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Full text of "The Literature of American Aboriginal Languages"

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AMERICAN. ABORIGINAL LANGUAGES. 



BY 



HERMANN 1-: LUDEAVIG. 



WITH ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 

BY PROFESSOR WM. W. TURNEB. 



EDITED BY NICOLAS TRUBNER. 



LONDON: 
TRUBNER AND CO., fiO, PATERNOSTEl! ROW 

HDCCCLTIII. 



LORDOX: 

TBOMA8 BABKILD, PBIHTKB, 11, SALISBUBT MQUABB, 

FLBBT MTBBBT. 



PREFACE. 



A NEW edition of Vater's " Linguarum totius orbis index," 
after Professor Julg^s revision of 1847, requires no apology. 
The science of Philology has made great progress within the 
last few years. Exotic languages are no longer considered as 
mere matters of curiosity, but are looked upon as interesting 
parts of the natural history of man, and as such receive their 
share of the brilliant light which modern critical studies have 
shed upon the natural sciences in general. 

Ethnologists now understand how to appreciate the high 
importance of language as one of the most interesting links of 
the great chain of national afllnities ; and the reciprocity exist- 
ing between man, the soil he lives upon, and the language he 
speaks, will become better understood the more our knowledge 
of these interesting topics is extended. 

Comparative philology has begun to be established upon solid 
scientific foundations ; and the recent endeavours to establish 
finally a uniform system of linguistic orthography will, when 
generally received, give a new and important impetus to that 
study, which must lead to most interesting results. In such a 
state of progress, new literary guides are constantly required; 
and one of them, embracing the aboriginal languages of our 
great western continent, is hereby offered to those who take an 
interest in American linguistics. 



VI PREFACE. 

From the discovery of our continent, the languages of the 
American Indians have always been, as they are still, an object 
of high interest to missionary labour; and wherever the atten- 
tion of the scientific world has been drawn to them, it was by 
the results of the exertions of these men, who, inspired by 
religious ardour, went out to teach ihe heathens, and, in their 
zeal for Christianity, soon learned to master the diversity of 
tongues. 

It was, however, and is still, difficult to obtain access to these 
results; the greater part of Indian grammars and vocabularies 
existing either in manuscript only, or, when printed, having 
been cofifined to the use of a particular nation, country, or 
religious society. Thus it happened that the Jesuit, Lorenzo 
Hervas, who zealously collected such grammars and vocabu- 
laries for the linguistic part of his '* Idea del universo,'^ 
could give notice of fifty-five American languages which were 
before unknown to learned philologists, or at least unnoticed 
by them. 

After Hervas and Gilii, whose discoveries were diligently 
revised and republished in AJelung's and Vater^s Mithridates, 
Dr. Benjamin Smith Barton, of Philadelphia, drew the attention 
of the scientific world to the languages of our Indians. The 
historical societies of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and the 
American Philosophical Society of Philadelphia, published, or 
republished, the scarce works of Eliot, Cotton, Roger Williams, 
Edwards, and Zeisberger; and the last-named Society com- 
mitted to Stephen Duponceau the task of subjecting the Ameri- 
can Indian languages to critical inquiries and studies. John 
Pickering, Henry R. Schoolcraft, and, above all, the venerable 
Albert Gallatin, continued these researches; and to Gallatin we 
are indebted for a better classification and a comparative view 
of the languages of the northern half of our continent and of 
Mexico. 

By the exertions of these gentlemen the science of Indian 
philology has been actively promoted ; and many officers of our 



PREFACE. VU 

army and navy have paid attention to the languages of the 
aborigines visited by them in their official explorations. 

In this way the materials for a more exact knowledge of the 
American Indian languages have been greatly increased ; and a 
new inventory of our riches is undoubtedly wanted. This want 
is the more felt^ because nearly all the Indian grammars and 
vocabularies are exceedingly scarce ; and the greater part of 
these materials is dispersed in books of voyages and travels, 
historical and geographical collections, documents, and reports, 
which are generally found only in public libraries. 

How far it was possible to supply the want in this coimtry, 
where bibliographical researches are much more troublesome 
and difficult than anywhere else, the following pages will show. 
The interest felt in this country in collecting and publishing 
notices concerning the languages of the aborigines of our con- 
tinent is naturally greater than elsewhere; and the earlier, 
therefore, these notices are published, the sooner we may expect 
that those who are better acquainted with the subject will 
submit them to critical examination, and supply the deficiencies 
which they undoubtedly contain. 

This made the offer for the publication of the following 
bibliographical repertory, by their active and enterprising pub- 
lisher, a welcome one. More welcome and, for the friends of 
science, really gratifying must be the care bestowed by Mr. 
Triibner upon this publication. With true love for the subject, 
and with a scientific zeal not to be surpassed, he has revised 
the manuscript, and supplied it with whatever his own know- 
ledge furnished, aided by the ample means which London, and 
Europe in general, offer to bibliographical researches, and made 
many valuable additions which could not have been collected oh 
this side of the Atlantic. He has been a true co-operator in 
the work now offered to the public. 

Business, in our great commercial emporium of the new 
world, leaves to the professional man but very little time for 
minute literary researches ; and our larger libraries being open 



via PREFACE. 

to the public only during business hours^ but one of them could 
be consulted while correcting the notices collected in the course 
of several years. 

The friendly aid which the officers of the Astor Library and 
of the American Bible Society lent for this purpose is ^hank- 
fuUy acknowledged. 

HERMANN E. LUDEWIG. 

New York, December , 1855. 



THE EDITOE'S ADVERTISEMENT. 



Dr. Ludewig has himself so fully detailed the plan and purport 
of this work, that little more remains for me to add beyond the 
mere statement of the origin of my connection with the publi- 
cation, and the mention of such additions for which I alone am 
responsible, and which, during its progress through the press, 
have gradually accumulated to about one-sixth of the whole. 
This is but an act of justice to the memory of Dr. Ludewig ; 
because, at the time of his death, in December, 1856, no more 
than 172 pages were printed oflF, and these constitute the only 
portion of the work which had the benefit of his valuable per- 
sonal and final revision. 

Similarity of pursuits led, during my stay in New York in 
1855, to an intimacy with Dr. Ludewig, during which he men- 
tioned that he, like, my self, had been making bibliographical 
memoranda for years of all books which serve to illustrate the 
history of spoken language. As a first section of a more ex- 
tended work on the Literary History of Language generally, 
he had prepared a bibliographical memoir of the remains of the 
aboriginal languages of America. The manuscript had been 
deposited by him in the library of the Ethnological Society at 
New York, but at my request he at once most kindly placed it 
at my disposal, stipulating only that it should be printed in 
Europe, under my personal superintendence. 

Upon my return to England, I lost no time in carrying out 
the trust thus confided to me, intending then to confine myself 
simply to producing a correct copy of my friend^s manuscript. 
But it soon became obvious that the transcript had been hastily 
niade, and but for the valuable assistance of literary friends, 

b 



THE editor's ADVEUTISLMENT. 



both in this country and in America, the work would probably 
have been al)andoned. My thanks arc more particularly due to 
Mr. E. G. Squier, and to Professor Wm. W. Turner, of Wash- 
ington, by whose considerate and valuable co-operation many 
difficulties were cleared away, and my editorial labours greatly 
lightened. This encouraged me to spare neither personal labour 
nor expense in the attempt to render the work as perfect as 
possible. With what success must be left to the judgment of 
those who can fairly appreciate the labours of a pioneer in any 
new field of literary research. 

De Souza's great and valuable bibliographical work, of which 
there is no copy in the library of the British Museum, has been 
carefully and sedidously consulted by Mr. Squier, who culled 
from it for my use all that bears upon the subject of American- 
Indian languages. 

Mr. Turner's additions will be found in the second portion of the 
volume ; for so valuable did his corrections and suggestions appear 
to me, that I determined to throw them, with some remarks of 
my own, into a second alphabetical arrangement, similar to that 
of the first. His additions are easily distinguished from those 
the responsibility of which rests with myself, by being enclosed 
within brackets, with the initials W. W. T. It would here be 
out of place to do more than notice the value of the contribu- 
tions of so eminent a philologist, who is pre-eminently distin- 
guished at Washington as the highest authority in all matters 
appertaining to the knowledge of the languages of the aborigines 
of America. To this double alphabet a very full Index has been 
added, and this was the more necessary, because, as in the in- 
fancy of all science there will be difficulties, in this there is no 
little confusion of names, which could only be reconciled by 
proper references in the Index. In opening a field hitherto 
almost untrodden, I may reasonably claim the reader's in- 
dulgence for such defects as must ever attend a first attempt of 
similar character. In all such cases facts have to be brought 
together, and seeming contradictions to be reconciled. Then, 
as in aU branches of human knowledge, with such data to build 



THE editor's advertisement. xi 



upon, in the bands of master-minds, a key may be discovered to 
the maze which, however imperfectly, is here placed before 
the reader, and for which the merit of careful and pains- 
taking industry may fairly be claimed. The defects alluded 
to arise in a great measure from the diversity of spelling 
adopted by the diflfereut nations of Europe to represent the 
same sounds; for the reader must bear in mind that the 
aborigines of America had no written alphabetical language, 
and that it was by Europeans that the spoken words of the 
various Indian tribes were first represented by distinct cha- 
racters. This renders what I may perhaps be pardoned for 
calling a linguistic geography of America almost necessary, in 
which, as the same tribe is not uufrequently called. by different 
names, the localities in which each of the many Red Indian 
tribes formerly dwelt should be noted with the utmost precision. 

A map constructed on this principle would enable the reader 
at one view to reconcile many apparent discrepancies, and to 
ascertain the aflSnity between each language, many of which are 
evidently mere dialects of one original tongue. As far as it was 
possible, the Index has been rendered complete, so that the 
reader will have little trouble in tracing any language he may 
be in search of. Should he find references to more than he is 
in quest of, he must consider it an error on the safe side, and 
attribute it entirely to similarity of sound and the difficulty of 
obtaining better materials. 

As ^^Old Mortality'^ cleaned the inscriptions on the Cove- 
nanters' tombs, so did Dr. Ludewig endeavour to rub off the 
rust of ages from the scattered remains of the aborigines 
of America. Had it not been a labour of love like his, 
it would not have been attempted. Unimportant as such 
labours may seem to men engaged in the more bustling occupa- 
tions of life, all must at least acknowledge that these records of 
the past, like the stern-lights of a departing ship, are the last 
glimmers of savage life, as it becomes absorbed, or recedes be- 
fore the tide of civilization. 

I may here be permitted to give the titles of a few other 



xii THE editor's advertisement. 

books appertaining to the subject, which did not come to hand 
till the whole of the sheets of the manual had been worked off: — 

Histoire des Nations Civilisees du Mexique et de TAmerique 
Septentrionale, par TAbbe Brasseur de Bourbourg. Vol. I. 
Paris, 1857, Svo. — Which, at pp. 44 — 73, contains a memoir 
on Mexican writing, the materials of which were, for the 
most part, supplied by M. Aubin. In the third chapter, at 
page 62, are also some observations on the languages of Central 
America. 

Vocabulaire Fran9ais-Creole, et des Conversations Fran9aises- 
Creoles. London, 1818, 8vo, pp. 113. — Which is simply a re- 
print of Ducoeur-Joly^s Vocabulary, 

In Schoolcraft's History, Condition, and Prospects of the 
Indian Tribes of the United States, Vol. V., p. 689, Appendix 
No. 1 7, is a letter on the affinities of dialects in New Mexico, 
by Governor William Carr Lane. 

By the kindness of Mr. Thomas Wright, I have been favoured 
with a sight of a manuscript grammar and vocabulary of the 
Kariff, or Charrib language, as spoken in the Bay of Honduras. 
It is written by Mr. Alexander Henderson, of Belize, Hon- 
duras, and will probably soon be given to the public under the 
auspices of the London Ethnological Society. Dr. Thomas 
Rainy, of New York, is preparing a Dictionary of the Geral 
Tongue of Para, in the Brazils, accompanied by a memoir; and 
Dr. Franca, a Brazilian, has a dictionary of the Tupi language 
in the press at Leipzig. Mr. E. G. Squier will shortly publish 
a monograph on the aboriginal languages of Central America. 

In conclusion, following the good and honest example of 
Aldus Manutius, and the printers of old, I would respectfully 
suggest to the reader the propriety of correcting with a pen the 
errata, pointed out in the subjoined list, prior to his consultin 
the work itself. 

NICOLAS TRUBNER. 

JiPXDON, hih October^ 1857. 



or 

O 



BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIR. 



Hermann Ed. Ludewig, though but little known in this 
country, was held in considerable esteem as a jurist, both in 
Germany and the United States of America. Bom at Dresden 
in 1809, with but little exception he continued to reside in his 
native city until 1844, when. he emigrated to America; but 
though in both countries he practised law as a profession, his 
bent was the study of literary history, which was evidenced by 
his '' Livre des Ana, Essai de Catalogue Manuel,^^ published at 
his own cost in 1837, and by his " Bibliothekonomie," which 
appeared a few years later. 

But even whilst thus engaged, he delighted in investigating 
the rise and progress of the land of his subsequent adoption, 
and his researches into the vexed question of the origin of 
the peopling of America, gained him the highest consider- 
ation, on both sides of the Atlantic, as a man of original 
and inquiring mind. He was a contributor to Naumann^s 
" Serapseum ;" and amongst the chief of his contributions to that 
journal may be mentioned those on " American Libraries,^^ on 
the ''Aids to American Bibliography,^^ and on the " Book-trade 
of the United States of America.^^ In 1846 appeared his 
''Literature of American Local- History,^' a work of much im- 
portance, and which required no small amoimt of labour and 
perseverance, owing to the necessity of consulting the many and 
widely-scattered materials, which had to be sought out from 
apparently the most unlikely channels. 

These studies formed a natural induction to the present work 



XIV BIOGRAPHICAL MKMOIR. 

on " The Literature of American Aboriginal Languages/' which 
occupied his leisure concurrently with the others, and the print- 
ing of which was commenced in August, 1856, but which he 
did not live to see launched upon the world; for at the date 
of his death, on the 12th of December following, only 172 
pages were in type. It had been a labour of love with him 
for years; and if ever author were mindful of the nomim 
prematur in annum, he was when he deposited his manuscript 
in the Library of the American Ethnological Society, diffident 
himself as to its merits and value on a subject of such paramount 
interest. He had satisfied himself that in due time the reward 
of his patient industry might be the production of some more 
extended national work on the subject : and with this he was 
contented ; for it was a distinguishing feature in his character, 
notwithstanding his great and varied knowledge and brilliant 
acquirertaents, to disregard his own toil, even amounting to 
drudgery if needful, if he could in any way assist in the pro- 
mulgation of literature and science. 

Dr. Ludewig was a corresponding member of many of the 
most distinguished European and American literary societies ; 
and few men were held in greater consideration by scholars 
both in America and Germany, as will readily be acknowledged 
should his voluminous correspondence ever see the light. In 
private life he was distinguished for the best qualities which 
endear a man's memory to those who survive him — he was a 
kind and affectionate husband and a sincere friend. Always 
accessible, and ever ready to aid and counsel those who applied 
to him for advice upon matters appertaining to literature, his 
loss will long be felt by a most extended circle of friends; and 
in him Germany mourns one of the best representatives of her 
learned men in America — a genuine type of a class in which, 
with singular felicity, to genius of the highest order is combined 
a painstaking and plodding perseverance, but seldom met with 
beyond the confines of " the Fatherland.'' 

N. T. 



INTRODUCTORY BIBLIOGRAPEIOAL NOTICES. 



Epitome de la Biblioteca Oriental, i Occidental, Nautica i Geogra- 
fica .... por el Licenciado Antonio de Leon, Relator del 
Supremo i Real Consejo de las Indias. Madrid, Juan Gonzalez, 
1629, 4to, pp. 80, 188, xii. 

The well-known Spanish historian, Don Andres Gonzales Barcia, enlarged 
this small yolume to a folio of ahout 1172 pages, wliich he published under 
the following title : — 

Epitome de la Biblioteca Oriental, y Occidental, Nautica y Geogra- 
ficA, de Don Antonio de Leon Pinelo, del Consejo de S. M. : en 
la Casa de Contratacion de Sevilla y Coronista mayor de las Indias. 
Aiiadido y enmendado nuevamente. Madrid, Francisco Martinez 
Abad, 1737—38. Three parts in 1 vol. fol. 

Notwithstanding the confusion and prolixity of this work, the notices it 
contains are very interesting, and their critical revision would be a useful and 
meritorious lindertaking. 

The 18th chapter of the BibUoteca Occidental, " Autores que han escrito 
en Lenguas de las Indias" (pp. 104 — 110 of the first, col. 719 — 738, and 
fol. 918 — 920 of the second edition), contains the bibUographical and literary 
■notices concerning American aboriginal languages, and mentions many works 
on that subject, which imdoubtedly exist still in manuscript, but have never 
been collected. 

NicoLAi Antonio, Bibliotheca Hispana Yetus, complectens Scrip- 
tores qui ab Octaviani Augusti Imperio, usque ad annum M, 
floruerunt, studio et curis Josephi Saenz, Cardinalis de Aguirre. 
Momce, 1696, 2 vols, in fol. 

The title contains a gross misprint. The work comprising the autliors 
until the year 1500, it ought to read, " usque ad annum MD" (1500), instead 
ofM (1000). Antonio died without the means for printing this work. They 
were defrayed by tlie Cardinal de Aguirre, who entrusted the editorship to 
Emmanuel Mars, a learned Valentian. The authors are arranged in chrono- 
logical order J tables are added to facihtate the use of the work. The 



XVI INTRODUCTORY BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

" Bibliotheca Nova," although pubUshed first, is bjit a sequel of the " Biblio* 
theca Vetus," of which a reprint likewise has appeared at Madrid, in 1788, 
under this title : — 

Bibliotheca Hispana Vetus, sive Hispani Scriptores qui ab 
Octaviani August! Aevo ad annum Christi MD floruerunt. Auctore 
D. NicoLAO Antonio Hispalensi I.C, Ordinis S. Jaeobi equite, 
patriae ecclesise canonieo, regiorum negotiorum in urbe et romana 
curia procuratore g^nerali, consiliario regie. Curante Francisco 
Perezio Bayerio, Valentino, Sereniss. Hisp. Infantum Caroli III. 
Regis filiorum institutore primario, Regiae Bibliothecae Palatino- 
Matritensis PrsBfecto, qui et prologum, et auctoris vitae epitomen, 
et notulas adjecit. To mi II, folio. Matriti, Ibarra, 1788. 

Ejusdem Nicolai Antonio, Bibliotheca Hispana Nova, seu His- 

panorum qui sive Latina, aut populari, sive alia quavis lingua scripto 

aliquid.consignaverunt. Momce, 1672, 2 vols, in fol. Typis Nicolai 

Tinassii. 

Nicolas Antonio was bom in 1617, at Sevilla, studied at Salamanca, and 
returned to Sevilla, composed his. Bibliotheca Hispana in the convent of the 
Benedictines, where the abbot, Benedict de La Serra, had accimiulated a 
splendid library. "When it was sufficiently advanced he took it to Rome, 
where he completed and printed it. He died at Madrid, in 1784. Antonio, 
agreeable to the custom prevalent at that time, arranged the names of the 
authors according to the alphabetical order of their Christian nfemes. This is 
a great inconvenience, which is only partially removed by the addition of a 
number of tables. A new edition was published at Madrid, by Franc. 
Perez Bayer, a learned Valentian j the title of which is, 

Bibliotheca Hispana Nova sive Hispanorum Scriptorum qui ab 
anno MD ad MDCLXXXIV floruere notitia. Auctore D. Nicolao 
ANT02fio Hispalensi I.C. Ordinis S. Jaeobi equite, patriae ecclesiaB 
canonieo, regiorum negotiorum in urbe et romana curia pro- 
curatore generali, consiliario regio. Nunc primum prodit recognita 
emendata aucta ab ipso Auctore. Tomi II. Matriti, Ibarra, 1783. 

The two works together have long and favourably been known as the 
"BibHotheca Hispana." It has always been regarded as one of the best 
works of the kind, and continues to enjoy a great reputation among savants. 

Relandi, Hadriani, Dissertationum Miscellanearum Partes 

Tres. Ultrajecti, 1706-7-8. 

These Dissertations are thirteen in number, one of them treating " De Linguis 
Americanis." 

De la Langue Americaine. (Pp. 458 — 490 of Vol. II, of P. 
Lafiteau, Meurs des Sauvages Americains. Paris, Saugrain aiiie, 
et Ch. Hocherau, 1724, 2 vols. 4to.) 



INTRODUCTORY BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. Xvii 

Rev. Dr. Malcolmb, Letters, Essays, and other Tracts, illus- 
trating the Antiquities of Great Britain and Ireland ; together witli 
many curious discoveries of the affinities between the language of 
the Americans and the ancient Britons in the Greek and Latin, etc. 
Also, specimens of the Celtic, Welsh, Irish, Saxon, and American 
languages. Edinburgh, 1738, 8vo. - Some copies, London, 17-44!, Svo. 

Essai sur les Rapports des Mots, entre les Langues du Nouveau 
Monde et celles de I'Ancien (pp. 489 — 5G0 of Vol. VIII of Monde 
Primitif analise et compare avec le Monde Moderue, considere dans 
divers objets concernant THistoire, le Blason, les Monnoies, les Jeux, 
les Voyages des Pheniciens autour du monde, les Langues Ameri- 
caines, etc., ou Dissertations Melees remplies de Decouvertes in- 
teressantes ; avec une carte, des planches, et un Monument de T Ame- 
rique* Par M. Court de Gebelin. Paris, 1773 — 1782, 9 vols. 4to. 

On the Connection of the Indian Languages with the Hebrew. 
(Arguments V. and VI. pp. 37 — 80 of: James Adaib, The History 
of the American Indians, particularly those nations adjoining to the 
Mississippi, East and West Florida, Georgia, South and North 
Carolina and Virginia, etc. etc. London, Edward and Charles Dilly, 
1775, 4to.) 

D. LoBEKzo He EVAS, Idea del Universo. Cesena, Gregorio 
Biasini, 1778—1781, XXI vols. 4to. Vol. XXII, FuJigno, 1792, 4to. 

The principal interest of this work consists in the linguistic notices given 
in the same. They are contained in the following Tolumes : — 

Vol. XVII (1784), Catalog© delle Lingue conosciuti e notizia 
della loro affinita e diversita. 

Of this volume, the following enlarged Spanish edition was pubUshed by 
the author : Catalogo de las Lenguas de las naciones conocidas y numeracion, 
division y clases de estas s^im la diversidad de sus idiomas y dialectos. 
Madrid, Imprenta de la Administracion del real Arbitrio de Beneficencia, 1800 
—1805, 6 vols. 4to. 

Vol. XVIII (1785), Origine, Formazione, Mecanismo ed Armonia 
degli Idiomi. 

Vol. XIX (1786), Aritmetica delle Nazioni. 

Vol. XX (1787), Vocabulario Poliglotto con Prolegomeni sopra 
piu di CL Lingue. 

Vol. XXI (1787), Saggio pratico delle Lingue con Prolegomeni 
ed una raccolta di orazioni dominicali in piii di trecento lingue e 
dialetti. 

c 



will INTRODUCTORY BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

Storia Antica del Messico cavata da' migliori storici Spagnuoli, e 
da' manoscritti, e dalle pitture antiche degl* Iiidiani : divisa in dieci 
libri, e eorredata di carte geografiche, e di varie figure : 5 dissertazioni 
sulla terra, sugli animali, e sugli abitatori del Messico. Opera dell' 
Abate D. FaAiccrsco Savebio Clavigebo. 4fco, 4 vols., plates. 
Cesena, 1780. 

Clavigero was bom about the year 1720, at Yera Cruz, in Mexico, and at 
the age of seventeen entered into the order of the Jesuits. When the order 
was suppressed, in 1767, he retired to Cesena, like most of the other Jesuits of 
Spanish America, to whom the Pope had given an asylum, where he under- 
took this important work, which was received by the learned of Europe with 
great applause. It contains in the last volume a li^t of the authors of gram- 
mars and dictioiiaries in the languages of Anahuac. The work was trans- 
lated into the following languages : — 

Into English under the following title — 
CLATiGEttO. The History of Mexico, collected from Spanish 
and Mexican Historians, from Manuscripts and Ancient Paintings 
of the Indians, illustrated by Charts and other Copperplates ; to 
which are added Critical Dissertations on the Land, the Animals, 
and Inhabitants of Mexico. By Abbe D. Feancisco Saveeig 
Clavioeeo. Translated from the original Italian by Charles Cullen, 
Esq., in two volumes, pp. xl and 940, 4to. London, 1789. 

Into German, from the English translation of Cullen — 
Geschichte von Mexico, auB Spanischen und Mexicanischen 
Geschichtschreibem, Handschrifben und Gemalden der Indianer 
zusammengetragen und durch Karten und Kupferstiche erlautert, 
nebst einigen kritischen Abhandlungen iiber die Beschaffenheit des 
Landes, der Thiere und Einwohner von Mexico. Aus dem Italian- 
ischen durch den Emitter Karl Cullen ins Englische und aus diesem 
ins DeuLsche iibersetzt, 2 Bde. mit Kupfern und Karten. Leipzig, 
1789—90, Schwickert, 8vo. 

Into Spanish— 

Clavigeeo. Hisioria Antigua de Megico : sacada de los mejores 
historiadores Espanoles y de los manuscritos y de las pintums 
Antiguas de los Indios ; dividida en diez libros ; Adornada con Mapas 
y Estampas, E illustrada con Dissertaciones sobre la tierra, los 
Animates y los Habitantes de Megico escrita por D. Eeancisco 
Saveeio Clavigeeo ; y traducida del Italiano por Jose Joaquin de 
Mora. Two vols., pp. xxxvi and 882, 8vo. London, 1826. 

Saggio di Storia Americana o sia storia naturale, civile e sacra 
de' regni, e delle provincie spagnuole di terra finna nelP America 



INTRODUCTORY BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. XIX 

meridiouale, descritta dell' Abate Filippo Salyador£ Gilit. Bon^a, 
Perego, erede Salvioni, 1780—1784, 4 vols. 8vo. 

Gilii waa one of the Jesuits banished, like all the other members of his 
order, from America. The third volume of his work, bearing the title, " Delia 
Beligione e delle Lingud degli Orinochesi e di altri Americani," pubhshed in 
1782, contains interesting details and. notices concerning American Tndiftn 
languages. 

Theodor JAN KiEwiTOH DE MiRiKwo, Sravuitel niy Slovar, etc. 
(Comparative vocabulary of all the languages aud dialects.) Si. 
Petershurg^ 1790—1791, 4 vols. -Ato, in Russian. 

Pallas haying published, in 1786 and 1789, the first i>art of the Yocabu- 
larium Catharinseum (a comparative vocabulary of 286 words in the languages 
* of Europe and Asia), the material contained therein was published in the 
above edition in another form, and words of American languages added. The 
book did not come up to the expectations of the Government, and was there- 
fore not published, so that but few copies of it can be foimd. 

William Marsden, A Catalogue of Dictionaries, Grammars, and 
Alphabets, in two parts. I. Alphabetical Catalogue of Authors. 
II. Chronological Catalogue of AV^orks in each Class of Language. 
London^ 1796, 4 to. pp. vi. 156. 

Privately printed, and very scarce ; contains but little about American 
languages. See also the BibHotheca Marsdeuiana. London^ Printed by J. L. 
Cox, 1827, 4to. 

B. Smith Barton, New Views of tbe Origin of the Tribes and 
Nations of America. Philadelphia, 1797, 8vo. 

Beprint«d (second edition, corrected and enlarged), ibid. Printed for the 
author by John Bjoren, 1798, 8vo. Pp. cix (preliminar)' discourise) ; 133 
(comparative vocabularies of 70 words) ; 32 (appendix, containing notes and 
illustrations). 

Mithridates, oder allgemeine Sprachenkunde mit dem Vater- 
Unser als Sprachprobe in beinahe 500 Sprachen und Mundarten, 
von JoHANN Christoph Adelung. Vol. I. Berlin, Voss, 1806, 8vo. 
Continued (from Adelung's papers) by Dr. Johaisn Severin Vater. 
Vols. II, III, and IV. lUd, 1809—1817, 8vo. 

The second and third parts of the third volume (1813 and 1816) contain 
the languages of America. 

A. J. VON Krusenstern, Woertersammlungen aus den Sprachen 
einiger Voelker des oest lichen Asiens und der Nordwestkueste von 
Amerika. St. Petersburg , Academie der Wissenschaften, 1813, 4to, 
pp. xi. 68. 



XX INTRODUCTORY BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

Jo. Severin Vater, Linguarura totius orbis Index Alphabeticus, 

quarum Grammaticse, Lexica, Collectiones Vocabulai;]Liin recensentur, 

patria significatur Historia adumbratur. Berlin, Nicolai, 1815, 

8vo, pp. X. 259. 

Text in German and Latin. Embraces all the known languages of the 
world, and giyes the bibliographical notices contained in the first two volumes, 
and the first part of volume III of the Mithridates. 

A new and enlarged edition, in German only, was published under the 
following title: — 

Literatur der Grammatiken, Lexica und "Woertersaminlungen 
aller Spraehen der Erde, von Johann Severin Yater. Zweite vollig 
umgearbeitete Ausgabe von B. Jiilg. Berlin^ Nicolai, 1847, 8vo, pp. 
xxii. 592. 

An Enquiry into the Language of the American Indians. (Chap. 
Ill, pp. 89 — 107 of: Elias Boudinot, A Star in the "West, or an 
humble attempt to discover the long lost ten tribes of Israel. Tren- 
ton, N. J. Eanton, ^lutcheson, and Diinham, 1816, 8vo, pp. 312.) 

Biblioteca Hispaoo- Americana Septentrional. Catalogo y Noticia 
de los literatos, que o nacidos, o educados, o florecientes en la 
America Septentrional Espaiiola, han dado a luz algun escrito, o lo 
han dexado preparado para la prensa. La escribia El Doctor D. Jose 
Mariano Beristain de Souza, del claustro de las universidades de 
Valencia y Valladolid, Caballero de la orden Espaiiola de Carlos III, 
y Commendador de la Eeal Americana de Isabel la Catolica, y Dean 
de la Metropolitana de Megico. Megico, 1816 — 19, 3 vols, folio. 

De Souza' s is by far the most important work for the Uteraturo of New 
Spain that has ever been composed. It comprises 3687 biographies, and 
although, hke most ^Spanish works of the kind, singularly uncritical, yet it is a 
perfect treasure as regards the cultivation of science and literature in Mexico and 
the adjacent countries. The work is extremely scarce, and appears to be 
altogether unknown in Europe. . 

P. E. DU Ponceau, Eeport made to the Historical and Literary 
Committee of the American Philosophical Society by their Corres- 
ponding Secretary on Languages of the American Indians. Phila- 
delphia, IS 19, 8vo. 

Reprinted as Chap. XV, "Language of the Indians," in James Buchanan's 
Sketches of the History, Manners, and Customs of the North American 
Indians. New York, Will. Boradaile, 1824, 2 vols. 12mo. Vol. II, pp. 
43 — 77 ; pp. 79 — 82, ibid : Catalogue of manuscript works on the Indians 
and their languages, presented to the American Philosophical Society, or 
deposited in their Hbrary. 



INTRODUCTORY BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. XXI 

John Pickebino, Essay on a Missionary Orthography for the 
Indian Languages of North America. Cambridge, 1820, 4to. 

ArchfiBologia Americana. Transactions and Collections of the 
American Antiquarian Society. Published by direction of the 
Society. Vol. I (pp. 436), Worcester, Massachusetts, 1820 ; Vol. II 
(pp. xxXy 573, map), Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1836. 

Sat, T., Vocabularies of Indian Languages (pp. Ixx — Ixxxviii of 
Astronomical and Meteorological Records and Vocabularies of 
Indian Languages taken on the Expedition for Exploring the 
Mississippi and its Western Waters, under the command of Major 
S. H. Long, 8vo. Philadelphia, 1822.) 

Adbien Baxbi, Atlas Ethnographique du Globe, ou classification 
des peuples anciens et modemes d'apr^s leurs langues ; pr^c6d6 
d'un discours sur I'utilite et Timportance de I'^tude des langues, 
etc. Paris, Eey and Gravier, 1826, fol. 

Table y>t V contains the " Division ethnographique de 1' Am^rique et tableau 
general cles langues Americaines ;'* and Table XLl, "Tableau poljglotte 
des langues Am^ricaines," gives a vocabulary of 26 words in about 120 
American languages and dialects. 

« Of the Language of the Indians," Chapter VI (pp. 106 to 114) 
of: A View of the American Indians, their general Character, 
Customs, Language, Public Festivals, Religious Eites, and Tradi- 
tions : showing them to be the descendants of the Ten Tribes of 
Israel ; the language of prophecy concerning them, and the course 
by which they travelled from Media into America. By Isbael 
WoESLET. London, 1828, 12mo, pp. xii and 186. 

On the Languages of the American Indians. (Chap. II, pp. 33 
— 631 of: J. H. M*CuLLOH, jun.. Researches, Philosophical and 
Antiquarian, concerning the Aboriginal History of America. Fielding 
Lucas, juu., 1829, 8vo.) 

John Pickeeino, Indian Languages of America. Appendix 

(pp. 581 — 600) to Vol. VI of the "Encyclopaedia Americana," 

Philadelphia, 1836, 8vo. Also, with separate title, " Remarks 

on the Indian Languages of North America,*' s. 1. Philadelphia, 

1836, 8vo. 

G^rmah translation (by Mrs. Prof. Eobinson), Ueber die Indianischen 
Sprachen Amerikas. Aus dera Englischen des Nord-Amerikaners Herm 
John Pickering, iibersetzt und mit Anmerknngen begleitet von Talvj. 
Leipzig, Vogel, 1834, Svo, pp. viii, 7l>, 1. 



XXU INTRODUCTORY BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

A LBEBT Gallatin, A Synopsis of the Indian Tribes within the 

United States, East of the Rocky Mountains, 'and in the British and 

Russian possessions in North America. Pp. 1 — 422, of Vol. II of 

the ArchsBologia Americana. Transactions and Collections of the 

American Antiquarian ^J'ociety. ((. amhridge, printed for the Society 

at the University Press, 1836, 8vo.) 

Sect. VI, Indian languages, pp. 1 — 208. Appendix of grammatical notices, 
and specimen of transitions and conjugations, pp. 211 — 302. 

VocabularieSy pp. 305 — 406. Select sentences, pp. 408 — 421. 

P. E. DU Ponceau, M^moiro sur le Systerae grammatical des 
Langues de quelques nations Indiennes de rAmerique* du Nord. 
Pari*, 1838, 8vo. 

Alcide d*Orbigkt, rHomme Americain (de TAmerique nieri- 
dionale) considere sous ses rapports physiologiques et moraux. 
Paris, Pitois-Levrault & Co., 1839, 2 vols. 8vo, and Atlas. 

Eeise des Prinzen Maximilian zr Wied. Coblenz, 1839, 
1841, 2 vols. 8vo. Vol. II, pp. 645 — 653, particularly on the lan- 
guage of signs. 

On this same subject see — 

Indian Language of Signs, Appendix B, pp. 27 — 1288 of the first vohnne 
of: Account of an Expedition from Pittsburgh to the Rocky Mountains, per- 
formed in the years 1819, 1820, .... under the command of Major 
Long, M. T. Say, and others, by Edwin James, Botanist and Oncologist to 
the Expedition. London^ Longman, Hurst, etc., 1823, 3 toIs. Sto. And 

"William Dunbab, On the Language of Signs among certain North 
American Indians. Letter to Th. JeflTerson, dated Natchez^ June 30, 1800. 
Pp. 1 — 8 of: Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Vol. VI, 
Part I. {Philadelphia, J. Aitken, 1804, 4to.) 

Eugene A. Vail, Notice sur les Indiens de TAmerique du Nord. 
Paris y Bertrand, 1840, 8vo, plates, pp. 244. (Des Langues Indiennes, 
pp. 40- 58.) 

Particularities of the Indian Languages. (Pp. 92—97, and com- 
parative view of the Indian and Asiatic Languages, pp. 100 — 103 of: 
John M'Intosh, The Origin of the North American Indians, etc. 
New York, Napis and Cornish, 1843, 12mo, pp. 311.) 

Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, 8vo, Vol. I 
(pp. viii and 492), 1845 ; Vol II (pp. clxxxviii, 298, two maps), 1848 ; 
Vol. Ill, Part I (pp. 202), 1853. New York. 

A. Gallatin, Notes on the Semi-civilized Nations of Mexico, 
Yucatan, and Central America. Pp. 1 — 352 of Vol. I of the 



INTRODUCTORY BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. XXUl 

Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. {New York, 

Bartlett and Welford, 1845, 8vo. ) 

Sect. I. Luiguages, pp. 1 — 48. Appendix. Grammatical notices, pp. 215 
—304. 

Ethnography and Philology of the United States Exploring Ex- 
pedition, during the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842. Under 
the command of Charles Wilkes, United States Navy. By Hobatio 
Hale, philologist of the expedition, 4to (pp. xii, 666, map). Phila- 
delphia, 1846. (The Languages of North-Western America, on pp. 
533 to 656.) 

A. Gallatin, Hale's Indians of Xorth-West America, and 

Vocabularies of North America, with an Introduction. Pp. xxv — 

clxxxviii, 1 — 130 of Vol. II of the Transactions of the American 

Ethnological Society. [Neu) York, Bartlett and Welford, 1848, 8vo.) 

Introduction III, Philology j Yocabularies, Grammar, pp. cviii — cxliv. 
Hale*s Indians of North- West America. Philology, pp. 25 — 70 ; Vocabu- 
laries, 71—130. 

H. R. Schoolcbaft, A Bibliographical Catalogue of Books, 
Translations of the Scriptures, and other publications in the Indian 
Tongues of the United States ; with brief critical notices. Washing- 
ton, C. Alexander, printer, 1849, 8vo, pp. 28. 

Contains a catalogue raisonnS of the Indian works in the Indian bureau of 
the department of the interior. 

It is reprinted with a few additions, pp. 523 — 551 of Vol. IV of the illus- 
trated work on the Indian Tribes of the United States, published by order 
of the Government of the United States. 

Historical and Statistical Information respecting the History, 
Condition, and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States. 
Collected and prepared under the direction of the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs, per Act of Congress of March 3, 1847, by Henet E. 
ScHOOLCHAFT, LL.D. Published by authority of Congress. Parts I 
to Y, 4to (with illustrations). Philadelphia, 1851 to 1855. 

H. R. Schoolcbaft, Indian Languages of the United States. 
(Pp. 340 — 345 of History, Condition, and Prospects of the Indian 
Tribes of the United States, Vol. II.) 

Fbancis Llebeb, LL.D., Plan of Thought of the American 
Languages (pp. 346 — 349 of History, Condition, and Prospects of 
the Indian Tribes of the United States, Vol. II). 

H. B. Schoolcbaft, Observations on the Manner of correspond- 
ing "Words in the Indian Tongue. (Pp. 371 — 385 of History, Con- 



XXIV INTRODUCTORY BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES. 

dition, and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States, 
Vol. IV.) 

H. E. ScnooLCEArT, Indian Numerals. (P. 712 of History, 
Condition, and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States, 
Vol. V.) 

Catalogue of Books in the Astor Library relating to the Lan- 
guages and Literature of Asia, Africa, and the Oceanic Islands. 
New York, Astor Library Autographic Press, 1854, 8vo, pp. 8, 424. 

Contains, on pp. 179 — 187, also books on the languages of the American 
Indians. 

An .Examination of American Languages, on pp. 53 to 72 of: 
ArchsBology of the United States; or. Sketches, Historical and Biblio- 
graphical, of the Progress of Information and Opinion respecting 
Vestiges of Antiquity in the United States. By Samuel. F. Haven. 
Pp. iy. and 168, 4to. Washington, 1856. 



BIBLIOTHECA GLOTTICA. 



ABENAKI, WAPANACHKI. 

Eastern Indians. This is the name given by Europeans to the 
Indians of New England, Canada, and Nova Scotia. Tribes of 
the Abenakis are the Mtcmacs, Sourtquoisy Ameriscoggins^ 
EtcheminSy and Penobscots. The Abenakis proper lived on the 
Kennebek river ; their principal place vs^as Nanrantsouak (Nor- 
ridgewock). 

WORDS A>'D YOCABULAJtIES. 

Hebtas, Saggio, p. 233. 

Pbofessob T. Sat, Comparatiye Vocabulary of various Dialects of the Lenape, 
etc.; note 15, pp. 135 — 145, to John Pickering's edition of: Dr. Edwards's 
Observations on the Mohegan Language, in Vol. X (second series) of the : Collec- 
tions of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Boston^ Phelps and Famham , 1823, 
8vo ; reprinted, ilid.y Little and Brown, 1843, 8vo. 

Baibi, Atlas Ethnographique. Tab. XLI, No. 815. 

Fatheb Sebastian Rasles, A Dictionary of the Abenaki Language in North 
America^ published from the original manuscript of the author, with an intro- 
ductory memoir and notes by John Pickering. Camhrid^ey Folsom, 1833, 4to ; 
forms part (pp. 370 — 574) of : Memoirs of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences. New Series, Vol. I. Cambridge, Folsom, 1833, 4to. The original 
MS. in the Harvard Library, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

No. IV, 14 of the Comparative Vocabulary (pp. 305—367) to A. Gallatin's 
Synopsis, etc.. Vol. II of the: Archsologia Americana; and (partly) under 
O, IV, 5, p. 109 of the Vocabularies in VoL II of the : Transactions of the Ameri- 
can Ethnological Society. 

Langue des Abenaquis, p. 514 of Vol. Vm of: Ant. Cofbt de Gebelix, 
Monde primitif. Paris, 1773, 4to. Reprinted in : J. B. Scherer's Recherches His- 
toriques et Qeographiques sur le Nouveau Monde. Paris, Brunet, 1777, 12mo, pp. 
327, 328. 

"William Willis, The Language of the Abenaquis, or Eastern Indians (extracts 
from Rasles, and list of Indian geographical names). Art. VI, pp. 93 — 117, and 

B 



*Z ABIPONES — ACCAWAY. 

E. E. Potter, appendix thereto, Art. VIII, pp. 185—193, 195, of Vol. IV of 
the : CoUections of the Maine Historical Society. Portland, 1856, 8yo. 

GBAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
P. P. WzoKHiLAiN, Wobanaki kiuzowi awighihan. Boston, 1830, 8vo. 

ABIPONES. 

Formerly of the Province of Chaco, now of Paraguay, east of 
the Parana river ; were divided into three tribes, the Naguegt^ 
gaguehee, the RucaheCy and the Jaconaiga, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hekvas, Origine, Tab. L et seq. 

Hebvas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, p. 161 et seq. 

Hesvas, Saggio, pp. 105, 106 ; and Toba Abipona, p. 105. 

Balbi, Atks Ethnographique. Tab. XLI, No. 450. 

Mabtii? Dobbizhoffeb, Presbjter et per XVIII annos Paraguarise mission- 
arius, Historia de Abiponibus, equestri, bellicosaque Paraguarise natione,locupletata 
copiosis barbarum gentium, urbium, fluminum, ferarum, amphibiorum, insectorum, 
serpentium prsecipuorum, piscium, avium, arborum, plantarum, aliarumque ejusdem 
provinciffi proprietatum obseryationibus. Vienncs, de Kurzbeck, 1784, 3 vols. 8vo. 
Transhited into — 

a. German : 

M. Dobbizhoffeb, Geschichte der Abiponen (by Professor Kreil). Wien^ 
1784, 3 vols. 8vo. 

b. Snfflish: 

An Account of the Abipones, an Equestrian People of Paraguay. From 
the Latin of Mabtid Dobbizhoffeb, eighteen years a missionary in that 
country (by Miss Coleridge). London, Murray, 1822, 3 vols. 8vo. 

The vocabulary and grammar to be found in Vol. II, p. 161 et seq. of the 
Latin edition. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 478, 497, 605, 506. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

M. Dobbizhoffeb, 1. c, Vol. II, p. 161 et seq. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 498—501. 

A. D'Obbigny, L'Homme Am6ricain, Vol. II, p. 117. 

ACCAWAY. 

Indian Tribe of Guyana, on the banks of the Demerara, belongs 
to the Caribi-Tamanakan stock. 



ACII\OUAS AGLEGMUTES. 3 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary of Eighty-two Nouns and Numerals (1 — 10) in the four Indian 
Languages of British Guyana, Accaway. By Will. Hillhouse, in the : Journal of 
the Royal Geographical Society of London. London, 1832, Vol. II, pp. 247, 248. 
Beprinted, pp. 155, 156, of Vol. V of: R. Montgomery Martin's British Colonial 
Library (West Indies, Vol. II). London^ 1844, 12mo. 

Vocabulary of Five Indian Nations in Guyana, Ackoway, in appendix No. V, 
pp. 164, 166 of : F. A. Van IIeutel, El Dorado. New York, J. Winchester, 
1844, 8to. 

Sib Robert H. Schomburoe, Vocabulary of Eighteen Words, compared with 
Eighteen other Guyana Languages and the Lingoa i^eral, pp. 97, 98 of the : Swansea 
Meeting Report of the British Association in 18^. London^ Murray, 1849, 8vo. 

Vocabulary of Eighteen Words (eight not in Schomburgk), compared with 
Arawak, Caribisi, and Warau, pp. 297, 298 of: W. H. Brett, the Indian Tribes of 
Guyana. New York, Rob. Carter and Brothers, I802, 12rao. 

ACHAGUAS. 

Wandering Tribe, on the banks of the Middle Orinoco and the 
Casanare. 

WORDS AND V0C.\BULARTK8. 
Hbbtas, Origine, Tabb. XII, LI et seq. 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, p. 631. 

ADAIZE. 

On the Red River, near Natchitoches. Only forty men in 1805. 

WORDS AND VOCABULAUTES. 

No.XIII, 18of the Comparative Vocabulary of FiOj-three Nations, pp. 805 — 
367 of the Synopsis of the Indian Tribes within the United States, East of the 
Rocky Mountains, etc., by Albert Gallatin, in Vol. II of the : Archa^ologia 
Americana. Cambridge Universittf Press, 1836, 8ro j and No. D, XIII, pp. 95 — • 
97, of the Vocabularies in Vol. II of the : Transactions of the American Ethnolo- 
gical Society. 

The Adaize words given after MS. notices of Siblkt. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 278. 

AGLEGMUTES, AGOLEGMUTES. 

In Russian America, at the mouth of the rivers Nuscliagak and 
Naknek. They belong to the Esquimaux. (Tcliouktchi Ameri- 
cans of Balbi.) 



1 AI-EUTAXS. 



AVOUDS AND VOCABUI.AUIKS. 

Ohromtsohbnko*s Yojage along the Coast of the Kussian Possessions in Ame- 
rica — in the : Northern A rchives for History, Statistics, and Travels, (In the Bus- 
sian language.) Si Fetershurff, 1824, Nos. 11 — 18. 

Translated into Qerman in the : Hertha of 1825, Vol. II, pp. 218—221. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique. Tab. XLI, No. 859. (Tchouktchi or Agle- 
mutes propre, de I'lle de Nurriwok et de I'Ue do St. Laurent.) 

ALEUTANS. 

In Russian America, on the islands between Alyaska and 
Kamschatka. The inhabitants of these islands speak different 
dialects. 

WORDS AND VOCABULAUIES. 

J. BiLLiNOS, Yojages (Russian edition). St. Petersburg^ 1811, 4to, pp. 121 — 129. 

Martin Satjeb, An Account of a Geographical and Astronomical Expedition to 
the Northern Parts of Russia by Commodore Joseph Billings. London^ T. Cadell 
and W. Davies, 1802, 4to, pp. 9 — 14 of the appendix. (Appendix No. II, Vocabu- 
lary of the Languages of Kamschatka, the Aleutan Islands, and of Kadiak.) 

Vol. II, pp. 296 —303, of the French translation by F. Cast^ra. Paris^ 1802, 
2 vols. 8vo. Pp. 399 — 406 of the German translation. Berlin^ 1802, 8vo. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 340, 841 ; Vol. IV, pp. 251—255. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique. Tab. XLI, No. 858. 

Aleutian Abeoedarium, s. 1. e. a. St, Petersburg, 1839 or 1840. 8fo. 

I. Veniaminoy. Aleutian Vocabulary (Russian). St. Petersburg, 1848. 

Aleutan Vocabulary (noted "not in America'*), under X 2, p. 130 of the Voca- 
bularies in Vol. II of the : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

Some (18) Aleutian and Kamskadale words compared in Samuel G. Drake, 
the Book of the Indians. 9th edition. Boston, Benjamin B. Mussey, 1845, 8vo, 
Part I, p. 16. 

Tveenty-one Esquimaux words compared with Aleutian, pp. 110 — 118 of the 
Esquimaux Vocabulary, published by the British Admiralty. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

I. Veniahinoy, Opyt Qrammatiki Aleutsko lisjevskago jasikil. St. Peters^ 
hnrg, 1846-8. 

XJeber die Sprnohen des Russischeu Amerika's, nach Veniaminov. Pp. 126 — 143 
of Vol. VII of: A. Erman, Arohiv fur wissenschaftiche Kunde yon Russland. 
J?er/i», Rcimer, 1819, 8vo. 



ALGOXQUIN. .) 



ALGONQUIN (CIIIPPEWAY). 

The Algonquins, as a tribe of the great Algonquin stock, were 
once powerful on the northern shores of the lakes and the St. 
Lawi^nce river. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

New Voyages to North America To which \a added a Dictionary of the 

AJgonkine Language, which is generally spoken in North America. ... By Babok 
liAHOJiTAy, Lord- Lieutenant of the French colony at Placentia, in Newfoundland. 
Done into English — a great part of which never printed in the original. London^ 
1703, 2 vols. 8vo. Reprinted, London^ 1735, 2 vols. 8vo. 

Translated, under the inspection of the author, from the French original, 
published in the same year uu'ler the title : Nouveaux Voyages de M. le li ason 
DE Lahoxtan dans TAmerique septentrionale. A la Hay^^ 1703, 8vo ; second 
edition, ihid.y 1705, 8vo. The second volume bears the title : Memoires de 
r Am^rique septentrionale, ou la suite des Voyages de M. le Baron de Lahon- 

TAir avec un petit dietionnaire de la langue du Pays. Tom. II. A 

la Haye^ 1704-, Svo ; second edition, ibid.^ 1705, 8vo. Both volumes under one 
title: Nouveaux Voyages, etc. A la Haye, Frdres Honore, 1709, 2 vols. 12mo. 
The : Petit Dietionnaire de la Langue des Sauvages Algonkins, s. 1. e. a., 
Svo, in the : Biblioiheca Heberiana, Vol. VI, p. 72, No. 163, is apparently taken 
* from a copy of Lahontan's work. The vocabulary is reprinted on pp. 214— 
219, in : Hadr. Relaxdi, Dissertationes Miscellaneee. Trajecti ad JRhenum, 
1706-7, 8 partes, Svo. 

The work of Lahontan has been translated also into German and into 
Dutch, (Beisen naar America, van Baron Lahontan. Jiaay, 1739, Svo.) 

HsRTAS, Vocabolario Poliglotto, p. 161 et seq. 

HsBTAS, Aritmetica, p. 114. 

HsBTAS, Origine, p. 37, Tabb. XL VII I, L, LI et seq. 

Hebtas, Saggio, p. 233. 

J. Long, Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader .... to 
which is added .... a Table, showing the Analogy between the Algonkin and 
Chippeway Languages. London, printed for the author, sold by Bobson, Debrett, 
& Co., 1791, 4to. Algonkin Vocabulary, pp. 185—211. 
Long's Voyages have been translated into — 

a. Germany by E. A. W. Zimmormann. Hambury, 1791, 8vo. 

b. French^ by Billecocq. Taris, an II (1793), 8vo. 

Examples of the Knisteneaui and Algonquin Tongues, pp. cvii — cxvi of: Alex- 
ander Mackenzie, Esq., Voyages from Montreal on the River St. Lawrence, 
through the Continent of North America to the Frozen and Pacific Oceans, in the 
years 1789 and 1793. London, T. Cadell, jun., and W. Daves, ttc, 1801, 4to. 
Reprinted, New York, 1802, 8vo ; and Parhy Levrault, 1802, 2 vols. Svo. 



() ALGONQUIN. 

Translated into — 

a. German, Mamlurffy 1802, 8?o. 

b. French, by F. Cast^ra. Parut, Dentu, 1802, 8 vols. 8fo. 

The Vocabulary is also printed on pp. 261 — 274 of : Tableau Hietorique et 

Politique du Commerce de Pelleteries dans le Canada avec un Vocabu- 

laire par F. Castera. Paris, Dentu, 1807-8. 

Smith Babton, New Views — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 343, 346, 416, 417 (from Lahontan, Smith 
Barton, Long, and Mackenzie) . 

Vocabulary of the -Algonquin Langue, pp. 579 — 602 of: Travels through the 
Canada s, etc. By George Heriot, Esq. London, R. Phillips, 1807, 1 vol. 4to, 
pp. xi and 602. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique. Tab. XLI, No. 818. 

J. Edwards, Observations on the Language of the Muhhekanew Indians. A 
new edition, by J. Pickering. Boston, 1823, 8vo. 

Keprinted from : Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 
Vol. X of the second series. Boston, printed by Phelps and Famham, 1823, 
8vo, pp. 81—160. 

Algonkin words in the Comparative Vocabulary of various Dialects of the 
Lenape stock, communicated by Professor Sat, pp. 135 — 145. 

No. 10 and IV jS of the Comparative Vocabulary of Fifty-three Nations, 
pp. 305—367, and No. IV jS, p. 368, of the Comparative Vocabulary of Sixteen 
Tribes, pp. 368 — 372 of A. Gallatin's Synopsis, in Vol. II of the : Arch«o- 
logia Americana. 

The " Old Algonquin," after Lahontan j the " Modem Algonquin," after 
Mackenzie. The former partly reprinted under No. IV (2), p. 106 of the 
Vocabularies in Vol. II of the : Transactions of the American Ethnological 
Society. 

Affinities of the Satsika or Blackfeet Language with those of the Algonkins, 
pp. cxiii, cxiv ; and 

Affinities of the Shyenne with Languages of the Algonkin Family, pp. cxiv., cxv 
of: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

Rev. M. Heceewelder, A Comparative Vocabulary of the Lenni-Lenape and 
Algonquin. MS. in the Library of the American Philosophical Society at Phila- 
delphia. 

Rev. Fred. Baraga, Dictionary, etc, (see Chippewa). 

A MS. Vocabulary of the Algonquin, in French, written at Miohimilimao, in 1740 
to 1748, by a Jesuit Missionary (1 vol. folio, pp. 582), is in the possession of 
Hugh Ramsay, Esq., of Montreal. 

Comparison of the Language of the Ancient Pampticos of North Carolina with 
the Algonquin Language (Chippewa, Natic), pp. 556, 557 of Vol. V of: School- 
craft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 



ALLENTIAC ^ANDAQU1£S. 



GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Mithridates, YoL III, part 8, pp. 412, 413. 

I^ote of D. FiOBiLLO to two Algonquin Songs, given by John Dunne, in his 
Notices relative to some of the Native Tribes of North America. Transactions of 
the Boyal Irish Academy. Tom. IX, p. 130. 

P. E. DuPONOEAU, M^moire sur le Syst^me Grammatical des Langues de 
quelques Nations Indiennes de TAm^quo du Nord. Pam, 1838, 8vo. 

H. B. SCHOOLGSAFT, An Essay on the Ghrammatical Structure of the Algon- 
quin Language, pp. 351 — 442 of Vol. II of the : Indian Tribes of the United States. 

H. B. ScHOOLOBAFT, Obflervations on the Manner of Compounding Words in 
the Indian (principally with Algonquin examples), pp. 371 — 381 of Vol. lY of 
the : Indian Tribes of the United States. 



ALLENTIAC. 

A Chilian language^ spoken by the Guarpos Indians of the pro- 
vince of Cuio. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

LuYB DB Yaldiyia, Ajte Grammatica, Yocabulario, Catecismo y Confes- 
aionario en Lengua Chilena y en las dos Lenguas Ailentiao y Milcocayac, que son 
las mas generales de la Provincia de Cuio en el reyno de Chili, y que hablan los 
Indios Guarpes y otros. Lima, 1607, 8vo. 

Bbunxt, IY, p. 547 — who mentions the same author's : Arte de la Lengua de 
Chile, published 1606 at Lima — gives a similar title as the above after Antonio, 
n, 67, but dated Lima, 1608, 8vo. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Lmra DB Yaldiyia, see under Yocabularies. 

ANDAQUIES. 

Indians of Nueva Granada^ territory of Mocoa (formerly depart- 
mento del Assuai)^ between the rivers Caquetd and Putumayo. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Andaqm and Spanish Yocabulary, taken in 1854 by the Fresbytero Manuel 
Habia AIiBIS. Pp. 27 — 29 of: Los Indios del Andaqui. Memorias de un viajero 
publioadas por Jose Maria Yergara i Yergara i Evaristo Delgado. JPopayan, 
imprenta de la Matricaria, 1855, 16mo, pp. 29. 



ANTIS — APINAGES. 



ANTIS. 

Brazilian Indians on the eastern slope of the Andes. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des Antis, du Rovers Oriental des Andes (Echoratos), Yocabulaire, No. 
XVI, pp. 290, 291 of Castelnatj, Vol. V, Appendice. 

APACHES. 

The great Apache nation roams over the triangular space 
included between the puellos of New Mexico, the river Colarado, 
and the Gila; they extend, also, into the State of Chihuahua, 
and even farther south. They are related to the great Atna- 
pascan family. The Navajos and Tiiialenos belong to them. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A Vocabulary— of the Copper Mine Apaches — has been taken by John R, 
Bastlett, the United States' Boundary Commissioner. 

Vocabularies of the Apache and Micmac Languages. The Apache by Dr. Chablbs 
C. Henbt. New Mexico, 1853. Pp. 578—589 of Vol. V of: Schoolcraft's 
Indian Tribes of the United States. 

Pbof. W. W. Tubneb, Comparative Vocabulary of Twenty-five "Words of 
Apache (from Bartlett's MS. Vocabulary), Hudson's Bay, Chepewyan, Dogrib, 
Tacally, Umkwa, Hoopah, and Navajo, pp. 84, 85 of the Eeport upon the Indians, 
added to Lieutenant A. W. Whipple's Report on the Route near the 35th Parallel, 
in Vol. II of the : Pacific Railroad Reports. Washington^ 1855, 4to. 

APIACAS. 

Brazilian Indians on the banks of the River Arinas. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des Apiacas. Vocabulaire, No. VIII, pp. 276—278 of Castelnau, 
Vol. V, Appendice. 

APINAGES. 

Brazilian Indians on the banks of the Tocantins River. Martius 
(Catalogue of Indian Tribes, No. 80, b) calls them Apinagds^ 
and mentions them as a tribe of the Ges or Gez nation, of which 
he na];aes nine tribes. 



ARAUCAXS. 9 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des Apinages (Rio Tocantins). 1. Partie donn^e par le Commandant 
du Fort S. Joao das duas Barras, pp. 270, 271. 2. Partie recueillie dans les 
Aldeas du Tocantins, pp. 271—273. Vocabulairo, No. V, pp. 270—273 of 
CASTELSAiJy ToL V, Appendice. 



AllAUCANS. 

The aborigines of Chili^ who call themselves Aiica, Moluches, 
or Chilidugu. They are divided into Pikunche^ or Puelche ; 
Pehuencke, to which the Auca or Moluches proper belong, and 
HuiUiche, D'Orbigny distinguishes the sedentary (Araucanian) 
and roving (Auca) tribes. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Yocabula Linguee ChilisB, in : Casp. Bablaei, rerum per octennium in Brasilia et 
alibi nuper gestarum sub prsefectura comitis J. Mauritii NassovisD Historia. 
Amatelodami, Jean Blaey, 1647, folio. Edit, secunda. Clivis^ 1660, Svo. 
(Yocabula Chilensia, pp. 479 — 491.) 

C^erman Translation — Barlaei Brasilianische Gteschichte, etc. Cleve, 1659, 
8vo. 

A View of the Cbilesian Language (Vocabulary), pp. 635—639 of: JoHir 
OoiLBT, America, being the latest and most accurate Description of the New 
VTorld, &c. Iiondon, printed bj the author, 1671, folio. 

Vocabulary, after Euas Hkrkmann, p. 629, in : Dr. O. D. (Dapper) Die un- 
bekannte neue Welt oder Beschreibung des Welttheils America. Amsterdam^ 
1673, folio. From this vocabulary the words given by : J. R. Forsteb, in his 
Observations made during a Voyage Bound the World (London^ Eobinson, 1778, 
4to), are said to be taken. 

De Chilensium lingua et Vocabularium dictionum Chilensium, in : Geo. Marc- 

gravii Tractatus Brasilise .... quibus additi sunt ilUus et aliorum com- 

mentarii de Brasiliensium et Chilensium indole et lingua; pp. 288 — 290 of: His- 
toria Naturalis Brasilia {Lugduni Batavorum et Amstelodami, Fr. Hackius, 
1648, folio), which contains the works of Guil. Piso and Geo. Marcgravius, 
on the Natural and Medical History of Brazil, published by Johannes de Laet ; and 
pp. 32 — 34 of: GuiL Piso de Indiffi utriusque re Naturali et Medica. Lugduni 
Batavorum^ Elzeyir, 1655, folio. 

Langue du Chili, pp. 535, 536 of Vol. VIII of: Cottet de GEBELiif, Monde 
Primitif. Baris, 1773, 4to. 

Hebyas, Origine, pp. 37, 164, 165, and Tabb. LI, LII et seq. (Chilena, Tab. 
XTiTX.) 

C 



10 ARAUCANS. 

Hebyas, Aritmetica, p. 95. 

Hebyas, Vocabulario, p. 161 et seq,, 220 (Araucana 6 Chilena). 

Smith Baeton, New Views — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 402 (Comparison of the Araucaniau, Greek, and 
Latin Languages), 422, 423. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique. Tab. XLI, No. 439. 

Wm. Mabsden, Miscellaneous Works. London, 1834, 4to, p. 104. 

Vocabulary of Twentj-threo Words. Pp. 162—164 of Vol. I of : A. D'Oebignt, 
L*Homme Am6ricain. 

Vocabulary Araucano and Cbileno, pp. 652, 653, of: Hobatio Haxe, Ethnogra- 
phy and Philology, United States Exploring Expedition. Philadelphia^ Lea and 
Blanchard, 1846, 4to. 

J)iccionario Chileno y Hispano, compuesto por el B. P. Mis. Akdb. Eebbes, 
&o. Enriquecido de voces 1 mejorado por el R. P. Fr. Hernandez F. Calzada. 
Edieion hecha para el servico de las misiones . . . . bajo la inspeccion del R. P. 
Misionero Fr. Miguel Anjel Astraldi. Santiago, imprenta de los Tribunales, 
1846, 8vo, pp. 92. 

The Spanish part under the title — Diccionario Hispano Chileno, compuesto por 
el P. Andbes Febees. Enriquecido por el P. Hernandez F. Calzada. Edieion 
hecha bajo la inspeccion del P. Fr. Miguel A. Astraldi. Santiago, imprenta del 
Progreso, 1846, 8vo, pp. 112. 

Breve Diccionario de algunas palabras mas usuales (Spanish and Chileno). 
Appendix of 29 pp. to : A. Febbes, Oramatica de la Lengua Chilena, edition by 
Calzada and Astraldi. Santiago, 1846, 8vo. 

A vocabulary, or specimens of the language of the Pehuenche, may be found in : 
Descripcion de la Naturaleza de los Terrenos que se comprenden en Jos Andes posei- 
dos por los Peguenches .... por P. Luis de la Cbuz, Alcala Mayor Provincial del 
ilustre Cabildo de la Concepcion de Chile. Primera edieion. Buenos Ayres, imprenta 
del estado, 1835, folio. Forms part of the first volume of: Pedro de Angelis, 
Coleccion de Obras .... relativos k la Historia de la provincia del Rio de la 
Plata. Buenos Ayres, 1835-7, 6 vols. 

See also the works and grammars of Febbes, Valdiyia, Faleneb, GiLn, 
Molina, Havestadt, Vidaube. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Ltjis de Valdiyia, Arte y Gramatica general de la Lengua que corre en todo el 
Eeyno de Chile, con un Vocabulario en la Lengua de Chile. Lima, Fr. Canto, 
1606, 8vo. 

P. Andbes Febbes, e. S. J. Arte de la Lengua general del Beyno de Chil^, con un 
Dialogo Chileno Hispano ; y un Vocabulario a que se aiiada la Doctrina Christiana 
y por fin un Vocabulario Hispano Chileno. Lima, 1765, 4to, pp. 682. Reprinted: 
Adicionada i correjida por el R. P. Fr. Ant. Hernandez Calzada de la Orden do 



ARAUCAXS. 1 1 

Francisco. Edicion becba para el serricio de las xnisiones por orden del Supremo 
Gobiemo i bajo la inspeccion del B. P. Fr. Miguel Anjel Astraldi. SantiagOy 
imprenta de los Tribunales, 1846, Svo, pp. 330. 

Extracts given by A. Gallatin, pp. 258—264, 277, of Vol. II of the : Ar- 
cbseologia Americana. 

Thomas Falkmer, A Description of Patagonia and tbe Adjoining Parts of South 
America, containing .... an Account of the Language of the Moluches, 'with a 

Grammar and short Vocabulary Hereford^ 1774, 4to, maps, pp. 144. The 

grammar and vocabulary, pp. 132—144. 

Translated (extracts only ?) into — 

a. OermaHy by Schack Hermann Ewald. Ootha, Ettinger, 1775, Svo. 
(Grammar and Vocabularies, pp. 163 — 181.) 

b. French, par M. B Geneve. Paris, Dufort, 1787, 2 vols. 24mo, 

pp. 160, 185. Reprinted at Paris, 1788. 

c. Spanish. T. Falkner, Descripcion de la Patagonia. Primera edicion 
Espanola. Buenos Jyres, imprenta del estado, 1835, folio, pp. vii, 63. Forms 
part of Vol. I of the: CcUcccion de Obras y Documcutos relativos & la 
Historia antigua y moderna de las provincias del Bio de la Plata, por Pedro 
de Angelis. Buenos Ayres, imprenta del estado, 1835-7, 6 vols. 

The extract " of the Patagonians," made by Thos. Pennant, and printed 
for him privately at George Allan's Darlington Press (1788, 4to) — which is 
abo reprinted in the appendix of the : Literarj' Life of the late Thos. Pen- 
nant, by himself, London, 1793, 4to — seems not to contain the above gram- 
mar and vocabulary. 

(Abbe VroArRS ?) Compendio della Storia Geografica Naturale e Civile del 
Beyno de Chile. Bologna, 1776, Svo. 

German translation — Kurzgefaszte Geschichte des Kdnigreichs von Chile. 
Von C. F. F. Hamburg, 1782, Svo, pp. 115—119. 

Bernabdi Hatestadt, e. S. J. Chilidiigii sive res Chilenses vel descriptio status 
turn naturalis turn civilb tum moralis regni populique Chilensis, inserta suis locis 
perfecta ad Chilensem linguam manuductione. Monasterii Westphalia, 1777, 
2 vols. Svo, pp. 952, map, and two plates of music. 

Divided into seven parts, of which the first is a very ample grammar of 
the Chilian tongue, the fourth an ample vocabulary of the same language, with 
■which the fifth — a Latin vocabulary — corresponds. The author was for 
twenty years a Jesuit missionary in Chili. 

In Vol. Ill of : Saggio di Storia Americana 6 sia storia naturale civile e sacra 
de' regni e delle provincie Spagnuole di terra firma nell' America meridionale. 
Descritta dall* Abate Filippo Saltadore Gilii {Roma, Perego, Erede Salvioni, 
1780-84, 4 vols. Svo), which, under the title of: Dalla Beligione e delle Lingua 
degli Orinocchesi e di altri Americani, 1782, contains the linguistic part of 
the above work j a grammar is given, pp. 261 et seq., and a short vocabulary, 
p. 383. 

Giov. Ion. Molina, Saggio sulla Storia naturale del Chili. Bologna, J782, Svo. 
(Grammar and Vocabulary, pp. 334 — 367. Molina has used two MS. grammars of 
Gabbisl Vega and Pietbo Garbeta. 



12 ARDA — ARRAPAHOES. 

The work of Molina, followed in 1787 by : Saggio della Storia civile del Chili 
{Bologna^ 8vo), was translated into — 

a. Spanish, by D. Domingo Jos. de Arquellada Mendoza. Madrid^ 1788, 
2 Tols. small 4to. 

b. French, by M. Graval, M.D. FariSy Nee de la Rochelle, 1787 (or 
1789), 8vx). 

c. Unfflish, with notes and appendix, by an American gentleman. Mid- 
dletown, Connecticut, 1808, 2 vols. 8vo. (By Will. Shaler or Rich. Alsop ?). 
Reprinted with notes and appendices, etc. London, Longman, 1809, 2 vols. 8vo, 

The second edition of the original appeared under the title : Saggio della 
Storia del Chili* Seconda edizione accresciuta. Bologna, 1810, 4to. Portrait 
and maps. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, p. 397—416. 

A' D*Obbignt, L'Homme Am^ricain, Vol. I, p. 399. 

AEDA. 

According to Alcedo, the Ardas are a tribe of Indians living 
between the Rivers Napo and Maranon, in the province of 
Quijos, not far from Quito. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Doctripa Christiana, y explicacion de sus misterios en nuestro Idioma Espanol y 
en Lengua Arda. Madrid, 1658, 12mo, pp. 28. 

. The Lord's Prayer in the Arda Language : — 

Daygue, mito, etepi, evota, agai, sanctificado, soro, oii vgua, mito me, h 
lortome guanuque, oririque, numo, aysague, enumo, agai, oju, mito, vepa, 
ve, toe, naueie, ayale, gui, matedo, numo, miu, ayale, a joti misi, eriquej 
paayaibo, nurebo, vreminoe, oig, vodutinau, vrrenui. Amen. 

AHEAPAHOES, 

Indians on the Kanzas River. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

No. E, VII, pp. 96, 98 of the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American 
Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

John S. Smith, Vocabulary, pp. 4<4S — 459 of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of 
the United States, Vol. II. 

Vocabulary, headed Ahnenin, in possession of Q-allatin ; collated by Dr. Prichard 
and Dr. E. Q-. Latham. Notice of Arrapaho in Vol. II of: Transactions of American 
Ethnological Society, apparently made whilst this Vocabulary was out of the pos- 
sessor's hand, as the language is there called Atsina. 



ARRAWAKS. 13 



ARRAWAKS. 

Indians of Guyana, on the banks of the Berbice and Surinam 
Rivers. (See J. E. Fabri, Geographisehes Magazin. Dessau and 
Leipzig, 1785, 8vo, Vol. IV, pp. 33—4.7.) 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Words compared with Yaio and Slicbar, pp. 642, 613, of: Joan, de Laet, 
NovTis Orbia seu Descriptionis Indian Occidentalis, libri XVI II. Lugduni 
Batavorum, Elzevir, 1633, folio. 

JFrench translation, ibid.y 1640, folio. 

Dentscli Arawakisches "Woerterbucb, zusamroengesteUt durcb THEOPHrLre 
ScHincANy (between 1748 and 1755). MS. in possession of the Moravian com- 
munity at Paramaribo. 

Smith Babton, New Views — Comparative A'ocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 697, 698. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique. Tab. XLI, "So, 585. 

Journal of the Royal Gtjographical Society of London. London, 1832, 8vo. 
Vol. II, pp. 247, 248: Vocabulary of Eighty-two Nouns and Numerals (1 — 10) in 
the four Indian Langtmges of British Guyana, Arawaak, etc., by William Hill* 
HOUSE, Esq., Surveyor. Reprinted in Vol. V of : R. Montgomery Martin's British 
Colonial Library (West Indies, Vol. II). London, 1844, 12rao, pp. 155, 156. 

GDable comparing Twelve Words of the Arrowack, Atovay, Maypure, Moxos, and 
Quichua. Appendix VI, p. 166, of : J. A. Van Heuvel*s El Dorado. Xew York^ 
J. Winchester, 1844, 8vo. 

Arrawak Numerals, p. 30 of : Bebnan*s Missionary Labours in British Guyana. 
London, 1847, 8vo. 

A Dictionary, Arrowack and German — Arrowakisch Deutsches W5rterbuch. 
Vermehrt, 1803, durch Theodob Schultz, in 1 vol. of 622 pp., 4to— is de- 
posited in the Library of the American Philosophical Society at Philadelphia. 

. Sib Hobebt H. ScHOikTBUBGE, Comparative Vocabulary of Eighteen Arawaak 
Words, in hia Vocabularies of the Indians of Guyana, pp. 97, 98 of the : Report of 
the British Association. Swansea, 1848, 8vo. 

Vocabulary of Eighteen "Words compared with Warau, Caribisi, and Accaway, 
pp. 297, 298 of: W. H. Bbett's Indian Tribes of Guyana. Xew York, 1852, 12mo. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

C. QuAinxT, Moravian Missionary among the Arrawacks, from 1769 to 1780, 
Nachricht von Suriname und seinen Einwohnern, sonderlich den Arawaken, 

Warauen und Karaiben und von der Sprache der Arawaken, von der 

Oew&chsen xmd Thieren des Landes, und Geschaften der dortigen Missionarien. 
OoerUU^ 8. a, (1807), 8vo. With map and two plates. 



14 ATHAPASCA ATNA^S. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 666—674. 

H. C. FocKE, Jets over de Arrowakken en hunne taal, pp. 42 — 53 of: West-Indie; 
Bijdragen tot de Bevordering van het Kennis der Nederlandsch West-Indisclie 
Kolonien. Vol. I. Haarlem^ 1855, 8vo. 

Deutsche Arawakkisclie Spraclilehre, zusammengestellt durch Theophilxts 
Schumann, Missionair zu Klosterbergen (between 1748 and 1755). MS. in 
possession of the Moravian community at Paramaribo. 

Qrammatikalische Satze von der Arawakischen Sprache von Theodoe Schultz. 
MS. in 12mo, pp. 173. 

Deposited by the author in the Library of the American Philosophical 
Society at Philadelphia- 

ATHAPASCA, ATHABASCA, TINNE, DTINNE. 

This great family of nations, to which the Kenaize are nearly 
related, occupies the whole of the northern limits of North 
America, together with the Eskimos. The principal nations 
belonging to the Athapasca family are the Chepewyans, Tahkals, 
Kutchin, Sussee, Dogrib, Tlatskanas, and Umpquas, The 
Navajos and Ticorillas seem to belong to the same stock. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Phrases and Grammatical Forms (Chippewyan from Du Ponceau's collection), 
pp. 215, 216, of Vol. II of the : Archseologia Americana. 

Vocabulary (Tacullies, Cheppeyans, Sussees), ibid.^ pp. 305 — 367. 

J. C.E.BusCHMANNjUber dieVerwandschaftderKinai-idiome mit demgrossen 
Athapaskischen Sprachstamme (mit Worttafel) , pp. 231 — 236 of the ; Monatsbe- 
richte der Berliner Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1854. 

J. C. E. BuscHMA-NN, Der A'thapaskische Sprachstamm. Berlin^ F. Diimmler, 
1856, 4to, pp. 149 — 319. (From : Abhandlungen der Philosophisch-Historischen 
Klasse der Koniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1855.) Contains : "Wort- 
verzeichniss der athapaskischen Sprachen, pp. 174 — 222 j and : Grosses Wort- 
verzeichniss des athapaskischen Sprachstammes oder der Xinai- athapaskischen 
Sprachen (compared with Koloschian), pp. 223 — 320. 

* 

ATNA'S. 

On the Atna, or Copper River, in Russian America. 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

. Some (1 1) Words compared with TJgalenze and Kolosch, p. 99 of Vol. I of : K. E. 
VON Bab, and Gb. von Helmebsen, Beitrage zur Kenntniss des Bussischen Heichs 



ATNAH ^ATTAKAPAS. 15 

und der angraenzenden Laender Asiens. St, Fetershurffy Press of the Academy, 
1839, 8vo. 

ATNAH, OR KINN INDIANS. 

Chin Indians (Shoushwap, Flat-head). On the Caledonia River, 
west of the Rocky Mountains. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Pp. 267, 258 of: Alexander Mackenzie's Voyages from Montreal to the 
Pacific Ocean, &c. London^ 1801, Ito. 

And p. 418 of the German translation of the same. Published at ITamburff^ 
1802, 8vo. Reprinted in A. Ghdlatin's Synopsis, Tol. II of the: Archsologia 
Americana, p. 378, under XXIII (58). Also Tol. II of the : Transactions of 
the American Ethnological Society, Tocabularies I, XXIII, p. 118. And 
partly in : Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 216. 

Baijbi, Atlas Ethnographique. Tab. XLI, No. 773. 

Atnah and Noosdalum Words compared, p. 157 of R. G-. Latham's Languages 
of the Oregon Territory. Pp. 154—166 of Vol. I of the : Journal of the Ethno- 
logical Society of London. £dinhurgh^ 1848, 8vo. 

Atna, or Shoushwap Vocabulary in J. Howse's Vocabularies of certain North 
American Indian Languages — Kutani, Flathead, Okanagan, Atna, pp. 199 — 206 
of: Proceedings of Philological Society, Vol. IV. Xon(2o», 1850. 

Flathead (as dialect of Atnah) Vocabulary, ibid, 

Okanagan (as dialect of Atuah) Vocabulary, ibid, 

ComparatiTe Vocabulary ef the Athapaskan and Kinai (among them the Atnah) 
Languages, pp. 269 — 318 of: Buschmann's Athapaskischer Sprachstamm. Berlin^ 
1856, 4to. 

ATTAKAPAS, OTAKAPA. 

Indians of Louisiana. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

No. XV, 50 of: Comparative Vocabulary of Fifty-three Nations, pp. 305 — 
867 of A. GaIiLATIn's Synopsis in Vol. II of the : Archaeologia Americana ; and in 
D, XV, pp. 95, 97 of Vol. II of the : Transactions of the American Ethnological 
Society. 

J. S. Vatbb, Analekten der Sprachenkunde. Leipzig^ 1821, 8to, No. 2, pp. 63 — 72. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 758. 

Vocabulary of the Atacapas, by Martin Duualde. MS. in the Library of 
the American Philosophical Society at Philadelphia. 

An Attakapa Vocabulary has been collected by John B. Babtlstt, United 
States Boundary Commissioner. 



16 ATUKE — AYMARA. 

ATURE. 

Indians of Venezuela, speaking the Saliva language; now 
nearly extinguished. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
T. S. GiLii, Saggio di Storia Americana. Soma, 1780—1784, Vol. Ill, 8vo. 

AYMARA. 

Indians of Bolivia, the north-westerly provinces of the Argentine 
Republic, and of Southern Peru. The Aymara language bears 
a close resemblance to the Quichua ; many words are the same 
in both languages, and their grammatical construction is likewise 
very similar. Of the various dialects of the Aymara language 
spoken by the Kanchis, Kasnas, KollaguaSy Karankas, Charcas, 
PacasaSy and Lupakas, the two latter are the most cultivated. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

P. Lttdotico Bebtonio, Yocabulario en la Lengua Ajmara. Impresso en la casa 
de la Compania de Jesus en Juli Puehlo^ en la ProTincia de Chucuito, por 
Francisco del Canto, 1612, 4to. 

WOLPGANG Bateb, Oratio Aymara cum yersione Latina (et continuatione). 
In : G. G. von Murr, Journal fiir Kunst und Litteratur. Niirnberg (1776 — 
1789, 17 vols. 8to), Vol. I, pp. 112—121; Vol. II, pp. 277—334; and 
Vol. Ill, pp. 55 — 104. Wolfgang Bayer was a Jesuit missionary among the 
Aymaras of southern Peru. 

Hertas, Origine, pp. 37, 177, and Tabb. XLIX, L, LI et seq. 

Hebtas, Aritmetica, pp. 101, 102. 

Hebvas, Saggio, pp. 89, 90. 

Hebvas, Vocabulario, pp. 161 et seq. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 2, pp. 537, 538, 547. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique. Tab. XLI, No. 460. 

* 

Vocabulary of Twenty-three Words, pp. 162, 164 of Vol. I of : A. D'Obbiont, 

L'Homme Am^ricain. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

P. Lttdotico Bebtonio, Arte y Grammatica copiosa de la Lengua Aymara* 
jSoma, Zannetti, 1608, 870. New edition, enlarged (by D. de Gualdo ?), 

LuD. Bebtonio, Arte de la Lengua Aymara, con una sylva de phrases 
de la misma lengua, y su declaracion en romance. Impressa en la casa de la 



BANIWA BATEM-DA-KAI-EE. 17 

Compania de Jesus en JuH Pueblo, on la ProTineia de Clmcuyio, por Fran* 
Cisco del Canto, 1612, 4to, pp. X, 1G18. 

Bbitnet, Yol. I, p. 305, mentions : Libro de la vida y milagros de nuestro 
Seiior Jesu Christo, en la Lengua Ajmara j romance. Impressa en la casa 
de la Compania de Jesus, etc., 1612, 4to. 

P. Lxnx)Yico Bbbtokio, Arte Brcvo de la Lengua Ajmara, para introduction 
del arte grande de la misma lengua. Soma, 1603, 8ro. 

P. DiSGO DE ToBBBS RuBio, Arte de la Lengua Ajmara. Ltmci, 1616, 8?o. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 2, pp. 535—546. 

A. D'Obbignt, L'Homme Americain, Yol. I, pp. 320—323. 

BANIWA. 

Indians on the Amazon and the Rio Negro. Wallace names 
'Banitoas, of the Rio Isauna, of Tomo-Maroa, and of Javita : 
of whom the first two speak kindred languages ; the third, 
however, a language totally diflFerent from the others. Martius 
(VII, 233) calls them MaiiibaSy Banibas^ and Manicas, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabolary (of ninety-eiglit words), pp. 521—541 of : Alfbed R. Wallace, A 
Narratire of Travels on the Amazon and Bio Negro. London, Reeve & Co., 
1853, 8to. 

BARRE. 

Indians on the Amazon. They speak a language similar to that 
of the Baniwas of Isanno and Tomo-Maroa^ and also of the 
Uainambuas and Tartana, 

WORDS AND VOCABLLARIES. 

• 

Vocabulary (of ninety-eight words), pp. 521—541 of: Alpbed R. Wallace, A 
Narrative of Travels on the Amazon and Rio Negro. London, Reeve & Co., 
1853, 8vo. 

BATEM-DA-KAI-EE. 

Indians of the north-western part of California, on the head of 
Eel River, The name above given is that of the valley in 
which this and other bands reside. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary, by Geobgb Gebbs, in : Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes, Vol. Ill, pp. 
434—440. 

D 



18 BAYANO — BETOI. 

BAYANO. 

Indians of the Isthmus of Panama, about the River Chepo. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Bkrthold Seemann, Vocabulary in his article on the Aborigines of the Isthmus 
of Prfnama. Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. Ill, part 1, 
pp. 179—181. 

BEAVER INDIANS. 

In the Hudson's Bay territory. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary, pp. 323—328 of Vol. II of: John McLean's Notes of Twenty-five 
Years' Service in the Hudson's Bay Territory. London, Bentley, 1849. 2 vols. 12mo. 

Duplicate Vocabulary in J. Howse's Vocabularies of certain North American 
Indian Languages — Beaver, I and II j Chipevyyan, I and II ; Sikanni dialect of 
New Caledonia, pp. 192 — 198 of Proceedings of : Philological Society, VoL IV. 
JLondon, 1850. 

BETHUCK. 

Language of an extinct tribe of Indians of the Algonkin stock. 
Dr. R. G. Latham had a vocabulary lent to him by Dr. King, 
Secretary of the Ethnological Society, but without an account 
of its origin. From internal evidence he satisfied himself that 
it was Bethuck, i. e,, aboriginal — not Eskimo, nor yet Micmac, 
but a branch of the Algonkin, per se. See Report of British 
Association for the Advancement of Science — Southampton 
meeting. 

BETOI. 

On the River Cassanare, in New Granada, of the same stock as 
the Ele and Yaruro Indians. The Situga and Airiko speak 
dialects of the Betoi. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIKS. 

Hbetas, Vocabulario poliglotto, pp. 161 et seq. 
Hebtas, Saggio, p. 109. 
Hbetas, Origine, Tab. XLIX. 



BLACKFBET. 19 

Hbbyas, Aritmetica, p. 106. 
Mitbridates, Vol. m, part 2, pp. 645, 650. 
Balbi, Atlas Ethnograpliique. Tab. XLI. No. 647. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

F. Joseph Gvicilla gaye his grammatical notes on the Betoya language to his 
successor, P. Jos. Padilla. Hervas preyailed upon Padilla, when retired from his 
missionary labours, to write down what he knew of the grammatical structure 
of this language. Adelung has used the letter of Padilla to Heryas. 

Mitbridates, Vol. HI., part 2, pp. &40— 647. 

BLACKPEET, SATSIKAA. 

Pieds noirs ; Blood or Paegan Indians of the Algonkin stock ; 
the most powerful tribe of the north-western prairies on the 
sources of the Missouri and the Rocky Mountains. They are 
divided into — 1. Satsikaa, or Blackfeet proper. 2. Kahna, or 
Blood Indians^ " Indiens du Sang.^^ 3. Ptekans, Paegans, Pica- 
neux. 4. Small Robes, 

WORDS AND VOCABDLAKIES. 

Esw. TJhfbsyille, The Present State of Hudson's Bay. Containing .... a 
specimen of five Indian languages. London^ Walker, 1790, Svo. Table to p. 202. 
Chrman translation — Mit Erauterungen, von E. A. W. Zimmermann. 
ffelnutedt, Fleckeisen, 1791, Svo. 

Mitbridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 254 (from ITmpeeville). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique. Tab. XLI, No. 770. Paegan ; Pied nobs 

No. XXI, 56 (p. 373) of the Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc, in 
Vol. II of the : Archteologia Americana (from Umfbeville). 

Beise des PsiirzEN Maximilian zu Wied. Cohlentz, 1839—1841, 2 vols. 
4to, Vol. I, pp. 584 et seq. j Vol. II, pp. 480 — 486. 

Blackfeet Vocabulary, Appendix, pp. 262 — 265 to Vol. 11 of: Geo. Caixin, 
Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American 
Indians. London, 1841, 2 yols. 8to. 

Blackfeet Vocabulary (and Lord's Prayer), on the last two pages of the last twa 
leaves of: Oregon Missions and Travels over the Bocky Mountains, 1815-6, 
by Father P. J. de Smet, e. S. J. New York, Edw. Dunigan, 1847, 12mo. 
pp. 408, 4to. 

Vocabularies of Languages of North-western America, No. 13, Z. Satsikaa 
(Blackfeet), pp. 569—629 of: Horatio Hale, Ethnography and Philology, United 
States Exploring Expedition. Philadelphia, Lea and Blanchard, 1846, foUo, and 



20 nODEGA — BRAZILIANS. 

C. ly, pp. 88, 90, 92, 94, of the Vocabularies in Vol. II of: Tpansftctions of the 
American Ethnological Society. 

Affinities of the Satsika or Blackfeet Language with those of the Algonkins, 
pp. CXIII, CXIV of Vol. II of: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

Satsika, or Blackfeet Vocabulary (Upper Missouri), by J. B. Monceovie, on 
pp. 494—505 of Vol. II of: Schoolcraft, Indian Tribes of the United States. 
Miscellaneous Tocabularies. 

J. HowsE, Vocabularies of certain ^orth-American Indian Languages — Black- 
foot I and II — Nipissing, Shawnee, Brunswick. Pp. 102 — 113 of: Proceedings of 
the Philological Society, Vol. IV. London, 1850. Duplicate Vocabulary of 
Blackfoot. The words of forms of speech were collected partly by Howse himself, 
and partly by such missionary and commercial agents as were known to haye 
the requisite opport lenities ; the same list of names and phrases being transmitted 
to all, 

BODEGA. 

Indians of California, who call themselves Olamenike, 

WORDS AND VOCABULAKIES. 

KosTEOMiTONOV, Woerter aus zwei Sprachen Neucalifomiens (Bodega and Seyer- 
noTzi), pp. 234 — 254 of Vol. I of : K. v. Bae und Q-E, y. Helmeesen, Beitrage 
Zur Eenntniss des russischen Beichs und der angranzenden Lander Asiens. 8t, 
Petersburg^ 1839, Svo. (Russian, German, and Bodega. Printed in Eussian type.) 



BRAZILIANS, 

Or rather, Tupis. The diflFerent tribes of the Tupis are named, 
q.nd a map of the wanderings and extension of this once 
numerous and mighty people given, in: Dfi. C. F. Ph. von 
Martius, Abhandlung von dem Kechtszustaude unter den Ur- 
einwohnern Brasiliens. MuncheUy F. Fleischer, 1832, 4to, map, 
pp. 86, 20. (The Appendix gives, on 20 pp., a view of the 
diflFerent Indian peoples, tribes, and hordes of Brazil.) Their 
language was called ^^ lingoa geraP^ (general language) by the 
Portuguese, and eight diflFerent dialects of this language are 
enumerated by Vater, viz., the dialects of the — 1. Tappen, in 
the province of Rio Grande do Sul. 2. Petiguaren (anthropo- 
phagi), in the provinces of Paraiba and Ceara. 3. Tupinaba^ 
on the shores of the Rio Real, in the province of Sergipe. 
4. Kaheteriy on the shores of the river S. Francisco, in the 



BRAZILLVNS. 21 

province of Peruambuco. 5. Tupininquins (the people first 
met with by Cabral), in the interior and on the coast of the 
province of Espiritu Sancto, at Porto Segnro and Ilheos. 

6. Taptgu€B, on the sea-coast from St. Paolo to Pernambuco. 

7. Tummimtoi and Tamotce, near Rio Janeiro. 8. Titpinambas, 
the largest of the tribes, in the provinces of Maranhao and 
Gran Para, speaking the most generally diffused diabct. 

Martius divides the Tupis into north, south, west, east, and 
central Tupis, and names, besides this people, 245 different larger 
or smaller tribes living within the Brazilian empire. 

Adelung calls the Tupis the North Guarany, and considers 
their language as a part of the Guarany language. 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

"Aucuns Mots des Peuples de Tlsle de Brezil." On four pages at tho end of 
Ant. Fabre*8 Extract of the MS. of Pigafetta*s Voyage, iu the Ambrosian 
Library of Milan. This extract bears the title : Le Voyage et Navigation, falct 
par les Espaignoles es isles de Mollucques, des isles qiulz ont trouye au diet voyage, 
des roys dicelles, etc. ^ari*^ Simon de Colines, s. a., small 8vo. Black letter 
(see Brunet, Vol. Ill, p. 743). 

The manuscript of Pigafetta was published in 1800, by Dr. Charles 
Amoretti : Primo Viaggio intomo al globo terracqueo, ossia ragguaglio della 
navigasione alle Indie orientaU per la via d'occidente, fatta sulla squadra del 
Capitano Maggalianes negli anni 1519— 1522, del Gavaliero Antonio Pig a- 
petta. Milano, 1800, 4to. 

Drench translation — Premier Voyage autour du Monde par le Chevalier 
Pigafetta, sur Tescadre de Magellan, pendant les annees 1519 — 1522 ; suivi 
de Textrait du traite de navigation du m^me auteur et d*une notice sur le 
Chevalier Martin Behaim, avec la description de son globe terrestre. Paris^ 
Jansen, 1801, 8vo, pp. 64, 415, maps and plates (the vocabulary, p. 241). 

The extract of Fabre has been translated into Italian, and published in the 
rare collection — II Viaggio fatto dagli SpagniuoU atomo al mondo, s. 1. 1536, 
4to (Brunet, Vol. IV, p. 603— before : Venezia, 1534, 4to ?), wherein it is 
printed on the last leaf. It is also reprinted in the first volume of Giam* 
battis^^a Ramusio Baccolta di Navigazioui e Viaggi. Venezia, Giunti, 1550, 
1559, 1556, 3 vols, folio, and often afterwards. 

Brazilian words and a conversation in Brazilian are given by : Jean PE Leb7> 
Histoire d'un Voyage fait en la Terre du Bresil, dite Am^rique ; contenant 
.... les mceurs et fa9ons de vivre ^tranges des sauvages Am6riquains, avec un 
ooUoque de leurlangue, s. 1. (d laRochelle). Printed by Anthony Chuppin, 1578, 
8vo, engravings. Eeprinted very often. Translated also into Latin, Enghsh, 
Dutch, and German. 

The Brazilian words and conversation are reprinted in the : Allgemeinc 



22 BRAZILIANS. 

Historic der Beisen zu Wasser und zu Lande. Amsterdam, 1747—1774/ 
21 vols. 4to, maps, plates, in Vol. XVI, pp. 263 et seq. 

Words from Lery and from Dutch notices, page 599, of: Joan de Laet, Novus 
orbis seu descriptionis Indise occidentalis, Libri XVIII. Lugduni Sataoorum, 
Elzevir, 1633, foUo. 

Translated into French (Lei^den, Elzevir, 1640, fol.), and Dutch (Leyden^ 
Elzevir, 1644, folio). 

Dictionariolum nomiuum et verborum Ungues Brasiliensis maxime comunis 
(collected by Emanubl de Mobaeb), cap. XI of: 1. Georgii Marggravii de 
Leibstad, Tractatus topographicus et meteorologicus Brasilise, cum eclipsi solari, 
quibus additi sunt illius et aliorum commentarii do Brasiliensium et Chilensium 
Indole et lingua— in ; Historia Naturalis Brasilia (edid. Joan de Laet). Lugduni 
and Amstelodamif F. Hackius, 1648, folio, pp. 276 et seq. And in: G-. Fisonis De 
Indies utrinsque re naturali et medica, Libb. XIV. Lugduni JBatavum, Elzevir, 
658, fol., pp. 22 — 24. 2. O. Dapper, Die unbekannte neuwe welt. Anuterdami, 
1673, fol., p. 412. (In Dutch, translated by Arnoldus Montanus : De nieuwe en 
onbekende weareld. Amsterdam, 1671, folio). 3. John Ogilby, America. London^ 
1671, see pp. 485 — 4S7. 4. Had. Relandi, Dissertationes miscellaness. Trajecti 
ad Menum, 1706, 1707, 3 vols. 8vo, Vol. Ill, p. 173. 

Brazilian words are given by Ans. Eoea^t, in his Additions to : Fedro Cudenas, 
Description of Brazil, in: Christoph Gottlieb von Murr, Beisen einiger Mis- 
sionarien der Gesellschaft Jesu in America. Nwrnberg, Zeh, 1785, 8vo, pp. 614^ 
map and plates, pp. 419 et seq. 

Hebyas, Origine, Tab. XLIX et seq. 

Hebyas, Vocabulario poliglotto, pp. 161 et seq. (Tupi and Brasile volgare.) 

Hebyas, Saggio, p. 98. (Tupi.) 

Smith Babton, New Views — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 2, pp. 450, 451, 458, 460, 603 (from Hervas, Laet, 
Moraes, and Eckart). 

. Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 492. Brazilien, Lingoa geral, 
Tupinamba, Tupi. 

Diccionario Fortuguez e Brasiliano ; Obra necessaria aos ministros do altar que 
emprehenderem a conversao de tantos milhares de almas que ainda se achao dis- 
spersas pelos vastos certoes do Brazil, sem o lume da Fe, e Baptismo, etc. For 
* * # Frimeira parte. Lisboa, 1795, small 4to, pp. 79. 

Some Brazilian songs are given in : Relacion de la Real Tragi-comedia con que 
los padres de la Compania de Jesus de Lisboa recibieron a Felipe II de FortugaL 
Lishoa, 1620, 4to. 

A Glossary of Tupi Words, pp. 629 — 639 of: John Litccock, Notes on Rio de 
Janeiro and the southern parts of Brazil, taken during a residence of ten years 
in that country, from 1808 to 1818. London, printed for Sam, Leigh, 1820, 4to 
(some copies have the date altered into 1822), plates, pp. 639* 

. The author announces at the end of his book, that he is about to publish a 



BRAZILIANS. 23 

f ** Grammar and Dictionary of the Tapi Language." These works were never 
published. The MSS. are deposited in the Library of the Geographical and 
Historical Institute at Kio de Janeiro. 

Sib Bobebt H. Schombubok, Comparatiye Vocabulary of Eighteen Words of 
the Lingua geral, in his Vocabularies of the Indians of Guyana, pp. 97, 98 of the : 
Beport of the British Association, Swansea Meeting, 1848. London^ 1849, 8yo. 

A Vocabulary of the : Langue do Kouros, Idiome de la Leiigua geral, given 
in : Fbancis de Castblnaf, Expedition dans les Parties Centrales de rAm^rique 
du Sud. Paris, A. Bertrand, 1850, 1851, 6 vols. 8vo. Vol. V, Appendix Vo- ' 
cabnlary, No. 18, pp. 285, 286. 

Vocabulary of the Lingoa geraL Tableau and Bemarks on the Vocabularies, 
by B. G. Latham. Appendix, pp. 529 — 534 (534 — 536, Comparison of the 
Lingua geral with the Tupi, Tupinamba, Mundrucu, Omagua, Guararri, and 
pp. 539 — 541, with Languages of Guyana), of : Alfbed B. Wallace, A Narrative 
of Travels on the Amazon and Bio Negro, with Account of the Native Tribes. 
London^ Beeve & Co., 1853, pp. viii, 541. 

Lista de Voces de la Lengua general del Brasil. Appendix to the MS. 
Zeona Dictionary, in the possession of Colonel Joaquin Acosta, of Nueva 
'Granada. 

A MS. '* Vocabulario das Linguas Brasilica e Portugueza," on 200 pp., 
together with a " Doutrina e perguntas dos Mysteries principaes de nossa santa 
F^ na Lingua Brazila," in Portuguese and Brazilian dialogues, stated to be written 
by the Bev. P. Mabcos Antoitio about 1750, is in the British Museum, 
collection of Xing George IV, No. 223. (See Fbed. Fbai^c. sb la Figaniebe, 
Catalogo dos Manuscriptos Portuguezes existentes no Museu Britannico. lAsboOy 
imprenta nacional, 1853, 12mo, pp. 184, 185.) 

Vocabulario Brazileiro para servir de Complemento dos Diccionarios da Lingua 
Portugueza, por Braz da Costa Bubim. £io de Janeiro, 1853, 1 vol. 8vo. 

Vocabulario Portuguez e Brazileiro, por Sr. Leonardo da Silveira das Dores 
Castello Branco. MS. in the Library of tl;e Historical and Geographical Institute 
of Bio de Janeiro. 

Vocabulario da Lingua geral, usada hoje em dia no Altos Amazonas. Por Sb. 
Ds. AifTTONio 6OV9ALTES DLiS. Pp. 553 — 576 of: Bevista Trimensal do Bio de 
Janeiro, Tom. XVII. 

Words in : Informa^ao dos Casamentos dos Indios ^o Brazili pelo Padbs 
Jose be AifCHiSTA, pp. 254—263 of: Bevista Trimensal do Bio de Janeiro. 
Second series, Tom. I, No. 2. 

Forty-three Words of the Language spoken by the Indians das Brenhas de Mu- 
cuiy, pp. 451, 4^2 of : Bevista Trimensal do Bio de Janeiro. Second series, Tom. I, 
9o.4u 

Paiaviana Words, pp. 252 — 256 of: Bela^ao 6^graphica-Historica do Bio 
Branco da America Portugueza. Composta pelo Bachabel Fbancisco Xayier 
Bibbibo de Sakpaia, in : Bevista Trimensal do Bio de Janeiro. Second series, 
Tom. VI, No. 18. 



24 BRAZILIANS. 

Diccionario d» Lingua geral dos Indios do Brazil ; reimpresso e augmentado 
con diyenoB Yocabularios e offerecido a S. M. Imperial, por JoAO Joaquim da 
SiLVA GniSffARES. Bahia^ 1854, pp. 106, 8vo. 

Diccionario Portuguez e Brazileiro, contendo o Vocabulario dos Indigenas 
CayuiU. Por Sr. Babao de Antonika. MS. in the Library of the Historical 
and Geographical Institute of Eio de Janeiro. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Jose de Akchibta, Arte de Grammatica da Lingoa mais usada na Costa do 
BrasiL Coimbra, 1595, small Svo., pp. 120. 

Extracts therefrom are given in Chapter X of the : Tractatus Brasilise of 
Marggravius, in : De Lingua Brasiliensium e Grammatica P. Jos. de Anchieta, 
e. s. J., and in Belandus, in their above-mentioned works. 

A Brazilian Grammar, Vocabulary, and Catechism, by Emanuel Yega, a Mis- 
sionary, is mentioned by Adelung, in his Mithridates, Yol. Ill, part 2, p. 442, 
as written but not printed. 

P. Lxnz Fioueiba, Natural de Almodovar, Arte da Grammatica da Lingua 
do BrasiL LUboa, 1681, 8vo. Reprinted by Miguel Deslandes. Lithoa^ 1687, 
Svo, and .... 4th edition. Lishoa, 1795, small 4to. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 2, pp. 422—446, 452—457. 

Langue Br6silienne, Moniimens de la Linguist ique du Br^sil composes au 2LY11 
Si^cle. Note 6, pp. 355—359, to : Une F^te Br6silienne c61^r^ k Rouen, 1550 
(Article de Ferdinand Denis), in the -. Bulletin du Bibliophile, 9me s^rie, Nos. 
10, 11, 12. Paris, Techener, 1849, Svo, pp. 355—359. 

See also the 9th note to the same article : La Chanson de Montaigne, Po&ie 
des Tupinambas. Drames des Missionaires, vers Tupiquee compost par 
eux, pp. 364—379. Also printed separately. Paris, 1850. And : Parecer 
da Commissao da Historia sobre o opusculo : Une FSte Br^zilienne, etc., 
pp. 443—449, Vol. XIV of: Revista Trimensal de Rio de Janeiro. 

Grammatica da Lingua geral dos Indios do Brazil, pelo Padre Luiz Figueiba, 
reimpressa por Joao Joaquim da Silva Guimares. Bdhia, 1851, 1 vol. Svo. 

Memoria sobre a necesidade do Estudo e Ensino das Lenguas Indigenas do 
BraziL Por Francisco Adolpho de Varnhagen. MS. in the Library ^f the 
Historical and Geographical Institute of Rio de Janeiro. 

Remarks on the Language of the Tupis, in Section IX of: Historia geral do 
Brazil, por Francisco Adolpho de Varnhagen. Vol. I. Bio de Janeiro^ 
Laemmert, 1856, Svo. 

Remarks on the Lingua geral and on Tupinamba, in Section Vm of: Historia 
geral do Brazil, por Francisco Adolpho de Varnhagen. Vol. I. Bio de Janeiro^ 
Laemmert, 1856, Svo. 

Ethnographia Indigena, Linguas, Emigra9oes, e Archsaologia. Por Sr. F. A. DR 
Varnhagen. Pp. 366—376 of: Revista Trimensal do Rio de Janeiro, Second 
series, Tom. V, No. 16. , . 



BUGKE — CADDOES. 25 

Collec^ao de Etjmologias Brazilicas, por Fb. Fraxcisco dos Prazbres 
MaranhIo. Pp. 69 — 80 of : BeTist« Trimcnsal do Rio de Janeiro. Second series, 
Tom. I, No. 1. 

BUGRE. 

Brazilian Indians. Balbi, who calls them Bougres^ says that 
they are cannibals. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Yocabulario da Lingoa Bugre (in Portuguese and Bugre), pp. 60—77 of Vol. 
XV of: Bevista do Instituto Historico e G^grapliico do Brazil. Sio de Janeiro^ 
typ. Laemmert, 1852, Svo. 

CABAROS. 

Brazilian Indians of the Aldeas on the River Tocantins. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIE.<*. 

Langue des Cabaros (Aldeas du Tocantins). Vocabulaire, No. YI, pp. 273, 274 
of: Castblkaf, Vol. V ; Appendice. 

CADDOES. CADODAQUIOUS. 

Indians on one of the branches of Red River. Their language 
is spoken by the NandakoeSy Nabadaches, and Inies or Tachies, 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 277. 

No. 51, XVI, of the Comparative Vocabulary of Fifty-three Nations, pp. 305 — 

867, and Supplementary Vocabulary of Caddo (six languages), 

pp. 881—397, by George Gray. Also, "Conjunctions," p. 272, and "Select 
Sentences," in Caddo, pp. 409, 411, 413 of A. Gallatin's Synopsis, in Vol. II 
of the : Archeeologia Americana. 

Part of XVI, 51, reprinted under E, XVI, pp. 96—98 of the Vocabularies 
in Vol. n of the : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

Captadt R. B. Marcy, U.S.A. Specimen of the Caddo and Witchita 
Languages, pp. 709 — 712 of Vol. V of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United 
States. 

Gaddo Vocabulary of Twenty Words, taken by LiErxENANT A. W. Whipple, 
p. 70 of the Beport upon the Indian Tribes, added to his Bcport on the Boute 
near the 85th Parallel, in VoL II of the : Pacific Bailroad Beports. Wathington^ 
1855, 4to. 

£ 



26 CAHITA — CALIFORNIANS. 

CAHITA. 

In the northern parts of Mexico. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
NouTelles Atmales des Voyages. ParU^ 1841, 8to. YoL IY, pp. 262 — 287. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Arte de la Lengua Cahita. Mexico^ 1737, 12mo. 

CAHUILLOS. CA-WI-OS. 

Califomian Indians residing near the Pacific^ between the 
sources of the San Gabriel and Santa Anna. 

Cahuillo Yocabulary, taken by Lieutenant A. W. Whipple, pp. 71 — ^76 of 
the Report upon the Indian Tribes, by Lieutcnuut Whipple, Thomas Ewbank, 
and Professor W. W. Turner, added to Lieutenant Whipple's Report on the 
route near the 35th parallel, in Yol. II of the : Pacific Railroad Reports. Wash' 
inffton, 1855, 4to, and 

Twenty-eight Cahuillo Words compared with Kechi, Netela, and lazh. Ibid^ 
p. 77. 

CALIFORNIANS 

In general. See— 

R. G, Latham on the Languages of New Califomia, pp. 72—86 of YoL VI of ; 
Proceedings of the Philological Society, London, 1850 ; G. Gibbs' Observations 
on some of the Indian Dialects of Northern Califomia, pp. 420 — 423 of YoL lU of : 
Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. See abo, pp. 99^^177 of the 
same yolume, the Journal of the Expedition of Colonel Rediok M*Keb, United 
States Indian Agent, through North-western California, performed in the summer 
and fall, 1851, by GEOBas Gibbs. 

The United States Boundary Commissioner, John R. Babtlett, has taken the 
following Tocabularies in Califomia : — 

Deguino or Comeya, at San Diego. 

Kechi, Mission of San Luis Rey. 

San Luis Obispo, Mission of same name. 

S*hana...' 

Tehama.,. 

Coluz ^in the Country watered by the Sacramento Riyer. 

Noana ... 

Diggers..., 

Diggers of Napa Yalley. 

MaJcaw of Upper Califomia. 



CAMACANS — CANADA. 27 

In a letter, he says : ** The name of Diggers is applied to all the California 
Indians bj the people (whites) generally, and it is difficult to get the real names of 
the tribes. Half the time the natives will give one the name of their chief or 
captain." 

Languages of California, by Adam Johnson. Pp. 406 — 415 of Vol. IV of: 
Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States, gives vocabularies and words 
of the following tribes : — Tuolumne tribes, pp. 407 — 412. Co-eo-noont on Mercedes 
Itiver, p. 413. Indians at King's Eiver and about Tulare Lake, pp. 413, 414. 
Indians near to Mag Beading, on the upper waters of the Sacramento Siver, 
pp. 414^ 415. 

CAMACANS. 

Cam(scaes Mongoyoz, or Monxocos Indians of the Capitania de 
Bahia^ Brazil (Martius, No. 11). 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

Beise des PsnrzEir Maxiiulian zu Wied Neuwied nach Brasilien. Frakkfurt 
am Main, 1820, 1821, 2 vols. 4to, VoL II, p. 327—330. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, Nos. 505, 507 (Camacans, Spix- 
Martins). 

CANADA. 

Early travellers give words of the Indian tribes inhabiting 
Canada under the name of Kanadians. 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 

Samitsl db Gi^AMPLAiK, Les Yojages de la Nouvelle France oocidentale, dite 

Canada, faites par Ve Champlain et toutes les d^ouvertes qu'il a faites 

en oe pays depuis 1603 jusqu'au 1629, ensemble la relation de tout ce qui s'est 
pass^ k la Nouvelle France en 1631. FariSy S. Lemure, Collet, 1632, 4to. 

Contains the translations of: P. Lasesme's Doctrine Chretienne, in Canadian, 
by Breboeuf; and of Prayers, by Massb. Brebceufs translation had been 
printed at Jtouen, 1610, 8vo. 

Yater states that the edition — Paris, Collet, 1627, 8vo — contains the same 
linguistic pieces. 

Hbbtas, Yocabulario Poliglotto, pp. 239, 240 (numerals). 

Skith Babtok, New Yiews, &c. — Comparative Yocabularies. 

Langnes du Canada, pp. 499 — 504 of Yol. YIII of: Coubt db Gebelin, 
Monde Primitifl Paris, 1772, 4to. Yocabularies taken from Sagard, Lahontan, 
Lafiteau, and Louis Yincent. Reprinted, pp. 313 — 319 of: J. B. Scherer's Ee- 
cherches Historiques et G^graphiques sur le Nouveau Monde. Paris, Brunet, 
1777, 12mo. 



28 CANISCHANA - CARIBS. 

CANISCHANA. 

Warlike tribe of the Moxos stock, on the rivers Mamore and 
Machupo, in Bolivia. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
A. D'Orbiont, L'Homme Am^ricaiD, Vol. I, p. 164; II, p. 208. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
A. D'Obbiont, L'HoTDme Am^ricain, Vol. II, pp. 245, 246. 

CARAJAS. 

Brazilian Indians on the banks of the Araguay [Carayas of 
Martius, No. 78). 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des Carajas (Rio Araguay), Vocabulaire, No. 4, pp. 268 — ^270 of: Cas- 
TELNAU, Vol. V, Appendice. 

CARIBS. 

Originally inhabiting the lesser Antilles, they settled, after their 
expulsion, on both sides of the Orinoco, particularly in the 
Sierra Paryme. There are — 1. Caribs proper ^ who call them- 
selves Karina, Kalinay or Kalinago / the Galihis of French 
Guyana are the principal tribe ; the Tuapoka and Kunaguara, 
on the lower Orinoco, are closely related to the Galibis. 
2. Yaoi^ on the Island of Trinidad and the opposite shores of 
Venezuela. 3. Guachire or Guaiqueries, on the Island of St. 
Margarita and around Cumana ; they are the most advanced in 
civilization. The Avarigotes, PurugotoSy and Acherigotes are 
said to speak the Carib language likewise. Humboldt calls the 
Caribs the *^Buchares of the New AVorld.^^ The words used 
by the men are often different from those used by the women. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Veritable Eelation de tout ce que s'est fait et pass^ au Voyage que Mons. de 
Bretigny fit k TAmprique occidentale. Ayec une description des Mceurs et des 
ProTinces de tous les Sauvages de cette graude partie du Cap de Nord ; un Dic- 
tionnaire de la Langue, et un avis tres necessaire k tous ceux qui veulent habiter.ou 



CAlliBS. 29 

faire habiter oe Pays-Uk, on qui desirent d'y ^tablir des Colonies. Le tout fait sur 
ces Ueuz par Paul Boyeb, Escujer, Sieur de Petit Puj. Parity 1654, small 8to. 
The " Dictionnaire," pp. 193 et seq. 

P. PiEBBX PSLLEPBAT, Belation des Missions des B. P. de la Compagnie de 
J^us dans les Isles et dans la Terre ferme de TAm^rique m^ridionale. Avec une 
introduction ^ la Langue des Galibis, sauvages de la Terre ferme de TAmerique 
m6ridionale. Parit, Cramoisj, 1655, 12mo. 

Bnmet (Vol. Ill, p. 664) says that the "Introduction is sometimes 
found separate from the Relation.*' 

Yoyage de la France equinoxiale en Tisle de Cayenne, entrepris par les Fran9oiB 
en I'annee 1652. Divisee en trois Uvres. Le premier contient T^tablissemenC de 
la Colonic, sun embarquement et sa route jusqu'es 4 son arriv^ en Tisle de Cayenne. 
Le second, ce qui s'est passe pendant quinze mois que Ton a demeur^ dans le pays. 
Le troisi^me traitte du temperament du pays et de la fertility do la terre et des 
moeurs et famous de faire des sauvagcs de cette contr^ ; avec un dictionnaire de la 
langue du mdme pays. Par M. Antoine Biet, Supcrieur des Prdtres qui ont 
pass^ dans le Pays. Paris, Clousier, 1664, 4to. 

Adelung, in his Mithridates (III, 684), says that the Tocabulary of Biet is, 
with a few exceptions, the same as the one given by Boyer. 

Histoire naturelle et morale des Isles Antilles de TAm^rique ; enriehie de plu- 
sieurs belles figures de rarctez le plus considerables que y sont 6crit«s ; ayec un 
Yocabulaire Caraibe. JRoUerdam, A. Leers, 1658, 4to. 

This book, which has been several times reprinted and translated, is known 
as : M. DE Kochltobt's History of the Antilles. Brunet (II, p. 585) names 
Louis de Poinoy and Cesab db Bochefobt as the authors. Du Tertre, 
who, at the same time prepared a history of the Antilles (published afterwards 
at Paris, JoUy, 1667 — 1671, 4 vols. 4to), says that General Louis de 
Poincy placed his notes and a vocabulary, made by P. EAiHOino Bbetok, 
in the hands of a young clergyman, M. de Bochefort of Rotterdam, who 
had been twice in the West Indies. The dedication of the work is signed 
" L. DE P.," which Barbier explains as Louis de Poincy. 
Beprints — 
Seconde Edition : revue et augment^e. Soiterdam, 1665, 4to. 
EUstoire Naturelle des lies Antilles, par M. de Bochefobt. Xyon, 1667, 
2 vols. 12mo. 

Dernier Edition : augment^e par Tautheur d'un B^cit sur .... la Yirginie, le 
Marie Land et la Caroline. Motterdam, 1681, 4to. 

Is the edition of 1665, with but a new title and the " Becit " annexed on 
p. 44. 
Translations — 
a. ISnglish: 
The History of the Caribby Islands, with a Caribbian Yocabulary. Ben« 
dered into English by John Davis, of Kidwelly. London^ printed for 
Thomas Dring and John Starkey, 1666, folio, pp. 8, 351, 10, 5, 

Scarce, because a great proportion of the copies was consumed in the 
great conflagration of London. The vocabulary, on ten not-numbered 
pages, after p. 351. 



30 CARIBS. 

b. German: 

Frankfltrt-on-tJke'Main, 1668, 2 vols. 12mo. Ibid., 1688, 2 vols. 12mo. 

c. Dutch : 
EoUerdam, 1662, 4to. 

Dictionnairo Caraibe-Fran^ois et Francois- Caraibe, mesl^ do quantity de 
romarques historiques pour r^-laircissement de la langue, par le P. Baymond 
Breton, de I'Ordre des Fr^res Frdchcurs, Missionnaire. Auxerre, GiUes Bouquet, 
1663, 1664, 1665, 3 tomes in 2 vols. Svo. 

(Annexed is — forming the Tolunie of 1664 — the same author's: Petit 
Cat^hisme, ou Sommaire des trois premieres parties de la doctrine chr^- 
tienne, traduit du Francois en la Langue des Caraibes Insulaires. Auxerre^ 
Gilles Bouquet, 1664, Svo.) 

New titles. Ihid., 1665, 1666, 2 vols. 8vo. 

N.B. Temaux Compans, in his : Biblioth^quo Am^ricaine (JParia^ A. 
Bertrand, 1837-8), No. 830, p. 143, names a : Dictionnaire Caraibe-Fran^ais, 
par le Pebe Lecleecq — JRennes, 1665— which must be a mistake. 

Dictionnaire Galibi, pr^sent^ sous deux formes — I. Commen9ant par le mot 
Francois ; II. Commen^ant par le mot Galibi ; pr^c^d^ d'un Essai de Grammaire 
par M. D. L. S. (De la Sauvage). Faris, Banche, 1763, Svo. 

Good compilation firom the above dictionaries. Makes part of : M. DB 
Pbefontaine, Maison rustique, h Tusage des habitants de la partie de la 
France ^quinoxiale connue sous le nom de Cayenne. 

Langues des Caribes et des Galibis, pp. 505— 514 of Vol. VIII of : Coubt ds 
Gebelin, Monde Primitff. Parisy 1772, 4to. From Rochefort and P. Breton. 
Reprint, pp. 319 — 327 of: J. B. Sceebeb, Becherches Historiques et G^gra- 
phiques sur le Nouveau Monde. FarUy Brunet, 1777, 12mo. 

Vocabulaire Fran^ais et Galibi, k I'usage de ceux qui voyagent dans les contr^es 
de la Guyane et h Cayenne, pp. 371 — 400 of: Voyage h la Guyane et h Cayenne^ 
fait en 1789 et dans les ann^es suivantes, par L. M. B., Armateur. Paris^ Tom. 
VI (1798), 8vo, pp. 400. 

No actual voyage, but a mere superficial compilation made by Louis Prud- 
homme, from other writers. 

Hebtas, Vocabulario poliglotto, pp. 237, 241 (numerals). 

Hebyas, Saggio, p. 112. 

Hebtas, Origine, Tabb. L et seq. 

Smite Baeton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. (Galibi, Caraibes.) 

Will. Hillhotjse, Vocabulary of Eighty-two Nouns and Numerals (1 — 10) in 
the four Indian Languages of British Guyana. Caribisce, pp. 247, 248 of Vol. II 
of the : Journal of the Koyal Geographical Society of London. London^ 1832, 
Svo. Reprinted in Vol. V of : Montgomery Martin's British Colonial Library 
(History of the West Indies, Vol. II). London^ 1844, 12mo, pp. 155, 156. 

Colonel GALnn)0, Carib Vocabulary (of Central America), seventeen words 



CARIBS. 81 

and numenlB, 1 — 10, p. 291 of Vol. Ill of the : Journal of the Bojal (Geographical 
Societj of London. London^ 1833, 8yo. 

AuCTDE D'OBBiamr, L'Homme Am^ricain. Pom, 1839, 2 yols. 8yo, YoL II, 
pp. 276—899. 

Mithridates, Vol. m, pp. 655, 681, 696, 698. 

(From Bojer, Pelleprat, Breton, and Biet, with comparison of the Y<ioi 
from Laet, and the Arowaek from Laet and Quandt.) 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographiqne. Tab. XLI, Ko. 576 (Caribe pr^ du Cap Nord 
— Gnyane Fran^aise — He Dominique — He Guadeloupe). 

GusTATS DS EiCHTHATi, Bapport des Langues Caribe et Poljn^enne (pp. 253 
—269), and: Bapport des Langues Caribe et Ouolofe (pp. 990—304), of Vol. II of 
the : M^moires de la Soci^t^ Ethnologique. Paris, Yeuye, Dondej-Dupr^ 1845, 
8yo ; with comparative yocabularies, viz., Caribe and Guarani, p. 256, note 1 ; 
Caribe and Poljn^ien, pp. 261, 262 ; Caribe, Sioux, and Polyn^ien, p. 264 ; 
Caribe and Ouolofe, pp, 303, 304. 

Some Ckaribbee^ords compared with Mohcgan and Hebrew. Pp. xxriii — ^xxx 
of: EzEKiEL Santobd, A HLstorj of the United States before the Revolution, with 
some account of the Aborigines. JPhUetdelpMaf Anthony Finley, 1819, 8vo. 

Same, compared with Mohegan, Greek, and Hebrew. Pp. 102, 103 of: Elias 
BouDisoT, A Star in the West, etc. Trenton, N. J., 1816, 8vo. 

A. D'Okbiokt, L'Homme Am^ricain. Vol. I, p. 162 (Ghilibi, Kitemoca, Yaois), 
y<d. n, p. 274 (Canbs), and Tab. to p. 276 ((3hilibi and Caribs of the Antilles). 

A short Yaoi Vocabulary, compared with Shebay and Arrowac. Pp. 642, 643 
of: JoAK. DX Last, Novus orbis. Lvgduni Batavorum, 1633, folio. 

Sib Bobxbt H. Schombubok, Ccmparative Vocabulary of Eighteen Words of 
Twelve Dialects of the Caribi-Tamanakan stock, viz., Caribisi, Accaway, Macusie, 
Arecnna, Soerikong, Waiyamara, Guinau, Maiongkong, Woyawai, Mawakwa, 
Pianoghotto, and Tiverighotto. Pp. 97, 98 of his Vocabularies of Eighteen Lan- 
guages and Dialects of Indian Tribes inhabiting Guyana. (British Association 
Beport, Swansea meeting, 1848.) London, 1849> 8vo. 

Sib Bobebt Schohbubgs:, A Vocabulary of the Maiongkong Language. Pp. 
217—223 of Vol. IV of the : Proceedings of the Philological Society. London, 
1850, 8yo. 

Sib Bobebt ScHOMBimaE, Ghiinau Vocabulary, and affinity of words in the 
Guinau with other languages and dialects in America, in his " Contributions to 
the Philological Ethnography of South America." Pp. 208—237 of VoL m of 
the : Proceedings of the Philological Society. London, 1848, 8vo. 

Vocabulary of Eighteen Words compared with Arawak, Accaway, and Warau. 
Pp. 297, 298 of: W. H. Bbett, Indian Tribes of Guyana. New Tork^ 1852, 
12mo. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

P. Piebbb Pbllepbat. See Vocabularies above. 



32 



I'ATAW BA — CAYAPOS. 



P. Raymond Breton, Grammaire Carnlbe. Auxerre, Gillos Bouquet, 1668, 
8vo. 

D. L. S., Esfloi (Ic Grammaire Galibi's. See Vocabularies abore. 

Mithridatcs, Vol. Ill, pp. 685 — 696. 

(From the extracts made by P. Sebast. Garcia from the MS. Grammar of 
P. Fern. Xikenez.) 

On the Carib language as spoken by females, see : Ghristofh Meinebs, G«8- 
chichte dcs wciblichen Gtjschlechts. Hanover^ Helwing, 1788—1800, 4 vols. 8vo, 
Vol. I, pp. 47— 

CATAWBA— KUTAHBA. 

Indians of Tennessee and South Carolina. 

W^ORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Smith Barton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part. 3, p. 308 (from Smith Barton). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique. Tab. XLI, No. 794. 

No. VII, 41, of the Comparative Vocabulary, pp. 305 — 367 to : A. Gallatin's 
Synopsis (Archseologia Americana) Vol. II). 

(From Smith Barton and MS. authority of J. L. Miller.) 

And No. D, VIII, pp. 94—96 of the vocabularies in Vol. II of the : Transactions 
of the American Ethnological Society. 

Comparison of the Languages of the ancient Waccoa of North Carolina, and 
the Catawba of South Carolina. Pp. f 57, 558 of Vol. V of : Schooloraet's Indian 
Tribes of the United States. 

CATHLASCONS. 

On the Columbia River, Oregon. Nearly related to the Chinooks 
and Haeltzucks. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary by John Scotiler, M.D. Pp. 243, 245, 247 of Vol. XI of the: 
Journal of the Boyal Geographical Society of London. London^ 1841, Svo. 

CAYAPOS. 

Indian tribe of the Aldeia S. Jos^ de Messamedes, in the Bra- 
zilian province of Goyaz. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

J. E. Pohl, Eeise im Innem von Brasilien. Weimar ^ 1832, 2 vols. 4to. Vol. I, 
p. 447. 



CAYUB\BAS — CAYUGA. 33 

CAYUBABAS. 

Indians of " los ^Moxos/' in north-eastern Bolivia^ on the Rivers 
Mamore and Yacuma, Mission Exaltacion. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hesvas, Origine, Tabb. L et seq. 

Hebyas, Yocabulario poliglotto, pp. IGl et seq. 

Heryas, Saggio, pp. 63, 64k 

Hebyas, Aritmetiea, pp. 102, 103. 

Mithridates, Tol. Ill, pp. 571, 576 

Bai3I^ Atlas Ethnograpbique, Tab. XLI, No. 466. 

A, D*OBBicnrr, L'Homme Am^ricain, Vol. I, pp. 162, 164 j Vol. TI, p. 208. 

GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
A. D*Obbigny, L'Homme Am^rieain. Vol. II, pp. 255, 256. 

CAYUGA, GOGOYANS, QUEUGUES. 

Tribe of the Iroquois, and one of the original five nations. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hebyas, Vocabulario Poliglotto, p. 239 (numerals;. 

Smith Babton, New Views — Comparatiye Vocabularies, and p. 20 of the 
Appendix to the edition of 1798. 

And £rom him. No. V, 6, of the : Vocabularies to A. Gkllatin*s Synopsis 
(Archseologia Americana, Vol. II, p. 376). 

Mithridates, VoL III, Part 3, pp. 818, 834^ 335 (from Babton and Dean). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnograpbique, Tab. XLI, No. 799. 

Cayuga Vocabulary, by Rey. Adam Eluot, of Tuscarora. Appendix L, pp. 
271 — 277, to: Henry K. Schoolcraft's Notes on the Iroquois. Ifew York^ 
Bartlett and Welford, 1846, 8to. 

Also : New York State Documents, No. 24, in Senate^ January 22, 1846 ; 
and pp. 393—400 (Comparative Vocabulary of the Iroquois) of the same 

work, edited as a book : Albany^ Pease and Co., 1847, 8yo. And pp. 482 

493 of VoL II of : Schoolcbapt's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

An extract from this Vocabulary is given under R. V. 4^ p. 115, of the 
Vocabularies in Vol. II of: American Ethnological ^'odety's Transactions. 

F 



34 CERI8 — CUAYMA. 



CERIS. 

Indians of Sonora, occupying the Island of Tiburou, in the Gulf 
of California. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIKS. 

A VocabiJary lias been taken by John B. Babtlett, United States BoaDdary 
Commissioner (see : Personal Narrative, Yol. I, pp. 463 — 466). 

CHAPACURA, HUACHI. 

Indians of Bolivia, near the Mission Carmen, on the Rio Blanco. 
The Quitemoca tribe speak a diflferent dialect. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
A. D'Obbignt, L'Hommo Am^ricain, Vol. II, p. 208. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
A. D'OfiBiQNY, L*Homme Am6ricain, Vol. II, pp. 220, 221. 

CHAYMA. 

Indian nation of Venezuela, department of the Orinoco, on the 
rivers Guarapiche, Areo, and Caripe, province of Cumana ; once 
powerful, now nearly extinct. Their language is closely related 
to the Tamanaca. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

P. Fbaitcisco D£ Tauste, Arte j Vocabulario de la Lengua de los Indios 
Chajmas, Cumanagotos, Gores, Parias j otros diversos de la provincia de Cumana 
b neuva Andalusia : con un tratado a lo ultimo de la doctrina Christiana y cateoismo 
de los misterios de nuestra Santa Fe ; traducido del Castellano en la dicha Lengua 
Indiana. Madrid, Bern, de Villa Diego, 1680, 4to, pp. 16, 187. 

A. YON Humboldt and A. Bonpland, Vojage aux E^gions Equinoxiales du 
l^ouveau Continent. Paris, SchoU and Dufour, 1799-1840, 4 toIs. 4to ; and Atlas 
in folio. Edition in 8vo, ibid, 1816-1831, 13 vols. 
Qertnan translation : 
A. TON Humboldt and A. Bonpland, Beise in die Aequinoctial G^^genden 
des l^euen Continents. Stuttgart and Tiibin^en, 1818, 8to, pp. 213-^229, 
258—261. 

A. D'Obbigny, L' Homme Am^ricain, Vol. II, p. 136. 



CHEMEHXEVIS CHEPEWYAN. 35 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
P. Fbancisco de Tauste, see Yocabularies. 
Humboldt and Bonpland, see Yocabularies. 

CHEMEHNEVIS. 

A band of Pah-utahs (Utahs of the River), belonging to the 
great Shohonee family. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Chemehneyi Vocabulary, taken by Lieut. A. W. Whipple, pp. 71—76 of 
the Beport upon the Indian Tribes, added to his : Report on the Route near the 
35th Parallel (YoL II of the : Pacific Railroad Reports. JFathingtoHy 1855, 4to). 

CHEPEWYAN. 

Vater calls this language the foundation of all the North 
American dialects — a kind of court tongue spoken by the chiefs 
of the different nations. The first attempt at a grammar is 
said to have been made at Cazenovia, by a chief of the name of 
Sahgah-jewagah-Bahweh. Gallatin ranks theChepewyan among 
the Athapascan family of languages — a theory adopted like\iise 
by Pricuard, Latham, and Buschmann. 

. WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Tocabulary of the Indians on the north-west part of the Hudson's Bay, p. 206 
— 211 of: Abthttb Dobbs, An Account of the Countries adjoining to Hudson's 
Bay in the north-west part of America ; containing, etc. et-c. — to which are added 

Y Yocabularies of the languages of several Indian nations adjoining to 

Hudson's Bay. London, 1744, 4to, map, pp. 211. Reprint, pp. 181, 182, 183 
of: Buschmann*s Athapaskischer Sprachstamm. Berlin, 1856, 4to. 

Example of the Chepewyan Tongue, pp cxxix — cxxxii of : Alex. Mackexzie, 

Voyages from Montreal through the Continent of North America 

ZomdoHy Cadell, jun., and Bayis, 1801, 4to, maps, pp. yiii, cxxxii, 412, 2. Reprint, 
pp. 180, 181 — 183 of: Buschmann's Athapaskischer Sprachstamm. JBerlin, 
1856, 4to. 

P. 145 of the Oerman translation printed at Kamburgh, 1802, 8yo. 
Pp. 304 — 310 of the French translation, by Castera. JParis, Dentu, 1807, 
8to. 

Mithridates, YoL III, part 3, p. 424 (from Mackenzie). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, Ko. 821. 

Yocabulaxy after Mackenzie, No. 6 (III) of the Comparaiive Yocabulary of 



36 CII£K£NT£8. 

Fifty-three Natioiis, in A. Oallatin'B Synopsis, etc., pp. 805—367 of VoL II of: 
Arcliseologia Americana. Reprintcnl under M. Ill, 1, p. 105 of the Vocabularies, 
in : Transactions of the American Etlinologicul Society, VoL II. 

PHOFE880B AV. W. TuBNEK (from Mackenzie), Comparative Vocabulary of 
Twenty-five "Words of CliciHJwyan, Hudson's Bay, Dogrib, Umkwa, Hoopah, 
Tacully, Navajo, and Apaclie, pp. 84, 85 of the : Report upon the Indian Tribea, 
added to Lieutenant A. AV. AVliippIe's lleport (A'^ol. II of the : Pacific Bailroad 
Beportd). Washington^ 1855, 4to. 

Vocabulary of the principal Indian Dialects in use among the Tribes in the 
Hudson's Bay Territory— Chippowayan, pp. 323—328 of VoL II of: Jomr 
M*Lean, Notes of a Twenty-five Years* Service in the Hudson's Bay Territory. 
London, B. Bentlcy, 1819, 3 vols. 8vo, pp. 308 and 328. 

J. Ho was. Vocabularies of certain North American Indian Languages — Chepe- 
wyan, I and II ; Beaver, I and 11 ; Sikanni Dialect of New Caledonia (pp. 191 — 198 
of: Proceedings of Philological Society, VoL IV. London, 1854). 

Sir John Bichardson, Arctic Exploring Expedition {London^ 1851) 2 vols. 8vo}, 
contains in Vol. II the following Vocabuluriea : — 

Vocabulary of the Chepewyan Tongue (by Mbs. MThebson), with Gree and 
English Translations, pp. 387 — 395. 

Kutchin and Chepewyan Vocabulary, pp. 382 — 385. 

J. H, Lepeot, a Vocabulary of Cliepewyan and Dogrib Words, pp. 400, 401. 

Mbs. MThebson's Vocabulary reprinted, pp. 174—177, 182, 183 of; Bosch- 
mann, Athapaskischer Sprachstamm. Berlin^ 1856. 4to. 

Chepewyan, compared with Tahcully, Kutchin, Dogrib, Sussee, Tlatikanai, and 
Umpqua (pp* 174 — 222) ; and, compared with the same, the Kinai languages, 
Koloschian, Navajo, and Ticorilla, pp. 269 — 318 of: Buschmanv, Athapaaluscher 
Sprachstamm. Berlin, 1856, 4to. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Grammatical Notices on the Cbippewyan Language, as Athapasca, are given 
by A. Gallatin, pp. 215, 216, 269 (Cheppeyan) of Vol. II of: Arohseologia 
Americana. 

CHERENTES, CHAVANTES. 

Brazilian Indians on the banks of the River Tocantins (and the 
Araguay) — Martius, No. 75, 7Q, Xavantes, Xerentes. They 
are total savages, and hostile to the other tribes of Brazilian 
Indians. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des Ch^rentes ou Xerentes de la Kivi^re de Tocantins, province de Gh}yaz 
(Chavantes). Vocabulaire II, pp. 262—264 of: Castelnau, VoL V, Appendioe, 
and: 



CHEROKEE. 37 

Langue des Cbayantes du Bio Tocantins (dialecte de c^es des Ch^rentes), pro. 
vince de Gojaz. Vocabulaire III, pp. 264—268. Ibid. 



CHEROKEE, CHILAKE. 

The Cherokees, at the beginning of this century, still lived 
south of the Ohio, in sixty-four towns or villages, divided into 
Ottare (Mountain Cherokees) and Ayrate (Ciierokees of the 
Valley). They are now west of Arkansas. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

J. Adaib, History of the American Indians. London^ 1775, 4to, pp. 43, etc. 
German translation — Breslau^ 1782, 8vo. 

SsciTH Barton, Xe\r Tiews, etc. — Comparative Uocabularies. 

T. Say, Yocabularies of Indian Languages, pp. bcx — bmyiii of : Astronomical 
and Meteorological Records and Vocabularies of Indian Languages, taken on the 
Expedition for Exploring the Mississippi and its Western Waters, under the 
command of Major S. H. Long. Philadelphia^ 1822, 8vo. 

LuiGi Castiglioxt, Tiaggio negli Stati Uniti dell* America Settentrionale, fatto 
negli anni 1785, 1786, e 1787. Milano, 1790, 2 vols. 8vo. ToL I, pp. 259—266. 
Chrman translation, by A. M. Petersen. Memmingeny 1793, 2 vols. 8vo ; 
Vol. I, pp. 322—328. 

Annual Report on the Civilization of the Indian Tribes. Kewhaveny 1824, 8vo, 
pp. 58—62. 

No. Vin, 42, of the Comparative Vocabulary of fifty-three nations, pp. 307— 
367 of Vol. II of: Archseologia Americana (by Boitdinot and Worcester). 

Reprinted under B, IX, pp. 82, 84, 86, 88 of the vocabularies in Vol. 11 of: 
Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

: Pp. 398—404 Supplementary Vocabulary in Cherokee (393 Words, by Rev. 
S. A. Worcester) ; and pp. 914 - 420, Select Sentences, ibid, 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 292, 304, 305. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 791. 

The Library of the American Philosophical Society at Philadelphia possesses the 
following MSS., presented to it by Thomas Jefierson : — 
Vocabulary of the Cherokee, by Judge Campbell. 

Vocabulary of the Cherokee ( over Hill) and Choctaw, by Benjamin Hawkins, 
Vocabulary of the Creek, Chicasaw, Cherokee, and Choctaw, by the same. 

Cherokee numerals (1—300 millions) by William Butler. Pp. 209—211, 
Vol. 11. of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 



38 CIIKTIMACIIA. 



OBAMMARS AND QBAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Cherokee Alphabet. Boston, b, a., fulio. 

Jonx Pickering, Bemarks on tlie Indian Languages of North America, s. L, 
1836, 8vo. Reprint of an article in the : Encjclopsedia Americana, VoL YI 
(1831). 

German translation — Ueber die Indianischen Sprachen Amerika*8 iibersetzt 
und mit Annierkungen boglcitct von Talvj (Mbs. Robinson, wife of Dr. Robin- 
son, of New York). Leipzig^ Vogel, 1834, 8vo, pp. viii, 80. (Cherokee, 
pp. 44 — 51, aud note 5, pp. 58 — 72 on Sequoyah's Alphabet.) 

John FiCEESiNa, A Grammar of the Cherokee Language. Boston, Mission 
Press, 1830, 8yo. 

Only fcTur sheets (pp. 9 — ^10) printed ; by the invention of Sequoyah's new 
alphabet, the work was stopped in its further progress. 

Kurre Grammatik der Tseherokesischen Sprache, Von Dr. H. C. voN DEB 
Gabelentz, pp. 257 — 300 of: Hoefer's Zeitschrift. 

Extracts from John Pickering's Qramniar, and answers to grammatical queries, 
by Rev. S. A. Woecester, missionary to the Cherokees, pp. 239 — 250. Cherokee 
Transitions, p. 276; and Notes to the Transitions, pp. 291—294. New Cherokee 
Alphabet, p. 301 of A. GnUatin's Synopsis, etc., in Vol. II of: Archseologia Ame- 
ricana. 

Rev. S. A. Wobcester's Remarks on the Principles of the Cherokee, in answer 
to questions transmitted under the direction of the Bureau of Indian AJBfairs. Pp. 
448—456 of Yol. II of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

Cherokee Primer. Fark Hill, Ark. Mission Press, John Candy, printer, 1840, 
18mo, pp. 24. Reprinted, ibid., 1846, 18mo, pp. 24. 

Cherokee Alphabet, p. 11 j brief specimens of Cherokee Grammatical forms. 
Pp. 12, 13, 30—32, 95, 96, 111, 112, 142—144 of Yol I of: The Cherokee Mes- 
senger (Nos. I — XII, August, 1844, to May, 1846), Cherokee Baptist Mission 
Press, 8vo. 

Cherokee Alphabet, one sheet in piano. Printed at the same press. H. Upham^ 
printer. 

CHETIMACHA. 

Indians of Louisiana. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulaire de la Langue des Chetimachas, pp. 73 — 84 of: J. S. Yateb, 
Analekten der Sprachenkunde. Leipzig, 2" Heft, 2te Haelfte, 1821, 8vo. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 759. 

No. 49, XIV, of the : Comparative Yocabulary of Fifty -three Nations, pp. 305 — 



CHIAFANECAS — CHIMaNO. 39 

367 of A. Gbllatin's Synopsis, etc., in Tol. II of: Archsolo^ Americana 
(from Uuralde), and No. D, XIV, pp. 95 — 97 of ToL II of: Transactions of the 
American Etlmological Society. 

A Vocabulary of the Chetimachas by Mabtin Dubalde. MS. in the Library 
of the American Philosophical Society at Philadelphia. 

CHIAPANECAS. 

Indians of the ]Mexican province of Chiapas. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Fb. de Cbpsda, Artes de las Lenguas Cliiapa, Zoque, Celdales y Cinacanteca 
Mexico, 1560, 4to. 

CHIKKASAS, CHICACHAS. 

Indians of Alabama^ ou the Mobile lliver, now of Arkansas. 
The Conchas of Florida West spoke the same language; also 
the MobUians, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Pp. 38 et seq. in : J. Adaib, History of the American Indians. London, 1775, 
4to,pp. 464. 

Otrman translation — Brestau, 178^ 8to. 

Smith Baston, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 
(Chikkasah, Conchac, Mobilian.) 

Mithridates, VoL III, part 3, pp. 292, 304, 305. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 789. 

No. IX, 44^ of the : Comparatiye Vocabulary of Fifty-three Nations, pp. 305 — 
S67 of A. Gkdlatin's Synopsis in VoL II of: ArchsDologia Americana. (By A. 
Gaiiatik, from a Gbicasa boy.) 

Bekjamdt Baw£IN8, Vocabulary of the Creek, Chickasaw, Cherokee, and 
Choctaw. MS. in the Library of the American Philosophical Society at Phila- 
delphia. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Mithridates, Vol. HI, part 3, pp. 295—302. 

CHIMANO, KULINO, TIKUNA. 

Indian tribes in the southern part of Hyabary, province of 
Solimoes, Brazil. A part of the Chimanos live in the south of 
Nueva Granada^ on the shores of the Putumajo River, and are 
called Tikuna. 



10 CIIIMMKSYAXS— CIIIXUK. 

Will: Its AM) V()('.\ltri..\R1K8. 
Ha Mil, All.!-* KtliiMcrajiluijiii', T.ih. XLT, No. 5;J0. 

CiriMMKSYAXS. 

Indians of the north-west coast, from 53' 30' to 53' 80* north 
hititu(h\ Tlicir hm^na^^c is similar to that spoken by the 
Tacullics or Carriers. 

WORDS AND YOCABULABIXS. 

Vooabulary, by .ToM\ SntrLKii, pp. 231, 233, 235 of: Journal of the Royal 
Qco^jrnpliic'il Soi-icty of London, Vol. XI. London^ 1811, 8to; and 

ir. XX, ]). 103, of till* Vocubularios in Vol. II of: TranBactions of the American 

Ethnological Socirt v. 

CIIIXANTEKA, CIXAKANTEQUA, 

Indians of Oajaca, ^Mexico, in the partidos of Quiecliapa^ Jala- 
log, and Cluiapan. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Fb. de Cepeda, Artcs de las Lenguas Cbiapa, Zoque, Celdales y Oinaoanteoa. 
Mexico, 15G0, 4to. 

CniNUK. 

Indians of Oregon, on the right bank of the Columbia River. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

C. S. BAFi>T:sQrE, Atlantic Journal and Friend of Knowledge. Philadelphia, 
1832, 1833, 8vo, p. 134. 

Gabb. Fbanchebe, Eclation d'un Voyage k la C6te Nord-ouest de rAm^rique 
septentrionale dans les anndcs 1810—1814. Montreal, 1820, 8vo. 

English translation, by J. V. Huntington — New York, Kedfidd, 1854^ 
12mo ; and in A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc., Appendix, Miscellaneous Vocabu- 
laries, No. XXVIII, 63, p. 379 of Vol. II of: Archajologia Americana. 

Journal of the Royal Geographical Society of London, Vol. XI. London, 1841| 
8vo, pp. 243—245, 247 : Vocabulary, by John Scoulbb, M.D. 

Tshinuk Words ; see Vocabularies of North-western America in : HoBATio 
Hale's Ethnography and Philology of the United States Exploring Expedition. 
Philadelphia, Lea and Blanchard, 1810, 4to, pp, 569—629. 



CHIPPEWAY. 41 

Hale, 1. c, mentions two dialects of Chinuk— 

Wailala (or Upper Chinooks), divided into Watlala proper (Cascade 
Indians) and Nihaloitih (Beheloots) ; and Chinool't proper, diyided into 
Tshinuk, Tlatsap (Clatsops), and Wakaikams (W'ahkyecums). 

See also pp. 636 — 650 of the above work for a Yocabularj of, and Treatise 
on, the ** Tshinuk" jargon, or Trade Language. 

The Tschinuk (Watlala) Vocabulary of the aV>ove work (R) is reprinted 
under U, XXYI, p. 121, of the : Transactions of the American Ethnological 
Society, Vol. II. 

The Chiuuk Vocabulary (Q) of the same work is reprinted under O, 
XXVI, pp. 89, 91, 93, 95, ibid. 

Words used in the Chinook Jargon, pp. 147 — 152 of: Joel Palmer, Journal of 
Travels over the Bocky Mountains to the Mouth of the Columbia Biyer, made 
during the years 1845 and 1846, containing .... also .... about 300 Words of 
the Chinook Jargon .... CinciniuUiy P. A. and H. P. James, 1847, 12mo, pp. 189. 

A short Vocabulary of the Clatsop Dialect. See pp. 343, 344 of : Ten Years in 
Oregon, by D. Lee and F. H. Fbost, late of the Oregon Mission of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. New York^ 1844, 12mo. 

Vocabulary of the Chenook Language, as spoken about Fort Vancouyer, pp. 
336 — 338 of: Bey. Samuel Pabeeb, Journal of an Exploring Tour beyond the 
Bocky Mountains. JifAoca, New York, 1838, 12mo. 

Chinook Vocabulary (Appendix), pp. 342 — 349 of: ALEXAin)EB Ross, Adven- 
tures of the First Settlers on the Oregon or Columbia River; being a Narrative of 
the Expedition fitted out by John Jacob Astor, to establish the Pacific Fur 
Company ; with an Account of some Indian Tribes on the Coast of the Pacific* 
IiOfuh», Smith, Elder, and Co., 1849, 12mo, map, pp. 352. 
(P. 349, Words of the Chinook Jargon.) 

Vocabulary of the Chinook Trade Jargon, in Note 1 (pp. 548—551) to the 
article, "Philosophy of Utterance," pp. 543 — 551 in Vol. V of: Schoolobapt's 
Indian Tribes of the United States. 

(Some further reports on this jargon are expected at Washington.) 

qrammabs and qbahhatical notices. 

pp. 562—564 of: HoBATio Hale's Ethnography and Philology of the United 
States Exploring Expedition. Philadelphia, Lea and Blanchard, 1847, 4to. Be- 
printed on pp. 56 — 58 of: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, 

Vol. n. 

Pp. 635—646 of: Hale's Ethnography, etc. Article headed—" The Jargon, or 
Trade Language of Oregon." Reprinted (partly) on pp. 62 — 70 of the : Transac'^ 
tions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

CHIPPEWAY, OJIBWAY. 

The principal dialect of the great Algonquin stock. The 
eastern Chippeways are called Sauteux, or Ojibois. 

Q 



42 CHIPPEWAY. 



WORDS AND V0CABULARIK8. 

Langue des Chippewajs, pp. 521, 522, of Yol. VIII of: Cottbt de Gebbldt, 
Monde Primitif. Paris, 1772, 4to. 

A short Yooabulaiy of the Chippeway Language, in : Jonathan Caryxb, Three 
Years' TraToh through the Interior Farts of North America, for more than Five 

Thousand Miles, containing an Accoi^nt of the Great Lakes, 

with a concise History of the Genius, Manners and Customs of the Lidians 
inhabiting the lands that lie adjacent to the Heads and to the Westward of the 

Great Riyer Mississippi London, 1778, 4to, map aud phites, pp. 544 (the 

Vocabulary, pp. 420 and following). Second edition, London, 1779, 8vo. Reprinted 
at Duhlin, 1779, Sto. Third edition (by Dr. T. B. Lettsom), with an Account of 
the Author. London^ 1781, Sto. Reprinted at Philadelphia in 1789, 8yo. 
Another Philadelphia reprint, by Joseph Cruikshank, 1789, 12mo, pp. ivi, 282. 
(The Vocabulary on pp. 215 — 223.) A third Philadelphia edition, by Key and 
Simpson, 1796, 12mo. (The Vocabulary on pp. 393 — 405.) A Boston edition^ 
1797, 12mo; and one printed at Charlestoton, Massachusetts, 1802, 12mo. 
Reprinted again under the title : J. Cabyeb's Travels in Wisconsin, from the 
third London edition. New York, Harpers, 1838, 8yo, map and plates, pp. 376. 

French translation, by M. de Montucla. Paris, 1784, 8yo. 

Oerman translation — Hamburg, 1780, 8yo (the Vocabulary on pp. 350 and 
following). 

J. LoNa, Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader, describing 

the Manners and Customs of the North American Indians to which is 

added, a Vocabulary of the Chippeway Language and a Table, showing 

the Analogy between the Algonkin and Chippeway Languages. London, Debrett, 
Egerton, and Co., 1791, 4to. 

The English and Chippeway Vocabulary, pp. 218 — 295 ; the Comparative 
Vocabulary, pp. 184 — 211. (A. Gallatin calls this " Eastern Chippeway.") 

Oerman translation — Samhurg, 1791, 8vo. 
Smith Babton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

B. D. (Baudby des Loziebes), Voyage ^ la Louisiane et sur le Continent de 
TAm^rique septentrionale, fait dans les ann6cs 1794 k 1798. Paris, Dentu, 
1802, 8vo. (The Vocabulary on pp. 353 and following.) 

Pbofessob T. Say, Comparative Vocabulary of Various Dialects of the Lennape 
Stock of North American Indians (Forty-five Words in Fifteen Dialects, among 
them Chippeway). Pp. 135 — 145 of: De. Edwaeds' Observations on the Mohe- 
gan Language, published by John Pickering, in Vol. X of the second series of: 
Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Boston, Phelps and Famham, 
1823, 8vo. Reprinted at Boston, by Little and Brown, 1843, Svo. 

Annual Report on the Civilization of Indian Tribes. Newhaven, 1824, Svo, 
pp. 55—57. 

Indian Vocabularies— Chippeway or Chippewa. Part 4, pp. 449—459, of the 



CHIPPEWAY. 43 

Appendix to YoL II of: Will. H. Keatikg, Narrative of an Expedition to the 
Source of the St. Peter's Rirer, Lake Winnepeck, Lake of the Woods, etc. etc., 

performed in the year 1823 under the command of Stephen H. Long. 

Philadelphia^ Carey and Lea, 1824, 2 vols. 8to, map and plates. Reprinted at 
London^ by Whittaker, 1825, 2 yols. 8vo. 

Vocabulary of the Algic, or Chippeway Language, pp. 487 — 493 of the Appendix 
to : Thokas L. McKennet, Sketches of a Tour to the Lakes, of the Character 
«nd Customs of the Chippeway Indians, and of Incidents connected with the 
Treaty of Fond du Lac ; also, a Vocabulary of the Algic, or Chippeway Language, 
formed in part, and, as far as it goes, upon the basis of one furnished by the Hon. 
Albert Qallatin. Baltimore^ Fielding Lucas, 1827, 870, plates, pp. 494. 

Ojibway Words and Phrases, pp. 399 — 418 of: Da. Edwin James, A Narratiye 
of the Captiyity and Adventures of John Tanner, United States Interpreter at the 
"Saiit de St. Marie, during Thirty Years' Residence among the Indians. New York, 
Caryill, 1830, Svo, plates, pp. 426 (pp. 294-312, 399—417). 

. Hbitby R. Schoolobaft, a Vocabulary of Words and Phrases in the Chippe- 
way Language (comprising the Letters A and B, and stating at the end that cir- 
bumstances prevented the insertion of the remainder of this Vocabulary), on 
pp. 203 — 210 of his : Narrative of an Expedition through the Upper Mississippi 
to Itaska Lake, the actual Source of this River. New York, Harpers, 1834^ 8vo, 
maps, pp. 307. 

Words under IV, 8, of: Comparative Vocabulary of Fifty-three Nations, in 
A. Ghdlatin's Synopsis in : Arohseologia Americana, VoL II,'pp. 305—367. Re- 
printed under A, IV, pp. 78, 80, 82, of VoL II of: American Ethnological 
iSociety's Transactions. (From Schoolcraft, James, and Keating.) 

Eastern Chippeways, under IV (e) of the : Comparative Vocabulary of Sixteen 
Tribes. Ibid,, pp. 369 (from J. Long). Reprinted under N, IV, 3, p. 107 of the 
Vocabularies in : American Ethnological Society's Transactions, Vol. II, pp. 414^ 
416. Ibid. "Select Sentences." 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 415, 416 (from Cabyeb, Long, and Bavdby 
Dis Lozi^Es). 

BaIiBI, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 818 (Chippeway propre on 
Ochippeway). 

Reise des Psinzbn Maximilian ztt Wied in das Innere Nord Amerika's 
in den Jahren 1832 bis 1834. Coblenz^ Hoelscher, 1838-1841, 2 vols. 4to, Vol. 
II, pp. 592—599. 

Translated into French, JParis, Bertrand, 1843, 3 vols. 8vo. 

Sauteu or Ogibois Vocabulary (Eastern Chippeways), in the Vocabulary of the 
Principal Indian Dialects in use among the Tribes in the Hudson's Bay Territory, 
pp. 823—328 of VoL II of: John M'Lean, Notes of a Twenty-five Years' Service 
^ the Hudson's Bay Territory. London, Bentley, 1849, 2 vols. 12mo. 

RsT, M. HsOKEWELDEB, Comparative Vocabulary of Lenni-Lennape proper. 



I 



44 CllIPPEWAV. 

the Miusi Dialect, the Mahicanni, Natick, or Nadic Ghippeway, Shawano, and 
Nanticoke. MS. in the Library of the American Philosophical Society at Phila- 
delphia. 

Numerals of— I. Ojibvray of Chegoimegon, by William W. "Wabeeit (1— 
billion, and 1—10 in the Pillagers, or Northern Ojibway Tongue), pp. 211 
— 213. II. Chippewa of the Up))cr Mississippi, by M. Faikbanes (1 — 100,000), 
pp. 216—218. And Ojibway (Vocabulary), Analytical Forms, with Comments, 
pp. 412—416, 417—419 of: Schoolcbaft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 
Vol. III. 

Vocabularies I, Algonquin Group. Ojibwa of St. Mary's, by G. JoHiTBTOir; 
Ojibwa of Grand Traveno Bay, by Rev. P. DoroHKETY ; Ojibwa of Saganaw, by 
G. MoEAN ; Ojibwa of Michilimackinac, by W. Johnston, on pp. 458 — 469 of 
Vol. II of : Schoolcraft*s Indian Tribes of the United States. 

Bey. Feed. Babaqa, A Dictionary of the Otchipwe Language, explained in 
English. This language is spoken by the Chippewa Indians, as also by the Otawas, 
Potawatamies, and Algonquins, with but slight differences. For the use of mis- 
sionaries, etc. Cincinnati, printed by Jos. E. Ilecmann, 1853, 12mo, pp. yii, 662. 

Comparative Vocabulary of Pamptico, Natic, and Chippewa (ef Michigan), 
pp. 556, 557 of Vol. V of : Schoolcbaft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

A Lexicon of the Algonquin Language, part 1, Chippewa, A, pp. 565 — 569. Ibid* 

Comparative Chippewa and Mahican Vocabulary of Twenty-two Words, p. 620; 
Hid, 

GRAMMARS AMD GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Edwin James, Outline of the Paradigma of a Chippeway Vocabulary .... 
8. a Albany, folio. 

A. Bingham, Ojibwa Spelling-book, according to the improved orthography of 
Edwin James. Albany, 1825, 8vo. 

Heney a. Schoolcbaft, Two Lectures on the Chippewa Substantive. Pp. 
169 — 202 of: Narrative of an Expedition .... to Itasca Lake. New York, 
Harpers, 1834, 8vo, map, pp. 307. 

Part of a course of Lectures on the Grammatical Structure of the Indian 
Languages, delivered before the St. Mary's Committee of the AJgic Society. 
The continuation of these lectures (Lectures III and IV) is published in: 

Heney A. Schoolcbaft, Oneota, or the Ked Race of America Now 

York, Burges, Stringer, and Co., 1844-45, 1 vol. (Nos. 1 — 8) 8vo, pp. 512 
(pp. 93—104, 221—232) . 

Gallattdet, Picturo-definer and Beadmg-book. Boston, Crocker and Brewster, 
for the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 1835, 12mo, pp. 
123. 

Ojibwa Spelling-book, designed for the use of native learners. Printed for the 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. Boston, Crocker and 
Brewster, 1835, 12mo, second edition, pp. 127. Third edition, %bid.y 1846, 12mO| 
pp. 96. 



CHIQUITOS. 45 

Ghippewaj Noung (from Schoolchapt's Lectures), pp.244 — 248 of: A. Qtd- 
latin*8 Synopsis, etc., in Vol. II of : Archseologia Americana. Chippewa Tran- 
sitioDs, ibid,, p. 289. 

Bet. G. a. Belcotjbt, Principes de la Langue des Saurages appeles Sauteux. 
QueheCf imprimerio de Frechette and Co., 1839, 12mo, pp. 146. 

A Chippeway Primer, compiled by the Key. Peter Douohebtt. Printed for 
the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church. New York, John 
Westall, 1844, 12mo, pp. 44. Second edition, ibid., 1847, 12mo, pp. 123. 

Short Reading Lessons in the Ojibway Language, translated by the Bey. Peteb 
DouGHEBTT. New York, John Westall and Co., 1847, 12mo. 

Joseph Howse, A Grammar of the Crce Language, with which is combined an 
Analysis of the Chippeway Dialect. London, Bivington, 1844, 8vo, pp. xx, 324. 

Eownr James, M.D., Essay on the Chippeway Language. Bead before the 
American Lyceum, at the third annual meeting, in the city of New York, May Srd, 
1833, pp. 73—80 of No. V of: The North American Savages (September, 1835), 
8yo. 

Bet. Feed. BABAaA, missionary at L*Ance, Lake Superior, A Theoretical and 
Practical Grammar of (he Otchipwe Language. Detroit, printed by Jabez Fox, 
1851, 12mo, pp. 576. 

The Transitions called " Chippeway," in : J. S. Vateb, Analekten der 
Sprachkmide. Leipzig, 1821, 8vo. Heft 2, pp. 15—20, are " Delaware." 

Bev. Thomas Htjelbut, A Memoir on the Inflections of the Chippewa Tongue. 
Pp. 383—396 of Vol. IV of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

Conjugation of the Verb " Waub." See pp. 291 — 388 of : Schoolcbaft's Indian 
Tribes of the United States. 

Original Words of Indian Songs literally translated. Chippewa. Pp. 559— 
664^ ibid. 

Etymology (Chippewa), pp. 593—600, ibid. 

Some Data respecting the Principles of the Chippewa and Mahican Languages, 
in a series of letters written durmg the years from 1822—1827. Chippewa. Pp. 
601—618, ibid. 



CHIQUITOS. 

In South America, on the Upper Paraguay, between the Chaco 
and Brazil. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Gilii, Saggio, etc., Vol. Ill, pp. 244—2^18, 334j— 339 (from the MS. notices of 
Padbs Cahano). 

Hebvas, Vocabokrio, pp. 163 et seq. 



46 CHOCTAW. 

Hebtas, Origine, pp. 27, 29, 87, 41, 44, 48, Tabb. XLIX, L, LI. 

Hebtas, Saggio, pp. 99—101. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 551, 570. 

Balbi, Atlas Etlinograpliique, Tab. XLI, No. 463. 

Vocabulary of Twenty-three "Words. Vol. I, p. 164, of : Alcide D^OBBiaNY, 
L*Homme Am^ricaiu. PariSf 1839, 2 toIs. 8to. Vol. II, p. 136, three words of 
the Cuciquia dialect. 

Vocabulaire, No. XIV, Langue des Chiquitos, in : Fb. se Castelnau, Exp^- 
tion, VoL V, Appcndico, pp. 286—288. 

Vocabiilnrio de la Lengua Chiquita. Parte 1* : Espauol y Chi4uito. 1 voL 4to, 
of nearly 700 pages. Parte 2'^ : Chiquito y Espafiol del Pueblo de S. Xavier (where 
it was composed by the Jesuits). One Tol. folio, of about 700 pages, two columns 
on every page. MS. in the possession of M. Alcide D'Orbigny. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

GiLiJ, Saggio, Vol. Ill, pp. 244-248, 334-339. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp 559—563. 

D'Obbigny, L'Homme Americain, Vol. I, pp. 134—136 ; VoL II, pp. 161 — 
163, and p. 180 (Curuminaca tribe), p. 182 (Covareca tribe), p. 184 (Curay^ tribe), 
p. 185 (Tapiis tribe). 

CHOCTAW, CHAHTAH. 

Indians of the Appalachian stock. Their language is closely 
related to those of the Chikasas and of the Muskoghees. The 
French in Louisiana used the Choctaw language for their com- 
munications with other Indian tribes. They live now west of 
Arkansas. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES, 

Lttigi Castiglioni, Viaggio negli Stati Uniti dell' America settentrionale, etc 
Milano, 1790, 2 vols. 8yo (Vol. I, pp. 259—266). 

Qerman translation by A. M. Petersen. Memmingen^ Seiler, 1793, Svo 
(pp. 322—328). 

Smith Babton, New Views— Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 292, 298, 304, 305. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XI, No. 790. 

Choctaw Numerals, by John Deennen, United States Agent, pp. 204 — 206 of 
Vol. II. of : Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

Some Words from the Language of the Choctaws (18, of which 14 are numerals), 
by Lewis Bbantz, 1785, p. 347 of Vol. Ill of the same work. 



ciioLo. 47 

No. JX, 43, of the: Comparative Vocabulary (pp. 307 — 367) to A. Q-allatin*8 
Synopsis in Vol. II of: Archeeologia Americana (from Wright's Spelling-book), 
and : Chocta Vocabulary, by Alfbed Weight, ihid.f pp. 371—396. Also : Com- 
paratiye Vocabulary of the Chocta and Muskoghee (97 words out of 600 which 
have certain affinities), ibid., pp. 405, 406. 

No. IX, 43, reprinted as B, X 1, pp. 82, 84, 86, 88, of the Vocabularies in 
Vol. II. of : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. The com- 
paratiye vocabulary, ibid.y p. cxii. 

MS. Vocabularies of the Cherokee (over Hill) and Choctaw ; and of the Creek, 
Chickasaw, Cherokee, and Choctaw — both by Benjamin Hawuks — are in the 
Library of the, American Philosophical Society at Philadelphia. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Mithridates, Vol. HI, part 3, pp. 300—302 (from Adaie, pp. 38, 39, 41, 44, 
68, 70—73). 

A Spelling-book written in the Chahtah Language, with an English translation. 
Second edition, revised. Cincinnati, printed by Morgan, Dodge, and Fisher, 1827, 
8vo. 

Chahta Holisso. Boston, Crocker and Brewster, for the American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 1830, 12mo, pp. 108. Third edition, revised, 
ibid., 1835, 12mo, p. 72. 

Chahta Holisso, it im Anumpuli ; or, the Choctaw Beader. For the use of 
native schools. Union, printed for the American Board of Commissioners for 
Foreign Missions, by John F. Wheeler, 1836, 12mo, p. 123. 

CrBrs Byington, An English and Choctaw Definer for the Choctaw Academies 
and Schools .... 18mo, pp. 252. Neto York, 1852. 

Cybvs Btinqton, Choctaw Vocabulary, pp. 62 — 64 of the : Report upon the 
Indian Tribes, added to Lieutenant A. W. Whipple's Report in Vol. II of: 
Pacific Railroad Reports. Washington, 1855, 4to. 

CHOLO, CHOCO. 

Indians of Nueva Granada, from the Gulf of San Miguel to 
the Bay of Choco, and thence, with a few interruptions, to the 
northern parts of Equador. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Cholo Vocabulary, by De. Edward Cullen ; and Comparison of the Cholo 
with the Languages of the Oronoco, by Dr. R. G-. Latham, p. 190 of part 2 of 
VoL XX of: Journal of the Royal Geographical Society. London, John Murray, 
1851, 8to. 

Pp. 179 — 181 of: Berthold Seem an. The Aborigines of the Isthmus of 
PlMiama, in : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. in, p. 1. 



48 CIIONDAL — CHOW-E-SIIAK. 



CHONDAL. 

Language spoken by the Indians of Chontales, on the northern 
shores of the Lake of Nicaragua. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

E. Geo. Sqttier, Nicaragua New Torky Appleton, 1852, 2 vols. 8vo. 

Vol. II, pp. Sl-l, 32]', 325 (from Jul. Fboebel), and: Transactions of the 
American Ethnological Society, Vol. Ill, part 1, pp. 101, 106 — 110. 

CHOROTEGANS. 

Indians of Nicaragua to the north of the Mexican inhabitants 
of Nicaragua (the Niquirans), between the Pacific Ocean, La'ke 
Managua, and the Gulf of Fonseca. They are divided into — 
Chorotegans proper, or Dirians ; Nagrandans^ in the plain of 
Leon j and OrotinanSy in the district of Guanacaste. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

E. G-EO. Squieb, Nicaragua New York, Appleton, 1852, 2 vols. Sro. 

Vol. II, pp. 320 — 333, Dirian from Maeaya ; and : Transactions of the American 
Ethnological Society, Vol. Ill, part 1, pp. 101, 106—110. 

CHORTI. 

On the banks of the Motagua, in Guatemala. A language 
related to the Maya and Poconchi. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A short Vocabulary, taken by John L. Stephens, at Zacapa, is given in; 
JL. Gallatin's Notes on the Semi-civilized Nations of Mexico. (Vol. I of: Trans* 
actions of the American Ethnological Society.) New York, Bartlett and Welford, 
1845, Bto, pp. 9, 10. 

CHOW-E-SHAK. 

Indians of north-western California, on the head of Eel River. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Geoegb Gibbs, Vocabulary, Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States, 
Vol. in, pp. 434—440. 



CHUNTAQUIROS COCHIMI. 49 



CHUNTAQUIllOS, PIEOS. 

Brazilian ludians in the neighbourhood of Santa Rosa^ in the 
province of Goyaz. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Laiigue des Chuntaquiros ou Piros (Simisencbis) du Yillage de Santa Rosa. 
Vocabulary, No. XVII, pp. 290, 291 of: Castelnau, Vol. V, Appendice. 

CINALOA, OR SINALOA. 

According to Hervas, three languages were spoken by the Indians 
of the Mexican State of Cinaloa — the Tubar, the Zoe, and the 
Hiaqui, which latter was the principal one. De Souza mentions : 
Arte de la Lengua Principal de Cinaloa, por P. Luis Bonifaz. 
BoNiFAZ was missionary to the Indians of Cinaloa, between the 
years 1602 and 1644. He died in the latter year at Valladolid, 
in Michoacan; but probably left his MSS. in some of the reli- 
gious establishments of the city of Mexico. 

COBEU. 

Indians on the Amazon. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary (of Ninety-eight Words), pp. 521—541 of: Alfred R. Wallace, 
A Narrative of Travels on the Amazon and Kio Negro. London^ Reeve and Ck)., 
1853, 8vo. 

COCANAS. 

Brazilian Indians on the Upper Amazon (Cocuannas of Mar- 
Tius? No. 224). 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des Cocanas de Nauta. Vocabulaire, No. XIX, pp. 293, 294 of: 
Castblnaxt, Vol. V, Appendice. 

COCHIMI. 

Indians of Upper California, near the Mission St. Xaverio. 
Belated to the Laymons. 

H 



50 COCOMARICOPAS — COCONUCOS. 

WOKDS AND VOCABULAUIES. 

IIertas, Yocabolario Poliglotto, p. 161 et scq. 

nEBYAS, Aritmetioa, p. 113. 

Heevas, Saggio, pp. 125, 233—237 (Dialect of St. (Jertrudis). 

Hebyas, Origiue, Tub. L ct scq. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 185, 198, 199, Cochimi and Cochimi-Lajmon 
of the Missions S. Xaverio and Jos. Comandu ; S. Borgia and S. Gertrudis (from 
Heeyas). 

Balbi, Atlas Etbnograpliique, Tub. XLI, No. 826. 

A. FoEBES, History of California. London^ 1839, 8to. 

grammars and grammatical notices. 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 192—198. 

COCOMARICOPAS. 

Indians of Sonora, near the River Gila. 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 

Sbort Vocabulary (Apacbe ?), collected by Lieutenant Emoey, p. 109 of VoL 
II of : American Ethnological Society's Transactions. 

A Vocabulary of the Cocomaricopa Language has been taken by John B. Babt- 
LETT, the United States Boundary Commissioner. 

Cocomaricopa Vocabulary, by Lieutenant A. W. Whipple, p. 94 of the 
Report upon the Indian Tribes ; added to his Keport on the Boute near the 36th 
Parallel, in Vol. II of : Pacific Bailroad Bcports. Washington^ 1865, 4to. 

COCONUCOS. 

Indians of the province of Cudinamarca in Nueva Granada. 
The Polindaras and Guambias arc kindred tribes. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Notices and some Words of the Coconucos, Polindaras, and Guambias, given on 
pp. 43 — 45 of: Tommaso C. de Mosqueea, Memoria Sobre la GhK>grafia Fisica 
y Politica de la Nueva Granada. Nuevo YorJc^ imprenta de J. W. Benedict, 
1852, 8vo. 

English translation, by Theodore Dwight. Ihid,^ 8to. 



COCOPAS — COMANCHES. 5 1 



COCOPAS. 

Indians of Sonora, between the Rio Gila and the Gulf of Cali- 
fornia. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A Yocabulaiy has been taken by Jomr B. Bartlett, United States Boundary 
Commissioner. 

COMANCHES. 

Indians of Texas, belonging to the great Shoshonee or Snake 
family. They range from the sources of the Brazos and Colorado, 
rivers of Texas, over the great Prairies, to the waters of the 
Arkansas and the mountains of Rio Grande. They are also 
called Hietans, Jetans, and Paducas. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Comanche Names and Numerals, on pp. 273, 274 of: Wic. Bollasrt's Ob- 
servations on the Indian Tribes in Texas, in Vol. II of : Journal of the Ethno- 
logical Society of London. lA>ndon^ 1850, 8vo. 

Dr. Heinbich Bebghaus, Uber die Yerwandtschaft der Schoschonen, Komant- 
schen und Apachen, in : FhysikaUscher Atlas ; Geographisches Jahrbuch, 1851. 
N. ILL ChthOy Justus Perthes, 4to, pp. 48 — 62, map. Vocabulary, pp. 
51—53. 

Captaik B. B. Marot, Yocabularies of Words in the Languages of the Coman- 
ches and Witchitas. Appendix H, pp. 273 — 276 of : Randolph B. Marcy and Geo. 
B. M'Clellan, Exploration of the Bed Biver of Louisiana, in the year 1852. Wash' 
ington, Nicholson, public printer, 1854, 8to. (33rd Congr., 1 Sess., House Exec 
Doc.) 

Comanche Vocabulary, by Bob. S. Neighbors, Esq., pp. 494 — 505 of Vol. II 
of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

Bob. S. Neighbors, The Na-ii-ni or Comanche of Texas ; their Traits and 
Beliefs, and their Divisions and Intertribal Belations. Ihid.^ pp. 125—134. 
(Comanche Numeration, pp. 129, 130.) 

Comanche Vocabulary, taken from Jesse Chisholm, a Cherokee, by LiErTENANT 
A. W. Whipple, pp. 71—76 of the Beport upon the Indian Tribes ; added to 
his Beport on the Boute near the 33th Parallel, in Vol. U of: Pacific Bailroad 
Beports. Washington, 1855, 4to. 

A Comanche Vocabulary has been collected by John B. Bartlett, the United 
States Boundary Commissioner. 



52 CONX'HO— CORA. 



CONCHO. 

A dialect of the Mexican language. Bishop Juan Espinoza, 
Franciscan, of the province of Zacatccas (Mexico), and Bishop 
of Santiago de Chile, wrote, according to Arlegui and De Souza : 
Arte y Vocabulario completo del Idioma Concho. 

CONIBOS. 

Indians of the Pampa del Sacramento, on the left banks of the 
Ucayale. 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

Words, pp. 286 and 292 of: Indiens Conibos, par M. de Saint Cbicq, pp. 274 
—295 of Tome YI of the fourth series of: Bulletin de la Soci^t^ de Gfeographie. 
Farisj A. Bcrtrand, 1853, Bvo. 

COPEH. 

Indians of north-western California, at the Putor Creek. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Geobge Gibbs, Vocabulary in: Schoolcraft's Indian Xribos of the United 
States, VoL III, pp. 428—434. 

CORA. 

Indians of New Mexico, near the Missions of Najarit. Their 
language resembles very much the Mexican. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

P. Jos. DE OsTEai, Vocabulario en Lengua Castellana y Cora. Mexico, 1732, 
4to. Fifty-two leaves. 

Heevas, Vocabolario Foliglotto, pp. 161 et seq. 

Hebvas, Saggio, p. 121. 

Heevas, Aritmetica, pp. Ill — 113. 

Hebvas, Origine, pp. 29, 37, 41, 44, 45, 48, 49, 118, 120, 121, 178, Tabb. XLIX, 
L, LI et seq. (Gives also Nayarit words.) 

J. S. Yater, Proben, etc. Leipzig, 1816, 8vo, pp. 353—373. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 703. 



COROADOS — COSTANOS. 53 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Doctrina Cristiana, Oraciones, Confesonario, Arte y Vocabulario de la Lengua 
Cora, por P. Jose Ortega. Printed by tlie Bishop of Guadalaxara, Sr. Don 
Nicolas Gomez de Cerrantes, 1729. 

Vocabulario del P. Joseph de Obtega. Mexico^ 1732, 8to. Tho preface 
contains grammatical notices. 

Mithridates, Vol. HI, part 2, pp. 131—138. 

COROADOS, COROPOS. 

Two Indian tribes on the banks of the rivers Paraiba and 
Pomba, in the Brazilian provinces Kio de Janeiro and Miuas 
Geraes. 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 

EscHWEGE, Journal fur Brasilien. Weimar^ 1818, 8to, 1* Heft. 
Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, Nos. 1:98, 499. 

CORREGUAJES. 

Indians of the New Granadian territory of Mocoa (formerly 
departamento del Assuai). 

WORDS AND VOCABULAKIES. 

Vocabulario Correguaje Espaiiol. Taken by the Presbytero Mantjel Mabta 
AxBis, in 1854. Pp. 21 — 24 of : Los Indios del Andaqui. Fopat/an, 1855, 16mo. 

COSTANOS. 

Califomian Indians on the Bay of San Francisco, and formerly 
under the supervision of the Mission Dolores. There were five 
tribes : Ah-tcash-tes, OUhones (called, by the Spaniards, Cos- 
tanoSy or, Indians of the coast), Al-tah-moSy Ro-mo-nanSy and 
Tu'lo-mos, A few other small tribes round the Bay speak the 
same language. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Costanos Vocabidary, by Pedro Alcantaea, in ; Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes 
of the United States, Vol. II. Languages, Miscellaneous Vocabularies, pp. 494 — 
505, and Note, p. 506. 



54 COSTA RICA — CREOLE. 



COSTA RICA, TALAMANCA. 

Many Indian tril);*3 inhabit Costa Rica, and especially the part 
tlicreof bordering on the Atlantic, the so-called district of Tala- 
manca. Galixuo names six, Juarros twenty -six different 
triljcs and nations. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Dr. Karl Scherzek, Spraclic dor wiklon Indiancrst&mme dcr Blancoe, Yalientes 
und TulnmaiioAs ontlnng der Ostkilsto zwitfc'hen deni Hio Zent und Bocca del Toro 
im St ante Costa Rica. Pp. 28—35 of VoL XXV of: Sitzangsberiohte der 
Philosophisoh-IIistorisclien Klasse der Konigliohen Akadomie der Wissenschaften. 
Tlenna, 1855, 8\'o. Also, with separate title : Spraclien der Indianer CeDtral 
Amerika's. Vienna^ 1855, 8vo, pp. 11. 

Also, pp. 573-576 of: Die Republik Costa Rica in Central Ameriks mit 
besondercr Beriieksichtigung der NaturvLThaltnisso und dcr Frage der Deutschen 
Aiiswandcrung und Colonisation. Beisestudien und Skizzen aus der Jahren 1858, 
1854, von Dr. Moritz Wagker und Dr. Karl Scheezer. Leipzig, 1855, 8vo. 

CREOLE 

Is the general name given in the West Indies to Negro corrup- 
tions of European languages. Thus the Negroes of Surinam^ 
originally an English colony, speak Creole, or Negro-English ; 
those of Guadaloupe and Martinique, French colonies, Negro- 
French, etc. ; and, consequently, the following divisions naturally 
present themselves : — Negro-English, Negro- Portuguese ^ Negro- 
Dutch, Negro- Spanish, Negro-French, 

L NEaRO-ENGLISII— 



Called, by the Negroes, ^^ Ningre-tongo,^ ^^ Ningre^^ and also 
^^ Bakra^' — is the language used by the Negroes among them- 
selves in the Dutch colony of Surinam, and with their European 
masters. The language is not now what it originally was, viz., 
a broken or corrupted English, but it has expanded into a 
Negro-English-Dutch language. Its general structure is English, 
and very many words are of English origin ; but those words 
which in course of time were superadded, with the new ideas they 
were meant to express, are not taken from the English, but the 
Dutch language, from which the Negro-English recruits itself 



CREOLE. 55 

constantly ; whilst many words, originally English, liave fallen 
into disuse, and been supplanted by corresponding Dutch ones. 
The Moravians have had a mission among the Negroes of 
Surinam for the last century. Their translation of the New 
Testament into Negro-English was first printed in 1829, and 
again in 1846. 

WORDS AND VOCABULAKIES. 

C. L. Schumann, Neger-Engliscli iind Deutsches Woerterbuch. Editio tertia, 
1783. 

MS. in the possession of the Moravians of Paramaribo. 

H. C. FoCKE, Neger Engelsch Woordenboek. Let/den, P. H. v. d. Heuyel, 1855, 
8vo, pp. xiii, 160. 

Deutsoh-Neger-Engliscbes Worterbuch. Nebst einem Anhang Neger-Englischo 
Spruchworter enthaltend, yon H. R. Wullschlaeqel. Lobau, 1856, 8to, pp. x, 
340. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Pp. 257, 258 of Vol. II of: Captain J. G. Stedman's Narrative of a Five 
Years' Expedition against the Kevolted Negroes of Surinam. 2 vols. 4to, London^ 
1796. 

Gemeenzame Leerwyze over het Bastard og Neger-Englisch op een gemakelyke 
Wyze te leeren verstaan en sprecken. Door Qt, C. W. Faramariho^ 1798, 12mo, 
pp. 150. 

Page 117 of: Count AiiBEBt ton Sack's Beschreibung einer Keise nach Suri- 
nam, etc. 1 vol. 4to, Berlin^ 1821. 

C(rammatical Remarks on Negro-English, in an article on the Negro-English 
New Testament in : Edinburgh Christian Instructor, Dec., 1829. 

A. Philological Analysis of the Negro-English Language, in : Wm. Gbeenfield's 
Defence of the Surinam Negro-English Version of the New Testament, etc. Lon' 
dom, Bagster, 1830, 8vo, pp. 80. 

A. Helmig van deb Vegt, Proeve eener handleiding om het Neger-Engelsch, 
zoo ab hetzelve over het allgemeen binnen de Kolonie Svirinam gesprokeu word. 
Aauierdam, 1844, 8vo. 

Kurzgefasste Neger-Englische Grammatik, von H. B. Wullschlaegel. Saut' 
ten^ gedruckt bey Ernst Moritz Monse, 1854, 8vo, pp. 67. 

H. B. WuiiLSCHi»AEQEL, Jets ovcr de Neger-Engelsche Taal en de Bijdragen tot 
hare Ontwikkeling en Literatuur, door de Zendelingen der Evangelische Breeder- 
gemeente geleverd. ParamaribOy 1854. Pp. 286 — 295 of; West Indie, Bijdragen 
tot de Bevordering van de Kennis der Nederlandsch West Indische Kolonien 
Eerste Deel. Saarlemy 1855, Svo. 



56 CREOLE. 



II. NEGHlO-POETUaUESE. 



Among the first settlers of Surinam were, besides Englishmen, 
many Portuguese Jews, whose numerous slaves soon adopted, in 
an imperfect manner, the language of their masters, speaking a 
broken Portuguese, which has now vanished from the colony with 
the wealth of those who originally introduced it. At the present 
time it is only spoken by one tribe of the free Bush Negroes, the 
so-called Saramaccans, on the Upper Surinam, descendants of the 
Plantation Negroes, who, at the time of the treaty of the peace 
in 1760, inhabited the forests on the Upper Saramacca, deep in 
the interior. These Saramacca Negroes, at least those among 
them who hold intercourse with the colony, understand, besides 
their own ^^ Djoe-tongo^' (Jew's language), the Negro-English 
language. No printed specimens known. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

C. L. Schumann, Woerterbuch der Saramacca Negerspraclie, 1778. MS. in 
the possession of the Moravian Missionaries at Paramaribo. 

in. NEaRODUTCH— 

Generally, but erroneously, called Danish-Creole — is spoken on 
the Danish AVest Indian Islands — St. Thomas, St. Croix, and 
St. John. There is a wide difference between this language and 
the Negro-English of Surinam. It is Dutch in its structure, as 
well as in the vocabulary, and the number of Danish, French, 
English, etc., words received into it is very trifling. The first 
book in the Creole of the Danish West Indies was printed in 
1761. It contained the Litany and several hymns. The Creole 
New Testament was first published at Copenhagen, in 1781, 
next at Barby, in 1803, and again at Copenhagen, in 1818. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

C. Q-. A. Oldendoeps Geschichte der Mission der Evangelbchen Briider auf 
den Caraibischen Inseln S. Thomas, S. Croix, und S. Jan. Herausgegeben yon 
J. Jac. Bossart. Barhy and Leipzig^ 1777, 8vo, plates. Vol. I, pp. 424—434. 

Specimens of this jargon are given in two versions of the Lord's Prayer in : 
Mithridates, Yol. II, pp. 252, 253, from the translation of the New Testament, 
published, Copenhagen^ 1781, Svo, and Barhg, 1802, 8vo. 



CREOLE. 57 

QRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL N0TICK8. 

J. C. Kdtoos, Kreool ABC Buk. S. Croix, 1770, 8vo. 

J. M. G-rammatica over de Creoolske Sprog pa do Danske Eilande i America. 
KJobenkaun, 1770, 8vo. 

OLDcnDORFS Gkschiehte der Missionen (sec Yocabularics aboTe). 

IT. NEGRO-SPANISH. 

The Spanish-Creole language, a broken Spanish, interspersed 
with some Dutch words, is spoken by the Negroes of the Dutch 
island of Curafao. We possess no information about a Creole 
language of Cuba — the words given in the Glossary (below 
mentioned) lending no countenance to the acceptation of a 
special Cuban-Creole tongue. A translation of the Gospel of 
St. Matthew into the Creole of Cura9ao was printed in 1844. 

WORDS AND VGCABDLARIKS. 

Gemeenzame Zamenspraken (Conyersations iu Dutcli and the Creole of Curasao). 
Door J. J. PuTMAJT. Saniarosa, Curcu^ao, 1853, pp. 66, 12mo. 

Glossary of Creole Terms in common use in Cuba, and of those relative to 
Slavery and the Trade in Slaves, pp. 181—188 of: Poems, by a Slave in the Island 
of Cuba, recently liberated ; translated from t)ie Spanish, by B. K. Madden, M.D. 
London, 1840, 8vo. 

Note, — A Grammar of the Dutch Language, for the use of the Negroes of 
Curasao, is published under the title : Proeve eener Ilollandsche Spraak- 
kunst, ten Gebruike der Algemeene Armenschool, in de Gcmeente van de 
H. SosA, op Curasao. Door J. J. Putman. Saniarota, Curaqao, 

V. IfEGEO-FRENCn. 

Prench-Creole of San Domingo, GuadaJoupe, Martinique, and 
of Trinidad. A poem in the Creole of Trinidad, printed as a 
fly-sheet, is in the possession of his Highness the Prince Louis 
Lucien Bonaparte. A Monsieur Borde, of Trinidad, is said to 
have written a Creole Grammar. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

S. 6. DircoBTm-JoLY, Manuel des Habitants de St. Dominque, contenant un 
Pr^ois de THistoire de cette lie depuis sa D^ouverte ..... suivi du premier 
Vocabulaire Fran^ais-Cr^le et de Conversations PranQaises-Cr^oles. Faris, 1802, 
2 Tob. 8yo. 



58 CROWS — CUMANA. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Cat^hisme en la Langue Creole ; pr^c^d^ d'un Essai de Grammaire snr ITdiome 
usite dans lea Colonies Fran^aises. FariSy impr. Yrujet de Surcy, 1842, 18mo 
(pp. 7-20). 

Creole Proverbs are given in : Victor Schoelcheb, Les Colonies Fran^aises ; 
1* Abolition Immediate de TEsclavage. Farts, Pagnerre, 1842, 8vo. 

CEOWS, TJP.SA-EO-KA, COENEILLES. 

Indians of the Missouri territoiy and Oregon. They are divided 
into three diflFerent tribes, speaking different dialects, viz. : 

1 . Kikatsa, or Crow proper, on the banks of the Yellow Stone ; 

2. AhnahaxoaySy or Ahwahaways (Black-shoes or ^* Souliers 
noirs"), between the Mandans and Minetarees; and, 3. Alia- 
kaweah, or Paunch Indians {^^Indiens ventrus^^), on the Snake 
River. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Sat, Vocabularies, p. LXXIX. 

Pbinzen Maximilian zu Wied, Beise in das Innere Nord Amerikas in 1832- 
1834. Coblenz, Hoelscher, 1838-1841, 2 vols. 4to, Vol. II, pp. 490. 

No. VI, o, of tbe Miscellaneous Vocabularies to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc., 
in Vol. II of; Arcbseologia Americana, p. 377 (from Sat). 

Upsaroka Vocabulary. B, VI (Sioux), 3, pp. 83, 85, 87, 89 of the Vocabularies 
in Vol. II of: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

Affinities of the Upsaroka or Crow Language with that of the Sedentary Mis- 
souri Minetares and those of the Sioux, pp. cxv, cxvi of : American Ethnological 
Society's Transactions, Vol. II. 

Upsaroka and Mandan Words compared (no affinity) : Schoolcrapt's Indian 
Tribes of the United States, Vol. Ill, pp. 255, 256. 

CUMANA. 

A province of Venezuela. See also under Chayma. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Diccionario de la Lengua de Cumana ; y Arte de la Misma, del P. Yang-uas. 
Corregido y aumentado por Fr. Matias Blanco, 4to. Burgos, 1683. 

grammars and GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Arte de la Lengua Cuman&, por Fe. ManueIi Yanquas, 4to. Burgos, 1683. 



CUNACUNA — DAHKOTAH. 59 



CUNACTJNA. 

Independent Indians of Nueva Granada^ on the south-easterly 
side of the Isthmus. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 616. 

CTJRETU. 

Indians on the Amazon. Martius (VII, B, 198) caUs them 
Coretds, and says that they are settled on the Upper Apaporis. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

HAI.BI, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 520. (Coretu.) 

Vocabulary (of Ninety-eigbt Words), pp. 521 — 541 of: Axfbed B. Wallace, A 
Karrative of Trayels on tbe Amazon and Eio Negro. London^ Beeve and Co., 
1853, 8to (p. 536, Comparison with the Curetu Words given by Balbi). 

CUSHNA. 

A Califomian tribe on the mountains of the South Yuba. 
Their language is common to most of the tribes inhabiting the 
upper portion of the Sacramento valley. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Cushna Vocabulary, by Mr. Johnson, United States Agent, in : Schoolcraft's 
Indian Tribes of the United States, Yol. II. Languages, Miscellaneous Vocabu- 
laries, pp. 494 — 505, and Notes, pp. 506 — 508. 

DAHKOTAH, SIOUX, NADOWESSIER. 

Indians between the Missouri and Mississippi, of which eleven 
tribes are mentioned. Heckewelder thinks they are Iroquois, 
but Cass claims them as a separate nation. The Assinipotls 
(Assinibules, Stone- Indians), on the Lake Winnipeg, are said to 
be a separate tribe of the Sioux. Formerly they were called 
Issati. 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

Langue des Nadowessiens. Pp. 552, 523 of Yol. YIII of: Coubt se Gebelin, 
Monde Piimitif. Pam, 1772, 4to. 



60 DAHKOTAH. 

Jonathan Caevee, A Short Vocabulary of the Naudowessie Language, in : 
Three Years' Trarels through the Interior Parts of North America. London, 1778, 
8vo, pp. 420 et seq. 

In other editions— 2)ttJ/e», 1779, Svo, pp. 405—412 ; Philadelphia, 1789, 
12mo, pp. 223-228; Ibid, 1796, 8yo, pp. 288— 292 j German translation, 
Hamburg, 1780, 8vo, pp. 356 and following. 

B. (aitdet) D. (es Loziebes), Voyage ^ la Louisiana. Pom, Dentu, 1802, 
Svo, pp. 348 et seq. (from Castee and B. D). 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 265. 

Smith Baeton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Dacota, or Sioux, in the Vocabularies of Indian Languages. Appendix, part 4, 
Vol. II, pp. 449—459 of: Wm. H. Keating, Narrative of Major S. H. Long, 
Second Expedition. Philadelphia, Carey and Lea, 1824, 2 vols. Svo. 

(In Chap. Vni of Vol. I, pp. 376— 439, an accurate " Account of the Dacotas, 
or Sioux Indians," is given.) The Vocabulary is prepared by Peop. Sat, 
and printed in the vocabularies added to the Astronomical and Meteorological 
Record of this Expedition : Philadelphia, 1822, 4to, pp. Ixxii — Ixxxviii. 

A Vocabulary of the Sioux Language, pp. 152 — 172 of: Caleb Atwateb, 
Bemarks made on a Tour to Prairie du Chien, thence to Washington City, in 
1829. Columbus, Isaac N. Whiting, 1831, 12mo. 

Sioux VocAbnlary in : Geo. Catlin's Letters and Notes on the Manners, Cus- 
toms, and Condition of the North American Indians. Fourth edition. London and 
New York, Wiley and Putnam, 1842, 2 vols. Svo, Vol. II, Appendix B, pp. 262 — 
265. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 774 (Sioux, Dacotah, Yanctou). 

Dakota Vocabulary, by a member of the Dakota Mission (S. R. BiGGS). New 
York, printed by R. Craighead, 1852, Svo, pp. 120. 

Reprint of the English-Dakota part of Riggs* Dictionary. (See Grammars, 
under Riggs.) 

No. VI, Sioux (thirteen dialects, Nos. 33 — 40, m, n, o, p, q. Among them. 
No. 34, Dakotah), in the Comparative Vocabulary, etc., to : A. Gallatin's Synopsis, 
etc. (Archseologia Americana, Vol. II, pp. 305—367, 374, 377, 379). 

No. 34, reprinted under B, VI, 1, pp. 83, 85, 87, 89, of the Vocabularies 
in Vol. II of : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

Memoires de la Society Ethnologique. Paris, 1845, Svo, Vol. II, p. 264. 

Affinities of the Upsaroka or Crow Language with that of the Sedentary Mis- 
souri Minetares and those of the Sioux. Pp. cxv, cxvi of the : Transactions of 
the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

Dakota Numeration (1 — billion), by Philandee Peescott, in : Schoolcraft's 
Indian Tribes of the United States, Vol. II, pp. 206—208. 

Indian (Dahkotah) Names and Writing. III. Preliminary Remarks, pp. xxiv — 
xxviii of: Mes. Maey Eastman, Dahcotah ; or. Life and Legends of the Sioux 
around Eort Snelling. New York, Wiley, 1849, 12mo. 



DAK1£N. 61 

Ed. ITifTBEyiLLE, The Present State of Hudson's Bay .... London^ 1790, 
870, pp. 195, 196, and Table to p. 202. 

He calls them As-sin-e-po-e-tuc, or Stone Indians (from Umfre?ille). 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 263—265. 

VT, m., in A. Gallatin's Comparative Vocabulary, above quoted, p. 374. 

Eeise des Pbinzen MAXiMnJAN zu Wied. Cohlenz, 1839, 1841, 2 vols. 4to, 
Vol. II, pp. 474—480. 

B. T. DsNiG, of Port Union, Assiniboin Vocabulary, pp. 416 — 429, 432, and 
numerals, pp. 429 — 431, of Vol. IV of : Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United 
States. 

GRAM3JARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Kudiments of the Grammar of the Sioux Language, pp. 149—151 of : Caleb 
Atwateb's Remarks (see Vocabularies). 

Sioux Dahcota Dialect ; from MS. Grammatical Notices of Gen. Cass, pp. 251, 
252 of: A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. (Archieologia Americana, Vol. II). 

Sioux Spelling-book, designed for the Use of Native Learners. Boston^ 
Crocker and Brewster, 1836, 12mo, pp. 22. 

Stephen Riggs and Gideon H. Fond, The Dakota First Beading-Book. 
Cincinnati^ Kendall and Henry, 1839, 18mo, pp. 50. 

Eev. S. W. Pond, Wowapi Inonpa. The second Dacota Beading-Book. 
JSoston, Crocker and Brewster, 1842, 12mo, pp. 54. 

S. B. Biggs, Wowapi Mitawa, Tamakece Kaga. My Own Book. Boston^ 
Crocker and Brewster, 1842, 18mo, pp. 6*. 

The printers compiled : A Mother's Primer, and Child's Picture-defining 
and Beading Book (after T. H. Gallaudet). 

S. B. Biggs, Dakota Tawoonspe, or Dakota Lessons; a book designed for 
schools. Louiscillef Ky., 1850, 12mo, p. 96. 

Ghrammar and Dictionary of the Dacota Language, collected by the Dakota 
Mission. Edited by S. B. Biggs, Missionary of the American Board of Com- 
missioners for Foreign Missions, under the Patronage of the Historical Society of 
Minnesota. Accepted for pubHcation by the Smithsonian Institution, December^ 
1851. JVVw Yorkj Craighead, printer, 4to, pp. xii, 412. 

Grammar, pp. 1— 64j Vocabulary, 65—278; Dakota-English, 279—3385 
English-Dakota. 

S. B. Biggs, Address on the Dakota Language, pp. 123 — 142 of : Annals of the 
Minnesota Historical Society for the Year 1850-1. St, Patt^ D. A. BobertsoD, 
printer, 1851, 8yo. 

DARIEN. 

The aborigines of the Isthmus have been hitherto known under 
ihe names of Dariely Urabac^ and Idibae, Their language was 



62 DE6UIN0S. 

said to be similar to the Cunacuna. Later researches have 
shown that four tribes — the SavanenCy Manzanillo^ or San 
Bias Indians, Cholo^ and Bayano — inhabit the Isthmus, who 
speak different languages. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Lionel Wapeb, A New Voyage and Description of the Isthmus of America, 

giying an Account of the Indian Inhabitants, their 

Language, etc. London, James Knapton, 1699, 8vo, map, plates, pp. yiii, 224, 14, 
pp. 181, 182, 187, 188. 

French translation, by Montirat, in : G. Dampier, Voyage autour du 
Monde. Amsterdam, 1705, 8vo, p. 250 and following, 

German translation, in : Allgcmeine Historic der Beisen, Vol. XV, p. 280 
and following. 

Smith Baeton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Hebvas, Aritmetica, pp. 106, 107. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 708. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 631. 

N.B. — The words given by Wafer correspond vritlr the Bayano given by 
Seeman. 

DEGUINOS, DTEGENOS. 

The Indians round San Diego — DeguinoSy Diegehos — were in a 
savage state, and their language almost unknown. Bartlett 
says that they are also called Comeya ; but Whipple asserts that 
the Comeya^ a tribe of the YumaSy speak a different language. 
Different dialects were spoken near San Juan Capistrano 
(Father Boscara calls the aboriginal inhabitants of San Juan 
Capistrano the Acagchemem nation), San Gabriel, San Luis 
Obispo, and San Antonio. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Yocabularies of San Diego, San Juan Capistrano, pp. 246, 248, 250 ; San Luis 
Obispo, San Antonio, pp. 247, 249, 251, by Be. John Scoulee, in : Journal of the 
Boyal Geographical Society of London, Vol. XI. London, 1841, 8vo, pp. 246 — 251. 

Reprinted, San Diego, W. 2, San Luis Obispo, W. 4, San Antonio^ W. 5, p. 129 
of Vol. II of : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

The Names of the Months in Acagchemem are given in : P. Boscaba.'s Chinig- 
chinich, pp. 303, 304 of: A. Robinson's Life in California. New York, Wiley 
and Putnam, 1846, 12mo. 

Nos. 15 {San Saphaet), 16 {Kizh, at San Oahriel), and No. 17 {Netela, at San Juan 
Capistrano) of the Vocabulary of Languages of. North-western America, pp, 569 



DELAWARE. 63 

— 629, in : HoE. Hale, Ethnography and Philology of the United States Explor- 
ing Expedition. Philadelphia, Lea and Blanchard, 18 i6, folio. Ibid., pp. 533, 634 : 
Vocabulary of Languages spoken at the Missions, "La Soledad and San MiffueV* 

Nos. 15, 16, 17, reprinted under U, p. 128, of the Vocabularies in Vol. II of: 
Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. The words of the Missions : 
La Soledad and San Miguel, ibid., p, 126. 

Twenty-eight "Words of Netela and Kizh compared with Cahuillo and Eechi, 
by Pbofsssoe W. W. Tuekse, p. 77 of : Eeport upon the Indian Tribes, added 
to Lieutenant A. W. "Whipple's Report (in Vol. II of the Pacific Railroad 
Reports. Washington, 1855, 4to). 

Des Langues Kizh et Netela de la Nouvelle-Califomie, by Dr. Buschmaiw, in : 
Monthly Report of the Royal Academy of Sciences of Berlin, for September and 
October, 1855. 

Diegefio and English Vocabulary, taken by Likutenaxt A. W. Whipple from 
Tomaso, the chief the Tribe, pp. 5, 6, of Lieutenant A. "W. WTiipple's Extract from 
a Journal of an Expedition from San Diego, California, to the Rio Colorado, from 
September 11 to December 11, 1849. (Congress Documents, 31 Congress, Second 
Session, Senate Executive Documents, No. 19). Reprinted, pp. 95 to 101, and Diegefio 
numerals, by Lieutenant W. A. "Whipple, compared with those giyen by Dr. 
Soouler, pp. 103 of: Lieutenant A. "W. "Wliipple's Report upon the Indian Tribes, 
etc. (Vol. II of Pacific Railroad Reports. Washington, 1855, 4to). Also re- 
printed on pp. 103, 104 of : Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States, 
VoLH. 

Twenty-eight Kechi "Words (from Babtlett) compared with Cahuillo, Netela, 
and Kizh, p. 77 of: Report upon the the Indian Tribes, added to Lieutenant A« 
W. "Whipple's Report (Vol. II of Pacific Railroad Reports. Washington^ 
1855, 4to). 

Vocabularies of the Deguino or Comeya, at San Diego ; Eechi, at San Luis Rey 
and San Luis Obispo, have been taken by John R. Babtlett, the TJnited States 
Boundary Commissioner. 

See abo under Califomians and Cahuillos. 

DELAWARE, LENAPE, LENNO-LENAPE. 

Belonging to the Algonquin stock. The following are men- 
tioned as the three original tribes : — 1. The Unamiy or TVanami 
(Turtle tribe) 2. The Unalachtgo (Turkey tribe). 3. Minsi, 
Ministiy or Munseyi (Wolf tribe). 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hbbyas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, p. 240 (numerals, etc.) 

Smith Bastoit, New Views, etc. — Comparative Yocabularies, and " Specimen 
of a Companson of the Languages of the Delaware Stock and those of the Six 
Ifations." Ibid,, Appendix, p. 20. 

In the yocabularies he gives also Canestoga (or Susquehannocs) words. 



64 DELAWAUE. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 371—376. 

(From a MS. Vocabulary of the Eussian General Bfttlae, and from 
Smith Babton.) 

Words, Phrases, and Short Dialogues in the Language of the Lenni-Lenape and 
Delaware, pp. 451 — 464 of Heckeweldeb*s Account, in Vol. I of: Transactions 
of the Historical and Literary Committee of the American Philosophical Society. 
Philadelphia, printed by Abraham Small, 1819, 8yo. 

Peop. T. Sat, Comparative Vocabulary of various Dialects of the Lenape (or 
Delaware) Stock of North American Indians, together with a Specimen of the 
Winnebags (or Nipegon) Language. 

(Contains forty-five words in the Language of the Mohegan, Lenape, Shaw- 
anese, Nanticoke, Narraganset, Mansel, Massachusetts, Penobscot, Abnaki, St. 
Francis Indians, Messisaugers, Algonkins, Chippeway, Knistenaux, Winne- 
bagos.) Printed, with notes, in J. Pickering's edition of D. Edwards* Observa- 
tions on the Mohegan Language in : Collections of the Massachusetts His- 
torical Society. Vol. X of the second series. Boston, Phelps and Faruham, 
1823, 8vo, pp. 135—145, 146, 148. Eeprinted, Boston^ Little and Brown, 
1843, 8vo. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 810 (Delaware and Minsi). 

No. IV, Nineteen of the Comparative Vocabularies of Fifty-three Nations in A. 
Gallatin's Synopsis, etc., in Vol. II of: ArchsDologia Americana, pp. 305 — 367. 
(From Heckeweldeb and Zeisbebgeb.) 

Beprinted under A, IV, 2, pp. 79, 81, 83 of the Vocabularies in Vol. II of: 
American Ethnological Society's Transactions. 

CusnnNQS, Indian Agent, Delaware Vocabulary, in : Schoolcraft's Indian 
Tribes of the United States, Vol. II, Languages ; 1, Algonquin group, pp. 470 — 
481. 

Vocabulary of the Delawares in 1792. From the papers of Ja3£ES Madisoit. 
Ibid. J Vol. Ill, pp. 424 — 427, Delaware (and Iroquois) words. 

Geo. Henby Losseiel, History of the Mission of United Brethren among the 
Indians in North America. Translated from the German by Christian Ignatius 
liatrbbe. London, 1794, 8vo. 

A Collection of Words in English, Magua, Delaware, and Mohikan (by Bit. 
John Ettwein, compiled in 1788, from Zeisberger's work, for General Washington), 
pp. 41 — 44 of : Bulletin of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Vol. I. PhUa- 
delphia, 1848, 8vo. 

Bey. Mb. Heckeweldeb, A Comparative Vocabulary of the Lenni-Lenape and 
Algonquin. 

Bev. Mb. Heckeweldeb, A Comparative Vocabulary of the Lenni-Lenape 
proper, the Minsi Dialect, the Mohicanni, Natik or Nadik, Chippeway, and Nanti- 
coke. 

Bev. Mb. Heckeweldeb, A Comparative Vocabulary of the Lenni-Lenape 
and Miami, or Twightwee. 



DELAWARE. 65 

Bet. Mb. Heoeeweldbb, Names of Tarious Trees and Plants in the Language of 
the Lenni-Lenape, or Delaware, distinguishing the Dialect of the Unamis and Minsi, 
The aboTe four manuscripts are in the Library of the American Philo- 
sophical Society at Philadelphia. 

Memorandum of the Names and Significations wliich the Lenni-Lenape, other- 
wise called the Delaware, had given to Rivers, Streams, Places, etc., within the 
States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia ; together with the 
names of some chieftains and eminent men of this nation. Taken from MS. papers 
of the Bey. John Heceeweldeb, during his mission among the Indians of Penn- 
eylvania. Presented to the Historical Society of Philadelphia, by Maurice C. 
Jones, of Bethlehem. Pp. 121—135, 139—154 of Vol. I of: Bulletin of the His- 
torical Society of Pennsylvania. Fhiladelphia^ printed for the Society, 1848, 8vo. 

Comparative Vocabulary of Lenape- Algonquin, Copte, Archipel, and Temate, 
pp. 280 — 284 of: GusT^v DE Eichthal, Rapport entre quelques Langues Am^ri- 
caines et le Copte. Langue Lenape- Algonquin, pp. 272 — 289 of VoL II of the : 
M^moires de la Soci^t^ Ethnologique. Paris^ Veuve Dondey-Dupr^, 1845, 8vo. 

Delaware Vocabulary, taken by Lieutenant A. W. Whipple from the Chief 
of the Black Beaver Tribe. Pp. 50 — 60 of the : Report upon the Indian Tribes, 
by Lieutenant Whipple, Thomas Ewbank, and Prof. W. W. Turner, added to 
Lieutenant Whipple's Report on the Bout« near the 35th Parallel in Vol. II of : 
Pacific Railroad Beports. WasMnffton^ 1855, 4to. 

GRAMMARS AMD GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Dayid Zeisbbbgeb, Essay of a Delaware Indian and English Spelling-book, for 
the use of the schools of the Christian Indians on Muskingum River. PAtto- 
delpMa, Miller, 1776, 12mo. Beprinted, Philadelphia, 1806, 12mo. 

Datid ZEiSBEsaEB, Grammar of the Language of the Lenni-Lenape, or Dela- 
ware Indians. Translated from the German MS. of the late Bev. David Zeisber- 
ger, for the American Philosophical Society, by Peter Stephen Du Ponceau, with a 
preface and notes by the translator. Pluladelphia^ James Kay, 1827, 4to, pp. 
188,1. 

Translated in 1816. Forms part of (No. 2 of part 1) Vol. Ill of: Trans- 
actions of the American Philosophical Society, held at Philadelphia, for pro- 
moting useful knowledge, second series. Philadelphia^ printed by James 
Kay, jun., 1840, 4to, pp. 65—251 (pp. 65 — 96 : the translator's preface). 
Presented to the Society, 2nd December, 1816. The MS. of the translation 
^ foUo, pp. 140) is in the Library of the American Philosophical Society at 
Philadelphia. 

On the Indian Languages (Delaware and Iroquob), pp. 18 — 23 of : Losbeiel's 
HiBtory of the Mission, etc. (see Vocabularies above). 

N.B. — ^Pp. 19, 20, more particularly on the Delaware. 

John Picesbii«^o> Bemarks on the Indian Languages of North America, s. 1., 
1836, 8vo. 

Beprinted from Vol. VII of the : Encyclopaedia Americana. 

German translation by Talvi (Mrs. Bobinson). Leipzig, Vogel, 1834, 8vo. 

K 



G6 DOGKIB INDIANS. 

P. £. DupONCEAiJ, Momoiro sur le Syst^mo Grammatical dcs Langues de qoel- 
ques Nations Indicuncs do TAm^rique du Nord. Parity 1838, 8to. 

E. A. Vail, Notice sur los ludicns do rAm6rique du Nord. Fans, 1840, 8to, 
pp. 50. 

Qrammatical Notices — Delaware (from Zeisberqeb), pp. 220 — 224. Delaware 
Transitions, pp. 267, 268, 283—288 j and Comparative A'iew, p. 289. Notes, pp. 
29-ii — 298 of: A. Gallatin's Sj-nopsis, etc. Yul. II of: Archseologia Americana. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 369—372. 

Lenapi AVawipootakso ave Apwatuk. First Lessons in Delaware. J. Mxekeb. 
Baptist Shawanoe Mission^ 1834, 18mo, pp. 48. 

Lenapee Spelling-book. Shawnee Mission, J. Meeeeb, for the Baptist Societj, 
1834, 12mo, pp. 24. 

Chapter IX, Language, No. Ill, Lenape, pp. 106 — 112 of : Hsoejeweldxb*8 
Account of the History, etc., of Indian Nations. Vol. I of: Transactions of the 
Historical and Literary Committee of the American Philosophical Society. Fhilo' 
delphiaf printed by Abraham Smal^ 1819, 8yo. 



DOGRIB INDIANS. 

Indians of the northern part of North America, between 
Martin's Lake and the Coppermine River. They call them* 
selves Thing-e-ha-dtinne,and belong to the Dtinne or Athapaskan 
stock. The ^^ Mauvais Monde " and Slave Indians are tribes 
belonging to them, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Dogrib Vocabularies, collected at Fort Confidence (pp. 395, 396), at Fort Simp- 
son (p. 397), and by Mb. O'Belan, of the Hudson's Bay Company (p. 898). 
MauTais Monde and Slave Vocabulary (pp. 399, 400). J. H. Lefbot, Vocabulary of 
Chepewyan and Dogrib Words (pp. 400, 401), and Dogrib Vocabulary, from 
Babbett, pp. 401, 402 of: Sir John Kichardson, Arctic Exploring Expedition) 
Vol. II. London, 1851, 2 vols. 8vo. 

Tlie same reprinted and compared with the other Athapaskan and Kinai Lan- 
guages, pp. 179—222, 269—318 of : Buschmank's Athapaskischer-Sprachstamm. 
Berlin, 1856, 4to. 

Pbofessoe W. W. Tueneb, Comparative Vocabulary of Twenty-five Words of 
Dogrib (fromEiCHAEDSON), Hudson's Bay, Chepewyan, TacuUy, Umkwa, Hoopah, 
Navajo, and Apache, pp. 84, 85 of the : Report upon the Indian Tribes, added to 
Lieutenant A. W. Whipple's Eeport in Vol. II of: Pacific Bailroad Eeports. 
Washington, 1855, 4to. 



EHNEK EN6EREKMUNO. 67 



EHNEK. 

Indian band of north-western California, at the mouth of the 
Salmon x>r Quoratem River. The language reaches firom 
Buffalo Creek to Clear Creek, thirty or forty miles above the 
Salmon, varying, however, from point to point ; on the Salmon 
it extends to the sources. They are a tribe of the Pehtsik 
Indians. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

George Gibbs, Yocabularj in : Sclioolcrafl*s Indian Tribes of the United States, 
Vol. in, pp. 440—445. 

ELE. 

In South America, on the banks of the River Casanare. Their 
language has much affinity to that of the Betoi and Yarara. 
The Ququaro speak a dialect of the Ele. 

WORDS AiND VOCABULARIES. 
Gelii, Saggio <U Storia Americana, Tomo HI. 

ENGEREKMUNG. 

Called by the Portuguese Botokudos, by others Amoves, Aimbores. 
In Brazil, south of the Rio Pardo, in the provinces Minas Geraes 
and Espiritu Santo. A plain language, without gutturals, but 
with many nasals. The Gherins of Almada sur le Taipe are a 
tribe of the Botokudos. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Mithridates, Vol. IV, p. 459. 

J. S. Yateb, Proben Deutscher Yolksmundarten : Dr. Seetzen's Lingmstischer 
Nacblass. Leipzig, 1816, Svo, pp. 352—374. 

Pbinz Maximilian zu Wied Nextwied, Keiso nach Brasilien in den Jahren, 
1815-1817. Frankfurli-am'Main, Bronner, 1819-1821, 2 vols, 4to, and Atlas. 

French translation, par F. B. B. Eyries. Paris, Arthur Bertrand, 1821, 
3 Tols. 8vo, and Atlas. 

Pbinz Maximilian ztt Wied Neuwied, Beise in das Innere Nord Amerika. 
Cobtetu, Hoelscher, 1838-1841, 2 vols. 4to, and Atlas, Vol. I, p. 588. 



68 ESKELEN. 

AuausTE DB Saikt-Hilaibe, Yojago dans lea Provinces do Bio de Janeiro et 
de Minas Q^raes dans lo District dcs Diamans ot sur lo Littoral du Br^sil ; suiyi 
de Notes sur quelquos Plantes charact6ristiquo8 et d*un Precis de THistoiro des 
Revolutions dc TEmpiro Br6silion. Faris, Gide, 1830-1833, 4 vols. 8vo. 

Alcips D*Obbiony, L*IIomme Am^icain. FarU^ 1839, 2 vols. Qvo, Vol. I, 
p. 164. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 501. 

A. D'Obbiony, L*Hoinme Americain» Yol. I, p. 164. 

Vocabulaire de Botecudea, d'apr^s M. Mabcus Pobtb, pp. 379 — 382 of: Note 

sur les Botecudes, accompagn^ d'un Vocabulaire de leur Langue et de quelques 

Bemarques, par E. F. Jomabd, pp. 377 — 384 of: Bulletin de la Soci^t^ de G^- 

graphie de Paris, Tome VI, de la 3"*« serie. Paris, Arthur Bertrand, 1846, 8vo. 

Portuguese translation — Pp. 107 — 113 of: Bovista Trimensal do Bio de 

Janeiro, 2<^ ser., Tom. II, No. 5. 

Deux Vocabulaires de la Langue de Botecudos, recueillis par M. Victob Be- 
KAULT de Barbacena. A. Langue des Nak-nanouks (Habitans des Montagues), 
pp. 248 — 252. B. Langue des Juporocas, Boutomoras et Craikmouses, pp. 253, 
254 ; and Note, pp. 259 — ^262 of Vol. V of: Castelnau, Voyage, ippendice. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
A. D'Obbigny, L'Homme Am^ricain, Vol. II, p. 347. 

ESKELEN, ESLENES. 

Californian Indians^ east of Monterey. The EkMentaches are 
said to be a tribe of the Eskelen, and to speak the richest idiom 
of all the Californian Indians. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Jean-Fbano. Galaup de la Pebouse, Voyage autour du Monde (1785-1788), 
r6dig6 et public par M. L. A. Millet-Mureau. Paris, imprimerie de la B^publique, 
an V (1797), 4 vols. 4to, and Atlas. R^imprim^, Paris, 1798, 4 vols. 8vo. (In 
Chap. 12 of Vol. I.) 

English translation— Xom^oii, Bobinson, 1799, 2 vols. 4to, and Atlas. 
German translation — Berlin, 1799, 2 vols. 8vo, Vol. I, p. 388. 
The linguist of the Expedition was De la Manon. He collected words 
of the JEcclemaches dialect. 

J. F. BoTJBGOiNO, Eelation d*un Voyage recent des Espagnols sur les Cdtes 
Nord-ouest do I'Amdrique septentrionale. Paris, 1789, 3 vols. 8vo. Second 
edition, 1792 ; third edition, Paris, 1803. 

German translation — Jeim, 1789, 8vo. Reprinted in : Archives Litt^raires 
de I'Europe, 1804, No. 4, p. 87. 

Relacion del Viage hecho por las Qoletas Sut61 y Mexicana en el auo de 1792, 



ESKIMO. 69 

para reoonocer el estrccho de Fuca ; con una introduccion en que se da noticia de 
las Expediciones executadas anteriormente por los Epauoles en busca del pays de 
nordeste de la America de Orden del Key. Madridy en la imprenta real, 1802 
Svo, pp. clxTiii, 185, Atlas. 

Pp. 172, 173, and p. 127 of Vol. II of: American Ethnological Society's 
Transactions. 

A. DE Humboldt, Essai politique de la Nouvelle Espagne. Parity Schoell, 
1811, 2 vols. 4to (or 5 toIs. Svo) ; often reprinted. 

YoL I, p. 322, of the 4to edition gives Eskelen numerals from the MS. of 
P. Lasitsk. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 205 (EsleneSy from Boubgoinq ; JEcclemaches, 
firom Db la Manon, in La Perouse). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 831. 

ESKIMO. 

North of 60" northern latitude. The three principal dialects of 
the Eskimo are those of — 1. The Karalis^ Gree7ilanders. 2. The 
Eskimo proper, on the shores of Labrador. 3. The Western 
Eskimos. 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 

Vocabulary of English and Eskimo Words, pp. 203—205, and "A Short 
Vocabulary of the Language spoken among the Northern Indians inhabiting the 
north-west part of Hudson's Bay, as it vras taken at different times from the 
mouths of Babiana and Zazana, two Indians, who were on board H. M. S. the 
* Eumace,* in the year 1742. By Edward Thompson, Surgeon of said ship." 
Pp. 206— 211 of : Abthub Dobbs, An Account of the Countries adjoining to 
Hudson's Bay, in the north-west part of America .... to which are added 
.... V Vocabularies of the Languages of several Indian Nations adjoining to 
Hudson's Bay .... London^ 1744, 4to, pp. 211, map. 

Hans Egede, Det gande Grdnlands nye Ferlustration. KjdhenKavn^ 1741, Svo. 
(Chap. XVII of the language, with a short Vocabulary.) 

JEngliih translation — A Description of Greenland. Londony 1745, Svo. 
French translation — Description et Histoire Naturelle du Groienland, trad, 
en Fran9ais par D. B. D. P. (Des Boches de Parthenay). Copenhague et Genkce^ 
1763, Svo. 

German translation — Beschreibung und Naturgeschichte von Groenland 
In's Deutsche iibersetzt von J. G. Kriinitz. Berlin, Mylius, 1763, Svo. 

J. Ain)£BSON, Nachrichten von Island, Groenland und der Strasse Davis. 
Mamburghy 1746, Svo, pp. 285—325. 

Paul Egede, Dietionarium Groenlandico-Danico-Latinum, completens primitiva 
cum suis derivatis quibus interjcctic sunt voces primarise e Kirendo Angokkutorum 
adomatum.. Hafni<By typ. orphanotr. Reg. Gottfr. F. Kisel, 1750, Svo, pp. 16, 312. 
Greenland, pp. 1—207; Danish, pp. 208-263 j Latin, pp. 264—312. 



70 ESKIMO. 

Langue dea Esquimaux et des Groenlandais, pp. 494 — 498 of Vol. VITE of: 
CoUET DE Gebelin, Moude Primitif. FarU, 1772, 4to. Vocabulary taken from 
Egede. Reprint, pp. 306 — 312 of: J. B. Schereb, Hecberches Historiques et 
G^grapbiquca sur le Nouveau Monde. Paris, Brunet, 1777, 12mo. Ibid. 
** Eskimo and Grreenland Words compared." 

Hebyas, Origine, Tabb. XL VIII, L, et seq. (Groenland). 

Hebyas, Saggio, p. 126, 127. 

Table to show the Affinity between the Languages spoken at Oonalaska and 
Norton Sound, and those of the Greenlanders and Esquimaux. Appendix VI to 
Vol. Ill of : A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean .... performed under the direction 
of Captains Cook, Clabee, and Gobe, in H. M. S. " Resolution" and " Discovery," 
in the years 1776—1780. London, 1784, 3 vols 4to, and Atlas. Dublin, 1784, 3 
vols. 8vo, Vol. Ill, pp. 654, 555. 

And in Vol. I, p. 308, of: Peteb Simon Pallas, Neue Nordische Beitraege 
Eur Physikalischen und Geographischen Erd-und Voelkerbeschreibung, 
Naturgeschichte und Oekonomie. St, Petersburg, Logan, 1781 — 1796j 7 
vols. 8vo. 

Eskimaux -English Vocabulary, for the use of the Arctic Expedition. Published 
by order of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. Compiled by Captain 
John Washinoton, R.N. London, John Murray, 1850, 12mo, oblong. Pp. xvi, 
160 : pp. 2—109, English-Eskimaux ; pp. 115—160, Eskimaux -English ; pp. 110 — 
113, Comparative Table of a few (21) Words of the Eskimaux (or Innuit), Chuckchi, 
Aleutian, and Kadjak Languages, chiefly from Balbi and Klafboth. 

J. Long, Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader .... to 
which is added .... a List of Words in the .... and Esquimaux Tongues. 
London, Robson, Debrett, and Co., 1791, 4to, p. 183 (twenty-two words). 

German translation, by G. Forster. Berlin, Voss, 1792, 8vo j and by 
A. W. Zimmermann. Samburg, Hoffman, 1791, 8vo. 

Captain Willlam E. Paebt, R.N., Journal of a Voyage for the Discovery 
of a North-west Passage, etc. London, 1821, 4to. 

Captain William Edwaed Paebt, R.N., Journal of a Second Voyage for the 
Discovery of a North-west Passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific, performed in 
the years 1821, 1822, and 1823, in H. M. S. " Fury" and " Hecla." Published 
by authority. London, Murray, 1824, 4to, pp. 600, pp. 559—569. Reprinted, 
Neio York, W. E. Dean, printed for E. Duyckinck, C. Long, and others, 1824, 8vo, 
pp. XX, 464. 

On the Eskimaux Language (of Melville Peninsula and the adjoining 
islands, more particularly Winter Island and Igloolik), pp. 451 — 457. Voca- 
bulary of Eskimaux Words and Sentences, pp. 459 — 464. Eskimaux Names of 
Places, p. 464. 

Otho Fabeicius, Den Groenlandske Ordbog, forbedret og foroget. Kjobenhavn, 
C. F. Schubert, 1804, 8vo, pp. viii,795 (pp. 10—544, Gronl. Danish; 545—795, 
Danish Register). 

Words are also given in the same author's : Fauna Grujnlandica. Hafni<B, 
1780, 8vo. 



ESKIMO. 71 

Captain F. W. Beechey, R.N., Narrative of a Voyage to the Pacific and 
Bebring*s Strait, to co-operat« with the Polar Expeditions, performed in H. M. S. 
"Blossom," in the years 1825, 1828. London, 1831, 4to, pp. 742 ; also, 2 yoIs. 
Byo. 

Vocabulary of Words of the Western Esquimaux, pp. 620 — 627 of the 4to 
edition, and Vol. II, pp. 366 — 383 of the 8vo edition. 

Appendix to the Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage, 
by SiB John Ross, C.B. London, 1835, 4to, pp. 376, plates. 

Names of Mammalia, Birds, and Fishes, in : Captain W. A. G-baah, Narrative 
of an Expedition to the East Coast of G-roenland, sent by order of the King 
of Denmark in search of the lost Colonies. Translated by C. Gordon Mac- 
dougall. London, Parker, 1837, 8vo, pp. 16, 199. Appendix No. II, B, pp. 
178—180. 

Mithridates, Vol. lEI, pp. 340, 431, and part 3, pp. 422, 424, 454, 455, 462 
(from Egede, Andekson, DofiBS, and Long), Vol. IV, pp. 251—253. 

Some Words (3) and Numerals (1 — 5) of the Behring Strait, Eskimo, Kadjak, 
Igloolik Eskimo, and Unalachka Languages compared, p. 123 of: VoN Baeb and 
Von HeIiMESEN, Beitraege zur Kenntniss des Kussischen Keichs, 6d. 1. St. 
Tetershurg, Academy of Sciences, 1839, 8vo. 

No. 1, 1, 2, a, of the Comparative Vocabulary of Fifty-three Nations in A. Galla* 
TIN*S Synopsis, in Vol. II of: Archseologia Americana, pp. 305 — 367 ; and Com- 
parative Vocabulary of Sixteen Tribes. Ibid., pp. 368 — 372 (Hudson's Bay, 1; 
Kotzebue Sound, 2 ; Greenland, a). 

(From Pabbt, Beechey, Egede, and Cbantz) 

Reprinted, I 1, under A I, pp. 78, 80, 82 ; I 2 a, under L I, p. 104, of the 
Vocabularies in Vol. II of : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

Baxbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 856. Groenlandais propre — 
Esk. d. L Baie du Prince Regent (Ross) ; Esk. (Dobbs) ; Esk. d. I'lle d*Hiver 
(Pany). 

Smith Babton, New Views, etc. Comparative Vocabularies (Greenlandera, 
Esquimaux). 

Comparative Table of the Dialects spoken by the Behring*s Strait and Labrador 
Eskimo, pp. 369—382 of Vol. II of: Sib John Richabpson, Arctic Exploring 
Expedition. London^ 1851, 2 vols. 8vo. 

Note, — The Behring*s Strait Eskimo, or Kuskutchewak, from Wbangel ; 
the Labrador Coast Eskimo from a Vocabulary of Rev. P. Latbobb. 

GRAMMABS AKD GBAMMATIOAL NOTICES. 

M. WoEU>iSE, Meletema de Linguee Grcenlandicffi ej usque a ceteris Unguis 
differentia, in: Semestria Societatis Hafhiensis. HafhitB, 1746, part 2, p. 
137 et aeq. 

En Groenlandsk A B D Bog. Kjohenhavn, 1760, 8vo. Reprinted, Kattitaio^ 



72 FLATUEADS. 

msrsut attuaromarsuUo Malligckseit. Gnadau^ 1835, Sro. Nye udg. yed Stexh'- 
^EBG. Kjdbenhavn, Mbsions Collegium, 1819, 8ro, pp. 20. 

Paul Egede, Grammatica Gnxiiilandico-Danico-Latina. Hafni<B^ 1760, Byo. 

David Cbantz, Historic yon Groenland enthaltcud die Beschreibung dea Landes 
und Boinor Einwohner, insbesondere die Gt^scliichte dor dortigen Mission zu Nsu 
IIekbnhut und Lichtenfels. Barby and Leipzig^ Kuuimer, 1765, 8yo. Fortset- 
zung, ibid , 1770, 8vo. Second edition, ibid,^ 1770, 870, pp. 277—287. Reprinted 
in Vol. XX of : Bibliothek der noucston Beisobesclircibungen. Frankfurt and 
Leipzig, 1779-97, 21 vols. 8vo. 

English translation — The History of Greenland, including an Account of 
the Mission carried on by the United Brethren in that country. London^ 
1767, 2 vols. 8vo. Reprinted, with a continuation to the present time, Notes, 
and Appendix. London, Longmans, 1820, 2 vols. 8vo. 

EoiL. Thobhallesen, Schema Conjugationis GrcenlandicsB verborum in ok, yok 
et rpok desinentium. HafnuB, 1776. 

Otho Fabbicifs, Forsoeg til en forbedret Groenlandsk Grammatica. JSjfdben- 
havn, 1791, 8vo. Andet oplog, ibid., C. F. Schubert, 1801, 8vo, pp. viii, 388. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 435, 447, 452-464. 

A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. in Vol. II of: Archseologia Americana, Appendix, 
No. I, pp. 211—214. 

(From Cbantz and the Mithridates). 

Brief Sketch of the Eskimaux Grammar, pp. xi, xvi of: Eskimaux-English 
Vocabulary, for the use of the Arctic Expeditions. London, John Murray, 1850, 
12mo, oblong. 

Sam. Kleinschmidt, Grammatik der Groenl&ndischen Sprache, mit theilweisem 
Einschluss des Labrador Dialectes. Berlin, Keimer, 1851, 8vo, pp. 10, 182. 

Grammatical Notices concerning the Eskimo Dialects of Behring's Strait and 
the Labrador Coast, pp. 364—368 of Vol. II of: Sib John Riohabdson'b 
Arctic Exploring Expedition. London, 1851, 2 vols. 8vo. 

The Grammar of Koenigsee, 1780 ; exists only in MS. 

PLATHEADS, SELISH. 

(atnah, shouschwap.) 

Indians of the Rocky Mountains and Oregon ; divided into niany 
tribes, of which the Salishy Ponderays, a] id Spokein Indians are 
the most important 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Pbinz Maximilian zu Wied, Bcise in das Innere Nord Amerika's in 1832, 
l)ifl 1834.. Coblenz, Iloelscher, 1838—1841, 2 vols. 4ito, Vol. II, pp. 501, etc 



FLATUEADS. 73 

No. XYIII, 63, of the : CJomparative Vocabulary of Fifty -three Nations. A. 
Gallatin's Synopsis, Vol. II of : ArchsBologia Americana, pp. 305 — 367. 
{Salish, from a MS. authority in Duponceau's CoUections.) 

Vocabulary of the Tsihaili-Selish family, in four branches (northern, middle, 
western, and southern), pp. 569—629 of: H. Hale*s Ethnography and Philology 
of the United States Exploring Expedition. Philadelphia^ Lea and Blanchard, 
1846, 4to, ms^. 

Hale divides the four branches of the Selish into the following languages :— 

1. NoBTHEBN Branch: — 

a. E. Shushwapunuh (Shush waps, Atnahs). 

N.B. — A short Atnah or Chin Indians Vocabulary is given by A. Gallatin, 
under No. XXIII, 58, of his Comparative Vocabulary of Fifty-three Nations, 
p. 378 (ArchsBologia Americana, Vol. II), from Macksnzis, pp. 257, 258 of 
his Voyages. London^ 1801. 

b. F. Selish or Flatheada^ divided into three dialects : — 
aa. c. Kullespelm (or Ponderays — Pend d*Oreilles). 

bb. d, TtakcuUitlin (Spokan Indians), 
cc e. Soaustlpi (Kettle-falls). 

c. Or, Skitsuish (Ooeur d'al^ne). 

d. H. Piskwaus (Piscous). 

2. Middle Branch: — 

I. Skwale (Nasqually). 

3. Western Branch : — 

a. J. Tfihailish (Chickailis, Chilts), divided into : — 

aa.y. l^hailish, 
bb. ^. KwaiantL 
cc. h, KwenaiwUl. 
b. K. Konoelitsk (Cowelits). 

4. SOTTTHERN BrANCH : — 

L. Nsietshawus (Killamuks). 

In the : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, VoL II, the Vocabu- 
laries of Q, H, I, J, E[, are given under T, XXIII, pp. 118, 119 ; the Vocabulary 
L, under U, XXIII, p. 120 ; the Vocabidary P, under C, XXTTT, « Selish Flatheads," 
pp. 88, 90, 92, 94. 

Ad. 3, a, a short Vocabulary of this language, called '* Checaiish^* is given by 
Messrs. D. Lee and J. H. Frost, pp. 341—343 of their : Ten Years in Oregon. 
Ijiew Yorky J. CoUord, printer, 1844, 12mo. 

A short Vocabulary of the Flathead Language, and the Lord's Prayer in the 
Flathead and Pend d* Oreille language, are given on the last, not numerated, pages 
of: P. P. J. DE Smet, e. S. J., Oregon Missions and Travels over the Bocky 
Mountains in 1845-1846. New Tork, Edw. Dunigan, 1847, 12mo, pp. 408, 4to. 

Salish and Okanagan Words, p. 158 of: B, G-. Latham, The Languages of the 
Oregon Territory pp. 154 — 166 ; and 

Ghikeeles and Tlaoquatoh Words, p. 236 of : Db. John Scouleb, on the Indian 

L 



7\f FOX ISLANDS — GE. 

Tribes inhabiting the North- West Coa»t of Ainerica, pp. 228—252 of: Journal of 
the Ethnological Society of London, Vol. I. Edinhtirgh^ 1848, 8vo. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Grammatical Rcmarkfi on the Lantnin^ of the Tsihaili-Selish family, in : H. 
IIalf, Ethnology and rhil(>h)gy of the United States Exploring Expedition. 
rhilcuielphifty Lea and Blanchard, 18 U>, 4to, map, pp, 535 — 542 ; and 

Transactions of tlie American Ethnological Society, Vol. II, pp. 26 — 34. 

POX ISLANDS. 

Russian America; continuation of the Alcutan Islands. See 
Unalaschka. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean .... performed under the direction of Cap- 
tains Cook, Clare, and Gk)BE, in the years 1776 — 1780. London^ 1784^ 3 toIs. 
4to. Vol. II, Appendix 6. 

J. Billings, Voyages (Russian edition). St. Petersburg^ 1811, 4to, pp, 121 — 
129. 

Mithridatcs, Vol. I, p. 567. 

K. E. VON Baee und Gb. von Helmebsbn, Beitraege zur Eennt'niss des 
Bussischen Beiches und der angracnzenden Lander Asiens. ^S'^. Petersburg^ VoL I, 
1839, 8vo, p. 259. 

PUCA STRAIT. 

Between the territory of Washington and the southernmost part 
of Vancouver's Island. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Varias Palabras del Idioma que se habla en la boca S. del Canal de Fuca y bus 
equiyalentes en Castillano, p. 41 of: Kelacion del Viage hecho por las goletas 
Sutil y Mexicana en el anno de 1792, para reconocer el estrecho de Fuca. Madrid^ 
imprenta real, 1802, 8vo. 

This Vocabulary is reprinted under No. XXIV, 59, of the Comparative 
Vocabulary in A. Gtdlatin's Synopsis (Archseologia Americana, Vol. II, 
p. 378). 

GE, GES, GEIKO (JAHTCOS). 

People living on the sea -shores of the Brazilian provinces 
Maranham and Gram Para. They are divided into several 



GUAQUES GUAKANI. 4 i> 

tribes, of which Martius (iv, 80) names nine, among them the 
Ao-geSy Cran-ges, Canacata-ges, Ponkata-ges^ and Paycob-ges. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

J. B. VON Sfix and K. F. Ph. vox Mabtius, Boise in BrasiJien. Munchem, 
1823—1831, 3 vols. 4to. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XEI, No. 513. 

GUAQUES. 

New Granadiau Indians, inhabiting the plains on the rivers 
Caqueta, Oteguasa, Cagiian, and Putumayo, in the territory of 
Mocoa (formerly departmentO del Assuai). 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIKS. 

Vocabulario Guaque-Espaiiol, taken by the Presbytero Maiojel Maria Albis, 
in 1854, pp. 24 — 27 of: Los Indios del Audaqui. Fopayan, imprenta de la 
Matricaria, 1855, 16mo. 

gu^\:n\is. 

Brazilian Indians of the province Mato-Grosso, on the banks 
of the Paraguay. Martius (No. 29) calls them also Guanans, 
says that they live between the Paraguay and the Sierra de 
Chainez, and thinks that they are related to the Cahdns or Coa- 
huanas (men of the wood), whom the Guaycurus call Cayu^ 
hahas. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des Guanas (Rio Paraguay). Vocabulary, No. TIT, pp. 274 — 276 of: 
Castelnau, A"o1. \, Appendice. 

GUARANI. 

The most extended nation of southern Brazil and the Argen- 
tine Republic, Paraguay, and Uruguay. They were christian- 
ized by the Jesuits, under the dominion of whom they lived, 
enjoying a theocratic form of government. Adelung (in 
Mithridates) distinguishes — 1. South Guaraiii, or Guarari pro- 
per, in Paraguay. 2. West Guarani, or Chiviguana and 
Guarayi. 3. North Guarani, or Tupi (see Brazil). Martius 
(I, A) calls the southern Tupis, Guaranis. 



76 GUARANI. 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

ALPnONSTJS Bakzena, Lexica et prcecepta grammatica, item liber confessionis 
et precum in quinque Indorum Linguis, quarum U8U8 per Americam australem, 
nempe Puquinica, Tenocotica, Catamareana, Quaranica, Natixana, sive Mogaznana* 
PeruvicB, 1590, folio. 

This title is given by Brunet (Vol. I, p. 239) from : Sotwell, Bibliotheca 
Societatis Jesu Natli. Bibadenciroe. Rome^ 1676, folio, p. 83. 

P. Antonio Buiz (de Montota\ Tesoro do la Lengua Guarani que se usa en 
cl PerCi, Paraguay y Bio de la Plata. Madrid^ Juan Sanchez, 1639, 4to j consists 
of 8 and 407 numbered leaves. 

The author had resided thirty years among the Guaranis. He published 
also : Catecismo de la Lengua G-uarani. Madrid^ 1640, 8vo. 

Vocabulario de la Lengua Guarani, por el P. Antonio Biriz ; revisto y aumentado 
por otro Beligioso. En el pueblo de S, Maria la Mat/or^ 1722, 4to. 

This is apparently a new edition of the Vocabulary annexed to : Arte de la 
Lengua Guarani of P. Bniz. 

GiLii, Saggio, Vol. Ill, pp. 249, 357 and following. 

CnRiSTOPH Gottlieb von Muee, Journal zur Kunstgeschichte und zur Allge- 
meinen Literatur. 2^wrnherg, Zeh, 1775-1790, 17 vols. Svo, Vol. IX, p. 98. 

Heevas, Vocabolario, pp. 161 et seq. 

Heevas, Aritmetica, pp. 95, 96. 

Heevas, Origine, pp. 29, 37, 41, 44, 48, 49, 55, 56, 78, 136, 178, Tabb. XLIX, 
L et seq. 

Heevas, Saggio, pp. 95, 98. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 458, 459, 466. (From Gilii and Heevas ) 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 490. 

J. A. VAN Hefvel, El Dorado j being a Narrative of the circumstances which 
gave rise to the reports in the sixteenth century of the existence of a rich and 
splendid city in South America. New YorJc^ VTinchester, 1844, 8vo, Appendix V, 
pp. 164, 165. 

Alcede D'Oebignt, L'Homme Am^ricain. Paris^ 1839, 2 vols. Svo. Vol. I, 
p. 164 ; Vol. II, p. 276 (Guarani of Paraguay and Guarayos of Bolivia compared 
vdth Carib, Galibi, and Oyampis). 

Six Words of the Fullah, Archipel, and Guarani Languages compared, p. 115 
of Vol. I of: M^moires de l^i. Soci^te Ethnologique. Paris, Dondey-Dupr^ 
1841, Svo. 

Deux Vocabulaires de Dialectes du Guarani. Vocabulaire XI. Langue de Cayo- 
was (Dialecte du Guaranis), pp. 282, 283. Vocabulaire XII. Langue des Guarani 
du Paraguay, pp. 288—290 of Vol. V of: Castelnaf, Voyage, Appendice. 



GUARPES — GUATOS. 11 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

P. Antonio Rfiz de Montota, Arte y Vocabulario de la Lengaa Guarani. 
Madrid, 1640, 4to. 

The Arte was again published under the following title : Arte de la Lengua 
Guarani, con los Escolios, Anotacioncs y Apendices, del P. Paulo Restive 
e S. J. Saeados de los papeles del P. Simon Bandini y otros. En el pueblo 
de Santa Maria la Mayor, 1734, 4to. Title given by Ferdinand Denis, in : 
Bulletin du BibliophUe, IX'"* Serie, Nos. 10, 11, and 12. Pam, Teehener, 
1849, 8vo, p. 358. Brunet, Vol. IV, p. 148, puts the date at 1724, firom the 
Catalogue of Chaumette. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 432—437, 457. 

A. D'Oebiont, L* Homme Americain, Vol. II, pp. 299—302. Ibid., pp. 325 
(Guarayos), p. 336 (Chiriguanos), pp. 342, 343 (Sirionos). 

GUARPES. 

Indians of the Chilian pro\'inc3 Cuio, who are said to speak 
the Allentiac or Mikokayac languages. 

WOKDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

LiTTS DE Valditia, Arto Grammatica, Vocabulario, Catecismo y Confessionario 
en Lengua Chilena y en las dos Lenguas Allentiac y Milcocayac que son las mas 
Generales de la Provincia de Cuio en el reyno de Chile, y que Hablan los Indios 
Guarpes y otros. Lima, 1607, 8to. (See Allentiac.) 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Ltjts de Valditia — (see Vocabularies). 

GUASAVA. 

A language spoken in the department of Michoacan, in Mexico 
(according to De Souza). Latham (Varieties of Mankind) says 
the Guazave language is mentioned as being that of the coast 
of Cinaloa. Whether it was different from the Maya dialect is 
doubtful. 

WOBDS AND TOCABTJLABIES. 

Arte 6 G^rammatica de la Lengua Guasaye, por P. Febnando ViLLAPAifE, do la 
Compaiiia de Jesus. MS. 

GUATOS. 

Brazilian Indians of the province Mato-grosso, on the Rio 
Paraguay. (On the Tacoary and Araguaya; of a fairer com- 
plexion than the other Indians. Martius, No. 32). 



78 GUAYKURU. 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des GuatOB. Vocabulary, No XII, pp. 283 — 285 of: CASTEtNAiT, 
Yol. V, Appcndice. 

GUAYKURU, MBAYA. 

South American Indians of the province Cujaba, on the left 
banks of the Paraguay, who call themselves Eijiguaijegi. The 
Spaniards called them " Cavalleros/' because they were excellent 
horsemen. Their language has two principal dialects — the 
Mbaya and the Enakaga, and is said to bear much affinity 
to the Baskish language. A similar language is spoken by 
the neighbouring Juiadge, Kochaboth, Guentuse, and even 
the Payaguas, who, besides, have their own very difficult 
language. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
GnJi, Saggio, Yol. Ill, pp. 367—371. 

Hebvas, Yocabolario Poliglotto, pp. 161 et seq., 221—223. 

(From the Spanish missiouarj P. Jose Sanchez Labbadob's MSS.) 

Hebvas, Aritmetica, p. 99. 
Hebyas, Origino, Tabb. XLYIII, L et seq. 
Hebvas, Saggio, pp. 106, 107 j and Payagua, p. 228. 
Mithridates, Yol. Ill, pp. 478, 505, 506. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 545 (Payagua-Guaycnru, Giiay- 
curu-Mbaya). 

Castelnait, Yoyage, and Yol. Y, Appendice, Yocabulaires, No. X, Langue des 
Guaycurus, pp. 280, 281. 

On the Payaguas, see : Fragments d'un Yoyage au Paraguay exdcutd par Ordre 
du Gouvernement j lus k I'Assemblee (de la Societ6 de Geographie) G^n6rale du 
23 D^embre, 1853, par Alfbed Dembbsat, pp. 5—31 of Yol. YII of the fourth 
series of : Bulletin de la Soci^t^ G^ographique. Paris^ Arthur Bertrand, 1854, 
8vo. (Pp. 30, 31, Words and Phrases.) 

A few Payagw& Words, and some Account of the Payagwas, by Chables 
Blachfoed Mansfield, Esq., M.A., Clare Hall, Cambridge ; with Eemarks by 
Robert Gordon Latham, M.D., pp. 496—504 of : Paraguay, Brazil, and the Plate. 
Letters written in 1852-1853, by C. B. Mansfield, Esq., M.A., map, portrait, 
and illustrations. Cambridge, 1856, 1 vol. 12mo, pp. xxii and 504. 



GUENOA GUYANA. 79 



GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Mithridatos, Vol. IH, pp. 482—488. 

A. D'Obbignt, L'Homme Am^ricain, Vol. 11, p. 120 of the : Lenguas or Juiadgo 
Dialect. 

GUENOA. 

Indian nation, on the eastern banks of the Uruguay River, south 
of the Guarani Missions. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

HsBYAS, Saggio, pp. 228—229. 
HsBTAS, Catalogo, p. 46. 

GUYANA. 

The principal tribes of British Guyana, besides the Accaways, 
are the Aforays, the Macoussies, and the Tiberacottes, Sir 
BoBERT ScHOMBURGK enumerates, besides the Liugua Geral, 
the Arawaak, Warau, and Taruma, the foDowing dialects, as 
spoken in Guyana, viz. : — 1. Of the Caribi-Tamanaken stock, the 
Caribisi, Accaway, Macusi, Arecuma, Soerigong, Waiyamara, 
Guinau, Maiongkong, Woyawai, Mawakwa or Maopityan, Piano- 
ghotto, Tiverighotto. 2. Of the IVapisian-Parauana stock, the 
Wapisian or Wapityan, Atorai, Taurai or Dauri, of all of which 
he gives a comparative vocabulary of eighteen words. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabularies of the Langaages of Fire Indian Nations in Guyana — ^Accowajs, 
Atoray, Macoussie, Tiberaoottis, Gnarano. Appendix No. V, pp. 164, 165 of: 
J. A. VAN H£T7TSL*s El Dorado. New York, Winchester, 1844, 8?o. 

P. 166, ibid.^ Comparison of the Arrowak, Atoray, Maypure, Moxos, and 
Qaichua. 

Sib Robebt H. Schombttboe, (Vocabulaiy and) Bemarks to accompany a 
Comparati?e Vocabulary of Eighteen Languages and Dialects of Indian Tribes 
inhabiting Guiana, pp. 96 — 99 of the : Report of the Eighteenth Meeting of the 
British Association for the AdvanTemeut of Science, held at Swansea, in August, 
1848. London^ J. Murray, 1849, 8to. 

Vocabulary of Eighty-two Nouns and Numerals (1 — 10) in the Four Indian Lan- 



80 HAEELTZUK — HAIDAU. 

guages of British Guiana — Arawaak, Accaway, Caribisco, Warow, by William 
IIiLLHOUSE, pp. 247, 248 of Vol. II of: Journal of the Royal Ooographical Society 
of London. London, John Murray, 1832, 8vo. 

nAEELTZUK, IIAILTSA. 

Naass Indians of the north-west coast, from 50" 30' to 53° 30' 
northern latitude. Dialeets of their language are spoken by 
the Billeckoola, and the inhabitants of Mackenzie's Friendly 
Village, 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

Alexandeb Mackenzie, Voyages from Montreal through the Continent of 
North America. London^ 1801, 4to, p. 376. 

Eeprinted, London^ 1802, 2 vols. 8vo, Vol. II, p. 273. German transla- 
tion. Hamburg^ 1802, 8vo, p. 545. Reprinted under No. XXVI, 61, of the 
Vocabularies to A. Gallatin's Synopsis (p. 378 of Vol. II of the : Archeologia 
Americana). 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 216 (Friendly Village, from Mackenzie). 

Vocabularies, by John Scofleb, M.T)., of Haeeltzuck and Billechoola, pp. 230, 
232, 234. Chimmesyan, pp. 231, 233, 235 of Vol. XI of: Journal of the Royal 
Geographical Society of London (1841), 8vo. 

Hailtsa Vocabulary, by A. Andeeson, p. 634 of: Horatio Hale's Ethnography 
and Philology of the United States Exploring Expedition. Philadelphia^ Lea and 
Blanchard, 1846, folio. 

The Vocabularies of Mackenzie and Andeeson, reprinted in the Vocabula- 
ries in Vol. II of : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, sub. H, 
XX (Naass), p. 103. 

Billechoola, Friendly Village, Fitz-Hugh Sound, Haeltzuk Words, p. 155 of : 
R. G. Latham, The Languages of the Oregon Territory (pp. 154 — 166 of VoL I 
of the : Journal of the Ethnological Society of London. Edinburgh^ 1848, 8yo). 

HAIDAH. 

Indians of Queen Charlotte^s Island. A branch of this tribe, 
the Kyganies {Kigarnies) live in the southern part of the 
Archipel of the Prince of Wales. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary of Kigarnee, Casarnee, Skittageets, Camshava, and Words of other 
tribes on the north-west coast (from MS. authorities of Stitbgis and Bbtant). 
No. XXVIII, 64, of the Vocabularies to A. Gallatin's Synopsis (Archsoologia 
Americana, Vol. II, p. 380). 



HAITI — HITCHITTEES. 81 

Vocabulary by De. John Scouleb, pp. 231, 233—235 of Vol. XI of: Journal 
of the Boyal Qeographioal Society of London. London^ 1841, 8to. 



HAITI. 

The aborigines of this island (San Domingo) are extinct. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Gnu, Saggio di Storia Americana, Vol. Ill, pp. 220—227. 

(Collected Haitian Words (from Otiedo, Piedro Mabttb, and Acosta). 
Supplements, see in : Bartbol. de las Casas, Begionum Indicarum accuratissima 
descriptio. Draniojvrti, 1598, 4to, pp. 8—10. 

C. S. lUpnTESQUB, Atlantic Journal and Friend of Knowledge. PkUadelphiai 
1832, 1833, 8to, pp. 50 et seq. 

Comparative Taino Vocabulary of Hayti, pp. 230—253 of: C. S. BAFOrBSQUl, 
The American Nations. Philadelphia, 1836, 12mo. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 3. 

GRAMMARS AKD GRAMMATtCAL NOTICES. 

Ab^c^aire Haytien; suivi d'un Precis Historique, Chronologiqueet Q^graphique 
sur risle de Haiti. Parit, 1839, 8to. 

The Haytian or l?aino Language restored, -with Fragments of the Dialects of 
Cuba, Lucagas, Boriquen, Eyeri, Casiri, Araguas. Grammatical Notices and Com- 
paratiye Vocabularies (pp. 215 — 259 of: C. S. Kafikssqus, The American 
Nations; or, Outline of their General History. Philadelphia^ printed for the 
Author, 1836, 12mo.) 

HITCHITTEES. 

A branch of the Creek confederation, on the rivers Chatahsochee 
and Mint. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

No. X, r, of the Comparative Vocabularies to A. GALLATnr's Synopsis (Archeeo- 
logis Americana, Vol. II, p. 377.) 

From MS. authority of M. BiDGB, a Cherokee. 

Numerals of the Hitchittee or Chel-o-kee Dialect (1—1000), spoken by seyeral 
tribes of the great Muscogee race. By Captain J. C. Casey, United States Agent, 
Florida; pp. 220, 221 of VoL II of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United 
States. 



M 



82 HOCHELAGA — UUASTEKA. 



nOCHELAGA. 

An extinct tribe of Canada, speaking a dialect of the Mohawk 
language. Montreal is situated on the place where this tribe 
formerly resided. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

R. Hacklutt, Collection of Voyages. London^ 1599, 3 toIs. folio j Vol. II, 
p. 231. 

Gt. B. Ramfsio, Nayigationi e Viaggi. Venezia, 1606, 3 vols, folio ; VoL in» 
p. 385. 

A short Vocabulary (from Caetiee), pp. 48, 49 of: Jolin de Laet, Orbis Noths, 
Lugduni Batavor,^ Elzevir, 1633, folio. 

From De Laet, reprinted in A. Gallatin's Synopsis (Arcbeeologia Americana, 
Vol. II, p. 376, under V, /3), and Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 335—337. 

See also : Jacques Caetiee, Brief R^it de la Navigation faite hs Isles de 
Canada, Hocbelaga, Saguenay et autres, et particuli^rement des MoBurs, Lan- 
gage et C^r^monies des Habitants d'icelles. Paris, Ponce Riffet, 1545, 8vo ; 
Itouen, 1598, 8vo ; and Italian, Prima Relatione della Navigatione di Jaques 
Cartier, in : Ramusio, Vol. III. 

Balbi, Atlas Etbnograpbique, Tab. XLI, No. 804. 

Smith Baston, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabulary. 

HOO-PAH. 

Indian tribe on the lower part of the Trinity River, in north- 
western California. Their language extends to the south fork. 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 

George Gibbs, Vocabulary in: Schoolcraft, Indian Tribes of the United 
States, Vol. Ill, pp. 440—445. 

Peopessoe W. W. Titbnee, Comparative Vocabulary of Twenty-five Words of 
Hoopab (from Gibbs), Hudson's Bay, Chepewyan, Dogrib, Umkwa, Tacully, 
Navajo, and Apache, pp. 84, 85, of : Report upon the Indian Tribes ; added to 
Lieutenant A. W. Whipple's Report, in Vol. II of: Pacific Railroad Reports. 
WasMngton^ 1855, 4to. 

nUASTEKA. 

Mexican Indians, north-east of Vera Cruz and the city of 
Mexico, in the State of Tamaulipas, near the Rio Panuco. 



HUDSON^S BAY INDIANS. 83 

WORDS AND T0CABULARIE8. 

Andbeas db Olmoz, Grammatica et Lexicon LinguflB Mexicans, Totonaqtua 
et Haastecffi. Mericiy 1560, 2 vols. 4to. 

Neither Eich nor Ternaux Compans, nor even Brunei, gives the title of this 
book. Brunet (III, p. 559) states only that Antonio, in his Bibliotheca 
Nova, Vol. I, p. 81, names sereral linguistic publications of Olmoz, but does 
not give their titles. De Sousa makes the same remark, but gives no titles 
either. 

Oablos de Tapia Zenteno (see Grammars). 

Miihridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 15, 123, 124. 

J. S. Yater, Proben der Deutschen Yolksmundarten und andere 

Sprachforschungen. Leipzig^ Fleischer, 1816, 8vo, pp. 353 — 375. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 704. 

NouTcUes Annales de Voyage. Paris^ 1840, 8vo, Vol. IV, pp. 9 — 37. 

A, Gallatin, Notes on the Semi-civilized Nations of Mexico, et<;. (American 
Ethnological Society's Transactions, Vol. I, pp. 9, 10, Comparative Table to p. 114, 
and Comparative Vocabulary, pp. 298—304). 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NCTICES. 

Aia>REAS DE Olmoz (see Vocabularies). 

Gablos de Tapia Zenteno, Art€ la la Lengua Huasteca. Mexico^ 174!7, 4to. 

Gablos de Tapla Zenteno, Noticia de la Lengua Huasteca con Catecismo j 
Doctrina Christiana. Mexico ^ imprenta de la Bibliotheca Mexicana, 1767, 4tOy 
pp. 10, 128. 

(Pp. 1—47, Grammar J pp. 48 — 88, Vocabulary; pp. 89 — 128, Catecismo 
and Doctrina.) 

An extract of this work is given by A. Gallatin in: Collections of the 
Ethnological Society's Transactions, Vol. I, pp. 276 — 286, and also in; 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 106—113. 

HUDSON'S BAY INDIANS. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

BowBix, A Dictionary of the Hudson's Bay Indian Language, s. L e. a., 1776, 
two sheets in folio. 

A short Vocabulary of the Language spoken among the Northern Indians 
inhabiting the north-west part of Hudson's Bay, as it was taken at different times 
from the mouths of Babiana and Zazana, two Indians who were on board H. M. S. 
** Furnace," in the year 1742, by Edwabd Thompson, surgeon of said ship. 

(Pp. 206 — 211 of: Abthttb Dobbs, An Account of the Countries adjoining 
Hudson's Bay. London, 1744, 4to.) 



84 HUROXS. 

Peopessob W. W. Turner, Comparative Vocabulary of Twenty-fire Words of 
Hudson's Bay (from Dobbs), Chcpewyan, Dogrib, Tacully, Umkwa, Hoopah, 
Navajo, and Apache, pp. ai, 85 of: Lieutenant A. W. Whipple's Report upon 
the Indian Tribes ; added to his Report on the Route near the 35th Parallel, in 
Vol. II of : Pacific Railroad Reports. Washington^ 1855, 4to. 

A Specimen of sundry Indian Languages spoken in the inknd parts of Hudson's 
Bay, between that coast and the coast of California. Table to p. 202 of : Edwabd 

Umpretillb, The Present Stete of Hudson's Bay to which are added 

a Specimen of Five Indian Languages London, Walker, 1790, 

Svo, pp. 230. 

German translation, by E. A. W. Zimmcrmann. Helmstedt, 1791, Svo. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 419, 422, 424 (from Dobbs). 

Lieutenant Edward Chappell, R.N., Narrative of a Voyage to Hudson's 

Bay, in H. M. S. " Rosamund," containing some Account of the Tribes 

inhabiting that Remote Region. London, Mawman, 1817, Svo, map, 4 plates, 
pp. 12, 280. 

HURONS, WYANDOTS. 

Formerly of Canada. Belonging to the Mohawk stock. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Dictionnaire de la Langue Huronne, on 72 leaves, in : Fbebe Gabbul SAaABD 
Theodat, Le Grand Voyage du Pays des Hurons, situ6 en I'Am^rique, vers la mer 
douce ^s demiers confius du Canada, avec un Dictionnaire de la Langue Huronne. 
Paris, Denis Moreau, 1632, 8vo, 92 leaves, and pp. 380. 

The Dictionary is sometimes found separatel;^, and the work occasionally 
bound in two volumes, the first of which is dated 1631. 

Court de G-ebelin has extracted Fifteen Words from Sagabd Theodat s 
Monde Primitif, VoL VIII, p. 501. 

N. DE Lahontan (see Algonquin). 

Hebyas, Saggio, pp. 231, 232. 

Smith Babton, New Views — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 336, 336, 337 {Huron, from Sagabd; 
Wyandot, from Smith Babton). 

A. Q-allatin, Synopsis, etc.. Comparative Vocabulary, V, 26 ^ (p. 372 of VoL 
II of: Archseologia Americana). The Wyandot is No. 26 of the Comparative 
Vocabulary, pp. 307—367, and is reprinted under A, V, 2, pp. 79, 81, 83 of VoL II 
of: American Ethnological Society's Transactions. 

John Piceebino, in the Encyclopsedia Americana, 1831. Translated into Oer^ 
man by Talvi (Mrs. Robinson). Leipzig, Vogel, 1834, Svo. 

P. E. Ditponceaf, Memoire sur le Systbme Grammatical des Langues de 
quelques Nations Indiennes de I'Am^rique du Nord. Paris, 1838, Svo. 



lAKONS. 85 

Balbi, Atks Ethnograpliique, Tab. XLI, Nos. 802, 803 (Wyandot Huron). 

John Johkston, of Piqna, Account of the Present State of the Indian Tribes 
inhabiting Ohio (Archseologia Americana, Vol. I, pp. 292 — 297). 

Eeprinted, with some additions, in the Comparatiyo Vocabulary of the 
Iroquois, pp. 393 — 400 of : II. B. Schoolcraft's I^otes on the Iroquois. 
Albany^ Pease and Co., 1817, 8vo. 

See also : Cofbt de Gebklin, Monde Primitif, 4to {Paris, 1772), Vol. 
VIU, pp. 499—504. 

Wyandot numerals (1—3,000,000), by William Walker, pp. 218—220 of 
Vol. II of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

J. HowsE, Vocabularies of certain North American Indian Languages — ^Hurons, 
Iroquois, Mohawks of Amherstburg, Stone Indians ; pp. 113 — 121 of: Proceedings 
of the Philological Society, Vol. IV. London, 1850. 

GR.\MMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Frsre Gabriel Sagard Theodat (see Vocabularies above). 

From Saoard, extracted by Professor Fiorillo, of G-dttingen, in Mithridates, 
Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 323—329. 

Dela Langue (des Hurons), Vol. II, pp. 458 — 490 of: P. Lapitxait, Moeurs 
des Sauvages Am^ricains. Paris, 1724, 2 vols. 4to. 

Supplementary Notices to Sagard are given by : General Parsons, Discoyeries 
made in the Western Country. (Memoirs of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, Vol. II, part 2.) Boston, 1793, 4to, pp. 124 et seq. 

Grammar of the Huron Language, by a Missionary of the Village of Huron 
Indians at Loretto, near Quebec ; found amongst the papers of the Mission, and 
translated fifom the Latin, by John Wilkie ; pp. 94 — 198 of Vol. II of : Trans- 
actions of the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec. Quebec^ printed by 
Thomas Gary and Co., 1831, 8to. 



lAKONS, LOWER KILLAMUKS. 

Indians of Oregon, on the shores of the Pacific, north of the 
Umpqua River. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

No. 8, T, of the Vocabularies of North-western America, pp. 569—629 of: HoB. 
Hale, Ethnography and Philology of the United States Exploring Expedition. 
PhUadelphia, Lea and Blanchard, 1846, folio. 

F. XXVni, pp. 99, 101, of the VocabiJaries in Vol. II of: Transactions of the 
American Ethnological Society. 



86 ILLINOIS — low AYS. 



ILLINOIS. 

Indians formerly of Illinois^ ])clongiiig to the Algonquin stock. 
The Mackenzles are closely related to them. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hebvas, Saggio, p. 233. 

Smith Baeton, New Views — Comparative Yocabularics. 

Mithridatcs, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 363, 364 (only two Words). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 808. 

No. IV, 22, in : A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. Comparative Vocabulary 
(Archfieologia Americana, Vol. II, pp. 305 — 367), after an anonymous French MS. 
in Duponceau's Collection, and (partly) under O, IV, 2, p. 112, of the Vocabu- 
laries in Vol. II of : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

INGANOS. 

Indians of the New Granadian territory of Mocoa (formerly 
departamento del Assuai). 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulario Ingano-Espaiiol, taken by the Presbyter Maituel Mabia Albis, 
in 1854 ; pp. 20, 21, of : Los Indios del Andaqui. Popayan^ imprenta de la Matri- 
caria, 1855, 16mo. 

INKULTJCHLUATE, KANGJULIT. 

In Russian America, on the rivers Chulitna, Kuskokwim, and 
Kwichpack. They belong to the Eskimo stock. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary of Twenty Words, p. 119 of: K. E. voN Bi.B and G. VON Helheb- 
SEN, Beitraege zur Kenntniss des Russischen Keiches, Band I. St, Petersburg^ 
1839, 8vo. 

Sagos KIN, Kwigpak Vocabulary (compared with Tchwagmjute, Kuskokwimjute, 
Kadjak, and NamoUer Languages), pp. 488—512 of VoL VII of : Erman, Archiv 
fiir wissonschaftliche Kenntniss von Russland. Berlin^ 1849, 8vo. 

lOWAYS. 

Indians on the River Dei Moines. 



IQUITOS IROQUOIS. 87 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

No. VI, n, of the Comparative Vocabulary in A. G-allatin*s Synopsis (Archeeo- 
logia Americana, Vol. II), p. 376. From Cass* MS. authority. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Rev. Messrs. S. M. Ietin and Wm. Hamilton, An Iowa Grammar, illus- 
trating the Principles of the Language used by the Iowa, Otae, and Missouri 
Indians. Iowa Mission (Presbyterian) 1848, 18mo, pp. 152. 

Iowa Primer, ibid.y only eight pages (17 — 24) printed, containing Dissyllables 
and Trisyllables, with English explanation. 

Bemarks on the Iowa Language, by Bev. "Wm. Hamilton, pp. 377—406 of 
Vol. rV of : Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

IQUITOS. 

Brazilian Indians on tlie banks of the Amazon. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des Iquitos, Vocabulary No. XXI, pp. 295, 296 of: Castelnatj, Vol. V^ 
Appendice. 

IROQUOIS. 

The great league of five (afterwards six) nations — Senecas, 
Mohawks^ Onondagos, Oneidas, Kayugas, and Tusearoras. For 
books on their languages^ see under the different nations. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Specimen of a Comparison of the Languages of the Delaware Stock and those of 
the Six Nations, p. 20 of the Appendix to Smith Barton, New Views (edition 
of 1798), and ComparatiTC Vocabularies. 

J. LoNGh, Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader, etc. ; to 
which is added .... A List of Words in the Iroquois, etc.. Tongues. London, 
Bobson, Debrett, etc., 1791, 4to, pp. 184—194, 212—215. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 318, 336, 337. 

Iroquois Words, pp. 22, 23 of : Geo. Henry Loskisl, History of the Mission of 
the United Brethren among the Indians, translated bj Ch. Ign. Latrobe. Lon- 
don, 1794, 8?o. 

A small Collection of Agoneasean Words (the Jgoneaseah are the fire nations), 
pp. 271 — ^275 of Vol. n of: James Maccaflet, History of the State of New 
York. New York, Gk>uld and Banks, 1829, 3 vols. 8yo. 



88 ITE JTONAMA. 

Comparative Vocabulary of the Iroquois (snd its Cognate, the Wyandot), 
pp. 393 — 400 of: IIeney R. Sciioolceaft, Notes on the Iroquois. Albany, 
Erastus H. Pease and Co., 18 i7, 8vo. 

A Vocabulary of Geographical Names of the Five Nations, compared with the 
French Names of the same places, is prefixed to : Colden's History of the Fiye 
Indian Nations of Canada. Second edition. London, John Whiston, Lookyer, 
Davis, and John Ward, 1750, Svo, pp. xv, xvi. Many reprints, among others, on 

pp. xi, xii of: An Account of Conferences held between Major- Gkeneral 

Sir William Johnson and the ...... Indian Nations. London, A. Millar, 

1756, Svo. 

J. HowsE, Vocabularies of certain North American Languages — ^Iroquois 
(Language of the Iroquois Indians of Caughnavassa and St. Begis), Mohawks, 
Hurous (Amherstburg, Stone Indians), pp. 113 — 121 of: Proceedings of the 
Philological Society, Vol. IV. London, 1856. 

Dictionnaire Iroquois et Fran9ois, M, S, C, N, etc., folio, in the Masarin Library 
at Paris. (See Uaenel, Catalogus MSS., etc., p. 328.) 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Language of the Iroquois, etc., with a Table exhibiting the Dialectical Variations 
of the Language of the Iroquois, as illustrated in their geographical names ; Chap. 
II, Book III, pp. 394 — 411, and Schedule, explanatory of the Indian Map 
(geographical names). Appendix I, pp. 465 — 474 to : Lewis H. MoboIn, League 
of the Ho-de-no-san-nee, or Iroquois. Mochesier, Sage and Brother j New York, 
Mark Newman and Co., 1851, 8vo. 

The Language of the Iroquois, Appendix, pp. 298—301 of: Minnie Myrtle, 
The Iroquois ; or, the Bright Side of Indian Character. New York, Appletons, 
1855, 12mo. 

ITE, ITENES. 

Independent Indians of Bolivia^ on the frontiers of Brazil^ on 
the western banks of the River Guapore. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
A. D'OEBiaNY, L'Homme Am^ricain, Vol. I, p. 164 ; Vol. II, p. 208. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
A. D'Oebignt, L'Homme Am6ricain, Yol. II, pp. 259, 260. 

ITONAMA. 

Indians of the province "los Moxos/' in Bolivia, on the 
Nonama and Machupa rivers, Missions Magdalena and San 
Bamon. 



lURIS — KACHIQUEL. 89 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIKR. 
Hebyas, Saggio, pp. 92, 93. 
A. D'Oebichtt, L'Homme Am&icain, Vol. I, pp. 162—164 ; Vol. II, p. 208. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 572—576. 

A. D'Obbigny, L'Homme Americain, Vol. II, pp. 239, 240. 

lURIS. 

Brazilian Indians of the province of Rio Negro. Martius 
(VII, 196) calls them Yuris, and gives the names of ten tribes 
—among them the Tucano-Tapuiija. 

WORDS AND VJCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary (of Ninety-eight Words), pp. 521 — 541 of : Altbbd B. Walla-CB, 
A Narrative of Travels on the Amazon and Bio Negro. London^ Beeve and Ck>., 
1853, 8yo. 

KACHIQUEL. 

Indians of the province of Solola, in Guatemala. The Kiche 
(Quiche), and Zutugil (and Poconchi), belong to the same stock. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

BsinBDiCT PB ViLLACANAS wTote, according to Adelung (Mithridates, Vol. HI, 
part 8, p. 5, note **), a Vocabulary and a Grammar of the Cakohiquel lan- 
guage, of which he was Professor at the TJnirersity of Guatemala. Juarros does 
not, however, mention his name. 

Numerals in the E^chiquel Language (1 — 100), by Colonel Galikdo, p. 214 
of Vol. XVIII of the First Series of: Bulletin de la Soci^t6 de GMographie* 
Farit, 1832, 8vo. 

Nouvelles Anuales des Voyages, VoL IV. Paris, 1840, 8vo, pp. 8 — 36. 

Gompendio de Nombres en la Lengua Cakchiquel ; por el P. Fb. PANTATiBON de 
Guzman, ciira del itinero por el Real patronato en esta doctrina y Cura de S. 
Maiie de Jesus Pache. £n 20 dias del mes de Octubre, 1704. MS. in 4to, 
pp. 336, in the possession of £. G. Squier, 

Hebyas, Saggio, pp. 226, 227. 

Db. £abl Sohebzeb (see Popoluka). 

Vocabulario en Lengua Castellana y Guatemalteca que se llama Cakchiquelchi. 
MS. in 4to of 500 pages (of the 17th century), in the Imperial Library at Paris. 

N 



\H) KAIUAK. 



GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Benedict i>e ViLLACANAa (!«t»e Yot'abulnriea aboTc). 

r. F. Alonzo Flores, Arte do lu I/ongua Kakcliiqucl 7 paralelo de las quatro 
Lcnf;iiiii4 Metrtipolitauas que hoy inU'grau eu el reyno de Goatbemala. Aniiffua^ 

Altiioiigh Juarroii (T, p. 3^)) stntes that this "Arte" was printed, and had 
proved very urtefiil, the book wiih coii:«ulen.Hl apocryphal untdl recently, when 
tile Abl)e Brusseiir ile iiourbourt; wrote from Guatemala that he had obtained 
four copies (see K. G. Squier'8 letter in the London Athemaum^ December 8, 
1K55, No. 1M>7). It contains a comparison of the Kachiquel with the 
Quiehi^ and Zutugil* »U three being dialects of one parent stock. Flores was 
Professor of the Kakchiquel language at the San Carlos University of Guate- 
mala. 

Arte du las tres Lenguas — Cacchiquel, Quiche y Yutuhil ; por el B. P. Fsay 
Fbancisco XiSiENEZ, del orden de predicadores. 

Second division of the Padre's great work on the history, languages, and 
antiquities of Guatemala, existing, in MS. only, in t' e University Library of 
Guatemala. (For an account of this MS. see N. Triibner's paper on Central 
American Archaeology, in the London AthencBum^ May 29, 1856, No. 1492.) 

Arte de Lengua Kakchikel del usso de Fr. Estevan Torresano Pre'* Ano de 
1754. A MS. of 143 leaves, in 8vo, in the Imperial Library at Pans. 



KADJAK. 

Island of Russian America. The inhabitants, called Komiges^ 
belong to the Eskimo stocky and speak a language similar to that 
of the Tschugazzi. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

J. BiLLiNas' Voyages (in Eussian). 8t, Petersburg ^ 1811, 4fco, p. 121. 

Mithridates, Yol. Ill, part 3, pp. 340, 341, 458, 459, 466—468; Vol. IV, 
pp. 251 — 255. (From notices taken by Robeck, Kesai^off, and officers of the 
Kussian-American Company.) 

Vocabulary of the Languages of Kamtskatka, tke Aleutan Islands, and of 
Kadjak, Appendix, No. 2, pp. 9 — 14 of: Maetin Safer, Account of the Expe- 
dition to the Northern Parts of Eussia . . -. . performed by Commodore 

Joseph Billings, in the years 1785 to 1794. London^ Cadell, jun., and Davis, 
1802, 4to. 

French translation, by J. Cast^ra. Parw, 1802, 2 vols. 870 5 VdL II, 
pp. 304—311. 

German translation. Berlin^ 1802, 8vo, pp. 399—406. 



KAWITSCHEX. 01 

Vocabulary of the Languages of the Islands of Cadiack and Oonalashka^ tlie 
Bay of Kenay, and Sitka Sound, Appendix III, pp. 329 — 337 of: Urey 
LisiANSKT, A Voyage round the World in the Years 1803, 180 i, 1805, and 1806. 
London^ John Booth, 1814, 4to. 

Chromtscheneo, Journal kept during a Cruise along the Coast of Russian* 
America, in : Northern Archives for History, Statistics, and Voyages (in Russian)^ 
St, Petersburg y 1824, 8vo, Nos. 11—18. 

Translated into German in : Hertha, 1825, pp. 218—221. 

Klapboth, Asia Polygbtta, pp. 324, 325. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 857* (Tschougatohi, Konega, 
Tschougazzi propre, Konega d'lle Cadjac.) 

Vocabularies to A. Ghillatin*s Synopsis, in Vol. II of : Archseologia Americana 
No. 1, b (from Klaproth), p. 3G8. 

Some "Words (3) and Numerals (1 — 5) of Kadjak compared with Unalachka and 
Eskimo, p. 123 of: K.E. Yoesf Baeb and Gr. tox Hkluersek, Beitrage zur 
Kenntniss des Russischen Reiches und der angranzenden L&nder Asiens, Vol. I. 
St, Petersburg, 1839, 8vo. 

Jtan Veniimin'OT, Samjetschania o Koloschenskom, Kadjacks-kom Jasikaa. 
St, Petersburg, 1839, 8vo. 

Sitka and Kailjack Words compared, p. 163 of: R. G. Latha^t, The Languages 
of the Oregon Territory ; pp. 154-166 of Vol. I of: Journal of the Ethnological 
Society of London. Edinburgh, ISIS, 8vo. 

Eskimo and Kadjak words (21) compared, pp. 110 — 113 of the Eskimo and 
English Vocabulary of H. B. Al. Admiralty. London, 1850> 12mo, oblong. 

Sack>skix, Kadjak Vocabulary compared with Kangjulit dialects, Tschngmjute 
and Namoller languages,, pp. 488—512 of Vol. VII of: Erman, Archir fur wissen- 
schaftliche Kunde yon Russland. Berlin, Reimer 18-19, 8?o. 

■ 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICKS. 

A few Notices from J. VEyiAMixoT, pp. 142, 143 of : Erman*s Archiv, Vol. 
Vn (1849). 

KAWITSCHEN. 

North of Fraser^s River, on the north-west coast, and on the 
opposite shores of Vancouver's Island. Their language bears 
affinity to that of the Haeeltzuk. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Kawitchen Vocabulary, by Dr. John Scouleb, in : Journal of the Royal Geo- 
graphical Society of London, Vol. XI. London, 1841, 8?o, pp. 242, 244—246. 



W* KKHKS — KINAI. 



KERES, QUEUES. 

Pii('l)I() Iiuli.ins, living; at Sail Dics^ and the neigh boi 
|)iu'l)l()s. TIk* Kiicttmi (Ki-()-a-iiuO or Tvguas (Tiguex) at 
|)oiniii;;(): the Corhltnni, or Quime, near Sandia and Isl 
aiul tilt* Aroma, vltv tribes l)(*lon<;in<; to them. 

WOKIJS AM) VCH'AlirLARIKa. 

Ki'H'K ViH-nlMtlnrii'!* — \ 1 1 1, Kiwonii ; XIV, Co<*hitemi ; XV, Acoma — taken 
Iji I'll NAM A. \V. Wiiiri'i.K. Pp. KG— Hi) of Chap. V of the: Report apt 
thr Iiiiiiaii 'I'rihi'!*, by Lii'iiti-iiitnt A. \V. Whipple, Thomas Ewbank, and Prof. Y 
\\\ luriH-r, mil it'll to Lit'uteiiuiit A. \V. Whipple's Report on the Route near th 
It.'iih runilU'l (Vi>l. H i»r thi' l*ai*ilic Kailroud Reports. WatlUngtom^ 1855, etc., 
•It..). 

Si'i' hImi " Purhlii Iiiilians/' LiKi'TEXANT SiMP80>'*8 Vocabuhiry, No. 1. 

KICIIAIS, KEECniES, KEYES. 

Indians of the Oreat Prairies, related to the Pawnees, living on 
th(r Cauadiau Rivtrr, near Cliouteau's old trading-house. 

AVOlinS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Kicliai Vocabulary, pp. G5 — 68 of Lieutenant A. "W. VVTiipple, Thos. Ewbank, 
nnd Prof. AV. AV. Turncr*s Report upon the Indian Tribes ; added to lira- 
tenant A. W. Wliipplo*!) Report on the Route near the 35th Parallel (VoL II 
of the PaciGc Railroad Reports. Washington^ 1855, 4to). 

Fifteen Kiehai Words compared with the Pawnee, Ricaree, Witchita, and 
ITueeo. Ibid.y pp. 08, 09. 

KIKKAPU, UKAHIPU. 

Tribe of the Shawanoe nation^ ])etween the Mississippi and Lake 
Michipjan. 

AVOKDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
Smith Babton, Now Views — Comparatiye Yocabularies ; and from him, in : 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 303. 

KIN AT, KENAI, KENAIZE, TTYNAI. 

Indians of Russian America at Cook^s Inlet and the Lakes 
Iliamna and Kisshick. Their language belongs to the great 



KINAI. 93 

Athapascan (or Tinne) family. They call themselves " Tnaina'* 
men. Sagoskin distinguishes four dialects of the Elinai lan- 
guage, among which are the Inkilik, Inkalit, and Ingelmut. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Wdrtersammlung aus der Sprache der Elinai (from Datddoff and Rezakotf), pp. 
59—68 of: J. Ton Krusenstem, Woertersammlungen aus den Sprachen einiger 
Yulker des Sstlichen Asiens und der Nordwestkuste yon Amerika. St. Petershurg^ 
1813, 4to. 

Chvostot I Datidofp, Puteschestwie w Ameriku (Voyage to America, in 
Bussiau), St. Petersburg^ 1810, 1812, 2 vols. 8?o. Vol. II, Appendix, pp. xiii — 
xxTiii. 

Cferman translation, by C. J. Scholtz. Berlin^ 1816, 8to. 

Vocabulary of tbe Languages of the Bay of Kenay, Appendix No. Ill, pp. 329 — 
337 of: Uret Lisia>'8KT, a Voyage round the World in the Years 1803 — 1806. 
London^ John Booth, 1814, 4to. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 212, 213, 230, 231, 235, 237, 238. (From 
Besaxoff, Davidoff, Lisiansky, and others.) 

n, 4, of the Comparative Vocabularies, pp. 305 — 3G7 to A. Gallatin's Synopsis 
(Vol. II of the Archseologia Americana, from Kisanoff). 

Beprinted under No. F, II, pp. 99, 101 of the Vocabularies in VoL II of : 
American Ethnological Society's Transactions. 

Balbi, Atlas £thnograpliique. Tab. XLI, No. 854, 855 (Ougagliakmuzi-Kinaia, 
Kinaitsa). 

Von "Wbanqel, in : K. E. von Far and Gr. von Helmersen, Beitrage zur 
Kenntniss des Russischen Reichs und der angr&nzcnden L&Dder, St. Petersburg, 
1839. Vol. I, p. 259. 

Ttynai Vocabulary (of the Dialects Inkilik, Inkalit, and Ingelmut), firom L. 
Sagosein*s Travels (m Russian). St. Petersburg, 1847-48, 2 vols. 8vo. Pp. 481 
— 487 of Vol. VII of : A. Ebman, Archiv fur wissensohaftliche Kenntniss von 
Bussland (Berlin, Reimer, 1819, 8vo) ; and also in Vol. I of the: Denkschriflen 
der Russischen Geographischen Gesellschaft zu St. Petersburg (Weimar^ 1849, 
Svo), pp. 3 . . . — 3 . . . The Inkiiik and Inkalit Vocabularies reprinted in : BrsCH- 
mann's Great Comparative Vocabulary, Athapask. Sprachst. Berlin, 1856, 4to, 
pp. 269—318. 

Wortverzeichniss der Elinai Sprache (from Datidoff, Resanoff, WbangeIi, 
KBrsENSTEBN, and Lisiasskt), pp. 233 — 249 ; and Grosses Wortverzeichniss des 
Athapaskischen Sprachstammes oder der Athapaskischen und Kinai-Sprachen, 
pp. 269— 318 of: J. C. £. BrsCHMA>^N, Der Athapa^kische Sprachstamm. Berlin, 
1856, 4to. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Mithridates, VoL III, part 3, pp. 232—236. 



9 4 KIOWA YS — KN I8TENAUX. 



KIOWAYS. 

Roving Indians of Texas. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A Vocabulary of their Language has been taken by the United States Boun- 
dary Commissioner, John B. Bahtlett. 

Kioway Vocabulary, taken from Andres Nuiiares, a Mexican, who was five years 
a captive among tiiem, by Lieutenant A. W. Whipple, on pp. 78—80 of Lieu- 
tenant Whipple, Thomas E wbank, and Prof. W. W. Turner's Report upon the Indian 
Tribes, added to Lieutenant Whipple's Report on the Route near the 35th Parallel 
(Vol. II. of the Pacific Railroad Reports. Washington, 1855, 4to). 

Also : Seventeen Kioway Words compared with Shoshonee Affinities. Ibid., p. 80. 



KNISTENAUX, KUISTENAUX, CUEES. 

Called also Killisteno, northernmost tribe of the Algonkin 
stock, between the Rocky Mountains and Hudson's Bay. 
Kindred dialects are spoken by the Nehethawa, Monsonik, 
Nenawehk, Abbitibbe, and were spoken by the Attikameg, who 
have entirely disappeared. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Edwabd Umebeville, The Present State of Hudson's Bay to which 

are added A Specimen of Five Indian Languages London^ 

Walker, 1790, 8vo, pp. 179 et seq. 

German translation, by E. A. W. Zimmermann, Helmstedt^ 1791, 8vo ; 
gives the dialect of the Nebethawas or Kalisteno. 

Names of the Moon, and Examples of the Knistenaux and Algonquin 

Tongues, pp. cv, cvi, cvii — cxvi of : Alexander Mackenzie, Voyage from Mon^ 

treal through the Continent of North America J^ndon^ Gadell, 

jun., and Davis, 1801, 4to. 

French translation, by J. Cast^ra. Paris, Dentu, 1807, 8vo, pp. 261—274. 

German translation. Samhurg, 1802, 8vo, pp. 118 et seq. 

* 
N.B. — The Knistenaux Vocabulary is reprinted, pp. 133—141 of: New 

Travels among the Indians of North America ; being a compilation 

from Lewis and Clark, and .... others, with a Dictionary of the Indian 

Tongue. Compiled by William Fishes. Philadelphia, James Sharan, 

1802, 12mo. Also in the popular book : Events in Indian History 

also an Appendix containing an Indian Vocabulary, Philadelphia, 

G. Miles and Co., 1842, 8vo, pp. 529- 533. 



KXISTEXALX. 95 

A Specimen of the Cree or Knistenaux tongue, which is spoken by at least three- 
fourths of the Indians of the north-west country on the east side of the Kocky 
Mountains, pp. 385 — 4C»3 of: Daniel William Habmox, A Journal of Voyages 
and Travels in the Interior of North America .... to which are added .... 
considerable Specimens of the Two Languages most extensirely spoken .... 
Andocer^ Massachusetts^ Fhigg and Gould, 1820, 8to. 

Mithridates, ToL III, part 3, pp. 418, 419 (firom Mackenzie), and theNehethwa 
(from Umfretillb). 

Killisteno, or Cree, in the Vocabularies of Indian Languages. Appendix 
(part 4, pp. 449—459 of Vol. II) to ; Wixliam H. Keating, Narratire of an 
Expedition to the Sources of St. Peter's Biver .... performed in the year 1823 
.... under the command of Stephen H. Long, Major, U. S. T. E. Philadelphia^ 
Carey and Lea, 1824, 2 vols. 8vo. 

Vocabulary taken by Professob Say, and printed also in the : Astronomical 
and Meteorological Records, and Vocabularies of Indian Languages, taken in 
the Expedition for Exploring the Mississippi and the Western Waters, under 
the command of Major S. H. Long. Philadelphia^ 1822, 8to, pp. Ixx, Ixxxviii. 
And in the Comparative Vocabulary of various Dialects of the Lenape 
.... together with a Specimen of the Winnebago, pp. 135 — 148 of the 
reprint of: Db. Edwabds, Observations on the Mohegan Language ; pp. 81 — 
160 of: Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, second series. 
Vol. X. Boston^ Phelps and Farnham, 1823, 8vo. Bepnnt, Boston, Little 
and Brown, 1843, 8vo. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 819. (Knistenaux propre, Cree). 

IV, 7, of the Comparative Vocabulary, pp. 305 — 367 of A. Qallatin'a 
Synopsis, etc., in Vol. II of: Archsologia Americana (from Habmon and 
Mackenzie). Beprinted, partly, under N, IV, 1, p. 106 of the Vocabularies in 
Vol. II of: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

Beiso des Pbinzbn Maximilian zu Wied in das Innere von Nordamerika in 
den Jahren 1832 bis 1834. Coblenz, 1839, 1811, 2 vols. 4to; Vol. II, pp. 505 
—511. 

Vocabulary of the Principal Indian Dialects in use among the Tribes in the 
Hudson's Bay Territory .... Cree, pp. 322 — 328 of Vol. II. of : John McLean, 
Notes of a Twenty-five Years' Service in the Hudson's Bay Company. LondoHy 
Bichard Bentley, 1819, 2 vols. 12mo. 

Vocabulary of the Chipewyan Tongue, with Cree and English translations, pp. 
387—395 of Vol. II of : SiB JoH» Bichabdson, Arctic Exploring Expedition. 
London^ 1851, 2 vols. 8vo. 

Note, — The Cree from a very full alphabetical MS. Vocabulary, found by 
Bichardson at the Caultere House (trading port). 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

J. HowsE, A Grammar of the Cree Language, with which is combined an 
Analysia of the Chippeway Dialect. London, 1841, 8vo. 



96 KOLT8CUANES — ROLUSCHES. 



KOLTSCHANES, GALZANES. 

Indian nation of Russian America, north of the River Atna. 
Divided into many tribes. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIKS. 

Yon Wrangbl, in : K. E. toq Bar and G. Ton Helmersen, Beitrage sur 
Kenntniss des Bussischen Reicbs und der angr&nzenden Lander Anens, St, 
Fetertburg, 1839, 8to ; Tol. I, p. 259. 

Beprinted in the Great Comparative Vocabulary pp. 269—318 of: BusCHiCABiry 
Athapaskischer Sprachstamm. Berlin^ 1856, 4to. 

KOLUSCHES. 

In Russian America, at Sitka Bay and Norfolk Sound. The 
Tschinkitans belong to them. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

G. FoBSTEB, Geschichte der Reisen an der Nordwestlicben und Norddstlichen 
Kiiste yon Amerika. Berliuy 1791, 3 vols. 8vo ; Yol. Ill, pp. 142 et seq. (from 
Pobtlock), 155, 169, 175, 216 (from Dixon). 

A Yojage round the World, but more particularly to the North-west 
Coast of America, performed in 1785 — 1788, in the " King George," and 
"Queen Charlotte," Captains Portlock and Dixon. By Captaiv Geobgb 
DixoK. London, Goulding, 1789, 4to, pp. 32, 360, 48, twenty-two plates. 
French translation, by M. Lebas. Parity 1789, 2 vols. 8fo. 
Same, by Captain Nathaniel Pohtloce. London, Stockdale, 1789, 4to, 
pp. 450, twenty plates. 

Abridgment of Portlock and Dixon's Yoyage. London, Stockdale, 1789, 
8to, pp. 272, map and plate. New title, ibid., 1791, 8vo. 

Yoyage autour du Monde pendant les ann^es 1790, 1791 et 1792, par L. Mab- 
CHAND ; pr^c^d^ d'une Introduction Historique .... par C. L. Claret Fleurieu. 
Paris, imprimerie de la B>6publique, 1799, 4 vols. 4to. Yol. I, pp. 587 et seq. 

Yoyage de La Perouse autour du Monde, public conform^ment au D^ret du 22 
Avril, 1791, et r^dig^ par L. A. Milet Mureau, General de Brigade. Paris, 1797, 
2 Tols. 4to, and atlas. 

German translation — Berlin, 1799, 2 vols. 8vo ; Yol. I, p. 339. 

Chvostov I Davidofp, Puteschestwie w Americu, St. Petersburg, 1812, 2 vols. 
8vo. Appendix, pp. 1 et seq. 

WSrtersammlung aus der Sprache der Koljuschen (from Bezanoff, Lisianskt, 
and others), pp. 47 — 55 of: J. v. Krusenstem, Woertersamnilungen aus den 
Sprachen einiger Ydlker des dstlichen Asiens und der Nordwestkiiste von Amerika. 
St. Petersburg, 1813, 4to. 



KONZA — KULA-NAPO. 97 

Mithridatos, Vol HI, part 3, pp. 212, 213, 224, 226—228, 235, 237 ; Vol. IV, 
pp. 251—253. 

Balbi, Atlas Etbnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 851, 852 (Eolouches, Tchinkitans). 

No. XXVII, 62, of Vocabularies to : A. Gallatin^s Synopsis, etc., VoL II of: 
Archsologia Americana, p. 371 (from Dayidoff). 

No. G, XVIIT, 1, p. 102 of the Vocabularies in Vol. II of: Transactions of the 
American Ethnological Society. 

Nossow, Koloschian Tocabularj (Oerman, Russian, and Kolosch), in Kussian 
letters, pp. 271 — 274 of; K. E. voy Bie and Or. yon Helhebsen, Beitrage jsur 
Eenntniss des Bussischen Beichs und der angranzenden Lander Asiens. St. PeUrt^ 
burff, 1839, 8to, Vol. I. 

Eleven Words compared with Atna and Ugalenze, p. 99, ibid, 

Jtan Vekiahinoy, Sapiski ob ostroyach Unalaschkinskago otdjela. (Notes on 
the Islands of the District of Unalaschka). St. Petersburg, 1840, 3 toIs. 8to. 

Jyak Venlaxikot, Samjetsehania o Koloschenskom i Kadjackskom. Si. Petert* 
hury, 1846, 8to. 

W. ScHOTT, Etwas uber die Sprache der Koloschen in : Erman's Archiv fiir 
die wissenschaftliche Kunde Ton Russland. Berlin, 1843 ; Vol. Ill, pp. 439 — 445. 

Gomparatire Vocabulary of the Athapascan, Eauai, and Koloschian Languages, 
pp. 269 — 318 of: Buschmanit, Athapaskischer Sprachstamm. Berlin, 1856, 4to. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
W. SCHOTT, Etwas iiber die Sprache der Koloschen (see Vocabularies aboTc). 

KONZA, KANZE, K^VNSAS. 

Indian tribe belonging to the Dacota stock, like the Sioux and 
Osage, on the northern banks of the Kansas River. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Smith Babton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies (Akansas). 

T. Sat, Vocabularies, pp. LXXII — LXXVIII of: Astronomical and Meteoro- 
logical Becords and Vocabularies of Indian Languages, taken on the Expedition 
.... of Major S. H. Long. Philadelphia, 1822, 8vo. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 778. 

Beise des Pbi^zen J^Iaximiliaii zu "Wikd, et<5. Coblenz, 1839. 2 vols. 4to 5 
Vol. II, p. 504. 

KULA-NAPO. 

One of the Clear Lake Bands in north-western Califomia. 

Their language is spoken by all the tribes occupying the Large 

Valley. 

o 



98 KUSKOKWIMES — KUTANAE. 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 



Geobge Gibbs, Yocabulary, in: Sblioolcrafl's Indian Tribes of tho United 
States, Vol. Ill, pp. 425—434. 



KUSKOKWIMES, TCHWAGMJUTES, KUSKUT- 

SCHEWAK, OR KUSHKUKCHWAKMUTES. 

Tribe of Russian America, between the rivers Nushagak^ 
Ugajak^ Chu]itna^ and Kuskokwina, on the sea-shore. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Von Wbangel, Koskokwim (Russian and German) Vocabulary, pp. 259 — 276 
of: K. E.Ton Bar and Gr. von Helmersen, Beitr&go zur Kenntniss des Bussischen 
Beichs und der angranzenden L&nder Asiens. fit. Petersburg ^ 1839, 8vo, Vol. I, 
printed in Russian letters. The Names of the Months and of some Planets are 
given ; ibid., pp. 134, 135, 

Reprinted in the Comparatiye Table of the Dialects spoken by the Behring's 
Strait and Labrador Eskimos (the former called Kuskutchewak), pp. 869 — 382 
of Vol. II of : Sis John Riohabdson's Arctic Exploring Expedition. London, 
1851, 2 Tols. 8vo. 

Sagoskin, Tchwagmjute and Xvrigpak Vocabularies (compared with Knskok- 
wime, Kadjak, and Namoller), pp. 488 — 512 of Vol. VII of: Erman's Archiv flip 
wissenschaftliche Kunde yon Russland. Serlin, 1849, 8yo. 

kutanIe, kutani, kitunaha, 

OR KUTNEHA, COUTANIES, FLATBOWS. 

Indian tribe near the sources of the Mary River, west of the 
Rocky Mountains. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Reise des Prinzen Maximilian zv Wied. Coblenz, 1839 — 1841, 2 yols. 4to j 
Vol. II, pp. 511-513. 

Vocabulary, 2 D of the Vocabularies of North-western America, pp. 569 — 629 
of: Horatio Hale's Ethnography and Philology, United States Exploring Expe- 
dition. Philadelphia, Lea and Blanchard, 1846, foUo. 

E, XXII, and pp. 97, 99 of the Vocabularies, Vol. II of the : Transactions of 
the American Ethnological Society. 

Vocabulary in J. Howse's Vocabularies of certain North American Indian Lan- 
guages — Kutani, Flathead, Okanagan, Atnaj pp. 199 — 206 of: Proceedings of 
Philological Society, Vol. IV. London^ 1850. 



KUTCHIN— LENCA. 99 

KUTCHIN, LOUCHEUX. 

Indians of North-western America, on the banks of the Yukon 
or Kutehi-Kutehi. They belong to the Athapascan family. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary of the Kutchin, of the Yukon or Kutchi-Xutchi. Drawn up by Mb. 
M'MuBBAT ; to which the Chepewyan Synonymea were added by Mbs. M*Phebsow. 
Pp. 382 — 385 of Yol. II of: Sir John Bichardson's Arctic Exploring Expedition. 
London, 1851, 2 vols. Sto. 

Reprinted and compared with the Athapascan and Xinai Languages, pp. 179 — 
222, 269— 318 of: Buschmann, Athapaskischer Sprachstamm. Berlin^ 1856, 4to. 

LAYMON. 

Indians of California, near Loretto, related to the Cotchimi. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hebtas, Saggio, pp. 234—237. 

P. DucBUE, in : Christoph. GK)ttl. von Murr, Journal zur Xunstgeschichte und 
«ur allgemeinen Literatur. Numherg^ 1775 — 1790, 17 vols. Svoj Vol. XII, 
pp. 268 et seq. 

Chbistoph. Gottl. ton Mttbb, Nachrichten von yerschiedenen li&ndem des 
Spanischen Amerika, aus eigenbandigen Aufi>atzen einiger Missionarien der Gesell- 
schaft Jesu herausgegeben. Halle, Heudel, 1809, 2 vols. 8yo ; Vol. II, p. 394. 

Mithridat«8, VoL m, part 3, pp. 198, 199, Cochimi-Leymon (from P. 
Ducbtje). 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Mithridates, Vol. HI, part 3, pp. 194.— 198. 

LENCA. 

Spoken by the Indians of the same name^ inhabiting principally 
the central parts of Honduras (Central America), especially the 
departments of Comayagua and Tegucigalpa. For an account 
of them see "Notes on Central America, particularly the 
States of Honduras and San Salvador, etc." By E. G. Squier. 
8vo. New York, 1855. Note C of Appendix. 



1 00 LULE — LUTU AM I . 

There are several dialects of the Lenca language^ viz., Guaji- 
quero, Opatoro, Intibucat, and Similaton, of all of which Squibr 
presents vocabularies. See pp. 371 — 373 of tlie Spanish edition 
of the work above quoted, viz. : " Apuntamicntos sobre Centro- 
America, particularmcnte sobre los Estados dc Honduras y San 
Salvador, etc., por E. G. Squier, Antiguo Ministro de los 
Estados Unidos cerca de las Republicas de Centro- America; 
traducidos del Ingles por un Ilondureno (Don Leon Alvarado)." 
Paris ^ 1856, imprenta de Gustavo Gratiot. 8vo, pp. xii and 
384, maps and plates. 

LULE. 

Once a powerful nation in South America (Paraguay, near the 
River Vermejo), perhaps identical with the Mataras, who were 
much feared by the Spaniards. They were divided into Ltde^ 
Isiftine, Tokistine, Oristine^ and Tonocot^. Their language 
bears a close ressmblance to the Vilela. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

P. Antonio Machoni de Cohdebia (Procurator-general of the Jesuits in Para- 
guay), Arte y Vocabulario de la Lengua Lule y Tonocote. Madrid, 1732, 12mo. 

Heevas, Origine, pp. 29, 37, 41, 44, 45, 49, 121, Tabb. XLIX, L et seq. 

Hebyas, Saggio, pp. 102, 103. 

Heetas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, p. 161 et seq., 223. 

Hebyas, Aritmetica, pp. 97, 98. 

Mithridates, Vol. IV, pp. 508, 516, 517. 

Balbi, Atlas Etbnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 456. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

P. Antonio Machoni de Coedebia (see Vocabularies above). 

Mitbridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 510 — 512, 514 — 516 (from the extract made by 
Hervas, from Machoni), 

LUTUAMI, CLAMETS. 

•Also Tlamatl, Indians of south-western Oregon, near the 
Clamet Lake. 



V W M w ^ 



MACONIS — MAHA. 101 



WOKDS AND VOCABULARIES. 



No. 9, U, of the Vocabularies of North-western America, pp. 569—629 of: Hob. 
Hale, Ethnography and Philology of the United States Exploring Expedition. 
Philadelphia, Lea and Blanchard, 1846, folio ; and F. XXIX, pp. 98, 100 of the 
Vocabularies in Vol. II of : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 



MACONIS. 

Brazilian Indians, nearly exterminated by the Botoeudos. The 
remnants of this tribe live now near Porto Seguro, in the 
province of Espiritu Santo. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Beise.des Pbinzen Maximilian zu Weed Neitwied. Frankfurt^ 1820, 1821, 
2 Tols. 4to J Vol. II, pp. 323—325. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethuographique, Tah. XLI, No. 503 (Maconi de Minas Novas). 



MAHA, OMAHA. 

On the junction of the Platte and Omaha rivers and the Mis- 
souri. They belong to the Sioux-Osage family. The Ponchas 
(Poncars, Puncaws) speak a kindred dialect. 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

T. Sat, Vocabularies of Indian* Languages, pp.'lxxii — Ixxviii, Ixxxi — Ixxxii, in : 
Astronomical and Meteorological Becords, and Vocabularies of Indian Languages 
taken on tlie Expedition for Exploring the Mississippi and its Western Waters, 
under the command of Major S. H. Long. Fhiladelphia, 1822, 8vo j pp. Ixx— ^ 
Ixxxriii. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethuographique, Tab. XLI, No. 779 (from Say). 

A. Gallatin's Comparative Vocabulary, No. VI, 39, pp. 305 — 367 of: Archseo- 
logia Americana, Vol. II ; and S, VI, 5, p. 117 of the Vocabularies in Vol. II of: 
Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

Beise des Pbinzen Maximilian ztj Wied, etc. Cohlenz, 1839 — 1841, 2 vols. 
4to J Vol. II, pp. 599—612, 632. 



102 MAI A. 



MAIA, MAYA. 

"Language of the Indians of Yucatan. Tlie Puctunc is a dialect 
of this language spoken in the southern part of Vera Paz. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hehvas, Vocabolario, pp. 161 ct seq. 

Heevas, Saggio, pp. 115, 116. 

Hebyas, Aritmetica, pp. 110, 111. 

Heetas, Origine (Yucatan) pp. 29, 41, 48, 121, Tabb. XLIX, L, LI et seq, 

P. Pedro Beltean de Santa Eosa Mabia, Arte de el Idioma Maya redueido a 
succiuctas reglas y Semi-lexicon Yucateco. Mexico^ Bernard de Hogal, 1746, 4to. 

Pebfecto Baezo, Yocabulario de las Lenguas Castellana y Maya, pp. 215 — 
217 of Yol. XYIII of the First Series of the : Bulletin de la Soci^te de G^ographie. 
JPariSi 1832, 8vo. 

Maya Numerals (1 — 10) and five Words in the Puctunc Dialect, given by 
Colonel G-alindo, pp. 213, 214 of Vol. XYIII of the First Series of the : Bulletin 
de la Society de Geographic. Paris, 1832, 8vo. 

Mithridates, Yol. Ill, part 3, pp. 15, 23. 

Malte Betjn, Oemalde von Amerika und seinen Bewohnern. Uebersetzt Ton 
G-reipel. Leipzig, 1824, 2 vols. 8vo. 

Yocabulaire Maya, avec les noms de nombre et quelques phrases k I'usage des 
voyageurs (Spanish, French, and Maya), pp. 79 — 90 (89, 90, phrases) of : Fbed. 
Waldeck, Voyage Pittoresque et Arch^ologique dans la province de Yucatan. 
PariSy Bellizard, Dufour, and Co., 1838, folio. 

Pp. 29 — 33, ibid., in a list of cities, villages, etc., in Yucatan, the significa- 
tion of many of the names is given. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographiqu?, Tab. XLI, No. 676. 

A brief Maya Vocabulary (English and Maya, with the Numerals annexed), 
Appendix, pp. 255 — 263 of: B. M. Noeman, Earables in Yucatan. New Tork^ 
J. and H. G. Langley, 1842, 8vo (tliird edition, Hid., 1843, 8vo), plates, pp. 304. 

A. Gallatin, Notes on the Semi-civilized Nations of Mexico, Yucatan and 
Central America, in : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. I 
{New York, Bartlett and Welford, 1845, 8vo), Article I, pp. 1—352 ; pp. 9, 10, 
104, 108, 298—304. 

Nouvelles Annales des Voyages. Paris, 1840, 8vo, Yol. lY, pp. 9 — 37. 

According to the notices given by CogoUudo, the historian of Yucatan 
(Madrid, 1688, folio), several MS. Dictionaries and Vocabularies have been com- 
piled of the Maya Language j the principal one having been that of Feat Axonzo 



MAINAS. 103 

DB SoLAiTA (" Un Vocabulario Muy copioso "), and particularly that of Fbay 
Antonio de Ciudad Beal, which was called the " Calepino," and which, according 
to Cogolludo, held more than " 1200 pliegos de limpio." 

Another Vocabulary is mentioned to have been written by Feat Bebnabdino 
DE Valladolid, who was known by his perfect pronunciation of the language. 

In Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 16, besides the above, Andbeas de AtendaSo 
is mentioned as having compiled a Maya Vocabulary. Cogolludo says nothing of 
this author. 

GBAMMABS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

The Grammars of Feat Louis de Villalpando, improved by Archbishop 
Landa^ those by Fbay Julian de Quabtes and by Fbay Juan Cobonel exist, 
or rather have existed, merely in MS. Cogolludo mentions, besides, an ** Arte mas 
Breve," compiled by Fbay Juan de Azevedo. 

Fbancis Gabriel de San Bonatentuba, Arte del Idioma Maya. Mexico^ 
1560, 8vo. 

Norman, p. 240, says that this Grammar is founded upon the one of 
Villalpando, improved by Landa. In Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 16, 
an edition {Mexico^ 1684) is mentioned, from which Hervas, assisted by the 
Missionary Don Rodriguez, had made an extract, the MS. of which Adelung 
made use of. 

P. Pedbo Beltban de Santa Rosa Mabia, Arte de el Idioma Maya reducido 
a succinctas regulas y Semi-lexicon Yucateco. Mexico^ Be^ardo de Hogal, 
1746, 4to. 

An Extract from this Grammar is given in Chapter XIV of : B. M. Norman, 
Rambles in Yucatan {New York, F. and H. G. Langley, 1842, third edition, 
1843, ibid., 8vo), pp. 241 — 249 ; and also in : A. Gallatin, Notes on the Semi- 
civilized Nations of Mexico, Yucatan, and Central America, in Vol. I of: 
Transactions of the American Ethnological Society {Neto York, Bartlett 
and Welford, 1845, 8vo), Article I, pp. 45 — 47, and Appendix No. 1 (3), 
pp. 252 — 268 ; for which Article also MS. notes of Don Pio Pebez, Gefe 
politico of Peto, Yucatan, given in 1842 to John L. Stephens, have been used. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill,, part 3, pp. 13 — 23 (taken from the above-mentioned 
extract of Hervas from San Bonaventuba). 

A Yucatecan Grammar, translated from the Spanish into Maya, and abridged 
for the Instruction of the Native Indians, by the Rev. J. Ruz, of Merida. 
Translated from the Maya into English by John Kingdom, Baptist Missionary, 
Belize, Honduras. Belize, printed at the Baptist Mission Press, 1847, 8vo, pp. 68. 

MAINAS. 

Indians of South America, on the banks of the rivers Pastazas, 
Nukurai^ and Chambira. 



104 MAIPURES. 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hebvas, Saggio, p. 94 (Lingua di Cerros). 

Hebtas, Catal. d. Ling., pp. 61, 62 (List of the Known Languages (16) in the^ 
provinces of Maynas and Maranou). 
Hebyas, Origine, Tabb. XL VIII, L et seq, 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES, 
Mithridates, Yol. Ill, pp. 592, 595, 596. 

MAIPURES. 

Indians of the Upper Orinoco and on the banks of the Ventuari. 
Their language is very generally spoken in the Orinoco regions, 
and particularly in the Mission of Atura. Dialects are spoken 
by the Avanes, Kaveres, Parenes, Guypunavi, and Chirupa. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

QiLiT, Saggio di Storia Americana, Vol. I, pp. 44, 35 ; Vol. Ill, pp. 185 — 375. 
Translated in Ch. G-. yon Murr, Eeisen einiger Missionarien der G^sellschaft 
Jesu in America. Niirnber^f, 1785, 8vo ; pp. 106 et seq. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 616, 617, 618, 628, 629, 631 (Maipure, Ayanoe, Kavere, 
and G-uypunavoe). 

Heevas, Origine delle Lingue, pp. 80, 104, 120, 121, and Tabb. XII, XIII, L, 
LI et seq. ; and for the Dialect of the Ayanes, pp. 164, 165, Tabb. XIII, LI et seq. 

Hebyas, Saggio, pp. 110, 111 ; and Avanes, pp. 87, 88. 

Hebyas, Vocabolario Foliglotto, pp. 161 et seq. 

Hebyas, Aritmetica, p. 104. 

A, YON Humboldt, Eeise, Vol. IV, p. 128. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 611 (Maypure), 

Some (7) Maipure Words compared with Arrowact, Atoray, Moxos, and 
Quichua, in Appendix VI, p. 166 of: J. A. yan Heuyel, El Dorado. New York^ 
Winthester, 1844, 8vo. 

A. D'Obbigny, L' Homme Am^ricaiii, Vol. II, p. 274. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 614—623. 



/ 



V» 



MAKOBY — MANAOS. 105 



MAKOBY. 

Indians of the Chaco, on the banks of the Vermejo River, by 
descent and language related to the Abipones. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hebvas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, pp. 161 et seq. 

(He used for this the MS. of the Missionary Baimund Tebmeyeb.) 

Mithridates, Vol. TIT, pp. 497, 505, 506. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 496, 497, 501, 502, 504, 505. 

MALALIS. 

Indians of the Brazilian province Minas Geraes, who speak a 
language very difficult to pronounce (Martius, I, No. 7). 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIKS. 

Beise des Pbinzen Maximilian zu Wied Neitwied nach Brazilien, in den 
Jahren 1815—1817. Frankfurt, 1820, 1821, 2 vols. 4to ; Vol. IT, pp. 321— 
323. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 508. 

MAME (POKO-MAM?). 

Indians of Guatemala, speaking a language related to the 
Kachiquel. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NC PICES. 

Fbat HiEBomrMus Labios, Arte de la Lengua Mame. Mexico, 1697. 

Ternaux-Compans . (Biblioth^ue Am^ricaine, p. 60, No. 806) gives the 
following title : Arte de la Lengua Mame, por Fr. Hieron. Larios, s. L, 1607. 

MANAOS, MONOAS. 

Brazilian Indians of the province of Para, between the rivers 
Urariva and Chinara, and particularly on the Rio Padavari 
.(Martius, VII C, No. 328, and Voyage, Vol. Ill, p. 1125). 

p 



106 MANDANS^MAQUAS. 



WORDS AND YOCABULAKIES. 

Dialogues in Manao and Portuguese, " Cademo da doutrina pella Lingua Monoa 
ou dos Manaos," and '*Compendes da doutrina christaa que se nianda ensinar 
com preceyto, anno de 1740," on twenty pages, in MS. No. 223 of the King 
George IV Collection, British Museum (see Fbed. Feakc. db la FiQANrEE^, 
Catalogo dos Manuscriptos Fortuguezes existentes no Museu Britannico. lAshoGi 
imprensa nacional, 1853, 12mo, p. 185). 

MANDANS, WAHTANI. 

Indians of the Upper Missouri, nearly extinguished by the small 
pox in 1838. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

C. S. Bafikesque, Atlantic Journal and Friend of Knowledge. Fhilculelphia, 
1832, 8 vo J p. 132. 

A. Gallatin, Synopsis, etc., in Vol. II of: Archseologia Americana, Appendix 
No. IV, Vocabularies, VI, p. 379. 

(Names of chiefs, from the treaty of the Mandans with the United States, 
July, 1825, with corresponding Minetare words.) 

Mandan Vocabulary, Appendix B, pp. 262 — 265, Vol. 11. of: Gtno, Catlik, 
Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American 
Indians, fourth edition. London and New York, Wiley and Putnam, 1842, 2 yols. 
8vo. 

Eeise des Pbinzen MAXiMiLLiN zu Wied. Coblenz, 1839 — 1841, 2 toIs. 4to j 
Vol. II, pp. 514—562. 

James Kipp, Mandan Vocabulary, pp. 446 — 459 of Vol. Ill of : Schoolcraft's 
Indian Tribes of the United States ; and 

Mandan and Upsasoka, and Mandan and Minetare Words compared, ihid,^ 
pp. 255, 256. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Beise des Frinzen Maximill^n zu Wied. Cohlenz^ 1839 — 1841, 2 toIs. 4to ; 
pp. 514—562. 

MAQUAS. 

Extinct tribe of the Iroquois in eastern Pennsylvania and 
western New York. Their language, as it appears by the oldest 
vocabulary, bears some affinity to the Wyandot and Mohawk. 



MASCHACARIS MASSACHUSETTS. 107 

At a later period we find the Onondaga sometimes called 
Maqua. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Yocabula Maliakuassica, pp. 155 — 160 of: Lutheri Cathechismus dfwersatt 
pa American Yirginiske Spraket. StockhoUny 1696> 12mo. 

A Collection of Words (English, Maqua, Delaware, Mohican) by Bev. John 
Ettwein, from Zeisbebgeb's MSS. (pp. 41 — 44. of No. 1, Vol. I, of the : Bulletin 
of the Historical Society of Pennsylyania. Philadelphia^ printed for the Society^ 
1848, 8vo). 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

The Library of the American Philosophical Society of Philadelphia has the 
following MSS. :— 

Dayid Zeisbebgeb, Essay of an Onondaga Grammar, or a short Introduction 
to learn the Onondagua, alias Maqua, Tongue, 4to, pp. 67. 

Chb. Ptbljeus, Affixa nominum verborum Linguae Maquaics, 4to, pp. 25. 

Chb. Pykljeus, Adjectiva, nomina et pronomina Linguae Maquaicse, cum 
nonnuUis de verbis, adverbiis et preepositionibus ejusdem Linguse, 4to, pp. 86. 



MASCHACARIS. 

Indians of the Brazilian province of Porto Seguro, on the 
banks of the rivers Pardo, Belmonte, and Santa Cruz. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Beise des Pbinzen Maximilian zu Wied Neitwied. Frankfltrt, 1820, 1821, 
2 vols. 4to J Vol. II, p. 319. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 502 (Machacali des bords du 
Jiquitinhonha) . 



MASSACHUSETTS INDIANS, NATICK. 

These Indians belong to the Algonquin stock — ^were formerly 
very numerous, but are now much reduced in numbers. The 
Montagnards and Skoffiy west of Hudson^s Bay, are related to 
them. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

John Eliot (see Ghrammars, second edition, Appendix, pp. xlix. — Ht). 

JosiAH' Cotton, Vocabulary of the Massachusetts (or Natick) Indian Language. 
Edited, from the original MS. (in Cambridge), by John Pickering, pp. 147—267 



108 MASSACHUSETTS. 

of Vol. II of Ihe Third Series of: Collections of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society. Cambridge^ priuted by E. W. Metcalf and Co., 1830, 8vo. (Copies 
with separate title : Cambridge^ 1829, 8yo.) 

Contains : Pp. 148 — 151, Notice of the MS., with Bemarks on the Author's 
Ethnography and the Pronunciation of the Language, by J. P. ; 155 — 213, 
Vocabulary j 244 — 257, Appendix (from Eliot*s Primer). 

Specimen of the Mountaineer or Sheshatapoosh-Shoish, Skoffie, and Micmao 
Languages. Vocabulary from an Indian boy, Gbbriel, pp. 16 — 33 of Vol. VI of 
the First Series of : Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society for the 
year 1799. Boston^ printed by Samuel Hall, 1800, 8vo. 

Smith Babton, New Views, eto. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 387-389 (from Eliot), and Skoffies and 
Mountaineers, ibid.^ pp. 418, 419. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 613. 

Comparative Vocabulary (of Forty-five Words) of various Dialects of the 
Lenape (or Delaware) stock of the North American Indians, by T. Say, in Note 
15, pp. 135 — 145, to Joha Pickering's edition of Dr. Edwards's Observations on 
the Mohegan Language, in : Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 
Vol. X of the Second Series. Boston, priuted by Phelps and Farnham, 1823, 8vo. 
Rjprinted, Boston, Little and Brown, 1843, 8vo ; pp. 81 — 160. 

Sco93[es (from Q-abriel), No. IV, g, Sheshatapoosh (Indian boy, Gkibriel), 
Labrador, No. IV, 11, and Massachusetts (from Eliot and Cotton), No. IV, 15, 
of A. Q-allatiu's Comparative Vocabulary, pp. 305 — 367, 369 of Vol. II of: Archseo- 
logia Americana. 

Also, under O, IVj 1 (Sheshapootoeh) , 2 (Skoffie\ p. 100, and P, IV, 1 (Mas- 
sachusetts, p. 108), of the Vocabularies, in Vol. II of: Transactions of the 
American Ethnological Society ; and an extract. Article I of the Appendix, p. 491, 
to : John W. de Fobeest, History of the Indians of Connecticut. Hartford^ 
Uamersley, 1852, 8vo. 

SiLA-S Wood, Sketch of the First Settlement of the several Towns of Long 
Island. Brooklyn, 1824, 8vo. Reprinted, ibid,, Spooner, 1828, 8vo. 

James Macauley, History of New York. New York, Gould and Banks, 
1829, 3 vols. 8vo ; Vol. II, pp. 264, 265 (from Wood). 

Rev. M. Heckeweldee, Comparative Vocabulary of the Lenni Lenape proper, 
the Minsi dialect, the Machicanns, Natik or Nadik, Chippeway, Shawano, and 
Nanticoke. MS. in the Library of the American Philosophical Society at Phila- 
delphia. 

Vocabulary of the Massachusetts Indians, extracted from Eliot's translation, 
pp. 288—299 of Vol. I of : Henry Schoolcraft, Historical and Statistical In- 
formation respecting the History, Condition, and Prospects of the Indian Tribes 
of the L^nited States. Collected under the direction of the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs. Philadelphia, Lippincot, Grambo, and Co., 1851, 4to. 



MATAGUAYA — MATLACINGA. 109 

Comparative Vocabulary of Pamptico of North Carolina, Natic or Massa of 
3Iassachii3etts« and Chippewa of Michigan, pp. 556, 557 of Vol. V of: School- 
ciiAFT^s Indian Tribes of the United States. 



GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

The Indian Q-rammar begun ; or, an Essay to bring the Indian Language into 
Kules, for the help of such as desire to learn the same, for the furtherance of the 
Gospel among them. By John Eliot (Isaiah 33, 19,-66, 18; Dan. 7, 14; 
Psalt. 19, 3; Mac. 3, 11). Cambind^fe, printed by Marmaduke Johnson, 1666, 4to. 
Reprinted, with Notes and Observations by John Pickebino and Duponceau, in : 
Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Second Series, Vol. IX. 
Boston, 1832, 8vo ; pp. 223—366. 

Contains: Pp. 223 — 242, the Massachusetts Language: Introductory 
Observations, by John Pickeking ; dated Salem, July, 1821. 
Pp. 243—312, reprint of Eliot's Grammar. 

Pp. (313 — 341) i — xxix. Notes and Observations on Eliot's Grammar. 
Addressed to John Pickering, by Peteb S. Duponoeatj. 
Pp. (342 — 360) XXX — xlviii, Supplementary Observations, by the Editor. 
Pp. (361—366), xlix — liv, Index of Indian Words in Eliot's Grammar; 
including Select Words firom his Translation of the Bible. 

There are separate copies of this edition mentioned (Brunet, II, p. 173) ; 
dated Boston, 1822, 8vo. 

Extracts from Eliot's Grammar are given in : J. H. M'CuUoch's Besearches 
concerning the Aboriginal History of America. Baltimore, Lucas, 1829, 8vo j 
Chap. II, on the Languages of the American Indians, pp. 42 — 53. 

The Indian Primer. Boston, 1720, 12mo. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 381—387. 

E. a Vail, Notice sur les Indiens de I'Amferique du Nord. Paris, 1840, 8vo ; 
p. 55, Conjugation. 

MATAGUAYA. 

Indians of the Gran Chaco, belonging to the Pampeen or Pata- 
gonian stock. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

A. D'Oebignt, L'Homme Amt'ricain, Vol. IT, pp. 109, 110. 

The Padres of the Mission of Tanja have compiled a MS. Vocabulary of 
this language. 

MATLACINGA. 

A Mexican language, mentioned by Prichard as being spoken 
in the valley of Toluca, in Mexico. De Souza mentions: — 



110 MAYORUNAS — M ENIENG. 



^^Arte y Diccionario de la Lengua Matlazinga, y Sermones 
y Catecismo en diclia Lengua, por Fr. Andres Castro/^ 
Castro went to Mexico in 1542, and not only learned the 
Nahuatl (Mexican), but also the Matlazinga and Toluca, which 
De Souza characterises as ^' Lengua la mas dificil de la Nueva 
Espaiia/^ He died in the Convent of Toluca, in 1577, leaving 
his MSS. in the Library of Santiago, Tlateluco, where they 
were seen by De Souza. 

According to the same authority, Fray Diego Basalanqub, 
who was elected, in 1623, Provincial of the Convent of San 
Luis Potosi, Mexico, and who afterwards retired to the Convent 
of Charo, composed both a grammar and dictionary of the Mat- 
lazinga language. De Souza also mentions that a volume of 
Sermons, in the Matlazinga, was composed by the Fr. Geronimo 
Bautista, Franciscan, in the year 1562, in the College of 
Tlateluco, in Mexico. He adds, " This language is one of the 
most difficult of New Spain ;" and also states that the volume 
above referred to exists in the library of the College just men- 
tioned. 

MAYORUNAS. 

Brazilian Indians of the province do Rio Negro, on the banks 
of the Rio Yavari (Martius, No. 184, and Vol. Ill, p. 1195 
of his Voyage) . 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des Mayorunas ciyilis^s (k T Amazon), Vocabulary XXV, pp. 299, 
8vo, of: Castelnau, Vol. V, Appendice. 

Langue dos Mayorunas sauvages (au Yavari), Vocabulary XXVI, pp. 800, 
801 of: Oastelnatt, ibid. 

MENIENG. 

Indians of the Brazilian province of Espiritu Santo, on the 
banks of the Rio Belmonte. They speak now the Portuguese 
language, but used formerly a dialect of the Kamakan. 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 

Reise des Peinzen Maximilian ton Neuwied, etc. Frankfurt, 1820, 1821, 
2 vols. 4to; Vol. II, pp. 212. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, Ko. 506. 



MENOMONIES MEXICAN . Ill 



MENOMONIES. 

Indians of the Algonkin stock, north of Green Bay, Wisconsin, 
between the Chippeways and Winnebagos. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Comparison of Words and Sentences in the Dialects of the Ottawaws and Me- 
nomonies, pp. 392 — 398 of: A Narrative of the Captivity and Adventures of John 

Tanner, during Thirty Years' Eesidence among the Indians Edited by 

Edwin James, M.D. New TorJc^ Q-. and C. and H. Carvill, 1830, 8vo. 

No. IV, 25, of the Comparative Vocabularies to A. GhiUatin's Synopsis, etc., 
in Vol. II of: Archseologia Americana, pp. 305 — 367, from D. Doty (MS.), 
James, and Notices in the Department of War, United States. Keprinted under 
O, IV, 5, p. 113, of the Vocabularies in VoL II of the : Transactions of the Ameri- 
can Ethnological Society. 

Menomony Vocabulary, by Mr. Bbuce, Indian agent at Green Bay, pp. 470 — 
481 of Vol. II of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the CJnited States. 



messissatjger. 

Indians of the Algonkin stock, south of Lake Superior. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Smith Babtoit, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates, VoL III, part 3, pp. 415, 416 (from Smith Baeton). 

No. IV, f, of the Vocabularies to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, Vol. II of: Archseo- 
logia Americana, p. 375 (from Smith Baeton). 

Comparative Vocabulary, etc., of T. Say (Notes to John Pickering's edition of 
Edwards's Observations on the Mohegan Language, in : Collections of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society, Second Series, Vol. X. Boston, printed by Phelps and 
Famham, 1823, 8vo. Reprinted, Boston^ Little and Brown, 1843, 8vo j pp. 135 — 
145. 

MEXICAN, NAHUATL, AZTEK. 

The Mexican language, properly called ^'Nahuatl/^ seems to 
have been used from the valley of Mexico down to Nicaragua. 
It was spoken originally by the Nahuatlacs, occupying the valley 
of Mexico, or Anahuac ; and the Tolteks, in subjugating the 
Nahuatlacs, are said to have adopted their language. The 



112 MEXICAN. 

Spaniards, finding the Azteks at the head of the Chichimek 
Empire, the denomination "Azteks" has also promiscuously 
been used for Mexican, or Nahuatl. The languages spoken by 
the Niquirans of Nicaragua, and the Tlascalteks of San Salvador 
are dialects of the Nahuatl. 

WOKDS AND VOCABULAKIES. 

Andbes de Olmos (see Grammars). 

Fray Alonso de Molina, Vocabulario en Lengua Castellana y Mexicana, com- 
puesto por el muy reverendo Padre Fr. Alonso de Molina, de la Orden del bien 
aventurando nuestro Padre San Francisco. Dirigido al may exoelente Senor 
D. Martin Enriquez, visorrey desta Nueva Espanna. En Mexico, en casa de 
Antonio Spinosa, 1571, 2 parts, in 1 vol. folio. 

First part : Yocabulario en Lengua Castellana y Mexicana, 4to, 126 leaves. 

Second part : Yocabulario en Lengua Mexicana y Castellana, 2, 162 leayes. 

The Dedication is dated 1569. The: Yocabulario en Lengua Castellana y 
Mexicana {Mexico, 1555, 4to), mentioned by Antonio in his Biblioteca 
Hispana Nova, I, 37, may therefore be a mistake, and refer to the Yocabulary 
of De Olmos, annexed to the Grammar of the same author. 

Di&logos en Lengua Mexicana, por Fb. Elias de Sak Juan Bautista. Mexico, 
1598, 8vo. 

Pedbo de Arenas, Yocabulario Manual de las Lenguas Castellana y Mexicana. 
Mexico, Henrico Martinez, s. a. (privilege, dated 1611), small 12mo. Beprinted, 
ibid., 1728, in 12mo, and 1793, in 12mo. 

Yocabulario Manual de las Lenguas Castellana y Mexicana, en que se contienen 
las palabras, preguntas y respuestas mas comunes y ordinarias que se suelen 
ofrecer en el trato y comunication entre Espanoles 6 Indios. Compuesto por 
Pedbo de Abends. Beimpreso en Puebla, en la Imprenta del Hospital de S. 
Pedro a cargo del C. Manuel Buen Abad. Ano de 1831, 12mo ; pp. 11,131. 

Two parts : Spanish-Mexican, pp. 1 — 93 j Mexican-Spanish, pp. 94 — 131. 

A short Yocabulary, p. 241 of: Joan, de Laet, Novus Orbis. Lugduni Jiata' 
vorum, Elzevir, 1633, folio. 

GiLii, Saggio di Storia Americana, Yol. Ill, pp. 228, 355 et seq. 

Diccionario Espafiol y Mexicano, pp. 248, 8vo, 1742 (sine loco et auctore) ; in 
the collection of C. A. Uhde, Esq. 

Ant. Coubt de Gebelin, Monde Primitif, Yol. YIII. I'aria, 1772 ; pp. 523, 
524, 525. Beprinted on pp. 332 — 334 of: J. B. Scherer, Recherches Histo- 
riques et Geographiques sur le Nouveau Monde. Paris, Brunet, 1777, 12mo. 

R. FOBSTEB, Bemerkungen auf seiner Reise um die Welt. JBerUn, 1783, 8vo, 
p. 254. 

Hebvas, Saggio, pp. 116—118. 



MEXICAN. 113 

Hesyas, Voc^ibolario Poliglotto, pp. 161 et seq. 

Hebvas, Origine, pp. 27, 29, 37, 41, 44, 45, 120, 121, Tabb. XLIX, L, LI 
et seq. 

Heevas, Aritmetica, pp. 63, 64, 107—109. 

Smith Babton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies, gives also words 
of the Indians of Colhua. 

NouveUes Annales des Voyages, Paris, 1840, Svo^. Vol. IV, pp. 8 — 36. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLT, No. 701 (Azt^que)* 

• Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 87, 88, 105, 106, 212, 213. 

A. Q-ALLATIN, Notes on the Semi-civilized Nations of Mexico, etc.. Vol. I of: 
Transactions of the American Etlinological Society. New York, Bartlett and 
Welford, 1845, 8vo ; pp. 9, 10, 298—304. 

E. G. Sqfieb, Nicaragua. New York, Appleton, 1852, 2 vols. 8vo 5 Vol. II, 
p. 314 (compared with Niquiran^ which is a Mexican dialect). 

American Ethnological Society's Transactions, Vol. IH, p. 101. 

Nahual Vocabulary of the Balsam Coast (San Salvador) and of Tzalco, 
pp. 351, 352 of: E. Or, Squieb, Notes on Central America, particularly the States 
of Honduras and San Salvador. New York, Harpers, 1855, 8vo. 

Aztec G-Iossary in : Evangeliarium, Epistolarium et Lectionarium Aztecum, sire 
Hexicanum, ex antiquo codice authographo Bebnabdini Sahagunii depromptum, 
nunc primum cum interpretatione, adnotationibus, glossario edidit B. Biondelli. 

This important monument of the ancient Aztec language will be published 
at Milan, in 5 parts, 4to, with fac-similes. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Anpbes de Olmoz, Ars et Vocabularium Mexicanum. Mexici, 1555, 4to. 

Brunet (III, p. 559) gives this title from Equiara. 

Vater gives the following title: A. db Olmoz, Q-rammatica et Lexicon 
Linguae Mexicanee, Totanacse et Huaxtecee. Mexico, 1555, 1560, 2 yoIs. 4to. 

In the Mithridates, III, 3, p. 92, the same title is given, but added to it : 
Cum Catechismo, Evangeliis, Epistolisque Mexicanice. Mexico, 1560, 2 vols. 
4to. 

Olmoz also wrote a Vocabulario Megicano, an Arte and Vocabulario in the 
Totonaca language, and an Arte, Vocabulario, Catecismo, Confessionario, and 
Sermons in the Huaxteco or Huasteca language. 

The Vocabularium Mexicanum (Mexici, 1855 4to) is sometimes mentioned 
as a separate work. 

Alonso de Molina, Arte de la Lengua Mexicana y Castellana. Mexico, en 
casa de Petro de Ooharte, 1571, 8vo. 

Fadbe Antonio del Rinoon, de la Compania de Jesus (Natural de S. Puebla 
de los Angelos), Arte de la Lengua Mexicana. Mexico, 1595, small 8vo. Be- 
printed, ibid., 1598, 12mo. 

Q 



llvl; MEXICAN. 

D. P. DiEOO DE Galdo Guzscav, del Onlcn do S. Aug., Arte Mezicano 6 
Gramatica dela Lengua Mexieana. Kii Mfjico^ vidua de Bernardo Calderon, 1643, 
Sfo (Mithridates, III, 3, p. 01, " 1612," »vo). 

IIoBACio Carociii, Arte Moxicano Copioi«o, para quo aiu maestro se paeda 
aprender la Leiigua. Mexico, lGi5, -Uo. 

Mithridati.*«, III, 3, p. 02, giveri the (tame title, but in Latin : Ars Copio- 
Bissiiua Liiiguu} Moxicautc ut dine magistro possis illam condiacere. Afexieij 
1615, Mo, 

The following may be citlier an extract from or a new edition of the book :-^ 
Comi)eudio del Arte de la I/rngua Mexieana del P. HoKACio Carochi 

dispuesto con brevedad, claridad y propiedad por el P. Ignatio de Paredea. 

Mexico, en la imprenta de la Bibliotcca Mexieana, 1759, 4to, pp. 24, 202. 

Padbe F. AnousTisr de VETAycuBT, Arte de la Lengua Mexieana. MexieOf 
1673, 4to, 49 leayee. 

Arte de la Lengua Mexieana, compucsto por el Bachilleb Doir Antovio 
Yabquez Gajstelu El Bey de Fiouecoa, Catredrdtico de dicha Lengua en los 
Reales Collegios de San Pedro y San Juan. Sacalo a luz por orden del iUustr. Sr. 
Dr. D. Manuel FemandeE de Santa Cruz, Obispo de Puebla. Pnehla de Iom 
AngeloSy 1689, 4to, 53 leaves. Reprinted, Mexico, 1693, 4to. Beprinted, Cor- 
regido segun su original, por el Br. D. Antonio de Olmeda y Torre. Mexico^ 
1716, 4to. Another edition, Puebla, 1726, 8vo, pp. 55. 

Arte de la Lengua Megicana segun el Dialecto de los Pueblos de la Nueya Oal- 
licia, por Fb. Juan Guebba. Mexico, 1699, 4to. 

Fbancisoo de Atila, Predicador, cura ministro por su Majestad del Pueblo de 
la Milpar y lector de Idioma Mexieana, Arte de la Lengua Mexieana y breves platicaa 
de los mysterios de N. Santa F6 catolica y otras para exortacion de su obligation 
a los Indies. Mexico, 1717, small Svo, pp. 78. 

P. F. Manuel Pebez, Arte de cl Idioma Mexicano. Mexico, pp. 98. 

Cablos de Tafia Zenteno, Arte Novissima de la Lengua Mexieana. Mexico^ 
Yiuda de Bernardo Hogal, 1753, 4to, pp. 22, 58. 

I). Jose Augustin de Aldama y Gueyaba, Arte de la Lengua Mexieana. 
Mexico, en la imprenta de la Biblioteca Mexieana, 1754, 4to. 

GiLiT, Saggio di Storia Americana, Vol. Ill, pp. 228 et seq., 355 et seq. 

ILlfael db Sandoyal, Arte de la Lengua Mexieana. Mexico, 1810^ Svo, 
pp. 62. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 93—104. 

Nouvelles Annales des Voyages. Paris, 1840, Svo ; Vol. IV, pp. 8 — 86. 

Consulta a los estudiosos sobre la Lengua Mexieana, in the : Museo Mexicano. 
Mexico, 1843, 8vo j No. 2, Vol. I (April 15, 1843), pp. 251—253. 

A. Gallatin, Ghrammatical Notices Mexican Language, Appendix 1 

to his Notes on the Semi-civilized Nations of Mexico, in Vol. I of the : Transaq- 



MEXICAN. 115 

tions of the American Ethnological Society. New Torky Bartlett and Welfdrd, 
1845, 8foj pp. 215—245. 

(From the Grammars of Caboohi and Tapia Zenteno.) 

JoH. Kabl Ed. Bfschmann, Tiber die aztekischen Ortsnamen. Erste Abtheilung. 
Berlin, Diiramler, 1853, 4to, pp. 205. More particularly pp. 20 — 37, 140 — 172 
(the Aztek Language in Nicaragua). 

MANUSCRIPTS. 

Arte de la Lengua Megicana, por Fb. Alonso Rakqel, provincial de Tula 
(1529 — 1546), according to De Souza. 

FocHEB (Fb. Juan) was one of the earliest ecclesiastics of Mexico, where he 
died, 1572. Wrote, according to Torquemada : Arte de la Lengua Megicana. 

Fb. Antonio Padilla Davila, native of Mexico, and Member of the Imperial 
Convent of that city in 1576, wrote: Arte para aprender la Lengua Megicana ; 
which is highly spoken of by Pinelo and Antonio. 

Arte de la Lengua Chichimeca, Diccionario de la Misma, y Catecismo en la Misma, 
por P. Diego Diaz Panoua, natural de Durango. Pangua died 1631, leaving, 
according to De Souza, this MS. 

Don Babtolmi Alva translated three poems of Lope de Vega into Mexican, 
which, according to De Souza, are preserved in the Library of the College of San 
Gregorio, in Mexico. 

Elementos do la Gramatica Megicana, por Don Antonio Tobab Cano y 
MoCTEZVMA, 1662. MS , according to Eguiara. 

Vocabularies y Dialogos Megicanos, por Juan Fbanoisco 1bagk)bbi. Written 
about the year 1780, and, according to De Souza, in the Library of the University 
of Mexico. 

Arte de los artes, 6 Florilegio de los artes de la Lengua Megicana, que se han 
Escrito ; y en que con nuevo y facil modo se ensefia su Gramatica, por Fb. 
Antonio Kosa Lopez Figueboa. MS. in the Convent of San Francisco, in 
Mexico. 

Arte y Yocabulario de la Lengua Megicana, preparados para las perusas, por 
Fbay Diego Osobio, Cura de Chalco y de S. Jose de Megico. 

Beglas para aprender con facilidad la Lengua Megicana, por Fb. Bebnabe Paez, 
Catedratico de Idioma Megicano en la Universidad de Megico. MS., according to 
Eguiara. 

Arte y Diccionario de la Lengua Megicana, por Illm6. D. Fb. Juan Ayoba, 
Obispo de Michoacan ; mentioned in the Cronica de la Provincia de San Gregorio. 

Art« y Diccionario de la Lengua Megicana, por Fb. Fbancisco Solcedo. 4to, 
in the Library of the Franciscan Convent of Guatemala. 

Arte, Vocabulario, y Catecismo Megicanos, por Jllm6. D. Fb. Fbancisco 
XnCBNSZ, primero Obispo de Oaxaca. Died in Mexico, and, according to De Souza, 
was the first who composed a grammar of the Mexican language. 



116 MIAMI. 

Arte de la Lengna Mogicana, y Diccionario trilingne Latino, Espaflol, y 
cano, por Fb. Bervabdino Saiiaoun. MS., probably in tbo Conrent of Sail 
Francisco, in Mexico. 

Mercado (P. Nicolas), Jesuit of Mexico, 1700 : went us Missionaiy to 
Cinaloa, whoro ho was the firot to discover that the Indians of the south coast 
■poke a dialect of the Mexican, in consequence of which he wrote : Arte de la 
Lengua Megicana, segun el diaictrto que usan los Indios do la Costa del sur de 
Cinaloa. 



MIAMI. 

Indians of the Algoihquin stock, formerly of the eastern part of 
Upper Louisiana, now west of the Mississippi. The lUinois 
and the Piankashaws are related to them. 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

SMixn Babton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

C. F. VoLNET, Tableau du Climat et du Sol des !E!tats Unis d'Am^qne, aniri 

d'^claircissemonts sur les sauyages. Paris, 1803, 2 toIs. 8vo ; Tome II, 

p. 433. 

Nouvelle edition, Paris, 1822, 2 parts in 1 vol. 8vo, p. 402. 

English translation, by C. B. Brown, A View of tlie Soil and Climate of 

the United States of America, with supplementary remarks on 

the Aboriginal Tribes of America, by C. F. Volney. Philadelphia, 1804, Svo. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 363, 364 (from Volney and Babtok). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 808 (Miami, Illinois) . 

No. IV, 21, of the Comparative Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, Ac., in 
Vol. II of : Archffiologia Americana, pp. 305, 367 (from MS. authorities of J. 
Thobnton, and in the War Department). 

And (partly) G N., 1, p. 112, of the Vocabularies in Vol. II of the : Transac- 
tions of the American Ethnological Society. 

Charles Handy, Indian agent, Miami Vocabulary, pp. 470, 481 of VoL II 
of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

N.B. — In the library of the American Philosophical Society of Philadelphia 
are : — 

MS. Vocabulary of the Miami, by Volney. 

MS. of a Comparative Vocabulary of the Lenni Lenape and Miami, or 
Twightwoe. 

MS. of the Miami, from the mouth of the Little Turtle, and of the inter- 
preter William Wells, by W. TnoBNTON. 



MIJB — MIKMAK. 117 



GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

C. F. YoLNEY (see Vocabularies). 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 353—356 (from Volnit). 

MIJE (MIXEP). 

Mexican language. According to De Souza, the Fray Fernando 
Bejarano, native of Anteguera, in Oaxaca, and prior of the 
Dominican convent of that town, passed a considerable part 
of his life amongst the Mije Indians, and perfected himself 
in their language, which, this author adds, '^ was very difficult 
to pronounce, as well as to write in Roman characters.'' 
Bejarano died in 1703, leaving in the hands of Fr. Antonio 
Zeballos, vicar of Quezaltepec, in Oaxaca, the following 
MSS. : — '^ Vocabulario de la Lengua Mije/^ "Sermones en 
Lengua Mije y en Castellano." A copy of the first was also 
preserved in the convent of Tuquila. 

The Fray Marcos Benito, according to the same authority, 
originally of the Dominican convent of Valencia del Cid, went 
to America as missionary amongst the Mije Indians, and com- 
posed — " Arte de la Lengua Mije, y Dcvocionario Manual de los 
Misterios del Rosario, en la Misma Lengua.'' 

MIKMAK. 

French name for the inhabitants of Acadia, Nova Scotia, New 
Brunswick, and Maine. The following are considered dialects 
of the Mikmak: — 1. Nova Scotia -, 2. Terre neuve Island', 
3. The Miramichi of New Brunswick. They are closely related 
to the Etchemins and Souriquois. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Specimen of the Mountaineer, or Shesha-tapoosh-shois, Skoffie, and Micmac 
Languages (by the Indian boy Gabriel), pp. 16—33 of Vol. VI of the First Series 
of the: Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society for the year 1799. 
Boston^ printed by Samuel Hall, 1800, 8vo. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 401—404 (from the boy Gabriel). 



118 MIKOKAYAK. 

Baxbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 817 (Qtispesien et Mikmak). 

No. IV, 12, of the Comparati?e Yocabiilary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc., 
(Vol. II of : Archeeologia Americana, pp. 305 — 367), and under Q, IV, 3, p. 109, of 
the Vocabularies, Vol. II of : American Ethnological Society's Transactions. 

The Indian of New England and the North-eastern Provinces : A Sketch of 
the Life of an Indian Hunter — Ancient Traditions relating to the Etchemin Tribe, 
their Modes of Life, Fishing, Hunting, etc. ; with Vocabularies in the Indian and 
English, giving the Names of the Animals, Birds, and Fish, the most complete that 
has been given for New England in the Languages of the Etcliemins and Micmacs. 
These are now the only Indian tribes to the north-east, the former inhabitants 
of New England, that have preserved their language entire, being the oldest and 
purest Indian spoken in the Eastern States. This book is the only work of its 
kind to be had. It contains the elements of the Indian tongue, and much that is 
new to the reading public, especially the names by which the red men of the forest 
designated the natural objects before them. Middletown^ Connecticut^ Charles 
H. Felton, printer, 1851, 12mo, pp. 24. 

The first edition had on the title-page the words — " Derived from Nicola. 
Tenesles, by a Citizen of Middletown." Afterwards, this was covered by a 
slip of paper, bearing the words — " By Joseph Babbatt, M.D., Member of 
several Learned Societies." The preface is signed J. B. The book is written 
by the said Nicola Tenesles. 

Vocabularies of the Apache and Micmac Languages (the Micmac by S. T. Band, 
Protestant Mission at Halifax, December 10, 1853), pp. 578—589 of Vol. V 
of : Schoolcrailb's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Micmac, from P. Matn^abd's MS. Notes in: A. Chdlatin's Synopsis, etc. 
(Archseologia Americana, Vol. II), pp. 227 — 232. 

Nicola Tenesles, by Joseph Barratt, M.D. (see Vocabularies). 



MIKOKAYAK, MILCOCAYAC, 

Language spoken by the Indians of the Chilian province of 
Cuio. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Ltrrs de Valdivia, Arte Grammatica, Vocabulario, Catecismo y confessionario 
en Lengua Chilena y en las dos Lenguas AUentiac y Milcocayac, que son las mas 
G^enerales de la provincia de Cuio en el reyno de Chile y que hablan los Indios 
Guarpos y otros. Lima, 1607, 8vo. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
LuTS DE Valditia (sce Vocabularies). 



MILICITE — MINETARES. 119 



MILICITE. 

Indians of New Brunswick, belonging to the Huron stock. 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

S. T. Eand, Milicite Numerals (1—1,000,000,000), pp. 690, 691 of Vol. Y of : 
Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 



MINETARES. 

Indians on both sides of Knife River. Their language has 
three dialects, viz. : 1. The Minetare proper, called also ^^ Gros» 
ventre^'' Bigbellies, Ehatsar. 2. The Alasar or Fall Indians. 
3. The Kattanahaws, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

E. Umfbetille, The Present State of Hudson's Bay to which are 

added .... a Specimen of Five Indian Languages. London, Walker, 1790, 8vo. 
German translation, hy E. A. W. Zimmermann. Helmstadt, 1791, Syo. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 254 (of Fall Indians, from Umfrbtillb). 

Pbofessob T. Say, Vocabularies of Indian Languages, in : Astronomical and 
Meteorological Records and Vocabularies of Indian Languages, taken on the 

Expedition for Exploring the Mississippi under the command of Major 

S. H. Long. Philadelphia, 1822, 4to ; pp. Ixxii — Ixxviii, Ixxxiv — Ixxxv. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnograpliique, Tab. XLI, No. 780» 

Beise des Fbinzen Maximilian zu Wied, etc. Coblenz^ 1839—1841, 2 toIs. 
4to ; Vol. II, pp. 499, 500, 562, 590, 

No. VI, 40, of the Comparative Vocabularies to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc., 
(Vol. II of: ArchsBologia Americana, pp. 305, 367) ; also to No. VI, ibid., -p. 379, 
Names of Chiefs (from Say). 

The Vocabulary partly reprinted, under S, VI, 6, p. 117 of the Vocabularies in 
Vol. II of: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

Affinities of the Upsaroka or Crow Language with that of the Sedentary Mis- 
souri, Minetares, and those of the Sioux, pp. cxy, cxyi, of Vol. II of: American 
Ethnological Society's Transactions. 

Minetare and Mandan Words compared, p. 256 of Vol. Ill of ; Schoolcbaft's 
Indian Tribes of the United States. 



120 MINSI MIXTEKA. 

MINSL 

Tribe of the Delaware or Lenape. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Smith Baeton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Pbof. T. Sat, Comparatiye Vocabulary of various J)ialects of the Lenape 
Stock of North American Indians ; in Note 15 to John Pickering's edition of Dr. 
Edwards's Observations on the Mohegan Language (Vol. X. of the Second Series 
of the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society). Boston^ printed by 
Phelps and Farnham, 1823, 8vo j reprinted by Little and Brown, 1843 ; 8vo, 
pp. 135—145. 

No. IV, h, of the Comparative Vocabularies to A. Q-allatin's Synopsis, &c. 
(Vol. H of: Arche&ologia Americana, p. 370), and (enlarged) under P. IV, 5, 
p. Ill, of the Vocabularies, Vol. II of the American Ethnological Society's 
Transactions (from Heckeweldeb's MS.). 

Ret. M. Heokeweldeb, A Comparative Vocabulary of the Lenni Lenape 
proper, the Minsi Dialect, the Mohicanni, Natik or Nadik, Chippeway, Shawano, 
and Nanticoke. 

Rev. M. Heokeweldeb, Names of various Trees, Shrubs, and Plants in the 
Language of the Lenape, or Delaware, distinguishing the Dialects of the Unamis 
and Minsi. 

The above two MSS. are in the library of the American Philosophical 
Society at Philadelphia. 

MIXTEKA, MISTECO. 

Indians of the Mexican State Oajaea. There are six dialects 
of this language — Tepozkolula {i\iQ h^si) y Yankitlan, Tlahiakoy 
MitlantongOy Under Mixteka^ and Mixteka of the Coast. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulario del Idioma Misteco, por Fbay Fbancisco Alvabado, printed in 
4to, in Mexico, by Pedro Balli, 1593. 

Diccionario Copioso y Erudito do la Lengua Misteca, por Fb. Diego Rio, MS. 
(Eio died in Tlachiaco, in the year 1644-.) 

Hebvas, Saggio, pp. 118, 119. 

Hebvas, Origine, Tab. L. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 60. 

J. S. Vater, Proben der Deutschcn Volksmundarten : Dr. Sectzen's Lin- 
guistischer Nachlass. Leipzig , E. Fleischer, 1816, 8vo j pp. 352 — 374. 

Nouvelles Annales des Voyages. Paris, 1841, 8?o j Vol. IV, pp. 260—286. 



4 



MOBIMI MOCUBY. 12 1 



GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NGTICKS. 

Fray Antonio de los Reyes, Vicario del Convento de Tamazulapa, Arte de la 
Lengua Mixteca conforme a lo que se habla en Tepozcolula. Mexico^ 1593, 12mo ; 
pp. 16, 163 contains Notices of the Ancient History of the Indians, and of 
their mode of computing years, 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 34—44 (extract from the above). 

Arte y Grammatica de la Lengua Misteca, y Ctttecismo Cristiano en la Misma. 
(This MS., by Fb. Feancisco Oetiz, an Augustan of Mexico, was seen by the 
Bishop Eguiara in the library of the College of San Pablo, in Mexico.) 

MOBIMI (MOVIMI, MO VIM A). 

Moxos Indians of the Bolivian Missions San Francisco di Borja 
and Santa Anna. Their language is very harsh. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
Heryas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, pp. 161 et seq. 
Hebyas, Saggio, pp. 91, 92. 
Heeyas, Origine, Tabb. XLVIII, L et seq. 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 571, 572, 576. 
Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 464. 
A. D'Oebigny, L'Homme Am^ricain, Vol. I, p. 164 ; Vol II, p. 208. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
A. D'Oebighy, L'Homme Americain, Vol. II, pp. 251, 252. 

MOCOBT, TOBA. 

South American Indians, on the banks of the rivers Vermejo 
and Ypita, related to the Abipones. D^Orbigny writes their 
name " Mbocoby.^^ 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Heeyas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, pp. 161—223 (from the MS. of the Missionary 
Baimttnd Teemeyee). 

Heeyas, Aritmetica, p. 99. 

Heeyas, Saggio, p. 105. 

Heeyas, Origine, p. 37, Tabb. XLVIII, L et seq. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 478, 497, 505, 506. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 449. 

R 



122 MOCOROSI — MOHAWK. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 501, 502, 503, 505 (from Tebmeyeb'b Notices, given 
hj Herras). 

A, D'Obbignt, L*Homme Am^ricain, Vol. II, p. 98. 

MOCOROSI. 

In JuLG, the Mokorosi (Mocorosi) is stated to be the language 
of the Indians of Mexico, now perhaps extinct ; reference being 
made to a " Vocabulario de la Lengua Mocorosi.^^ Mexico, 1599, 
8vo. 

Upon this. Dr. Latham furnishes the following notice: — 
JuLG^s notice of the Mokorosi is inaccurate. The work he means 
is an ^'Arte/' etc., published in Madrid, 1699. The language, 
however, is Moxa ; and what is called the Mokorosi Vocabulary, 
is only an edition of Marban^s Arte de la Lengua Moxa. Lima, 
1701. 

MOHAVI, MOTAVE. 

Indian tribe occupying the country on both sides of the River 
Mohave, in south-eastern California. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A Vocabulary of their Language has been taken by John R. Babtlett, United 
States Boundary Commissioner. 

Mojave Vocabulary, taken by Lieutenant A. W. Whipple, pp. 95 — 101 of 
the Report upon the Indian Tribes ; added to his Report on the Route near 
the 35th Parallel, Vol. II of the : Pacific Railroad Reports. Washington^ 1855, 4to. 

MOHAWK. 

Principal tribe of the Iroquois, now in Canada west. The 
Cochnewagoes (or Cocknawaga) are a smaller tribe belonging 
to them. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary, Tome LXIII, part 1, p. 142 of the Philosophical Transactions of 
the Royal Society of London. London^ 1665, etc. 

Hebyas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, p. 239 (numerals). 



MOHEGANS. 123 

Hervas, Saggio, pp. 125, 126. 

A Primer, for the use of the Mohawk Children, in the English and Mohawk 
Languages. Montreal^ 1781, 12mo. Reprinted, London, 1786, 12aio. 

Smith Babton, New Yiews, etc.— Comparative Vocabularies; and p. 20 of the 
Appendix to the edition of 1798. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 318, 330—333 (Cochnowago and Mohawk, 
firom Smith Babton). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 795. 

No. V, 27, of the Comparative Vocabularies, etc., A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc., 
in Vol. II of the : Archflsologia Americana, pp. 303—367. 

(From MS. authorities of P. Parish and D. Dwight.) 

Reprinted A, V (1), pp. 79, 81, 83 of Vol. II of: American Ethnological 
Society's Transactions. 

Ret. Adam Elliot, of Tusearora, Mohawk Vocabulary, Appendix L, to: 
Henry R. Schoolcraft's Notes on the Iroquois. New York, Bartlett and Welford, 
1846, 8vo; pp. 264— 270— and 

Pp. 393 — 400 (Comparative Vocabulary of the Iroquois) of the same work, 
published at Albany, Pease and Co., 1847, 8vo. 

Indian Names and Places (of the St. Regis Indians, a tribe of the Caughnuwnga), 
pp. 178—181 of: Francis B. Hough, M.D., History of St. Lawrence and 
Franklin Counties. Albany, Little and Co., 1853, 8vo. 

J. HowsE, Vocabularies of certain North American Indian Languages— Mohawk, 
Iroquois, Hurons of Amherstburg, Stone Indians, pp. 113 — 121 of: Proceedings 
of the Philological Society, Vol. IV. London, 1850. (Language of the Mohawks, 
living on the Grand River.) 

MOHEGANS, MAHIKANS, MUHHEEKANEW. 

Principal tribe of the Algonquins, ou the Hudson River, from 
Esopus to Albany. They were divided into Muchqicanh (Bear 
tribe), Mechchaooh (Wolf tribe), and Toon-paoah (Turtle tribe). 
The Pequods are related to them. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Mohegan Vocabulary (of 45 words), by Peof. T. Sat (Note 15, pp. 135 — 145) 
and Index of Mohegan and other Indian Words explained in Edwards's Observa- 
tions, pp. 155 — 157 of: Db. Edwabds, Observations on the Mohegan Language. 
Edition by John Pickering. (See Grammars.) 

Mohegan, English, and Shawanee Vocabulary, pp. 209 — 210 of: J. Long, Voyages 
and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader. London, 1791, 4to. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 400, 402—404 (from Baeton and Long). 

Smith Babton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 



124 MOHEGANS. 

Balbt, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 815 (Mohegan propre— Abenalti). 

No. IV, 17, of the Comparative Vocabulary to A. €tallatin*8 Svnopsis, etc., Vol. 
II of : ArchflBologia Americana, pp. 305—367, and (partly) under P, IV, 3, p. 110 
of the Vocabulary in Vol. II of: Transactions of the American Ethnological 
Society. Also, Article 1 of the Appendix (p. 491) to John W. de Foekest's His- 
tory of the Indians of Connecticut. Rartford^ Hamersley, 1852, 8vo (from 
Jefpebson (MS.), Heckeweldee, Edwaeds, and Jenks). 

A Collection of Words (English, Maqua, Delaware, Maliican), pp. 41 — 44 of: 
Re 7. John Ettwein's Remarks and Annotations concerning the Traditions, 
Customs, Languages, etc., of the Indians, from the Memoirs of Zeisberger 
(Bulletin of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Vol. I. Philadelphia^ 1848, 
8vo). 

Comparative Chippewa and Mohegan Vocabulary (of 22 words), p. 620 of Vol. 
V of : Sohoolceapt's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

Rev, Me. Heckeweldee, A Vocabulary of the Mohicanni, taken down from the 
mouth of one of that nation born in Connecticut. (MS. in the library of the 
American Philosophical Society at Philadelphia.) 

Rev. Me. Heckeweldee, Comparative Vocabulary of the Lenni-Lenape proper, 
the Minsi dialect, the Mohicanni, Natik or Nadik, Chippeway, and Nanticoke. 
(MS. in the same library.) 



GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Observations on the Language of the Muhhekaneew Indians, in which the 
extent of that Language in North America is shown, its genius is grammatically 
traced, some of its peculiarities, and some instances of analogy between that and 
the Hebrew are pointed out. Communicated to the Connecticut Society of Arts 
and Sciences, and published at the request of the Society. By Jonathan Ed- 
WAEDS, D.D., Pastor of a Church in Newhaven, and member of the Connecticut 
Society of Arts and Sciences. Newhaven^ printed by Josiah Meigs, 1788, 8vo. 
Reprinted at Philadelphia in 1789, 8vo ; at London in 1789, 8vo j at New York 
in 1801, 8vo. 

A new edition of the same, pp. 81 — 160 of : Collections of the Massachusetts 
Historical Society, Vol. X of the Second Series. Boston, printed by Phelps and 
Eamham, 1823, 8vo, and reprinted at Boston by Little and Brown, 1843, 8vo. 

(Copies of this new edition, with separate title, Boston, 1823, 8vo, liave 
been issued.) 

The contents of this new edition are : Pp. 81—89, Advertisement to the 
present edition, by John Pickering, dated Salem, May 15, 1822. Pp. 84 — 
98, Reprint of Dr. Edwards's Observations. Pp. 98—151, Notes by the Editor. 
Note 15, pp. 135—145, contains T. Say's Comparative Vocabulary of various 
Dialects of the Lonape (or Delaware) stock of North American Indians, 
together with a specimen of the Winnebago (or Nipegon) Language (forty- 
five words in Mohegan, Lenape, Shawanese, Nanticoke, Narraganset, Munsee, 
Massachusetts, Penobscott, Abnaki, St. Francis Indians, Messisaugas, Algon- 
kin, Chippeway, Knistenaux, and Winnebago). Pp. 152—154, Psalm xix, in 



MOSQUITO. 125 

Muh-he-con-nuk, translated by Rev. John Sergeant (from Morse's Report. 
JSfewhaven, 1822, 8vo ; pp. 359, 360). Pp. 155— 157, Jndex of Moliegan and 
other Indian words, explained in Edwards's Observations. Pp. 158 — 160, 
Index of the principal matters in Edwards's Observations, and the Editor's 
Notes. 

An extract from Edwards is given in : Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 
394 — 399, where reference is made to : American Museum, Tome V, pp. 22, 
141—144. Columbus, May, 1787, pp. 672. 

Specimen of the Moheagan Language, taken at Cambridge, February 28, 1804 

(from John Konkapot, jun.), pp. 98, 99, in : Additional Memoir of the Mohea- 

gans, and of Uncas, their ancient Sachem. Collections of the Massachusetts His- 

.torical Society, Yol. IX, First Series. Boston, Hall and Hiller, 1804, 8vo ; pp. 

77—99. 

The pages 75, 76 of the same volume contain a List of the Families of the 
Tribe of Moheagan, and number of each family. By A. Holmes ; dated 
February 1, 1804. 

Some data respecting the Principles of the .... and Mahican Languages, 
pp. 618, 619 of Yol. Y of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

MOSQUITO. 

The Mosquitos, or Miskitos, who inhabit the Moskito territory 
ill Central America, are a mixed tribe, the issue of aboriginal 
Indians with negroes shipwrecked on the coast, or escaped from 
the Spanish settlements of the interior. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Captain Hendeeson, R.A., An Account of the British Settlement of Hon- 
duras ; being a Brief Yiew of its Commercial and Agricultural ^sources, Soil, 
Climate, Natural His^orj, etc., with Sketches of the Manners and Customs of the 
Mosquito Indians, and a Journal of a Yojage to the Mosquito Shore. London, 
Baldwin, 1809, 8vo, map, pp. 203. Second edition, ibid., 1811, 8vo. 

Mosquitian and English Yocabulary, pp. 170 — 172 of: Thomas Young, A 
Narrative of a Residence on the Mosquito Shore during the years 1839, 1840, and 
1841 ; with an Account of TruxiUo and the adjacent islands of Bonacca and 
Eoatan. London, Smith, Elder, and Co., 1842, 8vo, plates, pp. iv, 172. 

Yocabularium, pp. 269 — 274 of: Bericht iiber die im hoechsten Auftrage .... 
bewirkte Untersuchung einiger Theile des Mosquito Landes, erstattet von der 
dazu emannten Comission. Berlin, Duncker, 1815, 8vo, maps, pp. iv, 274, 1. 

Mosquito Yocables and Dialogues, pp. 28 — 44 of: Alex. Hendesson's Gram- 
mar (see Grammars). 

Alex. J, Cotheal, Mosquito Yocabulary, pp. 257 — 264 of: Transactions of 
the American Ethnological Society, Yol. II. 

E. G. Squier's Nicaragua (Jt^ew York, Appleton, 1852, 2 vols. 8vo), Yol. II, 



126 MOSSA. 

pp. 314, 320—323, and American Ethnological Society's Transactions, Vol. Ill, 
pp. 101, 106—110 (fi;om Cothfal). 

Brief Vocabulary of the Mosquito Language, Appentlix, pp. 363 — 366 to: 
Sam. a. Baud, Waikna j or, Adventures on the Mosquito Shore. New York, 
Harpers, 1855, 12ino, illustrations, pp. x, 3G6. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Ueber die Sprache der Mosquito Indianer, pp. 241 — 268 of: Bericht iiber einige 
Theile des Mosquitolandes. Berlin^ 1845, 8vo (see Vocabularies). 

Alexander J. Cotueal, A Grammatical Sketch of the Language spoken by 
.the Indians of the Mosquito Shore, pp. 235 — 264 of: Transactions of the Ameri- 
can Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

A Grammar of the Mosquito Language, by Alexander Henderson, Belize, 
Honduras. New Yorky printed by John Gray, 18 i6, 8vo, pp. 47. 

MOSSA, MOXA. 

Nation of the province ^^ los Moxos/' in Bolivia, South 
America. Their language is related to the Maipure* Dialects 
are- — the Baure, Tikomeri, Chuchu, Kujyeno, Mosotie, and 
Mochono or Mtichojeone^ all in the Mission S. Xaverio. 

words AND VOCABULARIES. 

P. Pedbo Mabban, Arte de la Lengua Moxa, con un Vocabulario y Cathecismo. 
Lima, Jose de Contrevas, I7ul, 12mo. Vocabulario EspaiLol-Moxa, pp. 118 —361, 
Moxa-Espanol, pp. 362—650. 

Gini, Saggio di Storia Americana, VoL III, pp. 367 et seq. 

. Hebvas, Vocabolario, pp. IGl et seq. (Moxa, dialetto Moxo). 

Hebvas, Aritmetica, p. 103. 

Hebvas, Origine, pp. 29, 37, 44, 45, 48, 49, 118, 120, 121, 136, Tabb. XI, 
XLVIII, L, LI et seq. 

Hebvas, Saggio, pp. 90, 91. 

. Alithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 466, 554, 570, 617, 618 (from Hebvas and Giui). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnograpbique, Tab. XLT, No. 612 (Moxos). 

Eight Moxos Words compared with Arrowak, Atoray, Maipure, and Quichua, 
Appendix VI, p. 166 of: J. A. van Heuvel's El Dorado. New I orA:^ Winchester, 
1844, 8vo. 

Alcide D'Obbigny, L'Homnic A mericain. Vol. I, pp. 162—164, Vocabulary of 
twenty-three words ; Vol. II, p. 2(.)8, Baure and Moxos words of 1703 and 1831 ; 
p. 229, Moxos and Muchojeenes won's. 



MUNDRUCUS — MUSKOGHEE. 127 



GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

P. Pedro Maeban (see Vocabularies), the Grammar, pp. 1 — 117. 

Q-iLii, Saggio di Storia Americana, Vol. Ill, p. 238, 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 563—569. 

A. D'Obbigny, L*Homme Am^ricain, Vol. II, pp. 203—209, 228—230. 

Arte de la Lengua Baure, escrito por el P. Antonio Megio, de la Compania de 
Jesus, despues de mucbos anos de Misonero, y muchisima aplicacion y estudio k 
dieha Lengua en las reduccicnes de la Concepcion, S. Martin y S. Nicolas, donde 
ultimamente escribio dicbo arte, 17 49, folio. (MS. in possession of Alcide- 
D'Orbigny.) 

MUNDRUCUS, MUTURICUS. 

Indians of the Brazilian province of Para, between the rivers 
Tapajoz and Mauhe (Martius, V, No. 122). 

WORDS AND VOCABULARItS. 
Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 514. 

MURAS. 

Brazilian Indians of the pro\dnce of Para, on the Rio Madeira 
(Martius, VI, A, No. 129). 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Balbi, Atlas Etbnograpbique, Tab. XLI, No. 521. 

MUSKOGHEE, CREEK. 

The most numerous tribe of the Creek confederation, in the. 
northern parts of Florida. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

SiaTH Baeton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 
Mithridates, Vol, III, part 3, pp. 292, 304, 305. 
Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique; Tab. XLI, No. 788. 



128 MUYSKA. 

Bcise dcs Prixzen Maximilian zu Wied. Cohltnz^ 1839—1811, 2 vola. 4to ; 
Vol. II, pp. 690—592. 

No. X of Gallatin's Sjnopsifl in: Arclifrolojria Amcricnna, Vol. IT (nitchitti 
and Muskoghi Diuloct). AuthoritieH — A'oi'ubularv of -ir>2 Words, by Rev. L. 
Compere. Comiminication from Ridor, an e<hi(»ated Cherokee. Hawkins 
(vid, itifr.), 112 Select Scntenci»9, pi>. 108-1-12; the Ix)rd'8 Prayer, p. 421. 
Further Notices by Gallatin, in: Transactions of the American Ethnologi- 
cal Society, Vol. II, p. cxii, Coinpari!ion of GOO Choctaw and Muskoghee 
Words, ninety-seven agreeing; p. 83—88, List of Choctah and Muskoghee 
Words. 

E. A. Vail, Notice sur les Indiens de rAm<?rique du Nord. Paris, 1840, Sto, 
p. 55. 

Benjamin Hawkins, Vocabulary of the Creek, Chickasaw, Cherokee, and 
Choctaw. (MS. in the library of the American Philosophical Society at Phila- 
delphia.) 

Many geographical names of the Creek are explained in : Colonel Benjaxiv 
Hawkins, Sketch of the Creek Confederacy ; being Collections of the Georgia 
Historical Society, Vol. Ill, p. 1. Savannahy IS-IS, 8vo, pp. 88. 

Lieutenant-Colonel J. C. Casey, United States Agent, Muskogee or Creek 
Vocabulary : Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States, Vol. IV, pp. 416 
—429, 432. 

GEAMMARS AND GEAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

A. Gallatin, Synopsis : Archfieologia Americana, Vol. II, pp. 256 — 258 ; 
Transitions, pp. 270, 271, 272, 273, 275, 290, 291. 

Muskokee, or Creek First Reader, by W. S. Robertson, A.M., and Datid 
Winslett. New Tork, 1856, 12mo, pp. 48. 



MUYSKA, MOZKA, CHIBCHA. 

Indian nation (nearly extinct) in the neighbourhood of Santa 
Fe de Bogota, Nueva Grenada. Their language was called, 
also, Chibcha. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, p. 705. 

Journal Asiatique, Vol. Ill (Pariit, 1829, 8vo), pp. 401, 409. 

The numerals are given by A. Gallatin, Tab. A to : Notes on the Semi-ciyilixed 
Nations of Mexico, etc. (Vol. I of : Transactions of the American Ethnological 
Society), p. 114. 



MYNCQUESAR. 129 

J. S. Vatee, Proben, etc Seetzen'a Naclilass. Leipzig, 1816, Syo ; 

pp. 352—374. 

Colonel Joaquin Acosta, the author of " Compendio Historico del decubri- 
miento j colonization de la Nueva Granada," possesses a "Diccionario y Qrammatics 
de la Lengua Mosca Chibcha." MS., in 12mo, of 200 and 96 pp. The Dictionary 
is the only one existing ; the G-rammar is different from that of Fray B. de Lugo. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

P. Feat Beenaedo de Lugo, Grammatica en la Lengua general del nuovo reyno 
Uamada Mosca. Madrid, Bernardino de Guzman, 1619, small 8vo, pp. 158. 
(The year 1613, in EaetzeVs Catalogue, p. IIV, seems to be an error.) 

Mithridates (extract from the above Grammar), Vol. Ill, pp. 702 — 704. 

Adelung, in Mithridates, Vol. Ill, p. 701, note tt> states that a P. Daddei 
(Dadet ?) has printed a Grammar of the Muysca language. 

Joseph Dadet (Daddei ?), a native of Milan, one of the Jesuit founders of the 
University of Bogota, 1604, wrote a Vocabulary and a Grammar of the Muysca 
Language, but no copies can now be traced. The National Library of Bogota 
possesses a MS. Grammar (pp. 96, 12mo) and a MS. Dictionary (pp. 200, 12mo) 
of the Muysca Language. These are, perhaps, Dadey's. 

Ezequiel Uricoechea, a native of Bogota, intends to publish these MSS. in 
his forthcoming work, ** Monumenta Chibcharum." 

Sur la Langue des Muyscas, ou la Langue Chibc1ia, Bulletin de la Society de 
Gfographie. T^^rd Series, Vol. VIII, pp. 85—88. Paris, A. Bertrand, 1847, 8vo. 

A Comparison of the Chibcha Language with the Japanese, Bask, and Arabic, 
by Senob Pabayet, in : Annales de Philosophic Chr^tienne, No. 56 ; also sepa- 
rately : Memoria sobre el origin Japones Arabe y Vizcaino de los pueblos de 
Bogota. Paris, 1835, 8vo, pp. 32. 

Eemarks on the Chibcha Language, likewise Chibcha numerals (quoted from the 
above), in : Memoria sobre las Antiquedades Neo-Granadinas, por Ezequiel 
XJbicoechea. Berlin, 1854, 4to, pp. 6 — 10. 

MYNCQUESAR, MYNCKUSSAR. 

Language of the Mohawk stock, spoken in New Sweden (on the 
Delaware). 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Thomas Campanius Holm, Kort Beskri&ing om provincien Nya Swerige. 
Stockholm, 1702, 4to, p. 181. 

English translation by P. S. Duponceau, for the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, 1834, 8vo, p. 158 (also as part 1 of Vol III <rf 
the Collections of the Pennsylvanian Historical Society. Philadelphiay 
M*Carty and Davis, 1834, 8vo j pp. 1—168.) 

Mithridates (from Campanius), Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 334, 335. 

J. S. Vateb, Proben, etc. Leipzig, 1826, 8vo j pp. 381 et seq. 

s 



13U NA.VS8 — NANTICOKE. 



NAASS. 

Iiuliaiis of Eu^^Iish North-western America, on and above Mill- 
bank Sound. Of four of tlie Xaass tril)es, viz., the Jfat'ltsa, 
Ilarclfzuk, liillcc/ioola, and C/iim most/an, vocabularies are given 
(see llaceltzuk and (Ihinimesyans). 

WORDS AND VOCABL'LARIRS. 

Vocabiilnries of the Four Tribt'o, Trail tiact ions of tlio American Etbnologinl 
Society, Vol. II {Xeiv rork, IJartk-tt aud Wolfortl, 18 A8, 8to), H, XX, p. 108 j 
from the Vocabtiliirici of John Scuulek, M.D., Journal of the Bojal Qeognr 
phii-al Society of Loudon^ Vol. XI (London, Murray, 1841, 8vo), pp. 230 — ^285. 

Billechoola and Friendly Vilhigo Word*, p. 155 of R. Q-. Lathau, The Lan- 
guages of the Oregon Territory (Journal of the Ethnological Society of IiondoD, 
Vol. I, pp. 151—160. Edinburgh, 1818, 8vo). 

NAGRANDANS. 

Chorotega tribe of the plains of Leon, Nicaragua. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

E. G, Sqtjter, Nicaragua, etc. New York, Appleton, 1852, 2 vols. Stoj Vol 
II, pp. 314, 320—325 ; numerals, pp. 326, 327. 

GRAMMARS A17D GRAMHATICAL J!fOTIC£S. 

E. Geo. Squier, Nicaragua New York, Appleton, 1852 ; 2 toU. 8y<H 

Vol. II, pp. 315—319 (from Colonel Francisco Diaz Zapata). 

NANTICOKE. 

Tribe of the Algonkin stock, formerly on the Susquehannah — 
now west. 

W^ORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

T. Sat, Comparative Vocabulary, etc., in Note 15, pp. 135—145, to John 
Pickering's edition of Dr. Edwards's Obserrations on the Mohegan Language. 
(Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Second Series, Vol. X. Bot^ 
ton, printed by Phelps and Farnham, 1823, 8yo. Reprinted, Boston, Little and 
Brown, 1843, 8vo). 

No. IV, 20, of the Comparative Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc., 
in : Archeeologia Americana, Vol. II, pp. 305—367 ; and (partly) under P, IV, 6^ 
p. Ill, of the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, 
Vol. II. 

(From MS. Notices of Heckeweldeb and Mubbat Vans.) 

A Nanticoke VocabiUary (presented by Thomas Jefferson), and a Vocabulary of 



NARRAGANSET. 131 

the Nanticoke, taken from the mouth of a Nanticoke chief, by Rev, Me. 
Heckeweldee, in 1785, are among the MSS. in the library of the American 
Philosophical Society, at Philadelphia. 

Bev. Me. Heckeweldee, Comparative Vocabulary of the Lenni Lenape 
Proper, the Minsi Dialect, the Mohicanni, Natick or Nadik, Chippeway, Shawano, 
and Nanticoke. (MS. in the same Hbrary.) 



NARRAGANSET. 

New England Indians. The Pequods, Kavasumsenk, and 
Quintikuk belong to this stock. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A small Vocabulary in : William Wood, New England's Prospect ; being a 
true, lively, and experimental Description of that part of America commonly called 
New Englancf. London, 1634, 4to. Reprinted, ibid,, 1635, 4to, and 1639, 4to. 
Third edition, with an Introductory Essay. Boston^ Fleet, Green, and Bussell, 
1764, 8vo, pp. xviii, 128. 

EoGEB A. Williams (see Grammars). Tlie Vocabulary contahied in this 
Grammar, at the request of Smith Barton, has been extracted and reprinted 
as : Vocabulary of the Narrogansett Language, pp. 80 — 105 of : Collections of 
the Massachusetts Historical Society for the year 1798 (Vol. V of the First 
Series). Boston, printed by Samuel Hall, 1798, 8vo. Reprinted, Boston^ John 
Eliot, 1816, 8vo ; and ibid., John Eastbum, 1835, 8vo. 

T. Sat, Comparative Vocabulary, etc.. Note 15, pp. 135 — 145, to John Pickering's 
edition of Dr. Edwards's Observations on the Mohegan Language (Collections of 
the Massachusetts Historical Society, Second Series, Vol. X. Boston, printed by 
Phelps and Farnham, 1823, 8vo). Reprinted by Little and Brown, ihid., 1843, 8vo. 

Smith Baeton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabulary. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 387 — 389 (from Rogeb Williams), and as 
" New England " (from Wood). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 812. 

No. IV, 16, of the Comparative Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc., 
in : Archeeologia Americana, Vol. II, pp. 305 — 364, and (partly) under P, IV, 2, 
p. 110, of the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American Ethnological 
Society, Vol. II, and an Extract, Article 1 of the Appendix, p. 491, to John W. 
DB FoREEST, History of the Indians of Connecticut. Hartford, Hamersley, 
1852, 8vo. 

From Williams, and MS. Notices of Me. Tbeat. 



Silas Wood, Sketch of the First Settlement of the several Towns of Long 
Island. Brooklyn, 1824, 8vo. Reprinted, ibid., Spooner, 1828, 8vo, p. , and : 
Jajces Macauley, History of New York. ISew York, Gould and Banks, 1829, 
3 vols. 8vo; Vol. II, pp. 267, 268. 



132 NATCHES NAVAJOS. 



GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

A Key into the Language of America ; or, an Help to the Language of the 
Natives in that part of America called New England ; together with brief Ob- 
servations of the Customs, Manners, and Worsliips, etc., of tlie aforesaid Natives, 
in Peace and Warre, in Life and Death. On all which are added. Spiritual Ob- 
servations, Generall and Particular, by the Author, of chiefe and speciell use (upon 
all occasions) to all the English inhabiting these parts; yet pleasant and pro- 
fitable to the view of all men. By Roger AVilliams, of Providence, of New 
England. London, printed by Gregory Dexter, 1G43, 8vo, pp. 197. 

Thirty-two chapters, each with VocabiJary and Spiritual Observations. 

Keprint^d, pp. 17 — 163 of Collections of the Bhode Island Historical Society, 
Vol. 1. Providence, printed by John Miller, 1827, Svo. 

The grammatical and ethnological parts of the 32 chapters alone were 
reprinted under the title — 

A Key, etc., in Life and Death, in : Collections of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society, for the yeai* 1794 (Vol. Ill of the First Series). JSoston, printed by 
Joseph Belknap, 1794, 8to, and reprinted, Boston, Muuroe and Francis, 1810, 
Svo J pp. 203—239. 

Smith Barton, of Philadelphia, afterwards caused the Vocabulary to be 
reprinted in the same Collection, Series I, Vol. V (1798). (See Vocabularies.) 

NATCHES. 

Tribe of the Creek colifederacy, on the Lower Mississippi, now 
neariy extinct. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
Smith Barton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

No. VI, 47, of the Comparative Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc., 
in : Vol. II of the Archseologia Americana, pp. 305 — 36V ; and No. D, XII, Ameri- 
can Ethnological Society's Transactions, Vol. II, pp. 94, 96. 

Some Words are given in : Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 287. (From Lb 
Faob dv Peatz, Histoire de la Louisiane. JParis, De Bure, 1758, 3 vols. 12mo ; 
Vol. II.) 

NAVAJOS, NAVAHOES. 

A powerful tribe of the Apache family, related to the great 
Athapascan stock, residing on the tributaries of the River San 
Juan, west of the Rio Grande, and east of the Colorado, in New 
Mexico, between the 35 th and 37th parallel of northern lati- 
tude. The Spaniards call them Apaches de Nahajoa, 



NEW BRUNSWICK NEWFOUNDLAND. 133 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

James H. Simpson, Comparative Vocabulary of Words in the Language of 
the Pueblo or civilized Indians of New Mexico, and of the wild tribes inhabiting 
its borders. Appendix B, pp. 140 — 143, to his : Journal of a Military Recon- 
noissance from Santa F6, New Mexico, to tlie Navajo Country, made .... in 
X849; pp. 56 — 168 of: Reports of the Secretary of War, with Eeconnoissances of 

Boutes from San Antonio to El Paso Also .... the Report of Lieut. 

J. H. Simpson of an Expedition into the Navajo Country. (Exec. Dociim. Senate, 
No. 64, 31st Congress, Session 1). Washington^ printed at the Union Office, 
1850, 8vo, plates, maps, pp. 250. 

A Vocabulary of the Navajo Language lias been taken by the United States 
Boundary Commissioner, John R. Babtlett. 

CaJ^tain J. H. Eaton, United States Agent, Navajo Vocabulary, pp. 416 — 
432 (pp. 429 — 431, numerals) of Vol. IV of Schoolcraft's Lidian Tribes of the 
United States. 

Navajo Vocabulary, taken in 1852 by Lietttenant A. W. Whipple, pp. 81 — 
83 of Chap. V of his, Thomas Ewbank's, and Professor W. W. Turner's Report 
upon the Indian Tribes j added to Lieutenant Whipple's Report on the Route 
near the 35th Parallel (Vol. II of the : Pacific Railroad Reports. Washington^ 
1855, 4to). 

Peofessob W. W. Turner, Comparative Vocabulary of Twenty-five Words of 
Navajo, Apache, Hudson's Bay, Dogrib, Chepcwyan, TacuUy, Umkwa, and Hoo- 
pah, pp. 84, 85, ibid. 

Comparative Vocabulary of the Athapascan and Kinai Languages (also, Navajo 
and Ticorilla), pp. 269—318 of: Bitschmann, Athapaskischer Sprachstamm. 
Berlin, 1856, 4to. 

NEW BRUNSWICK. 

A dialect of ihe Mikmak. 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 

J. HowSE, Vocabularies of certain North American Indian Languages, Nipis- 
sing, Shawnees, Brunswick, Duplicate Blackfoot, pp. 102 — 113 of: Proceedings of 
Philological Society, Vol. IV. London^ 1850. 

All these are in one dialect — the Mikmak. It seems that the sound of the 
letter r is wanting in this language. The Vocabulary was originally made by 
Antony Roqees, an intelligent old hunter (but not an Indian), who had lived 
some time amongst the Indians, and is believed to have been well acquainted 
with their language. He was assisted by Abitase, said to be half Indian and 
half English. 

NEWFOUNDLAND. 

Island on the coast of Labrador. Its inhabitants belong to the 
Eastern Algonkins. The Milicite and Mikmaks are part of 
them. The Bethuck are extinct. 



LSA NIPISSINO NORTON SOUND. 

WORDS AND VOCADULARIES. 

Vocabulary of the language of the Xativos of Newfoundland, procured by the 
Rev. J. Leioii from Mury March, a n.-itivo woman, taken up the Bay of Exploits 
by Mr. Peyton, in March, 18iS (Juurnnl of the K(»yal Geographical Society 
of London, Vol. IV, pp. 218— 22U. Lumhn, 1«:U, 8vo). 

An extract from Mary Makcii's Vocabulary is contained in : IL Mont- 
gomery Martin's British Colonial Library, Vol. VI, pp. 300, 301. London^ 
1851. 

NinSSINO. 

Of tlie Algonquin stock of Indians, living on the Lake of the 
Two Mountains, in the district of ^Montreal, Lower Canada. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

J. HowsE, Comparative Vocabularies of certain North American Indian Lan- 
guages, Nipissing, Shawnees, Brunswick, and Duplicate Blackfoot (Proceedings 
of the Philological Society, Vol. IV, pp. 102—113. London, 1850). 

NIQUIRANS. 

Mexicans settled in the district of Nicaragua, hetween the Lake 
of Nicaragua and the Pacific Ocean. They speak a dialect of 
the Mexican language. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

E. Geo. Sqfiee, Nicaragua .... New York, Appletons, 1852, 2 vols. 8vo ; VoL 
II, p. 314 — and Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, VoL lU, 
part 1, p. 101. 

On the Aztck Language in Nicaragua, pp. 746—778 of : John Cabl Edward 
BuscHMANK, Tiber die Aztekischen Ortsnamen, V^ Abtheilung. Berlin, Diimmler, 
1853, 4to. 

NORTON SOUND. 

On the north-west coast, inhabited by Eskimaux. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean .... performed under the direction of Captains 
Cook, Claek, and Gore .... 1776 — 1780. London^ 1784, 3 vols, 4to ; VoL 
II, p. 334. Edition, Dublin, 1784, 8vo ; Vol. Ill, pp. 554, 555. Appendix VI, a 
table to show the affinity between the Languages spoken at Oonalashka and Nor- 
ton Sound, and those of the Grcculanders and Esquimaux. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 461 — 466 (from the above). 



NOTTOWAYS NUTKA. 135 



NOTTOWATS. 

Iroquois tribe of Virginia, nearly extinct. They called them- 
selves Cherohakah. 

WOKDS AND VOCABTJLAEIES. 

No. V, 32, of the Comparative Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. 
(Archeeolo^ia Americana, Vol. II, pp. 305—367). 

From MS. authorities of J. Wood and Teevezant. 

And under R, Y, 6, p. 115, of the Vocabularies in Vol. II of : Transactions of 
the American Ethnological Society. 



NUSDALtJM. 

Indian tribe of the north-west coast on Hood's Channel, related 
to the Haeeltzuk and Nutka Indians. 

WOEDS AND VOCABTTLAEIES. 

Noosdalum Vocabulary, by Dr. John Scottlee (Journal of the Royal Geogra- 
phical Society of London, Vol. XI. London, 1841, 8vo ; pp. 242, 244—246). 

Noosdalum and Atn ah Words compared, p. 157 of: R. G.Latham:, The Languages 
of the Oregon Territory (pp. 154 — 166 of Journal of the Ethnological Society of 
London, Vol. I, pp. 154—166). Edinburgh, 1848, 8vo. 

NUTKA, WAKASH. 

Indians of Vancouver's Island (their proper name is Yucuatl). 

WOEDS A.yD VOCABTTLABXES. 

A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean .... performed under the direction of Captarns 
Cook, Clabz, and Gobe .... 1776—1780. London, 1784, 3 vols. 4to ; Vol. 
II, Appendix No. 4. 

Appendix IV, Vocabulary of the Language of Nootka or King George's Sound, 
April, 1778, pp. 542 — 548 of the Dublin edition : Chmeenlaque, W. Watson, and 
Al. 1784, 3 vols. 8vo. 

Tlaoquatch and Nootka (from Cook) Words compared, p. 156 of : R. G. 
Latham, The Languages of the Oregon Territory (pp. 154 — 166 of Vol I of 
the Journal of the Ethnological Society of London). Edinburgh, 1848, 8vo. 

J. Fr. BouBOOiNa, Relation d'un Voyage recent des Espagnoles sur les Cdtes 



136 OMAGUA. 

Nord-oucst dc TAmdriquc scptcntrionalc (Archives LitteraireB de TEurope. JPar%9 
and Tubingue, 18^—1818, XVII, 8vo, No. IV, 18a4, pp. 78, 79). 

The numerals 1 — 10, from a MS. of Mk. ^Iozino in : A. do Humboldt, Eaaai 
politique sur le Royaumo dc la Nouvelle Espngnc. Parity Schoell, 1811, 2 yolt. 
4to ; Vol. I, p. 322. 

A^'ocabulario del Idioma do los Ilabitnntes do Nutka (Relacion del Viage heobo 
por las goletas Sutil y Moxicana en el anno do 1792, para reeonocer el estrecho de 
Fuca. CoLi una introducion en quo se da noticia de los expediciones executadas 
anteriormcute por los Espanolcs en buscn del paso del nord-este de la America. 
Madrid^ en la iuiprentn real, 1802, 8vo, atlas, pp. clxviii, 185 ; pp. 178 — 184). 

A list of Words in the Nootkian Langunge the most in use, p. 5, and War 
Song of the Nootka Tribe, p. 160 of: Narrative of the Adventures and Sufferingi 
of John R. Jewitt, only survivor of tlie ci*e\v of the ship "Boston," during a 
Captivity of nearly TJiree Yeara among the Savages of Nootka Sound, witli an 
Account of the Manners, Mode of Living, and Religious Opinions of the Natiret. 
New York, printed for the publisher, s. a., lOino. 

A popular book, compiled from Jewitt's Oral Relations, by Richabd Axsof, 
in 1815. It has. very often been reprinted. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 115 (from Cook, numerals from DixoK and 
Humboldt). 

Balbi, Atlas Etlmographique, Tab. XLI, No. 846. 

The iinmerals 1 — 10, as given by Cook and by Dixon, compared, p. 35, note *, 
of: J. H. M*CuLLOCH, jun., Researches, etc. JBaHimorCf F. Lucas, jun,, 1829, 8yo. 

No. XXV, 60, of the Comparative Vocabularies to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc, 
in: Vol. II of the Archoeologia Americana, p. 371 (from Jewitt). Reprinted in 
the Vocabularies, Vol. II of : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, 
under U, XXI, p. 121. 

No. 14 of Vocabularies of Languages of North-western America, pp. 569 — 629 
of : Horatio Hale, Ethnography and Philology of the United States Exploring 
Exi>edition. Fhiladelphia^ Lea and Blanchard, 1846, folio. The language is by 
him called : Ktvoneatshatka (Newittee). Reprinted, CXXI, pp. 89, 91, 93, 95 of the 
Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American Etlinological Society, VoL II. 

Fuca Strait and Wakash Words, p. 156 of: R. G. Latham, The Languages of 
the Oregon Territory (Journal of the Ethnological Society of London, pp. 154i — 
166). Edinburgh, 1848, 8vo. 

OMAGUA. 

Formerly a powerful nation of the regions between the Marailon 
and Orinoco. The principal tribes of the Omaguas were — 

1. The O magna propre, between the Maranon and Yapura. 

2. The Enagiiay on the Guaviari^ in Venezuela. 3. The Yuri- 
magiuiy on the Yuruba^ and in the province of Solimoes. 



ONEIDA. 137 

4. The Agua^ in New Granada and Venezuela. 5. The 
Kokamciy on the Lower Ueayale. 6. The Yetey on the Napo, in 
New Granada. 7. The Tokantiuy on the Tokantin^ in the 
Brazilian provinces Goyaz and Para. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

G-iLii, Saggio di Storia AmericaDa, Vol. Ill, pp. 371 — 375. 

Hebtas, Vocabolario, pp. 161 et seq. 

Hebyas, Saggio, pp. 98, 99. 

Hebyas, Origine, pp. 29, 37, 41, 48, 78, Tabb. XLIX, L et seq. 

Hebyas, Catalogo, p. 24, nota 1. 

Hebyas, Aritmetica, pp. 96, 97. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 554, 603, 611 (from GiLii). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnograpbique, Tab. XLI, No. 493. 

A. D'Obbigny, L'Homme Am^ricain, Vol. II, p. 274. 

grammars and grammatical notices. 

QiLii, Saggio di Storia Americana, Vol. Ill, pp. 371—375. 
Mitbridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 604—610. 

ONEIDA. 

Indians of the Iroquois stocky in the west of the State of New 
York. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hebyas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, p. 239 (numerals). 

Smith Babton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies ; and p. 20 of tbo 
Appendix. Edition of 1798. 

Mitbridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 318, 332, 333 (from Smith Babton). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnograpbique, Tab. XLI, No. 796. 

P. E. DuPONOBiu, M^moire sur le Syst^me Grammatical, etc, Paris, 1838, 
pp. 259—269. 

No. V, 30, of the Comparatiye Vocabulary to A. G-allatin's Synopsis, etc. 
(Vol. II of the : Arcbseologia Americana, pp. 305—367), and (partly) under R, V, 
3, Vol. II, p. 114, of: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. (From 
Babtoit and MS. Notes of Jeffebson.) 

T 



1-J8 ONOND.UiA. 

Richard Updike Siikrman, OnoMa Vocabularv, Appendix M, pp. 279 — 281, 
to: Jlciirv R. Srhooli'iafr, Noios <ni tin' Irocjuois. Sttv York, Bnrtlett and Wei- 
ford, 18 W), Hvo (New Vurk Stjito DocunuMitj*, No. 2 k Soiiato, 1846), and pp. 
393 — 40(), Coiiipiirative Viii-abnlary of tlu' Iroquois, of the oame work, published 
as a book. Aliiani/, IVasu and Co., IS 1-7, 8vo. 

Oneida A'ocabulary, by YorNO Skknanho, Onoida Caatle: Scboolcraft's Indian 
Tribes of the United States, Vol. 11, pp. 182 — 493. 



OXONDAGA. 

Iroquois tril)e, formerly of the west of the State of New York. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
Hebyas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, p. 239 (numerals). 

Smith Babtox, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabulary; and Appendix, 
p. 20 (edition of 1798) j and, from him, 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 318, 332, 338. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnograpliique, Tab. XLI, No. 797. 

Onondaga Vocabulary, by Abbaham le Fobst : Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of 
the United States, Vol. II, pp. 482—493. 

No. V, 28, of the Comparative Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. 
(Vol. II of the: Archseologia Americana, pp. 305 — 367). Reprinted, if ith addi- 
tions, in the Comparative Vocabulary of the Iroquois, No. 3 : Henry R. School- 
craft, Notes on the Iroquois, pp. 398—400. Albany, Pease and Co., 1847, 8vo. 
Reprinted (partly) under R, V, 1, of the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the 
American Ethnological Society, Vol. 11, p. 114, 

Deutsch Onondagisches Worterbuch von David Zeisbebgeb, 7 vols. 4to; anti, 
A Collection of Words and Phrases in the Iroquois and Onondago Language, 
explained in German, by the Rev. Chb. Ptbheus, 4to, pp. 140. The above two 
MSS. are deposited in the library of the American Philosophical Society, at Phila- 
delphia. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

The following MSS. are deposited in the library of the American Philosophical 
Society at Philadelphia : — 

Essay of an Onondago (jl-rammar, or a Short Introduction to learn the Onendago 
alias Maqua Tongue, by David Zeisbebgeb, 4to, pp. 67. 

Onondagoische Grammatica, by the same, 4to, pp. 87. 

Another Onondago Grammar, in the German language, by the same, 4to, 
pp. 176. 



OPATA — OSAGE. 139 



OPATA. 

Christian Indians of Sonora, in the central part of that State. 
The Eudeve is closely related to the Opate language. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hebvas, Saggio, p. 124. 

Hebyas, Origine, Tabb. XLIX, L et seq. 

Mithridates, Yol. Ill, part 3, pp. 161, 165—169 (from Hebvas). 

The United States Boundary Commissioner, John B. Babtlett, has taken a 
Vocabulary of their language. 

OREGONES. 

Brazilian Indians on the Amazon. (Martius, No. 190, says that 
the Portuguese call a wild nation on the 19a Orelhudos, but 
that the Spaniards call them Orejones, The name of Orelhudos 
is given by the Portuguese also to the AroaquiSy on the rivers 
Nhamundd and Negro, No. 143.) 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des Oregones : Vocabulary, No. XX, pp. 294, 295 of : Castelnau, 
Vol. V, Appendice. 

OSAGE. 

Dacotah Indians, called also Wawahy HuzzatOy Osawses, Washas, 
or Ous; about Arkansas and Osage rivers. They are divided 
into the Chanters (Arkansas, Clermont), Great and Little 
sages. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

J. S. Vateb, Analekten, Zweites Heft, Abtheilung 2, pp. 53—62. 

Vocabulary of some Words in the Osage Language, Appendix I, pp. 213 — 219 
of: John Bbadbttby, F.L.S., Travels in the Interior of America, in the years 
1809, 1810, 1811. Liverpool, printed for the author, by Smith and Galway. 
London, published by Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, 1817, 8vo. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLT, No. 784. No. VT, 37, of the Com- 
parative Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. (Vol. II of: Archseologia 
Americana, pp. 305 — 367). 

(From Bradbuky, and MS. Notices of L. Cass and Db. Mijbbat.) 



1 10 nvn. 

Rt'priiitiMl uijiliT H, Vr, 2, pp. H2, s5, S7, H'J t»f the Vocabulary, in Vol. II of: 
Tninoai'tioiis ut* tlu* AiiuTii'aii Kllinoln^ical Society. 

Rcisi' (Il'9 Priiiz;'ii Maximilian /.r Wied in Amorika. Coblenz,lSSO — ISll, 

2 vol*. Wo; Vol. II, pp. <»o7 -(»!.'». 

Ciloo.Miirc Osngo, pj). 2fil, 2i>2 of: VicrciK Texibr, Voyage aaz Prairies OaagpB 
rn LoiiiMUMC ot Missuiiri, \KVjf IHU\ Chnnont Ferrand^V6to\, Parit, Roret, 
ISU, Hvo. 

A M.S. Voi'ubuliiry of the Liui^uiitrt* of the Osago IndianB, by Ds. MuBBAT, of 
Louisville, Xeiitiicky, ii» ia the library of the American Pliilosopliical Society at 
riiiladelphiu. 

Vocaluilnry of (05 ») Words in the Osnge Lungunge, p. 275 of the : Diaiy of 
Mattiikw Clakksox, west of the Allegheimies, in 176G. (Schoolcraft's Indian 
Tribes of the Cniled Stales, Vt.l. TV, pp. 2U5— 278). 

(illAMMAUS AXi) OBAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Washasho AVageressa rahugreli IVe. The Osago First Book. Boston^ Crocker 
and Jirewster, for the Amcriciin Board of Foreign Missions, 1834, 18ino, pp. 126. 

OTO. 

Called also Otocs, Othouez, Oktolaktos, Wahtohtana^ Wahtoktak, 
on the left banks of the Platte River. They are divided into 
Otof's and Pahoja, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

T. Say, pp. Ixxii — Ixxx of: Astronomical and Meteorological Becordjs and 
Vocabularies of Indian Languages, taken on the Expedition for Exploring the 
Mississippi .... under the command of Major Long. Philadelphia^ 1822, 4to. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographiquo, Tab. XLI, No. 776 (Otoes, Ouahtokta). 

No. vr, 38, of the Comparative Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. 
(Arehoeologia Americana, Vol. II, pp. 305—367), and S, VI, 4, p. 117, of the 
Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II 
(from Sat). 

Reise des Prinzen Maximilian zu Wied, etc. Cohlenz^lS'^^ — 1841, 2yol8« 
4to ; Vol. II, pp. 612—630. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Note 16 (on the Winnepago and Otoe Dialects), pp. 119 — 151, of John Picker- 
ing's edition of Dr. Edwards's Observations on the Mohegan Language (Collections 
of the Massachusetts Historical Society, V^ol. X, Second Series. Boston^ printed 
by Phelps and Farnham, 1823, 8vo ; pp. 81 — 160. Eeprinted, Boston^ liittle and 
Brown, 1813, 8vo). 



OTOMI. 141 



OTOMI. 

Mexican Indians, the north-west of the Valley of Anahuac. 
Some also in the neighbourhood of the city of Mexico. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulario de la Leugua Otomi, por Fray Pedro Castillo. MS. 

Castillo was one of the earliest missionaries amongst the Otomies, whose 
language he perfectly understood and taught. He died in 1577, and was 
buried at Tula. (De Souza.) 

IIOBATio Cabochi, Grammatica y Vocabulario de la Lengua Otomi. Mexico^ 
1645, 4to. 

De Souza states that the MSS. of the Grammar and of the Vocabulary are 
in the library of Tepozotlan. 

Vocabulario de la Lengua Otomi, por F. Juan de Dios Castbo, 4to. 

Castro wrote about the year 1690, and his MSS. of both the Vocabulary 
and Grammar are preserved in the library of the College of Tepozotlan. (De 
Souza.) 

Vocabulario de la Lengua Otomi, por lUmo. D. Fb. Sebastian Bibebo, 
Obispo de la Paz. Printed in Mexico, according to Pinelo. 

Vocabulario Megicano y Otomi, por Fr. Pedbo Falacios. MS., according to 
De Souza, in the library of the College of Tlateluco, in Mexico. 

El Licenciado D. Luis de Nete y Molina, Beglas de Orthographia, Diccio- 
nario y Arte del Idioma Othomi, breve instruccion para los principiantes. Mexico, 
1767, 8vo, pp. 160 (the Dictionary, pp. 13—96). 

Hebvas, Origine, pp. 37, 118, Tabb. XLIX, L, LI at seq. 

Hebyas, Saggio, pp. 119, 120. 

Hebyas, Vocabolario, pp. 161 et seq. 

Hebyas, Aritmetica, pp. 109, 110. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 15, 123, 124 (from Hebyas and Neye). 

On p. 115, Eangel, P. Palacios, Sebast. Ribebo, and Juan de Dios 
Castbo are named as having written Grammars and Vocabularies of the 
Otomi — a statement confirmed by De Souza, upon whose authority we give- 
the full titles. 

J. S. Vateb, Proben der Deutschen Volksmundarten und Dr. Seetzen's Lin- 
guistischer Nachlass, etc. Leipzig, Fleischer, 1816, 8vo ; pp. 353 — 375. 

P. Joaquin Lopez Yepes, Catecismo y Declaracion de la Doctrina Cristiana 
en Lengua Otomi ; con un Vocabulario del Mismo Idioma. Mexico, 1826, 4to. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 706. 

Emanuel Naxeba, De Lingua Othomitorum Dissertatio. Philadelphia, 1835, 



] V2 OTOMI. 

4to, ill : TranMictioiiB of the American Philotophicil Sociatj, New SerieSy VoLY. 
Philadelpkiay publiiilu^d hv the Soi*icty ; printi'd by James Kay, 1834—1887, 4to; 
pp. 2W-21H;. 

Kouvt-llo!* AiinuKt* den Vovng***. Paris, Vol. IV (18-10), 8vo ; pp. 9 — 37. 

Vocaholurio Spii:;imolt>-ltaliiiuo-Otoiiii, pp. 27—78 of: Piccoloxiki'b Gram* 
mar («co Urammun*). 

Otumi Voi*abulary in : A. GALLATiN*a Notes on the Semi-ciTiliaed Nationa of 
Mexico, cU*. (TranrtiK'tions of the American Ethnological Societj, YoL I, 
pp. 298 -30k yeiv I'urk, JJurtlett und Wclford, 1815, 8vo). 

GUAM MARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICKS. 

Arte J Catocinmo do la Leugua Otomi, x)or Fb. Alonzo Banqel, Proyincial ds 
Siila (1529, 151G, MS.) 

Grani^Ltica de la Lengua Otomi, mas correcta j aumentada que la de Fr. PxDio 
Palacios. MS. by Ouoz (fr. Pedho), Frunciscan, Instructor in the Imperial 
College of Sta. Crus de Tlateluco ; died 1597. Wrote, besides, yariouB works in 
Nahuatl. 

IIoBATio CABOCni, Grammatica, etc. (see A^'ocabularies), pp. 1 — 12, 97— 
160. 

Arte de la Lengua de los Otomites, con todos sus diferentes Dialectos, por 
D. Francisco Puuon, Maestro de el Idioma Otomi en la Uniyersidad deMegico, 
ano 1690. MS. in the library of the University of Mexico. 

Gram^itica de la Lengua Otomi, y metodo para confesar k los Indios en ella, 
por Don Frak Cisco Haedo, 8yo. Printed a second time in Mexico, 1731. 

Luis de Neve y Molina (see Vocabularies). 

An Italian Extract of this Grammar was published under the title : Ccmte 
Enea Silvio Vincenzo Piccolomini, Grammatica della Lingua Otomi esposta in 
Italiano, secondo la traccia del Licenjiate Luis do Neve y Molina. Col Vocabulario 
Spagnuolo-Otomi, spiegato in Italiano. Boma, Tipogr. Propag. Fide. 1841, 12mo, 
pp. 82 (the Grammar, pp. 5—26). 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 113 — 123 (from Neve t Molina). 

Emanuel Naxeba (see Vocabularied). 

V. Piccolomini (see Vocabularies). 

A. Gallatin, Notes, etc. (Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, 
Vol. I, pp. 286—298: extracts from Neve t Molina, pp. 286 — 294, and from 
Naxeba, pp. 294—298). 

Arte 6 Gramiitica de la Lengua Otomi, por P. Juan de Dios Castro, MS. 
(see under Vocabularies). 

Arte 6 Gramdtica de la Lengua Otomite, por Don Juan Francisco Escamilla. 
Escamilla was Professor of Otomi in the University of Mexico (De Souza's 
authority). 



OTTAW AS — OTTO M A K U . 113 

Arte de la Lengua Otomi, y Catecismo y Confesonario, por Fr. Pedeo Falacios, 
8vo. MS., according to De Souza, in the library of the College of Tlateluco, in 
Mexico. 

Arte breve de la Lengua Otomi, compuesto por el Pe. Fr. Alonzo TJbbano, 
de la Orden N. P. S. Augustin, 15 leaves, 4to, MS. 

Original in the Imperial Library of Paris ; copy in possession of E. G. Squier, 
New York. The original is accompanied with a large and very complete 
Dictionary — Otomi, Nahuatl (Mexican), and Spanish (421 leaves, 4to), quite 
equal in extent to Molina's celebrated Vocabulario Mexicano. 



OTTAWAS. 

Indians of the Algonquin stock in Michigan and Ohio. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Comparison of Words and Sentences in the Dialects of the Ottowwaws and 
Menomonies, pp. 392 — 398 j Comparison of the language of some Versions of the 
Bible, with the Ottawwaw of the present time, pp. 421 — 422 ; and Comparison of 
a Greek Sentence with the Dialect of the Ottawwaws, p. 423 of: John Tanneb's 

Narrrative of his Captivity and Adventures prepared for the press by 

Edwin James, M.D. New York, G-. and C. and H. Carvill, 1830, 8vo. 

No, IV, 9, of the Comparative Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. 
(Archeeologia Americana, Vol. II, pp. 305 — 367). Reprinted (partly) under 
N, IV, 4, p. 107, of the Vocabularies in : American Ethnological Society's Trans- 
actions, Vol. II. 

(From Tanner, and MS. Notices of Me. Hamelin.) 

Anichinabek Amisinahikaniwa, The Indian Book. Detroit, printed by Geo. 
L. Whitney, 1830, 18mo, pp. 106 ; contains, on pp. 104, 105, a Vocabulary of 40 
words in French and Ottawa, by the Missionary Dejean. 

grammars and grammatical notices. 

Jonathan Meeker, Ottawa First Book. Shawnee Mission, printed by 
J. G. Pratt, 1838, 18mo, pp. 229. 

Abinodjnag Omasindiganiwan. Buffalo, printed by Oliver Steele, 1837, 8vo. 
pp. 8. 

Child's Book. Detroit, Bagg and Harmon, 1845, 18mo, pp. 8. 

OTTOMAKU, OTTOMACQUE. 

Indians of Bolivia, on the banks of the Yarura. The Taparita 
are said to speak a dialect of their language. 



Ill- OTUQl'IS— rACAGUARAS. 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIHS. 

OiLii, Saggio, Vol. Ill, p. 213 ; an<1, from Iiim, in the : Mithridates, Vol. UT, 
p. 650. 

IIlRVAS, Origine, Tabb. L et (»t>q. 

OTUQULS. 

Indians of Bolivia, of the province of Cliiquitos. Having been 
compelled by the Jesuits to adopt the Chiquito, their language 
is nearly lost. 

m 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Das Land Otuquis in Bolivia. Nach cinom Origin albericht von Mobssach, 
beschrieben von Dr. G-. L. Kriegk. Frankfurt^ 1838, 8vo ; pp. 28, 24. 

Otuke Vocabulary (23 words) given by: D'Orbiqnt, L*Horame Am^ricaiu, 
Vol. I, pp. 163 — 164. ; Vol. II, p. 136 ; who also gives some general remarks on 
the Language of the Otuke, Vol. II, pp. 176, 177. 

OYAMPIS. 

Carib tribe of French Guyana. 

WORDS AND V0CABULARIK8. 

Adah de Baube et F. Ferbe, De la Langue Oyampis, avec Vocubulaire, pp. 
107—109 ; and Lepbieub, Vocabulaire Ojampis, pp. 225 — 229 of: Bulletin de 
la Soci^te de Geographie, Second Series, Vol. I. Paris^ 1834, 8vo. 

A. D'Obbignt, L' Homme Am^ricain, Vol. II, p. 276. 

PACAGUAUAS. 

Moxos Indians, on the confluence of the rivers Beni and 
Mamore, in Bolivia. 

WORDS and vocabularies. 
A. D'OsBiaNY, L'Homme Amfericain, Vol. I, p. 164 ; Vol. II, p. 208. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
A. D'Obbigny, L*Homme Am^ricain, Vol. II, p. 268. 



PAICOXKCA PAMPTICOUGH. 1 J5 



PAICONECA. 

Indians of the province of Chiquitos, near Concepcion, between 
the rivers Bianco and Verde. They belong to the Chiquito 
stock ; one of their tribes is the Paunaca. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary of Twenty-three Words, pp. 162, 161 of Vol. I of: A. D'Orbigny, 
L'Homme Americain, and p. 162 of Vol. I, and p. 136 of Vol II, Vocabulary of 
five Words of the Paunaca tribe. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
A. D'Oebignt, L'Homme Americain, Vol. II, pp. 190, 191. 

PALAIHNI, PALAIKS, 

Indians of south-western Oregon^ on the northern frontiers of 
Upper California. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

No. 11, W, of the Vocabularies of North-western America (pp. 569—629) of : 
Hob. Hale, Ethnography and PhOology of the United States Exploring Expedi- 
tion. Philddelphiay Lea and Blauchard, 1846, folio ; and 

F, XXXI (pp. 98, 100), of the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American 
Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

PAMPTICOUGH. 

Indian tribe of North Carolina, now extinct. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A small Dictionary of Tuskerura, Pampticough, Woccon, in : John Lawson, 
Q«nt., Surreyor-General of North Carolina, a New Voyage to Carolina .... and 
a Journal of a 'Ihousand Miles travelled through several Nations of Indians, 
giving H pai ticular Account of their Customs, Manners, etc. London, 170i^, small 
4to ; pp. 225 -227. 

Firat printed in : Capt. John Stevens, A New Collection of Voyages and 
Travels .... none of them ever before printed. London^ December, 1708. 
To be continued monthly, 4to. (In Vol. I, afterwards with separate title, 
ibid,, 1709, 1714, and 1718, 4to.) 

German translation, Hamburg, V712,, 8vo. 

John Bbickell, M.D.,The Natural History of North Carolina, with an Account 

V 



140 IMNOS — PATArilOS. 

of the Traded, Maiiiicr!i, nnd Cuxtomd of the Giristian and Indian InhabiUntf. 
Duff/in, 17:)7, 8to ; rwvf title, ibid.^ 17 i*), 8ro (the Dictionarj from IjAWBOH). 

ITkuva^, AritiiiHirn. p. Hi. 

Smith IJakto.n, Xow Vio«n, etc.— (\>inpanitive Vocabularies. 

Mithriilutrs (fn>m tlit* abovo), Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 360—362. 

IUliiI, Atlas Ktlinographiqno, Tub. XFJ, No. 80U. 

No. TV, K, p. 375, of the Coinparativc Vocabubry to: A. GhiUatin's Sjmopais 
(.A r(*1uiH)ioj;ia Anu>riniii», Vdl. II). From Lawsox, IIebiot, Lave. 

Couiparii*oii of the Language of the ancient Pampticos of ^orth Carolina with 
the AIg(.n(|iun LunguHge, uiid of the aneiciit Waccoa of that State and the 
C*Hta\vbu of South Carolina (SriiuoLCKAFi^s Indian Tribei of the United States, YoL 
V, pp. 552 — 558 ; Tiukaruni, I'anipticough, and Waceoa, pp. 555, 556 5 Pamptico, 
Natic, and Chippewa, pp. 556, 557). 

PANOS. 

Brazilian Indians on the banks of the River Ucayale. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langne des Panos (Langue gencralc de 1' Ucayale), Vocabulary, No. XVIII of: 
Castelnait, Vol. V, Appeudice, pp. 292, 293. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Note sur la G-rammairo Pani. Becueillie par les Missionaires de I'TJcayale : 
Castelnau, Vol. V, Appendice, pp. 301, 302, 

PARENI. 

Indians of the Maypure Mission, on the River Mataveni, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Al. de Uttmboldt et A. Bonfland, Voyage aux B^ions 6quinoxiaIe8 da 
Nouveau Continent. Faris^ 1819, 2 yole. 4to ; Vol. II, pp. 366 et seq. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 610. 

A, D'Orbigny, L'Homme Am6ricain, Vol. II, p. 274. 

PATACHOS. 

Brazilian Indians in the province Porto Seguro, on the rivers 
Porto Seguro and Mucury. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Keise des Prinzen Maximilian zu Wied. FranJcfurt, 1820, 1821, 2 vols. 4to ; 
Vol. II, pp. 320 et seq. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 504. 



PAWXEE — PENOBSCOT. 147 



PAWNEE, PANI. 

Warlike tribe on the banks of the rivers Platte and Kansas, also 
on Red River. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

T. SatJ Vocabulary, pp. Ixii — Ixxxv of: Astronomical .... Hecords and 
Vocabularies of Indian Languages, taken on the Expedition for Exploring the 
Mississippi .... under .... Major St. H. Long. Fhiladelphia, 1822, 8vo. 

Balbi, Atlas Etbnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 738. 

Reise des Prinzen Maximilian ztt Wied, etc. Coblenz,lSS9 — 1841, 2 vols. 
4to ; Vol. II, pp. 630—632. 

No. XVII, 52, of tbe Comparative Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. 
(Arcbseologia Americana, Vol. II, pp. 305 — 367) ; and 

No. E, XVII, pp. 96—98, of Vocabularies in: Transactions of the American 
Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

Fiftoen Pawnee Words compared with Riccaree, Kichai, Hueco, and Wit chita, 
pp. 68, 69 of the Report upon the Indian Tribes, added to Lieutenant Whipple's 
Report (Pacific Railroad Reports, Vol. II. Washington, 1856, 4to). 

Six Caddo Words and Pawnee Affinities. Ibid., p. 70. 



PEBAS. 

Brazilian Indians on the Amazon. 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

Langue des Pebas, Vocabulary No. XXII, pp. 296, 297 of: Castelnait, Vol. 
V, Appendice. 

PENOBSCOT. 

I 

Abenaki tribe, greatly reduced, above Banger, Maine. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Smith Barton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates (from above), Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 402 — 404. 

T. Say, Comparative Vocabulary of various Dialects of the Lenape Stock, etc. 



1 IK l»i: N N SY LV A N I W s. 

Note 15, pp. 135—115, to John Picl[ering*B (Mlitioii of Dr. Edwards's Obserra- 
tions on the Mohegan Language. (ColliTtions of the Ma^sachusMts Historical 
Society, Second Sorit»s, Vol. X. Bo»ton^ printed by Phelps and Famham, 1823, 
8vo. Reprinted, i/yic/., Little and Hrowti, 18 W, 8vo.) 

Xo. TV, 11, B, p. 370, of the Compnnitive Vocabulary to A. Gki1!atin*B 
SynoprtiH (Archicoh)gia Aniericuna, Vol. II). From MSS. of Tbeat and Mrs. 
Oakdikkr. 

H. Hale, Ki'mnrks on the Langunge of the St. John or Colastukweek Indians, 
with a Penobscot Vocabulary. Boston, 1S3I-, Rvo, pp. 8, 



PENXSYLVAKJAXS. 

The Indians inliabitinj^ Pennsylvania, or New Sweden, were of 
the Algonkin and of the Iroquois stock (Mohawks). 

^VOUDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabularium Barbaro-Virgineorum ; additis passim locutionibus et observa- 
tionibus historicis brevioribus ad linguee pleniorem notitiam, pp. 133 — 154 of: 
Lutheri Oathcchisinus. df^ersatt pa American-Vergiuiske spruket. Stockholm^ 
1696, 12rao (from Thomas Campanius), 

Words, on pp. 49, etc. : Journal des S^avans, 1716, 4to. 

Book IV, Chap. I — X, Vocabuhiry, and Chap. XI and XII, Dialogues of: 
Thomas Campanius Holm, Kort beskrifuing om Provincien Nya Swerige. 
Stockholm, 1704, 4to ; pp. 153—599. 

English translation, by P. St. Duponcean, A Short Description of the 

Provin(!e of New Sweden Translated for the Historical Society of 

Peunsylvania, with notes, pp. 144 — 156, in: Memoirs of the Historical 
Society of Pennsylvania, Vol. III. Philadelphia^ M'Carty and Dayis, 1834, 
Svo ; pp. 1 — 168. 

Smith Bakton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies (Indians of Penn- 
sylvania, according to William Penn), from Campanius. 

No. IV, 198 (p. 371), of Comparative Vocabulary to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, 
etc. (ArchfiBologia Americana, Vol. II). 

Ant. Court db Gebelin, Langue de Pennsylvanie (Monde Primitif, Vol, 
VIII, p, 523). Reprinted in: J. B. Scherer, Recherches Historiques et G^- 
graphiques sur le Nouveaii Monde. Parisy Brunet, 1777, 12mo, p. 331. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 387 — 389 (from the Virginian Catechism). 

J. S. Vater, Proben Deutscher Mundarten : Dr. Seetzen's Linguist. Nachlass. 
Leipzig, 1816, 8vo ; pp. 376—380. 



PKQUOT PIMA. 149 



PEQUOT. 



Indians of Connecticut, related to the Mohegans. The Nanga- 
tuck Indians speak a kindred language. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary of Pequot and some Nangatuck Indian Words, Article I of the 
Appendix (p. 491) to : John W. de Fokbest, History of the Indians of Con- 
necticut. Hartford, Hamersley, 1852, 8vo. 

PESCHERAI, YAKANAKU, FUEGIANS. 

Indians of Fireland (Tierra del Fuego) and of the peninsulas 
Brunswick and King William IV ; divided into three tribes — 
KameneteSy Kennekas, and Karaikas, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

James Weddell, Master, R.N., A Voyage towards the South Pole, performed in 
the years 1822 — 1824. Containing a Visit to Tierra del Fuego ; with a particular 

account of the Inhabitants London, Longman, 1825, 8vo, pp. 280, 

13 maps and plates. Second edition, ibid., 1827, 8to, pp. 324, maps and plates ; 
p. 174. 

Hebyas, Catalogo, p. 15. 

Smith Barton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
A. D'OBBiaNY, L* Homme Am6ricain, Vol. I, p. 412. 

PIANKASHAWS. 

Southern tribe of the Ojibway stock. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Smith Barton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies ; 
And, from him, Mitbridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 360 — 362. 

PIMA. 

Indian nation of New Mexico and Sonora, where the country 
inhabited by them is called Pimeiia^ and divided into Alia and 
Baja. 



I.IO PINALKNOJ*. 



WORDS AND YOCABULARIKS. 

Kebyas, Originc, Tabb. XLIX, L it scq. 

IIebvas, Saggio, pp. 121, 125. 

loNATZ Pfeffebkorx, Bcsubreibung der Laadaohaft SoDora. KoUh, 1794^ 
2 vols, 8vo. 

Mitbridates (from tbe above), Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 1G2— 169. 

A Vocabulario de las Lcnguas Pima, Eudcve y Seris, is said, by De Souza, to have 
been written by Fr. Adamo Gilo, a Jesuit missionary in California. 

Pima Vocabulary, by Dr. Joiix Scoulek, in : Journal of the Royal Geogra- 
phical Society of Loudon, Vol. XI. London, 1841, 8vo ; pp. 246, 248, 25a 

Pima Vocabulary, under W, 1, p. 129, in : Transactions of the American £tlmo« 
logical Society, Vol. II. 

Dr. C. C. Paeiiy (Botanist to the Boundary Commission), Vocabulary of the 
Language of the Pimo Indians on the Hio Gila, New Mexico, pp. 161, 162 of: 
Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of tbe United States, Vol. III. 

Pima Vocabulary, by Lieutenant A. W. Whipple, p. 94 of: Beport upon 
the Indian Tribes (see Report on the Route near the 35th Parallel in : Pacific 
Railroad Reports, Vol. II). Washington, 1856, 4to. 

John R. Baetlett, the United States Boundary Commissioner, has also taken 
a Vocabulary of the Pimo Language. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Mitbridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 162 — 169 (from Iqnatz Ppeffebkobn). 



PINALENOS. 

Also called Piuon Lanos^ Piilols^ Pinal Leiio. Apache tribe, 
ranging over an extensive circuit, between the Sierra Piiial and 
the Sierra Blanca, near the Upper San Francisco River, north 
of the Gila, in New Mexico. 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

Pinal Leiio Vocabulary, taken in 1852, by Lieutenant A. "W. Whipple 
(see Report upon the Indian Tribes, in the Keport on the Route near the 35th 
Parallel, Chap. V, pp. 81 — 83 of : Pacific Raih'oad Reports, Vol. II. Washington^ 
1856, 4to). 



FIRINDA — POKONCHI. 151 



PIRINDA. 

Language of the Indians of Mechoacan, Mexico. Identical with 
Tarasca? De Souza says of Fr. Juan Bravo, the author of a 
Grammar of the Lengua Tarasca (see under Tarasca), "fue 
maestro peritissimo de la lengua Firinda, Uamada Tarasca/' 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
Hervas, Saggio, p. 120. 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 126—128. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Arte de la Lengua Pirinda, and also yarious Sermons in the same Language, bj 
the Fray Fbakcisqo Acosta, of the order of San Augustin, in the proTince of 
Michoacan. These MSS. were left in the library of the Convent of Charo. 

Arte Vocabulario y Manuel de la Lengua Pirinda, por Fr. Miguel Guetaba. 
According to De Souza, in the Conyent of Charo, province of Michoacan. 

PIRO. 

Indians of New Mexico, near El Paso. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A Vocabulary of the Piro Language has been taken by John R. Babtlett, the 
United States Boundary Commissioner. 

POKONCHI. 

Or Pokoman. Indian Nation of the district of Vera Paz, in 
Guatemala. Their language bears close affinity to the Maya. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Th. Gage (see Grammars below). 

Hbbtas, Origine, Tabb. XLIX, L, LI et seq. 

Hebtas, Saggio, pp. 113—115. 

Smith Babton, New Yiews, etc. — Coraparatiye Tocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 15, 23. 

Pp. 9, 10 of: A. Gallatin's Notes on the Semi-civilized Nations of MeiieO 
(Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. I. New Torh^ Bartlett 
and Welford, 1845, 8to.) 



152 niFOLicA. 

Dr. Kaul Si'iiKU/EK, Spnu'lio dcr TndianiT ron Palin (Pooonchi) 24 engL 
Meileii von Nfii CiiiatoiiiHlii, ])p. 28—35 of Vol. XV of the: Sitsungsberichte te 
Pliiloi*oplii«ch-IIistori!M'Iu'n KUaho (Kt KaiM^rlichen Akadcmie der Wissensohaftcn. 
VtenHa, 1855. 8vo. Alco under the iM'panito title : Sprscben der Indimner Osnttfl 
Aincrika B. I'teMHO^ 1855, 8to, ])p. 11. 

GKAMMAUH AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

TiioxAS Qaoe, The Kni;li»h-Ampricnn, his Travail by Sea and bj Land, or a 
New Hiirvey of the West IndicH . . . . with a Qraminar or aome few Rudimenta 
of the Indian tongue, called IVeonelii or Pocoman. London, printed bj R. Cotcfl, 
10-18, Hmrill folio. SiTond Kdition, A New Survey of the West Indies, eto. ZiomUm, 
1055, Humll folio; the Grammar on pp 213, et seq. Third Edition. London^ 1677, 
8vo. The Fourth Kdition, enlarged by the Author. London^ printed for T. 
NicholHon, 10Ul», 8vo. 

French tran!*lation — NouvcUe Relation, nontenant lea Vojages de Thonuw 
Gage dani la Nouvelle £rtp.igne. Traduite par le Sieur De Beaulieu Hues 
O'Ncil. JParUy Clousier, 1070, 2 vols. 12mo ; and added to it : Brieve Instme- 
tion )X)ur apprendra la Langue Indienne api>elee Poconchi ou Poooman. 
/><!//>, 1070, 12mo. 

Tliis Fnmch translation has often been reprinted, yiz., Amsterdam, Moret, 
1080, 2 vols. 12mo ; ibid., 1085; ibid., 1087 ; ibid., 1095 ; ibid,. Third Edi- 
tion, rcvuo ct corrigee, 1099, 2 vols. 12ino ; ibid., Fourth Edition, 1720, 
2 vols. 12m0i ibid., 1721; ibid., 1722. 

Bkunet, Vol. II , p. 315, however, remarks that the edition of 1676 is the 
one to which the translation of the Poconchi Grammar was added. This 
translation having appeared under a separate title, is generally found sepa- 
rately. 

Oerman translation — Ganz neue, merkwiirdige Reisebeschreibung nach 
Neuspanien .... ans dem FranzOsischen iibersetzt. Leipzig, 16u3, 4to. 
The Grammar on pp. 457—471. 

Dutch translation -'Nieu we ende seer naeuwkeerige Keyze door de Spaensdie 

West Indicn, van Thomas Gage overgeset door H. v. Q. (H. ran . 

Quellenburgh). Utrecht, 1082> small 4to. 

Spaninh translation— Nueya Relacion que contiene los Yiagea de Tomas 
Gage en la Nueva Kspaua. Paris, Rosa, 1838, 2 yols. 12mo. 

Mithridates (from Gage), Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. — 13. 

A. Gallatin (from Gage), Notes on the Semi-ciyilized Nations of Mexico, etc , 
pp. 45 — 47, 209—275, of: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, 
Vol. I. New York, Bartlett and AVelford, 1845, 8vo. 

POPOLUCA, 

Or Populukay Papoloka, Indians of Central America, in Oajaca^ 
and in the State of San Salvador. The same as Poconchi and 
Pocoman, t,e,, Kachiquel (?). Muhlenpfordt does not mention 
them in Oajaca. 



POTTAWaTAME POWHATTANS. 1 53 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Franc, de Toual, Arte y Vocabulario en la Lengua Popolaca de Tecoinachaleo 
(printed ? ). 

Br. Kabl Scherzeb, Sprache der Indianer Ton St. Maria, am Fusse des Was* 
ser-Yulcan's (Pupuluka-Eatchikel), 5 engli. Meilen tod Antigua Guatemala (Sitz- 
zungsberichte der Philosophisch-Historischen Klasse der Kaiserliehen Akademie 
der WissensehaOen, Vol. XV, pp. 28—35. Vienna, 1835, 8fo. Also under the 
sepamte title: Sprachen der Indianer Central Amerika*s. Tlenna, 1855, 8vo, 
pp. 11.) 

fiRAM.MAKS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Francesco db Toral (see Vocabularies above). 

POTTAWATAME, POUTEOTAMIS. 

Indians of the Algonkin stock, formerly near Detroit, Michigan. 

WORDS and VOCABULARIK.S. 

SxiTH Barton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates (firom the above). Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 343—346, 360—362. 

No. IV, a, of the Comparative Vocabulary (p. 375) to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, 
etc. (Archseologia Americana, Vol. II). From Barton, and MS. Notices in the 
War Department of the United States. 

Beprinted and enlarged under N, IV, 5, p. 107 of Vocabularies in : American 
Ethnological Society's Transactions, Vol. II. 

grammars and grammatical NOTICKS. 

Pottawottomie Spelling-book. Shawnee Mission, J. Meeker, printer, 1834. 
12mo, pp. 32. 

Letter of D. Wolcott to General Cass (in answer to printed queries). On the 
History and Language of the Pottowattamies, note, pp. 380 — 386 of: Henry R. 
Schoolcraft, Travels in the Central Portions of the Mississippi Valley (performed 
.... 1821). New Tort, Collins andHannay, 1825, 8vo. 

Pewani ipi Potewatomi ^lissinoikan eyowat nemadjik Catholiques endjik (Catho- 
lic primer). Baltimore, John Murphy, 1846, 24mo, pp. 31. 

POWHATTANS. 

Tribe of the Algonkin stock, in Alaryland and Virginia, now 
extinct. Jeffersox, in the Notes on Virginia, gives a view of 
their extent and tribes. 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 
Captain Johk Sxith, General History of Virginia, New England, and the 



151* I'RINCK WILLIAM SOUND — P7CBLO INDIANA. 

Summer U\cs London, 1620. folio. Reprinted, ihid.^ 1G27 and 1682, 

folio ; at the end of Dudk II. 

Reprinted : TheTrnvelp, Adventure!*, nnd Observations of Captain John Sroith, 

etc. Richmond, republinhed at the Franklin Press, William W. Graf, 

printer, 1819, 2 vols. 8vo ; Vol T, pp. 147, 1 18. 

No. IV, i (376), of the Comparutive Vocabulary to A. GALLATiir*8 Sjnopsia, 
etc. (Archtpologia Americana, Vol. II). 

Voeabulary of the Powbattnn Lanpfunge (from Captain Smith) in: James 
Macauley'fl Ilifllory of New York. New I orXr, Gould and Banks, 18299 3 vols. 
8ro; Vol. 1 1, pp. 263 - 270. 

PRINCE AVILLIAM SOUND. 

On the nortli-west coast of North America (Russian possessions), 
inhabited by Eskimaux. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

James Cook, Voyage to the Pacific Ocean (third voyage, under Cook, 

Clark, and Gore). London, 1784, 3 vols. 4to; Vol. II, pp. 374—376. 

Captain GEORaE Dixon, A Voyage round the World, but more particularly 
to the North-west Coast of America. London, Goulding, 1789, 4to, p. 241. 
French translation, by M. Lebas. Paris, 1789, 2 vols. 8vo. 
German translation, by J. R. Forster. Berlin, Voss, 1790, 4fco, p. 

Captain Nathaniel Pobtlook, A Voyage round the World, etc. Londrnt, 
Stockdale, 1789, 4to. 

German translation, by G. Forster, Geschichte derReisen an der Nord- 
west und Nordostkiiste von Amerika .... von Dixon, Portlock, Cook .... 
Berlin, Voss, 1791, 1792, 3 vols. 4to. 

And PoBTLOCE, G. Mortimer*s and Long's Travels, translated with 
separate title. Berlin, Voss, 1796, 4to. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 238. 

PUEBLO INDIANS (ZUNI, KERES). 

Indians of New Mexico. The tribes living at Santo Domingo 
and the neighbouring Pueblos are called Keres, or, by the 
Spaniards, Queres, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

James H. Simpson, A Comparative Vocabulary of Words in the Languages of 
the Pueblo or Civil Indians of New Mexico, and of the wild tribes inhabiting its 
borders, pp. 140 — \^Z of: Journal of a Military Reconnaissance from Santa F^, 
New Mexico, to the Navajo countiy, pp. 56 — 168 of; Reports of the Secretary of 
War, with Reconnaissances of Routes from S. Antonio to El Paso ; also, the 



PUELCHES. 155 

Report of Lieutenant J. H. Simpson. Wathington^ printed at the Union Office, 
1850, 8vo (Exec. Docum. Senate, No. 64-, 31st Congress Session). 
Simpson distinsruisfaes Pueblo Indians of: — 



1. St. Domingo S. Anna. 

S.Felipe Silla. 

Laguna Pojuate. 

Acoma Coehiti. 



2. S.Juan S.Clara 

S. Aldefonso Pojuaque. 

Marabe Tesuque. 

3. Taos — Picori — Sandia — Isleta. 
4. Yemes (old Pecos). 

Datid V. "Whiting, Pueblo (of Tusuque) Vocabulary, in : Schoolcraft's Indian 
Tribes of the United States, Vol. Ill, pp. 44,6—459. 

Captain J. H. Eaton, United States Agent, Pueblo (of Zuiii) Vocabulary, 
ibid.. Vol. IV, pp. 416—432 (pp. 429—431, numerals). 

Zuni Vocabulary, taken by Lieutenant A. W. Whipple, pp. 91 — 93 of the 
Beport upon the Indian Tribes (Report on the Boute near the 35th Parallel in: 
Pacific Railroad Reports, VoL IE. Washington^ 1856, 4to). 

PUELCHES. 

Indians of the Argentine Republic, between the Rio Negro and 
the Rio Colorado. They are divided into Chechehet, Divihet, 
and Taluhet; the two latter are called by the Spaniards 
"Pampas,^* The wild Charruas are related to them. Hale 
distinguishes only Pampas (north of the Rio Colorado) and 
Tehuetches (south of that river) . 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Th. Falsineb, Description of Patagonia (see Araucans) .... Hereford^ 1774, 
4to, p. 138. 

German translation, by Schack Hm. Ewald. Gothay Ettinger, 1775, 
8to, p. 13. 

HsBTAS, Catalogo, p. 20. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, p. 423. Puelches and Tuelhet (from Falknkb and 

HSBTAS). 

Vocabulary of Twenty-three Words, pp. 162—164 of Vol. I of: Alcide D'Oe- 
BIQNY, L*Homme Americain. 

Puelche Vocabulary and Sentences (Pampas and Tehuiliche), pp. 653—656 
of United States Exploring Expedition. Ethnography and Philology, by HoE. 
Hale. Philttdelphia, Lea and Blanchard, 1846. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

A. D*Oebignt, L*Homme Americain, Vol. II, pp. 79, 80 ; and p. 87, Notices on 
the Charrua Language. 



li)6 rr<iriM — grA»»iMs. 



JMQLINI. 

PiTuviau Indians^ on the islands of the Cliuquito Lake^ and at 
the Mission of tlic Patres McTcenarii, near the Pucarani. They 
spoke their language exclusively among themselves^ and did not 
permit strangers to learn the same. For worshippings they 
used the Quichua. No affinity to any other American Ian* 
guage. 

WOUDS AM) VOrABULAUIE.S. 

IIebyab, Origine, Tubb. L vi 8oq. 

Uekvab, Suggio, p. 93. 

Mitliridatcs (from ITkrvas), Vol. Ill, pp. 548 — 550. 

PURYS. 

Brazilian Indians, of the provinces llio de Janeiro and Espirita 
Santo. 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

WiiiH. L. VON EscHWEGE, Joumal fur Brasilien, Heft 1. fTeimar^ 1818, 
8vo. 

Balbi, Atlas EtlinograpLique, Tab. XLI, No. 497. 

QUADUS. 

Brazilian Indians, in the neighbourhood of Miranda. 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 

Langue des Quadus. Vocabulary No. IX, pp. 278—280, of: Cabtelnau, Vol. 
V, Appeiidice. 

QUAPPAS. 

Indians on the banks of the Arkansas River. (See Nuttall's 
Journal, pp. 81 — 89.) 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

No. VI, 36, of Comparative Vocabulary (pp. 305—367) to A. Gallatin's 
Synopsis, etc. (Archseologia Americana, Vol. II}. 



QUEEN charlotte's ISLAND — jlCUE. 157 

S, ly, 3, p. 117, of theVocubulanes (rransactious of tlie American Ethnological 
Society, Vol. II). 

QUEEN CHARLOTTE'S ISLAND. 

On the uortli-west coast of America. The language spoken by 
the Indians of this island is but little known. The Cufnshewar, 
Massif, SkittayeetSy Kecsani, and Kigarnce are mentioned as 
living on the island. 

\N0RD8 AND VOCABULARIES. 

Pp. 302, 380 of: Miscellaneous Vocabularies, in A. Gallatin's Synopsis 
f ArchsDologia Americana, Vol. II), contains, under XXIX, 64, p. 380, words of the 
Kiganiee, Casainee, Skittageets, Cumshawa, and other tribes of the north-west 
coast, and the numerals 1 — 10 in the Queen Charlotte Island Language. (From 
MS. authorities of Messrs. Stukgis and Bryant.) 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 850. 

Words, p. 1 5 4 of : R. G. Latham, The Languages of the Oregon Territory 
(Journal of the Ethnological Society of Loudon, Vol. X, pp. 154—166). Edin' 
hurgh, 1848, 8to. 

Skittagets (Queen Charlotte's Island) Vocabulary, No. 6, XIX, p. 102, of 
Vocabularies in ; Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

^ICIIE, QUICHE, KICHE. 

Indians of Guatemala, belonging to the Great Tzendal or Maya 
stock, which oc^'upics that State. Their language is closely 
related to that of the Kachiquels and Zutugils, and bears much 
resemblance to the INIava. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Eiche (^iche) Dictionary (from the CouTcnt of Papuna ?, sold by Pierre Bavila, 
on the 24th November, 1833). MS. vol. in 4to, on paper of the 18th century ; in the 
Imperial Library of Paris. Apparently a copy of the Cakchiquelchi Dictionary. 

A MS. Vocabulary of the Quiche Language is in the possession of Abbe 
Dominic Jehl, of Palin, near Amatitan, Guatemala. 

Quiche Numerals, p. 191 of: Jony L. Stephens, Incidents of Travel in Cen- 
tral America. Sew York^ Harpers, 1844, 2 vols. 8vo. 

Dr. Karl Scherzeb, Sprache der Indianer von Ixtlavacan (Quich^, 10 engl. 
Meilcn von Quesalteuango, Guatemala, pp. 28 — 35 of Vol. XV of: ^ilzungsberichte 
der PhilosophisL-h-Historiychen Klasse der Kaiserlichen Akailemie diT Wissen- 
schaften. 77e»»a, 1855, 8vo. Alsounder the separate title : Sprachen der Indianer 
Central Amerika's. Hennas 1855, 8vo, pp. 11. 



158 WficiHA. 

CiUAMMAUS AM) (iUAMMVTirAL KUTICK8. 

1'. F. Ai.oN/o Fi.nitKs, Artrdcli 1.tMi<;ii:i Kaki-liiipH'l y iinralolo rie las quatro 
J«<'iif;u:is .Mrtriipoliiuiiari i[\w li<>\ iiitr^ran rii cI ri'\iio do CSoalhciiiala. jimitoMtif 

AItlii)u^]i .lii.irriis (I, p. :ii:{) st:it(>t1i:it tliis " Arti*" was printed, and ]iad 
jin>vi'(l vi-ry tisi-ful, tin- honk wass fim-iiliTi'il u|MMTyphal until rfconlly, when 
the Abbe l{ra>si'ur dc Ihmriiour^ uroti- fntiii (iiiati'uiuht tlial ho had obtained 
four copies (si>o K. (i. Sipiicr's letti-r iu tlic Li)iidou Atheii<tum^ Deceinb^ 8, 
iNr}.*!, >ii>. 1 Kw). It t'oiitaiii!* a (■uInpari^un of the Kachiquel, with the 
Ijiiii'hr ntid /ulu^il, all tliive luMiiir dialtrtd of one pari'nt stock. Flores wat 
Prttfessur of the Kukcliiquel hin-fuage at the Suu Carlos Univerditj of Guate- 
mala. 

Arte de his tres J/eu^ua.H - Cueehiquel, Quiehc y Yutuhil j por el R. P. Fray 
FltANClsco XlMKNKZ, (li'I C)rdeii de Pivdieadores. 

Seeond divibion of the l*adre'sj ^reat work on the history, languages, and 
antiquities of Ouatenmla, exist iu«;, in MS. only, in the University Library of 
Guatemala. (For an acc<iunt of this MS. see X. Triibner's paper on Central 
American Archieology, in the Loudon Athenceiim, May 29, 1856, No. 1492.) 

Arte do Lcngua Kakehikel del uso do Fr. Estlvax ToRRESAyo, I're'* Ano de 
175 k A MS. of 113 leave:*, in Svo, in the Imperial Library at Paris. (Copy in 
possession of K. CI. Squier.) 

Contains: Parallelo de las Lenguas ^iehe (Kiche, Quiche), Cakchiquel 
(Kachiquel) y Zutuhil (Zutugil). 

A comparison is also made between this dialec^i and the Zutugil and 
"Kachiquel Grammar of Flores. 

Arte do Lengua ^iche (Quiche), compucsto por N. M. R. P. Fray Babtho- 
LOME AuLEO, Religioso Menor do N. S. P*^ San Francisco. 

In the Imperial Library of Paris. MS. of 67 leaves in 4to. (A copy also 
in possession of E. G. Squier, New York.) 

The Imperial Library also possesses the following MS. : — Marial sacro y 
Santoral. Sermones en la Lengua ^ iche, escritos por varies autores, princi- 
palmente por un ludio por lo qual hay mucho que correjir, o emendar en 
todos los Textos Latinos. Pertcueco al uso del P*-'- P*" Fr. P A. S., hijo de 
la S"^- Prov^- del dulcisimo fibre de J.II.S. Guatem"^- aiio de 1796. Con- 
tains 23 Sermons. 

QUICHUA, KECHHUA. 

The language of tlie Peruvians. It was spoken by all the tribes 
subject to the lucas, from Pasto to the River M?inle, in Chili, 
and is still in use. Many of the Spanish inhabitants speak it 
well and correctly. The Aymara bears a close affinity to the 
Quichua. 

Dialects of the Quichua : — 1. Dialect of Cuzco, or the Quichua 



QUICHUA. 159 

proper ; the most cultivated dialect. 2. Lamano or Lamtssa, 
round Truxillo. 3. Chinchaistiyu, round Lima. 4. Kalchaqui, 
in Tucaman, the best after the Cuzco dialect. 5. Dialect of 
Quito ; the least cultivated — corrupted by many foreign words. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Fr. Domingo de S. Thomas, de la orden de S. Domingo, Lexicon 6 Vocabu- 
lario de la Lengua general del Peru llair.ada Quiehua. Valladolid, impress© por 
Francesco Fernandez de Cordova, 1560, 8vo, of 8 and 179 leaves. 
(See Grammars, where also the edition of 1586 is noticed.) 

P. DiEGK) Gonzalez Holquin, Vocabulario de la Lengua general de todo el 
Peru llamada Quiehua, o del Inca. Sa la Chidad de los Sei^s, 1586, 8vo. 
Beprinted : Corregido e renovado conforme k la propiedad cortesana del Cuzco. 
£n la Ciudad de los Reyes, impresso por Francisco del Canto, 1607, 1608, 2 vols. 
4to ; pp. 375, 332. 

(Two parts — Quichua-Spanish and Spanish- Quiehua.) 

DiEOO DE ToBRES RuBio, E S. J., Grammatica y Vocabulario en la Lengua 
general del Peru, llamada Quiehua j en la Lengua Espanola. Sevilla, 1603, 8vo. 
The Gmmmar on 40 leaves. The Vocabulary, Quichua-Spanish, on 11 
sheets (A — L), Spanish-Quichua on 12 sheets (A — M). 

Reprinted : Arte de la Lengua Quiehua, compuesto por el Padre DiEGO de 
Torres Rubio, de la Compaiiia de Jesus. Lima, por Francisco Lasso, 1619, 8vo, 
103 leaves (4 and 44 numbered, 55 not numbered). 

Brunet, IV, p. 495, says that, independently of the Grammar, it contains 
two small Vocabularies, Spanish-Quichua and Quichua-Spanish. 

Reprinted : Tercera edicion, nuevamente corregida con auadidos los romances, 
el catecismo corregido pequeiio, el Vocabulario auadido y otro Vocabulario de la 
Lengua Chinchaysuyu, por el M. R. Juan de Figiteredo. Sn Lima, por Joseph 
de Contreras, 1700, small 8vo, 12 and 115 leaves. 

Reprinted : AHadio el P. Juan de Figueredo, de la misma compania, ahora 
nuevamente corregida y auraentada en muchas Vocables .... por un religioso 
de la misma compania. Lima, 1754, 8vo. 

El P. Maestro Fray Juan Martinez, Vocabulario en la Lengua general del 
Peru, llamada Quiehua y en la Lengua Espaiiola. Sn los Beyes, 1604, small 8to. 

Arte y Vocabulario en la Lengua general del Peru, llamada Quiehua. En los 
Seyes (Lima), Francisco del Canto, 1614, 8vo. 

(BibUotheca Heberiana, VI, 35, No. 512, X, 18, No. 522.) 

A short Vocabulary, pp. 477, 478 of: Joan, de Laet, Novus Orbis. Lugduni 
BtUavorum, Elzevir, 1633, folio. 

QiLii, Saggio di Storia Americana, Vol. Ill, pp. 355 et seq. 

Hbrvas, Origine, pp. 27, 29, 37, 41, 44, 45, 49, 79, 118, 135, 136, 139, 140, 
177, 178, Tabb. XLIX, L, LI. 



100 <il U HI A. 

Hfrvaj*, Vocabolario ri'liclnito. pp. 101 et jrij. (Kiohua o Peruano-Kichua deB* 
anno 1504 », Kiton:^, p. '22\ Kii'ljii:! c K:i«ii.t}. 

ITervas, Aritmctira, pp. Iimi. Inl .K;-:iiii. Ki!t'n:i, Laman'>, ChinehaTflUju). 

HruvAS, Sriu'^i'', pp. sv VK 

John Rkimidid Kuiisn.i:, Oii^-pvaiiojj.. ma.U' ilurinj; a A'oyagv round the 
W'orKl, on IMiv-i'-al Gi'i-grapliv, Natunil lIi»tL-r\. a:.d Kiliic PhilodOpliT. Loudot^ 
Robinson, 177S, ho. 

German tr:in>lutii»n — I'obrr-tt/i unil n.it Anniorkuni^eu yeneben ron G. 
Forstor. BerUn, Iluuilo am! SjH-niT, 17>i*, Svo, pp. 251. 

Smith Barton, Xow Vii»ws, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Arithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 522, 5.^7, 5:iS. 517, 571 v^from Hertas, Tobbes, and 
HoLGUix). 

Balbi, Atlas Etbnograpbiqne, Tab. XLT, No. -159 (dialect Quitaua). 

Will. ^Iarsdex, Miscellaneous Works. London^ Cox and Son, 183-lfy 4to^ 
p. 104. 

Vocabulary of Twenty-three Words, pp. 162, IGl of Vol. I of : A. D'OBBiaUT, 
L'Hommo Aniericain. 

Four Quichua Words comparetl with Arrowact, Atoray, Maipure, and Moxos, 
Appendix VI, p. 166 of: J. A. tax IIeutel's El Dorado. Sew York, Winchester, 
1814, 8vo. 

A MS. Vocabulary of the Chicliua Language is in the library of the Royal 
Geographical Society of London (Journal, etc., Vol. X. London^ Murray, 1841, 
8vo), p. xxiv. 

J, J. VON TsCHUDi (see Grammars). 

Vocabulary of Eighty-eight Words, Inca, Quichoa, and Italian, and numerals 
1 to 20, 30, 40, etc., to 100, 200, etc., to 1000, pp. 49—50 ; and : Alcuni Vocabuli 
piu communi in Lingua Quichoa, pp. 289—300 of: Gaetaxo Oscttlati, Ex- 
ploracioni delle regioni equatoriali lungo il Napo ed il fiume delle Amazoui, etc. 
MilanOf Typographia Bernardoni, 1850, 8vo. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Gramatica 6 Arte de la Lengua general de los Tndios de los BeynoB del 
Peru. Nuevamente compuesto por el Maestro Fray Domingo de S. Thomas, de 
la Ordcn de S. Domingo, Morador en los dichos Reynos. Impresso en Vol' 
ladolidf por Francisco Fernandez de Cordova, 1560, small 8vo, of 8 and 96 
leaves. 

The Vocabulary by the same author (see Vocabularies) is generally found 
annexed to this Grammar. Both are reprinted in : Arte y Vocabulario en la 
Lengua general del Peru, llamada Quichua y en la Lengua Espauola. En 
la Ciudad de los Reyes, por Ant. Ricardo, 1586, small 8vo. 

The Vocabulary has a separate title, given by Brunet, IV, p. 676 : Voca- 



QUICHUA. 161 

bulario en la Lengua general del Peru llamada Quiehua y en la Lengua 
Espanola. En lot Reyes, por Ant. Bicardo, 1586, small 8vo. 

The preface of this Vocabulary is signed "Bicardo." Biyero and 
Tschudi name Antonio Ricabdo as the author of the Vocabulary and 
Grammar. 

Diego de Tobbes Bubio (see Vocabularies above). 

P. DiEOO Gonzales Holguin, de la Compailia de J^sus, Natural de Caceres, 
Gramatica y Arte nueva de la Lengua general de todo el Peru llamada Quiehua, 
6 Lengua del luca, auadida y cumplida, en todo lo que le faltava de tiempos y 
de la Gramatica, y recogida en forma de Arte lo mas necesario en los dos primeros 
Libros. Con mas otros dos Libros postreros de Adieiones de Arte, para mas 
perficionarla, el uno para alcanzar la Copia de Vocables, y el otro para Elegancia 
y Omato. Impresso en la Ciudad de los Reyes del Peru, por Francisco del Canto, 
1607, 4to, of 4 and 1 W. leaves. 

Beprinted : Nueva Edicion, revista y corregida s. 1. O'enova, Pagano, 1842, 
Svo, pp. 320. 

D. Alonso de HiTERTA, Arte de la Lengua Quechua general de los Yndios de 
este Reyno del Peru. Impresso por Francisco del Canto, En los Reyes, 1616, 4to, 
of 8 and 40 leaves. 

A MS. copy of this Grammar was in the library of M. Chaumett« des 
Fossees (see MSS., p. 162). 

BiDAC. DE Olmos, Gramatica de la Lengua Indica. Lima, 1633, 4to. (Tschudi 
has " 1634.") 

D. Juan Boxo Mexia t Ocon, Natural de la Ciudad del Cuzco, Arte de la 
Lengua general de los ludios de Peru. Impresso eu Lima, por Jorge Lopes de 
Herrera, 1648, small 8vo, of 18 and 88 pp. 

El Bachiller Don Esteban Saitcho de Melgab, Arte de la Lengua genera] 
del ynga llamada Qqechhua. Lima, Diego de Lyra, 1691, 8vo. 

Langue du P6rou, pp. 525 — 533 of Vol. VIII of: Coxtbt de Gebelin, Monde 
Primitif. Paris, 1772, 4to. Beprinted, pp. 334—336 of : J. B. Scherer, Becher- 
ches Historiques et G^graphiques sur le Nouveau Monde. Paris^ Brunet, 1777, 
12mo. 

Gnu, Saggio, Vol. Ill, pp. 233—243. 

Mithridates, Vol. HI, pp. 526—534. 

A. D'Obbignt, L'Homme Am^ricain, Vol. I, pp. 272—274. 

La Lengua Quiehua, Cap. V, pp. 86 — 115, of: Mabiano Edxtabdo db Biyeba 
y JxTAN Diego de Tschudi, Antiguedades Peruanas. f'ienna, imprenta imperial, 
1851, 4to. 

J. J. vow Tschudi, Die Kechua Sprache. Erste Abtheilung : Sprachlehre. 
Zweite Abtheilung : Sprachproben, Dritte Abtheilung : Worterbuch. Wien, 
K.K. Hof undStaatsdruckcrci, 1853, 3 vols.Svo j pp. iv, 268; vi, 110, 1 j viii, 508, 2. 

Y 



102 wi liin A. 

On tho ]jinguii{;(> and Litrmturi' of tlio Iiica«i, pp. 161^201 of: Cuzco, A 
Journey to tlit« Anciont I apital (if Peru, with an Aivouut of the History, Ldtnguage, 
Litcrnttin', niid Aiitii|uili(*« of tlio Iitcii'^. And : Limu ; a Visit 1o the Capital and 
Provinces of Mtidern IVru; wiili a Sketch of the Vieeroga! Government, History 
of t)ie Uepublie, inid a Koview of tlie liitemture and Soeiety of Peru. With 
ilhist rat ions and a ni;ip. Jty Clkmknte) K. Mahkiiam, F.K.G.S. Crown 8vo, 
pp. 120. London^ IsriG. 

A Sketeh of the Grnnnnar, ete., of t)io Innis, with Vocabularies and Specimens 
of Coini>Otiition in Quichua ; Api>endix A of tlic above work, pp. 889 — 408. 

DIALECT3. 

1. iiuito. — Breve instruction 6 Arte de la Lcugna Commune de loa Indioa, 
Begun que se babla en la Provineia de Quito. Lima, en la imprenta de la Phizuela 
de San Christ ovul, 1733, small 8vo. 

2. Chinchaisuya. — Voeabulario de la Lengua Chincbaisuyo, por Juan de 
Fiau£U£DO (iH'e Vocabularies above, sub voce: De Tobkes Rubio). 

J. J. YON TscnuDi, Peru. Reiseskizzen aus den Jahrcn 1838 — 1842. Sanei 
Oalieut 18 IG, 2 vols. 8vo ; Vol. II, p. 379 ; also in the first part of: Die Kechua- 
spraebe, pp. 257—262. 

3. Tun^a (see under Yuuga, regular Alphabet). 

PEKUVIAX MS. VOCABULVEIES AND GBAMMAES. 

A MS. Grammar, late of the library of Wilhelm von Humboldt, is now in the 
Boyal Library at Berlin. 

In the library of the late French Consul at Peru, M. Amed^e Chaumette des 
Foss^es (Catalogue, Paris, Labitte, 1842, 8vo), many linguistic MSS. concerning 
Peru were contained, viz. — 

Alonzo de Huerta, Arte de la Lengua Quechua (Catal., p. 50, No. 574). 

Arte de la Lengua general del Inca llamada Quichua. MS. on paper, 12mo 
(Catal., p. 50, No. 575). 

Vocabulario de la Lengua de los Campos en la Pampa del Sacramento nel Peru. 
MS. on paper, 4to. 

Copied from a MS. in possession of D. Manuel Arnes, Governor of Anda- 
namarca (Catal., p. 51, No. 581). 

Vocabulario de la Lengua Passa 6 Setaba. MS. on paper, 1795, 8vo, oblong 
(Catal., p. 51, No. 582). 

Arte de la Lengua Cholona, advertencias para el idioma Chiriguano. 2 yoIs. 
12mo, MS. on paper (Catal., p. 51, No. 583). 

Vocabulario de la Lengua Caniba, por el P. Bfenaventuba Mabqfes, predi- 
cador en Ucayali (Escrito en favor del Colegio de Ocopa), MS. 4to (Catal., p. 51, 
No. 584). 

Cuademo que contiene el Vocabulario en Lengua del Inca scgun so habla en el 



RICCA&EES — RUMSEN. 163 

Obispado de Maynas j Ucayali, escrito por el Hermano Fray Gebonimo db los 
Dolores y Leceta, Conversor de los Pueblos de Pisqui y Cuntamana de Manca» 
Mayo 21, 1814. In the Missionary Convent of Santa Kosa de Ocopa, proyinee of 
Jauja. (See Tsohudi's Vocabulary, preface, p. vii.) 



RICCAREES, 

jRicaraSy Aricaras ; also, Satrahe. Indians of the Pawnee 
stock, on the right banks of the Missouri. 

WORDS AND YOCABXTLARIES. 

Riccareo Vocabulary in : Geo. Catlin, Letters and Notes on the Manners, 
Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians. Fourth edition. London 
and New York, Wiley and Putnam, 1842, 2 vols. Svo j Vol. II, pp. 262-265. 

Reise des Prinzen Maximilian zu Wied. Cohlenz, 1839 — 1841, 2 vols. 4to ; 
Vol. II, pp. 465—474. 

Fifteen Riccaree Words (from Prince Maximilian) compared with Pawnee, 
Kichai, Witchita, and Nueco, pp. 68, 69 of : Report upon the Indian Tribes (added 
to Lieutenant A. W. Whipple's Report in : Pacific Railroad Report, Vol. II, 
Washington, 1856, 4to). 



RUMSEN, RUNSIENES. 

Indians in the neighbourhood of Monterey, California. The 
Achastliers speak a dialect of the same language. 

WOBDS AND VOCABULAEIES. 

J. F. BouBOOiNG, Relation d'uu Voyage recent des Espagnols sup les Cdtes Nord- 
oueat de TAm^rique septentrionale. Paris, 1789, 8to, p. 78. Third edition. 
Farisy 1803, Svo. 

German translation— «7«na, 1789, 8vo. 

Relacion del Viage hecho por las Goletas Sutil y Mexicana en el anno de 1792, 
para reconocer el estrecho de Fuca, etc. Madrid, en la imprenta real, 1802, 8vo ; 
pp. 172, 173. 

P. 127 of: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

Db la Perouse, Voyage autour du Monde, etc. Paris, 1797, 4 vols. 4to ; 
Vol. I, Chap. 12. 

Translation— io»rfo», Robinson, 1799, 2 vols. 4to. 

German translation, by J. R. Forster and Math. Chr. Sprengel. Berlin, 
Voss, 1799, 1800, 2 vols. 8vo ; Vol. I, p. 388. (From : Magazin der merk- 
viirdigsten Reisebeschreibungen. Berlin, Voss, 1790—1810, XXXI, 8vo.) 



\i\\ >\ni.l\ "iAIKWIKNTO INDIANS. 

An>liivt>!< l.itti-nuri's ilr rKiiro)if, lS;»t-. (Piihlii*!* ]Mir uno Society de QeM dr 
I.i'i!r.'<i M.-t-ir-. Sr \i;i», Mdhi iikt. Ih:i.i:KiviM». i't*\) Paris And TubiHffue,lBO\ — 
Isiis. \\ II, si.i. No. l\. p. s7 tViiiii Itm utMiMii. 

A. hi III \ri»iir>r, I'''<'*:ii I'ii1itii|iii' '>ur K' Hovaiimo ilt* la Xbuvelle Espagne. 
y.i/ijr, K. S.li.ull, IMI. U V..N. It.i. Vi.i. I, p. nil. 

Milliriil.itro, Vol. Ill, part :t, p. liiK'i (fnim HoruooiNO, and AchoMtlierM from 
|)i: I.\\i\Ni*N). 

It\i III, \tlri4 Ktliiiiiifrnpliiipii*, 'l':ih. XLI, No. KftO. 



SAIUJJA, Klllllll. 

Or Cariri. Two tribes of christianized Indians^ in the Brazilian 
proviii(*e Haliia, near Coehoeira^ now inhabiting the villages 
('aran(|uejo and N'illa da Pedra Branea. Their languages are 

nearly the sanu*. 

» 

WOUns AND VOCABULARIKS. 

TTkh VAs, V»MVib»)lnrio Poli^jlotto, pp. 161 ct seq., 237 (numerals 1 — 10). Hervat 
*l«*riviw tlu! Kiriri fri)iii tlic Uliarib). 

IIkkvas, Saggio, p. 108, and " Dialctto Rozzo," p. 109. 

.1. H. VON Si'ix and F. Tii. vox Martius, Reise in Brasilien. Munchen^V^iZ — 
lS:n, 3 voK Mo; Vol, II, p. 015 (Sabujn). 

Mitliridatcs, Vol. Ill, pp. 4GG, 109. 

Haliji, Atlas ICtlinogra})liiquc, Tab. XLT, Xo. 509 (Kiriri, dialect Sabuja). 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

P. Lrrs ViNCENoro Mamtani, e S. »T., Arte de Grammatica da Lingua Bra- 
siliea da Na9ain Kiriri. Lvthoa^ Mi«ruel ios Condes, 1099, 18mo, pp. 124. 

The snme author liaa published: Catec*i*mo da Doutrina Cliristiana, na 
Lingua Brasil da !Xa9ar) Kiriri. Lisboa, 1098, 8vo. 

German 1 ninslatiou — Granimatik der Kiriri Spraelio. Aus dem Fortugies- 
isclien dcs P. Maniiani, libersetzt von H. C. von der Gabelentz (Beitr&ge car 
Si)ra(!honkunde, 3** Heft). Leipzig^ Brockliaus, 1852, 8vo, pp. 62. 

Mitliridates, Vol. I IT, pp. 408, 409. 

SACRAMENTO INDIANS. 

The Indians living on the Upper Sacramento River, in California, 
were visited by James D. Dana, attached to the United States 
Exploring Expedition ; Dana could not, however, learn the name 



sAKi — SAINT John's Indians. 165 

of the tribe. The Pujuniy Sekumne^ and Tsamak live on the 
western banks. Dana has likewise collected vocabularies of 
their languages. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIKS. 

Hob. Ha.le, Ethnography and Philology of United States Exploring Expedi- 
tion. Philadelphia, Lea and Blanchard, 184-6, folio ; pp. 630, 631, 632, 633. 

Eeprinted in: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. IT, 
pp. 122. 12i, 125. 

Words of the ^Language of the Indians near to Mag Headings, on the npper 
water of the Sacramento River, hy Adam Johxson, pp. 414, 415 of Tol. IV of : 
Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes, United States. 

SAKI, OTTOGAMI. 

Also SankeeSy SacSy Sakewi, Saiokis or Saques, and the latter 
OnthagamieSy Utagami, Foxes. Two Indian tribes, closely 
related, west of the Mississippi. The Kikkapoes speak the same 
language. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

William H. Keating, Vocabulary of the Sakewi or Sauk, in : Nsapratiye of 
an Expedition to the Sources of the St. Peter's River, performed in the year 1823, 
under the command of Major Stephen H. Long. Phitadeljphia, Carey and Lea^ 
1824, 2 vols. 8vo ; Vol. I, Appendix IV, pp. 450 — i59. 

Baxbi, Atlas Ethnographiquc, Tab. XLI, No. 806. 

Keise des Prinzen Maximilian zu Wikd. Coblenz, 1839—1841, 2 vols. 4to; 
Vol. II, pp. 522 et seq., 633 et scq. 

No. IV, 24, of Comparative Vocabulary (pp. 303—367). to A. Gallatin's Sy- 
nopsis, etc. (Archffiologia Americana, Vol. II), and (partly) under Q, IV, 4, 
p. 113, of the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society ,^ 
Vol. II (from Keating). 

:SAINT JOHN'S INDIANS, ETCHEMINS. 

A tribe of the Etchemitis^ speaking the same language as the 
Passamaquoddies. They belong to the Lenape stock. 

WORDS AND YOCAUrLARIES. 

JoAK. DE Laet, Notus Orbis, seu Descriptionis Indiee occidentalis, libri XVIII. 
Lugduni Batavorum^ Elzeyir, 1633, folio, p. 51. 



IfWi S\I.IV\ — SAN Kl KAN I. 

Fi'iu'h lraii«.l.-*tiuii IIi:<tiiiri- «!n Nnuvoaii Monde. Letfde^ Klzevir, 1G40 

fnliii. 

Iti'tfh tr:i!i-l.itiiiii - I.tuthit, I-'l/i'vir, 10 li, folio. 

Ilii:\ \-, V".;ili'.l iriii I'lhu'l-'n.i, !». "Jin (iiimiiTal>). 

Smiiii |!\un»N. N«\v \iiw-», I'll'. — ('iiniii:iraiivi> ViK'ahulnrtes. 

J{|.\. Mi.u.^ K'Kii.Mt.ii, \'ii.iilml:iry of Wonls in Iho LansuafTe of the Qaoddy 
Iiiiliiui.-* ( i*a--atiia<|iioilili, /./-., Polloi'k-li-li), Incatcil in IVrrv, Pleasant Point, State 
of Maiiir, nil lln' MatiT"* «if tin* Si-linnilak, ailjoiniiij; the Hritish Provinces (Collec- 
timi iif flu- lli*(iirii':»I Sm-iity of Mas^ju-hiiM-ttf*, Third Series, Vol. Ill, pp. 181, 183. 
<V/i////,/»/./#', M.'Iralf aii.l Co., iKtM, Kvo}. 

No. \\\ i:i ( '■''t«'l"'i"ii»s l*a»aniai|iioiMi) of tlie Comparatire Vocabulary (pp. 
:ii»r» 'Mu) lo A. Uallatin'- Synnii>i?., I'lc. f.Arflni'olo^ia Americana, Vol. II) ; aud 
(pari hi unil«r <>, 1\", I, p. hHj, tif Vora})ulari(.'s, in: American £thnological 
Soririy\ Tran-ai-t ioii.«., Vol. II (froiii KKi.i.iniu's and Tueat's MS. noticed). 

David Tknk-i.ks, h\ .loscjih IJarralt, M.D., The Indian of New England (see 
Mikniak). 

UUAM.MAIiS AM) fJRAMMATICAL XOTICKS. 

11. IIai.k, Ilomarks on Ihc Lan;;ua«;e of the St. John's or Colastuk week Indians, 
uilh n i*fii(»h.s(M>t Vocabulary. liuHlon^ 1831, Kvo ; printed for the author. 

SALIVA. 

IiKliaiis oil tlu» left l)anks of the Orinoco, between the rivers 
(lUJiviare and Meta, in the New Granadian province Boyaca. 
l)ial('(!ts of their hmj^uagc are spoken by the Attires^ Quaquas 
(whom th(! TamanacjuoR call '^ MajwjV^), and the Macos, or 
VlarouH. 

WORDS AND VOCAUr LAMES. 

CI I LI I, Snj^gio (li Sloria Amcrirana, Vol. TIT, p. 212. 

IIkuvas, Hagftio, 1)1). m, 230, 231. 

IIkhvah, Vocabolnrio l*<)Hj;lotti>, pp. 101 ct scq. 

Mithi-idatcs, Vol. Til, pp. 028 -029 (from GiLii and Heetas). 

IJALur, Atlft3 Eihno^'raphi(pio, Tab. XLT, No. 60i. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 024—027. 

8ANKIKANI. 

()jn)way tribe, late of the eastern banks of the Hudson. A 
kindred dialcHJt of this hmguage was spoken by some of the 
Indians of New Sweden. 



SANTA BARBARA. 167 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A short Vocabulary, pp. 75, 76 of: Joan, de Laet, Noyus Orbis, seu Descrip- 
tionis Indite occidentalis, libri XVIII. Lvgduni Batavorum, Ebsevir, 1633, folio. 
French translation — Ibid., 1640, folio. 
Dutch translation — Ibid., 164-1, folio. 

German translation in : (J. Jo. Schwabe) Allgemeine Ilistorie der Keben 
zu Wasser und Lande (Amsterdam^ Arkstee, 1747 — 1774, 21 yola. 4to), Vol. 
XVI, pp. 605 et seq. 

Smith Babton, New Views, etc, — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 374—376 (from De Laet). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnograpbique, Tab. XLI, No. 811. 

No. IV, 19, B, p. 371, of the Vocabularies to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. 
(Archseologia Americana, Vol. II ; from De Laet). 



SANTA BARBARA. 

Indians of California; Mission S. Barbara. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Mithridates, Vol. HI, part 3, pp. 201, 202, 205. 

The words taken from : An Historical Journal of the Expeditions by Sea 
and Land to the Nortli of California, in 1768, 1769, and 1770, when Spanish 
Establishments were first made at San Diego and Monterey. From a 
Spanish MS., translated by William Revely, Esq. Published by A. Dal- 
rymple. London, Ehnsley, 1790, 4to, pp. 76. This book is, without doubt, 
a translation of: Diario Historico de los Viages de mar y tierra hechos al norte 
de California, de orden del Virrey de Nuera Espanna Marques De Croix y por 
direccion de D. Jose de GttlTaz. Executados por la tropa destinada k dicho 
objeto al mando de D. Gaspar de Portola, y por los Paquebotes S. Carlos y 
S. Antonio de orden del Exc. Sr. Virrey. En la imprenta del Gobiemo. 
Mexico, 1770, folio, pp. 56. Signed : D. Miguel Costanso. Printed merely 
for private distribution. 

Extracts translated in : P. F. Bruns and E. A. W. Zimmermann*s Reposi- 
torium fiir die Neueste Geographic, etc. Tubingen, Cotta, 1792, 1793, 3 toIb. 
Svo ; Vol. I, p. 25. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnograpbique, Tab. XLI, No. 829. 

Vocabulary, by Db. John Scouler, pp. 247, 249, 251 of : Journal of the 
Boyal Geographical Society of London, Vol. XI. London, Murray, 1841, Svo. 

Beprinted, W, 3, p. 129, of the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American 
Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 



I'W s\i>IH()K(>M — SAVANKKIC. 

SAPIJiOKOM. 

Indians of tin* pnivincc of Moxos. TIilmf language is related 
to tlu* Unicliua. 

WOUIM AND VOCAKl'LAUIES. 

II Kit V AS, Vwuholario INili^Iutto, pp. H)I vi acq. 
lli:uVA:f(, Aritiiictica, p. li)2. 

Mithridnti'!*, Vol. Ill, pp. 571, 570 (fruin IIekva^). 
li.VLUi, Atlu6 Ethii(>grapliii]Ui', Tub. XLI, Xu. 167. 



SAllABECA. 

Christianized Indians of tlic Mission of Santa Anoa, in the pro- 
vince of Chiquitos, now Bolivia. Their language is nearly lost, 
like that of other Chiquito tribes. 

WORDS AND VOCAB CLARIES. 

Vocabulary of Twenty-tlireo "Words : D'OBUioyY, L'Homme Americain, VoL I, 
pp. 163, 164 ; Vol- II, 136, and pp. 172, 173, where a general Tiew of the charaoter 
of the Sarabeca language is given. 

SASTE, SHASTIES. 

Indians of south-western Oregon, on the northern frontiers of 
Upper California. 

AVORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

No. 10, V, of the Vocabularies of North-western America, pp. 569 — 629 of: 
Hoe. Hale, Ethnography and Philology of the United States Exploring Expe- 
dition. Philadelphia^ Lea and Blanchard, 1846, folio ; and, F, ^YTj pp. 98 • 
100, of the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, 
Vol. II. 

SAVANERIC. 

Indians of the New Granadian province Veraguas, near the 
village Las Palmas. 



SEMINOLBS SENEKAS. 169 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Berthold SEEiLiKir, The Aborigines of the Isthmus of Panama (Transactions 
of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. in, p. 1, pp. 179 — 181). 

SEMINOLES. 

Or, Isty-semole (wild men). Tribe of the Creek Confederacy in 
Florida. They are said to speak the Muskoghee. 

WORDS AJn> VOCABULARIES. 

Names of Seminole Chiefs, pp. 9, 10, 30 of: The War in Florida .... by a 
late Sta£f Officer. Baltimore, Lewis and Coleman, 1836, 12mo. 

A Vocabulary of the Seminole Language, pp. 97 — 105 of: Notice of East 
Florida, with an Account of the Seminole Nation of Indians. By a recent Trayeller 
in the ProTince. Charleston^ South Carolina, 1822, 8to. 

A Vocabulary of the Seminole Language, pp. 90 — 108 of: Sketch of the Semi- 
nole War, and Sketches during a Campaign, by a Lieutenant of the Left Wing 
.... Charleston^ South CaroUna, Dan. F. Dowling, 1836, 12mo, 

SENEKAS. 

Tribe of the Iroquois, near Buffalo and Niagara, in western 
New York. 

WORDS Ajn> VOCABULARIES. 

Hbbvas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, p. 239 (numerals). 

Smith Babton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies, and Appendix, 
p. 20. 

Mithridates, Vol. m, part 3, pp. 318, 334, 335 (from Smith Babtok). 

A short Vocabulary in the Language of the Seneca Nation, and in English. 
Ung-eish-neut ten-au-geh noh-nuh, yoh-weh-neut-sah eng-lish. London, printed 
by W. and S. Graves, 1818, 8to, pp. 35. 

Annual Beport, Civilization of Indian Tribes. Hewhaven, 1824,. Bvo, pp. 
68—65. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 798 (Seneca or Maoehachtini). 

No. V, 29, of the Comparative Vocabulary (pp. 305 — 367) of A. Galiatik's 
Synopsis, (Archseologia Americana, Vol. 11). Eeprinted (partly) under B, V, 2, 
p. 114, of the Vocabularies in : American Ethnological Society's Transactions, 
Vol.n. 

Z 



170 SEVERNOVSKIA — SUAHAPTAN. 

Seneca Vocabulary (of 452 Words and Phnwios), from a MS. in the War Depart- 
ment of the United States, pp. 381—597 of A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc., in : 
Archffiologia Americana, Vol. II. 

Seneca Appellative Words, Note B, pp. 158 — 164, of: Kev. Timothy Aldbn, 
An Account of sundry Missions performed among the Senecas and Munsees. 
New York, printed by J. Seymour, 1827, 18mo, pp. 180. 

Vocabulary of Concrete Terms and Conversational Forms, 16 pp. at the end of : 
Diabsawahgwah Gayadoshah. Boston, Crocker and Brewster, 1836, 8vo, pp. 43. 

Seneca Vocabulary (from Ely S. Fab£EB, Schoolcbapt, etc.), in Comparatiyo 
Vocabulary of the Iroquois, pp.393 — 400 of: H. E. Schoolcraft, Notes on the 
Iroquois. Albany, Pease and Co., 1847, 8yo. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Diabsawahgwah Gayadoshah. Reading Lessons, by Key. A. Wbight, Mis- 
sionary. Boston, Crocker and Brewster, 1836, 8yo, pp. 42. 

Key. A. WsiaHT's System of Writing the Seneca — is giyen in the preface to : 
Gtuk-na-shoh-ne Deowaahsaonyohgwah Na wen ni yuh (Hymns) Dosyowa (Buffalo 
Creek). Mission Press, 1843, 18mo, pp. 136. 

Table, exhibiting in the Seneca Dialect the conjugation of the Verb " Q^yase," 
** I shoot," Appendix II, pp. 475 — 477 of: Lewis H. Mobgan, League of the" 
Ho-de-no-sau-nee, or Iroquois. Mochester, Sage and Brother, 1851, 8yo. 

G6-wana Gw6-ih sat' hah you d^ yas d^h' gwah — a Spelling-book in the Seneca 
Language, with English definitions. Buffalo Creek Reservation, Mission Press, 
1842, 12mo, pp. 112. 

SEVERNOVSKIA, SEVERNOVZER. 

Or, ^^ Northerners.^' Indians north of Bodega Bay. They call 
themselves Chwachamaja, 

WORDS AlTD VOCABTJLAEIES. 

Woerter aus zwei Sprachen Neu Kalifomiens yon Kostbomitov. Seyemovzi 
(Chyachamaja), pp. 234—254 of: K. E. von Baeb und Gb. von Helmebsbn, 
Beitr&ge zur Kenntniss des Bussischen Reichs, Band I. St, Petershurg, 1839, 
8vo. (Russian, German, and Seyemoyze, printed in Russian type.) 

SHAHAPTAN, CHOPUNISH, SAHAPTIN. 

The NeZ'perces of the Canadians. The Kliketat, near Mount 
Bainier, the Walla- Wallas^ and the Okanagan^ on the upper 
part of Frazer^s Biver, speak kindred dialects. 



SHAHAPTAN. 171 



WOKDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Kliketat, Shahaptan, and Okanagan Vocabularies, by Dr. John Scouleb, in : 
Journal of the Koyal Geographical Society of London, Vol. XI {London^ 1841, 
8vo), pp. 236, 238, 240 ; and 

Shahaptan, Wallawalla, and Kliketat Words, by same, pp. 250—252 of: Journal 
of the Ethnological Society of London, Vol. I. Edinburgh^ 1848, 8vo. 

Words used in the Nez-perce Language, pp. 152 — 157 of: Joel Palheb, 
Journal of Travel over the Rocky Mountains to the Mouth of the CJolumbia 
Biver. Cincinnati, J. A. and U. P. James, 1847, 12mo. 

Salish and Okanagan Words, p. 158 of : E. G. Latham, The Languages of the 
Oregon Territory, pp. 154 — 166 of: Journal of the Ethnological Society of 
London, Vol. I. Edinburgh, 1848, 8vo. 

Sahaptin Vocabulary, divided into— 1, Jf. Sahaptin (Nez-percfes). 2, N. Wal- 
lawalla, vfhich is again divided into — a. t. Pelus (Peloses) ; b. j, Joakema 
(Yakemas); c. k. Tlakatat (Klikatats) ; pp. 569—629 of: Horatio Hale, 
Ethnography and Philology of the United States Exploring Expedition. Phila- 
delphia. Lea and Blanchard, 1846, folio. 

The Vocabulary M reprinted in : Transactions of the American Ethnological 
Society, Vol II, pp, 88, 90, 92, 94. 

Vocabulary of the ]S"ez-perc6 Language, pp. 327 — 330, and Vocabulary of the 
Clicatat Kation who inhabit the country north of the Cascades, pp. 330 — 333 of: 
KcT . Samitel Paekeb, Journal of an Exploring Tour beyond the Rocky Moun* 
tains, under the direction of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions, performed in the years 1835, 1836, and 1837. Ithaka^ New York, 
printed by Mark Andrus and Woodruff, 1838, 12mo. 

Vocabulary of the Languages spoken by the Nez-perc^s and other tribes 
inhabiting the country about the Great Forks of Columbia River, pp. 313 — 322 
of Vol. I of: The Fur Hunters of the Far West, by Alexandbb Boss, 2 vols. 
8to. London^ 1855. 



GRAMMABS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Nez-perc&* First Book. Designed for Children and New Beginners. Clear 
Water Mission Fress, 1839, 18mo, pp. 20. 

Sahaptin Family (Grammatical Notes), pp. 542—561 of: Hobatio Hale, 
Ethnography and Philology, United States Exploring Expedition. Philadelphia, 
Lea and Blanchard, 1846, folio; and: Transactions of the American Ethnological 
Society, VoL II, pp. 34—55. 



172 SHAWANOE. 



SHAWANOE, SHAWANEES. 

Formerly of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentueky ; afterwards in 
Indiana and Illinois, now west of Missouri. They were divided 
into the tribes — Piqua, Mcquachake, Kiskapocoke^ and Chilis 
cothe. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Shawanee Vocabulary, p. 209 of : J. Long, Voyages and TraTels of an Tnfiii| T| 
Interpreter and Trader, etc. ; to which is added a List of Words in the Shawanee 
Tongues. London^ liobson, et al., 1791, 8vo. 

Oerman translations — Hamburgh, 1791, 8vo, by G. Forster. Berlin^ 
Voss, 1792, 8vo (part of : Geschichte der Beisen die seit Cook an die Nord- 
westkiiste von America untemommen worden sind. Aus dem Englischen 
von G. Forster. Berlin, Voss, 1791, 1792, 3 vols. 4to, and 3 vols. 8vo), and 
together with Forster's translation of Portlock's and Mortimer^s Voyages. 
Berlin^ Voss, 1796, 4to. 

Heevas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, p. 240 (numerals). 

Hebyas, Saggio, p. 126. 

Smith Babton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 343—346, 360—362 (from Generals Btttlab 
and Gibson). 

Vocabulary of tlie Language of the Shawanoese, pp. 287 — 292, and : Names of 
Rivers, by the Shawanoese, pp. 297, 298 of: John Johnston, tJnited States 
Indian Agent at Piqua, Account of the Present State of the Indian Tribes 
inhabiting Ohio (Archseologia Americana, Vol. I, pp. 269 — 299). 

Forty-five Words in Shawanese are given in the : Comparative Vocabulary of 
Professor T. Say, in Note 15, pp. 135 — 145, to John Pickering's edition of 
Dr. Edwards's Observations on the Mohegan Language (Collections of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society, Vol. X of the Second Series. Boston, printed by 
Phelps and Faniham, 1823, 8vo. Beprinted, ibid,. Little and Brown, 1843, 8vo ; 
pp. 81—160.) 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 805. 

Shawnee Vocabulary, by Mb. CrMMiNGS, Indian Agent, pp. 470 — 481 of Vol. 
II of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

IV, 23, of the Comparative Vocabulary (pp. 305—367) to A. Gallatin's 
Synopsis, etc. (Arv^liDOologia Americana, Vol. II) ; and (partly) under Q, IV, 3, 
p. 113, of the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American Ethnological 
Society. 

(From MS. Notices of Jefeebson, in the War Department, and firom 
Babton, Gibson, Bxjtlab, and Pabsons.) 



SHEBAYI — SHINICOOKS. 173 

Shawnee Vocabulary, taken by Lieutenant A. W. Whipple, pp. 66 — 60 of: 
Whipple, Thomas Ewbank, and Professor W. W. Turner's Eeport upon the 
Indian Tribes ; added to his Report on the Boute near the 35th Parallel in : Paoifio 
Railroad Reports. Washington^ 1856, Ito. 

Rey. M. Heckeweldek, A Vocabulary of the Shawano, taken from the mouth 
of a white woman who had been twenty years a prisoner with that nation. (MS. 
in the library of the American Philosophical Society at Philadelphia). 

A Comparative Vocabulary of the Lenni Lenape Proper, the Minsi dialect, 
the Mohicanni, Katik or Nadik, Odppeway, Shawano, and Nanticoke. (MS. in the 
same library.) 

J. HowsE, Vocabularies of certain North American Indian Languages, Shawnee 
(Miami River), Nipissing, Brunswick, Duplicate Blackfoot, pp. 102—113 : Pro- 
ceedings of Philological Society, Vol. IV. London, 1850. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 354—356 (from General Bxjtlab's MS.) 

Siwinowe Eawekitake. Shawnee Speller and Reader, by Johnston Ltkins. 
Shawanoe Mission, J. Meeker, printer, 1834, 18mo, pp. 54. 

Summary of the same (by Pratt). Ibid,, 1838, 18mo, pp. 24. 

SHEBAYI. 

Indians of French Guyana, near Cayenne. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A short Vocabulary (compared with Arrowac and Yaoi), pp. 642 — 643 of : Joan. 
DB Last, 2^oyus Orbis, etc. Lugduni Batavorum, 1633, folio. 

SHINICOOKS, MONTATJK. 

Indians of Long Island, neighbours of the Unschagogs and 
Montauks, who spoke kindred dialects. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

SHiAS Wood, Sketch of the First Settlement of the several Towns on Long 
Island. Brooklyn, 1824, 8to. Reprinted, ibid,, Spooner, 1828, 8vo, pp. 182. 

Gires a Montauk Vocabulary (from a MS. of John Gardineb), which i» 

Beprinted in : James Macauley, The Natural, Statistical, and Civil History of 
the State of New York. New York, Gould and Banks, and Albany, Will. Gould 
and Co., 183y, 3 vols. 8vo ; h\ Vol. II, pp. 263, 264, 265 ; an 1 (from Wood) the 
Montauk Words are given in : 

No. IV, 18 (Montaucs, Long Island), of the Comparative Vocabulary (pp. 305 — 



174 SIIOSIIONEES. 

S67) to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. (ArcliaH>logia Americana, Vol. II) • and 
(partly) P, IV, 4 (Long Island), p. Ill, of tho Vocabularies in: Tranaactiona of 
the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

The MS. of Thomas Jeffekson^s Vocabulary of the Language of the Uuquacliog 
Indians is in tho library of the American riiilosophical Society at Philadelphia. 



SnOSIIONEES. 

Also Snake Indians, Serpens, Indians of the Rocky Mountains^ 
on the sources of the ^Missouri and Columbia rivers. They are 
divided into the Shoshoncs Proper and the Gens de Piti^, or 
Itadlgeurs (Root-diggers, by the Spaniards called Maradigos). 

W0BD3 AND YOCABTJLAJIIES. 

P. Ixxix of : T. Say*s Vocabularies in : Astronomical and Meteorological Beoorda 
and Vocabularies of Indian Languages, taken in the Expedition for Exploring the 
Mississippi and its Western Waters, under the command of Major J. H. Long. 
Philaclelphia, 1822, 4to. 

G. S. Bafinesqxje, Atlantic Journal, and Friend of Knowledge, Philadelphia^ 
1832, 12mo, p. 133. 

No. xxii, 57, p. 378, of the Vocabularies to A. Gtillatin*B Synopsis, etc. 
(Archseologia Americana, Vol. II; from Say). 

Beise des Prinzen Maximiliait zxj Wibd, etc. Cohlenz, 1839 — 1841, 2 vols. 
4*0 J Vol. II, p. 635. 

Vocabularies of Languages of North- western America. N. 12, Shoshoni; x, 
Shoshonees, Snakes ; y, Wihinasht (Western Shoshonees). Pp. 569 — 629 of : HoB. 
Hale, Ethnograpliy and Philology, United States Exploring Expedition. FhUo' 
delphiaf Lea and Blanchard, 1 846, folio. And in the Vocabularies in : Transactions 
of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II, C, No. xxxii (East Shohonees), 
pp. 88, 90, 92, 94 j U, No. xxxii (Wihinasht), p. 121. 

Shoshone Words, p. 159, and Shoshone and Sussee Words compared, p. 161 of: 
B. G. Latham, The Languages of the Oregon Temtory (Journal of the Ethnolo- 
gical Society of London, Vol. I, pp. 154 — 166. Edinburgh, 1848, 8vo). 

Vergleichendes WSrter Verzeichniss der Sclioshonen und der Komantschen 
Sprache (Willinascht), p. 54 of : Dr. Berghaus' Geograpliisches Jahrbuoh, 
No. III. GothiXj Perthes, 1851, 4to. 

Snake Language. Vocabulary of Forty-nine Words, on pp. 153 — 154, Vol. I, of : 
Alexander Boss, Fur Hunters of the Far West ; a Narrative of Adventures in 
the Oregon and Bocky Mountains, 2 toIs., crown 8vo. London, 1855. 

Seventeen Words of Shoshonee Dialects compared with Kioway, by Professor 



SHYENNES SITKA. 175 

W. W. Timinm, p. 80 of the : Beport upon the Indian Tribes (added to Lieute- 
nant A. W. Whipple's Keport, Pacific Railroad Beports, Vol. 11. Wcuhinffton^ 
1856, 4to). 

SHYENNES, CHEYENNES. 

Also, SharOy ShaxohaySy on the River Cheyenne, one of the 
tributaries of the Missouri. 

WORDS A^H) VOCABTTLAJtlES. 

« 

Names of Shyenne Chiefs who signed the treaty of July, 1825 (with correspond- 
ing Sioux words), No. VI, 9, p. 379, of the Vocabularies to A. (3^alla.tin*s Synopsis, 
etc. (Archffiologia Americana, Vol. II). 

Beise des Prinzen Maximilian zn Wied. Coblenz, 1839 — 1841, 2 vols. 4to 5 
Vol. II, pp. 487—489. 

Affinities of the Shyenne with Languages of the AlgonMn Family, pp. cxir, 
cxv; and 

Vocabulary of the Shyenne Language, with some Notes by Lieutenant J. W. 
Abebt, Top. Eng., pp. cxvi — cxviii of : Transactions of the American Ethnological 
Society, Vol. II ; originally hi Abert's Beport of his Examination of New Mexico, 
in the years 1846, 1847, pp. 417 — 548 of : Notes of a Military Beconnaissance, etc., 
by Lieutenant-( -olonel W. H. Emory. Washington^ 1848, 8vo. 

Langue deslndiens Cheyennes (numerals). Bulletin de la Soci^t^ de (S^graphie 
{Paris, 1840, 8vo, Third Series), Tome VI, pp. 384—386. 

John S. Smith, CJheyennes Vocabulary, pp. 346 — 459 of Vol. Ill of: School- 
craft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

GILAMMABS AND eKAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Lieutenant J. W. Abebt (see Vocabularies). 

SICANNIS, SIKANNI. 

Dialect of New Caledonia, related to the TacuUies. 

WORDS AND VOCAIITJLAKrES. 

Vocabulary of the Sikanni Dialect of New Caledonia, J. HowSB*s Vocabularies 
of certain North American Indian Languages — Sikanni, CJhepewyan. I and II, 
Beaver, I and II, Dialect of New Caledonia, Pp. 192—198 of: Proceedings of 
the Philological Society, Vol. IV. London, 1850. 

SITKA. 

Sitka proper is but a name for King George IIFs Archipel, 
inhabited by Kolusches. In general, the name Sitka is applied to 



176 8KETAPUSIIOISII. 

the languages of some ten tribes, who live between the 50th and 
55th degrees of northern latitude. The tribes who speak this lan- 
guage, and who may number some 05(K) souls, are the Chilcart, 
the most numerous and influential tril)e; iS/VZyi, on King George 
Ill's Island; IIoo(ha/i/ino, at Hood's Bay; Ark, and the JSTake, 
on Prinee Frederick's Sound; lu'Iikino, in Chatham's Strait; 
Kooi/rn, near Cape Decrision; Ilviincgay on the Island of the 
Prinee of Wales ; Stichcrn, and the Tumgarsee, (See Note to 
A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc., p. 302 of: Archseologia Americana^ 
Vol. II.) 

WORDS AND TOCABUIATUES. 

Vocabulary of the Languages of the Tslands of Gadiack and Oonalasohka, the 
Bay of Kcnay and Sitka Sound, Appendix, No. Ill (pp. 329 — 337), to : XJbey 
LisiANSKY, A Voyage pound the World, in tlie years 1803 — 1806. London, 
John Bootli, Longman, Hurst, Rees, Ornie, and Drown, 1814, 4to. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnograpliique, Tab. XLT, No. 851 (Eoloiiches de Sitka Sound). 

Sitca (Koulislicn) Vocabulary, under G, XVIII, 2, p. 102, of the Vocabularies 
in : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

Sitca, Cadiark, and Tungliaase Words, p. lf>3 of E. G-. Latham, The Languages 
of the Oregon Territory (Journal of the Ethnological Society of London, Vol. I. 
Edinburgh, 1848, 8vo, pp. 154—166.) 

SKETAPUSHOISH, SHESHATAPOOSH. 

Also Mountaineers {Montagnards), or Skoffies {JEscopies). 
Indian tribes west of Labrador, speaking a language closely 
related to the Knistenaux. (See Massachusetts Indians.) 

WOKDS AND VOCABULABIES. 

Specimen of the Mountaineer, or Sheshatapooshshoish, Skoffie, and Micmac 
Languages (from an Indian boy, Gabriel), pp. 16—33 of: Collections of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society for the year 1799, Series I, Vol. VI, Boston, 
printed by Samuel Hall, 1800, 8yo ; and (from this Vocabulary) 

Mithridates, Vol. IH, part 3, p. 344, 418, 419. 

No. IV, 11, of the Comparative Vocabularies (pp. 305—307), to A. Gauatin's 
Synopsis, etc. (Archoeologia Americana, Vol. II). 

And No. O, rV, 1, p. 108, of the Vocabularies in : American Ethnological 
Society's Transactions, Vol. II. 

Scoffie Vocabulary— IV, g, p. 869, of the Vocabularies to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, 



SOURIQUOIS— STONE INDIANS. 177 

etc., and O, IV, 2, p. 108 of the Vocabularies in : American Ethnological Society's 
Transactions, Vol. II. 

SOUIUQUOIS, ACADIANS. 

Indians of the Algonquin stock at the Bay of Fundy, Nova 
Scotia. They are sometimes also called IMicmacs. 

WORDS AXD VOCABULARIES 

Mabc l'Escarbot, Histoire de la Nouvello France. Paris, Jean Milot, 1609, 
small 8to, pp. 888 ; p. 688. Eeprinted, Paris, Milot, 1612, small 8vo ; Paris, 
Adv. Perier, 1618, small 8vo. 

A short Vocabulary, p. 53 of: J. de Laet, Isoyus Orbis, etc. Lugduni Baia- 
vorum, 1633, folio. 

Bjsbvas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, p. 240 (numerals). 

Smith Baeton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies (from De Last). 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 402 — 404 (from L*Esc abbot). 

No. rV, 12, B, p. 369, of the Vocabularies to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. 
(Archseologia Americana, Vol. II). 

SQUALLYAMISH. 

Indians at Puget^s Sound, related to the Haeeltzuk and the 
Indians of Nootka Sound. 

WOEDS AND VOCABULAKIES. 

Squallyamish Vocabulary, by Dr. John Scouleb, in : Journal of the Boyal 
Geographical Society of London, Vol. XI. London, 1841, 8vo ; pp. 242, 244 — 247. 

STONE INDIANS, ASSINEBOINS, ASSINI- 

POILS, ASSTNIBULES. 

The Stone Indians are the most numerous of any of the tribes 
inhabiting North-western America. Tliey are about 1,2C0 to 
1,400 tents. They inhabit the mid-country from between the 
Missouri and Assineboin rivers from within fifty miles of Red 
River, westward, to the sources of Qu'Appelle River, about the 
source of the Elbono, or north branch of the Assineboin River, 
and from thence to the Red Deer^s River, Saskatchewan. The 
Swampy Ground Stone Indians are now living close to the 
Rocky Mountains, near the source of the Red Deer's River, 

A A 



17H SISSKK — r.Ul l.LIKK. 

Saskatchewan. 'i'h(* Ir()(|iu)is^ Moha^vk, and Huron are mem- 
IxM's of tli(* sanio class of laniriia^cs. The place of the Stone 
Indian is more e([uivoeal ; althou«;h generally separated by most 
authors from tli(* Molh'Hvk Tor Iro(iuois) tongues, it has^ by some^ 
been eonneeted with that group. (See also under Dahkotah,^ 

WdUDS AMI VOrAIiri.AUIES. 

J. HowsK, Voinbulari«'8 of tvrtiiin Aint'rii'un Indian Languages — Stone Indian, 
Tnupioitf, Mohawk, Huron, pp. Hi) -1:21 of: Proeoi'dings df tho Philological 
Society, Vol. IV. London^ iSoO. 

SUSSEE, SURSEE. 

On the sources of the Saskatchewaine, a tribe of the Cheppe- 
wyans. 

"WORDS AXD TOCABULAHIES. 

Edward Umfretille, The Present State of Hudson's Bay; containing a 
Specimen of Five Indian Languages. London^ Walker, 1790, 8vo, p. 202. 

German translation, by E. A. W. Zimmermann. HeltMtedty Eleckeisen, 
1791, 8vo, p. 148. Reprinted in : 

No. Ill, c, p. 374, of the Vocabularies to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, etc. 
(Archfleologia Americana, Vol. II) j and a few words in : 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 254. 

Balbi, AtUis Ethnograpliique, Tab. XLI, No. 769. 

Sussee Words and Sussee compared with Shoshone, pp. 160, 161 of: B. Q-. 
Latham, The Languages of the Oregon Territory (pp. 154 — 166 of Vol. I of: 
Journal of the Ethnological Society of London. Edinburgh, 1848, 87o) . 

Sussee Vocabulary (from Umfbeville) compared with the other Languages of 
the Athapascan Stock, pp. 177 — 222 ; and, with the same, the Einai and Koleschian 
Languages, pp. 269 — 318 of : Buschmann, Athapaskischer Sprachstamm. Berlin, 
1856, 4to. 

TACULLTES, CARRIERS, NAGAILER. 

Indians of North-western America, on the sources of Fraser^s 
River. The Sicamiies are related to them. Mackenzie calls 
them Nagailer and Carrier Indians, 

WOEDS AND V0CABI7LABIES. 

Nagailer or Chin Indian Words, pp. 257, 258 of: Albxandbe Mackenzie's 
Voyages. London, 1801, 4to. 



TAII-LE-WAH. 179 

And (from him) Mithridatos, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 424. 

A Specimen of the Takully or Carrier Tongue, pp. 403 — 413 (p. 413, numerical 
terms) of : Daniel Williams Harmon, A Journal of Voyages and Travels in the 
Interior of North America ; to which are added a Description of the Inhabitants 
and considerable Specimens of the Languages most extensiyely spoken. Andover^ 
Flagg and (Jould, 1820, 8to. 

Professor W. "W. Turner (from Habmon) Comparative Vocabulaiy of Twenty- 
five "Words of Tacully, Hudson's Bay, Chepewyan, Umkwa, Hoopah, Navajo, and 
Apache, pp. 84, 83 of the : Beport upon the Indian Tribes ; added to Lieutenant 
A.W. Whipple's Report, in Tol. II of the : Pacific Railroad Reports. WatJUngton^ 
1855, 4to. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 822. 

No. Ill, 5, of the Comparative Vocabulary (pp. 307—367) to A. Gallatin's 
Synopsis, etc. (Archseologia Americana, Vol. II, from Habmon). 

Tahkali (Carriers) Vocabulary, No. 1, A, of the Vocabularies of Languages of 
North-western America, pp. 569—629 of: Hob. Hale, Ethnography and Philo- 
logy, United States Exploring Expedition. Philadelphia^ Lea and Blanchard, 
1846, folio. 

Hale divides the (1) Tahkali Umpqua language into — 

A. Tahkcdi (Carriers). 

B. Tlatskanaiy with the dialect-s 

a. Tlatskanai, 
h. Kwalhioqua. 

C. Umkwa (Cmpqua). 

The Tahkali Vocabulary was furnished to Hale by Mr. Anderson of the 
Hudson's Bay Company. It is reprinted, pp. 78, 80, 82, under A, III, in 
Vol. II of: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 

Tacullies Vocabulary (from Mackenzie, Habmon, and Hale) compared with 
the other Languages of the Athapaskan Stock, pp. 177—222, 269—318 of: Busch- 
mann, Athapaskischer Sprachstamm. Berlin^ 1856, 4to. 

GRIMMABS AND GBAMIIATICAL K0IICE8. 

A short notice of the Character of the Language is given, pp. 534, 535 of: Hob. 
Hale, Ethnography and Philology, United States Ej^ploring Expedition. Phila- 
delphia, 1846, foho. 

TAH-LE-WAH. 

Califomian tribe, on the Klamath River. 

WORDS AKD TOCABULABIES. 

Geobgs Gibbs, Vocabulary in: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes, Vol. Ill, pp. 
440—446. 



I'^O TALITII — TAM.\N.\(jri:. 



TALATIJI. 



Indian triho on the Ku'^sinia llivrr, a tributary of the Sacra- 
mento, in California. 



WORDS AM» VOCABULARIKS. 

Hon. n.u.K, Etlniogrnnliy nnd PhilologA', rnitcd States Exploring Expedition. 
rhif(ultfi>hia, l.ea ami i^lanchuni, 18 U), fulio, p. 631. (From Jaxxb D. Daka.) 

Roprintod in: Trant»a^-tioii8 of the AmeriL>an Ethnological Society, Vol. H, 
p. 123. 

TAMANAQUE. 

Indians of South America, on the banks of the Orinoco, near 
the Mission Enearamada. Their language, related to those of 
the Charibs and Chaynias, is spoken by the Parechiy Uara^ 
Muknrii, Uaraca-Paccili, Paiure, Acherekoitiy and Oje; kindred 
languages are 'those of the Palencas, Pariagotos, or PariaSy 
and still more so the Cumanagota. (See also under Cumana^ 

WORDS AND TOCaBVLARIES. 

GiTJi, Saggio di Storia Americana, Tomo III, pp. 375—382 386—389. 

Heevas, Origine, pp. 27, 29, 49, Tabb. XLIX, L et seq. 

Hebvas, Saggio, pp. 112, 113. 

Heetas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, pp. 161 et seq. 

IIervas, Aritmctica, pp. 104, 105. 

Mitliridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 618, 696, 697 ; p. 655 (with some Pajure and 
Avarigoto Words, from GiLii) . 

A. DE Humboldt and A. Bonfland, Voyage aux K^gions Equinoxiales dn 
Nouveau Continent (Paris, Schoell, Dufour, Gidc, and Maze, 1816 — 1831, 18 
vols. 8vo), Vol. I, pp. 482 et seq. 

Oerman translation — Stuttgart and Tiihingen, 1818, Vol. I, pp. 217 et seq. 

A. D'Oebiony, L'Homme Americain, Vol. I, p. 162. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographiqnc, Tab. XLI, No. 581, 582 (Cumanagita), p. 274 
(Tamanaque, Pariagotos de la Riviere Omabiche et du Golfo deParia-Tamanaque). 

Sir Robert H. Schomburgk, Comparative Vocabulary of Eighteen Words of 
Twelve Dialects of the Caribi-Tamanakan Stock, pp. 97, 98 of his Vocabularies of 
Eighteen Languages and Dialects of Indian Tribes inhabiting Guyana (British 
Association Report, Swansea Meeting, 1848. London, 1849, 8vo). 



TARAHUMARA. 181 



GRAMMARS AND 6RAMMATICAI. NOTICES. 

Qixn, Saggio di Storia Americana, Tomo IIT, pp. 176 — 185. 

Gilii wrote a G-rammar of the Tamanaka, wliich, however, was never 
published. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 656, 662, 666 (from Giui). 

DIALECTS. 

p. Fr. Francisco de Taustb, Arte y Yocabulario de la Lengua de los Indios 
Chaymas, Cumanagotos, Cores, Parias, j otros Diversos de la Provincia de Cu- 
mana 6 Nueva Andalusia; eon un Tratado a lo ultimo de la Doetrina Christiana 
y Catecismo de los Misterios de Nuestra Santa F4. Xraducido de Castellano en la 
dicha Lengua Indiana. Madrid^ Bernardo de TiJladiego, 1680, 4to ; pp. 16, 187 
(without the Doetrina, etc.) 

In : Bibliotheca Scriptorum Capuecinorum a P. DiONTSiO Genuensi ; con- 
testa, retesta et extensa a F. Bernardo a Bononia (Veneliis, Sebast. Coleti, 
1747, folio), p. 94, it is stated that this author's name was Franciscus db 
HArsTE, and that, in 1684, he was poisoned by the savages. It is further 
stated that he published : Dictionarium Indicum, adjuncto .Catechismo in 
Lingua Indiea. Matriti, 1680, 4to. ^ 

Brunet, however (IV, 404), calls him De Tauste, and he appears under 
the same name in : Bibliotheca Heberiana, VI, p. 255, No. 3482. 

A MS. copy of the book is in the Boyal Library at Berlin ; the author is 
named " De Tauste." 

Manuel de Yaxgues, Principios y Reglas de la Lengua Cummanagota general 
en varias Naciones que habitan en la Provincia de Cumana en los Yndios Occi- 
dentales, con un Diccionario. Burgos, 1683, 4to. The Dictionary bears the 
following title : M. Buiz Blanco, Diccionario de la Lengua de los Indios Cu- 
managotas y Palenques. 

According to Gilii, 1. 1., Vol. Ill, p. 410, P. Ruiz has printed a Grammar of the 
Cumanacotti language. 

TAHAHUMARA. 

Language of Nueva Biscaya^ or Northern Mexico; related to 
the Mexican. 

WOEDS AXD vocabularies. 

Hebtas, Vocabolario Poliglotto, p. 238 (numerals). 

Hebtas, Saggio, pp. 122, 123. 

Hebtas, Origiue, Tabb. L et seq. 

P. Math. Steffel, Tarahumarisches Worterbuch, ncbst einigen Nachrichten 
Ton den Sitten und Gebraucheu der Tarahuniaren in !Xeu-Biseava in der Audiencia 



1h:2 tauasca. 

Guailalniiira im >'ic<'Li'iiiii!rt'irlii> AIt>Mi'xu*o oilor Xeu Spanien. ^rmum, 1791 
Svi). Kfpriiiiril in : l'liri!*t(i]ili Onttlifb von Murr, Nacbrichten von verachie- 
(ifiHi) LiiiiiiiTii ilfo '*^|i:iiiiof)ifn AiniTika, n\\» iM^i^nliiindigen Auf^tzen einurer 
M nan- li. p (Ji-iliHi-li.ili Ar^n lu'r:iiiij»i':;i"U'n. Jlalle, Ueiiilel, Ba&d I No. 1 

ami li, isi'l*. S\o. 

Miiliri.liiii ■*, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. S7, S8, 1 Mi, 153, 154. 

IIai.iii, Atl:t!i Kthn<i{;rapliiqiii*, Tab. \LI, Xo. 719. 

>*i>iivi-llr- A II I mil's til'* Vii\ai»i's, Vul. IV (7\im, IKU, 8vo), pp. 261 287. 

A VfM-iibuhirv bus lii-cn t:ikcn bv •loiiN K. Bartlett, the United States 
Boundarv ( 'ulnIlli.'*^i(lntT. 

Arto V Vo«-ii))iilario ('iiinp1i.'to iU> la Lon^iia Taraliumara general en toda la 
CiHlinlia ilfl Pjirral, p«>r Fr. Jose ViciuitiNO, Lector de Teologia en el ConTento 
dt' Zai-ativas. -MS. (Do Souza). 

Artf y f«»pi<»so A'tH'abulari«» ili* la Lcngua TepcOiuana j Tarabumara, y Oitecismou 
y Couii's>iiMi»riu i-u dii-iia Lcngiia, por Fr. Geuonimo Fiouesoa. 

FigiKTou wuH born in Mexico, IG K) ; went as Jesuit MisaionaiT' to Pacaca^ 
aniuug tbe TeiH'lmunas, and died in tbc city of Mexico, in 1683. He left 
four copies of tbe above "Arte" in bis own bandwritiog. 

OKAMlLWtS AXD GKAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Mitbridates, Vol. ITT, part 3, pp. Ii6 — 153 (from P. Steffel). 

P. Fr. AEiouKL Tellechea, Compendio Grammatical para la Inteligencia del 
Idiouia Tarabumar. Mexico, imprcnta de la Federacion, 1826, small 4to, pp. 16, 
1G2, 10. 

Glavigero mentions MS. Grammars of: Agostino de Roa and Qirolamo 
FiGUEKAS (witb Dictionary). P. Stetfel mentions a Grammar begun by P. 
Thomas Gfadalaxaba. De Souza mentions likewise : Arte para aprender el 
Idioma de los Tarabumares, por P. Axtgustin Boa, Misionero. MS. Boa 
died in 1723. 

TARASCA. 

Language spoken in Miclioacan. (See also under Pirinda.) 

WORDS AXD TOCABULAEIES. 

Vocabulario do la Lengua Tarasca de Michoacan, dirigido al Illmo. D. Vasco 
de Quirogo, primero Obispo de aquella Provincia, por Fr. Mattjbino GuiBESTI. 
Mexico, 155D, 4to. 

Also, by tbe same autlibr : Dialogo de la Doctrina Cristiana en Lengua 
Tarasca ; Dedicada al Yirey D. Luis de Velasco. Mexico, 1553. 

Vocabulario y Sermones en Lengua Tarasca, por Fr. Jtjan Eamibez, Maestro 
en Teologia de la Provincia de S. Nicolas Toleutino de Micboacan. (MS., accord- 
ing to De Souza.) 



TARIANA. 183 

C. S. RAFiyESQUE, Atlantic Journal, pp. 9 et seq. 
Jklithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 129. 
Hebtas, Saggio, p. 120. 
Heryas, Origine, Tabb. XLIX, L et seq. 
Hebtas, Aritmetica, p. 107. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Arte de la Lengua de Miehoacan (Tarasca), por Fr. Juan Bbato. Mexico^ 1574. 

Tlii8 Grammar formed part of three volumes in 8vo, printed by Pedro 

Balli, in the same year. It was accompanied by a Confessionario, etc., in 

the same language. Souza says of the Fr. Bravo, " fue maestro peritisimo 

de la lengua Pirinda, llamada Tarasca." 

Arte de la Lengua Tarasca, y Sermones en la Misma, por P. Tomas Chacoit, 
1630. 

MS. in the library of the College of San Gregorio, in Mexico. (Souza.) 

Manuel trilinque, Latino, Castollano, y Tarasco, para administrar los Sacra- 
mentos k los Espauoles y k los ludios, por Fr. Angel Sebba. Mexico^ 1697, 4to. 

Sebba also wrote : Arte, Diccionario, y Confesonario de la Lengua Tarasco, 
which was prepared for the press, but never published j probaby in the city of 
Qu^r^taro. 

Arte y Diccionario de la Lengua Tarasca, por Illmo. D. Fr. JiTAir Alooba. 
Mentioned by Nicholas Antonio, and quoted by De Souza. 

P. Nicolas de Quexas, Arte de la Lengua Tarasca, del P. Diego Basalenqus. 
Mexico^ 1714, 8vo. 

An extract of this Grammar is given by A. Gallatin, Appendix I, No. 2, 
pp. 245 — 252, to : Notes on the Semi-civilized Nations of Mexico, etc. 
(Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Yol. I. New York, 
1845, 8vo). See also pp. 34, 45—48, ibid. 

Mithridates, Yol. Ill, part 3, p. 126—128. 

Clavigero mentions Grammars and Dictionaries by Matubin Gilbsbt and 
AkgeXiO Siebba (see titles above, from De Souza), and a Grammar of JuAK 
Battista de Lagunas. 

TARIANA. 

Braziliaii Indians of the province Rio Negro. (Martius, VII, 
p. 208.) 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary (of Ninety-eight Words), pp. 521—541 of: Alfbed R, "Wallace, 
A Narrative of Travels on tlie Amazon and Rio Negro. London^ Reeve and Co., 
1853, 8vo. 



18 I- TtllO-KO-YKM - TKIirKLIIET. 

TCMIO-KO-YEM. 

Iiidiaii band of Soiioiiui Valley, in iiorth-wcstern Califoruia. 

WOllDS ANU VOCAUILAKIES. 

Oeouoo Oiuiis, Voeuhulnrv (SchookTuft'!) Indian Tribes, Vol. Ill, pp. 428 — 
431). 

TEllUELHFr, PATAGOXIANS. 

Is the gcurral name of the Indians inhabiting Eastern Pata- 
gonia. Tiioy are divided into — Tvhuel Cunny, to whom belong 
the Yacana Cunny, Svhuak Cunfiy, and CuUlan Cunny, and 
Tchuclhet proper y or CaUilohet (mountain people), by the 
Spaniards called Serra?ios, Their language is said to be related 
to the Araucanian. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Thomas Falkner, Description of Patagonia (ace Araucan). Hereford, 1774^ 
4to, p. 132. 

German translation, by Scliack H. Ewald. Ooiha, Ettinger, 1775, 8to. 

Primo yiuggio intorno al globo terracqueo, ossia ragguaglio della navigazioiie 
alle Indie Oriental! per la yia d'occidcnte, fatta. sulla squadra del Capitano Mag- 
galianes negli anni 1519—1522, dell Cav" Antonio Pigafetta. MUano^ 1800, 
4to, pp. 191 et seq. 

Edited by Dr. Charles Amoretti, from a MS. in the Ambrosian Library of 
Milan. 

French translation, by the author himself .... suiyi de Textrait du trait6 
de navigation du m^me auteur ; et d'une notice sur le Chevalier Martin 
Behaim, avec la description de son globe terrestre (par H. J. Jansen). Pctrit^ 
Jansen, 1801, 8vo ; pp. 241 et seq. 

Captain James Btjrnet, A Chronological History of the Discoveries in the 
South Sea or Pacific Ocean ; Part I commencing with an account of the earliest 
discoveries of that sea by Europeans, and terminating with the voyage of Sir 
Francis Drake, in 1579. London, Hansard, 1803—1817, 5 vols. 4to; Vol I, 
pp. 37 et seq. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, p. 423 (from Falknee). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnograi-liique, Tab. XLI, No. 443 (Patagonien du Port St. 
Julien). 

Vocabulary of Twenty-three Words, pp. 162, 164 of Vol. I of : A. D'ORBiairr, 
L'Homme Amdricain j and Eight Words from Pigafetta, 1520, and D'Obbignt, 
1829, compared, p. 59, Vol. II, ibid. 



TEPEGUANA — TEQUIMA. 185 

TEPEGUANA, TEPEHUANA. 

Indians of north-western Mexico, in the province of Sinaloa. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 



FONTE. 
FlGUEROA. 

Febxaxdez. 

RlNALDDQ. 



See Grammars. 



OBAMMABS AND GBAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Arte y Vocabulario de la Lengua Tepehuana, by the Padre Juan Fonte, a 
Jesuit, and missionary amongst the Tepehuanas, by whom he was killed in 1616. 

Arte y Copioso Yocabulario de las Lenguas Tepehuana y Tarahumara, y Cate- 
oismo y confesonario en dichas Lenguas, por el Fr. Jebonimo Figueboa. 

Figueroa, bom in Mexico, 1604, Jesuit, went to Oaxaca, as missionary 
amongst the Tepehuanas, and died in the city of Mexico, 1683. He left four 
copies of the above " Arte " in his own handwriting. 

Arte y Yocabulario de la Lengua Tepehuana, gen^rica en la Sierra Madre, por 

Fr. Jose Febnandez, Franeiscano. 

Fernandez went to Zacatecas in 1717, where he was Provincial (Arlegui's 
authority). 

P. Benito Rinaldini, Arte de la Lengua Tepeguana, con Vocabulario, confes- 
sionario y Catechismo. Mexico, vidua de Ignazio Bernardo de Hogal, 1743, 4to ; 
pp. 72, 43, and 148, 

N.B. — Clavigero mentions MS. G-rammars and Yocabularies of TomiASO 

DB GUADAIiAJABA and of GiBOLAMO FiGUEBOA. 



TEQUIMA, OR OPATA. 

One of the languages spoken in the seventeen Jesuit Missions of 
Sonora. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulario de la Lengua Tequima y Platicas doctrinales en ella, por Katal 
LOMBABDO. Mexico, 1702. 

HxBVAS, Saggio, p. 47. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

'Arte de la Lengua Tequima, vulgarmente Uamada Opata, por Natal LoMBABDa 
3£Bxieo^ 1702, 4to. 

B B 



186 TETONS — TICORILLAS. 



TETONS. 

Sioux tribe between the Mississippi and Missouri. 



WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 



Bcise des Prinzen Maximilian zu Wied. Coblenz, 1839—1841, 2 vols. 4to; 
Vol. II, p. 498. 



TEXAS INDIANS. 

In : Museo Mexicano, Tomo III, p. 537, mention is made of 
^^ Manuel para administrar los SS. Saeramentos a los Indios de las 
Naciones — Pajalates, Orejones, Pacaos, Paeoas, Filijayas, Ala- 
sapas, Pamanes y otras muehas, come son: los Pacaliuches, 
Mescalos, Pampopas, Tacames, Chapopines, Venados, Pamaques 
y toda la juventud de Piliniques, Borrados, Samipaos y Manos 
de Perro. Compuesto por el P. Fray Bartolomeo Garcia, 
Predicadof Apostolico .... Franciscano de la Mission de San 
Antonio de Texas, 1769, 4to.^^ 

TICORILLAS. 

Apache Indians of western New Mexico. Their language shows 
affinity with the great Athapaskan stock of languages. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

James H. Simpson, Comparative Vocabulary of Words in the Language of 
the Pueblo, or Cirilized Indians of New Mexico, and of the Wild Tribes inhabit- 
ing its borders, Appendix B, pp. 140 — 143, to: Journal of a Military Kecon- 
naissance from Santa ¥4, New Mexico, to the Navajo Country, etc. (Reports of 
the Secretary of War, with Reconnaissances of Routes from San Antonio to El* 
Paso .... also .... the Report of Lieutenant J. H. Simpson, of an Expedi- 
tion into the Navajo Country. Exec. Docum. Senate, No. 64, Congress 31, 
Sess. 1. Washington, Union Office, 1850, 8vo ; pp. 86—168). 

Comparative Vocabulary of the Athapascan and Kinai Languages (also Navajo 
and Ticorilla), pp. 269 — 318 of: Bttsohmann, Athapaskischer Sprachstamm. 
Berlin, 1856, 4to. 



TICUNAS TIMUACA. 187 



TICUNAS. 

Brazilian Indians on the Amazon. (Martius,No.179). Tacunas, 
Tecunas, Ticonas, Tucunas, on the River Intahy. (See Voyage, 
Vol. Ill, p. 1196.) 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Langue des Ticunas (Cavallo coche), Vocabulary, No. XXIV, pp. 298, 299 of: 
Castelnatt, VoL V, Appendice. 

TILUEX, TEGUAS, KIWOMI. 

Pueblo Indians, belonging to the Keres family, residing at the 
pueblo of Santo Domingo, in New Mexico. 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

A Vocabulary has been taken by the United States Boundary Commissioner, 
John B. Babtlett. 

Sliwomi Vocabularies (one from the chief, the other from another member of the 
tribe) taken by Lieutenant A. W. "Whipple, pp. 86 — 89 of the Report upon the 
Indian Tribes, added to his Report on the Route near the 35th Parallel (Pacific 
Railroad Reports, Vol. II. Washington^ 1856, 4to). 

TIMBIKAS, CHANS. 

Brazilian Indians of the province of Goyaz. They are related to 
the Gres, and their language shows a close affinity to that of the 
Gres. Their three principal tribes are called Timbiras de Mata, 
Timbiras de Canella fina^ and Timbiras de Bocca furada, 
(Martius, IV, No. 81.) 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
Salbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 511 (Timbiras de Canella fina). 

TIMUACA, TIMUIQXJANA, TIMUICANA. 

Language of Florida Indians, in the neighbourhood of S. 
Augustin. 



1H8 TIMilA — TLAfXn'ATrll. 



WOK US AND VOCAIiULAUIES. 

IlKitVAf*, Aritinctio.'i, ]». llli. 

IIeuv.vh, Ori^im*, ft>rnin/iiitn' o mooi'iiiui-a ilcgli Idionii (p. 180, No. LXV) 

riin^iiii 'I'iiiiiiaciiim (U>llu Florida ; on two taliK*:*. 

Mit1n*iihito!<, ^'()l. III, part 3, p. 285, niul (from Mitbridatcs) in: Norton's 
LittTury <i:i/.t'tti' (Xeu' YurA\ Ho), 1S55, >'o. 5 (^[arch), p. 93 (Timoacaiia op 
Timuiioa Ijungun^^o). 

li.Ki.uiy Allan KlIinogniphi(pio, Tab. XLI, No. 785. 

GUAM M Alls AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Gruinatica dc la lAMi>;ua Tiinuiquuua de Florida, per Fr. FsA>'Ci8CO Fabeja. 
Mfxivo, 101 1. 

Also, hy the same author : Confcsonario en Lcngua Timuiqiiana. Mexico, 
1(}12. Catecismo do Li Doctriua Cristiaua en Lengua Timuiquana. Mexico^ 

1G17. 

Panja wqr a native of Toledo, in S^^ain, and was one of the founders of the 
FranciHi-an Order in Sa. Elena, in Florida, and Guardian of the first conyent 
entablished there. 

TINQUA. 

A language of Florida, in which were written a " Doctrina 
Cristiaua/^ and a lx)ok on the administration of the sacraments^ 
by Fray Gregorio Morula, which were printed, the first at 
Madrid in 1631, and afterwards reprinted at Mexico in 1635, 
and the second at Mexico in 1635 (Souza). 

TLAOQUATCII, TLOQUATCH. 

Indians of the south-western coast of Vancouver's Island. 
Their language appears to be the same as that of the Nootka 
Sound Indians, and is related to that of the Haecltzuk. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Tloaquatcli Vocabulary, by Dr. John Scouler, in : Journal of the Royal 
Geographical Society of London, Vol. XI {London, 1841, 8vo), pp. 242, 244, 
246. 

Dr. Joux ScouLEE, Chikeelis and Tlaoquatch Words, p. 236 of: On the 
Indian Tribes inhabiting the North-west Coast of America (pp. 228 — 252 of the : 
Journal of the Ethnological Society of liondon, Vol. I. Ildinhurghy 1848, 8yo). 



TLAFANEKA TLATSKANAI. 189 

Tlaoquatch and Nootka Words, p. 156 of: R. Q-. Latham, The Languages of 
the Oregon Territory (pp. 154 — 166 of Vol. I of the same Journal). 



TLAPANEKA. 

Indians of Tlapa, in the Mexican State of Puebla. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Humboldt (Essai politique sur le Boyaume de la Nouvelle Espagne, Vol. I, 
p. 243) mentions that at Tlapa a particular language is spoken. 

TLASCALTEKAS. 

Indians of San Salvador, who speak a dialect of the Mexican 
language. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Dr. Kabl Schebzeb, Sprache der Tlascaltekas Indianer im Dorfe Isalco im 
Staate San Salyador, pp. 28 — 85 of Vol. XV of: Sitzungsberichte der Philo- 
sophiscli-Historischen Klasse der Kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften. 
Ttennaf 1855, 8vo. A Iso under the separate title of : Sprachen der Indianer Central- 
Amerika's. rienna^ 1855, 8vo, pp. 11, 

TLATSKANAI, KWALHIOQUA. 

Indians of the Athapaskan stock and the TacouUie-Umpqua 
family of north-western America, speaking different dialects of 
one language. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

1, B, a, b, pp. 569 — 629, of the Vocabularies of North-western America, in : 
Horatio Haxe's Ethnography and Philology, United States Exploring Expe- 
pedition. Philadelphia^ Lea aud Blanchard, 1816, folio. 

Hale's Vocabulary compared with the other Athapaskan, pp. 177 — 222, and 
-with the Kiuai Languages and Xolos^hiati, pp. 269 — 318, of: Buschmaun's Atha- 
paskischer Spraehstamm. Berlin^ 1856, 4:to. 

M, 111, p. 105> of the same Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American 
Ethnological Society, Vol. VI. 



190 TOTONAKA. 



TOTONAKA. 

Language of Indians in the districts of Zacatlan, State of 
Puebla, and in tlie State of Vera Cruz. The four dialects of this 
language are the Tatlquilhatiy Chacahuaxti, Ypapana, and 
Tatimoh, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

IIebyas, Saggio, pp. 118, 119. 

IIebyaIs, Origine, Tubb. L et seq. 

Mitliridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 60 (three dialects of the Sierra Oaja, Sierra 
Alta, and others). 

J. S. Vateb, Froben, etc. ; Seetzen's Linguistischor Nachlass. Zei-pziff^ Yogel, 
1816, 8?o ; pp. 352—375. 

Salbi, i^tlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 699 (Totonaca, Sierra-alta). 

Nouvelles Annales des Voyages. Parity 1811, 8vo ; Vol. IV, pp. 261 — 267. 

N.B. — Clavigero says that Andbeas de Olmos and Cbisioval Diaz db Anaya 
have written G-rammars and Vocabularies of the Totonaka language. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Arte de Lengua Totonaca, conforme el Arte de Antonio Nebrija. Compuesto 
por D. Joseph Zambbano Bonilla, Cura beneficiado, etc. Dedicado al Exmo. Sr. 
D. Domingo Pantaleon Alvarez de Abreu, Arzobispo, Obispo de esta Diocesi. 
Llova aiiadido una doctrina de la Lenguu Naolingo, con algunas voces de la Lengua 
de aquella Sierra y de esta de Aca, que por orden de su Illustrmo. se imprimo. Su 
autor el Lie. D. Francisco Dominguez, Cura de Xalpam de los Angelos. Puebla, 
1752, 8vo, pp. 134, 79. 

(Naolingo is the dialect generally called Tatimolo.) 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 46—59. 

Adelung (Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 92) mentions, upon Marsden's 
authority : EiiGENio Komebo, Arte para aprender las Lenguas Mexicana y 
Totonaca. 

According to De Souza, the title is as follows : — Arte 6 G-ramatica de la 
Lengua Totonaca, por D. Eugenio Bomebo, de Antequera. MS. 

Arte y Vocabulario de la Lengna Totonaca, y varies Opusculos Catequisticos 
en la misma, por Illmo. D. Fr. Fbancisco Tobal, Obispo de Yucatan. MS. 
Toral died in Mexico, 1571 (De Souza). 

Arte para aprender ol Idioma Totonaco, and also : Vocabulario Totonaco-Cas- 
tellano, by Cbistobal Diaz Anata, Cura of Olintla, in the province of Fuebla, 
Mexico. MSS. (De Souza). 



TSCHUGATSCHI TSCHUKTCHI. 191 



TSCHUGATSCHI. 

Eskimo tribe, driven from the Kadjah Islands to Prince Wil- 
liam's Sound and Cook's Inlet. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 340, 341, 458, 459, 466; Vol. IV, pp. 251— 
253. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, Ko. 857 (Tchougatchi — Konaga). 

£. E. y. Baeb und G. Y. Helmebsen, Beitrage zur Kenntniss des Bussisohen 
Reichs und der angranzenden L&nder Asiens, Band I. St, Petersbwrg^ 1839, 8?o, 
p. 259. 

TSCHUKTCHI. 

They occupy the north-western part of Russian Asia, and the 
opposite shores of north-western America. A part of them are 
settled in Asia, and call themselves Namollo. They are un- 
doubtedly Eskimos. The Wild, or Reindeer, Tchuktchi call 
themselves Tchouktschee, Tchekto, and have been invaders, 
possibly, of the Korjake nation. Only the settled Tchuktchi 
belong to the American continent. 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 

Smith Babtok, New Views, etc.— Compapative Vocabularies. 

J. BiLLiSQy Puteachestvie, &c. (Russian edition of his Voyage, by Sarytscber, 
with Twelve Vocabularies). St. Petersburg^ 1811, 4to, pp. 190 j pp. 102—111. 
(The Vocabularies collected by the Head Physician, Dr. Bobeck). 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 340, 341, 407, 408; Vol. IV, pp. 242, 251— 
253 (from RoBECK, Mebce, and Koschaleff). 

A. J. Kbfsenstebn, W6rter-Sammlungen aus den Sprachen einiger VSlker des 
oestlichen Asiens und der Nordwestkiiste von Amerika. St, Petersburg^ 1813, 
4to ; pp. 33—44. 

J. S. Vateb, Proben deutscher Volksmundarten and Seetzen's Lin- 

goistiBcher Nachlass. Leipzic, Vogel, 8vo, 1816 j pp. 149 — 167. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 860, Tchouktchi Asiatiques; 
859, Tchouktchi Am^ricains. 

N.B. — No. 1, 3, of A. Gallatin's Comparative Vocabulary, pp. 307 — 367 of : 
Aroheologia Americana, Vol. II (the Asiatic Tshutchi). 



192 TUBAR — TUSCARORA. 



TUBAil. 

Indians of Sinaloa^ speaking a language related to the Tepe- 
guana and Tarakumara. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
IIebtas, Origine, Tabb. XLIX et seq. 
Hebtas, Saggio, p. 122. 
And (from him) in the Mithridates, III, 3, pp. 139 — 141. 

TUCANO. 

Brazilian Indians of the province Rio Negro. Martius (VII, 
196) enumerates them among the tribes of Juris. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary (of Ninety-eight Words), pp. 521—541 of: Alfred R, Wallace, 
A Narrative of Travels on the Amazon and Bio Negro. Lottdon, Beeve and Co., 
1853, 8vo. 

TUNGHASE. 

Indians of the south-eastern part of Prince of Wales's Archi- 
pelago. Their language is closely related to that of Sitka. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary by Dr. John Scoijler, in: Journal of the Koyal Geographical 
Society of London, Vol. XI (London, 1841, 8vo), pp. 231, 233—235. 

Tunghase and Sitka Words, p. 163 of: R. O. Latham, The Languages of the 
Oregon Territory (pp. 154—166 of: Journal of the Ethnological Society of 
London, Vol. I. Edinburgh, 1848, 8vo). 

TUSCARORA. 

Indians formerly of North Carolina. They joined afterwards 
(a.d. 1714) the Five Nations, or Iroquois, and are now in the west 
of the State of New York. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A small Dictionary of Tuskerura, Pampticough, Woccon, pp. 225 — 230 of: 
John Lawson, Surveyor-General of North Carolina, A New Voyage to Carolina; 



TZEN DALES. 193 

containing the Exact Description and Natural History of that Country, together 
with the Present State thereof j and a Journal of a Thousand Miles travelled through 
several Nations of Indians, giving a particular account of tlieir Customs, Manners, 
etc. London^ 1709, Uo. Reprinted, ibid., 1714, 4to, and 1718, 4to (only new 
title-pages). 

First printed as part of: A New Collection of Voyages and* Travels .... 
by Captain John Stevens .... London^ December, 170S, 4to ; to be con- 
tinued monthly (in Vol. I). Oennan translation, fi(»»»6iir^, 1772, 8vo. And 
in the plagiarism upon Lawson's Voyage : John Brickell, M.D., The Natural 
History of North Carolina, with an Account of the Trades, Manners, and 
Customs of the Christian and ladiao lahabitants. Dublin, 1737, 8vo ; and, 
with new title-page, 1743, 8vo. 

Hebtas, Aritmetica, pp. 113, 114. 

Smith Barton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies, and Appendix, 
p. 20. 

Mithridates, Vol. HI, part 3, pp. 318, 334, 335. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 800. 

No. V, 31, of the Comparative Vocabulary (pp. 307—367) to A. Gallatin's 
Synopsis, etc- (Archaeologia Americana, Vol. II) j and under R, V, 5, p. 115, of 
the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II 
(from MS. Notes of Pakish). 

Tuscarora Vocabulary, Vol. IT, Appendix B, pp. 262—265, of: Geo. Catlin's 
Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North 
American Indians. London and New York, Wiley and Putnam, 1841, 2 vols. 
8vo. 

Vocabulary of the Tuscarora, from William Chew, written out by the Rev. Gil- 
bert Rockwood, Appendix H, pp. 251 — 258, to : Henry R. Schoolcraft's Notes on 
the Iroquois. 2sew York, Bartlett and Welford, 18 AO, 8vo. (New York State 
Document, 18 i6. Senate No. 24.) And in the Comparative Vocabulary of the 
Iroquois, pp. 393 —400 of the same Report, published as a separate book. Albany^ 
Pease and Co., 1847, 8vo. 

Comparison of Tuscarora (from Lawson), Pampticough, and Waccoa, pp. 552 — 
556 of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States, Vol. V. 



TZEN DALES, CELDALES. 

Indians of Chiapas, speaking a dialect of the Maya. Abbe 
Brasseur considers the Celdal the parent language, and the 
Maya a dialect. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

C. S. Rafikesque, Atlantic Journal, and Friend of Knowledge. PhUadelpKia, 
1832, 1833, 8vo ; pp. 196—198. 

c c 



l\) if UAINAMBKr — I'OALENZI. 

A Bhort ^fS. Yocabiilary of tlie Tzi'ndol Lnngunjrc, brought from Chiapas by 
John L. Stephens, is mentioned by A. Oallutin, in hiA Notes on the Semi^ciTilized 
Nations of Mexico, etc. (Transactions of the American Ethnological Society^ 
Vol. I, p. 5). 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Fr. De Cepeda, Arte de las Letignns Chinpn, Zoque, Celdales j Cinancateca. 
Mexico, 1560, 4to. 

UAINAMBEU. 

Brazilian Indians of the province of Rio Negro. 

WORDS AND VOCABULAUIES. 

Vocabulary (of Ninety-eight Words), pp. 521 — 541 of: Alfred R. Waixacb, 
A Narrative of Travels on the Amazon and Bio Negro. London^ Reeve and Co., 
1853, 8vo. 

UCHEE. 

Creek Indians, east of the rivers Coosa and Chatahoochee. 
Their language is very harsh and guttural. They are now 
partly in Florida, partly in the west. 

words and vocabularies. 

No. XI, 46, of the Comparative Vocabulary (pp. 35 — 367) to A. Qtkllatin's 
Synopsis, etc. (Airchffiologia Americana, Vol. II ; from Ware, and MS. Notes of 
Bidge). 

And No. D. XI, pp. 94, 96, of: American Ethnological Society's Transactions, 
Vol. n. 

UGALENZI. 

Indians of Russian America, west of Cape St. Elias, and near 
the Island of Kadjak. Their language seems to be a dialect of 
the Koloschian. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

V. Wbangel, Some (Eleven) Words compared with Atna and Kolosch, p. 99 
of : !K. F. VON Baeb und Gr. v. Helhebsek, Beitrage zur Kenntniss des Bus- 
sischen Beichs und der angr&nzenden Lander Asiens, Band I. SL Peterahurff^ 
1839, 8vo. 

Comparative Vocabulary of the Athapascan and Kinai (among them the 
Ugalenze) Languages, pp. 269—318 of: Buschmann's Athapaskischer Sprach- 
stamm. Berlin^ 1856, 4to. 



UMPQUA — UNALASCHKA. 195 



UMPQXJA. 

Indians of Oregon, of the Athapascan stock, family of Talikali- 
Umpkwa. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Umpqua Yocabulary, by Dr. John Scotjleb, in : Journal of the Boyal G^gra- 
graphical Society of London, Vol. XI. London, 1841, 8to, pp. 237—239, 241. 

Umpkwa Vocabulary, 1, C, of the Vocabularies of North-western America, 
pp. 569 — 629 of : HosAxio Hale, Ethnography and Philology, United States 
Exploring Expedition. PhUcuielphia^ Lea and Bianchard, 1846, folio. 

And M, III, p. 105, of the Vocabularies of North-western America (Transac- 
tions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II.) 

Professor "W. W. Turner (/rom Hale), Comparatire Vocabulary of Twenty- 
five AVords of Umpkwa, Hudson's Bay, Chepewyan, Tacully, Hoopah, Apache, 
and Nayajo, pp. 84, 85 of the Beport upon the Indian Tribes ; added to Lieutenant 
A. W. Whipple's Beport (Pacific Bailroad Beports, VoL II. Wtuhington, 
1856, 4to). 

Umpqua compared with the other Athapascan languages, yiz., Chepewyan, 
Tahkali, Kutchin, Dogrib, Sussee, and Tlatskanai, pp. 174 — 222 ; and compared 
with the same, the Kinai languages — Koloschian, Navajo, and Ticorilla, pp. 269 — 
318 of: BusCHXANN, AthapasJLUicher Sprachstamm. Berlin^ 1856, 4to. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL ^^OTIC£S. 

A Grammatical Notice, see pp. 534, 535 of : Hobatio Hale, Ethnography and 
Philology, United States Exploring Expedition. PhUcuielphia^ Lea and Bianchard, 
1846, foUo. 

UNALASCHKA. 

The largest of the Fox Islands^ inhabited by Eskimos. The 
language of Unalaschka is spoken over all the Fox Islands^ and 
also on the peninsula of Aljaska. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

William Coxe, Account of Bussian Discoveries between Asia and America, 
etc. London, 1780, 4to (reprinted, ibid., 1784 and 1804), p. 303. 

Trench translation — Paris, 1781, 4to. Seufchatel, 1781, 8vo, p. 172, 
German traujlation — Frank/art and Leipzig, Fleischer, 1784, 8vo. 

A Table to show the Affinity between the Languages spoken at Oonalashka and 
Norton Sound and those of the Greenlanders and Esquimaux, Appendix YI 
to VoL III of : A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean, performed under the direction 



iy{) UTAHS VILELA. 

of Captains Cook, Clark, and Gore, 177G— 1780. London^ 178 1-, 3 voL*. 4to ; 
Vol. II, Appendix VI, p. 551. Edit. Dublin^ 1784, 3 vols. 8vo j Vol. Ill, pp. 
551, 555. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 458, 459 (from Resakopp). 

Vocabulary of the Languages .... of the Islands .... Oonalasebka .... 
Appendix No. Ill, pp. 329 — 337, of: UuEr Lisiaxsky's Voyage round the 
World. London^ John Booth, 1811, Ito. 

Balbt, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 858. 

Fred. Lutke, Voyage autour du Monde execute sur la Correttele Scniavine, etc., 
1826 et 1829. Traduit du Russe par F. Bo\e. Paris, Eirmin Didot, 1835, 1836, 
3 vols. 8vo, and Atlas ; Vol. I, pp. 236 — 2 17. The Russian original— Tedor Litke, 
Puteschestvio vokrug svj eta— appeared at St, Petersburg, 1834 — 1836, 3 vols. 8vo. 

Some Words (31 — and numerals 1 — 5) of the Uualachka compared with Eskimo 
and Kadjak, p. 123 of: \o's Baeu und Von Helmehsex, Beitrage zur Xentniss 
des Russischen Reiches, Band I. St. Petersburg, 1839, 8vo. 

Oonalashca Vocabulary, svh lit. X, p. 130, of the Vocabularies of North 
America, in : Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 
(Gallatin says, concerning this language, p. 77, ** not in America.") 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 460. 

UTAHS. 

Wild Indians on the borders of New Mexico. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Utah Vocabulary .... No. 9 of Appendix B, pp. 140 — 143, of : Jam:es H. 
Simpson's Journal of a Military Kecoiinaissance from Santa F^, Jfew Mexico, to 
the ^iavajo Country (Reports of the Secretary of War, with Kecounaissances of 
Routes from San Antonio to El Paso .... also .... the Report of Lieutenant 
J. H. Simpson. Washington, Union Office, 1850 j 8vo, pp. 65—168). 

VILELA. 

Indians of the Argentine province, Cordova, on the banks of the 
Salado River. Tliey are divided into OntoampaSy Yeconoampas, 
Ipas, and Pasaiues. There arc also some wandering tribes of 
tlic; Yilela in the forests on the banks of the llio Bermcjo ; 
among them are the ChunupieSy OcoleSj Atalalas, The Vilela 



VIRGINIA VUTA. 197 

language is related to the Lule, and has several dialects^ among 
which the Vilela proper and the Ontoampa are the most promi- 
nent. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

F. S. GiLii, Saggio di Storia Americana, Yol. Ill, pp. 364—366. 

Hertas, Tocabolario Poliglotto, pp. 161 et seq. 

Hervas, Origine, pp. 27, 29, 37, 41, 44, 45, 48, Tabb. XLTX, L, LI et seq. 

Hervas, Aritinetica, pp. 98, 99. 

Hervas, Saggio, pp. 103—105. 

Mitliridates, A^ol. Ill, part 3, pp. 508, 516, 517 (from Hervas and GiLii). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 455. 

YIRGIIsIA. 

The words which we find mentioned under this name belong to 
the Mohegan. 

WORDS and vocabularies. 

The "Few Words" given by (^aptain John Smith are to be found in — 
1, Vol. IT of: D. Samuel Puuchas, Ilakhiytus Postumus {London, 1625, V, folio), 
p. 1667. 2, p. 40 of his General History of Virginia. London^ 1627 {ibid,, 
1630, 1632), and Yol. I, pp. 147, 148, of the edition published in 1819 at Hich- 
mondy Virginia, Franklin Press, William W. Gray, printer, 2 toIs, 8vo. 

Tocabularium Parbaro-Virgineorum, pp. 133 — 154 of: Lutheri Catechismus 
Sfrersatt pa American Virginiske Spraket. StocJcholm, Burehard, 1696, small 8ro. 

H. Relandus, Dissertationes Miseellanefle. Trajecti ad Jihenum, 1706—1708, 
3 vols. 8vo, A'ol. Ill, pp. 208-211. 

Hebtas, Saggio, p. 126. 

Hervas, Origine, Tabb: L et seq. 

Smith Barton, New A'iews, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies; and (from him, 
as well as from the A'irginia Catechism) in : 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 387—389. 

Langue des Virginiens : Court de Gebelin, Monde Primitif, Vol. VIII, 
pp. 515-520. Paris, 1772, 4to. Reprmted, pp. 3-.^8-331 of : J. B. Soberer, 
Kecherches Historiques et G^ographiques sur le Kouveau Monde. Parw, Brunetj 
1777, 12mo. 

VUTA, HUILLICHE. 

ludiaus^ west of the Patagouians, and south of the Araucanians, 



I 



IIW WACOES WAIKl'R. 

They arc divided into the — Chanos, Chunos, or Cfionos, on and 
next to the ishiiid of Chiloe ; l^of/us, or Poyes^ on the islands 
of Wellington and Hanover, and the coast opposite; Keyus, or 
Keyes, south of the above, and down to the Straits of Magal- 
haens. Tlieir language is a mixture of Araucan and Tehuelhet. 

WOUDS AND VOCAIJULAKIKS. 



M' 



Th. Falknek, Dwi-ription of Patagonia. Hereford^ 1774, 4to, p. 
German traiislution— Qotha, 1775, 8vo, p. 124. 

AVACOES, NUECOS. 

Indians of the Great Prairies, belonging to the Pawnee stock, 
residing between the AVashita and Red rivers, in about 98° 20 
W. long. They are closely related to their neighbours, the 
^Vitchitas. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Nueco Vocabulary, pp. 65—68, and Fifteen Nueco Words compared with 
Pawnee, Riccaree, Kichai, and Witchita. pp. 68, 69, of the Report upon the Indian 
Tribes, by Lieutenant A. W. Whipple, Thomas Ewbank, and Professor W, W. 
Turner, added to Lieutenant A. W. Wuipple's Report on the Route near the 35th 
Parallel (Pacific Railroad Reports, Vol. II. Washington^ 1856, 4to). 



WAIKUR, GUAICUR, MONQUI. 

Indians of Lower California. The Cora and the Aripe speak 
dialects of their language. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

J. Begeet, e S. J., Nachrichten von der Amerikanischen Halbinsel Californien, 
mit einem zwiefachen Anhang falscher Nachrichten. Greschrieben von einem 
Priester der G^sellschaft Jesu, welcher lang darinn diese letztere Jahr gelebt hat. 
Mannheim, 1772, 8vo. 

Langue de la Californie (Waikur, from Begebt), pp. 553—555 of: Court 
de Gebelin, Monde Primitif. Faris^ 1772, 4to. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 198, 199. Cora Vocabulary, ibid,, pp. 87, 
88, 153, 154. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 3, pp. 188—192 (from P. Begebt). 



WAIILATPU — WARROWS. 199 



WAIILATPU, MOLELE. 

Indians of western Oregon, south of Columbia Iliver. The 
Waiilatpu proper are called, also, IVilletpoos, Cat/use, Their 
languages bear some affinity to the Sahaptin or Nez-perc^ 
language. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

T. Waiilatpu ; O. Waiilatpu (Willepoos, Cayuse), from Dr. "Whitman ; P. 
Molele (see Vocabularies of North-western Amorica, pp. 569 — 629 of: Hob. Hale, 
Ethnography and Philology of the United States Exploring Expedition. Phila- 
delphia^ Lea and Blanehard, 1846, folio). 

And IT, XXV, p. 120, of the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the American 
Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

grammars and grammatical notices. 

A Short Notice, p. 561 of : Hob. Hale, Ethnography and Philology of the 
United States Exploring Expedition {Philctdelphia^ 1816, folio) ; and, reprinted, 
p. 56, Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 



WARROWS. 

Indians in the interior of British Guyana. 

WORDS AND vocabularies. 

Journal of the Royal Geographical Society of London, Vol. II {London, 
1832, 8vo), pp. 247 et seq. Reprinted in R. Montgomery Martin's British 
Colonial Library, Vol. V (West Indies, II), pp. 155, 156. London, Bohn, 1844, 
12mo. 

Warrow Words, pp. 140, 141, of: John DuinriOBE Lang, J).D., View of the 
Origin and Migrations of the Polynesian Nations. London, Cochrane, 1834^ 
12mo. 

Vocabulary of Eighteen Words compared with Arowak, Accaway, and Caribisi, 
pp. 297, 298 of: W. H. Bbett, Indian Tribes of Guyana. New York, Carter 
Brothers, 1852, 12mo. 

Sir RoBEBT H. Schombxtbge, Comparative Vocabulary of Eighteen Warauan 
Words, in his ; Vocabularies of Eighteen Languages and Dialects of Indian 
Tribes inhabiting Guiana, pp. 97, 98 of: British Association Report, Swansea 
Meeting, 1848. London, 1849, 8to. 



200 WE IC- YOT — \V 1 N X K HAGOS. 



avi:e-yot. 

Indian band on the mouth of Ed Hlvor and near Huml>oldt Bay, 
in north-western California. (Ed Kiver is called Wcc-yot by 
the Indians residing on it.) 

WORDS AND VOCAia-LAlilKS. 

Qeobge Gibbs, Vocabulary : Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes, Vol. Ill, pp. 434 — 
440. 

AVEITS-PEK. 

Indians of north-western California, on the Klamath, at the 
junction of the Trinity. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Geoboe Gibbs, Vocabulary : Sclioolcraft's Indian Tribes, Vol. Ill, pp. 440 — 
445. 

WINNEBAGOS, NIPPEGON. 

Called, by the French, Puans, or Otchagras ; by the Oma- 
haws, Horoje ; and by themselves, Ilochungorah, Indians of 
the Sioux stock on Fox and Rock rivers, Wisconsin. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Professor Sat, Comparative Vocabularies of Various Dialects of the Lenape (or 
Delaware) Stock of North American Indians, together with a Specimen of the 
Winnebago (or Nippegon) Language, Note 15, pp. 135 — 145, to John Picker- 
ing's edition of Dr. Edv\ards*8 Observations on the Mohegan Language (Collec- 
tions of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Vol. X of the Second Series. Boston^ 
Phelps and Farnham, 1823, 8vo ; reprinted, ibid.^ Little and Brown, 1843, Svo ; 
pp. 81—160). 

Note 16, pp. 149 — 151, relates to the Winnebago dialect, which is considered 
as being of Mexican origin. 

Professor Sat, Vocabulary, pp. Ixxxvi— Ixxxviii, added to : Astronomical and 
Meteorological Records and Vocabularies of Indian Languages, taken in the 
Expedition for Exploring the Mississippi, under the command of Major J. H. Long. 
Philadelphia, 1822, 4to. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 775. 



WISH-OSK WOKKONS. 201 

No. VI, 83, of the Comparative Vocabulary (pp. 305—367) to A. Qallatiu's 
Synopsis, etc. (Archseologia Americana, Vol. II). 

And under S, VI, 2, p. 116, of the Vocabularies in : American Ethnological 
Society's Transactions, Vol. II. 

(From Sat, and MS. notices of BoiLODf Cass and in the War Depart- 
ment.) 

Winnebago Numerals (1— biUion), by Miss Elizabeth Lowet, pp. 214 — 216 
of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States, Vol. II. 



WISH-OSK. 

Indians of north-western California, on Humboldt Bay and 
Mad River. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

George Gibbs, Vocabulary : Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States, 
Vol. in, pp. 434—440. 

WITCHITAS. 

Indians of northern Texas, near the Red River. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Captain B. B. Mabcy, Vocabularies of Words in the Languages of the Comanches 
and Witchitas, Appendix H, pp. 273—276, of: Randolph B. Mabcy and 
GsoBeE B. M'Clellak, Exploration of the Bed Birer of Louisiana, in the year 
1852. Washington, Nicholson, public printer, 1854, 8to (33rd Congr. 1st Sess. 
House Exec. Doc.) 

Specimen of the Caddo and Witchita Languages, pp. 709 — 712 of VoL V of; 
Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States. 

Fifteen Witchita Words (from Mabcy) compared with Pawnee, Slichai, Bic^ 
caree, and Hueco, pp. 68, 69 of the Beport upon the Indian Tribes ; added to Lieu- 
tenant A. W. Whipple's Beport (Pacific Bailroad Beports, Vol. II. Wctsh" 
im^tony 1856, 4>to). 

WOKKONS, WACCOA. 

Indians^ formerly of North Carolina, long since extinct. Their 
language was related to that of the Catawbas. They were 
neighbours of the Tuscaroras in North Carolina. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

A small Dictionary of Tuskerora, Pampticough, Woccon, in : John Lawson, 

D D 



202 YAMKALLIE. 

New Voyage to Carolina (see Tuscarora). London, 1709, 4to, pp. 225 — 230 
et 8cq. 

German tranfllation— //amftttr^, 1772, ttvo, pp. 311 et seq. 

Dr. Joii-V Brick EL, The Xutiiral Ilistorj of North Carolina. Duhlii^ 1737, 
8vo. New title, ibid., 1743, 8vo. 

Uekvas, Aritmetica, p. Hi. 

Smith Barton, New Views, etc. — Comparative Vocabularies. 

Mithridatesy Vol. Ill, part 3, p. 308 (from Lawson). 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 7u3. 

Comparison of the Languages of the ancient Pampticos of North Carolina with 
the Algoncjuin Language, and of the ancient Waccoa of tliat State and the Catawba 
of South Carolina, pp. 552—558 of: Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United 
States, Vol. V. (Tuskarora and AVaccoa, both from Lawson, pp. 552 — 555 ; 
Tuskarora, Pampticough, and Waccoa, pp. 555, 556; Waccoa and Catawba, 
pp. 557, 558.) 

r. 87, and No. XIX, 54, p. 372, of the Vocabularies to A. Gallatin's Synopsis, 
etc. (ArchsDologia Americana, Vol. II). 

YAMKALLIE, KALLAPUIAH. 

Oregon Indians of the plains of the Wallamette, speaking a 
language related to that of the Cathlascons and Haeeltzuk. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIKS. 

Elalapooah and Yamkallio Vocabularies, by Dr. John Scoxileb, in : Journal 
of the Royal Geographical Society of London, Vol. XI. London^ 1841, 8to ; 
pp. 237, 239, 241. 

Vocabulary of the Calapooa Nation, pp. 333—336 of: Eev. Sahuel Fabkbb, 
Journal of an Exploring Tour beyond the Rocky Mountains. Ithaca, New 
York, printed by Mack, Andrus, and Woodruff, 1838, 12mo. 

No. 7, S, 9 {Kalapuya), and r. {Tuhwalati, Follaties), of the Vocabularies of 
North-western America (pp. 669 — 629), in : Horatio Hale, Ethnography and 
Philology of the United States Exploring Expedition. Philadelphia, Lea and 
Blanchard, 1846, folio. 

And E, XXVII {Kalapuya, Willamet), pp. 97, 99, of the North American 
Vocabularies (Tran^ctions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II). 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Pp. 564—566 of: Hoeatio Hale, Ethnography and Philology, United States 
Exploring Expedition. Philadelphia, Lea and Blanchard, 1846, folio. 

And pp. 58—61, Vol. II, of: Transactions of the American Ethnological Society. 



YAGUAS YAQUI. 203 



YAGUAS. 

Brazilian Indians on tlie Amazon. 

WORDS AND YOCABULARIBS. 

Langue des Yaguas, Vocabulary, No. XXTTT, pp. 297, 298, of: Castelkatj, 
Vol. V, Appendice. 

YAMEOS. 

Indians on the Upper Marauon, east from the junction of the 
Tigre River. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
HsBYAS, Origine, Tabb. XLVIII, L et seq. 
Hebyas, Saggio, pp. 107, 108 ; and (from him) 
Alithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 589, 595—597. 

YANKTONS, YANKTONANS, OR 
YANKTOANANS. 

Sioux tribe, between the Red River and the Missouri. 

WORDS A2n) VOCABULARIES. 

P. Ixxxiv of Say's Vocabularies in : Astronomical and Meteorological Be- 
cords, and Vocabularies of Indian Languages, taken on the Expedition for Ex- 
ploring the Mbsissippi .... under .... Major J. H. Long. Philadelphia^ 1822, 
4to. 

Balbi, Atlas Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 774. 

No. VI, 35, of the Comparative Vocabiilary (pp. 305 — 367) to A. Ghdlatin's 
Sjnopsb, etc. : Archseologia Americana, Vol. II (from Say). 

Beprinted under S, VI, 1, p. 116, of the Vocabularies in : Transactions of the 
American Ethnological Society, Vol. II. 

Beise des Frinzen Maximilian zxj Wied. Cohlenz^ 1839 — 1841, 2 vols. 4to ; 
Vol. II, pp. 491--498. 

YAQUI, HIAQUI. 

Christian Indians of Sonora, Mexico. (See also under Cinaloa,) 
It may be stated, on the authority of Hervas and Andr. Perez 



201 YAKURA. 

i)K Hi HAS Cllistoria do los Triumfos dc nuestra Santa Fe, 
Madrid y Hil."), folio), that tlic Iliaqiii \^ the priucipal language 
of Siiialoa ; and, on tlie authority of De Souza, that P. Luis 
hoMKA/ lias written an ''Arte dc la Lcngua Principal de 
(*inaloa/* which prohahly exists only in MS. 

WOHDS AND VOCABULAKIES. 

JIkuvah, Ori^iiic, Tabh. XL1\, L et 8eq. 

IIkuvah, Ha^f^io, |)p. 121, 122; and (from him) 

Mithridah'M, Vol. Ill, lart 3, pp. 15G— 158. 

A Vocahularv of tlicir Laii^uago lias been taken by JOHN B. Babtlett, the 
I'liiU'd iSlatcrt noundai'}- C'(>iMiiii*<HioiUT. 

(illAMMARS AND GIIAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Ario dr la Lciiguu rrincipnl dc Ciualoa, per P. Luis Bonifaz. (MS., according 
to Do Sou/Ji.) 

Mithridal<'s, Vol. HI, i)arf. 3, pp. 15G— 158 (Lord's Prayer, with Grammatical 
Nol«'f.\ 

YAllURA. 

I ndians of New (Jranada, in the plains of the Meta and Casanare^ 
tributari(rH of the Orinoco. They call themselves Japurin. 
Tluiir lan<5ua;j;c ])ears aflhiity to the languages of the Betoi, 
VA{\y and Otonnupies. 

WOUDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

(}iLii, Hagjrio di Htoria Americana, Yol. Ill, p. 212. 

IIkuvah, Vocabolurio Poliglotto, pp. 161 et seq. 

From 1*. Giov. Makia Fokneri, a missionary among the Yaruras, who 
had (;omi)osed a Grammar and a Vocabulary of their language, the MS. of 
both of which ho left at the Mission. Botumed to Europe, he gave to 
lIiTvas MS. Notices concerning the Yarura language, which were after- 
wards also used by Adelung and Yater for the Mithridates. 

Hebyab, Originc, Tabb. XLVIII, L et seq. 

nEBYAS, Aritmetica, pp. 105, 106. 

IIeuvas, Saggio, pp. 109, 110. 

Mithridates, Yol. Ill, p. 650 (from IIeevas and GiLii). 

Balbi, AilaH Ethnographique, Tab. XLI, No. 646. 

0. S. Eapinesque, Atlantic Journal, and Friend of Knowledge. Philadelphia, 
1832, 1838, 8vo, p. 118. 



YUKAI — YUMAS. 205 

Beprinted, pp. 349 — 851 of: Josiah Priest, American Antiquities and Dis- 
coveries in the West. Third Edition, Albany, printed by Hoflfman and White, 
1833, 8vo. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 635—640 (from Fobnebi). 

A MS. Grammar of the Yarura Language was in the library of W. von Hum- 
boldt, and is now in the Boyal Library at Berlin. 

YUKAI, 

Indians on Russian River, in north-western California. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

George Gibbs, Vocabulary : Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States, 
Vol. Ill, pp. 428—434. 

YULE. 

Indians of the Isthmus of Darien. 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIKS. 

Vocabulary of the Language of the Yule Indians, inhabiting the rivers and 
the coast of Darien, from the mouth of the Atrato to the coast of San Bias, by 
Dr. Edward Cullen, pp. 241, 242 of Vol. XXI of: Journal of the Royal 
Geographical Society, London, John Murray, 1851, 8vo. 

YUMAS. 

Indians of the south-western part of California, on the Rio 
Colorado, down to its entrance in the Gulf of California. They 
are divided into five tribes, of which the Cuchans are the most 
important. The others are the Ma-ka-os, Hah-waUcoes, Yam- 
pai-o, and Co-co-pahs. The Camoyes, or Puemaja, are a tribe 
of the Cuchans. 

WOEDS AXD VOCABTJLABIES. 

Vocabulary of about 250 Words in the Yuma (rather Cuchan) Language, pp. 
23 — 28 of Lieutenant A. W. Whipple's Extract fi^m a Journal of an Expedition 
from San Diego, California, to the Rio Colorado, from September 11th to Decem- 
ber 11th, 1849 (Congress. Docum., 31 Congr., 2nd Sess., Senate Exec. Doc., No. 
19, pp. 28). Reprinted, pp. 118—121 of the : Physical Data respecting that part 
of Southern California lying on the line of boundary between San Diego and the 
mouth of the river Gila ; with incidental descriptions of the Diegunos and Yumas 
Indian Tribes ; pp. 99 — 121 of Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States, 
Vol. II. 



200 YrX<JA — VIRACARER. 

Reprinted as : YMtna Voctibulary, with Notii'CD of tho Comoyes dialect, taken 
from I'ablo Coelum, n Vuiiia cliief, ])v Lioutoimiit A. W. Whipple, pp. 95 — 101 
of: R(>port ii]ion the Indian Tribes, nddcil to Lioutonant Wliipple's Report on 
the Route neur the :i5th l*arallel (Paeiiic Kuilroud Ri*port8. Wcuhingtony 1855, 
Vol. II, Ito). 

The United States boundary Commissioner, John R. Barti.ett, has also 
taken a Vocabulary of the Yuma Language. 

YUNG A. 

Pcniviaii Indians of the departments Truxillo, Zaiia^ Piura, and 
Catamavea. The Yneas had forced tlicm to leave their old 
abodes, and placed them in different villages; but they kept 
their language, which is totally different from the Quichua. In 
Mithridates, \o\. Ill, p. 518, the language is called Yunka- 
Mochika; by Hkrvas, Mochika di Yuncas. Rivero and 
TsciiUDi call it a dialect of the Quichua, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 
IIeevas, Saggio, p. 93, and (from him) 
Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 549—551. 
Hebvas, Origine, Tabb. L et seq. ^ 

GJIAMMAES AND GRA:k[MATICAL IfOTICES. 

Febnando de la Cabbeba (cura y vicario do S. Martin de Reque en el corre- 
gimiento de Chiclayo), Arte de la Lengua Yunga de los valles del obispado de 
Trujillo, con un confessionario y todas las oraciones cristianas y otras cosas. 
LimOy Juau de Contreras, 1644, 16mo. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, p. ^51. 

(The above Grammar was unknown to the authors of the Mithridates.) 

YURACARES. 

Indians of Bolivia, on the eastern slope of the Andes, on the 
rivers Ibabo, Mamore, Aimore, and Seacri. The Tacana, 
Maropa, and Apolista are tribes related to them. 

WORDS AXD VOCABULARIES. 

Vocabulary of Twenty-three Words, p. 16 i of Vol. I of: A. D'OBUiaNY, 
L'Homme Am^ricain. 

Diccionario Yuracare, by P. la Cueva, 4to, in two parts : Espanol-Yuracare, 
complete j Yuracare-Espaiiol, incomplete. (MS. in possession of Alcide D'Orbigny.) 



ZAMUCA — ZAPOTECA. 207 



GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

A. D*Obbignt, L'Homme Am6ricain, Tol. I, p. 359, and p. 376 (Tacana tribe), 
p. 380 (Maropa tribe), p. 382 (Apolist^ tribe). 

ZAMUCA, SAMUCA. 

Indians of the South American province Chiquitos. The three 
dialects of their language are the Zamuca, Caipotorade^ and 
Morotoco, 

WORDS AND VOCABULARIES. 

Hebtas, Tocabolario Poliglotto, pp. 161 et seq., 223 (Zamuca Chiquita). 

Hebvas, Saggio, pp. 101, 102, 229, 230. 

Hebyas, Aritmetica, p. 97. 

HsBVAS, Origine, pp. 37, 41, 45, Tabb. XLIX, L et seq. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 554—570 (from Hebvas). 

Balbi, Atlas Etbnograpbique, Tab. XLI, No. 462. 

Vocabulary of Twenty-three Samuca Words, Vol. I, pp. 163, 164; VoL 11, 
p. 136 (Xamucft), of: A. B'Orbignt, L'Homme Am6ricain. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, pp. 553 — 557. 

A. D*ObbiGnt, L'Homme Americain, Vol. 11, p. 147. 

ZAPAllI. 

Indians of Upper Peru and Equador, between the rivers Mara- 
non^ Pastaza^ and Napo. 

WORDS A^'D VOCABrXARIES. 

Brevi cemu suU' idioma Zaparo, corredati d'un saggio di diccionario, di alguni 
dialogi pill necesearii pel viaggiatore, pp. 281 — 297 of: Gaetano Osculati, 
Explorazione delle regioni equatoriali lungo il Napo, etc. MUano^ Bemardoni, 
1850, 8to. 

ZAPOTECA. 

Indian language of Oajaca^ Mexico. 



2()H /K.ONA. 



WORDS AM) VOCABl'LARIFS. 

Juan ve Couuova, Yofabularii) <lo lu Li'iigu;i Oipotcca. Mexico^ 1578, 4to. 

Vocn!>nlari() de lu LiMiirua Zupotocu, o Dicciunario Ilispano-Zapoteco. Mexico^ 
1571, Ito. 

Vocnlmlario df la l.cngiia Zapott'cn, b}- Hi>hop 1'eduo Fekia. 

Fcria was burn lo'Jl-, wont to Mexico, joined the Dominieans, became a 
iniHt»ioimrv amongst the Zapoteea^, uud, after filling many posts of dignity in 
the Church, was made iiishop of Chiapas, in 1575. Died about the year 
15H6. lie wrote besides : Confessionurio en la Lengua Zapoteca ; and: Doc- 
trina Christiana en la mii*ma Lengua. 

Diceionario de lu Lengua Zai>oteca. Also : Los Evangelios Quadragesimales en 
Lingua Zapoteca, hy Fray Ciikistobal A(jueuo. 

Fray Christobal Aguero was born in 1600, in San Luis de la Paz,in Michoaoan, 
became a Dominican monk in Oaxaca, in 1G18, and, according to De Souza, 
was so iHjrfect in the language of the Zapotecas, that he taught it publicly to 
his (HM'le.siastical brothers. Ue gave his Diceionario to the Bishop of Mon- 
terroso for publication ; the translation of the Evangelists remained in the 
Convent of Antcqucra. lie wrote also : Misccllaneo Espiritual en idioma 
Zapotcca, which was published in 4to, in the city of Mexico, by Bernardo 
Calderon, IGfJG. 

C. S. Eafinesque, Atlantic Journal, and Friend of Knowledge. Philcidelpkicij 
1832, 1833, 8vo, p. 52. 

Nouvelles Annnlos dcs Voyages, Yol. IV. Paris, 1841, 8vo ; pp. 260 — 286. 

The MS. Vocabulary of Cuuistobal Ague eg is also mentioned by Clavigcro. 

GRAMMARS AND GRAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

J. DE CoBDOYA, Arte de la Lengua Capoteca. Mexico^ 1564, 12mo. (De Sooza 
gives the date of 1578.) 

Arte do la Gram^itica de la Lengua Zapotcca, conforme al que de In G-ram&tica 
Latina escribio Antonio de Nebrija, por Fr. Pedbo Cueva. Megico, 1607, 8vo. 

Arte de la Lengua Zapoteca, por Fr. Antonio Pozo. MS. (According to De 
Souza, Fozo died in the Convent of Santa Ana Zecaho, in the year 1623. His 
]MS. was preserved in Tentitlan, Valley of Oaxaca. 

Tratado curioso de los raices y formacion de los Verbos de la Lengua Zapoteca, 
por Fr. Gebonimo Mobeno. 

Moreno was a native of Andalusia, went to America in 1597, was a mis- 
sionary in Oaxaca, and died, in 1631, in the Convent of San Domingo of 
Antequera. 

ZEONA. 

Language of the inhabitants of the north-westerly corner of 






ZOQUE. 209 



the empire of Brazil, province of Para, on the left bank of the 
Amazon, between the rivers Putumajo and Caqueta. It may 
be a dialect of the Omagna^ and, like that language,' related to 
the "Lingoa geral" of Brazil. 

WOBDS AND TOCABULA.BIES. 

Diccionario y Doctrina en Lengua Zeona. MS. of pp. 416, in 12mo, in the 
possession of Colonel Joaquin Acosta of Nuera Granada. The Appendix con- 
tains a List of Words of the " Lengua general del Brasil." 

ZOQUE. 

Indian language of Chiapas, Mexico. 

OBAMViBS AND GBAMMATICAL NOTICES. 

Fr. PE Cepeda, Arte de las Lenguas Chiapa, Zoqne, Celdales, y Cinaoanteca. 
Mexico, 1560, 4to. 



K E 



ADDKNDA. 



♦ ■ - 



(7V//' CmilrihiitioHs J'tinitMlifti hf /Vf »//-*«>/• Wm. \V. Tuknkh, of Waxkiuflhtu^ arf 
t-nvhtxnl in hftivk'fixy thuf \ 1, and hear the inifiafjt W. W. T.) 

ABENAKI. 

I TIio Coin}>anitirc ViHiilmlnrv apiK'ncUtl to Edwards's Moliegan Grammar wba 
coiiipiUKl, not bv " Profi'flrtor F. Say," but by ])r. Joiix Pickering, from various 
HoiinH-K, the ^Vinlu■l)H^o alone having bwu taken from Say. Of the Abenaki t^'O 
VtM'ubulnrifH arc given, one from Father Rasle's MS. Dictionary, and the other (St. 
Francis Indian^)) from Rev. Messrs. Ilohm^s and Xoyes. 

The numerals, from Fatlier Rasle's MS. Dictionaiy, are printed in Collections 
of Massachusetts Historical Society, Vol. X, first series. Boston, 1809, pp. 137, 
138.--W.W.T.] 

ABIPONES. 

Alonzo dk Bakcena, Arte y Yocabulario de la Lengua delos Indios Abipones y 
Quiranguis. Printed, according to Lo9ano, Descripcion Chorographica del gran 
Chaco ; and Barcia, in his edit ion of Leon Pinelo. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode bei Yolkeni aller 
Welttheile. Halle, 1817, 8vo. On the numerals, pp. 4-7.— W. W. T.] 

ALGONKIN. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
Gi— 66 ; on the pronouns, p. 109, wo^e.— W. W. T.] 

ALLENTIAC. 

Grammatica y Yocabulario en las Lenguas Allentiac y Milcocayac, por Tobbalva. 
Lima, 1608, 8vo. 



APACHES ATNAS. 211 



APACHES. 

[For Vocabulary of the Jicarilla Apaches, see " Ticorillas," p. 186. — 
W. W. T.] 

APPIACAS (Brazilian Indians). 

Vocabulary' of 113 words on page 315 of: Memoria sobre os usos, Costumes e 
Luiguagem dos Appiacas ; e descobrimento de Noyas Minas na proyincia de Mato 
Orosso. Pelo Conego Jose da Silva Guimarez, natural de Cuiaba. Pp. 297 — 317 
of: Bevista Trimensal do Instituto do Rio de Janeiro, Tomo VI. JUo de Janeiro, 
1844, 8vo. 

ARAUCANS. 

p. Gabriel de la Vega, Arte, Gramatica^ Vocabulario i retas a la Lengua de 
Chile. Mentioned in Barcia's edition of Pinelo, but not known to be printed. 



ARRAPAHOES. 

[There is no eridence that Dr. Latham " collated" Mackenzie's Vocabulary. In 
Varieties of Man," p. 344, he only copies Prichard (VoL V, p. 414) in calling 
the tribe Ahnenin ; whereas Gallatin (American Ethnological Society's Transac- 
tions, Vol. II, cvi) calls it Atsina. Which is right ? 

Reise des Prinzen Maxikhjan zu Wied, Vol. II, pp. 499, 500. — ^W. W. T J 



Ci 



ARRAWAKS. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und yigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerab, 
p. 71.— W. W. T.] 

ATHAPASCANS. 

[Buschmann's Athapaskischer Sprachstamm contains abo an exhibition of the 
pronominal prefixes, pp. 168— 170.--W. W. T.] 

Ueber die Volker und Sprachen Neu-Mexico's mid der Westseite des Britischen 
Nord Amerika's. Mit einer sjstematischen Worttafel des Athapaskischen Sprach- 
stammes. (Paper by J. C. E. Buschmann, read before the Berlin Academy, 
January 22, 1857.) 

ATNAS. 

[Reference is erroneously omitted to the larg^ Vocabulary in Bab und 
Helmsbssk (97 words, by Von Wrangell), in the Table to p. 259.— W. W. T.] 



212 ATNAII8 — HODKGA. 



ATNAIIS, OK Chin Indians. 

[The tomi " Xinn,'* ivtaiiied from Jiil^, is* pimply a Gtriman translation of the 
EiiglLMli word chin. Tlu*«.» ikx)[)1o an* callfd by Ma(*kcnzie "Chin Indiana,'* 
apiMrently on acc^ount of the projivtion of tho lower part of the fiM)e, caused by 
flattening the forehead. 

II. Hale, Kthnography and Pliilologj^- of the United Statea Exploring Expedi- 
tion, Vocab. E. pj). 570— (529. (Words.) 

11. Halk, Ethnograpliy, etc., p. 536. (Grammar.)— W. W. T.] 

Numerals 1 to 10 in " Tableau eomparatif dcs Noms de Nombre," Vol. II, p. 
401, of : DuFLOT DE MoFRAS, Exploration duTerritoire del'Or^gon des Califomies et 
dc la Mer vermeille, exfeout^ pendant les ann^ 1840-42, 2 vols. Parity 1844, 8to. 



AYMARA. 

Diego de Oualdo, Arte de la Lengua Aymara, con una silva de sua frases i su 
declaracion. ChicuUu, 1612, 8vo. (Printed, according to Barcia'Pinelo.) 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinarc und yigesimale Zahhnethode. On the numerals, pp. 
73, 74.-W.W.T.] 

BATEMDAKAIEE. 

[The Balemdakaiee, ChoweshaJc, Kulanapo, and Ytikai of GUbbs are identical 
with the " Severnovskia,'* or Chvachamayu^ of the Eussians, as appears from a com- 
parison of the Yocabularies. These are all but different names for the same tribe, 
or of subdiyisions of the same tribe. — W. W. T.] 



BLACKFEET. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und yigesimale Zahhnethode. On the numerals, p. 68. 
-^W, W. T.] 

Blackfoot Vocabulary, pp. 348 — 352 of : Die Indianer Nord Amerika's und die 
wahrend eines achtjahrigen Aufenthalts unter den wildesten ihrer Stamme eriebten 
Abentheuer und Schicksale, yon G-. Catlin. Nach der fiinften engUschen Ausgabe 
deutsch herausgegeben yon Dr. Heinrich Berghaus. Mit 24 yom Verfesser nach 
der Natui' entworfenen GemSlden. Zweite Ausgabe. Brussels Muquardt, 1851, 
8vo, pp. 382. 

BODEGA. 

[The Bodegan or Olamentke Indians of the Kussians (p. 20) are the same as the 
Tchokoymn of Gl^ibbs (p. 184] and the San Mafael Indians of Hale. The Talatvi 



BRAZILIAN. 213 

of Hale (p. 180) and the Tuolumne tribes of Johnson (see **Califomian8," p. 27) 
are aUied to them, at least in language. 

H. Hale, Ethnography and Philology of the United States Exploring Expe- 
dition. San Raphael Yooab. No. 15, pp. 570-629.— W. W. T.] 



BRAZILIAN. 

Dietionarium Linguse Bradilicse, auctore Emm. Veiga, Lusitan. Cum Gram- 
matica et Cateehismo. 4to. (Communicated by L. L^n de Eosny.) 

Memoria sobre a neeessidades do Estudo e Ensino das Linguas indigenas do 
Brasil, por Francisco Adolfo de Vamhagen. Pp. 53 — 63 of: Revista Tfimensal do 
Rio de Janeiro, Tomo III, 1841, 8vo. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
3, 4, 7—10, 73 ; on names of the fingers, pp. 302 -304.— W. W. T.] 

Diceionario da Lingua geral dos Indios do Brasil, reimpresso e augmentado com 
diversos vocabularios, e ofierecido a Sua Magestade Imperial por Joao Joaquini da 
Silra Guimaraes, Natural da Bahia. Bahia, Typ. de CamiUo de Lellis Masson & Ca., 
Rua de Santa Barbara, n. 2, 1854, 8to, pp. ri, 60, ii, 36. 

The contents of this volume are : 
Diceionario anonymo da Lingua de Na^ao Guarani, pp. 1 - 60. 
Addenda, pp. i, ii: 

Vocabulario da Lingua principal dos Indios do Para, do qual usao differentes 
tribus da mesma provincia, pp. 1 — 7. 

Vocabulario da Na9ao Botocuda, pp. 8 — 12. 
Vocabulario da Na^ao Camacam Civilisada, pp. 12 — 14. 
Vocabulario da Na9ao Camacam Mongoyos, pp. 14—16. 
Vocabulario da Na^jao Maconi, pp. 16 — 18. 
Vocabulario da Na^ao Malah, pp. 18 — 20. 
Vocabulario da Na^ao Patach6, pp. 20, 21. 
Vocabulario da Nac^ao TupinambSi, pp. 22. 23. 
Vocabulario da Na^ao dos Tamoyos, p. 23. 
Vocabulario da Na^ao Tupiniquins, p. 23. 
Vocabulario da Tribu Jupur6ca, pp. 24, 25. 
Vocabulario da Tribu Quat6, p. 25. 
Vocabulario da Tribu Machakalis, pp. 26, 27. 
Vocabulario da Tribu Mandacaru', p. 27. 
Vocabulario da Tribu Mucury, p. 28. 

Vocabularios de differentes Tribus, p. 29. 

Itapucuru', Puris, 

Macamecrom, Tabayara, 

Molopaque, Tunbira, 

Nheengaibas, Xumanas. 



21 I CAIIITA — <:ALIP()UNIAN LANGUAGES. 

V(X-abiilario dos IikIkm (las AIiIi'hh (lt» S. l\>ilra c Alim*ida, |ip. 30, 31. 

DialiHiori do Suo VvdrVy pp. :U, 32. 

Dialii-toH do Aliiioida, p. 33. 

Notiu* para t*«»lanvinu»iit08, j)]). 31, 35. 

Indt'x, p. 3(i. 

On ])ago 3i tlio following ourioiw noto occurs : " iU idiomas das tribus Baoebas, 
c rniqucnas tciii alf^uiiH iioines Ilcbrcos, anno jwr exoinplo—Joa— Jacob — Jaoobi 
— Tome— Toiiutpii — Davidii— Joanau— Mariand. O que indica quo os seua poTOS 
lui aiitigui(la<U' tivcrao coniiiumica^'ao (H)in o» Ilobreos." — Credat Judsua ! 



CAHITA 

[Maiuinl para adniini^trar d los Indios del idioma Cahita los santos SacrameDtos. 
.... C-oiiipiicHto ])or un Saecrdotc do la Compania de Jests, Missionfiro en las de 
la I'roviiu'ia dc Zynaloa. Mexico, 1741, 16mo, pp. 168. (A portion is in Spaniali 
and Cahita, YCiy useful for stud^^ing the construction of tlie language.) — ^W. W. T.J 

Die Ijautvcrandcrung aztckischcr WSrter in den sonorischen Sprachen und die 
sonorischc Endung A M E dargcstellt von Joii. Carl Ed. BuscHiffAifN. Aus den 
Abhandlungcn der K&nigl. Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, aus dem Jahie 
1856. Berlin, 1857, 4to, pp. 118. 



CAIllNOS. 

Franc, de la Puente, Catechismo de la Doctrina Christiana en el Idioma de los 
Indios Cairnos. Publ. por el Fr. Mateo Anguiano, Capuch., 1703, 4to. Mentioned 
in Barcia's edition of Pinelo. 



californian languages. 

Pliilologie; Diversity des Langues (in California and Oregon). Chap. XIII, 
pp. 386—402 of : Duflot de Mofras, Exploration du Territoire de T Oregon, des 
Califomies et de la Mer vermeille. Paris, Bertrand, 1844. 

M. DE Mofras gives, on pp. 391 — 396 of Vol. II, translations of the Lord's 
Prayer in the following languages, viz. : G-mluco, Mission S. Francisco Solano ; 
Choconjen, Bay del Sacramento; Jonkiousm^, Mission S. Bafael; Yall^ de 
Tulares ; Mission S. Clara ; Tatch^ or T^lami, Mission S. Antonio de Padua ; 
Mission S. Ines ; Mission S. Fernando ; Mission S. Julien ; Mission S. Juan 
Capistrano ; Mission S. Luys Eey de Francia ; Mission S. Diego ; Mission S. 
Francisco de Borgia ; Mission S. G-ertrudis ; Mission S. Ignacio de Loyola. 

Numerals 1 — 10 (Missions del Cannelo, La Soledad, San Luiz, San Juan, 
Pima, San Gktbriel, Indiens Azt^ucs), in the Tableau coraparatif des Noms de 



CAMACANS — CHEPEWYAN. 215 

Nombre. Vol. II, p. 401, of: Duplot de Mofkas, Exploration du Territoire de 
r Oregon des Californies et de la Mer vermeille, ex^ut«e pendant les ann^ 
1840-42. 2 vols. Parit, 8vo. 



CAMACANS. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zilhlmethode. On the numerals, p. 72. 
— W. W. T.] 

CANADA. 

The correct title of Ledesme's work is : Doctrine Chrestienne du P. Ledesma, 
tie la Comp. de Jesus ; traduite en langue Ganadienne par un P^re de la m^me 
Compagnie (le P^re Brebopuf). JRonen, Kichard, 1630, pp. 28, 8vo. Reprinted in 
Chaplain's Voyage in 1632. 

[The nun\erals 1 — 10 are given in Rtjdigeb, Grundriss einer Gfeschichte der 
menschlichen Sprache. Thl. I, p. 123 {Leipzig, 1782) ; and in A. F. Pott, Die 
quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode, p. 65. — W. W. T.] 



CARIBS. 

[The numerals of Essequibo {ibrom. Van Hettvkl) are given by M. Gkllatin, in 
Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. I, Table to p. 114. 

A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
69-71.— W. W.T.J 

CAYXJBABAS. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the mmierals, 
p, 74.— W. W. T.] 

CHEPEWYAN. 

[The first two sentences of what is said under this head apply, not to the 
ChepewyanSy but to the Ckippewajfs, The former, so far from being a courtly 
language, is one of the rudest and ^ most uncouth that is spoken on the continent. 
The blunder was probably introduced by Jiilg (see Carver, CThap. XVII), as Vater 
well knew the difference between the two languages (Mithridates, VoL III, 
part 3, p. 419). 

The last sentence also is not quite correct. It was not a " theory" of Gbllatin*s 
that the Chepewyan belongs to the Athapascan family of languages. He gave the 
name of Aihapasccts to the tribes who speak the class of languages at the head of 
'which stands the Chepewyan, from Athapasca Lake, which stands in the middle 
of their territory" (Archeeologia Americana, Vol. II, p. 17). 



21(i 1 IIKIUI.IS— CIIIAFANKCAS. 

I would tlicri'forp pro|>ofl4* to Hultfititiito tho following headiiifT: — 
"'J1ic Clu*)N»wvaiiii Ix'Ioiig to the i»t(N*k to wliioh M. QalUtin has given the 
<-<ttniiion naiin^ of Athnpamsiint. 'V\w\ call tluniiselves Sah'ifgttA-diHMe (Rising- 
}«iin IV'oplc), HI 1(1 extend from HiidKon'n Hay on the cast, between the Eakimoe 
on the nortli and the AltfonLin<i mi the Kinith, to I^ke Athapasca on the west." 
- W. \V. T. ' 



CIIEJIALIS, SELISIT. 

Voi'ahulan- of, in : The North- went Coast ; or, Three Years at Shoal-Water Bay. 
(*ontaininf7 Personal Adviiitiiren, a JKnk'ription of the Coast from Columbia Itiyer to 
the Straits of Kuea, and an Atvount of Indian CHistoms, Superstitions, Music, etc., 
an<l of the Vocabularies of the Cliehalis and Cliinook Languages, and of the 
".Far^on" of the North-west. With a general Description of Washington Ter- 
ritory', and Advi(V to KmiirrHiitK. Map and Illustrations, 12nio. New Yarky 1857. 



CJnilROKEE. 

ITttd'la-ffl Tsu'le-hi-m-u-hi^ Cherokee Plioenix. Edited by EUAS Boudinot. 
Printed weekly by Isaac 11. Karris, for the Clierokee Nation. New Eckota^ VoL I, 
No. 1, Feb. 21, 1828, to Vol. V, No. 52, May 31, 1834 ; foUo. (Stopped then, to 
collect funds ; ijcrhaps not resinned.) 

Besides a great number of public documents, passages from Scripture, hymns, and 
other pieces in the Cherokee language and character, it contains the following : — 

On the Cherokee Alpliabet, Vol. I, No. 1 . 

On the Cherokee Numerals, Vol. I, No. 2. 

Questions on the Language, by C. S. Rafinesqu?, Vol. I, No. 22. 

Answers to Prof. Rafinesque's Questions, by W. [Rev. S. A. Worcester], Vol. I, 
No8. 23, 25, 27. 

Long Words. By the same. Vol. II, No. 1. 

Inflections of Cherokee verbs : hi-tie-ga^ I speak, by Gawolihoski, Vol. II, 
Nos. 33, 34, 35 ; (fa-lii-i-ha, I «m tying, by the Rev. S. A. Worcester, Vol. II, 
Nos. 37, 41. 

Cherokee Advocate. PubUshed [weekly] at Tahlequah^ Cherokee Nation. Vol. I, 
No. 1, Sept. 26, 1841., to Vol. IX, No, 22, Dec. 28, 1853 j foho. The first editor 
was W. P. Ros3, (The pubKcation may have continued longer, but No. 22 of 
Vol. IX is the last of the copy in Mr. Peter Force's library, Washington.) 

This newspaper, like the precedhig, contains a great many papers in the 
Cherokee language, which would be extremely valuable to the student of the 
language.— W. W. T.] 



CHIAPANECAS. 

Eb. Domingo dr Lava, Obispo, Vocabulario de la Lengua de Chiapa. Men- 
tioned in Bareia's edition of Pinelo, but not known to be printed. 



CHINVK CHIPPEWAY. 217 



CHINUK. 

Numerals 1 —10 in the Tableau comparatif des Noma de Nombre. Vol. II, 
p. 101, of: DuFLOT DE MoFRAS, Exploration du Territoire de 1' Oregon, des 
Califomies et de la Mer vermeille, ex^ut^e pendant les annees 18-10-42. Paris, 
lau, 2 Tols., 8vo. 

[Lieut. G. F. Emmons gives a brief Klatsop Vocabulary in : Schoolcraft's Hist., 
etc., of Indian Tribes of the United States, Vol. Ill, pp. 223, 224. 

The following items are to be added to those on the " Jargon," which should 
have been put by themselves : — 

Vocabulary of the Jargon or Trade Language of Oregon [English-French Jargon]. 
Washington, 1853, 8vo, pp. 22. (Printed by the Smithsonian Institution for private 
distribution.) 

A Complete Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon [English-Chinook and Chinook- 
English] ; to which is added niunerous Conversations, thereby enabling any person 
to speak the Chinook correctly. 3rd edit. Portland, O, T., published by S. J. 
McConnick, 1856, 24mo, pp. 24. - W. W. T.] 

A Vocabulary of, in : Tlie North-west Coast j or. Three Years at Shoal-TVater 
Bay. Containing Personal Adventures, a description of the Coast firom Columbia 
River to the Straits of Fuca, and an account of Indian Customs, Superstitions, 
Music, etc., and of the Vocabularies of the Chehalis and Chinook Languages, and 
of the " Jargon" of the North-west. With a general Description of Washington 
Territory, and Advice to Emigrants. Map and Illustrations, 12mo. Xetc York, 1857. 



CHIPPEWAY. 

[Etaxs, James, The Speller and Intcspreter in Indian and English, for the use of 
the Mission Schools. In the Odjibwa tongue. Xetc Tort, 1831, 12mo. 

H. R. Schoolcraft, Summary Narrative of an Exploratory Expedition to the 
Soiux'ee of the Mississippi River in 1820 ; resumed and completed by the Discover^' 
of it« Origin in Itasca Lake, in 1832, etc. Philadelphia, Lippincott, Grambo, and 
Co^ 1855, 8vo, pp. 596. 

This work contains " Examination of the Elementary Structure of the 
Algonquin Language, as it appears in the Chippeway Tongue," pp. 442—447 ; 
and also the four Lectures previously published in the " Expedition to Itasca 
Lake" and "Oneota," pp. 453—515. 

The Rev. G. A. Belcoukt has composed an elaborate " Dictionnaire Fran^ais- 
Sauteux," which will probably be published bv the Smithsonian Institution. — 
W. W. T.] 

A Vocabulary of Chippeway Words, in H. W. Longfellow's Song of Hiawatha. 
Boston, 1855, 8vo, 



218 CIIIRIOUANA — COMANCHE. 



CIIIllIGUANA (GUARANI). 

P. Diego Samamego, VoonlMilario de la Ixm^nia Chiriguana. Mentioned in 
Jinn-ia'8 edition of Pinolo, but not knovni to he printed. 



CllOCHA. 

Dramas allegorieos en Lengiia Giocha, by the Fray Mabtin Acsveredo, native 
of San lldofonso, in the provincv of Oaxaea, Mexico. He left his MSS. in the con- 
vent of Ouxaea (De Souza). 

CHOCTAW. 

[Tliero arc some remarks on the language by James HArGHTON, in the 
Massachusetts Historical Gollei^tion, Vol. IX, first series, pp. 95 — 97. 

The Rev. Ci'iirs Bten'GTOn wrote, many years ago, a Qrammar of the Choctaw 
Language, which he is now engaged in revising for publication. — W. W. T.] 



COCAMAS. 

(? SOUTH AMERICA-GRAN CHACO.) 

P. Ratmuitdg de S^' Cbuz, Yocabulario de la Lengua de los Indios Cocamas. 
Mentioned in Barcia's edition of Pinelo, but not known to be printed. 

COCHIMI. 

[F. S. Clavigero, Storia deUa CaUfomia. Venizia, 1789, 2 vols., 8vo. Gram- 
matical Notices, Vol. I, pp. 110, 264.— W. W. T.] 

COCO-MARICOPAS. 

[That this might be an Apache people was a conjecture of M. Ghdlatin^s, from 
their word for " man" (Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. II, 
p. xcii) ; but now that we have Apache vocabularies, the Coco-Maricopa language 
is seen to belong to an entirely different stock. — "VV. W. T.] 

COMANCHE. 

Names of Comanche Chiefs and Niunerals (1—20), pp. 273, 274 of "Wiff. 
Bollaert's Observations on the Indian Tribes in Texas," in Vol. II of : The 
Journal of the London Ethnological Society. London, 1850, 8vo. 



CORA — DAKOTA. 219 



CORA. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und yigedmale ZlQilmetliode. On the numerals, pp. 
89, 90. -W. W. T.] 

Die Lautreriinderung aitekischer Worter in den sonorischen Sprachen und die 
sonorische £ndung A M E dargestdlt Ton JoH. Cabl Ed. Buschhahtt. Aus 
den Abhandlungen der KdnigL Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin aus dem 
Jahre 1856. Berlin^ 1857, 4to, pp. 118. 

CREOLE, NEGRO-ENGLISH. 

[K. SouTHEY gives a sketeh of the language in an article on the Ncgro-English 
New Testament : Quarterly Review, VoL XLIII. London^ 1830, pp. 553 — 564. 
— W. W. T.] 

CUMANAS. 

The correct title of Yangues* work is : Principios y Beglas de la Lengua Cum- 
managota general en varias naciones que habitan en la provincia de Cummana en las 
Indias Occidentales, con im Diccionario. By Man. de Yangues. Bmrgos, 1683, 4to. 

CUNACUNA. 

[A. F. Pott, Die qtiinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. Numerals 1 — 10i| from 
Balbi, p. 72.— W. W. T.] 

DAKOTA. 

[P. Du PoycEAF, Comparative Table of the Sioux or Nadowessie Stock, com- 
prehending the Winnebago. In Note 16 to Edwards's Mohegan Grammar. (Mass. 
Hist^ Collections, Vol. X, second series, p. 151.) 

II. C. Qabelektz, Q-rammatik der Dakota Sprache. Leipzig^ 1852, 8vo, pp. 64. ' 

P. HuNPALTi, A Dakota nyelv. Kiilon lenyomat a m. acad. ertesitobdL (The 
Dakota Language, extracted from the Bulletins of the Hungarian Academy.) Pesth^ 
1856, 8vo, pp. 55. 

Dakota TawaxHku Kin^ or The Dakota Friend, published [monthly] by the 
Dakota Mission. Q-. H. PoT), editor. St, Paul, Minnesofa^ Vol. I, Nos. 1—12, 
Nov. 1850 to Oct. 1851, 4to. Vol. H, Nos. 1—8, Jan. 1852 to Aug. 1852, fol. 
(The pubUcation was suspended at this point, on account of Indian troubles.) 

The Dakota Friend contains many articles in the Dakota language, besides 
specimens of the language in short sentences, with interlinear English transla- 
tions, etc. 

A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Z&hlmethode. On the nimierals, pp. 
67, 68.— W. W. T.] 



220 DAKIEN ESKIMOei. 



DAEIEN. 

• A. F. Pdtt, Die quinarc luid vigosimalc Zahlnietliode. On the iiumcralfl, p. 72. 
— W. W. T.J 

DELAWARE. 

Ad Losskiel, p. 64. Tlie Q^rraan original was published at Barbi/yl7S9, 8vo. 
Delaware and Iroquois words, pp. 21), 30. 

Six Delaware words, on page 125 of " General Parsons' Discoveries made in the 
Western Country." Article XI (pp. 119 — 127) of: Memoirs of the Amencau 
Academy of Arts and Sciences, Vol. II, Part 1. Boston, 1793, 4to. 



DIEGENOS. 

[This name means the Indians of Sati DiegOy so that tliere is no such name as 
Deguinos, Their language belongs to what I liave termed the Yuma tongue, 
dialects of which are spoken by various tribes on the Rio Colorado and Gila, e. g., 
the Mohave, Cuchan, and Coco- Maricopa. All the vocabularies (except the Diego 
itself) here enumerated by Dr. Ludewig belong to different other stocks. 

Dr. Buschmann's paper on the Kizh and Netela has been published separately 
under the following title: Die Sprachen Kizh und Netela von Neu Califomien, 
dargestellt von Joh. Carl Ed. Buschmann (aus den Abhandl. d. Konigl. Akad. d. 
Wissenschaften zu Berlin, 1855). Berlin, 1856, pp. 31, 4t'o.— W. W. T.] 



ESKELEN. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
63, 64.— W. W. T.] 

ESKIMOS. 

Schediasma hocce etymologico-philologicum prodromum Americano Gronlandicum 
in patronis appropriatum insinnat T warns Abel. Havnice, 1783, 4to. 

Vocabulary of the English, Danish, and Esquimaux Languages. Pp. 61 — 89 of: 
Appendix to the Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-West Passage, 
aiid of a Residence in the Arctic Regions during the Years 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 
1833. By Sir John Ross, C.B., K.S.A., K.C.S., etc.. Captain in the Royal Navy. 
Including the Reports of Commander, now Captain, James Clark Ross, R.N., 
F.R.S., F.L.S., etc. ; and the Discovery of the Northern Magnetic Pole. London, 
Webster, 1835, 4to, pp. xii, 120, cxliv, cii. 20 plates. 

Dialogues in the English, Danish, and Esquimaux Languages. Pp. 91 — 104 of: 
Appendix to the Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-West Passage, 



ETCHEMINS GORGOTOQUIEXSES. 221 

and of a Resklenee in the Arctic Regions during the Years 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 
1833. By Sir Jolm Ross, C.B., K.S.A., K.C.S., etc., Captain in the Royal Navy. 
Including the Reports of Commander, now Captain, James Clark Ross, R.N., 
F.R.S., F.L.S., etc. ; and the Discovery of the Northern Magnetic Pole. London, 
Webster, 1835, -Ito, pp. xii, 120, cxUt, cii. 20 plates. 

Remarks on the Eskimo Language, in the article " Eskimo," by Hussleb, Ersch 
und Gruber's Encyclopsedie, 1 Sect., Band 38, pp. 108—132. 

Verzeichniss der in Labrador befindlichen Landsaugethiere, Wasservogel, etc., in : 
Miinchner Qelehrte Anzeigen, 18-14!, Xos. 52, 53 (with the names in the Eskimo 
language). 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Z&hlmethode. On the numerals, 
pp. 2, 3.— W. W. T.] 

Greenland Numerals (I— 10, 16—30), pp. 208, 209, of P. C. Southeblant), on 
the Esquimaux, in Vol. IV of the Journal of the London Ethnological Society. 
London, 1854, 8vo. 

" Die Sprache der Eskimos auf Gronland," article by W. Schott, in : Magazin 
fur die Literatur des Auslands. Berlin^ 185(>, Nos. 38, 39. 



ETCHEMINS. 

[Fbed. Kiddeb, Vocabularj' of the Openango or Passamaquoddy Language, in 
Schoolcraft's History, Condition, etc., of Indian Tribes, Vol. V, p. 690. — W. W. T.] 



FLATHEADS. 

[J. HowsE, Vocabularies of certain North American Languages, in : Proceedings 
of Philological Society, Vol. IV. London, 1850, pp. 199— 206.— W. W. T.] 



POX ISLANDS. 

[Here, too, should be inserted the title of Sauer's work (see under " Aleutans,'' 
p. 4), as Billings's vocabidair was taken in Sitliauak, and corrected in Vnalashka, 
both of which belong to the Fox Islands. — W. W. T.] 



GE, GEIKO. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und ^-igesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, p. 73. 
— W. W. T.] 

GORGOTOQUIEXSES. 

p. Gaspab Rnz, Aleman, Gramatica de la Lengua Gorgotoquiense en el Peru. 
Mentioned hi Barcia's edition of Pinelo, but not known to be printed. 



222 OUAKANI UUA8TECA. 



GUARANI. 

P. AsT. Rurz DB MoNTOYA, L*Arte, Uocabulario, Caiocismo y Teeoro de la 
Lenfifiia Giiarani do la rrovinoia tli>l Paraguay y Bio do la Plata. Mctdrid^ 1639. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quiiiaro und vigesimaleZulilniethode. Ou the numerals, pp. 6, 
7, 60, 61, 301 J on the pronouiw, p. 109, no/tf.—W. W. T.] 

GUARAPUAVA. 

A district in Brazil^ inhabited by the Cames^ Votoroes, Dorins^ 
and Xocrens. The idiom used by these Indians is probably 
Guarani. 

Words and Qrammatic^ Notices, pp. 53, 54 of : Memoria sobre o Descobrimento 
e Colonia de Guarapuava. Escripta pdo Padre Francisco dob Chagas Lima. Pp. 
43 — 6t of: Revista Trimcnsal, etc., Tomo IV. Mio de Janeiro^ 1842. 

GUATUSOS. 

" Les Indians Guatusos du Nicaragua, par E. G, Squier," in : Athenscum Fran- 
^ais, 22 Dec., 1855 ; and also in : Nouvelles Annales des Voyages. 

GUAYCURU. 

A few words on p. 31 of : Historia dos Indies Cayalleiros, ou da Na^ao Guaycuru. 
Escripta no real presidio de Coimbra, por Francisco Bodrigitrs do Prade. Pp. 
21 — 47 of : Bcvista Trimensal do Instituto do Bio de Janeiro, Tomo I. Sio de 
Janeiro, 1839. 

GUYANA. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare imd vigesimale Zalilmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
69-71.— W. W. T.] 

HAIDAH. 

Numerals 1 to 10, in the Tableau comparatif des Noms de Nombre. Vol. II, p. 
401, of: DuFLOT DE MoFRAS, Exploration duTerritoire de 1' Oregon, des Califomies 
et de la Mer vermeille, executee pendant les annees 1840-42. Paris, 2 vols., 1844, 
8vo. 

HUASTECA. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und yigesimalo Zahlmethode. On the numerals, p. 
92 J ou the names of the fingers, p. 301.— W. W. T.] 



HITDSON's bay INKVLUCHLUATS. 223 



HUDSON'S BAY. 

[The t«Tn " Hudson's Bay Indians " is, properly, only another name for Chepe- 
¥nrans. Tlie Toeabulary of Chappell therefore, which is Cree, or Knisteneaux, does 
not belong here. — ^W. W. T.] 



HURONS, WTANDOTS. 

Six "Wyandot Words, on p. 125 of " Gkneral Parsons* DiscoTcries made in the 
Western Country." Art. XI (pp. 119 — 127) of: Memoirs of the American Academy 
of Arts and Sciences, ToL 11, Part 1. Boston, 1793. 

[A MS. Wyandot Qrannnar of 213 pages, small 4to, is in the possession of Prof. 
J. W. aibbs, of Yale College.— W. W. T.] 

A conununity of Indians of the Huron- Iroquois fimiily (the same with the " Fiye 
Nations" and '* Six Nations"), living at Caughnawaga on the St. Lawrence, nearly 
opposite Lachine, and a iew miles above MontreaL 

The settlement dates back to the year 1680, when Louis XT made a grant of it 
to these Indians. They are advanced in oivihzation, and, from their staunch 
loyalty and good services in the troublous year 1837, are in good &vour with the 
British power. 

A Vocabulary, consisting of the numerals to above 100, and upwards of forty 
of the commonest words and brief sentences, is in the possession of Thomas H. 
Gladstone, Stockwell, near London, collected by him in July, 1856. 



INKULUCHLUATS. 

[These belong not to the ** Eskimo," but to the Kenai stock, as is correctly stated 
by Jiilg. Dele the heading " Kan^ulif" the dialects of which class (spoken by the 
Tshnagmjuts and by the Kwichpaks and Kuskokwimjuts, see p. 98) are of the 
Eskimo fiunily. 

Lieutenant Zagoskin's Inkilik and Inkalit-jugelnut Vocabularies are printed in 
the following works : — 

I. 2!apiski Busskago Geographitsheskago Obshtshestva (Memoirs of the 
Russian Geographical Society), Vol. IT. St, Petersburg, 1847, 8vo (I cannot 
give the page of the 1st edition) ; 2nd edition, St, Petersburg, 1849, pp. 246— 
249. 

II. Denksohnften der Bussischen Gkographischen Gesellschaft zu St. Peters* 
burg, VoL I (German translation of the above, containing Vob. I and II of 
the original). Weimar, 1849, 8vo, pp. 354—358. 

m. A. Erman, Archiv fur WissenschafUiche Kunde von Bussland, VoL 
Vn. Bertin, 1849, 8vo (from the Russian, by W. Schott), pp. 481—487. 

rV. J. C. E. Buschmann, Der Athapaskischo Sprachstamm. Berlin, 1856, 
4to, pp. 269-^12.— W. W. T.] 



'2'2 I IK(H(r<»IH — KADJAK. 



TllOQl.'OTS. 

\'l I.niki.'I, |t. S7. Til" <KTi»nii oriiniml was publUhod at Barbif^ 1789, 8vo. 
Di'hiwan' mill InNiuoU wi>nN» n|). 2!», :W». 



[OWAY. 

\ \V. II \MiLToN iiiid S. M. litviN, All Kloiiinitan' Book of the loway Language, 
with till Kml;U>1i tnni!<latu>!i. ItHraif a Hit Sac Mtjucioii Prcxs, Indian Territorr, 1843. 

Till' tiilo of till* (IniiiiiiKir bv tlicm* ^Mitlt'imni nlioiild read as follows : — 

\V. II V MILTON and S. M. luviN, An loway Onuiimar, illustrating the Principles 

(if tilt' Liiiii^ua^i' nsitl hv the lowav, < )tni>, and Missouri Indians. lotoay and Sac 

Mission Prtss^ ISIS, Kiino, pp. 152.— \V. \V. T.] 



KACHIQUEL. 

Till* f<)llo\viii<^ tliri'4' art' inwitioncd in Baroia's edition of Pinelo, but not known 
to Ik' priiiti'd : — 

Fit. DoM ixcjo UE Vico, Doniinicano, Vocabularios i Arte de la Lengua Oachiquel 
i (It* la Vera Paz i de otras 8eis. 

Fu. Benito de Villacanas, Dominieano, Arte i Yocabulario de la Lengua Cachi- 
(juel (mentioned likewise by Clavigero). 

Fk. Alonso de Betancur, Arte i Yocabulario del Idioma de Q-uatemala 
(Quicli6?). 

PniLipprs Ruiz del Corral, Arte y Yocabulario de la Lengua de los Indios de 
Guatemala, Uamada Cachiquel (communicated by L. Leon de Rosny). 

Numerals, in : Nouvelles Annales des Yoyages, Yol. lY (1840), pp. 8 — 36. 



KADJAK. 

[The reference should not haye been omitted to the longer Yocabulary in Bar and 
Helmersen's Bcitrage (97 words, by Yon Wrangell), in the table to p. 259 of Yol. I. 

The title of Yenjaminov's work should read : — 

Ivan Yenjaminot, Zamjetshania o Koloshenskom u Kadjakskom jAzykakh. 
St. Peterahtirgy 1846, 8vo. 

Zagoskin's Kadjak Yocabulary (made up &om those of Billings and Lisiansky) 
is printed also in the Memoirs of the Russian Geographical Society (Russian), 2nd 
edition, Yol. II, pp. 250—266 j and in the German translation, Yol. I, pp. 359 — 
374. 

A. F. Pott, Die quinare und yigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, ji. 61. — 
W. W. T.] 



KAR ITIS — KONZA. 225 



KARITIS. 

Fr. Bernabdo Manetense, Capuch., Catechismo para los Karitis, Indios de 
Brasil j en Portugues i Indio. 1709, 8vo. Printed, according to Barcia-Pinela 

KINAI. 

[That Zagoskin speaks of four dialects of this language is probably a mistake. 
At all events, he gives Vocabularies only of two, the IttkUiJc and InkaUt-JvgelnuL 
These were first printed in the Memoirs of the Russian Geographical Society, VoL 
II. St. Petersburg, 1847 (2nd edition, pp. 246 -249).— W. W. T.] 

Ueber die Yerwandschaft der Kinai Idiome des Eussischen Nordamerika's mit 
dem grossen athapaskischen Sprachstamme. Paper by J. C. E. Buschmann, read 
before the Berlin Academy on May 18, 1854 (extract in the Monatsbericht der 
K. Preuss. Akademie der Wisseuschaften, Mai, 1854, pp. 231 — 236). 



KIRIKI. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the mmierals, p. 
72.— W. W. T] 

KNISTENOS. 

[Edw. Chappell, Narrative of a Voyage to Hudson's Bay in H.M.S. " Bosa- 
mond ;" containing some Accovmt of the North-eastern Coast of America, and of 
the Tribes inhabiting that remote Begion. London^ J. Mawman, 1817, 8vo, pp. 
256—279. 

Say's Vocabularies, appended to Long's Expedition, do not comprise the Knis- 
teno. The Vocabulary appended by Pickering to Edwards's Mohegan Grammar is 
made up fix>m Harmon and Mackenzie. — W. "\V. T.] 



KOLOSHES. 

[J. C. E. BuscHMANN, Die Pima Sprache vmd die Sprachen der Koloschen (from 
Abhandlungen der Konigl. Akad. der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, 1856, pp. 321 — 
432). Berlin, 1857, 4to. Contains a variety of observations on the language and 
its affinities, pp. 380—389, and a comparative table of alphabets, T*-ith an index to 
the same, pp. 398—427. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the niunerals, pp. 
62, 63.— W. W. T.] 

KONZA. 

A. F. Pott, Die quinare imd vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, p. 
67.— W. W. T.] 

Q u 



'2'm KISKOKWIMJUTS — M\YA. 



KUSKOKWIMJUTS. 

[Zatjortkin'ii Tshnatfrnjut and AV/^Ayw^-- A'wAf^*o|-/r/w/M/ Vocabularies are printed 
aNo in tilt* MtMnoirH of the KuHsian CUH)fn*aphu>al Sooioty (BuBsian), Vol. II, 2nd 
ociitii>n, J)]). 250— 2G(), and in thr (Ifrnian translation, Vol. I, pp.359 — 374. — 
\V. W. T.] 

KUTCIIIN. 

[J. A. TsnKSTKK, A hIioH Vocabulan- of the Loucheux Language, in : Proceed- 
ng« of till' IMiilologiail Stwiety, Vol. IV. London, 1850, p. 185. 

Also in : R. G. Latiiam'8 Natural Historj- of the Varieties of Man. London^ 
1850, 8vo, pp. 297, 298.— AV. \V. T.l 



I 



LIPANS, LAPANAS. 

Indians of Texas, belonging to the Apache stock. They hunt 
over the country between the Guadalupe and the Rio Grande. 

A few Lipan Words, p. 278 of: Wm. Bollaert's Observations on the Indian 
Tribes in Textis, in Vol. IT of the Journal of the London Ethnological Society. 
London, 1850, 8vo. 



MAHA, OMAHA. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimalc Zahlmethode. On the numerals, p. 
67.-W. W. T.] 

MAIPURES. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigeshnale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
14, 15.— W.W. T.] 

MAYA. 

Fr. Alonso de la Solana Franciseano, Vocabulario muy copioso de la Lengua 
de eTucatan o Maia i Epafiola. Mentioned in Barcia's edition of Pinelo. 

Fr. Luis de Villalpando, Franciseano, Arte i Vocabulario de la Lengua de 
Yucatan. This work and the following are mentioned by both Barcia-Pinelo and 
Clavigero, but not known to be printed. 

Fr. Bernardino de Valladolid, Orbis Pictus, in Latin, Spanish, and Maia. 
" Un Tomo como al que esta pintado, los ponia su nombre Latino, Castellano i el 
que le correspondia en esta lengua de los Indios." 



MAME. 227 

Fb. Juan de Acebedo, Frftnciscano, Arte breve le la Lengua JucatLeca. Men- 
tioned by Barcia-Pinelo, but not known to be printed. 

Fb. Ainx)Nio de CniDAD Beal, Vocabulario Castellan-Jucateco i Jucateco- 
Castellan, i un Calepino en 6 Tomos cada uno de 200 pliegos. According to 
Barcia-Pinelo and Clayigero, but not known to be printed. 

G-ASPAB Aktokio, Vocabulario de la Lengua de Jucatan. 

Fb. Juan Cobonel, Franciscauo, redujo el Arte antiguo de la Lengua Jucateca 6, 
mas breredad i clardad. This and the preceding are mentioned by Barcia-Pinelo, 
but not known to be printed. 

[The American Bible Society, in New York, possesses a MS. Dictionary Maya- 
SpanishrEuglish and English'Spanish'Maya, compiled by the Bey. John Kingdon, 
who died in Monroyia, on the coast of Africa, in the year 1855 ; also a MS. trans- 
lation of !3eltran's Grammar, by the same. 

Buz, in his Pre&ce, speaks of a Grammar by J. Nabciso, of Herranz and Quiros, 
printed at Madrid in the year 1838. 

A. Gallatin treats of the numerals in : Transactions of the American Ethno- 
logical Society, VoL I, pp. 51 — 55, and Table to p. 114. 

A, F, Pott, Die quinare und yigesimale Zahlmethode, pp. 93 — 96 ; names of the 
tigers, p. 301, 

C. B. Helleb, Beisen in Mexiko. Leipzig, 1853, 8yo. Grammatical Bemarks, 
pp, 381—385 ; Numerals and a few other words, pp. 386—388 — W. W. T.] 



MAME. 

Don Felipe Buiz Cobbal, Arte i Vocabulario de la Lengua de Guatemala. 
Printed according to Nic. Antonio and Barcia-Pinelo, and called in the Mithridates 
III, 2, p. 10, " Vocabulariiun Pocomamum." L. Leon de Bosny communicates the 
same title, but designates the language as Kacchiquel. (See under.) 

Lavicos is called Larios by Barcia, and his " Arte" stated to be printed in 1607. 

An "Arte y Vocabulario de la Lengua Mam" is said to have been written by a 
" Padbe Beinoso," which was printed at Mexico in 164<4. No copies known in 
European libraries. De Souza quotes a few words firom it, viz. : — 

CM, soft. 

A, water ; ha or haa, in the Maya, Eachiquel, etc. 

MaiHct, old. 

Man, &ther. 

Yunh, woman. 

Kol, evil. 

Kih, sim ; Maya, Jcini Quiche, kir ; Kacliiquel, Jceile. 



228 MANWAX8 — MEXICAN'. 



MAKDANS. 

" Details 8ur la Nation de» Iiidieiis Maiulans, cxtraits du Voyage daiis riiiterieur 
dc rAiiitTiquo du Nord, execute iH>iulant Iw aniiees 1832, 1833, 1834, par le Priiioo 
Max. i>k Nei'wied," in : Annak>8 dei* Voyagejj, 18-41, Vol. IV, pp. 5 — 47. 

Mundan Voeabularv, pp. 3-18— 352 of: I)ie Indianer Nord America's und die 
wahriMid eini»8 achtjiihrigen Aufent halts unter den wildesten ilirer Stamme erlebten 
AlxMitheuer und Sehieksale, von (r. Catlin. Naeh der fiinftcn cnglischen Ausgabe 
deutsch herausgcgebon von Dr. lleinrieh Berghaus. Mit 24 vom Verfasser nach 
der Natur entworfenen Geniiilden. Zweitc Ausgabe. Briissely Muquardt, 1851, 
8vo, pp. 382. 

MAKAMOMISIOS. 

V. Mat^uel D£ Vega, Catecismo, Diccionario i Gramatiea de la Lengua de los 
Maramomisios, ludios del BrasiL According to Barcia-Pinelo, but not known to 
be printed. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

[The Comparative Vocabulary in Note 15 to Edwards's Mohegan Grammar was 
compiled not by " T. Say," but by the editor, Dr. J. Pickering, who derived the 
Massachusetts vocabulary from Eliot. — W. W. T.] 



MATLAZINGA. 

Fb. Andres de Casteo, Franciscan©, Vocabulario, doctrina Christiana i Sermones 
en Lengua Matlazinga. — ^Arte de aprender las Lenguas Mexicana i Matlazinga. Ac- 
cording to Barcia-Pinelo and Clavigero, but not known to be printed. 



messissaugas. 

[Here, too, the preceding (Massachusetts) remark applies. The few words of this 
language are taken from Smith Barton. — W. W. T.] 



MEXICAN. 

Ad p. 112, line 8, Molina : reprinted in 1606, 4to, according to Barcia's edition 
of Leon Pinelo, where it is also stated that Hernando de Rlbas, an Indian, assisted 
Molina in compiling his dictionary. 

Ad p. 113, line 16, Squier : and pp. 216, 217 of the German translation by 
Karl Andree. Leipzig, Lorck, 1856, 8vo. 



MEXICAN. 229 

Ad p. 113, liiie 87, Molina : reprinted ibid. 1578, 8vo, according to Barcia- 
Pinelo. 

Ad p. 115, line 8, Eai^gel : mentioned as printed in Barcia-Pinelo. 

The work of Paredes (p. 114) is, properly speaking, only an extract, not a new 
edition of the " Arte" bv Carochi. 

Tupix, Chabl. db. Arte Norissinia de Lengua Mexicana. Mexico, 1753, 4to. 

Numerals (1 — 21, 30, 800, 8000), Tabla arimetica comparada de los Mejicanos y 
Tarascos. P. 68 of : D. Benito Mabia de Moxos, cartas Mejicanas, 2^ edicion. 
Genova, Pillas, s.a. (1839), 8vo. 

Numerals 1 — 10 in the Tableau comparatif des Noms de Noml»e, Vol. II, 
p. 401, of: Dfplot de Mofras, Exploration du Territoire de 1' Oregon, des Cali- 
fomies et de la Mer vermeille^ execut6e pendant les ann6es 1840-42, 2 toIs. Pam, 
1844, 8vo. 

An article by Mr. Aubin, of Paris, '' Langue Am^icaine ; Langue, Littcrature et 
Ecriture Mexicaines," in : Encyclopklie du XIX™® Si^e, Tome XXVI, Supple- 
ment, pp. 500—507. 

An article on Aztec Picture-writing by E. Q-. Squieb, in : New York Tribune, 
Not. 24, 1852. 

Die Spuren der Aztekischen Sprache im noerdlichen Mexico, 1*® Abtheilung. 
Paper by J. C. E. Buschmai^n, read before the Berlin Academy of Sciences, 
Feb. 9. 1854. 

The same. 2^® Abtheilung. Read April 27, 1854. 

These papers are now printing, and will form a supplementary yolume to the 
Transactions of the Berlin Academy of 1854. 

Grammatische Darstellung yon yier Sprachen des nord-westlicheu Mexico's. 
Paper by J. C. E. Buschmaxn, read before the Berlin Academy, May 22, 1854. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und yigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
97, 98 J on the names of the fingers, p. 301. 

C. B. Helleb, Beisen in Mexiko. The numerals and a few other words, pp. 
385— 388.— \V. \V. T.] 

M. L. Leon de Rosnt, of Paris, announces a new edition of the Dictionary of 
Molina, preceded by a Grammar of the Mexican language, which will be published 
in 4to, under the following title : Vocabulario de la Lengua Mejicana por el P. Fr. 
Alonzo de Molina ; nueya edicion publicada segun el original impreso en Mejico, 
con una yersion francesa, i preeedido de un compendio de la gramdtica Mejicana i 
de obserraciones sobre los diferentes idiomas de Mejico, por L. L^n de Bosny. 
(Esta nueya edicion se pubUcar^ en cuarto a dos columnas, con magnificos typos y 
en papel soUdo.) 

The following works are mentioned in Barcia's edition of Pinelo, but are not 
known to be printed ; — 

Fb. Antonio Datila, Dominicauo, Arte para saber la Lengua Mexicana, reduciendo 
sur elegancias a metodo. 



230 MICMAC — MIXTECA. 

Fr. J tan HAPTifiTA, FrnnciscAno, Vocabulario t.*cck«ia0tico en Lengua Mexicaiia. 

Fk. Antonio dk U)b Kevf.:*, I)oiiiinu>ano, Ar(4; do la Lengua Mexicana, oon 
al^iiiULf ciiriosidHdct* iiiiiM)rtuiiti*H (rhrunolo^itui). 

Fk. Juan FrciiEU, Frnncimtinoy Arte do la Ixnigua Mexicana. 

I). Ki'viKNio KoMEKO, Caiioiiioo do Iliiaxaga, Arte para aprendor las Lenguas 
Moxioana i Totoiiaca. 

Fk. AxoNdo DE IIekreka, Franeuoano, Dieeionario Mcxieano. 

Clavioero, in liis C*atalogue of Qranimars and Dictionaries of the Languages of 
Now Simin, inontioni* : — 

Franc. Ximknes, (Iranmiar and Dictionary'. 

]U:kn. i>e SAiiAorN, Grammar and Dictionary'. (Contradicted by Barcia, wlio 
di^igiiAtos it at* 1x*ing a l^atin ^rrannnar.) 

Bern. Meucado, Grammar. 

Ant. Day I la Padilla, Grammar. 

Darnaba Faez, Grammar. 

Ant. de Tovar Montezuma, Grammar. 

Jos. Perez, Grammar, printed. 

Gaetano J)E Cabrera, Grammar. 

Anton. Cortes Canal, Grammar, printed. 

MICMAC. 

[For " Terre Neuve Island" read Neirfoundland. 

J. HowsB, Vocabularies of ocrtain North American Indian Languages, in : Pro- 
ceedings of PlMlological Society of London, Vol. IV, pp. 104— 112.— W, W. T.] 

MILCOCAYAC. 

[MikoJcayak is an error of JiUg's, which is corrected in his errata. — W. W. T J 

MINSI. 

[The Comparative Vocabulary in Note 15 to Edwards's Mohegan Grammar (as 
observed before) is not by Say, but by Pickering, who obtained the few words of 
(/Ids dialect from Smith Barton and Heckewelder. — W. W. T.] 

MIXE, 

Ao. Quentana, Gramatica y Dieeionario (Clavigero). 

MIXTECA. 

Fr. Domingo de Santa Maria o de Hinojosa, Dominicano, Arte i Ensenanza 
de la Lengua Misteca, Mentioned in Barcia's edition of Pinelo, but not known 
to be prhited. 



MOCOROSI MOHEOAN. 231 

Autos Sacramentales en Lengua Mixteca, by the Fray Martin Aceyedo, native 
of San Ildefonso, in the province of Oaxaca, Mexico. He left his MSS. in the 
Convent of Oaxaca (De Soiiza). 



MOCOROSI. 

The title, as given by Barcia, is : Arte y Vocabulario de la Lengua Mocorosi. 
Mexico, 1599, 4to. 



MOHAAVK. 

[Many additional words are given by M. G^allatin, from E. S. Dwight, in tlie 
" Supplementary Vocabulary," Archseologia Americana, II, pp. 383 — 397. 

Bev. A. Elliot's Vocabulary is also reprinted (omitting the numerals) in 
Schoolcraft's Hist., etc., of Indian Tribes, Vol. IT, pp. 482—493. 

Rev. Mr. Hawley, Mohawk Numbers, firom Pres. Stiles's MSS. ; in Collections of 
Massachusetts Historical Society, Vol. IX, first series, p. 137. — W. W. T.] 



MOHEGAX. 

[The Vocabulary of 45 words in Note 15 to Edwards's Mohegan Grammar is 
extracted by the editor. Dr. Pickering, from the Ghranmiar itself. He also gives 
another (of 11 words) from Rev. W. Jenks. 

For "T. Say's," in the last paragraph of p. 124, substitute " the Editor's." 

The ftill title of the "American Museum," mentioned on p. 125, is "The 
American Museum ; or. Repository of Ancient and Modem Fugitive Pieces, ^c^ 
Prose and Poetical, Vol. V. PAi7arfW/)A*a ; Printed by Mathew Carey, 1789." 8vo. 
It ¥ra8 in this volume (pp. 22 — 25, 141 — 144) that the edition of Edwards's 
Grammar, printed at Philadelphia, in 1789, as stated by Dr. Ludewig on p. 124, 
appeared. The words " Columbus, May, 1787, pp. 672 " should be erased. They 
are derived from the Mithridates (III, 3, p. 391), where they stand thus : " Columb. 
May 1787. S. 672." My friend Peter Force, Esq., of Washington, whom I con- 
sulted as to what this could mean, has solved the riddle thus. The Columbian 
Magcucine, of the year 1787, contains on page 672 a notice of the death, on the 12th 
September, of " old Zachariah, regent of the Mohegan tribe of Indians, in the 
100th year of his age." Among the memoranda of one of the authors of the 
Mithridates relating to the Mohegans was a reference to this passage, which 
accidentally got inserted in the place where we find it in their work, with the 
typographical error of " May" for Mag. Ludewig, in attempting to make it more 
intelligible, rendered it still worse. 



The "Specimen of the Moheagan Language" in t^e Massachusetts Historical 
Society's Collections, Vol. IX, first series, is simply a vocabulary. — W. W. T.] 



232 MUNDRl'CrS — NAN'TICOHE. 



MrxDiircus. 

j A. F. l*oTT, Dio 4iiiiian> iind vi^*i«iiiuil(* ZiUiliiuHhocle. On the numerals, 
p. 73._W. \v. r. ; 

Ml'SKOGIIEE. 

""riu' ViM-iihiilnrit'K in OalbitinV Syno|>8w are found on pp. 307 — 367, 382 — 396, 
M»r>, mh;. -W. W.T.J 

MUTSUNS. 

[A tribe of Indians living in the country around the Mission of 
San Juan Baut'iHta, in Monterey Co., California. Their lan- 
jj^uage appears to be identical with that of the Mission of La 
Soledad, on the Salinas River (see under " Diegeuos/^ p. 63), 
and with that of the Kunisens or Achastlians of the Mission of 
San Carlos, near the city of Monterey. 

P. Felipe de Arroyo, Alfabetieo Arroyuelo de espresiones de estos Indios 
MutsiuK's do San Juan Bautista. Aug de 1815, fol., pp. 94. A MS. collection of 
words and phrases ; to wliich are appended catechetical exercises, forms of prayer, 
and sjxviniens of native music, belonging to the library of the Bishop of Monterey. 
The Smithsonian Institution is having a copy made of it. — W. W, T.] 

MUYSCA. 

Ad p. 129, line 25, Charles de Paeavey. The title is " Memoire sur TOrigine 
Japonnaise, Arabe et Basque des Peuples du Plateau de Bogota ;" not " Memoria 
sobre el origcn Japones," etc. 

Medrano, Arte de la Lengua del Nuevo Reyno de Granada. Mentioned in 
Barcia's edition of Pinelo, but not known to be printed. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
88, 89. -W. W. T.] 

NAGRANDANS. 

[E. Q-. Squiee's Vocabulary is reprinted in the Transactions of the American 
Ethnological Society, Vol. Ill, pp. 101, 106—110, 112, 113 ; and the grammatical 
rules and forms in pp. 101-105.— W. W. T.] 

NANTICOKE. 

[The Vocabulary in Note 15 to Edwards's Mohegan Q-rammar was derived by the 
editor. Dr. Pickering, from Murray and Heckewelder. — W. W. T.] 



NABRAGANSKTT ONEIDA. 233 



NARRAGANSETT. 

[The Tocabulary in Note 15 to Edwards's Mohegan Grammar was derired by the 
editor. Dr. Pickering, from that of R. A. Williams.— W. W. T.] 



NAVAJO 

Vocabulary of upwards of sixty words in Nabajo and English, pp. 419, 420, of : 
El Gringo ; or, New Mexico and her People. By W. W. H. Davis. New Y&rk, 
Harpers, 1857, 8vo, pp. 432. 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 

[The expression " all these," copied from Howse, refers to the words and phrases 
of his New Brunswick Vocabulary, or Micmac, under which head this Vocabulary 
should have been enteired. — W. W. T.] 



NEW GRANADA. 

Glossary of Words in use in New Granada, pp. 569—573 of: New Granada : 
Twenty Months in the Andes. By Isaac F. Holton, M.A., Professor of Chemistry 
and Natund History in Middlebury College. With Maps and Illustrations. New 
York, 1856, royal 8vo, pp. 606. 

The above Glossary does not, strictly speaking, fall within the range of our 
inquiries ; but as the words occurring in it are of Indian origin, or else, being 
Spanish, are used in a different sense from that given in dictionaries, or applied to 
objects unknown in the temperate zone, we felt some hesitation to exclude it. 



NUTKA. 

Numerals 1 — 10 in the Tableau comparatif des Noms de Nombre. Vol. II, 
p. 401, of: DuFLOT DE MoFRAS, Exploration du Territoire de TOr^gon, des 
Califomies et de la Mer vermeille, ex6cut^ pendant les ann^ 1840^2. Parity 
1844, 2 vols., 8vo. 



ONEIDA. 

[The Vocabulary in Schoolcraft's '' Indian Tribes" is the same (omitting the 
numerals) as in the " Notes on the Iroquois." As, however, they are ascribed to 
different sources, I have applied to Mr. Schoolcraft, who thus explains the apparent 
discrepancy : " The Oneida, taken by myself and by my nephew, R. U. Sherman, 

H H 



234 ONONDAGA OTOMI. 

was obtained from young Skenando, the grandson of-the noted chief of that name, 
and Johnson. Both are Oneidas, and the authority is equal. Mr. Sherman quoted 
one person, I another. They were both present while I took my part of the 
Tocabidary, sometimes one giving an explanation, and sometimes the oiherJ'* 
— W. W. T.] 

ONONDAGA. 

[The Vocabulary in the " Indian Tribes" is the same (omitting the nimierals) as 
in the " Notes on the Iroquois." These also are ascribed to different sources, 
which Mr. Schoolcraft thus explains : "I spent several days at Onondaga Reserva- 
tion (having a census to take, and Indian prejudices to overcome), conferring with 
the two leading chiefs, Captain Frost and Abraham Le Fort. The latter gave me 
the words of my form for a vocabulary, which form coincided very nearly with M. 
G^allatin's, but did not finish it. When I published these vocabularies in the 
* Notes on the Iroquois,' in 1847, I preferred to give, until I could complete mine, 
M. Gallatin's list. When, in 1852, I went to Philadelphia to print Vol. II of my 
' History,' etc., it is my impression I accidentally left the MS. of this vocabulary 
behind. From the insertion of Le Fort's name where you find it, it appears that I 
expected it to be forwarded to me in season for the press, and forgot to strike out 
my authority when thus disappointed." — ^W. W. T.] 



OSAGE. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, 
p. 67.— W. W. T.] 

OTO. 

[The reference to Pickering's Note 16 to Edwards's Mohegan Grammar should 
have been inserted, if at all, under the head of " Words and Vocabularies," as it 
contains nothing about the Oto but eight words in M. Duponceau's Comparative 
Table, p. 151.— W. W. T.] 



OTOMI. 

Barcia-Pinelo also mentions the Otomi works of Rangel and Palacios ; so does 
Clavigero, who, in addition, gives the title of the Vocabulary of P. Juan de Dios 
Castro, and speaks of an Otomi Dictionary by N. Sanchez. 

" Demonstracion y Explicacion del Alfebeto del Idioma Othomi, con sus propios 
caracteres," pp. 1—17 of : Breve Compendio de todo lo que debe saber, y entender 
el Cristiano, para poder lograr, ver, conocer, y gozar a Dios Nuestro Sefior en el 
Cielo etemamente. Dispuesto en Lengua Othomi, y construido literalmente en la 



PAWNEE PIMA. 



285 



Lciigua CasteUana por el P. Fr. Antonio de Guadalupe Ramirez, Predicador 
Apost61ico, y ex-Guardian del Apostdlico Colegio de Propaganda Fide de N.*S. P. S. 
Francisco de Pachucha. Villa de ChtadcUupey 178^ 4to, pp. xvi, 80. 

A Grammatical Outline of the Otomi Language, by E. BdDiGEB, on pp. 358 — 261, 
YoJ. YII, third section, of: Ersch und Gruber's Encydopsedie. Leipzig, 1836, 4to. 

Eman. Naxera's " Dissertatio de Lingua Othomitorum" is also separately printed. 
Philadelphia, 1838, 4to, pp. 48. 

X.B. For Notices of the same, see: GSttinger Gtelehrte Anzeigen, 1836, 
pp. 321—343 J and : Journal of the Royal G^graphical Society, Vol, V, 
pp. 355—361. 

[The numerals are given by M. Gallatin in the Transactions of the American 
Ethnological Society, VoL I, Table to p. 114. 

A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
90, 91 ; on the names of the fingers, p. 301.— W. W. T.] 



PAWNEE. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, 
p. 68.— W. W. T.] 

PENNSYLVANIANS. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahhnethode. On thet numerals, 
p. 64.— W. W. T.] 

PENOBSCOT. 

[The Vocabulary in Note 15 to Edwards's Mohegan Grammar is derived by tlic 
editor, Dr. Pickering, firom a MS. of the French Missionaries who had resided with 
the tribe.- W. W. T.] 



PIMA. 

Numerals 1 — 10 in the " Tableau eomparatif des Noms de Nombre," Vol. II, 
p. 401, of : DUFLOT DE MoPRAS, Exploration du Territoire de I'Oregon des Cah- 
foniies et de la Mer vermeille, execute pendant les ann^ 1840-42, 2 vols. 
Parity 1844, 8vo. 

[The Vocabulary in the Transactions of the American Ethnological Society, 
Vol. II, is copied by M. Gallatin from Dr. Coulter's, in the Royal Geographical 
Society's Journal. 

J. C. E. BusCHMAiTN, Die Pima-Sprache und die Sprache der Koloschen. 
(From Abhandlungen der Xoniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, 



236 PINA — QUICHE. 

aus dem Jahre 1H&6, pp. 321—432.) Berim, 1867, 4to. Contams the PhnA Texts 
and Grainiiiatical Obaenrationt from PfSeffericom, in the Mithridatea, convcted and 
greatly- cxU>nded, pp. 353—365 ; and a Yooabulary, collected from printed aouroes, 
with remarks on the same, pp. 367— ^76.— W. W. T.] 



PINA. 

Voi'abulario de la Lengua Pina, por P. Santiago Sedelhaib, Missionario de los 
Pinas, en la Nueva Yiscaya. 1764. MS., according to De Soiua. 



riRO. 

The pueblos that still speak the Piro language are Taos, Tezuque, Sandia, Isleta, 
and Isleta of the South. (See W. W. H. Davis, El Gringo j or, New Mexico and 
her People. New York, Harpers, 1857, 8yo, pp. 432.) 



POPOLUCA, 

Fr. Francisco de Joval, Arte, Vocabulario, Doctrina Christiana i Sermones en 
Lengua Popoluca. Both Barcia-Pinelo and Clavigero mention this work as printed. 



PUEBLO INDIANS. 

A Complete Vocabulary of Words in the Languages of the Pueblo or Civilized 
Indians of New Mexico. In the language of Pueblo Indians of — 

1. Santo Domingo, San Felipe, Santa Ana, Silla, Lagima, Acoma, Cochiti. 

2. San Juan, Santa Clara, San Ildefonso, Pojuaque, Nambe, Te^que. 

3. Taos, Picons, Sandia, Isleta. 

4. Jemez and Old Pecos. 

5. Zuni. 

6. Moqui. 

Pp. 157—159 of: El Gringo j or, New Mexico and her People. By W. W. H. 
Davis New York, Harpers, 1857, 8vo, pp. 432. 



QUICHE. 

[A brief Vocabulary, extracted from the Lord's Prayer as given by Stephens, and 
the numerals (also from Stephens), are given by M. Gullatin, in : Transactions of 
the American Ethnological Society, Vol. I, pp. 9, 10, 275, and Table to p. 114. 

A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
92, 93.— W. W. T.] 



QUICHUA SAN JUAN CAPIBTBANO. 237 



QUICHUA. 

Barcia-Pinelo mentions "Juan de Ybga, Arte e Budimentos de Gramatica 
Quichua. Impreso en Limaj*^ and states that "Fb. Mabti}^ de Victobia, del 
Orden de la Meroed, fue el primero que redujo k arte la lengua del Inca.* 



» 



RICCAREES. 

Eicoaree Yocabulaiy, pp. 348 — 352 of : Die Indianer Nord Amerika's und die 
wahrend eines achtjahrigen Aufenthalt« unter den wildesten ihrer Stfimme erlebten 
Abentheuer und Schicksale, yon G-. Catlin. Nach der funften englischen Ausgabe. 
deutsch herausgegeben yon Dr. Heinrich Berghaus. Mit 24 yom Yer&sser nach 
der Natur entworfenen Ghmilden. Zweite Ausgabe. Brussely Muquardt^ 1851, 
8f o, pp. 382. 

RUMSEN. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und yigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, p. 63. 
— W. W. T.] 

SAHAPTIN. 

[Dr. ScorxEB*s Vocabularies are printed also in the Edinburgh New Philosophical 
Journal, Tol. XLI, pp. 190—192. 

J. HowsE, Yocabidaries of certain North American Languages, in : Proceedings 
of the Philological Society of London, Yol. lY. Okanagan Yocabulary, pp. 
199— 204.— W. W. T.] 



SAN GABRIEL, KIZH. 

Califomian Lidians, mentioned already under " Diegefios," pp. 62, 63, to 
which .add — 

JoH. Cabl £d. BuscHMAiTN, Die Sprachen Kizh und Netda yon Neu Califomien. 
Abhandlimg gelesen in der Berliner Akademie der Wissenschaften, October 25, 
1855, pp. 501 — 531 of the " Abhandlungen der Philosophisch>historischffli Klasse" 
of said Academy for 1855, and with separate title. Berlin^ Diimmler, 1856, 4to. 



SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, ACAGCHEMEM, 

NETELA. 

Califomian Indians, for which see the article " Diegeiios," pp. 62, 63, adding — 
JoH. Cabl £d. Buschicakn, Die Sprachen £ixh und Netela yon Neu Califomien. 
Abhandlimg gelesen in der Berliner Akademie der Wissenschaften, October 25, 
1855, pp. 501 — 531 of the " Abhandlungen der Philosophisch-historischen Klasse" 
of said Academy, 1855, and with separate title. Berlin^ Dummler, 1856, 4to. 



238 SAINT JOHN S INDIANS 8H03HONKBS. 



SAIXT JOHNS INDIANS. 

y<M'ahuIjirT of the raMaiiiaquoddi, bj Fbsderice Eiddsb, pp. 689, 690, Vol. V, 
of: Schoolcnifl*!} Indian Tribos of the United States. 



SANTA BARBARA. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinarc und vigcsimale Zihlmethode. On the numerals, p. 63. 
— \V. W. T.J 

SAPIBOKOXI. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinarc und yigesimale Z&hlmethode. Numerals 1 — 10, irom 
Balbi, p. 74.— W. W. T.] 

SEMINOLES. 

[A letter addressed to the Indian Bureau by Frederic Kidder, of Boston, states 
that he is in possession of a MS. Tocabulary of the language. He says : " It 
contains at least four or five hundred words, and was got up with much care, partly 
by Lieut. Casey and other persons, one of them an old Indian trader." (School- 
craft's History, etc., of Indian Tribes, Vol. V, p. 689.)— W. W. T.] 



SENECA. 

[Moboan's League of the Iroquois contains also words and granmiatical remarks, 
pp. 395— 410.— W. W. T.] 



SHAWANEES. 

Sii Shawanese words on page 125 of " General Parsons' Discoveries made in the 
Western Country," Article XI, pp» 119—127, oft Memoirs of the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences, Vol. II, Part 1, Boston, 1793, 4to. 

[The two imperfect Shawanee lists of words in Note 15 to Edwards's Mohegan 
Grammar were collected by the editor, Br. Pickering, from Edwards's Grammar 
and from Johnston. — W. W. T.] 

SHOSHONEES. 

[N. J. WTETfl, Indian Tribes of the South Pass of the Rocky Mountains, etc., 
in : Schoolcraft's History, etc., of Indian Tribes, Vol. I, pp. 216, 218.— W. W. T.] 



SlOrX SQUALLYAMISH. 239 



SIOUX. 

Sioux Vocabulary, pp. 348 — 352 of: Die Indianer Nord Amerika^s und die 
wahrend eines achtjahrigen Aufenthalts unter den wildesten ihrer Stamme erlebten 
Abentheuer und Schicksale, Ton Q-. Catlin. Nach der funften englischen Ausgabe 
deutsch herausgegeben Ton Dr. Heinrich Berghaus. Mit 24 Tom Vcrfesser, nach 
der Natur entworfenen Gbmalden. Zweite Ausgabe. Briissely Muquardt, 1851, 
8vo, pp. 382. 

SITKA. 

Numerals 1 — 10 (Sitka and King George's Island) in the " Tableau comparatif 
des Noms de Nombre," Vol. II, p. 401, of: Duflot de Mofbas, Exploration du 
Territoire de 1' Oregon des Califomies et de la Mer vermeille, ex&utee pendant les 
annt^es 1840-42, 2 vols. Paris, 1844, 8vo. 



SJEVERNOVTSI. 

[The Russian word " Sevemovskia'* is not the name of a people or language, but 
a plural adjective agreeing vrith slora (words). ^* Sevemovzer" has a German 
termination. The proper title for this language would have been the native name, 
Krakhafiiaju. The BatemdaJcaieej Chotceshak, Kulanapo, and Yttkaiy are the same, 
or dialects of the same language.— W. W. T.] 



SONORA 

(LANGUAGES OF). 

Dos Libros de los diferentes Idiomas que se usan en la Provincia de Sonora, by 
Francisco Loaiza, Mexican Jesuit, and Missionary in Sonora, in 1736. The MS. 
exists in the Mission of Yecora (De Souza). 

Parallelen Sonorischer und Mexicanischer Worter. Paper by Joh. Cabl Ed. 
BrsCHMAKN, read before the Berlin Academy, Nov. 22, 1855. 

Die Lautveranderung azteldscher Worter in den sonorischen Sprachen und die 
sonorische Endimg A M E dargestellt von Joh. Cabl Ed. Buschmaitn. Aus den 
Abhandlungen der Koniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, aus dem 
Jahre 1856. Berliny 1857, 4to, pp. 118. 

SQUALLYAMISH. 

[These are the Sktcafe, or Nasqually, of Hale, See under "Flatheads," p. 73. 
— W. W. T.] * 



240 STONE INDIANS TARAHVMARA. 



STONE INDIANS, ASSINEBOINS. 

[The Yocabulaiy mentioned under this head should have been placed along with 
the others of the same dialect under the general head of *' Dakota." It gives no 
support to the exploded notion of Heckewelder and other eariy writers, that the 
Assineboins belong to the Iroquois stock. — ^W. W. T.] 



TABALOSA. 

P. Luis Teeuel, Gramatica de la Lengua Tabalosa del Peru. Mentioned by 
Barcia-Pinolo, but not known to be printed. 



TACULLIES. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Z&hlmethode. On the numerals, p. 66. 
-W. W. T.] 



TAMANAKI. 

Ad Yanoues (written by Barcia, langucLs). Barcia states that Fb. Mabtin 
Btuiz Blanco published, in 1663, an abbreviated and corrected edition of the 
Principios, etc., of Yangues ; adding" thereto a " Diccionario de las Lenguas de los 
Indios Cumanagotes i Palenques j" and that in 1683 he published another, " Arte i 
Yocabulario, con Catecismo i Directorio para confesar los Indios." 

Ad Tauste. Barcia-Pinelo states that Tauste is only the editor of the " Arte i 
Yocabulario de la Lengua de los Caribes de Nueva Andalusia" of Fb. Joseph de 
Cababantes. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und_ vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, 
pp. 13, 14 ; on the pronouns, p. 108 note ; on names of the fingers, p. 302. — 
W. W. T.] 



TARAHUMARA. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, 
pp. 10— 13.— W. W. T.] 

Die Lautveranderung aztekischer Worter in den sonorischen Sprachen und die 
sonorische Endimg A M E dargestellt von Joh. Gael Ed. Buschmann. Aus den 
Abhandlungen der Koniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berhn, aus dem 
Jahre 1856. Berlin, 1857, 4to, pp. 118. 



TARASCA — TIMBIRAS. 241 



TARASCA. 

Numerals (1—21, 30—800, 8000), Tabla Aritmetica comparada de los Mejicanos 
y Tarasoos. P. 68 of: D. Bkkito Marta db Moxos, Cartas Mejicanas. 2^ edic 
Genoa, tjp. L. Pellas, s. a. (1839), 8vo. 

Kote, — The Grammars by Gilberti and Lagimas are also mentioned in 
Bareia's edition of Pindo. 

TCHINKITANE. 

(RUSS. SITKA. SOUND.) 

Vocabulaire des TchinMtan^ns. Pp. 587 — 691 of: Etiennb Mabchakd, 
Voyage autoiir du Monde, pendant les ann^ 1790, 1791 et 1792. T. I. Paris, VI. 
(1798), 4to. (From the Collections of Captain Chanal and Surgeon Boblet) 



TEHUELHET. 

[H. Hale, Ethnography and Philology of the United States Exploring Expedi* 
tion, p. 656,— W. W. T.] 

TEPEGUANA. 

Die Lautver&ndenmg aztekischer Worter in den sonorischen Spracnen und die 
sonorisehe Endung A M E dargestellt von JoH. Cael Ed. Buschmann. Aus den 
Abhandlungen der Xoniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, aus dem 
Jahre 1856. Berlin, 1857, 4to, pp. 118. 

TEXAS. 

[The numerals of " certain Indian tribes between the Rio Norte and San Antonio 
of Texas," are given by M. G-allatin, in the Transactions of the American Ethno* 
logical Society, Vol. I, p. 53, and Table to p. 114. Also by A. F. Pott, in Die 
quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode, p. 69. — ^W. W. T.] 

JICARILLAS. 

[** TicorUla^" is a misprint in Simpson's Report for JicariUttSf which has been 
copied by Buschmami. — W, W. T.] 

TIMBIRAS. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zalilmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
72, 73.— W. W. T.] 

I I 



242 TIMUACA — T8HtJKT8HI. 



TIMUACA, TIMUQUANA. 

P. Andres Vito, (Ingles), Gramaticft, Diocionario i Catecumo en Lengua de 
Mariland en la Florida. 1642. Mentioned in Barcia*8 edition of Pinelo, but not 
known to be printed. 

The complete titles of Pareja*8 books are : 

Confessionario en Lengua Castellana y Tunuquana. Con algunos consejos para 
animar al penitentc. Y assi mismo van deelarados algunos efiectos j prerrogatiyas 
deste sancto sacrament o de la Confession. Todo muy vtil y proTechoso, assi para 
que los padres confessores sepan instniyr al penitente eomo para que ellos aprendan 
k saberse eonfessar. Ordenado por el Padre Fr. Francisco Par^a, Padre de la 
Custodia de Santa Elena de la Florida. Religioso de la .Or^en de nuestro Seraphico 
Padre San Francisco. Imprcsso con licencia en Mexico, en la Emprenta de la 
Viuda de Diego Lopez Daualos. Afio de 1613, 12mo, 238 leaves. 

Cathecismo y Examen para los que comulgan en Lengua Castellana y Timuquana. 
Por el Fr. Francisco Pareja. Mexico, en la imprenta de Juan Ruyz, 1627, 8vo. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmetbode. On the numerals, 
p. 66.— W. W. T.] 

TLASCALTECAS. 

Hundertachtzig WurzelwSrter aus der Sprache der Tlaskalteken im Dorfe Isalco 
im Staate San Salvador (Nahual of the Balsam Coast), aufgezeichnet und zusam- 
mengestellt nach Gallatin's Systcme zum G-ebrauche fiir vergleichende Wort- 
forschung. Pp. 505 — 507 of: "Wanderungen durch die mittel-amerikamschen 
Freistaaten Nicaragiui, Honduras und San Salvador. Mit Hinblick auf deutsche 
Emigration und deutschen Handel, von Dr. Carl Scherzer. Mit 2 Xarten. 
Braunschveig, Qc. Westermann, 1856, 8vo, pp. xx, 516. 



TOTONACA. 

AiTDBEAB DE Olmoz, Gh*ammatica et Lexicon Lingtue Mexicans, TotonaqusB et 
Huastecee. Mexico, 1560, 2 vols. 4to. 

Both Bai-cia-Pinelo and Clavigero mention this book as printed. 

D. Efgenio Koxebo, Canonigo de Huaxaga, Arte para aprender las Lenguas 
Mexicana y Totonaca. Mentioned by Barcia-Pinelo. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, 
p. 89.— W. W. T.] 

TSHUKTSHI. 

[The article under'this heading may be corrected as follows : — ^They occupy the 
north-eastern comer of Asia and the opposite shores of Russian America. Those in 



TUBAR UOALENTSI. 243 

Asia consist of two different noes, the aedeiUmy or Juhing^ and the nomad or 
reindeer Tshuktshi. The name Tshuktshi belongs properly only to the latter, who 
are allied by lineage and speech to the Konaks. The former call themselyeB 
NammoU^ and belong, like those in America, to the Eskimo stock. It is, of course^ 
with these only that we haTe here to do. 

Lieut. ZAOOSEnf, Short Comparative Dictionary of the Dialects of the Nanmiols 
and Xadjaks with those of the Inhabitants of the Coasts of Behring's Sea. (The 
Nanmiol words from Dr. Bobeck.) Printed in Zapiski Kusskago Geograph. 
Obshtshestra, VoL II, 2nd edition, pp. 250 — ^266. Also in the Q^rman transla- 
tion, Denkschriften der Buss. G^eogr. G^esellsch., VoL I, pp. 359—374. And in 
Erman's Archiv fur wissensch. Kunde von Kussland, VoL VII, pp. 488 — 511. 

J. ExAPEOTH, Asia Polyglotta, pp. 323 — 325 ; Atlas, foL xlix — ^Ivi. (In Julg, 
but omitted by Ludewig.) 

A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigesimale Zahlmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
58— 60.— W.W.T.] 

TUBAR. 

Mithridates, Vol. Ill, part 2, pp. 139 — 141. Lord's Prayor, with some gram- 
matical annotations. 

TUCUMAN. 

P. Pedbo ds Anasco, Vocabularios, Catecismos, Confesionarios i Qramaticas en 
diversas Lenguas del Tucuman. Mentioned in Barcia's edition of Pinelo, but not 
knowtt to be printed. 

tularena. 

Gramatica del la Lengua Tulareua, por el P. Arboto, de la Mission de S. Ines. 
MS. mentioned by M. Duflot de Mofras, Not€ 1 to p. 388, Vol. II. 



TUSGARORA. 

Tuscarora Vocabulary, pp. 348 — 352 of : Die Indianer Nord Amerika's und die 
wahrend eines ach^alurigen Aufenthalts untor den wildesten ihrer St&mmo erlebten 
Abentlieuer und Schicksale, von G. Catlin. Nach der fiinften euglischcn Ausgabe 
deutsch herausgegeben von Dr. Heinrich Berghaus. Mit 24 vom Verfesser nach 
der Natur entworfenen Gkmalden. Zweite Ausgabe. Brussel, Muquardt, 1851, 
8vo, pp. 382. 

UGALENTSI. 

[This is the tribe called by aome writers Ugaij<»khn^mtt or UgdljakhmmUL 
They speak a dialect of the Kimd^ under which general head the other vocabularies 
of their laugwigo are referred to. 



21'* UTLATECA — ^VIRGINIAN. 

Ilerr, m iii some other infiUncet, referenoe to the CompantiTe Yocabulaiy (of 
97 wortb) in the Tabk* to p. 259 of Baer und Helmeraen*8 BeitrBge, YoL I, is 
iTToneouslj omitt«d. — W. W. T.] 

UTLATECA. 

ncrraa (and after him Vator) classes this language with Quiche and Kaehiqud, 
as 8|>oken on the Pacific side of Guatemala, north of l^ioaragua. Squier supposes 
it to l>e identii'ttl with tlio Quichd. 

Arte de la Leiigua TJtlafeca, muy bien ordinada, por el Fray Mabia Mabthtez, 
DoininiL'ano. Mentioned by Barcia-Pindo, but not known to be printed. 

Doctrina Cliristiana en Lengua Utlateca por Frai^O. Mabboquik. Mexico^ 
apud Joannem Paulum, 1556, 4to. 

umpqua.. 

Numerals I to 10, in " Tableau comparatif des Noms de Nombre," YoL II, p. 
401, of : DuFiOT DE MoFRAB, Exploration duTerritoire de TOr^gon, des Galifomies et 
de la Mer Tcmieille, ex6cut^ pendant les ann^ 1840-42, 2 yoIs. Paris^ 1844, 8yo. 



UNALASHKA. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und yigesimale ZShlmethode. On the numerals, pp. 
61, 62.— W. W. T.] 

UTAHS. 

[Edwin Betant, What I saw in California : being the Journal of a Tour, by 
the Emigrant Boute and South Pass of the Rocky Mountains, across the Continent 
of North America, the Great Desert Basin, and through California, in the years 
1846, 1847. New York, D. Appleton and Co., 1848, 12mo. Contains a Yocabidaiy 
of 29 words on p. 165.— W. W. T.] 



VIRGINIAN. 

A Dictionarie of the Indian Language, for the better enabling of such who shal 
bo thither ymployed. Pp. 183 — 196 (two columns) of: The Historic of Travaille 
into Yirginia Brittania ; expressing the Cosmographie and Comodities of the 
Country, together with the Manners and Customes of the People, gathered and 
observed as well by those who went first thither as collected by William Strachey, 
Gent., the first Secretary of the Colony. Now first edited from the original 
Manuscript in the British Museum, by R. H. Major, Esq. London, printed by 
the Hakluyt Society, 1849, 8vo, pp. viii, xxxvi, two not numbered, altogether 
204 pp. 



HUECOS — YARVKA. 245 



HUECOS. 

[Tho name " Wacoes*^ has no right to an existence, it being but an English 
transcription of tho Spanish appellation Hvecos (erroneously printed Nuecos on 
page 198) apphed to these Indians. According to Lieut. Whipple, they call them- 
selves TalletcUstts.—W, W. T.] 



WAICURI. 

[Father Begert's very curious account of the language is contained on pp. 
177 — 194 of the " Nachrichten." It comprises, besides the general remarks on the 
characteristic features of the language, the Lord's Prayer and the Creed, both with 
Uteral and free translations, and the conjugation of a verb. — ^W. W. T.] 



WEAS. 

[A small Algonkin tribe, located, with the Piankeshaws, on the Osage River. 

The Wea Primer, Weu MtU^H-kU-ne, to teach the Wea Language. Cherokee 
Nation, Mission Press, 1837, 16mo, pp. 16.— W. W. T.] 



WITCHITAS. 

[The first edition of Capt. Marcy's Report is, ** Wcuhington, Robert Armstrong, 
pubKc printer, 1853, 8vo (32nd Congress, 2nd Sess., Senate Ex. Doc. No. 54)," in 
which the vocabularies are on pp. 307 — 310. — ^W. W. T.] 



WOCCON. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinare und vigeeimale Z&hlmethode. On the numerals, p. 68. 
-W. W. T.] 



YAQUI, HIAQUI. 



Mithridatos, Vol. in, part 2, pp. 157, 158, " Lord's Prayer, with grammatical 
notes." 



YARURA. 

[A. F. Pott, Die qiunaro und vigosimalc Zahlmethodc. On tho numei*aLs, 
pp. 15, 16.— W. W. T.] 



246 ZACATECAS ZAFOTECA. 



ZACATECAS. 

Arte J Yocabolario del Idioma de loi Zacatecas, por Fr. Pedbo Esfinabeda. 
Written about the year 1565, and mentioned by De Souza as having existed in the 
archiyes of the CouTent of the Villa del Nombre de Dios. 



ZAMUCA. 

[A. F. Pott, Die quinore und yigesimale Zlihlmethode. On the numerals, p. 74, 
-W. W. T.] 



ZAPOTECA, ZACAPULA. 

Febia's Vocabulary is also mentioned by Barcia-Pinelo, and Pozo's €h*ammar 
by Clavigero. 

Barcia-Pinelo mentions moreover that Fr. Salvadob de S. Cipbiano, Domini- 
cano, wrote *' De los Indios de la Provincia de Zacapula, en la Lengua de ella.* 



«) 



INDEX. 



A 



Abbitibbb (Knistenaux), 04. 
Abenaki, or Wapanachki, 1, 210. 
Abipones, 2, 210. 
Acadians, or Sonriqnois, 177. 
Acagchemem (Diegenoa), 62. 
Accaway, 2, 79. 
Achagaas, S. 

Achastlians fRumsen), 168. 
.Acherekotti (Tamanaque), 180. 
Acherigotes (Caribs), 28. 
Acoraa, or Keres (Paeblo Indians), 02. 
Adaize, 3. 

Aglegmutes, Agolegmiites, S. 
Agoneaseah (Iroquois), 87. 
Agua (Oraagaa), 137. 
Ahnahaways, Ahwahaways fCrows), 58. 
Ahnenin (Arrapahoe), 12. 
Ah-wash>tes (Costanos), 53. 
Aimbores, or Engerekmung, 67. 
Airiko (Betoi), la 
Alasapas (Texas Indiana), 186. 
Alasar (Minetaresj, 110. 
Aleutans, 4. 
Algonquin, 5, 210. 
Allakaweah (Crows), 58. 
Allentiac, Guarpea, Milcoeayac, 7, 210. 
Almeida (BrazUian), 214. 
Al-tah-mos (Costanos), 53. 
Ameriseoggins (Abenkki), 1. 
Amores, or Engerekmnng, 67. 
Andaqoies, 7. 
Antis, 8. 
Ao-ges (Ge^, 75. 
Apaches, 8, 211. 

Apaches de Nabojoa (Navajos), 182. 
Apiacas, 8, 211. 
Apinages, 8. 

Apolista (Ynracare), 206. 
Araucana, 9, 211. 
Arda, 12. 

ArecTima (Guyana), 70. 
Ariearas, or Riccarees, 163. 
Aripe (Waiknr), lOa 
Ark (Sitka), 176. 
Airapahoes, 12, 211. 



Aroaqois (Oregones), 139. 

Arrawaks, Airowaks, 13, 211. 

Assineboins, or Stone Indians, 177. 

Assinibules, or Stone Indians, 177. 

Assinipoils, or Stone Indiana, 177. 

Atalalas (VUela), 196. 

Athapasca, 14, 211. 

Atna, 14, 211. 

Atnah, Chin, or Kinn Indians, 15, 212. 

Atnah (Fbithead), 72. 

Atorays (Gnyana), 79. 

Atsina (Arrapahoes), 12. 

Attakapas, 15. 

Attikameg fEnistenaox), 94. 

Atnre, 16 ; (Saliva), 166. 

Anca, or Arancans, 0. 

ATanes fMaipores), 104. 

Avarigotes (Caribs), 28, 180. 

Aymara, 16, 212. 

Aymores, or Engerekmnng, 67. 

Ayrate (Cherokee), 37. 

Aztek, or Mexican, 111. 

B 

Bakra (Creole), 54. 
Baniba, Baniwa, 17, 214. 
Barr6, 17. 

Batem-da-kai-ee, 17, 212. 
Baore (Moxa), 126. 
Bayano, 18. 
Beaver Indians, 18. 
Bethuck, 18. 
Betoi, la 

Bigbellies (Minetares), 119. 
BiUeohoola (Haeeltiuk), 80 ; (Naaas In- 
dians), 180. 
Blackfeet, 19, 212. 
Blackshoes (Crows), 58. 
Blancos (Costa Rica), 54. 
Blood Indians, or Kahna (Blackfeet), 19. 
Bodega, 20, 212. 
Borrados (Texas Indiana), 186. 
Botocndos, or Engerekmnng, 67, 213. 
Bontomoras (Botocudos), 67. 
Brazilians, or Tapis, 20, 218. 
Bogre, 25. 



248 



INDEX. 



Cabtros, 26. 

Ctddoet, 25. 

CadocUqaioiu, or Caddoet, 26. 

Cahita, 26, 214. 

Cahaillos, 26. 

Caipotorade (Zamuoa), 207. 

Cairnos, 214. 

Californians, 26, 214. 

CallUehet (Tehuelhet), 184. 

Camacans, 27, 213, 219. 

Camoyes (Yuma), 205. 

Canada, 27, 215. 

Canacata-g^B (6ds), 75. 

Caniha (Quichoa), 162. 

Canishana, 28. 

Carajas, S8. 

Caribs, 28, 215. 

Caribi-Taxnanacan (Guyana), 70. 

Caribisi (Guyana), 79. 

Cariri, or Sabtga, 164. 

Carriers, or Tacullies, 178. 

Casarnee CHaidah), 80. 

Catawba, 82. 

CathlascOUB, 82.* 

Cayalleros (Guaykuru), 78. 

Cayeres (Maipures), 104. 

Ca*wi*08, or Cahuillos, 26. 

Cayapos, 82. 

Cayowas (Guarani), 76. 

Cayubabas, 83, 215. 

Cayuga, 83. 

Cayuse (Wailatpu), 199. 

Celdales, or Tzendales, 198. 

Ceris, 34. 

Cerros CMainas), 108. 

Chacahuaxti (Totonaka), 190. 

Chahtah, or Choctaw, 46. 

Chamers (Osages), 189. 

Chanos (Vuta), 198. 

Chapacura, 84. 

Chapopines (Texas Indians), 186. 

Charcas (Aymara), 16. 

Charruas (Fuelches), 155. 

Chavantes, or Cherentes, 36. 

Chayma, 84. 

Checalish, Chehalisb, or. Selish, 72, 216. 

Chechehet (Fuelches), 155. 

Chemehueyi, 35. 

Chepewyan, 35, 215. 

Cherentes, 86. 

Cherohakah, or Nottoways, 185. 

Cherokee, 37, 216. 

Chetimachas, 38. 

Cheyennes, or Shyennes, 175. 

Chiapanecas, 30, 216. 

Chlbcba, or Muysca, 128. 

Chicachas, or Chickasaw, 89. 

Chichimecs (Mexicans), 111. 

ChickaUis, or Tsihailish (Flatheads), 73. 

Chickasaw, 89. 



Chikkaaas, or Chioaohas, 89. 

Chilake, or Cherokee, 87. 

Chilcart (Sitka), 176. 

Chilicothe (Shawanoes), 172. 

Chilidugu, or Arauoant, 9. 

Cbilu, or Tsihailish (Flathead), 7U, 

Chimano, 89. 

Chimme8yan8,40; (Haeeltzuk),80; (Naass 
Indians), 130. 

Chin Indians, or Atnah, 15 ; or Nagailer, 1 78. 

Chinanteka, Cinaoantequa, 40. 

Chinchaisuyu (Quichua), 159. 

Chinuk, 40, 217. 

Chippeways, 41, 217. 

Chiquitos, 45. 

Chiriguana (Guarani), 75, 162, 218. 

Chirupa (Maipure), 104. 

Chocha, 218. 

Choco, Cholo, 47. 

ChocUw, 40, 218. 

Cholo, 47. 

Cholona (Peru), 162. 

Chondal, Woolwa, 48, 

Chonos (Vuto), 198. 

Chopunish, or Sahaptin, 1 70. 

Chorotega, 48. ' 

Chorti, 48. 

Chow-e-shak, 48, 212. 

Chuchu (Moxa), 126. 

Chunos (Vuta), 198. 

Chunupies (Vilela), 196. 

Chuntaquiros, 49. 

Chwachamaj a, or ^eTemoTskia, 1 70. 

Cinakantequa, or Chinanteka, 40. 

Cinaloa, 49. 

Clamets, or Lutuami, 100. 

Clatsop (Chinuk), 41. 

Cobeu, 49. 

Cocanas, Cocamas, Coouannas, 49, 218. 

Cochimi, 49, 218. 

Chochitemi (Keres), 92. 

Cochiti (Pueblo Indians), 154. 

Cochnewagoes (Mohawk), 122. 

Cocknawaga, or Cochnewagoes (Mohawk), 

J22. 
Coco-maricopas, 50, 218. 
Coconoons (California), 27. 
Coconucos, 50. 
Cocopas, 51 ; (Yuma), 205. 
Coeurs d'Aleine, or Skitsuish (Flathead), 

72. 
Colastnkweck, or St. John's Indians, 165. 
Coluz (Califomians;, 26. 
Comanches, 51, 218. 

Coraeya (California, San Diego;, ^6, 62. 
Conchas (Chickasaw), 89. 
Concho, 52. 
Conibos, 52. 
Copeh, 52. 
Cora, 52, 219. 
Cora (Waikur), 198. 



INDEX. 



24^ 



Comeilles, or Crows, 5S. 

Coroados, or Coropos, 58. 

Coronado (Mamas), 108. 

CoropoB, or Coroados, 58. 

Correguajes, 53. 

Costa Kica, 54. 

Costanos, 53. 

Coutanies, or Kutan^, 98. 

Covareca (Chiquitos), 46. 

Cowelits, or Kawelitsk (Flathead), 73. 

Craikmouses (Botocudos), 67. 

Cran-ges (Ocs), 75. 

Crans, or Timbiras, 187. 

Cree, or Knistenaux, 94. 

Creek, or Muskoghee, 127. 

Creole, 64, 219. 

Crowe, 58. 

Cachan, or Yuma, 205. 

Cuciquia (Chiquitos), 46. 

Culilaa Canny (Tehuelhet), 184. 

Cumana, 68, 219. 

Cumanagota (Tamanaque), 180. 

Cumshawa, or Camshewar (Queen Char* 

lotte'a Island), 157; (Haidah), 80. 
Cunacuna, 59, 219. 
Curaves (Chiquitos), 4Q. 
Curetu, 59. 

CuTuminaca (Chiquitos), 46. 
Cushna, 59. 
Cuzco (Quiohua), 158. 



Dahkotah, or Sioux, 59, 219. 

Darien, Dariel, 61, 220. 

Dauri (Guyana), 79. 

Delaware, or Lenni Lenape, 63, 220. 

Deguino (California), 26, 62, 220. 

Diegenos, 26, 62, 220. 

Diggers (California), 26. 

Diggers of Napa Valley (California), 26. 

Dirians (Chorotega), 48. 

Divihet (Puelches), 155. 

Djoe tongo (Creole), 56. 

Dogrib, 66. 

Dtinne, or Athapascan, 14. 

E 

Ecclemaches, Eskelen, 68. 

Echeloots (Chinuk), 41. 

Eelikino (Sitka), 176. 

Ehatsar (Minetares), 119. 

Ehnek, 67. 

Eijiguaijegi, or Guaykuru, 78. 

Ekklemaches (Eskelen), 68. 

Ele, 67. 

Enagna (Omagua), 136. 

Enakaga (Guaykuru), 78. 

Enimaga, or Eochaboth (Guaykuru), 78. 

Engerekmung, or Botocudos, 67. 



Escopies, or Skoffies, 176. 
Eskelen, 68, 220. 
Eskimos, 69, 220. 
Eslenes, or Eskelen, 68. 
Etchemins, or St. John's Indians (Abe- 
naki), 165, 221. 
Eudeve (Opata, Pima), 139, 149. 

F 

Fall Indians, or Alasar (Minetares), 119. 

FUijayas (Texas Indians), 186. 

Flatbows, or Kutanae, 98. 

Flatheads, 72, 221. 

Flathead (Atnah), 15. 

Florida Indians, or Timuaca, 187. 

FoUaties, or Tuhwalatis, 202. 

Fox Islands, 74, 221. 

Foxes and Sacs, 165. 

Friendly Village, Mackenzie's (Haeeltzuk), 

80. 
Fucu Strait, 74. 
Fuegians, or Fescherai, 149. 

G 

GaUbi (Caribs), 28. 

Galzanes, or Eoltschanes, 06. 

Ge, Geiko, Ges, 74, 221. 

Geiko, Ge, orGes, 74, 221. 

Gens de Piti6 (Shoshones), 174. 

Ges, 74, 221. 

Gherins (Botocudos), 67. 

Gogoyans, or Cayugas, 83. 

Goi^toquienses, 221. 

Greenlanders (Eskimo), 69. 

GrosTentre (Minetares), 119. 

Guachire (Caribs), 28< 

Guaicur, or Waikur, 198. 

Guaiqueries (Caribs), 28. 

Guajiquero (Lenca), 100. 

Guambias (Coconucos), 60. 

Guanas, 75. 

Guaques, 75. 

Guarani, 75, 21^, 222. 

Guarapuava, 222. 

Guarayi (Guarani), 76. 

Guarpes, Allentiac, Milcocayac, 77. 

Guasava, 77. 

Guatos, 77; Quato, 213. 

Guatusos, 222. 

Guaykuru, 78, 222. 

Guenoa, 79. 

Guentuse (Guaykuru), 78, 222. 

Guinau (Guyana), 79. 

Guyana, 79, 222. 

Guypunayi (Maipure), 104. 



Haeeltzuk, 80. 
Hah-wal-coes (Yuma), 206. 

KIL 



250 



INDEX. 



Haidah, 80^222. 

Hailtsa, or Haeeltzok, 80. 

Haiti, 81. 

Hennega (Sitka), 176. 

H'hana (California), 26. 

Hiaqui, or Yaqui, 203, 245. 

Hietans, or Comanches, 51. 

Hitchittees, 81. 

Hoohelaga, 82. 

Hochungorah, or Winnebago, 200. 

Hoodaonhoo (Sitka), 176. 

Hoo-pah, 82. 

Horoje, or Winnebago, 200. 

Huacbi, or Chapacura, 34. 

Huasteca, 82, 222. 

Hudson's Bay Indians, 83, 223. 

Haecos (Waooes), 198. 

HuillicheVata (Araucans), 9, 197. 

Humorano Mainas, 103. 

Hurons, 84, 223. 

Hozzaws, or Osages, 139. 



laakeroa, or Wallawalla (Sahaptin), 1 70. 

Jaconaiga (Abipones), 2. 

lahycos, or G^, 74. 

lakons, 85. 

Japorin, or Tamra, 204. 

Idibae (Darien), 61. 

lemez (Pueblo Indians), 154. 

Jetans, or Comanches, 51. 

lUinois, 86. 

Indiens yentms (Crows), 58. 

Indiens du SaiAg, or Kahna (Blackfeet), 19. 

Inganos, 86. 

Inies (Caddoes), 25. 

Inkalit-Yugelnut (Kinai), 02. 

Inkilik (Kinai), 92. 

Inkiiluchliiats, 86, 228. 

Intibucas (Lenca), 100. 

loways, 86, 224. 

Ipas (Yilela). 196. 

Iquitos, 87. 

Iroquois, 87, 224. 

Isistine (Lule), 100. 

Isleta (Pueblo Indians), 154. 

Issati (Sioux), 59. 

Isty-semole, or Seminoles, 169. 

Itapucuru (Brazilian), 213. 

Ite, Itenes, 88. 

Itonama, 88. 

luiadge (Quaykuru), 78. 

Juporocas (Botocudos), 67, 213. 

Juris, 89. 



Kaccbi, or Kaehiquel, 89, 224. 
Kadjak, 90, 224. 
Kaheten (Brazil), 20. 



Kahna (Blackfeet), 19. 

Kake (Sitka), 176. 

KalUpuiah, or YamkalUe, 202. 

Kalchaqui (Quichna), 159. 

Kalina, Kalinago (Caribs), 28. 

Kalisteno, or Knistenaux, 94. 

Kamakan (Menieng), 110. 

Kanas (Aymara), 16. 

Kanchis (Aymara), 16. 

Kangulit, or Inkiiliichliiat, 86. 

Kanzas, Kansas, 97. 

Kanze, or Konza, 97. 

Karaikas (Pescherai), 149. 

Karalits, or Greenlanders (Eskimo), 69. 

Karankas (Aymara), 16. 

Karina (Caribs), 28. 

Karitis, 225. 

Kasnas (Aymara), 16. 

KaUhba, CaUwba, 32. 

Kattanahaws (Minetare), 119. 

KaTeres (Maipure), 104. 

Kavasumsenk (Narraganset), 131. 

Kawelitsk (Flathead), 73. 

^Cawitchcs> 9 1 

Kechi(Califomia),26; (Diegenos), 63. 

Kechua, or Quiehua, 158. 

Keechies, or Kichais, 92. 

Keesam (Queen Charlotte's Island), 157:. 

Kemenetes (Pescherai), 149. 

Kenai, or Kinai, 92. 

Kenaize, or Kinai , 92. 

Kennekas (Pescherai), 149. 

Keres, 92, 154. 

Kettlefalls, or Sosiatlpi, 79. 

Keyes, Keyus, or Kichais, 92, 198. 

Kichais, 92. 

Kiche, or Quiche, 157. 

Kigamee (Queen Charlotte's Island), 157. 

Kikatsa (Crows), 58. 

Kikk^pu, 92. 

Killamuks, or Nsietshawus. (j^thead), 73* 

Killamuks (Lower), or lakons, 85. 

Killisteno, or Knistenaux, 94. 

Kinai, 92, 225. 

King's Biyer Indians (CalifomU), 26, 62. 

Kinn Indians, Chinn, or Atnahs, 15. 

Kioways, 94. 

Kiriri, or Sabuja, 164,225. 

Kiskapocoke (Shawanoes), 172. 

Kitunaha, or Kutanae, 98. 

Kiwomi, or Tihuex (Keres), 92, 187. 

Kizh (Edsh), or San-Qatoiel (Diegenos), 
62, 237. 

Kliketats (Sahaptin), 170. 

Knistenaux, 94, 225. 

Kochaboth (Guaykuru), 78. 

Kokama (Omagua), 137. 

Kollaguas (Aynvara), 16. 

Koltsha&es, 96. 

Kolnches, 96, 225. 

Konages, or Kadjak, 00. 



INDEX. 



251 



Konza, 97, 229. 

Kooyou (Sitka), 176. 

Kristenaux, or Knistenaujc, 94. 

Knla-napo, 97, 212. 

Eulino, or Chimano, 39. 

Kullespelm (Flathead), 73. 

Eunagaara (Caribs), 28. 

Kupeno (Moxa), 126. . 

Koskokwims, or Eoshkakchwakmutes, 98. 

Eatahba, or Catawba, 32. 

Euskokwimjuts, 226. 

Eutanae, Eutneha, Eutani, 98. 

Eatchin. 99, 226. 

Ewaiantl (Flathead), 73. 

Ewalhioqua, or Tlatskanai (Tahkali), 179, 

189. 
Ewenaiwitl (Flathead), 73. 
Ewigpak (Inkuluchliiat), 86. 
Ejganles, or Eigamies (Haidah), 86. 



La Soledad (Dieg^os), 68 ; see also Mot- 
sons, 232. 
Laguna (Pueblo Indians), 154. 
Lamano (Quichua), 159. 
Lamissa, or Lamano, 159. 
Lapanas, or Lipans, 226. 
Laymon, 99. 

Lenni Lenape, or Delaware, 63. 
Lenca, 99. 

Lipans, Lapanas, 226. 
Loucheux, or Eutchin, 99. 
Lapakas (Aymara), 16. 
Lule, 100. 
Lntuami, 100. 



Macamecnun (Brazilian), 213. 

Maehakalis (Brazilian), 213. 

Maokenzies f Illinois), 86. 

Maconis, 101, 213. 

Macos (Saliva), 166. 

Maconssies (Guyana), 79. 

Mag Readiugs, Indians at (California), 27. 

Maha, 101,226. 

Ma-ha-08 (Youmas), 205. 

Mahikan, or Mohegaa, 12S. 

Mala, or Maya, 102. 

Mainas, 103. 

Maiongkong (Guyana), 79. 

Maipures, 104, 226. 

Makaw (Upper California), 20. 

Makoby, 105. 

Malalis, 105, 213. 

Mame, Pokomam, 105, 227. 

Manaos, 105. 

Mandacaru (Brazilian), 213. 

Mandans, 106, 228. 

Manibas, or Baniwas, 17, 214. 



Manoas, or Manaos, 105. 

Manos de Perro (Texas Indians), 180. 

Mac^ityan (Guyana), 79. 

Mapoje (Saliya), 166. 

Maqua, 106. 

Marabe (Pueblo Indians^, 155. 

Maradi9os (Shoshonees), 174. 

Maramomisios, 228. 

Miuropa O^oracare), 206. 

Maschacaris, 107. 

Massaehussetts Indians, 107, 228. 

Massit (Queen Charlotte's Island), 157. 

Mataguaya, 109. 

Mataras (Lule), 100. 

Matlazinga, 109. 

Mauyais Monde (Dogrib), 66. 

Mawakwa (Guyana), 79. 

Maya, Maia, 102, 226. 

Mayorunas, 110. 

Mbaya, or Guay^uru, 78. 

Mechchaooh (Mohegans), 123. 

Mekos (Mexicans), 111. 

Menieng, 110. 

Menomonies, 111. 

Mequachake (Shawuioes), 172. 

MescaloB (Texas Indians), 186. 

Messisangas, 111, 228. 

Mexicans, 111, 228.. 

Miami, 116. 

Micmac, Mikmak, 117, 230. j 

Mije, 117. 

Milcocayac, Allentiao, Guarpes, 118, 230. 

MiUcite, 119. 

Minetares, 119. 

Minsi, Ministi (Delaware), 63, 120« 230. 

Miramiehi (Micmac), 117. 

Miskito, or Mosquito, 195. 

Misteco, or Hfixteka, 120. 

Mitlantongo (Mixteka), 120. 

Mixe, or Mige, 117, 230. 

Mixteka, 120, 230. 

Mobilians (Chickasaw^, 89. 

Mobimi, 12Lj 

Mochica (YungaV 206. 

Mochono (Moxa), 126. 

Mocoby, 121. 

Mocorosi, 122, 28L 

Mohavi, 122. 

Mohawks, 122, 231. 

Mohegans, 123, 231. 

Molele, or Waiilatpu, 199. 

Molopaque (Brazilian), 213. 

Moluches, or Araucans, 9.' 

Mongoyoz, or Camacans, 27, 213. 

Monoas, or Manaos, 105. 

Monqui, or Waikur, 198. 

Monsonik (Enistenanx), 94. 

Montagnards, Mountaineers, 107. 

Montauks, 173. 

Morotoco (Zamuca), 207. 

Mosotie (Moxa), 126. 



252 



INDEX. 



Mosquito, 123. 

Mountaineers, or Sheshatapoosh, 17ti. 

Moxa, Mossa, 126. 

Moyave, or Mohavi, 122. 

Mozka, or Muyska, 12S. 

Muchquanh (Mohegans), 123. 

Muchojeones (Mossa), 120. 

Mucury (Brazilian), 213. 

Muhhekanew Indians (Algonquin Mohe* 

gan), 8, 123. 
Munseyi, or Minsi (Delaware), 63, 230. 
Mundrucus, 127, 232. 
Muras, 127. 
Muskoghee, 127, 232. 
Mutsuns, 232. 

Muturicus, or Mundrucus, 127, 232. 
Muysca, 128, 232. 
Myncquesar, Mynckussar, 129. 

N . 

Naass, ISO. 

Nabadaches (Caddoes), 25. 

Nadowessies, Sioux, Dahkotahs, 50. 

Nagailer, or Tacullies, 178. 

Nagrandans (Chorotega), 48, 130, 232. 

Naguegtgagaehee (Abiponesj, 2. 

Nak-nanouks (Botocudos), 67. 

Nahuatl, or Mexican, 111. 

Namollo (Tshuktshi), 191. 

Nandakoes (Caddoes), 25. 

Nanticohe, Nanticoke, 130, 232. 

Narragansett, 131, 233. 

Nasqually, 73. 

Natches, 132. 

Natik, Nadik (or Massachusetts Indians), 

107. 
Nangatuck Indians (Pequot), 149. 
Navajos, 132, 233. 
Negro-Dutch (Creole), 56. 
Negro-English (Creole), 54, 
Negro-French {^Creole), 57. 
Negro- Portuguese (Creole), 56. 
Negro-Spanish fCreole), 57. 
Nehethawa (Enistenaux), 94. 
Nenawehk (Knistenaux), 94. 
Netela, or San Juan Capistrano (Diegeno), 

63, 237. 
Newfoundland, 133, 

New Brunswick (Mikmak), 117,133, 233. 
New Granada, 233. 
Nez-Perces, or Sahaptin, 170. 
Nheengaibas (Brazilian), 213. 
Nihaloitih (Chinuk), 41. 
Ningre (Creole), 54. 
Nipissing (Algonquin), 134. 
Nippegon, or Winnebagos, 200. 
Niquirans, 134. 
Noana (California), 26. 
Norton Sound, 134. 
Nottoways, 135. 



Nova Scotia (Mikmak), 117. 

Nouros (Brazilians), 20. 

Nsietshawus (Flathead), 73. 

Nuecos (misprint for "Huecos"), or Wa- 

coes, 198; see also page 245. 
Nusdalum, 135. . 
Nutka, 135, 233. 



Ocoles (Vilela), 1Q6. 
Oje (Tamanaques), 180. 
Ojibois (Chippewayj, 41. 
Ojibways, or Chippeways, 41, 
Okanagan (Sahaptin), 170. 
Okanagan (Atnah), 15. 
Oktolaktcs, or Otoes, 140. 
Olamentke, or liodega, 20, 212. : 
01- hones (Costanos), 58. 
Omagua, 136. 

Omaha, or Maha, 101, 226. 

Oneida, 137, 233. 

Onondaga, 138, 234. 

Ontoampas (Vilela), 196. 

Opata, or Tequima, 139, 185. 

Opatoro (Lenca), 100. 

Oregones, 139. 

Orejones (Texas Indians), 186. 

Orelhudos (Oregones), 139. 

Oristine (Lule), 100. 

Orotinans (Chorotegans), 48. 

Osages, 139, 234. 

Osawses, or Osages, 139, 234. 

Otchagras, or Winnebagos, 200. 

Othouez, or Otoes, 140. 

Oti^apu, or Attakapas, 15. 

Oto, Otoes, 140, 234; (loways), 87. 

Otomi, 141, 234. 

Ottare CCherokees), 87. 

Ottawas, 143. 

Ottogami, Onthagamies, or Sacs, 165. 

Ottomacque, or Ottomaku, 148. 

Ottomaku, 143. 
Otuquis, 144. 
Ous, or Osages, 139. 
Oyampis, 144. . 



Paoahuches (T^zfts Indians), 186. 
Pacaos, Pacoas (Texas Indians j, 186. 
Pacasas (Aymara), 16. 
Pacaguara, 144.. 
Paduca, or Comanche, 51. 
Paegans, or Piekans (Blackfeet), 19. 
Pahoja (Otoes), 140. . 

Pah-utah, or Chemehnevis, 85. 
Pajalates (Texas Indians), 186. 
Paiconeca, 145. 
Paiure (Tamanaque), 180. 
Pakasas (Aymara), 16. 
Palaihni, Palaiks, 145. 



INDEX. 



253 



Palencas (Tamanaqae), 180. 
Famanes (Texas Indians), 186. 
Pamaques (Texas Indians), 186. 
Pampas (Pnelches), 155. 
Pampa del Sacramento (Peru), 
Pampopas (Texas Indians), 186. ~ 
Pampticough, 145. 
Pani, or Pawnee, 147. 
Panos, 146. 

Papoloka, Popoluka, 152, 
Para (Brazilian), 218. 
Parechi (Tamanaques), 160. 
Pareni Parenes (Maipure), 104, 146. 
Pariagotos (Tamanaque), 180. 
Parias, (Tamanaque), 180. 
Pasaines (VUela), 196. 
Passa (Peru), 162. 

Passamaquoddi (St John's Indians), 165. 
Patachos, 146, 213. 
Patagonians, or Tehuelhet, 184. 
Paunaca (Paiconeca), 145. 
Paunch Indians (Crows), 58. 
Pawnees, 147, 235. 
Payaguas (Guaykuru), 78. 
Paycob-ges (Ges), 75. 
Pebas, 147. 

Pecos, or Yemes (Pueblo Indians), 154. 
Pehnenche (Araucans), 9. 
Pelus, or Wallawallas (Sahaptin), 170. 
Pend d'Oreilles, or Eullespelm (Flathead), 
73. 

Penobscot, 147, 235. 

Pennsylvanians, 148, 235. 

Pequod (Narraganset), 131. 

Pequot, 149. 

Pescherai, 149. 

Petiguaren (Brazil), 20. 

Pianoghotto (Guyana), 79. 

Piaroas (Saliva), 166. 

Piankashaws, 149. ■ 

Picaneux, or Piekans (Blackfeet), 19. 

Picori (Pueblos Indians), 154. 

Pieds noirs, or Blackfeet, 19. 

Piekans (Blackfeet), 19. 

Pihniques (Texas Indians), 1^6. 

Pikunche, or Puelche (Araucans), 9. 

Pima, Pimo, 149, 235. 

Pina, 286. 

Pinalefios (Apaches), 150. 

Pinols, or Pinalenos, 150. 

Piquas (Shawanoes), 172. 

Pirinda, 151. 

Piro, 151, 286. 

Piros (Chuntaquiros), 49. 

Piscous, or Piskwans (Flathead), 73. 

Pojuaque (Pueblo Indians), 154. 

Pojuate (Pueblo Indians), 154. 

Poko-mam (Mame), 105. 

Pokonchi, Poko-man, 151. , 

Polindaras (Coconucos), 50. 

Ponchas, Poncars (Maha), 101. 



Ponderays, Or Eullespelm (Flathead), 72. 

Ponkata-ges (Ges), 75. 

Popoluca, Papoloka, 152, 236. 

Pottawatome, 153. 

Pouteotamis, or Pottawatome, 153. 

Powhattans, 158. 

Poyes, Poyus (VutaHuilliche), 198. 

Prince WiUiamfs Sound, 154. 

Puans, or Winnebagos, 200. 

Puctunc (Maia), 102. 

Pueblo Indians, Keres, 154, 236. 

Puelche, or Pikunche (Araucans), 9. 

Puelches, 155. 

Puemaja (Yuma), 205. 

Puncaws, or Ponchas (Maha), 101 

Puquini, 156. 

PujunU (Sacramento Indians), 165. 

Purugotos (Caribs), 28. 

Pur)s, Puris, 156, 213. 

Quadus, 156. 

Quappas, 156. 

Qnaquare (Ele), 67. 

Quaquas (Salivu), 166. 

Quato (BrazQian), 213 j Guato, 77. 

Queen Charlotte's Island, 157. 

Quemaja, or Camoyes (Yusma, Cuchan), 
205. 

Quengues, or Cayuga, 33. 

Queres, or Eeres, 92, 154. 

Quiche, 157, 236. 

Quichua, 158, 236. 

Quime, or Cochitemi (Eeres), 92. 

Quintikuk (Narraganset), 181. 

Quito (Quichua), 158. 

Quoddi, or Passamaquoddi (St. John's In- 
dians), 166. 



Badigeurs (Shoshonees), 174. 
Bicaras, Biccarees, 163. 
Biccarees, or Bicaras, 163, 237. 
Boamaino (Mainas), l03. 
Bo-mo-nans (Costanos), 63. 
Boot-diggers (Shoshones), 174. 
Bucahee (Abipones), 2. 
Bumsen, Bunsienes, 163, 2J)7; (see alao 
under " Mutsuns," 232). 

8 

San Aldefonso (Pueblo Indians), 155. 

Santa Anna (Pueblo Indians), 155. 

San Antonio (Diegenos), 62. 

Santa Barbara, 167, 238. 

Santa Clara (Pueblo Indians), 155. 

San Diego (Diegeiios), 62. 

San Domingo (Pueblo Indians), 155. 



254 



INDEX. 



San Felipe (Paeblo Jndiuis), 156. 

San Gabriel (Diegeuoe), 62, 237. 

Saint John's Indians, 165, 2:^. 

San Juan (Pueblo Indians) 155. 

San Juan Capistrano (Diegenos), 62, 287. 

San Luis Obispo, California (Diegefios), 
02. 

San Migael (Diegenos), 62. 

San Raphael (Diegefios), 62, 212. 

Sabuja, or Kiriri, 164. 

Sao Pedro (Brazilian), 214. 

Sacramento Indians, 164. 

Upper Sacramento Indians (CaHfomia and 
Sacramento), 27, 164. 

Sacs, Said, Sakewi, 165. 

Sahaptin, or Shahaptan, 170, 237. 

Saki, 165. 

SaliTa, 166. 

Samipaos (Texas Indians), 186. 

Samuca, or Zamuca, 207. 

Sankikani, 166. 

Sapibokoni, 168, 238. 

Sarabeca, 168. 

Saramacoa (Creole), 56. 

Saste, or Shasties, 108. 

Satrahe, or Riccarees, 168. 

Satsikaa (Blackfeet), 19. 

Sanks, Sawkis, or Saki, 165. 

Sautenx (Chippeway), 41. 

Savanerie, 168. 

Sehnak Cunny (Tehnelbet, 184. 

Sekumne (Sacramento Indians), 1^5. 

Selish, or Flatheads, 72. 

Seminoles, 169, 238. 

Seneca, 169, 238. 

Seris, or Ceris (Pima), 84, 150. 

Serpens, or Shoshones, 174. 

Serranos (TehneUiet), 184. 

Setaba, or Passa (Quichua), 1^2. 

Sevemovskia, 170, 212, 239. 

Shahaptan, 170. 

Shara, or Cheyennes, 175. 

Shasties, 168. 

Shawhays, or Cheyennes, 175, 

Shawanoe, 172, 238. 

Shebayi, 173. 

Sheshatapoosh, 176. 

Shushwapnmsh (Tsihaili-Selish), Flat- 
heads, 73. 

Shinicooks, 173. 

Shoshonees, 174, 238. 

Shushwap (Flathead), 73. 

Shyennes, or Cheyennes, 175, 

Sicaunes (Tacullies), 178, 

Sjeveraovtsi, Sevemovskia, 239, 

Silla (Pneblo Indians;, 155. 

Similatnn (Lecca), 100. 

Sinaloa, or Cinaloa, 49. 

Sioux, or Dahkotah, 59, 239. 

Sirionos (Guarani)^ 75. 

Sitka, Sitcha, 175, 239. 



Situga (Betoi), 18. 

Sketapushoish, or Skoffies, 176. 

Skitsuish (Flatliead), 73. 

Skittageets (Queen Charlotte's Itsltuid), 

157. 
Skoffies, 176. 
Skwale (Flathead), 73. 
Slave Indians (Dogrib), 66. 
Smallrobes (Blackfeet), 19. 
Snake Indians, or Shoshnees, 174. 
Soaiatlpi (Flathead), 73. 
Soerigong (Guyana), 79. 
Sonora, 239. 

Souliers noirs (Crows), 58. 
Souriquois, 177. 
Spokein (Flathead), 72. 
Squallyamish, 177, 239. 
Stickeen (Sitka), 176. 
Stone Indians, 177, 240. 
Sussee, Sursee, 178. 



Tabalosa, 240. 

Tabayara (Brazilian), 213. 

Tacames (Texas Indians), 186. 

Tacana (Ynracare), 206. 

Tachies, or Inies (Caddoes), 2«'>. 

Tacullies, or Tahkali, 178, 240. 

TacTmas,or Ticunas, 187. 

Tahkali, or Tacullies, 179. 

Tah-le-wah, 179. 

Talamanca (Costa Rica), 54. 

Talatui, 180. 

Taluhet (Puelches), 155. 

Tamanaque, Tamanaki, 180, 1^40. 

Tamoiae, Tamoyos (Brazil), 21, 213. 

Taos (Pueblo Indians), 155. 

Taparita (Ottomakn), 143. 

Tapiguae (Brazil), 21. 

Tapiis (Chiquitos), 46. 

Tappen (Brazil), 20. 

Tarahumara, 181, 240. 

Tarasca, 182, 241. 

Tariana, 183. 

Taruma (Guyana), 79. 

Tatimolo (Totonaka), 190, 

Tatiquilhati (Totonaka), 190. 

Taurai (Guyana), 79. 

Tchekto (Tschuktchi), 191. 

Tchinkitane, 241. 

Tchnagmjutes, or Kuskokwims, 9-^. 

Tcho-ko-yem, 184, 212.. 

Tchuktchi (Aglegmutws), 3, 191. 

Tecunas, or Ticunas, 187. 

Teguas, or Tiluex (Kcrea), 187. 

Tehama (California), 26. 

Tehuetches CPuelches), 155. 

Tehuelhet, 184, 24L 

Tehuel Cunny (Tehuelliet), 18J. 

Tepeguana, 185, 24L 



Ttipoikolala (Miilalu), 130. 

Teqnimi, or OpiiU, 1»B, 185. 

Terra nsaTe lalud (Miknuk), IIT. 

Teinqne (Faeblo Indikoa), I'U. 

Teton*, 188, 

Jtaa Indiuia, 186, UI. 

■ihidft-;-Ls-JtiTii,^., c.t JJogrib, 66. 

Tibcruotti (anjriaa), TB. 

Ticorillu, erToneoaal; £>r "■"«■■"'"," 

186, 211. 
Ticonu, or Tioonu, IST. 
Tihiiex. 02, 1S1. 
Tikomeri (Mom), 136. 
TUmtik. or L'biniuio, S6. 
Timbiru, I8T, 213, ml. 
Timnioa, I8T, 242. 
Timaicuiii, or TimiuiM, 16T, 242. 



Tli^n 



*, 11. 



■inqia, 1) 



lo (Gujui*), 79. 
TlihUko (Hiiteka), 130. 
TbkaUt, or Kljkcut (Sahaptin), 170. 
Tlunud, or Lntuuui, 160. 
Tlaoqaalch, XJouuatcl), IBS. 
TUpueka, 1^. 
TU5CBlt<'C»B. ISS, ifi. 
Tlfttup{Chiu>lk). «l. 
TIklakanu (Tahkali), 1TB, IBB. 
Tnuna, or Kiuai, B'J. 
TobB, or Mooobj, lil. 
TokBDUu (Omagui), 13T. 
TokUtiDs (Lole), 100. 
Taltaki(MeiiuIi), 111. 
ToDOCDlc (Lole), 100. 
Toon-piooh (Mohcguis), 123. 
Totonuak. ISO, 313. 
TukaiUitliu (Spokeio, FlaLheid). 73. 
Tumak (^Sacnunento JodiaDa). IKS. 
TubinkitanB (Kolusohea), BO. 
Tibinok (CMuok). 11. 
TihiugiDJaWB, or Knakokwims, 98. 
Tahagatahi, ISl. 
Tihufctahi, 101, 312. 
TsihaUi-Saliah (FUlhead). 73. 
Tljnai. or Kinu. 03. 
TuttpDka{CaribaJ,28. 
Tuhar, loa, 213. 
TawDo, 1S2. 
Tiiooniwi, 319. 
TaoQDU, «i lunnas, IBT. 
Tohvslati (^Yamkallie), 1^2. 
Tulare lake Indiana (Califomiana, S6. 
Tulare iia, 313. 
Ta-lo-mo> (Coatoiuw}. S3. 
Tumgaraee (Siika), I7B. 
TiunmiiUioi (Braul), 21. 
TaDghuae, 102. 

Taulomne (CBliromiana), 37, 313. 
Topii, or Braiilians, 20. 
Tapmabk. Tubinamba (BruU), 30, 313. 
Tnpinis^iuiiB <Bn^),31, 318. 



Uainambea, 101. 

Uara-Mokun (Tanunaqoa), ISO. 

Uanua-Paccili (Tuuuwqiw), 180. 



1. Vsil,a 



1,213. 



Ucbee 

UKaijaohmulI^i 

der '■lTgalenUi.''ai^. 
Ukahipu, or Kikk»pUrfl2. 
Umpqua, or Tahkali, 170, IBS, 311. 
UnalaahkB, IDa, 211. 
Unakfhtgo (Delaware), S3. 



li (LIeUw 



-e).» 



Uncbagog (Stuuicoaka), 1T3. 
ljp«arok» (Crows). 68. 
Urabae(DRrien), 81. 
rraqii^ririB (liraziiiau), 311. 



Valientei (Costa Rica), 51. 
Tenados (Teiaa Indiana), 186. 
Vilela, IBS. 
Vii^Diaus, 167, 211. 
Vata-HaiUiche, IBT. 



Wacooa, or Wokkoaa, 201. 
Waoawa;, or Acoawaj, 2. 
Waooea, IBS (oogbt to be "Hoeooa," 

211). 
Wahtani, or Uanaana, 106. 
WaLtofiuna, or Otoes, 110. 
Wahloklak.flrOtoea. 110. 
Waicuri, Waikor. IBS, 218, 
WaiiUtpu, lOfl. 

(Qujaii»),7B. 

(Chinnk). 11. 
nanaa, or Natka, 139. 
WBllawalla (SahspUns), 170. 
WaDBini(lieUware), 83. 
Wftpanaehki, or Abenaki, I. 
Wapbiana (Gnjana), 7B. 
W»pisi«n-PBraHana (Gajana), 70. 
Wurau ((.invanB),79, 
Womws, llH'. 
Waahas, or Oaages, 199. 
WaUala (Chinnk), 11. 
Wawah, dr Oaagea, 13B. 
Weas, 315. 
Wee-jot, 200. 
Weits-pek, 200. 
Willamet (YambUle), 302. 



256 



INDEX. 



WUletpoos (Waiilatpu), 190. 
WinnebagoB, 200. 
Wish-oak, 201. 
Witchitas, 201, 245. 
Woccons, Wokkons, 201, 245. 
Woolwa, Chondal. 48. 
Woyawai (Guyana), 79. 
Wyandots, or Hurons, 84, 228. 



Xomanas (Brazilian), 213. 



Yae&na-Canny (Tehuelhet), 184. 

Yagaas, 203. 

Yakanaku, or Pescherai, 149. 

Yakema, or loakema (Sahaptin), 171. 

Yameos, 203. 

YamkaUie, 202. 

Yam-pai-o (Yuma), 205. 

Yankitlan (Mixteka), 120. 

Yanktons, Yanktonans, 203. 

Yaoi(Carib8),28. 

Yaqoi, 49, 203, 245. 

Yarora, 204, 245. 



Yeconoampas (Vilela), 00. 

Yete (Omagna), 137. 

Ypapana (Totonaka), 100. 

Yucuatl, or Nutka, 135. 

Yugelnut (Kinai), instead of Ingelmut, 93. 

Yukai, 200, 'il'2. 

Yule, 205, 

Yumas, 205. 

Yunga, 206. 

Yunka-Mochika (Yunga), 206. 

Yuracares, 206. 

Yuris, or luris, 89. 

Yurimagua (Omagua), 136. 



Zacapula, Zapotcca, 246. 

Zacatecas, 246. 

Zamuca, 207, 246. 

Zapari, 207. 

Zapoteca, 207, 246. 

Zeona, 208. 

Zoe (Cinaloa), 49. 

Zoque, 209. 

Zuui (Pueblo Indians), 154. 

Zutugil (Kachiquel), 89. 



THE END. 



London: Printed by Thomas Harrild, 11, Saliabury Square, Fleet Street. 



EERATA. 



rA«B LIMB 



2 




5 


40 


6 


10 


7 


14 


8 


8 


8 


10 


8 


11 


10 


32 


11 


3 


11 


19 


12 


22 



12 5 

14 18 
16 33 



17 


23 


28 


24 


32 


10 


33 


14 


35 




36 


26 


37 


28 


45 


17 


50 


29 


52 


14 


52 


19 


54 


10 


55 


23 


55 


24 


57 


32 


58 


2 


^8 


3 



add to AccAWAY, ** Wacawoyo." 

Jbr DaTes retid Davies. 

/(Mr Langue read Tongue. 

Jbr Quarpos read Guarpes. 

J(Mr puelloe rectd pueblos. 

ybr Atnapascan r«ac{ Athapascan. 

for Ti&alenos read Piualenos. 
ctfter 6 Yob. insert Folio. 
ctfter pp. 330 ituert This edition 
is without the " Vocabulario 
aque se anada la Doctnna 
Christiana." 

€t/ter 6 Tols. insert Folio. 

Arda, (Mfter Doctrina Christiana, 
etCyinsert This language being 
entuely unknown, the Lord's 
Prayer is given from the above 
book, 
from the bottom, for VoL II 
read VoL III. 

Jbr TicoriUas read Jicarillas. 

disconnect the words " New 
edition, enlarged (by D. de 
Gualdo?)" from the title to 
which they are attached, and 
connect them with the subse- 
quent title, line 34, to which 
they belong. 

Jor Isanno read Isauna. 

Jor Purugotos read Purugotes. 

Jor Kutahba read Katahba. 

Jor Queugues read Quengues. 

head-line and lines 4 and 8, Jor 
Chemehnevi read Cheme- 
huevi. 

Jor Ticorilla read Jicarilla. 

Jor 914 read 415. 

Jor KAnce read TAnse. 

Jor Nuevo retMd Nueva. 

Jor Putor read Putos. 

Jor Najarit re<»d Nayarit. 

Jor K6nigliohen read Kaiser- 
lichen. 

Jor Page 117 read Page 88 of 
Vol. I. 

Jor I voL read 2 vols. 

Jor Dominque read Doitungue. 

Jor en la langue read en langue. 

(rfter Fran^aises insert Par M. 
Goux. 



Tkum LtlfB 



61 
61 
62 
64 



68 
69 
69 
69 
70 



9 from the bottom,^/brNadowes8itar 

read Nadowessies. 
3 transpose after line 4. 

last line,yor Urabao rtfoctUrabae. 

26 &, 35, Jor Boscara read Boscima. 
32 add " The German original was 

published at Barby, 1789, in 

8vo." 
67 14 Jor Ququaro read Quaquaro. 
67 article Ele, insert after GUii, 

^'Balbi Atlas Fthnographique. 

Tab. XLI, No. 647." 
67 18 Jor Amores read Aymores. 
67 13 from the bottom, ybr plain read 

simple. 
Last line, Jbr Sutel read Sutil. 

2 Jor pays de retid paso del. 

3 Jor nordeste read noroeste. 
16 Jor Earalis read Karalit. 
29 Jor a voyage read a second voy* 

age. 
70 30 /or 1821 fvforf 1824, 
70 30 after 4to add pp. 559—569. 
70 42 Jor Schubert read Schubart 

70 43 Jor Index re<»d Register. 

71 18 Jor Helmesen rectd Helmersen. 

74 9 Jor Aleutan read Aleutian. 

75 30 Jor Guararo read Guarano. 

75 31 Jor Chiviguana read Chiriguana. 

76 34 Jor Fullah read Foulah. 

79 16jforTamanaken fv<uiTamanacan. 

80 34 Jor Camshava read Cumshawa. 

81 24 Jor Chatahsochee read Chata- 

hoochee. 
20 Jbr Inkuliichluate read Inku- 

IQchlQat, and omit Kangjulit. 
22 for £skimo read Eenai. 

27 & 28, dele from Kwigpak to 512, 
and read Yocabulare of the In- 
kiliks proper and of the Inka- 
lits-Yugelnut, pp. 481 — 487. 

5 for Iowa read loway. 

6 for Otae read Otoe. 
7ybr Iowa Mission read loway 

and Sac Mission Press. 
a/)f«r luris tJMtfH Jicarillas. (See 

under " Ticorillas " in the 

Addenda.) 
14 for du read de. 
29 for Bobeck read Bobek. 



86 

86 
86 



87 
87 
87 

89 



90 
90 



258 



ERRATA. 



rtnc LIN! 



91 11 for d'lle read de Tile. 

91 31 for Kawitschen reaff Kawitches. 

92 3 for Tiguex read Tihuex. 

93 2 for distinguishes four read fur- 

nishes vocabularies of two. 

93 3 dele among which are, and for 

InkaUt, and Ingehnut read 
1 nkalit- Yugelnut. 
9a 27 for Inkilik, InkaUt, and Ingel- 
raut read Inkilit and Inkalit- 
Yugelnut. 

94 24 for Moon read Moons. 

95 40 for Caultere read Carlton. 

96 11 for and read or. 

98 4 & 18 for Tchwagmjutes read 

Tshnagmjutes. 
98 7 for Kuskokwina read Kuskok- 

wim. 
100 15 for Isifitine read Isistine. 
100 24 /or IV rcaci III. 

103 5 from the bottom, for Kingdom 

read Kingdon. 

104 4 for Maranou read Maranon. 
104 17 for Avanoe, Kavere, read Avane, 

Cavere. 
104 18 for Guy punavoe read Guipunaye. 
106 26 for Upsaaoke read Upsaroka. 

113 35 /or 1855 rca<i 1555. 

114 11 for propiedad read propriedad. 
114 12 for Bibhoteca read Bibliotheca. 
114 Vo for Catredratico read Cathe- 

dratico. 
114 17 for Sacalo read Sacado. 

117 9 from the bottom,/or Terre neuve 

Island read Newfoundland. 

118 29 dele Mikokayak — (an error of 

Jiilg' 8, corrected in his errata) . 

122 6 for the read a. 

125 8 dele Colmnbus, May, 1787, pp. 
672. 

130 2 firom the bottom, for Murray 
Vans read Vans Murray. 

136 7 for anno read ano. 

136 9 for nordeste read noroeste. 

138 16 for Forst read Fort. 

140 5 from the bottom, /or Winnepago 
and Otoe Dialects read Winne- 
bago Dialect. 

140 6 for Rovet read Boret. 

141 2 after Indians irtsert to. 

143 13 for Ottowwaws read Ottawwaws. 

148 29 for 198 read 19, 7. 

149 11 for Kamenetes read Kemenetes. 

150 14 for liSl, 162 read 461, 462.> 



P&OK LIME 

52 12 for T. read J. 

52 15 for Hues read Hues. 

53 12 & 26, /or Pottawatame read Pot- 
tawatome. 

58 3 after Antigua dele the comma. 

58 38 for Manle read Maule. 

59 3 for Tucaman read Tucuman. 

60 27 & 28, for exploracioni read ex- 
plorazioni. 

63 15 for Nueco read Hueco. 

63 20 for Achasthers read Achastlians. 

63 26 for anno read ano. 

64 6 for Achastliers read Achastlians. 
70 21 for you read yon. 

70 26 & 29, for Chwachamaja read 
Chwachamaju. 

71 21 for Clicatat read Klikatat. 

75 2 from the bottom, for Archipel 
read Archipelago. 

76 6 for Eclikino read Eelikino. 
76 7 for Kooyen read Kooyou. 
76i 25 /or Messachutett read Massa- 
chusetts. 

78 11 for Saskatchewaine read Sas- 
katchewan. 

80 13 after Acherekotti insert Avari- 
kotti. 

80 30 after Paria insert a semicolon. 

82 . 24 for Girolamo read Jeronimo. 

85 24 for Girolamo read Jeronimo. 

86 16 & 29,/or Ticorillas read Jicarillas. 

87 8 for Tiluex read Tihuex. 

90 9 for Caja read Baja. 

91 2 for Kadjah Islands read Xadjak 
Island. 

91 11 for Tschuktchi read Tchuktchi. 
91 12 for western read eastern. 
91 15 for Wild read Nomade. 
91 16 for Tchouktschee read Tchoukt- 
chee. 

91 24 for 407, 408 read 467, 468. 

92 7 /or 3 read 2. 

93 29 for Document read Documents. 
95 19 for Ticorilla read Jicarilla. 

97 34 /or Vuta, HuilUche read Vuta- 
Huilliche. 

98 9 & 15, for Nueco read Hueco. 

99 7 for T. read S. 

201 5 for BoUoin read Boilvin 5 and. 

insert commas after Boilvin 
and after Cass. 

202 18 for Xallapuiah read Xalapuiah. 
-202 28 for 9 read q. 

204 9 for 3 read 2. 



London: Printed by Thomas Horrild, 11, Saliabuiy Square, Fleet Street.