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Full text of "Little Rosy's voyage of discovery undertaken in company with her cousin Charley"

NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 







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RO S WE LI/*> E MI LY E F SKE E L 







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PRy 

\ 





ROSY AND CHARLEY. 



LITTLE ROSY'S 



VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY 



UNDERTAKEN IN COMPANY WTTH HER 



COUSIN CHARLEY. 



With Forty-eight Illustrations by Lorenz Frolich, 







NEW YORK: D. APPLETON AND COMPANY. 

MDCCCLXVIII. 



THE > T FAV YORK 

P:;LI.IC LIBRARY 

,r > .~'j ."? tf >> 

33761UB 

ASfOR, LENOX AND 

I.LuiiN FOUNDATIONS 

B 1843 L 






INTRODUCTION. 




ITTLE people have much larger libraries 
of their own now-a-days than little 
people used to possess a good many years ago. 

I dare say you have lesson-books, and story- 
books, and picture-books, almost without end, 
given to you by your kind papas and mammas, 
who want you to grow clever and wise as fast 
as you can. 

But I don't think that any of you have ever 
had, or ever read, a book of travels. So I hope 
this book will be something quite new to you ; 
and what is new most little people consider 
very delightful. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



I. 

ROSY AND HER COUSIN CHARLEY. 




ITTLE Rosy Girard was in her fifth year, 
when she had an invitation to spend the 
summer at her uncle's house in the country. 

Now this uncle of hers was a very kind one ; 
and Rosy loved him very much, and her aunt 
too; and she had often played with her cousin 
Charley, before she went that long journey into 
France of which some of her little friends have 
heard. She liked running about in the fields, 
and on nice grassy hills, much better than in the 
streets of London. And so, though once upon 
a time Rosy had been a shy little girl, yet she was 
not at all afraid to pay this visit, even though her 
dear mamma could not go with her. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




I. 



Every day Charley used to read to Rosy out of a delightful book 

of travels. Rosy said she thought even Fanny liked it, 

though she did not generally care for stories. 



' ' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

As for Master Charley he had no sister of his 
own to play with ; so he was very glad to have 
his little cousin. 

The young friends played at all sorts of games, 
sometimes in the garden, and sometimes in the 
nursery ; and every day Charley used to read to 
Rosy out of a delightful book of travels. 

He was older than Rosy, and could read quite 
well; and they both thought these stories the 
most interesting that they had ever heard in all 
their lives. Rosy said that she thought even 
Fanny liked them, though she did not generally 
care for stories. 

Now Miss Fanny was a new doll which Rosy's 
papa had given her to comfort her for the loss of 
Julia, who had tumbled overboard as they were 
coming back from France ; but I do not fancy 
that Fanny thought very much about these stories, 
however quietly she might sit and hear them ; for 
her head was made of wax, and there were no 
brains inside it. But if Fanny did not think 
about them, we shall soon see that into Charley's 
head they put a wonderful idea. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



II. 

CHARLEY'S IDEA, 




UT this wonderful idea he contrived to keep 
in his head, and not tqr let it get out until 
the stories were all finished. Only once or twice 
he said, 

Ah, Rosy ! I '11 tell you of a plan of mine 
when the book is done.' 

Then of course she was very curious, as 
people say young ladies always are, and begged 
him to tell her now. 

But Charley was rather cruel about that, and 
only answered,- 

c Oh ! some day : don't stop the story.' 

At last it was all done ; and then Rosy went 
to put Fanny into her little bed, for fear she 
should hear the secret. It was a secret, Charley 
said. 



LITTLE ROSY'S TOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



i 




n. 



Charley tells Rosy his great secret : he has quite made up his mind 

to go and discover some new countries, like Captain Cook, 

and Robinson Crusoe, and Gulliver. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



And, after all, I think she would have heard 
it all, if she had not happened to be rather deaf ; 
for the young gentleman was so full of his plan 
that he told it in rather a loud voice. 

Now, what do you think it was ? 

He had quite made up his mind to go and 
discover some new countries, like Captain Cook, 
and Robinson Crusoe, and Gulliver ! 

Just think of that ! It made even Rosy open 
her eyes; and she asked timidly ,- 

c Are you big enough, Charley ? ' 

Of course ! ' Charley said, making himself 
look as tall as he could. c I can take care of 
myself, I should think ; and you too, Rosy. 
Don't I take care of you every day ? ' 

Then he talked about monkeys and parrots, 
and how they would catch some and bring them 
home for pets ; and about splendid flowers and 
delicious fruits, larger and more juicy than they 
had ever seen : till the little girl thought it the 
most delightful plan in the world, and Charley 
the most delightful of boys to make such a 
plan. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



III. 

WHERE TO GO. 




HE first thing is to get a map,' said Charley, 
after , a bit. ' We must find out what 
countries are left for us to discover.' 

Rosy hardly knew what a map was ; but she 
thought it very pretty, and pointed out to Charley 
that there were red countries painted on it, and 
blue countries, and yellow countries. 

c Which will be the nicest, and have most 
fruit in them, Charley?' she asked. 

c I don't know;' he answered ; ' but we are not 
going to any of these, for they are all discovered. 
The prettiest will be sure to be those that are not 
marked at all. We must see where there is most 
room for them. Look here, Rosy ; here 's lots of 
room down in this great sea; and if we go that 
way we shall be sure to find them.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



. 




VT/ ^ 
^ I /I 







o- __^=^ 



III. 



' The first thing is to get a map/ said Charley ; ' we must find 
out what countries are left for us to discover.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

c What shall we bring home for uncle ? ' asked 
Rosy. 

c Oh, a new kind of dog if we can ! Papa 
likes dogs/ 

Rosy thought she didn't, and that she hoped 
she should not find any ; but she did not say so 
for fear Charley should laugh at her. 

Talking of dogs, however, put Caesar into 
her head. He always barked at her when she 
went out of the front door; so when Charley 
asked, 

'Come, will you go, Rosy?' she hung down 
her head, and answered : 

' 1 don't know if I could walk so far.' 

c Of course we should often sit down,' said 
Charley, in an encouraging tone. c Come, don't 
be silly and spoil all my fun. I don't want to 
have to go alone.' 



B 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



IV. 

THE DECISION. 




OME into the garden and let's have a game/ 
said Rosy at last. 

( Yes, come,' exclaimed Charley ; c we can 
have a nice talk there, all by ourselves.' 

So the little cousins went down hand in hand, 
as they always did; and Charley gave Rosy her 
garden shoes, and helped her to put them on. 

c Now you can go on the grass, and not get 
your feet wet,' he said when they were on ; and 
Rosy said,- 

' Thank you,' and gave him a kiss for helping 
her. She began to feel that it would be unkind 
to let him go all alone, and that she could not do 
that when ( he was always so kind to her ! ' 

That was quite true. Charley did always 
take such care of his little cousin, that she felt 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OJ- DISCOVERY. 







IV. 



Rosy, after some hesitation, consents to accompany him ; and 
they seal the compact by shaking hands. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

quite safe with him; and his mamma was never 
afraid of trusting her with him. 

He soon began to talk again about his great 
plan, and to try and persuade Rosy to go with 
him ; but she thought of Caesar, and told her 
cousin of a long walk which her papa once took 
her when she c was so tired.' c Wouldn't this be 
longer ? ' 

c Oh, it wouldn't be the same thing at all,' 
said Charley. c They would often sit down, and 
then when they got to the forest it would be 
shady. They would start from the gate at the 
end of the back garden, and 

Here Rosy broke in with, 

c Yes, I will go, Charley. You shall not go 
alone.' 

c Shake hands, then, to show you agree to it,' 
cried Charley, stopping short and facing her. 
c That is the right way to make a bargain ; and 
then you must never want to turn back until I 
do. 3 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



V. 

PREPARATIONS. 




HEN shall we set off?' asked Rosy, for 
now she had quite made up her mind ; 
and when she had once made it up to anything 
she very seldom changed it again. 

c Oh, to-morrow!' answered Charley. 'It's 
fine now, and my papa says it's going to be fine; 
so there is no use in waiting.' 

c Then we must get ready,' said Rosy. ' Shall 
I pack up ? I can/ 

c We mustn't take much,' answered Charley. 
< People never do when they make a walking 
journey, but we must have something to eat.' 

So it was settled that, as they had had a very 
good breakfast, and expected to have even a 
better dinner, the lunch might well be saved. 

They got each a large slice of bread-and- 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




Charley whispered to Rosy, 'These will clo beautifully to eat 

in the desert countries.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

butter and a pear from nurse as soon as they went 
in ; and Charley whispered to Rosy, ' These 
will do beautifully to eat in the desert countries.' 

But he told her that these were not all ; for 
that for the last fortnight he had been saving 
little pieces of bread, which had all turned to 
biscuits. 

Rosy was very glad to hear that, and thought 
they looked so delicious in the little box in 
which he kept them, that she wanted to taste 
one. 

But Charley told her that good travellers 
never think much of eating and drinking, and 
that she must try to get used to doing without 
things. 

Rosy thought that this was very wise advice, 
and wished she were as wise as Charley. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



VI. 

ROSY'S FAMILY. 




HEN Rosy began to bustle about the 
nursery and consider what she would like 
to take with her. 

She had lots of playthings which she had 
brought from her own home, but she loved her 
dolls better than anything else, and she said that 
she should like to take them with her. There 
were only seven of them, little and big ; and 
some were small enough for Charley to carry in 
his pocket. And then Charley was not unkind 
to dolls as some boys are. He never poked out 
their eyes, or made holes in their arms to see the 
colour of their blood. Indeed, Charley rather 
liked dolls himself if he had confessed the truth ; 
and one which Rosy had dressed as a soldier he 
admired very much. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




VI. 



Rosy said she should like to take her dolls with her ; there were 
only seven of them, little and big. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY, 

But Charley was wiser than Rosy about 
journeys, though he had never been so far as 
she had ; and he said that though it might be 
very nice to make up such a large party, yet 
that these ladies and gentlemen would be tiring 
companions, as they would all want carrying. 

f And your arms would soon ache, Rosy ; 
and you would not be able to march so well, or 
to climb hills and rough places, if you take too 
much to carry ; besides we must carry all we can 
to eat and drink, you know. 5 

Rosy was obliged to confess that her cousin 
was right in this ; so she very good-temperedly 
gave up taking her dear dollies, though a tear 
would come into her eye when she said good-bye 
to them all. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



VII. 



THE FAREWELL. 




EXT morning as usual Charley and Rosy 
were sent to play in the garden ; and 
then they took the opportunity of beginning 
their journey. 

It was to be a secret, as I told you, and they 
thought themselves very brave young people to 
be ready to face so many dangers. 

Yet when they got half-way down the garden, 
and were about to lose sight of the house, they 
both felt rather affected as they turned to say, 
c Good-bye, old house ; I wonder when we shall 
see you again.' 

All day they were to march, Charley said, 
with only a rest now and then; and they must 
not care for either heat or cold, or for what they 
got to eat. So long as they did not starve, they 



LITTLE ROSY'S rOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 







VII. 



They each turned to say, ' Good-bye, old house ; I wonder 
when we shall see you again.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

must be quite content; and c the fresh air was as 
good as food any day.' 

Charley looked quite like a traveller with his 
bag slung over his shoulders ; and this bag con- 
tained the slices of bread-and-butter, the pears and 
biscuits. The bottle of water hung to it, being 
attached by a piece of string tied round the neck ; 
and it was corked very tightly ; for he had ham- 
mered the cork in with the end of his hoop-stick. 

Charley told his little cousin that it held 
water enough for a long time, and that when 
it was empty they would have to fill it at any 
lake or river which they might be passing. 

As for Rosy she carried nothing but her dear 
lamb, Robin, which she could not make up her 
mind to leave behind. 

Charley knew better than to let a young lady 
carry a parcel; so everything else he took himself. 

Perhaps you may wonder that he never asked 
his papa's opinion about this journey ; and it is 
certainly strange that he did not think of this. 
I don't know how it was; but as for Rosy she 
believed that all that Charley did must be right 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



VIII. 

THE START, 




AVING got to the end of the garden, the 
next thing was to get to the other side 
of the hedge which enclosed it; and at first 
Charley thought he would climb up the bank and 
get over at one of the lowest parts. 

But whether Rosy could get over too, even if 
he succeeded, seemed very doubtful. He was 
afraid she would never be able to climb by her- 
self; and he knew that when he was over he 
could not help her. 

So at last they made up their minds to scram- 
ble through a little hole in this hedge ; Charley 
going first to make it bigger, and then Rosy 
following close with her lamb. 

It was Caesar, the dog, who had made this 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




VIII. 



Rosy did not mind a fe\v scratches for herself ; she was only 

afraid for Robin, lest the brambles should tear 

off some of his nice warm wool. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCO VER Y. 

hole, though Rosy did not know that he ever 
came round that way. He had only made it 
large enough for himself; and he was not at 
all a large dog. Nor had he picked off the 
thorns, or dragged up the thistles ; but Rosy 
was not much afraid of these things, for she 
had been used to scrambling about; and she 
did not mind a few scratches for herself. She 
was only afraid for Robin, and thought the 
brambles would hurt him a great deal, and 
perhaps tear off some of his nice, warm, white 
wool. So she carried him straight in front of 
her, right over Charley's boots, and put his head 
under her chin so as to save his poor eyes. 

As for her own eyes, which really were 
better than Robin's because they could see better, 
she expected her hat to protect them ; and, 
besides, they had each a nice lid fixed over 
them which shut of itself, if anything tried to 
get inside, without her having the trouble of 
ever thinking of shutting them. 

Robin's eyes had no such lids ; so Rosy was 
obliged to take care of them for him. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



IX. 

THE FIRST DIFFICULTY, 




ND I can tell you that it was no easy 
matter to keep Robin from getting hurt; 
the brambles flew back so often in Rosy's face, 
and then she had to call out, 

c Oh, Charley ! my lamb 's caught again ! ' and 
he had to turn round and set it free. 

Once Charley said that he was sure Robin 
got caught on purpose, just because he did not 
like going with them; but when he saw that 
it vexed Rosy to hear her lamb blamed, he did 
not say it again. 

At last Charley got quite through ; and then 
he was able to turn round and take Robin out 
of Rosy's arms. He had only lost two or three 
little pieces of wool, though he was rather rough 
all over. 



LITTLE AY'.ST'.V VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




IX. 



Some birds over-head began chirping very loudly, and the 

little ones seemed to say to the big ones : 

' \Yhat are they going to do ?' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

c Take care of my dear lamb,' said Rosy, 
as she kissed him, and gave him up to Charley : 
and, as she did so, some birds over head began 
chirping very loudly indeed. 

I dare say they had never seen a lamb with 
such stiff legs before, nor any little children 
getting through a hedge. 

What they were talking about to each other, 
I don't know; but certainly they looked at them 
with great curiosity, and the little ones seemed 
to say to the big ones,- 

c What are they going to do ? Are they 
going to build a nest as you did for us ? Or 
are they only going to send that lamb into the 
fields to play with the other sheep, and get his 
legs to move more easily ? ' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



X. 

THE WIDE WORLD, 




HEY all three got through the hedge at 
last after a regular good scramble for 

Rosy had only torn her frock a little, and 
Charley got off with one bad scratch ; for which, 
of course, he did not care the least in the world. 
What brave boy ever did? 

Then both of them stood up on the other 
side, and Charley said, 

c Now the whole world is before us ; which 
way shall we go ? ' 

Rosy thought the world looked very large, 
though all she saw of it was a great stubble- 
field. 

When the corn was standing, she had several 
times crossed it by a little path, when she was 
out walking with her aunt; but she did not 



LITTLE ROSV'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 







' Now the whole world is before us ! Which way shall we go ?' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

know it again from the side where she and 
Charley stood. 

c This is the desert,' said Charley, enthusi- 
astically. ( Suppose we go straight to the other 
side of it. 5 

c Yes, let 's go,' answered Rosy, warmly. 
4 How long do you think we shall be crossing?' 

We shall see,' replied Charley ; c only we 
had better start at once. We shall not find any 
provisions here ; so it will not do to dawdle 
until we have eaten all we brought.' 

' No,' said Rosy, ' or else we should be 
starved.' 

She had set her lamb down, and was leaning 
on his back while they took their first look at 
the great world ; but now she caught him up 
in her arms, and gave him a great many kisses 
as they set off on their journey across the desert. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XI. 

THE DESERT. 




HE sun was shining brightly, and Master 
Robin was rather heavy; for he was a 
very large lamb. So Rosy's arms began to ache 
a little, and she soon told Charley that she 
thought the desert was a very hot place. 

Charley laughed, and said,- 

' Well ! I think it would have been a funny 
thing if we had found it cold, Rosy.' 

* It makes me thirsty,' answered Rosy. c Are 
people always thirsty in the deserts ? ' 

c Pretty often,' replied Charley ; c you had 
better drink a little water, Rosy.' 

Rosy was not sorry to do that; but when 
she offered the bottle to him, he only wiped 
his face with his handkerchief, and said,- 

c Oh, no ! not yet ! I can wait a bit.' 



LITTLE RO'SY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 







XL 



Rosy soon told Charley that she thought the desert a very 

hot place. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

For Charley thought to himself, 

( I must take care of Rosy because she is a 
little girl; but as for myself, why, of course, 
I must learn to do without lots of things. I 
shouldn't make much of a traveller unless I can 
go without food and water sometimes ; so the 
sooner I begin to use myself to hardships the 
better.' 

Charley had read a great deal about hard- 
ships in his book ; and he thought there would 
be no glory in his journey unless he had some- 
times been almost starved to death or parched 
up with thirst. 

As for Master Robin, he seemed to get on 
very comfortably. At any rate he made no 
complaints. And Rosy's arms felt all the better 
for having been without him for a few minutes. 



D 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XII. 

THE FOREST. 




HE two little travellers found the desert 
rather long ; and yet they reached the 
other side more quickly than they had expected. 

c Is this a palm ? ' asked Rosy, as they sat 
down under a tree. 

' No ; I think not,' answered Charley. c The 
leaves are not large enough. Perhaps it is a teak- 
tree, or some other that we do not see in Europe.' 

They had a little game with the lamb here, 
and eat two or three of Charley's biscuits before 
they set off again. And, when they were well 
rested, Charley said, 

c Now we are quite fresh for another start. 
It seems to me that we had better enter this 
forest. Perhaps we may get through it before 
nightfall. It is a virgin forest, you see.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




xir. 



' It seems to me that we had better enter the forest, and 

perhaps we may get through it before night-fall. 

It is a virgin forest, you see ! 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



Rosy looked rather puzzled at this remark; 
so her cousin added : 

c A wild kind of forest in which the trees 
have stood for nobody knows how long, ever 
since the flood, perhaps. Don't you recollect my 
reading about one of that kind, and how there 
was no path through it, and people had to cut 
their way through the trees as they went?' 

c And shall we ?' asked Rosy. c How funny it 
would be !' 

c I shouldn't wonder,' answered Charley ; * I 
brought my knife with me, in case we should.' 

So saying, he took his little cousin by the 
hand, that he might be better able to protect her, 
and with his stick in the other, and his eyes 
wide open he set off again boldly. 

As for Rosy, she had full confidence in 
Charley's strength and wisdom, and had no doubt 
that he was leading her quite right. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XIII. 

THE FIRST DISCOVERY. 




T was some time before the young tra- 
vellers took another rest. 

4 Soon we shall get deeper into the forest,' 
said Charley at last, < and then we shall not meet 
any one. I shall be glad to be where no one 
ever went before. Won't it be nice, Rosy? 5 

Rosy was not quite sure ; but she took off 
her hat, and sat down on a little green mound 
under another large tree, with bunches of small, 
round fruit. 

* I wonder what tree this can be,' said Rosy. 

4 Very likely a banana,' replied Charley, with 
a learned air. 

' Oh, no, not a banana, I know!' cried 
Rosy ; c for I have seen one of those in a large 
garden in Paris ; and it had very, very large 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XIII. 

' Then we are the first discoverers of the tree/ said Charley, 
' and we must give it a name. We'll call it 
after you, "The Rosy tree !" 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

leaves, made just like paper fans, not a bit like 
this one.' 

c Oh, then, it is some new kind of tree that 
nobody knows. I never saw one like it before ; 
did you. Rosy ? ' 

c No, never,' said the little girl. 

' Then we are the first discoverers of the tree ; 
so we must give it a name.' 

c Yes, let us give it a name,' said Rosy, 
eagerly. c What shall it be ? ' 

c We'll call it after you- -"The Rosy tree," 
answered Charley. c It's a very pretty one ; so 
you won't mind, will you?' 

c No ; I don't mind,' said Rosy, blushing a 
little; but is it a pretty name, for a tree, I 
mean ? ' 

' Of course it is,' answered Charley ; * at least 
I know if I were a tree I shouldn't mind having 
it.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XIV. 

THE SECOND DISCOVERY, 




FTER naming this wonderful tree, and 
trying to notice exactly what it was like 
so that they might describe it to the first people 
who knew about trees when they got home, 
Charley and Rosy went on with their walk, and 
soon came to a tiny stream, in which grew some 
very beautiful flowers. 

c Why, what are these ? ' said Rosy. c I never 
saw any like them before.' 

( Nor I, either,' added Charley. c We must 
name them after your mamma, and take some 
home to show to the learned men.' 

c Oh, yes,' cried Rosy, clapping her hands, 
< that will be nice.' 

c Let us bring them up on to the path,' said 
Charley, and then we can put them into our 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



-' 







XIV. 



The next discovery was a new species of flower, which was 

instantly named after Rosy's mamma ; and some specimens 

were preserved to show to the learned men on 

their return home. 



LITTLE KOSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

hats. They will look very pretty there. Besides, 
our hands are hot, and the heat soon kills 
flowers.' 

c How funny that is !' said Rosy, c when they 
so often grow in the sun, and get baked by it all 
day long.' 

c I suppose flowers will bear baking when they 
are on their own stalks, but not in our hot hands,' 
answered Charley. c Don't you remember about 
that stuff inside the stalk which papa showed us 
one day, and called sap ; and how he said that 
was what the plant ate and drank ? I suppose 
the flower starves, and gets too thirsty to live 
when it is broken off the stem, and that it can't 
bear heat so well when it has nothing to drink.' 

Rosy thought that Charley must have been 
very clever to find this out. She liked his idea too 
about the hats. In short she liked all Charley's 
ideas. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XV. 

THE THIRD DISCOVERY. 




HEY had not gone much farther before a 
bush appeared, covered with small black 
fruit which looked like raspberries, and nearly as 
good, so Rosy declared. 

c Oh ! but, Rosy, you must not eat them ! ' 
cried Charley, seizing her hand as she was going 
to pick one. 

'Why not?' asked Rosy. 

c Because they may be poison ; you cannot 
tell,' answered Charley. 

c Oh ! I don't think so ! They smell very 
good,' returned Rosy. 

' Do they ?' said Charley. c Let me smell.' 

He smelt several times at the fruit, and then 
thought that he would taste one, and wait a bit to 
see whether he felt any pain after it. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




xv. 



'Oh, Rosy ! you must not eat them,' cried Charley, seizing her 
hand as she was going to pick one. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

He did so ; and, after a minute or two, as no 
pain came, he said, 

< Yes, I think we may eat, Rosy. They are a 
juicy kind of fruit, and will make us not so 
thirsty. It is a good thing you found them.' 

Ah, Master Charley, what a good thing it was 
that these fruits were really not poisonous ! One 
can't tell always by pain coming; for sometimes 
things that are poisonous make people feel very 
comfortable, and send them so fast asleep that 
they never wake again I 

Whilst the two travellers were eating, Master 
Robin fell down ; and his little mistress said that 
he had gone fast asleep \ but he had not eaten any 
fruit, and his eyes were wide open as they always 
were ; for Rosy never could persuade him to shut 
his eyes. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XVI. 

JOURNEY THROUGH THE FOREST, 




'HEN they had made a good meal of this 
black fruit, which was very good, and 
very sweet to taste, they set off on their march 
through the forest once more ; and Charley, who 
walked first, and drew his stick along the ground 
as he went, exclaimed,- 

' Oh, isn't it splendid to walk like this through 
a place where no one has ever been before ? ' 

But Rosy, who had just torn a large rent in 
her frock on a branch which she had not seen, 
and which stuck out from an old trunk, did not 
think it quite so delightful. 

She almost wished that nurse had been there 
to mend it for her ; or that she had a needle and 
thread, that she might try herself, even though 
generally she was not fond of needlework; but 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



-yo 







XVI. 



Oli ! \^\\\ it splendid to walk like this through a place where 
no one has ever been before?' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

it was of no use wishing for what she could not 
have ; and so the little girl comforted herself 
by thinking that, as no one would ever pass them 
now, it did not matter much. 

And as there was nothing to be done for it 
but to take it patiently all the rest of the way, 
she only called to Charley to get her free from 
the bush; and then followed her leader, Master 
Charley, as quickly as her little legs would carry 
her. 

So on they went, dashing through the grass, 
and making frogs and all sorts of other creatures 
jump out of their way as they passed along. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XVII. 

THE MONSTER. 




LITTLE further on they were startled by a 
queer noise, as if something were sliding 
or jumping through the grass among the rocks. 

'What can it be?' said Rosy, turning pale. 

Charley did not answer ; but he looked rather 
frightened. 

However he did not forget that he was a boy, 
and that he had his little cousin to protect. And 
he made up his mind that no harm should happen 
to her if he could prevent it. 

So calling to Rosy and Robin to stand still 
both of them, he took his stick in his hand, and 
went forward to meet the monster. 

Out it came on the grass before them, and, 
Charley cried, 

f Oh, it's a crocodile ! ' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 








' Oh, it's a crocodile !' Rosy was almost afraid to breathe, as the 

creature lifted up its head. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

Rosy was almost afraid to breathe as the 
creature lifted up its head, just as if it were 
preparing to spring on him. 

But Charley put on a brave face, and went 
stoutly forward with his stick in his hand say- 
ing* 

< Never mind, Rosy ! I '11 soon do for the 

monster with this club of mine!' and at sight of 
the stick, the animal thought it best to turn 
round and make its escape. 

And, when it was gone, Charley said in rather 
a quiet way,- 

c It was a very small crocodile, if it was one 
at all. Perhaps it was only a lizard, Rosy.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XVIII. 

PRESSING ON. 




OW fast it ran away; didn't it?' said Rosy. 
4 Oh, I 'm so glad it has gone, I thought it 
was going to bite you ! ' 

' It was a good thing for it that it did not 
try,' answered Charley. < It would have felt some- 
thing of my club if it had come near enough. 
But now you have seen me conquer this enemy, 
you won't be so much afraid if any other should 
come.' 

Then Charley, who had drunk nothing since 
they started, took such a long draught, that when 
it came to Rosy's turn, the bottle was found to 
be nearly empty. 

c We shall have to go on short commons, I 
see,' he said. c Rosy, can you do with a little 
until we come to water ? ' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OE DISCOVER} 




XVIII. 



Charley took a long draught out of the bottle : so long that when 
it came to Rosv's turn it was found nearly empty. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

' If the river is not very far off, Charley/ 
she said ; c but I am getting very thirsty.' 

c Well ! we must press on through this forest ; 
there is nothing else to be done. I think I see 
an opening in the trees out there ; don't you ? ' 

'Let's run, then,' answered Rosy; 'let's run 
a race ; and we shall soon be there. I wonder if 
there will be any water close by when we get 
out.' 

' At any rate, Robin can't have a drop till we 
get a fresh supply, ' answered Charley. c He can 
go longer than we can without drinking; can't 
he, Rosy ? ' 

Charley looked rather quizzical when he said 
this, and Rosy got a little red, and did not seem 
quite to like it; so he gave Robin a very kind 
pat, and said no more about it. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XIX. 

A BAD TRAVELLER. 




OSY, however, very soon began to find that 
Master Robin was no small weight for 
her little arms. 

c Oh, you are heavy, Robin!' she said. C I 
wish you could walk.' 

So she put him down to rest her arms, and 
declared that c he was not half so heavy at home, 
and that he was a bad lamb to make himself 
heavy just when he ought to be light. It was 
very bad of him ; very bad indeed, and very 
unkind ! ' 

Then Charley said, 

c I would carry him for you, Rosy ; but you 
see I must have my arms free in case of any 
danger. Perhaps we shall meet another monster 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XIX. 



Rosy soon begins to find Master Robin no small weight for 

her little arms. She is sure that he makes 

himself heavy on purpose ! 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

before long ; and if I am not ready with my club, 
it may attack you.' 

' If he only had a board to stand on, and 
wheels like my horse, I could draw him along 
with a string,' returned Rosy. 

' Couldn't we tie some of this long grass to- 
gether, and make a string for him?' said Charley. 
c You might be able to draw him without any 
wheels.' 

So the little folks went to work to carry out 
this plan ; and, as it took some time, Rosy's arms 
got rested a bit. 

However, the grass string did not answer. 
It broke very often ; and then every time they 
tried to pull Master Robin with it, down he 
went; so at last they were forced to give it up, 
and go on as before. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XX. 

THE ANT-HILL, 




T was not long before our young travellers 
found themselves in front of a little hill- 
ock, which Charley immediately pronounced to 
be an ant-hill of a very remarkable kind ; not at 
all like an English ant-hill, but such a one as 
can only be found either in Africa or America. 

c So you see, Rosy,' said he, c we must be in 
one of those two continents; and England must 
be a long way off.' 

c What is a continent ? ' asked Rosy. 

c Oh ! don't you know ?' said Charley ; c but 
I forgot you hadn't learnt geography. Well, 
never mind, you'll know some day. Only, you 
see, we're not in England; that's all.' 

Will it be long before we get back again ? ' 
asked Rosy, rather anxiously. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 







H* 




Against such numbers resistance is impossible. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

4 Oh ! not long,' answered Charley, carelessly ; 
c but come, I want to see what is going on here ! ' 

c So do I,' cried Rosy, running towards the 
hill ; but Charley said, 

c Take care, the great creatures will come out 
and bite you. I 'd better go forward with my 
club.' 

Charley's way, however, was not one to pacify 
the enemy; for he had no sooner said this than 
he plunged his stick right down into their house. 
And instantly a whole army of atits,- -great fat 
ants, as big, Rosy said, as the tips of her fingers, 
made an expedition against their assailants. 

Against such numbers resistance was impossi- 
ble. Charley set off running as fast as he could, 
saying that they were too many for him; and 
Rosy followed him with her lamb in her arms. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXI. 

THE PRAIRIE, 




FTER running hard until they thought 
themselves quite out of reach of their 
foes, the little travellers came to a place where 
there were not so many trees. It was, indeed, a 
large meadow that lay before them; and there 
was thick grass all over the ground, and lots of 
flowers mixed with it. 

4 Why, this is another desert ! ' cried Rosy. 

' No,' said Charley ; ( don't you remember 
what the last was like, a great bare place, without 
any grass, or trees, or water? A desert is not a 
nice place at all. You know how hot you found 
ours ; but this is nice and cool ; and just look at 
the quantities of flowers ! I should say that it 
is a prairie, so now we must be in America.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




"iKH, COMP 



' I should say that this is a prairie : so now we must be 

in America.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

< Oh, is this a pairie?' said Rosy. 'It's a 
very nice place.' 

' Not a pairie, but a prairie,' replied Charley, 
looking very wise. c It 's a hard word, isn't it ? 
but you must try and recollect it. Say it over two 
or three times.' 

Rosy did so. She repeated it more than two 
or three times,- -I should say a dozen times at 
least, and then declared that she knew it quite 
well now, and would tell her mamma all about 
it when she went home. Then she began to 
pick dear mamma a nosegay ; but, as Charley said 
that the flowers would be dead long before she 
saw her mamma again, she told him that they 
should be for his mamma instead.' 

And Charley looked pleased and said, 

c Do, and I '11 help you.' 

So the little cousins went to work, and soon 
made up a splendid bunch of what Charley called, 
' rare, foreign flowers.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXII. 

THE SOUP.CE OF THE NILE. 




T did not take so long as one might have 
expected to cross what Charley called c the 
prairie ;' but when they got to the other side, they 
came to something much more dangerous, and of 
which they heard the sound at some little distance. 
I mean a running stream of water rushing over 
some rocks. 

Oh ! if Rosy's mamma had known where 
the little girl stood when she came to its banks, 
I don't think she would have thought Master 
Charley's protection quite enough. 

But Charley was not afraid himself. He had 
never tumbled into a river, or into a pond, and 
been in danger of drowning yet : so he did not 
know how it felt, or how much more easy it 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XXII. 



As soon as Charley saw the cascade, lie cried out. ' The source 

of the Nile, I do declare. This is something to 

talk about when we get back.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

was to go to the bottom and be drowned than 
to get out again. 

As soon as he saw the little cascade, which 
looked very pretty amongst the trees, he cried 
out,- 

c The source of the Nile, I do declare ! No 
one ever saw it before; and we have found it 
out ! Only think ! This is something to talk 
about when we get back ! ' 

c Do you think the Nile water is good to 
drink ? ' asked Rosy, who was very thirsty. 

c I should just think so ! ' answered Charley ; 
c why it is the best in the world ! ' 

c I wish we could get some, then ; but I 
am afraid of falling in if I dip the bottle in 
here.' 

And as she spoke, a little bird, which was 
chirping on a bough near, looked at her, as much 
as to say,- 

c You had better not try, little maiden : the 
water is deep just here, and runs very fast. You 
might get carried down the stream.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXIII. 

THE WATER OF THE NILE. 




HARLEY seemed to think so too; for he 
did not try to do anything just there, 
though he was as thirsty as his cousin. I must 
say, that on the whole he was a careful little 
man. 

So he looked a little further up the stream, 
and at last found a place where the banks were 
almost flat, and the water very shallow. 

In an instant Rosy laid Robin on the grass, 
took ofF her hat, and threw herself flat on her 
face on the bank. Charley followed her example, 
only that he put his mouth into the water, keep- 
ing himself from slipping with his hands. 

But Rosy thought it best not to go quite so 
close ; she only made a cup of her hand, and 
drank out of it. 



LITTLE ROSV'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XXIII. 

The little hand would not hold much at once ; but then she could 

fill it as often as she liked. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

The little hand would not hold much at 
once ; but then she could fill it as often as she 
liked, and so very soon she had quenched her 
thirst, and did not want to drink any more. 

But while she had been drinking, the pet 
lamb had slipped further and further down to- 
wards the water, until its feet went in. Then 
it stuck against something ; and, as it was not 
likely to get carried away, Charley said it would 
do it good to stay there a little while, for it would 
cool its feet. His were very hot, he knew ; and 
he should like well enough to put them in, if 
only he had a towel to dry them afterwards. 

The water tasted most delicious ; and, when 
Rosy had satisfied herself, she could not help 
laughing at Charley for drinking just as a cat 
drinks. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXIV. 

THE FORD. 




HARLEY and Rosy were at last quite 
rested and quite refreshed; for they had 
played about a good deal after they had drunk 
in this funny way. There was plenty of nice 
grass to pick on the banks of the stream, and to 
add to the splendid nosegay ; and there were 
plenty of little fishes to watch swimming and 
playing about in the water. And then it was a 
great comfort to Rosy to be able to leave Robin 
on the grass, to graze like other sheep ; for his 
weight had made her arms ache so much, that 
she had got quite out of patience with him. The 
thing was, where to go next. 

Charley thought the other side of the stream 
looked very inviting; and, after searching about 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XXIV. 



This is an ancient ford, I see, Rosy. We'll try and ford the river 
only I'll L, r o first, and sound the depth of it.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

for some time, he found a place where the water 
was quite shallow, so shallow that even in the 
the middle he was sure it would not come up to 
his knees. 

There were large stones and pieces of rock 
lying in the water, even in the middle of the 
stream; so it seemed to him not very difficult 
to get across, if only Rosy would not slip and 
tumble in. 

So he said,- 

c This is an ancient ford, I see, Rosy; we'll 
try and ford the river. Only, I'll go first and 
sound the depth of it. You had better take off 
your shoes and stockings while I try it; and we 
must dry your feet on the grass if they should 
get wet, and I can carry your stockings in my 
pocket.' 

It is very nice to see a boy taking so much 
care of a little girl; and if Charley had not 
brought his little companion all this way without 
leave, I should have called him a pattern boy. 
Rosy, as I have said, thought everything he 
proposed quite right. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXV. 

ROBIN'S ESCAPE, 




HEN Rosy had got her shoes and stockings 
off, she thought that, as the water was so 
shallow in that part that she would not really be 
hurt even if she should slip in, she might as well 
fill the bottle while Charley was sounding the 
water towards the middle. 

Charley stepped from stone to stone very care- 
fully, but had not gone far when he heard a 
piteous cry from Rosy : 

c Save my lamb ! Oh, save my dear Robin ! ' 
shrieked the little girl. c Oh, he '11 be drowned- 
I know he will! And I shall lose him my 
dear Robin !' 

In a second Charley turned to see what could 
be the matter, and beheld the poor creature 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XXV. 



Charley had not gone far when he heard a piteous cry from Rosy, 
' Save my lamb ! Oh, save my dear lamb ! 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

floating away down the stream as quietly as 
possible. 

Yes, quite quietly ; for poor Robin did not 
struggle or cry, or seem at all frightened ! 

It was Rosy who made all the noise. But 
she, you see, was often either pleased, or vexed, 
or frightened ; while Robin was such a quiet, 
calm sort of creature, that he never seemed to 
care about anything. 

Well, Charley, as soon as he saw what was 
the matter, courageously jumped off the stone 
right into the water- -which was not, I must 
tell you by the way, many inches deep just 
there, and by a violent effort rescued the dar- 
ling of Rosy's heart from a watery grave. 

It was all dripping wet, as you may be sure ; 
but what was that in comparison of the danger 
in which it had been placed ? 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXVI. 

CROSSING THE NILE. 




Y dear lamb is safe ! ' cried Rosy, quite 
overcome by her feelings. c Oh, Charley, 
how brave it was of you to go in and get him 
out ! Thank you, very, very much.' 

c Dear me,' said Charley, quite bashfully ; 
c what a fuss you make about a little thing ! 
Why, it was easy enough to save the creature ! 
I only got my feet a little wet, and what does 
that matter ? We must both get them wet if we 
mean to cross the torrent.' 

< The torrent ! ' said Rosy to herself; c I won- 
der what that means ! I wish I were as wise as 
Charley/ 

Charley was just then thinking how his little 
cousin could get to him. 

With the dripping lamb in his arms, he could 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XXVI. 

She rushed in without thinking that the pebbles might hurt her 
little feet, and hurried to embrace her dear pet. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

not well help her; so it was of no use going 
back. He, therefore, called out that she must 
take up her shoes and stockings, and venture in. 

c And never mind picking out the rocks,' he 
said ; c they are very slippery. You must just 
walk right in, and come to me.' 

Rosv did not wait for another invitation. She 

j 

rushed in, without thinking how the pebbles might 
hurt her little feet, and hurried to embrace her 
dear pet. 

Charley stood, with Robin in his hands, di- 
recting her how best to come ; and when she 
got near, he walked backwards that he might 
not lose sight of her. 

As for Rosy, she saw a little fish swimming 
about at her feet, and, if it had not been that 
her hands were full, how she would have enjoyed 
fishing with her fingers ! 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXVII. 

STRANGE BEHAVIOUR OF ROBIN. 




T length Charley and Rosy were both safe 
on the other side ; feet were dried with 
grass and pocket-handkerchiefs, shoes and stock- 
ings were on again, and Charley's hat too. 

As for Rosy's, I don't know quite what she had 
done with it ; but her hair was very rough, I know, 
and her frock considerably tumbled and torn. 
Robin's woolly coat looked better, perhaps, than 
might have been expected after its wetting; for 
the sun was warm, and soon dried it. 

He had been kissed a great deal since his 
accident ; and now that Rosy thought of it, the 
idea came into her head that perhaps he was 
thirsty, and that it was in trying to drink that he 
had fallen in. 

She needn't have thought that; for, dear me, 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE 'OF DISCOVERY. 







XXVII. 



The idea came into her head that perhaps Robin was thirsty, and 
that it was in trying to drink that he had fallen in. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



Robin never troubled himself about anything. 
He never would confess to being thirsty, at any 
rate; and, if he had felt so, he must have had 
water enough while he was floating about. 

Charley suggested this ; but Rosy said that 
perhaps Robin might not have thought of it; and 
so she took him down to the edge, and poked 
his nose into the water. 

But, no ; it was of no use. Robin was not 
thirsty ; and he would not drink, 

Rosy coaxed, and patted, and scolded; but 
nothing would induce him to open his mouth* 

Charley remarked that he had always taken 
it to be Robin's nature to keep his mouth shut, 
and do without drinking; but Rosy said, that 
must be because he was not used to lambs, or he 
would certainly have known better. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXVIII. 

REFRESHMENT. 




T last, tired of trying to make anything of 
him, his little mistress took Robin, and 
put him on a mossy bank behind a tree, that he 
might go to sleep if he would. She thought now 
that perhaps he had really been very much fright- 
ened in the water, though he had kept so quiet, 
and that that had made him seem stupid and 
obstinate. 

Then, while Robin slept, there was a capital 
opportunity of getting some rest themselves, and 
of having some lunch. 

Charley declared that he had never been so 
hungry in his life, and said that it was wonderful 
how journeys give people an appetite. 

Rosy quite agreed with him, and they munched 
away at their bread-and-butter with great pleasure. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




xxvur. 
Travelling <jives people a wonderful appetite. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

c I wish I had another piece,' said Rosy, when 
she had finished, ' I am hungry still.' 

' So am I,' answered Charley. < I feel as if 
I could eat up all the trees and flowers!' 

At this Rosy laughed; but Charley kept a 
grave face, and said,- 

c It's of no use pretending to be travellers, you 
know, Rosy. We must get used to feeling 
hungry sometimes, or we shall never do anything. 
Those pears must wait until it 's time for our next 
meal.' 

Rosy was very sorry in her heart to hear her 
cousin say this ; for she really had been thinking 
a good deal of those pears, and wondering when 
Charley would say they should be eaten ; but 
she would not for anything appear greedy, and 
therefore contrived to hold her tongue. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXIX. 

AMERICAN STRAWBERRIES. 




HARLEY and Rosy agreed now to take 
a good rest ; for, as Charley said, they 
had done a good day's work, and well earned it. 
To have crossed a desert, traversed a forest, 
passed through a prairie, and forded the Nile, 
after discovering its source all this was certainly 
something accomplished; and perhaps it was 
hardly to be wondered at that Rosy thought 
they might have allowed themselves to eat their 
pears. 

However, when ladies travel in company with 
very enthusiastic gentlemen, they must expect to 
have to put up with some few hardships. 

But it was not long before the patient and 
good-humoured little Rosy found something which 
made up for her disappointment. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XXIX. 



American strawberries are found to be very good, though they 
are rather smaller than English ones. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

Some of the flowers which they had stuck in 
their hats having become rather faded, they were 
hunting among the long grass and leaves for 
others to put in their places, when they dis- 
covered,- -what do you think ? Why some straw- 
berry plants among the leaves, with tiny red 
strawberries on them ! Only think ! 

' They are smaller than those which grow r in 
our garden, you see, Rosy,'* remarked Charley ; 
' but I think they are redder. They taste very 
good too ; don't they ? ' 

'Delicious!' answered Rosy, picking and eat- 
ing as fast as she could. 'And how nice they 
smell!' 

c There are such a lot of them, too,' added 
Charley ; c we know now what American straw- 
berries are like. Isn't it nice to be learning so 
many things without books ? ' 

c Yes ; we 're learning lessons out of doors, as 
I did in France. 3 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXX. 

MONT BLANC. 




HE two little friends did not leave their 
resting-place whilst there were any straw- 
berries to be found. They were thrifty young 
folks, you see, and knew how to make the most 
of every good thing that came in their way. 

Then they proceeded on their way, and soon 
came to a great hill, of which they could not 
see the top. 

Oh ! what can that great mountain be ? ' 
cried Rosy. 

'That! why, it must be Mont Blanc!' 
answered Charley ; c and we must make the 
ascent of it.' 

Make what ? said Rosy, looking quite 
puzzled. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 






' 




XXX. 



' Oh, what can that great mountain be ?' cried Rosy. ' It must 

be Mont Blanc,' said Charley ; ' and \ve must 

make the ascent of it.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

c I mean that we must go up to the top of it,' 
said Charley, laughing. 

( Up to the top ! But it 's so high and so 
straight, I don't think I could get up, Charley.' 

' Oh, yes, you can, if I help you ! ' he replied, 
coaxingly ; c you know I have often helped you 
up hills.' 

But, Charley, I think we could get round it,' 
Rosy said, going first to one side and then to the 
other, to see on which side it would be easiest to 
pass. 

c Oh, that would be cowardly,' returned 
Charley. c Travellers always go up all the moun- 
tains that they come near.' 

So Rosy crave way at once, for she always 
believed everything that Charley said. But this 
time it was with a trembling heart ; for, though she 
liked running down hill very well, she was never 
very fond of tugging up steep places. Indeed, 
when her papa was with her he generally carried 
her up the hills and let her run down the other 
side; but Charley was too short to do that; so 
there was nothing left for her but to do her best. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXXI. 

A SEPARATION. 




HE other side of Mont Blanc was a little 
more sloping than that which they had 
first seen ; so Charley went on a few paces before 
to try the ground with his c Alpenstock ' so his 
c club ' was now called. 

But he declared that Rosy would now find 
it quite impossible to carry Robin with her, as 
she would want her hands as well as her feet for 
climbing. 

Now, in spite of Robin's obstinacy in making 
himself as heavy as he could. Rosy dearly loved 
her little lamb, and could not bear to be separated 
from him. 

However, as Charley had said it would be 
easy enough to come back and fetch him when 
they had triumphed over this obstacle, she con- 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY, 




XXXI. 



Rosy was very sorry to leave Robin behind, but she tried to make 
him see that the separation was necessary. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



sented. She was very sorry to leave Robin behind, 
but she tried to make him see that the separation 
was necessary, and busied herself with giving him 
directions how to behave while she was away. 

: Now, you must be a very good lamb, Robin,' 
she said, ( and not try to run away from here, 
or else I shan't be able to find you again when I 
come back, you know ; and here *s plenty of 
grass to eat if you are hungry.' 

Master Robin made no answer ; and Rosy 
told Charley that she knew by that how sorry 
he was that he was not going, but that she 
thought he knew, too, that she couldn't carry 
him so far. 

It was, if the truth were known, quite a relief 
to Charley's gallant little heart to see Robin 
safely out of Rosy's arms, and her free from the 
burden. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXXII. 

THE ASCENT. 




T was not long before Charley had found 
a place where he thought Rosy could 
manage to scramble up, if he went first to prepare 
the way, by pushing aside some of the worst 
brambles, and finding out one which would afford 
her a firm hold. 

But the ascent was very steep; and the higher 
they got the worse it became. 

Poor little Rosy's hands got scratched, and 
her arms, as well as her legs, were soon very 
tired; because she had to use them as much as 
her legs to pull herself up. 

She got sadly out of breath, too, and could 
not help panting and puffing, and sometimes 
even giving rather a loud groan of despair; but 
then Charley always called out to her, in a 



LITTL E R OS I " 5 VO YA GE OF DISCO VER Y. 



^yi> 







XXXII. 

The ascent is very steep, and the higher the>- got the \vorse 

it 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



cheerful tone from above, and told her it was 
quite easy up there. It was quite easy to him 
no doubt, because he was a boy, and stronger 
as well as older than she was; but Rosy did not 
often find much difference when she got up 
there.' Only, as Charley wanted so much to get 
to the top, and as he was very kind and helped 
her all he could, she would not give up. 

The little birds came out from under the 
bushes, and seemed to wonder what they could 
be doing there, just as the little feathered folks 
had done when they were getting through the 
hedge. 

Some of them were very pretty birds too, 
quite different, so Charley said, from what they 
saw in England ; and he would have tried to 
catch one to be a pet for Rosy, if he had only 
had his hands free. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXXIII. 

VIEW FROM THE SUMMIT. 




T last, after the most unheard-of efforts, 
the enterprising young people reached the 
top of < Mont Blanc.' 

* Only think,' he exclaimed to Rosy, in 
triumph, most people have guides and ropes, 
and all sorts of things; but we have done it 
without anything except my alpenstock. Look, 
what a view there is ! ' 

< Yes,' said Rosy ; c I can see further than I 
ever saw in all my life, I think.' 

Are n't you glad now, Rosy, that you did not 
give in ?' 

' Yes,' answered Rosy ; c but I am very tired. 
My arms do ache so, Charley.' 

< Never mind,' returned her sturdy cousin ; 
c sit down now, and rest.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XXXIII. 

I can sec further than ever I saw in all my life,' said Rosy. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

But Rosy did not seem much disposed. She 
saw something down below which surprised her 
very much. It was a house, and so like her 
uncle's house, that she asked Charley if they 
could possibly see it now that they had got such 
a long way off. 

* Why not ? ' replied Charley ; c we can see 
all over the world here, you know : so, of course, 
we ought to see our house.' 

Rosy remembered that, once when she was 
going in a coach, her papa's house got smaller 
and smaller, until she could not see it at all ; 
but then she thought of course Charley must 
know about his own home. 

So she only said, 

c Oh, what 's that great red thing over the 
hill?' 

c Why, the sun, of course,' answered Charley, 
laughing. c It 's because we are in Africa that 
it looks so large.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXXIV. 

APPROACHING FAMINE, 




OUNG eyes do not require much time to 
see all that they want to see. And so 
Charley and Rosy had soon finished the good 
look round' for which they were determined to 
wait. Then they thought that it was about time 
to continue their journey. 

But first Rosy asked Charley when they were 
going to have dinner. 

' Are you so hungry, then ?.' he asked. 

Oh, not very!' said Rosy; 'only I thought 
it must be time.' 

Charley seemed to get rather uncomfortable 
at this. He proposed that they should eat the 
pears which had been kept for the next dessert. 
It was not pleasant to finish their last mouthful 
without a prospect of getting more ; and at present 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 







XXXIV. 
But first Rosy asked Charley when they were going to have dinner. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

they had not replenished their stock, either with 
fish or wild fruit, as he had hoped to do. But 
Rosy's face struck him as looking so pale, that he 
began to see that there was nothing else to be 
done. 

He looked in his box to see if there were any 
more of his biscuits ' left ; but unhappily he 
could find none. They had most of them been 
eaten as they walked along ; and he feared that 
the rest had fallen out of the box during the 
scramble up the hill. 

So they stood a few minutes munching the 
pears, which tasted decidedly delicious, more so 
than any pears that they had ever eaten. 

Rosy looked brighter afterwards ; and Charley 
secretly resolved, that no sooner were they safely 
down the mountain than he would begin in good 
earnest to look about for food. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXXV. 

THE PRECIPICE. 




UT when they had finished the pears, and 
turned once more to look at the sun, 
there was no sun to be seen ! 

It had gone down ! and Charley said to him- 
self, that certainly the light was not so bright as 
it had been. He began to feel uneasy, and to 
think, c What would they do if it got dark while 
they were up there ? ' 

Then he went to the edge of the rock, first 
on one side, and then on the other, to see how 
they could best get down. But the descent 
looked worse than the ascent. He did not see 
how he could manage it himself, even without 
thinking of Rosy. 

She did not venture close to the side ; for, 
even from a little distance, it looked terrible. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVER 




XXXV. 



When Charley went close to the edge, he said that it made him so 

giddy that his head seemed to swim round and round. 

Rosy thought he would fall, and held his coat. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

And when Charley went quite close, he said 
that it made him so giddy that his head seemed to 
turn round and round. 

Rosy thought he would fall, and that she 
would be left there alone ; so she stood behind 
him and held his coat to keep him from slipping. 

And now the sky had changed from red and 
gold to red and purple, and then to grey, and a 
sort of greenish shade, and instead of being bright 
and light it was beginning to get dusky and twi- 
light : so both the children began to get into low 
spirits. 

Rosy wished she had not come up that hill, 
but she did not say so ; and Charley wished he 
had never persuaded her to come ; but he also 
said nothing. 

This was very wise of both the little children ; 
for, if they had begun to grumble and scold one 
another, it would have done no good, and only 
made both of them uncomfortable ; but they 
loved each other too well to quarrel ; and I really 
think that each one was most afraid for the other. 



K 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXXVI. 

GREAT ALARM. 




OWEVER, when they had looked for a 
good while for an easy way of getting 
down, Rosy began to be frightened ; and she said 
to Charley : 

What can we do ? Must we always stop up 
here ? Oh ! Charley, we shall be so hungry.' 

c Don't be afraid, Rosy,' said Charley kindly ; 
' we won't give up yet ; we shall find some way.' 

c Shall we call your papa and mine to come 
and help us ? said Rosy again ' Do you think 
they would hear us ? 

' Oh, they are too far off,' replied Charley, 
mournfully : but at the same time he put both his 
hands before his mouth and set to work shouting 
with all his might 

c Papa ! papa ! : 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XXXVI. 



He put both his hands before his mouth, and began shouting 
Avith all his might, ' Papa ! papa !' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

Rosy also, relieved to be able to do anything, 
joined her little voice to his, and cried 

Uncle ! uncle ! ' with all her little strength. 

But no one answered ; only the sound of their 
own voices echoed in the distance among the hills 
and rocks, and then came back to them with a 
melancholy sound. 

For a few minutes they stood and looked at 
each other in a sort of despair, and then Rosy 
said- 

c Perhaps aunt might have heard, Charley, 
though uncle didn't; and then we couldn't hear 
her answer, because she never speaks very loud; 
but she would send some one for us, I know/ 

This suggestion was rather cheering; and 
Charley thought there might be something in it. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXXVII. 

THE DESCENT. 




UT after waiting for some minutes, which to 
them seemed hours, and finding that no 
one came, it was plain that something must be 
done. 

Charley felt that he had Rosy to take care of; 
and that thought made him bold. 

He tried once more, and this time got down 
a litde way. 

If only Rosy, with his help, could get down 
to him, they might manage, for the ground below 
was more sloping. 

So he cheered her on until she took courage 
too to try. 

But she was dreadfully afraid- -it looked so 
steep from the top. And now she began to think 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 







XXXVII. 

Rosy began to think that it is not always so pleasant to travel 

without one's parents. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

that it is not always so pleasant to travel without 
one's parents. 

c Don't look behind,' cried Charley. ' It will 
only make you giddy. I Ve got you, now for it,- 
slide a little.' 

Rosy tried hard ; but it was some time before 
her feet would reach the first stone on which she 
was to rest; and, besides, there were lots of thistles 
and other prickly things in the grass, which 
scratched her poor arms. 

She could not help crying a little, though even 
now she tried to be brave. 

Charley, however, now that he was over the 
first bit, felt firm on his feet. He got a good hold 
of Rosy, and, disengaging her frock from the 
thistles, he gave one good pull and the little feet 
rested on the first stone. It was easy then to reach 
the second, and so they got on to the slope of 
the hill. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXXVIII. 

DIFFICULTIES OF THE DESCENT, 




UT it was not long that they could keep 
on their legs. The descent became steeper 
again; and they were obliged to sit down and slide. 

Charley still went first to prepare the way, 
and Rosy sometimes could not help coming so 
fast after him that he found it hard to keep firm 
and steady. 

At other times, when the ground was better, 
she was able to slide down more pleasantly. 

c I don't think we '11 go up Mont Blanc any 
more, Charley,' she said after a bit. It isn't a 
nice place at all.' 

c Oh!' said Charley, 'you're soon afraid, 
Rosy ; travellers always have some troubles, you 
know. We shall soon be at the bottom and 
forget it all.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XXXVIII. 

They seem to have been more than an hour, and yet they are 
only half-way down. It is a terrible descent ! 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

But as he said this he looked down and saw 
that they were only half-way towards the bottom 
even now, though it seemed an hour since they 
started, It was a terrible descent, but he said no- 
thing; and Rosy was just trying to cheer up a 
little, when a sudden gust of wind blew her hat 
over her eyes. If her hands had been free she 
might have saved it even then ; but she was afraid 
to leave go her hold on Charley even to push it 
back. 

She came sliding down for a minute or two 
blindfold; and then another and stronger puff took 
it right off, and she saw it go down, down from 
point to point until it was quite out of sight. 

c Never mind,' said Charley once more. c We 
shall find it at the bottom, I dare say.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XXXIX. 

A NEW ALARM. 




FTER a bit they arrived, as they hoped, 
at the end of the steepest part. They 
had, at any rate, got on to a little plain piece, 
where they could keep easily on their feet and 
rest themselves. 

This was delightful indeed; for truly, poor 
little Rosy's strength would not have held out 
much longer. 

Charley soon began to recover his spirits and 
to look about him with all his usual interest. 

He was evidently made for a traveller. But 
Rosy felt by no means so comfortable, for in 
looking round her she saw a hole in the rock, and 
something moving about inside it. 

c Take care, Charley,' she said; c there is some- 
thing shining in there. Perhaps it is a savage.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XXXIX. 



' Take care,' said Rosy to Charley ; ' there is something in there. 

Perhaps it is a savage.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

c Oh ! ' cried Charley, turning pale, c and I 
am unarmed ! I left my stick upon the rock. 
I must go back and fetch it.' 

Oh, no, no ! ' cried Rosy, clinging to him, 
c don't go away ; stay with me ! ' 

c Well, then, we had better both go away,' 
answered Charley, seizing Rosy's hand, and turn- 
ing from the spot. 



r. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY, 



XL. 

A DREADFUL CREATURE. 




EVERTHELESS they kept their eyes on 
the hole as they passed it; for they were 
obliged to go along quite in front of it; there 
was no other way. And still something kept 
moving about inside. 

The children both trembled violently ; but 
Charley tried with all his might not to seem 
frightened. 

He whispered to Rosy,- 

' I don't think it can be a savage. It doesn't 
look like a man at all; but I can't think what 
it is. I wonder if there is only one ; or whether 
there are lots like it inside.' 

Rosy made no answer ; she was too frightened 
to speak. 

All at once a dreadful creature flew out of 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE 01< DISCOVERY. 






\ 




XL. 



All at once a dreadful creature iie\v nut of tin- hole over their 

heads, and Rosy cried out, ' Oh ! I don't like America '. 

I want to go home !' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

the hole and over their heads; and Rosy cried 
out,- 

c Oh ! I don't like America. I want to go 
home ! ' 

She put her hands over her head, and seemed 
as if she were going to fall. And as for Charley, 
his courage was quite gone now. He put both 
his arms up, and doubled himself up as if he 
thought the creature would alight on his head 
and crush him by its weight. And he said not 
one word to comfort Rosy. 

After all, what do you think this dreadful 
creature was ? 

It was black, and had wings, sharp-pointed 
wings; and it flew very fast, faster than any 
bird, arid whizzed close past the children's faces ; 
but it did not touch them. 

If they had only had it in their hands, and 
been able to have a good look at it, perhaps 
they might not have thought it quite so dreadful, 
for it was really- only a bat! 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XLI. 

CHARLEY'S FALL. 




OMEHOW or other, however, the hole was 
passed, and the fright about the bat got 
over. 

When they saw the creature fly right away, 
and found that he had not hurt them at all, 
perhaps they thought that they need not have 
been quite so much terrified. Charley was a little 
bit vexed with himself, and grew suddenly very 
active in scrambling about, and in helping Rosy, 
to make her forget that he had ever been 
frightened. But the little girl did not so easily 
get over it. She trembled and sobbed for a 
long time, and said a great many times 

' Oh ! Charley, wasn't it dreadful ? I thought 
it was something coming to kill us.' 

c But you see it wasn't,' Charley answered, 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 








The branch breaks, and down comes Charley. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

c so don't cry. We've got to think what we 
are about here ; it 's a steep bit again.' So saying, 
he seized hold of a bough, thinking with its 
help to swing himself down a good way. 

But now came a new trouble. For the 
branch broke, and down came Charley. 

His hat tumbled off of course, and blew 
away ; and poor Rosy, who had lost hers some 
time ago, we know, being just in front of 
Charley, was not in a very pleasant position. 

So here was a pretty piece of business. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XLII. 

A RAPID DESCENT. 




HARLEY had no time to say, 
c Get out- of the way. Rosy.' 



And she had no time to do it if he had. 
He fell against Rosy, and they both arrived at 
the bottom quicker than they had expected. 

Now there are some things which we could 
never wish to happen, which, when they are over, 
we are often very glad of. 

It was dreadful rolling over and over, all 
amongst the thistles and brambles, and stumps 
and stones, as they came down ; bumping against 
each other too, Charley's boots sometimes in 
Rosy's face, and her boots in his ! 

And it was a very long roll, too, and seemed 
as if it never would be over. 

No bush or tree stood in their way to stop 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




He falls against Rosy, and they both arrive at the bottom quicker 

than they had expected. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

them ; so down, down they came until they 
found themselves quite at the bottom of c Mont 
Blanc.' 

Then Charley thought to himself all in a 
minute, before he had time to get up,- 

c Well, that 's over at any rate. I 'm not 
hurt a bit ; and if Rosy isn't, why, perhaps, it 's 
as well I fell. It wouldn't have been easy to get 
her down that last piece of the hill.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XLIII. 

UNEXPECTED HELP. 




UT poor Rosy thought differently. 

She was not much hurt, it is true, only 
a little bruised and scratched ; but she fell with 
her head lower than her feet, and felt too giddy 
to rise. 

However, before she had time even to think 
about it, she heard some creature come snuffing 
up to her, and felt its tongue against her face. 

She had shut her eyes while she was falling, 
that she might not see the deep place into which 
she supposed she was going ; and now she hardly 
dared to open them to see what this creature that 
was licking her could be. 

Her cousin heard a faint scream,- 

c Oh, Charley ! it 's a lion ! He 's going to 
eat me !' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




' Oh, Charley ! it's a lion ! tie is going to eat me ! 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

But Charley saw what it was. 

c No, no, not a lion, Rosy !' he cried ; c it is 
our good Caesar. He has come to help us ; and 
here is papa behind him.' 

Charley did not know that Caesar was almost 
as terrible to little Rosy as the most formidable 
lion would have been. 

She thought at first, - 

c Oh ! then it is Caesar who is going to eat 

me.' 

But when Charley spoke, the good dog knew 
his young master's voice, and began licking him 
instead ; and Charley did not mind that at all. 



M 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY, 



XLIV. 

ROBIN'S RETURN. 




S soon as Cassar had left her to go to 
Charley, Rosy jumped up very quickly; 
and the colour began to come back into her 
pale cheeks. 

Charley's papa set him on his legs again, and 
was glad to see that no bones were broken. 

And both Charley and Rosy were glad to 
find themselves so quickly home again from 
America. 

It seemed, too, as if Caesar were anxious to 
give them a hearty welcome, and to get into 
Rosy's good graces ; for he no sooner saw that 
both the young travellers were sound and well, 
than he disappeared for a minute and came back 
with something in his mouth. 



LITTLE ROSY'S i'OYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



-7* 

7" - ' -" X >* . '- 

- T ff. ^ .- - f \ - TT u'> - 




' ( >!i, you good C.xsar ! I am so much obliged to you !' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

c Robin ! Robin ! ' cried Rosy, in surprise. 
c Oh, my dear lamb, how glad I am to have you 
again ! ' 

Her feelings of affection overcame her terrors 
this time, and she even went to take it from 
Csesar's mouth. 

Then the good dog capered about with joy, 
and licked her feet; and she even ventured to 
give him a pat, and to say- 

< Oh, you good Caesar, I am so much obliged 
to you.' 

Which Caesar evidently understood quite well ; 
for he lay down perfectly satisfied, and looked 
up in her face as if to say- 

c Now you won't be afraid of me any more, 
I hope, or mistake my kisses for bites again.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XLV. 

CHARLEY IN DISGRACE, 




UT Rosy had no time to play with her 
dear lamb then ; for it was getting quite 
dusk, and her uncle said they must make haste 
home. 

So Caesar, who was always anxious to make 
himself useful, came forward and took charge of 
Robin once more, and also of uncle's walking- 
stick. 

Rosy made no objection ; for she knew now 
how heavy the dear lamb could make himself, 
and did not feel inclined to carry him far again. 

Her uncle smoothed down her rough hair, 
patted her cheek, and asked her how she came 
to get lost, and then he lifted her in his arms; 
and poor little Rosy, quite tired out with all that 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 




XLV. 



Charley's Papa says nothing to him ; but Charley can see very 

well that he is not pleased. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

had happened, laid her head on his shoulder, 
and went fast asleep. 

As for Charley, he had not spoken since his 
papa came up. He only hung down his head, 
and looked very sheepish ; for Charley's papa 
had said nothing to him ; and he could see 
very well that he was not pleased. 

And now a little voice inside Charley, which 
had been very quiet all day, began to speak to 
him, and to make him very uncomfortable. 

It said,- 

c What did you go at all for ? You ought 
to have asked your papa and mamma's leave. 
You knew all the while that you ought not to 
have gone without; and how came you never 
to think of that ? You are a bad boy ; and it 
would have served you right if you had broken 
your neck when you tumbled down that hill.' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XLVL 

THE TRAVELLERS' RETURN. 




HARLEY'S mamma had been in a great 
fright all day about her little boy and 
her little niece. 

She thought that they must either be lost or 
stolen, and that perhaps she would never see 
them again. 

So when she saw them all come home safely 
she was very glad indeed, and took little Rosy 
in her arms, and kissed her while she was asleep. 

She would have kissed Charley too ; and 
Charley wanted very badly to kiss his mamma ; 
but his papa held him back, and gave him a 
good scolding before he would let him do so. 
He told him that he was old enough to know 
better, and that he did know better, and that 
it was very bad and cruel of him to take his 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY 







XLVI. 



Rosy wakes in her Aunt's arms ; and Charley gets a good scolding 
from his Papa, before he is allowed to kiss his Mamma. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 

poor little cousin, who always trusted him, so 
far away ; and that if she had Been starved, or 
lost, or frozen to death, it would have been all 
his fault. 

Charley was very unhappy when his papa 
said that, because he really loved little Rosy, and 
had not thought of such dreadful things hap- 
pening to her. 

Then Rosy waked up, and kissed her dear 
aunt, and said she was so glad to get back from 
America ; and her aunt smiled, and said she was 
glad, too, to have her home. 

And Charley promised never to do so again ; 
and then he was allowed to kiss his mamma and 
Rosy ; and they were all happy once more. 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



XLVII. 

THE TRAVELLERS' REPOSE. 




EFORE they were put to bed, the children 
had each of them a good basin of broth 
with plenty of bread in it ; and they thought 
it nicer than any broth that they had ever tasted, 
because they had never been so hungry before. 

They went to sleep directly they lay down ; 
for never in their lives had they felt so tired ; 
but in their sleep they tossed and started ; and 
Rosy's aunt heard her say something about a 
lion. 

Then she thought - 

c Charley will be cured of wishing to go and 
seek for unknown lands. That is one good thing. 
But, oh, if good Cassar had not found my darlings, 
they would have had to sleep out on the cold 
grass ; and perhaps they would both have died ! ' 



LITTLE ROSY'S VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY. 



-__^~-l 



ft 




XLVII. 



The children's sleep is rather disturbed. It will be a long time 
before Charley goes again in search of unknown lands. 



.StrasImr^H, printed G. Silbennumi. 



\ \.