mmediately aboue, the Lady Lions take a 
much needed break during halftime. 



Sp° r ts 

'107' 



^^phe 2001 Lady Lions are, First Row (l-r): Natalie Garton, Katie 

' Richards, and Michelle Guadagno; Second Row (l-r): Krystal King, 
Haleg Ballard, Marcy Jones, Rustyn Gordon, Emily Gable, and Jana 
Moss; Third Row (l-r): Elizabeth Thomas, Kristina Garrison, Kristina 
Barrett, Coach Brian Bennett, Casey Rbrams, Tiffany McKay, Rnyela 
LUhitehead, and Alexis Hutchinson. 




WOMEI 



After advancing to the state playoffs 
last season, the EMCC Lady Lions soccer 
team was looking to repeat their success 
in the 2001 season. The Lady Lions, led 
by head coach Brian Bennett, finished 
the 2001 season with an overall record 
of 8-4-1. 

Leading the scoring attack for the 
Lady Lions this year was sophomore 
Krystal King. Other notable scorers were 
sophomores Kristina Garrison, Marcy 
Jones, Tiffany McKay, and Jana Moss. A 
host of freshmen joined the team this 



year, adding to the team's depth. 

The Lady Lions started the year with a 
perfect 3-0 record thanks to wins over 
Shelton State, Jones, and Co-Lin. 
However, the Lady Lions' hopes for a 
perfect season were dashed with a 1 -0 
loss to Jones. 

EMCC faced Gulf Coast in the first 
round of the MACJC playoffs this year 
and fell by a final of 3-0. 

Although the Lady Lions didn't suc- 
ceed in the playoffs, they had a success- 
ful season and truly went for the prize. 




'immediately aboue, while taking a break 
•" from the game, the Lady Lions match the 
game with manager Wesley Clay and coach 
Brian Bennett. 




Sp or ts 

' 108 ' 




Veft, sopho- 
^ more Krystai 
King matches the 
ball sail through 
the air after hit- 
ting a header. 

y?elouj, looking 
^ to pass the 
ball, Jana Moss 
uses the side of 
her foot to hit it 
across the field. 




oc< 




Veft, Emilg Gable 
^ looks to get 
some more points 
on the board for 
the Ladg Lions. 



M^iddle, Katie 
'r Richards uses 
some soccer tech- 
niques to get the 
ball around the 
Holmes defenders. 



JU boue, Kristina 
'• Garrison tries to 
et the ball past a 
efender so she can 
put it in the back of 
the net. 



I 



Sp or ts 
' 109 ' 



IN THE 
ZONE 



"I came to EMCC to 
play soccer. I must 
haue 
liked it 
since I 
came 
back 
for my 
Bast 




K 



ear. 




s 

been a 
great experience." 

-Raron Rinsworth 
Midfield 

"I came back 
because the soccer 
pro- 
gram 
here 
has 

risen to 
a uihole 
new 
leuel. 
We all 
haue a 
different attitude 
towards the sea- 
son." 

-Wesley Clay 
Forward 

"EMCC was the best 
soccer proyram that 
I looked 
at. 

That's 
why I'm 
here. I 
also 
know 
that 
this will 
help me 
later on." 



-Chris Wilkins 
Midfield 




X 



ight, Chris Wilkins dribbles the 
ball across the field. 



immediately below, Garrett 
-^- Sutton takes an open shot 
against Delta. 




My/iddle, Dauid Smith looks to get 
^V the ball into scoring position 
against Holmes. 



immediately aboue, Brian Kelly 
°^" takes a shot in hopes of adding 
to the Lions' lead against Delta. 




Sp° r 's 

'no ' 



ft 




J 'S 



MEN 
SOCCER 

2001 EMCC LIONS SOCCER 



Date 


Opponent 


Location 


Score 


Aug. 26 


Gordon 


Scooba 


L 1-5 


Aug. 29 


Wallace 


Hanceville 


LO-6 


Sept. 1 


Jones 


Ellisville 


W 7-4 


Sept. 5 


East Central 


Scooba 


W4-0 


Sept. 8 


Co- Lin 


Wesson 


W 7-4 


Sept. 11 


Delta 


Scooba 


W 2-0 


Sept. 15 


Hinds 


Scooba 


W 3-0 


Sept. 19 


Itawamba 


Fulton 


L 1-1 


Sept. 22 


Holmes 


Scooba 


W 5-1 


Sept. 25 


Gulf Coast 


Scooba 


L 1-5 


Oct. 3 


Hinds 


Raymond 


LO-6 


Oct. 9 


Itawamba 


Scooba 


L2-3 


Oct. 13 


Delta 


Moorhead 


L 1-4 


Oct. 17 


Holmes 


Goodman 


W 6-0 


Oct. 23 


Wallace 


Scooba 


L0-9 




immediately aboue, the Lions practice 
their offensiue attack prior to the start 
of a game. 



sports 
"ill ' 



/ 



■he 2001 Lions are, First Row (l-r): Dauid Smith, Paul Ballard, Nathan 



Gregg, and flaron Smgser; Second Row (l-r): Shaun Quinn, Brian Kelly, 
Brian Sanders, Bo Blackledge, flaron flinsworth, and Chris LUilkins; Third Row 
(l-r): Oustg Wise, Drew Smith, Garrett Sutton, Steuen Piatt, UJesley Clag, 
Jonathan Dauis, Richard Lile, and coordinator Brian Bennett. 





The Lion soccer team entered the 2001 
season with a mixture of anxiety and high 
hopes. Players were concerned because 
veteran soccer coach Sean McDonall had 
left the team that summer, but in August, 
professional soccer player Adam Burke 
was named head coach. Under Burke's 
helm, the team had a good year. 

Wesley Clay, who led the offense, was 
ranked among the top five in the nation 
in scoring. Other key players this season 
were sophomore Brian Kelly, freshman 
Jonathan Davis, sophomore David Smith, 
and freshman Chris Wilkins. Goalie 



Nathan Gregg recorded four shutouts on 
the season. Other returning sophomores 
were Aaron Ainsworth, Bo Blackledge, 
Brian Kelly, Richard Lile, Steven Piatt, 
and Aaron Smyser. 

Newcomers to this year's squad includ- 
ed Paul Ballard, Michael Collins, Travis 
Strait, and Garrett Sutton. 

This year, the team tied for second 
place in the North Division with 
Itawamba. However, the point system was 
used to determine who would go to the 
MACJC playoffs, and for the second year 
in a row, the Lions stayed at home. 




^"mmediatelu aboue, the Lion soccer 
team huddles together for a prayer 
before the start of a game. 



Sports 
'112' 





y/eft, while tru- 
^ ing to stop the 
offensiue ad- 
uance, Steuen 
Piatt gets down 
low and defends. 



/?elow, goalie 
*^ Nathan Top' 
Gregg rares back 
to kick the ball 
from the goal. 





y/eft, mens head 
^ coach fldam 
Burke explains the 
ame strategg to 
he team during 
halftime. 



?, 



X^iddle, kicking it 
~" into high 

Sear, Jonathan 
auis heads down 
field with the ball. 



mmediatel 



a 



m * m aboue, with an 
opportunitg to 
aduance the 
ball, Paul Ballard 
looks to send the 
ball to another play- 
er. 



Sp° r 's 

'113 ' 




1NTH£ 
2DN6 



"I came to EMCC 
because of the won- 
derful 
people 
that 
are 
here 
and to 
haue a 
chance 
to play 
basket- 
ball." 

-Dorecious Powe 
Freshman 



"I came here 
because I thought 
that 
this 
was a 
good 
school. 
I also 
was 
able to 
stag to 
plag 
basketball." 

- Donna Franklin 
Sophomore 



"I chose EMCC 

because I felt like I 
could 
make a 
differ- 
ence on 
the 

basket- 
ball 
team 
and also 
because 

of the nice people." 

-Candace Spires 
Freshman 





a 



ight, Kelly Peoples looks for 
someone to pass the ball to. 

elow, Dorecious Powe gets 
ready to driue to the goal. 




iddle, freshman Katrina Barr 
brings the ball down court. 



i mmediately aboue, hoping to 

add to the Ladg Lions' lead 
Kenyetta Moore concentrates on 
her free throw shot. 



Sports 

'114' 






WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL 

2002 EMCC LADY LIONS BASKETBALL 



Date 


Opponent 


Location 


November 5 


Merdian 


Meridian 


November 8 


Gulf Coast 


Perkinston 


November 12 


Jones 


Scooba 


November 15 


East Central 


Decatur 


November 19 


Bishop State 


Fayette, AL 


November 20 


Bevill State 


Fayette, AL 


November 27 


Jones 


EUisville 


November 29 


Bevill State 


Scooba 


December 3 


Northeast 


Booneville 


January 10 


Meridian** 


Scooba 


January 14 


Delta 


Scooba 


January 17 


Itawamba 


Fulton 


January 21 


Holmes 


Scooba 


January 24 


Coahoma 


Scooba 


January 28 


Northwest 


Senatobia 


February 4 


Northeast 


Scooba 


February 7 


Delta 


Moorhead 


February 11 


Itawamba 


Fulton 


February 14 


Holmes 


Goodman 


February 18 


Coahoma 


Clarksdale 


February 21 


Northwest 


Scooba 


February 25 


State Tourney 


TBA 


February 26 


State Tourney 


TBA 


February 27 


State Tourney 


TBA 


February 28 


State Tourney 


TBA 



Denotes Keyes Currie Reception 




^immediately aboue, hoping to stop the 

offensiue aduance, Candace Spires gets 
ready to defend. 



Sports 

'IIS' 



/ 



he 2001 Lady Lions are First Rom (l-r): Kelly Peoples, Constance 



Logan, Erica Ray, Candace Spires, Allison Power, Katrina Barr, 
Natalie Williams, and Donna Franklin; Second Rom (l-r): Ryan Cole, 
Tamara Gibbs, Shonte Bass, Margaret McClure, Michelle Shaffer, Dorecious 
Pome, Kenyetta Moore, Coach Sharon Thompson, and Coach Dale Peay. 




WOMEN' 
BASKETBALL 



The 2001-2002 season brought many 
obstacles for the EMCC Lady Lions. In 
their first game of the year, the Lady 
Lions made a strong showing in an 82-68 
loss to Meridian. 

This is Coach Peay's 17th season as 
head coach. His assistant is Sharon 
Thompson. Thompson, who played for 
four years at Mississippi State, also 
played in Italy for a year and was draft- 
ed by the ABL. 

Four sophomores returned for a final 
season. They were Erica Ray from Oak 



Hill Academy, Donna Franklin from 
Meridian, and Kelly Peoples and Natalie 
Williams, both from Guin, Alabama. 

Newcomers to this year's squad 
included Yazoo County's Candace Spires 
and Michelle Shaffer, Katrina Barr of 
West Point, Constance Logan of Maben, 
Allison Power of New Hope, Dorecious 
Powe from NE Lauderdale, and Margaret 
McClure from Macon Central Academy. 

These ladies worked well together 
and took EMCC to new heights on their 
way to reaching the prize. 






^immediately aboue, Lady Lions Michelle 
Shaffer and Allison Power yet ready to 
block out on a free throw shot. 




Sports 

'116' 



y/eft, while try 
^ ing to keep 
the ball away 
from the oppo- 
nent, Erica Ray 
looks for some- 
one to pass to. 




Veft, following a 
^ foul, Donna 
Franklin gets ready 
to shoot a free 
throw. 



A^iddle, lady lion 

' freshman 
Margaret McClure 
awaits the rebound. 



immediately 
•*" aboue, during a 
timeout, Coach Peay 
explains a play to his 
team. 



Sp° r 's 

'117' 



IN THE 


ZONE 


"1 chose EMCC 


because 1 think that 


^———j! this 




place 


JJT. 


will 


B"-'"™ 


help me 




achieue 




my 




basket- 


\ / ^*M 


ball 


/ I expec- 


/ n 1 tations 


and dreams. 


55 



-Dennis Dupree 
Point Guard 

"I came to EMCC 
because I felt like 
this 

was the 
place 
for me 
to be. 
There is 
such a 
friendly 
atmos- 
phere 
here. 



-Jimmy Kelly 
Point Guard 




"1 came to EMCC all 


the way from Laurel 


■HHiinHHHI 


Hill, 




Florida 


tl ^l 


because 


m^- ^^B 


1 felt 


■ft — j^H 


that it 


T* 


was 


y\ /«^i God ' s 


J \/ \ will for 


' ^tfipfc 1™*° 


Scooba, MS." 


-Josh Steele 


Forward 


Sp° r ts 


"118" 





ight, sophomore Reshard Rlonza 
awaits to get the rebound. 

eloiu, Dennis Dupree eyes his 
opponent. 




'iddle, the Lions line up for the 
inbounds pass. 



i mmediately aboue, to get 

around the defender, Raphael 
Edwards makes a turnaround moue 




MEN'S 
BASKETBALL 

2002 EMCC LION BASKETBALL 



Date 

November 5 
November 8 
November 12 
November 15 
November 19 
November 20 
November 27 
November 29 
December 3 
January 10 
January 14 
January 17 
January 21 
January 24 
January 28 
February 4 
February 7 
February 11 
February 14 
February 18 
February 21 
February 25 
February 26 
February 27 
February 28 



Opponent 


Location 


Merdian 


Meridian 


Gulf Coast 


Perkinston 


Jones 


Scooba 


East Central 


Decatur 


GC Tourney 


Perkinston 


GC Tourney 


Perkinston 


Jones 


Ellisville 


Marion 


Scooba 


Northeast 


Booneville 


Meridian** 


Scooba 


Delta 


Scooba 


Itawamba 


Fulton 


Holmes 


Scooba 


Coahoma 


Scooba 


Northwest 


Senatobia 


Northeast 


Scooba 


Delta 


Moorhead 


Itawamba 


Fulton 


Holmes 


Goodman 


Coahoma 


Clarksdale 


Northwest 


Scooba 


State Tourney 


TBA 


State Tourney 


TBA 


State Tourney 


TBA 


State Tourney 


TBA 



** Denotes Keyes Currie Reception 




J mmediatelu aboue, the Lion basketball 

team watches an exciting game from the 
bench. 



Sports 

'119' 



/ 



'he 2001 Lion basketball team is First Row (l-r): Jimmy Kelly, Reygie 



Jackson, UJiley Gladney, Dennis Dupree, Raphael Edwards, Ryan Rodriyuez, 
Trey Gibson, and Tramechie Euans; Second Row (l-r): Manager Randy Uibrock, 
Coach Pam Moore, Jamar Hill, Dauarrius Hairston, Clem Celestine, Reshard Rlonza, 
Charles Braxton, Josh Steele, Coach Clay flrmstrony, and Head Trainer Ryan Cole. 




BASKETBALL 



IjUi*, 




Following the untimely death of 
Coach Steve Hull, his former assistant, 
Clay Armstrong, was named head coach. 
Armstrong took the reigns to lead a Lion 
squad who went out and performed just 
the way Coach Hull would have wanted 
them to. Pam Moore, EMCC softball 
coach and former basketball coach, was 
Armstrong's assistant. 

This year's squad was loaded with 
nine sophomores and five freshmen. In 
their home opener, the Lions got their 
first win in overtime against Jones 



County Junior College, marking the 
beginning of a season of close games. 

Sophomores of this year's team were 
Reshard Alonza, Charles Braxton, Clem 
Celestine, Dennis Dupree, Raphael 
Edwards, Wiley Gladney, Jamar Hill, 
Reggie Jackson, and Ryan Rodriguez. 

Newcomers to this year's team were 
Tramechie Evans of Starkville, Davarrius 
Hairston of Columbus, Jimmy Kelly of 
Northeast Lauderdale, and Josh Steele 
of Laurel Hill, Florida. All were treas- 
ures to EMCC's team. 






immediately aboue, hoping that he can cut 
•■ off the offensiue driue, Reshard Rlonza 
works to get in position. 



' 120' 



^eft, wain a 
^ look of satis- 
faction, 

Tramechie Euans 
knows he can get 
past the Jones 
defense. 

y?elow, while 
^hoping to cap- 
italize on the 
plag, Clem 
Celestine looks 
for someone that 
is open. 





^eft, in an 
^ attempt to driue 
to the goal, 
Dauarrius Hairston 
tries to get around 
the defender. 



/twiddle, in an 

r effort to get 
steal, Raphael 
Edwards gets his 
hands up. 



immediately 
aboue, Ryan 
Rodriguez tries some 
skill work. 



Sports 
' 121 ' 




tNlHS 
2DN6 



"I chose EMCC 

because, gosh, I loue 
this 
place. 
I'ue 
also 
had fun 
here 
playing 
base- 
ball. 1 



-Todd Harcroiu 
Sophomore 



I chose EMCC 
because I felt I 

would 
haue a 
good 
chance 
to 

become 
a better 
? ball 
player 
here." 

-Josh Snider 
Freshman 



I chose EMCC 

because I thought I 
would 
get to 
pitch 
and 

build on 
my 

career, 
so I can 
go far 

in my baseball 

hopes." 

-Lee Boyd 
Freshman 






^9 ight, with a look of determina- 
^V tion, J.D. Harbour gets ready to 
fire a pitch. 

mmediately below, Kenneth 
Morrison gets ready for an at 







J^^iddle, trying to fool the batter 
^~r with an off speed change up, 
Trey Wail lobs one to the plate 



mmediately aboue, Coach Tony 
Montgomery looks to the 

umpire for a call while Tyler Larose 

seeks guidance. 



Sports 

'122 ' 




I 




ISA !$Ii MAIL JL 




^4jrs£Z4/& ^4/ 




2002 LION BASEBALL SCHEDULE 


Date 




Opponent 


Location 


February 


14 


Gulf Coast 


Scooba 


February 


16 


Co-Lin 


Wesson 


February 


18 


East Central 


Decatur 


February 


22 


Jones 


Meridian 


February 


23 


East Central 


Meridian 


February 


24 


Meridian 


Meridian 


March 1 




LSI) Eunice 


Scooba 


March 2 




LSU Eunice 


Scooba 


March 6 




Lincoln Trail 


Scooba 


March 8 




Meridian 


Scooba 


March 9 




Hinds 


Raymond 


March 15 




Hibbing 


Scooba 


March 16 




Itawamba 


Fulton 


March 19 




Delta 


Scooba 


March 23 




Northwest 


Scooba 


March 27 




Holmes 


Goodman 


March 29 




Coahoma 


Scooba 


April 2 




Northeast 


Booneville 


April 4 




Pearl River 


Scooba 


April 9 




Itawamba 


Scooba 


April 13 




Delta 


Moorhead 


April 15 




East Central 


Scooba 


April 17 




Northwest 


Senatobia 


April 20 




Holmes 


Scooba 


April 23 




Coahoma 


Clarksdale 


April 27 




Northeast 


Scooba 




mmediately aboue, while discussing the 
game plan, Josh Perry and Keuin Long 
keep their eyes on the field. 



Sports 

'123 ' 



mmediately below, in a gesture of good sports- 
manship, the Lions prepare to shake the oppo- 
nent's hand on a job well done. 





■.";«»*:;;».««<>!■«'"■ 



ijim^i^lJimijidl 






The Lions, although coming off their 
worst season in Coach Baldner's sixteen 
years at EMCC, began the new year with 
a great deal of optimism. With eight 
returning sophomores and a talented 
freshmen class, the Lions were much 
improved in 2002. 

Looked to for leadership were eight 
sophomores led by Honorable Mention All 
State third baseman J.D. Harbour. 
Harbour hit .298 as a freshman and was 
chosen Rookie of the Year for the 2001 
Lions. Also being looked to for sopho- 
more leadership were the Lions' only 
returning pitcher Bill Cotton, as well as 
catchers Ben Earnest and Josh Perry. 



Infielders with playing experience that 
proved valuable included Ashley Chism 
and Ben Mason. Returning outfielders 
were Todd Harcrow and Kent Lewis. 

The freshmen recruiting class, along 
with walk-ons, numbered a squad of thir- 
ty-two. They competed for twenty-two 
positions. Coach Baldner felt that this 
year's recruiting class was one of the 
Lions' strongest in recent years. Of the 
sixteen recruits signed to scholarships, 
ten played in national tournaments this 
past summer. Seven of those ten played 
on a national championship team. With 
all these successful players, the team 
was bound to have a winning year. 





■ ■ ;>;:>.; ' 



mmediately aboue, before a game, 
Coach Tony Montgomery prepares the 
field. 




Sp° r fs 

'124' 




Veft, in an 
~ attempt to 
score more runs, 
Ashley Chism fol- 
lows through on 
a base hit. 



lit 



^mmediateli 
~ belouj, while 
trying to get to 
first base before 
the ball, Todd 
Harcrouj sprints. 




■ ■■■:-■.::■..:■: -■ ■-,/ ;: :., 





yeft, these guus 
* try to keep their 
heads in the game 
ujhile waiting for 
their turn at bat. 



M^iddle, Josh 
'r Buckley 
stretches to get the 
out at first base. 



mmediately 
aboue, knowing 
that practice makes 
perfect, the Lions 
prepare for the 2002 
season. 



i 



Sports 

'12S' 




IN1H6 
2DNB 



"I came to EMCC 
because I felt that 
this 

was the 
best 
place to 
contin- 
ue my 
college 
educa- 
tion, 
and it 
was close to home." 

-Kristin McClelland 
Freshman 



"I came to EMCC 

because of the good 
enui- 
ron- 
ment, 
the 

friendly 
people 
and 
staff, 
and I 
enjoy 

playing softball 

here." 

-Destiny Drish 
Freshman 

"I came here 
because I was able 
to con- 



tinue 
playing 
sports 
and 
stay 
close to 
the 

people I 
care 
most about." 

-Shannon Brown 
Sophomore 





^Pight, looking ready for action, 
rV Kayla Murphy awaits the next 

nil. 

jSe\ow, Shannon Brown tosses 
£^ Kayla Murphy the ball during 
infield practice. 




t^idtile, while taking infield 
*^f before a game, Kristin 

McClelland catches for Kati 

Fleming. 

immediately aboue, sophomore 
™ shortstop Rustyn Gordon acts 
quickly to stop the ball. 



Sports 

'126' 




SOFTBALL 

2002 LADY LIONS SOFTBALL 



Date 


Opponent 


Location 


February 21 


Gulf Coast 


Scooba 


February 28 


Gulf Coast 


Perkinston 


March 1 


Jones 


EUisville 


March 4 


Meridian 


Meridian 


March 8 


Holmes 


Goodman 


March 19 


Northwest 


Scooba 


March 23 


Delta 


Scooba 


March 25 


Itawamba 


Fulton 


March 28 


Meridian 


Scooba 


April 2 


Northwest 


Scooba 


April 4 


Jones 


Scooba 


April 9 


Holmes 


Scooba 


April 13 


Northwest 


Senatobia 


April 16 


Delta 


Moorhead 


April 20 


Itawamba 


Scooba 


April 27 


Northeast 


Booneville 




immediately above, Coach Pam Moore has a pep talk 
•*" with Austyn Gordon, Morgan McPhail, and Jep 
Vaughn. 



Sports 

'127' 



^^he Lady Lions are, First Rouj (l-r): Morgan McPhail, 

Kati Fleming, Emily Gable, Desting Drish, Kristin 
McClelland, Shannon Brown, and Rustgn Gordon; Second 
Rouj (l-r): Randi Little, Jennifer Knox, Kagla Murphg, 
Danita Richardson, Rlisha Dufour, Keelg Rutledge, and 
Coach Pam Moore. Not pictured: Rllison Poujer. 






riSALL 







The 2002 Lady Lion softball team counted 
on some returning players to come up big 
this season. Coach Pam Moore also expected 
the freshman class to step up and become 
important factors, and they did not disap- 
point. 

Sophomores Jessica Vaughn and Kayla 
Murphy both returned with batting averages 
that posted .489 and .451, respectively. 
Sophomore Ursula Conley returned for anoth- 
er year of play after a knee injury that kept 
her out the last part of the season. Conley, 
along with Vaughn, Murphy, and returning 
shortstop, Austyn Gordon, all collected All- 
State honors. Vaughn also won All-Region 



honors. Returning outfielders Morgan McPhail 
and Randi Little and returning infielders 
Shannon Brown and Donna Franklin, also 
added depth to the experienced class of 
sophomores. 

Newcomer Denitta Quinn was an important 
addition to the infield and batting averages. 

Kati Fleming, Destiny Drish, and Emily 
Gable were looked upon to take over impor- 
tant leadership roles as they led out the 
2002 Lady Lions from the mound. Other 
incoming freshmen were Cheryl Senate, 
Keely Rutledge, Kristin McClelland, Alisha 
Dufour, Jennifer Knox, Constance Logan, 
Allison Power, and Margaret McClure. 






immediately aboue, Donna Franklin looks 
™ back to see inhere the ball is before 
heading to third base. 



Sports 

'128' 




Jef\, Ursula 
^ Conley tries to 
apply the out on 
Danifa Richardson 
at first base dur- 
ing practice. 



immediately 
•*• belouj, fresh- 
man Destiny Drish 
folloius through 
ujifh her pitch 
ujhile ujarming 
up. 








eft, freshman 
pitcher Kati 
Fleming gets ready 
to release the ball 
and send it to the 
plate. 



J^^iddle, Morgan 
r r McPhail goes 
doujn to get tne out 
in the outfield. 



immediately 
~ aboue, in an 
effort to stop the 
lead runner, Kayla 
Murphy applies the 
tag at Ihird base. 



Sports 

' 129 l 




IN THE 
ZONE 



"I came to EMCC 
because of the music 
and 
golf 
pro- 

?rams. 
feel 
that I 
can 
con- 
tribute 
to both 
of these programs." 

-Matt Downing 
Freshman 



"I came to EMCC so I 
could improue my 
golf 
skills, 
play on 
a higher 
leuel, 
and be 
the 
best I 
can in 
it." 

-Jon Luke 

Hazelujood 

Freshman 



"I came here 
because this is a 
good 
school 
for a 
higher 
educa- 
tion and 
a good 
experi- 
ence at 
playing 
golf on this leuel." * 

-Deuin Dauis 
Sophomore 

Sports 

■ 130 ~ 





^jpight, Matt Downing follows 
^ through with his swing while 
practicing. 

immediately below, Keith 
■*" Faulkner gets down to look at 
his next shot. 



353 -■--''•> "*■-' 




- " ' • ' '* "**"' - - ■ - 







A^^iddle, hoping to lower his 

' score by at least two points, 
Jon Luke Hazelwood works on his 
swing. 

immediately aboue, knowing 
•*■ that practice makes perfect, 
Deuin Dauis works on getting his 
shot right. 






OLF 



Golf is a quiet sport, so to speak. However, 
one may say that golf is also a sport that the 
athlete must concentrate on. The object of 
the game is to place a small hard ball into a 
small hole using clubs. Imagine someone trying 
to hit that small hard ball 200 plus yards using 
something just slightly bigger than the ball 
itself. It is not as simple as it seems. All 
throughout the nation, there are intricate and 
well developed courses that provide a chal- 
lenge and adventure for the golfer. Golf is a 
true sport. To be a competitive golfer, one 
must devote many hours out on the links in 
order to improve chipping, putting, and drive 
distances. 

The 2001 golf team participated in tourna- 
ments in Picayune, Wiggins, Meridian, Tupelo, 
Wesson, Raymond, and Hattiesburg. May 2001 
graduate Matt King tied for second at the 
Region 23 Tournament. The finish qualified 
King for the National Championships in College 
Station, Texas, June 3-8, 2001. King was also 
named to the All-State and All-Regional Teams 
for Mississippi Community and Junior Colleges. 




g 002 Lion Golf Team is (l-r): Bo Blackledge, 

Hayes Rector, Deuin Oauis, Jon Luke 
Hazelujood, and Keith Faulkner. Not pictured: 
Matt Downing. 



Sports 

'131' 



n 



^081-2002 trainers are, (l-r): Hshley 
^ Knight, sophomore; Chris Watson, fresh 
man; Ryan Cole, head trainer; Rlan Lewis, 
freshman; and Rmy McDill, freshman. 




TRAINERS 



It is third down and five to go. The 
defense decides to blitz on a pass play. 
The quarterback is hit in the knees and 
dropped at the line of scrimmage. For the 
next five minutes, he lays on the field 
while athletic trainers attend to his injury. 

This year, EMCC is fortunate enough to 
have four student trainers under the direc- 
tion of second year head trainer Ryan 
Cole. 

Football is not the only sport these 
trainers are involved with. They are sure 
to be on hand at every athletic event to 
provide assistance if and when needed. 
These trainers work with the Rush Sports 



Medicine Team from Rush Foundation 
Hospital in Meridian. The hours are long, 
as trainers must travel all over the state 
to various events. They must also be on 
hand at practices in case they are needed. 
The main jobs of the trainers are to pre- 
vent injuries, evaluate injuries, and pro- 
vide rehabilitation services when an injury 
does occur. Part of the prevention of 
injuries is to provide plenty of water and 
pickle juice to prevent cramps. These stu- 
dent trainers put in long hours to keep the 
Lions and Lady Lions on their feet and pre- 
pare them to get back in the game and go 
for the prize. 






immediately aboue, Rshley Knight and 
-*■ Christopher LUatson make sure the footbal 
team has their much needed water. 




Sports 

'132 ' 



yeft, head 
^ trainer Ryan 
Cole and student 
trainer Rshley 
Knight examine 
Braz Coleman's 
knee during a 
game. 



y?elow, Ryan 
*J Cole gets 
some assistance 
from Rmy McDill 
Luith an injury. 




y/eft, trying to 
^ make sure the 
Lions don't dehy- 
drate, Christopher 
LUatson and Rshley 
Knight prepare 
wafer bottles for 
the team. 



X^iddle, student 
f f trainer Rmy 
McDill wraps an 
ankle prior to the 
start of football 
practice. 



immediately 
•*" aboue, Rlan 
Lewis prepares LUill 
Gillard's ankle to be 
wrapped before a 
football practice. 



Sports 

'133' 



Coach Steve Hull 




"I was lucky enough to experi- 
ence the professional and per- 
sonal side of Coach Hull. From 
a professional standpoint, he 
was outstanding. As a coach, 
he did not have many equals. 
He loved coaching and he was 
good at it. Personally, he was 
a great friend. If he was your 
friend, you really had some- 
thing. In my short time here he 
had turned into one of my best 
friends. He was a better friend 
than coach, and he was a 
great coach. He had a saying, 
'do it right.' He meant that we 
should always do our best at 
anything we do, or there's no 
reason to do it. I think we 
should all remember him by 
always trying to do what is 
right." 

- Clay Armstrong 
Men '$ Basketball Coach 





"When I remember Coach Hull, 
only good thoughts come to 
mind. His smiling, laughing, 
and joking around were always 
a constant whether it be on 
the basketball court, in his 
office in Stennis Hall, or 
around the campus on week- 
ends. I, as well as my husband. 
Tommy, became great friends 
with Coach Hull and his wife, 
Lisa. In the short six years that 
we were all a part of the 
Scooba family, our friendship 
continued to grow. Coach 
Steve Hull was a great friend 
and that is how I will always 
remember him." 

- Pam Moore, 
Men 's Assistant 
Basketball Coach; 
Women 's Softball Coach 



1961-2001 




"Coach Hull was a motivator. I 
have never seen a more determined 
coach. He was always pushing me. 
No matter how bad things got, you 
could always turn to him for posi- 
tive inspiration." - Dennis Dupree 



"Coach Hull was one of my 
favorite people. He was a good 

man who would help you any 
way he could and could always 
make you laugh. I will miss his 

enthusiasm." - Ashley Knight 



These pictures show just how 

intense Coach Hull was every 

game. He stood by his players 

1 00% and made them push 

themselves to give their best at 

all times. 



"Coach Hull was a great mentor 
and a wonderful coach. He will 

be missed greatly. He was 

always kind to everyone, even 

the ones he did not teach or 

coach. " - Ashley Chism 



"Coach Hull to me was more 
than a coach, but a father, not 
for two years but for many. He 
had tough love for everyone. He 

would help those who helped 
themselves." - Reshard Alonza 



Peopte 

134 



Coach Hull cheering his players during a game. Photos cour- 
tesy of The Meridian Star. 




Steve Hull, men's basketball coach for EMCC 

died of a heart attack while playing golf on 

Monday, October I 5th. He was 39 years old. 

He left behind wife, Lisa, son Trex, and daughter 

Bailey. Coach Hull was beginning his seventh 

season as head basketball coach at East 

Mississippi Community College. Coach Hull was 

very successful in all the sports he coached 
throughout the years. On October 1 9th, EMCC 
faculty, staff, and students held a memorial serv- 
ice for Coach Hull in the auditorium. Some of his 
players shared thoughts of their beloved coach. 
"What I admired most about Coach Hull is that 
he set priorities in his life," said team manager 
Randy Vibrock. "Basketball was a priority, but 
not the first. In practice and in the game, he was 

Coach Hull, but after the game was over, he 

became a teacher, a friend, a son, a father and a 

husband to his family." Along with some of the 

players, Coach Armstrong and Chief 
Administrative Officer Dr. Ed Davis shared their 
thoughts about how special Steve Hull was to 
them. Coach Hul was loved by so many people 
at East Mississippi Community College. He was 
not only a coach, but a teacher to many stu- 
dents of Scooba. He will be sorely missed by his 
basketball players, faculty and staff, as well as 
the student body. Everyone involved with East 
Mississippi Comunity College will never forget 
what a great man Steve Hull was. Always 
remember... "Do it right!" 

- Jennifer Hester 



These cheerleaders memorialize Coach Hull with their 
Homecoming corsages. 





After the memorial, the basketball team poses for a picture for Coach Hull's father. 



Steve Hull with his wife, Lisa, son, Trex, and daughter, Bailey. 



PeopCe 

135 \ 



"The reason I like 
EMCC is because 
they have a great 
coaching staff and 
the teachers are 



Our Ehude And log 

great because W J ^J 



they help students 
to enhance their 
learning ability, " 
said Gene Perry 
Jr., the vice - 
president ofSGA. 
"EMCC is a great 
place to come for 
that next step for 
continuing your 
education. When I 
came to EMCC I 
felt that everyone 
here treated me 
as an individual 
and not just a 
number like at 
other colleges. " 



Top right, from 
left to right, 
De'Andrae 
Craddieth, 
Tameka Pippin, 
Ethel Hill, and 
Vint Jackson 
are having a 
friendly con- 
versation at the 
Grill. 

Right, pictured 
left to right, 
first row, 
Quinton White, 
Eric Robinson, 
and second 
row, Garthia 
Halbert, Jon 
Ferguson, 
Rashad Bailey, 
Niecy Pusha, 
Krystal Bridges, 
and Gino Perry, 
are hanging out 
on the new 
sidewalk sur- 
rounding the 
Business Office. 



Imagine. Students are walking and chat- 
ting about classes, others are trying to get to 
that one class on time, and the rest are just 
talking about everyday things. This is a typ- 
ical day for the students of EMCC. The stu- 
dents, faculty and staff of the college are 
EMCC's pride and joy. The diversity in 
styles, culture and people make the college 
an exciting learning experience for every- 
one. The student-teacher relationship is not 
only professional, but it is also on a friendly 
level, too. "I like East Mississppi Community 
College because it feels like one big happy 
family," said freshman George Spinks. 

"EMCC is a home away from home," says 
Kelly Johnson, an incoming freshman who 
lives in the dorm on the Scooba Campus. 
Living on campus makes a lot of difference 
because this gives students a chance to 
interact with each other on a more personal 
level and to learn more of the indepen- 
dence that is expected when they enter the 
real world. 

"East Mississippi Community College has 
been a great experience, and I know that 
my experiences here will carry me far in 
life," said LeKeva Calhoun. 

Meeting new people is a great way to 
(earn about one's culture and also to learn 
to respect each other's differences. When 
students leave East Mississippi Community 
College, they will hopefully have gained a 
true knowledge and respect for their fellow 
student and will move full speed ahead in 
the right direction in life. 

Whether the students, faculty and staff you 
know come from military bases, the Golden 
Triangle campus or the Scooba campus, 
they are all the pride and joy of EMCC - truly 
one of the greatest treasures of the college. 

- Chandra Foard 




mmm 



people 

' 136' 




*'■:- 



Left, Chandra Foard 
and Tiffany R. Jones 
are making plans 
for the night. 

Top, Jon Ferguson, 
Vanyetta Holmes, 
Courtney Broome, 
Marquita Alford, 
and Ronaldo Beane 
are having an 
afternoon chat in 
front of the cafete- 
ria. 

Middle, Danita 
Quinn, Crystal 
Miller, and Donna 
Franklin are laugh- 
ing about what 
happened in class 
that day. 

Immediately 
above, Craig 
Reeves, Jon 
Ferguson, and Josh 
Steele are trying to 
see who is going to 
win in a game of 
one-on-one. 



peopi e 

'137' 



East Mississippi Community College 

Boarcj of Trustees 





Above, Dr. Ann Lamb makes a point during a board meeting held on the Scooba 

Campus. 



Above, Mr. R. S. Wofford and Mr. Charlie Box review 
the board minutes from the previous meeting. 



Mrs. Linda Jackson 

Kemper County 
Board Chairman 



Peopfe 

138 






•■ . 




Mr. Larry Bell 

Oktibbeha County 



Mr. Charlie Box 

Lowndes County 



Mr. Billie Dickson 

Noxubee County 



Mr. Tim Heard 

Lowndes County 




Mrs. Theresa Hughes Dr. Ann Marie Lamb 

Noxubee County Clay County 



Mrs. Susan Moates 

Clay County 



Mr. Dennis Morgan 

Lauderdale County 




Mr. Ed Mosley 

Lauderdale County 



Mr. John Persons 

Kemper County 



Mr. Tommy Wallace 

Board Attorney 



Mr. R. S. Wofford 

Oktibbeha County 



peopCe 

139 



Administration/Faculty/Staff 



Dr. Thomas L. Davis, President of EMCC 

Dr. Ed Davis, Chief Administrative Officer 

Debby Gard, Assistant Business Manager 

Garry Jones, Financial Aid Director 



Napoleon Jones, Assistant Vocational Director 

La Nell Kellum, Asst. Vocational Director 

GT/ Compliance 

Randall Lee, District Academic Dean 

Paul Miller, Assistant Director GT 



Jacqueline Newton, Columbus Air Force Base Director 

Mark Schroeder, Meridian Naval Air Station Director 

George Stockman, Business Manager 

Mickey Stokes, Dean of Students 



Joyce Walker, District Dir. of Institutional Research 

Dr. Rick Young, Chief Executive Officer GT 

Yolanda Allen, Receptionist/ Switchboard Oper. GT 

Kelly Atwood, District Director of Public Information 



Bill Baldner, Baseball Coach 

Janet Briggs, English Instructor 

Doreen Bryan, Secretary of the President 

Joanne Buchanan, Clerical/Switchboard Operator 



Adam Burke, Men's Soccer Coach 

Patricia Calloway, Business Technology Instructor 

Lynn Card, Administrative Assistant 

Terry Cherry, Art Instructor 



VcopCe 

140 




Faculty/Staff 




Debbie Coker, Cosmetology Instructor GT 
Ricky Collier, Welding Instructor GT 
Andrew Couch, Forestry Instructor 
Pam Cox, Related Studies/Math Inst. GT 



Maggie Dale, Accounts Payable & Purchasing 
Trina Dendy, Admin. Support Service Instructor 
Brenda DiMichele, Music Instructor 
Conrad DiMichele, Social Science Division Chair 



Marilyn Dolittle, Business Tech. Instructor GT 
Annalisa Ebanks, Physical Science/Math. Instructor 
David Ellis, Computer Programming Instructor GT 
Robert Ellis, Data Processing Manager GT 



Tonsha Emerson, Practical Nursing Instructor GT 
Linda Farrar, Hotel & Restaurant Instructor GT 
Russ Farris, Shipping/Receiving 
Zelma Fulgham, Business Technology Instructor 



Robin Fulton, Math Instructor 

Larry Gibson, Math Instructor 

Marie Gordon, Speech & Drama Instructor 

Grady Graham, Automotive Instructor GT 



Janet Gullett, Banking & Financing Instructor 
Jackie Hale, Job Placement Counselor GT 
Judy Higginbotham, Accounts Receivable Clerk 
Teresa Houston, Mathematics Instructor 



Pcopfc 

141 



Faculty/Staff 



Catalina Huerkamp, Spanish Instructor 

Jim Huerkamp, Science & Technology Inst. GT 

Jennifer Hull, Health Care Asst. Instructor 

Lucy Hull, Social Science Instructor 



Telemate Jackreece, Social Science Instructor GT 

Ellen Jordan, Biology Instructor GT 

Marilyn Lantz, English Instructor GT 

Ernest Lowrimore, Drafting Instructor GT 



Steve Malone, Machine Shop Instructor GT 

Elaine McKay, Accounts Receivable Clerk GT 

Donald McKee, Information Technology 

Belinda Mead, Nursing Instructor GT 



Marcy Montgomery, Clerical Support/ PR Assistant 

Tony Montgomery, Assistant Director of Housing 

Pam Moore, English Instructor/Softball Coach 

Melissa Mosley, Dist. Payroll/ Benefits Manager GT 



Ed Nave, Director of Continuing Education GT 

Irene Nichols, Related Studies Instructor 

Earl Oliver, Automechanics Instructor 

Wilton Parnell, Maintenance 



Karen Parsons, Nursing Instructor GT 

John Reeves, Social Science Instructor 

Rosemary Rice, Library Assistant GT 

Larry Salter, Psychology Instructor 




VcopCe 

142 



Faculty/Staff 




Marion Sam, ABE/GED GT 

Eddie Sciple, Ophthalmics Instructor 

Melinda Sciple, Secretary of the Academic Dean 

Hari Sharma, Mathematics Instructor 



Ellen Shaw, Tech Prep Instructor GT 

James Skipper, Science Instructor 

Susan Sleppy, Computer Instructor 

Mary Margaret Smith, Special Pop. Coordinator 



Roger Smith, Librarian 

Ann Smithson, Assistant Librarian GT 

Kim Sobley, District Learning Coordinator Assistant 

Janis Spears, Business Office GT 



Terry Stennis, Bookstore Manager 

Martha Taylor, English Instructor 

Gina Thompson, Related Studies Instructor GT 

Bobbv Thrash, Mathematics Instructor 



Kenneth Turner, English Instructor 

Mike Tvarkunas, Director of Info Tech. 

Bob Walker, Forestry Technology Instructor GT 

Michele White, Recruiting Director 




Cathy Williams, Registrar 
Clay Williams, Science Inst. 
Kary Williams, Math. Inst. 
Brenda Wilson, Special 
Populations Coordinator 
Sandra Yarbrough, Vo-Tech 
Secretary 

People 

M143M 






Who's Who Among America's Community 




William Michael Brown 

Major: Accounting 

SCF • Choir • Gospel Choir • 

National Dean's List • Kemper 

County After School Tutorial Program 



Ashley Chism 

Major: Computer Information Syst. 

Parents: Gary and Barbara Chism 

Baseball 



Addy Clark 

Major: Forestry 

Parent: Debbie Baker 

Forestry Club Secretary • 

Forestry Award 200 1 recipient 



Wesley Clay 

Major: Child Psychology 

Parents: Stewart and Malinda Clay 

Soccer • Phi Theta Kappa • 

President's List • PTK Award 




Michele Guadagno 

Major: Elementary Education 

Soccer • Phi Theta Kappa chairman 

•President's List • Dean's List • 

National Dean's List 



Joshua Hailey 

Major: Business 
Parents: David and Kay Hailey 
Phi Theta Kappa "Dean's List 



Jennifer Hester 

Major: Radiology 

Yearbook Editor • PTK • FCA • 

Student Recruiter • Sports 

Information 1 • Freshman favorite 



Latasha A. Jones 

Major: Office Systems Technology 

Parents: Earnestine S Londy Jones 

Gospel Choir • Phi Beta Lambda • 

National Dean's List 




Tiffany Moore 

Major: Secondary English/Coaching 

Choir • Newspaper • Highest GPA 

in Western Civilization class • 

Student Christian Fellowship 



Kayla Murphy 

Major: Physical Therapy 

Softball • Fellowship of Christian 

Athletes • Phi Theta Kappa • All State 

Softball 200 1 • President's List 



Kelly Peoples 

Major: Accounting 

Parents: Wade and Tammy Peoples 

Phi Theta Kappa • Basketball 



Gene A. Perry, Jr. 

Major: Accounting 

Parents: Gene and Hilda Perry 

Gospel Choir • Student Government 

Association •National Dean's List 



Pcopfc 

11441 

ShBRshBSBI 



College Students - Scooba Campus 




Scotty Elliott 

Major: Accounting 

Football • Newspaper • Phi Theta 

Kappa • FCA • President's List • 

JSA Today Academic All American 



Kristina Garrison 

Major: Pre-medicine 

Phi Theta Kappa President • Soccer • 

President's List •National Dean's 

List • Chemistry Award 



Felicia George 

Major: Speech Pathology 

Student Christian Fellowship • 

Choir • MYF Sunday School 

Teacher 



yefi^PEJ^^MMBfcr 


' i Hi 


1 m 


•■ « - .jjk 


1 ,_- 


»■&*" 




Wu \ 




M^ 


• i 


liiiij^i'-:: 


" / ■ 



Austyn Gordon 

Major: Business 

Soccer •Softball • National Dean's 

List • President's List • Phi Theta 

Kappa 




Melanie Key 

Major: Accounting 

Collegian »SCF • Scholar's Bowl • 

Syzygy »PTK Secretary •President's 

§ Dean's List *AII USA nominee 



Ashley Knight 

Major: Athletic Training 

PTK Historian • Student Trainer • 

Newspaper • Basketball statistician • 

National Dean's List •USA scholar 



Cora McDuffy 

Major: Elementary Education 

Phi Theta Kappa • Softball 

Manager • Choir • Gospel Choir • 

National Dean's S President's Lists 



Morgan McPhail 

Major: Political Science 

Softball team • President of FCA § 

SGA»SCF*HEADWAE* 
President's § National Dean's List 




Josh Perry Erica Ray 

Major: Secondary Education Major: Accounting 

Baseball • Phi Theta Kappa • Phi Theta Kappa • President's List • 

'resident's List • Social Studies Award Basketball • Fellowship of Christian 
• Fellowship of Christian Athletes Athletes • PTK Award 



Rocky Rockette 

Major: Business 

Parents: Joyce Bell § Rocky Rockette 

Football • Fellowship of Christian 

Athletes • Academic All American 



Danny Shoemaker 

Major: Funeral Services 

Sigma Phi Sigma • Restorative Art 

Award • Vice President of Sigma 

Phi Sigma for 200 1 



PCO/I& 

145 \ 



Who's Who Among America's Community 







Stuart Adams 

Major: Electrical 

Parents: Leon Adams and Debbie 

Ragon 

President's List 



Mechelle Blair 

Major: Office Systems Technology 

Phi Beta Lambda • 

Who's Who 



Josette Brown 

Major: Hotel § Restaurant 

DEX President • Sophomore class 

favorite • Student Government 

Association representative 



Rodney D. Busby 

Major: Drafting S Design 

Parents: Demar and Gayle Busby 

President of Phi Theta Kappa • 

VICA Club 





Readus Hudson 

Major: Electrical 

Parents: R. Hudson S Eaye Barnes 

Air National Guard •Hamilton 

Volunteer Fire Department 



Ardra I. Morgan 

Major: Office Systems Technology 

Parent: Elwin Bennett 
National Dean's List • Who's Who • 
Phi Beta Lambda • Phi Theta Kappa 



Laura Sanders 

Major: Elementary Education 

Parents: Jerry Dailey and Denise 

Findley 



Philip E. Talley 

Major: Political Science 
Parents: Brad and Alice Talley 



SCOOBA 

Campus 

(CONTINUED) 

Not Pictured 

Steven Platt 




Dusty Smith 

Major: Pre-medicine 

Reflections • Choir • Student Tutor • 

SGA Treasurer • Freshman Biology 

Award • SCF 



Marion Carolnella Smoot 

Major: Computer Science 

Phi Theta Kappa • Student 

Christian Fellowship • President's 

List 



Shauntez Williams 

Major: Liberal Arts 

Phi Theta Kappa • Syzygy • Phi 

Theta Kappa Award • English 

Composition Award 



David Yeates 

Major: Sports Medicine 

Parent: Mary Yeates 

Fellowship of Christian Athletes • 

Football 



Peopfc 

146 



College Students - Golden Triangle 







Bradley Courtney 
Major: Computer Networking Tech. 
Parents: Willie § Marilyn Courtney 

President's List • AITP 




Brad Cox 

Major: Math 

Parents: Rusty and Becky Cox 

Freshman class favorite 



Blake Hanson 

Major: Marketing 
Delta Epsilon Chi • placed I st in Delta 
Epsilon Chi State Conference • placed 
3rd in International Career conference 



Hope Holley 

Major: Office Systems Technology 

Who's Who* Phi Theta Kappa* 

Phi Beta Lambda • Phi Theta 

Kappa Award 





James B. Turnipseed 

Major: Electrical 
Parents: Jim and Ellen Turnipseed 
Phi Theta Kappa • President's List 



Sulata Young 

Major: Office Systems Technology 

Student Government Association 

Phi Beta Lambda • Dean's List 



Christopher J. Youngblood 

Major: Computer Programming 

Parents: Jerome § Janet Youngblood 

Phi Theta Kappa • President of 

AITP 



Brian Wimberly 

Major: Behavioral Science 

Phi Theta Kappa • Students in 

Christian Fellowship • President's 

List • Phi Theta Kappa 






Bianca Harris-Caldwell 

Major: Math 

Population Health Committee • 

Church Musician • Columbus AFB 

Lady Blaze basketball team 



Pamela Duff 

Major: Business Administration 

President's List • helped build Lee 

Recreational Park in Columbus • 

Volunteer work 



Jandrew Taala 

Major: Criminal Justice 
ASMC Magnolia Chapter Treasurer 
2000-2001 • Airman of the Year • 
Dean's List • Airman of the Quarter 



Columbus Air 
Force Base 
Extension 

(Not Pictured) 
Nneka Harrison 



-^ 



People 

147 I 



Sophomores 



Lashonda Adams 

Rafiah Akon 

Ronald Anthony 

Leon Ash 

Casey Asmus 

Glennda Aust 

Taft Baker 



Victor Barnett 
Bo Blackledge 
Tenisha Bland 
Lacisha Blunt 
Jeremy Brock 
Shannon Brown 
William Brown 



Shereka Bush 

Anthony Butler 

Michael Calloway 

Addy Clark 

Wesley Clay 

Kevin Coggins 

Myisha Cole 




Pep rally 

2001 



EMCC HoMECOMiiNq Pep RAlly 

At Its Best... 

The day was filled with 

loads of fun and entertainment. 

The cheerleaders danced, prizes 

were awarded, members of the 

football team spoke, pies were 

thrown at cheerleaders, and 

music was played. 



Pcopfc 

148 \ 



Sophomores 




> I -A 



€ Vr.*.t ! .ul, /f 




Christopher Coleman 
Ursula Conley 
William Cotton 
Bradley Courtney 
Brad Cox 
Tasha Crawford 
Al Cummings 

Roderick Dale 
Shalandria Darden 
David Dees 
Leneice Dennis 
Demorris Dismuke 
Rosalynn Dismuke 
Amy Doss 



Benjamin Earnest 
David Edwards 
Orlando Ellerby 
Mario Evans 
Godiva Fox 
Rashad Gandy 
Shavonne Gandy 




L-R. (p. 148) I . Otis Bumpers; 1 Lauren Hester. Wesley Clay, Stephen Piatt. Mandl 
Wells, Patrick DiMichelle, Rob McArthur, § Allison Power; 3. football players; 4. Leo 
the Lion; 5. Michael Collins 5 Chris Issac; (p. 149) 6. Cheerleaders pertorm a dance; 7. 
Coach Goode, Al Cummings, Michael Johnson, § David Yeates; 8. Otis Bumpers; 9. 
Shannon Brown; 10. Angel Williams, Summer Wooten, S Kristen Guadagno 

VeopCe 

m 149 1 



Sophomores 



Bonita Garner 
Kristina Garrison 
Natalie Garton 
Felicia George 
Kisha Gillespie 
Wiley Gladney 
Joshua Goodwin 



Austyn Gordon 

Michele Guadagno 

Joshua Hailey 

Sara Hansen 

John Harbour 

Richard Harcrow 

Amanda Harpole 

Janice Harris 

Jerita Harris 

Jamie Haskins 

Jennifer Hester 

Vanessa Hickman 

Rashad Hill 

Crystal Hogan 



American Pie 

2001 




HoMECOMJNq Will Never Be ThE 

Same WiihouT tIhe Pie TlnRowii\q.. 

This is the time when EMCC 

cheerleaders are punished for 

speaking on "Hush Day." 

Students throw pies, consisting 

of melted marshmellows, choco 

late syrup, and cool whip, into 

the cheerleaders' faces. 



VeopCe 

ISO 



Sophomores 



Luke Holman 
Phillip Hood 
Allen Hopkins 
Natasha Hopson 
Derico Howard 
Kanesha Howard 
Maria Hughes 

Bobby Irions 
Tomeka Ivory 
Mary Jackson 
Vent Jackson 
Lakisha Jefferson 
Shanketheia Jefferson 
Angela Jennings 




L-R. (p. 1 50) I . Kimanet Jones S Al Cummings; 2. Jennifer Hester g Jennifer Knox; i. 
Marquita Alford, Otis Bumpers, g Michael Johnson; 4. Piper Sharp g Tyler Lofton; 5. 
Michele White; (p. 151)6. Josh Steele g Jackie Elder; 7. Randi Little § Cassie Atkins; 
8. Amber Lunsford g Jana Moss; 9. Bailey Patterson g Elizabeth McNutt; 10. K. 
Jones, g A. Cummings 



Peopfe 

151 



Sophomores 



Melanie Key 

Mollie King 

Ashley Knight 

Chastley Lewis 

Marshetta Little 

Randi Little 

Deandra Lockett 



Dustin Love 

Sandra Lucas 

Odie Macon 

Mattie Madison 

Benjamin Mason 

Robert McArthur 

Catrina McBride 



Natasha McBride 

Lakeshia McDade 

Cora McDiifry 

Thomas McGee 

Kimbeiiy McLeod 

Morgan McPhail 

Brvan Mitchell 



A Chance to 
Dance 

2001 




TIhe HoMECOMiNq Dance 

ancI Fun Flicks... 

Every year EMCC students look 

forward to the annual dance, 

held this year during 

Homecoming week. Fun Flicks 

also offered the students a 

chance to dance and sing. 



VcopCe 

152 






Sophomores 



Gennice Moore 
Jerion Moore 
Kenyetta Moore 
Priscilla Moore 
Tiffany Moore 
Dana Mordecai 
Ardra Morgan 

Kayla Murphy 
Frederick Murray 
Felicia Norris 
Michael Oliver 
Yvonne Parr 
Mary Patterson-Davis 
Kelly Peoples 




L-R. (p. 1 52) I . Nancy Skelton; 2. Christina Craddieth, Constance Logan and Chimere 
Ewings; 3. Students dancing in the student center; 4. Steve Butler; 5. Constance 
Logan; (p. 153) 6. Tameka Pippin, Michael Johnson, § Jessica Vaughn; 7. Tony 
Robinson; 8. Coach Kelby Bowman. Audrey Carter S Joe White; 9. Bobby Johnson 5 
Chris Coleman; 10. Lasaundra Pusha 5 Kimanet Jones 



Peopfe 

153 \ 



Sophomores 





Lonell Richey 




Sheril Richey 




Gustavus Riley 




Maurice Riley 




George Roberson, Jr. 




Nichole Rogers 




Hope Sanders 




Shana Shamily 




Ben Shelton 




Kurt Shepherd 




Beulah Sherrod 




David Smith 




Dustin Smith 




Flice Smith 




Hal Smith 




Linda Smith 




Marion Smoot 




Latrans Spraggins 




Jack Stevens 




Jonathan Stokes 




Marques Sykes 




Inflatable Fun 




2001 




hflATAblE Fun, A Ume to Let it 
All Go ancJ Have a BIast WnU 

Your FrjencIs at EMCC... 

EMCC students are given the 

opportunity to have a "tun 

day" on campus. This year 

inflatable fun was included as 

part of the homecoming week's 

activities. 




peopfe 

154 



Maurice Sykes 
Philip Talley 
Matthew Terrell 
Cassandra Thomas 
Elizabeth Thomas 
Mario Thomas 
Eileen Thompson 

Felissa Thompson 
Kylan Tippett 
McKinley Turner 
Tameka Tyus 
Jacquelyn Walton 
Tripp Ward 
Phillips Watson 




L-R. (p. 154) I. Hayes Rector; 2. Allison Power S Andrea Judd; 3. Jennifer Hester S 
Steven Piatt; 4. Katie Richards 5 Titfany McKay; 5. Ben Stiller, John Fuller. Tony Butler 
S Ty Harbour; (p. 1 55) 6. EMCC students watch the fun activities, 7. Otis Bumpers; 8. 
Tiffany R. Jones S Crystal Hogan; 9. Katie Richards 5 Adam Parker; 10. Coach Adam 
Burke 






VeopCe 

155\ 



F 
R 
E 
S 
H 


Casey Abrams 

Dan Adams 

Marquita Alford 

Jennifer Allred 

David Ammons 
Kristel Anderson 

Miki Anderson 


Troy Anderson 

Antionio Anthony 

Cassie Atkins 

Kelly Atkinson 

Emily Aust 

Amanda Aycock 

Hayley Ballard 


M 
E 


Paul Ballard 

Lenta Bankhead 

Benjamin Barnett 

Katrina Barr 

Kristina Barrett 

Matthew Barrett 

Shikeeta Barry 


N 


Gary Bartlett 

Shonte Bass 

Thomas Bateman 

Niki Bates 

Rahshaad Baylis 

Kayse Bayliss 

Omar Beard 


Ca 


mpus Life 




2001 


EMCC 


Strews Have Fun On 


ThE 


ScoobA Campus... 


The sti 


idents at EMCC always 


enjoy 


spending time in their 


dorms 


> with friends, playing 


cards 


in the student center, 


talking 


outside and just finding 


somet 


hing to do at Scooba. 




-gfafcifc 



Peopfc 

156 





Cheryl Beaty 


F 


Michael Bell 


Eron Benson 




Niki Benson 


r> 


Patressa Bester 


K 


Oliver Black 


j.%. 


Tisha Bourrage 


t 


Amario Boyd 


r, 


Jonathan Brandy 


^~» 


Christina Brasher 


C 


Carolyn Brewer 


> 


Krystal Bridges 


*— w 


Shameka Brooks 


"m v 


Charnette Brown 


H 


Kwajalin Brown 




Lakeisha Brown 


lvl 


Shelia Brown 


1*1 


Otis Bumpers 


•A. ^&> 


Anitera Bush 


1—i 


Cardell Butler 


t 


Linda Butler 


£1 


Sherman Butler 


M 


Derek Calvert 


IN 


Aspen Cannon 




Lafrinia Carpenter, Iv 




Audrey Carter 




Centoria Carter 




Demetris Carter 






t-R, (p. 1 56) I. Sunshine Gardner; 2. Rashard Alonza, Darrel Madison, § Dejuan 
Turnipseed; 3. David Smith, Wesley Clay. Sean Quinn, § Steven Piatt; 4. Ty Harbour % 
Kris Barnett play cards in the SC; 5. Rosalynn Dismuke: (p. 1 57) 6. Laura LaGrone, 
LaTasha Farmer, S LaShonda White; 7. Students play cards in the student center; 
S.Taijuan Petty S Keisha Vassar; 9. Chad Carlson; 10. J.D. Harbour 



Peopfe 

157 \ 






F 


Cassie Chance 


Alesia Cheatham 




Jamie Cherry 


R 


Maurico Clark 

Melva Clark 

Lakeisia Clay 


E 


Ryan Clay 


Adrienne Cole 




Christopher Coleman 


S 


Joseph Coleman 


Laura Coleman 


Renia Coleman 


H 


Toccara Coleman 


Bayonca Collins 


<«■ amp 


David Conner 


M 


Naquietta Conner 


Samoria Conner 




Chris Cooper 


E 


Jennifer Coring 


Reneko Courington 


Chrishena Craddieth 


N 


Deandrae Craddieth 


Annette Creel 




Tita Cribbs 




Miracle Crump 




Phillip Culpepper 




Montrell Cunningham 




Debbie Darden 


Ca 


mpus Life 




2001 



Campus Life Is Full of... 

Whether EMCC students play 

in the water (when the campus 

floods), talk on the phone. 

socialize with new friends, or 

just play Playstation, they 

always have a good time on 

the Scooba campus, and make 

it a cherished experience. 




YzopCe 

158 




T***' **■ w*~ "" I ** ■ " 



Ashley Davidson 


F 


Alisha Davis 


JL 


Brenda Davis 




Christopher Davis 


D 


Deborah Davis 


K 


Gregory Davis 


JLm. 


Jonathan Davis 


■c 


Joyce Davis 


E, 


Latonya Davis 


^-^ 


Monica Davis 


c 


Maurice Dean 


^ 


Renaldo Deans 


k~r 


Joe Dent 


•m w 


Frances Devers 


H 


Patrick Dimichele 




Martha Dora 


lVf 


Detric Doss 


1m 


Dorsey Doss 


JHb ^ 


Cledeeden Dotson 


I"" 1 


Destiny Drish 


1h 


Alicia Dufour 


XL 


Jessica Duncan 


M 


Kimbely Earvin 


IN 



Latasha Easley 
Amy Easter 
Angela Ebenthal 
Tyrone Edmonds 
Chastity Edwards 




L-R, (p. 158) I . Elise Mallette; 2. Ashley Chism, tee Boyd, S Leif Carpenter; 3. Marcy 
Jones § Trey Gibson; 4. Kent tewis; 5. Keisha Jenkins, Latta Spencer S Regina Barkins; 
6. Randi Little, Jennifer Hester § Natalie barton; 7. Bailey Patterson § Chris Davis; 8. 
Rashard Alonza, Reggie Jackson, Tamar Gibbs. Atari Lofton, § Porecious Powe; 9. S. 
Brown, J. Hester S N. Garton; 10. Dana Stapleton, Kim Mowry S Lindsey Haywood 



Peopfc 

i55 






F 


Erica Edwards 


Jennifer Eiland 




Jacquelyn Elder 


R 


Deon Elliott 
Joan Estes 


Dontay Evans 


E 


Jennifer Evans 


Kimberly Evans 




Chimere Ewings 


S 


Dusty Ezelle 


Latasha Farmer 


Jon Ferguson 


H 


Terrell Fields 


Kati Fleming 


<^n v 


Lorie Flemings 


M 


Camillia Foote 
Katherine Ford 




Belinda Forest 


E 


Shameka Frazier 


Emily Gable 


Ronnie Galberth 


N 


Kendrick Gale 


Karla Ganann 




Ava Gardner 




Sunshine Gardner 




Kellye Garner 




Matt Garner 




Raymond Gibson 


Ca 


mpus Life 




2001 



EMCC Always OffERs Fun 
AdiviTiEs for? tIhe StucIent Body... 
Whether you are playing the 
guitar at Mr. Salter's house, 
playing volleyball, taking soft- 
ball trips, or supporting EMCC 
football, you always have a 
good time at East Mississippi. 



Veople 

160 1 













* / 












4 




^im ", 







Christa Gill 
Tameka Gladney 
Yolanda Glass 
Erika Glenn 
Nukimberly Glenn 
Christopher Godfrey 
Keith Goodson 



Barbara Gordon 
Kelvin Gordon 
Kim Grace 
Lorena Grady 
Nathan Gregg 
Devarrius Hairston 
Jeanette Hairston 



Alisha Halbert 
Hailey Harbour 
Tyrone Harbour 
Kendrick Harris 
Tamekia Harris 
Tangiel Harris 
Tracy Harris 



Antonio Hart 
Lindsay Haywood 
Charles Hazelwood 
Jon Hazelwood 
Taurean Hendrix 
Kristy Henley 
Teri Henson 








■M* 






£0& 




\f 



Lj 






L-R, (p. 160) I . Jennifer Knox, Rob McArthur, § Joel Patrick; 2. Morgan McPhafl, 
Kayla Murphy, Lauren Hester. Allison Power. Keely Rutledge, S Jennifer Hester; 3. 
EMCC softball team poses for a quick picture at McDonalds; -t.Keysha Ware; 5. At the 
honors dorm; (p. 161)6, Ashley Chism, Matt Minchew, Mr. Salter, S Josh Snyder; 7. 
J. Knox, Tiffany Moore. Dan Sundbeck, R. McArthur, Keely Rutledge, % Destiny Dnsh; 
8. T. Moore § Felicia George; 9. Montrel Bobo § Deidra Lewis: 10. M. McPhail, K. 
Murphy 5 K. Rutledge 



Vtopte 

161 



F 


Lauren Hester 


David Hester, II 




Kimberly Hill 


R 


Marion Hill 
Rodriquen Hill 


Stephanie Hill 


E 


Virginia Hogan 


Airon Holliday 




Crystal Hollis 


S 


Vernita Hollis 


Laron Hood 


Regina Hood 


H 


Hilda Hopkins 


Sharonda Hopson 


°am w° 


Henry Howells 


M 


Angela Huffman 


Adrian Humbers 




Jeremy Hurt 


E 


Ben Ira 
Christopher Isaac 


Angela Ivy 


N 


Kamekia Ivy 
Hansel Jackson 




Shana Jackson 




Takeita Jackson 




Tonya Jackson 




Alexas Jamison 




Tameka Jamison 




Plays 




2001 






Drama at EMCC Is Always Full 

of Surprises... 

Every year, the drama class at 

East Mississippi entertains the 

student body with laughs and 

good times. Particularly funny 

were Humpty Dumpty, 

Cinderella, and Trouble is 

Eating My Pants. 




People 

162 




L-R, (p. 162) I. Derrick Conner; 2. Mr. Lauderdale and Coach McDonnall; 3. Frankie 
Doss. Elizabeth Thomas § Gabe McCann; 4. Crystal Hogan § F. Doss; 5. Mrs. Judd § 
Mrs. Taylor; (p. 163) 6. the cast and crew; 7. Jeremy Jarvis, Crystal Hogan 6 Perez 
; 8. F. Doss; 9. F. Doss 5 E. Thomas; 10. Matthew Terrell. J. Jarvis S E. Thomas 



People 

163 m 



■:v: ; :-/'"S- : :. . .. . 



F 


Pearlie Lane 


Jason Lang 




Marcus Lang 


R 


Michael Lang 


Jason Latham 


Maranda Latham 


E 


Marcus Latham 


Martesha Lee 




Barry Lewis 


S 


Deidra Lewis 


Jennifer Lewis 


Matthew Lewis 


H 


Matthew Curt Lilly 


Stephanie Linch 


u^K ttf 


Tyler Lofton 


M 


Constance Logan 
Kary Loweiy 




Linda Lumpkin 


E 


Amber Lunsford 


Bobby Lyons 


Latoya Madison 


N 


Elise Mallette 


Chad Malone 




Susan Martin 




John Massey 




Benjamin May 




Joshua McBride 




Steven McCarter 


Beai 


uty & Beau 


1 


2001 






m 






■ '.;- 






rt »«OH«»«l' 







. ' 










EMCC Holds An AnnuaI Beauty 
An<J Beau PAqEANT Every Year... 
This year's event was different 
from previous years because it 
featured a showcase of all the 

beauties and beaus as they 

danced to New Orleans Lady. 

Forty two students participated 

in this year's pageant. 











^qwgffiHSS 





VeopCe 

164 1 





*.▲ 




Josh McCarty 
Kristen McClelland 
Mary McClure 
Lora McCollough 
Montoya McConnell 
Matthew McCraw 
James McCully 

Deborah McDaniel 
Amy McDill 
Raven McGee 
Jonathan McGowen 
Bridget McGregor 
Robert Mclntyre 
Tiffany McKay 

Prentiss McLaurin 
Joni McNeal 
Cassandra McNeese 
Elizabeth McNutt 
Brian Mead 
Michael Melcher, Jr. 
Kelon Midcalf 



Crystal Miller 
Martha Miller 
Timothy Mills 
Derrick Minor 
Melissa Minor 
Robert Miskel 
Jonathan Mitchell 



F 
R 
E 
S 
H 
M 
E 
N 



L-R, (p. 164) I . Garthia Halbert; 2. Jennifer Knox, Crystal Hogan. S Piper Sharp; 3. 
LaTasha Hopson § Marshetta Little; 4. Fred Murray; 5. Matt Vaughn, Nick Dimino, 
Willie Gillard, Keely Rutledge, § Allison Power; (p. 165) 6. Lauren Hester, Erica Ray, S 
Jennifer Hester; 7. Audrey Carter S Marion Smoot; 8. G. Halbert, Kristel Anderson, J. 
Knox, S J. Hester; 9. Paul Ballard S J. Knox; 10. Ashley Knight § Kristina Garrison 






YcopCe 

165 \ 



F 
R 
E 
S 
H 
M 
E 
N 



Keith Morgan 

John Morrow 

Latina Mosley 

Marcus Mosley 

Eddie Moss 

Jana Moss 

Kim Mowry 



Kerri Myers 

Trenton Myers 

Theneshia Neal 

Lakeshia Nichols 

Christopher Norrell 

Joe Odom 

Rodney Outlaw 

Jennifer Overstreet 

Byron Palmertree 

Adam Parker 

Bailey Patterson 

Doris Payne 

John Pearce 

C. Peay 

Jennifer Peeples 

Gino Perry 

Kenya Petty 

Sonya Petty 

Warren Petty 

James Phillips 

Jessica Phillips 



Sports 

2001 



EMCC SpoRTs At Its Best... 
The Scooba campus is full of 
great athletes in football, bas- 
ketball, baseball, softball, soc- 
cer, and golf. Trainers also play 
an important role in the sports 
atmosphere. And most of all, 
the athletes enjoy the support 
of fellow students. 




VnopU 

166 \ 







Pamela Phillips 


F 


Angel Polanco 


Rodney Pollard 




Josie Porter 


R 


Roddrick Porter 


Andrew Powell 


Allison Power 


E 


Travis Prisock, Jr. 


Nathaniel Pruitt 




Lasaundra Pusha 


c 


Larkin Quarrels 


N 


Shawanda Readus 


L-r 


Lamar Reed 


H 


Yulonda Reed 


Craig Reeves 




Andrew Reffett 
Melissa Rhodes 


M 


Elbert Rice 




Clint Richards 


E 


Cynthia Robinson 


Eric Robinson 


Taronda Robinson 


M 


Tony Robinson 


IN 



Veronica Robinson 
Reginald Roby 
Euvonda Roseburgh 
Shameka Ross 
Ashley Rowell 




L-R, (p. 166) I . Mary Margaret McClure; 2. David Yeates; 3. Audience watches the 
soccer game; 4. Ben Mason 6 Todd Harcrow; 5. Amy McDill; (p. 167) 6. Steven Piatt 
S Brian Sanders: 7. Shannon Brown; 8. Krystal King; 9. Pavarnus Hairston; 10. 
Raymond Gibson S Wesley Clay 



Peopfc 

167 I 



F 
R 
E 
S 
H 


James Rush 

Jeanisha Rush 

Lekeyia Rush 

Susan Rushing 

Keely Rutledge 

Tammy Sandifer 

Traci Savage 


Kelsey Scarbrough 

Margaret Schrock 

Tracy Scott 

Carolyn Sellers 

Hettie Sellers 

Mark Selvie 

Cheiyl Sennett 


M 
E 


Melissa Shackelford 

Robert Shaffer 

Piper Sharp 

Tarsha Sharp 

Renotta Shed 

Eunice Shelton 

Patrick Sherrod 


N 


Elijah Short 

Shylanda Simmons 

Shatina Simpson 

Crystal Sizemore 

Nancy Skelton 

Christina Skinner 

Kelvin Sledge 


Sp 


irit Week 




2001 


HoMEC 


OMiNC, Dress Up WeeI< 




CoNsisTEd of... 


Mc 


jnday- Camo Day 


Tue 


sday- Go USA Day 


Wedn 


esday- Costume Day 


Thi 


jrsday- Hush Day 


F 


riday- Spirit Day 




168 \ 






^jH 











> 















Benjamin Smith 


F 


Drew Smith 


1 


Jeanette Smith 




Marcus Smith 


T) 


Damaria Smoot 


K 


Laquaitta Smoot 


JA 


Pamela Smoot 


r 


Joshua Snider 


t 


Robin Sowers 




Chase Spencer 


C 


Marquitta Spencer 


^ 


George Spinks 


V-F 


Matthew Stanley 


-m w 1 


Krystal Staples 


H 


Dana Stapleton 




Joshua Steele 


IVyf 


Amberlie Stephens 


IVI 


Bethany Stevens 


A A 


Monique Stevenson 


T"i 


Nashedra Stevenson 


In 


Ayesha Stewart 


Jl. 


Charleasha Stewart 


M 


Orietta Stewart 


IN 


Shertesha Stewart 


oflb. Ti 


Donnie Stokes 


Angel Stovall 


Travis Strait 


Debra Stuart 










L-R, (p. 168) I . Elise Malette S Marquita Alford; 2. Lyndall Wood, Amy McDill, 
Shannon Brown, Loni Embree, Crystal Hogan. Jennifer Knox, Kelsey Scarbrough, Alicia 
Dufour; 3. J. Knox, Elise Malette, S Cassie Atkins; 4. Kimanet Jones; 5. students pose 
around a tree; (p. 169) 6. camouflage day; 7. Kristen McClelland, Shannon Brown, C. 
Atkins, S J. Knox; 8. Piper Sharp, Jackie Elder, § Katie Fleming; 9. Amber Lunsford S 
C. Atkins; 10. EMCC Switchboard operator, Joanne Buchanan 



VeopCe 

169 1 






F 


Terranee Sturdivant 


Marco Suarez 




Latara Suggs 


R 


John Sutton 


Nathan Taylor 


Deanna Thomas 


E 


Mary Thomas 


Wyvonia Thomas 


,^^> 


Salento Thompkins 


S 


Brian Thompson 


Joshua Thompson 


Lashuna Tillman 


H 


Joseph Triplett 


Debra Tuggle 


M 


Quintin Turner 


Locarno Turnipseed 
Nakesha Vassar 




Matt Vaughn 


E 


Tasha Vaughn 


Terrell Veazey 


Roderick Virges 


N 


Derrick Wallace 
Holly Ward 




Marcus Washington 




Christopher Watson 




Devron Watson 




Tawanda Weaver 




Tekeshea Weir 


GT C 


ampus Life 




2001 




GoIcJen TmANqlE Campus... 
Campus life on the GT campus 
revolves mostly around the stu- 
dent center. Whether students 
are taking a snack break, meet- 
ing up with study partners, 
playing pool, watching tv, or 
catching up with friends, every- 
body has a great time. 




PeopCe 

170 \ 






Alma Wells 


F 


Wade Whitaker 


Ashley White 




Linda White 
Roderick White 


R 


Alicia Williams 


Bobbie Williams 


E 


Gerrard Williams 


Keidra Williams 




Kelly Williams 


c 


Monica Williams 


:\ 


Theda Williams 


\*J 


Tyrango Williams 


H 


Lisa Williamson 


Pamela Williamson 




Larry Willis 
Kattie Wilson 


M 


Kimberly Wilson 




Laquaysha Wilson 


E 


Judy Wolanek 


Lyndall Wood 




N 




L-R, (p. 1 70) I . Shawn Robinson 5 Jay Raymond; 1. Jessica Threet S Tiffany Stapp; I. 
Lee Ann Coe, Antonio Hart § Derek Ryland at the polls; 4. Joshua Montgomery; 5. 
Emily Moore; (p. 171)6. Students pose for a picture; 7. Lacey Lee § Allan Evans; 8. 
Ashley Rowell % Jenny Seuffer; 9. Ryan Turner and Bill Johnston; 10. friends take a 
break at the Student Center 



Peopfe 

171 



Treasured 



Below, Kendrick Harris looks puzzled as he holds his trusty umbrella in the Student Center. 



Faces of EMCC 
2001 



Below, Marqita Afford, Al Cummings, Robert Miskel, and Eddie Moss are 
having a serious conversation in the Student Center. 




Above, Monica Davis, the 
yearbook's flower girl, is 
trying to hide from the 
camera. 

Above right, these girls 
could show a chorus line 
some new poses as they 
pretend to sneak into the 
boy's dorm. 



Above, Derrick Wallace and April Williams are showing that they need to Above, Shannon Brown, Randi Little, Natalie Garton, and Morgan McPhail are smiling for a quick snapshot on a rainy 
practice more on the tango. day. 



VcopCe 

\172\ 



Below, Ronaldo Dean. Tameka Harris, Nikio Edwards, Chimiere Ewing, Trina Barr, and Belinda Forrest are taking a Below, Randi Little and Lekeva Calhoun are playing a game of 
break between classes. tug-of-war, 



Below, Al Cummings is holding up 
Kelly Johnson before she falls. 




Above, Katie Richards and Mandy Wells 
show how well they can reenact The Blair 
Witch Project. 



Above, Cassie Atkins, Casey Abrams, Randi Little, and Amberlie Stevens are showing their silly side. Above, Lisa Bennett tells the mascot to give up her walkie talkie. 



173 \ 



Treasured 

Faces of EMCC 

2001 



Below, Wiley Giadney and Raphael Edwards are having a conversation 
about who played the best in the basketball game the night before. 



LJ UL 



Below, one of the students that attends the Golden Triangle campus shows his classmates how to really play the game of pool. 




Immediately above, Albert 
Goodwin is telling Jon 
Ferguson how he really 
feels about Scooba Tech. 

Above right, Roderick 
Gandy, Mario Thomas, 
and Fines Tate are won- 
dering what the object is. 
Could it be a bird, a 
plane? No, it's just the 
gym 



Above, Steve McCarter, Elphassaii Mattox, and Chris Washington are 
checking out some drawings that Chris designed. 



Above, Rico Sherman, Tiffany S. Jones, and Courtney Thompson are looking at upcoming events for the school year. 
They say the dance and inflatable fun are two of their favorites. 



Pcopfc 

174 



Below, Rashina Wren, Latasha Temple, and Jon Detric Grissom are telling what they did during the homecoming 
week's festivities. 



Below, William Brown and Cora 
Below, Destiny Drish and Alicia Dufour are having a quick chat McDuffy are showing their million dol- 

before they head to their class. lar smiles lor the camera. 




Above left, Tyisha Harris and Elphashaii 
Mattox are reminiscing about old times in 
front of the cafeteria. 

Above, Deidra Lewis, Crystal Hogan, 
Summer Wooten, Keisha Wier, and 
LaKeva Calhoun are having a chat out- 
side the girl's dorm. 



Above, some members of the EMCC Gospel Choir are warming up before they begin practice. After 
they tone up their voices, the Gospel Choir performs each year for the student body. 



Above, Tyisha Harris, Kimberly Wilson, and Fred Murray are playing a 
game of spades. 



Peopk 

175 



Fashion 
and Styles 
at EJVLCC 



TIte fAshioiN at East Mississippi Commune CollEqE 

is VERy diVERSE. ThERE ARE MANy STylES ANd TRENds 
tItAT MATch EVERyONE's pERSONAliTJES. WIhET^ER JT is 

sTylish or just Uid bAck, aII stents express tItem^ 

SElvES FREEly. "As AN AtWeTE, I pREfER A COIVlfoRTAblE 

STylE of cloThiNq," sAid Katje FlEMMiNq, phcfiER of 
ThE sorrbAll team. 

It doES NOT MATTER if \J is ORANqE flAJR, diffERENT 
ColoR TOENAils, OR AN AfRO, tIhE STudENTS loVE TO 

cfnAllENqE ThEMSElvEs iN fAshioN. Even if h is JUST 

SEEJNq WlUo CAN dRESS tIhE bEST OR tIhE MOST 
TfiROUqflOUT T^E VX/EEk. "I loVE TO dRESS Up," SAyS 

TiffANy R. Jones, a RETURNiNq sophoMORE. Some 
STylES tIhat you see on CAMpus can shock you, buT 
aII jn aII tIhese STylES bRiNq out tIhe true CREATMTy 
of EMCC. 

- Monica D/wis 



"My fashion is 
more of a unique 
type because I like 
to dress different- 

iy." 

- Atari Lofton 



"My fashion is 
more laid back 
since I am an ath- 
lete." 
- Roderick White 



"My fashion is 
based on the way I 
feel that day." 
- Destiny Drish 






Right, Keysha Ware who is 
pretending to be Alicia Keys in 
undercover, is showing the cam- 
era that million dollar smile, 
while checking the time belore 
her big show. 

Below, Steve McCarter, Tyisha 
Harris, and De "Andrae 
Craddieth all are wearing the 
latest lashion in laid bach cloth- 
ing, such as Duck Head, Nike, 
etc., while talking about the lat- 
est news in lront ol the 
Student Center. 




4fc? 



Above, Kristin McClelland, Shannon Brown, and Jennifer Knox combine 
patriotism into a cute lashion statement. 



Peopfe 

176 








Above. Cheryl Beaty is asking 
Kelly Johnson lor directions in 
her new 2001 Mazda 626. 

Immediately above. Terrel Ash. 
Matthew Downing, and Aspen 
Cannon are having a Iriendly 
chat while Aspen washes his 
car. Now which one would you 
choose, the 2001 Mazda or the 
old car? 



Lelt. lrom lett to right, Deidra 
Lewis, Keysha Ware, and 
Leheva Calhoun are showing 
the camera what is in on the 
Scooba Campus. 




"The things that are 

old are back and new 

things are in, so if it 

looks good, who's to 

say that it's out of 

style." 

- Cora McDuffy 



"I think that all the 
old styles are com- 
ing back in style." 
- Josh Synder 





"I think that 
flipped hairstyles 
and flare jeans are 
so in." 

- Kelly Johnson 



Wpat's out 

On t^e CAMpus of East Mississippi CoMMUNiTy 
CollEqE tNere are many ThiNqs tNat stents FeeI 

ARE iN Al\d out of STylE. 

ThERE ARE MANY ThilNC,S tIhAT ARE iN STylE, SUch AS 
FlAREd JEANS, low R\6eR JEANS, 60s-STylE FlippEtJ 
hAJRSTylES, ANd MANicUREd fiNqERNAits, JUST TO NAME 

a Few populAR TRENds. PeopIe aII over CAMpus 
show tIteSr personaUty iN ThE WAy They dREss. 

ANOTHER populAR WAy foR pEOpU TO EXpRESS TflEM' 

seIves is ThROuqh piERciNqs, such as TONquE RiNqs 
ANd belly RiNqs. 

CloThiNq ANd accessories aren't ThE ONly WAy 

STudENTS follow CURRENT TRENds. AnhudES ARE Also 
USEd. "PATRJOTiSM foR OUR COUNTRy is VERy iN COM' 
pAREd TO A yEAR AqO," SAid CaSSJE ChANCE, A 
fREshMAN AT EMCC. 

All jn aII East Mississippi CoMMUNiTy CollEqE 

STudENTS ANd fACulTy kNOW whAT's IN ANd Also whAT 
is OUT of STylE. 

- ChANCJRA FOARd 

Pcopfe 

M177M 



September 11, 2001 




"It was tragic and sad, but it has 

brought me comfort in knowing 

it increased togetherness, prayer, 

and faith of our nation as a 

whole. " - Kristina Garrison 




"We have all heard of the 
tragedies of Pearl Harbor and the 
Titanic, but I never imagined that 

such a dramatic tragedy could 

strike so close to home in our day 

and age." - Kati Fleming 





"Amidst this unthinkable tragedy, 

feelings of sympathy and anguish 

prevail toward those directly 

affected. It furnished each 

American with a different outlook 

on life." - Scotty Elliott 




"On the day of September 1 1 , 
200 1 , thousands of innocent lives 
were lost. Yes, this is a sad time, 
troubling and depressing, but we 
must continue and go on as best 
we can." - Marion Smoot 












M J .1 * .T : fl| 




r T«W 




LpL^j 




"I think that since this tragedy has 
happened, we have had more peo- 
ple come closer to God than ever 
before. People are really learning 
the meaning of life and how short 
it can be." - Gene Perry 



"When I came in from class and 
turned on the news, I was great- 
ly saddened. My heart ached for 
the families. I plan to join the Air 

Force one day and serve my 
country." - Kelsey Scarbrough 



"It was very sad that it took an 

event so devastating to draw our 

country back together through 

prayer. This day will never be 

forgotten." 

- Michele Guadagno 



"The events of September I I , 

200 1 , were tragic, but I think it 

brought us all together as one 

nation and people." 

- George Spinks 



"It was a depressing and very 
sad time. It woke America up to 
come together. It made me real- 
ize life is precious and to spend 

every day like it's your last." 
- Erica Ray 



VcopCe 

178\ 



Below, students from the Scooba campus show their USA 

spirit by decorating their clothes to wear during 

Homecoming Spirit week. 




Tuesday, September I 1 , 2001 was a day that 

shook America. On September I I , the United 

States of America lost more than words can say, 

but gained respect, resilience and prevalence. 

Thousands of lives were lost when two jets hit 

both World Trade Towers in New York and 

another jet hit the Pentagon. 

On this day, the United States lost its sense 

of innocence, safety and security. In a matter of 

minutes, the once "all powerful" nation was not 

so powerful. We will never be able to understand 

how people could commit these horrible acts to 

innocent human beings. But even after the 
acts of terrorism brought on our nation, we have 
prevailed and become a stronger bonded country. 

Through these months of sorrow and 
shock, we have overcome many obstacles. The citi- 
zens of the United States have come together as a 
whole and shown an overwhelming display 
of patriotism, as well as spiritual and moral sup- 
port for victims, heroes, political leaders, and 
defenders of our country. 
America has come together in prayer to heal 
all the broken hearts and ask the questions which 
can never be answered. Our nation has suffered 
dearly, but hopefully our nation has gained togeth- 
erness among different races, ethnic groups, and 
religion to become one strong American family. 
Don't let life pass you by. Live each day to the 
fullest as if it were your last. This page is dedicat- 
ed to all the victims, police officers, and fire fight- 
ers who lost their lives on 
September I 1 , 200 1 . 

- Jennifer Hester 



Below, Roxanne Liddell from the Golden Triangle campus 
works on a project in Christian Student Fellowship. 




Above, students at the Golden Triangle campus gathered around the television in 
the Student Center as the events unfolded. 



Above, the Golden Triangle campus prayed around the flag po!e. The Scooba Campus also 
held a prayer the night of September I I . 

Peopfe 

M1791 



Tmeasuneb 

F jt i end s 



The S 1 index I 



<stf 



Abrams, Casey 2, 4, 42, 106, 
173 

Acker, Alisha 3 
Adams, Stuart 88, 146 
Ahirich, Donna 7 
Ainsworth, Aaron 110, 112 
Alford, Courtney 137 
Alford, Marquita 5, 104, 
105, 151, 168, 172 
Alonza, Rashard 14, 15, 42, 
118, 120, 134, 156, 159 
Anderson, Krystel 3, 5, 23, 
155 

Anthony, Ronald 88 
Armstrong.Clay 120, 134 
Ash, Terrell 38, 61 
Atkins, Cassie 23, 26, 62, 
104, 105, 135, 173, 168, 169 
Atkinson, Kelly 86 
Atwood, Mike 69 



9g 



Bailey, Rashad 1 36 

Baker, Marco 97 

Ballard, Hayley 2, 106, 108 

Ballard, Paul 112, 113, 165 

Barkins, Rigina 158 

Barlett, Gaiy 96 

Barnett Kris 156 

Barnett, Detrick 98, 100, 101 

Barnett, Henry 59, 100 

Barnett, Victor 79 

Barney, Moncia 1 1 

Barr, Katrina 114, 116 

Barrett, Matthew 66 

Barry, Shikeeta 82 

Peopfc 

■ 180m 



Baskin, Teresa 10 
Bass, Shonte 1 14 
Bates, Niki 86 
Baughn, Trac 101 
Beam, Linda 9 
Beanes, Ronaldo 137, 173 
Bell, Patrick 100 
Bellamy, Kareim 95 
Ben, Ira 64 
Bennamon, Ricky 66 
Bennett, Brian 108, 112 
Bennett, Lisa 173 
Bester, Monique 41 
Black, Laura 72 
Blackledge, Bo 62, 112, 131 
Blair, Michelle 83, 146 
Blake, Nathan 97 
Bland, Tenisha 27, 28, 68 
Blue, Jerry 1 1 
Bobo, Montrel 161 
Boland, Mrs. Lou 7 
Bonner, Raymond 97 
Bourrage, Tisha 67 
Bowman, Kelbv 153 
Boyd, Lee 122, 158 
Boyd, Perez 163 
Brand, Cvester 80 
Brandy, Jonathan 100 
Braxton, Charles 120 
Brewer, Carolyn 84 
Brewer, Phyllis 90 
Bridges, Krystal 136 
Briggs, Janet 1 9 
Brock, Kimberly 90 
Broderick, Adam 76 
Brooks, Shameka 86 
Brooks, Sonya 68 
Brooks, Tamesha 84 
Broome, Daisy 75 
Brospher, Christina 68 
Brown, Josette 39, 146 
Brown, Pansy 35, 90 



Brown, Shannon 12, 13, 14, 

22, 126, 128, 148, 159, 169, 

168, 169, 172 

Brown, Shelia 82 

Brown, William 41, 144, 175 

Buchanan, Joanne 169 

Buckley, Josh 125 

Budlove, Aaron 14 

Bumpers, Otis 100, 148, 

151, 155 

Burke, Adam 118, 142, 155 

Burrus, Kevin 89 

Busbv, Rodney 146 

Bush, Rosie 83 

Butler, Linda 84 

Butler, Steven 152 

Butler, Tony 43, 154 



<£ 



Caldwell, Blanca 147 
Calloway, Patricia 68 
Cannon, Jason 87 
Carlson Chad 157 
Carpenter, Leif 158 
Carroll, Torri 41, 63 
Carter, Audrey 153, 165 
Carter, Jessica 76 
Celestine, Clem 120, 121 
Chance, Cassie 44 
Cherry, Susan 16 
Cherry, Terry 17, 31, 59 
Chism, Ashley 124, 134, 
144, 158, 161 
Clark, Addv 1 44 
Clark, Maurico 85 
Clav, Missy 84 
Clay, Welsey 108, 110, 112, 
144, 148, 156, 167 
Cocke, Brian 73 
Coe, LeeAnn 1 7 1 
Coggins, Terrance 100 
Coggins, ICevin 77 
Cole, Ryan 114, 120, 132, 
Coleman, Braz 100, 133 
Coleman, Chris 153 
Coleman, Connie 83 
Coleman, Jeffery 97 
Coleman, Sandra-85 



Coleman, Toccara 16 
Colhoun, LaKeva 173, 175 
Collier, Ricky 96 
Collins, Jeffery 94 
Collins, Michael 148 
Conley, Urusla 128 
Conner, Derrick 162 
Cooper, Ben 35, 90 
Coring, Jennifer 82 
Cotten, Bill 25 
Couch, Andrew 64 
Courtney, Al 30 
Courtney, Bradley 147 
Cox, Brad 147 
Cox, Brian 76 
Craddieth, Christina 152 
Craddieth, De'Andrae 136 
Crawford, Michael 85 
Crawford, Tosha 84 
Culpepper, Phillip 62 
Cummings AI 100, 149, 150, 
172, 173 

Cummings, Ashley 73 
Cunningham, Maurice 100, 
102 

Cunningham, Tosha 10 
Curry, Robert 100 




Dale, Roderick 65 
Darden, Shante 56 
Darnell, John Alan 63 
Davis, Chris 159 
Davis, Devin24, 130, 131 
Davis, Jonathan 112, 113 
Davis, Latonya 5,23 
Davis, Monica 27, 174 
Davis, Rita 31 
Davis, Tommy 30, 3 1 
Deans, Renaldo 25 
Deikourtnev, Scott 173 
Dendy, Trina 83 
Denney, Princilla 6 
Devers, Frances 84 
DiMichele, Brenda 40 
DiMichele, Patrick 34, 41, 
100, 102, 148 
Dimino, Nick 62, 100, 164 



Dismuke, Rosalyn 65, 156 
Donald, Rikki 82 
Doolittle, Marilyn 83 
Doss, Franklin 162, 163 
Downing, Matt 1 30 
Drish, Destiny 4, 126, 128, 
129, 161, 175 
Duff, Pamela 147 
Dufour, Alicia 4, 168, 175 
Duncan, Wesley 84 
Dupree, Dennis 42, 62, 1 18, 
120, 134 




Edenthal, Angela 89 

Edwards, Frank 100 

Franklin, Donna 128 

Edwards, Niko 25, 100, 173 

Edwards, Raphael 118, 120, 

121, 174 

Eiland, Jennifer 84 

Mrs. Elam 72 

Elder, Jackie 23, 104, 105, 

150, 169 

Ellerbv, Orlando 64 

Elliott, Scottv 100, 101, 145 

178 

Embree, Loni Lynette 168 

Emory, Heather 76, 77 

Evans, Allan 171 

Evans, Mario 100 

Evans, Roshunda 26, 28 

Evans, Tramechie 120 

Evers, Erica 84 

Ewing, Contessa 84 

Ewings, Chimere 61, 115, 

173 

Ezelle, Dustv57 



9 



Farmer, Keith 130, 131 
Farmer, LaTasha 157 
Farrar, Emmett 91 
Faulkner, Del 9 1 
Ferguson, John 5, 136, 137, 
174 



Fields, Tanya 6 

Fines, Tate 1 74 

Fleming, Kati 41, 126, 128, 

169, 178 

Five, Cory 78 

Foard, Chandra 2, 17, 137 

Foote, Camilla 26, 28, 35 

Forrest, Belinda 173 

Foster, Jeremv 100 

Franklin, Donna 114, 115, 

116 

Freez, Lyles 90 

Fuller, John 43, 154 

Fulton, Robin 23 



^ 



Gable, Emily 106, 108, 128 

Gandy, Rashod 100 

Gandv, Roderick 26, 32, 33, 

100, 174 

Gandv, Shavonne 65 

Gardner, Sunshine 156 

Garrison, Kristina 108, 109, 

145, 165, 178 

Garton, Natalie 12, 13, 59, 

108, 159, 172 

Gary, Brad 85 

Gavliss, Kavse 86 

George, Felicia 145, 161 

Gerald, Sean 100 

Gibbs, Tamara 114, 159 

Gibson, Catherine 82 

Gibson, Larrv 61 

Gibson, Raymond 167 

Gibson, Ryan 59 

Gibson, Trey 58, 120, 158 

Gillard, Will 43, 100, 164 

Gillis, Lee 78 

Gladney, Wiley 120, 174 

Graham, Gradv 81 

Grych, Sandra J. 73 

Gonzales, Kristi 74 

Good, Ben 4 

Goode, Tom 100, 101, 102, 

149 

Goodwin, Albert 175 

Gordon, Austyn 2, 56, 108, 

126, 127, 128, 145 

Grace, Kim 65 



Gray, Tony 7 

Grayson, Donnie 27, 30 

Gregg, Nathan 112, 113 

Grissom, Ion Detrick 13, 175 

Guadango, Michele 4, 106, 

108, 144, 178 

Gullett Janet 84 



96 



Hailev, Joshua 1 44 

Hairston, Davarrius 120, 167 

Halbert, Garthia 136, 164, 

165 

Hampton, Bryon 85 

Hampton, Tracy 72 

Handy, Herburt 1 3 

Hanson, Blake 147 

Harbour, Chrystal 14 

Harbour, f.D, 122, 157 

Harbour, Tv 43, 154, 156 

Harcrow, Todd 25, 62, 122, 

125, 166 

Harpole, Amanda 22, 23, 41 

Harris, Kendrick 100, 102, 

175 

Harris, Tameka 173 

Harris, Tvisha 1 75 

Hart, Antonio 170 

Haskins, Matt 75 

Haywood, Lindsav 159 

Hazelwood, Jon Luke 1 30, 

131 

Heard, Brenda 9 

Henry, Chris 95 

Hendricks, Galen 100 

Hester, Jennifer 13, 17, 31, 

144, 150, 154, 155, 160, 

165, 169 

Hester, Lauren 3, 5, 12, 24, 

27, 28, 148, 160, 165 

Higgenbothan, Chris 97 

Hill, Ethel 136 

Hill, Jamar 120 

Hill, Jessica 74 

Hogan, Crystal 19, 31, 38, 

40, 59, 155, 162, 163, 164, 

168, 175 

Holley, Hope 83, 147 

Hollis, Kenneth 100 



Hollis, Ricky 95 
I lolmes Vanyetta 137 
Hood, David 81 
Hopkins, Allen 66 
Hopson, LaTasha 164 
Ilopson, Sharon 57, 67 
Hopson, Terrone 1 4 
Horn, Anna 72 
Hoskins, David 78 
Howells, Deshune 100 
Hudson, Buddy 78 
1 ludson, Readus 1 46 
Hudson, T.C. 100 
Huffman, Daniel 79 
Hull, Jennifer 67 
Hunt, John 91 
Hutchinson, Alexis 2, 43, 
106, 108 



9 



Isaac, Chris 63, 100 
Ivory, Tomeka 84 
Ivy, Angela 82 



V 



Jackson, John 78 
Jackson, Reggie 120, 159 
Jackson, Takeita 84 
Jackson, Vint 1 36 
Jamison, Tameka 67 
Jarvis, Jeremy 18, 19, 163 
Jenkins, Keisha 158 
Jenkins, Lashundra 41 
Johnson, Bobbv 15, 153 
Johnson, Field 72 
Johnson, Jamie 72 
Johnson, Kelly 24, 1 73 
Johnson, Marcus 89, 96 
Johnson, Matthew 66 
Johnson, Michael 100, 149, 
151, 153 

Johnston, Bill 171 
Jones, Dustin 100 
Jones, Clarence 100 
Jones, Eric 3 

Jones, Kimanet 5, 27, 28, 32, 
33,40, 104, 105, 150, 153, 




168 

Jones, Latasha 68, 144 

Jones, Marcy 2, 106, 108, 

158 

Jones, Michael 74 

Jones, Tiffany R. 18, 137, 155 

Jones, Tiffany S. 174 

Jones, Ward 77 

Jordan, Sheena 27, 28, 90 

Mrs. Jordan 74 

Judd, Andrea 17,154,162 



/v 



Kelly, Brian 98, 1 10, 112 

Kelly, Jimmy 120 

Key, Melanie 145 

King, Jennifer 84 

King, Krvstal 2, 56, 58, 108, 

167 

Kirk, Catrina 75 

Knight, Ashley 132, 133, 

134, 145, 165 

Knolls, Michael 1 I 

Knox, Jennifer 27, 28, 31,40, 

41, 43, 104, 105, 128, 150, 

160, 161, 164, 165, 168, 169 




LaGrone, Laura 157 
Larose, Tvler 1 22 
Lasky, Eli 100 
Latham, Marcus 100, 101 
Latham, Miranda 3 
Lauderdale, Bill 17, 162 
Lee, Lacev 1 7 1 



Lester, Jeffery 10 

Lewis, Alan 132, 133 

Lewis, Deidra 161, 175 

Lee, Randall 16,26 

Lewis, Kent 158 

Lewis, Matt 59 

Lile, Richard 1 12 

Little, Katie 40 

Little, Marshetta23, 40, 65, 

165 

Little, Randi 12, 13, 14, 23, 

128, 151, 172, 173 

Lofton, Atari 1 59 

Lofton, Tvler 3, 100, 151 

Logan, Constance 3, 114, 152 

Long, Ken 124 

Lovelace, Bob 88 

Luna, Sigrid 9 1 

Lunsford, Amber 104, 105, 

135, 151, 165 

Lunsford, Larnique 6 



M 



Madison, Darrel 156 

Mahone, Steve 78 

Mallette, Elise 27, 104, 105, 

168, 158 

Malone, Peter 59, 100 

Manigo, Stacy 80 

Mapp, Sandy 80 

Martin, Rob 88 

Mason, Ben 24,166 

Mason, Justin 97 

Mason, Kenny 23 

Mattox, Elphashaii 174,175 

McArthur, Rob 148,160,161 

McCarter, Steve 174 

McCartv, Josh 24 

PeopCe 

m 181 m 



McCaskill, Latoya 8 
McClelland, Kristen 14, 22, 
24, 99, 126, 128, 169 
McKay, Tiffany 106, 108 
McClure, Marv Margaret 4, 
114, 115, 166 
McCoy, Don 66 
McDade, Lakeshia 68 
McDill, Amy 99, 132, 166, 
168 

McDonnall, Sean 19, 162 
McDuffv, Cora 2 , 40, 145, 175 
McGee, Raven 72 
McGee, Shanita 80 
McGee, Ward 64 
McKay, Tiffany 154 
McKeller, Kristin 1 3 
McPhail, Mark 27 
McPhail, Morgan 13, 27, 29, 
30, 38, 61, 127, 128, 12 l >, 
145, 160, 161, 172 
Mead, Belinda 82 
Michevv, Matt 25, 161 
Miller Crystal 41, 137 
Miller, Paul 23 
Mills, Timothy 66 
Miskel, Robert 100, 172 
Mitchell, Bryant 69 
Mitchell, John 5 
Mobley, Larry 97 
Montgomery, Joshua 1 70 
Montogomery, Tony 122, 
124 

Moody, Jason 1 8 
Moore, Emilv 72, 170 
Moore, Kenvetta 4, 114, 110 
Moore, Pam 59, 120, 127, 
128, 134 

Moore, Tiff an v 144, 161 
Moore, Tommy 101, 102 
Mordecai, Jay 94 
Morgan, Ardra 146 
Morrison, Kenneth 122 
Morrow, Dale 96 
Mosley, Fiffie 75 
Mosley, Latina 67 
Moss, Eddie 23, 100, 172 
Moss, [ana 2, 56, 108, 109, 
151 

Mowry, Kim 159 
Murphy, Ben 94 

Pcopfc 

■ 182 W 



Murphy, Kayla 30, 126, 128, 
129, 144 

Murray, Fred 164, 175 
Mvers, Trent 67 



% 



Nabors, Louis 95 
Navlor, Dominique 14 
Neal, Alander 36, 37, 39 
Neal, Edanil 75 
Neal, Theneshia 90 
Nichols, Irene 23 
Norell, Christopher 96 




Oates, Benny 74 
O'Brian, Jennifer 88 
Oden, Thomas 88, 91 
Odom, Dorothy 68 
Odom, Joe 66 
Ohnson, Trivena 85 
Oliver, Michael 2 
Oliver, Earl 66 
O'Neal, Jessica 85 
Outlaw, Rodney 34, 40, 41 
Overstreet, Jennifer94 




Parker, Adam-30,55 

Parker, Lvsbeth 8 

Pate, Monisha 6 

Patterson, Bailey 104, 105, 

151, 159 

Patrick, Joel 160 

Peay, Dale 114, 115 

Payne, Estella 78 

Peeples, Jennifer 8 

Peoples, Kelley 56, 60, 144 

Peoples, Kristian 100 

Peoples, Robert 13, 14, 114, 

1 16 

Pennick, Annie 58 

Penry, Tim 16 

Perry, Geno 100, 136, 144, 

178 



Perry, Josh 123, 145 

Peri-v, Katie 94 

Peterson, Nathaniel 81 

Petis, Shawonda 60 

Pettv, Kenya 36, 37, 90 

Petty, Taijuan 157 

Pippin, Tameka 14, 136, 153 

Pittman, Olean 80 

Piatt, Steven 42, 112, 148, 

154, 156, 167 

Poe, Courtney 34 

Polanco, Angel 66 

Pool, Andrea 79 

Pounders, Dustin 3, 5 

Powe, Dorecious 114, 116, 

159 

Powe, Rvan 87 

Powell, Drew 25 

Power, Allison 5, 12, 13, 24, 

59, 114, 148, 154, 160, 164 

Pusha Lasaundra 153 

Pusha, Niecv63, 136 

Pvron, Rudv 9 



^ 



Quarteraro, Carol Ann 10 
Quinn, Danita I 37 
Quinn, Shaun 112, 156 



9£ 



Rav, Erica 23 

Rector, Hayes 59, 131, 154 
Ratliff, Kay 68 
Ray, Erica 114, 115, 145, 
165, 178 

Raymond, Jav 1 70 . 
Readus, Shawanda 13 
Reed, Austin 81 
Reeves, Craig 60, 137 
Reeves, John 63 
Reynolds, Stacy 7 
Reynolds, Terion 100 
Rhodes, Mellisa 82 
Richards, Danita 65 
Richards, Katie 2, 108, 109, 
154, 155, 173 
Richardson, Danita 128 



Richardson, Jamar 100 
Richardson, Tyler 100 
Richey, Lonell 58 
Richev, Shirlv 85 
Riley, Gus 8 1 
Rivers, Russell 66 
Roberts, Jerry 87 
Robinson, Eric 41, 136 
Robinson, Jennifer 73 
Robinson, Pat 77 
Robinson, Shawn 1 70 
Robinson, Tonv 57, 66, 154 
Rockette, Rocky 100, 145 
Rodriguez, Rvan 120, 121 
Rowell, Ashley 171 
Ryan, Rodriguez 99 
Rush, Chassity 68 
Rush, James 68 
Rushing, Chris 4 
Rutledge, Keeley 13, 19, 59, 
128, 160, 161, 164 
Ryland, Derek 79, 89, 170 



s 



Salter, Larry 3, 62, 161 
Sanders, Brian 112, 167 
Sanders, Hope 99 
Sanders, Laura 1 46 
Sanford, James 14 
Sarcone, Elizabeth 17 
Scarbrough, Kelsey 168, 178 
Sciple, Eddie 65 
Schnell, Chief 78 
Schroeder, Mark 1 1 
Self, David 91 
Sellat, Hettie 79 
Sellers, Hettie 82 
Seuffer, Jenny 1 7 1 
Shackelford, Melissa 86 
Shaffer, Michelle 1 14 
Sharp, Piper 104, 105, 151, 
164, 169 

Shaw, Heather 80 
Shepard, Curt 4, 62 
Sherman, Rico 1 74 
Sherrod, Beulah 83 
Sherrod, Tamar 100 
Shumaker, Danny 69, 145 
Sillimon, DaShon 100 



Simmons, Shvlanda 79 

Simpson, Shatina 57 

Sims, Kerstii 9 

Sizemore, Crystal 9 

Skelton, Nancv 152 

Sleppv, Susan 61 

Smith, Ben 57, 64 

Smith, Brian 88 

Smith, David 62, 1 10, 112, 

156 

Smith, Drew 5, 112 

Smith, Dustv 41, 146 

Smith, Hal 69 

Smith, Linda Beam 78 

Smith, Marcus-57 

Smith, Marv J. 87 

Smoot, Marion 146, 165, 

178 

Smoot, Maurice 96 

Smyser, Aaron I 1 2 

Snider, Josh 122, 161 

Snowden, Devin 64 

Snowden, Jessie 100 

Sommerville, Marvin 100 

Sorrels, Chip 88 

Sowers, Robin 75 

Spencer, Latta 1 58 

Spinks, George 178 

Spires, Candice 63, 114, 115 

116, 117 

Spraggins, Jo Anna 74, 75 

Stapleton, Dana 159 

Stapp, Tiffany 170 

Steele, Josh 23, 120, 137, 

150 

Stegall, Michaella 9 

Stephens, Amberlie 4, 173 

Stiller Ben 43, 154 

Strahan, Joseph I 1 

Strickland, Lauren 76 

Sturdivant, Patricia 95 

Sudduth, Antonio 74 

Sunbeck, Dan 1 6 1 

Sutton, Garrett 1 10, 112 

Swanign, Jamonica 82 

Sykes, Marques 100 

Sykes, Morgan 57 



% 



Taala, Jandrew 147 
Talley, Philip E. 146 
Tannerbriel, Courtney 58 
Tate, Fines 100, 102 
Tate, Fred 9 
Taylor, Mrs. 162 
Taylor, Nathan 74 
Temple, Latasha 1 75 
Terrell, Matthew 69, 150 
Thomas, Elizabeth 18, 19, 
108, 162, 163 
Thomas, Mario 2, 174 
Thompson, Brian 100 
Thompson, Courtnev 1 74 
Thompson, Eileen 77 
Thompson, Sharon 1 14 
Thrash, Bobbv 3 1 
Threet, Jessica 1 70 
Tillman, Lashuna 86 
Tisdale, Shekelia 67 
Tullos, Shealvn 74 
Turner, Ryan 171 
Turnipseed, Benjamin 78 
Turnipseed, Dejuan 156 
Turnipseed, James B. 147 



s/ 



Vanderburg, Greg 78 
Vassar, Kesha 15, 157 
Vaughn, Jessica 56, 127, 153 
Vaughn, Matt 100, 
102,103,164 
Vaughn, Tasha 86 
Vibrock, Randy 120 



nv 



Waldrop, Ryan 39, 100, 102 
Wall, Trey 122 
Wallace, Derrick 15, 172 
Wallace, Tracey 14 
Ward, William 76 
Warren, Kim 58 
Washington, Chris 174 



Washington, Marcus 27 
Watson Chris 63, 132, 133 
Wier, Keisha 1 75 
Welch, Ed 11 

Wells, Mandi 16,42, 148, 
173 

West, Jonathan 26, 100 
Wharton, Gabriel 11 
Whitaker, Wade 23 
White, Angela 22 
White, Christina 16, 41 
White, Diane 8 
White, Joe 100, 153 
White, Michael 150 
White, LaShonda 157 
White, Quinton 136 
Whitehead, Angela 108 
Whittington, Joseph 80 
Williams, April 172 
Williams, John 75 
Williams, Shirley 97 
Wichman, Joshua 7 
Wilkins, Chris 110, 112 
Williams, Angel 16, 149 
Williams, Gerrard 100 
Williams, Micheall 100 
Williams, Minted 56 
Williams, Monica 96 
Williams, Natalie 56, 60, 114 
Williams, Shauntez 146 
Williams, Shicooner 77 
Willis, Larry 96 
Wilson, Billy 94 
Wilson, Kimberly 1 75 
Wilson, Pamela 75 
Wimberly, Brian 147 
Wise, Dusty 112 
Wood, Lyndall 1 68 
Wooten, Summer 18, 19, 
149, 175 

Wren, Rashina 175 
Wright, Andre 4 1 
Wright, Veron 1 00 
Wyers, Buddy 87 



°¥ 



Yarbrough, Livia 83 

Yeates, David 100, 146, 149, 

166 



Young, Dr. Rick 30 
Young, Surina 90 
Young, Sulata 147 
Youngblood, Christopher 85, 
147 




Colophon, The LioN, 2001 

The 67th volume of the LION, EMCC's yearbook was published by 
students of the Yearbook class at EMCC, Scooba, Mississippi, 39358, phone 
662-476-8442. This year's theme, What We Treasure, portrays the many aspects 
of college life that are treasured memories students will take with them when 
they leave EMCC. The theme also portrays the students, faculty, staff, and 
administration as treasures of the college. 

The yearbook was printed by Herff Jones in Montgomery, Alabama 
with the help of Gwyneth Winston and Steve Douglas, as well as many others in 
the Herff Jones plant. 

The yearbook was created by the yearbook staff using QuarkXPress 
4.0, Adobe Photoshop 5.0, a Macintosh G3, a Macintosh G4, and Epson and 
Umax Astra 1200 color scanners. Photos for all color pages were scanned by an 
Expression 1600 Color Scanner. 

EMCC YEARbook STAff 

Editor 

Jennifer Hester 

Campus Life 

Jennifer Hester 

Organizations 

George Spinks 

Programs 

Lauren Hester 

Sports 

Cassie Chance 

People 

Chandra Foard 

Photography 

Kelly Johnson, Shannon Brown, George Spinks, 

Marcy Montgomery, Michael Gann and Kelly Atwood 

People panel photos, Homecoming court and Beauty and Beau pictures 

were made by Whiddon Photography of Meridian. 

Golden Triangle Editor 

Matt Haskins 

A special thank you to staff member Monica Davis, who helped with all 

sections of the LION. 

PeopCe 

mi83\ 







\, p 



t/f 



"John Persons is to be com- 
mended for his interest in and 
concern for EMCC. He made 
many positive comments and 
contributed to enthusiastic dis- 
cussions in an organized man- 
ner and with concern for mak- 
ing EMCC a better place. 
Illness did not cause him to 
abandon his interest in the 
school. When he was unable to 
physically attend Board meet- 
ings, he would call to offer his 
suggestions regarding the 
agenda. We always expected 
his professional input and use 
of an extensive vocabulary. No 
matter what the task, we never 
had to worry about the quality 
of his decisions. He had the 
ability to compromise solu- 
tions to a number of complex 
Board decisions. We will truly 
miss the pleasant, smiling, car- 
ing, and conscientious work of 
Mr. Persons. His kindness and 
helpfulness will be long 
remembered and his presence 
truly missed. 

Linda Jackson 
Chairperson, EMCC 
Board of Trustees 



John Persons 





"In the 12 years that I served 
on the EMCC Board of 
Trustees with John Persons, I 
came to admire his dedica- 
tion to and untiring effort in 
behalf of the college. He had 
definite ideas on how the col- 
lege could best serve the stu- 
dents and the district from 
which they came. While his 
affable nature and humorous 
personality often eased tense 
moments in board proceed- 
ings, he was a man of con- 
viction and was willing to 
express those convictions. I 
consider it a privilege to have 
known and served with John 
in our effort to allow EMCC 
to reach its full potential. 
Susan Moates 
Secretary, EMCC 
Board of Trustees 



1927-2002 



Board of Trustee member John Persons died 
January 29, 2002, after a long illness. He had 
been an EMCC board of trustee member for 12 
years. 

It was known by all who knew him that EMCC 
was always close to his heart. Mr. Persons was 
born in 1927, the same year EMCC became a 
college. He was raised in Scooba and attended 
EMCC during World War II. Education was very 
important to him, and EMCC was an institution 
that he believed in and supported. He was instru- 
mental in helping EMCC become the success 
that it is today. 

He received his bachelors degree from the 
University of Nebraska and his masters degree in 



public administration from Oklahoma University. 

Mr. Persons was an Air Force Cadet and gradu- 
ated in the Class of 1949-C. He served in Korea 
for two years as a jet fighter pilot. While sta- 
tioned in Chicago, he married his wife, Peggy, 
also of Scooba. He was out of the military for 
nine years, but during those years he served as an 
Air Force instructor on a civilian basis. He then 
joined the Army to become a helicopter pilot, and 
served as a Medical Evacuation helicopter pilot 
during the Vietnam War. He retired from the mili- 
tary after 26 and a half years, with the rank of 
Lieutenant Colonial. 

While he was a helicopter pilot, he spent many 
hours working in and around hospitals. Because 



of this, his interest grew for the health care field. 
After leaving the military, he worked in health 
care for 1 years, including three years as the 
hospital administrator for the Macon Hospital. 

He is survived by his wife, Peggy Aust 
Persons of Scooba; two daughters, Linda Wilson 
and her husband, Nick, of Jacksonville, Florida; 
and Luann Jones and her husband, Mickey, of 
Concord, Ohio; a son, John E. Persons Jr., and his 
wife, Kiyomi, of Dallas; five grandchildren, John 
Edd Persons, Melissa and Kristin Wilson, Lauren 
Jones and Christopher Jones; a sister-in-law, 
Diane Hopper and her husband, Frank, of West 
Point; and several nieces and nephews. 
Mr. John Persons will be truly missed. 



"184 





"John Persons will be remem- 
bered for his loyalty, devotion, 
and faithfulness to EMCC. His 
actions reflected this in all mat- 
ters affecting the college, keep-, 
ing its best interests at heart.; 
He faithfully attended board 
meetings, even at times when 
his health was failing. I shall 
always remember him as a dear 
friend." 
R. S. Wofford, 
Board of Trustees 



"John Persons was a diligent 
member of the EMCC Board 
of Trustees for 1 2 years. He 
told great jokes and asked hard 
questions. His efforts and tal- 
ents were dedicated to the best 
interests of EMCC, and his 
leadership will be missed." 
Tommy Wallace 
Attorney, Board 
of Trustees 



"A great intellect enhanced 
through a wealth of worldly 
experiences gained from the mil- 
itary and as a civilian gave John 
Persons a unique perspective that 

greatly benefited EMCC. He 
will be missed, but not forgotten 
because his impact as a member 
of the Board of Trustees will be 
reflected in the continued growth 
and success of EMCC." 
Dr. Rick Young 
Golden Triangle Campus, CEO 



"John Persons played a major 
role during the transition to the 
new Board;, of Trustees. He was 
deeply committed'to EMCC 
and served with great dedica- 
tion and resolve. His leader- 
ship during a tumultuous peri- 
od of EMCC's history will 
always be remembered and . 
appreciated.*'. 
Dr. Tommy Davis 
EMCC President 



Below, John Persons, when he was a pilot in the military, smiles for a picture while in his plane. Mr. Persons receives his degrees on graduation day. 



"When 1 reflect on John, the 
fust thing that comes to mind 
is that he loved EMCC. He 
understood the role and the 
mission of the community col- 
lege system and was able to 
articulate that to others. His 
dedication to providing educa- 
tional opportunities to all stu- 
dents was second to none. 1 
was especially impressed by 
and will always remember 
John's wisdom, his command 
of the English language, and 
his articulate expressions. He 
will be truly missed. 
Ed Mosley, 
Board of Trustees 



Mr. Persons and his wife Peggy on 
their 50th Wedding Anniversary. 










The Board of Trustees and Mr. Persons (seated, second from left), smile for a group picture. 



Mr. Persons makes a point during an EMCC Board of Trustees meeting. 



ftapee 

m 185 







as 




;;:;:.:■: i^:>^:>^^:^-: : ^&^^.- 



as tired I nought 



s 




a\other ye\r at em.cc has come and gom. during this lime, 
\] \\"> new friendships, new classes and aiajw opportunities ap.ose 

bee&rb you. We 

look back on the umasured times vwith " frienda on campus^ 

whether it be from dorm life, spouts activities, ffjn fucks, 

school dances, homecoming, beauty and beau vagfanr \nd 

inflatable fun, and are reminded in words and fictures of ail 

THE LVENI - Wl tIAVl CHER HEl HIS Yl R YES, WE WILL BE SAD CO 
I,EA\T All THE FRIENDS WE HAVE MADE HERE, BUT THE MEMORIES KEEP 
REMINDING US OF HOW SFE&AIY 1TWAS. We BROUGHT TREASURES FROM 
OUR INDIVIDUAL JLIVES AND SHARED THEM WITH OUR NEW FRIENDS, We 
LEARNED THAT NOT ALL TREASURES ARE LASTING, AND MANY LOSE THEIR 
VALUE AS WE MATURE AND GO ON WITH OUR LIVES AFTER WE LEAVE COL- 
LEGE. We learned that some of the people we treasure win be : 

LOST TO US," OFTEN UNEXPECTEDLY AS $TEVE Hull WAS ON OCTOBER 
IS, 2001 TO A HEART ATTACK. We "SHOULD TREASURE EACH AND EVERY 
DAY AS IF IT WERE OUR, EAST, BECAUSE NO , 
ONE KNOWS WHEN OUR LAST DAY ON EARTH WILL COME, ThE PEOPLE 
INVOLVED DIREi ELY IN THE SEPTEMBER IItH TRAGEDY DID NOT KNOW- 
IT WAS\GOING TO BE THEIR LAST. ChERISH THE IMPORTANT THINGS IN 
YOUR LIE! I \MILY, FRIENDS, FREEDOMrFATfWl FoW^, JSIBIe, ' 
NOT TAK1N _» Ti IEM FOR GRANTED BECAUSE IT MAY'tiggPoO lW$i- We 
WILL TAKE THE MEMORIES OF THIS YEAR AT EMCC AND EACH OF US 
WILL FIND OUR OWN WAY OF TKEASURING~THEM. From THESE TREA$- "*S 
ORES' WE WILE BUILD OUR MEMORIES AS WE MOVE ON TO THE NEXT 
PHASE OF OUR EIVES, REMEMBERING THAT WHAT fOU TREASURE WILL 
REVEAL THE ESSEHCE OF WHO YOU ARE. 
I WIEE CHERISH AEE THE MEMORIES I HAVE MADE AT EM.CC/ 1 
HAVE DEVELOPED MANY SPECIAL FRIENDSHIPS AMONG FELLOW STUDENTS, 

FACULTY, AND THE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF THAT WILE STAY WITH ME 
FOREVER. EMCC HAS, PROVIDED ME WITH MANY OPPORTUNITIES THAT 
WIEE CARRY ME LATER AS I FURTHER MY EDUCATION. This COLLEGE IS 
TREASURED IN MY EYES BECAUSE STUDENTS CAN DEVELOP A CLOSE RELA- 
TIONSHIP -WITH THEIR TEACHERS. ThANK YOU FOR GIVING 
ME THE OPPORTUNITY TO SHARE AND BUILD MANY SPECIAL MEMORIES 
AND FRIENDSHIPS WITH YOU. MAY CjOD BLESS YOU AND KEEP YOU SAFE 

ALWAYS. 

"For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also." 

Matthew 
6:21 

Your 2002 EMCC Editor 




JUaaaaXCt 




peopfe 

186 \ 




w o r i 




2001-2002 






ax 



*, nevie^ 



A 




HERFF JONES 




world 




NTS 






John Walker, the American 
Taliban, is being held for war 
crimes against the United States. 



Princess Margaret, sister of 
Britain's Queen Elizabeth, 
dies at age 71. 




Even though the total number of shark attacks decreased in 2001, a 
rash of highly publicized cases make this "the Summer of the Shark." 



Enron is the largest company in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy. 
Allegations arose concerning the shredding of documents believed to be 
connected to the company's use of funds from its employees' 401k program. 




¥4 


* 1 

HHmhDH 





On Jan. 1, 2001, 12 European nations adopt a single currency called the 
Euro which becomes legal tender in Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, 
Germany, Greece, Holland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Portugal and Spain. 



Daniel Pearl, a Wall Street Journal reporter, is kidnapped and 
murdered by the National Movement for the Restoration of 
Pakistani Sovereignty. President Bush declares, "The United States 
of America will rid the world of these agents of terror." 




^1 




v 
'LuxuryLiner 



Million of acres of 
southeastern Australia are 
scorched by wildfires. 



Ford and Firestone go their separate ways after a year of 
finger pointing in the deaths of more than 170 people in 
Ford Explorers equipped with Firestone Tires. 



American Airlines Flight 587 leaving New York for 
Santo Domingo crashes three minutes after take off, 
killing 251 passengers and nine crew members. 





Congressman Gary Condit is a central figure in the 
search for Chandra Levy, a Department of Justice 
Intern, who has been missing since April 2001. 



' * . 




W .^m 


.^A lr&~ s^k 



The sun sets on the Taliban as U.S. soldiers raise an American flag from the World Trade 
Center at a U.S. Air Force base near the Afghan city of Kandahar. The United States 
organized its allies and began an all-out "War on Terrorism." 



Slobodan Milosevic appears before the U.N. War 
Crimes Tribunal on charges for crimes against 
humanity during Yugoslavia's breakup in the 1 990's. 




Elizabeth Dole, former president of the American Red 
Cross and spouse of former presidential candidate Bob 
Dole, announces her candidacy for the Senate. 





After being detained for more than three months by the 
Taliban, American aid workers Heather Mercer and Dayna 
Curry are rescued from Afghanistan. 



Letters containing anthrax are delivered to U.S. senators Patrick Leahy and Tom 
Daschle, and NBC News Anchor Tom Brokaw. The Senate office building was 
closed for three months. Five people died from inhalation anthrax. 






On June 11, Timothy McVeigh, convicted of the April 19, 
1995, bombing of the Oklahoma City federal building, is 
executed by lethal injection. 



A missile defense shield to protect 
the United States is a priority of the 
Bush Administration. 



Hundreds of bodies are discovered at 
a Noble, Georgia crematory, some 
dating back more than 10 years. 





After 12 years of construction, the 
efforts to stabilize the Leaning 
Tower of Pisa are complete. 



Amnesty for illegal Mexican 
immigrants is promoted by 
President Bush. 




The decision to allow federal funding for embryonic stem cell 
research only on stem cells from embryos already collected raises 
ethical questions. 





Israeli Prime Minister 
Ariel Sharon announced 
a plan to set buffer 
zones after an increase 
in violence against the 
Palestinian Authority. 

Jim Jeffords switched 
from the Republican 
GOP to the Democratic 
party's side of the aisle, 
causing an important 
shift in power and 
reorganization of the 
Senate. 

Crown Prince Dipendra 
of Nepal gunned down 
10 members of the 
Nepalese Royal family 
before turning the gun 
on himself. 

A North Carolina state 
trooper killed one 
Green Beret and 
injured another when 
they tried to disarm 
him, believing that 
he was part of a 
training exercise. 

Experimental drug BL22, 
which targets only a 
rare form of leukemia 
cell, showed signs of 
great success in 
fighting hairy cell 
leukemia. 

Andrea Yates drowned 
her five children in 
the bathtub of her 
Texas home. She pled 
not guilty by reason of 
insanity. 

Charles Bishop, 15, 
stole a Cessna aircraft 
and crashed it into the 
Bank of America Plaza 
in Tampa, Florida. 



GM launches a program to cut its 
workforce by 1 percent through 
an early retirement program. 



ubfid 



Ford looks to cut 12,000 union 
jobs and 8,000 salaried positions. 



Britain's Prince Harry may face 
charges stemming from smoking 
marijuana and drinking underage. 



3K- 




Kmart, the giant discount retailer, files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy 
protection while it reorganizes its holdings. 



Wendy's founder and spokesman 
Dave Thomas dies at age 69. 




e n d u r i n 



FR 






:dom 



Tuesday, September 11, 2001, will be remembered as a tragic day that 
changed the world. That morning, a plot, masterminded by terrorist Osama 
bin Laden and the al-Qaeda network, was put into action. Two hijacked 
commercial airliners were flown into New York City's World Trade Center 
Towers, ultimately causing their collapse. Immediately following the 
incident, another hijacked airliner crashed into one side of the Pentagon in 
Washington, D.C, and a fourth plane crashed in Pennsylvania. Thousands 
of lives were lost, citizens were terrified and the world was in shock. 

Following that mournful day the United States experienced anthrax 
scares, continued security threats and the reality of war. Despite the horror, 
fear and heartache, U.S. citizens united and their patriotic spirit soared. 
President Bush promised: "We will not tire, we will not falter, we will not 
fail." Through that statement and the remarkable sense of national pride 
exuded by U.S. citizens, it became evident that no threat, great or small, 
could deter the United States resolve for enduring freedom. 




World leaders, such as Prime Minister of 
England Tony Blair, profess their sympathy 
and support for the United States. 




Through his courageous leadership, NYC Mayor 
Rudy Giuliani becomes known as "Mayor of the 
World" and was knighted by Queen Elizabeth. 




In response to the shocking tragedy, President 
George W. Bush addresses the nation offering 
strength, comfort and patriotism. 





Ailing airlines urge citizens to 
defy terrorists' attempts to disrupt 
lives by reboarding airplanes. 



Thousands of people world-wide 
donate blood and volunteer their 
services to aid U.S. recovery. 




1R0 



j-JV> 



Michael Benfante and 
John Cerqueira, 
employees on the 81st 
floor of the World 
Trade Center, selflessly 
carried wheelchair- 
bound Una Hanson 
down 68 flights of 
stairs to safety. 

New York City Fire 
Department Chaplain 
Father Mychal Judge, 
lost his life at Ground 
Zero while offering 
last rights to another 
victim. 

While attempting to 
rescue others, 343 
firemen and 60 police 
officers died during 
the attack on the Worl 
Trade Center Towers. 

Army Chief Warrant 
Officer Craig Sincock, 
despite losing his wife 
at the Pentagon, offerei 
assistance to those he 
could aid at the scene. 
On Sept. 12, Sincock 
began acting as a grief 
counselor for others 
who had lost family 
members at the site. 

Passengers Todd 
Beamer, Tom Burnett, 
Mark Bingham and 
Jeremy Glick joined 
to overcome hijackers 
aboard Flight 93 that 
crashed in Pennsylvania. 
Beamer's final statement 
"Let's roll," has become 
a symbolic phrase 
since then. 



Canine rescue teams help 
firefighters search for survivors 
among the wreckage. 



U.S. troops dedicate their lives 
to preserving freedom and 
keeping America safe. 



An overwhelming spirit of unity and national pride arises out of the 
smoldering ashes and human devastation from the September 11 
attacks on the United States. 



Citizens and communities 
across the country proudly 
display patriotic decor. . 



t V & 

MOVT 







Actress Julia Roberts wins her 
eighth People's Choice Award for 
favorite motion picture actress. 



Hit movie "Harry Potter and the 
Sorcerer's Stone" breaks box 
office records. 





ABC's "My Wife and Kids" and Damon 
Wayans win People's Choice Awards. 



NBC's "The Weakest Link" puts a 
new edge on quiz show standards. 





Academy Award-winning actor Russell Crowe claims a Golden Globe 
Award and an Academy Award nomination for his performance in "A 
Beautiful Mind." The movie is nominated for five Academy Awards. 



"Shrek" wins an Oscar nomination 
and the People's Choice Award for 
Favorite Motion Picture. 



Jack Lemmon, an Academy and 
Emmy Award-winning actor, dies 
at age 76. 





Professional soccer player Ethan 
Zohn is the $lmillion dollar 
winner of Survivor: Africa. 



In honor of those involved in the events surrounding September 11, Hollywood actors and musicians combine 
efforts to produce "America: A Tribute to Heroes." The benefit, which was aired simultaneously and 
commercial- free by dozens of broadcast and cable networks, raised more than $100 million in donations. 




Stars of the No. 1 rated show "Friends" agree to return for a ninth 
season in 2002-2003. Each cast member received a 33 percent 
salary increase bringing their wages to $1 million dollars per episode. 




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Soap star Kelly Ripa 
replaced Kathy Lee 
Gifford on "Live with 
Regis." 

Box office hit "Lord of 
the Rings: The Fellowshi 
of the Rings" earned 13 
Academy Award 
nominations. 

Actress Winona Ryder 
was arrested for 
allegedly shoplifting 
$5,000 worth of clothinj 
and accessories from 
Saks Fifth Avenue. 

Actors Kelsey Grammer 
and Ray Romano tied 
for favorite male 
television star at the 
annual People's Chocie 
Awards. 

The world bids farewell 
to Academy Award- 
winning actor Anthony 
Quinn. 

The 2001 Emmy Awards 
were postponed twice 
because of security 
concerns. The eventual 
winners were "The West 
Wing," "Sex and the 
City," "The Sopranos," 
"Everybody Loves 
Raymond" and "Will and 
Grace." Other popular 
shows were "ER,""CSI," 
"That 70's Show," 
"Smallville"and"Scrubs.' 

Other popular movies 
were "Rush Hour 2," 
"Monsters, Inc.," 
"The Mummy Returns," 
"Jurassic Park III," 
"John Q" and 
" We Were Soldiers." 



"Pearl Harbor" heart-throb Josh 
Hartnett furthers his career with 
his role in "Black Hawk Down." 



Popular television star Carroll 
O'Connor dies at age 76. 



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The United Nations names 
actress Angelina Jolie its 
goodwill ambassador. 



Actress Nicole Kidman wins a Golden Globe award for her musical 
performance in "Moulin Rouge." Kidman and "Moulin Rouge" 
were both nominated for Academy Awards. 



Hit television show "Buffy the 
Vampire Slayer" takes a bold steffii 
by producing a musical episode. 



MUSIC 




Favorite Album, Pop/Rock 'n Roll, is awarded to Destiny's 
Child for "Survivor" at the American Music Awards. They also 
won a Grammy for Best R&B Performance by a Duo/Group. 




Jennifer Lopez says "I do" to dancer and choreographer 
Chris Judd just eight months after the announcement of her 
split from boyfriend of two years, Sean "P. Diddy" Combs. 






Pop superstar Britney Spears makes her debut on the big screen in the movie 
"Crossroads." She also released her self-titled album, went on tour, performed in her 
"Live from Las Vegas" HBO special and dated 'IN SYNC pop singer Justin Timberlake. 



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George Harrison, known as "The Quiet Beatle," dies at 58 
of cancer. The death of John Lennon in 1980 leaves Paul 
McCartney and Ringo Starr as the only remaining Beatles. 



Nelly wins Favorite Artist, Rap/Hip- 
Hop, at the American Music Awards. 



Michael Jackson is named Artist of 
the Century at the 2002 American 
Music Awards. 




Alicia Keys wins Favorite New Artist, Soul/Rhythm and Blues, and 
Favorite New Artist, Pop/Rock 'n Roll, at the American Music Awards. 
Keys also won five Grammys, including Song of the Year for 'Tallin'. " 





Madonna tours the United States 
for the first time in eight years. 
Tickets sold for $250 each. 



Linkin Park's "Hybrid Theory" is 
the best selling album and the 
song "Crawling" wins a Grammy. 











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Tim McGraw and wife Faith Hill win Favorite Male and Female 
Country Music Artist at the American Music Awards. 



Pop group 'N SYNC 
took the title Favorite 
Group/Band/Duo for 
Pop/Rock 'n Roll at the 
American Music 
Awards. In addition, 
they won a People's 
Choice Award for 
Favorite Musical Gn 

Bush's lead singer 
Gavin Rossdale an* 
No Doubt's Gwen 
Stefani announced 
their engagement. 

Christina Aguilera, 
Mya, Lil' Kim, and Pink 
won a Grammy for Best 
Pop Collaboration 
"Lady Marmalade." 

U2 earned $109.7 
million from their U.S. 
concert tour this year. 
They won Internet 
Artist of the Year at the 
American Music 
Awards and performed 
at the Superbowl 
XXXVI halftime show. 
They also won four 
Grammys. 

Garth Brooks received 
the Award of Merit at 
the American Music 
Awards. 

Movie soundtrack "0 
Brother, Where Art Thou' 
won five Grammys at the 
2002 awards ceremony 
and was awarded Album 
of the Year. 

Other musicians who 
made headlines this year 
included Nelly Furtado, 
Outkast, Train, Staind, 
India.Arie, Lenny Kravitz, 
Lucinda Williams and 
Craig David. 



Janet Jackson wins Favorite Female, 
Pop/Rock, at the American Music 
Awards. She also won two Grammys. 




Rising music and movie star 



Aaliyah dies in an airplane 
crash. She was 22. 



Mariah Carey's first movie "Glitter" 
and its soundtrack are panned by 
critics and ignored by fans. 



T 



r e n d s & 



sCHNOLOGY 









Cell phones in schools are 
considered a distraction and banned 
by some administrators. 




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The Intel Pentium 4 processor is the 
next evolution in desktop processing 
technology. 




Microsoft's future generation video 
game system X-Box delivers the most 
powerful game experiences ever. 




■ 



A new top-of-the-line iMac is introduced by Apple Computer. The redesigned computer has a floating 
15-inch LCD flat screen, allowing users one-touch adjustment, a 700 MHz or 800 MHz PowerPC G4 
processor, and the SuperDrive for playing and burning CDs and DVDs. 



Handspring, Inc. introduces a 
handheld computer with a built-in 
cell phone. 





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Dusters, as worn here by actress 
Evan Rachel Wood, are a new 
trend in stores everywhere. 



Reggae/pop superstar Shaggy 
wears his colored sunglasses, a 
hot trend for the year. 




There is a different attitude in American culture this year for 
Halloween. A shift to the "hero concept" make firemen and 
policemen costumes the most popular choices among children. 





Hewlett Packard and 
University of California 
scientists patented a 
process that will 
eventually develop a 
computer chip small 
enough to fit on the 
head of a pin. 

SONICblue unveiled its 
first hard drive-based 
portable music player, 
The Rio Riot, which 
holds up to 5,000 
songs or 400 CDs 
worth of digital music. 

Glitter, sparkle and 
shimmer were found in 
makeup, nail polish, 
body lotion, hair gel and 
on clothing. Corduroy 
pants, studded belts, 
hoodies, vintage and 
unique cut jeans 
were also popular. 

A travel-size camera 
from Intel was designe 
to shoot Internet-ready 
photos and videos for 
easy upload. 

An electric toothbrush 
was a necessity when 
it came to serious 
dental hygiene. 

DVD players gained 
popularity and 
threatened to replace 
VCRs. 

From the court to the 
classroom, Adidas All 
Day All Night sneakers 
were the "cool kicks" 
for the year. 

Cell phone cases were 
a hot item to coordinate 
with an outfit. 




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Claudia Schiffer shows off some 
hot trends: low-rise jeans, fat 
belts and tops with some sparkle. 



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Body and skin jewelry continue 
to be a "cool thing to do." 



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Flip-flops make a comeback. They 
were available in an assortment 
of funky colors and styles. 



After September 11, Americans unite and show their patriotism by 
wearing red, white and blue. 



Boots that rise to the knee are 
in stores everywhere. 



SPORTS 




"His Airness" returns to the court after three years in retirement. 
Michael Jordan, 39, faced perhaps his toughest challenge in 
leading the Washington Wizards to the 2002 playoffs. 




Barry Bonds sets a new Major 
League record for most home 
runs in a single season with 73. 



Jennifer Capriati wins the French 
Open in 2001, then wins a second 
straight Australian Open in 2002. 




The New England Patriots claim their first Super Bowl title with a win 
over the St. Louis Rams. A dramatic fourth-quarter field goal gave the 
Patriots a 20-17 victory. 





During a game following the Sept. 1 1 tragedy, the football team at John R. Rogers High School in 
Spokane, Wash., proudly carries the American flag onto the field. This photo appeared in several major 
newspapers and was featured in Sports Illustrated. 



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Tiger Woods wins a fourth 
consecutive major, The Masters. 




Venus Williams repeats as Wimbledon and 
U.S. Open Champion. In the U.S. Open 
finals, Venus defeated her sister Serena. 






* 



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American cyclist Lance Armstrong claims 
his third consecutive Tour De France title 
in July. 



With six victories and nearly $7 million in 
earnings, Jeff Gordon claims another Winston Cup 
Championship for the 2001 NASCAR season. 







:V;' 



Lennox Lewis regains his World Boxing Council and 
International Boxing Federation heavyweight titles 
from Hasim Rahman in Las Vegas, in November. 



L.A. Laker Kobe Bryant earns MVP honors 
at the NBA All-Star Game, leading the West 
All-Stars over the East, 135-120. 



The Arizona Diamondbacks win their first World 
Series crown, defeating the New York Yankees, 
champions in 1998, 1999 and 2000. 





Dale Earnhardt, Jr. returns to Daytona in July to win an emotional Pepsi 400. Just five 
months earlier, a crash during the Daytona 500 took the life of his legendary father, Dale 
Earnhardt, Sr. 



The Colorado Avalanche win the 2001 Stanley 
Cup, defeating the New Jersey Devils. 




h e r 



American snowboarding sensation Kelly Clark takes the United 
States' first gold medal in the Women's Half-Pipe Snowboarding 
competition at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. 




Americans Ross Powers (gold), Danny Krass (silver), and Jarret 
Thomas (bronze) sweep the medals in Men's Half-Pipe 
Snowboarding at the 2002 Winter Olympics. 




American Chris Witty 
took the gold in world 
record time in the 
Women's 1 000-meter 
Speed Skating 
competition at the 
Winter Olympics. 

The United States 
earned 34 medals in 
the Winter Olympic 
Games in Salt Lake 
City, the most ever by 
the United States 
in the winter games. 

Third generation 
American Olympian 
Jim Shea captured the 
gold in the Men's 
Skeleton competition 

The Miami Hurricanes 
won the Rose Bowl 
and their fifth NCAA 
Division I Football 
Championship with a 
decisive 37-14 victory 
over the Nebraska 
Cornhuskers. The 
Hurricanes' baseball 
team also won the 
College World Series 
12-1 over Stanford in 
the final game. 

Pitcher Danny Almonte 
dominated Little 
League Baseball with 
an untouchable slider 
and grueling fastball. 
It was discovered 
at season's end that 
Almonte was 14 years 
old, two years over the 
league age limit. 

PGA star David Duval 
took home his first 
career major title, the 
2001 British Open, in 
July. 




The U.S. two-woman bobsled 
team of Vonetta Flowers and Jill 
Bakken win the gold medal. 



Anton Sikharulidze and Elena Berezhnaya of Russia and David 
Pelletier and Jamie Sale of Canada receive gold medals in Pairs 
Figure Skating. Initially given the silver medal, the Canadians were 
awarded gold after misconduct by a French judge was discovered. 



Casey Fitzrandolph takes the 
gold in the Men's 500-meter 
Speed Skating event. 



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