(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A list of palimpsest brasses in Great Britain"

,.■;■*■ 



■■'>.;■■ ■•-•■■ 






• ;:'-'''';''V:.',.''',- -■- ''■ ''■"'- ' 





THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

LOS ANGELES 



Parcel no 15. LZ'Ib'O 




i^>Vii 



WITH THE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



The 
Castle Bookshop 

A . H . D O N C A S T E R 



MUSEUM STREET 



COLCHESTER, ESSEX 



Cokheiter 2b34 



<N 



^ 



'/: 



A't^/'- 






^/ 









A LIST 

OF 

PALIMPSEST BRASSES 

IN 

GREAT BRITAIN 



COMPILED BV 

MILL STEPHENSON, B.A., F.SA 



Reprinted from The Transactio7is of the Monumental Brass Society^ 
Vol. IV., pp. 1-31, 97-135, 141-164, 189-211, 219-245, 251-288, 293-335. 



LONUON 

JOHN BALE, SONS & DANIELSSON, Ltd 

83-89, Great Titchfield Street, W. 

MCMIII 



tYB 



\'^ 



S^s it 



CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

Bedfordshire ... ■■• ■•• ••■ ••• •■ ^ 

Berkshire ..■ ■■• ••• ••• •• ^ 

Buckinghamshire ... 

Cambridgeshire ... ■ ■ ••• ••• ••• ■ • '' 

Cheshire ... ... ■■• ••• ••■ •• ••• ~° 

Cornwall... . ••• ••• ■•■ •• •■ "' 

Cumberland ... ■■ ■•• ••• ••• ••■ ^5 

Derbyshire 

Devonshire ... ■•. ••• ■• •■ ^9 

Dorsetshire ... ■•■ ••■ •■ 3° 

Durham ... ... ■• • • •■• •• ■• 3' 

Essex ... .. . •■• ••• • •• ••• 3' 

Gloucestershire ... ... ■•• ••• ••• ••• 53 

Hampshire ... •■• ••• •• •• •■ 53 

Isle of Wight ... 56 

Herefordshire ... ■. •• • ■ ••■ ■•• 5*^ 

Hertfordshire ... ... ■• ••■ ••• ••• 5^ 

Huntingdonshire ... . . • ■ •• •• •■■ "9 

Kent ... , 69 

Lancashire ... ... • ■ ■•• ■■• •■• "^7 

Leicestershire ... ■■■ ■•• •• •■■ ••• "^9 

Lincolnshire ... ■• ■ •• ••• ••■ • ■ 93 

Middlesex 'oo 

Monmouthshire ... •■ ■■• ••■ ••• •■• ^^5 

Norfolk ... ... ... ••• •■■ ••• •■• n^^ 

Northamptonshire ... ••■ ■•• ••• ••■ '4- 

Northumbeiland ... ... ••• ••• ••• ■■• M2 

Nottinghamshire ... ... ■•• •■• ••• •■• '4- 

Oxfordshire ... ••• ••• •■■ ••■ •• '43 

Rutland ... ... ... ••• •■• ••• •• '54 

Shropshire ... ... • •■ ■ •• ••• •• '54 

Somersetshire . • ••• ••• •■• ••• '54 

Staffordshire ... ... ••■ ••• •• ••• '55 



942619 



IV, 



Contents. 



Suffolk 


162 


Surrey 


166 


Sussex 


178 


Warwickshire 


181 


Westmorland 


.. 183 


Wiltshire... 


184 


Worcestershire 


189 


Yorkshire 


189 


Ireland ... 


197 


Scotland... 


197 


Wales 


199 


Private Possession 


199 


Derelicts... 


201 


Additions and Corrections ... 


203 


Summary 


214 


Index 


225 



Lisi of Illiistrafioiis. 



V. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Denchworth, Berks. .. 

Reading, St. Lawrence, Berks. 

Denham, Bucks. 

Chester, Holy Trinity 

Yealmpton, Devon. ... 

Aveley, Essex 

Brightlingsea, Essex 

Fryerning, Essex 

Stondon Massey, Essex 

Strethall, Essex 

Tolleshunt Darcy, Essex 

Upminster, Essex 

Walthamstow, Essex 

Gloucester, Temple Church 

Bayford, Herts. 

Hertingfordbury, Herts. 

St. Alban's Abbey, Herts. 

Walkern, Herts. 

Aylesford, Kent 

Erith, Kent... 

West Mailing, Kent. 

Margate, Kent 

Minster (Sheppey), Kent 

Shorne, Kent 

Sibertsvvould, Kent 

Westerham, Kent 

Great Bowden, Leic. 

Boston, Line. 

Harrow, Middlesex 

Isleworth, Middlesex 

London, All Hallows Barkinj 

London, British Museum 

Felmingham, Norfolk 

Halvergate, Norfolk... 

Merton, Norfolk 

Norwich, St. John Maddermarket 
, St. Martin-at-Palace 
„ St. Peter Mancroft ... 





.. 


6 


fo face 


8 


II 


12 


... 


21 






30 






32 






33 






35 






37 






40 


42, 43, 44 


46 


47, 49 


50 


51 


52 




54 




58 




62 




64 


67 


,68 




69 


to face 


73 




76 


77 


78 




81 


... 


83 




84 


85, 


86 


... 


88 


... 


93 


104, 


105 


] 


06, 


107 



1 09 

II, 112, 113, 212 
... 117 
I 18, 119 
... 121 
123,126 



132 



VI. 



Lisi of Ilhisfrafions, 



Norwich, Strangers' Hall 
Great Ormesby, Norfolk 
Paston, Norfolk 
Salhouse, Norfolk ... 
Sail, Norfolk 
Stanton St. John, Oxon. 
Clifton Campville, Staffs. 
Ampton, Suffolk 
Hadleigh, Suffolk 
Halesworth, Suffolk 
Betchworth, Surrey 
Cambervvell, Surrey 
Cheam, Surrey 
Cobham, Surrey 
Walton-on-Thames, Surrey 
Morland, Westmorland 
Howden, Yorks. 
Rotherham, Yorks. ... 
Sessay, Yorks. 
Winestead, Yorks. ... 
Private Possession ... 
Derelicts 

Tideswell, Derby. ... 
Hackney, Middlesex 
London, British Museum 



I'AGF. 

••• 135 

••• 135 

136, 137 

••• 139 

... 139 

... 152 

... 155 

... 162 

... 165 

... 166 

... 167 

... 169 

170, 171 

••• 173 
... 177 

... 183 
... 189 
... 191 

193, J95 
... 197 
. . . 200 

20[, 203 

... 205 

... 210 

212 



A LIST OF PALIMPSEST BRASSES. 

Compiled by Mill Stephenson, B.A., F.S.A. 



An attempt is here made to compile a complete list of the 
palimpsest brasses so far as at present known. Such a list must 
necessarily be more or less imperfect, but is published in the hope 
that not only members of our own Society, but those of the 
Oxford Society, and brass rubbers generally, may be able to add 
to or correct the information which the writer has been able to 
get together. Any additional information, corrections, or rubbings 
of unrecorded palimpsests, will be thankfully received by the 
writer if sent to 14, Ritherdon Road, Upper Tooting, London, 
S.W. 

The palimpsests are described in the first instance under 
counties, but it is proposed to sum up and discuss the various 
classes at the close of the paper. 

The term obverse is in all cases used to denote the later or more 
modern side of the brass, and the term reverse the earlier work. 



BEDFORDSHIRE. 

B ROM HAM. 

This fine and well-known brass belongs to the class of appro- 
priated or adapted memorials. It consists of the figure of a man 
in complete plate armour, with collar of SS., two ladies, a triple 
I 



canopy, two shields between the heads of the figures, three shields 
(two lost) on the finials of the canopy, a foot inscription and a 
marginal inscription. The date is between 1430 and 1440. In 
1535 the brass was converted into a memorial for Sir John Dyve, 
his mother Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Thomas Wilde, 
Esq., and [his wife Isabel, daughter and heiress of Sir Ralph 
Hastings, but the only change made was the substitution of a new 
foot inscription (perhaps only the old plate turned over and re- 
engraved) and the introduction of new shields on the finials of the 
canopy. 

The two original shields between the heads of the figures are, 
at present, the only clue to the persons originally commemorated. 
The dexter shield bears (civg.), a fess and a canton (gn.) Widville, 
impaling . . . . a chevron . . . between three lions dormant, the two 
in chief facing each other . . . , probably for Lyons. The sinister 
shield bears Widville impaling . . . on a chief . . . a fleiir-de-lys 
. . . . , at present unidentified.^ The brass is usually attributed 
to Thomas Widville, 1435, and his two wives, Elizabeth and 
Alice, whose maiden names are unknown. John Widville, the 
father of Thomas, is supposed to have married a daughter of the 
Lyons family, and it may be that these two shields are merely 
commemorative of earlier family alliances, and that the shields on 
the finials would have contained the arms of Thomas and his two 
wives. The shield, at present remaining on the centre finial, 
bears the arms of Dyve, {gu.), a fess dancetty or between three escallops 
(erm.). The foot inscription, bearing the following words : 

Sl^ntri0 Coniuffie/ n mtUo inert Hit matmn mater 
(Elijflbctlj l)ttt0 ^Ijome MiiU ^vmiQCvi 

Coniur Isabella \)ttc0 Eatiulplji l^agt^ngfif milit' ct Ijic 
sjepilitugf iii" j^oumxbm Sin° 1535 

is either an insertion or may be the original plate turned over and 
re-engraved. Until this plate and Dyve shield can be examined 
the question of the identity of the original persons commemorated 
must remain in its present state of uncertainty. 

The brass is engraved in Lysons' Magna Britannia, vol. i. p. 
163, and is fully described by Mr. H. K. St. J. Sanderson in his 
Bedfordshire List published in the Transactions, vol. ii. p. 8i. 



' The family of Roger or Rogers, of Dorset, bore Arg., on a chief or, a Jlenr- 
de-lys gu. 



Flitton. 

Obverse. Thomas Waren, Gent., 1544, in armour, and wife 
Elizabeth ; male effigy and children lost ; inscription mutilated, 
small, now mural, North Aisle. 

The inscription only is palimpsest and has been broken into 
three pieces, whereof two are now missing. Mr. Sanderson- only 
notices one piece, but an old rubbing in the writer's collection 
contains one of the missing pieces which luckily completes the 
rhymes on the reverse. The Waren inscription reads thus : 

, , . . I 0oule of Cljomaef (Mav \ m o:entilmnit $ (Elijalictlj 

.... I maef ti['eti p jscconti da^ | of C^ctobcr a° 9^ IDc 

.... I Qiic of l^^uQ ^mv^ ^£ tjiii | on toljojje ^oulr^ 3|l)u 
Ijatic m't^ Simm. 

The first portion has been missing for years, the second has 
more recently disappeared, the third still remains in the church 
and is quoted by Mr. Sanderson. 

Reverse. The second and third portions of the inscription bear 
the following verses : 

^uiH tumulu cerui0. Cue no mortalia | ^pni^. '(lali 

naq? Uomo (?) 
clautiit' omiiie Ijomo (?) ;^in0qui!S cri0 | qui transient 

0ta »leo:e 

plora. »)um quoti cri0 fucramqj quoti ref | pro mc prccor 
ora. 

Luton. 

Obverse. Isabel Hay, 1455, head gone, nearly effaced, broken 
in two pieces, the upper part (now lost) measuring 6 inches and 
the lower 14 inches. The remaining piece is loose in the church 
chest. This fragment, together with the inscription in twelve 
Latin verses, is all that remains of the brass to John Hay, for 
thirty years steward to the Archbishop of Canterbury, repairer of 

- Bedfordshire Brasses in Trans. Mon. Br. Soc, vol. ii. p. 160. 



churches and roads, dec, 1455, and wives Anne (with three chil- 
dren) and Isabel. It was formerly in the North Aisle. 

Reverse. Portions of canopy work of curious design, the shaft 
of the canopy composed of a series of scrolls. The work is un- 
finished and appears to be a "waster" from the workshop. 
Haines conjectures it to be of foreign manufacture, but it seems 
to be English origin, of about the same date as the obverse. 

A rubbing of the obverse and reverse complete is in the Col- 
lection of the Society of Antiquaries. 

POTTESGROVE. 

Obverse. Wm. Saunders, Gent., 1563, in civil dress, wife 
Isabel, and inscription. The lower part and feet of the male 
figure lost, only the centre of the female figure remains, half the 
inscription is also lost, the remaining portion being much broken 
and damaged. In its present condition the male figure measures 
i3|- inches in length, the female gi inches, and the inscription 
ii| X 52 inches. The brasses are now screwed to a wooden 
board affixed to the south side of the Chancel wall. 

Reverse. The male figure is cut out of a portion of a large 
Flemish brass, c. 1360-70, and shows portions of canopy work 
with a background diapered with crowned monsters, butterflies, 
&c. The fragment of the female figure shows a portion of the 
upper right-hand corner of the same brass, there is a small por- 
tion of the same diapered background with the symbol of St. 
Matthew in the corner, and a few mutilated letters of a marginal 
inscription enclosed by a small border ornamented with four 
leaved flowers. The back of the inscription plate is much 
damaged and may or may not have belonged to the same brass. 
It appears to be made up of fragments, certainly of foreign work- 
manship, but too much damaged to say with certainty whether 
belonging to the other pieces or not. 

The obverse and reverse of this brass have been fully described 
and illustrated by Mr. H. K. St. J. Sanderson in the Transactions 
of the Monumental Brass Society, vol. ii. pp. 6-g. 

BERKSHIRE. 

Blewbury. 

John Latton, Esq., of Chilton, 1548, in tabard, and wife 
Anne, with six sons (now lost) and nine daughters ; effigy of 



another wife lost ; inscription and four shields of arms, Chancel 
floor. 

A few years ago a portion of the inscription became loose and 
was found to be palimpsest. It was examined and recorded^ by 
Mr. W. H. Richardson, F.S.A., to whom the writer is indebted 
for the information, but unfortunately fastened down again before 
any rubbing or any note of the reverse was made. 



COOKHAM. 

Obverse. Raffe More, Gent., 1577, in civil dress, and wife 
Mary, daughter of John Babham, Esq., with ten English verses 
and a marginal inscription, the whole much mutilated, North 
Aisle. 

The marginal inscription, when complete, read thus: 

-j- l^crc IjTtlj tljc lioDj^' of Eaffc a^ore (Bcnf loljo mnrricti 
^ai7' tljc tiatiffljtcr of 3]oljn Babljam, ciBefq. ^j purdjasJeH 
mijitcplacc BuUoclxO anti ^Ijnfocic^ ann otijcr lanti^ iw 
CoUdjam anti tipcti toitljout mnt of lji0 liotij'e on tlje fcaeft 
tia^ of ^t. games tljc apostle \\\ tlje ['caie of our lortie 
d^oti 1577. 

Reverse. At the restoration of the church in i860, three 
pieces of this brass were found to be palimpsest. The largest 
piece consists of the centre portion of the figure of Mary More 
from the waist downwards. This piece measures twelve inches 
in length and is cut out of a portion of a Flemish brass of late 
fifteenth century work. It bears a small portion of a head, 
apparently wearing a round topped bascinet, and surrounded with 
canopy and diaper work. The centre arch of the canopy is 
cusped below and crocketted with oak leaves, one of which is 
entire. The background is diapered with foliage, &c., in squares 
outlined by small roundels or nail heads. The smaller pieces 
■consist of two portions of the marginal inscription, one, 8| inches 
in length, bearing the words " here lyeth the," has on the reverse 
a few Lombardic letters, (^^iBj^ + ^^ + IFl^ ^^eing a 
portion of a Latin inscription from an early Flemish brass. The 
other, 9 inches in length, bearing the words "and shafseies a," 

^ Transactions Nexvhury Field Club, vol. iv. p. 56. 



has on the reverse a few engraved lines, apparently part of a 
female face. 

All are now fastened down and the brass nearly covered by 
the organ. 



Denchworth. 

Obverse. William Hyde, Esq., 1557, in armour, and wife 
Margery [Cater, of Letcombe Regis] , 1562, with twelve sons and 
eight daughters, ten English verses and inscription, relaid and 
now mural, Chancel. 

The inscription only is palimpsest. It measures 17I x 52 
inches, and reads thus : 

j^uijSquijS trang^ierigf pro no^tcief ora aiabugf 
Ct 31uncto0 tumulo tu prcce 31uno:c turo. 
^^t toljiclje Mlpllm ^^^c c^qu^n ticcee>£>^ti tijc srecontie 
tia^ of 9^a}>c in tljc ^cre of our lortir (Boti ^€€€€€%}I>ii 
anti tlje gfaptic a^argerj^ Iji^ to^fe tircrg^e^'ti tljr xxUi tia^ 
of 31uit^ ill tlje ^crc of oure lorlie (15oti 9^€€€€€%dBii. 

Reverse. The reverse of this inscription shows another inscrip- 
tion of great historic value, and fortunately complete. It is in 
French, and records the laying of a foundation stone of Bisham 
Priory by King Edward III., in commemoration of his victories 
at Berwick in 1333, and at the request of Sir William de 
Mountagu, the founder of the Priory. 



itirfoiptoqupft la teraiHe toqs %Ia diMirda S}allrsan 



Denchworth, Berks. 
The inscription is as follows : 

Ctitoarti Eo[' 2Dan0:Irt'c qc fijst \c m^c tiniant la €itc tie 

3t 



retoj^k t coquj^eft la bntaillf illeoqcf i la tiite Cite la brille 

0ein 
tt 9^avQavttt Ian Uc grce. 91^. CCC dB^^iii. nmt ccm't 

pere a la 
requejEftc »)ire ^(lliUiam ti^ Sl^otintagu fountiouc De centre 

me0oun. 

The capitulation of Berwick took place on St. Margaret's day, 
1333, and Sir William de Montagu was one of the signatories to 
the treaty of surrender. The foundation charter of the priory of 
Bisham is dated loth April, 1336. 

The palimpsest plate is now fastened by movable screws. 



Reading, St. Lawrence. 

Obverse. Water Barton, Gent., 1538, in civil dress, with 
inscription. 

Effigy 23J inches in height ; inscription plate 28| x 5| inches. 

Reverse. The entire brass is made of portions of the brass of 
Sir John Popham, who died in 1463, and was buried, according to 
Stowe,* in the Charterhouse, London. The upper part of the 
figure of Water Barton shows the pointed sollerets and a greater 
portion of a lion on which the feet rested. The lower portion of 
the figure shows the hilt of the sword and a portion of the tabard, 
giving enough to identify the two lower quarterings as those of 
Zouch and Popham. 

The Popham inscription is fortunately preserved entire on the 
reverse of Barton's inscription and reads thus : 

"^ic iacct 3iO\ji0 popljam mik0 q°tim lingf tie ^unxt}} in 

i^ormanUia $ tine? 
tic Cljarticforti tic 3Dcnc ac tic aibinjytan tt alibi in SinQiia 

qui oluit i-iiii° 
Hie mcn0' ^prilicf anno tiiti millnio <Z€€€°JL^iii'' tnV 

aic ypirict' tic 

The Rev. Charles Kerry, in his History of the Church of St. 
Lawrence, Reading, p. 136, says, " The old ledger on which Bar- 
ton's brass was laid was undoubtedly the very slab which covered 

* Stowe's Survey 0/ London, ed. 1633, p. 478b. 



8 

the body of Sir John Popham. In adapting it for a second 
memorial, the old matrices were chiselled out and the stone 
rubbed down, but the bottoms of most of the rivet-holes contain- 
ing the leaded rivets remain, indicating the bearings of the 
original. The principal figure stood beneath a canopy. The 
knight was habited in a tabard of arms, and the fragment taken 
from the left-hand side of the figure exhibits the fourth and part 
of the third quarterings with the hilt of the contiguous sword. 
The tail of the lion passed under the foot of the knight and ter- 
minated in a graceful curve by the side of the sword. The 
soUerets, exhibiting seven laminae, are finely pointed." 

The arms of Popham, arg., on a chief gu. two stags' heads 
cahossed or, quartering Zouch of Dene, gu., a chevron arg. between 
ten bezants, six in chief and four in base, are on a brass to the Forster 
family in the neighbouring church of Aldermaston, and were also 
in painted glass in the windows of the Hall. Sir George Forster, 
of Aldermaston, who died in 1533, is described on his sumptuous 
tomb as " coson and one of the heyres of Sir Stephyn Popham." 

The brass is now set in a hinged copper frame fastened to the 
north pier of the chancel arch. The obverse is engraved in Views 
of Reading Abbey and Churches, vol. i. p. 54, and the obverse and 
reverse in Kerry's History of St. Lawrence's Church, p. 134. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 

Chalfont St. Giles. 

Obverse. Inscription to John Salter, 1523, and wife Elsabeth. 
Size of plate, 21 x 3I inches. 

£)f ^0' djaritr praj^ for tljc EfoulesJ of Jolju Salter aun 

dlmbctl) lji0 
topf tlje bjljidjc 3|oIjit ticreef^eti t\)t xii tia[? of nprdl ^n tlje 

^tvt of 
our lorti pD Sl^iD^5H9!^ui on toljo^e jsoulcjs ilju Ijnue merc^ 

amen. 

Reverse. Another inscription, slightly mutilated at each end, 
to Thomas Bredham, 1521, and wife Anne. 

(Pra)[' for t\)c jjoulcef of ^IjomasJ Brcnljam of tlje 
peri0!3lje 





^ .MlopjpflgMgte iiuflfiiiiiisl^iini mjapaiiSttfttii 






Palimpsest Brass, 1538 and 1463, Reading, St. Lawrence, Berks. 



f CT na^ 

. . , , tl)e ^er of o^ lorU 9^m%%i on toijogfe 0onU0 
iljii Ijaiie mcr(cp amen) 

' The brass is now placed in a hinged frame fastened to the wall 
of the North Aisle, For many years it was nailed against the 
Stone House in this parish, but was restored to the church by 
Miss Saunderson. 



Chalfont St. Peter. 

Effigy of a priest in eucharistic vestments, c. 1440. Height 
1 5 inches. This has been slightly altered by the addition of shading 
and the rounding of the toes. A new inscription has then been 
been added to Sir Robert Hanson, vicar of Chalfont St. Peter 
and of Little Missenden, who died in 1545. 

Chicheley. 

Obverse. Anthony Cave, Esq., merchant of the Staple of 
Calais, lord of the manor of Chicheley, 1558, in armour, and wife 
Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Lovell, Esq., of Astwell, with 
inscription and three shields of arms, one lost. The brass is 
engraved in G. Lipscomb's History of Buckinghamshire, vol. 
iv. p. 97 ; and the figures only in R. E. C. Waters' Genealogical 
Memoirs of the Extinct Family of Chester of Chicheley, p. 84. 

Reverse. Haines in his Mamial of Momimental Brasses, part ii. 
p. 260, under "Addenda and Corrigenda," states that "on the 
reverse of a shield is part of an English inscription." The writer 
has been unable to see a rubbing and would be grateful for 
further information. 

Middle Claydon. 

In 1897, Mr. Alfred Heneage Cocks, Hon. Sec. Bucks. Arch. 
Soc, communicated the following note to the Records of Bucking- 
hamshire, vol. vii. p. 529, " During some recent repairs at Middle 
Claydon Church, the large brass to the memory of Roger Gyffard, 
Esq., and Mary his wife (the former of whom died 1542, the date 



10 

of the lady's death being imperfect), was temporarily removed for 
its better preservation. It, fortunately, then came under the notice 
of our indefatigable honorary member, Mr. Arthur Clere, who 
found that the inscription plate below the figures is a palimpsest. 
He has very kindly sent me a rubbing of the original inscription, 
with the remark, ' I was not able to get a good rubbing of the 
reverse side, as the engraver in cutting the more modern inscrip- 
tion cut through the brass in several places, which he filled up 
with solder, and so obliterated some of the words.' The plate 
measures 2ft. 6fin. long x 5in. high. In the first line, the mid- 
dle of the name " Bellingham " is a blank, bounded by fragments of 
the letters / or //, and g. At the end of the same line there is a 
space of ixV'^- after the abbreviated form of Hybernia so it is 
possible something else was originally there. At the end of the 
second line, the context, and the space, suggest the disappearance 
of the abbreviated form of Domini ; similarly at the end of the 
third line a small portion of a capital A suggests that the ensuing 
space contained the word Anno ; and at the end of the last line 
the termination of the ornament is missing, and the word miseri- 
cordiam is slightly imperfect." 

Mr. Cocks reads the inscription thus : 

^rate pro aiabj Mlaltm Bel[Un]0:l)m ^lia0 tiicti ^al= 

tcri 3|rrlonnc Wi^m^ armor' in H^j^brrnia 
(Et Clpjabftlj' uxovi0 tim qui quitim (ItllaltrrujS obiit 

trrcio t)ir mni0i0 Sl^aii anno [tiiii] 
gi^ilUmo €€€€°%^dBdBm. €)biitque ticta Cl^jabetlj 

xir tiie 9^rn0i0 9^m rotirm ^[nno] 
quorum animr prr tiri mi0ericortiiam 31^^ cterna pace 

requic0cant. ^mnt. 

The brass of Roger GyfFard is engraved in Lipscomb's History 
of Bucks., vol. i. p. 194, and there is a small cut of the Belling- 
ham inscription accompanying Mr. Cocks' description of the plate 
in the Bucks. Records. 



Denham. 

Obverse. Amphillis, daughter of Sir Edmund Peckham, 1545, 
with foot inscription and shield. 

Effigy 15^ inches high, inscription 15I x 5 inches, shield 5I X 
4f inches. 



II 







• • 




AMPIIILLIS I'F.CKIIAM, 1545, DENHAM, BUCKS. 

(^ linear.) 



12 



dMMx 







liife 




Reverse of Brass of Amphillis Peckham, Denham, Bucks. 

(J linear. ) 



13 



Haines mentions this brass as lost. Fortunately this is not 
the case. It was loose in 1894 and was exhibited at a meeting of 
the Society of Antiquaries by the Rev. R. H. Lathbury, M.A., 
rector of Denham, in whose custody it then was. 

Reverse. On the reverse of the figure of the lady is another 
figure of a friar, in gown and hose, with his hands folded within 
his sleeves, and a knotted cord hanging from his girdle. The 
figure has been slightly mutilated at the top and bottom, the ears 
and tonsure having been partly cut away, and the feet altogether 
removed. The reverse of the inscription bears the following, 
which may or may not be the epitaph of the friar : 

^wi trancficf eficftc. motiicu Ictyc quicf fait i0te 
^ni mtt occultuef. Ijic iSuli tcUurc scpultus 
3|ix lanport nat'. iattt \)\t 3IoIjn ^^kt tumiilat' 
cut m 0albatu0. ati xpm funtie prccatu^. 

On the reverse of the shield is its original bearing, a birchrod 
surmounting a mace or staff of office in saltire between the letters 

arranged in cross. 

It is uncertain how these letters should be read. They may 
stand for Magistev Johannes Pyhe Scholaris, or for Johannes Pyke 
Magister Schola;. In either case the birch would be appropriate. 
The meaning of the mace is difficult to account for, unless it be 
a ferule or badge of authority of a schoolmaster. 

The date of the earlier brass, and the three pieces seem as in 
the later case to form one memorial, is c. 1440. 

Both sides of the brass are illustrated in the Proceedings of the 
Society of Antiquaries, 2 S. vol. xv. pp. 230, 231, and are here 
reproduced by kind permission of the Society. 

Ellesborough. 

A shield belonging to the brass of Thomas Hawtrey, Esq., 
1554, and wife Sybell, with eleven sons and seven daughters, 
shows traces of alteration. Originally the charge appears to have 
been a plain cross, this has been erased and the arms of Hawtrey, 
(Arg.) three lions rampant in bend between four cotises (sa.), substi- 
tuted. The brass is now placed on the v/all of the South Aisle. 



14 



Eton College Chapel. 
I. 

Obverse. Three-quarter effigy, 13 inches high, of Thomas 
Edgcomb, fellow and vice-provost of Eton, 1545, in academical 
dress, with inscription, 17^ X 9 inches, in ten Latin verses. 

The effigy is palimpsest. 

Reverse. The figure of Thomas Edgcomb is cut out of an 
earlier plate and contains portions of an inscription in ten Latin 
verses. The writer has no rubbing of the reverse, but a full 
description will appear in the next number of the Oxford Journal 
of Monumental Brasses, in the continuation of Mr. T. Eustace 
Harwood's paper on the Eton Brasses, the first instalment of 
which has already appeared. 

IL 

Obverse. Effigy of EHzabeth, wife of Robert Stokys, 1560, 
with inscription. Effigy 23^ inches high, inscription plate 22|^ x 
4 inches. Apparently the work of the Norwich school of en- 
gravers. 

The figure of Robert Stokys, who also died in 1560, and the 
children, are lost. 

The inscription only is palimpsest. 

Reverse. On the back of the inscription is another inscription 
to Walter Haugh, 1505, and wives Margaret and Isabel. 

€)ratc p. ^mbj ^(llflltcri ijaufflj Sl^argarete $ J^aMk 

tirorum ciu^ tt p. 
quibj ticu0 (IcLlaltn*u0 orare ttmv qui quitim (lillalterucf 

obiit ^OTu° Hie 
notinnbri0 ^nno tini millimo €€<l€€°\)° quor' ^lab? 
opiciet' tie'. 

This inscription also appears to belong to the Norwich school. 
The curious expression, "pro quibus orare tenetur " frequently 
occurs on inscriptions in Norfolk, most, if not all, belonging to 
the local school. 

Hedgerley. 
Obverse. Margaret, wife of Edward Bulstrode, 1540, with 



15 

group of ten sons and three daughters, shield (mutilated), and 
foot inscription. 

Effigy 2oJ inches high, inscription 22J x 2f inches, shield 
8x6^ inches, and group of children 6^ x 12^ inches. 

All palimpsest. 

Reverse. The figure of the lady is cut out of an inscription in 
English verse, which is only partly legible, but, according to 
Haines, reads thus : 

. . . . ef (Etione: bj? Ijp0 ff'ue (?) sftone 

[ili]o mane more gentj^U mpgljt be : ^o rpclje auti pore 

fful of liotote 
5ailm['g:ljt^ pti of Ijief graee : proiiiti l)j'm leke pltie iit 

tlje fforuace 
dBlantie ^z bjiic? Ijere to be bette : \^tM l^^ie jjeke i 

0ore I I) 10 eatoet 
purjyj^ti from jj^ntne : nef a of (?) bap(?)tpie. 

On the back of the inscription is another inscription to Thomas 
Totyngton, Abbot of Bury, who died in 1312, but the plate does 
not seem to have been cut before the sixteenth century. It runs 
thus : 

^ot^niffton fcITljomacf CtimTItii qi fait nbbas 
^it iiicet e0to pia gfibi tiuct'r u'o:o maria 

The group of children has been cut out of the lower portion 
of the figure of a bishop or abbot, c. 1530, showing the chasuble, 
staff of the crosier with vexillum, and dalmatic. 

On the reverse of the shield are portions of canopy work with 
a representation of our Lord's resurrection, and a small fragment 
of the figure of some saint. 

Notices of this palimpsest occur in Archaologia, vol. xxx. 
p. 121; Archaological Journal, vol. x. p. 76; and in Haines' 
Introduction, p. xlv. 

Stone. 

Obverse. Thomas Gorney, 1520, in civil dress, and wife 
Agnes, with six sons and three daughters, and foot inscription. 

Effigies 16^ inches high, inscription 2o|- x 3 inches, children 
5| inches high. 

The male effigy and inscription palimpsest. 



i6 

Reverse. On the back of the male effigy is the figure of a lady, 
c. 1440-50, and on the back of the inscription is another incom- 
plete inscription to Christopher Tharpe, who is said to have died 
in 1514. It reads thus : 

^f ^>^ c^arite pra^' for tljc 0oule of ^pofer TOarpe 

baljicije tieceef^cti tijr rrbiii Dap of ^eptcmbrc p^ ^^u . . . 

The two inscriptions are engraved in the Records of Bucking- 
hamshire, vol. ii. p. 175, and a lithograph of the brass and 
palimpsests, full size, has also been privately (?) printed. 

Taplow. 



Obverse. Thomas Manfelde, Esq., 1540, in armour, right foot 
lost, and two wives, Agnes (Trewonwall), and Katherine, who 
survived him, with foot inscription and three shields. 

Male effigy 20 inches high, female effigies i8|- inches, and 
inscription 23^ x 5 inches. 

The three figures and inscription palimpsest. 

Reverse. The figure of Thomas Manfelde is cut out of a large 
figure of a lady, apparently a widow, c. 1490 (?), or possibly 
earlier. The left arm, a portion of the hand, portions of the 
mantle with its long cord and tassels, and indications of the 
under-dress alone remain. 

The figure of the wife on his right hand is composed of two 
fragments of earlier brasses. The upper and larger fragment, 
15^ inches in length, is cut out of a larger figure, but owing to the 
pitch and solder adhering to the surface it is impossible to say 
what the figure originally was. In the rubbing only a few lines 
show. The lower portion, 3x6 inches, shows the face and neck 
of a lady, with a linked chain round the latter. The date appears 
to be c. 1470, and the head may possibly have belonged to the 
lady whose body now forms part of the inscription. 

The figure of the wife on his left hand is made up of three 
pieces of earlier work, but the whole is much obscured by pitch 
and solder. The upper portion of the figure, 12 inches in length, 
although split across diagonally, appears to be composed of por- 
tions of the brass of an ecclesiastic, the fringed end of a stole or 
maniple just appearing. The lower portion, 7 inches in length, 
is cut out of an inscription in English verse. This inscription 



17 

was in double columns, but only a few words at the end of the 
first column remain, and only the fragments of two letters at the 
beginning of the second : 



" lo^e 

Ijat!) pone 

me obec tljrobje 

be not eflotoe 

to Cecil^e 

. . . . f ^ork trulpe. »>,... 

The inscription plate consists of two pieces of earlier work. 
The larger, 20^ inches in length, is cut out of a large figure of a 
lady, c. 1470? At the top the figure is cut off just about the 
shoulders, and below a little above the feet. Enough remains to 
show that the gown had an opening at the neck in the shape of 
a pointed oval, was close-fitting and high-waisted, with a plain 
girdle. The sleeves close and the cuffs of fur. Possibly the 
head, previously mentioned, may have belonged to this figure. 
The smaller piece of the inscription, about 3 inches in length, has 
a few engraved lines only, showing the folds of some garment, 
either the dress of a lady, or the chasuble of a priest. 

II. 

Obverse. A black letter inscription in twelve English verses 
to Ursula, wife of Thomas Jones, c. 1570. 

Size of plate, 15I x 9J inches. 

Reverse. This plate is made up of the figure of a lady, 
c. 1500-20, cut into three pieces. Beginning on the left-hand side, 
the first plate, 4^ inches in width, bears the head and hands of 
the lady. The plate is cut across the forehead and across the fur 
cuffs at the wrists. Enough remains to show the face, part of 
the kennel-shaped head-dress, the hands and the fur cuffs. The 
lady was facing to the right, so may have been one of a pair of 
wives. The centre portion, 6f inches across, shows the lower part 
of the figure and the feet, with the end of the long girdle. The 
right-hand plate, ^\ inches across, shows the centre of the figure 
with the upper part of the girdle. Owing to the curious manner 
in which the figure has been cut up the pieces do not accurately 
join, but all seem to belong to the same figure. 
2 



t8 



III. 

Obverse. An inscription, ig x 5^ inches, to Robert Manfelde, 
Esq., who served Kings Henry V. and VI. This inscription is 
in Roman capitals, and appears to have been engraved c. 1600. 
Fragments of an earlier marginal inscription to this same Robert 
Manfyld, who died in 1459 (?), remain in the church. 

The later inscription reads thus : 

CoNDiTVR Hic Miles, Robertvs nomine Manfelde 

AVLICVS EFFVLGENS HeNRICI TEMPORE QVINTI 
Qvi VARIOS SVBIIT SVMO PRO ReGE LABORES 
DVM GaLLOS ET NoRMANNOS per BELLA DORMABAT 
ArMIGER AC QVARTVS H : PRO TVTAMINE SEXTI 
EXTITIT ELECTVS, DVM MORS IN FVNERA TRAXIT. 

Reverse. This shows about three-quarters of the figure of a 
civilian, c. 1500, from the hands to the feet. He wears the usual 
gown of the period with deep fur cuffs, and has a large gypciere 
attached to his girdle. 

The writer is indebted to Mr. James Rutland, of Taplow, for 
the loan of the rubbings of these palimpsests. All are now relaid 
in the new church and fastened down. 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 

BURWELL. 

Obverse. A figure in cassock, surplice, and almuce, head on 
cushion, originally under triple canopy, but only the centre pedi- 
ment, with a figure of our Lord in Pity, remains. Marginal 
inscription lost. Effigy 54 inches in height, size of whole com- 
position 114 X 5i| inches. Generally and probably correctly 
attributed to John Lawrence, of Wardeboys, Hunts, abbot of 
Ramsey, 1508-39, who died in 1542, and was buried, according to 
the directions in his will, in Burwell church. 

Reverse. The remaining pediment of the canopy, excluding 
the figure of our Lord, is made up of three pieces of an early 
figure of a deacon, c. 1320 (?). The bottom portion of the canopy, 
a plate of brass measuring 8 inches in height x 14 inches in 
width, shows the dalmatic with its fringed edge and orphreys, 



19 

and also a portion of the maniple. The centre portion, a small 
piece of the finial, shows the embroidered amice at the neck, and 
the top piece the face of the figure. 

The effigy is composed of two pieces of metal, the upper hav- 
ing nothing on the reverse. The lower, measuring 28 inclies in 
length, bears thfe lower half of an abbot in rich vestments. The 
figure is represented wearing the albe, stole, dalmatic, tunic, 
maniple, and chasuble. The dalmatic, tunic and chasuble are 
richly embroidered. The staff of the crosier also appears with 
the tassel of the vexillum just showing. 

That the slab was prepared for the brass of a mitred figure is 
proved by the fact that the indent for the mitre still shows above 
the head of the present figure, and that the lower part of the 
figure originally occupied its present position is proved by its 
fitting the indent exactly when reversed, but not so when as at 
present. The monument may therefore have been prepared by 
John Lawrence when abbot of Ramsey, and the figure altered 
either by himself or by his executors to suit the changed times. In 
order to do this a new upper half had to be provided for the 
figure, as it was impossible to adapt the old part to the changed 
conditions. The brass as it now remains consists, therefore, of 
three parts : (i) the obverse of the canopy and the reverse of the 
lower part of the figure, of date c. 1520; (2) the upper part of 
the figure and the obverse of the lower part, of date c. 1540 ; (3) 
the reverse of the canopy, of date, c. 1320 (?). 

The obverse and reverse of the brass are beautifully engraved 
in Messrs. Wallers' Scries of Monumental Brasses, and also by the 
same engravers in the Publications of the Cambridge Antiquarian 
Society, vol. ii. pi. i. Part of the effigy representing the lower 
portion of the abbot is engraved in Haines' Introduction, p. ixviii. 



Cambridge, Queens' College Chapel. 

According to the Transactions of the Monumental Brass Society, 
vol. ii. pp. no, 271, one of the crests at the corners of the mar- 
ginal inscription to Robert Whalley, 1591, is palimpsest, and 
bears a fragment of a Latin inscription to Thomas Cla..., 147 ., 
on the reverse. It is thus described at p. 271, "A fragment of 
an inscription on the reverse of the upper dexter corner-piece. 
This fragment is 3 x 3^ inches, and bears in black letter, the 
following words " : 



20 

Uljomcf Cla ... 

. . . rn^teU qi obiit . . . 
....(m)o €€(t (l°^dB^ . . . . 

The loose piece is in the possession of the College authorities. 
In 1897 ^11 the brasses still remained in the old chapel now 
used as a lecture room. 



Grantchester. 

Described as follows in the Transactions of the Monumental Brass 
Society, vol. iii. p. 24: "On the north side of the chancel floor, 
the matrix of an inscription plate, 2| x 1 1 inches. A small frag- 
ment of the plate (4 inches of one end) is in the keeping of the 
incumbent. It is inscribed in black letter as follows" : 

^vatc p ala m 

cava tic (Bncn .... 



*' The reverse is also inscribed in black letter as follows" : 

.... tic ^tobjc ^n 
.... miffcabit 

CHESHIRE. 

Chester, Holy Trinity. 

Obverse. Inscription, 17^ x 8|- inches, to Henry Gee, twice 
mayor of Chester, who died in 1545. 

^crc tinticc l^^ctlj biir^'cti tljc botij? of 
^cnr^ (I5cc ttoo mma ma^cr o£ tijijs 
cctj^'c ot Cljc0tcr iljj^cljc ticcc^^^ti tljc 
titJj tia^ o£ September ^n" mi a^'Dalb" 
on "txiW^ 0onl\c ilju Ijabc mcrc^. 

Reverse. This inscription has been cut out of a large brass 
representing a man in armour, c. 1520-30, wearing the mantle and 
insignia of the Order of the Garter. The fragment shows the left 
leg from the top of the knee to the instep. The knee is encircled 
by the garter in the usual manner, but the motto does not appear. 
A portion of the mantle remains, together with one of the long 



21 



tasselled cords used for fastening this garment. The fragment 
resembles in style the well-known brass to Sir Thomas Bullen, 
K.G., 1538, at Hever, Kent. 




Chester, Holy Trinity. 
Reverse of Inscription. 



CORNWALL. 

CONSTANTINE. 

Obverse. Rich. Gerveys, Esq., in civil dress, and wife Jane, 
daughter of Thomas Trefusis, Esq., both buried 8th October, 
1574, "\vith eight sons and eight daughters, quadrangular plate 
with canopy, detached marginal inscription, peculiar. Engraved 
E. H. W. Dunkin's Monumental Brasses of Cornwall, pi. xxxiii. 



22 

Reverse. The quadrangular plate on which are engraved 
the effigies of Richard Gerveys, wife, and children, is really 
composed of two earlier plates soldered together. The upper 
portion shows the figure of a man in armour, cut off at the waist 
and across the forehead ; his head is bare, long curly hair shows 
above the ears, and he has beard and moustache. His head 
rests on a richly diapered cushion supported by angels. Over 
his armour he wears a jupon charged with his arms, three crescents 
surmounted by a bendlet. Portions of colouring matter were found 
showing the field to have been argent ; the crescents and bendlets 
appear to have been sable. The whole of the background of the 
plate is filled in with a diaper of foliage, and portions of saints 
under canopies appear at the edge on the right-hand side. One 
of the saints may be St. John the Evangelist. The lower plate, 
on which are engraved the Gerveys' children, is apparently the 
upper corner of the same monument, and bears the pinnacles of 
the canopy, a fragment of the symbol of St. Mark, and a few words 
of a Flemish marginal inscription in Lombardic characters : 

The whole is of Flemish origin, and may be dated c. 1375. 

Both plates are engraved in Waller, p. xi. ; and the man in 
armour only in the Gentleman'' s Magazine, N.S., vol. i. (1864), 
p. 523 (erroneously lettered Harrow-on-the-Hill) ; Lithograph by 
John Williams (full-size) ; and Dunkin, pi, xxxiv. 

This brass has been relaid in a new stone and the palimpsest 
portions fastened down. A small point in connection with the 
Gerveys brass is worthy of notice. It was the work of a local 
engraver, but as he was unable to engrave the heraldic charges, 
he cut out a portion of the brass in the shape of the shield and 
inserted another piece of brass on which the charges had been 
engraved, probably in a London workshop. The hole for this 
shield is plainly shown in all the engravings of the reverse of the 
brass quoted above. 



Mawgan-in-Pyder 

I. 

Obverse. A fragment of the marginal inscription to George 
and Isabel Arundel), 1573. The fragment bears the words, " our 



23 

lorde God MCC," in black letter, and is now preserved at War- 
dour Castle. 

Reverse. A fragment of a Flemish brass bearing portions of 
two words and a part of a lozenge charged with heraldic devices. 
The words are cut through the centre and consequently illegible, 
and there is too little of the lozenge to give the arms. Engraved 
Dunkin, pi. xli. fig. i. 

The brass of George Arundell and wife Isabel originally 
consisted of two effigies, twelve English verses, four shields of 
arms, and a marginal inscription. The effigies are relaid in the 
south aisle, the verses fastened to the screen, the shields lost, or 
may be with the others on the screen, and the fragments of the 
marginal inscription are at Wardour Castle. The brass is 
engraved in Dunkin, pi. xxxvi. 



II. 

Obverse. Figure of Jane Arundell, 1577, and half the foot 
inscription in thirteen English verses, the other half lost. Now 
preserved at Wardour Castle. 

Reverse. The figure of Jane Arundell is composed of frag- 
ments from two different Flemish brasses. The upper half 
of the figure shows portions of a rich canopy which originally had 
saints in niches down the side, the upper half of one female saint 
bearing a tower, perhaps St. Barbara, remains, the lower half 
having been cut off in rounding the head. This portion is 
engraved in Dunkin, pi. xli. fig. 5. The lower half of the figure 
shows portions of the centre of a canopied device and is dated 
1374. A small portion of a seated figure, probably God the 
Father, remains, and on liis right are two nimbed figures playing 
on musical instruments. Then comes a mass of canopy work, 
and finally a small portion of the marginal inscription bearing the 
words " no septimo (sic) quart." The whole of the background 
is filled in with rich diaper. A somewhat similar device appears 
on the back of the remaining portion of the verses. The central 
figure is God the Father, seated, and holding a soul in a sheet, 
on the right are two nimbed figures, one swinging a censer and 
the other holding a candlestick. There is an abundance of rich 
canopy and diaper work. Above the central figure is half a 
shield bearing apparently a chevron gonttee de sang. These two 
fragments are engraved in C. S. Gilbert's Historical Survey and 



24 

Heraldy of Cornwall, vol. ii. p. 658 ; Transactions of the Exeter 
Diocesan Architectural Society, i S. vol. iii. pi. 16; Haines' Intro- 
duction, pp. 16, 17; Dunkin, pi. xl. Mr. Dunkin says: "On the 
reverse of the missing half of the plate on which was engraved 
the acrostic to Jane Arundell were the words, ' domini Millesimo 
t . . . ,' which if placed before ' no septimo quart . . . ,' gives 
the year 1374, thus 'domini Millesimo t [recentesi] mo septimo 
quart . . .' This date agrees with the style of architecture and 
the peculiar type of black letter made use of in the design. It 
has been suggested that perhaps the brass was never used, owing 
to the mistake the engraver made in the date, the latter part of 
which should have been ' septuagesimo quarto.' " 

The brass of Jane Arundell originally consisted of an effigy, 
a foot inscription in thirteen English verses forming an acrostic, 
and a marginal inscription. Fragments of the marginal inscrip- 
tion are preserved in the church, but the figure and the half of 
the verses are at Wardour Castle. It is engraved in Dunkin, pi. 
xxxviii. 

III. 

Obverse. Head of Mary Arundell, 1578. Now preserved at 
Wardour Castle. 

Reverse. A fragment of a Flemish brass, being a portion of a 
draped figure of a saint, headless, holding a clasped book. En- 
graved Dunkin, pi. xli. fig. 3. 

The brass of Mary Arundell originally consisted of an effigy, 
a foot inscription in thirteen English verses, two shields of arms, 
and a marginal inscription. The head of the effigy, the whole of 
the marginal inscription, and one shield of arms, are at Wardour 
Castle. The verses are fastened to the screen in the church. 
The brass is engraved in Dunkin, pi. xxxvii. 



IV. 

Obverse. Fragment of marginal inscription to Cecily Arundell, 
1578, bearing the words, " wyfFe who depa . . ." in black letter. 
Now preserved at Wardour Castle. 

Reverse. Fragment of a Flemish brass bearing a portion of 
a richly diapered robe and part of the head of a small dog with 
collar of bells. Engraved i^z/;;^^, pi. xli. fig. 6. 



25 

The brass of Cecily Arundell originally consisted of an effigy, 
a foot inscription in twelve English verses, and a marginal 
inscription. The effigy has been relaid in the south aisle, the 
verses are fastened to the screen, and the fragments of the mar- 
ginal inscription are at Wardour Castle, The brass is engraved 
in Dunkin, pi. xxxviii/ 

V. 

Obverse. A rose from one corner of the marginal inscription 
to Edward Arundell, 1586. Now preserved at Wardour Castle. 

Reverse. A portion of a man's face and neck, showing ruff and 
doublet. Foreign, of late date. Engraved Dunkin, pi, xli, tig, 2. 

The brass of Edward Arundell originally consisted of an effigy, 
two plates, one with eight Latin verses, the other with eighteen 
English verses, a marginal inscription with a rose at each corner, 
and several shields of arms. The effigy has been relaid in the 
south aisle, the verses are fastened to the screen, the shields are 
lost, and the fragments of the marginal inscription are at War- 
dour Castle, The brass is engraved in Dunkin, pi, xxxix. 

VI. 

Obverse. A shield charged with the arms and quarterings of 
Arundell, It is: Quarterly I. Arundell. II, Quarterly (i,) and 
(iv.) Dynham, (ii.) and (iii.) Arches. Ill, Chidiock, and IV. 
Carminow. In the fess point is a mullet for difference. Now 
preserved at Wardour Castle, 

Reverse. A fragment of a Flemish brass, of late date, consist- 
ing of a portion of scroll work, a few words of an inscription in 
two lines with an outer border of foliage. Engraved Dunkin, pi. 
xli. fig. 4. 

The descriptions of these brasses are entirely taken from Mr. 
Dunkin's admirable volume On Cornish Brasses. Haines states 
the loose inscriptions to be at Lanherne Nunnery ; they have 
since been removed to Wardour Castle, Tisbury, Wilts, the seat 
of Lord Arundell of Wardour. 



CUMBERLAND. 

No palimpsest noted in this county. 



26 

DERBYSHIRE. 

ASHOVER. 

Obverse. Inscription to Thomas Babyngton, Esq., of Dethik, 
son of John, son and heir of Thomas Babyngton, by Isabel, 
daughter and heiress of Robert Dethyk, Esq., 1518, now mural. 
South Aisle. 

Size of plate, 18x5 inches. 

Reverse. On the back of the plate is another inscription to 
Robert Prykke, serjeant-of-the-pantry to Queen Margaret, 1450, 
and his three children, John, Robert, and Margaret. This in- 
scription is now fastened down, but according to J. C. Cox's 
Notes on Derbyshire Churches, vol. i. p. 30, was as follows: 

ll|ic mn Eobcrtu0 |9rpkUe armiQ:' quontiam gfectiengf 
^aantric tini Q^arjyarete regina ^nglie 'clotljeef {sic) 
Eobt'u0 ct ^arprcte lilirri sini qui quiticm Kobt'110 
pater obiit mii tiie mens' 9^m SL° tini W^^^'^'^^^^ 
quorum animabu0 propicictur ticu0 ^men. 

The curious word " Tothes " is probably a transcriber's error 
for " Johes," the contraction for Johannes. 

Dale Abbey. 

During excavations on the site of the abbey in 1879, several 
small fragments of brass were found. Two pieces proved to be 
palimpsest. They join together on the obverse side and show a 
sort of cable band with a knot at one of the corners. The centre 
is a blank. The writer has no explanation to offer as to its use. 
1 he reverse of the larger piece shows the greater part of a human 
face, but whether male or female it is difficult to say. The 
smaller piece appears to be the neck of a lady wearing a wimple, 
and may or may not have belonged to the face. The larger piece 
measures about 7 X 45 inches, and the smaller 3x5 inches. 



NORBURY. 

Obverse. Sir Anthony Fitzherbert, justice of the Common 
Pleas, 1538, head gone, and second wife Maud, daughter and 



27 

co-heiress of Richard Cotton, Esq., of Hampstall Rydware, in 
heraldic mantle, with five sons (lost) and five daughters (the 
second in heraldic mantle), fourteen Latin verses on two plates, 
one shield of arms, and three fragments of the marginal inscrip- 
tion. 

All the remaining parts, except the lower portion of the 
daughters, palimpsest: 

The figure of the judge in its present condition measures 
29 inches in height, of the lady 36 inches, the daughters 1I5 X 
I2i inches (the palimpsest portion 7^ x 12^ inches), the larger 
plate with verses 225 x gj inches, the smaller plate 22^ x yk 
inches, the shield 9x8 inches, and the fragments of the marginal 
inscription respectively 15^, 15, and loi^ inches. The size of the 
slab is 10 feet 4 inches x 4 feet 3 inches. 

Reverse. The figure of the judge and that of his wife, exclud- 
ing her head, join together and make up the greater portion of 
the figure of a lady, c. 1320. The judge forms the lower half, 
and his wife the upper. The lady belongs to the same type as 
the figure of Lady Creke, c. 1325, at Westley Waterless, Cambs. 
She is represented with wimple, close-fitting kirtle, over-gown 
and mantle, the latter gathered up under her right arm. The 
head of Dame Maud is formed out of a piece of canopy work and 
has traces of one Lombardic letter of a marginal inscription, 
showing it to have belonged to the sinister side of the compo- 
sition. On the reverse of the children is a more perfect piece of 
the canopy work with the figure of a monk, the background 
•diapered with a fretty design, and on the edge a few letters of the 
marginal inscription in Lombardic letters: 'J^^hJE^ - ©3E. 
This piece belonged to the dexter side of the composition. The 
shield is cut out of the centre pediment of the canopy and shows 
the figure of God the Father seated and enclosed in a quatrefoil. 
The three fragments of the marginal inscription all bear other 
fragments of the Lombardic inscription, thus: X3Ei^ • X^El(2)^I?i 

: .s3E:Bi:E. : — ^i^M-i^j^ - :e):e : yL\ — :jpm^m : 

JSJ^* All these pieces form part of one composition. Mr. W. 
H. St. John Hope, in the Journal of the Derbyshire Archaological 
Society, vol. iv. p. 54, conjectures these pieces to have formed 
part of the brass of one of the wives of Sir Theobaud de Verdun, 
who died in 1316; and Mr. A. A. Armstrong, formerly Librarian 
•of Denstone College and Curator of the School Museum, in a 
pamphlet treating of the brass, ascribes it to Dame Matilda, wife 



28 

of Theobald de Verdun, lord of Alton, who died in 1312 and was 
buried in the south transept of Croxden Abbey. This abbey was 
dissolved in 1538, and the greater part of the plunder became the 
property of William Basset, who had married the judge's daugh- 
ter Ehzabeth. 

The two remaining plates on which are inscribed the Latin 
verses belong to a much later memorial. The larger bears the 
centre portion of a figure in monastic habit, probably a portion of 
the prior referred to in the hexameters on the smaller plate. 
This smaller plate bears the remains of the hexameter verses in 
two parallel columns, but much cut down. They read thus : 

. . . mas quonnam prior. Ijic tcllurc quicscit : 3|mquieti 

muntiiim 0iln par 

.0 Ijunc brr0um memor. r0to que morierief: Dile 

ratiatcr mnx. M 

. s^ana fee quiti . tiult giffuare catiatee : da earo U que 

MU\ .be 

. . aores eito . mareent ^eu que tiolores : ^ni tiant 

merores eum 

. . mci leges . mi fratee funtie preeameii: 3u penis 

tiegeres ut ab 

The date of these two plates may be placed c. 1440. 

It is just possible that the blue marble slab may also be 
pahmpsest and have on its reverse the casement of the earlier 
brass. 

All the palimpsests are now fastened down, but the late Sir 
Wollaston Franks had careful electrotypes made and fastened to 
a stout board. These now hang on the vestry wall. 

The obverse and portions of the reverses are illustrated in the 
Journal of the Derbyshire Archtsological Society, vol. iv. frontis- 
piece, and the obverse and reverse are fully illustrated in the 
Portfolio of the Monumental Brass Society, part vi. pis. 4 and 5. 

Impressions, both of the obverses and reverses, are in the col- 
lections of the British Museum, South Kensington Museum, the 
Society of Antiquaries, and the Sheffield Museum. 

Further information may be found in Mr. Hope's paper, above 
cited, and in Mr. A. A. Armstrong's paper originally read before 
the North Staffordshire Field Club, and published in its Trans- 
actions for 1892. 



29 

DEVONSHIRE. 
Braunton. 

Obverse. Lady Elizabeth Bowcer, daughter of John [Bouchier, 
ist] earl of Bath, and wife of Edward Chechester, Esq., 1548, 
kneeling at a desk, the lower part of which is broken away, with 
inscription. 

Effigy 13J inches high ; inscription plate 23^ x 4J inches. 

Engraved in the Transactions of the Exeter Diocesan Architectural 
Society, vol. vi. part ii., pi. 7. 

Both plates palimpsest. 

Reverse. The figure of the lady shows on the reverse the face 
and neck of a man in armour of the camail period, c. 1370. The 
laces of the camail are plainly shown running round the front of 
the bascinet, and the camail is composed of banded mail. This 
fragment may be of foreign workmanship. On the reverse of the 
inscription is part of the centre of the figure of a lady, c. 1370, a 
portion of one of the long lappets or tippets hanging from the 
elbow being just visible. Compare with the figure at Necton, 
Norfolk, to Ismayne de Wynston, 1372. 



Yealmpton. 

Obverse. An inscription in six English lines to Isabel, third 
daughter of Henry and Agnes Fortescue, and wife of [John] 
Copleston, 1580. 

<Jl\)i'i^c 0l)int\} September mnm f^te Ijuntirct) j'carref 

t\)tm efpcut 
auti fourc timc0 t^ciit^' tocrc m\cc Cljci^t to caitlj Voacf 

0cnt 
M,\)tix 3l2>abcl t\)t loicf of Coplcoton ticarc tiiti tivr 
d)C tljirD ticU' buricti tljcnrc no\uc Ijcrc in tumbc Dotlj Ijr 
%o ll}cnr^' ffortc-^ciic (sic) tljirtic tiauffljtrr b[' ticjjrce 
^uti ^ijnccf Ci\{\C Ijii* motljcrc? name of ^ainrtmainrccf 

blotic \oc[0 0br. 

Size of plate, 22 x 5^ inches. 

Reverse. The upper portion of a quadrangular plate of Flemish 
workmanship, c. 1460. The head of the person commemorated, 



30 

a priest, just appears a little to the right of the centre of the 
plate. Above and encircling his head is a twisted scroll with this 
imperfect inscription : 

...esto -- manor = Varolii = prccibusf -- pia = tirgo... 

Behind the figure, on the right hand-side, is a portion of a 
large figure of St. James the Great with his pilgrim's staff, no 
doubt the patron saint of the priest. On the left-hand side is the 
head of the B.V. Mary with long plaited hair. She was pro- 
bably represented seated, as there are indications of throne work 
in the left-hand corner of the plate and near the head of the 
figure. 




-f^-^' 



Yealmpton, Devon. 

In the centre is a figure of God the Father seated on a large 
high-backed throne and holding in a sheet the soul of the deceased, 
represented as usual by a small naked figure, but having the 
unusual feature of a nimbus round the head. The background 
round the throne is studded with stars. The remainder of the 
plate is diapered with rich foliage work. The brass, when com- 
plete, seems to have been of a similar type to those at Basle, 
Switzerland, to Isabel, duchess of Burgundy, 1450 ; Amiens, 
France, to Bishop John Avantage, 1456 ; and Termond, Flanders, 
to Peter and Margaret Esscheric, c. 1470. All figured in the 
Rev. W. F. Creeny's Motiumental Brasses on the Continent of Europe. 

The writer is indebted to the Rev. H. W. Macklin for the 
knowledge of this interesting palimpsest and for a rubbing. 



DORSETSHIRE. 

Litton Cheney. 

According to John Hutchins' History and Antiquities of the 
County of Dorset, third edition, 1861-67, vol. ii. p. 755, there is 



31 

a palimpsast inscription in this church. The account is somewhat 
vague and the present writer has been unable to verify it. The 
editors of the third edition of Hutchins say: "A brass plate, 
which is palimpsest, that is, has been used before the last inscrip- 
tion was engraved for a similar purpose. It has three inscriptions 
altogether : " 

(i) "hie iacet Johes Chapman ffyschmoger et Alicia uxor eius 
qui quidm Johes obiit Septimana pasche anno dni M.CCCCLXXI 
quor' aiabz ppicietur deus. Amen.'* 

(2) "Hie iacet Alexandriam (?)Warnby qui obiit iiij° die mes' 

anno dni M°CCCC°LXXXVP cui' ale ppiciet' deus." 

(3) " Orate p aiabz Johis Newpton et Thome Neupto q"" alarum 
ppiciet' d's." 

As far as one can judge, No. 3 must be the obverse, and Nos. 
I and 2 the reverse. 

DURHAM. 

No palimpsest noted in this county. 

ESSEX. 

The writer desires to express his great obligations to Messrs. 
Miller Christy, W. W. Porteous, and E. Bertram Smith, for 
knowledge of the palimpsests at Terling, Tolleshunt Darcy, 
and Upminster ; also for the loan of rubbings and for much kind 
assistance in every way in the preparation of the Essex list. 
To Messrs. Christy and Porteous the writer is further indebted 
for the loan of the blocks illustrating the brasses at Aveley, 
Brightlingsea, Fryerning, and Strethall ; to the Society of Anti- 
quaries for the block illustrating Stondon Massey ; to Mr. F, W. 
Short for investigations at Walthamstow ; and to Mr. Arthur H. 
Brown for the loan of the rubbing of a lost shield at Upminster. 

Aveley. 

Obverse. Inscription to Charles Barett, son and heir of 
Edward Barett, Esq., 1584, aet. 29, and wife Christian, daughter 
of Sir Walter Mildmay. Size of plate, 19^ x 5 inches. 

^rcc buticr Ipctlj Cljarlccf Barrtt cfonnc anH \)ti\'t to 
(ElJbjarti Barett ccfquirc: toljo marprti Cljricftian tiatityljtfr 
to s»ir ([(llaltcr ^tltimaj' knj'ffljt, anti Ijnti far Ijrr \\ 0onnccf 
iinti on Uiiujyljtcr. Ijc ticccacfcfct) in tljc uk j'crr of Ijio 
iiffc tljc biii tia^'c of ^w^mt an° ^\\\. 1584. 

3 



32 



Above the inscription is a shield (5^ inches in height) bearing 
the arms of Barett, per pale (arg. and gu.),four bars counterchanged. 

Reverse. On the back of the inscription is a portion of a 
marginal inscription from a large Flemish brass. It bears the 
following words 

xxiii, 0tt. tiaclj. l mt^it + ^icr Icglj 

enclosed between longitudinal foliated borders of simple, but 
elegant design. The date is c. 1420. 

The original slab, still containing the shield, lies on the floor 
of the Chancel, but the inscription is loose, one piece being in the 
hands of the vicar, and the other in the Colchester Museum. 



efiaariSr %Mtt rfinmrrtta mamfr iW&im im4)m 

anir mi WioWfr.ljr itttm^ in ije ^w »frr of to 
aoe Uir ttn fiagr tf HUfiua an"* M. 1 5 8 4"^ 




Palimpsest Inscription, Aveley, Essex. 

About one-fifth full size. 

For a full account of the history and vicissitudes of this brass see 
Messrs. Christy and Porteous' account in The Transactions of the 
Essex Archaological Society, N.S., vol. vii. p. 4, where both sides 
of the brass are engraved. 

Brightlingsea. 

A bracket, c. 1400, whereon have been placed the effigies of 
Dame Alice Beryff, 1536, and her daughter Margaret, inscription 
lost. On floor of North or Beriffe Chapel. 

This is a compound brass, and so far as is at present known, 
a palimpsest by appropriation, although the figures are strongly 



33 




Brightlingsea, Essex. 

About one-eleventh full size. 



34 

suspected to be true palimpsests. The bracket originally sup- 
ported the figures of two priests in copes, the indents showing 
the figures to have been about 25 inches in height. In 1536 the 
smaller figures (22^^ inches in height) of Dame Alice and her 
daughter were substituted. Messrs. Christy and Porteous, who 
figure and describe this brass in The Transactions of the Essex 
ArchiBological Society, N.S., vol. viii. pp. ig, 28, give the following 
reasons for considering the ladies' figures to be palimpsest : — 
" In the first place, the plates are (as the edges show) of greater 
thickness than those ordinarily used when the later effigies were 
engraved. As to the figure of the maiden lady, there can hardly 
be a doubt that the curious contraction in the width of the gown^ 
which is observable about the level of the knees, was rendered 
necessary by the use of some earlier effigy, though, with a little 
more care, this contraction could have been rendered much less 
obvious or done away with altogether. That the existing effigies 
are some three inches shorter than those on the back of which 
they are engraved is easily accounted for ; for the narrow necks 
of the priests would not allow of the insertion of taller effigies 
of the width of those now existing into the same matrices. It 
seems probable therefore, that, on the death of two lady members 
of the Beriffe family, the effigies of the two earlier priests were 
seized upon, cut down, and re-engraved on the reverse side by 
some clumsy workman in order to make them serve as monu- 
ments to the ladies in question." 



FiNGRINGHOE. 

Obverse. Effigies of John Alleyn, c. 1600, and his daughter 
Ailse on one plate, with inscription. Male effigy i2| inches 
high; inscription-plate i5|- x 3f inches. 

The inscription only is palimpsest. 

Reverse. On the back of the inscription is a portion of the 
text from Job i. 21, of about the same date. 

Iehova dedit Iehova abstulit sit nomen .... 
benedictv mors frvmarv meta est & . . . . 
salvtis cvpio etiam dissolvi & esse cv . . . . 

Now fastened to the Chancel wall. 



35 



Fryerning. 

Obverse. A lady, c. 1560, slightly mutilated at the head and 
left arm. Height 22^ inches. Husband, children, shields and 
inscription lost. Probably part of the brass to Leonard Berners, 
third son and heir to William Berners the elder, Esq., 1563, and 
wife Mary, eldest daughter and co-heiress of James Gedge, Esq., 
of Shenfield. 





Reverse. Obverse. 

Palimpsest Figure, Fryerning, Essex. 

About one-sixth full size. 



Revevse. About two-thirds of the upper portion of a lady, c. 
1460, attired in the usual costume of a widow. 

The brass is now mounted in a frame so as to display both 
sides and hangs in the Vestry. Both sides are engraved in 
Alfred Suckling's Antiquities and Architecture of Essex, p. 8, and 
in The Essex Review, vol. iii. p. 123. 



36 



Stondon Massey. 

Obverse. Effigies of Rainold Holingworth, 1573, in armour, 
and wife, with foot inscription, and shield of arms with crest and 
mantling on square plate. Effigies, male 18^ inches, female 
I7f inches, inscription-plate 18 x 6| inches, shield of arms 
7I X 6j inches. Relaid and now mural in Nave. 

Reverse. The male and female effigies are palimpsest, being 
made up of fragments of Flemish brasses of two different dates, 
the whole of the female figure and the lower part of the male 
being of one and the same date, probably of the latter part of the 
fourteenth century, whilst the upper part of the male effigy is 
considerably later. Rubbings of the brasses were exhibited 
before the Society of Antiquaries on the 25th of January, 1877,* 
by Mr. Edward Cox, who stated " they had been removed from 
the church for security on account of the stone beneath having 
crumbled away. They had now been replaced in the church, 
under his superintendence, in what is known as the Chapel of the 
Meyer family, to whom the Stondon property came some forty 
or fifty years ago, when the last of the Holingworths died, leaving 
no direct issue." Mr. A. W. Franks, Director, communicated 
the following remarks on the palimpsest portions : — " The former 
[i.e., the earlier work, on the reverse of the feiiiale and the lower 
part of the male effigy) consist of two canopies, of which the 
upper one is imperfect. In the lower is the figure of St. Andrew, 
fully draped, with a nimb, bearing in his right hand a book, and 
in his left his usual attribute, a cross saltire. In the upper one 
is a figure of St. Bartholomew, also with a nimb, the right hand 
pointing out of the canopy towards the sinister, and the left hold- 
ing his usual attribute, a flaying-knife, with the point upwards. 
Immediately under the right hand, on the outside of the mantle, 
appears a singular mark, to which it may be well to call atten- 
tion, though I am not prepared to say it has any significance. 
It would be interesting if it should hereafter prove to "be an 
artist's mark." 

" It is noticeable that the lower portion of the engraving on 
the back of No. i {i.e., the male effigy) is inverted. It appears, 
if placed in its proper position, to fit the lower portion of No. 2 

' Proceedings, 2 S., vol. vii. p. 123. 



37 









Palimi'sest Reverses, Stondon Massey, Essex. 

t 

J linear. 



38 

{i.e., the female effigy) from which it was probably taken and 
soldered on No. i in its present position." 

" On the upper part of the back of No. i (see woodcut) is a 
large portion of the arms of Cleves and La Marck quarterly, 
with an inescutcheon, of Burgundy modern and ancient quarterly, 
and Flanders over all. ^ Adolphus, first Duke of Cleves, married 
for his second wife Mary of Burgundy, one of the daughters of 
John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy, and died in 1448. (See 
L'Art de Verifier les Dates, xiv. p. 400). The coat of Burgundy, 
with an inescutcheon of Flanders, was borne by the Dukes John 
the Fearless and Philip the Good, until the latter acquired the 
Duchy of Brabant in 1430. The arms on the brass can scarcely 
be those of Adolphus, first Duke of Cleves, and Mary of Bur- 
gundy, as she was not an heiress, which according to modern 
English heraldry such a marshalling of arms would denote ; but, 
according to French or German heraldry in the fifteenth century, 
these arms might have led one to suppose that a Duke of Bur- 
gundy, or a member of his family, had become or claimed to be 
Duke of Cleves ; or, that a Duke of Cleves had become Duke of 
Burgundy : neither of which cases was the fact. John, Duke of 
Cleves, the eldest son of Adolphus, bore the arms of Cleves and 
La Marck only ; either side by side, as on his seal (see Vredius, 
Genealogia Com. Flandr., p. 119), or impaled, as in the achievement 
of his arms as knight of the Toison d'Or (which he had been 
created in 1451), which were placed in 1458 over his stall in the 
church of Our Lady at Bruges (see Gaillard's Inscriptions et 
Monuments de la Flandre Occidentale, tom. i. pt. 2, p. 8 ; Chifflet, 
Insignia Gentilitia Eqn. Ord. Veller'is anrei. No. xlvii. p. 27 ; Maurice, 
Toison d'Or, p. 58). His younger brother, however, Adolphus, 
Lord of Ravenstein, bore the arms of Cleves and La Marck 
quarterly, with the inescutcheon of Burgundy, as shown by 
his seal (Vredius, Geneal. Com. Flandr., p. 122; Sceaux des Grands 
Feudataires, pi. xxxii. fig. 2 ; Demay, Inventaire des Sceaux de la 
Flandre, Nos. 123, 124), and in his achievement placed over his 
stall in the church of Our Lady at Bruges in 1458 (Gaillard, 
p. 10). The same arms were continued by his son Philip, and 
it is possible that this younger branch of the Cleves may have 

' Cleves. Gu., an escutcheon arg., over all an escarbuncle or. La Marck. 
Or, afess chequy arg, and gu, BURGUNDY Modern. Az., three fleiir-de-lys or 
within a bordtire gobony arg. and gti. Burgundy Ancient. Bendy of six or 
and az., a bordiire gii. Flanders. Or, a lion rampant sa. 



39 

adopted the inescutcheon of Burgundy as a difiference. A 
splendid mausoleum was erected at the Dominican church at 
Brussels for Adolphus, Lord of Ravenstein, who died 1492, and 
his second wife in 1501. It consisted, however, of effigies in 
relief with rich metal v/ork, and remained till the destruction 
of the Dominican church in the bombardment of Brussels in 
1695 (see Brahantia Sacra). It does not therefore seem probable 
that the plate of which our brass is a portion, and which was 
laid down in 1573, was derived from it. There may, however, 
have been an earlier tomb for the first wife of Adolphus, Beatrice 
of Portugal, who was buried at Quesnoy." 

" The obscure object on the dexter side of the brass, above 
the arms, is part of the crest of the Duke of Cleves, which was, 
according to Chifflet {Insig. Gent. Ord. Eq. Veil, anvei, No. xlvii. 
p. 27), ' Une teste de taureau affrontee de gueulles, armee et 
allumee d'or, sommee d'une couronne cerclee an blason de la 
fasce de La Marck, rehaussee de fleurons d'or.' The chequy 
portion, seen above the eye of the bull in the woodcut, is part of 
the fesse of La Marck above mentioned. This crest seems here 
to have been treated as a helmet, and the bars at the mouth 
of the bull are a portion of the visor. They are so represented 
in Maurice, Toison d'Or, p. 50," 

This interesting palimpsest is now fastened down. The 
reverses are engraved in Proceedings of the Society of A ntiquavies of 
London, 2 S. vol. vii. pp. 124, 125, and here reproduced by kind 
permission of the Society. 



Strethall, 

Obverse. Inscription to Thomas Abbott, rector, 1539. Size 
of plate 14 X 4i inches. 

^tu Uctlj iJl^aiorrr Uljomaef Abbott 
late pGoit Ijrr' toljlclj tirrrosm p \^m Daj' 
of C^rtob' tbf ;'rr' of our lorti iJl^iCCCCC 
31^^^3131^ on I0I300 ooiilr Jcoii Ijaiic nuuc^' 

Now erroneously placed under the figure of a priest in 
academicals, c. 1480, in the Chancel. 

Reverse. Another inscription to Margaret Siday, c. 1450. 



40 

9^e Sl^argnretam ^ttiap mono tcrmibug t^am 
£iuontiam formo^am muUcrcm relliffio^am 
^ic contemplantc0 qualcef critic memorantegf 
4Bo0citc po0co tieum cclicf nonet miciji mansfum 

The reverse is now fastened down. There is a plaster cast 
in the Saffron Walden Museum. Both sides of the plate are 
engraved in The Reliquary and Illustrated Archaeologist, vol. v. p. i6. 



33ijlrtn!]ioIfl) innuMs^onft inirftiutintliin ^- 






Palimpsest Inscription, Strethall, Essex. 

About one-sixth full size. 



Terling. 

A small corner of the inscription belonging to the brass to 
William Rochester, Esq., 1558, in civil dress, and wife Elizabeth, 
1566, with six sons and four daughters, brass engraved c. 1584, 
is loose and proves to be palimpsest. On the obverse this corner 
bears the letters " In an | And fy " in two lines, and on the reverse 
two letters of an inscription in raised black letter. The fragment 
measures 2 x i| inches and belongs to the left-hand corner of 
the inscription. 



TOLLESHUNT DaRCY. 

I. 

Obverse. The lower portion of the border of a large Flemish 
brass, c. 1375. The plate measures 38 x 6f inches, and is 



4i 

composed of three strips, which respectively measure, beginning 
from the right, 13I, 9, and 15^ inches. The odd 5 inch is made 
up in the joints which do not fit very closely. 

The design consists of a background richly ornamented with 
conventional vine leaves and bunches of grapes, a long curving 
scroll, or rather a series of small scrolls, containing clauses from 
the Apostles' Creed. In the centre is a small seated figure of 
the Virgin, crowned, and holding the Child in her arms. On the 
right is a seated figure of St. Philip, his name ^. ^IjllippUS 
on a small scroll above his head, in his right hand he holds a 
long cross and with his left points to a scroll bearing the words 
from the Creed attributed to him. On the left is a similar figure 
of St. Bartholomew, a small scroll above his head bearing his 
name ^. 3flrtl)0lrntru', in his right hand he holds a knife and 
with his left points to the scroll. In the right hand corner is the 
winged ox of St. Luke, and in the left the winged lion of St. 
Mark. 

The scroll, or series of small scrolls, reads thus : 

liti patrifif omipotctis | itir bctiir' iutircarc ijitioe> t ntor= 
tuo0 1 Crctio ill 0'pm sanctum 1 sancta(m) 

The words " dei patris omnipotentis " form part of the clause 
" sedit ad dextram dei &c." attributed to St. James the Less and 
probably his figure appeared on the side strip above the emblem 
of St. Luke. To St. Philip is attributed the clause, " Inde 
venturus est judicare vivos et mortuos," and to St. Bartholomew 
the clause, "Credo in spiritum sanctum," whilst the single word 
" Sancta(m) " forms part of the clause, " Sanctam Ecclesiam 
Catholicam," attributed to St. Matthew, and whose figure was 
probably on the side strip above the emblem of St. Mark. 

This side of the brass is engraved in The Transactions of the 
Essex Archaeological Society, N.S., vol. i. p. 3, and in F. Chancellor's 
Ancient Sepulchral Monuments of Essex, pi. xlvii. Also compare 
with this the border of the well-known brass at Schwerin to 
Bishops Godfrey and Frederick de Bulowe, 1375, engraved in the 
Rev. W. F. Creeny's Monumental Brasses of Europe, p. 10. 

Reverse. The two end pieces are palimpsest, but the centre 
piece is blank. These two palimpsest pieces bear a design some- 
what similar to that on the obverse. The background is similar, 
the emblems of St. Luke and St. Mark appear in the corners, but 
the Saints are different and the scrolls are treated in a different 
manner. 



42 







U 



E- 
Z 

u 

S . 

O X 

< M 

^ W 
X . 

> 

< 
Q 

z 

D 

o 



(I. 
O 

> 

Pi 

Q 
< 



OS 

> 
O 



3 
O 

< 



43 

The larger piece has the seated figure of St. James the Less 
holding a club or fuller's bat in his left hand and pointing with 
his right to a scroll bearing the words, ^CllCt iltl tiCltCram UCl 
patrigf OmnipOtCntief. in the comer is the winged lion of St. 
Mark represented seated and not as on the obverse standing. 

On the smaller plate is a seated figure of St. Thomas, but 
owing to the solder used in brazing the plates together his em- 
blem is obliterated. His left hand points to a scroll bearing the 

following clause, 2Dic iT^urrcrit a mortin0 a0ccntiit ati 

CClOgf. In the right-hand corner is the winged ox of St. Luke 
seated. 

This interesting fragment is now nailed to the wall of the 
Darcy Chapel, but whether it ever formed part of a large Flemish 
brass in the church of Tolleshunt Darcy, or whether it has 
drifted into this church from some other source, is unknown. 



II. 



Obverse. A lady, c. 1535. Effigy ijh inches in height. 
Inscription lost. 




Obverse. Reverse. 

Palimpsest Figure, Tolleshunt Uakcy, Esse.x. 

About one-sixth full ^ixtb. 

Now placed on the wall of the Darcy Chapel. Possibly 
Katherine, wife of Thomas, son of Anthony Darcy, Esq., 1535. 



44 

Revevse. A portion of the lower part of an abbot or bishop, c. 
1400 (?). Portions of the following vestments can be seen: the alb 
with its lower apparel, one end of the stole, the dalmatic or tunic 
with its fringed border, and the chasuble. Now nailed to the 
wall of the Darcy Chapel. 

III. 

Obverse. An inscription, within an ornamental border, to 
Anthony Darcy, Esq., justice of the peace, 1540. To this 
inscription belongs (?) a large nondescript armed figure, a six- 
teenth or seventeenth century copy of an early fifteenth century 
brass." 




I feftiiliB0pofocfi)t)9lQili5©P;frH 











Palimpsest Inscription, Toli.eshunt Darcy, Essex. 

About one-eighth full size. 

The inscription only is palimpsest. It measures 21 x 10 
inches, and reads thus : 

l3crr tinticr tljj'ef 0tcnc \}Kt\\ ^\\m\^ 2Darc^ 
rsquicr $ ^wQtizt of tlje peace to ou^ 0ou'aig:'e 
lorn kino: Ijrnq' tljc Viii toljirlj ^nton[> nccejspli 
tljc rbiii U^ of October an° tint 9^^V^^1L° 

' Apparently copied from the brass to John de Boys, Esq., 1419, still pre- 
served in the church. A similar instance of the copying of an earlier figure 
occurs in the church of St. Peter Mancroft, Norwich, where the armed figure of 
Peter Rede, Esq., who died in 1568, is represented in armour of the period c. 
1470. Peter Rede is engraved in Haines' Monumental Brasses, Introd., p. 52. 



45 

The figure and inscription are engraved in F. Chancellor's 
Ancient Sepulchral Monuments of Essex, pi. xlvi. 

Reverse. Another inscription in raised black letter to Robert 
and Maud le Wale, who both died on the 28th of July, 1362. 
It is of Flemish workmanship and reads as follows : 

+ ^tatc . 0pcnalitcr . pro aialnm . robcrti . 
k Miaic . n . matiltiio . fonscrticf . cmsticm 
quorum . rorpcra . mb . i0to . lapitir . sunt 
Ijumata . qui . olncruiit . Uiccsimo . tiii tJic . men 
0(0 . iulii . anno . tiommi . milcsimo . trc 
ccntf0lmo . E^ii . animafau0 . quorum 
propicictur . alti0imu0 . amen . 

Now nailed to the wall of tlie Darcy Chapel. 



IV. 

Four shields with Darcy arms, &c., sixteenth century, now 
fastened to the wall of the Darcy Chapel. 

Obverse, (i.) A shield, 5I x 45 inches, bearing the arms of 
Darcy, {Arg.), three cinquefoils {gu.), pierced {of the field), in fess 
point a crescent . . . for difference. 

(2.) A shield, similar in size, bearing Darcy, as above, impal- 
ing . . . a fess . . . hetuieen three oak leaves . . . , perhaps for 
FitzLangley.^ 

(3.) A shield, similar in size, but broken into two pieces, 
bearing Darcy as above. 

(4.) A mutilated and broken shield, apparently belonging to 
the same series. In its present condition it only measures about 
5x4 inches in its broadest parts. It appears to bear the arms 
of Darcy, as above, impaling . . . tivo chevrons . . . , but it is very 
indistinct.*^ 

Reverse, (i) and (2) are cut from the same brass: when 
placed together they show the hands, a portion of the right arm 

' The arms of Darcy quartering FitzLangley (Arg.), a fess between three oak 
leaves (gu.), occur on a mural monument in the church of All Saints, Maldon, to 
the memory of Thomas Darcy, Esq., 14S5, sec Chancellor's ^«(/f«/ Sepulchral 
Monuments of Essex, p. 146. 

= This impalement may be Tyrei.i., (Arg.), two chevrons (az.), ivithin a 
bordure engrailed (gu.). 



46 



and the upper part of the body of a figure, probably an ecclesi- 
astic, in academical dress, a Master or Bachelor of one of the 
Faculties, wearing a fur-lined tippet and hood. The cuffs of the 
under-dress reach up to the knuckles. Date c. 1420. Com- 
pare with the figure of John Motesfont, LL.B,, vicar of Lydd, 
1420, in the church of Lydd, Kent.^ 

{3.) Shows a portion of an ecclesiastic in amice and chasuble. 
Date c. 1420 (?). The figure is cut off just below the chin and 
just below the knuckles. 





321 4 

Palimpsest Shields, Tolleshunt Darcy, Essex. 

About one-fifth full size. 

(4.) This fragment has a few engraved lines only, but may 
possibly be a portion of the chasuble of No. 3. 



Upminster. 

I. 

Obverse. A civilian, c. 1540, turned sideways and wearing a 
doublet, to the girdle of which is attached the gypciere, tight 
hose, the usual fur-lined gown with long false sleeves, and very 
broad-toed shoes. Inscription lost. Height of effigy 17 inches. 



' Engraved in T. H. Oyler's Lydd and its Chiinh (fronds.). 



47 

Reverse. The figure has been cut out of the lower part of a 
much larger figure of an ecclesiastic, either an abbot or a bishop, 
vested in albe, stole, tunic or dalmatic, and chasuble. Probable 




Obverse Reverse. 

Palimpsest Figure, Upminster, Essex. 

About one-sixth full size. 

date c. 1400-20. This figure is now fastened to the wall of the 
North Chantry. 



II. 

Obverse. Nicholas Wayte, citizen and mercer of London (son 
of Thomas Wayte, citizen and draper of London), lord of the 
manor of Geynes in Upminster, died August 7, 1542, and wife 
Ellen, daughter of Robert Dencort, of Alveley, by Elizabeth, his 
first wife, daughter of Jenkyn Gierke, of Alveley, died May 27, 
1545. The inscription mentions that Robert Dencort afterwards 
married Maryon Myller, and had issue Richard, Annes, and Alice 
Dencort. 

Male effigy 19] inches in height, female 184 inches, inscrip- 
tion-plate 22 X 7 inches. All palimpsest. 

4 



48 

Reverse. The figures of Nicholas Wayte and wife are cut out 
of a very large foreign brass, probably Flemish, of an abbot or 
bishop, and when placed together show the gloved hands folded 
on the body, part of the chasuble richly diapered with large 
foliage work, the centre orphrey having small figures of Saints 
under canopies. A portion of the stem of the crosier also appears. 
Both pieces show signs of considerable wear. The work, from the 
style of ornamentation, may be dated in the last quarter of the 
fifteenth century, probably c. 1480. Two pieces from this same 
figure are re-used in parts of a brass to a member of the Knighton 
family, c. 1545, at Bayford, Hertfordshire.^ So far as the writer 
is aware this is the first instance in which pieces of one and the 
same brass have been identified in two separate churches. It is 
also interesting as proving that the two later brasses came from 
the same workshop. 

The reverse of the inscription shows a portion of another 
inscription consisting of an epitaph in Latin verse, four lines 
remaining perfect, but a fifth has been bisected and is illegible. 
This inscription is in very large and bold black letter, apparently 
of English workmanship, c. 1500. It reads thus : 

jF^lir ilia W& albo gfiffnantia lapillo 
€n tntvtt fuller limina 0ancta pater 
3111 pro meritisf retidat pia premia eljrijstuief 
Siue maueant cueto0 intiubitata pio0. 

The writer is indebted to the Rev. J. E. Field, of Benson, for 
the following metrical paraphrase of these lines : 

" Set we the white-stone mark upon that happy day 
When o'er the holy threshold Father Fuller trod his way 
To him Christ for His merits the pious guerdon give 
Which undoubted waits for all men the pious life that live." 

The brass is now fastened to the wall of the Nave. 



III. 

A small fragment, now lost, reproduced from a rubbing in the 
collection of the Society of Antiquaries. 

' See illustration, Bayford, Herts. 



49 




tufmrnM f fisfliJrt^WM i6Bf (iro(ti 3?l9a^a$ tfiafftiralt^finikjr Jaw/ 



nj'nnt 5titilrif4W^«nf'a\n'ni ^men.v^ 



CAMMVMAV UU/'tVV' 



7« wvMMv 







Obverse and Reverse of the Wayte Brass, 1545, 

Upminster, Essex. 

About one-eicrhth full size. 



50 

Obverse. A fragment of a helmet with mantling. Possibly a 
portion of the lost figure of Roger Dencourt, Esq., 1455. 




\ 



> 







¥^^m 



<^ 



Formerly at Utminster, Essex. 

Reverse. A small piece of canopy work of English design, 
probably a " waster." 



IV. 

In the collection of Mr. Arthur H. Brown, of Brentwood, is a 
rubbing, taken in September, 1862, of a palimpsest shield, 6 x 5^^ 
inches, now lost. On the obverse are the arms of the Mercers' 





Obverse. Reverse. 

Formerly at Upminster, Essex. 

One-third full size. 



Company ; on the reverse a shield bearing a chevron and on a 
chief some charge resembling an eagle displayed ; but the whole 
design is much obscured by pitch. The shield may have formed 



51 

a portion of the brass to Nicholas Wayte, 1545, who, as stated 
in his inscription, was a citizen and mercer of London. The 
family of Brown, of South Weald, Essex, bore (gu.), a chevron 
between three lions' Jambs erect and erased {arg.), on a chief (of the 
second) an eagle displayed (sa.), armed and crowned {or), which may 
possibly be the coat here represented. The writer is indebted to 
Mr. A. H. Brown for the loan of the rubbing from which the 
accompanying illustration has been made. 



Walthamstow. 

Obverse. — Hale, in civil dress, and wife — , daughter of 
— Porter, born at Grantham, died in 1588 (only lower part of 
figure left), and inscription in eight Latin verses. 




Obverse and Reverse ok the Hale Brass, 1588, 
Walthamstow, Essex. 



About one-tenth full size. 



The male effigy measures igt inches in height ; the female, in 
its present mutilated condition, 6 inches ; and the inscription- 
plate 17 X 6| inches. 

There is an engraving of this obverse side with the figure of 
the wife complete in J. P. Malcolm's Views Within Tivclve Miles 
Round London, 181 1, intended as an Appendix to Lysons' 
Environs of London. 



52 

Reverse. The male figure is cut out of the lower portion of 
a much larger figure of a civilian, c. 1450, a portion of the girdle 
appearing at the head and a slight indication of the fur border of 
the bottom of the tunic at the feet. The remaining portion of 
the female figure exhibits on the reverse the hands, a portion of 
the sleeves, and the girdle of another civilian, also of date, c. 
1450. 

The inscription, or a portion of it, is probably palimpsest, but 
no record seems to have been made when the brass was shifted. 
There is a suspicious joint in the right-hand corner which has 
every appearance of being the outline of the base of a figure to 
which a small portion has been added to complete the date. 
Some few years ago the brass was relaid in a cement slab 
in the Nave, but very soon the figures became loose and were 
removed into the Vestry. Eventually the inscription was taken 
up and together with the male figure fastened to a pillar at the 



filtsi .pOTirri.^ljalffioie Jijrirtts frfrjajfl: 
•^ Sraw^ham mf annnt; mmr MQotmc ttramlo 
QimtUDF fti jiiates j^atas tttiiSfmJi) wuittiira . 

Mixri xr.ffiFi)-, nna rl;nlic. mri trarHt.RTf; viom 
fisrrrafinruus rt jniltetamni ifla pmrau) 
^ nimraiirtfsijtiinisji&'nrf Msto. 
tus cratf pi) imnrrs gmWrrt froQ. . ' 
c BirEf mnrtr PTU6. pnnnjuiro Oetre i^s'. 



Obverse of Hale Inscription, 1588, Walthamstow, Essex. 

east end of the South Aisle. The upper part of the female figure 
had disappeared before i860. The lower part was loose in the 
Vestry cupboard in January, i9oi,when the church was visited 
by Mr. F. W. Short, to whom the writer is indebted for the 
above illustration. 



WiMBISH. 

A small fragment from the now lost brass to Joan Strangman, 
c. 1575, is preserved in the British Museum. For many years it 
was in the possession of the late Canon Sparrow Simpson who 
had purchased it with other curiosities and being unable to 
identify it presented the fragment to the Museum in 1874. 

Obverse. A small portion, 2f x 3f inches, of the left elbow of 
the lady. 



53 

Reverse. Five letters " blllgi/' part of a word from the 
marginal inscription of a large Flemish brass, c. 1420. A portion 
of the design for an angle emblem also appears. Haines (vol. ii. 
p. 64) says " on reverse an effigy of St. John, &c.," but nothing is 
known of this. The brass has been fully described and illustrated 
by Messrs. Christy and Porteous in the Transactions of the Monu- 
mental Brass Society, vol. iii. p. 262. 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 
Bristol, Temple Church. 

Obverse. A priest in processional vestments, viz., cassock, 
surplice, and cope, but the almuce is omitted. Date c. 1460. 
Inscription lost. Relaid in a new stone on the Chancel floor. 
Height of effigy 27 inches. 

Reverse. The figure of the priest is cut out of the larger 
figure of a lady, of date c. 1460, and apparently representing a 
widow, as she wears the plaited barbe and mantle, and has a ring 
on the third finger of the right hand. This portion is now 
fastened down. From the similarity of dates it is probable 
that this figure was a " waster," either from some defect in the 
workmanship or because it failed to please the representatives of 
the family. 

Both sides of the brass are engraved in George Pryce's Notes 
on the Ecclesiastical and Monumental Architecture and Sculpture of 
the Middle Ages in Bristol, p. 118, fig. 9, and in C. T. Davis' 
Monumental Brasses of Gloucestershire, p. 59. 

The writer is indebted to Mr. Davis for the loan of the block 
from which the accompanying illustration is printed. 



HAMPSHIRE. 

DUMMER. 

Obverse. Inscription to Alice Magewik, 1591. Size of plate 
9^ X 2^ inches. 

^cre l^'ctlj t\)c boli[' of ailj'S 
S^atjctoik of 2Dumrr tortiolo 
bljo tircti t\)c ruii \ji\vc of 
3|anuarj^' ^iino 2Dni 1591. 



54 




"" iiiniiiiiiiii'"""""^"'^'"""^ 



Palimpsest Brass, c 1460, Temple Church, Bristol, Gloucestershire. 

About one-quarter full size. 



55 

Reverse. Another inscription to Sir Robert Clerk, chaplain of 
the chantry of Peter Fabiller. Date c. 1500. 

^it mtt ringf Kobcrtu0 Clerk quoria[m] 

Capdlanujs Cantarief prtri ffabillec i[n] 

p'0enti tztWa. funtiat' twi' m ppiciet' tic' ^[men]. 

Found in 1889 under the pews in the South Aisle, and now 
hung on a hinge and fastened to the wall. 



Odiham. 

Obverse. A man in armour, c. 1540, feet lost, now mural, 
North Chantry. Height of effigy in its present mutilated con- 
dition 23^ inches. Possibly Richard Vass, Esq., 1542. The 
original slab, now partly covered by the stove, shows indents for 
this figure, two wives, two groups of children (one group consist- 
ing of one son and five daughters yet remains under the stove), 
an inscription, and several shields. It appears to have been once 
on an altar tomb, but this has been destroyed. 

Reverse. The figure is made up of three odd pieces. The 
top piece, 4|- x 4f inches, bears a few engraved lines only, 
much obscured by pitch, and may possibly have been a portion of 
the priest in the centre piece. The centre piece, measuring 
loi X 9| inches, is cut out of the centre of a figure of a priest in 
a cope, c. 1480 (?). The bottom piece, 9 inches in length, bears 
a portion of a draped figure, c. 1440 (?), 



Winchester College. 

In the possession of the Warden of the College is the greater 
portion of the original figure of John White, elected Warden of 
the College in 1541, consecrated Bishop of Lincoln in 1554, 
translated to Winchester in 1556, deprived in 1559, died at South 
Warnborough in 1560, and buried in Winchester Cathedral. 
The brass was probably engraved and laid down in the College 
Chapel about the year 1548. When the Chapel was restored in 
1877, some of the brasses, including this one, were taken up for 
safety, but when again required, could not be found, nor, with 



56 

the exception of this fragment, have any of them been recovered. 
In 1882, Dr. Freshfield caused facsimiles of all the missing 
brasses to be engraved and laid down in the Chapel. The 
original figure is palimpsest. 

Obverse. Effigy of Warden White, head and feet lost. Size 
of figure in its present condition 31 x 135 inches. The Warden 
is vested in a cassock, surplice, and cope richly embroidered with 
pomegranates and roses, the hood just appearing on the shoul- 
ders. The cope is fastened by a large morse charged with the 
sacred monogram. 

Reverse. The figure has been cut out of the upper part of a 
much larger figure of a lady, in the costume of a widow, c. 1440. 
The end of the plaited barbe appears on the breast, the over- 
gown has large surplice sleeves, and the tight-fitting sleeves of 
the undergown appear at the wrists. 

Both sides of the brass are engraved in the Havipshire Field 
Club Papers and Proceedings, vol. iii. pi. i, page 80. 



ISLE OF WIGHT. 
No palimpsest noted here. 

HEREFORDSHIRE. 
No palimpsest noted in this county.' 

HERTFORDSHIRE. 

The writer is indebted to Mr. W. Frampton Andrews, of 
Hertford, for the loan of the rubbings of the palimpsests at Bay- 
ford, King's Langley, and Walkerne. 

Aldenham. 

Obverse. A portion of the inscription to John Long, Salter^ 
citizen and alderman of London, 1538, and wife Dame Margery. 
The plate in its present mutilated condition measures 12^ x 



57 

4 inches. Sir Henry Chauncey, in his History and Antiquities of 
Hertfordshire, ed. 1826, vol. ii. p. 371, states that the plate was 
formerly in the North Aisle, and gives the inscription in full. The 
missing words are here shown in brackets. 

[l^ere Ij^etlj] bttrj^eti tljc liori^' of Joljtx [Eono: Salter] 
[citijejn i aincrman of ^Loiitioii tinti [2Damc iJl^ar] 
[Qtt^ IjJiS topfc bjljidj Joljix D^'cti ['c [ti tiiU' of] 
[3|ul^ 9^°V'^dB3BViii [toljose gfoul 3]C0U0 partioii] 

Chauncey erroneously gives the date as 1536. 

Reverse. A portion of another inscription in raised black 
letter of the second half of the fifteenth century. It is in three 
lines, but defaced in places : 

militicf q 

tiio:ni02?imc tiomine (Ele tir'igf ti . . , 

animatuifif propicict' tic 

In a communication to the Transactions of the Cambridge Uni- 
versity Association of Brass Collectors, pt. ix. (1891), p. 23, Mr. W. 
F. Andrews writes that " the fragment of brass was found at the 
vicarage in June, 1889," and that the vicar intended to have it 
framed and hung in the vestry. 



Bayford. 

Obverse. A man in armour, c. 1545, the centre portion of a 
female figure of similar date, and a shield charged with the arms 
of Knighton impaling Gascoigne quartering Pigott. Most 
probably the remains of the brass to John Knighton, Esq., lord of 
the manor, who died in 1545, and of his wife, apparently a mem- 
ber of the family of Gascoigne. The male figure and the shield 
are now relaid in a recess in the Chancel specially constructed to 
receive the Knighton monuments when the church was rebuilt 
in 1870. The fragment of the female effigy was not relaid and is 
now in the possession of Mr. W. Clinton Baker, of Bayfordbury, 
who has most courteously lent the original for reproduction and 
to whom the writer desires to express "his obligations. 

The male effigy is 20 inches in height, the fragment of the 
female effigy 6^ inches, and the shield measures 6| x 5 inches. 



58 

The male effigy is engraved in J. E. Cussans* History of Hertford- 
shire, vol. ii. (Hundred of Hertford), p. 148. 

All the existing pieces are palimpsest. 

Reverse. The armed figure is made up of two portions of a 
large shrouded figure ; the upper, 13^ inches in height, shows the 
folds of the shroud over the body with the bare knee and part of 
the leg just appearing, the lower, 6f inches in length, shows the 
foot and a small portion of the leg. The two pieces do not join, 
a small piece having been cut out. The hatching over the joint 
is simply a key for the solder. The date appears to be about the 
middle of the fifteenth century. 







WW 









Obverse and Reverse of the Knighton Brass, Bayford, Herts. 

About one-eighth full size. 

The fragment of the lady and the shield are cut out of a large 
Flemish brass of an abbot or bishop, c. 1480, of which two other 
larger pieces form the reverses of the figures of Nicholas and 
Ellen Wayte, 1545, at Upminster, Essex,^ thus confirming the 
date of the Knighton brass and also proving the Bayford and 
Upminster brasses to have come from the same workshop. As 
before remarked under Upminster, this, so far as the writer is 



' See illustration, Upminster, Essex, No. II. 



59 

aware, is the first instance in which pieces of one and the same 
brass have been identified in separate churches. The fragment 
of the lady shows a portion of the richly diapered chasuble, part 
of the stem of the crosier, and the portion of the figure of a Saint 
on the centre orphrey of the chasuble. The shield also shows a 
portion of the chasuble with its edge, and portions of the dalmatic 
or tunic beneath. As is the case at Upminster these fragments 
show signs of considerable wear. 



Great Berkhampstead. 

Obverse. Six Latin verses from the brass to John Water- 
house, Gent,, and wife Margaret; both died in 1558. Size of 
plate i8| X 7 inches, in two pieces respectively measuring 15 
and 3^ inches. 

(tcct mb W tumulo coniiinc trorq? iaccmucf 

aetemam pacem tionct ttriqj ^m^ 

/liil cuiqucim abcftulimu<j efi quiti bcitefccimujs till 

(Est qui pro mcritic? prcmia Uigna tiabit 

d^eft tamcii trna gfaluef Cricfti miefccatio qtiam qui 

Crau0i0 ambobuef scpc prccarc prccore. 

Reverse. The larger piece is cut out a very finely engraved 
quadrangular plate commemorating Thomas Humfre, of London, 
goldsmith, and Joan, his wife, a daughter of William Bayntun, 
brewer. The date may be c. 1500 (?). Haines states that the 
upper part contains portions of two figures in shrouds (?), with 
five sons and two daughters, and between them St. Michael 
weighing souls. A portion of the figure of St. Michael is fairly 
clear but the rest is very indistinct. The inscription on the 
lower part of the plate is in raised black letter, the large initial 
"O" enclosing a small seated figure of St. Jerome in Cardinal's 
robes, with a cross in his right hand and a lion on his left side. 
Four lines of the inscription remain and read thus : 

^i }>onvc djaritc praj' for tlje 0oul[c0] 
of ^Ijomas l^umfrc late of llonti[on] 
goltismj'tljc anti 3|onc Iji'of toj'ffc tijc [Mn] 
Qiljtcr of (Elj^'ll^'am Baj^'ntu brrtocr tcil)['c[lj] 



6o 

The tops of the letters of a fifth line can just be seen. From 
the delicacy of the engraving it seems probable that the brass 
was the work of one of the worthy goldsmith's own craft. The 
plate, which is now on a hinge, is fastened to the sill of a window 
in the North Transept. The figure of St. Jerome is engraved in 
J. E. Cussans' History of Hertfordshire, vol. iii. (Hundred of 
Dacorum), p. 6i. 



Braughing. 

Stolen during the restoration in 1888, and now in the Saffron 
Walden Museum, Essex. 

Obverse. Effigies of a civilian and wife, c. 1480, inscription 
lost. Probably Thomas Grene, son of Richard Grene, 1484, 
and wife. Height of effigies iSg inches. The figure of the man 
is in two pieces, the head being broken offi 

Reverse. The male effigy is alone palimpsest and is cut out of 
the slightly larger figure of a lady, c. 1440, wearing a veil head- 
dress and a very high-waisted gown with large full sleeves. 

The obverse of both figures and the reverse of the male 
figure are engraved in the Transactions of the Monumental Brass 
Society, vol. ii. p. 214. In a paper, by Mr. W. W. Porteous, 
accompanying the illustration, it is stated that the brasses were 
purchased from a mason for five shillings by Mr. J. J. Green, of 
Stanstead, Essex, and by him presented to the Museum. 



Eastwick. 

In the collection of the Society of Antiquaries is a rubbing 
of the palimpsest portion ^ of the inscription in eight English 
verses, now lost, to Robert Lee, Esq., 1564, and wife Joan. The 
figure of Robert Lee has long been missing, but the stone 
still containing the figure of his wife Joan, the eight verses, a 
smaller plate with the date of death, and two shields, remained 
in the Chancel floor until the church was rebuilt between 1870 
and 1880, when all except one shield and the smaller inscription- 
plate disappeared. Quite recently the figure of the wife, which 
is not palimpsest, has been recovered and together with the other 

' See N. Salmon's History of Hertfordshire, 1728, p. 255. 



1 



6i 

two pieces placed on the tower wall. The second shield has 
found its way into the Saffron Walden Museum. Possibly the 
inscription may yet turn up from some unexpected quarter, and 
as an aid to identification is here printed in full. 

Obverse. The plate bearing the verses measures ig| x Cl- 
inches and has been broken across the middle, the pieces re- 
spectively measuring g and io|- inches ; a small fragment, about 
2x4 inches, has also been broken from the top right hand 
corner. The verses are as follows : li 

ILlobcrt %tz (£0qu['cr IjijS botiic 13 Inir^'cli Ijcre 

<iail)o jserijcti tot l^^w^z Ctitoartic fir^tc tief gfrtocc mciiie a 

5anti after to lij^iiffe ^aijillippe anti Sl^atie ^ucne of latr 
^nti la0t to^'tlj ^ucnc (EUjabetlj our noble prince in 

<anti of tlje anncient :2BnQ:lcp ^otogfe in Cljes^Ijire bornr 

toa0 Ijc 
5anti in tijief '(lombe tot 3]onc Ijicf toife lytu burieti botiir 

tljcp be 
jfor toljo0c ffooti tertuegf on t^t ertlje anti tijere nrsferbeti 

fame 
^\)\^ ffooti remembraunee after tietlj isljall 0tiU reneto 

tlje jsame 

The smaller inscription bearing the date of death measures 
II X 2| inches, and is also either broken across the middle or 
composed of two plates respectively measuring 5^ and 5I inches. 
It bears the words : 

toljiclj Eobert tipeti p^ rriii lia^ of 
3|anuar^n 1564, anti tlje ssa^^li 31oue 
tij^eti i'f ba^' of 

Reverse. On the reverse of the eight English verses is the 
greater portion of an inscription to Elynor, [wife] of John Pate,' 

i[5]2i: 

' Wills of the following members of the Pate family may be found in the 
registers of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury at Somerset House : John Pate, 
of Shillington, Beds., and Offley, Herts., 1505 ;■ John Pate, of St. Thomas of 
Acres, London, 1506; and John Pate, of Henley-on-Thames, and Blackfriars, 
London, 1520. 



» * « * 



62 



t pra^ for tf)e gfoule of CEl^nor l^ate 
to 31o5tt pate nnti tiouffliter of 
of ^m\t^ t\ic tol)icl)e (Elinor tiece^^en 
f ffebruar^ t\it ^ere of our lorti (Bots ^ 
xxi on to^o^e gfoulr JiW \\a\it merc^ amen. 



Although a portion of the date is missing, the style of the 
inscription and of the lettering leaves no doubt as to the date 
being 1521. 

Hertingfordbury. 

A shield, 5^ x 4f inches, formerly in this church, but now in 
the possession of the Society of Antiquaries of London. 





Obverse. 



Reverse. 



Formerly at Hertingfordbury, Herts, 
now in possession of the society of antiquaries. 

About one-third full size. 

Obverse. A shield of arms bearing. Quarterly I. and IV. two 
lions passant. 1 1 . and II I . a cross patonce, impaling a saltire engrailed, 
which again impales a lion rampant.^ 

An old rubbing in the collection of the Society of Antiquaries, 
from which the above shield was identified as belonging to this 



' This may be the coat of Dudley quartering Sutton and impaling Tiptoft and 
Powys. 



63 

church, shows that originally there were four shields on the slab, 
viz., (i) at the upper dexter, three bars gemel, for Benstede (?);^ 
(2) at the upper sinister, the shield now in the possession of the 
Society of Antiquaries ; (3) at the lower dexter, Quarterly I. and 
IV. two lions passKut ; II. and III. a cross patonce, impaling 
Quarterly I. and IV. a saltire engrailed impaling a lion rampant ; II. 
and III. three bars gemel (?) ; (4) at the lower sinister, as No. (3), 
but in the first quarter of the impalement the lion takes pre- 
cedence of the saltire. These shields are now lost. 

Reverse. The shield has been cut out of a group of children, 
c. 1460. Portions of five or six boys may be clearly seen and in 
the right hand corner is apparently the skirt of a female figure. 



King's Langley. 

Obverse. Inscription to William Carter, 1528, and wife 
Alice. Size of plate 17x3 inches. The prayer clauses at the 
beginning and end have been completely cut out. 

f (Lcllj'Um Carter anti ^1^0 ij^'cf bj^'fr 

tljc toljpcl) (l(ll?'llm tirfC00cti tljc \\ tiar of aprj^U fw t!)r pcrc 
of o'- lorn 9^i>Tc^a^>Tnici ^^ 

Reverse. Another inscription to Joan, apparently the wife of 
— Marsburgh, citizen and bowyer of London, 1487. The des- 
truction of the prayer clauses in the Carter inscription unfortu- 
nately renders this inscription incomplete. 

Prn^j for tljr sonic of Jo 

iJl^ar0buro:l) ritqcm anD liotoj'cr of Honnon toljidjc 

Joljan tic . . . 
I pc pcrc of ottr lorti pti ^ bl^°CCCC2l 

^^^V\\ . . . 



St. Alban's Abbey. 

Obverse. The lower portion of an -abbot, c. 1400, generally 
attributed to John de la Moote, abbot from 1396 to 1401. The 

' The arms of Benstede are (gii.) t/n-ee bars getuel (firg.). 



(H 



fragment measures 21 inches in height. Engravings of this well- 
known brass may be found in Boutell's Monumental Brasses and 

Slabs, p. 148 ; The Portfolio of the Mommiental 
Brass Society, pt. xi. pi. i. with pieces now 
lost ; The Home Counties Magazine, vol. i. 
pp. 154 (as in the Portfolio), 155 (from a 
sketch made in 1643). 

Reverse. The lower part of a lady with 

a small dog at her feet, of similar date and 

probably a "waster" from the workshop. 

Engravings of this reverse may be found in 

Boutell, p. 148 ; Macklin's Monumental Brasses, 

St. Alban's Abbey. p_ jog . ^nd the Home Counties Magazine, 

vol. i. p. 157, to the publisher of which the writer is indebted 

for the loan of the accompanying block. 




St. Alban's, St. Peter. 



R. Clutterbuck, in his History of Hertfordshire, vol. i. p. 118, 
gives the following account of the discovery of the palimpsest 
reverse of the inscription to Roger Pemberton, Esq., high sheriff 
of Herts., and founder of an almshouse at St. Alban's, died 1627, 
aged 72. The inscription is now lost, only the figures of Roger 
and Elizabeth Pemberton and a quadrangular plate bearing their 
six children remain in the church and have recently been relaid 
and fastened to the wall of the South Aisle. 

Clutterbuck says : " The stone to which these brass plates 
were originally affixed having been broken, the workmen, at the 
time of the repair in 1786, finding that Mr. Ray's gravestone [in 
the south aisle] was of a size convenient for their purpose, took 
possession of it, and fastened the brasses to it ; but the stone hav- 
ing been taken up during the time of the last repair, and exposed 
to the heat of the sun, the cement which fastened the largest 
plate was melted, and it was pulled off, when it appeared that 
the inscription which commemorated Mr. Pemberton was as 
much an intruder upon the brass as the brasses were upon Mr. 
Ray's gravestone, for upon the back of the brass plate appeared 
the following inscription engraved in the antient German charac- 
ter": 



^5 

" iltvt l^^nl) Joljii Ball brirkcmakrr toljirlj pbc tljc pflr= 
00110 anti toartjcns of tl)ls Cljirdjc 3^0 pcrclr for a pcr= 
pctiitill oliitc to be kcptc for tijc 0oulp0 of Ijim nnl5 
(Elijabctlj lji0 to;'f anti Joljii Ball l)i0 faticr anti Cljrj'0= 
tiaii 1)10 molirr anti tljc 0aiti ;|oljii ticcc00rti rljc uiii tia^' 
of €)ctobrc tljc }kvc of oi lorn Q^.ITc^f on tol)O0c 
0ouli0 J['\)n iia\ic mrrc[>. ^mcn." 



Walkern. 

I. 

Obveysc. Inscription to Richard, son of John Huniherstone, 
1581. Size of plate 151 x 4 inches. 

i^ere l^ctlj buricti iinticr tlji0 0tonr tl)c botip 
of E^cljarti I3umbcr0tonr tljc 0onnc of 3|o^n 
l^umbcr0tonc toljo nccca00cti tljc biitij tia^' 
of i^arcljc i\\ ^t ^tu of o^ Eorb (Boti 1581. 

Reverse. The greater portion of an inscription to John Love- 
kyn, four times mayor of London, who died in 1370, and was 
buried in the church of St. Michael, Crooked Lane, London. 
The inscription reads thus : 

[Fcjrmibim t&za tiatur ILobckmi caro pulcljra [31olji0] 
[Bi]0 fuit Ijic maior itcrum bi0 Ecp uib[cntc] 
[ajnno millcno tcr C cum 0cptuapno 

John Lovekyn was mayor of London in 1348, 1358, 1365, and 
1366, in the two latter years by command of the King as stated 
in the inscription. According to Stow, he rebuilt the church of 
St. Michael, Crooked Lane, and " was buried there in the choir, 
under a fair tomb, with the images of him and his wife in alabas- 
ter. The said church hath been since increased with a new 

choir and side chapels, by Sir William Walworth ; and 

also the tomb of Lofkyn was removed, and a fiat stone of grey 
marble, garnished with plates of copper, laid on him, as it yet 
remaineth in the body of the church."^ From this account it 

' Thorns' edition of Stovv's Survey, p. 83. 



66 

seems probable that Walworth moved the high tomb with ala- 
baster figures into a new position and marked the actual place of 
interment by " a flat stone of grey marble, garnished with plates 
of copper," one being this inscription which was seen and copied 
by Stow. The date 1370 appears to be an error; John Love- 
kyn's will is dated on the Thursday after the Feast of St. James 
the Apostle (July 27), 1368, and was enrolled and proved in the 
Hustings Court of London on November 6, in the same year. 

The plate is now on the wall of the Vestry. Both sides are 
engraved in J. E. Cussans' Histcvy of Hevtfovdshive, vol. ii. (Hun- 
dred of Broadwater), p. 79. See also the Tvansactions of the London 
and Middlesex Avchceological Society, vol. iii. p. 133, when the original 
plate was exhibited and commented upon by the late Mr. J. 
Gough Nichols, F.S.A., and vol. vi. p. 340, for a paper by the 
late Major Alfred Heales, F.S.A., entitled "Some Account of 
John Lovekyn, Four Times Mayor of London." 



n. 

Obverse. Effigies of Edward, son of John Humbarstone, 
gent., 1583 in civil dress, and wife Annas, daughter of Edward 
Welche, with five sons and three daughters, a foot inscription, 
and shield of arms with helmet, crest, and mantling on a square 
plate with rounded top. 

The male effigy measures i8j inches in height; the female 
17^ inches; the plate on which the sons are engraved tapers 
from 6 to 5^ inches in height and in length is 6f inches ; that on 
which the daughters are engraved tapers from 6 to 5 inches in 
height and in length is 5 inches; the inscription-plate is 2i| x 4 
inches ; and the plate bearing the shield, &c., is 8^ inches high 
by 7 inches wide. 

All palimpsest. 

Reverse. The reverse of this brass is made up of no fewer 
than eleven pieces cut out of three or four Flemish brasses of 
various dates. Five pieces belong to a marginal inscription, 
dated 1474, and apparently commemorating a member of the 
Van Lauwr family ; four other pieces, two being fragments of a 
marginal inscription and two portions of a shield, appear to 
belong to a brass to the family of Gryse, of date c. 1510 ; another 
bears a group of sons, of date c. 1500; and another the head of 
a lady, c. 1400 (?). 



^^7 













Paiimi'mcm Ki.M.KMiM'i IIimrkkmum; 1!ka>s, 15S3, W.\lki;r.\, Hekis. 

About one sixth lull size. 



68. 



The male effigy is made up of two pieces, the upper, 7^ inches 
in height, bears the head of a lady in veil head-dress and wimple, 
of date c. 1400 (?); the lower, io| inches in length, bears a por- 
tion of a marginal inscription bearing the words 0rp0C tilt OU'l ^ 
enclosed within an ornamental border of foliage, and may be 
dated c. 15 10.- A small fragment of this same inscription is 
used in the foot inscription, and the shield out of which the 
children are cut bears the arms of the Gryse family impaling 
another coat. 

The female effigy is also made up of two pieces belonging to 
a marginal inscription (a third piece bears the date 1474) appar- 
ently part of a memorial to the family of Van Lauwr. The 
upper portion, 7 inches in length, bears the word 0CpultUCrC 
on a curved scroll, below which is a smaller scroll bearing the 
words p -f l[' + filUlt, the background being filled in with a 
rich diaper of foliage work. The lower portion, 10 inches in 
length, bears on a curved scroll the words ttllt + IflUtor, with 
the background filled in with a rich diaper of foliage and mons- 
ters. A portion of a roundel just appears at the narrower end of 
the fragment. 

The children are cut out of a large shield of arms originally 
measuring about 11x9-^ inches ; the two pieces join together and 

give the arms of the Gryse family, a chev- 
ron between three trefoils, impaling a buck's 
head with an escallop shell in base, possibly 
a differenced coat of the family of De 
Cerf.^ 

The inscription is composed of four 
pieces, respectively measuring loj, 6|, 2f , 
and 1 1 inches. The larger piece is cut 
out of a group of sons, c. 1500, under 
canopy work and standing on a floor 
divided into squares. The centre figure 




Walkern, Herts. 



' For " Gryse die overleet " = Gryse who died. 

^ Compare with the marginal inscription in the church of Notre Dauie, Bruges, 
to Alexander and Barbele du Bosquiel, 15 12, figured in J. Gailliard's Inscriptions 
Funeraires et IMonumentales de la Flandre Occidentale, vol. ii. p. 140. 

' Rietstrap, Armorial General, gives the arms of De Gryse, of Bruges, as 
D'arg. au cJiev7-on de gii. ace. de trois trejles de sinople, and those of De Cerf de 
Haghedorne, Bruges, D'or a un rencontre de cerf de gu. Gailliard, Inscriptions 
Funeraires, &c., says the Gryse family have a vault in one of the chapels in the 
church of St. Donat, Bruges. 



69 

is complete, the one on the right is cut in half, and of the one on 
the left only the hands and a portion of the robe remain. It will 
be noticed that this figure has a small cross in its hands, proba- 
bly indicating that the child was dead. The second and third 
pieces of this inscription are portions of the 1474 inscription ; the 
larger piece bears the words int JCI, and the smaller the end of 
some word now illegible. The fourth piece is a mere fragment 
from the border of the Gryse inscription. 

The plate bearing the Humberstone shield contains a portion 
of a roundel, and a curved scroll with the date CCCCD + 2.310 
^iiil, and has the background filled in with the diaper work 
of foliage and monsters. 

The brass was originally on the floor of the North Aisle, but 
is now fastened to the wall. 

HUNTINGDONSHIRE. 

No palimpsest noted in this county. 

KENT. 

Aylesford. 
Obverse. Inscription to John Savell, gentleman, servant to 
Sir Thomas Wiat, knight, 1545. Size of plate, 17^^ x 3^ inches. 

^ere Ipetl) JoW »)atell (Bentilman jsiitpme efarbant to ^^r 
'(Il)omnef Wiiat knvQl)t 'txiliic^ tifce00iti tlje lanrtt) tiop of 
maiTljc ^" mi 9^iFr^2iF. ^n VdIjosc 0otilc iljTi Ijn uc 
nicrcp. 



;|^{pffl)|dmsafifll'®Enttitoan flapturstuSaiitfiispr 




Palimpsest Inscrh'tign, Aylesford, Kent. 

About one-quarter full size 

Reverse. The inscription is cut out of a portion of a canopy 



70 

of a very late foreign, probably Flemish, brass, and shows the 
greater portion of a figure of Force or Fortitude. This cardinal 
virtue is represented by a female figure with a shield charged 
with a cross on her left shoulder, whilst with her hands she is 
apparently throttling a dragon. On a small curved scroll at her 
feet are the letters OVCt and the top horizontal stroke of the letter 
'• F." Force is usually represented either throttling the dragon or 
tearing it out of a crenellated keep or dungeon, as may have been 
the case in this example, but unfortunately, the right-hand side 
of the figure is cut off. The date of this fragment appears to be 
but a few years earlier than the inscription. It is engraved in the 
Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries, 2 S. vol. viii. p. 174, and in 
W. D. Belcher's Kentish Brasses, pi. 10, No. 15. 

COBHAM. 

Obverse. Inscription to William Hobson, master of the col- 
lege, 1473. Size of plate, 16 x 4I inches. 

^ic iam tingf W^illm | ^ob0on quonliam 
^a^ii i0tiu0 coIUq | ii qui obiit xzii Hie 
iau0U0tia°tinia^°CCCC° ] JL^mU tnV m dpicin' \it' 

Only the first half of this inscription, eight inches in length, 
is original ; the remainder is a restoration by Mr. J. G. Waller. 
It is engraved in W. D. Belcher's Kentish Brasses, pi. 38, No. 67. 

Reverse. The original half bears on the reverse a portion of 
another inscription, c. 1420 (?), but the name and date are un- 
fortunately wanting. 

^ic iatmt magi^t' 

obiit x):° Die men0' 

ac 30abeUa $ Sig;nt0 

Now fastened down. 

CUXTON. 

I. 

Obverse. Inscription, slightly mutilated at one end and date 
not filled in, to John Buttyll, parson of Cuxton and chaplain to 
Prince Edward. The effigy, 15 inches in length, is lost. Size of 
inscription-plate in its present condition, 1 5! x 3^ inches. The 
casement shows it to have originally measured lyk inches in 
length. 



71 

[Prap] for tlje isoulf of ^a&ttt 3!ol)n Button pgfon of 

[t!ji0] cl)urcl)e, anD c!)apla^n to t!)e i^^o:!) $ nob^ll 

[prijnce Ctitoartie, tol)icf) 91^ Jolin tiece^efili t^t 

[Hap] of ^n° nni S^^F^ toljo' gfoule i!)u pno. 

The casement lies on a high tomb between the Chancel and 
the South Chapel with a painted chamfer inscription, which, 
according to Thorpe's Registrum Roffense, p. 772, reads thus : 
" Hie iacet Johannes Botyll rector huius ecclesie qui obiit ultimo 
die Junii anno domini 1568." 

Although Master John Buttyll held the living until the year 
1568, the brass cannot be dated later than the year 1547, when 
Prince Edward became King Edward VI. Probably it was 
engraved during the rector's lifetime, somewhere between the 
years 1540 and 1547. There is an engraving of the tomb 
in Gough's Sepulchral Monuments, vol. ii. pi. xxxii. p. ccxc. 

Reverse. This inscription is cut out of a portion of a large 
canopy with figures of saints and angels in niches. The lower 
portion of one female saint and the head and wings of an angel 
alone remain. Haines queries it as Flemish, but it appears to be 
of English workmanship late in the fifteenth century. 

Loose in the church chest in 1900. 



II. 

Obverse. A mutilated inscription, 11 x 5 inches, to John 
[Turner] , woolpacker, of London, 1545. 

prap for t!)e gfoulc of 31ol)ii 

dJUolpackrr of EonDon 0ome 

I^at!)erpn0 Cljrp0tc!)urcl)c 

Sluffueft a° nni ^°V'^ILV. o toljo 

Mr. J. Challenor Smith, in a communication to Notes and 
Queries, January 4, 1879, says : " By way of supplying the missing 
surname I subjoin a''note from a will, obviously that of the person 
commemorated on the brass. Will dated 12th and proved 22nd 
August, 1545 (P.C.C. Pynnyng, fo. 33), 'John Turner of the 
parishe of Saint Kateryn Christis Church w'in London Wolman 
.... My bodye to be buried in the churche of Cokston in Kent, 
in the Chapell of Our Lady, yf I doo deceas in the parishe of 
Hallyng. And yf I lyve I will that my body shal be buried in 



72 



the Church of Saint Kateryn Christis Church aforsaid, before 
the Fonte, in a knowlige of the faithe which I toke there. . . .' " 
Master John Buttyll was one of the witnesses to this will. 

Reverse. This is composed of the fragments of two inscrip- 
tions, the larger piece, 7| inches in length, bears a portion of an 
inscription to Adam (?) atte Sterre, 1395, and wife Marion, 139 — . 
It reads thus : 

.... a atte Sterre qui ... . 

g^°ccc"E^^5erF° 

.... riona atte Sterre .... 

. . . . \\(i €€€"" /I5onoQ:e0im .... 

The smaller piece, 3|- inches in length, bears a few words of 
a later inscription, c. 1460 (?), much obscured by pitch and 
solder. It reads thus : 

.... uoq? pauU . . . 
£f q' p'oc ol . . . 
bita e0t 

with a scroll composed of leaves under the last line. 

Broken in two pieces and loose in the church chest in 1900. 



DOWNE. 

Obverse. Inscription, now broken and mutilated, to John 
Bederenden, citizen, clothier, and chamberlain of London, 1445. 
Size of plate, 21 x 2f inches. 

^iz mtt 3o^e0 Betiec[emien] qntim €m^ ^annari' 

$ Camerari' ILonlion 
qui obiit rriif Hie 2Decembri0 a° mi "3^^ €<t€€°^%V 

t\xi ale ppiciet' tie' ^me. 

Reverse. A portion, 7^ inches, bearing the commencement of 
the inscription, is a fragment of the end of another inscription 
of similar date, probably a " waster." It bears the following 
words : 

qui obiit ri Die 

.... alabi ypiciet' Deujsf. 






mm 



I'imT 







Palimpsest Inscription, Erith, Kent. 

About one-third full-size. 



\Tofacep. 73 



73 
Erith. 

Obverse. Inscription, now much broken and mutilated, to 
Anne, eldest daughter of Thomas Harman, Esq., of Crayford, 
and wife of William Draper, gentleman, of Erith, 1574, " and 
lefte in chyldryn too sonnes and too dowghters that ys to say 
Thomas and Henry : Elizabeth & Brydgett." 

Size of plate when complete 13 x 6| inches. 

^ttt i^nljt tl)c faoti^c of annc i5arma[u p] 
eluejste 2Dotog:()ter of ^ljoma0 l^arman [of] 
Cra^forn (E^quicc auU toife to inillm 2Dra[p of] 
(Erpt[)t Qtnf toljo 2D['cti tljc rt[ij na^e of] 
ipfbruar^ 1574 anti leftc in [Clj^ltirpn too] 
»)onne0 i too SDotugljtcrief tlja[t ^0 to 0ap] 
d)oma0 antJ i^cnr^ : dijabetl) [i 3v}>\iQm], 

The words in brackets are supplied from a complete rubbing 
in the collection of the Society of Antiquaries. In 1863 Erith 
church was much damaged by an explosion in the neighbourhood 
and this brass disappeared during the subsequent restoration. 
In 1893 ^ small fragment about 3x3 inches, was given to Mr. 
R. A. S. Macalister by a gentleman whom he had met whilst 
travelling in Scotland. Mr. Macalister identified the fragment 
as belonging to Erith and sent it on to the Rev. R. W. M. Lewis, 
then curate at Erith, who fastened it to the wall of the vestry. 
In 1897 ^^- Lewis received from the family of a former church- 
warden another piece of the brass measuring about 9x6^ inches, 
and then had the pieces mounted in a frame between two sheets 
of glass and hung in the church. Upon examination the frag- 
ments proved to be palimpsest. 

Reverse. A fragment of a large Flemish brass, of late fifteenth 
or early sixteenth century work, showing a portion of a shield with 
a fretty field charged with eagles displayed and a small portion of 
the mantling above, also a piece of the ornamental border sur- 
rounding the whole. 

Both sides of the brass are engraved in the Transactions of the 
Monumental Brass Society, vol. iii. p. 203. 

Faversham. 

Obverse. Two shields, 6x5 inches, each bearing the arms 
of the Cinque Ports. Date c. 1540. 



74 

Reverse. One shield is cut out of the figure of a lady, c. 1440, 
apparently a widow, portions of the barbe, the veil head-dress, 
mantle, and girdle of the kirtle being visible. Rings are worn 
on the fingers of both hands. The second is simply an old 
shield re-used, and bears the arms of Langley, quarterly per fess 
indented (arg.) and (az.) quartering Langley, quarterly {or) and (gu.) 
a bend (sa.). 

These shields are now fixed on hinges and let into a pillar in 
the North Aisle. 

GODMERSHAM. 

Obverse. Inscription to William Geffray, chantry priest, 1516. 
Size of plate, 15I x 2| inches. 

^ic iacn tingf ^illmujs (Beffra^ qu°tim cantari0ta 

l^ui' ttclii qui obiit rr° Hie ^'cii Sin° Uni 9^°<t€€€€° 

Reverse. Another inscription, to William Attilburgh, gentle- 
man, 1471, and wife Margaret. 

^ic mmt ^laiillmgf ^ttilburg:!) gen'osfugf n ^atsatna 

uxat 
€iu0 qui quiHem aoliUmgf obiit xxiiii° Hie ^tmi& 

)aprili0 a° 
dni 9^''CCCC°^^^3i° quor' ianimab? opicietur tieuef 

ame. 

Loose in the custody of the vicar. 

Graveney. 

In the collection of the Society of Antiquaries is an early 
rubbing, taken by Thomas Fisher in the first quarter of the 
nineteenth century, of a palimpsest fragment then loose in the 
church chest but now lost. It is a fragment of an inscription, 
9X3 inches, bearing on the obverse in very late black letter 
characters the words : 

. . . auenel Couerlelige burieti tlje . . . 
. . . U}bttiie xxi, 

and on the reverse a portion of another inscription : 

m]ic iacn 'djomas C!)^ 

. aprir a° mi 9^°€€(t€°9B . . . 



75 

The rubbing is very faint and indistinct, especially of the 
obverse side. 



HOATH. 

The Rev. H. Haines, in his Manual of Monumental Brasses, part 
ii. p. 102, states that the figure of Agnes, wife of Antony Maycot, 
1532, is palimpsest. The figure is now fastened down and the 
writer has been unable to obtain any further information. 



Lee, St. Margaret. 

I. 

Obverse. Inscription, mutilated, to Henry Byrde, groom of 
the King's chamber, 1545. Size of plate about 13 x 4I inches. 

i^enricugf B^cUe quontiam Falectuef Camece 
Eeffie mo dormit gfub jsaro q' (i\iiit xxiiii 
2Die iapriU0 anno tini 1545 
zwi' ale ^piciet' lieugf 

Reverse. H. H. Drake, in his new edition of E, Hasted's 
History of Kent, part i. the Hundred of Blackheath (all published), 
p. 229, gives the following unsatisfactory note : " This brass, a 
palimpsest, was unknown to Thorpe." 

The inscription is now securely fastened to the wall of the 
North Aisle and the writer has been unable to obtain any further 
details. 

n. 

Obverse. Effigy (23 inches) and inscription (20 x 4I inches) 
to Mrs. Isabel, daughter of Thomas Hatteclyf, Esq., and wife to 
Mr. Nicholas Annesley, 1582. 

Reverse. Drake, p. 229, says on the back of the inscription 
are " fragments of a palimpsest (probably Flemish) displaying the 
lion of St. Mark engraved with remarkable vigour and richness." 

This inscription has been inaccurately relaid under the small 
figure of Elizabeth Couhyll, 1513, and is now on the wall of the 
North Aisle, The writer has been unable to obtain any further 
details of the reverse. 



76 
West Malling. 

Obverse. A shield, loose in April, 1901, but about to be 
refixed, 6x5^ inches, bearing — Quarterly I. and IV. (Arg.), 
semy of cinquefoils (gu.) a lion rampant (sa.) Perepoynt. II. (Arg.), 
SIX annulets, 2. 2. and 2 [sa.) Manvers. III. (Az.), three hedge- 
hogs (or) Heriz. From the brass to Elizabeth, daughter of Sir 
Anthony Babington, and wife of George Perepoynt or Pierpont, 
Esq., 1543. The upper part of the figure and another shield 
bearing Babington quartering Dethicke still remain in the 
original slab on the Chancel floor and are probably also palimp- 
sest. Engravings of this side of the brass may be found in 
Haines, Introd., p. 244 (effigy) ; W. D. Belcher's Kentish Brasses, 
pi. 78, No. 151 (effigy and Babington shield) ; and the Rev. H. W. 
Macklin's Monumental Brasses, p. 75 (ibid.). 







Palimpsest Shield, West Malling, Kent. 

About one-third full size. 



Reverse. A portion of the pediment of a canopy, c. 1500, to 
which has been added a small piece with a few engraved lines 
only in order to complete the shape of the shield. By the 
courtesy of the vicar, the Rev. A. A. Lawson, the writer was 
■enabled to clean the pitch from the plate and so bring out the 
lines of the canopy. The smaller piece is much obscured by the 
solder used to fasten the two plates together and it is impossible 
to say what it may have originally represented. 



77 
* Margate. 

I. 

Obverse. A heart inscribed (BtftlO qtl, with three scrolls 
respectively inscribed KctmnptOC meU0 bliJlt— 2De tttXxX 

0urrmuru0 0um — gn carne mea tiOcbo tieu ^altator^ 

mCU, and an inscription, 19 x 2| inches, to Sir Thomas Smyth, 
vicar, 1433. 

^xz mzt tin0 '^Ijomagf »)mptl) quontia ticari' igfti' eccUe 

qui obiit 
t'cio tiU €)ctobri£f SL" tiui <^''€€<L<^°'^l^%nf cui' ale 

ppiciet' tieu0 Slmen. 

Engravings of this side of the brass may be found in the 
Gentleman's Magazine, vol. Ixvii. (1797) pt. ii. p. 641 ; The Oxford 
Manual,^, cxiv. (heart and scrolls); Rev. H. Haines' Manual 
of Monumental Brasses, Introd., p. cclxiii. (heart and scrolls); 
and W. D. Belcher's Kentish Brasses, pi. 82, No. 164. 



Palimpsest Reverse of Inscription, Margate, Kent. 

About one-fifth full size. 

Reverse. When the church was restored about twenty years 
ago, the inscription was found to be palimpsest. It bears on the 
reverse the greater portion of another inscription to John Dalton 
and wife Alice, 1430. 

[€)r]ate pro a'lab} 9IoI)i£f 2Dalton n SiUcic uic'ifi ciii^ que 

tiicta Alicia obiit 
[ . . ]bii tiic gianuarti anno tini 9^'€€€€°^^%' quor' 

alabj ppicict' ticuef ante. 

From the close similarity in date it is probable that this 
inscription was a " waster" from the workshop. 

The writer is indebted to Mr. W. J. Mercer, of ^Margate, for 
the tracing from which the accompanying illustration has been 
made. Mr. Mercer also states that only two rubbings of this 
inscription were made before it was refixed in its original position 
on the Chancel floor. 



78 





79 

II. 

Obverse. Inscription to Thomas Fliitt and wife Elizabeth 
Twaytts, 1582. Size of plate, 28^ x 8^ inches. 

HiER VNDER LIETH BVRIED ThOMAS FLIITT 

who departed this life the 

And Elizabeth Twaytts his wyfe who 

DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE XXVIII OF ivli 

A° Domini 1582. 
From the style of lettering, the shape of the numerals, and the 
use of the word " Hier " for •' Here," it seems probable that the 
inscription was cut in Flanders and imported by Thomas FUitt. 

Reverse. A portion of the side strip of a Flemish marginal 
inscription, c. 1400, bearing on a long curved scroll the words 
iaer Ongf ^ercn a\0 men ^tVtet ^ and containing shields and 
scenes from the life of man in the compartments formed by the 
curving of the inscription. In the top compartment is the base 
of a shield showing the charge of a roundel, in the next are two 
figures on stilts, in the third a shield-semy of crosses crosslet three 
helmets, two and one, and in the fourth a youth catching butterflies 
with the aid of his cap or hood. The whole of the background is 
filled up with a diaper of conventional vine leaves and bunches of 
grapes. This side of the plate is engraved in W. D. Belcher's 
Kentish Brasses, pi. 81. fig. 161; The Building News, January 13, 
1888 ; and G. Clinch's Old English Churches, p. 237. In the chapel 
of St. Mary, Ypres, is a somewhat similar brass, but later in date, 
to the memory of Pieter Lansame, 1489, and wife Lizebette, 
1487. It is engraved in the Rev. W. F. Creeny's Monumental 
Brasses on the Continent of Europe, p. 46. The Margate fragment is 
now fixed on a hinge and attached to the wall of the South 
Aisle. 

Minster, Isle of Sheppey. 
As is now well known the legs of the figure of Sir John de 
Northwode, 1320, are a sixteenth century restoration. Mr. J. G. 
Waller, under whose superintendence the brass was repaired and 
relaid in 1881, thus describes the circumstances of this early 
restoration and the later discovery of the palimpsest. Mr. 
Waller says^ : " In the early days of- archaeology (1838), myself 

' " In the year of our Lord as one writes." 

■•* Proceediyigs of the Society of Antiquaries, 2 S. vol. viii. p. 443, :).nd Arckaolosia 
Cantiana, vol. ix. p. 148. 



8o 

and brother visited Minster, and were struck with the comic 
peculiarity in the mode of crossing the legs, as shown in this 
figure. Unlike any other example, it seemed as if in the act of 
performing some ingenious feat of the terpsichorean art. We 
were not long, however, before we pronounced it to be an 
ignorant restoration, much to the disgust of a very self-important 
sexton or clerk, who, finding his crusader legend upset, seemed 
almost inclined to turn us out of the church. Closer examination 
showed a different colour of the metal, which only proved what 
the details of costume and character of the recumbent lion 
indicated. Pursuing the subject afterwards, we not only became 
the more convinced, but we assigned the date proximately of this 
restoration to the early part of Henry VIII.'s reign, and were 
borne out by the brass of Peter Gerard, 1492,^ engraved in our 
volume of Monumental Brasses, in which the recumbent lion is 
almost identical. Years rolled on, when a casual conversation 
with the Rev. Canon Scott Robertson revealed that he had found 
evidence in the register of Archbishop Warham, at Lambeth, 
pointing directly to the causes which led to this curious circum- 
stance, so unusual at a time when destruction on a large scale 
was at hand. At a visitation held at Sittingbourne, October i, 
151 1, the churchwardens of Minster presented that, ' It is desyred 
that where, of long tyme agoo, in the said chapell, a knight and 
his wife (were) buried, and their pictures upon theym very sore 
worne and broken, that they make take away the pictures, and lay 
in the place a playn stone, with a epitaphy who is there buried, 
that the people may make setts and pewys, where they may more 
quietly serve God, and thot it may less cowmber the rowme ' 
(Register, fol. 57, vi.). The commissary admonished the church- 
wardens and parishioners to present themselves before the Lord 
Archbishop and to implore his paternity for help in this matter 
(fol. 79, vi.). It is a natural assumption, therefore, that at this 
time a reparation of the figures took place, and that the en- 
lightened Archbishop Warham may have enjoined this preserva- 
tion, instead of acceding to the very churchwardenlike request of 
putting ' a playn stone with an epitaphy.' By turning over the 
legs of the knight we now see in what way our churchwardens 
set about the work. The artist employed was not an archaeolo- 
gist, yet he evidently assumed that the figure must be that of a 

' At Winwick, Lancashire. See A Series of Monumental Brasses, by J. G. 
and L. A. B. Waller. 



8i 



crusader, and so, according to the notion that arose about this 
time, that a cross-legged effigy denoted one who had served in 
the Holy Land, he thought it the proper thing so to restore the 
brass. Unhappily, he seemed to have forgotten that, when the 
legs are crossed the knees must be close to each other, and that 
the original, preserving this part of the figure, shows them 
wide apart ; so in this he erred. Then he follows nearly the 
costume of his own time, though not exactly, in respect to the 
soUerets, which have the aspect of belonging to the armour worn 
a few years earlier. As regards the recumbent lion, as before 
stated, it has all the character of that used in brasses of the early 
part of the sixteenth century, at which time the work was 








Palimpsest Figure, Minster (Sheppey), Kent. 

About one-eighth full size. 

evidently done. The reverse shows that an old brass, either from 
the same or some other church, was robbed for the metal by 
which to do this repair. It is the base of a female figure having 
had two dogs at her feet, and the date of this may be assigned to 
the close of the fourteenth century. I think that all antiquaries 
have cause to thank Archbishop Warham that this interesting 
brass has been preserved instead of the plain stone and ' the 
epitaphy who is there buried.' " 

The palimpsest portion measures 2o|^ inches in height. The 
reverse is engraved in Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries, 2 S. 
vol. viii. p. 444. It is now fastened down. The Northwode brass 



82 

(without the reverse of the palimpsest) is engraved in C. A. 
Stothard's Monumental Effigies, p. 50 ; The Cambridge Camden 
Society's Illustrations of Monumental Brasses, No. vi. p. 205 ; Rev. 
C. Boutell's Monumental Brasses and Slabs, pp. 42, 44 ; Rev. H. 
Haines' Manual of Monumental Brasses, Introd., p. 23 ; J. Hewitt's 
Ancient Armour, vol. ii. p. 151 ; Gentleman's Magazine, N.S. vol. 
v. pt. ii. (1858) p. 103; Archcsologia Cantiana, vol. ix. p. 149; 
W. D. Belcher's Kentish Brasses, pi. 84, No. 170 ; and G. Clinch's 
Old English Churches, p. 208. 

Penshurst. 
Obverse. Inscription, shield of arms, and marginal inscription 
with text from Matthew xix., to Margaret, infant daughter of Sir 
Henry and Lady Mary Sydney, 1558, aged i| years. A strip of 
the marginal inscription measuring 10 inches in length is loose 
and is palimpsest. It bears the words : 

mt for to ^ucl)e ijs t^c feingtio. 

Reverse. A few words of another inscription, c. 1500, as follows : 

ut tiq} iuncta : ^ro quit} oreti^ to0. 

Most probably more of this marginal inscription is palimpsest. 

Rochester, St. Margaret. 

Obverse. Half effigy of Thomas Cod, vicar, 1465, vested in 
cassock, surplice, amice and cope, the orphrey of the latter orna- 
mented with a running pattern of foHage. Height of effigy, 16 
inches; size of inscription-plate, 13x19 inches. The figure only 
is palimpsest. 

Reverse. Another figure of Thomas Cod but vested in cassock, 
surplice, almuce and cope, the orphrey of the latter more richly 
ornamented with a heart-shaped design alternating with circles 
enclosing the words " Ihu — m'cy." This figure may have been 
engraved a little earlier as it much resembles one at Fladbury, 
Worcestershire, to Thomas Mordon, 1458, but there must have 
been some reason for re-engraving and substituting the amice for 
the almuce, the latter being generally worn with the cope. Both 
sides of the plate are engraved in Boutell's Series of Monumental 
Brasses, and in his Christian Monuments, p. 154. The brass has 
been restored and a new head added ; it is now inlaid in a copper 
plate and hung on the Tower wall. 

Shorne. 
Obverse. Inscription, now lost, to Edmund Page, Gent., of 
Shorne, 1550, who had at the time of his death five sons and two 
daughters by Eleanor, his only wife, then living. 



83 



^tvt Ipetf) burieti (Elimontic ^ajye late of ^!)orne (Be[nt 

to!)icl) DpeH] 
'Efie bii liap of ifebruarp in tljt b ^tvt of tl)e Ee^ffne 

o[f li^nge (Ktitoarti] 
'^ije 0pj;t, auti in tl)C ^ere of o^^ Eortie (Bori ^CCCCCil 

«aDn [tol)O0e 0oul ^W] 
iiant mnc^, toljo tjati att t!)e tj^me of 1)10 lierljc b 0o[nue0 

anti ij] 
2Dotoffl)ter0 t^at ^0 to 0a^ %\)oma0, €lm^n\), MLillm 

[(BtovQt, Eionell.] 
31ol)n anti ^g:ne0 b^ (Elenore ^10 onel^ to^fe t[)en U[t3inQ:]. 

The words in brackets are supplied from Thorpe's Registnim 

Roffense (1769), p. 760, who records 
the inscription as then in the Nave, 
In the collection of the Society of 
Antiquaries is a rubbing of this in- 
scription taken by Thomas Fisher in 
the early part of the last century, A 
portion was then lost, the remaining 
piece measuring 17I X 6 inches. 

Reverse. The only authority for 
the reverse is an engraving, here re- 
produced, in the Gentleman's Magazine 
for 1801, pt, i, p. 497. From this it 
appears that the inscription had been 
cut out of a large quadrangular plate 
in the upper portion of which was a 
figure of Our Lord in Majesty seated 
upon a rainbow with a sword point- 
ing towards his head. The back- 
ground representing the sky is pow- 
dered with stars, estoiles, and a 
crescent moon. In the foreground, 
on a mound or grassy hill, is the 
greater portion of a figure in a shroud 
with a mutilated scroll above bear- 
ing the words quU0Cit lit 0pe. and 
below is a shield bearing the arms of 
the City of Rochester — Or, on a cross 
gu. the letter R of the first, a chief as the 
second charged with a lion passant guar- 
dant gold. In the right-hand lower 




Formerly at Shorne, 
Kent. 



84 

corner is the kneeling figure of a lady from whose hands proceeds 
a scroll inscribed (Et 3IU^lCia tm ^tliubafautme. Above the 
lady's head appears the hand of another figure. In the right- 
hand top corner is a portion of a shield of arms, the first quarter 
of which appears to bear some kind of beast within a bordure 
charged with fleur-de-lys. The lower or third quarter has the 
appearance of being intended for the arms of Mortimer. This 
fragment may be assigned to a date between 1520 and 1530. 



SiBERTSWOULD. 

Obverse. Inscription, partly in rough black letter and partly 
in cursive letters, to Philemon Powndall, 1660. Size of plate 
i5i X 4f inches. 

^tavt lietlj t^e botip of pi)ilemon 

4Bob)ItDilU deceased y^ 13 of March 1660 he was ^^ years 
Old when he died : he had one wife, one son and 6 Daughters. 

Loose in Vestry. 



^%l CQ rr . gefgfge. 6o5y.ofoPg i/em o. j. 

Old..w\\inJie,he.a.tit.\\aA.onejvife..one.soii.aiici.lx2)aii^kterS'.- 



©rate pro aia Jacobi Bering arixt) 
qui ®biif.ii^.^ie 9)cfober 3nno 



Palimpsest Inscription, Sibertswould, Kent. 

About one-quarter full size 

Reverse. Another inscription in late black letter to James 
Dering, Esq., 1532. 



85 

^vatt pro aia 3Iacobi 2Dering: arm' 
qui ^biit \V nie €)ctober anno 

Although this plate bears the date 1532, the style of lettering 
shows it to have been engraved much later, probably c. 1630. 
During the seventeenth century some member of the Bering 
family, probably Sir Edward Bering, the antiquary, 1598-1644, 
placed in Pluckley church numerous brasses to his ancestors and 
this plate may have formed one of the series, being either rejected 
for some fault or more probably stolen during the troubles of the 
Civil War. 

Westerham. 

I. 

Now lost. Reproduced from a rubbing in the Collection of 
the Society of Antiquaries dated 1850. 

Obverse. A group of six daughters, c. 1520. Size of plate, 
5x5 inches. John Thorpe in his Registrum Roffense, p. 1029, 
mentions the slab of Richard Hayward, 1529, then " in the cross 
isle at the west end," as containing the figures of six daughters, 
which may be the group under consideration. 




Formerly at Westerham, Kent. 

About one-third full size. 

Reverse. A portion of a quadrangular plate, the background 
diapered with lozenges or quatrefoils, bearing the upper portion 
of the head of a man with long hair and a scroll bearing the 
words: 



86 



^mcm quegfo tame qmti0 intiiffne benig:(ite) 
(tt 0tmv 0'tu me rege birjo tubm. 

A portion of another scroll appears in the top left-hand 
corner. The plate is apparently of English workmanship, c. 1500. 



II. 

Obverse. Inscription, i6| x 6 inches, to Richard Potter, 
Esq., late of Westerham, his three wives, Elizabeth, Anne, 
Alice, and his twenty children, whereof he left three sons and 
ten daughters living at the time of his death in 1563. 

Eicliarli potter late of ?Laie0tra (Egfquiec burieti liere 
l^ati bp 1)10 Hi "toint^ (Elijabetl). Sint. anu aiice. xx, 
Cbiluren, toljereof ^e leffte aliue at Ijief neat^e t^e iiiitii of 
a^ape. 1563. ill. »)onne0 anti. x. 2Daug:^ter0. 

91 gflepe in tiugfte, bntill tlje morning. 

Come Eortie 31e0U0. come quicklpe. 



* comrlariirlfflii^'roTiinimrMge'. 




Palimpsest Inscription, Westerham, Kent. 

About one-quarter full size. 



87 

Reverse. This inscription is cut out of a portion of a large 
Flemish brass of late date, apparently only a few years earlier 
than the inscription itself. It consists of a portion of a richly 
ornamented column standing upon a square base, on the front 
panel of which is suspended a shield of arms bearing Quarterly 
1. and IV. Quarterly . . and . . , in the first and fourth an estoile 
. . , in the second and third an annulet. II. and III. Chevronny of 
four pieces . . . and .... At the side of the column is a portion 
of the leg of some animal. 

This plate is now on the wall of the South Aisle under the 
figure of John Stacy, but the palimpsest portion cannot be 
seen. There is a rubbing in the collection of the Society of 
Antiquaries. 



III. 

A group of seven sons, 5f x 6^ inches, belonging to the brass 
of William Myddilton and wives Elizabeth and Dorothy, 1557, 
is said to be palimpsest, and to have on the reverse a portion of 
an inscription, but the writer has been unable to verify this. 

Most of the brasses at Westerham have been relaid and hope- 
lessly mixed up. These sons are now attached to the figure of 
John Stacy, 1536, and under the figure of John Stacy is the 
inscription to Richard Potter, 1563. 



LANCASHIRE. 

Manchester Cathedral. 

Obverse. A man in armour and wife, c. 1540, nearly effaced, 
inscription lost. Now on a board in the Chapter Room. Probably 
Sir Alexander Radclyffe, of Ordsall, 1 548, and wife Alice, daughter 
of Sir John Boothe, of Barton. There is an engraving, mostly 
conjectural, of this brass in the Transactions of the Lancashire and 
Cheshire Antiquarian Society, vol. ix. p. 97. The female figure is 
alone palimpsest. 

Reverse. The greater portion of another figure of a lady, c. 
1450, but also in bad condition. Engravings of the obverse and 
reverse of this figure may be found in the Palatine Note Book, vol. 
iv. (1884) p. 77. 



88 








m 
til 

lli 

U 

tii 



Q 



f§l 



o § 

a, 
U 



PL, 






89 

LEICESTERSHIRE. 

Great Bowden. 

Obverse. Inscription, 17x5 inches, to William Wolstonton, 
rector, 1403. This inscription was removed from the chancel 
floor in 1886 previous to a restoration and was then found to be 
palimpsest. It was unfortunately broken during removal. 

H^ic iactt mnffigft' Mlill0 dtlloleftontou qnnm 
Eector im' tttWc qui oliiit tiltimo tiic menjs' 
^UQimi a' nni '^.€€€€° iiV cut* aleppiclet' ti0. 

Reverse. A portion of a small Flemish brass, c. 1350 (?), 
containing the figure of a civilian under an arched canopy with 
super canopy above. The figure has long curly hair, beard and 
moustaches, and wears a close-fitting tunic buttoned down the front 
with tight sleeves buttoned from the elbows to the wrists. Long 
liripipes or lappets hang from the elbows, and the waist is 
encircled by a narrow girdle. Over the shoulders is a hood or 
cape with a serrated edge ; the legs are clothed in tight hose and 
the feet in pointed shoes. Below the feet is a small dog. The 
whole of the background is filled in with a diaper of foliage. The 
continuation of the canopy work shows that originally there 
was another figure on the right-hand side, probably that of his 
wife. A small Flemish brass of somewhat similar character is 
preserved in the Archaeological Museum at Ghent. This speci- 
men, measuring 15I x ii| inches, contains the figures of a 
civilian and wife, c. 1400 (?), under canopies, but the inscription 
has been defaced. It is curious to note that this brass is also 
palimpsest, having at a subsequent date been converted into an 
inscription.^ In the Oxford Portfolio for June, igoi, Mr. Scott- 
Hall figures yet another similar palimpsest plate, also preserved 
in the Ghent Museum. This plate bears on the obverse an 
inscription dated 1604, and on the reverse the figures of a civilian 
and a priest under canopy work with a mutilated inscription 
bearing the date 1368. It measures about 28 X 18 inches. 

Another small plate is preserved in the chapel of the Lady 
Superior of the Beguinage at Bruges, and of which there is a 
plaster cast in the Museum of Antiquities in the Belfry. It 
measures 17 x 10 inches and commemorates Griel Van Ruwes- 

' For this information and for a rubbing of the Ghent brass the writer is 
indebted to the Rev. W. E. Scott-Hall, of Oxford. 



90 

cuere, who died in 1410, but the plate seems to have been en- 
graved earlier as the date is an addition.^ The curious little 
brass at Aveley, Essex, to Ralph de Knevynton, 1370, also 
belongs to the same type.'' 

Both sides of the Great Bowden brass are engraved in the 
Transactions of the Leicestershire Architectural and Archceological 
Society, vol. vi. p. 223. From the will of William de Wolstonton, 
printed at p. 224, it appears that he left instructions for "one 
marble stone to be bought for 300 shillings to be set over my 
grave, and that it be ordered and arranged in such form and 
manner as my executors know that I have appointed." 



Loughborough. 

In the Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries, 2 S. vol. iii. 
p. 205, under date December 21, 1865, it is recorded that John 
Gough Nichols, Esq., F.S.A., exhibited a monumental brass 
plate from Loughborough Church, Leicestershire, respecting 
which he communicated the following notes : 

" The church of Loughborough is one of those very large 
ecclesiastical structures of which so many have been recently 
restored under the judicious care of Mr. George Gilbert Scott, 
F.S.A. In these restorations it is too often the case that, whilst 
great zeal is shown for architectural renovation, the ancient 
monuments and sepulchral memorials suffer from neglect and 
removal. There were a few relics of such memorials in brass 
plate in Loughborough Church which have not hitherto been 
replaced ; but I trust they still will be, as they are at present, 
preserved in a box in the vestry. One of these I have by per- 
mission of the Ven. Archdeacon Fearon, the rector of Lough- 
borough, brought to London, and beg to exhibit it this evening. 
It has an inscription on both sides, and each of them of some 
curiosity. The inscription which was exposed to view is nearly 
destroyed by friction from feet, and it was much in the same 
condition seventy-five years ago when it was drawn by Mr. 
Schnebbelie for my grandfather, and engraved (first) in his 

' Engraved in the Rev. W. F. Creeny's Monumental Brasses on the Continent 
of Europe, p. 24. 

- Engraved in J. G. and L. A. B. Waller's Series of Monumental Brasses. 



91 

Leicestershire Collection.^ I have now, with the assistance of 
my friend, Mr. Charles Spence, removed some cement with 
which it was partly encrusted, and have succeeded in decipher- 
ing somewhat more than one half of it." 

'' Cl)i0 rr M^ of 31anuar^ in ^t ^ere of oure Hot^t one 

^.€€€€ anti rlj tl)e 

trutot^e to recorne ann garget \\i& toife untiec tl)ief 0ton 

graben 0onne ^atv^ to name 

late fi0cl)mong:er of Eontion fpntiinge a pceegft ful pre0t 

l)ir ^ere tia^ in tl)i£f cl)irclje (Bon gete tl)eir jsfotilis 

goolie regfte. 

" In the history of Leicestershire the first words were read, 
* Here lyeth Giles Jordan,' evidently because it was presumed, 
and probably correctly, that this was the same memorial thus 
noticed by Burton in his description of Leicestershire, ' On the 
tombe of Giles Jordan and Margaret his wife ; which Giles dyed 
1415, Quarterly, Argent, three mullets gules; and sable, a chev- 
ron or between three garbs argent.' The costume of the figures 
seems scarcely so early as 1415. Indeed it will be remarked how 
closely it resembles the attire of another townsman of Lough- 
borough and his wife (engraved in the same plate, and now 
exhibited) which are dated 1480. I am inclined to believe the 
date is really 1441." The name of Giles Jordan was, we may 
presume, legible in Burton's time. 

" On the reverse side of this plate, since it has been raised 
from the stone in which it was embedded, has been found, cut in 
bolder and still perfect letters, an epitaph in the following 
words : 

'' €)rate p a'lab} cElijabetlj %i0k nuo filie 3|ol)i0 Cerff 
uni' Ecmemorator' tie ^ceio Eegi^ l^erici sent 

;2Dtueli0 HiQk filii | goljiie filie tice Cli^abetlj qi obierilt 
t'mino 0ci l^illarii ^nno ^Vii° timrjnn litQis 

" This inscription is very singular in its giving the date of the 
■death of the parties, not by the year of our Lord, the month or 
•day, but by the year of the King's reign, and the term of St. 

' History of Leicestershire, by John Nichols,, vol. iii. pi. cxxii. fig. 3, p. 901 ; 
also in Bibliotheca Topographica Brilannica, vol. viii. pi. ixix. fig. i, p. 1380. 

'^ In the Transactions of the Leicestershire Architectural and Archaological 
Society, vol. v. p. 299, the Rev. W. G. Dimock Fletcher gives the date as 1445. 



92 

Hilary. The mother and her two children are all three stated to 
have died in Hilary term in the 17th year of King Henry the 
Sixth, that is, in 1438. Her father, who was Remembrancer of 
the King's Exchequer, may have fancied the legal form of dating 
as peculiarly appropriate to members of his family. That three 
of them should have died at nearly the same time may probably 
be attributed to the prevalence of the plague or some other serious 
epidemic disease. It is, however, possible that there may have 
been some error in this date which led to the plate being cancelled 
and used for another memorial. One further observation may be 
made upon this date, namely, that the year occurring upon this 
the earlier inscribed surface of the brass, shows that, as before 
suggested, 1415 is too early for the other side, which we would 
rather assign to 1441. The occurrence of Otuel as a christian 
name at this period should also not be passed without observa- 
tion." 

This plate, measuring 31x2! inches, is now fastened to the 
south wall of the Tower, together with the mutilated figures of 
Giles and Margaret Jordan. 



93 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 

Boston. 

Obverse. A much mutilated and worn figure of a lady, c. 1460. 
The head, feet, and a greater portion of the left side lost. She 
wears a high-waisted gown, encircled by a narrow ornamental 
girdle, and having close-fitting sleeves with small turned-back 
cuffs. Height of effigy in its present condition, 19I inches. 




Paumpsest Figure, Boston, Linos. 

About one-sixth full size. 



Reverse. A portion of tlie upper part of a large figure of a 
widow, c. 1390, showing the barbe and veil, the hands and fore- 



94 

arms, the sleeves of the kirtle with their numerous buttons, the 
gown with close-fitting sleeves, and the cord for fastening the 
mantle. 

Loose in the library over the porch in 1894. 

GUNBY. 

A knight and lady of the Massyngberd family, c. 1405, both 
with SS. collars, double canopy, the side shafts lost, five shields, 
of which two only remain, and a marginal inscription, now much 
mutilated. 

In 1552 the brass was appropriated as the memorial to Sir 
Thomas Massyngberde, who died in that year, and his wife Joan, 
a daughter of John Braytoft. To accomplish this the marginal 
inscription, which was originally in incised letters, was cut down 
and replaced by one in raised letters. Traces of the earlier 
inscription are still visible between the words of the later 
inscription. 

The brass, which is on the floor of the Nave, is engraved in 
the Rev. C. Boutell's Series of Monumental Brasses, and in the 
Portfolio of the Monumental Brass Society, vol. ii. pi. xxi. 

HORNCASTLE. 

Sir Lionel Dymoke, 1519, in armour, kneeling, with scroll 
from hands, two sons (now lost), and three daughters; Holy 
Trinity lost, in the casement is now painted a coat-of-arms ; three 
shields and an inscription. On the wall at the East end of the 
North Aisle. Engraved in G. Weir's Horncastle, ist Edition 
(1820), p. 30, and 2nd Edition (1822), p. 27, and the Rev. S. 
Lodge's Scrivelsby, the Home of the Champions, p. 53. 

The lower portion of the plate bearing the sons, i\ x 3f 
inches, was palimpsest, having on the reverse a fragment of a 
Flemish inscription with three letters on a curved scrolE 
between diaper work of vine leaves and bunches of grapes, 
c. 1370. A rubbing of this fragment is in the Collection of the 
Society of Antiquaries. 

According to the Rev. H. Haines' Manual of Monumental 
Brasses, pt. ii. p. 118, there is on the reverse of one of the shields 
of arms "a figure playing a violin, Flemish." The writer has 
been unable to see any rubbing of this or to obtain any further 
details. 



95 
Laughton. 

A knight in armour, probably of the Dalison family, c. 1400, 
under triple canopy. Appropriated by the insertion of a new 
foot inscription as a memorial to William Dalison, Esq., Sheriff, 
Escheator, and Justice of the Peace and Quorum for the County 
of Lincoln, who died in 1546, and his son and heir George 
Dalison, who died in 1549. 

The brass, which is on a high tomb at the East end of the 
South Aisle, is engraved in the Rev. C. Boutell's Series of Monu- 
mental Brasses; the Rev. H. Haines' Manual of Montimental 
Brasses, Introd., p. clxi. ; J. Hewitt's Ancient Armour, vol. ii. 
p. 185 (eff.) ; Gentleman's Magazine, N.S. vol. v. pt. ii. (1858), 
p. 223 (eff.) ; and Audsley's Dictionary of Architecture, p. 252. 

Lincoln, St. Mary-le-Wigford. 
L 

Obverse. A small cross standing on two steps, the lower 
inscribed with word QYtiZ, and an inscription to William Horn, 
formerly mayor of Lincoln, 1469. The cross is y^ inches m 
height, and the inscription- plate measures 24^ x 4 inches. 

I^ic 3|acet Mlilljs l)orit quontia maior ci'tnt' Eincoln 
q« obiit rif tiie marcu a° tirii 9^''€€€€° Irir cut' 
ale ppiet' I10. 

The engraver seems to have miscalculated his space and hit 
upon the ingenious idea of placing the last word of the inscription 
on the lower step of the cross. 

Reverse. The authority for this is the Proceedings of the Society 
of Antiquaries, 2 S. vol. v. p. 473, when, on March 20th, 1873, 
Mr. Edward Peacock, F.S.A., exhibited three rubbings of 
palimpsest brasses found under the floor of this church in 1871. 
Mr. Peacock says that on the back of the inscription to William 
Horn is " part of a canopy with the figures of St. Simon and St. 
James the Greater, as may be conjectured from the symbols of a 
saw and a shell, which they respectively bear." On the back of 
the cross, or on the steps supporting it, is "a merchant's mark," 
but Mr. Peacock gives no description of it, and the rubbings can- 
not now be found. 

The brass is now fastened to the North Pier of the Tower 
Arch, so that the palimpsest portions cannot be seen. 



96 

II. 

Obverse. Inscription to John Jobsun, fishmonger and sheriff 
of Lincoln, 1525. Size of plate, 13 x 3 inches. 

I^ic mn 3OP0 31ob!Sfu ff^djmono:er olim 
ticicomeiEf ciuitat' lincolnie qui obiit iiij° 
W gulii ^° mi W <^<^<L<L€,° %%V tni' 
ale ^^^iiin' W amen 

Following the last word is a representation of an axe and 
knife. 

Reverse. Authority as No, I. An inscription " only partially 
legible." 

Now fastened to the West wall of the South Aisle. 

Norton Disney. 

Obverse. A curious quadrangular plate, 35 x 23 inches, un- 
dated, but probably engraved between the years 1570 and 1580. 
It commemorates two members of the Disney family : William 
Disney, Esq., who died in 1540, and his wife Margaret Joiner, 
and their eldest son Richard, who died in 1578, and his two 
wives, Nele Hussey and Jane Ayscough. The plate is divided 
into five compartments, the upper containing a triangular pedi- 
ment enclosing a shield charged with the arms and quarterings 
of Disney impaling Joiner. On the dexter side of the pediment 
is the crest of Disney, a lion statant guardant, and on the sinister 
that of HussEY, a hind lodged under an oak tree, gorged and chained. 
The second compartment contains the half-effigies, kneeling at a 
desk, of William Disney, Esq., in armour with helmet, and his 
wife Margaret Joiner. Between them is a scroll bearing the 
words Sufferance tlOtlj dEagfe, and behind the father are 
the half-effigies of four sons in civil dress with their names, 

Eicljart), William, ^\ioma0, iprance^, on scrolls; behind 

the mother are five daughters, also half-effigies, with their names, 

<ann, ^ax^, S^argaret. I^ateren, Briget. on scrolls. 

Under the centre figures is inscribed : 

acllillm 2Di0nep cEgfquier, Sl^arpret gjoiner. 

The third compartment contains three shields of arms, the 
centre bearing the arms and quarterings of Disney, the dexter 
those of HussEY, and the sinister those of Ayscough. In the 
fourth compartment are the half-effigies of Richard Disney, full- 



97 

face, in armour with helmet, and his two wives, Nele Hussey 
and Jane Ayscough, slightly turned towards him. Behind the 
first wife, Nele Hussey, are the half-effigies of seven sons in civil 
dress (the portion of the plate, 5| x 2 inches, bearing their 
names has been cut out) and five daughters, ^CllM, (£-0ttt, 
JUtietlj, 31Utl^l)» anti »)USfan. The plate behind the second 
wife is blank. Below is the following inscription : 

ijjclc nauffljter of ^^ ^lillm ^usfo^ I^nj^ffljt (Eicl)arli 
3Di0nfj,') Jianm tiaug:ljt of ^"^ MLilim ^p^coufflje. I^. 

The fifth compartment is occupied by the following inscrip- 
tion : 

"(Ilje l^'fe, conber0acion, anti <seniice. of tljc first afaoue 

namcti (Icllillm ^ime^ 
iinti of EicIjartJ 2Di0nep Ijigf Sonne tocrc comeutiablf 

iintouffest tbev neig:= 
boars trebje anti fatljcfull to tijrr prmcc aix^ clntc $ 

acceptable to fcirijall^ 
niig:l)t[' of vuljome toe trust tlje^ are recebeb to valuation 

accorbinffe to tlje 
0tebfast fa^'tlje toljiclj tljej^' Ijab in i tljroufflje tlje merc^ 

anb memt' of Cljrist o"^ 
saiiior 'oTljes trutljes ar tljus 0ttt fortlje tijat in all 

aties (Bob ma^ be tijankfiillj' 
rjlorifieb, for tljes anb suclje l^^ke Ijis gracilis benifites, 

Revevse. A long Dutch or Flemish inscription in black letter 
recording the foundation, in 1518, of a mass at the altar of St. 
Cornelius, by Adrian Adrianson and the lady Paesschine van den 
Steyne. 

[In] t Jaer duizst vijfhondert eh xviij opten xxix dach [in] 
decembri Soe hebben adriaen adriaensz ende Joncvrauwe 
paesschine van den steijne ghefond [eert binnen] desz ke [rcke o] p 
sincte Cornells ouctaer Eene ee [uwige mi] sse dae [chs] de 
welcke de kercklTTrs anghenomen [hebbe] n te doen doene en 
tonderhoudene. Te beghinnene de voersz misse altijt nader 
clock sclach van thien wren daer den priester vooren hebben 
zal vij poont gz vlaems tsiaers jn vier termine den coster die ter 
voersz misse luden sal de groote scelle v sz gz tsiaers op sincte 

aechte 
dach alsmen huer beijder jaergetijde doet oft des ander 



98 

daechs daer na jndien zij op eenen sondach comt ende op 
ghennen dach anders. Soe zullen de voorn kerckmrs of de 

be [sitters] [t] sauens ter vigelie en tsmerghens ter 

misse 
do [en bringhen op] t gracht pelle en saerge ende daer op doen 
stellen viij bernende stallichten van wasse Ende de vier 
kerckmrs de iij heleghegheestmrs en deke en beleeders huijsvrz 
van sinte Cornelis ouctaer zullen come zitten ten graue ter 
vijgelie va ix lessen en ter misse van requiem die der voorn 
bezitters doen singhen zuUe mette voile chore met andoenders 
eh prouider leuereh daer toe dat oflferliecht daer de voile 
choer de kerckms helegegheestmrs deken eh baleeders vande 
lakensniders huere huijsvrauwe de prister bezitter van deser 
misse coster costrissen ende de bodel mede zullen gae offeren 
singhende onder de offererande de Sequentie dies ire dies ilia &c 
daer vooren de voorn bezitters tgoets ghehouden zuUe zijn te 
betalen jnde vigelie den deke iiij gz elck canonick vicepastoer 
coraelmeester ij gz elcken capelaen ende mercenarius j gz ende 
elck chorael xij 1' Ende des anderdaechs jnde misse diesgelijke 
wel verstaende zoe enzal niement van hem luden hierafgaud' 
dan die pht zijn va beghinsel vaden dienst tottem eijnde. Noch 
[z] ullen zij betalen den prister die de misse voersz singhen zal 

vj gj 
[die a] ndoenders elc xij gz die prouidierder ij gz de coster ij gz 

di [e] 
[costri] ssen tsamen vj gz voor tdecken en de kaersen tontstek [en] 

The letters and words in brackets are conjectural, as the brass 
is damaged in places. The following translation is based upon 
various versions printed in R. Gough's Sepulchral Monmnents, 
vol. i. pt. i., Appendix, p. cxcvii. ; the Rev. G. E, Jean's List 
of Sepulchral Brasses in Lincolnshire, p. 48; the Rev. G. Roberts' 
Parish Memorials relating to Norton Disney ; and the Transactions 
of the Monumental Brass Society, vol. ii. pp. 222, 301 : 

" In the year 1518, on the 29th day of December, thus have 
Adrian Adrianson and Lady Paesschine van den Steyne founded 
within this church upon the altar of St. Cornelius one daily 
perpetual mass, which the churchwardens have undertaken to 
have celebrated and continued. The said mass to begin always 
after the stroke of ten, the priest to have seven pounds grooten 
Flemish yearly in four terms. The sexton, who for the said 
mass shall ring the great bell, five shillings grooten yearly on 
St. Agatha's day when the anniversary of the two is celebrated, 



99 

or on the day thereafter if it fall on a Sunday and on no other 
day. So shall the aforesaid churchwardens or the trustees. . . . 
in the evening at the vigil and in the morning at the mass 
cause to be placed on the grave the pall and serge and eight 
burning candles of wax, and the four churchwardens, the three 
Holy Ghost masters, and the dean, and the wife of the director 
of St. Cornelius' altar shall come and sit at the grave at the 
vigil of the nine lessons and at the mass of requiem which the 
before-named trustees shall cause to be sung with full choir, 
with shrouders and providers supplying the oblation light, where 
the full choir, the churchwardens. Holy Ghost masters, dean, 
and directors of the clothcutters, their wives, the priest trustee 
of this mass, sexton, sextonesses, and the beadle shall offer 
singing during the offering of the sequence Dies irae, Dies 
ilia, &c. For which the aforesaid trustees shall pay, in the 
vigil, to the dean four groats, to each canon, vice pastor, and 
choirmaster two groats, to each chaplain and mercenary one 

groat, and to each chorister twelve (?) and on the next day 

in the mass the like, it being well understood that none of these 
people shall profit hereof except those present from the begin- 
ning to the end of the service. Moreover they shall pay the 
priest singing the aforesaid mass six groats, the shrouders each 
twelve groats, the providers two groats, the sexton two groats, 
the sextonesses together six groats for the covering and lighting 
the candles." 

Another nine lines of this, or of a similar inscription, forms 
the reverse of the inscription to John Dauntesay, 1559 (but query 
engraved later), at West Lavington, Wiltshire.^ From this it 
appears that the name of the church was " Westmonstre," 
which has been identified- as that of St. Martin, or Westmonster, 
formerly existing in the city of Middleburgh, in Walcheren, in 
the province of Zeeland. This church seems to have been 
completely destroyed in 1575."^ The West Lavington fragment 
also records the penalty for any breach of the agreement, the 
property in such case to lapse to the guild of the altar of St. 
Cornelius with the same charge as set out in the foundation, 
one light to go to the churchwardens, &c., and one amongst the 
friends of Adrian Adrianson, and one amongst the friends of 
the lady Paesschine. 

' See Archceological Jountal, vol. iv. p. 362, and E. Kite's Monumental 
Brasses of Wiltshire, p. 56. 

^ ArchiEological Joitrual, vol. v. p. i6o. 
' Ibid. 



lOO 

The Norton Disney plate is now in a hinged frame on the 
north wall of the Chancel. The obverse side is engraved in 
R. Gough's Sepulchral Monuments of Great Britain, vol. i. Introd., 
pi. cxxii, p, cxxii,, and both sides in the Oxford Portfolio of 
Monumental Brasses, pt. v. pi. iv. 

MIDDLESEX. 

Cranford. 

Obverse. Inscription to Nicholas, son of Thomas, and brother 
to Mardocheus Bownell, parson of this church, 1581. Size of 
plate, 165 X 3I inches. 

^ett untiec l^etlj tljc boti^c of i^icolag Botunell late 
tlje jsonne of ^ljomne> Botoncll an\i farotljcr to ^actios 
clim0 Botunell pardon of tl)i0 rljiirclj toljo ticce00eri 
tt)e rbitfj M^t of »>eptcmber I58l 

Reverse. Four lines of a fifteenth century inscription, the top 
and bottom lines bisected. 

Cortiigf (?) atroi* (?) 

Bellua pa00oru non imtt tiolor obitn \)uim 
^ic constant qui parte 0rneu tiampnief laceratuef 
ab grauiorib? quieuit (?) plciussimuo eiio (?) 

Now fastened on a hinge. 



*o^ 



Harlington. 

Obverse. Effigies of Gregory Lovell, Esq., lord of the manor 
and patron of the church, 1545, aged 56, in armour, and wife 
Anne, daughter of David Bellingham, Esq., inscription (now 
lost), and four shields of arms. A small figure of a daughter is 
also lost. The male effigy measures i8j inches in height, the 
female 17^ inches, the inscription-plate 24I x 5^ inches, and 
the shields 6| x 5J inches. The upper part of the lady's figure 
is engraved in the Rev. H. Haines' Manual of Monumental Brasses, 
Introd., p. ccxlv. 

The inscription, which has disappeared within recent years, 
read thus : 

i^ere Ipet^ d^uegor? Houell C0qu^er late lortie of tfjigf 

'ciLotoixe of i^acl??itffto 
anti patotii of tlji0 Cljutclje anb ^mte lji0 to^ffe 

2DotDffI)ter to iabj^tlj 15tU 



lOI 

I|nio:{)m (t^qn^n toljo bcttornc tljcm Ijati 31^^"^^ "^^^ 

Dotoffljtcr before tije etU'l> 
(Bregor^' Deee00|^ti f toljielje d^repn' Deutpti tljio tooi'ltie 

to^oiit Ijeire of Ijis lioti^' 
tl)e rrijti) nap of €)etolier in tlje Ibi pere of Ijio ^gf in^ti 

in tlje j^ere of our lortie 
tieoti a^"CCCCC°iH3 idiJl^CiR 

In the last line the clause containing the prayers for tlie soul 
of the deceased has been erased. 

The shields, now inaccurately arranged, bear the following 
arms : 

A. Upper Dexter. (Arg.) a bugle horn (sa.), styinged (or) 
Bellingham, quartering (Arg.), three bendlets (gu.), on a canton (of 
the second) a lion passant [as the first). Burneshead, with a crescent 
in fess point for difference. 

This shield should be on the lower dexter, i.e., under the 
man's feet. An old rubbing shows the original shield to have 
been lost. It no doubt bore Lovell quartering Cornwall. 

B. Upper Sinister. Quarterly I. and IV. {gti-), three bars 
nebnly {or) a canton ermine. Lovell II. and III. {Arg.), a lion ram- 
pant {gn.), crowned {or) debrnised by a bend {sa.) charged with six bezants. 
Cornwall (?) impaling Bellingham quartering Burneshead as 
above. 

This shield is in its original position. 

C. Lower Dexter. Similar to B. This shield was origin- 
ally the sinister shield on the back of the tomb. Shield A 
should be here. 

D. Lower Sinister. Lovell quartering Cornwall. This 
shield is in its original position. 

Traces of colour still remain in some of the shields. So far 
as at present known three of the shields are palimpsest, as was 
also the inscription. The effigies and shield B have never been 
loose, but are probably also palimpsest. 

Reverse. The inscription was made up of two pieces, the 
smaller, about 3 inches in width, apparently a portion of a 
hgure of a civilian, c. 1500-20, but the rubbing in the possession 
of the writer is very indistinct. The larger piece is a nearly 
perfect inscription, about 21 inches in length, to George Barlee, 
son of William Barlee, Esq., " which'e George whyle he lyved 

vowed hymself to John Jer(usa)l(e)m in Ingland," and 

died in 1513. 



102 

H^Btt Ipetl) (BtovQt Baiiee tl)e 0ont cf ^lillm BarUe 

of t{) 

jEfquper tol)icljc ffeorge tol)^Ie lie Ipbeti tjotoeti !jpm0elf to 

fi^^[?nt] 3Iol)n 3|erlm in 3Ii^ffiiii'i^ ^i^^ f)^ Decegfsfeti tljc 

xiiii ti 

t[)e pere of our lorn plj 9^^F'^riij on tol)O0e jsoules 

lliu 

Shield A is made up of two pieces ; the smaller, forming the 
base of the shield, is a fragment of the lower portion of a small 
figure in civil dress, probably a boy from a group of sons, 
c. 1500-20. The larger piece is the end of an inscription, of 
about the same date ; the top line is illegible, then there is a 
wide space followed by two more lines. 



Ijaue m'c^ 

.... 0t' $ a ate 

the last few words being no doubt " paternoster and an ave." 

Shield C is known to be palimpsest, but cannot now be 
examined, as the new serpentine altar-rails have been built 
against it, so that despite its hinges it is now a permanent 
fixture. The writer has been unable to see any rubbing of 
the reverse, and would be grateful for any information. 

Shield D is also made up of two fragments : the smaller 
piece, forming the base of the shield, is a portion of a figure, 
and looks very much like the collar and partlet of a lady, or 
possibly the girdle surrounding her waist. It appears to be 
little earlier than the obverse side, and is much obscured by 
solder. The larger piece shows a few words of an English 
inscription, c. 1500-20, thus: 

.... to t\)c mo0t .... 
.... molicr of tlje .... 
.... 00eti tljc ln0t .... 

The brass in its original slab is now let into the South wall 
of the Chancel, the shields on hinges. It was formerly on a 
high tomb on the North side of the Chancel, " under an obtuse 
arch ornamented with quatrefoils and foliage."^ An old rubbing 

' D. Lysons' Middlesex Parishes^ p. 129. 



I03 

in the collection of the Society of Antiquaries shows not only 
a portion of the figure of the daughter, but also two shields 
and another mutilated inscription from the back of the tomb. 



Harrow. 

Obverse. Two plates, slightly mutilated, one containing the 
commemorative inscription and the other ten English verses, 
to Dorothy, daughter of William Bellamy, Esq., of Uxenden, 
in the parish of Harrow-on-the-Hill, and wife of Anthony 
Frankishe, Gent., of Water Stratford, Bucks, 1574. Size of 
inscription-plate, 18^ X 8i inches, of verse plate, 19I x 9 inches. 

^nt l^n\i burden p faoti?' of [2Dorotlj]^e late to^fc of 

ianton^ 
ffi-aiikj^0lje of (L(llatei:0trotforU in tlje Coimt^e of Buck* 
d^cnt' ann tiotocyljter of (LcLUUinni 3e\lam^ of cLUentitn in 
tl)c pniT^'0lje of l^arroto bpou tlje IjjjU in tlje Countj^f 
of ^pD' (Efifquper anti I^atljcrpit l)i0 to^^fc toljiclj ^iiton^' 
anti 2Dorotl)pe IjaU imc brttoenc tljem one 0onne anti 
fotore tiotoffiJtft*0 bij. (15erratt ffrnnkp^Ije. 3Ione. 9^arp. 
ffCQunces anti 31one. an'n tlje 0aj'ti 2Dorotl)[^e tiin nepart 
out of tlji0 toorlti tlje uutt; tiaj^ of auo:u0t Si^ 1574 

l^ere 2Dorot^^e ffrank^0l)e l^^etl), toljo0 mortall l^mta av 

lieati. 
But to enioj^'e imortal re0t, Ijee 0oule to Ijetjen ^0 fleaUti. 
(Icai)ple0 l^tt ti^ti la0t. 0l)e b3a0 a pateene of gooti l^>fe 
SDeboute to pn, gootJ to tlje poore, a clja0t anti peefet 

topfe 
ffor cbri0t lji0 cro00e 0lje calti, ao:apn0t tlje pang' of 

lieat^ 
ioljiclj 0lje toitlj mj^niD * ^ic beljelD, untj^ll Ijee later breatlj 
idnti 00 QdXit up Ijec p0t, to pti toljiclj l^'fe liiti lenti 
l^ljo for Ijer poti anD toortlj^ l^^fe, pbe Ijer a Ijapppe enti 
[aijtljobjfflj ^^ tieatl) totij tj;7nt of Dart Ijatlj brotogljt Ijer 

corp' a0leape 
['(ITlje] eternall pt>, Ijer eternall 0oule. eternall^'e tiotlj 

kepe. 



^ 



104 



Reverse. The inscri 




Harrow, Middlesex. 

About one-quarter full size. 



ption-plate is cut out of a Flemish brass, 
c. 1370, showing a por- 
tion of canopy work with 
the small figure of a man 
in tunic, hood and mantle, 
holding a book in his 
right hand, possibly in- 
tended to represent one 
of the prophets. Below 
is a smaller seated figure 
of a weeper with a long 
liripipe attached to his 
hood. Along the edge 
are the following words 
of a marginal inscrip- 
tion : 

31nt + 31iin- + 0110 
+ Ijeren 

enclosed by a narrow 
border ornamented with 
dots, roses, and quatre- 
foils. A small strip of 
plain brass has been 
soldered on to the right- 
hand corner, as the plate 
proved too small for the 
later inscription. 



The plate bearing the verses is also cut out of another very fine 
Flemish brass, c. 1360. It bears a portion of the head, neck, 
shoulders, and hands of a lady, her head reposing on a cushion 
supported by angels and richly diapered with birds and foliage. 
Her wimple and mantle are plain, but her robe is ornamented 
with a rich diaper of foliage enclosing lions' heads and winged 
monsters. A narrow fillet enriched with roses and quatrefoils 
runs between the figure and the side shaft of the canopy. In 
a niche in the side shaft is the greater portion of a small figure 
of St. Paul, with sword and book, and beyond this is the 
marginal inscription, of which only the numeral X'Q appears. A 
small quatrefoil encloses a shield charged with three stags at 
speed. 



I05 




Harrow, Middlksex. 

About one-quarter full size. 

The two plates are now framed and hang on the wall of 
the South Aisle. 

The palimpsest portions are engraved in J. G. and L. A. B. 
Waller's Series of Monumental Brasses, Introd. p. x. ; Transactions 
of the London and Middlesex Archaeological Society, vol. i. pp. 272, 
273 ; ^ Transactions St. Paul's Ecclesiological Society, vol. iv. p. 232 
(canopy piece only) ; and both sides of the plates in S. Gardiner's 
Architectural History of Harrow Church, pis. xxxvii., xxxviii. 



ISLEWORTH. 
• I. 

Obverse. Inscription to William Chase, Esq., serjeant to 
King Henry VIII., and of his most honourable household of his 
hall and woodyard, 1544. Size of plate, ig| x S\ inches. 

^i ^r cljai^te pca^ for tlje »)OUle of Mlillm Cljnefr 

suqnnc efcrffcaunt to kj^no: \)t\\x^ tlje \iin $ of Ij^'cf mo0t 

Ijonorable 
l)oto0eljolt) of \)^^ Ijnll $ toooti['crt) toljidj tiece00etJ tljr tiiii 

Dap 
of 9^a['c vw tlje per of ourc lortic floti Sl^iCCCCC aixti 

rliii) 
of tDl)O0 0oule $ all txiQi)>\\ ^oule^ ilju Ijaite xmu^ amen. 

' From which the accompanying illustralions are, \y permission of the Society, 
reproduced on a reduced scale. 



io6 



tfsM^lrtrj?m#tte«iraWiepM«|fl)r^^^ 









IsLEWORTH, Middlesex. 

About one-fifth full size 

Reverse. A portion of the side shaft of the canopy of a fine 
Flemish brass c. 1350-60, with the figure of an apostle under 
rich canopy work. The name of the apostle is unfortunately 
wanting, and there is some doubt as to his identity, for in his left 
hand he holds a club, the emblem usually assigned to either St. 
James the Less or St. Jude, whilst with his right hand he 
supports a large open book or tablet inscribed with the words 
remijar0ionem peCCatOrum, the clause from the Apostles' Creed 
usually given to St. Simon, whose emblem is most frequently a 
saw or one or two fishes. 

At the top of the plate is the name ^^^^Bi^^^^^if)* 
XaElJS."!E"j©-, in late Lombardic characters, but this refers to 
the apostle whose figure was in the corresponding niche above. 

When the brasses were relaid some years ago the Chase 
inscription was placed under the figure of a man in armour, 
c. 1450. It is at the East end of the Nave, but was loose in its 
casement in 1902. 



II. 

Obverse. Inscription to Fraunces, daughter of Edward Holland, 
Esq., of Denton in the county of Lancaster, and servant to the 



107 



Lady Margaret, Countess of Derby, 1575. The last two figures 
of the date are broken away, but the register records her burial 
on March 29th, 1575, as " Frances Holland, gentlewoman to the 
Countess Darby." Size of plate, 16x6 inches. Relaid under 
the figure of a civilian, c. 1590, at the East end of the Nave. 

Ijcrc lietlj burieti unticu tljie ap^niion of anms 
yi^i0tris ffraunc' ll^ollanti one of tljc tjnuffijtcre of 
Ctitoartic il^ollanti of 2Dcnton in tljr Countic of XmW' 
ka0trr (£0quier: m"^ ecrbant unto t^^t rijljt l)ono= 
table tlje \Mz ^^arpret Coiintesse of 3Derbie toljo 
tii00ea0eti tlje rrbiitb liiu?e of ^arelje ^^ tini 15175 1. 



luirr ^lipfe-fttiir ftfTiiant&tto K)rr|^|oiuJ'^ 




'^^It^M^^I^D^X^X^il^^Mi^^Yi^^SMi^ 



W/tiiiniiniini/iiiiiininiiiininmiiiiiiiniiiiiiuiiiiiiniiniinminiiiiuniiiiinnimi 



ISLEWORTH, MlDDLESKX. 
About one-quarter full size. 



Reverse. A fragment of the upper left-hand corner of a large 
Flemish brass, of late fifteenth or early sixteenth century work, 
showing a portion of a shield with a field fretty charged with 
eagles displayed, and a small portion of the mantling above, 



io8 

also a large pomegranate in the corner and pieces of the 
ornamental border surrounding the whole. At Erith, Kent, 
forming the reverse of the inscription to Anne Harman, 1574/ 
is another fragment of this Flemish brass, also showing part of 
a shield with eagles displayed on a fretty ground with mantling, 
&c., but cut from the right-hand side of the plate, as is proved 
by the position of the eagles in the shield and the shading in 
the broadest line of the ornamental border, which in the Erith 
example runs in from the inner and in the Isleworth from the 
outer side of the plate. 

The Isleworth palimpsest is now fastened down. It is here 
reproduced from a rubbing in the collection of the Society of 
Antiquaries. 

Littleton. 

Inscription to the Lady Blanche Vaughan, sometime wife 
of Sir Hugh Vaughan, " who lyeth buryed at Westmynster," 
1553, and shield of arms. The shield only is palimpsest; it 

bears on the obverse the arms of the family of Castell 

three castles triple-towered ji'ith a flenr-de-lys in fess point for 

difference, and on the reverse the greater portion of a group of 
five daughters, c. 1520, wearing kennel-shaped head-dresses and 
close-fitting gowns with tight sleeves and turned-back cuffs. 
The shield measures 5I x 4f inches, and in 1899 was loose in 
its casement on the Chancel floor. 

London, All Hallows Barking. 

The mutilated brass to William Thynne, Esq., a master of 
the household to Henry VIII., 1546, in armour, with head resting 
on helmet, his second wife Anne, a daughter of William Bonde, 
a foot-inscription with text, and a commemorative marginal 
inscription with the symbols of the Evangelists at the corners, 
was completely restored and relaid in a new slab by Messrs. 
Waller in 1861, at the expense of the late Marquis of Bath, and 
was then found to be palimpsest. 

Obverse. The original and palimpsest portions consist of (A) 
the figure of William Thynne, 29J inches in height, a small 
portion between the feet lost ; (B) three-quarters of the figure 
of his wife, 24 inches in height, the lower portion with the feet 

' Engraved in the Transactions of the Monumental Brass Society, vol. iii. p. 
203, and see also vol. iv. p. 145. 



leg 



I 






I 



g 





^1 



London, All Hallows Barkino. 
Palimpsest Reverses of Thynne Brass. 

About one-seventh full size. 



no 

and a piece of the right elbow lost ; (C) a strip of the marginal 
inscription, 37 X i| inches, bearing the words . . . ^ Of t|)0, 

lorti' '(Irumpet in bjljosc Compng: tljat tor map all 31"?' 

fullj^ ntete l^^m ; and (D) another strip of the marginal 
inscription, 41 1 x I5 inches, bearing the words 2DCpflrtptl fCOlTl 

tl)i0 prison of lji0 fraple botij? ^^ x^^ tinp of ^UQU^tt 
^nno tiui. 1546 $ in tje x:iTbiiit&. 

Reverse. (A) This is cut out of the centre portion of a much 
larger figure of a lady, c. 1530, and shows a portion of the hands 
with lace cuffs at the wrists, a rich girdle encircling the waist, 
and a long cord with tassels, which no doubt fastened the mantle, 
but of this there is no trace. 

(B) This is cut out of the centre portion of an ecclesiastic, 
c. 1 5 10, in mass vestments and holding a chalice. Only a 
portion of the body, the right shoulder, arm and hand, together 
with the foot and a part of the bowl of the chalice, appear. 

(C) Is a portion of an ornamental border from the top of an 
inscription-plate, c. 1520 (?). The upper portion of the first line 
of the inscription also shows, but is illegible, as only the tops of 
the letters remain. This piece gives the width of the inscription 
as 38 inches. 

(D) Three fragments from the same inscription as (C), 
bearing the words gju %l)t ^tVt Of OUt lorH (150tl.— tl)t 

bti) tiap of ^UQU^t— ^Ije to^??cl) ef^ go^n tieceaspti, and a 

small fragment on the reverse of XXhUf bearing two lines from 

obttt rrhii° hit 

an earher mscription ,,,/, In the first three pieces 

Dpiciet tie am . . ^ 

the tops and bottoms of other letters are visible, but too frag- 
mentary to be legible. 

The brass is now at the East end of the South Aisle. William 
Thynne edited, in 1532, the first complete edition of Chaucer's 
works, with the exception of the " Ploughman's Tale." His 
will is printed in Notes and Queries, 3 S., vol. iv. pp. 365, By his 
second wife, Anne Bond, he had three daughters and one son, 
Francis, afterwards Lancaster Herald, and one of the original 
members of the Society of Antiquaries. 



Ill 



London, British Museum. 



I. 



Obverse. A circular plate much worn and indented, 5|- inches 
in diameter, bearing the bust of a priest, c. 1400-20, in amice, 
surrounded by the smaller busts of four boys, and enclosed by 
the following inscription: + IjIC UUtt 3l0ljC!3 mctl^nt (?) CIjOlGi 

JtiiMto (?) Cffllnlteru' manuir (?) qc' alab} upicict' tic\ This 

inscription is exceedingly difficult to read owing to its worn 
condition and from its having been slightly cut down when 
re-used. The writer is indebted to Mr. C. H. Read, Keeper of 
the Mediaeval Antiquities, and to Mr. O. M. Dalton, of the 
same Department, for much kind assistance in the attempt made 
to decipher it. 





British Museum. 

About one-third full size. 

Reverse. On this is engraved a wedge-shaped instrument 
with loops on the left-hand side, and graduated at the bottom 
from I to 8. An early form of quadrant (?). The instrument 
is enclosed with a circle, and probably formed a portion of the 
same brass as the reverse of No. II. 



II. 

Obvevse. A circular plate, 5^ inches in diameter, bearing 
the small half-effigy of Thomas Quythed, " tercius magister 
istius collegii," c. 1460 (?), in mass vestments and surrounded 
by the following inscription; ^\Z XHZtt '(IljOmCf qU[>tIjCtJ 

nuiffcot' llcrcr iQti' collrcyii riu' aic upicict' tic'. 



I 12 



Reverse. On this is engraved a pair of open compasses 
within a circle. The style of ornamentation on the upper part 
of this instrument points to a late sixteenth century date. 





British Museum. 

About one-third full size. 



Possibly the reverse of No. I. and of this formed parts of a 
brass to a mathematical instrument maker. 



III. 

Obverse. A group of seven daughters, c. 1470-80, all with 
butterfly head-dresses, and close-fitting gowns open at the neck 
and trimmed with fur. Size of plate, 6 x 4I inches. 

Reverse. The hands, wrists, and a portion of the body of a 
large figure, apparently of the fifteenth century. 

IV. 

Obverse. A group of three sons, c. 1530-40, in civil dress; 
feet lost. Size of plate, 4^ x 3^ inches. 

Reverse. Portions of six figures from a group of sons, c. 
1500-20, in civil dress. 



Obverse. A quatrefoil bearing the symbol of St. Mark within 
a border ornamented with small roundels. Size of plate, 5x4! 
inches. 



113 



Reverse. A portion of a shield, apparently foreign, bearing 

. . . a chevron . . . charged with six barvulets . . . impaling . . . 
a chevron between three crescents . . . 









British Museum. 

About one-third full size. 

The obverse and reverse are reproduced in the Rev. H. W. 
Macklin's Monumental Brasses, p. iii. See also Wimbish, Essex, 
and Betchworth, Surrey. 

London, Guildhall Museum. 

Obverse. The upper half of a shield, late sixteenth century, 
3j X 5^ inches in width, bearing a chevron engrailed ivith two 
leopards' faces in chief and a label of three points, impaling a 
quartered coat, the first quarter bearing per pah seven barrulets 
counterchanged, and the second three lions rampant. 

Reverse. A portion of a late fifteenth or early sixteenth 
century inscription : 

Cibi0 n 

... or ti' qui qiiitim liica .... 

... is ^cptcmbris ^itito 

. . . uorum aiiilij pkitt' ti . . . . 

Said to have been found in the City. 

NORTHOLT. 

Obverse. Effigies of John Gyfforde, in armour, his wife 
Susan, who died in childbed in 1560, a group of nine sons, a 
group of three daughters, and a foot-inscription in six Enghsh 
verses. Four shields lost. All in 1902 loose in the slab on the 



114 

Chancel floor, and, with the exception of the inscription, all 
palimpsest. 

The male effigy is 15 inches and the female 14I inches in height, 
the inscription-plate measures 16^ x 6|- inches, the sons 6x6 
inches, the daughters 6 X 4|- inches, the shields were 7x6 
inches, and the whole slab, which was once the cover of an 
altar, one incised cross remaining, is 66 x 32 inches. This 
side of the brass is reproduced in the Girl's Own Paper for 
December 3, 1892. 

Reverse. The male effigy is composed of two plates, respec- 
tively measuring lof and 4^ inches. The larger piece, which 
forms the lower part of the effigy, shows portions of the legs 
and feet of an armed figure, c. 1480, the feet resting on a hound. 
The smaller or upper portion belongs to the same figure, and 
shows the cuisses on the thighs, the tonlettes with a baguette 
of mail between the plates, and a portion of the sword crossing 
the body diagonally. The female effigy is composed of three 
plates, respectively measuring 4^ , 7, and 3^ inches. The first, 
forming the head of the figure, is another portion of the armed 
figure previously described, and shows the lower portion of the 
breastplate, part of the faces, the pommel of the sword and a 
portion of the sword-belt. The larger piece in the centre shows 
lines of drapery only, and the lower piece consists of the base 
of a lady's figure showing the folds of drapery at the feet and 
the ground on which the figure stands. The centre fragment 
may possibly have belonged to this figure, but all the joints 
are much obscured by the solder used to fasten the pieces 
together. 

The group of sons is composed of two plates, the upper being 
cut out of the centre of an inscription and reversed, the first 
line being illegible owing to the solder : 



... obiit xiiii tiie nee . . . 
. . . anno Dili milllo €€€,.. 

The lower is cut from the left-hand corner of a three-line 
inscription, the first line obscured by the solder : 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



eiujEf qui quitirm MliU .... 
obiit xW tiie Sl^aii . . . 

The group of daughters is cut out of a worn group of about 
eight kneeling sons, in civil dress, c. 1500. 



1 1 5 

PiNNhK, 

Obverse. Small figure, g^ inches in height, of Anne, daughter 
of Eustace Bedingheld, Gent., 1580, in swaddling clothes. She 
was buried at the charges of her grandmother, Margery, widow 
of John Draper, citizen and " bere " brewer of London. The 
inscription, now imperfect, originally measured i7|- x ^^ inches, 
a small piece, i| inches in width, being lost : 

}^ttt untier Iml) tljc bo^vt of ^iiite Beriitig:tclti t[lje] 
2Dtiug:|)tec of Cucftace BeDiiifffcltJ ^mt' toljo tirpteti \)[n\ 
l^tt 5c iTiijtf) ct tabvnav}^ \5S0, $ luirj^cu at tljc cl)a[i:n0:'?] 
of Sl^argni' 2Drapcr tuiDoto late to^'fc of Jjolja 2Dra[per] 
Citijcii auti bcre bretorr of lloutioit Ijcc (Brauutimotfljerj 

This obverse side is engraved in the Transactions of the London 
and Middlesex Archceologicat Society, vol. iii. p. 178, and in the 
Girls Own Paper, October 8, 1892. 

Reverse. The figure is cut out of the marginal inscription 
of a large Flemish brass of late date, and bears the words 
HiER + LIGHT, with an ornamental stop between them. The 
reverse of the inscription-plate may have formed a portion of 
a canopy, or possibly of a figure, but as there are only two broad 
lines and three smaller ones it is impossible to give any exact 
definition. 

The brass was formerly on the floor of the North Aisle, 
and narrowly escaped complete destruction at the time of the 
restoration, when the end of the inscription was lost. It is now 
mounted in a wooden frame and kept in the vestry. 



MONMOUTHSHIRE. 
No palimpsest noted in this county. 



ii6 



NORFOLK. 



Cley. 



Obverse. Inscription to Robert Tayllar, 1578. Size of plate, 
10 X 3J inches. 

^tvc l^nl) tlje boti^ of 
lioliart Cnpllar bjlja tipeti 
gf 14tfj of 3!anuarp a° 1578. 

Reverse. Two pieces of canopy work of late design, probably 
Flemish. One piece bears the base of a shaft with the feet and 
legs of a small figure in a niche. The other, which is obscure, 
appears to belong to a part of the same composition. 

Loose in the vestry in 1890. 



Clippesby. 
Obverse. A small fragment of an inscription, 3 X 2| inches. 

. . tini aia 3Ioljief Ij . . 
. . qui obiit xxii . . . 

. . a° nni 9^° C . . , . 

Reverse. A portion of another inscription, possibly a " waster," 
as it is of much the same date. 

.... qui rop .. . 
.... fit Ijistori . . . 
. . . piciftur ti . . . 

This fragment, dug up in the garden of the old rectory, is now 
kept in the church chest. Blomefield, in his History of Norfolk, 
vol. xi. p. 164, notes an inscription " on an old brass," to John 
Heron, rector, 1472, of which this may possibly be a portion. 



1 1 



Felmingha.ni. 

I. 

Obverse. Inscription to Ursula Wychehynggam, c. 1530. 
Size of plate, 10^ x 2| inches. The work of a local engraver. 

€)ratc pro ala 2lU*c?iile (liillpdjcljpng: 
pm cut' ale propicictur Do amcii 

Reverse. The Rev. H. Haines, in his Manual of Monumental 
Brasses, part ii. p. 151, says, " on reverse an inscription to William 
Elyes, chaplain, 1500." The plate is now fixed to the wall and 
the writer has been unable to obtain any further information. 

II. 

Obverse. Inscription in large coarse Roman capitals to Robert 
Moone, 1591. Size of plate, io|- x 5^ inches. The work of a 
local engraver. 

HEARE LYETH THE 
BODYE OF ROBERT 
MOONE WHO DISSE 
ASED THE 24 DAYK OF 
MAY ANNO DONI I 59 i . 



HEARELYETHThE 
BODYE OFROBERT 




A^AfA^NODONl■I59I 




Palimpsest Insckii'tion, Felmingham, Norkoi.k. 

About OTie-fiftli full size. 



Reverse. This inscription is cut out of the centre portion a 
priest in mass vestments, c. 1450-60. The fragment shows the 
hands, the sleeves of the amice, the maniple and portions of the 
chasuble. 

The plate is now fastened to the wall. 

Frenze. 
A. shield, 51 x 4^ inches, with the arms of Lowdham, Arg., 
three escutcheons sa., on the obverse, and on the reverse another shield 



iiS 



bearing Quarterly I. and IV., a chevvon. II. and III., a lion ram- 
pant, crozaned or. From the brass to Ralph Blenerhaysett, Esq., 
1475. The reverse appears to be an unfinished shield with the 
arms of Blenerhaysett quartering Orton, which, for some error, 
was cancelled and the arms of Lowdham substituted on the other 
side of the plate. 

Loose at Frenze Hall in 1891. See Norfolk Archeology , vol. 
xiii. p. 194. 

Halvergate. 

I. 

Obverse. Small half-efifigy of a lady in turban head-dress, with 
a mutilated inscription to Robert Swane and Alice (?) his wife, 
1540. The figure measures 8 inches in height and the inscription- 
plate, in its present mutilated condition, is I2| x 2 inches. The 
whole is the work of a local engraver. 

Inscription : 

.... lr['tl)e Eobarti »)\Dnnr anti 
... izk \)v^ toj^fc a° tiiv ^° V^ rl. 





lep^ti;61j^\ci .feiBKur alio 



Jraml^ilisr^niniiH 



Palimpsest Figure, Halvergate, Norfolk. 

About one-sixth full size. 



Reverse. The almost complete memorial of Brother William 
Yarmouth, consisting of his bust in monastic habit, with the 
following short inscription, the last letter of the surname wanting : 

ffratcr ^iUmgf JI^'^'i^^i^^" • 

Date c. 1440. Now hung in a frame on the wall of the church. 
Both sides of the plate are engraved in Norfolk Archaology, vol. 
X. p. 218. 



• 119 

II. 
Obverse. Inscription to Robert Golword and wife Katharine, 
1543. Size of plate, 20 x 3| inches. The work of a local 
engraver. 

^t(x}! for tl)C cfoulc of Eobati (Boltnorti i liatc'ine 
1)10 to^'fe on b3l)oi0 efoulc 3Ic0u Ijauc m'c^' 
a°tini 9t^° CCCCC vliit (Kt p quib? tcncnttir 






Icttt^ftpbDlip flf difalirtlj J ll])}f of to p: tab fcilp»,| ll'orthp, 
aalhphipDofctof i^ uplipl ifliD IiarDoifxftpslJaprsmliiJollrtlitu 



^fiYii lit I 



5)02'aftM)fe oMaWn^ Hje dliJDc#tbB'|Dl|!|yjpMl2lo!| 



Palimpsest Inscription, Hai.verga'ie, Norfolk. 

One-fifth full size. 

Reverse. Another inscription, also the work of a local 
engraver, to Elizabeth, daughter of Lord Bardolf and wife of 
Thomas, Lord Scales. Undated, but probably engraved c. 1460. 

\}txt iTSt^'tl) f boti)' of cli0abrtl) f toj'f of tljos f lord 
;©lD)'lu f tiotot' of f nofa^'l lorD Imrtjolf i Ijrs tia^'cs 17'tlj 

llOtBtljt)' 

'^o qbjooc 0otDlc ilju 0rnlic ['^ liropps of pi plcntcuoto0 

mrrcp 
^0 pt aft)'r ri0 objtla^q' ecljc abntic \DPtI) ['^ l)ol[' i }n 

ppcturl fflorj* 

Probably spoil from Blackburgh Priory, the burial place of the 
Scales family. There is considerable doubt as to the identity of 
the lady to whom this inscription was cut. Thomas de Scales, 
seventh Lord Scales, who died in 1460, is said to have married, 
about the year 1433, Emme, a daughter of John Walesborough, 
of Devon. The Complete Peerage by " G. E. C." adopts a sugges- 
tion originally made in Notes and Queries (6 S., vol. xii. p. 426) 



that " Thomas " is a mistake for " Robert " and assigns the lady 
to Robert, Lord Scales, who died in 1419. It also, on the 
evidence of this inscription, states that the lady was buried at 
Halvergate, quite overlooking the fact of the inscription being a 
palimpsest and, therefore, no evidence. 'Blomeheld, in his History 
of Noyfolk, vol. X. p. 23, makes this Elizabeth to be a first wife of 
Robert, fifth Lord Scales, who died in 1402; whilst Burke 
[Extinct Peerage) makes her the only wife of the said Robert and 
the lady who had for her second husband Sir Henry Percy. 

A possible solution of the difficulty may be found in considering 
the lady as a second and unrecorded wife of Thomas, seventh Lord 
Scales. The theory of an engraver's error is ingenious but hardly 
probable, for, in the first place, an engraver was not likely to com- 
mit such an error as the substitution of the name " Thomas " for 
" Robert," nor, on the other hand, would the family overlook such 
a blunder. 

Merton. 

Obverse. Thomas de Grey, Esq., in armour (legs lost), 1562, 
inscription (mutilated), and three shields (two lost). The figure, 
when perfect, measured 20 inches in height, in its present con- 
dition only 14 inches; the inscription-plate 26 x 4 inches, and 
the shields 6x5 inches. 

Inscription : 

i^ere lictlj li^toi^^i^^^'^^ tiljc botiie [of ^Ijomao] tiegre^e 

(Esquior ^onnc nnti Ijcprir ot Ctiuuti 
tiegr^^'c Csquior toljo tirccascti tlj[c 12 of Sl^a^J 1562. 

anti Ijati to Ijis first ^ife ^nnc cEucuotie 
2Daiio:ljtcr ot ljcnr?'c Cucrotie of [Hinstcti in] »)Uffol\e 

cEoquior ^nti to lji0 0cconti 
Cfuipancc tljc 3Dauo:!)tcr of [»>ir (laij^monlic Carnrluc of 

antljon^T in Cornrtorll 
I^niffljtc toljo0c 0oulc pn p[artion]. 

The words in brackets, now lost, are supplied from Cotman's 
engraving. The brass, which is the work of a local engraver, is 
on the floor of the South Aisle beneath a pew, but the boards 
above it are movable. It is engraved in J. S. Cotman's Sepulchral 
Brasses in Norfolk, vol. i. pi. Ixxv. p. 40, where the inscription and 
shields are shown perfect. 

Reverse. The first portion of the inscription, measuring 



121 



9| inches, became detached from the stone some years ago and 
was found to bear on the reverse the feet of a man in armour 
resting on a Hon, c. 1390. It is now fastened down, but there is a 




Rkvkkse of Pori'ion of iNscRirrioN. 
Merton, Norfolk. 

About one-half full size. 

rubbing in the collection of the Society of Antiquaries from which 
the accompanying illustration has been made. The joint on the 
right hand side is much disfigured by solder. The whole brass 
appears to be made up of fragments, and is probably all 
palimpsest. 



Narburgh. 

Obverse. Inscription to Elizabeth, wife of John Goldyngham, 
Esq., 1556. Size of plate, 14I X 5^ inches. The work of a 
local engraver. 

^;»fiT itnticr U'Ctlj luuTCti (£l^0abctlj 
cBoltii'mjljin outvmr tljc topff of J^^^W 
(J5olt))'noi)ni r^qiD'cr toljo ticpartcti tljijs 
piToriu loorltic tljc liii tiap of ffcbriiarp a'' 
155(3 toljooc 0olxilc pi3 partion 

Reverse. This inscription is cut out of the lower portion of a 
priest in mass vestments, c. 1470-80. The fragment shows part 
of the chasuble, the maniple, the stole, the bottom of the alb, 
and the feet of the figure. 

Now fastened to the Tower wall. There is a rubbing in the 
collection of the Society of Antiquaries. 



I 2 2 

Norwich, St. John Maddermarket. 

I. 

According to the Rev. F. Blomefield's History of Norfolk 
(1806), vol. iv. p. 290, also quoted in J. S. Cotman's Sepulchral 
Brasses in Norfolk, vol. i. p. 33, and in the Rev. H. Haines' 
Manual of Monumental Brasses, Introd., p. ccxxvi., the lost in- 
scription from the brass to John Marsham, mayor of Norwich, 
who died in 1525, and wife Elizabeth, was a palimpsest. On the 
obverse it bore the following : 

" €)f ]?our cljnr^tc prap for t^t 0ouUe0 of 91oIjn Sl^nrdjam 
gfometpmc mairc of t\ii^ tittiz of j^or^Diclje i (ili^abetlj 
Ijief tojjffe toljidj ^lolju ucceajjefcti tlje rtii nap of Slpap in 
tljc ['frc of our Eorti (Boti 9^' >tc rrb oit tol)O0r jsfoullest 
anil all €xmn\ 0oullcef ^l*^^" 1)'^^^ mercj' amen." 
" Sl^cmcnto Ijomo quia moricri0." 

and on the reverse, or as Blomefield says, " on the same plate, on 
the side next the stone, is this, as appeared when it was pulled 
off, it being now loose in the vestry " : 

" Charitable peppl tljat 0ljall loke upon tljis 0ton 

l^ate 31cbn i^ar0l)am h\ remembrance of pour eljarite 

S^aper of tl)i0 Cpte 0umtpme toa0 lji0 per0on 

5anti tlje riij tiap of ^ap tljen tieparteli Ije 

anti a 9^° V^ ix\\i\ iTt Cri0t pere0 anointeti 

ipor Cli? 1)10 toife of pour cljarite prap 

^Ijat in tlje ifeptlj Catljolick from tlji0 toorlti tieparteti 

^w tlje pere of Cri0t ^° F^ 

ge 0ljall not lo0e pour rljaritable tiebocion 

x\\ Carr»inal0 Ijabe granted pou riF tiape0 of pardon." 

Evidently a cancelled plate to suit the changing times. 

II. 

Obverse. Inscription, in raised black letter, to Nicholas 
Sutiherton, alderman and mayor (in 1539) of Norwich, 1540. 
In the right-hand corner is a small shield with the Suttherton 
arms. Size of plate, 25^ x 6 inches. The work of a local 
engraver. 

l^ere lietlj Burieti pf botip of S19a0ter i|5icljola0 ^uttljerton 
latte Sl^aper i ianijerma of tlji0 toorcljipfull tixt toljpclje tlje 
neute 



T23 



^ta after [n Ijc tons Sparer tii0cc00iti ototc o£ tl)i0 tvmU 

torie l;'fe 
tljflt tone? tljc pcrc of okir lorti 1540 tlje r tin^'c of jl^obcmbr 

to^osf sfoulf 0a}^c ['obj g|c0u Ijauc m'cj' for ^0 Ijc 3|0 00 
0cljnU pc Be 








Palimpsest Inscription, St. John Maddermarket, Norwich. 

About one-sixth full size. 

Reverse. The lower portion, from the hands downwards, of 
the right-hand side of a lady, c. 1460, in mantle. At her feet, 
engraved on her gown, is the complete figure (7^ inches high) of 
a daughter attired as a nun, and half the figure of another 
daughter in the usual costume of the period. 

The brass is now fixed to the wall of the South Aisle so that 
the reverse cannot be seen. Some years ago all the brasses in 
this church were taken from their stones and placed on the walls. 
In consequence of this injudicious treatment all have suffered 
severely from corrosion, and are now in a disgraceful condition ; 
in fact, are fast being ruined. 

III. 
Obverse. Effigies of Robert Rugge, Esq., alderman and twice 
mayor of Norwich, 1558, in civic gown, his wife Elizabeth, five 
sons, four shields, four scrolls, and an inscription on a bracket. 
A plate bearing a group of daughters and a shield with a 
merchant's mark now lost. As nearly the whole brass, which is 



124 

of a common Norwich type, the work of a local school of 
engravers, is palimpsest, it will be more convenient to consider it 
in sections. In all, it originally consisted of fourteen pieces, 
as follows : — 

(i) The figure of Robert Rugge, in civic mantle, the lower 
part of the legs and the feet wanting. In its present condition 
the figure measures 37^ inches in length. 

(2) A scroll proceeding from his mouth. This scroll has 
twisted ends, it measures 13x2 inches, and is inscribed 

Pater tic ccli0 ticu0 
mi0crrnr nobis. 

(3) The figure of Elizabeth Rugge, 35 inches in length. 
She wears the kennel-shaped head-dress, and the usual under- 
and over-gown of the period. The latter is fastened round the 
waist by a silken cord with knotted ends. 

(4) A scroll from her mouth similar to (2), but inscribed 

Jfili retjcmptor mutii Ueu0 
miscrcrr nobis. 

(5) A shield between the heads of the figures, bearing the 
initials R. E. interlaced by knot work. 

(6) A bracket upon which the figures stand, and which 
bears the inscription : 

^t ^our rljarptic pra)'c for tlje soules of Eobnrte Euffge 

(fsquirr 
sometime fliticrman anti ttopsc Q^tipcr of tljis toorsljipfull 

citic of 
^orbjiclj. anti (i^lqabctl) Ijis tojjffr toljiclj Ijan i^&m bcttoire 

tljcm 
fj'bc sonnrs anti it) Dauffljtrrs ann tijc saitic Eofat l^iiQQt 
licpartctJ tljis tranciton' life tlje rbii) tiaj'e of ffebruarie in 

tlje j'care of our iiorti (Boti 1558, of toljose soiiles 
Sfl^e ^oii ;|e0ti Ijaiie mere^'e ^men. 

This bracket measures 31^ x 24 inches. 

(7) A square plate, gj x g^ inches, bearing the kneeling 
figures of five sons in doublets and knee-breeches. 

(8) A scroll proceeding from the corner of the plate, similar 
in style to (2) and (4), but inscribed 

2Deuo propiciii0 e0to 
animabu0 parentli nror* 

(9) A square plate bearing the figures of the three daughters 
now lost. 

(10) A scroll similar to (8). 



125 

(ii) A shield at the upper dexter corner, charged with the 
arms of Rugge (Gules), a chevron engrailed between three pierced 
mullets (argent), with hehiiet, mantUng and crest, a talhot passant 
(argent), collared, ringed and eared (sable). 

(12) A shield at the upper sinister corner, charged with the 
arms of Kugge only. 

(13) A shield at the lower dexter corner with Rugge's 
merchant's mark, now lost. 

(14) A sliield at the lower sinister corner, charged with the 
arms of the Mercers' Company. 

The brass was formerly on the floor of the South Aisle, but is 
now fastened to the wall of the North Aisle, and is in a disgraceful 
condition from damp and neglect. It is engraved, somewhat 
inaccurately, in J. S. Cotman's Sepulchral Brasses in Norfolk, vol. 
i. pi. 70. 

Robert Rugge was sheriff of Norwich in 1537, mayor in 1545, 
and again in 1550. His brother, William Rugge, was the last 
abbot of St. Benet's Hulme, and subsequently bishop of Nor- 
wich from 1536 to 1550. Robert was twice married, the date of 
the death of his first wife, Elizabeth is unknown ; his second 
wife was Alice, widow of William Hare ; she survived him and 
was buried at Plumstead. 

Reverse, (i) The figure of Robert Rugge. This is made up 
two plates, respectively measuring 19^ inches and 18 inches, and 
consists of the greater portion of the centre of a large and early 
figure of an abbot. The figure is vested in amice, alb, 
maniple with broad-fringed end, and chasuble. The apparels of 
the alb are continued entirely round the wrists, and the amice 
lies loosely round the neck. The hands are encased in rich 
gloves, the right holding the stem of the crosier, whilst the left 
supports a large, richly-bound and clasped book. As the lower 
part of the figure is wanting, except two fragments used for 
scrolls, it is impossible to say what otheroavestments were worn. 
The date appears to be about 1320, and the figure may be com- 
pared with that formerly at Oulton, SutToIk, to Adam de Bacon, 
rector, who was living in 13 18, but whose brass is generally dated 
about i3io\ Effigies of abbots holding books are not uncommon, 
but only one brass has so far been noticed. It is at Adderley, 
Shropshire, to an unknown abbot, date about 1390'^ 

' Engraved in J. S. Cotman's Sepulchral Brasses in Norfolk and Suffolk, vol. 
ii. pi. iii. ; Rev. C. Koutell's Monumenlal Brasses and SLihs, p. 95 ; Rev. H. 
Haines' Manual of Monumental Brasses (1861), Inirod., p. cxlii. ; Photolithograpk 
privately published by E. M. Reloe, jiin. ; Norfolk Ardi, colony, vol. i. p. 355. 

■ Engraved in ArclKzologUal fotirnal, vtil. Iii. p. 53. 



126 




Palimpsest Reverses ov Rugge Brass. 
St. John Maddermakket, Norwich. 



127 

(2) and (4) Scrolls. These are both cut from the lower part 
of the figure of the abbot. No. (2) shows a part of the staff" of 
the crosier and a portion of the orplirey of the chasuble. No. (4) 
shows part of the apparel of the alb at the feet of the figure, 
and also a portion of a lion's face, showing that the figure had, 
as in the case at Oulton, a lion at the feet. 

(3) The figure of Elizabeth Rugge. This is made up of three 
pieces, respectively measuring 15 inches, 4^ inches, and 5^ 
inches. All belong to the figure of a priest in mass vestments, 
and may be dated about 1340. 

(5) Shield with initials. This is cut out of a larger shield 
bearing the arms of Fastolf, Quarterly (or) and {azure) on a bend 
(gules) three crosses crosslet (or). 

(6) Bracket. The greater portion of this is blank, only the 
finial, 8| X 7 inches, being palimpsest. It is composed of two 
pieces, of which the larger bears the face of a lion of early date, 
and the smaller may have been a portion of its body, but only one 
engraved line remains. 

(7) The sons. Blank. 

(8) Scroll. Made up of bits of an armed figure and half a 
lion's head. Date about 1440. 

(9) The daughters. Lost. 

(10) Scroll. Blank. 

(11) and (12) Rugge arms. Blank. 

(13) Merchant's mark. Lost. 

(14) Mercers' arms. Cut out of the figure of a lady in kirtle 
and mantle, c. 1440. 

In all, portions of six brasses were re-used to make up Rugge's 
memorial. The shield with the arms of Fastolf may have come 
from the abbey church of St. Benet Hulme, as it is known that 
Sir John Fastolf was buried there in 1459, in a chapel which he 
had erected on the north side of the presbytery, where his wife, 
Milicent, a daughter of Sir Thomas Tiptoft, was also buried. 
The fragments of the armed figure and of the lady may possibly 
have belonged to the same brass. There are no means of identi- 
fying the abbot, he may have come from any house. If from 
St. Benet's, it may have represented Nicholas de Walesham, 
who died in 1302, or Henry de Brook, who died in 1325. 

The various reverses of this brass are engraved in Norfolk 
Archicology, vol. xiv. p. 66, and are here reproduced on a slightly 
reduced scale, by kind permission of the Council of the Norfolk 
and Norwich Archaeological Society, 



128 



Norwich, St. Martin-at-Palace. 
On the floor of the Chancel, now partly covered by the choir 
stalls, is a large slab, 8 feet 6 inches x 4 feet, with the indents 
for a commemorative inscription, 18 x 15 inches, in the centre, 
and a large shield of arms, g} x 8|- inches, below, the whole 
surrounded by a marginal inscription, of which the following 
words still remain — ^ am 0'OCV tljtlt ItlP— ClOtljCtl apmiCtDltlj 

— ftcdje ^tt 31 m^ 0clfe— oljall brljoltie Ijjnn not,— on four 

strips of brass, each measuring if inches in width. The work of 
a local engraver. The Rev. F. Bloinefield, in his History of 
Norfolk (8vo. ed. 1805-10), vol. iv. p. 372, thus describes the 
brass, which appears to have been perfect in his time : 

" In the chancel there is a large stone with brass plates, on 
which is circumscribed that passage in xix. Job, verses 25. 26, 27. 

•• 31 am 0bcr tl)at m)' rcticmar Iplictlj ant) tljat 3 0ljall 
rpgfe out of tlje cartlj m tljc latter na^ tljat 3 jJljall be 
clotljeti affainie bjitlj tW ekj'iine anti 0e p^ n^ nt^ aeclje 
^ee 3 mp selfe 0ljaU beljoltie Ijpm not toitlj otljar but \Ditlj 
tljese came e^'e^.' 

" it^ere Ipetlj Ijptin untier tlj^c 0tone 
^Ije bDpfe of s>ir pij^Hpppe Caltljorpe \\\\v%\)t 
ant! clepj'ti 2Dame 3iii^f f!)^ tiotoiyljter of one 
3]Ijon Bleberlja^'00et (E^quier Ije Ijj'jjljt 
^Ije lobeti (15oti'0 loortie anti libeti Ij'ketuise 
^Ije pbe to tlje poore 1 peaj^'ti for tlje xnz^z 
^Ije ruleti Ijer Ijolo^e in mescuer anti cj^cce 
^^e 0pent a0 it eame anti ptljereti not moel)e 
Ulje tiajj of apn'll ttoentp anti 0etien 
(I5oti tiiti Ijec eall from ljen0e on to Ijabben 
anno 1550. 

" Calthorpe impales Bleverhasset, Lowdham, Orton and 
Keldon." 

In Norfolk Avchcsology, vol. i. p. 366, it is recorded that on 
July 2, 1846, the secretary read a letter from Mr. Dawson 
Turner, stating that Mr. Warren, of Ixworth, had sent for the 
inspection of the Society a brass, of which Mr. Turner gave the 
following description : 

" Brass, formerly attached to the stone in the church of St. 
Martin-at-the-Plain [or at-Palace] , Norwich, which commem- 
orated Jane, wife of Sir Philip Calthorpe, Knt., and daughter of 



129 

John Bleverhassett, Esq., who died 153c [error for 1550.] The 
arms upon it are Calthorpe {Cheqiiy or and az., a fess erm.) impaling 
Blenerhasset (Gn., a chevron erm. between three dolphins entbowed az.), 
Lowdham (Arg., three escutcheons sa.), Orton {Vert, a lion rampant 
arg., crowned and armed gu.), Keldon {Gu., a pall reversed erm.). In 
this brass are two things to be remarked, its very unusual thick- 
ness and its having been a portion of a larger plate, on the reverse 
of which had been engraved the figure of a female or priest, 
a part of whose drapery is here visible. The outline of the 
whole shield, and of each smaller coat and its bearing, appears 
raised, owing to the interior of the several figures being depressed, 
except in the or of Calthorpe, and in the argent and ermine, as often 
as they occur. In the case of the or the brass is left and was 
probably only covered with a wash of gold, or with gold leaf. 
Argent and ermine always present a surface of lead, on which small 
fragments of a very tliin white enamel are here and there 
observable, showing that the whole was originally coated with 
such. When other colours were to be represented, a matrix 
composed of red lead, mixed with wax or oil, fills the cavity, 
leaving, however, room for a coat of enamel, considerably more 
thick than the white just mentioned ; but hardly any portion of 
such is anywhere to be seen. In two of the azure compartments 
in the Calthorpe arms, the red lead has been carefully removed, 
exposing the metal, quite irregular in its surface, perhaps left 
purposely so below." Mr. Turner stated that it was Mr. 
Warren's intention to restore the brass to its original position. 
In 1847 the Rev. C. Boutell, in his Monumental Brasses and Slabs, 
p. 150, illustrates the two sides of the shield and repeats Mr. 
Dawson Turner's description. Mr. Warren's good intention was 
not carried out, for The East Anglian Notes and Queries, vol. i. 
(1858) p. 415, contains an enquiry by a correspondent signing 
himself '* L.," as to the whereabouts of this brass. An editorial 
note says, " We have the authority of Mr. Warren, of Ixworth, 
to say that the brass of Jane Calthorpe was bought by him at the 
sale by auction of the effects of the late Rev. George Boldero, of 
Ixworth ; and the late Mr. Goddard Johnson and himself searched 
the Norwich churches to discover the stone from which it had 
been removed. Having been successful in this search Mr. 
Warren left the brass with Mr. Goddard Johnson to have it 
replaced, if possible, but if this could not be done, ^Ir. Johnson 
was to present it in Mr. Warren's name to the Norwich Museum, 
but this does not appear to have been done." In the same 



130 

volume, p. 425, another correspondent, under the initial " A," 
states, " A short time after the decease of the late Mr. Goddard 
Johnson, the palimpsest shield from the gravestone of Jane 
Calthorpe was left with me by the Rev. J. Gunn, to be 
restored to the church of St. Martin-at-the-Palace, with the 
understanding that it was to be refixed to the stone from 
which it had been so long reaved. This has not yet been 
done, but the Rev. S. B. Harris, in whose custody I left the 
brass, has explained the delay, and again promised that it shall 
be replaced. Some fragments of the marginal inscription, which 
have been detached for years, are also in his care, and these, too, 
are palimpsests. A portion inscribed ' Redeemer lyveth and 
that ' is cut out of the same effigy as the shield, and another 
fragment having ' wyth the same eyes ' has on its reverse part of 
a shaft of a canopy, still retaining its original gilding." 

The brasses were never replaced. They were probably sold 
amongst the goods of the vicar on his decease, and after passing 
through various hands were in April, 1902, in the possession of 
Prince Frederick Duleep Singh, Old Buckenham Hall, Norfolk, 
to whose courtesy the writer is indebted for rubbings. 

The pieces now preserved at Old Buckenham Hall consist of 
the shield and three fragments of the marginal inscription, all 
being palimpsest. The shield, which measures 9^ x 8| inches, 





Palimpsest Shield formerly in St. Martin-at-Palace, Norwich. 

About one-fourth full size. 

bears on its obvevse the arms of Calthorpe impaling Blener- 
HASSET quarterly with Lowdham, Orton, and Keldon, and on 



131 

the reverse the lower portion of a lady in mantle, c. 1530. Two 
fragments of the marginal inscription, respectively measuring 7^ 
and 10 inches, join together and have on the obverse side the words 
rCtiemar Ij'betij antJ tljat. These pieces come from the top 
ri^ht-hand corner of the slab, but the indent for the greater part 
of the strip is now covered by the choir stalls. Their reverse con- 
sists of another portion of the c. 1 530 lady ; a small fragment of an 
engrailed charge, either a bend or a saltire, shows that her mantle 



:W^^ ^^sm^mui. 



mtm^^im^'^my >. m. 




Palimpsest Fragments of Marginal Inscription kormerly in 
St. Martin-at-Palace, Norwich. 

About one-fourth full size. 

was charged with heraldic bearings. The third strip, measuring 
13J inches in length, bears on its obverse the words t\)t&t eftllllC 
Z^t'S, and belongs to the top left-hand corner of the slab, being the 
last words of the text. On the reverse is a portion of the shaft of 
a canopy, c. 1530, finely engraved and still retaining traces of 
gilding. 

No doubt the other fragments of the marginal inscription still 
remaining in the slab will be found to be palimpsest should they 
ever become detached. 



Norwich, St. Pkter Mancroft. 
Obverse. Effigy of Peter Rede, Esq., 1568, in armour of date 
about one hundred years earlier, a copy from an older figure.* 

' This is proved by the date of the palimpsest, and by the fact that the fii^ure 
and inscription are cut from the same Flemish brass. 



132 




j5EREVNDEBJJYBTlt^- COUPS OF PETERKJ^DE ESaVI 
' ER->^HOHA*H ^0KHEEV^ERVE,DN0T0NEY H YS 
PKYI^^CEAND•GVNTREY•J5VT•AIESO•lI£•EMPEROR:CHAR 
LESTI^'5' BOtTE-Al-TFECONQVESE OFBARBARIAA>D ATTH: 
«IEGD0F-TVN1SA6-AES^0-1N01HERPLACESWH0RAX)GEV'- 
ENHmBY'Tre-5AYD-EMPFJlOVR- FORHYS-VA LIAVJSTP^^ 
DE,DE5TiEORDER-OFBAKBARIA>)/HO*DYE.DTH: 13' OF 
DECEMBER;IKTH:YEAR0F0VREL0RD'G0D15' 6^ 8- 



Okveksh: and Reverse ok the Brass to Peter Rede, 1568, 
St. Peter Mancroft, Norwich, 

Abuut one-fifih full size 



Very curious, the work of a local engraver. Height of effigy, 21 
inches. Below is the following inscription on a plate measuring 
234 X 6| inches : 

HERE . VNDER . LYETHE Y . CORPS . OF . PETER . REDE . ESQVI 

ER . WHO . HATH . WORTHELY . SERVED . NOT . ONLY . HYS 

PRYNCE . AND CVNTREY . BUT ALLSO . THE . EMPEROR . CHAR; 

LES . THE . 5 . BOTHE . AT . THE . CONQVEST . OF . BARBARIA . AND . AT 

. THE 
SIEGE . OF . TVNIS . AS . ALSO . IN . OTHER . PLACES . WHO . HAD . GEV. 
EN . HYM . BY . THE . SAYD . EMPEROVR . FOR . HYS VALIAVNT . 
DEDES . THE . ORDER . OF . BARBARIA . WHO . DYED . THE 29 OF 
DECEMBER . IN . THE . YEAR . OF OVRE . LORD . GOD I568. 

The brass lies on the floor of the chancel and is engraved 
in J. S. Cotman's Sepulchral Brasses in Norfolk, vol. i. pi. Ixxvii. 
p. 41, and the Rev. H. Haines' Manual of Monumental Brasses, 
Introd., p. lii. 

Reverse. Portions of a large, fine Flemish brass of very late 
fifteenth or early sixteenth century work. The figure of Peter 
Rede has been cut transversely from the plate, thus giving a 
narrow section of about half the brass. At the left-hand side, 
forming the legs and feet of Peter Rede, is a shield charged with 
four piles issuing from tlie sinister} Then in the centre of the figure 
is the greater portion of tfie head of a civilian wearing a cap and 
resting on a cushion richly diapered with flowers and foliage, 
with other diaper work of a slightly different pattern in the 
corners beyond the cushion. This figure was under a canopy, 
traces of which appear on the left and right-hand sides of the 
head. This canopy was also continued on the right-hand side, 
where, forming the head of Peter Rede, is another richly diapered 
cushion, showing that originally there was another figure, 
probably that of the man's wife. 

The inscription is cut out of the same brass and shows a strip 
of the border ornamented with geometrical work, a portion of the 
body of the civilian shovving the right shoulder and hands, and 
in the corner a tassel of the cushion and a small piece of the 
diaper work beyond the cushion. The writer is indebted to Mr. 
L. G. Bolingbroke, of Norwich, for the loan of the rubbing from 
which the accompanying illustration has been made. 

' In foreign heraldry called hiiauche. The family of Holman, originally from 
the Duchy of C\t\t:s, hezr. Parti emaitche d' argent <t de gueules. See T- Wood- 
ward's Heraldry, British and Foreign, veil. i. p. 148. 



134 

Norwich, St. Stephen. 

Effigy of a lady, c. 1410, 23I inches in height, in veil head- 
dress, close-fitting kirtle with long tight sleeves reaching to the 
knuckles, and over-gown with high collar and large, full sleeves. 
To the base of this figure has been attached a plate, 8 X 2f 
inches, bearing two small seated figures of bedesmen, or beggars, 
with crutches and rosaries, and a new inscription added appro- 
priating the figure to Eel (or Ele) Buttry, the last prioress of 
Campsey Ash, Suffolk, who died in 1546, and by her will directed 
her body " To be buryed in the north side of the chappell of ower 
blyssed Ladye" in this church. 

The inscription-plate, 14^ x 35 inches, is the work of a local 
engraver, and reads thus : 

[4arar] for x\)z [ooulir] of GEcl 23uttiT 0iit^me 
prrorrs of Campc00c on toljo0c 0oule 3]fefu 
Ijatir wxzi tlje rrim tia^' of ^ctolin* i^° V^x,M°, 

The first and fourth words of this inscription have been 
defaced, but the clause, " on whose soule, &c.," has escaped 
erasure. 

The brass, which is on the floor of the North Chapel, is 
engraved in J. S. Cotman's Sepulchral Brasses in Norjolk, vol. ii. 
Appendix, pi. i. fig. A. p. 57 (imperfect and erroneously 
assigned to St. Laurence's church) ; Rev. H. Haines' Manual of 
M onuniental Brasses, Introd., p. ccx. (figure only) ; and Norfolk 
Archaeology, vol. vi. p. 295 (effigy and inscription). 

With reference to the Christian name of the prioress about 
which authorities differ, the brass itself giving " Eel," Mr. J. 
Challenor Smith, F.S.A., has kindly sent the following note: 
"William Botery, citizen and merchant of London, will 1535 
(P.C.C. Hogen 30), mentions his sister ' dame Ede, prioress of 
Camisey, Suffolk." 

Norwich, Strangers' Hall. 
A palimpsest inscription, formerly in the possession of the 
late Mr. Bayfield, of Norwich, and supposed to have come either 
from the church of St. Paul, or that of St. James, Norwich, is 
now (1901) preserved in this Hall. 

Obverse. Inscription to Anne, wife of Thomas Randolf, 1536. 
Size of plate, ii4 X 2 J inches. The work of a local engraver. 

Prar for tl)r soulr of ^nnr (atf 
t(jr toifr of '(Iljomn^ Etintiolf 1536. 



o:) 






m"'"' 




Palimpsest Inscription now in the Strangers' Hall, Norwich. 

Al)out one-third full size. 

Reverse. A fragment of a Flemish plate, bearing a portion of 
the face, neck, right shoulder, and two fingers of the right hand 
of a lady, c. 1500. A portion of a brooch and of the cords for 
fastening the mantle also appear. 

Great Ormesby. 
Three-quarter effigy, 22 inches high, of a lady, c. 1440, 

wearing a horned head-dress with veil, 
a close - fitting kirtle, and a mantle 
fastened across the breast by a cord 
and tassels. In her hands she holds 
a heart circumscribed with the words 

(ErtI) mp bor^}f 3 ^i\3c to tlje 
oil mj' 0oule JiW Ijauc m'cj>.^ 

Altered, by the insertion of much 
coarse shading and the addition of an 
inscription (now lost), to represent 
Alice, daughter of Sir William Boleyn, 
and wife of Sir Robert Clere, 1538. 
Loose in the church chest in i8go. 
The casement is under the wooden 
flooring of the Chancel. The figure is 
very inaccurately engraved in J. S. 
Cotman's Sepulchral Brasses in Norfolk, 
vol. i. pi. Ixvi. p. 36, where the in- 
scription and one shield of arms is also 
shown. 




Great Ormesby, Norfolk. 

About one-seventh full size. 



^ See Haines, Introd., p. cvii. The original is much worn. 



136 



Paston. 



Effigy of Erasmus Paston, who died in 1538, in civil dress, 
four English verses, inscription, and two shields. The effigy of 
his wife Mary (Windham), who died in 1596, is lost. The male 
effigy is 25 inches in height, the plate with the verses measures 
24 ^ 5i inches, the inscription-plate i2| x 2f inches, and the 
shields 7 x 6| inches. The brass, which appears to have been 
executed c. 1580, lies on the Chancel floor and is engraved in 
J. S. Cotman's Sepulchral Brasses in Norfolk, vol. i. pi. Ixviii. p. 37. 

So far as at present known only the shields are palimpsest, 
but it is highly probable that the remainder of the brass will also 
be found to be made up of earlier fragments. The plate with the 
verses is composed of three separate pieces, and the inscription- 
plate of two separate pieces, a very suspicious circumstance. 

Obverse. Shield No. I. Quarterly of Twelve I. {Arg.), six 
fleur-de-lys [as.), a chief indented {or). Paston. II. [Ayg.), a fess 
between two chevrons (gn.), the upper charged with a fleur-de-lys {or). 
Peche. III. Erm., on a chief indented {gu.) three coronets {or). 
Leach. IV. {Or), on a chevron between three lions' heads erased {gu.), 
as many bezants. Somerton. V. {Az.), an escutcheon within an orle 
of martlets {arg.). Walcot. VT. {Arg.), a chevron between three 
bears' heads couped {sa.), muzzled {or). Berry. VII. {Arg.), a chief 
indented {gu.). Hemgrave. VI II. {Arg.), a fess between three 
crescents {gu.). Wachesam. IX. {Az.), a lion rampant guardant {or). 
Hethersett. X. {Sa.), a fess between two chevrons {or). Ger- 




Palimpsest Shield, Paston, Norfolk. 

About one-third full size. 



^37 

BRIDGE. XI. (Arg.), on a chevron (g:i.) three fleur-delys {or). 
Peyver. XII. Quarterly, i and 4. {Az.), a cross paiee (or). 
Mautby (.?) 2 and 3. iGu.), a fess (arg.) between thirteen billets {or). 

LOUVAINE.^ 

Reverse. Sliield No. I. A fra^'ment of a Dutch or Flemish 
inscription, late fifteenth century, in raised black letter. 

Obverse. Shield No. II. Quarterly I. and IV. {Az.), a 
chevron between three lions' heads erased (or). Windham. II. and III. 
Quarterly 1 and ^. {A z.), a bend {or). Scrope. 2 and 3. {Arg.), 
a saltire engrailed {gu.). Tiptoft. 




Palimpsest Shield, Pasios, Norfolk. 

About one-third full size. 

Reverse. Shield No. II. A fragment of another Flemish 
brass, rather later in date, c. 1520 (?), with the head of a figure 
resting on a mattress, a portion of a scroll bearing (mi0)rrcrc 
mci tJCUCf, and a shield charged with three wheat sheaves and a 
villi ht. 

These shields are now fastened down. 

Ranworth. 
Obverse. Three scrolls, 7x2 inches, the only remaining 
portions of a brass which originally consisted of a heart, 5^ X 4 

^ See the Rev. E. Farrer's Chwch Hei-aUry of Norfolk, vol. i. p. 376. 



138 - . 

inches, with the scrohs above, and an inscription-plate, i6 x 4 
inches, with a shield of arms, 8x6 inches, below. The case- 
ment, 1 1 feet X 3 feet 6 inches, still remains on the floor of the 
Nave. The brass was the work of a local engraver and may be 
dated c. 1540. The scrolls bear the following words from the 
Office for the Dead, the opening word "Credo" having doubtless 
been engraved on the heart. 

Scrolls : 

(i) qn rcticptor mc' mnit 
I \\\ noiiief0imo tiie 

(2) uc trrra gurrcctur' m 
(tt in rarnc mca 

(3) uiticlio ticum 
gfaluatoie meu 

Reverse. Scrolls (i) and (2) are cut out of portions of a fine 
marginal inscription in raised black letter, c. 1460, and respec- 
tively bear the words : 

(i) u anfflie i ffrancie 

and the first stroke of another letter. 

(2) flfuit q? I 0craicio rcg: 

(2) and (i) may possibly read contmuously. 

Scroll (3) is from a portion of an inscription to Drye, 

citizen of Norwich, 1510, and is the work of a local engraver. 

.... it tirpc mm /13ortoici 
.... n<3 ^ tini W V X 

Loose in the church chest in i8g8, 

S.A.LHOUSE. 

Now lost. Reproduced from a rubbing in the collection of 
the Society of Antiquaries. 

Obverse. Inscription to Henry Tyllis, c. 1540. Size of plate, 
8x2 inches. The work of a local engraver. 

^ic 3|am l^cric' tj^llP 

Reverse. Another inscription to Richard Gardener, chaplain 
c. 1500. Also the work of a local engraver. 



139 

Crate u ciia Eccartii (Bartirncc 
Cap'li cni' alt ppicict' tic' ^mc. 




JHHtEj) flm'torDnsfiriiran; 



Palimpsest Inscription formerly at Salhouse, Norfolk. 

One-half full size. 

The rubbing is endorsed, " this was in the church chest at Sal- 
house, Norfolk, the reverse thickly covered with pitch," but 
unfortunately no date is given. 

Sall. 
Obverse. A mutilated and worn inscription to Geoffrey 
Melman (?), c. 1480. Size of plate in its present condition, 
9f X 2f inches. The work of a local engraver. 

Cerate p iTiabj (Balfritii ^clmaii (?) t . . . . 
feiiiptib? tci I mcrcmio (?) qua carpct'o (?) ac . . . . 




Palimpsest Reverse of Inscription, Sall, Norfolk. 

About one-half full size. 



I40 

Reverse. A small fragment of a Flemish brass consisting of a 
portion of the head of a lady with braided hair and parts of the 
diaper work of the cushion on which her head rested. Date 
c. 1400. 

Loose in the church chest in i8go. 

Shimpling. 

Obverse. Inscription to Thomas Le Grys, Gent., 1692, aet. 
60. Size of plate, 'Sk X 35 inches. Nave floor. 

Thomas Le Grys Gen' 
Obiit 27^'° Septembris 
Anno ^tatis s\jje 60 
Annoque Dom : 1692 

Reverse. Another inscription to Anthony Le Grys, Gent., 
son of Robert and Susan Le Grys, 1598. The work of a local 
engraver. 

Here lyeth bvryed the corps 
OF Anthony Le Grys gent yonger 
son to Robart Le Grys & Svsan 
his wife : He ended this life the 
2oT« OF December 1598. 

This plate has been inaccurately relaid, so that the earlier 
inscription now appears. The explanation is thus given by the 
present rector, the Rev. J. W. Millard : " The brass became 
loose in the time of my pre-predecessor, Mr. Harrison (about 
sixty years ago), when the earlier inscription was revealed, and 
he, thinking that Anthony had the first and best claim, replaced 
the brass with the earlier inscription uppermost, but it was a 
mistake, for, according to the registers, only Thomas was buried 
in the church." See a communication by the Rev. H. E. Field 
to the Transactions of the Monumental Brass Society,' vol. iii., p. 2ig. 
The Rev. C. R. Manning, F.S.A., in Norfolk Archtsology, vol. x. 
p. 202, gives the following account of the plate : " There is no 
entry in the register of the burial of Anthony Le Grys in 1598. 
The brass does not fit the indent in the stone, and it is thought 
probable that it belonged originally to some other church. The 
Le Grys family lived at Billingford and Dickleburgh. Ihe brass 
is a palimpsest, and there is an entry in the burial register signed 
by Henry Harrison, rector, 1830, stating, after recording the 
above [i.e., the 1598] inscription, that 'on the reverse of the same 



HI 

brass is also the underneath inscription, Thomas Le Grys, Gen : 
obiit 27'"° Septembris Anno aetatis suae 60, annoque Dom : 1692.' 
This Thomas was buried here, and the entry is in the register, 
' Tho : Le Grys, Gent., was buried Sept. 28, 1692.' The older 
brass, therefore, of Anthony, brought from elsewhere, was used 
for him." 

SOUTHACRE. 

In 1889, six fragments from the brass to Sir Roger Harsyk, 
1454, and wife Alice, were in the custody of the then rector. 
These fragments consisted of (i) the hands holding an inscribed 
heart, the upper portion missing; (2) and (3) portions of the scroll 
issuing from the top left-hand corner of the heart and bearing the 
words, UtliCili Cil ; CiCrUO tUO tine ; (4) a portion of the com- 
memorative inscription on a scroll, ^{\ XlXiUtl^ t SiliCi ', (5) the 
end of this scroll with the letter Z of "Alicie," and an orna- 
mental twist ; (6) the continuation of the scroll with the words, 
011c qUOr' aiall? DpiCtCt' tintCf am. Two of these fragments are 
palimpsest. No. (i), the hands and heart, bears on the reverse the 
mutilated head of a civilian, c. 1400, and (5), the twist of the 
scroll of the centre part of the commemorative inscription, has on 
the reverse three letters of a Flemish marginal inscription. 

The casement for the Harsyk brass still remains on the 
Chancel floor. It measures 5 feet 6 inches x 2 feet 6 inches and 
shows the indents for the arms, hands, heart, with three scrolls 
issuing therefrom, and two fine achievements of arms in the 
centre of the stone, the commemorative inscription, on a twisted 
scroll, is below, and at the four corners are shields of arms. 
This slab, together with the existing fragments and the palimp- 
sest portions, is illustrated in the Portfolio of the Monumental Brass 
Society, vol i. part x. pi. 3. 

Trunch. 

Now lost. Recorded in the Rev. H. Haines' List of Monu- 
mental Brasses, p. 232, as then (1861) in the possession of Mr. 
Bayfield, of Norwich. It is also entered in the Rev. E. Farrer's 
List of Norfolk Brasses, p. 114, as then (1891) in the same gentle- 
man's hands. Mr. Bayfield is since dead and all trace of the 
brass is now lost. There is a rubbing in the collection of the 
Society of Antiquaries. 



142 

Obverse. A mutilated and much worn inscription to Walter 
Bownyng (?) or Bowmont (?) and wife Melicint (?), 1473. Size of 
plate, i2| X 3I inches. 

(ItLlaltrri Bobin^no: (?) i ^elicit (?) uroricf 

obiit Wmo quarto liic 

. . . 9^° <^€€€' ^^^1131 qwor' iiiiili^ upicict' He' nmc. 

Reverse. A fragment of a Flemish marginal inscription bearing 
the letters CI + t\W^ + ft + enclosed by two narrow fillets 
ornamented with quatrefoils, roses and leaves. The inscription 
is divided by a large quatrefoil enclosing a shield bearing the 
letter W in base, and a crescent and mullet on flanches in chief. 
Both sides of the brass are engraved in the Rev. C. Boutell's 
Monumental Brasses and Slabs, p. 149. 

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 
Nether Heyford. 

French inscription and two shields to John Mauntell and 
wife Elizabeth (Heyford), c. 1400, formerly on a high tomb but 
now on the Chancel floor. One shield only is palimpsest. It 
measures 5I x 4^ inches, and bears on the obverse the arms of 
Heyford, (Gu.), a maunch (arg.), and on the reverse the arms of 
MoNTACUTE (Arg.), three fusils conjoined in fess (gu.), quartering 
LoNGESPEE (Az.), six Uoucels rampant (or). Both sides of the 
shield are engraved in the ArcJasological Journal, vol. ix. p. 300, 
and at p. 385 of the same volume the late Mr. W. S. Walford 
suggests the quarterly coat to be intended for the arms of William 
de Montacute, second Earl of Salisbury of that name, who died 
in 1397, or of William his father, the previous Earl, who died in 
1344, but in this latter case engraved much later. 

Probably the shield was a " waster," rejected for some fault 
in the heraldry. The shield bearing the arms of Mauntell is a 
modern restoration, the original having disappeared. The in- 
scription has also been filled in with composition and the 
palimpsest shield fastened down. 

NORTHUMBERLAND. 

No palimpsest noted in this county. 

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. 

No palimpsest noted in this county. 



1 



143 



OXFORDSHIRE. 

Checkendon. 

I. 

A small piece, 3^ X 2 inches, of the marginal inscription to 
John Rede, 1404, was loose in 1897. On the obverse it bears the 
letter li^ of the surname Rede, and on the reverse a small cross 
and the first stroke of a letter. This piece has since been re- 
fastened in the casement. The writer is indebted to Mr. J. 
Challenor Smith, F.S.A., for this note. 

11. 

Obverse. A mutilated inscription to Edmund Rede, Esq., 
patron of the church, and wife Cristine, 1435. Size of plate in 
its present condition 18J x 3^ inches. 

^k mtt (Etimuliu0 Eetie ^rmiff* nc patron' mi' tzzMz 

qi obiit \iii\° tiie ^ 

CEt Cricftina ur' ti' que obiit iTbiii^tiic Sl^arcii ^° tini Sl^° 

<t€<^€''^^^V 

Reverse. A portion of a side shaft of a canopy with half a 
figure of a female saint, crowned, and holding the shaft of some 
weapon in her hands. This figure is probably intended for 
St. Margaret, the shaft being that of the spear or cross with 
which she is usually represented slaying the monster at her feet. 
Above the figure is a fine crocketted canopy with a background 
of masonry. This fragment is of English workmanship, c. 1400-20, 
and was probably a " waster." The brass is now fixed down in 
the Chancel with keyed screws. Both sides of the plate are en- 
graved in the Transactions of the Monumental Brass Society, vol. iii., 
p. 87. 



144 

EWELME. 

Obverse. Inscription to Henry Lee, fuller and citizen of 
London, and wife Alice, 1494. Size of plate, 18x4!^ inches. 

^rate p ^lafa^ i}cnrici ILtt ffuloiti0 zt tM^ Eoutiou ihi 
^epulti XXI ttm tie abneclj^ccl) zt aiicie ucociefeiugf l)ic Ja 
cet qui {sic) obiit ^' tini 9^° CCCC° Iriaa-iiij till tiic 
Sl^arcii 

Reverse. A small portion of the upper part of the canopy of 
a fine Flemish brass, c. 1360. In the upper tabernacle work is 
the small figure of an angel playing on a musical instrument. 
The main arch of the canopy is crocketted with oak leaves and 
acorns and carries a pattern of running foliage, whilst the back- 
ground and part of a cushion are richly diapered with foliage 
work and seated dogs, or perhaps monsters. The inscription ran 
round the edge on a narrow fillet, but only the initial cross 
appears. 

The brass, which is on the floor of the South Aisle, is now 
fastened down by keyed screws. Both sides of the plate are 
illustrated in the Journal of the Oxford University Brass Rubbing 
Society, vol. i. frontis. 



Goring. 

A civilian and wife, c. 1600, with three sons and five daughters. 
Now fastened to the Chancel wall with a modern inscription 
ascribing the brass to members of the family of Whistler, 
of Goring. It is engraved in H. W, Taunt's Goring, Streatley, 
and Neighbourhood, p. ig, and P. G. Stone's Goring Church and 
Priory, p. 8. 

The children only are palimpsest. The plate bearing the sons 
measures 7x6 inches, and that of daughters 7x8 inches. 
When placed together the following inscription is on the reverse : 



Here liet 
of Langf 
who dece 



H Walter PIrunes 



ORDE Gent 
ASED The 2 
Ano Dni 



LEMAN 

5 DAY OF 

1594 



{Daughters) {Sons) 

Now fastened down. The palimpsest is engraved in Stone, p. 7. 




145 

Mr. Percy Manning writing on the brasses at Goring^ notes 
that " the brass to Walter Prunes, gent,, 1594, and his wife 
Mary, daughter of Thoby Playdell, of Great Faringdon, 1609, 
still remains in Langford Church, Berks," and conjectures that 
" it is possible that the original inscription, which only recorded 
the husband, was discarded for one which included both husband 
and wife, and found its way to the brass-sculptor's workshop in 
consequence." 



Ipsden. 

Obverse. Thomas English, in armour, and wife Isabel, both 
died in 1525, and both slightly mutilated, inscription and shield 
of arms. 

Only the figures, measuring 18 inches in length, are palimpsest. 

Reverse. The male figure is cut out of the upper portion of a 
much larger figure of a lady, c. 1420. She wears a small crespine 
head-dress with veil, a kirtle with tight-fitting, closely-buttoned 
sleeves, and a high-waisted gown fastened by a plain girdle, and 
having a falling collar and large surplice sleeves. Her head forms 
the feet of the armed figure. 

The figure of Isabel English is cut out of an inscription 
in Latin verse of about the same date as the figure of the early 
lady, to which it may or may not have belonged. There are 
fragments of five lines, but three are much cut about. 

uit^[ta]pilton (?) ^pouefa Joljlg? 

(tn 3Ioljri morte niit Ijcregf tentmq} gfub anni& 
[C]t plurc0 miti pat' Ijnc micfcfale lejyauit 
[^] int (?) rpo ffrati ncim oieef cfanctificauit 
t 

The name "Stapilton" is a little doubtful but may be correct. 
It was first suggested by the late Mr. H. Haines. 

The brass has at some time been relaid in a modern freestone 
slab within the altar rails, and quite recently the loose pieces have 
been fixed down with keyed screws by the Oxford Society. Both 
sides of the plates are engraved in the Journal of the Oxford 
University Brass Rubbing Society, vol. i., pis. xxv., xxvi., pp. 253, 254. 

' " Monumental Brasses in the Deanery of Henley-on-Thames," in the Journal 
of the Oxford University Brass Rubbing Society, vol. i., p. 246. 



146 
Oxford, Magdalen College Chapel. 

I. 

Obverse. Inscription to John Caly, M.A., fellow of the college, 
1515. Nearly effaced. Size of plate, 8^ x 2| inches. 

-SDrate p ala 31cp£f Cal^ m'c I artibj 

$ q°ntiam fioti' Ijui' coIUq' q' obiit 

. . . I'unii ^° ^^ V rt cut' ale ppic' He' 

Reverse. A portion of another inscription to Isabel, wife of 
Fyscher, citizen and clothier, 1464. 

^rate p aia Jgfalielle ffp^cljer .... 

ff^0cl)ec tiniQ $ panarii tiu bir . , . 

Hie 31umi ^° tini a^' CCCC Iriiii . . . 

Loose in the bursary in 190 1. 

II. 

Obverse. Effigy, 37I inches in height, and inscription 31I x 
4I inches, to Arthur Cole, S.T.B., president, and canon of 
Windsor, 1558. Engraved in J. G. and L. A. B. Waller's Series 
of Monumental Brasses, pt. xiii. (effigy only). 

Reverse. According to the Rev. H. Haines' Manual of Monu- 
mental Brasses, pt. ii. p. 170, there is on the reverse "a priest 
in chasuble, &c., an inscription to Robert Cobbe, citizen and 
tailor of London, 1506, and wife Margaret, and part of another 
inscription." 

The writer has been unable to find any rubbing, or to gain 
any additional information. The brass was "restored" about 
the year i860, when a new head was added, but the firm 
who carried out the work kept no record of the reverse. 

Oxford, St. Mary Magdalene. 

I. 

Richard Ham den and wife Alice, 1524 ; on reverse of inscrip- 
tion another inscription in French to Margaret Holgote, fourteenth 
century. Now lost. See the Journal of the Oxford University 
Brass Rubbing Society, vol. i. p. 178, for a paper on the " Brasses 
in the Church of St. Mary Magdalen," by Mr. Percy Manning, 
M.A., F.S.A., who quotes from Wood's MS. (Bodleian), F. 2ga 
fol. 333b, as follows : 




147 

" On another [marble stone] under the pictures of a man and 
a woman is this engraven, on brass plates : 

" Pray for the sowles of Rychard Hamden, Esquire, & Alys 
his wyffe, of whose sowles Jesu have mercy : which departed 
An. Dom. 1524. 

" The said Alice was sometime the wife of Georg Havell of 
this parish Brewer, and I think shee lived after 1524." 

" Note y' when the brass (on which the said inscription was 
engraven) was some yeares ago taken up, I read this french 
inscription engraven on the other side : ' qi pur Lalme Margret 
Holgote cy prye devoutement en ciel done Luy soit graunde joye 
de dieu Lomnypotent.' 

" So y' by this it shews y' the said brass had been fastnd to 
another grave, but whether it lay'd here or in another church I 
know not." 

II. 

Obverse. Inscription to Jane, daughter of Thomas Bassett, 
Esq., of Hince, Staffs., and second wife of Robert Fitzherbert, 
Esq., of Tissington, Derbyshire, 1574. Size of plate, 14 x 6 
inches. 

^zxz lietlj burieti tlje botipe ot Jane ffitjljerbert 
gfeconn toiffe of Eobart ffit^Ijcrbert of %mi\\Qto\\ 
i\\ tlje cauiitpe of 2Derbie C^qiiiec nun one of tlje 
2Daug:l)tcr0 of '(]]:ijoma0 Ba^^ett of i^ince i\\ tlje 
countie of ^tafforli Cefquier. W^) 3Iane Dj^eti tlje 27 
of October in tlje peee of our loetie dSoti 1574 

Reverse. Portions of a sixteenth century Flemish or Dutch 
inscription, the five upper lines in raised letters, and the five 
lower in incised letters. 

Ill 

orjyljeleii 0p . . . 
metteii lutie (n) . . 
te Deelc xiii . . . 
te toetteii ij . . . 
3In tie0e l^au . . . 
cElke ffoetie .... 
tail jno:lje0e ... 
pautoelfif till . . . 
liaclj : %t\\ bi . . . 



148 

A border running round three sides of the lower half of the 
inscription shows that this is complete as regards the number of 
lines. 

The brass is now in a wooden frame in the Vestry. Both 
sides of the plate are illustrated in the Journal of the Oxford 
University Brass Rubbing Society, vol. i. p. 179. 

Oxford, St. Peter-in-the-East. 



In the Gentleman's Magazine for 1841, pt. i. p. 270, a corre- 
spondent "J. I." under date March, 1841, reports the discovery 
" under old pews not long since removed " of a loose brass plate 
having on its obverse side the following inscription : 

ft oTatj " ^rate pea animabugf gio^flvii^ C^^ttofe cibigf t^ 
01 ^1 pamtjlrii ^ontioit {iensis) J'^'^s ^-^ 

-i/ ^ Kicartii ^^aton^aru armijyein uefuncti nup^^tie fwrn* 

and on the reverse the following verses : 

, •' ^txxitK terra tfg:at '^zx^H prccat (« remittat) 

iHtvwAy ^m\i\ji^ u^ ^abeat ^iti^x^ agft^ (petat)," 

s^vuT^ / " The italic letters are supplied from conjecture, the end of the 

a^t" / brass being imperfect." 

The brass is mentioned in the Rev. H. Haines' Manual of Monu- 
mental Brasses, pt. ii. p. 173, no doubt from this reference, as 
the entry is marked with a dagger showing that he had never seen 
either the brass or a rubbing. From a paper on the brasses in 
this church published in the Journal of the Oxford University Brass 
Rubbing Society, vol. i. p. igS, it appears from the authority of 
Wood's MS. that the Latin verses should be the obverse and the 
inscription the reverse side, and the conjectured word " remittat " 
should read " resumat." Wood's account' is as follows : " On a 
broken marble stone with this inscription on a brass plate, with- 
out any name : 

" ' Terram terra tegat demon peccata resumat 

' Mundus res habeat spiritus astra petat. 

' As you be so was I, pray you for me 

' For as I am so shall you [be, so] requyryth charyte.' " 



Wood's MS. (Bodleian), F. 29a, fol. 348c. The brass is also described in 
T. Hearne's Collections, vol. i., p. 135 (Oxford Historical Society, 1884). 




149 

The plate with the two English verses still exists but the 
other plate has disappeared. 

II. 

Obverse. Richard Atkinson, alderman and five times mayor 
of Oxford, also a justice of the peace and quorum, 1574, in civic 
mantle, and two wives, the second named Annes, the first 
unnamed, with a group of five sons and six daughters, and a foot 
inscription. The male effigy is 22^ inches in height, the female 
19J inches, the children ii x 6 inches, and the inscription-plate 
28 X 4f inches. 

All palimpsest. 
Reverse. This, with the exception of one piece, is composed of 
the upper portion of a large late sixteenth century Flemish brass, 
very little earlier in date than the obverse side. When the 
various pieces are arranged together the result is a double canopy 
with central pillar and flat-topped arches. Under the dexter 
arch is an achievement of arms, the shield charged with . . a 
tower . . , the crest being a beast's head, the former is represented 
as suspended from the helmet by a ribband and the mantling is of 
the florid and ornate character usual at this period. The sinister 
arch encloses two cherubs holding a lozenge charged with . . a 
tower . . . impaling . . a fess . . . 

The odd piece, which forms the larger portion of the children, 
9x6 inches, is a fragment of a Dutch or Flemish inscription in 
raised black letter relating to the foundation of a mass and a 
dole and reads thus : 

. . . (e)n natv tier }tlntv moef^eit gfal liic prejst .... 

. . . t<st cotiitiiam^tren tanticr }cluev l^tvkiO 

. . . nt pric0terir. W, 0'. bi. ti'. 0:'. altiig na .... 

. . . intcQtev0 ten Dcieit Ijoiyljeix tiineii ba 

. . . te toetene em faroot ban. ii. 0:'. eu c (?) 

. . . aecm0tc man0 en. ti. tie acrmjs 

n al0 ti . . . 

Mr. H. K. St. J. Sanderson gives the following translation of 
this inscription ^ : 
"... and after the said mass shall the priest .... 

. . . daily servitors of the said church 

. . . and priests 7 shillings 6 deniers of grooten always after .... 
. . . masters at the three high seasons of ... . 

... to wit one loaf of two grooten and 

. . . poorest men and the six poorest " 

' Trans. Mon. Br. Soc, vol. ii., p. 144. 



ISO 

The brass should be on a high tomb in the North Chancel 
aisle, but in 1901 the plates were loose at the clerk's house. 
Both sides of the brass are engraved in the Transactions of the 
Monumental Brass Society, vol. ii. p. 144, and on an odd sheet 
issued by the Oxford University Brass Rubbing Society in i8g6. 

Shipton-under-Wychwood. 

Obverse. A quadrangular plate, 27^ x 19 inches, with recum- 
bent figure of Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Thomas Tame 
and wife of Edmund Home, Esq., 1548, in shroud, lying on the 
floor of a panelled room with a small flat, arched canopy above, 
from which hangs a large shield charged with arms of Horne 
(Arg.), a chevron engrailed (gu.) between three unicorns' heads erased 
(az.), impaling Tame (Arg.), a dragon (vert) and a lion (az.), 
crowned (gu.) combatant, quarterly with Clifford, of Frampton, 
CO. Glouc, Chequy (or) and (az.), on a bend (gu.) three lions passant 
guardant of the first, ivith a crescent . . for difference. 

Below is an inscription in twelve English verses : 

C5i0 picture presfcntptljc to ^o^^ Eememberanre 

%iz lajste 0emblptutie of alle ^o^ hz'rsiti^ auti fame 

<aU0o Ijit ^pitffnet'j'etlj tlje moctall cl)aunce 

of CUjabetlje uouffljtec $ Iie^'er of Cljomaef 'Eame 

toljiclje 0umtj?me bja0 tlje Uece anti lotpnge tojjffe 

£)f cnmoittie l^orne (E0qu5er tietorpuffe all ^ei* liffe 

to^ojse mortall botip uoto congfumpti to nugfte 

toais labile Ijere in graue agf b^ nature neD' l)it mu^te 

3|it tbe itxt off Cljrpgftpef Jncarnacpon 

^ t^oto^antie fpbe buntirpti fort^ aim epffbt 

C^e x*b of ^U0:u)3t Ijer bertbuef enclpuac^oit 

brouffljt Ijer to tlje place of tlie eternall Ipg^t. 

Reverse. The plate is composed of two pieces, the top 
5 inches in width, being blank. The remainder, 22^ x 19 inches, 
consists of a black letter inscription, in 22 lines, confirming a 
grant [in 1494] of a messuage in the parson's [fee] at Aylesbury 
to the wardens or masters of the guild or brotherhood, otherwise 
called the Fraternity of the Glorious Virgin St. Mary, Our Lady 
of Aylesbury, by John Stone and his wife Alice, for dirges to be 
sung yearly on the 23rd of April and masses on the following day, 
the vicar to have eight pence, the other priests and clerks two 
pence, and the masters two pence ; but if any default be made 



iSi 

then the wardens or masters of the parish church shall take over 
the messuage and its appurtenances and cause the said dirges 
and masses to be performed. 

[To] all trewe faythfuU & cristen pepull whyche shall see here 

beholde o"" rede thys p'sent 
[wrjytyng John Stone & Alyse hys wyffe send gretyng in o"- 

lorde eu'lastyng be it knowen 
[b] y C univ'site that we have gevyn g'nted & cofirmed by 

chartc & season ys of delyv'ed to the 
[w] ardens or masters of y^ guylde or of the brey'hed otherwyis 

called y^ frat'nyte of the glori' 
[V']gyn seynt marye o"" lady of ayllesbury a mese w' the 

apportenncys lying i the p'sonys 
[fee ?] i ayllesbury i man' forme & codicione here folowyg y' is to 

sey that if y^ sayd masters 
themselfe or by y^ att'neys whatsoeu' they bee I the p'bendall 

churche of this blessyd 
[m] ary o"^ lady of ayllesbury aftyr y^ man' & usage of y^ churche 

of salesbury soleply to be kept 
[si] nge for y sowles of the said Johii and Alyse hys wyffe 

dyryges yerely the xxiij day of 
[a] pryll i tyme to come & alwey to endure & on y^ morowe the 

messes in lyke wyse then 
[They ?J to enioye y*= seyd mese w' this also that [they ?] geue 

unto y« vicarye of y seid churche 
[ye] rely for y« tyme beyng viiiti & distribute to other p'stys & 

clarkys syngyng the 
masses ij'i yerely at y^ place & days aforesayd & more ou' if the 

seyd masters or 
att'neys whiehe (sic) for y« tyme shall be to sup'vide or ou'see 

the p'mysses take for y= 
[la] burs ij'^ that then the forseyde mese w' thap'tynn'cys holy 

remayn to the seyd 
[m] asters & y^ successors for eu'more & if defaute be made yn 

the p'mysses or in aney of 
[the] m at any day o'^ on y^ morowe after aney of theys days 

o"^ of aney of y^ morowys a 
[for] e seyde yn whiehe as it is p'mysed it owth to be done & kept 

y' then y^ forseyd John & 
[Al] ys my wyffe aforesayd wyll & graunte y' the wardens o"^ the 

masters of y*= sayd p'yshe churche 



152 

[of] ayllesbury whiche for y= tyme shall bee take ynto y^ handes 

all ye forseyd mesa [w' th] er apporte 
[nc] es & yt they recey ve season yn y same to fynde y* dyryges 

& masses I man' & forme w'l wrytn 
. . . they & ys successors i the office of y« sayd churche do 
cotynellie y*= same by tymes eu'more to edure 
The first two or three letters in each line are obscured by the 
solder used to fasten the two pieces together. 

The brass is now in a hinged oak frame on the wall of 
the North Aisle. Both sides of the plate are reproduced in the 
Portfolio of the Oxford University Brass Rubbing Society, pt. ii. pi. 6. 

Stanton St. John. 
Obverse. Inscription to Anne Frene, 1524, on a plate with 
curved sides, 12 inches in length at the top, y^ inches at the 
bottom, and 4|- inches in width. The lettering very rude, prob- 
ably the work of a local engraver. 

pre^ for ^^ gfoU of aitne frene 
W Hrpartrti j^^ err of otore 
lortie a m cccccrriiij 




Stanton St. John. 

About one-quarter full size. 

Reverse. The shoulders and hands of a large early figure of a 
lady, c. 1350 (?). Loose at the Vicarage in 1901. The brass was 
removed from the Church about the beginning of the last century, 
but returned in 1869.^ 

' See Proceedings of Society of Antiquaries, 2 S., vol. iv., p. 339. 



153 

Waterperry. 

Walter Curzon, Esq., [1527] , in armour, and wife Isabel, 
daughter of Robert Saunders, Esq., of Harrington, Northants, 
with eight sons and seven daughters, a commemorative foot 
inscription, four shields, and a marginal inscription with text 
from Job. The daughters and foot inscription lost, and the 
marginal inscription mutilated. An appropriated and altered 
brass, originally representing a man in armour, and wife, of date 
c. 1445, and closely resembling the brasses at Cheddar, Somerset, 
to Sir Thomas Cheddar, 1442^ ; West Grinstead, Sussex, to 
Sir Hugh Halsham and wife, 1441^; and Etchingham, Sussex, 
to Sir William Echyngham and wife, and their son Sir Thomas, 

The male effigy, 43 inches in height, has been provided with 
a new head and shoulders ; the palettes which originally protected 
the armpits have been partially erased, but can still be easily 
traced ; additional plates have been added to the breastplate, and 
the edges of all the various pieces have been invecked and 
shaded. The taces have been converted into a mail skirt with 
tonlettis, but on these latter the lines of the taces can still be 
traced. Plates have been added to the kneepieces, gussets of 
mail inserted at the insteps, and the pointed sollerets have been 
rounded. The lion, dagger and sword are untouched except for 
the addition of some ornamental work to the pommel and chape 
of the latter. 

The female effigy is 41^ inches in height. The upper portion, 
igl" inches, is either a new plate or the old one turned over and 
re-engraved. The lower is the original plate unaltered except for 
the addition of some slight shading and the insertion of the long 
chain and pomander box. 

The groups of children, and also the shields, judging from 
their shape, were probably added at the time of the appropria- 
tion. Of the foot inscription there is no record. The marginal 
inscription is curious as giving an unusual rendering of the text 
from Job xix., 25-27, and also as an early instance of the use of 
the emblems of mortality, each word being divided by a skull 
and crossbones alternately, and the whole terminating with the 

'Engraved in the Rev. H. Haines' Manual of Monumental Brasses, Introd., 
p. 190 (detail) ; Proceedings Somerset Archaological Society, 3 S., vol. iv., p. 44. 
- Engraved in the Rev. C. Boutell's ]\Iotiumetital Brasses. 
^ Engraved in the Port/olio of the Monumental Brass Society, No. V., pi. 3. 



154 

initials W. C. A fragment of this inscription bearing the words 
"visuri sumus" was loose in 1845, but has since been lost; on 
the reverse were the words " [A] ugusti mense Kam,"^ from which 
it appears probable that the original inscription has simply been 
reversed. 

The brass has been fully discussed in the Architectural Guide 
to the Neighbourhood of Oxford, pp. 251-263 ; Proceedings of the 
Oxford Society for Promoting the Study of Gothic A rchitecture, Easter 
Term, 1845, pp. 5, 6, 22-29 ) Journal of the Oxford University Brass 
Rubbing Society, vol. i., pp. 1 16-120; and is engraved in the 
Architectural Guide, p. 253 ; Proceedings of the Oxford Society, S'C, 
p. 25 ; The Oxford Manual for the Study of Monumental Brasses, 
p. 16 ; The Rev. H. Haines' Manual of Monumental Brasses, Introd., 
p. 44 ; and the Oxford Portfolio of Monumental Brasses, pt. i., pi. 4. 



RUTLAND. 
No palimpsest noted in this county. 

SHROPSHIRE. 

No palimpsest noted in this county. 

SOMERSETSHIRE. 
No palimpsest noted in this county. 



Engraved in The Proceedings of the Oxford Society for Promoting the Study 
of Gothic Architecture, Easter Term, 1845, p. 25. The word " Kam" seems to 
be an error. 



155 




STAFFORDSHIRE. 

Clifton Campville. 

Obverse. Half effigy of a lady (a widow [?] ) in veil head-dress, 
wimple, kirtle, and mantle, c. 1350-60, on a bracket. The stem, 
canopy, shields, and marginal inscription lost. The figure with 
bracket, measuring 25^ inches in height, is engraved in the 
Rev. C. Boutell's Christian Monuments, p. 139. The slab 

formerly in the 
centre of the Chan- 
cel has recently 
been shifted into 
the South Chantry 
chapel now used as 
a Vestry. 

Reverse. A por- 
tion of the centre 
of the figure of a 
large cross-legged 
knight, c. 1300, in 
banded mail, with 
Clifton Campville, Staffs. surcoat fastened 

About one-twelfth full size. round the waist by 

a cord. Just above this cord is a fragment of the mail mittens 
showing that they were slipped ofif the hands and hung down as 
in the case of Sir Robert de Septvans, at Chartham, Kent. A 
broad belt with a large buckle encircles the hips and supports 
the sword, one quillon of which appears. The hawberk is slit 
in front showing the quilted hacqueton below, and the knee- 
pieces are richly ornamented with a diaper of foliage work. 
This figure was probably a " waster " and used up again in the 
workshop. 

The brass is now loose in the vestry, both sides of the plate 
and also the slab are engraved in the Reliquavy, N.S. (1891), 
vol. v., p. 181. 

Okeover. 
This interesting, but much mutilated brass, an excellent 
example of a palimpsest by appropriation and alteration, may 
best be considered under two headings, (i) the original memorial 
as laid down by the Zouch family, and (2) the appropriation and 
alteration by the Oker family. 




156 
No. I. The Zouch Memorial. 

The brass as originally laid down commemorated William, 
fifth Lord Zouch of Harringworth, and his two wives, Alice 
Seymour, who died in 1447, and Elizabeth St. John. As will 
presently appear the brass was laid down soon after the death of 
his first wife, Alice Seymour. The composition consisted of the 
figure of Lord Zouch in complete plate armour, bare headed, 
with his head resting on his helmet, probably once surmounted 
by his crest, an ass's head, bridled and haltered, a small nick in 
the dexter boss of the canopy marking one of the ass's ears. 
The figure belongs to a well-known type, of which there are 
good examples at West Grinstead, 1441s and Etchingham, 1444^, 
both in Sussex. At the feet of Lord Zouch is his famous family 
badge, an eagle or falcon standing on the branch of a tree 
raguly. The seal of Lord Zouch appended to a document in 
the British Museum (Add. Charter, 21,871), dated 1430, bears 
Quarterly L and IV. Zouch, II. and III. Seymour and Lovel 
quarterly. The helm is surmounted by the crest, an ass's head, 
bridled and haltered, and the shield is supported by two eagles 
or falcons, each standing on a branch raguly.^ The seal of 
William, fourth Lord Zouch, shows both badge and crest, but 
that of John la Zouch the crest only. A standard of John la 
Zouch, temp. Henry VII., has the badge immediately following 
the cross of St. George in the head of the standard, and the field 
semy of asses' heads, with the motto VIRTVTE : NON : VI." 

Lord Zouch's first wife, Alice Seymour, is represented on the 
dexter side, she wears the small horned head-dress and veil, a 
kirtle with close-fitting sleeves, and a fur-lined mantle fastened 
across the breast by a cord with hanging tassels. At her feet 
are two small dogs with collars of bells. The second wife, 
Elizabeth St. John, is on the sinister side, her costume is iden- 
tical® with that of Alice Seymour, except that she is represented 
with long flowing hair encircled by a narrow fillet. Figures with 
long flowing hair are generally considered to represent maiden 

' Engraved in Boutell's Monumental Brasses of England. 
'• Reproduced in the Portfolio of the Monumental Brass Society, pt. 5, pi. 3. 
^ This seal is engraved in Proceedltigs of the Society of Antiquaries, 2 S., vol. 
xvii., p. 52, 

* Engraved Ibid., p. 53. 

* Messrs. Waller say this figure has "a gown with loose hanging sleeves," but 
this is not the case. 



157 

ladies, but occasionally married ladies are so represented, as at 
Wilmslow, Cheshire, 1460,^ Mugginton, Derbyshire, c. 1475^ 
and Tattershall, Lincolnshire, 1479.'' The effigy of Anne of 
Bohemia, queen of Richard II., in Westminster Abbey Church,^ 
and that of one of the wives of John Tiptoft, Earl of Worcester, 
1470, in Ely Cathedral Church,'* show the same peculiarity. 

The canopy is a fine triple one with embattled cornice below 
the figures. On the main finials are shields of arms, and from 
the evidence afforded by these it is possible to identify the second 
wife. Of the three shields below the figures there is no record, 
as they were entirely renewed by Oker in 1538. 

The marginal inscription can only be partially recovered, the 
fragments read thus : 

+ ^it iaceitt CLclUllmcf 3Dngf %(\ 50uc[l)] 

, . CL<^(^(Z.° Ct 2Dna Alicia [uror zim filia] 

} l)[nTef y^ili] \sm tic ^e^mo>^ [m] .... que obiit rrf 

[Hije [meii]0' JwMi ^° tiiti a^° <^<Z(t<^ [ribii] 

€€■"" ^mf aiab? p'picictur 

titm ^[nten] 

The words in brackets, now lost, are from a rubbing in the 
collection of the late Sir A. Wollaston Franks, and now in the 
possession of the Society of Antiquaries of London. This 
inscription is valuable as giving the date of the death of Alice 
Seymour. It also shows that three dates were intended to be 
recorded, but two of these were never filled in. 

To return to the heraldry, the most interesting piece of 
evidence in relation to the persons commemorated by this brass 
appears on the two shields on the main finials of the canopy. 
These shields are a hoiiche, long and somewhat narrow, approach- 
ing the square shape, with the outlines produced by a series of 
concave lines. On brasses they are early examples of this form 
of shield, but instances occur on seals at this date and even 
earlier. 

The shield on the centre finial is divided into three coats per 
pale : the centre Zouch, gules, hezanty and a quarter ermine ; the 

' Engraved in Boutell's jMonuinental Brasses of England. 

' Engraved in Archa:ologual Journal , vol. xxxi., p. 375; and J. C. Cox, 
Churches of Derbyshire, vol. iii., p. 218. 

^ Engraved in Gough's Sepulchral Moniitnents, vol. ii., pi. xcviii., p. 267. 
* Engraved in Gough's Sepulchral Alonumenls, vol. i., pi. ixii., p. 163. 
' Ibid., vol. ii., pi. Ixxxix., p. 226. 



iS8 

dexter Seymour, argent, two chevrons gides, quartering Lovel, or, 
semy of crosses-crosslet, a lion rampant azure ; ^ the sinister St. John 
of Bletso, as in the next shield to be described. 

The shield on the sinister finial contains a very curious com- 
pound coat of St. John of Bletso. It is divided perfess, and the 
upper part again divided per pale, with the arms of Beauchamp 
of Bletso : gules, on a fess between six martlets or, a mullet sable pierced 
of the second, on the dexter ; and those of Patshull of Bletso : 
argent, a fess between three crescents gules on the sinister. The lower 
half of the shield is completely filled with the coat of St. John 
of Bletso : argent, a bend gules, on a chief of the last two midlets 
or pierced of the second.^ The shield on the dexter side appears to 
have been renewed by Oker in 1538. Its loss is much to be re- 
gretted, but it may fairly be assumed to have borne Seymour, as 
in the dexter impalement of the centre shield. 

William, fifth Lord Zouch of Harringworth, succeeded to the 
barony on the death of his father in 1415, made proof of age in 
1423,^ and was summoned to Parliament from 1425 to 1462, in 
which year he died. His first wife was Alice, only daughter and 
heiress of Richard, Lord St. Maur or Seymour, by Mary, daugh- 
ter and heiress of Thomas Pever, of Toddington, Bedfordshire, 
and widow of John Broughton.'* She was a posthumous child, 
born on the 24th of July, 1409, in the house of Thomas Cressy, 
citizen and mercer of London, in the parish of St. Lawrence, 
Cripplegate, and there baptised.' She made proof of age in 1423, 
being then married to Lord Zouch,'' by whom she had two sons 
and two daughters, and, as the inscription tells us, died on the 
2ist of July, 1447. 

Lord Zouch's second wife was Elizabeth, a daughter of Sir 
Oliver St. John of Bletso, by Margaret, daughter and heiress of 
John Beauchamp of Bletso.'' She survived him, and afterwards 

' The arms of Lovel were quartered by Seymour through the marriage of Sir 
Nicholas de St. Maur with Muriel, daughter and heiress of Richard Lovel, Baron 
Lovel of Gary. This quartered shield of Seymour is shown on the seal of Lord 
Zouch. 

- These two shields are engraved in the Proceedings of the Society of Anti- 
quaries, 2 S., vol. xvii., p. 55. 

^ Calendarium Inquisitionum post mortem (Ed. 1828), vol. iv. , p. 82. 

^ G. E. C's Complete Peerage, vol. vii., p. 24, under St. Maur. 

■' Ibid., and Banks' Z>^;'wa«/ and Extinct Peej-age, vol. ii., p. 518, from a 
pedigree of St. Maur on the claim of Sir Gecil Bishop to the barony of Zouch of 
Haryngworth, before the House of Lords {Sessions Papers, vol. viii., p. 259). 

^ Calendarium Inquisitionum post mortem (Ed. 1828), vol. iv., p. 82. 

' Harl. MS. 1074, printed in Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, vol. 
vi., p. 213 ; G. E. C.'s Complete Peerage, vol. vii., p. 86, under Scrope of Bolton. 



159 

married, as his second wife, John le Scrope, fifth baron Scrope of 
Bolton, K.G. She was living in 1489, when she is mentioned in 
a petition of John, seventh Lord Zouch, for a partial reversal of 
his attainder, as " Elizabeth, wife of John Scroupe, Knt., Lord 
Scroupe of Bolton, grandmother of the said Lord Zouch." ^ 

To understand the St. John shield, it is necessary to carry the 
pedigree of this family a step back. Roger Beauchamp of Bletso, 
who died in 1379-80, married Sybil, one of the daughters and a 
co-heiress of William de Patshull, and through her inherited the 
Bletso property. His great-grandson, John Beauchamp, married 
Edith Stourton, and left two children, a son, John, who died 
young and unmarried, and a daughter, Margaret, who, on the 
death of her brother, became heiress to the estates, and carried 
them by marriage to Sir Oliver St. John of Bletso, by whom she 
had three daughters, Edith, Mary, and Elizabeth, and two sons, 
John and Oliver. On the death of Sir Oliver St. John, his widow 
married John Beaufort, first Duke of Somerset, and by him had 
an only daughter, who subsequently became the mother of King 
Henry VH. Margaret's third husband was Lionel, Lord Wells. 

That the brass commemorated Lord Zouch and his first wife 
Alice Seymour, is proved without doubt from the fragments of 
the inscription, but until the discovery of the arms on the two 
shields there has been an uncertainty as to the identity of the 
second female figure. This uncertainty is now removed, as the 
heraldic evidence proves the figure to represent Elizabeth St. 
John, second wife and subsequently widow of Lord Zouch. 
From the costume of the figures and from the general style the 
drass must have been laid down within a very few years from 
the death of the first wife, and it may be that the second wife 
chose to have herself represented with long flowing hair, in order 
to show that she was the living, or possibly the younger in point 
of years. 

Where the brass was originally laid down and how it came 
into the possession of the Oker family the writer has been unable 
to discover, but possibly it formed part of some monastic spoil 
purchased by Humphrey Oker and converted to his own use. 

No. 2. The Oker Memorial. 
The Zouch brass, still in its original slab, having passed into 
the possession of the Oker family, was now converted into a 

' Rottili ParlianientorHm, vol. vi., p. 424. 



i6o 

memorial for Humphrey Oker, Esq., who died in 1538, his wife 
Isabel, a daughter of John Aston, Esq., and their thirteen 
children. The canopy remained untouched except that two of 
the shields were reversed, the notch a louche skilfully filled up, 
and the Oker arms in the one case, and those of Oker and Aston 
impaled in the other, engraved on the plates. The third shield 
seems to have been renewed or perhaps rubbed down and the 
Zouch charges completely obliterated, it was also broken at the 
upper dexter corner, so a new piece was brazed on, and the 
impaled arms of Oker and his wife engraved on the reverse. 
The new corner piece was cut out of a larger figure and shows 
lines of drapery.^ 

With regard to the figure of Lord Zouch, portions of the 
body armour were cut away and a tabard charged with the Oker 
arms made in the indent thus created. The upper part of the 
helmet with its crest was removed, or may have been previously 
lost, and the Oker crest — an oak tree eradicated — together with 
the word ^ktV substituted. This crest is cut out of an older shield 
bearing a cross fleury between two martlets in chief, perhaps the 
part of a shield with the arms attributed to Edward the Con- 
fessor.^ The lower part of the helmet belongs to the original 
figure, and strangely enough the Zouch badge was allowed to 
remain at the feet of figure. 

The lady on the dexter side remained unaltered and passed as 
Isabel Oker, but the lady with the long hair on the sinister side 
was not wanted, so her figure was reversed, and thereon were 
engraved the Oker children in three rows, each child with its 
name beneath. 

SDotorat^e 

The head and shoulders of the figure were filled up with the 
impaled shield of Oker and Aston placed on an oak tree, together 
with an inscription stating the shield to represent 

%\\t armH0 of iSDker anti Sl^ton 

' See Portfolio of The Monumental Brass Society, pt. ix., pi. 6. Reverse of 
shield B. 

^See Portfolio of the Monumental Brass Society, pt. ix. pi. 6. Reverse of 
Oker crest. 



^Wn 


Eoffirr 


laauf 


il^icola^ 


3ol)n 


Eob't 


^illm 


C5om0 



i6i 

It may also be noticed that the heads of the small dogs at the 
lady's feet have been filed off. The shields below the figures 
appear to have been wholly renewed. The centre one bears the 
arms of Oker, and the other two, Oker impaling Aston. The 
one and a half now remaining are cut out of some large figure 
and show lines of drapery on the reverse.^ 

The marginal inscription was simply reversed piece by piece 
and re-engraved for Oker. It is imperfect, but the following 
remained about 1855 : 

+ i^fre unticr tljp0 jstottc l^etlj b 

€)feer t^qii'^tt mmt^mt Eorti of €)ker aitu 31 Cabell \^^& 
topfe Uotoff^ter of Joljix ^0to t&qn^tv $ 2Dame (Elefabet^ 

1)^0 tD^fe tlje toljiclje ^umf tieceefs^ti tljc ia*b tia^ of 

SiT^vcU tlje ^crc of our lorti 

gfouleis $ ^U crieftcn efoul' 3^11 Ijaue m'ci ante 

The arms of Oker are Ermine, on a chief gules three bezants ; 
and those of Aston argent a fess and in chief three lozenges sable. 

About the year 1857 the whole brass was stolen from the 
church, and the fragments which were recovered were mostly 
broken into pieces ready for the melting-pot. In all, fifty-five 
pieces were rescued, but the interesting armed figure from the 
centre had disappeared, and no trace of it has since been found. 
The figure of one lady was recovered perfect, but only about 
two-thirds of the other, and that in twenty-one pieces. The 
canopy and inscription were also broken up, but the majority of 
the former, and eleven pieces of the latter, as well as the three 
shields from the finials, and one shield and half a shield from the 
lower part were saved. All the fragments were for many years 
preserved in the neighbouring hall, but in 1897 the present repre- 
sentative of the Oker family had them securely fixed to an oak 
board and replaced in the church, the palimpsest parts being no 
longer visible. The original slab, formerly in the chancel, 
disappeared some years ago during a " restoration." 

A beautiful plate of the brass as the Oker memorial, but with 
the inscription very imperfect, is included in Messrs. Wallers' 
Series of Monumental Brasses. The brass has also been reproduced 
in the Portfolio of the Monumental Brass Society, pt. ix. pi. 4, the 
Zouch memorial ; pi. 5, the Oker memorial; pi. 6, as in 1897; 
and in the Portfolio of the Oxford University Brass Rubbing Society, 
pt. i. pi. 6, the Oker memorial ; pi. 6a, the palimpsest portions. 
' Iduf. Reverse of shields C and D. 



l62 



SUFFOLK. 

Ampton. 

Obverse. A lady, c. 1490, facing to the dexter and slightly 

mutilated. She wears 
a butterfly head-dress 
and a gown edged and 
trimmed with fur, 
open at the neck and 
with close-fitting 
sleeves. Height of 
effigy 12 inches. 

Reverse. A portion 

of the lower half of 

the figure of another 

lady, c. 1470, in gown 

edged and trimmed 

with fur and having 

full sleeves. Probably 

a "waster " from the 

workshop. 

Now fastened to 
Ampton, Suffolk. ^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ 

One-quarter full size. 




Bury St. Edmunds, St. Mary, 

Obverse. Inscription to WiUiam Fairclyffe, 1600. Size of 
plate, 17x3 inches. Local. 

^ecuntiec Ipetf) t^e boDp of ^lilliam ffaircl^ffe 

^B^ 1600 
of bur^ ^t c^timuutisf ^e liieti t^e xxii of a^arcfj 

The engraver having miscalculated the spacing has interpolated 
the date between the two lines. 

Reverse. A portion of another inscription to Eleanor Wynn, 
c. 1400 (?) 

^k mzt (Elianora ?L21^nn quontiam ur . . . . 
que obiit rb bir mtmi^ martii a° bni Sl^° 

Loose in the vestry in 1903. 



i63 

COOKLEY. 

Obverse. William Broune, 1587, buried in *' Reindam " 
church, and wife Margery, 1594, with 4 sons, 4 daughters, and 
foot inscription; their son, Richard, placed the memorial in 1595. 
Nave floor. 

Reverse. So far as at present known only the plate, 6x5 
inches, bearing the daughters is palimpsest, having on the reverse 
a fragment of an English inscription of about the same date as 
the obverse : 

HERE LIETH .... 
GENTILMAN . . . 
FRANCIS SCRO . . . 

Probably a " waster." 



Denham. 

Obverse. Anthony, third son of Sir Edmund Bedingfield, 
1574, with foot inscription. Size of figure, 24^ inches ; of inscrip- 
tion-plate, 2 if X 3 inches. 

Reverse. The late Rev. C. R. Manning made the following 
communication to Notes and Queries, 5 S., vol. xii. (Nov. 29, 1879), 
p. 428 : — " In Denham Church, Suffolk, is the brass of Anthony 
Bedingfield, 1374. The plate is two feet in height and represents 
him in a gown. This brass was stolen a few years ago, but has 
now been fortunately recovered and replaced. It is found to be 
(so to speak) a palimpsest. The reverse is the extreme lower 
portion of a much larger Flemish brass, representing the feet 
and flowing robes of apparently three persons, with part of an 
inscription : 

Hie iacet dopnus Jacobus 

Wegheschede natus de 

bergis monachus professus 

T . . . sacerdos huius monasterii 

qui obiit 

" At each end of the inscription is a small coat of arms, viz. 
I. and IV. apparently, ermine, three lozenges (the ermine spots 
nearly as large as the lozenges), II. and III. chequy (of nine 



1 64 

squares). From the lettering and drapery it does not appear to 
be much earlier than 1500." 

The brass is on the Chancel floor, but the palimpsest is now 
fastened down and the writer has been unable to see any 
rubbing. 



Hadleigh. 

Obverse. Inscription in twenty English verses to Rowland 
Taillor, D.C.L., rector of Hadleigh, and martyr, 1555. Brass 
engraved c. 1560 (?). Size of plate, 22 J X 15^ inches. Mural. 
North Chapel. 

(Bloria in alti^gfimigf \ito 
^t Kotolann 'ZITaiUor^ fame g 0\}t'oit 

an txczUtnt SDeti^nir 
Sin\i 2Doctor of tiic Cibill latoe 

a preacher rare anti t^m 
l^in^t ^enrpe anti I^inge CUtoarli' Ua^egf 

preacfier anli pardon Ijcre 
^\iat gate to (I3oti cont^nuall praise 

anti kept lji0 flocke in feare 
ianti for tl)e trutlje ronuempneti to Upe 

^e toajEf in fierce flame 
?lflli^ere Ije receiteti pac^entlie 

die torment of t^e efame 
anti 0trong:lie gfuffreli to t^entie 

CLQll)ic!je matie tfie 0tanner0 b^ 
%tio^cc in (Eoti to gfee t^eire frentie 

anti paeftor 00 to ti^e 
<SD Caillor toere t^ie m^g^tie fame 

^prig^tlH l)fee inroltie 
^l)ie SDeeUe^ te^erbe tijat tlii0 gooti name 

toere jsip^ereli iitvt in goltie. 

^biit anno tini. 1555. 

Reverse. A portion of a large Flemish brass, c. 1500, showing 
the head, shoulders, and hands of a civilian, with a richly 
diapered background of foliage work. On the upper left-hand 
side is the lower portion of a figure in a long flowing robe, 



i65 

probably part of an angel who may have been supporting a 
shield above the man's head. Immediately below this figure 
is the head and a portion of the stem of a cross. The outer 




Hadleigh, Suffolk. 
Reverse of Inscription to Rowland Taillor. 

About one-fifth full size. 

border, of which a small fragment remains, appears to have 
carried the inscription on a long-curved scroll, the bottoms of 
two letters may be seen at the top left-hand corner, the space 
between the curves being filled with foliage. The civilian is 
represented with long curly hair and wears an embroidered 
doublet with a chain round his neck and a gown faced with fur. 
Both sides of the plate are engraved in Proceedings Suffolk Institute 
of Archeology, vol. iii. p. 6i. 



Halesworth. 

Obverse. An inscription, mutilated, to John Browne, of Hales- 
worth, who died August 23rd [1581J, aged 80 years and 25 
weeks ; by his only wife he had 6 sons and [10] daughters, he 
had also 65 grandchildren, 54 being alive at the time of his death. 
Size of plate in its present condition, ii| x 6^ inches. 



i66 

^tve l^n^ 31ol)n Brotone ot ^allt^ 

qupet Ipte anH tiieti tlje rriij of ^uju 

of t!)affe of %dBdB^ ^ear^jS anti 3^5BF toea , . . . 

U^ om\^ toiffe toitl) tofiom |)c l^beD 

pearegf anti ffite monetljcef 0ir 

tiaug:f)trr0, i)e liauti al0o Ut ffran 

liiii toere libing:e at tl)e tia^e of I) 

Reverse. A portion of a large Flemish brass of early sixteenth 
century date, with part of a figure of a civilian, a diapered back- 
ground and a fragment of the marginal inscription, it 0tCVt . , . , 
with an outer border of foliage. 

Now fixed on a hinge on the wall of the South Aisle. This 
inscription together with the upper part of a lady, a group of 




Halesworth, Suffolk. 
Reverse of Inscription. 

About one-fourth full size. 

six sons and a mutilated group of ten daughters, no doubt the 
wife and children of John Browne, were recovered from the river 
Waveney in 1825 as recorded in the following modern inscription : 

" These brasses were dragged out of the river Waveney 
in the year 1825, at a spot called the ' roaring arch ' at the 
second bridge on Earsham dam ; and fell into the hands 
of Rev^- S. Blois Turner, by whom they have been restored." 



SURREY. 
Betchworth. 



A shield, 52 x 4f inches, found amongst rubbish in the 
churchyard, but now in the British Museum. For many years it 



1 6; 




was in the possession of the late Mr. Albert Way who communi- 
cated the following note to the Archcsological Journal, vol. xii. 
p. 293 : 

" Impressions from a palimpsest brass escutcheon, found in a 
very decayed condition, amongst rubbish in the churchyard of 
Betchworth, Surrey. The two faces of this plate are here 

represented. The more 
ancient, possibly engraved 
about the commencement 
of the fifteenth century, 
presents a merchant's 
mark, composed of the 
letter H, terminating at 
top in two streamers, 

which cross so as to re- 
Palimpsest Shield from Betchworth, , , -rxr t^, „ 

' semble a W. The up- 

oURRKY 

About one-fourth full size. strokc is traversed by a 

bar terminating in a cross at one end, and at the other in a 
symbol of frequent occurrence in these marks, which bears 
resemblance to the Arabic numeral 2. 

" The obverse of the escutcheon found at Betchworth presents 
the bearing of the Fitz-Adrians, who held the manor of Brockham 
in the parish of Betchworth, under the Warrens. In the 
Visitation of Surrey by Clarencieulx, temp. Henry VIII. (Harl. 
MS. 1561, p. 3),' the arms of Adryan, Lord of Brockham, are given 
thus : Arg., two bars nehiUy sa., a chief cheqiiy ov and az. The chief 
was doubtless derived from the Warrens, whose feudal tenant, 
the Fitz-iVdrians, or Adyans, appear to have been. The fashion 
of the escutcheon here represented, however, is of much later 
date than the time when the male line of the Adrians failed, 
according to the statement in Manning and Bray's History of 
Surrey, vol. ii. pp. 209, 211, namely, between 1356 and 1378, 
when Thomas Frowick, who married the heiress, succeeded 
them, 

*' The south side of the chancel at Betchworth has belonged 
from time immemorial to the manor of Brockham, and the plate 
may have been one of several coats afBxed to some memorial of 
the Frowicks, there interred." 

The charge on the obverse side is clearly, Vair. a chief chequy. 
Both sides of the plate are engraved in the Archcuological Journal, 
as above ; Gentleman's Magazine, vol. xliii. N.S. 1855, p. 270; and 
Surrey Archaological Collections, vol. xv. p. 28. 

' .See P't'si'/ations of Surrey, Harleian Society, vol. xliii. p. 229. 



i68 

Camberwell St. Giles. 
I. 
Obverse. Inscription to Edward, son of John Scott, Esq., 
1538. Size of plate, 2oi x 2f inches. 

€)f [^o»^ cl)arite p'^' for f jsoullc] of Ctitoarli ^cott on of 

^f lEfoneef of ^Joljir 
^cott (E^quier toijicljc Ctibjarti nece^gf^li ^^ ,ia*u*t1i tia^ of 

»)eptlbc ano tini 

9^°tmfxxx\}im [on to^ogfe gioulle $ all x^tw jsouir 3||u 
l)aue merc^e]. 

The words in brackets have been defaced, but so Hghtly as to 
be easily legible. 

Reverse. Composed of two pieces of brass, one, 4 inches in 
length, is blank, the other, i6i inches in length, is a portion of an 
inscription to John Ratford, citizen and glover. The fragment 
reads thus : 

^iz iacet 3Jol)' Katforn €ini^ tt Cirot 

obiit xxix° tiie meit0' ^eptembci^ tm\X9i ai . . . . 

Cirot . . . = cirotecarius or chirothecarius, a glover, from 
chirotheca, a glove or gauntlet. There is no date on the fragment, 
but the style of lettering places it in the last half of the fifteenth 
century. Of John Ratford himself the writer has been unable to 
find any information. 

The brass is now in a hinged oak frame on the back of the 
choir stalls on the North side. 

II. 

Obverse. An inscription and shield of arms to Margaret,, 
daughter of Matthew Keleatt, gent., of Surrey, and wife of John 
Dove, by whom she had five sons and four daughters, and died 
on April 22, 1582. 

The inscription, i6| x 5 inches, is as follows: 

^zu l^rtlje bur^eti tl)e Boti^ of Q^argarrt 2Dobe 
topfe to 3Ioljix 2Dobe tiaug^ter of S^atljeto I^eleatt 
of ^ucrcp (gentleman, anti l)ati 3|00ue h^ t^e jefaiti 
31ol)n t) ^ounesf ann iiij 2Dauo:ljter0 $ Ueceagf^en 
tit xxH na^e of ^prill ^nito tiomini 1582 

The shield, 6J x sk inches, bears the arms of Dove, Per 
chevron (az.) and (vert) three doves volant {arg.), impaling Keleatt 
or Kellet {arg.), on a mound [vert) a hoar passant [sa). 



169 

Reverse. This inscription and shield of arms are cut out of 
portions of a large Flemish brass of very late fifteenth or early 
sixteenth-century work. The inscription consists of a portion of 
an ornamental border containing two small figures of monks as 




Palimpsest Inscription, Camberwell, Surrey. 

About one-fourth full size. 

" weepers," and a portion of a Latin inscription on a scroll with 
a twisted end. Only four words remain, as follows : 

^10 + bino + mtwQt + »)tcuuti' 

The background is filled with a diaper of foliage work. 

The shield shows a mere fragment of a figure. The ground- 
work is divided into large squares, 
and resting on this is a naked foot 
and the endof some drapery, most 
probably a portion of a figure in a 
shroud. The base and portion of 
a shaft of a canopy also appear. 
An early example of a brass of 
this type occurs in the Cathedral 
at Bruges, to Joris de Munter 
and wife, 1439. It is figured in 
the Rev. W. F. Creeny's Monu- 
mental Brasses of the Continent of 
EtiYOpe, p. 25. In the church of 
St. Jacques, in the same city, is 
another to James and Kateline 
Bave, 1464, and at Lubeck is one 
as late as c. 1550, to two unknown persons. 

The brass is now in a hinged oak frame on the back of the 
choir stalls on the North side. The reverses are figured in 
Surrey Archaological Collections, vol. xv. p. 31. 




Palimpsest Shield, 
Camberwell. 

About one-third full size. 



170 
Cheam. 



A man in armour with collar, c. 1480, and two shields. Wife 
and inscription lost. This may be the much-worn brass mentioned 
by Lysons, with small effigies of John Yerde, who died in 1449, 
and wife Anne, who died in 1453. If so, it must have been laid 
down some years after the date of their death, for the costume 
certainly points to a date between 1475 and 1480. 

One of the shields, 3f x 3J inches, is palimpsest, on the ohvevse 
m m\ w it bears the arms of CouRTENAV 

Jill ^1 1| WXi^ impaling Yerde. On the reverse 

F^ Bi I I . ' is a merchant's mark of simple 

design which may be intended 
to form the initials of T.H. 
This has now been fastened 
down, the small figure of the 
man and the two shields having 
been inlaid in a new stone. 
Both sides of the shield are illustrated in Surrey Archaological 
Collections, vol. iii. p. 339. 




Cheam, Surrey. 

About one-third full size. 



II. 

Thomas Fromondes, Esq., 1542, in civil dress, and wife 
Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of John Yerde, Esq., with six sons 
and four daughters, all kneeling, a representation of the Holy 
Trinity, an inscription, and three shields of arms, two of which 
are lost. 

The whole of this brass is palimpsest, being made up of 
various fragments. These are respectively lettered A, B, C, &c., 
on the accompanying illustration. 

A. Obverse. The representation of the Trinity. 

Reverse, Two hands issuing from clouds and holding a heart, 
inscribed : 31 ^C ^Sft ^lllOC 1110'. This is again encircled by a 

scroll, inscribed: libera me line tie morte 

and in the upper angles are the words, ^I^U Itt'e^. 

B. Obverse. Shield of arms, with Fromondes quartering 
Ellenbridge and impaling Yerde. 

Reverse. A fine early shield bearing the arms of the See of 
Lincoln. 







Oou0l}tn^Hnirl)fperof |otrti'pt?itr<?liiitp?r\i)ini1if Gliomas' ^frrlTpiJiJie! 



Obverse of Brass to Thomas Fromondes, Cheam, Surrey. 





172 

C. Obverse. The figure of Thomas Fromondes. 

Reverse. The right elbow, hands, and lower portion of a lady 
kneeling at a desk. The girdle with its long pendent end is well 
shown. 

D. Obverse. The figure of Elizabeth Fromondes. 

Reverse. The lower portion of the kneeling figure of a civilian 
with long gown and rosary hanging from belt. 

E. Obverse. The four daughters. 

Reverse. A few engraved lines making the outline of a face, 
probably only scratching on a waste piece of brass. 

F. Obverse. The six sons. 

Reverse. A small piece of canopy work with about three- 
quarters of the figure of St. John the Evangelist. 

G. Obverse. The inscription. 

Reverse. The greater part of a shrouded figure of a man. 

All the fragments, with the exception of the arms of the See 
of Lincoln, may be dated between 1500 and 1520. The shield 
bearing the arms of Lincoln is much earlier, probably about 
1420. 

The brass is now hung in a wooden frame so that both sides 
can readily be examined. It is preserved with the other brasses 
and monuments in the Lumley Chapel, the only part of the old 
church now remaining. 

In the Stirrey Archceological Collections, vol. iii. pp. 340, 342, are 
lithographs, full size, of the obverses and reverses of A. and B., 
and at p. 342 is a woodcut of the figure of St. John, Both sides 
of the brass are reproduced in the Portfolio of the Monumental Brass 
Society, part iv. pi. 5, and in the Surrey Collections, vol. xv. p. 33. 

III. 

An inscription to Bartholomew Fromondes, " nuper de 
Cheym," 1579, with two shields. 

The two shields, 5^ x 4^ inches, are palimpsest, having on 
the obverse the arms of Fromondes, and on the reverse another 
coat charged with two bends. Both are alike. The shields are 
now fastened down, having, together with the inscription, been 
inserted in a new stone. 

COBHAM. 

Obverse. A man in armour, c. 1550, bareheaded, and with 
long beard. Nothing is known of the person commemorated by 



173 

this brass, but it has sometimes been attributed, on the authority 
of Manning and Bray,' to one James Sutton, " bayle " of the 
lordship, who died in 1530. The figure is 24I inches in height. 





Palimpsest Brass at Cobham, Surrey, c. 1550 and c. 1510. 

About one-eighth full size. 

Reverse. The greater part of a priest, c. 1510, in eucharistic 
vestments holding a chahce and wafer ; the former, which is of 
large size, is inscribed on the bowl with the words CECitO lit 311'^^' 
and the latter bears the word 3Il)i2f. 

The brass is fixed with movable screws to a pillar in the 
South Aisle. Both sides of the plate are engraved in Brayley 
and Britton's History of Surrey, vol. ii. 408 ; the Rev. H. Haines' 
Manual of Monumental Brasses, Introd., p. xlvi. ; and the Surrey 
Archcsological Collections, vol. xv. p. 34. 



' History of Surrey, vol. ii. p. 738, " In the chest is preserved a brass with the 
figure of a man bare-headed, long beard : Of your charite pray for the soulles of 

James Sutton tytne bayle of this Lordeshippe and Mawde his ivyfe which 

the xii day of fuly y' yer of o'' Lord God M. V'^xxx. and the sayd M 

the day of the yer of our Lord God M, V^ ," This inscrip- 
tion is now lost. 



174 

HORLEY. 

On the floor of the Chancel, but removed from the North 
Aisle, is the large and fine brass of an unknown lady, possibly 
some member of the Salaman family. The figure measures 

4 feet 6| inches in height, and stands under a fine single canopy, 
the size of the whole composition being 7 feet 7 inches x 2 feet 

5 inches. The lady is represented wearing a large horned head- 
dress and veil, an undergown with turned-back collar and full 
sleeves gathered into a broad band at the wrists, a high-waisted 
overgown also with a turned-back collar and very large surplice 
sleeves. Round her neck is a small collar of SS. with a trefoil- 
shaped fastening. The date is c. 1420. At the feet of the figure, 
on her right-hand side, was originally the small figure of a child, 
most probably her son, but this is lost ; the only indications left 
being the rivets which held the figure, the small mound upon 
which it stood, the indent of one foot upon the lady's gown, 
and the square cut in the folds of the dress for the bottom of the 
tunic. A similar instance of a son standing besides his mother 
occurs on the fine brass to Lord and Lady Camoys, 1419, at 
Trotton, in the adjoining county of Sussex. 

The original inscription, measuring 23 x 5| inches, together 
with two shields between the pinnacles of the canopy, is lost. 
At some period or another, possibly in 1516, another inscription 
has been added at the feet of the figure, so that it now purports 
to represent one Joan, the wife of John Fenner, gent., who died 
in 1516. This later inscription, measuring 18 x 5^ inches, reads 
thus : 

€)t ^0"^ cljarite pra^ far tljc efoulc of "^oltan ffeniur 
latt to^f of "^oin ffennec jycnt' tD^ic!)e 3Io5an 
necegfefeli t^e ii tia^ of 31wlp ni t^^ jere of our ^orU 
Sl^°t)a*bi on to!)O0e 0oule 3^11 Ijauc mercp aimn. 

Strictly speaking, this brass should not be classed as a 
palimpsest, because there is an absence of proof as to the date at 
which the the Fenner inscription was placed below the figure. 
If placed there in 1516, it is a palimpsest in the sense of appro- 
priation ; but, on the other hand, the inscription may have been 
throwing about loose in the church, and have been placed it its 
present position through ignorance. 

The figure of the lady, together with the canopy, but without 
the Fenner inscription, is reproduced in the Portfolio of the Monu- 
mental Brass Society, part iii, pi. 4. 



'75 
■ Sanderstead. 

I. 

Obverse. A group of ten sons, c. 1520, now placed above the 
inscription to Nicholas Wood, 1586, but probably belonging to 
the brass of John and Dyones Awodde, 1525. Size of plate, 
6f X 5^ inches. 

Reverse. This shows a few lines of drapery only, and it is im- 
possible to give a more exact definition as the rubbing, the only 
one known to the writer, in the Collection of the Society of 
Antiquaries is very poor and unsatisfactory. 

The brass has been relaid in a new stone on the Chancel 
wall and the palimpsest part fastened down. 

II. 

Obverse. Inscription to Nicholas Wood, third son of John at 
Wood, of Sanderstead Court ; he served Queen Elizabeth since 
the second year of her reign and died in 1586, leaving a wife and 
nine children, viz., Harmon, John, Nicholas, Thomas, James, 
John, Richard, Alice and Suan probably intended for Susan. 
Size of plate, 18 x 5^ inches. 

^tu l^etf) il^pcljolas ^ooti t^t tljirtic cfoitite 
of J^a^n at ^ooti of ^auiiticr^tcti Cocte tnljo jscrbcti 
^wzm CUjabrtlj mw^s tlje 0cconti ['care of ijcr 
Ea^ite $ t!fmi0£fen tljc ili/td of ^aj^' 1586, anti Icftc 
bcljinut Ijim a toife aiili cljillircix ix, bi^ 0oitiiie> : i^acmoii 
31ol)u. iliicljola^, ^Ijomef, 3amc0, 31oijn. Eicljarti, a.llief 
anti »)uan 

Reverse. Another inscription to Nicholas Pury, Esq,, a mem- 
ber of the Middle Temple, 1585. 

rb tiie ^arcii ann° mi 1585. 
ClauDituc l)oc tcmplo i^icolaim ^ur^nijs Ijcrocf 
anniffcr zt ^empU qui mctiii 0ociu0 ecat 
Bcati qui in SDomino moriuutur. 

As the dates on the two inscriptions so nearly coincide it may 
be surmised that the inscription to Nicholas Pury was rejected 
for some reason or another and became a " waster," soon to be 
reused. 

This plate has been relaid in a new stone on the Chancel wall 
and the palimpsest part fastened down. Of the latter there is a 
rubbing m the Collection of the Society of Antiquaries. 



176 

III. 

Obvevse. Inscription, now lost, to Henry Pollestede, gent., of 
Pirllew, citizen and merchant-tailor of London, 1556. 

An impression preserved in the collection of the Society of 
Antiquaries shows the plate as broken at one end. In its muti- 
lated state it measured 16 x 5 inches. The missing words are 
given by Aubrey, in his History of Suvrey, vol. ii. p. 74, and are 
here shown in brackets : 

^tu Eeeftitlje f boti^e of ^enr^e ^ollegfte [tie late] 
oC pirlletD gcntilma ^omtj^me 'tim^tiw i m[acc^ant] 
taj^lor ot iloiitio tuljiclj !l^enr^e neptptie i^^ i*r[b Uape] 
of tieceber ^ii° ^,V'%V% o toljojse gfoule Jlju [Ijaue 
merc^]. 

Reverse. According to Manning and Bray's History of Surrey, 
vol. ii. p. 576, this consisted of another inscription to William 
Bycklay, who died in 1467. The inscription is thus given by 
these authors : 

Bycklay Wiirmics facet hie sub tnarmore victus 
Et hie regimen p' quo rogo funde p'cani^ 
Anno post B : : d'ni hie migrat ab urbe 
MLXV. C. dni quater ij simul adde- 

In vol. iii., Appendix, p. 158, is the following note: "On 
looking over the effects of the Parish Clerk, who died suddenly, 
his friends found in his house the plate which had been on 
Pollestede's gravestone broken in two. It was afterwards given 
as a matter of curiosity to Mr. Barnes, who presented it to Mr. 
Glover. The plate has been returned by Mr. Glover to the 
church, and is now fixed in a frame, so that both sides of it may 
be inspected, and it is suspended against the wall." As before 
stated the plate is now lost. 

Walton-on-Thames. 

Hanging on the wall of the Chancel is a board to which is 
now fastened the brass of John Selwyn, " gent' Keeper of her 
Ma'is Parke of Oteland' vnder y^ right honorable Charles 
Howard Lord Admyrallof England," 1587, and wife Susan, with 
their surviving children, five sons and six daughters. The brass 
is of an ordinary type ; but one plate between the heads of the 
principal figures is of more than usual interest, as it displays 
a feat of agility performed by John Selwyn at a stag-hunt in the 



177 

presence of Queen Elizabeth. It is said^ that Selwyn, " in the 
heat of the chase, suddenly leaped from his horse upon the back 




No, I.— The Reverse, No, 2.— The Obverse. 

Palimpsest Plate, Walton-on-Thames, 

About one-fourth full size. 

of the stag (both running at that time with their utmost speed), 
and not only kept his seat gracefully, in spite of every effort of the 
affrighted beast, but, drawing his sword, with it guided him 
towards the Queen, and coming near her presence, plunged it in 
his throat, so that the animal fell dead at her feet," 

This small plate measuring 8J x 7^ inches, contains two 
representations of this feat. No, i, thenverse of the plate, shows 
Selwyn, with a short beard, without hat, and holding with one 
hand the stag's horns, whilst with the other he plunges the 
sword into its neck. This side is lightly engraved and appears to 
have been submitted for approval and rejected. No, 2, now the 
obverse of the plate, shows a much more spirited representation of 
the scene. Selwyn wears a hat and cloak, and keeps his seat 
without holding the horns of the stag. 

Impressions of both sides of this plate are in the collection of 
the Society of Antiquaries. The brass is also figured, with both 
sides of this plate, in the Antiquarian Repertory, ed. 1807, vol. i. 
p. I, and without the pahmpsest portion, in Brayley and 
Britton's History of Surrey, vol. ii. p. 328 ; Illustrated London News, 
vol. X. No, 268 ; The Bazaar, Dec, 8th, 1893 ; and the palimpsest 
plate alone in the Surrey Archceological Collections, vol. xv. p. 38. 

The original slab, said to have been dug up in the North 
Aisle, has now disappeared. 



' Antiquarian Ref<ertory, vol. i. { 



^. I. 



178 

SUSSEX. 
Etchingham. 

Obverse. Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Thomas and Margaret 
Echyngham, 1452, and Agnes, daughter of Robert Oxenbrigg, 
1480, with foot inscription. Size of inscription-plate, 18 X 3I 
inches. 

Reverse. According to the Rev. H. Haines' Manual of 
Monumental Brasses, pt. ii., p. 209, the inscription bears on its 
reverse another inscription to Thomas Austin, son of Thomas 
Austin, citizen and mercer of London, 1405. 

l^ic iacet Tl^oma^ Sinmn filing 'clliome ^u0t[in] 
quontiam ciui0 et merceri' Eontion qui obiit rrtii[tiie] 
ttun0' ^aii ^" Dili 9^° €<Z€(l''V cnV axe piciet* tigf 

[amen] 

The brass is now in the South Aisle securely fastened down 
and the writer has been unable to see any rubbing of the reverse 
or to trace the source of Mr. Haines' information. 

RODMELL. 

Obverse. Inscription to John dela Chambre, Esq., 1673. Size 
of plate, i8| X 3i inches. 

HERE LYES THE BODY OF JOHN DE LA CHAMBRE 
ESQ'' WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 
4TH DAY OF DECEMBER 1673. 

Reverse. Another inscription to John Broke and his wife 
Agatha, a daughter of John Rademelde, and formerly the wife of 
Richard Weyvyle.^ Agatha died in 1434, and the inscription 
states that she and her husband John Broke were benefactors to 
the church. 

^ic iacmt ^oljejs Brofee $ Sfptlja nx' tiu0 fiUa ^oW 

U Eatiemeltie 
$ uror imp ]!^m Mc^n^fU, ^ut obiit xi° tiie ^p'ligf 

^° nnf 91^°CCCC" 
xxxiiii. qui multa cotuUt Ijuic ttclit quoc' alali^ ppicift' 

ticu0. ^mcn. 

It would appear that the representatives of John de la Chambre 
annexed a brass already in the church and converted it into his 
memorial. The plate is now on a hinge on the South wall of the 
South Chapel. 

' The will of Richard Weyvyle, of Rademeld, Sussex, is in P.C.C, Manke 40. 



179 

TiCEHURST. 

A large figure, 34|- inches in height, of a man in armour, 
c. 1370, in bascinet, camail, &c., to which has been added two 
small figures, 18 inches in height, of ladies in kennel-shaped 
head-dresses, &c., engraved c. 1510, and an inscription, 24 x 3I 
inches, to John Wybarne, Esq., who died in 1490, and his two 
wives Edith and Agnes. The inscription, which may possibly be 
the one belonging to the early figure turned over and re-engraved, 
reads thus : 

€)rate pro ^mn^ 3|ol)i0 (LOlj^barne ^cmig'i (Eliitlje et 

^g:neti0 conefoctu 
0uarum qui quitiem 31 "^P^ cl^iit ^^^^^ tiecimo W ffebcuarii 

^nno Eiffui {sk) 
Ecffief ^enrict »)eptimi quiuto quorum ^idbuef propicietur 

ticugf ame 

Agnes Wybarne, by will dated 20 February, 1502, and proved 
25 November, 1503,' desires her body to be buried in the Chancel 
of Ticehurst church in her husband's grave there, before the 
image of our Lady, and directs her executors "To bye a con- 
venient stone to laye upon my husband John Wybarne's grave 
and myne." 

The executors seem to have appropriated a stone already in 
the church, and as this stone contained the figure of an armed 
man it was easy to add the female figures and the inscription, if, 
indeed, it is not the old one turned over, and so carry out the 
instructions of the will. 

The brass lies on the Chancel floor, and is figured in the 
Sussex Aychceological Collections, vol. viii., p. 17 ; Transactions of the 
Monumental Brass Society, vol. ii., p. 224; and The Connoisseur, 
vol. i., p. 165. 

WiLLINGDON. 

Obverse. Inscription to Mr. Robert Parker, third son of Sir 
Nicholas Parker, of Wallington (error for WilUngdon), died 
January 18, 1618-19, aged 18. Size of plate, i6|- x 4! inches. 

Here lyes the body of M"* Robert 
Parker third sonne to S"" Nicholas 
P'ker of Wallington K''who died y 22 
OF Ian : 1618 being 18 yeares of age. 

'P.C.C, 26 Blamyr. 



i8o 



Reverse. A portion of another inscription dated April i6, 
1618, to an unknown person who died in the seventeenth year of 
his age. 

IN ASSVRED HOPE OF A BETTER : THE iG^" OF APRIL 
1618. IN THE 17"^" YEAR OF HIS AGE. 

De Seipso 
Caelica quae vivo dederat spes guadia (Christo 
Avspice) iam cum spes desinit esse frvor. 

Probably a " waster." The plate is fixed on a hinge on the wall 

of the North Aisle. 



l8i 



WARWICKSHIRE. 

ASTLEY, 

Obvevse. A broken and mutilated inscription to John Crugge, 
son of William Crugge, of Exeter, gent., 1533, and wife Barbara. 
Size of plate in its present condition 20 x 5^^ inches, originally 
23I inches in length. 

[€)f ^^o"^ c]ljarite puii]i' for [» f^otoU' of JoljiX Cntjjffr 0oii 

[of IcUillm Cruffffc] 
[Iiitc o]f (Ei'C0t' ffrntilma i Barbara Ijistoif bjljidjc Joljii 

Cruffffc [nicti ax t^rrc] 
[fclti I] 11 f Countic of ^iliti f rbii) Da[' of nrmnbcr 

^11' Uni W >^' ^^m t 
[f pere o]f ?'f rcijyu of Iv^'ng li^enrp j>' cigljt lattlj t ^"^ 

gfaiO Barbara OicD [^'f] 
[ n]a)' of an° tini 9^° >Jc o toljooc 

fifouir 311)" Ijaue \\\[i^ a.] 

The words in brackets are supplied from an old rubbing in the 
collection of the Society of Antiquaries. This rubbing is 
endorsed thus : " This inscription is on a brass plate on the East 
side of the Nave of Harefield church and the figure is supposed 
to be under the new boarded floor." The Astley plate exactly 
corresponds with this rubbing in every detail and must, sometime 
during the nineteenth century, have been transferred from Hare- 
field to Astley, the Newdegate family having held property in 
both places. Lysons, in his Parishes in the County of Middlesex, 
p. 117, also mentions the tomb of John Crugge as at Harefield, 



l82 

" on the floor of this chapel (Brakenbury) is the tomb of John 
Crugge, of Exeter, gent., who died in 1533. He married 
Barbara, daughter of John and Amphelicia Newdegate." Why 
this plate should have been transferred to Astley remains a 
mystery, for the church of Harefield is full of Newdegate brasses 
and tombs. Possibly it became loose and was taken to the house 
for safe custody, and then removed to the Warwickshire home of 
the family, when it was placed in Astley church by error, its 
original home having been forgotten. 

Reverse. This consists of a portion of the representation of a 
shrouded skeleton of a woman. The plate has been much cut 
down, but the lower part of the jaw, the ribs, pelvis, and thigh 
bones are clearly shown ; parts of the elbow and of the left hand 
also appear, showing that the arms were held straight to the 
sides as is usual in this class of figures. The date is c. 1500. 

The plate is now fixed in a copper frame so as to show both 
sides. 



Haseley. 

Effigies of Clement Throkmorton, Esq., 1573, in armour, and 
wife Katherine, daughter of Sir Edward Nevell, groups of six 
sons and seven daughters, five shields and marginal inscription. 
On a high tomb in the Chancel. So far as is at present known 
only the sons and a portion of the marginal inscription are 
palimpsest ; these are now fastened upon hinges so that both 
sides may be examined. In all probability the remainder of the 
brass is also largely palimpsest. 

The group of seven sons, 8;^ x 7 inches, is engraved on two 
pieces of metal, the smaller strip, 81 x i^ inches, containing the 
feet of the figures is blank, but on the reverse of the larger piece, 
81 X 5f inches, is a mass of pinnacle work from the upper part 
of a canopy of a large Flemish brass of late fourteenth century 

date. 

The strip of the marginal inscription, 22^ x i^ inches, bearing 

the words SDecember in tljc pcrc of our Eortie (Boti ^i 

<^<^<^<^<^ is cut out of the lower part of the figure of a 
civilian, c. 1450, of English workmanship. Portions of the pen- 
dent end of the girdle and of the fur-lined opening at the bottom 
of the tunic can just be seen. 



i83 
WESTMORLAND. 

MORLAND. 

Obverse. Inscription to John Blythe, vicar for thirty-five years 
and four days, died January i6, 1562. Size of plate, 2o| x 5 * 
inches. . 

91oljii Blprljc l['brti Ijcrc hvciw of tljic? Cljurdjc bv tljc 
0Piifc of rrub pcros * lii) tiapcs anti 3Dcparr)i'ti tijicf 
Ij'ff tljc ubj Del)' of Jaiuuin' in tljr )'rrc of our lortir 
cBon iJl^^ cccccluij on loI)O0c clonic Jlju Ijauc m'n' amc 



,1iil)ni3lj)tl)iiiJBfti l)rirBpmuot*tl)i!e»<iIiiin1if tin tiir 

lliiff ti)^,^l3) iiH]i of IrtiuiariLin Wm nf uur toiDr *< 
<&oiri}| td^sc If q onUiljofrfoule 31311 ijaur^ii aiii? 




Pammi'sest Inscription, Morlano, Westmorland. 

About one-fifth full size. 

Reverse. A portion of a quadrangular plate of English work- 
manship bearing the figure of a son in armour, bareheaded and 
a portion of another armed figure, probably the father, as it is 
much larger in size. Below is a fragment of the inscription : 

€^ratr pro an .... 

rt ^j'billr wx. 

C»biit ill) tiic jfc . . . . 

The style of the armour fixes the date as c. 1520. 

In 1894 the brass was loose in the vestry. Both sides of the 
plate are reproduced in the Transactions of the Cumberland and West- 
morland Antiquarian and Arch^ological Society, vol, xiii. p. 149. 



1 84 

WILTSHIRE. 
West Lavington. 

I. 

Inscription, in fourteen English verses, to John Dauntesay, 
1559, but quere engraved later, at the same time as No. II. Size 
of plate, 22 X 11^ inches. On the floor of the Dauntesay 
Chapel. With this inscription is a figure of John Dauntesay, in 
armour of the period of his death, it is engraved in E. Kite's 
Monumental Brasses of Wiltshiye, pi. xxi. The inscription only is 
palimpsest. 

Obverse. 

<3Dnc tljouefantic pcrcsf to^'tlj Ijuntirctiliccf f^'tc anU f^'btec 

npne full paste 
3|ljon 2Dauntc0ap tiiti djaunffc tijis Ipfe for Ipfc tljat still 

Sljall laste 
31n tljc nj'nctrcntl) of 9^a}^c Voljrn springe all tljinges 

unto mans use 
(Eben t\}cn tljis man tljat mortall toas, Ijis tieatlje coulUe 

not refuse 
l^e Ijati ttoo ^['bes sueeessitel^'e bp Ijol^^ tuetiloekes rigljt 
^0 toljom Ije teas as fa^'tljfull as teas eber an?' toigljt 
^eben eljilbren Ije Ijab b[' tlje laste. anb b}> tlje f^'rst 

Ijab f^be 
'(Iljrouglj bjljom tl)ouo:l) l^'fe be toobe atoa^'e Ijis name 

remains aljjbe 
^e bjas Csquj^er, b[' offiee eafee a "^imitt just also, 
a proppe to poore. a frenbe to rielje. to none at all a fo. 
^0 toljen Ije Ijab spente fort^'e ['eres anb fobjre in bale 

of bjoe, 
2Deatl) strooke, anb stra^'te Ije baas eompellb out of tljiS 

bjorlbe to pe. 
113 is eareas tljen tljat bjas but l\Uu' f" birinlUing bjorm 

is meate 
l^is sobjle Ijope 10 bjitlj (Bob posseebes in Ijeaben a 

Ijeabenlp seate. 

Reverse. Nine lines of a Dutch or Flemish inscription in 
black letter recording the penalty for any breach of an agreement 
in the foundation of a mass at the altar of St. Cornelius in the 
church of Westmonstre by Adrian Adrianson and the lady 



i85 

Paesschine van den Steyne. Thirty-three lines of this, or of a 
similar inscription, form the reverse of a brass to the Disney 
family at Norton Disney, Lincolnsliire, c 1580, and give the date 
as 15 1 8. The West Lavington fragment apparently preserves 
the last nine lines of the inscription : 

heijleghegheestmeesters van Westmonstre ende jndien 
gijluden daer af in ghebreke varen zoe zal tzelue goet 
comen opt gilde van sinte Cornelis ouctaer metter 
zeluer last alst altsamen breeder blijcken mach bii 
den fondacien daer af zijnde daer af een licht on der 
den kerckmeesters een onder de heijlegheestmrs 
een onder den deken ende baleeders van sinte Corne 
lis ouctaer een onder de vrinden Adriaen adryzeii 
een ond' de vriende va joncvrauwe paesschine voorfU 
The following is a translation : 

" Masters of the Holy Ghost at Westmonstre, 

and should you [or your people] fail herein, the same property 
shall lapse to the guild of the altar of St. Cornelius, with the 
same charge, as may be further seen in the foundation thereof, 
being one light thereof amongst the churchwardens, one amongst 
the masters of the Holy Ghost, one amongst the deacons and 
vergers (?) of the altar of St. Cornelius, one amongst the friends 
of Adrian Adianson, and one amongst the friends of the lady 
Paesschine aforesaid." ' 

For a full account of the foundation of this mass see under 
Norton Disney, Lincolnshire. 

II. 

Obverse. Inscription in twenty English verses to Margaret, 
daughter of John Ernley, and second wife of John Dauntesay, 
1571. On same slab as No. I. Size of plate, 22 x 16^ inches. 

I^rrrc tiotl) \\\ grnbc uuciTcti b'c a iJl^artynrrt hv niimr. 
^f Jljoii 2Daiiiucoa)' tljc laot tort'c a ffcmc of pccrclccf 

fame. 
^i cljiltircit Ofbrii oljc motljcr tuao 00 (15oti tiiti blro^c 

tljat tiTc 
^^at pt efljoultic not fruitlcosc rcmainc but Ijabc po0= 

xtxxxtt 

' See ArchcEological Jouitial, vol. iv. p. 362, and vol. v. p. 160 ; E. Kite's 
Monuvienlal Brasses of IViltshire, p. 56. 



i86 

Btir \Dljcn tjcatlj prrrot Ijcr Ijoluefcliantic ticcrc, djc pa0t 

iLvkc turtle trur. of nclj anti poorc ssljr Ijnti anr> Ijatl) tl)C 

praj'se. 
'^tocltc j^ereef a loititiotoc 0l)c nin Ij^bc after l)cr l)oto0C= 

bann npcti, 
^£f c|)a0te as eber aim tiili tonljin tljief toorlti mo0t toine. 
^ matronc mWtic sljc bja0 most toiere. ju0tc, pnlp. grille. 

auti 0iig:e, 
i^cr ivkc, n0 triall truclpe 0ljctDtlj, i& rare in tl)i5 our ag:c. 
^Ijc ncljcr turiin atoaj,' l)er care from tl)em tljat a^'tie tiin 

crabe, 
l^er ne^'Q:l3bour0 poorc tijat Irbti in tnant rel^e00c of Ijer 

0l)objltic Ijabr. 
Ulje poorr anti romfortclref0c from toronp 0!)c efatti anti 

tiefentic 
l^er pram tljertfore tiotl) Ubr anti lastc tfjoug^c life be 

broiig:l)t to entie. 
Il^er toealtl) or bertcou0 Ij'fe coulD not Keepe ^er from 

tiarte of tieatlj. 
€)f Januarp tlje npneteentlj slje ^eltieti I)er laeft breatlj 
3Jn j'ere of oar lor^e a tljotosanUe fpbe Ijuntireli 0ebent[' 

one, 
^!je felte tlje panjueef of 2Deatlj tljat ma^ escljetocti be 

of none. 
l9er 0otole toptl) (Boti acfsuretil^' entilejscr jores liotlj fenotoe. 
i^er botipe 0leepeo ann 00 0l)all rest untill tl)e trumpe 

tjoe blobje. 

Reverse. Twelve lines of an inscription in large Roman 
capitals with the date, 1552, in Arabic numerals. Mary and 
Douce, daughters of the deceased, caused the monument to 
be made. 

IVXII 1552 DIVTVRNA ET PENE TRIENNA [li] 
EGRITVDINE FRACT' INVICTO TAME ANI [mo] 
E VIVIS DECESSIT. MARIA AC DVLCIA FIL[i^] 
AMANTISSIME PIETATIS ERGO MONVMEN [tVM] 
HOC POSVERE VT ET TV VIATOR HOC 
TRISTI EXUMPLO COMOTVS FATA ETiA I [n] 
ANIMO PERPENDENS QVAM NIHIL HIC S [it] 
FIRMVM AC STABILE DISCAS RERV OMN [IVM] 



FORE ALIQVANDO VICISSITVDINEM A [c] 
SPRETIS REBVS MORTALIV DEV IMORTA [LEM] 
TIMERE. VALE ET PUS TVIS PRECIBVS 
DEFVNCTVM DEO COMMENDA. 

This inscription is enclosed on two sides by a plain border ; 
when perfect it measured about 24 inches in width. The letters 
in brackets are supplied from Kite's transcript.* 

Melksham. 

Inscription and two shields to Ambrose Dauntesey, Esq., 
1612, who married Gertrude, daughter of Henry Sadler, Esq., 
of Everley, and widow of Henry Brouncker, Esq. For many 
years these plates were in private hands but have now been 
replaced in the church and let into the north wall of the chancel. 
So far as is known only the shields are palimpsest, and these, 
which measure 6| by 5^ inches are now fastened down so that 
the palimpsest portions cannot be seen. 

Obverse. Shield No. I. bears the arms of Dauntesey (Gu.), 
a lion rampant (arg.) grappling with a tvyvern erect (vert), and shield 
No. n. the arms of Sadler, (Or), a lion rampant per fess (az.) 
and (gu.). 

Reverse. Shield No. I. shows the end of a lady's dress and 
the lower portion of the kneeling figure of a man in armour 
probably a son, c. 1600. Shield No. H. bears the following 
fragment of an inscription of about the same date : 

Apostrophe ad . . . 

obiit 23" die m . 

Esse viam latam . . . 

Ad caelvm ano . . . 

Hang datvr ir . . . 

Alma dignat . . 

. . . TVA mors m . . . 
Both sides of shield No. I., and the obverse of No. H., are 
engraved in E. Kite's Monumental Brasses of Wiltshire, p. 82. 
There are rubbings of obverse and reverse of both shields in 
the collection of the Society of Antiquaries. 

Salisbury, St. Thomas. 
John Webbe, mayor in [1561] , died in 1570, and wife Anne, 
daughter of Nicholas Wylford, citizen and merchant tailor, 
with three sons and three daughters, three out of four shields, 

' J/i»i. Biasses of Wills., p. 57. 



i88 

and a mutilated marginal inscription. Chancel floor. The 
figures are engraved in E. Kite's Monumental Brasses of Wiltshire, 
pi. xxii. Mr. Kite, at p. 58, has the following note: "On the 
reverse [of the border fillet] is a portion of an inscription of 
much bolder character. The letter here engraved [an F or 
T] as a specimen was copied by Mr. G. A. Howitt, some 
years since, when the plate was loose." The letter in question 
has every appearance of having come from a Flemish marginal 
inscription. Probably the whole brass is palimpsest. 

Steeple Ashton. 
From the Journal of the British Archaological Association, vol. 
xxi. (1865) p. 192:— "Mr. Irvine called attention to a modern 
instance of a ' palimpsest ' as it has been usual to term it. It 
is copper, and is in Steeple Ashton Church and curious for its 
late date. Mr. Irvine states that on visiting the church he 
found the tablet loose, and was permitted by the rector to 
have it cleaned. Copies were taken of both sides before being 
refixed. On the upper part of the monumental face are engraved 
a skull and cross-bones, placed on a scroll dividing the words 
Memento Mori, and beneath is the following in five lines : 

'TO THE MEMORY OF 

DEBORAH MARKS 

WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE 

THE 8th DAY OF MARCH, 1 72O 

AGED 99 ' 

"The reverse of the tablet shows that it has constituted 
and been employed as a copper plate for printing, as on the 
top is part of an inscription reading ' and the Divil overbalanced 
by the Bible.' In the middle of the plate is the half of a balance, 
the scale borne down by the Holy Bible. Beneath the beam 
are three labels, the first two no doubt, like the last, proceeding 

from the mouths of figures. They severally read. ' ge 

hell and fetch more weight .... shall be ruined quite ' — ' If 
we do not hall our church will fall ' — ' Burn y^ heretick book.' 
On the left side of the scale are a group of four figures, a 
crowned and robed queen holding a sword, a sovereign or noble 
wearing a spiked or eastern crown or coronet, and two mitred 
bishops. In the background is a building inscribed ' The Church 
of Eng , , . . ' Beneath are the following : 

' Who are all resolved to maintain our rights 
Against the French Pope, Divill, and all their mights, 



1 89 

Therefore, good subjects, all with one accord 
Honour and praise and magnifye the Lord, 
Who hath preserv'd our gratious Queen to be 
From Popery a means to set us free. 

(Sold by S. Farley in Wine Street, Bristoll.) ' 
" The style of the coarse engraving, taken in connexion with 
the date of Deborah Marks' death in 1730, would lead one to 
infer the figures represented to be those of William and Mary 
(1689-94), as in the latter year Queen Mary died in the month of 
December of the small-pox." 

WORCESTERSHIRE. 
No palimpsest noted in this county. 

YORKSHIRE. 

HOWDEN. 

Obverse. Inscription to Peter Dolman, Esq., of Kilpin, 
counsellor at law, 1621. He married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Richard Remington, archdeacon of the East Riding, by whom 
he had three sons, Richard, Phillip and Timothy. Size of plate, 
15I X 5 inches. 

HERE LYETH THE BODY OF PETER DOLMAN OF KIL 
PIN ESQVIEK COVNSELLER AT LAW WHO MARRIED 
ELIZABETH DAVGHTER TO RICHARD REMINGTON 
CLERKE ARCHDEACON OF THE EAST RIDING IN THE 
COVNTY OF YORK DECEASED BY WHOM HE LEFT 
YSSVE THRE BONNES VIZ. RICHARD, PHILLIP AND 
TIMOTHY DOLMAN WHO DEPARTED OVT OF 
THIS TRANSITORY WORLD THE XIII DAY OF DE 
CEMBER ANNO DNl 162I. 




Reversk ok Inscripi ion, Howden, Yorks. 

Aljoul one-fourth full si^e. 



1 90 

Reverse. The central portion of the figure of a civih'an, 
c. 1520, in gown with deep sleeves lined with fur, and having a 
gypciere attached to his girdle. 

The brass is now fastened to the West wall of the South 
Aisle. 

Ilkley Museum. 

Most improperly removed from the parish church and placed 
in the museum. 

Obverse. Inscription to William Robinson, 1562, husband to 
Jennet Robinson, and father and mother to numerous children 
whose names are set out in the inscription. Size of plate, 15x6 
inches. 

-f WYLLM 

ROBENSON . LAYT . HVSBAD . TO lENAT 
ROBENSON . FATHER . AND . MOTHER . TO . THOMA 
LEARD . LAVRAS . ARTHVR . WILLM . AND . WYLLM 

AND _ _ 

RECHARD . FRACES . MARGRET . ELTz . ESABE 

AND 

GRACE . lANE . WHOSE . BODE . WAS . BVRIED 

ANO . DOMINO 1562. 

A very curious and rough inscription, probably the work of a 
local blacksmith. The plate is broken at the top and the first 
few words have been defaced. 

Reverse. The beginning of another inscription in large bold 
black letter : 

^cpultura 31olji0 lacj^ii .... 
€t p'bmtiarii^f ^tpl^nigto . . . 

This is without doubt a portion of the plate marking the burial 
place of John Reynald, or Raynald, who was prebendary of 
Stillington, a stall of the cathedral church of York. John Ray- 
nald was admitted to the prebend of Beckingham, Southwell 
Minster, on February 5, 1492-3, which he resigned in November, 
1494. On the 25th of the same month he was instituted to the 
prebend of Stillington, York, which he held till the time of his 
death. On August 24, 1499, he was appointed archdeacon of 
Cleveland, and died holding this office on December 24, 1506. 
By his will he left his body to be buried in the cathedral church 
of York, a stone to be placed over the place of his sepulchre. 
Both sides of the plate are figured in the Antiquary, vol. xxviii. 
(1893), p. 61. 



191 

ROTHERHAM. 

Obverse. A shield shaped plate, 5^ X 5^ inches, bearing an 
inscription and coat of arms to Ralph Bullock, Esq., of Unston, 

1637. 

Hie Jacct Rodolphus Bullock 

De Vnston A rmigeru qui obiit 9" 
Die Martii An Domini 1637° 
Arms. Erm., on a chief (gu.) a label of Jive points (or) Bullock. 
Probably the work of a local engraver, who has most ingeni- 
ously turned an old shield into a memorial for Ralph Bullock, 
but has rather blundered in the inscription over the word 
"armiger" which he has rendered as "armigerum." 




CllTc Jacil %(fo^fas BuKocK 
(t)( ^11/fon MtTniqera Out oEii/tg" 




Palimpsest Shield, Rotmrrham, Yorks. 

About one-third full size. 

Reverse. An old shield much worn and defaced, but the out- 
lines of the charges, except in the case of the Lascelles coat, can 
easily be made out. It is of sixteenth century date and bears 
the arms and quarterings of the Melton family, viz. : Quarterly 
I, {Az.), a cross patonce {arg.) Melton. II. (Gii.), three liicies 
hauriant in fess {arg.) Lucy. III. Quarterly i and 4. (illegible, 
but no doubt originally Arg., three chaplets gu. Lascelles). 2 and 
3- {Arg.) two bars {az.), a Jleur-de-lys in fess for difference. Hilton 
IV. Quarterly i and 4. {Arg.), a boar passant {gu.) Verli (?). 
2 and 3. {Arg.), a helmet {gu.) Kilham (?). 

The brass is now on a hinge and attached to the wall near 
the south pier of the chancel arch. Both sides of the plate are 
reproduced in the Yorkshire Archcvological Journal, vol. xv. p. 42. 



192 

Scarborough Museum. 

In the museum of the Scarborough Philosophical and 
Archaeological Society. Found in 18 10 on St. Nicholas Cliff 
near the site of the destroyed Benedictine church of St. 
Nicholas. 

Obverse. A very small plate, 2f x if inches, bearing an 
inscription to Brother William of Thornton. Date c. 1360 (?). 






There is an engraving of this side of the plate in T. 
Hinderwell's Histoyy of Scarborough, 2nd ed. (181 1), p. 125. 

Reverse. A small fragment of a Flemish marginal inscrip- 
tion bearing the numeral XI and a stop in relief on a hatched 
ground. Probable date c. 1350 (?). Both sides of the plate 
are illustrated in the Journal of the Oxford University Brass 
Rubbing Society, vol. i. p. 255. 



Sessay. 

Obverse. Full length effigy of Thomas Magnus, archdeacon 
of the East, Riding, and rector of Sessay, 1550, in cassock, 
surplice, almuce and cope, with scroll from hands bearing the 
words 'JC^n fill tiCi miserere mei. Below is the following 
inscription : 

l^ere Ipetlj Sl^aster ^Ijomae i^agntief ^rcljlieaeon of 

in tlje Sl^etrepolitau Cljj'relje of gorke i Mon of tljigf 

Cljpre^e tD|)tcl)e 
2Dpeti t\\t iTbii)tl) tJiij' of ^tiffust a° Mi 9^" tcctCo I toljoefe 

0oule ffoti Dlion. 

At the four corners of the slab are quatrefoils, the upper and 
lower dexter bearing the Holy Lamb with cross, and the upper 
and lower sinister the stalk and flower of the columbine.^ 

' "In the old church was glass containing his rebus, an Agnus Dei with M 
thereon. Above was the mo.to as on the arms, and the herbage was full of 
columbines." — Tonge's Visitation (Surtees Society, vol. xli.), p. 59 (note). 



193 






■DnrttlirHlnn'ftaBofXiiguftJniraglcmr'llDljiofrfmilraoftBiim 






Thomas Mac.nus, Archdeacon ok thk East Riding, 1550, 

Sessay, Yorks. 

About one-e!evenlh full si/e. 



194 

Below the inscription is a shield charged with the arms of 
Magnus. Bendy of six (vert) and (gu.), on a fess (oy) a lion passant 
giiardant between two cinquefoils of the second, and above is the motto 
^ef (Boll to^'ll in black letter. 

The figure, including the scroll, is 25^ inches in height, the 
inscription plate measures 24I x 3I inches, the quatrefoils 
5 X 4j inches, and the shield 6| x 5^ inches. The brass lies 
on the chancel floor and is engraved in J. Gill's Vallis Ehoracensis, 
p. 352 ; R. A. S. Macalister's Ecclesiastical Vestments, p. 147 (eff. 
only) ; and in the Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, vol. xvii. p. 310. 

Reverse. In March, 1902, the whole brass was loose in its 
casement and on examination the greater portion proved to be 
palimpsest. For this information and for a rubbing of the 
palimpsests the writer is indebted to Mr. W. J. Kaye, F.S.A. 
With the exception of the trunk of the figure the whole brass 
is made up of fragments of earlier brasses. The head and a 
greater portion of the scroll is in one piece and cut out of an 
earlier figure, but is too fragmentary to say what the figure 
may have been. The inscription appears to have been cut 
out of the centre of a large figure of a lady, probably wearing 
a mantle as a portion of the cord and tassels for fastening this 
garment appears at one end of the plate. The shield may 
possibly have come from the same figure as it bears lines of 
similar drapery. Two of the quatrefoils are cut from a coped 
priest, the orphrey of the cope being ornamented with foliage 
and circles bearing letters ; two letters ^ and d^ remain. The 
other two quatrefoils are made up of bits, one bearing portions 
of drapery from the feet of a figure, the other a portion of 
similar drapery and a large Lombardic D with traces of some 
oiher letter but obscured by the solder used to fasien the pieces 
together. All the palimpsest portions are illustrated in the 
Yorkshire A rchaological Journal, vol. xvii. p. 311. 



TOPCLIFFE. 

The fine Flemish brass, 69 x 37 inches, to Thomas de 
TopclyfF, 1362, and wife [Mabel], 1391, both in mantles, with 
fine canopy and mutilated marginal inscription, is engraved in 
Messrs. Wallers' Series of Monumental Brasses, and in the Intro- 
duction, p. ix., is the following account of the discovery of the 
palimpsest portions : " The brass of Thomas Topcliff and lady 
was, a few years ago [about i860] , during the restoration of the 



195 



^ 








I'ALIMI'SEST I'ORIIONS OK KrASS TO TllOMAS MaGNUS, 

Sessay, Yokks. 

About one-eleveiuh full size. 



196 

church, removed from its slab. The reverse was discovered to 
be entirely, or nearly so, composed of plates of metal that had 
been previously used. But one small portion, however, fell 
under the writer's observation, and that was a part of the border, 
the reverse of which showed a portion of an inscription in Longo- 
bardic capitals and in the Flemish vernacular, ' bidt. voer. die. 
ziele.' i.e., pray for the soul. It was extremely well executed, 
much in the style of the brass at St. Albans to Abbot Delamare ; 
and was only a few years earlier in date to that of which it now 
forms a portion. Of the rest, the account given by the Rev. H. 
A. Hawkins, the incumbent of Topcliffe, though less complete 
than one could have wished of so curious a fact, is nevertheless 
useful, and tends to support the theory that occasionally spoilt 
metal was reworked on its opposite surface. In a letter, he says, 
' I remember the fact of its being engraved over its entire sur- 
face, but I could not make out the design if there was one. It 
struck me rather ^as being a collection of several small sheets of 
brass, on the back of which the artist or his apprentice had 
been trying their engraving tools. I could trace no connec- 
tion between one sheet and another ; there was something 
resembling an elaborate ladder on one sheet, and on the next 
a sword, out of all proportion to the ladder, if it was intended for 
one, and only slightly sketched, whereas the ladder, as I have 
remarked, was highly finished.' We must be thankful to possess 
so brief a record of so curious a fact, though we may regret the 
opportunity of a more searching scrutiny has been lost. There 
can be little doubt that we have here the metal of spoilt work, of 
various designs, used over again. That described as a ' ladder ' 
was most likely the commencement of some architectural 
feature, dividing into panels." 

The brass in its original slab is now fixed on the wall of 
the north aisle. No rubbing of the palimpsest portions seems 
to be in existence. 



WiNESTEAD. 

Obverse. Upper part of a man in armour, bareheaded, his 
head resting on his helmet, and wife (mutilated), c. 1540, a group 
of seven sons, the eldest in armour, and a group of six daughters 
(one headless). Marginal inscription lost. Chancel floor. 
Probably to the memory of some member of the Hildyard 
family, possibly Sir Christopher Hildyard, who died in 1538, and 



197 



his second wife, Joan. Engraved in G. Poulson's History of 
HoldernesSy vol. ii. p. 479, and Yorkshire Avchaological Journal^ vol. 
xii. p. 228. 





Palimpsest Brass at Winestead, Yorks. 

About one-fifth full size. 

Reverse. In 1899 the remaining portion of the man in armour 
became detached from the stone and upon examination proved to 
be palimpsest. It is 10 inches in length and bears upon the 
reverse the left shoulder, arm, and a portion of the hands of 
a civilian, probably a merchant, wearing a mantle. The sleeve 
of the under-dress is richly ornamented, the cufF reaching to the 
knuckles. The background to the figure, a very small portion of 
which remains, is richly diapered. The work is Flemish, c. 1360, 
and is in the same style as the great brasses at Lynn, Norfolk. 

This fragment has now been securely fastened down, it is 
figured in the Yorkshire A vchcBological Journal, vol. xvi. p. 239. 

The remaining plates of this brass will, no doubt, upon 
examination be found to be palimpsest. 

IRELAND. 

No palimpsest noted in this country. 

SCOTLAND. 

Edinburgh, St. Giles. 
Obverse. A quadrangular plate, 3 if x 21 1 inches, to James 



198 

Stewart, Earl of Murray, and Regent of Scotland, assassinated 
at Linlithgow on the 2y<^ of January, 1569-70. In the centre 
is a large achievement of the Regent's arms with the motto, 
SALVS . PER . CHRisTVM, and on either side are figures of 
Religion and Justice, with the mottoes, pietas . sine . vindice . 
LVGET, and ivs . exarmatvm . est. Below is the following 
inscription in raised letters : 

23 . jANvARii . 1569. 

lACOBO . STOVARTO . MORAVI/E . COMITI . SCOTIA . 
PROREGI . VIRO . ^TATIS . SV^ . LONGE . OPTIMO . 
ABINIMICIS . OMNIS . MEMORI^ . DETERRIMIS . 
EX . INSIDIIS . EXTINCTO . CEV . PATRI . 
COMMVNI . PATRIA . MCERENS . POSVIT . 

This inscription was composed by George Buchanan. The 
original tomb was destroyed in 1829 and the brass plate 
removed to Donybristle House, the seat of the Earl of Moray, 
but in 1865 the tomb was restored by the then Earl and the 
brass replaced in the upper panel. In examining the family 
papers in the charter-room of Donybristle, the Earl of Moray 
discovered a detached sheet without name or date, endorsed 
"The compt. of geir furnisit to my L buriall." From internal 
evidence it clearly refers to the Regent's funeral in 1569-70, 
and is in a contemporary hand. This document gives the 
names of John Roytel and Murdoch Valker as the masons 
who constructed the tomb at the expense of ^133 6s. 8d. ; 
and of James Gray, goldsmith, who engraved the brass plate 
at the charge of ^20, whilst the same plate of brass was bought 
from David Rowane for £7. The details from the account 
are as follows : ^ 

" Item, gaif to Jhone Ryotaill and Mwrdoche Valka 
measonnis for the making of my Lordis sepulteur according 
to the indentour maid betwix vmquhill Maister Jhone Wod 
and thame. i"" xxxiii. li. vi. s. viii. d. 

" Item, to James Gray goldsmyth for ingraving of ane platt 
of bras vpoun my Lordis sepulteur. xx. li. 

" Item, to Dauid Rowane for the same platt of bras. vii. H. 

*' Item, for varnishing of the same plaitt and putting vpe and 
fixing thairof. "'J- "• 

" Item, to the payntour for bleking of the sepulteur and his 

paynis. ^^' ^• 

' See Pioceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, vol. vi. p. 49, a 
paper by David Laing, entitled "Notice respecting the monument of the Regent 
Karl of Murray, now restored, wiihin the Church of St. Giles, Edinburgh." 



199 

Illustrations of this obverse side may be found in Proceedings 
of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, vol. i. pi, vi. p. 196; 
The Scottish Antiquary, vol. vi. p. 56; The Catalogue of the Edin- 
burgh Heraldic Exhibition (i8gi), pi. ci. ; Macgibbon and Ross's 
Ecclesiastical Architecture of Scotland, vol. ii. p. 453. A litho- 
graph (full size) has also been privately printed. 

Reverse. The Proceedings of the Society of A ntiquaries of Scotland, 
vol. i. p. 181, under date May g, 1853, contains the following 
account of the reverse : — " The original brass of the Regent Earl 
of Murray, removed from St. Giles' Church in 1829 was again 
exhibited, and the Secretary called attention to the highly inter- 
esting fact, which had previously escaped notice, that it furnishes 
an example of a palimpsest brass. It is engraved on the reverse 
of the centre portion of a larger brass, probably of the latter part 
of the fifteenth century. This has borne two full length figures, 
a male and a female, with a richly diapered ground and orna- 
mental border, and surrounded by an inscription, of which only 
a part remains, reading on the right side, spouse . owmquhile . 
OF . YE . SAID . THO, and on the other side, whilk . diet . the . 

THIRD . DAY . OF , AUGUST . AN ." 

This portion is now fastened down. 

WALES. 

No palimpsest noted in this country. 

PRIVATE POSSESSION. 
Mr. W. J. Andrew, Cadster House, Whaley Bridge. 

Obverse. A group of four sons and one daughter, c. 1500-20. 
The sons in ordinary civil dress, the daughter with long hair, a 
kennel shaped head-dress and gown with close sleeves and large 
cuffs. Size of plate 5x4! inches. 

Reverse. A few engraved lines apparently from the figure of 
a civilian, c. 1470. Two of the lines are filled with solder. 

Sir M. Boileau, Ketteringham Park, 
Wymondham, Norfolk. 

Obverse. A man in armour, bare-headed, his head resting on 
a helmet, c. 1560, lower part of legs and feet lost. Height of 
effigy in present condition 13-2 inches. 



200 





Palimpsest Figure in the Possession of Sir M. Boileau. 

About one-fourth full size. 

Reverse. A fragment of a large fifteenth century Flemish 
brass showing a portion of a figure, apparently an ecclesiastic, 
with folded hands and wearing a chasuble richly diapered with 
foliage and scroll work, the centre orphrey bearing a small demi- 
figure of our Lord or of one of the Apostles. 

Both sides of the brass are figured in Norfolk Archaology, vol. 
xiii. p. 198, and by permission of the Society here reproduced on 
a reduced scale. 

Mr. Ambrose Lee, Heralds' College, London. 

Obverse. A group of three daughters, c. 1540. All wear 
" Paris heads," the eldest a gown with long false sleeves, the 
second a gown with sleeves puffed and slashed at the shoulders, 
and the youngest a gown with open sleeves. Size of plate, 
6x3! inches. 

Reverse. A portion of a pediment of a canopy with three 
crockets, of English workmanship of about the middle of the 
fifteenth century. 

Supposed to have come from a ruined chapel at Quarrendon, 
Bucks. 



201 



IS 



the present 
unknown, 



DERELICTS. 

The term " dereHct " is used to denote that 
ownership or whereabouts of the original brass 
rubbings being extant. 

I. 

Obverse. A very small fragment of an inscription bearing 
the words : 

.... JOljI0 .... 

. . . nis qui .... 

Size of fragment, 2^ x 2 inches. 

Reverse. Another piece of an inscription bearing : 

.... 

.... a obiit IT . . . 
. . . oiT iiiabj .... 

Formerly in the museum at King's Lynn, Norfolk. Rubbing 
in the collection of the Society of Antiquaries, 

n. 

Obverse. A sundial made by R. Treswell in 1582. Size of 

plate, 7 X 7^ 
inches. 

Reverse. The 
lower portion of 
a quadrangular 
plate showing 
the legs and feet 
of an emaciated 
and shrouded 
extended 
mattress. 




figure 
on a 

The original 
plate, then in 
the possession of 
Mr. W. Tyson, 
was exhibited at 
the Bristol Meet- 
ing of tlie Archae- 



Reverse ok Sundial. 

About one-half full size. 



ological Institute 
in 1851. There 

is a rubbing of the reverse in the collection of the Society of 

Antiquaries. 



202 



III. 



Obverse. Effigy of a lady, c. 1540, in heraldic mantle, with 
hands held apart, and kneeling at a small desk on which lies 
an open book. She wears the " Paris hede," a lace partlet, 
a gown with close sleeves edged with lace, and a mantle 
fastened by a large brooch. There are three ermine spots 
on the gown and the mantle bears the following arms, Barry 
nehuly of six . . . ajid . . ., a chief ermine. The figure is 
13^ inches in height. 





Palimpsest Figure. 

Alx)ut one-fourth full size. 



Reverse. A portion of the side shaft of a canopy showing 
the head and shoulders of a female saint, crowned and nimbed, 
under fine canopy work. Apparently foreign of late fourteenth 
or early fifteenth century work. 

Said to have been in the possession of a Mr. Christopher 
Smyth about the year i860. Rubbings of both sides are in 
the collection of the Society of Antiquaries. 



203 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 

Eton College Chapel. 

I. 

Mr. T. Eustace Harwood, in the Oxford Journal of Monumental 
Brasses, vol. ii. p. 70, gives the following description of this 
palimpsest : " The effigy consists of two pieces, joined across 
the shoulders; these two pieces coming apart, instead of being 
properly braced, they were repaired by soldering a piece of tin 
over the join ; this process has rendered illegible the first of ten 
fragments of Latin hexameters which were on the reverse. The 
other nine are as follows : 



. . . Ijic nnt: bictuef 
. . tiimi0 qj liiiobus 
£f pnuci0 qj tiicfaucs 
r uocte miffiMbit 
. 0iqiii)3 gfociflbit 

Q .% . gfilii binacf 

t mt patcrqj 

. rn0 atqtic iubamcn. 

. . moril)U0 ^mcn.' " 



II. 

Mr. J. Challenor Smith, F.S.A., has kindly forwarded the 
following extract from the will of Walter Haugh, of Worsted, 
Norfolk : " to be buried in chapel of St. John Baptist of Worsted 
by the sepulture of Isabell my wif. I will that Sir Thomas James 
preest have a service to sing for me Margarete and Issabell my 
wiffes." Will dated November 5, 1505, and proved January 25, 
1505-6 (P.C.C, 42 Holgrove). 

The brass (with slab and palimpsest inscription) is engraved 
in the Oxford Journal of Monumental Brasses, vol. ii. p. 72. 

CORNWALL. 

CONSTANTINK. 

The palimpsest portion with the man in armour is repro- 
duced in G. Clinch's Old English Churches, p. 235. 



204 

DERBYSHIRE. 

MORLEY. 

The slab in which is inlaid the brass to Sir Henry Sache- 
verell, 1558, and wife Isabel, may be said to be a palimpsest 
in stone, as on the reverse is the casement for a fine brass 
of an ecclesiastic with a marginal inscription. It is thus 
described in the History and Antiquities of Morley, by the late 
Rev. S. Fox, rector, p. 8, quoted in J. C. Cox's Churches of 
Derbyshire, vol. iv. p. 334 : " The stone which contains this 
brass is very far from being in its original situation. The 
brass is small and inferior to the early ones; and the stone 
in which it is placed is extremely rough and unfinished. This 
led to the examination of the under part of the stone, when 
it was found that it had once contained a very fine brass of 
an ecclesiastic, and had been surrounded by a border fillet 
bearing an inscription. Those parts of the stone which were 
not cut away to receive the brass and fillet were highly polished. 
The rivets were still quite perfect, and the pitch with which 
the brass had been imbedded was quite fresh. It is not unlikely 
that, after this stone had been deprived of its original treasure, 
it formed part of the spoil which was brought from Dale 
Abbey." 



TiDESWELL. 

Obverse. Inscription to Laurence Brierly, vicar, 1680. Size 
of plate, 8J X 6| inches. This inscription, for many years in 
private hands, has recently been restored to the church, and 
is now fixed on hinges on the wall above Bishop Pursglove's 
brass. 

Exuvie 
Lau : Brierly 
vie hujus Eccle 
sise v : id : Jan : 1680 
Nescitis horam. 
Reverse. Portions of eight lines of an inscription to Bishop 
Pursglove, who died in 1579, in black letter of a late type 
and with very florid capitals: 

. . . y Robert Pursgloue .... 

, . . care at Schoole and learning . . . 



205 



ir 



HiimiliilllbitFUiilinlFniw 



2^% 






EXUVLC 



vi c hii^uy E#ile 



Obverse and Reverse ok Brierlx— Pursgi.ove Inscription, 
TiDEswEi.i., Derbyshire 

About one-half full si/e. 



206 



. . . . o London he was had . . . 

... by name in pauls which did . . . 

. . . ntain full thi'ice 3 whole years . . . 

. . . placed as I wis 

. . . doth lye S' Mary Oueris 

. . . send into that colHdge r . . . 
It is exceedingly difficult to account for this fragment of 
inscription, the letters of which are quite sharp and show no 
signs of wear. It is certainly not a piece of the original 
inscription, as the style of lettering is of much later date and 
differs completely from that of the marginal inscription, which is 
original. The curious split tops to some of the letters and the 
same florid capitals occur on the inscription to Sir Sampson 
Meverill, which is known to have been restored in 1702 by Sir 
John Statham, and may still be seen on the high tomb in the 
Chancel. The inscription now under the bishop's figure appears 
to have been engraved about the year 1705, according to an entry 
in the Tideswell school accounts for that year, when the sum of 
£1 14s. lod., rent of certain lands in Taddington, was agreed to 
be " laid out for brasse &c. for repairs of the Bishopp's Tombe 
w*^h is stolen off"." ^ It appears from the lines preserved on the 
Brierly fragment that the two inscriptions were similar in com- 
position, but the lettering of the present one is much coarser than 
that of the Brierly fragment. It is just possible that a new 
inscription may have been prepared for the bishop's tomb some 
little time before Brierly's death, and that for some reason or 
another the plate remained on the engraver's hands and was cut 
up and re-used, or it may be that Brierly's plate was not laid down 
until many years after his death, possibly at a time when the en- 
graver was working on the Pursglove inscription, and that he used 
up a plate which he had had the misfortune to spoil. 

The inscription now below the figure of Bishop Pursglove 
reads thus : 

Under this stone as here doth ly a corps sumtime of fame 
in Tiddeswall bred and born truely Robert pursglove by name 
and there brought up by parents care at Schoole & learning trad 
till afterwards by uncle dear to London he was had 
who WILLIAM BRADSHAW hight by name in pauls w^h did him 

place 
and y"" at Schoole did him maintain full thrice 3 whole years 
space 
' From information kindly supplied by the rector, the Rev. J. M. J. Fletcher. 



207 

and then into the Abberye was placed as I wish 

in Southwarkft call'd where it doth ly saint mary overis 

to OXFORD then who did him send into that Colledge right 

and there 14 years did him find vV-h Corpus Christi hight 

from thence at length away he went, a clerke of learning great 

to GiSBURN ABBEY streigh' was sent and placed in priors seat 

BISHOP of HULL he was also, archdeacon of Nottingham 

provost of rotherham colledge too, of YORK eak suffragan 

two gramer Schooles he did ordain with land for to endure 

one hospital for to m.aintain twelve impotent and poor 

o gisburne then with tiddeswall town lament & mourn you 

may 
for this said clerk of great renoun lyeth here compact in clay 
though cruell death hath now down brought this body w^ here 

doth ly 
yet trump of fame stay can he nought to sound his praise on high. 
Qui legis hunc versum crebro reliquum memoreris 
vile cadaver sum tuque cadaver eris. 

Engravings of the bishop's brass may be found in Gent. Mag., 
vol. Ixiv. (1794) pt. ii. p. iioi, and Cambridge Camden Society's 
Illnstrations of Monumental Brasses, No. I. p. ig. 

DORSETSHIRE. 
Litton Cheyney. 

The writer is indebted to Major E. B. Evans for kindly 
visiting Litton Cheyney and hunting up the palimpsest inscrip- 
tions, which are now kept loose at the rectory. As stated by 
Hutchins, there are three inscriptions, the plate bearing the 
inscription to John Chapman having been cut into two pieces and 
converted into memorials to Alexander Warnby, and to John and 
Thomas Newpton. 

Obverses, (a) Inscription to Alexander Warnby, i486. Size 
of plate, 8^ X 3 inches. 

li^ic Placet aicrantjriam (s/V) (laianibj' 
qui obiir iiii" tiic mc3' m'ciK?) ^imo 

nm ^° €€€€° ^f aBF F3^ cui' ale Dpicict' nnief. 

The third word in the first line certainly reads " Alexandriam," 
and the month seems to be " Marcii," but the plate is much worn 
and dented. The lettering is peculiar and appears to be the 
work of a provincial artist, (b) Inscriptionto John and Thomas 
Newpton, undated. Size of plate, 5^ X 3 inches. 



2o8 

neupto qo^ am di^icin' d'cf. 

This also seems to be the work of a local artist, the lettering is 
peculiar and the spacing bad. In the first two lines the letters 
are large, whilst in the third line they are much smaller and run 
closely together. The style of lettering is different to that on the 
inscription to Alexander Warnby, but apparently as the two 
inscriptions complete the reverse inscription their dates must be 
nearly alike. 

Reverse. These two plates preserve the complete inscription 
to John Chapman, fishmonger, 1471, and wife Alice. This plate 
when joined together measures 14x3 inches. 

H^ic met 3o^cs C^alpman ffpgfc^moger et SiUcia uror 
fiu0 qui quilim Jo^p obiit ^rptimana pa^c^e jauno 
tini Sl^° €€€€° 2l^^j,° quor' alabj Dpicietur tieu0 ^mcii 

The first portion has been utilised for the Newpton inscrip- 
tion, the second for the Warnby. The lettering of the Chapman 
inscription is good and appears to be the work of a London 
artist. The edges are quite sharp and show no signs of wear. 
Possibly the plate may have been a " waster," and sent from one 
workshop to another. It is certainly curious to find the two 
pieces re-used in the same church. 

HERTFORDSHIRE. 

Aldenham. 

I. 

The inscription to John Long, 1538, is now framed and 
hanging on the east wall of the Vestry. 

II. 

Half a shield, 3 X 5| inches, from the brass to Ralph 
Stepney, Esq., first lord of the Town of Aldenham and patron 
of the church, 1544. Framed and hanging in the vestry. 

Obverse. The lower portion of a shield showing part of a 
chequy fess with an owl in base impaling a quartered coat. 
A perfect shield still remaining in the slab at the west end of 
the nave shows the arms to have been Stepney, (Gu.), a fess. 



209 

cheqtiy \or) and {az.) between three owls (nvg.) impaling Quarterly 
I. and IV. (Arg.), a lion rampant {sa.) Cressey. II. and III. 
(Erin.) three bars {gu.) Hussey (?). 

Reverse. A portion of a group of sons, c. 1500. 

Barley. 

Obverse. Inscription to Robert Bryckett, 1566. Size of plate, 
20^ X 31^ inches, in two pieces respectively measuring 14 a and 
5f inches. Formerly on the nave floor but now hanging on the 
south wall. 

^ic iattt EobcrtujS ISrpcfectt ffcu'osfu^* qui obiit bfcimo 
Xiit 3Iunu Sinno mi ^" tttcC litr tt nam mc rlir 

Reverse. Only the larger piece of the inscription is palimp- 
sest, having on its reverse the greater portion of another inscrip- 
tion to Richard Pecok, citizen and armourer, and his wives 

and Isabell. Apparently late fifteenth century. 

€)rate p a'ia Eicami ^t:ok ciM t armer 

\ii\° iliufif flff bruarii anno ^i millmo etc 

tt I gisalirllc uroru ri'tie €iuorum animabu 

For a notice of this palimpsest the writer is indebted to 
Mr. W. Frampton Andrews, of Hertford. 

KENT. 

Erith. 

Another piece of the Flemish brass used as the reverse of the 
inscription to Anne Harmon, 1574, is to be found at Isleworth, 
Middlesex, used as the reverse of the inscription of Frances 
Holland, 1575, but now fastened down. 

Margate. 
I. 
In the first line for " Gredo " read " Credo." 

MIDDLESEX. 

Hackney. 

Two shields, 6^ x 5^ inches, from the brass to John Lymsey, 
1545, and wife Margaret (Pickenham). Loose in 1903. 

This brass, restored from an early drawing, is engraved in 



2IO 



the Rev. H. Haines' Manual of Mommental Brasses, Introd., 
p. ccxxxi., and in Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, N. S., vol. 
ii. p. 309. The sons and one shield were then lost and the 
marginal inscription was imperfect. The figure of the lady, 
most probably a palimpsest, and the fragments of the marginal 




Palimpsest Shields, Hackney, Middlesex. 

About one-third full-size. 

inscription have now disappeared, and within the last few 
months the shield bearing the arms of Pickenham has also 
vanished. The figure of John Lymsey appears to be of earlier 
date, c. 1510-20, possibly spoil from some monastic house re-used 
by the brass engraver without any alteration. 



211 

Obverse. Shield No. I., originally at the lower sinister corner 
of the slab, bears Quarterly I. and IV. (Or), an eagle displayed 
(gu.) charged on the breast with a mullet (or), within a bar dure {of the 
second) charged with eight cinquefoils (arg.) Lymsey. II. (Gu.), two 
bars gemel between three annulets (arg.) Ryckhill. III. {Arg.), a 
chevron {sa.) between three columbines ppr. Coventry. 

Shield No. II., originally at the upper sinister corner of the 
slab, bears Lymsey and quarterings as in No. I. impaling 
PiCKENHAM, {Az.), a Uou rampant {or) holding a battle axe, headed 
{arg.), hafted {or). 

Reverse. The shields have been cut out of a large quad- 
rangular plate of Flemish workmanship of the early part of 
the sixteenth century. Allowing for the shape of the shields 
the pieces join together and show the upper part of a figure 
of St. John the Baptist in his camel skin robe, holding in his 
left hand an open book and pointing thereto with his right. 
Below the book, and not thereon as usual, is the Holy Lamb 
with banner, but of this only the nimbus surrounding the head 
and part of the banner are visible. The background is diapered 
with a pattern of large foliage work, whilst architectural design, 
probably intended to represent the interior of a church, fills the 
top of the plate, the two supporting columns at the sides being 
ornamented with a chevron pattern. The plate appar*ent]y 
belongs to the type in which the person commemorated is 
represented kneeling with a figure of his patron saint standing 
behind him, in this case St. John the Baptist. 

The writer is indebted to the Rev. J. F. Williams for notice 
of this interesting find and for rubbings of the plates. 



London, British Museum. 

The following palimpsests formerly in the possession of the 
late Mr. Bayfield, of Norwich, have recently been deposited in 
the Museum. 



I. 

Tiie inscription from Trunch, Norfolk. See Trunch, Nor- 
folk, and also Norfolk additions and corrections. 



212 




11. 

A small fragment, 2i x i inch, bearing on the obverse the feet 

of a civilian, c. 1530, 
and on the reverse a 
portion of a canopy 
from a fourteenth 
century Flemish brass. 

III. 

Another fragment, 
3^ + i^ inches, bear- 
ing on the obverse a 
fragment of a sixteenth 
century inscription 

trill tiie octo... 

and the tops of the 
letters of another line, 
and on the reverse the 
letters KCE ^om a 
Flemish marginal inscription of the fourteenth century. 




Palimpsest Fragment. 

Full si/e. 



NORTHOLT. 

Reproduced in the Portfolio of the Monumental Brass Society, 
vol. ii. pi. 29, with the palimpsest portions. 

NORFOLK. 
The palimpsests at Felmingham ; Halvergate (2) ; Merton ; 
Norwich, St. John Maddermarket, to Nicholas Suttherton, 1540, 
St. Martin-at-Palace, St. Peter Mancroft, and in the Strangers' 
Hall ; Great Ormesby ; Paston ; Salhouse ; and Sail, are repro- 
duced in Norfolk Archaology, vol. xv. pp. 61-90. 

Felmingham. 

I. 

Reverse. Inscription to William Elyes, chaplain, 1500. Local. 

€)ratc 5 aiii M,i\\\ (El^egf captUani 
qui olnit bi' tiie i|5oucbr' a° ri W^"" 

Loosely suspended by a nail on the wall at the west end of 
the nave. 



213 

II, 

Also loosely suspended by a nail on the wall at the West end 
of the nave. The writer is indebted to the Rev. J. F, Williams 
for the rubbing of the reverse of No. I., and for the notes on the 
present positions of the brasses. 

Merton. 

The brass to Thomas de Grey, 1562, is no longer beneath a 
pew but on the floor of the south aisle. 

Paston. 
The recovery and restoration of the Paston shields is thus 
recorded in Norfolk Archaology, vol. iv. p. 360, under date 4th 
November, 1852, " The Rev. John Gunn informed the Com- 
mittee that Mr. Rising, of Horning, had handed to him a brass 
formerly on the tomb of Erasmus Paston in Paston church ; and 
that another had been found in the possession of a blacksmith at 
North Walsham ; both of which he had caused to be restored to 
their original positions on the tomb." For this note the writer 
is indebted to the Rev. J. F. Williams. 

Trunch. 

The inscription to Walter Bownyng and wife Melicent, 1473, 
has recently been found amongst the effects of the late Mr. Bay- 
field, and is now deposited in the British Museum. It is broken 
into five pieces and is in a very fragile condition. The surname 
appears to be " Bownyng," and his wife's christian name 
" Meloci(n)t." 

SUFFOLK. 
Denham. 
A rubbing of the palimpsest portion is in the collection of 
Mr. Arthur H. Brown, of Brentwood. Another copy is said to 
be kept in the vestry of the church. 

SURREY. 

CoBHAM." 

Mr. H. Gough, of Redhill, suggests that the words on the 
bowl of the chalice should read " Esto m(ihi) Ihs." 



214 



SUMMARY. 

The term " palimpsest," although not strictly accurate, is, like 
many other words also not strictly accurate, a very convenient 
word to apply to this class of memorial. In its true sense the 
term is applied to ancient manuscripts where older writing has 
been effaced to make way for new script. It was first employed 
by the late Mr. Albert Way, F.S.A., in reference to brasses, and 
although other words have been suggested at various times this 
term seems to be the most convenient and to be in general use. 

Palimpsest brasses may be divided into two main classes : 

A. Appropriated and converted brasses. 

B. Brasses which bear on their reverse side engravings 
of figures, inscriptions, &c., either of English or foreign 
workmanship. This class may be subdivided into three 
heads : 

(i) Wasters from the workshop. 

(2) Spoil from the destruction of the monastic houses 

and chantries in our own country. 

(3) Imported plate and spoil from the destruction 

of the religious houses in the Low countries. 

By far the greater number of palimpsests fall under Class B 
and its subdivisions, and as it is only by chance or by the acci- 
dental loosening of plates that the opportunity arises for their 
examination, many more may still be noted from time to time. 
To a certain extent the classes overlap as in the cases of Water- 
perry, Oxon., and Okeover, Staffs., where some of the plates are 
simply turned over and re-engraved. The Okeover brass was 
most probably monastic spoil and very possibly the one at 
Bromham, Beds., came from a similar source. The Lymsey 
brass at Hackney, dated 1545, but now nearly all lost, appears 
to have been a compound example, the man being in armour of 
the period, c. 1510-20, the lady in a costume of the period of the 
date of the brass, whilst two of the shields are cut out of a 
foreign example. 

Class A. — Appropriated and converted brasses. In some 
cases earlier brasses have been simply appropriated by the 
addition of a new inscription and new shields, or the old ones 
turned over and re-engraved, without any alteration to the 
figures or canopies. Examples occur at Bromham, Beds., where 
a brass to a man in armour and his two wives, c. 1430-40, has 



215 

been turned into a memorial for Sir John Dyve, 1535, his wife, 
and his mother, by the addition of a new foot-inscription and the 
insertion of a new shield bearing the Dyve arms ; at Bright- 
lingsea, Essex, where a bracket, c. 1400, now carries the figures 
of two ladies of the Beriffe family who died in 1536, it is very 
probable that these two figures are cut out of the larger figures 
which originally occupied their places ; at Gunby, Line, where 
a brass to one of his own family, c. 1405, was turned into a 
memorial for Sir Thomas Massyngberde and his wife Joan, 1552, 
by the simple process of cutting or beating down the earlier 
incised inscription and making a new one in raised lettering, 
traces of the earlier inscription being still visible between the 
words of the later ; at Laughton, in the same county, is a some- 
what similar instance, where an armed figure, c. 1400, probably a 
member of the Dalyson family, has, by the insertion of a new 
inscription, become the memorial of William Dalyson, who died 
in 1546, the inscription also mentioning his son George, who 
died in 1549, some small repairs to the canopy work seem to 
have been effected at the same time ; at Horley, Surrey, where 
the figure of a lady, c. 1420, now, by the insertion of a small 
inscription under her feet, purports to be Joan Fenner, who died 
in 1516; at Ticehurst, Sussex, where a large armed figure, 
c. 1370, now appears with two small figures of ladies, c. 1500, 
and an inscription to John Wybarne, who died in 1490, and his 
two wives Edith and Agnes, the latter of whom died in 1502 ; and 
at Norwich, St. Stephen, where the figure of a lady, c. 1410, has 
received a new inscription turning her into one Eel (or Ele) 
Buttry, who died in 1546. In a few cases brasses were not only 
appropriated but practically converted into new memorials 
by various alterations and additions to the figures themselves. 
Of this, the true form of palimpsest, only four examples have 
been noticed, viz., at Chalfont St. Peter, Bucks. ; Great Ormsby, 
Norfolk ; Waterperry, Oxon. ; and Okeover, Staffs. In the 
example at Chalfont the figure of a priest in mass vestments, 
c. 1440, has been altered by the addition of shading, the rounding 
of the toes, and the addition of a new inscription making him into 
Robert Hanson, vicar of Chalfont, who died in 1545. At Great 
Ormsby, the three-quarter figure of a lady, c. 1440, has been 
altered by the insertion of much coarse shading and the addition 
of a new inscription (now lost), to represent Alice, wife of Sir 
Robert Clere, who died in 1538. The brass at Waterperry must 
remain more or less a mystery until the reverses can be properly 



2l6 

examined. At the present time it is the memorial of Walter 
Curzon, who died in 1527, and his wife Isabel, but possibly the 
brass may have been recut a few years later. Anyway the 
original brass commemorated a man in armour and his wife, 
c. 1445, with a marginal inscription and probably four shields of 
arms. To convert this earlier armed figure into one conforming 
with the date of Curzon's death it became necessary to make 
extensive alterations in the style of armour, A new head and 
shoulders had to be provided but the rest of the figure was 
altered by strengthening the breast plate with several overlapping 
plates, partially obliterating the oblong palettes, converting the 
taces into a skirt of mail, inserting mail gussets at the insteps, 
and rounding the pointed sollerets. All the lines of the body 
armour were invecked and shaded and small additions made to 
the ground on which the lion rests and to the ornamentation of 
the scabbard of the sword. The upper half of the lady is either 
a new plate or the old one turned over and re-engraved, but the 
lower half is the original with the addition of a little shading and 
the continuation of the chain carrying the pomander box. The 
marginal inscription appears to have been simply turned over and 
re-engraved, as there is a record of a loose piece (now lost) which 
had on its reverse a portion of another inscription. The brass at 
Okeover is a similar instance, but an examination of the reverses 
has enabled a complete identification to be made. Originally laid 
down to the memory of William, fifth Lord Zouch, of Harring- 
worth, and his two wives, about the year 1447, soon after the 
death of his first wife, Alice Seymour, it became, probably as 
spoil from some monastic house, the memorial of Humphrey 
Oker, who died in 1538, his wife, Isabel, and their children. 
Little alteration was really made in the brass, except in the figure 
of Lord Zouch, where portions of the body armour were cut 
away and a tabard charged with Oker arms made in the indent 
thus created. The upper part of the helmet with its cresi yas 
removed and the crest of Oker substituted. The lady on the 
dexter side remained unaltered and passed as Isabel Oker, but 
the second lady was superfluous, so her figure was reversed, and 
thereon were engraved the Oker children in three rows, the head 
and shoulders of the figure being filled up with an oak tree 
bearing a shield. The original shields and the marginal inscrip- 
tion were simply turned over and re-engraved. 

Class B. — Brasses which bear on their reverse side engrav- 
ings of figures, inscriptions, &c., either of English or foreign 



217 

workmanship, sub- divided into three heads : (i) wasters from 
the workshop, (2) spoil from the destruction of the monastic 
houses and chantries in our own country, and (3) imported plate 
and spoil from the destruction of religious houses and churches 
in the Low Countries. 

(i) Wasters from the workshop, including plates cancelled 
through some error either in detail or in the inscription or 
heraldry, or from the design not meeting with approval. As 
Mr. Waller remarks in the introduction to his Series of Monu- 
mental Brasses, p. ix., "Spoilt metal from the workshop must 
have been of frequent occurrence, as experience in the manu- 
facture of similar memorials proves." The dates of the two 
sides generally but not always nearly coincide. 

Examples of wasters closely corresponding in date occur 
at Luton, Beds., where the figure of Isabel Hay, 1455, has 
on the reverse portions of unfinished canopy work of much 
the same date; Chalfont St. Giles, Bucks., where the inscrip- 
tion to John and Elizabeth Salter, 1523, has on the reverse 
another inscription to Thomas and Anne Bredham, 152 1 ; Stone, 
Bucks., where the figure of Thomas Gorney, 1520, shows on the 
reverse a portion of a figure of a lady, c. 1440-50, whilst the 
nscription bears a portion of another inscription to Christopher 
Tharpe, who is said to have died in 1514; Lytton Cheyney, 
Dorset, where two inscriptions, one to Alexander Warnby, i486, 
and another to John and Thomas Newpton, of about the same 
date, have been made from an inscription to John Chapman, 
fishmonger, 1471, by the simple process of cutting the latter 
inscription into two pieces ; it is curious to find the two pieces 
still in the same church, and as the lettering of the later inscrip- 
tions suggests a local origin, whilst that of the Chapman inscrip- 
tion appears to be of London make and is yet quite sharp, 
showing no signs of wear, it may perhaps be conjectured that 
the local man applied to a London firm for a piece of metal and 
received the inscription which he promptly cut in two; Fing- 
ringhoe, Essex, where the inscription to John Alleyn, c. 1600, 
has on the reverse a portion of a text of much the same date ; 
Bristol, Temple Church, where a priest in processional vest- 
ments, c. 1460, is cut out of a lady of about the same date; 
St. Alban's Abbey, Herts., where the lower portion of an un- 
known abbot, c. 1400, shows on the reverse the lower half of a 
lady, also of about the same date ; Downe, Kent, where the 
inscription to John Bederenden, 1445, bears on the reverse a 



2l8 

portion of an inscription of similar date ; Margate, Kent, where 
the inscription to Thomas Smyth, vicar, 1433, has on the 
reverse the almost complete inscription to John and Alice 
Dalton, 1430 ; Loughborough, Leicestershire, where the much 
worn inscription to Giles Jordan, 1441, bears on the reverse 
another inscription to Elizabeth Lisle, 1438 ; Southacre, Nor- 
folk, where some of the fragments of the brass to Sir Roger 
Harsick and wife, 1454, bear other fragments on the reverse, 
including one small Flemish bit; Nether Heyford, Northants., 
where a shield bearing the Heyford arms from the brass to John 
Mauntell and wife, c. 1400, shows on the reverse the arms of 
Montacute quartering Longespee, possibly intended for the arms 
of WilHam de Montacute, second Earl of Salisbury of that 
name, who died in 1397; Goring, Oxon., where some children, 
c. 1600, have on the reverse an inscription to Walter Prunes, 
T594, in this case the inscription has been cut in two, one half 
for the sons, the other for the daughters; Clifton Campville, 
Staffs., where the half effigy of a lady, c. 1350-60, on a bracket, 
is cut out of a cross-legged figure in mail, c. 1300; Ampton, 
Suffolk, where a lady, c. 1490, bears on the reverse another lady, 
c. 1470; Cookley, Suffolk, where a group of children, 1595, has 
on the reverse a portion of an inscription of about the same 
date ; Sanderstead, Surrey, where an inscription to Nicholas 
Wood, 1586, bears on the reverse another inscription to Nicholas 
Pury, 1585 ; Willingdon, Sussex, a similar case, one side of an 
inscription bearing date 1618-19, the other 1618 ; and Melksham, 
Wilts., where two shields, 161 2, are respectively cut out of a 
figure brass and an inscription, both of about the same date. 

In some cases a greater length of time is observable between 
the engraving of the two sides, and this may possibly be ac- 
counted for by the plates becoming loose and so lost, or by theft 
or losses during repairs and rebuilding, when, as in our own 
time, the plates would eventually find their way into the hands 
of the dealers in old metal and so back to the workshops. Such 
may have been the case at Ashover, Derbyshire, where the in- 
scription to Thomas Babyngton, 15 18, has on its reverse another 
inscription to Robert Prykke, 1450; Braughing, Herts., where a 
civilian, c. 1480, is cut out of a lady, c. 1440; King's Langley, 
Herts., where the inscription to William Carter, 1528, has on 
the reverse another inscription dated 1487; Godmersham, Kent, 
where the inscription to William Geffray, 1516, has on the 
reverse an inscription to William Attilburgh, 1471 ; Boston, 



219 

Line, where one lady, c. 1460, is cut out of another, c. 1390; 
Ipsden, Oxon., where the figures of Thon:ias and Isabel 
Englysche, 1525, are respectively cut out of the figure of a 
lady and of an inscription, c. 1420; Oxford, Magdalen College 
Chapel, where the inscription to John Caly, 15 15, has on the 
reverse another inscription to Isabel Fyscher, 1464 ; Stanton 
St. John, Oxon., where the inscription to Anne Frene, 1524, 
is cut out of the figure of a lady, c. 1300; and Etchingham, 
Sussex, where the Echynghani-Oxenbrigg inscription, 1480, has 
on the reverse an inscription to Thomas Austin, 1405. The 
engraver who restored the legs of Sir John de Northwode, at 
Minster, Isle of Sheppey, Kent, in the early part of the sixteenth 
century appropriated an earlier figure from somewhere in order 
to carry out this repair. 

In the few cases where both sides of the plate refer to the 
same person, it may be assumed that the original engraving was 
rejected either from some error in detail, or from the design not 
meeting with approval, or from the inscription containing some 
expression not in harmony with the times. The brass at Bur- 
well, Cambs., to John Lawrence, abbot of Ramsay from 1508 to 
1539, was probably prepared during his lifetime and represented 
him as an abbot, but on his death in 1542 the figure was altered 
and he simply appears in cassock, surplice, and almuce. The 
half effigy of Thomas Cod, vicar of St. Margaret's, Rochester, 
1465, was originally vested in cassock, surplice, almuce, and 
cope, but on the later side the amice takes the place of the 
almuce ; the reason for this change is not obvious. A shield 
at Frenze, Norfolk, bears on its obverse the arms of Loudham, 
whilst on the reverse is an unfinished shield with the arms of 
Blenerhayset quartering Orton. The inscription originally pre- 
pared for John Marsham in 1525, formerly in the church of 
St. John Maddermarket, Norwich, contained a grant of so many 
days pardon, but this plate was cancelled and a new inscription, 
altogether different in style, engraved on the other side. At 
Walton-on-Thames, Surrey, the feat of agility performed by 
John Selwyn at a stag-hunt in the presence of Queen Elizabeth 
is twice engraved. The earlier engraving is very lightly done 
and shows him riding on the stag, without hat, whilst with 
his left hand he holds the stag's horns and with the other 
plunges the sword into its neck. This does not seem to have 
been approved and a more spirited representation of the scene 
was engraved on the other side. Selwyn now wears a hat and 
cloak and keeps his seat without holding the horns of the stag. 



220 

(a) Spoil from the dissolution of the monastic houses between 
1536-g, and the dissolution of the chantries, &c.,in 1547. These 
wholesale and sweeping destructions flooded the market with old 
metal and have provided by far the largest class of palimpsests. 
In a few cases it is possible to identify with more or less certainty 
the places from which the original brasses came, as at Dench- 
worth, Berks., where the inscription to William Hyde, and wife, 
1562, bears on its reverse the record of the laying of a foundation 
stone of Bisham Abbey, by King Edward III., in 1333 ; at 
Reading, St. Laurence, Berks., where the brass to Walter Barton, 
1538, is entirely made up of portions of the brass, including the 
complete inscription, of Sir John Popham, who died in 1463, and 
was buried, according to Stowe, in the Charterhouse, London ; 
in Eton College Chapel, where the inscription to Elizabeth 
Stokes, 1560, has on the i*everse another inscription to Walter 
Haugh, 1505, who by will desired to be buried in the chapel 
of St. John Baptist, at Worstead, Norfolk ; curiously enough, 
both inscriptions are the work of Norfolk engravers ; at Hedgerly, 
Bucks., where, on the back of the inscription to Margaret 
Bulstrode, 1540, is another to Thomas Totyngton, abbot of 
Bury ; at Norbury, Derbyshire, where portions of the brass to 
Sir Anthony Fitzherbert, and wife, 1538, appear to have come 
from a brass of the De Verdun family, who buried in Croxden 
Abbey ; at Walkern, Herts., where, on the back of the inscrip- 
tion to Richard Humberstone, 1581, is an inscription to John 
Lovekyn, lord mayor of London, who was buried in the church 
of St. Michael, Crooked Lane ; at Halvergate, Norfolk, where 
the inscription to Robert Golword, 1543, bears on its reverse 
another inscription to a Lady Scales, probably from Blackburgh 
Priory, the burial place of the Scales family ; at Norwich, 
St. John Maddermarket, the Rugge brass, 1558, is probably made 
up of spoil from the great abbey of St. Benet Hulme ; at 
Shipton-under-Wychwood, Oxon., the plate bearing the figure 
and inscription to Elizabeth Home, 1548, doubtless came from 
some church in Aylesbury, since it records on its reverse the en- 
dowment of a chantry in that town, and at Rodmell, Sussex, 
John de la Chambre, 1673, or rather his executors or representa- 
tives, seem to have appropriated an inscription already in the 
church and simply engraved Chambre's inscription on the back. 
In addition to these, other examples of spoil occur at Flitton, 
Beds. ; Chichley, Middle Claydon, Denham, a fine example, 
having on the reverse the almost complete figure of a friar 



221 

together with an inscription to John Pyke, probably a school- 
master, since his shield bears the device of a birchrod, Eton 
College Chapel, Hedgerley, and Taplow, three examples, all in 
Bucks. ; Cambridge, Queens' College ; Chester, Holy Trinity, 
where the reverse shows the leg of an armed man wearing the 
Order of the Garter ; Braunton, Devonshire ; Fryerning, Stret- 
hall, Tolleshunt Darcy, two examples, Upminster, and VVal- 
thamstow, all in Essex ; Dummer, Odiham and Winchester in 
Hampshire ; Aldenham, Great Berkhampstead, Eastwick, and 
Walkern, in Hertfordshire ; Cuxton (2), Faversham, West 
Mailing, Penshurst, Shorne (lost), and Westerham, all in Kent; 
Manchester Cathedral ; Cranford, Harlington, Littleton, London, 
All Hallows, Barking, and Northolt, all in Middlesex ; Felming- 
ham (2), Halvergate, Merton, Narborough, Norwich, St. John 
Maddermarket (2), St. Martin-at-Palace, and Ranworth, all in 
Norfolk ; Checkendon, Oxon. ; Oxford, Magdalen College 
Chapel; Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk; Camberwell, Cheam, 
Cobham, in Surrey ; Morland, Westmorland ; West Lavington, 
Wilts; and Howden, Ilkley and Sessay, Yorkshire. 

(3) Imported material, mostly from the Low Countries. 
Flanders and the neighbouring provinces were early celebrated 
for the manufacture of plates of " latten " or brass, and large 
quantities must have been imported into England as the plate 
was apparently not made at home until the time of Queen 
Elizabeth. Amongst this imported material must have been a 
certain quantity of shop waste, which seems to be the only way 
to account for the existence of certain early Flemish examples, 
as at Great Bowden, Leic, where the inscription to William , 

Wolstonton, rector, 1403, bears on the reverse a portion of 
a small Flemish brass of a civilian under a canopy, c. 1350; at 
Horncastle, Line, where portions of the brass to Sir Lionel k <^\^ 
Dymoke, 1519, are composed of foreign fragments; at Southacre, 
Norfolk, where the remains of the brass to Sir Roger Harsyk \ 'Oi 
and wife, 1454, include a piece of a Flemish marginal inscrip- 
tion ; other fragments occur at Sail, c. 1480, and at Trunch, \ Hi ^ r 
1473, both in Norfolk ; and at Ewelme, Oxon., 1494. The 
reverse of the great Flemish brass at Topcliffe, Yorkshire, dated 
1391, is said to be entirely covered with earlier work, and at 
Tolleshunt Darcy, Essex, is preserved a portion of the border of 
another Flemish brass, of late fourteenth century date, the two 
sides of which differ but slightly in design and date. 

Flemish fragments are mostly found between the years 1540 



T^O 



and 1590, and this may be accounted for by the rehgious troubles 
in the Low Countries which cuhninated in the outbreak of the 
Calvinists in 1566, when no fewer than 400 churches in Flanders 
and Brabant alone were pillaged, and the subsequent outrages 
committed by the Beggars of the Sea or water gueux in 1572, 
whose first acts were to plunder churches. 

Examples of the re-use such Flemish fragments have been 
noted at Winestead, Yorks, c. 1540; Tolleshunt Darcy, Essex, 
1540, preserving a complete inscription to Robert and Maud le 
Wale, 1362; Isleworth, Middlesex, 1544 and 1575; Bayford, 
Herts., c. 1545; Upminster, Essex, 1545; Aylesford, Kent, 
1545; Hackney, Middlesex, 1545; Hadleigh, Suffolk, c. 1560; 
Pottesgrove, Beds., 1563; Westerham, Kent, 1563; Norwich, 
St. Peter Mancroft, 1568; West Lavington, Wilts., 1559 (but 
engraved later); Mawgan-in-Pyder, Cornwall, 1573, i577> 1578 
and 1586; Stondon Massey, Essex, 1573; Haseley, Warw., 
1573; Constantine, Cornwall, 1574; Erith, Kent, 1574; Harrow, 
Middlesex, 1574; Oxford, St. Mary Magdalen, 1574, and St. 
Peter-in-the-East, 1574; Denham, Suffolk, 1574; Wimbish, 
Essex, c, 1575; Cookham, Berks., 1577; Cley, Norfolk, 1578; 
Norton Disney, Line, c. 1580; Paston, Norfolk, c. 1580; 
Yealmpton, Devon., 1580; Pinner, Middlesex, 1580; Hales- 
worth, Suffolk, 1581 ; Lee, Kent, 1582 ; Margate, Kent, 1582 ; 
Camberwell, Surrey, 1582; W^alkern, Herts., 1583 ; and Aveley, 
Essex, 1584. About ten of these fragments belong to the four- 
teenth century and chiefly show canopy work, as at Pottesgrove, 
Mawgan-in-Pyder, two very fine pieces, Stondon Massey, Isle- 
worth, Ewelme, and Haseley. A portion of an armed figure 
together with canopy work and inscription occurs at Constan- 
tine ; a complete inscription at Tolleshunt Darcy ; part of a 
lady with canopy work at Harrow ; and a portion of a civilian 
at Winestead. About eight belong to the fifteenth century, 
as at Cookham, mostly canopy and diaper work ; at Yeal- 
hampton, the upper portion of an oblong plate with soul of 
the deceased in a sheet, the head of the person commemorated 
and heads of his patron saints ; at Aveley and Margate, strips 
of marginal inscriptions, the latter with scenes from the life 
of man ; at Upminster and Bayford, portions of figures ; at 
Walkern, inscriptions and heraldry ; and at Paston, inscription 
and head of a figure. From eighteen to twenty belong to the 
sixteenth century and comprise various designs, as at Mawgan- 
in-Pyder, heraldry and portions of figures ; Stondon Massey, 



heraldry; Walkern, children; Aylesford, Westerham, and Ox- 
ford, St. Peter, canopy work^ Erith and Isleworth, heraldry; 
Norton Disney, West Lavington, and Oxford, St, Mary Mag- 
dalen, inscriptions; Hackney, Norwich, St. Peter Mancroft, 
Denham (Suffolk), Hadleigh, Halesworth, and Camberwell, 
portions of figures, some with canopy work and some with 
bits of inscriptions. Some brasses are made up of fragments 
of various dates, as at Stondon Massey, a mixture of fourteenth 
and sixteenth century work ; and at Walkern, where no fewer 
than four brasses of various dates have been made use of to 
build up the Humberstone memorial. On the other hand the 
brass at St. Peter-in-the-East, Oxford, is entirely, with the 
exception of a part of the children, cut out of one plate, the 
various pieces fitting together and forming the greater part 
of a canopy. 

In three cases only have pieces of the same Flemish brass 
been found in different churches, viz., at Up cmircn , Essex, 
and Bayford, Herts., where are portions of the figure of an 
abbot or bishop, the later side in each case bearing date 1545; 
at Erith, Kent, and Isleworth, Middlesex, portions of an heraldic 
device, the obverses dating respectively 1574 and 1575; and at 
Norton Disney, Line, and West Lavington, Wilts., portions of 
a long inscription recording the foundation of a mass, the date, 
1518, appearing on the Disney piece, whilst the name of the 
church, Westmonstre, is preserved on the Lavington fragment. 

The re-use of brasses was not entirely confined to sepulchral 
monuments, for amongst the collections of the Society of Anti- 
quaries is a late seventeenth century clock, the face of which 
is cut out of a memorial inscription, and a sundial made by 
R. Treswell in 1582, exhibited at the Bristol Meeting of the 
Archaeological Institute in 1851, bears on its reverse a portion 
of an emaciated and shrouded figure extended on a mattress. 
Occasionally palimpsest stones are found, as at Morley, Derby- 
shire, probably spoil from the neighbouring abbey of Dale. 
The fine series of garter plates preserved in St. George's 
Chapel, Windsor, contains four palimpsest examples, the 
helms and crests of three plates having been turned over and 
re-engraved, whilst the fourth bears on its reverse an unfinished 
design for another plate. ^ 

' See W. II. St. J. Hope's Siall Plates of Knighls of the Garter, and Proc. 
Soi. Antiq., 2 S. vol. xviii. p. 14S. 



Index. 



'?o 



25 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



• •• ■ 


39 


. 


125 




203 


• 97. 99, 


184 


. 56, 208, 


221 




8 


34. 


217 




30 


■. 162, 


218 


. 


199 




157 


;holas... 


75 


, ... 


120 


62 


223 



I'AGE 



Abbott, Thomas ... 
Adderley (Salop.) 
Additions and Corrections 
Adrianson, Adrian 
Aldenham (Herts.) 
Aldermaston (Berks.) 
Alleyn, Ailse, 34 ; John 
Amiens (France) ... 
Ampton (Suff.) ... 
Andrew, W. J. ... 
Anne of Bf)hemia, Queen 
Annesley, Isabel, 75 ; Nicholas 
Anthony (Cornwall) 
Antiquaries, Society of 
Arundell, Cicily, 24 ; Edward, 

25 ; George, 22 ; Isabel, 22 

Jane, 23; Mary 
Arundell of Wardour, Lord 
Ashover (Derby) ... 
Ashton, Steeple (Wilts.) 
Astley (Warw.) ... 
Aston, arms of 
Aston, Isabel, 160; John 
Atkinson, Annes, 149 ; Richard 
Attilhurgh, Margaret, 74 ; 

William 

Austin, Thomas ... 
Avantage, John, bishop 

Amiens ... 
Aveley (Essex) ... ... 31 

Awodde, Dyones, 175; John 
Aylesbury (Bucks.) 

Aylesford (Kent) 69, 

Ayscough, Jane ... 



26, 



24 

25 
218 
188 
181 
161 
160 
149 



74, 218 
178,219 
of 

... 30 
, 90, 222 

- 175 

150, 220 

222, 223 

96, 97 



Babham, John, 5 ; Mary ... 5 
Babington, Sir Anthony, 76 ; 

Elizabeth, 76 ; Isabel, 26 ; 

John, 26 ; Thomas ... 26, 218 

Bacon, Adam de ... ... .. 125 

Ball, Chrystian, 65 ; Elizabeth, 

65 ; John 65 

Bardolf, Elizabeth, I19; Lord... 119 

Barett, arms of ... ... ... 32 

Barett, Charles, 31 ; Chiistian, 

31 ; Edward ... ... ... 31 

Barlee, George, lOl ; William ... loi 

Barley (Herts.) ... ... ... 209 

Barton, Walter ... ... ...7, 220 

Basle (Switzerland) ... ... 30 



Bassett, Elizabeth, 28 ; Jane, 147 ; 

Thomas, 147 ; William ... 28 
Bave, James, 169; Kateline ... 169 
Bayfield, Mr. ... 134, 141, 21 1, 213 
Bayford (Herts.)... 57, 58, 222, 223 
Baynlun, Joan, 59 ; Thomas ... 59 
Beauchamp, John, 158, 159; Mar- 
garet, 159; Roger 159 

Beauchamp of Bletso, arms of ... 158 
Beaufort, John, duke of Somerset 159 
Bederenden, John ... 72, 217 

Bedfordshire ... ... ... i 

Bedingfield, Anne, 115; Anthony, 

163 ; Sir Edmund, 163 ; Eustace 115 
Bellamy, Dorothy, 103 ; William 103 
Bellingham, arms of ... ... loi 

Bellingham, Anne, 100; David, 

100; Elizabeth, 10; Walter... 10 
Benstede, arms of ... ... 63 

Berkhampstead, Great (Hert=.) 59, 221 
Berkshire ... ... ... ... 4 

Berners, Leonard, 35 ; Mary, 35 ; 

William 35 

Berry, arms of ... ... ... 136 

Berwick (Northumb.) ... ... 6, 7 

Beryff, Dame Alice, 32 ; Mar- 
garet 32 

Betchworth (Surrey) ... ... 166 

Bisham Priory (Berks.) ... 6, 7, 220 
Blackburgh Priory (Norf. j 119, 220 
Blenerhasset, arms of ... 129, 130 
Blenerhasset, Jane, 128 ; John, 

128, 129 ; Ralph 118 

Blewbury, Berks. .. ... ... 4 

BIythe, John 183 

Boileau, Sir M. ... ... ... 199 

Boleyn, Alice, 135; Sir William 135 
Bolingbroke, L. G. ... ... 133 

Bonde, Anne, 108; William ... 108 
Boothe, Alice, 87 ; Sir John ... 87 
Boston (Line.) ... ... 93, 21S 

Botery, see BiUtry. 

Bouchier, John, Earl of Bath, 29 ; 

Lady Elizabeth ... ... 29 

Bowcer, see Bouchier. 

Bowden, Great (Leic). ... 89, 221 

Bownell, Mardocheus, 100; Nich- 
olas, 100; Thomas ... ... 100 

Bownyng, Millicent, 142, 213 ; 
Walter... ... ... 142, 213 



226 



Index. 



PAGE 

Boys, John de ... ... ... 44 

Braughing (Herts.) ... 60, 218 

Braunton (Devon.) ... 29, 221 

Braytoft, Joan, 94 ; John ... 94 

Bredham, Anne, 8, 217; Thomas, 

8, 217 
Brierly, Laurence ... ... 204 

Brightlingsea (Essex) ... 32,215 

Bristol (GIouc), Temple Church 53, 217 
British Museum, see London. 
Bromham (Beds.) ... ...i, 

Brook, Agatha, 178; Henry de, 

127; John 

Broughton, John ... 

Brouncker, Henry 

Brown, arms of ... 

Browne, John, 165 ; Margery, 

163 ; Richard, 163 ; William 
Bruges (Belgium), The Beguinage, 

89 ; The Cathedral 
Bryckett, Robert... 
Buchanan, George 
Buckinghamshire. . . 
Bullen, Sir Thomas 
Bullock, arms of ... 
Bullock, Ralph ,.. 
Bulstrode, Edward, 14 ; Margaret, 

14, 220 
Burgundy, arms of ... ... 38 

Burgundy, Dukes of, 38 ; Isabel, 



214 

178 

158 

187 

51 

163 



169 

. 209 

. 198 

.8, 203 

21 

• 191 
191 



Duchess of, 30 ; Mary of 




38 


Burneshead, arms of 


• • . 


lOI 


Burwell (Cambs.) 


18, 


219 


Bury St. Edmund's (Suff.) 


162, 


221 


Buttry, Ele or Ede, 134, 


215; 




"William... 




134 


Buttyll, John 




70 


Bycklay, William 


• . . 


176 


Byrde, Henry 


... 


75 



Calthorpe, arms of ... 129, 130 

Calthorpe, Dame Jane, 128 ; Sir 

Philip 128 

Caly, John 146, 219 

Camberwell (Surrey) 168, 221, 222, 223 
Cambridge, Queens' College 19, 221 
Cambridgeshire ... ... ... 18 

Camoys, Lady, 174; Lord ... 174 

Campsey Ash (SufF.) 134 

Carrew, Temperance, 120 ; Sir 

Wymond ... ... ... 120 

Carter, Alice, 63 ; William 63, 218 
Castell, arms of ... ... ... 108 

Cater, Margery ... ... ... 6 

Cave, Anthony, 9 ; Elizabeth ... 9 

Cerff, John 91 

Chalfont St. Giles (Bucks.) ...8, 217 
Chalfont St. Peter (Bucks.) ...9, 215 
Chambre, John de la ... 178,220 
Chapman, Alice, 31,208; John, 

31, 207, 208, 217 



PAGE 

••• 155 
... 105 
170, 221 

Eliza- 



143 



Chartham (Kent) 

Chase, William ... 
Cheam (Surrey) ... 
Chechester, Edward, 29 

beth 

Checkendon (Oxon.) 

Cheddar (Somerset.) 

Cheddar, Sir Thomas 

Cheshire ... 

Chester, Holy Trinity .. 

Chicheley (Bucks.) 

Chy . . . , Thomas 

Chyttok, John 

Cinque Ports, arms of ,. 

Cla . . . , Thomas 

Claydon, Middle (Bucks.) 

Clere, Alice, 135, 215 ; Sir Robert 

13s 
Clerk, Elizabeth, 47 ; Jenkyn, 47 ; 

Robert 

Cleves, arms of, 38 ; dukes of 



29 

221 

■• 153 

■■ 153 

20 

20, 221 

9, 220 

.. 74 

.. 148 

•• 73 
19 

..9, 220 



215 

55 
... 38 
1 16, 222 



Cley (Norfolk) 

Clifford of Frampton, arms of ... 1 50 

Clifton Campville (Staffs.) 155, 218 

Clippesby (Norfolk) 116 

Clock with palimpsest face ... 223 
Ccbbe, Margaret, 146; Robert... 146 
Cobham (Kent) ... ... ... 70 

Cobham (Surrey).., 172, 213, 221 

Cod, Thomas ... ... 82, 219 

Colchester Museum (Essex) ... 32 

Cole, Arthur 146 

Constantine (Cornwall) ... 21, 203, 222 
Cookham (Berks.) ... 5, 222 

Cookley (Suff.) 163,218 

Copleston, Isabel, 29; John ... 29 

Cornwall ... 21, 203 

Cornwall family, arms of ... loi 

Cotton, Maud, 26, 27 ; Richard 27 

Couhill, Elizabeth 

Courtenay, arms of 

Coventry, arms of. . . 

Coverledge, 



Cranford (Middsx.) 

Creke, Lady 

Cressey, arms of ... 

Cressey, Thomas ... 

Croxden Abbey (Staffs.)... 

Crugge, Barbara, 18 1 ; John, 181 ; 

\\'illiam... 
Cumberland 
Curzon, Isabel, 153, 216; Walter 

153 
Cuxton (Kent) 70 



••• 75 

... 170 

... 210 

... 74 

100, 221 

... 27 

. . . 209 

... 158 
28, 220 



181 
25 

216 
221 



Dale Abbey (Derby.) ... 26, 204, 223 
Dalison, George, 95, 215 ; William 

95. 215 
Dalton, Alice, 77, 218 ; John 77, 218 
Darcy, arms of ... ... ... 45 



Index. 



227 



Daicy, Anthony, 43, 44 ; Katherine 

43; Thomas ... ... ... 43 

Dauntesay, arms of ... ... 187 

Dauntesay, Ambrose, 187 ; Ger- 
trude, 187 ; John, 99, 184, 185 ; 

Margaret 185 

Denchworth (Berks.) ... 6, 220 

Dencort, Alice, 47 ; Annes, 47 ; 
Elizabeth, 47 ; Ellen, 47 ; 

Richard, 47 ; Robert, 47 ; Roger 50 

Denham (Bucks.) 10, 220 

Denham (Suffolk) 163, 213, 222, 223 

Derby, Margaret, Countess of ... 107 
Derbyshire ... ... 26, 204 

Derelicts ... ... ... ... 201 

Dering, Sir Edward, 85 ; James 84 

Dethyk, Isabel, 26 ; Robert ... 26 

Devonshire ... ... ... 29 

Disney, Jane, 96 ; Margaret, 96 ; 

Nele, 96 ; Richard, 96 ; William 96 
Dolman, Elizabeth, 189 ; Peter, 
189; Phillip, 189; Richard, 

189; Timothy 189 

Dorsetshire ... ... 30, 207 

Dove, arms of ... ... ... 168 

Dove, John, 168; Margaret ... 168 

Downe (Kent) 72, 217 

Draper, Anne, 73; John, 115; 

Margery, 115; William ... 73 

Drye, 138 

Dummer (Hants.) ... 53, 221 

Durham ... ... ... ... 31 

Dymoke, Sir Lionel ... 94, 221 

Dyve, arms of ... ... ... 2 

Dyve, Elizabeth, 2 ; Isabel, 2 ; 

Sir John ... ... 2, 215 

Eastwick (Herts.) ... 60, 221 

Echyngham, Elizabeth, 178 ; 

Margaret, 178 ; Thomas, 178 ; 

Sir Thomas, 153; Sir William 153 
Edgcomb, Thomas ... ... 14 

Edinburgh, St. Giles 197 

Edward III., King ... 6, 220 

Ellenbridge, arms of .. ... 170 

EUesborough (Bucks.) ... ... 13 

Elyes, William ... ... 117, 212 

English, Isabel, 145, 219; 

Thomas... ... ... 145, 219 

Erith (Kent) 73, 108, 209, 222, 223 
Ernley, John, 185 ; Margaret ... 185 
Esscheric, Margaret, 30; Peter... 30 
Essex ... ... ... ... 31 

Etchingham (Sussex) 153, 156, 178, 219 
Eton College (Bucks.) 14, 203, 220, 221 
Everode, Anne, 120; Henry ... 120 
Ewelme (Oxon.) ... ... 144, 221 



Fabiller, Peter 
Fairclyffe, William 
Farley, S 



55 
162 

189 



PAGE 

Fastolf, arms of ... ... ... 127 

Fastolf, Sir John, 127 ; Milicent 127 
Faversham (Kent) ... 73, 221 

Felmingham (Norfolk) 117, 212, 221 
Fenner, Joan, 174, 215 ; John ... 174 
Fingringhoe (Essex) ... 34, 217 

Fitzadrian, arms of ... ... 167 

Fitzherbert, Sir Anthony, 26, 220 ; 

Jane, 147; Maud, 26; Robert 147 
Fitzlangley, arms of ... ... 45 

Fladbury (Wore.) 82 

Flanders, arms of... ... ... 38 

Flemish fragments re-used, 4, 5, 22, 23, 
24, 25, 29, 32, 36, 40, 45. 48, 53, 58, 
66, 69, 73, 75, 79, 87, 89, 94, 97, 99, 
104, 106, 107, 113, 115, 116, 133, 
135. 136, 137, T39, 141, 142, 144, 
147, 149, 163, 164, 166, 169, 182, 
184, 188, 192, 196, 197, 200, 202, 
203, 209, 210, 212, 221, 222, 223 
Fliit, Elizabeth, 79 ; Thomas ... 79 

Flitton (Beds.) 3, 220 

Force, figure of ... ... ... 70 

Forster, Sir George ... ... 8 

Fortescue, Agnes, 29: Henry, 29; 
Isabel ... ... ... ... 29 

Fortitude, figure of ... ... 70 

Franki.she, Anthony, 103 ; Dor- 
othy 103 

Frene, Anne ... ... 152, 219 

Frenze (Norfolk) 117,219 

Friar, figure of ... .., ... 13 

Fromondes, arms of ... 170, 172 
Fromondes, Bartholomew, 172; 

Elizabeth, 170; Thomas ... 170 
Frowick, Thomas ... ... 167 

Fryerning (Essex) ... 35, 221 

Fyscher, Isabel ... ... 146, 219 

Gardener, Richard ... ... 138 

Garter, Order of ... ... 20, 221, 223 

Garter plates, palimpsest ... 223 

Gedge, James, 35 ; Mary ... 35 

Gee, Henry ... ... ... 20 

Geffray, William ... ... 74,218 

Gerard, Petet ... ... ... 80 

Gerbridge, arms of ... ... 136 

Gerveys, Jane, 21 ; Richard ... 21 
Ghent Museum ... ... ... 89 

Gloucestershire ... ... ... 53 

Godmersham (Kent) ... 74, 218 

Goldyngham, Elizabeth, 121 ; 

John 121 

Golword, Katherine, 119; Robert 

119, 220 

Goring (Oxon.) 144, 218 

Gorney, Agnes, 15 ; Thomas 15, 217 
Grantchester (Canibs.) ... ... 20 

Graveney (Kent) ... ... ... 74 

Gray, James, goldsmith ... ... 19S 

Grene, Richard, 60 ; Thomas ... 60 



.2-28 



Index. 



PAGE 

Grey, Anne de, 120 ; Edmund de, 
120; Temperance de, 120; 
Thomas de ... ... 120,213 

Grinstead, West (Sussex) 153, 156 
Gryse family, 66, 68 ; arms of ... 68 
Guildhall Museum, see London 

Gunhy (Line.) 94, 215 

Gyft'ard, Mary, 9 ; Roger ... 9 

Gyfforde, John, 113; Susan ... 113 

Hackney (Middsx.) 209, 214, 22?, 223 



Hadleigh (Suffolk) 
Hale, 



...164, 222, 223 
... 51 
165,222,223 
••• 153 



Halesworth (Suffolk) 
Halsham, Sir Hugh 
Halvergate (Norfolk) 

118, 119, 212, 220 
Hamden, Alice, 146; Richard... 
Hampshire 
Hanson, Robert ... 
Hare, Alice, 125 ; William 
Harefield (Middsx.) 
Harlington (Middsx.) 
Harman, Anne, 73, 

Thomas... 
Harrow (Middsx.) 
Harsyk, Alice, 141 



108, 



IOC), 

209; 



221 
146 
53 
9>2i5 
125 
181 
221 



71, 
222 



Sir 



103 
Roger, 
141, 218, 221 

182, 222 



Haseley (Warw.) 
Hastings, Isabel, 2 ; Sir Ralph... 
Hatteclyf, Isabel, 75 ; Thomas... 
Haugh, Isabel, 14 ; Margaret, 14; 

Walter 14, 203, 

Hawnsard, Richard 

Havvlrey, arms of 

Hawtrey, Sybill, 13 ; Thomas ... 

Hay, Anne, 4 ; John, 3 ; Isabel, 

3> 4, 
Hayward, Richard 
Hedgerley (Bucks.) ... 14, 

Hemgrave, arms of 
Henry VII., King 
Herefordshire 
Heriz, arms of 
Heron, John 
Hertfordshire 
Hertingfordbury (Herts.) 
Hethersett, arms of 

Hever (Kent) 

Heyford, Nether (Northants.) 

Hey ford, arms of... 

Heyford, Elizabeth 

Hildyard, Sir Christopher, 196 ; 

Joan ... 197 

Hilton, arms of ... ... ... 191 

Hoath (Kent) 75 

Hobson, William 70 

Holgote, Margaret 146 

Holingworth, Rainold ... ... 36 

Holland, Edward, 106 ; Frances 

106, 209 



2 
75 

220 

148 

13 

13 

217 

85 
220, 221 

... 136 

... 159 

... 56 
... 76 
... 116 
56, 208 
... 62 

... 136 
21 

218 
142 
142 



142, 



PAGE 

Horley (Surrey) 174, 215 

Horncastle (Line.) ... 94, 221 

Home, arms of. .. ... ... 150 

Home, Edmund, 150; Elizabeth, 

150,220; William ... ... 95 

Hotman, arms of... ... ... 133 

Howden (Yorks.) ... 189, 221 

Humberstone, Annas, 66 ; Ed- 
ward, 66 ; John, 65, 66 ; Richard 

65, 220 
Humfre, Joan, 59 ; Thomas 
Huntingdonshire... 
Hussey, arms of ... 
Hussey, Nele 
Hyde, Margery, 6 ; William 





59 




69 




209 


...96,97 


...6, 


220 


190, 


221 


145. 


219 


.., 


197 




10 



Ilkley (Yorks.) Museum... 

Ipsden (Oxon.) ... 

Ireland 

Ireland, King of Arms ... 

Isleworth (Middsx.) 

105, 106, 209, 222, 223 

Jobsun, John ... ... ... 96 

Joiner, Margaret ... ... ... 96 

Jones, Thomas, 17; Ursula ... 17 

Jordan, Giles, 91, 218 ; Margaret 91 

Keldon, arms of ... ... 129, 130 

Keleatt, arms of ... ... ... ibS 

Keleatt, Margaret, 168 ; Matthew 168 

Kent 69, 209 

Kilham, arms of ... ... ... 191 

King's Langley (Herts.)... 63, 218 

Knevynton, Ralph de ... ... 90 

Knighton, John ... ... ... 57 

La Marck, arms of ... ■ ... 38 

Lancashire ... ... ... 87 

Langford (Berks.) 145 

Langley, arms of ... ... ... 74 

Langley, Kings (Herts.)... 63, 218 

Lansame, Lizebette, 79 ; Pieter 79 
Lascelles, arms of ... ... 191 

Latton, Anne, 4; John ... ... 4 

Laughton (Line), ... 95, 215 

Lavington, West (Wilts.) 97, 184, 

221, 222, 223 
Lawrence, John ... .. 18,219 

Leach, arms of ... ... ... 136 

Lee (Kent), St. Margaret 75, 222 

Lee, Alice, 144; Ambrose, 200; 

Henry, 144; Joan, 60; Robert 60 
Le Grys, Anthony, 140 ; Robert, 

140; Susan, 140; Thomas ... 140 
Leicestershire ... ... .. 89 

Lincoln, St. Mary-le-Wigford, 95, 

96; see of, arms of ... ... 170 

Lincolnshire ... ... ... 93 

Liiistcd (Suffolk) 120 



Index, 



229 



PAGE 

Lisle, Elizabeth, 91, 218; Joan, 

91 ; Otuel 91 

Littleton (Middsx.) ... 108,221 
Litton Cheyney (Dorset.), 30, 207, 217 
London, All Hallows Barkin^j, 
108, 221 ; British Museum, 52, 
III, 112, 113, 166, 211, 212, 
213; Charterhouse, 7, 220; 
Guildhall Museum, 113; St. 
Michael, Crooked Lane, 65, 
220 ; Society of Antiquaries of 

62, 223 
Long, John, 56, 208 ; Margery... 56 
Longespee, arms of ... ... 142 

Loughborough (Leic.) ... 90, 218 

Louvaine, arms of ... ... 137 

Lovekyn, John ... ... 65,220 

Lovell, arms of ... ... lOi, 158 

Lovell, Anne, 100; Elizabeth, 9 ; 

Gregory, 100; Thouias ... 9 

Lowdham, arms of, 117, I2Q, 130 

Lubeck (Germany) ... ... 169 

Lucy, arms of ... ... ... 191 

Luton (Beds.) 3, 217 

Lydd (Kent) 46 

Lymsey, arms of ... ... ... 210 

Lymsey, John, 209; Margaret ... 209 

Lynn (Norf.) Museum 201 

Lyons, arms of ... ... ... 2 

Magewik, Alice ... ... ... 53 

Magnus, arms of, 194 ; rebus of 192 
Magnus, Thomas... ... ... 192 

Mailing, West (Kent) ... 76, 221 

Manchester Cathedral ... 87, 221 

Manfelde, Agnes, 16 ; Katherine, 

16; Robert, 16; Thomas ... 16 
Manvers, arms of... ... ... 76 

Margate (Kent), 77, 79, 209, 218, 222 

Marks, Deborah 188 

Marsburgh, Joan ... ... ... 63 

Marsham, Elizabeth, 122 ; John 

122, 219 
Massyngberd, Joan, 94, 215 ; Sir 
Thomas... ... ... 94,215 

Mauntell, Elizabeth, 142 ; John 

142, 218 
Mautby, arms of ... ... ... 137 

Mawgan-in-Pyder (Cornwall), 22, 

23, 24, 25, 222 
Maycot, Agnes, 75 ; Anthony ... 75 
Melksham (Wilts.) ... 187,218 

Melman, Geoffrey ... ... 139 

Melton, arms of ... ... ... 191 

Mercers' Company, arms of, 50, 

125, 127 
Merchants' Marks ... 167, 170 

Merton (Norfolk), I20, 212, 213, 221 

Middleburgh (Zeeland) 99 

Middlesex... ... ... 100, 209 

Mildmay, Christian, 31 ; Sir Walter 31 



PACE 

Minster, Isle of Shcppey (Kent) 

79. 219 

Missenden, Little (Bucks.) ... 9 

Monk, figure of ... ... ... I18 

Monmouthshire ... ... ... I15 

Montacute, arms of ... ... 142 

Montacute, William de. Earl of 

Salisbury ... ... 142, 218 

Montagu, Sir William de ... 6, 7 

Moone, Robert ... ... ... 117 

Moote, John, Abbot of St Alban's 63 

Mordon, Thomas... ... ... 82 

More, Mary, 5; Raffe 5 

Morland (Westmorland)... 183, 221 

Morley (Derby) 204, 223 

Motesfont, John ... ... ... 4(5 

Mugginton (Derby) ... ... 157 

Munter, Joris de ... ... ... 169 

Myddilton, Dorothy, 87 ; Eliza- 
beth, 87 ; William 87 

Myller, Maryon 47 



Narburgh (Norfolk) ... 121, 221 

Necton (Norfolk) 29 

Nevell, Sir Edward ... ... 182 

Newdegate, Amphelicia, 182 ; 

John 182 

Newpton, John, 31, 207, 217 ; 
Thomas... ... ...31,207,217 

Norbury (Derby.) ... 26, 220 

Norfolk 116, 212 

Northamptonshire ... ... 142 

Northolt (Middsx.) 113, 212, 221 

Northumberland ... ... ... 142 

Northwode, Sir John de... 79,219 

Norton Disney (Line), 96, 185, 

222, 223 
Nottinghamshire... ... ... 142 

Norwich, St. James, 134 ; St. 
John Maddermarket, 122, 123, 
212, 219, 220, 221 ; St. Martin- 
at-Palace, 128, 212, 221 ; St. 
Paul, 134 ; St. Peter Mancroft, 
44, 131, 212, 222, 223 ; St. 
Stephen, 134, 215; Strangers' 

Hall r.j, 134, 212 

Nun, figur^^ ... ... ... 123 



Odiham (Hants.) 55.221 

Okeover (Statil's.), 155, 214, 215, 216 
Oker, arms of, 161 ; crest of ... 160 
Oker, Humphrey, 160, 216 ; 

Isabel ... ... ... 160, 216 

Ormesby, Great (Norfolk), 135, 

2 12, 21 
Orion, arms of ... ... 129, 13 

Oulton (Suffolk) 12 

Our Lord in Majesty ... ... 8 

Oxenbrigg, Agnes, 17S ; Robert 17 



230 



Index. 



PAGE 

Oxford, Magdalen College Chapel, 
146, 219, 221 ; St. Mary Mag- 
dalen, 146, 222, 223 ; St. Peter- 
in-the-East, ... 148, 222, 223 

Oxfordshire ... ... ... I43 

Page, Edmund, 82 ; Eleanor ... 82 
Palimpsests, classes of ... ... 214 

Parker, Sir Nicholas, 179 ; Robert 179 
Paston (Norfolk), 136, 212, 213, 222 
Paston, armsof ... ... ... 136 

Paston. Erasmus, 136,213 ; Mary 136 

Pate, Elynor, 61 ; John 61 

Patshull, arms of... ... ... 158 

Patshull, Sybil, 159; William de 159 
Peche, arms of ... ... ... 136 

Peckham, Amphillis, 10 ; Sir 

Edmund 10 

Pecok, Isabel, 209; Thomas ... 209 
Pembeiton, Elizabeth, 64 ; Roger 64 

Penshurst (Kent) 82, 221 

Percy, Sir Henry 120 

Perepoynt, arms of ... ... 76 

Perepoynt, Elizabeth, 76; George 76 
Pever, Mary, 158; Thomas ... 158 
Peyver, arms of ... ... ... 137 

Pickenham, arms of ... ... 210 

Pickenham, Margaret 209 

Pierpont, see Perepoynt. 

Pinner (Middsx.) 115,222 

Playdell, Mary, 145, Thoby ... I45 

Pluckley (Kent) 85 

Plumstead (Norfolk) 125 

Pollestede, Henry 176 

Popham, arms of... ... ... 8 

Popham, Sir John, 7, 220; Sir 

Stephen... .•• 8 

Porter, 5^ 

Potter, Alice, 86 ; Anne, 86 ; 

Elizabeth, 86; Richard ... 86 

Pottesgrove (Beds.) ... 4,222 

Powndall, Philemon 84 

Private Possession I99 

Prunes, Mary, 145 ; Walter, 144, 

145, 218 

Prykke, Robert 26,218 

Pursglove, Robert, Bishop of Hull 204 

Pury, Nicholas 175- 218 

Pyke, John 13.221 



Quarrendon (Bucks.) 
Quythed, Thomas 



200 
III 



Radclyffe, Sir Alexander, 87 ; 

Alice 87 

Rademelde, John 178 

Randolf, Anne, 134; Thomas ... 134 
Ranworth (Norfolk) ... 137. 221 

Ratford, John 168 

Reading (Berks.), St. Lawrence, 7, 220 



FAGE 

Rede, Cristine, 143 ; Edmund, 

143 ; John, 143; Peter 44, 131 

Remington, Elizabeth, 189 ; 

Richard 189 

Resurrection, The ... ... 15 

I\eynald, John ... ... ... 190 

Robinson, Jennet, 190 ; William 190 
Rochester (Kent), arms of, 83 ; 

St. Margaret 82, 219 

Rochester, Elizabeth, 40 ; William, 40 

Rodmell (Susse.x) 178,220 

Rogers, arms of ... ... ... 2 

Rotherham (Yorks.) 191 

Rowane, David ... ... ... 198 

Roytel, John 198 

Rugge, arms of ... ... ... 125 

Rugge, Alice, 125 ; Elizabeth, 
123, 124, 125, 127 ; Robert, 
123, 124, 125, 220; William... 125 

Rutland 154 

Ruwescuere, Griel Van ... ... ^89 

Ryckhill, arms of 210 



Sacheverell, Sir Henry, 204 ; 

Isabel 204 

Sadler, arms of ... ... ... 187 

Sadler, Gertrude, 187 ; Henry... 187 
Saffron Walden (Essex) Museum 

40, 60, 61 
St. Albans (Herts.), The Abbey, 

63, 217 ; St. Peter 64 

St. Benet Hulme (Norfolk), Abbey 

of 127, 220 

St. John, arms of 158 

St. John, Edith 159 ; Elizabeth, 

156, 158, 159; John, 159; 

Mary, 159; Sir Oliver . 158, 159 

St. Margaret I43 

Salhouse (Norfolk) ... 138, 212 

Salisbury (Wilts.), St. Thomas ... 187 

Sail (Norfolk) 139. 212, 221 

Salter, Elizabeth, 8, 217 ; John 8, 217 
Sanderstead (Surrey) ... 175.218 
Saunders, Isabel, 4, 153 ; Robert, 

153 ; William 4 

^avell, John 69 

Scales, Elizabeth, 119, 220; 

Robert, 120; Thomas, Lord... 119 
Scarborough (Vorks.) Museum ... 192 

Scotland I97 

Scott, Edward, 168; John ... 168 

Scro..., Francis ... 163 

Scrope, arms of ... ... ... I37 

Scrope, John le. Lord Scrope ... 159 

Selwyn, John 176, 216 

Septvans, Sir Robert de 155 

Ses;ay (Yorks.) 192,221 

Seymour, arms of 158 

Seymour, Alice, 156, 158, 216 ; 

Richard 158 



Index. 



^31 



PAGE 

Shimpling (Norfolk) 140 

Shipton-under-Wychwood (Oxon.) 

150, 220 

Shorne (Kent) 82,221 

Shropshire ... ... ... I54 

Sibertswould (Kent) ... ... 84 

Siday, Margaret 39 

Singh, Prince Frederick Duleep 130 
Smyth, Christopher, 202 ; Thomas 

77. 218 
Somersetshire ... ... ... IS4 

Somerton, arms of ... ... 136 

Southacre (Norfolk), 141, 218, 221 

Stacy, John ... ... ... 87 

Staffordshire ... ... ... I55 

Stanton St. John (Oxon.) 152, 219 

Stapilton, John 145 

Steeple Ashton (Wilts.) 188 

Stepney, arms of ... ... ... 208 

Stepney, Ralph ... ... ... 208 

Sterre, Adam atte, 72 ; Marion... 72 
Stewart, James, Earl of Murray 198 
Steyne, Paesschine van den, 97, 99, 185 
Stokys, Elizabeth, 14, 220 ; Robert, 14 
Stondon Massey (Essex), 36, 222, 223 

Stone (Bucks.) 15,^17 

Stone, Alice, 150 ; John ... 150 

Stone, palimpsest... ... 204, 223 

Stourton, Edith 159 

Strangman, Joan ... ... ... 52 

Strethall (Essex) 39, 221 

Suffolk ... 162, 213 

Summary ... ... ... ... 214 

Sundial, palimpsest ... 201, 223 
Surrey ... ... ... 166, 213 

Sussex ... ... ... ... 178 

Suttherton, Nicholas ... 122, 212 
Sutton, James ... ... ... 173 

Swane, Alice, 118 ; Robert ... 118 
Sydney, Sir Henry, 82 ; Lady 
Mary, 82 ; Margaret, 82 

Taillor, Rowland... ... ... 164 

Tame, arms of ... ... ... 150 

Tame, Elizabeth, 150; Thomas 150 
Taplow (Bucks ) ... 16, 17 18, 221 

Tattershall (Line.) 157 

Tayllar, Robert 1 16 

Terling (Essex) ... ... ... 40 

Termond (Flanders) ... ... 30 

Tharpe, Christopher ... 16, 217 

Thornton, William of ... ... 192 

Throckmorton, Clement, 182 ; 

Katherine ... ... ... 182 

Thvnne, Anne, 108 ; Francis, 1 10 ; 

William 108 

Ticehurst (Sussex) ... 179, 215 
Tideswell (Derby) 204 



I'AGE 



221, 


222 


194, 

de 
15. 


221 

194 
220 




21 


2or, 


223 
16 


213, 


174 
221 
166 


' ' ' 


79 
138 
201 



Tiptoft, arms of 



137 



Tiptoft, John, Earl of Worcester, 
157 ; Milicent, 127 ; SirThomas 127 



Tolleshunt Darcy (Essex) 

40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 

Topcliffe (Yorks) 

Topclyff, Mabel, 194; Thomas 
Totyngton, Thomas 
Trefusis, Jane, 21 ; Thomas 
Treswell, R. 
Trewonwall, Agnes 
Trotton (Sussex) ... 
Trunch (Norfolk) 141, 211, 
Turner, John, 71 ; Rev. S. B. 
Twaytts, Elizabeth 
Tyllis, Henry 
Tyson, W. 



Upminster (Essex) 

46, 47, 48, 50, 221, 222, 223 

Valker, Murdoch 198 

Van Lauwr family ... 66, 68 

Vass, Richard ... .. ... 55 

Vaughan, Lady Blanche, 108 ; 

Sir Hugh 108 

Verdun, Maud de, 27, 28 ; Sir 

Theobaud de ... ... 27,28 

Verli, arms of ... ... ... 191 

Wachesham, arms of ... ... 136 

Walcot, arms of ... ... ... 136 

Wale, Maud le, 45, 222 ; Robert 

le 45. 222 

Wales 199 

Walesborough, Emme, 119; John, 119 
Walesham, Nicholas de ... ... 127 

Walkern (Herts.) 

65, 66, 220, 221, 222, 223 
Walthamstow (Essex) ... 51, 221 

Waltonon-Thames (Surrey) 176, 219 

Walworth, Sir William 65 

Wardour Castle (Wilts.)... 23, 24, 25 
Waren, Elizabeth, 3 ; Thomas ... 3 
Warnby, Alexander ... 31, 207, 217 
Warwickshire ... ... ... 181 

Waterhouse, John, 59 ; Margaret 59 
Waterperry (Oxon.) ...153) 214, 215 
Waveney river ... ... ... 166 

Way, Albert 167, 214 

Wayte, Ellen, 47, 58 ; Nicholas, 

47, 50. 58 ; Thomas 47 

Webbe, Anne, 187 ; John ... 187 

Wegheschede, Jacobus ... ... 163 

Welche, Annas, 66; Edward ... 66 

Wells, Lord 159 

Westcrham (Kent) 

85, 86, 87, 221, 222, 223 
Westley Waterless (Cambs.) ... 27 
Westminster Abbey ... ... 157 

Weslmonstre, church of... 99, 184, 223 



Westmorland 
Weyvyle, Richard 
Whalley, Robert .. 



183 
178 

19 



23- 



ludcx. 



PAGE 
144 

55 

69 

2 



Whistler family ... 

White, John 

Wiat, Sir Thomas 

Widville, arms of... 

Widville, Alice, 2 ; Elizabeth, 2 ; 
John, 2 ; Thomas 

Wight, Isle of 

Wilde, Elizabeth, 2 ; Thomas, 

Willingdon (Sussex) ...' 

Wilmslow (Cheshire) 

Wiltshire ... 

Wimbish (Essex) ... 

Winchester College (Hants.) 

Windham, arms of 

Windham, Mary ... 

Windsor (Berks.), St. George's 
Chapel ... 

Winestead (Yorks.) ... 196, 221 

Winwick (Lane.) ... ... ... 80 

Wolstonton, William ... 89, 221 

Wood, Alice, 175 ; Harmon, 175 ; 
James, 175 ; John, 175 ; Nicho- 
las, 175, 218; Richard, 175; 
Susan, 175 ; Thomas 175 



79. 



52, 
55. 



2 

56 

2 

218 

157 
184 
222 
221 
137 
136 

223 



PAGF. 

Worcestershire ... .. ... 189 

Worstead (Norfolk) 220 

Wybarne, Agnes, 179, 215; 

Edith, 179, 215 ; John 179, 215 

Wychehynggam, tjrsnla... ... 117 

Wylford, Anne, 187; Nicholas... 187 

Wynn, Eleanor ... ... ... 162 

Wynston, Ismayne de ... ... 29 

Yarmouth, William ,.. ... 118 

Yealmpton (Devon.) ... 29, 222 

Yerde, arms of ... ... ... 170 

Yerde, Anne, 170; Elizabeth, 

170; John, 170; Thomas ... 170 

York Minster 190 

Yorkshire 189 

Ypres, St. Mary 79 

Zouch, arms of, 8, 157 ; badge of, 
156; crest of, 1 56 ; seal of, 1 56 ; 
standard of ... ... ... 156 

Zouch, John la, 156; William, 
Lord Zouch of Harringworlh 

156, 158, 216 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY 

Los Angeles 

This book is DUE on the last date stamped below. 




UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY FACILITY 




AA 000 282 073 6 







.^■:v^!' 




^ "'ft. 



^4- 






r V 



"''if 



ii'f-y