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Full text of "Little men and women - Babyland"


' # 







FOR USE IN 



Primary Schools, Home i Kindergarten, 







D. LOTHROP & CO., Publishers, 
Boston, Mass. 



iSSo. 



COPYRIGHT BY 

0. LOTHROP & CO. 
1880. 



4vv 



0^ c .J^ 



Press of Rockwell and Churchill, 
39 Arch St., Boston. 




[ai. .ary, 1880. 
Vol. I. No. 1. 



Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Babyland. 
D. LoTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. 

[Coprrigbt, 1880, bj D. Lotrrop k Co., and entered at the F. 0. at Boiton as ncond-claal matter.] 



75 cts. a year. 
7 cts. a number. 



TWO PAIRS 

I KNOW two little boys. Their 
lames are Bob and Willy. 

They live on the same street. They 
"o to the same school. 







THE BOY WHO SAW THINGS. 



Both have bright eyes ; but Willy 
sees twice as much as Bob. 

This morning they walked side by 
side to school. 



OF EYES. V. c.. 

LISRARY 

On the way Bob saw a hand- 
organ man. He also saw three boys 
flying a kite. 

He said he was sure that this was 
all he saw. 

Willy saw the kite. He saw the 
hand -organ. But he saw other 
things, too. 

He saw a row of doves. 

They were sitting up under the 
eaves of a stone church. 

There were white doves, and gray 
doves, and purple doves ; and they 
were sitting in a long row. 

It made him glad to sqg them. 

He saw the ivy on the church. He 
wished there were vines on his papa's 
house. 

He saw red geraniums growino- 
in the windows of three houses. 



01 



PEDRO. REMEMBER S THANKS<iIVING. 



He saw soft white clouds moving 
across the sky. The sky was very 
blue. 

He saw that the boys with the kite 
had not much string. He gave them 
his ball of twine. 

He saw the hand-organ man looked 
hungry. He gave him a penny. 



He saw by the clock that he ctnd 
Bob must walk faster or they would 
be late. 

He saw that one of his overcoa 
buttons was almost off, and he must 
show it to his mamma. 

Which pair of eyes would you 
rather have ? 



PEDRO. 



He can sit, he can stand, 

He can climb up a tree ; 
He can hold in his hand 

A cup full of tea; 
He can eat a hot cake 

Without burning his thumb; 
He can hoe, he can rake, 

He can beat on a drum. 



He can run, he can hop. 

For Pedro is spry ; 
He can dance like a top, 

He can laugh, he can cry ; 
But there's one little thing 

This monkey can't do, 
And that is to sing 

And chatter like you ! 



REMEMBER'S THANSKGIVING. 



Little Remember — yes, that was 
her real name — was tired. 

The rolling of the ship made her 
sick. The ocean was very wide. Ev- 
ery morning little Remember came 
on deck and looked for land, but she 
never could see any. 

Sometimes she was afraid they 



never, never should see land again. 

It was three months since they left 
England. 

It was summer, then. The hedge- 
rows were full of blossoms. The 
fields nodded with grain. The birds 
sang in the woods. 

How long ago it seemed ! 



1^ Every 



REMEMBER S THANKSGIVING. 



Every day Remember would ask 
her mother if they were not " most 
home." 

I " Yes, dear, I hope so," the mother 
would say. 

"Will our new home be as pleas- 
ant as the old one used to be ? " 

** We will try to make it so." 

Then the mother would kiss her ; 
but sometimes Remember would feel 
a tear fall with the kiss. 

Perhaps Remembers mamma was 
homesick, too. 

One night the little girl could not 
sleep. 

Early in the morning she crept 
out of her berth. 

A berth is a little bed on a shelf. 

The storm was over. The water 
was very still. 

She went up on deck. 

While she stood by the railing, 
where she could see the water, she 
heard a faint " peep, peep." It sound- 
ed as if it were right over her head. 

She looked up and saw a tiny bird 
on the top of the mast. 

She felt sure it was a little land bird. 
" O, I hope we are near the shore ! " 
said little Remember. 

She ran and told the captain. He 
^oked through his glass. 



Yes ! there was a faint line in the 
distance. 

It was land. It was Cape Cod. 

Soon the good ship May Flower 
sailed into harbor in the bay, and 
stopped, and the little Pilgrim, Re- 
member Allerton, saw land once more. 

It was the twenty-first of Novem- 







LITTLE REMEMBER. 

ber, 1620. " Let us thank the dear 
God!" said this little Remember, 
who lived more than two hundred 
years ago. 

Although there was po roast tur- 
key, nor mince pie, nor plum pud- 
ding, I don't think any child c^^r 
saw a happier Thanksgiving Day. 

—B. E. B. 



A LITTLE COUNTRY GIRL 



A LITTLE COUNTRY GIRL. 




/•iz; r_)>a ' ,77 



k 



What will Lolly do in summer ? 

She'll pick berries red, 
Trim her hair with dandelions, 

Weed her flower-bed. 
Tie her curls with yellow corn-silk. 

Make long daisy chains, 
Ar^ ^^lay " keep house " with all 
her dolls, 

livery time it rains. 



A LITTLE COUNTRY GIRL. 



^ 



What will Lolly do in autumn ? 

See the yellow grain, 
And pick golden-rod and asters, 

Up and down the lane. 
Saturdays she'll go a-nutting, 

Wade among the leaves, 
And ride upon the loaded cart 

High up among the sheaves. 



mi:^u^,.MA 



/f^'f^x .f0f^ 






P^^^m 



ka^?^2s-. 



■'« 



_ 2 ^ ilmmfnif^mC^. 



What will Lolly do in winter? 

She will skate and slide, 
Play at games and look at pictures 

By the fireside. 
She will sew upon her presents 

For the Christmas tree, 
And through snowy winter nights 

Sleep snug as snug can be. 

—K.L. 



C5^sfi 



MpCJttij'lii 



THE TRUE STORY OF DICK S DOLLAR. 



THE TRUE STORY OF DICK'S DOLLAR. 



Dick was a boot-black. 

The only home he had was in an 
o' ellar. 

xlere he slept every night with 
Tim, the news-boy. 







Dick's stand was close by a large 
depot. 

" Have a shine, mister ? Only five 
cents a shine !" 

That was what Dick calle(} out as 



Sometimes nobody seemed to hear 
him. ' 

But one day there came a shower 
of rain, and Dick had just as much 
work as he could do. 

One after another the five-cent 
pieces dropped into his pocket. 

At last it was so heavy he had to 
turn it inside out. 

When he counted the five-cent 
pieces he found he had twenty. 

" Why," said Dick, " twenty half- 
dimes make the same as one hun- 
dred cents. And a hundred cents 
make just one dollar ! " 

Dick felt rich. 

He and Tim had paid the rent of 
their room that morning. He had a 
whole loaf of bread at home. He 
thought he had plenty to wear, al- 
though he was barefoot and out at 
elbows and knees. 

Yes, he could do what he chose 
with that dollar. ..# 

I will tell you what he did — for 
this is not a " make believe " story. 
It is true, Dick is a Boston boot- 
black. 

Dick took his pile of five-cent 



WHAT IS THIS ? 



pieces to the kind gentlemen who 
were getting up the " Poor Children's 
Excursions." 

" I want you to take this dollar," 



said he, " and give some little boy a 
real jolly day in the country — just 
as you did me last year ! " 

—B. E. E. 



WHAT IS THIS? 




m'^^~'/:W 




Boys, what is this ? 
" A head," says John. 
" A rabbit's head," says Will. 
" The head of a hare," cries Dick. 
Yes, it is a head. It is much like 
a rabbit's head. 

But Dick has answered right. It 



is the head of a hare. The hare is 
the big cousin of the rabbit. 

He is usually lighter in color. He 
is often white. But the wild rabbit is 
brown. 

Like the rabbit, the hare has very 
long ears; they are often longer than 
the head itself. 

Like a cat, hares hear the least 
sound. 

The hare is timid. If he hears 
any strange noise he runs away vtr) 
swiftly. 

Both rabbits and hares have long 
whiskers like a cat's. 

Both live in the woods. 

Rabbits have homes underground 

Their big cousins have only nests 
in the bushes. 

Some kinds of rabbits are kept s 
pets. These tame rabbits vary in 
color from white to black. It ; 
harder to tame and keep a hare. 



8 



WALTERS FRIEND. 



WALTER'S FRIEND. 




liked to stand at the big 
window and look into the 
walnut tree and count 
the nuts. 

When he saw Gray 

I he called to him : ** Look 
out! you will slide off!" 
But Gray hopped up 
into the tree. He ran 
about among the yellow 
leaves. He picked off a 
nut. 



His name was Gray. 

He was small. He was spry. He 
liked to climb. He was sitting on 
the roof the first time Walter saw 
him. 

Walter was up in the attic. He 



Then he sat down on a limb to peel 
his nut. 

While he nibbled he looked at the 
boy in the window, with two bright 
eyes. 

"You will fall!" called Walter. 

Gray laughed. His laugh sounded 
like this : 

Chir-r ! chir-r-r! 

Then he leaped down and came 
across the roof toward the window. 

Walter thought he was coming in 
— but no ; he was gone ! 

The next day they saw each other 
agawi. 

This time he showed Walter how 
fast he could peel nuts. Every 



WALTERS FRIEND. 



time a nut was peeled Walter thought 
he was coming to the window with 
it. But when he was almost there 
he would disappear. 

Walter could never see where he 
went. 

He often wondered about it. 

One night there was a storm. All 
the leaves fell. The trees were left 
bare. There were no more nuts. 
Little Gray, too, was gone. 

Walter watched, but little Gray 
never came back. 

But, one day, when Walter was up 
in the attic, he heard a noise. 

It was like a low, roguish laugh. 



Walter knew that " chir-r ! chir-r-r ! " 

There stood Gray. 

His bright eyes were full of fun, 
and he turned and ran round behind a 
big chest of drawers. 

Walter came after him so quick 
he could not hide. 

So he made the best of it. He 
showed Walter his nest in an old 
basket, and his store of nuts, and 
the hole under the window where he 
went in and out. 

After that they saw each other 
every day, and had good times. 

Walter's friend was a gray squirrel. 

— E. F. P. 




THE WINTER HOME OF WALTER'S FRIEND. 



lO 



PUDDING AND MILK. A REQUEST FROM THE BIRDS. 



PUDDING AND MILK. 




Two little stools 
Side by side ; 

Two little girls, 
Mother's pride, 

Jolly as kits. 

Plump as mice ; 
Pudding and milk- 

Isn't it nice ? 



Two little bowls 
Round and white ; 

Two little spoons 
Silver bright ; 



Pudding and milk, 
Mothers know, 

Is just what makes 
Little girls grow I 



A REQUEST FROxM THE BIRDS. 



Dear little girls, throw us a crumb ; 
Dear little boys, please bring us 

some ! 
O, don't you know, when falls the 

snow. 
That dinnerless the birdies go ? 
Yet, dears, we earn, with summer 

song, 
Our daily food the winter long. 
A little bird with hunger wild 
Is wretched as a starving child. 




WHAT PERCY FOUND. 



II 



WHAT PERCY FOUND. 




He found 
it, one Satur- 
day, out in the wheat-field. It had 
been there all summer long. 

The tall wild flowers had peeped 
at it. The winds Had swung it to 
and fro. But Percy was the first one 
who held it in his hand. 

It was as round as an apple. 

It was as soft as silk inside. 

Can you guess now what it was 
that Percy found ? 

No. 

Then you cannot guess what was 
in it. 

Well, it was something that held 
ten pairs of eyes, and ten sets of 
little feet. 

It was a house. 



It was a home. 

A mother and her nine children 
lived in it. 

Yet it was so small that Percy 
carried it away with him, on the palm 
of his hand. 

Can you guess now? 

No. 

Well, I shall have to tell you what 
it w^as. 

It was the nest of a field mouse. 

A field mouse is the smallest ani- 
mal that has four feet. 

There were nine baby mice, and 
their mamma, in the nest that Percy 
found. 

He kept them all. He put them 
in a cage. They were pretty pet« 

The mother mouse eats grain. Sh- 
laps water like a dog. 

Percy has taught her how to turn 
a wheel. 

Sometimes, she will hang from 
the top of the cage by her long tail 
She will swing there for many miii 
utes. She will keep time with the 
ticking of the clock. 

Percy never forgets to feed hi. 
tiny pets. 



12 



TICK TOCK. 



A NAUGHTY SHEEP. 



TICK TOCK. 



Tick tock, tick tock — 

I'll count the seconds by grand- 
mother's clock. 

When sixty have ticked, the min- 
ute-hand shows 

That one minute comes as another 
one goes. 

Sixty seconds a minute, and then 
it will take 

Sixty minutes, I know, an hour to 
make. 

The length of a day I can easily 
mark — 

Just twenty-four hours of day-light 
and dark. 

Seven days make a week ; and then 
fifty-two 

Of these weeks make a year, if my 
counting is true. 

A hundred long years, and then 
there will be 

A century here, for some one to see. 




A NAUGHTY SHEEP. 




What very soft steps 'you take, naughty sheep ! 
You wish me to think you're good, naughty sheep ! 
You've come through a hole in the fence, naughty sheep 
And now you must go straight back, naughty sheep ! 



ABOUT CHESTNUTS. 



13 




CHESTNUT LEAVES. 



CHESTNUT BURR. 



OPEN BURR WITH NUTS. 



DRY CHESTNUT BLOSSOMS. 



ABOUT CHESTNUTS. 



Alfie's eyes are blue. Alfie's 
eyes are very bright. He sees every- 
thing. 

He knows the birds' names. 

He can tell you about the trees. 

He can tell you how chestnuts 
grow. He has watched the chestnut 
trees since spring to find out. 

The chestnut trees did not bloom 
early. 

Alfie wondered why. He was 
afraid they might not bloom at all. 

" And what would the squirrels do 
then ? " asked he. 

" Eat acorns, perhaps," said I. 

Alfie laughed. 

One day, long after the pink apple- 



blossoms had come and gone, Alfie 
came running in from the lawn. 

" Papa, papa," cried he, " the chest- 
nut trees are all covered with fringes." 

" Fringes ? " said I. 

" Yes, long, green frm^.v ; and 
some are nearly white. Come, paj. 
come and see ! " 

So I followed Alfie out to the 
chestnut trees ; and, sure enough, he 
was right. 

At the ends of the twigs, all ovc^ 
the trees, like tufts of fringe, wci*. 
the chestnut-blossoms Alfie had been 
watching for. 

I broke off a branch. 

I showed Alfie that each thread 



H 



ABOUT CHESTNUTS. 



of the fringe was a blossom-sterp. 

We picked off the bits of blossoms 
that grew along the stem. Alfie 
said they were like beads on a string. 

Alfie did not like to smell the 
odor of the blossoms, 

Alfie went to see the chestnut 
trees every few days. 

One day he came back with a 
sober face. He had something in 
his hand. 

" See, papa," said he, " the fringes 
have turned brown ; and they are all 
blowing away." 

" We will go down and see about 
this," said I. 

We found the fringes had not all 
blown away. One thread was left at 
the end of almost every twig. 

The tiny dry blossoms still clung 
to t^-^.e stems. 

But soon Alfie's quick eyes saw 
that the one or two nearest the branch 
ere gore. In their place were queer, 
green balls. 

These ba-lls \Yere about as big as 
peas. They had sharp prickles all 
v^er them. 

Alfie's eyes twinkled like stars 
hen I told him these were young 
hestnut burrs. 



. Alfie cut one of theifi open with 
his jack-knife. He found little chest- 
nuts growing inside. 

Then his eyes twinkled again. 

After that, all summer, Alfie 
watched the burrs. They grew fast 
— "to make up for blossoming so 
late," Alfie said. 

Soon they were as large as mar- 
bles. Then as big as walnuts. By 
autumn the prickly green burrs were 
as big as Alfie's own brown fist. 

At last, one October day, after a 
sharp frost, Alfie knew that nutting- 
time had come. 

Here and there, over the trees, the 
burrs were half open. Alfie could 
see the plump, brown nuts inside. 

Some of the nuts, and some of the 
burrs, too, had fallen to the ground. 

Alfie tried to pound the burrs open 
with a stone. He pricked his fingers. 
Then he stamped them open with his 
little boot-heel. 

He picked up his pocket full of nuts. 

Then he climbed up and broke off 
a twig with two chestnut burrs on it. 
He brought it in to me. 

The burrs were beginning to turn 
brown. One was shut tight. One 
was wide open ; and in it were three 



WHERE DID IT GO t 



nuts. The inside of the prickly burr 
was as downy and soft as velvet, and 
as yellow as gold. 

" And, O, papa," said Alfie, " the lit- 
tle blossoms that didn't grow to burrs 



have stayed on all summer. They 
look like little burrs themselves, don't 
they, papa ? " 

And papa thought they did. 

— Q. S. F. 



WHERE DID IT GO? 



It was a beautiful ball of soap. 
It was a lovely golden-brown color. 

It was so clear that you could see 
:hrough it. 

They bought it to wash the baby 
.vitn. 

When the baby saw it, he cried 
or it. 

Any smart baby^ would have cried 
or it, because it was so pretty. 

He took it in his small, fat, dim- 
pled hands. 

What fun it was to see it skip 
iway, and roll across the floor and 
nto the corners ! 

Once baby grabbed it very tight, 
md bit it with his one tooth. But 
't could not have tasted good, for he 
made a dreadful face. 

Then they gave him a bath in his 
little bath-tub. 



They used this lovely ball of golden- 
brown soap. 

Baby splashed it in the water. 

He laughed, because it always 
slipped through his hands. 

But they forgot to take the beau- 
tiful ball of soap out when they took 
baby out. 

They did not think of it until after 
baby had played "This little pig 
went to market " with his toes, and 
had been kissed all over, and dressed, 
and sung to sleep. ^^ 

Then they went to look for it. 

But it was "gone. 

There was nothing in the bath-tub 
but some soap-suds, with the sun- 
shine rnaking little rainbows in the 
bubbles. 

Where did it go ? 

— M. i:. 



i6 



FANNY. 



FANNY. 



" Where is my blanket ? " said 
Fanny. 

Fanny stood in her stable, munch- 
ing a wisp of hay, after her supper of 
warm meal. 

It was growing dark, and she felt 
drowsy. 

She turned her head this side and 
that. 

She looked down on the floor. 

She looked in the manger. 

** What can Tom have done with 
my blanket ? " said she. 

" I hope he does not mean to leave 
.ae ^ght without it ! 

" ^ onder if he would like to have 
his m jther forget to put the blanket 
on his bed. 

'' Well, I must find that blanket 
myself. 

'' I h(r)e it is in the stable some- 
where ! 

" Ah ! there it is ! " 

The stall was boarded up on one 
side as high as Fanny's shoulder. 

The blanket lay across the top 
board. , 

Fanny had found it. 

But how should she put it on ? 



She turned her head as far as she 
could. 

She took the blanket in her mouth 




FANNY DOES THE BEST SHE CAN. 

She pulled it down on her back 
just as it was. 

She could not spread it out. 

It did not make her much warmer 
to have it in a roll on her back. 

But she had done her best. 

Next morning her master foun( 
the blanket rolled upon her bad 
when he came to feed her. 

He thought she was a smart littk 
horse. 

Don't'you think so, too? 

Every night now Fanny is c; 
fully blanketed. 




February, 1880. 
Vol.1. No. 2. 



Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Babyland. 
D. LoTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. 

f CopTTlshl. 1S80, bj D. LoTHBOP k Co.. and entered Bfc the P. O. ftt Boston ms Hcond-due matter.] 



75 ots. a year. 
7 cts. a number. 



BUNNY'S BREAKFAST. 



This is a true story. 

It is about a hungry rabbit. 

Once he belonged to two little 
oys. 

These little boys were very fond of 

lady who lived next door. So they 

ave her their handsome white rabbit. 

This lady's little baby was afraid 
f the rabbit. 

She was afraid of his long ears. 

When she saw him she crept away 
5 fast as she could. 

The rabbit was afraid of the baby. 

He was afraid of her voice. 

He had never heard a baby cry 
ifore. 

When she cried he hopped away 

to a corner and sat down and 
embled. 

'ie would not come out of the cor- 



ner until the baby wa§' carried up 
stairs. Then he came out. 




BUNNY AT BREAKFAST. 



One day the lady and her b: 
v/ent away* for a visit. 



i8 



BUNNY S BREAKFAST. 



They were to stay away all night. 

They were so glad they were going 
they never thought about the rabbit. 

They forgot that he would want 
his supper and his breakfast. 

The rabbit hopped about in the 
kitchen all the forenoon. He was 
so glad the baby was gone ! 

In the afternoon he was hungry. 

He hopped out into the shed. His 
pan was empty.' 

He was very sorry his mistress 
had forgotten him. 

He was lonesome and hungry 
when he went to sleep that night. 

He was lonesome and hungry 
when he woke next morning; 

He hopped again into all the cor- 
ners. He hopped out into the shed. 

He could find no breakfast. 

Then he hopped through into the 
sitting-room. 

But there was no breakfast there. 

He saw another door open. It 



was not wide open, but he pushed 
through. He was now in the parlor. 

He saw something in this room 
that made him glad. 

He saw breakfast. He saw plenty 
of breakfast. 

His mistress had not forgotten 
him. 

The floor was covered with green 
leaves and flowers. They looked 
fresh and tender. 

The rabbit thought he was in a 
garden. 

He must have thought so, for 
when his mistress came home at 
night she found the rabbit had 
gnawed the leaves and flowers of the 
parlor carpet. 

She gave the rabbit away and 
bought a new carpet. 

Please remember to leave some- 
thing for your pets to eat when you go 
away from home. They need their 
regular meals as much as you do. 



Something is growing down under the snow, 
Down under the deep, cold, freezing snow; 
Something for Willy and Lilly, I know. 
Something is growing down under the snow. 
Bread ! Bread is growing down under the sr 
" Ha, ha ! " laughs Willy. " Yes, surely, 'tis so ! " 



FIVE LITTLE CHICKENS. 



I< 



'^^ ^*^ 




FIVE LITTLE CHICKENS. 



Said the first little chicken, 
With a queer little squirm, 

"O, I wish I could find 
A fat little worm ! " 

Said the next little chicken. 
With an odd little shrug, 

" O, I wish I could find 
A fat little bug ! " 

Said the third little chicken, 
With a sharp little squeal, 

" O, I wish I could find 
Some nice yellow meal ! " 



Said the fourth little chicken, 
With a small sigh of grief,* 

"O, wish I could find 
A green little leaf ! " 

Said the fifth little chicken. 
With a faint little moan, 

" O, I wish I could find 
A wee gravel stone ! " 

" Now see here," said the mother, 

From the green garden patch, 

" If you want any breakfast, 

You just come and scratch ! " 

— U. F. p. 



THE LITTLE HOUSE ON THE CORNER. 

It was a very old house. It was a | This corner was where two streets 
very little house. ! met. 

It stood on a corner of land t...t^ , An old lady and her two little 
lookeci 'ike the point of a fiat-irdn. 1 grandchildren Yw^.d m this house. 



20 



THE LITTLE HOUSE ON THE CORNER. 



The little boy's name was Carl. 

The little girl's name was Gretna. 

Their father and mother were dead. 

They were Germans. The little 
house stood almost on the border- 
line between France and Germany. 

France and Germany are countries 
across the Atlantic Ocean. 

You can sail for these countries 
from Boston harbor. 

At the time I am telling you about, 
the French and German people were 
at war with each other. 

One day Carl heard the men in the 
streets talking to one another. 

. " The French soldiers will be here 
to-day," they said. 

" They will turn the town upside 
down ! 

" We must hurry away with our 
families." 

Carl ran home and told his grand- 
mother and Gretna. 

" Oh, dear ! " said the little girl ; 
" what shall we do ? 

" We have nobody to take care of 
us ! 

" We cannot get away, because dear 
grandmother cannot walk." 

** No, we never will go and leave 
grandmother here," said Carl. 



" The good God will protect us," 
said the old grandmother. 
. When it grew dark they shut the 
blinds of the little house. 

They sat down together by the 
fire. 

They did not dare to go to bed. 

About midnight they heard the 
blast of the French trumpets. 

Then, soon, they heard a heavy- 
tramp of feet outside. 

Every minute they expected to 
hear a loud thump at the door. 

But no ! the sounds grew fainter 
and fainter. 

By and by all was still. 

When morning came, Carl peeped 
out. 

Quietly, quietly, all night, the snow 
had been falling. 

High drifts of snow were piled 
above the windows. 

The little house on the corner was 
hidden from the street. 

The French soldiers had not seen 
it. 

It was the only house in the town 
that they had not harmed. 

" Praise the good God ! " said 
Grandr^jth I said he would tab' 

care of . 



OAK TREES. 



21 




WHICH IS THIS? 



WHICH IS THIS? 



OAK TREES. 



One day Percy brought a hand- 
ful of acorns into the house. 

He had picked them up under the 
two great trees by the gate. 

One tree was a red oak. The other 
was a white oak. 

Some of the acorns had fallen out 
of their cups. 

These were long and slender ; and 
they were of a brown color. 

Percy cracked one of them between 
his teeth. 

It was quite sweet, like a chestnut. 

Then he tried another. 
—This one was short and thick; and 
it was tightly fastened into its cup. 

He found this acorn was very 
bitter. 

He was surprised. 



He had thought that all acorns 
were alike. 

He did not know that the white 
oak bears sweet acorns. 

He did not know that the red oak 
bears bifter acorns. 

He did not know, before, that there, 
was more than one kind of oak 
tree. 

His mother told him to run out 
and pick off a leaf from each of the 
trees by the gate. 

He thought, at first, the leaves 
were just alike. 

But when he put them side by side 
he saw they were different. 

The leaves of the red oak were 
lossy. 

They were also cut into deep point 



very g 



22 



OAK TREES. 



The leaves of the white oak were 
more blunt. 

They looked as if their points had 
been rounded off with a pair of scis- 
sors. 

The bark of the red oak is very 
dark. 

The bark of the white oak is of a 
lighter color. 

The bark of both kinds is used in 
tanning leather. 

There are more than twenty kinds 
of oak trees. 

The live oak keeps green all 
through the winter. 

It grows in the South. 

The scrub oak never grows to be 
more than four feet high. It has 
tiny acorns striped with black. 

Bears and deer are very fond of 
scrub oak acorns. 

The pin oak grows in swamps. 
The trunk of the pin oak looks as if 
great nails had been thrust half way 
into it and left there. 

The wood of the oak is very strong. 

Builders use it for the floors and 
rafters of buildings. 



Coopers use it for the staves of 
barrels. 

Tables, chairs, and all kinds of 
furniture are made of it. 

Parts of carriages and plows are 
also made of oak. 

The crooked branches of the iron 
oak are used for the knees of a ship. 

They are bent up just like a knee 
and hold the beams of the ship to- 
gether. 

The corks that we use in bottles 
and jugs are made from the bark of 
a kind of oak. 

It is called the suber oak, and 
grows in Spain and ?*ortugal. 

Spain and Portugal are countries 
across the ocean. 

They are south-east from us. 

Next morning, as Percy walked 
along to school, he looked up at the 
trees. 

His little sister laughed because 

he kept saying : 

** White oak, red oak ! Red oak, 

white oak ! White oak, white oak, 

red oak ! " 

— B. E. E. 



SEEING THE WORLD. 



23 



SEEING THE WORLD. 

" Do see those beans run up the poles ! " said ^^ 
little Miss Pumpkin Vine. /I 

She was speaking to Mr. Bumble Bee. He had | 
come to make a call. 'f ' 

" Oh, that is nothing new ! " said Bumble Bee. 

" Well," said Miss Pumpkin Vine, " I have al- 
ways thought the ground was good enough for 
my pretty, yellow blossoms. Certainly, then, it is 
good enough for those mean little bean flowers." 

"There wouldn't be room enough for everybody 
if everybody had to live in the same place," said 
Mr. Bumble Bee. 

Then, with a cheerful buzz, he flew over the 
fence. 

Miss Pumpkin Vine looked after him with 
wishful eyes. 

She thought it would be pleasant to have wings. 

" Oh dear ! " said she, " I would like to see 
more of the world. It is too 

down 




24 



SEEING THE WORLD. 



here on the ground. I'm tired of it ! " 

She threw out her arms. 

The tips of her green fingers 
touched one of the poles. 

How surprised little Miss Pump- 
kin Vine was ! 

She at once began to climb like 
the beans. 

She climbed for many days. 

At last she reached the tip top of 
the pole. 

'• It is grand to see so far," she said 
to herself. 

" I should be very happy and glad 
if my head did not feel so heavy and 
bad." 

Her yellow blossoms had been 
growing all this time into pumpkins. 

It was hard for her to hold these 
pumpkins up there in the air. 

" I wish I could lie down and 
take a nap," said she. " I am really 
very, very tired. 

But she could J'nd no place on the 
tall pole to lie down comfortably. 



There she staid three or four days. 

Her head ached. 

Her back ached. 

Her arms ached. 

For the pumpkins grew heavier 
every day. 

She did not like to own that she 
had made a mistake. 

But she did say to herself, one 
day, that possibly it was not the best 
place for pumpkins on the tip top of 
a pole. 

At last. Jack Frost took pity upon 
her. 

One cold night he helped her down 
to the ground. 

Next day, as Sir Bumble Bee flew 
by he heard Miss Pumpkin Vine 
talking. 

** The best place for pumpkins is 
down on the ground," said she. 

" I am sure of that. 

"The beans may climb as many 

poles as they like. 

" I have seen enough of the world." 

— E. 



A chubby little sister 

Was rubbing at her tub;. 

A chubby little brother 
Came up to help her rub ; 



The chubby little brother. 
Fell down in with a cry ; 

The chubby little sister 
Then hung him up to dry. 



A TRUE STORY ABOUT A BIRD. 



2c; 



A TRUE STORY ABOUT A BIRD. 




A pair of humming-birds 
built their nest in a tree. 

The tree was a butternut 
tree. 

It stood near a house. 
From a chamber window 
the family could look into the nest. 

The nest was not much larger than 
a large thimble. 

In this nest they could see the 
beautiful little mother sitting on her 

eggs. 

There were only two eggs. 

They were about as large as peas. 

The people in the house were care- 
ful to never disturb their small neigh- 
bors. But they often went to the 
window to look at them. 

When the sun shone on the birds, 
through the leaves, they looked like 
two small bits of a rainbow. 

The father bird used to come to 
the window to sip honey dew out of 
the honey-suckles. 



As he drank the dew he made a 
noise like the loud buzzing of a bee. 

He made it by moving his wings 
swiftly. 

By and by the eggs were hatched. 

It was a pretty sight tu watch the 
parent birds. 

They would fly back and forth a 
a hundred times a day to feed their 
two tiny babies. 

These two bird babies were not as 
large as two bees. 

One afternoon there were signs of 
a heavy shower. 

" What will become of the poor 
humming-birds ? " said their friends 
in the house. 

" If we move the nest, the parent 
birds will be frightened. 

" Perhaps they would never go into 
it again. 

"What shall we do for them? 

" The baby birds will die if they 
are exposed to the storm. 

" Will the old birds know enough 
to pfotect them in any way ? " 

The little mother bird soon showed 
that she knew what she was about. 



26 



GREAT EXPECTATIONS. 



Some of the family, at the window, 
saw her grasp a large leaf with her bill. 

She spread this out over her nest. 

There was a hole in the leaf. 

She slipped this hole over a small 
stick in the side of the nest. 

This stick held the leaf in place. 

The baby birds were safely covered. 



Then she flew away. 

When the rain was over the mother 
came back. 

She unfastened the leaf. 

She found her baby birds dry and 
warm, and ready for their supper. 

Was she not a nice little mother? 

— ili. 0. J. 



GREAT EXPECTATIONS. 



When I grow to twenty-one, 
I will plant a field of corn. 



When the leaves are fresh and green, 
A slender stalk shoots up between. 




LOOKING INTO THE FUTURE. 



When the corn begins to sprout, 
Two wee leaves come peeping out. 



While the stalk keeps on to grow. 
The tiny ears begin to show. 

When the ears are long and thin. 
The pretty silk begins to spin. 

When the pretty silk is spun. 
It turns the color of the sun. 

When the summer sun is gone, 
It 's time to gather in the corn. 

When this corn is gathered in. 
What a fortune I shall win ! 

— M.JSi W. 



THREE TRAVELLERS. 



27 



THREE TRAVELLERS. 



One day, Freddy, Minnie and little 
Tot came into the house together. 

They went up to nurse and told 
her that they were three great trav- 
ellers. 

" Indeed ! " said nurse ; " are you ? " 

" Yes, we are," said Tot ; " and we 
want an ocean." 

" Please make an ocean for us," said 
Minnie. 

"We have boats," said Freddy. 
"We would like so much to sail them 
about on an ocean." 

They held up their boats. 

When nurse saw them she said 
they certainly ought to have an 
ocean. 

So she made an ocean. 

She made it in a large wash-tub. 

There were six pailfuls of water in 
this ocean. 

" But," said Minnie, " we want a 
blue ocean." 

]5o nurse made the water blue. 

She made it blue with indigo. 

Then Tot said she wanted a salt 
ocean. 

So nurse put some salt in the tub. 

When the ocean was finished, Fred 



said the ocean water down at Rowe's 
Wharf was not blue. He said it was 
green. 

Nurse was sorry the ocean was not 
the right color, but she thought the 
boats would sail on it just as well. 

When she had gone in, the three 
great travellers laughed and clapped 
their hands. 

" Look at our deep blue sea ! " 
they shouted. 

Minnie sat on the east side of the 
tub. She said she lived in England. 

Fred sat on the west side. He 
said he lived in America. 

Minnie said there had been so 
much wet weather in England that 
the wheat crop was spoiled. 

Fred said he would send her some 
flour. 

He said there was always plenty of 
wheat in America. Flour is made of 
wheat. 

So he loaded his boat with barrels 
of flour. 

Then he sailed it over the ocean 
to Minnie. 

The barrels were empty spools. 

It was great fun to play that the 



28 



THREE TRAVELLERS. 



spools were barrels, and to fill the 
holes with flour. 

Tot loaded her boat with red and 
white clover. She called it hay. 

Minnie sent a very funny load back 
to the United States. 

Her boat was loaded with little 
china dolls. Some were white and 
some were black. 

She said they were emigrants. 

Then the bell rang, and the three 
great travellers went in to dinner. 

What do you think little pussy 
did while they were gone ? 



She saw the little boats move and 
she wanted to play with them. 

She put her paw on one. Over in 
she went. Splash ! 

The travellers heard her and ran 
out. 

" Man overboard ! " cried Fred. 

Tot's hay was tipped over. She 
said it was a shipwreck. 

. Tot pulled pussy out. She tied up 
one of her paws with a handkerchief. 
Then pussy ran away to tell her 
mother. 

— K. T. W, 



THE LITTLE CHIEF. 




I AM my mother's little man ; 
I am the chief of all the clan ; 



I know there's Ned and Fred and Ted, 
But if you please, sir, I'm the Head. 

They like their play, and so, you see, 
Who 's left to be the man but me ? 
My mother knows I am the one 
To do that thing which must be done. 

I sweep the walks ; I tend the door ; 
I go on errands to the store ; 
And any day I'd run a mile 
To see my pretty mother smile ! 

You needn't laugh because I'm small ! 
Just being big, sir, isn't all — 
I'm much a man' as any man 
If I do everything I can ! 



A QUEER POLICEMAN, 



29 



A QUEER POLICEMAN. 



All city boys and girls have seen 
policemen. 

The boy with bright eyes who 
lives in Boston tells me they are big 
men. 

They wear navy-blue clothes, with 
large brass buttons. 

They also wear a leather belt. 

A heavy stick hangs like a sword 
from this belt. 

The wise little girl who lives in 
Boston tells me that policemen " keep 
the peace." 

The boy with bright eyes says that 
means keeping men from fighting, or 
quarreling, or doing wrong in any 
way. 

My queer policeman does not look 
at all like the Boston policemen. 

My policeman is small. 

My policeman usually wears a 
pretty uniform of slate-colored fea- 
thers, with white spots. 

My policeman '' keeps the peace " 
between timid chickens and wild 
hen-hawks. 

My policeman is a fowl. 

His name is Guinea-fowl, or Pin- 
tado. 



He belongs to the turkey family. 

He is about as large as a common 
hen. 

His legs are short. 

His tail is short; and droops al- 
most to the ground. 






MMILmA 




THE GUINEA-FOWL. 



His head is naked, or only has a 
few hair-like feathers. 

He is bold and very noisy. 

His voice sounds like the creaking 
of a rusty hinge. 

Some farmers always keep a few 



30 



MORE ABOUT CHESTNUTS. 



Gyinea-f owls with their flocks of hens. 
They think their harsh cries frighten 
away hen-hawks. 

Guinea-fowls come from Africa. 

They live in the woods, on the 



banks of rivers in large flocks. 

They stay together in flocks of 
two or three hundred. 

They eat grass and insects. 

— C.S.P. 




Here is a picture of my little friend. 

I don't know his name, but I like 
him. And I know where he lives. 

Every day he goes by my window. 
He smiles up at me. I smile down 
at him. 

His cheeks are so red and round ! 
I should like to pinch them, just once. 

I notice that he never goes by late. 



He never goes by crying. 

He never kicks at a dog. 

He never " scats " at a cat. 

He never crowds up against other 
boys. 

He never looks cross ; and I think 
I know why. 

Sometimes when I pass his moth- 
er's house after dark the curtains are 
up. I see my little friend at supper. 

His supper is always a big cup of 
new milk, with nice brown bread. 

No cake. No pie. 
So I know why he smiles so much. 
He smiles because he never feels sick 
and ach-y. 

Sometimes little boys are naughty 
because they are ach-y. 



MORE ABOUT CHESTNUTS. 



" All aboard ! " shouted the con- 
ductor. 

Ding, dong ! went the engine bell. 



The whistle screamed. 
Then the long train began to roll 
out of the great depot. 



MORE ABOUT CHESTNUTS. 



31 



Soon we left Boston behind us. 

Alfie was curled up on the seat 
beside me. 

" Now, papa," said he, " tell me 
more about chestnuts." 

The day before, at home, he had 
brought in the last of the nuts. 

He and the squirrels had found 
them all at last, every one. 

This morning he had wanted to 
go into the city with me. 

He wished to see what became of 
the big bags of chestnuts the men 
gathered in the woods. 

So I had taken him to market. 

In that market nuts are sold by 
the bushel to the storekeepers. 

Then we went to one of the stores 
where we saw nuts sold by the quart 
and the pint to the boys and girls. 

Once, at a street corner, we saw a 
whole jwagon-load of chestnuts. 

Tnc driver was trying to sell them 
to the people that went by. 

Once a moment he would call out 
so loud that Alfie put his hands up 
to his ears. 

" Chestnuts / Chestnuts ! Sweet 
chestnuts ! Only ten cents a quart ! " 

Alfie counted seven men and four 
boys who stopped to buy. 



But Alfie liked most to see the 
chestnut roasters. 

Some of them were little girls. 

Some of them were little boys not 
much larger than Alfie himself. 

They each had a queer little stove. 

These stoves had long legs and 
little ovens. 

The shell of each nut was cut 
with a sharp knife before it was 
roasted. 

If this were not done the nut would 
burst into pieces as soon as it was hot. 

The nuts were roasted until the 
shells curled apart at these cuts. 

Then the yellow meat was tender. 

Sometimes the chestnuts were not 
sold as fast as they were roasted. 

Then they were put in the oven to 
keep hot. 

On one stove Alfie had seen some 
very large chestnuts. 

They were as big as four common 
nuts. 

Now, when he asked me to tell 
him more about chestnuts, I told 
him about those large nuts. 

They do not grow in America. 

They grow in the southern coun- 
tries of Europe. 

They are plenty in those countries. 



32 



MORE ABOUT CHESTNUTS. 



In the chestnut season, poor peo- 
ple almost live upon them. 

They eat them raw. 

They roast them. 

They boil them. 

Sometimes they grind them into 
sweet yellow meal. 




ONE OF THE CHESTNUT ROASTERS. 

They make puddings of the chest- 
nut meal. 

They make bread of the chestnut 
meal. 

They make cake of the chestnut 
meal. 

Sometimes they stick chestnut 
meats together like pop-corn balls. 



Alfie was pleased when I said that 
American chestnuts were sweeter 
than European chestnuts. 

There is a famous chestnut tree 
on Mount Etna, in Italy. 

Mount Etna is a volcano. 
. A volcano is a mountain that 
smokes at the top like a chimney. 
Sometimes it sends up fire also, and 
long streams of melted stone run 
down the mountain sides. 

The chestnut tree on Mount Etna 
is one hundred and sixty feet around. 

The trunk is hollow. 

When it rains people often go into 
this hollow tree for shelter. 

This tree is sometimes called "The 
Hundred Horse Chestnut," because 
a great lady with many friends on 
horseback once found shelter there 
in a storm. 

Alfie said all the boys in town 
could go nutting under that tree. 

I told him of a big chestnut tree 
in France. That chestnut tree is one 
thousand years old. 

It still bears nuts. 

I should have told Alfie more, but 

the train stopped, and we were at 

home. 

— (7. S. P. 




Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake a7id Babyland. 



March, 1880. 
Vol.- 1. No. 3. 



D. LOTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. 

[Gopjright, 1880, b7 D. LoTBaoF h Co.. and entered at the F. O. at Boston aa second-clau matter.] 



75 cts. a year. 
7 cts. a number. 



PUSSY'S CHOICE. 



Pussy slept in the barn with her 
three kittens. 

They had a nice hay nest. This 
hay nest was warm and soft. 




Mary's pet. 



The kittens were comfortable. 
But mother Pussy was not satis- 
fied. 

She knew about a place which she 



thought the kittens would like better. 

This place was a little girl's trun- 
dle-bed. 

Do you know what a trundle-bed 
is? 

Perhaps you never have seen one. 

Trundle-beds are not much used 
now. Long ago they were common. 

Then the bedsteads for grown peo- 
ple were higher than they are now. 

A trundle-bedstead was like a low 
square box, with four feet. 

It had casters fitted into its four 
feet, so that it could be rolled, or trun- 
dled, under the large bed. 

It staid under the large bed in the 
daytime. 

It was pulled out at night. 

The little children slept in this 
trundle-bed. 



34 



PUSSY S CHOICE. 



Mary's trundle-bed was soft. It 
had a white pillow. 

It had a silk bed-quilt, made from 
one of mamma's dresses. 

This silk bed-quilt was quilted in 
little squares, like a checker-board. 
In every square there was a blue 
flower. 

Little Mary liked this silk bed- 
quilt very much. 

It was so soft and so pretty. 

Pussy liked it too. She was al- 
lowed to lie on it sometimes. 

One day Pussy ran into the house. 

She came from the barn. She had 
something in her mouth. 

She went through the kitchen so 
fast that the cook did not see what 
she had in her mouth. 

The cook thought pussy had caught 
a mouse. 

Pussy ran right through the kitch- 
en, into the hall, and up-stairs. 

She crept under the big bed. 

She jumped up into the trundle- 
bed. 

She put something down on the 
soft, silk quilt. 

Then she jumped out and ran 
down-stairs. 



After she had gone, something said, 
'* Mi-ew, mi-evv ! " 

That was what Mary heard. O, 
such a little mi-ew ! 

Mice don't mew. 

So it was not a mouse. 

The mi-ew came frohi under the 
big bed. 

Mary pulled out the trundle-bed. 

She saw a tiny kitty on her pretty 
silk quilt. 

It was a lovely white ^kitty, with 
black spots. 

Mary ran back to the window. 

She saw pussy going straight back 
to the barn to get her other little 
kitties. 

But mamma said that this couldn't 
be allowed. 

This is what mamma sang to her 
little girl : 

" Puss and her kittens 

Must sleep in the hay ; 
And the bed be kept tidy 
For my little May ! " 

But the first little kitty staid in 
the house. Mary tied a blue ribbon 
around its neck, and it always was 

Mary's pet. 

—31. 0. J, 



Winnie's troubles. — how gip went on a journey. 



35 



WINNIE'S TROUBLES. 

" I never shall be big," 
Said little Winnie Winch ; 

" I have tried for a month 

And I haven't grown an inch — 

I know, for I measured 
By a mark on the wall. 

Little cups, little books, little desks, 
little clothes — 

For seven long years I've had only 
those. 

Then thepoor small Winnie 

Made a great wise plan 
How to grow very fast ; 

And away she ran. 
When she came in again 

She was — oh, so tall ! 
Her gown swept the floor 

From the door to the wall ; 

She walked up and down, till she tripped in her train, 

And then she was glad to be a small girl again. 

— E. F. P. 




HOW GIP WENT ON A JOURNEY. 

(A TRUE STORY.) 



GiP was a dog. 

He was small, shaggy, and pretty, 
with bright eyes. 

I knew Gip. He lived in Salem. 



His master was a carpenter. 
One day his master went away in 
the cars. 

He went to build a house for a man 



36 



HOW GIP WENT ON A JOURNEY. 



who lived in Baytown, by the sea. 

Before he left home he shut Gip 
up in a large room. 

He did not wish Gip to follow him. 

Gip cried hard to be let out. 

He grew tired of walking up and 
down and barking. , 

At last he jumped up on a table 




WAITING FOR THE BAYTOWN TRAIN. 

and looked out of the window. 

But it was no fun to look out and 
watch the cats in the yard when his 
master was gone. 

He thought about it for two hours. 

By and by his mistress heard some- 
thing go crash, crash — rattle, bang ! 

She looked out, and' there was Gip 
running out of the yard. 

She called, but he ran on. 

" I must watch him," she said ; 
" he cost too much money to lose." 

She put on her hat and cloak and 
followed him. 



Gip ran to the depot with his little 
sharp nose close to the ground. 

His mistress followed. 

Three trains of cars stood in the 
station. 

Gip smelled them all. He turned 
away. 

He was not pleased. 

Five or six trains came in and 
went out. 

Gip did not like one of them. 

At last his mistress said she must 
go home. She had left her little baby 
fast asleep on the bed. 

Gip would not go with her. 

The man who looked after all the 
trains said he would watch Gip for 
her. 

She thanked him. She said, ** My 
husband went to Baytown this morn- 
ing on the first train. 

** He will not come back for a 
week. Gip wants him." 

" I understand," said the man. " I 
will send you word about Gip." 

That night he told her what hap- 
pened after she went home. 

The little dog walked back and 
forth like a man. 

He smelled of every train which 
came in and went out. 



HOW GIF WENT ON A JOURNEY. 



37 



When the Baytown train came at 
last, he barked, and jumped about. 

The conductor said, " Who's dog 
is that?" 

When he heard the story he said, 




"which way did my master go?" 

" A dog that knows where he wants 
to go need not buy a ticket." 

Th^n Gip sprang up the car steps 
and went in. 

He took a seat close to the window 
and looked out. 

One of the men on the train tried 
to tease him. , 

He tried to make him get off at 
every place where the cars stopped. 

Gip did not like it. He sat still 
and growled. 

When the cars rolled into Baytown, 
Gip sprung out. Then he looked all 
around. 

The conductor said, '* He knows as 
much as a child ; let him alone." 



Gip decided at last which road he 
would take. 

Then he ran on more than a mile. 

At last he found his master at 
work. 

One of the men went after Gip, 
and told his master he would give 
him one hundred dollars for him. 

His master would not part with 
his wHie, loving dog. 

He had never worked in Baytown 
before, and Gip had never been in the 
cars before. 

How could Gip tell which cars 
went to the sea-shore, and which 
went to the city? 

How did Gip know when he got to 
Baytown ? 




"O, I KNOW ! " 

How could Gip tell it from the 

other places ? 

But Gip did many strange things 

in his short life. 

^K. T. W, 



38 



A PIECE OF RUBBER. 



A PIECE OF RUBBER. 




IX- 

^ear- 
o 1 d 
P e r- 
cy is 
learning 
to draw. 
He has 
a drawing- 
book, two 
pencils, and 
apiece of 
India-rub- 
ber. 

The lead 
in one of 
the pencils is very hard. 

This pencil makes fine light marks 
on the paper. 

The other pencil is filled with soft 
lead. 

This pencil makes broad dark 
marks. Percy says these dark marks 
are hard to rub out. 



^^^i*aS^ 



GATHERING THE SAP. 



One day Percy's little brother, 
Robin, asked what his piece of rub- 
ber was made of. 

Percy could not tell. 

He asked his mamma. 

She told him that India-rubber was 
a kind of gum that drops from trees. 

Then she told Percy and Robin 
to bring the big atlas. 

She turned to the maps of South 
America and Asia. 

On these two maps she pointed 
out the countries where the rubber 
trees grow. 

" The rubber trees are very tall 
trees," said mamma. 

" The branches are all at the top. 

" Early in the morning the rubber 
gatherers go out and cut many holes 
in the trunks of these tall trees. 

" Under each hole they fasten a lit- 
tle cup. 

" By and by these cups are full of 
a yellow-white sap, or juice, which 
drops from the holes in the trees. 

" This juice looks like good, rich 
milk. 

" The rubber gatherers often mould, 
out of clay, odd little bottles, and 



A PIECE OF RUBBER. 



39 



sometimes the shapes of animals. 

" Over these shapes they pour the 
thick, gummy, milky rubber juice. 

", Then they hold these shapes 
over hot fires. 

" The heat hardens the juice. 

" It also makes the color darker. 

" When the first coating of gum is 
dry, they wet it again, dry it, wet it 
again, dry it, and so on until the coat- 
ing of dried gum is very thick. 

** When the last layer of gum is dry, 
they break out the clay inside and 
throw it away. 

"Then the curious rubber shapes 
are ready to take to market. 

" They are carried to the city on 
the tops of long poles." 

" Why don't they take them in 
baskets ? " asked Robin. 

" Because they are often quite 
sticky. It takes the gum a long time 
to dry." 

" Is my piece of rubber," asked 



Percy, "made of the pure gum?" 
" I think so," said mamma. 
" The purer it is, the better it will 

rub out pencil marks. 

" When they wish to make the best 

kind of pencil rubber they tear or 

grind the gum into fine bits. 

" These bits are carefully washed, 
"Then they are pressed together 

under^eavy rollers into sheets. 

" The sheets of rubber that are 

« 

made in this way are very firm and 
fine. 

" These sheets are then cut into 
little blocks by great shears that 
work under water. 

" Then the blocks are put in long 
iron trays and dried in the sun. 

" After this they are sent to the 
stores." 

" And little boys like me, who are 
learning to draw," said Percy, "go 
into the stores and buy them." 

—E. E. B. 




Yes, little cat, you may come and look out; 
I '11 hold you tight and you needn't pout — 
It's the naughtiest thing I ever heard. 
That you should wish to dine on a bird — 
On a dear little bird ! 



40 



A LONG CHASE. 




WHICH WILL GET IT ? 



A LONG CHASE. 



Mr. Brown's six ducks are out for 
their first spring swim. 

There are five white ducks, and 
one black one. 

They quacked and quacked as they 
came down from the barn-yard to the 
bank of the stream. 

They made as much noise as six 
boys and girls. 

"Yes, the ice is gone," said the 
first duck, as he swam away. 

" We'll have a good long swim," 
said the second duck, as he, too, 
swam away. 

" The air is like summer," said the 



third duck, as he, too, swam away. 

" See the pussy willows," said the 
fourth duck, as he, too, swam away. 

" O, isn't this water delicious ? " 
said the fifth duck, as he, too, swam 
away. 

The sixth duck came last. 

The sixth duck said nothing. . 

The sixth duck swam on as fast 
as he could. 

Soon the sixth duck was at the 
head of the procession. 

^Ah, the sixth duck has seen a little 
frog sitting on a log ! 

The sixth duck means to have 



A LONG CHASE. 



WHAT IS IT.'' 



41 



that tender frog for his lunch. 

The five other ducks dip and splash 
and enjoy their bath. 

The sixth duck swims close by the 
log. She turns up one eye. She 
stretches up her neck. She opens 
her long flat bill — snap ! 

" O, see ! she's got the first frog of 
the season ! " cry the five other ducks. 
" Divide ! divide ! " 

But the sixth duck makes believe 
that she doesn't hear. 



And now there is a chase ! 

How the six pairs of webbed feet 
paddle ! How they dash and splash 
the water ! How the long necks 
stretch forward ! 

How mad the sixth duck is ! She 
is growing tired. The frog is get- 
ting heavy. She can't get a chance 
to take even one bite. 

I think the black duck will get the 

frog, don't you ? 

— E. F. P. 



WHAT WAS IT? 



It was brown. 

It was hard. 

It grew inside a rough husk. 

It was brought across the sea. 

It was brought from a hot country. 

In that hot country it grew on 
a tall tree. 

It held food and drink. 

A little brown animal climbed the 
free. 

He had bright eyes and sharp 
claws, and a long tail. 

He pulled off this strange thing 
in the rough husk and threw -it 
down. He threw down many others. 

A man picked them up. 



He put them in a basket. 

He carried them on board a s^.Ip. 




THK STRANGE THING TN' ITS HUSK. 

They were brought to New York. 
At the wharf they were put into a 
wagon. 



42 



WHAT IS IT? 



Then they were carried to a gro- 
cery. 

A gentleman bought one. 

He took it out of the husk. 

He carried it home to his children. 

They had never seen one. 

They wanted to play with it. 

The kitten patted it with her paw, 
smelt it, then ran away. 

They rolled it towards her. 

She was afraid of it. She arched 
her back, and spit at it. She ran off 
into a corner. 

•* Papa, how can we open it ? " the 
children asked. " Is it good to eat ? " 

Papa took a gimlet, and bored two 
oi three holes in it. 

He i.,fld it over a cup. 

Out c^'me something like milk. 



The children liked this queer milk. 

Then he cut through the hard shell 
with Tommy's hatchet. 

There was a white meat inside. 

The children liked this, too ; but 
it was hard. 

The mother grated this white 
meat into a dish. She put in milk, 
and eggs, and sugar, and lemon. 

She baked it in the oven. When 
it came out, it was a delicious pud- 
ding. 

Sometimes you eat candy, and lit- 
■ tie cakes, made from the same kind 
of hard white meat. 

Who knows what it is? 

What country does it come from? 

What little animal climbed the 

tree, and threw it down? 

— M. 0. J. 




O, a wonderful scholar 
Ls our little Kate! 



She reads in a primer ; 

She writes on a slate ; 
Her lines are not even ; 

Her O's are not round; 
And her words in the reader 

Could not be found. 

Her sewing — what puckers! 
What stitches ! what knots ! 



A WONDERFUL SCHOLAR. 



POLLY S CHAIR. 



43 



And along the whole hem, 
There are tiny red spots ; 

Her weekly reports 

Tell how oft she has spoken ; 

And there's not a rule 

That she never has broken. 

Yet she comes to mamma 
For a smile and a kiss, 



As if a " bad mark," 

Should be paid for by this. 
And she cries in delight, 

While she swings round her hat : 
" I'm a wonderful scholar, 

For I can spell * cat ! ' 

C-A-T, Cat!'' 

~K,L, 



POLLY'S CHAIR. 



Mary and Nellie had a parrot. 

She was not a green parrot. 

She was silver-grey. 

She came from Africa. 

She came in a ship. The captain 
gave her to their mother. 

She did not talk much. 

The little girls did not know how 
to teach her to talk. 

She could only speak her own 
name, " Polly." 

The little girls wished she could 
speak their names. 

But they liked her very much. 
She was gentle and good. 

Some parrots are cross. They 
scold and bite. 

This parrot would not bite or 
scratch. 



She was kept in the nursery. 
She had a large, round cage. 
It was made of tin. 




SEE WHAT I'OLI.Y DID ! 



It looked like silver. It was very 
bright and pretty. 

There was a ring in the cage. 



44 



MISS PUSSY S SICKNESS. 



Polly used to sit in the ring some- 
times and swing. 

She did not stay much in her cage. 

The door of the cage was always 
open. 

She went in and out, and hopped 
around as she pleased. 

One chair in the nursery was al- 
ways called " Polly's chair." 

It was just like the others. 

But Polly always perched on the 
back of this chair. 



She never perched on the other 
chairs. 

A cup of bread and milk was set 
in this chair for her every day. 

She went to it and ate when she 
pleased. 

She nibbled the back of this chair 
with her sharp beak, until it looked 
as you see it in the picture. 

Mary and Nelly show this chair to 

visitors. 

—M.J. 



MISS PUSSY'S SICKNESS. 




DR. grey's patient. 

Miss Pussy is ill ; 
She lies very still 



In her snug little bed, 
With a pain in her head. 

" O doctor ! " cries she, 
" Pray what can it be 
That gives me such pain 
On the top of my brain ? " 

Says old Doctor Grey, 
" Excuse me, I pray, 
For seeming so rude. 
But it is for your good ; 

" I really do think — " 

(This he says with a wink !) 

" You have eaten a slice 

Too much of young mice ! " 

—E. E. B. 



JIMMY S FRIEND. 



45 



JIMMY'S FRIEND. 



Jimmy had a friend. 

His friend was a little red calf. 

No little boys lived near Jimmy. 

So he was glad he had the little 
red calf for company. 

They had many good times to- 
gether. 

Every morning Jimmy took Bossy 
out of the barn. 

He tied her with a long rope to a 
tree in the field. 

There she could eat grass all day 
and lie down in the shade. 

He led her back to the barn every 
night. 

But Bossy was not always willing 
to be led. 

When she was left to go as she 
pleased she would as soon go one 
way as another. 

But when Jimmy tried to lead her 
she would pull back to go in the way 
Jimmy did not want her to go.< 

The monier-t she felt Jimmy pull 
on the rope she would act naughty. 

She looked very funny when she 
shook her little red head at him. 

Did Jimmy get angry and tug 



hard at the other end of the rope ? 

O, no ! 

Jimmy knew what do. He turned 
Bossy around. 

Then he made believe to pull her 
the other way. 

Of course Bossy would back the 
other way then. But this time it 
would be just as Jimmy wanted her 
to go at first. 

Jimmy always enjoyed this fun. 

Bossy had her way, and he had 
his, at the same time. 

But this was the only fault Bossy 
had. 

She was very happy and frisky. 
Sometimes she would start up and 
run across the field as fast as she 

go- 
Then Jimmy had to let go the 

rope. 

If he did not, Bossy would drag 
him along, and the rope would cut 
his hands. 

Sometimes he would fall down on 
the grass. 

Once Jimmy tried to stop Bossy 
by a trick. 



46 



jimmy's friend. BUMBLE BEE IN PRISON. 



He let her go past a tree on one 
side while he went on the other. 




THE WRONG ONE IS STOPPED. 



He thought the rope would come 
against the tree, and stop her. 
But Bossy was not stopped. 



Instead she ran around and around 
the tree so very fast that the rope 
was wound round and round 
and round Jimmy himself. 
Before he could think he 
i^Ji^z was bound hand and foot to 
the tree. 

Then Bossy stopped and 
looked at him. 

Then she came up closer. 
Then she began chewing 
the leg of his trousers. She 
gnawed a great hole before 
Jimmy's cries brought some 
one to help him. 
Jimmy did not try another trick 
on his little friend, Bossy. 
This is a true story. 



BUMBLE BEE IN PRISON. 



One day Bumble Bee staid out 
among the flowers the whole after- 
noon. 

He flew as fast as he could from 
one blossom to another, to see which 
was the sweetest. 

He knew he liked white clover best. 

The blossom of the clover is a 
bundle of cups. 



At the bottom of each cup there 
is a very small drop of honey. 

Bui the bees can find it, and the 
bees can get it out. 

The drops of honey^n white clover 
are sweeter than the drops of honey 
•in red clover. 

He knew he liked clover best ; but 
all this afternoon he had been flying 




BUMBLE BEE IN PRISON. 



47 



in a garden where there was no clover. 

About four o'clock he paid a visit 
to Holly Hock. 

Holly Hock had a very tall stalk. 
Her pink flowers were at the top of 
this stalk. 

Bumble Bee went into one of these 
pink flowers. 

He sat down to rest, and to eat the 
sweet food he found there. 

The wind rocked the stalk back- 
wards and forwards. 

He felt as if he was in a pretty 
pink cradle. 

By and by he grew sleepy. 

He felt so sleepy that he forgot all 
about going home. It was very nice 
to lie in the pink cradle. 

By and by something made a noise 
and woke Bumble Bee. 

He stretched his legs. 

Then he stretched his wings. 

Then he thought he would go 
home. 

But when he tried to get out he 
could not find the door. 

He went around and around, but 
he could not find any door. 

Holy Hock had shut up her leaves 
and twisted them together closely, 
just as we shut up our houses at 



night and fasten the doors. 

Bumble Bee felt vexed for a mo- 
ment. 

But he soon went to sleep again, 
and did not wake until morning. 

Then he heard a loud voice close 
to him. 

The voice belonged to Hatty. 

Hatty was a little girl who loved 
to get up early and run into the gar- 
den and sing and shout. 

When Bumble Bee heard her he 
began to buzz and hum and try to 
get out. 

But Holly Hock had not yet 
opened the doors. 

By and by Bumble Bee heard 
Hatty speak : 

"Oh! what do I hear? I believe 
there is a bee shut up in this flower! 
I mean to pick it off and carry it into 
the house to show to Aunt Sarah." 

Then she broke off" the top of the 
tall stalk. 

Bumble Bee was whirled around 
and tossed from one side to the other. 
He felt very much frightened. 

Hatty heard his loud buzzing. She 
thought she would just take one 
peep at him. 

So she began to pull open the 



48 . 



BUMBLE BEE IN PRISON. 



pink leaves of the shut-up flower. 

By this time Bumble Bee wasquit( 
angry with little Miss Hattie. 




BUMBLE BEE LAUGHS AND STARTS FOR HOME. 



He pushed through the opening 
and took hold of Hatty's finger and 
stung it just as hard as he could. 



Hatty dropped the stalk, and began 
to cry. She ran into the house. 
Her finger ached badly. 

It swelled up, and be- 
came hard and red. 

Aunt Sarah got some 
salt and put on it, and 
did everything she could 
to cure it. 

Bumble Bee flew in 
after Hattie. He wished 
to see if she was hurt 
very bad. 

After a while Hatty's 
finger felt better. 

This 'taught Hatty to 
be more careful how she 
handled creatures that 
could sting. 

Bumble Bee laughed 
as he flew out of the win- 
dow to go home. 

" Holly Hock played 
a fine joke on me," he 
said, " but I played as 
good a one on that 
naughty little Miss Hat- 
ty. I do not think she 
will wish to wake up a sleeping bee 
again, very soon." 

—M. E. N. 11. 




April, 1880. 
Vol. I. No. 4 



Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Babyland. 
D. LoTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. 

[Copyright, 1830, by D. LOTBSOP k Co., and entered at the P. O. at Boston as second-class matter.] 



75 ets. a year. 
7 cts. a number. 



HOW SALLY STUDIED GEOGRAPHY. 



Sally was a little Primary school- 
girl. 

She was a very small young per- 




SALLY STARTS. 



son, and she lived in a very small 
village. 

But this very small Sally had very 
big thoughts. 

She always heard all that her 
teacher said. 

She always remembered all she 
heard. 

She had long known there was a 



large world outside of the small vil- 
lage, and she wished she could see it. 

Every day at school she heard 
about hills, and mountains, and 
rivers. 

Her teacher drew pictures of them 
on the black-board. 

Sally copied these pictures on her 
slate, and wished she could see a real 
river, a real mountain, a real hill. 

One night, after school, she tied on 




SALLY RESTS. 



her pink sun-bonnet, and started off 
to see what she could find. 



50 



HOW SALLY STUDIED GEOGRAPHY. 



It was almost sunset, but Sally 
thought she could walk a mile, and 
get back before dark. 

Sally knew that roads were meas- 
ured into miles, just as cloth is 
measured into yards. 

She walked fast until she was out 
of the village. 

Then she stopped and looked 
around. 

How much land there was every- 
where ! 

On one side of the road there was 
an open field. 

Sally went into this field ; for she 
thought she saw some hills there. 

The field was full of hillocks. A 
hillock is a very small hill. 

Sally ran down one and up another 
unt'il she was tired. 

Then she came back. She sat down 
on the road-side and looked about. 

The hills over in the field seemed 
very large to her. Perhaps they were 
a range of mountains. 

At one end of the field many trees 
stood together. Sally felt sure this 
was a forest. 

She thought she could see water 
near the trees. Perhaps that was a 
river. 



What a nice field! It was full of 
geography. 

Sally thought she would ask her 
teacher to bring all the scholars to 
see it the next Saturday. 

"Then I can go to the river," she 
said. " I must not go to-night, for 
after I rest some more I must go 
home." 

You can see Sally meant to be a 
good girl. She did not mean to make 
her mamma worry. 

But before she was quite rested it 
grew dark and she fell asleep. 

Mamma did not know where she 
was. Mamma could not have found 
her. 

But the doctor came along in his 
carriage. The moon shone and he 

L 




SALLY FALLS ASLEEP. 



saw the wee white apron on the grass. 

He stopped his horse, and got out 
of his carriage. 

" Bless me ! " said he. " Here is 
little Sally Day fast asleep on the 
road-side ! " 



HOW SALLY STUDIED GEOGRAPHY. JOCKO S NEEDLE BOOK. 



51 



In ten minutes the small geogra- 
phy scholar was in her own little 
bed. Mamma's tears dropped on her 
face, but she did not wake. 

When she woke next morning her 



throat was sore, and her shoulder 
ached, and mamma looked very sober. 
Then Sally knew she had done 
wrong. But she had not meant to. 

—E. F. P. 



JOCKO'S NEEDLE-BOOK. 



One morning after the children 
had gone to school, Mrs. Lee took 
out her work-basket and sat down to 
sew. 

She put on her pretty silver thim- 
ble. She opened her needle-book. 

There was not a needle in it ! 

She was surprised. 

" Where can my needles be ? " said 
she. " I am sure there were plenty 
here last night, when I sewed the 
buttons on Anna's apron. 

" It must be that Jocko has had 
my basket. But I don't see how he 
could get it. And where did he put 
my needles ? " 

Jocko was a little monkey. 

He was full of play and fun. 

He amused the family very much. 

They petted him and liked him, 
though they did not always like his 



mischief. But they were patient 
with him. 

Mrs. Lee looked in many places, 
but she couldn't find her needles. 

She wanted a needle very much, 
for she was in a hurry about some 
work. 

This was long ago, before there 
were any sewing-machines. 

At last she had to put on her bon- 
net and shawl, and go out to buy 
some more needles. 

She felt sure Jocko was the rogue. 

Months afterwards, when house- 
cleaning time came, the needles were 
found. 

Where do you guess they were? 

They were sticking in the edge of 
the carpet, close to the wall. That 
was Jocko's needle-book ! 

—M. 0. J. 



•52 



NEDDY S PETS. A GOOD DOG. 



NEDDY'S PETS. 




"here's a kitty for you!" 

Neddy has a pony, 

Her name is " Jenny Stone; " 
He strokes her and he pats her, 

And rides her all alone. 



He had a. little kitten, 

Her name was " Nellie Gray ; " 
He gave her to a lady, 

Who lives a mile away. 

He has a little chicken, 

Her name is Miss "Bright Eyes ; 
And when she sees her master 

She lifts her wings and flies. 

He has a big Newfoundland dog, 
His name is " Faithful Tray ; " 

Both Neddy and his doggie 
Were five years old in May. 

He has a baby-sister, 

His best and dearest pet — 

What do you think /ler name is? 

She hasn't any yet. 

—K L. 



A GOOD DOG. 



He was a shaggy shepherd-dog 
with large, bright eyes. 
His name was Fritz. 
He lived in Switzerland. 



His master had a cottage on a 
mountain. 

The family lived there in summer, 
because they wished their flocks to 



A GOOD DOG. 



53 



feed on the sweet moiyitain grass. 

In winter they moved down into 
another house in the valley. 

Earlier than usual, one year, there 
came a great snow-storm. 

The family were in the cottage on 
the mountain. 

They had meant to move next day 
to their winter house in the valley. 



The snow fell until it covered the 
house on the mountain. 

There was a great wall of snow 
against the doors and windows. 

They could not get out. 

There was little to eat in the house. 

There was little wood to burn. 
The family felt very anxious. 

At last the shepherd said, " There is 




FRITZ STA.iTS OFF FOR HELP. 



but one thing to do. I will push Fritz 
up the chimney. I think he can get 
out on the roof. If he gets out he 
will go down to the valley. Some 
one will see him. Then they will 
''ome and help us." 

Then he told Fritz he must go down 



to the valley and bring help. 

The dog seemed to understand. 
He looked up into his master's face 
and wagged his tail and ran to the 
door. 

The shepherd put him up the 
chimney as far as he could. 



54 



A GOOD DOG. —ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE EARTH. 



The dog held on with his paws 
and scrambled up. 

At last he came out on the roof. 

Then he leaped off, and plunged 
away through the snow. 

It was very dark in the cottage all 
day. Not a ray of light could come 
in through the snow. 

They listened all night for Fritz to 
come back ! It was very lonesome, 
and the children cried. 

Sometime the next day they heard 
a faint bark. 

" That is Fritz ! " the children 
shouted. " He is coming!" 

Soon they heard voices. Then 
they heard men's feet stamping about 
on the roof. 

At last the men found the door. 
The children heard them shovelling 



away the snow as fast as they could. 

By and by the door was opened. 

Fritz sprang in with glad barks. 

He licked the children's faces. The 
children kissed him. 

The men had brought food. 

After they ate the food, they went 
down to their home in the valley. 

Their neighbors had built good 
fires, and the house was warm and 
comfortable. A nice dinner was 
ready for them. 

The children never forgot that night 
on the mountain. 

They used to put their arms around 
the dog, and say, " Good, good Fritz ! 
If you had not helped us we should 
have died under the snow." 

This is a true story. 

—M. 0. J. 



ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE EARTH. 



My two little brothers, Jimmy and 
Johnny, think it is slow work to learn 
to read. 

What would they think if X\\ty 
were little Chinese boys, and had to 
learn to read the Chinese language ? 



Jimmy and Johnny 1 ave only 
twenty-six letters to learn. 

The Chinese children have more 
letters to learn than ten little boys 
could count in an hour, if they 
counted all the time. 



ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE EARTH. WHAT IF ? 



55 



There are many thousands of let- 
ters for Chinese pupils to learn. 

When a little Chinese boy repeats 
his lesson he does not stand facing 
the teacher. 

He stands with his back to the 
teacher. 

If the little Chinese pupil makes a 
mistake in his recitation, what do 
you suppose the teacher does ? 

The teacher gives him a sharp tap 



on the head with the metal smoking- 
pipe which he always carries about 
with him. 

This tap hurts ; for the Chinese 
children have their heads shaved 
close. 

The taps fall on their bare heads. 

You may be sure the little Chinese 
pupils pay good attention to their 
recitations. 

—K 



WHAT IF? 




THE THREE LITFLE BOYS WHO WORRIED. 

Three little boys on the door-step 

sat. 
All three were rosy, and fair, and 
fat. 



But out on the grass lay white snow- 
flakes ; 

The April clouds were making mis- 
takes. 

" Now you don't suppose," says Dicky 

Dear, 
" That perhaps there won't be flowers 

this year? " 

" Oh, nobody knows," says Tommy 

Jinks, 
"Nobody knows what the weather 

thinks ! " 

" If no one knows," cries Hop-o'-my- 
Thumb, 



56 



WHAT IF ? — WHAT HAPPENED IN A GARDEN. 



" If no one knows what's going to 
come, 

" The rose may be brown instead of red, 

But, sir, if she is, off goes' her head ! " 
» 

And then the three, as, quick as a 

whiff, ' 
Began to sob, "What if! What if!" 



Tommy Jinks said " Oh ! " and Dick 

said " oh ! " 
And Hop-o'-my-Thumb, he, too, said 

so, ^ 

They meant to weep; but the sun 

came out, ^ 
And off they ran with a happy 
shout. * 



WHAT HAPPENED IN A GARDEN. 



IN FIVB- CHAPTERS. 



I.' — THE WEED. 

It was many hundred years ago. 

It was in a king's garden. 

The queen and her little princes 
used to walk in this garden every 
pleasant day. 

The sons of queens are called 
princes. 

All sorts of beautiful flowers grew 
in this garden. 

There was a high wall all around 
this garden, and in one corner, close 
to this wall, there sprang up a plain 
little plant. 

This plant looked like a common 
weed. 



For a long time no one in the 
palace knew that the weed was m 
the garden. 

The flowers were not kind to it. 

The bright red roses would not 
look at it. 

The tall white lilies felt that it had 
no right to be in a king's garden. 

But the little weed staid there, and 
grew and grew. 



II. 



THE WORM. 



One day, when the plant had grown 
to be quite large, a small ugly worm 
crept up its stem. 
■" The rose and the lily both shock 



WHAT HAPPENED IN A GARDEN. 



57 



me off," said the worm, " so I have 
come to you." 

** What do you want of me ? " said 
the weed, in a kind uoice. 

" A place to rest, and something to 



eat," said the worm. " I feel as 
though I mus^ have something to 
eat." 

•* Poor thing," said the weed, " I 
am sorry for you. See, I have plenty 




IN THE king's GARDEX. 



of leaves. Take just as many as 
you want." 

So the hungry worm began to nib- 
ble the fresh green leaves. How 
good they tasted ! It ate and ate. 

By and by the worm grew sleepy. 

The kind weed did not try to 



shake the tired creature off. 

The worm stayed many days, for 
the kind weed did not like to send it 
away. It grew very plump and round, 
as it ate all the time. It was also a 
prettier color ; one could almost see 
through it. 



58 



WHAT HAPPENED IN A GARDEN. 



III. WHAT tHE WORM DID. 

At last the worm began to spin a 
web around itself and from leaf to 
leaf. 

The weed wondered what this 
strangre visitor would do next. 

The worm spun round and round 
itself without stopping. 

The threads came out of its mouth. 

They grew finer and whiter, and 
the web thicker and thicker. 

In shape this web began to look 
like a bird's egg. 

" I do believe it is building itself a 
little house," said the weed, " and 
means to stay here always." 

By-and-by the worm was shut up 
in the soft little house it had spun 
for itself. 

There was no door, no window. 

The worm came out no more. 

IV. WHAT THE LITTLE PRINCE 

FOUND. 

A few days after this the queen 
was walking up and down the garden 
in the shade of the high wall. 

One of the little princes was with 
her. 

To-day he saw the weed in the 
corner. He ran to pull it up. 

There must be no tall weed like 



that in his father's beautiful garden. 

As he put out his hand to pull it 
up, he saw a curious white ball among 
the leaves. 

What could it be ? 

He picked it off carefully. 

He carried it to the queen. 

She had never seen anything like 
it before. 

She shook it up and down in her 
hands. 

Something seemed to rattle inside 
the ball. 

She was standing on one of the 
pretty bridges in the garden. 

As she turned to go back to the 
palace, the soft little ball rolled out 
of her hand. 

It'dropped into the stream of water 
below. 

The little prince ran down the bank 
to find his pretty plaything. 

He waded out into the water. 

He caught the tiny ball before it 
floated out of sight. 

But something had happened to it. 

Had the water opened it ? 

There was now a hole at one end. 

There was a long fine thread hang- 
ing out at the other end. 

This thread began to unwind just 
like his kite string. 



WHAT HAPPENED IN A GARDEN. A STORY ABOUT JOHNNY. 



59 



Then a pretty little butterfly came 
out. 

It brushed against his hand. 

It must have been fast asleep in- 
side the ball. 

The little prince ran up the bank 
and told his mother. 

V.^ — THE GREAT DISCOVERY. 

The wonderful ball was taken to 
the palace. 

Wise men from far and near came 
to see it. 

It was the first silk worm's cocoon 
that had ever been unrolled. 

This worm was a silk worm. 

The thread it spun into the web 
was a silk thread. 

Such a web is called a cocoon. 



You can see cocoons in the Natural 
History Rooms in Boston. 

There are about thirteen thousand 
yards of silk thread in a cocoon. 

In a few years the whole garden 
was planted full of weeds like the 
one that had fed the hungry silk 
worm. 

This weed was a young mulberry 
bush. 

It had no beauty like the rose and 
the lily. 

Its fruit was not worth much. 

But its leaves were the right kind 
of food for the precious silk spinners. 

So the proud roses and lilies had 
to move out and make room for the 
useful weed. 

—B. E. E. 



A STORY ABOUT JOHNNY. 




ANY years ago, 
when Johnny was 
a little boy, he had 
a pretty glass. 
Johnny's father 
1 taught him to say 
these words be- 
fore he drank his 
milk out of this dainty glass : 



" I wish you health, papa ! " 

It sounded very funny ; for this is 

the way Johnny said it : 
" Wis' 'ou hea'th, papa ! " 
One day he had, been at play very 

hard. 

Rolling hoop is hot, dusty work. 
He was glad when he heard the 

dinner-bell. 



6o 



A STORY ABOUT JOHNNY. ROB S QUEER FRIEND. 



He came to the table very hungry, 
very thirsty. 

He caught up his glass in both 
hands. 

He forgot all about the sweet little 
sentence for papa. 

He was just going to drink, when 
•papa said in a pleasant tone : 




JOHNNY TRIKS TO REMEMBER. 

" Wait, my little man, what are 
you going to say to me ? ". 



Johnny stopped. A bright red 
blush came on his cheek. 

He put down his glass. He tried 
to remember. 

But he was in a great hurry, and 
could n't think as well as he could 
sometimes. 

So he said something he had often 
heard at table : 

" Help 'self, papa ! " 

Then up came the glass again. 
Johnny's milk was out of sight the 
next minute. 

Papa laughed.- 

" That will do for this time, little 
boy," 'said he. 

" It is good advice, anyway. If 
papa gets into- hard places, he will 
try to do as Johnny says — ' help him- 
self.' " 

—M. J. 



ROB'S QUEER FRIEND. 



It lived in the sand-bank. 

One morning it came up the path 
to the kitchen door. 

It hopped across the stone steps. 
With one tremendous hop it landed 
on the door.-sill. 



With funny little jerks it crossed 
the kitchen-floor. 

Then it sat down near the stove. 

It looked like a big, brown dump- 
ling. 

It had queer little legs doubled up 



ROB's queer friend. WHO PLAYED THE PIANO? 



6l 



under its fat body. It was spotted 
with spots of darker brown. 

No, it was not an ugly toad. It 
was a very pretty toad, Rob said. 

Rob was down on the floor look- 
ing at it. 

He thought it was asleep. 

Soon a fly came buzzing along. 

The big, wide mouth flew open. 
Out leaped a long, red tongue ; the 
fly was snapped in and swallowed. 

Then Mrs. Toad went to sleep 
again, until another fly came along. 

She came into the kitchen for her 
breakfast of flies several mornino^s. 

Rob was very polite to his new 
friend. He returned all her calls. He 
spent many hours at the sand bank. 

Sometimes, when he went early in 
the morning, he found her scraping 
sand into her house. 



He found she always did this when 
she was to be gone a little while. 

She scraped the sand down from 
above the hole with her little fore- 
feet. 

Rob thought he would like to see 
what it w^as she covered up. 

So one day, after she had gone, he 
took away the sand with a small 
stick. 

What do you think he found ? 

Nine little toadies. They were 
about as big as hickory nuts. 

Rob put back all the sand. 

He smoothed it over the little toads 
just as he found it. 

I do not think the mother toad ever 
knew that her house had been broken 
into, or that Rob had seen her 
babies. 

— .S'. P. B. 



WHO PLAYED THE PIANO? 



" Go up stairs, Perry dear, and see 
who is in the parlor," said mamma. 

Perry's mamma was making cake 
down in the kitchen. 

She heard some one playing " do, 
re, niiyfa, sol," on the piano up-stairs. 



Who could it be ? 

The boys were in school. Mary 
had gone down town. No one of the 
family was up-stairs. 

" Do, re, mi, fa, sol,'' said the pi^ao. 
very distinctly. 



62 



WHO PLAYED THE PIANO 



" Run, Perry dear, and see who is 
in the parlor," said she again. 
" Mamma will come up soon." 

Perry was only five years old. 'He 
was very fat, very slow, and he did 
not like to go up-stairs alone. He 
was afraid of strangers. 

But when his mamma spoke so 

ft 

kindly he went up. 




He put down his feet very hard on 
every stair to frighten away anybody 
who was up there. 

He looked in the parlor. He did 
not see any one. 

He went back into the hall and 
called, " No, mamma, it is nobody ! " 

" Nobody could not play the piano," 
said his mother. 

As soon as Perry was back in the 
kitchen, they all heard the piano 
again. 



" Do, re, mi, fa, sol," it said ; and 
then a "</<?" sounded up very high. 

" Some one is trying to play a joke 
on us," said Perry's mamma. 

Then Bridget went up to see who 
was there. 

All was still. 

She looked behind the doors. 

She looked under the sofa. 

No one was there. 

" The child is right," she said. 
" Nobody is in the room." 

But all the time two bright eyes 
were peeping out from behind a long 
lace curtain. 

This curtain hung at the window 
near the piano. 

As soon as'Bridget was down-stairs 
again, " do, re, mi, fa, sol, si,'' went 
the piano. 

" I will go up myself this time," 
said Perry's mamma. 

She went Very fast and still. 

She heard a noise like some one 
running softly. 

But she could not find any one. 

'* I will stay outside and watch," 
she said. 

She went out softly and stood be- 
hind the door. 

Very soon she heard the piano 



THE LOST CHICKENS. 



63 



again, " do, re, mi, mi, mi!' 

She peeped in. 

There was Perry's own pet kitty 
standing on the keys of the piano. 

She was looking at her face in the 
shining wood, and stepping about. 

" Oh, you little rogue ! " said she. 

Then Pussy sprang down and ran 
behind the curtains. Her eyes shone. 



She knew that she was a rogue. 

Pussy was fond of music. Mary 
often had played for her. So when 
she saw the piano open she thought 
she would make music for herself. 

After that, Perry often put her up 
on the piano keys. 

He called her " The Musical Cat." 

—if. T. ^Y. 



THE LOST CHICKENS. 



" Cluck, cluck ! cluck, cluck ! " called 
the mother-hen, 
"Some harm has come to my 
chickens, I fear ; 
I counted this morning, and then 
there were ten ; 
Now four are gone, and but six are 
here." 

" Peep, peep ! peep, peep ! " four chick- 
ens replied. 
As they sipped the dew from a 
burdock leaf ; 
" We must hurry back to our mother's 
side. 
She is calling us now with a voice 
Wk of grief." 

Then away to her side they ran 
again, " 






Leaving the dainty drink they had 
found; 




I'i-ii*^*^'?*.. <3t 



S^Siij&*~ ■-.. 



"all safe and sound." 

" Cluck, cluck ! cluck, cluck ! " said the 

mother-hen, 

'* Here are my ten, all safe and 

sound." 

—M. IE. N. H. 



64 



AN EASTER FLOWER. 



AN EASTER FLOWER. 



At Easter time a lady gave Lily 
a lily. 

The little girl, Lily, had pink 
cheeks and dark hair. 




THE FLOWER THAT MADE LILY GOOD. 

The flower, lily, had white leaves 
and a golden heart. 

Lily had just been naughty. She 
had kicked with her little foot at 
cook, because cook would not give 



her two frosted cocoanut cakes in- 
stead of one. 

She still looked very cross when 
her mamma's friend put* the Easter 
flower in her hand. 

But no one can sit and look 
at a white lily and feel cross. 

As the little girl looked down 
at this great white flower in her 
hand, she began to feel gentle 
and kind. 

A sweet thought came into 
heart. She placed the great 
white lily in a vase. 

She carried it down into the 
kitchen. She set it on the win- 
dow sill. 

" This is for you, cook," she 
said. 

Cook was so surprised she 
could not speak, but she kissed 
Lily's cheek. 

The beautiful Easter flower 

has faded. 
But its sweet spirit has not 
faded,, for cook and Lily have been 
polite and pleasant to each other 



ever smce. 



— R 




Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Babyland. 



May, 1880. 
Vol. I. No. 5. 



D. LoTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. 

[Copyright, 1880» by D. Lotbbop & Co.. and entered at the P. 0. at Boston a« second-olaBt matter.] 



75 cts. a year. 
7 cts. a number. 



THE WAY TO SCHOOL. 



This is the way George and Jenny 
go to school. 

First they go and stand up before 
their mother and open their lips 
wide. 

She looks at their teeth, and if 
they are clean and white she says, 
"All right, children." 

Then they hold up their hands so 
that their mother can see them. 

She looks at the palms, the backs, 
the nails, the wrists. 

If they are nicely washed and 
cleaned, she says again, "All right." 

Then each child kisses her cheek, 
and she kisses their foreheads and 
says, " Good-bye, little ones." 

They say, "Good-bye, we will be 
good scholars to-day." 



Then they start off on a run. 

They run until they come to Mr. 
Baker's garden. 

Then they stop and peep through 
the palings at the lovely flowers. 




GEORGE AND JENNY. 



They cannot run by the lovely flow- 
ers without one look at them. 

" I like the tulips, they are so 
gay," says George. 



66 



THE WAY TO SCHOOL. 



" Let's count the colors," says 
Jenny. 

" There are crimson^ and scarlet, and 
deep yellow, and light yellow ones, 
and brownish ones, and striped red 
and white ones," says Jenny. 

"Six," says George, who has 
counted. 

Then on they go. 

They run by Miss Perkins' house 
because there is a big dog there who 
sometimes runs out and barks at 
them. 

His name is Spot. Spot never 




THE DOG THAT BARKS. 

bites ; but the children do not like his 
barking. Jenny thinks he would 
bite, if he could catch them. 

They walk quite slowiy ^Y ^^^ ^i^" 
tie shop on the corner. 

They like tc look at the toys in 



the windows of this gay little shop. 

George looks at the tin soldiers and 
the boxes of marbles. The marbles 
have as many colors as the tulips. 

Jenny looks at the little dolls. 
She likes best the little doll that sits 
in a swing and looks as if it were 
going very fast. 

Next they come to the bridge over 
the creek. 

They stop a minute or two to look 
over the railing. 

They see the water below run over 
the stones. 

They see the tiny minnows swim 
about. 

They open their lunch box, and 
take a little piece off one of the 
slices of bread. 

They break the bread into crumbs. 

They throw the crumbs of bread 
down to the minnows. 

The minnows dart up to the sur- 
face and eat the crumbs. 

Then they hear the nine o'clock 
bell ringing. 

Then they run very fast. 

Almost always they reach school 

in time. 

— ^\ u. s. 



A GOOD MOTHER. 



67 







" r THINK I WILL GO AND TELL MASTER JOE. " 



A GOOD MOTHER 



" Patter, patter," came fou: small 
feet up the hard path. 

" Clatter, clatter," came the same 
small feet across the porch. 

They stopped before the open door. 

In came a pink nose. A long 
wooly face followed. 

Two big eyes looked all about. 
These eyes were pale gold color. 
They had white lashes. Instead of 
eye-brows they had something like a 
cap-border of thick, soft wool. Grow- 
ing out through the thick, soft 



wooly cap were two small ears. 

" There's your sheep," said Alice. 

Yes, there was a sheep standing 
right in the doorway. 

" Why, Nanny," said Joe, " how 
did you come here ? " 

" Ba-a," answered Nanny. 

Her voice trembled. The tears 
almost stood ig^ her golden eyes. 

Joe was sure there was some trou- 
ble. He spoke to Nanny kindly : 
" We'll go and see about it." 

" Ba-a," answered Nanny. 



6% 



A GOOD MOTHER. 



Off Joe and Nanny went together 
down the green lane to the sheep 
pasture. 

The gate stood open. Nanny 
trotted through. Joe followed. 

Nanny went straight across the 
open field to the edge of the woods. 

There, in a thicket, stood a lamb, 
Nannie's own little white lamb. 

Its poor little head had been caught 
in the bushes. 

It was held fast between two stub 
born little oaks. It couldn't stir. 

Joe pulled away one of the little 
trees. 



He lifted the lamb carefully out. 

He gently placed it beside its 
mother. 

" Ba-a-a " said Nanny to Joe in a 
very loud tone. 

There were ten thanks in that " Ba- 
a-a. 

" Ba-a-a," said Nanny's lamb in a 
very small tone. 

There were ten thanks in that 
" Ba-a-a" too. 

Was not Nanny a wise sheep to 
go to the house and tell her master 
that she was in trouble ? , 



THE TWO HOUSEKEEPERS. 



My two little girls, Mayette and May, 
Keep house like mamma every day. 

Each little' girl has all to herself 
The whole of a great wide closet 
shelf. 

They move about the furniture 

small. 
In parlor, kitchen, bedroom and hall. 

They sweep and wash, they boil and 
bake, 



An.'' pretty suits for their dolls they 
make. 

Each small playhouse is neat and as 

bright 
As a brand-new pin, from morn 

till night. 

And Grandma says, " 'tis pleasant to 

see 
What tidy dears they're learning 
to be. 

. ~M. E. N. H. 



ANOTHER QUEER POLICEMAN. 



69 



ANOTHER QUEER POLICEMAN. 




A GOOD POLICEMAK. 



Did you read the story called, " A 
Queer Policeman," in the March 
Little Folks Reader f 

I did. 

It made me think of another queer 
policeman. 

This other policeman is a tortoise- 
shell cat. 

Tortoise-shell cats are black, with 
yellow spots. 

This policeman keeps the peace 
between my baby brother and a big 
red rooster. 



^ 



My mother puts Baby in his little 
carriage. 

She gives him a piece of bread. 

She draws him out into the green 
yard under the trees. 

The tortoise-shell cat always fol- 
lows them out into the green yard. 

** Now, Puss," my mother says, 
" you must take care of Baby ! " 

Then she goes into the house. 

The tortoise-shell cat sits down 
beside the carriage. 

She looks as stern as any police- 
man you ever saw. 

By and by the big red rooster 
comes lip to the carriage. 

He stretches out his long neck. 

He tries to take away Baby's bread. 

Then the tortoise-shell cat springs 
up at him, and drives him away. 

The hens stand at a distance and 
look on. They dare not come near 
the carriage. 

The red rooster walks round and 
round, but he does not dare come 
back. 

It is always safe to leave Baby 
with the tortoise-shell cat. She 



70 



THE TROUBLES OF PIGEON BLUE. 



never scratches, nor bites him. She 
never takes away his bread. 

Is not the tortoise-shell cat a good 
policeman? 



I think she ought to have- a shin)^ 

collar to wear on her neck. Don't 

you think she deserves it ? 

— K. L. 



THE TROUBLES OF PIGEON BLUE. 



The three doves, Pigeon Snow, 
Pigeon Pearl, and Pigeon Blue, were 

sisters. 

Pigeon 'Snow was the eldest, Pig- 
eon Pearl came 
next, and Pig- 




eon Blue was 
the youngest. 
These three 

doves lived in a pretty dove-cote. 
Pigeon Snow and Pigeon Pearl 

were happy doves ; but Pigeon Blue 

was full of trouble. 



Her two sisters, spoiled all her 
comfort. 

Pigeon Snow was always saying 
" Don't, don't. Blue ! " and then Pig- 
eon Pearl would say it after her, 
"Don't, Blue! Don't!" 

It was so in winter, it was so in 
summer. 

In winter Pigeon Blue could 
never sit out on the roof of the 
dove-cote with any comfort. 

" Don't go out, Blue ! " Pigeon 
Snow would say. " It is just the day 
for the hawks to see you." 

*• Don't go, dear Blue," Pearl would 
say, " for the hawks will get you." 

Pigeon Blue might have paid some 
attention to what her sisters said, if 
the hawks ever had got her. 

But the hawks never had got 

her. 

So Pigeon Blue felt her sisters did 
not know what they were talking 



THE TROUBLES OF PIGEON BLUE. 



71 



about ; and she went out and sat on 
the roof of the dove-cote as much 
as she liked. 

Now it was summer; and the 
hawks could not see them as they 
sat up in the apple trees. 

The leaves were thick, and hid 
them from the hawks. 

They could see the hawks sailing 
overhead, but the hawks could not 
see them. 

But Pigeon Blue took no comfort. 

Snow and Pearl did not like it 
because she flew down into Mrs. 
Bly's hen-yard after corn. 

" I would not go there, dear sister 
Blue," said Snow. " Bessy Bly's big 
gray cat is often in the yard. She 
will catch you some day." 

" Yes, dear Blue," said Pearl, " the 
big gray cat will catch you if you go 
there." 

Now, if the gray cat ever had 
caught her. Pigeon Blue might have 
paid some attention to the advice. 

But the gray cat had never caught 
her. 

So Pigeon Blue flew down and 
ate corn with the hens as often as 
she liked. 

But one day the gray cat did catch 



Pigeon Blue. He carried her in his 
mouth into the kitchen. 

" Come here, sir ! " said cook in a 
sharp voice. 

The gray cat was always well-fed, 
so he was not hungry. 

He let the cook take the tremb- 
ling dove out of his mouth. 

Pigeon Blue was not much hurt, 
and Bessy Bly carried her home to 
the dove-cote. 

• After that. Pigeon Blue believed 
the cat would catch her, and she 
staid at home. 

She never flew down after corn 
again. 

But she did not believe that a 
hawk would catch her. 

When it came winter again she 
went up as usual, and sat on the 
roof in the sunshine. 

Pigeon Snow and Pigeon Pearl 
begged her to come down. 
But she would not. 
•' Pshaw ! " said she. " The hawks 
won't touch me. 

"Besides, I am so nearly the color 
of the roof, they won't see me. 

" If they catch anybody it will be 
that white hen in the doorway of 
the barn. She is white. She can 



72 



POPPING CORN. 



be seen at a very great distance." 

But one day a hawk came down — 
pounce ! 

Off he sailed with something in 
his claws. 

It was not the white hen. 

It was Pigeon Blue. 



Then Piq^eon Blue believed that 
the hawks would catch her. 

But it was too late. There was 
no kind cook to save her from being 
eaten. 
This time no one brought her back. 

— E.F. F, 




POPPING CORN. 



When the long winter evenings 
come, Frank and Lizzie and mamma 
like to pop corn. 

They have a wire corn-popper with 
a very long handle. 

One night Frank wondered what 
made the yellow corn turn white 
when it popped. 

He thought about it for a long 
time. 



But he could not find out. 

At last he asked his mamma. 

His mamma told him that the 
yellow corn was white inside. 

She told him that in each kernel 
there is a little hole. 

You would think there was noth- 
ing in that little hole. 

But there is. 

This little hole is full of air. 



POPPING CORN.— WHAT A LITTLE PRINCE DID. 



73 



When the air gets hot, it swells 


inside out, and we see the pretty 


and grows too big to stay in the 


white part of the corn. 


little hole. 


Frankie said he understood it. 


When it gets very hot it bursts 


Do you ? 


the kernel open, and the kernel turns 


—K. L. 



WHAT A LITTLE PRINCE DID. 



This is a story about an English 
boy. 

His name is George ; and the 
English people call him Prince 
George. 

He lives across the ocean, in 
England. 

The Prince of Wales is his papa. 

The beautiful Princess Alexandra 
is his mamma. 

Queen Victoria, the Queen of 
England, is his grandmamma. 

His papa is rich, and Prince 
George lives in a large handsome 
house. 

When Prince George was a very 
little boy, he had many servants to 
wait upon him. He had many teach- 
ers to teach him. 

But Prince George was a merry 
little fellow, after all. 



He liked fun just as other little 
boys do. 

When little Prince George was 
about three years old, a new carpet 
was brought home for one of the 
parlors. 

It was a velvet carpet. 

It was covered with pretty flowers. 

It was put down on the floor. 

Then the Prince of Wales went 
into the parlor to look at it. 

What do you think he saw? 

He saw his little son. Prince 
George, in there. He had his little 
watering-pot in his hand. 

Prince George was watering the 
pretty flowers on the new velvet 
carpet. 

What do you suppose his papa 
said to him? 

— K. L. 



74 



POLLY-KATE. 




"GOOD-BY ! TIME TO GET READY FOR SCHOOL." 



POLLY-KATE. 



All the little boys and girls whom 
I know, say they like to read stories 
about parrots. 

This story is about a handsome 
green parrot, and it is true. 

I knew this handsome green par- 
rot when I was a little girl, 

It belonged to my little school- 
mate, Kate. 



Its name was Polly. 

But this naughty parrot told every- 
body that its name was Polly-Kale ! 

Kate and I always w6nt to school 
together. Our houses stood side by 
side, with a garden between them. 

We played together in this garden, 
in the morning before s(^hool time. 

When we were playing, we sorffe- 



POLLY-KATE. 



75 



times heard some one calling us : 

''Girls! girls! come in! come 
in ! Time to get ready for school ! " 

How we would run ! 

We would stop to kiss each other 
through the gate, then Kate would 
run into her house, and I would run 
into my house. 

" Why are you in such a hurry?" 
the maid often asked. 

" Is it not time for school ? " I 
would answer, 

" No," she would say. " I think 
Polly has cheated you again." 

Then we would run back into the 
garden. 

One day Kate's mamma said to 
me, " Jenny, you must take dinner 
with Kate to-day. I shall have roast 
duck." 

" Quack ! quack ! quack I " called 
Polly-Kate from her cage. 

So I went home to dinner with 
Kate. 

Kate's papa was late that day, and 
Polly grew hungry. 

At last Kate's papa came, and we 
sat down to dinner. 

Polly-Kate stood in her cage and 
looked down at us. She bowed her 
he^d just as we did, when grace was 



said, and looked like a good parrot. 

Every day, as soon as grace was 
said, Kate's papa put a potato on a 
fork, and the servant gave it to 
Polly. 

Then Polly-Kate would say, " O, 
my ! thanks ! thanks I " 

But Kate's papa said a very long 
grace this time. 

Polly-Kate did not like it. 

She was very, very hungry. 

She shook her head again and 
again. 

At last, she could not be patient 
any longer. 

" Say amen ! " she screamed. " Pol- 
ly-Kate wants potato ! " 

Because we laughed, Polly-Kate 
thought she had done right. She 
grew very fond of saying " amen." 

At last she always was carried 
down into the kitchen at dinner time. 

But I think the mischief Polly- 
Kate liked best, was to call us in 
from our play in the garden. 

Sometimes she would speak like 
Kate's mamma. 

Sometimes she would speak like 
my mamma. 

She could make her voice sound 
like the voice of anybody in either 



76 



POLLY-KATE. — DOLLY'S MISTAKE. 



family. She liked to do that. 

" Quick! quick, girls ! " she would 
call. " You will be late ! " 

Then when we came into the house, 
out of breath lest we should be late, 
the naughty rogue would stand in her 



cage and laugh as hard as she could. 

" Such fun ! such fun ! " she would 
say. 

Polly-Kate liked to see us vexed, 

Was she not a rogue ? 

— K. T. W. 



DOLLY'S MISTAKE. 



Dolly was a black horse. She was 
handsome. She was spirited. She 
was also gentle. 

Dolly sometimes drew a chaise. 
But she oftener carried a lady on her 
back. 

This lady petted her. 

She sometimes gave Dolly apples. 

She sometimes gave Dolly sugar. 

She sometimes gave Dolly cake. 

Dolly was let out every day to' 
eat the green grass, and run about. 

Dolly could be trusted. She 
would not go away. 

The lady often sat by one of her 
parlor windows. It was a sunny 
south window. At this window the 
lady could see the clover meadows, 
the green woods and the hazy hills. 
She liked to sit by this window 



and sew, or read, or write letters. 

Black, handsome Dolly often came 
to this open window. She would oft- 
en put her handsome, slender, black 
head ii)to the room and look about, 
and put her nose in the lady's hand. 

Then the lady would feed Dolly. 
She would talk to her and pat her 
glossy neck. 

Then Dolly would take the apple, 
or the piece of cake, from the lady's 
hand. She would nod as if to say 
" thank you." 
• Then she would trot off. 

One day when Dolly came to the 
sunny south window, it was shut. 

There was no one in the parlor. 

But Dolly did not know anything 
about glass. She did not suppose 
there was anything in her way. 



DOLLY'S MISTAKE. 



77 



She put her handsome black head 
right through the window. 




DOLLY IS SURPRISKD. 



Smash ! smash ! 
The glass flew 



all about. It 



scratched Dolly's handsome face. 

What an astonished Dolly she 
was ! 

What a frightened Dolly she was ! 

She drew back. 

She ran away down the hill. 

She shook her head. 

She waved her long tail. Her 
foretop blew up and down over her 
eyes. 

In the shade of the old apple-tree 
she stopped at last. 

There she stood and wondered 
what made that window act so bad. 

It was a long time before she went 
up to that window again. 

Her mistress could not coax her to 
come, with cake, nor apples, nor 
sugar. 



BESSIE'S BASKET. 



I.- —THE SURPRISE. 

On the morning of Bessie's sixth 
birthday she found some pretty pres- 
ents beside her plate at breakfast. 

One was a china doll. 

It had blue eyes and flaxen hair. 

It was dressed in a pink gingham 
gown like one of Bessie's own gowns. 



Another present was a pretty book 
with gay covers. -^It had pictures on 
almost every leaf. 

" How lovely ! " cried Bessie. 

But the prettiest and dearest pres- 
ent was a tiny basket. 

This basket had a cover and a 
handle. 



78 



BESSIE'S BASKET. 



It was woven of splints. 

Some of these splints were colored 
red, some green, and some white. 

Bessie cried out with joy when she 
saw the dainty little thing. 

" Oh ! oh ! who could have given 
me such a nice basket? Was- it 
you, mamma?" 

" No, my dear, guess again." 

" Papa, then, surely." 

" Guess once more." 

" Brother Frank, I think." 

" See if there is anything in it," 
said mamma. 

Bessie took it up from the table. 

She found it was heavy. 

Then she peeped in. 

What do you think she saw? 

A tiny note with ** Bessie Clarke, 
Fayette, N. Y.," written upon it. 

She opened this note. She found 
this written inside : 

" A little basket, full of love 
From cousin Mary Ladd ; 

A gift to little Bessie Clarke 
To make her birthday glad." 

" Cousin Mary sent it, mamma," 
said Bessie. " I think she is very 
kind indeed." 



II. THE CANDIES. 

Under the note were some barley 
candies. 

Mamma let Bessie eat two of the 
candies after breakfast. 

Bessie would have liked to eat all 
that were in the basket. But she did 
not ask if she might. 

She knew that too much candy 
would make her feel unwell. 

After a few days Bessie's basket 
was empty. 

She had given many of the candies 
to her schoolmates and to brother 
Frank, and had herself eaten one 
after dinner each day until they were 
gone. 

Then she wished to use the pre- 
cious basket. 

But she could not find any way to 
do so. 

It was too small to carry her sew- 
ing in to school. 

It was too large to carry her little 
slate pencil in. 

It was too square to carry her rub- 
ber ball in. 

It was not deep enough to get her 
doll in and let the cover close. 

So, for some time, si e had to con- 
tent herself with letting it stand on 



BESSIE'S BASKET. 



79 



her own little dressing bureau. 

There she could often look at it 
and admire its colors, its shape, its 
pretty cover, and its slender handle. 

III. THE GOOSEBERIES. 

In the garden was a clump of 
gooseberry bushes. 

By and by the berries grew ripe. 

They had been green and hard. 

Now they were purple and soft, 
and very sweet. 

" Bessie," said mamma, " you may 
fill your basket with gooseberries." 

Bessie ran to the garden and quick- 
ly filled it. 

She counted as she dropped the 
berries in. 

She found her basket held fifty 
berries. 

In her class at school were six 
children besides herself. 

She carried the basket and berries 
to school. 

She gave seven berries to each of 
the three boys and three girls. 

She kept seven for herself. 

That took forty-nine. 

There was one berry left in the 
basket. 

" What shall we do with that 



one ? " said Bessie to her mates. 

" Put it out on the gate-post for a 
bird to eat," said one of the boys. 

So she put the berry there, and 
after school it was gone. 

For two or three weeks Bessie car- 
ried her basket of berries every day. 

Every day she gave seven to each 
of her class-mates, and put one on 
the post for a bird. 

Every day after school she looked 
on the post and the berry was gone. 

But she never knew whether it was 
a bird, or a child, that took the berry, 
or whether it rolled off and was lost. 

But she thought it was a bird, 
. She hoped it was a very handsome 
golden oriole that had a nest in a tree 
near the school-house. 

When the gooseberries were gone 
the basket was placed once more on 
the bureau. 



IV. 



THE NUTS. 



There it stood until autumn. 

Then, when the nuts in the forest 
began to ripen, papa took Bessie and 
Frank out of the village to the wood 
to gather some. 

Three-cornered glossy beechnuts 
rattled down from the trees. 



8o 



BESSIE S BASKET. 



The dear little basket was filled 
with these beechnuts. It held as 




BESSIE PTCKS FIFTY GOOSEBERRIES. 



many as two hundred beechnuts. 

Another day the basket held hard, 

white hickory-nuts that had tumbled 



out from their green houses high up 
on the trees. 

The prickly burrs of 
the chestnuts were opened 
by Jack Frost, and the 
shining nuts were found 
among the pretty brown 
leaves. 

Bessie thought these 
chestnuts the prettiest 
nuts which the basket 
had held. ^ 

At Christmas time Bes- 
sie saw her dear basket 
hanging on the tree. 

She said to her mam- 
ma, " I think it looks very 
pretty there. It is pretty 
everywhere. I mean to 
keep it always." 

And she did keep it 
many years. 

At last she gave it to 
her little niece on her 
sixth birthday. 

It was filled with bar- 
ley candies, just as it was 
so many years ago when 
it came to little Bessie, now grown 
to be Aunt Bessie. 




Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Babyland. 



June, 1880. 
Vol. I. No. 6. 



D. LoTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. 

[CopTTigbt, 1880, by D. Lothbop & Co., aod entered at the F. 0. at Boston as second'Cladl matter.] 



75 ots. a year. 
7 cts. a number. 



MR. AND MRS. BROWN. 



The Browns are my neighbors. 
They came from the South some 
weeks ago. 




-'V-.- • N.- 



MR. AND MRS. BROWN. 



There is a street of houses in one 
of my garden trees. The Browns 
took one of these houses. 



After a few days I saw three pret- 
ty eggs in the house. 

These eggs were blue and white 
with specks of brown at one end. 

One day Mrs. Brown found anoth- 
er Q:^<g in her house. 

It was not a little blue and white 
Q.g<gi like her own. 

It was a great, brown, speckled 

It was as large as the three blue 
and white eggs put together. 

Mrs. Brown looked at it. 

Then she chirped to Mr. Brown to 
come. 

He came and looked at it too. 

Then they flew up on the telegraph 
wire and talked about it. 

Mrs. Brown said, " I am afraid. 



82 



MR. AND MRS. BROWN. 



my dear, that this big egg may be 
something dreadful when it is 
hatched. 

** Perhaps it will be one of those 
horrid creatures with such long tail 
feathers, ^kndsuch loud voices, that 
scream so in the morning before the 
sun comes up! " 

" My dear," said Mr. Brown, " we 
will move at once ! " 



They left their pretty home and 
the four eggs. 

They moved into the next house. 

Soon there were three small blue 
and white eggs in the new home. 

The next week there was also one 
large brown one. 

This time poor little Mrs. Brown 
spread her soft wings over them all. 

She said nothing to Mr. Brown. 




THE STREET ON WHICH THE BROWNS LIVED, 



After a time there were in the 
house four baby birds. 

Three baby birds were small, one 
was large. 

In a few days the large bird filled 
half the house. 

One of the baby Browns was 
crowded out, and fell to the ground 
and died. 

In a week more the large bird 



could not stay in the house. It sat 
in the door. 

This large bird ate nearly every- 
thing the mother brought home. 

The little Brown babies would push 
their heads from under his feathers 
and cry, '" peep, peep," for a share ! 

None of us know what kind of a 
bird the stranger will prove to be. 

My little daughter, who watches 



MR. AND MRS. BROWN. 



the Browns every day, does not like 
him very well. 

She says, " He has no right to 
adopt himself into a home where he 
does not belong ! " 



83 



Mr. and Mrs. Brown feel quite 
proud of him. 

I hope he will turn out well, but I 
have my doubts about that bird ! 

— L.M.B, 



SOME NAUGHTY I'S. 



"I I I " 
Some little people cry : 
" I won't, I can't, 
I shall, I shan't 

Oh, whr;^ '■ '--.-Cc^iiiy I ; 



"III" 
^) •••> -*•> 

Now hear them passing by : 

" I han't, I be, 

I are, I see — " 
Oh, what a naughty I ! 



THE STORY OF PUSSY GARDNER. 




I. PUSSY S HOME. 

.1 . r is a large black 

iidma Gardner's cat. 
; d with Grandma Gard- 
tc, except one day and 

ma Gardner says she is a 
fortnble cat to live with. 

every room in the 



She can unlatch the doors ; and 
she goes in and out as she pleases. 

There is only one place where she 
cannot go. 

That place is the cake closet. A 
big button has been put on the cake 
closet door. 

Pussy knows the button was put 
on to keep her out of the closet, and 
she never tries to open that door. 

If she was a naughty cat, she 
would try, every day, to jump up and 



84 



PUSSY GARDNER. 



turn the button and get in. 

Then Pussy Gardner would not be 
a nice comfortable cat to live in the 
house with, would she ? 




mice at the barn in the course of her 
long life. 

But now she leaves this work for 
the two young cats to do. 
_^ ^_ _ __^, Yet if a mouse comes 
into the house and fright- 
ens grandma, she is always 
ready to hunt it out and 
kill it. 

In winter she lies on 
the rug before the fire. 

In summer she likes 
to sit out doors among 
grandma's flowers. 



CHAPTER 



USSYS 



PUSSY GARDNER AMONG GRANDMA'S FLOWERS. 

Pussy Gardner knows as much 
about the barn as she knows about 
the house. 

She has caught many rats and 



GREAT rROUBLE. 

Last sumriit^r Robby 
Gardner came\ to visit his 
grandmamma. \ 

Robby GardnV-'' '^ -'- 
same agQ.as Pu.i -^) ^ard- 
ner. \ \ 

Both R|bb> :u id Pussy 
are nine ylars ol 1- 

Robby It on :e called 
Pussy Ms cat. 

He did not tease her, or J/mrt her, 
but Pussy.did not wai 
cat. 



, I Robby 'i 




PUSSY GARDNER. 



85 



Robby did not let her have time 
enough to sleep. 

When Robby talked about his cat, 
Pussy said, "No, I am Mrs. Gard- 
ner's cat." 

When Robby went home he asked 
his grandmamma to let him carry 
Pussy with him. 

Grandmamma said he might take 
her. 

Pussy was astonished when grand- 
ma said that. 

Grandpa put Pussy in a basket, and 
tied the cover on. 

Then he put the basket in the 
wagon. Robby got irt. They drove 
away to Robby's home. 

Pussy did not enjoy the ride. 

She said just what she thought 
about it. She said it in very loud 
tones. 

By and by they came to Robby's 
house. 

Robby shut all the doors. Then 
he took Pussy out of the basket. 

He gave her a good dinner of 
bread and milk. 

But Pussy would not eat a mouth- 
ful. 

He made her a soft bed. 

But Pussy would not lie down. 



She went and sat by one of the 
doors. There she staid. 

Pussy did not like the looks of 
things in Robby's house. 

The doors had knobs instead of 
latches. 

Pussy was sure she could not learn 
how to turn knobs. 

They put her dinner in a hand- 
some bowl. 

There was a bright blue picture on 
this bowl. 

But Pussy wanted her old tin 
basin. 

CHAPTER III. pussy's ESCAPE. 

Robby said everybody must be 
careful to keep the doors shut. They" 
must not let his cat out. 

But Robby's papa sat up late to 
read that night. 

He forgot what Robby said. 

He opened the back door too wide, 
and Pussy stepped through. 

The next morning Robby could 
not find his cat, and he felt very 
sorry. 

But Grandpa Gardner found her, 
and he felt very glad. 

When he opened the door, there 



86 



PUSSY GARDNER. FACTS ABOUT ELEPHANTS. 



was Pussy on the door-stone ready 
to come in. -. 

Grandma took her up in her arms. 
" I don't see how we ever let her go 
away ! " she said. 

" I don't either," said Pussy. ** For 
this is my home just as much as it 
is yours." 



They never gave Pussy away 
again. But Pussy does not seem 
at all glad when Robby comes for 
a visit. 

She is never seen on the morn- 
ing when he goes home until after 
he is gone. 

— M.E.N. E. 



FACTS ABOUT ELEPHANTS. 



Dick is the boy who wants to 
know things. 

He has been to the Natural His- 
tory Rooms in Boston. 

In the large hall he saw the skele- 
ton of a great animal. 

Dick's big brother Tom said it was 
the skeleton of a mastodon. 

This animal lived thousands of 
years ago. He lived before there 
were any men on the earth. 

Then the animals, and the trees, 
and the flowers even, were unlike 
those now on the earth. 

" How do you know ? " asked 
Dick. 

" By digging," answered Tom. 

" Men often find parts of strange 



trees and animals when they dig for 
the coal we burn. 

"This big skeleton of the mastodon 
was dug out of the earth." 

" Are there no mastodons now ? " 
asked Dick. 

" No," answered Tom ; " the ele- 
phant is nearest like the mastodon 
of any animal now living." 

" Tell me about the elephant, 
then," said Dick. 

" Well," said Tom, " elephants 
live in the southern forests of Asia, 
and in Africa. 

"They go in troops just as chick- 
ens go in flocks. 

" They are usually as quiet and 
harmless as cows. 



FACTS ABOUT ELEPHANTS. 



87 



" They are the largest and heaviest 
animals on the earth. 

" They have a thick, hairy skin ; 
and their color is like that of the 
smallest of animals — the mouse. 

" The African elephant is larger 




THE ELEPHANT. 



than the elephant that lives in Asia. 
He is also wilder. 

" The Asiatic elephant is from 
seven to ten feet high. He weighs 
from three to four tons. A ton is 
2240 pounds. 

" The African elephant is often 
twelve feet high. 



" His ears are three times as large 
as his cousin's in Asia. They are 
often five feet long and four feet 
wide. 

"The people in Southern Africa 
use these huge ears for sledges. 

" One of the strangest things about 
an elephant is his tusks. 

''These tusks are really the eye 
teeth. 

"They keep on growing as long 
as the elephant lives. 

" They are often from six to ten 
feet long. 

" They sometimes weigh two hun- 
dred pounds. 

"These teeth are pure ivory. 
Paper folders, knife handles, and 
many beautiful articles, are made 
from this ivory. 

" Sometimes a single elephant's 
tooth, or tusk, is worth one hundred 
dollars. 

" And the elephant's nose is as 
strange as his eye teeth. It is called 
his trunk. 

" It is four or five feet long, and 
tapers almost to a point. 

"The trunk takes the place of an 
arm and hand. 

" It can be stretched out and drawn 



8S FACTS ABOUT ELEPHANTS. WHAT A LITTLE COUNTRY GIRL DID. 



in. It can be moved in every direc- 
tion. 

** It is very strong ; with it the 
elephant can pull up small trees. 

"At the end is a sort of thumb; 
with this he can pick up a fine nee- 
dle. 

" He also gathers leaves and grass 
and puts them in his mouth with his 
trunk. 

" So you see the elephant really 
feeds himself with his nose ! 

" The elephant can be easily trained 
and taught. 

" In Asia and Africa the people 
keep elephants as we keep horses. 

" They ride on them. They plow 
and work with them. 



" Elephants will travel fifty miles a 
day. 

" Wild elephant^ often go twenty 
miles at night after a drink of water. 

"Their food is vegetable. One 
once kept in London ate two hun- 
dred pounds of vegetables a day, be- 
sides quantities of hay ; and he often 
drank from sixty to eighty gallons of 
water. 

" Elephants live to be one hundred 
and fifty and perhaps two hundred 
years old." 

" O-oo ! " said Dick, as Tom finished 
the elephant talk, " take me to see an 
elephant ! " 

And Tom promised to do so. 

— C. S. P. 



WHAT A LITTLE COUNTRY GIRL DID. 



This rose was picked in a country 
door-yard. 

A red-cheeked country girl sent it 
to a pale-faced city girl. 

The little city girl put it in a glass 
of water to keep it fresh. 

The rose grew on a tall green 
bush. 



There were more then fifty roses 
on this tall green bush. 

The tall green bush, with its pink 
roses, grew under the little country 
girl's bed-room window. 

This little girl was fond of her 
roses, but she had heard of the poor 
city children who have no flowers. 



WHAT A LITTLE COUNTRY CxlRL DID. 



89 



Her papa worked in the city. 
He went into the city on the cars 
every Monday morning. 

He came back every Saturday 




THE COUNTRY ROSE. 



night to his cooi country home. 

He told her how the ragged little 
boys and girls near the depots ran 
out bare-headed to ask the passengers 
for flowers. 



Her mamma told her, too, that 
most of the city people bought their 
flow^ers. 

The little country-girl, who had 
fifty roses on one bush, thought 
that was very funny ! 

But she thought most about 
the little children who had no 
money to pay for flowers. 

" Can they not get butter- 
cups ? " she asked. 

" I think not," said mamma. 
"Nor daisies?" 
" No," said mamma. 
" Not even dandelions ? " 
" I think not," said mamma. 
" I think some of them cannot 
get even a blade of grass." 

The little country girl thought 

about those children every day. 

One Sunday night she said 

to her papa, " Will you carry 

, some of my flowers to the city 

children ? " 

Papa and mamma talked to- 
gether a little while, then papa 
said he would carry them. 

So the little country girl sent a 
large basket of roses to the city 
children. 

She picked them before sunrise. 



90 



WHAT A LITTLE COUNTRY GIRL DID. 



There were twenty full-blown roses, 
and ten sweet buds, in the basket. 




THE LITTLE GIRL WHO SENT THE ROSES. 

Papa himself did not give the 
roses to the children. 

He had no time to do that. 

He carried the basket to a lady 
whom he knew. 

This lady was a city missionary. 

This lady knew where the poorest 
and sickest children lived. 

Before night she gave a rose, or a 
bud, to thirty children. 

Not one of the thirty children had 
had a flower before that summer. 

O, how glad they were ! 

They carried the roses in their 
hands all day. 

They held them to their cheeks. 
They sang little songs. 



They sat in little groups to watch 
the buds unfold. 

Those who were sick kept the 
roses on their pillows. 

Yes, one little country-girl made 
thirty little city children very, very 
glad. 

When her papa came home she 
heard all about it. 

He brought her a letter from the 
lady. This letter told her how glad 
the city children were. 

After she read the letter she went 
out and kissed the rose bush. 




A LITTLE GIRL WHO RECEIVED A ROSE. 

" You ought to be a very happy 

rose bush," she said. 

—E. F. P. 



JOHNNYS HORSE. IN A TRAP. 



91 



JOHNNY'S HORSE. 



A fine young horse has Master John, 
With saddle and bridle always on ; 
His stable's on the parlor floor; 
And grandpa bought him at the store. 

He has a coat of soft brown hair; 
His mane and tail are long and fair; 
One ear is black and one is white ; 
And both his eyes are very bright. 



He will not kick or run away ; 
He stands untied for half a day ; 
But oh ! he is a pretty show 
As Johnny mounts to make him go. 

And Johnny rides for many a mile, 
And grandpa sees him with a smile ; 
He wishes he could be a boy, 
Just such a gallop to enjoy. 

— M. E. K H. 



IN A TRAP. 



** I think I'll take a walk," said the 
brown puppy to himself. 

He had been asleep, by the side of 
his three brothers. 

They lay on the barn floor in the 
sunshine. 

He rolled over and stretched his 
four little paws. 

Then he gaped until he showed 
his two rows of tiny white teeth, and 
his pink tongue. 

It took him a long time to get 
upon his short legs, for he was 



as plump as an apple dumpling. 

He waddled along out of the barn. 

At the door he stopped. 

He gave a little bark of joy. 

There was a tin teapot on the step. 

There was some yellow corn meal 
dough in the teapot. 

Peter had been feeding the chick- 
ens, and some of "the meal was left. 

The brown puppy liked corn-meal. 

He put his round brown head, eyes, 
ears, nose, and mouth, into the tin 
teapot. 



92 



IN A TRAP. 



What do you think happened 
then? 

He couldn't get his head out. 
He gave a big bark of trouble. 




IN TROUBLE. 



He knocked the tea-pot up and 
down on the floor as hard as he co^uld. 

He ran here and there. 

He could see nothing. 

His mother woke up. 

She ran to him. 

She patted the tea-pot with her 
paw. 

She pulled it with her teeth. 

But she could not get it off. 

The poor little puppy whirled round 
and round, with the tea-pot on his 
head, and thought he should be 
crazy. 

At that moment, Peter, who was 
pumping water, thought he heard a 
noise. 

Yes, he did hear a noise. 

He heard the brown puppy's moth- 
er bark. 



He heard the tin tea-pot thump on 
the barn floor. 

He ran out to the barn to see what 
these sounds meant. 

He laughed when he saw the 
queer animal with four dumpy legs 
and a tin head, dancing around the 
barn. 

He soon set the poor little fellow 
free. 

The brown puppy ran off down the 
lane as fast as he could go. 

He barked little short barks. 

He never looked back once. 




A SCARED PUPPY. 



He did not come back to the barn 
until noon. 

He never puts his nose into strange 
dishes now. 

— if. 0. J. 



PUSSY AND THE MARTINS. BRAVE LITTLE DIMPLE. 



93 



PUSSY AND THE MARTINS. 



One day Pussy said, as she came 

from the barn, 
*T am very tired of living on mice ; 
I'll take a walk through the trees, I 

think ; 
A tender young bird would taste very 

nice." 

Then she climbed, and climbed, with 

a careful step. 
From branch to branch of a tall green 

fir, 
Where Mrs. Martin lived with her 

mate 
In a snug little house that was built 

for her. 

But the martins saw her as on she 

came. 
And they hastened out to drive her 

away ; 



They pecked at her ears, her eyes, her 

nose. 
And frightened her so she'd no wish 

to stay ; 

And down to the ground they fol- 
lowed her close ; 

They flew about her from side to 
side, 

Till Pussy was sick with a dizzy 
head, 

And glad to go in a corner and hide. 

She will not climb the fir tree again ; 
She found the martins too bold and 

strong ; 
She keeps to her diet of rats and 

mice. 

And stays in the barn where the 

cats belong. 

— M.U. K H. 



BRAVE LITTLE DIMPLE. 



Dimple was a little girl who lived 
in New York city. 

She had a pretty home. 



She had a very kind papa and 
mamma. 
She was a good little girl ; but she 



94 



BRAVE LITTLE DIMPLE. 



was not always a sensible little girl. 

Though she was six years old, she 
was afraid to go into a dark room. 

One night, Dimple went down 
stairs with the maid for some fresh 
water. 

The maid tried to turn the gas 
light up, but instead she turned it 
down, and it went out. 

How Dimple screamed ! 

She made such a great noise that 
all the people in the house ran to see 
what was the matter, and her mamma 
was ashamed of her. 

Papa often talked to Dimple about 
light and darkness, day and night, 
and Dimple often promised not to be 
afraid any more. 

But one night she cried for an hour. 

What do you think it was for ? 

Because her mamma asked her to 
bring a spool of thread from the next 
room. 

"She must be cured of this foolish 
fault," said mamma. 

" Yes, she must," said papa, " or she 
will grow up to be a coward." 

Dimple thought about what they 
had said. 

" I will cure myself," she said to 
herself. " I will not be a coward." 



One day it rained hard and Dimple 
did not go to school. 

It was very dark all day. 

What do you suppose Dimple did 
that dark day ? 

She went all alone up to the dark 
attic. 

She had been there with her mam- 
ma several times, but this time she 
did not have a lamp as mamma did. 

At first she could not see where to 
step. 

The light from the small window 
did not reach the corners. 

Dimple moved about softly until 
she found an old cradle. 

Her papa was rocked in this cradle 
when he was a baby. 

Dimple got into this cradle and sat 
down. 

There was a soft quilt in it. 

By and by Dimple could see bet- 
ter. ^ 

She saw a great many boxes, and 
trunks, some old coats hanging up, 
and some baskets and bundles. 

But she saw nothing that could 
hurt her. 

She sang very softly a little song 
she sang at school. 

Dimple was afraid there might be 



BRAVE LITTLE DIMPLE. 



95 



something hidden behind the chim- 
ney, but she said, " I will not be 
afraid. I will try to be sensible. 

"This is my papa's 
house. He would have 
nothing in it that could 
hurt his little girl." 

The rain pattered on the 
roof. 

Dimple did not like 
to hear it at first. 

Then, as the drops fell, 
she began to count the 
loud drops and the low 
drops. 

At last she fell fast 
asleep in the cradle as she 
counted the drops. 

When papa came home 
to dinner, no Dimple could 
be found. 

They looked all over 
the house, except in the 
attic and the cellar. 

" She is such a little 
coward, she would not go 
where it is dark," said 
papa. 
f " Her little cloak and 
hood are here! " said mamma; 
has not left the house." 



It was Dimple's dog that found 
"her. 

The attic door was open a little 




DIMPLE TRIES TO BE BRAVE. 



she 



L 



way, and he pushed it wide open with 
his nose, and went up. 



96 



BRAVE LITTLE DIMPLE. 



Dimple's papa followed with a lamp. 

They found Dimple in the old 
wooden cradle fast asleep. 

" Dimple, my little daughter," said 
papa, "why did you hide up here?" 

" I came to try to like the dark," 
said Dimple ; " I do not mean to be 
a coward." 

Three long hours had little Dim- 



ple been in the great dark attic. 

She never was afraid again to be 
alone in the dark. 

Dimple was only five years old 
then. Now she is a tall lady. 

Her own little boys and girls like 
to hear her tell the story of the dark, 
rainy day in the attic. 

—K. T. W. 



A LITTLE BIRDS' PLAY-HOUSE. 



I saw a birds' play-house last week. 

It was built by some little birds 
that live in Australia. 

It was brought to America in a 
ship. 

Learned men have looked at the 
little building, and they think it was 
built only to play in. 

First, the birds make a platform of 
twigs. These twigs are woven in and 
out as you braid paper mats. 

The play-house is built on this mat. 

It is woven of fine twigs. These 
twigs meet at the top, like the sides 
of the roof of a house. 

When the play-house is done, the 
birds bring playthings into it. 



They bring shells. They bring 
colored pebbles. They bring colored 
rags. They bring bright feathers. 

They strew some of the shells and 
stones in front of the door. 

They lay some of the shells and 
stones in rows along the walks. 

They stick the feathers and rags 
in among the twigs. 

Then the birds play. 

I don't know whether they call the 
play " tag," or " hide-and-seek," but 
they chase each other in and out of 
the playhouse, and chatter and call. 

These birds are cousins to the 
starling. They are called the " Satin 
Bower Bird of Australia." 




July, 1880. 
Vol. I. No. 7. 



Edited by the Editors of Widk Awake a7id Babyland. 
D. LoTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. 

rCopyrielit, 1880, by t). Lothrop & Co.. and entered at the P. 0. Hi I)Qst.->n as second-class matter.] 



75 cts. a year. 
7 cts. a number. 



HAPPY LITTLE LAURA. 



Little Laura Dates sat down to 
rest. 

She was out in the meadow at 
grandpapa's. 

She had been walking along by the 
fences to pick the blackberries. 

She sat still just one moment. 

Then she jumped up. She looked 
so happy. 

Why ? 

Because "long vacation" always 
came in summer time ! 

Laura was a little Primary school- 
girl, and lived in the cit)^ 

She was so glad, each year, when 
school closed and she could go to 
grandpa's farm. 

Little Laura sat down again on the 
grass, and thought about it, 



The hot sun shown right down on 
her bare head, but Laura liked that. 




HAPPY LITTLE LAURA. 



" What if long vacation came in 
winter!" said Laura. '' I shouldn't 



98 



HAPPY LITTLE LAURA. — HARRY's BIRTHDAY. 



like it at all, I know I shouldn't ! " 
" But now it is very nice," said she. 

*' It comes when there are roses and 

peppermint by the brook, and cherries 

and early apples, and blackberries and 

blueberries, and pond-lilies. 

" I do think the best of everything 

comes in long vacation ! 

" It is just the right kind of 

weather to swing in a hammock. 



" It is just the right kind of weath- 
er for boat-rides. 

" It is just the right kind of weath- 
er for picnics. 

" Isn't it funny," said Laura, "that 
when it is such weather that a lit- 
tle girl can not possibly study 
it is the very kind of weather to 
have all sorts of good times?" 

—E. F. P. 



HARRY'S BIRTHDAY. 



" Harry is seven years old to-day — 
What shall we do to please our 
boy ? " 
Said dear papa in his kindly 
way; 
" Take him to town and buy him 
a toy?" 

" Cried Tom, " O, father, buy him 

a gun. 
And a box of caps — then there'll 

be fun ! " 
" A rocking-horse," said Sister 

Sue ; 
Said Sam, "A flag, red, white 

and blue !" 



" Father, some candy!" said sweet- 
tooth Charley, 

" Chocolate, almond, and sticks 
of barley, 

In a pretty box with a picture 
cover — 

Harry is such a candy lover! 

Mother said, " Let us sail down 
the harbor. 
And see the bright water dance 
in the sun, 
Come home at six and have tea in 
the arbor !^' 
Cried all: "That's the very 
thing to be done!" 



WHAT I SAW IN BOSTON. 



99 




'-ia{l,.<w 



THE LITTLE GERMAN CHILDREN. 



WHAT I SAW IN BOSTON. 



What do you think I saw one 
morning last winter, as I walked 
down Washington Street? 

I saw three children and their 
father. 

Oh, they were having such a good 
time ! 

I stopped and looked at them. 

They were fat, rosy-cheeked little 
children. 

Their father was fat and rosy- 
cheeked too. 

They looked like Germans. 

I think they were emigrants. 



Emigrants are people who leave 
their own country and go to another 
country to live. 

German emigrants come from a 
country called 'Germany. , 

There were two little girls and a 
little boy. 

The little girls wore brown dress- 
es, long-sleeved aprons and faded 
sacques. They both had red hoods. 

The little boy wore trousers, but 
he had a big-sleeved apron like the 
girls. He had a very shabby fur 
cap. 



lOO 



WHAT I SAW IN BOSTON. BEAUTIES. 



Do you want to know about the 
good time they were having? 

Perhaps you would think it was 
very poor fun. 

But the German children did not. 

They laughed and chattered until 
their cheeks fairly shone. 

They were at the drinking foun- 
tain in front of Franklin Square. 

Here is a high stone trough for 
the horses to drink out of in sum- 
mer. 

In winter it is covered with a stone 
plank. 

The emigrant children were stand- 
ing on this plank. 

Their father must have put them 
up there, for it was too high for them 
to climb. 

He would spread out his arms, 
and the children would jump into 



them just as fast as he could catch 
them, and set them down on the pave- 
ment. 

Then he would lift them up, and 
the fun would begin again. 

I think the man enjoyed it as much 
as the children did. 

It looked very funny to see a 
whole family amusing themselves in 
that way in the streets of Boston. 

But they did not seem to know that 
anyone was watching them. 

Yet nearly everybody who passed 
stopped to smile at the pretty sight. 

I never saw any of them again. 

But I would like to know more 
about them. 

I am sure there are no happier 
children in Boston than those little 
Germans. 

— K. L. 



■i^ 



BEAUTIES. 



Fritz always opens his eyes wide 
when he goes out-doors. 

He likes his picture-books. 

He likes to hear mamma read 
stories. 

But he likes " real things " better. 



Yesterday he saw some birds that 
had just arrived from the South. . 

Fritz said he should like to know 
their names so that he could speak 
to them when they met. 

Then mamma said, " Mrs. Robin, 



BEAUTIES. 



lOI 



Red Breast, this is my son Fritz." 

" Mr. Oriole, Master Fritz." 

" My son Fritz, Mr. Blackbird." 

Fritz said he liked to be introduced 
to birds and flowers. 

Then he saw some pretty creatures 
with great spotted wings. 

Fritz knew them. He said they 
were " beauties." Fritz is too little 
to speak such a long word as " but- 
terflies." 

He asks mamma to-day where 
" beauties " come from. 

Then mamma shows him some- 
thing on the twig of a tree, that 
makes him step back, 

It is a great green worm. 

This worm is as long as Fritz' 
chubby little hand. 

It is bigger around than three of 
his fingers. 

Fritz sees that this fat green worm 
is spinning a fine white thread all 
about itself. 

The little head goes back and forth 
so swift, spinning and winding the 
fine white thread. 



By-and-by the worm is covered all 
over with the fine white thread. 
Then mamma cuts off the twig. 




A "BEAUTY." 

She carries it in the house. 

She lays it, worm and all, in a lit- 
tle box. 

Next summer, Fritz will open the 
box. 

Instead of a worm he will find a 
handsome " beauty " with great spot- 
ted wings. 

Then he will know where butter- 
flies come from. 

— S. K F. 



I02 



HOW MOOLY COW TALKED. 



HOW MOOLY COW TALKED. 



One morning Artie's mamma sat 
by the open window with Artie in 
her lap. 

It was a bright summer day. 
Baby Artie watched the bees come 
and go around the flowers under 
the window. 

Pretty vines hung about the win- 
dow. Beautiful blossoms made the 
air sweet. 

Artie and his mamma were all 
alone in the house. 

The servants had gone out, and it 
was very still. 

Suddenly they heard a loud "Moo ! 
moo ! moo ! " 

The sound came from the barn at 
the back of the house. 

" Mooly cow is talking to her 
baby," said mamma. 

" Moo ! moo ! moo ! " said the 
cow again. 

This time it sounded as thougfh 
she were frightened. 

Patrick always took care of Mooly 
but he had gone to market. 

Mamma thought she ought to go 
out and see what was the matter. 



Just as she had made up her mind 
to go, a great head and pair of horns 







MOOLY AND BOSS RELL. 



came right in at the open window. 

Artie was frightened. 

He began to cry. 

The more he cried the faster the 
cow " mooed." 

Her eyes were very large. She 
put her big 'nose close to the lady's 
face. " Moo, moo, moo, moo ! " she 



HOW MOOLY COW TALKED. 



103 



said as fast and loud as she could. 

'' Yes, I will come," said the lady. 

She was not afraid of poor Mooly. 

She took the crying boy in her 
arms and followed Mooly. 

The barn was at the end of the 
large garden. 

When Patrick went away he had 
shut the door. It was open now. 

Mooly had burst it open with her 
horns and head. 

When the lady w^ent inside she 
saw that Boss Bell, Mooly's pretty 
calf, had got her head betw^een two 
boards. 

She was nearly strangled. 

She had tried to get out of her 
pen and got caught. 

Then Artie's mamma put Artie 



on some hay and found a hammer. 

She knocked off the board and set 
the little calf free. 

Poor little Boss Bell was so weak 
she could scarcely stand. 

Mooly stopped mooing. 

She kissed Boss Bell. 

She was very happy. 

She coaxed Boss Bell to go out in 
the garden. 

The lady let them go. They staid 
in the shade of an apple-tree until 
Patrick came back. 

When Patrick came little Artie 
tried to tell him the story, by saying 
''Moo! moo! moo!'' like the cow. 

Do you wonder that Patrick said 
that Mooly knew as much as folks ? 

— K. T. W. 







'9^^H! 


^^^9neh^i^^ 


1 


^kjhIiH' 


HSs^W^^p^.- 



am Little Summer, 
And I am on my way 

To a distant country, 
To seek a pleasant day ; 
\\ But if I do not find it 

Be sure I will not stay. 



I04 



LITTLE BOLSTER. 




MAMMA. READS TO GRACE ABOUT THE COTTON PLANT. 



LITTLE BOLSTER. 



What a funny name for a little 
girl ! 

Her real name was Grace; but 
auntie called her " Little Bolster," 
because she sometimes wore such a 
queer long-sleeved apron. 

This long-sleeved apron was made 
of striped stuff that looked like bed- 
ticking. It was long, and covered 
her all over. 

Auntie said she looked like a little 
pillow, or bolster, when she wore it. 



She wore it when she helped her 
mother wash dishes. 

At other times she wore a pretty 
lace-trimmed apron. 

Little Bolster lived in the city ; 
but every summer she went to stay 
with grandpa who lived in the 
country. 

When she was five years old, she 
began to go to school. 

She did not like school. But she 
liked to know about things, and she 



LITTLE BOLSTER. 



105 



asked a great many questions. 

She often asked her mamma to 
read aloud to her. 

When vacation came, she went to 
grandpa's. 

She took her books with her, and 
auntie heard her read every day. 

She had a small Arithmetic too, 
and auntie gave her short lessons 
in it. 

** I don't like Arithmetic," she said 
one day. 

" Why not ? " said auntie. 

" Because almost every question 
ends with why. I hate those whys!" 

One question in Little Bolster's 
arithmetic was this : 

" If you have two apples, and 
your brother gives you two more, 
how many have you? Four. Why?" 

''Didn't the man that made the 
book know why?" Little Bolster 
asked. 

" Perhaps," she added, " his brother 
never gave him two apples more, so 
he never was quite sure it would be 
four." 

*• What a funny Grace ! " said Un- 
cle Charles. 

When Grace grew older, her 
mamma tried to teach her to sew. 



She cut calico into tiny square 
blocks, and basted them together. 

Grace tried to sew them over and 
over. 

Such funny little stitches as she 
made ! 

They were as uneven as dog's 
teeth, and not half as white. 




THE BURSTING OF THE COTTON POD. 

" I don't like patch-work," she said 
one day. 

"When I'm a big woman, I'll have 
my quilt all one big piece. 



io6 



LITTLE BOLSTER. 



" 1 11 have it all pink with a blue 
border." 

" What a funny Grace ! " said Un- 
cle Charles again. 

" Where did you get this calico, 
mamma ? " asked Grace. 

" Up-stairs, in the great trunk." 

"No, I mean, where does it come 
from first ? It don't grow like the 
grass, does it?" 

" It don't grow just like the grass, 
but it is m.ade of something that 
does grow out of the ground." 

" Can I see it grow ? " 

" I'm afraid not. It is too cold 
here for the plants that calico is 
made from." 

" Tell me all about it, please," said 
Little Bolster. 

Then her mamma opened a book 

and read to her little daughter: 

^ "Calico is made- from cotton. 
m 

"Cotton is a plant that grows in 

the southern part of the United 

States, and in other warm lands. 

"The seed is sown early in the 
spring. 

"When the plants are fully grown, 
they put out pretty white blossoms. 



" By-and-by, these blossoms fall off. 
" Then there is a little pod left where 
the flower was. 

"The pod grows larger and larger 
till it is as large as a small egg. 

"When the pod is ripe, it bursts. 

" It is full of white cotton like soft 
wool. 

" In this wool are some seeds. 

"Then the soft down is picked out 
of the pods. 

"The seeds are taken out of the 
down. 

"Then the cotton is done up in 
large bales, and sent to the mills. 

"There the spinners spin it into 
yarn, and the weavers weave into cloth. 

"A part of this cloth is left white, 
and is used in making many of our 
underclothes. 

"A part is stamped with pretty fig- 
ures, and we call it print, or calico." 

" Oh, what a long time it takes to 
make a piece of calico ! " said Little 
Bolster. 

"And then it takes so long to make 
the quilt afterwards," she added with 
a long sigh. 

— L. L. P. 



THE DOUGH-DOG. 



107 



THE DOUGH-DOG. 



One day when grandma was making 
some pies, 

She wished to give Tommy a pleas- 
ant surprise ; 




So she made a puppy-dog out of 

some dough, 
And baked it, and marked it, and 

named it Bruno. 



This wonderful dog could stand on 

its feet. 
Its body was chubby, and cunning, 

and neat. 
Its little dough-head was spotted 

with black, 
And its little dough-tail curled over 

its back. 

And when Tommy saw it he shouted 

with glee, 
" How good grandma was to make 

that for me ! " 
And he played with the puppy-dog 

day after day, 

Till its head and its tail were both 

worn away. 

—31. E. iV. H. 



THE RAISIN CURE. 



Little Laura was going to school 
for the first time. 

She was a timid little girl. 

She felt afraid to go alone. 

So mamma said she would go 
with her to the school-house. 



She dressed Laura in a pretty pink 
gown, and a cunning little white 
apron with two pockets. 

But the little apron with two 
pockets did not keep Laura from 
being afraid. 



io8 



THE RAISIN ,CURE. 



When mamma was buttoning the 
little coat, Laura laid her curly head 




LITI'LE LAURA. 



down on mamma's shoulder. 

" S'pose I cry, mamma ? " she said. 

" My little Laura must be brave," 
said mamma. " There will be many 
other little girls at school, and the 
teacher is kind." 

Laura shook her head. " I am 
afraid I will cry, mamma," she said. 

Mamma stopped to think. Her 
little girl was very fond of raisins. 
She went into the pantry and got 
some for her. 

Laura felt braver with so many 
raisins in her apron pocket. 

Mamma introduced her little 
daughter to the teacher. The teach- 
er had a pleasant face, and Laura 
thought she should not feel afraid. 



But when all the boys and girls 
came into the room, Laura felt afraid. 

She was sure she should cry. 

Then she thought of the raisins. 

She took a plump one out of her 
pocket. 

It tasted so sweet she forgot to 
cry. 

By-and-by the teacher came and 
spoke to her. 

" Little girls should not eat raisins 
in school," she said pleasantly. " Why 
did you bring them ? " 

Laura could not speak. She could 
not look up. 

The teacher spoke again. " Why 
did you bring them, dear?" 

" I brought them 'gainst I cried," 
said a faint little voice. 

The teacher smiled. Then she 
kissed Laura. Every time she 
looked at Laura, after that, she 
smiled. 

The smile was as good as a raisin 
every time, and Laura did not cry 
at all. 

She ate her raisins at recess. 

The next day Laura was not afraid 
to go to school alone. 

This is a true story. 

—L. M. P. 



HOW THE DICKSON CHICKENS WERE SAVED. 



109 



HOW THE DICKSON CHICKENS WERE SAVED. 



CHAPTER I. THE CHILDREN TRY. 

It was no use to expect to keep 
the chickens. 

One after another, they would 
all go. 

The Dickson children were almost 
discouraged. 

They had tried so hard to save the 
pretty, downy, little creatures. 

Charlie and Kate kept good watch. 
Every time they saw a bird fly over, 
they would run and cry, ** A hawk! a 
hawk ! " 

Fanny and Bertha ran about and 
swung their sunbonnets, whether 
they saw any signs of danger or not. 

They frightened the hens, and that 
is all they did do. 

White Wings lost a chick in the 
morning. 

Brownie mourned over the loss of 
a darling at noon. 

At night a piercing shriek from 
Speckle told that the last of her 
brood was gone. 

Then Sammy brought out the old 
shot gun. 



Mr. Hawk seemed to know what 
the gun meant. 

For a few days he staid away. 

But one day, when the family were 
at dinner, down he came, right be- 
fore the open door. 

That time he carried off the nicest 




A HAWK ! A HAWK ! 



chicken in the whole flock. After 
that Sammy ate his meals on the' 
woodpile with the gun by his side. 

It was not very comfortable. The 
hot sun shone down on his head, 
and blistered his face. 

Sue came out with an umbrella. 

But Sammy would not have it. 



^ 



no 



HOW THE DICKSON CHICKENS WERE SAVED, 



He said he couldn't see the hawk 
if he should come. Besides, he 
wouldn't come with a great umbrella 
in sight. 

" Then why not put up the um- 




SAMMY MEANS TO SHOOT THE HAWK. 

brella and leave it ? " Sue asked. 

Sammy said he meant to shoot 
the hawk. 

But by-and-by he had to go to the 
well for a drink of cold water. 

As soon as he was gone — whiz ! 
swoop ! kut-kut-ka-daw-cut ! Away 
flew Mr. Hawk with a fat young 
pullet. 

CHAPTER II. GRANDPA TRIES. 

Then grandpa set up a scarecrow. 

Scarecrows are used in cornfields 
to frighten away the crows that come 
to pull up the corn. 



So grandpa thought a scarecrow 
might keep Mr. Hawk out of the 
chicken-yard. 

This is the way grandpa made the 
scarecrow. 

He cut a big limb from a tree. 

It was six feet long, about as tall 
as a man. 

He trimmed off all the branches 
except two near one end. These two 
branches were the arms. 

Then he fixed it to stand in the 
ground. 

Next he wound it with straw. 

Then he dressed it in a old blue 
soldier's overcoat. The two branches 
went in the sleeves. 

He fastened an old hat on the 
straw head. 

Next he tacked some strips of 
bright tin on a long narrow board, 
and made the scarecrow hold it up. 

So at last the scarecrow was a ter- 
rible-looking man, with a very big 
gun. 

But it was of no use. 

Mr. Hawk soon found out that 
the wooden gun could not fire a 
shot, and the straw man could not 
run or even say, " Shoo ! " 

So Mr. Hawk's family still had 



HOW THE DICKSON CHICKENS WERE SAVED. 



Ill 



spring chicken for breakfast, dinner, 
and supper. 

CHAPTER III. THE KINGBIRDS TRY. 

" Get up, children ! Good news ! " 
called grandma early one morning. 

" What is it ? " they asked. 

" Kingbirds," said grandma. 

" Ah," said Sammy, " Mr. Hawk 
will have to look out now ! " Sammy 
had heard of king-birds before. 

Mr. Hawk did have to look out. 

Bertha ran in after breakfast, quite 
out of breath. 

"Do come, mamma!" she cried. 
" Two big bumble-bees are chasing 
that hawk!" 

Sure enough ! Mr. Hawk w^s fly- 
ing as fast as he could. 

But he could not escape from the 
two " bumble-bees " as little Bertha 
called the two kingbirds. 

How the tiny creatures did dart ! 

Sometimes they were over him. 

Sometimes they were under him. 

They pecked at his eyes. 

They plucked out his feathers. 

They followed him out of sight. 

They gave him just such a chase 
every time he came. 



The fourth time they chased him 
was the last. 

Mr. Hawk never -came near the 
hen-yard again. 

Then the kingbirds built a nest up 
in the spruce tree. 





THE KING BIRDS SAVE THE CHICKENS. 

There they raised four little birds, 
then four more. 

Now there are ten kingbirds on 
the Dickson farm. 

I think the Dickson chickens will 
be safe after this. 

— >S'. P. B. 



112 



WHO HAD THE CHERRIES. 



WHO HAD THE CHERRIES. 



How red the cherry trees shone as 
Ben and Bobby drove in at the big 
gate with papa ! 




AN EARLY BREAKFAST. 



Papa had just been down to the 
depot for his little boys. They had 
come home for the long vacation. 

They both stood up in the buggy 



when they saw the cherry trees, and 
swung their hats. 

The ripe cherries glittered among 
the green leaves all- over 
the trees, as the sunset 
light struck them. 

" I'll be up in those 
trees long before sun- 
rise ! " said Bobby. 

" I too," said Ben. 

A half-dozen little fel- 
lows did have a break- 
fast of ripe juicy cherries 
next morning before sun- 
rise. 

But Ben and Bobby 
were not among them. 

Ben and Bobby were 
fast asleep. 

Six bright-eyed black- 
birds had the early juicy 
b'reakfast. 

Nobody ever heard of 
a blackbird that lay abed 
late in the morning! 

But they left plenty of cherries for 



the little boys. 



—n. 




Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Babvland. 



August, 1880. 
Vol. I. No. 8. 



D. LoTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. 

[Copyright, 1S80, by D. Lotbeop & Co.. and entered at the P. 0. at Boston as 8econd-cla«f matter.l 



75 cts. a year. 
7 cts. a number. 



DOT, THE DENTIST. 



Dot is a monkey. 

He has lived in our country two 
years. 

He was brought here from India, 
by his master. 

Dot is a happy, good natured little 
fellow. 

He is full of tricks and pranks. 

But last week Dot was not a hap- 
py, pleasant monkey. 

Dot was cross. 

Dot had the toothache ! 

All the family were sorry for him. 

He would sit down on the floor 
and put his paw up to his mouth, 
and look so pitiful ! 

Sometimes he would cry and sob. 

Then he would run around the 
room as fast as he could go. 



At last Dot grew tired of the pain. 
He made up his mind to have the 




DOT HAS THE TOOTHACHE. 



toothache no longer — no, not one 
minute longer ! 

What do you suppose Dot did ? 

He found a long stout string. 



114 



DOT, THE DENTIST. FLORA AND THE MUTTON. 



He wound this string around the 
aching tooth. 

Then he took the string between 
his two front paws. 

He pulled it tight. He held it 
fast. 

Then he drew up one of his hind 
legs, and kicked on the string hard 
and swift. 

Out flew a scream from Dot's 
mouth ! 



Out flew a tooth half way across 
the room. 

The big tears stood in the little 
dentist's eyes. 

He looked up at his master. Then 
he gave a sharp little howl. 

Then he ran away, and had a nap. 

When he woke up, he was as pleas- 
ant and happy as before. 

This is a true story. 

— E. F. P. 



FLORA AND THE MUTTON. 



Flora is a spaniel. 

Tib is a grey cat. 

They were great pets, and good 
friends with each other. 

They were allowed to come into 
the dining-room. 

Many nice bits were given them 
at meal-times. 

One day their master was dining 
alone. 

Some one called to see him in 
haste. 

He left his dinner, and went out 
into the hall. 

When he came back, Flora was 
•lying on the dinner-table. 



There was a leg of roast mutton 
on the big platter. 

She was lying beside that platter. 

But Flora had not touched the 
roast mutton. 

She did not move when her mas- 
ter came in. 

She did not seem afraid, or 
ashamed. 

Her master thought, " This is a 
very strange thing for Flora to do. 

*' I have always been proud of her 
good manners. 

"I never knew her to get on the ta- 
ble before. 

" But the mutton has not been 



FLORA AND THE MUTTON. DODE S SCHOOL-DAYS. 



115 



touched. I do not understand it." 

He looked around the room. 

Then he saw Tib hiding in a cor- 
ner. 

Tib looked very much ashamed. 

She looked as if she had been in 
mischief. 

" Ah ! I see," said her master. 

" Miss Tib tried to help herself to 



roast mutton while I was out. 

•* Flora drove her away. 

" Flora is on the table to take care 
of my dinner for me." 

You may believe that Flora had a 
very nice dinner that day. 

She very kindly allowed naughty 
Tib to share with her. 

—M. 0. J, 



DODE'S SCHOOL-DAYS. 



Washington is the capital of the 
United States. 

The President lives in Washing- 
ton. 

Dode lives in Washington, too. 

I have often seen Dode in Wash- 
ington. 

Her real name is Theodora, but 
everyone calls her Dode. 

Dode is a little black girl. Her 
mother is very poor. 

One day a kind lady said to Dode's 
mother, " Dode may come and live 
with me. I will give her some 
clothes. I will send her to school. 
She can wait upon me when she is 
not in school." 



Dode was eight years old. But 
she had never been in a school- 
room. 

She was glad to live in a fine 
house. 

She was very glad to have neat 
clothes like other little girls. 

The lady gave her three pretty 
gowns. 

She gave her a pair of stout 
shoes. 

She gave her a pair of striped 
stockings. 

Dode danced for joy when she saw 
the striped stockings. 

" Now I is like white folks." 

Dode did not know that she should 



ii6 



DODES SCHOOL- DAYS. 



say ** am " instead of "is." 

Every morning, before breakfast, 
Dode swept the brick sidewalk in 
front of the house. 




HAPPY DODE. 



It was very funny to see her ; the 
broom was so tall, and Dode was so 
short. 

She would sweep a little. 

Then she would stop and look at 
her gown. 

Then she would sweep a little 
more. 



Then she would stop and look at 
her striped stockings. 

So it sometimes took Dode a lonsf 
time to sweep the sidewalk. 

When she was very happy, she 
sang songs while she swept. 

Dode made these songs herself. 

One song had this verse : 

" Dode, you is a happy girl, 

Yes, you is ! 
Just like pretty white girl now, 
Yes, you is ! " 

Dode did not know that she should 
say " are," instead of " is." 

One morning Dode's mistress 
called to her from the window : 

" You must sweep faster, little girl. 
School begins this morning." 

Dode stopped singing. She swept 
as fast as she could. 

When she started for school, with 
a white ruffle in the neck of her 
gown, she felt very proud. She held 
her head very high. 

" How old are you, Theodora ? " 
asked the teacher, 

" Next to Sam," said Theodora. 

"How old is Sam?" said the 
teacher. 

" Next to me," said Theodora. 



DODES SCHOOL-DAYS. ON THE BEACH. 



II' 



Then the children laughed. 

The teacher pointed to a large A. 

" Can you tell me what this letter 
is called ? " she asked. 

" Looks like mammy's toasting- 
fork," said Dode. 

" Do you know any of the letters ? " 
asked the teacher. 

" No, miss," said Dode, " only the 
dancing one, and the one like pappy's 
saw-horse." 

The teacher found that S was the 
" dancing letter," and that X was like 
the saw-horse. 

" Well, little girl," said the teacher, 
" if you will come every day I will 
teach you to read." 

When recess-time came Dode went 



out with the rest of the girls. 
But she did not go back into the 
school-house with them. 

Dode's mistress tried to learn why 
Dode disliked to go to school. 

What do you suppose Dode said ? 

" I can't get any learning where 
they say one letter at a time I " 

So ended Dode's school-days. 

She still sweeps the brick walk 
every morning, and she still sings 
like a bird : 

" Dode, you is a happy girl, 

Yes, you is ! " 

I am afraid Dode will never learn 
to say " are " instead of " is." 

— K. T. W. 



ON THE BEACH. 



Lotty and George went to the sea- 
shore. They staid a week. 

They were out on the beach every 
day. 

How happy they were ! They 
climbed among the rocks. 

They dug in the sand. 

They had big iron spoons to dig 
in the sand with. 



They liked to make wells in the 
sand. 

They liked to see the wells fill 
with water. 

Sometimes they would forget the 
tide was coming in. 

Then the waves would come fast 
and chase them up the shore. 

Sometimes their feet would be 



ii8 



ON THE BEACH. 



wet before they could run away. 

They could always see ships away 
in the distance, with big white sails ; 
and little boats would often pass by. 

Then Lotty would wave her apron 




ox THE BEACH. 



or her handkerchief. George would 
swing his hat. 

The people in the boats would 
wave their hats in reply. 

George and Lotty often gathered 
pretty shells and pebbles. 

They picked up star-fishes and laid 
them on the rocks to dry. 

There were some birds that staid 
around the beach all the time. 

They were large and queer. 

These birds had long legs and long 
bills. 



These birds hunted in the sand for 
worms and little shell-fish to eat. 

They often waded off into the wa- 
ter after food. 

But they did not have web-feet to 
swim with, like geese and ducks. 

Sometimes they would stand so 
still that Lotty and George would 
think they could catch them. 

But when they tried to come near 
them the birds would run away very 
fast on their long legs. 

George and Lottie wished to know 
the names of the long-legged birds. 

They told their papa about them. 
He said they were sand-pipers. 

The week seemed very short to 
Lotty and George. 

They were sorry to go home and 
leave the sea-shore. 

They carried some shells and peb- 
bles with them. 

But they could not take the bright 
blue water, the rocks, and the sand- 
pipers. 

They remembered this happy visit 
to the beach all winter. 

But they remembered the sand- 
pipers longer than anything else they 
saw. 

They often drew pictures of the 



ON THE BEACH. MY KITTY. 



119 



sand-pipers on their slates at school. 

Sometimes they drew very long 
legs for the sand-pipers. 

Then they laughed at the very 



funny birds on their slates. 

They often wished they knew 
where the sand-pipers staid in win- 
ter-time. 

— M. E. N. H. 



MY KITTY. 




THE PET KITTY. 



Come here, kitty, and sit on my 
shoulder, 
Give me your paw, and purr in 
my ear. 



And you shall have cake and cream 
for dinner, 
• And a little nap on my bed, my 
dear. 

But first give your face a good 
washing, 
And with each little paw wipe it 
well ; 
And I'll tie on your neck a blue 
ribbon. 
To fasten your collar and bell. 

For you caught that sly mouse in 
the pantry. 
Where he had nibbled my crack- 
ers away ; 
What should I have done without 
kitty? 
That same nibbling mouse would be 

here to-day. 

— M. M. H. 



I20 



CHARLIE S RABBITS. 



CHARLIE'S RABBITS. 



Charlie had four baby rabbits. 
Two of them were pure white. 




" MAMMA, WHAT SHALL WE DO ? " 

One was black, with a white collar 
and one white ear. 

The other was white, with black 
spots. 

They staid with their papa and 
mamma in a box in the wood-house 
chamber. 

Their papa's name was Dick. 

He was a bad, disagreeable rabbit. 

Their mamma's name was Minnie. 

She was a cross, selfish rabbit. 

For a while Minnie took good care 
of her four baby rabbits. Then she 
got tired of staying with them. 

She and Dick would go off and 
stay for hours. 



The four baby rabbits sometimes 
got very hungry. 

Charlie did not know what to do. 
He could not get Minnie or Dick to 
go to them. Minnie bit him when 
he tried to carry her to her babies, 
and he let her go. ^ 




Charlie felt very sad. 
At dinner, at breakfast, at supper, he 
thought of his poor hungry rabbits. 



CHARLIES RABBIT. — MRS. ORIOLE. 



121 



" Oh what shall we do with them, 
mamma," he would say. 

Charlie's mamma told him to 
bring the little hungry rabbits to the 
kitchen. 

Charlie brought them. 

" We will see what can be done," 
she said. 

Then she got some warm milk, a 
spoon, a towel and a napkin. 

She sat down and spread the towel 
in her lap. Then she took a little 
rabbit in her lap, and folded a napkin 



under its chin for a bib. 

She opened its mouth and poured 
the nice warm milk down its hungry 
throat. 

At first some was spilled. But 
when the baby rabbits found how 
good it was, they drank it easily. 

Every day Charlie's mother fed 
them, until they could, take care of 
themselves. 

So Charlie's rabbits were saved. 
They are large handsome rabbits 
now. 

— C. H. B. 



MRS. ORIOLE. 



Did you ever see an oriole's nest ? 

It is fastened to a tree. It hangs 
down. It looks like a little long bag, 
or purse. 

It is made of bits of flax, and 
wool, and horsehair, and any kind of 
string the birds can get. 

There are always two or three long 
hairs which go in and out all through 
an oriole's nest. 

These hairs look like the darning 
threads in a stocking. 

o 

Some of the strongest strings are 
wound around the bough of the tree. 



and fasten the nest in place. 

The nest is fastened like this in 
three places. 

When the nest is finished, Mrs. 
Oriole puts a pad of soft wool, or 
cows' hair, in the bottom. 

On this soft cushion she lays three 
eggs. 

These eggs have pale purple spots 
on the large ends. 

Fine pale purple streaks ruii criss- 
cross around the small ends. 

I once saw two orioles buildino- a 
nest. It was in an apple tree. 



122 



MRS. ORIOLE. 



This apple tree did not seem to 
me a good place for a nest. 

It grew by the roadside. 

Noisy wagons passed under it 
all day. 




"tU^ 



AN oriole's nest. 



There was a noisy tin-shop right 
across the road. 

But orioles are not afraid of noise. 

They like to be near where people 
live. 

Mrs. Oriole liked that tin-smith's 
shop. 

She often looked over to the shop 



as if she saw something that pleased 
her. 

Mrs. Oriole staid in the tree and 
built the nest. 

Mr. Oriole brought the hair and 
wool and string to build it with. 

If Mrs. Oriole liked what he 
brought she took it and wove it in. 

If she did not like it she scolded 
and sent him off for more. 

Once he brought her a skein of 
sewing-silk which a dressmaker had 
left on her window-sill. 

Mrs. Oriole liked that very much. 

She gave two or three gay little 
chirps. 

The little chirps meant, "Thank 
you ! Very nice 1 " 

But when she needed the long 
strips to fasten the nest to the tree, 
he could not please her. 

He brought two horsehairs. One 
of them was a foot long. 

But Mrs. Oriole scolded him. She 
shook her head at the horsehairs. 

Then he brought her a long piece 
of red yarn. 

But Mrs. Oriole did not want red 
yarn. 

She sat down and looked over at 
the tin-shop. 



MRS. ORIOLE. BRAVE ALICE. 



123 



At last she flew down. 

She alighted at the door of the 
tin-shop. 

She got what she wanted at once. 

It was a long piece of bright fine 
wire. 

The tin-smith had swept this wire 



ont of the shop, several days ago. 

This wire was just right to fasten a 
bird's nest to a tree. 

I thought Mrs. Oriole showed good 
sense when she took it. 

I often saw that wire shining out 
among the leaves of the apple tree. 



BRAVE ALICE. 



A fire broke out in a stable. 

It was not a livery stable. 

It belonged to a private house. 

Three handsome, spirited horses 
stood in the stalls. 

The coachman had gone home to 
dinner. 

The stable door was locked. 

The key was in his pocket. 

The master of the house was not 
at home. 

All the servants but one were 
frightened, and did not know what 
to do. 

This one was Alice, the cook. 

She told the waiter to break open 
the stable door. 

Then in she went. 

She knew horses were always 
afraid of fire. 



She knew it was hard to control 
them. 

She went quickly into the first 
stall. 

She untied the halter. 

She wrapped her apron around the 
horse's head, over his eyes. 

She led him to the door. 

She turned him out. 

She took the second horse out the 
same way, blindfolded with her 
apron. 

Then she let out the third horse, 
blindfolded with her apron. She 
saved them all. 

The stable was burned down. 

The gentleman who owned the 
horses was very grateful to Alice. 

He gave her many beautiful pres- 
ents. 

— M, J. 



124 



THE SHEEP IN THE THORNS. A PERSEVERING DOG. 



THE SHEEP IN THE THORNS. 




CAUGHT ! 



A sheep was caught in the bushes 

one day, 
And she worked so hard to get out 

and away 



That her nice woolly coat was tan- 
gled and torn, 

And some of its pieces were left on 
a thorn. 

But she said to herself, when at last 

she was free, 
'* I'm sure that some bird will be 

thankful to me 
When she finds this wool to put into 

her nest, 
To make a soft bed where her babies 

may rest." 

So this sheep went her way, well 

pleased to believe 
That the birds would be glad such a 

gift to receive. 
How much better was this than to 

fret and complain, 

Because the rough thorns had given 

her pain ! 

— if. JE, N. H. 



A PERSEVERING DOG. 



I will tell you a true story of a dog. 
One day his master was travelling 



on horse-back with a friend. The 
dog ran along beside them. 



A PERSEVERING DOG. 



125 



The dog's master told his friend 
that he would hide something along 
the road, and the dog would find it. 

So he got off his horse. 

He showed the dog a piece of 
money. 

He then put a mark on the money 
so he would know it again. 

He put the money on the ground 
by the roadside. Then he put a 
large stone over the money. 

They rode on a few miles. 

Then he told the dog to go back 
and get the money. 

The dog went back, but he could 
not move the stone. 

While he was trying, two gentle- 
men came along. 

They went to see what the dog 
was doing. 

They lifted up the stone, and one 
of them put the money in his pocket. 

What do you think the dog did 
then? 

He followed the gentlemen twenty 
miles. 

Then they stopped at a hotel. 

He watched them all the time. 

He followed them to their room. 
They did not know it. 

Then he hid under the bed. 



When they were asleep the dog- 
took the pantaloons in his mouth. 

He knew his master's money was 
in one of the pockets. 

He jumped out of the window with 
the pantaloons. 

He carried them to his master. 

It was a long way. 

He did not reach him until morn- 
ing. 

His master had wondered why he 
did not come. 




THE PERSEVERING DOG. 



He was surprised to see him bring- 
ing the pantaloons in his mouth. 

In the pocket of the pantaloons he 
found the money which he had sent 
the dog to look for. 



126 



A PERSEVERING DOG. — A CATASTROPHE. 



He also found a watch, and a purse. 
The dog's master advertised for 
their owner in a newspaper. 

In this way he found out to whom 



the watch and purse belonged. 
He sent them to their owner. 
Was not that a persevering dog? 



A CATASTROPHE. 




One little black cat, one little gray — 
Two little funny cats having such a play ! 
Over goes the gray cat sticking out her toes ; 
Down tumbles Blackie, right upon her nose! 

Here comes the mamma-cat, straight across the floor; 
There go the kitten-cats scrambling for the door; 
Up pops a brown mouse, coming through a crack! 
Jump goes the mamma-cat before it can get back ! 

Funny little black cat, funny little gray — 
How they let the brown mouse try to run away I 
Off goes the brown mouse, in among the pails ! 
Then how the mamma-cat pulls their little tails I 



— jS. W. d. 



A FOUR-FOOTED MILK-MAN. 



127 



A FOUR-FOOTED MILK-MAN. 



A donkey's master usually takes 
care of him. But I know of a don- 
key that once took care 
of his master. It was 
across the ocean in Spain. 

The donkey's master 
was a milk-man. 

He petted his donkey a 
great deal. He trimmed 
his harness with pretty 
gay-colored tassels. 

The donkey loved his 
kind master. 

The man did not take 
his milk in a wagon, as 
milk-men do here. 

He hung the cans, pails, 
and jugs over the don- 
key's back. He led the 
donkey to his customers. 

One morning the milk- 
man was sick. There was 
no one to send with the 
donkey. At last he decided 
to send the donkey alone. 

So he tied on the cans. 

He also tied on a letter. It asked 
the customers to take their milk, and 



then to send back the empty canF. 
Then the donkey started off alone. 




RINGING THE DOOR-KELL. 



After a while he came back, all 
right, with the empty cans. 



128 



THE MEETING OF THE BIRDS. 



The next day he went alone again, 
and the next, till his master got 
well. 

His master learned afterwards 
that when the customers did not 



come out, the wise animal would take 
the handle of the bell in his mouth 
and ring till they came. 

So you see this donkey really did 
take care of his master. 




THE MEETING OF THE BIRDS. 

Four little merry, talkative birds 
Met in a thicket together one day ; 

And, " Oh, how pleasant it is," said one, 
"To build pretty nests in the month of May. 

'' I like the world best in June," said one, 

"When the flowers are blossoming bright and 
sweet. 

And the cherries are hanging thick on the trees, 
Ripe and crimson, all ready to eat. 

The other two said, " O, we like to sing 
To call the people to rise with the sun ; 

And we like to sing at the evening hour 
To tell the people the day-time is done." 

And so these four little frolicsome birds 

Talked as they met- in the thicket one day. 
Till they thought of their young ones waiting at 
home. 
When they spread their small wings and flut- 
tered away. 




September, 1880. 
Vol. I. No. 9. 



Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Babyland. 
D. LoTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. 

[Cftpjriglit, 1880, by D. Lothrop & Co., and eotered at the P. O. at Boston aa Beeood-daia matter. 1 



75 cts. a year. 
7 cts. a number. 




AFTER VACATION. 



Little Rob has 
come home. 

He is ready for 
school again. 

He has had two 
months of fun and 
good times. 

He w a s pale 
when he went from 
the city to uncle 
Jack's. 

Now his hands 
are brown. His 
cheeks are red and plump. 

He can jump twice as far as he 
could before vacation. 

He has lived out doors, climbed 
fences, and rolled on the grass in the 
sunshine. 



TV 

GATHERING APPLES. 



But Rob says he has not played all 
the time. 

Rob says he worked a great deal 
at uncle Jack's. 

He says he helped everybody at 
the farm do their work. 

He says he went every morning 
with aunt Mollie to feed the poul- 
try. 

Every evening he helped her shell 
the corn for their breakfast. 

He says he went every week with 
uncle Jack to salt the sheep. 

Uncle Jack keeps a hundred 
sheep. 

Rob says it is enough to deafen 
you to hear all those sheep and lambs 
cry, ''Ma-a! ma-af" when* they come 
in a flock to meet you and get the salt. 



I30 



AFTER VACATION. 



Rob 'says the stories about sheep 



are wrong. 




ROB HELPS FEED THE POULTRY. 

say ''Ma-af Rob says he heard 
Uncle Jack's sheep say it more than 
a thousand times. 

Rob says he helped milk the 
cows. 

He often let down the barn-yard 
bars for the cows to come through. 

He lashed away the flies and gnats 
so that the cows would stand still to 
be milked. 

He gave them bunches of sweet, 
red clover to eat so that they would 



be sure to stand still. 

Rob says he worked a great deal 
in the apple orchard. 

He says he went up the ladder 
many times with a basket to get ap- 
ples for aunt Molly. 

The sweet " harvest-boughs," and 
the early pippins, and the sops-of- 
wine, and the snow-apples, all were 
ripe before he came away. 

He says aunt Molly would often 
have had no apples for dumplings, or 
to bake, if he had not brought them 
from the orchard. 

Rob is right. 

He did not play all the time. 




ROB HKLPS MILK THE COWS. 



But the work- was as much 
fun as the play, Rob says. 



PRET S DINNER PARTY. 



131 




THE DINNER PARTY IS A SUCCESS. 



PRET'S DINNER PARTY. 



Pret was a large, handsome, grey 
cat. 

He was a gfreat favorite in the 
house. He was not often scolded. 

Pret liked to have company. He 
was always .glad when other cats 
came to see him. 

Pret was sorry for cats who were 
not so well-fed as he was. 

One day Pret made up his mind to 
give a dinner party. 

He invited his poorest cat-friends. 

I will tell you how Pret did his 



L 



marketing for this dinner party. 

When Hannah, the cook, went 
into the pantry, he went too. 

He crept along close to Hannah's 
feet. He was hidden by her dress. 
Hannah did not see him. 

The cupboard door was open. 

There was a large mutton bone on 
the cupboard shelf. 

Hannah wished to make a soup 
of this mutton bone. 

But Pret wanted it for his dinner 
party. 



132 



FRETS DINNER PARTY. IN THE DOUBLE HOUSE. 



He seized it in his mouth. He 
pulled it off the shelf. He drew it 
along to the stairs. 

Hannah had gone out of the room. 

He pulled it up one step, then up 
another, then up another. 

Thump, thump ! bump, bump ! the 
mutton bone went up the stairs. 

Pret's master heard the noise. 

He opened the door to see what 
was the matter. 

But Pret was a great pet, and his 
master did not take the mutton bone 
away from him. 

He wished to see what Pret would 
do with such a big bone. 

So he let him go on with it. It 
was so heavy Pret had to stop and 
rert very often. 



But at last he got it up stairs, and 
out into the yard. 

Five cats sat waiting there. 

Pret laid the bone down before 
them. 

How those five cats sprang to get 
the first mouthful ! 

Then Pret sat down. 

He washed his paws and watched 
the five cats eat their dinner. He did 
not touch one mouthful himself. 

Pret thought it was a very pleas- 
ant dinner party. 

Pret's master thought so, too. 

The five cats thought so, too. 

Those five cats did not often get 

mutton bones with meat on them. 

This is a true story. 

— M. 0. J. 



IN THE DOUBLE HOUSE. 



High up in the elm ' 
A double house rests, 

For two families built, 
With room for nests. 

Mrs. Wren lives east ; 

Mrs. Sparrow lives west; 



But they quarrel all day 
As to which is best. 



Mrs. Sparrow walks in 
When Mrs. Wren's away; 

What she does I don't know, 
But it's not fair play. 



IN A DOUBLE HOUSE. — GREEDY TOPSY. 



^33 



Mrs. Wren, oft declares 
Mrs. Sparrow steals hay, 

So these naughty neighbors 
Have a tiff each day. 



If we had bird-police, 
Perhaps they would see 

What the law could do 
With neighbors in a tree. 



— K. T. W. 



GREEDY TOPSY. 



Topsy is a horse. 

She is small and slim and glossy. 

She likes to go very fast, but she 
is so kind that children can drive 
her. 

Topsy has one fault. She is al- 
ways hungry. 

Her master thinks he gives her 
enough to eat. 

Topsy does not think so at all. 
Topsy knows she is always hungry. 

Topsy has hay, oats, corn and fresh 
water three times a day. 

.Sometimes she is let out for a 
run in the clover pasture. 

But Topsy never runs when she is 
let into the clover pasture. 

No, indeed ! 

Topsy buries her nose among the 
green grasses and the red clover 
blossoms. 

She never lifts her head and looks 



about as the other horses do. 

She does not even look up when 
the cars go by. 




TOPSY AND PRINCE, 



Topsy just eats and eats. 

When she goes back into the sta- 
ble, she goes straight to her man- 
ger. 

She eats all the grain in the food- 
box, every kernel. 

Then she eats all the hay in the 
rack. 

Next she scrapes up all her straw 



134 



GREEDY TOPSY. 



ABOUT SWALLOWS. 



bed with her hind feet. She draws 
it forward with her fore feet. She 
eats all the straw she can reach. 

Then she whinnies to Prince. 

Prince is Topsy's colt. 

There is only a low partition be- 
tween their stalls. 

Prince knows what Topsy wants 
him to do when she whinnies. 

Prince pulls out a wisp of hay 



from his own rack. 

He reaches it up to Topsy. — 

Topsy takes it from his mouth. 

Then Prince pulls out another 
mouthful. 

Topsy takes that too. She eats it. 
She eats the next, and the next, un- 
til Prince's hay is all gone. 

Even then Topsy seems to think 
she would like a little more. 



ABOUT SWALLOWS. 



Swallows have long wings. They 
can fly fast. 

But they do not sing so sweetly as 
some birds do. 

In summer we see large flocks of 
swallows. 

They go away before winter 
comes. 

All swallows build their nests in 
queer places. 

Some build them in barns. These 
are called barn-swallows. 

Barn-swallows are very friendly 
with each other. 

Several families live in the same 
barn. 



They make their nests up in the 
top of the roof, so high up that cats 
cannot climb to them and catch the 
young birds. 

They fasten the nests to the side 
of a beam. 

They stick them on with mud. 
The mud grows hard and keeps 
them from dropping off. 

Some swallows build their nests 
in banks. These are called bank- 
swallows. 

I should think the dirt would fall 
in and spoil their nests, but it does 
not. 

When you go past a bank where 



ABOUT SWALLOWS. 



135 



they live, you can see the small 
round holes where they go in. 

But you cannot see the nests. 

Some times the nests are many 
feet from the outside of the bank. 



people do not often have fires. 

You may often see them flying 
about old houses and going in at the 
tops of the chimneys. 

If you should go into the houses, 




BARN-SWALLOWS. 



They are very nice warm nests. 

They are made of fine hay, and 
lined with a few large soft feathers. 

Some swallows build their nests 
in chimneys. These are called chim- 
ney-swallows. 

They choose those chimneys where 



you might hear them too. 

The young swallows make a loud 
noise when the old birds come to 
feed them. They chirp and flut- 
ter. 

In the night the noise of their 
wings sounds like distant thunder. 



136 ABOUT SWALLOWS. DACIE. 


The chimney-swallows have a 


It is fastened against the side of 


poor, rough nest. 


the chimney half-way up. 


It is made of small sticks. It has 


Did you ever see a swallow ? 


no soft lining. 


— M. E. N. H.' 



DACIE. 



Dacie was a trim little sailor. 

He was just two inches long. 

His coat was made of many little 
shining scales. 

Round his neck he wore a ruffle 
with a lilac-colored edge. 




dacie' S GLASS HOUSE. 

His small fins were also edged 
with lilac. 

When you read that Dacie had 
scales and fins, you know that he 
was a fish. 

Yes, Dacie was a fish. Once he 
lived in a brook. 



A lady put her hand in the water 
and caught him. 

She carried him home and put 
him in a large glass globe half full 
of water. 

There were colored stones, small 
shells, bits of coral, mosses and sea- 
weeds in the bottom of the globe. 

Dacie often staid down in the bot- 
tom of his glass home and played 
among these pretty things. He was a 
gay little creature. He liked to dart 
about, here and there, and hide under 
the stones. 

One day the lady whistled as she 
dropped in some crumbs for his 
breakfast. 

Dacie was playing among the 
corals. In a second his small head 
was above water. His keen eyes 
peeped everywhere. 

The lady whistled again. 

Dacie heard it. He swam round 



DACIE. 



137 



way. 



and round in a very merry 
Then he stopped. 

The lady whistled again. This 
time she reached down her hand. 
There were crumbs on one fing-er. 

Dacie swam to her hand. He 
took the crumbs from her fingeri 

Three times the lady whistled. 

Each time Dacie swam up and 
took the crumbs from her finger. 

After that, she always fed him in 
this way. 

When she whistled, he would dart 
out from some nook and swim up to 
her hand. 

Then, with droll little jerks, he 
would snatch the crumbs from her 
finger. 

He always seemed charmed while 
she was whistling. 

He made known his joy by very 



funny little antics and gambols. 

But one day, when she whistled, 
Dacie did not come. 

The lady searched for him. She 
found her pretty pet wedged in be- 
tween some stones. 

She took him out carefully. She 
laid him gently in her hand. 

But Dacie did not open his eyes. 
He did not move. Dacie was dead. 

She laid the little pet in a moss- 
lined clam-shell. 

She spread a fragrant geranium 
leaf over him. 

She tied the two shells together 
with a blue ribbon. 

She buried him by the brook-side. 

Some people think fishes cannot 
hear. 

This lady is sure fishes can hear. 

— F. P. C. 




138 



A LITTLE HERO. 




JAMIE JIUNS TO THE RESCUE OF TRIPP. 



A LITTLE HERO. 



Jamie was a Scotch lad. 

His home was across the ocean, 
in Scotland. 

He lived in a cabin on a hill. 

Near this hill was a pond. 

Jamie had good times in winter 
when he played on the ice with his 
dog Tripp. 

One bright day Jamie and Tripp 
went down to the pond to play. 

Jamie soon saw that the sun had 
melted the ice a little. 

So he did not go out on the pond. 

But Tripp had no fear. 

Tripp ran out upon the ice. 



He wished to play. So Jamie 
rolled his ball along the ice. 

Tripp chased it. But all at once, 
the ball rolled into the water where 
the ice was broken. 

Little Tripp was running very 
fast, and he could not stop himself on 
the slippery ice. 

He slid into the cold water. 

He tried to scramble out. But 
his paws slipped off" the edge of the 
ice each time. 

Then Tripp barked to his little 
master. 

Jamie looked around for help. 



A LITTLE HERO. HOW TOOTS HELPED MAMMA. 



139 



There was no one in sight. 

He ran around to the other side of 
the pond where the ice was a little 
thicker. 

There was a pile of boards on the 
hillside. 

He ran up to the pile and took a 
board. 

It was so heavy he could scarcely 
drag it along. But at last he got it 
down to the pond. 

Then he pushed it along on the 
ice. 

He could hear the ice crack under 
his feet. But on he went. 

Soon he reached the place where 
Tripp was. 

He laid the board down. 

He crept along on it. 



He soon reached his shivering little 
pet. He caught him by the collar. 

With Jamie's help Tripp crawled 
upon the board. 

Jamie was so glad to take the wet 
little fellow up in his warm coat. 

They got back to the land safely. 

And soon they were in the warm 
cabin. 

Tripp was wrapped in a warm 
■ blanket, and put behind the stove. 

Before night he was frisking about 
as well as ever. 

But Jamie's arms were lame for 
many days. 

Jamie was a true little hero, al- 
though he never called himself by 



such a grand name. 



F. E. 8. 



HOW TOOTS HELPED MAMMA. 



There was an iron box to drop 
letters in not far from the house 
where Toots lived. 

Toots lived in the city. This little 
box was fastened to an iron fence. 

Toots had often been there with 
his big brother to drop letters in. 



When Toots' mamma had any 
letters for the mail-box she laid them 
on the corner of the hall table. 

One day when she was getting 
ready for a drive, she laid a large 
bundle there. 

The bundle had some goods in it. 



140 



HOW TOOTS HELPED MAMMA. 



These goods were to be returned to a 
large store. 

While Toots' mamma was putting 
on her bonnet, her little boy went 
away. 

No one saw him go. 

But when the family were getting 




TOOTS HELPS MAMMA. 



into the carriage, Toots could not be 
found. 

They, looked in the stable. Toots 
was not there. 

They searched the house. No 
Toots could be seen. 

Then a lady in the next house 



opened her window. She said, " I 
saw your little boy going down 
the street." 

Mamma, brother, grandma, and 
. servants, ran to the gate. 

There was Toots coming up the 
street. He looked smiling and happy. 

" Toots put big letter in ; now say 
thank you," he said to his mamma. 

What is it Toots has done? 

" What did you put in, Toots ? " 
asked mamma. 

Everyone asked questions. Toots 
said, " Big letter ! Say thank you to 
Toots." 

Toots' big brother went to the 
letter-box to see. 

" Toots help mamma. Toots put 
in big letter ! " said the little fellow 
merrily. The big brother came back 
with the bundle of goods. 

A lady had seen Toots try to put 
the big package in the iron box. 

He stood on tip-toe. 

He stretched up as high as he 
could. 

But every time the big bundle 
would slide back. Poor little Toots 
tried to put it in again and again. 

At last his little face grew bright. 

He took the bundle and pushed it 



HOW TOOTS HELPED MAMMA. 



141 



between the slats of the fence to 
which the box was fastened. 

He worked very hard to do this. 

When it was done he seemed very 
happy. 

The lady who saw him said he 
looked so pleased and so proud she 
wanted to go out and kiss him. 



This lady knew where Toots lived. 

When he had gone she went out 
and got the bundle to take home. 

She met Toots' big brother and 
gave it to him. Little Toots felt 
very sorry when he found he had not 
helped mamma after all. 

— K. T. W. 



JOHN'S WAGON. 



When John was a boy, he had a 
little wagon. His papa had it made 
for him. 

It was a very strong little wagon. 

It was made of oak wood. It had 
four iron wheels. 

This strong little wagon was 
painted green, with red stripes. 

John had good times with his 
wagon. 

He lived on a farm. 

There is a great deal of work on a 
farm to be done with wagons. 

Every day John found some use 
for his wacron. 

In summer, when his father made 
hay, John went into the meadow and 
made hay too. 



He cut grass and clover with his 
little sharp sickle. 

He let the grass and the clover 
lie in the sun and dry. 

When it was dry it was hay. 

Then little farmer John raked it 
up with his pretty wooden hay-rake. 

Then he loaded it into his wagon 
with a little pitchfork. 

Then he drove the load into the 
hay barn, and pitched it over into the 
haymow. 

Every year little farmer John 
planted a garden of his own. 

In the fall, when his melons and 
his pop-corn were ripe he drew them 
into the barn with his wagon. 

W^hen the nuts were ripe, John 



142 



JOHN S WAGON. 



and his sisters went every pleasant 
day to the woods with the little 
wagon. 

On the way to the woods they 
often saw little piles of nuts by the 
side of the stone walls and fences. 

They knew the squirrels had put 
these nuts there to carry away to 



He had big wagons, and horses 
too. 

After he had gone, little boys 
sometimes came to the old farm. 
And these little boys always wanted 
to play with John's wagon. 

John's mother always told them 
to be very careful, for the wagon 




i' 



JOHN MAKES A LOAD OF HAY. 



their nests to eat in the winter. 

They thought the squirrels must 
find this slow work. 

They thought the squirrels would 
find a little wagon very handy. 

Such loads of nuts as John and 
his sisters used to draw home! 

By and by John grew to be a tall 
man. 

Then he went far away from home, 
to live on a big farm of his own. 



was made for her little ft)oy, and 
must not be broken. t 

So it was kept in good qf^der. 

After many years big farmer 
John came back to visit his old 
home. 

He wanted' to see all the old 
things that he used to play with. 

He was the most pleased to sec 
his little green wagon with the red 
stripes. 



JOHNS WAGON. KITTYS ACCIDENT. 



43 



He said that none of his big 


and melons in the woods and fields. 


wagons were half so pleasing. 


When he went home to his own 


He drew it up and down the yard. 


farm he carried the little wagon with 


He said it made him want to be a 


him. 


little boy again, and go after nuts 


— M. M. H. 



KITTY'S ACCIDENT. 



Nelly and Kitty were very good 
little friends. 

They went to' the same school. 
They sat side by side at the same 
desk. 

They learned their lessons from 
the same books, 

Nelly lived quite near the school- 
house, but Kitty lived a mile away. 
So Kitty always carried her dinner 
in a little tin pail. 

Somet^^mes Nelly went home to 
dinner. Kitty often went home with 
Nelly, and ate dinner with her. 

One night Nelly went home with 
Kitty from school. 

Kitty's papa was a farmer. 

After they had eaten their supper, 
they went into the barn to play an 
the hay. 

It was a large barn. 



There were cows and horses. 



There were wagons. 



machine. 



There was a mowing 
and a horse rake. 

They had a nice time on the fra- 
grant new hay. 

They jumped from one mow down 
to the other. 

By and by Kitty made a miss-step. 

Down she slid on the hay. Down, 
down she came to the floor. 

She tried to get up and walk. 

But she could not. 

It hurt her so ba.dly that she cried. 

Poor Kitty ! she was frightened. 

She thought her leg was broken. 

She thought how dreadful that 
would be. 

Her brother Sam was milking the 
cows. 

Nelly ran to the yard and told 



144 



KITTY S ACCIDENT. 



Kitty's big brother about it. 

He came as fast as he could. 

He put his poor little sister into 
the wheelbarrow. 




KITTY'S FALL. 



Then he wheeled her to the house. 

Kitty's mother took off her stock- 
ing very gently. 

She found that the little white 
ankle was sprained. 

She bathed it with some arnica, 



and then wrapped it up in flannel. 

Poor Kitty could not play any 
more that day. 

Nelly went home feeling very 
sorry for her little playmate. 

Kitty did not go to school for two 
weeks. She lay on the lounge, with 
her foot wrapped up. 

She was so patient and quiet that 
everyone in the house tried to do 
something for her. 

Grandma read stories to her. 

Her mother made a new suit for 
her doll. 

Little brother Tom brouirht her 
handfuls of gay wild-flowers. 

Nelly came to see her every Satur- 
day. 

Her teacher sent her a book, full 
of pretty stories and pictures. 

Kitty read the stories aloud to 
mamma. 

She painted the pictures with her 
water colors. 

So the days went by quite fast. 

And by and by Kitty was in school 
again. 

Kitty often says, " It was not so bad 
after all to have a sprained ankle, for 
everybody was so good to me." 

— M. M. H. 




Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Babyland. 



October, 1880. 
Vol. I. No. 10. 



D. LoTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. 

[Copyright, 1880. by D. Lotheop £ Co., and entered at the P. 0. at Boiton as seoond'dasi matter.l 



75 cts. a year. 
7 cts. a number. 



LADY BUG AND HER TWO COUSINS. 



Lady Bug lived in a rose bush. 
The rose bush was a nice place 
for a lady's home. 




LADY BUG STARTS TO VISIT MISS BLUE WINGS. 

In the day-time she walked up 
and down the green stems to take 
the air. 



At night she slept on a soft bed of 
pink rose leaves. 

Lady Bug did not often walk on 
the ground. 

She did not like to get dirt on her 
dress. 

Lady Bug's dress was a bright 
orange, spotted with black. 

One pleasant day, Lady Bug 
thought she would go to the other 
side of the flower-garden and visit 
one of her cousins. 

Her cousin's name was Miss Blue 
Wings. 

Miss Blue Wings lived in a snow- 
ball bush. 

Lady Bug looked at all the flowers 
as she passed along. 

But she did not see any so pretty 



146 



LADY BUG AND HER TWO COUSINS. 



as her own fragrant roses at home. 
Miss Blue Wings was very glad 
to see her cousin Lady Bug. 






M< 




. ir 



LADY BUG AND HER COUSIN FIRE FLY. 

They rocked on the branches of 
the .snow-ball bush, and talked. 

Blue Wings told Lady Bug about 
her troubles with the grasshoppers. 

Miss Blue Wings did not like the 
grasshoppers because they came 
every day to gnaw the leaves of her 
snowball bush. 

Toward night the cousins had a 
nice supper. 

They had snowball pudding. It 
was sweetened with honey. 

They sat at the table so late that 



it was dark when Lady Bug started 
to go home. 

"Oh, dear!" said she. "What 
shall I do ? I cannot see which way 
to go ! " 

Just then another cousin came to 
call. 

His name was Fire Fly. 

" Cousin Lady Bug," said he, 
" wait a moment, and I will light 
my lanterns, and go home with 
you." 

How glad Lady Bug was ! 

Mr. Fire Fly lighted his lanterns. 

Mr. Fire Fly carries his lanterns 
under his wings. 







COUSIN FIRE FLY COMES TO TEA. 

It was a long wet walk across the 
garden. 

Lady Bug got her bright orange 



LADY BUG AND HER TWO COUSINS. CONTRARY BILLY. 



147 



dress badly drabbled in the heavy 
dew. 

She was very glad to reach her own 
rose bush again. 

She thanked Fire Fly many times 
for his kindness. 

She invited him to come and take 
tea with her the next day. 

Mr. Fire Fly said he should be 
happy to come. Then he went back 
into the garden with his lanterns. 

Lady Bug said to herself, as she 



went up the leaf to bed, " How good 
it is to find friends when you need 
them I 

" When cousin Fire Fly comes, I 
will give him the best supper I can 
get ! " 

She did give him a good supper. 

She had gold and silver cake. 

The silver cake was made of white 
roses. The gold cake was made of 
yellow roses. 

— M. U. m If. 



CONTRARY BILLY. 



Billy was a peddler's horse. 

Every day he drew a large wagon 
along the country roads. 

This large wagon was loaded with 
tin and brooms. It was a heavy load 
to draw. 

He stopped at all the houses so 
that his master could sell the brooms 
and tins. 

One day, after he had trotted along 
several miles, Billy stopped where 
there was no house in sight. 

" Go along ! " said his master. 

" I won't," said Billy. 



This is the way Billy said ** I 
won t. 

He set his fore feet out. He ^aid 
back his ears. He shook his heau. 

His master got out of the wagon 
and patted him. 

Billy would not stir. 

He moved the harness a little, 
here and there. 

Billy would not stir. 

He talked to him in a very pleas- 
ant tone. 

But Billy would not stir. He 
said " I won't." 



148 



CONTRARY BILLY. ABOUT SWANS. 



What was to be done ? 

The peddler wished to sell his 
brooms and tins and go home to 
supper. 




BILT.Y SAYS, "l WON't!" 

But he could not do this if Billy 
refused to do his part. 

He went to the back of the 
wagon. A gentleman who passed 
by thought he was going to get 



some heavy thing and whip the 
horse. 

Instead, the peddler took a pail 
from the wagon. 

There was some meal in this pail. 

He showed this to Billy. 

Then he walked on and set the 
pail down. 

Billy could see the pail. 

Pretty soon Billy lifted his ears. 
He looked very good-natured. He 
went forward to the pail. 

His master let him eat the meal. 

Then he put the pail back in the 
wagon. 

Then he took the reins and jumped 
in, and Billy trotted off briskly with 
his load. 

The meal was better for Billy than 
a whip. 

—M. 0. J, 



ABOUT SWANS 
Swans are the most beautiful of 



all the birds that swim in the 
water. 

They have smooth round bodies. 
They have long slender necks. 



They can swim faster than a man 
can walk. 

Those swans that are found in 
North America are white all over. 

Some that live in South America 



ABOUT SWANS. 



149 



have white bodies and black necks. 

In far-off countries there are swans 
that are entirely black. 

Swans are not fond of the land, so 
they stay on the water the most of 
the time. 

They eat roots and plants that 
grow along the shore. 

They build their nests in the 
rushes and coarse grass by the edge 
of the water. 

Sometimes they build their nests 
on little islands. 

They lay seven or eight eggs. 
They set on them six weeks before 
the baby swans are hatched. 

It is not safe to go near the old 
swans when they have families, for 
they will fight very hard. 

Sometimes they will take their 
young ones on their backs and carry 
them away from a place where they 
have been disturbed. 

Under the outside feathers of 
swans there is a thick, soft down. 

People use this down to trim 
garments with. Muffs and tippets 
and many other things are made out 
of swan's down. 

A long time ago, in England, all 
the swans in the country were under 



the care of the king. 

The king would not allow any 
one to keep swans except the 
princes, or the richest people. 

If any persons stole swans' eggs 
they were shut up in prison. 

Swans live to be very old. Some- 
times they have been known to live 




almost a hundred years. 

Boston children can see swans on 
the pond in the Public Garden. 

There are boats on this pond built 
in the shape of swans. 

The live swans sometimes swim 
along by the side of these boats as 
though they believed they were real 
swans. It is a funny sight. 

— M.E.K H. 



I50 



SISSY S STORE. 



SISSY'S STORE. 



Twenty years ago, Sissy was a 
little girl. 

Sissy's papa was dead. 

Sissy's mamma could not buy her 
any nice playthings. 

Sissy's mamma had only a little 
money. She worked hard. 

Sissy tried hard to help her 
mamma. At night, when she came 
home from school, she took off her 
shoes so they would not wear out so 
soon. 

Sissy could not have new shoes 
often. 

There were two little brothers to 
buy shoes for, beside herself. 

But Sissy was always a happy, 
smiling little girl. 

One day Sissy said she was going 
to "keep a store." 

Her mamma thought she meant 
to play " keep store." 

But Sissy meant to keep a store 
that would bring her some money to 
use. 

She was certain she could earn 
some money as well as mamma. 

Sissy's store was in a woodshed. 



The little merchant made all the 
things that she sold. 

Sissy was a wise little merchant. 

She knew that her customers 
would be little girls and boys. So 
she made playthings to sell. 

She made little paper boats. 

She made paper traveling bags. 

She made paper air-castles. 

She made dolls' trunks with pretty 
straps and buckles. 

She made Jacob's ladders and 
many other pretty playthings out of 
paper. 

Her paper was of many different 
colors. 

Sissy and her brother pinned 
some of the playthings on the 
woodshed wall. 

She placed some of them on an 
old table. 

Then she sent word to the children 
that the store was open. 

Sissy sold these paper playthings 
to her customers for pins and nails. 

A paper travelling bag cost one 
nail. 

A paper boat cost two nails. 



SISSY S STORE. 



151 



She has a home of her own. 
The other day I saw her making a 
pretty paper boat for her little boy. 
She told me this story of the store 



A paper air-castle cost five pins. 

When they had sold all the play- 
things Sissy made more. 

Then she changed the nails and 
pins into money. 

She sold the nails to a 
man for two cents a pound. 

She sold the pins to 
a dress-maker. 

What do you suppose 
Sissy did with the money? 

Bought candy? 

No. 

Cakes ? 

No. 

Sissy saved every penny 
and bought her baby broth- 
er a pair of new shoes. 

Sissy knew that would 
help mamma. 

Mamma was very proud 
of her little merchant. 

And how glad Sissy was 
when she placed the money 
in mamma's hand ! 

Sometimes Sissy made 

•' sissy's store. 

such pretty paper dolls that 

ladies would buy them for their little I she kept when she was a little girl. 




girls, and pay her money for them. 
Sissy is a woman now. 



I 



Was she not a good little girl ? 

— K. T. W. 



152 



IN THE TOP DRAWER. 



IN THE TOP DRAWER. 



The top drawer of the bureau was 
open, **just a crack." 

Linny stood in front of the bu- 
reau. 

His little flaxen head came up 
even with the bottom of the drawer. 

Pretty soon he reached up. He 
put the tip of a rosy forefinger 
in at the crack. 

The tip of the rosy forefinger 
touched something soft and fluffy. 

Then there was a soft little flutter 
in the drawer. 

Then something said, " Cheep, 
cheep, chippety-cheep ! '' 

The rosy finger-tip began to be 
afaid. 

" Something might bite it,"thought 
Linny. 

But it is sometimes easier to get 
into bureau drawers than to get out. 

It was a very small crack ; and 
now, when the rosy forefinger wished 
get away, the small crack held on 
to it very tight. 

Linnie could not pull the rosy fore- 
finger out. 

Linny's mamma thought she 



heard somebody crying. 

She came to the door and looked 



m. 



"Why, Hamlin ! " she said. " What 
are you in mamma's . top drawer 
for ? " 

*' I am not in it," sobbed Linny. 
'' It is only the tippest end of my fin- 
ger that is in." 

" O," said mamma, " it is the fin- 
ger that is naughty, is it ? 

" I think we will cut off the finger 
quick, before it makes the rest of 
Linny naughty. 

" Fingers must not go a-peeping." 

Linny laughed as he caught hold 
of mamma's scissors. 

'• Please, mamma, it won't do so 
any more," he said. 

Then mamma took the poor finger 
out, and kissed it. 

" Now, please to look in the 
drawer," said Linny. " There's some- 
thing soft in there." 

" Yes," said mamma, " sheets and 
pillow-cases." 

"Something that says, ' cheep 1 
cheep I ' " said Linny. 



IN THE TOP DRAWER. THE RAT-BABIES. 



153 



" That is a funny kind of pillow- 
case," said mamma. 

Mamma opened the drawer. 

Out flew a pretty little robin. 

'' He must have flown in through 
the window, and into the drawer," 



said mamma. "Then somebody must 
have shut the drawer before he got out. 
How scared he must have been ! " 

"Birds must not go a-peeping," 
said Linny, with a roguish smile. 

—A. F. B. 




TAKING A BATH. 



THE RAT-BABIES. 



One day Mamma Rat went away 
from home. 

She left her rat-babies asleep in 
the nest. 

While she was gone a boy found 
her nest. 

He carried away her rat-babies. 
There were three of them. 

The rat-babies were almost two 
inches long. 



They had very bright eyes, sharp 
teeth and long tails. They had 
very wise old-looking faces. They 
did not seem at all afraid of the boy. 

The boy put them in a new home. 

Their new home was in a long, 
square glass bottle. 

A piece of lace was tied over the 
mouth of this bottle so that the rat- 
babies could have fresh air to 



154 



THE RAT-BABIES. WHAT NELL FOUND. 



breathe all the time. 

Then the bottle was laid, length- 
wise, on the window-sill. 

. The rat-babies were full of life 
and fun. They tried to bite holes 
in the lace door. 

They were fed with bread crumbs. 
They had plenty of water. 

As soon as they ate anything they 
took a bath. 

It was a funny sight to see those 
rat-babies take a bath in the bottle. 

They sat up just as a cat does 
when she washes herself. 

The three sat in a row. 

Each one washed his own face 
and paws, and as far as he could 
reach round his trim little body, just 
as a cat does. 



Then the rat in the middle sat 
quite still while the two other rats 
finished his bath for him. 

Each rat in turn sat in the mid- 
dle, while the outside rats washed 
for him where he could not reach. 

Their tongues and fore paws 
were their wash-cloths. 

Their tiny mouths were their wash- 
basins. 

They took several such baths 
every day. 

I saw it all myself. 

While we were at supper pussy 
put up her paw and opened the lace 
door. 

We never saw our three cunning 
rat-babies again. 

—F. P, O. 



WHAT NELL FOUND. 



Nell had the measles. 

She caught them at school. 

She was very sick. Her face was 
swollen. Her eyes were weak. They 
had to be bandaged with a cool linen 
cloth. Her room had to be kept 
dark. 

O, how glad Nell was when she 



could look about again. 

She sat by the window all the 
time. 

Her window looked out on the 
orchard. 

The apple-trees were in blossom. 
They looked like great pink and 
white clouds. 



WHAT NELL FOUND. 



155 



The orchard was full of birds and 
bees. 

She had nothing to do but watch 
these birds and bees. 

She learned a great deal about the 
ways of different birds. 

She liked very much to watch 
the night-hawks. 

Night-hawks are large birds. 

They fly about after sunset. 




POOR NELI, ! 



They feed upon insects. 

They come out to catch the insects 
just at twilight. 

Often they darted about among 
the trees that shaded Nell's window. 



Nell never saw them in the day- 
time. 

But one morning she saw some- 
thing strange in a tree. 

It looked like a big bunch of 
feathers. 

At first Nell thought it must be 
the feather duster. 

While she was looking at it, the 
bunch of rough feathers straightened 
out. 

Out popped a head. It was a 
bird's head. 

The bunch of feathers was a dark 
gray bird. 

It opened its bill and called, 
''Char-A?//^./" 

" What ? " answered a voice from 
the ground. 

The voice was very hoarse. 

Nell thought " Char-/(9//^ " might 
have taken cold from sitting down 
on the damp ground. 

The gray bird up in the tree called 
out " C\\.2iX-lotte I " many times that 
day. 

As soon as it got an answer it 
would ruffle up its feathers, put its 
head behind its wing, and go to 
sleep again. 

How Nell did wish she could go 



56 



WHAT NELL FOUND. 



out and climb that tree ! 

Once the bird almost tumbled out 
of the tree. It spread its wings to 
keep from falling. Nell saw white 
spots on the under side of its wings. 




THE NIGHT HAWK. 



Then she was sure it was a night- 
hawk. 

She was sure there must be a 
night-hawk's iiest near by. 

She felt sure " C\\2iX-lotte " was sit- 
ting on some eggs down in the 
grass. 

She asked Rob to search for the 
nest. Rob searched. He could not 
find it. 

But Nell knew she could find it if 
she could go out-doors. 

When Nell was strong enough to 
go out, the first thing she did was to 



search for the night-hawk's nest. 

She climbed over the fence under 
the tree where the gray bird sat. 

As she jumped down on the other 
side, a big bird flew up. 

She looked in the grass. 

There were two eggs close by her 
feet. Nell was glad she had not 
stepped on them. 

There was no nest. The leaves 
and grass had been scratched away. 

The eggs lay on the bare ground. 
These eggs were larger than any eggs 
Nell had ever seen. They were pale 
green, with dark brown spots. 

Every day Nell went to look at 
the pale green eggs. 

One day she found one tgg and 
one funny little bird. 

Next day she found two funny 
little birds, and no tgg. That day 
she saw the mother-bird. 

The mother-bird was lighter col- 
ored than the bird in the tree. 

She was spotted. She was the 
same color as the ground and the 
old dead leaves. 

Perhaps that was the reason Rob 
could not find her. 

The baby birds were not bare like 
other little birds. 



WHAT NELL FOUND. BILLY NEWTON S LUNCHEON. 



^S7 



They were covered thick with 
heavy down. 

Rob told his teachers at the High 
School what his little sister had 
found. 

The High School teachers came 
to see the funny little birds. 

They wanted to take the baby birds 
away. They wanted to keep them at 



the museum for people to look at. 

But Nell would not let them rob 
poor mamma " ChdiV-lotte " of her 
children. 

Perhaps the big night-hawk knew 
that Nell was a friend to birds, for 
the next summer he came back to 
the same tree. 

— aS'. p. B. 



BILLY NEWTON'S LUNCHEON. 



Billy Newton is not a boy. 

Billy Newton is Dr. Newton's 
horse. 

Each week Billy travels many 
miles. He carries the doctor to the 
houses where the people are sick. 

At all hours of the night Billy is 
waked up, led out of his stall, har- 
nessed to the doctor's carriage, and 
driven off, he knows not where. 

Billy does not like this very well. 

He enjoys going to visit sick 
people on bright sunny days. 

Billy cannot understand why peo- 
ple will be sick on rainy, or stormy 
days. 

Sometimes the doctor is in such 



a hurry that he cannot wait for Billy 
to finish his breakfast. 

Billy can't understand this either. 

Billy is a very bright horse, but 
he does not understand disagreeable 
things. 

At last Billy made up his mind 
that he would have a luncheon. 

Billy did have a luncheon. 

Billy did not carry his luncheon in 
a pail, or basket, or package, as you do. 

O, no, Billy buys it on the street. 

I will tell you how he does it. 

Billy's master stops at a banking- 
house every morning. 

Across the street from the bank 
an old woman keeps a fruit stand. 



158 



BILLY NEWTON S LUNCHEON. 



She sells apples, candy and nuts. 

Billy buys his luncheon of the old 
fruit woman. 

After the doctor jumps out and 
goes into the banking-house, Billy 



She gives him a stick of candy. 
Billy stands there and eats it. 
He stands there until the doctor 
comes for him. 

Then the doctor pays the fruit 




BILLY 13UYS HIS OWN LUNCHEON. 



looks up and down to see if the road 
is clear. 

If no carriages are passing, Billy 
walks across the street to the fruit 
stand. 

He asks the old fruit woman for a 
stick of candy. 

He does not speak, but she under- 
stands him. 



woman a cent for the candy. 

Billy buys his luncheon of the 
fruit woman every day. 

One day, when his mistress was 
driving him, Billy fell down. 

She was afraid he would spring 
up and break the harness. 

She wished to keep him quiet un- 
til some men came to help her. 



BILLY NEWTON S LUNCHEON. ABOUT JACK. 



159 



She remembered she had some 
candy in her pocket. 

She fed the candy to Billy. In 
this way she kept him lying still un- 



til some men came to help her. 

She was very glad that day that 
Billy had a sweet tooth. 

— L. M. P. 



ABOUT JACK. 



Jack was a baby elephant. 

He was eight months old. 

He lived in India. 

Jack was not a wild elephant. 
He belonged to a gentleman who 
kept him as a pet. 

Jack was very fond of his master. 

He followed him like a dog. 

Sometimes Jack went where he 
was not wanted. 

One day he followed his master 
into church. 

Sometimes he went with him to 
make calls. 

Then Jack followed his master 
into the parlors. 

He liked to stand by his master 
and fan him. 

Jack understood all that was said 
to him. 

He liked to do errands. 

He liked to bring things from 



the kitchen to his master. 

He liked to bring fruit from the 
store-room. 

He liked to help so well that the 
servants were very fond of him. 




JACK "WAKES HIS MASTER. 



Jack was always up early in the 
morning. 

As soon as he was awake he 



i6o 



ABOUT JACK. KEEPING SCHOOL. 



always went to call his master. 

He went up on the veranda. Then 
he walked along to the open win- 
dows of his master's room. 

He stood there and gave a trumpet 
call. 

If that great noise did not awake 
him, then Jack put his trunk in at 



the window, and touched his master 
on the forehead, very gently. 

That always woke him. 

Jack would wait until he saw his 
master dressing. 

Then he would trot away con- 
tented. 

— F. E. 8. 




TEACHING SCHOOL. 



{A Picture for a Blackboard or Slate Story ^ 




November, 1880. 
Vol. I. No. II. 



Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Babyland. 
D. LOTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. 

[Copyright, 1S80. \^^ D. Lothbop & Co.. and entered at the P. 0. at Boston as second-dasi matt«r.l 



75 ots. a year. 
7 cts. a numbrr. 




HOMESICK SUE. 



Splash ! came 
the big raindrops 
on the window 
pane. 

Splash ! came 
the big tears down 
on Sue's white 
apron. 

Sue was home- 
sick. 
Sue was a long way from home. 
Sue was a little American girl. 
Her home was in Boston. Now she 
was in London. The big gray ocean 
lay between London and Boston. 

She wished she had never come to 
England to visit uncle John. 

It rained almost every day in Eng- 
land. 



Hark ! Rap rap! rap ! tap tap tap ! 

There was uncle John at the door. 

Sue did not like the big brass 
door-knockers. 

She liked door-bells, such as they 
had in America. 

She ran down to let uncle John 
in. 

There he stood, dripping wet. 




OUT OF UNCLE JOHN'S HAT ! 



What was the matter with uncle 
John's hat ?. What made it stir and 
jerk so? 



1 62 



HOMESICK SUE. 



** Meiv, mew, mew I " 

Where did the little " ;;^^2;e/ " come 
from ? 

Sue looked about the hall. She 
peeped out into the street. 

Just then uncle John's hat almost 
tumbled over. Uncle John put up 
both hands and lifted it off. 

He set it down on the floor. 

Out leaped a kitten. 

" I've brought you a tabby cat," 
said uncle John. 

This kitten was not at all like Sue's 
handsome Tabby at home. 

It was not like any Tabby she had 
seen. 

It was gray, an odd reddish gray, 
marked with broad dark stripes. 

Uncle John said " tabby " was not 
short for " Tabitha." 

He said " tabby " meant " brin- 
dled." 

He said " tabby " was a name given 
to all cats of that kind of gray. 

The little London tabby sat and 
purred in Sue's arms. 

But now the " mews " came again 
as loud as before. 

Uncle John laughed. 

He put his hands down in his big 
overcoat pockets. 



He brought out two more cats. 

Sue jumped away from the first 
one. 

It looked so strange. 

It had no tail ! 

It was a Manx cat. 

Uncle John told her that Manx 
cats never had tails. 



'^,>'?%5 




A MANX CAT. 



But Sue would not have a cat 
without a tail. 

So back Mrs Manx went into 
uncle John's overcoat pocket. 

The other cat was odd, too. 

But Sue liked it. 

It was an Angora cat. 

This Angora cat had a tail long 
enough and big enough for herself 
and for the Manx cat too. 

She had beautiful hair. 

It was creamy white, and so long,v 
and so silky. 

And, O, how pretty her shagg 
tail was ! 



HOMESICK SUE. THE FIRST SEAM. 



163 



Sue liked her better than any cat 
she had ever seen. 

But this lovely Angora cat had one 
fault. 

She would not be petted. 

Sue gave her two cats some milk 
and some meat. 

After this dinner, Miss Angora 
curled herself up on the sofa pillow, 
and went to sleep. 

Uncle John carried the Manx cat 
off in his overcoat pocket. 

The little London tabby came 



up to her mistress. She jumped up 
in her lap and wanted to play. 




THE ANGORA CAT. 



They had a long frolic together ! 
Sue forgot she was homesick. 

— &\ P. B, 



THE FIRST SEAM. 



Who sewed the first seam ? 

I think it was a little bird. 

This little bird that sews is called 
the tailor bird. 

The tailor bird is never seen in 
our country. 

The tailor bird's home is in 
India. 

The tailor bird sews its nest. I 
will tell you exactly how he does it. 

First, the bird selects a very large 
green leaf, not too high up on the 
tree. 



Then he punches a row of holes 
down each side of the leaf. 

He punches these holes with his 
sharp bill. 

Then he goes away to find some 
thread. 

He goes to some plant with a long 
coarse stem. 

From this long stem he strips long 
threads, or fibres. 

He does this with his bill. 

He then takes this thread, or fibre, 
in his bill. 



164 



THE FIRST SEAM. AUTUMN LEAVES. 



He flies back with it to the leaf. 
Then he puts the thread through 




THE TAILOR BIRD. 



and 



through the holes he has 



punched along the sides of the leaf. 



He does this just as you lace 
your boots. 

He sews back and forth, back and 
forth, until he has made the leaf into 
a cunning green bag. 

This bag has an opening at the 
top. 

If one leaf is too small, he selects 
two leaves, and punches holes in 
the sides of both. 

Then the green bag has two seams 
instead of one. 

He lines this bag with soft bits of 
down. 

Then it is a nest, all ready for the 

The mamma bird sits in it. 

She swings to and fro and has a 

good time. 

— i. 31. B. 



AUTUMN LEAVES. 



The autumn leaves are ripe. 

The little Lee girls go out under 
the trees, and into the woods, every 
day to get them. 

They select hundreds of the bright- 
est leaves to bring home. 

They lay them in large books to 



press, with heavy weights on them. 

In this way they learn to know the 
different kinds of trees by their 
leaves. 

They know the scarlet maple 
leaves. 

They know the yellow elm leaves. 



AUTUMN LEAVES. NANS COMPOSITION. 



165 



They know the brown oak leaves, 
and the dark crimson oak leaves. 



\ i -s,,^ ^^ 




BEAUTIFUL AUTUMN I.EAVKS. 



They 
leaves. 



know the brown beech 



They know the pale golden hickory 
leaves. 

They know the rich maroon su- 
mach leaves. 

They give the leaves which they 
think the most beautiful to mamma 
for an autumn leaf-album. 

They decorate their own chambers 
with the leaves. 

They pin branches on the walls. 

They pin sprays on the window 
curtains. 

They arrange garlands of dark red 
blackberry vines around the picture 
frames. 

They place great clusters in the 

vases. 

So their chambers look bright and 

cheerful all winter. 

~K. L. 



NAN'S COMPOSITION. 



Nan loved flowers. 

She had a garden of her own. 

She took care of this garden her- 
self. 

One day she carried a boquet to 
school and gave it to her teacher. 

Nan's class had learned to write. 



They used to write little stories on 
their slates. 

The teacher put Nan's flowers on 
her table. 

When Nan's class was called, the 
teacher spoke to them pleasantly: 

"Now children, I have something 



1 66 



NAN S COMPOSITION. 



new for you to-day. I will give each 
of you a flower out of Nan's 
boquet. I want you to write some- 




thing on your slate about the 
flower." 

She gave Nan a morning glory, 
because it was just the color of 
Nan's blue eyes. 

This was what Nan wrote on her 
slate : 

A MORNING GLORY. 

A morning glory is a beautiful 
flowef. It looks as if it might be a 



fairy's cup or flower vase. 

This one is blue, but some are 
pure white. 

Some are purple. Some are pink 
with white edges. 

The pink ones with white edges 
are very pretty, I think. 

Morning glories last only a few 
hours if the sun shines. 

One time last summer, there was 
a pure pink one on mamma's trellis. 
It was hidden in among the leaves. 
That morning glory lasted a week 
before it died. 

A blue and white one came out 
near the pink one. The blue and 
white one was the prettier, I think. 

When I was up to grandma's 
last summer, cousin Bess and I 
used to get up earlier than the 
others. 

We went into the garden and 
picked boquets of flowers to put 
by the plates on the breakfast 
table. 

We almost always picked morn- 
ing glories. 

My cousin and I often used to 
pick them at night when they were 
wilted, and blow them. We can 
blow them to look like little bags. 



NAN S COMPOSITION. 



BUNNY-COATS BED. 



167 



If you blow them long enough 
they will burst. 

They will not blow up if there is 
the least little slit in them. 

Mamma says the bumble-bees 
make the slits in them, to get the 
honey out. 

The bumble-bees' tongues are too 
short to reach down the whole length 
of the flower 

So they make a little hole in the 



sides of the morning glories. 

Then they lick the honey out. 

I watched one once when I was 
swinging under the apple tree. 

It was very funny to see him make 
the little hole in the flower. 

This is all I know now about 
morning glories. 

I mean to have them in my gar- 
den, and watch them next summer. 

— L. L. P. 




BUNNY-COAT'S BED 



Little gay Bun-ny-coat 
Slipped into bed — 



Nothing was seen of him, 
But his gray head: 



Where was his bed, think you ? 
Where did he dream ? 

You will laugh when I tell you, 
So droll does it seem ! 



In little Jean's pocket 

In her apron so white. 

The little grey " Bunny-coat ' 

Slept all the night. 

—F. P. a 



1 68 



THE KITE THAT WOULD NOT FLY. 



THE KITE THAT WOULD NOT FLY. 



Fred and Harry wanted a kite. 

Their playmate, Berty Day, had a 
handsome one. 

Berty 's kite went high up, over 
the tops of the trees in Mr. Day's 
g-arden. 

It was red and white. 

It had a very long tail. 

Berty's big brother made it for 
him. 

When Fred and Harry saw it, 
they said, " We will make a kite 
too." 

They ran home and told their 
mamma they were going to make a 
kite out in the wood-shed. 

Their mamma offered to come out 
and show them how. 

But both the boys said no, they 
knew how. 

They found some sticks. They 
fastened them together for a kite- 
frame. 

Their mamma gave them some 
pretty paper to cover the kite-frame. 

The boys thought it was great fun 
to work in the wood-shed. 

They laid the kite-frame on a long 



bench. They fastened the pretty 
paper on the frame with some flour 
paste. 

Next they wanted a kite-string. 




THE KITE THAT WOULD NOT FLY. 

Mamma brought them a whole 
ball of twine. 

It was coarse and strong. 

She smiled as she looked at the 
frame. 

She told them not to make the 
tail too heavy. 

" O, we know all about kites," 
said Harry. 

" Mamma, you can't tell us any- 
thing about kites," said Fred. 



THE KITE THAT WOULD NOT FLY. 



169 



So mamma went back into the 
house. 

She smiled as went along. 

At last the kite was finished. It 
looked very gay. 

It had a beautiful long tail. 

They ran in and showed it to 
their mamma. 

" You see we did know how to 
make a kite, mamma," they said. 

Then they took it out to fly it. 

Fred gave it a toss. 

They both were ready to run with 
the string and let the kite go as high 
as it liked. 

But the kite did not rise. It tum- 
bled flat to the oTound. 

" Let me hold her," said Harry. 

But the kite would not rise. 

" Let us shorten the tail," said 
Fred. 

So they shortened the tail. But 
the kite would not rise. 

" The wind must be wrong," said 
Fred. 

** No," said Harry. " Look at Ber- 
ty's kite ! It is high up among the 
clouds." 

But nothing could make the kite 
rise. 

'Harry grew cross, and said Fred 



had made the tail wrong. 

Fred grew cross, and said Harry 
had made the frame wrong. 

They were very disagreeable to 
each other. 

Just than papa came out. He 
looked at his two little sons. He 
looked at the kite. 

" It is because you did not begin 
right," he said. " Your frame is too 
heavy. Some of the sticks are too 
long. Neither boys nor kites will 
rise in the world, if they begin 
wrong." 

Then he made a new kite-frame, 

His sticks were not too heavy, nor 
too short, nor too long. 

He got new paper to cover it. 

The tail was handsome, but not 
too long. 

Fred and Harry both clapped their 
hands when the new kite sailed up 
and up, as high as Berty's kite. 

Fred and Harry have made many 
toys since then. 

They have made kites and tops, 
and balloons, and ball-clubs. 

But they think it is a good plan 
every time to ask papa or mamma to 
show them how. 

—K. T. W. 



lyo 



WILLIE S PET. 



WILLIE'S PET. 



Willy is a little American boy. 
He is eight years old. 

He used to live in Boston. 

Now he lives in France. 

France is a country across the 
Atlantic ocean. 




WILLIE'S PET. 



Willy sailed across the ocean in a 
steamer. 

He went with his sick mamma. 

When Willy first went to France 
he was very lonely. 

He lived in a large hotel. 

There were many children in the 
hotel. 

But Willy could not get acquain- 
ted with any of the children, because 
they all spoke French. 



Not one of the children could 
speak a word of English. 

Willy could say '* if you please," 
in French. 

He could say " yes " and " no," in 
French. 

But those five words 
did not help him get ac- 
quainted. 

Willy thought it was 
funny that such small chil- 
dren could speak French. 
He thought French was 
a very hard language to 
speak. 

The French children 
thought it was very funny 
that such a small boy as 
Willy could speak English. 

The French children thought Eng- 
lish was a very hard language to 
speak. 

The only person that Willy could 
talk wdth was his sick mamma. 

One day a lady came to call on his 
mamma. 

Her little son came with her. 

His name was Louis. 

The two mammas talked together 



WILLIE S PET. 



171 



in the French language. 

The two little boys could not 
speak to each other. 

But they could look at pictures 
together. 

They could smile at each other. 

They could offer each other nuts 
and candies. 

While they were looking at the 
picture-books, Willy jumped up. 

"Mamma," said he in English, 
" I hear a canary bird ! " 

At the same moment Louis jumped 
up. 

** Mamma," said he in French, "I 
hear a canary bird ! " 

Then the two little boys looked at 
each other. They smiled. 

They both ran out on the balcony 
They both expected to see a canary 
bird. 

But they could not find any 
bird! 

They looked up, and down, and all 
around. But there was no bird in 
sight. 

They ran back into the parlor. 

" Louis," said the French boy's 
mamma, " I think I have found the 



smger. 



Yes, she had. 



What do you think it was ? 

It was a tiny mouse. It sat under 
the fender and sang. 

This singing mouse was smaller 
than a common mouse. 

It had long ears. 

When it sang it moved these long 
ears up and down. 

This little singing mouse staid in 
the hotel all winter. 

It staid under the fender almost 
all the time. 

A great many people came to see 
it, for singing mice are not often 
found. 

Its song was like the song of a 
canary bird, only it was lower and 
softer. 

Sometimes it sounded as if two 
mice were singing. 

But Willy never found but one. 

The singing mouse grew so tame 
that it would eat out of Willy's 

hand. 

It would sing when Willy was sit- 
ting beside it. 

W^as it not a pretty pet? 

Willie says the singing mouse 
does not sing in French. 

He is very glad of that. 

— K. L. 



172 



MISS LUNT S SCHOOL. 



MISS LUNT'S SCHOOL. 



Miss Lunt was a school-teacher. 

She taught school in her own 
house. 

The school was in her pretty par- 
lor where she played on the piano. 

The pupils sat on the bright chintz 
sofas, and in the pretty chairs. 

There were pictures on the walls. 

There were flowers on the tables. 

Two bird-cages hung in the large 
bay window. 

Ten large girls came to Miss 
Lunt's school. 

Four small girls came to Miss 
Lunt's school. 

Miss Lunt was very fond of her 
four small pupils. 

She did many pleasant things for 
this little class. 

There was a small room next the 
parlor. 

In this small room there was a low 
bed with soft pillows. 

When the four small girls grew 
tired or sleepy, she sent them into 
this room. 

They could run about and play in 
this room, or they could lie down on 



the low bed and take a nap. 

There were blocks, and games, and 
toys in this room. 

There was also a low table with 
bright blue plates and cups. 

The small girls could sit at this 
table and eat their lunch. 

The small girls could bring their 
dolls, if they chose, and play with 
them in this room. 

They could not take the dolls into 
the school room. 

Sometimes Miss Lunt wished the 
four small girls to sit near her in a 
row on a low sofa. 

Then she let each one take a pic- 
ture-book while she heard the ten 
large girls recite. 

Any one of the four small girls 
who did not whisper while she sat in 
the row, nor touch the next girl, nor 
move her feet, had a good mark. 

That good girl could wear a lovely 
blue ribbon bow on her shoulder for 
a whole day. 

If that good girl wished to bring a 
flower, Miss Lunt would wear it in 
her hair all the morning. 



MISS LUNTS SCHOOL. JET AND DOT. 



173 



One day there were three good 
girls. 

The next day Miss Lunt had to 
wear a sunflower, a pink and a rose. 

It was a very pretty class when 
the four small girls stood up in a 
row. 

Once two of the ten large girls 
did not study their lessons. 

Miss Lunt put those two tall idle 
girls into the small girls' class. 

But the small girls did not want 
any tall idle girls in their class. 

Then Miss Lunt put the two 
tall idle girls in a class by themselves. 

Then they were ashamed and 
studied their lessons. 

Once in two weeks Miss Lunt had 
a " story morning." 

On *' story morning " Miss Lunt 



told her girls stories about animals, 
and her girls told her about their 
pets at home. 

The four small girls and the ten 




THE SMALL CLASS IS SPOILED. 



large girls always enjoyed " story 
morning." 

Not one of Miss Lunt's fourteen 
girls was ever unkind to any animal. 



JET AND DOT. 



Susie Dale and her aunt Jane 
were going home. 

They had been to grandpa's to 
spend Thanksgiving. 

Grandpa had made Susie a pre- 
sent. 



He had given 'her two fur-babies 
with long ears. 

One of the fur-babies wore a coat 
of black. 

The other fur-baby wore a coat of 
grey,with white dots around the neck. 



174 



JET AND DOT. 



Both coats were as soft as silk. 

The fur-babies lay in an open 
work-basket. They could peep out, 
and breath fresh air. 

Susie and Aunt Jane stopped in 
Boston for two days on their way 




SUSIE AND HER FUR-BABIES. 



home to the farm-house. 

They went to Boylston market 
every morning to buy apples and 
cabbage for the fur-babies to eat. 

At last Susie and Aunt Jane 
reached home. 

Then Susie's papa built a snug 
house for Jet and Dot. 

Jet was the name of the fur-baby 



who wore the black coat. 

Dot was the fur-baby who wore 
the grey coat with white dots. 
There was no floor in the house. 
The fur-babies would not have 
liked a board floor. 

The fur-babies finished 
the house themselves. 

They used their paws 
for shovels. With these 
spry shovels they dug a 
path under ground. 

At the end of the path 
they dug a little chamber 
to sleep in. 

They carried leaves, 
and cotton, and wool to 
this dark chamber. 

The leaves, and cotton, 
and wool made a soft bed 
and soft pillows. 

Every morning after 
breakfast Susie invited Jet and Dot 
into her house. 

They stayed with Susie an hour. 
She gave them bits of pie and 
cake. 

They jumped upon her shoulders, 
and sat there to nibble the nice bits. 
In summer time Susie often took 
Jet and Dot to a clover field. 



JET AND DOT. OUR HERO. 



175 



They liked to scamper about and 
bite the tender clover. 

It always took four boys, two 
girls, Aunt Jane and papa, to get the 



lively rogues home again. 

Susie kept her pretty fur-babies 
four years. 

— F.P. C. 



OUR HERO. 



This is a true story. 

It is a sad story. 

It is about Cass and Hero.- 

Cass was our horse. 

Hero was our dog. 

Cass and Hero were great friends. 

When Cass was out with the 
carriage, Hero always trotted along 
by his side. 

Cass was pastured on an island 
in the river. 

Hero swam across the riyer every 
day to get to Cass. 

They had great frolics together. 

They ran all over the island to- 
gether. 

Hero always came back at night 
to watch the house. 

Then he swam across to the island 
again early in the morning. 

Now comes the sad part of the 
story. 

One night in the middle of the 



winter we heard Hero barking very 
loud. 

We all jumped up to see what the 
matter was. 

The stables were on fire 

Hero was barking to waken us. 

Cass was tied up in the stable. 

The men tried to get him out. 

But the stable was full of fire 
and smoke. They could not get to 
him. 

Hei:o* tried with all his might to 
save Cass. 

He tried to drag him out by his 
bridle. 

He ran from the stable door to 
his master. 

He ran from his master to the 
stable door. 

He barked. He cried and howled. 

At last he jumped into the burn- 
ing stable and lay down beside poor 
Cass. 



176 



OUR HERO. 



We called Hero. We went as 
near as we could. 

But we could not coax him to 
come out. 

We could not get to him through 




the smoke and the fire and the fall- 
ing timbers. 



The firemen were there hard at 
work. . 

They had come with their fire-en- 
gines from the village. 

But they could not get into the 
stable to save Hero and Cass. 

When morning came, our house 
was burned down. 

Our stable was burned down. 

Our carriages were burned. 

We were very sorrowful. 

But we felt worse about Hero and 
Cass than about anything else that 
we had lost. 

There were only some whitened 
bones left. 

These bones showed that Hero 
and Cass lay side by side through 
the fire. 

I told you it was a sad story. 

But don't you think it is a sweet 

sad story ? 

— K. L. 




PICTURE TO COPY ON SLATES. 




December, 1880. 
Vol. I. No. 12. 



Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Babyland, 
D. LoTHROP & Co., Publishers. Boston, Mass. 

fCopjright. 1880, by D. loTBBOP b Co.. and entcKd at the P. O. ftt Boston m leeond-clMlf mattar.l 



75 cts. a year. 
7 cts. a number. 



THE BEAR THAT CAME TO SCHOOL. 



Many years ago there was a little 
red school-house. 




THE BIG BLACK BEAR. 



-t was up among the New Hamp- 
shire hills. 



This little red school-house stood 
very near the woods. 

It was half a mile from any house. 

It had only one door. 

It had six small windows. 

It had no easy chairs and pretty 
desks, such as you enjoy. 

It had wooden benches instead of 
chairs. 

There were long wide counters 
in front of these benches, instead of 
desks. 

There was a shelf under each coun- 
ter for the books and slates. 

A great rusty stove stood at one 
end of the little red school-house. 

The school-boys brought in big 
armfuls of wood to burn in this 
stove. 



178 



THE BEAR THAT CAME TO SCHOOL. 



One winter day, when there was 
snow on the ground, one of the little 
school-boys went out and left the 
door open. 

The scholars heard a" noise at the 
door. 

It was a big, soft footstep. 

They looked up. 

They saw a big, black bear. 

He was standing in the doorway. 

How frightened the little children 
were ! 

The teacher was frightened, too. 

The children ran behind a coun- 
ter in the farthest corner. 

The teacher came and stood with 
them. 

The little ones cried. 

Some of the larger ones screamed. 

The teacher trembled. 

But the bear did not offer to eat 
any of them. 

He walked in. 

He sat down by the fire. 

He looked good natured, but no 
one dared go past him. 

He turned round and round. He 
warmed himself all over. 

Then he stood up on his hind legs 
and shut the door. 

The children screamed louder than 



ever when they saw him shut the 
door. 

But the bear did not come toward 
them. 

He began to take down the hats 
and bonnets and shawls and cloaks 
which hung on the pegs behind the 
door. 

He took them all down, and laid 
them in a heap on the floor. 

Then he took down the satchels 
and dinner baskets. 

He opened them. He took out 
the dinners. 

He stood there and ate bread, and 
cheese, and pie, and doughnuts, and 
pickles, and cold meat, and apples. 

Do you not suppose that bear's 
stomach ached ? 

But he was not satisfied. 

He wished to see what the teacher 
had for dinner. 

He went and smelt at her desk. 

It was locked. He could not 
open it. 

He gave himself a big shake. 

He looked as if he wanted to say, 
" Too bad ! too bad ! I know they 
sent the teacher something extra 
nice for her dinner! I wish I coi "d 
get it ! " 



thf: bear that came to school. 



179 



Then the bear walked to the door. 

He opened it and went out ! 

O, how glad the children were ! 

They looked out of the windows. 

They saw him go off into the 
snowy woods. 

At noon they went and* looked at 
his big tracks in the snow. 




THE BIG BLACK BEAR EATS A LUNCH. 

But they did not go very near the 
woods. 

Now I wili tell you why the bear 
came to this school-house. 

Many years before a boy in the 
neighborhood caught this same bear. 

The bear was a little playful cub 



at that time — a baby bear. 

The boy tamed and trained him. 

All the children in the neighbor- 
hood petted him and played with 
him. 

He often went to school with 
them. At noon they always gave 
him part of their dinner. 

One day he went off and never 
came back. 

The boys he had played with grew 
up to be men. They forgot the little 
pet bear. 

The bear grew up too. But he 
did not forget. 

When he came down from the 
northern woods, he remembered the 
red school-house. 

He may not have remembered the 
boys. But he remembered the din- 
ner baskets. 

So he opened the door and went 
in. 

He did not go in to eat the .plump, 
rosy, little boys and girls. 

He went in after the plump dough- 
nuts and the rosy apples. 

He must have gone back up to the 
great, ^ northern woods, for nobody 
has ever seen him since. 

— L. M. P. 



i8o 



MARYS JOURNEY. 




MARY STARTS IN THE COACH-AND-FOUR. 



MARY'S JOURNEY. 



CHAPTER I. MARY GETS ARABELLA 

READY. 

When Mary Green was six years 
old her mother took her to visit an 
aunt. 

This aunt lived sixty miles away. 

Mary thought this was a very long 
journey. 

She was busy one whole afternoon 
in getting ready. She packed her 
little travelling bag with all sorts 
of things for Arabella's comfort. 

Arabella was going with her. Ara- 



bella was her large and petted doll. 

Mary packed a thick sash for 
Arabella to put on if it was cold. 

She packed a blue and white 
afghan to spread over Arabella 
when she. took a nap. 

She packed a small book which 
Arabella could hold in her tiny 
hand if she should wish to read. 

She packed a lunch for Arabella. 
This lunch was ten small pieces of 
bread an inch square, and a pep- 
permint lozenge. This lunch was 



MARY S JOURNEY. 



l8l 



neatly tied up in thick white paper. 

CHAPTER II. MAMMA GETS MARY 

READY. 

Mary's mother also was busy one 
whole afternoon in getting ready. 

She packed a little trunk for Mary. 

With what, do you guess? 

" Nice white dresses trimmed with 
lace ? " 

" Ever so many sashes of all 
colors ? " 

" Kid shoes and slippers of black 
and white, blue and pink ? " 

" Mary's best hat with a plume, 
and her play hat of brown straw ? " 

No, all your guesses are wrong. 

Little Mary went on her journey 
thirty years ago. Little girls dressed 
very plainly then. 

Mary's mother put into the little 
trunk-one white dress of plain muslin 
with aC tiny ruffle around the neck. 

This was Mary's best dress. It 
was only worn to church, or when 
Mary made grand visits. 

No sash was put in. There were 
narrow strings of white muslin to 
tie the dress around the waist. 

Six long-sleeved gingham tiers 



were laid in the little trunk. 

Two gingham sunbonnets were 
also laid in. 

These tiers and sunbonnets were 
for Mary to play in. 

Then, wrapped in paper, her thick 
j shoes were laid in, some handker- 
chiefs, some under clothing, her comb 
and brush, and her needle case and 
-thimble. 

A plain blue wool dress, her best 
morocco shoes, and a straw bonnet 
with a blue ribbon on it, were laid 
on the bed. These were for Mary to 
wear on the journey. 

CHAPTER III. THE STAGE COACH. 

After breakfast, next morning, the 
bag, the lunch, the trunk, and Ara- 
bella were brought out on the piazza. 

Mary sat there too, to watch for 
the stage. 

By and by she heard the merry 
stage horn. The stage driver was 
blowing it. 

Then she heard the wheels rattle. 

Then they saw the great high 
stage with4ts four horses coming 
down the street. 

The driver, away up on top, made 



l82 



MARY S JOURNEY. 



a big flourish with his whip, and 
drove up to the door in fine style. 

The four horses looked very gay 
and held their heads very high. 

The driver had put a bunch of 
lilacs on the head of each horse. 

Mary thought this looked very 
pretty. She wondered if the horses 




MARY IN HER GINGHAM SUIT. 



liked the smell of the flowers. 

Mary and her mamma entered the 
coach. v.They said good-bye. They 
threw kisses to papa and George. 

The driver gave his whip another 
flourish, and away the four horses 
went. 

The big coach tipped up and 



down, forward and backward. Mary 
thought the motion was perfectly 
delightful. 

" O, mamma," she said," I wish we 
were going a hundred miles instead 
of sixty." 

CHAPTER IV. THE NEW PASSENGERS. 

By and by they stopped at a 
country tavern and had dinner. 

When they got in the stage again 
they found some new passengers. 

There was a lady with two chil- 
dren. 

The two children were about 
Mary's own size and age. 

They were a boy and girl. They 
were twins and looked exactly alike. 

They had bright black eyes that 
sparkled with fun. 

Their heads were round as apples. 
Their black hair was cut very close. 

Their cheeks were like 'roses. 
Their mouths looked ready to laugh 
all the time. 

They both were as fat and round 
as babies. 

Their mother called them Dick 
and Dolly. 

Every time Dick looked at Dolly 



MARY S JOURNEY. 



183 



she laughed in great glee. 

If Dolly spoke a word to Dick he 
laughed. 

If their mother spoke they both 
laughed. 

They made friends with Mary in 
about five minutes. 

They all were so jolly that the 
driver wished they were up there 
with him. 

So he stopped the horses. He 
asked them if they would like to 
ride on the outside for a while. 

Their mothers said they might. 

CHAPTER V. ON TOP OF THE STAGE 

COACH. 

The three children were jollier 
than ever when they all were perched 
up on top of the coach. 

" See the bossy calf in that field ! " 
cried Dick. 

" See the little colt over there ! " 
said Dolly. 

** Hurrah ! there are some lambs! " 
shouted Dick. 

" O, those lovely white geese ! " 
said Mary. 

" See that bantam cock ! isn't it a 
beauty?" called Dick. 



Then there was a cry of delight 
from all three. Arabella would have 



h^il 




WHAT THEY SAW FROM THE STAGE COACH. 

shouted too, if she could. 

There, on the stone wall, stood 



1 84 



MARY S JOURNEY. RALPH AND ROVER. 



something very beautiful indeed. 

Mary had never seen one before, 
but she knew from pictures that it 
must be a peacock. 

His long tail came down to the 
ground. 

■ It was all golden-green and blue, 
and how it shone in the sun ! 

The peacock seemed to know they 
were looking at him. 

He spread his tail as wide as he 
could and walked along on the wall. 

" I never saw anything so pretty 
iji the world ! " said Mary, and Dick 
and Dolly clapped their hands. 



All at once Mary cried out again. 
She saw houses and church spires. 
"Are we there, mamma?" she asked. 

Yes, Mary was at her journey's 
end. 

She said good-bye to the jolly 
little twins. They went on with the 
stage. 

She thanked the driver for her 
nice ride outside. 

And than she was very glad to 
take Arabella and go up the long 
walk to her auntie's house, for she 
was a very tired, sleepy little girl. 



RALPH AND ROVER. 



Rover is a Newfoundland dog. 

Ralph is' a raven. 

Ralph and Rover are great friends. 

Ralph often perches on Rover's 
back. 

Sometimes he rides on Rover's 
back all around the yard. 

Rover lets Ralph pick the same 
bones with him. 

One day Rover got run over. 

His leg was broken. 

He had to stay in the stable. 



Then Ralph brought bones to 
Rover every day. 

Ralph would not sleep on his perch. 

He slept in the stable with Rover. 

But one night the hostler forgot 
that Ralph had not come. 

He locked the door before Ralph 
got in. 

What do you think Ralph did ? 

Ralph has a strong, sharp beak. 

He pecked the stable door with 
this strong, sharp beak. 



RALPH AND ROVER. THE OLD SNOW MAN 



185 



In the morning there was a hole 
through the stable door. 

The hole was not quite big enough 
for Ralph to get into the stable. 



If he had worked one hour longer, 
he would have got in. 
This is a true story. 

— K, L. 




THE OLD SNOW MAN. 



Charley, and Arthur, and John, 
Three merry young rogues that I 
know, 
Have been at work in the drifts 
And made an old man out of 
snow. 

His body is clumsy and rough; 
His face has queer features to 
show ; 
And nothing but stumps for his 
arms 
Has this poor old man made of 
snow. 



But how the boys frolic and shout ! 

And how their chubby cheeks 
glow ! 
For oh ! 'tis such wonderful fun 

To make an old man out of snow. 

They pat him, they smooth him 
around 
To harden him well ; for they 
know 
That the sun will do all he can 
To melt down their old man of 
snow. 

—M. E. K H. 



1 86 



WHY THE CLOCK TOLD STORIES. 



WHY THE CLOCK TOLD STORIES. 




Mintie was a kitten. 
Her hair was white. 
Mattie was a little 
girl. 

Her hair was yellow.* 
Grandpa gave the kit- 
^ ten to Mattie before her 

eyes were open. 

As soon as she could eat milk for 
herself, Mattie took her home. 

Mattie thought her the cunningest 
kitten in the world. 

She named her Snowflake at first 
because she was so white. 

But after she meddled with the 



minutes Mattie changed her name 
from Snowflake to Mintie. 

Mintie is short for minute. 

Do you wonder how Mintie could 
meddle with the minutes? 

I will tell you. 

Mattie lived in the country. 

Her papa went to Boston every 
day. 

He always got home at six 
o'clock. 

So they had six o'clock dinners. 

There was a large carved Swiss 
clock in the sitting-room. 

Every day, toward night, Mattie 
watched the long minute-hand very 
closely. 

And always, just as the clock said 
it was six, Mattie met papa at the 
door with a kiss. 

But one day she did not meet 
him. 

The long hand said it was twenty 
minutes of six. Mattie was romping 
with her white kitten. 

All at once the door opened, and 
there stood papa. 

Mattie jumped up. She ran to 



WHY THE CLOCK TOLD STORIES. 



187 



papa for her six o'clock kiss. 

Then she looked at the clock. 

Papa looked at the clock too. 

He said it must be slow. 

But no one had touched the clock. 

It was very strange. 

The dinner was late. 

The next day Mattie was at the 
door when the Swiss clock struck 
six silver chimes. 

But no papa! 

Mattie waited five minutes. 

Still no papa ! 

Mattie waited ten, fifteen minutes. 

Still no papa! 

Dinner was on the table. Dinner 
was growing cold. 

Mattie waited twenty-five minutes. 

Mamma was waiting too. 

Just then papa came I 

He said the clock must be fast. 

So they all went and looked at the 
clock. 

It seemed all right. 

No one had touched it. 

But it told stones every day for a 
week. 

Mamma said she didn't know 
when to have dinner. 

Papa said he should have to get a 
new clock. 



But one day Mattie found out the 
trouble. The clock was not to 
blame. 

Mattie had gone to the sitting- 
room very quietly. 

The door was open. 

In the middle of the floor sat 
Snowflake. She was very still, 
except her tail. That was moving 
slowly. Her eyes were very bright. 

Mattie thought she was watching 
a mouse, perhaps. So she kept still 
herself and waited. 

All at once the kitten gave a 
spring toward the long weight of the 
Swiss clock. 

Up she went, up to the very top 
of the clock ! 

She looked about very proudly for 
a minute. 

Then she reached down quickly 
with her fore-paws. 

She rested the left paw on the 
pivot. 

With the right paw she pulled the 
long minute-hand up, up from figure 
eight to figure eleven. 

Suowflake had set the clock fifteen 
minutes ahead. 

"Mamma! mamma!" Mattie fairly 
shouted. " I've found it out ! " 



1 88 



WHY THE CLOCK TOLD STORIES. TID-ER-E-L 



Mamma came. Then Mattie told 


at the door, when papa 


came. 


her how the white-haired kitten had 


How papa did laugh 


when they 


meddled with the minutes. 


told him ! 




They thought ifthe funniest thing 


And they tied a tiny 


toy watch 


a kitten ever did. 


around Snowflake's neck. 


and named 


That night dinner was just ready, 


her Mintie. 




and Mattie and mamma both were 




- C. S. P. 



TID-ER-E-I. 



What a long, funny name " Tid-er- 
e-i " is for a pet ! 

But the little boy who owned this 
pet often called him " Tid." 

The little boy did not keep Tid 
in the house. , 

O, no, Tid had a house of his own. 




But Tid did not like to stay in his 
house. 

Tid always wished he could run 
around in the flower garden. 



He wished he could go out through 
the gate with the little boy and girl 
who came to see him so often. 

Sometimes when Tid thought 
about the garden he would stand 
right up on his hind legs and squeal. 

Was Tid a little bear? No. 

Was he a young fawn ? No. 

Was he a colt, a calf, or a rabbit? 

No, no, no ! 

Tid was a pig. But he was a 
pretty pig, a small, plump, white, 
round pig. 

He was so very white and pretty 
that the children sometimes dressed 
him up with ribbons. 

But Tid was a little rogue. 

He would get out of his house 
whenever he could. 



TID-ER-E-I. 



189 



He would poke his funny, pink 
nose under the door, and lift it. up 
and squeeze out under it. 

Then he would scamper into the 




■riD's NAUGHTY HABIT. 



garden to find the children ! 

He ran about after them like a 
little dog. 

Sometimes, when they were at 
play, he rolled over and over on the 
grass, and made a noise like this : 
" Hoo-o ! hoo-o! " 

The children called that Tid's 
laugh. 

This funny pet got out of his 
house so often, and ran after the 
children so much, that Charlie, the 
hired man, was very cross about 
him. 

Charlie was the one who had to 
mend the little house. 

Charlie was the one who had to 
run after Tid-er-e-i and catch him, 
and put him back in his house. 

One pleasant moonlight evening 



the children were invited to a party. 

The party was at a house near 
their own house. 

It was in summer time. 

Many city children were staying 
in the neighborhood. 

The party was to be a large one. 

" Now, children," said mamma, 
"you must keep very still when you 
pass Tid's house. You know Tid 
hears everything." 

The children went on tip-toe past 
Tid's house. 

They talked in whispers. 

But Tid's quick little ears heard 
the light steps and the whispers. 

"Ah," said he to himself, "they 
are going somewhere. I will go 
too." 

Then Tid scratched with all his 
might. He soon had a hole under 




" I WILL GO TOO ! " 

the boards. In a few minutes he 
was out. 

Then he came to the gate. 

Naughty Tid 1 He raised that 



190 



TID-ER-E-I. 



gate up and squeezed through ! 

Then how he ran ! 

He seemed to smell the children's 
footsteps, just as a dog would. 

The children were laughing and 




OFF FOR THE PARTY. 



talking about him at the party. 

" We are safe now," said Harry, his 
little master. "Tid did not hear us 
this time." 

" Poor fellow," said the little sis- 
ter. " How he would enjoy the 
party." 

" I wish he had come ! " said one 
of the city girls. " He is so cun- 
ning." 

" Ugh, ugh ! " said something at 
the window. 

All the children ran to the window. 

There was Tid on the verandah, 
looking in. 

" What shall we do ! " said his two 
little owners. They were much 
ashamed. 

'* Let him be," said the little girl 



who gave the party. " He knows 
where you are. If you put him 
back he will get out and come again. 
Besides he will make such fun for us 
all." 

" Do let him stay ! " cried all the 
children. 

So little white Tid staid at the 
party. 

He behaved very well. 

When he squealed, the children 
called it singing. 

When he made funny little noises, 
they called it laughing. 

When he ran up and down the 
verandah, they called it dancing. 

They all thought it was very funny 
to have a pig at a party. 

Tid had some cake and some fruit 
when the children did. 

His little owners took him home 
early. 

They stopped at his house. 

He went in like a good pig, when 
they opened the door. 

All this happened many years ago, 
but his little owners have never for- 
gotten their naughty, pretty little 

Tid-er-ei. ^ 

— K. T. W. 



WHAT SHALL WE DO ? 



191 



"WHAT SHALL WE DO?" 



" What shall we do ? " 

This was what the little children 
in a hospital said. 

A hospital is a large building 
where sick people can go who cannot 
be cured or taken care of at home. 

There were only children in this 
hospital. 

There were thirty children. 

Some of them lay in little white 
beds ! 

Some of them sat up in little easy 
chairs. 

Some of them sat in wonderful 
little chairs which could be wheeled 
around the room. 

Some of them could walk about if 
they walked very slow. 

They had some books and some 
toys. ^, 

But they had heard all the stories 
many times. 

They had seen all the pictures 
many times. 

They had played with all the toys 
many times. • 

They had grown very, very tired 
of them all. 



They wanted something new. 

" What shall we do? " they said. 

One day a lady from a country 
village came in to see the hospital 
children. 

She heard them say, " What shall 
we do ? " 

She saw how tired they Were of 
their playthings. 

She knew they could not take 
rides, nor see any new places. 

She thought of her own children 
at home. 

She had often heard them say, 
" What shall we do ? " 

" Now," said she to herself, " my 
children and these hospital children 
shall answer each other's questions. 

" They shall give each other some- 
thing to do." 

She went home. * 

She asked her friends to orather 

o 

up all the old story-books, and old 
dolls, and old toys, which their chil- 
dren had thrown aside. 

She asked her own children to 
bring her all their' old books and 
toys. 



192 



" WHAT SHALL WE DO ? 



Then she invited all the children 
in the village to come to her house 
on Saturday. 

She formed them into a band. 




SOMETHING TO DO. 



She called them "The Little 
Brothers and Sisters of the Sick." 

They re-painted the old games. 

They pasted and re-bound the 
torn picture books. 

They made new suits for the 
dolls. 



The horses that had broken loose 
from the old tin wagons were har- 
nessed in a"-ain. 

Cars were formed into trains again, 
and made to run. 

Bright pictures were pasted into 
blank books. 

Some of the boys made picture- 
puzzles. 

They went into the woods and 
gathered bags of nuts and boxes of 
autumn leaves. 

There were enough pretty things 
to fill a large box. 

Then one pleasant winter day this 
lady took all the " The Little Broth- 
ers and Sisters of the Sick " into 
the city with her. 

She took them to the hospital. 

She let them give the dolls and 
toys and picture-books, the nuts and 
the bright autumn leaves, to the sick 
children. 

How glad the sick children were ! 

How glad the well children were ! 

When the " Little Brothers and 

Sisters of the Sick " went home, they 

said, " Next year we will do this 

same thing again ! " 

— M. 0. J. 



To Teachers, Superintendents, and School Boards. 



THE 



Little Folks' Reader 



Is prepared to meet the 
rapidly growing demand 
from tlie Public Schools of 
America for 



RbsIi Reaii im ioi 



and of a character more 
fully adapted to the real 
wants than any at present 
supplied. 



It is believed that this SERIAL READER, with its bright, suggestive, simple 
Stories and Poems, its Object-lessons, its large, clear type, and its beautiful 
Pictures, will be 

TtorouEMy MM to tlie Little Beginners, assisting tliem to "Reafl at Siglit," 
Tliorou01y HelDffl M SuMcstiye to Teachers, 

Tlioronglily DeWful to liotli Scholars M Teachers. 

T/ie most competent authors and artists will be employed ; and the aim of both will be to 
induce the boys and girls to use their eyes, and think about what they see. 

The "building idea" of the Reader is that the child's eye readily becomes ac- 
quainted with any word, however long, with which his ear is already familiar, the 
associations aroused assisting to fasten the eye upott the form of the word, in an 
intelligent and reflective manner \ ajso awakening curiosity and interest in the 
child's mind. Thus the exercise of reading becomes normal and spontaneous 
instead of mechanical. 



The New England yournal of Education says : 
"If anything in this world will stimulate boys and 
girls to learn to read, and at the same time teach 
them to use their eyes, and think of what they 
behold around them, this charming Little 
Folks' Reader will do it." 

The Little Folks' Reader has the hearty 
sanction of Dr. Samuel Eliot, Superintendent of 
Schools in Boston, where it has just been 
adopted in the primary departments ; and also of 
Col. Parker of Quincy, in whose schools it is now 
being used. 

The Educational Weekly says : " D. Lothrop & 
Co., Hoston, the children's publishers, have at last 
given us Uhe very thing'' \\\ the LrrrLE Folks' 
Reader. Its type and illustrations are clear and 
artistic." 

The Vt. Phcenix says : " Messrs. D. Lothrop & 
Co., Boston, have begun a real missionary work 
in the cause of primary education." 



The Moravian says : "The Little Folks* 
Reader is ' a new departure,' and looks very 
much like a 'royal road to learning,' or a near 
approach to it." 

The Cambridge yeffersonian says : " No better 
piimary reader ever came from the press." 

The Teachers' Advocate says : " A move in the 
right direction has been made by D. Lothrop & 
Co., of Boston, in the way of furnishing fresh 
reading for the primary pupils of our schools. 
Our men want fresh reading every day, and find 
it in the daily papers; our ladies have their 
weekly and monthly magazines ; and there is no 
reason why our children should not have a new 
reader once a month, especially when one maybe 
had for four cents. We are not paid for adver- 
tising the Little Folks' Reader, but we feel 
that the enterprise is worthy of free and full 
notice, and we hope the project may meet with 
that success which it deserves." 



The Publishers know that the only proof is in seeing and testing, hence they will gladly send 
specimen of the first number, with terms of supply, to Every Superintendent Of Schools 

in America, and to Every Primary School Teacher, who will send address to 

D. LOTHROP & CO., Publishers, 

33 Franklin Street, Boston, Mass. 



SUPPLEMENTABY SCHOOL BE AD ma. 



All volumes on this list have been submitted to a severe censorship, and nothing unfit for school-room reading can 
he found between their covers. 



HISTORICAL SERIES BY CHARLOTTE M. YONGE. 

Miss Yoiigo, while always boldly and continuously outlining the course 
of historical events, has the knack of seizing upon incidents which reveal 
the true character of historical-personages, so that these volumes are em- 
inently calculated to teach as well as to interest. The language is simple, 
yet expressive, the freedom of treatment, bold, yet accurate. The 
characters appear and disappear with all the serious brevity of moving 
time, and seem to speak for themselves. 

Young- Folks' History of Germany. Map, aud8l 

illustratious. 12mo. $1.50. 
Young Folks' History of Greece. l2mo. Fully 

illustrated. .'jJl.oO. 
Young- Folks' History of Rome. Fully Illustrated. 

121110. $1.50. 
Young- Folks' History of England. Uniform with 

Gerniany and Greece. 12mo. .$1.50. 

Charming history charmingly illustrated. 

Young Folks' History of France. Very fully and 
fluely illustrated. 12mo. .$1.50. 

BIOGRAPHY. 

Life of Amos Lawrence. By W. R. Lawrence. 

New Edition. Large 12mo. Illustrated. $1.50. 

No young people who have in them the basis of excellence, can read 
this volume without feeling a noble ambition to imitate the goodness and 
the usefulness of its subject. 

Poets' Homes. Quarto. $2.00. 

A collection of entertaining papers, concerning the homes, habits and 
work of prominent American authors, prepared by R. H. Stoddard, 
George Lowell Austin, &c. Fully illustrated by views, interiors, and 
portraits. 

Poets' Homes. Second Series.. Quarto. $2.00. 

Chatty and very full accounts of Oliver Wendell Holmes, William Cul- 
Ion Bryant, Ralph Waldo Kmerson, Col. Paul H. Hayne, John Boyle 
O'Reilly, &c. Prepared by Arthur Gilman, Chas. F. Richardson, &c. 
Each fully illustrated. In each case these charming biographies have 
been prepared by personal friends, and all data is reliable. 

Oar American Artists. First Series. By S. G. W. 
Benjaniin. Large Quarto. 36 illustrations. $1.50. 
Mr. Benjamin, than whom no one is more conversant with the past and 
present of American art, has here nobly employed his pen in making 
American young people acquainted with the works and the history of 
the prominent living painters of our native land. These artists have fur- 
nished sketches of their studios, and finished drawings of their paintings ; 
and, in several cases, their own portraits drawn in pen-and-ink by them- 
selves. 



Anderson-Mas- 
board covers. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 

Winged Wonders. By Mrs. A. E. C. 
kell. Quarto. Illustrated. Clir 
75 cents. 

Water Wonders. By Mrs. A. E. C. Anderson-Maskell. 

Quarto. Illustrated. Chronio board covers. 75 cents. 
On Four Feet. By Mrs. A. E. C. Anderson-Maskell. 

Illustrated. Chromo board covers. 75 cents. 



Dogs. By Ernest Ingersoll. Illustrated. ICmo- Cliromo 

board covers. 25 cents. 
Cats. By Ernest Ingersoll. Illustrated. IGmo. Chromo 

board covers. 25 cents. 

True Stories About Pets. Illustrated. iGnio. 
Chronio lioard covers. 60 cents. 
These stories are all true, and very delightful. 



NATURAL SCIENCE. 
By Adam Stwiii. Quarto. 



Illustrated. 



At Home. 

Chromo board covers. 75 cents. 

In the Mountains. By Adam Stwiu. Quarto. Illus- 
trated. Chromo board covers. 75 cents. 

By Sea and Shore. By Adam Stwin. Quarto. Illus- 
trated. Chromo board covers. 75 cents. 

Overhead : What Harry and Nelly Discovered in the 
Heavens. Illustrated. Quarto. Chromo board covers. 
$1.00. 
Astronomy as children will like it. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Story of English Literature for Young Readers 
(The). By Lucy Cecil White (.Mrs. Lillie). Fully 
illustrated with portraits and views of celebrated spots. 
12mo. $1.25. 

Prepared in England, with access to valuable MSS. and old Records. 
Kg young student should be without it. 

Book of Golden Deeds (A) of all Times and all 
Lands. Gathered and Nari-ated by the author of Young 
Folks' Histories. School Edition. 75 cents. 

Little Lucy's Wonderful Globe. By the author 
of Young Folks' Histories. Quarto. 23 full-page illus- 
trations. Chromo board covers. 75 cents. 
School Edition. Extra cloth. $1.25. 
It is a story of geography and liistory all in one. 

Behaving ; or, Papers on Children's Etiquette. By 
Shirley Dare. 16mo. $1.00. 

This book should find its way into every home, and we would urge 
parents and teachers to read it to their children and pupils. — K. K. Jour- 
nal of Education. 

Child Toilers of Boston Streets. By Emnui E. 
Brown. With 12 pictures drawn from life by Katherine 
Peirson. lOmo. 75 cents. 
The author knows personally every "Child Toiler" of whom 

writes. 

Happy Moods of Happy Children. Origin;.! 

Poems. By favorite American authors. 75 cents. 

Every phase of child life is here touched, and children everywhere will 
recognize it as their own especial book. Nothing unsuited for readiitr 
aloud in the school-room will be found between its covers, and it i.s beau- 
tifully illustrated. 



WIDE AWAKE. 
The Young People's Illustrated Monthly Magazine. Ella Farman, Editor. Price, .f;>2.00 a year, in adviiiici'. 1.0 
cents a iiumher. Special terms for use in schools. 

The ui' ;it v:iii(ty of illustrated papers on practical topics renders this magazine very interesting and profitable as a school nadir in the advaiurd 

LITTLE FOLKS' READER. 

Edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Babt/land. A bright, new 16-page Illustrat(>d Monthly for the little ones, 
and especially designed for use in Public and Private Schools. Price, 75 cents a year, in advance. 7 cents a nui:il)ei-. 
(Spi'ci il rates to teachers and schools.) 

" We desire to call special attention'to the tiew publication entitled Little Folkt' Reader, edited by the Editors of Wide Awake and Brthijland, to 
be issued monthly, designed to meet the rapidly growing demand from the public schools for fresh reading every month. It is made up of oharmniL', 
sirnpl ■ ..^lories, poems, and object-lessons, printed in large, clear type, with beautiful pictures of hii;h artistic merit. If anything in this world v ill 
stiinul.ite boys and girls to h^arn to read, and at the same time teach them to u.>*e their eves, and think of what they behold around them, this charii;- 
iug Utile Fo;/c.h' Reader will do it. Every superintendent, school comniiUee-ni.in, niid primary teacher, should at once send for a sample copy lor 
(■x:im\n,i\]iin."—jVetD England Journal of Jiducalion. 

TO ADORN THE SCIIOOL-KOOM.— LITTLE FOLKS' I'K TURE GALLERY. 75 cents. 
A scroll of twelve Big Bright Pictures, ea(th with a new story in Big Black Letters. 

Special Terms on all the above publications for introduction. Correspondence solicited. Full catalogue of our 
Publications mailed free on application. D. LOTllROP & CQ., Publishers, 32 Franklin St., Boston. 



CHOICE BOOKS. 




HAPPY MOODS 

OF HAPPY CHILDREN. 

Sent post-paid on receipt of price — $i.oo. 

D. LOTHROP & CO., Publishers, Boston. 





- Jesus, 
Lover -of My Soul. 

This time-honored hymn, dear ,_ 
the hearts of thousands, has been finely 
illustrated by Robert Lewis, and is now 
£^ady, and has been placed at a low price to 
"^eet the wants of the people at large. 
Quarto. Gilt. Heavy plate paper. Price, 
$ 1 .00. Sent post-paid on receipt of price. 

D. LOTHROP & CO., Publishers, Poston. ~_| 

Vignette from Jesus, Lover of My Soul. 



Full pai;c iliubtiation fruui Jesvs, Lover of My Soul. 



''The Ninety and Nine." 

ILLUSTRATED BY 

ROBERT LEWIS. 

Now ready, a new edition, con- 
taining, additionally, music for the 
words, and a letter from the sister 
of Elizabeth C. Clephane, giving 
many particulars respecting the 
writer of this famous hymn. Quar- 
to. Gilt. Heavy plate paper, price, 
$1.50. Sent post-paid on receipt 
of price. 



D. LOTHROP &• CO., Publishers, 

Boston. 



-s C2« 






" TJie Wide Awake magazine is one 
in which the children take special delight. 
Were they asked to write a review there- 
of, it would be in one word, "splendid," and such being their ver- 
dict, grown folks agree with them without further ar^ment. 
Indeed none is needed." — Albany Press. 



D.LotopHo'sMaH fort Family: 



(F'or the Young People^ 




^.v... 




WIDE AWAKE. 

20 CENTS A NUMBER. $2.00 A YEAR. 

This carefully edited magazine can be placed iu the hands "of young people with confi- 
dence and safety. A bright, clear, sunshine sparkle characterizes everything allowed to appear 
on its pages. Its stories, poems, narratives and adventures are chosen from the Mss. of the best 
writers iu the country, and then placed in the hands of popular artists for full illustration. 

II. 

{For the Very Little Ones.) 

BABYLAND. 

5 CENTS A NUMBER. 50 CENTS A YEAR. 
. This beautiful eight-page quarto is the only periodical ever made especially for the babies. It i» 
full of large gay pictures, sweet little stories and jingles, and very funny drawings for copying on 
slates and in drawing-books. Several new and amusing features are shortly to be added. 

III. 
{For Primary Schools, Home'- Teaching and Kindergartens^ 

LITTLE FOLKS' READER. 

7 CENTS A NUMBER. 75 CENTS A YEAR. 
The Little Folks' Readeu is a sixteen-page quarto, exquisitely gotten up iu every detail of letter- 
press and iihistration. Its success the last year in teaching children to " read at sight," in schools 
all over the country, has been something as marvellous as gratifying. 

IV. 
{A Gtcide for the Book-buyers of the Family.) 

THE BOSTON BOOK BULLETIN. 

PUBLISHED QUAUTEULY. 30 CENTS A YEAB. 

This periodical gives discriminating reviews of new books, and an index, with price, of all new publications both iu 
this country and England. No family should be witliout it. 

23^ Iji sending for specimen numbers of these periodicals, ask for descriptive catalogue of D. Lothrop & Co.'s 
Books, comprising a list of over Nine Hundred Volumes. All orders and inquiries will receive prompt attention. 



YE 13143